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Full text of "Catalogue ... annual exhibition"

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CATALOGUE 

SEVENTH ANNUAL 

EXHIBITION 



CHICAGO 

ARCHffECTURAL 



SKETCH CLUB 



ART INSTITUTE 
CHICAGO 

MAY 
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°«'VyJo°Th°d;.Gl&a|o'AVcHi'k^^ Sketch Club and the Chicago Society of 

" ^oj^^^f^c^^jj^pml quarters in the club house at 274 Michigan Avenue. 

o o . n o « t » <■ u c o • 




The Chicago Society 
- of zArtists ^ i ■ . ■■ 

» Was formed in 1888, and incorporated April 

1 7/1889, at which time its quarters were the studios of the different members. 
Its object being the advancement of art in Chicago, the cultivation of social 
relations among its m e mbe r s and th e general Hjuil ding up of snch an art 



home as will be a credit to art and Chicago, where the works of its members 
as well as others can be properly placed beforelhe public. 

The Society numbers among the members niany representative men in 
painting and sculpture and has a total membership of one hundred and 
thre€i 



Officers 



President 
Vicfe-President 
Secretary 
Treasurer 



Ernest Albert 

Dr. J. Elliott Colburn 

Louis J. Millet 

Chas. Edvv. Boutwood 



T>irectors. 

John Vanderpoel. W. G. Williamson. / 

W. W. Vernon. 



Club House, 274 Michigan Avenue. 



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The Chicago Architectural 

Sketch Club.. / 

' This Club was organized in 1881 by a few architects 
assistants and designers in the allied arts, the object being then as it is 
now, the mutual improvement of its members and the advancement of a,rt 
and architecture, accomplished by friendly competitions and a series of 
lectures or essays relating to all matters pertaining to architecture or the arts. 

At present classes are being held at stated times in water color, model- 
ing and pen and ink, under able instructors, and are fully appreciated by 
the members, as is shown by the large and steady attendance. The club 
counts among its members some of the most promment architects, artists, 
sculptors and members of the allied arts, both in Chicago and elsewhere. 

The problems for competition are ail carefully selected by the executive 
committee, and all awards are made by an adjudicating committee com- 
posed of three of Chicago's well-known architects. Entertainment for the 
members is provided by a committee appointed for that purpose, and many 
a pleasant evening has been spent in the roorns of the club. Besides the 
regular club competitions, which are for members exclusively, the Clark 
medal competition held under the auspices of the club, being open to all 
draughtsmen. 

■ ■ '• 

Officer Siof the Club 



President 

First Vice-President 

Second Vice-President 

Secretary 

Treasurer 



Hugh M. G. Garden 

Stephen M. Wirts 

Arthur Heun 

Alfred R. Schlesinger 

Ernest J. Wagner 



ExecJitive Committee 

Hugh M. G. Garden Stephen M. Wirts 

Arthur Heun / Edgar S. Belden 

Frank L. Linden A. R. Schlesinger 

Ei^nest J. Wagner 

Adjudicating Committee 



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Chas. L. Frost 



Chas. a. Coolidge 



M". Zimmerman 



Club House, 274 Michigan Avenue 

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^Members of Chicago jlrchiteUural Sketch Club. 



A. B. Anderson 
Frank J. J. feerndt 
Wm. Braeger 
D.C. Chaffee 
Jno. R. Dillon 
T. O. Fraenkel 
Wm R. Gibb 
Anibal Guerini 
Arthur Heun 
Morris G Holmes 
John Johnson 

S. H. Levy 

R. S. Lindstrom 
J. A. Miller 
W. B. Mundie 
G. M. Russeque 
Alfred R. Schlesinger 
R. E. Smith 
H. F. Swansen 
C. W. Trowbridge 
R. B- Williamson 
Arthur Woltersdolf 



W. J. Beaulejj 
Seymour Davis 
Alfred F. Evans 
Oscar Haupt 
G. W. Obermaier 



Dankman Adler 
S. S. Beman 

E. S. Bushnell 

F. O. Cloyes 
John Meiggs Ewen 
E. R. Graham 

C. H. Kilby 
Normand S^atton 
H. Roche^ 

0. G. Traphagen 
Jas. R. Willett 
Ernest J. Spierling 

J. K. Allen 
H. L. Gay 
Harry Lawrie 

D. G. Phimister 



ACTIVE HEMBERS 

Jas. Den. ^^ars 
Adolph Bernhardt 
H. G. Brinsley 
F. L. Davis 
A. R. Durkee 

F. M. Garden 
J. M. Goodwin 
John L. Hall 
Howard G. Hodgkins 
H. W. Jackson 

R. R. Kendall 
J. Lilleskav 
C. E. Lund 
Paul Mueller 
J. D. Raab 
C. B. Schaefer 

G. A» Schoenberg 
R. C. Spencer, Jr. 
H. C. Trost 

E. J. Warner 

W. G, Williamson 
A. G. Zimmerman 



Edggjr S. Belden 
Addison Gr Berry 

Lawrence Buck 

Geo. R. Dean 

Chas. F. Eppinghausen 

Hugh M. G. Garden. 

Ernest F. Guilbert 

L. H. Heinz 

E. A. Hoeppner 

E. C. Jensen 
Chas A. Kessell 

F. L Linden 
John Mansfield 
R. McWhirter 
A. Y. Robertson 
R. E. Schmidt . 
E. H. Seeman 
Geo. H. Strahan 
C. U. Trowbridge 
P. J. Weber 



Stephen M. Wirts 



NON-RESIDENT HEMBERS 



E. A. Batwell 
Oscar Enders 
B. L. French 
A. W. Hompe 
John E. Youngberg 



A. G. Brown 
Edmund L. Ellis 
J. L. Fyfe 
J. W. Krause 



ASSOCIATE HEMBERS 



Charles B. Atwood 
W. W. Boyington 
D. G. Carrier « 
Henry Ives Cobb 
Reynolds Fisher 
Wm. Holabird 
pP^iil C Lautrup 
Arthur Peabody 
F. R. Schrock 
Clinton J. Warren 
Francis M. Whitehouse 



M. L Beers 
D. H. Burnham 
W. W. Clay 
Charles A. Coolidge 
Charles S. Frost 
Fred Klees 
O. S C. Oleson 
John W. Parker 
Chas A. Tracey 
Geo. E. Watson 
Wm. Zimmerman 



HONORARY MEMBERS 



F. L. Blake 
F. S. Hunt 
R. C. McLean 
L. H. Sullivan 
Fritz Wagner 



Robert Clark 
W. L. B. Jenney 
L. Muller, Jr. 
Lorado Taft 



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Juries of ^Admission for this Exhibition 



HONORARY PRESIDENT 

Mr. Charles L. Hutchinson 

ARCHITECTURE AND DECORATION 

Mr. W. W. Clay, Chairman 

Messrs. Chas. A. Cdolidge, Irving K. Pond, W. G. Williamson, 

T. O. Fraenkel, Chas. A. Kessell 

DECORATIVE SUBJECTS 

Mr. Ernest Albert, Chairman 
Messrs. J. H. Vanderpoel, Oliver Dennet Grover, Jules Guerin, 
Chas. Francis Brown, Robert Roscovich 

SCULPTURE 

Mr. Lorado Taft, Chairman 
Messrs. Carl Rohl Smith, Johannes Gelert 

CATALOGUE COnniTTEE 

Mr. Hugh M, G. Garden, Chairman 
Messrs. Ernest J. Wagner, Edgar S. Belden, Chas. A. Kesseil 

H. G. Brinsley. 

IN CHARGE OF EXHIBITION 

Mr. Alfred R. Schlesinger. 



The Chicago Architectural Sketch Club takes this opportunity to publicly 
and heartily thank the Illinois Chapter American Institute of Architects for 
their generous assistance and co-operation. 

The Club also wishes to express gratitude to Mr. Chas. A. Coolidge, Mr. 
Chas. L. Hutchinson and the officers of the Art Institute who have done 
much to make this exhibition possible. 

The announcement of the award of the ''Institute Gold Medal" presented 
to the Club by the Illinois Chapter American Institute of Architects will ba 
made Thursday evening'May loth. 



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Design for Pediment of Art Institute. Johannes Gelert, Sculptor 



Catalogue 



ADLER AND SULLIVAN—ArcHitects. 

1 Water Color— Hotel, . . 

2 " " —Office Building, - 
ALBERT, ERNEST Artist. ^ - 

3 Water Color — Suburban Residence. 

4 •♦ " —Gate Lodge, Tuxedo. 

5 ^^ - i « L ^=Gate^ind Lodge, Ames'^EstateT^Iassr 



Del. 
L. Rassmussen 



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— Warder HpUse, Washington, D. C. 






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7 " ♦' —Brick and Stone Entrance. 
AMERICAN TERRA COTTA CO. 

8 Terra Cotta— Terra Cotta Vase. 
ANDROVETTE & CO. Stained Glass Manufacturers. 

9 Water Color -Design for a window. 

lo *' " — Design for church window. 



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-Design for stained glass. 

-Desigir&r windows in Masonic Temple, Bay City, Mich. 

- Design for window in St. Matthew's Church, Scranton, 
Pa. 

—Companion lo above. 

— Design, Secular Subject. 

— Design for hall window. 

— Designs for stained glass. 

ATWOOD, CHAS. B.— Architect. 

21 Pen and Ink — Competitive Design for Chicago Art Institute. 

22 Water'Color - Exterior Art Building, World's Fair, - Alex. Sandier 
;23 " " -Interior Art Building, World's "Fair. 



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BEERS. M. L.- Architect. 

24 Water Color— High School, 
BEERS, CLAY & DUTTON— Architects. ^ 

25 Pen and Ink — Medinah Temple, 
BELDEN, E. S— Architect. 

26 Pen and Ink — Metropolitan Station, ) 
~ " a Working Drawing, ) 

BEMAN, S. S.— Architect. 

27 Pen and Ink— Railway Station. 7^^ - -» C. Graham 

28 *' ♦• —Memorial Church. - V A. B. Le Boutillier 

29 •* *♦ — The James Blackstone Memorial Library, 

30 ** " — Section through same, 

31 Water Color— Railway Station and Office Building, C. Graham 

32 •' •' — Lake-ide Club, - - P. C. Lautrup 
BENTLEY, MISS M. LOUISE— Designer and Carver. 

33 Carving— Carved Easel. ^ 
BERRY, A. C— Architect.! 

34 Water Color— Monument to an Architect, 
BOCK, R. W. 

35 Plaster— Spandrel representing Art. 



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Hugh M. G. Garden 



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37 

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39 
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I '• Music, 
—Statue of Child representing Morning, 
*' " Evening, 

— Caryatidie Lion, ^ - __jrl_^ 



R. W. Bock 



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42 
43 
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— Model of Pediment for Electricity Building, I 
World's Fair, - - - S 

— Caryatide Newel Post, 



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— Section of Tympanum representing Truth, 

—Sketch of Pediment representing Unitioh of |^ 
Capital and Labor, * - - \ 

45 " —Sketch fdr a Candelabrum, 

46 Wax— Cupid, - - - - 

47 Plaster and Wax — ^IModel for Sheridan Monument, - 

48 Plaster — Resting Indian, 

BOSWORTH & HUNT.— Architects. 

4Sa Water Color — Desigrn for Magdalen Hospital, N. Y., W. W. Boswbrth 

48b " " —Desigip for a Model Sunday School, 

48c '• *' — Design for Chicago Academy of Sciences, 

BOYINGTON & CO., W. W.^Architecis. 

49 Water Color— Peoria Church, . - - P. C. Lautrup 

50 —Hamilton Club, - - W.G.Williamson 

51 —Highland Park Club, 

52 — Wall Decoration, - - 

53 Pen and Ink — Hahnemann Medical College, C. W. Trowbridge 

54 " " — Iowa St^te Building— Elevation. i 

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BRANDT, C— Artist. r^ ^ ^<^A 

55 Decorative China Painting. 

56 Small China Painting. 






57 

58 

59 

60 '• '• " ' 

62 " " *' . 

63 " " " 

64 .....* 

65 «..«.' 

66 " •' 

67 .i .. »i 

68 Glass Painting; — "Mignon" — Transparency. 

69 " '' — Transparency. 

70 •* «« _ «« 

71 " " •' . 
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74 " " — " 

76 M .. _ 1. 

BROOKS, MISS C. L —Sculptor. 

77 Bronze — Portrait— Relief. 

78 Clay— "Frolic"— A Group. ' „ 
BUCK, L— Designer. 

79 Water Color — .Architectural Subject, - - L. Buck 
80 
8[ 
82 

83 
BURGES, MISS IDA J. Artist. 

8i Decorative The Spirit of Truth Shall Rule Over Them, I. J. Burges 

85 " Vestibule— Wall and Frieze, 

86 " Reading Room Wall and Frieze Panels, 

87 " "Spring" Design for Tapestry, 
BURNHAM,D H Architect. 

88 Working Drawing E'evation of Field Building, Chicago, P. J. Weber 
BURRIDGE, WALTER Artist. 

89 Water Color Gen Jackson's Courtyard, New Orleans, W. Burridge 
CHICAGO ARCHITECTURAL SKETCH CLU B Design for an Elevated 

Railroad Terminal Station, Problem for the 1893 Competition for the 
Robert Clark Testimonial. 

90 Pen and Ink Gold Medal Design for above, - W. Pell. Pulis 

91 Wash Drawing Silver Medal Design for above. Francis L. Norton 
- 92 Pen and Ink Bronze Medal Design for above, - Ben. Trunk 

93 " " First Honbrable Mention for above, " Edw. G. Garden 

91 " '* Second Honorable Mention for above, W. P. McArdle 

95 ** *' Design for same by . - - John Richmond 

96 " " Design for a Mantel, •- T. O. Fraenkel 



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CHICAGO CERAMIC CIvUB. 



Vase, 
Vase, 

Sugar Bowl, 
Figure Piece, 
Tray, 
Plate, - 

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97 
98 

99 
100 

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102 
103 
104 

105 
106 

107 

108 

109 

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112 

114 

115 " 

116 8 Pieces, 

117 Jardiniere, 

118 Vase, 
:Bow1, 



Del. 
Mrsf. Murray 
Mrs. L/. R. Parmelee 



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MisS M. Roth 

Mrs. Grace M. Standish 

Mrs. N. M. Stern 

Miss Ida M. Trunkey 

Miss Topping 






Vase, 



Miss N. M. Yeoman 



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Miniature, 

'/^ dozen Fruit Knives, 

Plate, - 



Miss ]V|^^. Heuermann 



119 
120 
121 
122 
123 
124 

125 
126 

127 
J 28 
129 
130 

131 



Ice Cream Set, 
Vase, - 



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Chocolate Set, 
I Piece, 
Vase, 

Chocolate Set, 
Vase, 




Plate, - 
Portrait, 

CLAY, W. W.— Architect 

132 Water Color -Town Hall , - 

133 " " - Entrance to a Residence, 
CORWIN, C. S.— Architect. 

134 Pastel- -Residence, - 

COLBY & SONS -Furniture. 

135 Furniture— Stuttgardt Desk, 

136 " —Table Empire, 

137 " —Large Colonial Chair, - 
13S «' —Colonial Dining Chairs, 
139 " /— ■ ** Music Cabinet, 



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Miss Hancey 

Grunewald & Busher 

Mrs. V. P. Jenkins 



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Mrs. Ross Lewin 
- Mrs. Aulich 



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Mrs. Bond 

Miss N. Brandecker 

Miss Helen Clark 

Miss L. Cole 

Miss M. Dibble 

Mrs DeWolf 
Mrs. M. McGreery 

- Miss M. Herndel 

Panic. Lautrup 
Ernest Albert 

C. A. Corwin 

Stephen M. Wirts 
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DEAN, G. R. . - Dg/. 

140 Water Co^or — Persian Brickwork, Palace of Artaxerxes, G.R. Dean . . | 

141! •* " -Fountain in Court of Belvilacqua Palace, 

Bologna, Italy, t - - •* 

DECORATORS SUPPLY CO. L - 

142 Interior Decorations. 

DUTTON, W. S. Architect 

143 Pen and Ink Design for a Church, - - ' W. S. Dutton 

ENDERS, OSCAR- Architect. 

144 Water Color Residence, - - - Oscar Endefg 

145 Pen and Ink '* 

146 ** '* Facade for a School of Architecture, 

FEUDEL, ARTHUR Artist. 

147 Oil" Hollyhocks, - - - - Arthur Feudel 

FIELD, MARSHALL & CO. 

148 Italian Embroidered Panel, XVI Century. _: ^ 

149 Portuguese Embroidered Spread, XVII Century. 
Spanish Embroidered Altar Cloth, XVII Century. 
French Embroidered Vestment, Louis XV. 
Portuguese Embroidered Spread, XVII Century. 
Japanese Embroidered Portiere. 

Antique Carved and Inlaid Oak Mantel. XVII Century. 
Antique Carved Oak Sideboard, XVII Century. 

156 Carved Oak Chest, Date 1720. 

157 Oak Table, Style Jacobian. 

158 Antique Oak Chair. 
1.9 Aubousson Tapestry, entitled "The Shores." Origj^nal m^de iu 

Beauvais in 1685. 

160 Flemish Tapestry, XVI r Century, Louis XIV. 

161 Beauvais Tapestry, Henry II, entitled "The Return to Rome," by 
Jules Remain. Border modern workmanship. 

162 Aubiisson Tapestry, Modern. 

163 Beauvais Tapestry, Louis XIII, re^resentiggiAgamjemnon , t he Kt ng7 
receiving votive offerings. 1 




164 Beauvais Tapestry, Louis XmL,!^after Peter Paul Rubens. 

165 Aubusson Tapestry, Modern. 

166 Flemish Tapestry, Louis XV. 

167 Aubusson Tapestry. Portrait after the painting by Louis Gallait. en- 

titled "The Arab," exhibited Paris Exhibition, 1889. Owner, Mrs. 
C.J. Blair. . " 

168 Teak wood Doors, originals at Ahmedebad, India. XVII Century. 

169 Carved Bracket, Indian Teakwood. The ornament represents the 

decorative expression of religious sentiments from the highest 
period of Indian Art. 

170 Inlaid India Doors. Original in Palace at Umritza. 

FRAENKEL, T. O - Architect. 

171 Pencil -Sketch for Residence, - : - T. O. Fraenkel 

172 Pen and Ink — Sketch for Hotel, - ; " 
I7J " " —Sketch for an Inn, - - . ** " 

174 " " -Colonial Work, New Orleans, " 

175 , " " —Colonial Sketches, - - 

176 'Water Color — Court, New Orleans, 



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Jenn/& Mun^J^* Architects 

- New York Life Insurance Building 



John Johnson, Del. 






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FRAENKEL& SCHMIDT Architects 

177 Water Color—Mountain Home, - 

178 " «' —Church flt Peru. - ^ 
FROST, CH AS. S. 

179 Water Color -Calumet Club, - - 
.180 '* " —Residence at Morgan Park, - 
GARDEN, E. G.—Designer. ^ . V 

180a Pen and Ink — Entrance to a City Residence, 

GARDEN, HUGH M. G.-t Architect. 

181 Water Color — Study for an Office Building. - 

182 " •• -An Apartment Building, 

183 " " - Sketch, .■ - !- 

184 Pen and Ink— A Small Church, ,- 

GELERT, JOHANNES Sculptor. 

185 Plaster Pediment intended for Art Institute, Chicago, - J. Gelert 
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187 «' — Christopher Columbus, intended for Lake Front 

Park, Chicago, - - - - 

188 " — Soldiers and Sailors Monument, intended for Des 

Moines, Iowa, - -^^^ _-__,_.--- 

189 Photo ^ympani. Herald Building, Chicago, 



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GENSCH & HARTMAN- Caivers. 

192 Furniture- Toilet Table (Rococo). 

193 ** — Pedestal (Italian Renaissance). 
GIBB, WM. R- Architect. 

194 Pen and Ink— Design for Museum and Library Building, Wm. R. Gibb 

195 /Water Color— Combined Armory, Club and Apart- 

/ _^ ment Bldg. for Chicago City Troop, Hugh M. G. Garden 

GILBERT, CASS.— Architect. 
. 195a Water Color — Chimneys in the Latin Quarter, Paris, Cass Gilbert 



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— Tt , m pie— Castor and Pollux ^— 4^ Agri- 

--—^' gentum, Sicily, ^— ^ ~^-^ ~ 

— Tower — Palazzo Vechio — Florence, 

- Study for Town and Country Club, St. Paul, 

- Study for a Small House near St. Paul, 

— Study for Armory Building, Shattuck 
School, Minnesoti, - - 

— College Building, Siialtuck School, 



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Pen and Ink — Sketch of Balcony, 
GOODWIN, J. M —Architect. 

196 Pencil— Sketches, 

197 Water Color Arch of Titus, 

198 '* " —Palazzo Con tarini Fas an, 

199 " " —St. Georgio in Velabro, 

200 '* " Atelier— Study Work, 



John Rachac 

J. M. Goodwin 
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GRANGER, A. H.— Architect. 

201 Pen and Ink Residence, - - 

202 ♦• «« -A Library Building, 
GUERINI, HANI BAL Sculptor. 

203 Ornamental Sculpture in Italian Renaissance, 
HEUN, ARTHUR. 

204, Pencil— Cathedral at Spyer( from nature) - 

205 Water Color ~ A City Residence, - 

206 •' " -Entrance to a City Residence, - 
HEUERMANN, MAGDAM. -Designer and Carver. 

207 Hall Chair, Decorated in Pyrography. 
HILIv & WOLTERSDORF Architects. 

208 Pen and Ink— Proposed Post Office at the Lake 

Front, Chicago, 
JENNEY & MUNDIE Architects. 

209 Pen and Ink Office Building, 



Del, 
A. H. Granger 
Hugh M. G. Garden 

H. Guerini 

- A. Heun 



Arthur Woltersdorf 



210 
211 
212 
213 
214 

215 
216 



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Isabella Building, Chicago, 

New York Life Building, Chicago, 

Entrance to same, - . 

Residence, - - - 

Dining Room in same, 

Residence, - - _ 

First National Bank, Terre Haute, Ind^ 



W. B. Mundie 
J. W. Johnson 



E. C. Jensen 
J. W. Johnson 



(( 



217 Water Color Residence, 
JENSEN, E.C. 

2i8 Pen and Ink St. Trimite, Falaise, 

219 " " Farm House near St. Romain ,^ - 

220 ' " Entrance, Onzain, France, - 

221 ' ' So-called House of Henry IV, at Nerac, 

222 ;; " Ostend Gate, Belgium, 
KEMEYS, EDWARD Sculptor. 

223 - Terra Cotta Jar, 
224 



W. B. Mundie 



E. C. Jensen 



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Edward Kemeys 



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225 


Plaster 


-Sketcli of Lion for Art Institute, 


226 




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227 


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Bust of an Indian, 


228 




Fighting Bear and Panther, 


229 


" 


Canadian Lynx, 


230 




Grizzly Bear, - 


231 




Denizens of Jungle, - 


232 




Grappling his Garrie, 


233 

f 


" 


-Maternal Affection, - 


234 




Soul of Contentment, 


235 


" 


Panther Surprised, - 


236 


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Bay Lynx, 


237 




Crouching Panthers, - 



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KEMEYS, EDWARD—Continued. 



238 

^39 
240 

241 
242 

243 
244 

245 
246 



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— Guarding the Plaid, 
^ El Coyote, - 
—Jaguar and Boa, 
" —The Oldest of His Herd, 
Bronze— Old Ephraim, *- 
" ^—Battle of the Bulls, - 
" — A Mountaineer, - 
" After the Feast, 

Terra Cotta— African Lion, 
KENNARD, DeWITT TAYLOR-Architect. 

247 Water Color Residence, 

248 " " Church, - 

249 *' " << 



250 



-A Colonial Residence, 



LINDEN GLASS CO. 

250a Leaded Glass Window Design, 



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250b 
250c 
2 5od 
25oe 



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Del. 


Edward Kemeys 








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L. Buck 




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MACK, BERTIE A. Designer. 

251 Waier Color Design for Stained Glass Window, - Bertie A Mack 
MAHER, GEO. W.— Architect. ' 

252 Pen and Ink Residence at Omaha, - . q. W Maher 

253 " " City Residence, - - * i.^ 

254 " " Country Homestead, - , «< 

255 Water Color House by the Sea, - - Mrs. EHz. B. Maher 
MARSTON AND HOTCHKIN Architects. 

256 Water Color -Hall in Residence. - . j p g^ott 

257 " " A Court Yard. - . R. B. Hoichkin 

258 Pen and Ink The Colonies Hotel, 
MITCHEL & HALBACH— Designers and Draughtsmen. 

259 Water Color— Lobby of an Empire Theatre 

260 " «• —Theatre Interior. 

261 ♦' '• —Restaurant Interior. 
NELSON, W. P. & CO. 

262 Water Color— Hotel Parlor. 

263 '« '« —Hotel Dining Room. 

264 " " —Theater (Interior). , 
PATTON & FISHER.— Archit^ts. 

265 Water Color— Chicago Academy cf Sciences 

266 " " —Ladies' Dormitory, - 

267 " " —Kenwood Club, Chicago. - 

268 " " _ '« '« a ^ 

269 *' *' «' << «< 

270 •• " —Apartment Building, - ' - " 

271 " '« —Public Library, . . 



L. Rasmussen 



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PERKINS, FREDERICK W.— Architect. 

272 Water Color— Hotel Building, 

273 " " —Interior Sketches of Residences, 

274 *' " --Apartment Building, 
27: * ' *< « ' 

276 Pen and Ink — Residence, 
PERKINS & SEIvBY.— Architects. 

277 Water Color — Summer Home at Lake Geneva, - Rascovich 

278 Pen and Ink — State Normal School at Stevens' Point, Wis., 

P. C. Lautrup 
PERKINS & WEBER.— Architects. 



O. E. Brandt 



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H. G. Ripley 



279 Pen and Ink — Details of a Residence, 

280 " " — " «« 

28r| " " — '« " _ 

582'-^ '1^' " t_ «< «t 



Joseph P. Weber 






POND & POND —Architects. 

283 Pen and Ink— Highland Park Club House, 

284 Water Color— Highland Park Club House, 
PURDV & HUTCHESON.— Sculptors. 



Irving K. Pond 



2^5 

2S6 
287 
288 
289 

R 1 XSON 

290 
291 
292 

293 
294 



Plaster — Rococo Panel. 

" — Renaissance Panel. 

Sketch for Pediment. 

Low Relief Head. 
O. C— Architect. 

Water Color— A Suburban Residence (Block Plan), O. C. Rlxsou 
" —Same— Plan, First Floor, 
" •' — Same — Plan, Second Floor, - 

" " — Same — Front Elevation, 
— Same — Side Elevation, 
— Same — Longitudinal Section, 



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295 
ROGERS, JOHN W. 

2q6 Pen and Ink — Sketch of Gate, 
SHAW, HOWARD — Designer. 

297 Water Color— Elevation of Club House, 
SHEPLEY, RUTAN & COOLIDGE.— Architects. 

298 Water Color — Dwelling House, 



299 
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— Study for a Small Library. 
— ^^esign for Main Staircase of Art 
Building, 

301 " " —Additions to a residence in St. 

Louis, Mo., 

302 Pencil— Kennels for the Country Club, Bridgeton, 

Missouri, 



John W. Rogers 

H Shaw 

R. C. Spencer, jr 
H. M. G. Garden 

R. C. Spencer, jr 

E. G. Garden 

E. G. Garden 



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SKETCH CLUB OF NEW YORK.— Work by Club Members. 



303 


Water Col 


304 




305 




306 


_/ X 


307 




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3"9 




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311 




312 




313 




vx 314 





Del. 
Emery Roth 



S, I. Stammer, jr 

Geo. E. Melendy 

Chas. H. Israels 

Edgar A. Josselyn 



— San Stefano, Venice, -> 

— Church Tower, 
— Library, 
— Church Tower, 
—Mosaic Mantel, - - 

—Rose Window, - - , - H. L. Parkhurst 

—Rose Window, . - H. H. Braun 

Ingle Nook in Stone, - - W. J H. Dudley 

—Doorway for House in Poaghkeepsie, E. R. Edwards, jr 
— Bronze Knocker, Siena, - Haroldson Berckley 

—Sketch from Photo, - Justus M. Uffinger 

SNEAD IRON WORKS. 

315 Wrought Iron— Wrought Iron Grill (Rococo). 

316 " " —Wrought Iron Grill (Louis XIV.) 

317 Cast Iron— Ornamental Panel (Bronze Finish). 
SPENCER, R. C. ir —Designer. 

318 Pencil— Note Book Leaves, - - R. C Spencer, jr 

319 " —Note Book Leaves, 
Water Color- Church at Villemaur Sur Yone, 

" —Pompeii, - - 

— Seinna, 
— Tower at Rion, 
— Rothenburg, - - . 

— Mantua Ceilinjjs, 
— Mantua Ceilings, 
— Pompeiian Fountain, 
— Details, 
— Usse, France, 
— Auxerre, France, 

SPIERLING & LINDEN.— Decorators and Designers. 
331 Water Color— Simple Color Schemes, - 



320 
321 
322 
323 
324 
3?5 
326 

327 
328 
329 
330 



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Frank L. Linden 



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332 
333 
33; 
335 
336 
337 

X / \ 

:339 

340 

3U 
342 

SULLIVAN, LOUIS H. 

343 Pencil Ornament on Wainwright Memorial, 

344 " ~ •' Getty Tomb, 






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TAFT, LORADO— Sculptor. 

345 Plaster — Columbus at Salamanca, 
, 346 " —Two Monks (jragment) - - 

347 ** Sketch Model], "Sleep of the Flowers," 
THURBER, W. SCOTT. j 

347a Etching Cologne Cathedral, 
347b " - Stockholm, j - 
TOBEY FURNISHING CO. 1 

348 Furniture — Library Tablle, Mahogany, 



349 
350 
351 
352 

353 
354 
355 
356 

357 

358 

359 
360 



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—Desk, 
—Chair, 
'' —Sofa, 
Water Color— Sketch of Chair, 



dabinei. 



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-Model of a Residenc 




Ornamental Iron— Fire Screen. 



Del 



Taft 



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A. H. Haig 

Geo. Clingman 
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G. F. Babb 

P. B. Wight 

Alex, Sandier 

S. M. Wirts 



2 Pieces Art Silk. 

I Pair Curtains. 

I Pair Lace Curtains 

I Pair I/ace Curtains 

VAN OSDEL. 

361 Plaster 

VISCONTI, F. 

362 Furniture— Work Table. 
303 " —Tea Table. 

364 '* —Library Chair. 
WIGHT, P. B.— Architect. 

365 Pen and Ink— Brooklyn Library, - 

366 Water Color National Academy of Design 

367 " " —Brooklyn Library, - 
WIRTS, STEPHEN M -Designer. 

368 Pen and Ink— Classical Designs in Furniture 
WINSLOW BROS. CO. 

369 
370 

371 " " —Wrought Iron Grill. 

372 " " —Flower Stand. 

373 " " —Gas Bracket. 

374 " '• —Hinge Plate. 

375 Water Color— Wall Lanterns. 

WRIGHT, FRANK.- Architect. 

376 Water Color- Residence, 

377 " " —Residence, - 

378 ' " " -The Hall, 

379 " " —Residence, - - - . «« 

380 " •' —Residence, - - 

381 Pen and Ink— Competition Design for Milwaukee 

Library and Museum, - Frank Wright 

NOTE Many other exhibits were received too late to be catalogued. 



Ernest Albert 

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Detail 



Drawn by Louis H. Sullivan 



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W. G. Williamson, Del. 




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Sketch for a Residence Oscar Enders, Arch, and Del. 










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T. O. Fraenkel, Del, 



Church at Peru 







Siena, Italy R. C. Spencer, Jr., Del, 



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The niajoritv of thr Knijru\ tnii>- in this hook \\ er*- inncle h\ tin- ab(>\ <• ririn /'// ( "»/»/i/t,. 




CARSLEY MANUFACTURING CO. 

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Bank and Office Fittings 



FACTORY 2242-2254 S. LA SALLE ST 



OFFICE 211 WABASH AVE. 




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CHICAGO 



MM:)RAI Lie. STEA/n AND ELECTRIC 

PASSENGER and EREIGHT 

ELEVATORS 



ARCHITECTL'RAL IRON WORK 




1 
]n(). Dams, President Jvo. D. IIikbaku. Vict' I'resicU'iit :uul Manager 
Edw. E. MoRKii. I. . Secretary and rreHSurer 



THE JOHN DAVIS CO. 

STEAM AND HOT WATER 

HE ATlNGMi VENTILATING 



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GENERAL OPnCF. AND WORKS (^ \-\ \ C^ /\ C C^ II I 

554 WEST 15TM STRKCT V^l llV^ AV3W . ILL. 



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FORMERLY PRES'T 
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CARFENTEK 

AND 

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TELEPHONE MAIN 2469 

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S. E. CORNER MADISON AND FIFTH AVE. 

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MANUFACTURER 



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Established 1828 



IE J. L mn iRon works 

84 to 90 Beekman St. NEW YORK 

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Manufacturers and Importers of 

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Stable Fixtures of all kinds 

CATALOGUES WILL BE FURNISHED TO INTERESTED PARTIES 



iKi.KPiiONE MAKKisoN 275 . D. M, Qlay, Treasurer uiul Manager 

I 
I 

TK^ Vell5 f Dewlon Co. 

HEATING . PLUMBING 

VENTILATING 

CONTRACTORS AND ENGINEERS 

LARGE CONTRACTS A SPECIALTY 

2^4 T>earhorn Street (^nlC^^O zMonadnoch building 

SOME OF THE BUILDINGS EQUIPPED 

I'lA'MBING -M<)NAi)NO( K, Asliland Block, Chicago Athletic Association, Chicago Art Insti- 
tute, Henry Ives C\)bl>'.s Residence, Cosmopolitan Hotel, New Orleans, Union Trust 
Bld'g, St. I.ouis, New York Life Bld'g, Kansas City, Htc. Etc. 

HEATING— Marshall Field's New Block, Chicago Art Institute, Chicago Reach Hotel, Tudor 
Apartment Bld'g, Thos. Corrigan's Residence, Kansas City, Etc. Etc. 



A MERICAN l ^ADIATOR S 



TRADE MARK 



rAnOUS::: 



FOR THEIR COnCLY OUTLINES 

HIGH ART ORNAMENTATIONS 
PERFECT CONSTRUCTION 
ErnCIENCY 




HUNDREDS OP STYLES AND SIZES 

ADAPTED TO THE REQUIREMENTS 
OP ANY STRUCTURE 



NATIONAL 



DIRECT. INDIRECT and DIRECT-INDIRECT 

RADIATORS 

rOR BOTH STEA/^\ AND MOT WATKR 

A MERICAN l^ ADIATOR C OMPANY 

11M13 LAKE STREET . CniCAGO 

NEW YORK . 9ii CENTRE ST. /MINNEAPOLIS . 320 riRST ST . N. 

BOSTON . 44 OLIVER ST. DENVER . 1810 BLAKE ST . 

FACTORIES . DETROIT AND BUEPALO 





m 

sncnD & (D. 

[it0n vowi 



CHICAGO OFFICI: 

Roims 805-806 Home Ins. Bld'g 

CHICAGO, HJ_. 

Shops at Louisville, Ky. 

STRUCTURAL 
m AND ORNAMENTAL 

IRON WORK 



Fine Castings in iron, Brass 
and Bronze 

Artistic Modeling 

High-class Forged and Ham- 
mered Wrought Iron Work 

Pattern formed Screen Work 

Electro-plating in Coppei and 
Brass 

Bower-Barft Furnace 

Examples too numerous 
to mention of Structural 
and Ornamental Work 
made by us in all the 
principal cities ot 
the country 



J. G. McCarthy, President and Treasurer 
E.J. McCarthy, Vice-President 
J. B. NoELLE, Secretary 



I'ki tnio^K WvsT y^ 



ci. G. McCarthy Co/nPANY 



WALL PAPER 



PAINTING AND DECORATING IN ALL ITS BRANCHES 



202 WASHINGTON BOL'L-EVARD CORNER GRCEN 



CHICAGO 



BRANCHES . /^ILWAL'KEl: . 0/^\AhA . DENVER 



HCRRING-MALL-AARVIN COA\PANY*S 
SArCS AND DEPOSIT WORK 

RfzCElVED hlGtlEST AWARDS 

AT TME 

WORLD'S COLIJAABIAN EXPOSITION 



A. L. DHANt & CO. general agents 



32-5A WABASM AVENUE . CHICAGO 



O 



R. C". Si KKi.iNG, Pre.s't, St. Louis H. VV. Kliot, Sec. and Treas. St. Louis 

S. S. Ki^^KKM., V-Pres'tand ("ieii. Mj^r. C-'hicsi^fo W. K. Miij.Axn, Asst. Sec. andTreas. Chicago 

CHICAGO 
HYDRAULIC-PKESS 
BRICK CO. 



OFFICE AND EXHIBIT ROOM 

301-302-303 CHAMBER OF COMMERCE BLD'G 

WASHINGTON AND LA SALLE STS. 
CHICAGO 

'ri'k-plioiu'S. \1;iiM '-i.y^ .111(1 ,;S^5 ^ TeLs. 

•lotli St. aiul \\'(jnl\v<)rrh Avr Yards 637 

\\- .-iz. \>,M,,i-w ivT, ^. 1 ^ iStli and L;iSnllc' Sts Soutli 71;^ 

Works I'oKlKK, iNTi, Nlort liniisrs ,,, i r> 1 11 t:. inr * 12- 

I 1" louriioy and Kockwinl Sts West 565 

lierndon St. and ('lvl)nurn Ave. . . Xorth St^o 



The effect of Pressed Brick in tiie new light and mottled 
colors depends so much upon variety of shade in connection with 
a suitable mortar color, that it is impossible to base a correct judg- 
ment on single samples. Appreciating this, we have fitted up 
adjoining our office, a Pressed Brick Exhibit Room, which we 
invite you to visit. Here you will see Hydraulic-Press Brick in 
every variety of color and shape — you will see i^ot loose sample 
Brick, but Brick Walls laid up in Mortar. 

Architects tind that it saves them time and worry to bring 
their clients to see us and select brick for themselves. 

Draughtsmen find that it helps them in making details to 
consult with us regarding sizes and shapes, especially in the new 
light and mottled colors. 

Contractors find that it pays them to buy brick of a concern 
t-hat carries a large stock and can deliver promptly. 

Owners find it satisfactory to come to us to select brick, be- 
cause we have the largest variety, the best quality, and the only 
right method of exhibiting l^ressed Brick. 

Our Pressed Brick Walls enable you to select a brick that will 
not disappoint you. 



V 




Vin5low 

Bro5. 

Company 

Iron Vork5 



\\^-()u<4ht and Cast Iron 
Bronze . l^rass . Aluminium 
Duplex l^ronze 
Galvanoplastic . Fire (jilt 
and Fire Fnamelincr 

Artistic 
Blaclismithing 

Special Designs Submitted 



Works : 376-398 Carnal 1 Ave. 

ExHiMiT Room : 

759-761 The Kookeiy 

CHICAGO 



I'iihlisli(r>- (if ( )k namkxi ai. Ikon 



DAVIDSON & SONS 
Pine Interior A\arble and A\osaic Work 

FOOT OF NORTH /^ARKr.T ST. Chic AGO 



^^^ 




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KNTUAXCK TO SJ-.W YOKK I.IVK Ul 11, DING 



Qj 



AMERICAN 
IRON AND STEr.L WORKS 



•^imitesl- 

ftpuetapal-fteel 



WORKS AT 
PITTSBURGH, PA. 



CHICAGO. ILL. 



Tk^ d^enh^i iPt^c^^ Sriel^ G^o. 




CI.EVELAXD, O 



Red, Bu£ Gray, Brown, MoUlcd and Gkued Brick 

SHAPES AND SHADES A SPECIALTY 
Chicago Oftice 

809 Medinah Building CHARLES T. Harris, Manager 

Telephone Harrison 674 



/ 



^ 



r. w. innD s cd. 
(DnmcioiB 



For Steam and Hot Water 
Warming and Ventilating 
Apparatus 

Pipe Fittings, Valves, Boilers 
Pumps, Etc. 



cnicnQO 








•'v-Aia41ihk. 



"J^:-"^^, 



>^ 



Orr& Locke ft 



Hardware Co. 



50 State Street opposite masonic temple 
71 Randolph Street 



•• •• •• 

•• •• •■ 



Dealers in 

The best goods of all the Leadl/ig Manufacturers 
Exclusive Specialties of our own Manufacture 

General Hardware, Cutlery and Mechanics' Tools 



••. •*• ••• 



IVe make the finest and largest display of 

Handsome House Trimmings 

in all Metals and all Finishes 

and will guarantee OUR PRICES TO BE LOW when 

quality is properly considered 



•\ ••. ••• 

•• •• •• 



WE SOLICIT A CALL OR CORRESPONDENCE 



J 



* 



HSlAHI.lsXKJi IN;. 



I plephone Mail) t2<\ 



INC.OKJ'OKAI'KD 189O 



Jonathan Clark & Sons Co. 

Contractors for Buildings 



No. 4 SHERMAN ST. ROOMS 43 and 44 



CHICAGO . ILL. 







1- . W. C'l.AKK. Presidt'iit 

(iKO. T. Clakk, Vice-Prcsidenl and rre:is\inr 
W. H. SiMNEH, Secretary 

W'l' vjt'f, tht: (tt')ieral i^ontrartnrs for tilt- 

jnlln7"inff Buildings : . • . .- . 

CHICAGO AR'J' INS'inUTK 

lU'DA FOl'XDRY PLANT, llarvoy, 111. 

SCHMl l.HACH BREWERY, Wheeling. W . \ a. 

INIOX R. R. S'l ATION, Wlieeliiig. ^^ . Va. 

KQUITAHEE BUIEDINCJ 

HOTItF. FRIENDSHIP 

sii\ KNIKKN lU 1IJ)1\(;S for T. S. Gov't. Fort Sheridan 

W AREHOUSK AXD FAC FORTES for Messrs. J. M. Clark. Siua Sinitli, 
Chas. Kastner ,V Co., W. ). Watson and other.'; 

^ lA riOXs for the Metro))olitan Wi'.'^t Side KJexated Railroad 



* 




Wo [Po [Ml@b@(?| C®/fH|p^irj)y 

193 WABASH AVE. 

FRESCOING . PLAIN PAINTING 
AND HARDJVOOD FINISHING 



TELEPHONE MAIN 2716 



112-114 MICHIGAN ST. 



L. Wolff Manfg Co. 

p'lumbing goods 



Wolff's . Enameled . Iron . Baths 




B 63 



Samples of our Enameled Goods and a full line of other Plumbing Specialties 

may be seen at our Show Rooms 



o 



91 Dearborn Street . Chicago 



ALSO AT 
1533 BLAKE STREET DENVER 11 N. WASH INGTON AVE. MINNEAPOLIS 

GENERAL OFFICES . 93 W. LAKE STREET 

CHICAGO 



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CRERT/l^'RinERM-fl^TEb 
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THE'RlALTO'^'S-.THtTRflDEP^ 



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■EMM 4® LAKESIDE B)¥ILD1/1G 

^GO'ILL 



t^Y4i>^ii;ki*::; 



gpw wrwM T iTi r w n ' ^ nT< r J^if ]il;>jlK'1da;^^ 




H. J. .M()(;i<i:.. I'te.siiltMil 

!■ . r. 1 1 \SKi:i.i , Ircasun r 



M. H. M \i)UK\, Vice-President 

"" U. J- Dkai'KR, SecreUirv 






ROUGH . SAWED AND 
MACHINE DRESSED 

STONE 



Successors to the 

Singer & Talcott Stone Co. Corneau Stone Co. 

Excelsior Stone Co. 3odenschatz & Earnshaw Stone Co. 

Chicago & Lemont Stone Co. Lockport Stone Co. 

Joliet Stone Co. , Crescent Stone Co. 

Quarries at LEMONT^ LOCKPORT and JOLIET 



MainOjjice, ^20 Chamber of Commerce Building 



"t'nriier \T ;i sli i ngton and J.:r^aTre~Sifeet.s 



CIiica.$o 



Our specialties are Sidewalks and Engine Beds, sawed and 
machine dressed 

Our facilities are superior to anything in our line 

Our material is conceded to be unequaled 

Our service is unsurpassed 



TELEPHONE MAIN 347 




MARBLE 
MOSAICS 



^ FRANK L. DAVIS 

225 DEARBORN ST. . CHICAGO. ILL 



. . The . . 



Geladon Terra=Cotta Co 



Limited 



Mann fact 11 rt-rs of 



'i% 




Tiles 



•Alfred C cuter, \, \ 



^^NOSERA 



•■^iitircU iH-w Dc.'<i2"n.>- 



RHIXOJCEROS 
DIAMOND PERSIAN, &c. 

The Most Artistic, tiie Best guality, the Best Color 



GENERAL WESTERN AGENCY 



809 MEDINAH BLDG. CHICAGO 

Telephone Harbison 674 



CHARLES T. HARRIS 



MANAGER 



REES BROTHERS 



GeNTRAGtORS 



Manufacturers of Interior Hardwood Work, Stairs, Etc. 



50-52 N0Rr0N STREET 
GRIGAGO 



Established in 

1865 . 



A. H. Andre ws & Co. 

215 Wabash Avenue, Chicag-o 

Workers in Wood and Metal — Largest manufacturers of Bank, 
(JfKce, Court House, Opera and Church Furniture. 

Interior Wood or Metal Work, Folding Beds, largest variety, fully warranted.^^ ' 
Opera Chairs 




Andrews' Metal ChauB^ 
'nrtiles, and Piano and Type- 
writer Chairs — Antique 
Copper finish, highly pol- 
ished — artistic, light, com- 
fortable and indestroetiblew 








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%: ..-V,-. ' .-r; 



-.-^=^x>■. - v. 




d. A. COLBY & SONS 



MA.Ml At TL'KKKS OK 



Pice iDter^ior^ Rithir?^^ 



acd J)eeor»atior2^ 

DRAPINGS, UPHOLSTERING, LACE CURTAINS, &c. 

SPECIAL DESIGNS 

^For all kinds of Artistic I.vrKKi.,K W„kk ani> Flkxis,i,nos submitted for approval - 

and estnnates given for the execution of the work. Corns/<om/r„re solicited. 



WARCROOMS 148-154 WABASH AVE. 
CHICAGO 



FACTORY 85-89 HENRY STREET 
CHICAGO 




X^.'KVf^MW4'' 






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CONSOLIDATED 






Seymodr 'pfduspoftatioti Po. 



WITH 



IfonbefH JHiebi^aLti Xf^HspofUtiob Qo. 



^j''.:»i>*i! 

'.-^^. ■»<:•■ 






4- '■• 



'■'■-■A 



FASTEST TIME 



Best Service .... Most Picturesque Route 

TO THE 

FISHING-^GROUNDS^-AMD-^SUMMER-^RESORTS 



of Northern Michigan 
Charlevoix, Petoskey 
Bay View, Harbor Springes 
Mackinac Island . etc. 



Steamers leave Tuesday i p. in., Wednesday 4 p. m., Friday 9 p. m. 

and Saturday 10 p. m. , 



Steamers daily (except Sunday) at 8 p. m. for' 



HOIvIv AND, OTTAWA BEACH, MAC AT AWAT ARK, GRAND RAPIDS 

Etc. Etc. 

Milwaukee and Manistee Division, Steamers daily from^ ~ 

Milwaukee, at 7 p. m. for 
MANISTEE, FRANKFORT, and all points East 



FOR FULL PARTICULARS ADDRESS 



B. L. BURK GENERAL PASSENGER AGENT 



CAST END MICHIGAN STREET 
CHICAGO 



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CATALOGUE 

EIGHTH ANNUAL 

EXHIBITION 



CHICAGO 
ARCHITECTURAL 

CLUB 



ART INSTrrUTE 



CHICAGO 

MAY 2^ TO JUNE 10 

MDCCCXCV. 



ri. .■ 



■' .^o >• 









The Chicago Architectural Club and the Chicago Society of 
Artists occupy joint quarters in the club house at 274 Michigan 
Avenue. 



THE CHICAGO SOCIETY OF ARTISTS. 

The Society numbers among its members many representa 
tive men in painting, sculpture and architecture and has a total 
membership of one hundred and fifty. 

^----^ OFFICERS. 

President, John H. Vandkrpoei,. 

Vice-President, \Vm. Wrndt. 

Secretary, Ar.BERT Foerster. 

Treasurer, . . Chas. Edw. Boitvvood. 

' : DIREC'WRS. 

LoRADo Taft. Lons J. Mii.uet.' 



/|\ 



rHEODORE Oscar Fraenkei.. 



Club House, 274 Michigan Avenue. 



CHICAGO ARCHITECTURAL CLUB. 



OFFICERS. 

Presideut GEORGE R. Dean. 

First Vice-President, Ei^MER C. JENSEN. 

vSecond Vice-President Frank M. Garden. 

Secretary, John Robert Dii,i,on. 

Treasurer, Edgar S. Bei<den. 

Assistant Secretary, Harry C. Starr. 



EXECrriVE COMMITTEE. 

George R. Dean. Frank M. Garden. 

Edgar^. BEI.DEN. Elmer C. Jensen. John Robert Dii,i,on. 

Arthur George Brown. John W. Johnson. 



CATALOGUE COMMITTEE. 

CiEORGK R. Dean. Chas. F. Eppinghausen. 

Edgar S. Bki^den. Frank M. Garden. 

Hugh M. G. Garden, Chairman. 



JURY OF ADMISSIONS. 
Irving K. Pond. R. C. Spencer, Jr. T. O. Fraenkei.. 



The exhibition has been conducted by the members of the Executive 
and Catal^gu^ Committees. 



Members of Chicago ArchHectiiral Club. 



ACTIVE MEMBERS. 



Hugo Arnold, 

Miss Jennie Arnold, 

Chas. Eliot Birge, 

Edgar S. Belden, - 

A. C. Berry, - 

A. G. Brown, - - 

J. Den Baars, 

Adolph Bernhard, 

HL G. Brinsley, 

Lawrence Buck, 

Wm. Braeger, 

W. J. Beauley, - . - 

Oscar Blumner, 

D. H. Burn ham, 

S. S. Beman, 

D. C. Chaffee, 

Myron H. Church, 

W. W. Clay, - 

Geo. R. Dean, 

F. L. Davis, - 

John Robert Dillon, 

Oscar Enders, 

Alfred Evans, 

Chas. F. Eppinghausen, 

T. O. Fraonkel, 

J. L. Fyfe, - 

John B. Fisher, '^'^^- .; 

Aug. Fielder, 

Chas. S. Frost, 

Edward G. Garden, 

Frank M. Garden, 

Hugh M. G. Garden, 

Henry F. Griesbach, 



364 Wells Street. 
360 South Paulina vStreet. 
389 East Superior Street. 
13 1 3 Monadnock liuilding. 
122S Wrightwood Avenue. 
825 Temple Court Building. 
338 Washington Boulevard. 
' 1534 West Fulton vStreet. 
44, 115 Monroe vStreet. 
237 Dearborn Avenue. 
1200 Main Street, Dubuque, Iowa. 
604 Scott Street, Joliet, 111. 
1034 Trinity Avenue, New York City. 
1 142 The Rookery. 

507 Pullman Building. 
3601 Vincennes Avenue. 
Royal Insurance Building. 

508 Insurance Exchange Building. 
274 Michigan Avenue. 

Temple Court Building. 

544 Unity. Building. 

900 Columbian Building, St. Louis, Mo. 

155 Montague Street, Brooklyn, N. Y,i II 

70 La Salle Street. 

604 Pullman Building. 

670 Mas.sachusetts Avenue, Boston, Mass. 

89 29th Place. 

Schiller Building. 

502 Pullman Building. 

32 Telephone Building, vSt. Louis, Mo. 

362 Ontario »Street. 

362 Ontario vStreet. 

176 Center vStreet. 



Will. K. Cribh, 
Julius Harder, 
Arthur Heuii, 
K. A. Hoeppncr, - 
John Iv. Hall, 
A. W. Houipe, 
O. C. Hansen, 
Clarence Hanson, - 
M. H. Hunt, - 
Rltjier C. Jensen, - 
J. W. Johnson, 
Max Jenney, - 
I'Vank Jobson, 
Chas. A. Kessel, ' - 
l<>ank I,. Linden, - 
J. Lilleskau, - 
vSamuel H. Lev}, - 
Thomas I". H. Leyden, 
R. vS. J^indstroni, - 
Jos. C. Llewellyn, - 
J. A. Miller. 
Paul Mueller, 
Win. B. Mundie, - 
Robert McWhirter, 
L. J. Millet, - 
Jas. \V. McDonald, 
Chas. \V. Obennaier, 
A Heatty Orth, 
LVed l^ischel, 
I). H. Perkins, 
Alex. Y. Robertson, 
Kuiery Roth, 
G. M. Russeque, - 
John A. Rogers, 
Arthur Rouleau, 
David Robertson, - 
K. IL Seeman, 
R. C. Spencer, 
C. Bryant vSchaefer, 
Richard K. Schmidt, 
G. A. vSchonberg, 
R. E. Smith, - 
Harrv C. vStarr, 



417 Royal Insurance Building. 

342 Ivcxingtoii Avenue, New York. 

701, 172 Washington vStreet. 

61 1 The Rookery. 

Temple Court Building. 

Care of Royal Furniture Co., Grand Rapids, Mich. 

739 vSixty-second vStreet. 

823 Larrabee vStreet. 

1309 Venetian Building. 

1 1 20 Home Insurance Building. 

Care of Williams & Andrews, Dayton, Ohio. 

I 120 Home Insurance Building. . . 

Royal Insurance Building. 

4105 Indiana Avenue. 

1216 Michigan Avenue. 

271 West Ohio Street. 

549 La Salle Avenue. 

6516 Stewart Avenue. 

3234 Portland Avenue. 

84 Adams Street. 

271 Chicago Avenue. 

Schiller Building. 

1 120 Home Insurance Building. 

5548 Wabash Avenue. 

225 Wabash Avenue. 

I I 10 Boyce Building. 

935 North Clark Street, 

404 vSouth Highland Avenue. 

466 Cleveland Avenue. 

vSteinway Hall. 

53 Campbell Park. 

241 East 87th Street, New York City, N. Y. 

215 Wabash Avenue. 

Marquette Building. 

47 Winthrop Place. 

4633 Champlain Avenue. 

15 Major Block. 

Schiller Building. 

825 Temple Court. 

604 Pullman Building. , 

826 Y\ M. C. A. Building. 

Care of Snead & Co., Louisville, Ky. 
27 43d Street. 



Geo. H. Strahan, - 
Alex. Sandblom, - 
Howard Shaw, 
E. F. Starck, 
Geo. W. Selby, 
H. C. Trost, - 
Samuel A. Treat, - 
Victor Traxler, 
Edward T. Wilder, , 
Ernest J. Wagner, 
W. G. Williamson, 
R. B. Williamson, 
Stephen M. Wirts, 
P. J. Weber, - 
Arthur Woltersdorf, 
A. G. Zimmerman, 



28 Sherman vStreet. 

99 Baxter Street. 

115 Monroe Street. 

looi Teutonic Building. 

Marshall Field Building. 

26 1 1 South Halsted Street. 

58 Wabash Avenue. 

1 142 The Rookery. 

1 1 20 Home Insurance Building. 

1216 Michigan Avenue. 

159 La Salle Street. 

159 La Salle Street. . 

150 Wabash Avenue. 

1 142 The Rookery. 

80 La Salle Street. 

631 Fullerton Avenue. 



J. K. Allen, - 
F. L. Blake, - 
Robert Clark, 
Henry Lord Gay, 
Fred S. Hunt, 
W. L. B. Jenney, 
Harry Lawrie, 
L. Muller, 
R. C. McLean, 
D. G. Phimister, 
L. H. Sullivan, 
Lorado Taft, - 
Fritz Wagner, 



C. Lauron Hooper, 
Dankmar Adler, 
L. B. Dixon,. - 
F. R. Schock, 
Clinton J. Warren, 
Chas. B. Atwood. 
E. R. Graham, 



HONORARY MEMBERS. 

25, 34 Wabash Avenue. 

117 East 23d Street, New York. 

Kingsbury and Ohio Streets. 

92 Dearborn Street. 

484 Warren Avenue. 

Home Insurance Building. 

Omaha, Neb. 

19 Tribune Building. 

19 Tribune Building. 

949 Jackson Boulevard. 

Auditorium Tower. 

Athenceum Building. 

1 1 18 The Rookery. 



ASSOCIATE MEMBERS. 

34 Walton Place. 
Auditorium Tower. 
95, 230 La Salle vStreet. 
807 Teutonic Building. 
84 La vSalle vStreet. 
1 142 The Rookery. 
T142 The Rookery. 



J 



Paul C. I^aulrup, - 
Henry Ives Gobb, - 
Frauds M. Whitehouse, 
Geo. E. Androvette, 
Wm. Holabird, 
M. Roche, 
Ed S. Bushuell, 
Fred Kees, 
O. G. Traphagan, - 
M. h. Beers, - 
Johu W. Parker, 
Johu M. Eweu, 
Arthur l*eabody, - 
D. G. Carrier, 
Chas. H. Kibby, - 
Chas, A. Coolidge, 
Gen. Wm. vSooy Smitli, 
Wm. Zimmerman, 
Chas. S. Frost, 
Theodore F. Reese, 
Wm. D. (;ates. 
D. V. Purringtou, - 
Thomas A. Dungan, 
Harry C. Knisely, 
H. B. Prosser, 
Herman L. Matz, - 



1 142 The Rookery. 

100 Washington Street, 

117 I^ake Shore Drive. 

27 Clinton Street. 

1618 Monadnock Building. 

i6i8 Monadnock Building. 

801 Medinah Temple. 

Minneapolis, Minn. 

Duluth, Minn. " 

508 Insurance Exchange. 

40 River Street. 

ii2r Xhe Rookery. 

1006 Title and Trust Building. 

1309 Venetian Building. 

1309 Venetian Building. 

801 Stock Exchange. 

Masonic Temple. 

502 Pullman Building. 

38 Randolph Street. 

Marquette Building. 

323 Chamber of Commerce Building. 

611 Security Building. 

68 West Monroe Street. 

Marquette Building. 

323 Chamber of Commerce Building. 




Plaster casts of the Cover Design, 24 inches high, by Richard W. Bock, 
vSculptor, may be had by addressing Mr. Bock at the Club House. Price, $1.50. 




Tiptch Traveling Srholar^'hip /:i/vois. 
7^. C. Spencer, Jr. 



s 



The (W)ld Medal of the Illinois Chapter, American Institute 
of Architects, offered annually to he competed for by members of 
the Chicaiio Architectural Clul), has been awarded to . . . 



KL."\ir:H C. Ji'.NSKx. 



Subject for Competition: / 

./ ItuHiiivo^ Dci'olcd to the Sludv of Ihi/aiiy^ Zoq/o^ 



■y and Mineralogy. 



C n AS S, I'Kos'i 



AI)J( I)li A 11 .\(. ( '( Kl/Jl// T7EE. 

T. (). FkAi-NKia.. / August Fiedler. 



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.4 l^uhhiiiii — niadi' hv -IVlyroii H. Hunt 



Catalogue. 



ADLKR & SULLIVAN— Auditorium Tower. 

1 Guaranty Building, Buffalo, New York. 

2 Scale Drawings of Ornament for Guaranty Building. 

3 Photographs of Models from the above Drawings. 

4 lixecuted Examples of same. 

GRO. E. AxNDROVETTE CO.— 27 South Clinton Street. 

5 vSix Sketches for vStained Glass. 

6 Leaded (ilass, Colonial Motif 



s - " . " • ■■' 

WM. JEAN BKAULEY— Joliet, 111. 

9 European vSketclies. 

■ • TO "- ^--.H—- 

I! 

12 House at Le INlans. 

13 Old House at Le Mans. 

14 Origiyal Study. 

CARL BEIL— 81 Illinois vStreet. 

15 Dormer Window, Plaster Cast. 

16 Corbel, Plaster Cast. 

17 
18 




:S 






•5 









BKIL & MAUCH— Si Illinois Street. 

19 Mantel in Louis XV. vStyle, Plaster Cast. , 

CHARLES B. BIRGE— 1309 Venetian Building. 

20 Sketch in Sienna, from Photo. 

21 Chapel, Chateau d'Amboise, from Photo. 

22 Monument to a Musician. 

23 vSketch from Photo. 

24 A Park Shelter. 

25 flan and Section, a Building for the Study of Botany, Zoology and 

Mineralogy. 

26 Elevation. 

27 Detail of an Entrance. 

RICHARD W. BOCK. 

28 Design for Catalogue Cover, Plaster. 

CHARLES FRANCLS BROWNE— 302 Wabash Avenue. 

29 Neptune Temple at Paestum. 

30 Interior of Pompeiian Bath. 

LAW^RENCE BUCK— 702 Gaff Building. 

3 1 House by Andrews, Jacques & Rantoul. 

32 House by Cram & Wentworth. 

33 Study of a Chateau. 

D. H. BURNHAM & CO.— The Rookery. 

Ellicott Square Building, Buffalo. 

34 Detail of Main I^ntrance. 

35 Detail of Elevation. 

36 " " 

37 Section of l^ntrances and Ellicott Court. 
Winnebago Building, Chicago. j 

38 North Elevation. _ * 

39 vSouth " - 

40 East 

41 West 

42 Details of Exterior. 

43 

44 

45 Details of Hall and Corridor. 

^Nlabley Building, Detroit. 

46 Elevation. 

4/ 

48 Details of Elevation and Section. 

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DUDIvKY C. CHAFFEK 4356 Hllis Avenue. j 

49 Rendering from Photo. 

50 Gate Lodge, North Easton, H. H. Richardson, Architect. 

51 Temple at Paestum, from Photo. 

CLEVELAND ARCHITECTURAL CLUB— 1002 Garfield Building. 

52 A Part of California State Building, World's Fair, W. D. Benes. 

53 Entrance to a Stone Residence, - - - - W. D. Benes. 

54 St. Mark's Church, Cleveland, - - Wilbur Manning Hall. 

55 A House on a Cliff, - - - - - - Benj. S. Hubbell. 

56 A Suburban House, . - . . . Benj. S. Hubbell. 

57 A City Cafe, - - - - - - - Leland Ray Rice. 

58 Hotel Cluny, Paris, . - . . . chas. Peter Weeks. 

59 Boat and Bath House, - - - - Chas. Peter Weeks. 

JOHN COMES— Fort Wayne. 

60 Study for an Italian Villa. 

61 Main Entrance to an Italian Villa. 

62 Church of the Holy Sepulcher, Jerusalem. 

E. BELL CROCKETT— 609 Beveridge Flats. 

63 Bennett Houses, Chicago, - Fraenkel & Schmidt, Architects. 

CUDELL & HERZ— Metropolitan Building. 

64 Front Elevation of Cafe. 

65 Japanese Room. 

66 Rococo Parlor. 

67 Wine Room. 

68 Vaudeville Theater, Auditorium. , 

GEORGE R. DEAN- 274 Michigan Avenue. 

69 Design for a Country Hotel. 

G. R. DEAN & A. R. DEAN— 274 Michigan Avenue. 

70 Library for Doane College, Nebraska. 

CHAS. 1^ EPPINGHAUSEN-Stock Exchange. "■ 

71 vSketch from Photograph. 

^ ~ I ( II II 

J 2 

73 vSketch after Herbert Railton. 

WILSON IvVRE, Jr.— Philadelphia. 

74 Cottage for Mr. Freer, Kingston, N. Y. V.^ 

75 House and vStable, Allegheny, Pa. 

76 Hall in Country House near Jenkintown, Pa. 

77 Mantel in Lil)rary. 




Doonvav St. PrassacL . R 



Of)/: 



IV T. Wvindur 



KP:RRY .\: Cl.AvS— 419 Broadway, Milwaukee. 

78 Design for Wisconsin State Building, World's I'^air. 

KRNKST FLACxG. 

New York Clearing House. 

79 Plans, 

<So Klevation. 

Si vSection. 

52 vScribner Building, New York City. "^ 

53 vSection of New Corcoran Gallery of Arts, Washington, D. C. 

54 Proposed Tilden Trust Library, New York. 

55 Plan. 

56 Pylevations. 

. S7 Monument to William Cullen Bryant. 

FI.A(;G cS: BENSON— New York City. 

88 Design for a Hall. 

PLANDKRS .S: ZIMMP:rMAN— Masonic Temple. 

89 Residence at Glencoe. 
, 90 Study for Residence. 

THKOI)ORJ«: OSCAR FRAENKEL— 604 Pullman Building. 

91 Study for a Park Casino. 

92 Architectural vSketch, Pastel. 

93 
94 

J. ERH^DLANDER— Ecole des Beaux Arts, Paris, l-rance. 
Chambre de Notaires. 

95 Plan. 

96 l^levation. 

97 vSection. 

HUGH M. G. GARDEN— 362 Ontario Street. 

A Building devoted to the vStudy of Botany, Zoology and Mineralogy 

98 Plan and Section. 

99 Elevation. 

P:L:\IP:R (;RP:Y— 419 Broadway, Milwaukee. 
loo Office and Out-door Sketches. 

. lOI 

102 luiropean vSketches. 
10:; 



HENRY F. GRIESBACH. 

104 Residence of Will. V. O'Brien, Chicago ; Flanders 6!: Zimmerman, 

Architects. 

105 Interior Sketches of same. 

OLIVER DENNETT GROVER— 317 East 49th Street. 

Decorative Paintings for the Dome of the Blackstone Library, Branford, 
Conn. ; S. S. Beman, Architect. 

106 "The First Issne of the Gutenberg Bible." 

107 "Venetian Printers." 

108 Six Photographs of similar Panels. 

GUENZEL & HIBBARi)— 1210 Ashland Building. 

109 German Department, Y. M. C. A. Building. 

110 Residence. 

111 Sheriff's Residence and Jail. 

ERNEST F. GUILBERT— 100 Washington Street. , 

112 Main Entrance, Yerkes' Observatory. Henry Ives Cobb, Architect. 

113 Suburban Residence. » 

FERD. HAHN— 726 West North Avenue. 

114 Parlor Screen. 

115 Carved Panel. 
116 

117 Jewelry Box. 

HERBERT HALE— Ecole des Beaux Arts, Paris. France. 

118 Foyer de Danse. 

HOLABIRD & ROCHE— Monadnock Building. 

119 Water Tower, Fort Sheridan. 

120 Residence, Lake Shore Drive. 

121 _" , Michigan Avenue. 

MORRIS (VRAXT HOLME.S— F15 Monroe Street. 

122 Carmel MissioiK 

123 An Artist's Home. 

H. HORNBOSTEL— Ecole des Beaux Arts, Paris, lYaiice 
Un Pavilion pour la boisson des eaux therniales. 

124 Plan. 

125 Elevation. 

126 vSection. 

127 Perspective. 



MYRON H. HUNT— 1309 Venetian Building. 

128 Rubbingsof Italian Wrought Iron, nine examples. 

129 Rubbings of Ornament, four examples. 

130 Rubbings of Inscriptions, eleven examples. 

131 Sketch of House of Agnes Sorel, Orleans^ France. 

132 Floor Tiles, House of St. Catherine, Sienna, twenty examples. 

133 Temple Bar, London, England. 

134 Color Scheme of Ceiling, Library of*Cathedral, Sienna. 

135 Inlaid Wainscot Panel, Perugia, Italy (full size). 

136 Cornice of Wainscot, Perugia (full size). 

137 Pompeiian Mosaic. 

138 Mosaic at Ravenna, four examples. 

139 Ceiling Decoration, S. Francesco, Assisi, Italy. 

140 Panel by Raphael, Perugia, Italy. 
140A Tower of Santa Croce, Florence. 
140B Transept and Tower S. M. Novella. 
140C Italian Sketches. 

RICHARD M. HUNT— New York City. 

141 Front and Side Elevation, Residence for Mrs. Josephine Schmid. 

142 ist and 2d Story Plans of same. 

ELMER C. JENSEN— Home Insurance Building. 

Gold Medal Design, competition for the gold medal of the Illinois Chapter 

of the American Institute of Architects. 
A Building devoted to the Study of Botany, Zoology and Mineralogy. 

143 Plan and Section. 

144 Elevation. 

HARRY DODGE JENKINS— 103 Auditorium. 

145 Sketch of Courtyard, from Photo. 

146 U .4 ,4 ,< ,, 

147 Proposed Museum for University of Chicago, 

Henry Ives Cobb, Architect. 
JOHN JOHNSON— 

148 House in Normandy, from Photo. "^^^ — 

Design for a Building devoted to the Study of Botany, Zoology and 

Mineralogy. 

149 Plan and Section. 

150 Elevation. 

J. & R. LAMB— New York City. 

151 Chancel Decoration in Mosaic. 

152 Altar and Reredos. 



FRANK I. LINDKN— 1216 Michigan Avemic. 
153 Design for Leaded Glass. 

155 
156 

157 Interior Decoration , 

JAS. BROWN LORD— New York City. 

158 House for R. C. Sibley, Usq., Kntrauce Front. 

159 Garden Front of Same. 

160 Proposed Hotel. 

161 Proposed Hospital. ^ 

162 Small Houses, 

GEO. W. MAKER— 218 La Salle Street. 

163 Residence in Chicago, 
164 

166 •' i< .* 

FRED M. MANN— Boston, Mass. 

Gold Medal Design, vSociety of Beaux Arts Architects' Competition. 
A Small Theater for the production of Cantatas. 

167 Plan. 

168 Elevation. 

169 Section. 

OLIVER W. MARBLE— 806 Gaff Building. 

170 Design for Drovers' National Bank, Chicago. 

171 Design for Rock Island County Court House. 

L. HENRY MORGAN— Ecole des Beaux Arts, Paris, France. 

Un petit Marche avec tribunal de paix au dessus. 

172 Plan. 

173 Facade. 

174 Section. 

LOUIS MULLGARDT— St. Louis, Mo. 

175 Design for Entrance to Vandeventer Place, St. Louis. 

176 Design for Fountain in \'andeventer Place. 

177 Design for "Lotos Club," vSt. Louis. 

W. B. MUNDIE— Home Insurance Building. 

177A Old Fireplace. 

177B Sketch at Nuremburg. 



r 



\V. A. QTivS- 175 -l^earboni street. ' ■ 

1 78 vSt. Peter's episcopal Church, Chicago, 

179 Interior Sketch of vSame. 

PATTON & MSHKR— 115 Monroe Street. 

Chicago Academy of vScieuces. 

180 Floor Plans. 

181 Pylevation and vSections. 

182 Perspective. 

183 Study for a Club House. 

184 Alternative Design. 

185 First Baptist Church, Hyde Park. 

W. T. PARTRn)GE— St. Louis, Mo. 

186 Miscellaneous Pencil Sketches. 

187 Doorway, St. Prassade, Rome. 

DWIGHT H. PERKINS— 1 107 Steinway Hall. 

188 Steinway Hall, exterior. 

189 Residence for F. P. Sherman, 

FREDERICK W. PERKINS-i 15 Monroe Street. 

190 Country Residence. 

FRIvD PISCHEL— 274 Michigan Avenue. 

A Building devoted to the study of Botany, Zoology and Mineralogy. 

191 Plan and vSection, 

192 PHevation. 

POND & POND— Venetian Building. 

193 University Congregational Church, Chicago. 

194 Interior of vSame, 

195 The Anthony Residence, Evanston. 

196 The Irving Apartments, Chicago. 

CHRISTIA M. READE— 211 Wabash Ave. 

197 Design for Stained Glass. 
198 

T99 " " Wall and Ceiling. 

200 '' " Interior Decpration. 

201 " " Wall and Ceiliu"-. 

202 " " Illumination. 

203 " " '' 

204 - " Wall Decoration. 

205 House in Chartres and Fragments of Chartres Cathedral. 

206 Courtyard of the Hotel de Cluny, Paris. 



/^.. - 



ALEXANDER H. RKVEJ.L eS^ CO.— Wabash Ave. 

207 Chandelier. 

208 " ^ 

209 »' 

210 " 

O. C. RIXSON— 1 142 The Rookery. 

211 Monument to Commemorate the Discovery of America and its 

Development. ^ 

ALBERT RANDOLPH ROSS— New York City. 

212 Full size detail, Table under Wall Mirror. Bedroom of Marie 

Antoinette, Fontainbleau. 

213 Full size detail, Back of a Marble Seat. 

214 Marble Altar, Museum of Michel Angelo, at Rome. 

215 Scale Drawings of Bath Room in the Pitti Palace. 

216 Full size detail, Marble Stele, National Museum, Athens. 

217 Bronze Lamp, Pompeii. 

218 Sketch. 

219 '* 

220 " 

221 •' 

222 Elevation, Legion of Honor, Paris. 

C. H. B. SCHAEFKR— 225 Dearborn Street. 

223 Cottage. 

224 Chimhey, Chateau de Blois, from Photo. 

225 Gothic Corner. 

SCHMID & SCHEIDEN— 71 Washington Street. 

226 Parlor. 

227 Interior of Church. 

R. E. SCHMIDT— 604 Pullman Building. 

228 Detail of Entrance. 



GEORGE L. SCHREIBER— 1741 47th Street. 

229 Mural Decoration, " The States." 

230 Copy of Border in the Pantheon, Paris. ■-- — - - 

231 Mural Decoration, Frieze of Ivy festooned. 

SHEPLEY, RUTAN & COOLIDGE— Venetian Building. 

232 Second Presbyterian Church, St. Louis, Mo. 

233 Study for West Front and Porch of Trinity Church, Toston. 

234 Residence for J. A. Spoor, Esq. 

235 '♦ " Wm. Dickinson, Esq. 






.' -i-^-l: \_ '•■•— -,''^-^^'' */-.T'/^ '^'T'hr^i^y 






GEORGE K. SHIMODA— 4939 Lake Avenue. 

236 Design for Japanese Gardens, Lincoln Park. 

237 •♦ " a Church. 

R. C. SPENCEk, Jr.— 1503 Schiller Building. 

Envois Rotch Traveling Scholarship. 

238 Doorway at Perugia. 

239 Plan of S. M. dei Miracoli at Venice. 

240 Ceiling of Villa Madama. 

241 Cross in Wall of Tribune, S. M. dei Miracoli. 

242 Cottage at North Evanston. 



243 
244 






it 



it 



245 House at Evanston. 

245 A House at Chautauqua Lake, N. Y. 

JOHN SUTCLIFFE— 702 Gaff Building. 

246 Hillside Cottage. ' 

247 Church. 

248 Residence. 

249 Bath House on Lake Michigan. 

TIFFANY GLASS & DECORATING CO.— New York City. 
Drawings by J. A. Holzer. 

250 Choir Gallery, St. Vitale, Ravenna. 

251 Memorial, Bas Relief. 

252 Sketch for Glass, "St. Cecilia." 

253 Young Indian, Mosaic Design. 

JOHN M. VAN OSDEL— 225 Dearborn Street. 

254 Residence. 

JOHN VAN PELT— Ecole des Beaux Arts, Paris, France. 
Apartment for a Prince. ' 

255 Plan. ^^ 



256 

257 



Facade. 
Section. 



CLINTON J. WARREN-84 La Salle Street. 

258 Lexington Hotel, Chicago. 

259 Auditorium. Annex Hotel, Chicago. 

260 Proposed Imperial Hotel. 
Competitive Design for Minnesota State Capitol. 

261 Plan. 

262 Elevation. 

263 Section . 



'■.x\ 



V 



H. H. WATERMAN— 2 18 La Salle street. 

264 Residence at Beverly Hills, Chicago. 

WM. WATSON— 45 N. W. Myrtle Avenue. 

265 Carved Chair. 

P. J. WEBER— 1142 The Roakerj'. 

Design for Washington State Capitol. 

267 Plan. 

268 Elevation. 

269 Section. 

270 Perspective. 

EDWARD T. WILDER— 1 1 20 Home Insurance Building. 

271 Cloister of Augustine Convent, Toulouse, from Photo. 

WILLETT & PA SHLEY— 1640 Unity Building. 

272 Lecture Hall and Apartment Building. 

273 Entrance to Above. 

274 Residence. 

275 Chicago College of Dental Surgery. 

FRANK L. WRIGHT— Schiller Building. 

276 Study for a Pleasure Resort at Cheltenham. 

YALE & TOWNE MFG. CO.— 154 Wabash Avenue. 

277 Artistic Metal Work. 



r A.<A._ >-?. jr._ 









EXHIBIT OF CERAMIC DECORATION BY MEMBERS OF THE 
CHICAGO CERAMIC CLUB AND OTHERS. 

CAROL AUS— Studio Building. 
278. China Tea Set. 

FRANCES NICHOLSON BOND -Athenaeum Building. 

279 Keramic Lamp. ' 1 ■ 

280 Coat-of-Arms. ^ 

281 Plaque. 

282 Keramic Tile. . ' j ' 

HELEN M. CLARK— 1 105 Auditorium. 

283 Jardiniere of Roses. 

284 Fish Platter. 

285 Panel of Roses. 

N. A. CROSS— 1 16 Auditorium. 

286 Decorated China. 

M.-ARY C. DIBBLE— 5324 Washington Avenue. 

287 Vase. 

288 Fruit Plates. - 

MRS. A. A. FRAZEE— 1 16 Auditorium. 

289 Decorated China. 

290 an ' " ^ 

291 
292 



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«( 



(( 



MRS. V. B. JENKINS— 103 Auditor ium. 

293 Rose Jar. 

294 Writing Set. _^ 

FLORENCE D. KOEHLER-906 Marshall Field Building. 

295 Plaque, Lotus. 

296 Enameled Vase. 

297 Jar, Conventionalized Lotus. 

298 Box, Etched. 

299 Box. 

300 Porcelain, seven pieces. 



.;ai- 



SADIE R. LITTLE— 629 Adams Street. 

301 China Jar. 

MARIE McCREERY— 4148 Grand Boulevard. 

3Q2 Teapot. 
- 303 Creamer. 

GRACE H. PECK— 3848 Elmwood Place. 

304 Cup and Saucer. 

305 Plate. , 

306 " I 

307 Vase. 

MARY A. PHILLIPS— 4308 Forrestrith Avenue. 

308 Porcelain Painting " Queen Louise." 
'309 " '• "Cloister Secrets." 

^^^ 310 — *^ — ** "Jardiniere of Roses." 

E. C. SILBERHORN— 849 Marshall Field Building. 

311 China Lamp. 

312 Tray, Theme "The Power of the Rose." 

313 Tray. 

GRACE M. STANDISH— 115 Auditorium. 

314 Chop Platter in Roses. 

315 Small Jardiniere in Bergonia. 

MRS. L. M. SWARTWOUT— 322 Howard Avenue, Austin, 111. 

316 China Plates, Royal Berlin. 

KATHERINE THOMAS— 3756 Ellis Avenue. 

317 Lamp, Royal Worcester. 

318 Tray, Figure, "Fairy of the Moon." 

319 Five O'clock Tea Set. 

320 Cups and Saucers. ^ 



HELEJTM. TOPPING— 4425 Berkley Avenue. 
321 Jardiniere. 



J M i \ ,K . • \ ,,,-•.<; ' . I , . , 



The advertising has been restricted 
to the representative firms of the city, 
and the committee takes this oppor- 
tunity to heartily thank them for 
making this Exhibition possible. 

Thk Catai,oguk Committee. 



■\ 



AGENTS FOR 

Hydraulic-Press Brick Co , 
St. Louis, Mo. 

Findlav Hvdraulic-Press 
Brick Co^ Findlay Ohio. 

Illinois Hvdraulic-Press 
Brick Co., Collinsville, 111. 

New York Hydraulic-Press 
Brick Co., Kochester, X. Y. 

Eastern Hvdraulic-Press 
Brick Co., Philadelphia, Pa. 

Northern Hydraulic- Press 
Brick Co., Minneapolis 

Omaha Hydraulic-Press 
Brick Co., Omaha, Neb. 

Kansas City Hydraalic-Press 
Brick Co., Kansas City, Mo. 

Washington Hvdraulic-Press 
Brick Co., Washington. D.C. 



K. C. Sf KRIJNCi, Prt'st, St. I.oui.s. 
H. W. ELIOT, Secy and Treas., St. I.ouis. 

S. S. KIMBEI-L, Vice-Pres't and C.enl Mgr.,) 

C. B. KIMBELL, Asst Secv, -CHIC 

W. K. MILLARD, Ass't Trea.s., ) 



AGO. 



Chicago 
Hydraulic-Press 

Brick Go. 



MANUFACTURERS AND DEALERS IN 



MYDRAUUIG-PRCSSBD 

Molded and Indiana Red Common 

BRICK 



OFFICE AND EXHIBIT ROOM 

301-303 Chamber of Commerce BWg. 



Corner La Salle and Washington Sts. 

CHICAGO^- 



works: porter, Indiana 



telephones: 

office, - - - Main 143S 

( iSth and La Salle Sts., 
, ' Flournoy and Rockwell Sts., - 

Storehouses : - Herndon St. and Clybourn Ave., 
( 40th St. and Wentw'orth Ave., - 



South 753 

West 565 

North S59 

Yards 637 



AGENTS FOR 

St. Louis Enameled Brick 

EnKlish Enameled Brick 

Biishnell Buff Brick 

Milwaukee Brick 

Racine lirick 

Ricketson's Milwaukee 
Mortar Colors 

Salt-Glazed Wall Coping 

Hansen s Patent Chimney 
Tops 

Terra Cotta Flue Lininu 



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lianqqist & Ericsson 

fiftasoii Contractors 
ant) !fiSutlbcr6 



BOX 277, Office ... 83 \JJa&f)\r)<^tov) Jtreet 

BUILDERS' AND TRADERS' EXCHANGE 



ROOMS 3 AND 4 



Chie 



ago 



OFFICE i^OURS, 12 TO 2 P. M. 
TELEPHONE, No. 730 MAIN 




CHARLES T. HARRIS & CO. 

...REPRESENTING... 

THE CENTRAL PRESS BRICK CO. 

PRESSED AND ENAMELED BRICK. 

The brick made by this conipatiy has jtist been mentioned by the editor of tlie 
German Polleiy and Byickmakini^ Journal, in the (iernian Brick Manufacturers' 
Association, as "the verN' best of the drj'-pressed brick that I met with during 
my stay iu the United States.'" 

THE CELADON TERRA-COTTA CO./Ltd. 



CONOSERA ROOFING TILES. 

This tile was placed laf^t year on the Orrington Lunt Library. Steinway Hall. 
^ the Mandel and Unrath residences, and others. 

THE EVENS & HOWARD FIRE-BRICK CO. 

RE-PRESSED BRICK AND TERRA-COTTA. 

This is one of the best etjuipped companies in this country and is noted tor 
the superior quality and artistic value of its products. 

Artistic Building Nlaterifjl ix Specialtx-. 

1001-1002 MARQUETTE BUILDING, 

TELEPHONE, MAIN 3910. ^^ CHICAGO. 




Pti:c Iksj^ii. ^ Plan. Elmer C. Jensen. 

Compeiiiion for the Gold Medal of the Illinois Chapter A. I. A. 

"A Memorial Building:, devoted to the study of Botavv. Zoology and Mineralogy^ 



V 



(No Model.) 

J. STAMSEN & R. S. BLOME. 

METHOD OF CONSTRUCTING STEEL AND CONCRETE ARCHES, 

SIDEWALKS, &c. 

No. 537,866. Patented Apr. 23, 1895. 



./. 





KEPT in perfect condition ten years from date of completion and guaran- 
teed to last longer, look neater, remain permanently water-tight and 
give better satisfaction generally than the best quality of limestone 
flagging, with many other advantages, as the vast amount of work done by us, 
now in use, will verify, all at a cost of from 40 to 60 per cent of that of stone^ 
Being originators of above construction, together with an experience therein 
greater than the total of all others, will insure work done in a permanent and 
first-class manner. Further particulars, specifications, etc., cheerfully given. 

JOSEPH STAMSEN & CO. 

Cement and Asphalt Paving Contractors 

Room 2 Metropolitan Block, Chicago 

TELEPHONE, MAIN 2403 




t.- 



<- 



The Late st Su ccess Triumph Fumace 




POWERFUL, ECOiNOMICAl. 
AND DURABLE. 

34 Styles and Sizes. 

Craig-Reynolds Fdy. Co. 

DAYTON, OHIO, 

MANUFACTURERS. 

GEO. D. HOFFMAN, 

WESTERN MANAGER, 

82 E. Lake Street, 
CHICAGO. 

Catalogue upon application. 



J. SGHARMER 



JC^ 




fiHD gONTKACTOR^ 



167 DEARBORN STREET" 

CHICAGO, ILL. 



TELEPHONE, MAIN 2892 




I '.' 



How do you pump 

the water to the upper floors of j^our flat 
where the cit}' pressure will not deliver it ? 

The Rider or Ericsson Hot-Air Pump solves 

this problem and will pump the water at less 
expense in fuel than any pump in the world. 
FUEL : GAS, COAL OR OIL. 

Ls a record of 20 years^^^suffi- 

cient guarantee ? 






THE RIDER 



The Leading Architects of the United States Indorse Ihem. 

FOR COUNTRY WORK 

MORE RELIABLE THAN WINDMILLS. 



NEW YORK, 

37 DEY STREET 



Rider Engine Co. 

86 Lake Street, 
CHICAGO. 



THE ERICSSON 



Joseph Dux 



V 



ARCHITECTURAL WOOD CARVING 

MODELING 
AND DESIGNING 



Telephone, 2545 



ORNAMENTAL PATTERNS 
FOR ALL KINDS OF METAL CASTINGS 



278 and 280 East Madison Street 

Near Bridge 



CHICAGO 










^ 



^ 






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O 









THE SNEAD & CO. IRON WORKS, 

LOUISVILLE, KY. 



CHICAGO OKKICE : 
Room 1012, iVIarquette Builclin<i 



STRUCTURAL and ORNAMENTAL IRON WORK 



FOR BUILDINGS 



VM K S B '« 



l'M"-r 







FOUNDERS OF LIGHT AND HEAVY CASTINGS of all classes; columns, lintels, ma- 
chinery castings, building fronts, skylights, sidewalk lights. 

DESIGNERS AND MANUFACTURERS OF STRUCTURAL STEFX WORK, such as roofs 
and girders, and fireproof steel construction of approved methods; beams, channels 
and shapes furnished on short notice. 

ARTIST ARTISANS IN WROUGHT IRON, STEEL. CAST IRON, BRASS, BRONZE AND 
ALUMINIUM, producing railings, gates, grilles, elevator screetis, lanterns, window 
guards, wire guards. 

WE USE THE BOWER-BARFF AND ELECTRO-HRONZP: FINISHES for cast or wrought 
iron; our double plating will stand exposiire to the weather. 

MANUFACTURERS OF THE "Green Patent Book Stack" and the " Snead Patent Shelf 
for Libraries," the system in use in the New Library of Congress. 




/- 



i\i\tl\oi\y 6urk^ 



iV\a50i\ Coi\traQtor 

4 14 Bort Buil6Lii\3 . ^1 QUii\cy £tr^^t 



Telephone, A^aio 3722 



I*... 



H. Probst, Pres. & Treas. Paul F. P. Muller, Secy. Barney Lichter, Vice-Pres. F. W. Schulte, Auditor. 




l^.^^'^K:':^ 



General Contractors 



NEW YORK: 
MOHAWK BLDG.,160 FIFTH AVE. 



CHICAGO: 
THE SCHILLER. 



FORT WORTH, TEXAS. 
BRANFORD, CONN. 



Prominent Buildings Completed and in Course of Erection : 

Schiller Building. Chicago. $S4o,ooo; Post Ofhce (Dooley Blocks Salt Lake City. 8220,000: Union 
Trust Building, St. Louis, Mo . S550 000 ; Court House, Fort Worth, Texas, 8507,000; Memorial 
Library Building, Branford, Conn , $250,000; Synagogue, Chicago, (North Side); St. Martin's 
Church; St. Vincent Church. 

WORLD'S FAIR BUILDINGS: Fisheries, Casino, Music Hall. Peristyle. Dome of Horticul- 
tural, German Empire Bldg , Kentucky State Bldg., Moorish Palace, Arena, Con%'ent La Rabida. 



Ernst Held^iaier 5^ Ge. 

Out Stone 
Contractors ^ 



Cologne and TVlclin gtreets, G^ioago 




We are thoroughly equipped 

with all of the latest and most improved iiiachinerv 

for dressiiiic stone ... 



TeZe/j/ione; Office, A/oin .'i.>'« 
Yards, Cann'l :^5.'> 



George E. Watson Co. 

Draftsmen and Artists' Supplies 



38 Randolph Street 



Gr/ our revised net prices on all material used by 

iVrcliitects and Artists. 

A complete line of Water Colors, 
Brushes, Inks and Papers. 



THEODORE F. REESE, Manager Artists (Department 



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JNO. Davis, President. JNO. D. Hibhard, Vice-President and Manager. 
Edw. fe. Morrill, Secretary and Treasurer. 



THE JOHN DAVIS tO. 



STEAM AND HOT WATER 



HEATING ^J VENTILATING 



TELEPHONE. 2720 MAIN 
• i 



125 MAIN EXPRESS 



69-79 MICHIGAN STREET 

CHICAGO, ILL. 




Fii®e-Pr>0©fing G©. 



office ... 

1303 Sel^iller Bid?. 
Ql^ieaQO 



MANUFACTURERS AND CONTRACTOR? OF 



LIGHT FIRE-PROOFING MATERIAL 



GYPSUM QUARRY, 

GRAND RAPIDS, MICH. 



FACTORY, 
CHICAGO HEIGHTS^Jkl- 



Hollow Tile for Partitions, Furring Tile, Column and Beam C<»vering 
Fire-Proof Plaster Boards for Iron and Wood Construction - 
Plaster Boards are the best Non-Conductors of heat and sound 



Some of the prominent 

Chicago Buildings 

Macl(olite Fire- Proofing 

has been 

employed in 



Monadnnck Bn ildini:; 
SchiUer Theate.} and Ojfue 

Building 
Champlain Building 
Criminal Court Building 
)uiing ll'onit'n'i. Chi tslian 

yi >soci<ition Jin i/di nc> 
Mai qucitf Building 



Mc I 'ii ki'i' ■^ Thratry 
Bone Building 
Lndington Bti ilding 
Manhattan Building 
Pontiac Building 
I eiiftian Building 
Blaza Apartment Building 
Chicago City Schools 



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GARDNER SASH BALANCE CO. 




Gardner's Indestructible 
Steel Sash Locks. 

BURGLAR PROOF. 

The Latch and Keeper are made of co/<f 
rolled slt'i'l. hence are infinitely stronger 
and better than any cast-iron lock can be. 

This Lock is simple in construction, 
neat in appearance, cannot be opened from 
r the ontside, has a greater range tlian any 
lock made. 



MANUF.\CTUKEn IJY 



GARDNER SASH BALANCE CO. 

MANUFAC'llRKRS OK 

Aluminium Bronze Sash Ribbon, Sash Ribbon Attachments, Ribbon Sash Pujieys 

Chain Sash Pulleys, Rope Sash Pulleys, Ventilating Sash Bolt, 

Steel Door Fasts and the Gardner Steel Sash Locks. 

For Descriptive Catalogue, Address GARDNER SASH BALANCE CO. 

311 First National Bank Building, Chicago, 111. 



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Design for a Memorial Windmo. 
Christia M. T^eade. 



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Design for a Church. 
John Stttcliffe, Architect. 






JAMMMILLER ft BRO. 



129 & 131 
5.CLINT0N St., 

•Chicago 





ELECTRIC LIGHT 
GOODS. 

ANNUNCIATOR AND 
MAGNET WIRE. 

FAN MOTORS. 

HOUSE GOODS. 

OSCAWW DYNAMO 
AND MOTOR 
BRUSHES. 

LAMPS. 

TELEPHONES. 

DYNAMOS AND 

MOTORS 



Manufacturers, Importers and Dealers 

^ Elect rical Supplies 

Electric Light and Power Machinery 
Obrositk Wirks and Cables 

'^T;ca"r:^r^^°- I296 Dearborn St., Chicago 






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House on Lake Shore Drive, Chicago. 
Holahird &■ Roche, Architects. 



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L. Wolff Manufacturing Company, 



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PLUMBING GOODS. 



THE ''SULTANA.' 



i!iii!:iiiani '"'« 



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THE "SULTANA" UNDER-ROLL RIM BATH. 



WRITE FOR SUPPLEMENT, SHOWING 

WOLFF'S Enameled Iron Baths. 



GENERAL OFFICES: 
93 WEST LAKE STREET. 



SHOWROOMS : 
91 DEARBORN STREET, 

CHICAGO. 



Branches: DENVER, rvlINN E APOLIS. 



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An Entrance. 



Chas. E. Birge. 



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EUGENE DIETZGEN CO. cp^^^ 

and Sunjcying 



MANUFACTURERS AND IMPORTERS OF 



j;PaWin5 lT2atePial<^ Instruments 

76 Dearborn Street (Telephone, Main 726), CHICAG.0 




Most extensive Printing Rooms at igg E. Randolph St. ( Telephone, Main iS/o) 

FOR MULTI-COLOR PRINTS 
AND BLACK AND BLUE PRINTS 

Complete Illustrated Catalogue and Sample Book of Papers furnished on application. 



Walcott-Hurlbut Company 
Plumbers' Supplies 

175-177 Lake Street 
""""^"^ Chicago 



Our showrooms are fully equipped with the latest improved 
Plumbing Appliances, and we consider it a pleasure to show our 
goods. Catalogues furnished upon application. 




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FIRST CHOICE 

The Lapland 

Refrigerators 



THK Lapland Refrigerator, made of 
Oak, with its dry -air system, 
open slat metal ice rack, patent self- 
closing drip cnp and many other desir- 
able features, is today the favorite of 
the people. The leading architects of 
this city specify them for flat and 
style No. 12. with Drop Shelf. apartment buildings and consider them 
Write for cauiogu«. the bcst in the market. 

Lapland Refrigerators are manufactured in 50 diflferent styles and sizes 



"^ Ranney Refrigerator Co., • 



S6 Lake vStreet, 
CHICAGO. 



The Wells-Newton -Ouav Co. 



Some of the Buildings Equipped. 
plumbing: 

Monadnock. 

Ashland Block. 

Chicago Athletic Association. 

Chicago Art Institute. 

Marquette Building 

Henry Ives Cobb's Residence. 

First Regiment Armory. 



Cosmopolitan Hotel, New Orleans 
Union Trust BIdg., St. Louis. 
New York Life Bidg., Kansas City. 



etc., etc. 

heating: 

Marshall Field's New Block. 
Chicago Art Institute. 
Chicago Beach Hotel. 
Tudor Apartment Building 
L. G. Wells' Apartment. 
H. C. Wellington's Apartmem. 
A. P. Brink's Residence. 
Music Temple Building. 
New England Bldg,, Cleveland, 
etc.. etc. 



Plumbing 
Steam HeatiDg 



-a-BiJ: 




CONTRACTORS AND ENGfNEERS 



Large Contracts a Specialty. 



Monadnock Block, 



Chicago 



Wken you specify B^lks ^ 







K^memLer 



'That ire manufacture onlv one quality -tlje best. 
That we sett no seconds dr Gray tubs. 
T/Mt we make the largest variety on the market. 
That our tubs are all guaranteed, and have 

S. M. CO. 
on the bottom. ' 



STAflDARD MfG Go 



PITTSBURGH, Pfl 



Western Branch : Eastern Showroom : 

31 Dearborn Street, Chicago. s East 42d Street, New York 

Central Branch : 
531 AND 533 Wood Street, Pittsburgh. 










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— SriER/nAN & TLAVIN 

ANDnosAics . 

MOSAIC rLOORS. \\'ALLS AND CKILINGS IN AN^' DESIGN 

GARBLE WAINSCOTING. TLOORS. PLU/HBER TOPS. BATH Tl'BS. 
SODA rOUNTAlNS AND ALL \'ARIETIES OP GARBLE WORK. 

SPECIAL DESIGNS IN /"MOSAIC 
PURNISHED IF DESIRED. 

INTERIOR FINISHING IN /GARBLE AND ON^^\■ IN BEST ST'i'LE. 



2507-2519 State Street, cniCAGO 

TELEPHONE. SOITM 697. 



Stickitabit 



Absolutely Non-Cockling (Hue- 
Mountant, for mounting Photo- 
graphs, Scpieegee Prints, Colored 
Work in Albums, on Cards or Plate Paper : it lays flat, dees not 
scak through, and preserves the finisli ; does not stain the most 
delicate shade of ribbon. . 



^^ Put up in 4-oz. and 8-oz. cans, 25 cents and 50 cents. 

Kodaks. 

Developing and Printing. Photo Supplies for Amateurs. 
Album nounting a Specialty. 

MAIL ORDERS PROMPTLY ATTENDKI) TO. 

Boston Photo-Finishing Co. 

608=9, 126 State Street, CHICAGO, ILL. 


















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T o illa^trate iomc of tke Vanou^ de5^n;i exe cuted- bij u5 \tQ 
itiQv/tlie w e jTe^i We l ^gVe ma de l ut Hc u^c 0^ the ^ariou ;^ inetaij 
l^flnb W d$ appl Ud tQBuilderjHa.Tdmdre u^c Tef^r v(ca to tkt./' 
feiioWing lar^e BidUmg^. ^l PHoEiJi\€K<utcd in ^tmUaro 1^': 



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ift 4 p^^^ r <^t-<P S lL^gl\ M^JaL '^'^ 1^94195 A^ ha ve J-Uc Itanisbi jKmu 
fe^ fl^il the iar^ On ice W iUiTK^^^; JVy^);^^^'- j^ruauuy Pc Kt> ji^ the 





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J p. L. , DEL. 







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TELEPHONE, MAIN 2749 



KNISELY & YELDHAM CO. 



SLATE, TIN, IRON AND TILK 



ROOFERS 



MANUFACTURERS OF 



Galvanized Iron and Copper Cornices, Bays, Skylights, etc. 



... KNISELY BUILDING 



68^74 West WLonPoe Street, Chicago 










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Established 1855 



CRANB 



Elevator Company, 
CHICAGO. 



Hydraulic, Steam ^"d Electric Elevators 

FOR PASSENGER AND FREIGHT 
SERVICE. 



^A«^o^lci's Columbifin Exposition, 
Nine F^irst Awards. 



GENERAL OFFICES AND WORKS, 
219 S. JEKKERSON STREET. 




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REVELL'S 

FINE ELECTRIC LIGHT 

AND •.•••.•••.*• 

GAS FIXTURES 

EXCLUSIVE AGENTS FOR 

THE MITCHELL-VANCE CO. 

NEW YORK 



Estimates given for furnishing 
Homes, Clubs, Public Buildings, etc. 



Alexander H. ReVell & Co. 

Wabash Ave. and Adams St. 
CHICAGO ... 



T. w. POTTS & co; 



CONTRACTORS FOR 



Plumbing, Gas Fitting and Sewerage 

52 State Street, Chicag-o 

Among the buildings for which we have furnished the 
Plumbing, Gas Fitting and vSewerage are 



The Auditorium, Chicago. 

The Auditorium Annex, 
The Stock Exchange, 



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ESTABLISHED 1828 



The J. L. Mott Iron Works 

NEW YORK ... CHICAGO ... BOSTON 
SAN FRANCISCO ... ST. LOUIS 

MANUFACTURERS OF 

I I 

lilodern Saoitary Appliances 



OF ALL KINDS 




Steam Heaters Hot Water Heaters 
Furnaces Metal Fountains 

'Drinking Fountains Lamp Pillars 
leases JF{ailings Gates Entrances 

and oArt Metal Work generally 



Stable and Barn Fixtures of every description 



We manufacture Plumbing and Heating Haterials suitable 
for all kinds of buildings and for all purposes 



CORRESPONDENCE SOLICITED 



311 and 313 Wabash Avenue, CHICAGO 




'>^^&&^%.' 



Telephone, Harrison 771. 



HANLEY & CASEY, 



SANITARY 



PLUMBING, 



HEATING AND 



VENTILATING 



APPARATUS, 



17 Ply mouth Place, 



CHICAGO. 



A' 




The American Terra Cotta and Ceramic Co. 

OFFICES, FACTORIES, 

MARQUETTE BUILDING . CHICAGO TERRA COTTA . ILLINOIS 

MUELLER BROTHERS 



MANUFACTURERS OF 



Artistic Picture Frames 

.In Gold, Silver and Natural Wood 

Embroidered Linens made up in Passe Partouts 
^ a Specialty 



0» 

^..^PRICES MODERATE x^^ GIVE US A TRL\L - 

138-140 Wabash Ave. 

Take Elevator 

Telephone, Main i960 CHICAGO 



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ITALIAN-VILLA- 
E'NORTH-ENTIfANCE- 



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ilanufacturers of 
Single and Duplex Types 
of Pumping Hachinery 

for every available 

service 



B?vrr Pumping 

GERMANTOWN JUNCTION, PHILADELPHIA, PA. 

MANUFACTURERS OF 1 

High-Pressure, Compound and Condensing Corliss 
Direct-Acting and Fly Wheel 
Duplex Elevator Pumps 

Electric House, Elevator Pumps and Artesian Well Pumps a Specialty 

J. ECKER, Manager Chicago Office 

912 FORT DEARBORN BUILDING 

- 136 MONROE Street 

Send for Descriptive Catalogue. Specifications for Elevator Pumping Machinery 

furnished on application, 
TELEPHONE, MAIN 38.50 



E. P. Strandberg & Bros.' 



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General Contractors 



and 



Builders 



824 Sixty-first Street, - Chicago 










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Thurber's Art Galleries 

21 o Wabash Avenue 

' . . , ■ 1 ■ - 

special attention given to mounting and 
framing of Drawings for Architects 

Prompt attention and reasonable prices 



Wholesale aud Retail Agent for GoupilSc Co.. Paris 
Thos. Agnew & Sous, London 
The Fine Art Society, I.ondon 



WILLIAM H. WARREN 



MANUFACTURER OF FIXE 



Hardwood Interior House Finishings 



BANK AND OFFICE FITTINGS 



.^lackhawk Street and Smith Avenue 



Telephone, North 602 



Chicago 



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THE NORTH W EST ERN 

TERRA- COTTA 

COMPANY 



MANrFACTlRKRS OF 



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Architectural Terra-Cotta, 
Glazed and Enameled Work 
in all Varieties. 



Works and Main Office, 
Corner of Clybourn and \A^rightwood Avenues. 

fcity Office, Room 1118 The Rookery, 

CHICAGO. 



CONTRACTORS FOR THE FOLLOWING PROMINENT 
„__^ . CHICAGO BUILDINGS ^ 

Woman's Temple, Masonic Temple, - Medinah Temple, — 

Herald Building, Schiller Building, Stone Building, ' 

Ashland Building, Champlain Building, Ogden Building, 

Stock Exchange, New York Life, Y. M. C. A. Building, 

Columbus Memorial, Marshall Field, Equitable, 

Northern Hotel, Chicago Academy of Y. W. C. A. Building, 

Steinway Hall, Sciences, and many others. 




Hitropt'a)! Skt'fcb. 
Ehnrr (hwi. 



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DAVIDSON & SONS, 



. INCORPORATED . 



FINE INTERIOR MARBLE AND MOSAIC WORK, 

Foot OF North Market Street, CHICAGO. 




KNTRANCK TO NKW YORK LIKE HUILDING. 



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E/nier Grev. 






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FRHNK L. DHiZlS. 

MOSAIC DECORATOR. 



225 Dehrborn Street. 



CHICAGO. 



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H0U5E AT VJCEN2LA 

DECORATED WITH vJCRAFF HO-^'O'?. 




Pencil Sketch. 
IV. T. Partridge. 



Vierling, iVicDowell & Company 

Manufacturers oi 

ARCHITECTURAL IRON. 



:::i:i"^iJK;:;.a::i![|ip|!!ii!ii""'l|iiiiiiii||,|ih^ 




General Koundrx, Stair and, Beam Worlc. 

Engineers for Fireproof Buildings. 

Offic© and "Works: T we ntv- third Street and Stewfirt Avenue, 

Chicago. 

Robert Vierling. President. T.ouis Vierling. Secretary and Treasurer. 

Alfred Grossmith, Superintendent. 



WM. GRACE, President. 



F; D. HYDE, Vice-Prest and Treas. 
M. M. DUTTON, Secretary. 



(jrrace & llyde Company 



GENERAL CONTRACTORS 
AND BUILDERS 



Telephone, Main 2784 



413 and 414 Tacoma Bnilding 



CHICAGO 



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Pencil Sketch. 



IV. T. Partridge. 



31 



F. W. LAMB COMPANY 



■ CONTRACTORS FOR 

i. 

STEAM AND HOT WATER 

WARMING AND VENTILATING 

APPARATUS 



256 Michigan Street, - Chicago 

Telephone, North 329. 



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1. 1. LEACH & SON 



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GENERAL 
CONTRACTORS 



OFFICE, ROOMS 1210-11 SECURITY BUILDING 
S. E. CORNER MADISON STREET AND FIFTH AVENUE 



CHICAGO 



Telephone, Main 1744 Masonry a Specialty 




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PRINTERS 
STATIONERS 



steel anb Copperplate 

lEmxeivcvs an& prtntets* 

BLANK BOOK MAKERS 




The Henry O. 
Company 




212=214 Monroe Street 
Chicago. 



cr^iSur 



jf aCllitteS are such that we can handle to best advantage all work in the 
above lines. We make a specialty of the higher grades of work 
and cater only to the best trade. Our prices are reasonable, when quality is 
considered. We should be pleased to submit estimates, or send representa- 
tive, on request. . - j 




The Engravings iu this hook 7vere made by J. Manz <2f Company. 

THE CATALOGUE COMMITTEE. 



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CATALOGVE « 



NINTH ANNVAL . -'' - 7-:?:":^T;;r:-:;::::;. >'i;i ^^^1^ ; ,y ,_ , ,. ,• ./ 

EXHIBITION:; :,;:--,.V:.::::y:.-'- UVn'U\,^ 






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CHICAGO 

ARCHITECTVRAL 

CLVB 



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j^RTJNsraxvrz 



=—- - ^....-...^ 

CHICAGO - ^ 

MARCH THIRTY-FIRST TO 
APRIL ELEVENTH 3 

MDCCCXCVI ^ 



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for: 



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: CHICAGO ARCHJTECTURAL CLUB. 



.W^s'i i 



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OFFICERS. 



George R. Dean, 
Richard E. Schmidt, 
Myron H. Hunt, 
Frank M. Garden, 
Edward T. Wilder, 



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President. 

1st Vice-President. 

2nd Vice-President. 

Secretary 

Treasurer. 



EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE. 

George R. Dean. Richard E. Schmidt. 

Myron H. H»r. Frank M. Garden. Edward T. Wilder. 

John Robert Dillon. Arthur George Brown. 



CATALOGUE COMMITTEE. 



Herman L. Matz. 
Victor A. Matteson, 
Hu^h M. G. Garden. 
John Robert Dillon. 



Howard Shaw. 
Edgar S. Belden. 
Myron H. Hunt. 
Frank M. Garden. 



Arthur George BRawN, Chairman. 



_Q_n_ 



L. J. Millet. 



JURY OF ADMISSION. 
R. C,.SrEN CER, Jr._ 



Irving K. Pond. 






EXHIBITION COMMITTEE. 



— John Roiiert Ptllon, 
Chairmar 
Arthur Geokge Brown. |^ Jas. W. McDonald. 

Wm. Eggebrecht. ^ife John Lilleskau. 



H;\RR, C. Stari 



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Members of the Chicago Architectural Club^ 



ACTIVE MEMBERS. 



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A. S. Alschuler, 

Hugo Arnold, 

Jennie Arnold, 

O. E. Brandt, 

Edgar S. Belden, - 

A. C. Berry, - 

Charles Eliot Birge, 

A. G. Brown, 

Adolph Bernhard, - 

H. G. Brinsley, 

Lawrence Buck, 

William Braeger, 

W. J. Beauley, 

Oscar Blumner, 

D. H. Burnham, 

S. S. Beman, - - = 

J. Den Baars, - 

D. C. Chaffee, 
Myron H. Church, 
W.W.Clay, - -' - 
^. B. Crockett, - - 

P. J. Cunningham, 

E. M. Camp, 
George K. Dean, 

F. L. Davis, - - - 
Arthur R. Dean, '^-- ^^ 
John Robert Dillon, 
Seymour Davis, 

Max Dunning, 

Oscar Enders, 

Charles F. Eppinghausen, 



2216 Wabash Avenue. 

1800 Sherman Avenue, Evanston. 

938 Spaulding Avenue. 

10 Chalmers Place. 

1014 Monadnock Building. 

61 5 Walnut Street, Des Moines, Iowa. 

1309 Venetian Building. 

825 Temple Court Building. 

1534 West Fulton Street. 

44, 115 Monroe Street. 

237 Dearborn Avenue. 

245 E. Superior Street. 

604 Scott Street, Joliet, 111. 

39 Bowdin Street, Boston, Mass. 

1142 The Rookery. 

507 Pullman Building. — ■ 

338 Washington Boulevard. 

4356 Ellis Avenue. 

Royal Insurance Building ' 

508 Insurance Exchange. - 

604 Pullman Building. ~ 

31 Michigan Avenue. 

108 Dearborn Street. 

274 Michigan Avenue. 

Temple Court Building. 

274 Michigan Avenue. 

490 S. Campbell Avenue. 

907 Walnut Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 

1001 Teutonic Building. 

900 Columbian Building,'St. Louis, Mo. 

828 Stock Exchange. 



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William Eggebrecht, 
T. O. Fraenkel, ; 
Charles S. Frost, 
J. L. Fyfe, 
John B. Fisher, 
August Fiedler, 
L. A. Fisk, 
Alfred Fellheimer, - 
Julius Floto, - 
Edward G. Garden, 
Frank M. Garden, - 
Hugh M. G. Garden, 
Henry F. Griesbach, 
OHver Dennett Grover, 
Arthur Heun, 

E. A. Hoeppner, 
John L. Hall, 
Clarence Hanson, 
Myron H. Hunt, 
C.Hatzfeldt, - 
Elmer C. Jensen, 
J. W. Johnson, 
Max Jenney, 
Frank Jobson, 

H. D. Jenkins, 
*Charles A. Kessell, 
C. B. Kimball, 

F. W. Kirkpatrick, - 
K. A. Kirkpatrick, - 
H. C. Koll, - 



Trank XT Clhden, - 
J. Lilleskau, 
Samuel H. Levy, 
Thomas F. H. Leyden, 
R. S. Lindstrom, 
Joseph C. Llewellyn, 
B. B. Long, 
F. S. Lohmuller, 
T. Livingston, 
Sidney Lovell, 
J. A. Miller, - 
Louis J. Millet, 



148 Wabash Avenue. 

604 Pullman Building. 

604 Pullman Building. 

670 Massachusetts Avenue, Boston, Mass. 

89, 29th Place. 

Schiller Building,^ 

286, 37th Street. 

640 N. Wells Street. 

7626 Ford Avenue. 

32 Telephone Building, St. Luuis, Mo. 

1309 Venetian Building. 

362 Ontario Street. 

176 Center Street. 

317, 49th Street. 

1403 Ellsworth Building. 

611 The Rookery. 

Temple Court Building. 

174 Center Street, New York City. 

1309 Venetian Building. 

804 Teutonic Building. 

1120 Home Insurance Building. 

Randolph Building, Memphis, Tenn. 

1120 Home Insurance Building. 

Royal Insurance Building. 

2548 Indiana Avenue. 

4105 Indiana Avenue. 

I9th and Douglas Boulevard. 

1301 W. Madison Street. 

4318 Lawrence Avenue. 

592 Lincoln Avenue. 

1216 Michigan Avenue. 

303 Jane Street. 

49 Tell Court. 

6516 Stewart Avenue: '. ~ 

3234 Portland Avenue. 

84 Adams Street. 

148 Hartford Building. 

820,218 LaSalle Street. 

3835 Calumet Avenue. 

Ellsworth Building. 

1504 Newport Avenue. 

225 Wabash Avenue. 



% 



♦Deceased. 






William B. Mundie, 
Victor Andre Matteson, 
James W. McDonald, 

F. E. Mountjoy, 
Paul Mueller, 

E. A. Nelson, 
Ivar Noess, 

Charles W. Ubermaier, 
Fred. Pischel, 

D. H. Perkins, 
Alex. Y. Robertson, 
John A. Roj>:ers, 
Arthur Rouleau, 

H. J. Ross, 

E. H. Seeman, 

R. C. Spencer, Jr., 

C. Bryant Schaefer, 
Richard E. Schmidt, 
Wm. H. Schuchardt, 

G. A. Schonber^^^ 
R. E. Smith, - 
Harry C. Starr, 
Howard Shaw, 

E. F. Starck, 
Geori^e H. Strahan, 
Axel Sandblom, 
Geo. J. Schell, 
H. C. Trost. - 
Samuel A. Treat, 
Victor Traxler, 
H. S. Thomas, 
Frank Upman, 
Edward T. Wilder, 
Ernest J. Waijner, - 
W. G. Williamson, - ~ 
R. B. Williamson, - 
Stephen M. Wirts, - 
A. C. Wilmans, 

D. ^. Waid, - 
P. J. Weber, - 
Arthur Woltersdorf, 
A. G. Zimmerman, 



1120 Home Insurance Building. 

1309 Venetian Building. 

1110 Boyce Building. 

253 Dearborn Avenue. 

Schiller Building. 

98 Oak Street. 

228 LaSalle Street. 

933 N. Clark St. 

466 Cleveland Avenue. 

Steinway Hall. 

351 Oakley Avenue. 

1532 Marquette Building. 

47 Winthrop Place. 

Evanston. 

15 Major Block. 

Schiller Building. 

574 Flournoy Street. 

Teutonic Building. 

1016 Teutonic Building. 

826 Y. M. C. A. Building. 

Care of Snead & Co., Louisville, Ky. 

27, 43d Street. 

115 Monroe Street. 

1001 Teutonic Building. 

28 Sherman Street. 

1325 Wellington Avenue. 

1618 Monadnock Building. 

2611 S. Halsted Street. 

58 Wabash Avenue. 

1142 The Rookery. 

440 Claremont Avenue. ^ 

6026 Ellis Avenue. 

1120 Home Insurance Building. 

1216 Michigan Avenue. 

159 LaSalle Street. 

159 LaSalle Street. 

Am. Art Ass'n, Paris, France. 

239 Osgood Street. 

9332 Laurel Avenue. 

1142 The Rookery. 

70 LaSalle Street. ^ 

631 Fullerton Avenue. 



■^^^s^^^S^^^^^^ 



i^^^^^^^m^^^^^^^ms. 



^^#^5*?=^*: 






ASSOCIATE MEMBERS. 



*C. B. Atwood, 
Dankmar Adler, 
George Androvette, 
IVl. L. Beers, 

B. M. Brittingham, - 
Edward S. Bushnell, 
Henry Ives Cobb, - 
R. M. Combs, 
Charles A. Coolidge, 
Samuel Dauchy, 
Thomas A. Dungan, 
H. R. Dillon, - - 
John M. Ewen, 

L. A. Ferguson, 
William D. Gates - 
Richard H. Gardner, 
William Holabird, - 

C. Lauron Hooper, 
E. Greble Killen, - 
Harry C. Knisely, - 
Herman L. Matz, 
Max Mauch, - 

H. B. Prosser, 

D. V. Purington, 
John W. Parker, 
M. Roche, 
Theodore F. Reese, 
Gen. Wm. Sooy Smith, 
Oscar Spindler, . 

A. L. Van den Berghen, 
Francis M. Whitehouse, 
Clinton J. Warren, 
William Zimmerman, 
I A Whifp - 



1142 The Rookery. 

Auditorium. 

27 Clinton Street. 

508, 218 La Salle Street. 

Ill North State Street. 

159 LaSalle Street. 

100 Washington Street. 

306 Chamber of Commerce. 

1309 Venetian Building. 

84 Illinois Street. 

611 Security Building. 

113 Lake Street. 

1121 The Rookery. 

139 Adams Street. 

Marquette Building. 

312 First National Bank Buildinii. 

1618 Monadnock Building. 

363 Superior Street. 

150 Michigan Avenue. 

68 W. Monroe Street. 

302 Chamber of Commerce. 

81 Illinois Street. 

Marquette Building. 

323 Chamber of Commerce. 

40 River Street. 

I6l8 Monadnock Building. 

503, 302 Wabash Avenue. 

Stock Exchange. - 

6616 Maryland Avenue. 

Art Institute. 

117 Lake Shore Driv e. 

84 LaSalle Street. 

Masonic Temple. 

1303 Schiller Building. - 



* Deceased. 









HONORARY MEMBERS. 



J. K. Allen, 
F. L. Blake, - 
Robert Clark, 
Henry Lord Gay, 
Fred. S. Hunt, 
W. L. B. Jenney, 
Harry Lawrie, 
L. Muller, 
R. C, McLean, 
D. G. Phimister, 
Louis H. Sullivan, 
Lorado Taft, 
Fritz Wagner, 



25, 34 Wabash Avenue. 

117 East 23d Street, New York. 

Kingsbury and Ohio Streets. 

92 Dearborn St. 

484 Warren Avenue. 

Home Insurance Building. 

Omaha, Neb. 

19 Tribune Building. 

19 Tribune Building. 

949 Jackson Boulevard. 

Auditorium Tower. 

Athenaeum Building. 

1118 The Rookery. 



'c. 





Traftsverse Section. 



Church S. Maria dei Miracoii. 



Geo. (). 7^0 1 fen, Jr. 



M?iMy^l>' 




Catalogue* 



GEO. E. ANDROVETTE & CO.— 27 South Clinton Street. 

1 Ceilinjj Liy:ht. , 

2 A Romanesque Window. 

3 A German Renaissance Window. 



ADAMO BOARI- 1142 The Rookery. 

4 Sketches for a Thirty-two Story Office Building. 



BLACKALL & NEWTON— Boston. 

5 Hotel in Southern New Hampshire. 

' 6 Tremont Temple, Interior. 7" 

7 Tremont Temple, Balcony. 



CARRERE & HASTINGS— New York City. 

8 R. M. Hoe House. 

9 "Mail and Express" Building. 

^r^T-z ^AQ ^^ife^ Building. - '^^=^- -r=z= 

It C. A. Herter House. ! 

12 H. T. Sloane House. - — 

13 Hall of Sloane House. 

14 Block Plan of the Estate of E. C. Benedict. 



J.IA. COLBY 8^ SONS— 148 and 150 Wabash Avenue. 

1 5 Card Tablev Inlaid ( Mahogany ). 

16 Large Arm Chair (Mahogany). 

17 Small Arm Chair (.Vlahogany). 

18 Rocker (Mahogany). 

19 Dressing Table (Mahogany). . 

20 Small Centre Table (Mahogany). 

21 Book Case and Desk combined (Mahogany). 

(jfHlCAGO ARCHITECTURAL CLUB -274 Michigan Avenue. 

Designs for the Improvement of the Lake Front Park, prepared by the 
\ Chicago Architectural Club in conjunction with the Municipal 

Improvement League. 

22 Plan for the Proposed Lake Front Park, Chicago. 

23 Bird's-eye View of the Proposed Lake Front Park. 

24 Sketch for Field Columbian Museum Building 

25 Design for a Monument. 

26 Design for a National "Lincoln" Monument. 

27 Model of a Fountain for Lake Front Park. 

28 Model of a Soldier's Monument. 

29 Approach to Viaduct. , 

30 Design for a Shelter. 

ARTHUR G. BROWN— 225 Dearborn Street. 

31 A Park Shelter. 



BEIL & MAUCH— 81 Illinois Street. - 

32 Fountain Group (Model)/ , 

33 Ornamental Panel (Model), Hotel Savoy, New York City. 
34 H3rnamenral Panel (Model), Hotel Savoy, New York City. 



35 Elephant's Head (Model). 



CARL BEIL— 81 Illinois Street. 
36 A Knight (Model). 



-I i h 



■;:;fOv'' ,'':-v^ 



'■',"■'■'";■■"'>■'■ ■V:^''"'-" •'X'- .*"■■■'■■ "■-';. 



RICHARD WALTER BOCK. 

37 Sketch (Model) for Monument of Champlain, for Quebec, Canada. 
27 Lion Fountain for Lake Front Park (Model). 

26 A Project for National " Lincoln " Monument. 

38 A Soldier's Monument (Defending the Flag; Sketch Model). 

39 A Soldier's Monument (Returning Home; Sketch Model). 

40 Lion Group. 

41 Statuette (Elf, Midsummer Night's Dream). 
Bust; Bacchante. 

LAWRENCE BUCK— 234 La Salle Street. 

42 Church at Chihxiahua, Mexico. 

43 Design for Harmony Club, New Orleans. 

44 Design for Harmony Club, New Orleans. 

45 Apartment Building; John Sutcliflfe, Architect. 

46 Court House; O. W. Marble, Architect. 

47 Church; O. W. Marble, Architect. 

W. W. BOYINGTON & CO.— 159 La Salle Street. 

48 Second Presbyterian Church, Lafayette, Ind. 



DUDLEY C. CHAFFEE— 1309 Venetian Building. 
49 Venetian Street Scene. 

GEORGE R. DEAN— 274 Michigan Avenue. 
50 A Country Church. ^-—^ 

30 A Park Shelter. 

24^ Design for Field Columbian Museum. 

N. MAX DUNNING. 

51 House at Perigueux, France. 



WM. H. EGGEBRECHT— 14? Wabash Avenue. 
52 Lion's Head (Model). , 



J. B. FISHER. 

53 Pen Sketches. 



• ^ ■ 



HARRY DODGE JENKINS-lOO Washington Street. 

54 Haskell Museum, University of Chicago; Henry Ives Cobb, Architect. 

ARTHUR HEUN— 1403 Ellsworth Building. 

55 Residence at Lake Forest. 

56 Residence at Lake Forest. 

57 Country Stable. 

• '. 58 Country Stable. - 

59 Country Stable. 

60 Hall in Country House. 

CHARLES S. FROST— Pullman Building. 

61 St. James' M. E. Church, Chicago. 

62 Home for the Friendless. 

63 Winamac Apartments. ' ' 

JENNEY & MUNDIE— Home Insurance Building. 

64 Design for an Office Building. 

65 Design for an Office Building. 

ELMER C. JENSEN— Home Insurance Building. 

Competitive Design for Chapter Medal, 1896. 

66 A Music Pavilion, Plan and Elevation. Second mention. 

67 A Music Pavilion, Perspective. Second mention. 

BIRCH B. LONG -148 Hartford Building. ^ 

68 Sketch. 

69 Sketch. , 
' 70" Sketch. 

VICTOR A. MATTESON-l 309 Venetian Building. 
/I Arcade, Capitol at Albany, N. Y. 

MAX MAUCH— 81 Illinois Street. 

72 Portrait Bust (Model). 



DWIGHT H. PERKINS AND R. C. SPENCER, Jr. 

73 Sketch for a Country Church. 

HENRY J. ROSS— 265 Huron Street. 

74 Summer House, Oconomowoc Lake; J. T. W. Jennings, Architect. 

75 House at Evanston; J. T. W. Jennings, Architect. 

76 House at Evanston; J. T. W. Jennings, Architect. 

77 House at Evanston; J. T. W. Jennings, Architect. 

78 Worthington Apartments; J. T. W. Jennings, Architect. 
Competitive Design tor "Chapter Medal," 1896. 

79 A Music Pavilion, Plan and Elevation. First mention. 

80 A Music Pavilion, Perspective. First mention. 

C. H. B. SCHAEFER— 574 Flournoy Street. 

81 Studies in Sound. 

HOWARD SHAW— 115 Monroe Street. 

82 Residence at Akron, Ohio. 

83 South Shore Drive, Chicago. 

84 Residence, Chicago. 

85 Residence, Kenwood. 

ROBERT C. SPENCER, Jr. 

86 A Maine Farm House. 

87 Trinity Rectory, Boston. 
1: 88 Cottage in Evanston. 

89 House in Wilmette, 111. *~" 

90 House in Madison, Wis. 7 ; '\ " — .-.-^ 

91 House in Madison, -Wis. 

HARRY C. STARR— 27 Forty-third Street. . 

^ ' 92 A City Residence. "^ -- - ■-- - nr^: —^r- -_- 

VICTOR TRAXLER— 54 Sigel Street. f_ 

25 A Memorial Monument, Elevation. 
25 A Memorial Monument, Perspective. 



" ■.■■■'■ 


■■■^'- V ■ ■*; 




.. ■>''. 




,, ■; ■-. •' ■ ■■ -^ .'*■ ;'■,"■'■ . 




■ . ■ ' -,; .y;V, .■., ■ *■■- ■ 


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• 


o . ';>vr.' ' ', 


■ ./■• ' 




;.:.;■'■'■.' ':.■■.'/ 



FRANK UPMAN— 6026 Ellis Avenue. 

93 A Model Sunday School, Plans and Elevations — 

Hoflfman & Upman, Architects. 

94 A Model Sunday School, Perspective; Hoffman & Upman, Architects. 

VAN DEN BERGHEN— Art Institute., 

28 A Soldier's Monument (Model). ' • . 

95 A Pediment (Model), 
f 96 Sketch Model. 

E. T. WILDER— Home Insurance Building. 



/ 



97 Entrance to a Railroad Station, Elevation. 

98 Entrance to a Railroad Station, Detail. 



\ 



SKETCH CLUB OF NEW YORK. 

99 Canterbury Cathedral, from the Dark Entry, 

100 An Old Farm House, Staten Island, 

101 Trinity House, Worcester, England, 

102 The Porta Corta, 



F. L. Harnois. 

F. L. Harnois. 

G.W.E. Field. 

Robert Kendrick. 



CLEVELAND ARCHITECTURAL CLUB— Cleveland. Ohio. 

103 Iron Grille, . . . . . W. Dominick Benes. 

104 A Cottage, . ; . . . William A. Bohnard. 
^ 105 Scale Details, First Congregational Church, Coburn, Barnum & Benes. 

106 Y. M. C. A. Building, . . Coburn, Barnum & Benes. 

107 Trinity Congregational Church, . . , . John Horlock Elliott. 
" 108 Catalogue Cover, . . ~. . . Wilbur M. Hall. 
=^=^ "=^ H09 Catalogue Cover, .=-=™r" — , ; ^— , JWillard Hirsh. 



no Rendering from Photograph, 

111 Suggestions for a Den, 

112 Design for a Country Residence, 



Leland Ray Rice. 

Rohrheimer & Bowman. 

Charles S. Schneider. 



COLUMBIA COLLEGE, DEPARTMENT OF ARCHITECTURE: 

113 A Bank Building, Perspective, r — ^~ .- W. C. Ay res. 

114 A Bank Building, Plan, ... . W. C. Ayres. 

115 A Bank Building, Elevation, . . -. -. W. C. Ayres. 



' r ■*• ";- ^I'-vVit^vr; 



'•-'■'3*''' 



COLUMBIA 

116 
117 
118 
119 
120 



COLLEGE, DEPARTMENT OF ARCHITECTURE— Continued. 







121 






122 






123 






124 




■ 


125 






126 






127 






128 






129 






130 


1 




131 






132 


■ J 




133 






134 




- 


135 






136 






137 






138 






139 




' 


140 ' 






141 




* 


142 




* , 


143 
144 



A Public Library, Plan, ^ . . . 

A Public Library, Elevation, . . ; 

A Bank Building, Perspective, 

A Bank Building, Plan, 

A Bank Building, Elevation, 

A Public School, Perspective, \ ^ 

A Public School, Plan, 

A Public School, Elevation, 

A Casino, Plan, . . 

A Casino, Elevation, .... 

A Bank Building, Perspective, 

A Bank Building, Plan, .... 

A Bank Building, Elevation, . 

An Academy of Fine Arts, Plan, 

An Academy of Fine Arts, Elevation, 

A Bank Building, Perspective, 

A Bank Building, Plan, . 

A Bank Building, Elevation, 

A National Conservatory of Music, Plan, 

A National Conservatory of Music, Elevation, 

A Surgical Hospital, Perspective, 

A Surgical Hospital, Elevation, . 

A Surgical Hospital, Elevation, 

A Surgical Hospital, Ground Plan, 

A Surgical Hospital, Second Floor Plan, » — 

A Surgical Hospital, Plan, ... 

Gothic Chirrcli,~""7 ^^T'^'^'T' ." "" . 



S. J. Bloorrlingdale. 

S. J. Bloomingdale. 

. E. K. Bossauge. 

. E. K. Bossauge. 

. E.'K. Bossauge. 

F. L. Comstock. 

F. L. Comstock. 

F. L. Comstock. 

D. W. Chandler. 

D. W. Chanjdler. 

H. G. Emery. 

H. G. Emery. 

H. G. Emery. 

M. J. Fox. 

M. J. Fox. 

W. K. Fellows. 

W. K. Fellows. 

. W. K. Fellows. 

. Richard L. Leo. 

.. Richard L. Leo. 

L. F. Pilcher. 

L. F. Pilcher. 

.^ L. F. Pilcher. 

L. F. Pilcher. 

_ _ L. F. Pilcher; 

L. F. Pilcher^ 
.7 ' R. M. Schell. 



145 



146 

147 
148 



Palazzo del Commune, Piacenza, Italy, . George Oakley Totten, Jr. 
Eglise S. Maria del Miracoii, Elevation, . George Oakley Totten, Jr. 
Eglise S. Maria dei Miracoii, Transverse Section, 

. George Oakley Totten, Jr. 

Eglise S. Maria dei Miracoii, Longitudinal Section, 

George Oakley Totten, Jr. 

Eglise S. Maria dei Miracoii, Plan, . . George Oakley Totten, Jr. 
Eglise S. Maria dei Miracoii, Details, . . George Oakley Totten, Jr. 









' ' >,-'.'>^ 









'l^^■r>■" 



CUI^TIS & COMPANY— Boston. 

. • B(»ston Public Library; McKim, Mead & White, Architects. Photo- 

,,;- graphs by Soderholtz. . . 

n - 149 View from Copley Square. 

150 Detail of Cornice. ' 

151 Set of Printers' Marks, Sculptured on Facade (33). 

"152 Seal of the Library, over Main Entrance, by St. Gaudens. 

153 Detail of Main Entrance. 

154 Detail of Iron Work, Main Entrance. 

155 Main Entrance. 

156 Boylston Street Entrance. 

157 Detail of Iron Work, Boylston Street Entrance. 

158 Main Vestibule. 

159 Entrance Hall. 

160 Detail of Mosaic Ceiling, Entrance Hall. 

161 Another Detail of same. 

162 Interior Court. 

163 Another of same. 

164 Colonnade of Interior Court. 

165 Grand Staircase, from Entrance Hall. 

166 Staircase Hall, from Landing, showing one of the Lions (Louis St. 

Gaudens, Sculptor), and a portion of the Chavannes Decoration. 

167 Staircase Corridor, showing the Decoration of Puvis de Chavannes. 

168 Staircase Corridor, looking toward Venetian Lobby. 

169 Staircase Corridor, looking toward Pompeiian Lobby. 

" i70"The Decoration by Chavannes. ' ^ - 

171 Detail of Italian Gates (Antique), 

n — -^y2 Another of same. ---^:3zz _. : : - 

173 Mantel in Delivery Room. 

i/^ Daieb nan. . 

175 Doorway and Balcony in Bates Hall. 

176 Detail of Ceiling, Bates Hall. ^ 

177 Trustees' Room. 

178 Sir Harry Vane the Younger, by Macmonnies. 
The Decorations by Jno. S. Sargent, Sargent Hall. 
180 Lunette. T 



CURTIS & COMPANY— Boston— Continued. 

181 Arch of Ceiling, right hand portion. 

182 Arch of Ceiling, left hand portion. 

183 Frieze of the Prophets, central portion. 

184 t^rieze of the Prophets, right wing. 

185 Frieze of the Prophets, left wing. 



CHARLES A. DIEMANN— Cedar Rapids, Iowa. 

X, ■ 

186 A Country House, Normandy. _^__ „„^. 

187 A Sketch. - 

DETROIT ARCHITECTURAL CLUB. 

188 Miscellaneous Sketches. 1 

189 Miscellaneous Sketches. ' 

190 Miscellaneous Sketches. [ '^""^ ^'"'^^ Sketches executed by Members 



191 Miscellaneous Sketches. 

192 Miscellaneous Sketches. 



ALBERT KAHN. 

193 House at Laval. 

194 Pencil Sketches. 

195 Pencil Sketches. 

196 Pencil Sketches. 

197 Pencil Sketches. 
— — 198 Pencil Sketches. 

199 Pencil Sketches. 
2G9~ Pencil Sketchesr 



at Club Rooms. 



-«) 



201 Pencil Sketches. --- -~ 

202 Pencil Sketches. , 

203 Pencil Sketches. 

204 Pencil Sketches. ' '" 

DINWIDDIE & NEWBERRY— New York Life Building. 

205 Lincoln's Inn Apartments, Chicago. 

206 Presbyterian Church, Battle Creek, Michigan. 






WILSON EYRE, Jr.— Philadelphia, Pa. 

207 House for Charles Borie, Jr., at Rydal, Pa. 

208 Garden for Beauveau Borie, near Rydai^^p£L 

209 Summer Cottage, Beaver Jail, Rhode Island. 

210 Sketch of Hall. a 

211 Proposed House at Colorado Springs. 

EAMES & YOUNG— St. Louis, Mo. 

212 Sketch for a Residence. 

213 Residence for Ex-Governor D. R. Francis. 

214 Oftice Building. 

ERNEST FLAGG— New York City. 

215 Washington State Qapitol, Perspective. 

216 Washington State Capitol, Plan. 

217 Washington State Capitol, Elevation. 

218 Design for Minnesota State Capitol, Perspective. 

219 Design for Minnesota State Capitol, Elevation. 

220 American University, Grounds and Buildings. 

221 American University, Main Buildings, Plan. 

222 History Building, American University. 

223 History Building, American University. 

224 The Hearst School for Girls, Washington, D. C. Perspective. 

225 The Hearst School for Girls, Plans and Elevations. 

226 Residence for R. Fulton Cutting, Plans. 



227 Residence for R. Fulton Cutting, Section and Elevations 

228 Tomb for Samuel J. Tilden. 






^■i 



K^ 



229 St. Nicholas Skating Rink, New York City, 



FERRY & CLAS— Milwaukee, Wis. 

230 Masonic Temple, Milwaukee. 

231 Madison Library. 
- — 232 Madison Library. 

233 Madison Library. 

234 Milwaukee Library. 






■"i.r^/-'- " 



"«*# 



FEHMER & PAGE— Boston, Mass. 

235 Worthington Building, Boston. 

236 Oliver Ames School. ^ 

237 Terrace Houses. . 

ELMER GREY— Milwaukee, Wis. 

238 Rocher Saint Michel, Le Puy, France. 

239 Grand Staircase, Palace of the Doges, Venice. 

240 Church at Nevers, France. 

241 Church at Sens, France. 

' 242 Church at Vezelay, France. 

243 Amiens Cathedral. 

244 French Market. 

245 Oxford, England. 

246 Court Yard of an Inn at Varzy, France. 

247 Santa Georgia Maggiore, Venice. 

G. L. HARVEY— 115 Monroe Street. 

248 Provident Hospital, Chicago. 

HERBERT EDMUND HEWITT— 5828 Woodlawn Avenue. 

249 Tiles. 

250 Tiles. 

E. A. KENT— Buffalo, N. Y. 

251 Chapin Building. 



i>H.> 



GEO. W. MAHER— 218 LaSalle Street. 

252 A Chicago Residence. 
^iyi A Chicago Residence. 



254 A Chicago Residence. 

255 House at Edge water. 

MASON & RICE— Detroit, Mich. 



256 Photographs of Miscellaneous Buildings. 

257 Photographs of Miscellaneous Buildings. 

258 Design for Pickwick Club, New Orleans, Plan. 



MASON & RICE— Detroit, Mich.— Continued. ^ 

259 Design for Pickwicic Club, New Orleans, Details. 

260 Design for Pickwick Club, New Orleans, Section and Details. 

261 Design for Pickwick Club, New Orleans, Elevation. 

262 Design for Pickwick Club, New Orleans, Elevation. 

W. P. NELSON CO.— 193 Wabash Avenue. 

263 Study of Decoration of G. A.R. Memorial Hall, Chicago Public Library. 

264 Model of Ornament of above, one-half full size. 

265 Interior Decoration. 

266 Interior Decoration. ~> 

267 Interior Decoration. 

268 Interior Decoration. 

H. B. PENNELL— P. D. Club, Boston, Mass. 

269 A Savings Bank, Plan. 

270 A Savings Bank, Perspective. 

J. RUSSELL POPE. 

Roman Prize Drawings. 

271 A Bank for Savings, Plan. 

272 A Bank for Savings, Elevation. 

273 A Bank for Savings, Perspective. 

PATTON & FISHER— 115 Monroe Street. ' 

i 

274 , Library at Northtleld, Minn. . 

— 27^'AlJni versify Building. ] " 



7 



POND & POND— Venetian Building. 

276 Buildings at " Hull House." - 

277 Hall Fire-place in a Residence. 



P. D. CLUB— Boston, Mass. 

278 Design for a Custom House, Section. 

279 Design for a Custom House, Elevation. 

280 Design for a Custom House, Detail. 



. •"^- V^'' '"J 



.i 



CHRIST! A M. READE-211 Wabash Avenue. 

281 Memorial Window. 

282 Marble Mosaic. 

283 Marble Mosaic. 

284 Sketches from Cluny Museum, Paris. 

T. HENRY RANDALL-New York City. 

285 A Court House, Plan. 

286 A Court House, Elevation. 

287 A Court House, Section. 

288 A Court House, Perspective. 

R. E. RASEMAN— Detroit, Michigan. 

289 Church at Ann Arbor, Michigan. 

JOHN SCOTT & COMPANY-Detroit. Michigan. 

290 Public Library. 

291 Residence. 

WALTER SCHUMM-371 Centre Street. 

292 Prato Cathedral 

293 A Berlin Portal. 

294 Friederich Werder-shes Gymnasium. 
J. A. SCHWEINFURTH-Boston. 

295 House in New York City. 

296 Hancock Memorial. ^' ~ 

297 Public Library, Rentham, Massachusetts. 

298 Design for a Club House. 

299 School at Auburn, New York. 

300 Designs for Rnnlr pz-wwowo ' .___. 

^^* ^^sign for Minnesota State Capitol. 

^^- 302 Residence^on Commonwealth AvenueT" 

303 Public Library, Champaign, Illinois. 

ARTHUR A. STOUGHTON-New York City. 

304 St. Germain I'Auxerrois, Paris 

305 A Metal Spire. 



Edward G. Garden. 

Edward G. Garden. 

A. Guissart. 

A. Guissart. 

Ernest Klipstein. 

Ernest Klipstein. 



ST. LOUIS ARCHITECTURAL CLUB. 

306 A Museum of Fine Arts, Plan, 

307 A Museum of Fine Arts, Elevation, 

308 A Bank for Savin^^s, . . • 

309 A Hotel de Ville, . • • • • 

310 Hotel de Ville, Beaugency, France, . • 

311 A Detail from San Miniato, . • 
STRATTON & BALDWIN— Detroit, Mich. 

312 Church, Birmin^'ham, Mich. 
ANNA SEIDENBERG— Auditorium Tower. 

313 Portrait on Glass. 

314 Miniature, " Resurrection of Christ." 

TIFFANY GLASS & DECORATING CO.-New York City. 

315 Stained Glass Window. 

316 Design for Stained Glass Window. 

317 Design for Decoration, G. A.|. Memorial Hall, Chicago Public Library. 

318 Design for Decoration, G. A. R. Memorial Hall, Chicago Public Library. 

319 Ceiling of same. 

320 Assembly Hall, G. A. R. Memorial Hall, Chicago Public Library. 

321 Decorative Panel, (Model). 

322 Decorative Panel, (Model). 

323 Scale Model of Memorial Hall, Chicago Public Library. 



THE T SQUARE CLUB-Philadelphia, Pa. 

324 Summer Sketches, ._ .. • 

325 Summer Sketches, . • • 

326 Salisbury Cathedral, . -^^ ^ 
327 A Colonial House^ . • j -_ 

328 An Inglenook . . • 

329 A Composition, . • • • 

330 Sketches in Spain, . . • 

331 A Private Theatre, Plan, 

332 A Private Theatre, Elevation, 

333 A Private Theatre, Section, 



J. J. Bissengger. 

J. J. Bissengger. 
-. - J. J. Bissengger. 

J. J. Bissengger. 

^7^^^=^ D. K. Boyd. 

D. K. Boyd. 

Walter Cope. 

Maurice M. Feustmann. 

Maurice M. Feustmann. 

Maurice M. Feustmann. 



;■■((!<> n;: "<'";r' J;i;*^5^'yw^; 



"*T 



THE T SQUARE CLUB— Philadelphia— Continued.- 

334 Arnold Mansion, Fairmount Park, Philadelphia, 
33 S A Colonial House, 

336 Canterbury, England, 

337 Cathedral, Chartres, 

338 Cathedral, Bayeux, 

339 Amalfi, Italy, . . 
-340 Decoration from St. Mark's, Venice, 

341 A Choragic Monument, , ., 

342 A Private Chapel, . 

343 A Theatre for Cantatas, Plan, . 

344 A Theatre for Cantatas, Elevation, 

345 A Theatre for Cantatas, Section and Detail, 

346 Sea Wall, Stairway and Landing, 

347 Interior, Burgos Cathedral, 

348 Design for Book Cover, 

349 Bell Cote, .... 

350 Palatial House and Gardens, Plan, 
.351 Palatial House and Gardens, Elevation, 

352 Palatial Hoqse and Gardens, Section, 

353 Block Plan of Gardens, 

354 A Pedestal, 

355 A Colonial House, Elevation, 

356 A Colonial House, Elevation, 

357 An Inglenook, 

358 Entrance to a Private Estate, . ' 

359 Design for a Book Cover, 
-360 A Country House, -- . _r 

UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA SCHOOL OF 

361 A Savings Bank, Elevation. Prize Design,- 

362 A Siivings Bank, Plan, 

363 A Persian. Rug, .... 

364 A Conservatory of Music, Plan, 

365 A Conservatory of Music, Elevation, 

366 A Restaurant in a Public Park, Plan, 



F. A. Hays 

W. C. Hayes. 

J. P. Jamieson. 

J. P. Jamieson. 

J. P. Jamieson. 

J. P. Jamieson. 

J. P. Jamieson. 

Albert Kelsey. 

Albert Kelsey. 

Albert Kelsey. 

Albert Kelsey. 

Albert Kelsey. 

C. Z. Klander. 

C. Z. Klander. 

A. B. Lacey. 

A. C. Munoz. 

A. C. Munoz. 

A. C. Munoz. 

A. C. Munoz. 

A. C. Muno2. 

C. O. Provost. 

Edgar V. Seeler. 

Edgar V. Seeler. 

Lloyd Titus. 

Lloyd Titus. 

A. P. Valentine. 

A. P. Valentine. 



ARCHITECTURE. 



^ercy Ash. 



Percy Ash. 

Courtney M. Baker. 

Geo. C. Baum. 

Geo. C. Baum. 

Geo. C. Baum. 



:\ 



UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA SCHOOL OF ARCHI 
_ j67 „ A Restaurant in a Public Park, Elevation, ■ 

368 A Suburban School House, Plan, 

369 A Suburban School House, Elevation, 

370 A Mausoleum, Plan, . . 

371 A Mausoleum, Elevation, . - 

372 Carved and Painted Chest, 

373 A Court House, Plan, 
L_ 374 A Court House, Elevation, . 

375 A Court House, Perspective, 

376 A Frontispiece in the Ionic Order, 

377 A Savings Bank, Plan, 

378 A Savings Bank, Elevation, 

379 A Monumental Staircase, Plans, . 

380 A Monumental Staircase, Elevati(»n, 

381 Pompeiian Mosaic, 

382 A Restaurant in a Public Park, Plan, 

383 A Restaurant in a Public Park, Elevation, 

384 A Private Bath-House, Plan, 

385 A Private Bath-House, Elevation, 

386 A Court Yard, Plan, ..... 

387 A Court Yard, Elevation, 

388 Tapestry Motif, . . . 

389 A Grotto in the Doric Order, 

390 A Sm^ll Public Library, Plan, 

391 A Small Public Library, Elevation, 

392 An. Angle of an Office Building, Plan, 

393 An Angle of an Office Building, Elevation, 

394 Renaissance Pilaster, 
395 Moorish Decoration, . . 

396 A Casino, Plan, 



1397" A Casino, Elevatiorr, : ^ 

398 A Greek Ionic Doorway, 

399 A Monumental Staircase, Plan, 

400 A Monumental Staircase, Elevation, 

401 A Casino, Plan, . . 



FECTURE -Continued. 

r' Geo. C. Baum. 
Francis M. Bancroft. 
Francis M. Bancroft. 
Francis M. Bancroft. 
Francis M. Bancroft. 
W. D. Brinkle. 
Arthur H. Brockie. 
Arthur H. Brockie. 
Arthur H. Brockie. 
Arthur S. Brooke. 
H. L. Duhring, Jr. 
H. L. Duhring, Jr. 
H. L. Duhring, Jr. 
H. L. Duhring, Jr. 
H. L. Duhring, Jr. 
Alfred M. Githens. 
Alfred M. Githens. 
Alfred M. Githens. 
Alfred M. Githens. 
Alfred M. Githens. 
Alfred M. Githens. 
J. L. Heacock. 
J. Edgar Hill. 
J.Edgar Hill. 
J. Edgar Hill. 
Oscar M. Hokans(jn. 
Oscar M. Hokanson. 
Oscar M. Hokanson. 
Oscar M. Hokanson. 
Wm. A. Klemann. 



