(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "Florists' review [microform]"

h-L-C 



r-r^r^v ;, v, 



rrn 



,-*—^--n,E WEEKLY ^ |« ; 



*E^/£f/ 



VoUXK. 



A JOURNAL -^o" FLORISTS. SEEDSMEN a'-^ NURSERYMEN. 

FLORISTS' PCBIilSHINO CO., 680 Caxton Building, 884 Dearborn St., CHICAGO. 

CHICAGO AND NEW YORK, MARCH 7, 1907. 



No. 484, 



■V^Tuberotts Begonias 



Large bulbs 
measuring 
IH inches 
and upward. 



Crimson 1 1 

Scarlet 
Wliite 
Bose 
\ Pink, llglit 
Yellow 
Salmon 
Orange 
. Copper 

SINGLE, extra large bulbs. IK inches and up, same colors as above, 

50c per doz.; $2.75 per 100; $25 00 per 1000. 
DOUBLE, extra large bulbs, l^i inches and up, same colors as above, 

75c per doz.; $4.50 per 100; $40.00 per 1000. 



SINGLE. 

Separate colors, or 
all colors mixed. 
Doz. 100 

85c $2.S6 

1000, $80.00 



DOUBLE. 

Separate colors, or 
all colors mixed. 
Doz. 100 

66e $4.00 

1000, $86.00 



ARTHUR T. BODDINGTON, 



842 WKST 
14TH ST., 



New York City 



Begonia Gloire de Lorraine 

IN BLOOM 

4-inch per 100, $35.00 

5-inch per 100, 50.00 

Pandanua Veitchii, finely colored, 24 in. high from top 
of soil, $1.00 each. 

Pandanus Veitchii, large plants, $1.50 to $3.00 each. 

Boston Ferns, specimens, $18.00 per doz. 

Adiantum Farleyense, 5-in. pots, $9.00 per doz. 

J. A. PETERSON, WESTWOOD, GINCiNNATI, 0. 



THE BEST COMMERCIAL WHITE MUM 

WHite UlaQH Dean 

Strong well rooted cuttings, ready now, 
$10.00 per 100. 
Terms: Cash with order from unknown parties. 



WM. F. KASTIN6, 



383-887 
Ellicott Street, 



Buffalo, N. Y. 



Fuchsia Little Beauty 

2M-lnch. thrifty young plants, »4.50 per 100. 

VInca Malor, green variegated with light green, field-grown, f6.00 per 

100. 
Boston Ferns, bench-grown, $10.00, 115.00 and t20.00 per 100. 

Scottll, bench-grown, ready (or 3 and 4-inch pots, $6.00 p«r 100. 

HydranfEea Otaksa all sold. Let us have your order early for next 
fall delivery and assure you of best possible service. 

Alternantberas. BriUiantisslma, best red, and Auiea Nana, best 
yellow, August rooted, 60c per 100; $6.00 per 1000. 

Poinsettias, summer delivery. Place your orders now for this val- 
uable Christmas plant. As usual, we will have the best stock in the 
market. 2^-lnch, $5.00 per 100; $16.00 per 1000. 3-inch, $7.00 per 100; 
$66.00 per 1000. 

On any article, S5 at 100 rate, 250 at 1000 rate. 

B41R FLORAL CO., ERIE, PA. 



Carnations — Rooted Cuttings — M pirns 



White Perfection, pure white...,...". $'>.00per 

White Lawson 3.00 

Lady Bountiful 8.00 

Lieut. Peary 4.00 

Bed Riding Hood, new scarlet 12.00 

Victory 6.00 

Cardinal 4.00 

Red Lawson 4.00 

Daybreak Lawson or Melody : 6.00 

Enchantress 2.50 

Helen Goddard 5.00 

Fiancee 4 00 

Variegated Lawson 3.00 

Harlowarden. crimson 2.00 



100; 



$50.00 per 

25.00 " 

25 00 " 

30.00 " 

100.00 " 

50.00 " 

80.00 " 

30.00 " 

50.00 " 

20.00 " 

45.00 " 

80.00 " 

25.00 " 
15.00 



1000 



Aristocrat, beautiful cerise, the best variety disseminated this season. 



Ready Marcb 15. $2.00 per 100; $15.00 per 1000. 

Mrs. Mary Mann Merstbam Yellow W. H. Cbadwick 

Golden Ghadwick Adelia Estelle 

Oremo Yellow Bonnaffon Touset 

Mrs. Nathan Smith White Bonnaffon Glory of Pjicific 

Majestic Ivory Pink Ivory , Mrs. Robinson 



Roses 



$2.00 per 100; $15.00 per 1000. 

Mme. Chatenay Bridesmaid 

Bride Uncle John 

Richmond Golden Gate 



CHICAGO CARNATION CO., A. T. PYFER, Mgr„ JOLIET, ILL. 



THE E. G. HILL CO. 

RICHMOND, INDIANA 

Oar general list quoting 

Roses, Carnations, 
Mums, Geraniums 

IS NOW READY. 

High-Grade Novelties Our Specialty 






TUBEROSE BULBS 

Ready Now. Well Cured Stock, $8.50 per 1000 

For SPRING PLANTING 

Tuberous-rooted Begonias, Caladiums, Cannas, Dahlias, 
Gladiolus, Lilies, etc. Send your order early. 
Avoid delays incident to spring rush. : : : : 

Complete line of Flower and Vegetable Seeds ready 

Florists' Wholesale List free for the asking. 

THE W. W. BARNARD CO., ...^^"JSS^-n.. CHICA60 



^ 



" fmiitifi ifci Hi [i ii'mirti \ m y-^-^^-^ ^*^ r n i tV' aii f -''--' -■ '• v .-'- ^-^^ -:-: 



IllBfr n^f'-*-' "- -* ■"-•■-•*■ ''^- ' ■ i ^:,r^':..-L 



^dl-*a-^ ;<>. *:■. 



'^?™^!W'^'P!^'^??»?!*'r»l!"P!"W^^ 



U58 



The Weekly Florists^ Review* 



March 7, 1907. 



LET'S KNOW U! 



U KNOW US! 



EASTER MARCH 31 

BE PREPARED— Send for an assortment of oar EXCLUSIVE and UP-TO-DATE PLANT 
BASKETS-all SIZES and PRICES New and Novel effects in PLANT BOXES. Our 
EXCLUSIVE TWO-TONED MOIRE CREPE PAPER, FOUR-PLY-is what you need to 
decorate all your EASTER POTS, PANS and BOXES-PLAITED and WATER-PROOF 
CREPE PAJPER in all colors. Send for samples and prices. 

Just received large shipment of MATS in PERFECT FLOWER SHADES such 
as MOSS, NILE, WHITE, PINK, LAVENDER, YELLOW and BLUE. Order at once, 
while stock is complete. 

1220 RACE STREET 
PHILADELPHIA. PA. 



IVf . RICE & CO., 



The Leading Florists* Supply House and Ribbon Specialists. Importers and Manufacturers. 



Mention The Review when you write. 



SPRING 1907 



Write for Special 
Low Prices on 

SELECTED PLANTS 

BULBS, ROOTS 

Elc, lo 

F. W. 0. SCHMITZ 

PRINCE BAY, N. Y. 

Mention The Review when you write. 

JOS. G. NEIDINGER 

1438 No. 1 0th St. PHILADELPHIA 

OUR SPKCIALTIES: 

Wax Flowers, Wax Flower Designs 

WHEAT SHEAVES 
Wicker Pot Covers, Plant Stands. 

Mention The Review ■when yon write. 

Keep your " I " on ttie enterprlsinsr 
rLORISTS* SUPPLY HOUSE 

J. STERN & CO. 

125 N. lOtli Street, PHILADELPHIA 

Mention The Review when yon yrite. 

Wired Toothpicks 

Manufactured by 

W. J. COWEE, BERLIN, N. Y. 

10,000.. ..$1.50; 50.000.... $6.2S. Sample free. 
Por sale by dealers. 

U< tlon The Review when you write. 



Tie a Great Big Bow 

of ribbon on the Easter plant A bow that will match the 
foliage, or match or blend with the flower. 

PINE TRBE RIBBONS will match your foliage, 
and match or blend with your flowers. 

Why— PINE TREE RIBBONS are dyed and woven 
to attain this result -and they do. Order the wide Messaline 
Ribbons. They are wonderfully brilliant and lustrous, and 
yet the prices are not high, for you buy direct from the 
mill and 

SAVE ALL BETWEEN PROFITS. 

ull|? ptt^ Em ^tlk MHIb (Hfltt^ang 

OfflM sod ■alesroomt, 806-80S*810 Arch St., 62*S4 N. Elvhth St. 

Wide Satin Ribbons, Wide Taffeta Ribbons, Narrow Satin 
Ribbons, Narrow Taileta RlDbons. A postal brings samples. 





Sa ASPARAGUS 
GLi PLUMOSUS NANUS 

100 1000 

Greenhouse crop, fresh BOc $8.60 

Asparagus PI. Nanus, free air grown.25c 1 75 
Asoaraarus Sorensrerl 16c .76 


ESTABLISHED 40 YEARS 

Rose Hi Nurseries 

NEW ROCHELLE, N. Y. 

Most Complete 

Horticultural Establishment 

in America. 

NEW YORK OFFICE, 

Siebrecht BIdg., 5th Ave. and 38th St. 


H. H. BERGER A CO. 

47 BARCLAY ST. NEW YORK 

Mention The Review when .von write. 


L. BALMANN & CO. 

Importers and HaBafactarers of 

riorists' Supplies 

76-78 Wabasb Ave., CHICAGO 


Mention The Review when you write. 


Write for supplement to catalogue F , it will interest you. 
Mention The Review when you write. 


Always Mention tbe 

When Writins Advertisers 


^THE FLORISTS* HAIL ASS'N 
HAS PAID $101,000.00 

tor giasB broken by ball in the past twenty years. 

For particulars address 
JOHN O. BSLJDR. 8«c't. Saddle Blver.N. J. 

Mention The Review when yon write. 



:.'...• ^...^iJ-k^'^iA^j^..' •'^^ ^'- '•-■^iH.-v-' 



i ^^-- -•^^.^■^>f'-^^:--^:^^-i^^'~^^'''-'—^*^-^''*^^'-^^- —*'-'- "-itfi<i^lri f-,---'^-*-*--^-*^-^-^'^-*^^-^-^--^-^ 



■Hjf v ■.^'■<,Pf)l^|»JP^W,,"*^l>.'J^ ',.\"x ^^ ■- v>»",rx""? .•^' ^ ^if^iw-^'JPV- ""■r^v^rrr'TBT". 



Mabch 7, 1907. 



The Weekly Florists' Review. 



U59 







^i*»'r-«S3' 



COMMERCIAL ORCHIDS. 

[A paper by J. A. Newsham, New Orleans, 
read before the Society of Southern Florists, at 
the New Orleans convention, February 14 to 16, 
1907.1 

In presenting a paper on this subject 
I do so with a full understanding that it 
must be done in as few words as is pos- 
sible. With a class of plants so large 
and varied as the orchid family, compris- 
ing, as it does, many thousand varieties, 
some, both beautiful and curious, are not 
available for florists' use. Many are not 
available because of their scarcity and 
high price ; others, from the fact of their 
shyness to bloom under the treatment the 
ordinary florist has time and facility to 
give them; so that at the present time 
the number of varieties grown for cut 
flowers is limited to a few that are easily 
managed and not too expensive to buy 
in quantity. But I am sure the time will 
come, and before long, when there will 
be many more varieties added to the 
orchid family, or the present list of 
orchids for florists' use, especially when 
their requirements become better under- 
stood by the general run of florists, with- 
out, necessarily, being expert orchid 
growers. 

When we look back over a few years of 
the cultivation of the rose and carnation, 
we can count the few men who, then, 
really made a success of their cultiva- 
tion, while today they are being grown 
in every part of the country by the thou- 
sands, by men who have not spent a life- 
time in learning how to grow them suc- 
cessfully. So it will be with the orchid, 
which is a plant that will stand rougher 
treatment than either of them without 
showing the immediate effect of it or 
ruining the season's crop of flowers, as is 
often done by a little mismanagement of 
either the carnation or the rose. At the 
same time, when once an orchid gets in 
a bad condition, it is often better to 
throw it away than try and bring it 
around again; and this is one reason 
why so many have failed to make orchid 
growing pay, one-half of the space being 
filled with plants which bring no returns, 
and, in most cases, only make a breeding 
place for all kinds of insects and fungus 
diseases to ruin the balance. Of course 
there may be exceptions, in which a 
plant may be of some special value, and 
may pay for time and attention neces- 
sary to restore it to a healthy condition. 

A Word to the Beginner. 

The first question for the beginner to 
ask is, "What kinds of plants should I 
start with?" My advice to him is to 
start with what is generally termed semi- 
established plants; that'iS, plants which 
have been recently imported and have 
already commenced to grow; and get 
them from a first-class house, that makes 
a specialty of thte part of the business. 
By doing so, one not only learns how 
they are potted, but will also stand the 



chance of securing special varieties 
among them, as they are not all collected 
while in bloom, and many of the finest 
and most valuable varieties have turned 
up among imported plants. For this 
reason, one may often buy old estab- 
lished plants cheaper than newly im- 
ported ones; but he may be sure, all the 
good varieties have been picked out of 
them. While I have made a list of va- 
rieties to grow especially for cut flowers, 
I am sure it will pay anyone who runs a 
store to grow a nice collection of other 
varieties as an advertisement, using them 
when in bloom for the decoration of his 



I have seen them do well under many 
conditions. I prefer pots or hanging 
pans, mostly for their lasting quality, 
for, although they will grow as well in 
wooden baskets, there is always the draw- 
back that they commence to rot and get 
full of fungus, and it is not an easy 
matter to take them out, as the roots 
become grown around them, and to put 
them in a larger basket without taking 
the old ones away is sure, sooner or later, 
to end badly on account of the fungus 
from the rotten wood. With pots there 
is not so much danger, as they last much 
longer and are cheaper. For potting ma- 
terial peat is good where it can be easily 
procured; if not, fern roots and live 
sphagnum moss is all right. The pots 
ought to be more than half full of 
broken pots and charcoal and the plants 
must be firmly potted and staked until 
they have become established. This is im- 
portant, for if they are loose and shaky 
they seldom do well; and, by all means, 
use as small pots as possible, especially 
with newly imported plants, or any that 
have gotten in bad condition at the roots 
from overwatering or any other cause. 

Watering. 

Watering is one of the most important 
things in orchid culture. Too much 




Display Basket of Orchids and Adiantum. 



store, window or any other purpose, as 
they always command attention and are 
.talked about whereve^ rare flowers are 
mentioned. 

Potting. 

Orchids are grown in many ways; in 
ordinary pots and pans, baskets made 
from wood, in earthenware, and the small 
growing kinds do well on blocks of wood. 



water at certain seasons is the cause of 
many failures, especially in winter, dur- 
ing their resting period. In our climate, 
where we do not have to fire very hard, 
little water is necessary; perhaps a little 
twice a week is suflScient; just enough 
to keep them from shriveling. I make a 
rule in the winter, when I have any 
doubts as to a plant 's wanting water, 
to pass it by until the next time; and in 



/ 



^^..^.t^.w.-.f,^. tix.^..".Ji;n.,,-|j^^-:,.,»A,.^,.J ._i,,..._..l.'>-L^" ^«.-. .. .■...■.y:— 1. .f.i. .. I.'; 



.jaf i.-.-ujLiJ ^■..-..T- ..>.. ■■ vji- .^>,. 



I .' - .fy '■ ■:■•■■ ■ ■ 



1160 



.i^*f ,-, v^f 



The Weekly FIoHste* Rfeviiw. 



Mabch 7, 1907. 



the summer, under the same conditions, 
I water it then. I have found it a good 
rule, not only with orchids, but also with 
the other plants. Of course, weather con- 
ditions have a great deal to do with the 
amount of water needed. In the summer- 
time with outdoor plants and good drain- 
age tuere is not much fear of overwater- 
ing, twice a day not being too much for 
established plants or plants in baskets or 
blocks. Of course newly potted or im- 
ported plants would not require it so 
heavy until they commence to grow 
freely. 

Resting;. 

Resting is also important with many 
varieties, especially cattleyas, Iselias and 
dendrobiums, also some varieties of the 
oncidium. When a plant has about fin- 
ished its growth is the time to reduce 
the watering by degrees until you give 
just enough to keep the bulbs plump. 
Keep them in that condition until they 
commence to show flower, when they 
require a little more water; but never 
get them soaked or the buds are liable 
to turn yellow and fall before opening. 
Especially with a low temperature after 
flowering they generally commence to 
grow, and this is a good time to pot them 
or change them in any way needed. 

General Management. 

As we cannot grow any of the cool 
orchids in the southern climate, we need 



should be much moister and needs less 
ventilation. This class, most of them 
not having bulbs, cannot be allowed to 
become dry or they will lose their foli- 
age, except dendrobiums, which may be 
wintered in the same house as cattleyas, 
as they require about the same treatment 
while resting. 

The American varieties do better out- 
doors under slat shades from the first 
part of April until they have completed 
their growth, when they must be brought 
under cover, as a wet season would 
start them into growth again. I have 
not .given the East Indian varieties a 
thorough trial outdoors during the sum- 
mer months; but with most of the vari- 
eties we can make more growth in one 
year than they can in the north in two 
without interfering with their bloom- 
ing. 

List of Varieties. 

Cattleya Trianse, from Colombia, is 
considered one of the best varieties for 
florists' use, being one of the easiest 
to grow, varies in color from pure white 
to deep rose, and blooms here from No- 
vember to April and sometimes twice. 

Cattleya Mendelli, from Colombia, 
about the same color, somewhat larger, 
and blooms a little later than C. Tri- 
anae. 

Cattleya Mossia?, Venezuela, varies 
much in size and color, some varieties 
being almost double the size of others. 




Store of the Schoen Floral Co., Toledo, O. 



only to divide them into two houses, one 
for the East Indian varieties and the 
other for the American varieties. There 
need be little difference in the tempera- 
ture of the two, but the one for the 
East Indian varieties, such as the cypri- 
pedium, phalacnopsis and dendrobium, 



Blooms after C. Mendelli. A good vari 
ety of C. Mossia) is hard to beat. 

Cattleya gigas, Colombia, is the larg- 
est flowering variety, and in its native 
country is one of the freest bloomers, 
having as many as seven flowers on a 
single spike; but under cultivation it 



is not often seen in this condition. By 
iffrowing it in pans or baskets hung 
r 'Close to the glass and given a little more 

heat, it will bloom quite freely during 

July and August. 

Cattleya labiata, Brazil, is the best 
for autumn flowers and an easy one to 
manage; while not so fine a variety as 
some, it comes in when flowers are 
scarce, and should be grown on that ac- 
count. 

Cattleya Percivaliana is considered a 
small variety of C. Mossise, with a shade 
darker Up, and is' the latest of the large- 
flowering cattleyas to bloom. 

Cattleya Skinneri, Central America, is 
the best of the smaller flowering cat- 
tleyas; blooms in the spring, is of a 
deep rose color, and bears as many as 
eighteen flowers on a spike. 

Lselia purpurata, Brazil, is a fine va- 
riety, blooming in the summer months, 
but is becoming scarce. 

Lselia anceps, Mexico, and its many 
varieties, is easy to grow; blooms in the 
fall with long spikes, which makes it 
always useful in any kind of work or 
decorations; in color from pure white 
to deep rose. 

Phaleenopsis amabilis, Philippine is- 
lands, is one of the finest orchids to 
grow in this section, bearing large 
spikes of almost pure white flowers in 
the spring months, when they are always 
in demand. It is considered rather hard 
to manage, and, as it comes from a hot 
climate, is grown too close and confined 
in the attempt to keep up the tempera- 
ture, especially in the winter time, where 
much fire heat is required. But here we 
have plants which only receive fire heat 
a few times during the winter, the tem- 
perature often going below 45 degrees, 
and still these plants do not seem to 
suffer in the least. They are grown in 
an open house all the time, where every- 
* thing is left open night and day, ex- 
cept when there is fear of a frost; and 
they have been grown that way for 
years. 

Phalaenopsis Schilleriana, from the 
same country as the last, is a stronger 
grower, bearing a spike with as high as 
100 flowers at one time; color, from pale 
to dark pink. 

Vanda cserulea, northern India, is one 
of the few blue orchids, varying from 
light to dark blue. It is always salable. 

Dendrobium nobile, India, is one of 
the oldest varieties, easy to grow and 
flower. 

Dendrobium Wardianum, Burmah, is 
also an old favorite. 

Dendrobium Phalsenopsis, New Guin- 
ea, is one of the best for cut flowers, 
giving spikes sometimes two feet long, 
with from twenty to twenty-four flowers 
of various shades of pink, and lasts a 
long time in bloom. 

Dendrobium formosum, Burmah, is a 
good one to grow, bearing white flow- 
ers which are much used for bridal bou- 
quets. 

Odontoglossum citrosmum, Mexico, is 
about the only one of this class we can 
manage here; should be given the same 
treatment as Lselia anceps, and gives 
long spikes of light pink flowers. 

Oncidium crispum, O. spendidium and 
O. varicosum are three good varieties 
to grow, bearing long spikes of yellow 
or spotted flowers which are fine in deco- 
rations. 

There are, of course, many others 
which may be grown, but I think this 
list will give as good results as a larger 
one. 



i .r,.-.':«iLy^^^^-,_ ,,.^.......^..u:i,..:M'.. — -.. ■■> 



T'!"lW<P^""'»'^^?>l;'i^UWf!i't''W 



'^W^nTp* ./rTvji J " :,-.ifttT^„«^_i'.nnB'.i^7Mrw»if#», 



,^Tt:,^^j ■ ■ ■ "^T^ -. ^ 



Mabch 7, 1907. 



The Weekly Florists' Review* 



116\ 




Gates Ajar by J. W. Ross, Centralia, 111. 



THE GATES AJAR. 

The accompanying illustration is re- 
produeed from a photograph of a gates 
ajar, both glorified and simplified ^by 
J. W. Ross, of Centralia, 111. The piece 
stood thirty-eight inches high and was 
twenty-eight inches wide. The loose 
treatment adds immensely to the at- 



tractiveness of the design; indeed, in it 
the solid design usually made can hardly 
be recogaized. The flowers used were 
Bride and Bridesmaid roses, callas. Pa- 
per Whites and valley, the flowers from 
some unsold Christmas azaleas being em- 
ployed in the gates, for the design was 
made December 29, 

A few makers of excellent funeral 



work still employ the old, solid style of 
construction, but the newer idea is a 
loose form. It takes rather better flow- 
ers, but not so many of them, and tho 
effect -is of a larger and much more ar- 
tistic piece. The solid design gives 
the impression of being a mechanical 
creation instead of the work of an 
' ' artist. ' ' <^ 



.«jtiivt:i^wKl:_^ia^...»r< .-. Jp^^l■^.^JLift^ ^\.-*:^\. 



.,^.m2.-it^i»iLf^^^.^.ij..-^: 



I 



U60 



The Weekly Florists^ Review* 



MAncii 7, 1907. 



the siiiiuiici'. iiiMlfi' tlic saiiu' (•(Hiditioiis. 
I ^vat(■l• it tlit'ii. I liiive foiiiul it a jjctod 
rule, nut (Hiiy uijh orcliids, but also uitli 
the other plants. Of course, weatluM- con- 
ditions have a j^reat deal to do with the 
amount of water needed. In the snninier 
time with outdoor ])l:ints and j^ood drain- 
age tiieii' is not nmcii fear of ovfiwatcr- 
ing, twice a day imt lioin^' ton much for 
established pl.-inls i>r jilaiits in liaskcts or 
blocks. ( )f c((nisr rii'wly jiotted or im 
]iorted ]p|aiits wimld not icfjuirc it so 
hcavv until tln'\" cntniin'Mcc to jrrow 



frcelv. 



Resting. 



Ticsting is also im|)ort:int with many 
varieties, especially catth\vas, liclias ami 
dendroluums. ;ils(i snmc \arii'tifs ni' tlic 
oncidium. When a plant has about fin- 
ished its yrowili is the time to icducc 
the w.ateriny liy dc>^iTcs until vnu yi\<' 
just enough tn keep the bulbs plum|>. 
Keep tliein in th:it cniiditinn until they 
coinineiice to siiow tlowei-. when they 
recjuire a little nuoe water; but ne\ei' 
get them soaked or the buds are liable 
to turn yellow and fall before opening. 
Especially with a low temperature nfter 
lloMorint; they giMU'rally cuninn'nce tn 
grow, and this is n good time to put them 
or clmuge them in any way needful. 

General Management. 

As A\t' cauMnt ^row any ut' the cool 
orchids in the southern clim.ate, we need 



shoulil be much moister and needs less 
ventilation. This class, )iu)st of them 
not having bulbs, cannot be allowed to 
beconu' dry or they will lose their foli- 
age, except dendrobiums, which may be 
wintered in the same house as eattleyas, 
as they require altont the same treatment 
while resting. 

'I'lie American varieties do better out- 
doors under slat shades from the first 
part of April until they have completed 
their growth^ when they must be brought 
under cover, as a wet season would 
strut them into growth again. I have 
imt given the East Indian varieties a 
tlioroiigh trial outdoors during the sum- 
mer months; but with most of tlx; vari- 
eties we can make nuire growth in one 
year than they can in the north in two 
without inttM'ferini; with their Itloom- 



lU"-. 



List of Varieties. 



<'attleya Triana', from Colombia, is 
considered one of the best vari(^ties for 
tlorists' use, being one of the easiest 
to grow, varies in color from pure white 
to dee]i rose, and blooms here from Xo- 
\enil)er to April and sometinu's twice. 

• '.-ittleya Meinlelli. from Colombia, 
■ ibout the same color, somewhat larger, 
and bhmnis ;i little later than C. Tri- 
nuic. 

('uttleya Mossia', N'enezuela, varies 
uiutdi in size ami cohir. some varieties 
beih!" alnu)st doubh; the size of others. 




/ 



Store of the Schoen Floral Co., Toledo, O. 



only to di\ide them into Iwn Imuses, oiu' 
fof tlie I'Jast Indian ^arietieK nnd the 
.other Idr the Aineiicnn xaiieiicv. 'I'heie 
need be little dilTeretice in the tempera- 
ture of the two. but the one for the 
East ItKtIan \:iiiel if<, sucli as tin' cypri- 
pcdiuni. pli;il;eiio|isis :i nd dendrnbium. 



ItloolllS after < '. Mendelli. A ydml \;iri 

ety of ( '. Mossia' is hard to bent. 

< nttleyn oijrjis, ('oloinbia, is the larg- 
est flowering \ariety, and in its nali\e 
country is one of the freest bloonnMs. 
lia\in;^ as inan\' as sexfii flowers on a 
siui^le '-|iike: but uuiler cultixatiou it 



is not often seen iu this contlitiou. By 
growing it in pans or baskets hung 
close to the glass and given a little more 
heat, it will bloom quite freely during 
July and August. 

Cattleya labiata, Brazil, is the best 
for autumn flowers and an easy one to 
manage; while not so fine a variety as 
some, it comes in when flowers are 
scarce, and should be grown on that ac- 
count. 

Cattleya Percivaliana is considered a 
small variety of C. Mossise, with a shade 
darker lip, and is the latest of the large- 
flowering eattleyas to bloom. 

Cattleya Skinneri, Central America, is 
the best of the smaller flowering eat- 
tleyas; blooms in the spring, is of a 
deep rose color, and bears as many as 
eighteen flowers on a spike. 

La?lia purpurata, Brazil, is a fine va- 
riety, blooming in the summer months, 
but is becoming scarce. 

La;lia anceps, Mexico, and its many 
varieties, is easy to grow; blooms in the 
fall with long spikes, which makes it 
always useful in any kind of work or 
decorations; iu color from pure white 
to deep rose. 

Phala^nopsis amabilis, Philippine is- 
lands, is one of the finest orchids to 
groW' in this section, bearing large 
spikes of almost pure white flowers in 
the spring months, when they are always 
in demand. It is considered rather hard 
to manage, and, as it comes from a hot 
climate, is grown too close and confined 
in the attempt to keep up the tempera- 
ture, especially in the winter time, where 
much fire heat is required. But here we 
have plants which only receive fire heat 
a few times during the winter, the tem- 
perature often going below 45 degrees, 
and still these plants do not seem to 
suffer in the least. They are grown in 
an open house all the time, where every- 
thing is left open night and day, ex- 
cept when tliere is fear of a frost; and 
they have been grown that way for 
years. 

I'hahrnopsis Schilleriana, from the 
same country as the last, is a stronger 
grower, bearing a spike with as high as 
100 flowers at one time; color, from pale 
to dark pink. 

Vanda cterulea, northern Imlia, is one 
of the few blue orchids, varying from 
light to dark blue. It is always salable. 

Dendrobium nobile, India, is one of 
the oldest varieties, easy to grow and 
flower. 

Dendrobium AVardianum, Buriiuih, is 
also an old favorite. 

Dendrobium Phatenopsis, New Cuin- 
ea, is one of the best for cut flowers, 
giving spikes sometimes two feet long, 
with from twenty to twenty-four flowers 
of various shades of pink, and lasts a 
long time in bloom. 

Dendrobium formosum. Burniah, is a 
good one to grow, bearing white flow- 
ers wliich .are much used for bridal bou- 
qiu'ts. 

Odontoglossum litrosmuni. Mexico, is 
about the only one of this class we can 
manage here; should be.gi\cn the same 
treatment as hadia .am'ejis, and gives 
long spikes of light pink llowers. 

Oncidium crispum, O. siiemlidium and 
O. varicosum are three yood varieties 
to grow, bearing long spikes of yellow 
or spotted flowers which are fine in deco- 
rations. 

There .-ire. ol' (;ourse, many others 
vvliiidi may be ;^rown. but 1 tliink this 
list will '^^ive ;i- Liood results as a larger 
• one. 



March 7, 1907. 



The Weekly Florists' Review. 



1161 




Gates Ajar by J. W. Ross, Centralia, 111. 



THE GATES AJAR. 

'J lie ;ircniii|iaiiviiij^ illiist i:iti<iii is lo- 
prodiH-vil I'ldiii u ])l)ot(><;rajili oT a >;ates 
ajar, tiolii t^lorifiod ami sini|)li(}e(l liy 
.1. W. ii'ns<. (if t'ontralia, ill. The piece 
stdoil thirty I'jnlit inches lii^h r. '1 was 
twenty fioht inches wide. The .loose 
Ire.atinent adds ininieiis\>l\ In the al- 



t lact iveness ol liie dosiirn ; in<leed, in it 
the solid design usually made can hardly 
ho recognized. The tlowcrs used were 
liride and Jiridvsinaid roses, callas. Pa- 
per Whites and \alley. the flowers from 
some unsold (Jhristmas a/.aleas Iteiny- em- 
ployed in the gates, lor the design was 
made Dr-ecndier '_".•. 

.■\ few makers of eNcdli'iit funeral 



work still employ the ohj,- solid stylo of 
construction, but tlKi/ncwcr idea is a 
loose form. It takes rather better flow- 
ers, but nut vii many of them, .and the 
ctfi'rt is ol a l;ir^iT and nimh moi'O ar- 
tist ie [tiecc. The s.dirj design gives 
the impression of lieing a mechanical 
i-reation irste.-hl of tlio wruk ^if an 
"artist." 



-.=...,.,,.. 



•^,h7 .-.'-»;' tip, "I, •i;5^,7v^,Vr^l^'*^•'.•^^ ■«(•'; -.5 ' ' ■ < ■,<,•),■,'. 



• "f JfT'ppjj _ 



1162 



The Weekly Rorists* Review. 



Mabch 7, 1907. 



DONLAN ON EXHIBITIONS. 

In an address before tlie Tarrytown 
Horti(?iiltural Society, Tarrytown, N. Y., 
f'ebruary 26, J. 1. Donlan spoke in part 
as follows: 

To our mind the vast majority of 
public^ flower shows display mostly, and 
merely, the egot^m or conceit of the 
flower grower. To be suie, the very 
highest cultural art is shown at these 
exhibitions, but that is all ; and, as a 
climax io this self-satisfactory suffi- 
ciency, no attempt whatever is made to 
satisfy the hungry ambitions of the great 
multitude. The grower naturally stands 
exhultingly,. admiring his symmetrically 
arranged rows of vases of flowers or 
mounds of plants over which he has 
labored day and night all the year to 
have them reach their perfection; but 
his extreme monotony in arranging these 
pets compels the average visitor to sniff 
with a casual glance, pass along to see 
all that is of interest to them in a few 
moments and go out to spread the news 
that, "It is just the same or not even 
as good as last year." There is some- 
thing radically wrong in all this and we 
are glad of this opportunity of submit- 
ting it to the attention of schedule com- 
pilers and the society in general. 

Every plant or flower has attractive 
beauty about it. The aim of every 
grower or dealer in them should be to 
show that attractiveness to best advan- 
tage, and in doing so he accomplishes an 
inestimable benefit, for he not only edu- 
cates, but creates a desire. If the grow- 
ers must have their crudely formal dis- 
plays, in order to satisfy a mistaken 
idea of the best methods of showing su- 




periority of culture, then a day should 
be set apart where the whole, or as much 
as possible, of the exhibits should be re- 
arranged, in competition, from a utility 
or artistic standpoint. We contend that 
inasmuch as the majority of stock is 
grown and exhibited with a view to its 
adaptability to certain decorative pur- 
poses, that that adaptability should be 
exemplified or portrayed. 




>£!v 




^♦^'••^ 



SEASONABLE 

SUGGESTIONS 




%fe»>'^f»'»Jn.''Mf#»^U^»''fc*-»><^^ •W-*^ %<r^ V'^''fef»»^t<>^''fef»> ■Wr^%fe»>'Wf»>^t<r^>Mr»N 



J 



Petunias. 

If you are propagating petunias from 
cuttings be careful not to leave them in 
the sand too long or until they become 
hard. Place in 2Vi-inch pots in light, 
rather sandy compost and give them a 
.light bench. In the case of seedlings, a 
portion may be put in pots for special 
orders, but they do equally as well in 
tints and grow like weeds when trans- 
planted from them. It saves a great 
amount of labor and watering to use the 
flats. They may also be pricked out in 
frames with a gentle bottom heat after 
the middle of April. Many other plants 
may be treated in the same way, in- 
cluding asters, stocks, verbenas. Phlox 
Drummondi, salvias and many others. 
The flats have the advantage of being 
more readily handled, more especially 
if plants are needed for store trade. 

Cannas. 

While there is still good time in which 
to start the roots of cannas, if you want 
good, stocky stuff they can be taken 
from under the benches, or wherever they 
have been stored, and brought into heat. 
Some growers lay the whole clumps on 
the benches and divide them after they 
start to grow. A much better plan is 
to divide them, leaving one sound eye 



and a few roots for each plant. These 
can be potted at once into 4-inch pots 
and if treated carefully only a small 
proportion will fail to start. They must 
be kept somewhat on the dry side at the 
start or many will rot. 

A better plan is to lay the individual 
pieces on a bench, closely together, where 
there is some bottom heat and where a 
top heat of 60 degrees at night is main- 
tained. Cover the bench with moss and 
scatter a little leaf-mold or moss over 
the roots. Keep them syringed twice a 
day, but do not soak them with the hose. 
In about three weeks growth and roots 
will be startiag freely and they can be 
potted up. Treated in this way excel- 
lent stock can be had with less trouble 
and expense than by any other method 
we have tried. 

Giladium Esculentum. 

Roots of that popular subtropical 
plant, Caladium esculentum, can be 
started any time during the month of 
March. The largest roots are not the 
most desirable. A brisk, moist heat is 
needed to make them break well. Set 
them on a bench in the same way as 
cannas, but if possible give them more 
bottom heat. Pack closely between the 
roots with moss, leaf-mold or sand. They 



will be ready for potting in about half 
the time cannas are if kept rather more 
moist at the root. If space on benches 
is valuable, you can delay starting them 
until after Easter this year and still get 
first-class plants. 

Genistas. 

Plants of genista intended for Easter 
which have been kept well clipped and 
bushy should show color by the middle 
of the month, in which case they will be 
along in good season. While these plants 
are quite attractive and sell well, they 
do not keep so well in the dwelling house 
as azaleas and some other plants. They 
should never be grown warm, for if 
forced the flowers will simply not keep 
at all. 

If a supply of cuttings has not been 
put in of these, a batch should now be 
placed in the sand. Do not place them 
in a warm house. A bench which suits 
carnation cuttings will root them well. 
If potted and grown along they will 
make nice 4-inch plants for next fall. 
Genistas need frequent pinching to keep 
them bushy. In the case of larger 
plants the simplest method is to clip 
them with a pair of shears several times 
during the summer months. Do not at- 
tempt to plant them outdoors in sum- 
mer. They are hard things to lift and 
will lose about all their foliage, even if 
carefully treated. 

Azaleas. 

If the buds of azaleas are beginning 
to show color now they will come along 
in time for Easter in a cool house. Later 
plants should be kept in a warm, moist 
house and freely syringed until they 
show color, after which they are to be 
kept dry overhead and rather cooler. 

If you have any plants unsold from 
the earlier batches, pick off the seeds 
and give them a warm house to make 
some growth in. They can be planted 
outdoors in a sunny spot, where you can 
reach them with the hose, and they will 
make fine stock for potting up in the 
fall. V 

Ferns. 

The majority of florists grow, or ought 
to grow, some ferns. A large variety is 
neither necessary nor desirable, for the 



^.w'...:.. ^-..x,.i..t,.».. ..^j.,jiu\Ht.^^^^u >■■ .■■«-« -Mtiir-fllr'-- ■-"■■•'"'•-■^■'-^^■iftiiJBiillltliil ii'-'i^li'lT 



nw.v»fW..if^W.M'.iivr 



.n;i.»il^viyn>.mji'«:M 



"^*'^*^-:'^, "^ '"'. 7»^^T*""rv^T*TvTTY* ^T'- 



Mabch 7, 1907. 



The Weekly Florists' Review. 



U6S 



call is only for a few sorts. Of these 
Adiantum cuneatum holds first place and 
is indispensable where bouquet or fu- 
neral work is made. If it is possible 
that some of your ferns have not been 
overhauled for a long time, before 
the spring rush starts in is a good time 
in which to pot them. If large, chop the 
clumps through with a sharp spade. Dis- 
etitangle the roots and repot in sizes 
sufficient to allow an inch of compost 
around the clump. In the case of plants 
in small pots, all they will need is to 
have the crocks removed from the roots 
and any loose soil shaken out before 
being repotted. 

A suitable soil for ferns consists of 
equal portions of leaf -mold and loam, 
with sand added. For vigorous growing 
sorts more loam and less of the leaf com- 
post can be used. Do not use s£ny ani- 
mal manure or chemical fertilizer of any 
sort. Plants, however, with the pots 
well filled with roots enjoy an occasional 
watering with liquid manure. Ferns of 
all sorts need a shady house and a moist 
atmosphere. In summer they grow 
splendidly in coldframes under sashes 
shaded with kerosene and white lead. 
Snails are sometimes troublesome among 
adiantums. A dusting of air-slaked lime 
on the bench will clear out most of them. 
A little should also be dusted among the 
crowns. If the pots can be moved from 
the bench and boiling water poured over 
it many will be killed. 

A few desirable ferns to grow in ad- 
dition to Adiantum cuneatum are A. gra- 
cillimum, A. Charlottse, Pteris cretica 
Majdi, Pteris serrulata cristata, Cyrto- 
mium faleatum, Cibotium Schiedei, the 
finest tree fern for house culture; Pteris 
adiantoides, Pteris "Wimsetti, Aspidium 
tsussimense, Davallia stricta and the 
various nephrolepis, such as Bostonien- 
sis, Whitmani, Scottii and Elegantissima. 

Care of Seedlings. 

Many of the earUer sown batches of 
annuals will now be ready to pinch off. 
This work should not be delayed a day 
longer than absolutely necessary. We 
are mostly prone to sow our seeds too 
thickly and a few days' crowding will 
ruin many of the little seedlings. Shade 
with cheese-cloth or newspapers for a 
few days after the pricking off. Do not 
overwater them and, on the other hand, 
be careful they are not allowed to get 
dusty dry. Use a watering pot in lieu 
of a hose for watering purposes. Keep 
all flats of seedlings which are not 
pricked out well up to the light to keep 
them stocky. 

Brief Reminders* 

Buds of Easter lilies -should now be 
starting to droop. Those which still 
point upwards need a little hurrying. 
Now is the time to get in the extra forc- 
ing needed, not the week before Easter. 

Sow seeds of Canterbury bells, wall- 
flowers, Campanula persicifolia and C. 
pyramidalis, and any of the perennial 
delphiniums if you want strong plants 
by fall. 

Marguerites should not be subjected to 
any forcing. The flowers of these re- 
main fresh on the plant a long time if 
they are not allowed to become dry. 
Flowers should now be opening. 

If you see color in the buds of Bam- 
bler roses by March 15 you should have 
them in season for Easter. 




Charles Knopf. 



Elkhart, Ind. — The greenhouses of 
Mrs. E. M. Bullock were entirely de- 
stroyed by fire at 5 a. m. February 28. 



THE GLASS MARKET. 

The jobbers of greenhouse sizes of 
window glass who are advertising in the 
Review find the demand considerably 
ahead of last year. Ever since the be- 
ginning of the season the number of in- 
quiries has been greater than usual. 
There are not so many large orders be- 
ing placed, but a much greater number 
of smaller orders. All through the coun- 
try growers are adding one or two houses. 

The price of glass has been stiffening 
steadily since the strength of the de- 
mand became apparent. The window 
glass industry seems in a strong position 
this spring and manufacturers are re- 
luctant to cut greenhouse sizes. It ap- 
pears certain that when the end of the 
season's fire comes, in June, there will 
be no great stock of greenhouse sizes on 
hand to meet the demand, which will 
continue steady, probably clear through 
September. The result will be that 
prices during the summer are likely to 
see a still further advance. 



CHARLES KNOPF. 

Charles Knopf, of Richmond, Ind., has 
loved flowers ever since he was old 
enough to admire their beauty, and was 
always near them whenever he had the 
opportunity. He flrst started in the 
florists' work in Richmond about fifteen 
years ago, at the Cascade Greenhouses, 
and from therjB he went to the E. G. 
Hill place. It' was here that he acquired 
a general knowledge of the business and 
the raising of new carnations. He re- 
mained there about two and one-half 
years, and then went back to the Cas- 
cade Greenhouses. While there he dis- 
covered the value in the carnation Dor- 
othy, but it was not a seedling of his 
own raising. Shortly after being at this 
place the second time he saw a good op- 
portunity to establish a wholesale busi- 



nes at the E. T. Grave place in Rich- 
mond, which at that time was only two 
small houses, more for the pleasure of 
Mrs. Grave than for profit. Mr. Knopf 
went to work for Mrs. Grave as grower 
and manager. He then bought the va- 
riety Dorothy, in a short time proved 
its worth and worked up* stock and in- 
troduced it to the trade. It proved to 
be a valuable variety for the trade, as 
it is still quite extensively grown in cer- 
tain localities. He remained with this 
firm five years and then established the 
firm of the B. K. & B. Floral Co., of 
which he is manager. 

Mr. Knopf has raised many seedlings 
and has a number now on the place. 
Sarah A. Hill, white, is his best sort and 
shortly to be introduced to the trade. It 
is named for the sister of E. G. Hill, who 
is associated with the Hill company, and 
who is a^ well informed in trade matters 
as any other member of the firm. She 
has charge of the office work, and is usu- 
ally the first to greet the visitor. If the 
carnation achieves a place as high in the 
estimation of the craft as has the lady 
whose name it bears, Mr. Knopf can ask 
nothing more. 



HORTICULTURAL EXHIBITION. 

The bureau of publicity of the Mann- 
heim exposition of 1907 sends out the 
following: 

A great horticultural exposition, in 
combination with an international expo- 
sition of art, will be opened May 1 at 
Mannheim, on the Rhine, Germany. It 
may be of greatest interest that a num- 
ber of most exquisite artists participate 
in this arrangement by creating special 
gardens, each one promising to be re- 
markable because of its originality. 
Probably modern horticultural art will 
obtain numerous new incitations and 
great impulse from this exhibition. 

The exposition at Mannheim is especi* 



■V I'lBMlt.nlftf**-" '--''**'• '•^•■"-—■•^■Mlini- rtLri">M"-"ti' r'' - 1 T -| iini'- 



. irtiitir-fi-n- -Vnt-^ilri All'**' >'.. ^' I I 



r' ■v,3;ff.-sr.T-T!7?^'^ w 



f*^i^W: 



U64 



The Weekly Florists^ Review* 



Mabch 7, 1907. 



ally a national undertaking, yet Ameri- 
can gardeners will haw opportunity to 
exhibit in several departments. Inter- 
national are the exhibits of orchids, 
cacti, modern horticulture and the exhib- 
its of fruits and greens. England, 
Prance and even the primitive forests of 
South America will contribute to the ex- 
hibits of orchids. Besides cultivated 
plants from England and France there 
will be exhibited, as curiosities, the 
strange forms of wild orchids, gathered 
with difficulty in Mexico, l^r^ail and on 
the banks of the Orinoco river. 

The cactus exhibit will contain a great 
number of interesting and peculiar 
plants, representing a rich collection 
from all tropical countries. There will 
be, for instance, gigantic cacti from 
Mexico and South America. 



The exhibition of horticultural novel- 
ties, by cultivators from Germany and 
foreign countries, surely will be of great- 
est attraction. The progress of Ameri- 
can horticulture in fruits and plants, as 
well as in greens, will be shown here. 

Eight special exhibits will give oppor- 
tunity to all countries of the world to 
show by their products their degrees of 
advancement in fruit cultivation. Amer- 
ica, a country which sends every year 
many thousands of quintals of fruit to 
Germany, will take justifiable interest in 
exhibiting its products at Mannheim and 
in demonstrating the different methods 
of preparing them for a long voyage. 
People will be interested in the differ- 
ent methods of preserving fruits and 
greens and the various forms of cool- 
ing apparatus. 




CARNATION NOTES —VEST. 



Shif ting Young Stock. 

If you propagated a lot of carnation 
cuttings early and have had them potted 
six weeks or so you will have to give 
them a shift within the next few weeks. 
The first two weeks in March is the best 
time for this, as a rule, because it gives 
the plants plenty of time to become re- 
established and to make a good growth 
before time for planting out. 

Don't think that because the young 
plants may look young and tender and 
not excessively pot-bound that they will 
stand all right in the small pots. Young 
carnation plants want to be kept con- 
tinually on the move. By that I do not 
mean that they should be induced to 
make a large, rank growth, but it should 
be slow and steady' and should not be 
checked by being pot-bound, which means 
not only starved, but later on it means 
frequent drying out at the roots during 
warm spring days. The latter is as in- 
jurious as the first named, if not worse. 

We like to plant from pots and prefer 
shifting the young plants from 2-inch 
into 3-inch pots and planting from these 
into the field. There are several reasons 
for this. When planting from pots you 
have a good ball of earth and you have 
every root that belongs to the plant in- 
tact. Taking the plant from the green- 
house out into the open field, subjecting 
it to the strong sunshine and the drying 
spring winds, is trying enough for the 
young plants, without having many of the 
roots torn or cut and, in many cases, 
most of the soil shaken from them. If 
there is no rainfall for a few days the 
suffering is not so intense when a good 
ball of earth is kept intact, nor will it 
begin so early as it will when the soil- 
is shaken from the roots. You will find, 
too, that this ball of earth will hold to- 
gether in the fall when you dig the 
plants for housing and it is a great help 
at that time. I have also found that 
the roots on such plants will be more 
bunchy and you can get more of them 
with the plants, when digging them. 

Another way, which is practiced by 
many large growers and which is a modi- 



fication of the above, is to pot the cut- 
tings into 2-inch pots and about this time 
plant them in three inches of soil on the 
bench, setting about three inches apart 
each way. This method will produce 
fine, strong ^oung plants and the 3-inch 
pots are dispensed with. The ball from 
the 2-inch pot will hold together when 
taken up- to be planted in the field, but, 
of course, many roots are broken and 
the transfer is accompanied with more 
suffering than when planting is done 
from pots. The growth is more apt to 
be rank and soft under this method, too, 
which is not desirable. There will not 
be so much drying of the soil as in the 
pots, which is a good feature and insures 
a steady growth. Either of these meth- 
ods is commendable, though we prefer 
the pot method. We do not approve of 
planting the rooted cuttings right on the 
bench. The roots run out too long and 
are mangled too much when taking up 
the plants. 



Cuttings taken from the sand after 
this date can be potted right into 2%.- 
inch pots and left in those pots until 
time for planting out. When these are 
set on a bench near the ventilators, or 
where! a draught will strike them, the 
pots should be plunged abafGlNiialf-way 
in sand. This will retard drying out and 
will be a great help next month. 

Keep the young plants sprayed with 
the tobacco extracts, to prevent aphis or 
thrips from getting a foothold on them, 
the same as you do the blooming plants. 
Dusting them with tobacco dust will be 
found a great help, too, though we pre- 
fer the spraying as being more effective 
and cleaner. Syringe them hard, at 
least once each week, to keep off red 
spider and to keep off rust, dust them 
with air-slaked lime. Be sure they have 
an abundance of sunlight and ventilation 
to promote sturdiness. 

A. F. J. Baur. 



SOIL FOR CARNATIONS. 

I shall grow carnations in benches next 
year for the first time, having grown 
them under glass, but in the ground. I 
want to get the right kind of soil, but I 
cannot get rotted sod or cow manure 
here. I can get a rich, black, sandy 
loam, almost silt. What shall I put with 
that? Leaf -mold is obtainable. 

A. L.H. 



There is no use describing what we 
consider the ideal carnation soil in this 
locality, since you say you cannot secure 
the two principal parts that we use. 
Rotted sod and cow manure will, without 
any doubt, make the best soil for carna- 
tions; but we have known fine carnations 
to be grown where one pr both of these 
were lacking. Carnations do not like a 
rough soil like roses do, but, rather, a 
porous, well-pulverized soil bordering on 
a sandy loam, though not too light. 
When cow manure is added in liberal 
quantities to enrich it, you have a first- 
class soil. In your case with such a light 
soil as you have, if your soil is rich, you 
will likely get a heavy, rank growth and, 
unless you can make it heavier with clay 
or cow manure, you will not get the qual- 



MLl^"^ 




l^wr 


p» 




y^^^^P 






• 

1 




> 


>.'':>^ 


1 


fi 


1 



Pink Seedling Lawson z Enchantress. 

(Raised by C. Leisy, Wenonah, N. J. 



■ ...rv ■ .. .... •!■ ''•^<<^:-rtiui'Hmtin t iSi i ii 



^r^W^y'^'-' 



:.'/r'-Tr^.'. TTv.-y^'iri^"^'**.' V. . " T ■ 



Mabch 7, 1907. 



The Weekly Florists' Review. 



1165 



ity in the blooms you ought to get. The 
fitems, too, will lack in s&ength. 

If your carnations in the natural 
ground gave fairly good results, then I 
would use the same soil on the benches. 
If you use stable manure rake out as 
much of the straw as you can. Sheep 
manure would be better ; use a big wheel- 
barrowful of sheep manure to a yard of 
soil. Turn this over several times, a cou- 
ple of weeks apart, so it will be well 
mixed. After filling in the bencnes, rake 
in a liberal supply of bone meal, before 
setting in your plants. After that de- 
pend on sheep manure for mulching and 
bone meal and wood ashes to stiffen the 
stems and heighten the quality of the 
blooms. You must watch your plants 
and give them what they seem to need 
from time to time. One cannot give ex- 
plicit directions without knowing more 
about local conditions, etc., than I do 
about yours. A. F. J. B. 

HELLENTHAUS CARNATIONS. 

The accompanying illustration is pre- 
pared from a photograph made in one 
of the new houses of J. R. Hellenthal, 
at Columbus. There are four varieties 
of carnations in the house. Enchantress, 
Lawson, Lady Bountiful and Ethel Ward. 
The plants of Enchantress, according to 
Charles M. Jones, who is grower in 
charge, are a long way ahead of any- 
thing else on the place. 



AMERICAN CARNATION SOCIETY. 



Carnations Registered. 

E. Witterstaetter, Cincinnati, registers 
The Cardinal, color a deep rich scarlet; 
habit similar to Estelle but stronger. 

The Aristocrat, color a deep, lively 
cerise; long-stemmed flowers three to 
three and one-half inches in diameter; 
habit, no surplus grass, a rapid grower, 
quite healthy and with long-jointed 
stems. 

Afterglow, color a light, rosy cerise, 
a three-inch flower, guard petals stand- 
ing out straight, with high buUt center; 
habit, a strong, vigorous grower, stems 
the length of Aristocrat but more rigid; 
destined to be grown as largely as Law- 
son in its time. 

i Albert M. Herr, Sec'y. 



DELPHINIUMS. 



The larkspurs are useful annual and 
perennial plants. The boldness of the 
plant and the beauty of the flowers will 
always attract attention. They are ef- 
fective when planted in beds or. massed 
in front of shrubs. In color the flowers 
range from palest to deepest blue, and 
include pink, red and white, but rarely 
yellow. 

The culture of larkspur is simple, ob- 
serves the National Council of Horticul- 
ture. They will thrive in almost any 
good garden soil and in almost any sit- 
uation. The perennial kinds should be 
propagated from seed sown early in the 
fall. In the spring young seedlings, 
which have been kept during the win- 
ter in a coldframe in 2-inch or 3-inch 
pots, should be available and should be 
set out two or three feet apart in rich, 
sandy loam, in a sunny exposure. Peren- 
nial larkspurs may also be propagated by 
taking up an old plant and dividing its 
roots. In fact, a bed will remain in con- 
dition longer if the plants are dug up 
and replanted every three or four years. 
The roots or young seedlings may be ob- 




Carnation House of John R. Hellenthal, Columbus, Ohio. 



tained from most wholesale dealers in 
hardy plants. Grandiflorum, hybridum, 
and f ormosum are the best varieties. 

Seed of the annual varieties may be 
sown in beds or borders in spring or fall, 
preferably the latter, so germination may 
take place in early spring. As the seed- 
lings grow they should stand twelve to 
eighteen inches apart. Seed sown in 
April will give good results. When the 
plants are established they should be 
transplanted to light, rich soil, where 
they will grow rapidly. The so-called an- 
nuals are really hardy biennials, but be- 
cause they bloom the first season they 
are treated as annuals. Two successive 
flower crops may be had the same season 
from the same plants if the faded flower 
stems of the first crop are removed. 
Among the better varieties are Ajacis, 
which grows from fifteen to eighteen 
inches high, and has graceful spreading 
branches, and grandiflorum. 