Wm. A. Klemann. 
Emil H. Niemann. 

Emile G. Perrot. 

Emile G. Perrot. 

Emile G. Perrot. 



.<:;-■■! '.'.'V 



' ' ''''/'fv-'^Sir ''';'^'rv''l;;':'FSi?'" 



UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE-Continued. 



402 A Casino, Elevation, 

403 A Restaurant in a Public Park, Plan, 

404 A Restaurant in a Public Park, Elevation, 

405 Pompeiian Wall, 

406 Byzantine Mosaic, 

407 An Assyrian Panel, 

408 A Theatre, Plans, 

409 A Theatre, Elevation, 

410 Interior Decoration, 

411 A Museum and Library Group, Plan, 

412 A Museum and Library Group, Elevation, 
413-419 Decorative Designs not signed. 

CHARLES F. VARNEY -St. Louis, Missouri. 

420 Residence. 

421 Residence. 

422 Residence. 

423 Residence. ' 

424 Sketch in St. Louis. 

425 Sketch in St. Louis. 

ELIHU VEDDER— Rome, Italy. 

Decorative Pane]s, Conjrressional Library, Washinj^ton, D. C. 
. 426 Corrupt Legislation. 

427 Government. 

428 Anarchy. 

„ .: 429 Good Administration. 

430 Peace and Prosperity.' 

PETER B. WIGHT-225 Dearborn Street. 



Emile G. Perrot. 

. Arthur M.Shrigley. 

. Arthur M. Shrigley. 

Eleanor P. Stewardson. 

W. A. Stewart. 

H! A. Stone. 

Howard A. Stout. 

Howard A. Stout. 

Howard A. Stout. 

. Charles A. Zeigler. 

Charles A. Zeigler. 



^ 



^t5t A Savings Bank. 

432 A Library Building in a Park. 



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A, H, ABBOTT & CO, Chicago 



,>'^-» -i« t .>r*4 5.K ,3l^ {,/! < 



50 MADISON STREET 




TRACING CLOTH, 
BLUE AND BLACK 
PRINT PAPERS 
DRAWING PAPERS 
DRAWING BOARDS 
and TABLES 



Importers and Manufacturers of 

Drawings Materials for Architects 
Engineers and Draftsmen 



SURVEYING and 

MATHEMATICAL 

INSTRUMENTS. 

TAPES, SCALES, 

TRIANGLES, 

T SQUARES, Etc. 



Special inducements to Drawing Classes in G>lleges 




DEXTER 
BROTHERS^ 






English 
Shingle 
Stains 



will produce the Moss 
Greens, Wood Browns, 
and Dull Reds. Send 
for sample boards and 
Residence in Chicago Geo. W. Mahe.r, Architect sketches 

DhX 1 cR dKO 1 HhRS 55 and 57 broad street, BOSTON 

SOLE MANUFACTURERS . . - .. 



H. M. Hooker & Co. 57 w. Randolph st. 

Carry a full stock in Chicago 






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AGENTS FOR 

H3^draulic-Press Brick Co. 
St. Louis, Mo. 

Illinois Hydraulic-Press 
Brick Co. Collinsville, 111. 

Findlay Hydraulic-Press 
Brick Co. Findlay, Ohio. 

Akron Hydraulic-Press 
Brick Co. Cleveland, O. 

New York Hydraulic-Press 
Brick Co. Rochester, N. V. 

Eastern Hydraulic-Press 
Brick Co. Philadelphia, Pa. 

Washington Hydraulic-Press 
Brick Co. Washington, D.C. 

Northern Hydraulic-Press 
Brick Co. Minneapolis,Minn. 

Omaha Hydraulic-Press Brick 
Co. Omaha, Neb. 

Kansas City Hydraulic-Press 
Brick Co. Kansas City, Mo. 



I 



I 



E. C. STERLING, Pres't 

H. W. ELIOT, Sec'y and Treas ) 



f-ST. LOUIS 



! S. S. KIMBELL, Vice Pres't & Goal Mgr.. ) 

I E.C. KIMBELL. Ass't Secy, V CHICAGO 



I W. K MILLARD, Ass't Treas.. 

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Hydraulic- Press 
Brick Co. 



MANUFACTURERS AND DEALERS IN 

HYDRAULIC-PRESSED, MOULDED AND 
INDLVNA RED COMMON 



BRICII 



OFnCE AND EXHIBIT ROOMS: 



301-304 



CHAMBER OF COMMERCE BLDG. 

COR. LASAUUE AND WASHINGTON STS. 

CHICAGO 



Works: Porter^ Indiana* 



TELEPHONES : 



Office 



\ Express 105 
I Express ic6 



Storehouses 



C 18th and La Salle Sts., . . . South 753 
J Flournoy and Rockwell Sts., West 56; 
j Herndon St. & Clybourn Ave., North %9 
(. 40th St. and Wentworth Ave.. Yards 637 



AGENTS FOR 

St. Louis Enameled Brick 

English Enameled Briclc 

Bushnel! Buff Brick 

Milwaukee Brick 

Racine Brick 

Ricketson's Milwaukee 
Mortar Colors 

Salt-Glazed Wall Coping 

Hansen's Patent Chimney 
Tops 

Terra Cotta Flue Lining 




1 



THE WINSLOW BROS, CO. 

ORNAMENTAL I RON 



BOWER 

BSRrr 

HOTinCRED 

LCAr \vo\m 

BRONZE 

TELEPHONE 
WEST 557 

racroRY 



MOOMOOO 



CHiaco 



ooootoooo 




DUPLIN 
BRONZE 

(lALV/lNO 
PlJ^.sriC 

BRA5.S 

TFLRPHONF 
>\?<m A I 

orncc 



Geo. B. Engle, Jr & Co. 



PRESSED AND 
ENAMELED 
BRICK- 



VITRIFIED ROOFING TILE 



Suite lO^l Marquette Building, 204 Dearborn St. 



Telephone Main 4669 CHICAGO 



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The [1orthue5TerhT[RRa-G3ttaCq, 



AAliUFACTURE'RS OF 



ARCH ITCCTURAL TCRRA-COTTA 
TROA ^FCCIAL Dn51GN5 



VORKS, 

COR clybouru and 

WRIGHTU'OOD AVE 



OFFICE. 

COR CLYBOURN AND 
WRIGHTV/OOD AVE. 



BRA\HCH OFFICE. 

ROOA MO. 1118 ROOKfiRY BUILDIMG CORNCR 
LA SALLE AND AD/VTVS ST. 



CHICAGO. 



ILLINOIS. 



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Mackolite Fire-Proofing Co* 

Office: i3o3 Schiller Building, Chicago 

TELEPHONE MAIN 4142 

M..„P.cT„R«s LIGHT FIRE-PROOFING 

XND CONTRACTORS OF MATERIAL . . . . 



GYPSUM QUARRY, Grand Rapids, Mich. FACTORY, Chicago Heights, III. 

Hollow Tile for Partitions, Furring Tile, Column and Beam Covering 
Fire-Proof Plaster Boards for Iron and Wood Construction 
Plaster Boards are the best Non-Conductors of heat and sound 

SOME OF THE PROMINENT CHICAGO BUILDINGS MACKOLITE FIRE-PROOFING HAS BEEN 

EMPLOYED IN 

Monadnock Building Young Women's Christian Manhattan Building 

SchillerTheatreand Office Bid. Association Building Pontiac Building 

Champlain Building McVicker's Theatre Venetian Building 

Criminal Court Building Boyce Building Plaza Apartment Building 

Marquette Building Ludington Buuding Chicago City Schools. 



EDW. C. SMITH WM. M. WEBSTEff 



SMITH & WEBSTER 

^^-- - Manufacturers of -^ . 



Plumbing Goods of every Description 



^ 



CCNCRAL OFFICE AND WORKS 

15-21 NORTH CLINTON STREET 



CHICAGO 

SHOWROOMS ^rf* **x.*» ».v.i ^^ 

UNITY BUILDING, 77 DEARBORN STREET 




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Pencil Sketch. 
St. Lazarre, Avallon. 



Albert Kahn. 



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Charles T. Harris & Co. 



Manufacturers and Dealers 



TERRACOTTA 
ROOFING TILES 
PRESSED BRICK 
ENAflELED BRICK 



Suite I00I-I002 Marquette Building 
ao4 DEARBORN STREET 



CHICAGO. 



Chicago Ornamental Iron Co. 

manufactures 

ornamental iron and bronze work 

for buildings, including 

elevator cabs and enclosures, 

stairways, 
— railings, grilles, leaf work, etc. 7- 

OF ANY DESIRED FINISH. 



ALSO MAKC A SPECIALTY OF SOLID BRONZE WORK, SUCH AS 
STORE FRONTS, TABLETS, STATUES, ETC. 

OFFICE AND WORKS: 

2607 TO 2627 SOUTH HALSTED ST., CHICAGO. 



A. Vanderkloot, Prest. H. C. Trost, Vice-Prest. A. E. Coleman, Secy, and Treas. 



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L. WOLFF MANUFACTURING CO, 

PLUMBING GOODS 




The "Neptuna" Under-Roll Rim Bath 



General Offices: 93 W. Lake St. p U I P A (^ O 
Show Rooms: 91 Dearborn St. ^1 IIV^/AVJ^^ 



Branches i Denver 

' Minneapolis 



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The OrioiMlaiid Standard SMngle Stains. SofnUcl- 
vety and Dnrai^lc in Colon tbcy are Easy to Jlppiy and 
6row Old 6racefnily, iPitbont eiMlMng, Blackening or 
Peelind* - 

Sabers SbeatMiM and Deafening ''Qnilt" 

Jl Soft, Imilient CnsMon of Dead- Jlir Spaces, eqnal 
to Cbree cavers of tbe Best Telts. « « Sonnd-proof, 
l)eat-proot non-inflanittaMe and non-decaying. 

full inf omatiOM upon applicatioiu $aM«el €al>ot» Sole maiittf acturer 
1201 OwiNgs BniMliig, GMcago, Til. Bostoa, mass. 



Pioneer Fireproof 

Construction Co 

i?4? South Clark Street, Chicago 



HOLLOW TILE A«D 

MANUFACTUKEKS AND Fi /^ Pi /^ I TO 

CONTRACTORS FOR I LyiVvJUo 

~ ~ ~"TE RRA corf A 



MANUFACTURERS AND 
CONTRACTORS FOR 
EVERY DESCRIPTION OF 



FOR FIREPROOFING BUILDINGS. 



Contracts taken in all parts of the United States. Send for Illustrated 

, Catalogue and Price List. 



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MARBLE 



GLASS 

AND CCRA/niC 

MOSAICS 



FRANK L DAVIS 



302 Michigan Avenue, 



CHICAGO. ILL, 



Evans iVlarble Q^o. 



Importers, 
Producers, 
Manufacturers and 
Wholesale Dealers. 



Italian and Tennessee Marbles ^r.r,;l^:rrV.;. 



For Building: Interiors, 



Mantels and 
Monumental Stock. 



^02 MICHIGAN AVENUE, 



TELEPHONE 
HARRISON 553 



Chicago, 111. 



l^^;■. ■-;■:,.:£. 



■"% 



LiiBJiluyj^iliijil^i 



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American 
Terra Cotta 
AND Ceramic 

Co. 



ARCHITECTURAL 

TERRA COTTA 



Factories : TERRA COTTA, ILL. 
Office: 1043 MARQUETTE BUILDING, CHICAGO. 



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MAKERS OF 

STRUCTURAL AND ORNAMENTAL IRON WORK FOR 
ARCHITECTURAL PURPOSES. 



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Phatoi^raph. 



ft 

Mc Kim, Mead &<> White, Architects. 
Staircase Eiitratice Hall, Bostojt Public Library. 



STAMSEN & BLOMf 



ESTABLISHED 1866 



HIGH-GRADE 



CONCPCTE 
ASPHALT 

WOPK 



...IN ALL THE 
BRANCHES THEREOF 



MILLIONS OF FEETINUSE 



Telephone Main 2403 



Room 2, Metropolitan Block 
CHICAGO 



MUELLER BROTHERS 

Manufacturers of ... _^ 

ARTISTIC ^^^^^ 

PICTURE SILVER and 

FRAMES -™— ^ 

ARCHITECTURAL DRAWINGS MOUNTED 

A SPECIALITY 
PRICES MODERATE GIVE US A TRIAL 

134- J 40 Wabash Avenue 

TAKE ELEVATOR 

Telephone Main 1960 CHICAGO 




REEDY ELEVATORS 

FOR . 

PASSENGER AND FREIGHT SERVICE 

ELECTRIC 
__ STEAM AND HYDRAULIC 
" : POWER 



The J. W. Reedy Elevator Mfg. Co. 

- — 83 TO 91 Illinois Street 

CHICAGO 




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W.R NELSON COT 

INTERIOR DECORATORS 
^ ^ HIGH-CLASS ^ ^ 

FRESCO PAINTING 

FROM ORIGINAL DESIGNS.?* 
FINE PAPER HANGINGS 

and Decorative Materials* Paint- 
ing and Wood-finishing; in all 
branches thereof* 

193 

WABASH AVENUE 
CHICAGO 

TELEPHONE MAIN 27J6 




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Profit Elevation. Geo. O. Totten, yr. 

Church S. Maria dei Miracoli. 



Joseph Dux 

ARCHITECTURAL WOOD CARVING 

MODELING 
- AND DESIGNING 



Telephone Main 2545. 



ORNAMENTAL PATTERNS 
FOR ALL KINDS OF METAL CASTINGS 



278 and 280 East Madison Street. 

Near Bridge 

CHICAGO. 




J. J. WADE k SON. 

PLUA\I^I:P5««" 
DP«IM COK'TIMCrOllS 



MANUFACTURERS OF 
AND DEALERS IN 



^; The "Wade Accessible Flushing Clean-out 
Sewer Fittings and Back Water 
Gate Appliances. 

CHEMICAL LEAD BURNING. 

TEL. MAIN 2998. 

Accessible FLUsHiNG-Ciean-out Straight Fit- 276 DEARBORN STREET. CHICAGO, 
ting with and without Back Water Gate. the mon adijock. 



Studebaker Bldg. 
Venetian Bldg. 
Champlain Bldg 
Equitable Bldg. 
Kent Bldg. . 



CONTRACTORS FOR 

10 stories. Atwood Bldg. . 13 stories. 

13 stories. Dexter Bldg. . 8 stories. 

14 stories. N. V. Life Bldg. 12 stories. 
8 stories. Kedzie Bldg. . 9 stories. 
8 stories. Adams Ex. Bldg. 11 stories. 



Old Colony Bldg. 
Lees Bldg. . 
Reliance Bldg. . 
State Safety Bldg. 
Newberry Library 



17 stories 

12 stories 

14 stories 

8 stories 

5 stories 



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JAMES R. MILLS, Manager Chicago Office. 



^^fliaq cmx ^jladicduiyt (Som poiw. 



NEW YORK OFFICE 

89 AND 91 CENTRt ST. 



BUFFALO, N. Y. 



CHICAGO OFFICE 

93 Lake Street 



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Elevation, 



A Hotel de Ville. 



A. Guissart. 



The Yale Locks vSri/ 

Builders^ Hardware 

ArtMetalWork 



The Yale & Towne Mfg» G)/ 

Western Office: J52-J54 Wabash Avenue • • . . CHICAGO 



CHICAGO 



j DYNAHO.S, 



I 



AND I 

OF ALL KIND5. * 




OFFICES AND SALESROOM 
139 ADAMS ST. 
CHICAGO - '- 



EDISON 



Electric Light and Power 

Construction Work. 
Complete Lighting and f 




'-" COMPANY 



Wiring of Fine Residences | 
Particularly Solicited | 

' " ' M I II " III III I 



■■■ ^,i^ 




Eievatioti. 



Design for a Memorial Monunmit. 



Victor Traxler. 



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Wc were the ORIGINATORS of all the above work and CLAIM to 
have done MORE for the ADVANCEMENT of ART in BUILDERS' 
HARDWARE than any other concern in this country^ 



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p. & F. CORBIN 





MAKERS OF 




FINE LOCKS A.0 


ARTISTIC 


BUILDERS' HARDWARE 




CHICAGO 


♦ 


104-106 LAXE STREET 

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WAREHOUSES: 


WORKS: 


NEW YORK: 24-26 MURRAY STREET 


NEW BRITAIN, CONN. 


PHILADELPHIA: 925 MARKET STREET 



A. LANQUIST 




MASONand 

GENERAL 

CONTRACTOR 



OFFICE, 85 WASHINGTON STREET 

ROOMS 3 AND 4 1 



Office Hours, 12 TO 2 P. M. V5rllL>ALjU 

Telephone No. 730 Main 



......s 




Charles Z. Klander. 
hiterior of Burgos Cathedral. 



'i^\.'-hi^...-..-'!i'\^-i>hk-lLi!^^^«i 




MAIN OFFICE. CHICAGO, ERECTED 1895. 



CHICAGO VARNISH CO. 



MANUFACTURERS OF 



HIGHEST GRADES OF 



ARCHITCCTUI^L HNISHCS 



CHICAGO. NEW YORK. 



BOSTON. 



■■■'■■: ',,f^';^^:'^i0 




IVater Color. 



Sketch, Oxford, Eng. 



Ebncr Grey. 



KNISELY & YELDHAM CO. 



SLATE, 
TIN, IRON 
AND TILE 



ROOFERS 



Manufacturers of 
Galvanized Iron and Copper 
Cornices, Bays, Skylights, Etc. 



KNISELY building 



Telephone Main 2749 



68-74 W. Monroe Street^ Chicago. 



We Claim 




ELECTRIC ELEVATOR 

Greatest Simplicity. 

Greatest Durability. 

Greatest Economy of Power. 

Highest Efficiency. 

Smoothest Kunning. 

Smoothest Starting anrl Stopping. 



EatOD&Pitnce 



Manufacturers of Electric, 
Steam, Hydraulic, Belt- 
power and Hand 

passenger and freight 

ELEVATORS 



70 TO 76 

MI CHI (JAN STKKKT 

CHICACJO 



Easiest Handling. 

Least Care and Attention. 

Least Liability to getting ont of 

Order. 
Least Skill required to keep in order. 
Least Number of Farts. 




Water Color. 



Church at Sens, France. 



Elmer Grey. 



V 



ESTABLllSHED 1855. 



James 



Telephone Main 2364. 



illan & Co* 



BOILER SETTERS, FURNACE BUILDERS, 

SMOKELESS FURNACE AND FUEL SAVER 



2i South Canal Street^ 



CHICAGO, ILL. 




Chicago, Dec. 14th, 1805. 
Gentlemen: We are very pleased to inform 
you that your Smokeless Furnace has been 
severely tested by us, and that we pronounce 
it a perfect success, and heartily recommend 
it to all. We remain 

Very Respectfully, 

DAVID BERG & CO. 



Chicago, Dec. 12th, 1895. 
Gentlemen: We have used your furnace 
with the utmost satisfaction, having tried 
thirteen other devices for the prevention of 
smoke, without any satisfactory result, and 
cheerfully recommend yours as represented. 
Yours Respectfully. 

E.JENNINGS & CO. 



Chicago, March 14th, 1S96. 
Gentlemen: After having used your Smokeless Fiirnace for over 
three (^3) months on one of my Steam Boilers at 153 and i-^ West 
Washington Street, I find that it not only prevents smoke, biit also 
shows a good saving of fuel. Yours Respectful! v, 

J. BEIDLER. 
J. R. ANDERSON, Manager. 



REFERENCES: 



Maypole Bros.. 6 Boilers. Canal Pumping Station. 

H. H. Blake. Ewart Building. 

"Times-Herald.^' 







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TIFFANY CLASS A5 DECORATING COMPANY 



FVRNISHERS \5 CLASS WORKERSDOMESTICVJ ECCLESIASTICAL 
DECORATIONS i?KS MEMORIALS 




333 TO 341 FOVRTH AVENVE NEVMDRK 



IN cities where a smoky atnu)sphere prevails the year 
round, and where the collection of soot and dirt 
soon dims all exposed surfaces, it becomes an 
absolute necessity to use some manner of decorations 
which maybe of such character that occasional cleaninii 
will renew all its oritjinal color and beauty. Glass 
Mosaic fills this exact condition, and furthermore, i^jives 
the most exquisite decorative effects. That it is durable 
and lasting is shown conclusively by the exquisite 
examples, still in perfect condition, which date back to 
the sixth century. In these the colors are as bright as 
when first made, and there never has been a time during 
their existence when a simple cleansing would not restore 
them to their original condition. The Tifiany Glass 
and Decorating Company have revived and developed 
glass mosaic decoration, until to-day they rival in color 
and workmanship many of the finest specimens of the 
past. In the Marquette Building, Chicago, is an excellent 
example of their use of Glass Mosaics. It is made the 
decorative feature of the main entrance hallway, and is 
most brilliant in its coloring. In the recent contracts 
which this firm have taken for the interior work of the 
Chicago Public Library, Glass Mosaic will again be the 
principal decorative feature. In the Alexander Com- 
mencement Hall at Princeton, and St. Agnes' Church, 
New York, it also enters very largely into the decorative 
conditions. The Tiffany Glass and Decorating Company 
strongly advise its use, particularly where through 
atmospheric conditions exposed surfaces are quickly 
soiled and dimmed. Designs and estimates for large 
public buildings will be furnished upon application. 



GLASS 
MOSAIC 



PERMANENT 
DECORATIONS 



SIXTH 
CENTURY 



MARQUETTE 
BUILDING 



CHICAGO 
PUBLIC LIBRARY 







05 



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^^HE D. M. QUAY CO. , 

Plumbing, Steam Heating and Ventilating 

Contractors and Engineers 

Large Contracts a Specialty 

CHICAGO 



MONADNOCK BLOCK 



SOME OF OUR REFERENCES 



PL.UMB1N0 

BUILDINGS 

The Monadnock 

Ashland Block 

Chicago Athletic Association 

Marquette Building .... 

Union Trust, St. Louis .... 

New Vork Life, Kansas City 

D. S. Morgan, Memorial, Buffalo 

Cosmopolitan Hotel, New Orleans 

Fisher Building. Chicago 

Park Building, Pittsburgh . . 

Ellicott Square Building, Buffalo . 

Mass. State Mutual Life Assurance Buildmg. 

Worcester 

Chicago Art Institute .... 



PLUMBING AND STEAM HEATING 

Ohio Building, Cleveland, Ohio 
Tax Abstract Building. Chicago . . 
Chemical Building', St. Louis 

STEAM HEATING 

Marshall Fields Retail Store 

Chicago Beach Hotel 

Steinway Hall, Chicago .... 

Lincoln Building 

Tudor Apartment, Chicago 

Reaper Block, Chicago 

Chicago Public Library .... 
McCormick Mem. Library. Chicago 
Lindell Building, St. Louis 



Hansell-Elcock Foundry Co 

architectural 
ironwork 



AIX"HI:P mTMUE, 'l"WI:M'l"Y- rHIPI) PUCI:, 
RIITLER AMI) rWlzNTY-rOUPTH .STI?r:l:i;s. 



I aix'.E srocw or- -s tccl \^a^^\^ and ch/^nmiils m.\vi\\s 

ON HAND. 




/'. D. Club. 



<f 



Piatt. 
Savings Bank. 



H. §. PetmelL 



.._^=r=;i-;. 




Chicago Interior 
Decorating Co* 

Designers and 
Makers of 

Ceramic 
mosaics 



MANTELS, TILES and 
FIRE-PLACE FURNISHINGS 



FACTORY AND salesroom: 149-150 Michigan Ave. CHICAGO 



J. SCHARMER 




i CARPENTER 



AND 




CONTRACTOR 




520 THE ROOKERY, CHICAGO, ILL. 




Side Elevation. 




Colonial House 



Front Elevation. 



J. J. Bisseiigger, 








jf ARTISTIC HOMC-3 

yAPAFT/iCy^T 5uilD;N(55 
^ PVBLIC BVILDINC^^ 



yi^yhpo. 




HOW DO YOU PUMP 



the water to the upper Hoors of your 
flat where the city pressure will not 
deliver it? 

The Rider or Ericsson Hot-Air 
Pump solves this problem and will pump 
the water at less expense in fuel than any 
pump in the world. 

fup:l: gas, coal or oil. 

Is a record of 20 years a suflicient 
guarantee? 

The leading Architects of the United 
States indorse them. 

For country work more reliable than 
Windmills. • . 

RIDER ENGINE CO. 



NEW YORK, 

37 Dey Street. 



S6 Lake Street, 

CHICAGO. 



THE RIDER. 




/ 



Ferry &^ Clas, Architects. 
Masonic Temple, Milwaukee, Wis. 



Established i8-^. 



CRANE 

Elevator Company, 

CHICAGO. 



Hydraulic, Steam and Electric Elevators 

FOR PASSENGER and FREIGHT 
SERVICE. 



World's Columbian Exposition, 
Nine First Awards. 



GENERAL OFFICES AND WORKS, 
219 S. JEKRERSON STREET. 




« 






^ ^^l l|.ll1 utt U HJim ' u Lif j iffF-'a; rrm-j? » - . r . '' .' i!irT £:.! F^''-'! -iJ^- 



A 




y ■ - - 

PcyiaV Sketch, Salisbury, Eng, • J, 7 Bissengger. 



Ludowici Roofing Tile Comp'y 



• • • 



Manufacturers 



CHICAGO 





Showing Side Lock. 




Orooved Tile, 9x16 inches. 



Cross Section. 




Showing^ Cros5 Lock. 





k* 

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^ 

^ 

► 'iU 






Si 






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^ 






I 



^T-Gei^ain C-AyxEi\5\oi5 » Pair ^s 




Foreign Sketch. Arthur A. Stoiighton. 

St. Germain r Auxerrois, Paris. 




^ 



■^ 




Press of Rogers $ Ulells 
Chicago. 






„ Mj* ,.■-,; .%« *,4»«[.t^ '■■* _. ** -i*^,'*'!''- 









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_ ^, :V _^ ^ V.,; ■ : _^^ ^■***,- 



fley e n berg P'**^ P''Qo^'"g Co» 

MANUFACTURERS OF THB . 

Meyenberg Patent Fire Proofing Floor ArcheSy Parti' 
tionsy Furring, Boiler Cover s. Column Covers, and 
other Fire Proof Tile work for Building 

NQT£— Our Tiling is 50 per ceot lighter, douMethe strength, and cheaper, than all other manufactures. 

TELEPHONE MAIN 3035 

Main Office, 705, 167 Dearborn St. . . - CHICAGO 

The following are some of the buildlng^s erected the past eighteen 
months in which the Meyenberg Fire Proof Partitions, Floor 
Arches and materials generally have been used: 

Tlic County Cottrt House. Monmouth, 111. Hubinjjer Office Building, New Haven, Conn. 

Henry Stores and A])art. Hldif., Rockford, 111. Schouton Building, Keokuk, Iowa. 

High School Building. .Monticello, Ind. New Klysiuni Theatre, Memphis, Tenn. 

Swanell A])arlment ISldg., Kankakee, 111. Asylum for the Blind, Jane.sville. Wis. 

I)n Page Co. Court House, W'heaton, 111. Woodstrom Apartment Building, Chicago. 

I'irst New Cumberland I'res. Church, Chicago. Wallers Industrial Building. Chicago. 

I'ratl Store Building Chicago. Bismarck School Building, Chicago. 

'I'he I'orrestx ille. Cliioago. Hope Avenue School Building, Chicago. 

<".reeM Schoal Building, Chicago. New Newherry School Building, Chicago. 

Duncan School Building, Chicag >. Armitage School Building, Chicago. 

I.eavitt School Building. Chicago. Healy School Building. Chicago. 

Wallace School Buildinvr, Chicag ). May Schol Building, Chicago. 

New Wentworth School Building, Chicago. McCormick's New Residence, Chicago. 

.\shton .-Xparlmeut liuilding, Chicago. Dunn Building, Chicago. 

Rogers IJuilding. Chicago. Season's Building Chicago. 

Illinois Steel Co. 's Hosi)ital, Chicago. C.rant Orr Apartment Building, Chicago. 



Expanded Metal 860 



Old Colony Building 



ire-Proofing Co. ^^^«^ 



Fire Proof Floors 
Roofs and Sidewalk 
Solid Partitions 



Metal Furrin<T^ and Lathincr for all kinds of Ornamental Plastering. 






.i^'y:^-j,i.ii^fiiA:"''' ■' 



AGENTS FOR 

HydrauHc-Press Brick 60. — _ 

8t. Louis, Mo. 
Illinois Hydraulic-Press Brick 

60., ColHnsvilie, III. 
Findlay Hydraulic- Press Brick 

Co.. Findlay, Ohio 
Akron Hydraulic-Press Brick Co. 

Gleveland, Ohio 
New York Hydraulic-Press Brick 

Co,, Rochester, N. Y. 
Eastern Hydraulic -Press Brick 

60., Philadelphia, Pa. 
Washington Hydraulic-Press 

Brick 60., Washing:ton, D. C. 

Northern Hydraulic- Press Brick 
60., Minneapolis, Minn. 

Omaha Hydraulic-Press Brick 
Co., Omaha, Neb. 

Kansas City Hydraulic-Press 
Brick Co.', Kansas City, S\o. 



E. C. STKRLINC.. Prcs't . 

H. W. EI.IOT, Sec'y and Treas. 



Ut. I, 



GUIS 



e 



S. S. KIMBHLL. Vice-Pres't & Gen'l Mgr. XrirTrArrv 
H. 0. KIMHEll,, Asst Secy and Treas. ^^ni^^^^^ 



Chicago 

Hydraulic-Press 
Brick Go. 



MANUFACTURERS AND DEALERS IN 



HYDRA ULIC'PRESSED, MOULDED A ND 
IS DIANA RED COMMON 





BRICK 



Office and Exhibit Rooms: 

301-304 

Chamber of Commerce Building 

Cor. La Salle and Washington Sts. 

CHICAGO 



Works: Porter, Ind. 



TELEPHONES 

Office /Express 1ft") 

Ottice . / Express 10(i 

18th and La Salle Sts. 



Storehouses 



/18th and La Salle Sts South l.h\ 

) Flourney and Rockwell Sts., Wtst^iCM 
k Herndon St. and Clyboiirn Ave. North H-'i'.^ 
Uoth St. and Wentworth Ave.. Yards G'57 



AGENTS FOR 

St. Louis Enameled Brick 

English Enameled Brick 

Milwaukee Brick 

Racine Brick 

Ricketson's Milwaukee 
Mortar Colors 



Salt-Glazed Wall Coping 

Hansen's Patent Chimney 
Tops 

Terra Cotta Flue Lining 



CATALOGVE 



OF THE 



TENTH ANN VAL- EXHIBITION 



OF WORKS OF ARCHITECTVRE 

AND THE ALLIED RNE ARTS 

HELD VNDER THE AVSPICES OF 

THE 



CHICAGO 
ARCHITECTVRAL 

CLVB 



AT THE 

ART INSTITVTE OF CHICAGO 

BEGINNING MARCH TWENTY-THIRD 

ENDING APRIL ELEVENTH 

MDCCCXCVII 



Introduction 



The principal object of the Chicago Architectural Club, the ruison d'rtrr 
for its existence, is the advancement of Architecture and the Allied Arts. 

To this end meetings are held, lectures delivered and classes conducted 
for the improvement of the members in their art, but realizing that no great 
advance can be made without the intelligent ap])reciation f)!" the public, we 
endeavor in our annual exhibitions to j^resent the best that has been done in 
the vear, not only in the local field, but from the I'nited vStates generally, 
to the end that the interested layman may follow the ])rogress of Architecture 
and Architects, and by his ever increasing sympathy fiud for himself an added 
pleasure in the contemplation of good work from the standpoint of an educated 
taste and give to the capable men that discrimiuating encouragement which is 
one of the Artist's highest rewards. 

The 5icopeof the ICxhibitions includes drawings and sketches of buildings 
m course of erection, projects in competition, drawiugs by students in the 
various schools both here and abroad, and .such sketches and studies of historic 
monuments as help one to an appreciation of the jnirelv pictorial feeling in 
Architecture and its surroundings. 

Under the generic title of the Allied Arts are included exhibits of 
architectural sculpture, nuiral decorations and stained glass, carvings in wood, 
metal work, mosaics, and such decorative articles as display design in the 
ornamentation of ))uildings. — 

Modern methods of pictorial reproduction have enabled us to illu.strate 

the Catalogues of these Kxhibitions in such a manner that they have become 

valuable as records of Architectural History in America, and are preserved and « 

consulted as reference books by Architects generally. 

— 4— 



THE CHICAGO ARCHITECTURAL CLUB 



274 MICHIGAN AVENUE 
CHICAGO 



Officers 



Richard K. Schmidt, 

DVVIGHT H. PKRKINS, 

Adou>h 1'. Bkrnhard, 
a r t h u r ( j ko r ( *. k h row n , 

I)AX. EVKRHTT WaiD, 



President 

ist Vice-President 

2d Vice-President 

Secretary 

Treasurer 



Executive Committee 



Richard Iv Schmidt Dwight H. Pkrkins 

Adoi.ph P\ Bkrnhard Arthur George Browx 

Dan. Kvkrktt Waid H. Von Hoi.st 

Harry Dodge Jenkins 



1^ 



COMMITTEES OF TENTH ANNUAL EXHIBITION 

Exhibition Committee 

. ^ Kdgar vS. Bei<den, Chairman 

Frank Macdonaij) Garden Adolph F. Bernhard 

John Ijij.ESKAU Harry Dodge Jenkins 

N. Max Dinning Arthur George Brown 

Jury of Admission 

GeorCtE R. Dean Hugh M. G. Garden Howard V. D. Shaw 

Hanging Committee 

Hugh M. G. Garden F^i.mer C. Jensen George R. Dean 



Catalogue and Finance Committee 

Frank Macdonai.d Garden, Chairman 
Arthur (George Brown Edgar S. Bei^den 



Members of 



Adelsperger, Rolland 
Arnold, Jennie 
Arnold, Hugo 
Beauley, W. J. 
Belden, Kdgar S. - 
Beman. S. vS. 
Bernhard. Adolph F. - 
Berry, Addison C. 
Birge, Charles Kliot 
Bluniner, Oscar 
Bock, Richard W. 
Braeger William - 
Brandt, Oscar K. 
. Brinsley, H. G. - 
Brown, Arthur George 
Buck, Lawrence 
Biirnham, I). H. 
Camp, Erwin M. 
Carr, Charles A. 
Chaffee, Dudley C. 
Church, Myron H. 
Clay, W. W. 
Cranford, K. X. . 
Crockett, E. Bell - 
Cunningham, P. J. 
Davis, I'rank L, 
Davis, vSeymour 
Dean, Arthur. R. - 
Dean, (Veorge R. 
Dillon, John Robert 
Dunning, N. ?,Iax 
Edbrooke, Harry W. J. 
Eggebrecht, William - 
Eliel, Roy 
Enders, Oscar 
Eppinghausen, Charles V. 
Fellheimer, Alfred 
I'isher, John B. - . 



the Chicago Architectural Club. 

ACTIVE MEMBERS. 

63 Commerce Buildiuir 
93S Spaulding Avenue. 
274 Michigan Avenue. 
604 Scott vStreet, Joliet, 111. 
1001 Monadnock Buildiii*'^ 
507 Pullman Building. 
- T780 Old Colon V Buildin<-^ 

6r5 Walnut vStreet. Des INIoincs, Iowa. 
17S0 Old Colofiv Buildin<r 
- -- jriWe.st Adams vStreet. 
3240 Lake Park Avenue. 
108 Dearborn Avenue. 

4.V47 Chambers vSireet, New York. 
I'ort Wayne, Indiana. 

S25. 225 Dearborn Street. 

344 Dearborn Avenue. 

I r42 The Rookery. 

902 I'i.sher Buildin*:. 

317 Ru.sh .Street. 

134 Fiftieth Street. 

713 Royal In.surance Building. 

50.S, 218 La vSalle Street. 

803 A.shland Block. 

604 Pullman Building. 

31 Michigan Avenue. 

305 Michigan Avenue. 

907 Walnut Street. Philadelphia, Pa. 

121 La Salle vStreet. 

121 La vSalle vStreet. 

67 Moffatt Block, Detroit, Mich. 

loor Teutonic Building. " 

3965 Drexel Boulevard. 

148 Waba.sh Avenue. 

4443 Flllis Avenue. 

900 Columbian Building. vSt. J^ouis, Mo. 

938 Stock Exchange Building. 

640 North Wells vStreet. 

89 Twenty-ninth Place. 



"i'Msk, Louis A. 
Plolo, Julius 
Fraenkel, T. O. - 
Fyfe, James L. - 

Garden, Ivdward (V. 

•Garden, Frank M. 

Garden, Hugh M. G. 

-G rover, (Oliver Dennett 

Hall, John L. 

Hanson, Clarence 

Hatzfeldt, Clarence 

Hendrickson, Arthur C. 

Herz, Arthur 

Heun, Arthur 

Hewitt. Herbert Kdniund 

Hoep])ner, l\. A. - 

HofTnian, John I'. 

Hoist, H. von - . - 

Hulla, John - 

Hunt. Myron H. - 

Jenkins. Harry Dodge 
Jennings, (k-orge II. 
Jensen. h:inier C 
Jobson. I'rriuk 
Johnson. John W. 
Kinihall, Cofirad H. 
Kirk])alrirk. I'. W. 
KirkDatrick. Robert A. 
Jvlein])e]l, Waller F. ^^-^ 



Koll. Henry C, 
Levy. v'^anuK'l H. 
Le\(Un. Thomas 1\ H. 
IJedberg. Hugo J. 
. ' Lilleskau. John 

Lindstrom. Robert S. - - 

Livingston, Thomas 
Llewellyn. Jose])h C. 
Lohmueller. Frederick Wilhelni 
Long. Hirch Burdette- 



Matteson. Victor Andre 
McDonald. James \V. - 
Miller. J. A. 
Millet. Louis J. 



2S6 Thirty-seventh Street. _ ^ 

7626 Ford Avenue. 

604 Pullman Building. 

670 Massachusetts Avenue, Boston, Mass. 

362 Ontario Street. , 

362 Ontario Street. _ 

362 Ontario Street. 
. 317 Forty-ninth Street. 

Temple Court Building. 

174 Centre vStreet, New York, N. Y. 

<So4 Teutonic Building. 

522 Forest Avenue, Evanston, 111. 

99 Metropolitan Block. 

177 iMfty- first vStreet Boulevard. 

5828 Woodlawn Avenue. 

61 r The Rookery. 

306 La vSalle Avenue. 

265 Fast Sixty-first Street. 

606 West Kighteenth Street. 

Stein way Hall. 

2548 Indiana Avenue. 

823 Hinman Avenue, Fvanston, 111. 

1 120 Home Insurance Building. 

Marquette Building. 

38 Madison Street. Memphis, Tenn. 

4106 L:ilis Avenue. 

1677 West Monroe Street. 

4220 Calumet Avenue. 

18 Lincoln Avenue. 

592 Lincoln Avenue. 

1 21 7 Rokeby vStreet. 

6516 Stewart Avenue. 

371 Mohawk Street. 

303 Jane Street. 

3234 Portland Avenue.^ — 

3835 Calumet Avenue. 

1245 Marquette Building. 

Blunienthal, Hanover, Germany 



S 



^29 Sheridan Road, F:vanston, 111. 
274 Michigan Avenue. 
310 Chamber of Commerce, Toledo, O. 
1504 Newport Avenue. 
225 Wabash Avenue. 



Moiintjoy, I'red. H 
Mueller, Paul 
Mundie, William Uryce 
Nelson, Edward O. 
Naess, Ivar - 
Obenuaier, Charles W. 
Pattison, James William 
Perkins, Dwight H. 
Pischel, Fred. 
Robertson, Alex. Y. 
Rogers, John A 
Ross, Henry J. 
Rouleau, Arthur 
Sandblom, Axel 
Seaman, R. II. 
Seney, Edgar V. - 
Schell, George J. - 
Schmidt, Richard l\. 
Schonberg, G. A, 
Schuchardt, William H. 
Schumni, Walter 
Shaw, Howard V. I). - 
Sheblessy, J. F. 
Spencer, Jr., R. C. 
Starck, E. F. 
Starr, Harry C. 
Strahan, George H. 

Thomas, Harry S. -l 

Traxler, Victor 
Trost, Henry C. - 
Upman, Frank 
Waid, D. Everett 
Weber, P. J. 
Wilder, Edward T. 
V/ilmans, A. C. z_ 

Williamson, Robert H. 
Williamson, W. G. 
Wirts, Stepiien M. 
Wittekind, H. W. 
Woltersdorf, Arthur 
Work, R. G. 
Zimmerman, A. G. 
Zimmerman, Hugo H. 



San Antonio, Texas. 

370 West II 8th vStreel, New York, N. Y. 

1 120 Home Insurance Building. 

9.S Oak Street. 

112 Sedgwick Street. 

935 North Clark Street. 

Tree vStudio Huilding. ^ — 

Stein way Hall. 

466 Cleveland Avenue. 

351 Oakley Avenue. . 1 

S03 A.shland Block. 

737 I'nity lUiilding, 

47 Winthrop Place. 

1430 Noble Avenue. 
641 Lincoln Avenue. 

12023 Stewart Avenue. 

161S MonadiU)ck Building. 

1016, 172 Washington Street. 

621, S4 La Salle vStreet. 

263 Queen Anne Place, Milwaukee, Wis. 
36, 241 Wabash Avenue. 

20, 1 15 Monroe Street. 

2933 Farrell Avenue. 

Stein wav Hall. 

10.S West Main Street, Ma<lison, Wis. 

27 Forty-third Street. 

2.S Sherman Street. 

3639 Wewatta Street, Denver, Col. 

1142 The Rookery. 

Midland Block. Colorado Springs. Col. 

6026 Ellis Avenue. 

S03 A.shland Block. 

1 142 The Rookery. 

Orlean, Humboldt. County, Cal. 

239 Osgood Street. 

Schiller Building. 

159 La Salle Street. 

131 Boul. Montparnasse, Paris, I'rance. 

1 120 Home Insurance Building. 

70 La vSalle Street. 

1 15 Monroe Street. 

22, I 15 Monroe Street. 

1279 Perry Street. 



ASSOCIATE MEMBERS, 



Adlcr, Daiikiiiar - - 
Aiidrovette, (ieorge 
lirittiiighani, B. M. 
Brown, iMclelio F. 
lUislincll, Kdward S. 
Cobb, Henry Ives 
Combs, Ro<^ers M, 
Coolidge, Charles A. 
Daucliy, Samuel - 
Dillon, Henry R. 
Dungan, T. A. 
Kwen, John M. 
I'V'rguson, L. A. 
(;ates, W. I), 
(lardner, R. A. 
Goudy, V. W. 
Harris, Chester R. 
Holabird. W. 
Killen. Iv. Grible 
Knisely, H. C. 
Mat/., Herman L. 
Mauch. Max 
Parker, John M. - 
Perkins, V. \V. 
Prosser, H. 1^ 
Purington, I). V. - 
Reese, Theodore 1'. 
Roche, Mi - - - 
Spindler, Oscar 
Smith, (len. William Sooy 
Van den Berghen,A. L. 
Warren, Clinton J. 
White, J. A, 



Auditorium Building. 
27 Clinton vStreet. 
Palm Beach, Florida. 
1002 Masonic Temple. 
1269 West Madison Street. 
100 Washington Street. ^ 

405 Chamber of Commerce. 
17S0 Old Colony Building. 
<S4 Illinois Street. 
Lake and Dearborn Streets. 
61 1 Security Building. 
1 121 The Rookery. 
139 Adams Street. 
Marquette Building. 
312 First National Bank Building. 
106 Wabash Avenue. 
155 Washington Street. 
161S Monadnock Building. 
150 Michigan Avenue. 
68 West Monroe Street. 
302 Chamber of Commerce. 
<Si Illinois Street. 
40 River Street. 
115 Monroe Street. 

Marquette Building, 

323 Chamber of Commerce. 
18 Adams Street. 
16 1 8 Monadnock Building. ^; 
209 South Clinton vStreet. 
801 Stock Kxchange Building, 
Art Institute. 
84 La Salle Street. 
1303 Schiller Building. 



? 



HONORARY MEMBERS. 



Allen, J. K. - 
Blake, F. L. - 
Clark, Robert 
Gay, Henry Lord 
Hunt, F. S. - 
Jenney, W. L. B. 
Lawrie, Harry 
McLean, R. C. 
Muller, Jr., L. 
Phimister, I). G. 
Sullivan, Louis H. 
Taft, Lorado 
'Wagner, Fritz 



.5. 



34 Clark vStreet. 

I 17 E. T>venty third vSt., New York, N. Y 

Kingsbury and Ohio vStreets. 

92 Dearborn Street. 

4621 Francisco Avenue. 

I 120 Home Insurance Building. 

Omaha. Nebraska 

410 Manhattan Building. 

410 Manhattan Building. 

949 Jackson Boulevard. 

Auditorium Tower. 

Athenneum Building. 

I I iS The Rookerw 




-v 



u 




./ Ilurvt Wood Paitrl 



I!v Claude Fayette Bragdon 



Catalogue 



WM. MARTIN AIKEN- Supervising Architect, United States Treasury 

Department, Washington, D, C. 

1 Government Building at Philadelphia, I'a. 

2 (lovernment Building at Clarksville, Tenn. 

3 Government Building at San P'rancisco, Cai. 

4 Government Building at Madison, Ind. 

r> Government Building at New London. Conn. 
<; Government Building at Paterson, N. J. 
7 Government Building at Pawtucket, R. I. 
s Government Building at Saginaw, Mich. 
9 Government Building at Pueblo, Col. 
3 Government Building at Portland, Ore. ^" 



HUGO ARNOLD--274 Michigan Avenue. 

11 Water Color Sketch. 

12 Water Color Sketch. 

13 Water Color Sketch. 

11 



CHARLES B. ATWOOD— (Deceased). 

Designer in Chief of the World's Columbian Exposition. 
(The following are original sketches by Mr. Atwood and are 
exhibited by courtesy of Mr. Daniel H. Burnham.) 

14 First Sketch for the north and south ends of the Art Palace, 

W. C. E. 

15 A Study for the Art Palace, W. C. E. 

16 A Study for the Interior of the Art Palace, W. C. E. ^^ 

17 Studies for the Dome of the Art Palace, W. C. E. 

18 A Detail. 

19 First Sketch for the Art Institute of Chicago. 

20 Plan for a Church in Evanston, 111. 

21 Elevation of Same. 

22 Elevation of a Church. 

23 Study for an Ofhce Building. 

24 Study for a Banking House. 

25 Photograph of the Art Palace— World's Columbian Exposition. 

26 Portrait of Mr. Atwood. 

CHARLES R. AYARS- Evanston, III. 

27 Competitive Design for Police and Fire Station for Evanston— 

By L. Rasmussen. 
JAY B. BEEL— 274 Michigan Avenue. 

28 Temple of Fortune. 

29 Water Color and Pastel Sketch. 



BELDEN AND HIGGINSON— 1001 Monadnock Block. 

30 A Country House— Scale Drawings, by A. B. Higginson. 

31 An Entrance to a Cemetery, by A. B. Higginson. 

32 A Country House— Perspective (Catalogue Illustration), by 

Edgar S. Belden. 

33 Old House in Blois, France, by Edgar S. Belden. 

34 Competitive Design Police and Fire Station for Evanston, 111. 

— 12- 



HAMILTON BELL & CO.— 424 Fifth Avenue, New York. 

35 Color Scheme for Decoration of Pompeian Court — 

Jefferson Hotel, Richmond, Va. 

Carrere & Hastings, Architects. 

36 Another Drawing of Same — (Catalogue Illustration). 

37 Color Scheme for Decoration of Dining Room — 

Jefferson Hotel, Richmond, Va. 

Carrere & Hastings, Architects. 

38 Sketch for Decoration, "The Dance." 

39 Sketch for Stained Glass. 

40 Decoration for Dining Room, "Fruit" and "Bread." 

BERG & CLARK— 10 West Twenty-third Street, New York. 

41 Costei- Tomb — Woodlawn Cemetery. : 

V. H. BLACKALL— Music Hall Building— Boston. 

42 P^enway Garden — l^oston — Preliminary Studies. 

43 Fenway Garden — Boston — Perspective and Plans. 

44 Fenway Garden — Boston — Banquet Hall. 

45 Study for an Entrance to an Ice Rink. 

E. H. BLASHFIELD— 58 West Fifty-seventh Street, New York. 

4G Rome— Preliminary Nude Study — Decoration of Dome— Wash- 
ington Library. 

47 America — Drawing for Figure — Decoration of Dome — Washing- 

ton Library. 

48 Greece — Drawing for Figure — Decoration of Dome — Washing- 

ton Library. 

49 Italy— Drawing for Figure— Decoration of Dome— Washing- 

ton Library. 

50 Study for Decoration of the Lantern Crown of Washington 

Library. 

51 "The City of Pittsburg Offering Her Steel and Iron to the 

Commerce, Industry, Agriculture, and Navigation of the 
W\;rld"— Lunette in the Bank of Pittsburg. 

-18— 



OSCAR BLUMNER— 139 Locust Street. 

52 Mausoleum. 

53 Proposed Speedway Across, and City Gates Houses to, Chicago 

River. 

54 Section of an Art Gallery. 

55 Elevation of a Parsonage. 

56 Elevation of a Club House. 

RICHARD W. BOCK— 3240 Lake Park Avenue. 

57 Memorial Tablet to A. C. Hesing. 

58 Victory for Lovejoy Monument. 
5i) Tripod for Lovejoy Monument. 

60 Eagle for Lovejoy Monument. 

61 Model for Fountain. 

BORING & TILTON— 57 Broadway, New York. 

62 House at Boonton, N. J. 

63 House for Judge John F. Dillon. 

64 House for Dr. I. H. Piatt. 

66 Plan of Grounds. St. Bartholomew's Sch(K)l. 

67 Front Elevation, St. Bartholomew's School. 

E. RAYMOND BOSSANGE— 12 East Twenty-third Street, New York. 

68 A Ferry House— Plan— Medal Design Beaux .\rts Society Com- 

petition, 

■'■«, ' 

ADDISON B. LE BOUT1LLIER--100 Charles Street, Boston. 

69 Interior of a Temple at Paestum. 

CLAUDE FAYETTE BRAGDON— Rochester, N. Y. 

70 Design for Stained Glass, "The Snake Charmer." 

71 Design for Stained Glas«, "Diana" and 'The Shadow. " 

72 Chap Book Drawings. 

73 Book Plates and Book Covers. 

— 1-1— 



CLAUDK I'AYI^TTK IjRACi DON— Rochester, N. Y.— Continued. 
74^— V-enetian Sketch. 

75 Sketch for a House for Mr. Campbell Johnston, Pasadena, Cal.. 

76 Measured Drawing of Italian Detail. 

77 Sketch in Paris. 

78 Sketch in Paris. 

79 Frame of Italian Sketches. 

80 Sketches of Italian Palaces. 

81 End Pavilion of the Hotel de Ville, Paris. 

82 Burnt Wood Panel, 'Diver and Mermaid." 

83 Burnt Wood Panel, "Trilby." 

84 Burnt Wood Panel, Renaissance Design— (Catalogue Illustra- 

tion). 

85 Perspective — Proposed New Municipal Building for the City of 

New York — Gordon, Bragdon and Orchard, Architects. 

86 Front Elevation of Same. 

87 Rear Elevation of' Same. 

88 Section of Same. 

89 Basement plan of Same. 

90 First Floor Plan of Same. 

91 Second Floor Plan of Same. 

92 Sketches* in London and Paris. 

t 

BRIGHT & BURFEIND— 827 Schiller Building. 

93 Barnhof, Germany— Drawing by Walter Schumm. 

94 Residence Front, Berlin— Drawing by Walter Schumm— (Cata- 

logue Illustration). 

ARTHUR GEORGE BROWN- 225 Dearborn Street. 

95 Mission Church of San Fernando, California. 

9G Mission Church of San Juan Capistrano, California. 

97 Design for Small Country House in California— Plan. 

98 Design for Small Country House in California— Elevation. 

IDA J. BURGESS— 900B Marshall Field Building. 

99 Design for the Decoration of Common Council Chamber. 



OEORGE GARY— Buffalo, N. Y. 

100 street Scene and Office Building. 

101 Facade of a National Theater. 

CHICAGO ARCHITECTURAL CLUB. 

Eighth Annual Competition for the Robert Clark Medals. — 
Conditions: The competition is open to architectural 
draughtsmen under thirty years of age, residents of the 
United States and not practicing architects. All drawings 
must be executed by the author of each design without 
assistance. Problem: A bath house for a small city to be 
placed in the city park. Its greatest dimension shall not be 
more than 200 feet. It shall consist of one story and 
basement. The first story shall contain the following 
rooms: A large hall for conversation and the promenade; 
it may be lighted from above; two lounging or reading 
rooms, one for each sex, which shall communicate with 
the bathing departments; a bathing dejiartmont for each 
sex, each of which shall contain a plunge room with basin 
of about 1,500 square feet area- — this room should be lighted 
from above; attendants' and checking room: towel and 
suit room; about fifty dressing rooms; about ten bath 
rooms; one toilet room. 
Adjudicating Committee — 

LOUIS J. MILLET. Chairman. 

CHARLES A. COOLIDGE. 

JEREMIAH KIERSTED CADY. 

102 Elevation, by David J. Meyers, Boston— First Prize, Gold Medal 

(Catalogue Illustration). 

103 Plan of Same (Catalogue Illustration). 

104 Elevation, by John F. Jackson, Buffalo — Second Prize, Silver 

Medal (Catalogue Illustration). 

105 Plan of Same. 

106 Elevation, by Oscar M. Hokanson, Philadelphia, Pa. — Second 

Prize, Silver Medal (Catalogue Illustration). 

107 Section of Same. 



CHICAGO ARCIIITKCTrRAL CU'B— Continued. 

108 Plan of Same. 

J 09 Elevation, by Arthur Shrigley, Lansdowne, Pa. — Third Prize, 
Bronze Medal. 

110 Plan of Same. 

111 Elevation, by John F. Sheblessy, Chicago' — Honorable Mention, 

Special Bronze Medal. _ 

112 Plan of Same. 

113 Elevation, by Thomas Livingston, Chicago— Honorable Men- 

tion, Special Bronze Medal, 
ni Plan of Same. 

115 Elevation, by Pierre A, Liesch, Boston— Commend. 

116 Plan of Same. 

117 Elevation, by Wm. Leslie Welton, Everett, Mays.— Commend. 

118 Plan of Same. ^ 

127 Elevation, by Harry S. Thomas, Jr., Chicago. 

128 Plan of Same. 

135 Elevation, by Harry W. J. Edbrooke, Chicago. 

13G Plan of Same. 

A?>1 Elevation, by Henry K. M. Goodwin, Louisville, Ky. 

13S Plan of Same. 

143 Elevation, by Herbert C. Wise, Philadelphia, Pa. 

145 Plan of Same. 

14G Elevation, by John Robert Dillon, Detroit, Mich. 

147 Plan of Same. 

CHICAGO ORNAMENTAL IRON WORKS— Twenty-sixth and South Hal- 
ted Streets. 

152 Galvano Door Cover and Galvano Ornaments, etc. 

153 Galvano— Copies of Medals, etc. 

154 Bronze Baluster (Catalogue Illustration). — 

155 Bronze Baluster (Catalogue Illustration). 

156 Bronze Door and Frame. 

CLARK & JAMES— 50 Bromfield Street, Boston. 

157 Court, Ludford House, Ludlow. 

158 Ludford House. 

-17— 



-.-Tl-' 



CLARK cS: JAMKS. 50 Bromfield vStreet, lk)ston— Cuntiiiued. 

.159 Much Wenlock (Reynolds). 

160 Much Wenlock (Old Street). 

COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY IN THE CITY OF NEW YORK. 



161 A Club House, by W. E. Parsons. 

162 Exeter Cathedral, by J. T. Tubby, Jr. 

Stained Glass in Cologne Cathedral, by A. H. Albertson. 

163 A Museum, by Richard L. Leo. 

164 Palazzo Pandolfini, Florence, by Arthur Ware. 
San Biagio, by H. A. Beadle. 

Farnese Palace, by C. L. Otto. 

165 Grand Staircase, by C. C. Wright. 

166 A Club, by W. E. Parsons. 

167 A Railway Terminus, by W. E. Parsons. 

For other Columbia University drawings see end of catalogue. 
(No. 719, etc.) 



R. N. CRANFORD— 803 Ashland Block. 

168 Competitive Design for Art Museum. Fairmount Park, i'hihi- 

delphia — Elevation. 

169 Competitive Design for Art Museum. Fairmount Park. Phila- 

delphia — Elevation. 

170 Competitive Design for Art Museum, Fairmount Park, Phila- 

delphia — Plan. 

171 Competitive Design for Art Museum. Fairmount Park, Phila- 
delphia — Plan. 

172 Preliminary Sketch for a Suburban Church. 

173 Preliminary Sketch for a Church in Hyde Park. 

HENRY E. CREGIER— 114 Dearborn Street. 

174 First Church of Christ, Scientist. Chicago— Exterior. 

175 First Church of Christ, Scientist, Chicago— Interior. 

— IS— 



VRANK L. DAVIS— 302 Michigan Avenue 

176 Color Sketch of Mosaic Head — Drawing by McArthur. 

177 Color Sketch of Mosaic Ornament— Drawing by McArthur. 

178 Mosaic Head Executed from Above. 

179 Mosaic Ornament Executed from Above. 

180 Mosaic Figure of St. Paul. 

N. MAX DUNNING— 1002 Teutonic Building. 

181 Competitive Design for Church of Christ, Scientists, Chicago. 
1&2 Residence at Wlnnjetka^ 



183 Sketch of a Colonial Porch. 

184 Sketch of an Old Chateau. 

185 Sketch of College of Spain. 

WILSON EYRE, JR.- 027 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 

186 Garden for Beauveau Borie, Jenkintown, Pa. 

187 Garden for Charles L. Borie, Jr., Jenkintown, Pa. 

188 House for A. L. Frothingham, Princeton, N. J. (Catalogue 

Illustration). 

FERRY & CLAS— Milwaukee, Wis. 

189 Competitive Design for Library for Erie, Pa. — Exterior. 

190 Competitive Design for Library for Erie, Pa.— Interior, ,of Ref- 

erence and Reading Room — Drawings by* Elmer Grey. 

WALTER FISCHEL— 680 Forty-third Street. 

191 lironzed Planter Medallion, Bas Relief (Pestalozzi, Froebel). 

JOHN B. FISHER— 153 Twenty-ninth Street. 

192 Pen and Ink sVetch. 

19:] An Interior of San Marco. 

T. O. FRAENKEL— 604 Pullman Building. 
194 Water Color Skei^ch. 



HUGH M. G. GARDEN -820 Marshall Field Building. 

195 Competitive Design foJ the First Church of Christ, Scientists — 
Plan of Main Floor. 

197 Same — Longitudinal Section. 

198 Same — Interior Perspective (Catalogue Illustration). 

199 Same— Exterior Perspective (Catalogue Illustration). 

201 A Tomb. 

202 A Court House. 

203 Residence for William Manson. 



CHAS. E. GARSTANG— Davenport, Iowa. 

205 Doorway in an Old Courtyard. Abbeville — From Photograph' 

(Catalogue Illustration). 

206 Castle of Vitre— From Photograph. 

207 Florence, Cloister of Certosa di val D'ema Monastery— From 

Photograph. 

208 Venice, Doorway of the Church of the Frail— From Photograph 

(Catalogue Illustration). 
PAUL GERHARDT— 920 Schiller Building. 

209 Evangelical Lutheran Church— Interior Ptr.-pc(tivt\ 

CASS GILBERT— 52i Endicott Building. St. Paul, Minn. 

210 Second Prrmiated Design— Montana Siate Capitol Building- 

Perspective (Catalogue Illustration). 

2.11 Same— Fir.st Floor Plan. 

212 Same— Second Floor Plan (Catalogue Illustration). 

213 Same— Attic Floor Plan. 

214 Same— Elevation, North. 

215 Same — Elevation, South. 

216 Same— Section. 

217 Armory— Shattuck School. 

218 Building for Shattuck School (Catalogue Illustration). 

219 Amiens Cathedral. 

220 Temple of Castor and Pollux, Agrigentum, Sicily. 

221 Cottage near St. Paul, Minn. (Catalogue Illustration). 

—20- 



CASS GILBERT— ')24 Kiidicott Huilding, vSt. Paul, Minn.— Continued. 

222 Houses in St. Paul, Minn. . 

223 Balcony of Endicott Building. 

224 Brazer Building, Boston, Mass. — Drawing by D. A. Gregg (Cata- 

logue Illustration). 



RICHARD GRIESSER— 909 Schiller Building. 
'^25 Country Village Scene, Germany. 



22r> Country Village Scene, Germany. 

•CLARENCE HATZFELDT— 172 Washington Street. 

227 Small Library (Catalogue Illustration). 

,. . " 

J. T. HETHERINGTON— 100 Washington Street. 

228 Proposed Aparcment Building, Chicago — Drawing by L. Rass- 

mussen. 

H. E. HEWITT— 5828 Woodhnvn Avenue. 

220 Delta Gamma Lodge, Albion, Mich. 

FRANCES G. HIGGINSON— Winnetka, 111. 

230 Pastel, Design for Stained Glass. 

231 Oil, Design for Stained Glass (Catalogue Illustration). 

232 Oil, Design for Stained Glass. 

HILL & WOLTERSDORF— 70 LaSalle Street. 



233 Competitive Design for Illinois Trust and Savings Bank — Plans. 

234 Same — Elevation. 

235 Same — Section. 

HANS HIRSCH— 346 East Fifty-sixth Street. 

236 Ornament, Executed in Castine Marble. 

—21- 



HOWARDS GAULDWELL— 10 East Twenty-third Street, New York. 

237 Villa in Tennessee — Elevation (Catalogue Illustration). 

238 Same— Plan (Catalogue Illustration). 

239 Same— Section. 

GEORGE MARTIN HUSS— 1285 Broadway. New York. 

240 Stone House, Lake George, N. Y.— First Floor Plan. 
2?I StoneHouse, Xi£rke~TJeorge~,"N.^5r:^=^Perspective: 

242 Front Elevation — Accepted Design for the desired Scientitic 

Alliance Building, New York City. 

HARRY DODGE JENKINS— 100 Washington Street. 

243 Sketch for the Chapel, University of Chicago, H. I. CobI). Archi- 

tect. , .' 

244 Birds Eye View Hull Biological Laboratoi les. rniversity of 

Chicago, H. I. Cobb, Architect. 

245 House for Alanson Bigelow. .Jr.. Cohassett. Mass.. H. I. Cob'o, 

Architect. 

246 Water Color Sketch. 

247 Chicago Post Office, Henry Ives Cobb. Architect. 

EDGAR A. JOSSELYN— 1 Broadway, New York. 

248 Clarkson Memorial, Potsdam, N. Y.— Plan. 

249 Clarkson Memorial, Potsdam. N. Y.— Perspective. 

249A Clarkson Memorial, Potsdam, N. Y ___ 



W. D. KIMBALL— With the Tobey Furniture Co. 

250 Water Color Sketch of a Dining Room 'I'pble 

251 Water Color Sketch of a Couch. 

252 Water Color Sketch of a Sofa. 



•».)^ 



G ' H ^BORSt!^^^' |: Associated Architects, 100 Washington Street. 

J.' T. HETHERINGTON, ( 

J ■■•(,• 

253 A Country House— Drawing by Louis Rasmussen. 

254 House at Yonkers on the Hudson-Drawing by Louis Ras- 

mussen. 

255 House at Yonkers on the Hudson-Drawing by Louis Ras- 

mussen. 

256 Proposed Residence on Drexel Boulevard, Ch icago-Drawing 

by Louis Rasmussen. 

257 Proposed Apartment Building on the South Side, Chicago. 

J. & R. ]^AMB-5y Carmine Street, New York. 

258 Design for Decoration of Dome-The Delaware Avenue Baptist 

Church, Buffalo, N. Y. 

259 Design for Chancel End, Showing Altar and Reredos, also 

West and East Windows. 
2G0 Design for "Conrad" Mamorial, St. Mary's Church, Wayne, Pa. 

JOS LUBER—loTO Madison Avenue, New York. 

■ 261 -Behold. I Stand and Knock at the Door"- -Design for figure 
portion of window. 
2»;2 '-He is not Here, He is Risen," Stained Glass-Loaned by 
Tiffany Glass and Decorating Co. 

JOSEPH C. LLEWELLYN-12-t5 Marquette Building. 

263 Nor^h Pavilioi), Lincoln Park, Chicago. 

BIRCH BTRLETTE LONG— Evanston, 111. 

264 Durham Cathedral. 



265 Entrance to Ludlow Castle (Catalogue Illustration), 

266 La-Tour d'Aigues. 

267 Street Fountain, Stamboul. 

268 Houses, East Grinstead, England. 

269 Lichfield Cathedral. 

270 Central Tower, Canterbury, from Dark Entry. 



HOWARD & CAULDWELL— 10 East Twenty-third Street, New York. 

237 Villa in Tennessee — Elevation (Catalogue Illustration). 

238 Same— Plan (Catalogue Illustration). 

239 Same— Section. . 



GEORGE MARTIN HUSS— 1285 Broadway. New York. 

240 Stone House, Lake George, N. Y.— First Floor Plan. 
241 — Stone ^Imtse , Lak e Ge org e , N. ~Y~. — Persi^eetive. 



242 Front Elevation — Accepted Design for the desired Scientitic 

Alliance Building, New York City. 

HARRY DODGE JENKINS— 100 Washington Street. 

243 Sketch for the Chapel, University of Chicago, H. I. Cobb. Archi- 

tect. 

244 Birds Eye View Hull Biological La])oratoiies. University of 

Chicago, H. I. Cobb, Architect. 

245 House for Alanson Bigelow, Jr., Cohassett, Mass.. H. I. Cobb, 

Architect. 

246 Water Color Sketch. 

247 Chicago Post Office, Henry Ives Cobb, Architect. 

EDGAR A. JOSSELYN— 1 Broadway, New York. 

248 Clarkson Memorial, Potsdam, N. Y. — Plan. 

_^ 249 Clarkson Memorial, Potsdam, N. Y.— Perspective. 



249A Clarkson Memorial, Potsdam, l^^Y.—- 

W. D. KIMBALL— With the Tobey Furniture Co. 

250 Water Color Sketch of a Dining Room Ta1)le 

251 Water Color Sketch of a Couch. 

252 Water Color Sketch of a Sofa. 



G^' H ^OR^St!^^^' I Associated Architects, 100 Washington Street. 

J. t. HETHERINGTON, f 

253 A Conntry House— Drawing by Louis Rasmussen. 

254 House at Yonkers on the Hudson— Drawing by Louis Ras- 

mussen. 

255 House at Yonkers on the Hudson— Drawing by Louis Ras- 

mussen. 

256 Proposed Residence on Drexel Boulevard, Chicago— Drawing 
^yrLoiiis Rasmussen. 



257 Proposed Apartment Bailding on the South Side, Chicago. 

J. & R. LAMB— 59 Carmine Street, New York. 

258 Design for Decoration of Dome— The Delaware Avenue Baptist 

Church, Buffalo, N. Y. 

259 Design for Chancel End, Showing Altar and Reredos, also 

West and East Windows. 

200 Design for "Conrad" Mamorial, St. Mary's Church, Wayne, Pa. 

JOS LAUBER— 1570 Madison Avenue, New York. 

201 -Behold, I Stand and Knock at \he Door"- -Design for figure 

portion of window. / 

262 "He is not Here, He is Risen," Stained Cxlass-Loaned by 

Tiffany Glass and Decorating Co. 

JOSEPH C. LLEWELLYN— 1215 Marquette Building. 

263 North Pavilion, Lincoln Park, Chicago. 

BIRCH BTRLETTE LONG— Evanston, 111. 

204 Durham Cathedral. 

265 Entrance to Ludlow Castle (Catalogue Illustration). 

260 La-Tour d'Aigues. 

267 Street P^ountain, Stamboul. 

268 Houses, East Grinstead, England. 

269 Lichfield Cathedral. 

270 Central Tower, Canterbury, from Dark Entry. 



^> 



GEORGE W. MAHER— 218 LaSalle Street. - 

271 Facade of a Public Library Building. 

272 Facade of a Residence. 

273 A MatcJi Rendering. 

274 Photograph of a Residence. 

A. L. C. MARSH— 97 Nassau Street, New York. 

275 Sketch for stable for John J. Gibbons, Esq., at Little Silver, N. J. 

276 Sketch for house for John J. Gibbons. Esq., at Little Silver, N. J. 

McKlM, MEAD & WHITE— 160 Fifth Avenue, New York. 

277 Front and Rear Elevations— Library Building — I ni vei siiy ot 

the City of New York. 

278 Plan of Same. ~' 

279 Same — Section on Main Longitudinal Axis. 

280 Perspective of Uffiversiiy Hall — Columbia University. 

281 Another Perspective of Same. 

282 First and Second Floor Plans of Same. 

2?i?. Elevation of Academical Building — Universiiy of VJrsinla. 

284 Plan of Same. 

285 Elevation of Mechanical Laboratory— I'niversity of Virginia. 

286 Plan of Same. 

287 Elevation and Section of Restoration of Rotunda — Tjiii\ersi[y of 

Virginia. 

288 Plan of Same. 

289 General Plan — University of Virginia. 

FRANK CURRY MILLER— 116 North Broad Street. Philadelphia, Pa. 

290 A Residence in Germantown. 

291 A School House in Stamford, Conn. 

MITCHEL & HALBACH— 264 Michigan Avenue. 

292 Competitive Decorative Designs for the Illinois Trust and 

Savings Bank. 

293 S^me. 

294 Same. 

295 Same. 

296 Same. 

297 Same. 

298 Same. 

HORACE MORAN— 876 Broadway, New York. 

299 An Interior — Musee de Cluny, Pari^. 

—2-1— 



J. GEORGE MORGAN— Philadelphia, Pa. 

300 Facade of the Palace— Cogolludo. 

THE MOSAIC TILE COMPANY— 619 Pullman Building. 

301 Head Executed in Mosaic Tile. 

302 Head Executed in Mosaic Tile. 

IVAR NAESS— 113 Sedgwick Street. 

303 Baptistery Screen. 

304 Motive from the Pantheon and from the Vatican. 

NETTLETON, KAHN & TROWBRIDGE— Detroit, Mich. 

305 Competitive Design for the County Building, Detroit,_Mich^ 

306 Study for an Art Club Building. 

WILLIAM CHURCHILL NOLAND— Richmond, Va. 

307 S. Giorgio Maggiore, Venice. 

308 Decoration in Library, Siena Cathedral. 

309 Ceiling Decoration, Villa Madama, Rome. 

310 Old House, Lisieux, France. 

311 Old House, Chinon, France. 

312 Bits of Mt. S. Michel, Angeis, France, and of Salisbury, Eng- 

land. 

313 Bits of Sens and Le Mans, France. 

OLMSTEAD, OLMSTEAD & ELIOT— Brookline, Mass. 

314 General Plan of Jackson Park. Chicago. 

315 General Plan cf I^ke Park, Milwaukee. 

316 General Plan of Leland Stanford University, California. 

317 Perspective of Same— Photolith from drawing by D. A. Gregg. 
^ 318 General Plan— Art Institute of Chicago— Grounds. 

319 General Plan— Estate of Ogden Geolet, Newport, R. I. 

320 General Plan— Estate of J. M. Longyear, Marquette. 

321 General Plan— "Onunda.'' 

322 General Plan— "Auldwood." 

323 Photographs of "Onunda." 

324 Heliotypes of "Auldwood." 

JOSEPH PENNELL— 

The following are drawings and lithographs done' by Mr. Pen- 
nell as illustrations for Washington Irving's book, "The 
Alhambra," and are exhibited by courtesy of Frederick 
Keppel & Co., New York. They are for sal§ at the fol- 
lowing prices: 



u 



JOSKPH PHNXKlj,-Coiitinued. 
Drawings — 

325 The Pool. Price, $18.00. 

326 Out of "Fair Seville City." Price, $15.00. 
227 The Market Place. Price, $20.00. 

328 A Gate of Granada. Price, $10.00. 

329 One of the Shabbiest Posadas in Granada. Price. $20.00 

330 "The Walls * * * Studded with Towers." Price, $15.00 

331 "A Sumptuous Palace." Price, $15.00. 

332 "In Front of the Old Moorish Palace." Price, $15.00. 

333 The Franciscan Convent. Price, $12.00. ' 
™334- A Parochial Church. Trice. $1U0^0. "^ : 



335 The Outer Towers. Price $10.00. 

336 Calle de los Gomeres. Price. $14.00. 

337 The Palace of the Captain-General. Price. $15.00. 

338 The Square of the Vivarrambla. Price, $20.00. 

339 The Avenue to the Alhambra. Price, $18.00. 

340 Entrance to the Palace of Charles V. Price. $7.50. 

341 A Moorish Doorway. Price. $15.00. 
342. The Gardens. Price, $30.00. 

343 Entrance to the Hall of Abencerrages. Price. $35.00. 

344 Fountain of Abencerrages. Price, $25.00. 

345 An Old Moorish Aqueduct. Price, $12.00. 

346 Alcove, Hall of the Two Sisters. Price. $12.00. 

347 La Plaza de los Algibes. Price. $12.00. 

348 Tomb of St. Ferdinand, Seville. Price, $25.00. 

349 The Garden of Lindaraxa. Price. $25.00. , 

350 House of the Grand Captain. Price, $15.00. 

351 Puente Pines. Price, $7.50. 

352 Pass of Elvira. Price, $7.50. 

353 Falling to Decay. Price, $12.00. 

354 "Many of the Houses Were Built in the Moorish Style. Round 

Patics, or Courts." Price, $9.00. 

355 House of the Darro. Price, $40.00. 

356 The Convent. Price, $12.00. 

357 A Rough Lane. Price, $15.00. 

358 Banks of the Xenil. Price, $18.00. 

359 A Window in the Hall of Justice. Price, $18.00. 

360 The Valley of the Darro. Price, $18.00. 

361 A Narrow Stone Gallery— Tower of Comares. Price, $15.00. 

362 The Balcony. Price, $12.00. 

363 The Tower of the Seven Floors. Price, $18.00. 



■=4* - — 2(i — 



v/"' 



JOSlvI'II rivNNia.L— Continued. 

Mi The Prado. Price, $12.00. 

3»j5 The Course of the Xenil. Price, $15.00. 

8r>6 Sanctum Sanctorum. Price, $18.00. 

3G7 Entrance to the Hall of Ambassadors. Price, $30.00. 

3=68 The Little Garden of Lindaraxa. Price, $12.00. 

3G9 The Outer Court of the Generalife. $40.00. 

370 The Colonnade and Inner Court. Price, $20.00. 

371 A Corner of the Court. Price, $14.00. 

372 The Court of the Aqueduct. Price, $25.00. 
__ _373 The Cypress Walk. Price, $20.00. 

371 Groves^and Gardens. Price, $25.00. - — — ^~ 

375 Bridge on the Darro. Price, $12.00. ), 

376 The Moorish Mint. Price. $12.00. 

377 Seville Cathedral. Price, $35.00. , 

378 Entrance to Mosque, Cordova. Price, ?20.00. 

379 Toledo. Price, $15.00. 

380 "A Solitary Mule Path Winding Among the Hills.'' Price, 

$20.00. 

381 The Fruitful Orchards of the Generalife. Price, $20.00. 

382 A Garden at Seville. Price, $20.00. 

3S3 The Towpr of Las Infantas. Price, $12.00. 

384 Inhabitants of the Old Towers. Price, $7.50. 

385 Interior of the Tower of Las Infantas. Price, $20.00. 
380 Seville. Price, $30.00. 

387 Sally-ports beyond the Walls. Price, $15.00. 

388 Torre de la Callina. Price, $40,00. 

389 The Groves of the Generalife. Price, $20.00. 

390 Malaga. Price, $12.00. 

391 Palace of the Captain-General. Price. $25.00. 

392 The Gate of the Xenil. Price, $15.00. 
393. An Entrance. Price, $12.00. 

394 The University of Granada. Price, $15.00. 

395 Gate of Elvira, Granada. Price, $20.00. 

396 The Tower of the Treasure. Price, $12.00. 

397 The Little Bridge over the Darro. Price, $12.00. 

398 Ruiuri of the Moorish Mint. Price, $12.00. 

LITHOGRAPHS. ' 

The following are Lithograph? by Mr. Pennell and are for sale at $5.00' 
each. Duplicates of almost all of the lithographs can be had by applying 
to Frederick Keppel & Co. Fifteen proofs only were printed of each and 



JOSEPH PKNNKLL—Continued, 

the stones effaced. Three proofs only of each came to America. The bal- 
ance were sold in London. 

' 399 Entrance to the Hall of Ambassadors. 

400 Gate of the Vine. ' 

401 Court of Lions. No. 1. 

402 Court of Lions. No. 2. 

403 The Apartments of Washington Irving. Alhambra. 

404 Doorway: Court of the Fishpond. 

405 Street of the Dead. . :.....^_^^__ 

406^"The^ Liftle Tnn Yard. 



•rv ;. 



407 The Alhambra from the Fountains of Avellanos. 

408 The Gate of Justice, Alhambra. No. 1. 

409 The Gate of Justice, Alhambra. No. 2. ; 

410 The House of the Weathercock: Pass of Lope. 

411 The Gate of Iron. 

412 The Market-place, Granada. 

413 Court of the Generalife. 

414 The Sierra Nevada. 

415 Gate of the Alhambra. 

416 Parador del Sol. 

417 Tomb of- Ferdinand and Isabella. 

418 The Coppersmith. 

419 The Alhambra from the Abbyacin. 

420 The Fountain of Lions. 

421 The Shabbiest Inn of Granada 

422 The Mosque. 

423 Lions of the Mosque. 

424 The Court of the Mosque. 

425 The Garden of the Mosque. No. 1. 

426 The Garden of the Mcsque. No. 2. 

427 Tower of the Mosque. 

428 Entrance to the Alhambra. , 

429 The Court of Myrtles. 

430 The Hall of Ambassadors. 

431 The Cypress of the Generalife. 

432 The Balcony. 

433 The Green Shop. 

434 Garden of the Generalife. T 

435 The Great Window. 

436 Posada de las Tabladas. 

437 The Shop with the Blue Tiles. 



JOSr:PH rivNNKLL— Continued. 

438 In the Alliambra Wood. 

439 The Shop. , 

440 On the Banks of the Darro. 

441 The Bridge on the Darro. 

^^ 442 The Gate of Elvira. ' . 

443 The Bridge at Cordova. 

444 The Inn Y^ard, Granada. 

445 The Shop of the Little Cat. . 

446 Court of the House of Peregil. 

LOUIS RASMUSSEN— 1467 North Clark Street. 

447 Competitive Design for Monument in memory of Jefferson Da- 

vis. (Catalogue Illustration.) 

LOUIS T. RISHER— Detroit, Mich. 

448 Chateau of Tourney. 

449 Design for a Country Church— Plan. 

450 Design for a Country Church— Elevations. 

FRED. S. ROBINSON— Grand Rapids, Mich. 

451 A Country House and a Village Smithy. 

452 Water Color Sketch. 

453 Water Color Sketch. 

JOHN ARTHUR ROGERS— 803 Ashland Block. 

454 A Mill in France. 

455 Gateway after Parrish. 

456 House at Lisieux, France. _ . 

HENRY J. IjLOSS, 737 Unity Building. 

457 Competitive Design for Montana State Capitol Building, Per- 

spective. 

458 S^me— Section. 

459 ^ame— First Floor Plan. 
460^ ^ame— Second Floor Plan. 

461 Competitive Design for Binghamton, N. Y., City Hall— Floor 

Plan. 

462 Same— Elevation. 

463 Evanston Police and Fire Station. 

464 Chicago Residence. (Catalogue Illustration.) 

/ , —20— 



/ ' 



HENRY J. ROSS, 7;>7 riiily Buiklin.u— Continued. . ^- 

465 Chicago Residence. 

466 Depot at Edgebrook. 

467 Tower in Germany. 

468 Street in France. 

469 Elizabethian House. • 

470 House for A. J. Earling, Oconomowoc, Wis. 

471 House at Glen Ridge. N. Y. 

472 Kaukauna High School — Elevation. 

473 Plan of Same. 

RUSSELL & ERWIN MFG. CO.—New York. 

474 Plaster Cast— Colonial Escutcheon, designed by O. E. Brandt. 

475 Plaster Cast -Greek Escutcheon, designed by O. E. Brandt. 

476 Bronze Casting — Door Knocker, designed by O. E. Brandt. 

477 Bronze Casting— Greek Escutcheon, designed by O. E. Brandt. 

478 Color Sketch — Empire Escutcheon and Knob, designed by O. 

E. Brandtr — 



479 Coloi: Sketch — Louis XVI Escutcheon and Knol), designed, by 

O. E. Brandt. ^ . 

480 Color Sketch — Gothic Escutcheon and Knob, designed by (). 

Brandt. . 

481 Bronze Casting — Louis XV Escutcheon, designed by W. B. 

Ditmar. 

482 Bronze Casting— Greek Escutcheon, designed by W. B. Dilmar. 

483 Bronze Casting— Naturalistic Escutcheon. ' designed i)y \V. G. 

Williamson. 

WALTER SCHUMM— 241 Wabash Avenue. , 

484 Club Building in Berlin. 

485 Design for a Lodge. 

EDGAR V. SEELER— 328 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 

486 The Dental School of the University of Penn.— 1st and 2d Floor 

Plans. Side Elevation and Transverse Section. 

487 Same — Front Elevation. 

488 Courtyard of the Palazzo, Fava, Bologna. 

489 The Flower Astronomical Observatory— Uni. of Penn. 

490 Sketch in Viterbo. 

491 Chateau de Vitre. 7 

492 Three Foreign Water Color Sketches. 



HOWARD SHAW— 115 Monroe Streets 



493 A Bachelors' Apartments. 

494 Lakeside Press Building. (S. A. Treat and Howard Shaw, As- 

sociated Architects.) 

495 Residence for W. E. Kelly. (Catalogue Illustration.) 

496 Residence on Calumet Avenue, Chicago. (Catalogue Illustra- 

tion.) 

497 A Memorial Chapel. 

498 A Country Club. 

. 499 A Residence on Greenwood Avenue. 

JOHN F. SHEBLESSY— 100 Washington Street. 

500 Elevation for a Town Hall. (Catalogue Illustration.) 

501 Plan of a Town Hall. 

502 Sketches, 6riginal Designs. 

SHEPLEY, RUTAN AND COOLIDGE— 1309 Venetian Building. 



503 Court House ¥t~South Bend, Iiid7~ Perspective^ 

504 Plan of Same. 

505 Section of Same. 

506 Competitive Design for Illinois Trust and Savings Bank. Per- 

spective. (Catalogue Illustration.) 

507 Section of Same. (Catalogue Illustration.) 

508 House for Joseph Medill, Esq., Wheaton, 111. 

€HAS. P. SHEWEY-218 La Salle Street. 

509 Pen and Ink Sketch. 

510 Pen and Ink Sketch. 

OEO. K. SHIMODA— 1114 Steinway Hall. 

511 Competitive Design of Illinois Trust and Savings Bank. 

512 Sketches at Nikko, Japan. 

SKETCH CLUB OF NEW YORK— 3 East Fourteenth Street, New York. 

513 Competitive Design for New York Athletic Club, by H. H. 

Braun. 

514 Christ on the Cross, by A. R. Ritter. 

515 Sketch Club of New York— Outing Sketches, by C. H. Darsh. 

516 Sketch Club of New York— Outing Sketches, by C. H. Darsh. 

517 Design for Hobokcn Library, by Jas. Ross. 

518 Two Cottages, by Jas. Ross. 

— :n— 



SKETCH CLUB OF NIvW YORK -;i Kast Fourteenth Street, New York- 
Continued. . 

519 A Batchelors' Bungalow, by W. H. Dudley. 

520 Measured Drawings — Manchester Cathedral, by Jas. S. A. 

Mercer. 

521 Measured Drawings-— Manchester Cathedral, by Jas. S. A. 

Mercer. 

522 Measured Drawings — Manchester Cathedral, by Jas. S. A. 

Mercer. 

523 Measured Drawing— Manchester Cathedral, by Jas. S. A. 

Mercer. ^ ^ 

524 Measured Drawing— Manchester Cathedral, by Jas. S. A. 

Mercer. ' 

525 Measured Drawing— Manchester Cathedral, by Jas: :S. A. 

Mercer. 

526 Sketch Club of New York Competition — Piano Case, by J. N.' 

Hutchins (deceased). • 
- 527 Sketch Club of New- York Competition— Front for a Commercial 



Building, by J. N. Hutchins and E. J. Brown. ™ 

528 Color Sketches from Italy, by R. Kendrick. 

529 Pencil Studies from Italy, by R. Kendrick. 
530~^encil Studies from Italy, by R. Kendrick. 

531 Sepia Sketches from France, by R. Kendrick. 

532 Outing Trip, Sketch Club of New York— From Nature, by John 

F. Nolan. 

ST. LOUIS ARCHITECTURAL CLUB. 

533 Residence, by Oscar Enders. 

534 Suburban Residence, by Oscar Enders. (Catalogue Illustra- 

tion.) 

% ^ 535 Norman Porch (Canterbury), by Oscar Enders. 

536 Sketch in° Burgundy, by Frank Stiff. 

537 Library, by Benjamin Trunk. 

538 Lindell Real Estate Building, by D. A. Gregg. ^^ 

:^ i:Z_539 Pickwick Club, by E. G. Garden."^^^^^ — ^ =:^ 



540 Designs for a Cabinet, by Victor Berlindis. 

541 City House (Middle Ages), by S. M. Hitt. 

542 Class Work (Capitals). (Catalogue Illustration.) 

543 Class Work (Doorway) 

544 Class Work (Tower). 

545 Residence, by Wm. B. Ittner. 

546 Residence, by Wm. B. Ittner. 



•'• H^ 



ST. JvOUIvS ARCHITECTURAL CI.UB— Continued. . 

547 Residence, by^\Vm. B. Ittner. 

548 Wayne County Court House (Drawings by Messrs. Ittner, Guis- 

sart, Helfensteller and Enders). 

549 Same. - 

550 Same. 

551 Same 

552 Same. - • 

553 Saiiie. 

554 Same. - 

555 Same. 

556 Study for a Parl^ Pavilion, by G. F. A. Brueggeman. 

557 Public Drink House, by Emil H. Niemann. 1 

558 Entrance to Private Estate, by Emil H. Niemann. 

559 Savings Bank, by Emil H. Niemann. 

560 Theater, by Ernest Klipstein. 

561 Justice Court, by Ernest Klipstein. 

562 St. Paul Capitol, by F. C. Bonsack. 



SUTCLIFFE & BUCK— 234 La Salle Street. 

563 Entrance to Lincoln Park, Chicago. 



T. SQUARE CLUB— Philadelphia, Pa. 

564 Ingle Nook, by Geo. G. Bassett. (Catalogue Illustration.) 

565 Pritchett House, by Frank Allison Hays. 

566 Rear of Pritchett House, by Frank Allison Hays. 

567 Courtyard in Apartment House, Wilmington, by Frank Alli- 

son Hays. (Catalogue Illustration.) 

568 Sketch for House by Frank Allison Hays. (Catalogue Illus- 

tration.) 

569 A Savings Bank — Facade, by William Charles Hays. ( Catalogue 

Illustration.) 

570 Plan of Same, by William Charles Hays. ' 

571 Temple of Neptune — Paestum. by William Charles Hays. 
572 Sketch near Florence, by William Charles Hays. 

573 Doorway, Church of Santa Paula, Seville, Spain, by A. C. Munoz 

and J. J. Borie. 

574 Design for a Pedestal, by A. C. Munoz. 

575 Country Hous^-tiear Vigo, Spain, by A. C. Munoz. 

576 Cottage, by William L. Price. 

577 Residence for Chas. E. Hires, Esq., by William L. Price. (Cata- 

logue Illustration.) 



T. SQUARE CLUB— Philadelphia, Pa.— Continued. 

578 House at Overbrook, by William L. Price 

579 Detail of Hall Mantel — Residence of Alan Wood, by William L. 

Price. 

580 Store Building, Germantown, Pa., by William L. Price. 

581 Interior Decoration— German Renaissance, by Wm. F". Supiee. 

582 Interior Decoration— Empire Drawing Room, by Wm. F. Suplee. 

583 Interior Decoration— Empire Drawing Room, by Wm. K. 

Suplee. 

584 Interior Decoration— English Dining Room, by Wm. F. Suplee. 

585 Interior Decoration— Delft Dining Room, by Wm. F. Suplee. 
:: 586 A Stone Bridge, by Wm. Charles Hays. 

587 A Stone Bridge, by David Knickerbacher Boyd. 

588 A Stone Bridge, by James P. Jamieson. 

589 A Stone Bridge, by J. George Morgan. ^ 

590 A Stone Bridge, by George Bisham Page. (Catalogue llliis ra- 

tion.) 

591 A Spinsters Garden, by Lloyd Titus. 

592— A Summer Sketch, by James P. Jamiesan. — 



593 Old Mill at Warwick, by James P. Jamieson. 

594 Facade for Three Fianks. .\din B. Lacey. 

595 Agrigentum. by James P. Jamieson. 

596 South Portal of Catheciral Le Puy, by Jame.' 1- .lam,(>^'Mv ~ 

597 Chapel at Passyunk. by James P. Jamieson. 

598 The Philopratrician Hall, by Emil G. Perot. 

599 Portals at Bourges. by James P. Jamieson. ;. 

600 Mosaic. Palermo, by James P. Jamieson. 

601 Pompeii, by James P. Jamieson. 

602 Porte d'Ardcn— Laon, by James P. Jamieson. 

603 Summer Sketch, by Jam^s P. Jamieson. 

604 Tower cf St. Pierre, by James P. Jamieson. 

605 French Besses, by James P. Jamieson. 

606 Foreign Sketches, by James P. Jamiesjn. 

607 Sketches Near Angers, by Janus P. Janr.eson. (Ca:al()=>ue 11- 
' lustration.) 

608 Close Gate— Salisbury. Ijy James P. Jamieson. (Cata'ogn:> Il- 

lustration.) 

TIFFANY GLASS AND DECORATING CO.— New York. 

1__ ^^^ Sketch for Staine'd Glass— "St. Cecilia," by J. A. Holzer. 

611 Sketch for Decoration of a Dining Room, by J. A. Holzer. 

612 Sketch for Stained Glass— "Ruth and Naomi," by J. A. Holzer. 

— :;4— ' 



HENRY W. TOMLINSON— 28 Twenty-ninth Street. 

613 "St. Caterina," Pisa. 

614 Villa Rotonda, Vicenza. (Catalogue Illustration.) 

615 Inlay Work for Interior Wood Work. 

616 Inlay Work for Interior Wood Work. 

VICTOR TRAXLER— 1142 Rookery. 

617 Design for a City Residence — Elevation. (Catalogue Illustra- 

tion.) 

618 General Plan of Same. 

619 Interior Decoration. 

A. B. TROWBRIDGE— Detroit, Mich. - 

620 Sketch of the Crypt at Mont St. Michel. 

UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANA— Philadelphia, Pa. 

621 Club House for Undergraduates — Plan, by Conrad F. Neff. 

622 Elevation of Same, by Conrad F. Neff. (Catalogue Illustra- 

tion.) — ^^ 

623 A Memorial Fountain, by Arthur Shrigley. 

624 Portico of a Music Hall, by Gerritt Jacob De Gelleke. (Cata- 
-— logue Illustration.) ^ -; : ' 



625 A Flower Stand, by Arthur Spayd Brooke. ^^^ i ^ „_ 

626 A Flower Stand, by Lorin Andrews Rawson. 

627 Gateway to a l^rivate Estate, by Ira Edgar Hill. 

628 A Building for the Study of Economics, by Franklin D. Ed- 

mund. 

629 A Frontispiece, by Joseph Starne Miles. 

630 A Fire Department Building, by Gerritt Jacob De Gelleke. 

631 A Building for the Study of Economics, by Chas. Tattersall 

Ingham. 

632 A City Residence — Section, by Harrjson Goff Kinball. 

633 Une Ecole des Beaux Arts — Plan, by 'George CroU Baum. 

634 A School of Architecture — Plan, by Arthur Shrigley. 

635 A Memorial Fountain, by Alfred Morton Githens. 

636 A Well by the Roadside— Plan and Section, by Gerritt Jacob 

De Gelleke. 

637 Detail of Same, by Gerritt Jacob De Gelleke. 

638 Elevation of Same, by Gerritt Jacob De Gelleke. 

639 A Well by the Roadside — Detail, by Henry Mocser Kropff. 

640 Section and Plan of Same, by Henry Mocser Kropff. 

641 Elevation of Same, by Henry Mocser Kropff. 

-85- 



UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA— Philadelphia. Ta — Coiitiiuied. 

642 A Casino-Elevation, by Arthur Ebbs. Willauer. (Catalogue 

^ Illustration.) 

643 Plan of Same, by Arthur Ebbs. Willauer. " " _ 

644 A National Theater— Plan, by Herman Louis Duhring. 

645 Elevation of Same, by Herman Louis Duhring. 

646 Pen and Ink Rendering, by Arthur Spayd Brooke. 

647 Studies in Interior Decoration— Dining Room, by Ij:iizabeth .1. 

Abel. 

648 Studies in Interior Decoration— Picture Frame, by Elizabeth .1- 

Abel. 

649 Studies in Interior Decoration— Hall, by Elizabeth J. Abel. 

650 Studies in Interior Decoration— Drawing Room Furniture, by 

Anna Harlan Wister. 

651 Studies in Interior Decoration-Tiles for Fire Place, by Anna 

Harlan Wister. 

652 Studies in Interior Decoration— Persian Rug, by Mary Harned. 
653 Studies in Interior Decoration— Altar Cloth, by Elizabeth J. 

Abel. 
654 Studies in Interior Decoration— Stained Glass Window, by EUzt 

abeth J. Abel. 
— ^ 655 Studies in Interior Decoration— Byzantine Mosiac, by Augus- 

tave A. Dick. 

656 Studies in Interior Decoration— Renaissance Ceiling, by Augus- 

tave A. Dick. 

657 Studies in Interior Decoration— Dining Room, by Anna Harlan 

' Wistar'. 

658 Studies in Interior Decoration — Tapestry, by Anna ilarlan Wis- 

tar. 

659 Studies in Interior Decoration — Dressing Table. l)y Helen M. 

Pennington. 

660 Studies in Interior Decoration — Dining Room Furniture, by 

Helen M. Pennington. 

661 Studies in Interior Decoration— Brocade, l)y William Albert 

Stewart. 

662 Studies in Ornament — Pompeian Wall, by Robert Frost Dag- 

gett. --^— _-_ _ 

663 Studies in Ornament — Renaissance Ceiling, by Conrad Ferdi- 

nand Neff. 

664 Studies in Ornament— Byzantine Cap and Mosiac. by Conrad 
Ferdinand Neff. 

665 Studies in Ornament— Moorish Wall Pattern, by Henry B. Hays. 

— 8r>^ 



UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA— Philadelphia, Pa.— Continued. 

666 Studies in Ornament— Renaissance Pilaster, by Harker Wil- 

loughby Jackson. 

667 Studies in Ornament— Perforated Stone Window, by Wm. Frank 

— Miller. __i„ „ ,^ ^ ^^^ i. /-.•^.v,^^^ 

668 Studies in Ornament— Moorish ITrcli, by Alfred Morton Oithens. 

669 Studies in Ornament— Gothic Stained Window, by Ira Edgar 

Hill 

670 Studies in Ornament— Byzantine Mosaic, by Robert Frost Dag- 

gett 

671 Studies in Ornament— Moorish Arch, by William F. Miller. 

672 Studies in Ornament— Moorish Arch, by Conrad F. Neff. 

673 Thesis Design for a Botanical Museum, by Alfred Morton 

Githens. ^ . . 

674 Same. \ 

675 Same. _, xx-i, 

676 A Ferry House for New York City, by Ira Edgar Hill. 

677 A Ferry House for New York City, by Conrad F. Neff. 

678 A Frontispiece, by Charles T. Ingham. 

679 Custom House for Port of Entry, by Frederick M. Mann. 

680 An Art Club, by Frederick M. Mann. 

681 Pencil Sketches, by Frederick M. Mann. 

C. G. VIERHEILIG— Grand Rapids, Mich. v 

682 Mention Drawings, Time Sketches, Grand Rapids Architec- 

tural Club. 

H. VON HOLST— 255 East Sixty-first Street. 

683 A Rich Amkteur's Residence — Plan. 

684 Elevation of Same. 

685 Frontispiece. 

686 A Colonial Stairway. 

DAN EVERETT WAID— 803 Ashland Block. 

687 Fifth United Presbyterian Church. 

688 Girls' Mutual Benefit Club— 531 W. Superior Street, Chicago. 

WAID AND CRANFORD— 803 Ashland Block. 

689 Design for a Double House. ' 

690 Design for a Double House. 

WILLIAM WALTON— 360 West Twenty-second Street, New York. 

691 Heraldic Panel. 

692 Panel for Black Wainscoting— "Lady Godiva's Dream." 

693 Study for Tapestry. 

J. N. WATSON— Peoria, Illinois. 

694 Cheateau de Comberg — From Photograph. 

695 Cloister of an Augustine Convent — From Photograph. 

—87— 



CHARLES WEATHERSON— 3739 Prairie Avenue. 

696 Model of World's Columbian Exposition— Scale, 220 ft. to 1 in. 

P, J. WEBER— 1142 Rookery. 
^ 697 Pri^ Design— New York City Hall, - — .- ^^ 

698 Same. 

699 Same. 

700 Same. 

701 Same. i 

702 Same. 

703 Same. \ 

LEO. J. WEISSENBORN— 355 Garfield Avenue. 

704 Design for a Residence. 

E. T. WILDER— 1120 Home Insurance Building. 

705 A Bit in Venice. 

W. G. WILLIAMSON— 157 La Salle Street. 

706 Lake Cottages. 

AUGUST C: WILMANNS— 2.39 Osgood Street. 

^ 707 A Town Library— Elevation. 

708 Plan of Same. 

^ T. W. WILMARTH CO.— State Street. 

709 Details of Bronze Fixtures Submitted for Chicp°;o Public Li- 

brary, designed and drawn bv Charles E. Bi.^e. 

710 Same. (Catalogue Illustration.) 

711 Same. (Catalogue Illustration.) 

712 Same. 

FREDERICK WILSON— Stapleton P. O., Staten Island. N. Y. 

713 Competitive Design for Windows for City Hall, Paterson. N. J. 

(Catalogue Illustration.) 

714 Design for Mural Mosaic — "In Memoriam." (Catalogue Illus- 

tration.) 

WILSON AND MARSHALI.— 218 La Salle Street. 

715 Apartment Building. (Catalogue Illustration.) 

716 Residence. 

717 Semi-detached Residences. 

JOHN E. YOUNGBERG— 4000 Drexel Boulevard. 

718 Measured Drawing of Academy of Sciences, Athens, Greece. 

COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY. 

722 A Design for Library and Museum — Plan, l)y Boyd Van Ben- 

thuysen. 

723 A Design for Library and Museum — Elevation, by Boyd Van 

Benthuysen. 

724 A Design for Library and Museum — Elevation, by Boyd Van 

Benthuysen. 

— 3g- • - 



COIX^MBIA UNlVKRSlTY^Continued. 

725 A Grand Staircase— Plan, by C. C. Wright. 
727— A Port of Entry— Plan, by Edward I. Shire. 
728 A Port of Entry— Elevation, by Edward I. Shire. 

730 A Hall for Oratorios— Plan, by H. P. Alan Montgomery. 

731 A Hall for Oratorios, by H. P. Alan Montgomery. 

732 A Graded School, by Henry Stewall Hall. --. 

733 A Opera House— Elevation, by Joseph Van Vleck, Jr 

734 A Opera House— Plan, by Joseph Van Vleck, Jr. 

734A An Opera House— Side Elevation, by Joseph Van Vleck, Jr. 

735 A Custom House and Postoffice- Elevation, by W. K. Fellows. 

736 A Custom House and Postofflce— Perspective, by W. K. FeUows. 
736A A Custom House and Postoffice— Plan, by W. K. Fellows. 

737 A Boarding School— Elevation and Section, by Jas. M. Austen 

T^arrach 

738 A Boarding School—Elevation and Section, by Jas. M. Austen 

l~)arrach 
738A A Boarding School— Plan, by Jas. M. Austen Darrach. 

.JOHN JOHANSEN— Chicago, 111. 

739 Study of a Lunnette for Art Institute of Chicago Building, to 

be placed over staircase. Subject from Keats' "Endymion." 

NOTE— The Catalogue Committee desires to express regrets that a 
few drawings were delivered too late to be inserted in the catalogue. 



Albert H. Wolf 

Consulting and Contracting Engineer j 




Steel Buildings, 
Bridges, 
Roofs, and 
Difficult 
Foundations. 



COLUMN SPLICE PLATE AND WIND BRACINO TOR 
Pabst Building, Milwaukee. 

DeilfiKd ud Erected b; Albert H. Wolf, In \%%\-n. 

— :!9— 



Chicago. 



♦♦Index to Advertisements** 



Tagc 

Abbott, A. H. & Co '. ... 128 

Andrews, The A. H., Co 126 

Andrews & Johnson Co . 90 

American Terra Cotta and Ceramic Co 88 

American Varnish Co 100 

Berry Brothers. Ltd •. 5^ 

Bonet, Leo 98 

Bristol, W.W '. fp 

Brown Brothers Mfg. Co 94 

Bridgeport Wood P^inishing Co., inside front cover 

Cabot, Sam uel .'...;... 7*^ 

Corboy, M.J 1 26 

Caubert, Eugene & Co. (Condorc cement,) last cover page 

Cole, J. Wendell & Son .10^) 

Chicago Terra Cotta Co 142 

Chicago Portland Cement Co '. 120 

Chicago Fire Proof Covering Company ...118 

Chicago Arcliitectural Iron Works. . . 1 14 

Chicago Ornamental Iron Co 1 10 

Chicago Edison Company 108 

Chicago Hydraulic Pressed Brick Company 2 

Chicago \'arnish Co 60 

Cincinnati Architectural Iron Works Co., The ... 70 

Clark, Geo. M., Co., Inside Back Cover 

Clark, C. Everett 130 

Clinton Wire ClothXo 100 

Corbin, P. & F...." . 54 

Congress Construction Co 130 

Crossman & Sturdy 142 

Carretti, John & Co 142 

Davis, Frank L. .. 74 

Decorators Supply Co 116 

-40— ' 



# 



x 



*„ 



Dexter liroiheib • • • ■ • • 64 

Dickinson Cement Co.. ...... ... • ' 62 

Dux, Joseph ■ • • • 124 

Earnshaw, E. & Son .777777777: ~T . . . . t . . . . ttttt rTTTTT-rrrTTrrT^ . 82 

j^lim'lds M f^. Co . ., ^ _ ^ ._^.^ -_■■ .■■■ • J ''^ 

Elevator Supply and Repair Co • . • ■„■ -777 TTTTT 7. 82 " 

Empire Portland Cement 5^ 

Enterprise Wire Cloth Mfg. Co. 96 

Evans Marble Company 74 

Expanded Metal Fire Proofing Co . i 

Flanagan & Biedenweg. • 94 

Furst, Henry, Co., The • 124 

(iarden City Sand Co 136 

( iardner Sash Balance Co 72 

(iailey, Asa .' • • • • U2 

Hodgson, T. J., & Co 9^, 

Hanging Rock Sand Stone Co., The : 122 

Hansell-Elcock Foundry Company 98 

HallowcU (iranite Co ■•• 58 

H. M. R. Construction Cos 5^ 

Hearnshaw Fire Proofing Co., The -. 124 

Henne & Company ~ • 84 

Henry, Frank '42 

Hooker, H. M., Co., Agts 64 

Hawes & Dodd. H2 

Jenkins & Reynolds Co., The ^ 7- . 128 

Knisely (S: Veldham .7 108 

La Salle Pressed Brick Co., The 78 

Lowe Brothers no 

Lucas, John & Co 7 . .7. . . 7 '. I04 

Luxfer Purism Co.. , • '20 

Ludowici Roofing Co '44 

Mackolite P'ire Proofing Co '42 

Marsh, E. S. Mfg. Co '32 

>Liriner & Hoskins '•^" 

MarinelliBros '40 

Meacham & Wright . 92 

Meuller Brothers '^2 

Meyenberg, Fire Proofing Co • • • • • ' 

McArthur Bros '3^ 

McFarland, J. C ^4 

McNulty Brothers '2° 

Miller, James A. & Bro ^^ 

-41— 



Moore, E. B. & Co 136 

Mosaic Tile Co . , The 84 

Murphy Varnish Co^^inside front cover 



• « • • • • 



Mugler, Geo. A. . . ..... . . , 124 

N iagara Ra d iator .Co,.,..^,^^..^-^-^-^-^ .-^-.-^^ — "77:":T~~7~Tr7T:777^^~ 

Nacey, P., Co ...120 

Northwestern Terra Cotta Co 134 

Orr & Lockett Hardware Company .... ... 80 

Pfleger Mfg Co., The ...136 

Pierce & Richardson : .rrr. 130 

Raymond Lead Co • • -^ -^ 'oo 

Reading Hardware Co. ....... 84 

Rock Plaster Co ^ 112 

Roebling's Sons Co., John A 122 

Russell & Erwin : 56 

Sammis, Fred, H ..114 

Samson Cordage Co., inside back cover 

Schreiber, The, L. (S: Sons Co . 66 

Seidel, Paul 72 

Schmidt & Staak . . 50 

Sherman & Flavin i ..... 106 

Smith, F. P., Wire and Iron Works 96 

Stanley Works, The .... 104 

Stebbins, S. Jr. & Co. 128 

Stamsen & Blome. . 50 

Terra Blanca Fire Proofing Co 140 

Tififany Glass and Decorating Company 82 

Tiffany Enameled Brick Company ... 92 

Thomas & Smith 126 

Umbdenstock Co., The 138 

U nion Foundry Works 86 

Vilas Brothers 132 

Vierling, McDowell & Co 132 

Voss, Frederick . . 96 

Wadsworth-Howland Co 102 

Weitzel,J.F 7^ 

Winslow Bros Co., The 112 

Wilmarth, F. W., Co .^^ . . -^ 142 

Wheeling Corrugating Co 1 20 

Wolfinger, Clarence I 88 

Wolf, Alfred 39 

Wolf, Fred. W., Co., The... 80 

Yale & Towne Mfg. Co 138 

Zander, Aug., Co. 142 

u - . _42_ 




i ( 



^ E. H. Blash field 

Ajnrnca'' — Decoration of Dome, Congressional Library, ^ 

Washing to7i, D. C. 




Nettlelon, h'ahn Cf Ti oivbt ui,i>;e. 

Study Jo r an Art Ctiib Bnildhig. 



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Howard & Cauldwell, Architects. 



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Library^New York University McKim, Meade & white 



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Chas. J. de Gelleke, University of Penn. 



A Portico of a Music Hall 




" Louis Rasmussen 

Competitive Design for Monument in Memory of Jeff, Davis. 



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Frank Allison Hays, Architect 

Court Yard in Apartment House Wilniington 



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Bstabliabed 1866. 



Stamsen & Blome, 



JUIIions 
of Feet 

in Use 



HEAVY 



Concrete ConstriiGin 

EVERY BRANCH OF PORTLAND CEMENT PAVING. 

Second Floor UNITY BLOG. 

CHICAGO. 



Teleplioae 
Express 12 



Empire Portland Cement Co, 



^A RN ERSj~N^^^ 




C. E. SCHAUFFLER, Resident Manairer 



737-738 MONADNOCK BLOCK 

TELEPHONE HARRISON 73 



...CHICAGO 



SCHMIDT & STAAK 

Architectural Sculptors 



MANUFACTURERS OF 



Cement and Plaster Relief Decorations 

200 Wells Street, Chicago 






■♦^^^^w* r$ ^^ St -J v^, 




]^ Michigan State Capitol Building 

of which we (jive an illustration on the 
opposite page, has its interior woodwork 
finished throughout with 



Berrv Brothers' 



Hard Oil Tinisb 

Under date of May 31, 189S, Mh. E. E. 
p^ Myers, the architect of the building, A^ 
says: 

''I have spccijied the vaniish and hard oil finish 
manufactured by Berry Brothers of this city for 
nearly all the public and private buildings which 
I have designed for the past t-wentyfive years. 
They have always given the highest satisfaction, 
and I have no objection to their use in any build- 
ing designed by me. .it a recent visit to the 
Capitol Building of this State— which was com- 
pleted nearly tiventy years ago— 1 2vas surprised 
to find -work which -was originally finished -with 
their goods looking as fresh and perfect as if the 
ivork li'ere recently done.'" \ 

f^' %^^ ^^ ^^^ •^^ 

We send interesting literature on natural wood 
finishing and finished woods, free for the asking. 
Our little cloth-covered book, "Natural Woods, 
and How to Finish Them," is of much practical 
value to the architect. 

Berry Brothers, Ltd., Detroit, Hich^ 

Varnish Manufacturers 



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104atici 
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S treet 

Works :New 
Britain Conn. 



Italian 16*> 

CenlurY 
Knocker 
m Bronze. 



Wfeliers OF Modem Hardw^are affcerGoth- 
ic,Renaissance and Mediaeval Motifs, 
^chibects Designs executed bY skilled 

Craftsmen with Refinement ^.Precisian. 










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^ Contractors ^ 



i]}i Unity Building 




LfSDAQY- HALL UNIVCRSITY or lLLi,^OlO 

A CuirrOHD QiCKTO I_AOi-M1 rcCTS 

J*/-\t3,'nWw.TL |~"\,attAN* li,L 



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"^jRUSSELL & ERWIN 
MANUFACTURING COMPANY. 




ARCHITECTURAL HARDWARE. 



NEW^ YORK 

NEW BRITAIN CONN 

PHILADELPHIA - BALTIMORE 

LONDON . 



CHICAGO SAMPLE OFFICE 

941-2 MARQUETTE BUILDING 

TELEPHONE -2640 -MAIN. 



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MAIN OFFICE. CHlCACiO, EKECTED 189^. 

CHICAGO VARNISH CO. 

MANUFACTURERS OF 

Highest Grades of 

Architectural Finishes 



Dearborn and Kinzic Sts. 
CHICAGO 



2J5 Pearl St. 
NEW YORK 



Pearl and High Sts. 
BOSTON 



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SHEPLEY, RUTAN & COOLIDGE, AHCHITECTS 

' NICOLA*^ E. WKYDERT, >>up\. for Library Board 

ALPHA PORTLAND CEMENT 

was used in the construction of all the prominent build- 
ings erected in Chicago during the year IS'Mi, as follows: 

Illinois Trust and Savings Bank, Lewis Institute, Stewart Building, 
University of Chicago, Silversmiths Building, Chicago Journal Build- 
ing, Ashland Block,- Studebaker Building, McCormick Harvester 
. .Machine Works, Van Buren Street Station, Viaducts and Subways, 
Illinois Central Railroad Company. Chicago Public Library. New 
" Fair" Building. 







DICKINSON CEMENT CO., General Western Agents 



Chicago 



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Moss-Green Roof 



G i ves an Artist i c Finis h 
to any Shingled House 



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Dexter Brothers' 
English 
Shingle Stains 



will produce the Moss Greens, Wood Browns and Hull 
Reds. Send for sample boards and sketches to . . . 

The following firm act as our Agents: , 

H. M. HOOKER CO. DEXTER BROTHERS 

57 W. Randolph St., Chicago 53 Third St., Boston 



J. C. MCFARLAND... 



Galvanized Iron and Copper Cornices 



SLATE 



..Roofer., 

TIN AND IRON 



TILE 



Skylight and Glazed Work 



Contracts tai<en in any part 
of tlie United States.... 



TELEPHONE SOUTH 158 



2511-19 State St. 
CHICAGO 



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Designed by F. M. Andrews of Williams & Andrews, Dayton, Ohio. 

The cut shows the steel skeleton frame of the Reihold Building, Dayton, 
Ohio, during erection and also the elevator screen in entrance hall of the same 
building. The structural steel in this building and also all ornamental work 
in iron and bronze was executed by the L. Schrrihp:r amd Sons Co. Electro 
Platins;. Art Smith Work. Architects designs carefully and artistically 
executed. Exclusive original designs furnished on application. 



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Pra:L'>/ hv I). H. Gregii ■ Cass Gilbert, Atchitecl 

Brazcr Building, Boston, Mass. 




JAMES R, MILLS, Manager Chicago Office 



^Kiaq oMi ^Ritctlato^ (S^AMi paun). 



NEW YORK OFFICE 

89 AND 91 Centre St. 



BUFFALO, N. Y. 



CHICAGO OFFICE 

93 LAKE STREET 



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CINCINNATI ^^ 






it ARCHITECTURAL 
IRONWORKS ^ 

COMRMNY ■*■ 



STRUCTURAL AND ORNAMENTAL 3€r 3ir ^ 

\? ^ Jfe: IRON WORK J 

/ FRONT AND LAWRENCE STREETS :^ / 
i CINCINNATK^ OHIO *k n: Kt. * 



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Evans Marble Company 



Importers, - — 
Producers, 
rianufacturers and 
Wholesale Dealers. 



Italian and Tennessee Marbles 

For Building Interiors 

302 Michigan Avenue, Chicago 

MARBLE CONTRACTORS FOR 



Plumbers' Slabs, 
Furniture Marble, 
Mantels and < 
Monumental Stock 



Library of Congress, Washington, I). C. 
Fisher Building, Chicago, 111. 
Cuyahoga Building, Cleveland, O. 
(irand Central Station, Chicago, 111. 
Lyceum Theater, Memphis, Tenn. 
Dekum Building, Portland, Oregon. 
Oregonian Building, Portland. Oregon. 



Masonic Temple, Chicago, 111. 
Art Institute, Chicago, 111. 
Cook Co. Criminal Court Building. 
Manhattan Building, Chicago. 
Millikin Building, Decatur. 111. 
Mather Building, Cleveland. Ohio. 
Hotel Metropole, Chicago. 111. 



Chicago Public Library. 




—14- 







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Long Distance 

Telephone 1440 



X 



J, F. Weitzel 

Architectural 

Shcetmetal 

Work... 



QNCINNATI 



Polv9on Conductor 




The pipe is expanding. Through its pe- 
culiar polygon scalloped spiral construction, 
allowing sufficient expansion and resistance, 
an artistic effect is also secured, not possessed 
by any other conductor pipe in the market. 

ice forming in it will not, by slipping, as 
in other conductors, burst joints and seams, 
but will descend gradually, without injury to 
the pipe. Water, in heavy rains, will dis- 
charge more freely, as the pipe will not choke. 

Considering quality of material used and 
workmanship required in producing the pipe, 
also the durability and design obtained, the 
Patent Polygon is, besides being the best, the 
cheapest in the market. 

HOME ENDORSEMENTS 

Thos. Emery's Sons. 

Samuel Hanaford & Sons, Architects. 
A. O. Elzner, Architect. 

Giannanni & Moorman. Architects. 
J. P. Striker, Architect. 
— ^ "■ " H. E. SiTer Architect, anJ others 







ODESIGN FOR A- fiESIDENCE 



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iipfawiwiiiiiii 




Design for a City Residence — Elevation 



Victor Traxler 



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Cabot's Creosote 
Shingle Stains 

have all the distinguishiriK points of 
excellence of a high class article. They 
have a clear transparency and soft 
depth of color and freshness of tone 
impossible to obtain except by use of 
the best pigments and the most careful 
and skillful preparation. No mudd\ 
effects, no blackening, no lifeless colors 

" Wood treated "L'ilh Cyosotr is not .mi h- 
Irct to dry rot or otht'i drray." — 

ci:yT( R )' nn "rii. >.\a a" )■ 



FRANK WRIGHT ARCHITKCT, CHICAGO. 

Cabot's Sheathing and Deafening *' Quilt " 

An indestructible, resilient cushion of dead air 
spaces, giving the most perfect conditions for heat 
insulation and sound deadening. Easy \o apply, 
light, clean, inodorous, inexpensive, and far superior 
to former methods. 

" The Quilt is considered by us the best kind o/ 
deafening paper on the market." — 

ROSSITER c-- H'RIC.m 

SAMUEL CABOT, Sole Mnfr. 




I20I Owings BIdg:., CHICAGO 

70 Kilby St., BOSTON, MASS. 



The La Salle Pressed Brick Co. 



GEO. B. ENGLE, Jr., Agent 



Manufacturers 
of . . . 



Drv Pressed and 
Vitrified Tront Brick 

Special Colors to Order 



Vitrified Roofing Tile 



Telephone Main 4669 

Suite 1 05 J Marquette Building 
CHICAGO 



— 7S- 



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Drawn by H'aller Scliumm Bi ii>ht cf Buyfirtid, Aycfiittrls 

Res idol ce Fron t — Berlin 



OrR ^ LOCKETT 

Hardware Co, - 



Manufacturers, 
Wholesale and 
Retail Dealers 



50 State Street (Op. Masonic Temple) 

7 J Randolph Street 

Our stores form an J, 180 feet deep on Ran- 
dolph and 80 feet deep on State Streets. We 
occupy five floors and oasement, have three 
electric elevators, double telephone service, 
and all latest Improvements to facilitate the 
transaction of business rapidly and at the 
Loicest Possible Cost. 

All the Prominent Manufacturers Liberally Represented 
Our Designs are the Latest Our Stock the Largest 

Our Facilities the Best Our Prices the Lowest 



THE FRED W. WOLF CO. 



SOLC 

MANUFACTURERS 
OF THE 



I I jynP Ice and Refrigerating 

_f Machine 



EASTERN OFFICE, 

Room 520, 18 Broadway, New York. 
.SOUTHEASTERN OFFICE, 

E. E. EGAN, 819 Equitable Building, Atlanta, Qa 
SOUTHWESTERN OFFICE, 

E. P. MADDOX. Fort Worth, Texas. 
PACIFIC COAST AGENTS, 

CLOT & MtESE, San Francisco, Cal 



Office, 139, 141 and 143 
Rees Street, 

CHICAGO, II^L^., U. S. A, 



FOR. 



Ice Factories, Cold Storage Houses 
Breweries and Packing Houses 



Over 2,900 Machines in Actual Operation. 
Machines Built from 10 to 200 Tons Daily 

Capacity. 
The Amount of Melting Ice which these 

Machines represent DAILY is 77,357 tons, 

or 28,235,305 tons PIR YE*R. 



SO 



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Birch Bui del le Long 



F.ntraucc to Liidknv Castle 



Elevator Supply and Repair Co. 

'^4 and ^6 W. MONKOH St.. CHlCACio 

ELEVATOR FLOOR INDICATORS _ - 

ELECTRIC ELEVATOR SIGNALS 
IMPROVED FLASH-LIGHT ANUNCIATOR 
(Signalling operator of first car i 

Our apparatus is in coi^stant use in tiie tnu'sf buiidiiiu-^ ot the eounlrw 



TIFFANY-CLASS 15 DECORATING COMPANY 

rVRNISHCRS W CLASS «'ORKr:RS DOMES nc \rilXCLLSlASTlCAL ■ 



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DECORATIONS- ^J MEMORIALS 



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]]]TO 341 FOVRTH AVENVL NEVVORK 



E. Earnshaw & Son 

Masons and General Contractors 

1010 \HW YoKK Lift-: Bliildinc; 

Monroe and La Salle Sts. 

TELEPHONE Main 612 ^ CHICAGO 




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'^ »« ■^~r,t^ M <r%t 



J 'f flier 



Charles E. Garstang 

DoorTi'ay of tJic Church of the Frarl 



PHILIP HENNE 



U. E. HARKSCrt 



HENNE & COMPANY 



CONTRACTORS 



Dealers in All Kinds of 

CUT AND 

SAWED STONE M 



S. E. Corner Fleetwood 
and Blanche Streets 



. . . Chicago 



Telephone West 8U 




The Mosaic Tile Co Reading 

Zancsviiie, Ohio i Hardware Co. 

MANUFAC^Tl REKS ()(• 




Ceramic Mosaic Tile 

"Parian" Vitreous Tile 

For Floors and Mural Decoration 
POLYCHROME 

Send for Sketches, Estimates and Samples 



I 



Fine 

Builders' 

Hardware 



(( 



Vassar" Cylinder Locks 

As used oil Marshall I-ield 
Annex, Monadnock. Man- 
hattan. Hartford, Stewart 
HiiilditiKS. and many other 
office buildings 



Factories; 

Reading, Pa. 



C^hicajjd ( )ftKe: 

73 Wabash Ave- 



Hi 



- CAP IN COURT or 
Palazzo Zorz.i 




(r/<?^5 W^ork 



Di aivn by J. C. Stephens 

St. Louis Aychitcctiiral Club 



lelephDnB 






WORKS. 
76^ 5T SGREENWQOO 



5ED.T. WILLIAMSON. 

PRE5. 



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W.R GWINN. 

"•^^^ 5ECY s treab: 



AVE 



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1 Architectural ' . 
[Ornamental' Iron - # 



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617 First National Bank Bldo! 

Gmigago. 



James A. AIillkr 
& Brother 




ROOFHRS . IN . SLATt . TiN . AM). IkoN 
AND . MaKHRS . of . GOKNIChS . BaVS 

Sky . LiciHTs . Etc . in . Gopphr . and 
Galvanized. Ikon '/^'$4M./St^f^ 
Special.Atthntion.Givhn. TO. First 
Class. Work. AND. LARCih.GoNTR ACTS 



120-131... 

SOUTH CLINTON ST. 



...Chicago 



sc, 



Cl^ARgNCE I. WOLFING§R 

Contractor 
and Builder 

FiNH Rksidhnch 

Work 

A Sphcialty 




164 La Salle St. 



Carpentry, Interior Finish. 

Offices and Bank Fxtures, 

Fine Cabinet Work 

of all kinds 

TEL. MAIN ^841 

CHICAGO. ILL. 



American Terra Cotta and 

Ceramic Co- 



ARGHITEGTURAL TERRA GOTTA 



FACTORIES: 

TERRA GOTTA, HA. 



OFFICE: 

104^ MARQUETTE BUILDING 
GHlGACiO.... 



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ae ANDREWS & JOHNSON CO. ^ 



Manufacturers of 



Hot Blast Heating 
Apparatus^ Blowers^ 
Fans and Engines ^ 

Heating and Ventilation 



South Clinton Street 



CHICAGO 




//^. PF. Bristol 



ATTORNEY AND 
COUNSELOR 



Special Attention to 

MecJniiiics' Lien Matters 



SL'ITH 608 
CHiCACio Opeim HorsB Blk, 

CHICAGO 



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nzzizrzTiffain; 


Meacham ^ „^ 


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- 


Enameled Brick 
Companv..* 


IVright 

General Sales 
Agents 





Manufacturers of 


Utica Hydraulic 






CEMENT 




Enameled 


and 







Dealers in 




AND 


"Dykerhoff" 




Pressed Brick 


"Royal Crown- ImpOrteU 

:^Z:- . Portland 

•■»'y'\, CdlKnt 

''tienry 




1^ (9 (9 i9 

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Also... 

^^Atlas^^ 






and other Brands of 




General Offices: 


American Portland 




IDarquette Building 


Cement 




Chicago... 


IDichigan and 
Deip York Stucco 




Eastern Office: 






626-156 fifth ilvc. 


98 Market St. 




Dcio York... 


Telephone Ex. 59 





92 




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KA( ro» 



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*- " i \ OLCORATOPS I \| sn()uiM)OMh 

MO. U -SlAlMtl) \# ^^^":^" . 










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(ili\SS 



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ESTIMATES AND SPECIAL DESIGNS TO SCALE FREE OF COST 

ANY STYLE 

FOR LEADED COLORED, OR BEVELED PLATE GLASS 

OR COPPER SASH SETTINGS 

CHURCH GLASS, MEMORIAL WINDOWS AT ALL PRICES 

OUR WORK IS FIRST CLASS THROUGHOU"^ 



Sidewalk 
Lights 




Floor and 
Roof Lights 



BROWN BROS. MNFG. CO. 



I Established in Cliica^M) in 1860) 

N. W. COR. Jackson Blvd. 
AND Clinton Street 



Telephone Main 408=^ 



Chicago 



94 




Frederick jri/snn, Stap!e/(>n. .\. )'. 



Dcsiou for Mural Mosaic—-'' In Memoru 



mm 



V 



Enterprise Wire Cloth 
Ma n uf acturing Co. 



FREDERICK VOSS 
Proprietor 



Manufacturer of 



/IrcbitecCural and Decorative 
Ulire and Iron Ulork 



Wire Lathing a speciait\ . Bank and Office 
Railings, Elevator and Window Guards, Stair 
Rails, Iron Fences, Stable Fittings. Wire Cloth, 
and Wire Goods of every description. 

TELEPHONE WEST T-7 

, ^ 

61 7-2 J Austin Ave. Cor. Lincoln St. 
..CHICAGO.. 



Members Chicago Puilders' and Traders' 
Exchange 

Long Distance Telephone, Express 438 

R R Smith 

Wire and Iron Works 

Office, 100-102 Lake Street, and 
20-22 Dearborn Street 

Factory, N. W. Cor. loth aiul I.aflin Sts. 



M IDeldl 
Ulorit 

'Crestiiigs and 
Vanes, Wire 
Cloth, Brass and' 
lilectro-Plated 
Wiirk. Lath, Etc. 

Iron ?ence$ 

Stairs, >>table 
Ei.xtures, Jails, 
(iiiards. Eire Es- 
capfS, [-{uiiders' 
Wi.rk. >^luilteis 
and l)(Mirs 

Stiid for Catalogue 




WICKETS 4 GRILLES 




T. J. Hodgson 
& Coinpany 

Cavpentevs 

and... 

Builbcvs 

Tine Residences a Specidliv 

Telephone Main 3899 

Room 29 

90 LA SALLE ST. 



or, 



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Hansell-Elcock Foundry Co. 



ARCHITECTURAL 
IRON and STEEL WORK 

ARCHER AVENUE, TWENTY-THIRD PLACE, 
BUTLER AND TWENTY-FOURTH STREETS. 



LARGE STOCK OF STEHI. KAILS, BHAMS. CHANNLLS, 
ANGLES AND PLATES ALWAYS ON HANI). 



RIVETED COLUMNS AND GIRDERS OFALLDESIGNS 



..XFXy BONET... 

Artistic Stucco and Modelling Co. 

1449 STATE STRFoET. 

Ornamentation in Stucco for 
Private Residences, Churcliesand Theatres 

Ornaments in Plaster Cement 
for Hxtcriors. 

DESIGNS AND ESTIMATES FURNISHED 

—its— 




JVilson Erye,Jr., Aichilcct 



/foiisr for Mr. A. L. FrotJiijiotoii , Jr. 




309-315 N. Branch Street 
CHICAGO 



r^Va? 



Sole Mali;ers of the Renowned 

Tloorcnc ... 

The Only Finish for Hard 
Wood Floors. 

Also Mnfrs. of the t'nsurpasseJ 

Granite finishes 

FvXterior and Interior. I'or 
Finishing of F'ine Wood 
Work. etc. I'liexcelled for 
Finish and I)nra])ilitv. 



..Raymond's Compressed.. 

LEAD SASH WEIGHTS 

H'ilh W'loiiiihl and Malleable hon ]-\istt'ttin\i>. 

3 



i I8M 





mm 



Solid, Compact, Noiseless 

These Weights are made 
under Hydraulic Pressure, 
securing j^reatcr solidity 
and density of metal, and 
a stnoothness of finisli not 
found in ordinary Cast 
Lead \Vci),fhts. <)ccui)y on- 
ly lialf space of Iron Wts. 

RAYMOND LEAD CO. 



1 ake and Clinton Streets 



..Cn CAGO 



Seiul for circular and i)rice.- 



CLINTON WIRE CLOTH CO. 



137 LAKE STREET, CHICAGO. 



76 Beekman St, NEW YORK. 

Sole Proprietors and 
Manufacturers of 

' Clinton ' Doable Twist Warp, 
" Clinton " Stiffened, 

"Clinton" Corrugated 

..Wire Lath.. 

Made from Steel, Japanned 

Steel, or Galvanized Steel 

Wire; also Steel Wire Galvan- *^^j^ 

ized after woven. 



SAN 1 R\Nr,IS( (). ( Al 




ShmvittQ h'ev of Mo>lar 



...ABSOLUTE FIREPROOF CONSTRUCTION. 

Ceilings plastered on this Lath will never crack or fall. 

-10(>- 




Chas. E. (nX) sUiuq; 



Detail of a Doonvay in an Old Court Yard 



t^iim SHin^le Stains 



Equal to any on the market tor beauty and durabilit\ . 
JWe carry twenty-four (24) handsome shades, samples^ 
of whTcTi will he fiirnished in lS()Ot< Torni orOii wood 
on application. 



Carburet Black 



The «^reat preservative tor all exposed worls. Struc- 
tural iron, Metal Roots, Shingle Roots, (iutters, Iron 
Fences. Boiler Fronts, Fire Escapes. Shutters, Smoke 
Stacks, etc.. can absolutely be protected a.u;ainst corro- 
sion by the use of Carburet Black. It will cover a much 
larger surface than ordinary goods and will retain its 
preservative qualities a greater period, ruiuiing into 
years. Practical experience on work demanding the 
greatest measure of protection has demonstrated tliat it 
is without question the most economical and at the same 
time the best preservative on the market. 

WADSWORTH-HOWLAND COMPANY 

paint and color grinders 

Chicago 



MUELLER BROTHERS 



Manufacturers ot . 




^artistic 

picture ^I' VHW ana 

I FRAMES 



NATLIKAI. WOOD 



ARCHITEC'I'URAL DRAWINCiS MOUNIFI) 

A SPECIALTY 

PRICES MODERATE GIVE US A TR AL 

134-140 Wabash Avenue 

TAKH hlKVATDIf 

lelephone Main 1960 CHlCACiO 

-102— 










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The Father of Color Harmony 




(lje(l at the age of 10;!, after haying gaiiiedjL 
world-wide reputation as chemist and the 
successful technical expert of the worhl 
famed (Gobelin Tapestry I'actories. We 
have applied his principles to the selection 
of colors for the exterior and interior decora- 
tion and preservation of buildings of iilL 



kinds. Our cards show the ai)plication; 

Ihi'x :ci/l (vst yoit only n /yostal. 

JOHN LUCAS & CO. 



PHILADELPHIA 
NbW YOKK 



CHICAGO 
BOSTON 



CHhVHEUL 



Manufacturers of specialties tor hcipin.u: to scatter beautv about the home. 



Stanley^s 
BaU 
Bearing 
Steel 
Butts ♦ ♦ ♦ 




Advantages 

Unlimited. 

Resistence 

to Wear, 

No Need 

of Oiling. 

Low Cost. 



Samples Frt'c to Architects 



THE STANLEY WORKS 

DIvPARTMIvNT "(V" 
NEW BRITAIN, CONN. 79 Chambers St., NEW YORK 

— 101 — 




Hufih M. (i. Carden, Architect 

Dcsioii for First Church of Christ 




P>'^^'-i^y-V4M^lrim^f~^^f^min Marble and Our x. m sxtwiit-— j^ jx^: 



Vinnf^nr^c Pofpnt Straight=Line Joints 

Mnncar ?» raiciii 3^^^, ^„ ^ Copper ceiiing 




Artistic and 

Ornamental 

C:ill ami sff sa mplcs 

3. Ulendell 
Cole 6 Son 

No. 9U Chicago 
Opera House 



X. H. — Stec-l KolliiiK 
Partitions, one '_'_' fool 
lii^h rolls into one foot 
(lianietcr. 




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Knisely & Yeldham Co. 



SLATE, TIN, I RON and TILE 



ROOFERS 



MANUFACTURERS OF 

Galvanmsed If^on and Copper 
^Cornices, Bays, Skylights, Etc. 



knisely building 

68-74 West Monroe Street 



CHICAGO 



....CHICAGO 



DYNAMOS, 
MOTORS, LAMPS. 

AM) SUPPLIFSOF 
ALL KINDS 



Office and Salesroom 
I ^9 ADAMS ST. 
CHICAGO 



EDISON 



Electric Light and Power 
Construction Work. 

Complete Lighting and 
Power Plants. 

Wiring of Fine Residences Par- 
ticularly Solicited. 



COMPANY 



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Chicago Ornamental Iron Co 



CHICAGO, ILLINOIS 



c...,„..rs..r Ornamental Iron and Bronze 



on the following buildings: 

The New Cliicaj^o Public Library, Chicaj^^o. 

Cohiiiibus Memorial lUiiUlin^;', ChicaL^^o. 

New Van Huren vSt. vStatioii. 111. Ceiil. R R. Co., Chicai^o. 
IMaiiters Hotel. St. Louis. New York Life Huildint^, Cliicat^o. 

Talace Hotel, Denver. 

Hlackstone, Memorial Library. Hraiiford, Conn., 
and many other important buildiuij.s ihrousjhoul the country. 



A. E. COLEMAN, Prest. A. VANDERKLOOT, Vice-Prest. 



JATHS E. LOW, Secv 




sa: 



*€ 



Cbc measure of waluc 
\% net wbat you p^Vi t^ut 
wbat yott baue ^otteula 
quantity an4 quality. 



BETTER THAN OTHERS 
BECAUSE WE PUT IN THEN 

surriciENT or quantity 

AND QUALITY OF THOSE 
MATERIALS NECESSARY 
TO HAKE THEN BETTER. 



-110- 





Firdrriik Wilson 



Stained Glass Sketches for City Ila'l 
Patterson, N. J. 



j^ 



The Winslow Brothers Company 



ORNAMENTAL IRON 

CHICAGO 




Telephone West 8S7— Factory 



Bower Barff 

Nammercd 
Leaf Work 

Bronze 

Duplex Bronze 

Galvano 
Plastic 

Brass 



Telephone Main M— Office 



Rock iUall Plaster 




n^HH MODtRN Wall Piaster is especially 
adapted for tire proof huildino-s, as it is 
unaffected either by fire or water, is the only 
hard piaster that preserves iron lath from rust 
or corroding, costs hut a trifle more tlian 
common lime mortar, and we cruarantee it 
superior in every respect, it hardens aiu! 
tou((liens hy a^e hein<^ better in ten year^ 
than when first put on. For full particular 
cail on or address 



s 

s 



THE ROCK PLASTER COMPANY 



1204 Chamber of Commerce 



TEL. 3679 MAIN 



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elOOLJiSB 



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('(//; /■/ ^' ^■- //(/ ^////i.' V. . I / , ///,V', /> 



/•."(/ri (//rr' Ilamlltoii Bell 



ColoioSihi'DU fo)' l^ccoratioii — llic Ponipciaii (aV(?-/, Tiir /rffdso}! Ilofcl 



RicJuiwud^ \ Iroiiiia 



M. SALOMAN. President 



Chicago /Ircbitectural Iron Ulorks. 

DE81GNHK>. AND MANUFACoTUJ^lU^s^ Oh 

PLAIN AND ^ ^ ELBCTRO-PLATING 



ORNAMENTAL CAST ^ BOWHR BARFFEl) 

AND WROUGHT IRON ANDGALVANO PLASTIG 

BRONZE AND jj WORK, DESIGNS AND 

BRASS WORK j| ESTIMATES FURNISHED 



BRANCH OFFICE 



Oakley Ave. and Kinzie St. 

ROANOKE BUILDING ...CH ICAGO 

Some buildings completed during the last \ ear are : 

Indianapolis National Bank, Indianar«)lis. Coiintv Court House. I..wanJa I'.i 

>>cot(ish Rite Building. Indianaroiis. Brazer Building, Boston. 

County Court House. Kock Island, III. Public >^afetv Building. Piitsburj,'ti 

Great Northern Theater and Hotel BuildinJ,^ I'. >^. Court House and Postoftice Baton 

Chica8:o. Rouge, Ua. 

>Mlversmith Building, Chicago. Columbia Theatre, Washington, D. C. 



TELEPHONE, MAIN 2324 



FRED H. SAMMIS 



Contractor in 



MARBLE 



Foreign and Domestic 

And Manufacturer of MOSAIC TILE 

Office 159 La SaUe St. ^j*.Jt FACTORY, ELGIN, ILL. 

CHICAGO, ILL. 

REFERENCES 

Produce Kxchange. X. V. Chicago Tclei)houc Co., Chicago 

St. John's College, IJrooklyii, N. Y. Julian Hotel, Dubuque, Iowa, 

Edison Ilhiniiiiating Co,, Brooklvii, N, \'. Chamber of" Coinmerce, Detroit Mich 

FXii.son Ilhiniiiiating Co., Patterson, N. J. Mathew Laflin I5uilding, Chicago 

Carter Huildiiig, Boston, Mass, Home Savings Hank, Klgiii, III 

Dartmouth Club, New Bedford, Ma.ss, Court House. Rochester, Ind 

Tremont Temple, Boston, Mass. Court House, Sparta, Wis. 

Club House, Saratoga, N. Y. Commercial Hotel. Muscatine lowrt 

Carnegie Library Building. Braddock, Peiin. Illinois Trust and Savings Bank, Chicago, 

Monmouth Court House, Monmouth, 111. Knoxville Court House. Knoxville Iowa 

State Building. Geneva, 111. \ye.stinghouse I'.uilding, Pittsburg Pa 

Chicago Historical Art Building. Central Cnioii Telei)h.>iK- Cf). lUdi:. lobd,, 

Continental Hotel, Chicago. oliio. 

-114- 




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A. I-l).N\rM)^. Prest. and Treas 



Cfl \^. W Wl 



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Edmunds Manufacturing Co, 

...BUI1J)HKS AM) CONTRACTORS... 



MaiuifactLiri'i's of 



\ Fine Interior Finish 
Mantels 
V / Side Boards 
:^'i Office Fittings, Etc. 



COH. ROBHY St. AM) WASHBUHNE AVH. 
Telephone Canal 68 CHICAGO 



ik; 




(;oi.n Mi-.DAL 



Plan of fulfil House. 



Dai'id J. Myers, Boston. 



@CAGO pE^PgOOF 




STEAr 

PIPE 4' BOILER 





COVERIMOS 




MER^ L" 



^ 






^wBatfMBUiiltfk^ ^ 



MineralWool 



FOR IMSULATIMG AMD DFADmiMG 

'*Anti=Flame'' 

THE GREAT Fire proof coating 



OFFICE 5? SALESROOMS 

46AriD50 FRAMKLIh 

CHICAGO 

TELEPHONE MAIM Z%^ 



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T. I. A\CNL!LTV 



I'. II. VaMin I I*. N \f,l:N 1>. W. MrinMI> 

Bstablished 1866 



HcNulty Bros. 

Contractors 



PLASTERING 

AND... 

CONCRETING 



-R.^-Nacey Co. - 

,\\i)1)i;kn A\n hods oi- 

Plumbing 

Gas Fitting 

HEATING A.Nl) 
HOUSE DRAINAGE 



J Telephone Main 2921 

Room 46, 159 La Salle Street 
..CHICAGO.. 





ior1)pration5 

V ST.\*\PtD <s»r iiios-<f D .Sriri 
roc CtlllVOS ,v(o SiDt \»'M.l.s 









mdMs 






nrmv^Qi 



V'ww residence work our .specialty .Ml work 
i;i\iMi personal sujje! \ision. 

Telephone Harrison 3H7 
339 Wabash Ave. CHICAGO 




NORMAN D. FRAZER. RALPH GATES, 

President. Sec"y and Treas. 

P. 0. KROTTNALRER, Supt. 

_ i^uccessors to 

Anglo American Portland Cement Co. 

Manufacturer.s of thi.s brand onlv. 
(inaranteed ecjvial in every respect 
to any hi^h j^rade Portland Cement 

'relej)}iones: 
City— Express 421 Hill Canal 75 



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The Roebling 

Fire Proof 

Construction ^ 

CW$ System Is based mwii Correct ' 

liiecbatiical and Scientific Principles 



hreqular Stone 



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dric/<^ Laid m Cow^e^ 



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Brick, do. 



Brick I d^O. 



lie Flanks. 



aser-' 



Brick^ do 



Brick, do 




■do. 



^■■do. 



Brick Pier, 
ab'tbCounes. 



do. 



Plank Fhtfoim 
of 2'il0"5fuff. 



Forminqa I'd 




jqoa.^e. 



10 IBi .im, 
25.5 Ibi. 



Test of a Roeblinti Imtc I'roof I'loor Aii'li un- 
der a load of 4.(XK) Ihs. ])er sciuare foot after 
the Arch had been subjected to a fire test of 
five hours at a temperature of 2. (K»0 3 and had 
been cooled by a stream from a fire engine. 

rstimates and Information 
furnished on application to 

John R, Rccblin^^s Sons Co. 



I7M73 Lake St. 



CHICAGO 



r.Ko. C. UAILHV, Manager. 

Works: TRENTON, N. J. 



The Hanging Rock 
Sand Stone Co^ 



Hanging Rock, 

Vermillion County, 

Indiana, 

Brown and Blue 

Granite 

Sand Stone 

ANALYSIS 



Silica - - - - 

Alumiii.i 

( ).\i(le 1 1' m 

I, line 

Maj^nesia - 

Moisture 

Los*- by iunU i.iU ;i (tt r 
(lr\in'j 



7 r,s 
:;..'.l 
■_'.'.•■') 

trace 
().■_'■) 

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'.I'.t.tll 



This stone has more Silic-.i. and l(>s Aluinina. 
Iron, Magnesia and Alkali, than the cele- 
brated Connecticut Kiv( r liroun Stone. 

Write for Prices and Samples 



Che Han^ini) Rock Sand Stone Co 

1126 Y. M. C. A. BUILDING 

CHICAGO 



— 1.>-J- 




Study for Stained (ilass. 



I'l aurrs (!. 11 iiii^i)iscn 



THE... 

Hearnshaw 
fire-proof 
partition 

COMPANY 



Geo. a. 

MUGLER.... 
Artistic 

Picture Frames 




90... 

West Lake CHICAGO 

Street |ll. 

yoseph Dux 

ARCHITECTURAL 
WOOD CARVING 
MODELIiNG 
AM) DESIGNING 

Ornamental Patterns For All Kinds of 
Metal Castini 



special attention 
give:>: k) re (,ili)!N(, 

106-108 WABASH AVE. 

TEL. MAIN 1787 



Take filevator 



..CHICAGO 



Henry 
Furst & Co. 



HENRY lURST 
HENRY FURST, JR. 
CARL n.iRSl 



CONTRACTORS FOR 



\irs 



CUT 

SAWED 

PLAINED 

and 

TURNED 



Stone*. 



278-280 E. Madison St. 

NF.AR BRIDGE 



Teleplione 

Main 2^4 = 



Chicago 



•^^* "^^ V^ ti?* 



Office, YarJ and Works 

Phone 439-455 Fifth Avenue 

Hain 162H CHICAGO 



-124— 




Richard II'. /li)ik.Siiilf>:ni 



P(sio>i for a FoiDitaiii . 



,i,.. 



00 




ONLY 't Helps Business... 



to have your office furaished with modern, weii finished, perfect 
office furniture- it conts no more thin the other Icind. 



• ANDREWS Metal Typewriter Chairs, | wm'^u wire seat and back 

^MiMiMHB ' \ adjustable to any position. 

ANDREWS Typewriter Deslcs. 
ANDREWS hifh grade Office Fittings. 
ANDtEWS Office Deslis, medium to best. 

See our FURNITURE in Illinois Trust and 
Savings Bank, next Auditorium. 



THE A. H. ANDREWS CO. 



300 Wabash Av , CHICAGO. 




$15 AND UP. 




# 



Luxfer Prisms 
..Daylight.. 

LUXFER PRISM COMPANY 

EXHIBIT: 170 Lake Street OHice i THE ROOKERY 




Pelepliont' 

Main Jt,i)j 



M. J. CORBOY... 

yuL^"''^"^ Plumbings House Drainage 

Natural Gas Fitting, Etc. 

Gas and Electric Fixtures, Fine Plumbintj: Goods and Sanitar\- Speciilti.^s 



Personal attention jjiven to testinj; 
and examination oi Plumbing and 
House Drainage 



t 



78 Dearborn St 

CH ICAGO 



THOMAS' tS SMITH 

STEAM AND WATER 

Heating and Ventilating Apparatus 

...GENERAL STEAM FITTING... 



Telephone 

MAIN 4486 



i6 North Canal Street 
CHICAGO 



— 126— 




"-\ 




TW.WlLMARlM 1(1. 



/h\siiiririi and Diaivti, Clias. I'.. lUiiic 

Design for Ihonze Fixture. 



S. J. Stebbins & Co. /l.n./|PPOTT6rQo. 




BUILDERS'... 
HARDWARE 

AND TOOLS.... 





41-43 Van Buren St. 

Between State and Wabash Ave. 

CHICAGO 



'hi.TH- M;iin :9<t7 



Pressed 
Brick 



We haiullf llu- bc^t aiui nio^t 
complete line (^f Pressed lliiild- 
iiig Brick and His^h ( ".i ai'.e I'ire 
IJrick to bf found in .America 



The Jenkins & 
Reynolds Co. 

105 Chamber of 
Commerce Building 

CHICAGO 



DRAWINQ ^ 5UFFLIE5. 



HSTAIiLISHEl) 1S56. 



Fire 

Brick niarincr ^ Hoskins, 

ASSAYRR5 and 
ANALYTICAL 



CHEMI5T5.... 

81 S. CLARK STREET, 
Rooms 5J^o 55. 

ANALYSES OF ALL KINDS 



Cla\'.«, Cements. Structural Material, Waters, 
etc. 

Consultation and advise in all matters 
connected with the Chemistry of IJinldint^ 
Materials. 

As.says of Ores and Metallurgical I'ro 
ducts. Mines Ivxamijied in the interests of 
the Investor. 

Correspondence Solicited, 

References if required. 



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...Telephone, Main 888.... 



C. EVERETT 
CLARK 

General Contractor 
and Builder..., 



McArthu 
Bros. 



and 



General 

Contractors 

Builders 



Suite 1 M)>. Title and Trust PUl];.. 
100 Washin^non St. CHlCACiO. 

B. F. PIERCE, Superintendent. 



(pierce 2} (Ricfarbeon 

Consulting and 
Designing Cnijinccrs 



DEPARTMENTS OF ENQINEERINO: 

Mechanical Heating 

Electrical Ventilating 

Sanitary 



ENGINEERS: 

K. H. I'IKKCF: K. !•",. KIC IIA k I)>( )N 

c. ]■'. los'ncK s. c. m:ii,i;i< 

r. r. I'OTTKK 

Estimates, Plans, Spec = 
fications, Testing and 
Supervision 

1405-12 M AN H ATT AN BLDG. 



410 drt'at Nortlu 111 Biiikiinir 

....6HICA(i() 



(■,n'^l,lvt■ I'.hrliiirdt . I'n>^t I'lionc Main 1 I'.H.J 

llfnr\- W >e'h!>ift<.i". S(C\'. 



'F^lione Main 15S^ 



lis Dfahbohx St. 

CHICAGO 



CONGRESS ^ 
CONSTRUCTION 
COMPANY 



HO^CH BLM 1.1)1 NT, 

12-1 14 Dbahbokx ST. 
..CHlCACiO.. 



-l:;(.— 




/)rO)lZC I)dll/Sf('r^ C'/inai^n O) namriitnl fi<)>i H'ork^ 



Vlerlmg,McDowell&Co. 



Manufacturers of 



^Architectural Iron^- 

(reneral Foundry, Stair /BeamlVork 

Engineers for Tireproof Buildings. 
Qffjce and Works: 23d St, Sc Stewart Av. 



...CHICAGO... 

A'o/>rr/ Vin/ini^^ Pirsf. Louis \'icrli)i^, Sc^' y ^ 7)y,is 



.llfrcd (', I'iK-'Siuith . Siipf. 




f^4J&AILEV 




PORTLAND^ 
CEMENT f^^i _ _ _ 
ASPHALT ^\J^rifo/¥mMirOMiM 

V AND OTHER ^ ^^^^^^(."""^^rJ^^^ 

CONCRETE J6 iA^A£iJt^mr^r 



Qf/CAOO. 



..-3- RELIEF 




The Back Water Gate of 
The Twentieth Century . . ♦ 

XTbe ©pen Ma^ 

No (ibstruitiiiii Im seweraj^i i ir venl:l,iii<in 

E. $. marsh mr^. Co. '"f. fines. 



ESTABLI5HED 1877 



VILAS BROTHERS 



MANUFAC TUHKHS OF 



R.L. G. Graphith and Oxide Mineral Paint: 



FOR STRUCTURAL IRON AND WOOD 



Telephone Main 3304 



227-229 Fifth Ave,, CHICAGO 



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ICAG 

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THE GARDEN CITY 
SAND GO. 



SALfcSA(.bNTS 



FORHIC.N AM) DOMHSTIC 



High Grade 

, . . Portland Cement 



,\\ANUKA(.TURKRS AND DHALHWS IN All. (.RM)t:s 



...FIRB BRICK ANO CLAV... 



Sand of Every Kind 



(jEneral Buildin(, Supplies 



Security Bldc, Chicago 



Pflegers... 



Wire 
Screens 



For Windows and Doors 



MAlJt BY 



THE PFLEQER MFG. CO. 

CHICAGO, ILL. 




HARDWOOD FLOORS 

Wood Carpets, 
Parquet Floors, 
Rug Borders, 

Send Stamp /or Book of Designs. 

E. B. MOORE & CO^ 

48 and 60 Randolph St. 
Chicagro, 111. 



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The Yale Locks 



Builders' Hardware 




Art Metal Work 



The Yale & Towne Mfg. Co, 

Western Office: 152-154 Wabash Avenue 



Chicago 




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Terra Blanca 
...Fire Proofing Co... 










MAMJKACTUKKRS Ol 

Light 

Fire Proofing 

Material 

For Iron and Wood 
Construction 



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Factory: Office: 

200 TO 220 ISth Place S69 Loomis Sthhet 

On line of N. Pacific P. P. Tracks Corner ISth Place 



...CHICAGO... 



Telephone, (^mal 8J. 



Marinelli Bros. 

mosaic and IDarblc 

CONTRACTORS 

Manufacturers of Marble and Ceramic 

Mosaic Work, Cement Flooring for Hase- 
ments, Ktc, Mosaic Mantels, Facings, 
Hearths, Ktc. 

Telephone Express 744 

172-4 S. Clinton St. CHICAGO 



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J. H. DiMKRN, President 

T. W. (".ii.MORK, V. Tres. and Treas. 



Kstablished 1S.")0 

Incorporated 18JH) 

F. W. WILMARTH CO. ^j^ Oas and Electric Light Fixtures 

Exclusive Agents AF^CHfiK o PANCOAST FIXTURES 

Special desions furnished. 225 and 227 State Street, CHICAGO 



August Zandkr, Ptes. and Treas. 



Oscar A. Rkitm. Src\. 



W.M. Zandicr, C'cn'I Supt. 

AUG. ZANDER CO. <^ General Plastering Contractors 



Telephone, Express v^l 



OFFICE, ROOM 40 LAKESIDE BUILDING 
S W. COR. CLARK AND ADAMS ST. 



. CHICAGO, ILL. 



Jo /if I Caretti 



John Caretti & Co. 



p. ./. Pi ruardin 



\. I-') atu escoii 



Alaiuifacturers Ceramic, Harble 



( i . I >a>nh) nsio 



•n? Enamel MOSAICS 



Fine Harble Entrances and Fire Place Settings. Medal and Diploma at World s 

Columbian hxpos.tion, Chicago, IS;);!. Kstablished ISS}. Telephone Main iS. 

Office, Salesroom and Works: 234 MICHIGAN STREET . CHICAGO 



MACKOLITE FIRE PROOHNG CO. •■'''Zl'^%"^. p.„o, 

Manufacturers and Contractors ot \a^\u lire Proofuij. Matenal. P.iriitio./Tik- 
Master t^.iarJs, Deatenuii; Material, Eire Proof [.Mhrn^, Furring Tile, (ieneral Eire- 
t r.n.tiny. Eire Proof Protection tor iron anJ \V,M)d (-onsiruction in Everv Eorm. 

^"""^Chlcatro Heiirhf^. Ill / ; ,a ^"**^^- *^'***'" '^*''' Schiller Bldjf. 

cnicago Heights. III. { /rl. ,,,: Mann ,03-9 Randolph St.. CMICAGO 

FRANK HENRY contractor for . Intcrior Marble Work 

MOSAIC AND TILE FLOORS 

Manufacturer of Decorative Marble for Wainscoting. Friezes. Ceilings 
Columns, Altars, etc. Hi.iihest awards at World ^ l-air. Artistic eO'ecfs' 
Teleph.me. No .{7!i,. Office and Worics: 118-MICHIOAN STREET 



CHICAGO 



ABNKR CKOSSMAN 



GROSSMAN & STURDY 

I Formerly Crossman iS: Lee 1 
1303 Michigan Ave. ^ After May I at 207 Michi<ian Ave.i 



I. (-. SI I 1M.\- 



CHICAGO, ILL. 




Chicago Ccrra Cotta Roofinij and 
, .Siding Cilc Co.. 

Vitrified Roofing Tiles of all kinds 
1122 Marquette Building . CHICAGO 




I. B. HAWFS 



J. ,M. I)( )I)i) 



HAWES & DODD 

Tiles, Ceramic Mosaics and Fireplace Furnishings 

Sole agents Maw 6c Co. 's Knglish Tiles and Mosaics and Mur- 
doch Parlor (irate Co. ( Hostoni P,rassand Iron ]-ireplace Coods. 
Factory and Warehouse: 101 West Adams St. STEVENS BLDG., 24 ADAMS ST., CHICAGO 

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A (^liih IIoU^C ^^ ' ■'''■ -'^'"■''■"'^"•^' Columbia ( 'ii ii'ci sity 



LuDowici Roofing Tile Co. 



MANUFACTUKtKS Of 




Interlocking Terra Gotta 
Roofing Tile... 






The most advanced principles of construction and manutact- »'e are adopted 
in the making of LUDOWICI ROOFING TILES. InteliigenTand thorou.uh 
investigation invariably confirms these principles and commends their results. 
Accepted and largely used by the Supervising Architect's office in United States 
Government work and by leading Architects throughout tlie country. 

419 Chamber of Commerce 



Works 



CHICAGO HEIGHTS 



CHICAGO... 






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All of the buildings in the Ferris Wheel Park are rooted with LUDOWICI TiLFS. 

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GEORGE M, CLrAR] 



iOMP 



149 to 161 






MORE DURABLE THAN 

(Copies of tests made, proving above^ 
Sold by th« Hardware TTradc 

SAMSON OORDACE WORKS, > BOSTtONf Um 



CHAl L. MUNGER, Goicrai Agnir^ 



Full stock carried with 



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Held & ^he ART INSTITVTE 

March Z5'^ \q f\m\\ 15'^ W^a. 



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The Bridgeport Wood Finishlns: 





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THE NORTHWESTERN TERRA COTTA CO. 

CHICAGO 



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CHICAGO VARNISH CO. 

MANUFACTURERS OF 

Highest Grades of 

Architectural Finishes 



DiarbDrn and Kinzie Sts. 
CHICAGO 



2l5PeirlSt. 
NEW YORK 



Pearl and High Sts. 
BOSTON 




[ J'^0 111 an s l^emple 



E. C. STERLING, President. \^ , ■ 
H. W. ELIOT. Sec'y and Treas. / ^'- "-"""•• 



S. S. KIMBELL, V. Pres. and Gen. Mur. 

H. L. MATZ, Assistant Secretary }-(,lnca«i) 

E. C. KIMBELL, Assistant Treasurer 



...AGENTS FOR... 



Hydraulic-Press Brick Co. 
St. Louis, Mo. 

Illinois Hydraulic-Press Brick Co. 
Collinsvilie, Hi. 

Findlay Hydraulic-I'ress Brick Co.. 
Findlay, Ohio 

Cleveland Hydraulic-Press Br;ckC:o. 
Cleveland. Ohio 

New Yi)rk Hydraulic-Press Brick Co 
Rochester, N. Y. 



Eastern Hvdraulic- Press Brick Co. 
Philadelrliia. Pa. 

Washineton Hvdrau'ic-Press Brick 
Co., Washln,i>:ii)n, D. ^.. 

Menoriionie HvJraulic-i'ress Ikick 
Co.. Minneapolis, Minn. 

Omaha Hydraulic- Press Brick Co., 
Omaha, iNeh. 

K.msas Cit>' H vdraulic-Press Brick 
Co., Kansas (;ity. Mo. 



Chicago 
Hydraulic= Press 

Brick Co. 

r 
MANtKACTrKKRS OF .AND DK.M.KkS IN 

Hydraulic-Pressed, Molded and Indiana Red Common Brick 



Office and Exhibit Rooms, 1 

1 


301-304 


1 


Chamber of Commerce BIdg. 


Cor. ha. Salle and Washington 


Sts. 


CHICAGO 




Works: Porter, Ind. 




TELEPHONES 


■- 


OFFICE 




Express lOo 
Express lOti 




STOREHOUSES 




18th and La Salle Sts 

Harrison and Rockwell Sts., 
Herndon St. and Clybourn Ave., 
40th St. and Wentworth Ave. . . 


South 7.'):! 

West '^CC^ 

North .S.09 

Yards »i;57 



^..AC^.ENTS FOR... 

St. Loui.s Knaineled Brick 

St. Louis White-faced Brick 

English Enameled Brick 

Racine and Milwaukee Buff 

La Salle .S: Bush n ell Buff 

Ricketson's Milwaukee Mortar Colors 

Salt-Glazed Wall Coping 

Hansen's Patent Chimney Tops 

Terra Cotta V\\\v Lining 

"Continental" Pavers for Colonial 
W^ork 



— 4 




Co>ih <ii /ois. Pcdi:;rijl, l-'irrinati cb" Co. 



Architects, Holabird & Roche. 



McConncll Apartment House. 

Division and Astor Streets, Chicago. 

/\^/i.s.S('/ Mottled Face Brick furnished by Chicago Hydraulic- Press Brick Co. 




HE 



Locks and Hardware 



for the residence 
shown on the op- 
posite page (that 

of Mr.Chauncey J. Blair, of Chicago ) 

were made by the 

Yale & Towne 



Mfg. Co. 



of Stamford, Conn., General Offices, 
9, 11 and 13 Murray St., New York. 
Two Artistic Brochures, "Artist 
and Artisan " and " Yale Vulcan 
Locks," will be sent on request. 

LOCAL OFFICE: 

152-154 Wabash Avenue, 
CHICAGO. 




On the Entrance Doors 



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The Jenkins & Reynolds Co. 

established 1872 
Manufacturers of and Dealers in 

...HIGH-GRADE... 

fire brick, fire clay 
Pressed Front Building Brick 



4()S Ghamher of Gommerce Buildin(r. 
15 Soutli Glinton Street 



CHICAGO 



Andrews & Johnson Co- 



Manufacturers of 

Hot Blast Heating Apparatus 

Blowers 

Fans and Engines 

HEATING AND VENTILATION 
250-254 South Clinton St, CHICAGO 

— s — 





//. S. S(//h!ck.s. Aiflii/if. 



St. PauV s Church. 

22nd Place and Hoync Aveyiuc, Chicago. 

Pressed Jlrick Furnished by JEX KINS & REYNOLDS CO., Chicago. 



RUSSELL & ERWIN 

MANUE\CTURING 

COMPANY 



NEW BRITAIN CONN. 



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HARDWARE. 
COLUMBIA LOCKS. 

BRANCHES, 

NEW YORK CHICAGO LONDON 

PHILADELPHIA BALTIMORE. 

CHICAGO SAMPLE OFFICE, - - 940-2 MARQUETTE BUILDING 

...TELEPHONE MAIN 2640... 
Architect's Catalogue on Application 




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iMoioici Roofinci Tile Companv 

4J9 Chamber of Commerce Building:, CHICAGO 
^ J^ Telephone Main J824 ^ ^ 

Manufacturers of the Most 
Perfectly Devised and Best Made. . 

ginterlocfeing Hoofing JTile 



•••••••••••• 



Reflect... 



ARCHITECTS 



...Reflect 



The roof may be the most conspicuous feat- 
ure of a house Terra Cotta Tile is the hij^hest 
grade of roofing material 

The Ljuaiity of material used reflects honor 
or otherwise on Architect, Owner and Contractor. 

Tile requires no heavier construction than 
slate. 



Paper under either makes a warmer roof. For 
Factories, Warehouses and Power Houses save 
your sheathing by using strips ( 1x2 i. 

Complete specifications for la\ing with 
sheathing ur without will be furnished upon 
applicatit)n. 

Prompt personal response made to your sum 
mons by telephone or otherwise. 



American Bronze Foundry Co. 

1112 Steinway Hall CHICAGO 




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Bronze Statuary and Decorative Trimmings 



ALL WORK GUARANTEED 



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IDEAL ENGINES ^r— a. L Ide & sons 

Works and General Offices: SPRINGFIELD, ILL. 

CHICAGO OFFICE : 1203 flarquette Building: Teliphone Main 4376. 







MURPHY VARNISH 
^os COMPANY ^^ 

^Transparent Wood Finishes -jt 

- INTERIOR AND EXTERIOR ^^=^^= 








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-S'. J'olis, J I., .\ I , hilri i a lid /■'.'n: I iirci . 

Po-iVcr House, I 'nioii lUevatcd Railicay Co. , Chicago. 
6/ //. /\ lUxbcock & Wilcox Boilers. 




l->pei i.ilK a a; K-J U,i 1-itCii ic ^ei vn.e m ( )tlKf l-5a,Llm^s, >ia)i cs, trU. 

IDEAL ENGINES :r~ a. L We & sons 

Works and General Offices : SPRINGFIELD, ILL. 

CHICAQO OFFICE : 1203 Harquette Building: TcupHONt Main 4376. 








MURPHY VARNISH 
^ot COMPANY ^^ 

^Transparent Wood Finishes ^ 

- INTERIOR AND EXTERIOR == 








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-S'. J'olis, Ji., A 1 1 /iiirt l a mi /■'.'ii^ I iifri . 

Poicer HoNsc, ( 'nioii Elevated Railicay Co. , Chieago. 
6/ //. /\ /iahrock & IViIcox nailers. 



THE FRED, W, WOLF COMPANY 

Sole Manufacturers tor America of the 

Linde Ice and Refrigerating Machine 



The Most Durable Ice and Rcfrigfcratingf 
Machine on the Market «^ J* 



3,200... 

IN ACTUAL OPERATION 







50- TON LINDE HbFKIGIHATINCi MACHINE. 

WE ARE ALSO ,^ ^ ^ 

The manufacturers of AMMONIA FITTINGS, and a trial will 
convince the user of their vast superiority over other makes ,^ S ^ ^ 
Globe Valves. AMMONIA CONDENSERS. Angle Valves J* ^ 

WE SOLICIT YOUR CORRESPONDENCE 
The Cut on the Opposite Page Represents a View in our Factory. 



GENERAL OFFICES |39=|43 RgeS St. ( fool «f B.yton ) CHICAQO, U.S.A. 

and Factory... ^ 



BRANCH OFFICES. 



NEW YOPK: Leonard C. Schmitt. 209 East 94ih St. FORT WORTH, TEXAS: E. P. Maddox 

ATLAiNTA, Ga.: E. E. Eaj;an. 819 Equitable Bids;. ^AN FitANCISCO, Cal.: Clot & Meese, 167 Fremont St. 

— Hi - 



Generators and Distributors of blectrical Energy for Ail Purposes. 



CHICAGO EDISON COMPANY 



LIGHT POWER. 

Arc, — For Motors to Operate 
Incandescent. all Kinds of Machinery , 



Entire buildings are now operating their elevators, 
hoists, house pumps, ejectors, fans, and ventilating 
systems by motors driven from our Central Station 
service, and are making handsome savings not only 
in the cost of operating and investment (including 
interest and depreciation), but in the utilization of the 
valuable basement space for other purposes, and in 
many cases even making it a revenue producer. 
Witness the Illinois Trust & Savings Bank and the 
Silversmiths' building. 

Improvement in the service and saving in the expense 
can be made in old buildings as well as in new ones by 
the substitution of electricity for steam. This means 
giving tenants the same convenient, economical service 
that is offered in modern buildings. Electric light and 
power is a formidable weapon in the competition of 
landlords for tenants and tenants for trade. 
We will undertake to find a market for present equip- 
ment of engines and dynamos when abandoned for 
Central Station service. 

Our Construction Department is completely equipped 
to execute contracts in connection with electrical work. 



i«- 



; 



CATALOGVE 

OF THE 



ELEVENTH - 
ANNVAL 

EXHIBITION 



BY THE 



CHICAGO 

ARCHITECTVRAL 

CLVB 



AT THE 

ART INSTITVTE OF CHICAGO 

MARCH TWENTY-THIRD TO APRIL TENTH 

MDCCCXCVIII 



V 



(pteface,... 



The Eleventh Annual Exhibition comprises works of Architec- 
ture and the Allied Arts. 

The works of Architecture include drawings and sketches of 
buildings in course of erection, projects in competition, drawings by 
students in the various schools, sketches and studies of picturesque 
architectural subjects. 

Under the scope of the Allied Arts come the exhibits of archi- 
tectural sculpture, mural decorations and stained glass, mosaics, 
carvings in wood, metal work and all articles which make up the 
interior furnishings of buildings. 

The Chicago Architectural Club takes this opportunity to express 
its thanks to the clubs, societies, schools and individuals who have 
sent their works to the exhibition. The Club wishes, also, to thank 
the officers of the Art Institute for their aid, the members of the jury 
of selection, and all those who have assisted in the work of the 

Exhibition, thereby contributing to its success. 

The Chicago Architectural Club gratefully acknowledges the 
liberal support of the Advertisers, which rendered the publication of 
catalogue possible. 



THE CHICAGO ARCHITECTURAL CLUB 

ART INSTITUTE 
CHICAGO 



Officers 

F. W. KiRKPATRiCK (Succeeding E. G. Garden, resigned), President 

WiLUAM H. Eggebrecht, . ist Vice-President 

. T 2d Vice-President 



August C. Wii^manns, 
N. Max Dunning, . 
J. C. L1.EWEI.1.YN, 



Secretary 
Treasurer 



Executive Committee 



F. W. KIRKPATRICK 

Wii^LiAM H. Eggebrecht 
J. C. Llewei<i.yn 



August C. WiIvManns 
N. Max Dunning 
Frank Upman 



COMMITTEES ON ELEVENTH ANNUAL EXHIBITION 

F\ W. KirkpaTrick, Chairman 

N. Max Dunning Victor Andre Matteson 

Hugo Arnold Clarence Hatzfeld 

Harry Starr Birch Burdette Long 



Louis J. Millett 



Jury of Admission 

J. K. Cady 



Robert C. Spencer, Jr. 



Hugh M. G. Garden 



Hanging Committee 

Elmer C. Jensen 



George R. Dean 



Catalogue and Finance Committee 

J. C. Llewellyn, Chairman 

F. W. KIRKPATRICK H. Von Holst 



RESIDKNT ACTIVE MEMBERS. 



Arnold Hugo 

Arnold, Miss Jennie 
Barker, Frank 
Beel, Jay Bassett 
Belden, Edpar S . 
Bernhsrd, Adolpli . 
Birge, Charles Kliot 
Braegei , vVilliani . 
Brown, Arthur George 
Burnham, D. H. 
Carr, CharlesTT. ~ 
Chafee, D. C. 
Church, Myron II. 
Cranford, R, N. 
Davis, Frank L. 
Dean, George R. . 
Dean, Arthur R. . 
Dunning, N. Max . 
Edbrooke, H. W. J. 
Eggebrecht, William 
Eliel, Roy . . ^ 
Eppinghausen, Charles 
Fisher, John B. 
Floto. Julius . 
Fyfe, James L. 
Garden, H. M. G. . 
Hatzfield, Clarence 
Hemmings, E. C. . 
Herz, Arthur. 
Heun, Arthur 
Hewitt, H. E. 
Hoeppner, E. A. . 
Hoffman, John 1'. . 
Holsman, Henrv K. 
Hunt, Myron. 
Jenkins, Harry I). . 
Jensen, Elmer C. . 
Jobson, Frank 
Johnson, J. W. 
Kirkpatrick, F. W. 
Kleinpell, Walter F. 



F. 



80(), IH4 La Salle vStreet. 

1120 Home Insurance Buildini;. 

1233 Marquette Building. 

85, 121 La Salle Street. 

1001 Monadnock Building. 

17S0 Old Colony Building. 

1780 Old Colonv Buildim-. 

234 East Ontario Street. 

825, 225 Dearborn Street^ 

1142 The Rookery. 

inr Rush Street. 

290 Ashland Boulevard. 

1233 Marquette Building. 

1314 Ashland Block. 

305 Michigan Avenue. 

121 La Salle Street. 

50, 115 Monroe Street. 

Pullman Building. 

39()5 Drexel Boulevard. 

148 Wabash Avenue. 

4443 Ellis Avenue. 

1120 Home Insurance Buildiiiir. 

453 Twenty-ninth Street. 

7020 Ford Avenue, Sjuth Chicago. 

417 Home Aver.ue, Oak Park, Illinoi.s. 

302 Ontario vStreet. 

804 Teutonic Building. 

201 Bi.ssell Street. 

99 Metropolitan Block. 

177 Fifty-first Boulevard. 

Arcade Building, Peoria. Illinois 

401 The Rookery. 

536 Cleveland Avcr.nc. 

153 La Salle Street. 

vSteinway Hall. 

2548 Indiana Avenue. 

1120 Home Insurance Building. 

Marcjuette Building. 

1120 Home Insurance Building. 

742 West Monroe Street. 

372 Webster Avenue. 



-22 — 



Kiissche, Arthur . 
Levy, Samuel H. . 
Liedberg. Hugh J. 
Lilleskau, John 
lyinestrom, R. S. . 
Llewellyn, Joseph C. 
Long, Birch Burdette 
Matteson, Victor Andra 
Miller, J. A. . 
Millet, Louis J. 
Mundie, William B. 
IVIuellerV Paul F. P. 
Naess, Ivar 
Nelson, Charles F. 
Nelson, Edward O. 
Neubauer, Adolph 
Niedecken, George M 
Niedecken, Mary M. 
Pattison, James William 
Perkins, I). W. 
Pi sell el, Fred. 
Rogers, John A. 
Rouleau, Arthur 
Rawson, Lorin A. 
vSandblom, Axel, 
Sehaefer, W. A. L. 
vSchmidt, Richard K. 
vScliell, George J. . 
vSchoenberg, George A 
Seaman, Ji. H. 
Seney, Edgar F. . 
vShaw, Howard V. D. 
vSniith, William J. 
vSpencer, R. C, Jr. 
Starr, Harry C. 
vSturm, Meyer J. 
Sheblessy, John F 
Traxler, Victor 
Tomlinson, Henry W. 
Upman, Frank 
Von Hoist, H. 
Weber, P.J. . 
Williamson, W G 



1()01 Manhattan Building. 

190 Dearborn Avenue. 

871 Mohawk Street. 

o03 Haddon Avenue. 

.3234 Portland Avenue. 

1245 Marquette Building. 

1013 Teutonic Building. 

1030 Davis Street, Evanston, Illinois. 

1504 Newport Avenue. 

225 Wabash Avenue. . ^^.^ ' 

1120 Home Insurance Bnjlding, 

Schiller Building. 

Abroad. 

Twenty-second and Loomis Street. 

98 Oak Street. 

613 Pullman Building. 

291 Michigan Avenue. 

291 Michigan Avenue. 

Tree Studio Building. 

Steinway Hall. 

1510 Oakdale Avenue. 

1314 Ashland Block. 

47 Winthrop Place. 

Riverside, Illinois. 

1430 Noble Avenue. 

22, 159 La vSalle Street. 

1013 Teutonic Building. 

1618 Monadnock Building. 

621, S4 La Salle Street. 

132 La vSalle Street. 

12023 Stewart Avenue. 

20, 115 Monroe Street. 

1427 Michigan Avenue. 

Steinway Hall. 

27 Forty-third Street. 

13 Lane Court. 

2933 Farrell Avenue. 

1142 The Rookery. 

1106 Steinway Hall. 

1761 N. Street, N.W., Washington, D.C. 

255 East Sixty-first Street. 

1142 The Rookery. 

159 La Salle Street. 



— 23- 



. " 1 



v.. 

Wirt]c, S. M. . 
Wilmanns, August C. 
Wittekind, H. W. . 
Woltersdorf, A. 
Work, R. G. . 
Zimmerman, A. G. 
Zimmerman, Hugo H. 



Abroad on Leave. 

264 Sheffield Avenue. 

1120 Home Insurance Building. 

70 La Salle Street. 

20, 115 Monroe Street. 

22, 115 Monroe Street. 

1279 I>erry Street. 



ASSOCIATE MEMBERS. 



Adler Dankmar 
^roes-Van-Dort, G. — 
Bushnell, E. S. . 
Combs, Rogers M. 
Coolidge, C. A. 
Dauchy, Samuel . 
Dillon, H. R. 
Dungan, Thomas A. 
Ewen, John M. 
Ferguson, L. A. . 
Gates, W. D. . 
Killen, E. G. . 
Kinsley, H. C. 
McFetridge, W. H. 
Matz, Herman L. . 
Meuch, Max . 
Nelson, Charles F. 
Perkins, F. W. 
Prosser, H. B. 
Purington, D. V.. . 
Roche, M. 
Smith, General William S. 
Spindler, Oscar 
Torgerson, Henry . 
White, J. A. . 



Auditorium Building. 

218 Wabash Avenue. " 

12()9 West Madison Street. 

405 Chamber of Commerce. 

1780 Old Colony Building. 

84 Illinois Street. 

113 Rush Street. 

611 Security Building. 

112 The Rookery. 

139 Adams Street. 

Manjuette Building. 

151 Michigan Avenue. 

68 West Monroe vStreet. 

Art Institute. 

302 Chamber of Commerce. 

81 Illinois vStreet. 

Twenty-second and Loomis vSlreet. 

115 Monroe Street. 

Marquette Building. 

323 Chamber of Conmierce. 

1618 Monadnock Building. 

733 Stock F^xchange. 

209 South Clinton Street. 

153 La vSalle vStreet. 

vSchiller Building. 



NON-RESIDENT ACTIVE MEMBERS. 



Adelsperger, Rolland 

Brandt, Oscar E. . 
Berry, A. C. . 
Davis, Seymour 
Dillon, John Robert 



921 West Washington vStreet, vSouth 

Bend, Indiana. 
43 Chambers Street, New York. 
615 Walnut Street, Des Moines, low a. 
907 Walnut Street, Philadelphia. 
481 Cass Avenue, Detroit, Michigan. 
24^ 



w 



»v.>l \ '._ ^f^x ' V Iri't^'Ttj^VH 



Enders, Oscar 
Garden, Edward G. 
Garden, Frank M.. 
Starck, E. F. . 
Thomas, Hariry S , Jr. 
Wilder, E. T. 



904 Columbian Building, St. Louis, Mo. 
Youkon Territory, British N. America- 

108 West Main Street, Madison, Wis. 
3639 Weatta Street, Denver, Colorado. 
160 Fifth Avenue, New York. 



HONORARY MEMBERS. 



Allen, J. K 

Blake, F. S. ^ 

Clark, Robert 
Gay, Henry Lord 
Hunt, rVederick vS 
Jenney, W. L. B. 
Lawrie, Henry 
Muller, L., Jr. 
McLean, R. C.x 
Phimister, D. G. 
Sullivan, L. H. 
Taft, Lorado . 
Wagner, Fritz 



34 Clark Street. 

117 E. Twenty-third Street, New York- 
Kingsbury and Ohio Streets. 
92 Dearborn Street. 
4621 Francisco Avenue. 
1120 Home Insurance Building. 
Omaha, Nebraska. 
410 Manhattan Building. 
410 Manhattan Building. 
949 Jackson Boulevard. 
Auditorium Tower. 
Athenaeum Building. 
1118 The Rookery. 




^25- 



The jury selected by the Architectural Club to award the medal 
offered by Mr. Henry R. Dillon, has placed first the design of Mr. Victor 
Traxler, of Chicago, and second the design of Mr. John Robert Dillon. 
of Detroit. The design placed first shows a clear grasp of the problem, 
the principal features of the building being admirably placed and em- 
phasized both in plan and elevation. The treatment is refined and dig- 
nified throughout and shows careful study and exquisite taste, while the 
rendering of the drawings is beyond criticism. 

The design placed second is also admirable in plan and in the ar- 
rangement of the principal features demanded in the programme, and il 
deserves very high praise for its thoroughly architectural character. 
The exterior, although less pure and refined in style than that of the 
design placed first, Avould look exceedingly well if built and would sug- 
gest a clubhouse more than any of the other designs submitted. 

The design of Mr. J. F. Sheblessy (placed third) deserves honorable 
mention for its general conception and for the architectural treatment 
and rendering of the principal facaie. With further siudy of the plan 
this design might have been made to lank with the best. 

The design of Mr. Fisher, which was placed fourth, suffers very much 
from unfortunate grouping of the principal features of the plan and 
from the awkwardness of an entrance on too long an axis. 

Judged as a whole, the competition was a very successful one and 
reflects great credit upon the contestants. 

J. K. CAD^ 

LOUIS J. MILLET, 

R. C. SPENCER, JR., 

Jury of Award. 



— 2G , 



CATALOGUE 



ALDEN, L. HARLOW— Vandergrift Building, Pittsburg, Pa. 

1 Perspective of Residence. 

ATELIER MASQUERAY— 128 East Twenty-third Street, New York 
City. 

2 Elevation (plan). B. Levitansky. 

3 A Well by the Roadside. H. F. Wickenhoefer. 

4 A Governor's House in a State Capital. William T. L. 

Armstrong. 

5 Country Hotel. Leonard Shultz 

6 Country Hotel. Mortimer Foster. 

7 Plan. William T. L. Armstrong. 

8 A Country Inn (plan). Karl Richardson. 

9 A Governor's Residence at a State Capital. William Sanger. 

10 A Country Inn. Karl Richardson, 

11 A Country Inn (section). William Armstrong. 

12 Plan. Mortimer Foster. 

13 Plan. Leonard Shulz. 

14 Plan. William L. Armstrong. 

15 A Well by the Roadside (detail). H. F. Wickenhoefer. 

— 27 — 



AYARS, CHARLES R.— 605 D«ivis Street, Evanston, 111. 

16 Competitive Drawing for Proposed Academy Building for 

Northwestern University, Evanston, 111. L. Rasmussen. 

BABB, COOK AND WILLARD— 3 West Twenty-ninth Street, New 
York City. 

17 National Academy of Design, Amsterdam. Elevation. 

18 National Academy of Design, One Hundred and Ninth Street. 

Elevation. " 



19 National Academy of Design, Cathedral Avenue. Elevation. 

20 National Academy of Design. Basement Plan. 

21 National Academy of Design, Ground Floor. 

22 National Academy of Design, Association Floor. 

23 National Academy of Design, Fourth Floor. 

BATES & GUILD CO.— 13 Exchange Place, Boston, Mass. 

Photographs, by E. Soderholz, of Buildings. 

by Edmund M. Wheelwright, City Architect of Boston, 
Mass., from 1891 to 1895, from "Municipal Architecture 
in Boston," 1891-1895. 

25 Frame 1. 

Tower — Fire Department Headquarters. 

Tower — Mechanic Arts High School. 
V 28 Frame 2. 

Boston City Hospital, 

Pathological Department. 
31 Frame 3. 

Gibson School. 

Austin Farm — Austin Farm Dormitory. 
34 Frame 4. 

Brighton High School. 

BAXTER, MISS M W.— Sherwood Studios, 58 West 5th Street, New 
York. 

36 Moorish Design for Mural Decoration. Miss M. W. Baxter. 

28 — 



, \ -1 '- ^?" --Ft'^,!^ 



BEEL, JAY BASSETT— 2950 Cottage Grove Avenue, Chicago, 111. 

37 Eastern End of Ston Assos (pen and ink). Jay Beel. 

38 Sketch from Photograph (entrance to garden). Jay Beel. 

BISSEGER, JOHN J.— 328 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 

39 Sketches for Workmen's Houses. J. J. Bisseger. 

40 A Country Church. J. J. Bisseger. 

41 Study for a Hall. J. J. Bisseger. 



BLACKALL, CLARENCE H.— Music Hall Building, Boston, Mass. 

42 Cambridge Savings Bank Building, Cambridge, Mass. 

George M. Page. 

43 Working Study for Elevator Enclosure, Store on Washing- 

ton Street, Boston. C. H. Blackall. 

44 Pastel Study. C. H. Blackall. 

45 Details of Cambridge Savings Bank Building. C. H. 

Blackall. 

BOCK, R. W.— Statuary. 

46 Machinery and Electricity Building, Sculpture. 
Trans-Mississippi and International Exposition, Omaha, 

Neb. 

47 Center Group, Symbolizing Progress. 

48 Corner Group of Humanity, £s Shown by the Developments 

of Machinery. 

49 Golden Rod. The Spirit of the Prairies. 

BOYD, LAWRANCE VISCHER--1215 Harrison Building, Philadelphia, 
Pa. 

50 Paduor High School, Wayne, Pa. 

51 Paduor High School (front elevation). 

52 House at Pelham, Germantown, Pa. 

BOYD, DAVID KNICKERBOCKER— 1010-1013 Harrison Building, 
Philadelphia, Pa. 

53 Public School, Wayne, Pa. 

—29- 



rfi'-Cfiv^'^'^ »t' '^ '.'. 



y-i 



BRAGDON, CLAUDE PAYETTE— 104-105 Cutler Building, Rochester 
,^ New York. 

> 54 Border — Magazine and Pamphlet Covers. C. F. Bragdon. 

BRUST, PETER— Milwaukee. 

55 Design for a Baptistry. 

BRACKEN, JULIA M.— 26 Studio Building. Chicago. 111. 

56 Monument. Julia M. Bracken. 



BURROUGHS, M.— Detroit. 

57 Furniture Sket'ch. 
Furniture Sketch. 
Furniture Sketch. 
Furniture Sketch. 

BOGGS, EDWARD F.— Southeast Corner Tenth and Walnut Streets. 
Philadelphia, Pa. 

58 Court of Bargello, Florence. Sketch by E. T. Boggs. 

59 Arch of Constantine, Rome. Sketch by E. T. Boggs. 

60 Porch of St. Zeno. Verona. Sketch by E. T. Boggs. 

61 View of St. Salute, Venice. Sketch by E. T. Boggs. 

62 Chateau Azay le Rideau, France. Sketch l)y E. T. Boggs. 

CRAM, GOODHUE & FERGUSON— Exchange Building, .53 State 
Street, Boston, Mass. 

63 Competitive Design for Proposed St. Paul's Church, Roches- 

ter, N. Y. 

64 Church of Our Savior, Middlebcro, Mass. 

65 St. Stevens' Church, Fall River. Mass. 

66 The Fore Court at Leighcombe. 

COPE & STEWARDSON— 320 Walnut Street, Philadelphia. Pa. 

67 Houses on Walnut Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 

68 Pennsylvania Institution for the Instruction of the Blind. 

69 Main Entrance. 

70 Ground Floor Plan. 

71 Section Through Cloister. 

72 House for J. S. Morg.in, Princeton, N. J. 



"n ■ ■ 



COLUMBIA COLLEGE. 

73 Plan of Casino. H. S. Beadel. 

74 Apartment House for Students. 

75 Plans and Perspective. H. A. Jacobs. 

76 An Art Club House. A. L. Ware. 

77 A Municipal Clock Tower. J. D. Boyd, Jr. 

78 Students' Club House (plans). H. W. Congdon. 

79 Students' Apartment House (elevation and section). H. A. 

Jacobs. 



80 A Railway Terminus and Hotel (plan). G. W. Rappold. 

COLUMBIA COLLEGE SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE. 

81 Elevation School of Fine Arts. Edwin Kaufman. 

82 A Students' Club House (elevation). H. W. Congdon. 

83 A Railway Terminus and Hotel (elevation). George W. 

Rappold. 

84 School of Fine Arts (plan). Edwin Kaufman. 

85 Regimental Armory (plan and elevation). T. De Coppet. 

86 A Facade. R. J. Reiley. 
A Facade. H. Kafka. 

87 A Hall for University Lectures. R. H. Elliott. 

88 A Students' Club House. H. W. Congdon. 

89 A Students Club House. H. W. Congdon. 

COLUMBIA COLLEGE— Morningside Heights, New York City. 

90 A Museum of Sculpture. H. H. Hooper. 

91 Elevation of a Theater. H. Herz. 

92 A Casino. H. L. Beadel. 

93 A Doorway. M. Colt. 

94 Sculpture (rendered in two washes). A. C. Tyler, 

95 Doric Order (detail). A. C. Tyler. 

96 Design for a Grand Staircase. R. D. Weekes. 

97 Regimental Armory. H. R. Elliott. 

98 A Casino. Harold Hall. 

99 A Small Museum. H. W. Wachtie. 

—SI— 



r.^ 1!!., ^..J _ 



■^'.MA'-r •■'■':-■ ^^ -v>.>/'.:' ' .' 



COLTMAN, ORA. 

100 An Alley. Ora Coltman. 

101 Afternoon. Ora Coltman. 

COLBY & SONS— 148 Wabash Avenue, Chicago, 111. ^ 

102 Collection of Furniture (designs). William Eggebrecht. 

CHILDS, FRANK A.— 1203 Maple Avenue, Evanston, 111. 
103 Sketch in WateTCoTorT 



104 Sketch in Water Color. - 

105 Sketch in Water Color. 

106 Sketch in Water Color. 

107 Sketch in Water Color. 

108 Facade of Vijla. 

109 Plans of Residence. 

110 Elevation of Residence. 

CHICAGO SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE. 

111 "A Baptistry" — three-days' sketch problem (plan, section 

and elevation). F. S. Fairman. 

112 Pompeian Fragment. S. Smith. 

113 Temple of Zeus, Olympia. V. S. Watson. 

114 Greek Detail F>echtheuni Door. Iv Steck. 

115 Roman Doric (detail). Arthur Mackio. 

CHICAGO SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE— The Art Institute, Chi- 
cago, 111. 

116 Tomb— A Sketch Problem. H. S. Powers. 

117 Tomb— A Sketch Problem. H. W. Edbrooke. 

118 Libraiy (design for the end pavilion of). A. S. Alsclniler. 

119 Library (design for the end pavilion of). H. D. Powers. 

120 Li])rary (design for the end pavilion of). R. E. Bourke. 

121 Doorways — The Side Entrance to a Public Building — 1. 

V. S. Watson. 

122 Doorways — The Side Entrance to a Public Building — 2. 

W. S. Alban. 

-32- 



V 



CHICAGO SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE— The Art Instituie, Chi- 
cago, 111.— Continued. 

123 Doorways — The Side Entrance to a Public Building— 3. 

A. S. Harmon. 

124 Tomb— A Sketch Problem. H. S. Powers. 

125 Tomb— A Sketch Problem. H. W. Edbrook.e. 

1^2^ Library (design for the end pavilion). A. S. Alsohuler. 

127^ Library (design for the end pavilion). H.D. Powers. 

128 Library (design for the end pavilion). R. E. Bourke. 
■ 129 Doorways— The Side Entrance to a Public Building. V. S. 
Watson. 

Doorways— The Side Entrance to a Public Building. W. S. 
Alban. 

Doorwaj-s— The Side Entrance to a Public Building. A. S. 
Harmon. 

CHICAGO ARCHITECTURAL CLUB— Architects' Club House Compe- 
tition for the Henry R. Dillon Medal. 

130 Rendered Elevation— Second Mention. John F. Sheblessy. 

131 Two Plans and Section of Same. John F. Sheblessy. 

132 Elevation and two Sections. John B. Fisher. 

133 Two Plars. John B. Fisher. 

134 Elevation „ (two plans and section). Lorin A. Rawson. 

135 Rendered Elevation (gold medal design). Victor Traxler. 

136 Section and Two Plans (gold medal design). Victor Traxler. 

137 Elevation (two plans and section)— First Mention. John 

Robert Dillon. 

N. Max Dunning. 
N. Max Dunning. 
N. Max Dunning. 
N. Max Dunning. 
John F. Sheblessy. 
Birch Burdette Long. 
Birch Burdette Long. 
Clarence Hatzfeld. 
Clarence Hatzfeld. 

—33- 



138 


Sketch 


139 


Sketch 


140 


Sketch 


141 


Sketch 


142 


Sketch 


143 


Sketch 


144 


Sket^ch 


145 


Sketch 


146 


Sketch 



k 



CHICAGO ARCHITECTURAL CLUB— Architects' Club House Conipe 
titiou for the Henry R. Dillon Medal. — Continued. 



147 Sketch. 

148 Skett3h. 

149 Sketch. 

150 Sketch. 
15i Sketch. 
152 Sketch. 



153 Sketch. 

154 Sketch. 

155 Sketch. 

156 Sketch. 

157 Sketch. 

158 Sketch. 

159 Sketch. 

160 Sketch. 

161 Sketch. 

162 Sketch. 



Clarence Hatzfeld. 
Clarence Hatzfeld. 
Frank Upman. 
John B. Fisher. 
Walter F. Kleinpell. 
Harry C. Sta rr. 



J. Bassett Beel. 
J. Bassett Beel. 
J. Bassett Beel. 
J. Bassett Beel. 
Charles A. Carr. 
Charles A. Carr. 
Charles A. Carr. 
Birch Bnrdette Long. 
Birch Burdette Long. 
Birch Burdette I^ong. 



PROJECT DRAWINGS— Subject: Residence for a Retired Florist. 
N. Max Dunning, Patron, succeeding. 

163 Frank M. Upman. 

164 Plan of Basement. 

165 Plan of First Floor. 

166 Plan of Second Floor. 

167 Plan of Third Floor. 

168 Elevation of Front. 

169 Perspective from the Gardens. 

170 Perspective from the Street. 

171 Section Through Main Hall. 

172 Block Plan. 

Members: N. Max Dunning, Birch Burdette Long, John F. Sheb- 
lessy, William Eggebrecht, Hugo Arnold, Clarence Hatzfeld, Charles A. 
Carr, Walter Kleinpell, Frank Upman. 

—34- 



Subject: Re-designing of Elevated Station for the Union 
Loop. Robert C. Spencer, Jr., Patron. 

174 Elevation. 

175 Section. 

176 Plan of Waiting Room. 
178 Plan of the Tracks. 

Members; R. C. vSpencer, Jr.; Victor Andre Matteson, Harry C, 
Starr, Hugo Liedberg, Hugo Arnold. ■ 



A Cold Storage Warehouse. 
Dwight H. Perkins, Patron. 

181 Randolph Street Elevation and Sections. 

182 Canal Street Elevation (east elevation). 

183 Railroad and Dock Floor. 

184 Teamsters' Floor. 

185 Store Floor. 

18G Produce Exchange Floor. 



Members: D. H. Perkins, Howard Shaw, Arthur R. Dean, Henry 
W. Tomlinson, E. A. Hoeppner, Hugo Arnold, W. D. Gates, Lorad- Taft. 

CASEY, EDWARD PEARCE— 171 Broadway, New York City. 

187 Rotunda, Congressional Library, Washington. 

188 Competitive Design for the National Academy of Design. 

189 Front Elevation (plans of first and second stories). 

190 Competitive Design for Exterior of Hotel Raleigh, Wash- 

ington, D. C. 

191 Front Elevation. 

192 Interior Perspective. 

193 Elevation for a Fire Engine House for New York City. «/ 

CAMERON, E. ^ 

194 Decorative Panel. E. Cameron. 

€00K, JAMES B.— Randolph Building, Memphis, Tenn. 

195 The Pyramid of Cheops. James B. Cook. 

—35— 



DETROIT ARCHITECTURAL CLUB. 



196 Summer Sketches. 

197 Summer Sketches. 

198 Summer Sketches. 

199 Summer Sketches. 

200 Summer Sketches. 

201 Summer Sketches. 

202 Summer Sketches. 

203 Summer Sketches, 

204 Summer Sketches. 

205 Summer Sketches. 

206 Summer Sketches. 

207 Summer Sketches. 

208 Summer Sketches. 

209 Summer Sketches. 

210 Summer Sketches. 

211 Summer Sketches. 

212 Summer Sketches. 



W. S. Burrows. 
W. S. Burrows. 
W. S. Burrows. 
S. Rosengarten. 
S. Rosengarten. 
S. Rosengarten. 
S. Rosengarten. 
S. Rosengarten. 
S. Ropengarten. 
E. Lorch. 

E. Lorch. 
R. Mildner. 
George H. Roper. 

F. J. Barnes. 
John Frauenfeld. 
M. R. Burrow. 
Louis Klein. 



DAVIS, FRANK L.— Michigan Avenue. 

213 Design for Mosaic Floor, Chicago 

F. Burroughs. 

214 Design for Mosaic Floor, Chicago 

F. Burroughs. 

215 Design for Mosaic Floor, Chicago 

F. Burroughs. 

216 Design for Mosaic Floor, Chicago 

McArthur. 

217 Design for Mosaic Floor, Chicago 

McArthur. 

218 Design fcr Mosaic Floor, Chicago 

McArthur. 

219 Design for Mosaic Floor, Chicago 

McArthur. 

220 Design for Mosaic Floor, Chicago 

McArthur. 

-36— 



Public Library. 


Miss H. 


Public Library. 


Miss H. 


Public Library. 


Miss H. 


Public Library. 


Duncan 


Public Library. 


Duncan 


Public Library. 


Duncan 


Public Library. 


Duncan 


Public Library. 


Duncan 



--X-0 



DAVIS, FRANK L.— Michigan Avenue— Continued. 

221 Design for Mosaic Floor, Chicago Public Library. Duncan 

McArthur. 

222 Design for Mosaic Floor, Chicago Public Library. Duncan 

McArthur. 

DEAN, GEORGE R.— 121 La Salle Street, Chicago, 111. 

223 Design for the Improvement of Ferris Wheel Park. Eleva- 

tion. George R. Dean. 



224 Design for the Improvement of _ Ferris Wheel Park. Per- 
spective. George R. Dean. 

225 Den for Mr. E. Burton Holmes. George R. Dean. 

226 Decoration Frieze Design. George R. Dean. 

227 Cast Iron Pilaster (photograph). George R. Dean. 

DUNHAM, HORACE C— 31 West Street, Boston, Mass. 

228 Frame of Photographs of Antique Furniture. H. C. Dunham. 

229 Water Color— Arch of Titus. 

230 Water Color— Street in Florence. 

231 Water Color— Venice. 

EYRE, WILSON, JR.; AND COPE & STEWARDSON AND FRANK- 
MILES DAY — A.-isociated Architects, Philadelphia. 

Free Museum of Science and Art. 

233 Ground Plan. 

234 Perspective. Wilson Eyre. 

EYRE, WILSON, JR.— 929 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 

235 Mantel for E. S. Hand 

236 Dining-Room in House of Dr. Joseph L^:?ivj 

237 Mantels for Ernest Albert. 

238 Mantels. 

239 Ben<!h and Chair for Mask and Whig Club, 

240 Sketch of Proposed House at Albany, N. Y. 

241 Front for Dennison Manufacturing Co. 

—37- 



1' ' 



' ' 'r?J- V.T: 



FELLOWS, WILLIAM K.— Art Institute, Chicago. 
Rendered Drawings. 

242 A Bow-Window (Concoiir Gradbref, 96). 

243 A Rectory — Twelve-hour Sketch. 

244 The Color Decoration of the Central Dome of the Villa 

Madam, Rome. 

245 The Color Decoration of the Central Dome of the Vill» 

Madam, Rome. *; 

246 A Court Window of the^ Ducal Palace, Venice. 

247 Water Colors. 

248 Riv di D. Marino, Venice. 

249 Via Giovonni Dupre, Sienna. 

FISHER, JOHN B.— 218 La Salle Street, Chicago. 

250 A. Boulevard Engine House. J. B. Fisher. 

FLAGG, ERNEST— 35 Wall Street, New York City. 

251 New York City Hall— South Elevation. 

252 New York City Hall— (perspective). 

253 New York City Hall— Section. 

254 New York City Hall— Floor Plan. 

255 Residence for F. G, Bourne, Oakdale, L. I. — Front Eleva- 

tion, Rear Elevation. 

FRANK, J. HORACE— 2116 Mouat Vernon Street, Philadelphia. 

256 Court Enclosure and Entrarca 

257 Rendered Plan. 

258 Section. 

FRARY, I. F. 

259 Design in Louvre. I. F. Frary. 

FROST & GRANGER— 806 The Temple, Chicago. 

260 Sketch for Station for the Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul 

Railway Co. at Minneapolis, Minn. Alfred Feldheimer. 

261 Proposed Scheme for Midlothian Club at Blue Island, IlL 

Hugo Arnold. 

—38- 



1' ROvST & GRANGER, 800 The Temple, Chicago— Continued. 

262 Proposed Scheme for Midlothian Club at Blue Island, 111. 

Hugo Arnold. 

263 Accepted Scheme for Midlothian Club. Charles S. Schneider. 

264 Residence at Lake Forest, 111. Charles S. Schneider. 

265 Residence at Lake Forest, 111. Charles S. Schneider. 

266 Residence at Lake Forest, 111. Hugo Arnold. 

FERSON, ARTHUR— 31 West Twenty-fourth Street, New York City. 

267 Design for a Barometer. — 

268 Design fcr a Cabinet. 



GARDEN, HUGH M. G. 

269 Design for Collegiate Building. Hugh M. G. Garden. 

270 "'Illinois Building" at Trans-Mississippi International Ex- 

position. H. M. G. Garden. 

271 Floor Plan of Abovv?. H. M. G. Garden. 

272 Detail of Above. H. M. G. Garden. 

273 Library of House for W. G. Hale. H. M. G. Garden. 

274 Perspective of House for W. G. Hale. H. M. G. Garden. 

275 House for Mrs. Morris. H. M. G. Garden. 

276 Perspective of Summer Cottage at Moose Head Lake, for 

Pr3f. W. G. Hale. Birch Burdette Long. 

GREGG, D. A.— 1029 Tremont Boulevard, Boston, Mass. 

277 Pencil and Color— Mary Arden's Cottage. D. A. Gregg. 

GREY, ELMER— 419 Broadway. Milwaukee, Wis. 

278 The Town of Semur— Water Coloi, 

279 Cathedral at Troyes— Water Color. 

280 Roadside Church near Troyes — Water Color. 

281 Church near Semur — Water Color 

282 Church at Provins — Water Color. 

283 Design for a Tomb — Pen and Ink. 

284 Town of Semur, France — Water Color. 

285 Design for a Baptistry Screen — Pen and Ink. 

— 159- 



GULBRANSON, P. G.— 31 West Street, Boston, Mass. 

286 Old Furniture. P. G. Gulbranson. 

287 Sketches for Furniture. P. G. Gulbranson. 

288 Sketches for Furniture. P. G. Gulbranson. 

HAYS, FRANK A.— 423 Chefctnut Street, Philadelphia. 
^ 289 Design of a Residence. Frank A. Hays. 

290 Alterations to Housi for M. M. Swabb, Efeq. Frank A. Hays. 



HAYS, WILLIAM CHARLES— 320 Walnut Street, Philadelphia. 

291 A Memorial Tomb (first mention T Square Club). William 

Charles Hayes. 

292 An Arrangement of Terraces and Steps (second mention 

T Square Club). William Charles Hayes. 

HELLER, EUGENIE M.— 58 West PMfty-seventh Street, New York 
City. 

293 Panel for a Screen, Painted on Canvas. E. M. Heller. 

294 Design for a Stained Glass Transom. E. M. Heller. 

HOKANSON, OSCAR M.— 616 North Fortieth Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 

295 Moore House, Vienna, Virginia. Oscar M. Hokanson. 

ILLINOIS, UNIVERSITY OF— Champaign, 111. 

296 Design for a Small Library. F. R. Capron. 

297 Design for a Music School. C. M. Davidson. 

298 Miscellaneous Designs. 

299 Eight-Hour Problems. 

300 Two Designs for Museums. C. R. Clark. 
300A Two Designs for Museums. A. L. Thayer. 

301 Pencil Sketches. 

302 Drawings from Cast. 

303 Design for Club House. C. 0. Kuehne. 

304 Design for Railroad Station. T. C. Kistner. 

305 Design for an Athenaeum. Charles Howinson. 

306 Design for Interior Decoration. 

—10- 



.J 



JOSSELYN, EDGAR A.— 27 West Thirtieth Street, New York. 

307 Sketch Submitted in the Preliminary Competition for the 

New York Library. 
JONES, BEATRIX— 21 East Eleventh Street, New York City. 

308 Two Bird's-Eye Views of a Gentleman's Residence near New 

York. 

JAMIESON, JAMES P.— 1408 South Fifteenth Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 

309 Stall from Chapel, Palazzo Publico, Siena. 

3i0^ Sketch of Doorway. - 



KAHN, ALBERT— Detroit, Mich. - 

311 Water Color Study. 

312 Color Study 

313 Color Study. 

KENNEDY, HAYS & KELSEY— 931 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 

314 Sketch for additions to "The Wheel," Merlon. 

315 Sketch for additions to House at Glenside. 

316 Sketch for additions to House at Glenside. 

317 Chestnut Street Elevation of Office Building. O. Wenderoth. 

318 Scale Drawing. Residence for Chas. E. Bosby. 

319 Elevations, etc., of the West Philadelphia Trust Co. 

320 Sketch of Pritchell House. 

321 Tenant House at West End. (Pencil Sketch.) 

322 Competitive Drawing for the Land Title and Trust Co. 

O. Wenderoth. 

323 Sketch for a Panel in Ingle Nook. M. P. Hayes. 

324 Perspective. Land, Title and Trust Co., Philadelphia. 

KNOX & ELLIOT— Cleveland, Ohio. 

325 Design for Ohio State Capitol Alteration. J. H. Elliot. 

KOCH, ARMAND D.— 902 Pabst Building, Milwaukee, Wis. 

326 Portal of St. Trophine at Aries. (Measured Drawing done 

at Ecole des Beaux Arts, Paris.) 

327 Gothic Panel Notre Dame de Paris. (Measured Drawing 

done at Ecole des Beaux Arts, Paris.) Medal awarded. 

—41- 



LEVY, SAMUEL H.— 190 Dearborn Avenue. Chicago. 

328 A Town Pumping Station. Pen and Ink Drawing. Samuel 

H. Levy. 

LONG, BIRCH BURDETTE— 1013, 172 Washington Street, Chicago. 

329 Tomb of Marguerite de Bcurgone. 

330 Bour France. Pen and Ink 

331 Villa Lante. Staircase and Fountain. 

332 Pen and Ink and Pencil. 
"' " 333 Villa de Este. Pencil. 

334 Ulm Cathedral. Water Color. 

335 Eagle Gates, Broome Park, England 

336 Pen and Ink and Pencil. 

337 Sketch. Water Color. 

MAKER, GEORGE W.— Room 820, 218 LaSalle Street, Chicago. 

338 Residence of John Farson, Oak Park, 111. Water Color. 

Perspective. Geo. W. Maher. 

340 Photograph Residence, Chicago. 

341 Photograph, Interiors. 

342 Residence c t Kenilwcrth, 111. 
342 A Detail of Porch and Kntrauce. 

343 Residence at Kenilworth, 111. 

344 Residence at Kenilworth, 111. 2 Photos. 

344A Detail to Porch and Interior. Residence at Ed^ewater. 

Detail to Porch and Interior. Residence at Edgew.iier. 
Photos. 

345 Residence at Kenilworth, 111. 2 Photos. 

MANN, FREDERICK M.— University of Pennsylvania. 

346 Church of St. Angelo, Perugia. 

347 Roman Sketches 

348 Palazzo Vasan Venice. 

349 Doorway to Chapel. v 

MANN, GEORGE R.— St. Louis, Mo. 

350 Montana State Capitol. Oscar Enders. 

—42— 



:v7 ''■■V' '■'•''''' .■^"}--^i-/Xt':r,'^'^^^^ 



MASS. INSTITUTE OP^ TECHNOLOGY, DEPARTMENT OF ARCHI- 
TECTURE. 
351 Elevation of a Governor's Residence. R. C. Henry. 
(First Mention, Beaux Arts Competition.) 

353 Plan of Same. R. C. Henry. 

354 Section of Same. R. C. Henry. 

355 Elev^ation and Section of a Departmental Store. D. T. 

Myers. 

356 First Floor Plan of Same. D. T. Myers. 

357 Second Floor Plan of Same. D. T. Myers. 

358 India Ink Rendering. Carl Werner. 

359 Elevation of a Small Theater. (First Mention Beaux Arts 

Competition.) R. W. Pcrter. 

360 Details of Same. R. W. Porter. 

361 Elevation of a University Club House. (Medal, Beaux Arts 

Competition.) A. H. Spaler. 

362 Plan of Same. A. H. Spaler. 

363 Elevation of a Governor's Residence. (Medal, Beaux Arts 

Competition.) R. W. Porter. 

364 Plan of Same. R. W. Porter. 

365 Section of S?me. R. W. Porter. 

MILDNER, R. -Detroit. 

366 Gate Palmer Park. 

MORGAN, .1. GEORGE— 1012 Harrison Building, Philadelphia, Pa. 

367 An Arrangement of Terraces and Steps. i 

NIEDECKER, GEORGE M.— 291 Michigan Avenue. 

368 Design for Fiiezes. 

OELSCHLAGER, CHAS. E.— Harrison Building, Philadelphia, Pa. 

369 Proposed House at Washington, D. C. 

OTTENHEIMER, HENRY L.— 1201 Fort Dearborn Building, Chicago. 

Water Color Perspectives. ^ 

370 Residence for Dr. Jos. Zeisler, Chicago. Henry J. Ross. 

371 Residence for James E. Gr^enbaum, Chicago. Henry J. 

Ross. 

-43- 



:.■%■• '^^r^. 



OTTENHEIMER, HENRY L.— 1201 Fort Dearborn Building, Chicago, 
Continued. 

372 Apartment Building for Dr. C. P. Caldwell. Henry J. Ross. 

373 Apartment Building for A. A. Canavan. Henry J. Ross. 

374 Residence of Leon Hartman, Chicago. 

375 Detail of Entrance. 

376 Detail of Exterior. 

377 Chicago Home for Jewish Orphans. 

378 Chicago Home for Jewish Orphans. ~- " ^^ ^ 

379 Design for Tombeau. 

380 Study for Residence. 

381 Apartment Building, Les Tours. Perspective Water Color. 



PARISH, CLARA W.— 78 W. 54th Street, New York City. 

382 Design for Window. 

383 The Hymn. 

384 The Annunciation. 

385 The Three Marys at the Tomb. 

PARKER, EDGAR O.— 24 Craigie Street, Cambridge, Mass. 

386 Design for Wall Paper. 

387 Design for Wall Paper. 

388 Design for Wall Paper. 

PATCHETT, CLIFFORD— 24 Craigie Street, Cambridge, Mass. 

389 Design for Wall Paper. 

390 Design for Wall Paper. 

391 Design for Wall Paper. 

PATTON & FISHER— Montauk Block, Chicago. > 

392 Design for a Library Building. H. M. G. Garden. 

PENNSYLVANIA UNIVERSITY, SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE. 

393 A Villa on an Island, Plan. A. E. Willaner. 

394 A Villa on an Island, Elevation. A. E. Willaner. 

395 Plan of Entrance, Elevation. A. E. Willaner. 

396 Elevation. F. D. Edmonds. 

—44— 



PENNSYLVANIA UNIVERSITY, SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE- 
Continued. 
Elevation. W. Wittenberg. 
Plan. W. Wittenberg. 
Grounds, Plan. W. Wittenberg. 
A Belvidere, Elevation. W. Trumbower. 
A Belvidere, Plan. W. Trumbower. 
A Belvidere, Section. W. Trumbower. 

A Belvidere, Detail. W. Trumbower. 

Elevation of Belvidere. W. F. Wischmeyer. L ___ 

Plan of Belvidere. W. F. Wischmeyer. 

Elevation of Belvidere. V. L. Johnson. 

Elevation of Belvidere. G. A. Reinhardt. 

Decoration. 



397 
398 

399 
400 
401 
402 
403 
404 
405 
406 
407 



408 
409 
410 
411 
412 
413 
414 



415 

416 

417 

418 

419 

420 

421 

422 

423 

424 

425 
426 

427 



A Byzantine Mosaic. A. S. Brooke. 
Water Color. A. S. Brooke. 
Embroidery. Helen M. Pennington. 
Altar Cloth. Helen M. Pennington. 
Ceiling. H. M. Kropff. 
A Byzantine Mosaic. E. Broguard Okie. 
Ceiling. F A. Romnel. 

Monthly Problems. 

A Library, Elevation. G. J. DeGelleke. 

A Casino, Elevation. G. J. DeGelleke. 

A Casino, Plan. G. J. DeGelleke. 

A Casino, Plan and Section. G. J. DeGelleke. 

A City Residence. G. J. DeGelleke. 

A Memorial Tablet. V. L. Johnson. 

A Tomb. H. M. Kropff. 

A Frontispiece. R. W. Snyder. 

A Pantheon.. Plan. A. S. Brooke. 

A Pantheon, Elevation. A. S. Brooke. 

A Memorial Church. A. S. Brooke. 

A Pantheon, Elevation. A. E. Willauer. 

A Pantheon. Plan. A. B. Willauer. 



( 






PENNSYLVANIA UNIVERvSITY, vSCHOOL OI- ARCHITECTURE— 
Coutinued. 

428 A Gourt House, Elevation. A. E. Willaiier. 

429 A Court House. Plan. A. E. Willauer. 

430 A Memorial Church, Elevation. H. L. Duhring. 

431 A Memorial Church, Side Elevation. H. L. Duhring. 

432 A Memorial Church, Plan. H. L. Duhring. 

T A Memorial Church. 



433 Section. H: L. Duhring. 

z::z43i Elevation. ^7 M. Hokanson. 

435 Side Elevation. O. M. Hokanson. 

436 Plan. O. M. Hokanson. 

437 Section. O. M. Hokanson. 

438 A City Hall, Elevation. W. Wittenberg. 

PERKINS, DWIGHT HEALD— 1107 Steinway Hall, Chicago. 

439 Perspective of Machinery and Electricity Building at the 

Trans-Mississippi and International Exposition, Omaha. 
D. H. Perkins. 

440 Detail of the Same. D. H. Perkins. 

441 Detail of Center Pavilion. D. H. Perkins. 

442 Plaster Cast of Detail. 

443 Water Color Sketch, Competition Design. ^ 

444 River Falls Normal School. R. C. Spencer. 

PEROT, EMIL G.— 1306 N. 24th Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 

445 Design for an Opera House Elevation. 

446 Design for an Opera House Plan. 

PIETSCH, THEO. W.— Chicago. 

447 A Chamber of Commerce. 

448 A Suite of Re^^eption Rooms in a Palace. 

449 Section of Same. 

450 A Church Elevation and Section. 

451 Plan of Same. 

—id— 



1 ' • 



m 



PIICTvSCH, TIIKO. W.— Chicago— Continued. 

452 A Home for Aged Priests, Facade. 

^53 Plan of Same. . , - ~ 

454 Section of Same. 

455 A Light House. 

456 An Entrance Gate to a Fortified Town. 

457 A Cafe and Restaurant on an Island. 

458 Toml) Mnsee de Trocodaro, Paris. 



JIEADEJ, CHRISTIA M.— 849 Marshall Field Building, Ghicago 

459 Old Houses, Chester, England. 

460 Four Pencil Sketches. 

461 Design for Stained Glass 

RETIG, OTTO— 58 West 57th Street, New York City. 

462 Moorish Design for Center of Ceiling. 

RICHARDS, MISS AMY— 406 West 57th Street, New York City. 

463 Book Covers. 

464 Book Covers. 

RUSSIvLL e^ ERWIN MFG. CO.— Marquette Building, Chicago. 

465 Cast of Empire Escutcheon. 

466 Cast of French Renaissance Escutcheon. 

467 Cast of Flemist Escutcheon. 

468 Knob and Escutcheon, Colonial. 

469 Door Pull, French Renaissance. 

SANDBLOM, C. A.— 1430 Noble Street, Chicago, 111. 

470 Design for Opera House. 

471 Fire Station. 

472 Hotel. 



SCHMIDT, RICHARD E. 

473 Perspective of Building at Omaha Exposition. Birch Bur- 
dette Long. 

—47— 






'^llPR^l!J5^j77*^^^ 



SHAW, HOWARD. 

474 Apartment House. H. M. G. Garden. 

475 Residence. H. M. G. Garden. 

476 Residence. H. M. G. Garden. 

477 Residence. R. C. Spencer, Jr. 

478 Club House. R. C. Spencer, Jr. 

SHEPLEY, RUTTAN & COOLIDGE— 1780 Old Colony Building, Chi- 
cago. 



~^79 Sketch of Church. D. A. GreggF — r^r^— ^=^-^^^ 

480 Sketch of Church. D. A. Gregg. 

481 Sketch of Church. D. A. Gregg. 

482 Sketch of Church. D. A. Gregg. 

SPENCER, R. C, JR.— Steinway Hall, Chicago. 

483 Competitive Design for Soldiers' Monument at Orchard 

Knob. 

484 Competitive Design for Soldiers' Monument at Missionary 

Ridge. 

485 Competitive Design for Library at Menasha, Wisconsin. Per- 

spective. 

486 Mausoleum for Fleishman Estate. Perspective. 

487 Residence, Sheridan Road, near Wilmette, for Mr. H. Kelsey. 

488 View from Road. 

489 View from Lake. 

STARR, HARRY C— 27 43d Street, Chicago. 

490 Design for a Residence Front. 

491 Design for a Country Residence. 

STRATTON, EDWARD B.— 35 Kilby Street, Boston, Mass. 

492 Sketch Rouen, France. 

493 Sketch, Sem^re, France, 

494 Wraxall Manor, Wiltshire, England. 

495 Haddon Hall. 

496 Note Book Sketches. 

497 Sketch in England. 

t 

—4b— 






r ■<'■ ■ "»','•.' 



STRATTON & BALDWIN— Detroit, Michigan. 

498 Competitive Design for Detroit Opera House. M. Burroughs. 

ST. LOUIS ARCHITECTURAL CLUB. 

499 A Water Tower, Club Competition. Emil H. Nieman. 

500 A Circular Belvidere, Detail. M. H. Fuerbinger. 

501 A Circular Belvidere, Elevation. M. H. Fuerbinger. 

STEVENS, JOHN CALVIN— Portland, Maine. 

502 House at Bar Harbor. 



STURM, Mr:YKR J.— 13^jL^n^ Court, Chicago. 
503 Trinity Church Boston. 



SUPERVISING ARCHITECT, TREASURY DEPARTMENT— Washing- 
ton, D. C. 

504 Perspective of the Federal Building, Omaha Exposition. 

Chas. D. Maginnis. 

505 Front Elevation of the Federal Building, Cheyenne, Wy- 

oming. Theo. F. Last. 

SUTCLIFFE & BUCK— 903, 234 LaSalle Street, Chicago. 



506 


Study 


507 


Study 


508 


Study 


509 


Study 


510 


Study 


511 


Study 


512 


Study 


513 


Study 


514 


Study 


515 


Study 


516 


Study 


517 


Study 


518 


Study 


519 


Study 



n Church Design, 
n Church Design, 
n Church Design, 
n Church Design, 
n Church Design, 
n Church Design, 
n Church Design, 
n Churcn Design, 
n Church Design, 
n Church Design; 
n Churcja Design, 
n Churoh Design, 
n Church Design, 
n Church Design. 

—49 



Lawrence Buck. 



(( 






~\ 



SWALES, FRANCIS S.— 1022 Granite Building, Rochester, N. Y. 

520 Book Covers and Page Borders. 
521 Mount of Designs and Sketches. 

522 Sketch of an English Country Church. 

TAYLOR, ISAAC S.— 

523 Design for Office Building. Oscar Enders. 

TIFFANY GLASS & DECORATING COMPANY— 333, 341 Fourth Ave- 
nue, New York City. 



524 Cartoon, Wood Carving and Astronomy. Frederick Wilson. 

525 Cartoon, Education of the Virgin. Frederick Wilson. 

526 Cartoon, The Immaculate Conception. Frederick Wilson. 

527 Sketch, The Ascension. Frederick Wilson. 

TITUS, LLOYD— 1224 Walnut Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 

528 An Episcopalian Church for a City Parish, Front Elevation. 

529 Plan. 

VAN OSDEL, J. M.— 825, 225 Dearborn Street, Chicago. 

530 Residence, Water Color. Arthur George Brown. 

531 Plans of Residence. 

532 Dwelling House, Water Color. Arthur George Brown. 

533 Plans of Dwelling House. . 



534 Sanitarium, Water Color. Arthur George Brown. 

WALKER, HOBART A.— 35 Nassau Street, New York City. 

535 Church of Ascension, Pittsburg, Pa. H. A. Walker. 

536 Same with Rectory and Parish House. H. A. Walker. 

WBCHSELBERGER & HEWITT— 13 Arcade Building, Peoria, 111. 

537 Irving School Building, Peoria, 111. Herbert E. Hewitt. 

WILLETT & PASHLEY— 1640 Unity Buildirg, Chicago. 

539 Summer Residence of Most Rev. Archbishop Feehan. Paul 

C. Lanthrop. 

540 Entrance, St. Mary's Training School, Feehansville, 111. 

Pencil Sketch. Birch Burdette Long. 

—.50— 



■ • . ■>* ..■. * p , 



WIRTS, vSTEPHEN M.— 6 place de V Odeon, Paris. 
540 Fountain, Notre Dame. 



WISE, HERBERT C— 929 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 

541 Design for a Garden. 

WRIGHT, FRANK LOYD— 1117 The Rookery Building, Chicago. 

542 Examples of Ele'ctro Glazing. Luxifer Prism Co. 

WU ERTZ, E. H.-81 Illinois Street, Chicago. 



543 Cast of Statue. 

WAID & CRANFORD— Ashland Block, Chicago. 

544 Water Color Perspective, Brooklyn Medical Library Build- 

ing. R. N. Cranford, H. M. G. Garden. 

545 Water Color Perspective, A College Building. R. N. Cran- 

ford. 

546 Water Color Elevation, A Public School Building. R. N. 

Cranford. 

547 Basement Plan, A Church. 

548 First Story, A Church. 

549 Elevation, A Church. 

550 Perspective, A Church. R. N. Cranford. 



551 Competitive Design for a Medical Library. R. N, Cranford. 
First Story Plan Medical Library. 

552 Second Story Plan Medical Library. 

553 Longitudinal Section. . 

554 An Apartment Building, Elevation. 

HEUN, ARTHUR— Chicago, 111. 

, 555 House at Manchester, Mass. 

556 Plan of House at Manchester, Mass. 

557 Country Residence. 

558 Country Residence. 

559 Country Residence. 



—51- 








tlfu^ G:^2^ia^ oJ^prKftf^m^' .j^Mt/am^ t^i-aoi^' 



ahtrmy OJ^i-<^ '&^C^4£A^^^^ 



ny C>nti^iat'^ 



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Reading Hardware Co. 



MANUFACTURERS OF 




Fine Builders' 
Hardware... 

"Ua$$ar" Cylinder Cocks 

As used oil Marshall Field 
Annex, Monadnock, Man- 
hattan, Hartford, Stewart 
Buildings, and many other 
office buildings. 



Factories: 

Readings Pa^ 

— r,2 



Chicago Office, 

JOS Lake Street 



>^i'ZSX''^^A 




VW>T',,, ■ 



■ ■"'- , ' ;■■■', »-/''^' "'i:,.,-^' " ■/ V ' >■ ^* ^■;■. 




By I'rrd U'ihnu, A'rTu )'<)ik 



Astronomy 



"':-'^/-^!^w-r'i-'-.''^, ".-.'" ■■' 



Eatabliabed 1866. 



Stamsen & Blome, 



HEAVY 



Concrete Construction 

EVERY BRANCH OF PORTLAND CEMENT PAVING. 

SECOND Floor unity blog. 

CHICAGO. 



Assyrian Asphalt Co. 



MANUFACTURERS OF 



MINERAL RUBBER ROOFING, ACID PROOF PAINTS, 
INSULATING COMPOUNDS, HOT PIPE DIP. 

Damp Corse Mastic for floors of breweries, schools, etc. 



311 Tacoma Buiding: 



TcLEPHONE Main 1864 



CHICAGO 




,■54 — 



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J-iy I'red ll'ihou, Nriu Yoik 



Wood Carving 



^^J!J:-f:;^!.X:S^My:YA^('Y 






9 9 9 9 



LUXFER-PR] 






9 9 9 9 




ft 








Will Add a Desirable Flaturh to 
Your Buildlng and will Work 
Wonders wrrH Dark Interiors . . 
















The Americam Lmxfer Prism Co< 

THE ROOKERY, CHICAGO 

56 








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Expanded Metal 
Fire-Proofing 60. 

W. W. Ramsey, 860 Old Colony Building 

President afid Manager. , CriICA.GO 



' JFire i^roof JTloors 

Koofs antr ^itretoalk 
^olib ^Partitions 

METAL FURRING AND LATHINQ 

FOR ALL KINDS OF 

ORNAMENTAL PLASFERINQ Telephone, Harrison 799. 

®tr & Xockett 1E)atbware (^o. 

Manufacturers* SO State Street (Op. Masonic Temple) 

Wholesale and Retail Dealers 71 Randolph Street 

Our stores form an J, 180 feet deep on Randolph and 
80 feet deep on State Streets. We occupy five floors 
and basement, have three electric elevators, double 
telephone service, and all latest improvements to 
facilitate the transaction of business rapidly and at the 
Lowest Possible Cost. Having our own shop we are able 
to do repair work or execute special metal work at 
short notice. 

We build Refrigerators and Cooling Rooms for hotels, restaurants and 
private residences. We are Chicago Agents for the celebrated ALASKA 
REFRIGERATORS. Send for our expert and let us give you an estimate.' 

All the Prominent Manufacturers Liberally Represented 
Our Designs are the Latest Our Stock the Largest 

Our Facilities the Best Our Prices the Lowest 

— 58 — 



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CLARENCE 1. WOLFINGER 




t64 La Salle Street**** 



Contractor and 
Builder 

Fine... 

Residence Work 
A Specialty... 

Carpentry, 

Interior Finish, 

OlTiccs and Hank I'Mxtures 

FINE CABINET WORK 

of all kinds u>« ,/* 

TEL. MAIN <841 

.***CHICAGO. ILL* 



Meacham & Wright 

MANUFACTURERS' AGENTS FOR 

Utica Hydraulic Cement 

And Dealers in... 

Imported and American Portland Cement 
Michigan and New York Stucco 



98 Market St. 



GHICAGO 



TELEPHONE, EXPRES3 59 



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' ■■ ",-* ■^- *->pf,'i 




By Elmer Gray 



Sketch of a Church iiear S enter, Frajice 



: .!■■;»-' ^'J ■ l';--. 



American Terra Cotta and 

Ceramic Co. 



Hrcbitectural XTerra (Totta 



Office: 
Factories: 1043 MARQUETTE BUILDING 

TERRA GOTTA, ILL. CHICAGO 



Tiffany Enameled Brick 

Company ^= 

MANUFACTUHEKS OF 

Enameled Brick r^^ Enameled Tile 

Eastern Office: 

GENERAL OFFICES: ORRIN D. PERSON 
Marquette Building 160 Fifth Avenue 
CHICAGO NBW YORK 

- (12 — 



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JARVIS HUNT, ARCHITECT, CHICAGO 

CABOT'S 
Insulating and 
Deafening "Quilt" 



CABOT'S 
CREOSOTE 
SHINGLE STAINS 

The Oritrinal shin<^le-stains 
and the standards of shinj^^le- 
stain excellence. 




p&umz:n 



The most perfect non-conductor of heat and 
and sound on the market. 



SAMUEL CABOT 

Sole Manufacturer 



70 Kilby St., Boston, Mass. 

1303 Owings BIdg., Chicago. III. 



TelEphDnB 
Expre^ 



W.R GWINN. 

SECT S TREA5. 



"WORKS 
752! 5T S GREENWOOD 




617 fiRCT National Bank Bldg. 

Ghigago. 



(U 




Sketch at Troys, Frmice^ by Elmer Gray. 



:»5-i 




L^hma 




hlsaatXlay Works 



., , . PIRPPRnnPIMP HOLLOW and 

Manufacturers of. .. . . F 1 HCr H. WVJ T 1 IN Vj poROUS BRICK and 



Office and Works 



TILE .... 

ANY DESIGN MADE TO ORDER. 



Foot of West Wellington Street 



TAKE ELSTON AVENUE CARS 

TELEPHONE WEST 980 Send for our Catalo{;ue . . . CHICAGO 

All our goods are guaranteed free of lime and weatherproof. 



>•«« 



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Ar^ in Framing 



MUELLER BROS. 

138-140 Wabash Ave., CHICAGO, ILL. 

SPECIAL ATTENTION GIVEN TO 

j) Mounting & Framing Architectural Drawings \ 

. .. PRICES MODERATE ... 



— 66 — 



L^x=5»» 




E?itra?ice to a Fortified Tozvn, by Theo. F, Pietsch 



■^^1:^*mr*-'.-'^"S,v. 



. 1 ■ ■ ,■>■• ' -i 



Magnesia 

Sectional Steam Pipe and Boiler Covering 



THE ONLY STEAM PIPE COVERING WHICH 
COMBINES THE GREATEST NON-HEAT 
CONDUCTING POWER, ABSOLUTE HRE- 
PROOF QUALITIES AND DURABILITY. ^^Jt 



In all Comparative tests, it is shown to be not only the best, 
but alst) the most economical covering' ::::::::::::::::::;::::::::::::; 



WALCH & WYETH 

No. 208-210 Lake St. Telephone Haln 3547 



A. EDMUNDS, Pres. and Treas. CHAS. L. WEST, Sec'y. 

Edmunds Manufacturing Co. 

BUllcDERS AND CONTRACTORS 



MANUFACTURERS OF. 



Fine Interior Finish 
f^j^ riantels 
tjMti Side Boards 

Office Fittings, Etc. 

COR. ROBEY ST. AND WASHBURN AVE. 

Telephone Canal 68 ... CHICAGO 

— 68- 



■■. ■ r " I''" 




"51 












.;'.,^?j'tf '■;■■;;',, !V' ■ 




1 6 Cents Per Day^os 

For a Party Line 

TELEPHONE 

In a Private Residence. 

Ebony Finish, Nickel Parts ; wall space 
required, 10 xl)^ inches. Bell rings only 
when you are Ccflled. No battery at residence. 

Fire and Police Protection Afforded. 

Connection between house and office pro- 
vided. Your physician, your druggist, your 
grocer, and others are brought within easy 
reach. 

CHICAGO TELEPHONE CO. 

203 Washingfton Street. 




Contract Department. 



— 70- 



J> 




Residence, by H, M. G. Garden and Edward G. Garden^ Architects 



r-iT^.', ^e-v^'^^c: •. 



ROGK WALL PLASTER 

THE MODERN WALL PLASTER 

Wins its way as an article of merit. The sales for ROCK WALL 
PLASTER have increased in the last year over 300 per cent., thus 
proving that it has given the very best of satisfaction to those 
using it. — ; — 

Give it a fair trial and you will be convinced that it is the 
best of all wall plasters. 

For full particulars, address. 



THE ROCK PLASTER MFG. CO. 

450-458 Illinois Street Chicago, 111. 




Astoria Hotel New York. 



CHURCH & GETCHELL, AGENTS 



H. J. HARDENBKRC, 

... Architect. 

PURDY & HENDERSON, 

.... Engineers. 

Most costly hotel in the 
world — the steel superstructure 
is painted with ... 

No. 30 

^M Superior 
Graphite 
Paint....... 

MANUFACTURED BY THE 

Detroit Graphite IDfg. Co. 

Marquette Building, CHICAGO 



72- 










SL Stephe7is Churchy at Fall River, Mass., by R. A. Cram 



»''sT&'-^' .r' ■'' ' ¥"',r' *r-':7^'"'«^;'»"'''^'; 7: '" ■ ■ 



Spierling & 
Linden 

Interior Decorators and 
?urni$her$ 



S2)6 Michigan Avenue 



Telephone South 94 



CHICAGO 



Library Bureau 

MANUFACTURERS Or 

SPECIAL HIGH GRADE 
. CABINET WORK . . 

ESTIMATES FURNISHED ON 



Patent 
L B. Steel 
SHELVING 

for Libraries, Stores and Offices. 

215 Madison Street 

Telc^honc Express 181 ClllCAuO 



The UlinsloiP Brothers Companv 



...CbicaQO.. 




Orifamental 
Iron 

Bronze and 
Brass 



74 — 



.J 



.r .■ '■^%i' •»'. -*T! 







mmi!ii!mi,,m,,.:. 



'id id 



Ville Sante, by B. B. Long, Chicago 



y»^»;; ■';^*,'^>5r^^> • v;.;^:^^ i*"" .i« I'f • : •" ■*■ ■.■•V '' • 



THE KEITH LUMBER COMPANY^ 

CHICAGO. 

HARDWOOD, POPLAR & SOUTHERN PINE LUMBER, 



MAHOGANY, 



REDWOOD, 



RED CEDAR, 




CYPRESS, 



CHESTNUT, 



SPRUCE, 



MAPLE FLObRING, OAK TIMBERS A, WAGON STOCK. 

OFFICE AND YARD: 

FOURTEENTH AND WOOD STREETS. 



D. E. CORNEAU, President and Treasurer. 

E. B. CORNEAU, Secretary. 



ESTABLISHCO 1874 INCORPORATED 1894 



f^ orpeau [ umber Qo. C. A. PALTZ§R 

MANUFACTURERS AND DEALERS IM I II JW \} \C) \\ * VOv ) 

LUMBER, 



A LATH AND 
SHINGLES 



Wholesale Lumber Dealers 



e^ 



OFFICE. YARD AND DOCK. 

2516 to 2530 Cologne Street 

Near Main Street Bridge. 
Telephone Canal 206 CHICAGO 



SPECIAL ATTENTION GIVEN TO THE CITY 
TRADE. 



DFFICE AND YARD, 

Archer Avenue and Quarry Street 

Longf Distance Telephones, /^ IJ I /^ A /^ r\ 
Canam5 — Canal 4f)7. L.rllL.AUU 



— 70- 



^ 




to 



^ 



^ 



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I ■ 



■■■' w;v5™-- 




•nic 



vmn/iG/inTJLDLnca[c 











$ JACOB RODATZ t 

^ Mason and General Contractor * 

t|f 520 THE ROOKERY t|f 

i^ Telephone nain 4660 -^^^-^CH I C AG O ^ 

'r 'r 

Hh 'I? Hh 4^ 'i:^ tI? tI? t!N 'If 'If 'It Ht? ^ '^ 

•'fU v)^ •/p* i^f» f^ a^* *T* "T* *T* *T* *1^ 'T' *T* 'T' *T* *T* *T* M* "T* "T* *T* *T* *T* *T* ^T* *T* *T* *T* 




> 



r' 



-^ 



Street in Roiien by E. B. Siratton 



J 



^i^'f?^ii!r'p^': 



•y ■ 



H. A. Streeter Globe Iron Works 







^ 



stm 



^X^ 



Saves half the Expense. For connecting Angles, Tees or 
Bars to I Beams for Roofs, Ceilings and other Iron and Steel 
Constructional Work. Does away with Drilling and Bolting. 

Structural Iron Work a Specialty. 

35 TO 41 INDIANA STREET. - - CHICAGO. 

FOR CONNECTING ' 



Angles, Bars, B^ams or Tee Iron to I Beams for Roofs, Ceilings and 
Other iron and Steel Constructional Work. 

A Few Prominent Buildings where Streeter's Patent Steel Clip has been used; __^ 



Carnegie Building 
Par melee Building, 
Equitable Building, . 
Michigan Trust Co. Bldg, 

. Grand Rapids. Mich. 
McAllister & Dall Building, Cleveland. Ohio 



Pittsburg, Pa. 

Cleveland, Ohio 

. Atlanta, Ga. 



Cleveland. Ohio 

Cleveland, Ohio 

. Decatur, 111. 

Davenport, Iowa 

Toledo, Ohio 

Philadelphia, Pa. 

Buffalo, N. Y. 

. New York City 

Columbus, Ohio 



New England Building, 

Garfield Building, 

Milliken Bank Building, 

City Hall .... 

Spitzer Building . 

Bourse Building, 

Morgan Building 

Savoy Hotel 

Wyandotte Building . 

Cairo Apartment Building, Washington. D. C. 

Blackstone Memorial Library 

Bradford, Conn. 

Massillon Bridge Co. Toledo, Ohio 

Detroit High School . Detroit, Mich. 

Ellicott Square Building Buffalo. N. Y. 

Crane Elevator Co. Building Chicago 

Atwood Building .... Chicago 
Newberry Building Chicago 



Marquette Bnildinjj;^ .... Chicago 

Reliance IJuilding .... Chicago 

Kearsage Building .... Cliicago 

Monadnock Building Chicago 

Temple Building , . . . Cliicago 

Ashland Block .... Chicago 

The I'air Building .... Chicago 

Old Colony Building Chicago 

Athletic Club Building Chicago 

Home Insurance Building Chicago 

Pontiac Building .... Chicago 

Ellsworth Building Chicago 

Home Insurance Building Chicago 

P.ntiac Building .... Chicago 

Ellsworth Building .... Chicago 

Stock P'xcliange Building Chicago 

Security Building .... Chicai^o 

Academy of Sciences, I.incoln Park Chicago 

Teutonic Building . . Chicago 

New Era Building .... Chicago 

Schiller Building . Cliicago 

Fisher Building .... Chicago 

County Jail Chicago 

Great Northern Hotel . . Chicago 



London & Liverpool & Globe Insurance Company Building, New Orleans, I,a. 







, ,V.,j: 


. . J^l -., -', ^ 


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y_:- lifj^r). 


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Brooli] n Mc.iical [Jbrary Biiddif?' 




GAS LOGS, 



MANTELS, TILES, 
MOSAICS, 

BRASS ANDIRONS, 
WROUGHT-IRON ANDIRONS 

FENDERS, 
GAS FIRES, GRATES 



CHilCAGO INTERIOR FINISH CO^ 



1151 MiiCHLQAN AVENUE 

OPPOSITE ART INSTITUTE 



1 eleptione 

Maine H'i>2. 



M. J. CORBOY. . . 

Kc4''""'' Plumbing, House Drainage 

Natural Gas Fitting, Etc. 

Gas and blectric Fixtures. Fine Plunibini^ (joods and Saiiitar\- Specialties 



Personal attentidn .^iven to tt'Siing 
and exaininaiion uf I'lumbinjj anJ 
House Drainage 



3? 



78 Dearborn St. 

CH ICAGO. 



Chicago Ornamental Iron Co. 

CHICAfiO, ILLINOIS 

Contractors for ORNAMENTAL 
IRON AND BRONZE 

A. E. COLEMAN, Prest. A. VANDERKLOOT, Vice-Prest. JAMES E. LOW, Sec'y 

— 82- 



O 







u 



MITCHEL & HALBACH 

Interior Decorations illtBPIDP DBCDratOPS... 

Art QIass 

Draperies and Portieres 264 iMichigan Avenue 

High Grade Furniture ^ 

Furnished From r^\\\r^ r^r\ 

Special Designs Telephone Harrison 119 CHICACjO 




N(M?MAN n. FRASl:l<, I'rtsiJtnt. 

RAL PH (lATHS, '^ecretar\ aiul rit-.tSLircr. 

P.O. KHOTT.NAl'RHl^ -^upfrint.iKl.ni. 

SUCCESSORS TO 

Anglo=American Portland Cement 
Company 

Maiiutacliirer.s of this brand oiilw 
CiuaranU-ed e(|ual in i-\\r\- i(.'-|nrt 
to an}- hi^h j^radc- rorllaml Cinunt 

TELEPHONES: 
City-Express 421 (Mill Canal 75 



GEO. D. HOFFMAN FURNACE CO. 



MANUFACTURERS OF 



Warm Air Furnaces and Combination Heaters 

THE ALLEN AUTOMATIC AIR VALVES 

f-OK STKAM KAIMATOKS 

HEATING SUPPLIES vrfv*«v*e Room 15. 40 Dearborn Street. CHICAOO 

TELEPHONE EXPRESS 27 1. 



GEQ> A. MUGLER t^^ZSTZ 






ilrtistic Picture Tramcs 



15 Washington Street, N. E. Cor. Wabash Ave. CHICAGO 



TAKE ELEVATOR 

-84— 





( '. //. lUiu khni: 



Pastel Study 




Members Chicago Builders' and Traders' 
Exchange 

Long Distance Telephone, Express 438 

F. P. Smith 

Wire and Iron Works 

Office, lOe-102 Lake Street 

Factory, N. W. Cor. 15th and Laflin Sts. 

M IDclal 
Ulork 

Crestings and 
Vanes, Wire 
Lluth, Hr jss and 
Electro-Plated 
Work, Lath, Etc 

Iron fences 

Stairs, Stable ^ 
Fixtures, Jails. 
(iuards. H're Es- 
capes, Builders' 
W(.rk, Shutters 
and Doors 

WICKCTS & GRiLLCS vSeiid for Catalogue 



GUSTAVE EHRHARDT HENRV W SCHLUETEK 

President Secretary 

Phone Main 1499 



Oongrm 
OonstPDrtion Oo. | 

General ! 
Contractors ' 



Bramhali 
Du parquet Co 



INCOKPORATF.n 



(iKO. <;. RRODKS, 

President 



n. hf;min(;\vay. 

Treasurer 



^V (i^V i^V (^* 

.Manufacturers of 

French Ranges 

Cooking: Apparatus and 
Utensils for Hotels, 
Institutions, Diningf Cars 
Steamboats^ Etc.^«^ 

^^* ^3% t*^* %^^ 

81=83 Market Street 
CHICAGO, ILL. 



Suite 1517 Masonic Tempi* 

CHICAGO 



-8H— 




Hardwood Floors. 

IVOOD CARPETS PAROHET FLOORS. 

WOOD MOSAIC- 

Send fltnmp for booa of dcsiCTis. 

E.B MOOEE <fe CO. 48-50 Randolph Street, Ohiea(ef^ 



« ■ ^\ 




Main Entj'ance Improvement of Ferris Wheel Park 



(j forge R. /)f'iifi, Architrct 



S> 



Wy- 'i^ :■{.'■ ■"^■■'- 



Vanderpoel & Co, 



Foundry. 
Machine and 
Architectural 



Iron Work^ 



497 and 503 W. 22nd Street, CHICAGO 



TELEPHONE CANAL 2.0 



ABNEk GROSSMAN 



J F. STURDY 



GROSSMAN & STURDY 

INTERIOR DECORATORS 

AND FURNISHERS 



CFFICE 
aiiil MUDIO 



OPI'OSlTh TUl l()(,A.\ ,\\()M .\\K\1 

-287 nichigan Avenue 




Marinelli Bros. 

MOSAIC 

and MAK'P.l.fc: 

COM UACIOK'S. 



MannhiclurtTs of Harble and Ceramic 
Mosaic Work, C< iin iil l-kjoi iii<^ lOr H;ise- 
nitiils, flc., Mosaic Mantels, I-aciiigs. 
Hearths, etc. 



Telephone Express 744 
173-4 S. Clinton St. = CHICAOO 



Chicago Dredging and Dock Co. 



(incorporated; 



Contractors for Public Works 

Docks, Bridges, Foundalions, Dredging 

\JFFICE, COMMERCE BUILDING. . . . O 11 I O A Vjl W 



OFFICE TELEPHONE 1967 

— ,s,S — , 



■ ' <i 




S. J. STEBBINS CO. 



Removed to 

74 Van Buren Street, 

— — Between State and Dearborn Streets 



Builders' HarclATs^are, 
Cvitlery aiicl Tools 



Telephone, rialn 2907 V- xl Ix-^ /VCjr(_) 



J. C. McFarland... 

GALVANIZED IRON AND COPPER CORNICES 



SLATE. 

IILE, 

TIN 

and IRON 



ROOFER 



th°e"rnuldstatL'." RepSfrwork Skylight aod Glazcd Work 

Promptly Done ... 

Telephone South 158 25II-I9 State St. CHICAGO 



IMPERVIOUS 

Shingfle Stains 

I Vilas Bros. ^^^ -^ ^^^ ^'^*^ ^-' 



Manufactured bv 

Send for colors on wood and prices. 



Mackolite Fireproofing- Co... 

'' FIREPROOFING THAT 

Mamifactiirersand •- 1^ rlREPROOF. 

Contractors for ... 

Light Fireproof ing for Floors, Partitions, Furring, Ceilings and Deafen- 
ing, Column and Girder Covering, Fireproof construction for iron and 
wood in every form. Estimates submitted for iron and fireproofing . . . 

Tel. Main 4142 O flee: 1303 Schiller BIdg., CHICAGO, ILL. 

— (K)-- 



.:,;,■• ;.rf-.v- r. 













^ 



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13 

c5- 



> 






SHgRMAN & FLAVIN 

riarble, riosaic. Tile Work 



2505 to 2519 State Street 



...THOMAS & SMITH... 



STEAM AND \> ATER 



Heating and Ventilating Apparatus 



C.KNHRAL SThAM hirilNc; 



Telephone Main 44S6 



16 North Canal Street, CHICAGO 



p. NACEN 



Established 1866 



I' ,M. MrHPMN 



...P. NACEY CO. . 



MODERN METHODS OF 



Plumbing, Heating, Gas-Fitting and House Drainage 



Telephone Harrison 387 



3iQ W'abasfi Ave. 

(^Jjpo.sitf ,A u<lit( mii 111 i; uildin^'' 

CHICAGO 



Sykes Steel Roofing Co. 

Manufacturers of GALVANIZED AND COPPER CORNICES 

SKYLIGHTS ANn SHEET METAL CONTRACTORS. 
METAL, SLATE AND TILE ROOFING. 

Larjje contrails our SpeciallN'. in any pan of the I'niti-.i States. 
We are the larj^ijesl manufactureis of Corru^'ateJ Iioii Steel 
Hooting, Siding, etc., in Chicago. 

Telephone Canal 5 61 1 South Alorgan St., CHICAGO, ILL. 



/•• - -Tiv;-;; ■'■■'■ ;;\?;'f;^^.'•■tr*■^'■*;^•^^'?>?^^^^^^^ 




^as^^^ 



'Si 



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Henry Furst & Co, 



HHNKY KURST, JR 
CAUL lUKST. 



CONTRACTORS FOR 

CUT. 

SAWED. 

PLANKI) 

and TURNED... 



STONE 



Office. Yard aiul Works 

439-455 Fifth Avenue 

Telephone Main •638 ...CHICAGO 



...R. O. SCHMIDT... 

Architectural Sculptors 



M AMJt .\( Tl!WI:KS Of- 



Cement and Plaster Relief Deeorations 

200 Wells Street, Chicago 



fSTABusHFoje^e . Assayers 

IDarinCr S HOSkinS Analytical chemists 

81 SOUTH CLARK ST. ^"^ Mining Engineers 

TELEPHONE (lla\s, (Iciiifiits. btructur.il M.itiTi.il, 

EXPRESS 330 kooms 5" tO 55 W.UtTS. etc. 

(IniiMilt.iliim .iikI a(l\ ii f m all in.ittfts 
(.MiiiuHii'J vsiili ilu- (lifiinsirN i)f MiiilJiiiv; 

Analyses of all kinds Materials 

Assa\s of Ores aiul Wctallur^'ical 

I'ruJiuls Mints f \aiiiint\l in the inter- 



Correspondence Solicited References if required tsts nt the hncsior. 

HANSELL-ELCOGK FOUNDRY CO. 

Structural Steel and Iron Work 

LAKdH srof K 01 sTi;i I. KAii.s. hi;ams, ( ;il AN M I.S, 

A.\(lI.i;S AM) 1'1.ATF;S ALWA\>> on IIAND::;;:;:::;;;:::::: 



RIVE TED COLUMNS AND GIRDE RS OF A LL DESIGN S 

ARCHER AVENUE, TWENTY-THIRD PLACE, /^ |_| I /^ A ^^ ^N 

BUTLER Ai^D TWENTY-FOURTH STREETS _^___^^_ CHICAGO 

— '.tl — 




h'rauk Alliso)) 1 fayis— AUnatiom to IIousi for M. M. Sioab, li 



S(]. 



BRANCH OF 



Keuffel & §sser Co. n^wTokk 

/// Madison Street, CHICAGO 

Drawing Materials, Surveying Instruments, Etc. 

STANDARD 
SPECIFICATION BLANKS 



Elevator Supply and Repair Co. 

34 and 35 W. Monroe St., CHICAGO. . . . Ph )iu': Miin 1741. 

ELEVATOR FLOOR INDICATORS, 

ELECTRIC ELEVATOR SIGNALS, 

IMPROVED FLASH-LIGHT ANUNCIATOR. 
(Signaling operator of first car.) 

Our apparatus is iti constau*^ use iu tlu' tniest l)uil(iin_i;"s ot' the countrw 



Telephone, Main 888. 

C. EVERETT CLARK 

General Contractor and Builder 

Suite 1303, Title and Trust Building. 

100 Washington St., CHICAGO. 
E. F. PIERCE, Superintendent. 

Enterprise Wire Cloth Manufacturing Co* 

FREDERICK VOSS, . . . Proprietor 

^sc. Manufacturer Architectural and Decorative ^ 
'^ of ... . Wire and Iron Work ^^ 

Bank and Office Railiii^^s, Elevator and Window (kiards, vStair Kails, Iron 
Fences, Stable Fittings, Wire Cloth, and 
Wire Goods of every description. 
Wire Lathin<( a specialty. jt Telephone West 757 <J^ 

617-21 Austin Ave., Cor. Lincoln St., CHICAGO. 

-9G- 







-f ; fmnid k'ocli 



Gothic Panel, Notre Dame de Paris 



tir.ap."- V-^-' I ^,f7^,'^'*'T V ^' ' 




VULCANITE." "STAR." 
LAGERDORFER" anJ "CONDOR" 



J' J- Portland Cement 



" WIGTON STEEL," 
" FRANKLIN CROWN." 
"SLIGO" and " MANITOU " 



^ J' Fire Brick 

and Qeneral Building: Suppliers 



Tel. ^U)2 Main 



A.H.ABBOTr&Co. 

Drawing Materials 

Mathematical and Surveying 
Instruments S f^ ^^ 




■y 



Supplies for . . . 

>^CHOOLS AND ARCHITECTS. 

CIVIL AND MECHANICAL EN(iINEERS 



50 Madison Street - GHICAGO 

Telephone, Main 34:29 



Use Only the Best «^ S' 

^ ^ There Is None *^Just as Good 



ft 



Adainailt - — The Perfection of Wall Plaster 

GIVES PERFECT RESULTS 

Room 517 Chamber of Commerce, ♦ CHICAGO, IlL 
MILWAUKEE WEST SUPERIOR DETROIT 



E. BAGGOT 



Manufacturer and Dealer in 



-t. 



GAS, ELECTRIC 

and COMBINATION FIXTURES 



Plumbing and Sanitary Work in All Its Branches. 



f>peciai Designs 

upon application 



169=171 Adams St., CHICAQO 



— 9.S — 



'■ ■ 'K/*''^,^'!^ . '' 




^ 

^ 












JOHN A. COLBY & SONS 



DESIGNERS AND MAKERS OF 



6001I Furniture, Interior Work, Upholstering 

LACE CURTAINS, DRAPERIES, BRASS BEDSTEADS, 

Special Desif(ns and Estimates Furnished 



FACTORY: 



■4^ to 50 N. Elizabeth St. 



148=154 Wabash Ave., CHICAGO, ILL. 



ESTABLISHED 18=.S 



J. B. Sullivan & Bro. 



INCORPORATED) 



PAINTgRS AND DECORATORS 

AND DEALERS IN PAPER HANGINCiS 



266-268 N. CLARK STREET 



Telephone Morth KM 



.CHICAGO 




'C.Tpri^' = 



STEEL AND CONCRETE CONSTRUCTION OVER VAUl TS A SPECIALTY. 



KST \].I.|S1IK[> l-,-;i. IVt IIIM'UHATKK 1 -'.':! . 

Portland Cement 
Sidewalk Co. 

VV. U. RF-NNACKLK. Manajjer 

Sidewalks, Driveways, Curbing 
BASEMENT AND MALT FLOORS 

In unv |.iirt ..f" t),v City ..r Slatr. 

Room .SO, 119 and 121 La Falle St. 

■I'lK.ne'.M.iin 2( <^. CHICAGO. 

i^ffice lloui s, ir a. in. tn 2 f>. in. 



LUCIUS A. HINE & CO. 

16 North Canal Street CHICAGO 




^19 



Builders' Hardware 



Manufacturers 
of... 

AND HARDWARE SPECIALTIES 



TRANSOM LIFTERS — all sues and finishes v^J»v»t^^^^ 
D DOOR HOLDERS — three sizes and all finishes ^^^^^^^ 
LETTERS AND NUMBERS— all sizes, styles and finishes. 

SPECIAL WORK IN BRASS, BRONZE OR IRON. 



^1 



-100- 











u 






I 



vmWW^W^^^^^^^ '^^^^ ' '• ' ' ' ' /^ ' ■"■ ■• " ' .'' -^ 




«aOSmp 



HYDB^^pi 



THE ERWIN-WELGH 
HYDRAULIC MACHINERY CO. 

MANUFACTURERS OF 

Hot Air Pumping Engines 

Automatic Hydraulic Pumps & Electric Pumps 

Used to pump water for private residences, public 
buildings, and for irrigation, also 

Perfection Cellar Drainers 

Used to insure dry cellars. 
Descriptive Catalogue sent upon request. 

Office and Salesroom, 85 Dearborn St., Chicago. 




M. SALOMON, President. 



Eastern Offices- * ^2<' Broadway. NEW YOKK 
tASTERN UFUCES. ^ Worthington Building, BOs^TON. 



Chicago Architectural Iron Works 

DESIGNERS AND MANUFACTURERS OF 

Ornamental Iron, Bronze and Brass Work 



rialn Office and Works, Oakley Avenue and Kinzie Street •-» mj ■ y-» XC'Ci 

Branch Office. RO\INOKE HUlLDINr), Hadison and La Salle Streets. dl ICAvJiJ 



Cement and Ashphalt 
Paving 




Walks, Driveways, Floors, etc. 

GONCRETE GONSTRUCTION. 



A. S. BRADLEY, Jr. 

Cement 
Sidewalks 



GRANITOID AND CONCRETE WORK 
OF ALL KINDS. 

...812 Reaper Block... 

Phone nain 296 CHICAGO 

RESIDENCE 

5450 RIDGEWOOD GOURT 



-102- 



■ » '. ; "' '. 



■ , ;'■% i''-ii««i^;;*^"'''^''' 




Competitive Design to? Opera House, by M, Burroivs 

Sliatton a>iii Baldivni /tychitcrt 



^r 



•^ 4 - .'■"■'_(■ 



! /Robert Vii'yling, Ptfsideni. 

Louis r/ei ling, Sec\v d'' lyeas. Alfred Gtossmith,^Mpt. 



Vierling^^CDOWeU&CO, i Architectural iron ... — 

Iron Works-23d St. & Stewart Av. J General Foundry, Stair and 
Chicago. ] Beam Work. 



Q. BROES VAN DORT 

REPRESENTING BRENTANO'S 

Importers of Architectural Art and Industrial Works <=t^ <^tB^ 

.....218 Wabash Avenue, CHICAGO 

J. B. HAWES , . ~ J. A\. DODD 

HAWES & DODD 

Tiles, Ceramic Mosaics and Fireplace Furnishings 

SOLC AGENTS 

Maw & Co/s English Tiles and Mosaics, and 

Murdoch Parlor Grate Co. ( Boston ) Brass and Iron Fireplace Goods 

STEVENS BUILDING, 24 ADAMS ST. 

Factory and Warehouse : 101 West Adams 5t. — i ^ \^\^ \^\^ 



=== JOSEPH DUX=== 

ARCHITECTURAL • CARVING 

MODZLING AND DESIGNING 

Ornamental Patterns for all kinds of Metal Castings 



278-280 East Madison Street ^near bridge) 

Telephone Haln 2545 CHICAQO 

-lOJ- 



yi: 'V ,>ty r^>*^.-<^'^^i v'V,,^'^!!. 







Vernon S, lVa(so)i 



Details Temple of Zens Olympia 



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THE CHICAGO 



ARTS AND CRAFT 

OCIETY 




FORMED AT 

HULL HOUSE 

OCT. 22 

J897 




Chicago Arts and Grafts Society 



CONSTITUTION 

(ADOPTEE:) OCTOBER 31, 1897) 



Section 1. The name of this society shall he "The Chicago Arts and 
Crafts Society." 

Sec. 2. The objects of this society shall be : 

1. To cultivate in its members, and throut^h them in others, a just sense 
of beauty, 

2. To call the attention of those engaged in the production of articles of 
every day use to the possibility of developing in these articles the highest 
beauty through a vital harmony with the conditions of production. 

8. To influence the present movement toward manual training and art 
education. 

4. To influence, as far as possible, the sources of the designs and decora- 
tions for all useful and ornamental work. 

5. To recognize and encourage handicraft among its members, and through 
them in others, in order that the stimulation derived from this means may ])e 
a helpful factor in the development of those new ideals which })resent 
Gonditions, to- wit, industrial organization and the machine render necessary. 

6. To consider the present state of the factories and the workmen therein, 
and to devise lines of development which shall retain the machine in so far as 
it relieves the workman from drudgery, and tends to perfect his product ; but 
which shall insist that the machine no longer be allowed to dominate the 
workman and reduce his production to a mechanical distortion. 

7. To hold exhibitions, and to found and maintain centers where the 
various crafts may be carried on and developed on lines suggested bv the 
society. 

. Sec. 3 The officers of this society shall consist, for the present, of a 
secretary, who shall appoint the committees as necessity for them arises. Kach 
committee shall have executive powers, and shall report to the general society. 

Sec. 4. Time and place of meeting shall be determined by vote of the 
society. Special meetings may be called by the secretary, at which one-fifth 
of the membership of the society shall constitute a (juorum. 

vSee. 5. This constitution may be amended at any meeting of the society 
by a two-thirds vote, provided that the attendance be not less than one-third 
of the entire membership. 



Members of Arts and Crafts Society 



Anderson, Miss Louise 
Addains, Miss Jane 
Anderson, Miss Mary 
Ashton, Miss Kate 
Armstrong, Miss. . 
Abbott, A. II. & Co. 
American, Miss 
Burgess, Miss 
Barr, Charles H. . 
Bagley, Mr. I). 
Bajley, Mrs. 
Barllett, Miss 
\Bro\vn, ICd. Osgord 

kickinghani, Mrs. Joli 

k)\vcr, Miss 
Bulger, William 
Bi-acken, Miss 

Bovington, Miss 

i" . . . 

Bovington, Miss Alice 

Buiklev, Miss Marv 

Crolsby, L. 

CulVer, Mi.ss 

Colt^, Miss . 

Ciudires, Mrs. 

Craiich, Miss r^nima 

Cros.'jnian, Abner . 

Colli IS, Mrs. Clara 

DuBdiis, Miss 

Dole, George S. 

Delano, Mrs. Frederick 

Delanjo, Frederick 

De Tijuidt. Mrs. H. A. 

Durk^e, Mi.ss Cora 

Duncanson, Mrs. H. \V 

Dauchy, Samuel . 

Eruing, C. H. 

French, Miss 

Ferrv. Mrs. Charles 

f 

Farwell. Mrs. Frank 
Holrnes, Dr. Bayard 



Tree Studio Building, City — Artist 

:VAr) South Hal.sted Street, City. 

']2d Superior vStreet — Musician. 

Evan.ston, 111. 

:V20 Hampton Court, City. 

50 Madison Street, City— Artists, 

'M'M) Vernon Avenue, City. 

Marshall Field Annex, City. 

East Greenwich, R. I. 

2227 Prairie Avenue. 

2227 Prairie Avenue. 

Hull House, City. 

First National Bank Building, City. 

1S;)2 Calumet Avenue, City. 

<)()2 Division Street, City. 

-I4f)-") Gakenwald Avenue, City. 

Tree Studio Building, City. 

:VM) Ontario Street, City. 

390 Ontario vStreet, City. 

St. Louis, Mo. 

148 Wabash Avenue, City. 

;51 Ashland Avenue, City. 

;:;820 Ellis Avenue, City— Artist. 

47<S Elm Street, City. 

232 Rush Street, City. 

27S Michigan Avenue. 

WV'.stern Springs. 

Studio Building, City — Artist. 

;')47 Dearborn Avenue. 

li>;>;> Indiana Avenue, City. 

19.3.") Indiana Avenue, City. 

Winnetka, 111. 

2 Bank Street, City. 

P.I7<') Fillmore Street, City. 

S4 Illinois Street, City. 

.'!1 .Ashland Avenue, City. 

31 Ashland Avenue, City. 

183 Lincoln Park Boulevard, City. 

Lake Poorest, 111. 

101 East Fortieth Street, City. 



.-^ 



Holmes, Mrs. 

Haiuill, Robert 

Hamill, Mrs. Robert 

Hall, Miss Alberta 

Higginson, Augustus 
^ Higginson, Mrs. Augustus 

Howard, Mrs. B. F. 

Head, Miss 

Holtzschut, h. 

Howe, Miss . 

Hancock, Mrs. Hradford 

Hussey, Miss 

Hazenplug, Frank 

Hunt. Myron 
' Hunt, Mrs. Myron 

Klapp, Mrs. Eleanor 

Klapp, Eugene 

Klapp, Mrs. Eugene 

Koehler, Mrs. 
Key, Miss Mabel 
Kittredge, Miss Jeanette 
Kiemmer, Rob 
Lloyd, Henry 
Lloyd, Mrs. 
Large, Miss Josephine 
Lowrie, Mr. 
Maloney, Miss Marion 
Monroe, Miss Lucy 
Moore, Dr. Dorothia 
McBurney, Hugh 
McBurney, Mrs. . 
McCormick, Miss Eli/.al)etli 
MacGinnis, Miss R. 
Morganthau, Miss S. 
Marvin, Mrs. W. 
Nixon, Miss . 
Neale, Miss . 
Ostertag, Miss 
Perkins, Dwight H. 
Perkins, Mrs. 
Page, Miss Eleanor 
Pond, Irving K. . 
Pond, Allan 



Dav 



101 Hist I-orty-fifLh vS.reet. City. 
262 Michigan AvenuL% Cit}-. 
262 Michigan Avenue, Citv. 
4307 Oaken wald Avenue, City. 
Winnetka, 111. 
Winnetka, 111. 

3100 Groveland .Avenue, City. . 
,2 Banks vStreet, City. 
27 Clinton Street, City., 
Hull House. City. 
39 Bellevue Place, City. 
602 Division Street, City. 
1045 North Clark Street, City. 
11 Stein way Hall. 
LI Stein way Hall. 
The Alexander, Rush Street. 
The Alexander, Rush Street, City 
The Alexander, Rush Street, City 
3824 Ellis Avenue, City. 
Tree Studio Building, City. 
9 Studio Building — Artist. 
'")61 Wasliburn Avenue. 
Winnetka, 111. 
Winnetka, 111. 
320 Superior Street, City. 
1331 Monadnock Building, City. 
1101 vSteinway Hall, City. 
The Plaza. I 

Hull House. i 

1625 Prairie Avenfue, City. 
1625 Prairie Aven^ie, Citv. 
124 Rush Street. 1 
57 Laflin Street, (tity. 
3327 Calumet Aveiiue, Cit\ . 
2974 Indiana Avenue, City. — — -■ — 
743 North Clark Street, City. 
The Alexander. 
Athenaeum Building, City. 
3929 Indiana Avenue, City— .Architect. 
3929 Indiana Avenue, Citv. 
2126 Prairie Avenue, City. 
Steinvvay Hall. 
Steinwav Hall.. 



-IJO— 



Pettibone, Mrs. P. F. , 
Read, Miss Christian M. 
Revell, A. H. 
Ritchie, J. W. 
Spencer, R, C. 
Smith, Frederick M. . 
Smith, Mrs. 
Shortall, Mrs. J. L. 

Salter, W 

Sheridan, Mrs. Edith . 

Smith, Miss . . „ _, 

Sharpe, Miss's. 

Sharpe, Miss Martha . 

Star, Miss .... 

Stevens, Mrs. 

Schufeldt, Mrs. W. B. 

Steele, F. M. . . . 

Triggs, Prof. O. L. 

Taylor, Mr. and Mrs. Homer 

Twose, Geo. M. R. 

Twing, May 

Underwood, Miss Helen 

Vincent, Mr. and Mrs. George 

Wakeen, Miss 

West, Miss Alice 

West. Miss .... 

Wright, Frank 

Winslow, Herman 

Winslow, Mrs. Herman 

Week, Miss . 

Wagner, Fritz 

Waite, Horace F. 

Waite, Miss . 

Wynne, Mrs. 

Wilmarth, Mrs. 

Watson, Mrs. 

Walker, Mrs. C. M. 

Willing, Henry 

Willing, Mrs. 

West, Miss . 

Young, Mrs. E. F. 

Zeublin, Charles 

Zeublin, Mrs. Charles 



159 Warren Avenue, City. 

849 Marshall Field Building, City. 

188 Wabash Avenue, City. 

26 Park Avenue, City. 

1107 Steinway Hall, City. 

21 Walton Place, City. 

21 Walton Place, City. 

1604 Prairie Avenue, City. _ 

1519 West Adams Street, City. 

5 Scott Street, Chicago, 111. 

19 Walton Place, City. 

Wilkes-Barre, Penn. 

Wilkes-Barre; Penn. 

Hull House. ^ 

335 South Halsted Street, City, 

2244 Calumet Avenue, City. 

3815 Ellis Avenue, City. 

University of Chicago. 

Kenilworth, 111. 

320 Superior Street. City. 

1845 Arlington Place. 

3022 Prairie Avenue. 

University of Chicago. 

Winnetka, 111. 

577 East Division Street, City. 

577 East Division Street, City. 

Oak Park, 111. 

River Forest, 111. 

River Forest, 111. 

Tree Studio Building, City— Artist. 

Rookery Building, City. 

7 Astor Street, City. 

7 Astor Street, City. 

9 Ritchie Place, City. 

Auditorium Annex, City. 

319 South Robey Street, City. 

392 La Salle Avenue, City. 

Rush Street. 

Rush Street, City. 

577 East Division Street, City. 

The Harcourt, City. 

6052 Kimbark Avenue, City. 

6052 Kimbark Avenue, City. 



—121- 



CATALOGUE 



Arts and Crafts Society 



DESIGNED AND EXECUTED BY V. K. & A. H. SPICER. 

1 1 Carved wood box, exhibited by Mrs. Richardson. 

2 1 Sea Chest. 

3 1 Piano Bench carved. 

DESIGNED AND EXECUTED BY GEORGE S. I)OUE-3.S7 Dearlmrn 
Avenue. 

■ 

4 1 Hall clock, exhibited by Mrs. Hiilburt. 

5 1 Chest on standard, exhibited bv Mrs. Hnlbiirt 

6 1 Dressing table with drawers, $25.00. 

7 1 Oak table, inlaid, $10.00. 

10 6 Small picture frames, each $1.50. 

11 2 Photograph holders for wall, each $1.50. 

12 1 Swinging mirror with drawers, $12.00. 

13 3 Paper and envelope holders, each $2 50 

14 1 Octagon table, $15.00. 

^^^l^in^Jl^^J^ EXECUTED BY AUGUSTUS B. AND FRANCES G. 
HIGGINSON. 

15 1 Small box carved on three sides and top, $12.00. 

16 1 Small box carved on four sides, top not carved $10.00 

17 1 Small box, top carved, $4.00. 

18 1 Small box burned and stained, $2.50. 

19 1 Oak bench, $20.00. 

20 1 Oak clock case, for wall, $6.00. 

21 1 P.sir brass candle shades, $4.00. 

22 Brass candle shades, $1.00. 

-122 — 



23 Brass candle shades, $1.50. ' 

24 Brass candle shades, $2.50. 

25 Brass candle shades, $2.50. 

26 1 Oak settle, carved back and sides, $200.00. 

27 1 Oak table with drawers, carved sides, $100.00. 

28 1 Oak coffer with brass panel, $100.00. 

29 1 Screen three leaves, upper panels of brass, lower panels of 

linen, $65.00. 

30 1 Small square tea table, black, $30.00. 

31 1 Oak table without drawers, carved sides, carving executed 

bv Joseph Palmer, apprentice of Mr. and Mrs. Higginson, 
$95.00. 



32 1 Oak framed mirror, carving executed by Joseph Palmer, 

$65.00. 

33 1 Settle, carved backs and sides, exhibited by Mr. George 

Higginson, Jr. 

34 1 Brass tray, exhibited by Mr. George Higginson, Jr. 

35 1 Sconse, brass. 

36 1 Hall chair taken from German design. 

37 1 Copper bowl, exhibited by George Higginson, Jr. 

38 1 No. 7 brass candle shade, $2.50. 

39 1 Brass lanip shade, $15.00. 

40 1 Silver lamp, exhibited by Mr. and Mrs. Higginson. 

41 2 Candle sticks, brass, exhibited by Mr. and Mrs. Higginson. 



DESIGNED AND EXECUTED BY JOSEPH PALMER. 

42 1 Hand mirrcr, stained cedar, chip carving, $5.00. 

43 1 Walnut box. chip carving, $12.00. 

44 1 Paper knife with scabbard, carved, $3.00. 

DESIGNED AND EXECUTED BY LOUISE ANDERSON AND JEAN- 
ETTE KITTREDGE. 



45 1 Hall settle with leather trimmings, $40.00. 

46 1 Pillow to go with settle, $15.00. 

47 1 Library table with quotation border in fire etching, $45.00. 

48 1 Monk's chair, $15.00. 

49 1 Tea table with carved quotation border, duplicate, exhib- 

ited by Mrs. Springer. 

50 1 Hanging desk, $40.00. 

51 1 Photogiaph chest, Flemish, with oxidized handles, $25.00. 

52 1 Wood box with panels of hammered lead, $38.00. 

53 1 Dictionary stand with lead panel, $15.00. 

54 1 Piano bench, exhibited by Miss Large and Miss Anderson. 

55 1 Leather screen with copper panels, $75.00. 

56 1 Leather door hanging, American Indian design, $27.00. 

57 1 Leather pi^.no cover, $25.00. 

58 1 Copper lamp shade, $40.00. 

59 1 Copper bowl, $12.00. 

60 1 Copper lamp shade, small, $7.00. 

61 1 Small leather curtain. 



EXHIBITED BY SAMUEL BRIDGES DEAN-Boston, Mass. 

62 Very old English oak table, called "gate legged," $30 00 

63 Iron hanging trivit, Flemish renaissance, $15.00. 

64 Iron shovel, Flemish renaissance, $7.00. 

65 Copper kettle, French time. Louis 16, $10.00. 

66 Pair German hinges, 16th century, $15.C0. 
• 67 German trivit, time Durer, |I5.00. 

EXHIBITED BY HULL HOUSE SHOP-335 South Halsted Street Chi- 
cago. ' 



68 Carved oak book slide, executed by Miss M. Euphrate, $4.00 
by Carved oak frame, executed by Michael Amoroso, $12 00 

70 Oak chair, executed for and exhibited by Miss Elizabeth Day 
McCormick, designed by Francis H. Higginson and 

George M. R. Twose. 

71 Oak bookcase, designed by George M. R. Twose and exhibited 

by Ella R. Waite. The panels in the lower part of the 
doors, designed for covering magazines, pamphlets etc 
for which the lower shelves are intended. The glasses in 
the upper part painted in Heraldic colors are book and trade 
marks of the early printing houses done by F. Hazenplug 



DESIGNED AND EXECUTED BY ARTHUR B. GRINNELL-New Bed- 
ford, Mass. 

72 Box carved and colored tulip design, exhibited by Miss 

Louise Peasley. 

73 Bellows carved and colored, exhibited by Miss Louise Peas- 

ley. 

74 2 Bellows, carved, by Mrs. Heiliger de Windt. 

75 1 Small round box, chip carving, exhibited by Mrs. Heilieer 

de Windt. ^ 

EXHIBITED BY R. HASSELGREN— 440 North State Street. 

^ Iq Antique oak chest, iron straps, from Stockholm, $250.00 

^^^lir.^^^ ^^^^^' reproduced from the German handicraft 
178.00. 

79 Antique brass candlestick, Swedish, $25.00. 

DESIGNED AND EXECUTED BY MISS IDA BURGESS-849 Marshall 
Field Annex, 

80 1 Screen, two folds, in leather, with panel in color and fire 

etching. 

82 1 Woven tapestry, Norwegian, $40.00. 

83 Woven tapestry, Norwegian, $45.00. 

84 Chair, Norwegian. 

—124— 



DESIGNED AND EXECUTED BY MISS SCHMEDLTNG— 849 The 
Marshall Field Building. 

85 1 Hanging cabinet, in Norwegian style, $25.00. 

86 Chair, decorated, Norwegian, $10.00. 

87 Table, decorated, Norwegian, $15.00. , 

88 Drawn work, Norwegian, $12.00. 

89 Design, Norwegian, $6.00. 

90 Portfolio, $10.00. 

91 Chair, carved, Norwegian (imported), $30.00. 

CERAMICS. 

EXHIBITED AND DESIGNED BY SAMUEL BRIDGES DEAN— Bos- 
ton, Mass. - ' 

The lottery in this exhibit was made in England, and 
the forms and objects were suggested by the study of 
the domestic pottery vessels made in that century during 
the 15th, 16th and 17th centuries. The great charm of 
the pottery lay, aside from the coloring in the crude treat- 
ment of form, biscuit and glaze. 

92 Bowl and beakers, $30.00. 

93 Green jug, $10.00. 

94 Large vase, $45.00. 

95 Biscuit jar, $10.00. 

96 Bowl and beakers, $30.00. 

97 Yellow jug, striped, $15.00. 

98 Green plaque, exhibited by Miss Louise Anderson (sold). 

99 Plaque, yellow, $10.00. 

100 Ivoving cup, $15.00. 

101 Lyg. green, $7.00. 

102 Large yellow jug, $25.00. 

•^ 

EXHIBITED BY H. DEAKEN— 1429 Michigan Avenue. 

103 1 Vase of chi-hung monochromatic porcelain. The pate fine; 

the glaze deep red, dappled. The inside and the bottom 
have white glaze. Wood stand. 

104 1 Rouge box; hard paste porcelain. Clear white glaze, decor- 

ated with floral designs in rich, bright enamel. Wan-li 
jeweled porcelain. Carved wood stand. 

105 1 Chinese Incense burner, liver color, glaze of remarkable 

richness and smoothness. Celadon markings at base. 
Ivang-hsi era. Has finely carved teak wood cover and 
stand. 

106 Rouge box; soft paste. The pate is exceedingly smooth and 

fine in texture, and cream white in color. Decoration of 
dragon and clouds in tender blue. A choice specimen of 
Kai-Prin, Yav. Kang-hsi era. Carved wood stand. 

— 12.5— 



107 Vase; jar-shape, Famille vertG, Floral and leaf design in 

brillic nt green, red and blue enamels. Height nine inches. 
Has seal mark, Kang-hsi era. Wood stand. 

108 Snuff bottle; porcelain, cucumber glaze. Kang-hsi era. 

109 Snuff bottle; porcelain, cucumber rind glaze. In form of 

bean pod. Kang-hsi. 

110 Snuff bottle; porcelain. Fish-roe crackle glaze. Kang-hsi 

era. Stopper. 

111 Snuff bottle; porcelain; apple glaze, crackled jade stopper. 

112 Chinese pen washer; splendid example of "peach blow." 

Seal mark, Kang-hsi era. 

113 Coupe. Apple green glaze, with decoration of bats and 

clouds in black. Yung-ching era. Teak wood stand. 

114 Vase. Heights, lO^/^ inches; Wan-li jeweled porcelain decor- 

ated with floral scrolls in strong, green, yellow and red 
enamels. A fine specimen. \ ung-ching era. Carved teak 
stand. 

115 Chinese bowl. Depth, 2% inches; circumference 17^4 inches. 

Coral red glaze, with bamboo, in white reserve. Carved 
teak stand. Chien-lung era. 

116 Vase, of Chien-lung Cha-yeh-mo porcelain. The glaze of 

rare softness, is dark tea-green, covered with yellow dust. 
Has mark of Chien-lung era in seal character. Wood 
stand. 

117 Jar, of Kai-pien (soft paste) blue and white porcelain. 

Height, 9% inches; circumference 28% inches. The pate 
is close and heavy; the glaze of medium luster and 
crackled. The body is covered with soudle l)lue, reserved 
in which are four large panels with llcral designs and 
landscapes. Filack wood cover and stand. 

118 Vase, Celadon glaze. Date, 1 279-1 3<;7. 

119 Rouge box. Giant crackle. 

120 Blue and white porcelain rouge box. Chien-lung era. 1736. 

121 Vase; gray crackle; tenth century. 

122 Vase; coral red glaze. 

123 Porcelain vase; moss agate glaze. Carved wood stand. Rare. 

Makuza Kogan. 

124 Porcelain vase; bottle shape. Cloud of glowing red and 

gray glaze around body, wii.h decoration of dragons. 
Carved wood stand. Makuza Kozan. 

125 Vase; milk white glaze. Design of cherry-tree blossoms in 

natural colors. Makuza Kozan. 

126 Vase; shades cf evening glaze. Makuza Kozan. 

127 Vase; graceful bottle form. Glaze, brown, blue and gray 

mottled; of greatest brilliancy. Carved wood stand. By 
Tahimoto. 

128 Vase; brilliant red, showing markings of' darker shade. 

coloring carried inside the mouth. Wood stand. By 
Tahimoto. 

129 Vase; bottle form. Clear white glaze, with band of most 

brilliant flambe encircling body. Carved wood stand. By 
Tahimoto. 

130 Vase; mottled glaze. Tahimoto. 

-12(>- 



131 Vase; tea dust glaze. Tahimoto. 

132 Vase; design of bamboo in moonlight. By Kato. 

133 Porcelain vase; glaze of ivory white and texture remark- 

ably fine. Finely carved peony and border patterns 
ornament the entire surface. This vase was awarded 
silver medal at Kago exhibition, spring 1894. Has carved 
signature, Seyfu. Height, 18 inches. Carved black wood 
stand. Seyfu. 

134 Vase; coral red glaze. Seyfu. 

135 Vase; ivory white glaze. Seyfu. 

13(i Satsuma perfume box. Entire surface of box and lid orna- 
mented with designs of fans, done in various rich colored 
enamels and gold. Height, 3 inches. By Yabu Meizan, 
Satsuma. 

137 Vase; Satsuma. Fairence-green and yellow glaze. Date\ 
1600; by Satsuma. 

138r Imari jewelled cup and covered. Extremely rare specimen. 
Date, 1780. . 

139 Tea jar. 



EXHIBITED BY CHRISTOFLE & CO.— 1733 Michigan Avenue. 

Every piece of Delaherche's pottery is made by himself. 
He has no one to assist him beyond an old man and 
woman to attend to the clay and lighting the furnace. 
Each piece has attained 1200 degrees of heat. He has no 
factory — every piece is his own creation and coloring. 
He has only turned out 300 pieces, nearly all of which are 
distributed in the European museums. 

Plaque; designed by Delaherche, $25.00. 

Vase; designed by Delaherche; 4 handles, $30.00. 

Vase; designed by Delaherche, $5.00. 

Vase; designed ])y Delaherche, $15.00. 

Vase; designed by Delaherche, $5.00. 

Vase; designed by Delaherche, $6.00. 

Large tile; designed by Delaherche, $7.00. 

Small tile; designed by Delaherche, $5.00. 

Piece of blue nancy glass; designed by Daum. 

Coi.pe Blanc de Cuisre; designed by Delaherche, $7.00. 



EXHIBITED BY PROFESSOR CHOYO— 463 Orchard Street. 

150 1 Japanese bowl; decoration of Arabesque figures in very 

rich, deep indigo blue; crackled in heavy, creamy cloud 
fashion. A pottery made by and signed Keuzan (a famous 
potter and designer). 

151 1 Japanese porcelain bowl; glaze of soft golden chocolate. 

Old Imari ware. 

152 1 Porcelain vase, with a small neck, decorated with conven- 

tional cherry flowers in many colors, floating on water 
(princely). Make, Nabeshima. ---"x,. 

—127— 



140 




141 




142 




143 




144 




145 




146 




147 




148 




149 





153 


1 


154 


1 


155 


1 


156 


1 


157 


1 


158 


1 



EXHIBITED F3Y HURLEY & CO.— 145 State Street. 

Nancy glass vase; made by Emile Galli. 185.00. 

Piece Royal Copenhagen Porcelain, sea gull decoration. 

Piece Royal Copenhagen, dark blue decoration. 

Piece Holland Delft, metallic luster decoration. |;7.00. 

Piece Choisy le Roi Faience. J525.O0 

Piece Rosenberg Faience. $10.00. 

EXHIBITED BY MRS. C. R. CRANE--2559 Michigan Avenue. 

159 1 Invalid set; Hungarian metallic luster. By Zsolnay. 

160 2 Bowls; Hungarian metallic luster. By Zsolnay. 
~ 161 2 Bowls; Russian porcelain. By Zsolnay. 

162 1 Persian tile. By Zsolnay, 

163 2 Plaques; Hungarian ware. By Zsolnay. 

EXHIBITED BY THE ROOKWO©D POTTERY COMPANY— Cincin- 
nati, O. 

The dominating idea behind these productions to which 
iheir individuality is due, is a return to the first impulses, 
to desire to make pottery — not this ware or that ware; 
the endeavor to grow from within out to make one's own 
decoration and find one's own processes. The attempt 
was started hy several Cincinnati women in 1874, and in 
1880 Mrs. Maria Longworth Storer opened a pottery called 
the Rookwcod, which grew into the present company. The 
pottery is managed on lines opposite to the prevailing 
factory system, the effort being to attain a higher art 
rather than to cheapen pro<'esses. No printing patterns 
are used, and individual ai'tistic feeling is encouraged to 
the utmost. 

A group of Rook wood ware, containing some of the 
latest effects attainable under the new glazes, namely, 
the "Sea Green," "Iris." Each decorator here represented 
has taken these glazes and worked out an original and 
distinct style of decoration for himself. 

164 Tile; Iris; currants (sold). Albert R. Valentine. 

165 Vase; Iris; Iris. Albert R. Valentine, $18.00. 

166 Vase; Iris. Albert R. Valentine, $25.00. 

167 Vase; sea-green; fisher. Albert R. Valentine, $35.00. 

168 Vase; sea-green; Iris. Albert R. Valentine, $60.00. 

169 Vase; sea-green; clouds and stork. Albert R. Valentine, 

$25.00. 

170 Vase; sea-green; storks. Matt. A. Daly, $100.00. 

171 Vase; sea-green; Narcissus. Matt. A. Daly, $12.00. 

172 Vase; sea-green; dragon. Matt. A. Daly, $10.00. 

173 Vase; sea-green; conventional; water-lilv. Matt. A. Daly, 

$20.00. 

174 Vase; sea-green; snake. Matt. A. Daly, $7.00. 

175 Basket; Iris; grass and blossoms. Ketaro Shirayamadani, 

:^15.00. 

-128— 



176 

177 

178 
179 

180 
181 
182 
]83 
184 

185 
18G 
187 
188 
189 
190 
191 
192 
193 
194 
195 
19f) 
197 



Mug; iris; skeleton and grape vines. Ketaro Shirayama- 

(lani, $30.00. 
Vase; Jris; Sphinx and swallows. Ketaro Shirayamadani, 

$25.00. 
Vase; sea-green; red poppies. Ketaro Shirayamadani, $15,00. 
Vase; sea-green; modeled turtle. Ketaro Shirayamadani, 

$8.00. 
Vase; sea-green; frog. Ketaro Shirayamadani, $10.00. 
iris; dogwood. Artus Van Briggle, $15.00. 
Iris; Bios. Artus Van Briggle, $18.00. 
iris; cyclomen. Artus Van Briggle, $15.00. 
sea-green; clouds and stork. Artus Van Briggle, 



Vase ; 
Vase ; 
Vase ; 
Vase; 

$18.00. 
Vase; sea-green; 
sea-green 



Ewer 

Vase ; 
Vase; 
Vase ; 
Vase; 
Vase ; 
Vase; 
Vase; 
Vase; 
Vase; 
Vase; 
Tray; 



Iris 
Iris 
Iris 
Iris 
Iris 
Iris 
Iris 
Iris 
Iris 
Iris 
Iris 



water-lily. Artus Van Briggle, $75.00. 

grasshopper. Artus Van Briggle, $8.00. 
fish. John Dee Wareham, $12.00. 
plumbago. John Dee Wareham, $22.50. 
fish. John Dee Wareham, $15.00. 
dragon. John Dee Wareham, $15.00. 
dogwood. John Dee Wareham, $10.00. 
Jack in pulpit. John Dee Wareham, $25.00. 
jonquil. John Dee Wareham, $20.00. 

lilies. John Dee Wareham, $30.00. 

dragon. John Dee Wareham, $12.00. 
dragon-fly. John Dee W^areham, $12.00. 
fish. John Dee Wareham, $25.00. 



EXHIBITED AND EXECUTED BY WILLIAM BULGER- 
wald Avenue. 



-4465 Oaken- 



These pieces are the product of a small private kiln, 
and have an extrinsic interest as coming from (as far as 
is known) the only local pottery. The exhibits are selec- 
tions from experiments in glaze and forms, beyond which 
stage this private enterprise has not as yet advanced. 

198 1 Green glazed jar. 

199 1 Green glazed vase. 

200 1 Green glaze vase. 

201 1 Green glaze vase. 

202 1 Yellow glaze bowl. 

203 1 Saucer with sample, last green glaze. 

204 1 S.'iucer with sample, gr^en and yellow glaze. 

205 1 Saucer with sample, brown glaze. 



EXHIBITED BY SPAULDING & CO.— 243 State Street, Chicago, 111. 

206 1 Galle vase, $50.00. 

207 1 Nancy vase, $75.00. 

208 1 Small Nancy vase, $13.50. 



rill— 






EXHIBITED BY MRS. N. P. BIGELOW— 2215 Prairie Avenue. 

209 2 Modern Chinese plate.s.. 

EXHIBITED BY MRS. W. P. CONGER— 262 Michigan Avenue. 

210 1 Dish. Golf-Juan-Nice. 

EXHIBITED BY MRS. R. W. HAMMILL— 262 Michigan Avenue. 

211 1 Sutsuma jar. 

212 1 Box. Delaherche. 

213 2 Plates, modern Italian from old Chinese. • 



4^ 



DEDHAM POTTERY. ( For prices enquire at desk ). 

The pottery known at present under the name of Ded- 
ham -pottery A^as founded over thirty years ago on the 
marshes of Chelsea, Mass., by Alexander W. Robertson, 

T „ , one of a family of Scotch potters, who came to this coun- 

- try about the mid<lle of the century. A couple of years 
later his brother, Hugh C. Robertson, the present mana- 
ger of the Dedham pottery, became associated with him. 

In 3 872, the father, James Robertson, a potter of much 
experience in Scotland, England and this country, joined 
the sons with the rcj^ilt that the pottery took a new direc- 
tion and began to produce a more artistic ware. The 
firm name became James Robertson & Sons, and the title 
Chelsea Kerimac Art Works was adopted for the pottery. 

In 1880 Mr. James Robertson died, and in 1884 Alex- 
ander retired from the business. This left Hugh free to 
conduct various experiments and strive for the solution 
of some of the more difficult problems with which art 
loving potters have to contend, and to these ends he de- 
voted several years with the result that ihe produced 
some beautiful glazes. But devotion to- the aesthetic 
ideal and lack of patronage compelled him to close the 
pottery for a time, until finally, a few gentlemen in Bos- 
ton, appreciating the beauty of the products and wishing 
to see them multiplied, formed a company to enable Mr. 
Robertson to continue his studies and experiments. 

In 1891 the Chelsea Pottery, U. S., was incorporated 
with Mr. Robertscn a.s manager, and undertook, in the 
old pottery, the development o;f the crackle wares, with 
blue inglaze decoration. 

It soon became apparent that the site of the pottery 
was unsuited for the production of the wares it was de- 
sired to make, and in ]896 a new pottery was built at 
Dedham, Mass., and the old place abandoned. It wao 
thought best at that time to change the nanne to the Ded- 
ham Pottery, as the old i.ame had oft^^n led to tho ware 



being mistaken for English Chelsea ware. Since the re- 
moval to Dedham, Mr. Robertson has resumed his ex- 
periments, and the result is a series of vases of beautiful 
colors and textures, which it is hoped will stimulate an 
interest in this most delightful as well as most ancient 
and useful of arts. 



VASES AND PLATES IN GRAY CRACKLE WITH BLUE INGLAZE 

DECORATIONS. 



DECORATED BY CHARLES E. MILLS. 



214 i Vase in crackle glaze. 

215 1 Vase in crackle glaze. 

DECORATED BY HUGH ROBERTSON. 

216 1 Vase in crackle glaze. 

217 1 Vase in crackle glaze. 

218 1 Vase in crackle glaze. 

219 1 Vase in crackle glaze. 

DECORATED BY JOS. LINDEN SMITH. 

220 Plate in crackle glaze, rabbit design. 

221 Plate in crackle glaze, fish design. 

222 1 Plate in crackle glaze, lily design. 

223 1 Plate in crackle glaze, tree and landscape design. 

DECORATED BY CHARLES E. MILLS. 

224 1 Plate in crackle glaze, tris design. 

225 1 Plate in crackle glaze, lily design. 

226 1 Plate in crackle glaze, crab design. 

227 1 Plate in crackle glaze, turtle design. 

228 1 Plate in crackle glaze, butterfly design. 

DECORATED BY DENMAN ROSS. 

229 1 Plate in crackle glaze, lion design. 

DECORATED BY ARTHUR DOW. 

230 1 Plate in crackle glaze, poppy design. 

DECORATED BY M. M. ADAMS. 

231 1 Plate in crackle glaze, magnolia design. 

—131- 



DECORATED BY VICTOR HOWES. 

232 1 Plate in crackle glaze, grape design. 

233 1 Plate in crackle glaze, snow-tree design. 

DECORATED BY KATE MORSE. 

234 1 Plate in crackle glaze, chestnut design. 

DECORATED BY SARAH E. GANNETT. 

^35 1 Plate in crackle glaze, duck design. 

Vases in colored glazes. 

DECORATED BY HUGH C. ROBERTSON. 

A few of these vase^ were thrown by Benj. Williamson. 

DECORATED BY VHITOR HOWIES. 

236 1 Plate in crackle glaze, grape design. 

237 1 Plate in crackle glaze, snow-tree design. 

DECORATED BY KATE MORSE. 

^ 238 1 Plate in crackle glaze, chestnut design. 

DECORATED BY SARAH E. GANNETT. 

239 1 Plate in crackle glaze, duck design. 

Vases in colored glazes, a few of which were thrown 
by Benj. Williamson; most were thrown and all the glaz- 
ing done by Hugh C. Robertson. 

EXHIBITED BY MISS PEASLEY— 309 Huron Street. 

240 1 Vase, earthenware, design of fish and crustaceans. Exe- 

cuted by Masters Bros., London. 

EXHIBITED BY MRS. F. A. DELANO— 1,933 Indiana Avenue. 

241 1 Vase, Favrile glass, design of purple clematis, white morn- 

ing glorifs and gr'^en leaves, cut in relief on clear glass 
body. Louis Tiffany. 

242 1 Vase, Nancy glass, showing design of nettles and leaves. 

Damm. 

243 1 Vase, Nancy glass, green v/ith gold thistles in relief. 

—\:V2— 



Work of the (Atlan) Ceramic Art Club during a short 
preparatory course of study of the best styles of decor- 
ated pottery and porcelain, under Mrs. Koehler. 

249 1 Low dish; old China. Mrs. J. E. Zenblin. 

250 1 Jewel box; Persian. Mrs. J. E. Zenblin. 