THE ILLINOIS APPROPRIATION. 

An amendment to the bill providing 
the annual appropriations for the Uni- 
versity of Illinois has been introduced 
at Springfield by C. J. Lindley and is 
now in the hands of the sub-committee 
on university, of the house appropria- 
tions committee, of which Frank J. 
Heinl, of Jacksonville, is chairman. 
These gentlemen are looking after the 
florists' interests, but when the amend- 
ment is reported out with the bill men- 
tioned, it must have as broad support 
as the trade can get for it. The follow- 
ing is the text of the amendment: 

That It shall be the duty of the Agricultural 
Experiment Station to discorer and demonstrate 
the best methods of producing plants, cut flow- 
ers and vegetables under glass, and the most 
effective remedies for disease and Insect enemies 
of the same, to Investigate and demonstrate the 
best varieties and methods of producing orna- 
mental trees, shrubs and plants suitable for pub- 
lic and private grounds In the various soils and 
climatic conditions of the state, and to dissemi- 
nate information concerning the same; and 
that, to carry out the provisions of this section, 
there be, and hereby Is. appropriated the sum 
of ten thousand dollars ($10,000.00) for the year 
1907 and five thousand dollars ($5,000.00) for 
the year 1908; provided, that the work under- 
taken and outlined in this section shall be car- 
ried out In lines to be agreed upon by the direc- 
tor of the Agricultural Experiment Station and 
an advisory committee of five, to be appointed 
by the Illinois State Florists' Association. 

This asking is supported by the Illi- 



nois State Florists' Association, Chicago 
Florists' Club, Horticultural Society of 
Chicago and all the leading growers of 
greenhouse products. Each florist should 
see personally or write his representative 
at Springfield to support the appropria- 
tion asked for. 



USING HAND PUMP. 

Can water be forced with a hand pump 
a distance of 350 feet, which includes 
an elevation of seventy-five feet above 
the water in the well ? J. K. H. 



Your question is not quite clear, but if 
the well is not over thirty feet deep the 
^vater can be raised by suction to that 
height and then forced any distance into 
the tank. If the well is over thirty feet 
deep it will be necessary to place the 
working cylinder of the pump within 
thirty feet of the water-level in order to 
make it work. Water can be taken from 
a well 300 or 400 feet deep, but the 
Avorking cylinder is usually placed well 
down, even below the water-level, so that 
there can never be more than thirty feet 
suction. Above the working cylinder it 
is simply a matter of lifting a column 
of water to the height desired, which 
simply requires power. While the work 
in question can be done by hand power, 
it will be hard, and an engine or wind- 
mill should be carefully considered if 
there is much pumping to be done. 

L. C. C. 



Bloomsville, O. — W. S. Lowry, who 
began in a small way two years ago, re- 
ports good business. 

Minneapolis, Minn. — The articles of 
incorporation of Wm. Donaldson & Co. 
have been amended so that beginning 
March 4 the name became L. S. Donald- 
son Co. 

Davenport, Ia. — The Tri-City Flo- 
rists' Club held a special meeting Feb- 
ruary 28 at Fejervary park. The ques- 
tion as to whether they would give an 
annual picnic or not was to have been 
discussed but after the new greenhouse 
had been inspected little time remained 
to discuss the question, so the meeting 
took on the form of a social evening. 



u. I'l Aiat^nrtfi ■rtto lit*' -*^' " — -^ ■•--■..■■ —^'-.--.^^ \ 



I ■Vl«>-*lWl1fii JMii'rliiii'irmfii 1 ■ i^i£.cJt, 



' r. vn f*/, .,■■ 



I.--. /-Jl ■-.■^■/,-i« 



v>7•,■^',>'"4?» •^■:-'r^rr;;i>fr>'~^f^v'rr^'^ir^<^^^ 



\\66 



The Weekly Florists' Review* 



Mabch 7, 1907. 



VEILAND & OLINGER PLANT. 

The establishment of Weiland & Oliu- 
ger, at New Castle, Ind., consists of six- 
teen houses. Ten of them are devoted to 
tea roses, three to American Beauty and 
three to carnations. The accompanying 
illustrations are from photographs made 
November 20. Enchantress is shown in 
one of the interior views, Beauty in the 
other. Peter Weiland gives his personal 
attention to the Beauties and had a fine 
crop on for Christmas. He is one of a 
well-known family of florists, being a 



son of M. Weiland, of Evanston, III., a 
nephew of Peter Keinberg and related to 
the Wietor brothers, Adam Zender, John 
Muno and others in the trade. Mr. Olin- 
ger is his partner 's brother-in-law. They 
have, in addition to the range of glass, 
a big field of peonies of the best varie- 
ties, planted for cut flowers. Last season 
the weather was so unfavorable just at 
the blooming period that it ruined most 
of the crop, but the field has now been 
planted long enough for the stock to be 
well established and better luck is hoped 
for this year. 




GREENFLY AND RED SPIDER. 

As spring advances we may look for 
a rapid increase of greenfly and red spi- 
der and special efforts should be made 
to exterminate them before they become 
too numerous. 

It is almost impossible to fumigate 
with tobacco as frequently as is neces- 
sary to keep greenfly in check, without 
at the same time causing injury to the 
flower and foliage to some extent. 

The petals of the pink varieties are 
so easily bleached that heavy fumigation 
frequently makes them unsalable and, 
although the injury to the foliage is not 
so apparent, it is there nevertheless, and 
a careful microscopic examination will 
show the injury done. 

This method of keeping greenfly in 
subjection is yet the most commonly used 
but it is far from being perfect; nor 
have we as yet found a substitute that 
can be used with the same freedom and 
safety. 

That cyanide of potassium is more ef- 
fective and less injurious to bloom and 
foliage there is no doubt, but many 
growers show a decided inclination to 
avoid the attending dangers consequent 
on the use of this deadly gas. Where 
plenty of tobacco stems can be had it 
is a very safe and effective way to keep 
these under the benches, on the pipes or, 
in fact, anywhere in the house where 
they will be out of the way and cause 
no untidiness. By renewing these peri- 
odically greenfly can make no headway 
and there is not the least danger to even 
the most delicate leaved plants, such as 
ferns, spiraeas or cinerarias. 

If spider is present in the house keep 
the syringe going on every favorable oc- 
casion and, particularly, keep an eye on 
the young plants, as this is oro of the 
most insidious and injurious pests they 
have to contend with in their present 
stage. BiBES. 



SOUTHERN ROSES UNDER GLASS. 

[A paper by R. Lockerbie, New Orleans, read 
before the Society of Southern Florists, at the 
New Orleans Convention, February 14 to 16. 
1907, continued from the Issue of February 28.] 

Plantins. 

The operation of planting is simple, 
but must be well done. Insert the plant 
well beneath the surface of the soil and 
press it down firmly with both hands. 
The soil around the plant must then be 
firmed, leaving a cup-like depression at 
the base. Eoses naturally love a firm 
footing, but where the soil is of a heavy, 
clay texture, less firming is necessary 
than where it is of a loose, sandy nature. 
In the latter case you can hardly make 
the soil too firm, so you must let the 
nature of the soil guide your judgment 
in the matter. Be careful in all this 
firming process not to mash the ball of 
the young plant. I have found no imple- 
ment so handy for this "purpose as a pint 
beer bottle filled with sand and corked. 
Like a certain brand of soap, this "just 
fits the hand," and beats the bare fist 
or a brick all hollow. Where three men 
work together, one inserting the plants 
and the other two using the bottles, a 
great many can be speedily planted. 



Watering at Plantiiig. ■ 

After planting a few rows fill the de-' 
pressions full of water, so that the bench 
will be thoroughly saturated to the bot- 
tom, and spray the plants. By delaying 
this waterm^, until a whole bench is 
planted you m^y find a great many of 
the plants have evaporated their mois- 
ture and lost the tips of their young 
shoots. Every bright day the plants will 
require copious doses of water, in the 
depressions only, and also a good syring- 
ing. Do this in the morning and repeat 
the syringing after dinner all during the 
hot summer months. The walks and un- 
derneath the benches should also be well - 
wet down a few times each day to neu- 
tralize, as far as possible, the enervating 
effects of the summer heat. 

There is a wide margin between the 
terms, too wet and too dry, but this 
cannot be measured out in talk, and each 
grower must study this out for himself. 
It is difficult to give too much water ' 
during the summer months, if the roseS 
are in a good growing condition and the 
drainage has been properly provided for. 
It is also well to remember that a rose 
plant during summer will quickly go tO' 
pieces if kept too dry, and is much 
harder to restore than one that has been 
kept a little too wet. 

The grass and weeds will quickly 
spring into being, but there need be na 
haste to remove them. For the first 
three weeks they serve two important 
purposes, which more than compensate 
for the little nourishment they take from 
the soil. First, they take up any surplus 
moisture the bench may receive, thus 
keeping the soil sweet, and second, they 
act as a shield against the sun's rays,, 
keeping the soil cool and giving the 
young plants a good chance to start into 
active growth. After this they must be 
religiously kept down. 

Supporting. 

Staking and tying up are next in or- 
der. The sooner tea roses are tied up,, 
the better and stronger will the breaks 
be. Beauties, on the other hand, ought 
to be left to wander at their own sweet 
will until the breaks have started fronk 
the bottom. It seems the gentle over- 
hang is just enough to induce the eyes at 
the base to start into active growth. 
Use wire stakes three and one-half to 
four feet long for tea roses and six feet 
long for Beauties, and tie each stake t» 
an overhead wire running the whole 
length of the bed, over each row of 
plants. Keep the plants always neatly 



•- ;.''.V\'".i..l 1 




Establiihment of Weiland & Ollnger, New Gistle, Ind, 



ilMVi.*^' >.^- iri^. .'T.fT'AffjK-A if^d'fi- •**'' ^--*-- -* ^*>«^-J»fe'.. 



■*- -^'■"^-"ira>'^>riilAitiiJ ■! 



v^^'Tfli; ^^xy^'':'ri'i:^Ti\-i',"s-'?f?j^,'-r 



•■fi-rr -.7 f^-.f* 



.,,•,..-,,.- '■■-..-«t- 



March 7, 1907. 



The Weekly Florists' Review. 



1167 




House of Beauties at Weiland & Olioger's^ New Castle* Ind. 



tied up, but not too tightly. Remember 
that the air must circulate freely 
through, as well as around, the plants. 

In about six weeks from planting each 
young plant should have filled the cup 
around its base with roots, and the whole 
bed can -then be leveled off and firmed 
evenly all over. A dusting of air-slaked 
lime may then be applied and the sur- 
face loosened up with a hand cultivator. 
Repeat this cultivation every week if 
uecessary until the roots reach the sur- 
face, when all cultivation must cease. 
The firming of the soil is necessary to 
produce fine, large foliage, the proper 
accompaniment to a first-class bloom. 

The Trying Months. 

The months of July and August are 
very trying ones on the young plants. 
Then we have almost daily many hard 
thunder showers which, followed by the 
bright sun, produce a warm, moist at- 
mosphere, causing a soft, rank growth, 
which is liable to breed trouble later. I 
would recommend a light mulch of any 
old, wornout manure at this time by way 
of protection against the sun's rays and 
after each shower syringe the plants and 
wet down the walks. This mulch will 
preclude the necessity of cultivating the 
benches so often. Renew it when it gets 
worn out. 

During the summer months top and 
side ventilators and all doors should be 
wide open day and night, except during 
heavy rain storms, when they should l^ 
closed just enough to turn the rain. 

About October 1 in this latitude is 
soon enough to close the side ventilators 
at night, but the ones at the ridge should 
always be more or less open, according 
to the state of the weather. 

Particular care should also be taken 
with the watering. The plants will need 
less water, and should only be syringed 
in the morning, so that the foliage will 
be thoroughly dry before night. 

October is generally very fickle and is 
liable to usher in a few very cool nights 
without much warning, which, unless your 
heating apparatus is ready for action, 
will either check the growth of the plants 
or start a healthy dose of mildew. A 
check in the growth at this time is a 
serious matter and something that is to 
be avoided at all risks. The transition 
from summer to winter conditions should 
come gradually and every effort be made 



to keep the plants healthy and growing. 
"When the thermometer outdoors falls 
below 60 degrees at night, a little fire 
heat is beneficial. Start your fires and 
open the ventilators a few inches. This 
insures a good circulation of air, and 
tends to give the roses that strong, 
leathery foliage so much desired. In- 
deed, there are few nights when it is 
needful to have the ventilators tightly 
closed, and make it a rule never to have 
them closed at night unless you are fir- 
ing. The fuel is not wasted, even if you 
have to open the ventilators to keep the 
temperature down. 

Temperature. 

The best night temperature for tea 
roses of the Bride and Bridesmaid class 
is 56 degrees, but, unfortunately, we 
don't often get it cool enough to reach 
that mark. Kaiserin and Perle like it a 
little warmer, and 60 degrees at night 
suits them well. The Kaiserin is a fine 
rose for the south, and is just as free 
during the shorter winter months as The 
Bride, and in the fall and late spring is 
far superior to that popular variety. 
Beauties require a night temperature of 



60 degrees and Meteor requires 68 to 
70 degrees. Since the advent of Rich- 
mond the Meteor has been relegated to 
the background, but, nevertheless, it is a 
fine rose for the south. 

The day temperature on dull days 
should run 2 degrees to 5 degrees higher 
than the night temperature and on bright 
days the thermometer may go 10 degrees 
to 20 degrees higher and even more, but 
with plenty of ventilation on the houses. 

The whole subject of ventilating is a 
particular science in itself. Outdoor con- 
ditions must be closely observed and as 
the temperature begins to rise you must 
raise the ventilators a little at a time 
and keep them going up with the mer- 
cury. As the temperature begins to fall, 
so must the ventilators gradually come 
down. The man who can do this thor- 
oughly under all conditions has mastered 
one of the most important factors in 
rose growing. 

Syringing. 

Other important points are the water- 
ing and syringing, two entirely distinct 
operations. Every morning the beds 
ought to be closely examined and any 
dry spots watered before they get a 
general watering. Conditions are re- 
versed from summer and the beds are 
easily overwatered. Light, sandy soils 
will use quite a lot of water, while heavy 
clay soils are long in drying out and 
consequently will use less water. Care 
and judgment must be observed. 

Every bright day the plants must be 
syringed; otherwise red spiders will get 
in their fine work. A fine spray of water 
must be so directed as to hit the under 
side of the foliage, where the spiders 
congregate. These little pests are faith- 
ful to their destiny, "be ye fruitful and t. 
multiply," and their instinct leads them 
to seek the under side of the foliage as 
the safest spot. To syringe properly, 
the lower half of the nozzle should be 
closed with the forefinger, which gives 
the stream of water a natural upward 
direction and makes it easier to reach 
the under side of the leaves. 

I again emphasize the necessity of this 
operation as early as possible in the 
morning, so that the foliage may be dry 
before sundown. If the foliage is not 
thoroughly dry by night it will soon de- 



« 


i u ■• 


j 

•> 

, It. 


■■A i 





House of Enchantress at Weiland & Olinger's, New Castle, Ind. 



^■ifiifc'tlMi-""**^"^**^-^'^-'' '-■•^'^-■^'"'- " ■ ■■Vi'^WrttAnirtrt ^ Ji:iUi.^'... IsL. t^-*^^-- -* . ..^:*^.-.^.~.^^.'^i^^. .• a, - - 



*:,_iiJi..^.i^.^.., 



:'r«'l»*(f.^/'T»;^' "J^k-Jw.N'iTr'T 



Vr - -T- ^' T'Tl,- 



7" jlpi'^.T''"' 



rp^ 



"TfTflP rl -'I l^'l-'^" <!l!fT ff\*^''~ 



'-'iP>y*'^'"'^^''""^T'"yfv 



U68 



The Weekly Florists' Review, 



March 7, 1907. 



velop a red rust that is baneful in effect 
and detracts from the market value of 
the blooms. 

It sometimes happens that immedi- 
ately after syringing the weather be- 
comes cloudy, in which case I would ad- 
vise putting a little artificial heat in the 
houses and opening the ventilators a little 
wider. 

You will find the red spider most trou- 
blesome on Beauties and roses with 
hybrid blood in them. Possibly the 
heavier foliage of these varieties offers a 
better protection from the force of wa- 
ter. Some growers, in regions where 
syringing is often impossible for days 
at a time, use a weak solution of Paris 
green to keep the spider in check; but 
I have had little experience with it, so 
am not competent to advise. Where 
there is plenty of force of water and 
enough bright days to allow of syringing 
twice or three times a week, there will be 
little trouble with the pest. 
(To be Continued.) 



field has made peonies a specialty since 
1884. He now has a collection of 640 
varieties. In the block shown in the 
picture there is just one plant of each 
variety. They are planted 3x5 feet, all 
carefully labeled and afford an excellent 
opportunity for comparison of varieties. 
The other illustration shows a hedge 
of viburnum fifteen feet high and in full 
bloom, loaded with thousands of flowers. 
This hedge divides the residence and or- 
namental grounds' from the service 
buildings of the farm, which also are of 
a character to impress the visitor with 
the fact that Mr. Eosenfield has one of 
the finest locations ^o be found anywhere 
in the west. 



SEEN IN NEBRASKA. 

The accompanying illustration, repro- 
duced from a photograph made at the 
home of J. F. Eosenfield, at West Point, 
Neb., is interesting for several reasons, 
not the least of which is the fact that 
it controverts the general eastern idea of 
conditions in Nebraska. Those who. 
think of the state as regards horticul- 
ture, usually apply to it only the terms 
properly pertaining to the western and 
the northwestern counties, where the ele- 
vation is as much as 5,000 feet above 
the sea, where the land is principally 
sand hills, which give way to the buttes 
and bad lands of the extreme western 
part, and where the wind is never weary. 

West Point, the home of J. F. Eosen- 
field, is in Cuming county, in the eastern 
section of the state. This is a section 



THE EXPERIMENT STATION. 

[A paper by Professor A. C. Beal, of the Uni- 
versity of Illinois, read before the Illinois State 
Florists' Association, at the annual convention, 
ut Bloomlngtou, February 19, 1907.] 

President Eudd, in his address to the 
S. A. F. in 1899, said: "We are not as 
a class receiving from the experiment 
stations — institutions established and con- 
ducted with public funds and for the 
public good — the benefits to which we are 
entitled. For this state of affairs no 
one is to blame but ourselves. We have 
neglected to make our wants known in 
an intelligent manner, and have not ac- 
cepted gracefully what little work has 
been done in our behalf. * ' 

President Kasting, last year at Day- 
ton, called attention to the work of the 
experiment stations and advanced the 
opinion that florists should use their best 
endeavors to see that the stations are pro- 
vided with suflScient funds for carrying 
on their work. 

Since there has been a movement in 
Illinois during the last two years look- 
ing toward closer relations between the 
florists and the State Experiment Sta- 
tion, I thought it might be well at this 




Hedge of Viburnum at J. F. Rosenfield's, West Point, Neb. 



adapted to apple growing and native 
plums and cherries are recommended by 
the state horticultural society. Grapes 
do well here. The picture shows that 
there is nothing of the arid character in 
this section of the state. 

In the foreground' of the picture a 
peony plantation is shown. Mr. Eosen- 



time to call attention to the object of 
experiment stations, what has been ac- 
complished and what in floriculture needs 
to be done. 

Work of the Experiment Stations. 

The work of the experiment stations 
is thus outlined in the Hatch act, which 



provided an appropriation of $15,000 an- 
nually for establishing and maintaining 
a station in each state : "It shall be the 
object and duty of said experiment sta- 
tions to conduct original researches or 
verify experiments on the physiology of 
plants and animals, the diseases to which 
they are severally subject, with the 
remedies for the same ; the chemical com- 
position of useful plants at their differ- 
ent stages of growth; the comparative 
advantages of rotative cropping as pur- 
sued under varying series of crops; the 
capacity of new plants or trees for ac- 
climation; the analysis of soils and 
water; the chemical composition of ma- 
nures, natural and artificial, with experi- 
ments designed to test their comparative 
effects on crops of different kinds; the 
adaptation and value of grasses and for- 
age plants; the composition and digesti- 
bility of the different kinds of food for 
domestic animals; the scientific and eco- 
nomic questions involved in the produc- 
tion of butter and cheese ; and such other 
researches or experiments bearing direct- 
ly on the agricultural industry of the 
United States as may in each case be 
deemed advisable, having due regard to 
the varying conditions and needs of the 
respective states and territories." 

According to the last available report, 
there are sixty experiment stations in the 
United States, of which fifty-three re- 
ceive support from the federal govern- 
ment. Although there are 710 persons 
engaged in the work of these stations, 
floriculture is not recognized, and but 
one person, George Coote, in the Oregon 
Experiment Station, is specifically charged 
with experimental work along this line. 

During the twenty years that the 
United States experiment stations have 
been established in the various states, 
there have been issued not less than 
5,000 bulletins, of which sixty are on 
floriculture and allied greenhouse sub- 
jects. Of these, eight were on outdoor 
flowers, five on florists' flowers, twenty- 
four on vegetables under glass, five on 
diseases and seven on insects affecting 
greenhouse plants, three on greenhouse 
management, two on construction, three 
on electro-horticulture and one on forcing 
fruit. Of the sixty bulletins issued one 
was from Illinois, the leading state in 
floriculture. 

A Broad Field. 

One of the reasons why more work 
has not been done for the benefit of the 
florist is that in many of the stations 
one man stands for the whole subject of 
horticulture, and not only would this 
seem a broad enough field for any man 
to cover, but, in addition, the position 
is often linked with either botany, for- 
(!stry, entomology or agriculture. 

If horticulture includes orchids, onions, 
oranges, apples, bananas, greenhouses, 
canning factories, cold storage, cover 
crops, spraying, plant breeding, white 
fly and landscape gardening, can one man 
do justice to them all? 

In the beginning of this station work, 
the farmers themselves were indifferent 
and often prejudiced against it, so that 
the work had to be made intensely prac- 
tical, and therefore it was confined to 
the food products. The result has been 
that the orchard products were empha- 
sized and the training of the students 
in the colleges with which these stations 
were connected was principally along this 
line. Since the horticulturists have been 
trained in pomology and their inclinations 
were in this direction, and, recognizing 
that no man can obtain recognition in the 



V 



?j».'.xiitj 



A 1tint\j.^^ktii -illii. a::..^A 



• 'ill iitiiitKw itafcfitifur'fctifiTitlnili'nii ir*- iirfiiriiVi 



'HHW.WW^fr 



wjr'Sfnr^''!r^r^^Zr^' f^ •■ "'i «•'«» •^r^-'iw^-;--'»y-',-w'y^ * •:■!'■ ■•:■' ■ , ■■ 



% March 7, 1907. 



The Weekly Florists' Review. 



1169 



itl^tmm:i.^^^mu^:. 








•' ■ ' ' 




.,..v . ,*. Af.-. ' f -..•'•; '^••• 








y 


dm 


. i' 


■m 


r 


1! 






•> 

4^ 




•J 




1 










"\ 


•■•S -s *; 


•* • 


^ ... 






• 

* 
r 









Home of J. F. Roscnfield, at West Poinl, Neb. 



scientific field unless he is a specialist, it 
is not strange that this line of work has 
received the most attention and support. 
Illinois has taken the lead in recogniz- 
ing the need of specialization in horti- 
culture. In the university one man is 
charged with the development of the 
work along each of the following lines: 
Pomology, vegetable gardening, landscape 
gardening and floriculture. This institu- 
tion is therefore better able to carry on 
investigations in horticulture. 

Stations Poorly Equipped. 

The chief reason why more work is 
not done for the florists is that stations 
have not been properly equipped for car- 
rying on work in floriculture. The Hatch 
act assumed that the states would pro- 
vide suitable buildings for the station 
work. Many states were slow to do this. 
Illinois did not support its station until 
1901. At the present time the station re- 
ceives from the state $95,000 annually, 
divided as follows: Animal husbandry, 
$25,000; soil investigations, $25,000; 
com investigations, $15,000; dairy inves- 
tigations, $15,000; orchard investiga- 
tions, $15,000. In addition to the above, 
the college receives $50,000 annually for 
equipment. 

During the last two years the follow- 
ing problems have come to us for solu- 
tion: A prominent grower of cucum- 
bers under glass appealed to the station 
for aid to solve a trouble which was 
destroying his plants and threatening to 
wipe out a special trade which he had 
developed in cities all over the north- 
west. In response to repeated appeals, I 
was directed to visit him and investigate. 
I found his plants dying from a bac- 
terial trouble, the organism multiplying 
in such numbers in the water channels of 
the stem as to cut off the water supply. 



so that the plants wilted and died. Hav- 
ing determined the cause of the trouble, 
we were unable to go further and assist 
him in what he, above all else, wanted 
to know — that is, how to get rid of the 
trouble. We should have been in posi- 
tion to have planned and carried out 
some experiments in those infected 
houses. I tried to reserve one of our 
own small houses for some work on this 
trouble, but had to yield it to a gradu- 
ate student for a piece of work for a 
thesis. The houses we have were built 
for instructional purposes. We must have 
separate equipment, especially designed 
for experimental work. 

Last fall some infected leaves of a 
chrysanthemum were received. After a 
careful examination no disease was 
found. Whether we failed to get the 
fruiting stages of the fungus in the 
leaves sent, or that the trouble was physi- 
ological, due to something out of bal- 
ance in the growing plant, or that it 
was caused from something sprayed on 
the plant, we were unable to determine. 
A visit to the greenhouses would have 
furnished the clew. 

At the present time in the city of 
Springfield is a trouble affecting roses, 
which at first sight a grower would say 
was due to overwatering, but the trouble 
is not a new one; three expert growers 
have come and gone in the establishment, 
but all failed to solve it. The amount of 
water has been varied. It affects both 
grafted and own root plants and also 
benches with and without bottom heat. 
The owner, seemingly, has tried every- 
thing, yet there is an annual loss of 
$5,000 on account of not being able to 
solve it. 

An insect especially destructive on Me- 
teor rose was the subject of an investi- 
gation by an entomologist who pub- 



lished an excellent scientific account of 
the life history, but did not tell the 
growers how to combat it. Here was an 
excellent opportunity for practical in- 
vestigations of benefit to the rose grow- 
ing industry. 

President Vaughn, at Washington, 
spoke of the need of investigations with 
fertilizers and cut flowers. In addition, 
some investigations on soils for green- 
house crops need to be undertaken. 

Efforts for an Appropriation. 

Two years ago the florists of the state 
went to Springfield and asked for $30,000 
to build greenhouses at the Experiment 
Station and to carry on investigations 
in floriculture. The men who went made 
a good impression and some persons in a 
position to know thought we would get 
something. The bill looked as though 
it would go through until the last ten 
days of the session. The house appro- 
priations committee recommended the 
bill out, carrying $15,000, and next day 
reconsidered and killed it on the score 
of economy. Every one in this associa- 
tion should recognize the fact that few 
people have any conception of the amount 
invested in floriculture and that we had 
to carry on an educational campaign. 
Much has been accomplished in this line 
and this association can do a great work 
in bringing to the people a realization of 
the extent of floriculture. 

As most of us were inexperienced in 
getting legislation, we made some mis- 
takes last time, but these have been over- 
come in our present endeavor to accom- 
plish the securing of an appropriation. 
The assurances are promising that we 
shall succeed. Our state is in good finan- 
cial condition and we must get our appro- 
priation this year if at all. If a period 
of depression should come, we could not 



X-. 



1*...U. ,4..-^- 



•i.i:^:«k^.A..;.^^-^ 



.1. . .t. .u.. 



^-»V.^>^'? '' ■ 



'^'^T .TVp'^'" » "i iP*'JI»lf*l?MlW^"<,"«l 



1170 



The Weekly Florists' Review* 



March 7, 1907. 



It is in the best section of upper Broad- 
way and should prove a profitable ven- 
ture. 

J. B. Kidd, lately with the Hinode 
Co. and with William Elliott & Sons, 
has been appointed customs inspector 
for the port of New York in the seed, 
bulb and plant department. There were 
a great many applicants for the position 
and Mr. Kidd is to be congratulated. 
He is competent and practical. 

Wilson's plant oil is as popular with 
the nurserymen as the florists. Andrew 
Wilson, of Summit, is a young man, but 
the inventive bee is in his bonnet. His 
brother has patented his cement bench 
and Eobt. G. Wilson, of Brooklyn, has in- 
vented a style of white bark decoration 
that has made his store the finest in the 
city of churches. The Wilsons are cer- 
tainly an inventive family. 

H. H. Berger & Co. will move from 47 
Barclay street to 70 Warren street 
May 1. 

William Elliott announces the first 
auction of the year Qn March 12. 

The H. A. Stoothoflf Co. is having a 
wide call for its Aphicide nicotine paper, 
one of the most effective of fumigators. 

The cut flower exchange and market on 
the top floor of the Coogan building is 
to return to first principles and open at 5 
o'clock in the morning. There is no 
limit to the strenuous life of the horti- 
culturist and soon there will be no limit 
to the hours. One would suppose 6 a. m. 
early enough for the opening services. 
Before long there will be all-night flo- 
rists, just as there are all-night banks. 
The market claims it had to change the 
hour of opening to meet the example of 
some of the adjoining wholesalers, who 
have for some time been on deck as early 
as 5 a. m. 

Bonnot Bros, are handling and ship- 
ping fine Enchantress and roses at their 
stand in the Coogan building. Frank 
Millang has completely recovered from 
his broken ankle accident and will be in 
line with the Long Island and Jersey 
growers at the early hour. 

John Seligman & Co. lately have added 
some growers of fine roses to their staff 
and are preparing for a large Easter 
call from out-of-town buyers, as well as 
their rapidly growing local trade. 

Perkins & Schumann find their quar- 
ters cramped for the increasing clientele 
since moving to the ground floor of the 
Coogan building. Before another year 
they expect to double the size of their 
present quarters. 

The Geller Florists' Supply Co. is dis- 
tributing a neat protection for telephone 
mouthpieces that involves utility, con- 
venience and good advertising. Twenty- 
eighth street continues to be the Mecca 
of the wholesalers. There will be fur- 
ther removals from adjoining streets to 
this center this spring. Centralization 
is the watchword. On Twenty-ninth 
street estates are changing hands and 
rents are rising. It looks as if both 
sides of Sixth avenue would ultimately 
harbor about an equal number of the 
trade with Twenty-eighth street. It 
would seem an excellent plan if Presi- 
dent Totty's prophecy should be ful- 
fllled that the New York club locate its 
home on this famous street. 

George J. Allen, eldest son of J. K. 
Allen, celebrated the christening of the 
veteran's first grandchild with a reunion 
at his home on Sunday evening. 

Siebrecht & Son have a new yellow rose 
that is very popular and which the firm 
expects to exhibit at the rose convention 
in Washington. J. Austin Shaw. 



hope to get an appropriation for floricul- 
ture. If we fail this year we may wait 
ten years to get anything. Once the in- 
dustry is recognized we can demonstrate 
the need of experimental work and con- 
tinue the appropriation. Our asking will 
not fail if this association properly sup- 
ports the movement. Each member 
should personally see his representative 
on the appropriations committee in the 
assembly and ask his support for an ap- 
propriation for work in floriculture. 

The following tables will show the 
growth of floriculture in Illinois in 
capacity and value, according to the 
census of 1900 and estimates of 1907: 

, 1900. 1907. 

Area under glass, sq. ft... 8,744,020 16,613,638 

Commercial florists 6,310,906 

Market gardeners 2,433,114 

Investment Com. Florists. .$4,648,056 18,831,306 

Value of land 2,439,163 

Value of buildings 2,096,652 

Value of implements, etc. 112,241 

Wholesale value of product 1,894,960 3,600,424 

Retail value of product 3,095,000 5,880,500 

Expenditures — 

Labor 420,538 799,022 

Fertilizers 24,220 

Fuel, tons 70,000 133,000 

COMMERCIAL FLORICULTURE VERSUS COM- 
MERCIAL FRUIT GROWING. 
(Table 16, Vol. 5, U. S. Census 1900.) 



Fruit Growers. 
Value products not fed. . .$1,588,460 
Excess value florists' 

products 

Expenditure, labor 226,550 

Expenditure, fertilizers... 6,150 

Average value per 

establishment 3,724 

Average value of land.... 2,611 

Average value of buildings 838 



Florists. 
$1,865,722 

$277,262 

420,538 

24,222 

9,315 

4,888 
4,202 



NEW YORK. 



TheVUaktL 



The promise of the old proverb con- 
cerning March should encourage all 
who labor for and anticipate a profit- 
able Easter, The fickle month has come 
in like a liou, so we may depend upon 
sunny skies and pleasant weather for 
its close. But no industry can realize 
the planning, difficulties and dangers of 
this movable festival of Easter so viv- 
idly as do the florists, and it would give 
general satisfaction, to this trade at any 
rate, if the ecclesiastical authorities 
would get together and fix upon April 
15 every year for this spring celebration 
and cut the moon out of it altogether. 
The only consolation this year is that 
Easter comes some years as early as 
March 22. 

Winter is making up for lost time 
and we have more snow than Canada 
can boast, as a visitor from Toronto has 
.lust informed me. The week opens with 
iow temperature and business showing 
little improvement. Last week was 
called the dullest of the year and prices 
of everything were at the bottom. The 
cold hampered the street merchants and 
so dammed the violet outlet. It is safe 
to say that at times a million violets 
were spending the night in the whole- 
sale district, dependent upon the weath- 
er and the Athenians as to whether 
they would ever see the light. The 
finest specials just in sold as low as 40 
cents and hordes of leftovers were 
closed out gladly at $1 a thousand. It 
is painful to contemplate and perhaps 
the less said about it the better. The 
oldest wholesaler, and there are several 
of them, says he has never seen any- 
thing like it at this season of the year, 
and yet if one consults the records of a 
year ago he will find that this is but a 
recurrence of past experiences and that 
every year the weeks just preceding 
Easter are "dead ones." With Lent 
and winter out of the way the old-time 



prosperity will rapidly materialize and 
by March 31 we will forget. 

Just now there is enough and to spare 
of every variety of flower. Boses are 
coming in quantity and color to the 
satisfaction of buyers and prices, which 
have held firm while all else retrograd- 
ed, arc now shaded considerably, the 
best Brides and Maids selling as low as 
$10 per hundred on Saturday. Beauties 
hold better than any other Atariety and 
there has been no change in quotations 
for several weeks, the best grades still 
not equal to the demand. Chatenay, 
KlUarney and Richmond have held their 
own and are in a class not dependent 
on oversupply, for there are never 
enough of them. 

Spring flowers are much in evidence, 
sweet peas, forget-me-nots and stocks, 
with slight demand. Where the nar- 
cissi come from, if not the south, is 
hard to estimate. There have never 
been such heavy receipts, every whole- 
saler being overwhelmed with them. 
Thousands were sold at 10 cents a 
bunch and some large clearings were 
made at 50 cents a hundred. There 
seems no end to the lily of the valley 
and the number of gardenia growers 
must have been greatly increased since 
a year ago. Easter lilies are not yet 
plentiful. 

Carnations are especially weak, some 
grand stock selling as low as $20 a 
thousand. Enchantress and many of the 
novelties included. Samples of the green 
variety are already on exhibition. The 
supply men have the secret of manu- 
facture widely disseminated and every 
man of the 60,000 in the parade March 
16 will doubtless depend upon the florist 
for suitable decoration. 

Orchids grow more popular as the 
varieties increase and the retail win- 
dows are made attractive by profuse use 
of them, the prices being most reason- 
able with Easter only three weeks 
away. McManus says orders are already 
being booked for shipments at that time 
to every large city within a radius of 
a thousand miles. 

Vartoisi Notes. 

Monday, March 11, is rose night at 
the New York Florists' Club and ex- 
hibits are solicited, not only of roses, 
but of every novelty in plant and 
flower. An interesting evening is as- 
sured. 

Visitors are cordially invited. The 
club is making rapid progress. An in- 
teresting surprise will make the evening 
memorable. The attendance should 
never go below 100, now that special ar- 
rangements are made monthly by the 
entertainment committee to get out of 
the beaten track and make the evenings 
worth while to all who come. 

On Wednesday Mrs. W. B. Fullerton 
delivered at the American Institute an 
interesting illustrated lecture on 
"Beauty and Utility in the Home 
Plot," greatly enjoyed by a large audi- 
ence and made especially attractive by 
the colored lantern slides introducing 
personal experiences and accomplish- 
ments. These lectures are given weekly 
and on Wednesday, March 6, George T. 
Powell will discuss "How to Lay Out a 
Country Place" with stereopticon illus- 
trations. March 27 H. Siebrecht, Sr., will 
lecture on "Easter Flowers and Spring 
Gardens." 

Messrs. Siebrecht & Son have opened 
a new store at Ninetieth street and 
Broadway and fitted it up handsomely. 



, ..A.*->j^ul- .. .. 1. 



.fit- -_ It .^'^'^..^ i ..■.'. ^..^-^ ;^&t*^jM.4U, 



t -'.A^- -A ■■:^' , *.:-■ - '^^'■,Li»' >t.-t>-i.-...»l^ t gi.^-V.^ i^ . -, jr-Aa- [J sn iihti- I'l- , -fnHriiiiirrffc ■^■■nT- i hiiJfi I rJAaariiWiitiiii 



'Tv^rrjaT;"™" ™ 



^^^^i^^^Ti^-'^'^- '"^"iv^^^^rT' r .^r^r^' 



■^. , ., .- .p .- ,^ 



. T-^ 'If-.- 



Mabch 7, 1907. 



The Weekly Florists' Review^ 



U7l 



WAYSIDE NOTES. 

The Baltimore Gardeners' and Flo- 
rists' Club is justly proud of its new 
home and the banquet given to the lady 
friends of the members Monday evening, 
February 25, in the hall of the building, 
■was voted by all as being immense. The 
building is complete in every detail, with 
storage rooms in basement and on the 
ground floor and so constructed that up 
to the present time no ice has been 
needed to keep the temperature down to 
the desired degree. Manager Perry, of 
the Baltimore Florists' Exchange, 
showed me stock that had been held 
more than a week, owing to dull demand. 
It was perfectly crisp and fresh. 

Growers are increasing about Balti- 
more, but there is room for a good 
Beauty specialist. The constant call 
for this rose and good price paid war- 
rants the investment. Since the great 
fire wonderful improvements have taken 
place in this city and the craft have 
shared in the advance. All the principal 
stores are located near each other and 
make excellent displays. 

Feasts' second store uptown is the lat- 
•est move to keep in touch with business 
moving northward. They carry, un- 
doubtedly, the largest stock of decorative 
plants in the south, devoting two big 
houses to that purpose. The tall house 
for asparagus, built on the W. H. Elliott 
plan, is a success, as, in addition to 
heavy, long strings, sufficient seed is 
saved annually to pay for itself. A 
platform has been erected near the ridge, 
along which Asparagus Sprengeri is 
planted in boxes. The plants, having 
unlimited head-room, make great growths. 
A fine lot of the uncommon Acacia 
pubeseens was noted, also the new daisy. 
Queen Alexandra, which, while a finer 
and larger flower, is later than the old 
variety. Adiantum Croweanum is pre- 
ferred to all other maidenhairs. Carna- 
tipns are not extensively grown. Cardi- 
nal is the best red, good color and 
keeper, but not free enough. Jenning's 
patent for benches, consisting of 1-inch 
iron pipe set in concrete, is used entire- 
ly for roses; first cost is all there is. 
Golden Gate is grown largely here and in 
Washington, Ivory does even better 
than Bride. Perle is stiU popular. Me- 
teor is, at present, more satisfactory 
than Eichmond, which is grand farther 
north. A battery of Furman boilers 
furnishes the heat; a gasoline engine the 
motive power for pumping liquid manure, 
which is carried into every house by a 
system of piping. An auto is the latest 
addition to the delivery system of this 
up-to-date place. 

Dropping in at F. H. Kramer's, Wash- 
ington, D. C, I had the opportunity to 
see his new rose. Queen Beatrice, in va- 
rious stages of growth, and while the 
newly cut blooms are most intense in 
•color, those that had been kept in the 
windSw for five days were but just show- 
ing off color, which, at this stage, re- 
sembles that old favorite, La France. 
As the rose will be at its best during 
the convention of the Rose Society, an 
excellent opportunity will be offered to 
see it growing. Mr. Kramer says it is 
the best all the time and Maids will not 
sell while the Queen is around. 

Peter Bisset, at Twin Oaks, has a 
promising seedling, of which Queen 
Beatrice is one of the parents; but the 
gem of his collection is the result of a 
•cross which has produced a perfectly 
full-cupped form of the hybrid tea, with 
the scent of a hybrid perpetual, large 



petalled, good center, excellent forcer, in 
color between Mme. Gabriel Luizet and 
Marquise de Castellane. Unfortunately 
there will not be a bloom open around 
convention time, but at the time of my 
visit I saw a grand flower, unlike any- 
thing I have hitherto seen. It is a win- 
ner, no doubt about that. To visit his 
houses at this time one could hardly 
conceive the grand display of aquatics, 
made possible during the summer, and 
for which Twin Oaks is famous. 

The stores operated by the craft in 
Washington are a show in themselves and 
will well repay a visit. Eetailers from 
smaller towns can carry away ideas 
which, for various reasons, they do not 
originate, but readily copy, and it is 
quite in order so to do. Easter displays 
will attract crowds of sightseers and it 
is expected that the rose show will be 
more largely patronized than any pre- 



iraVERY now and then a well 
u9 pleased reader speaks the word 
which is the means of bringing a new 
advertiser to 



P 



Silts' 

Such friendly assistance is thoroughly 
appreciated. 

Give us the name of anyone from 
whom you are buying, not an adver- 
tiser. We especially wish to interest 
those selling articles of florists' use 
not at present advertised. 

FLORISTS' PUBLISHING CO. 
52(M0 Cazton Bldg. Chicago 



vious flower show. The club, with its 
proverbial hospitality, extends a hearty 
welcome to all and it goes without say- 
ing that all visitors will have a thorough- 
ly good time. Make a special effort to 
be there; you won't regret making the 
trip. W. M. 

THE DEATH ROLL. 



Herman C Baartman. 

Word has reached this country of the 
death of Herman C. Baartman, senior 
member of the bulb growing firm of 
Baartman & Koning, of Sassenheim, 
Holland. Mr. Baartman was one of the 
passengers on the steamer Berlin, which 
was wrecked off the coast of Holland 
February 21. Of the 143 passengers on 
board only fourteen were saved and 
Mr. Baartman was one of those whose 
lives were lost. He was returning from 
a business trip through England in the 
interests of his firm. Previous to this 
he had made an even dozen trips to the 
United States and had made a wide ac- 
quaintance in the trade. He numbered 
as many friends as any Hollander com- 
ing to this country, for he knew his busi- 
ness thoroughly and was most careful in 
all his dealings. The information of his 
death comes to his partner, John Kon- 
ing, who is at present traveling in this 
country and who states he will continue 
the business as heretofore. 



Mr. Baartman is worthy of special 
mention from the fact that he was a life 
member of -the S. A. F. and was the 
only European member of the craft who 
was so affiliated with our national or- 
ganization. It is to his friendship 
with William F. Kasting that his mem- 
bership was due. He joined during Mr. 
Kasting 's administration. 

Philip Winter. 

Philip Winter died February 22, at 
the residence of his daughter, Mrs. J. A. 
Brack, at Glenville, O. Mr. Winter was 
83 years old and a pioneer florist of 
Cleveland. He located at Glenville in 
1853. Four children survive him. The 
funeral was held Sunday, February 24, 
from the residence of Mrs. Brack. 

Ferdinand Tschupp. 

Ferdinand Tschupp, whose serious ill- 
ness was chronicled in the Review a few 
weeks ago, died at his home at North 
Bergen, N. J., Sunday, February 24. The 
funeral services were held February 28 
and were largely attended, as Mr. 
Tschupp was widely known and affiliated 
with a number of Masonic bodies. He 
was 66 years of age. 

Isaac M. Brainard. 

Isaac M. Brainard, a well-known and 
wealthy citizen of Gouvemeur, N. Y., 
died February 26 at the home of his 
daughter, Mrs. Emma Johnston, aged 79 
years. For about thirty-five years Mr. 
Brainard had been engaged in the mar- 
ket gardening business and operated ex- 
tensive greenhouses in the town. He 
leaves one son, William G. Brainard, and 
one daughter, Mrs. Johnston. 

Sylvester Snell. 

Sylvester Snell, a well-known market 
gardener, of Watertown, N. Y., died Feb- 
ruary 26 at the age of 73 years. He 
leaves, besides his, wife, two daughters, 
Mrs. Herbert Gumee and Mrs. Frank 
Beckstead, of Watertown; five sisters, 
Mrs. A. Gillett and Mrs. Clara Holden, 
of Watertown; Mrs. Barbara Shaw, of 
Adams Center; Mrs. Joshua Snell, of 
Little Falls, and Mrs. Harrison Fuller, 
of Honeyville, and one brother, David 
Snell, of Watertown. 

Frank Yahnke. 

Frank Yahnke, aged 70 years, who has 
been closely identified with horticulture 
in Minnesota for a number of years, died 
at his home at Winona February 27. He 
was the proprietor of the Pleasant Valley 
Nursery and for a number of years has 
been connected with farmers' institute 
work, acting as lecturer through the 
winter months. He originated the 
Yahnke apple. 

James B. Ennis. 

James B. Ennis, a veteran nurseryman, 
died February 24, at his residence in 
Bloomington, HI,, which place had been 
his home for more than forty years. His 
death was due to grip and pneumonia, 
although his health had been feeble for 
some time. 

Mr. Ennis was born in County Dublin, 
Ireland, October 18, 1831, emigrating to 
America at the age of 19 years. He 
located in Philadelphia and entered the 
Eleventh Pennsylvania Volunteer Infan- 
try. After the civil war he moved to 
Bloomington, where he became employed 
in the nursery business. He married 
Miss Mary Sheehan, forty- four years ago, 
in Philadelphia. Six children were born, 
all of whom are still living. 



..■:-■..■■-■.:.;■■. -i ii-^a|j;V|-||ifiiV|-h'flii|fc|i^«i'-Mitii>ii>iit.-it .-^^^^ II II • J.tt=..v^-:vA..i.'t>-- 



i^'.K-.s^^ .ki:JtjajL ^^-^ 



' vm ii|i|^.- 



M72 



y' 



The Weekly Florists^ Review* 



Mabch 7, 1907. 



^; 



</^£¥ 



if printed Wednesday evening and 
mailed early Thursday morning;. It 
is earnestly requested that all adver- 
tisers and correspondents mail their 
"copy^ to reach us by Monday or 
Tuesday morning at latest, instead 
of Wednesday morning, as many 
have done in the past. 



CONTENTS. 

Orchids— Commercial Orchids (illus.) 1159 

Store of The Scboen Floral Co. (illus.).... 1160 

The Gates Ajar (Illus.) 1161 

Donlan on Exhibitions 1162 

Seasonable Suggestions 1162 

— CannaB 1162 

— Caladlum Esculentum 1162 

— Petunias 1162 

— Genistas 1162 

— Azaleas 1162 

— Ferns 1162 

— Care of Seedlings 1163 

The Glass Market 1163 

Charles Knopf (portrait) 1163 

HorUcultural Exhibitions 1163 

Carnations— Carnation Notes — West 1164 

— Soil for Carnations 1164 

— Pink Seedling LaWson x Enchantress 

(Illus.) 1164 

— Hellentbal's Carnations (illus.) 1165 

Delphiniums 1165 

Using Hand Pump 1165 

The Illinois Appropriation 1165 

Welland & Ollnger Plant (illus.).... 1166 

Roses— Green Fly and Red Spider 1168 

— Southern Roses Under Glass 1166 

Seen in Nebraska (illus.) 1168 

The Experiment Station 1168 

New York 1170 

Wayside Notes 1171 

The Death Roll — Herman C. Baartman.... 1171 

— Philip Winter 1171 

— Ferdinand Tschupp 1171 

— Isaac M. Brainard 1171 

— Sylvester Small 1171 

— Frank Yahnke 1171 

— James B. Ennls 1171 

Hardy Ferns 1172 

Ladies' Auxiliary 1172 

Chicago 1173 

St. Louis 1175 

Baltimore 1176 

Boston 1177 

Philadelphia 1180 

Washington . ; 1182 

Indianapolis 1182 

Columbus. Ohio 1182 

Want Advertisements 1186 

Seed Trade News « 1188 

— California Conditions 1180 

— The Spirit and the Letter 1189 

— Imports 1190 

— Free Seeds Not All Loss 1190 

— Help Yourself to Seeds 1192 

— Looking Forward 1192 

— Catalogue Illustration 1193 

Best New Sweet Peas 1194 

Huntington, L. 1 1194 

Vegetable Forcing — Feast or Famine 1196 

— McMlchael's Place (Illus.) 1195 

— Vegetable Markets 1105 

— Cincinnati Market Radish 1196 

Pacific Coast — San Francisco 1204 

— Plant Trade at Frisco 1204 

Nursery News — Euonymus 1205 

— Another Bogie 1206 

— Hardy Ornamental Shrubs 1200 

— Insects and Plant Diseases 1207 

Kansas City 1210 

Detroit 1212 

Cincinnati 1214 

Pittsburg 1216 

Tarrytown, N. T 121S 

Greenhouse Heating— Size of Flow Pipe... 1228 

— Pipe Required 1228 

— Trouble with Heating 1228 

— Size of Boiler 1220 

Twin Cities 1230 

Ithaca, N. Y 1232 



The growers at Poughkeepsie, N. Y., 
and vicinity use charcoal screenings in 
their soil, with excellent results. 

The imports of window glass during 
the week ending February 23 were 2,551 
boxes of 100 feet each, valued at $5,499 
in the consular invoices. 



THE ANNUAL 



SPECIAL SPRING NUMBER 




For Easter, 1907 

Will be issued on MARCH 21 



IT WILL BE IN KIBPING WITH THE BEST PREVIOUS SPECIAL 
ISSUES OF TBK BBVIEW, AND THAT'S "ENOUOH SAID." 



AdTVrtlaars ^tao irlah to ftTmll thttina«lTe« ol tbla opportimltr 
lor puttlnK tliolr speolaltlos botoro the WHOLB trad* should 

Get Copy to Us as Early as Possible 



Eesults bring advertising. 
The Eeview brings results. 

Canary birds and goldfish are two 
suitable and profitable side lines for the 
retail florist. 

The demand for greenhouse help again 
has become strong. The labor question 
will be an important one as the spring 
planting season approaches. 

Louis Feeeman is to be superintendent 
of the joint exhibition of the American 
Eose Society and Florists' Club of Wash- 
ington, March 13 to 15. His address is 
1307 F street N. W., Washington, D. C. 

Those who are in search of novelties 
should keep an eye on the pages of The 
Eeview devoted to European advertise- 
ments. Practically every new plant 
worth trial is offered there as soon as 
stock is ready. 



HARDY FERNS. 



Among the hardy ferns are varieties 
greatly differing in size and form, from 
a hair-like creeping stem bearing a few 
simple, moss-like leaves, to the vigorous 
growing plajits with large leaves, attain- 
ing a height of two or three feet. The 
varying conditions in which the different 
species succeed is remarkable. Many of 
them require a warm temperature, while 
others do well in cool and shady places. 

Of the 4,000 or more species of ferns, 
not more than about forty species are 
suited to outdoor culture in ordinary 
soils and situations. These species can 
be planted in beds, borders or rockeries, 
or in the foreground of shrubbery. As 
most of them require a somewhat shady 
place, they are especially useful for fill- 
ing in places where grass and other 



light-loving plants cannot grow. Perfect 
drainage is required. The soil should 
have leaf -mold in it, or decayed peat or 
well decayed sod will answer. 

Hardy ferns are best planted in the 
spring, says the National Council of Hor- 
ticulture, but they can be planted in the 
summer, if the fronds or leaves are cut 
back, making it easier for the plants to 
establish themselves before the winter 
sets in. In the winter the ferns should 
be given protection, with a covering of 
leaves, hay or straw. 



LADIES' AUXILIARY. 

Mrs. Charles H. Maynard, 219 Horton 
avenue, Detroit, Mich., secretary of the 
S. A. F. Ladies' Auxiliary, requests the 
publication of the following: 

"The following states have reported 
members of the Indies' Auxiliary to the 
S. A. P.: Missouri, Michigan, Pennsyl- 
vania, Illinois, Ohio, Massachusetts, In- 
diana, New York, Connecticut, Louisiana,. 
Wisconsin and Washington. The secre- 
tary would like to hear from the District 
of Columbia, New Jersey, Colorado^ 
Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Maryland, Ne- 
braska and other states not reported. 
Our first order for pins grows small. 
Address the secretary." 



I*rovidence, E. I. — The new green- 
houses of Ehode Island College, Kings- 
ton, have been completed. There are 
two east and west wings and one north 
and south. At the north end of the 
latter is the laboratory building, includ- 
ing offices of heads of the departments 
and the caretaker's rooms. The houses 
are of steel frames and concrete founda- 
tions and cost about $15,000. 



^ JL^ :^\..>lt/i'-*^>.V^,.. 



■r-^■•«^^:>^ ,;-:> .....^:yhM.jUii»M j^ J. fti.-ifcrt\.ri {'fiViih'r mji'^* j.i.-rA.tt ^«,^- ■.&,»■. «^_ 



■^■B"* ^fW^'W "i'l^T^^ V J^T^J '» 



■"WS^T'^ ■■ ^ ■TT*5-V'- W3^-w**'V'"''''J'V^'P^"'f?"W^H.)|l'.ll.^ ' >T,'. "•'^-f^'T^'"'^- , TVry^^ ',"' .'.'?"":'.V?' ,; 



-:t^— - ■■■>.>•. 



Mabch 7, 1907. 



The Weekly Florists' Review. 



U73 



LILIES 



For 
Easter 



We shall have a large supply of our usual good stock. Orders 

booked NOW we guarantee to fill at the following prices: 

$15.00 per 100; $I50.00 per 1000. 



Send Today's Order to Amiing for 

CARNATIONS 

A large supply in all grades, including the finest 
lot of fancy stock to be found in the west. 
Especially strong on Enchantress. 

BULB STOCK 

Plenty of Tulips, all colors, single and double; 
also Jonquils and Daffodils, Callas and Harrisii. 