251 1 Plaque; old Chinese. Mrs. F. M. Steele. 

252 1 Lustre Plaque; Moorish. Miss Eva E. Adams. 

253 1 Salad dish; old Chinese. Miss Grace Peck; $12.00. 

254 1 Cup and saucer; Russian. Miss Grace Peck. 

255 1 Plaque; Japanese. Mrs. L. E. Frazee. 

256 1 Plaque; Persian. Miss L. E. Cole; $8.00. 

257 1 Low dish; old China. Mies L. E. Cole; $7.00. 

258 1 Plaque; old China. Mrs. S. L. Humphrey. 

259 1 Rose jar; Persian. Mrs. S. L. Humphrey. 

260 1 Low dish; India Persian. Miss Mabel C. Dibble; $10.00. 

261 1 SmaJl water pot; Satsuma. Miss Helen M. Topping. 

262 1 Night lamp; Japanese. Miss Florence Miner. 

263 1 Small Water Pot; Persian. Miss Florence Miner. 

264 1 Chocolate pot; old Chinese. Miss Mary A. Phillips; $25.00. 

265 1 Guiger jar; old Chinese. Mrs. F. M. Sessions. 

266 1 Cup and saucer; old Chinese. Miss -Marguerite Yoeman. 

267 1 Pitcher; old Chinese. Mrs. N. B. Lawson; $6.00. 

268 1 Low difeh; old Chinese. Mrs. M. McCreery. 

269 1 Rose jar; Indian. Miss Mabel C. Dibble. 

270 1 Bowl: Indian. Miss Helen M. Topping; $15.00. 



EXHIBITED BY MRS. LYDIA AVERY COONLEY-WARD— 625 Di- 
vision Street. 

Designed by T. S. Ashbee, Essex House, London. 

271 1 Brooch; Chrysophrase, set in copper. 

272 1 Brooch; opal, set in copper and silver. 

273 1 Napkin ring; ametiiyst, set in silver. 

274 1 Covered dish. 

275 1 Card receiver, with handles. 



DESIGNED AND EXECUTED BY MADELENE YALE WYNNE— No. 
9 Ritchie Place, Chicago. 

276 1 Copper tray, etched. Exhibited by Mrs. Coonley Ward. 

277 1 Silver and enamel pin, pendants; $25.00. 

278 1 Silver serpent pin, with enameled pendants; $25.00. 

279 1 Copper and enamel hair-pin, pendant; $15.00. 

280 1 Silver and enamel Gypsy pin, pendant; $12.00. 

281 1 Silver and enamel bar-pin; $12.00. 

282 1 Silver hair-pin; $10.00. 

283 1 Copper and enamel pin; $14.00. 

284 1 Copper and enamel pin; $25.00. 

285 1 Silver and copper hair-pin; $10.00. 

286 1 Silver dragon hair-pin; $12.00. 

—133— 



287 1 Copper dragon pin. 

288 1 Silver and enamel teaspoon; $6.00. 

289 1 Silver ladle; $15.00. 

290 1 Copper sconce; "Spirit of the Flame;" $15.00. 

291 1 Brass sconce; $15.00. 

292 1 Copper desk 'candlestick; $6.00. 

293 1 Brass bowl, with handles, etched; $20.00. 

294 1 Brass bowl, etched; $20.00. 

295 1 Copper and enamel hair-pin; $15.00. 

296 1 Copper bowl. (Sold.) 

297 1 Large brass plaque, exhibited by Mrs. Taylor. 

DESIGNED BY ELEANOR E. KLAPP— 58 Bellevue Place. 

298 1 Brooch; Oriental topaz in Roman gold oak leaf setting. 

299 1 Brooch; large spray set in silver stones, almadines and 

peridots. 

300 1 Bracelet of green obsidian, set in gold; $30.00. 

301 1 Buckle; silver, with old Dresden medallion; $12.00. 

302 1 Buckle; silver, with green obsidians; $13.00. 

303 1 Ring; opal, in gold laurel leaf setting; $18.00. 

304 1 Ring; silver, with Australian tiger eyes; $8.00. 

305 1 Ring; gold, with turquoise; $12.00. 

306 1 Brooch; wide, of Siberian amethyst, set in silver; $25.00. 

307 1 Brooch; circle of Brazilian topaz, set in Roman gol^; 

$28.00. 

308 1 Spray of green obsidians, set in gold; $28.00. 

309 1 Brooch; Baroque pearls, set in gold; $20.00. 
^ 310 1 Brooch; Brazilian topaz, set in gold; $18.00. 

311 1 Brooch; Sinolsy topaz, set in gold; $12.00. 

312 1 Brooch; Brazilian amethyst, Etruscan setting; $40.00. 

313 1 Brooch; aqua marine, set with rose diamonds, in platina; r 

$90.00. 

314 1 Ring; Baroque pearl, in gold (Cherub heads). 

315 1 Bonnet pin; amethyst and crystals; $9.00. 

316 1 Bonnet pin; topaz and crystals; $9.00. 

317 1 Bonnet pin; peridot and crystals; $9.00. 

318 1 Bonnet pin; almadine and crystals; $9.00. 

319 1 Hat pin; topaz and crystals; $9.00. 

320 1 Veil pin; amethysts in gold; $6.00. 

DESIGNED BY ELAINE HUSSEY— 603 Division Street. 

321 2 Antique gold buckles, set with semi-precious stone; $10.00. 

322 1 Clasp, in green bronze, set with opaque green stones; du- 

plicate; $25.00. 

323 1 Book-cover, in calf; ornamented with a design of grape 

vine burnt in, and illustrated; corners decorated with 
carved disks of bronze, set with cabochous of pink coral; 
$10.00. 

EXHIBITED BY MISS WAITE— 7 Astor Street. 
324 1 Russian silver vase. 



DESIGNED AND EXECUTED BY JULIAN L. YALE— 9 Ritchie Place. 

325 1 Silver tankard. 

326 1 Silver tankard. 

327 1 Silver bowl. 

328 1 Silver cream pitcher. 

329 1 Silver bowl and handles. 

330 1 Silver spoon. 

331 1 Silver spoon. 

332 1 Silver bowl, with feet. 

333 1 Salt spoon. 

334 1 Silver and gold salt spocn. 

335 1 Silver measure. 

DESIGNED AND EXECUTED BY HOMER & ISADORE TAYLOR— 
Kenil worth, 111. 

336 1 Copper nut bowl and ladle; |25.00. 
:VS7 1 Copper box; $30.00. 

338 1 Copper bowl; borderiuside; |12.00. 

:]39 1 Copper bowl; with handle; $10.00. 

340 1 Copper bowl; double bottom (not for sale). 

341 1 Copper bowl; deep yellow; $15.00. 

342 1 Copper bowl; with clover ornament; $12.00. 

DESIGNED BY C. M. READE— 849 Marshall Field Building. > 

343 1 Silver belt set, with j.^wels. 

344 1 Design for belt. 

345 1 Design for belt. 

Designs for pins and buckles. 
Designs for book plates. 

EXHIBITED BY MISS WAITE— 7 Astor Street. 

346 1 Silver belt, designed for and exhibited by Ella R. Waite. 

DESIGNED AND EXECUTED BY CHARLES H. BARR— Greenwi<Jh, 
Rhode Island. 

347 1 Mardarin tea caddy; copper. 

Removable inner tube lid tea scoop and stramers, silver 
plated; $4.00. 

349 1 Caldino; copper, packs together for traveling; $4.00. 

350 1 Bedroom candlestick (oxidized brass); $5.00. 

351 1 Etruscan spcon for olives; sterling; $5.00. — 

EXHIBITED BY MISS WALD, Nurses' Settlement— 265 Henry Street, 
N. Y. 

352 8 Single candlesticks; brass. 

353 2 Chanucah lights; brass. 

354 1 Skewer; silver. 

355 1 Candle snuffer; brass. 

356 1 Tea kettle; copper. 

357 1 Small milk pitcher; copper. 

358 1 Drip bowl; copper. 

359 1 Preserve kettle; brass. 

360 1 Large round tray; brass. ; 

-135— 



361 1 Small round tray; brass. 
i 362 1 Tall copper cup; $2.00. 

363 1 Mortar and pestle; brass; $3.00. 

364 1 Samavar; with long tray, round at one end, and one drip 

bowl; $17.00. 

EXHIBITED BY MISS ADDAMS— Hull-House, 335 Halsted Street. 

365 1 Bronze cup; welded handle, dolphin decoration. T. L. 

Ashbee. 

366 1 Copper kettle; recently retired after continuous service 

for eighty years. 

367 1 Copper pitcher. Bought from Rus-sian emigrants. 

368 1 Copper vessel. Bought from Russian emigrants. 

369 1 Brass pan. 

37T) 1 Copper Russian jardiniere. 

371 1 Ceremonial cup. 

EXHIBITED BY MISS BROCKWAY— 335 S. Halsted Street. 

372 1 Brass coffee pot. 

EXHIBITED BY MISS GERTRUDE HOWE— 387 E. Forty-fifth Street. 

373 1 Samaver tray and bo^wl; brass. 

EXHIBITED BY MISS MARY R. SMITH— 19 Welton Place. 

374 1 Brass lasin. 

375 1 Brass basin. 

EXHIBITED BY MRS. ERNEST CARROLL MOORE Hull-House. 

376 1 Brass pot. 

EXHIBITED BY MISS CORA FREER— Tree Studio Building. 

377 1 Coffee pot; copper. 

378 1 Tea kettle, with stand; copper. 

379 1 Tea kettle, with stand and lamp. 

380 1 Holland milk can. 

EXHIBITED BY PAULINE DOHN— Tree Studio Building. 

381 1 Pewter beaker; Dutch; in common service. 

382 1 Pewter pitcher; Dutch. 

383 1 Pewter cream jug. 

384 1 Pewter sugar bowl. 

385 1 Green pottery cullender; Brittany 

386 1 Green potterv bowl; Brittany. 

387 1 Brass tankard. 

EXHIBITED BY WINSLOW BROS. COMPANY— Carroll Avenue, 
Adams and Fulton Streets. 

388 1 Hammond leaf and bronze bell. 

DESIGNED BY MRS. EDITH SHERIDAN— Marshall Field Building. 

389 1 Brass sconce; exhibited by Mrs. Higginson. 

— 13fi- 



I 



DESIGNED AND EXECUTED BY MARY E. BULKELEY— Hillside, 

St, Louis County, Missouri. 

390 1 Portfolio of white calf; beaten and illuminated linings of 

green watered poplin, laced in; $20.00. 

391 1 Leather belt. Exhibitad by Miss Mary Bulkley Kohlsaat. 

DESIGNED AND EXECUTED BY MISS NORDOFF— 39 Washington 

Square, New York. 

392 Engraving portfolio; peacock pattern, gold background; 

$50.00. 

HERMAN DUDLEY MURPHY— Trinity Court, Boston, Mass. 

Color prints and dry point etchings and monotypes, 
designed and reprinted by Horace Dudley Murphy. 

393 A doorway in Venice; $20.00. 

394 A Woodway in Venice; $15.00. 

395 The lady with the shell; $15.00. 

396 The Sainte; $15.00. 

397 Solitude; $15.00. 

398 Storks; from the Japanese; $15.00. 

399 Boats; $15.00. 

400 Rotterdam; $20.00. 

401 A Dutch fishing boat; $15.00. 

402 A Dutch fishing boat; $15.00. 

403 A road in Holland; $25.00. 

404 The Singer; $20.00. 

CAROLINE BOWLES MURPHY— Winchester, Mats. 

Designs for mural panels. 

405 The white rose; $50.00. 

406 The toilette; $50.00. 

407 The Angel of the tomb; $150.00. 

408 The clouds; $50.00. 

Frames in ])urnished bronze, by H. Murphy. 

DESIGNED AND EXECUTED BY FRANK HAZENPLUG— 1045 
North Clark Street, Chicago, 111. 

410 Cushion cover; applique work; $50.00. 

411 Wall hanging (a portion); applique work and stencil. 

412 Folding screen; stenciletl denim panels; exhibited by C. 

L. Williams, River Forest; $40.00. 

413 Folding screen; painted panels; title, "Alice in Wonder- 

land." Exhibited by H. S. Stone, Chicago. 

EXECUTED BY AMALIE HANNIG— Division Street and La Salle 
Avenue, Chicago. 

414 1 Table scarf; Persian design, in yellow. 

415 Tea-cloth, in yellow. 

416 Sofa pillow, in green and M'hite. Executed by a pupil of 

the Hull -House, German Needle Work class; $25.00. 

— 187 — 



EXHIBITED BY MRS. F. A. DELANO— 1933 Indiana Avenue, 
Chicago. 
417 Screen, with tapestry. Design of white lilies and Acanthus 
leaves. Executed Dy William Morris. 



EXECUTED BY MISS ELIZABETH DAY-McCORMICK— 124 Rush 
Street, Chicago. 

418 Piece of embroidery, with Portuguese stitch, 

419 Pillow cover. 

420 Portierre. 

DESIGNED AND EXECUTED BY THE DEERFIELD SOCIETY, of 
Blue and White Needlework — Deerfield, Mass. 

The Deerfield Society is an effort to revive the linen 
embroideries of the last century, which, in the hands 
of the New England Women, reached a stage of develop- 
ment that may be considered unique, and which is no 
longer practiced, being well-nigh forgotten or overlooked. 
It would appear to have flourished all through the 
eighteenth century, and reached its high water mark 
just before the Revolution, after which it was gradually 
superceded by imitations and copies of foreign — chiefly 
French — embroideries. The Deerfield Society aims to 
reproduce this colonial needlework from designs that 
have been preserved as family relics, adapting them to 
modern uses. For this purpose a particular effort has 
been made to get the old dyes, and the Society now 
produces all the indigo blues and fustie greens used in 
its embroideries. All the pieces sent out by the Society 
bear its signature — a flax wheel, enclosing the letter D. 

421 Knitting-pocket; exact reproduction of pocket dated 1760; 

$12.00. 

422 2 Round Mats; design found on border of bed-spread dated 

1768; $5.00 each. 

423 Center-piece; design derived from bed-valance, worked by 

Keturah Baldwin (Dorset, Vt.), dated about 1760; $25.00. 

EXECUTED BY MME. P. CARUSA— Hull-House, Chicago. 

424 Lace spread; foundation and lace made by Mme. P. Carusa. 

425 Thread that the spread was made with. 

426 Table-cover, in blue and green design; derived from the 

work of Mrs. Sarah Snell, dated 1770; $10.00. 

427 Door curtain; design derived from bed-spread worked by 

Mrs. Sarah Snell (descendant in the fifth generation from 
John Alden, and great-grandmother of William Cullen 
Bryant), of East Bridgewater, Mass., 1770, on hand- 
woven linen; $500.00. 

428 Gray sideboard cover; design from woven spread, dated 

about 1800; $25.00. 

429 White bureau cover; design from bed-spread, dated about 

1725; $15.00. 

— 1.S8— 



< 






EXHIBITED BY MRS. C. R. CRANE>-2559 Michigan Avenue, Chipago. 

430 Bed-spread; blue and white, peasant embroidery. 
4%^ Bed-spread ; pink and white, peasant embroidery. 

432 T^able-cover (large) ; peasant embroidery. 

433 Table-cover (small); peasant embroidery. 

434 1 Florentine strip, 

435 1 Lace embroidery scarf. 

436 1 Blue and white silk scarf. 

437 jl Small bluest strip. 

438 1 Red embroidered bfig. 

EXHIBITED BY ALICE E. NEALE^— Venetian Building, Chicago. 

439 JDorris tapestry. Designed by Miss Wood; price, $1.00. 

440 I Marlboro' Damask; manufactured by Richardson, London; 

per yard, $12.00. 

441 Green and gold silk; magnolia design. Designed by Alice 

E. Neale; per yard, $8.00. 

WOVEN BY MISS CAROLINE KIRKLAND— 161 Rush Street. 

442 Woven Swedish sampler. 

DESIGNED AND EXECUTED BY EMILY DU BOIS— Studio Build- 
ing, corner State and Ohio Streets. 

443 Bent iron sconce; coat-of-arms, decorations; exhibited by 

Miss Anderson. 

444 Table scarf; executed on Irish linen, design taken from 

old Celtic Bible; exhibited by Miss Du Bois. Designed 
and executed by Miss Butternut; $35.00. 

445 Table cloth, design from old Celtic Bible; exhibited by Miss 

Du Bois. Designed and executed by Miss Butternutt; 
$15.00. 

EXHIBITED BY TIFFANY ENAMELED BRICK COMPANY— Mar- 
quette Building, Chicago, 111. 

447 Enameled tiles for fireplace and walls. Designed and exe- 

cuted by the Tiffany Enameled Brick Company. 

DESIGNED AND EXECUTED BY WILLIAM MORRIS. 

448 St. James' damask. Exhibited by Marshall Field & Co. 

449 Blue Woolen; lattice design. Exhibited by Chicago Carpet 

Company. 

450 r~ Piece of silk. Exhibited by Mrs. Horace Waite. 

EXHIBITED BY MRS. SHERIDAN— Marshall Field Building, Chicago. 
Designed and worked by Florence Dickenson. 

451 Table-cover. Oriental-modern. (For sale.) 

452 Table-cover. Oriental-modern. (For. sale.) 

453 Linen pieces; original. (For sale.) 

454 Linen piece; original. (For sale.) 

455 Linen pieces; original. (For sale.) 

Embroidery executed by pupils at Hull-House, under 
the supervision of Miss Elizabeth Day McCormick. 

—139- 



^« 



EXECUTED BY MRS. SAMUEL WALKER— 105 Pine Street, Chicago. 
460 Old Munich chair. 

461 Old Munich chair. 

462 Old Munich chair. 

463 Chippendale chair, with arms. 

464 High-backed old English chair. 

465 Desk chair; old tapestry seat. 

466 Hall table. ' - - - 

467 Brass candlestick; Dutch. 

468 Old English table. 

469 Piece cf German embroidery. 

470 Old Welsh driyer. 

471 1 Kitchen chair; stained in accordance ^ytih suggestions 

of Mrs. Augusta Higginson; furnished by Colby & Son. 

BOUND BY ARTHUR NELSON POPE— Geneya, Illinois. 

472 Studies in forwarding. 

473 "The Bibilot;" Vol. 1; in blue half-morocco. 

474 "The Bibilot;" Vol. 2; in blue half-morocco. 

475 "The Growth of Love." Bridges; half-morocco. 

476 "Little Journeys." Hubbard, Vol. 2; in red half-morroco. 

477 "L'Abbe Constantine." Halevy; full morocco sides and 

border, tooled in blind. 

BOUND BY ELLA RAYMOND WAITE-7 Asior Street. 

478 "Binding of Books," by Home; in olive morocco, tooled 

with conventional patterns. Bound after three months' 
_ study. 

BOUND BY MARY E. BULKELEY— Hillside, St. Louis County, Mo. 

479 "The Blessed Damosel;" crushed blue Levant, inlaid with 

"white rose and seven stars," the inlay beaten; tooled 
doublure, with yellow poplin panels. Perfected copy; 
$25.00. 

480 "Christmas Verse;" flexible ])inding of brown cow-skin, 
, beaten with design of holly and mistletoe, sewn on green 

morocco bands; brown silk linings and green morocco 
joints; $20.00. 

481 "Cupid and Psyche;" cream morocco, inlaid with border of 

butterflies, in brown and green inlays, tooled; silk 
linings; $15.00. 

482 "Greek Odes;" white calf, beaten with Greek palmette" de- 

sign in panel. 

483 "An Italian Garden." 

BOUND BY EVELYN HUNTER NORDHOFF— 39 Washington 
Square, New York. 

484 "Pilgrim's Progress;" whole binding tan, beaten calf, green 

joints, silk end papers, tan and green ties; $75.00. 

485 "Youe Noquehis Poems;" half binding. 

486 Japanese deer skin rack; Japanese paper sides and end 

paper; $10.00. 

—140— 



487 "A Modern Rosalind;" by Carpenter; bound in beaten tan 

leather, laced down the sides over red satin, red satin end 
papers. 

488 "Imitation of Christ;" white beaten calf back, gold over 

rose silk end papers; leather joints. 

489 "My Japanese Wile;" whole binding, Japanese painted; 

deer-skin, leather joints, silk end papers; $20.00. 

490 "The Japanese Bride." Naomi Tamura; whole binding in 

cloth of gold; $15.00. 

491 "Painters of the Renaissance Berenan;" whole binding red 

morocco, inlaid with interlaced pattern in white calf, 
covered with rose-varnished gold; decorated edges; 
leather joints, cloth of gold end papers. 

492 "American Charceal." J. F. Allen, with etched plates by 

E. H. Nordhoff; white beaten calf covers, bound together 
by silver rings; green silk end papers. 

493 "Six Cups of Chocolate." Edith B. Matthews; loose cover 

of beaten calf, silk ties, pink flowered silk lining; $5.00. 

EXHIBITED BY W. IRVING WAY— Caxton Club, Art Institute. 

494 "Old World Idylls." Austin Dobson. Bound by Riviere & 

Son. 

i 

EXHIBITED BY MR. ROBERT HAMILL— 2126 Prairie Avenue. 

495 "Dante." Bound by Petit. 

EXHIBITED BY MR. CHAUNCEY WILLIAMS. 

496 1 Bock. Bound by Cobden-Sanderson. 

497 1 Book. Bound by Doves Bindery. 
. 498 1 Book. 

EXHIBITED BY MISS ADDAMS— Hull-House. 

Four numbers of the "Evergreen," published by 
Patrick Geddes and Colleagues, Edinburgh. 

499 "Spring." 

500 "Summer." 

501 "Autumn." 

502 "Winter." 

EXHIBITED BY RINGER & CO. 

503 "La Reliure Francaise;" one volume; full blue Levant, 

extra gilt panel side; inside rolled border; inlaid olive 
calf, gilt line center. Designed and finished by William 
H. Crafts, who served an apprenticeship under the late 
William Mathews. Bound by Ringer & Co.; two volumes, 
$G0.00. 

EXHIBITED BY JOHN H. WRENN— Caxton Club, Art Institute. 

504 "Story of 'Remini;" Leigh Hunt. Bound by Ruban. 

505 "Poems;" Bret Harte. Bound by Ruban. 

-141— 









EXHIBITED BY GEORGE HIGGINSON, JR.— Winnetka, 111. 

506 "King Florus and the Fair Jehane." Printed (William 

Morris) at the Kelmscott Press, London, 1893. Bound 
by Doves Bindery. 

507 "The Tale of the Emperor Constans and of Over Sea." 

Printed (William Morris) at the Kelmscott Press, Lon- 
don, 1894. Bound by Zahensdorf. 

508 "Gothic Architecture." Printed (William Morris) at the 

Kelmscott Press, London, 1893. Bound by De Coverly. 

509 "Of the Friendship of Amis and Amile." Printed (William 

Morris) at the Kelmscott Press, London, 1894. Bound 
by Riviere & Son. 

EXHIBITED BY MARTHA FOOTE CROW AND HARRIET C. 
BRAINARD— 2970 Groveland Avenue, Chicago, 111. 

Two specimens of printing from the W^ind-Tryst Press, 
of Chicago. 

510 "Sonnets:" by the pupils of Hyde Park High School. 

511 "The Lady of Life;" Martha Foote Crow. 

EXHIBITED BY MICHAEL M. STRAUS— 549 Dearborn Avenue, 
Chicago, 111. 

512 "Seneca;" Rome, 1475. Pannartz. 

513 "Aristotle;" Venice, 1481. Phillip. 

514 "Aulus Gelius;" Venice, 149G. 1. Detrid 

515 "V. Flaccus;" Venice, 1523. Aldus. 

516 "Ortographia;" Venice, 1561. Aldus. 

517 "Pliny;" 1640. Elzevir. 

518 "Tolomes;" Venice, 1547. Giolito. 

EXHIBITED BY ROBERT W. HAMILIv— 212G Prairie Avenue, 
Chicago, 111. 

519 "Pietro Bembo;" Venice. 1504. Aldus. 

520 "Satires of Juvenile and Flaccus:" Amsterdam, 167L 

Elzevier. ^ 

EXHIBITED BY MRS. H. M. WILMARTH— Auditorium Annex. 

521 "The, Romance off Syr Percy velle of Gales;" overseen by 

F. S. Ellis, after the edition printed ])y J. O. Hallowell, 
from th.-^ MS., in the library of Lincoln Cathedral; 
finished on the 16th day of February, 1895. Printed by 
William Morris, at the Kelmscott Press. 

522 Two trial pages of the projected edition of Lord Berner's 

translation of "Froissart," printed in September, 1897, 
to preserve the design made for the work of William 
Morris at Kelmscott Press. The death of William Morris 
caused the project to be abandoned. 
. 523 "Works of Geoffrey Chaucer," edited by F. S. Ellis; orna- 
mented with pictures designed by Edward Burns-Jones, 
and engraved on wood by W. H. Hooper; printed at the 
Kelmscott Press. 

—142— 



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524 "The Water of the Wondrous Isles;" written by William 

Morris, at the Kelmscott Press; finislied the first day of 
April, 1897. The borders and ornaments were designed 
entirely by William Morris, except the initials "Wilan" 
and "Empty," which' were completed from his unfinished 
designs by R. Calterlon-Smith. 

EXHIBITED BY MR. IRVING WAY— Caxton Club, Art Institute. 

525 "The Poems of John Keats;" title page border and initials 

by William Morris, color decorations by Mrs. W. Irving 
Way; Kelmscott Press, Printer. 

526 "Hand and Soul " Dante Gabriel. Rosette title-page border 

and initials by William Morris; Kelmscott Press, 
Printer. 

527 "Gothic Architecture." A lecture for the Arts and Crafts 

Society, by William Morris; initials by William Mor- 
ris. Printed during the "Arts and Crafts" exhibition in 
London, 1893; Kelmscott Press, Printer. 

528 "Sonnets from the Portuguese; " Mrs. Browning. 

529 "Copeland and Day." With B. G. Goodlines' border and 

initial designs, done in color by Mrs. Way. 

530 "Florence Bardsley's Story." Field. With portraits, initials 

and ornaments done in color by Mrs. Way. 

531 "Garland of Rachel." A collection of madrigals by Andrew 

Long, and divers kindly hands. Composition by Prof. 
Henry Daniel, of Oxford, done by hand and pressed by 
hand; with initials by Mrs. Daniel, and ornamented by 
Alfred Parsons, 

DP:SIGNED AND KXPXUTED BY ANNA H. SPICER— Kenilworth, 111. 

5:V2 1 Purple bowl. 

5;^:^ 1 Shell shape bowl. 

ry.'A 1 Cireen atid pink bow^l. '' 

53.") 1 Larjj^e sunset colored bowl. 

.">.'{(') 1 Small sunset colored bow-l. 

5.")7 1 Mottled bowl. 

o.'iS 1 Small bowl. 

539 1 Candle shade. 

540 Spiritual Poems. John Grey. Vale Press. With ornaments 
- by Charles Rlcketts, Engraved on the wood. 




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Index to Advertisements 



PAGE 

Adamant Mfg. Co ^8 

Abbott, A. H. & Co 98 

American Rron/e Foundry Co 1^ 

American Terra Cotta and Ceramic Co 62 

American Luxfer Prism Co oi> 

Andrews & Johnson 8 

Assyrian As])halt Co '^4 

Babcock & Wilcox Co., The outside cover 

BaKlev, Frederick P. & Co ^ 144 

Baiij^ot, E '^8 

Barker, Alfred inside back cover 

Behm, G. . . . . 5-t 

Bramhall, Duparquet Co 86 

Ihidgeport Wood Finishin^^ Co ,. .inside front cover 

Bradley Jr., A S 102 

Carboy :\I. J 82 

Cabot,' Samuel ■ 64 

Colby, John A. c\: Sons 100 

Chicaj..^o Telephone Co 70 

Chicatro Hydraulic-Press Brick Co 4 

Chicai^o Varnish Co 2 

Chicaj^o Dredj^in,i< »Sc Dock Company 88 

Chica<(o Portland Cement Co 84 

Chicai^o Ornamental Iron Co \ 82 

Chicago Interior I'ini.sh Co 82 

Chicago luh.son Co 18 

Chicago Architectural Iron Works 102 

Clark, C. Kverett 0(> 

Corneau Lumber Co 7() 

Congress Construction Co 8(> 

Crossman & Sturdy 8S 

Davis, L. Frank , .' 80 

I )ecorators' Supply Co. , The 7<S 

Detroit (;ra])hite iSlfg. Co. (Church & Getchell, Agents) 72 

Dickinson Cement Co 52 

Dux, Josei)h 104 

Ivlnuinds Mfg. Co ... . ^ 6S 

Klevator Supply and Repair Co . : 96 

Umpire Fire Proofing Co inside front cover 

Krwin-Welch Co. , The 102 

F>panded Metal Fire Proofing Co 08 ^ 

I^anagan & Beidenweg 78 " 

Inirst," Henry cS: Co 94 

Garden City Sand Co 98 

Gardner Sa.sh Balance Co 70 

Globe Iron Works ( H. A Streeter) 80 

Hansell-Elcock 1/oundry Co 04 

Hawes & Dood ./ '. 104 



■'^ 






Mine, Lucius A U)() 

HofTman, Geo. D. , Furnace Co S4 

Ide, A. L. & Sons 14 

Jenkins & Reynolds Co. , The S 

Keith Lumber Co. , The 7() 

Keuffel & Esser Co 



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> 



Library Bureau 74 

Lehniann-Kohlsaat Clay Works (>() 

Lonergan, Thomas tv: Co inside front cover 

Ludowici Roofing Tile Co 12 

Mackolite Fire Proofing Co 90 

Mariner & Haskins \H 

Marinelli Bros SS 

Meacham & Wright (W) 

JNIitchel & Halbach' Si 

Moore E. B. & Co . : S(\ 

INIugler, Geo. A S4 

McFarland, J. C 1»0 

Mueller Bros (Wi 

]\Iurphv Varnish Co 14 

Nacey Co !I2 

Northwestern Terra Cotta Co 1 

Orr & Lockett Hardware Co ')S 

Paltzer, C. A 7(1 

Portland Cement Sidewalk Co 100 

Reading Hardware Co , ;")2 

Rodatz, Jacob 7S 

Rock Plaster Mfg. Co 72 

Russell & P:rwin Mfg. Co 10 

Stamsen <S: Blome .">4 

Stebbins, S.J. Co '.Ml 

Schmidt, R. O <I4 

Sherman & P^lavin 02 

Simpson Bros. Co .' lo2 

vSniith. P\ P., Wire and Iron Works Si; 

Spierling & Linden 74 

Svkes Steel Roofing Co 02 

Sullivan, J. B. ^: Bro loo 

Tiffany tvuameled Brick Co 02 

The Win.slow Bros 74 

The T. Wilce Co , 00 

Thomas & Smith 02 

Torgenson, Henry J\. & Co inside back cover 

I'nion F'oundry Works 04 

Vanderpoel & Co SS 

Van Dort Boes, (; 104 

Vierling-McDowell cS: Co 104 

Voss, P"rederick 00 

Vilas Bros 00 

Walch & Wyeth ()S 

Wolfinger, Clarence I (iO 

Wolf Co., Fred W. , The 1 (> 

Yale (S: Towne Mfg. Co 






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Pdinter afid Interior 





eater m Fine Art Watt J^er 



527 and 529 West Madi^c^ Street 
Telephone West 191 





CHiCAOO 



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CROta-DRUM TYPC FOR LOW-CCILINO BASKMCNTS. 



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Sales for J 897 Include the following:: 






Park Row Building:. . . .New York Qty 

Siiicicf Bonding 

Andcnon BtsUding 

Waahington Life Bklg . . 

Empire Building 

Franklin Building 

Exchange Court Bldg. . . 

Ruptured and Crippled 
Hoq>ital 

Hotel Royahon 

Univenity Qub 

R« G* Dun Building — 

Gold Street Telephone 
Building 

Graham & Straust Brooklyn, N. Y* 

Syracuse University — Syracuse, N. Y. 

Babcock School of Physics, Alfred, N. Y. 

Darlington Building. . .Philadelphia, Pa* 



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44 



44 



Land &TitleTrust Co . . PhiladeIphia,Pa« 

QtyHall ** ** 

United States Naval Home, ** ** 

Parkside Apartment House, ** ** 

Tl^yatt Building Washington, D. C 

United States Capitol . . ** ** 

Mutual Building Atlanta, Ga« 

Mississippi Agricultural and 

Mechanical College. .Starkville, Miss. 
Claus Sprekels Bldg • • San Francisco, Cal. 
Examiner Building. . " 
Behnont School ** 

Roman Catholic Theolo- 
gical Seminary Menlo Park, Cal. 

Weston Hospital forlnsane, Watertown^ lU. 
Ohio Institute for Feeble- 

Minded Youth ColuitnbUs, Ohio 

St Margaret Hospital Pittsburg, Pa. 



Send for our book "Steam." 

The Babcock & Wilcox Co. 



NEW YORK 



CHICAGO 



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^RAILWAY WHITE wmm^^--mi-» 

{f''\ v^i-^ft;^^^^^ th« wlihcst, the greatest body and the , 

"^ '' f^fi^^^^^^^^'^^ durable VHitc Lead ever manufactured. /; / ; 

& ELECTK1G,,W0QD FILLER 






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Fully fuaranteed, and manufactured in all sbadesi 



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>^ y^"^>^^%i:^4rr"^ f^ various shades that are permanent 

^ ' f^rfV'^V'^'^-l?'" r'^'^d fliarantee4.,to.be an absolute preservative. "• . 

















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pwoi)rci:K>s or A Bii/AinrcL 

(-]\n:\:\ r,t:OK^GlA \'I:KM) AINTlo.ri 
.^AK^IMJ: \-()\^ IM IM^IOI^ riMSll. 
S(PMKM(Mx> IN O.CALriA' AM) 
APl>t:.\K^^\.\JI: lO 
LnP()IfH:D .^\A[^}MJ:. 



Office: ]^20 inarciuccic Building, 
Chicago, ML 



Samples furnished to Architects 
on application. 



Quarries at hollv Spniiss. ficorsia. 



Luxfer Prisms 

Electro-Glazed 

sri'TLY Ai^soLr ri:LV piki-: 

IXAYLIC.Hr, 11 us rAKlXC. I 111' 
TLACl-: OF ALL MiyiHODS ()!■ 



ARTU'R^LAL LlOMriNC 



Luxfer Electro-Glazed Plates 

Take the place of the antiquated iron shutters — 
alwavs on guard against fire, never shutting out 
the davhght, and protecting the court and allev 
windows. 



^ 



Art Electro-Glazing Process 

For stained glass and Cathedral windows is a new- 
method that is rapidly taking the place ot the old- 
stvle handworked lead glazing — neater and more 
symmetrical, finer artistic results. 



American Luxfer Prism Co. 

(JKNKRAL OFFICKS AM) 1 ACTORV : 

372 Fulton Street, 

CHICAGO, ILL. 




Holabird .S: I-ioach, Arc liilects. 



GACK BROS. p.riLDrxr,. 

l.uxler I'risms used Ihrouo-houl. 



I'^acadc b\- Louis H. Sulliwan. 



GENERA rORS .^ND DISTRIBLTORS OF 
ELECTRICAL ENERC)' FOR ALL PiRPOSES. 



Chicago 
Edison Company 



I^XTIRK buildings arc now opir- 

atin^- their ele\'ators, hoists, 

■^ house i)unips, ejectors, fans 



LIGHT... 

Arc, 
Incandescent. 

POWER... 

and ventilating- systems by motors '^ For SMoiors io Operate 

dri\en from our Central Station ser\- , all kinds of cMachinery. 

ice, with the result that they are not 
only making substantial savings in 

their operating expenses, ])Ut are able to utili/e their valuable base- 
ment space for other purposes, and in some cases even making il a 
revenue producer. 

The Silversmiths' l^uilding and the Illinois Trust and Sa\ ings 
Bank are examples of this. 

J 

Improvement in the Service and Saving in the Ex pense 

Can l)e made in old buildings as well as in new ones 1)\- the substi- 
tution of electricity for steam. This means gi\ing the tenants of 
old buildings the same convenient, economical service as that oftered 
in modern buildings. 

KI.i:CTRIC LIGHT ASd TOWl-.K 
IS A FORMIDAHI.I': W I". A TON IX THE 
CO.MPETrnoX OI- I.AXDI.OKDS I- ( ) R IF.XAXIS 
I) TKXAXTS FOR TRADK. ' 



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\\> will undertake to ^wuX a market for present ecpiipuK-nt of 
engines and dynamos when abandoned for Central Station ser\ice. 



OUR CONSTRUCTION DEPARTMENT 
IS COMPLETELY EQUIPPED TO EXECUTE 
CONTRACTS IN CONNECTION WITH 
ELECTRICAL WORK. 




1 t 



COMPRTITIVE SKETCH FROM QIOTATION OF POETRY. 

By J. 1. Risses:ger. 







CHICAGO OIFICP: BlILDIXG, FKKCTI-D i8..,5. 

Architectural Finishes of the 
Highest Grade. 

CHICAGO VARNISH COMPANY 

; Established 1^65). 



Dearborn and Kinzie Sts, 
CHICAGO. 



215 Pearl St. 
NEW YORK. 



Pearl and High Sts. 
BOSTON. 



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ATALOGVE of the-;^ 
T<welfth Annual Exhi- 
bition by the CHICAGO 

ARCHITECTVRAL 

CLVB at the ART INSTI- 
TVTE, March 30 to -^^ r^ 
April t6, MDCCCXCIX ^ 




o. 



TO THE 
ADVERTISERS. 



THE CHICAGO ARCHITECTURAL, 
CLUB TAKES THIS OPPORTUNITY 
TO EXPRESS ITS THANKS TO THE 
ADVERTISERS FOR THEIR VERY 
LIBERAL SUPPORT IN THE PUBLI- 
CATION OF THIS CATALOGUE. 



PHF^S OF 

THE HENRV 0. SHEPARD COMPANY, 

212-214 MONROE STREET, 

CHICAGO. 



10 



To Our hriencls. 




N this age of rapid progress and ceaseless activity in the industrial and 
mechanical arts, the fine arts are too often a secondary considera- 
tion, or sometimes none at all, in our public and private work. It 
is encouraging, however, to note the improvement in this respect 
during the last few years. Not only are the artists and artisans attaining 
a higher standard, but the general public has acquired, more or less, a 
belter understanding of art and works of art — a fact which makes itself felt 
for good in the busy life of our city. 

The credit for accomplishing thus much is due mostly to the Art Insti- 
tute, where the works of all branches of art can he seen and studied, either 
trom the permanent exliibits of ancient and modern works or from the 
tem|)()rary exhibitions of indixiduals and clul)S. 

One of the most interesting and instructive of the latter exhibitions is 
the one held by the Chicago Architectural Club. 

'Vhr last twenty-fi\e years of this century have witnessed in this country 
a coiistantl\- increasing effort by the Architects to elevate the standard of 
the i)rofession. and e\-olve an architecture adapted to our modes of lixing 
and our new materials. A great stinuilus to work in the rigiit direction are 
the Nearly exhibitions of the architectural clubs in the large cities. Through 
the efforts of individuals the\ tr\" to procure as many exhibits from other 
cities as the\- can. Cnfortunately, the dates of the different exhi])itions often 
conllid, and there exists no understanding as to the mutual sharing of the 
individual acKanlages. ( )ur Club expresses the hope that all the principal 
clubs of the country will cooperate in a satisfactory arrangement of dates and 
interchange of exhibits. In this way they will be brought into closer rela- 
tion to one another, and by an exchange of ideas their work will be greatly 
benefited; an "unaffected scliool of modern architecture in America" will 
change more and more tVom a mere vision to a reality. 

The day is not far distant when the architectural clubs will be a potent 
factor in the life of oiu' cities. P)y their educational influence and through 
their agency iniblic ()i)inion will be brought to ])oar upon the municipal 
goxernments in regard to giving a truly monumental character to public 
buildings, beautifying the cities in other respects and rendering them thor- 
oughly healthful. 

The Club teels confident that a coc)peration as above suggested may be 
brought about from the fact that its eflx^rts to get out-of-town exhibits this 



11 



;■-.>- 



year ha\e been crowned with unprecedented success. Clubs, as well as 
individuals, have responded willingly and generously to the recjuests tor 
drawings. 

The Exhibition, as it is spread over the'^five galleries, presents a com- 
plex picture. Drawings of buildings, finished or in course of erection, as 
well as of imaginary projects, decorative and picturescjue subjects, are the 
main features. The Allied Arts are represented by works of sculpture, 
mural decorations and stained glass, metal work and articles which make 
up the interior furnishings of buildings. 

Though the collection be a complex one, the visitor will feel that the 
different elements of architecture and the allied arts are brought closer 
together and that the benefits derived therefrom will make themselves felt 
in the work of the different branches. This is one of the chief aims of the 
Chicago Architectural Club. Its membership includes, besides architects and 
draughtsmen, artists, mechanics and some of the representative men of firms 
dealing in building materials. 

The work of the Club is divided into lectures on various subjects, class 
work and competitions. Its social life aims to bring the members into closer 

contact with one another. The fact that its rooms are in the Art Institute is 

f 
in itself a stimulus for the club life. Away from the cares Of business lite, 

our members can receive encourage)ment and new inspirations from their 

surroundings. 

But we will leave the visitor to his own musings, and hope, though he 
may find things to criticise, he will understand the spirit which i)rompted 
the exhibition and the zeal and energy which have been put in the work, 
and will carr>' away with him into the busy world new ideas on Atcliitec- 
ture and new confidence in those men who consider Architecture a fine art 
and try to express it in the hovel as well as in the palace. 

Tfhe Club wishes to ^express its hearty thanks to all exhibitors for their 
cordial and courteous support, to the officers of the Art Institute and to all 
those who have assisted in the work of the exhibition, therel)y contributing 
to its success. 

THE EXHIBITION COMMITTEE. 

H. \\ vox HoLST, Secretary. 



i .lI.J!Umfj i ,J 



\K' l\y^r'^;~-'^y^'- 'T/.i ■ 



Modern Architecture. 

Read before the Chicago Architectural Club. 



THIC term modern architecture may tie variously applied. For the purpose 
k)( this paper I wish to limit it to its strictest meaning. When we speak 
of modern painting we refer to method rather than to time ; it is in this 
sense that I desire to put the subject before you. That we may arrive at our 
l)osition today it will be necessary to review the history of architecture in so far 
as other nations have had, at their time, a modern architecture. 

iVimitive man constructed for himself a shelter to in part shield him from 
the element which, in his climate, was his especial discomfort, or to protect him 
from hi;, especial danger. The materials were such as, with his limited power, 
he could best and most easily j)ut together. As he possessed more knowl- 
edge, as he V)ecame more cooperative, with his adde(;l force, he used stronger 
materials. He passed easily from the pliant reed to the iturdy forest tree — 
from the mud hut to the stone fortress. This material he found in nature ; 
this material he used, naturally, as he found it. As his mind developed, he 
called to his aid science, which is knowledge. This he applied to his con- 
struction ; with the aid of machines he moved larger masses and constructed 
stronger edifices. There were no limitations, except the limits of his knowl- 
edge and power. . . , 

This simple growth went on — the art following the development of the 
peoj:)le, logical in the use of its materials, and conforming to the wants of 
man, growing in strength and beauty as the race gained power — as different 
in one race as its climate or needs differed from another's. This law con- 
trolled until the fifteenth century. 

Let us return to i^rimitive man and follow the decoration he applied to 
this construction. As he developed more fully, as he acquired more easily 
the necessities and comforts of life, he had more leisure for the ornamenta- 
tion of his shelter. Actuated by the inborn love of beauty, stirred up by 
the desire to show his position among his fellows, stimulated by his ambi- 
tion to outdo his neighbors, this ornamentation increased, in quality first and 
quantity second, until he arrived at what we call his best period. It is that 
period which produced the highest in art, the grandest in literature, the most 
just laws and the greatest physical condition of the race. From this point the 
ornament increased in quantity and decreased in quality as the race became 
more ostentatious — as it sought new or novel effects; weaker in blood as it 



13 



i 

forsook the laws of nature, vviiich, by observing, it had built itself up, until, 
corrupt and degenerate, it was swallowed up l)y a race of later development. 

What was this ^rnament? In general, one luay say of any ancient race : 
Bring me what it loved, and I will construct for you its ornament. The 
peaceful agricultural race took its ornament from the field and the doriiestic 
animals. The race that lived by hunting took its ornament from the tiative 
fauna and the animals used in the chase; the warlike, from its victories; the 
religious, from its gods. In each race are all these, in about the ratio of 
their prominence in the race. 

Much time has been spent in trying to discover a chain of ornament to 
prove that all architecture has been dependent on that gone before. Books 
have been written to show how the ornament of one nation has been introduced 
by another. Since everything done has its influence on what follows, there is 
necessarily something true in this development of one style from . another. 
Certainly it is true of those styles which have been imported, which, although 
called by other names, are simply continuations of former styles ; l)Ut in 
what may be called "vital styles" this influence is very much overestimated. 

The fact that an ornament is similar in two countries does not prove 
that one is copied from another ; similar conditions produce similar results. 
The fact that only such brnament as applied tc^ its conditions was retained 
in any race if imported, is strong proof that it] might as easily have been 
originated, for it shows the discerning power of the race and the love it had 
for a logical ornament as well as for a logical construction. For the pur- 
poses of our line of thought it matters not how this ornament was obtained. 
The fact remains that the ornament used was an ornament which appealed 
to those who viewed it — that it was vital, in the life, and of the life, of the 
people; it was the conventionalization of what they saw and loved in their 
daily life, or what touched them deeply in their history or religion.! 

If we look into the ornament of any of the great vital styles, this truth 
is forced upon us. . 

The Egyptian's tomb was his religion; on it he recorded his life — por- 
traits of himself and family, representations of his gods, scenes in his life 
and home, his domestic animals, his horses and chariot. In the purely 
decorative portions he used his native flowers, notably the lotus, his national 
owe r — the flower with which he approached his gods and with which^he 
crowned himself at his feasts. 

Architecture was the only art considered worthy of the upper class ; 
for this reason there was no sculpture, as we use the term. It was all sub- 
servient to architecture, and adorned it. That the architectural scheme 
might not be destroyed, the sculpture was deeply conventionalized ; realism 



14 



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being thus eliminated, feeling or the essence of the subject sculptured was 
developed to a wonderful degree, and the Egyptian has left to us the finest 
examples of the idealization of animal forms that any age has produced. 

The Persian, through his love for the chase, adorned his architecture 
with hunting scenes and the native wild flowers. That the sculptor knew 
well his subject, there can be no doubt. The majesty of the lion and the 
swiftness of the greyhound are drawn with equal power and truth to nature, 
the conventionalization eliminating all except that quality which was the 
dominant one. Of the flora, we find principally the rose and the lotus. 
Persia is the land of roses — nowhere else do they attain such glof ious per- 
fection. The lotus was native to the soil and held in religious veneration. 

If we accept the position that architecture and architectural forms passed 
from Egypt to Persia and Greece, it is interesting to note that the lotus, 
which the Persian knew and admired, continued to hold a prominent place ; 
while in Greece, where it was not, except in one inferior variety, it was soon 
lost as a flower, though it may have exerted a strong influence in. deter- 
mining some of the architectural forms. . 

The Greeks were a race peculiar, in that they were in a sense without 
a native land. They lived in the acts of their ancestors, and wherever they 
settled, even after many generations, were more loyal to their ancient heroes 
than to the land of their birth. Their Bible was the Iliad and Odyssey. 
In their early ornament, the greater part is the representation of scenes in 
the lives of their deified heroes. In most cases the sculptured ornament 
refers directly to the purposes of the building. In the purely decorative 
portions we find the native plants, especially the palm which grew in the 
neighborhood. It is found throughout their architecture, and used much the 
same as the F^gyptians used the lotus. Although the palm has religious and 
historical interest for the Greeks, it is not safe to say that it was used on 
this account alone, for we find other plants almost, if not quite, as common, 
such as the honeysuckle and acaqthus, which appear to have had little 
signification. 

The essential property of the Greek ornament is its national and con- 
temporaneous character. Everything was in artistic keeping with the life and 
dress of the people who stood about it. There was no attempt to resort to 
novelty by depicting the animals or dress of other nations. It was the 
Greek's idea of the "eternal fitness of things" which made his architecture 
what it is. The ornament is much more realistic than the Egyptian's, 
principally by reason of the high esteem in which the art was held. Since 
the sculptor was equal with the architect, his work took equal part with it, 



15 



■ SS'^KiV^W.'-i'^'^^w'r - ■ , ;• '" ■■>^'- '"f ; ' 



and the building was as nuicii a pedestal on which to place the ornament 
as the ornament was the adorning of the l)uilding. 

If we take a long step and consicler the Gothic, we will have before us, 
perhaps, the latest vital style. The Gothic has been traced bydhe archi- 
tectural historian directly from^the classic. I'roni his point of view,- this is 
doubtless true. But, so rapid and thorough was the eliminating^ process 
carried on, that in its best period we find them absolutely dissimilar in 
form and feeling. The people were a religious race — probably as intensely 
so as any the world has ever seen. Its pictorial ornament was its religion ; 
its , floral decoration was the nature taken from its gardens and fields. 
Anything capable of decorative form was thought worthy of a place on its 
most glorious edifices. In many cases the ornament does not appear to 
have had especial signification, and >et the flower language at that time was 
so highly developed that exhaustive study might bring out very interesting 
results. In some cases the application is very marked, as the use of tht.- 
lily, a flower dedicated to the \Mrgin, in the lady chai)els in the twelfth .and 
thirteenth centuries, and from that time becoming a striking architectural 
decoration. • . , ' 

An interesting application of our subject is in the use of the palm in ( iothic. 
We find it in very early work in its classical form; not existing in nature in the 
country. It sdon disappeared, and was suddenK- revived when the Crusnders 
returned, bringing large cjuantitit^ from the Holy Land. • 

If we study the history of painting and sctilpture, we will find this same 
steady growth, and with architecture we will find them at a standstill in tlie 
fifteenth century. This sudden change in the artistic world nuist have been 
caused by some great power which had a direct influence on the creators. 
We will find it at the exact i)eriod where we should expect it. That the 
decline of the art began with the invention of the printing press is no nieiv 
coincidence — one is the direct result of the other. A great and sudden 
impetus was given literature by this acquisition. The great minds of the clay 
pressed into the field. All the great works of anticjuity were described and 
put in concise form. Not content with this, literature proceeded to lay down 
rules for their imitation. She dictated the colors to be used in jiainting; she 
insisted that the sculptor shouM pose his models thus and so, or copy those 
things done before; she laid down laws for science and forbade investigation 
in certain lines; she furnished a set of measurements for architects — not in 
general, but to the width of a line for every portion of every building. 

For three hundred years all progress in the arts was stopped. Painters 
spent their time copying work better done before, or putting into the eye of 
man that which had already been done by the ear. Architects, most deluded 



of all, reared ])iiildinj^s from descriptions and covered them with decoration, 
the originals of which in nature they had never seen. Since that time, each 
young mind, full of a desire to interpret the great truths which have come 
to him as, in communion with her, he has drunk in the beauties of nature, 
has been forced to have his senses blunted, his imaginations drowned, his 
very talents stunted, by a constant repetition of forms he does not under- 
stand, the originals of which in nature he has never seen, and which. in 
maturer years he admits to himself arel essentially bad. Within this century 
the other arts have one by one returned to the great mother, nature, for 
inspiration. .^ 

If space permitted, it would be interesting to folloW tJie emancipation of 
the various arts from the rules and limitations so long accepted; the conflict 
has been very similar in each, and one will answer as an example. Early 
in this century the illustrators for comic and other papers, through the neces- 
sities of their vocation and through their observations of nature, showed to 
others something of what might be done with contemporary life. This phase 
of art was taken uj) and followed by the ''Little Masters," so called, who 
were men without much training, and had little to lose in the then correct 
art. These men produced little of value, principally because of their lack 
of mental vigor and training. Men of ability, until Delacroix, followed the 
accepted canons of art. Delacroix, the leader of the Romanticists, broke 
away from the classic school, yet with his followers took his subjects almost 
entirely from literature. , j 

Dti\ id, the opponent of Delacroix, backed as he was by a great emperor, 
did much to delay the progress of the new school, and it was left to Millet 
and the men of his day to depict the life about them and show what beauty 
nature holds out to those who love her. Color, however, was not sought out 
in the same spirit. The artist recognized that in most cases pure local color 
produced a color scheme crude and unbalanced. 

It remained for Manet to discover the subduing and harmonizing effect 
of atmospheric color. This, in general, was the process of evolution. The 
names mentioned are given to show the time, rather than the persons, to 
whom we are indebted, for in all evolution each one striving for truth will 
produce something to make up the advance. It is no longer necessary for 
our sculptors and painters to dress our statesmen in Roman togas nor our 
soldiers in coats of mail to indicate wherein they serve the people. Artists 
have a more subtle method of transmitting thought. 

The true artist receives into his soul a feeling ; if he can transmit this 
feeling to another, his mission has not been in vain. This is the true value 
of art. Without this carrying power the work is worthless from an artistic 

^ o .■ . . . 



.•i 



X 



} 



standpoint. It may be true and serve its purpose as liistory. How this 
feeling is reproduced we know not, nor shall we know until the laws ol 
hypnotism and other psychical phenomena are understood. We do know 
that it cannot exist, except it first existed in the artist. No rules <ire oi 
any avail. In all the arts, except architecture, these things are accepted. In 
them the artists have passed the debatable ground and, are working\ |ogether 
in a new and rich field. That the public is awakening, there is no longer 
doubt. It responds to the thrilling chords of modern music; it crowds our 
art galleries, it fills our libraries. That ^' one touch of nature which makes 
the whole world kin" is fast making it an intelligent, discerning and 
receptive one. 

Let us now take up the parallel of architecture. Architectural literature 
has led architecture since the fifteenth century. The premises, as we have 
seen, were not correct, however logically niay have been the course ft)ll<)wed 
since; the position now arrived at is beyond comprehension, (io where yt)U 
will in our country and in every city, you will find men at work cutting 
holes in the facades of buildings built after the best architectural text-l)0()ks ; 
so universal is this practice, that more than one-half of the large buildings 
have undergone this operation and a large proportion of tiie remainder are 
tenantless. Year after year architects rear buildings, pointing out llieir 
archaelogical beauties, " and science follows close behind with a sledge- 
hammer and makes a wreck of the archcelogical part of them. So evident 
is this that the people now demand and are receiving a logical construction. 
The architect recognizes the necessity, and clings to ancient construction 
solely that he may employ ancient ornament. This he distorts out of all 
proportion in order to form a compromise with a useful construction. Con- 
stantly dissatisfied with results, he Hits from style to style. 

Just now the Renaissance is in vogue, and the Davids of architecture 
are taking the bright minds from the hotbed of America and shutting them 
up in the refrigerator of all progress — Italy, a country which never devel- 
oped a style ; a country where each style, being imported, began at its best 
and rapidly degenerated. Nature, that great storehouse of artistic supply, 
never furnished nourishment for the Renaissance style; except at the first, 
where it appears to have taken its inspiration directly from the Greek, it is 
a book architecture nourished by the dogmas of Vitruvius. 

For four hundred year4 we have choked in our efforts to suck blood 
from dry bones. How long shall we continue, and what are the influences 
which hold us from the fat and marrow? Today the evil, especially in 
America, is the architecturall school. The instructors are not architects. The 
pupils have too much instruction and too little guiding. Their minds are 



18 



■ .,c, , ^ 



crammed with a knowledge which will prevent the natural growth of any 
problem which may confront them. The development of the memory is 
forced; but the mind, like the source of its supply, the Roman ruin, is left 
overgrown with acanthus weeds and blocked with egg and dart moldings. 
Why spend years learning the steps by which the Gothic passed from the 
Greek, when the essential quality of its art is in the fact that it got rid of 
the Greek, and not that it retained any of the Greek influence ? If we cai\ 
imagine a medical school where none of the instructors is or ever has been 
a practicing physician, with the writings of Claudius Galen for a text-book, 
we will have a just.iComparison. 

The painter no longer paints in the Renaissance or Byzantine style as 
he did fifty years ago. He paints in his own style, and we now begin to 
hear of the American style or school, which means simply that he paints as 
an American sees America, with an American's pride and patriotism. When 
an American builds as an American sees America, then and not until then 
will we have an American style. 

If we cease to try to express character by the use of different styles, a 
method which is now universally adopted — a method which is governed by 
association, the lowest form of expression — if we throw off the yoke of 
precedent and stop copying the works of other nations and other times, if 
we form an American style, what will it be ? If we judge of our future by 
the works of those nations who recognize no architectural rules, the new 
American style is clear. We will never have a great ecclesiastical decora- 
tion ; the Protestartt church is against the use of pictorial symbols. We 
will never have a great historical style in the sense the Greeks possessed 
it ; we are not hero worshipers. We may not record the acts of ourselves 
nor our contemporaries as did the Egyptians. First and foremost we are an 
agricultural people. We love flowers and foliage plants. We inherit a taste 
for the woods and chase. We are a manufacturing people. We are inter- 
ested in our history and the sciences. We take comfort in our religion. 
We may, then, expect a decoration evolved from these subjects in the pro- 
portion of their prominence. Owing to our love of novelty and our invent- 
ive genius, we will not develop one line, but will use whatever we find in 
any which contains decorative quality. We will not continue to use in 
building after building one or two plants, as did the Egyptian or the Per- 

i 

sian, but, like the builders in the Gothic period, choose f6r ourselves those 
things which best express the character we seek. ^ 

We will have a colored architecture, for we, as a nation, love color. We 
who hold the painter and sculptor in high esteem will evolve an architecture 
which will give them the opportunities that they so rightly deserve. It is 



X 



/ 



19 



<sr73p''P'^w'?'^''!9f!^*^^iP'''f^ 



■ij/3r »/»'*wj\-^q^ -yTKr T" f 1 M^ 



\. 



now impossible for a modern painter to place himself in the si)int of paint- 
ing what would harmonize with any of ihe ancient styles of architecture. 
There are, at present, technical difficulties to overcome. It is necessary, in 
order to^^rodVice the numerous complicated drawings which constitute the 
plans of a building in the time allotted by bur rapid age, not to mention the 
economy required to prevent financial failure, to observe a system. This 
condition is not, however, prohibitory to the forming of a new style, for it 
has been successfully overcome in many large and notable buildings. 

If the schools would develop the true designing power of our pupils, 
and train them in the conventionalizing of natural forms, the step would be 
an easy one. There is no field of artistic, study. so open to success as this 
one, for this architecture is sure to come ; it is now well under way. We 
are now in the transitional period. Modern thought is showing itself here 
and there on our public buildings. Here and there, in domestic architecture, 
a frieze, a mantel facing or a stained-glass window is designed and executed 
in decorative character without the use of precedent, and with nature as the 
model. On the exterior of the new Congressional Library at Washington 
are carved, with great truth, typical heads of all the different races. Not 
only is this of far greater interest than the repetition of so many lion heads, 
but it is a valuable record in stone of the world's position today. At the 
entrance and in the rotunda of the Marquette Building, in Chicago, we have 
excellent examples of this new style. The Auditorium Hotel is filled with 
frescoes representative of American life. In nearly every building some ol 
the art has forced itself in. ' 

The Columbian Exposition was full of American art in spite of the 
understanding among the Architects that the work should all be classic. 
The Court of Honor was full of American ornament. So thoroughly was 
this ornament conventionalized and ennobled by eliminating all except the 
highest quality, that it held its place well with the best productions of classic 
art. Had the Fair been held ten years earlier, two huge lions would have 
taken the places of the charming statues of Plenty and Industry. Had this 
feeling been carried throughout, we would have shown to the world that we 
are independent leaders in art as well as in the sciences. As it is, we have 
shown a beginning and given a foretaste pf what our arckitecture will be 
when we again put oUjrselves on exhibition before the nations of Europe. 

("jEOrge R. Dean. 



^■■v 



20 



'^r^ 



:,[.'■ "w^''jw5i( 



W' 



CHICAGO ARCHITECTURAL CLUB. 



orriccRS. 



Joseph C. Llewellyn, 
Albert (i. Zimmerman, 
Henry K. Holsman, 
N. Max Dunning, . 
August C. Wilmanns, 



President. 

I St Vice-President. 

2d Vice-President. 

Secretary. 

Treasurer. 



V 



IzXIiCUTIVI!: COnniTTEli. 



Joseph C. Llkwelian. 
Albert (i. Zimmkrma.vT 
Henry K. Holsman. 
N. Max Dunning. 
August C. ^\'IL.^L\^NS. 



Birch Burdette Long, Three Years. 
Charles A. Carr, Three Years. 
Henry W. Tomlinson, Two Years. 
Clarence Hatzfeld, Two Years. 
Herman V. von Holst, One Year. 



William H. Eggerrecht, One Year. 



CXHIhITION COnniTTEE 



'S 



Henry W. Tomi^inson, Chairman. 

Heriman \'. VON Holst, Secretary. 

Au(;usT C. Wilmanns, Treasurer. ' 

Birch Burdette Long. Clarence Hatzfeld. 

Charles A. Carr. William H. Eggerrecht. 



JURY or 7\DMI55ION ^^ND H^^NOING COnniTTCE. 



D\YiGHT Heald Perkins. Frank W. Handy. 
George R. Dean. Rorert C. Spencer, Jr. 

Howard W D. Shaw. 



Alfred H. Granger. 
Irving K. Pond. 



'i\ 



i 



LLST or MI:^1BI:l?5 



Chicago Architecture! I Club. 



leaker, r>ank S. . 
J^ernhard, Adolph 
Birge, Cliarles 1^. . 
lirowii, Arthur ( 1. 
lUirnliani, 1 )aniel 1 1. 

Calm, l^dgar H. 
Carr, Charles A. . 
Church, Myron H. 

1 )avis, Frank L. 
Dean, George R. . 
Dean, Arthur R. . 
Dillon, John Robert 
Dunning, X. Max . 



l^l!:5IDr:N r ACVWTz iN 1:^11 ^1:1 ?.S. 

1233 Marcjuette lUiilding. 
13 14 Ashland lilork. 
17S,) ( )ld Colony liuilding. 
S25, 225 l)jarl);)rn Street. 
I 142 The Rookery. 

}>22;i, Michigan Ancuul-. 

317 Rush Street. 

1 233 Maniuette^Buikling. 

3115 Michigan Aveiuic. 
121 La .Salic Street, 
121 La Salle Street. 
2325 W. .\danis .Street. 
6)4 Lullnian lUiilding. 



l\ggebrecht, \\1lliani H 
ICliel, Roy 

Mscher, John I>. . 
Kioto, Julius . 
Vyk, James L. 

Garden, Hugh M. (i. 
Granger, Alfred H. 

Hatzfeld, Clarence 
Hemmings, I^. C, 
Heun, Arthur 
Hill, P^rancis J. 
Hoeppner, K. A. . 



14S Wabash .\\enue. 
4443 l>llis .\ve4u1e. 

453 Twenty-ninth Street. 

7626 l-'ord Avenue, .South Chicago. 

42u Home Avenue, ( )ak I'ark. 

1013, 172 Washington .Street. 
806 The Temple. 

S04 Teutonic lUiilding. 
25i liissell .Street. 
1300 ICllsworth lUiilding. 
218 Wabash Axenue. 
461 The Rookery. 



I lolsiiKiii, I lunry K. 
1 lolsl, 1 leriiian \'. von 
I hint, Myron 

Jensen, Elmer C. . 
Jobson, b'rank 

Kelley, John 1 1. . 
Kleinpell, Waller l"\ 
Kulsche, Arthnr W. 

Lanniiers, 1 lernian C\ 
Le\ y, Sanuiel H. . 
1 .iedberg, I luj^o J. 
Lilleskau, John 
I andstroni, Robert S. 
I .le\\ell\n. Joseph C 
I.oiil;,, liirch iUu'dette 

.Mattes( »n, \ictor Andre 
Miller, Joseph A. . 
Millet. Louis J. 
Mitchell, John A. . 
Morse. IJnrton 1".. 
Mueller, Paul V. \\ 
Mundie, William 15. 

Nelson, l!d\\ard ( ). 
Neubauer, Adolph 
Newberry, Robert T. 

Perkins. 1 )u i-ht I leald 
I'ischel. I'"red 
rosthuina. l-"olkert 

^ 

Raw son. Lorin A. 
Rouleau. Arthur . 

.Sandblom. Carl Axel 
.Schmidt. Richard l".. 
Schmidt. I lugo 
.Seeman, I'aiiil II. . 
Seney, Ixli^ar I'\ . 
Shaw, Howard \'an 1 )()ren 



153 La Salle Street. 

255 l^ast Sixty-fu'st Street, 

iKjy Steinway Llall. 

If 20 Llonie [nsurance Ikiilding. 
1233 Marquette l^uilding. 

2832 X^ernon Avenue. 
372 Webster Axenue. 
i6!Ji Manhattan Building. 

Fisher I^uilding, 

i733'Mar(iuette Ikiilding. 
371 Mohawk Street. 
303 ILaddon Avenue. 
3234 Princeton Avenue. 

1245 Marcjuette lUiilding. 

loiT, Teutonic lUiilding. 

1030 I )a\is .Street, i'lvanston. 
1504 Newport Avenue. 
2?^ Wabash Avenue, 
'592 California Avenue. 
I 122 Lawndale A\enue. 
.Schiller lUiilding. 
ii2i) liome Insurance Building. 

98 Oak Street. , 

1 .' - 
169 W abash Axenue. 

171 La .Salle .Street. 

1 107 Steinway 1 lall. 
1510 Oakdale .Avenue. 
770 North Leaxitt .Street. 

1 linsdale, Illinois. 
510 West Polk Street. 

1430 Noble Avenue. 
1013 Teutonic lUiilding. 
285 {''remont .Street. 
790 I'ine Grove Avenue. 
12023 .Stewart Avenue. 
20, 115 Monroe .Street. 



2.S 



Spencer, Robert C, Jr. 
Starr, Harry C. . . 
Sturm, Meyer J. . 

Taylor, Edward P. 
Tomlinson, Henry \V. 
Traxler, Victor 
Twose, Geo. M. R. 

Viehe-Naess, Ivar 

Weber, Peter J. . 
Wendland, William R. 
Wells, William A. 
Wilmanns, August C. . 
Winslow, Carleton Monroe 
Wittekind, Henry, Jr. . 
Woltersdorf, Arthur F. 
Work, R. G, 

Zimmerman, Albert G. 
Zimmerman, Hugo H. 



1107 Steinway Hall. 
27 Forty-third .Street. 
13 Lane Court. 

II South May Street. 
1106 Steinway Hall. 
1142 The Rookery. 
320 Superior .Street. 

212 Oak Street. 

1 142 The Rookery. 

357 Twenty-fourth Street. 

Seneca-7 Kansas. 

264 Sheffield Avenue. 

17S0 Old Colony Building. 

1 120 Home Insurance Building. 

70 La Salle .Street. 

20, 1 15 Monroe Street. 

115 Monroe .Street. 
1279 Perry .Street. 



/ASSOCIATE nCNI^ClK 



Adler, Dankmar . 
Amory, W. Austin 

Behr, L. Theodore 
Broes-Van Dort G. 
Bushnell, Edward S. 

Clark, P^dward C. 
Coffman, Geo. W. 
Combs, Roger >L 
Coolidge, Charles A. 

Dungan, Thomas A. 

Emery, Jesse Lee . 
Ewen, John M. 

Ferguson, Louis A. 
Fuller, L. E. 



Auditorium Building. 
4913 Madison A\enue. 

343 PZast Fifty-sixth Street. 
[269 West Madison Street. 
Flournoy and Rockwell Streets. 

610 Manhattan Building. 
218 Clark Street. 

405 Chamber of Commerce Building. 
1780 Old Colony Building. 

611 Security Building. 

38 Dearborn Street. 
1 112 The Rookery. 

139 Adams Street. 
2417 Michigan Avenue. 



24 



■■• - •> ■•■■:■• ■••[■ '^^' v.y~.<M'r^;'.\i y; .^-■,\ix. .-■.«•• :Y'rA^^^^^^ 



Gates, W. I). 

Heinz, George P. 

Killen, E. Greble . 
Knisely, H. C, 

Matz, Herman L. . 
Maiich, Max . 

Perkins, Frederick \V, 
Pierce, E. I". 
Prosser, H. 1). 
Purington, D. V. . 



Reese, Theodore 



Smith, Gen. Wm. Sooy 
Spindler, Oscar 
I Schmidt, Rudolph (). 

Torgerson, Henry 

I'llnian, Harry 

. ' White, J. A. . 
Wilcox, A. L. 
Wyles, Thomas Rnssell 



Marquette Building. 

419 Chamber of Commerce. 

Chicago Athletic Association. 
68 West Monroe Street. • 

302 Chamber of Commerce Building. 
81 Illinois Street. 

115 Monroe Street. 

1303, ioo Washington Street. 

A^arquette Building. 

323 Chamber of Commerce Building. 

20 Adams Street. 

733 Stock Exchange. 
209 vSouth Clinton Street. 
191 Superior Street. 

153 La Salle .Street. 

3610 Calumet Avenue. 

Schiller Building. | j 

■/it 

533 West Adams Street. | 

1564 Monadnock Building. 



HONORZ^RY. 



Allen, John K. 

Blake, Theodore L. 

Clark, Robert 

Gay, Henry Lord . 

Hunt, Frederick S. 

Jenney, W. L. B. . 

Lawrie, Henry 

Muller, Louis, Jr. . 
McLean, Robert Craik 



40 Dearborn Street. 

117 East Twenty-third Street, New York. 

2505 Kenmore Avenue. 

Q2 Dearborn Street. 

46 North Francisco Avenue. 

1 120 Home Insurance Building. 

Omaha, Nebraska. 

610 Manhattan Building.! 
610 Manhattan Building. 



25 



i^TVy' ■yj*ri;;*'o^;H ..: ; , 7^; .'■^:\ -.y^,- :■ ■ ■*'^'-'- 



Phiinister, I). (".. . 
Sullivan, Louis 11. 
Taft, Lorado 
\\'agner, Fritz 



165 Soiilli l''rancisc() Axliuil' 



AiKJiloriiuii Tower. 



Vine Arts lUiilding". 



1 1 iS TIk- kookcrv. 



NON-l?r:SII)t:N'r. 



Adelsperger, Roliand . 

Berry, A. C. . 
Brandt, Oscar I'. . 

Chafee, Dudley C. 

I-Albrooke, Marry W. J. 

Garden, ICdward G. 
Garden, Frank M. 

Pattison, James William 

Starck, lulward V. 
Shel)lessy, Jolm !•". 
Smith, William J. . 

Thomas, Harry S., Jr. . 

Wirts. Stei)hen M. 



2d I '. .S. \'ol. Fnuineers 



43 Chanihfrs Street, New N'ork. 

\'. M. C. A. r.uikhng. IV-oria. 

l",a-t Las Aegas, \. M. 

^'nk()nTer., IJritisli N. Aimriea. 
^'uk«)^ 'l\-r., Urilish N. Anuiica. 

The AlheiKLum, Milwankrc-. Wis. 

loS West Main Street. Madison. Wis. 

Ai'catlc liuilding. Pe<»ria. 111. 

291 ) .\\enue L, .San .Viitonio, Tex.is. 

^2 Kin^- I)ln(k, i)cii\i-r, C<»lora(lo. 



2 Impasse (Ic ("« mti, Paris, i-'rauc 



(.-. 



A 







VV,'- iVj^^r: 










>^:;-sr 



HKR.MAN I,. DI HKIN(.. 



I ■■ 



V ■ . 

'A 



~\......_ 



CAIJ^NDAR, 1 590- 1 099. 



Sept. 19, 1898. : Bolieniiaii Night. ' '- 

Sept. 28, 1898, Chicago Arcliitectural Club was entertained at the Builders' 

Club. 

•()ct. 3, 1898. Annual Meetinij^ and I'^lection of Officers. 

( )('l. 17, 1898. Smoker — ^ " Terra Cotta as a Ikiilding- Material." Talks by 

"^ Messrs. Vrhz Wai;ner and W'm. I). Gates, 

Oct. 31, 1898. Bohemian " I ialloween." 

No\. 7, 1898. Illuslratetl Lecture — W. M. R. l^rench, "The Walue of a 

Line." (Ladies' Night.) 
No\ . 14, 1898. Smoker — "Plumbing in Buildings," by Paul F. Potter, 

' "Sewage Disposal in Country Residences," by Henry 

Lord ( ia\'. / 

N<t\. 21, 1898. Lt'cture ^ — Normand S. i'atton, "A Typical Chicagf) Public 

School." 

Nov. 28, 1898. P>ohemian — "Cake Walk." 

Dec. 5, 1898. Lecture ^Irving K. Pond, "Development of the Modern 

Apartment Building." 

Dec. 12, J898. .Smoker — "The Paint Ouestion," by (iorham B. Coftin. 

' t " X'arnish, Its Manufacture and Cse," by W. S. Potwin, 

Dec. 28. 1S98. P)ohemian — Christmas Celebration, 

Jan. 9, 1899. Illustrated Lecture — Dwight Heald Perkins, "A Study of 

Recent International I^xi^ositions," 

Jan, 16, 1899. .Smoker — "Plastering," by Thomas Jones, 

Jan. 23, 1899, Lecture — Louis 11. .Sullivan, "The I'rinciples of .Architec- 
tural Design," 

J.m. 30, 1899. P)ohemian — "A Night in Italy," 

1\1). 6, 1899, Illustrated Lecture — Lorado Tafc, "A Tramj) Through 

Normandy and Brittany," (Ladies' Night.) 
I'eb. 13, 1899. .Smoker — " Specitications for Permanent and Safe P^lectrical 

Construction," l)y W. H. Merrill. 
Feb. 20, 1899. Lecture — "Reminiscences of a Trip Through Holland," by 

Mr. J. H. X'anderpoel, illustrated by chalk sketches. 
Feb. 27, 1899. Drama — "The New Draftsman," written by F, C. Hem- 



mmgs. 



f starch (^, 1899. Lecture — P^rank Lloyd Wright, "The Practical Nature of 

the Artistic." 



! ■ 



March 13, 1899. Smoker — "Heating- and X'entilating," by James k. Will^-tt. 

March 20, 1899. Illustrated Lecture — John K. Allen, "A Trip Through Nor- 
way." (Ladies' Night.) 

IMarch 30, 1899. Opening Reception, Twelfth Annual Ivxhihition. 

March 30, 1899, to April 16, 1899. Twelfth Annual Exhibition of the Chicago 

Architectural Club, at the Art Institute. 



April 3, 1S99. 

April 10, 1899. 

April 17, 1899. 

April 24, 1899. 

May I, 1899. 

May 8, 1899. 

May 15, 1899. 



Lecture. 

Smoker. 

Lecture. 

Bohemian. 

Lecture. 

Smoker. 

Entertainment. 



COni^niTIONS. 

Fritz Wagner Competition for Terra Cottk Column. Closed No\ . 14, 1S9S. 

ist Prize, I50.0C), deorge R. Dean. 

2d Prize, 130.00, Carl A.xel .Sandblom. > ^ 

3d Prize, I20.00, Birch Burdette Long. 
A Church Window. Closed January 16, 1899. 

ist Prize, Samuel H. Levy. 
A Schoolhouse Entrance. Closed P'ebruary 20, 1899. 

ist Prize, Carleton Monro^W'inslow. 
Catalogue Cover^for Twelfth Annual Exhibition. Closed March iS, 1899. 

ist Prize, William H. Eggebrecht. 

2d Prize, (ieorge R. Dean. 




« . ■• ^ " * ' ' -S? c3tS^ " ■■A *f 



- d'-:»MS' ^i^^ 



HERMAN L. DUHRING. 



28 



, -.,„,,^^,.J^.,,,.^.,. 



INDEX 

To Architectural Exhibits. 



AMERICAN LUXFER PRISM CO. — 370 Fulton Street. Chicagro. 

1 Luxfer Electro-Glazed Art Glass. ' 

2 Luxfer Electro-Glazed Art Glass. 

3 Luxfer Electro-Glazed Art Glass. 

AMERICAN TERRA COTTA & CERAMIC CO.— 1045 Marquette Building. 

4 Terra Cotta Group — " Lioness and Cubs." 

5 Large Terra Cotta Vase. ■ 

ALMINI CO. — 107 Wabash Avenue, Chicago. 

6 Interior Decoration. Rendered by Birch Burdette Long. 
I 7 Interior Decoration. Rendered by Birch Burdette Long. 

ANDERSON, H. WYNDHAM — 39 W. One Hundred and Twenty-fourth St., New York City. 

8 Biem Klosterbier. After Painting by Griitzner. 

ANDREWS, HELEN — 9 W. Sixty-fourth Street, New York City. 

9 Moorish Ornament. 

ARCHITECTURAL DECORATING CO. -249 Wells Street. 

10 Specimen of Composition. Capitals and Ornaments. 

ARMSTRONG & CO., MAITLAND — 61 Washington Square, South. 

11 Glass — St. Mark's Church, Baltimore. 

12 Memorial Windows at Biltmore, N. C. 

1 2/1 Stained Glass Window — ' ' Visit of Queen of Sheba to 
Solomon." 

13 Cafe, Hotel Wendel, Pittsfield, Mass. 



BACON, FRANCIS H.— 96 Washington Street, Boston, Mass. 

14 Mausoleum for E. D. Adams. 



<^ 



BAlLY & TRUSCOTT — 421 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 

15 Sketch of Hall for Residence of Mr. Curtis. Rendered by 

G. G. Bassett. 

16 New Baptist Church. Rendered by Arthur Truscott. 



29 






^ ■ • '. '• • ■ ■■ ■■ ' ■ . . .... I 

BENSON & BR0CKWAY-S5 Broadway, New York. 

17 School No. 17, Borough of Richmoiul. First Floor. Plan. 

18 Trinitj^-^hurch, Montclair, N. J. Perspective. 

19 School No. 17, Borough of Richmond, N. V. Elevation. 

20 Competitive Design, Jersey City Public Library. 

BISSEQGER, J. J.— 328 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 

21 T-Square Club Competition. First Mention. 

22 T-Square Club Competition. Second Mention. (Sketch 

from Quotation of Poetry. ) 

BLACKALLa clarence H.- Music Hall Buildinf, Boston, Mass. 

23 Study for Elevator Enclosure. 

BLASHPIELD, EDWIN H.-58 W. Fifty seventh Street, New York.- 

24 Photos for Ceiling- Panel Decoration in Librarv of (jco. \V. 

Childs Drexei. 

BOARI, ADAMO— 1107 Steinway Hall, Chicago. 

25 Luxfer Prism Co. Comjoetition. Second Prize. 

BOHNARD, WILLIAM A.— 41 Homer Street, Cleveland, Ohio. 

26 Sketch for a Cottage. 

27 Study for a Country Club. 

BORING & TILT0N-3a Broadway, New York. 

28 Immigrant Station, Ellis Island. 

BOYD. DAYID KNICKERBACKER— 1012 Harrison Building, Philadelphia, Pa 

29 Sketch — Saturday Club. Rendered by J. S. Milas. 

30 A Residence. 

.31 A Residence. Ele\ation. _' • 

32 Design, City Church. Elevation. 

33 Design, City Church. Plan. 

34 House at Overbrook, Pa. S.-W. PZlevation. 

35 House at Overbrook, Pa. N.-E. Elevation. 

BOYD, LAWRENCE VISSCHER- 1215 Harrison Building, Philadelphia, Pa 

36 House at (jcrmantown, Pa. Plan. 

37 House at (iermantown, Pa. Photo. 

38 House at Germantown, Pa. Elevations. 

39 House at Pelham, Pa. 

40 House at Oxerbrook Farms, Pa. 

BRAGDON. CLAUDE FAYETTE -104 Cutler Building, Rochester, N. Y 

41 Decoration for Vagabond Club. 



30 



'^r ■; ■ i 



BRAODON & HILLIVIAN 104 Cutler Building, Rochester, No Y. 

42 Railway Station. Claude Fayette Bragdon. 

43 Entrance of Livingston County Courthouse. Claude Fayette 
. Bragdon. ,' 

BRIDQEMAN, F. A.— 303 Filth Avenue, New York. 

44 Sketch for Decoration, Swiss Hotel. . ' . 

45 Decoration — A Greek Dance. 

BROOKE, ARTHUR S.— 3920 Sansom Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 

46 Carlylc House. 

47 House at Alexandria, Va. 

BROWNSCOMBE, JENNIE— 11 East Fourteenth Street, New York. ^^^ / 

48 Design for Mural Painting. 

BUDD, K. C— 154 Carnegie Hall, New York. 

49 Cottage. 

BURGESS. IDA J. 849 Marshall Field Building. 

50 Ik'drooni Candlestick, Oxidized Bronze. Designed and 
; executed by Chas. H. Barr. 

51 Bedroom Candlestick, Natural Bronze. Designed and exe- 

cuted by Chas. H. Barr. 
^2 I^^gyptian Pipe Rack and Smoking Set. Designed and exe- 
cuted by Chas. H. Barr. 

53 Bedroom Candlestick. Designed and executed by Chas. H. 

Barr. 

54 Smokers' Set. Designed and executed by Chas. H. Barr. 

CAHN, EDGAR BERNARD — 3223 Michigan Avenue, Chicago. 

55 A Modern Synagogue. Elevation. 

56 *A Modern Synagogue. Plan. 

CAMPBELL, WALTER M.— 54 Devonshire Street, Boston. 

57 Sudford House, England. 

58 Church of Notre Dame, Bernay, France. - 

59 Cloister Door, Dryburgh Abbey. 

CARR, CHAS. A. -317 Rush street. - 

60 vSection. through Modern Theater. 

61 Plan of Modern Theater. 



31 






CENTURY CO., THE — 33 E. Seventeenth Street, New York. 

62 " The Five Sisters," York CathecU'al. Jos. Pennell. 

63 Ely Cathedral and Lady Chapel, from Southeast. Jos. 

Pennell. 

64 Durham Cathedral from the Wear. Jos. Pennell. 

► 65 Gloucester Cathedral (Lady Chapel). Jos. Pennell. 

66 Saiita Maria La Blanca. Jos. Pennell. 

67 Canterbury Cathedral (Norman Stairway). Jos. Pennell. 

68 Ely Cathedral, Lantern, from' Northeast. Jos. Pennell. 

69 Canterbury Cathedral, South Side. Jos. Pennell. 

70 The Hall in People's Palace, London. Harry Fenn. 

71 Lodge of Fred L. Ames. R. D. Andrews. 

72 Madison Square Garden/^ A. F. Jaccaci. 

73 House of Wm. Walter Phelps, Esq. Geo. Fletcher Bal)b. 

CHAPM4N DECORATINQ CO. — 1417 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 

74 Hall in Country House. 

75 Breakfast Room in Country House. 

76 Den for Country House! 

77 Moorish Corner for Country House. Rendered by Gustav 

Ketterer. . 

78 Frescoes for the American Baptist Pub. Co. Rendered by 

Gustav Ketterer. 

79 Library in Country House. Rendered by Wm. I^\ Suplee. 
80' Country House Librarv. Rendered by Wm. F. Suplee. 

^ 81 Hall, Radnor, Pa. ' • 
\' ^ 82 Elizabethan Dining Room. 

CHICAGO ARCHITECTURAL CLUB -Art Institute, Chicago. 

83 Terra Cotta Column Competition. First Prize, (ieo. R. 

Dean. 1 

84 Terra Cotta Column Competition. Second Prize. Carl Axel 

Sandblom. 

85 Terra Cotta Column Competition. Third Prize. Birch Bur- 

dette Long. 

86 Terra Cotta Column Competition. Third Prize. Birch Bur- 

dette Long. 

87 Church Window Competition. First Prize. Sam'l Levy. 

88 Schoolhouse Entrance Competition. First Prize. Carleton 

Monroe Winslow. 

89 Catalogue Cover Competition. First Prize. W^m. H. Egge- 

brecht. 

90 Catalogue Cover Competition. Second Prize. Geo. R. 

Dean. 

CHICAGO ORNAMENTAL IRON CO.— Twenty=sixth and South Halsted Streets, Chicago. 

91 Bronze Fountain for the Courthouse at South Bend, Lid. 

Shepley, Rutan & Coolidge, Architects. 



3-.' 



CLAY, W. W.- Chicago. 

92 Design for Grant Memorial Plan and Perspective. 

COCHRAN, ARTHUR S.- Philadelphia, Pa. 

93 House at Mankato, Minn. 

COLBY & SONS, JOHN A.- 148 Wabash Avenue, Chicago. 

94 Selections for F'urniture. Designed by Wm. H. Eggebrecht. 

t ■ ■ 

COPE & STEWARDSON — 320 Walnut Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 

95 University of Pennsylvania Law School. Plan, ist flooi. 
"^^B University of Pennsylvania Law School. Plan, 2d Floor. 

goa University of Pennsylvania Law School. Facade. 

97 University of Pennsylvania. Dormitories. Detail. - 

D'ASCENZO, NICOLA — 1020 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 

98 Alteration. 

99 City Trust Elevator Hall. 

100 City Trust Building 'Elevator Hall. ^ 

loi The Arts. Decoration for Terminal. 

102 Color Sketch — San Vitale Ravenna'. 

103 Color Decoration — Poldi Pezzoli Museum, Milan. 

DAY & BRO., FRANK MILES — 925 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 

104 Monument to Benjamin Franklin. 

105 Garden. 

106 Dining Room for Mr. Alexander Van Rensselaer. Chapman 

Decorative Co.. 

107 Reception Hall. ^ 

108 Dining Roolii. ~ ^ ' 

109 Lutheran Publishing House. 

DEVOE, H. M.— New Brighton, S. I. 

I ID School for All Saints' Parish. 

DIETRICH, E. G. W.— 13 West Twenty-eighth Street, New York. 

111 Sketch for House, Danbury, Conn. 

DOERR, W. P.— 1203 Chamber of Commerce, Chicago. 

1 1 2 Scene in Venice. . 

113 Scene on Grand Canal. 

114 Scene on Maulbraun, Suabia. 

115 Elevation — Academy of Music. . 



83 



•I 



m- 



DONNELL, H. E.— in Fifth Avenue, New York. 

ii6 House at Roselle, N. J. - 

117 House at Roselle, N. J. 

DUHRING, H. L., Jr.— 1420 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 

118 Plan of Villa Madama. i 

119 Mosaic Golumns, Naples Museum. 

120 Sketch of Columns, Athens. > 

121 Sketch of the Palais de Justice, Brussels. 

122 Sketches in Venice. 

123 Tower and Market Place, Verona. 

124 Sketch of Chateau d'un. 
•125 Interior of II. Redentore. 

126 Interior of S. M. Campitelli, Rome. 

127 Sketches and Notes in Italy. 

128 Mosaic Detail, Monreale Cathedral, Sicily. 

129 Old House, Bourges, France. 

130 Vestibule. Church of St. Ours, Loches, Trance. 

131 Front and Side F^levation of The Bigallo, Morence. 

132 House at Pompeii. " 

133 Sketch of Tower, Verona, Italy. 

134 Old Mosque at Athens. 
' 134^ Sketches in England. 

^ f- . ' ■ ■ 

DWYER, FRANCIS C— St. Louis, Mo. 

135 Sug'gfestions for Treatment oi House of Delegates. 

136 St. Louis City Hall. 

137 Same for Council Chamber. Rendered by Francis C. 

Dwyer and J. \V. Ginder. 

EAMES & YOUNG -St. Louis, Mo. 

138 Fine Arts Building, Omaha Exposition. 

EISEN, WM. C- Studio Buildinsr, Chicago. 

138^ Dining Room Panel, burnt and colored. 
138^ Decorative Pan,el, burnt. 
138^: Decorative Panel, burnt. 
138^' Frieze. Pyrographic. 

ENDERS, OSCAR — St. Louis, Mo. 

139 A Little Casino. 

140 A Country Residence. 

141 Mausoleum of the Victims of the Maine. 

142 A Cemetery Entrance. 

143 Sketch for Country House. 

144 Monument to the Heroes of Santiago. 

145 A Country Residence. 
145/ A Suburban Residence. 



3i 






EYRE, WILSON, Jr.— 927 Chestnut street, Philadelphia, Pa. 

146 Houses. C. B. Moore. 

147 Fireplace. House in California. 

148 House, New York, for Ernest Albert. 

149 A Formal Garden, for Alex. Rensselaer. 

150 ^tablfe and Garden at Strafford, Pa. 

^ FAXON, JOHN LYMAN — 7 Exchange Place, Boston. 

151 East Boston High School. 

FERRY &*CLAS- Milwaukee, wis. 

152 Public Library, Milwaukee. 

FLAQG, ERNEST— 35 Wall street. New York City. 

153 Soldiers' Monument. Perspective. 

154 Residence of F. G. Bourne. Perspective. 

155 ^tudy for Cathedral of St. Peter and St. Paul. . 

156 Botanical Garden. Rear Elevation. 

157 Botanical Garden. Side Elevation. 

158 Botanical Garden. Transverse Section. 

159 Botanical Garden. Plan. 

160 Botanical Garden. Front Elevation. 

161 Study for Protestant Episcopal Cathedral, D. C. 

i6ia Study for Protestant Episcopal Cathedral, D. C. Elevation. 

FLAQQ, ERNEST and W. B. CHAMBERS -New York. 

162 Lawrence Library. 

FROST & GRANQER — 806 The Temple, Chicagro. 

163 Union Passenger Station, Omaha. Rendered by W. H. 

Cutler. 

164 Girls' Dormitory, Lake Forest University. Rendered by 

W. H. Cuder. 
164/5 Midlothian Golf Club, Blue Island, 111. 
164c University Hospital, Lake Forest, 111. 

GAY, HENRY LORD — 93 Dearborn Street, Chicago.) 

165 Summer Residence at Lake Forest. 

166 Residence of Frank R. Chandler. Carriage Approach. 

167 Music Room and Great Hall of same. 

168 View from Parlor of Great Hall in same. 

GILBERT. CASS — Endi^ott Building:, St. Paul, Minn. 

169 St. Francis of Assisi. 

170 Tower of Utrecht Cathedral. 

171 Torcello. 



35 



I vj 



J! -r 



OILBERT. CASS— Endlcott Building, St. Paul, IVirnn.— Continued. 

172 Eukhuisin Tower. ^ 

173 Amsterdamer Gate, Harlem. 1 

174 Nuremberg. 

175 Temple of Neptune at Paestum. 

176 Tower of St. Francesco, Romano. . , 

177 St. Jacques, Ghent. . , 

178 Cathedral at Antwerp. 

GITHENS, A. M.— 1512 Pine street, Philadelphia, Pa. 

179 Country Club. Plans. 

180 Elevation of Country Club. 

GRAY, ELMER —Milwaukee, Wis. 

181 Hall. Irving H. Reynolds. 

182 Hall in Frederic Buell's House, Milwaukee. 

183 Summer Residence for Elmer Gray. 

184 Sketch of House for G. R. Nash, Esq. 

,i ,' ■ ■ 

GREEN & WICKS— 110 Franklin Street, Buffalo. N. Y. 

185. St. Vincent's Female Orphan Asylum. . 

186 House of Mr. E. M. Mills. j 

187 Utica Savings Bank. Exterior. '1 

188 Utica Savings Bank. Exterior. 

189 The Natatio, by Buffalo Club. 

XiREENLE A F, JAMES L.- I Broadway, New York. 

190 "Pennbrook," Estate of Clarence Blair Mitchel. Rendered 

by Hughson Hawley. 

191 The Duke Ciardens. Rendered by M. Seymour Bloodgood 

GRIFFIN. PERCEY — 48 Exchange Place, New York. 

192 Stable for A. B. Jenkins, Llewellyn Park. 

193 The Homewood Club House. 

GRUEBY, FAIENCE CO. — 164 Devonshire Street, Boston, Mass. 

194 Arch Piece, two colors. W. H. McGinty. 

195 Vase, dull green. G. P. Kendrick. 

196 Vase, dull green, (j. P. Kendrick. 

197 Console, dull green. A. \V. Chittenden. 

198 \'ase, dull green. G. P. Kendrick. 

199 Vase, dull green. G. P. Kendrick. 

200 Vase, dull green. (}. P. Kendrick. 

201 Vase, dull green, (j. P. Kendrick. 
' 202 Vase, dull green. G. P. Kendrick. 

203 Vase, green, with lilies. G. P. Kendrick. 



36 



\-' 






GRUBBY, PAIBNCB CO.— 164 Devonshire Street, Boston, Mass.— Continued. 

204 Vase, dull green. G. P. Kendrick. 

205 Vase, dull green. G. P. Kendrick. 

206 Vase, dull green. G. P. Kendrick. _ 

207 Vase, dull green. G. P. Kendrick. 

208 Vase, dull green. G. P. Kendrick. 

209 Vase, dull green. G. P. Kendrick. 

210 Vase, dull green. G. P. Kendrick. 

211 Vase, dull green. G. P. Kendrick. 

212 Vase, dull green. G. P. Kendrick^ 

213 Vase, dull green. G. P. Kendrick. 

214 Vase, yellow. G. P. Kendrick. 

215 Vase, yellow. G. P. Kendrick. 

216 Vase, crackle. Wm. H. Grueby. 

217 Moorish Tile, colors. G. P. Keridrick. 

218 Vase, dull green. G. P. Kendrick. 

219 Moorish Tile, dull green. G. P. Kendrick. 

220 Lion's Head, bronze. G. P. Kendrick. 

221 Vase, dull green. W. H. Graves. 

222 Photograph of Pottery. 

223 Photograph of Pottery. 

HALL, ALBERTA— 43^^03 Oakenwaid Avenue, Cliicago. 

224 Drawings for Book- Plates. 

225 Designs for Book-Covers. 

225/" Modeled P'rame. Cast in Iron. ".. 

HARDENBERQH, H. J., Arcliitect— 10 W. Twenty-third Street, New Yorlc. 

226 Hotel Raleigh, Washington, D. C. 

HARRIS, WM. L.— 2 W. Fourteenth Street. New York. 

227 Copy of 13th Century Glass in Chartres Cathedral. 

228 Copy of 13th Century Glass in Chartres Cathedral. 

HAYS, PRANK A.— 931 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 

229 Sketch on West Chester Pike. 

230 Tenant House on Garrett Road. 

231 Old House at Manoo. 

232 Pencil Sketch near " The Eagle." 

HEWITT, O. W. & W. D.- Philadelphia, Pa. 

233 Yacht House for Geo. C. Boldt. 

HILL & WOLTERSDORF-70 La Salle Street, Chicago. 

234 General View, St. Paul's Church. 

235 Detail of Entrance, St. Paul's Church. 

236 Interior View, St. Paul's Church. 



37 






HISS, PHILIP— III Fifth Avenue, New York. 

237 Hall for Country House. 1 , 

■-,)■■ 

HUNT, MYRON H.- 1107 Steinway Hall. 

238 Sketches of the Pirie Residence. 

239 Residence for Catharine M. White. 

24b Residence for Catharine M. White. Elevation. 

241 Residence for J. E. Nolan, E\anston, 111. Rendered by 

F. W. Kirkpatrick. 

242 Residence of Myron Hunt, Evanston, 111. 
243- Residence of Myron Hunt, Library. 

244 Photo of Residence of Myron Hunt. 

245 Photo of Residence of Myron Hunt. 

246 Photo of Jenkins Cottage, Evanston, 111. 

247 House for Harlow N. Higinbotham, Evanston. 

247^^ House for Harlow N. Higinbotham, E\anston. Elevation. 
247^ Photo of Pirie Residence. 

HOKANSON, O. M. — 616 N. Fortieth Street, Philadelphia. Pa. 

248 Colonial Details. 

HOWELLS & STOKES— 47 Cedar Street. New Vorlc. 

249^ Tenement Plan No. i. 

249 Tenement Plans No. 2. _ . 

250 Tenement Plans No. 3. 

251 Tenement Plans No. 4. 

HUBER. H. F. & CO.- 174 Fifth Avenue, New York. 

253 Triumph of Democracy. Arthur Thomas. 

254 Leather Chair Back (hand carved j. 

HUNT, RICHARD HOWLAND — 28 E. Twenty-first Street. New York. 

• 252 Residence for A. Stern. 

HUNT, JARYIS — 1407 Monadnock Building, Chicago. 

255 Saddle and Cycle Club. 

INQLE & ALMIRALL — 10 E. Twenty-third Street, New York. 

256 Binghamton Sa\'ings Bank Building. 

KEEN & MEAD - 1420 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia. Pa. 

257 Y. M. C. A. Building. Rendered by Hughson Hawley. 

258 Garden and Dormitories, Union League Club.* Rendered 

by Hughson Hawley. 

259 Children's Homeopathic Hospital, Philadelphia. 



38 






KELSEY, ALBERT -931 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 

260 A Tour de Force. Plan. 
26o<^ A Tour de Force. Detail. 

KENNEDY, HAYS A KELSEY— 931 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 

■. ' ,1'.. ■ 

261 House for Mrs. Albertson. Rendered by F. A. Hays. 

262 Sketch for Suburban House. Rendered by F. A. Hays. 

263 Sketch for a Country House. Rendered by F. A. Hays. 

264 . Alterations and Additions to House near Glenside. Ren- 

dered by F. A. Hays. 

265 Sketch for Country House. Rendered by F. A. Hays: 
265^ Sketch for a House. Rendered by F. A. Hays. 

KETTERER, GUSTAV— 1417 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 

266 Simmons' Gallery, Congressional Library. 

267 Mosaics in Corner Pavilion Congressional Library. 

268 Delivery Room, Congressional Library. 

269 Tyrolese Interior. . 

270 Duomo Monreale, Sicily. 

271 Bargello, Florence. • 

272 San Michaele, Florence. 

273 Interior Pallazo, vSiena. 

274 Capello, Santa Maria, Sicily. ■ 

275 Interior South Kensington Museum. - 

276 Town Hall, Pistojia. • 

277 Altar Chapel, Palermo. , ^ 

278 Aisle, San Marco, Venice. 

279 Hasilica di San Vitali, Ravenna. 

KIESSLINQ, CALVIN -Boston. v 

279^^ Jersey City Free Library. 

KRAYLE CO., THE -849 Marshall Field Building, Chicago. ^ 

280 Chair — Leather Carving. Christia M. Reade. 

281 Lamp Shade — Copper and Opalescent Glass. 

282 Portiere — Leather Applique Border. 

283 Embroidered Portiere. Designed by Ida J. Burgess. Exe- 

cuted by M^ry W. Mowbray. 

284 Embroidered Portiere. Designed by Mrs. Ibenfeldt. 

285 Bride's Book, Illuminated. Title-page by Mme. de Mure. 

Cover designed by Christia M. Reade. 

286 Green Ooze Leather Mat. Christia M. Reade. 

287 Brown Ooze Leather Mat. Christia M. Reade. 



39 



LAMMER5, HERMAN C. — Fisher Buildinir, Chicagro. 

288 Windsor Castle. 

289 Fountain at Luzerne. 

290 Nuremburg, Germany. Sketch. 

291 Nuremburg, Germany. Sketch. 

292 Auxerre, France, Sketch. 

293 Church at Bourges, France. 

294 Heidelberg. 

295 European Sketches. 

LAMB. CHARLES. * 

295a Design of Marble Altar and Reredos. 

LANGTON, DANIEL W.— 115 E. Twenty-third Street, New Yorlc. 

296 Estate for Lawrence Hutton, Esq. 

297 Plan of Grounds for Robert L. Stevens, F^S(i.,Westbury,L. L 

LAWRENCE, WARRINGTON G.— iii Fifth Avenue, New York. v 

298 Residence at Glenridge, N. J. 

299 Residence for Dr. J. Allen Osmun. 

LEEDS, EDWARD 1.-54 Devonshire Street, Boston. 

300^ Proposed Church. ' 
^ 300 Sketches in Caen, France. 

301 Interior St. Etienne de Monte, France. 

302 Village Church, Penshurst, England. 

303 Magdalen College, England. 

304 Interior Brewers' Hall. ^ 

LEONARD, M. E. — 310 W. Fifty-sixth Street, New York. 

305 Questing Beast. 

LITTLE & BROWN — 70 Kilby Street, Boston, Mass. 

306 House and Grounds of Geo. K. Birge, F^sq. , Buffalo, N. Y. 

307 Dunster Hall, Har\ard Uni\crsity, Cambridge, Mass. 

LLEWELLYN, JOS. C — 1245 Marquette Building, Chicago. 

308 Residence of Mr. M. J. Carpenter, La Grange, 111. Ren- 

dered by Birch Burdette Long. 

309 Hall of same. Rendered by Birch Burdette Long. 

310 Office Building of Chicago Portland Cement, Co., Oglesby, 

111. 

LONG, BIRCH BURDETTE— 1013, 172 Washington Street. 

311 Rothchild House. 

312 St. Fagan's Castle. 



40 



'P^/'r_.'- ,'■,;■■■ ;. ' . s>".: ■' ■• -'■■■■,.,'*.,.?"... ::• :;t.- ^'■•f'"™I'>^'■'■■^'■T^^^ 



MACKENZIE. CLINTON- 3 Julian Place, Elizabeth, N.J. 

313 Competition for Lackawanna Trust & Safe Deposit Co. 

MAQINN. CHARLES -New York. 

315 Memorial Window, Little Falls, N. J. r 

MANDELBAUM, CHERI - Montcalm Street, Detroit. 

314 Preliminary Competition for the Cornell University Scholar- 

ship in Architecture. Elevation. 

316 Preliminary Competition for the Cornell University Scholar- 

ship in Architecture. Plan. 

317 Study for Hotel. Plan. 

318 Study for Hotel. Elevation. '. 

MANN, F. M. — 328 Chestnut street, Philadelphia, Pa. 

319 Memorial Church, St. Paul. 

McKIM, MEAD & WHITE and DONALDSON & MEIER -Associate Architects. 

320 _ Proposed Building for Savings Bank, Detroit. By Hughson 

Hawley. 

METCALF, FRED L.- 108 Fulton street, New York. 

321 Detail of Openings, Church of Sacred Heart, N. Y. 

MUELLER & MILDNER- Detroit, Mich. 

322 Premiated Design for Fountain, Detroit. R. Mildner. 

MUNDIE, W. B.-1117 Schiller Building. 

, 323 Water-Color Rendering. . ^ . - _ _^, . 

324 Proposed Residence, Elm Street. " 

325 North Division High School. 

NETTLETON & KAHN—1117 Union Trust Building, Detroit. 

326 Grace Hospital Nurses' Home Building. 

NEWBERRY, ROBERT T.- 1210 New York Life Building, Chicago. 

327 Residence of R. T. Newberry. 

328 Residence of R. R. Hicks, Batde Creek, Mich. 
328<f Proposed Apartment Building, Chicago. 

OTIS, WM. A. - 

329 Design for Church at La Crosse, Wis. 

PARIS, WM. F. — 273 Fifth Avenue, New York. ^ 

330 Dining Room Decoration. ' 

331 Suggestion for Stained and Painted Glass. 



41 



\xs^^r^S^y^ V^^^*^" '^^ ■ ••"'^ >■ 's^'^'/'^'* tiy^ri''vi:^^,i'f»frr"{-?^7'''^!r'''W^*f'iirv^ 



./ 



■■/ ■ 



1 









PATTON, FISHER & MILLER — Montauk Block, Chlcagfo. 

332 Design for Evanston High School. L. Rasmussen. 

333 Memorial Baptist Church, Chicago. L. Rasmussen. 

PERKINS, MRS. L. F. •",■. -■■, ; ■. ■■ '\''''^ ■ 

334 Decoration for Child's Room. , 

335 D^ecoration for Child's Room. ! 

336 Decoration for Child's Room. 

337 Decoration for Child's Room.« 

338 Decoration for Child's Room. 

339 Decoration for Child's Room. 

PERRY. R. HINTON — 51 W. Tenth Street, New York. 

340 Decorative Panel. Subject from Norse Mythology. 

PIETSCH, THEODORE WELLS- 305 East Huron street, Chicago. 

340^ A Crematory. General Plan. 

340<^ A Crematory. Fayade (ensemble). 

340^ A Crematory. Latreale Fa9ade. 

34oaf A Crematory. Posterior Facade. 

340^ A Crematory. Perspectixe (Bird's- Eye Mew). 

340/" A Crematory. Longitudinal and Trans\erse Sections. 

POND & POND— 1109 Steinway Hall, Chicagro. 

341 The Hull House Group, Chicago. Irving K. Pond. 

342 The Hull House Group, Chicago. 
^_ 343 The Jane Club Building at Hull House. 

343a Artists' Colony at Oregon, 111. 

343<^ Auditorium and Coffee House, HliU JHouse. 

PRICE, HENRY BROOKS- 10 E. Twenty-third Street, New York. 

344 End of Waiting Room. City Hall. 
344^ Museum for Private Collection. 
344-^ Monumental Stairway. 

RANKIN & KELLOGG— 1024 Walnut Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 

345 First M. E. Church, German town. Pa. 

346 United States Post Office and Customhouse, Camden, N. J. 

D. A. Gregg. 

347 Washington County Courthouse Competition. D. A. Gregg. 

"J _ ■ • 

RAYMOND, W. OAKLEY— 17 Broadway, New York. 

348 Design for Apartment House for Students. Facade. 
348<5 Design for Apartment House for Students. Plan. 



42 



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READE, CHR15TIA M. — 849 Marshall Field Building:, Chicago. 

349 Book-Plate of the Riverside Public School. 

350 Book-Plate of Frederica C. Schmedling. 

.■ ■ -■ V. " ■ ■ . , ■ ■ ' •■ ■■ . ■. • 

RENWICK, ASPENWALL & OWEN.— 367 Fifth Avenue, New York. 

351 House at Williamston, Mass. 

ROBERTSON, R. H. — 160 Fifth Avenue, New York. ^ 

352 Elevation of Country House. 

ROBINSON, ARQYLE E. — 5406 Jefferson Avenue, Chicago. * 

351^ Pen-and-ink Rendering. 

ROSS, JAMES -Yonkers, N. Y. v 

353 Bird's-Eye View of Cottages. 

ROULLEAU. ARTHUR — 510 West Polk street, Chicago. 

353^ Entrance to Cathedral of Ste. Cecil. 1 

ST. LOUIS ARCHITECTURAL CLUB — St. Louis, Mo. 

354 "An Engine House." First Mention. Ben. Jan^ssen. 

355 "An Hotel de Ville." Elevationl E. P. Schoeiltgen. 

356 " Entrance to Public Park of Importance." First Mention. 

Ben. Janssen. 

357 Entrance to Tunnel. Fred. Cox. 

358 Residence for H. L. Chase. Wm. B. Ittner, Architect. 

359 An Architectural Club House. M. H. Fuerbruger. 

SCHILLING, E. A. -Detroit, Mich. , , 

360 Design for Fountain. Plan. 

361 Design for Fountain. Elevation and Section. 

362 Public Shelter Pavilion, Belle Isle Park. Accepted Design. 

3CHMIDT, RICHARD E. — 1013 Teutonic Building, Chicago. / 

363 Residence of Mr. Jos. Theurer. Photograph. 

364 Front Elevation of Same. 

365 Side Elevation of Same. 

356^ Sketch of Residence of Geo. W. Mathews, Jr. 
357Jt' Building for Montgomery Ward & Co. 
358^ Terra Cotta Details of Same. 
359.r Terra Cotta Details of Same. 

SCHNEIDER, CHAS. S. — looa Garfield Building, Cleveland, Ohio. 



. '^ 



360:1: Study for an English Country House. 
3612' Sketch for a Country House. 



43 



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SCHOENTQBN. E. P. — Columbia Building, St. Louis, Mo. 

362^ An Hotel de Ville. 

SCHUCHARDT, WM. H.-Milwaulcee. Wis. 

363^' Preliminary Competition. Cornell Traveling Fellowship. 

SEARS. TABER-iii Flllh Avenue, New York. 

3642' A Corner in the Mus^e, Cluny. 

SHEPLEY, RUT AN & COOLIDQE-St. Louis, Mo. 

3652' Competitive Design for St. Louis Club House. John S. 
White. 

SNYDER, C. B. J. — Superintendent of School Buildings, 585 Broadway, New Yorlc. N. Y. 

366 Girls' High School. Perspective. 

SPENCER, R. C, Jr.— 1107 Steinway Hall, Chicago. 

367 Syndicate Arcade. Competition of Luxfer Prism Co. 

First Prize. 
367^ A Spencer Memorial Library at Geneva, Ohio. 

SANPORD, E. STARR — 3 E. Fourteenth Street, New York. 

368 ' ' Poejtical Promenade. ' ' Drawn by Robert Benvenuti. 

STONE, W. E. — 33 state street, New York. 

•369 Cottage on Long Island. 

370 Sketch. House in Princeton, N. J. W. E. Stone. 

STONE, CARPENTER & WILLSON — 49 Westminster Street, Providence, R. I. 

371 Transfer Station for Union Railroad. Providence, R. I. 
' ' 372 Providence Institution for Saving. 

STONE. PALMER & HORNBUSTEL — 23 State Street, New York. 

373 Free Public Library Competition. Ground Plan. 

374 Free Public Library Competition. Second Floor Plan. 

375 Free Public Library Competition. Facade. 

STRIEBINOER. FREDERICK WM.-New England Building, Cleveland. Ohio. 

376 A Pantheon. Plan. 

377 A Pantheon. Section. 

378 Tower of Justice, Alhambra. 

379 Doorway in Alhambra. 

380 Market St. Germaine, Paris. 

381 Interior Cluny Museum, Paris. 

382 Court in Alhambra. 



44 






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STRIEBINQBR, PRBDERICK WM.— New England Building:. Cleveland, Ohio — Continued. 

383 Shooting Club F'a^ade. • 

384 Tower, Toledo, Spain. 

385 Traveling Sketches — Tower in Normandy. 

386 Chemistry Hall Fa9ade. Project Ecole des Beaux Arts. 

387 Marine Laboratory. 

388 Marine Laboratory. Project. 

389 A Pantheon Fa9ade. Project B. A. 

SUPLBE, WM. P. — 1417 Chestnut street, Philadelphia, Pa. 1 

390 Smoking Room. 

TAYLOR. JAMES KNOX — Supervising: Architect, Treasury Department, Washing:ton, D. C. 

391 U. S. Post Office, Newport, Ky. Chas. D. Maginnis. 

392 U. S. Post Office, Akron, Ohio. 

393 U. S. Post Office, San Francisco, Cal. E. A. Crane. 

394 U. S. Mint, Philadelphia, Pa. E. A. Crane. 

395 U. S. Post Office, Brockton, Mass. Chas. D. Maginnis. 

396 U. S. Post Office, Newport, Ky. Chas. D. Maginnis. 

397 U. S. Public Building, Boise, Idaho. Chas. D. Maginnis. 

/. ■ / 

THOMAS, ARTHUR -New York. , 

397^ Ceiling Decoration. 

T-5QUARe CLUB- Philadelphia, Pa. 

398 Seal of T-Square Club. 

TUBBY, W. B. — 81 Fulton Street, N. yI 

399 Public Library, Jersey City, N. J. Second-story Plan. 

400 Public Library, Jersey City, N. J. Elevation. 

ULLRICH, R.- 120 Liberty Street, New York. 

401 Plans of Grounds of Geo. A. Joslin. R. Ullrich. 

VIEHE-NAESS. lYAR — 212 Oak Street, Chicago. 

402 ' ' Un Casino. ' ' 

403 Une Salle d' Examen. 

404 L' Escalier d' un Theatre. 

405 Une Rosande. : 

406 Une Stele. Twelve hours' time. 

407 Une Salle des Seances. 

408 Etude d' une ' ' Travee dans une Eglise. ' ' Paraisseal. 

409 Une Archive. 

410 La Pr6miere Travee d'un Portique Voutr^. 

411 Une Travee d'un Mus^e. 

412 Un Pavilion pour une Statue Celebre. 



-45 



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WALKER & MORRIS — 56 New Street. New York. 

413 Sketch for School No. 4. Brooklyn, N. Y. 

WEED, RAPHAEL A. — 338 W. Twenty-first street. New York. 

414 Burnt Wood Panel. 'V ; 

415 Burnt Wood Panel, with Ivory Inlay. . 

WELLS, NEWTON A.- Champaign, in. 

416 Studies for Interior Decorations. 

417 Studies for Interior Decorations. 

418 The Forge of Vulcan. 

419 (School of Minerva. 

420 Color Sketch for Arcadia. 

421 Arcadia Sketch. 

422 Wood Sacred to the Muses. 

WHEBLOCK, H. B.— 336 La Salle Street, Chicago. 

423 Accepted Design for the Western Methodist Book Concern. 

424 Alternative Design for the Western Methodist Book 

Concern. 

■ ■ I 

WHITE, JOHN STAFFORD— Chemical Building:, St. Louis, Mo. 

425 A Kentish Church. . 

426 The Bell Tower. Provins. 

427 Roofs of Semur. 

428 Farm House near Paris. 

429 Sketches. Dordrecht, Holland. 

430 Poster for Minstrel Show. 

WILLIAMSON, F.— 41 University Place, New York. 

431 Sketches in South America. 

WILSON & MARSHALL-218 La Salle Street, Chicago. 

432 Residence of S. B. Chapin, Lake Geneva, Wis. 

433 Residence of T. F. Bremner. 

434 Stable for C. R. Lamb. 

435 Proposed Building for the Paris Exposition. , 

436 Residence of Mr. Vorrier. 

437 Powers' Theater, Chicago. 

438 Residence of E. H. Phelps. 

439 Residence of C. R. Lamb. 

440 Residence of D. B. Scully. 

441 Illinois State Building at Omaha Exposition. 

442 Proposed United States Building, Paris Exposition. 



46 



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^ WINSLOW, CARLETON MONROE — Chlcagro. 

' ^ 443 Cathedral Church of St. Luke. 

444 Water-Color Class Study. 

. 445 Water-Color Class Study. 

446 Water-Color Class Study. 

YORK & SAWYER -156 Fifth Avenue, New York. 

^' 447 House for John Simmons. Perspective. 

448 Design for Library at Pawtucket, R. L Plan. 
448^ Design for Library at Pawtucket, R. L Elevation. 

449 Franklin Savings Bank. Perspective. 

450 Design. ^ 

ZIMMERMAN, HUGO— ; 1279 Perry Street, Chicago. 

451 Old (jcrman Doorway. 

452 Palace de Jacques Coeur. 



NAVAL T^IXHITECTURC. 

BUREAU OF CONSTRUCTION AND REPAIR — U. S. Navy. 

Plans, Sections, etc., U. S. Government Work. Wm. Cramp & 
Sons, Philadelphia. J. F. Hanscom, Na\'al Constructor, U. 
S. N., in charge. 

453^ United States Battleship " Iowa." 
453^5 I'nited States Cruiser " Brooklyn." 
453^ United States Destroyer "Columbia." 



APCHITECTUI^AL 5CH00IA 

CHICAGO SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE — Art Institute of Chicago. 

454 A County Courthouse. Elevation, A. S. Alschuler. 

455 A County Courthouse. Plan. A? S. Alschuler. 

456 Design for a Public School. Elevation. Wm. A. Wells. 
^ 457 A County Courthouse. Plan. Oscar B. Marienthal. 

458 A County Courthouse. Elevation.. Oscar B. Marienthal. 

459 A County Courthouse. Plan. Vernon S. Watson. 

460 A County Courthouse. Elevation. Vernon S. Watson. 

461 Ticket Office. Sketch. Arthur Mackie. 

462 Reviewing Stand. Plan and Elevation. Charles P. Rawson. 

463 A City Residence. Plan and Elevation. Arthur Mackie. 

464 A Country Villa. Elevation. A. S. Alschuler. 

465 A Country Villa. Plan. A. S. Alschuler. 

466 Rostral Column. Oscar B. Marienthal. 

467 A City Residence. Elevation. Wm. A. Wells. 

468 Chair in the Theater of Dionysius. J. F. Porter. 



47 



,JV,^ 






-1 



COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY -New York city, N. Y. / 

V ... - ■ -w 

469 A Byzantine Arcade. Detail. A. D. ¥. Hamlin. 

470 An Exhibition Building for Architecture at a World's Fair. 

Plan and Elevation. W. G. Tachen. \^ 

471 An Exhibition Building for Architecture at a W(»rld's Fair. 

Sections. W. G. Tachen. 

472 Rendering from Croquis de Architecture. F. B. Lefferts. 
I 473 A Design for a Country Club. Section. H. L. Beadel. 

474 A Design for a Country Club. Elevation. H. L. Beadel. 

475 A Design for a Country Club. Plan. H. L. Beadel. 

476 A Bathing Establishment in New York City. Elevation. 

Hugh McLellan. 

477 A Bathing Establishment in New York City. Plan. Hugh 

McLellan. 

478 A Presidential Mansion.' Plan. A. H. Gunear. 

479 A Presidential Mansion. Elevation. A. H. Gunear. 

480 A Presidential Mansion. Section. A. H. Gunear. 

481 An Art Gallery. Elevations. S. E. Plousky, F. B. Lefferts. 

482 An Exhibition Building for Architecture. Sections. C. H. 

Aldrich. 

483 An Exhibition Building for Architecture. Plan and Ele- 

vation. C. H. Aldrich. 

484 A Public Library. Elevation. C. L. Otto. 

485 A Public Library. Plans. C. L. Otto. 

486 A High Masonry Dam. Elevation. J. T. Williams, Jr. 

487 A High Masonry Dam. Section. J. T. Williams, Jr. 

488 A High Masonry Dam. Detail. J. T. Williams, Jr. 

489 A High Masonry Dam. Plan. J. T. Williams, Jr. 

490 A Naval Museum. Perspective. Huger Elliott. 

___ 491 A Design for a Skating Rink. P^levations. N. E. Wood, 
C. S. Keiser. 

492 A Naval Museum and School. Elevation. Edward Blum. 

493 A Public Bath. Plan. Hugh McLellan. - , 

494 A Public Bath. Elevations. Hugh McLellan. 

495 A Roller Skating Rink. Elevations. W. F. Dominick, 

F. B. Lefferts. ' 

496 Design for a City House. Elevations. T. Blondel, J. D. 

Boyd. > 

497 Design for a City House. Elevations. W. E. Schumm, 

A. Kaufmann. 

498 A Naval Museum. Elevation. B. S. Cairns. 

499 Design for a Kiosk. Elevation. F. B. Lefferts. 

500 City Club H0US8. Elevations. A. Ware.* 

501 Pumping Station. Elevation. E. L. Satterlee. 

502 Pumping Station. Elevation. J. D. Boyd. 

503 Railroad Station. Elevation and Plan. J. D. Boyd. 

504 Pumping Station. Elevation. A. L. Fechheimer. 

505 A Regimental Armory. Elevation. C. L. Otto. 



48 



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COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY— New York City, N.Y. — Continued. 

506 Byzantine Capitals. E. Blair, E. W. Bartberger. 

507 A Railroad Station. Plan and Elevation. Howard Chap- 
. man. — 

COLLEQE OF ARCHITECTURE, CORNELL UNIVERSITY -Ithaca, N. Y. 

508 A Pavilion for Billiards in an Italian Garden. Elevation 

(Sophomore Design). F. L. Ackerman. 

509 A Pavilion for Billiards in an Italian Garden. Plan and 

Section (Sophomore Design). F. L. Ackerman. 

510 A Pavilion for Billiards in an Italian Garden. Detail 

(Sophomore Design). F. L., Ackerman. 

511 A Belvedere. Elevation (Junior Design). H. M. Bowdoin. 

512 A Belvedere. Plan (Junior Design). H. M. Bowdoin. 

513 A Ballroom. Plan and Elevation (Junior Design). Frank 

Eurick, Jr. 

514 A Ballroom Detail (Junior Design). Frank Eurick, Jr. 

515 A Ballroom. Plan and Section (Junior Design). A, T. 
1 Farrell. 

516 A Ballroom. Detail (Junior Design). A. T. Farrell. 

517 A Ballroom. Plan and Elevations (Junior Design). S. M. 

Turrill. r 

518 A Pantheon. Elevation. Prof. John V. Van Pelt. ., 

519 A Pantheon. Plan. Prof. John V. Van Pelt. 

520 A Lecture Hall on the Cornell University Campus. W. 

Herbert Dole. First Holder of the Cornell Univerity 
Traveling Fellowship in Architecture. 

521 A Lecture Hall on the Cornell University Campus. Plan. 

W. Herbert Dole. First Holder of the Cornell University 
Traveling Fellowship in Architecture. 

522 A Lecture Half on the Cornell LIniversity Campus. Eleva- 

tion, W. Herbert Dole. First Holder of the Cornell 
University Traveling Fellowship in Architecture. 

523 A Lecture Hall on the Cornell LIniversity Campus. Section. 

W. Herbert Dole. First Holder of the Cornell Uni- 
versity Traveling Fellowship in Architecture. 

524 A Grand Stairway in a Metropolitan Library. Plan. W. 

Herbert Dole. Firsts Holder of the Cornell University 
' Traveling Fellowship in Architecture. 

525 A Grand Stairway in a Metropolitan Library. Section. 

W. Herbert Dole. First Holder of the Cornell Uni- 
versity Traveling Fellowship in Architecture. 

526 A Grand Stairway in a Metropolitan Library. Section. 

W. Herbert Dole. First Holder of the Cornell Uni- 
versity Traveling Fellowship in Architecture. 

527 Lecture Hall on the Cornell University Campus. Plan. 

Fr.^nk Eurick, Jr. 



49 



COLLEGE OF ARCHITECTURE, CORNELL UNIVERSITY — Ithaca, N. Y. — Continued. 

528 Lecture Hall on the Cornell University Campus. Elevation. 

Frank Eurick, Jr. 

529 Lecture Hall on the Cornell University Campus. Section. 

Frank Eurick, Jr. 

MASSACHUSETTS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY -Boston, Mass. 

530 An Army and Navy Exhibit. Section. Almeron W. 

McCrea. 1 

531 An Army and Navy Exhibit. Plan. Almeron W. McCrea. 

532 An Army and Navy Exhibit. Elevation. Almeron W. 

McCrea. 

533 An Army and Navy Exhibit. Section. Henry Harwbod 

Hewitt. 

534 An Army and Navy Exhibit. Elevation. Henry Harwood 

Hewitt. 

535 An Army and Navy Exhibit. Plan. Henry Harwood Hewitt. 

536 Design for an Atheneum. Section. A. H. Cox. 

537 Design for an Atheneum. Section. G. P. Stevens. 

538 Design for an Atheneum. Plan. G. P. Stevens. 

539 Design for an Atheneum. Elevation. A. H. Cox. 

540 Design for an Atheneum. Plan. A. H. Cox. 

541 Design for an Atheneum. Elevation. G. P. Stevens. 

542 India Ink Rendering of Doric Order. W. C. Appleton. 

543 An Army and Navy Exhibit. Section. Carl Werner. 

544 An Army and Navy Exhibit. Elevation. Carl Werner. 

545 An Army and Navy Exhibit. Plan. Carl Werner. 

, 546 An Entrance to a Pantheon. Sections. Eugene A. Teute- 
berg. 

547 An Entrance to a Pantheon. Sections. Louis Nelson 

Gowell. 

548 Water-Color Drawings. 

549 Life Class Drawings. 

550 Pen and Ink Drawings. 

551 Pen and Ink Drawings. 

UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS — Urbana, Illinois. 

552 Exposition Building for Chicago. Plan and Section. H. J. 

Naper. 

553 Exposition Building for Chicago. Front and Side Ele- 

vations. H. J. Naper. 

554 Legislative Building. Elevation and Plan. A. L. Thayer. 

555 Legislative Building. Sidfe Elevation and Section. A. L. 

Thayer. 

556 A Clubhouse for Artists. Elevation. C. M. Davison. 

557 A Clubhouse for Artists. Side Elevation and Section. 

C. M. Davison. 



50 



JL^- 



UNIVERSITY OP ILLINOIS— Urbana, Illinois -Continued. 

558 Rendered Blue Prints. H. T. Eastman and E. W. P. Flesch. 

559 Office Building. Front and Side Elevations. C.R.Clark. 

560 Commercial Bank. Front Elevation. A. E. Fullenwider. 

561 Commercial Bank. Section. A. E. Fullenwider. , 

562 Commercial Bank. Plan. A. E. Fullenwider. 

563 Fire Engine House. Front and ^de Elevations.^ C A. 

Smith and R. W. Weirick. 

564 Courthouse. Elevation. C. E. Hair. 

' ■ 565 Pencil Sketches. Class in Perspective. 

566 A Music Studio. Elevation. R. W. Weirick. 



UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA. 

567 An Art Museum. Plan and Elevation. P. R. Siegel. 

568 A Villa on an Island. Plan. William Wittenberg. 

569 A Villa on an Island. Elevation. William Wittenberg. 

570 A Frontispiece in Ionic. Lester Kintzing. 

~ 571 A Casino. Front Elevation. W. H. Thomas. 

572 A Medical Laboratory. Plan and Elevation. P. R. Siegel. 

'573 A Villa on an Island. Plan. A. E. Willauer. 

574 A Belvedere. Elevation. W. Trumbower. 

575 A Belvedere. Plan. W. Trumbower. 

576 Entrance to a Public Library. Detail. W. Trumbower. 

577 A Terminal Railroad Station. A. E. Willauer. 

578 Design for Ceiling Decoration. Marie Rodes. 

579 Byzantine Mosaic. B. U. Nisbet. 

580 Design for Ceiling Decoration. Martha Davis. 

581 Dormitories of University of Penn. ^F. F. Lincoln..^, 




61 



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C^iBRiA Structural Steel 

Beams, Channels, Tees, Zees, Angles, Girders, 

Columns, Trusses, Etc i 

Designs and Estimates made for Structural Work* 



Cambria Steel Company 



General Office: 
Harrison Building, 15th and Market Streets, PHILADELPHIA. 



v~>- 



CHICAGO OFFICE: 209 Western Union Building* 
CLIFFORD ;• ELLIS. ALLAN F. McINTYRE. 



Other Offices. 



NEW YORK, 71 Broadway, ST. LOUIS, 716 North Second Street, 
H. L. Waterman. E. H. Linley. 

nr^cT^ov^ . \z-\u c. . OMAHA, 303 South Thirteenth Street, 
BOSTON, 70 Kilby Street, ^ i ^^^^^ 

H. W. Hayes. 

I ATLANTA, 325 Uecatur Street, 

CLEVELAND, Perry-Payne Building, ^- ^- ^^°"«- 

Bourne-Fuller Co. LOULSVILLE, 147 Third Street, 

Davis, Kelly & Co. 

CINCINNATI, Neave Building, PITTSBURG, 8.8 Park Building, 

J. L. Adams. xir-n- iv* t • 

William McLain. 

DETROIT, Newberry Building, NEW ORLEANS, 303 Magazine Street. 
W. F. Jarvis & Co. S. L. Mitchell. 



WORKS AT JOHNSTOWN, PA. 



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E. C. STERLING, President. Ic* i 
H. W. ELIdT, Sec'y and Treas. ]^^' '' 



OUIS. 



S. S. KIMBELL.V.-Pres.andGen.Mgr.) 

H. L. MATZ, Assistant Secretary. -Chicago. 

E. C. KIMBELL, Assistant Treasurer. ) 



Hydraulic^Press Brick Co. 

St, Louis, Mo. • , v^ 

Illinois Hydraulic^Press Brick Co. 

Collinsville, 111. 

Findlay Hydraulic^Prcss Brick Co. 
Findlay, Ohio. 

Cleveland Hydraulic-'Press Brick Co. 
Cleveland, Ohio. 

New York Hydraulic^Press Brick Co. 
Rochester, N. Y. 



...AGENTS FOR... 

Eastern HydrauliC'Press Brick Co. 
Philadelphia, Pa. 

Washington Hydraulic^Press Brick Co. 
Washington, D. C. 

Menomonie Hydraulic/Press Brick Co. 
Minneapolis, Minn. 

Omaha Hydraulic-'Press Brick Co. 
Omaha, Neb. 

Kansas City Hydraulic^Press Brick Co. 
Kansas City, Mo. 




Hydraulic- 
Brick Co 




=■»< 



MANIFACTURERS OF AND DEALERS IN 

Hydraulic-Pressed, Molded and 
Indiana Red Common Brick... 



Telephones- 



Office: Express 105. 




E.xpREss 106. 




STOREHOUSES : 


^, 


Harrison and Rockwell Sts., 


. West 565 


Herndon St. and Clybourn Ave., 


. NORT H 859 


40th St. and Wentworth Ave., 


. Yards 637 



Office and Exhibit Rooms : 

30 J -304 
Chamber of Commerce Building;^ 

Cor. La Salle and Washington Sts. 

CHICAGO. 

Worlcs : Porter, ind. 



...AGENTS FOR... 

ST. LOUIS ENAMELED BRICK. ST. LOUIS WHITE.FACED BRICK. 

ENGLISH ENAMELED BRICK. RACINE AND MILWAUKEE BUFF. 

LA SALLE & BUSHNELL BUFF. SALT.GLAZED WALL COPING. 

RICKETSON'S MILWAUKEE MORTAR COLORS. 
HANSEN'S PATENT CHIMNEY TOPS. TERRA COTTA FLUE LINING. 

"CONTINENTAL" PAVERS FOR COLONIAL WORK. 



54 



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Ferrosteel 



REGISTERS, VENTILATORS, GRILLS 

150 Sizes 
of this Neutral Moorish Design. 

n 25 Styles of Finish. 

ALSO, 

A Large Number of other Regular and Special Designs. 



FERROSTEEL REGISTERS ARE NOTED 

FOP GREAT STRENGTH, HIGH FINISH, EXCELLENT WORKMANSHIP. 



PLEASE WRITE FOR 

Blue Book for the Register Trade. 



THE FERROSTEEL COMPANY, 

CLEVELAND : 86-88 Water Street. CHICAGO : 45-47 Lake Street. 

BOSTON : 92 North Street. NEW YORK : 23 J Water Street. 



56 



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Shepley, Rutan & Coolidge, 
Architects. 



SPECIMEN OF SOLID BRONZE REGISTERS 

made for 

The Southern Terminal Station, Boston, Mass., 

by 

The FERROSTEEL Company, 

^ Cleveland, Chicago, 

- New York, Boston. 



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Murphy Varnish Company 

Twenty-second and Dearborn Streets, 

CHICAGO. 



■/. . ■ ;■- ■' ■ /■■ 



NEWARK, N.J. BOSTON. 

CLEVELAND. ST. LOUIS. 

SAN FRANCISCO. 

PARIS. 



MANUFACTURERS OF 



^^* TRANSPARENT WOOD FINISH."^-^ 

INTERIOR ... EXTERIOR ... FLOOR. 

For use where durability and perfection of finish is desired ; revealing and 

preserving the beauty of natural woods. . , 



OUR PUBLICATION 

"HOW TO FINISH NATURAL WOOD AND WHITE ENAMEL WORK," 

FREE FOR ASKING. 



Every One Warranted. None Better. 

Broughton 

Improved Self-CIosing 
Basin Cocks 

E. STEBBINS MFG. CO. 

...Sole Manufacturefs... 

r 

BRIGHTWOOD, 
MASS. 



SEND FOR CIRCULARS, 

I B, CLOW & SONS, 

CHICAGO AGENTS. 



58 



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A home, to be truly beautiful, 
must have about it an easy air of 
comfort and convenience* 



A Telephone 



should form a part of the equip- 
ment of every modern residence, 
and wUl do its share in making 
home life enjoyable. It costs but 

16 cents per day. 



Contract Department, 



CHICAGO TELEPHONE COMPANY, ^03 w^ZsZ Let 



Tlffaey EEameled Briek 



COMPANY 



MANUFACTIRKRS OF 



Enameled Brick and Enameled Tile 



General Offices: 



MARQUETTE BUILDING, CHICAGO. 



Boston Agent : 

LEONARD & COMPANY, 
220 Devonshire Street, 
BOSTON. 



New York Agent : 

ORRIN D. PERSON, 

(60 Fifth Avenue, 
NEW YORK. 



60 





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BaUbliabed mS66. 

STAM5EN'& Blome, 



HIGH GRADE 



Concrete Work 

Floors, Sidewalks. Construction. Etc. 

BANK FLOOR UNITY BLOC. 

CHICAGO. 



BRONsoN PORTLAND 

BRONSON ^_. ._ _ 
DIAMOND OtMLN I 



EACH AND EVERY BARREL INDORSED BY 



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Dickinson Cement Company 

MARQUETTE BUILDING. 



Telephone, Central 939. 



WE ARE HAPPY TO FURNISH ANY INFORMATION 
REGARDING PORTLAND CEMENT. 



€2 





6S 



; .■-. 



'-^^^^^f^^^ff^^^f^|'^^s'fm''^T'l^'^T^J^ 



Ladcywid Roofing Tile Company 



4t9 Chamber of Commerce Building, 
CHICAGO 



Ma,nufa.ciurers of the Most 
Perfectly De'vised and Best Made 



Telephone Main 1824. 



Inkrlockins Roofing Cilc 



Architects, Reflect. 



The roof may be the most conspicuous 
feature of a house. Terra Gotta Tile is the 
highest grade of roofing material. 

The quality of material used reflects 
honor or otherwise on Architect, Owner and 
Contractor. 

Tile requires no heavier construction than 
slate. N 



Paper under either makes a warmer roof. 
For Factories. Warehouses and Power Houses 
save your sheathing by using strips (1x2). 

Comj)lete specifications for laying with 
sheathing or without will be furnished upon 
application. 

Prompt personal response made to your 
summons by telephone or otherwise. 



Architects 



WHY will you specify common lime mortar on 
your buildings when there are so many good 
reasons for using a good hard mortar ? The 
clinch on ROCK WALL PLASTER is twenty-eight 
times as strong ; it will crack less, will not pit or chip, 
will not come down when deluged with water, is prac- 
tically fireproof, and costs but very little more than 
the cheapest lime mortar. For full particulars get our 
Rock Wall Plaster Book. 



Telephone, Main 3679. 



The Rock Plaster Mfg. Co. 

450 to 458 ILLINOIS STREET, 
CHICAGO, ILL. 



64 



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WHITNEY RESIDENCE, DETROIT, MICH. 



H. Stevens, Architect. 



Roofing Tiles furnished by 
Ludowici Tile Co., Chicago. 



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CABOrS 
CREOSOTE 
SHINGIF Sl'AINS. 




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Chapman, Frazer it Blinn, Architects, Boston. 

The Original and Standard Shingle Stains. 

Distinguishable by their soft depth and freshness of color, their clearness and transparency, 
and their permanence. No tawdry or muddy effects, no blackening, no washing off. 

" Wood treated with Creosote is not subject to dry-rot or other decay." 

— Century Dictionary. 

Cabot^s Insulating and Deafening ** Quilt/^ 

' . A resilient cushion of dead-air spaces, giving the most perfect conditions for the non-conduc- 
tion of heat and the absorption of sound-waves. 

SAMPLES AND CIRCULARS ON APPLICATION^^ ^ 


SAMUEL CABOT, Sole Manufacturer, 
BOSTON, MASS. 215 Dearborn Street, CHICAGO, ILL. 





The Yale and Towne Mfg* Company^ 

^TS PRODUCTS EMBRACE 

LOCKS of every kind and for every use, the most complex 
and expensive, the simplest and cheapest, and every 
intermediate grade. 

BUILDERS' HARDWARE of every kind and quality ; and 
a vast number of special articles used in buildings of 
every kind. - _ 

ART METAL WORK in every school of ornament, in every 
metal and finish, and in greater variety of design than by 
any other maker in the world. 

Each of the Company's Local Offices is provided with a handsome 
Exhibit Room containing samples of its products, intended for the use of Architects and 
their clients in the selection of locks and metal work. 

Two Artistic Brochures, "Artist and Artisan" and the "Vulcan Locks," sent on request* 



GENERAL OFFICE : 
9-II-I3 MURRAY ST., NEW YORK. 



LOCAL OFFICE: 



J 3 1-137 Wabash Ave, Chicago. 



66 



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EXPANDED METAL LATH 

';;;7° isXX^hicago Architectural Club to fight the 
'dairger of fire with. 



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.-. .,«<;5,.-;r -■•■ 




NORTH-WESTERN EXPANDED METAL CO. 



86o Old Colony Building, CHICAGO. 



WE ARE MANUFACTURERS, 
WHOLESALE AND 
RETAIL DEALERS IN 

Builders' Hardware 

The Latest and 
Best Designs 

From all the leading makers can always be seen in our sample room. 




We build Refrig^erators and Cooling Rooms for 
hotels, restaurants and private residences, and are 
Chicago Agents for the celebrated ''ALASKA/' 

Having our own shop, we are able to execute special 
metal work and do repair work at short notice. 

Orr & Lockett Hardware Co. 

V 71 Randolph Su and 50 State St. (MasSfrTempie.) 



68 






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AUDITORU'M AND COFFEE HOUSE AT HULL^HOUSE. 
Pond & Pond, Architects. 













ROTHCHILD HOUSE. 
By Bircli Burdette Long. 



09 



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58-65 imWOIS^T. CHI CAGO 



lei. Express 







OfflCL 
BanIT B0)'0- 

CHICAtJO. 



S^&'Eft 



TAIRS. _ 

Flevator lnclqsures. 

Swfe filONTS, 

f ENCE5, Gates, 
Grilles, Railings, 
A f^iRE Escapes. 



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STAINED CLASS WINDOW MADEfiYTHEFlANAaAN^DiEDENWEaG* 



71 



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CDe Winslou) Bros. Companp 

...Chicaso... 




Ornamental 
Iron ana 
Bronze 



ORIGINAL DESIGN FOR 5ALC0NY RAILINQ. 



_ Architects are confident 
the ^'Heating Apparatus" 
will be right if we have 
the contract to put it in. 

BAKER & SMITH CO., 

92 and 94 Washington Street. 

The Heating Apparatus in 

The Fair. The Temple, Great Northern Hotel, 
Ashland Block, Illinois Club, 

Hon. Franklin MacVeagh, Hon. Robt. T. Lincoln, 
Mrs. C. H. McCormick, 

ARE EXAMPLES. 



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I^eaoham fr Wpi;^ht 



Manufacturers' Agents Tor 



UTICA HYDRAULIC CEMENT 



Atlas and 8teel Brands 



AMERICAN PORTLAND CEMENT 

Dealers in Dykerlioff^ illsen and Heym Brands 

IMPORTED PORTLAND CEMENT 



308-309 Chamber of Commerce BIdg. 



Telephonct Central 59. 



J. J. WADE & SON CO. 

52 Dearborn Street. 



Telephone, Central 1156. 



Plumbing, Oasfitting 
and Sewerage... 




Dealen in J, J. WADE'S 

BACK-WATER GATES 



Wade Clean-Out, Straifrtit Sewer 
Fitting and Back-Water Gate. 



FOR PREVENTION 

OF FLOODED CELLARS. 



74 



•.*.i-. 




W. A. Otis, Architect. , 



EPISCOPAL CHURCH, LA CROSSE, WIS. 



..... 




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A COTTAGE. 
By Katherine Budd. 



T 'T l^JSXt^' '"' ft "rTi , 



TELEPHONE n. 500. 



W. A. & A. E. WELLS. 



BUILDING 
CONTRACTORS. 



W. A. WELLS. ' 

A. E. WELLS. 

P.A.WELLS. CHICAGO. 



SUITE 1014 ynONADNOCK BUILDING. 



^ • 



BAGGOT GO. 



TELEPHONE, 
/^AIN 261. 



/nANUPACTL'RERS AND 
DEALERS IN 



GAS. ELECTRIC and 
C0A\B1NAT10N EIXTURES. 



SPECIAL DESIGNS 
UPON APPLICATION. 



PLIJAABING AND SANITARY WORK 
IN ALL ITS BRANCHES. 



169-171 ADAA\S STREET, ChICAGO. 



76 



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THE AVER'S BUILDING. 



Holabird & Roach, Architects. 



W. A. & A. E. Wells, General Contractors. 



77 



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llastcr 

antr 

M00tr. 



Capitals for ^^terittirs antr Interiors. 

Jint (grille ®Iorh. oDtltpbont, Pain 223(f. 



Andrews & Johnson Co. 



Manufacturers of 

HOT BLAST HEATING 
APPARATUS, 

BLOWERS, 

FANS AND 
ENGINES. 



HEATING AND 
VENTILATION. 



250-254 S. Clinton St. 
CHICAGO. 




.78 



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We are manufacturing 



RUBBER TILING 



Under Letters Patent. 



Elegant in design and finish; 
suitable for offices, v^esti- 
bules, hallways, bathrooms, 
etc. 

• ALSO 

/HATS. /nATtlNG. 
STAIR TREADS. ETC. 

THE GUTTA PERCH A & RUBBER 
MANUFACTURING CO. 

96-98 LAKE STREET. CHICAGO. 



Clarence L Wolfinger, 

Contractor and Builder... 



Fine Residence Work a Specialty. 



J 




Carpentry, 

Interior Finish, 

Offices and Bank Fixtures. 

FINE CABINET WORK 

Of all Kinds. 

TcL Main 3841. 

t64 La Salle Street , 

CHICAGO, ILLINOIS. 



80 



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W. G. BEVERLY, General Manager. 



GEO. C. GRAY, Treasurer. 



THE Jenkins & Reynolds Co, 



(Established 1872.) 



MANUFACTURERS OF 
AND DEALERS IN 



HIGH-GRADE 

Fire Brick, Fire Qay^ 
Re-Pressed Vitrified Building Brick 

15 South Clinton Street (Between Randolph and Washington Streets), 

CHICAGO. 



Sole Agents for Chicago and~ the Northwest for.- ' 

COLUMBUS BRICK AND TERRA COTTA CCS PRODUCT 
and WEBSTER'S VITRIFIED BUILDING BRICK. 



f •'-■.■/ 



:;ty*;"'". 



' IMPERVIOUS 

SHINGLE STAINS 



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MANUFACTURED BY 



; VILAS BROS. 

227 and 229 Fifth Ave. CHICAGO, ILL. 



Send for colors on wood, and prices. 



Paul F. FMIIU6ll6r, 

Builbtng 
Construction 



General Contractor. 



t50t SchiUer BxiMmZf 
CHICAGO. 



'Phone. Main 4234. 



83 



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'r>'M - I t"" S' '' 1 1'.''.', 'S ' ' <9 ! ■ 



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ST. PAUL'S CHURCH, 22D PL. AND HOYNE AVE., CHICAGO. 

H. S. Schlacks, Architect. Paul F. P. Mueller, Superintendent. 

This church is built of Vitrified Brick furnished by Jenkins & Reynolds Co., Chicago. 



83 



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1 »J u, ' ->.> 



JAMES A. MILLER & BRO 



Slate^ Tin^ 
Tile and Iron 




/ 



Galvanized Iron and Copper 

Cornices, Bays, Skylights, etc* 



129-13 J South Clinton Street, 



Special attention to large contracts. 
First-class work, fulh* guaranteed. 



CHICAGO. 



•- fv % • • 



The inland ARCHITECT 

Chicago's Great Monthly Journal of Architecture. 

High Class Technical Articles. Sumptuous Illustra- 
tions of best American Buildings. An acknowledged 
leader among Architectural Journals. 

RETAIL SUBSCRIPTION PRICE: 

Photogravure Edition, $10.00 a year. 

Regular Edition. 5.00 a year. 

Single and Sample Copies Photo. Edition, - «i.oo 

Regular " - .50 

Established February, 1883. Volumes commence In February and August. 

Published uninterruptedly since commencement under 
present management. 






LICENSEES FOR THE EXCLUSIVE PUBLICATION OF THE 

UNIFORM CONTRACT, 

FRAMED AND ADOPTED BY THE AMERICAN INSTITUTE OF Architects 

AND The National Association of Builders. 



THE INLAND PUBLISHING CO. 

610 Manhattan Building. 



CHICAGO. 



84 



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SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE, UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA. 

By F, F. Lincoln. 



'^' 



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BYRnrS SIJEITH- " 
INIi LHTH .„< LYOH 
CPWKED JOISTS 




are what make true walls, celllnfj^s and floors in every building. Can be supplied 
by all lumber dealers. Architects will benefit their clients by specifying them. 

Don't be imposed upon by Imitations. For information and circulars, address 

The Byrkit-Hall Sheathins Lath Co., 159 La Salle St., CHICAGO, ILL. 







-20^t. 



CDlcago Building trades Bureau 
of Information* 

1202 Chamber OF Commerce. 



OBOROB K. THOMAS, 
Manager. 



This Bureau was established August i, 
1897, for the purpose of furnishing infor- 
mation to Architects, Owners, Loan Men, 
Surety Companies, Contractors and others 
interested in building. 

An important part of its work has been 
the furnishing to Architects of accurate in- 
formation regarding the mechanical and finan- 
cial honesty and ability of contractors. The 
rapid growth of Chicago makes it imperative 
that there should be in existence a reliable 
and accessible record of those who have 
made successes or failures of their contracts. 
Such a record is kept at this office, and all 
inquiries from Architects will receive prompt 
and careful attention. 

Among others, we refer by permission to 
the following architects : 

N. S. PATTON. CHARLES J. FURST. 

M. L. BEERS. HANDY & CADY. 

W. W. CLAY. P. B. WIGHT. 

MYRON W. HUNT. FRED AHLSCHLAGER. 



MARINE 

FLOOR 

VARNISH 



MOST 

DURABLE 

FLOOR 

FlNiSH 

MADE, 



The particular feature of Marine Floor 
Varnish is its FLEXIBLE HARDNESS, 
which gives to it the superior wearing 
qualities, and prevents the varnish from 
cracking or marring white. Water does 
not affect Marine Floor Varnish, there '- 
fore makes it invaluable for the var^ 
nishing of bath rooms, window sills or 
any woodwork coming in contact with 
water. It can be rubbed, and will take a 
high polish if desired. 

For beauty and durability of finish 
is unexcelled. 

Made ooly by 

Grace Varnish Company. 



Established 1881. 
119-121-123-125-127 Larrabee St. 



CHICAGO. 



Readv Rock Asphalt Roofing. 

ASPHALT PAINTS AND CEMENTS. 




Srreened (Iravel. 
Trinidad A<tphalt. 
Bnrlnp. 

Trinidad AHplialt. 
Roitln-Hlzpd Paper. 



(The surface of the Trinidad Asphalt lake, exposed to the weather 
for centuries, shows no perceptible decay.) 



Telephone, 202 Harrisoa. 



Wesf Coast Rooting Co., 1023 nomcmock, 

CHIOTOO. 



86 



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TROY LAUNDRY MACHINERY CO. 



LIMITED. 



MAKERS OF 



High CIrade Laundry Magmi^^^ 



CHICAGO- 
TROY, N. Y. 



NEW YORK CITY. 
SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



ESTIMATES AND PLANS CHEERFULLY FURNISHED. 



A. E. Col 



E^AN, 



Pres. 



A. Vanderki.oot, Vice-Pres. 



Jamks E. Low, Secy. 



Chicago Ornamental Iron Co. 

• 26th ana S. Halsted Sts., CHICAGO. 

Ornamental Iron and Bronze 

SEE FOUNTAIN ILLISTRATION FOR EXAMPLE OF BRONZE WORK. 
Erected by us. Designed by Shepley, Rutan & Coolidge, Architects. 



W. E. BROWN. 

■■' ■'■ ■■■ r:."^. V/- ,-, • •:► 



TEL. 5354 MAIN. 



A. E. MORTIMER. 



BROWN & MORTIMER, 

PLUMBING, GASFITTING 
AND SEWERAGE. 



45 WEST WASHINGTON STREET. 



CHICAGO, ILLINOIS. 



Samuel S. Greeley, President. 
Frederick Greei,e,v, Treasurer. 



Morris L. Greeley, \ice-President. 
Sylvester N. Howard, Secretary. 



GREELEY- HOWARD CO. 



Established 1854. 

CITY AM) COUNTY 
SURVEYORS... 



Telephone, Main 1416. 



822 Opera Hoise I^lock, 
112 Clark Street, 
CHICAGO. 



88 






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HULBERT & DORSEY 

Formerly Superintendents for E. Baggot. 

PLUMBING AND DRAINAGE 

TELEPHONE, MAIN 1972. 

175 MONROE STREET, CHICAGO. 

p. NACEY. ESTABLISHED 1866. P.M. MURPHY. 

P. INAOCY GO. 



MODERN METHODS OF 



— PbUMBINO, HEATIINQ — 

GASriniNG AND HOUSE DRAINAGE. 

Telephone. Harrison 387. . 3J9 Wabash AvcnuC, CHICAGO* 

Opposite Auditorium Building. 

R. H. Stewart, President. ' i Gko. R. Stewart, Secretary. 



000 



INTERIOR bECOR/ITORS 

AND DEALERS IN 

W/ILL P4FER5... 



Telephone, Main 3079. CMICM^Oo 

FUND ALL & MALLY, 

IMPORTERS AND WORKERS OF 

FOREIGN AND DOMESTIC 

MARBLE, ONYX AND MOSAICS 

* - 

ARCHITECTURAL WORK SOLICITED, 

735 TO 739 W, KiNziE St., Chicago. 






WW^^^W:^^' 




A COUNTRY CLUB. 
Columbia University, by H. L. Beadel. 




HEIDELBERG. 
Herman C. Lammers. 



1 

■v.. 



Telephone, Main 888. 

C. EVERETT CLARK 



- 1. 



General Contractor and Builder 

Suite t303t Title and Trust Building, 

100 Washington Street, CHICAGO. 

E.F. PIERCE, SapeHniendenL 

WILLIAM P. WILLIAMS, Presidcnt AND Treasurer. SAMUEL W. ALLERTON, Vice President. 

W. C. BOWMAN. Secretary. H ERMAN N C. LEICHSEN Ri NG, Superintendent 



MANUFACTURERS OF 



TV^OSKIC • TILE • F^LOORS. 

MARBLE AND SCAGLIQLA 

Office and Factory, Flournoy and Rockivell Sis, 
r— — CHICAGO, 



Telephone, West 306. 



7 



W. H. JACKSON & CO, 



Designers and Manufacturers of 



JMantclS; Opeii fireplaces and 6rate9 

Importers of CUcs and JMoBaics. 

860 Broadway (Union Square^ ) 8th St.) t Chicago Branch : 

NEW YORK CITY. 505 Pullman Bld^., CHICAGO. 

CEMENT AND ASPHALT 
CONTRACTORS- 

TESSELATED TILE AND COLORED CEMENT FLOORS. 

FLOOR IN BASEMENT OF ART INSTITUTE LAID BY 

Simpson Bros, Co. 

Tcleph Dne, Main 883. 

92 ■ 




Established 1860. 




Pond tSc Pond, Archilects. 



ARTISTS' COLONY, OREGON, ILL. 




n— _j o. r» I A .i-!i i_ 



ARTISTS' COLONY, OREGON, ILL. 



"*;'/, •'•> ' ..I'^^Kf' '• 



HAMMILL FIRE ESCAPE CO. 

MANUFACTURERS OF 

FIRE ESCAPES FOR BUILDINGS. 

5T7XNDPIPCS 7\ND inPROVED H05C CONNECTIONS. 
IMPROVED STT^IRWTW EIRE ESCAPES, IRON B7\LCONIE5 T^ND RZ\ILING5, IIK3N 

STT^IRWORK (all Kinds), r 



■PHONE, MAIN 5305. 



Work erected in any part of United States. 

50, 164 La Salle Sf., CHICAGO, ILL. 



Chicago Electrical Construction Co. 

42 EAST CONGRESS STREET, 
CHICAGO, ILL. 

DYNAMOS. MOTORS. 

COMPLETE LIGHT AND POWER PLANTS. DYNAMO AND MOTOR 
REPAIRS. ESTIMATES ON ALL ELECTRICAL WORK. 

H. BALL, Manager. 



HENRY KERBER & SON 



W. L. KERBER 



CONTRACTORS AND 

DEALERS IN 

ALL KINDS OF 



Cut-Stone and Planed 
Sidewalks 



OFFICE AND YARD I 



TELEPHONE. 

SOUTH 482, CHICAGO. 

: s 



311 E. Twenty-first St. •. CHIC AGO, 

and Bedford, Indiana* ^ 



SPECIFICATIONS PREPARED. 
JOBBING PROMPTLY ATTENDED TO. 



TELEPHONE, MAIN 1896. 



CONLON COMPANY 



^ 



ENGINEERS AND 
CONTRACTOR^ FOR 



Steam and Hot Water Heating and Ventilating* 

132 Lake Street, CHICAGO. 

£eO. J. CONLON, MANAGER. v 



94 



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The United States Fidelity and Guaranty Co. 

Contract Bonds — Court Bonds — Fidelity Bonds. ' 

Every Architect should specify "A Corporate Bond required." 

London Guarantee and Accident Co., Limited. 

Employers' Liability — Public Liability — Accident Insurance. 

Every Architect should require Contractor to carry Liability Insurance. 

Conkting, Price 6t Webb, aeaerai Agtats, 

New York Life Building, CMICAQO, 

Apply tor rates aod particulars. TeL Central 1033. 

. ^ 

Elevator Supply and Repair Co. 

PHONE. Main 1741. 34 and 36 Wcst Monroc St., CHICAGO. 

ELEVATOR FLOOR INDICATORS, 

ELECTRIC ELEVATOR SIGNALS, 

IMPROVED FLASH-LIGHT ANNUNCIATOR. 
(Signaling operator of first car.) 

Our apparatus is in constant use in the finest buildings of ttie country. 

GRAVES BROS. 

STEAM AND HOT WATER HEATING 

'engineers and CONTRACTORS. 

Fifteen years of practical experience in all classes of High and Low Pressure 
Steam and Water Heating and Power Plants. The best material, first-class 
work and personal supervision insures our patrons the best results. 

TELEPHONE, MAIN 3868. 

n, J56 Lake Street. CHICAGO. 

M. ^HCDLCR, 

HOUSE MOVER AND RAISER 

Special Attention Paid to Shoring: Up Fronts, Setting Columns, Lintels 
and Girders, Shoring Up and Straightening Floors. 

Brick and Stone Buildings Raised and Moved. 



Office : Room 603, IIS Dearborn St 
i, CHICAGO. 

Office Hours: 1:30 to 2:30 p. m. 

Telephone, Express 730. 



Residence : IS York St. 

Yard: IS to 31 York St. 

Telephone, West 675, 
Builders' and Traders' Exchange, Box No. 339. 



96 



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Designed by 

Jenney & Mundie. 



AN EXAMPLE OF MITERING IN MARBLE. - 

, Executed by 

Frederick P. Bagley & Co. in Georgia Verd Antique. 



97 



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Jg^^^:^^^ .'ivrrTi;x:r ^7 -^ J>J, ^n. 



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'>«'Tr'.T:;'pTJ?* ■ :^ ^ 'T r-/^ "<;^*^e> ':v^'^'^?'v' i-'rv/ ■■■•^j " ■ .;; : 



W. p. Nelson Company 

f in^ Paper f^angingi 
Tnurior Decoratfon and PaintiMd. 

Stdlnea eids$/ 



193 Wabash Avenue, CHICAGO. 



Estimates and Designs submitted* 
TeltphonCf Main 2716, 



L. H. Prentice Co. 



EXCLUSIVELY . . . 



Steam and Hot-Water Heating Apparatus 

THAT HEATS. 



203 and 205 Van Buren Street, Cor. Franklin St. 

CHICAGO. 



Nelson & Kreuter, 



Telephone, Main 4>764. 



MANUFACTURER 



.oXaundry JMacbinery... 



Office and Salesroom: 
42 and 44 S. CLINTON STREET. 



\ 



London. 
Cologne. 



Specially adapted for Hotels, Infirmaries 
and Charitable Institutions. 



FACTORY: 42 to 48 S. Qinton St. and 34 to 48 W. Washington St. 



San Francisco. ^^t tt/^ a /^ •^ 

Belfast. Paris. LHICACjU. 

Dusseldorf. Christiania. 



Repairins: of all kinds of Laundry 
Machinery done on short notice. 



NEW YORK OPPICE:^ 

160 FIFTH AVENUE. 



ST. LOUIS OFFICE: 

FULLERTON BUILDING. 



BOSTON OFFICE: 

BRAZER BUILDING. 



GEORGE fl. FULLER COMPAMY, 

BUILDING 
CONSTRUCTION 



10Z7 MBRQUETTE BUILDTHC. 



CMicnco, 



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BUILDING FOR MONTGOMERY WARD & CO. 



Richard E. Schmidt, 

Architect. 



Mottled Pressed Brieve furnished by 
Chicago Hydraulic-Press Brick Co. 



* ^,js^76?>^3«Sfi'^'(?.' ""'^ t*." ^1'"' *,V7,"',T' ; 



Established 1856. 



Assayers, 



Mariner & HOSKINS Analytical chemists 



81 SOUTH CLARK STREET. 



and Mining Engineers. 



Telephone 

Express 330. 



Rooms 51 to 55. 



Analyses of all kinds. 



Correspondence solicited* 



Clays, Cements, Structural Material, 
Waters, etc. 

Consultation and advice in all matters 
connected with the Chemistry of 
Building Materials. 

Assays of Ores and Metallurgical 
Products. Mines Examined in the 
References if required, interests of the Investor. 



J. B. HAWES. 



J. M. DODD. 



HAWES &DODD, 
TileSf Ceramic Mosaics and Fireplace Furnishings, 



Sole Agents : 

Maw & Co's English Tiles and Mosaics. 

Mnrdock Parlor Grate Co. (Boston), Brass and 
Iron Fireplace Goods. 



STEVENS BLDG , 24 ADAMS ST. 

CHICAGO. 

Factory and Warehoi'sk , 

loi WEST ADAMS STREET. 



Telephone, Main 4868. 



Brown Bros. Mtg. Co. 



Established Irv 1560. 



Sidewalk Lights 



N. W. Corner Jackson Boulevard cind 

Clinton Street 

CHICAGO. 



AMERICAN T AUNDRY MACHINERY fO. 

CHICAGO. CINCINNATI. NEW YORK. V 



MANUFACTURERS OF ALL NEEDED 



Laiminidlry SljpipDnsiinKge 



COMPLETE OUTFITS FOR PUBLIC AND 
PRIVATE INSTITUTIONS A SPECIALTY. 



Plans and Estimates 

furnished for Architects. 



100 



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i HANSELL=ELCOCK FOUNDRY .CO. 

Structural Steel and Iron Work 

LARGE STOCK OF STEEL RAILS, BEAMS, CHANNELS, 
ANGLES AND PLATES ALWAYS ON HAND 

RIVETED COLUMNS AND GIRDERS OF ALL DESIGNS. 

ARCHER AVENUE. TWENTY-THIRD PLACE. 



BUTLER AND TWENTY-FOURTH STREETS. 



CIXICA.OO. 



USE ONLY THE BEST. 

THERE IS NONE "JUST AS GOOD." 



ADAMANT 

The Perfection of Wall Plaster... 



Room 517 Chamber of Commerce. CHICAQO, ILL. 
MILWAUKEE. WEST SUPERIOR. DETROIT. 



TELEPHONE, MAIN 3767. 

Hennessy Bros. & Evans Company, 

BUILDERS AND 
, GENERAL CONTRACTORS, 

ROOM 605, 100 WASHINGTON STREET, 

CHICAGO. 



Elevator Epclosures. Elevator Cabs. 

Meeker Iroa Doors. Iron and Window Guards. 



J AS. C. HOLENSHADE, 

Architectural Brass, Iron and Wire Work. 

76 West Monroe Street, CHICAGO. ILL. 

Telephone, Main 2182. 

102 



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'<-i!'.^' ^v'?'^-' ,*$:" j;sf*' 'Sf'^/'™; 




GREEK DANCE. 
F. A. Bridgeman. 




DECORATIONS FOR CHILD'S PLAYROOM. 
By Mrs. Held Perkins. 



103 



'X™ * " V -•% '' 



t , «* * • 5 



Interior Woodworking Co. 

296 Wabash Avenue, 
CHICAGO, ILL. 



Telephone, 86 Harrison. 



^ood jMantels, JMosaics 



Special designs and estimates 
Furnished on Request. 



Fireplace Furnishings, 
Floor and Ornamental Tile. 



American Mason Safety Tread Co. 

HERMAN PFEFFER, 

Agent, 
1551 Marquette Building, CHICAGO, ILL. 

The Mason Safety Tread absolutely prevents slipping, and is practically unwearable. 
Applied to either wood, iron, marble or granite STAIRS, whether old or new. 
ElectriC'Light Box, Hydrant and Manhole Covers. 

The only non-'Slipping COAL/HOLE COVERS in the market. 
Mason Sidewalk Lights, absolutely non-slipping. 
- ^ Hyatt Lights repaired by us are absolutely non/slipping. 

F.P.NELSON. W. P. NELSON. 



F. P. Nelson &Son, 
Carpenters, Builders and General Contractors 

Room 404, lis Dearborn Street, CHICAGO. 

Telephone, 1421 Central. 

Jx^ A yf T^ t "t Accepted by Underwriters : Fireproof 

I IVI O HOflOfiri Metal Sash and Frames, Wire Glass 

• V^» ITIWI CtliailVl*** (pivoted or sliding). 

GALVANIZED IRON AND COPPER CORNICES. 



SLATE, 
TIN, 

TILe and 
IRON ... 



ROOFER 



.?eT„Ttkt.l?es'" RTaif^l^Sorf Skylight and Glazed Work. 

Promptly, Done. 

Telephone. South 158. 25 1 1- 19 State Street. CHICAGO. 

104 



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ScMULER & Mueller... 



MANUFACTURERS OF 



Ornamental Glass 



Telephone, Main 1680. 



84-86 Market Street, 
CHICAGO. 





RALPH SOLLITT 


, - — ' 


SUMNER SOLUTT 




;*.Bttllder$ 


Telephone, CENTRAL 910. 


105 HARTFORD BUILDING 
140 DEARBORN STREET 
CHICAGO. 

ft 

• 


DESIGNINQ. 

nODELlNQ. 


STONE AND WOOD CARVING. 
ORNAHENTAL I'LASTER. 


JOw)trn DUX... 


-1. 


Architectural 
Sculptor 




278-260 E. HADISON ST. 


TELEPHOME. MfllN 25*5. 


CHICflQO. 



CaRSLEY MANUFACTURmG Co. 



(Incorporated.) 



Fine Interior Hardwood Finish and Stair Work 



BANK AND OFFICE FITTINGS. 



Telephone, South 118. 



2242-56 South La Salle Street, CHICAGO. 



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DECORATIONS FOR UNIVERSITV OF ILLINOIS. 
By Newton A. Wells. 



lor 



^IFT' 'r/'ft'iT*' .':;■' %i^:-V^;;./"7'i'5(''.»:;<vJV^ :;•■"■,'- '•..:■ "7v.^^?^. (A*/ "■■■,:■ ■.'-,■;> •■'■ .' ■^ •; '-n^v^Ep. 



The Architect or Engineer 



Who fails to investigate claims to surpassing merit made by any apparatus entering 
into his work, constantly runs the risk of remaining ignorant of something he would most 
> gladly know of. The 

'^ Webster System '' of Low Pressure Steam Heating 

lays claim to an efficiency and economy which, if vindicated, constitute that system a class 
by itself. If the steam heating of a large and important building is a problem you must 
shortly solve, we shall be pleased to have you write us. - 

■■■■■■- K\:'>--:c\r^^^'-^ WEBSTER & CO., Camden, N. J. 

NEW YORK: CHICAGO: BOSTON: PHILADELPHIA: ST. LOUIS : 

322 Broadway. 1509 Moiiadnock Bldg. 729 Tremont Bldg. 1105 Stephen Girard BIdg. 621 Century Bldg. 



Jacob Rodatz, 



MasoDini annd 

(n)]inltrsi(£it(D)r 






000 



520 THE ROOKERY, CHICAGO. 

TELEPHONE, /AAIN 4660. 

€bicddo JlrcbHcctural iron UlorKs 

DESIGNERS AND MANUFACTURERS OF 

modern Store Tronis. Stairs. Elevator Cabs. Tiiclo$iire$. Qrilles and Guards. 



METAL BANK AND OFFICE FIXTURES A SPECIALTY. 



CDicado new York Pittsburg 

Oakley Ave. and Kinzie Street. 1)33 Broadway. 78 Schmidt Building. 

Established 1859. J. H. Dimerv, President. 

Incorporated 1890. . T. W. Gilmore, V.-Pres. and Treas. 

t. w. wilmarth co. 
Gas and Electric Light Fixtures. 

...EXCLUSIVE AGENTS... 

ARCHER & PANCOAST FIXTURES. 

Special Designs Furnished, 225 and 227 StatC StfCCt, ChicagO. 

108 



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ENTERPRISE WIRE CLOTH MANUFACTURING CO. 

FREDERICK VOSS, Proprietor* 



MANUFACTURER OF 



Architectural and Decorative Wire and Iron Work 

BANK AND OFFICE RAILINGS, ELEVATOR AND WINDOW GUARDS, 

STAIR RAILS, IRON FENCES, STABLE FITTINGS, 

WIRE CLOTH, AND WIRE GOODS OF EVERY DESCRIPTION. 

WIRE LATHING A SPECIALTY. 



Telephone, West 757. 



617-621 Austin Avenue, cot* Lincoln Street, CHICAGO. 



CH. DOD. 



C. BAUER. 



F. HAHN. 



A(x:hitectupal Decopating Co. 



MANUFACTURERS OF 



Artistic Pelief Ornamentation 



OriAamented Pattern for Brass aud Iron Castings, 
nodding and Wood Carving. 

Tel. 347 North. 249 WCLI^ STI^CflT. 

special Designs, Samples and Csf luxates submitted ow application. 



Sherman & Flavin 

Marble, 
Mosaic and 
Tile Work 



2505 to 2519 State St. 



S. J. Stebbins Co, 

Builders' 
Hardware 



CUTLERY, TOOLS AND 
ELECTRICAL SUPPLIES. 

74 Van Buren Street, 



Between State and Dearborn Sts. 



CHICAGO. 



Telephonet Harrison 1300. 



110 



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Vierling,McDowell&Co;' 

Iron "Works— 23d St. & Stewart Av. 

Ghlcago. 



Structural and Ornamental 

,1 ■ ■ ■ . . ; 

Iron and Steel 



CO 






James M. Rice Go. 



Tel. Main 1944. 



PLATE AND WINDOW GLASS, 
ART GLASS, MIRRORS, ETC. 

34-40 South Water Street, 

Estimates promptly furnished. GHIGACO. 

KNISELY BROS. 

WIRE-GLASS WINDOWS. 

Slate, Tin and Corrugated Iron Roofers 



MANUFACTURERS OF 



Galvanized Iron Cornices, Corrugated Iron Roofing 

AND Metal Skylights. 



Telephone, 4109. 



99 AND 101 BUNKER STREET, 

CHICAGO. 



The Frederick Post Co- 
Drawitid materials, Surt^eyiitd Tnstruments, €tc 

blue prints, black prints. multi-color prints. 

ACME duplicators. MULTIPLEX COPIERS. 



Telephone, IVIain 1288. 



218-220 South Clark Street, 
CHICAGO. 



11:2 



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LUXFER PRISM COMPETITION — SECOND PRIZE. 
Adamo Boari, Architect. 



ii;? 



Every man to his tr ade. 
Fm a consulting engfineer* 

Let me help you make those plans and specifications 
for your electrical and steam plants* 

Chas* (j* Armstrong, 

Telephone, Harrison 56, Ftsher BuUding, Chtcago. 




R. 0. Schmidt, 

Archtteciarat Sculptors* 



Manufacturers of 



Cement and piaster Relief 
Decorations... 



191-193 Superior StrcA't, 
CHICSOO. 



Spier ing &. Linden 


EUGEP DIETZGEfl CO. 




IMPORTERS AND 


■1 


MANUFACTURERS OF 


Decorators 


^Dra'wmg 


' 


Instruments and 


1216 Micnigan Ave. 
CHICAGO. 


cMaterials,,* 


Cstimate.s and sketches 


TRADE MARK, tj l^ff^^^^TSCP 


submitted for complete tijrnlshlngs. 






181 Monroe Street, 


Telephone. South 9^. 


CHICAGO, ILL. 


- - 


Telephone, Main 726. 



114 



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JJLJNN S Reversible Sliding Sash Attachment. 

Glass can be cleaned on both sides from the interior of the building without removing screen or storm 
window. When it is supplied with this attachment anyone can operate the sash to clean it. No fittings visible 
when sash is in place. Storm and weather proof. ' "A 

Facilitates the cleaning of windows and removes all danger to life. Can be placed on any standard 
window. It is unnecessary to detach cord or chain. 

FOR FULL PARTICULARS WRITE 

DUNN REVERSIBLE WINDOW CO. 

115 Dearborn Street, Chicago, Illinois. 



Cbc Tllinois fire-Proof Covering €o. 



M. M. WAGNER, PROPRIETOR. 

Asbestos Fibre Covering, 

Asbestos Moulded 

Covering", 

Asbestos and Hard Wool 

Felt Sectional Covering, 

Asbestos and Mineral 

Wool Sectional Covering, 



MANUFACTURERS OF 




P. S. OLSEN, MANAGCR. 

Asbestos and Hair Felt 
Sectional Covering, 
Special Fireproof Lining 
for Ceilings, 
Wick and Packing, 
Engineers' Sundries, 
Covering for Cold Water 
Pipes. 



TEL. MAIN 2931. 



OFFICE, ROOM E, 78 LA SALLE STREET, CHICAGO. 





SUCCESSOR TO R. E. DEWEY & CO. 



GALVANIZED IRON and 
COPPER CORNICES... 



METAL SKYLIGHTS, SLATE, TIN AND CORRUGATED- 
IRON ROOFING. 



119 WEST VAN BUREN ST. 

CHICAGO. 



Members Chicago Builders' and Traders' Exchange. 

h P« StnltD Wire ana Iron Works 




Send for Catalogue. 



Office, I00-I02 Lake Street. 

Factory, N. VV. Cor. 15th and Laflin Sts. 
Long Distance Telephone, Express 438. 



Jirt metal Work 



Iron fences 



Wickets and Grilles. 



Crestings and Vanes, 
Wire Cloth, Brass and 
Eleclro-PIated Work, 
Lath, Etc. 

Sole Mfrs. Patent Enclosed Prisms. 
Agents J. L. Mott Iron Works, N. V., Stable Fittings and Ornamental Iron 



Stairs, Stable Fixtures, 
Jails, Guards, Fire Escapes, 
Builders' Work, Shutters 
and Doors. 



llfi 



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J. C. ROBINSON 



'. ■ Telephone, Main 3864. 




Mason and General Contractor 



Room 408 Commercial Bank Building, 
t75 Dearborn Sired, CHICAGO. 



S. Wilks Manufacturing Co. 

53-55 S. ainton St^ CHICAGO, ILL. 



MANUFACTURERS 



WILKS HOT WATER HEATERS" 

and jSTEEL tanks Best in use. all Steel.} 
sendIfor catalogue. 

For all purposes, heating: and E. H.[SEDGWICK, 

supplying Hot Water, etc^ General Manager. 

THE WINDOW SWINGING CO. or Chicago. 

1453 MONADNOCK BLK. 



* I 



Old or new <(vindom>s swung inside the room 
for CLEANING, by our 

SIMPLE, CHEAP AND PRACTICAL 

device, m)Hbout change or defacement 
^ — ^^ _ of frame or sash* 

Call and see them in operation or send for Illustrated Catalogue. 

ARNOLD HINKEN8, PRESIDENT. MATHIAS ROOS, SECRETARY. 

J. G. GUSTAFSON, VICE-PRESIDENT. CONRAD BRAUN. TREASURER. 

BUTLER STREET FOUNDRY AND IRON CO. 

3422-3432 Butler Street, 
Telephone, South 761. ^ CHICAGO. 

Architectural Iron Work« All kinds of Boiler and General Castings* 

Beams and Channels in Stock. 

118 



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BRONZE FOUNTAIN FOR THE COURTHOUSE AT SOUTH BEND, IND. 

Designed by Shepley, Rutan & Coolidge. 



119 



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JOHN II.KKHM 



A.II.NIHM 



lEROORaillRS 




^(KWn 



19 N. STATE ST 



CHICAGO 



THE T. WiLCE Co. 





H 





KILN-DRIED. BORED. POLISHED AND MATCHED ENDS. 

Mail and telephone orders for any quantity promptly attended to. 



WE GUARANTEE ALL OF OUR FLOORING. 



telephones: igJSJtlJ^ 



OFFICE AND FACTORY 



Twenty-second and Thfoop Streets^ CHICAGO* 




N Caretti & Co. 



. nANUPACTURCRS OP 

CERAAMC 



^^ /nosAics 



/*\EDAL AND DIPLO/^A 
WORLD'S COLUA\BlAN EXPOSITION. 

1893. 



M. F. RITTENHOUSE, President 



J. W. EMBREE, Secretary. 



RITTENHOUSE 6c E MB REE CO. 

LUMBER 

OFFICE, YARD AND MILL: 35th ST. AN D CENTER AVE. ^ 

TELEPHONE, YARDS 502. 
OUR SiPECIALTY: ' 

KlLN-DRIED HARDWOOD FLOORING 



AND INTERIOR FINISH. 



Chicago. 



120 



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TRADE-MARKS 

AND 

STANDARDS. 



This Trade-Mark 
represents ' 
the very highest grade of 
Rubber-Covered Wire. 
It is carried 
in all types, 
to suit varying 
electrical requirements 



BY THE 



CENTRAL ELECTRIC COMPANY, 

264. 266. 268 AND 270 

Fifth AVENUE. 

CHICAGO. 



Halsted Brothers 



JlKbitcctiiral 
Iron Olork 



388-390 W. Randolph St. 
CHICAGO, ILL. 




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(< 



CHICAGO AA," 
VULCANITE," "STAR," 
LAGERDQRFER," "LEHIGH" 

Portland Cement. 



"WIGTON STEEL," 
"FRAXKLIX CROVVX," " S. B.," 
"SLIGO" and "DOME" 

Fire Brick 

and General Building Supplies. 

Tel. 5102 Main. 




M. W. POWELL CO, 

ROOFERS 



AND DEALERS IN 



MATERIALS and TOOLS 

Flax Felt and Wool Felt Roofs. 
AiCtinolite Roofs. Tile Roofs. . 

204 Dearborn Street, 



Telephone Central 903. 



CHICAGO. 



122 



Mii^iikAi^fc^iaiaiKa<BfeS4av;.....v.i;-,v.'..^. .■: 



''V^5^f^™r7^''£ ■^31 iC'^.^jT^"^;^ 






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CLOISTER DOOR, DRYBURGH ABBEY. 
By Waller M. Campbell. 




COMPETITION SKETCH OF SCHOOLHOUSE DOORWAY, CHICAGO ARCHITECTURAL CLUB. 
y _ By Carleton M. Winslow. 



■-.■■ iiy 



l>oop$ Si Cu(lu)]$ D)antel Co. 



<0 MONROE STREET. 



Bathroom and Vestibule Tiling 



Ceramic Mosaics. 

Tklephone, Main 2074. 



Exctusi've Agents for Mantels , 

Consoles and Interior Fittings manufactured by 



The Geo^ £♦ Peterson Co^ 



'Phone 5283. 



28 1 N. Sangamon Street. 



DESIGNS AND ESTIMATES CHEERFULLY GIVEN. 



'HE half-tones and etchings 
illustrating this Catalogue 
were made by... 



lp^er2ov/ §ompar2^ 



CHARLES W. HILL CO. 




Steam and ^HHH and Uentilating 

l>ot Ulatcr Seating... IH^I Engineers... 



Tel. Harrison J298. 21 Quincy Street . Suite 303 . CHICAGO. 



^ 







FRENCH BEVEL MIRROR. 



Designed by Ihe Geo. L. Peterson Co. 



I'i.T 




SHOWING 
FRENCH GOTHIC 
KNOB 
AND ESCUTCHEON 



DESIGNED AND EXECUTED FOR 



CHICAGO RESIDENCE 

(SEE OPPOSITE PAGE) 



BY 



Pussdl and Epwin 
Manufacturing Company 

NEW BRI?rAIN, CONN. 



NEW YORK 

PHILADELPHIA 

BALTIMORE 

BOSTON 

LONDON 



ENTRANCE DOORS 



CHIOXGO SAMPLE OrFICC 

941-42 Marquette Building 

Telephoae...riaia 2640 

ILLUSTRATED CATALOGUE (1899) ON APPLICATION 



126 









' ' . 




RESIDENCE FOR ^JOHN G. SHEDD, ESQ. 
Frederick W. Perkins, Architect. " 



^ See opposite page. 



127 




T^ Cf ort^vOestern Terra Cotta Co. 

Chicago, Hi. 



y. 



123 



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SECOND PRIZE, t)RAWING FOR CATALOGUE COVER. 

By George R. Dean. 



129 



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Co. 



Passenger 



and 



rrcight 



ELEVATORS 



"The Standard of the World." 



New York ::: Chicago. 



130 



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SCHLESINGER & MAYER'S NEW BUILDING. 
Otis Elevators used throughout. Louis H. Sullivan, Architect. 



131 






Index to Advertisers. 



I'AGli 

Adamant Company, 517 Chamber of Commerce . 102 

Almini Company, The, 107 Wabash Avenue 91) 

American Laundry Machinery Co., Chicago . 100 

American Luxfer Prism Co., 372 Fulton Street, Chicago 2 

American Terra Cotta & Ceramic Co., Marcjuette Building . ..... 8 

Andrews & Johnson Co., 250 South Clinton Street 78 

Architectural Decorating Co. , 249 Wells Street no 

Armstrong, Chas. G., Fisher Building 114 

Art Marble Co., Flournoy and Rockwell Streets 92 

B 

Babcock & Wilco.x Co., Marquette Building ....... Cover, page 4 

Baggot, E., Co., 169 Adams Street 76 

Baker & Smith Co., 92 Washington Street . . ^ 72 

Brown Bros. Mfg. Co., N. W. cor. Jackson Blvd. and Clinton .St. . . . 100 

Brown & Mortimer, 45 West Washington Street 88 

Butler Street foundry & Iron Co., 3422 Butler Street 118 

Byrkit-Hall Sheathing Lath Co., 159 La Salle Street 86 

C 

Cabot, Samuel, 215 Dearborn Street . 66 

Cambria Steel Co. , Philadelphia, Pa 52 

Caretti, John, & Co., Chicago 120 

Carsley Manufacturing Co., 2242-2256 South La Salle Street ii>6 

Central Electric Co., 264 Fifth Avenue 122 

Chicago Architectural Iron Works, Oakley Avenue and Kin/ie Street . . 108 
Chicago Building Trades Bureau of Information, 1202 Chamber of Com- 
merce 86 

Chicago Edison Co., Chicago, 111 4 

Chicago Electrical Construction Co., 42 Congress Street 94 

Chicago Hydraulic-Press Brick Co. , Chamber of Commerce 54 

Chicago Ornamental Iron Co., Twenty-sixth and Halsted .Streets . . . 88 

Chicago Telephone Co. , 203 Washington Street 60 

Chicago X'arnish Co., Dearborn and Kinzie Streets 6 

Clark C. Everett, 100 Washington Street 92 

Conlon Company, 132 Lake Street 94 

Conkling, Price & Webb, New York Life Building 96 

D 

Decorators' Supply Co., 215 South Clinton Street : 78 

Dietzgen, Eugene, Co., 181 Monroe Street . 114 

Dickinson Cement Company, Marquette Ikiilding " . . 62 

Dunn Reversible Window Co., 115 Dearborn .Street 116 

Dux, Joseph, 278-280 East Madison Street 106 

E 

Elevator Supply & Repair Co., 34 West Monroe .Street 96 

Enterprise Wire Cloth Mfg. Co., 617-621 Austin Avenue no 



13i 



J. ..;i-'*,Vi,''-V'"' ■ . >^ ■/ i*"'^.;,'" yy 




COMPETITION DRAWING, JERSEY CITY PUBLIC LIBRARY. 
Stone, Palmer & Hornbostel, Architects. 




HOUSE OF MR. E. M. MILLS. 
Green & W icks, Architects. 

133 



' .' !.."» iL' 






F 



I'AGK 

Ferrosteel Compan}^ The, 45 Lake Street . 56 

Flanagan & Biedenweg Cd., 58 Illinois Street 70 

Flindall & Mally, 735 Kinzie Street , 90 

Fuller, George A., Company, 1027 Marquette Building 98 

, G 

Garden City Sand Co., The, Security Building 122 

Grace Varnish Company, 119 Larrabee Street 86 

Graves Bros., 156 Lake Street 96 

Greeley-Howard Co., 112 South Clark Street 88 

Gutta Percha & Rubber Mfg. Co., The, 96 Lake Street 80 

H 

Halsted Brothers, 388 West Randolph Street "" . . . 122 

Hammill Fire Escape Co., 164 La Salle Street 94 

Hansell-Elcock Foundry Co., Butler and Twenty-fourth Streets .. . . . 102 

Hawes & Dodd, 24 Adams Street 100 

Heath & Milligan Sifg. Co., Chicago Cover, page 2 

Hennessy Bros. & Evans Company, 605 Title and Trust lUiiiding . . . 102 

Hill, Charles \V., Co., 21 Quincy Street 124 

Holenshade, Jas. C, 76 West Monroe .Street . , 102 

Hoops & Ludwig Mantel Co., 10 Monroe Street 124 

Hulbert & Dorsey, 175 Monroe .Street 90 

I 

Illinois Fire-Proof Covering Co., The, 78 La .Salle .Street 116 

Inland Architect, The, 610 Manhattan Building 84 

Interior Woodworking Co., 296 Wabash Avenue 104 

J 

Jackson, W. H., & Co., 505 Pullman Building 92 

Jenkins & Reynolds Co., The, 15 South Clinton Street 82 

K 

Kehm Bros. & Mertz, 19 North State Street 120 

Kerber, Henry, & Son, 311 East Twenty-first Street 94 

Knisely Bros., 99 Bunker Street 112 

Krefting, E., 119 West X'^an Buren .Street 116 

L 

Ludowici Roofing Tile Company, Chamber of Commerce 64 

M 

Mariner & Hoskins, 81 .South Clark .Street 100 

McFarland, J. C, 2511-2519 .State .Street 104 

Meacham & Wright, 308 Chamber of Commerce 74 

Miller, James A., & Bro., 129 .South Clinton .Street 84 

Mueller, Paul F. P., 1501 Schiller Building ^ 82 

Murphy \'arnish Co., Twenty-second and Dearborn .Streets 58 

N 

Nacey, P., Co., 319 Wabash Avenue 90 

Nelson, W. P., Co., 193 Wabash Avenue 98 

Nelson & Kreuter, 42-44 South Clinton Street 98 

Nelson, F. P., & Son, 404, 115 Dearborn Street 104 

North- Western Expanded Metal Co., 860 Old Colony Building .... 68 

Northwestern Terra Cotta Co. , The 128 



\ 



134 



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BYZANTINE ARCADE. 
Columbia University, A. D. T. Hamlin. 




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O l'A(.E 

Orr & Lockelt Hardware Co., 7 r Randolpli .Street 68 

Otis I'^levator Co., Fisher lUiildin.£^ 130 

Peterson, (ieo. L., Co., The, 281 North Sanji^aiiion .Street . . . . . . 124 

iu4 

1 12 

122 

98 



Pfeft'er, Herman, 1551 Marcjuette Building 
Post, Frederick, Co., The, 218 South Clark Street 
Powell, M. \\'., Co., 204 Dearborn .Street . . . 
Prentice, L. H., Co., 203-205 \'an Buren .Street 



R 

Rice, James H., Co., 34 .South Water Street 112 

Rittenhouse <S: I'^mhree Co., Thirty-hfth .Street and Center Avenue . . 120 

Robinson, J. C, 175 Dearborn .Street 118 

Rock Plaster Mfg. Co., The, 450-45.8 Illinois .Street 64 

Rodatz, Jacob, 520 The Rookery 108 

Rosenow & Co., 373 Dearborn Street 124 

Russell & I'^rwin Mfg. Co., 941 Mar(|uette Building 126 

S 

Schmidt, R. ()., 191 Superior Street 114 

Schuler & Mueller, 84-86 Marcjuette lUiilding 106 

Sheeler, H., 115 Dearborn Street 96 

Sherman & Flavin, 2505 State Street iio 

Simpson Bros. Co., Chamber of Commerce 92 

Smith, F. P., Wire & Iron Works, uk) Lake .Street ......... 116 

Sollitt Bros., 105 Hartford Building iu6 

Spierling & Linden, 1216 Michigan Aveiuie 114 

Stamsen & Blome, Unity Building 62 

Stebbins, F., Mfg. Co., Brightwood, Mass 58 

Stebbins, .S. J., Co., 74 \'an Buren .Street iio 

Tiffany Fnameled Brick Co., Marquette Building 60 

Troy Laundry Machinery Co., Chicago SS 

U 

Union Foundry Works, 417 First National Bank liuilding 70 

V 

Verd Antique Marble Co., 1420 Marquette liuilding, Chicago i 

Vierling, >IcDowell & Co., Twenty-third .Street and .Stewart Avenue . . 112 

\'ilas Bros., 227 Fifth Avenue 82 

Voss, Frederick, 617-621 Austin Avenue iio 

W 

Webster, Warren, & Co., 1509 Monadno^k lUiilding 108 

Wilmarth, T. W., Co., 225-227 .State .Street 108 

Wilks, S., Mfg. Co., 53 South Clinton .Street 118 

Window .Swinging Co., The, 1453 Monadnock Building 118 

Wilce, T., Co., The, Twenty-second and Throop .Streets 120 

Winslow Bros. Company, The, Chicago 72 

Wade, J. J., & .Son Co., 52 Dearborn Street 74 

Wells, W. A. & A. F., 1014 Monadnock Building 76 

Wolfinger, Clarence I., 164 La .Salle .Street 80 

West Coast Roofing Co., 1023 Monadnock Building 86 

Y 

Yale & Towne Mfg. Co., The, 131 Wabash Avenue 66 



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ANNUAL 



OF THE 



Chicago Architectural Club 



IJKIXCi THE HOOK OF THE 



Thirteenth Annual Exhibition 

1900 



■ X 



mn institute 

CHICAGO 



COPYRIGHT, 1000, BY THK 

Chicago ARcntTKCTURAL Club 






i-Zo , - 



THE HENRY 
OSHEPARJ>- 
CO" 




CHICAGO 



GREETING, 



THE Chicago Architectural Club, through the courtesy of the 
Art Institute and the cooperation of patrons, is enabled to 
submit to the citizens of Chicago this exhibition of the year's 
architecture at home and abroad. 

It is also enabled to publish this book of the exhibition, and hopes 
that it may become a record and souvenir of an event worthy ot 
commemoration. 

The Architectural Club has noticed the great interest that has 
been taken in civic beauty by citizens, by our municipal officers, and 
by clubs and societies. 

The Mayor has appointed a special commission to study the park 
problem ; there are sexeral projects for specific parks and playgrounds 
under consideration by the Council; the Woman's Club has deter- 
mined to devote a portion of its energies regularly to civic beautifica- 
tion; the Municipal Science Club exists for the purpose of studying 
municipal problems; the Art Association has declared war on unsightly 
bill-boards; the Improved Housing Association has exposed our slum 
tenements and has come forward with plans for improvement, and the 
University of Chicago and the Northwestern University are directing 
the attention of their students to conditions and problems connected 
with the city's welfare. .In addition, Chicago now has an Art Com- 
mission with power to pass upon public works of art. A directory of 
such societies is given on page 93. With the development and 
improvement of our commercial life and the steady increasing concern 
in municipal politics (and the gradual improvement in our city 
government), it is becoming possible for our city to grow in artistic 
life and expression. 

Recognizing the increasing interest in municipal art, and believ- 
ing in its ultimate accomplishment, the Architectural Club gladly lends 
itself to the combining and correlating of these activities. To that end 
it has invited the Improved Housing Association to share in this exhi- 
bition, and has availed itself of the cordial assistance of the Arts and 
Crafts Society. This society has furnished and decorated the two- 
room tenement planned and erected in the gallery by the Club. 



To the exhibitors outside ot our own membership the Club 
acknowledges its gratitude and appreciation of the great contribution 
made by them. 

In addition to its self-appointed task along municipal lines the 
Architectural Club, in connection with the Architectural League of 
America, stands for the new thought in art and design. 

It stands for art which is fundamental, in which form follows and 
expresses function — which aims to "solve problems of utility in terms 
of beauty," and which, while revering the past, yet places principle 
before precedent. 

It has taken special pleasure in observing the progress of the new 
spirit, as manifested in recent work in this country. 

The illustrations in this book have been selected partially for the 
purpose of illustrating this idea, although it is frankly admitted that 
some of the work shown would not come under this head. 

It is our hope that our friends will join with us next year in more 
closely uniting work along lines of common interest, and in making 
the Exhibition and the Annual still more representative of good work 
and progressive ideas. ' »• 

The Exhibition' Committee. 




Patrons of the Exhibition of 1900. 



INSTE;AD of resorting to the former method of finaijcing our exhibitions by 
the sale of advertising space in the catalogue, another method has been 
adopted for the present year. The patrons whose names a})pear below 
have borne the entire expense of the exhibition of 1900 simply as citizens 
interested in the welfiireand improvement of Chicago. 

The Architectural Club takes this opportunity of expressing its appre- 
ciation of the action of the patrons, and of congratulating the municipality 
ujion what it has received from them. 

Adamant Manufacturing Co 517 Chamber of Commerce. 

Hard Plaster. 

Almini Compan}', The 107 Wabash Avenue. 

Interior Decorators. 

American Cement Tile Co Chicago. 

Flooring and Roofing Tiles. 

American Terra Cotta & Ceramic Co 1043, 204 Dearborn Street. 

Andrews & Johnson Co 256 Washington Boulevard. 

Heating and Ventilating Contractors. 

Bagley & Co., Fredk. T i8th Street Viaduct. 

Baumgarteu Bros 1365 Ogden Avenue. 

Plumbers. 

Behr, E. Theo 343 East 56th Street. 

Decorator. 

Beil & Mauch 81 Illinois Street. 

Sculptors. 

Binner luigraving Co 21 Plymouth Place. 

Binner Building. 

Broes Van Dort, G 704, 218 La Salle Street. 

Architectural and Art Industrial Publications. 

Brown & Mortimer • • -45 West Washington Street. 

Plumbing Contractors. 

Burnham & Co., D. H 1142 The Rookery. 

Architects. 
Butler vStreet Foundry & Iron Works 3424 Butler Street. 

Cabot, Samuel 1302, 215 Dearborn Street. 

' Creosote Shingle Stains and Insulating Quilt. 

Caffall Brothers 184 La Salle Street. 

Caffall Waterproofing Process. 

Calm, B 3223 Michigan Avenue. 

Chicago Edison Co 1 39 Adams Street. 

F^lectrical Contractors. 

Davis, Frank L 302 Michigan Avenue. 

Mosaics. 



Chicago Hardware Mfg. Co 1 1 20 Chamber of Coumierce. 

Chicago Hydraulic-Press Brick Co.'. Chamber of Commerce Building. 

Chicago Ornamental Iron Works 2625 South Halsted Street. 

• Chicago Varnish Company Dearborn Avenue and Kinzie Street. 

Chicago, New Ycfrk and Boston. ' 

Chicago Veneer Co Blue Island Avenue and Robey Street. 

Church & Jobson 1 233 Marquette Building. 

Architects. 

Clark Compan}', C. Everett 1015, 100 Washington vStreet. 

General Contractors. 

Coolidge, Charles A 1780 Old Colony Building. 

Architect. 

Corbin, P. & F 104 Lake Street. 

Hardware. " 

Dean, George R 121 La Salle Street. 

Architect. 

Decorators Supply Co., The 215 South Clinton vStreet. 

Architect lira) Modelers. 

Detroit Graphite Mfg. Co 1425 Monadnock Building. 

Graphite Paint. 

Dietzgen Co., Eugene i.Si Monroe vStreet. 

Drawing Materials. 

Dodge & Co., H. B 525 .Stock Exchange Building. 

Blinds, vScreens and Shutters. 

Dux, Joseph ... 278, 80 Madison Street. 

Carver. 

Egan, James J " *. .85 Dearborn Street. 

Architect. 

Elevator Supply & Repair Co 36 West Monroe vStreet. 

Falkenau Construction Co 1 1 16, 108 La .Salle vStreet. 

General Contractors. 

Ferrosteel Company, The 45 Lake vStreet. 

Registers. 

Flanagan & Biedenweg Co., The 59 Illinois Street. 

Manufacturers of Art Glass. 

Frantzen Company, Arthur . -. 839, 225 Dearborn vStreet. 

Electrical Contractors. 

Frost & Granger 806 The Temple. 

Architects. 

Fuller Co., Geo. A •"27, 204 Dearborn vStreet. 

General Contractors. 

Fullerton, Charles W Highland Park, 111. 

Furst, Charles J 1 72 Washington vStreet. 

Architect. 

9 



Galloway, James B 115 Monroe Street. 

Real Estate. 

Gay, Henry Lord 92 Dearborn Street. 

Architect. 

Glessner, J.J 1800 Prairie Avenue. 

Greeley-Howard Co 822, 112 Clark Street. 

Surveyors. 
Gunther, Charles F 1602 Indiana Avenue. 

Haigh, Joseph : 212, 156 Washington Street. 

General Contractor. 

Hallberg, L. G 812 Oxford Building. 

Architect. 

Halsted, Joseph 388-390 West Randolph Street. 

Architectural Iron Work. 

Hansell-Elcock Foundry Co Archer Avenue and 23d Place. 

Hawes & Dodd 24 Adams Street. 

Ceramic, Mosaics and Filing. 
Head, Franklin H 2 Banks Street. 

Heath & Milligan Mfg. Co 170 Randolph Street. 

Paint and Color Makers. 

Hennessy Bros. & Kvans Co 605, 100 Washington Street. 

General Contractors. 

Holabird & Roche 1618 Monadnock. 

Architects. 

Holmgren, J. A 815 Main Street, Evanston. 

Painter. 

Huber, Julius II 172 Washington Street. 

Architect. 

Huehl & Schmid 63, 163 Randolph Street. 

Architects. 

Hulbert & Dorsey ^ 175 Monroe Street. 

Plumbers. 

Hutchinson, Charles L 2709 Prairie Avenue. 

Interior Wood Working Co 296 Wabash Avenue. 

Jeffries Co. , The Janesville, Wis. 

Jenney & Mundie 520 New York Life Building. 

Architects. 

Kehm Bros. & Mertz 19 North State Street. 

Steam Heating. 

Knisely-Yeldham Co .74 West Monroe Street. 

Slate, Tin and Iron Roofers. 

Kroeschell Bros. Co 55 Erie Street. 

Boiler and Steamfitting Works. 

Lanquist, A 404, 1 15 Dearborn Street. 

Mason and General Contractor. 

Lathrop, Bryan 77 Bellevue Place. 



9 ■ 



Library Bureau 215 Madisou Street. 

Fine Interior Woodwork. 

Ivudowici Roofing Tile Co .419 Chamber of Commerce. 

Interlocking Terra Cotta Roofing Tile. 

Luminous Prism Company 27 South Clinton Street. 

Patent Lights. 

Mackolite Fireproofing Co 701, 103 Flast Randolph Street. 

Fireproofing. 

Marthens, Chester N 171, 73 vSoutli Canal Street. 

Interior Marble Work. 

McFarland, J. C 251 1 State Street. 

Sheet Metal. 

Meacham & Wright 308-9 Chamber of Commerce. 

Utica and Portland Cement. 

Morava, W Marquette Building. 

. Structural Iron. 

Moulding Co., Thomas 808 Chamber of Commerce. 

Pressed Brick. 

Mulvey, Arthur B .310, 59 Clark Street. 

Murphy Varnish Company 22d and Dearborn vStreets. 

Nacey Co. , P 315 Wabash Avenue 

Plumbers and Steamfitters. 

Nelson & Son, F. P 115 Dearborn Street. 

I'ainters and Decorators. 

Nelson Co. , W. P 193 Wabash Avenue. 

Painters and Decorators. 

Neubauer Decorating Co 169 Wabash Avenue. 

Decorators. 

New York Belting & Packing Co 150 Lake Street, Chicago. 

Manufacturers of Interlocking Rubber Tiling. 

Northwestern Expanded Metal Co 860 Old Colony. 

Firejjroofing. 

Northwestern Terra Cotta Co. , The 1 1 1 8 The Rookery. 

Otis Elevator Company- 409, 277 Dearborn vStreet. 

Passenger and I'Yeight Ivlevators. 

Patton, Fisher & Miller 605, 115 Monroe vStreet. 

Architects. 

Pauling, E. G 19, 132 La Salle Street. 

F'inaucial Agent. 

Petersen Electric & Structural Iron Works 1013 New York Life Building. 

PfefFer, Herman 1557 Marquette Building. 

American^ Mason vSafety Tread Co. 

Pfleger Manufacturing Co. 960 North vSpaulding vStreet. 

Screens and Weather Strips. 



10 



Pischel, Fred 1510 Oakdale Avenue. 

Powers Regulator Co 34, 40 Dearborn Street. 

Heat Regulators. 

Pratt & Lambert .370 26tli Street. 

Varnishes. 

Prentice Company, L. H 203 Van Buren Street. 

Heating Contractors. 

Priudeville, Charles H 85 Dearborn Street. 

Architect. 

I'ost Co., Frederick 60 Lakeside Building. 

Architects' Supplies. 

Robinson, John C 50, 175 Dearborn Street. 

Contractor. 

Rock Plaster Mfg. Co 1019 Chamber of Commerce. 

Rogers, James Gamble 1314 Ashland Block. 

Architect. 

Russell & F^rvviu Mfg. Co 941 Marquette Building. 

Architectural Hardware. 

Ryerson, Martin A 49th Street and Drexel Boulevard. 

/ ■ - ' ' , - - 

vSchmidt, Richard E. . . . . .r^_t^j. 1013. 172 Washington Street. 

y /^"^^rehitect. 1 

Schmidt, R. O 191 and 193 Superior Street. 

Architectural Modeler. 

Seeman, Emil H /. 132 La Salle Street. 

Mortgage Investments. 
Selfridgc, Harry G 117 Lake Shore Drive. 

Shaw, Howard 115 Monroe Street. 

/ — Architect. 

vSheeler, H 403, 115 Dearborn Street. 

/ House Mover. 

Sherman & Flavin. , . . .^77^-,^: 2507-09 State Street. 

Marble and Tile. 

Simpson Bros. Co 704 Chamber of Commerce. 

1 Cement and Asphalt. 

Sollitt Co. , Oliver 106, 140 Dearborn Street. 

General Contractors. 

Sollitt, Ralph and Sumner 104, 140 Dearborn Street. 

General Contractors. '/ 

Spierling & Linden 1216 Michigan Avenue. 

Decorators and Furnishers. 



I 



I 



11 



/ 



V . 



Stamsen & Blome , . . Bank Floor, Unity Building. 

Cement and Paving. 

Stebbins Co^, S.J 74 Van Buren Street. 

Hardware. 

Struble & Co., Henry 293-307 East 40th Street. 

Cut Stone Contractors. 

Sullivan, Louis H 1600 Auditorium Tower. 

Architect. 

Sutton, John C 203, 167 Dearborn Street. 

Plastering Contractor. 

Temple, Wm .1303 Chamber of Commerce. 

Thomas & Smith .- 16 North Clark Street. 

Steam Heating. 

Thomlinson, Bradbury, Riley Co 39th Street and Stewart Avenue, 

Cut Stone Contractors. 

Tiffany Enameled Brick Co Marquette Building. 

Tobey Furniture Co. , The '. 100 Wabash Avenue. 

Furniture and Decorations. 

Treat, Samuel A 1507 I'isher Building. 

Architect. 

United States Blue Print Paper Co 717 Rialto Building. 

Architects' Supplies. 

Vanderpoel Co., The 497-503 West 22d vStreet. 

s Architectural Iron Works. 

Walch & Wyeth 208-10 Lake Street. 

Magnesia, Steam Pipe and Boiler Covering. 

Walther, Ferd 503, 172 Washington Street. 

Carpenter Contractor. 

Weary, Edwin D 1449 Marquette Building. 

Architectural Modelings and Mosaic. 

Wells, W. A. & A. E 1014 Monadnock Building. 

General Contractors. 

Wilmarth Co. , T. W 225 State Street. 

Gas Fixtures. 

Winslow Bros. Company, The 368 Carroll Avenue. 

Ornamental Iron. 

Wolfinger, Clarence I 164 La Salle Street. 

General Contractor. 

Woodstrom, John 92 La Salle Street. 

President Lake View Building Co. 

Zimmerman, Albert G 115 Monroe .Street. 

Architectr J 



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THE HOUR or OPPORTUNITY. 



I. 

GREAT events have proved that Chicago is the epoch-making- 
city of this nation. Whether we believe there are special 
providences made for us only, or believe in a manifest destiny, 
or that our city is but the product of an evolution out of the vast 
forces of the Northwest, the myriad powers of her environment, we 
can not but perceive that ever and anon there comes a stroke upon 
the tocsin of Time betokening that it is again our turn to touch the 
heart of the world. 

But it is not so much to the credit as for the development of a 
people that such events and periods of intensity occur. It is, indeed, 
a dangerous thing for a man to elect himself a hero, or for a people to 
arrogate to themselves anything more than a feeling of satisfaction and 
thankfulness that they have had a chance to do something that 
brought heroic results. As, for instance, it was not the people of 
Chicago who had the wisdom or the power to select Abraham Lincoln 
for his work, though it was upon this chosen spot that their frantic 
enthusiasm, heedless of most things save that he was their own, helped 
to ordain unwittingly the destiny of Lincoln to undreamed of tragedy 
and sorrow, but to sublime duty and opportunity, and to an 
immortality of memory, affection, and renown. Thus 4t came about 
that in no other city exists a spot more worthy of heroic bronze, nor 
one to which the centuries may bring a greater fame, than the one 
where Lincoln first received his crown of wild olive at the hands of 
the people. 

Other happenings here have proved to be of colossal import to the 
world, as well as to our own welfare. The burning of Chicago aroused 
the world to an outpouring of sympathy and practical help that broke 
all records and made the world, by that much, better. Out of that 
unparalleled catastrophe and its exigeant demands, sprang the need 
and broad opportunity that created a race of architects whom this 
nation should not forget to honor. For it was they who first attacked 
and successfully fought the impatient, crass, and imperious commer- 
cialism of Chicago, and taught this city its first real lesson in the 
greater world economy of how commercialism may find its surest 



17 



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success and largest profits by the aid and dominion of Art. /Vnd, in 
doing this, they builded better than they knew, for, by the stand they 
took then, backed by the independence they were able to maintain, 
they did but pave the way for the infinitely greater triumph of the 
same kind that came twenty years later, when all the world, amused 
and curious, was watching to see what we could do with an inter- 
national exposition. Upon the stroke of another mystic hour ot 
opportunity there arose here, in supernal beauty, the majestic flower 
of civilization that won for Chicago the civic crown of a World City. 
When the manly insistence and good generalship of one great firm of 
architects, supported by the generous self-abnegation of others of the 
Chicago contingent, won, in their good-tempered struggle for the 
mastery over such commercialism as existed in the World's Fair 
Directorate, and established once for all the suzerainty of Art in 
World's Fair matters, they accomplished for this nation what no other 
power could have done at the moment, and won a victory of inesti- 
mable significance to our future. 

But that is not all. They also not only raised up a magnificent 
professional standard and astonished the world by the splendors of 
their creative genius, but they took an advanced position of leader- 
ship which they can never honorably yield — the leadership of Art — 
to resign which would be stultification. From the day of closing of 
the World's Fair gates, it has been clear that supremacy in Art, of the 
American people, will depend more upon the ethical methods of archi- 
tectural practice and the cultivation of a high esprit du corps among 
architects than upon any other influences. 

True, the American people, busy with gambling, stock yards, 
steel mills, trust combines, presumptive prosperity, imperialism, gold 
mines, and a few thousand other things like those, have little idea 
of what sHipremacy in Art may bring to a nation. They have admir- 
able, but uncertain, promptings, and it must be admitted that these 
are almost universally, though privately, entertained, but they have not 
learned at all that if they would only avail themselves of the supreme 
opportunities in Art which have been given them along with the rest 
of their heritage they would soon rule the commerce of the world, 
and, far better than that, they would conquer and rule themselves, 
and rid themselves of evils that are now so apparently remediless, so 
corrupting, and malign. 

The prescience and civic patriotism of Pericles led the Greeks to 
build the harbors and the Piraean Way for defense and for the 



18 



commerce of Athens, and with the glories of its Parthenon and 
Acropolis to set the seal of beauty and art upon their civilization, the 
one that outlives all others of antiquity in human sympathy and interest. 
The palaces of St. Petersburg " like a mist rose into towers " from the 
marshes of the Neva at the arbitrary will of Peter the Great, and the 
plans of Paris, the beautiful city of the modern world, were drawn 
anew for the protection and glorification of the Napoleonic dynasty 
that shriveled one day as a giant mushroom 'withers in the blaze of a 
summer morning's sun. But these were one-man power propositions. 
Chicago's present opportunity grows out of accumulated necessities, 
conditions and interests so general, so vital, and so obvious, that no 
despotic decree of czar or einperor, no scheming political boss like 
Tweed, aad not even a Pericles is needed for its exploitation. The 
fundamentals of this proposition are so many and so broad as to show 
plainly that they are nature's own, and in their formation implicitly 
Cpllow the law of cause and effect and the law of circumstance. 

Confronting Chicago at this moment is another stupendous oppor- 
tunity so incomparable, so practical in its foundations, and so fasci- 
nating in its possibilities that its dominance over public sentiment and 
over the ambitions, the minds, the will, and the enthusiasm of the 
people of Chicago, will, when they understand its underlying propo- 
sitions, as far surpass the World's Fair period as the sensations of 
that time were beyond the ordinary. 

No such opportunity was ever offered to any other city in the 
world. The facts which now exist and which form the basis for this 
opportunity are dimly felt by many — are realized in part by some — 
but are combined and understood in their aggregate by very few. 

Scrutinizing them, the first all-important group of facts to concen- 
trate upon and realize is : 

First. That over one thousand millions of dollars-^^ i ,000,000,000) 
is now changing hands, or in form of refunding operations, is relocating 
in different depositories and investments connected with the reorgani- 
zation operations of the transcontinental trunk and subsidiary lines of 
railroad now going on, and a thousand millions more will be needed 
and used to complete these reorganizations safely upon their thor- 
oughly new basis of radical economy and reform. 

Second, That it had become a question, vital to the great money 
syndicates of the world, whether these railroads should face reorgani- 
zation or stagger along under unbearable burdens, or in an avalanche 



19, 



of bankruptcies involve the whole business world in so appalling a 
panic as to bring almost universal ruin. 

That, thanks to the wisdom and the courage of the masters of 
finance of this country and abroad, aided by the fortunate tide of great 
industrial production, good prices and abundant crops in the United 
States, this dreaded panic has been forestalled and averted, and 
the work of reorganization has been so consummately and silently 
managed that even the speculators of the stock markets have for once 
failed to realize what was going on. 

Thh'd. That scientifically located terminals, so placed as to accom- 
plish the most perfect economies by being directly upon deep water- 
ways and harbors at certain points on the Pacific Coast, the Atlantic 
Coast, and especially at Chicago, arc vital to the success of these great 
railroad reorganization schemes, for the time has come when every 
hour and every penny that can be saved in transferring or transporting 
a ton of freight means a double benefit, both to the public and to the 
railroad interests, while the enormous growth of the tonnage of water 
freights, owing to the increased size, capacity and economy of opera- 
tion of deep-draft lake and ocean ships, has forcetl the railroads to a 
policy of conciliation and preparation for mutual accommodation. 

The second great group of salient facts to recognize is : 

First. That here at Chicago is the spot for the greatest harbor in 
the world. 

Second. That in the economy of the silent, immutable law of 
progress the natural head of navigation of the Mississippi River is 
not at Saint Paul, but at Duluth, West Superior, and up the 
Georgian Bay. 

Third. That those prophets of development, the Rothschilds, 
whose decisions are based upon profoundest expert research and 
knowledge of conditions in every part of the United States and British 
America, believe that at South Chicago will center the most colossal 
and varied steel industries of the world. 

Fourth. That in the difference in levels between the lakes above 
us and between Lake Michigan and the Mississippi lie the stored-up 
dynamic forces that will ultimately settle the question of supreme 
manufacturing interests — here, in the low gap of Chicago, only a 
few hundred feet above sea level, and lying at the heart of limitless 
transportation facilities and natural resources of the richest country in 
the world. 



20 



Every man conversant with our real condition knows that 
Chicago needs this new harbor, with all the auxiliary docks, ware- 
houses, elevators, belt lines without grade crossings and connecting 
all lines with deep water, and, in short, all modern appliances for the 
transferj^'transshi^ment and proper allotment of the millions of tons of 
freight that gather here now and are subject to drastic disadvantages 
because we have no proper dock system. 

The trains of thirty-five railroads ply in and out, and others are 
wanting entrance to Chicago, but for not one of these have we any 
proper terminals next to deep water, nor even any proper accommo- 
dation for lake freights now aggregating annually in tonnage several 
times more than freight passing through the Suez Canal, 

Track elevations settle but few of the vital problems of termi- 
nal business. The cartage problem involves millions of dollars of loss 
annually to both shippers and railroads. The congestion of our 
streets, unregulated and puzzling as it must be so long as present 
conditions prevail, is a direct tax upon all business and all property — 
onerous and scarce endurable — amounting in some respects well-nigh 
to confiscation. In the two square miles that constitute the business 
center, property values aggregating two hundred millions of dollars 
are at a standstill or retrograding. The street pavements are rotten, 
or otherwise ruined, and the conditions under them are worse and 
more dangerous; the soil foul and poisonous; the manholes and sewers 
filled with deadly gases of decompo^tion, mixed with explosives from 
pipes rotted everywhere by electrolysis, and explosions are imminent 
at any moment, especially in winter, by contact with electricity leaking 
from thousands of wires and broken-down conduits, that even the 
proprietary companies scarce dare to inspect. 

(irime and filth abound. The city authorities, for the most part, 
do as well as they can, but with a treasury virtually bare, and deficit 
rampant where millions of dollars are needed, it is idle to expect an 
efficient public initiative. 

The intramural surface railroads, hampered and oppressed by 
congestion of the streets, have reached their limit of efficiency. They 
pack the people in like sardines, but run their cars as well as they can 
and really do wonders. But the down-town district is their purgatory 
of involuntary murder, of cost of operation, of breakdowns, loss of 
time, disappointment of their patrons and consequent generation of 
hostility, and a hundred other privations that assail their corporate 
business and demand quick remedy. 



2\ 



It is imperatively demanded that the Chicago River shall be 
improved and readjusted to a higher degree of usefulness now that it 
is regenerate, and the property along its banks not wasted by the 
idiocy of digging it out and throwing it away, but made ten times 
more valuable than ever. Dismal portents are in the labor sky of 
strikes and lockouts, bans and boycotts, and our people are humiliated 
and bewildered as never before, over the stagnation of the building 
business, and the shame of the foregoing evil conditions. And yet 
this city may well look forward to a realization of its opportunities on 
a world basis and in accordance with world conditions. 



II. 

Chicago's greatest opportunity, like every other tremendous thing 
in life, is thus made up of matters good and evil, things of formidable 
prestige, power and influence ; things that are dreadful, virulent and 
degenerate, ideals that are noble and feasible, necessities innumerable, 
some exasperating, some revolutionary and some auspicious, but all 
crystallized and bound together into one golden hour of supreme neces- 
sity — the matrix of reality fused by the white heat, the eleciric flame 
of the nick of time and circumstance. 

To create the scientifically located harbor and terminals that will 
protect and double our commerce, that will relieve us of congestion by 
one comprehensive plan, that will take care of genuine rapid transit for 
freight and passengers of every kind, give the enormous extra benefits 
of short-haul transportation through the worst congested of cities is 
considerable of a job and will cost ten millions of dollars to start 
with, and forty millions more when all is done. But there are people 
outside of Chicago who desire these improvements in our city just 
as much as we do, and they happen to be the people who have 
already put more money into railroad investments, principally centering 
here, than the total valuation of the whole State of Illinois, Chicago 
included. They have not balked at raising two thousand millions 
within the last two years, and it is known that they are not averse to 
furnishing the fifty millions this Chicago work will require. 

The city of Chicago will not have to put up a dollar, nor levy a 
tax, nor assume a responsibility beyond a legal police control that is 
properly the municipal function, but will get enormous public and 



22 



municipal benefits. In response to the general feeling that something 
must be done, many of our citizens have already applied themselves 
unselfishly to the work. Some effort bore immediate results, some was 
apparently unsuccessful, but all helped toward creating the necessary 
preliminary conditions. 

We are all familiar with the plan for a boulevard subway under the 
river proposed by Mrs. H. N. May; we have been attracted by the 
underground loop subway proposed by Gen. Wm. Sooy Smith, and 
the conduits by Commissioner McGann. We know of the scheme for 
subways proposed in a general way by Mayor Harrison, and acknowl- 
edge our debt to Owen F. Aldis and his associates in promulgating 
the subway idea several years ago. 

J. R. Putnam's Arcade Rapid Transit Railway proposition was an 
important contribution, as was General Torrence's elevated terminal. 
Too much can not be said of the work^so much of it already executed 
in track elevation, the credit of which is so largely due to Commissioner 
John O'Neill. And to Arthur J. Caton, Judge Ewing, J. N. Jewett, 
B. F. Ayer, Telford Burnham, G. P. Englehart, Wm. Penn Nixon, 
Marshall Field, T. B. Blackstone, M. B. Madden and many others we 
are indebted for the agitation of the Lake Front Park scheme with 
the outer boulevard to Jackson Park. 

An invaluable practical demonstration is now being made by Geo. 
W. Jackson, who, with the new telephone conduit, is showing the great 
importance of the space beneath our streets and the feasibility of its use. 

A great work has been done by the Illinois Chapter of the Ameri- 
can Institute of Architects in planning a possible improvement of the 
Lake Front and for using the park north of the Art Institute for 
municipal buildings. 

Availing ourselves of this great opportunity now, means to the 
city and citizens of Chicago the quadrupling of the vafues of property, 
especially in the down-town district. It means doubling the popula- 
tion of Chicago in a shorter time than it ever doubled before. It 
means the permanency of street pavements, without the assessment of 
property'abutting, and making each street equal to a boulevard, but 
without restriction of desirable traffic. It means the immediate 
improvement of the Chicago River and returning it to a traffic greater 
than ever, and more profitable. It means the de\'elopment of the 
Calumet region beyond the dreams of any of the promoters of that 
region ; and, finally, when it becomes really known that fifty millions 
of dollars are actually to l)e spent at once for practical benefits to 



23 



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Chicago, it means that the beautifying of Chicago becomes a matter 
of course. It means the completion of the Lake F'ront Park. It 
means new municipal buildings, permanent exposition buildings, art 
buildings, libraries, museums, and galleries, the construction of boule- 
vards and parks — these must all be included in the plans of the 
future not far off. 

Finally, it means emphatically that, with the enormous gathering 
volume of popular feeling and public interest that these things will 
inevitably create, joined with the fact that many thousands of working- 
men will find steady employment in construction work for three 
years, and at least twenty-five thousand will then have permanent 
employment, no labor strikes or kindred obstructions could stand a 
show of success in the face of the public sentiment and safeguards, or 
the instincts of self-preservation among the labor men and trades 
councils. 

It needs no clarion call to convey to a body of practical idealists 
like the American architects that fifty millions of dollars provided to 
be spent here on practical things that will enable the business men of 
the town to do five times the business that can now by any possible 
chance be done under present conditions, and will bring the business, 
too, will mean a hundred millions more, at least, for the architects to 
provide investments for in more costly and magnificent structures for 
the down-town district. If they can witness such a realization of 
opportunity as that, they can well afford to be imperturbable over the 
surrender of practicality made by New York in allowing a nine-million- 
dollar Speedway to be built along the shore of Harlem River, thus 
spoiling the most magnificent site in the world, except ours, for an 
ideal dock and warehouse system, at the plutocratic beck of Tammany 
and Wall street millionaires, political and stock exchange bosses, to 
the real detriment of the people and enormously to the detriment of 
New York. t 

For the wonted discernment of the architects will show them that, 
with the prestige Chicago has already conferred upon their profession, 
and the grand backing of this greatest of opportunities, they them- 
selves can become facile pn'nccps, leaders of artistic and conmiercial 
progress of every kind. It is in their power to do these things, to 
organize for a world-important work with world-recognized workers. 
The public expects these things and will inevitably have its expecta- 
tions realized. 

Jamks F. Gookins. 



24 



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31 






'^ I ^HE Art and Literature Department of the Woman's Club 
I decided, some time since, to undertake as its permanent work 
such effort toward the beautification of Chicago as seemed from 
time to time possible and practicable. 

As a first step in this direction, it availed itself of the opportunity^ 
offered by the Architectural Club in a recent competition. 

In this competition a prize was offered for the most acceptable 
design for the embellishment of the small triangular park bounded by 
North State and Rush Streets, opposite Bcllevue Place. 

The design submitted by Mr. Birch Burdette Long, and shown in 
the accompanying illustration, was accepted by the department, the 
originality of the design and its freedom from unrelated precedent 
especially recommending it to the committee. 

The cooperation of the city in planting and maintaining such 
shrubs, trees, and vines as are necessary to the completion of the idea 
has been secured, and it is the intention to start the work of construc- 
tion soon. 

It is the belief of the Woman's Club that the success of this initial 
effort toward the establishment and maintenance of beautiful small 
parks will be but the first step toward similar work in more densely 
populated districts, and that it will furnish an inspiring object lesson 
and a precedent for further accomplishment along such lines. 

To make a charming garden spot surrounding the well-designed 
shelter, and to accomplish this end for a comparatively small sum, will 
be evidence to every passer-by of the feasibility and great desirability 
of more such oases in the civic desert. It is this greater object that 
the Woman's Club hopes to reach by means of this first experiment, 
and the generous response of the Architectural Club in placing the 
results of the competition at its disposal, is heartily appreciated. 

It is hoped, in addition to the inspiration toward further effort 
of this kind which this venture will afford, that it may also establish a 
precedent for cooperation between different societies which shall result 
in further benefit to the public. The study of concrete civic problems 
and the effort toward their solution by such societies as the Architec- 
tural Club gives much hope and promise for better things in the future 
history of Chicago. 

Lucy Fitch Perkins, 

Chairman of Committee of Art and Literature Department 
of the Woman' s Club. 



32 



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DESIGN FOR PARK IMPROVEMENT. 
By Birch Burdette Long. 



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LONGITUDINAL SECTION. 




PLAN. 




CHICAGO NATIONAL BANK. 
Jentiey & Mundie, Architects. 



» ' 



THE rAR/nhOUSE PROBLE.n. 



FOR an architect there is no better way of spending a summer 
holiday than * a- wheel in a prosperous farming country, seeking 
interesting examples of a domestic architecture in the rough. 
He must expect little and be content to find his pleasure chiefly in 
the enjoyment of woods and fields, for the average farmstead adds but 
a doubtful charm to the landscape. Often, indeed, a near view will 
show a habitation so brutally bald, ugly, forbidding and neglected in 
the midst of such dismally bare and repellant surroundings that it 
niay be said of our own benighted heathen, still deaf to the gospel of 
beauty, that they live in a land ' ' where every prospect pleases, and 
only man is vile. " '' 

Amid the freshness and beauty of the fair open country, one cheer- 
less or unsightly house seems, by contrast, more discreditable to a 
highly civilized and progressive race than a whole row of them in the 
city. But when, in some rise or turn of road, a picturesque and home- 
like farmstead greets the eye, a grateful picture sinks into the beholder's 
memory, not soon to be effaced. Unspoiled by the crude latter-day 
vagaries of the village carpenter, or the blighting influence of the 
ready-made plan of commerce, house, barns, windmills, and out- 
buildings are sometimes found happily placed as to site, and built in 
seemingly haphazard yet sturdy and purposeful fashion, with wings, 
perhaps, and other supplementary structures of later build for growing 
needs. Enhancing the charm of such a home, one is likely to find a 
broad sweep of green between the house and road, well-kept hedge- 
rows separating lawn from orchard, orchard from field, and garden 
from both, and tall trees, the last of a race of forest giants, towering 
above roofs and chimneys, while flowering vines reach to eaves and 
droop again in waving streamers. 

Upon studying such a type as this, found oftcnest in New Eng- 
land, where the sober traditions of colonial work still have a strong 
hold upon the country builder, it will be seen that for the architect 
familiar with all the cunning tricks of nice planning, and in sympathy 
with farm life, an excellent beginning has already been rnade for one 
of his ideal good farmhouses. 



38 












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39 



In northern New England, and here and there in the West where 
New Englanders have settled, the typical farmhouse is a long rambling 
structure with the sacred ' * parlor ' ' and guest-room at one end and the 
barn and workshop at the other. In Northern regions, where old- 
fashioned winters with deep drifting snows still reign, the convenience 
and comfort of this type are obvious. Of course, a separate and larger 
barn for stock is usually required, although examples may be seen, 
where, through various sheds, a house is united with a great barn, large 
enough for all purposes. The accompanying plan for a Northern farm 
house is designed to eliminate the most serious defects found in even 
the best of these buildings. These defects, some of which are due to 
perverted ways of living, are first, a connection between kitchen and 
barn inadequately shut off against odors ; second, incomplete or incon- 
venient laundry, fuel, pantry and other working arrangements ; third, 
lack of bathroom and sanitary conveniences; fourth, and perhaps most 
serious of all, lack of a large, sunny, attractive living-room in place of 
the frigid, old-fashioned state parlor, held sacred to memorable occa- 
sions, such as weddings and funerals. One needed feature, seldom 
provided, is a roomy entry set apart for the male members of the house- 
hold in which they may remove dirty boots and overalls and clean 
themselves up properly before entering the kitchen or living-rooms. 
Often toilet and wardrobe conveniences may be provided in the laundry. 

In planning and placing a house in a sharply rolling country, such 
advantage of the site may usually be taken to provide easy and con- 
venient access to house and barn on two levels, giving an added charm 
and picturesqueness to its various aspects, seldom found in the level 
prairie. 

The little field-stone farmhouse is another architect's ideal, having 
no existing prototype, but suggested by the desire to show the neg- 
lected but delightful possibilities of native materials, even in the hands 
of rude workmen as applied to an arrangement for simple yet good 
and seemly living, with special provision for the enjoyment of al fresco 
repasts in the summer upon the vine-roofed terrace which juts out into 
a sharp slope overlooking a fair and fertile valley. Such homes as 
these are not beyond the means of many a farmer. It is to be hoped 
that a quickened desire for better housing and more beautiful surround- 
ings will in good time bring the farmhouse builder into sympathetic 
touch with the true architect who can'^nd will give the smallest prob- 
lem his largest thought to benefit his fellow-men, if not for gain. 

Robert C. Spencer, Jr. 



40 








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FOl'RTH AVE. M. E. CHl.'RCH, LOIISVILLE, KY. 
W. J. Dodd and Arthur Cobb, Architects. 



42 



-:V*>-.-'^ 



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A TOMB. 

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Course in Archeology, First Class at the Ecole des Beaux-Arts. 

By James Gamble Rogers. 



43 



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• CENTRAL* MPTliT • OPPHANACt* 

JOMrt M. Xkn 0>e*L iMKHlTTCT CMKA^O 



CENTRAL BAPTIST ORPHANAGE. 
John M. Van Osdel, Architect. 



.„;f-'V>>. ^'7''^.; y.,' ; ■ ,;■ *-i. 



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SKETCH. 
By Newton A. Wells. 





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SIMMER CABIN. 
George L. Harvey, Architect. 



y . 



THE Exhibition Committee regrets that the exhibit of the Im- 
proved Housing Association could not reach Chicago in time 
for listing and illustration in this book. It has been possible 
to procure the prize designs in the tenement house competition, and 
they are published here by the cooperation of the Construction News. 
We add to their publication a design for a similar problem by Mr. 
Beman, made some time ago, and sketches of the Langdon Apart- 
ments, one portion of which is now built on the West Side. 

We quote from a recent editorial in the Construction News the 
following : 

" That the competition has proved of great value to tenement house archi- 
tecture is certain, and that Chicago will profit by the chance of studying the 
original drawings at the coming architectural exhibition is also certain. But 
we would warn Chicago against too close an adoption of any of these plans. 
.The New York competition is based on the typical 25 x 100 foot lot. This 
division of land is one of the greatest afflictions ever thrust upon a great city. 
Lots in Chicago are generally of the same width, but of even greater depth. 
Owners and architects should resist the narrow unit, especially in tenement 
building, and by combining lots, leaving courts, widening alleys, and planting 
trees and grass, convert the center of our blocks into the most desirable instead 
of the most unsightly portion. 

" In Chicago, land is not so valuable as in New York, and we can limit our 
tenements to four stories, and in rnany instances to three, and can also have 
garden space without the loss of the required five or six per cent. No tene- 
ment, we believe, should be built more than four stories in height. If, how- 
ever, the value of the land makes it necessary to increase the height to six 
stories, an elevator should be included in the equipment." 

Another element in the tenement house problem in Chicago is that 
of transportation and the shifting centers of industry. A building 
may be well situated as a tenement, and five or ten years after be 
poorly located. It is therefore prudent to build in such a manner 
that the building may be easily converted either to hotel, manufactur- 
ing, or storage purposes. 

T^he embodiment of the garden idea referred to above reduces this 
danger to the minimum, for by it a building becomes less dependent 
upon its neighbors, and the beauty and comfort of that feature would 
cause people to tolerate undesirable conditions to a very great degree. 

The Exhibition Committee. 



47 



As a part of the problems of the Improved Housing Association, 
the cheap lodging-house must be considered. Over 25,000 
men apply for low-priced lodgings each night. The accommo- 
dations at the present time are inadequate in number and foul in 
character. The new law has effected some improvement, but very 
little in comparison to the urgent necessities. . 

Mr. Bogue is interested in the movement mid submits for public 
consideration the plans here shown. They show a building of 1,130 
rooms, averaging 6x9 feet — the charges ranging from 20 to 30 cents 
a night. Free bath, laundry, and reading-room privileges are 
included. A restaurant at low prices is to be maintained. The 
building is to be fireproof The character of patrons might make this 
building seem an unwise investment, but such is not the case, and no 
one would indorse such a proposition on a charity basis. The fact is 
that the lodging-house and low-priced tenement represent the only 
classes of buildings that have not been overbuilt in Chicago. It is 
xlemonstrable that this building would pay well, and such has been 
the experience of Mr. Mills in New York. He has erected two hotels 
on this order and each pays a fair income in addition to affording 
valuable opportunities to men of moderate means. 

The project has been endorsed by prominent business tnen, by 
city officials, and by many other students of the lodging-house 

problem. -r t- r- 

The Exhibition Committee. 



48 




ttvi-oifrta ^mrrm xA.oMm sm r-r 



LODGING HOTEL FOR CHICAGO. 
D. H. Burnham & Co., Architects. 



frj acj icti'^j 



49 




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•BUKK PLAN- 






PLANS FOR SHATTICK PRIZE FOR COMPETITIVE DESIGNS FOR ARTISANS' HOMES - 

LIMITED COMPETITION. S. S. Beman, Architect. 



51 




K£NTAt5LE ARfA 4039.6 ^q.Fr» 533^ of LOT 4- TWO ROOM AJ^RrMEhO 
FREE AJI?v!>PACE ^250Z" '• r^O.of- •• •* tTMRee •• 

WALL5,PAl?Tir)0MS'<- ZTOUR. 

Public ^PACE laio.o- »«i<».i^*.. .. jz APA«TMEhT^ in all 

TOTAL ' 7* i-00. a -- -a 100 -/^^ LOT 34 ROOM S »' ♦» 

SECOND PRIZE PLAN FOR MODEL TENEMENTS. 
Israels & Harder, Architects. 



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ARCHITECTURE, more than any other art, may reflect the 
changing, and growing requirements of a people. The effort 
for social service known as the settlement movement is an 
expression of a need which has sprung into our civilization within the 
last fifteen or twenty years. We show the architectural expression of 
this need by illustrating the buildings of Hull House, University of 
Chicago Settlement, the Chicago Commons, the Northwestern Uni- 
versity Settlement, and the David Swing Memorial. 

The settlement movement is generally understood without being 
closely defined, and its aims and purposes are best met when least 
emphasis is placed upon its institutional aspect. 

The housing of the various activities of these social centers presents 
to the; architect a problem in the solution of which precedent can 
play but a small part. 

The requirements are varied, and belong neither to individuals nor 
to a class, but include the social and educational well-being of all the 
people in the community. 

Its demands are preeminently democratic and genuine, as con- 
trasted with the luxury and whims which may find expression in other 
kinds of building. In addition to such variety of requirements a3 
follo\y when the plans must include dwelling places with complete 
equipment, gymnasia, classrooms, and even theaters, the means are 
invariably limited. In this religious movement, no money is put into 
the embellishment of an architectural monument to stand through the 
ages. The building is frankly and simply a means to a social end. 
Its very limitations and the newness of the problems presented make 
the settlement buildings more closely expressive of the life of the 
present than, for instance, the church edifice, with its ecclesiastical 
architecture handed down from previous ages. There is no precedent 
to govern their architectural expression — these buildings must be 
designed as a direct response to definite needs. This, we believe, has 
ever been the starting point of good architecture. 

Of the settlements illustrated, none is complete, and two have not 
yet been started. They are in various stages of completion and equip- 
ment. Other centers are moving in the same lines, and it is the hope 
of the Architectural Club to show in its Annual for 1901 the additions,, 
and changes to these centers, executed between now and then, as well 
as those that are not represented at this time. 



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UNIVERSITY OF CHICAGO SETTLEMENT. 
Dwight Heald Perkins, Architect. 



65 




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INTERIOR DETAIL OF PRIVATE STIDV. 




INTI':RI()R detail of main entrance LOOKINO INTO DRALCHTINC, K(JOM. 




RKSIDEN'CE OF NATHAN C. MOOKK, OAK I'ARK. 
I-'raiik Lloyd Wright, Architect. 




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DWELLING FOR MRS. ROBKRT LXKART, RIX'ICR l"ORl':ST 
F"raiik Lloyd Wright, Architect. 




F()]< MR. K. C. WALLER, RIVER Ff)Ri:ST. 
I-'raiik Lloyd Wright, Architect. 



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AIJ. SOILS Bl ILDINC, CMI('A(,(). 
Frank IJo>d Wright ami Dwiglit IleaUi Perkins, Arclntccts, Associattd. 



AUDirOklUM fLOOR PLAN. 




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ALL SOLLS HriLDIXG. 



83 



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Design submitted by Israels it Harder, Architects. 



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NEW YORK Cl'STOM HOISK. 
Design submitted by I). H. I'.urnham & Co., Architects. 




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92 



SOCIETIES ENGAGED IN PUBLIC IMPROVE- 
MENT IN CHICAGO. 



The Art Commission, 
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\V. L. 15. Jennev. Lorado Taft. Ralph Clarkson. 



AN ACT TO PkOX'IDI': FOR THE CREATION ( )F ART COMMISSIONS 
IN CITIES AND TO DEFINE THEIR POWERS. 

BI^ IT ENACTED by the People of the State of Illinois represented in 
(ieneral Assembly : 

Section i. Whenever in any city in this State the City Council shall deem 
it advisable, they may by ordinance provide for the creation of a commission to 
be known as tiie Art Commission of such city : 

Section 2. Such commission shall consist of the mayor of such city, the 
president or chief officer of the principal art institute, or similar incorporated 
organization, if there be any in such city, the presidents or president of the 
boards or board of park commissioners of any parks, park, or system of parks 
within the limits of such city under the control of a board or boards of park 
con1Illis^ioners (all of whom shall serve as members of the state art commission 
during; the continuance of their said several offices) and three other members, 
residents of said city, to be appointed by the mayor. One of said three mem- 
bers shall be a painter, one a sculptor, and one an architect. 

Skciton 6. Hert-after no work of art shall become the property of such 
city by ])urchase, ^\U, or otherwise, unless such work of art, t)r a design of the 
same, together with a statement of the proposed location of such work of art, 
shall first have been sul)niitted to and approved by the commission ; nor shall 
such work of art, until so approved, be erected or placed in or up(jn or allowed 
to extend over or uj^on any street, avenue, square, common, municipal build- 
ing, or othe;" place belonging to such city, or any i:)ark, boulevard or public 
ground situated witliin the limits of such city. The commission may, when they 
deem i)roper, also recjuire a com]ilete mcxlel of the proposed work of art to be 
submitted. The term " work of art," as used in this connection, shall apply to 
anti include all paintings, nuiral decorations, stained glass, statues, bas relief, 
or other sculi>tures, ornaments, fountains, images, or other structures of a per- 
manent character intended for ornament or conmiemoration. The term "mu- 
nicipal t)uilding," as used ni this connection, shall include all public schools 



w 



and all buildings or portions thereof, and all grounds used for school purposes 
in such city. No existing work of art in the possession of the city, or in any 
parks, boulevards, public grounds, school buildings, or school grounds afore- 
said, shall be removed, relocated or altered in any way without the similar 
approval of the commission except as provided in Section S of this Act. When 
so requested by the mayor or the Common Council, the commission shall act 
in a similar capacity- with similar powers in respect of designs of buildins^s, 
bridges, approaches, gates, fences, lamps, or other structures erecletl or to be 
erected upon land belonging to the city, or a part of any t)f tlie parks, public 
grounds or boulevards witliin tlie limits of such city, and in respect of the lines, 
grades and plotting of the public ways and grounds, and in respect of the arches, 
bridges, structures, and approaches which are llie property of any corporation 
or private individual, and which shall extend over or upon any street, a\enue, 
highway, boulevard, park, or other pul)lic place belonging to or within the 
limits of such city. 

But this section shall not be construed as impairing the power of any i)ark 
board to refuse its consent to the erection or acceptance of public monumc-nts, 
or memorials, or other works of art or structures of any sort within any park, 
boulevard, or other public ground under their control in such cit\ . 



The Art Association of Chicago. 



i'Ki;sii)KN'r: 
Mr. Jo}i.n Barton r.wM;, 525 The Temple. 

!•■ I R ST \' I c !•;- 1' R i:s 1 1 ) I-; n t : 
Mrs. Herman J. H.\l,i,, 5545 Washington Avenue. 

S HCON I) V I C i;- I'R KS 1 1 >K .NT : 

Mr. Wai.i..\ck Hi'Xk.man, 4505 I'AW^ Aveniu'. 

Ri;coR I ) I \< ; SIX k vvva k \" : 

Miss Jessie S. (iARDNICR, i()36Jacks()n Boulevard. 

CORRI'.SI'ONDINC, Si;C R I'.TA R\- : 
Mrs. W. 1'. (tROWICK, 964 Jackson Boulevard. 

Tricasirer: 
Mrs. L. Br.\ci-; Shattick, 5.ioo WoiKllawn .Avenue. 



SM 



Municipal Art League of Chicago. 



OBJECTS. 



The objects of this Association shall be to promote in every practicable 
way the Ijeautifying of the Streets, Public Buildings and places of Chicago ; to 
bring to the attention of the officials and people of the City the best methods 
for instituting artistic municipal improvements, and to stimulate Civic pride 
in the care and improvement of private property. 

The first Board of Directors, elected at the meeting for preliminary organi- 
zation, shall consist of the following ])ersons, who are to serve the numl)er of 
years set opposite their names or until their successors have been elected and 
have qualified. 

City Official: (Vacant.) 
Architects : 

Louis II. vSui.mv.vn, for one year. 

Thter B. Wight, for two years. 

jAMics Gamble Rocers, for three years. 

Paif/tcrs : 

Ralph Ci,ark.son, for one year. 
Chari,e.S J. Browm:, for two years. 
J. H. \'ani)ERI'OEL, for three years. 

Sculptors : 

Max Mauch, for one }ear. 
Charles J. Sullivan, for two years. 
LORADO Taft, for three years. 

Laymen : 

Arthur T. Aldus, ft)r one year. 
David Ma\I';r, for one year. 
Harry C Selfridge, for two years. 
W.M. T. Donovan, for two years. 
I'RANKLIN MacVicagh, for three \ears. 
vSami'EL E. Barr};tt, for three years. 

Ji'est Parks: 

Jos. W. vSUDDARD, for one year. 

*> Lincoln Park : 

Hi:rman B. WiCKiCRSHAM, for one year. 

Sontli Parks: (X'acant.) 



!)."i 



Chicago Woman's Club. 

FINE ARTS BUILDING 



Mrs. Louise D. Shkrman President. 

Mrs. M.J. R. Tvi.kr Secretary, 



Illinois Chapter 
American Institute of Architects. 



President S, A. Tki:at. 

First Vice-President P. B. Wight. 

Second \'ice-Presidenl \V. C. Zimmkkman. 

Treasurer Ckokck Bkaimont. 

Secretar\- Harry H. Whiciu.ock. 



Chicago Architects' Business Association. 



President S. A. Tri:at. 

I'irst Vice-President Normand S. Patton. 

Second Vice-President GiCORCK Bkai'MONT. 

Secretary C. R. .Xdams. 

Treasurer O. H. i'oSTi.i;. 



Arts and Crafts Society. 

HULL HOUSE, CHICAGO. 
GeoRCI'. M. R. TwoSK . . Secretars- 



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Chicago Improved Housing Association. 



Executive Committee: 



IVIrs. Henry Wade Rogers. 
Miss Jane Addams. 
Mr. Livingston W. Fargo. 
Miss ISIary E. McDov^^ell. 
Mrs. Emmons Blaine. 
Mr. Chas. E. Hutchinson. 
i\Irs. Frederick P. Bagley. 
Prof. Chas F. Bradley. 
Mr. Dwight Heald Perkins. 
Mr. Charles Frederick Weller. 
Mr. John H. Bogiie. 



Mr. b:. p. Bicknell. 
Mr. W. R. Hunter. 
Mr. James Minnick. 
Miss Juliette Wall. 
Mr. H. Wirt Steele. 
Miss Minnie F. Low. 
Dr. F. W. Reilly. 
Miss Julia C. Lathrop. 
Mr. Allen B. Pond. 
Mr. J. G. S. Nesmith. 
Prof. Graham Taylor. 



Chicago Public School Art Society. 

The object of this society shall be education by means of works of art in 
tlie Public Schools. 



OFFICERS: 



I'RK.sii)I';nt: 
Mk.s. John B. ShI'IRWood, 530 W. Monroe Street. 

\KK-I'K1-;S1I)KNT: 
^Iks. Hicnkv W. M.ACi'.K, "22 Union Avenue, Auburn Park, 111. 

RECO R I )1 NC, .SKC R KT.\ R V : 

Mrs. Hhnrv E. vSor'ruwKi.L. 469 X. vState vStreet. 

CORRlvSroNDI.NC, SKCRIvTARY: 
Mrs. W. T. Ha 1,1., 3519 Calumet Avenue. 

tri;asuri;r: 
Mrs. John Bickincham, KS32 Calumet .\venue. 








, Tur.Mr.PPiri/l IDDARV.FOR-TMF! iNin/cpci-r\/.or.\A/r>0<^Trn . 



M -^ *. V. 



Ximmons & Fellows, Architei ts. 



98 



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FOR MP.^.B,!^l.JU7t;v 

si« ST»c()n>>c:i_i_ -^ve . ' 




SIPERIMPOSED RESIDENCES. 
Henry K. Holsmaii, Architect. 





PLAN. 



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Plan 



of two-rootii tenement erected full size in the galleries of the Art Institute by 
the Architectural Club, and furnished and decorated by the Arts and Crafts 
Society, as referred to in follow ing article. 



\0A 



A Statement Concerning the Arts and Crafts Exhibit. 



THE exhibit of the Chicago Arts and Crafts Society was initiated, 
affected and determined by the following conditions: 

ist. The holding of a Tenement House Exhibition in New 
York, consisting of (a) models of actual or proposed improved tene- 
ments, (b) photographs of good and bad housing and overcrowding 
conditions, ( c) sanitary and hygienic data. This exhibition proposed 
to show what had been done and what it was possible to do in tene- 
ment housing with proper conditions of light, air, water supply, floor 
area, drainage, etc. 

2d. The participation of Chicago in this enterprise and the moving 
of the major portion of the exhibition to Chicago under the auspices 
of the C. A. C. 

Under these conditions it seemed that just as the Tenement House 
Exhibition was presenting a model of what should constitute a mini- 
mum standard of fit human habitation with regard to light, air and 
sanitation in tenement buildings, and making this standard a matter 
of public knowledge, so the Arts and Crafts Society might properly 
join hands and complete the work by endeavoring to show the 
furnishings and decoration of these dwellings in all possible attractive- 
ness. 

All "possible attractiveness," however, entailed a consideration 
of what constitutes a possibility, a task which the very limited condi- 
tions of expenditure rendered by no means easy. It was decided, 
however, that a possibility in this connection should consist, (i. ) of 
any article of limited cost purchasable generally; (ii.) of any article 
which, though not purchasable generally, would, on account of its 
usefulness, price and attractiveness, be a welcome addition to the 
existing possibilities. 

This second class, therefore, may be considered as constituting a 
group of models which, though made purposely for this exhibition, 
could, in the opinion of the Arts and Crafts Society, be taken to the 
factory and reproduced at low cost with great democratic benefit. 

We here, however, begin to encounter the complexities of the 
situation. It can easily be seen that people who are engaged in a 



struggle for existence, will, when they get a little "ahead," wish to 
expend that little in some manner significant of the economic position. 
A margin of money obtained by hard work and denial will, when 
deposited in a bank, provide a comforting sense of security and ease 
which offsets to some degree the hardness of the struggle. It is, 
therefore, a natural demand that the same margin deposited in furni- 
ture shall still minister, with its evidence as wealth, to that feeling of 
uneasiness which rises from the insecure conditions of modern industry. 
Beauty, which is a vague term, will not appeal to such a purchaser in 
the form of a simple adaptation of form to function of good line or of 
color, but rather in that more direct form in which wealth can be made 
evident, in brilliancy and a certain appearance of costliness. Provided 
with this stimulus, the manufacturer responds on every plane, with 
furniture the main object of which is to look as though it cost every 
cent and more than what is i)aid for it. This disposes of the impression 
that the quality for which articles are mostly bought is beauty, in any 
esthetic interpretation of the word, and leaves us face to face with the 
fact that severity and plainness of outline are unconsciously regarded 
by many as representing the bare struggle for existence, while the 
ornament of to-day and the garish upholstery fabrics stand for that 
desirable economic plane on which one j)roudly chooses between 
luxuries. Bad as this condition is, it yet contains some hopefulness, 
in the- fact that the reason for which these articles are bought is, 
after all, for that which they turn back to the life of the purchaser, 
and this provides the possibility of pointing out that the vital \'alue of 
beauty in its simple aspects is much more than that of any manifesta- 
tion of wealth. We are therefore endeavoring to show possibilities of 
color and form, not as things per se, but as things having a direct 
and important \'alue to life, just as the tenement exhibition shows 
possii^ilities and necessity of space and light for the same reason. 

All procedure had, of course, to be based on existing conditions. 
There are certain things that have to be recognized, such as sinks, 
wash-tubs and stoves. Ruskin says, somewhere, that the best orna- 
ment for a cottage is a Hitch of bacon, and perhaps one should be 
glad that usually the largest and most expensive article in a tenement 
is the stoxe. There is perhaps no reason wh\- stoves should be so 
ugly, but the fact remains that in the present year of grace they are. 
They and the wash-tubs are fixtures inflexible in form and not sus- 
ceptible to color, and as such, seem to be articles which can only be 
affected indirectly. Examination will show that hitherto these articles 



lOii 



have been permitted too free a field, since most of the articles which 
have color and form — all crockery and china, for instance, and all 
metal objects — are sedulously concealed in a closet, and the stove, the 
wash-tub and the sink, from sheer lack of competition, dominate the 
apartment. Since the reversal of this policy was not exactly possible, 
it seemed wise, at any rate, to restrict its effect by creating a competi- 
tion of interests. With this object the plates and cups and saucers 
were taken out of the closet and restored to the ensemble, the metal 
objects were made as conspicuous as possible, things were chosen for 
their brightest and gayest colors, and the walls were calcimined white, 
partly for the freshness of it and partly to act as a flux for the amalgam 
of color. In the matter of furniture, the form of the cheaper articles 
are usually the best, being more direct and free from the meretricious 
ornament which simulates costliness. They are, however, spoiled by 
being dipped in some yellow liquid, the glare of which, when dry, 
swallows uj) the outline. In such a case it seemed wise to recognize 
the best in the article and to emphasize it. Hence, the painted chairs, 
one of which shows in the old age of its paint a mellow effect which 
no peeling varnish can achieve. This will suffice to show the spirit 
and the manner in which the exhibit has been prepared. The remark 
will undoubtedly be made, that such interiors are beyond the means 
of "poor people." But just as the Tenement House Exhibition 
shows the conditions of light, air and sanitation that every one ought 
to possess, so the Arts and Crafts Society \iims to show the same 
status of household articles. There are minimum standards in all 
things, and the case of those people who have not or can not attain 
the standard of light and air and space set by the Tenement I'^xhibi- 
tion, the standard of lixing set by the unions or of the surroundings, so 
lightly and uncertainly sketched here, is a matter of consideration for 
those societies which are endeavoring to affect economic conditions so 
as to make these minimum standards effective. 

It is of course not necessary to point out that nothing in the way 
of a copy of the exhii:)it is advocated. In preparing it, reliance has 
been placed on certain persistent elements in human nature as opposed 
to certain elements less developed. Hope has been built on the 
human love of color and brightness, and this has been opposed as 
strongly as possible to the habit of allowing mere expedience to 
dominate. It was felt that an emphatic statement of what was pos- 
sible in legitimate charm would do much to (nercome, ( i. ) the mere 
expedience ol closets, (ii.) the vacuum that closets create, which has 



10^ 



to be filled up somehow; and also, the habit of regarding certain 
household work as unpleasant, which has arisen because all satisfactory 
evidence of the work and all pleasure in it is made impossible by 
hiding it away. 

To repeat, we are therefore endeavoring to show a possibility, not 
for the thing in itself, but for its value to lives and to living, and it is 
hoped that this statement has not rendered the object more obscure. 

George M. R. Twose, Secretary. 



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SKKTCH FROM PHOTOGRArH 
By Birch Burdette Long. 



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iSAJT^ at M N K S JHA>T C H 



SKKTCIl l-KOM I'lloTOOKAI'll 
B\' liirch Hmdette Long-. 



TttE ARCHITECTURAL LEAGUE OE AAAERICA. 



IT is with peculiar gratification that the Chicago Architectural Club 
takes this opportunity to recognize its affiliation with the other 
architectural societies of the United States and Canada in the 
Architectural League of America. The effort which this club jnit 
forth in undertaking to call a meeting of delegates from the various 
architectural clubs to l)e held in Cleveland last Jime has been more 
than repaid by the added interest which has been manifested in club 
affairs. As a further result of that meeting, an increased inspiration 
has been felt for greater efforts in the study of civic problems as w it- 
nessed by the discussion of the Lake I^'ront problem, the grouping of 
public buildings around a municij)al court, the extension of the park 
system to include the Calumet region, the Desjilaines Ri\-er valle\', 
and the .Skokie Marsh, and the establishment of small parks and pla)-- 
grounds in the congested districts. 

The Code (io\erning Competitions, recommended by the Archi- 
tt'ctural League of America, and also adopted by the Architectural 
League of Xew N'ork, the National Sculptors' .Society, the Society of 
Mural Painters, the T-.Scjuare Clul) of Philadelphia, the Pittsburgh 
Architectural Club, and sexeral others, has been adopted b\- the 
Chicago Architectural Club and is recommended to all those who, 
believing that the best results ma\' be obtained by competitions, wish 
to conduct them on a basis of mutual understanding that shall be 
honest and fair to all parties. To any societN' or indix'idual needing 
assistance in formulating a competition program, this club treely 
tenders its assistance and good offices. 

We believe that there is much to be gained through conference 
with fellow-workers. We anticipate for the Architectural League of 
.\merica an increased influence for the development of an api)reciation 
of honest and intelligently conceixed architecture. 

To the next conxention of the League, which will be held in 
Chicago, June 7, 8, and 9, 1900, the Chicago Architectural Club most 
cordiallv iiuites its confreres of the League, as well as all other socie- 
ties liaxing affiHated interests. 

To tlie various members of the Architectural League ot America 
w lio ha\e assisted in the collection and forwarding of works in other 
lities for our exhibition we extend our thanks, with the assurance 
that their efforts on our behalf are appreciated, and will be gladly 
reciprocated. 

Tin-; LxHiiniioN Committki:. 







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THE Architectural Club occupies cjuarters in the north basement 
of the Art Institute. Its actixities for the season of 1899 and 
1900 ha\e been similar to those of pre\ious years. They are 
edinrational and social, as indicated by the following' : 



CALENDAR 1899-1900. 



.Sc-ptcml)er iS, 

SeptenihtT 25, 

Octol)er 2, 

October 9, 

October 16, 

Oclol)er 23, 

October 30, 

November 6, 

N()veml)er 13, 



N()\enil)er 20, 

Noveml)er 27, 

I)ecemher ^, 

I)ecemt)er 11, 

December iS, 

December 27, 

January S, 

Januar\- 15, 

Jaiuiar\ 22, 

January 29, 

I'"el)ruar\ 5, 

I'"ebruar\- 8, 



I''ebruar\' 12, k/k 



S99. 
S99. 
S99. 
899. 
899. 

899. 

899, 
899. 

899. 



899. 
899. 
899. 

899. 

899. 
899. 
900. 

91 X I . 

9u< J . 

91 K). 
900. 

900. 



( )peiiiiig Night. Smokir. 

I'ohemian by outgoing Ofiicers, 

Animal I-llection of ( )rii(ers. 

Chicago Day. 

Smoker. "The lUisiness .Management of an .Arc liited's 

Office," by Henry K. I b)lsman. 
.Address by Mr. Jolin Neal TiUon, on the " I'.arbrrini 

Palace.'' 
1 lallowe'en I<'ntertainment, 
•Sketch Niglit. .Suggestions for bnprcnemeiit of Chih- 

room. 
Smoker. Papers b\- .Mr. .Artluir I-Vant/en, on " l-'Jeclrie 

Lighting Construction," and Mr. I'. Cortez Wilson, on 

".Acetylene (ias Lighting." 
l"..\hil)ilion of IMiotographs, by Mr. ildward J. Jones, Jr. 
Thanksgiving P3ntertainment. 
Sketcii Night. "'Hie Method of Indicating .Statnar\ on 

Architectural Drawings," by Mr. Max .Mauch. 
Smoker. "Ways and Means of Publishing Our Next 

Catalogue." 
Lecture. " l'"arm Mouses" hy Mr. Robt. C. Spencer, Jr. 
Christmas I-.ntertaimnent. 
Sketch Night. "The Designing of Statuary," hy .Mr. 

.Max .\Liuch. 
Smoker. .Address b\ .Mr. Joseph Tuyman, on the " Ps\ - 

cliologv of Textile Materials." 
An Illustrated Lecture b\- Mr. I'rank .M. C.arden, on 

" IC\i)eriences in the Klondike." 
P)ohemian. l"\'uist Night. 

Sketch Night. .Suggestions for a .Memorial to the Nine- 
teenth Century. 
\iew of (iermania Club P)allroom Decorations, made by 

.Mr. I leim'ich .Meixner. 
Smoker. " I'"urniture," by .Mr. Joseph Twyman. 



I:i0 



I\l)riiiir\ 19, ii/)ii. llliislrHled Lecture on " I'lie Mills lltjtcl for Chicago," 

by Mr. John 11. Uogue. 

l-ebruary 26, 1900. iCnlertaimnent. 

March 5, 1900. Sketch Night. 

March 12, 1900. .Smoker. 

March 19, 1900. Press \'iew Chicago Architectural Kxhibition, 10:00 a. .m. 

to 4:00 p. M. 

Marcli 20, 1900. Opening Recei)tion of same, 7:00 i>. M. to 11:00 i*. m. 

March 26, 1900. Review of Mxhibit and Overflow Mxiiibition in Clul)rooni. 

April 2, 1900. Entertainment. 

April 9, 1900. .Sketch Night. 

April 16, 1900. .Smoker. 

April 23, 1900. Lecture. 

A|)ril 30, 1900. Closing i'jitertainment. 

June 7, S and 9, 1900. Convention of Architectural League of America. 

COA\[>[:riTIONS. 

( "om|)etition for the imi)ro\t-nienl of a small Chicago Park. 

Walter I 1. Klt-inix-ll secured #50 from I'ratt & Lambert to be gi\cn as i)riz(.-s 
lor this com|)etition. 

ist I'ri/e, #25, .Arthur Rouleau. 

2(1 I'rize, #15, John Lilleskau. 

3(1 I'rize, >io, Carl Axel .Sandblom. 

The Illinois Chai)t(r, American Institute of Architects, have offered Cold, 
SiKer and IJronze .Medals for the best (k-signs for a Cit\- Hall and an ICducational 
l)uilding to be located in Crant Lark. 

Awards had not b«.'en made when the year book went to i)ress. 

Compt-lition tor the imi)ro\ cment of the Clubroom. 

ist I'rize, ;fio 

2d Prize, |5 
l)ia\\ings ha\c uol l)(.'en recei\cd in this competition as year book goes to 
press. 

'llie co\cr ol the Club Annual was designed by Robert C. Spencer, Jr. 



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Chicago Architectural Club. 



orriCERS. 

JoSEi'H C. Li,i;\v];i.i,VN, President. 

R()iii;KT C. .Si'KNCKK, Jr., Innst Vice-President. 

Henry K. Hoi<sman, vSecond Vice-President. 
HiRCH BiRDKTTK Long, Secretary. 

August C. Wilmanns, Treasurer. 

EXECUTIVE CO/n/niTTEE. 



Jos);i'H C. I<i.e\vi<;li.vn, Henry W. Tomi.in.son. 

RoiiERT C Si'i;n'Ckr, Jr. Clarence Hatzi'KM). 

Hi-NRY K. Hoi.sman. Charles A. Carr. 

HiRCH IUri)i;tti-; Long. Walter H. Kleinpem, 

August C. W'ii.manns. Max Mauch. 

Cari.eton Monroe Winseow. 



EXHIBITION CO/n/niTTEE. 



Walter H. Kleinpell, Chairman. 
Clari;nce HaT/.i-ELI), Secretary. 
August C. WIL^L^NNS, Treasurer. 
Henry W. Tomlinson. Charles A. Carr. 

Ma.\ INIauch. Carleton Monroe Winslow 

I)a\ II) KnickI';rbacki;r Boyd, Philadelphia. 
Julius !•. Hardi'.r, New York. 

DwiGiiT HealI) Perkins, Ivditor of Clul) Annual. 
-JURY or AD/^\ISS10N. 



Josi;i'ii C. Pli;\vl;llyn. Richard \i. Schmidt. 

DwiGHT Hi'.Ai.D ]'I';rkins. Arthur Heun. 

William K. I'Ei.lows. 
William I';. Stone, New York. AlhI':rt Kiu.sI'.N', l'liila(leli)hia. 



123 



MANGING CO/nAMTTEE. 

RouKRT C. Spenckr, Jr. Kdgar S. Bei.dicn. 

Hugh M. G. Gardkn. Arthur Gkorc.k Brown. 

N. Max Dunning. Max Maiich. 

Charges Frederick: Weei<er, 

Representing the Improved Housing Association. 



CO/^/niTTEE ON TENEA\ENT EXHIBIT 



Fred Pischei,. 
John Sheui.essv. 
Alfred G. Zimmerman. 



Kmil C. Lorsch. 
J. Nheson Watson. 
IIarrv C. .Starr. 



PRESS CO/^/niTTEE. 



Henry W. Tomi.inson. Lorado Tait. 

Robert C. Spencer, Jr. James W. Tattison. 

Edgar Cameron. 










ONWtvniA O-vii • 3TABu:i 



Howard Shaw, Architect. 



1:^4 



LIST or MEMBERS 



Chicago ARcniTCCTURAL Club. 



RESIDENT ACTIVE /nEA\BERS. 



AUinj^, V^an Wageiieii 
Atchison, John D. 

Baker, Frank S. . 
Hartolomae, Francis M 
liclden, H(lji;^ar S. 
Bernhard, Adolpli 
Berry, A. C. 
Birge, Chas. F. 
Benedict, Jules B. 
Bourke, Robert I".. 
B\o\vn, Arthur G. 
Burnham, I). H. . 

Cahii, lulgar B. 
Carr, Chas. A. 
Church, Myron I \. 

Dauchy, G. \'. 
Davis, Frank F. . 
Dean, George K. 
Dean, Arthur R. . 
Dillon, John R. . 
Dunning, N. Max 

Fdbrooke, H. W. J. 

Fellows, William K. 
Fischer, John B. . 



3167 Groveland Avenue. 
1233 Marquette Building. 

316 Warren Avenue. 
720 Adams Street. 
16; La Salle Street. 

1 3 14 Ashland Block. 

iSuS Fisher Building. 

Abroad. 

640 East Sixtieth Street. 

1808 Fisher Building. 

225 Dearborn Street. 

1 142 The Rookery. 

3223 Michigan Avenue. 

317 Rush Street. 

1233 Marquette Building. 

84 Illinois .Street. 

305 Michigan Avenue. ' ■ •- /' - 

121 La Salle Street. 

1780 Old Colony Building. 

Wilmette, 111. 

1 2 18 Association Building. 

3965 Dre.xel Boulevard. 

1733, 204 Dearborn Street. 

The Alvord, Brick Church Station, East 
Orange, N. J. 



12.T 



Floto, Julius 
Fyfe, James L. 

Gage, Thomas G. 
Garden, Hugh M. G. 
Garden, Frank M. 
Granger, Alfred H. 
Griffin, Walter B. 
Gruenfekl, Caspar 

Hatzfeld, Clarence 
Hazelton, H. F. . 
Hemmings, Edw. C. 
Heun, Arthur 
Hill, Francis J. 
Hoeppner, E. A. .. 
Holsman, Henry K. 
Hunt, Myron 
Hyland, Paul V. . 

Insley, ¥-. E. 

Jobson, Frank 
Johnson, Morris O. 

Kelley, John H. . 
Kleinpell, Walter H. 

Lammers, Herman C. 
Lang, Louis A. 
Levy, Samuel H. . 
Lilleskau, John 
Lindstrom, Robert S. 
Little, Edmund Cook 
Llewellyn, Joseph C. 
Long, Birch Burdette 

Marienthal, Oscar 15. 
Mauch, Max . 
Miller, Joseph A. 
Millet, Louis J. 
Morse, liurton E. 
Mueller, Paul F. P. 



'2294 Gladys Avenue. 
420 Home Avenue, Oak Park, 111. 

1780 Old Colony Building. 
1013, 172 Washington Street. 
1013, 172 Washington Street. 
806 The Temple. 
1 107 .Steinway Hall. 
1902 Milwaukee Avenue. 

S04 Teutonic Building. 

1808 Fisher Building. 

261 Bissell Street. 

1300 Ellsworth Building. 

218 Wabash .\ venue. 

461 The Rookery. 

1 1 17 Association Building. 

123 La Salle Street. 

59 N. Francisco Street. 

Architectural Dept. 1. C. R. R. Cen. Sta. 

1233 Mar(juette Building. 

Architectural Department, I. C. R. R., 
Central Station. 

2832 Vernon Avenue. 
372 Webster Avenue. 

21 Plymouth Place. 
261 1 N. l''orty-first Court. 
1733 .Marciuette Building. 
303 Haddon .Avenue. 
3234 Princeton Avenue. 
557 Washington P)Oulevard. 
1 2 18 Association Building. 
IU13, 172 Washington Street. 

3134 Forest Avenue. 

81 Illinois Street. 

1504 Newport Avenue. 

225 Wabash Avenue. 

1 173 Central Park Avenue. 

Schiller Building. 



i-j« 



Nelson, Edw. O. . 
Neubauer, Adolph 
Newberry, Robt. Thorne 
Nimmons, Cieorge C. . 

Page, Harvey L. . 
Perkins, Dwight Heald 
Phillips, John 
Pischel, Fred 

Rawson, Lorin A. 
Rouleau, Arthur . 

Sandbloni, Carl A. 
Schmidt, Richard E. 
Seaman, Kmil H. 
Seney, Ivdgar F. . 
Spencer, R. C, Jr. 
Sheblessy, John 
Stander, Adolph . 
Starr, Harry C. 
Sturm, Meyer J. . 

Tonilinson, Henry W. 
Twose, (ieo. M. R. 

\'iehe-Naiss, Ivar 
\'on Hoist, Herman 

Weber, P. J. 
Watson, J. Nelson 
Watson, R. Bruce 
Wendland, Win. R. 
White, Melville P. 
Wilinanns, August C. 
Wirts, Stef)hen M. 
Winslow, Carleton Monroe 
Wittekind, Henry J. 
Woltersdorf, Arthur 

Zimmerman, Alfred (i. 
Zimmennann, Hugo H. 



98 Oak Street. 
169 Wabash Avenue. 
171 La Salle Street. 
1733 Marquette Building. 

918, 153 La Salle Street. 
1 107 Steinway Hall. 
1013 Teutonic Building, 
1510 Oakdale Avenue. 

Hinsdale, 111. 

510 W. Polk Street. 

1430 Noble Avenue. 

1013, 172 Washington Street. 

790 Pine Grove Avenue. 

4464 Lake Avenue. 

1 107 .Steinway Hall. 

2933 Farrell Avenue. 

1013, 172 Washington Street. 

27 Forty-third Street. 

868 Pine Cirove Avenue, 

1 107 Steinway FLall. ( 
335 South Halsted .Street. 

632 Wells Street. 

255 East Sixty-first Street. 

1 142 The Rookery. 

295 .S. Lawndale Avenue. 

1808 Fisher Building. 

357 Twenty-fourth Street. 

Cor. Twenty-sixth and Halsted Streets. 

7 East Monroe Street. 

148 Wabash Avenue. 

1780 Old Colony Building. 

520 New York Life Building. 

70 La .Salle Street. 

115 Monroe Street. 
1279 I'erry Street. 



J 



127 



Adelsperger, Rolland 
Brandt, Oscar E. . 
Chafee, D. G. 
Garden, Edward G. 
Mitchell, John A. 
Pattison, James Wm. 
Schmidt, Hugo 

Scofield, Hubert C. 
Smith, Wm. J. 
Starck, E. F. 

Taylor, Edward L. 

Thomas, H. S., Jr. 
Wells, Wm. A. . 



NON-RESIDENT /nEA\BERS. 

156 Fifth Avenue, New York City. 



Chemical Building, St. Louis. 

Champaign, 111. 

Tree Studio Building. 

Care of Mexican Construction Co. 
Apartado 2 B., City of Mexico. 
Battle Creek, .Mich. 
Box 113, Galveston, Texas 
108 W. Main Street, Madison, Wis. 

Care of Roeder & Twicker, Apartado 

2125, City of Mexico. 
52 King Block, Denver, Colo. 

?9 Office Block, Topeka, Kan. 



.Alschuler, A. S. . 

Behr, E. Theo. 
BroesA'an Dort, G. 

Bushnell, Edward S. 

Cameron, lulgar . 
Clark, Edward C. 
Coffman, George W. 
Combs, Rogers M. 
Coolidge, Chas. A. 
Cornell, Paul, Jr. . 

Dungan, Thos. A. 

F>wen, John M. 

Ferguson, Louis A. 

Gates, Wm. D. . 
Giannini, O. 

Heinz, Geo. P. 



ASSOCIATE A\EA\[iERS. 

2112 Michigan .Avt-nui.- 



343 L.ast l*"ift\-sixtli Street. 

Students' Hall, Sixty-eighth and Normal 

.Avenue. 
971 Washington Boulevard. 

15 Tree Studio Building. 
610 Manhattan Building. 
717 Kialio Building. 
405 Chamber of Commerce. 
17811 Old Colony linildmg. 
II 19 .Monadncjck lUiilding. 

Roanoke Building. 

1 1 12 The Rookery. 

139 Adams Street. 

1045 .Marciuette lUiilding. 
211 E. Madiscju Street. 

419 Chamber of C(jmtnerce. 



12H 



Killen, I*'.. ( irel)lc 
Kniscly, 1 1. C. 

Matz, Herman L. 

Perkins, l''rcdcrick \\^ 
I'ierce, I^. I'. 
IM-osser, II. r.. 
I'liriiiglon, 1). \'. . 

Reese, Theodore \\ 

Schmidt, R. O. 
Sniitli, (nil. Will. Soi)\ 
Smitli, 1 .uther L. . 
S] )iiuller, Oscar 

Torgenson, I lenry 
'rwvniaii, Joseph . 

I Ihiian, I larry 

Weary, I'.dwin I). 
Wliitc-, J. A. . 
Wilcox, A. I.. 
Wyles, Thos. R. . 



Chicago Alliletic Association. 
68 W. Monroe Street. 

302 Chamber of Commerce. 

1 15 Monroe Street. 
1303, 1 00 Washington Street. 
1045 Marquette Ikiilding. 
323 Chamber of Commerce. 

24 Adams Street. 

19 1 Superior Street. 
733 Stock lOxchauge. 
225 Jackstni Park 'Perrace. 
209 S. Clinton Street. 

153 I ,a Salle .Stret't. 
loo Wabash Avenue. 

3610 Calumet Avenue. 

1449 Mar(|Uette Huildini;-. 
Schiller Puilding. 
.Sixty-se\enth and I'nion Avenue. 
1564 Monadnock lUiilding, 



hONOl^AlA' A\t:A\BCl^S. 



Allen, John K. 
Blake, Theo. P. . 
Clark, Ro])ert 
( iay, I lenry Pord 
1 luiit, l"'rcdcrick S. 
Jenney, W. 1 ,. 15. . 
Pawrit', I lenr\- 
Muller, Pouis, Jr. 
McLean, Robert C. 
Phiniister, D. (;. . 
Sullivan, Pouis' I 1, 
Taft, 1 ,orado 
Wagner, I'rit/ 



40 Dearborn Street. 

2.S P.. Forty-lirst Street, New York. 

2505 Kenmore Avenue. 

92 Dearborn Street. 

46 \. Francisco Avenue. 

520 New ^'ork Pife Building. 

Omaha, Neb. 

610 Manhattan Building. 

610 Manhattan Building. 

5,i9>'lournoy Street. 

Auditorium Tower. 

Fine Arts lUiilding. 

I nS The Rooker\-. 



I-:'.) 




HOrSP; OF MR. AI.Bf':KT L. JOHNSON, I.-ORT H.\MII.T(iX, X. \- 
Little it O'Cotiiioi, Architects. 



i:W 



INDEX 

To AixhitectLircil Exhibit. 



ADAMS & WARREN — 20 West Thirty-fourth Street, New York City. 

1 House. T. G. Condon. 

2 House. T. (}. Condon. 

ALDEN & HARLOW — PIttsburir. Pa. 

3 Country House for 11 I*". Jones. 

AMKRICAN TERRA COTTA AND CERAMIC CO.- 602 Chamber of Commerce Buildinif, 
Chicago. 

4 lv\hil)it of Art Pottery. 

ANDERSON, WALTER B.- Belmar. N.J. 

5 Study in Ornament, Roman Capital. 

ANDREWS, JAQUES & RANTOUL— 1 Somerset Street, Boston, Mass. 

6 Worcester County Courthouse, Massachusetts. 

ARNOLD, HUGO 104 Lumber Exchan^^e Building:, Minneapolis, Minn. 

7 I )esii^n for a Tomb. 

ASHBEE, C. R., M. A.- No. 37 Cheyne Walk, S. W., London. 

S I )esign for various Gold and Sih'er work for table or personal 

serx'ice. 
9 VVoniburne Wodehouse, Wolverhampton, Staffordshire, 

luigland. Plxterior. 
10 Womburne Wodehouse, W^olverhampton, Staffordshire, 

ICngland. Interior \'ic\vs. 
I I Magpie and Stump House, Chelsea, London. 

12 Fireplace in Cast Iron, Copper Repousse h ittings. 

13 Restoration and Additions to Turner's House, Chelsea, 

London. 

14 Design for I'urniture and Woodwork. 
15' Tower Screen, Seal Church, Kent. 

i(i Design for Jeweh'v, Metal-work and Llectric Light P'ittings. 

17 No. 74, Cheyne Walk, Chelsea, London, S. W. 

iS Designs for \arious Metal-work and Jewelry. 

19 Nos. 37 and 73, Cheyne Walk, Chelsea, London, S. W. 

20 Danxers Tower, Chelsea, London, S. W. 

21 Block of Houses on Chevnc Walk, Chelsea, London. 



VM 



ATTERBURY, GROSVENOR — Astor Court, New York. 

22 Ten Houses for H. O. Havemeyer, Islip, L. I. 

23 Perspecti\'e — Boat Houses and (latevvays. 

24 House B. 

25 Houses C and D. 

BALFOUR, R. S., A. R. I. B. A. 76 Inverness Terrace, London, \V. 

26 Small Country House, Tittleworth, Sussex, luigland. 

BARNET, HAYNES & BARNET-St. Louis, Mo. 

27 South FayadeofSt. Anne's Widows' House and I'"oundliny 

Asylum, St. Louis, Mo. 

28 Front Elevation of Col. Chas. S. Hill's Residence, St. Louis, 

Mo. 

29 Interior. Main Hall of Col. Chas. S. Hill's Residence, 

St. Louis, Mo. 

30 Interior. Dining-room of Col. Chas. S. Hill's Residence, 

St. Louis, Mo. 

31 Interior. Parlor of Col. Chas. .S. Hill's Residence, St. Louis, 

Mo. 

32 Interior. Library of Col. Chas. S. Hill's Residence, St. Louis, 

Mo. 

33 Interior. Music-room of Col. Chas. S. Hill's Residence, 

St. Louis, Mo. 

BARNUM, F. S. & CO. - New England Buildinjf, Cleveland, Ohio. 

34 Design for Commercial Building. 

35 Design. Caxton Building. 

36 Sketch TT- St. Andrew's Church, Cleveland. 

BARNUM, FRANK SEYMOUR — 190 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, Ohio. 

37 Lincoln High School, Cle\eland. 

BEAULEY, WM. J. — 1651 Monadnock Block, Chicago. 

38 "A Bit of Old (iermany." 

39 House, Le Mans, France. 

40 Church of San Diego, Mexico. 

41 Old House, Rouen, h'rance. 

BEHR, E. THEO -604 Cable Building, Chicago. 

42 A Decorative Panel, Figural. 

43 Wall Panel in Rococo, Water-color. 

44 Sketch for Parlor Wall. 



1 H-.' 



BEIL & MAUCH — 8i Illinois Street, Chicago. 

45 Decorative Figure for U. S. Electricity Department, Paris 

Exposition. Executed by Max Mauch. 

46 Decorative Panel for liank in Pittsburg. Executed by 

Max Mauch. 

BELCHER, JOHN -20 Hanover Square, London, W. 

47 The (uiildhall, Cambridge. \^ievv of Main Staircase. 

48 The (iuildhall, Cambridge. View in Council Chamber. 

49 House at Pangbourne. View of Tower. 

50 House at Pangbourne. Garden Front. 

BEMAN, S. S. Pullman Building, Chicago. 

51 Shattuck 'I'enement Competition. Plans and diagrams. 

52 .Shattuck Tenement Competition. rde\ations. 

BERNARD, JOANNY & ROBERT- 58 Rue de Rome, Paris. 

53 Second Prize Drawing for New ^'ork Life Insurance Com- 

pany's Building. Plans. 

54 Second Prize Drawing for New York Life Insurance Com- 

pany's Huilding. Ide\ations. 

BISSEGER, JOHN J. 1510 Real Estate Trust Building, Philadelphia, Pa. 

55 Sketches of h'urniture for W. \V. Wilbur. 

BLACKALL, CLARENCE H. - 1 Somerset Street, Boston, Mass. 

56 Interior of Panking-room, V. S. Trust Co., Boston, Mass. 

BOARI, ADAMO 1107 Steinway Hall, Chicago. 

57 Design Submitted in Mexican National Capitol Competition. 
• Perspective. 

58 Design Submitted in Mexican National Capitol Competition. 

Ele\ation. 

BOIT, EDWARD DARLEY-28 Rue Qalilee, Paris. 

59 /I'lorence, from the Hill of San Miniato. 

60 Part of the Convent of Valambrosa. 



BORIN(j & TILTON 32 Broadway. New York City. 

61 House for Charles A. Moore. 

62 U. .S. Immigrant Station. Hospital Building. 
U. S. Immigrant Station. General View. 



i:« 



BOURNE. FRANK A.— 849 Tremont Building, Boston. 

63 Public Library, Bangor, Me. 

BOYD, DAVID KNICKERBACKER - loio Harrison Building, Philadelphia, Pa. 

64 A Composition. 

BRACKEN, JULIA M.-19 Studio Building, Chicago. 

65 Elgyptian Seat. 

BRAGDON & HILLMAN — 104-505 Cutler Building, Rochester, N. Y. 

66 Summer Cottage for Mr. Nathan Stein, Ontario Beach, N. ^'. 

67 End of BilHard-room for Warham Whitney, Rochester, X. ^^ 

BREWSTER, GEORGE T.— 121 East Seventeenth Street, New York City. 

68 Seal of the University Club 

BROWN, ARTHUR GEORGE -225 Dearborn Street, Chicago. 

69 Office Studies, Small Dwelling. Plans. 

70 Office Studies, Small Dwelling. Elevation. 

BROWN, FRANK CHOUTEAU- 10 West Cedar Street, Boston, Mass. 

71 Music, Cover Design. i 

72 Music, Title Design. 

73 Songs — Nevin Lithograph. 

74 Two Organ Compositions — Original Drawing. 

75 Midnight Clear. Lansing. ^ 

76 Northern Song. 

77 Songs. Browiski. 

78 Book Plates. Helen Noel. 

^9 Two Book Plates. Harry B. Center, K. Samuel Davis. 

80 Two Book Plates. Charles Albert, for Law Books and 

Private Collection. 
Si Book Plate. James C. Plant. 

82 Book Plate. Harriet StevVart Brown. 

83 Book Plate. Sewell Cuder. 

BUCKLAND, HERBERT I.— Queens College, Birmingham, England. 

84 A Roadside Inn at Bromford, Erdington. 

85 Design for Port Elizabeth Library. 

BUDD, KATHERINE C. iH West Thirty-fourth Street, New York City. 

86 Sketch. 

87 Sketch. 

88 Cottage. 



\:u 



BURGESS, IDA J. -849 Marshall Field Building. Chicago. 

S9 A Peace Treaty. Karly Settlers and Indians. 

BURNHAM & CO., D. H. The Rookery, Chicago. 

90 Competitive Design for New ^'ork Customhouse. First 

I^loor. Plan. 

91 Competitive Design for New York Customhcjuse. Fourth 

Moor. Plan. 

92 Competitive Design for New \'ork Customhouse. State 

Street l-Hevation. 

93 Competitive Design for New \'ork Customhouse. Flevation 

on Bowling Green. 

94 "Mills" Hotel for Chicago. Perspective. 

95 "Mills" Hotel for Chicago. IMan. 

CADY, BERG & SEE 31 East Seventeenth Street, New York City. 

96 .Study lor a City Hospital. 

CARLSON, H. J. -70 Kilby Street, Boston, Mass. 

97 House at Marblehead, Mass. 

9S Cow Barn and Hen House for Herbert Dumaresque, Chest- 
nut Hill, Mass. 

CASE. J. W. 10 La Fayette Avenue, Detroit, Mich. 

99 Choir .Screen, Church of Ste. Madelaine, Troyes, France. 
100 Towers of Chartres. 
loi Palace, Casa D'Oro, X'enice. 

CLINTON & RUSSELL 3* Nassau Street, New York City. 

102 Houses for William Waldorf Astor. 

COMES, JOHN T. — 65 Firat National Bank Building, Pittsburg, Pa. 

103 A (iarden i'avilion. First Mention. 

COMSTOCK, F. R. 124 West Ftrty-fifth Street, New York City. 

104 .Second Church of Christ (Scientist), Central Park, West 
' and .Sixt\-eighth .Streets, New York City. 

COOPER, C. J. HAROLD 8 Bloomsbury Square, London. 

105 Interior of -Study, 15 .Stratton .Street, Piccadilly, London, \\\ 

106 I^xterior, 16 .Stratton Street, Piccadilly, London, W. 

107 I'"..\terior, 15 .Stratton .Street, Piccadilly, London, W. 

loS Interior of Study, 15 Stratton Street, Piccadilly, London, W. 



COPE & STEWARDSON.— 320 Walnut Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 

108a Accepted Design of the AVashington lTniversit\' at St. Louis, 

Mo. IMockPlan. 
108/' Brookings Building. Plans and Elexation. 
loSr Liggett Hall. Plans and Elewation, 

ioS(/ Plans and l^lexations of the Busch and Cuj^ples Buildings. 
loSf Second Floor Plan of the Busch and Cupples Buildings. , 

COVELL, WM. S.- 152 Broadway, New York City. 

109 I'.ntrance to Roman Monastery. 

CRANE, LIONEL FRANCIS -13 Holland Street, Kensington, London, Enjf. 

1 10 Design fc^r a Small Countr\- House. 

CRANE, WALTER- 13 Holland Street, Kensington, London, Eng. 

111 Port du Mareschal, Bruges. 

112 W'inchelsea Church irom the Xorthcast. 

CREGIER, HENRY E.- Chicago Bead/ Hotel. 

113 The Westminster Hotel, IJoston. 

114 Hotel Majestic, Philadelphia. 

115 The .Singerh', IMiiladelplua. 

CUNNINGHAM, BETRAM- 

116 Stud\' for Suburban Residence. 

DABNEY & HAYWARD 120 Fremont Street, Boston, Mass. 

117 Building for KennecK' Instate and Pro])(>sed Bank Building. 

D'ASCENZO, NICOLA- 1020 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 

iiS Decoration for a l^allrcjom. 

119 The Presentation in the Temple. Cartoon for part of the 

Rogers Memorial Window, box Chase, Pa. 

DAVIS, SAMLEL R.— 1115 Stephen Qirard Building, Philadelphia, Pa. 

120 Dining-room in I louse lor Capt. Jose])h W. Crawford. 

121 Proposed Alumni Hall, Cornell L'ni\'ersity, Ithaca, X. Y. 

DAVISON, THOMAS -28 Great Ormond Street, London, W. C. 

122 Cottage Hospital, Aldershot, F^ngland. 

123 Portion of Design for Municipal Buildings. 



Kiti 



DAVISON, T. RAFFLES 33 King Street, Covent Garden, W. C. 



24 

25 
26 

27 
2S 
29 
30 
31 
32 

33 

34 

35 

3^> 

0/ 

3'^ 

39 
40 

41 
42 

43 
44 

45 



A Bit of old Salop Architecture. 

Lost (after Sanquinette's Picture). 

A Lodge. By J. H. Sedding. 

St. Agnes, Kennington. 

Old P\)nt, Canterbury. 

A Birmingham Law Court. By Aston Webb. 

(irand Piano. Designed by T.\;. Jackson. R. A. 

P)0\v Church, Cheapside. 

Fox Oak. 13y Halscy Ricardo. 

Church of Holy Rood, Watford. 

The (iatehouse, Ligatestone. 

The iMiibankment, London. 

.Stalls of Hornby Church. 

X'ictoria Law Courts, Birmingham. 

Church of the Hol\- Rood, Watford. 

Looking Down, College Hill, London. 

Fox Oak. ' . 

Chapel Interior, Welbeck. 

Cardiff Munici])al Building. 

C4uu-ch of the Holy Rood, Watford. 

Juljilee Day, i S97. 

" Se\ern luul," Worcestershire. 



DAY, FRANK HILES, & BRO.-925 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 



146 1 L)use at Ambler, Pa. 

147 House at Ambler, Pa. 
14.S House on Locust Street. 

149 House on Locust .Street. 

150 House on Locust .Street. 

151 House on Locust .Street 

Alco\'e. 

152 House on Locust .Street. 

153 House on Locust Street. 

and Librarx". 

154 Outer X'estibuie. Horticultural Hall. 



Rece])tion-room. 
ALiin Stair Hall. 
Plans. 

h^acade, ^L^in .Stairway and 



Breakfist-room, 



Dining-room 



^^\' ^'Jff'^.^ MILES, WILSON EYRE, Jr., AND COPE & STEWARDSON, Associated 
Architect.s'. 

- 155 iM-ee Aluseum of Science and Art, University of Pennsyl- 
\ania. 

156 Free .Ahiseum of Science and Art, University of Pennsyl- 

\ania. 

157 Free ALiseum of Science and Art, l^niversity of Pennsyl- 

\ania. 



is; 



DECKER, WEST & COOPER- 109 East Nineteenth Street. 

161 Competition for V. M. C. A. Buildino, Scranion, Pa. l^rst 

Floor I'lan. 

162 Competition for V. M. C. A. Huilding, Scranton, Pa. iMont 

Elevation. 

163 Competition for Y. M. C. A. Hiiilding, Scranton, Pa. I'er- 

spective. 

DENBY. EDWIN H.-41 West Fiftieth Street, New York City. 

164 Concert Hall and Cafo, Brooklyn. N. \'. First Floor Plan. 

165 Concert Hall and Cafo, Brooklyn, .\. \'. l.ont^itudinal 

Section. 

166 Concert Hall and Cafe, Brooklyn, X. \. I-' rout l^cvation. 

167 Concert Hall and Cafo, Brooklyn, N. \'. (/ross Section. 

168 A Tower of Tonlonse. 

169 Interior of San Miniato, Florence. 

DENNETT, MARY WARE and CLARA WARE-i Somerset Stieet, Boston, Mass. 

170 Gilded Leather Wall Hanj^ing. ( )ri,oinal Cordo\ an Process. 

172 Morocco Screen, I)\-ed, Tooled ancj Polished. 

DENTZ, THOMAS J. 124 West One Hundred and Fifteenth Street. New Vorl< City. 

173 Sketch for Dinino-rooni. 

DODD, W. J. & ARTHUR COBB- Equitable Building, Louisville, Ky. 

174 Residence of .Mr. ( ieo. I". Berry, I'rankfort, Kv. W. T. 

Dodd, Del. 

175 Fourth Avenue M. F. Church, Louisville, Ky. W. I 

Dodd, Del. 

DUHRINQ, OKIE & ZIEaLER-1420 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 

176 Competitive I)esii,ni for V. M. C. A. Buildinp at S(M-anton, 

Pa. 

DUMENIL, L.-18 Rue de L'Arrivee, Paris. 

178 Door of the Hotel de X'ille at Toulon. 

EDEN, F. C— 3 Staple Inn, London, England. 

179 A Villa^-e Church. 

EDEN, F. C, & J. L. WILLIAMS -3 Staple Inn. London, England. 

180 Competitive Design for St. Luke's, W'innin^toii. 

ENDERS, OSCAR — 900 Columbia Building, St. Louis, Mo. 

181 Porte du Pont, Seine et .Marne. 

182 Castle Hornitz, near Zittan. 

183 Old House, Stratford-on-.\\ on. 

184 Residence. 



i:!s 



Fr-:RNALD, CHAPMAN A. Boston Architectural Club, Boston, Mass. 

185 S. Maria Delia Salute, Venice. 

FIELD, O. W. E.— 115 Monroe Street. 

1 86 The Cathedral from the Canons' Row, Rochester. 

187 Book Covers to be executed on Cloth. 

188 Sketch for Public School, Atlantic Highlands, N. J. 

FlQCilS, PHILLIPS T. 28 Martin's Lane, Cannon Street, London. Engrland. 

189 Shops and Offices, High Street, Guildford, Surrey, luigland. 

FROST & QRANGER- 184 La Salle Street, Chicago. 

190 Station at Highland Park, 111., for C. & N.-W. R'y. 

191 Station at Clybourn, III, for C. cS: N.-W. R'y. 

192 Perspective of Proposed Episcopal Church at Lake Forrest. 

193 Residence for W. I). Schultz, Esq., Janesville, Ohio. 

194 Competitixe Design for Chicago National Hank. 

(iARDEN, HUQH M. G.-172 Washington Street, Chicago. 

195 Sketch of Residence for Chas. H. Hodges. - 

196 Residence for hVank R. McMullen, Highland Park, 111. 

197 Stable for h'rank R. McMullen, Highland Park, 111. 

QARNIER, TONY -5 Rue de Furstemberg, Paris. 

198 Chimney in a Hunting Lodge. 

199 Panel between Windows in a Monumental Gallery. 

GAY, HENRY LORD - 94 Dearborn Street, Chicago. 

200 Model Staircase in Residence in Lake (ieneva. Model by 

Joseph Dux. 

GEORGE, ERNESr, & YEATES— 18 Maddox Street, London, West, England. 

201 Two Modern Bridges. 

202 ICdgeworth Manor, Gloucestershire. Additions. 

203 Bridge, Lodge and (iates at North Mymms, Hertfordshire, 

I'Jigland. 

GIBSON, ROBERT W. 54 Broad Street, New York City. 

204 Sa\ings Bank of Utica. 

205 Competitive Design for the New ^'ork Customhouse. 

Mrst I'loor Plan. 

206 Competitive Design for the New ^'ork Customhouse. 

, Second I'loor Plan. 

207 Competitive Design for the New "S'ork Customliouse. 

Sixth Moor Plan. 

208 Competitive Design for the New ^'ork Customhouse. 

Bridge .Street I-^lexation. 

209 Competitive Design for the New ^■ork Customhouse. 

State Street I^lexation. 

210 Hearst School for Girls, W'ashinuton, D. C. 



IS! I 



GILBERT, BRADFORD L.-50 Broadway. New York City. 

211 Passenger Station at Toms Rix-er, \. J. 

GILBERT. CASS -III Fifth Avenue, New York City. 

2 12 Competition for the Washington rnix'crsity, St. Louis. 

Plan. 
212/; Agricultural Building, Trans-Mississippi ICxposition, 

Omaha, Xeb. 

GITHENS, ALFRED MORTON -1512 Pine Street, Piiiladelphia, Pa. 

213 House near Oroitwitch, Worcester, luigland. 

214 House near Droitwitch, Worcester, hjigland. 

215 Drawing-room, South Wraxhall Manor House, near Hath, 

haigland. 

216 Hack of a House in ( "dastonhury, Somerset, iaigland. 

217 The Sir Christopher Wrenn House, in Chichester, laigland. 

218 The Corners in Oak Room, Posele\- Phice, Surrc\-, laigland. 

219 iM-om the Hattlementofthe Keep, Stokesav Castle, haigland. 

220 In the Hall, Loseley Place, Surre_\-, l-aigland. 

GREEN & WICI^S-iio Franklin Street, Buffalo, N. Y. 

221 Study tor Tower, Machinery and d'ransportation Ihiilding, 

Pan-American Pxposition, io<>r, Hutfalo, X. ^'. 

222 h'ront hdevation. Manufacturers and Traders Hank, Huftalo, 

N. Y. 

223 Study lor Tower, Machinery and Transportation lUiilding, 

Pan-American l^xjiosition, k^of, Huftalo, X ^". 

224 Design for Hospital at Warren, I'a. 

225 h'irst Idoor Plan of Hospital at Waircii, Pa. 

226 Design for Hospital at Warren, Pa. 

GREENLEAF, JAMES L.— Landscape Architect, 1 Broadway, New York City. 

227 The Oardens, Instate of J. P,. Duke, i:sq., Somcr\ille, X. f. 

( Catalogue Illustration.') 

228 The Home (".rounds, instate of [. H. Duke, i:s(i., Somer\ille, 

X. J. 

229 Stud\- tor Cedar Terrace, Penni)rooke Hall, l-'.state of 

Clarence P)lair Mitchell, P.sq., h'ar Hills, X. [. 

230 A Summer Home on a \illage Lot. (The two last from 

Xew \'ork League.) 

QLEICHMAN, MORRIS M.-8(> Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, Ohio. 

231 laigine House Xo. iS. 

GRUEBY FAIENCE COMPANY 3=A Park Street, Boston, Mass. 

231a l-Jiameled Terra Cotta Medallion. 
231/? luiameled Terra Cotta Medallion. 



1(1 



HABERSTROH & SON, L. 9 Park Street, Boston, Mass. 

232 Proposed Mural Decoration for Dining-room. 

HALL, ALBERTA — 4303 Oakenwald Avenue, Chicago. 

233 Design for I-'abric No. i. 

234 Design for Fabric No. 2. 
23s Design for Fabric No. 3. 
236 J )esign for Fabric No. 4. 



o ^ ^ 
-v1/ 



P)Ook Plates. 



23S Design for Pook Cover, Vau\ Papers and Pages for Book. 
Titled "Among the Roses." 

239 Designs for Pook Covers, 

240 Drawings for l^ook Plates. 

HARF:. HENRY T.— 13 Hart Street, Bloomsbury, London, England. 

241 Westminster College, Cambridge. > 

HARVEY, (jEORQE L. 115 Monrne Street, Chicago. 