Violets 



Doable and Single. Fine 
quality and lots of them. 



Sweet Peas 

White and Pink. Splendid 
quality and a large supply. 



FANCY VALLEY ALWAYS ON HAND 



CURRENT PRICE LIST 

AMERICAN BEAUTIES Per doz. 

Stems, 30 to 36 Inches 16.00 to 16.00 

Stems, 20 to 24 laches 3.00 to 400 

Stems, 12 to 16 inches 1.60 to 2 00 

Seconds 76 10 1.00 

Bridesmaid per 100, 4.00 to 12.00 

Bride " 4.00 to 12 00 

Chatenay " 5 00 to 12.00 

Golden Gate " 5 00 to 12.00 

Richmond and Liberty... " 5.00 to 12.00 

CarnatlonB, 8<-lect " 1.50 to 2.00 

larg-e and fancy " 3.00 to 4.00 

Miscellaneous Stock 

Violets, N. Y. double " .5" to .75 

single " 50 to .75 

Valley, select •' 2.00 to 4.00 

Callas per doz. 1.25 to 1.50 

Easter Lilies " 2.00 

Mignonette " .50 to .75 

Sweet Peas per 100, .75 to 1.50 

Romans " 3.00 

Paper Whites " 3.00 

Jonquils, Daffodils " 3.00 

Tulips, all colors " 2.00 to 6.00 

Green Goods 

Asparagus Plumosus, per string .35 to .60 

" per bui.rh, .35 to .7o 

Sprengerl per 100, 2.00 to 5.00 

Adlantum " 1.00 

Smilax....per 100, 120.00: per doz. 2.50 

Ferns per 1000. t3.00; perlOO. .30 

Leucothoe Sprays, per 1000. I6..50; per 100, 75e 
Galax, green and bronze, per 1000, 11.00. 

' per case, 10.000, $7.50 

Boxwood 35c per bunch ; 17.50 per case 

Subject to change without notice. 

Store open 7 a. m. to 6 p. m. Sundays and 

holidays closed at noon. 



E. C. AMLING 



The Largest, Best 
Equipped and Most 
Centrally Located 
Wholesale Cut Flower 
House in Chicago. 



32-36 Randolph St. 



Lone Distance Telephones, 

1978 and 1977 Ventral, 

7846 Aatomatic 



Chicago, III. 



Mention The Review wlien you write. 



CHICAGO. 

The Great Central Market. 

The outlet for stock has broadened 
since last report. The lessened social ac- 
tivity, due to the advent of Lent, has 
pretty well worn away, so that the legit- 
imate demand is about equal to the sup- 
ply of first-class stock in roses. The 
knowledge that spring sales are now in 
order has become general in stores where 
this market is not drawn upon except for 
special large lots, with the result that 
last week the call for carnations in thou- 
sand lots was so good that the price 
was advanced on Friday, when most of 
the big shipments went out. Friday night 
one house reported sending out 20,000 
carnations on these special orders — but 
it did not serve to clean them out. 

Beauties continue in short supply. 
There are not enough of the long and 
medium grades to fill orders. Short 
stock is more abundant and less in re- 



quest. Quality is variable, but both cut 
and quality are due shortly to improve 
materially. Bride is in considerably bet- 
ter demand than Bridesmaid. In fact, 
all white stock is selling well because of 
a large amount of funeral work. The 
same factor causes short roses to realize 
pretty fair prices. None of the growers 
has any complaint to make at the state 
of the rose market. Chatenay is seen 
in fine form and there are large receipts 
of Bichmond of superb quality. Kil- 
larney is giving a good crop for several 
growers and maintains its popularity. 

The carnation market this week is 
slightly better than last, but there con- 
tinue to be heavier receipts than the 
legitimate demand can consume. 

A little bad weather last week put 
the violet market in a worse state than 
at any time thus far this season. The 
stopping of business produced an accu- 
mulation from which the market has not 
rallied. Prices went down to where many 
shipments realized no more than express 



charges and there was considerable loss. 
For the very best stock in the small lots 
50 cents per hundred was top. 

Callas continue abundant. There are 
increased receipts of Easter lilies. The 
quality is nothing to brag of with most 
of the growers. Tulips continue in large 
supply, but not so many daffodils and 
jonquils are seen. There is still enough 
valley, but not quite such heavy receipts 
as in the last fortnight. Sweet peas are 
much more abundant, of fine quality and 
selling well. 

The wholesalers are speculating on the 
outcome in the fern department. Stock 
is spoiling rapidly and that received 
from the east indicates a similar condi- 
tion there. It is predicted that $4 to $5 
per thousand will be the price before 
new ferns are in. Smilax frequently is 
difficult to procure. Orders should be 
booked a day in advance if possible. 
Adiantum also is shortening up. Strings 
of asparagus are in fair supply but 
bunches are small. 






U74 



The Weekly Florists' Review* 



March 7, 1907. 



^ 



LONGIFLORIMS 



FOR 

EASTER 



$15.00 PER 100 



Our reputation for having the BEST LILIES is because all our lilies are shipped in the 
original packages, packed at the greenhouses, thus avoiding bruising by second handling, 
and because they are from the most expensive bulbs, grown by the most careful growers. 



FANCY MURIIiLO TULIPS, double pink, for Easter, 
$4.00 and $5.00 per 100. 



EMPEROR, fancy Jonquils, $4.00 and $5.00 per 100 
for Easter. 



LA REINE TULIPS, $3.00 per 100 for Easter. WHITE LILAC, for Easter, $1.50 per bunch. 

Write us for prices on large orders of all kinds before placing orders, as we can save you money on all kinds 
of Novelties; also Roses, Carnations, Violets, Valley, Etc. 

Baskets and Easter Novelties 

Just received this week, a large shipment of Baskets and Novelties. We saw in the beginning of the season 
that we would run short before Easter, so cabled for more. The large demand we have had has exceeded all our 
expectations, but this new lot will enable us to fill all orders promptly and in a way that will please you. Order one 
of our assortments today and it will be delivered in plenty of time for Easter. 

A full line of BIRCH BARK, POT COVERS, HAMPERS, CREPE PAPERS, GLASSWARE, 
BOXES, or anything^ else you may need, alw^ays on hand. 

A. L. RANDALL CO. 

Have you our Catalo({ue? Sent free on request. 19-21 RdndoIpH St., CHICAGO, ILL. 



Mention The RfTlew when yon write. 



St. Louis Exhibitors. 

Fred C. Weber, Jr., was in town last 
week asking the growers to send exhibits 
to the flower show of the St. Louis Hor- 
ticultural Society, which opened March 4. 
Leonard Kill is attending, with a large 
display of Peter Eeinberg's roses. He 
took some magnificent Brides, Maids, 
Richmond, Chatenay and Uncle John, 
also an exhibit of Beauties and several 
other varieties they grow in lesser quan- 
tity. C. L. Washburn went down to do 
a little missionary work on behalf of 
the red carnation. No. 20. J. D. Thomp- 
son, of Joliet, also took an exhibit. 

Williams and His Plans. 

Frank Williams and his partner, 
George, of the Alpha Floral Co., Des 
Moines, have opened temporarily on the 
corner of Adams and Wabash, where they 
have a large double store. They state 
they have a three years' lease and have 
ordered fixtures to fit the place up in 
first-class style. As soon as these are 
ready they will open a permanent store 
there. 

May 1 Frank Williams will close the 
Masonic Temple store, which he has con- 
ducted since the departure of Mosco. He 
states he is making little money there 
and the landlord added $4 a day to the 
rent. The Randolph street store will be 
continued as usual. 

Favors The Queen. 

J. P. Brooks, who is conducting the 
old George Harrer place at Morton 
Grove, thinks The Queen is the most 
profitable carnation in commerce today. 
He has more than 20,000 plants of this 
variety and grows less than 1,000 of any | 



other sort. Last year The Queen made 
more money for him than any other va- 
riety he grew, and this year, with greatly 
increased plantings, it is making the 
same comparison with other sorts. Mr. 
Brooks was for some time foreman for 
the Poehlmann Bros. Co. and is an ex- 
cellent grower. 

Belated "Wedding Announcement. 

It has developed that Julius Niesen, 
formerly with Wienhoeber, and for the 
last couple of years in business for him- 
self at Holden's old stand on Forty- 
seventh street, took unto himself a wife 
several months ago. He neglected to 
make any announcement at the time, but 
always has a cigar in his pocket in case 
of emergencies. 

Gatfield Park G)nsefvatory. 

Jens Jensen, superintendent of the 
west side parks, says the new conserva- 
tory to be erected in Garfield park will 
be the finest in Chicago, and those less 
conservative connected with the park ad- 
ministration say it will be the finest in 
America. The estimated cost is $225,- 
000. It is to be quadrangular, covering 
230x302 feet. Tlie bids will be opened 
next Tuesday. 

Veather in February. 

The mean temperature for February 
was 26 degrees, right on the average for 
the last thirty-seven years. The highest 
was 53 degrees, February 13, and the 
lowest 2 degrees below zero, February 4. 
It was only three above February 22, 
giving quite a variety. The precipitation 
was only one inch, less than half the i 
normal. There was ten inches of snow. 



The wind averaged fifteen miles an hour, 
one mile more than in January. There 
were six clear days, fourteen: partly 
cloudy and eight cloudy. January had 
twenty cloudy. 

Various Notes. 

John Pehrson, who was for a long 
time in the retail department of the 
George Wittbold Co., has opened an at- 
tractive store on his own account at 25 
East Forty-third street. It is an excel- 
lent neighborhood and only a few doors 
from the Illinois Central station, where 
it is passed each day by thousands of 
people who can afford to buy flowers — 
and most of them do. 

Jensen & Dekema will try four novel- 
ties in carnations this season, planting 
each one quite heavily. These will be 
White Enchantress, Winsor, Beacon and 
Aristocrat, and Mr. Jensen thinks they 
are the four finest varieties that ever 
have been added to the lists in one year. 

N. J. Wietor says the business in 
rooted cuttings is ahead of expectations 
this year. Orders are larger than ever 
before. One order was for 10,000 Beauty 
cuttings and there have been a number 
equally large but including several vari- 
eties. 

Arthur B. Dietsch is enjoying a good 
cut of carnations from the late Winandy 
place, handled by Zech & Mann. There 
also is a good crop of lettuce now on 
and bringing good money. 

Michael Fink, who sold out his retail 
store on Cottage Grove avenue, is now 
with the A. L. Randall Co. The Randall 
Co. reports the call for white lilac stead- 
ily ahead of the supply. 

The Poehlmann Bros. Co. now has 115 



(»";>" -»fK?rvT'"' 



March 7, 1907. 



The Weekly Florists' Review, 



J»75 



RICHMOND 

We have a big cut of this Best of Red Roses, Splendid Quality 



ALSO LARGE SUPPLIES OF 



CHATENAY and MAID 

Send your orders for all stocic in season, we have a full line. 



CURRENT PRICE LIST 



AMERICAN BEAUTIES 



Per doi. 
$^00 
5.00 
4.00 
3.00 
2.50 
2.00 
1.50 
Short $ .75 to 1.25 



Long ttem. 

30-inch 

24-inch . . . . 
20-inch . . . . 

18-inch 

15-inch . . . . 
12-inch . . . . 



Maid and Bride $5.00 

Uncle John 5.00 

Chatenay 5.00 

Liberty 5.00 

Richmond 5.00 

Sunrise 5.00 

Perle 5.00 

Golden Gate 5.00 

Killarney 8.00 

Ivory 5.00 

ROSES, our selection 



P«r 100 
to $10.00 
to 10.00 
10.00 
10.00 
10.00 
10.00 
8.00 
10.00 
15.00 
10.00 
6.00 



P«r 100 

Carnations $2.00 to $3.00 

Valley 3.00 to 4.00 

Violets 50 to .75 

Paper Whites 3.00 to 4.00 

Romans 3.00 to 4.00 

Callas per doz. 1.50 to 2.00 

Harrisii ** 1.50 to 2.00 

Asparag^us Plumosus, 

per bunch 50 to .75 

Ferns per 1000 3.00 

Galax ** 1.00 



PETER REINBERG 

1,500,000 feet of glass. SI Wabash AVCe^ CtllCSGO 



Mention The Review when you write. 



men employed at its greenhouses at Mor- 
ton Grove. It is said to be the largest 
force employed by any cut flowier grower 
in the United States. 

The Florists' Club holds its March 
meeting next week, Thursday evening. 
Easter will be the subject for discussion. 

C. W. McKellar says orchids have im- 
proved in supply the same as other items 
and that the demand is a little slow at 
present because no great amount of wed- 
ding work is done during Lent. 

The Benthey-Coatsworth Co. is han- 
dling some excellent sweet peas from the 
E. G. Hill Co., Bichmond, Ind. 

Home-grown orange blossoms are one 
of the March specialties of the E. F. 
Winterson Co. They say the green car- 
nation fluid is selling better than ever 
this year. 

P. Pearson contemplates selling his in- 
terest in the business of Keene & Pear- 
son, 920 North Campbell avenue, to en- 
gage in carpentering. 

It is reported that J. F. Kidwell has 
abandoned his plan of erecting a range 
of greenhouses west of the city this sea- 
son, 

E. Franzen, sales manager for Schei- 
den & Schoos, says the demand for car- 
nation cuttings, especially Enchantress, 
continues excellent. He is surprised at 
the number of inquiries received for un- 
rooted cuttings of Enchantress. 

Klehm's cut of Novelty tulips is o%Ter 
for the season. Kennicott Bros. Co. re- 
ports having done especially well on them 
this year. 

James King, of Elmhurst, is serving 
on the federal grand jury, reported by 
the daily papers as about to indict a 
number of trust officials. 



O. P. Bassett has written from Fun- 
chal, Island of Madeira, that the flowers 
of their red carnation. No. 20, taken 
with him on the steamer, were still in 
good condition. They were shipped from 
Chicago February 5 and Mr. Bassett 's 
letter was dated February 12, 

The latest popular song had been sung 
by John P. Kisch, if with somewhat dif- 
ferent words, for two years before it 
became the hit of musical comedy. Its 
title is * ' My Irish Eosie. ' ' A good 
many have joined in the chorus. 

E. C. Amling says the sun has brought 
out the sweet peas in abundance. They 
have had a brisk sale up to the last few 
days. 

Although Peter Keinberg has been de- 
nounced by Alayor Dunne and his friends 
because as alderman he voted for the 
new traction ordinances, and because he 
favored Carter Harrison for mayor, 
when the Dunne people made up their 
finance committee they put Mr. Eein- 
berg's name well up on the list. He is 
expected to raise funds for a cause he 
does not favor. All that Mr. Beinberg 
does in the present campaign will bo 
done for the democratic party and not 
for municipal ownership. 

Adam Wolniewicz says he will have 
about 1,000 geraniums in bloom for Eas- 
ter. One of the sections of his cast-iron 
boiler broke last week, but he patched it 
with Smooth-on cement and escaped loss. 
He thinks the patched boiler will carry 
him through tlie season. 

A. L. Vaughan, of Vaughan & Spcrry, 
has spent a few days canvassing the 
prospects among the growers and thinks 
well of them. 

"\Vm. A. Peterson and "Gipsy" Smith, 



the evangelist, have been conducting re- 
vival services in various parts of Chi- 
cago, doing spring plowing in the Lord's 
garden, as it were. 

At E. H. Hunt's, C. M. Dickinson 
says the approach of spring is made ap- 
parent by increased calls for To-bak-ine 
products. 

Kobert Klagge and wife, Mt. Clemens, 
Mich., were in town last week. 

Otto 6oerisch was lucky man in a suit 
club this week, on an investment of $2. 

The business in young stock seems 
quite satisfactory to all this year. There 
also is an excellent sale for the old 
plants from the benches, especially Beau- 
ties. 



ST. LOUIS. 



The Market. 



Business is still good locally, as a fair 
week's business was reported last week 
by almost all the retailers. Funeral work 
is especially heavy. There seem to be 
])lenty of small weddings and an occa- 
sional large one, in spite of tiie Lenten 
season. The Orthwein wedding, March 5, 
was one of the largest this season. Other 
social work is somewhat scarce. 

In roses, first-class stock in Brides and 
Maids is still scarce and high in price. 
Large quantities of violets are being 
brought into market every day and the 
demand for them is excellent. Prices 
range low. The supply of Californias 
will be small for Easter. 

Carnations are a little too plentiful, 
but still in great demand, with prices 
for extra fancy at $4 per hundred. Qual- 
ity is extra fine in all varieties, especially 



-■ ■^^■■«^- - -AwAi Xk^'.-. A 






■".T,- rr- ,w; ■ f,/- -r 'n- 7?fc' ■-■*■ 7' ■",.1 



•T^T-'prr^ 



U76 



The Weekly Florists' Review^ 



Mabch 7, 18»7. 



Lilies for Easter 

Our lilies are .better than ever this year and we will have a big lot just 
right for Easter. We will book now a limited number of orders at 
$13.00 per 100; $150.00 per 1000. Later market sure to be higher. 

AH Cut Flowers Now in Good Supply 



LET YOUR 
ORDERS COME 



CURRENT PRICE LIST 



AMERICAN BEAUTIES Per doz. 

Extra long $6 00 

30 to 36-lnPh 4.00 

20 to 2i-inch 3.00 

15 to 18-inch 2.00 

Per 100 

Short $8.00 to $12 00 

Richmond, select, 36 in. stem. . . 18 00 

fancy 1200to 15.00 

Medium 8 00 to lo.oo 

short 4.noto 6.00 

Maid and Bride, select, long... 10.00 to 12.(0 
medium 6.C0 to 8 00 



PerlOO 

Maid and Bride, short $3.00 to $4 00 

Ubateuay, Gate, select, long 12 00 

medium 800 

" shoit 4.00to 600 

Perle, Sunrise, select, long 8.00 

medium and short 3.00 to 6.00 
Carnations, Lawson and white.. 2.00 to 3.00 
($tleet lea. Enchantress, 

Prosperity 4.00 

Good Split 150 

Harrisli Lilies 2o.OO 

Freesias 3.00 to 4.00 



Paper Whites, Romans 

Valley, fancy 

Jonquils and Daffodils 

Mignonette, fancy, large spikes. 

Snapdragon, fancy yellow 

Plumosus Sprays, Sprengeri.... 

Strings 

Smilax 

Galax per 1000. $1 25 

Ferns per 1000, 300 

Adi antum 



Per 100 

$3.00 
3.00 
3.00 
600 

10.00 
3.00 

50.(0 

16.00 



1.50 



Tulips 3.00to 5.00 



Write or wire (or special quotations on large lots. Subject to change without notice. 

POEHLMANN BROS. CO 



33-33 Randolph St. 



L. D. Phone 
Central 3573 



CHICAGO 



Mention The Review when .vou write. 



Nelson Fisher, Lady Bountiful and En- 
chantress. Cardinal sells well. 

The run on bulb stock at the wholesale 
houses has been good. Valley is plenti- 
ful, and so are Von Sions and tulips. 
Callas are well up in demand. Dutch 
hyacinths sell well. Eomans, Paper 
Whites and freesia are none too many. 

Extra fine quality of sweet peas are 
to be had, also forced white lilac. In 
greens everything one wants' is to be 
had. 

Various Notes. 

E. W. Guy, of Belleville, has returned 
from a visit to bis father, at St. James, 
Mo. 

C. De Wever, who has been very sick 
for the last three weeks, has fully recov- 
ered. Mr. De Wever had a close call, 
but his strong constitution pulled him 
through. 

Walter Eetzer, late in the employ of 
Mrs. M. M. Ayers, is now with the St. 
Louis Seed Co. 

J. W. Dunford, at Clayton, is busy 
shifting his stock of 15,000 geraniums 
into 4-inch pots. He reports that he is 
entirely sold out of pot lilies for Easter. 

C. A. Kuehn reports that the green 
carnation fluid put up by the Manchester 
Chemical Co. is selling well. 

S. S. Skidelsky, of Philadelphia, was 
in town this week. 

Walter Weber and Frank Fillmore 
paid a visit last week to their friends, 
John Steidle, A. Jablonsky and James 
Dunford, in the country. 

Miss Meyers, bookkeeper for George 
Angermueller, says that the rumor report- 
ing that she is to be married soon is a 
bit too previous and says that a man of 



her choice must have 100,000 feet of 
glass well filled with the choicest stock. 

W. C. Smith & Co. have received a 
large shipment of florists' supplies from 
Bayersdorfer, Philadelphia, including 
good styles in wicker baskets. 

Charles Dauernheim, Jr., of Kimnls- 
wick, Mo., is cutting a fine lot of extra 
quality carnation blooms, which are con- 
signed to Henry Berning. 

Oscar Huettmann must be busy these 
Lenten days, from the amount of stock 
he carries home each morning. 

Rude Windt, who has charge of his fa- 
ther 's show houses, has a fine lot of 
blooming plants and cut stock. Business 
is all that could be expected during the 
Lenten season. 

Fred Pope, on the south side, has had 
a busy week in funeral orders. His 
houses are well filled with Easter stock 
of all kinds. 

Henry Ostertag, of Ostertag Bros., re- 
ports the Orthwein wedding for Tuesday 
one of the largest of the season. They 
ordered a large shipment of orchids from 
New York. This order will run close to 
$1,000. 

From present prospects quite a lot of 
glass will be added by several of the 
Kirkwood growers this summer. Grow- 
ers at this place have almost doubled 
their business this season. They grow 
little but violets and carnations. 

A. Berdan, of Kirkwood, is sending in 
some extra fine lily of the valley and 
other bulbous stock, 

John Burke, Fred Foster and Alex Sie- 
gel tried to corner the market in violets 
last Saturday and partly succeeded early 
in the morning, but later too many came 



in, so the smaller buyers had theii share 
as well. 

Monday morning the committee was 
working hard in the banquet hall in the 
Masonic Temple to have everything in 
readiness for the Horticultural Society's 
spring flower show, which opened March 
4. I Complimentary tickets have been 
sent broadcast to business men and soci- 
ety folks. In this way it is expected to 
enroll a large number of the more 
wealthy class, who will, in the future, 
pay for the holding of flower shows in 
the fall. J. J. B. 

BALTIMORE. 



The Market. 



Business last week was fairly good. 
Nothing of great importance was on 
hand, but enough trade to keep everyone 
going steadily at this time of the year. 
Funeral work has been the most called 
for. Our growers have no trouble in 
disposing of their cut blooms, as we have 
had so vast an amount of funeral work; 
in fact, any kind of flowers were salable 
that could be used. 

We are having fine, bright sunshine 
and roses and carnations are coming in 
heavier, with a slight decrease in prices. 
A large amount of bulbous stock is on 
the market and can be had in any quan- 
tity at reasonable prices. The Harrisii 
stock looks unfavorable in some sections 
and a short crop is feared. Sweet peas 
are more regular, while violets are plen- 
tiful, bringing 50 cents per hundred. 
Greens are scarce and many order from 
the north. The cost and expressage make 
them expensive and there is not much 
profit for the retailer. 



.i-.. 



t ii^^.-^J^lMe^u 



T'^TTITT' 



Mabch 7, 1907. 



The Weekly Florists' Review. 



J 177 



E. F. WIMERSON CO. 

45-47-49 Wabash Ave., CHICAGO 



We are handling 
the choicest 
line of 



Carnations 

in the Chicago Market. Exclusive supplies of Rudd's " Blue 
Ribbon " red and pink seedlings for fancy trade. 

HBADQUABTBBS FOB 

Wild Smilax, Boxwood, Ferns, Galax, Etc. 

The Largfest Stock of 

Up-to-Date Florists* Supplies 

and Manufacturers of **Up-to*date** Wire Deaig^ns in the West. 



-OATA^tOOUS rBBE- 



CURRENT PRICES 

BBAUTIE8 Per doz. 

30 to 80 Inches 15.00 to Irt.OO 

20to24 Inches 3.00 to 4.00 

12tol61nches 1.60 to 2.00 

Short. 76to 1.00 

ROSBS Per 100 

Bride and Maid 16 OQ to tlO.OO 

~ " 10.00 

10 00 

10 00 

16.00 

6.00 

2.00 
4.00 



Richmond and Liberty 5.00 to 

Golden Gate and Uncle John 5 00 to 

Chatenay 5.00 to 

KlUarney 8.00 to 

Roses, our selection 

CARNATIONS 1.60 to 

" fancy 3.00to 

BIISCELLAN£OCS 

Violets, double .76 

single 60to .76 

Harrisli Lilies, doz., 12 00 to t2 50 

Callas " 1.60 to 2.00 

Valley 2.00to 4.00 

Paper Whites and Romans 3.00 to 4.00 

Jonquils, Daflodlls 8.00 to 4.00 

SweetPeas 1.00 to 1.60 

Tulips a.OOto 6.00 

GREENS 

Smilax Stringro per doz., 2.00 

Asparagus Strings each, .40 to .60 

Asparagus Bunches " .86 to .60 

Sprengerl Bunches " .26 to .60 

Adlantum per 100 1.00 to 1.50 

Perns, common per 1000 2.60 

Galax, Green and Bronze " 1.00 to 1.60 

Leucothoe Sprays " 7.60 

Boxwood 60-lb. case, 7.60 

Prices Sabject to Change Without Notice. 



Mention The Review when you write. 



Carnations 

Heavy receipts of all varieties. 

Good stock $1.50 to $2.00 per 100 

Fancy stoclc 3.00 to 4.00 per 100 



VIOLETS 



ROSES 



Fine Single and Doable, 50c to 75c per 
100. 



TULIPS 



Large cuts now on and prices lower. 
$5.00 to $10.00 per 100. 



VALLEY 



Plenty of all colors ; common, $3.00 to 
$4.00 per 100 ; fancy, $5.00 per 100. 



Abundant at $3.00 to $4.00 per 100. 
Fancy stock always on hand. 



All Other Stock in Large Supply. If you can use special large lots of our selection write, wire or phone for 
our Special Quotations. There is no one able to serve you better. Time to thuik about yotir Easter orders. 

VAUGHAN & SPERRY 

58-60 WABASH AVE., CHICAGO 



Mention The Review when you write. 



Various Notes. 

A representative of one of the out-of- 
town houses was here offering carnations 
in lots of 500 at $2.50 per hundred and 
selects at $3. He took many orders. 

Edward Pauth reports business good 
and can offer no complaint. 

Henry Eberhardt has been offering fine 
primroses and cinerarias. 

Charles Cook, West Mosher street, dis- 
played a lovely stall of Easter bulbs in 
Lexington market Saturday and disposed 
of nearly every plant. 

Fishniger Bros, have made their ap- 
pearance on Eutaw street with a large 
line of various kinds of plants. 

Club Meeting and Banquet 

The regular meeting of the Gardeners' 
and Florists' Club was held February 25 
in the new Baltimore Florists' Exchange 
building, with Vice-president Charles 
Seybold in the chair. The meeting was 
cut short. The new bookcase is now in 
our club-room and was admired by every- 
one. Otto Fielder was elected a member. 



The banquet committee took charge of 
the larger part of the evening. The 
rooms were handsomely decorated with 
cut flowers and potted plants and while 
the musicians played many danced. 

August Bernard and brothers ren- 
dered a number of songs in English and 
German, after which the chairman in- 
vited the jolly crowd downstairs. The 
doors of the salesroom of the exchange 
were thrown open and at the sight of 
the many good things a rush was made 
and justice was surely done. It took 
about two hours to reach the last course. 
About 100 covers were laid and every 
lady received at least one flower. 