242 Residence on North Shore. 

243 Wesley Uos])ita!, Chicago. 

244 Summer Cabin, Pes Cheneaux. Photo. 

245 Residence on Prairie Avenue. 

246 I^:vanston Hospital from the Northeast. Photo. 

247 ICvanston Hospital frcjm the Southeast. 

248 Small I losj)ital. 

HAYS, WM. CHARLES— Second Holder, John Stewardson Memorial Traveling Scholar- 
ship, 320 VVulnut Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 

249 Sketch at Chenonceau. 

250 Sketch near Axay le Rideau. 

251 Sketch in Montlhery. 

252 House at IJakewell,' Derbyshire. 

253 Old Monastery at Tarascon. 

254 House ol Tristan at Tours. Measured Drawing. 

255 Anticpie Capital from Miletus. 

25f) St. Loren/o h'uori le Mura, Rome. Capital from Porch. 

HEACOCK & HOKANSON 931 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 

257 ^'. .M. C. A. P.uilding, Scranton, Pa. hdevation on Mul- 

berry Street. 

HEUN, ARTHUR — 1300, 155 Dearborn Street, Chicago. 

258 \'illa Crest. Summer Residence in Manchester, Mass. 

259 Interior. \"illa Crest. 



1-11 



HOLSMAN, HENRY K.-153 La Salle Street, Chicago. 

260 The Amarilla Apartments, Fifty-fifth Street and IntUana 

Avenue. 

261 Superhnposed Residences, Perspective. 

HOPPIN & KOEN—160 Fifth Avenue, New York City. 

262 Residence at Tuxedo Park, New Jersey. 

HUBER & CO., JULIUS H.— 172 Washington Street, Chicago. 

263 Sketch for Residence. By Julius H. Huber. 

. 264 Residence in Edgevvater for Mrs. Jennie R. Zorge. i^y 
Juhus H. Hnber. 

Designs Submitted in the Phebe Hearst Architectural Compe- 
tition for the University of California. 

^ Photographic l".iilar,t;t'meiits l.oaiieil hy the Kej;eiits of the riiivei>.it>- 1 
E. BENARD — 29 Boulevard Pereire, Paris, France (First Prize). 

265 Plan of Huildinos and ( Ironnds. 

266 Pers[)ecti\'e. 

H0WELL5, 5TOKES & HORNBOSTEL -63 William St., New York City Second Prize). 

267 Plan of Buildings and ( hounds. 
26S Perspective. 

DESPRADELLES & CODMAN — 6 Beacon Street, Boston, Mass. Third Prize 1. 

269 Plan of Buildings and Cirounds. 

270 Perspectix'e. 

HOWARD & CALDWELL— 10-12 East Twenty-third St., New York City (Fourth Prize). 

271 Plan of Buildings and ( irounds. 

272 Perspective. 

LORD, HEWLETT & HULL- 16 East Twenty-third Street, New York City I ifth Prize 1. 

273 Plan of Buildings and ( Grounds. 

274 Perspective. 

BARBAUD ET BAUBAIN 2 Boulevard Henry IV., Paris. 

275 Plan of Buildings and ( h-ounds. 

276 Persj)ecti\e. 

V 

PROF. F. BLUNTSCHLI — 4 Stockgasse, Zurich. 

277 Plan of Buildings and ( irounds. 

278 Perspecti\e. 

RUDOLF DICK — 99 Josefstader Strasse, Vienna, Austria. 

279 Plan of Ikiildings and ( irounds. 

280 Perspecti\ e. 



1 (-. 



J. H. FREEDLANDER-New York City. 

281 IMan of Buildings and (irounds. 
2S2 Perspective. 

Q. HERAUD ET W. C. EICHMULLER-3 Rue des Tournelles Arcueil and 18 Rue de 
• L'Odeon, Paris. 

2.S3 Plan of Piuildings and (Grounds. 
284 Perspectixe. 

WHITNEY, WARREN -160 Fifth Avenue, New Yorlt City. 

2S5 Plan of Buildings and (irounds. 
2 86 Persjicctive. 



HUNT, MYRON H. 123 I.a Salle Street, Cliicago. 

2S7 llo^c for llarlow X. Higinbothani, l^\anston. 

288 Apartment House for Mrs. Xony Williams, Hwmston. 

281; Plans and l'~le\ations. 

2«.^o Byzantine Mosaics. 

291 (ireek Temple at Paestuni. 

291CC i'hotograph of Residence of Catherine .M. White. 
291/' Terra Cotta Models of Ornament. 

INQRAHAM, GEORGE HUNT -528 Tremont Building. Boston, Mass. 

292 Preliminary .Sketches for a Country House in the .Suburbs 

of Boston. 

293 Photos, of House of (ieorL^c H. Ingraliam, Milton, Mass. 

ISRAELS & HARDER 194 Broadway. New York City. 

294 Nassau County Courthouse Comjjetition. Perspectix'c \'iew. 
2i)S Nassau County Courthouse. I*'ront hJevation. 

296 V. .S. Customhouse, New York Citw Bowling Creen 

Elevation. 

297 I'. .S. Customhouse, \ew \'ork Citw .State .Street Ele\a- 

lion. 

298 C .S. Customhouse, New N'ork Cit\'. ( ".round Plan. 

299 r. -S. C'ustomhouse, New \'ork Citw Bridge Street Ele- 

\ation. 

300 r. .S. (^istomhouse. New \\)rk Cit)\ .South Ele\'ation. 

TTNER, WM. B.- Board of Education, St. Louis, Mo. 

301 .Monroe .School, St. Eouis, Mo. h'.lex'ation. 

JACKSON, W. E.-92Q Chestnut Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 



O 



02 



Design for a Flat Ikiilding, Brooklyn, ^'. V. 



14.? 



JENNEY & MUNDIE — 520 New York Life Building, Chicago. | 

303 Residence in Chicago. 

304 Office Buildino- for Mr. Henry Herman, Milwaukee. 

305 Accepted Design for the Chicago National Hank. Perspec- 

tive. 

306 Accepted Desit;n for the Chicago National Hank. Moor 

Plan. 

307 Accepted Design for the Chicago National Hank. Longi- 

tudinal Section. 

JONES, BEATRIX — 21 East Eleventh Street, New York City. 

308 P^ornial Garden for Mrs. C. H. Ncwhold, " C.ate I^u-ni," 

Jenkintown, Pa. 

KELLEY, JAMES T.-57 Mt. Vernon Street, Boston, Mass. 

309 Residence for Prancis A. Poster, P^scj., Weston, Mass. 

310 Residence for J. Arthur Heebe, Hoston, Mass. 

311 House, Hoston, Mass. 
Countrx' 1 louse near Hoston. 

KING, JAMES J.- 81 F>ine Street, New York City. 

312 Heauchamp Chapel, Warwick, iaigland. 

313 Peterborough Cathedral, Ijigland. 

KRAYLE CO., THE -849 Marshall Field Building, Chicago. 

314 Objects in Leather for IPnise Purnishing. Hy Mrs. P.. 11. 

Center and Miss C. M. Reade. 

315 Photograj)hs of Objects. P,.\ecutcd b\- the Kra}'le Co. 

316 Photogra])hs of Objects in Leather. ICxecuted b\- Mrs. 

Edward 1 1. Center. 

KROPF, M. M. 5211 Penn Avenue, New York City. 

307^? .Sketch olTower, Cinu'ch of .\scension, Pittsburg, P.i. 

LANGTON, DANIEL W. 

30SC? A ( iarden in the Shinnecock Hills, Pong Island. 

LAW, HENRY H. 503 Fifth Avenue, New York City. 

309^? Altar and Reredos, St. John's Church. Trox', N. N'. 

LE BOUTILLIER, ADDISON B.-12 West Street, Boston, Mass. 

3ICX? Decorati\e Designs lor Printing. 
3IIC7 Sketch for a Oolf Club. 

LIESCH, PIERRE A.- 65 First National Bank Building, Boston, Mass. 

3i2<:? The Swan Kitchen at Wrc.xham, Paiglaiid. 

LINDSTROM, ROBERT SETH-3234 Princeton Avenue, Chicago. 

313c? Cottage, Postleigh, 1 )e\'onshire, Paigland. 



lU 



LITTLE & O'CONNOR -20 West Thirty=fourth Street, New York City. 

314a House for Albert L. Johnson. 

3i4<5 House for Albert L. Johnson. Entrance. 

3i5<5 Plan of Buildings and (irounds. 

LLEWELLYN, JOSEPH C. - 153 La Salle Street, Chicago. 

316/; Highland Park High School, Highland Park, 111. 

317 Bird's-Eye View Agricultural Buildings, University of Illi- 
nois, Urbana, 111. 

31S Bird's-l'^ye View Agricultural Buildings, University of Illi- 
nois, Urbana, 111. Perspective of Main Building. 

319 Agricultural Buildings, University of Illinois, Urbana, 111. 

Main Building. 

320 Design for Park Gateway. 

321 Design for Residence at River Eorest, 111. 

LONG, BIRCH BURDETTE - 3739 Langley Avenue, Chicago. 

322 Design for the Improvement of Oak Park. Perspective. 

323 Design for the Improvement of Oak Park. Plan and 

Details. 

324 \'iew in the Garden of the Villa Castello. 

325 The Guisti Gardens. 

326 \'illa Caprarola, Garden Wall. 

327 (lates at Monkshatch. 

328 A Rendering. 

LORD, HEWLETT & HULL- 16 East Twenty-third Street, New York City. 

32S Competitive Design for W'ilkesbarre Courthouse. Elevation. 

329 Competitixe Design for W'ilkesbarre Courthouse. Plan. 

MACAULAY, ELLEN K.- Graver's Lane, Chestnut Hill, Philadelphia, Pa. 

330 "There came Wise Men from the P^ast." 

MAGINNNIS, WALSH & SULLIVAN - Tremont Building, Boston, Mass. 

331 St. John's Chapel, Brighton .Seminary, Brighton, Mass. 

MAHER, GEO. W.- 218 La Salle Street, Chicago. 

332 Residence of Mr. \\\ V. I'urbeck, Lake Geneva, Wis. 

333 Residence of Mr. A. B. Leach, South Orange, N. J. 

334 Residence of Mr. Wm. CotTeen, Hinsdale, 111. 

335 Residence of Mr. M. A. Cheney, Kenilworth, 111. 

MAISTRASSE & BERQER - 13 Rue le Peletier, Paris. 

336 Competitive Drawing for the New \'ork Life Co's Building, 

Paris. Third Prize. 

MAURY, L. M.— 223 West Fifty-seventh Street, New York City. 

337 St. Sepulchre's, North Hampton. 



n.T 



MANN, FREDERICK M.-328 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 

338 Competitive Drawing for a College Library. Perspective 

with Plan. 

339 Library of the LTni\ersity of West X'irginia. 

MANNY, E. A. -Security Building, St. Louis, Mo. 

340 School at Normandy, Mo. 

341 Sketch for Burlingtcni Passenger Station. 

342 Houses in West End. 

MASON, GEO. D.-80 Qriswold Street, Detroit, Hich. 

343 Preliminary Sketches for a Residence for V. II. Walker, 

Detroit. 

344 Sketches and Photos, of Stables at Belle Isle Park, Detroit. 

345 Proposed Residence at Detroit, Mich. 

346 Residence of Forbes Robertson, Detroit, Mich, 

MAUCH, MAX -81 Illinois Street, Chicag:o. 

347 Portrait Bust No. i and Pedestal. 

348 Portrait Bust Xo. 2 and Pedestal. 

MAURY & DODD- Louisville, Ky. 

349 Design for University Building. W. ]. Dodd, Del. 

McARDLE, M. P.- 512 Security Building, St. Louis, Mo. 

350 Residence in St. Louis. 

McKIM, MEAD & WHITE -160 Fifth Avenue, New York City. 

351 Shaw Monument, Boston, Mass. 

352 University Hall, Columbia Dniversit}-. 

METCALF, LOUIS R,- 16 East Twenty-third Street, New Yorl< City. 

353 Entrance and X'estibule on a Circular Corner. 

354 I^Ilevation. 

355 Plan and Section. 

MILLIGAN, R. M.- 1201 Chemical Building, St. Louis, Mo. 

356 St. Ann's Orphan Asylum, .St. Louis, Mo. 

MITCHELL, ARNOLD -30 Great Marlborough, Street, London, England. 

357 House, The Cables, Harrow on the Hill. 

358 Design for the Colfe Crammar .School, Leu isham, i-Jiglaiui. 

359 Parish Room, Clapton, London, England. 

360 New l^oard Office, Ormskirk, England. 

361 House, .St. Margaret's, Harrow, Ijigland. 

362 House, Woodside, .Stanmore, fjigiand. 

363 House at Rickmansworth, England. 

364 Municipal Mansion for an hjiglish l"ov\n. 



1 u\ 



MOLITOR, JOHN 320 Walnut Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 

365 Sketch for a (lothic Tower. 

MONAQHAN, KATHERINE S.-40 Mercer Street, Princeton, N. J. 

366 Palace in Turin. 

MONTALAND, CHARLES - 35 Rue Jacob, Paris. 

367 Porte Cochere, Rue St. Louis, en L'Isle, Paris. 

MORRIS, GEORGE SPENCER - Q04 Girard Building, Philadelphia, Pa. 

368 Some l^its ol Switzerland. ^ 

NEUBAUER, ADOLPH ~ 169 Wabash Avenue, Chicago. 

369 Interior Decoration in Old German Renaissance. Adolj:)h 

Neubauer. 

NEIIBADER DECORATING CO. -196 Wabash Avenue, Chicago. 

370 Interior Decoration in Old (jerman Renaissance. By A. 

Xeubauer. 

371 Interior Decoration of Room, Style Fin de Siecle. A. 

Xeubauer. 

NEWTON, ERNEST — 4 Raymond Building, Gray's Inn, London, England. 

372 I louse at Halsmere, Surrey. 

373 House at \Vokiny;ham, Berkshire, 

NEWTON, GEORGE F.-()3o Tremont Building, Boston, Hass. 

374 1 )esiL;n <br Church, Dorchester, Mass. 

NICHOLS, GEO. A. 521 Grand Central Station, New York City. 

^7S I )esig;n for herrv-house, h'orty-second Street, New York. 
Plan. 

376 Design for I*"erry-house, b'orty-second Street, New York. 

Section. 

377 Design for I-'crry-house, Forty-second Street, Xew York. 

River Front. 

375 Design for h'erry-house, horty-second .Street, New \'ork. 

Street I^'ront, 

NIMMONS & FELLOWS- 1733 Marquette Building, Chicago. 

379 The II. C. Frick Lil)rary, W'ooster rnixersity. 
3<S() House for I. L. I'^llwood, Port Arthur, Tex. 
3S1 McCormick Harvesting Machine Co., Paint and Wood 
Shop. 



147 



O'BRIEN & SON, M,^2o8 Wabash Avenue. Chicago. 

382 Tall Dark-green \'ase. 

383 Pot with Purple Lotus Flowers. 

384 The "Morris Bowl." 

385 Pot with Purple Buds. 

386 Two Tiles from the Jungle Book Series, 

OLMSTED BROS.-Brookline, Mass. 

387 General IMan for the Muddy River Parkway. 

388 Plan for the G. W. Norton Instate, Louisville, Ky. 

389 General Plan for Keney Park, Hartford, Conn. 

ORTH, GEORQE S. & BROS. -341 Sixth Avenue, Pittsburg, Pa. 

390 A Colonial Place, Pittsbin-g, Pa. 

OTTENHEIMER, HENRY L. - Fort Dearborn Building, Chicago. 

391 Cit)' Hall and Auditorium. 

392 Jno. O' Neil \ aughe\- — Apartment Building. 

393 Residence of L. Newgass, Chicago. 

394 Residence for C. Samuels, Chicago. 

395 The P)ouglas House, Houghton, Mich. 

396 Cireenwood Apartment Building, Chicago. 

397 Residence for Charles Yondorf, Chicago. 

PAGE, HARVEY L.-913. i53 La Salle Street, Chicago. 

398 hde\ation — Row of City Dwellings. 

399 Detail — Dining-room in Mrs. P. A. Hearst's Residence, 

Washington, D. C. 

PATTON, FISHER & MILLER- 115 Monroe Street, Chicago. 

400 Proposed Public Lil)rar\-, Dixon, 111. 

401 Methodist Episcopal Church, W'heaton, 111. 

402 Third Congregational Church, Oak Park, 111. 

PEABODY & BEAULEY-Monadnock Block, Chicago. 

402/; Perspectix e Sketch. 
402<'- Perspective Sketch. 

PENNELL, HENRY B.-qs Mt. Vernon Street, Boston, Mass. 

403 The Porches of Amiens Cathedral, Amiens, !• raiicc 

404 Interior of Church of St. h'rancis, Assisi, Ilal}'. 

405 Interior of St. Peter's, Rome, Italy. 

406 Interior of Capella Palatina, I'alermo, Sicil)'. 



148 



PERKINS, DWIQHT HEALD— 1107 Steinway Hall, Chicago. 

University of Chicago Settlement : 
r Street and (iarden fronts. 

407 •^' Main Floor Plan. 

( Second Floor Plan. 

r Photograph of (jymnasium. Fxterior. 

408 •< Photograph of (jymnasium. Interior. 
(^Photograph of (gymnasium. Stage. 

409 Langdon Apartment Buildings. 
Northwestern University Settlement : 

r Exterior. 

410 - First Story Plan. 

( .Second .Story Plan. 
J. J. Wait, Residence: 
( Fxterior X'iews. 
4^1 ( Plans. 

412 Stable for U. B. Pratt, h:ikhart, Ind. 

PERKINS, FRANK EDSON - Assistant Professor of Design, University of Pennsylvania. 

413 Design — Suite of Reception Rooms. 

PERKINS, FREDERICK W.- 115 Monroe Street, Chicago. 

414 .Stables and Water Tower for Mr. John Dupee, Oconomo- 

woc. Wis. 
4i5^r Studies for a Residence to be Built at Racine, Wis. 
415/; Photographs of Chicago Residences. 
415^ Residence of H. M. Wallis, Racine. 
415^ Residence of J. U. .Shedd, Chicago. 

PERKINS, LUCY FITCH — 3Q29 Indiana Avenue, Chicago. 

416 Preliminary Study of Decoration over .Stage in Gymnasium 

of University of Chicago Settlement. 

PEROT, ROBESON L.— 619 Philadelphia Bourse. 

417 .Sketch — Parish Building, Christ P. I^^. Church, Christian 

Hundred, Delaware. 

41 5 Residence and .Stable, Bryn Mawr, Pa. A. H. Theobald, 

Esq., Owner. 
4i(j Mantels — In Hall, Dining and Diving Rocjms. Residence 
A. H. Theobald, Bryn Mawr, Pa. 

420 .Suburban Houses near Philadelphia. 

421 Residence, Chestnut Hill, Philadelphia. 

422' Cemetery ( Gatekeeper's 1 louse, Northwood Cemetery, Phila- 
delphia. 

PEYRAUI), F. E., and H. (i. MARATTA 160 Dearborn Avenue, Chicago. 

423 .Sketches for " Truth Teaching the World." Peoria. 

424 Public Library, Peoria. Mural Decorations. 

425 Public Library, Peoria. Mural Decorations. 

426 Public Library, Peoria. Mural Decorations. 



149 



PITE, BERESFORD-48 Hartley Street, London, West. 

427 Town Hall and Municipal Offices, Cardiff. 

428 Town Hall, Colchester. 

429 English Mission Hospital for Jews, Jerusalem. iM-ame 

Damaged. 

430 Sloane Medallion Design. "A West End Club." 

POND & POND— 1109 Steinway Mall, Chicago. 

431 Hull House. Cieneral Plan. Persj)ective. h'our Interior 

Photographs. 

432 David Swing Settlement. C.eneral Plan. Three Persj)ec- 

tives. 

433 Chicago Commons. Six Plans. Perspective. 

434 Residence for James W. Thompson. Perspective. 

435 Jane Club. Two Photograi)hs. 

POPE, JOHN RUSSELL -5 Rue de la Chaise, Paris. 

436 A Well for the Court\ard of the Hosj^ital Ste. [ean 

d' Angers. Course in the History of Architeclure, 
Ecole des Beaux-Arts, Paris. 

POTTER, W. WOODBURN-1913 Spruce Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 

437 Design for Country Clubhouse. 

PRAT, MAY ROSINA — 6 West Twenty=second Street, New Yorl< City. 

438 Hand-bound i^ooks. 

PRID/MORE, J. E. O. — Champlain Building, Chicago. 

439 Residence of H. E. \'eatch, Chicago. 

Projet: A City Hall on the Lake Front, Chicago. 

X. Max Dimming, l-Lvuler. I'raiuis M. Hartoloiiuu-. 

Clftrence Hatzft-ld. Cliarles A. C'arr. 

Puirton !•". Morse. Carlton .Monroe- Winslow. 
Walter H. Kleinpcll. 

440 I'rincipal Eacadc. 

441 Eirst Story Plan. 

442 h"oin-th Story Plan. 

RANKIN »& KELLOGd— 1024 Walnut Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 

443 Eront P^knation — E. S. Customhouse and Postoffice, 

Camden, \. |. 

444 I-^^xterior Details — E. S. Cnstomliouse and Postol'tu'e Cam- 

den, X. J. 

RAYMOND, VV. OAKLYEY- 17 Broadway, New York City. 

445 Musio CajMtolino, Rome. 



1.50 



READE, CHRISTIA M.— 849 Marshall Field Building, Chicago. 

446 Book Plate. (Proof Copy.) 

447 Design for Lock and Hinges for Library Case Doors. 

(Photo.) 

REEVS, GEO. M.-152 West Fifty-fifth Street, New York City. 

44S Design for Stained (ilass Window. 

449 Decoration for a Fireplace. 

RODMAN, C. S.— 16 East Twenty-third Street, New York City. 

450 Diploma Problem at Kcole des Beaux- Arts. Plan. 
45C)rt Diploma Problem at Kcole des Beaux-Arts. Elevation. 

RO(iERS, JAMES GAMBLE — 1314 Ashland Block, Chicago. 

451 Drawing of an Analytique. 2d Class, Kcole des Beaux-Arts, 

Paris. 

452 Copy of the Frieze of Darius. Course of Archeolog}-, 2d 

Class, I^cole des Beaux-Arts. 

453 A Country Bank. Elevation. Projet of the 2d Class, 

Kcole des Beaux-Arts, Paris. 

454 A Coimtry Bank. Plan and .Section. Projet of the 2d 

Class, Kcole des Beaux-Arts. 
435 A Largf Bathing {establishment in a Park.^ Plan, Section 

and lelcxation. Projet of the ist Class, Ecole des Beaux- 
Arts. 
456 A Tomb. Course in Archeology, ist Class, at the Ecole 

des Beaux-Arts. 
437 .A 'Suite of Reception-rooms. Vlan and Section. Projet ol 

the Kirst Kcole des l^eaux-Arts. 
43^^ A Bav Window for a Paris Building. Projet in the Kirst 

Class, lecole des Beau.\-.\rts. 
439 A Pantheon. Plan, P^lex'ation and .Section. Projet of the 

First Class, Kcole des Beaux- Arts, Paris. 
4f)(> Perspecti\es and Plans of the Chicago Institute. 

ROMHYN, CHARLES W. 4,S Exchange Place, New York City. 

4^)1 Stable for William i^ax'lis, b^scj. 

ROSBORd, CHRISTIAN F. 35 Wall Street, New York City. 

4'>2 Librar\- for Small Country Ttnvn. 

ROLLEAL', ARTHUR (i. 

Coni])etili()n for the Im])r()\cment of a Chicago Park, 
b ii'st Prize 1 K sign. 
4^1:; l'rrs])ecli\e. 
4(^ Plan. 

ROWLAND, GEORGE M. 

4f)5 A Countrx' Church for i'orto Rico. 



l.")! 



RUTTAN & RUSSELL- 65 First National Bank Building, Pittsburg, Pa. 

466 Well for C. K. Speer, Ksq. , Friendship Hill, Pa. 

467 Entrance to St. Augustine Roman Catholic Church, 

Pittsburg, Pa. 

SAUER, ANDREW J.— 929 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 

468 Design for City House. 

469 Summer Sketches. T-Square Competition. 

SCMERMERHORN & REINHOLD-430 Walnut Street, Philadelphia. Pa. 

470 Gate Lodge at Pembroke, Bryn Mawr, for Mrs. Charles 

W^heeler. 

SCHMIDT, RICHARD E.- i72iWashington Street, Chicago. 

471 Residence for C. H. Thorne. 

472 Five Bronze Floor Plates for Montgomery Ward l\: Co. 

SCHNEIDER, ARTHUR -1650 Willson Avenue, Cleveland, Ohio. 

473 Customhouse at Tangier. 

474 Scene in Tangier at l3usk. 

475 Scene in Al-K'sar, Morocco. 

SCHNEIDER, CHARLES SUMNER- 1002 Garfield Building, Cleveland. 

476 Den in Residence. Henry White, Cleveland. 

SEARS, TABER~96 Fifth Avenue. 

477 F!levation of Music-room. 

SHAW, HOWARD- 115 Monroe Street, Chicago. 

478 Gateway, Akron, Ohio. 

479 Oberlin Chemical Laboratorv. 

480 Residence, Dayton, Ohio. 

481 La (irange Country Club. 

482 Stables, Onwentsia Club. 

483 Residence, Hinsdale, 111. 

484 Residence on Lake Shore Drive, Chicago. 

485 Staircase, Hall, Chicago. 

486 Proposed Store Building. 

487 D. K. E. Clubhouse, University of Chicago. 

488 Comj^etitive Design, Chicago National Hank. 

SHEBLESSY, JOHN F.-2933 Farrell Avenue, Chicago. 

489 P^levation for \'. M. C. A. Building, Scranton, Pa. 

490 First Floor Plan of Same. 

491 Sketch — I^levation for Chicago City Hall. 

SHEPLEY, RUTAN & COOLIDGE— 1780 Old Colony Building, Chicago. 

492 Plan — Leland Stanford, Jr., rniversitx', Palo Alto, Cal. 

493 Perspective — Leland Stanford, Jr., Lnixersitv, Palo 

Alto, Cal. 

494 Perspecti\e — Residence, Xorman P). Ream, JCscj., Thomp- 

son, Conn. 



I.vi 



SHEPLEY, RUTAN & COOLIDGE — Chemical Building, St. Louis, Mo. 

495 Accepted Design for St. Louis Trust Co. Perspective. 

496 Accepted Design for St. Louis Trust Co. Floor Plan. 

SHURTLEPF, ARTHUR A.- 9 West Cedar Street, Boston, Mass. 

497 An Old Flower (iarden, Nevvburyport, Mass. 

SPENCER, R. C, Jr.— 17 Van Buren Street, Chicago. 

Illustrations for Book " Ciood Farmhouses " : 

498 Sheet I. a Field Stone Farmhouse. 

b Walworth I'^irm. 
c Foothill Farmhouse. 
d Prairie Farmhouse. 
e Shingled Farmhouse. 

498 Sheet 2. / " Elmsmere." 

if Northern Farmhouse. 

499 Maine Farmhouse. 

500 Italian Farmhouse. 

501 Farmhouse near Florence, Italy. 

STEPHEN & GREENE — Temple Court. 

502 Design^for Church at Winstead, Conn. 

503 House on Great Harrington Road, Mass. 

STEPHENS, JNO. C— 904 Columbia Building, St. Louis, Mo. 

504 Chenonceaux. Chateau. Pavillion. 

505 Saumur. Motel de Ville. Facade. 

506 Saint Antonin. Hotel de Ville. Ensemble. 

STRIEBINQER, FREDERICK WM.-1215 New England Building, Cleveland, Ohio. 

507 Towers of Normandy, France. 

508 Torre de la Iglesia, San Dome, Toledo, Spain. 

STURM, MEYER, J. -512, 175 Dearborn Street, Chicago. 

509 Book Plates. 

SUPPLEE, WM. P.- 1417 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 



10 "A I'"cllo\\'s Room, 






TAYLOR, P. STEWARD, A. R. I. B. A.— 5 John Street, Bedford Row, London, England. 

511 A Hotel in the Isle of Wight. 

THOMAS, ARTHUR- 1193 Broadway, New York City. 

512 Sketch — Meeting of La Salle and Hennepin, St. Joseph 

Ri\er. 1679. Courthouse, South Bend, Ind. 

513 Sketch — La Salle Treaty with Miami Indians, 16S1. 

Courthouse, South Bend, Ind. 

THOMAS, P. INIGO-4 Clifford Street, London, England. 

514 Barrow Court, Somerset, luigland. 



i.is 



TILfeEN, GE6. T 85 Devonshire Street, Boston, IVlass. 

515 Pagoda, Observatory near Blue Hill, Mass. 

516 Jesup Hall, Williams College. 

517 Drinking Fountain. 

TITUS, LLOYD — 925 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 

518 School of Architecture and Museum for Casts. 

519 First Mention — John Stevvardson Memorial. Scholarship 

Competition, 1899. (iround Floor Plan. 

521 Facade. 

TOTTEN & ROGERS — 931 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 

522 Flevation — House for J. C. Hooe, Fsq., Washington, I). C. 

523 Perspective — Riggs Bank, Competitive Drawing. 

TOWNSEND, C. HARRISON, F. R. I. B. A.— 29 Great George Street, Westminster, 
London, England. 

524 Entrance to Cliff Towers, Devonshire, luigland. 

525 Mantel in Billiard-roum, Lindehaus, Dusseldorf, Germany. 

526 Design for a Picture Callery jn Whitechapel, London. 

Panel in Mosaic. 

VAN AUKEN, GEO. H.— 32 East Fourteenth Street, New York City. 

528 Proposed Apartment House, Syracuse, N. \. 

VAN OSDEL, J. M.— 225 Dearborn Street, Chicago. 

529 Sketch for Small Church. Fle\ation. Arthur George 

Brown, Del. 
5'^o Sketch for Small Church. Plan. Arthur George Brown, 
Del. 

531 Block Plan — Central Baptist Orphanage. Arthur George 

Brown. Del. 

532 Administration Building, Central Baptist Or[)hanage. Arthur 

George Brown, Del. 

WARREN, E. P.— 20 Cowley Street, Westminster, London, England. 

533 The Church of St. Martin. Bryanston, Blanford, iMigland. 

534 The I'^ast (iate Hotel, High Street, Oxford, luigland. 

535 \'ictoria Fountain and Clock Turret, Oxford, England. 

WARREN, HAROLD B.-4 Milton Road, Brookline, Mass. 

536 Court)'ard of P)ish(»p"s Palace at St. Davids, South Wales. 

WATMOUOH, RICHARD L. 1510 Real Estate Trust Building, Philadelphia, Pa. 

537 Design fr)r hJitrance to a \a\-\- \'ar(l. 

538 .A Semi-Suburban I louse. 

539 A Colonial 1 fr)use. 

540 Detail — Semi-Suburban Residence. 



1.54 



WATSON, J. NELSON — 295 South Lawndale Avenue, Chicago. 

541 Stairway, Villa Lante, Bagnata. From Photo. 

542 Stairway, Villa Lante, Tivola. From Photo, 

543 Sketches from Nature in and about Peoria. ■ 

WATSON, ROBERT BRUCE -1808 Fisher Building:, Chicago. 

544 Ward Buildings, Asylum for Feeble-minded Children, Lin- 

coln, 111. 

545 Female Infirmary. An Addition to the Northern Hospital 

lor the Insane, P^lgin, 111. 

547 Male Cottage, Southern Hospital for the Insane, Anna, 111. 

548 Sketch for Woman's Building, Illinois State Fair Grounds, 

Springfield. 

549 Barn for the Gubernatorial Mansion, Springfield, 111. 

WEARY, EDWIN D - 1449 Marquette Building, Chicago. 

550 Scammozzi Capital, Terra-Galvano. 

551 ( irotescpie Mask, Terra-Galvano. 

552 Modillion, Terra-Galvano. 

553 Italian Renaissance Capital, Terra-Galvano. 
S34 Italian Renaissance Capital, Terra-Galvano. 

555 Greek Capital, Terra-Galvano. 

556 Shield — Terra-Cialvano. 

WELLS, NEWTON A. University of Illinois, Urbana, ill. 

539 Paris Sketches. 

560 Paris Sketches. 

WHITEHOUSE, Francis M. 

Crowhurst — Residence of F. M. Whitehouse at Man- 
chester, Mass. 

561 Street X'iew. 
5^)2 Court \'iew. 

563 J-'-ntrance Detail. 

WILSON & MARSHALL- 21H La Salle Street, Chicago. 

564 Residence of D. B. Scully, Graceland A\e. and Beach 

Court, Chicago. 

565 Residence of George ]'l. West, 3946 Fllis Ave., Chicago. 

WINSLOW, CARLTON MONROE — 1780 Old Colony Building, Chicago. 

^f-'j Compctitixe Design for the Inipro\ement of a Chicago Park 

Persi^ective. 
s68 Conijietitive Design for the Im[)rovement of a Chicago Park. 

Plan. 
569 Comj^ton Church, Surrey, l^ngland. 



155 



WINSLOW, WETHERELL & BIOELOW-4 Hamilton Place, Boston, Mass. 

570 Competitive Design for Office Buildings. Perspective. 

571 Competitive Design for Office Buildings. Line Drawing. 



WIRTS, STEPHEN M.- 148 Wabash Avenue, Chicago. 

572 Rouen Cathedral Tower, France. 

573 Tour de Notre Dame, Paris. 

574 Town Gate, Moret, France. 

575 Four Normandy Towers, France. 



WOOD. EDGAR, A. R. I. B. A. -78 Cross Street, Manchester, England. 

576 House at Bowdon, Cheshire, luigland. 

577 House at Middleton, Lancashire, I^ngland. 

578 The Ceorge and Dragon Inn, Castleton, Lancashire, I^ng- 

land. 

579 House at Marland, near Rochdale, Lancashire, luigland. 

580 House and Shop, Middleton, Lancashire, h^ngland. 

58 1 ..Proposed Clock Tower, Huddersfield, Yorkshire, l^ngland. 



WRIGHT, FRANK LLOYD -435 The Rookery. Studio, Oak Park. 

582 Photograph. Exterior. 

583 Photograph. I-^ntrance. 

584 Photograph. Plan. 

585 Photograph. Private .Study. 

586 Photograph. ICntrance Interior. 

587 Photograph. Residence Nathan ( i. Moore. 

588 Sketch. Residence Mr. A. C. McAfee. 

589 Sketch. Residence of Mrs. Robert Lchart. 

590 Sketch. Residence for Mr. 1^. C. Waller. 

591 Sketch. Residence for Mrs. David Devin. 

592 Perspective — .AH Souls i^uilding. 



ZIMMERMAN, ALBERT G.-115 Monroe Street, Chicago. 

593 Residence on Pine Grove A\enue, Chicago. Water-color 

Sketch. 

594 Residence in I'^dgewater. 



ZIMMERMANN, HUQO H.-1279 Perry Street, Chicago. 

595 I'Llevation for a Tomb. 

596 Plan for a Tomb. 



lot) 



THE CHICAGO SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE — The Art Institute, Chicago. 

597 A Gate Lodge. Arthur Mackie. 

598 Order from Propylea. Adelaide Benhatn. 

599 Roman Capital. Fred Johnck. \i 

600 A Science Temple. J. Curtis (lordon. 

601 A Primary School. Elevation. Arthur Mackie. 

602 A Primary School. Plan. Arthur Mackie. 

603 A Hospital. Elevation. Oscar 11 Marienthal. 

604 A Hospital, l^lan. Oscar B. Marienthal. 

605 A Hospital. Plan. Oscar B. Marienthal. 

606 A Museum and Library. Alfred .S. Alschuler. 

607 A Museum and Library. Elevation. Alfred S. Alschuler. 

608 A Museum and Library. Plan. Alfred S. Alschuler. 

609 An Art .School. Vernon S. Watson. 

610 A Tomb. Vernon S. Watson. 

611 A (iate Lodge. Vernon S. Watson. 



COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY. 

612 McKim Competition. Prize Drawing. Plan. W. E. 

Parson. 

613 .State Capitol. Elevation. J. I). Boyd, Jr. 

614 State Cajjitol. .Section. J. 1). Boyd, Jr. 

615 Designs for a City House. Elevation. L. E. Smith. 

616 Designs for a City House. Elevation. Edward E. Hewitt. 

617 A .Small Museum, (i. W. Jacoby. 

618 A Small.Museum. 1^. T. Schoen. 

619 Public Lii^rary for .Small Town, h'rank I'rich, Jr. 

620 A ^'acht Club. P^lex ation. R. L. Hyett, 

621 A City Hall. Plans. H. R. Mainzer. 

622 A City Hall. r:ievation. H. R. Mainzer. 

623 A City Hall. Lower Office Plan. H. R. Mainzer. 

624 A liank for Savings. E. A. Nelson. 

625 A Bank for Sa\ings. E. J. Lang. 

626 A Bank for .Sa\ings. Arthur Kaufman. 

627 Hotel and Mountain Resort. Plan. B. .S. Cairns. 

628 Hotel and Mountain Resort. Elevation. B. S. Cairns. ■' 

629 A Public Bath. I^levation. 1{. L. .Satterlee. 

630 A Public Bath. Plan. K. L. Satterlee. 

631 A Public Bath. Section and PLle\'ation. E. L. Satterlee. 

632 ' New ^'ork ^'acht Club. E. B. Lefferts. . 

633 Drawings from Photograph. W. T. Warren. 

634 Drawings from Photograph. H. P. I'pton. 

635 Drawings from Photograph. H. B. Coosby. 

636 Drawings from Photograph. K. H. Rosengarten. 

637 Drawings from Photograph. G. W. Jacoby. 

638 I )rawings from Photograph. E. E. Willson. 



157 



CORNELL UNIVERSITY. 

638a Pan-American Exposition. Elevation. F. Urich, Jr. 

639 Pan-American Exposition. Plan. F. Urich, Jr. 

640 Pan-American Exposition. Elevation. H. M. Bowdoin. 

641 Pan-American Exposition. Plan. H. M. Howdoin. 

642 Pan-American Exposition. Elevation. R. A. Tissington. 

643 Pan-American Exposition. Plan. R. A. Tissington. 

644 A Fire Engine House. F. S. Ackerman, 

645 A Fire Engine House, (ieorge Winkler. 

646 A Fire Engine House. W. 1). Straight. 

647 Building for an Exhibition of Fine Arts. Cieorge Winkler. 

648 End of a Reception-room in the Executive Mansion, W. 

Herbert Dole. 

649 End of a Reception-room in the Executive Mansion. Helen 

B. Brinkerd. 

650 Study of the Ionic and Composite Orders. R. Harold 

Shre\'e. 



UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS. College of Architecture- Champaign, III. 

651 Library. Plan. R. W. Weirick. 

652 Library. Section. R. W. Weirick. 

653 Library. Front Elevation. R. W. Weirick. 

654 Terminal Railroad Station, (j. F. Kepler. 

655 Class in Perspective — Sketches. 

656 Terminal Railroad Station. Elevation. R. C. Ricker. 

657 Chemical Laboratory. Elevation. R. W. Weirick. 

658 A Country Fair. Perspective. C. A. Smith. 

659 A Church. Elevation. H. T. Eastman. 

660 Town Hall. Elevation. W. J. Brown. 

661 Bird's-eye View of Hospital. C. (i. Lawrence. 



UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA. College of Architecture- Philadelphia, Pa. 

662 .Staircase for a .State Capitol. L W. Hoover. 

663 Outlet to a Mountain Stream. F. I". Lincoln. 

664 Design for a United States Pavilion at the Paris Ext)osition. 

W. D. Blair. 

665 Elevation of a Department .Store. L. X. rijllette. 

666 Elevation. A School of Architecture. \\ R. Siegel. 

667 Cafe and Boat Landing. R. F. Lincoln. 

668 Thesis Design for a State Capitol. Plan. W. D. I^lair. 

669 Thesis Design for a State Capitol. h:ievation. W.D.Blair. 

670 h^nd of Dining-room. Third ^'ear Design, (ieo. R. ( ;ral)er. 



laK 




DETAIL OI'- CAPITAL 
In Studio of I^'raiik Lloyd Wright. 



159 




FRAGMENT FROM A DECORATION 
Hy Harvey Ei.i.is 





A POSTER 

iiV (.:i.AlDli KvYHTIK Uracdon 



THE DECORATION ON TITLE A(;E HV HIRCH HLRDETJE I.oNO 




^ (Catalogue 
of the fourteenth 
annual exhibition of 
the chicago archi- 
tectural club 



IN I HK (".Al.l.KRIKS i)V rill". AK T INSIIIU'IE 
MICllKiAN A\K. AND ADAMS STKEiyr, FROM 

'iiirKsi)A\', MARCH 'r\\'i:Ni\- Kion rji, to 

MONDAW Al'RIL KI !• rKKNTH, A. 1). MDCCCCl 




^ 



7a . ' 






KX II I HIT ION C()MMrn'l-,K \<()R IIIK V I A K 



i ' r ' I 



J. NELSON WATSON MAX MAUCH 

CHARLES A. CARR HURTON M. MORSE 

E. CHARLES HEMMINGS WALTER H. KLEINRELL. anr/n^m;! 



I><)AK1) ()\< I'DI roKS 

DWIGHT HEALD PERKINS ROBERT C. Sl'ENCER, Jk. 

HUGH M. G. GARDEN, C/iatn,ui,! 



The Jury of Admissions is identical with the Exhibition Committee and the Hoard of Editors 
The Hangmg Committee is identical with the Jury of Admissions with the a.ldition of 

BIRCH BURDETTE LONG and N. MAX DUNNING 



(.11 i c \(.() ARCH niun u ra. l c lt h 

(Uub Rooms in the Art Institute^ Michigan Ave.^ opposite Adams St. 

HENRY K. HOLS MAN, President 
KOBKU r C. SPENCER, Jk., First Vice-President P. J. WEBER, Second Vice-President 

lURCH BURDETTE LONG, Secretary ADOLPH BERN HARD, Treasurer 



i';xr:cuTivi< commii ri;i', 



HENRY K. HOLSMAN 
\\\\<CW BURDETTE LONG 
CHARLES A. CARR 
BURTON E. MORSE 
ROBERT C. SPENCER, Jr. 



E. CHARLES HEMMINGS 
WALTER H. KLEINPELL 
P. J. \VE15ER 
J. NELSON WATSON 
MAX MAUCH 



ADOLPH BERNHARD 








'1^, 






l.^ 



FRAGMENT FROM A DECORATION 
By Hakvky Elms 



^HE EXPENSE Ol^ I H E EXHIBIIION AND 
CATALOGUE IS BORNE BY THE ARCHEIEC- 
TURAL CLUB AND THE FOLLOWING LIST OF 
PATRONS, TO WHOM THE CLUB IS INDEBIED 
FOR THEIR GENEROUS AND HEARIY ENCOUR- 
AGEMENT :: A SUPPLEMENT TO THIS LIST WILL 
BE FOUND AT THE END OF THE CATALOGUE. 



PA'i'KoNs ()|- Till-: i:xiiiHrri()N 



AMERICAN CEMP:XT TILE CO. 

ANDREWS & JOHNSON CO. 

HAGGOT. E., CO. 

HAGLEV, EREDEUICK }'., c\: CO. 

HEIL t*v MALCH 

IHNNER ENGRA\IN(; CO. 

BROWN KETCHAM IRON WORKS 

BROWN cV MORTIMER 

BURNHAM, DANIEL H. 



CABOT, SAMUEL 
CAEFALL BROTHERS 
CHICAGO HYDRAULIC I'. B. CO. 
CHICAGO ORNAMENTAL IRON CO. 
CH ICAGO P( )RTLAN I) CE .\I E NT CO. 
CHICA(;0 \ARNISH CO. 
CHURCH, A. B. 
CHURCH, MYl'iON H. 
CLARK CO., C. E\ ERETT 



CLARK, JOHN V. 
COOLIDGE, CHARLES A. 
COR BIN, P. \- E. 
I)A\IS, FRANK L. 
DECORATORS' SUPPLY CO. 
DICKINSON, ALBER T 

dietz(;en CO., eugiinI': 

DONNELLEN-, THOMAS !•:. 
DRIVER, EDWARD A. 



^m 



DUX, JOSKl'lI 

FX'KELS, JAMKS H. 

E(;AN, JAMKS J. 

ELLIS, MRS. A. M. H. 

FALKENAU CONSTKUCTK^N CO. 

FROST (S: GRANC'.ER 

FULL1':R CO., GEORC.l". A. 

GARDEN, FRANK AL 

GARDEN, WIJC.H M. (,. 

GATES, \VM. D. 

GRACE & HYDE CO. 

(;REELEV, HOWARD CO. 

GUNTHER, CHAS. F. 

HALSTED, JOSEPH 

HAIG H.JOSEPH 

HALL15ERG, L. G. 

HAWES & DODD 

HENNESSEY BROS. \- EN'ANS CO. 

HOLSMAN, HI:NRY K. 

HUTCHINSON, CHARLES L. 

HUHER, JULU'S H. 

huliu:r r & dorsey 

INLAND ARCHn'ECl", THE 
JENNH'". \- MUNDH-: 
KNISELY \- YELDHAM CO. 



LAWSON, VIC'POR F. 

LH5RARY lUJREAU, T1H-: 

LLEWELLYN, JOSEPH C. 

LONC;, IMRCH HURDETTE 

LUDOWICl ROOFIN(; 1 ILE CO. 

MANSURE, E. L. 

Mc FAR LAND & CO., J. C. 

MACKOLFFE FIRE-PROOFING CO. 

MAC VEA(]H, FRANKLIN 

MARTHEUS, CHESTER N. CO. 

MATZ, HERMAN L. 

MAYOR CO., WM. 

MILLET, LOUIS J. 

MOKAX'A CONSTRUCTION CO. 

MURl'HY VARNISH CO. 

MOULDING CO., THOMAS 

N. \V. EXPANDED METAL. CO. 

N. W. TERRA-COT r A CO. 

NEW YORK PACK. & BELTING CO. 

PATTON, FISHER cV MILLER 

PERKINS, DWIGHT H. 

PISCHEL, FREDERICK 

PROSSER, H. B. 

POST COMPANY, V REDE RICK 

PRINDEVILLE, CHARLES H. 



ROIMNSON, J. C. 

ROCK PLASri'.R MFG. CO. 

RODATZ, JACOB 

ROGERS, JAMES GAMliLE 

RYERSON, MARTIN A. 

SOLLITT, OLIVER CO. 

SOLE ITT, RALPH (Jt SUMNER 

SPIERLING .V LINDEN 

STAMSON c\: BLOME 

STARKWEATHER, MRS. R. E. 

SULLI\'AN, LOUIS H. 

SUTTON, JOHN C. 

TIFFANY ENAMELED BRICK CO. 

TOBEY FURNITURE CO. 

TREAT, SAMUEL A. 

THE VANDERPOEL CO. 

vn^ RL I NG, Mcdowell cV co. 

WALSH eS: WYETH 
WARD, M RS. L. A. COONLEY 
WARREN CO., WM. H. 
W^ARREN, WEBSTER X; CO. 
WELLS, W. A. (S; A. E. 
WILMARTH, T. \V. CO. 
WOLTE RSDOR F, A RTHU R 



xV 




PROPOSED PERISTYLE AND ARCH AT THE KOOT OF MARKET STREET, SAN FRANCISCO 

Willis Polk, Architect 




I'ROI'OSKI) I'KKlSrVI.K AND AKCH AT THE KOOl' OK MARKKT STRERT, SAN FRANCISCO 

, W'iM.ls I'oT.K, Arctiitcct 



'O 




HLART AND (RAFT OF THE MACHINE 

S WE work along our various ways, there takes shape within us, in some sort, 
an ideal — something we are to become — some work to be done. This, I 
think, is denied to very few, and we begin really to live only when the 
thrill of this ideality moves us in what we will to accomplish. In the years 
which have been devoted in mv own life to working out in stubborn materials a 
feeling for the beautiful, in the vortex of distorted complex conditions, a hope has 
grown stronger with the experience of each year, amounting now to a gradually deepen- 
ing conviction that in the Machine lies the only future of art and craft — as I believe, a 
glorious future; that the Machine is, in fact, the metamorphosis of ancient art and 
craft; that we are at last face to face with the machine -the modern Sphinx — whose 
riddle the artist must solve if he would that art live — for his nature holds the key. 
For one, I promise "whatever gods may be" to lend such energy and purpose as 1 
may possess to help make that meaning plain ; to return again and again to the task 
whenever and wherever need be; for this plain duty is thus relentlessly marked out for 
the artist in this, the Machine Age, although there is involved an adjustment to cherished gods, perplex- 
ing and painful in the extreme; the fire of many long-honored ideals shall go down to ashes to 
reappear, phcrnix like, with new purposes. 

The <jjreat ethics of the Machine are as yet, in the main, beyond the ken of the artist or 
student of sociology; but the artist mind may now approach the nature of this thing from ex- 
perience, which has become the commonplace of his field, to suggest, in time, 1 hope, to prove, that 
the machine is capable ot carrying to fruition high ideals in art — higher than the world has yet seen ! 




D1SC[I-'1>1\S of William Morris cling to an opposite view. Yet William Morris himself deeply 
sensed the danger to art of the transforming force whose sign and symbol is the machine, and 

though of the new art we eagerly seek he sometimes despaired, he quickly renewed his hope. 

He plainly foresaw that a blank in the fine arts would follow the inevitable abuse of new-found 
power, and threw himself body and soul into the work of bridging it over by bringing into our lives 
afresh the beauty of art as she had been, that the new art to come might not have dropped too many 
stitches nor have unraveled what would still be useful to her. 

That he had abundant faith in the new art his every essay will testify. 

That he miscalculated the machine does not matter. He did sublime work for it when he pleaded 
so well for the process of elimination its abuse had made necessary; when he fought the innate vulgarity 
of theocratic impulse in art as opposed to democratic; and when he preached the gospel of simplicity. 

All artists love and honor William Morris. 

He did the best in his time for art and will live in history as the great socialist, together with 
Ruskin, the great moralist: a significant fact worth thinking about, that the two great reformers of 
modern times professed the artist. 

The machine these reformers protested, because the sort of luxury which is born of greed had 
usurped it and made of it a terrible engine of enslavement, deluging the civilized world with a 
murderous ubiquity, which plainly enough was the damnation of their art and craft. 

It had not then advanced to the point which now so plainly indicates that it will surely and 
swiftly, by its own momentum, undo the mischief it has made, and the usurping vulgarians as well. 

Nor was it so grown as to become apparent to William Morris, the grand democrat, that the 
machine was the great forerunner of democracy. 

The ground plan of this thing is now grown to the point where the artist must take it up no 
longer as a protest: genius must progressively dominate the work of the contrivance it has created; to 
lend a useful hand in building afresh the "Fairness ot the Earth." 



THAT the Machine has dealt Art in the grand old sense a death-blow, none will deny. 
The evidence is too substantial. 

Art in the grand old sense — meaning Art in the sense of structural tradition, whose craft is 
fashioned upon the handicraft ideal, ancient or modern; an art wherein this form and that form as 
structural parts were laboriously joined in such a way as to beautifully emphasize the manner of the 
joining: the million and one ways of beautifully satisfying bare structural necessities, which have come 
down to us chiefly through the books as "Art." 

For the purpose of suggesting hastily and therefore crudely wherein the machine has sapped the 
vitality of this art, let us assume Architecture in the old sense as a fitting representative of Traditional- 
art, and Printing as a fitting representation of the Machine. 

What printing — the machine — has done for architecture — the fine art — will have been done in 
measure of time for all art immediately fashioned upon the early handicraft ideal. 

With a masterful hand Victor Hugo, a noble lover and a great student of architecture, traces her 
fall in "Notre Dame." 

The prophecy of Krollo, that "The book will kill the edifice," 1 remember was to me as a boy 
one of the grandest sad things of the world. 

After seeking the origin arid tracing the growth of architecture in superb fashion, showing how 
in the middle ages all the intellectual forces of the people converged to one point — architecture —he 
shows how, in the life of that time, whoever was born poet became an architect. All other arts 
simply obeyed and placed themselves under the discipline of architecture. They were the workmen 
of the great work. The architect, the poet, the master, summed up in his person the sculpture that 
carved his fa(^"ades, painting which illuminated his walls and windows, music which set his bells to pealing 
and breathed into his organs there was nothing which was not forced in order to make something of 
itself in that time, to come and frame itself in the edifice. 



Thus down to the time of Gutenberg architecture is the principal writing — the universal writing 
of humanity. 

In the gi-eat granite books begun by the Orient, continued by Greek and Roman antiquity, the 
middle ages wrote the last page. 

So to enunciate here only summarily a process, it would require volumes to develop; down to 
the fifteenth century the chief register of humanity is architecture. 

In the fifteenth century everything changes. 

Human thought discovers a mode of perpetuating itself, not only more resisting than architecture, 
but still more simple and easy. 

Architecture is dethroned. 

Gutenberg's letters of lead are about to supersede Orpheus' letters of stone. 

The book is about to kill the edifice. 

The invention of printing was the greatest event in history. 
It was the first great machine, after the great city. 
It is human thought stripping ofi" one form and donning another. 
Printed, thought is more imperishable than ever — it is volatile, indestructible. 
As architecture it was solid; it is now alive; it passes from duration in point of time to 
immortality. 

Cut the primitive bed of a river abruptly, with a canal hollowed out beneath its level, and the 
river will desert its bed. 

See how architecture now withers awav, how little by little it becomes lifeless and bare. How 
one feels the water sinking, the sap departing, the thought ot the times and people withdrawing from 
it. rhe chill is almost imperceptible in the fifteenth century, the press is yet weak, and at most draws 



'^- - from architecture a superabundance of life, but with the beginning of the sixteenth century, the malady 

of architecture is visible. It becomes classic art in a miserable manner; from being indigenous, it 
becomes Greek and Roman; from being true and modern, it becomes pseudo-classic. 

It is this decadence which we call the Renaissance. 

It is the setting sun which we mistake for dawn. 

It has now no power to hold the other arts; so they emancipate themselves, break the yoke of 
the architect, and take themselves off, each it its own direction. 

One would liken it to an empire dismembered at the death of its Alexander, and whose provinces 
become kingdoms. 

Sculpture becomes statuary, the image trade becomes painting, the canon becomes music. Hence 
Raphael, Angelo, and those splendors of the dazzling sixteenth century. 

Nevertheless, when the sun of the middle ages is completely set, architecture grows dim, becomes 
more and more effaced. The printed book, the gnawing worm of the edifice, sucks and devours it. It 
is petty, it is poor, it is nothing. 

Reduced to itself, abandoned by other arts because human thought is abandoning it, it summons 
bunglers in place of artists. It is miserably perishing. 

Meanwhile, what becomes of printing? 

All the life, leaving architecture, comes to it. In proportion as architecture ebbs and flows, 
printing swells and grows. That capital of forces which human thought had been expending in build- 
ing is hereafter to be expended in books; and architecture, as it was, is dead, irretrievably slain by the 
printed book; slain because it endures for a shorter time; slain because human thought has found a 
^•"■"' more simple medium of expression, which costs less in human eflx)rt; because human thought has been 

rendered volatile and indestructible, reaching uniformly and irresistibly the four corners of the earth 
and for all. 

Thenceforth, if architecture rise again, reconstruct, as Hugo prophesies she may begin to do in 



the latter days of the nineteenth century, she will no longer be mistress, she will be one of the arts, 
never again the art; and printing — the Machine — remains the second Tower of Babel of the human race. 

SO the organic process, of which the majestic decline of Architecture is only one case in point, has 
steadily gone on down to the present time, and still goes on, weakening the hold of the artist upon 
the people, drawing off from his rank poets and scientists until architecture is but a little, poor 
knowledge of archeology, and the average of art is reduced to the gasping poverty of imitative 
realism; until the whole letter of Tradition, the vast fabric of precedent, in the flesh, which has increas- 
ingly confused the art ideal while the machine has been growing to power, is a beautiful corpse from 
which the spirit has flown. The spirit that has flown is the spirit of the new art, but has failed the 
modern artist, for he has lost it for hundreds of years in his lust for the letter^ the beautiful body of 
art made too available by the machine. 

So the artist craft wanes. 

Craft that will not see that human thought is stripping off^ one form and donning another, and 
artists are everywhere, whether catering to the leisure class of old P^ngland or ground beneath the heel of 
commercial abuse here in the great West, the unwilling symptoms of the inevitable, organic nature of 
the machine, they combat, the hell-smoke of the factories they scorn to understand. 

And, invincible, triumphant, the machine goes on, gathering force and knitting the material 
necessities of mankind ever closer into a universal automatic fabric; the engine, the motor, and the 
battle-ship, the works of art of the century! 

The Machine is Intellect mastering the drudgery of earth that the plastic art may live; that the 
margin of leisure and strength by which man's life upon the earth can be made beautiful, may 
immeasurably widen; its function ultimately to emancipate human expression! 

It is a universal educator, surelv raising the level of human intelligence, so carrying within itself 
the power to destroy, by its own momentum, the greed which in Morris' time and still in our own 






time turns it to a deadly engine of enslavement. The only comfort left the poor artist, side-tracked as 
he is, seemingly is a mean one; the thought that the very selfishness which man's early art idealized, 
now reduced to its lowest terms, is swiftly and surely destroying itself through the medium of the 
Machine, - . 

THE artist's present plight is a sad one, but may he truthfully say that society is less well off 
because Architecture, or even Art, as it was, is dead, and printing, or the Machine, lives? 

Every age has done its work, produced its art with the best tools or contrivances it knew, the 
tools most successful in saving the most precious thing in the world — human effort. Greece used the 
chattel slave as the essential tool of its art and civilization. This tool we have discarded, and we would 
refuse the return of Greek art upon the terms of its restoration, because we insist now upon a basis of 
Democracy. 

Is it not more likely that the medium of artistic expression itself has broadened and changed 
until a new definition and new direction must be given the art activity of the future, and that the 
Machine has finally made for the artist, whether he will yet own it or not, a splendid distinction between 
the Art of old and the Art to come ? A distinction made by the tool which frees human labor, lengthens 
and broadens the life of the simplest man, thereby the basis of the Democracy upon which we insist. 

TO shed some light upon this distinction, let us take an instance in the field naturally ripened 
first by the machine — the commercial field. 

The tall modern office building is the machine pure and simple. 

We may here sense an advanced stage of a condition surely entering all art for all time; its 
already triumphant glare in the deadly struggle taking place here between the machine and the art of 
structural tradition reveals "art" torn and hung upon the steel frame of commerce, a forlorn head upon 
a pike, a solemn warning to architects and artists the world over. 



We must walk blindfolded not to see that all that this magnificent resource of machine and 
material has brought us so far is a complete, broadcast degradation of every type and form sacred to 
the art of old; a pandemonium of tin masks, huddled deformities, and decayed methods; quarreling, 
lying, and cheating, with hands at each other's throats — or in each other's pockets ; and none of the 
people who do these things, who pay for them or use them, know what they mean, feeling only — when 
they feel at all — that what is most truly like the past is the safest and therefore the best; as typical 
Marshall Field, speaking of his new building, has frankly said: "A good copy is the best we can do." 

A pitiful insult, art and craft! 

With this mine of industrial wealth at our feet we have no power to use it except to the per- 
version of our natural resources? A confession of shame which the merciful ignorance of the yet 
material frame of things mistakes for glorious achievement. 

We half believe in our artistic greatness ourselves when we toss up a pantheon to the god of 
money in a night or two, or pile up a mammoth aggregation of Roman monuments, sarcophagi and 
Greek temples for a postoffice in a year or two — the patient retinue of the machine pitching in 
with terrible effectiveness to consummate this unhallowed ambition — this insult to ancient gods. The 
delicate, impressionable facilities of terra cotta becoming imitative' blocks and voussoirs of tool-marked 
stone, badgered into all manner of structural gymnastics, or else ignored in vain endeavor to be honest; 
and granite blocks, cut in the fashion of the followers of Phidias, cunningly arranged about the steel 
beams and shafts, to look "real" — leaning heavily upon an inner skeleton of steel for support from 
floor to floor, which strains beneath the "reality" and would fain, I think, lie down to die of shame. 

The "masters'' — ergo, the fashionable followers of Phidias — have been trying to make this wily 
skeleton of steel seem seventeen sorts of "architecture" at once, when all the world knows — except the 
"masters"^ — that it is not one of them. 

See now, how an element — the vanguard of the new art — has entered here, which the structural- 
art equation cannot satisfy without downright lying and ignoble cheating. 






This element is the ^structural necessity reduced to a skeleton, complete in itself without the 
craftsman's touch. At once the million and one little ways of satisfying this necessity beautifully, 
coming to us chiefly through the books as the traditional art of building, vanish away — become history. 

The artist is emancipated to work his will with a rational freedom unknown to the laborious art 
of structural tradition — no longer tied to the meagre unit of brick arch and stone lintel, nor hampered 
by the grammatical phrase of their making — but he cannot use his freedom. 

His tradition cannot think. 

He will not think. 

His scientific brother has put it to him before he is ready. 

THE modern tall office building problem is one representative problem of the machine. 
The only rational solutions it has received in the world may be counted upon the fingers of 

one hand. The fact that a great portion of our "architects" and "artists" are shocked by 
them to the point of oflfense is as valid an objection as that of a child refusing wholesome food because 
his stomach becomes dyspeptic from over-much unwholesome pastry — albeit he be the cook himself 

We may object to the mannerism of these buildings, but we can take no exception to their 
manner nor hide from their evident truth. 

The steel frame has been recognized as a legitimate basis for a simple, sinciere clothing of plastic 
material that idealizes its purpose without structural pretense. 

This principle has at last been recognized in architecture, and though the masters refuse to accept 
it as architecture at all, it is a glimmer in a darkened field — the first sane word that has been said in 
Art for the Machine. 

The Art of old idealized a Structural Necessity — now rendered obsolete and unnatural by the 
Machine — and accomplished it through man's joy in the labor of his hands. 

The new will weave for the necessities of mankind, which his Machine will have mastered, a robe 



of ideality no less truthful, but more poetical, with a rational freedom made possible by the machine, 
beside which the art of old will be as the sweet, plaintive wail of the pipe to the outpouring of full 
orchestra. 

It will clothe Necessity with the living flesh of virile imagination, as the living flesh lends, 
living grace to the hard and bony human skeleton. . 

The new will pass from the possession of kings and classes to the every-day lives of all — from 
duration in point of time to immortality. 

THIS distinction is one to be felt now rather than clearly defined. 
The definition is the poetry of 'this Machine Age, and will be written large in time; but the 

more we, as artists, examine into this premonition, the more we will find the utter helpless- 
ness of old forms to satisfy new conditions, and the crying need of the machine for plastic treatment^ 
a pliant, sympathetic treatment of its needs that the body of structural precedent cannot yield. 

To gain further suggestive evidence of this, let us turn to the Decorative Arts — the immense 
middle-ground of all art now mortally sickened by the Machine — sickened that it may slough the art 
ideal of the constructural art for the plasticity of the new art — the Art of Democracy. 

Here we find the most deadly perversion of all — the magnificent prowess of the machine bom- 
barding the civilized world with the mangled corpses of strenuous horrors that once stood for cultivated 
luxury ^-standing now for a species of fatty degeneration simply vulgar. 

Without regard to first principles or common decency, the whole letter of tradition — that is, 
ways of doing things rendered wholly obsolete and unnatural by the machine — is recklessly fed into 
its rapacious maw until you may buy reproductions for ninety-nine cents at "The Fair" that originally 
cost ages of toil and cultivation, worth now intrinsically nothing — that are harmful parasites befogging 
the sensibilities of our natures, belittling and falsifying any true perception of normal beauty the Creator 
may have seen fit to implant in us. 



•V 



The idea of fitness to purpose, harmony between form and use with regard to any of these 
things, is possessed by very few, and utilized by them as a protest chiefly — a protest against the 
machine ! 

As well blame Richard Croker for the political iniquity of America. 

As "Croker is the creature and not the creator" of political evil, so the machine is the creature 
and not the creator of this iniquity; and with this difi^erence — that the machine has noble possibilities 
unwillingly forced to degradation in the name of the artistic; the machine, as far as its artistic capacity 
is concerned, is itself the crazed victim of the artist who works while he waits, and the artist who waits 
while he works. 

There is a nice distinction between the two. 

Neither class will unlock the secrets of the beauty of this time. 

They are clinging sadly to the old order, and would wheedle the giant frame of things back to 
its childhood or forward to its second childhood, while this Machine Age is suffering for the artist who 
accepts, works, and sings as he works, with the joy of the here and now I 

We want the man who eagerly seeks and finds, or blames himself if he fails to find, the beauty 
of this time; who distinctly accepts as a singer and a prophet; for no man may work while he waits or 
wait as he works in the sense that William Morris' great work was legitimately done — in the sense that 
most art and craft of to-day is an echo; the time when such work was useful has gone. 

Echoes are by nature decadent. 

Artists who feel toward Modernity and the Machine now as William Morris and Ruskin were 
justified in feeling then, had best distinctly wait and work sociologically where great work may still be 
done by them. In the field of art activity they will do distinct harm. Already they have wrought 
much miserable mischief. 



IF the artist will only open his eyes he will see that the machine he dreads has made it possible to 
wipe out the mass of meaningless torture to which mankind, in the name of the artistic, has been 
more or less subjected since time began; for that matter, has made possible a cleanly strength, an 
ideality and a poetic fire that the art of the world has not yet seen; for the machine, the process now 
smooths away the necessity for petty structural deceits, soothes this ^yearisome struggle to make things 
seem what they are not, and can never be; satisfies the simple term of the modern art equation as the 
ball of clay in the sculptor's hand yields to his desire — comforting forever this realistic, brain-sick 
masquerade we are wont to suppose art. 

WILLIAM MORRIS pleaded well for simplicity as the basis of all true art. 
Let us understand the significance to art of that word — SIMPLICITY — for it is vital to 
the Art of the Machine. 

We may find, in place of the genuine thing we have striven for, an affectation of the naive, which 
we should detest as we detest a full-grown woman with baby mannerisms. 

English art is saturated with it, from the brand-new imitation of the old house that grew and 
rambled from period to period to the rain-tub standing beneath the eaves. 

In fact, most simplicity following the doctrines of William Morris is a protest; as a protest, well 
enough; but the highest form of simplicity is not simple in the sense that the infant intelligence is 
simple — nor, for that matter, the side of a barn. 

A natural revulsion of feeling leads us from the meaningless elaboration of to-day to lay too 
great stress on mere platitudes, quite as a clean sheet of paper is a relief after looking at a series of bad 
drawings — but simplicity is not merely a neutral or a negative quality. 

Simplicity in art, rightly understood, is a synthetic, positive quality, in which we may see evidence of 
mind, breadth of scheme, wealth of detail, and withal a sense of completeness found in a tree or a flower. 



A work may have the delicacies of a rare orchid or the stanch fortitude of the oak, and still be 
simple. A thing to be simple needs only to be true to itself in organic sense. 

WITH this ideal of simplicity, let us glance hastily at a few instances of the machine and see how 
it has been forced by false ideals to do violence to this simplicity; how it has made possible the 
highest simplicity, rightly understood and so used. As perhaps wood is most available of all 
homely materials and therefore, naturally, the most abused — let us glance at wood. 

Machinery has been invented for no other purpose than to imitate, as closely as possible, the 
wood-carving of the early ideal — with the immediate result that no ninety-nine cent piece of furniture 
is salable without some horrible botchwork meaning nothing unless it means that art and craft have 
combined to fix in the mind of the masses the old hand-carved chair as the ne plus ultra of the ideal. 

The miserable, lumpy tribute to this perversion which Grand Rapids alone yields would mar the 
face of Art beyond repair; to say nothing of the elaborate and fussy joinery of posts, spindles, jig 
sawed beams and braces, butted and strutted, to outdo the sentimentality of the already over-wrought 
antique product. 

Thus is the wood-working industry glutted, except in rarest instances. The whole sentiment of 
early craft degenerated to a sentimentality having no longer decent significance nor commercial integrity; 
in fact all that is fussy, maudlin, and animal, basing its existence chiefly on vanity and ignorance. 

Now let us learn from the Machine. 

It teaches us that the beauty of wood lies first in its qualities as wood; no treatment that did not 
bring out these qualities all the time could be plastic, and therefore not appropriate — so not beautiful, 
the machine teaches us, if we have left it to the machine that certain simple forms and handling 
are suitable to bring out the beauty of wood and certain forms are not; that all wood-carving is apt to 
be a forcing of the material, an insult to its finer possibilities as a material having in itself intrinsically 
artistic properties, of which its beautiful markings is one, its texture another, its color a third. 



r 

The machine, by its wonderful cutting, shaping, smoothing, and repetitive capacity, has made it 
possible to so use it without waste fhat the poor as well as the rich may enjoy to-day beautiful surface 
treatments of clean, strong forms that the branch veneers of Sheraton and Chippendale only hinted at, 
with dire extravagance, and which the middle ages utterly ignored. 

The machine has emancipated these beauties of nature in wood ; made it possible to wipe out the 
rhass of meaningless torture to which wood has been subjected since the world began, for it has been 
universally abused and maltreated bv all peoples but the Japanese. 

Rightly appreciated, is not this the very process of elimination for which Morris pleaded.'' 

Not alone a protest, moreover, for the machine, considered only technically, if you please, has 
placed in artist hands the means of idealizing the true nature of wood harmoniously with man's 
spiritual and material needs, without waste, within reach of all. 

And how fares the troop of old materials galvanized into new life by the Machine? 

Our modern materials are these old materials in more plastic guise, rendered so by the Machine, 
itself creating the very quality needed in material to satisfy its own art equation. 

We have seen in glancing at modern architecture how they fare at the hands of Art and Craft; 
divided and sub-divided in orderly sequence with rank and file of obedient retainers awaiting the 
master's behest. 

Steel and iron, plastic cement and terra-cotta. 

Who can sound the possibilities of this old material, burned clay, which the modern machine 
has rendered as sensitive to the creative brain as a dry plate ^to the lens — a marvelous simplifier? And 
this plastic covering material, cement, another simplifier, enabling the artist to clothe the structural 
frame with a simple, modestly beautiful robe where before he dragged in, as he does still drag, five 
different kinds of material to compose one little cottage, pettily arranging it in an aggregation supposed 
J to be picturesque — as a matter of fact, millinery, to be warped and beaten by sun, wind, and rain into 

a variegated heap of trash. 



*.«f^;, 




There is the process of modern casting in metal — one of the perfected modern machines, capable 
of any form to which fluid will flow, to perpetuate the imagery of the most delicately poetic mind with- 
out let or hindrance — within reach of everyone, therefore insulted and outraged by the bungler 
forcing it to a degraded seat at his degenerate festival. 

Multitudes of processes are expectantly awaiting the sympathetic interpretation of the master 
mind; the galvano-plastic and its electrical brethren, a prolific horde, now cheap fakirs imitating real 
bronzes and all manner of the antique, secretly damning it in their vitals. 

Electro-glazing, a machine shunned because too cleanly and delicate for the clumsy hand of 
the traditional designer, who depends upon the mass and blur of leading to conceal his lack of touch. 

That delicate thing, the lithograph — the prince of a whole reproductive province of processes — see 
what this process becomes in the hands of a master like Whistler. He has sounded but one note in 
the gamut of its possibilities, but that product is intrinsically true to the process, and as delicate as the 
butterfly's wing. Yet the most this particular machine did for us, until then in the hands of Art and 
Craft, was to give us a cheap, imitative eflfect of painting. 

SO spins beyond our ability to follow to-night, a rough, feeble thread of the evidence at large to the 
efi^ect that the machine has weakened the artist; all but destroyed his hand-made art, if not its 
ideals, although he has made enough miserable mischief meanwhile. 
These evident instances should serve to hint, at least to the thinking mind, that the Machine is a 
marvelous simplifier; the emancipator of the creative mind, and in time the regenerator of the creative 
conscience. We may see that this destructive process has begun and is taking place that Art might 
awaken to the power of fully developed senses promised by dreams of its childhood, even though that 
power may not come the way it was pictured in those dreams. 

Now, let us ask ourselves whether the fear of the higher artistic expression demanded by the 



Machine, so thoroughly grounded in the arts and crafts, is founded upon a finely guarded reticence, a 
recognition of inherent weakness or plain ignorance ? 

Let us, to be just, assume that it is equal parts of all th;:e€, and try to imagine an Arts and*Crafts 
Society that may educate itself to prepare to make some good impression upon the Machine, the 
destroyer of their present ideals and tendencies, their salvation in disgtiise. 

Such a society will, of course, be a society for mutual education. 

Exhibitions will not be a feature of its programme for years, for there will be nothing to exhibit 
except the short-comings of the society, and they will hardly prove either instructive or amusing at this 
stage of proceedings. This society must, from the very nature of the proposition, be made up of the 
people who are in the work — that is, the manufacturers — coming into touch with such of those who 
assume the practice of the fine arts as profess a fair sense of the obligation to the public such assump- 
tion carries with it, and sociological workers whose interests are ever closely allied with art, as their 
prophets Morris, Ruskin, and Tolstoy evince, and all those who have as personal graces and accom- 
plishment perfected handicraft, whether fashion old or fashion new. 

Without the interest and co-operation of the manufacturers, the society cannot begin to do its 
work, for this is the corner-stone of its organization. 

All these elements should be brought together on a common ground of confessed ignorance, with 
a desire to be instructed, freelv encouraging talk and opinion, and reaching out desperately for any one 
who has special experience in any way connected, to address them, 

I suppose, first of all, the thing would resemble a debating society, or something even less digni- 
fied, until some one should suggest that it was time to quit talking and proceed to do something, which 
in this case would not mean giving an exhibition, but rather excursions to factories and a study of pro- 
cesses in place — that is, the machine in processes too numerous to mention, at the factories with the 
men who organize and direct them, but not in the spirit of the idea that these things are all gone wrong, 
looking for that in them which would most nearly approximate the handicraft ideal; not looking 



■.,-■■ : ,-;^,--.' 



into them with even the thought of handicraft, and not particularly looking for craftsmen, but getting a 
scientific ground-plan of the process in mind, if possible, with a view to its natural bent and possibilities. 

Some processes and machines would naturally appeal to some, and some to others; there would 
undoubtedly be among us those who would find li<-tle joy in any of them. 

This is, naturally, not child's play, but neither is the work expected of the modern artist. 

I will venture to say, from personal observation and some experience, that not one artist in one 
hundred has taken pains to thus educate himself I will go further and say what I believe to be true, 
that not one educational institution in America has as yet attempted to forge the connecting link 
between Science and Art by training the artist to his actual tools, or, bv a process of nature-study that 
develops in him the power of independent thought, fitting him to use them properly. 

Let us call these preliminaries then a process by which artists receive information nine-tenths of 
them lack concerning the tools they have to work with to-day — for tools to-day are processes and 
machines where they were once a hammer and a gouge. 

The artist to-day is the leader of an orchestra, where he once was a star performer. 

Once the manufacturers are convinced of due respect and appreciation on the part of the artist, 
they will welcome him and his counsel gladly and make any experiments having a grain of apparent 
sense in them. 

They have little patience with a bothering about in endeavor to see what might be done to make 
th^ir particular machine mediaeval and restore man's joy in the mere work of his hands — for this once 
lovely attribute is far behind. 

This proceeding doubtless would be of far more educational value to the artist than to the 
manufacturer, at least for some time to come, for there would be a difficult adjustment to make on the 
part of the artist and an attitude to change. So many artists are chiefly "attitude" that some would 
undoubtedly disappear with the attitude. 

But if out of twenty determined students a ray of light should come to one, to light up a single 



operation, it would have been worth while, for that would be fairly something; while joy in mere 
handicraft is like that of the man who played the piano for his own amusement — a pleasurable personal 
accomplishment without real relation to the grim condition confronting us. 

GRANTING that a determined, dauntless body of artist material could be brought together with 
sufficient persistent enthusiasm to grapple with the Machine, would not some one be found who 

would provide the suitable experimental station (which is what, the modern Arts and Crafts shop 
should be) — an experimental station that would represent in miniature the elements of this great pulsat- 
ing web of the machine, where each pregnant process or significant tool in printing, lithography, 
galvano-electro processes, wood and steel working machinery, muffles and kilns would have its place 
and where the best young scientific blood could mingle with the best and truest artistic inspiration, to 
sound the depths of these things, to accord them the patient, sympathetic treatment that is their due? 

Surely a thing like this would be worth while — to alleviate the insensate numbness of the poor 
fellows out in the cold, hard shops, who' know not why nor understand, whose dutiful obedience is 
chained to botch work and bungler's ambition ; surely this would be a practical means to make their 
dutiful obedience give us something we can all understand, and that will be as normal to the best of 
> this machine age as a ray of light to the healthy eye ; a real help in adjusting the Man to a true sense of 
his importance as a factor in society, though he does tend a machine. 

Teach him that that machine is his best friend — will have widened the margin of his leisure until 
enlightenment shall bring him a further sense of the magnificent ground plan of progress in which he 
too justly plays his significant part. 

If the art of the Greek, produced at such cost of human life, was so noble and enduring, what 
limit dare we now imagine to an Art based upon an adequate life for the individual? 

The machine is his! 

In due time it will come to him ! 



Meanwhile, who shall count the slain? 

From where are the trained nurses in this industrial hospital to come if not from the modern 
arts and crafts ? 

SHELLEY says a man cannot say — -'*I will compose poetry." "The greatest poet even cannot 
say it, for the mind in creation is as a fading coal which some invisible influence, like an inconstant 
wind awakens to transitory brightness; this power arises from within like the color of a flower 
which fades and changes as it is developed, and the conscious portions of our nature are unprophetic 
either of its approach of its departure;" and yet in the arts and crafts the problem is presented as a 
more or less fixed quantity, highly involved, requiring a surer touch, a more highly disciplined artistic 
nature to organize it as a work of art. 

The original impulses may reach as far inward as those of Shelley's poet, be quite as wayward a 
matter of pure sentiment, and yet after the thing is done, showing its rational qualities, is limited in 
completeness only by the capacity of whoever would show them or by the imperfection of the 
thing itself. 

This does not mean that Art may be shown to be an exact Science. 

"It is not pure reason, but it is always reasonable." 

It is a matter of perceiving and portraying the harmony of organic tendencies; is originally 
intuitive because4he artist nature is a prophetic gift that may sense these qualities afar. 

To me, the artist is he who can truthfully idealize the common sense of these tendencies in his 
chosen way. 

So I feel conception and composition to be simply the essence of refinement in organization, the 
original impulse of which may be registered by the artistic nature as unconsciously as the magnetic 
needle vibrates to the magnetic law, but which is, in synthesis or analysis, organically consistent, given 
the power to see it or not. -^ 



*i^- 



And I have come to believe that the world of Art, which we are so fond of calling the world out- 
side of Science, is not so much outside as it is the very heart quality of this great material growth — 
as religion is its conscience. 

A foolish heart and a small conscience. 

A foolish heart, palpitating in alarm, mistaking the growing pains of its giant frame for approach- 
ing dissolution, whose sentimentality the lusty body of modern things has outgrown. 

UPON this faith in Art as the organic heart quality of the scientific frame of things, I base a belief 
that we must look to the artist brain, of all brains, to grasp the significance to society of this thing 

we call the Machine, if that brain be not blinded, gagged, and bound by false tradition, the letter 
of precedent. For this thing we call Art is it not as prophetic as a primrose or an oak ? Therefore, 
of the essence of this thing we call the Machine, which is no more or less than the principle of organic 
growth working irresistibly the Will of Life through the medium of Man. 

Be gently lifted at nightfall to the top of a great down-town office building, and you may see 
how in the image of material man, at once his glory and menace, is this thing we call a city. 

' > There beneath, grown up in a night, is the monster leviathan, stretching acre upon acre into the 
far distance. High overhead hangs the stagnant pall of its fetid breath, reddened with the light from 
its myriad eyes endlessly everywhere blinking. Ten thousand acres of cellular tissue, layer upon layer, 
the city's flesh, outspreads enmeshed by intricate network of veins and arteries, radiating into the gloom, 
and there with muffled, persistent roar, pulses and circulates as the blood in your veins, the ceaseless 
beat of the activity to whose necessities it all conforms. 

Like to the sanitation of the human body is the drawing off of poisonous waste from the system 
of this enormous creature; absorbed first by the infinitely ramifying, thread-like ducts gathering at their 
sensitive terminals matter destructive to its life, hurrying it to millions of small intestines, to be 
collected in turn by larger, flowing to the great sewer, on to the drainage canal, and finally to the ocean. 



'■•f^;^:':^-^ '.•'•, - 



This ten thousand acres of flesh-like tissue is again knit and inter-knit with a nervous system 
marvelously complete, delicate filiaments for hearing, knowing, almost feeling the pulse of its organism, 
acting upon the ligaments and tendons for motive impulse, in all flowing the impelling fluid of man's 
own life. 

Its nerve ganglia! — The peerless Corliss tandems whirling their hundred ton fly-wheels, fed by 
gigantic rows of water tube boilers burning oil, a solitary man slowly pacing backward and forward, 
regulating nere and there the little feed valves controlling the deafening roar of the flaming gas, while 
beyond, the incessant clicking, dropping, waiting — lifting, waiting, shirting of the governor gear con- 
trolling these modern Goliaths seems a visible brain in intelligent action, registered infallibly in the 
enormous magnets, purring in the giant embrace of great induction coils, generating the vital current 
meeting with instant response in the rolling cars on elevated tracks ten miles away, where the glare of 
the Bessemer steel converter makes a conflagration of the clouds. 

More quietly still, whispering down the long, low rooms of factory buildings buried in the gloom 
beyond, range on range of stanch, beautifully perfected automatons, murmer contentedly with 
occasional click-clack, that would have the American manufacturing industry of five years ago by the 
throat to-day; manipulating steel as delicately as a mystical shuttle of the modern loom manipulates a 
silk thread in the shimmering pattern of a dainty gown. 

And the heavy breathing, the murmuring, the clangor, and the roar! — how the voice of this 
monstrous thing, this greatest of machines, a great city, rises to proclaim the marvel of the units of its 
structure, the ghastly warning boom from the deep throats of vessels heavily seeking inlet to the water- 
way below, answered by the echoing clangor of the bridge bells growing nearer and more ominous 
as the vessel cuts momentarily the flow of the nearer artery, warning the current from the swinging 
bridge now closing on its stately passage, just in time to receive in a rush of steam, as a streak of light, 
the avaknche of blood and metal hurled across it and gone, roaring into the night on its glittering 
bands of steel, ever faithfully encircled by the slender magic lines tick-tapping its invincible protection. 



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Nearer, in the building ablaze with midnight activity, the wide white band streams into the 
marvel of the multiple press, receiving unerringly the indelible impression of the human hopes, joys, 
and fears throbbing in the pulse of this great activity, as infallibly as the gray matter of the human 
brain receives the impression of the senses, to come forth millions of neatly folded, perfected. news 
sheets, teaming with vivid appeals to passions, good or evil; weaving a web of intercommunication so 
far reaching that distance becomes as nothing, the thought of one man in one corner of the earth one 
day visible to the naked eye of all men the next; the doings of all the world reflected as in a glass, so 
marvelously sensitive this wide white band streaming endlessly from day to day becomes in the grasp 
of the multiple press. 

If the pulse of activity in this great city, to which the tremor ot the mammoth skeleton beneath 
> our feet is but an awe-inspiring response, is thrilling, what of this prolific, silent obedience ? 

And the texture of the tissue of this great thing, this Forerunner of Democracy, the Machine, has 
> been deposited particle by particle, in bhnd obedience to organic law, the law to which the great solar 
universe is but an obedient machine. 

Thus is the thing into which the forces of Art are to breathe the thrill of ideality! A SOUL! 



AN ADDRESS BY FRANK LLOYD WRIGHT TO THE CHI 
CAGO ARTS AND CRAFTS SOCIETY, AT HULL-HOUSE, 
MARCH SIX, AND TO THE WESTERN SOCIETY OF EI^GI- 
NEERS, MARCH TWENTY, NINETEEN HUNDRED AND ONE 




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DETAILS FROM THE GUARANTY BUILDING, BUFFALO, N. Y. 

LoLis H. Sfi.LivAN, Architect 




THE F.LKVATOR GRILLES, THE GUARANTY BUH.DING, BUFFALO, N. Y. 

I^iis H. Sullivan, Arcliitect 




A DETAIL OF THE GUARANTY BUILDING, HUFFALO, N. V, 
-■ Loi'is H. Sii.i.ivAN, Architect 




SKETCH OK THE JAPANESE PAVILION, JACKSON PARK, CHICAGO 
By BiKCH Blkdktte Long 




DESIGN FOR A GARDEN FOR THE DUKE ESTATE, SOMERVILI.K, N. J. 
Drawn fv M. Seymolr Rioodgooh Hv Iamks (iKi'isLKAh 




A COUNTRY I'l.ACE AT FAR HIl.LS, N. J. 
Dkawn iiY M. Skvmoik HiooDGO(ii) O Hv Jamhs Grkknleaf 







THE RIVER FRONT OK HOUSE K)R MR. EDWARD HRADI.EV 
Ei.MEK (iKL",, Architect 




■\1\K r.AKIlEN FRdXT OK MR KDWARO URADI.KVS HOl'SF, 
l-'.i.MhK CiKi'V, Architot 




SKETCH OK INTKRIOR OF MR EDWARD URADI.EV'S MOUSE 
Ei.MFR ()Ky\ , Ar. hitec t 



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Sl'MMKR HOMK FOR MR. IKANC'IS I'.OVl) 
Hi Mil; ( 'iKK\ , An hiui t 




SKKTCH FOR A THEATRK. FOR MARION, INDIANA 
High M. G. Gakdkn, Anhitect 




A HOl'SK AT IllCHI.AXn PARK, ILLINOIS 
Urt.H M. G. Oakukn, Arrliiieii 



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SKKTCH FOR A COUNTRY HOUSK 

I'oNn & Pond, Architects 




H&US L A T xXs A » I fcl( 









HOUSE AT LA SALI.E, ILLINOIS 

I'oNi) S: I'oMi, Arihiieds 




SKEICH FOR A HOISP: AT KOCHESTF.R, \. V 

Chaki.ks S. Klm<; and Harvk.v Em is, An liiiei ts 




HOUSK FOR MR. I'lERRK PLRCKLI. 
Chaklks S. Eli.is and Hakvkv Ellis, Architects 




HOUSE FOR MR. FRANCIS A. PHELPS, WILKESBARRE, PA. 

Wilson F.vkr, Architect 





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SKKICH lOR DINMXC.ROOM, HOt'SK FOR MR. FRANCIS A. PHKI.PS, WILKF.SBARRE, PA. 

Wii.soN KvKH, .Vrchileil 



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PROPOSED COUNTRY HOUSK 

Wilson Kyke, Archltixt 




HOUSK FOR JOHN \V. FOSIKK, (U'THRIE CKNTER, IOWA 
Hknky K. Holsman, Architect 





ITALIAN SKKllHKS 

Hy I IrsiAvis Tivosr 




IHK DllS IRHMI'HAI, AKCH, ROCIIKSTER, N. V, 
C'l Ai ni- KwHTTK Hkai;i«is. An liiieil 




KIRKPI.ACK IN KKSIDEN'CK, SAN KKANflSCO 
Hi iss c^ Favii.i 1- , An liiidts 







HOUSE AT VOX I'OINr, KOR MR. FRANK. (lORDON BIGEI.OW 
Ki.MKR Ghh\, Archltcrt 










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HOUSE NKAR ST. DAVID, PKNNSYLVANIA 
David Knickk kbockkk Bovd, Architect 




A KARMHOUSK AT OC.F.MA, WISCONSIN, FOR MK. C. \V. KRIKCKR 

R. C. Si'F-:N( I'H. Ji;., Archlle. t 







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K. C. Sprni KK, Jk., Anhiteit 



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SKETCH FOR HOUSE IN SAX FRANCISCO 
CoxHEAii & CoxHEAi), Architects 




SKK.rCH FOR HOUSE AT SOl'TH ORANGK, N. 
Gki)K(,f \V, Mahf.r, Anhiteii 




SKMI DKIAC HEI) MOUSKS KOR MR. HOWARD MORRIS 
Ki.MKK Oke\ , An hitp( t 




SKCIION ()l I.IHKAkV AM) (_'()\SKK\' A |( )KN' 1-()K MR. JOSKl'H I. tl'N N 1N( ; 1 1 AM 

C'llAKI I'S S. I'.I US AMI 1I\I.\IN I'.l I I';, Arillllccts 



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I oin|ieliti\(.- DcMyii tot tlie Kit si rr;uelint; Siholarsh ip ol the (In. iiyo A rrhitcctural Club 

H\ Nm s(,\ Max Di nmm, 
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I (iiiipft in\ (-. I )r^iy n iDf the |- ir --i 1 r ;i\ cliiij; >> hol:ir^lii|i ol the ( 'In. a^'O Art hi ten lira I Club 

\\\ '1mo\1 \^ IM)P\ T \I I M \(,K 

St 1 III ! "A I'nitrd Slate-- Kuiha^'-v in a F.UKipcan (apital" 




THK l;AI.I,.k(i< iM 

Coiiipi-titive Design for tlie First 'I'lavcliiig S( lioiar^liiii oi i[ie I Im jl"! An luce, tiiral (liil. 

By John H . \'in\ \ i\ -. 
Si'I'II-ct: "A I'liitcil .-^t.it' s Kinba^'-v m a |-Mrn|ir.iii C'a|iii.i! " 



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A KOUNTAIN NEAR FI,( )K KXCK 



A FDINIAIN IN II.OKl-.NCI-; 



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A lOlNlAlN IN THE CIAKDKN ( ) I- iHK Tril.KklKS, I'ARIS 
Ski-:ixh hv U. 1'.. I'knnkli. 




COMPHTITIVE nKSK;N FOR A HOARD OK TRADK AND SKX K KXCHANCK AT lUJDA I'KSlll 

Akthi K 1Ikk(/, Architeit 





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CLASS DKSIGNS 
By Nicoi.A D'AscENzi) 




IIIK KNTKANCK. HOISK Al ()C( )\().MO\V()t;, WIS. 

Mii\\ \Kii Shaw, Ar. liiici t 




I'KOl'i )SKI) (Ol.I.KOK CIIAI'KI. 
Mow. Mill Sn \\\ . An hitci.1 




Fourteenth Annual Exhibition 

ST/i^e ARCHITECTURAL 
LEAGUE Sr NEW YORK 

215 'WEST FIFTY SEVENTH STREET 
"ADMISSION FREE: Tues. V Thurs., 5oc. 



A POSTKK DKSICN 
By Ci.AiDK Kavkttk Hkagdds 




SC:ilKMK FOR I )KCn RATION 

Hy KhANK 1,,'I.IMIKN 




SKKl'CHKS lOR SIAINKD-CI.ASS WINDOWS IN MR. JAMKS S. WATSON'S YACHT "(iKNKSEK' 

Hv Cl.AlDK KaVKITK IJKACilXiN 



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•m: CAItEDRAl. ChURCtt OF S\ FR/^H^!S ASD Tt£ APOSTLES --^-^ 7 '' 

SAN rRANClSCO, CALIFORNIA. 



THE CATHEDRAL CHURCH OF ST. FRANCIS AND THE Al'OSl I.ES, SAN FRANCISCO 

Wii.i.is Polk, Architect 



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I'ANKL FROM A DECORATiON FOR A lilLLIARD-ROOM IN 
ROCHESTKR, N. Y. 



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I KM kAi, I'ANKI. l)F A DKCORATION FOR A lUI.M A RD- K<)( )M IN ROCHKSTER, N. Y. 

Hy HaI';\k\ F.i.i.is 




fKNI'RAI, I'WKI Ol A DKC'ORATION I'OR A HII.Ll ARD- K()( )M IX ROCHESTER, N. V. 

Hy I1ak\h\ Ki.i.is 



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PANEL FROM A DECORATION FOR A BILI,IAR1)-R()< )M IN ■' 
ROCHESTER, N. V. 

By Harvey Elms 




HOUSE AT OAKLAND, CALIFORNIA 
Wii.i.is Poi.K, Architect 




SKETCHES FOR FURNl'lURE 
By Ci.AiTiK Kavrtth Hkacdon 




HOUSE AT LAKE FOREST, ILL. 
John T. Hethkrington, Architect 



ANNOUNCEMENT 

TN the Architectural Club the year 1900 is made memorable by the founding of the Annual Travel- 
^ ing Scholarship. The selection is made by competition, and the scholarship, amounting this year to 
I3 25.00, is designed to assist the winner in defraying the expenses of a European tour devoted to 
architectural study. From the treasury of the club ^2 50.00 is appropriated annually, and this year 
Mr. George R. Dean has subscribed I50.00, and Mr. Wm. Bryce Mundie $25.00. The competition 
extends over five months, with a separate competition each month, the subject in each case being a part 
of the whole general problem, and the decision is made by ballot of the members of the club. At 
each meeting, when a competition is hung for judgment, a critic, who has had opportunity to study the 
designs submitted, reviews the drawings. The subject is then open for discussion bv the members, and 
later the ballot is taken. From the first the interest has been intense, the discussions developing much 
valuable criticism, and the final competition and decision ending in great enthusiasm. By ballot of the 
members the scholarship is this year awarded to Mr. Nelson Max Dunning. 

The subject chosen for competition was "A United States Embassy in a European Capital," 
and this was divided in five sections as follows: 

BLOCK PLAN OF BUILDINGS AND GROUNDS. 
THE ENTRANCE GATES. 
PLANS AND ELEVATIONS OF BUILDINGS. 
INTERIORS OF BALL-ROOM AND GRAND HALL. 
BIRD'S-EYE VIEW OF BUILDINGS AND GROUNDS. 

On the competition for the entrance gates, Mr. George R. Dean acted as critic; on the block plan 
of buildings and grounds, Mr. Dwight Heald Perkins; on the plans and elevations of buildings, Mr. 



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James Gamble Rogers and Mr. Krank Lloyd Wright; on the ball-room and grand hall, Mr. Louis J. 
Millet, Mr. Edward G. Garden of St. Louis, and Mr. Louis H. Sullivan; and on the bird's-eye view, 
Mr. Robert C. Spencer, Jr., Prof. Seth Temple of the University of Illinois, and Mr. Louis H. Sullivan. 
Elsewhere in the book will be found illustrations of some of the designs submitted in the fourth com- 
petition, and it is greatly regretted that the final drawings were submitted too late for reproduction. 

The Club feels a justifiable pride in the foundation of the scholarship, in that it is the first archi- 
tectural scholarship to be founded in the West, and is a goal towards which the efforts of the members 
have been long directed. Besides the scholarship, this exhibition and the usual current municipal prob- 
lems and club work, the interest of the members has been enlisted in the affairs of the Architectural 
League of America, the executive board of which is this year chosen largely from the members of the 
Architectural Club. The questions proposed for debate by the Educational Committee of the League 
have been taken up eagerly by the members, and the debates have proved, perhaps, the most interest- 
ing of any meetings of the year. The questions proposed for debate between the Architectural Club 
of Chicago, the T-Square Club of Philadelphia, and the Architectural League of New York are: 

Question i. Is it advisable that the architectural student devote the time necessary to obtain a so-called 
classical education as a foundation for refined culture and taste, or can the same refinement be 
gained by studies more closely allied to architecture? 

Question 2 a. Should architectural design and the study of historic styles follow and be based upon a 
knowledge of pure design? ^ 

2 />. How can pure design be best studied ? 

And as these touch what is fast becoming the "sore spot" of architectural education in America, it has 
not been difficult to arouse interest. It is proposed to publish the debates on this and the other ques- 
tions proposed bv the Educational Committee of the League, in the hope that these much-mooted 
problems may be either solved or answered. 



LIST OF MEMBERS OF THE CHICAGO ARCHITECTURAL CLUB 

RESIDENT ACTIVE MEMBERS 



ALLING, VAN WAGENEN, 3167 Groveland Ave. 
ALSCHULER, A. S., 21 12 Michigan Ave. 
ATCHISON, JOHN D., 90 Washington St. 
BAKER, FRANK S., 316 Warren Ave. 
BARGMAN, E. F., 1543 Addison^Ave. 
BARTON, FRANCIS M., 720 Adams St. 
BELDEN, EDGAR S., 164 La Salle St. 
BERNHARD, ADOLF F. (Treas.), 1219 Ashland Blk. 
BERRY, A. C, 2008 W. Adams St. 
BENEDICT, JULES B., 640 East 60th St. 
BOURKE, ROBERT E., 5648 Michigan Ave. 
BROWN, ARTHUR (i., Wilmette, 111. 
BURNHAM, D. H., 1142 The Rookery. 
CARR, CHAS. A., 317 Rush St. 
CHATTEN, M. C, 2251 Calumet Ave. 
CHURCH, MYRON H., 1233 Marquette Bldg. 
DAUCHY, G. v., 84 Illinois St. 
DAVIS, FRANK L., 305 Michigan Ave. 



DEAN, GEO. R., 121 La Salle St. 

DEAN, ARTHUR R., 1780 Old Colony HIdg. 

DILLON, JOHN R., Wilmette, 111. 

DRUMMOND, WM. E., 510 N. Central Ave., Austin, 
)UNNING, N. MAX, 1217 Association lUdg. 
- EDBROOK, H. W. J., 3965 Drexel Blvd. 

FELLOWS, WM. K., 1733, 204 Dearborn St. 
^FISCHER, JOHN B., 7455 I'arnell Ave. 

FYFE, JAMES L., 420 Home Ave., Oak Park, 111. 

GAGE, THOMAS G., 1780 Old Colony Bldg. 
/GARDEN, H. M. G., 1013 Teutonic Bldg. 

-GARDEN, FRANK M., 1408 Wabash Ave. 

GLIDDEN, HOMER H., 175 Dearborn St. 

GRANGER, ALFRED IL, 806 The Temple. 
"GRIFFIN, WALTER B., 1107 Steinway Hall. 

GRUENFELD, CASPAR, 1382 W. Cullom Ave. 
/HATZFELD, CLARENCE, 804 Teutonic Bldg. 

HAZLETON, H. T., 1808 Fisher Bldg. 



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HEMMINGS, E. C, 1418 Champlain Bldg. 

HOEPPNER, E. A., 461 the Kookery. 
^HOLSMAN, HENRY K.(Pres. ), 1 1 18 Association Bldg. 

HUNT MYRON, 123 La Salle St. 
- HYLANI), PAUL V., 520 Pleasant St., Oak Park, 111. 

1NSLE\', K. E., Architectural Dept., L C. R. R. Co. 
' JENKINS, HARRY D., 42 Woodland Park. 

JOBSON, FR.ANK, 501 Pulhiian lildg. 

JOHNSON, MORRIS O., III. Central Station. 

KELLEY, JOHN H., 2832 Vernon Ave. 
^ KLEINPELL, W. H., 372 Webster Ave. 

LAMMERS, HERMAN C, 21 Plymouth Place. 

LANC;, LOUIS A., 261 1 N. 41SI Court. 

LILLESKAU, JOHN, 303 Haddon Ave. 

LINDSTROM, R. S., 3234 Princeton Ave. 

LLEWELLYN, JOSEPH C, 1217 .Association HIdg. 

LONCr, HIRCll liURDETTE, 1107 Steinway Hall. 

MARIEN'PHAL, OSCAR li., 3134 Forest Ave. 
T^M.VUCH, MAX, 28 St. Clair St. 

MILLER, JOSEPH A., 1504 Newport Ave. 
^MILLET, LOUIS J., 151 Michigan Ave. 



MORSE, BURTON E., 11 73 Central Park Ave. 
MUELLER, PAUL F. P., Schiller Bldg. 
NEWBERRY, R. T., 171 La Salle St. 
NIMMONS, GEO. C, 1733 Marquette Bldg. 
PATTISON, EDWARD B., 441 1 Emerald Ave. 
PERKINS, DWIGH'l" H., 1107 Steinway Hall. 
PHILLIPS, JOHN, 1013 Teutonic Bldg. 
PISCHEL, FRED, 15 10 Oakdale Ave. 
RAPP, GEORGE L., 318 East 37th St. 
RAWSON, LORIN A., Hinsdale, 111. 
REINHARDT, G. A., 170 Osgood St. 
ROULEAU, ARTHUR, 510 W. Polk St. 
SCHMIDT, RICHARD E., 1013 Teutonic Bldg. 
SENEY, EDGAR F., 12021 Stewart Ave. 
SPENCER, R. C, Jr. (ist V.-P.), 1107 Steinway Hall. 
S i'AUDER, ADOLPH,' 1013 Teutonic Bldg. 
SHAW, HOWARD, 115 Monroe St., City. 
STARR, HARRY C, 27, 43d St. 
STURM, MEYER J., 868 Pine Grove Ave. 
TAYLOR EDW. L., 11 S. May St. 
TALLMADGE, T. E., 1142 The Rookery. 



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/- TOMLINSON, WEBSTER, 1107 Steinway Hall. 
VON HOLST, HERMAN, 1780 Old Colony Bldg. 
WEBER, P. J. (2d V.-P.), 1 142 The Rookery. 
WATSON, J. N., 1035 W. Monroe St. 
y WATSON, R. BRUCE, 1808 Fisher Bldg. 
WEIRICK, RALPH, 1733 Marquette Bldg. 
WENDLAND, WM. R., 357, 24th St. 



WHITE, MELVILLE P., Coiner 26th and Halsted 

( 
Streets. 

WILMANNS, AUGUST C, 264 Sheffield Ave. 

-WOLTERSDORF, ARTHUR, 70 La Salle St. 

ZIMMERMAN, A. (;., 115 Monroe St. 

ZIMMERMANN, 11. H., 1279 Perry St. 



NON-RESIDENT MEMBERS 



ADELSPERGER, ROLLAND, Santiago de Las Vegas, 
Cuba. 

BRANDT, OSCAR E., 156 Fifth Ave., New York City. 

CHAFF:E, 1). C, Chemical Building, St. Louis, Mo. 

GARDEN, EDWARD (;., Chemical P,ldg., St. Louis, Mo. 

LEVY, SAMUEL H., Battery Park Bldg., New York. 

MITCHELL, JOHN A., Omaha, Neb. . 

PATTISON, JAMES WM., Tree Studio lildg. 

POLK, WILLIS, San Francisco. 



SCHMIDT, HUGO, City of Me.xico. 

SCOFIELD, HUBERT C, Battle Creek, Mich. 

SHEBLESSY, JOHN, Louisville, Ky. 

SMITH, WM. J., Box 113. (lalvcston, Tex. 

SIWRCK, E. 1<'., 108 W. Main St., Madison, Wis. 

THOMAS, 11. S., Jr., 52 King P.lock, Denver, Coh). 

WELLS, W. A., 29 Ofhce lUock, Topeka, Kans. 

WINSLOW, C.ARLETON .M., St. James Bldg., Broadway 
and 26th St., New \'()rk ("ily. 






ASSOCIATE MEMBERS 



HKHR, !<;. 'IllKO., 343 K. 56tli St. 

15ROES-VAN DORT G., Students' Hall, 68th and Nor- 
mal Avenue. 
HUSHN1-:LL, KDWARl) S., 971 Washington Blvd. 
CAMERON, I<:1)(;AR, 15 Tree Studio Bldg. 
COFEMAN, GEORGE W., 717 Rialto Hldg. 
COMBS, R()(;ERS M., 40s Chamber of Coinnieice. 
COOEIDGI';, CHAS. A., i7<So Old Colony 151dg. . 
DUNGA.X, THOS. A., Roanoke lildg. ' 

EVVEN, JOHN M., I I 12 The Rookery. 
KERGUSON, EOUIS A., 139 Adams St. 
(j.ATl^S, \\ M. D., 602 Chamber of Commerce. 
GIANNINI, ()., 211 E. Madison St. 
(iR.W, GIOO. C., 1210 Chamber of Commerce. 
HEINZ, (;i<;o. 1>., 419 Chamber of Commerce. 
KII.LK.X, I-:. GREBEE, I'he Eafavette, E. Harrison St. 
KNISEE\-, H. C.,68 W. Monroe St. 



MATZ, HERMAN L., 302 Chamber of Commerce. 
PERKINS, FREDERICK W., 115 Monroe St. 
PIERCE, E. E., 1303, 100 Washington St. 
PROSSER, H. B., 602 Chamber of Commerce. 
PURINGTON, I), v., 323 Chamber of Commerce. 
REESE, THEODORE F., 24 Adams St. ' 
SCHMIDT, R. O., 191 Superior St. 
SMITH, EUTHER E., 3144 Groveland Ave. 
SPINDEER, OSCAR, 209 S. Clinton St. 
TORGERSON, HENRY, 1749 Marciuetle Bldg. 
TWYMAN, JOSEPH, 100 Wabash Ave. 
UEEMAN, HARRY, 3610 Calumet Ave. 
VAN INWAGEN, Jr., JAME.S, 1051 Marquette Bldg. 
WHITE, J. A., Schiller Bldg. 
WILCOX, A. L., 67th and Union Ave. 
WYEES, TOM R., 1564 Monadnock lildg. 
WATSON, VERNON S., 5762 Rosalie Court. 



HONORARY MEMBERS 



ALLEN, JOHN K., 40 Dearborn St. 

BLAKE, THEO. L., 28 E. 41st St., New York City 

CLARK, ROBERT, 2505 Ken more Ave. 

GAY, HENRY LORD, 92 Dearborn St. 

HUNT, FREDERICK S., 46 N. Francisco Ave. 

JENNEY, W. L. B., 520 New York Life Bldg. 

LAWRIE, HENRY, Omaha, Neb. 



MULLER, LOUIS, Jr., 610 Manhattan Bldg. 
McLEAN, ROBERT C, 610 Manhattan Bldg. 
PHIMISTER, D. G., 539 Flournoy St. 
SULLIVAN, LOUIS IL, Auditorium Tower. 
TAFT, LORADO, Fine Arts Bldg. 
WAGNER, FRITZ, 1118 The Rookery. 




PRINTED FOR THK CHICAGO ARCHIIKCTUKAL 
CMIIi, 1!V R. K. UONNKI.I.KV & SONS COMI'ANV, 
AT IHK I.AKKSIDK I'RKSS, CHICAGO, MIJCCCCI 



THE CHICAGO ARCHITECTURAL ANNUAL 



PUBLISHED BY THE CHICAGO ARCHITECTURAL CLUB. A SELEC- 
TION OF WORKS EXHIBITED AT THE ART INSTITUTE IN MARCH 
OF THE YEAR ONE THOUSAND NINE HUNDRED AND TWO 



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'THE BEACON OF PROGRESS, A MONUMENT TYPIFYING THE APOTHEOSIS OF AMERICAN CIVILIZATION TO BE ERECTED ON THE SITE OF THE 
WORLD'S FAIR AT CHICAGO, BY M. DESPRADELLE OF BOSTON, MASS. THE STATES AND TERRITORIES ARE REPRESENTED BY 

FEMALE FIGURES HAND IN HAND. IN THE PLACE OF HONOR IN THE AXIS OF THE MONUMENT ARE WRITTEN THE NAMES OF THE 
THIRTEEN ORIGINAL COLONIES. UPON THE STELA GUARDED BY THE EAGLE IS THE GODDESS OF THE TWENTIETH CENTURY. AT THE 
BASE IS A GREAT AMPITHEATRE FORMING A SANCTUARY. IN THE INTERIOR ELEVATORS CONDUCT TO DIFFERENT BALCONIES AND TO 
THE BEACON PLACED ONE THOUSAND FIVE HUNDRED FEET ABOVE THE GROUND :: :: :: :: :; :: ;: :; :: : : :: ;: 



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IN DESIGNING HITCHCOCK HALL IT WAS NECESSARY TO GIVE DIS- 
TINCTIVE CHARACTER TO THE BUILDING ITSELF, TO HARMONIZE 
IN A GENERAL WAY WITH ALL OF THE OTHER BUILDiNGS-TO JOIN 
LITERALLY TO SNELL HALL, USING A PARTY WALL, AND TO MAIN 
TAIN PROPER RELATIONS BETWEEN THE MASSES OF HITCHCOCK 
HALL AND THE HULL LABORATORIES. IT WAS ALSO NECESSARY TO 
MAKE PROPER CORNER EMPHASIS AT THE CORNER OF ELLIS 
AVENUE AND FIFTY-SEVENTH STREET, AND TERMINATE THE COM- 
POSITION OF BOTH HITCHCOCK AND SNELL AS VIEWED FROM THE 
NORTHWEST. THE STORY HEIGHTS OF SNELL AND HULL ARE 
DIFFERENT. IT WAS IMPOSSIBLE TO PRESERVE THE LEVELS OF 
BOTH-THEREFORE SNELL WAS COPIED AS REGARDS STORY HEIGHTS, 


















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WINDOW LEVELS AND CORNICE LINE. THE SKETCH SHOWS THE 
DORMERS REMOVED FROM SNELL TO UNITE IT STILL MORE WITH 
THE CORNER AND TO GIVE TO THE ENTIRE COMPOSITION A LOW 
HORIZONTAL EFFECT. THE REMOVAL OF SNELL DORMERS IS ONLY 
UNDER CONSiDERATION-IT MAY NOT BE DONE. THE CUT ON THE 
OPPOSITE PAGE IS THE VIEW FROM THE NORTHWEST, BEING THE 
CORNER OF ELLIS AVENUE AND FIFTY-SEVENTH STREET. THE 
CUT ON THIS PAGE SHOWS THE VIEW FROM THE CAMPUS. THE 
DETAILS ARE PHOTOGRAPHED FROM THE SCULPTOR'S MODELS 
FOR CARVING, MADE BY RICHARD W. BOCK. THE PLANS ARE OF 
THE FIRST AND THE TYPICAL STORIES. THE ARCHITECT IS 

DWIGHT HEALD PERKINS. CHICAGO :: :: :: : : :: :: 











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THE CHICAGO ARCHITECTURAL ANNUAL 



PUBLISHED BY THE CHICAGO ARCHITECTURAL CLUB. A SELEC- 
TION OF WORKS EXHIBITED AT THE ART INSTITUTE IN MARCH 
OF THE YEAR ONE THOUSAND NINE HUNDRED AND TWO 



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'J' HE BEACON OF PROGRESS, A MONUMENT TYPIFYING THE APOTHEOSIS OF AMERICAN CIVILIZATION TO BE ERECTED ON THE SITE OF THE 
WORLD'S FAIR AT CHICAGO, BY M. DESPRADELLE OF BOSTON, MASS. THE STATES AND TERRITORIES ARE REPRESENTED BY 

FEMALE FIGURES HAND IN H.AND. IN THE PLACE OF HONOR IN THE AXIS OF THE MONUMENT ARE WRITTEN THE NAMES OF THE 
THIRTEEN ORIGINAL COLONIES. UPON THE STELA GUARDED BY THE EAGLE IS THE GODDESS OF THE TWENTIETH CENTURY. AT THE 
BASE IS A GREAT AMPITHEATRE FORMING A SANCTUARY. IN THE INTERIOR ELEVATORS CONDUCT TO DIFFERENT BALCONIES AND TO 
THE BEACON PLACED ONE THOUSAND FIVE HUNDRED FEET ABOVE THE GROUND :: :: :: : : :: ;; :: :: :: :: :: :: 




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JN DESIGNING HITCHCOCK HALL IT WAS NECESSARY TO GIVE DIS- 
TINCTIVE CHARACTER TO THE BUILDING ITSELF. TO HARMONIZE 
IN A GENERAL WAY WITH ALL OF THE OTHER BUILDINGS-TO JOIN 
LITERALLY TO SNELL HALL, USING A PARTY WALL, AND TO MAIN 
TAIN PROPER RELATIONS BETWEEN THE MASSES OF HITCHCOCK 
HALL AND THE HULL LABORATORIES. IT WAS ALSO NECESSARY TO 
MAKE PROPER CORNER EMPHASIS AT THE CORNER OF ELLIS 
AVENUE AND " FIFTY-SEVENTH STREET. AND TERMINATE THE COM- 
POSITION OF BOTH HITCHCOCK AND SNELL AS VIEWED FROM THE 
NORTHWEST. ' THE STORY HEIGHTS OF SNELL AND HULL ARE 
DIFFERENT. IT WAS IMPOSSIBLE TO PRESERVE THE LEVELS OF 
BOTH— THEREFORE SNELL WAS COPIED AS REGARDS STORY HEIGHTS. 




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WINDOW LEVELS AND CORNICE LINE. THE SKETCH SHOWS THE 
DORMERS REMOVED FROM SNELL TO UNITE IT STILL MORE WITH 
THE CORNER AND TO GIVE TO THE ENTIRE COMPOSITION A LOW 
HORIZONTAL EFFECT. THE REMOVAL OF SNELL DORMERS IS ONLY 
UNDER CONSIDERATION— IT MAY NOT BE DONE. THE CUT ON THE 
OPPOSITE PAGE IS THE VIEW FROM THE NORTHWEST, BEING THE 
CORNER OF ELLIS AVENUE AND FIFTY-SEVENTH STREET. THE 
CUT ON THIS PAGE SHOWS THE VIEW FROM THE CAMPUS. THE 
DETAILS ARE PHOTOGRAPHED FROM THE SCULPTOR'S MODELS 
FOR CARVING, MADE BY RICHARD W. BOCK. THE PLANS ARE OF , 
THE FIRST AND THE TYPICAL STORIES. THE ARCHITECT IS 
DWIGHT HEALD PERKINS, CHICAGO : : : : : : 













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VIEW FROM THE NORTHEAST 



DWIGHT HEALD PERKINS. ARCHITECT 



INTERIOR OF BALL COURT 




THE UNIVERSITY OF CHICAGO 



GYMNASIUM-VIEW FROM THE ATHLETIC FIELD 



MORGAN PARK ACADEMY 






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FIRST FLOOR PLAN 




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RESIDENCE IN LAKE FOREST, ILLINOIS 





SECOND FLOOR PLAN 






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THE UNIVERSITY OF CHICAGO SETTLEMENT 



COTTAGE ON BUSTIN'S ISLAND. CASCO BAY 
FIRST FLOOR PLAN 






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DWIGHT HEALD PERKINS, ARCHITECT 
SECOND FLOOR PLAN 




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ROOM 




HOUSE AT EVANSTON. MYRON HUNT. ARCHITECT 




HOUSE DESIGNED FOR THE LADIES' HOME JOURNAL. ELMER GREY, ARCHITECT, MILWAUKEE, WIS. 






A SOUTHERN FARMHOUSE 

R. C. SPENCER. JR., ARCHITECT 

HOUSE AT EVANSTON 




COPYRIGHT CURTIS PUB. CO. 



A PROPOSED MUSIC HALL AND OFFICE BUILDING SEVENTEEN STORIES IN 
HEIGHT. OF WHICH DWIGHT HEALD PERKINS AND ROBERT C SPENCER. JR.. ARE 
ASSOCIATE ARCHITECTS. CONTAINS THE CONCERT AUDITORIUM HERE ILLUS- 
TRATED, DESIGNED AND DRAWN BY MR. SPENCER. IT IS PLANNED TO SEAT 
3.500 PEOPLE. THE RICH PERFORATED SCREEN ABOVE THE STAGE CONCEALS 
THE ORGAN AND ORGAN LOFT. UNUSUAL FEATURES OF THE INTERIOR ARE 
THE PERFECT INTER-RELATION OF BALCONY FRONTS AND PROSCENIUM ARCH, 
AND THE PANELS ABOVE ON THREE SIDES FOR MAGNIFICENT MURAL PAINTINGS, 
RICHLY DECORATIVE IN COLOR SCHEME AND FIGURE COMPOSITION, IN DESIGN 
INC THE HOUSE AT CANTON. ILLINOIS. A SCHEME OF BOARD AND ROUGH-CAST 
TREATMENT HAS BEEN ADOPTED ABOVE THE FIRST STORY, WHICH SEEKS 
TO RETAIN THE CHARM OF THE OLD HALF-TIMBER WORK WITHOUT ANY FALSE 
PRETENSE OF SOLID TIMBER OR ACTUAL EXPOSED CONSTRUCTION, THE ROUGH 
STAINED BOARDS ARE USED IN AN* ARCHITECTURALLY DECORATIVE, RATHER 
THAN IN A STRUCTURAL WAY. AND SERVE TO COMPOSE THE OPENINGS AND 
GIVE VARIETY AND EMPHASIS TO THE PRINCIPAL MASSES AND SURFACES. 
TERRACES. WALLS AND PAVEMENTS ARE OF LOCAL PAVING BRICK. WALLS 
ABOVE ARE OF RED LOCAL SAND-MOLD BRICK. RICH, WARM AND VARIED IN 
COLOR. THE SOUTHERN AND NORTHERN FARMHOUSES ARE TWO OF A SERIES 
OF SEVEN DESIGNED AND DRAWN BY MR. SPENCER FOR THE LADIES' HOME 
JOURNAL." BETWEEN OCTOBER, 1900 AND JUNE. 1901. THE ENTIRE SERIES OF 
ORIGINAL DRAWINGS BEING EXHIBITED THROUGH THE COURTESY OF THE PUB- 



LISHERS. 



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THE EVANSTON HOUSE, ILLUSTRATED BY PHOTOGRAPHS, WAS 




A CALIFORNIA FARMHOUSE 
HOUSE AT EVANSTON 




BUILT IN 1894. THE FIRST STORY IS OF COM- 
MON PINKED EVANSTON COMMON BRICK, LAID 
IN RED MORTAR. PORCH POSTS AND GATES 
ARE SOLID YELLOW PINE TIMBERS, OILED 
AND VARNISHED. THE ROUGH BOARDING 
ABOVE IS STAINED A DEEP REDDISH BROWN 
AND THE ROUGH-CAST PLASTERING IS A DULL 
CREAMY BUFF, SHADING INTO LIGHT GRAY. 
THE LAKE DELAVAN GARDENER'S LODGE, 
WITH LAUNDRY, WORKSHOP, WINDMILL TANK 
AND GREENHOUSE, IS OF FRAME CONSTRUC- 
TION, FINISHED OUTSIDE WITH CEMENT 
ROUGH-CAST. WOODWORK IS ROUGH AND 

STAINED A LIGHT WARM BROWN OR TAN. 
THE GARDENER'S COTTAGE AT LAKE GENEVA 
IS COVERED TO ROOF WITH TWOINCH PLANK 
WORKED INTO WIDE LAP SIDING, ROUGH 
FROM THE SAW AND STAINED A VERY DEEP 
WOOD BROWN. SHINGLES ARE MOSS GREEN. 
THE TWO HOUSES AT MADISON, WISCONSIN, 
WERE BUILT IN 1895, ON LANGDON STREET. 
AS OFTEN HAPPENS, THE REAR VIEWS ARE 
MOST PICTURESQUE, THE STAIR^CASE 

SHOWN IS IN THE SMALLER HOUSE. :: 



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A NORTHERN FARMHOUSE 

R. C. SPENCER, JR., ARCHITECT 

GARDENER'S LODGE AT LAKE DELAVAN, WIS. 





GARDENER'S COTTAGE AT LAKE GENEVA, WIS. 
R. C. SPENCER. JR.. ARCHITECT 
TWO HOUSES AT MADISON, WIS. 




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1^ HOUSE FOR 

MR- U-C'ORENDORFF 

AT CANTON. ILL 




R'C- SPENCER JR ARCHITECT, CHICAGO 



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BUILT OF LOCAL COMMON RED BRICK LAiD IN 

WlDtJ^INTi WITH CEMENT ROUCh CAST 6^ 3TAiN- 

fP B0/>Ri>5 ^N STUD FRAME ABOVE"- Roop^ r£i;tIIE 





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ALPHA DELTA PHI CHAPTER HOUSE AT CORNELL UNIVERSITY, ITHACA. NEW YORK. GEORGE R. DEAN. ARCHITECT. CHICAGO, IS DESIGNED 
TO STAND ON A POINT OF GROUND OVERLOOKING THE CITY. THE LARGE PLATE-GLASS WINDOWS IN LIVING-ROOM LOOK UP AND 

DOWN THE VALLEY. THE TWELVE-SIDED PORCH HAS WINDOWS THAT SLIDE UP INTO THE WALL OR MAY BE PULLED DOWN IN WINTER. 
INCREASING THE LIVING-ROOM SPACE. THE BUILDING WILL BE OF BRICK AND PLASTER WITH STONE BASEMENT AND TILE ROOF. THE LODGE 
STANDS ABOUT TWENTY FEET HIGHER ON THE GROUND THAN THE HOUSE. THE ENTRANCE BEING APPROACHED BY A FLIGHT OF STEPS 




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SECOND rU'OK 



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GEORGE R. DEAN, ARCHITECT 
BRONZE DOOR GRILL AND 
HALL LAMP FOR MRS. ELLIS 



DINING HALL, STRAWBERRY ISLAND 

m6nUMENT at DUBUQUE, IOWA 

WINDOW IN DEN FOR MR. BURTON HOLMES 






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'pHE DREXEL Cf^ ANNEX, 
GEORGE R. DEAN, ARCHI- 
TECT, CHICAGO. THE FRONT 
IS OF YELLOW BRICK WITH 
PATTERN BRICK IN BROWN. 
THE INTERIOR CONNECTS BY 
MEANS OF THE LARGE 
ARCHES WITH THE OLD 
CAFE. THE LANTERN IS ON 
THE STREET CORNER, OF 
WROUGHT IRON AND GLASS, 
IS ELEVEN FEET HIGH AND 
LIGHTED BY TWO ARC LAMPS 





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,« 'pHIS STABLE IN LAKE FOREST. BUILT IN A DENSELY WOODED TRACT- 
ARTHUR HEUN, ARCHITECT-IS OF SHINGLES LEFT TO WEATHER. THE 
TRIMMINGS ONLY ARE PAINTED. THE COLOR CHOSEN_BEiNG A SOFT BROWN. 
THE TIN ROOF ON TOV/ER IS PAINTED BROWN GREEN. THE FRIEZE SHOWN 
HERE IS IN A LIBRARY DECORATED IN RED WITH OLIVE GREEN WOODWORK. 
THE GROUND IS OF ROUGH PLASTER STAINED A DUSKY GOLD AND THE 
STENCIL IS PAINTED IN A RICH INDIAN RED :: :; :: :: :: :: :: :: :: :: :: 



■-*-»» 





RESIDENCE IN LAKE-SIDE IS BUILT ON A PROMONTORY. THE LAKE BEING ON ONE SIDE AND A DEEP 
RAVINE ON THE OTHER. IT IS TO BE CONSTRUCTED OF WOOD AND FINISHED IN ROUGH-HEWN 
LUMBER. STAINED A RICH CREAM COLOR WITH TRIMMINGS OF A DARK GREEN. THE WALL. UP TO A 
HEIGHT OF FIRST STORY WINDOWS. ALSO ENTRANCE PORCH. IS CONSTRUCTED OF DARK VITRIFIED 
BRICK. RESIDENCE IN LAKE FOREST IS BUILT OF DARK VITRIFIED BRICK, LAID WITH BLACK JOINTS. 
THE PLASTER IS ROUGHCAST AND OILED. ALL TRIMMINGS ARE OF WOOD. PAINTED BLACK. ARTHUR 
HEUN, ARCHITECT.'CHICAGG. 






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'pHE RESIDENCE IN WINNETKA IS BUILT ON THE BLUFF FACING THE LAKE. THE FIRST STORY WALLS 
ARE OF VITRIFIED BRICK, A DARK BROWN IN COLOR. WITH TRIMMINGS OF BEDFORD STONE. SECOND 
STORY AND ROOF IS FINISHED WITH CEDAR SHINGLES DIPPED IN GREEN STAIN OF TWO HARMONIOUS 
SHADES. THE RESIDENCE IN DES MOINES IS FINISHED IN ROUGH PLASTER PAINTED A LICHEN GREEN, 
WITH TRIMMINGS IN WOOD OF A DARK OLIVE COLOR. FOUNDATION WALLS ARE FACED WITH NEUTRAL 
BROWN BRICK. ROOF IS OF SHINGLES, STAINED GREEN. ARTHUR HEUN, ARCHITECT. :: :: 




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A COUNTRY HOUSE AT OREGON, ILL. 
A CLOCK TOWER AT WYOMING, N. Y. 





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A COTTAGE AT EAGLE'S NEST, 
A SILO AND CUTTING SHED 
AT OREGON. ILL. 



JHE PHOTOGRAPHS HERE- 
WITH REPRODUCED ARE 
FROM RECENTLY EXECUTED 
WORK IN EAST END AND 
WASHINGTON AVES., CHI- 
CAGO. THE CLOCK TOWER, 
A DRAWING OF WHICH IS 
PRESENTED, IS TO MARK 
THE ENTRANCE FROM THE 
MAIN STREET TO A PARK IN 
WHICH IS SITUATED THE VIL- 
LAGE HALL WHICH MRS. 
COONLEY WARD HAS ERECT- 
ED FOR THE VILLAGE OF 
WYOMING. NEW YORK. THE 
COUNTRY HOUSE IS ONE OF 
A GROUP OF BUILDINGS IN 
PROCESS OF ERECTION ON 
THE LAUGHLIN FARM ON THE 
ROCK RIVER JUST ABOVE 
OREGON. ILL. THE HOUSE 
HAS A BEAUTIFUL SETTING 
IN A WIDE VALLEY NEAR THE 




EXTERIOR AND INTERIOR VIEWS, RESIDENCE OF MR. STUARt COONLEY 

RIVER AND JUST OPPOSITE 
THE HIGH EAGLE'S NEST 
BLUFF ON THE CROWN OF 
WHICH THE ARTIST COLONY 
IS LOCATED. THE OTHER 
BUILDINGS, GROUPED PIC- 
TURESQUELY ON A WINDING 
ROADWAY AT A DISTANCE 
FROM THE HOUSE, ARE THE 
DAIRY BARN, WITH BOILER 
PLANT AND REFRIGERATING 
MACHINE, AND THE COW 
BARN, THE HORSE BARN AND 
CARRIAGE HOUSE AND SILO 
WITH ATTACHED SHEDS. 
THE MATERIALS USED ARE 
CONCRETE, LIME STONE, 
ROUGH CAST; THE GENERAL 
BODY OF COLOR BEING 
WHITE, WITH TIMBER WORK 
STAINED DARK GREEN AND 
HERE AND THERE AN OUT 
CROPPING OF RED BRICK 
FOR RELIEF. ; : : : : : : : :: 



EXTERIOR VIEW, RESIDENCE OF JAMES W. THOMPSON 
POND & POND, ARCHITECTS 








yHlRD CHURCH OF CHRIST SCIENTIST OF CHICAGO. THE EXTERIOR IS EXECUTED IN DULL ENAMELLED BRICK 
WITH CORNICES AND ORNAMENTAL MEMBERS IN DULL GLAZED TERRA COTTA. THE BASE AND THE COLUMNS IN 
CRAY GRANITE, AND THE WINDOWS GLAZED WITH OPALESCENT GLASS IN PATTERN. THE BRICKS A SOFT MOTTLED 
GRAY IN COLOR, THE TERRA COTTA CREAM WHITE AND THE GRANITE OF THE SAME COLOR VALUE AS THE BRICKS 




HTHIRD CHURCH OF CHRIST SCIENTIST OF CHICAGO. THE INTERIOR IS EXECUTED IN PLASTER WITH WOOD TRIM. 
THE BROAD SURFACES AND THE FORM OF THE ARCHITECTURAL MEMBERS ARE AN EXPRESSION OF THE STRUC- 
TURAL FACT OF A WOOD FURRED VAULT SUPPORTED BY STEEL TRUSSES. THE DOMINANT COLOR IS GOLDEN 
YELLOW; THE MOULDINGS, ORGAN SCREEN, AND BALCONY FRONTS IN CREAM WHITE: THE WALLS GOLDEN YELLOW, 
THE ORNAMENTS STENCILLED IN GOLD AND THE GLASS GOLDEN YELLOW, PICKED OUT WITH WHITE AND GREEN 




.^--n 





THE GARDEN FRONT 



THE STABLE 



COEDMORE-THE HOME OF MR. FRANK R. McMULLlN. HIGHLAND PARK. ILL. 



HUGH M. G. GARDEN, ARCHITECT 



THE LIVING-ROOM 



THE DINING-ROOM 






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CCHEME FOR THE TREATMENT OF THE INTERIOR COURT OF A CITY CLUB HOUSE. TO 
BE EXECUTED IN CEMENT AND ENAMELLED TILES WITH A TILED FLOOR AND THE 
COLUMNS OF GRAY LIMESTONE. THE OPENINGS ARE ARRANGED TO BE CLOSED IN IN- 
CLEMENT WEATHER AND OPENED TO THE AIR WHEN THE WEATHER PERMITS. 



A HOUSE IN BUENA PARK, CHICAGO. RICHARD E. SCHMIDT. ARCHITECT. 



'J:^:i 





SEAT HNIJ 

liKONZE OKCAN SCf^EHN 



SECOND PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH 
MICHIGAN AVENUE AND TWENTIETH STREET 
CHICAGO 




HOWARD SHAW 

ARCHITECT 

CHICAGO 



ONE OF THE LAMP2 




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SEAT END 
THE PULPIT 





LAKESIDE PRESS BUILDING 
HOWARD SHAW, ARCHITECT 

ENTRANCE 



VESTIBULE 

62 LAKE SHORE DRIVE 
















COTTAGES AT MIDLOTHIAN 
COUNTRY CLUB, CHICAGO 
HOWARD SHAW. ARCHITECT 
[3RONZE ENTRANCE DOORS 
RESIDENCE, 62 LAKE SHORE 
DRIVE CHICAGO ■■ :; ;: ;; 





COTTAGE FOR MRS. N. F. McCORMICK, LAKE FOREST 
LOUIS H. SULLIVAN, ARCHITECT 



PLAN 



SPRING SONG-A DECORATION 



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HOUSE FOR 

ELLIS WAINWRIGHT 

AT ST. LOUIS 



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GAGE BROTHERS' BUILDING, MICHIGAN2AVENUE. LOUIS H. SULLIVAN, ARCHITECT. DETAIL. 




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CAST-IRON GRILLE 

AN ARC LAMP 

A DETAIL 

LOUIS H. SULLIVAN 

ARCHITECT 





STAIRS IN STORE FOR SCHLESSINGER & MAYER 

LOUIS H. SULLIVAN. ARCHITECT 

EXTERIOR DETAIL OF STORE IN TERRA COTTA 





THE GETTY TOMB. 
A MEDAL. LOUIS H. 
SULLIVAN, ARCHI- 
TECT : : : : 







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GRILL ROOM, DERBY CLUB, CLEVELAND, OHIO 



INTERIOR 



M. M. GLEICHMAN, ARCHITECT, CLEVELAND, OHIO 
OWN RESIDENCE 



ENGINE HOUSE, CLEVELAND, OHIO 



ENTERIOR 







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RESIDENCE FOR F. T. GATES. MONTCLAIR, N. J. 

GEORGE W. MAHER, ARCHITECT 

RESIDENCE FOR JAMES A. PATTEN. EVANSTON 

DETAIL 



DETAIL 







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SKETCHES FOR WALL DECORATIONS 

EXECUTED BY L. J. MILLET 

FOR GEORGE W. MAHER, ARCHITECT 





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AN AMERICAN 
EMBASSY, BY 
J. H. PHILLIPS 



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AN AMERICAN EMBASSY, BY WM. E. DRUMMOND 



BIRD'S EYE 



'pHE DRAWINGS ON THIS PAGE, THE PRECEDING PAGE AND THE TOP DRAWING ON THE FOLLOWING PAGE ARE SOME OF THE DRAWINGS 
SUBMITTED IN LAST YEAR'S SCHOLARSHIP COMPETITION. THE COMPETITION THIS YEAR CLOSED TOO LATE FOR PUBLICATION. THE 
COMPETITION THIS YEAR WAS VERY SUCCESSFUL FROM THE STANDPOINT OF THE NUMBER OF COMPETITORS AND GENERAL EXCELLENCE 
OF WORK PRODUCED. THE AMOUNT OF MONEY (ONLY THREE HUNDRED AND TWENTY-FIVE DOLLARS) FURNISHED THE CHICAGO 
SCHOLAR IS ENTIRELY TOO SMALL. WHEN WE CONSIDER THAT EVERY LARGE CITY IN THE EAST HAS FROM TWO TO FOUR 
SCHOLARS IN EUROPE ALL THE TIME. WHO ARE FURNISHED ONE THOUSAND DOLLARS EACH, IT WOULD SEEM THAT THE CITIZENS 
OF CHICAGO SHOULD TAKE INTEREST ENOUGH IN THE ARCHITECTURE OF THEIR CITY TO KEEP ONE MAN AT LEAST PERFECTING 
HIMSELF IN HIS ART :: :: :: :: :: :: :: :: :: :: :: :: :: :: :: :: :: ;: :; :: :: :: :: 



PLAN 



BALLROOM 



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AN AMERICAN EMBASSY. THE ENTRANCE 
BIRCH BURDETTE LONG 

LIVING-ROOM COTTAGE FOR ADLA! T. EWING. SPRING LAKE, MICH. 
JARVIS R. HARBECK, ARCHITECT 





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Of ▼ ▼ T 
FRANK r 
LLOYD T 



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JHE NINTH DESIGN IN THE LADIES' HOME JOURNAL SERIES OF 
MODERN SUBURBAN HOMES. THE BLOCK PLANS AT EITHER SIDE 
OF THE PAGE SHOW ALTERNATIVE ARRANGEMENT SUITED TO 
AN AVERAGE SUBURBAN LOT WITH A FRONTAGE OF SEVENTY- 
FIVE FEET. AT THE BOTTOM OF THE PACE IS A SECTIONAL VIEW 
OF DINING-ROOM, LIVING-ROOM, AND ENTRANCE WAY, SHOWING 
THE ROOMS IN TRUE RELATION TO EACH OTHER. THE FRAME 
OF THIS BUILDING, AS OF THE HOUSE ON NEXT PAGE IS OF WOOD 
PLASTERED OUTSIDE UPON METAL LATH WITH OUTSIDE TRIM OF 
UNDRESSED WOOD, STAINED BROWN. THE INTERIOR FINISH IS 
OF STAINED AND WAXED PINE OVER ROUGH SAND FINISHED 
PLASTER, ALSO WAXED. THE HOUSE IS TO BE BUILT AT RIVER- 
SIDE, ILLINOIS, AND FINISHED AS HERE SHOWN. :: 



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FTH DESIGN IN 
LADIES' HOME 
JOURNAL SERIES OF 
MODERN SUBURBAN 
HOUSES. THE QUAD- 
RUPLE BLOCK PLAN AND 
VIEW AT BOTTOM OF THE 
PAGE SHOWS AN AR- 
RANGEMENT OF THE 
HOUSES THAT GIVES PRI- 
VACY TO EACH HOUSE- 
HOLDER. SECURING AT 
THE SAME TIME A 
BREADTH OF TREATMENT 
FOR THE WHOLE THAT 
BRINGS MANY ADVAN- 
TAGES OVER THE PRES- 
ENT SYSTEM OF SUBDIVID- 
ING A SIMILAR BLOCK. 
THE LARGER PLAN AT THE 
CENTER OF THE PAGE 
SHOWS THE DETAILED 
ARRANGEMENT OF THE 
PLAN USED AS THE BASIS 
FOR THE GROUP. :: :: 



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AT THE TOP OF THIS AND THE FOLLOWING PAGE IS A PERSPECTIVE DRAWING OF THE METZGER HOUSE TO BE BUILT AT SAULT STE 
MARIE, MICHIGAN, WITH A BLOCK PLAN OF THE GROUNDITO THE LEFT. THE HOUSE IS TO BE BUILT OF NATIVE LIGHT GRAY SAND- 
STONE WITH TILE ROOFS. AT THE BOTTOM OF THE FOLLOWING PAGE IS A BIRD'S-EYE VIEW OF THE HILLSIDE HOME SCHOOL, AT 
HILLSIDE, WISCONSIN, WITH A PLAN ABOVE TO THE RIGHT. THE SCHOOL IS BUILT OF PINK SANDSTONE AND OPEN TIMBER CON- 
STRUCTION OF OAK. THE DRAWING BELOW THIS TEXT SHOWS THE STREET FRONT OF THE ROGERS HOUSE AT OAK PARK. THE 
EXTERIOR WALLS ARE PLASTERED. THE METZGER HOUSE AND THE ROGERS HOUSE ARE THE WORK OF FRANK LLOYD WRIGHT AND 
WEBSTER TOMLINSON. :: :: :: :: :: : : ,■ : : :: :: 





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THE WINSLOW HOUSE AND BARN AT RIVER FOREST. ILL., AT THE TOP OF THIS 
AND THE FOLLOWING PAGE. WITH A DETAIL OF THE STONE CARVING OF THE 
ENTRANCE TO THE WINSLOW HOUSE AT THE LOWER LEFT-HAND CORNER OF 
THIS PAGE. BENEATH THIS TEXT IS A DETAIL OF THE LOGGIA COLUMNS OF THE 
HELLER HOUSE ON WOODLAWN AVENUE. CHICAGO. BELOW THE WIEW OF THE 
WINSLOW BARN ON THE NEXT PAGE IS A STUDY FOR A VILLAGE BANK PUB- 
LISHED IN THE BRICK BUILDER'S SERIES DESIGNED TO BE CAST IN CONCRETE 
ENTIRE. THE WINSLOW HOUSE STANDS IN SPACIOUS GROUNDS ADJOINING THE 
WALLER ESTATE AT RIVER FOREST AND WAS BUILT IN EIGHTEEN NINETY-FOUR. 
THE WALLS ARE OF A BRIGHT GOLDEN ROMAN BRICK: THE MODELED ORNAMENT 
OF THE FRIEZE A DEEP CREAM COLOR: THE ROOF OF A SOFT YELLOWISH PINK 
SHINGLE TILE. THE AUVERGNE PRESS IS LOCATED IN A WING OF THE BARN. 
COLOR AND MATERIALS OF THE BARN ARE SIMILAR. :: ;: 






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MR. WRIGHT'S WORK ROOMS AT OAK PARK. BUILT OF SAND-MOLD BRICK AND UN- 
SURFACED WOOD. THE WHOLE IS STAINED IN QUIET BRONZE TONES. THE 
FIGURES TERMINATING THE PIERS AT EITHER SIDE OF THE ENTRANCE WERE 
MODELED BY RICHARD BOCK, WHO ALSO MODELED THE FIGURE OF 'GOLDEN 
ROD." THE INTERIOR IS OF THE SIMPLEST MATERIALS. SOFT WOODS AND 
ROUGH PLASTER. STAINED IN DEEP TONES. POLYCHROMATIC IN ARRANGEMENT. 
BELOW AND ON THE OPPOSITE PAGE ARE VIEWS OF " GLENLLOYD." THE RESI- 
DENCE OF B. HARLEY BRADLEY. AT KANKAKEE. ILLINOIS. THE EXTERIOR IS OF 
CREAM-WHITE PLASTER AND UNSURFACED WOOD. STAINED A SOFT BROWN. 
THE INTERIOR AND FINISHINGS ARE OF QUARTERED OAK THROUGHOUT. THE 
FITTINGS AND FURNISHINGS WERE DESIGNED BY THE ARCHITECT. THE COLOR OF 
THE INTERIOR WALLS. FLOOR COVERINGS AND HANGINGS OF THE MAIN FLOOR IS 
DEEP RED, COMBINED WITH YELLOW OVERHEAD. THE PLASTER WALLS. TRIM. 
AND FURNITURE ARE STAINED AND WAXED. THE HOUSE STANDS IN A SMALL 
GLEN ON THE BANKS OF THE KANKAKEE RIVER. AND WAS BUILT LAST YEAR. 
TOGETHER WITH THE HICKOX HOUSE. WHICH OCCUPIES THE ADJOINING SITE. 







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THE LARGER ILLUSTRATIONS ON THIS PACE 
ARE INTERIOR VIEWS OF THE DINING-ROOM 
AND LIVING-ROOM AT GLENLLOYD. THE 

FURNITURE AND FURNISHINGS DESIGNED 
WITH THE HOUSE. AT THE TOP OF THE 
PAGE IS A DETAIL OF THE DINING CHAIRS 
AND TABLE IN MR. WRIGHT'S OWN HOUSE. 
BELOW THIS TEXT A VIEW IN THE NURSERY, 
A VAULTED CEILING WITH A BRICK WAINS- 
COT BENEATH. ON THE FOLLOWING PAGE 
S A VIEW OF THE HICKOX HOUSE AT 
KANKAKEE, ILLINOIS :: :: :: :: :: 










pj THE TOP OF THE PAGE IS THE 
WEST FRONT OF THE RIVER FOR- 
EST GOLF CLUB, BUILT AT RIVER 
FOREST, ILL. BELOW THIS A PER- 
SPECTIVE VIEW OF THE NEW ABRA- 
HAM LINCOLN CENTER, TO BE BUILT 
ON OAkWOOD BOULEVARD, AT THE 
COR. OF LANGLEY AVENUE. FRANK 
LLOYD WRIGHT AND DWIGHT HEALb 
PERKINS, ASSOCIATED ARCHITECTS. 
THE GROUND FLOOR IS DEVOTED 
TO THE VARIOUS WORKING SOCIE- 
TIES OF THE PARISH; THE SPACE 
ABOVE. TO THE AUDITORIUM: ABOVE 
THIS THE SEMINARY ROOMS AND 
QUARTERS FOR THOSE IMMEDIATE- 
LY CONNECTED WITH THE CHURCH 
WORK. THE TOP FLOOR IS A CLUB 
ROOM FLOOR DIVIDED INTO LARGE 
HALLS. WITH A MEZZANINE FOR 
GYMNASIUM WORK. ON THE FOL- 
LOWING PAGE THE HENDERSON 
HOUSE at' ELMHURST. ILL., AND 
BELOW ARE TWO VIEWS OF ONE 
OF THE MAIN ENTRANCES TO LEX- 
INGTON TERRACES. THE TOWERS 
SERVE TO LIGHT THE TERRACES 
AND APPROACH. THE INTERIOR 
COURT IS LIGHTED WITH SIMILAR 
TOWERS IN THE RE-ENTRANT AN- 
GLES. THE STRUCTURE AS A 
WHOLE IS TO CONTAIN 328 FLATS: 
AVERAGE OF FOUR ROOMS EACH. 




/^— - 





THE PATRONS HAVE, BY THEIR GENEROUS AND HEARTY SUPPORT, MADE 
THIS EXHIBITION AND ANNUAL :: :: :: :: :: :: :: :: :: :: 



ALLINCJ, VAN WAGENEN 

ALSCnULEK. ALFRED S. 

ANDREWS & JOHNSON CO. 

ANGUS & (;iNi:»ELE CO. 

AMERICAN HARDWARE CO. 

AMERICAN TERRA COTTA & CERAMIC CO. 

I5AC0N, FRANCIS T. 

ha(;got, E., CO. 

HEHR, E. rilF:()I)ORE 

HEIL & MAUCll 

MAKER, FRANK S. 

BENEDICT, JULKS H. 

I5ERN11AR1), .XDOLFH V. 

BINNEK I>:N(JRAV1N(; CO. 

BOURKE, KOBEKT E. 

BKOKS, VAN DORT (J. 

BROWN & MOR TIMER 

BULLARDcS: GORMLEXCO. 

BULLEV & ANDREWS 

BURNIIAM, I). II. & CO. 

CABOT, SAM I' EL & CO. 

C.\FFALL BROS. 

CARK, CHAS. A. 

C111CA(;0 FDISON CO. 

CHICAGO HYDRAULIC I'RESSED BRICK CO. 

CHICAGO ORNAMENTAL IRON CO. 

CIHCACiO VARNISH CO. 

CHURCH, MYRON H. 

CORIUN, v. i<c E. 

culbertson, ii. w. 
davis, frank l. 
dean. geo. r. 
decorators' supply co. 
I)iet/,(;en, eu(jene. co. 
donnellfy, thomas e. 
drummond, \vm. e. 
dunning, n. max. 
dux, josfimi 

E.VrON & PRINCE CO. 

FCKELS, JAMES II. 

EDBROOKF. HARRY W.J. 

EG AN, JAMES J. 

EICH, GEOK(iE B. 

FALKENAU CONSTRUCTION CO. 

FISCHER, JOHN B. 

FROST & (iRANGER 

FULLER, GEORGE A., CO. 

FURST, JACOB. SONS 

(iAGE. THOMAS G. 

(JARDEN. FRANK M. 

(iARDEN. HU(;H M. G. 

(iLIDDEN, HOMKR W. 

(iRACE & HYDE CO. 

(JREELEY, HOWARD CO. 

(iUNTHER, CHAS. F. 

HALLBER(L L. G. 

HALSTED, J0SP:PH 

HARBECK, IERVIS R. 



hatzfeld, clarence 

HAWES & DODD 

hazleton, h.t. 
heath & milligan 

HEMMINGS, CHARLES E. 

HENNE & CO. 

HENNESSY BROS. & EVANS CO. 

HERCZ, ARTHUR & CO. 

HOLABIRD & ROCHE ^ 

HOLSMAN, HENRY K. 

HUBER, JULIUS H. 

HUEHL&SCHMID 

HULBERT& DORSE Y 

HUNT, LEIGH B. 

HUTCHINSON, CHAS. L. 