F. G. Burger was the toastmaster. The 
arrangement for the special ladies' night 
and feast was in the hands of a com- 
mittee composed of 1. H. Moss, T. Pat- 
terson and M. Eichmond. Those who 
responded to the toasts were Bichard 
Vincent, E. A. Seidewitz and Robert L. 
Graham. 

It was said to be one of the most 
successful banquets ever held by the club 



and the ladies were assured that a ban- 
quet will be given them by the club once 
a year. J, L. T. 



BOSTON. 

The Market. 

The inevitable slump has come and 
flowers are more of a drug than for a 
long time. Values have fallen heavily 
and vary so much that it is hard to give 
quotations. Ice-chests which for a good 
many weeks were practically empty are 
now filled to overflowing and these con- 
ditions are likely to continue until the 
holding back of stock for Easter causes 
a lessened supply. Eoses are much more 
abundant and have dropped nearly to 
normal prices. A few hybrids, mostly 
Brunners, are seen and sell much better 
than Beauties, which latter are being 
hard pushed by Eichmond this season. 
Carnations have sold as low as $1 and 
none but select stock makes or exceeds 
$3. Violets have been slaughtered un- 
mercifully, prices of 10 cents per hun- 



■* • t- '-*• -"•■* j>»>.^i- ■ .-1^ . 



n78 



The Weekly Florists' Review* 



Mabch 7, 1907; 



r\ 



NOW BOOKING 



Orders for Easter 



£et ng hear from yon as to yonr 
probable needs, especially on 



LILIES 



WE shall have the ffoods— can compete with any house on 
quality and price. Write us today. 

Plenty of all stock now in market except possibly Beauties. 
Quality fine and prices reasonable. 

E. H.HUNT 

CHICAGO, ILL. 



76-78 Wabash Avenue, 

£. S. Phone 1761 



CURRENT PRICES 

BBAUTTBS Per doz. 

30to36-lnch $5.00 to $6.00 

24to30-lnch 4.00 to 5.00 

15to20-lnch 2.00 to 3.00 

8tol2-lnch 1.00 to 2.00 

ROSES (Teas) Per 100 

Bride and Maid. $6.00 to $10.00 

Bichmond, Chatbnay 6.00 to 12.00 

Golden Gate and Uncle John 6.00 to 10.00 

Perle 6.00 to 8.00 

Roses, our selection 5.00 

CARNATIONS 1.50 to 

" fancy 2.00 to 

" extra fancy 

MISCEIiliANEOUS 

Violets, double 75 to 

Violets, single 60 to 

Harrisll Lilies per doz. 

Callas " 1.50to 

Valley 3.00 to 

Paper Whites 

Romans 

Tulips 3.00 to 

Daffodils, Jonquils 3.00 to 

Sweet Peas 1.00 to 

OREKNS 

Smllax String's per doz. 

Asparagrus Strines each 

Asparag-us Bunches " 

Sprengeri Bunches " 

Adiantum per 100 

Ferns, Fancy per 1000 

Galax " 

Leucothoe Sprays " 

Boxwood per 50 lb. case, 

SUBJECT TO MARKET CHANGE 



1.50 to 
.50 to 
.35 to 



1.00 to 



2.00 
S.OO 
4.00 

1.00 
.75 
2.50 
2.00 
4.00 
3.00 
3.00 
4.00 
4.00 
1.25 

2.00 

.60 

.50 

.35 

1.00 

2.60 

1.50 

7.50 

7.50 



Mention The Review when you write. 



Sweet j 
Peas I 



Best Roses ^ 

Also all other Stock in Season* We have large supplies of special fancy 
stock and should like to supply your needs. Book orders noW tor Easter* 

The Benthey-Coatsworth Co. 

Wholesale Cut Flowers, Room 202, 35 Randolph St., Chicago 



■( 



>• 



Mention The Review when yon write. 



I 

J 



dred being recorded on not a few and 
only fancies reach the 50-cent mark. 
Street fakirs are selling bunches of fifty 
at 10 cents. 

Bulbous stock is too abundant and 
prices erratic. Sweet peas even have 
been a glut and almost unsalable. The 
quality of these is splendid and it seemed 
too bad to see such large quantities un- 
sold. Lilies and callas are abundant 
and much lower. Quite a variety of 
other spring flowers are seen, for which 
the demand is a little uncertain. 

Presentation Banquet. 

About sixty members of the Garden- 
ers' and Florists' Club assembled at the 
banquet room of the Boston Club, 22 
School street, on the evening of March 
6, the occasion being a complimentary 
banquet and testimonial to ex-Presidents 
J. A. Pettigrew and James Wheeler. A 
generous response was the result when 
an appeal was made to the club mem- 
bers for small contributions toward a 
fund for recognizing in some way the 
services the two esteemed past presidents 
had rendered to the club. F. E. Palmer 
had charge of the arrangements and 
these were well carried out. The deco- 
ration committee had seen to it that the 
tables were tastefully adorned and the 
room presented a very attractive ap- 
pearance. 



After dinner had been served and 
cigars passed, Edward Hatch, the genial 
treasurer of the club for the last thir- 
teen years, assumed charge of the post- 
prandial exercises and called on a num- 
ber of those present for remarks. Pat- 
rick Welch, in his own inimitable way, 
in the name of the club spoke of the 
way ex-President Pettigrew had re- 
galvanized the club into life and the 
earnest work he had done as presiding 
officer for two years, also of the earnest 
and enthusiastic work of his capable 
successor, James Wheeler, during his 
tenure of office and amid applause pre- 
sented each in turn with a handsome tes- 
timonial in the form of a handsome 
bronze group, suitably inscribed. The 
two recipients gracefully and feelingly 
responded, speaking of their terms of 
service being made especially pleasant 
by the willingness of the members to aid 
them in every way. A musical program 
of songs, readings, etc., was interspersed 
and the whole evening was a very en- 
joyable one. 

Various Notes. 

J. A. Pettigrew lectured at Horticul- 
tural hall March 2 on trees for streets 
and waysides before a good audience. 
An animated discussion followed the lec- 
ture. 

Fire of unknown origin caused heavy 



damage at the establishment of Elijah 
Cartwright, in Needham, on the morn- 
ing of February 28. Efforts to subdue 
the flames with small hose were inef- 
fective and before help came the head 
house was almost gutted and the ends 
of several connecting houses burned out. 
The stock in these houses was almost a 
total loss, carnations being mostly 
grown. Much sympathy is felt for Mr. 
Cartwright, whose loss would not have 
been so great but for the fact that on 
the morning in question the thermometer 
was 10 degrees below zero. 

Boston's big annual automobile show 
opens March 9, the whole of the immense 
Mechanics' building^ as well as Horti- 
cultural hall, being utilized for the show, 
which equals in size and number of ex- 
hibitors the two recent New York ex- 
hibitions combined. The decorations are 
elaborate and unique. Mechanics' build- 
ing is a representation of a New Eng- 
land apple orchard with the trees in 
full bloom. 

Entries are coming in from the spring 
exhibition of the Massachusetts Horti- 
cultural Society. While the fine ex- 
hibits of the American Eose Society will 
be missed this year, there will be an 
abundance of other attractive features. 

Sidney Hoffman had an effective win- 
dow of Ghent and mollis azaleas at his 
Massachusetts avenue store last week. 



March 7, 1907. 



The Weekly Florists^ Review* 



U79 



> 



WILD SMILAX 



Large supply constantly on hand. 

Fine quality. 

Large cases, only $5.00. 

The only item we aee soaroe is American Beantlea. Send us yonr 
orders lor all out flowers in season. 

Kennicott Bros. Co. 

WHOIiEBAKE COMBKIBBION FI^OBZSTB 

CHICAGO 



40-42-44 Randolph Street, 

It. D. Phone, Central 466. 



CURRENT PRICES 

BEAUTIES Per doz. 

80 to 86-inch $5.00 to $6.00 

24to28-inch S.OOtO 4.00 

16to20-lnch 1.60 to 2.00 

8tol2-lnch 50tO 1.00 

Shorts .76 

ROSES (Teas) Per 100 

Bride $6.00to»12 00 

Maid S.OOto 10.00 

Richmond 6.00 to 12.00 

Golden Gate and Uncle John 6.00 to 10.00 

Chatenay 5 00 to 12.00 

Roses, our selection 5.00 

CARNATIONS 1.60 to 2,00 

" fancy 3.00 

" extra special 4.00 

MISCEL.I.ANEOUS 

Violets, double or single 60 to 1.00 

Harrisil Lilies per doz. 1.76 to 2.00 

Callas " 1.50 to 2 OO 

Valley S.OOto 4.00 

Romans 3.00 

Tulips S.OOto 4.00 

Daffodils, Jonquils S.OOto 4.00 

GREENS 

Smilax Strings per doz. 2.00 to 3.00 

Asparagus Strings each .40 to .50 

Asparagus Bunches " .35 to .50 

Sprengeri Bunches " .36 to .60 

Adiantum per 100 1.00 to l.iO 

Ferns, common per lOOt 2.60 

Galax " 1.00 to 1.50 

Leucothoe Sprays per lOflO, green, .76 

Leucothoe Sprays " bronze, 1.00 

SUBJECT TO MARKET CHANGE. 



Mention The Reylew when you write. 



Wietor Bros. 

51 Wabash Avenue, 
CHICAGO 



Current Price List 

AMERICAN BEAUTIES 



Lon£ stems. 

30-inch 

24-mch 

20-inch 

18-inch 

15-inch 

12rinch 



Per doi. 
600 
500 
400 
300 
250 
200 
150 

Short $0 75 to 125 

Per 100 

Maid and Bride $5 00 to $10 00 

Uncle John 5 00 to 10 00 

Chatenay 5 00 to 10 00 

Richmond 5 00 to 10 00 

Perle 5 00 to 8 00 

Golden Gate 5 00 to 10 00 

Killarney 8 00 to 15 00 

ROSES, our selection 5 00 

Carnations 2 00 to 3 00 

Valley 3 00 to 4 00 

Violets 50 to 75 

Paper Whites 3 00 to 4 00 

Romans 3 00 to 4 00 

Callas per doz., 1 50 to 2 00 

Harrisii ** 150 to 2 00 

Asp. Plumosus. . .bunch, 50 to 75 

Ferns per 1000, 3 00 

Galax ** 100 



are among 



Mr. Hoffman 's decorations 
the finest in the city. 

Houghton & Clark had an attractive 
window of imantophyllums last week, 
and some fine amaryllises. 

Neil B. Glass, employed at Montrose 
Greenhouses, during a temporary fit of 
insanity threw himself out of a third- 
story window February 18 and sustained 
such severe injuries that he died at the 
Boston city hospital February 26. Mr. 
Glass was a native of Scotland, a first- 



BOMBAYREED 



Window Boxes 



AND 




Jardinieres 



are the best on the market; large- 
ly handled by leading florists. We 
want YOU to know our full line. 
YOU can use it. Prices low and 
invitlDg. 

Write today for price list 
and Inteirestlne cataloKue. 

Bombayreed Mfg. Go. 

s. G. 



Mention The Review when yon write. 



class workman and much esteemed by 
all who knew him. He was a member 
of the Gardeners' and Florists' Club 
and attended the meeting January 15. 

A recent call on Joshua Lawson, at 
E. J. Milton 's in Brookline, found the 
cattleyas, which are the special feature 
here, in fine condition. In the center 
stage in the cattleya house the plants 
are tied on rafts, six or seven plants to 
each, and seemed in excellent health. 
Dendrobiums and some other orchids are 
also grown. A fine batch of specimen 
cyclamens was noted. 

At Mrs. H. Dumaresq's, in Chestnut 
Hill, where William Downs presides, we 
found excellent batches of Primula ob- 
conica, cyclamens and other seasonable 
plants. In carnations, Patten, Lawson 
and Enchantress were doing especially 
well. Another season Beacon and 
Winsor will be tried. Bridesmaid and 
Eichmond are mostly grown in the rose 
house. A batch of exceedingly fine 
specimens of Lorraine begonias were 
just on the wane. Nectarines were just 
coming into flower. Mr. Downs' cot- 
tage is both internally and externally 
one of the most attractive we have seen. 

February broke all records for low 
temperature for a long term of years. 
In North Easton we recorded zero or 
below on twelve nights, the lowest be- 



ing 20 degrees. March is rather severe, 
but there is no very springlike feeling 
in the air yet. 

Thomas Koland, of Nahant, has a 
finer stock than ever of Easter plants, 
including roses, azaleas, mahemias, 
marguerites and other serviceable stock 
all finely grown. W. N. Ceaiq. 



GLEN COVE, N. Y. 

The monthly meeting of the Nassau 
County Horticultural Society was held 
February 15, at the Oriental hotel. There 
was a large attendance. Seven were 
nominated for membership. The special 
prize for carnations arranged for effect 
was won by Valentine Clevis. Lawson 
carnation, shown by William Eccles, 
scored eighty-nine points ; Phoenix Roebe- 
lenii, by Thomas Harrison, scored 
eighty- four points; mignonette, by A. 
MacKenzie, eighty-four points; lily 
of the valley, by A. Janache, sev- 
enty-nine points; double violets, by 
H. Matz, seventy-six points. Felix 
Mense was awarded a cultural certificate 
for a bunch of 100 Princess of Wales 
violets. A large collection of carnations 
Avas staked by Charles Bertanzel, for 
which he received honorable mention. 
The judges were: J. Ingram, S. J. Tre- 
pass and J. Everett. 

A. Janache gave an interesting talk on 



^ -^L-i ■:. — ^...^■. -.A-. -. 



i"*Ii Vaili ■■'-* - .~x^ -. ^ ^.^ -..■■. '-^ ■'—«.'-.:-- •: 



U80 



The Weekly Florists^ Review* 



Mabch 7, 1907. 



t 



OIR SPECIALTIES 



ORCHIDS 

Pink and White Sprays 



WHITE LILACS CATTLEYAS SINGLE DAFFODILS 
TULIPS PANSIFS FREESIAS 

FANCY BRIDE, BRIDESMAID AND RICHMOND 

A complete line of Choice Easter Plants. Price list on request 



The Leo Niessen Co. 

Note our new number. 

1209 Arch Street, 



WHOLESALE FLORISTS 

Philadelphia, Pa. 



Open from 7 •. m. to 8 p. m. Our Service Is Unexcelled. 



Mention The Review when you write. 



Phoenix Ecebelenii. The F. E. Pierson 
Co., Tarrytown, offered a silver cup for 
twenty-five Windsor carnations, to be 
competed for at the coming autumn ex- 
hibition. 



PHILADELPHIA. 



The Risine Eastern Market. 

The days when everything sold at good 
prices hav« passed for the time being, 
and it is now oftentimes diflScult to mar- 
ket flowers at anything like satisfactory 
prices. The oversupply of daffodils is 
past, with daily expectations of southern 
shipments, now overdue. Tulips are, 
however, sold at distressingly low prices; 
really fine stock has been retailed on the 
street at less than cost of bulbs. This 
is merely an indication of the depres- 
sion in the tulip market. The stock is 
excellent in all colors. Violets, while 
abundant in supply, are selling well at 
moderate prices. Sweet peas are also 
extremely plentiful. The best sell, but 
the medium and shorter grades are hard 
to market. Carnations are lower in price 
than a week ago, quality excellent, de- 
mand only fair. The situation in roses 
remains unchanged, excepting that teas 
are more plentiful. Smilax has advanced 
in price. 

The Washington Convention. 

Those intending to exhibit at the Wash- 
ington convention of the American Rose 
Society can obtain the premium list with 
all the latest additions by applying to 
Benjamin Hammond, Fishkill-on-Hudson, 
New York, or Charles McCauley, Eight- 
eenth and Kearney streets, N. E., Wash- 
ington, D. C. The exhibition will open 
Wednesday, March 13. All those inter- 
ested in roses are cordially invited to be 
present. 

Recent Importations. 

B. Eschner, of M. Rice & Co., has 
shown me two extremely pretty Easter 
novelties which his firm is distributing. 
One, an improved plant mat, i^ in every 
way superior to the old mats so largely 
used. It comes in all flower colors, is of 
tine quality, and very durable. The other 
is an exquisite little birchbark fernery, 
rectangular in shape, ornamented with 
mushrooms, mosses and other growing 



THE Horists' Supply House of America 

Easter Novelties 

FANCY BASKETS order an assortment of our latest styles. 

MAGNOLIA AND BAY LEAVES ^°°««^°SRi8'"''"°'' 

pA ly^y POT COVERS I'he latest novelty. Give standard size flower 

P/l Mtf^Y CREPE PAPERS ^^^^^^*^ ^^^ waterproof. Choice com- 

GREEN SEA MOSS a Japanese air plant. Pretty in baskets. 

OUR CATALOGUE IS FREE 

H. BAYERSDORFER & CO. 

^d'SXli 1129 Hrch St., PHILADELPHIA, PA. 



Mention The Review when yon write. 



things so natural that one could hardly 
believe they are not real. The leading 
ret.iiler3 have greatly praised this fern- 
ery, which has the additional recommen- 
dation of being moderate in price. 

Among the Growers. 

The average quality of the Easter 
plants at Godfrey Aschmann's is decid- 
edly higher year by year, showing the re- 
sult of hard, painstaking work. The lil- 
ies are nicely budded, averaging five 
flowers to the plant, clean and healthy. 
They are already being hardened off in 
some of the houses. The spiraeas, the va- 
riety is Gladstone, are well grown and 
full of buds. Azaleas are here in great 
quantity, the varieties noted being 
Deutsche Perle, Vervteneana, and Mme. 
Vander Cruyssen. Hydrangeas, cinera- 
rias. Ramblers, primroses, begonias and 
bulbous flowers make up the assortment. 



What especially impresses one about God- 
frey Aschmann's place is the care he has 
given to studying the wants of his mar- 
ket (all the sizes are the best selling 
commercial varieties) and the large 
quantity of stock that he disposes of 
each season. 

Carnations at Craig's. 

Robert Craig showed me as pretty a 
lot of carnations as one could wish to 
see. His Enchantress paid him 93 cents 
a plant last season, a remarkable yield, 
and this year promises to do as well or 
better. White Perfection and Vesper are 
his whites, Robert Craig his scarlet, 
while for crimson he has a fine seedling 
of C. W. Ward's 'as yet unnamed. A 
whole house of seedlings in their second 
year is a fine sight. A pink of good size, 
brighter than Daybreak, is exceptionally 
promising. 



-U.*jt? %^^-,:^'ira.T. 



'l' II idlliM "■' ~---.---«— -t^-^ — ^.■■.^-'-■.■■'•-J.- ^i^-■^^.- »—;-A>.»ja.-.Jtw -.>■-». .,.. 



^ .• , ; . ^■'- '-fY.^ '■:•:"• '^~'/ 7 '^^j^^"^^ --i' «fi'jH'^j5^*Bi'"^'»';^*';T«^^Ty"*"^'^ .T^^t <• 



Maiuii 7, 15)07. 



The Weekly Florists* Review. 



1181 



VALLEY 



THE FINEST IN 
AMERICA 



$3.00 and $4.00 per 100. 



We Hare an Kxeeptlonally 
Fine Stock of 



Well Rooted Carnation Cuttings 



From the Best 
Growers, 
At Follows: 



Per 100 Per 1000 

Craig $600 $55.00 

Victory 6.00 50.00 

Haines 6.00 50.00 

Peary 3.50 30.00 

Bountiful 300 25.00 

Goddard 6.00 50.00 



Per iro Per 1000 



Enchantress. . . 
White Lawson 
Harry Fenn . . . 

Lawson 

Red Sport 



.$2.50 
. 2.50 
. 2.50 
. 2.00 
. 3.50 



$20.00 
20.00 
20.00 
15.00 
24.00 



Per 100 Per 1000 

Patten $2.50 $24.00 

Cardinal 3.00 25.00 

Flaminfro 3.00 25.00 

Var Imperial 10.00 100.00 

Pink Imperial 10.00 100.00 



S. S. PENNOCK-MEEHAN CO. 

THE Wholesale Florists of PHILADELPHIA, 1608-1618 Ludlow St. 



Montlon The Review when you write. 



Large BEGONIA BULBS 

These should be planted more extensiveljr by florists 
as the plants are very salable and bringr gooi. prices. 



Doz. 

Crimson 40c 

Oranice 40c 

Scarlet 40c 

rink 40ij 

White 40c 

Yellow 40e 

Mixed Ittc 

Asparagfus Plumosus Seed 

Fine, plump, well g'erminatlng' seed which 

will give great natlsf action, all indoor-arrown. 

100 seeds 1000 sRedn .5000 B«>eds 

J^xtrn Quality 50c »4 00 $19.00 

tiood 40*; H.OO 13.7.5 

ASTER SEED 

Selected from large, long-stemmed, speci- 
men flowers. Trade pkt. Oz. 

Sample's, in seoarate colors SOc 

Semple'a. In mixed colors HOc 

Qneen of the Market, in sepurate 

colot^ 20c 

Qneeo of the Market, in ml.Ktid 

colors 20e 



SloKle FlowerlDK 



100 
r2 7.5 
2.75 
2.75 
2.75 
2 75 
2.75 
2.50 



1000 
$23.50 
2:160 
23 60 
23 50 
23..50 
23.50 
;J2.00 



Double FlowerInK 



100 
$5 00 
5 00 
500 
500 
5.00 
500 
4.00 



lUOO 
$40 00 
40 0(1 
40 00 
40 00 
40 00 
40.00 
3,"i.U(l 



$1.00 
1.00 

.('•0 



.m 



CARNATION BANDS 



Are tiny rubber bands, almost invisible, 
they save bursted carnations by niablu); 
them all useful. 

1000. $o.ir. 

2000 25 

4.500 50 

7000 7.5 

10,000 1.00 

All post paid. 

LITTLE OEM ALTSSUM 

The real dwarf type, a profuse bloomer, 
exceil«»nt for bedding and border worh, trade 
pkt., 10c; per oz., 30c. 



Kend fur oar Florists' Wholesale, also General Catalog, It will par ron. 

HENRY F. MICHELL CO. 



1018 IMarket Street, 



PHILADELPHIA. PA. 



Mention Tbe ReTlew when yon write. 



Qub Meeting. 

Prci-idcnt .Samuel S. Ponnot-k presided 
over a large meeting of the Florists' 
(vlub Tuesday evening, Mart'h .1. P. ,T. 
Lynch, of West Grove, read an interest- 
ing paper on the mail trade in rose 
])lants. F. H. Kramer, of Washington, 
i)rought three magnificent vases of C^ueen 
Reatriee, unusual flowers, heavy stems 
and good foliage. .John Cook, of Balti- 
more, sent a new seedling resembling an 
improved (Jontier. Rob<>rt Scott & Son 
exhibited two Irish seedlings, one a soft 
])ink, full flowers, which Edward 
Schwartz says they will ))lant in quan- 
tity for next season, and the other a 
long, coppery bud with heavy i)etals. 
Samuel Batcheler showed Brides and 
Maids that surprised the experts. Kd- 
ward Towill, of Roslyn, brought a splen- 
did vase of the new rose, Josej)h Hill. 
It attracted much attention. 



P. F. Richter Avill speak on bulbs at 
the April meeting. 

Various Notes. 

The Philadelphia Wholesale Flower 
Market has paid its stockholders a divi- 
dend of V- a share. 

An illustrated rose lecture will bo de- 
livered by ])r. Robert A. Iluey at Y. M. 
(". A. hall. Main and Price streets, Ger- 
mantown, Mondav evening, ^March 11, at 
S o 'clock. 

(ieorge Palmer, formerly Avitli John 
Holt, of North Wales, is now in charge 
of the Harleigh cemetery greenhouses, at 
Camden, X. J. 

Charles Gray, who has had a wide ex- 
perience in cut floAver circles, is now 
with Edw. Eeid. 

Edw. Niemann, who left for Mexico 
March 2, received before his departure 
a handsome gold watch with his initials 



on the outside and "From his Florist 
Friends" engraved on the inside of the 
case. 

W. E» McKissick has a good card in 
his flew telephone mouthpiece, which 
gives his name and number, and sug- 
gests that Avhen you want his goods he 
will meet you halfway. 

Berger Bros, are domiciled in their 
new quarters at 1305 Filbert street. Fur- 
ther improvements there are under way. 

William .T, Moore is expecting south- 
ern daffodils in quantity any day. 

Charles M. Wagner and Mrs. Wagner, 
of Cleveland, were visitors to Bayers- 
dorfer & Co. this week. Mr. Berkowitz 
reported unusually heavy orders Monday. 

The executive committee of the S. A. F. 
will meet in this city next Monday. 

Charles ^[. Campbell has a nice lot of 
Easter plants. He has a good retail 
business. 

Miss Anne H. Lonsdale died on Sat- 
urday of pneumonia. Funeral services 
were held on Tuesday. Miss Lonsdale 
was the only surviving daughter of Mr. 
and ]Mrs. Edwin Lonsdale, to whom the 
deepest sympathy of all the craft goes 
out. 

Answers to Correspondents. 

Review readers «re Invited to send niiy ijues- 
tions relutluK to eultnre or marketing: of plants 
and flov\'ers In Philadelphia, to Phil, hi rare of 
liny of the leading seed or oommission houses. 
Kaoh iiuestloii will he submitted to a competent 
l)erson and answered under number. Correct 
name and address must always accompany In- 
(|uiry, hut will not he published . 

77. — Last year out of 4,000 Jerusalem 
cherry plants we had one plant one-half 
of which was variegated. We ]vd\-v taken 
cuttings from the variegated side and 
also the berries, Tlie seed is just show- 
ing now and from all appearances it will 
come variegated; at any event, it is en- 
tirely different from the other seedlings. 
The berries on the variegated plant were 
the same as on the green variety. It 
made a very pretty plant. Do you think, 
this would take as a novelty and do you 
know of any one else who has struck a 
seedling of this nature? 

Ans. — T think well grown and well ber- 
ried variegatt^d plants of Jerusalem 
cherry would make an excellent novelty. 
[ have never heard of variegated plants 
coming true from seed. It is an old law 
that nature will not reproduce itself io 
variegated form in this way. Phil. 



.K.*i,A. ^^•■— ,:. . ,„f^,'A;,-^ .■^■. .^•.■'■.-■.^^.[■•^.'•^«.|--i.r.*.-».,^<.-.^..^*-.{ini.ioii ■ >•-■-<■.■■--■ 



^ .- ." — '• - 



■'v^ 



n82 



The Weekly Florists^ Review. 



Mabch 7, 1907. 



GREEN CARNATION FLIID 



Buy the genuine 



TlIC flDIOIilATnP who made the first fluid and exhibited the first P^l |D \f C A DO A^^ 
BtuS from Mrs. Beu I nC III1IUII1A I Ullj green carnations at the Chicago Chrysanthemum Show r W W rl TILr^rlO/^Vlw 



MRS. r. BEU, 



$1.00 PER QUART. PINTS 60 CKNTS 

60 WABASH AVE 

OR 2780 N. 40th AVE., 

Mention The Review when yon write. 



CHICAGO 



Green Carnations 



We sold Green Car- 
nations 10 yrs. ago. 



A new method and a good one. Enough powder to make 1 quart of fluid for $1.00; 
gallon, $3.50. Prepaid to any address. Our goods are fully guaranteed to be 
the best. Buy from the Orig^inator. Write today. Samples free* 



We sold Green Car- 
nations 10 yrs. ago. 



FRED GEAR, (^'rhiritXi.r) 1113 Vine St, Cincinnati, Oiiio 



Mention The Review when you write. 



EMERALD GREEN •^^KSd""' 

Pam C4 Pa# |*idc's DBV ^''^^° carnations use AJAX FLOWKR DTK. The only Dye on the market that will color 



Money refunded if not satisfactory 

E. F. WINTERSON CO., 



a beautiful Emerald Green and still allow the flower to retain its natural appearance. 
Complete instructions free. Per quart by express $1.00. Can only be bad from 



45-47-49 WABASH AVE., 

Mention The Review when yon write. 



CHICAGO, ILL. 



WASHINGTON. 



Convention Notes. 

National interest is being manifested 
in the exhibition of the American Eose 
Society and Washington Florists' Club 
■which will be held in the Washington 
Light Infantry hall, March 13 to 15. 
Nearly every state and territory in the 
Union will be represented, as well as 
different portions of Canada. Washing- 
ton is particularly interested in three 
classes open to amateur competitors. 
Three prizes of $5, $3 and $2 are offered 
by John Clarke for best specimen of a 
fern' which has been grown in a dwelling 
for at least four months previous to ex- 
hibition, Peter Bisset offers three prizes 
of similar amounts for best specimen 
of rubber plant grown under same con- 
ditions. George Field offers a like 
amount for best geranium. Preparations 
for the exhibition have been in progress 
for weeks and strongly indicate that 
Washington will this year have one of 
the finest exhibits in its history. 

^~ Jas. L. Career y. 



INDIANAPOLIS. 



Ctirrent G)mment. 

Trade conditions remain good and, in 
spite of brighter weather, almost all 
kinds of stock is kept used up; prices 
remain good and the quality of both 
roses and carnations is much improved. 
There is an abundance of bulb stock. 
The different stores and the market had 
a decidedly spring appearance last Sat- 
urday, the window displays being espe- 
cially attractive. 

H. W. Rieman is busy planting roses. 
His Easter plants look to be in fine 
shape and, no doubt, he will reap a rich 
reward. 

A party, consisting of A. Wiegand, 
Arthur Smith, Ed Larson and Sydney 
Smith, visited Richmond last week. All 



GrsBn CARNATIONS 

Send 25c and receive by mail a package of dye 
that will color 75 to 100 carnations green. Have 
many letters stating it is best on market. 3 pack- 
ages 60c. 2c stamps accepted. 

Louis Elsass, Chillicothe, Ohio 

Mention The Review when yon write. 

were favorably impressed with Hill's 
new rose, Rhea Eeid. It is the rose that 
will make the hit; a fine bud with a 
splendid color. The firm's new houses 
were interesting, not only for what they 
contained, but in their construction and 
heating. The firm has spared no effort 
in making this a model plant. At the 
B., K. and B. greenhouses the carnations 
were fine, their Superior showing to good 
advantage, also Sarah Hill, a fine white. 
At Vernon Grave 's everything was lovely, 
ixis benches of Enchantress were a sight 
to see. All his carnations were in fine 
shape and promise well for Easter. The 
nicest lot of violets in this section of 
the country are at Ed Ruch 's green- 
houses. He is certainly fortunate in es- 
caping the disease that has ruined so 
many. 

E. A. Nelson has a lot of spiraeas com- 
ing on for Easter, also lilies. He is one 
of the few who have had good luck with 
them this year. 

Arthur Smith and John Van Aart 
leave for Philadelphia this week, where 
they go to take charge of greenhouses 
at Newtown. Good luck to them. They 
will do a wholesale business. S. 



COLUMBUS, OHIO. 



The Market. 



As we have all expected for some time, 
prices are softening rapidly. Those of 
our craft who cater to the transient trade 
are happier than ever, as the lower 
prices go, the larger always are the cash 



t^UlTlllNtj ST. PATRICK 

Emerald Green Coloring, the beet for Car- 
nations. Beady for use, tl.OO per quart. 

Manchester Chemical Co* 

2804 Haneheater Ave., ST. LOUIS, MO. 

Phones, Kinloch, Central 5313; Bell, Beaumont 84 

Qr C. A. KUEHN, 112« Pine St., St. Lonia, Mo. 

Mention The Review when you write. 

GREEN 

Carnation Fluid 

For coloring white carnations green for St. Pat- 
rick's Day, price, Sl.OO per bottle. Write today 
for Free Samples with full instructions. 

Edwards&Co.,Newport«Ky. 

Mention The Review when yon write. 

over-the-counter sales. The enormous 
volume of business we have had right 
along still keeps on. Funeral work is 
abundant and at the best prices. Al- 
though it is Lent, many calls for flowers 
keep all extremely busy. The seedsmen 
have also started on what will be a great 
business year. 

The Florists' Club. 

Tuesday evening, February 26, the 
final meeting of the month was held. 
President Stephens was in the chair and 
the attendance of members was larger 
than usual. The matter of the distribu- 
tion of the penny packets of both flower 
and vegetable seeds to the children of 
the public schools received much atten- 
tion. The seeds will soon be ready for 
the children. This seed distribution is in 
charge of M. B. Faxon. At this meet- 
ing the flower committee for the evening, 
consisting of Messrs. Sexton, Reichart, 
Roth, Metzmaier and Brust, awarded to 
R. A. Currie twenty points for a fine 
specimen of Simon Mardner azalea, and 
twenty-five points for an elegant bunch 
of Princess of Wales violets to I. D. 
Siebert. A discussion of the chrysan- 
themum show to be held in November 



V 



.■u,M..'i'..:^i^^^iht.^tL-^ -■- .'.^::-. ^ ■ . |i,-..-|iiJ.itiatA>i«Hii'.iiai-iiii fr f(Vif A'lVj^ii'MHrhilii^'iitenirfMyi'-a.aiim'iaiii I'i'rVi'i'irnriiiffi 'i *t>ti i -■-••'■"■''' -* -■ ■^-^■'••'■.- ■■ - i 



fmii!f^f;i!W'W^^^rv^'(9,ytT'i'<'. ".''*'?f<;^w*''7^'^;y. ;;»,■ '■ 



i.wjriltnmw'yjirr 



Mabch 7, 1907. 



The Weekly Florists' Review. 



1183 



Southern WILD SNILAX 



NOW RBADT IN QUANTITY. 1 



E. A. BEAVEN, EVERGREEN, ALA. 



Mention The Review when yon write. 




WILD SMILAX, »iS 



yXfW %,a9fS» where you can 
ALWAYS GKT IT. LONG NEEDLE PINES, 
• doz. PALM CROWNS, $2.50 per do*. 
Extra nice long-stemmed PALM LEAVES. $2.50 per 100. MAGNOLIA, $2.50^)er 16-cubic-foot case. 
SHEET MOSS, $2.00 per sack, GREY MOSS, $2.00 per sack. GALAX, $1.00 per lOOO. 

Speed a specialty. Write for catalogue. 



Caldwell the Woodsman, 
Introducer of theWlld Smllax 



CALDWELL THE WOODSMAN DECORATING CO., - - EVERGREEN, AU. 



Mention The Review when 70a write. 



Feros-Galax-Lencothoe 

Hardy Fancy rema 

Per 100 25c Per 1000 $2.00 

Gr«en and Bronze Galax LeaTea 

Per 1000 $1.00 Per 6000 $3.76 

Green and Bronze Leuoothoe Spray* 

Per 100 60c Per 1000 $5.00 

Boxwood 
Per lb 16c Per case $6.50 

Green Slieet M oas 

Per bale 25c Bundle, 5 bales... $1.00 

Spliasnum Moaa 

1 bale, $1.25 5 bales. $5.50 10 bales, $10.00 

Wholesale 
Oommission Florist 

80 Kaat Third St., CINCINNATI, OHIO 

Mention The Review when you write. 



C. E. CRITCHELL, 






llirill PQflD ^°<1 Perfect stock. Green 
llblf UnUr Galax, Leuoothoe Sprays, 
Fancy and Dagger Ferns. 
All strictly fresh 
1 from the world's fin- 
est patch. Are now 
'ready for shipment. 
Galax, 50c per 1000; 
Fancy and Dagger 
Ferns, 8O0 per 1000; Leucotboe 
Sprays. $2.50 per 1000. Discount 
on large orders. Write for prices in case lots. 
Terms: Oash or good references with orders 
from unknown parties. Place your order with 
as and get just what you want, and get it quick. 

RAY BROS., ELK PARK. N. C. 

Mention The Review when you write. 

FERNS 

Larg'est stock of any 
dealer in the trade. 

Fancy, $1.50 per 1000 

Dagger, 125 per 1000 

ROBERT GROVES 

ADAMS, BIASS. 

Mention The Review when you write. 

Very Best Quality Bronze and 
Green Galax Leaves J^^^^Jo^'oo 

Beantlfni Bronze Lencothoe Sprays.. $0.60 per 100 

Green " " .. .50 per 100 

Bhododendron Sprays, very choice... 1.50 per 100 

Fancy and Dagger Ferns $2.00 per 1000 

I guarantee all stock satisfactory. 

■. H. HITCHCOCK, Glenwood, Mich. 

Mention The Review when yon write. 

..Wholesale Galax and LeucothOb.. 

Direct from the woods to the dealer. 

Galax, Green and Bronze 50c per 1000 

Leucothoe Sprays (green only) $2.00 per 1000 

Ferns, dagger and fancy 70c per 1000 

Special prices on lots of 100,000 and up. 
Terms strictly cash. F. O. B. Elk Park, N. C. 

r. W. Richards & Co., Banners Elk, N.C. 

Mention The Review when yon write. 




FANCY FERNS 

$1.50 per 1000. 

DAGGER FERNS.. 

$1.26 per 1000. 

GALAX, GREEN OR BRONZE 

7So per 1000. 

BOXWOOD, No. 1 stock, 50 lb. cases, $8.50. 

I.AUIUEL. FBSTOOmNG, 4c. 5c and 6c per yard. 

Finest quality LAUBBL WRBATHS, $3.00 per doz. Cheaper grades if wanted. 

SOUTHKRN SMIL.AX, fancy stock in 50-lb. cases, $5.50. 

LAURKL BRANCHBS, 35c per bundle. 

Telecrapli Offloe, NBW SALKM, MASS. 
Lone Diatance Telephone Connection. 

CROWL FERN CO., MILLINGTON, MASS. 



Mention The Review when you write. 



HKADQUARTKRS FOR 

Hardy Cut Greens and Florists' Supplies 

FANCY AND DAGGER FBRNS. fine quality. $1.50 

per 1000. 
NBW CROP BBILLIANT BRONZB AND GREKN 

GALAX, $1.00 per 1000; $7.50 per case of 10,000. 

SOUTHERN WILD SMILAX, $3.50 and $7.00 per case. 

LAUREL FESTOONING 

Good and full, 5c and 6c per yard. 
BRANCH LAUREL, 50c per bunch. 
LEUCOTHOE SPRATS, $1.00 per 10«. 
SPHAGNUM MOSS, 50c per bag; five bags, $2.00. GREEN MOSS, $1.00 per bbl. 
FLORISTS* SUPPLIES— A full line of Florists' Supplies, Wire Frames, Corrugated Boxes, 
Out Flower Boxes, Immortelles, Cycas Leaves. Sheaves of Wheat, Tin Foil, Cut Wire, etc. 

HENRY M. ROBINSON & CO. 

Til. 2617-2618 Main. 16 Province St., 9 Chapman PL, Boston, Mass. 





Mention The Review when you write. 




Extra fine FANCT 
and DAGGER 



$2.00 per 1000. 



FERNS 

^— B^* ^W^ Discount on large orders. 
BOXWOOD, 20c per lb.; 50 lbs.. $8.60. GALAX, Bronze and Green. $1.26 
per 1000; $7.50 per case. LEUCOTHOE SPBfcTS, $1.00 per 100; $7.50 per 1000. 
Let us have your standing order for Ferns. 

Send for our weekly price list of Out Flowers. 

MICHIGAN CUT FLOWER EXCHANGE, incorporated 

88-40 BROADWAY, DETROIT, MICH. 

Mention The Review when yon write. 



Green or 



GALAX cTron^e 

$6.50 per case of 10,000; 5.000 lots, 75c per 1000; 
2000 lots, 80c per 1000; 1000 lots, $1.00 per 1000. 
Terms cash, F. O. B. Little Falls. N. Y. 

THOMAS WILLIAMS,Jordanville,N.Y, 

Mention The Review when you write. 



BRILLIANT 



GALAX AND C DD A VC 
LEUCOTHOE <5rKAI J 

Wholesale Trade Solicited 

J. L BANNER & CO., Montezuma, N. G. 

Mention The Review when yon write. 



U84 



The Weekly Florists^ Review* 



Mabch 7, 1907. 



Beauties, Richmond, Maids, 
Brides, Uncle John, Chatenay, 
Killarney, Liberty, Carnations 

and an abundant supply of everything at the lowest market price. We should 

appreciate YOUR Order. 

GEORGE REINBERG 

35 Randolph Street, . CHICAGO 



Mc>nti<in 'I'he Review when yon write. 



CW.NcKELLAR 




CHICAGO 51 Wabash Ave. 



I have many 
Novelties in 

Ribbons 

and 

Chiffons 



GREEN DYE ^"^^''^ 

For St. Patrick's Day Carnations. Best there is, 75c per quart. 



CURRKNT PRICK LIST 

ORCHIDS, a specialty. Per doz. 

Dendroblums 13.00 to l«.00 

Oattleyas 6.00 

Assorted, box, 16.00 to 1%. 

Beauties, Bztra Fancy. . 6.00 

2i to 86-lnch stems 4.00 to 6.00 

16 to 20-inch stems 2.00 to 8.00 

Short stems 76 to 1.60 

Per 100 
Bride, Maid, Ivory, Gate .. 5.00 to 10.00 

Liberty, Richmond 6.00 to 10.00 

Chatenay, Sunrise, Perle. . 5.00 to 10.00 

Roses, my selection 5.00 

Carnations, lar^e fancy... 8.00 to 4.00 

" good stock.... 1.60 to 2.00 

Violets, double or slngrle.. .50 to .76 

HarrisU per doz. 2.00 to 2.60 

Gallas perdoz. 150to 2.00 

Valley 2.00to 4.00 

Pai>er Whites. Romans .... 3.00 

Tulips, Jonquils 3.00 to 5.00 

Miirnonette 4.Q0tO 8.00 

Dutch Hyacinths 5.00 to 6.00 

Smilax perdoz., 2.00 

Asparagus Strlng^s... each, .36 to .60 
Asp. Plu.,Sprenreri, bunch, .36 to .76 

Adiantum per 100, 1.00 

Ferns per 1000, 2.00to 2.60 

Oalax " 1.00 

Boxwood Sprays, per bunch .86 

Wild Smilax, large size, per case 15.00 

Subject to changre without notice. 



Mention The Review when you write. 



closed the evening 's work. The meeting 
adjourned till March 12. 

Various Notes. 

While William and Samuel Graflf have 
been in Chicago, attending the marriage 
of their sister, Harry Aaron has been 
assisting James McKellar in handling 
the large business of the Graflf Bros. 

The Fifth Avenue Floral Co. Avas espe- 
cially busy last week. Among other or- 
ders they had the supplying of carna- 
tions daily to the booths of the Ohio 
Hardware Men's Convention which is 
annually held here. 

The craft are most favorably com- 
menting upon the splendid American 
Beauty rosea at the Institution for the 
Feeble Minded. T. A. Sexton is in charge 
of the state's greenhouses there. 

The craft are glad that Mrs. E. M. 
Krauss is again able to be back at her 
store after a severe attack of the grip. 

The Clover Hill Greenhouses have a 
fine stock of Easter plants coming on, 
and, as usual, their regular business will 
carry them off. 

The Franklin Park Floral Co. has, as 
in past years, a large stock of geraniums 



coming on, and, considering the weather, 
the plants are in excellent condition. 
The varieties grown here are: S. A. 
Nutt, Queen of the West, Single Gen- 
eral Grant, Heteranthe (Double General 
Grant), and Mnie. Hallock Foote. 

The incorporation last week of the 
American Mutual Pottery Co., of Co- 
lumbus, with a capital of $100,000, 
means that our Columbus Pottery Co., 
recently destroyed by fire, will be rebuilt 
and operated. 

Another competitor for the cut flower 
business has appeared.' The Columbus 
Drug Co. has added a floral department. 

C. V. Heikes & Co., of Troy, O., have 
established headquarters here for spring 
nursery stock sales, and planting eon- 
tracts and are so advertising in the daily 
papers. 

There has been an unusiial number of 
spring openings in the big stores, which 
has used up a lot of stock, and this 
week one of the theaters gave carnations 
to its patrons. All this helps. 

A suit for .$500 damages has been 
brought against Gustave Drobisch, the 
dean of our florists. The plaintiff de- 
clares that the smoke from the green- 



houses of Mr. Drobisch, has blackened 
the walls of her house and polluted her 
cistern water. Much interest in the out- 
come of this case is felt by all the 
craft. 

The weather has been exceptionally 
sunny and fine lately, but it has been 
cold. A great trade is sure for Easter. 

Zero. 



Tipton, Ia. — Mr. Shiffer, who started 
the Tipton Greenhouse some years ago, 
has sold the plant to Mr. Patterson, 
whom he employed last winter during 
the busy season. 

Calumet, Mich. — Fire threatened the 
destruction of the greenhouses of the 
Lutey Floral Co. February 25. The of- 
fice building and boiler room were de- 
stroyed, and some of the plants were in- 
jured by frost. 

Bo.\NOKE, Va. — The case of McGhee, 
the florist, against the Tidewater, was 
closed February 26. Mr. McGhee claimed 
$1,200 from the Tidewater for alleged 
damages done to his flower beds on Jef- 
ferson street, but the court decided 
against him in the case. 



.JLj 



a''yf.->^'\^c''^^'!^^v'!!^-W'^\rr^^^'!^'-'jrr;^-'7^;^f^rw^:r/''y,m^. 



Mjhrcu 1, 1907. 



'jfr^MTij^v 



»»^r*-',f^-y^:^-»~rr'nr ™ ■*- . ■' '"' - . 



The Weekly Horists' Review. 



U85 



The riorists' Manual 



By WILLIAM SCOTT 




Here is a 
Business Book 
For Business Men 

SECOND EDITION 

THOROUGHLY REVISED AND 
BROUGHT UP TO DATE 



NO SCIENCE, BUT LOTS OF 
PRACTICAL COMMON SENSE 



"Find enclosed $5 for the Florists' Manual, by 
William Scott. It is the best book of the age on 
commercial floriculture and should be in the home 
of every gardener." — Conrad Forbach, Buffalo, 
N. Y. 



"I have several times been consulted by those who would make a begin- 
ning in the Florists' business. In each case I have said that the first step is 
to subscribe for a Trade Paper, and the next to procure a copy of The 
Florists' Manual." — J. A. Valentine, Pres. Park Floral Co., Denver, Colo. 



No dry-as-dust botanical classifications, but 
tells you just how to produce marketable plants 
and cut flowers in the best and cheapest way. 



Tells you just what you want to know about 
every plant that there is any money in for a 
Commercial Florist. 



Treats of over 200 subjects and is freely Illustrated with fine balf-tone engravinsrs. 

WITH WHICH HAS BEEN INCLUDED 
THE PRONOUNCING DICTIONARY OF PLANT NAMES 



PRICE, $6.00, PREPAID BT EXPRESS OR MAIL 



FLORISTS' PUBLISHING CO., 



Csjcton Bttildinfi;, 

384 Dearborn Street, 



CHICAGO 



■i-^-\.^.-ii-^.^.g^'-..^--. - .-.-. 



.:'^JirLk.I^£&.k.L«Mt%k^A-J«...-jL.Jkb^l 1 .■\M.iL . 



.Ai-A.'kl* Jj.j 



U86 



The Weekly Florists' Review* 



Mabch 7, 1907. 



^i 



LEWISIA TWEEDYI. 

This plant is to be numbered among 
the most attractive of recent introduc- 
tions,- says a writer in an English con- 
temporary. It has all the good attri- 
butes of the best alpine, and possesses 
the finest flowers of a naturally showy 
race. It is a Californian plant that 
grows wild under conditions that are 
alpine, on the one hand, and partaking 
of those of the desert on the other, inso- 
much that cultivation, as we understand 
it, is more likely to do harm than good. 

It forms a flattened, leafy rosette, in 
some measure like that of Echeveria met- 
allica, and averaging six inches across. 
The flowers are produced in dozens from 
the leaf axils, and are held nearly erect, 
are multipetaled, fleshy, and funnel- 
shaped, whilst the color scheme is apri- 
cot mainly, but later rose and purple 
struggle for place till the flower fades. 
It is a beautiful plant in flower, and 
quite distinct from any other. 

Under cultivation one could select for 
it a sheltered recess in rockwork, and 
plant it in a rift or seam between boul- 
ders, laying its roots back into soil and 
rock chippings as far as they will go. 
It cannot have too much solar heat, but 
it can have too much moisture, and the 
position noted is probably the best that 
can be given it. 

An importation from California of 
many adult specimens showed clearly the 
conditions under which the plants grow. 
The roots were exact copies of the larg- 
est dock roots ever dug — nearly a yard in 
length, and they bore the impress of rock 
chips and stout yellow loam very plainly. 
The size of root and leaf, and the num- 
ber of old flower stems these imported 
roots carried showed that this lewisia has 
not been seen under cultivation in half 
its real strength and capabilities of 
flower production. 



The Review is full of valuable infor- 
mation. In fact, it is the best florists' 
paper I have ever read. I would not be 
without it for ten times its cost. — Geo. 
Fauth, Woodlawn, Md. 

WANT ADVERTISEMENTS. 



AdTsrtlBements under tbls head one cent a 
word. CASH WITH ORDER. When answers 
are to be addressed In our care, add 10 cents for 
forwarding:. 

SITUATION WANTED— By a married man; 
Scotch; as private gardener on a gentleman's 
place; thoroughly understands the management 
of greenhouses, Jrults, flowers, vetretables, 
lawns, etc.; open for engagement Agrll 1. Ad- 
dress No. 84, care Florists' Review. Chicago. 

SITUATION WANTED— As forem;iD. exper- 
ienced In nursery and landscape garden 
work; accustomed to plans; experienced In the 
construction of Italian, European and American 
gardens, roads, lakes, etc. ; well recommended in 
the handling of men. Address No. IIS, care 
Florists' Review, Chicago. 

SITUATION WANTED— By first-class gardener 
and florist; 25 years' experience In green- 
houses; flowers, fruits and vegetables; German, 
single, a hustler, wants steady position on private 
place; flrst-class Chicago references; over 7 
years with present employer; state full par- 
ticulars; good wages expected. Address No. 
113, care Florists' Review, Chicago. 

HELP WANTED— Assistant for general green- 
house and nursery work; no firing; $9 00 
week— chance for advancement. F. Walker k, Co., 
634 4th Ave., Louisville, Ky. 

HELP WANTED— Three single young men, at 
once, with some experience In this business, 
willing to further their knowledge. Address No. 
118, care Florists' Review, Chicago. 

HELP WANTED— At once, man for general 
greenhouse work; state wages and exper- 
ience in first letter. G rohman Bros., 317 Fltzhugh 
St., Saginaw, E. S.,lMlch. 



Your Plans 
For 1907 

should include telephone 
service at youi home as well as at 
your place of business. 

It isn't only "just as 
easy" to do things by telephone, it is 

EASIER 
CHEAPER and 
QUICKER 

NEW YORK TELEPHONE COMPANY 
J5 DEY STREET 



HELP WANTED — Carnation grower; state 
wages with board. N. C. Moore & Co., 
Morton Grove, 111. 

HELP WANTED— Single man for general green- 
house work: must know how to handle 
bedding plants; state Wages. Address No. 114, 
Florists' Review, Chlcdge. 

HELP WANTED— A ^ood grower of roses and 
carnations, mums' and general stock; $40 00 
per month, board and room for first year; send 
references. C. Humfeld, Clay Center, Kan. 

HELP WANTED— A good experienced waterer; 
must be able to furnish reference. Address 
immediately. The McGregor Bros Co., Spring- 
field, Ohio. 

HELP WANTED— Salesman acquainted with 
the trade to carry side line, pocket sample; 
quick seller; large profits. Address The Cpving- 
ton Seed Co., Covington, Ky. 

HELP WANTED— A sober and capable man to 
handle retail trade, make-up and design; 
references; state salary. Address No. 1, care 
Florists' Review, Chicago. 

HELP WANTED— At once, first-class grower 
of carnations and a general plant line, sin- 
gle; must be sober and industrious; wages $50 00 
per month, room and board. Address No. 104, 
care Florists' Review, Chicago. 

HELP WANTED— A good all-round florist for 
general greenhouse work; must be young, 
strong and sober; German preferred. Apply or 
call at once to Christ. Bussjaeger, cor. Dale and 
Charles Sts., St. Paul, Minn. 

HELP WANTED— Man who understands grow- 
ing roses and general stock; good all-round 
man; permanent nosltion; married man pre- 
ferred; wages. $15 00 per week. Apply Howard 
P. Klelnbans, 66 Center Square, Kaston, Pa. 

HELP WANTED — A thoroughly up-to-date 
store man for first-class Chicago retail store. 
Must be Al designer and decorator, also flrst- 
class salesman; good salary to right party. Ad- 
dress No. 108, care Florists' Review, Chicago. 

HELP WANTED— Competent man to grow car- 
nations; roses and mums, and general stock; 
20000 ft. of glass: steady job; must be all right, 
with good reference. W. E. Gravett, Lancaster, 
Ohio. 

HELP WANTED— At once, a rapid potter, and 
one thoroughly acquainted with planting 
out of spring bedding plants; must be a steady 
and sober man; reference required. Address 
John Reck k Son, Bridgeport, Conn. 

HELP WANTED— Settled married man of ex- 
I>erience to take management of established 
florist's store; salary and part interest or all 
salary if desired. Address No. 88, care Florists' 
Review, Chicago. 

HELP WANTED — A competent carnation 
grower with practical knowledge of general 
stock; none but a good carnation man need ap- 
ply; state salary In application. Address No. 
69, care Florists' Review, Chicago. 



HELP WANTED — Two men experienced ii* 
potting and general greenhouse work. 
Steady position. J, F. Wilpox, Council Bluffs, la. 

HELP WANTED— Propagator for carnations,, 
roses and general stock. Address M. Bloy, 
Rocky River, Ohio. 

TTELP WANTED— .Young man with some ex- 
Jj- perience in general greenhouse work; posi- 
tion permanent and good home; state age, ex-. 
I>erience, references and wages per month with' 
board. Address Geo. S. Beldlug, Mlddletown, 
N. Y. 

HELP WANTED— Young; active man, exper- 
lenoed'in'deSlgnlng, to take charge of store 
and with some grewihouse experience; steady 
t)ositlon; «tate refei«pce apd salary expected. 
A. Waldbart Sc Sons, HataiUon andHortou Place, 
St. Louis, Mo. 's •' „'. . „ 

'■ .;. ■ i'!'-:^t.M- ■ 

HELP WANTED— A' sober ind competent man 
to take charge of 22,000 ft. glass: must be a 
first-class grower of cut flowers and plants; 
none but a good man need apoly: state age, sal- 
ary and references In application. Apply, Arthur 
L. Raub & Co., Easton, Pa. • 

TTELP WANTED— A"tEoroughly up-to-date 
-TL store man to take charge and manage one 
of the finest floral establishments in the west; 
must be an Al designer and decorator and a first- 
class salesman; good salary and commission to 
right party. Address with references as to char- 
acter and ability. No. 73, care Florists' Review, 
Chicago. 