HVLAND, PAUL V. 

ILLINOIS TERRA COTTA LUMBER CO. 

INSLEY, E. E. 

JACKSON, WM. H. & CO. 

JENNY & MUNDIE 

JOBSON, FRANK C. 

JOHNSON. MORRIS O. 

KIMBELLS.S. BRICK CO. 

KLEINPELL, WALTER H. 

KNISELY, H. C. & G. F. 

LANQUIST, A. 

LAU, WILLY H. 

LAWSON. VICTOR F. 

LENNOX & HALDEMAN 

LIBRARY BUREAU 

LLEWELLYN, JOS. C. 

LONG, BIRCH BURDETTE 

LOWE, E. C. 

LUDOWICI ROOFING TILE CO. 

MACKOLITE FIREPROOFING CO. 

MACVEAGH, FRANKLIN 

MARIENTHAL, OSCAR B. 

MAYOR, WM., CO. 

McCarthy, J. G. CO. 

McFARLAND, J. C. & CO. 

MILLIGAN, GEO. D.. CO. 

MORAVA CONSTRUCTION CO. 

MOULDING, THOS. CO. 

MUELLER. PAUL F. P. 

MUNDIE, WM. B. 

MUNROE & SOUTHWORTH 

MURPHY VARNISH CO. 

NACEY, P. CO. 

NELSON, W. P. COMPANY 

N. Y. BELTING & PACKING CO., LTD. 

N. W. EXPANDED METAL CO. 

N. W. TERRA COTTA CO. 

ORR & LOCKETT HARDWARE CO. 

OTIS ELEVATOR CO. 

OTIS, W. A. 

PATTISON, EDWARD B. 

PERKINS, D. H. 

PEARSON BROS. 



POSSIBLE 

PHILLIPS, JOHN H. 

PIERCE, E. F. 

PISCHEL, FREDERICK 

PITTSBURG PLATE GLASS CO. 

POND, IRVING K. 

POULSEN, EDWARD J. 

POWERS REGULATOR CO. 

PRATT & LAMBERT 

PRENTICE, L. H., CO. 

PRINDEVILLE, CHAS. H. 

REINHART, G. A. 

ROBINSON, J. C. 

RODATZ, JACOB 

ROGERS, JAS. GAMBLE 

ROULEAN, ARTHUR 

RUSSEL & ERWIN CO. 

SCHMIDT, RICHARD E. 

SCOWN, WM. J., BUILDING CO. 

SELFRIDGE, HARRY G. 

SHAW, HOWARD 

SMITH, F. P., WIRE & IRON WORKS 

SOLLITT, OLIVER 

SOLLITT, RALPH, & SUMNER CO. 

SPENCER, ROBERT C. JR. 

SPIERLING & LINDEN 

STAMSEN & BLOME 

STARR, HARRY C. 

STAUDER, ADOLPH F. 

STEBBINS, S. J., CO. 

SULLIVAN, LOUIS H. 

SUTTON, JOHN C. 

SWIFT, GEO. B. CO. 

SYKES STEEL ROOFING CO. 

TALLMADGE, THOS. E. 

THOMAS & SMITH 

TIFFANY ENAMELED BRICK CO. 

TOBEY FURNITURE CO. 

TOMLINSON, WEBSTER 

TREAT, SAMUEL A. 

U. S. BLUE PRINT PAPER CO. 

UNION FOUNDRY CO. 

UNVERZAGT, ARTHUR GERBER 

VAN INWAGEN, JR., JAMES 

viERLiNG, Mcdowell & co. 

WALSH & WYETH 
WARREN, WM. H., CO. 
WEI RICK, RALPH W. 
WELLS BROS. CO. 
WENDLAND, WM.R. 
WHITE, MELVILLE P. 
WILMANNS, AUGUST C. 
WILMARTH, T. W., CO. 
WINSLOW BROS. CO. 
WISCONSIN LIME & CEMENT CO. 
WOLFINGER, CLARENCE I. 
WOLTERSDORF, ARTHUR 
WRIGHT, FRANK L. 
ZIMMERMANN, A. G. 
ZIMMERMANN, HUGO H. 



A 



LIST OF MEMBERS OF THE CHICAGO ARCHITECTURAL CLUB 



RESIDENT MEMBERS 



^ 



ALLING, VAN WAGENEN,2239 MICHIGAN AVE. 

ALSCHULER, A. S., 2112 MICHIGAN AVE. 

ANDERSON, PIERCE, 1142 THE ROOKERY 

ANDREWS, ALFRED B., 412, 115 DEARBORN ST. 

ANDREWS, A. G., 943 SEVENTY-SECOND PLACE 

ATCHISON, JOHN D., 90 WASHINGTON ST. 

BACON, F.T., 902, 1 PARK ROW 

BAKER, FRANK S.. 316 W^ARREN AVE. 

BARGMAN, E. F., 1543 ADDISON AVE. 

BEAULEY, WM. J., 1007MONADNOCKBLDG. * 

BELDEN, EDGAR S., 164 LA SALLE ST. 

BEHR, E. THEODORE, 343 E. FIFTY-SIXTH ST. 

BERNHARD, ADOLPH F.. TREAS., 1219 ASHLAND BLOCK 

BERRY, A. C, 2008 W. ADAMS ST. 

BENEDICT, JULES B., SECOND V. P., 806, 184 LA SALLE ST. 

BOURKE, ROBERT E., 5648 MICHIGAN AVE. 

BROWN, ARTHUR G., W' ILMETTE. ILL. 

BURNHAM. D. H., 1142THE ROOKERY 

CARR, CHAS. A., 1142 THE ROOKERY 

CHATTEN, M. C. 2251 CALUMET AVE. 

CHILDS, FRANK A^. EVANSTON, ILL. 

CHURCH, MYRON H., 1233 MARQUETTE BLDG. 

DAVIS, FRANK L., 305 MICHIGAN AVE. 

DEAN. ARTHUR R.. STEINWAY HALL 

DEAN, GEO. R.. 218 LA SALLE ST. 

DILLON, JOHN R., 1544 LEXINGTON ST. 

DRUMMOND, WM. E.. 510 N. CENTRAL AVE.. AUSTIN. ILL. 

DUNHAM, GEO. FOOTE, 604 PULLMAN BLDG. 

DUNNING, N. MAX. 1217 ASSOCIATION BLDG. 

EDBROOKE, H. W. J., 396; DREXEL BLVD. 

EICH, GEO. B., 1601, 100 WASHINGTON ST. 

ELIEL, ROY 1602, 100 WASHINGTON ST. 

FELLOWS, WM. K., 1733, 204 DEARBORN ST. 

FISCHER. JOHN B., 7455 PARNELL AVE. 

FYFE. JAMES L., 420 HOME AVE., OAK PARK, ILL. 

FOGEL, R. W.. 877 RACINE AVE. 

GAGE. THOM.AS G.. 1780 OLD COLONY BLDG. 

GARDEN, H. M. G., 1013 TEUTONIC BLDG. 

GARDEN, FRANK M., 1408 WABASH AVE. 

GLIDDEN. HOMER W., 196 CASS ST. 

GRANGER, ALFRED H.. 806 THE TEMPLE 

GRIFFIN, WALTER B.. ELMHURST, ILL. 

GRUENFELD. CASPER. 1382 W. CULLOM AVE. 

HARBECK, JERVIS R., 1107 STEINWAY HALL 

HATZFELD, CLARENCE, 999 W. EDDY ST. 

HAZLETON, H. T., 305 DEARBORN AVE. 

HEMMINGS, E. C . FIRST. V.-PRES.. 1419 CHAMPLAIN BLDG. 

HERCZ, ARTHUR, loi METROPOLITAN BLOCK 

HOEPPNER, E. A.. 461 THE ROOKERY 

HOLSMAN, HENRY K.. 1118 ASSOCIATION BLDG. 

HUNT, LEIGH B., 1780 OLD COLONY BLDG. 

HUNT, MYRON, 123 LA SALLE ST. 

HUNTER, DAVID C, 373 BURLING ST. 

HYLAND, PAUL V., 520 PLEASANT ST., OAK PARK, ILL. 



INSLEY, E. E., 902, I PARK ROW^ 

JENKINS, HARRY D., 42 WOODLAND PARK 

JOBSON, C. FRANK, 501 PULLMAN BLIKi. 

JOHNSON, MORRIS O.. 902, 1 PARK ROW 

KELLEY, JOHN H., 3980 VERNON AVE. 

KLEINPELL, W. II., 372 WEBSTER AVE. 

LAMMERS, HERMAN C, 21 PLYMOUTH PLACF. 

LANG, LOUIS A., 2611 N. FORTY-FIRST COURT 

LILLESKAU, JOHN, 303 HADDON AVE. 

LLEWELLYN. JOSEPH C, 1217 ASSOCIATION HLD(;. 

LONG, BIRCH BURDETTE, uo7SrKINWAY HALL 

MAHER. GEO. W., 821, 218 LA SALLK ST. 

MARIENTHAL, OSCAR B.. 3134 FOREST A\K. 

M AUCH, MAX. 28 ST. CLAIR ST. 

MILLER, JOSEPH A., 1504 NEWPORT AVK. 

MILLET. LOUIS J.. 151 MICHIGAN AVK. 

MORSE. BURTON E.. EIGHTY-FH-TH ST. WD Sl'KW \K 1' .\VK. 

MUELLER. PAUL F. P., SCHILLER BLDG. 

MUNDIE, W. B., 520 NEW YORK LIFE Bl.lXi. 

NAPER. HERBERT J., 57 DELAW.\KE PI.AlK 

NIMMONS. GEO. C, 1733 MARQUETTE BLD(;. 

PATTISON, EDW.\RD H., 4411 EMERALD AVK. 

PERKINS. DWKJHT H.. 1107 STEINWAY W.WA. 

PETERSEN. JENS C. 1219 ASHLAND BLOCK 

PHILLIPS, JOHN H.,SEC"Y, 1601, 100 W.VSHINGTC )N ST. 

PISCHEL, FRED, i^ioOAKDALE AVK. 

POLK. WILLIS. 1142THE ROOKERY 

POULSEN. EDW. J., 594 N. FRANCISCO ST. 

RAPP. GEORGE L.. 318 EAST THIRTY-SKVKNTH SI'. 

RAWSON. LORIN A., HINSDALE. ILL. 

REINHARDT, G. A., 170 OSGOOD ST. 

ROULEAU. ARTHUR. 510 W. POLK ST. 

ROSENTHAL. A. B.. 125 WALNUT ST. 

SCHMIDT, RICH.XRD K., 1013 TKITONIC ULD(;. 

SENEY, EDGAR K.. 12021 STEWART .\VK. 

SHATTUCK, W. F.. ART INSTITU'IK 

SPENCER. R. C, JR.. PRKS.. 1107 STEINWAY HALL 

SPINDLER. OSCAR, 209 S. CLIN'ION ST. 

STAUDER, ADOLPH F., 402 JOURN.M. BLDG. 

STARR, HARRY C, 27 FORTY-THIRD SI". 

SHAW. HOWARD, iiS MONROE ST. 

TALLMADGK, T. K.. 1142 THE R()()KKK\ 

TOMLINSON, WEBSTKR. 1107 STKINW.W li.M.L 

UNVERZAGT, ARTHUR (i., loi M KTKOl'OL! TAN BLOCK 

WEBER, P. J..702KISHKR BLD(;. 

WATSON, R. BRUCK. 305 DKAKBOKN .'^T. 

WEIRICK, RALPH W.. 304 BOWEN AVE. 

WENDLAND, WM. K.. 357 TWENTV-KOURTH ST. 

WHITE, MELVILLE P.. THIKTV-SK\ KN'I II ST. & S TKW.VK I .\VI-. 

WILMANNS, AUCJUST C. 264 SHKKFIKLD .WE. 

WOLTERSDORF, ARTHUR, 70 LA SALLE ST. 

ZIMMERMAN, A. (i., 205 LA SALLK SI. 

ZIMMERMAN, H. H.. 1279 PKKKV ST. 



NON-RESIDENT MEMBERS 



AI)P:LSPEKGER, HOLLAND. 2oq DEAN BLDG., SOUTH BEND IND. 
BRANDT, OSCAR E., 4S CHAMBERS ST., NEW YORK CITY 
LITTLE. EDWARD C, COLUMBLA BLDG., ST. LOUIS. MO. 
LOROH.EMIL. 514 BRUSH ST.. DETROIT MICH. 
PATTISON, JAMES WM., TREE STUDIO BLDG. 
RICE, J. L., HOWES BLOCK, CLINTON, IOWA 

SHEBLESSY, JOHN E., CARE OF KENNETH McDONALD. FOURTH 
AND MAIN STS.. LOUISVILLE, KY. 



SCOFIELD, HUBERT C, BATTLE CREEK. MICH. 
SMITH, WM. J., BOX 113, GALVESTON, TEX. 
STARCK. E. F., 108 W. MAIN ST., MADISON, WIS. 
THOMAS, H. S.. JR., 52 KING BLOCK, DENVER. COLO. 
WATSON, J. NELSON, 5178 FAIRMOUNT AVE. ST. LOUIS, MO. 
WELLS. W. A., FIRST NATL. BANK BLDG., MOLINE, ILL. 
WINSLOW, CARLETON M., 156 FIFTH AVE., ROOM 910, N. V. CITV 



ASSOCIATE MEMBERS 



api'el, henry l., 3.^44 wabash ave. 
broes-van dort, (i., 218 la salle st. 
bushnell, edward s., 971 washington bln'd. 
cameron, edgar, is tree studio bldg. 
coffman, geor(ie w., 717 rialto bldg. 
combs. rogers m. 1007 chamber of commerce 
cooi.iix;e. chas. a.. 1780 old colony bldg. 

DUNCiAN. THOS. A.. ROANOKE BLDG. 

FALNBIGL. FERDINAND, loi METROPOLITAN BLOCK 

FERGUSON, LOUIS A., 139 AD^MS ST. 

(iATES, WM. D., 602 CHAMBER OF COMMERCE 

(ilANNINI, O.. 211 E. MADISON ST. 

GRAY, GEO. C, 1210 CHAMBER OF COMMERCE 

HALL, IRWIN R., 440 N. STATE ST. 

HEINZ, GEO. P.. 4i9^HAMBER OF COMMERCE 

KILLEN, E. (;REBLE, 12 E. HARRISON ST. 



KNISELY, H. C. 68 W. MONROE ST. 

LAU, WILLY H.. 503 PULLMAN BLDG. 

MATZ, HERMAN L., 304 CHAMBER OF COMMERCE 

NOELLE, JOSEPH B.. 1832 WABASH AVE. 

PERKINS, FREDERICK W„ 115 MONROE ST. 

PIERCE, E. F., 100 WASHINGTON ST. 

PROSSER, H. B., 602 CHAMBER OF COMMERCE 

KOESCH, CHAS. E., 503 PULLMAN BLDG. 

SCHMIDT, R. O., 204 ILLINOIS ST. 

SMITH, LUTHER, L., 3144 GROVELAND AVE. 

SOLLITT, RALPH T., HARTFORD BLDG. 

TWYMAN, JOSEPH. 100 WABASH AVE. 

VAN INWAGEN, JR., JAMES, MOMENCE, ILL. 

WHITE, J. A., SCHILLER BLDG. 

WYLES. THOS. R., 1^64 MONADNOCK BLDG. 



HONORARY MEMBERS 



ALLEN, JOHN K, 40 DEARBORN ST. 

BLAKE THEO. L., 28 E. FORTY-FIRST ST., NEW YORK CI 

CLARK, ROBERT. 2505 KENMORE AVE. 

(iAV, HENRY LORD, 92 DEARBORN ST. 

HUNT, FREDERICK S., 1272 W. VAN BUKEN ST. 

JENNEY, W. L. B. J., ^20 NEW YORK LIFE BLDG. 

L.\WRIE, HENRY, PA.XTON BLDG.. OMAHA, NEB. 



T\ 



MULLER, LOUIS, JR., 610 MANHATTAN BLD(i. 
McLEAN, ROBERT C, 610 MANHATTAN B|,pG 
PHI MISTER, D. G., 539 FLOURNOY ST. 
SULLIVAN, LOUIS H., AUDITORIUM TOWER 
TAFT, LORADO, FINE ARTS BLDG. 
W.\GNER. FRITZ. 1118 THE ROOKERY 



.^ 



CHICAGO ARCHITECTUAL CLUB 



THE ART INSTITUTE. MICHIGAN AVENUE, CHICAGO 



K. C. SPEXCEK. JK. 
E. CHAS. HEM Mixes 
jri.ES U. BEXEDICT - 
K)HX H, PHILLIPS, 
\l)(iLPH !• liEKXHAkl) 



PKESIDEXI' 

ElKST N'lCE-PKESlDI'.XT 

SECOND \ICE PKESIDEX I 

SECKETAR\ 

TKEASIKEK 



EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 



KOBEKl C. SPENCER. J 1< 
E. CHAS. HEMMIXGS 
JLLES 15. HEXEDlCr 



JOHN H. PH1LL!I'> 
ADOLPH E. liEKXH.XKI) 
ROHEK'l" E. liOlRKl-, 



r E. I ALL.\L\1)(.E 

EDITOR OF ANNUAL 
(.EoR(;i': R. DEAX 

FINANCIAL MANAGER 
\\.\L1ER H. KI.l'.IXPELl. 

JURY OF ADMISSION TO EXHIBITION 



(.EOR(il'. R. Di: AN 



RKIIARI) E SCILNHDI 



ROHER I ( . SIM-.XCER ]\<. 



PRINTED FOR THE CHICAGO ARCHITECTURAL 
CLUB, BV R. R. DONNELLEY & SONS COMPANY. 
A'J' THE LAKESH)E PRESS, CHICACiO, MDCCCCII 



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dKKiO ARoif KTUBMCLUB 

Tie Art Institute. Micliigin Avenue, Cliicago. 



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Harry 
Executive Committee. 



Arthur G. Brown . 
H. W. J. Edbrookb 
Wm. J. Beauley 
Harry D. Jenkins . 
C.Si 



STARR 



President. 

First Vice President. • 

Second Vice President. 

Secretary. 

Treasurer. 



Exhibition Committee. 



■*•: 



Arthur G. Brown. 
H. W. J. Edbrooke. 
Wm. J. Beauley. 
Harry D. Jenkins. 



Harry C. Starr. 
N. Max Dunning. 
T. E. Tallmadge. 



Birch Burdette Long, Chairman. 
N. Max Dunning. Robert E. Bourke. 

H. W. J. Edbrooke. H. D. Jenkins. 



T. E. Tallmadge. 



Editors of Annual. 
L. A. Rawson. 



Jury of Admission to Exhibition. 
Wm. J. Beauley. Martin Roche. W. B. Mundie. 

Scholarship Committee. 



Willis Polk. 



Pierce Anderson. 



D. H. Perkins. 



The following patrons have, by their generous and hearty support, made possible this exhibition and annual. 



Adler, a. K. 

Alpha Portland Cement Co. 

American Terra Cotta and 
Ceramic Company. 

American Warming & Ven- 
tilating Co., Lewis & Kit- 
chen, Proprietors. 

Andrews & Johnson. 

Baggot, E,, Co. 

Baumgarten Bros. 

Behr, E. Theo. 

Beil & Mauch. 

BiNNER- Wells Co, 

Boston Woven Hose & Rub- 
ber Co. 

Brinkmann, Wm. J. 

Broes, Van Dort G. 

Brown, A. G. 

Bulley & Andrews 

Burnham, D. H., Co. 

Cabot, Samuel. 

Chicago Gas & Electric 
Fixture Mfg. Co. 

Chicago Hydraulic Press 
Brick Co. 

Chicago Ornamental Iron 
Co. 

Chicago Portland Cement 
Co. 

Chicago Varnish Co. 

Clark C. Everett Co. 

corbin, p. & f. 

Cowan, W. K. 

Crilly, Wm. M. 

Decorators Sxjpply Co. 

DiETZGEN, Eugene. 

Detroit Graphite Mfg. Co. 

Dodge, H. B. & Co. 

Eaton & Prince. 

Egan, J. J. 



Alling, Van Wagenen. 
Beauley, Wm. J. 
Belden, Edgar S. 
Bourke, Robert E. 
Burnham, D. H. 
Chaddock, D. C. 
Clark, Robert, Testimonial 
Fund. 



Fraenkel, T. O. 
Frost & Granger. 
Fuller, Geo. A., Co. 
FuRST, Jacob, Sons. 
Garden, Frank M. 
Garden, H. M. G. 
Glessner. J. J. 
Grace, Wm., Co. 
gunther, c. f. 
Haigh, Jos. 
Hallberg, L. G. 
Halsted, Jos. 
Hanley-Casey Co. 
Hansell-Elcock Co. 
Harris, Geo. E. 
Hawes & DODD. 
Hetherington, John T. 
Hill & Woltersix)rf. 
HoLABiRD & Roche. 
HoLSMAN, Henry K. 
Hoops, W. H. & Co. 
Hoover, Ira W. 
hulbert & dorcey. 

ACKSON, Wm. H. & Co. 
[ ENKiNS & Reynolds. 

ENNEY & Mundie. 

Cehm Bros. Co. 
Keller, D. F. 
KiMBELL, S. S., Brick Co. 
Knisely, Harry C, Co. 
Kroeschell Bros. Co. 
Lanquist, a. 
Lau, Willy H. 
Lawson, Victor F. 
Library Bureau. 
Llewellyn, J. C. 
LuDOWici Roofing Tile Co. 
MacVeagh, Franklin. 
Mandel Bros. 
Mansure, E. L. 



Marshall, B. H. 
Marthens, Chester H. & Co. 
Mavor, Wm., Co. 
McCarthy, J. G. 
McCoRMiCK, Stanley. 
McFarland, J. C. & Co. 
McIlroy -Jennings Cornice 

Works. 
McNulty Bros. 
Miller, Jas. A. & Bro. 
Millet, Louis J. 
Milligan, Geo. D., Co. 
MoRAVA Construction Co. 
Moulding, Thos., Co. 
Mueller Bros. 
Mueller, Paul F. P. 
Murphy Varnish Co. 
Nacey, p., Co. 
Nelson, F. P. & Son. 
Nelson, John L. & Bro. Co. 
Nelson, w. P., Co. 
Newman, Edgar M. 
NiMMONS & Fellows. 
NorthwesternTerra Cotta 

Co. 
Orr & Lockett Hardware 

Co. 
Ottenheimer, H. L. 
Otis Elevator Co. 
Otis, W. A. 
Peabody & Beauley. 
Pearson Bros. 
Perkins, Dwight Heald. 
Pittsburgh Plate Glass Co. 
Pond, Irving K. 
postlb, d. e. 
Pratt & Lambert. 
Prentice, L. H., Co. 
Prindiville, Chas. H. 
Rapp, Geo. L. 



Patrons of the Traveling Scholarship of 1903. 



Combs, R. M. 
CooLiDGE, Chas. A. 
Dean, Geo. R. 
Dunning, N. Max. 
Edbrooke, Harry W. J. 
Graves, G. P. 
Gray, Geo. C. 
Hazleton, H, T. 



Hutchinson, C. L, 

iENNBY & Mundie. 
.iLLESKAU, John. 
Llewellyn, J. C. 
Long, Birch "Burdette. 
Matz, Herman L. 
Phillips, John H. 
Ryerson, Martin A. 



Co. 



Rawson, L. A. 
Roebling Construction 
Rogers, James Gamble. 
Rogers & Wells. 
RussEL & Erwin Mfg. Co. 
Schmidt, Richard E. 
ScHULER & Mueller. 
Smith, F. P., Wire and Iron 

Works. 
Snyder, J. W. 
Sollitt, Ralph & Sumner 

Co. 
Spencer, R. C, Jr. 
Spierling & Linden. 
Starr, Harry C. 
Stebbins, S. J., Hardware 

Co. 
Strandberg, E. p., Co. 
Struble, Henry. 
Sturdy, Joseph F. 
Sutton, John C. 
Thomas & Smith. 
Tiffany Enameled Brick 

Co. 
Tomlinson- Riley Co. 
Tomlinson, Webster. 
United States Blur Print 

Paper Co. 
United States Gypsum Co. 
ViERLiNG, McDowell & Co. 
Ward, Montgomery, & Co. 
Warren, Wm. H., Mfg. Co. 
Webster, Warren, Co. 
Wells Bros. Co. 
WiLMARTH, T. W., Co. 
Wilson, H. R. 
WoLFiNGER, Clarence 1. 
Wright, Frank Lloyd. 
Zimmerman, W. Carbys. 



Shaw, Howard. 
Weirick, Ralph. 
White, Melville P. 
Williamson, W. G. 
Wilmanns, August C. 
Wilson, Lewis W. 
Zimmerman, A. G. 




* I !■ 







'^'■■'■■ 






N presenting its fourth Annual Catalogue to the public, 
the Chicago Architectural Club desires first of all to 
thank those whose names appear in the pages of this 
book as patrons, for the generosity and interest which 
[\ have made the publication of this work a possibility 
n and ensured the success of the exhibition. The Club 
has for several years followed the plan of financing the 
annual exhibition and catalogue through the subscrip- 
tions of patrons instead of by means of advertisements in the catalogue; 
thus both conserving the beauty and utility of the book and maintaining 
the dignity of the Club. The patrons of the exhibition are therefore not only 
entitled to the gratitude of the Club for their support, but have also the right 
to share in whatever of credit to architecture may result from the exhibition. 

The Chicago Architectural Club is each year the sponsor 

/ //(' I w nihil of an exhibit, and a catalogue. They constitute the 

tdlif ll> . lulls chief event and work of the Club. The exhibit is 

supposedly an exposition of present-day architecture, 
and the catalogue is copiously illustrated with typical selections from the 
work in the exhibit. This undertaking of the Club is an endeavor to foster 
in the public mind an interest in and a knowledge of the latest and best 
architectural developments. While it is not to be presumed that the general 
public is whollv lacking in the critical faculty as regards architecture, yet 
the character of our commonest objects — our buildings — furnishes abundant 
evidence that there is much need for improvement in that respect. Indeed, 
the elevation of our architectural standards is a work so necessary, so 
influential, and so vital as to rank among the highest needs of our city. 
Our buildings should be not merelv models of convenience and good taste, 
but monuments of pride and glory. If it be true that surroundings affect 
life — which none will deny — then has architecture, because it is the most 
conspicuous, ever-present feature of civic lite, an influence beyond human 
divining. It is therefore incumbent on everyone to endeavor to make such 
a potent influence a blessing, rather than to permit it to become a bane. Yet 
without the knowledge which will enable us to distinguish between the good 
and the bad, how can we hope for popular progress in that direction? Arch- 
itecture, being so common and universal an element in our surroundings, is 
too generally accepted with indifference, and our lives are thereby uncon- 
sciously moulded to existing conditions. The mode of life is arranged to fit 
the building, rather than the building being made to conform to the needs of 
life. Humanity is much too prone to accept things as they are, without pro- 
test, or to rest content with half-way remedies; and great loss and injury are 
the inevitable result of this complacency. The object of this exhibit is to 
arouse the dormant spirit of architectural criticism, by showing in an attractive 



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and comprehensive manner the most commendable work ot modern Aincri- 
can architects. The display is as fairly representative of the best architec- 
tural work now being done in this country as it is possible to gather together. 
The allied architectural clubs of the United States arrange their respective 
exhibitions successively upon such dates that the drawings can follow a circuit 
of the largest cities. Architectural work has frequently been presented in 
such a form as to be ot slight interest to persons not of our profession, To the 
unprofessional mind, for example, there is little meaning in a two-dimension 
drawing. Pictorial work has much greater educational value for the general 
public. Therefore, to make our exhibition instructive and entertaining to 
outsiders, as well as to members of our profession, drawings of the sin";plest 
descriptive character, as well as those of a complex and purely technical 
order, are liberally displayed. There are many crafts and arts whicli are 
closely associated with architectural results, and wherever possible, examples 
of such connection are shown. Kurnishing, interior decoration, and the 
depiction ot landscape — each an art in itself — ser\'e a common purpose as 
architectural accessories. The high place which architecture occupies among 
the arts is thus clearly evidenced by the general character and universal inter- 
est of our exhibition. It is a duty which every man owes to the community 
to give as much time as possible to it, anci by studying the works of the 
leaders of thought in the architectural profession, fit himself, each in his own 
sphere, to do what in him lies for the elevation ot architecture in Chicago. 



Ilu ( liih 



The Chicago Architectural Club is an organization ot 



men in the architectural protession. It also embraces a 
special membership of persons whose business is closely 
related to the protession. The latter class ot members is not a usual feature 
ot architectural clubs, but the Chicago Architectural Club believes that asso- 
ciation between the men who plan buildings and those who gi\e buildings 
material form, tends to the betterment ot the results. Membership in the 
Club is ot particular value to the younger men. By culri\ating the talents 
of its members, the Club hopes to improNe the architecture ot this great city. 
It is a truism that the draftsman ot today is the architect of tomorrow. By 
means ot fellowship and its consequent diffusion of ideas and methods, by 
lectures, by competitions — the members of the Club are kept in close touch 
with their art. Kverv year the Club has a "Traveling Scholarship" com- 
petition. This consists of a series ot competitions, developing an architectural 
problem. The drawings submitted in each competition are discussed and 
voted upon as to their order of merit, by the Club members. The (Hub 
member whose drawings receive the highest percentage, becomes entitled to 
go abroad at the expense ot the Club, to observe and stutlv the works of 
the great masters ot architecture. He is thus enabled to keep abre:ist of 
l\uropean culture, and returns with a fund of ideas to be transmuted into 
stone or marble, to the honor of the Club and the beautifying of Chicago'. 



Folio Six 



CHICAGO ARCHITECTIML CLUB 



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Folio Seven 



A-M/iM, xi,.., 'l.,,*^ 



CHK/iGO ARCHITECTUKVL CLUB 




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Fo/w I'Jght 



SIXTEENTH ANNUAL EXHIBITION 





SKETCHES OF DINING ROOM 

Residence William Jean Reauley, Arcliitect 

by Birch Hurdette Long 




STABLE FOR MR. SOLLITT 
Holabird iS: Roche, Architects 



Folio Nine 



CHKXiO ARCHITECTURE CLUB 



LOINTRY HOUSK 
by Howard Shaw, Architect 





RKSTArRAXT lUILI )I N( ;, ( Il|( ACO 
Ricliard K. Schiiii(h, Arc hitect 




I'olio Ten 



SIXTEENTH ANNIM EXMBITTON 



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la'ROl'KAN DUAWINC.S 
l)y N. Max Dunning, C. A. C, Traveling Scliolar 






Folio FAcvc7t 



CHKKK) ARCHITECTUKM CLUB 



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HANK, ST. jOSKl'II, Mo. 
K'liiu'v \ Miiiidif, Arc:liilfcl;5 




CKMF/IKRN' \'AlI/r 
n. ],. Ottenlicinior, Arcliitcct 




I'ALAZ/.O MASSIMl 
Ira W. I loovcr 



Fo/if I'lcch'c 



SIXTEENTH ANNUAL EXHIBITION 




CHOP HOUSE 

(Back of Union League Club) 

Peabody & Beauley, Architects 



C\V\ l<i:Sll)i.NCl., CHiCACO 
l'i',il)()(lv i\ iU',iiiU'\, Arcliitct ts 




Fo/w TJiirtcen 



CHKAGO ARCHITECTUB\L CLUB 




BUII.DINC; FOR CHICAC.O UNi\i:Rsriv 
l)v lames Gamble Rogers, Arcliitetl 




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SOLDIKRS AND SAILORS MONLMIA T 
Israels iV Harder, Architects 



Fo/w I'ourtccn 



SIXTEENTH ANNUAL EXHIBITION 




BENEDICTINE CHAPEL 




Folio Fifteai 



CHIG^GO ARCHITECTURM CLUB 




"PALAZZO" MASSIMI 
by Ira M. Hoover 




T>*l'H..I»NM»M %a /^Wrfftt 



ACCKPIKI) DKSIflN, PASSEN(;KR STATION, \VASHIN(;T0N, 1). C. 

I). H. liuriiliam \ Co., Architects. 



Fo/to Sixteen 



SIXTEENTH ANNUAL EXHIBITION 




Water Colur Sketch 
l)y Ira VV. Hcniver 



"\-ENICK" 



Water Color Sketch 
by Ira W. Hoover 




cottagp: near kenilworth 



Folio Seventeen 



CHK^GO ARCHITECTURAL CLUB 





MARKi/r srRKi:r, san iranciscc) 

Willis l\.lk 



DRAWING GATEWAY 
W. M. Campbell 




STCDY FOR HALL 
H. R. Wilson, Architect 



Folio I'Aghicen 



SIXTEENTH ANNUAL EXhUBITlON 







i* •• 



SCHWABS STATION, GERMANY 



From Water Color, by William Jean Beauley 



Folio Nineteen 



CHfC^GO ARCHITECTIML CLUB 



-v 




inti:ri()r of taproom 

Hohibird c\: Roclic, Arcliitccts 



DESIGN FOR BANK BUILDINC 
Holabird ■& Roche, Arcliitects 




Folio Twenty 



SIXTEENTH ANNUAL EXHIBmON 



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COMPETITION FOR SOLDIERS AND SAILORS MONUMENT 




150AT HOUSE 
\V. L. Coulter, Architect 



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Folio Tzventy-Chw 



QWMX) ARCHITECTUKM CLUB 




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PLAN OF FlR5r FLOOR 



LIBRARY 
!')>■ Albert Randolph Ross 



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Fo/io '/ u <e?Uy- 7 7. 'o 



SIXTEENTH ANNUAL EXHIBITION 




VILLAGE LIBRARY 
School of Architecture, Cohimbia University 






Folio Twenty-Three 



(mm) ARCHITECTIML CLUB 




STUDY OF HAI.l. 
H. R. Wilson, Arcliittct 





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H. R. WilsDii, Arcliitcct 



Folio Twenty-hour 



SIXTEENTH ANNUAL EXHIBITION 




STAIRCASE FIRST NATIONAL BANK BUILDING, CHICAGO 
U. H. Burnhani i!v Co., Architects 



Folio Tiventy-Five 



CHKXIO ARCHITECTIML CLUB 




ARC ()!■ rrirs 

ROMl-: 

1 ra W . 1 lii(]\ c'l 



MEASURED DRAWIN(; 



Fulio Twenty-Six 



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SIXTEENTH ANNUAL EXHIBITION 



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COUNTRY RESIDENCE 
Lindsley Johnson, Architect 



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DRAWINC, 

1)V \\ . W. Hoswortli 




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CHKAGO ARCHITECTIML CLUB 



SCM(X)L. LIBHAKY &. MI'UIO BDILDING 

INSllTl'IXJN^ ■*- tl>lt(.MlON j'-^DfAr AND Pl'MB 
JACkSONVllir 111 
■I Skuri WA1SOM 




l\obtM"t Hnice Watson, Architect 



STAIR, PUBLIC LIBRARY, 
BOSTON 

I.e. Haldeii 







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Folio 1 wenty-liight 



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SIXTEENTH ANNUAL EXHIBITION 




LIBRARY 

Henry K. Hulsinaii, Arcliitect 



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CITY RESIDENCK 
By X'ictor Traxlcr, Architect 



Folio Tivcnty-Ninc 



CHK^GO ARCHITECTURM CLUB 




I'ROPOSEI) NKW ELKS CLUB, CHICAGO 
Peabody tV I5eaiilcy, Arcliitccts 





STAIR HALL 
Howard Shaw, Arcliitect 



HOIJSK, WILMINGTON, ILL 
i'cabody i!t Heavilcy, Arcliitccts 



Folio Thirty 



SIXTEENTH ANNUAL EXHIBITION 




COUNTRY HOUSE 

jaines (iambic Rogers, Arcliitcct 




DFXORATIVE PANEL 
by C. Stetson Crawford 



Folio Ihirty-Onc 



CHIGMGO ARCHITECTURE CLUB 







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STUDY OF HALI. 
H. K. Wilson, Architect 




STUDY OF HALL 
Hy H. Is. Wilson, Architect 



Fo/io Thirty-Two 



SIXTEENTH ANNUAL EXHIBITION 




SICILIAN (2UARTKR, NI-:\V YORK CITY 
By William Jean Beauley 



Folio Thirty-Three 



CHKKK) ARCHITECTIML CLUB 



PENCIL SKETCH 
by Ira W. Hoover 





STIDIKS 

IN 
DESIGN 

School of Architccliire 
Cohmihia Liiivcrsity 




Folio Thirtv-Fonr 



SIXTEENTH ANNUAL EXHIBITION 




U. S. NAVAL ACADEMY 
Ernest Flagg, Architect 




I)1:TA1L, ROME 
J. C. Haldcii 



Folio Tliirty-Five 



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CHICAGO ARCHITECTURAL CLUB 




RKSIDKNCK 

T. (). Fiaenkcl, Architect 



CASINO, ROME 




Walter M. C'.implifll 



RKSIDKNCK 
Atchison \ Kdhn inkt-, An;l:itects 




Folio Thirty-Six 



SIXTEENTH AltftJAL EXHlBmON 



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NKVV I'lTTSHURCH THEATER 
liciij. H. Marsliall, Arcliitect 



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W\[SON ft II\/LIT()N ARtHllins 
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ACCEl'TEI) DESIGN ILLINOIS STATE BUILDING, LOUISIANA PURCHASE EXPOSITION 

Watson Hazeiton, Architect 



Fo/io Thirty-Seven 



CHIOMGO ARCHITECTURAL CLUB 




SANTA MAKIA 1)1". SALITK, XT'.NICi: 
Ira W. H(H)ver 




SKETCH 

by Clinton ( i. Harris 



Folio 'riiirtv-/'Agh/ 



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SIXTEENTH ANNU\L EXHIBITION 




SKl.TCH, SAN FRANCISCO 
Willis I\)W 




SKI'.lCIl 
by N. Max Dunning 



J 




SKETCH 
by Cass Gilbert, Architect 



IT- 



Folio Thirty-Nine 



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CHICAGO AR.CHITEaUI»\L CLUB 








FIRST NATIONAL BANK lUILDINC, CHICAGO 
D. H. Burnham ^i: Co., Architects 



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Di'.rAii. 

Niimiuiiis (\ I'cllnws, Arcliitrcts 





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S. cV- M. S. and C. R. I. \- P. TKRMINAL STATION, CHICAGO 
Frost (!v (iraiigcr, Arcliitccts 



Folio Forty 



SIXTEENTH ANNUAL EXHIBITION 



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Al'ARTMKNT liUlLDING 
Atcliisoii >!v- Kdhrooke, Arcliitects 




Kl'.SIDKNCI': lRi:i) MAM)]''.!., CHICACO 
I'cahndN \- ikNiiik'v, Architects 




IN TERIOK CHIRCH 
W illiani J. Briiikmati, Arcliitect 



Folio Forty- 0)1 c 



CHICAGO ARCHITECTUR\L CLUB 



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lATRANCK UAlMI.l.l 1" IIOI'SI 
I-"rost iV (Iran^er, Arc hitfctS; 



X 



CHIKCH 
Frost iS: (iraiiger, Arcliitt-cts 




HAI.I. BARTI.r.IT norsi'. 
I' rost \' (iraiigfr, .Arcln'tc-cts 



Folio I^ortY-Tico 



SIXTEENTH ANNUAL EXHIBITION 



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CHICAGO ARCHITECTUBM CLUB 



RESIDENT MEMBERS 



Alling, Van Wagenen 
Alschuler, a. S, . 
Anderson, Pierce 
Andrews, Alfred B, 
Andrews, A. G. . 
Atchison, John D. 



Bacon, F. T. . . 
Beauley, Wm. J. . 
Belden, Edgar S. 
Behr, E. Theodore 
Bernhard, Adolph F, 
Benedict, Jules B. 
Bourke, Robert E. 
Brown, Arthur G. 
burnham, d. h. . 
Bargman, E. F. 
Brinkmann, Wm. J. 



2239 Michigan Ave. 
21 12 Michigan Ave. 
1142 The Rookery. 
412, 115 Dearborn St. 
943, 72d PI. 
90 Washington St. 

B 

902, I Park Row. 
1007 Monadnock Blk. 
164 La Salle St. 
343 E. 56th St. 
161 5 Ashland Blk. 
806, 184 La Salle St. 
520 New York Life Bldg. 
806, 184 La Salle St. 
II 42 The Rookery. 
1543 Addison Ave. 
83, 163 Randolph St. 



Carr, Chas. a 720 Tribune Bldg. 

Chatten, M. C 806, 184 La Salle St. 

Childs, Frank A. . . . Evanston, 111. 

Church, Myron H. . . . 1233 Marquette Bldg. 



D 



Davis, Frank L. . . 
Dean, Geo. R. . . 
Dean, Arthur R. 
Drummond, Wm. E. . 
Dunham, Geo. Foote 
Dunning, N. Max. 
Downey, Aloysius H. 



305 Michigan Ave. 

218 La Salle St. 

Steinway Hall. 

510 N. Central Ave., Austin, 111. 

1019, 135 Adams St. 

1217 Association Bldg. 

720 Tribune Bldg. 



£ 

Edbrooke, H. W. J. . . . 3965 Drexel Boul. 

Eich, Geo. B 1601, 100 Washington St. 

Eliel, Roy 4443 Ellis Ave. 

F 

Fellows, Wm. K. ... 1733, 204 Dearborn St. 

Fischer, John B 7455 Pamell Ave. 

Fyfe, James L 420 Home Ave., Oak Park, 111. 

FoGEL, R. W 877 Racine Ave. 

G 

Gage, Thomas G 1780 Old Colony Bldg. 

Garden, H. M. G. . . . 1013 Teutonic Bldg. 
Garden, Frank M. . . . 1408 Wabash Ave. 



Glidden, Homer W. 
Granger, Alfred H. 
Griffin, Walter B. 
Gruenfeld, Casper 



Hatzfeld, Clarence 
Hazleton, H. T. 
Hemmings, E. C. 
Hectz, Arthur 
Hoeppner, E. a. 
HoLSMAN, Henry K. 
Hunt, Leigh B. 
Hunt, Mvron . 
Hunter, David C 
Hyland, Paul V. 
Hals, Harold 
Haagen, Paul T. 
Hamilton, J. L. 



Jenkins, Harry D. 
JoBsoN, C. Frank . 
Johnson, Morris O 



Kelley, John H, . 
Kleinpell, W. H. 



Lammers, Herman C. . 
Lang, Louis A. . . . 
LiLLESKAu, John . . . 
Llewellyn, Joseph C. . 
Long, Birch Burdette 
Long, F. B 



Maker, Geo. W. . . 
Marienthal, Oscar B. 
Mauch, Max. . . . 
Millet, Louis J. . . 
Morse, Burton E. . 
Mueller, Paul F. P. 
Mundie W. B. . . . 
Marshall, B. H. . . 
Marsh, Harry L. 



Naper, Herbert J. 
Nimmons, Geo. C. 



1306 Berwyn Ave. 
806 The Temple. 
Elmhurst, 111. 
1383 W. Cullom Ave. 

H 

999 W. Eddy St. 
305 Dearborn Ave. 
1 4 19 Champlain Bldg. 
101 Metropolitan Blk. 
461 The Rookery. 
1 1 18 Association Bldg. 
1780 Old Colony Bldg. 
123 La Salle St. 
373 Burling St. 
914 Cable Bldg. 
881 W. Monroe St. 
4453 Berkeley Ave. 
6200 Jefif^rson Ave. 

44 Woodland Park. 
501 Pullman Bldg. 
902, I Park Row. 



3980 Vernon Ave. 
372 Webster Ave. 



21 Plymouth PI. 
261 1 N. 4i8t Ct. 
303 Haddon Ave. 
1 217 Association Bldg. 
611 Cable Bldg. 
1618 Monadnock Blk. 

M 

821, 218 La Salle St. 

3134 Forest Ave. 

28 St. Clair St. 

151 Michigan Ave. 

85th St. and Stewart Ave. 

Schiller Bldg. 

520 New York Life Bldg. 

4730 Drexel Boul. 

806, 184 La Salle St. 

N 

57 Delaware PI. 
1733 Marquette Bldg. 



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Pattison, Edward B 
Perkins. Dwight H. 
Petersen, Jens C. 
Phillips, John H. 
PiscHEL, Fred 
Polk, Willis . 
PouLSEN, Edw. J. . 



Rapp, Geo. L. # . 
Rawson, Lorin a. 
Reinhardt, G. a. 
Rouleau, Arthur 
Rosenthal, A. D. 
Rugee, P. H. . . 



Schmidt, Richard E. 
Seney, Edgar F. . . 
Shattuck, W. F. . . 
Spencer, R. C. Jr. . 



44 II Emerald Ave. 

1 107 Steinway Hall. 

1615 Ashland Blk. 

1601, ic» Washington St. 

Farmers, Ky. 

1 142 The Rookery, 

594 N. Francisco Ave. 



53 E. 53rd St. 
Hinsdale, 111. 
170 Osgood St. 
510 W.Polk St. 
125 Walnut St. 
1320 Montana St. 



1013 Teutonic Bldg. 
1 202 1 Stewart Ave. 
Art Institute, 
1107 Steinway Hall, 



Spindler, Oscar 
Stauder, Adolph F. 
Starr, Harry C. , 
Shaw, Howard . 



Tallmadge, T, E, 
ToMLiNSON, Webster 
Unverzagt, Arthur G. 



209 S. ClintonftSt. 
402 Journal Bldg. 
27 43rd St. 
613, 175 Dearborn St. 



T U V 



1 142 The Rookery. 
1107 Steinway Hall, 
loi Metropolitan Blk. 



w 



Weber, P. J. . . . 
Watson, R. Bruce 
Weirick, Ralph W. 
White, Melville P. 
Wilmanns, August C. 
Woltersdorf, Arthur 
Wright, Clark C. 



Zimmerman, A. G. 
Zimmerman, H. H. 



702 Fisher Bldg. 

305 Dearborn St. 

304 Bowen Ave. 

Cor. 37th St. and Stewart Ave. 

402 Journal Bldg. 

70 La Salle St. 

1200 Steinway Hall. 



205 La Salle St. 
1279 Perry St. 



ASSOCIATE MEMBERS 



Appel, Henry L 3344 Wabash Ave. 

Broes-Van Dort, G. . . 218 La Salle St. 

Cameron, Edgar ... 15 Tree Studio Bldg. 

Chaddock, De Clifford . 1227 Buena Ave., Evanston, 111. 

Coffman, Geo. W. . . . 717 Rialto Bldg. 

Combs, Roger M. ... 1007 Chamber of Commerce. 

Coolidge, Chas. A. . . . 1780 Old Colony Bldg. 

DuNGAN, Thos. a. . . . Roanoke Bldg. 

Dunning, A. C 35 Dearborn Ave. 

Falnbigl, Ferdinand . roi Metropolitan Blk. 

Ferguson, Louis A. . 139 Adams St. 

Gates, Wm. D 602 Chamber of Commerce,] 

Giannini, 211 E. Madison St. 

Gray, Geo. C 1210 Chamber of Commerce. 

Gates, Ellis D 602 Chamber of Commerce. 

Hall, Irwin R 440 N. State St 



Kniseley, H. C. . 
Lau, Willy H. 
Matz, Herman L. 
Noelle, Joseph B. 
Pierce, E. F. . 
Prosser, H. B. 
Perkins, F. W. 
Roesch, Chas. E. . 
Schmidt, R. O. 
Smith, Luther L. 
SoLLiTT, Ralph T. 
TwYMAN, Joseph . 
Van Inwagen, James, 
White, J. A. 
Wyles, Thos. R. . 



JR 



68 W. Monroe St. 

503 Pullman Bldg. 

304 Chamber of Commerce. 

1832 Wabash Ave. 

100 Washington St. 

602 Chamber of Commerce. 

Marquette Bldg. 

503 Pullman Bldg. 

204 Illinois St. 

3144 Groveland Ave. 

Hartford Bldg. 

100 Wabash Ave. 

Momence, III. 

Schiller Bldg. 

1564 Monadnock Blk. 



NON-RESIDENT MEMBERS 



Adelsperger, Roland 
Dillon, John R. . 
Harbeck, Jervis R. 
Lorch, Emil . . 
Pattison, James Wm 
Rice, J. L. . . . 
Scofield, Hubert C 
Sheblessy, John F 



20g Dean Bldg.,South Bend, Ind. 

Prudential Bldg., Atlanta, Ga. 

1 23 Theodore St., Detroit, Mich. 

16 Mellen St., Cambridge, Mass. 

Tree Studio Bldg, 

Howes Blk., Clinton, Iowa. 

Battle Creek, Mich, 

4th and Main Sts., Louisville.Ky. 



Smith, Wm. J. . . 
Starck, E, F, . 
Thomas, H, S, Jr. . 
Watson, J. Nelson 

Wells, W. A, . . 



Des Moines, Iowa. 
108 W. Main St., Madison, Wis. 
52 King Blk., Denver, Colo, 
5178 Fairmount Ave,, 

St. Louis, Mo. 
First Nat'l Bank Bldg., 

Moline, III. 



HONORARY MEMBERS 



Allen, John K 40 Dearborn St. 

Blake, Theo.L 28 E, 4i8t St,, New York City. 

Clark, Robert .... 2505 Kenmore Ave, 

Gay, Henry Lord ... 92 Dearborn St, 

Hunt, Frederick S, . . 1126W, Monroe St. 

Jenney, W, L, B 520 New York Life Bldg, 

Lawrie, Henry .... Paxton Bldg., Omaha, Neb. 



MuLLER, Louis, Jr. 
McLean, Robert C. 
Phimister, D. G. . 
Sullivan, Louis H. 
Taft, Lorado 
Wagner, Fritz 



610 Manhattan Bldg. 
610 Manhattan Bldg. 
539 Flournoy St. 
Auditorium Tower, 
Fine Arts Bldg, 
1118 The Rookery, 



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of Bx^i^ite 



^)cUmt^ (^nnuaP (^^iBi^ton 

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Rogers & Wells 
Chicago 



CHK^GO ARCmTECriML CLUB 



LIST OF EXHIBITS 



ABLER, A. K., and S. A. TREAT, 164 1 Monadnock Blk., Chicago. 

1 Ravisloe Country Club. 

2 Rosenbaum Memorial Building. 

ALLEN, FRANCIS R., 6 Beacon St., Boston, Mass. 
8 Reredos Immanuel Church, Boston, Mass. 

4 Residence of J. W. Brown, Wellesley, Mass. 

AMERICAN TERRA COTTA & CERAMIC CO., Room 602, 
138 Washington St., Chicago. 

5 Exhibit of Vases designed by members of Chicago Archi- 

tectural Club. 
ASH, PERCY, 1517 H Street, Washington D. C. 

6 Preliminary Study. Country House for Geo. H. Eldridge, 

Esq., Chevy Chase, Md. Plans. 

7 Prel|iminary Study. Country House for Geo. H, Eldridge, 

Esq., Chevy Chase, Md. Elevation. 

ASH, PERCY, and WM. M. POINDEXTER, Associated Archi- 
tects, Washington, D. C. 

8 Competitive Drawings for Municipal Building, Washington, 

D. C. Front Elevation. 

9 Competitive Drawings for Municipal Building, Washington, 

D. C. First Floor Plan. 

10 Competitive Drawings for Municipal Building, Wishington, 

D. C. Section, Side and Rear Elevations. 

ATCHISON & EDBROOKE, go Washington St., Chicago. 

11 An Apartment Building, Evanston, 111. 
11 A Residence, Sheridan Park, 111. 

BEAULEY, WILLIAM J., 1007 Monadnock Block. 

12 Old House, Bronx Park. 
18 The Old Tavern. 

14 Original Astor House, New York City. 

16 Forty-ninth and Broadway. 

16 The Old Homestead. 

17 Five Points New York City. 

18 Schwabs Station. 

19 Fifty-first near Broadway, New York City. 

20 Sicilian Quarter, New York City. 

21 Interior. Dining Room, Residence Wm. J. Beauley. 
BEHR, E. THEO., 343 East Fifty-sixth Street, Chicago. 

22 Michigan Avenue. Looking north from Art Institute. 

23 Cottage at Chalmette, near New Orleans, La. 
BELDEN, EDGAR S., Room 68, 164 LaSaUe Street, Chicago. 

24 Residence, Lake Shore Drive. 

BENEDICT, JULES B., 640 East Sixtieth Street, Chicago. 
26 Photographs. Residence at Algona, Iowa. 

BOCK, RICHARD W., 243 East Thirty-ninth Street, Chicago. 

26 Competitive Sketch — Model for McKinley Monument, 

plaster, one-fourth full size. 

BORST & HETHERINGTON, 1404 Title and Trust Building, 
Chicago. 

27 Partial View, Residence. Lake Geneva, Wisconsin. 

28 Northeast View. Residence. Lake Geneva, Wisconsin. 

29 Southwest View. Residence. Lake Geneva, Wisconsin. 
BOSWORTH, W. W., 142 East Thirty-third Street, New York 

City. 

80 The Great Sphinx. Drawn from a recent photo, by W. 

W. Bosworth. 

BOYD, DAVID KNICKERBOCKER, Harrison Building, Fif- 
teenth and Market Streets, Philadelphia, Pa. 

81 Residence, 810 Pine Street, Philadelphia. Photographs. 

82 Residence of William Henry Sayen, Esq., Wayne, Pa. 

Photographs. 
88 Residence of Arthur P. Baugh, Esq., Wynnewood, Pa. 
Perspective. 

84 Residence of Arthur P. Baugh, Esq., Wynnewood, Pa. 

Photographs. 

85 A Country Residence. Illustrated in " The Craftsman." 

86 Perspective Sketch and Plans of Residence, No. 810 Pine 

Street, Philadelphia, 

BRIGHAM, WM. T. & W. C, Shelter Island Heights, Suffolk 
County, N. Y. 

87 Series of Eleven Photographs taken from windows of 

" Marine Mosaic." 



BRINKMANN, WM. J., Room 86, 1 63 Randolph Street, Chicago. 

88 Corpus Christi Chapel, Chicago, 111. 

89 Interior of Our Lady of Sorrows Church, Chicago, III. 

40 St. Josaphat's Chiy^ch, Chicago, III. 

BROOKS, A. F., 722 Athenaeum Building, Chicago. 

41 A Medal. Louisiana Purchase Exposition. 

BROWN, FRANK CHOUTEAU, Ticknor House, 9 Park Street, 
Boston, Mass. 

42 A Set of Dining-room Furniture for a Country House. 

Frame of Six Photographs. 

BURNHAM, D. H. & CO., 1142 The Rookery, Chicago. 

48 Photograph of Flatiron Building, Comer Broadway and 

Fifth Avenue, New York, N. Y. 
44 Bird's-Eye View, Union Station, Washington, D. C. 
46 Study for Waiting Room. Union Station, Washington, 

D. C. 

46 Plan of Washington, D. C, showing proposed improve- 

ments and the Union Station. 

47 Sketch of Union Station, Washington, D. C. Accepted 

Design. 

48 Study for Union Station, Washington, D. C. 

49 Sketch Plan. Union Station, Washington, D. C. 
BURNHAM & CO., D. H., 1142 The Rookery, Chicago. 

60 First National Bank, Chicago. View of Staircase. Author, 

J. F. Sturdy. 

BUTLER & RODMAN, 16 East Twenty-Third St., New York City. 

61 New York Juvenile Asylum. 

62 New York Juvenile Asylum. Perspective of typical girls' 

cottage. 

68 New York Juvenile Asylum. Plan of Hospital. 

64 New York Juvenile Asylum. Elevation of Hospital. 

66 New York Juvenile Asylum. Plan of Church. 

66 New York Juvenile Asylum. Elevation of Church. 

67 New York Juverule Asylum. Plan of School. 

68 New York Juvenile Asylum. Elevation of School. 

69 New York Juvenile Asylum. General Plan. 

60 Proposed Residence, New London, Conn. 

61 Mausoleum for J. D. Archbold, Esq., Tarrytown, N. Y. 

CAMPBELL, WALTER M., 8 Beacon St., Boston, Mass. 

62 The Casino, Villa Doria Pamfili, Rome. 
68 Thatched Gateway, S. Romain, France. 
64 Towers of the Cathedral, Bayonne, France. 

CAPARN, H. A., 156 Fifth Ave., New York City. 
66 Garden and Lawns at Fairfax, Va. 

66 Gardens and Lawn at Fairfax, Va. - Plan. 

67 Country Estate at Dalton, Pa. 

CLARK, APPLETON P., Jr., 605 F St., Washington, D. C. 

68 Theater, Lima, Peru. 

69 Residence Mr. Thos. M. Gale, Washington, D. C. 

COLLINS, CHARLES, 6 Beacon St., Boston, Mass. 

70 A Canal in Venice. 

7 1 Cloisters of S. H. Novella, Florence. Water color. 

72 Sunset at Notre Dame, Paris. 

SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE, Columbia University, New 
York City. 

78 A Village Library. Plan. Elevations. Perspective. 
Fourth Year Problem. By W. H. Orchard. 

74 A Public Market Building. Elevation. Thesis Design. 
By G. W. Jacoby. 

76 A Public Market Building. Elevation and Section. The- 
sis Design. By G. W. Jacoby. 

76 A Public Market Building. Plan. Thesis Design. By 

G. W. Jacoby. 

77 A Public Market Building. Details. Thesis Design. By 

G. W. Jacoby. 

78 A High School. Elevation. Thesis Design. By J. T. 

Hannemann, Jr. 

79 A High School. Plans. Elevation and Section. Thesis 

Design. By J. T. Hannemann, Jr. 

80 A People's Institute and Recreation Park. Plan. Thesis 

Design. By E. J. Schoen. 
'"81 A People's Institute and Recreation Park. Elevation 
of Rostrum. Thesis Design. By E. J. Schoen. 



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SDCreENTH ANNUM EXHBmON 



School of Architbcturk — Continued. 

88 A Cantilever Bridge. Perspective. Thesis Design. By 

C. S. Kaiser. 
8t A Cantilever Bridge. Elevation. Thesis Design. By C. 
S. Kaiser. 

84 A CantUever Bridge. Plan. Thesis Design. By C. S. 

Kaiser. 

85 A Sun Parlor or Loggia in a Large Mansion. Fourth 

Year Design. By L. H. Fowler. 

86 A City Residence. Plans and Elevation. Fourth Year 

Problem. By B. S. Palliser. 

87 Studies in Decorative Design. Ceilings in Renaissance 

Style. Second and Third Year Design. By M. G. 
Colt, Luden £. Smith. 

88 A Seaside Hotel. Plan and Elevation. Perkins Fellow- 

ship Competition. Prize Design. By \S. S. Kaiser. 

89 A Seaside Hotel. Plan and Elevation. Perkins Fellow- 

ship Competition. By B. S. Cairns. 

90 A Seaside Hotel. Plan and Perspective. Perkins Fel- 

lowship Competition. Prize Design. By C. S. Kaiser. 

91 A Seaside Hotel Plan and Perspective. Perkins Fellow- 

ship Competition. By B. S. Cairns. 

92 Studies in Decorative Design. A Romanesque Doorway. 

By H. B. Crosby, L. E. Smith. 
98 Studies in Decorative Design. Gothic Windows. By C. 
S. Kaiser, L. E. Smith, Huger Elliott. 

94 A Country Estate. Fourth Yes^r Problem in Landscape 

Design. By L H. Fowler. 

95 A Sun Parlor of Loggia in a Large Mansion. Fourth 

Year Design. By F. B. Warren. 

96 A City Residence. Plans and Elevation. Fourth Year 

Problem. By S. S. Labouisse. 

97 Plan for Architectural Treatment of "South Field," 

Columbia University, New York City, Wm. Swing. 

98 A Country Club on the Palisades of the Hudson. Plan. 

Fourth Year Problem. By John S. Struyk. 

99 A City Residence. Detail. Fourth Year Problem. By 

W. H. Orchard. 

100 Plan for Architectural Treatment of "South Field," 

Columbia University. Fourth Year Problem. By 
Shiras Campbell. 

101 Studies in Decorative Design. Romanesque Doorways. 

Second and Thu-d Year Design. By C. S. Kaiser, G. W. 
Jacoby, E. J. Schoen. 
108 A City Residence. Plans and Elevation. Fourth Year 
Problem. By W. H. Orchard. 

COPE & STEWARDSON, 320 Walnut St., Philadelphia, Pa. 

lOS Chapel, St. Marks Church, Philadelphia. 

104 Chapel, St. Marks Church, Philadelphia. 

105 Chapel, St. Marks Church, Philadelphia. 

106 Chapel, St, Marks Church, Philadelphia. 

107 Chapel, St. Marks Church, Philadelphia. 

108 Washington University, St. Louis. 

109 Washington University, St. Louis. 

110 Washington University, St Louis. 

111 Washington University, St. Louis. 
118 Entrance Mary Institute, St. Louis. 

COLLEGE OF ARCHITECTURE, Cornell University, Ithaca, 
N. Y. 
lit A Museum of Fine Arts. By J. Andr£ Smith. 

114 A Southern Resort. Elevation. By Fred L. Ackerman, 

Edmeston, N. Y. 

115 A Pantheon. Perspective. By Fred L. Ackerman, 

Edmeston, N. Y. 
115AA Pantheon. Section Perspective. 

116 An Auditorium. By R. Irving Dodge, Ithaca, N. Y., care 

College of Architecture. 

117 An Auditorium. By Herman Dercum, Cleveland, Ohio. 

118 A Southern Resort. Plan. By Fred L. Ackerman, 

Edmeston, N. Y. 

COULTER, W. L., Saranac Lake, N. Y. 

119 Shin^e Camp on an Adirondack Carry. 

180 Interior of the Shingle Camp on an Adirondack Carry. 

181 Boat House on Upper Saranac Lake for Mr. Adolph 

Lewisohn. 
188 Lodge on Upper Saranac Lake, N. Y., for Mr. Adolph 
Lewisohn. 

CRAWFORD, EARL STETSON, 939 Eighth Ave., New York 
City. 
18t A Decorative Overmantle. 



CROWNFIELD, S. L., 3 East Fourteenth Street, New York City. 

184 Design for Wallpaper. Parrot. Tulip Motive. 

185 Piece of Printed Warp Silk. Gourd Motive. (Made 

from Design.) 

186 Decorative Study. Poppy. 

187 Cushion in Leather and Velvet. Vine Motive. 

DUNNING, N. MAX, 1218 Y. M. C. A. Building, Chicago. 
188. Street in Petit Andeley, France. 

Row of Houses in Leigh, England. 
Church in Rouen, France. 
Old House at Seven Oaks. 
Magdalene Tower, Oxford. 
Old House at Penshurst, England. 
Postoffice at Penshurst, England. 
Postoffice at Penshurst, England. 
Workingman's Cottage, Leigh, England. 
Workingman's Cottage, Leigh, England. 

& PRINDEVILLE, 85 Dearborn Street, Chicago. 
Collegiate Hall, St. Mary's Academy, Notre Dame, Ind. 
St. Xavier's Academy, Chicago. 
Design for a Convent, Chicago. 
St. Paul's Cathedral, Pittsburgh, Pa. 



189 
180 
181 
188 
188 
184 
185 
186 
187 

EGAN 
188 
189 
140 
141 

ERSKINE, RICHARD, 515 Stephen Girard Building, Phila- 
delphia, Pa, 
148 Sketch of Old House, Darby, Pa. 

EYRE, WILSON, 929 ^hestnut Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 
148 Perspective Sketch. Residence at Lenox, Mass. 

144 Residence at Lenox, Mass. 

145 Cottage at Greit Hack, Long Island, N. Y. 

146 Sketch for Shooting Lodge. 

147 Sketch for Dining Room. Residence at Binghamton, 

N. Y. \ 

148 Sketch for Living Room. Residence at Bradford Hills, 

149 Country Residen^, near Philadelphia. [Pa. 

150 Plan o| Country Residence, near Philadelphia. 

151 Houses at Roland\Park, Baltimore, Md. 

158 Sketch for Living Room. Residence on Giiford Avenue, 
Jersey City, N. J. \ , 

FISHER, ARTHUR A., 24 East Twenty-third Street, New Yori 
City. Care B. W. Morris, Jr. 
158 A A Country Church. Side Elevation and Section. Beaux 
Arts Society, Competition. 
A Country Church. Plan and Front Elevation. Beaux 
Arts Society, Competition. New York City. 

ERNEST, 35 Wall Stre^et, New York City. 
U. S. N. Academy. Chapel Perspective. 

Perspective of Memorial Hall, Cadet 

Generad, View from Northeast. 
General View from Chapel. 

West \£levation. Cadet Quarters 



158 

FLAGG, 
154 
155 

156 
157 
158 



U. S. N. Academy. 
Quarters Building. 
U. S. N. Academy. 
U. S. N. Academy. 
U. S. N. Academy. 



Building. \ 

159 U. S. N. Academy. Section Theo. Memorial Hall 

160 U. S. N. Academy. General Layout of Grounds. 

FRAENKEL, T. O., 1613 Marquette Building, Chicago. 

161 Residence on the Mississippi Sound. 
168 Residence on the Gulf Coast. \ 
168 Sketch for Residence. Water Color. 

164 Sketch for Residence. Water Color. 

165 Sketch for Bank Building, New Orleans. 

166 Design for Club Building, Mobile. 

FREEDLANDER, J. H., 044 Fifth Ave., New York City. 

167 Mess HaU, N. H. D. V, S. Front Elevation. 

City, Tenn. 

168 Mess Hall, N. H. D. V. S 

City, Tenn. 

169 Power House, N. H. D. V. S. 

Tenn. 

170 Barracks, N. H. D. V. S. 

Tenn. 
FROST & GRANGER, 806 Woman's Temple Building, Chicago. 

171 Hibbard, Spencer, Bartlett & Co.'s Building, State, South 

SVater Streets and Chicago River, Chicago, 111. 
178 Residence of Mr. F. C. Bartlett, 2901 Prairie Ave., 

Chicago. Photographs. 
178 Lake Forest and Chicago Buildings. Photographs. 
174 Lake Shore and Michigan Southern and Chicago, Rock 

Island and Pacific Railways, Terminal Station, Chicago, 111. 

GAUBERT, LEON. 

176 Library Interior, Residence of G. A. Joslyn. 



Johnson 



Side Elevation. Johnson 

Elevation. Johnson City, 

Elevation. Johnson City, 



CHKj^fiO ARCHITECTUBM CLUB 



GERBER, ARTHUR, 700 Fisher Bldg., Chicago. 

'176 Competitive Design for a Soldiers and Sailors Monument. 

177 Competitive Design for a Soldiers and Sailors Monument. 

GILBERT, CASS, in Fifth Ave., New York City; »nd Endicot 
Building, St. Paul, Minn. 

178 Sketch of Cloister at Palermo, Sicily. 

179 Fine Arts Building, Louisiana Purchase Exposition, St. 

Louis. Front Elevation. 

180 Fine Arts Building, Louisiana Purchase Exposition, St. 

Louis. Garden Elevation. 

HAAGEN, PAUL T., 4453 Berkeley Ave., Chicago. 

181 Study for a Summer Residence at Lake Geneva. 

182 Study for a Country House and Grounds. 

HABERSTROH, L., & SON, 9 Park St., Boston, Mass. 

188 Sketch for the Decoration of the Majestic Theater, Boston, 

Mass. By H. B. Pennell. 
184 Sketch for Decoration of Majestic Theater, Boston. By 
H. B. Pennell. 

HALDEN, J. C, 35 Congress Street, Boston, Mass. 
186 Detail of Stairway. Boston Public Library. 

186 Detail of the Atrium. Pallazzo Massimi, Rome. 

HALS, HARALD, 881 W. Monroe Street, Chicago. L-^ 

187 Sketch. 

188 Court Elevation. Palais d'Escouville, Calvados, France. 

HARRIS, CLINTON G., 165 School Lane, Germantown, Phila- 
delphia. 

189 La rue St. Julien. Door Front. 

190 An Early April Morning in Pennsylvania. 

191 The Cathedral Court at Gerona. 

192 Sketch of the Bishop's House at Lincoln. 
198 St. Giles Rectory. 

194 Along the Voorstraat-haven Dordrecht. 

195 Bank of Philip II., at Medina del Campo. 

196 Eglise, rue St. Jacques, Lisieux. 

197 At Salwarp Court in Worcestershire. 

HAWES & DODD, 24 Adams St., Chicago. 

198 Ceramic Mosaic. Panel. 

HAYS, WILLIAM CHARLES, ioi2 Walnut Street, Philadelphia, 
Pa. 

199 Competitive Design for the Soldiers and Sailors Monu- 

ment, Philadelphia. 

HEACOCK & HOKANSON, 931 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia, 
Pa. 

200 Residence at Elkins, Pa. 

HELLER, E. M., 58 W. Fifty-seventh Street, New York City. 

201 Christ on the Mount of Olives. Design for Stained Glass. 

202 Panel for a Screen. 

208 Santa Lucia. Design for Stained Glass. 

HOKANSON, O. M., 931 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 
204 A Suburban Cottage. 

HOLABIRD & ROCHE, 1618 Monadnock Block, Chicago. 
206 Stable for Oliver Sollitt, at Fox Lake, 111. 

206 Seven Photographs of Interior, at Auditorium Apartments. 

207 Bank for Petoskey, Mich. 

208 Baker Building, Kewanee, 111. 

209 Study of Bank Building. 

HOLSLAG, EDWARD J., Chicago. 

210 Rear Dining Room, Auditorium Annex. 

211 Lunette, Carnegie Library, Muncie, Ind. 

212 Lunette, Carnegie Library, Muncie, Ind. 
218 Dining Room. Residence of G. A. Joslyn. 

HOLSMAN, HENRY K., 153 LaSalle Street, Chicago. 

214 Collegiate Building, Parsons College. 

216 Library, Parsons College. 

216 Gymnasium, Parsons College. 

217 Academy Building, Parsons College. 

218 Science Hall, Parsons College. 

219 Ravenswood Baptist Church. 

220 Residence. North Front. James H. Eckels' Country 

Seat. 

221 Residence. Front toward Lake. 

Country Seat. 



HOOVER, IRA W., Fifth holder John Stewardson Memorial Schol- 
arship, 184 LaSalle Street, Chicago. 
222 Windsor Castle, from Eton. Sketch. 
228 Haddon Hall, from the Terrace. Sketch. 
224 Haddon Hall, from the Meadows. Sketch. 
826 Bell Hotel, Tewksbury. Sketch. 

226 Black Bear Tavern, Tewksbury. Sketch. 

227 House at Stratford on Avon. Sketch. 

228 Caesar's Tower, Warwick Castle. Sketch. 
829 Cottage near Kenilworth. Sketch. 

280 Magdalen Hall, Oxford. Sketch. 

281 Salisbury Cathedral, from Southeast. Sketch. 

282 Les Portes du Jub^, St. Etienne du Mont, Paris. Meas- 

ured Drawing. 
288 Lateral Doorway of St. Germain des Pres, Paris. Meas- 
ured Drawing. 

284 Musee de Cluny, Paris. Sketch. 

285 Chapelle de Jesus Ouvrier, Paris. Sketch. 

286 Garden Accessories, St. Cloud. Sketch. 

287 Dairy Bridge at Versailles. Sketch. 

288 Petit Trianon, Versailles. Sketch. 

289 Old House at Vitr^. Sketch. 

240 Chateau at Vitr6. Sketch. 

241 La Vaucelle at St. Lo. Sketch. 

242 Portal, St. Michele at Le Puy. Sketch. 
248 At Le Puy. Sketch. 

244 Sketch of Lateral Entrance, Notre Dame du Port Cler- 

mont-Farrand. 
246 At Bayeux. Sketch. 

246 At Lisieux. Sketch. 

247 At Lisieux. Sketch. 

248 Vieux Colombier, Vitry sur Seine. Sketch. 

249 Montalbaan's Tower, Amsterdam. 

249A Arch of Titus, Rome. Elevation. Measured Drawing. 

260 Arch of Titus, Rome. Plan. Measured Drawing. 

261 Arch of Titus, Rome. Section. Measured Drawing. 

262 Entrance Doorway of Palazzo Venezia, Rome. Measured 

Drawing. 
2621. Ceiling, Palazzo Massimi, Rome. Measured Drawing. 
268 In the Courtyard of the Palazzo Massimi, Rome. Sketch. 

264 Entrance Portico of the Palazzo Massimi, Rome. Sketch. 

265 Arcades of the Colosseum, Rome. Sketch. 
266A In the Borghese, Rome. Sketch. 

266 SS. Giovanni e Paolo, Rome. Sketch. 
A Fountain at Viterbo. Sketch. 
A Window in Perugia. Sketch. 
In Perugia. Sketch. 

Sketch. 



267 

268 
269 
260 
261 



James H. Eckels' 



St. Pietro at Assisi. 

At Siena. Sketch. 
261 A At Siena. Sketch. 
262 At Siena. Sketch. 

268 Pazzi Chapel, Santa Croce, Florence. Sketch. 
264 Ospedale del Ceppo, Pistoja. Sketch. 
266 Cortile of Palazzo Fava, Bologna. Sketch. 

266 Mercato Vecchio, Verona. Sketch. 

267 I Gesuati, Venice. Sketch. 

268 In Venice. Sketch. 

269 In Venice. Sketch. 

270 S. Maria della Salute, Venice. Sketch. 

270A Marble Table in Neapolitan Museum. Measured Sketch. 

27 1 Funereal Procession, Wall Painting in Neapolitan Museum. 

Copy. 

272 Wall Paintings from Casa Veti, PompeiL Copy. 
278 Casa di Pansa, Pompeii. Sketch. 

274 At Paestum. Sketch. 

275 Temple of Juno at Girgenti. Sketch. 

276 Temple of Juno at Girgenti. Sketch. 

277 Temple of Neptune at Girgenti. 

278 At Taormina. Sketch. 
878A At Taormina. Sketch. 

HOWARD, JOHN G. and D. Everett Waid, 156 Fifth Ave., New 
York City. 

279 Perspective. Long Island College Hospital, Henry, 
,^ Amity and Pacific Streets, Brooklyn, N. Y. Rendered 

' by D. A. Gregg. / 

UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS, Urbana, ill. 

280 Dome of the Chigi Chapel. Stud^ in Interior Decoration. 
By V. M. Holder. V 

An Art Institute. By Arthur R. KeUy, Los Angeles, Cal. 
A Faculty Club House. By J. R. Kennedy, Tuscaloosa, 

Ala. \ 

A Boat Club House. By O. J. Francis, Chicago, 111. 



/ 



\ 



l:iiiMM^ 



^r^js'.'^. '"■'■'" ■ ■ '■'- 



SIXTEENTH ANNUM EXHBmON 



University of Illinois — CoiUinued. 

884 A Faculty Club House. By Neil McMillan, Chicago, lU. 
286 A Conservatory of Music. School Facade. By Theodore 
M. Sanders, little Rock, Ark. 

886 A Conservatory of Music. Auditorium — Facade. By 

Theodore M. Sanders, Little Rock, Ark. 

887 An Episcopal Church. By H. W. Whitsitt. 

JENNEY & MUNDIE. 

888 National Bank of St. Joseph, St. Joseph, Mo. 

JOHl^SON-LINDSLEY. 

88^ Country Residence for Mrs. Robert W. Lesley. 

JOHNSON, T. R., 3 N. Fulton Ave., Mt. Vernon, N. Y. 

800 Electrolier for an Isle of Safety. Municipal Art Society 
Competition, New York. 

891 Bookplate. 

KEEN, CHAS. BARTON, 1604 Chestnut Street,. Philadelphia, Pa. 

892 Sketch of House at Atlantic City. 

KELLY, JOHN H., 3980 Vernon Ave., Chicago. 
898 Water Color. 

LAVALLE, JOHN, 85 Devonshire Street, Boston, Mass. 

894 Sketch for House, at Pride's Crossing, Mass., by C. A. 

Maginnis, Boston, Mass. 
896 Sketdi for House at Cohasset, Mass., by A. G. Ripley, 

Boston, Mass. 

896 Views of House at Cohasset, Mass. 

LEAVITT, CHAS. W., Jr., 15 Cortlandt St., New York City. 

897 Estate of F. S. Smithers, Esq., Glencove, L. I. 

898 Gardens of D. P. Kingsley, Esq., Riverdale, N. Y. 

299 Property of Geo. B. Post, Jr., Esq., Bemardsville, N. J. 
General Plan. v. 



LEISENRING, 
City 



L. MORRIS, 77 Washington Place, New York 



800 Sketch. Looking toward the Salute, Venice. 

801 Portions of the Terra Cotta Frieze. Delia Robbias. 

Ospedale del Ceppo Pistoja. 
808 Sketch. Bruges. St. John's Hospital. 
808 Sketch at Quadlingburg. 
804 Sketch at Hildesheim. 
80& Sketch. The Warrburg. 
806 Sketch. Old Renaissance. House. Tours. Measured 

Drawing. Brick Work. Old Rathhaus. Hanover. 

LIGHT, GEO. A., 244 Fifth Avenue, New York City. 
Design for Small Library. Side Elevation. 
Design for Small Library. Elevation. 

Soldiers and Sailors Monument, Philadelphia, Pa. Per- 
spective. 

Soldiers and Sailors Monument, Philadelphia, Pa. Eleva- 
tion. 

Soldiers and Sailors Monument, Philadelphia, Pa. Section. 

Design for Church. Plan. 

Design for Church. Main Elevation. 



807 

808 

809 
810 
811 



LLEWELLYN, JOS. C, I2i8 Y. M. C A. Building, Chicago. 
818 library at Battle Creek, Mich. 
818 Warehouse at Kansas City. 
814 Residence for Mr. F. O. Magie, Winnetka. 
816 First Design, library at Battle Creek, Mich. 

MAHER GEORGE W., 218 LaSaMe Street, Chicago. 

816 Country Home at Glencoe, lU., of Mr. Harry Rubens. 

817 Residence of Mrs. E. J. Mosser, Buena Park, Chicago. 

818 Photographs of exterior of James A. Patten residence, 

Evanston, 111. 

MARSHALL, BENJAMIN HOWARD, Architect, Chicago. 

819 Sketch of Nixon Theater, Pittsburg, Pa. 

880 Final Drawing of Nixon Theatre. 

881 Stable for Mr. J. J. Mitchell, Lake Geneva, Wis. 
888 Stable for Mr. M. H. Tichenor, Oconomowoc, Wis. 
888 Iroquois Theater, Chicago. 

886 Residence for J. C. Hutchins, Lake Geneva, Wis. 

886 Entrance of Theater, Forty-Second Street, New York. 

887 Sketch of Spring House n>r J. J. Mitchell, Lake Geneva, 

Wis. 

888 Sketch of Residence, Kenwood, Chicago. 

880 Memorial Chapel, Kirkland B. Armour, Kansas City, Mo. 

881 Residence in Kenwood. 



DEPARTMENT OF ARCHITECTURE, Massachusetts Institute 
of Technology, Boston, Mass. 
888 A Chapel Screen. By W. R. Greeley. 

888 Choir Stall in a Cathedral. By W. T. Aldrich. 

884 A Large Residence, inspired by the Venetian Classical 

Palaces. Elevation. By F. W. Puckey. 
886 A Veteran's Home. Elevation. By E. F. Lawrence. 

886 An Art Museum. Elevation. By F. C. Hirons. 

887 A Club House for the Twentieth Century Club. By 

Alexander J. Scholtes. 
838 A Large Residence, Inspired by the Venetian Classical 
Palaces. Plan. By F. W. Puckey. 

889 A National Battlefield Park. Plan. By W. P. R. Pem- 

ber. 

NIMMONS & FELLOWS, 1733 Marquette Building, Chicago. 

840 The New Spahr Building, Columbus, Ohio. 

841 Hayden Building, Columbus, Ohio. 

848 Residence for J. Rosenwald, Esq., Comer Forty-ninth 
Street and Ellis Avenue, Chicago. 

NIMMONS & FELLOWS and HOIjLACE S. POWERS, 1733 
Marquette Building, Chicago. 
848 Lesher Building, Cor. Franklin Street and Lomax Place, 
Chicago. 

OAKLEY THORNTON, 1220 Spruce Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 
844 Dordrecht. 

ORR, HUGH, 15 Exchange Street, Boston, Mass. 

846 Competitive Design for Soldiers and Sailors Monument, 
Philadelphia. Plan. 

846 Competitive Design for Soldiers and Sailors Monument, 

Philadelphia. Section. 

847 Competitive 'Design for Soldiers and Sailors Monument, 

Philadelphia. Perspective. 

OSTERTAG, B., Tree Studio Building, Chicago. Three Panels. 
847A Decorations from Dining Room of house of J. J. Husser. 
847B Decorations from Dining Room of house of J. J. Husser. 
8470 Decorations from Dining Room of house of J. J. Husser. 

OTTENHEIMER, H. L., 1123 Schiller Building, Chicago. 

848 Residence, Ligonier, Ind. 

849 Warehouse, Fort Wayne, Ind. 

860 Residence, Duluth, Mmn. 

861 Cemetery Vault, Rosehill, 111. 
868 Residence, Fort Wayne, Ind. 
868 Residence, Chicago. 

864 Opera House, Houghton, Mich. 

PARIS, WM. FRANCKLYN, 315 Fifth Ave., New York City. 
866 Decoration. Reception Room for Residence, Fifty-second 
Street and Fifth Ave., New York City. 
Bookcases for Residence, Fifty-sixth Street and Madison 

Ave., New York City. 
Library Table for Residence, Fifty-sixth Street and Madi- 
son Ave., New York City. 
Louis XV. Scr;:en. Panel of Antique Tapestry. 
Empire Arm Chair. 



866 

867 

868 
869 



PARSONS, W. E., 156 Fifth Ave., New York City. 

860 Free and Paying Baths. Facade. Problem in First Class. 

Ecole des Beaux Arts. ^t 

861 Free and Psiying Baths. Plan. Problem in First Class. 

Ecole des Beaux Arts. 

PEABODY & BEAU LEY, 1007 Monadnock Block, Chicago. 
868 Entrance, City Residence. 
868A Abson's Chop House. 
868 A City Residence. 
864 Proposed Elks Club. 

PEART, CAROLINE, 1723 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 
866 Court of Myrtles, Alhambra. 

866 Luxembourg Gardens, Paris. 

UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA. 

867 A Metropolitan Cathedral. Plan. Julien F. Abele. 

868 A Metropolitan Cathedral. Elevation. Julien F. Abele. 

869 A Parish Church. Plan. G. H. Bickley. 

870 A Parish Church. Elevation. G. H. Bickley. 



-^•' 



(mm) ARcmTECTiM. club 



University of Pennsylvania — Continued. 

871 A Governor's Mansion. Plan. J. G. Dentz. 

872 A Governor's Mansion. Elevation. 

878 Embroidered Chairback. Decorative Design. 

874 Triumphal Arch. Plan and Elevation. Midgley Walter 

HUl. 
876 A Small Public Library. Plan and Section. C E. 

Howell. 

876 A Small Public library. Elevation. C. E. Howell. 

877 Academy of Fine Arts. Plan. W. T. Karcher. 

878 Academy of Fine Arts. Elevation. W. T. Karcher. 
870 Preliminary Study of University Group. Thornton Oakley. 

880 Building for School of Architecture. First Floor Plan. 

C. G. Spoerl. 

881 Building for School of Architecture. Elevation and Sec- 

tion. Second Floor Plan. C. G. Spoerl. 

882 Greek Ionic Order. H. D. Wood. 

PERKINS, DWIGHT HEALD, I20O St^nway Hall, Chicago. 
888 (One Frame) Nine Photographs of Hitchcock Hall, Uni- 
versity of Chicago. I 

884 Cast or Ornament in Library of Hitchf:ock Hall, Univer- 

sity of Chicago. 

885 (One Frame) Morgan Park Gymnasium. Stable for Mrs. 

Chas. Hitchcock. Residence of J. J. Wait, Esq. 

PERKINS, FREDERICK W., Marquette BuUding, Chicago. 

886 Sketch for a Residence. 

887 Stable at Lake Geneva, for Otto Young. Photograph. 

888 Stable at Lake Geneva, for Otto Young. Detail View. 

Photograph. I 

889 Photographs of Residence, Chas. H. Hulburd, Lake Shore 

Drive, Chicago. 

890 Sketch No. i, Residence, Chas. H. Hulburd, Lake Shore 

Drive, Chicago. 

891 Sketch No. 2, Residence, Chas. H. Hulburd, Lake Shore 

Drive, Chicago. 

PEROT, ROBESON LEA, 303 Philadelphia Bourse, Philadelphia, 
Pa. 

892 Residence at Chestnut Hill, Philadelphia. Photographs. 

PEROT & BISSELL, 303 Philadelphia Bourse, Philadelphia, Pa. 
Terra Cotta Bosses for Residence, Winterthur, Del. 
898 House at Radnor, Pa. Sketch. 

894 House at St. David's, Pa. Sketch. 

895 Stable near Greenville, Del. 

896 Residence near Greenville, Del. 

POGGI, EDMUND HOWE, 907 Walnut Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 

897 An Advertising Kiosk. — First Mention, T-Square Club 

(Philadelphia) Competition. 

POLK, WILLIS. 

897A Birdseye View, San Francisco. 
897B Looking down California Avenue. 
897C View of Market Street. 

POND & POND, 1 109 Steinway Hall, 21 Van Buren Street, Chicago. 
897D Building for Young Men's Christian Association at Ann 
Arbor, Michigan, by I. K. Pond. 

RANKIN & KELLOGG, 1012 Walnut Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 

898 U. S. Court House and Post Office, Indianapolis, Ind. 

Accepted Competitive Design. Elevation. 

899 Chambers-Wylie Presbyterian Church, Philadelphia. In- 

terior. 

400 Boston Athenaeum. Competitive Drawings. First Floor 

Plan. 

401 Boston Athenaeum Competitive Drawings. Front and 

Side Elevations. 



ROSBORG,.C. F., 35 Wall Street New York City. 

400 Elevation. Proposed Theater to be erected in New Yprk. 

410 Perspective. Second Prize Design for Soldiers and 

Sailors Monument, Philadelphia. 

411 Section. Second Prize Design for Soldiers and Sailors 

Monument, Philadelphia. 

412 Plan. Second Prize Design for Soldiers and Sailors 

Monument, Philadelphia. 
418 Elevation. Second Prize Design for Soldiers and Sailors 
Monument, Philadelphia. 

ROSS, ALBERT RANDOLPH, 156 Fifth Ave., New York City. 
414 Plan of First Floor Carnegie Library of Nashville, Tenn. 
416 Front Elevation Carnegie Library of Nashville, Tenn. 

SCHERMERHORN, C. E., 430 Walnut Street, PhUadelphia, Pa. 

416 House for Mr. J. H. Yocum, Bryn Mawr, Pa. 

SEYFARTH, Robert, 821, 218 LaSalle Street, Chicago, 

417 Library. 



SHAW, HOWARD, 615, 175 Dearborn Street, Chicago. 

418 Perspective of Residence at 2106 Calumet Ave., Chicago. 

419 Photograph of Manufacturing Building, Wabash Ave., 

Chicago. 

420 Exteriors. Residence of Mr. Howard Shaw at Lake For- 

est, 111. 

421 Interiors. Residence of Mr. Howard Shaw, at Lake For- 

est, 111. 

422 Interiors. Residence 2106 Calumet Ave., Chicago. 
428 Sun Vow. 



SCHMIDT, RICHARD E. 

428A St. Joseph's Hospital, Ashland, Wis. 

428B St. Anne's Sanitarium, Chicago. 

428C A Restaurant Building for Chicago. 

428D The Hall. A Restaurant Building for Chicago. 

428E Residence, North State Street, Chicago. 

428F House for Mt. Morris, 111. 

4286 House at Winnetka, 111. 

428H North Shore Health Resort. 



SHURTLEFF, ARTHUR A.- 9 W. Cedar Street, Boston, Mass. 
424 Arrangement of Farm Buildings and Farm at Kearsarge, 

N. H. 
424A Measured Plan of a Garden West of Boston. 



SONNTAG, LOUIS, 24 E. Twenty-third Street, New York City. 
426 A Country Church. Beaux Arts Society Competition. 



SPIERING, LOUIS C, 4027 McPherson Avenue, St. Louis, Mo. 

427 A Museum o£ Fine Arts. Plan and Elevation. 

428 A Thirteenth Century Pulpit. 

429 Public Building. Sections. Plan. 



TOMLINSON, WEBSTER, Steinway Hall, Chicago. 

480 "Ingle Nook." Rear. Summer Cottage for J. H. 

Howard, Esq., Lake Bluff, 111. 

481 "Ingle Nook." Front. Summer Cottage for H. J. 

Howard, Esq., Lake Bluff, 111. 

TRAXLER, v., 636 Evanston Avenue, Chicago. 

482 " A Residence." 
488 " Study for a Bank." 



ROBINSON, ARGYLE E., 
408 Residence. 

ROGERS, JAS. GAMBLE, Ashland Block, Chicago. 

404 Views of C. E. Pope Residence, Lake Forest, 111. 

405 Design for Residence, at Evanston, 111. 

406 Gate Lodges near Chicago. 

407 Design for Tomb at Lake Forest, 111. 

408 Perspective of the School of Education Building. 

versity of Chicago. 



Uni- 



487 

488 

480 
440 
441 



Elevation. 
Elevation. 



WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY, St. Louis^ Mo. 
486 A Club House for St. Louis Architects. 

Albert D- Millar. 
A Club H<iuse for St. Louis Architects. 

Wilbur T. Trueblood. 
A Club House for St. Louis Architects. 

bur T. Trueblood. 
A Monument to John Ericsson. By Francis S. Swales 
A Monument to John Ericsson. By Albert D. Millar. 
An India Ink Rendering. By C. H. Fessenden. 



By 
By 



Plan. By Wil- 



''ll^?»I^^'?T''^*?»'fF«f^n^w^^ , • '''\ r'-w^f^iw^- 



ijs^sfiSffpswpf'Sp?^:'?!''' * ■' ■ .,'■ ' 



:.'5^:. i^'?_ T^'f»;»^(-Tirf'^';i-:^l",^ . 



'Oe 



SIXTEENTH ANNUM EXHBmON 



WATSON & HAZELTON, Room 805, 305 Dearborn Street, 
Chicago. 

Model of Illinois State Building at the Louisiana Pur- 
chase Exposition, St. Louis, Mo., 1 904. 

Illinois State Building at the Louisiana Purchase Exposi- 
tion, St. Louis, Mo., 1904. 

Institution for Deaf and Dumb, Jacksonville, 111. 



448 
448 



444 

WEBER, P. J., FUher BuUding, Chicago. 

44&AB Sketch of the Stamum for the Olympian Games. 
446 Perspecdve Sketch for a Sanitarium. 

446 Perspective Sketch for a Sanitarium. 

447 Bank and Office Building. 

448 Competitive Design for the Illinois State Building, St. 

Louis. 

449 Competitive Design for the Illinois State Building, St. 

Louis. ^ -X 

460 Competitive Design for the Illinois State Building, St. 

Louis. 

WELLS, NEWTON A., University of Illinois, Urbana, IlL 

461 " Valor." Decorative Panel, in Tinted Plaster. 

WHITE, JAMES M. and SETH J. TEMPLE, Urbana, 111. 

465 Competitive Design for the Illinois State Building, at the 

Louisiana Purchase Exposition. 

WIGHT, PETER B., 11 12 Chamber of Commerce Building, 
Chicago. 
468 Church of the Transfiguration, Chicago. 
464 Front Elevation of Office Building. 

WILSON, H. R., 218 LaSalle Street, Chicago. 

466 Preliminary Sketch for Residence of Mr. Clark, Peoria, 111. 

466 Residence, Mr. Lee Hunt, Memphis, Tenn. 

467 Preliminary Sketch. Exterior of Residence for James L. 

Honghteung, Winnetka, IlL 

468 Exterior of Apartment Building for Mr. W. B. White, 

Chicago. 

469 Preliminary Sketch for Garden Decoration for Mr. Clark's 

Residence at Peoria, 111. 

480 Preliminary Sketch of Residence for Mrs. N. J. Knicker- 
bocker, Elkhart, Ind. 

461 Preliminary Sketch of Billiard Room. Carl Stonehill 
Residence, Chicago. 

468 Design of a Theatre and Roof Garden for Chicago. 

468 Preliminary Sketch of Hall, for Mrs. N. J. Knickerbocker's 
Residence, Elkhart, Ind. 

464 Interior of Dining Room. Residence of R. W. Harris, 
Memphis, Tenn. 

466 Interior Hall. Residence of Mrs. N. J. Knickerbocker, 
Elkhart, Ind. 

466 Country Residence, J. B. Murphy, Lake Beula, Wis. 

467 Residence, Caii Stonehill, Chicago. 

468 Residence, Mrs. N. J. Knickerbocker, Elkhart, Ind. 



469 Marble Hall and Staircase, Carl Stonehill's Residence, 

Chicago. 
WILSON, H. R., 218 LaSalle Street, Chicago. 

470 Preliminary Sketch. Apartment Building for John A. 

Devore. 

471 Preliminary Sketch for residence of Dr. Klebb, Winnetka 

ZIMMERMAN, A. G., Home Insurance Building, Chicago. 

478 National Biscuit Company Building, Fifteenth Street 
Frontage, New York City. Drawn by J. C. Torrence. 



DRAWINGS SUBMITTED IN C. A. C. TRAVELING 
SCHOLARSHIP FOR 1903 

LONG, BIRCH BURDETTE. 

478 Bird's-eye Perspective. 
474 Block Plan. 

WEIRICK, RALPH. 

476 Bird's-eye Perspective. ••' 

476 Detail of end Pavilion. 

477 Elevation. 



CIRCUIT DRAWINGS 

GROSVENOR, ATTERBURY. 

478 No. I. House for Dr. C. C. Rice, Easthampton, L. I. 

479 No. 4. House for A. B. Claflin, Southampton. 

480 House for A. B. Claflin. 

481 No. 5. Residence for Miss Richards, Easthampton. 

BORING & TILTON. 

488 Memorial Hall. Jacob Tome Inst., Port Deposit, Md. 
488 Memorial Hall. Interior. Jacob Tome Inst., Port 

Deposit, Md. 
484 Inn. Interior. Jacob Tome Inst. 

FRIAR BONA VENTURA and FRIAR PAULUS. 

486 The Benedictines of Beuron. Cram, Goodhue and Ferger- 
son. 

486 All Saints Church, Dorchester, Mass. 

ISRAELS & HARDER. 

487 Monument for Soldiers, Sailors and Marines who Served 

in the War of the Rebellion. Competitive Drawing. 

RENWIC, ASPINWALL & OWEN. 

488 Giamatin Inn. Lawrence Park, Bronxville, N. Y. 

489 Gramatin Inn. Lawrence Park, Bronxville, N. Y. 

SANTE MARIE PERRIN. 

490 Notre Dame de Fourviere Lyon. 



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) 



PERIODICAL LITERATURE 



227 



ROY, Gene . _ 

Shot in the dark. Outdoor Life 130:35-74- O 
'62 
ROYAL academy of arts, London 

Sold for $2,240,000; Leonardo's drawing of 
Virgin and Child with St Anne and St John 
the Baptist. Time 80:42 Ag 10 '62 
ROYAL Danish ballet 
Dramatic Danes. L. Moore. 11 Dance Ma«r 36: 
14-18 Ag '62 
ROYAL Dutch-Shell group 
Mainnioih oil company trims the fat off. 11 
Bsns W p 102-f S 15 '62 
ROYCE, William S. 
ISconomics of disarmament. Nation 195:105-9 
S 8 '62 
RUBBER industry and trade 

Last big sir. Time 80:66-7 Ag 10 '62 
RUBEL, John H. 
Rubel spells out space philosophy; sum- 
mary of address, por Miss & Roc 11:37-8 
O 22 'G2 
RUBELLA 
German measles virus. Scl Am 207:104-1- S 

•62 
German measles virus found by U.S. sci- 
entists. Sci N L 82:94 Ag 11 '62 
RUBIN, Larry 
Heidelberg; poem. Commonweal 77:68 O 12 
'62 
RUBIN, Maude 
After first grief; poem. America 107:895 O 13 

'62 
Full cycle for Aunt Cynthia; poem. America 
107:924 O 20 '62 
RUBIN. Morton J. 
Antarctic and the weather; with biographical 
sketch. Sci Am 207:47. 89-94 biblloK(p292) 
S '62 
RUBINSTEIN, Alvln Z. 
Russia and the uncommitted nations. Cur 
Hist 43:218-23-1- O '62 
RUBINSTEIN, Irvin. See Best. J. B. jt. auth. 
RUBINSTEIN, Marion 
Fishing goes to college. 11 Am For 68:38-40 
S '62 
RUDEEN, Kenneth 
Harness racing. Sports Illus 15:63 O 23 '61; 

16:54-5 Mr 12: 17:47 O 1 '62 
Motor sports. Sports Illus 14:44-5 Ja 23; 58 
Mr 6 '61; 16:56-f- Mr 5; 80+ Ap 2; 39-40-}- 
My 28; 76+ Je 11; 17:58-60 O 1 '62 
RUDEL, Julius 
Profiles, W. Sargeant. por(p57) New Yorker 
:i8:624- O 20 '62 
RUDNICK, Josephine 
George Tapps in Africa. Dance Mag 36:19-21 

O '62 
Weather or not. Dance Mag 36:58-9 S '62 
RUDOLPH. Paul 
Concrete; a special report. 11 Arch Forum 
117:ScS-9 S '62 
RUGS and carpets 
Rainbow at your feet. 11 McCalls 89:78-85 S 
•U2 

Care 
Most common carpet faults and what to do 
about them. Good H 155:138f O '62 
RUHL. Robert Waldo 
About this time of year; exposes of fraud 
and corruption at votiiiir time. R. L. 
Tobin. Sat R 45:49-50 O 13 '62 
RUHRBERG, Karl 

Gerhart Hauptmann, dramatist of the op- 
pressed. UNESCO Courier 15:23-5 S '62 
RULE of law 
Order and change in a warless world. W. 
Millis. Sat R 45:18-20+ S 15 '62 

RUNNELLS, James Edward 
Forgotten man. por Time 80:65 S 7 '62 

RUNNING 
Happy ending to a false start. A. W. 

Schardt. Sports Illus 17:E3-E4 S 3 '62 
Ready for anything, il Time 80:62-3 Ag 31 

•62 
Summit chase of an organization mller. J. 

Lovesey. il Sports Illus 17:42-3 S 3 '62 
RUOHOMAA. Kosti 
Count rv cameraman: Camera club of New 

York. .7. Deschin. i] N "i' Times Mag p59 

O 28 '62 

RURAL credit unions. See Credit unions 
RURAL homes. See Summer homes 
RURAL life. See Country life 
RURAL life conference. Catholic. See National 

Catholic rural life conference 
RURAL schools 
Art in the rural schools. H. Skuldt. 11 Sch 
Arts 62:9-12 S '62 
RURAL sociology. See Sociology, Rural 
RUSDEN. Philip L. 
Guard atrainst winter Injury. Horticulture 40: 
529 O '62 
RUSH, Myron 
Khrushchev's limited dictatorship, blblloar f 
Cur Hist 43:193-200 O '62 



RUSK, Dean 

Eighth anniversary of SEATO; statement, 
September 7. 1962. Dept State Bui 47:451 
S 24 '62 

Foreign policy aspects of space conununica- 
Uons; August 6. 1962. Dept State Bui 47: 
315-19 Ag 27 '62 

Fulbright agreement with Germany marks 
tenth anniversary; text of statement, July 
18, 1962. Dept State Bui 47:221 Ag 6 '62 

Global struggle for freedom; address, August 
31, 1962. Vital Speeches 28:714-17 S 15 '62 

President Kennedy and Secretary Rusk urge 
restoration of foreign aid funds; state- 
ments, September 19 and September 21, 
1!)(;2. Dept State Bui 47:518-25 O 8 '62 

Secretary Rusk hopes of greater coopera- 
tion In space field; Interview, ed. by B. De 
Mauny. Dept State Bui 47:348 S 3 '62 

Secretary Rusk interviewed on Issues and 
answers, July 8, 1962. Dept State Bui 47:179- 
85 Jl 30 '62 

Secretary Rusk to Senator Fulbright: letter, 
August 9, 1962. Dept State 47:^62 S 3 *62 

Secretary Rusk's news conference of July 12, 
1962. Dept State Bui 47:171-9 Jl 30 '62 

Statem.^nt, on U.N. loan legislation, July 2, 
1962. Dept State Bui 47:142-4 Jl 23 '62 

United States again calls for action on draft- 
ing of disarmament treaty; remarks. July 
24. 1962. Dept State Bui 47:243-6 Ajf 13 
'62 

Winning a worldwide Victory for freedom; ad- 
dress, August 13. 1962. Dept State Bui 47: 
343-8 S 3 '62 
RUSSELL, Andy 

1 work for mv bucks, por Outdoor Life 130: 
;5S-41+ O '62 
RUSSELL, Bertrand Russell, 3d earl 

Russell; war, peace, the bomb; with excerpts 
from conversation, ed. by E. GrifHths. 
por(cover) Newsweek 60:56-7 Ag 20 '62 
RUSSELL, Francis 

Movies. Nat R 10:89-90; 11:311-13. 386-7; 12: 
103, 251 + , 333-4+; 13:198+ F 11, N 4. D 2 
'61, F 13. Ap 10. My 8. S 11 '62 

Pilgrims and the Rock. Am Heritage 13:48-55 
() '62 
RUSSELL. Fred 

Pigskin preview '62. Sat Eve Post 235:20-5 
S 8 '62 
RUSSELL, Pee Wee 

Profiles. W. Balliett. por New Yorker 38:30- 
2+ Ag 11 '62 

RUSSELL, Rosalind 

Kind of trai I am. pors Sat Eve Post 235:26-31 
S 29; 36-7+ O 6; 72-5 O 13 '62 

RUSSELL. Sanders 
Preacher Russell put his worst foot forward; 
Hambletonian stake. K. Rudeen. 11 por 

Sports Illus 17:20-1 S 10 '62 
RUSSELL, Serena 

D6but at Blenheim palace, il pors Vogue 140: 
82-3 Ag 1 '62 

RUSSELL, Texie Horton 
Fond recollections department. Hobbles 67:124 
O '62 

RUSSIA 

Rus.sia today. R. Wilson, il Look 26:39-40+ 

N 6 'f.2 
Soviet Union. 1962; symposium, blbllog f Cur 

Hist 43:193-233+ O '62 
/See also 
American.s in Russia 
Hfillot — Russia 

Child reus literature — Russia 
Communism — Russia 
Cos! of living — Russia 
Disarmament — Russia 
Food sui)))ly — Russia 
Newspapers — Russia 
Novocherkassk 
Railroads — Russia 
Research — Russia 
."-lecret service — Russia 
Taxation — Russia 

Defenses 
Battlefield rockets for the red QI. 11 Pop Scl 
181:104-5 O '62 

Description and travel 

Our far-flung correspondents; Le Chopin to 
Moscow. A. Moorehead. New Yorker 38:118+ 
O 6 '62 

Economic conditions 

In Sputnikland; report by W. Bassow. News- 
week 60:68 O 8 '62 

Khrushchev and the Common market. F. B. 
Stevens, il U S News 53:48-9 Ag 13 '62 

Khrushchev's troubles as Russia faced show- 
down, il U S News 53:71-2 N 5 '62 

Riots at Rostov. Newsweek 60:42+ O 22 
•62 

To have and to hold. N. Cousins. Sat R 45: 
24 S 8 '62 
See also 

Food supply — Russia 

Labor and laboring classes — Russia 

Russia — Industries 



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228 



READERS' GUIDE TO 



RUSSIA — Continued 

Economic policy 
Tragic paradox. R. Hotz. Aviation W 77:21 Ag 
13 '62 
See alao 
Communism — ^Russia 

Economic relations 
Join 'em? blast against the Conunon marlcet. 

Newsweeli 60:48 S 17 '62 
Russia reacts to the Common marlcet. A. 

Werth. Nation 195:68-70 Ag 26 '62 

Japan 
Ruddying up of Japan & Russia. 11 Time 
80:73 S 7 '62 

Foreign relations 

Cold war: four contemporary appraisals. J. 
L,. Snell. biblios- f Am Hist R 68:69-75 O 
•62 

Communist ideology and Soviet foreign policy. 
B. D. Wolfe. For Affairs 41:152-70 O '62 

From Sputnilc to boomerang? decline in Com- 
munist fortunes, il Newsweek 60:64-6-1- O 8 
'62 

Khrushchev's troubles as Russia faced show- 
down, il U S News 5:^:71-2 N 5 '62 

Meanings of coexistence. P. E. Mosely. For 
Affairs 41:36-46 O '62 

Russia and the uncommitted nations. A. Z. 
Rubinstein. Cur Hist 43:218-23-f O '62 

War of words: turning point? F. B. Stevens. 
U S News 53:57 N 5 '62 

What is Khrushchev now up to? E. Crank- 
«haw. 11 N Y Times Mag p54- S 2 '62 

Asia 
Soviet policy in Asia: a reappraisal. I. Spec- 
tor. biblioK f Cur Hist 43:257-62 N '62 

China (People's Republic) 
Big schism. Newsweek 60:52-1- O 15 '62 
Russo-Chlnese alliance. R. Swearlngen. Cur 

Hist 43:229-334- O 62 
Slno-Sovlet conflict and the West. D. S. Za- 

gorla. For Affairs 41:171-90 O '62 

Cuba 

Castro: how strong? how long? T. Szulc. 11 

N Y Times Mag p25-7-l- S 23 '62 
Course of the Russian build-up. our choices. 

J. Dillie. 11 Life 53:36 S 21 '62 
Cuban jitters. New Repub 147:3-4 S 17 '62 
Fishing tale; Soviet fishing fleet in the area 

of the Atlantic. 'Hme 80:18 O 5 '62 
Hostile presence close to home; with report 

by H. Lavine. 11 Newsweek 60:19-22 S 17 '62 
Is Castro's Cuba a Soviet base? 11 U S News 

53:43-6 S 10 '62 
Is Cuba a threat? J. Burnham. Nat R 13: 

306 O 23 '62 
Khrushchev dares U.S. on Cuba. 11 U S News 

53:43 S 24 '62 
Khrushchev in Cuba. K. Crawford. Newsweek 

60:35 S 17 '62 
Russians in Cuba today. 11 U S News 53:12 O 

8 '62 
Soviet build-up in Cuba. 11 Sr Schol 81:34-6 

S 26 '62 
Storm mount.'i in red Cul>a. il Sr Schol 

81:17 O 10 '62 
Ugly Russian. K. Crawford. Newsweek 60:32 

O 1 '62 

Oermany (Democratic Republic) 
After the peace treaty. T. Prittle. New Re- 
pub 147:8-10 S 10 '62 

Latin America 
Cuban bulld-up. Commonweal 76:507 S 21 '63 

United States 

Bie- showdown? blockade of Cuba: reaction 
from world capitals, il U S News 53:35-40 
N 5 '62 

Coexistence in west Europe. M. Berkowltz. 
blbliog f Cur Hist 43:211-17-f- O '62 

Crises deepen. 11 Bsns W p32-3 S 8 '62 

Crises that never end: cold war maneuvers, 
il Bsns W p 19-21 S 1 "62 

Khrushchev in Cuba. K. Crawford. Newsweek 
60:35 S 17 '62 

No deal in Cuba. America 107:945 O 27 '62 

Once aerain. a summit on Berlin? il News- 
week 60:15-16 O 29 '62 

Peace comes from trust; Graduated and re- 
ciprocated Initiative in tension-reduction. 
, C. E. O.ogood. Scl N L, 82:173 S 15 '62 

Reason and power. Fortune 66:83-4-1- O '62 

U.S. replies to Soviet protest on patrol air- 
craft: 1,'..S. and Soviet notes of September 
4. 1962. Dept State Bui 47:449 S 24 '62 

Yugoslavia 
Revisionists prefer blondes; Soviet- Yugoslav 
relaUons. 11 Time 80:23 O £ '62 



Industries 

Not a dirty word; capitalist flavored incen- 
tive system, il Newsweek 60:30-1 O 29 "62 

Red carpet out for fur buyers; Soviet fur 
auction. 11 Bsns W p34-5 Ag 11 '62 

Maps 

Map of Russia (cont) Sr Schol 79:21 O 4 '61: 
81:21 O 3 '62 

Politics and government 
Khrushchev's limited dictatorship. M. Rush. 

blbliog f Cur Hist 43:193-200 O '62 
New Russia? by H. E. Salisbury. Review 
Reporter 27:48-51 S 27 '62. A. Brumberg 

Religious institutions and affairs 
Smugigled prayers. America 107:538-9 Jl 28 '62; 
Reply. J. P. Kleinz. 107:576 Ag 11 '62 

Riots 

And then the police fired; night of rioting 
and piilasinK in Novocherkassk, Russia. 
Time 80:31 O 19 '62 

Food riots reported in I^SSR. Sr Schol SI: 
'17-18 O 24 '62 

Social conditions 
See also 
Labor and laboring classes — Russia 
RUSSIA and the United States 
Pierre's mission to Moscow. L. Bergquist. il 

Look 26:17-23 Ak 14 '62 
What Americans think about quarantine of 
Cuba. V S News 53:3S-9 N 5 '62 
RUSSIAN artificial satellites. See Artificial 

satellites, Russian 
RUSSIAN automobiles. See Automobiles, For- 
eign 
RUSSIAN church. See Orthodox Eastern 

church, Russian 
RUSSIAN humor. See Humor. Russian 

RUSSIAN literature 

From Gorky to ra.steriiak: six writers in 
Soviet Kii.s.'iia. bv H. Muchnic. Review 
Nation lltf) :2l'2-:! O l.'i '62. K. Lehovich 
RUSSIAN painting. See Painting. Russian 
RUSSIAN poetry 

Translations Into English 

<'oninionly so; tr. by K. HiTKchberKCr and 
M. i'r.vchodko. V. JSIailikov.skii. Nation 195: 
223 O 13 '62 

Our mother.s dei)art; tr. l>\s G. Reave\-. K. 
Kvtu.-^lieiiko. Good H 155:153 O '62 

RUSSIAN space probes. See Space probes, 

Russian 
RUSSIAN technical assistance. See Technical 

assistance, Russian 
RUSSIANS 

ISee also 
Humor, Russian 
\\'iiite itu.s.sians 
RUSSIANS in China 

Grass-roots reports; l.OdD white lUis.sian rofu- 
Xee.s f.\r>elled from China. New.swt-ek 60:49 
O 22 '62 
RUSSO, Bob 
Warmup for the Nationals. Hot Rod 15:69- 
714- S '62 
RUTHERFORD, Don 
We catch the spring floods. Am City 77:215- 
16 S '62 
RUTLEDGE, Archibald 

Final proof; poem. McCalls 89:159 Ag '62 
In miniature; poem. McCalls 90:225 O '62 
Once to my soul; poem. Ladles Home J 
• 79:35 S '62 
RUTLEDGE, Bob 

Post card cancellations. Hobbles 67 122 O "62 
RUTMAN, Darrett B. 
My beloved and good husband; with excerpts 
from letters of M. and J. Winthrop. Am 
Heritage 13:24-74- Ag '62 
RWANDA 

Rwanda and lUinindi. the risky hnsines.s of 
independence, il Sr Schol 81:12-15 O 10 
•62 
Security council recommends U.N. admit 
Burundi and Rwanda; statement. July 26, 
1962. C. W. Yost. Dept State Bui 47:296 
Ag 20 '62 
U.S. congratulates Burundi and Rwanda on 
independence; texts of messages. June 28. 
1962, J. F. Kennedy. Dept State Bui 47:134 
Jl 23 '62 
S(^e also 
United nations — Rwanda 

RYAN, Floyd T. 

MiniH-.'Ota grffn magic. Am For 68:24-7 O 
■62 
RYAN, John Julian 
Are we educating conscience? Cath World 196: 
20-3 O '62 

RYAN. Stephen P. 

Ivondon stage. America 107:956-8 O 27 '62 

RYBAK, Rose Kacherlan 
Day the moonmen landed; drama. Plays 22: 
45-50 O '62 



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The Art Institute ;Qr:v,GflxqA©0, 



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CATALOGUE 

OF THE 

Smntecntb ilnnual Exhibition 

OF THE 

/Ircbitectural Ciub 



MARCH THIRTY-FIRST TO APRIL TWENTIETH 
NINETEEN HUNDRED AND FOUR 




PRINTED FOR THE ART INSTITUTE. CHICAGO, 1904 ^^ 






V C C C O 1} c c 

'-■ P "^ It 

9 <• C 'flj. 



^^ tHB ?OLtpWlMG iiS A ^IST OF THE PATRONS WHO HAVE 
drit5RC)lJ5iy:^iJB.SG:RffiED TOWARD THE EXPENSE 



• • * a • k o 



en 
» « 



c .,». . ... ,.,EUHD OF THIS EXHIBITION: 

• Witiikk • Adj^^s Co. 
E. Baggot & Co. 

The Bedford Quarries Company. 
RuDoi^PH S. Bi,0ME & Co. 
Chari^ks Bonner & Co. 
Bu^i^EY & Andrews, 
d. h. burnham. 
Samuel Cabot. 
Everett C. Ci^ark Co. 
De Cwfford Chaddock. 
Chicago Edison Company. 
Chicago Hydrauwc Press Brick Co. 
W. M. Crii.i,y. 
George R. Dean. 
Detroit Graphite Meg. Co. 
WlI,I,IAM K. Fei*i.ows. 
Frost & Granger. 
FuRST & Fanning. 
H. M. G. Garden. 
W. D. Gates. 
L. G. Hai,i,berg. 
Hawes & DODD. 
J. L. Hamii^ton. 
Hoi^ABiRD & Roche. 
Ii^WNois Terra Cotta IvUmber Co. 
Ii^iviNois Brick Co. 
Jenkins & Reynolds Co. 
Kehoe Bros. & Co. 
Harry C. Knisely. 
S. S. KiMBELL Brick Co. 
Kroeschell Bros. Co. 
Leafgreen Bros. 
J. C. Llewellyn. 
LuDowici Roofing Tile Co. 
B. H. Marshall. 
Thomas Moulding Co. 
J. C. McFarland & Co. 
Max Mauch. 



\ 



Hbrmann L. Matz. 

T. J. McNui^TY Bros. 

Paui, F. p. Mukli«ER. 

Arthur Meagher. 

James A. Mii^i^er & Bro. 

W. B. MuNDiE. 

P. Nacey Co. 

S. N. Neii^son. 

George C. Nimmons. 

The Northwestern Terra Cotta Co. 

Orr & lyOCKETT Hardware Co. 

Otis Ki^evator Co. 

Patton & MlI,I,ER. 

PEABODY & BEAUI.EY. ' 

D. H. Perkins. 

Pioneer Fire-Proofing Co. 

Producers' Suppi^y Co. 

Irving K. Pond. 

George C. Prussing. 

L. H. Prentice Co. 

Jacob Rodatz. 

James Gambi^e Rogers. 

Martin A. Ryerson. 

Richard E. Schmidt. 

R. C. Spencer Jr. 

Jacob Scharmer. , 

lyOUIS SuIvI^ivan. 

Ei*i.ioT W. Sproul. 

E. P. Strandberg Co. 
John Tait. 

Thompson Starrett Co. 
Tiffany Enamei^led Brick Co. 
Webster Tomlinson. 

Rii^EY Tomunson Co. 

V1ER1.1NG McDowEivL Co. 

Frank Voightman. 

Watson & Hazleton. 

Wells Bros. Co. 

Wisconsin Lime 8l Cement Co. 

Clarence I. Wolfinger. 

A. F. Woltersdorf. 

A. G. Zimmerman. *^ - 7 \ , f^ \ f 



■ A- 



STANDING OFFICERS, 1903-4. 

Wii,i.iAM K. Fei<i,ows, President. 

J. L. Hamii^Ton, First Vice-President. 

T. E. Tali^madge, Second Vice-President. 
Edward O. Nei,son, Treasurer. 

Paul, V. Hyi^and, Secretary. 

MEMBERS OF EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE. 

Hugo H. Zimmerman. Horace S. Powers. 



EXHIBITION COMMITTEE. 

J. L. Hamii^TON, Chairman. 
E. B. Pattison, Secretary. 

FINANCE COMMITTEE. HANGING COMMITTEE. 

J. h. Hamii,ton. Irving K. Pond. 

Hermann h. Matz. W. G. Wii^uamson. 

Roger M. Combs. Edward J. Poui.sen. 

' Chari.es a. Carr. 

JURY OF ADMISSION. 
CHICAGO. NEW YORK. 

W. B. Mundie. Birch Burdette Long. 

James Gambi^e Rogers. John H. Phii^ups. 

George w. Maher. 

philadelphia. boston. 

W11.1.IAM Chari^es Hays Ci^arence Bi^ackali,. 



^ 




03 



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CATALOGUE. 



FRANK B. ABBOTT— 225 Dearborn Street, Chicago. 

1. Coca-Cola Building. 

2. Rubel Fireproof Building. 

AMERICAN TERRA COTTA AND CERAMIC CO.— 602 
Chamber of Commerce, Chicago. 

3. **Teco" Vases. 

Designed by W. B. Mundie. 

PIERCE ANDERSON— 1658 Ridge Avenue, Evanston. 

4. The Cathedral of Tarragona, Spain. 

5. San Giorgia and Santa Maria della Salute, 
Venice. 

6. The Giudecca, Venice. 

7. Spire of St. Front, Perigeoux. 

8. Vestibule, San Marco, Venice. 

9. San Marco, Venice. 

10. Baptistry of San Giovanni, Sienna. 

11. Santa Maria della Salute. 

12. The Mosque, Cordova. 

13. The Columns of the Piaz?eta, Venice. 

14. I^a Gir^lda, Seyijla, 



6 The Art Institute oe Chicago. 

ATCHISON & KDBROOKE— 90 Washington Street, Chi- 
cago. 

15. Sketch for a Residence at Bvanston. 

16. Sketch, Grammar School. 

HENRY BACON— 160 5th Avenue, New York City. 

17. Monument on the lot of Daniel A. Davis, 
Tarry town, N. Y. 

18. Monument to Gov. Roswell P. Flower, Water- 
town, N. Y. 

19. **Bonney" Monument, lyowell Cemetery, 
Lowell, Mass. 

20. Alteration of Carter Hall Virginia House for 
Eben Richards. 

WILLIAM JEAN BEAULEY— 1007 Monadnock Block, 
Chicago. 

21. House, Riverside Drive, New York City. 

22. Soldiers' and Sailors' Monument, New York 
City. 

23. Fifth Avenue Church, New York City. 

24. Old House, New York City. 

E. THEODORE BEHR— 193 Wabash Avenue, Chicago. 

25. Entrance to Grounds of J. J. Mitchell, Lake 
Geneva, Wis. 

26. Dining Room Decoration. 



Chicago Architecturai, Ci^ub. 



27. Entrance to Grounds of H. J. Mobre, I^ake 
Geneva, Wis. 

28. A Vase (Color Drawing.) 



S. S. BEMAN, 135 Adams Street, Chicago. 

29. First Church of Christ, Scientist, Pittsburg, 
Pa. 

30. T. B. Blackstone Memorial I^ibrary, Chicago, 
111. 



CHAS. G. BLAKE MONUMENT CO.— 718 Woman's Tem- 
ple, Chicago. 

31. Granite Vase. 



C. E. BRUSH— 23-24 Borden Block, Chicago. 

32. Design for State Fair Building. 

33. Design for Northern Illinois State Normal 
School. 

34. Design for Boat House, Fish and Flower 
Pavilion. 

35. Design for Woman's Building, University of 
Illinois. 

86. Design for Theatre. 

37. Plans and Sections for Theatre. 



8 The Art Institute oe Chicago. 

D. H. BURNHAM & CO.— Railway Exchange Building, 
Chicago. 

38. Music Hall in Wanamaker Store, N. Y. 

39. West Point Competition — Plan. 

40. West Point Competition — Plan of Chapel. 

41. West Point Competition — Elevation of Chapel. 

42. West Point Competition — Side Elevation of 
Chapel. 

43. West Point Competition — Section through 
Chapel. 

44. West Point Competition — Section A-A. 

45. West Point Competition— Section B-B. 

46. West Point Competition — Section C-C. 

47. West Point Competition — Section E-E. 

48. West Point Competition — Section D-D. 
49«. Wanamaker Store, New York. 

49^. Preliminary design, same. 

50a, Henry W. Oliver Natatorium, Pittsburg. 

50^. I^ibrary and Museum, Cincinnati. 

BURNHAM, CARRERfi & BRUNNER— Cleveland, Ohio. 

Public Buildings of the City of Cleveland — 
Scheme B. 

51. Ground Plan. 

52. Section through Esplanade. 



Chicago Architkcturai, Ci.ub. 9 

53. Section through Mall. 

54. Section through Mall. 

55. Bird's eye view, North. 

56. Bird's eye view, South. 

CHAPMAN & FRAZER— 8 Exchange Place, Boston, Masr. 

57. House of Mr. E. N. Fenno,at Falmouth, Mass. 

58. House of Mr. T. W. Burnham, at Cleveland, 
Ohio. 

59. Residence at Bar Harbor, Me. , for Alexander 
J. Casfatt, Esq. 

60. Interiors residence on Commonwealth Ave., 
Boston, for E. C. Stanwood, Esq. 

GEORGETTE E. COOLIDGE— 4752 Kimbark Avenue, 
Chicago. 

61. A Stairway. 

62. A stairway. 

COLLEGE OF ARCHITECTURE — Cornell University. 
R. A. TISSENGEN. 

A Government Building for the entertainment of 
State guests. 

63. Floor plan. 

64. Elevation. 



10 The Art Institute of Chicago. 

HERMAN DERCUM. 

65. A Monument to the Patriots of the American 
Revolution. 

CHARI.es S. COBB. 

66. An Exedra in a cemetery — Plan and elevation. 
FRED h. ACKERMAN. 

67. A Museum of Fine Arts for a small city. 

COLIN CAMPBELL COOPER— Art Club of Philadelphia. 

68. The Boston " Stump," Boston, England. 

CRAM, GOODHUE & FURGUSON— 172 5th Avenue, New 
York City. 

Accepted competitive design for the reconstruc- 
tion of The United States Military Academy 
at West Point. 

69. Elevation, Riding Hall. 

70. Plans, Grounds and Buildings. 

71. Elevation, Chapel. 

72. Plan, Chapel. 

73. Section on line E-F. 

74. General Elevation; 

75. Church Interior (photo.) 

76. Church Interior. 



Chicago Architecturai, Club. 11 

PAUL P. CRET— 3729 Locust Street, Philadelphia. 

77. Salle des seances for the Institute de France 
(Section). 

78. Salle des seances for the Institute de France 

(Plan). 

79. A Fountain. 

80. Commemorative Monuments in the Pantheon. 

81. Commemorative Monuments in the Pantheon 
(Transept) . 

82. Commemorative Monuments in the Pantheon. 

83. A Vitrine for the display of objects d'art. 

THE CRAFTSMAN— Syracuse.— Harvey Ellis, Author. 

84. Residence. Exterior. 

85. Residence Interior. 

86. Residence. Interior. 

87. Residence. Court-yard. 

S. N. CROWEN— 85 Dearborn Street, Chicago. 

88. Apartment Building at Bdgewater. S. H. 
Hodge, owner. 

89. lyake County Hospital, Waukegan, 111. 

90. Apartment Building, Chicago. Gustav Khr- 
hardt, owner. 

91. Apartment Building, Chicago. Mrs. Sarah 
M. Isham, owner. 

92. Stables for ' ' The Hub, ' ' Chicago. 



12 Thk Art Institute of Chicago. 

H. W. J. KDBROOKE— 90 Washington Street, Chicago. 

Competitive design for a Woman's Bldg. Univ. of 
Illinois. 

93. 1st Floor Plan. 

94. 2d Floor Plan. 

95. Perspective. 

ROY ELIEL— 4443 Ellis Avenue, Chicago. 

Design given second place in Fourth Annual 
Travelling Scholarship, competition Chicago 
Architectural Club. Subject : A Creche. 

96. 1st Floor Plan. 

97. Detail interior of Day Room. 

98. Garden front, South Elevation. 

99. Detail exterior, Conservatory. 

WII^ON EYRE— 929 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia. 

100. House at New Rochelle, N. Y. W. H. Har- 
rison, owner. 

101. House at Swarthmore, Pa. Anton Wagner, 
owner. 

Country House, Oyster Bay, L. I. Stanley 
Conklin, owner. 

102. Exterior. 

103. Interior, living room. 



Chicago Architbcturai, Ci.ub. 13 

104. Proposed garden for Mr. Robert Forrest, 
Philadelphia. 

105. House at Tuxedo Park, Tuxedo, N. Y. H. 
Deacon, owner. 

106. House for Wm. Bayard. 

FRANK FORREST FREDERICK— University of Illinois, 
Urbana. 

107. Thumbnail sketches of Shakespeare's Coun- 
try. 

J. H. FREEDLANDER— 244 5th Avenue, New York City. 

108. Residence for M. Newborg, New York City. 

FROST & GRANGER— 184 La Salle Street, Chicago. 
West Point Competition : 

109. Riding Hall, West Elevation. 

110. Riding Hall. Plan. 

111. Riding Hall. South elevation. 

112. General plan. 

113. Section on Line A-B. 

114. Section on lyine E-F. 

115: Office Building for Chicago &, Northwestern 
Ry. at Chicago. Perspective drawing. 



14 The Art Institute oe Chicago. 

HUGH M. G. GARDEN— 172 Washington Street, Chicago. 

116. A Tyrolean Balcony. 

WM. D. GATES— 603 Chamber of Commerce, Chicago. 

117. Mosaic panel. (O. Giannini). 

118. Court yard, Wind Mill Inn. 

CASS GILBERT— 79 Wall Street, New York. 

119. Elevation of Festival Hall, St. Louis. 

120. The New York Custom House. 

J. L. HAMILTON— 4720 Madison Avenue, Chicago. 

121. ** An old German street corner." 

122. A Design for a monument. , 

WM. LAUREL HARRIS— 423 West 59th Street, New York. 

123. Color study for decorative figure in St. Paul's 
Church (Paulist Fathers) New York City. 

124. Color study for decorative figure in St. Paul's 
Church (Paulist Fathers) New York City. 

125. Color study for decorative figure in St. Paul's 
Church (Paulist Fathers) New York City. 



Chicago Architecturai, Club. 15 

GEORGE I/YON HARVEY— 615, 175 Dearborn Street, 
Chicagfo. 

126. Hospital, Evanston, 111. 

Residence C. A. Ward, Evanston, 111. 

127. Exterior. 

128. Entrance detail. 

Residence of George A. Thorne, Winnetka, 111. 

129. Exterior. 

130. Interior, living room. 

131. Residence of Frank Hibbard, I^ake Forest, 111. 

HAWES & DODD— 24 Adams Street, Chicago. 

132. Mantel facing of lyustered Tile and Mosaic 
Inlay. 

HILIv & WOLTERSDORF— 70 La Salle Streen, Chicago. 

133. Medallion for store entrance, Thos. Church 
Bldg., Chicago. 

134. House of Mr. Fred Voss, Chicago. 

135. House of James Moir, Esq. , Burlington, Iowa. 

136. House of James Moir, Esq. , Burlington, Iowa. 

137. House of James Moir, Esq., Burlington, Iowa. 

JARVIS HUNT— 1405 Monadnock Bldg., Chicago. 

138. Warehouses for Butler Bros., Chicago. 
139a. A gate lodge for J. H. Moore, I<ake Geneva. 
139^. Warehouses for Kelly, Maus &Co., Chicago. 



16 The Art Institute oe Chicago. 



MYRON HUNT— Los Augeles, Cal. 

140. Bird's eye perspective, Hotel Maryland, 
Pasadena, Cal. 

GEORGE HUNT IN GRAHAM— 2a Park Street, Boston, 
Mass. 

141. Residence, Milton, Mass. 

142. Same — Interior. 

WILLIAM B. ITTNER— Board of Education, St. Louis. 

143. Wyman School. 

144. Horace Mann School. 

145. Cote Brillante School. 

146. "Wm. McKinley High School. 

147. Ralph Waldo Emerson School. 

148. Three main entrances. 

JENNEY & MUNDIE^— 520 New York Life Bldg., Chicago. 

149. Illinois State Monument at National Park, 
Vicksburg. Plaster Model. 

150. Same — Section. 

151. Proposed office building. 

152. Proposed church. 

153. Proposed office building. 

154. Proposed office building. 



Chicago Architecturai, Ci.ub. 17 

155. Proposed office building. 

156. Proposed hotel. 

157. The Ridgely National Bank, Springfield, 111. 

158. Residences, Chicago and vicinity. 

CHAS. BARTON KEEN and FRANK MEAD— 1220 Chest- 
nut street, Philadelphia. 

House at Saratoga Springs for Chauncey Olcott, 
Esq. 

159. Street front. 

160. Garden front. 

ALBERT KEIvSEY— 931 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia. 

Improvements at Chautauqua. 

161. Plan of Civic Center. 

162. Water approach to Hall of Philosoph\ . 

163. Plan of the grounds. 

164. The Pier House. 

165. Plan of Arts and Crafts Village! 

t 

E. A. KENT— 94 White Building, Buflfalo, N. Y. 

166. House, 762 Delaware Ave., Buffalo. Plan. 

167. House, 762 Delaware Ave., Bnffilo. Pcr-^pec- 
tive. 



18 Thk Art Institute op Chicago. 

JOS. LAUBER— 51 West Tenth Street, New York City. 

168. Color scheme for window in Westminster 
Presbyterian Church, Bloomfield, N. J. 

CHAS. W. IvEAVITT— 15 CortlandtStreet,New York City. 

169. Saratoga Club — Views on grounds. 

170. Views across garden. 

171. House at Rye, N. Y. George D. Barron, 
owner. View of grounds and garden. 

172. House at Port Chester, N. Y. Hobert J. 
Park, owner. Bird's eye view. 

173. View of Mall. Same. 

174. House at Mt. Kisco, N. Y. Moses Taylor, 
owner. Views on estate. 

175. House at New Haven, Conn. Rutherford 
Trowbridge, owner. Garden treatment city 
lot. 

176. House at Islip, Long Island, N. Y. H. K. 
Knapp, owner. Views of main entrance. 

177. Country estate, Morristown, N. J. Garden 
and terraces. 

178. House at Islip, Long Island. H. K. Knapp, 
owner. Views on estate. 

179. House at Elberon, N. J. Simon Guggen- 
heim, owner. View of Whitehall grounds. 



^ 



Chicago Architecturai, Ci,ub. 19 

FRANK h. UNDEN— 1216 Michigan Avenue, Chicago. 

180. Scheme for wall decoration. 

181. Scheme for wall decoration. 

BIRCH BURDKTTE LONG— 7 East 42d Street, Few York. 

182. The Avenue Villa D'Bste. 

183. A Sunny Canal, Venice. 

184. San Francesco, Bologna. 

185. The fountain, Villa Torlonia. 

186. Campo del Fiori, Roma. 

187. Morning in the market place, Verona. 

188. Shipping on the Giudecca Canal, Venice. 

189. Golfo di Pozzuoli, Napoli. 

190. Venetian sketches. 

191. Italian sketches. 

192. Sketches from Rhine Str. Borussia. 

193. The Rain, Amersfoort. 

194. In the Borghese gardens. 

195. The Capitoline Museum, Rome. 

196. The Olives of Assisi. 

197. The Garden of the Villa D'Este. 



20 The Art Institute of Chicago. 

198. Giotto's Campanile, Florence. 

199. A Bit of Sunlight. 

200. St. Peter's from the Medici. 

201. In the Forum of Trajan. 

202. Warwick Castle from the bridge. 

203. Temple of Vesta, Tivoli. 

204. Oxford sketches. 

205. Au Evening in Sienna. 

206. Notre Dame and the River Seine. 

207. The Afternoon Promenade, Paris. 

208. The Gesuiti, Venice. 

209. The Sabine Mountains, Villa D'Kste. 

210. Marina Grande, Capri. 

211. Scala di Spagna, Roma. 

212. Black Dam Mill Pond, Kenilworth. 

213. Carleton House Terrace. 

214. After the storm, Sienna. 

215. The River Arno, Florence. 



LrORD, HEWLETT & HULL & Kenneth Murchinson— 
i6 East 23d Street, New York City. 

216. Study of cupola, residence for Hon. W. A. 
Clark. 

217. Facade — Same. 



Chicago ArchitecI'ural Ci.ub. 21 

GEO. W. MAKER— 218 La Salle Street, Chicago. 

218. Edgewater Presbyterian Church. 

219. Residence, Kansas City. S. H. Velie, owner. 

220. Stable and lodge building at Glencoe, 111., 
for Harry Rubens. 

221. Sketch, North Shore House. 

222. Same, water color perspective. 

E. A. MANNY— Security Building, St. Louis. 

223. Concession, World's Fair. 

224. Business Building, Olive Street. 

B. H. MARSHALL— 603 Cable Building, Chicago. 

225. Residence, I^ake Shore Drive. Chas. A. 
Plamondon, owner. 

Nixon Theatre, Pittsburg. 

226. Elevation. 

227. Floor plans. 

228. Colonial Hotel, Chicago. 

229. Residence, Lake Forest, 111. J. T. Pirie, 
owner. «, 

230. Garden view — same. 

231. Facade of Comedy Theatre. 

232. House at Glencoe, 111. Harry E. Nolan, 
owner. 

233. Interior of same. 



22 Thb Art Institute of Chicago. 



MAURAN, RUSSEIvL & GARDEN— 1610 Chemical Build- 
ing, St. lyouis. 

234. I^incoln Library, Springfield, 111. 



MCDONALD & SHEBLESSY— 4th and Main Streets, 
I^ouisville, Ky. 

235. Second English Lutheran Church. 

236. Apartment Building. Perspective. 

237. View of main entrance. 

JOHN MOLITOR~204 South 36th Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 

238. Sketch, Notre Dame, Paris. 

239. Chapel, Hospital, Santa Cruz, Toledo, Spain. 

240. Grotesques, Notre Dame, Paris. 

241. Inlaid Mosaic Panel, Ravello. 

242. Chapel doors, Santa Maria della Spine, Pisa. 

243. Old houses, Luzerne, Switzerland. 

244. Sketch, San Carpoforo Come, Italy. 

245. Porte du Groux, Nevers, France. 

246. Chateau de Berze, Dijon, 

247. Augustius, Valladolid, Spain. 

248. Entrance Hotel de Vogue, Dijon. 

249. Sketches in Germany. 



Chicago Architkcturai, Ci<ub. 38 

W. B. MUNDIE~720 Tribune Building, Chicago. 

260. Recent work in the Chicago Public School 
System. 

NIMMONS & FEIvI.OWS~1732 Marquette Building, Chi- 
cago. 

251. Buildings at Gray's Lake. Richard W. 
Sears, owner. 

252. Second National Bank, Winona, Minn. 

NORTHWESTERN TERRA COTTA CO.— 1000 Clybourn 
Avenue, Chicago. 

258. Terra cotta panel. 

254. Terra cotta pedestal. 

255. Terra cotta vase. 

256. Terra cotta odd pieces. 

H. L. OTTENHEIMER— 1123 Schiller Building, Chicago. 

257. Photograph of entrances. 

258. Residence, Chicago. 

259. Theatre interior, Chicago. 

PALMER & HORNBOSTEL— 63 William Street, New 
York. 

260. Manhattan Bridge, general perspective view. 

261. Manhattan Bridge, perspective view of an- 
chorage. 



S4 The Art Tnstitute of Chicago. 

262. Manhattan Bridge, perspective view of an- 
chorage. 

263. Manhattan Bridge, section through anchor- 
age. 

264. Manhattan Bridge, working drawings of an- 
chorage. 

265. Manhattan Bridge, photographs of work 
under construction. 

266. Manhattan Bridge, perspective view of tower. 

267. Manhattan Bridge, working drawings of 
tower. 

268. Manhattan Bridge, detail perspective. 

269. Manhattan Bridge, side elevation. 

270. Manhattan Bridge, detail model. 

271. Blackwell's Island Bridge, elevations of an- 
chorage Pier. 

272. Blackwell's Island Bridge, plan of anchorage 
pier. 

273. Blackwell's Island Bridge, elevation of an- 
chorage pier on Blackwell's Island. 

274. Blackwell's Island Bridge, photographs of 
work under construction. 

275. Blackwell's Island Bridge, perspective view. 

276. Blackwell's Island Bridge, perspective view. 

277. Blackwell's Island Bridge, detail perspective. 



Chicago Architecturai, Ci^ub. 25 

278. Blackwell's Island Bridge, perspective view 
from approach. 

279. Blackwell's Island Bridge, working drawings 
of towers. 

280. Blackwell's Island Bridge, detail model. 

281. Pelham Bay Park Bridge, perspective view 
from river. 

282. Pelham Bay Park Bridge, perspective view 
on bridge. 

283. Pelham Bay Park Bridge, perspective sketch. 

284. Pelham Bay Park Bridge, detail of towers. 

285. Pelham Bay Park Bridge, elevation. 

286. Williamsburg Bridge, anchorage. 

287. Williamsburg Bridge, general perspective 
view. 

288. Williamsburg Bridge, detail perspective. 

289. Williamsburg Bridge, detail perspective. 

290. Williamsburg Bridge, detail model. 

291. New City Hall Station, plan of basement 
and rapid transit subway station. 

292. New City Hall Station, ground floor plan 
1st level. 

293. New City Hall Station, plan of gallery and 
Third Avenue Elevated platform, 2d level. 



26 The Art Institute of Chicago. 

294. New City Hall Station, plan at level of Man- 
hattan Bridge and Brooklyn Bridge elevated 
train platform. 

295. Perspective view of 6ity Hall and Elevated 
Station. 

296. General view showing locality of Terminal 
Station of Brooklyn Bridge. 

297. Bird's eye perspective of river and city. 
WM. FRANCKLYN PARIS— 315 Fifth Avenue, New York 

City. 

298. Henry II cabinet. 

299. Henry II table. 

300. Renaissance cabinet for Geo. Arents. 

301. Beauvais tapestry for Henry G. Trevor. 

PATTON & MILLER— 153 La Salle Street, Chicago. 

302. First Congregational Church, Wilmette. 

303. Free Public Library, Council Bluffs, Iowa. 

304. Spies Public Library, Menominee, Mich. 
306. First Presbyterian Church, Rockford, 111. 

PEABODY & BEAULEY— 1007 Monadnock Blk., Chicago. 

306. Residence. 

307. Residence. 



Chicago Architecturat^ CIvUB. 27 

DWIGHT H. PERKINS— Steitway Hay,; C'nic^igo- ; v 
Competitive design for Post Office Bt^iMijjg, 






Hammond, Indiana. " » = ^' •■ "o , • f « , 

308. Basement plan. 

309. First story. 

310. Second and third story. 

311. Front and side elevation. 

312. Section and rear elevation. 

CHARLES A. PHILLIPS— 1615 Ashland Block, Ciiicago. 
Competitive design for Post Office Building, 
Hammond, Ind. 

313. Elevation and section. 

314. Plans. 

J. H. PHILLIPS— 5 East 42d Street, New York. 

315. Sketches in England. 

316. Old Canal at Chester. 

317. The Bay at Naples. 

318. Old Church. San Francesco, Romania. 

319. Monument to Victor Emmanuel. 

320. Duke of York's Column, London. 

321. The Tiber, Rome. 

322. Garden, Villa Falconiere, Frascate. 

323. Sketches in England. 



28 T.3E Art Institute oi^ Chicago. 

■■-■I ...I. -r. -. I III I M^.M^ f . I .. T1... ■,. — ..■■, I I ■ — ,--,■,.■■ I. — 

8^4. ;Sfck«tclifes in- Hn gland. 

825. Temple of Neptune at Paestum and Basilica 
'di'^. Francesco, di Paola, Naples. 

326. Castello St. Angelo, Rome. 

Farm buildings just outside Borghese Gar- 
dens, Rome. 

, POND & POND— 1109 Steinway Hall, Chicago. 

327. Y. M. C. A. Building, Lake Geneva, Wis. 

328. The Drummer House, Lake Geneva, Wis. 

329. The Hegler Houses, La Salle, 111. 

330. The Perkins House, Edgewater, 111. The 
Howe House, Evanston, 111. 

331. The McCormick House, Buena Park, 111. 

332. U. S. Post Office, Kankakee, 111., accepted 
design. Floor plans. 

333. U. S. Post Office, Kankakee, 111. Elevations. 

334. U. S. Post Office, Kankakee, 111. Drawings. 

335. Mercantile Building, Wm. Kent. 

WM. GRAY PURCELL— 319 N. Kenilworth Avenue, Oak 
Park, 111. 

336. Design for Public Library. (Submitted in 
the Brickbuilder Competition.) 

337. A suburban home. 



Chicago Architectural Ci^ub. 20 

RAND & SKINNER— 336 Boylston Street, Boston, Mass. 

338. Gift Shop and Tea House, Magnolia, Mass. 

339. Ray Memorial I/ibrary, Franklin, Mass. 

T. HENRY RANDALL— The Tower, Madison Square, 
New York. 

340. Hotel, Charleston, S. C. West elevation. 

341. Hotel, Charleston, S. C. Front elevation. 

342. Hotel, Charleston, S. C. Plan. 

343. Residence of Henry W. Poor, Esq., Tuxedo 
Park, New York. Entrance front. 

344. Residence of Henry W. Poor, Esq. South 
facade and gardens. 

345. Residence of Henry W. Poor, Esq. Detail 
of entrance. 

346. Baltimore Music Hall, front and entrance. 

347. Baltimore Music Hall, Southwest corner. 

LOUIS B. RASMUSSEN— La Grange, 111. 

348. Competitive design for Soldiers* and Sailors' 
Monument. 

REED & STEM— 7 East 42d Street, New York. 

349. Seattle Terminal Depot, Great Northern 
Railroad. 



30 Thk Art Institute of Chicago. 



HBNRY I,. REINHOIvD, JR.— 1004 Chestnut Street, Phil- 
delphia. 

350. Swiss Chalet, Cape May, N. J. 



JAMES GAMBLE ROGERS— 1615 Ashland Blk„ Chicago. 

351. U. S. Post Office and Court House, Ham- 
mond, Ind., Competition. Plan., 

352. U. S. Post Office and Court House, Ham- 
mond, Ind. Elevations and section. 

353. Sketch for residence, Evanston, 111. 

354. Estate of A. B. Dick, Esq., I,ake Forest, 111. 
Photographs. 

355. Residence of A. L. Farwell, Esq., Lake 
Forest, 111. Photographs. 

356. Texas residence. 

ROGERS & MANSON— 85 Water Street, Boston, Mass. 

357. The Brickbuilder Competition for a small 
Public Library. 1st prize design by F. C. 
Hirons. Elevation. 

358. 1st prize design. Detail. 

359. 2d prize design, by Calvin Kiessling. Ele- 
vation. 

360. 2d prize design. Detail. 

361. 3d prize design, by W. S. Wells, W. D. 
Crowell and H. W. Hathaway. Elevation. 



Chicago AncHii^ecTURAi, Ci,ub. 81 



362. 3d prize design. Detail. 

363. 1st mention design Claude Fayette Bragdon. 
Elevation. 

364. 1st mention design. Detail. 



ARTHUR ROULEAU— 603 Cable Building, Chicago. 

365. Bird's eye view of Quebec. 

« 

RICHARD n. SCHMIDT~172 Washington Street, Chicago. 

366. Central Pavillion of St. Anne's Sanitarium. 
Chicago. 

367. Warehouse for Schoenhofen Brewing Co., 
Chicago. 

HOWARD SHAW~615, 175 Dearborn Street, Chicago. 

368. Second Church, Chicago. 

369. Entrance 4901 Woodlawn Ave., Chicago. 

370. Residence, Akron, Ohio. 

371. Factory, Fond du Lac, Wis. 



ARTHUR A. SHURTLEFF— 9 West Cedar Street, Boston, 
Mass. 

372. Plan of Windmill Park and old windmill, 
Island of Nantucket, Mass. 



32 Thi{ Art Institute op Chicago. 



W. and J. SLOANB— Broadway, New York. 

373. Sketch, East Indian lounge. 

SP^IRIylNG & lylNDEN— 1216 Michigan Avenue, Chicago. 

374. Design for wall decoration. 

375. Design for wall decoration. 

LOUIS H. SULLIVAN— 1601 Auditorium Tower, Chicago. 

376. Design of theatre front. 

JOHN SUTCLIFFE— 218 La Salle Street, Chicago. 

377. Grace Church, Oak Park, 111., interior. 

378. Grace Church, chancel. 

379. St. James Church, Sturgis, Mich. Clara 
Sutcliffe, Del. 

380. Christ Church, Pensacola, Fla. I^awrence 
Buck, Del. 

381. Church of Our Savior, I^ittle Falls, Minn. 
Clara Sutcliffe, Del. 

382. St. Andrew's Church, Ashland, Wis. Clara 
Sutcliffe, Del. 

383. St. Thomas' Church, Plymouth, Ind. Clara 
Sutcliffe, Del. 

384. St. James' Church, Dundee, 111. Clara Sut- 
cliffe, Del. 



Chicago Architectural Club. 83 

385. Studies in color composition. Clara Sut- 
cliffe, Del. 

386. Studies in color composition. Clara Sut- 
cliffe, Del. 

387. Studies in rendering. Clara Sutcliffe, Del. 

388. Study of a church. Clara Sutcliffe, Del. 



THOMAS E. TALLMADGE— 1417 Railway Exchange, 
Chicago. 

Winning design for Victor Falkenau Prize in the 
Competition for the Fourth Annual Travel- 
ling Scholarship of the Chicago Architectural 
Club. Subject : A Creche. 



389. 


Sketch elevation. 


390. 


Sketch plan. 


391. 


Details. 


392. 


Perspective. 


393. 


Elevation and section. 


394. 


Plan. 



SETH J. TEMPIvE— Urbana, 111. 

395. Study for a house. 

396. Study for a house. 



34 The Art Institute of Chicago. 



VICTOR TRAXLER~636 Bvanston Avenue, Chicago. 

397. Study for a Parliament House to be erected 
on eastern portion of the garden of the Tuil- 
eries, Paris, France. 

398. Same. Plan, elevation and section. 

399. Same. Perspective. 

UNIVERSITY OF II,LINOIS— Urbana, 111. 
JOSEPH W. WII^SON. 

400. I^eaning Tower of Zaragoza. 

401. Arch of Titus, Rome. Measured drawing. 

NEII. McMII.l,AN. 

402. Memorial Hall. Elevation and plan. 

403. Memorial Hall. Flevation and plan. 

F. SCHOTT. 

404. Pencil sketches. 

405. Water color sketches (Students). 

406. Color studies for interior decoration. 
(Students). 

UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA— Philadelphia, Pa. 
L. B. HOLLAND. 

407. The back wall of a church. 

C. E. HOWELL. 

408. The back wall of a church. 



Chicago Archit^cturai, Ci^ub. 85 



H. C. HIBBS. 

409. A club house for an Art Society. 

C. F. RABENOIyD. 

410. A private chapel. Elevation . 

K. M. SMITH. 

411. A private chapel. Elevation. 

412. A private chapel. Plan and section. 

WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY—Architectural Dept. 

413. Elevation. Establishment for automobile 
amateurs. 

414. Plan for same. 

415. A rock cut tomb. Detail and elevation. 

H. H. WATERMAN— 218 La Sdlle Street, Chicago. 

416. Residence, Chicago. 

417. Mercantile building, Chicago. 

WATSON & HAZIyETON— 305 Dearborn Street, Chicago. 

418. Plan. Reproduction of City of Jerusalem, 
World's Fair, St. Louis. 

419. Photographs of work. Same. 

420. Working drawings. Same. 

421. Water color perspective. Same. 



86 The Art Institute of Chicago. 



422. Water color perspective, Hospital for con- 
tagious diseases, Chicago. 

423. Water color perspective, Hospital for tuber- 
culosis patients, Dunning, 111. 

424. Water color perspective, three Cottages for 
care of insane patients, Dunning, 111. 

P. J. WEBER— 700 Fisher Building, Chicago. 

425. Public lyibrary, Colorado Springs. 

426. Refectory. Ravinia, 111. 

427. Stadium, Ravinia, 111. 

428. Theatre, Ravinia. 

429. Public Ubrary, Seattle, Wash. 

430. Competition for Cathedral at Colorado 
Springs . Perspective . 

431. Competition, Cathedral, plan. 

432. Mausoleum for Archbishop Feehan. 

433. Apartment building, Michigan Avenue, for 
Lucius G. Fisher, 

WESTERN IRON CONSTRUCTION CO.— 193 South 
Desplaines Street, Chicago. 

434. Wrought iron hand forged door grille. 

435. Model, vestibule door, wrought iron grille. 

436. Hand hammered brass cartouche. 



Chicago Architecturai, Ci,ub. 87 



H. B. WHEElrOCK—llOe Schiller Building, Chicago. 

437. U. S. Post Office, Kankakee, Competition. 
Floor plans. 

438. Competition. Front elevation. 

JAS. M. WHITE and SETH J. TEMPIvE— Urbana, 111. 

439. Agronomy Building for the University of 
Illinois. 

440. Horticultural Building. Same. 

441. Beef Cattle Building. Same. 

H. R. WILSON— 218 La Salle Street, Chicago. 

442. Sketch, billiard room residence of C. I^. Mc- 
intosh, Milwaukee. 

443. Sketch, dining room, residence of Thomas 
Cahill, Evanston, 111. 

444. Sketch, billiard room, residence of Fred'k 
Robinson, Racine, Wis. 

445. Sketch, residence, Pasadena, Cal. 

446. Sketch No. 2, residence, Pasadena, Cal. 

447. Accepted design residence of C. h. Mcintosh, 
Milwaukee. 

448. Preliminary sketch. Same. 

449. Sketch, residence, Memphis, for R. T. 
Cooper. 



38 The Art Institute oi«' Chicago. 

450. Sketch, Park Bridge, Chicago. 

451. Sketch, residence, Little Rock, for MissS. C. 
Turner, Ark. 

452. Sketch No. 1, dining room, residence C. I/. 
Mcintosh, Milwaukee. 

453. Sketch No. 2, same. 

454 Sketch, library, residence of C. J. Barnes, 
Chicago. 

455. Sketch, country residence. 

456. Sketch, alterations of residence Frederick 
Robinson. 

457. Sketch, residence at Memphis, Tenn. 

458. Preliminary sketch, office building J. I. Case 
Threshing Machine Co., Racine, Wis. A. 
Arthur Guilbert, Associate. 

BENJ. E. WINSLOVV— 1319 Chicago Avenue, Evanston, 111. 

459. Cathedral, Roskilde, Denmark. 

460. Details, Nike Apteros, Athens. 

461. Chalk drawing. Sphinx. 

462. Nike Apteros Temple, Athens. 

463. Column detail, Pantheon, Rome. 

FRED'K B. WIRT— 1541 Addison Avenue, Chicago. 

464. Pen sketch, St. Paul's Church, Chicago. 



Chicago Architecturai, Ci^ub. 39 

W. CARBYS ZIMMERMAN— 1101 Steinway Hall, Chicago. 

465. U. S. Post Office, Kankakee, 111. 

466. U. S. Post Office, Kankakee, 111. 

467. U. S. Post Office, Kankakee, 111. 

468. U. S. Post Office, Kankakee, 111. 

A. G. ZIMMERMAN— 205 La Salle Street, Chicago. 

469. National Biscuit Co.'s Building, Chicago. 



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ENGRAVED AND PRINTED BY 

BARNES-CROSBY COMPANY 
CHICAGO 




The Following is a List of the Patrons who have Gener- 
ously Subscribed Toward the Expense 
Fund of this Exhibition: 



H. R. Wilson 
^Nimmons & Fellowes 

D. H. Burnham & Co. 
Thomas Moulding Co. 
R. S. Blome Co. 
Harry C. Knisely Co. 
Jenkins & Reynolds Co. 
The Northwestern Terra 

Cotta Co. 

E. P. Strandberg Co, 
Illinois Brick Co. 
Pioneer Fire Proofinj^ Co, 
Peahody & Beauley 
Morava Construction Co. 
D. C. Chaddock 

Patton & Miller 

Detroit Graphite Mfg. Co. 

F. P. Nelson & Son 

Herman L. Matz 

The Roebling Construction 
Co. 

I. K, Pond 
Louis Sullivan 
Charles Bonner 
M. M. Livings 
A. G. Zimmermann 
Crofoot Nielson Co. 
Holabird & Roche 
J as. Gamble Rogers 
Chicago H\^draulic Press 
Brick Co. 

A. Lanquist 
Jas. A. Miller & Bro. 
Clarence I. Wolfinger 
Wells Brothers Co. 
A. H. Abbott & Co. 
M. J. Corboy 



C. Everett Cl^rk Co. 

George R. Dean 

P. Nacey Co. 

L. H. Prentice Co. 

The Decorators Supply Co. 

Chicago Edison Co. 

Hugh Garden 

Bulley & Andrews 

J. C. Llewellyn 

Benj. E. Winslow 

Richard E. Schmidt 

Herman Von Hoist 

The Frederick Post Co. 

R. M. Combs 

H. L. Ottenheimer 

W. M. Crilly 

Arthur Woltersdorf 

Howard Shaw 

J. L. Hamilton 

Hawes & Dodd 

P. J. Weber 

Orr & Lockett Hardware Co. 

Martin A. Ryerson 

Illinois Terra Cotta Lumber 
Co. 

Paul F. P. Mueller 

L. E. Stanhope 

S. S. Kimbell Brick Co. 

United States Blue Print 
Paper Co. 

G. Broes Van Dort 

Union Foundry Works 

Willy H. Lau 

W. Carbys Zimmermann 

J. W. Snyder 

Elliott W. Sproul 

Thomas & Smith 






Chicago Varnish Co. 
Voigtmann & Co. 
Hulbert & Dorsey 
Wm. H. Hoops & Co. 
J. C. McFfcrland & Co. 
American Engineer Specialty' 
Co. 

Vierling McDowell & Co. 

W. A. Otis 

E. V. Johnson 

McNulty Brothers 

Henry Lord Gay 

P. & F. Corbin 

Jenney & Mundie 

E. Baggott 

The Yale & Towne Mfg. Co. 

Greelej' Howard Co. 

Arthur G. Brown 

Charles H. Prindeville 

Library Bureau 

C. F. Gunther 

Hansell Elcock Co. 

Geo. W. Verity 

W. H. Jackson Co. 

Pratt & Lambert Varnish Co. 



Davis Construction Co. 

John M. Ewen 

William Grace Co. 

Henry K! Holsman 

Arthur Meagher 

Tiffan}' Enamelled I^rick Co. 

Wm. D. Gates 

Mandel Brothers 

Devoe & Reynolds Co. 

Kroeschell Brothers & Co. 

Otis Elevator Co. 

Harry Dodge Jenkins 

Jacob Rodatz 

Stanley McCormick 

Chester N. Marthens Co. 

Chicago Ornamental Iron 
Works 

Samuel Cabot 

Henne & Co. 

Ralph & Sumner Sollitt 

Franklin McVeagh 

Kenwood Bridge Co. 

Oliver Sollitt 

Furst & Planning 



Pittsburgh Plate Glass Co. 
Standard Concrete Construction Co. 



FIFTH ANNUAL SCHOLARSHIP COMPETITION 

Prize donated by 
MR. VICTOR FALKENAU 



Chicago Architectural Club Officers 



1904-1905 



J. L. Hamilton, President 

Harry L. Marsh, . . . . ist Vice President 

Edward B. Pattison, ... . 2nd Vice President 

M. M. Levings, ....... Secretary 

Edward O. Nelson, . . . ... Treasurer 

Hugo H. Zimmermann and Alfred L, Alschuler 
Members of Executive Committee. 



EXHIBITION COMMITTEE 

Edward B. Pattison, .... Chairman 

L. E. Denslow, Secretary 

Herbert P. Beers D. H. Burnham 

John M. Dodd Roy Eliel 

Harry D. Jenkins Frank S. Linden 

Christian Morgenstierne Henry L. Ottenheimer 

H. R. Wilson Ernest Woodyatt 

Ellis Gates Charles E. Brush 

FINANCE COMMITTEE 

Edward B. Pattison, Otto Silha 

JURY OF ADMISSION 

Chicago New York 

Charles A. Phillips Birch Burdette Long 

Max Dunning John H. Phillips 

Arthur Heun 

Boston 
Civ\rence H. Blackall 



The Trend of Architectural Thought Today. 



A laj^man visiting an exhibition of architectural drawings in one 
of our larger cities today, must be impressed with the fact that the 
exhibitors are working in a number of contrary directions. 

Among these exhibitors are those who follow some well established 
historic stj'le, others who use historic forms in a free and modern 
wa}', and still others who would have none of this inheritance, but 
strike out boldly to use entirely new forms, as they think. 

All three parties contend that their work is rational and thought- 
ful ; the first, and sometimes the second, lay claim to being scholarly. 
Grammatical these two must be to be meritorious, while the third has 
as yet no recognized grammar. 

So, it is apparent, there is a wide difference of opinion among 
creators of architecture; but they are agreed that to gain results there 
must be a blending of law and logic, together with poetry and romance, 
in other words, a blending of structural necessities and recognition of 
practical requirements and good planning, together with proportion, 
grace and style in its larger sense. 

We are taught and accept that in their day and for their require- 
ments, the Greek architects of the temples and the Gothic builders 
of the cathedrals came nearest reaching the goal of perfect architecture. 
But this does not blind us to the fact that the servile copying of these 
gems of architectural art in another age is plagiarism; a study in 
archeology, possibly, but surely not creative architecture. 

Again, we learn that in every age when great buildings were 
designed and executed, the public was alive to the noble and the 
beautiful in its architecture, and without this spirit in the people 
such feats would have been impossible. 



( \ 



This may perhaps explain why the Nineteenth Century is con- 
sidered barren of great achievements (with the usual exceptions that 
prove the rule) in this, our chosen art. The Nineteenth Century is 
recognized as the age of steam power, of wonderful progress in the 
mechanic arts, of the breaking of the fetters of slavery and serfdom, 
and extension of personal liberty generally. With this new order of 
things, decades were required for adjustment into new positions and 
the upsetting of traditions. 

This movement is today going on. We are fast developing from 
the steam age to the age of electricity. To use the words of President 
Roosevelt, "Modern life is both complex and intense, and the tremend- 
ous changes wrought by the extraordinary industrial developments of 
the last half century are felt in every fibre of our social and political 
being." 

With these forces, which affect our lives so vitally, rapidly chang- 
ing, is it any wonder that matters architectural should be in an un- 
settled state ? Architecture is a reflex of the civilization of its day. 
When man has time to think only of bare necessities there is no 
place for sentiment. Building at such time lacks nobility. 

Consider for a moment the history of architecture in this country 
during the last century. 

It began with Georgian, better known as Colonial work; then 
followed our Greek period, of which the old Tremont Hotel, Boston, 
now razed, and the Boston Custom House are representatives. After 
that came a time when our architects studied the English journals 
religiously and sought inspiration in the then dominant Victorian 
Gothic. This was followed, at least in the building of frame dwell- 
ings, by work which, for want of a proper name, was miscalled 
"Queen Anne." Some of these Queen Anne architectural crimes 
against good taste have been spared oblivion by fire and still stare 
us in the face. Next came the American adaptation of the South of 
France Romanesque, with H. H. Richardson as its champion and 
best essayist. 

With the death of Richardson, Romanesque began to wane and 
Italian Renaissance became the vogue. About this time schools of 
architecture in this country and in Europe, preeminently the E'cole 
de Beaux Arts, Paris, began to wield an influence, which influence 



has grown to a pronounced degree, |)articularly in New York City. 
This latter work naturally has an academic air, is Modern Classic or 
Modern French Renaissance, and in New York often outfrenches the 
French. 

About the time the schools of architecture began to wield a 
pronounced influence in this country, a voice from the wilderness 
would occasionally make itself heard through the architectural press, 
either by way of an article or by the illustration of some design, 
wherein the author plainly showed his refusal to be tied by precedent 
and the teaching of the schools of design. Independence was the 
note struck. It said: 'I care nothing for your worn-out motives and 
3'our accepted standard of taste! Here is my understanding of the 
case and my interpretation. I at least have the courage of my con- 
victions." 

This is the spirit of the workers in the new movement, whose 
work with us has as yet no name, unless we call it, with fi^lmer Grey, 
"Inventive and Indiginous American Architecture." 

European architecture has its disciples of the new movement in 
architecture and art, and numerically they are stronger there than 
here. In France they are known as workers in L'Art Nouveau, in 
Germany and Austria, Secessionists. The American work is, how- 
ever, in no way a copy of L'Art Nouveau abroad. 

Standing quietl}' by, ready to learn what real merit there is in 
the new, yet at the same time holding on to the experience of the 
past, ready to apply whatever seems best adapted to the problems in 
hand, are the majority, perhaps, of thinking, earnest architects and 
designers today. 

As stated above, it is the function of architecture to express in 
concrete form the civilization of its day. Perhaps there may come 
into our art, no less than into our lives, a deeper note, one of greater 
unity of passion and directness of impulse. Expression is as neces- 
sarv as leaf and blossoms are to the black brances of the trees. 

Arthur Woltersdorf. 



Chicago Architectural Club 



ACTIVE MEMBERS 



Abbott, Frank B. 
Alschuler, Alfred S. 
Andrews, Alfred B. 

Bacon, Francis T. 
Bagge, Christian W. 
Bargman, E. F. 
Bartholomew, F. L. 
Beauley, William J. 
Beers, Herbert P. 
Behel, Vernon W. 
Behr, E. Theodore 
Beman, S. S. 
Bennett, Arthur J. T. 
Bernhard, Adolph F. 
Bicknell, Alfred H. 
Blake, Charles G. 
Bourke, Robert E. 
Brinkman, William J, 
Brinsley, Herbert G. 
Brush, Chas. E. 
Brydges, E. Norman 
Buhmann, Chas. J. 
Burghoffer, Leon 
Burnham, D. H., 

Carman, Chas. W. 
Carr, Chas. A. 
Chatten, M. C. 
Church, Myron H. 
Ciarcoschi, S. 
Clark, Edwin B. 
Cohen, Isidore 
Coolidge, Chas. A. 

Dean, George R. 
Denslow, L. E. 



Dinkelberg, E. P. 
Dodd, John M. 
Dunham, Geo. Foote 
Dunning, N. Max 

Edbrooke, H. W. J. 
Eliel, Roy , 

Fellows, William K. 
Flanders, John J. 
Fleury, Albert 
Fogel, Reuben W. 

Garden, Frank M. 
Garden, H. M. G. 
Gaubert, Leon 
Gerber, Arthur U. 
Graham, E. R. 
Granger, Alfred H. 
Griffin, Walter B. 

Haagen, Paul T. 
Hagney, Jas. A. 
Hamilton, J. L. 
Hammond, C. H. 
Harper, W. W. 
Hatzfeld, Clarence 
Hazelton, H. T. 
Helder, C. Will 
Heun, Arthur 
Hoeppner, E. A. 
Holmes, N. H. 
Holsman, Henry K. 
Hudson, Harry F. 
Hunter, David C. 
Hyland, Paul V. 



/I 



Jenkins, Harry D. 
Jensen, Elmer C. 
Jensen, Jens 
Jobson, Frank C. 
Johnson, Jens A. 

Kable, Chas. Howard 
Keiller, David 
Kelly, John H. 
Knox, Arthur H. 

Lang, Louis A. 
Levings, M, M. 
Lilleskau, John 
Linden, Frank L. 
Linke, John E. 
Liska, Emil 

Llewellyn, Joseph C. 
Long, F. B. 

Mahler, H. H. 
Maher, George W. 
Marienthal, Oscar B. 
Marsh, Harry L. 
Martin, Edgar O. 
*Mauch, Max 
Marvin, Chas. R. 
McMurry, Oscar L. 
Millet, Louis J. 
Mohr, Frederick J. 
Montgomery, John T. 
Morse, Burton E. 
Morgenstierqe, Christian 
Mueller, Paul F. P. 
Mundie, Wm. B. 

Nagle, Callard P. 
Naper, Herbert J. 
Nelson, Edward O. 
Nimmons, George C. 

Ottenheimer, Henry L. 



Paschen, Jacob 
Pattison, Edward B. 
Perkins, Dwight H. 
Petersop, Martin 
Potts, J. Oliver 
Poulsen, Edward J. 
Powers, Horace S. 

Rapp, George L. 
Rawson, Lorin A. 
Rogers, John A. 
Rondel, Victor E. 
Rouleau, Arthur 
Ruge, P, H. 
Russy, Anthony F. 

Sandegren, Andrew 
Schmidt, Richard E. 
Seyfarth, Robert 
Shankland, R. M. 
Shattuck, Walter F. 
Shaw, Howard V. D. 
Silha, Otto A. 
Spencer, Robert C, jr. 
Spindler, Oscar 
Springer, Chas. E. 
Stanhope, L. E. 

Tallmadge, T. E. 
Taylor, Victor F. 
Tomlinson, H. Webster 
Torrance, James R. 

Von Hoist, Herman 

Wagner, E. J. 
Walker, Wm. E. 
Walker, Frank C. 
Waterman, Harry H. 
Watson, Robert Bruce 
Weber, P. J. 
White, Melville P. 



■ Deceased, 1905. 



Willatzen, Andrew 
Williamson, Robt. B. 
Williamson, Wm. G. 
Wilmanns, August C. 
Wilson, Horatio R. 
Winslow, Benjamin E. 
Wirt, Frederick B. 



Wittekind, Henry 
Woltersdorf, Arthur 
Woodyatt, Ernest 

York, John D. 

Zimmerman, A. G. 
Zimmerman, Hugo H. 



ASSOCIATE MEMBERS 



Ailing, Van Wagenen 
Appel, Henry L. 

Barry, W. H. 
Beckerleg, E. L. 
Bonner, Chas. 

Campbell, Donald 
Chaddock, DeClifford 
Clifford, D. F. 
Coffman, George W. 
Combs, Roger M. 

Dunning, A. G. 

Eiker, Charles F. 
Ewen, John M. 

Falkenau, Victor 
Freeman, Ernest 

Gates, Ellis D.^ 
Gates, Wm. D. 
Grace, William 
Gray, Geo. C. 
Greeley, M. L. 

Hanstein, Herman 
Hart, W. B. 
Holslag, Edward J. 

Kimbell, E. C. 
Kimbel],M. N. 



Kimbell, S. S. 
Knisely, Harrj^ C. 

Lanquist, A. 
Lau, Willy H. 
Lauer, Martin W. 

Marshall, Sylvester 
Matz, Herman L. 
Moulding, Jos. W. 

Noelle, Joseph B. 

O'Connell, Thos F. 

Pierce, E. F. 
Prosser, H. B. 

Ramsey, Wm. E. 
Robinson, F. B. L. 
Rodatz, Jacob 

Schmidt, R. O. 
Shepard, H. E. 
Snyder, J. W. 
Sollitt, Ralph T. ' 
Struble, Henrj' 

Van Dort, G. Broes 
Van Inwagen, James Jr. 

Wolfarth, Wm. 
Wood, John R. 
Wyles, Tom R. 



NON-RESIDENT MEMBERS 



Adelsberger, Roland, 
Anderson, Pierce 
Andrews, A. G., 
Benedict, Jules B. 
Browning, Alex. 
Davis, Frank L. 
Downey, A. N. 
Gruenfeld, Casper 
Harbeck, J. R., 
Heinz, G. P., . 
Hemmings, E. Chas. 
Johnson, Morris O. 
Long, Birch B. 
Mattison, V. A. 
Phillips, John H. 
Polk, Willis 
Purcell, Wm. G. 
Scoffeld, Hubert C. 
Sheblessy, John F. 
Starr, Harry C, 
Watson, J. Nelson 
Weirick, Ralph W. 
Wells, W. A. . 



8ii .Michigan Ave., South Bend, Ind. 
Care Union Depot, Washington, D. C. 
1632 Frick BMg., Pittsburg 
Paris, France 
680 Seneca St., Buffalo 
1707 FlatironBldg., N. Y. 
Little Rock, Ark. 
1608 Main St., Los Angeles, Cal. 
123 Theodore St., Detroit 
522 Colorado l^ldg., Denver 
2532 W. North Ave., Baltimore 

Panama 

7 E. 4.2nd St. N. Y. 

La Salle, 111. 

7 K. 42nd St., New York 

124 Sansome St., San Francisco 

2312 Durant Ave., Berkeley, Cal. 

306 Post Bldg., Battle Creek, Mich. 

4th and Main Sts., Louisville, Ky. 

62 W. 68th St. New York 

5178 Fairmount Ave., St. Louis, Mo. 

424 Fifth Ave., New York 

Oklahoma Cit\-, Oklahoma 



HONORARY MEMBERS 



Blake, Theodore L. 
Lawrie, Harry 

Allen, John K. 
Clark, Robert 
Gay, Henry Lord 
Hunt, Frederick S. 
Jenney, W. L. h. 



28 E. 41st St. New York City 
Caxton Bldg., Omaha, Neb. 

McLean, Robert C. 
Muller, Louis, Jr. 
Phimister, D. G. 
Sullivan, Louis M. 
Taft, Lorado 



Wagner, Fritz 



EXHIBITORS 

i 

ALLEN & COLLINS-z:^ Beacon street, Boston, Mass. 

1 Design for a synagogue. » 

2 Plans for a synagogue. 

ALSCHULER, ALFRED S.— 567 East Forty-fifth street, second place traveling 
scholarship (a city residence). 

3 Perspective. 

4 Boulevard elevation. 

5 Street elevation. 

6 First and second-story plans and interior detail. 

AMERICAN TERRA COTTA AND CERAMIC CO.— 602 Chamber of Com- 
merce building. 

7 Landscape in colored clays. ,^. 

8 School of fish. 

9 Studies in colored clay. 

ASH, PERCY— 1620 Riggs place, Washington, D. C. 

10 Desdemona's house, Venice. 

1 1 Study for U. S. postofifice, Ogden, Utah. 

12 Study for U. S. postofifice, Charlottesville, Va. 

i.^ Study for U. S. postofifice, Charlottesville, Va. (not used). 
BEAULEY. WILLIAM J.— 1007 Monadnock block. 

14 Sketch of new Broadway tabernacle, New York. 

15 Old house, Williams bridge, New York. 

16 Carl Bitter Studio, on the Hudson. 

17 Jules Guerin's studio. New York. 

BEHEL, VERNON W.— 720 Tribune building, Traveling scholarship competi- 
tion (a city residence). 

18 Perspective. 

1 9 Boulevard elevation. 

20 Street elevation. 

21 First-story plan. 

22 Second-story plan. 

BORINfe, WILLIAM A.— 32 Broadway, New York. 

23 Sketch for country honse at Nassau. Long Island. 

24 Competition for Johns Hopkins University — Plan f)f grounds. 

25 Competition for Johns Hopkins University — Laboratory building. 
BOURNE, FRANK A.— 96 Mason building, l^oston, Mass. 

26 "Dike Rock," summer residence of Mr. W. N. Hartshorn. Clifton, Mar- 

bldhead, Mass. 

27 A village store. Preliminary sketch. 

28 Central Congregational church, Bangor, Me. Original sketch. 

29 Photographs of Central Congregational church, Bangor, Me. 
P.ROWN, FRANK CHOUTEAU— 9 Park street. Boston, Mass. 

30 Stable at Dcdham, Mass. 

31 Sketch perspective, "Edge Hill." 
31 A frame of four cottages. 

S2 Perspective, "Grey Rocks," Lockport, Mass. 

33 "Grey Ledge," Isleboro, Me. The living room. 

34 "Grey Ledge," Isleboro, Me. The dining room. 

35 "Grey Ledge," Isleboro, Me. Fireplace, alcove, living room. 



BRUST, PETER— 426 Camp building, Milwaukee, Wis. 

36 Entrance to St. John's cemetery, Manches, Waukesha county. Wis. 
BRUST, PETER, and RICHARD PHILLIPS— 426 Camp building, Milwau- 
kee, Wis. 

2,7 M. E. church. 
BRUSH, C. E.— 24 Borden block. 

38 Tower. 

39 Water color sketch. 

40 Privtfte house. 

41 Office building. 

BUCK, LAWRENCE— 909 Steinway hall. 

42 to 54 Sketches for residences. 

BURNHAM, D. H. & CO.— 1417 Railway Exchange building. 

55 Bessemer Park — Recreation house. 

55A Bessemer Park — Showing swimming tank, etc. 

56 Grant Park and proposed Shore Blvd. 
57^ Calumet Park. 

58 Wading pool in Armour square. 

59 Sherman Park — Recreation house. 

60 Sherman Park. 

61 Palmer Park — Showing swimming tank, etc. 

62 \ park in packing house district. 

CENTURY CO., THE— 33 East Seventeenth street. New York city. (Birch 
B. Long.) 

63 The new Vauxhall bridge, from the Surry side of the Thames. 

64 The rebuilt Ken , bridge, named for King Edward VH. 

65 The new criminal court-house, replacing Newgate prison. 

66 The new Gaiety theater. 

67 The Royal School of -Art Needlework, the Imperial Institute in the dis- 

tance. 

68 Victoria memorial. 

69 The new war office, parliament houses in the distance. 

70 The new government offices. 

y\ The Victoria and .Albert Museum. (South Kensington Museum.) 
72 The Passmore Edwards settlement from the garden. 
yT, The new Westminster Cathedral (Roman Catholic). 
CHICAGO SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE— Art Institute, Chicago. 

74 (Edd. A. Ruggles) A conservatory in conncctir)n with a residence. 

75 (C. Bowman) Ionic frontpicce. 

76 (Charles Kellogg) Design for hunting lodge. 

yy (Albert D. Becker) A small museum in a park. 

78 (Edward F. Gillette) Entrance through an arcade. 

79 (G. R. Livermore) Shelter in a park. 

80 (C. H. Hammond) A hospital of fifty beds. 

81 (Robt. Sayer) A niche (8-hour sketch).' 
CHILD'S, FRANK A.— Evanston, 111. 

82 Platio in a California residence. 

83 Residence in California. 

84 Interiors. 

COHEN, ISIDORE— Eng'r, Monadnock block. 

85 Photograph of steel frame work 2,000,000-bushel grain elevator for 

West Shore railroad at Weehawken, N. J. 

'1 



COOPER, COLIN CAMPBELI^sS West Fifty-seventh street, New York. 

86 St. Nicholas tower, La * Rochelle, France. 
COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY OP ARCHITECTURE— New York. 

87. (J. F. Steffens) A concert hall. Fourth-year design. Plan. 

88 Elevation and section. 

89 (Frederic P. Squire) Domical church (thesis design). 

90 Domical church elevation. 

QT (Harold F. Percy, deceased) Museum Marine Biology (thesis design). 

92 (Engelbert Neus) A hippodrome, elevation, post graduate design. 

93 A hippodrome plan design. 

94 (John Wynkoop) vA school of fine arts, thesis design; plan. 

95 A school of art, the design elevation. 
COLLEGE OF ARCHITECTURE— Cornell University. 

96 (R. Irving Dodge) A chimney piece elevation. 
96A (Taylor Wickham) A museum in a small city. 

97 (F. Y. Johannes) A chimney piece detail. 

98 (Charles S. Cohb) A fireplace for the Gorigoyle club room. 

99 A thermal establishment elevation. 

TOO (Prof. Maurice T. Prevot) A canal between two seas. Perspective. 

TOT (Prof. Maurice T. Prevot) A canal between two seas. Plan. 

102 (Prof. Maurice T. Prevot) A cafe, elevation. 

T03 (Prof. Maurice T. Prevot) A cafe section. 

104 (T. Andre Smith) A wayside chapel (a ten-hour sketch). 

T05 A landing place elevation. 
D'ASCENZD, NICOLA- 38 South Sixteenth street, Philadelphia, Pa. 

T06 Cartoon for window in the Trenton courthou.se, "Justice." 

T07 Cartoon for class memorial window in the Woman's College, Balti- 
more, Md. 

108 Design for lead^ glass window for Philadelphia Book Co. 

Tog Design for leaded glass window for Philadelphia Book Co. 

TIG Cartoon for leaded glass window for Tabard Inn Food Co. 

Ill Cartoon for leaded glass window for Tabard Inn Food Co. 

TT2 Cartoon for leaded glass window for Tabard Inn Food Co. 

113 Cartoon for leaded glass window for Tabard Inn Food Co. 

TT4 Cartoon for leaded glass window for Tabard Inn Food Co. 

DUNNING, N. MAX— T2i8 Y. M. C. A. building. 

T15 Street in Beauvaise, France. 
116 Old monastery well. - 

TT7 Old monastery well. 

T18 Market place, Caudebcc, France. 

T19 View from balcony Villa D'Este. 

T20. Garden stairs. Villa D'Esta. 

121 Street view in Chartres, France. 

122 Garden termination, Capararola, Italy. 

123 Residence for J. R. Dickinson, at Winnetka. 

EIZNER & ANDERSON— 136-38 Ingalls building, Cincinnati, O. 

T24 Ilomestead hotel lobby. Hot Springs, Va. 
ESSER, H. J. — 426 Canio building, Milwaukee, Wis. 

125 General offices, central car house and terminal station for T. M. E. 

R. & L Co. 

126 Building for the Johnson Service Co. 

127 A building for the Wisconsin Telephone Co. 

128 A residence on Lake Mendota, Madison, Wis. 



EYRE, WILSON— Philadelphia, Pa. 

129. House for Maxwell Wyeth, sketch, entrance fr'ont. 

130 House for Maxwell Wyeth, sketch, garden front. 

131 House for Maxwell Wyeth, sketch, house and grounds. 

132 Proposed house for Seymour J. Hyde at Greenwich, Conn., entrance, 
, front. 

FREEDLANDER, J. H.— 244 Fifth avenue. New York city. 

The National Home for Disahled Volunteer Soldiers, Johnson City, 
Tenn. 
Iv33 The entrance gates and lodges. 

134 The mess hall (main elevation). 

135 Detail of the tower of the mess hall. 

136 The Carnegie lihrary. 

137 Residence for Mr. M. Newhorg. 50 East iMfty-sccoiid street. New 

York city. 

FRENCH, D. C, Sculptor — i-5ronze doors. Original at Uoston Library build- 
ing. Trowbridge, architect. 

FROST & GRANGER— 184 La Salle street. 

140 Baltimore & Ohio Railroad Co. office building — Competitive perspective. 

141 Baltimore & Ohio Railroad Co. ofHce buildiug — section, first floor plan, 

second floor plan, third floor plan. 

142 Northern Trust Co. bank — Perspectixe and plan. 

143 Northern Trust Co. bank — Model, one-half inch. ^^ 

144 Country residence — perspective. 

145 Country residence — Rear elevation. 

146 Residence in Clevelanrl- Perspective. 

147 Residence in Cleveland — Elevation. 

148 Residence in Cleveland — Plans. 
GARNSEY, GEO. 0.-1017 Adams Express building. 

149 Interior opera house. 

150 Pompeii Roman mosaic Hoor. 

GATES POTTERIES CO., THE— Chamber of Commerce building. 

151 Teco pottery. ( .\ group.) 

GRIFFIN, WALTER P). — Elmluirst, 111. Traveling scholarship competition. 

152 Perspective. 

153 Boulevard elevation. 

154 Street elevation. 

155 Plans. 

HAMILTON, J. L.— 4720 Madison avenue. 

156 Design for a monument. 

Hamlin, a. D. I". — 105 Momingsidc avenue, Columbia Cnixersity. 

, 157 Soldiers' and Sailors' monument, Whitinsville, Mass. 
HAMMOND, CHAS. HERRICK— 702 Msher building. Successful competi- 
tive design, fifth amnial traveling scholarshij). (A city residence.) 

158 Perspective. 

159 Boulevard elevation. 

160 Street elevation. 

161 Plan of first story. 

162 Plan of second story. 

163 Interior perspective. 

164 Preliminary sketches. 

165 Interior, Middle Temple church, London, England. 

A 



i66 Cloister, Chester Cathedral, England. 
- 167 Chester, East Gate street, froni the west wall. 
HARDING & UPMAN— 1316 G street, Washington, D. C. Competitive design 
for new Freedman's hospital building, Washington, D. C. 
r68 Bird'seye perspective. 

169 Front elevation. 

HARRIS, WM. LAUREL— 423 West Fifty-ninth street. New York city. 

170 Color study for figure in St. Paul's church (Paulist Fathers), New 

York city. ' 

171 Color study for figure in St. Paul's church (Paulist Fathers), New 

York city. 
HARRIS. A. L.— 1516 H street, Washington, D. C. 

172 A state dining room. ■%. 

HEWITT, HERBERT EDMUND— 22 Arcade building, Peoria, 111. 

173 Peoria Country club, Peoria, 111. Perspective exterior. 

174 Peoria Country club, Peoria, 111. Photographs. 

175 Crcve Coeur club, Peoria, 111. Exterior perspective. 

176 Competitive design for bank building for Dime Savings and Trust Co., 

Peoria, 111. 
HILL & WOLTERSDORF— 70 La Salle street. r 

177 A suburban bank. 

HOOPS & CO., WM H.— 10-12 Fast Monroe street. 

178 Tiles and fireplace, furniture. 
HOLST, HERMAN V. von— 11 18 The Rookery. 

179 Pont Neuf, Paris. 

180 Palazzo Ca Doro, Venice. 

181 Desdemona palace, Venice. 

182 Francis' I. gallery at Fontaincbleau. 

183. Venetian sketches. Ducal palace, S. Giorgio Maggiare. 
HOWELL & STOKES— 100 Williams street. New York. 

184 St. Paul's chapel for Columbia University. 

HULL, WASHINGTON— 16 East Twenty-third street, New York city. Hotel 
and theater. Times s(|uare. New York City. 

185 First floor ])lan. 

186 Side elevation. 

187 ]">ont elevation. 

Design for armory of the Second Naval Battalion, Brooklyn, city of 
New York. 

188 b^irst floor plan. 
i8q I'Vont elevation. 

190 Side elevation and section. 

Memorial Continental hall for the Daughters of the American Revolu- 
tion. Washington, D. C. 

191 First and second floor plans. 

192 Perspective and front elevation. 

193 Side elevation and section. 
IIULLA, JOHNL-84 La Salle street. 

194 Clergy house, All Saints church, Ravenswood, 111. 
HYLAND, PAUL V.— 1030 Park avenue. 

195 Onc-half-inch scale details of "A Village Church," submitted in "Brick- 

builder competition." December, 1904. 

196 Onc-sixteenth-inch scale plan and one-eighth-inch scale front and side 

elevations of "A Village Church," "Brickbuilder competition," 1904. 



2f 



UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS-Urbana, 111. 

197 (Abell, R. E.) An American embassy. 

198 (Fountain, S. J.) An entrance to an estate. 

199 (Fountain, J. S.) Design for city hall. 

200 (Fountain, J. S., Parker, Walter) Studies of interior, design, hall, 
dining room, living room. 

201 (Ricker, Ethel) A summer resort. 

202 (Schott, Fred, Jr., Moratz, A.) An entrance to an estate. 

203 (Schober, M. W., McCoy, J., Roberts, H. F.) Frieze of .Parthenon 
(Frag). Gothic capita]. Renaissance pilaster. 

204 (C. M. Davison) "A Grotte." 

205 (C. M. Davison) A college of botany. 

206 (C. M. Davidson) A Swiss chalet. 

207 (Wilson, Joseph Wade) Design for a chautauqua. 

208 (Wilson, Joseph Wade) Design for a chautauqua. 

209 (Wilson, Joseph Wade) Arch of Titus, measured drawing. 
ITTNER, WILLIAM R.— Board of Education, St. Louis, Mo. 

210 Public school buildings, city of St. Louis, Mo. 
21 r Public .school buildings, city of St. Louis, Mo. 

JACKSON COMPANY. W. M.-504 Pullman building. 

212 Enamel and luster mosaic panel. 

213 Enamel and luster panel. 

214 Mosaic frieze of enamel and luster. 
JENKINS, HARRY DODGE— 19 Woodlawn Park. 

215 Studio corner. 

216 In Twenty-third street. 

217 S. A, Douglas cottage. 

218 Cottage Columbia, S. C. 

219 Sketch Columbia, S. C. 

220 Summer Sketch alley 

221 College Inn, White City. 

JENNY & MUNDIE, 1401 New York Life building, Chicago. 

222 Bird'seye view St. Charles Home for Hoys, St. Charles, 111. 
Competition for B. & O. Office Building. 

223 Perspective. 

224 Section first floor plan, second floor plan. 

225 Section third floor plan, eighth floor plan. 

226 Section twelfth floor plan. ; 
JENSEN, JENS— 1030 Augusta street. 

227 Country estate. 

228 Suburban home grounds. 

KABLE, CHAS. H.— 733 Marquette building. 

Ihird place fifth annual traveling scholarship competition (a city resi- 
dence.) 

229 Perspective. 

230 Boulevard elevation. 

231 Street elevation. 

232 First story plan. 

233 Second story plan. 

KOESTER, JOHN— 2023 Michigan avenue. 

234 Pompeiian panel in wood inlay. 

LAUBER, JOSEPH— 51 West Tenth street, New York. 

235 Alternate scheme for a transfiguration, Trinty Lutheran church, Lan- 

caster, Pa. 



236 Color scheme for a transfiguration, Trinty Lutheran church, Lancaster., 

Pa. (Accepted design.) 
^2ii "Christ's Admonition to Thomas," cartoon for window in Ascension 

church. New York city. 
238 Photograph of completed work in Ascension church. 
LEAWITT, Jr. CHAS. W.— 15 Cortlandt street, New York, N. Y. 

^39 Saratoga club, Saratoga, N. Y. View of garden, looking south. 

240 Chas. E. Coxe, Malvern, Pa. Formal garden. 

241 Chester A. Congdon. Duluth, Minn. View of terraces and garden. 
LEVINGS, MARK M.— 6430 Yale avenue. 

Fifth annual traveling scholarship competition. (A city residence.) 

242 Perspective. 

243 Boulevard elevation. 

244 Street elevation. 

245 First and second floor plans. 
LINDEN, F. L. — 1216 Michigan avenue. 

246 Color scheme for decorations. 

247 Color scheme for decorations. 

248 Color scheme for decorations. 

LITTLE & BROWNE— 70 Kilby street, Boston, Mass. 

249 Gate and Gate Lodge, estate at Prides Crossing, Mass. 

250 Photograph of exterior, house of Robert S. Bradley, Boston. Mass. 

251 Alternative l<"()re Court," entrance front, estate at Prides Crossing, Mass. 

252 Layout of grounds, estate at Prides Crossing, Mass. 

253 Water front of estate at Prides Crossing, Mass. 

254 Fore Court entrance front, estate at Prides Crossing, Mass. 
LLEWELLYN, J. C— 1218 Y. M. C. A. building. 

255 Frame of photos — Residences. 

256 Frame of photos — Manufacturing building. 

257 Building at J^attle Creek, water color. 

258 Residence at Moline, 111. 

MAllER, GEORGE W.— 1S21-218 La Salle street. 

259 Examples of recent work. 

260 Photographs of Mr. Harry Rubens' stable and lodge building at Glen- 

coc. 111. 

261 Residence of Richard W. Sears at Oak Park, 111. 

262 Residence of Mr. H. W. Mallen at Oak Park, 111. 

M.\RS11 & PETER-520 Thirteenth street Northwest, Washington, D. C. 

263 Competition design for new Freedman's hospital buildings, Washing- 

ton, 1). C. Bird's-eye perspective. 

264 Competition design for new b>eedman's hospital buildings, Washing- 

ton, D. C. Front elevation. 

265 Federal building. Wheeling, W. Va. 

266 Residence on Connecticut avenue, Washington, D. C. 
DFPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE, MASSACHUSETTS INSTITUTE OF 

TECHNOLOGY— Boston, Mass. 

267 (Emerson, F. N.) A city hall. 

268 (Faelton, Otto) Plan and section of a maritime station. 

269 ( Ivielton, Otto) Detail of a museum of fine arts. 

270 (Eraser, Linda S.) A college for women. 

271 (Hoi ford, W. G.) Detail of a Protestant church. 

272 (Jenkins, A. D. ) A stock exchange. 



t - 



273 (Keyes, H. F.) A bay window. » 

274 (Lillencrantz, Edith) An art museum. 

275 (Lord, J. P.) Detail of a doorway of a twentieth century club house. 

276 (Scholtes, A. T.) Perspective sketch of the interior of a stock exchange. 

277 (Simpsom, H. G.) A maritime station. 

278 (Simpsom, H. G.) Sketch for interior of a stock exchange. 

279 (Simpsom, H. G.) Sketch of interior of Gothic chapel. 

280 (Simpson, H. G.) Sketch for a reception hall in a state house. 

281 (Rowe, H. W.) A crematory elevation. 

282 (Rowe, H. W.) A crematory plan. 

283 (Rowe, H. W.) A bay window. 

284 (Wadsworth, A. P.) A pavilion at the end of a large building (twelve- 

hour sketch "enloge"). 

285 (Wiard, Oliver M.) A club house for a literary society. 

286 (Wilcox, F. S.) An art museum. 

287 (\V^ires, E. Stanley) Study of a Corinthian capitol. 
MAX MA UGH MEMORIAL ROOM. 

Sculpture and other pieces of work of Max Mauch loaned by Mr. Beil. 
MITTERHAUSEN, ALFONSO— 42() Camn building. Milwaukee. Wis. 

288 A windmill (water color). 
MORGENSTIERNE, CHRISTIAN— 61 10 Ellis avenue. 

Second place tlfth annual traveling scliolarship. (A city residence.) 

289 Perspective. 

290 Boulevard elevation. 

291 ^Street elevation. 

292 Plan of first story; 

293 Plan of second story. 

294 Ground plan. 

MORRIS, BENJ. W.— 5 West Thirty-first street, New York city. 

295 Front elevation home office building Aetna Insurance Co., Hartford, 

Connr 

296 Detail '79 hall. 

297 '79 hall, Princeton University. - ',, 
NIMMONS & FELLOWS— 1733 Marquette building. 

Buildings for Sears, Roebuck & Co. 

298 Administration building. 

299 Merchandise building. 

300 General plan of buildings. 

301 Residence for Mr. Rosenwald, 4901 VAWs a\enue, exterior. 

302 Residence for Mr. Rosenwjild, 4901 I'lllis avenue, interior. 
NORTHWESTERN TERRA' COTTA CO, Tl IF— 1000 Claybourne avenue. '' 

303 An eagle in terra cotta. 

304 Name panel in terra cotta. 
OLMSTED BROS.— Brookline, Mass. 

305 Sketch for flower garden for Mr. Gilbert Cowan, Louisville, Ky. 
OTIS, W. A.— 175 Dearborn street. 

306 Hall and stairway, residence, Davenport, la. 

307 Music room and library mantel, residence, 1 V.ivenport; la. 

308 Christ Episcopal church, Winnetka, 111. 

309 Residence, Wellington avenue, Chicago. 

310 Residence, Evanston, 111. 

311 Preliminary sketch for stable. Rock Island, 111. 



OTTENHETMER, H. L.— 1123 Schiller building. 

.312 Sketch for College Inn, Sherman House restaurant. 

313 Warehouse for Hartman Furtiiture Co. ■] 
PEARODY & BEAULEY— 1007 Monadnock block. 

314 A country house. 

315 Treatment of a grave. 

316 Plaster model for monument to Charles D'uanc Rogers. 
PERKINS, DWIGHT HEALD— 1200 Steinway Hall. 

317 Residence in Evanston, 111. 

31)^ Residence in Muskegon, Mich. 
,^]g Carnegie Library, Niles, Mich. 

320 Over decoration, Chicago lieach hotel. 
PIIHJPP, RICHARD— 426 Camp building, Milwaukee, Wis. 

321 Mrs. L. C. lleide's house. Prospect Hill, Milwaukee. 

;;^22 Preliminary sketches for suburban houses. , , 

POND & POND— 1109 Steinwcly Hall. 

323 Water color of Ilumboldt 1\'lephone Exchange. 
I'RUYN, WILLIAM II., JR.— 4217 Perkeley avenue. 

324 .\ temple memorial to William McKinley. 
PURCELL, WM. GRAY— 2312 Durant vivenue, P.erkeley, Cal. 

325 Dwelling for Mr. Oliver Esmond, Seattle, Wash. 

326 A city bank. V 
rUTNAM & COX— 6 Hancock avenue, Boston, Mass.' 

^27 Carnegie I'echnical School's competition plan. 
32«S Perspective. 
RELD & STEM— 7 East Forty-second street. New York city. 

329 Concrete bridge. 

330 Concrete bridge. 

331 Van Cortlandt Park station. 
X^■2 Van Cortlandt Park station. 

,\,^^^ ■ FJevation for h\)rty-lifth street, New York city. 

334 Pers])ective study — Railway terminal and office building. 
ROlilNSON, ARGYLL E.— 623, «4 La Salle street. 

335 Firepr(X)f warehouse. 

RO(;b:RS & MANSON— 85 Water street. Bo.ston, Mass. 

(The Brickbuilder com])etition for a Village Church.) First prize — De- 
sign by Addison B. Lc I>outillier. '• 

336 Elevation. 
,]^7 Detail. 

(The Brickbuilder competition for a Village Church.) Second prize — De- 
sign by Aymar Embury. 
33(S lilevation. 
^^^) Detail. 

(The P)rickbuilder competition for a Village Church.) Third Prize — De- 
sign by E. Donald Robb. 

340 Elevation. 

341 Detail. 

ROGERS, JAS. GAMP.LE- 1615 Ashland block. 

342 Cumiiletion of Chicago residence. 

Eight sketches of a residence and stable which were sent to Mr. Peter G. 
Thomson, College Hill, Ohio. 

343 Perspective of court. 

344 Ground plan. 



345 Front elevation. 

346 Side elevation. 

347 First floor plan. 

348 Second floor plan. 

349 Elevation of stable. 

350 Floor plan of stable. 

Drawings of a residence and stal)lc which arc now being erected for Mr. 
Peter G. Thomson, College Hill. Ohio. 

351 Perspective. 

352 Elevations and sections. 

353 First and second story plans. 

354 Interior elevation of main hall. 

355 Interior elevation of nnisic room. 

356 Plan and elevation of stable. ! 
ROSS, ALBERT RANDOLPH— 542 Fifth avenue, New York city. 

357 Columbus public library, Columbus. Ohio — Perspective. 

358 Columbus public library, Columhus, Ohio — Perspective lirst floor plan. 
SAVE, CARL IVl.— 2235 Michigan avenue. 

359 Water color sketch, Stockholm, Sweden. 
SCHUCHARDT, \VM. H.— 716 Goldsmith building, Milwaukee. 

360 Patio de Duruxa Alham Ora, (iranada, Spain. 

361 11 Redentore. Venice, Italy. 

362 Church of I Gesuati, Venice, Italy. 

363 Madonna del Monte, Vicenza, Italy. 

364 Puerta Judiciaria Alhambra, Granada, Spain. 
SEVFARTD. R. E.— 821, 213 L<'i Salle street. 

365 Suburban residence of R. E. Seyfarth. 
SHAW, HOWARD, 615, 175 Dearborn street. 

366 A small office building. 

SHURTLEFF, ARTHUR A.— 22 Congress stret^t, Boston. 

367 (J. E. Page, Esq.) Sketch for arrangement of grounds at Winchester, 

Mass. 
SIMPSON, HORANCE G.— 6 Hancock avenue, Boston. 

368 A reception hall in a state capitol. 

369 A country residence. 

370 Competitive design for Vicksburg battlefield memorial — Elevation. 

371 Competitive design for Vicksburg battlefield memorial — -Plan. 
STURN, MEYER J., AND OCHSNER, A. J., M. I).— 84 La Salle street. 

2)^2 Hospital exhibit, gold medal award, St. Louis, 1904. 
EXllHMT— Gal 4 Williams — .COmabuEwvRBBpfi shrdhuumn 

TALLMADGE, THOMAS E.-hourth holder Chicago Architectural dub scholar- 
ship. 

2iTi Courtyard of the Bargello, Florence. 

374 Measured drawing — Drinking fountain near IHorence. 

375 The rear of St. Peters, Rome. 

376 St. Peters from the Pincian hill. 

378 The Pitti palace, Florence. 

379 The Uflizi and the Palazzo Vecchio. h'lorence. 

380 The interior of St. Marks, Venice. 

381 In Venice. 

382 Near Monte Carlo. 

383 Roman theater, Aries, France. 

384 Moonlight on the Loire, Amboise, France. ■ ' 



l"7 



38s Chateau of Blois, France. 
• 386 Chateau of Langeais, Francq. 

387 Chateau of Chenonceaux, France. 

388 Church of St. Germain des Pres,'*Paris. 

389 Musee de Cluny, Paris. ' ^' 

390 Late afternoon on the Seine, Paris. 

391 Pavillion Turgpt, The Louvre, Paris. 

392 In the Luxembourg garden, Paris. 

393 Notre Dame, Paris. 

394 Interior of Notre Dame, Paris. 

395 Interior of St. Etienne du Mont, Paris. 
TAYLOR & CLIFFORD— 1882 Evanston avenue. 

396 Decorative sketch for dining room in residence. 

397 Decorative sketch for library in residence. 
TEMPLE, BURROWS & M'LANE— Davenport, Iowa. 

398 Preliminary sketch of a residence for Mr. W. A. Layman. 

399 Preliminary sketch of grounds for Mr. W. A. Layman. 

400 Preliminary sketch of a residence for W. L. Mason. 

401 Preliminary sketch of a residence for R. H. Harned. 

402 Preliminary sketch for an office building for the Hon. J. R. Lame. 

403 Preliminary sketch for remodeling Trinity lodge room. 
TROWBRIDGE, ALEXANDER BUEL— 79 Wall street. New York. 

404 Study for a house at Oyster Bay, L. I. ''■ 
JOSEPH TWYMAN MEMORIAL ROOM— 

Furniture and other pieces designed by Joseph Twyman, exhibited by the 
Tobey Furniture Co. under the auspices of the Wm. Morris society. 
VAN PELT, GARRETT, JR.-426 Camp building, Milwaukee, Wis. 

405 Sketch for sunnner cottage, Waukesha, Wis. 
WALKER, FRANK C— 1417 Railway Exchange building. 

Fifth annual traveling scholarship competition (a city residence). 

406 Perspective. 

407 Boulevard elevation. 

408 Street elevation. 

409 First story plan. 

410 Second story plan. 

411 Ground plan. 

WEARY, ALLEN M.— 1417 Railway Exchange building. 

412 Thomas Orchestra hall. 

413 Ann Hatha way's cottage. ■ ~ 

414 Arch of Titus. 

WEBER, P. T.— 700 Fisher building. 

415 Hotel Kaiscrhof — Addition for present building— Perspective. ' 

416 Country house for F. S. Munro. Highland Park, 111.— Perspective. 

417 Ravinia Park building, Chicago— Milwaukee Electric Railroad Co.— Per- 

spective. 

418 Theater- Fort Sheridan park, Chicago— Milwaukee Electric Railroad Co 
WECHELSBERGER, J.— 1601, 100 Washington street. 

419 Perspective of store building. 
WILSON, H. R.— 218 La Salle street. 

420 J. I. Case T. M. Co., office building, Racine, Wis. 

421 Charcoal study of new hotel. The New Morrison hotel. 

422 Main office, the New Morrison hotel. 

423 Charcoal studies of gentlemen's restaurant in hotel. 



424 Charcoal studies — Ladies' restaurant in hotel. 

425 The Gund residence, La Crosse, Wis. 

426 Preliminary sketches for residence work. 

427 Preliminary sketches — Residence work. 

428 Preliminary sketches of residence work. 

429 Preliminary sketches of residence work. 
WYMAN. A.^ P.— 17 E. Van Buren street. 

Details for river wall shelter house. 

430 Monument and restoration of Ft. Massac park. 

431 Main entrance. , 

432 Entrance gate. 

433 Plan for surroundings of the Myra Bridwell school, Windsor Park. 

434 Plan for restoration of front. 
YOUNGBERG, JOHN E.— 218 La Salle street, 

435 Monument to John W. Root, Jackson Park. Chicago. 

436 Tile mantel facing "Girysanthennuns" — Residence of S. A. McClean, Jr. 
YORK, JOHN DEVEREUX— 499 North State street. 

437 Madonna of the Lilies decorative panel (in oil). 

438 Residence facade water color lart Noveau Italian coloring. 

439 Villa D'Este — Charcoal and color drawing from nature. 
ZIMMERMAN. HUGO II.— 1279 Perry street. 

440 Summer sketch — Chicago river. 

441 Summer sketch — Lake Ripley. Wis. 

442 Rose Lodge — Lake Ripley, Wis. 

DREXEL INSTITUTE SCHOOL OF ARCI IITECrURE— Philadelphia. 
ROY K. HEATON. 

443 Sketch, doorway at train. 
RICHARD ERSKINE. 

443 Study of the Corinthian caji from the temple of Jupiter Stator. 
JOHNC. McGOWAN. 

444 St. Pauls, London. 
WM. SIDNEY PITTMAN. 

445 Water color sketch. "■ 
E. DONALD ROBR. 

446 Perspective rendering in water color. 

COPE & STEWARDSON, 320 Walmit street, Philadelphia. 

447 Library, Bryn Mawr college. 

448 House near Philadelphia — persjK'ctive, plan. 
HELEN F. MEARS— 131 W. 23d street. New York city. 

449 Wall fountain. 

WORK OF WATER COLOR CLASS Ol- THE ARCHITECTURAL CLUB. 
W. W. HARPER. 

450 Harvard Law School. 
J. CARGILL. 

451 A suburban house. 
M. C. CHALLEN. 

452 A sketch. 
L. E. DEN SLOW. 

453 A Venetian scene. 




BOULEVARD ELEVATION. 

Successful Competitive Design for the Fifth Annual Traveling Scholarship of the 

Chicago Architectural Club. By C. H. Hammond. 

Subject: A City Residence. 



>"* 




FiRAT Bed Room Fo^oor. 




MAIN FLOOR PLAN. 

Successful Competitive Design for the Fifth Annual Traveling Scholarship of the 
Chicago Architectural Club. By C. H. Hammond. 
Subject: A City Residence. 




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Second Place. Competitive Design for the Fifth Annual Traveling Scholarship of the 

Chicago Architectural Club. By Alfred S. Alschuler. 

Subject: A City Residence. 



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HOUSE FOR L. BUCK. L. Buck, Architect. 




ROSE LODGE, LAKE RIPLEY, WIS. Hugo H. Zimmermann. 



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A COMPOSITION. 
Horace G. Simpson, Boston, Mass. 




SKETCH OF THOMAS ORCHESTRA HALL. Allen M. Weary. 




PALOZZO VECHIO, FLORENCE. T. E. Tallmadge. 







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A CITY BANK. 
Wm. Gray Purcell, Berkeley, Cal. 




DETAIL OF A DOORWAY OF A TWENTIETH CENTURY CLUB HOUSE. 
By J. P. Lord, Massachusetts Institute of Technology. 




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A SMALL OFFICE BUILDING. 
Howard Shaw, Architect. 




A CHIMNEY PIP:(:K — DKTAIL. 
By F. Y. Joannes, ('ornell University. 



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THE DETAILS OE A MUSEUM OF FINE ARTS. 

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By Otto Faelton, Massachusetts Institute of Technol6gy. 




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DESIGN FOR A BAY WINDOW. 
By H. W. Kowe, Massachusetts Institute of Technology. 





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GATE AND GATE LODGE, ESTATE AT PRIDES CROSSIXCi. 
Little & Browne, Architects, Boston, Mass. 







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SKCOND STORY PLAN 



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FIRST STORY PLAN 



KKSIDKNCK WHICH IS NOW BEING ERECTED FOR MR. PETEK THOMSON, 

COLLEGE HILL, OHIO. 

Jas. Gamble Rogers, Architect, Chicago, 111. 




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CHURCH OF I. GKSUATI, VKNICE, ITALY. 
Wm. H. Schuchardt, Milwaukee, Wis. 




(\ A. (\ ROOM, LOOKIXO SOI'TII 





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C. A. C. ROOM. I.OOKINC; NORTH 




L()H1^^" Ol' THl-: C. A. C. KOOMS 



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Temple Gate — Nikko, Japan 

John Devereux York, Architect 



nineteenth Annual 
(Exhibition or 
Zhe Chicago 

-XTrchitectural (tlub 



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to Jlpril (Eighteenth 




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''J lie following is a List of the Patrons who have generously 

subscribed toward the Expense Fund 

of this Exhibition : 



Holabird & Roche 

The Bedford Quarries Company 

John M. Ewen 

Rudolph S. Blome Company 

Thompson Starrert Company 

Tiffany Enameled Brick Company 

Otis Eleyator Company 

Henne (S: Company 

American Bridge Company 

Pitrshurg Plate (ilass Company 

Wells Brothers 

jaryis Hunt 

'y. k F. Corhin 

I'he Yale c*v.' Toxyne Manutacturing 
Company 

Illinois Brick Company 

l/ant]uist t^v lllsle\- 

The American Terra Cotta t^- Ceramic 
CompauN' 

E. \ . Johnson 

Chicago H\draulic- Press Brick Company 

S. S. Kimhell Brick Company 

R. c^' S. Sollitt Companx 

Bulle\ (.^- Andrews 

Johnson vSer\'ice Company 

Nimmoiis tV Fellows 

|acoh Rod at/, 

Munroe c^' Southworth 

D. C. Chaddock 

Hansell -Elcock Compan\- 

Thomas Moulding Compan\' 

Sykes Steel Roofing Companx' 

I Aidow'ici - Celadon Company 

Spencer & Poxyers 



Postle & Mahler 

H. (i, Zimmerman 

American Engineering Specialty Company 

Tobcy Furniture Company 

John D. York 

Orr & Lockett Hardware Company 

Crofoot, Nielsen & Company 

Dayis Construction Company 

Ci. W. Varitv 

Wm. H. [ackson & Company 

Pratt & Lambert . 

Chicago Edison Company 

H. R. Wilson 

(ieorgc R. Dean 

J. C. Llewellyn 

Wm. Mayor Company 

Arthur Woltersdorf 

Union Foundry Works 

Jenkins & Reynolds 

Herman L. Mat/, 

F. P. Nelson & Son 

Kroeschell Brothers Company 

jenney, Mundie & |ensen 

F,. Baggot Companx' 

J. U'. Snyder 

Deyoe li- Raynolds Company 

U. S. Blue Print Paper Company 

|. L. Hamilton 

Hawes & Dodd 

Irving Pond 

Northwestern Expanded Metal Company 

Louis H. Sulliyan 

William H, Warren Manufacturing 
Company 



p. Nacey Company '"'" 

L. H. Prentice Company 

W. M. Crllley 

William Adams * 

Franklin MacVeagh & Company 

The Powers Regulator Companv 

McNulty Brothers 

C. F. Gunther 

\ ierling, McDowell & Compan\' 

Wm. J. Beauley 

f. Brinkman 

Chicago Ornamental Iron Companv 

Hulbert li; Dorsey 

Standard Concrete Construction C'ompan\' 

|ohn J. Glessner 

Detroit Graphite Manufacturing Companv 

Morava Construction Company 

Patton .^- Miller 

Willy H. I.au 

L. C. Hall berg 

E. P. Strandberg 

I,inden Cilass Company 

Harry C. K nisei y 

Eugene Diet/.gen 

Richard E. Schmidt j 

Trussed Concrete Steel Compan\' 

Furst c^' Fanning 

K.ehm Brothers Ci)mpan\ 

vSamuel Cabot 

Andrews l^ Johnson Companv 

D. H. Perkins 



The Richards Manufacturing Company 
Oliver Sollitt 

Chicago Varnish Company 
The Decorators Supply Companv 
James A. Miller & Brothers Company 
C. Everett Clark Companv 
The Roebling Construction Companv 
H. L. Ottenheimer 
'I'homlinson Rilev Companv 
The Winslow Brothers Companv 
Howard Shaw 
Stanley McCormick 
P. j. Weber 
Eibrar\' Bureau 
■n. \on Hoist 
Henry K. Holsman 
Harry Dodge fcnkins 
Chas. Bonner 

The Frederick Post Companv 
F. P. Smith 
L. E. Stanhope 
W m. H. Hoops cv Comp'^iv 
R. \I. Combs 
Cha>. H. Prindeville 
\\m. Carbvs /iinmerman 
Mark M. Eeviiigs 
Benj. E. Winslow 
A. H. Abbott <Si Companv 
Martin A. R\erson 
Chas. E. Hutchinson 



Six iH AwuAt, Scholarship Comim- ri iion 

/'//v-r Do uitfil h\ 
Thk N'orthwestkrn Tf.rra C'oriA Comfanv 



Chicago Architectural Club Officers 



1905-1906 

Edward O. Nelson, ^ President 

Edward B. Pattison, . . . First Vice-President 

Otto A. Silha, Second Vice-President 

H. H. Mahler, . .... Secretary 

L. E. Denslow, ...... Treasurer 

Arthur J. T. Bennett, I tv/, , r 1- • ^ 

Alkred S. Alschuler, Members of Executive Committee 



EXHIBrriON COMMITTEE 

Otto A. Silha, „ . . Chairman 

John D. York, Secretary 

Frank B. Abbott Elmer C. Jensen 

D. H. BiTRNHAM Frederick B. Wirt 

Chas. a. Carr Alfred H. Bicknell '^^ 

L. CiAUBERT David C. Hunter 

FINANCE COMMFITEE 
Otto A. Silha 

HANGING COMMITIEE 

^l\HOMAs E. Tallmadce Chas. E. Brush 

Arthur Rouleau Albert Fleury 

X CATALOCiUE COMMITTEE 

John D. York F. L. Bartholomew 

Martin Peterson Benjamin E. Winslow 



JURY OF ADMISSION 

Chicago New York 

Georce R. Dean John H. Phillips 

Herbert Ct. Brinsley Birch B. Long 
Herman VonHolst^ 

Boston Philaiif.i.i'hia 

Clarence H. Blackall John Molitor 



Signs of The Times 



^\ 



IN these busy times there are many good "signs of the 
times," and so much for good in architecture and art 
in general, that both the architect and laymen should 
teel encouraged. 

Probably one of the most wholesome signs is the 
increasing interest shown in gardening, both from the 
standpoint of the designer as well as the house owner. 
This interest exerts a refining influence that cannot be 
overestimated. 

Architects appreciate the important part good land- 
scape effects add to their work, and now plan their work 
to fit an already beautiful site, or to make the future beauty 
of the site fit their design. This is as it should be, and let 
us hope that the time is not far distant when the landscape 
work will be considered as a matter of course a part of 
the architect's work. This should apply to public work 
as well as to domestic work. The architect who has 
designed 'a house on an undesirable site, and has succeeded 
in planning the landscape features so as to make the house 
and site harmonize successfully, has enjoyed keen pleasure. 

One cannot contemplate the many books on gardening — 
the many magazines of moderate cost devoted to the home, 
and the increasing number of fine magazines devoted to 
architecture and the allied arts — the local improvement 
associations, as well as the larger and broader civic improve- 



ment organization.s— the excellent work of arts and crafts 
societies — the increasing number and enlarging scope of 
technical and architectural schools, without feeling that 
they all tend to advance our art and its environments, in 
the right direction. 

The several club- catalogues issued yearly vseem to indi- 
cate an improvement in the character of the exhibitions. 
In vsome of these catalogues, however, considerable indiffer- 
ence is indicated, particularly as regards the inerit of the 
work illustrated. The annual exhibitions are, and should 
be, an inventory of the year's best work, and the catalogue 
should reflect only the best ot this work. Could it be 
made a rule to illustrate only such work as contains un- 
questioned merit, and eliminate the large amount of 
uninteresting and indifferent work, the catalogues would 
serve a better purpose and the exhibitions would assume 
greater importance in the eyes of the profession. A glance 
at some catalogues and a visit to some exhibitions lead one 
to suppose that considerations other than real merit have 
prompted the judges to exhibit or illustrate certain work. 

The character of both the exhibitions and the cata- 
logues should be raised to and maintained on a high 
professional basis, so that the best men in the profession 
would make serious efforts to prepare special material for 
exhibition. An exhibit should be divided into two or 
possibly three sections. One to contain only photographs 
and illustrations of executed work; the other to contain 
examples of rendering and illustrations of proposed work, 
or school and club competitions. 

E. C. JENSEN 



■= .1 



Chicago Architectural Club 



Active Members 



Alschuler, A. S. 


1507 


Fisher Building 


1895 


Abbott, Frank B. 


650 


First National Bank Building 


1904 


Andrews, Alfred B. 


412- 


-115 Dearborn Street 


1 90 1 


Bagge, Christian W, 


521 


North California Avenue 


1904 


Bartholomew, F. L. 


720 


Tribune Building 


1904 


Beauley, William J. 


1007 


Monadnock Block 


1891 


Behel, Vernon W. 


720 


Tribune Building 


'903 


Behr, E. Theodore, 


734 


Atheneum Building 


.. 1899 


Beman, S. S. 


928 


Fine Arts Building 


1897 


Bennett, Arthur J. T, 


1442 


Lexington Avenue 


1904 


Bernhard, Adolph F. 


I 1 


East 24th Street, New York 


1892 


Bicknell, Alfred H. 


720 


Tribune Building 


•903 


Blake, Chas. F. 


7 2Q- 


-184 La Salle Street 


1904 


Bourke, Robert E. 


140 I 


New York Life Building 


1899 


Brinkman, William J. 


83- 


-163 Randolph Street 


1891 


Brinsley, Herbert G. 


909 


Jackson Boulevard 


1893 


Brush, Chas. E. 


23 


Borden Block 


1904 


Brydges, E. Norman 


21 17 


\\'ilcox Avenue 


1905 


BurghofFer, Leon 


275 


South Canal Strept 


J 903 


Buhmann, Chas. J. 


900 


South Ashland Avenue 


1904 


Burnham, D. H. 


'4'7 


Railway Exchange Building 


1895 


Carr, Charles A. 


1020 


West Eddy Street 


1897 


Chatten, M. C. 




Europe 


1900 


Church, Myron H. 


'233 


Marquette Building 


1885 


Ciarcoschi, S. 


720 


Tribune Building 


1904 


Clarke, Edwin B. 


( 


Hotel Victoria, Chicago Heights 


1904 


Cohen, Isidore , 


628 


Monadnock Block 


'903 


Coolidg:, Chas. A. 


1780 


Old Colony Building 


1894 


Dean, Chas. F. 


806 


-184 La Salle Street 


1905 


Dean, George R. 


218 


La Salle Street 


1894 


Denslow, L. E. 


70 


La Salle Street 


1904 


Dinkelberg, E. P. 


1417 


Railway Exchange Building 


1904 


Dodd, John M. 


24 


Adams Street 


1904 



y 



Donderdale, G. 


1507 Fisher Building 


1906 


Downe, Edwin L. 


342 Franklin Street 


1906 


Dunning, N. Max 


I 5 1 6 First National Bank Building 


1895 


Dunham, Geo. F. 


3437 Michigan Avenue 


1 90 1 


Dwen, R. G. 


1 40 1 New York Life Building 


[906 


Edbrooke, H. W. J. 


3965 Drexel Boulevard 


1897 


Eliel, Roy 


4443 Ellis Avenue 


1896 


Fellows, William K. 


1733 Marquette Building 


[895 


Fischer, John B. 


7455 Parnell Avenue 


[895 


Fogel. R. W. 


2373 North Robey Street 


[902 


Flander^, John J. 


402-80 Dearborn Street 


[904 


Fleury, Albert 


3 1 1 8 Lake Park Avenu^ 


[904 


Garden, H. M. G. 


901 Teutonic Building 


[8,92 


Gaubert, L. 


6608 Monroe Avenue 


[904 


Gerber, Arthur U. 


Wilson Avenue Station 


[901 


V- 


North -Western Elevated R. R. Office 




Graham, E. ^R. 


141 7 Railway Exchange Building 


[<894 


Ciranger, Alfred H. 


806-184 La Salle Street 


1898 


Green, Herbert H. 


161 5 Ashland Block 


[905 


Hamel, T. S. 


805-305 Dearborn Street 


[906 


Haagen, Paul T. 


105 45th Street 


[902 


Haganey, Jas. A. 


201-2358 Indiana Avenue 


[905 


Hall, Oliver A. 


5 1 6 44th Court 


1905 


Hamilton, J. L. 


4720 Madison Avenue 


1903 


Harper, W. W/ 


Omaha, Nebraska 


[905 


Hatzfeld, Clarence 


999 West Eddy Street 


1895 


Hazelton, H. T. 


305 Dearborn Street 


[888 


Helder, C. Will 


2515 West Harrison Street 


[904 


Heun, Arthur 


8 1 Steinway Hall 


1889 


Hoeppner, E. A. 


1305-170 Broadway, New York, N. Y. 


1889 


Hoffman, Emil J. 


701-172 Washington Street 


905 


Holmes, N. H. 


806 La Salle Street 


1904 


Holsman, Henry K. 


633 Monadnock Block 


1897 


Hudson, Harry F. 


4618 Calumet Avenue 


1905 


Hunter, David C. 


372 Burling Street 


1902 


Hyland, Paul V. 


1030 Park Avenue 


900 


Jenkins, Harry D. 


19 Woodland Park ] 


1895 


Jensen, Elmer C. 


1 40 1 New York Life Building ] 


1890 


Jensen, Jens.'=''Vv 


1030 Augusta Street ] 


904 


Johnson, Jens. A. 


1 406 North Central Park Avenue ] 


1904 




Keiller, David looi 

Kelly, John H. '5609 

Knox, Arthur H. 804 

Kohfeldt, Walter J. 1417 

Lang, Louis A. 261 i 

Levings, Mark M. ^43° 

Lilleskau, John 303 

Linden, Frank L. 1 2 1 6 

Linke, John G. i loi 

Liska, Emil 1320 

Llewellyn, Joseph C. i 5 i 8 

Long, F. B. 161 8 

Maher, George W. 821- 

Mahler, H. H. 204 

Marsh, Harry L. 806- 

Martin, E. D. 701- 

Marvin, Chas. R. 161 8 

Millet, Louis J. 169- 

Miller, W. F. 4580 

Morse, Burton E. '245 

Mueller, Paul F. P. 823 

Mundie, Wm. B. 1401 

Nye, H. E. 1208 

Nagle, Callard P. 368 

Naper, Herbert J. 57 

Nelson, Edward O. 167 

Nimmons, George C. '733 

Ottenheimer, Henry L. i 34 

Prins, E. Paul 1303 

Parker, W^ltei^ H, ' 57^5 

Paschen, Jacob- 20- 
Pattison, Edward B. - 441 i 

Peterson, Martin 720 

Perkins, D. H. 720 

Poulsen, Edward J, 53 

Powers, Horace S. i 200 

Rapp, George L. 53 

Rawson, Lorin A. 

Reichert, Will 49 1 



Home Insurance Building 
Wabash Avenue 
Hinman Avenue, Evanston 
Railway Exchange Building 

North 41st Court 

Yale Avenue 

Haddon Avenue 

Michigan Avenue 

Steinway Hall 

West 1 6th Street 

First National Bank Building 

Monadnock Block 

218 La Salle Street 

Dearborn Street 
-184 La Salle Street 
-172 Washington Street 

Monadnock Block 
-171 East Adams Street 

Oakenwald Avenue 

Marquette Building 

Schiller Building 

New York Life Building 

Winona Avenue 
Carroll Avenue 
Delaware Place 
Winthrop Avenue 
Marquette Building 

Monroe Street 

Grace Street 
Monroe Avenue 
-70 La Salle Street 
Emerald Avenue 
Tribune Building 
Tribune Building 
Shakespeare Avenue 
Steinway Hall 

East 53 rd Street 
Hinsdale, Illinois 
Monroe Street , 



1904 
1899 
1905 
1905 

899 
1904 

895 

885 

1905 

1904 

895 

1903 

885 
[905 

'903 
1904 

1904 
895 

1905 
898 
885 
885 

1906 
904 

1902 
895 

1900 

1904 

[906 
1905 
[904 
1900 
1905 
888 
1 90 1 
[903 

1900 

897 

1905 



/? 



Rondel, Victor E. 


3356 Vernon Avenue 




1903 


Rouleau, Arthur 


510 West Polk Street 


( 


1895 


Ruge, P. H. 


440 North State Street 




1903 


Rusy, Anthony, F. 


626 South Avers Avenue 




1903 


Sandegren, Andrew 


926 First National Bank Building 


1904 


Schmidt, Richard E. 


172 Washington Street 




1888 


Seyfarth, Robert 


821-218 La Salle Street 




1904 


Shankland, R. M. 


1 1 06 Rookery Building 




1 904 


Shattuck, Walter F. 


900-218 La Salle Street 




1902 


Shaw, Howard V. D. 


613-175 Dearborn Street 




1895 


Silha, Otto A. 


720 Tribune Building 




1903 


Spencer, Robert C 


I 200 Steinvvay Hall 




1894 


Spindler, Oscar 


209 South Clinton Street 




1896 


Springer, Charles E. 


3819 Prairie Avenue 




1904 


Stanhope, L. E. 


6427 Greenwood Avenue 




1904 


Tallmadge, Thomas E. 


309 Ashland Block 




1900 


Taylor, V. F. 


1882 Evanston Avenue 




1903 


Tomlinson, Webster H. 


809-811 Steinway Hall 




1897 


Torrance, James R. 


205 La Salle Street 




1904 


Von Hoist, Herman 


1 1 1 8 Rookery Building 


'1 


1896 


Von Rosen, Chas. 


720 Tribune Building 




1906 


Wagner, E. J. 


I 2 1 6 Michigan Avenue 




1885 


Walker, Frank C. 


928 Fine Arts Building 




1904 


Waterman, Harry H. 


2 1 8 La Salle Street 


* 


1904 


Watson, Robert Bruce 


305 Dearborn Street 




1899 


Weber, P. J. 


702 Fisher Building 




1892 


White, Melville P. 


37th Street and Stewart 


Avenue 


1899 


Willatzen, A. C. P. 


620 Forest Avenue 




1904 


Williamson, Robert B, 


720 Tribune Building 




' 1885 


Williamson, Wm. G. 


1 1 24-1 53 La Salle Street 




1885 


Wilmanns, August C 


1 8 1 7 Arlington Place 




1895 


Wilson, Horatio R. 


2 1 8 La Salle Street 




1904 


Wilson, Joseph W. 


44 Seeley Avenue 




1905 


Winslow, Benj. E. 


161 8 Monadnock Block 




1903 


Wirt, Frederick B. 


1438 Wilson Avenue 




1903 


Wittekind, Henry 


6 1 1 Cable Building 




1897 


Woltersdorf, A. 


70 La Salle Street 




1894 


Woodyatt, Ernest 


161 5 Ashland Block 




1904 


York, John D. 


524 North Clark Street 




1904 


Zimmermann, A. G. 


205 La Salle Street 




1894 



"\ 



V 



Bjork, A. E. 
Brand, Gustave A. 

Holslag, Edward J. 

Maldaner, Arthur 

Wyman, A. D. 



Allied Members 

3297 Sawyer Aveiiue 
5 1 4 Steinway Hall 

85 Washington Street 

9 1 2 Rector Building 

1 7 East Van Buren Street 



1905 

1905 

1905 
1905 
1905 



Associate Members 



Ailing, Van Wagenen, 


1014 


Monadnock Block 




1900 


Appel, Henry L. 


3344 


Wabash Avenue 


, 


1 90 1 


Beckerleg,y E. L. 


1 1 19 


West Adams Street 




1904 


Beidlerp A. W. 


439 


Rookery Building 




1905 


Bonner, Chas. 




Chamber of Commerce 


Building 


1904 


Capron, E. F. 


4' 


Dearborn Street 




1905 


Chaddock, De ClifFord 


1227 


Benson Avenue 




1902 


Clarke, Chas. B. 


'54 


Lake Street 




1906 


Clifford,' D. F. 


»33P 


George Street 




1904 


Coffman, Geo. W. 


263 


La Salle Street 




1899 


Combs, Roger M. 


1 202 


Chamber of Commerce 


Building 


1895 


Crowe, J. G. 


602 


Chamber of Commerce 


Building 


1906 


Eiker, Chas. F. 


1515 


Marquette Building 




1904 


Ellis, H. W. 


154 


Lake Street 




1906 


Ewen, John M. 


1637 


Judson Avenue 




1892 


Falkenau, Victor 


108 


La Salle Street 




1904 


Fanning, Chas. G. 


73 


Hawthorne Street 




1906 


Freeman, Ernest 


1 12 


Dearborn Street 




1904 


Gates, Ellis D. 


602 


Chamber of Commerce 


Building 


1903 


Gates, William D. 


602 


Chamber of Commerce 


Building 


1895 


Grace, William 


1408 


Wabash Avenue 




1904 


Gray, George C. 


1202 


Chamber of Commerce 


Building 


1 90 1 


Greeley, M. L. 


822- 


-112 Clark Street 




1902 


Haigh, Arthur H. 


904 


Marquette Building 




, 1905 


Hart, W. B. 


370 


East 26th Street, 




1903 



y^ 



Kehm, August 


19 


North State Street 




1906 


Kimbell, E. C. 


* 301 


Chamber of Commerce 


Building 


1904 


Kimbell, M. M. 


301 


Chamber of Commerce 


Building 


1904 


Kimbell, S. S. 


304 


Chamber of Commerce 


Building 


1904 


Knisley, Harry C. 


273 


South Canal Street 




1895 


Lanquist, Andrew 


393 


North Clark Street 




1904 


Lau^ Willy H. 


503 


Pullman Building 




1902 


Lauer, Martin W. 


603 


Chamber of Commerce 


Building 


1904 


Marshall, Sylvester 


1 107 


Chamber of Commerce 


Building 


1903 


Matz, Hermann L. 


304 


Chamber of Commerce 


Building 


1895 


Moulding, Jos. W. 


1202 


Chamber of Commerce 


Building 


1903 


Noelle, Joseph B. 


1832 


Wabash Avenue 




I 90 1 


O'Connell, Thos. F. 


19 


Chamber of Commerce 


Building 


1904 


Pierce, E. F. 


100 


Washington Street 




1898 


Prosser, H. B, 


602 


Chamber of Commerce 


Building 


1895 


Ramsey, William R. 


6605 


Harvard Avenue 


t» 


1904 


Robinson, F. B. L. 


419 


Chamber of Commerce 


Building 


1904 


Rodatz, Jacob 


: 449 


Rookery Building 


r 


1904 


Schmidt, R. O. 


643 


South Jefferson Street 


•i 


1899 


Snyder, J. W. 


316- 


-145 La Salle Street 




1904 


Sollitt, Ralph T. 


. 1 100 


Hartford Building 


f 


1890 


Struble, Henry 


293 


East 40th Street 




1904 


Van Dort, G. Broes 


218 


La Salle Street 




1897 


Van Inwagen, James, Jr. 


1922 


Kenmore Avenue 


• 


1 90 1 


Wolfarth, Wm. 


215 


South Clinton Street 




1904 


Wood, John R. 


H'5 


Railway Exchange Building 


1904 


Wyles, Tom. R. 


1 1 22 


Monadnock Block 




1899 



Adelsberger, Roland 
Andrews, A. G. 

Browning, Alex 

Davis, Frank L. 
Downey, A. H. 



Non-Resident Members 

811 Michigan Avenue, South Bend, Indiana 1896 

1632 Frick Building, Pittsburg, Pennsylvania 1902 

680 Seneca Street, Buffalo, New York '903 

1707 Flat Iron Building, New York, N. Y. 1889 

Little Rock, Arkansas '9^3 



Gruenfeldi Casper 

Hammond, C. H. 
Herbeck, J. R. 
Heinz, G. P. 

Hemmings, E. Chas. 

Kable, C. H. 

Long, Birch B. 

Mattison, V. A. 

Phillips, John H. 
Polk, Willis 
Potts, Oliver J. 
Purcell, Wm. Gray 

Scofield, Hubert C. 

Weirick, Ralph W. 
Wells, Wm. A. 

Zimmerman, Hugo H. 



1 608 South Main Street, Los Angeles, Cal. 1 899 

Europe '904 

123 Theodore Street, Detroit, Michigan 1901 
522 Colorado Building, Denver, Colorado ^899 
424 Fifth Avenue, New York, N. Y. 1897 

665 Worcester Block, Portland, Oregon '904 

7 East 42nd Street, New York, N. Y. 1895 

La Salle, Illinois 1895 

7 East 42nd Street, New York, N. Y. 1^99 

124 Sansome Street, San Francisco, California 1902 
1317 Market Street, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 1903 

706 Ninth Avenue, Seattle, \^'ashington '903 

\J. S. Post Office Bldg., Laramie, Wyo. 1899 

424 Fifth Avenue, New York, N. Y. 1901 

Oklahoma City, Oklahoma * 1898 

Europe 1896 



Allen, John K. 

Blake, Theodore L. 

Clark, Robert 

Gay, Henry Lord 

Hunt, Frederick S. 

Jenney, W . L. B. 

Lawric, Harry 

McLean, Robert C. 
MuUer, Louis, Jr. 

Phimister, D. G. 

Sullivan, Louis H. 

Taft, Lorado 

Wagner, Fritz 



Honorary Members < 

64 North Jefferson Street i 

28 41st Street, New York, N. Y. 
2505 Kenmorc Avenue 
418—52 Dearborn Street 

1 40 1 New York Life Building 

Caxton Building, Omaha, Nebraska 

Minneapolis, Minnesota 
602—356 Dearborn Street 

539 Flourney Street 

Auditorium Tower 

Fiiie Arts Building 

141 5 Railway Exchange Building 



S 



* 

1885 

* 

1886 
1888 
1885 
1885 
1885 

1885 
1886 



* Date Unknown. 



A- 



EXHIBITORS 



ALSCHULER, ALFRED S. — 1507 Fisher Building. 

1 A city residence. 

2 Living room of a country residence. 

AMERICAN TERRA COTTA & CERAMIC CO.— 602 Chamber of 
Commerce Building. 

3 Exhibit of decorative terra cotta panels in colors. 

4 Decorative wall tiles in colors. 

5 Terra cotta statue for residence of Mrs. Dana, Springfield, Illinois. 

ARMSTRONG, WILLIAM T. L. — 239 West 123rd Street, New York. 

6 Along the Tiber, Rome, Italy. 

BEHR, E. THEODORE — 26 Van Buren Street. 

7 Cirill room decoration, 

BOARD OF EDUCATION — Chicago, Illinois. 

8 ( Wm. B. Mundie) English high and manual - training school building. 

9 ( Wm. B. Mundie) South division high -school building. 

10 (Wm. B. Mundie) McKinley high -school building. Front elevation. 

11 (D. H. Perkins) Sketch for Rosehill grammar-school building. 

12 (D. I^. Perkins), Proposed sketch for the Moos grammar-school building. 

13 (D. H.^ Perkins) Sketch of the Graeme Stewart grammar-school building. 

14 ( D. H. ^Perkins ) Sketch of the Lyman Trumbull manual -training school 

building. 

15 (D. H. Perkins) Proposed sketch for a 24 -room grammar-school building. 

16 (D. H. Perkins) Sketch for Washington grammar-school building. 

17 ( R. B. Williamson) Sketch of Englewood high -school building. 

18 ( R. B. Williamson) Graham grammar-school building. 

BOHNARD, WILLIAM A. — 226 Oliver Street, Cleveland, Ohio. 

19 Stable and garage for Mr. A. S. Ingalls, Glenville, Ohio. 

20 Summer cottage of Mrs. Daniel Marshall at Noble Beach, Ohio. 
2 I Residence of Mr. Chas. Ricks, Glenville, Ohio. 

BRUST & PHILIPP— 201 Camp Building, Milwaukee, Wisconsin. 

22 House for Dr. Hatch. V^iew from the Rock river. 

23 Entrance. 

24 Front. 

25 Stair hall. 



- |f I Y»11 ■,'^* ' "^^^f*" '•■flrt^ r 



■"-«f5' 



BROWN, FRANK CHOUTEAU — 9 Park Street, Boston, Mass. 

26 Back bay house, Boston. - 

27 A stage setting for "She Stoops to Conquer." Interior of "The 

Three "Jolly Pigeons." 

28 House at Wollaston for John Buchanan. Street front. 

29 Garden front. 

30 Hallway. ''' 

BUCK, LAWRENCE - 909 Steinway Hall. 

3 1 to 49 Sketches for Residences. 

BUDD, K. C. — Bible House, New York. 

50 Country house. 

CAPARN, H. A. — 156 5th Avenue, New York. 

5 1 Small garden at Schuylerville, New York. 

CHICAGO ORNAMENTAL IRON CO. — 37th Street and Stewart Ave. 

52 Bronze panel in elevator enclosurers, First National Bank building. 

CHICAGO SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE— Art Institute. 

53 ( E. F. Gillette) A country church — Elevation and perspective. 

54 Plans and sections. 

5 5 An 8 - room schoolhouse. 

(J. Carroll Johnson) Prize drawing in a ^25 prize competition. 

56 A dining-room lamp. 

Prize drawing in $250 home traveling scholarship competition — A 
country estate. 

57 Perspective. 

58 General plan. 

59 Plan of house and studio, 

60 Elevations and sections. 

6 1 Detail. 

62 (Saniuel Qreenbaum) Doric rendering. (First year work.) 

63 (Arthur Buckett ) Doric rendering. (First year work.) 

64 ( Robert Ostergren ) An automobile garage. 



COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY — School of Architecture. 

65 (A. S. MacDonald, A. L. Loveless, J. F. Steffens ) Ceiling and end of 

an important room. ( Fourth year sketch. ) 

66 (E. J. Stork, J. H. Klenke, J. W. Stinson, M. Mayer) Studies in style. 

Designs for a Romanesque doorway. 

67 (Theodore M. Jones) A public school. Plans and elevations. (Fourth 

year design. ) 
68^, (Lucian E. Smith) Decoration of a public square. (18 -hour sketch.) 
McKim fellowship competition. 



•\v 



McKim fellowship competition. A central library on an irregular lot. 

69 Elevation. * / 

70 Plan. . .■ 

COLLEGE OF ARCHITECTURE — Cornell University. 

71 (Jules Andre Smith) A horticultural museum. Elevation. 

72 Plans. 

73 (Ralph Elliott Abell) A monastery plan. 

74 (Charles Sherman Cobb) A state dining room. Sections. 

75 Residence for an Ambassador. Elevation. 

76 Plan. 

77 (Robert North) Residence for an Ambassador. Elevation. 

78 Plan. 

79 Concert hall in park. Elevation. 

80 Plan. ^ 

81 Gargovle club fireplace. Elevation. 

CRET, PAUL P. — 3904 Locust Street, Philadelphia, Penn. '■ 

82 Museum of Art and Archaeology. Improvements for the city of Lyons. 

Survey and perspective sketches 

83 Plan and elevation. 

84 A railway. 

DREXEL INSTITUTE— School of Architecture, Philadelphia. 

85 (Andrew H. Maclntire) A facade for San Michele. 

86 (Thomas B. Herman) A town church. Elevations. 

87 Plan. 

D'ASCENZO STUDIOS, THE— 1608 Ludlow Street, Philadelphia, Penn. 

88 Design for window in Philadelphia Northeast manual -training school. 

89 Cartoon for music -room window. 

90 Decorative panel. "In the garden." 

91 Study of nude for the figure of "Wisdom" for the Camden County 

Court House, Camden, New Jersey. 

92 Painted cartoon for bath-room window. "The mermaid." 

93 Cartoon for "Madonna" for the Church of the Incarnation, Philadelphia. 



ELLIOTT, HUGER — 3903 Sansom Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 

94 Salamanca, Spain. j 

95 In the Temple. ^ 

EPPINGHOUSEN, CHARLES F.— 326 South Willow Avenue, Austin, Illinois. 

96 Pen-and-ink sketch. 

EYRE, WILSON — New York. 

97 House for Mr. Harleston Deacon, Tuxedo, New York. 



98 House for Mr. J. G. Butler, Youngstown, Oh 



10. 



L 



ft^fc^^-- p^n V . ','" {«^' -5 , ' - • 



FECHHEIMER, A. LINCOLN-^ 1 61 5 Ashland Block. 

.99 Decoration of end wall of an art-room in a public library. 

100 Ecole des Beaux Arts. Diplome. An American Bank. 

1 01 Diplome Thesis. An American Bank. Front Elevation. 

102 First-class project. Decoration of a Court of Common Pleads. 

103 Second-class archaeology. Assyrian lion, Louvre Museum. 

FOGEL, R. W.— Railwav Exchange. 

104 Old dutch windmill near Kolze, Illinois. , ■ 

FROST & GRANGER — 184 La Salle Street. 

105 Perspective of Lake Forest College. 

106 A group of houses at Rbckford, Illinois. 

107 Proposed scheme for development of Lake Forest College. 

108 Proposed residence for Mr. W. A. Mearns, Washington, 1). C. 

109 Sketch for proposed hause in Lake Forest. 
I I o Group of railroad stations. 

I I I Study of corner tower. 

GARDEN,' HUGH M. G. — 172 Washington Street.. 

112 A block of stores in a countrv town. 

GATES POTTERIES — 602 Chamber of Commerce Building. 

113 Exhibit of Teco Pottery. "(iates" Frogs. 

114 Exhibit of Teco Pottery. ^ 

CiREEN, HERBERT H.— 3502 Lake Avenue. , Successful competitive design, 
sixth annual traveling scholarship. 
Competition No. i. An Episcopal Church. -> 



««5 


Perspective. 


116 


Front elevation. 


117 


Side elevation. 


118 


Section. 


119 


Plan. 




Competition No. 2. 


I 20 


Water elevation. 


I 21 


Park elevation. 


I 22 


Plan and section. 




Competition No. 3 


•23 


Perspective. 


124 


Section. 


125 


Plan. 



A vacht club-house for (Jrant Park. 



A recreation pier tor a public park. 



HAAGEN, PAUL T.— 105 45th Street. 

Sixth annual traveling scholarship. Competition No. F. Episcopal church. 

1 26 Perspective. 

127 Side elevation. 

128 Front elevation. 

1 29 Section. 

1 30 Plan. 



-f 



Competition No. 2. A yacht club-house for Grant Park. 

131 Water elevation. 

132 Park elevation. , ■ • ' 

I -J t Section. '' , . 

1 34 Plan. I ■ 

I, • ' ■ 

HARVEY, ELI — 80 Washington Square, East— New York. 

135 Photo lion house. New York Zoological Park. 

HAWES & DODD— 24 Adams Street. 

136 Cierman Faience. Mantel facing. 

137 Tile mantel facings. 

138 Mosaic mantel facings. 

t 

HOWE, LOIS L. — 717 Tremont Building, Boston, Mass. 

139 Sketches for farmhouses. 

140 House of Mrs. A. A. Burrage, Brookline, Mass. 

1 4 1 Sketch for living room at Concord, Mass. 

142 Remodeled exterior. Cambridge, Mass. 

HULLA, John— 84 La Salle Street. 

143 Sketch for a house for H. F. Wetter, Rogers Park.^ 

144 A group of Kenilworth houses. 

UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS — Urbana, Illinois." 

145 (Geo. Ausumb) Interior decoration, a dining room and living room. 

146 (Geo. Ausumb, H. F. Robinson) Facade of art museum. 

147 (John W. Case) Library. V^enice. 

148 (Alice Clarke) Thesis elevation. Residence for a suburban estate. 
, 149 Thesis plan. Residence for a suburban estate, 

150 (S. J. Fountain) Thesis elevation. 

1 5 I Thesis plan. 

152 (J. E. Henry. M. W., Schober) Facade of art museum. 

153 (F"red Schott, Jr. ) Thesis elevation. A temple for Zion Citv. 
1 54 Thesis plan. A te'mple for Zion City. 

I 55 Thesis section. A temple for Zion Citv. 

JONES, HARRY VV.— Lumber Exchange, Minneapolis, Minn. 

156 Residence for F. W. Clifford. 

157 Sketch of residence, Minneapolis. 

KABLE, C. H. — 665 Worcester Block, Portland, Oregon. 

Sixth annual traveling scholarship. Competition No. i . Episcopal church. 

158 Perspective. 

I 59 Front elevation and section. 

160 Side Elevation. 

161 Plan. j . 



KEES & COLBURN — 603 Kasota Building, Minneapolis, Minn. 

162 Chamber of Commerce Building, Minneapolis. 

163 Advance Thresher Warehouse, Minneapolis. 

1 64 Tribune Building, Minneapolis. ' :^ 

KNOX, ARTHUR H. — 804 Hinman Avenue, Evanston, Illinois. 
Sixth iannual traveling scholarship. Competition No. i . 
Episcopal church. 

65 Perspectiv^e. 

66 Front elevation. - 

67 Side elevation. 

68 Section looking toward altar. "«' 

69 Ground plan. 
Competition Np. 2. A yacht club-house for ijrant Park. 
Elevation from the park. 



70 

71 

72 

73 
74 
75 

76 

77 
78 

79 
80 



Elevation from the lake 
Section. 

Ground floor plan. 
Second floor plan. 
Third floor plan. 

Competition No. 3. A recreation pier 
Perspective. 
Side elevation. 
Longitudinal section. 
Plan. 

Design for fireplace in Faience 
tion "B.'\ 



'Mention" Brickbuilder Compcti- 



LADIES HOME JOURNAL, THE— 425 Arch Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 

181 A rough-cast house for a corner lot. 

Interior. 

Plans. 

A stucco country house. 

Interior. 

Plans. 

A country house on a small place. Perspective. 

Interiors. ^ 

Plans. 

A small suburban house. Perspective. 

Interiors. 

Plans. 
193-194 A Gambrel-roof house. Perspectives. 
195—196 Plans. 
197-198 A country house and a garden. Perspectives. 

199 Plans. 

LATENSER, JOHN — 630 Bee Building, Omaha, Neb. 

200 First wing of the new Omaha high school. 



182 

•83 
184 
185 
1^6 
187 
188 
189 
190 
191 
192 



c 



LAUBER, JOSEPH— 51 West loth Street, New York, N. Y. 

201 Color sketch for window in church. **Hope." 

20 2 Sketch for window in St. Andrew's, New York. "St. Agnes." ' 

203 Sketch for window in residence, Montclair, N. J. 

LEVINGS, MARK M.— 175 Dearborn Street. 

204 Chapel — Inns of Court, London. 

205 King's School, Canterbury. 

206 Waterloo bridge, London. 

LIBRARY BUREAU — 156 Wabash Avenue. 

207 Mahogany low roll-top desk. 

208 Mahogany desk chair. 

209 Mahogany Unit book-case. 

LITTLE & BROWN — 70 Kilby Street, Boston, Mass. 

210 Residence of Capt. Larz Anderson, Washington, D, C. Entrance hall. 

211 Elevation. Garden front. . ti; 
2 1 2 Great hall. 

2 I 3 Elevation from Massachusetts Avenue. 

214 Down Town Club, New York City. Dining-room. 

215 Vestibule of house, 332 Beacon Street, Boston. 

LORD & HEWLETT— 16 East 23rd Street, New York, N. Y. 

216 Proposed new wing of the Westchester County Court House, White Plains, 

N. Y. 

217 St. Jude's Church, Blythebourne, Brooklyn, N. Y. Exterior. 

2 1 8 Interior, . "■ ■ • 

MACAULEY, ELLEN— Jamestown, R. I. 
- . 219 The Three Fates. 

MACHADO, ERNEST M. A. — 9 Cornhill, Boston, Mass. 

220 Ottkvva Golf and Country Club, Ottawa, Canada. 

221-222 House of lames H. Proctor, Hamilton, Mass. . . 

223 Stable of James H. Proctor. 

MAHER, GEORGE W. — 218 La Salle Street. 

224 Residence of Mr. C. R. Erwin at Oak Park, 111. 

225 Residence of Mr. Francis Lackner at Kenilworth, 111. 
2^6 Residence of Mr. E. B. Blinn at Pasadena, Cal.j 

MASSACHUSETTS INSTITUTE TECHNOLOGY — Boston, Mass. 

227 (F. L. W. Richardson) Design for a City Hall. 

228 (A. J. Scholtes) A cathedral. 

229 (L. Luquer) A cathedral. 

230 (M. H. Goldstein) A cathedral. 

231 (E. C. Lebenbaum) Detail of a club house. 



\ 



^X^-^'/t^Sh" -^ ^•* f^ 



i 

MATTESON, VICTOR ANDRE — La Salle, Illinois. 

232 Detail of country house. Estate at Deer Park, 111. 

.233 Stable of estate at Deer Park, 111. 

234 La Salle Public Library, La Salle, 111. \ 

235 Boat House, Deer Park, 111. ^ 

MORRIS, BENJAMIN W., JR. — 5 West 31st Street, New York, N. Y. 

236 Competitive design for McCosh Hall, Princeton, N. J. East elevation. 

237 South elevation. 

NIMMONS & FELLOWS— 1733 Marquette Building. 

238-239-240 Photos of buildings for S. R. & Co., Chicago. 

241 Terra cotta ornament around doors Administration building. 

242 Ornamental iron and bronze in Administration building. 

243 Plaster ornament in vestibule Administration building. 

244 Faience frieze Adrninistration building. 

OTTENHEIMER, H. L. — Fort Dearborn Building. 

245 Home for Jewish Friendless, Chicago. 

246 Extension to Haymarket Square, Chicago. 

247 Apartment building, Chicago. 

OTIS, W. A.— 175 Dearborn Street. 

248 Study for group of Church buildings. 

PACKARD, FRANK L. — Columbus, Ohio. 

249 Dutch room in the Ohio Club, Columbus. , 

250 Tap room. 

'\2 5i Water - color .^ sketch of lounging room. 

252 Water -color perspective of residence of S. Casparis, Columbus. 

253 Living-room in residence of J. H. Roys, Columbus. 

254 Lounging - room in the Columbus Country Club, Columbus. 

255 Superintendent's residence at Massillon State Hospital, Massillon. 

256 Exterior. — Charles H. Lindenberg's residence, Columbus. 

PARKER, WALTER— 5725 Monroe Avenue. 

Second place sixth annual traveling scholarship competition. 

Episcopal Church. 





Competition No 


257 


Perspective. 


258 


Front elevation. 


259 


Side elevation. 


260 


Section. 


261 


Plan. 




Competition No 


262 


Water elevation. 


263 


Park elevation. 


264 


Section. 


265 


Plan. 



2. A yacht club-house for Grant Park. 



i ' 



Competition No. 3. Recreation pier. 

266 Perspective. " 

267 Elevation. ' 

268 Section. 

269 Botanical museum. ' . 

PARIS, WM. FRANCKLYN— 26 West 35th Street, New York, N. Y. 

270 Library table. 

PATTON & MILLER— 140 Dearborn Street. 

271 Girls' Dormitory, Heidelberg University, Tiffin, Ohio. 

272 Library building, Indiana University, Bloomington, Ind. 

UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA — School of Architecture. 

273 (J' S. Warner) A memorial chapel for a university.' Front elevation. 

274 Side elevation. 

275 Section. 

276 Plan. 

277 The central part of a library. Front. 

PHILLIPS, CHARLES A 161 5 Ashland Block. 

278 Sepia sketch of St. Germain des Pres, Paris. 

279 Sketches. 

PHILLIPS, ROGERS & WOODYATT— 1615 Ashland Block. 

280 Photographs of a residence near Pittsburg, Pa. "^ 

POSTLE & MAHLER— 1732 Marquette Building. ' 

281 Broadway elevation of Miami County Court House, Peru, Ind. 

PURCELL, WM. GRAY— 319 North Kenilvyorth Avenue, Oak Park, Illinois. 

282 A college dormitory. 

283 A metropolitan riding club. 

284 Bank and office building for a small western city. 

PUTNAM & COX — 6 Hancock Avenue, Boston, Mass. 

I- 

285 A manufacturing plant. Providence, R. I. 

RAND & SKINNER, PUTNAM & COX— 6 Hancock Avenue, Boston, Mass. 

286 Assembly hall. Smith college, Northamton, Mass. Perspective. 

287 Floor plan. 

ROGERS & M ANSON, "The Brickbuilder" Competition for an Office Building. 
Boston, Mass. 

(Raymond M. Hood — Paris, France) First prize design. 

288 Elevation. 

289 Scale details and plans. 



■1 ■ - 



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' ( William C. Hazlett, New York, N. Y. ) Second prize design. 

290 Elevation. , 

291 Scale details and plans. 

( Claude F. Bratigdon, Rochester, N. Y. ) Third prize design. 

292 Elevation. 

293 Scale details and plans. 

ROGERS, JA^. GAMBLE AND CHARLES A. PHILLIPS— 161 5 Ashland 
Block. 

294 The Evanston Free Public Library. Front elevation. 

ROTH, FRED'K G. R.— 27 Cottage Place, White Plains, N. Y. 

295 "Polar Bear" for Ceramics. 

SANDEGREN, ANDREW— First National Bank Building. 

296 Washington Park Hospital. 

297 The "Alvah Terrace" apartment building, Drexel Boul., Chicago. 

SCHMIDT, RICHARD E. AND H. M. (i. (iARDEN.— 172 - Washington 
Street. 

298 The Michael Reese Hospital, Chicago. 

299 Main entrance to Hospital. 

300 Study for residence at Lake Geneva. 

301 Study for a high mercantile building. 

302 Stock exposition buildings, Illinois State Fair Cirounds, Springfield, Illinois. 

SCHUCHARDT, WM. H.— 716 Goldsmith Building, Milwaukee, Wis. 

303 Palais de Fontainbleau. 

304 Carrera de Darro. Granada, Spain. ' • 

305 Chateau d'Amboise. 

SCOTT & CO., JOHN — 518 Moffat Building, Detroit, Michigan. 

306 Residence for Frank Ci. Allen, Moline, Illinois. 

SHEPLEY, RUTAN & COOLIDCJE — 1 780 Old Colony Building. 

307 Memorial library group for the University of Chicago. 

308 The Bartlett gymnasium, University of Chicago. ^., 

309 The Law' School, University of Chicago. Exterior. 

310 Interiors. 

311 Assembly hall, commons club-house and tower group, l^niversity ot 

Chicago. Exterior. 
3 1 2 Group of interior and exterior detail of the assembly hall. 

3 1 3 Borland Office Building, Chicago. . 

314 Ryerson Public Library, Grand Rapids, Mich. 

SHAW, HOWARD VAN DOREN — 175 Dearborn Street. 
3 1 5 Mentor building. Monroe and State Streets, Chicago. 



. 1 



SHURTLEFF, ARTHUR A. — 22 Congress Street, Boston, Mass. 

3 1 6 Sketch of a small garden in Brookline, Mass. , 

SIMPSON, HORACE G.— 6 Hancock Avenue, Boston, Mass. 

1 

317 Proposed theater, offices and restaurant. 

318 A subway entrance. ..- 

SKINNER, THEODORE H.— 6 Hancock Avenue, Boston, Mass. 

^19 Studies of buildings and sites for the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 
Boston, Mass. 

STANHOPE, L. E. — 184 La Salle Street. 

320 Residence of Hamilton Brown, Geneva, Illinois. 

3 2 I Apartment building. Photos of exterior and interior. 

STOREY FURNITURE CO. — 293 Wabash Avenue. 
322 Exhibition of "mission" furniture. 

TALLMADGE & WATSON — 309 Ashland Block. 

! 323 House of V. S. Watson, Oak Park, Illinois. 

324 Small house for Quinlan & Tyson, Evanston, Illinois. 

325 Elevation of Mount Vernon Seminary, Washington, D. C. 

326 An apartment house. 

TURNER, C. Y.— 130 Carnegie Hall, New York, N. Y. ~V 

327 Original study. Mural painting, ''The burning of the Peggy Stewart at 

Annapolis, Md., October, 1774." Baltimore Court House, Baltimore, 
Md. 

328 Drawing for mural painting, "The burning of the Peggy Stewart." 

329 Study in color, "The burning of the Peggy Stew^art." 

330 Original color-sketch for mural painting for the Manhattan hotel. New York. 

331 Original sketch for mural painting, "Barter with Indians for Land in 

Southern Maryland, 1634." Baltimore Court House. 
T,j^z Study in color, "for Barter with Indians." 

333 The progress of man. 

NORTHWESTERN TERRA COTTA CO., THE — 1000 Clybourn Avenue. 

334 A Terra Cotta exhibit. 

VON HOLST, H._643 Rookery Building. 

335 (irace memorial chapel, Chicago. Exterior. 

336 Interior. 

WEARY, ALLEN M.— 1417 Railway Exchange. 

337 Sketch. 

338 Sketch. • '.] 

339 Sketch. 

340 Sketch. 



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WELLS, NEWTON A. — University of Illinois. 

341 Series of preliminary sketches from Homer's Iliad. Decorations fcr a 

library. 

WILLET STAINED GLASS CO., THE— 723 Liberty Ave., Pittsburg, Pa. 

342 The marriage of Isaac and Rebecca. Hebrew Temple, St. Paul, Minn. 

343 Prophecies fulfilled. Study of a window in the Cathedral, Amiens. 
344, St. Francis d'Assisi. New St. Paul's Cathedral, Pittsburg, Pa. 

345 Baptism of Jesus. New St. Paul's Cathedral, Pittsburg, Pa. 

WILSON, JOSEPH W._ 44 Seeley Avenue. 

Third place sixth annual traveling scholarship competition. 
Competition No. i. Episcopal Church. 

346 Perspective. 

347 Front elevation and section. 

348 Side elevation. 

349 Plan. 

Competition No. 2. A Yacht Club - House for Grant Park. 

350 East elevation. 

351 West elevation. - ' 

352 First floor plan. 

353 Second floor plan and section. 
Competition No. 3. Recreation pier. 

354 Perspectve. 

355 Elevation and section. 

356 Plan, 

357 Sketch. 

WING & MAHURIN — Fort Wayne, Indiana. 

358 Residence, p. B. Ball, Muricie, Ind. 

WINSLOW, BENJAMIN E.— 5411 Ridgewood Court. 

359 A study in light and shadows. 

YORK, JOHN DEVEREUX — Atelier, 522 North Clark Street. 

360 Gate of Nikko, Nikko, Japan. 

LAU, WILLY H Pullman Building. 

361 Exhibit of bronze electroliers in L'Art Noveau. 

HAMMOND, CHAS. HERRICK— 4627 Greenwood Avenue. 
Fifth holder Chicago Architectural Club scholarship. 

362 to 378 European sketches. 



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of the Chicago Architectural Glub. By Walter Parker 

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A. Lincoln Ffxhhf.imer, Chicago 




A Rksidenck at Kkmlworth, Illinois 

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"Till- H\iiiiin_L; "t till- l'cL'i.'\ Sti-w.irt .it .A iui.ip(iri>, M.iia l.iiul, Oi, tolifr, l"~4"" 

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Hkni, Wis 1 ah Mkhkis, Air hilcct. New V"rk 






Catalogue 
of the t^ven 
tieth annual 
exhibition of 
the chicago 
ar c hit e c 
tural club 



^a^ 



HELD IN THE GALLERIES OF 
THE ART INSTITUTE, MICH 
IGAN AVE AND ADAMS ST 
IN THE MONTH OF APRIL, 1907 



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Fkki) H. Wikt, Chicat'o 
European Skctcli 




Chicago Architectural Club Officers 



1 906- 1 907 



Alfred S. Alschuler, . 
J. L. Hamilton, 

Chairman Scliolarsliip Committee 

Chas. H. Hammond, 

Chairman Exhibition Committee 

Walter G. Koheeldt, 

Chairman Membership Committee 

Chas. E. Brush, . 

Chairman Finance Committee 

Edward J. Pol'lsen, 

Chairman House Committee 

Vernon S. Watson, 

chairman Educational Committee 



President 
First Vice-President 

Second Vice-President 

Secretar}^ 

Treasurer 

Member Executive Committee 

Member Executive Committee 



EXHIBITION COMMITTEE 
Chas. H. Hammond, ...... 



Chairman 



FINANCE COMMITTEE 
Otto A. Silha 

EDITOR OF CATALOGUE 

Hugo H. Zt.nlmernlann 

HANGING COMMITTEE 

E. C Lowe Wai,ter F. Shattuck 

Paul T. Haa(;en R. C. Spencer, Jr. 

ThOS. E. TALL^L•\D(;E 



Chicago 

Irvino K. Pond 
Alfred H. Granger 
Howard V. D. Shaw 



JURY OF ADMISSION 

B<1STON 

Clarence H. Blackall 
Ralph Adams Cram 
L. C. Newhall 
R. Cltrston Sturgis 
C. D. Ma(;innis 

Np:\v York 

Birch B. Lonc; 
John H. Phillips 




The following is a list of patrons who have gener- 
ously subscribed toward the Expense 
Fund of this Exhibition 



Davis Construction Company 

G. W. Verity 

Pratt & Lambert 

Chicago Edison Company 

H. R. Wilson 

George R. Dean 

J. C. Llewellyn 

Wm. Mavor Company 

Arthur \\'oltersdorf 

Union Foundry Works 

Samuel Treat 

Wm. H. Jackson & Company 

A. S. Alschuler 

Herman L. Matz 

F. P. Nelson & Son 

Jcnney, Mundie & Jensen 

Detroit Graphite Manufacturing Com- 
pany 

E, Baggot Company 

U. S. Blue Print Paper Company 

J. L. Hamilton 

Hawes & Dodd 

Irving K. Pond 

Northwestern Expanded Metal Com- 
pany 

Louis PL Sullivan 

P. Nacey Company 

L. H. Prentice Company 

W. M. Crilley Company 

Franklin MacVeagh & Company 

The Powers Regulator Company 



McXulty Brothers 

C. V. Gunthcr 

Vierling, McDowell & Company 

Chicago Ornamental Iron Company 

Morava Construction Company 

Willy PL Lau 

E. P. Slrandberg Company 

The Northwestern Terra Cotta Com- 
pany 

Holabird & Roche 

D. H. Rurnham 
Charles L. Hutchinson 

The Bedford Quarries C<jmpany 

Rudolph S. Blome Company 

Martin A. Ryerson 

John M. Ewcn 

Thompson-Starrett Company 

Otis Elevator Company 

Heime & Company 

Pittsburg Plate Glass Company 

Jarvis Hunt 

P. & F. Corbin 

The Yale & Towne Manufacturing Com- 
pany 

Lanquist & Illsley 

The American Terra Cotta & Ceramic 
Company 

Chicago Hydraul'c Press Brick Com- 
pany 

S. S. Kimbell Brick Company 

R. & S. Sollitt 



Tiffany Enameled Brick Company 

American Bridge Company 

Wells Brothers 

Bullcy & Andrews 

Johnson Service Company 

INIunroe & Southworth 

Nimmons & Fellows 

Jacob Rodatz 

Thomas Mouldinj^ Company 

Lu (low ici- Celadon Company 

Spencer & Powers 

v.. V. Johnson 

Postle &' Mahler 

American l^ngineering Specialty Com- 
pany 

Tohe}' Furniture C<)m])any 

John 1). ^'ork 

Orr & Fockctt Hardware Company 

Crofoot, Nielsen 61; Company 

Linden Class Company 

llarry C. Kneislcy 

F,ugene Diet/gen 

Richard F. Schmidt 

Trussed Concrete Steel Conii)any 



Furst & Fanning 

Kehn Brothers Company 

Samuel Cabot 

D. H. Perkins 

Oliver Sollitt 

Chicago Varnish Company 

The Decorators' Supply Company 

James A. Miller & Brothers 

C. luerett Clark Company 

The Roebling Cfinstruction Company 

H. L. Ottenheimer 

The Winslow Brothers Company 

Howard Shaw 

P. J. Weber 

Library Bureau 

IF \'on Hoist 

F. P. Smith 

R. M. Combs 

Chas. H. Prindeville 

Wm. Carbys Zimmerman 

A. H. Abbott Company 

Sykes Steel Roofing Company 

Andrews & Johnson Company 

Barnes-Crosby Company 



Prize for Se\'knth Annual Travelino 

Scholarship Donated hy 

Mr. E. G. Elcock 



On the Threshold of the Exhibition 




|N these days of restless energy, we are apt to 
become too much engrossed in our own individual 
affairs. Concentrated energy is a wonderfully fine 
thing if it keeps in touch with all the agencies working 
about it and is influenced by them. And he whose 
task it is to design the shelters for his fellow-men above 
all should be on the alert, feehng, as it were, constantly 
the pulse of his patients, and determining to the best of 
his ability the architectural diet and medicines best suited 
to his clients' condition. A thousand puzzling questions 
arise in the treatment of each case, and no two cases are 
alike. How often do we of the architectural profession fail 
to realize that we can be a tremendous factor in shaping the 
lives of those for whom we build. The form and color we 
give to our structures may be instrumental in awakening the 
beholder's interest, or leaving him indifferent, in stimulating 
him to energy or inviting him to rest. The opportunities 
and possibiHties for doing the right or the wrong thing are 
without Kmit. 

We must feel the drift and tendencies of our times; 
helping them along if they be good, diverting them from 
the dangerous path if they be bad. Architects must be 
leaders, but should not forget that at the same time they 
are more or less servants to the wants and tastes of the 
public. 

Once a year we have the opportunity to see how our 
fellow-workers have solved the many problems confronting 
them. There are not only photographs, but also the first 



sketches showing the original conception. We see the 
different ways in which each individual studied the problem. 
We are apt to overlook the splendid opportunities such an 
exhibition offers us for advancement, and for bringing us 
into closer touch with our fellow-workers. 

In visiting an exhibition it is natural to compare and 
criticise. But of what nature should this criticism be? A 
celebrated French painter said the best way to study a work 
of art was to look for its meaning, for the underlying idea/ 
and for its good points first of all; the bad points would 
reveal themselves without being searched for. If this spirit 
guides us, our enjoyment will be keen, and the profit to 
ourselves great; it will give us new ideas and new courage 
for our daily tasks. 

Let us enter the doors in a spirit of good fellowship 
and friendliness, and may the general public, too, be sym- 
pathetic, genecous, and charitable, then in truth will it be 
a success, this our Twentieth Annual Exhibition. 

H. V. VON HOLST. 





The Presidio 



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Telegraph Hill 

Sketches for the Improvement of San Francisco 

D. H. BuRNHAM & Co., Architects, ChicaRO 




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H. K. Wii.SDN, Architect, Chica^;o 




La Maquise Apartment Building 
H. R. Wilson. Architect, Chicago 




Central Bay of a Library 
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FOR A Bank Building 

Geo. Light, New York 




Title Guarantee & Trust, 176 Broadway, New York 
Kked & Stem, Architects, New York 




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Sketch of House for Mr. W. T. Lovell, Oak Park, III. 
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Accepted Dksign for the St. Louis Artists 
Guild Cluk House 

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American School of Correspondence, Chicago 
Pond & Pond, Architects, Chicago 





Residenxe of Mr. Emil Rudolph, Highland Park, III. 

Geo. W. Maher. Architect. Chicaco 



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Detail Tower, Nave and (}ate Posts 

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Residence vok Dr. Grafton Mcnkok 

Frank CnotTKAr Hkows, Architect, Hdstoii 








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CoMPKTrnoN FOR Union TnKoi.ociirAi. Seminary, Nkw York 
Cass Crii.nKKT, Architect, New York 




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Rksidenck for Mr. Robt. C. Gillis, Los Ancikles 
Mykon Hi'NT AND K L M K K GuKY, Architects, Los Angeles 




House for H. M. Gorham, Santa Monica 
Myron Hlnt ani5 Elmkk Gkky, Architects, Los Angeles 




HorsE AMI (iAKPKN I'di.; Di^ i'i\\ Co(HKAN, F.os An(.ki.p:s 

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Alpha Dklta I'm Hoish, Cokneli. Univekshy 

Dkan \- Dkan. Architects, Chicairn 



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MvKoN Hint and Elmkk Gkky 




Main Entrance to Bi'ilding of E. & K. Laundry Co., 

Cambridge 
C. Hkkhkkt McCi.ake, Architect, Cambridge, Mass. 









Living Room and Central Cox-rt in Residence of Mr. Loris 

C. Tiffany, Cold Spring Harbox:r, L. I., New York 

Lons C. TifFANY, New York 





Two Interior Views in Residence of Mr. Harry Rubhns, 

Glencoe, III. 

Gv.n, W. Maher, Architect. Chicago 




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List of Exhibits 



ART SHOP — 338 Wabash Avenue, Chicago. E. P. Rosenthal, Manager; Jessie 
Arms, DeHneator. 

1 Decorative frieze. 

2 Note for a decoration. 

3 Santa Barbara Mission. MoonHght. 

4 Landscape decoration. 

5 Decoration. 

6 Capistrano Mission. 

ASH, PERCY— 729 15th Street, Washington, D. C. 

7 Stable for R. White Steel, Esq.. Bryn Mawr, Pa. 

8 Residence for R. White Steel, Esq., Bryn Mawr, Pa. 

D'ASCENZO, NICOLA— 1608 Ludlow Street, Philadelphia. 

9 "Knowledge." ]\Iural decoration, Camden County Court House. 

10 Preliminary sketch for Madonna and Child, Church of the Incarnation, 

Philadelphia. 

1 1 Preliminary sketch for a window, Overbrook Presbyterian Church, Over- 

brook, Pa. 

12 

13 Water Nymph. 

14 Cartoon for mural decoration of Indianapolis Court House, Indianapolis, 

Ind. 

15 Cartoon for mural decoration of Indianapolis Court House, Indianapolis, 

Ind. 

16 Cartoon for window in St. John's Church, Cynwyd, Pa. 

17 Cartoon for window in St. John's Church, Cynwyd, Pa. 

ARCHITECTURAL DECORATING 00.-643-64^ So. Jefferson Street, Chicago. 

18 Corinthian cap. Portland cement. 

19 Hermes, casted in Portland cement. 

20 Panel, "Cupids Carrying Fruit," in plaster. 

BEATT^' &• STONE— 55 Broadway, New York. 

21 "Lancecote." Peapack, New Jersey. 

22 Dining Room in house for A. C. Beatty, Esq., 73d Street, New York. 

23 House for A. Chester Beatty, Esq.. 16 East 73d Street, New York. 

24 New east wing at Lithgow, New York. 

Bl'CK. LAWRENCE^)09 Ste'nway Hall. Chicago. 

25 Water color sketches — Residences. 

BOTTOMLEY, W. LAWRENCE— 254 W. I32d Street, New York. 

26 Crypt of San Erancesco. At Assisi. 

27 From the south aisle of Chartres Cathedral. 

28 Church of San Domenico, Siena. 

29 Chapel in S. M. Sopra Minerva, Rome. 



BOURNE. FRANK A.— 70 Kilby Street, Boston, Mass. 

30 St. Luke's Church (Episcopal), Chelsea, Mass. Photographs. 

31 St. Luke's Church (Episcopal), Chelsea, Mass. 

32 Original sketch, for complete Parish Buildings. 

BRUSH, C. E.— 99 Randolph Street, Chicago. 

33 Municipal building. Rendered by Buck. 

34 Municipal building. 

BOARD OF EDUCATION— D. FT. Perkins, Architect. 720 Tribune Building, 
Chicago. 

35 New type of 50-room school building. Three perspectives. 

36 Moos School. Perspective. 

37 Rogers School. Perspective. 

38 Nathaniel Pope School. Perspective. 

39 Washburne School. Elevation. 

40 Spaulding School for Crippled Children. 

41 Lyman Trumbull ISTantial Training School. Perspective. 

42 Lyman Trumbull Manual Training School. Plans. 

43 William Penn School. Perspective. 

44 Bowen High School. Perspective. 

45 Bowen High School. Plan. 

46 Proposed school. Perspective. 

47 Washington School. Perspective. 

BEIL & HERMANT-28 St. Clair Street. Chicago. 

50 Figure panel for Cook County Court House, to l)c executed in granite. 

BEHR. E. THEO., & O. GROSS— 27 Van Burcn Street. Chicago. 

51 Part of dining room frieze. Mr. Gross' residence. 

52 Part of frieze, executed in Railway Exchange. 

BROWN. FRANK CHOUTE.XU— 9 Park Street, Boston, Mass. 

53 "Edgchill." North front. 

54 "Grey Rocks." Long Hall. Rockport, Mass. 

55 A Suburban House. Dedham. Mass. 

56 "Grey Rocks." Ocean front. Rockport. Mass. 

57 Two Back Bay houses (photographs). 

58 Group of Fair booths. 

59 Residence. Dr. Grafton Miniroe. Front. 

60 Residence. Dr. Grafton Munroe. Rear. 

61 Competitive design for High .School. 

62 Design for Suburban Church. 

BRIGHAM, COVENEY & BISBEE— 184 Boylston Street. Boston. 

63 First Church of Christ. Scientist. Boston, ^Tass. 

64 Interior of Auditorium (photograph). 

65 First Church of Christ. Scientist. Boston. 

66 Exterior, from south (photograph). 

67 First Church of C. S. B. 

68 Perspective view of exterior. 

69 High School. Fairhaven, Mass. 



70 Exterior, from Hutllestone Avenue (photograph). 

71 Brigham, etc., continued. 

72 High School. Fairhaven, Mass. 

73 Basement, first, second and third floor plans. 

74 The First Church of Christ, Scientist. Boston. 

75 First floor and auditorium floor plans. 

BENNETT, E. H. — 1417 Railway Exchange, Chicago. 

76 Greek Theatre. Syracuse. 
']'] Cathedral of Pisa. 

78 S. Vitate. Ravenna. 

79 Sta. Maria De La Salute. Venice. 

80 Baptistery of Florence. 

81 The Bridge of Sighs. Venice. 

82 Cathedral of Sienna. 

83 Cathedral of Munrcalc. Sicily. 

84 Sacre Coeur de Montmartre. Paris. 

85 The Arsenal. Venice. 

86 Gallerie Francois I. Fontainbleau. 

87 Crypt of S. Miniato. Florence. 

88 Tomb of Seiim II. Constantinople. 

89 Siena. 

(}0 Grand Canal. Venice. 

9[ Baptistery of S. Marco. Venice. 

92 Notre Dame. Paris. 

93 Athens. 

94 Casa della Caccia. Pompeii. 

95 Portal of the Cathedral. St. Gilles. 

96 Portal of S. Marco. Venice. 

lU'RNFi.AM, D. IT— 1417 Railway Exchange, Chicago. 

97 Midway Plaisance (proposed waterway). 

98 Midway Plaisance (proposed waterway). 

9<; Union Station. Washington. Photos, showing building in course of con- 
struction. 

100 llnion Station. Washington. Perspective, showing plaza. 

101 San Francisco. Proposed plan. 

102 San Francisco. Proposed sketches a, b, c and d. 

103 San Francisco. Preliminary sketches a, b and c. 

CORNELL UNI VERSLrV— Ithaca. N. Y. 

105 (Charles S. Cobb) A civic center. Plan. 

106 (Charles S. Cobb) A civic center. Perspective. 

107 (Wickham Taylor) k hunting lodge. Plan and elevation. 

108 (W. W. Uannon) .\ hunting lodge. Plan and elevation. 

109 (W. W. Hannon) An automobile club. Elevation. 

1 10 (W. W. Hannon) An automobile club. Plan. 

COX. KENYON— 145 W\ 55lh Street, New York. 

111 The Progress of Civilization. Eight Lunettes in Iowa State Capitol. 

Photo of completed work. 

112 The Progress of Civilization. Color sketches. 

IT3 The Progress of Civilization. Study of figure of Hunting. 



114 The Progress of Civilization. 

115 The Progress of Civihzation. 

116 The Progress of Civilization. 

117 The Progress of Civilization. 

118 The Progress of Civilization. 

119 The Progress of Civilization. 

120 The Progress of Civilization. 

121 The Progress of Civilization. 

122 The Progress of Civilization. 



Study of figure of Agriculture. 
Study of drapery of Agriculture. 
Study for figure of Manufactures. 
Study for figure of Education. 
Study for drapery of Education. 
Study for figure of Science. 
Study for drapery of Science. 
Study for figure of Art. 
Study for drapery of Art. 



CHATTEN, M. C— 1507 Fisher huilding. Chicago. 

123 Bridge of Sighs. Venice. 

124 Scene in Venice. , 

125 Villa Medici. Rome. - 

126 Daus Le Jardin dcs Tuillcrics. 

127 Chateau Amboise. France. 

128 Stable at Chaumont. 

131 Chateau Langeais. France. 

132 Chateau Azay-Le-Rideau. France. 

C.\PARN. H. A.— 156 5th Avenue. New York. 

133 View from a terrace at \Vyomint>. N. J. 



CASE. J. W.— Champaign, 111. 

134 Newspaper building for Detroit Journal. 

CRAM, GOODHUE & FERGUSON— 170 5th Avenue, New York. 

' 135 Grotesques in main cornice of Cadet Barracks. United States Military 
Academy. West Point. N. Y. Photos. 
n6 Grotesques in main cornice of Cadet Barracks, United States .Military 
Academy, West Point, N. Y. Photos. 

137 Grace Church Chapel. Chicago. Photos. 

138 Proposed' Cathedral for Havana, Cuba. PerspecfAc. 

139 Proposed Cathedral for Havana, Cuba. Interior. 

140 Church, Havana. Cuba. Perspective. 

141 Church, Havana, Cuba. Detail of west entrai^e. 

142 Church, Havana, Cuba. Detail of tower, nave and gate posts. 



CHICAGO SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTl'RE— Art Inst tutc. Chicago. 

143 (L. T. Bergcr) A Chapel in a Cathedral. Junior Prob'em. 

144 

145 
146 



(Joseph Herman) A baseball park. Plan. 
(Joseph Herman) A baseball park. Elevation. 
(Joseph Herman) Home traveling competition. 



CROWEN, S. N.— 1801-2 Borland building, Chicago. 

148 "The Fey" Apartment. S. W. corner Wilson .Xvenue and Clarendon. 

Chicago. 

149 "Beach View" Apartment building. 2511-2519 Clarendon Avenue. 

150 "The Shcrwin"' Apartment build'ng. N. E. corner Sheridan Road and 

Windsor Avenue. 

151 Navarre Buffet and Billiard Hall. S. W. corner Argyle and Evanston 

Avenue. 



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152 Interior of Navarre Buffet and Billiard Hall. 

153 Interijor of dining room, Fey Apartment building. 

154 Interior vestibule of Fey Apartment building. 

155 Ilfracombe Apartment building. S. E. corner Kenmore Avenue and 

Lawrence Avenue. 

DEAN & DEAN— 218 La Salle Street, Chicago. 

157 Block of houses for Indiana Steel Co. Gary, Ind. 

158 Residence for Mr. Whitefoord R. Cole. Nashville, Tenn. 

159 House for Indiana Steel Co. Gary, Ind. 

160 Church. Designed for Normal Park, Chicago. 

161 Shooting lodge for Mr. Albert G. Meier. 

162 Sigma Alpha Epsilon house. University of Illinois. 

163 Sanger Monument. Graceland Cemetery. Front. 

164 Sanger Monument. Graceland Cemetery. Side. 

165 Sanger Monument. Graceland Cemetery. Detail. 

166 Sanger Memorial Window, Second Presbyterian Church. 

167 Alpha Delta Phi house. Cornell University. Hall. 

168 Alpha Delta Phi house. Cornell University. Living room. 

169 Alpha Delta Phi house. Cornell University. House and lodge. 

170 Alpha Delta Phi house. Cornell University. Hall window. 

171 Alpha Delta Phi house. Cornell University. House from below. 

172 Alpha Delta Phi house. Cornell University. From library window. 

173 Alpha Delta Phi house. Cornell University. Lodge. 

174 Music building for Doane College. Crete, Neb. 

DINKELBP:RG, F. p.— 135 Adams Street, Chicago. 

175 Seat in waitnig room. (Commercial Nat. Bank.) 

176 Istrian marble seat in public court. (Commercial Nat. Bank.) 

177 Easy chairs in ist and 2d Vice-Presidents' offices. (Commercial Nat. 

Bank. ) 

178 Chairs in President's room. (Commercial Nat. Bank.) 

179 Furniture in ladies' retiring room. (Commercial Nat. Bank. ) 

180 Light fixtures for check desks, public court. (Commercial Nat. Bank.) 

181 Lantern. Adams and Clark Street entrances. (Commercial Nat. Bank.) 

182 Ceiling lights in Adams Street entrance hall. (Commercial Nat. Bank.) 

183 Chandelier, Adams Street entrance hall. (Commercial Nat. Bank.) 

184 Chandelier in directors' room. (Commercial Nat. Bank.) 

185 Table lamp in directors' room. (Commercial Nat. Bank.) 

EMERSON, WILLIAM— 281 5th Avenue, New York. 

186 72d Street Branch of 19th Ward Bank, New York, N. Y. Vi-in. plans. 

187 72d Street Branch of 19th Ward Bank, New York. N. Y. ^A-in eleva- 

tion and sections. 

188 72d Street Branch of 19th Ward Bank, New York. N. Y. -K-in. scale 

model. 

EYRE WILSON— ^29 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia. Pa.; 35 W. 21st Street, New 
York. N. Y. 

189 House for Roland R. Conklin, Esq., at Huntington, Long Island, N. Y. 

190 House and grounds for Geo. W. King. Marion, Ohio. 



FROST & GRANGER— 184 La Salle Street, Chicago. 

191 The Northern Trust Company. Chicago, 111. 

192 Sketch for residence for Mark S. Willings, Esq. Lake Forest, 111. 

193 Dormitory buildings. Lake Forest College. 

FERUEKES & CRAMER— Pabst building, Milwaukee. 

^ 194 Prospect Avenue. Milwaukee. "^ 

195 Lake drive. Milwaukee. 

196 ' Photo of residence- for Mr. John H. Frank. Prospect Avenue, Mil- 

waukee. 

GREEN, HERBERT— First National Bank building, Chicago. 

197 Peter's in the East. Oxford. 

198 Sketch in Lincoln, England. 

199 Sketch in Forum, Rome. 

200 Lion of St. Mark's, Venice. 
200% Crypt. Canterbury Cathedral. 

GRIFFIN, WALTER BURLEY— Landscape Architect. 1200 Steinway Hall, 
Chicago. 

201 Grounds of Northern Illinois State Normal School. Dc Kalb, 111.- View 

of terrace gardens. 

202 Emery House, Elmhurst, III. Interior photos: 1. Bed njoms ; II. Liv- 

ing room ; III. Living room ; IV. Dining room. 

203 Grounds of Eastern Illinois State Normal School, Charleston, 111. Plan. 

204 Study for house at Elmhurst, 111. II. Living room. 

205 Study for house at Elmhurst, 111. III. Exterior in plaster work. 

206 Study for house at Elmhurst, III. I. Exterior in brick work. 

207 "Bungalow," near Hollister, Cal., for Messrs. Jenkins, Lewis & Dickin- 

son. 

208 Cottage at Winnetka, 111. Study. 

209 Emery House, Elmhurst, 111. Exterior photos 1., II., HI., IV. 

GILBERT, CASS— II East 24th Street, New York. 

210 Mount St. Michel. Water color. 

211 Perspective. West Street office building. New York, N. Y. 

212 Plan, Elevation and Section, competition for Union Theological Sem- 

inary. New York, N. Y. 1 

213 First floor plan. Competition for Connecticut State Library and Supreme 

Court building. 

213 (Warren R. Briggs, Associate) First floor plan. Compi'tition for Con- 

necticut State Library and Supreme Court building. 

214 (Warren R. Briggs, Associate) Front Elevation of eonipelition for 

Connecticut State Library and Supreme Court building. 

GATES POTTERIES — 602 Chamber of Commerce building, Chicago. 

215 Teco pottery lamp. Base. 

216 Group of Teco vases. 

217 Teco pottery vase. 

218 Teco pottery vase. 

HAMMOND, C. H.— 4627 Greenwood Avenue. Chicago. 

219 Melrose Abbey. Scotland. 

220 I. Gesuati. Venice. 

221 Notre Dame. Paris. 

222 St. Etienne De Mont. Paris. 



HOWE, SAMUEI^-317 West I20th Street, New York. 

223 Frieze decoration. Water color. 

224 Frieze decoration. Water color. 

225 House. Cold Spring Harbour, Long Island, New York. Mr. Louis C. 

Tiffany. (Moonlight.) 

226 Photos. Mr. Louis C. Tiffany's house. Cold Spring Harbour, Long 

Island. 

227 Set of small photos. Frieze in dining room. Port Washington, Long 

Island, N. Y. Mr. Arthur T. Van. 

MYRON HUNT and ELMER GREY— 1017 Union Trust building, Los Angeles, 
Cal. 

228 Residence and garden for Mrs. R. R. Blacker, at Pasadena, Cal. View 

from southeast. 

229 Porch and terrace. Perkins' residence, Pasadena, Cal. 

230 Entrance court. Bungalow on the top of Mt. Wilson. 

231 House at Montecito, Cal. 

232 House and garden for Dr. Guy Cochran, Los Angeles, Cal. 

233 Residence for Gilbert E. Perkins, Pasadena, Cal. 

234 Residence for Mr. Robt. C. Gillis, Santa Monica, Cal. 

235 Beach cottage for H. E. Huntington, Cliffton, Cal. 

236 House for H. M. Gorham, Santa Monica, Cal. 

MYRON HUNT— 1017 Union Trust building, Los Angeles, Cal. 

237 Pergola of the Maryland Hotel, Pasadena, Cal. View I. 

238 Pergola of the Maryland Hotel. View II. 

239 Hall. Livingston Jenks' residence. San Francisco, Cal. 

HAAGEN, PAUL T.— 105 East 45th Street, Chicago. 

240 Over the roofs. A sketch. 

HULLA, JOHN— Schiller building, Chicago. 

241 Living room in house to be erected at Rogers Park for Mr. Wm. Tempel. 

242 Park for Mr. Nelson A. Lewry. 

243 Perspective of Motor Inn. 

244 Plan, 1/32, of Motor Inn. Proposed. 

ISRAELS & HARDER— 31 West 31st Street, New York, N. Y. 

245 Photo. Executed work. Residence for Mr. Edward Thaw. 

246 Photo. Executed work. Residence for Mr. Edward Thaw. 

247 First story plan. Residence for Mr. Edward Thaw. 

248 Front Elevation. Residence for Mr. Edward Thaw. 

249 Detail. Residence for Mr. Edward Thaw. 

250 Detail. Residence for Mr. Edward Thaw. 

ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY— Urbana, 111. 

251 (G. W. Awsumb) Design for State Capitol. Two plans. 
(G. W. Awsumb) Design for State Capitol. Elevation 

252 (C. C. Rich) Academy of Music. Plan. 

(C. C. Rich) Academy of Music. Elevation. 



253 (E. N. Dugan) College Doniiilory. Plan. 
(E. N. Dugan) College Dormitory. Elevation. 

254 (L. E. Wilkinson) Academy of Fine Arts. 'Plan. 

(L. E. Wilkinson) Academy of Fine Arts. Elevation. 

JENSEN,' JENS— 1030 Augusta Street, Chicago, 111. t 

255 Twelve photos from estate of H. Rubens, Glencoc, and A. C. Magnus, 

Winnetka. 

256 Rose garden. Humboldt Park. 

JENKINS, HARRY DODGE— 24 W^nxUawn Park. Chicago. 

257 Design for house in suburb. 

258 Sketch. "Rear Elevations." 

KOHN, ROBERT D.— 170 Fifth Avenue, New York. 

259 First floor plan, plan 'of garden and south elevation of house for ]\lr. 

Louis E. LaHin, Lake Forest, 111. 

260 Second floor plan and north rk'vation of house for Mr, Louis E. Latlin, 

Lake Forest, 111. 

LEAVITT, CHARLES W.. JR.— 220 Broadway, N. Y. Landscape Engineer. 

261 Lockwood CoUegiaie School for Girls. Scarsdale, N. Y. 

262 Perspective of flower garden. Joseph La Rocque. Jr.. Minrbrook, N. J. 

263 Knox Taylor, Esq. Highbridge, N. J. (General plan.) 

264 Lehigh University. South Bethlehem, Pa. ((ieneral plan.) 

LOVELL, SIDNEY— 168 Michigan Avenue, Chicago. 

265 Waterloo Theater building. Waterloo, Iowa. 

LE BOUTILLIER. ADDISON B.— 8 Beacon Street, Boston, .Mass. 

266 House at Glen Falls, N. Y. 

267 Cottage at Andover, Mass. 

268 Drawings for magazine covers. / 

269 Drawings for Grueby garden pottery. 

270 Drawings for illustrations and bookplatts. 

MASSACHUSETTS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY P.ost.)n, .Mass. 

271 (F. S. Wilcox) A State Automobile Club. Plan, \()<yi) traveling scholar- 

ship competition. 

272 (F. S. Wilcox) A State .Automobile Club. Itlevation. 

273 (Miss Ida A. Ryan) A Slate Automobile Club. Plan. lyo^) traveling 

scholarship competition. 

274 (Miss Ida A. Ryan) .\ State .Automobile ('lub. Comi)etition. bllevation. 

275 (L. C. Clarke, Jr.) A State Automobile Club. Plan. 

(L. C. Clarke. Jr.) A Stale .Automobile Club. Flevation. 

AIORRIS, BENJAMIN WISTAR— 5 West 31st Street, New York. 

276 Plan of proposed improvements of Lake Forest College. Lake Forest, 

111, 

277 Photos. Pallon Hall, Brokaw Field Dormitory Group. Princeton Uni- 

versity. 

278 Rendered drawing, west elevation, Patton Hall. Brokaw Field Dormi- 

tory Group. Tower Section. Pr-nceton University. 



McCLARE, C. HERBERT — 649 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, Mass. 

279 Main entrance. Building of the E. & R. Laundry Co., Cambridge. 

280 Employes' entrance. Building of the E. & R. Laundry Co., Cambridge. 

281 Photo of the building. Building of the E. & R. Laundry Co., Cambridge. 

MAKER, GEORGE W.— 218 La Salle Street, Chicago. 

282 Examples of recent work. 

283 Exterior and interior views of Mr. Harry Rubens' country residence 

at Glencoe, 111. 

284 Court House. 

285 Residence at Highland Park, 111., for Mr. Emil Rudolph. 

MARSHALL & FOX— First National Bank Building, Chicago. 

286 Forrest Theater, Philadelphia, Pa. 

287 Herman E. Dick. Residence. Janesville, Wis. 

288 Empire building. Sioux City, Iowa. 

289 Residence. Reno, Nev. 

290 South Shore Country Club. Chicago. 

291 South Shore Country Club. Lake Front. 

292 South Shore Country Club. Casino building. 

NEWHOUSE, H. L.— 4630 Prairie Avenue, Chicago. 

293 "Norman Court Apartments." Lake Avenue, north of 47th Street. Nor- 

man P. Cummings, owner. 

294 Apartment building at 4719 Michigan Avenue. A. J. Moore, owner. 

NEWHALL & BLEVINS-9 Park Street, Boston, Mass. 
29s Universalist Church. Maiden, Mass. 

NELSON, FRANCIS A.— 44 West 39th Street, New York City. 

29C) Ancient well head. Verona, Italy. 

297 Hospital of Santa Cruz. Toledo, Spain. 

OTTENHEIMER, H. L.— 715 Fori Dearborn building, Chicago, 111. 

298 Cafe at Houghton. Houghton, Mich. 

299 Clock for Hyman, Berg & Co. S. E. corner Washington and State 

Streets. 
,^00 Studio and residence. Harry D. Jenkins, 24 Woodlawn Park. 

301 Garage. 4808 Grand Boulevard, Chicago. 

OLMSTED BROS.— Brookline, Mass. 

302 Perspective of garden at Scarborough, New York. 

303 Views of garden at Scarborough, New York. 

304 Plan of garden at Scarborough, New York. 

306 Views of garden at Manchester, Mass. 

307 Plan of garden at Manchester, Mass. 

POND & POND— Stein way Hall. Chicago. 

308 Study for the Metropolitan Church of Christ, Chicago. 

309 American School of Correspondence. Chicago. 

310 American School of Correspondence. Another view. 



PRAY, HUBBARD & WHITE— 15 Ashburton Place, Boston, Mass. 

311 Mr. Fuller's estate at Fall River, Mass. Perspective and plan. 

312 Estate of Mrs. Bemis, Chestnut Hill, Mass. Photos. 
Estate of Mrs. Bemis, Chestnut Hill, Mass. General plan. 

313 Estate of Landon A. Thomas, Esq., Augusta, Ga. Plan of gardens. 

314 Estate of Mr. Frost West, N.ewton, Mass. Plan and section. 

PARIS, WM. FRANCKLYN— 26 West 35th Street, New York. 

315 Dining room wall decoration. Carved woodwork and mantel. 

316 Section of carved oak room and consol unfinished. 

ROBB, E. DONALD— 170 Fifth Avenue, New York. 

317 Mosque at Cordova, Spain. 

318 Cathedral of Chartres. North porch. 

319 Alh^mbra. Granada, 

320 Durham. 

321 Ponte Vecchio. 

322 Palazzo Cavilli. Venice. 

323 Sketches in Italy. 

324 Notre Dame de Paris. 

325 Gen. Meade's headquarters. Gettysburg. 

326 Amiens. 

327 Venice. 

328 Farm house. 

329 Bell Harry Tower. Canterl)ury Cathedral. 

REINHOLD, HENRY L., JR.— 1004 Cheslnul Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 

330 Gate lodge at "Pembroke,"' Bryn Mawr, Pa., for Mrs. Chas. Wheeler. 

331 Gloucester City High School Competition. Front and end elevations. 

332 Gloucester City High School Competition. First and second floor