HELP WANTED — A young man for general 
greenhouse work where carnations and 
chrysanthemums are grown; would be expected 
to wait on customers, assist in design work and 
pack orders for plants; apply, stating wages 
with rooms, with or without board. Morton's 
Evergreen Lodge Flower Garden, Clarksvllle, 
Tenn. 



HELP WANTED— A bright youngman to assist 
In our flower department; one with exper- 
ience in first-class flower stores: must be able 
to make up designs quickly and artistically; per- 
manent position and good chance for advance- 
ment: give full particulars In first letter and sal- 
ary desired. Address Superintendent, William 
Donaldson & Company, Minneapolis, Minn. 

HELP WANTED ^ Married man preferred; 
must be sober, understand raising cut flow- 
ers, general stock, propagating and designing; 
also competent to take entire charge and handle- 
help; give references and experience; salary, 
$60 00 per month and opportunity to work out 
rent of cottage connected with greenhouses. 
Merryvale Greenhouses, Helena, Ark. 

HELP WANTED— A good all-round greenhouse 
man as foreman of 2500 feet of glass; a 
grower of cut flower and general greenhouse 
stock; a man wanted that wants to stay if the 
place is agreeable; $55.00 for the first month, 
$60.00 for the next four months; at the end of the 
4 months' if he and we are agreeable we will con- 
tract for a year at an advance over the 4 month- 
price; we want the man at once. Address The- 
Newburys, Mitchell, S. D. 



jfc^^^^^"-"^'*-*-^ ^- - - — - -^■- 



'.;r'^ •■ "#7™ 



^T' '.™.--F V9.'VlJ^«^T.,%"'fi» '>- IfV " 



March 7, 1907, 



The Weekly Florists' Review. 



U87 



WANTED-Address Of Harry Wallles. Address 
Hlnz & Co., Learenwortb, Kansas. 



w 



ANTED— Good slsed aquarium in perfect 
order. Box 698, Troy, N. Y. 



WANTED— To lease on May 1, 15,000 to 25,000 sq. 
ft. of srlaso; for 6 yedrs or so; good rent for 
good place. A. Ley & Bro., Langdon, D. C. 

WANTED— To rent, 10,000, or more, feet of glass 
In good condition; must be near Cbicago. 
Address No. 91, care Florists' Review, Chicago. 

WANTED— Two flrst-class growers want to 
lease greenhouses in the spring, within 
100 miles of Chicago. Address No. 98, care 
Florists' Review, Chicago. 

FOR SALE OB BENT— Carnation greenhouses; 
good market, established business; land as 
needed for outdoor work and gardening if de- 
sired; reasonable rent or sale on easy terms. 
For particulars address C. T. Phelps, North 
Adams, Mass. 

FOR SALE— Good store business; well located 
In Chioaero; owner going to Europe, Ad- 
dress No. 101, care Florists' Review, Chicago. 

FOB SALE-SOOO feet of glassif big money in it 
for the right man, but he must have eome 
money; don't write unless you mean business. 
Address No. 6!S, care Florists' Review, Chicago. 

FOR SALE— 3000 feet Of glass, fine location; can 
sell all you grow and then have to buy; will 
stand close Investigation, good reason for sell- 
ing. Address No. 99, care Florists' Review, 
Chicago. 

FOR SALE— Greenhouse, 12,000 feet of glass, 
planted to roses and carnations; 2 acres of 
land adjoining; everything in good condition; in 
nice Southern ciiy; no greenhouse within 200 
miles. Address Ocala Greenhouse, Ocala, Fla. 

FOR SALE— A well equipped flower store in 
fine location, Chicago; reasonable, pleasant 
living rooms; just the place for man and wife; 
good reasons for selling. Address No. Ill, care 
Florists' Review, Chicago. 

FOR SALE— Five greenhouses and 50 acres of 
ground within easy reach of Philadelphia; 
good house, barn, and water supply; the best 
rose soil; an ideal place for building up a paying 
business. Address No. lOO, care Florists' Re- 
view, Chicago. 

FOR SALE— Five new greenhouses, containing 
20.000 square feet of glass. In operation one 
year; four hours from Pittsburg, Cleveland, Erie 
and Buffalo; good central location. For partic- 
ulars, write Henry F. Michell Co., Philadel- 
phia. Pa. 

FOR SALE— Greenhouse; 4000 feet of glass, 
7-room residence, barn, three lots for sum- 
mer work; city water and sewer connections; 
natural gas for fuel (no night fireman) : cut 
flower trade in city of 1200. Address lola Green- 
house, 704 E. Lincoln St., lola, Kan. 

FOR SALE— Greenhouse plant; about 9000 sq. 
ft. glass; good dwelling house and bam; 
situated In Chicago, 20 minutes ride from center 
of city; excellent locality, which is building up 
very rapidly. Address No. 110, care Florists' 
Review, Chicago. 

FOR SALE— A list of over 15,000 names of live 
plant buyers in the Southern states; revised 
' and corrected to date; no fakes or dead ones; 
nicely gotten up in a separate book for each 
state; price $50 00. Address Not 105, care Flo- 
rists' Review, Chicago. 

FOR SALE— Equity in well established whole- 
sale and retail florists' business in good lo- 
cation in Chicago; doing good business; well 
stocked with Boston ferns, bedding plants and 
miscellaneous stock; will sell for $800 cash; 
fullest investigation invited. Address P. Pear- 
son, 920 North Campbell Ave., Chicago. 

FOR SALE— Dwelling and 3 greenhouses; fully 
stocked; in growing town 7 miles from Phil- 
adelphia; everything In good shape to continue; 
all tools, horse, wagon, etc.; am Identified with 
company which needs my time; this is not a run- 
down place, but can be Increased. F. R. Mat- 
singer, Palmyra, N. J. 

FOR SALE- 7,000 feet of glass, 3 greenhouses 
stocked with roses, carnations and a general 
assortment of window and bedding plants; have 
a quantity of bulbous stock in good shape for 
Easter; hot water heat. Dwelling house with 
six rooms; lot 175 feet front, 190 feet deep; fine 
local and outside trade; do not miss this chance 
for It Is a good one. Address W. H. Searing, 
712 13th Street, Greeley, Colo. 

FOR SALE— Florists' business, consisting, of 
15000 feet of glass, 8^ acres of land, 6-room 
house, barn, wagon-shed, 2 boDers, t>5 hotbed 
sash, 3 wagons, buggy, surrey, 3 horses, 1 cow; 
greenhouses well stocked with Easter and bed- 
ding stock; 35 minutes on Carrlck car from Pitts- 
burg or 1 hour and 15 minutes' drive; will sell at 
reasonable price; good chance for quick buyer. 
Address No. 109, care Florists' Review, Chicago. 



FOR SALE — Greenhouses established at St. 
Paul; good location, about 15 minutes ride 
from the center of the city; houses built on three 
large city lots; tfood dwelling house, 8 housfs in 
all, and will be sold reasonable on easy terms to 
responsible party. For further details, corres- 
pond with the undersigned. L. L. May & Co., St. 
Paul, Minn. 

WANTED,,.. 

A first-class man for general work in a 
first-class flower store; must be sober, 
industrious and honest; also good refer- 
ences. Address P. H., care J. J. Beneke, 
1216 Olive St., St. Louis, Mo. 

WANTED 

Manager for established retail store; must have 
wide experience in decorating, cut flower work, 
etc., and accustomed to wait on flrst-class trade. 
Please state former positions; also leferences 
and salary expected. Address 

B. r. BARR, 950 Columbia Ave.. 
R. F. D. No. 1, Lancaster, Pa. 

WANTED 

200 feet second hand 4-lnch pipe. 
'200 feet second hand Sinch pipe. 
200 feet second hand 2-inch pipe. 
Also globe valves to match, 
must be cheap for cash. 

A. B. HUNTER, Belleville, Ala. 

l^zsM^Afl A man who thoroughly understands 
■■ «■■■ id! growing lettuce and carnations to buy 
an interest in my business and take full charge of new 
house 47x186x166 feet; small capital required; will 
guarantee the sale of all the lettuce and carnations that 
we can grow; no better opportunity to make money ever 
offered; give full particulars in first letter as to where 
you have worked and what you have done;_ ill health is 
the only reason I have for wanting to take in a partner: 
the dwelling house has U rooms, city water and natural 
gas. Address No. 107, care Florists' Re- 
view, ChloaKO. 

\T/^l«|4-p^ Grower of bulb stock, 
W ctiitCvi ferns, etc.; also thor- 
oughly experienced propagator for gen- 
eral stock; experienced help only need 
apply. Give references and state salary 
in first letter. The Gasser Company. 
Wholesale and Retail Growers, 1013 
Prospect Avenue, Cleveland, Ohio. 

Wanted, Landscape 
Gardener and Florist 

to handle Pure Kentucky Law^n Grass 
BUxture and Kentucky Blue Grass Seed direct 
from the blue grass state. Big profits. Write now. 

THE COVINGTON SEED CO., Covington, Ky. 

MANAGER WANTED 

For first-class retail Boston store, must have 
had wide experience in designing and decorating 
and accustomed to wait on flrst-class trade, 
steady position: very best salary to right party 
state full particulars with application. 

Addresi No. 89, 
Care Florists' Review, Chicago. 

FOR SALE 

Greenhouse plant of 25.000 feet of glass; an 
up-to-date place, heated by steam and cheap fuel; 
the houses are in good condition, well stocked 
with everything for wholesale and retail trade; 
also Flower and Seed Store with fixtures, seven- 
room house and eight acres of land; if desired, 
will sell half Interest or lease the plant for term 
of years. This Is an excellent opportunity and 
is worth investigating. Address No. 48, care 
Florists' Review, Chicago. 

FOR SALE 

Tr^TJ T^OY used four months. 16 ft. long, 
l\alLrO\jr^f 7 ft. y,ide, 8>i It. high. 

AccommodatioQ for commercial or wholesale 
florist. Will sell at a sacriflce. 

CHAS. MILLANG, 
50 Vest 29th Street, NEW YORK CITY. 



FOR SALE 

Colorado Springs, Colo* 

Wholesale and retail business well located; 34 
greenhouBes: 13 acres of land; 4 boilers, 16-60; 2 
dwelling houses. For terms, 

WM. CLARK, Colorado Springs, Colo. 

Bf^n CAI F T On account of my health, I 
■ ^^I* ^*«l-a- * am compelled to take the 
world easier, and for that reason, I will offer my entire 
manufacturing business which has the distinction of 
being the best established reputation of its nature in 
this country. The sale includes the Duplex Gutter, 
the Standard Ventilating Machine and the Standard 
Steam Trap, of which a great many were installed in 
the last 2 years with the best results. Also the gutter 
had a very laive run, and I am shipping a large range 
at present to California. Address 

£. HIPP^BD, YOUNGSTOWN, OHIO 

FOR SALE 
GREENHOUSE PIPE 

4-IN. BOILSR TUBES, second-band, in fine 
condition, absolutely free from scale and with 
ends cut square. Sample and prices on appli- 
cation. KROKSCHBLL BROS. CO. 

51 Krle Street, CliloaKO 

Situation Wanted 

By A-1 Florist, 81 years old and up-to-date; 
good designer,decorator, salesman and practical 
grower of roses, carnations, chrysanthemums, 
plants, etc. Not a horticultural expert, but a 
practical all-round man with the ability to 
manage and get results; West or South preferred. 
Wishes to take hold of good plant about April 1, 
and manage same with success, good salary, 
etc., expected. 

ADDRESS No. 97, 
CARE FLORISTS' REVIEW, CHICAGO. 

FOR SALE, a^Dt^tS!^* 

FLORIST BUSINESS, RICHMOND, VA. 
Long; Establlabed. 

Consisting of five greenhouses, three 100 x 16 
feet each, and two 50 x 10 feet each. Thoroughly 
heated by hot water system. Windmill and 
abundance of good water. A good, fair stock on 
hand. The property consists of almost an entire 
block in tho suburbs of Richmond, Va., with a 
nice modern frame residence of seven rooms, 
stable, etc. Electric railroad line runs in front 
of the property. Free delivery of mall twice 
daily. An excellent remunerative trade, and 
annually increasing. Address, 

J. THOMPSON BROWN tl CO. 
1113 E. Main Street, RICHMOND, VA. 

WANTED 

By March 15, first-class 

Cut Flower Worker 

Good salary to experienced 
man, used to high-class trade. 

Address No. 106, 
care Florists' Review, Chicago 



The Second Edition 

—of the— 

Florists^ Manual 

Is Now Ready 

Price, $5.00 a copy, 
carriage charges prepaid. 









UMI iijini ir«».<.i(iji'T,^(»piii>l»/Mj,i I IIP uiimijIlPl^lfiil ljfyp(i^jiw.,inHi; 11,^ 57ir™r??7r-.^^-'v:T 



r'TTT^ri \-v« *», '■.."i|i"»!',"wwiT' "•"*"•.' vrv\>.',y*-r:''iwv3^''^'vy^i.-vvj'!>f'^-^!y> ■8!WW'w*",".»ii^*,wT"'V.'Jwjill|iW.."»i"*'81 ^ 



1188 



The Weekly Florists^ Review* 



Maiich 7, 1007. 




Co, 



SEATTLE, WASH. 

Growers of 



PUGET SOUND 



CABBAGE SEED 



MfiiiUiii ']'he Kevlew when you write. 

S. M. ISBELL ft CO. 

JACKSON, MICH. 

Seed Growers for tlie Trade 

BEANS, CIICIJIVIBER, TOMATO, 
Radish, Peas, Muskmelon 

Squash, Watermelon, Sweet Corn 

We are now booklnG: orders for 1907 fall deliv- 
ery. Send for contract prices; also surplus list. 
Mpntinn The Review when yog write. 

Waldo Rohnert 

OILROY, CAL. 

Wholesale Seed Grower 

Specialties: Lettuce, Onion. Sweet Peas. AFter, 
Oosmos, MiKUonette. Verbena, in variety. Cor- 
respondence solicited. 

S.D.WoodrufF&Sons 

SPKCIALTIKSt 

Garden Seeds in Variety. 

Maine seed potatoes, onion sets, etc. 
Correspondence solicited. 

HalB Orrice and Seed Farms, OBANGE, CONN. 

New York City Store, 88-84 Dey Street. 

PACIFIC SEED GROWERS' GO. 

too Market St., San Francisco, Gal. 

SPKCIALflES: 

Onion, Carrot, Lettuce, 
Sweet Peas. 

Mention The Review when yon write. 



D. V. BURR ELL, Grower of 

Special Strains of Melons and Cucumbers 

Three pt my specialties are the Burrell 
Gem Cantaloupe. Burrell's Thoroughbred 
Rocky Ford Cantaloupe and Burrell's Klon- 
dike Cucumber. Contract orders solicited. 

AMress. D. V. BURRELL. A 11, Rocky Ford, Colo. 



Mention The Review when you write. 

CONNECTICUT CORN. 
Onion, Beet, Carrot, Turnip, Parsnip. 

The Everett B. Clark Company 

MILFORD, CONN. 

East Jordan, Mich. Sister Bay, Wis. 

We are now writing' growing contracts for 
PEAS AND BEANS 

which we grow in both Michigan and Wisconsin. 
Mention The Review when yon write. 

C. C. MORSE ft CO. 

Seed Growers 

171-173 Clay St., SAN FRANCISCO, GAL. 
Onion, Lettuce, Sweet Peas 

and other California Specialties 



[ Burpee^s Seeds Grow ) 



Mention The Review when yon write. 



LEONARD SEED CO. 

Growers and Wliolesaiers of Superior Garden Seeds 

Seedsmen and Florists Supplied at the shortest notice and at right prices. 
Our Cataloarues are now ready and are mailed upon request. 

Flower Seeds— Onion Sets '« f^SV'SIlfdo'fpist.. CHICAGO 

Mention The Review when yon write. 



in Bulk 
and Packages 



LAWN GRASS SEED 

Dickinsons, Evergreen, and Pine Tree Brands 
SPECIAL MIXTURES SEED FOR GOLF GROUNDS 

THE ALBERT DICKINSON CO. 



MINNEAPOLIS 



CHICAGO 



Mention The Review when you write. 



Seed Trade News. 



AMEBICIN SEED TBADE ASSOCIATION. 

Pres., Henry W. Wood, Richmond, Va.; First 
Vlce-Pres . Charles Surge, Toledo, O. ; Sec'y and 
Treas., C. E. Kendel, Cleveland. The 26th annual 
meeting will t>e held at New York City, June, 1907. 



L. L. May, St. Paul, and Mrs. May 
are at French Lick Springs, Ind. 

Arxold Eingiek, of W. W. Barnard 
Co., Chicago, is making his annual tour 
of the Pacific coast. 

The season 's crop of state pure seed 
laws is only second to the record yield of 
railroad rate legislation. 

The mail order houses report a brisk 
business, the outlook indicating an in- 
crease over last year. 

A. G. Lee, the local seedsman, is inter- 
esting himself in the flower show which 
is to be held at Fort Smith, Ark., next 
November. 

H. H. Berger & Co. will remove May 1 
from the store at 47 Barclay street, oc- 
<!upied ever since the business was es- 
tablished in New York, to new quarters 
at 70 Warren street. 

The truckers iu the vicinity of Beau- 
mont, Tex., have organized an associa- 
tion, with James Pattinson president and 
.]. A. Arnold secretary and treasurer. 
Mr. Arnold also is secretary of the Cham- 
ber of Commerce. 

The death of H. C. Baartman, the 
well-known Holland bulb grower, who 
has made twelve trips to this country, 
is reported in the obituary column this 
week. He was one of those drowned in 
the wreck of the steamer Berlin, off the 
coast of Holland, February 21. 

is an apparently authorized sketch of 
Dexter Mason Ferry, "philanthropist 
and benefactor," published in the pro- 
gram of the Detroit bi-centenary cele- 
bration of 1901, it is stated that the 
seed house he established in 1856 "did 
in its first year about $6,000 ; since that 
time in a single year the sales have been 
more than $1,500,000." 



TO THE TRADL.. 

Just issued — our special price list 
giving our position on onion seed. 

We shall send this to the Trade, 
being unable to make the personal 
visit contemplated. Please write 
for it. 

A. J. Pieters Seed Co* 

HOLLISTER, CAL. 

Mention The Review when yon write. 

CHAUNCEY P. COY & SON 

Established 1878. WATERLOO. MSB. 

VINESEEDS 

AND SEKD CORN 

Wholesale Growers for the Seed Trade 
Write for 19U7 Contract Offers 

Mention The Review when yon write. 



ALFRED J. BROWN SEED GO. 

Grow^ers of 

Garden Peas and Beans 

For the Wholesale Trade 

GRAND RAPIDS. t MICH. 

Mention The Rev1«>w when yon write. 

R. T. Edward.«? is manager of the Che- 
boygan (Mich.) interests of N. B. 
Keeney & Son, Leroy,. N. Y. 

The country papers, which are quite 
naturally opposed to the great mail order 
houses, have got hold of the fact that the 
seed catalogue of Montgomery Ward & 
Co. was excluded from the mail because 
of a so-called lottery feature, and are 
making capital of it. 

A CHANGE in the Department of Agri- 
culture, through the often rumored re- 
tirement of Secretary Wilson, or in the 
general government, through the inaugu- 
ration of a new administration, will 
doubtless have more or less effect in 
modifying the policy of supervising sev- 
eral lines of private endeavor. The res- 
ignation of two assistants to the post- 



'.'«wvp^'.»iiij 'j-^^w^^jj.fy^r ^\"f.:.V!iaWlJPWJJ'4«i'f^fWI^^J,Hi/V!T''''™''i 



wj(*liii,i ^j^tj^.vjjr",v/iuw^«r.*i? •r7«yr:rr'»j?Ti "'i.ws«'/f\jw' n 



Mabch 7, 1907. 



The Weekly Florists' Review. 



U8> 



Dreer's Summer Flowering Bulbs 











^HHHHi^ 












^■dreerTs 
■ BEGOH)a£ 


H 



The B*ffoaia« and Olozlnlas offered by n* are the best that ■UU and 
oareftil seleotiou caa produce, being' grown tor ue by one of the most 
expert Snropean specialists. 

TUBEROUS-ROOTED BEGONIAS 

Single riovreredt Scarlet, Orimson, White, Tellow, Rose and Orange, 40c per 
doz.: $8.00 per 100; «2.'>.0O per 1000. 

Choice Single Flowered In Mixture, 35c per doz.; $2.50 per 100; $22.00 per 1000. 

Double riowerlng. Scarlet, Rose, White and Yellow, 65c per doz.; $5.00 per 100; 
$40.00 per 1000. ^ 

Choleest Double Flowering in Blixture. 50c per doz.: $4.00 per 100; $35.00 
per 1000. 

NEW HYBRID FRILLED TUBEROUS BEGONIAS 

A most unique form of flowers of immense size with wavy or frilled petals, similar 
to the be st forms of single petunias, 25c each; $2.50 per doz.; $20:00 per 110. 

GLOXINIA CRASSIFOLIA GRANDIFLORA 

A very fine selected strain, strong, well matured bulbs. Red, White, Blue, Red with 
white border. Blue with white border, in separate colors or in choicest mixture, 60c 
per doz.; $4.00 per 100; $35.00 per 1000. 

FANCY-LEAYED CALADIUMS 

A choice selection of 25 distinct named varieties, fine large bulbs, $1.50 per doz.. 
$10.00 per 100. Choice mixed varieties, $1.25 per doz.; $8.00 per 100. 

Our ana'terly Wholesale List offers a tall line) 
of Seasonable Plants, Seeds and Bnlbs. 



HENRY A. DREER, Philadelphia, Pa. 



Mention The Review when yon write. 



master-general is likely to ease the fric- 
tion in that department. To none of 
the government's new policies can objec- 
tion be made on principle, but the appli- 
cation of the rulings has resulted in 
much excessively fine hair-splitting and 
caused no end of annoyance. 

The conference report on the agricul- 
tural appropriation bill, carrying the 
usual provision for free seeds, was last 
Saturday approved by both branches of 
congress. 

CALIFORNIA CONDITIONS. 

Ordinarily a fairly satisfactory review 
of the condition of California crops at 
this time of the year might be given, but 
this season is so unusual that it is im- 
possible to make more than a very gen- 
eral statement. 

Boot crops are pretty Tvell in the 
ground, but so far (February 25) have 
made very little growth, and there are 
still many sacks in the hands of the 
growers. Onions are finally all planted, 
though only within the last fortnight 
one large grower had 2,000 or 3,000 bags 
still on hand. 

Part of the radish and lettuce seed is 
not yet planted, and some growers are 
still planting sweet peas, though every 
day of delay now adds to the risk of 
failure. The success of these late plant- 
ed peas will depend somewhat on the 
time when the hot waves come. If all 
goes well, they may make a good crop, 
because the ground is thoroughly soaked. 

The onion crop, on the whole, does 
not look encouraging. Some fields are in 
excellent condition, but many others have 
been drowned out, and many more have 
been so affected by water as to greatly 
retard the growth of the onions and to 
cause a thin stand. 

Weeds are also getting quite a start on 
some fields and they will make the work 
of the grower harder in this already dif- 
ficult season. 

Growers are now hustling after their 
bulb men for next year. Most of the 



JOHNSON'S iTdnriNri CE^i^rk for 

HIGH-GRADE /%9 I CK 9 1212 LP FLORISTS 

From the Best American and Enropean Growers. 

Trade pkt. Oz. 

Qaeen of the Market, three weeks 
earlier than other Asters, separate 

colors $0.20 $0.60 

Choice mixed 15 .50 

Semple's L.ate Branching, high- 
grade American-grown, not Cali- 
fornia, separate colors 20 .75 

Cboleemlxed 20 .75 

Ostrich Plnme, separate colors 25 1.5U 

Choice mixed 25 1.26 

Victoria, highly prized by florists for 
bedding and cutting, separate colors .25 1.75 
Choicemixed 25 1.50 

Improved Peony Perfection, very 
popular with florists, a profuse 

bloomer, separate colors 25 1.50 

Choicemixed 20 1.25 

Bligmon, an Invaluable variety for 

cutting, pure white 25 1.50 

Choicemixed 25 1.25 

Hohenzollern, enormous flowers, 

separate colors 20 1.26 

Choicemixed 20 1.00 

Comet, a beautiful class, with curled 
and twisted petals, separate colors.. .25 1.50 
Choicemixed 25 1.25 

Daybreak (originator's stock), shell- 
pink, one of the most beautiful of 
Asters, early, long-stemmed and of 
compact habit 30 2.00 

Pnrlty (originator's stock), pure 
white, and identical in form and 
habit with Daybreak 30 2.00 

SWUBTlPEAS, florists' standard sorts, oz., 5c; H lb- 10c; pound, 25c. 

JOHNSON SEED COMPANY, 217 Market St., Philadelphia, Pa. 

Herbert W. Johnson, of the late firm of Johnson & Stokes, President. 

Mention The Review when yon write. • 




seed to produce next year's onion crop 
is probably already in the ground, though 
one grower was trying to place contracts 
last week, and the condition of some 
fields already planted or contracted for 
is not the best. It is far too early, how- 
ever, to guess at the prospects for bulbs 
for the 1907 harvest. Aluum. 



THE SPIRIT AND THE LETTER. 

The horticultural trades in England 
are by the ears over the Prevention of 
Corruption Act, which prohibited the 
paying of commissions to employees, in- 
cluding gardeners, on purchases made 
for their principals. A trade meeting 
was held and over 800 firms have signed 



an agreement to seek no way of evading 
the provisions of the act, but to support 
it loyally. Now, the old seed house of 
Sutton & Sons has issued a circular, well 
within the terms of the act, which, while 
setting forth the firm's aversion to get- 
ting business by feeing customer's em- 
ployees, goes on to say that "while so 
many of our customers ask us to recog- 
nize the care bestowed on our seeds by 
the gardeners who have the cultivation 
of them, we have not the least objection 
to doing so, if we have the express ap- 
proval of the customer in writing. For 
this purpose we append a form, which 
may be signed and returned to us. ' ' Ac- 
cording to the English trade papers, it 
has raised a storm, as being a violation 



1^^ .-ritdt\ .ki_-b.u.^. « 






U88 



The Weekly Florists^ Review^ 



Mai!(H 7. liUtT. 




SEATTLE, WASH. 

Growers of 



PUGET SOUND 



CABBAGE SEED 



[ Burpee^s Seeds Grow ) 



Mention The Review when you write. 



Mfriiloti "I'lif ICevlew wlicii ymi wrlle. 

S. M. ISBELL S CO. 

JACKSON, MICH. 

Seed Grow^ers for the Trade 

BEANS, CICIMBER, TOMATO, 
Radish, Peas, Muskmelon 

Squash, Watermelon, Sweet Corn 

Wo are now bookiiit; onitTP for l'.»07 fall deliv- 
ery. Send for c-ontraet prices: also surplus list. 
Mfntion The Kevlew when yoil write. 

Waldo Rohnerf 

GILROY, CAL. 

Wholesale Seed Grower 

Specialties: Lettuce, Onion. Sweet Peas, Aster, 
Cosmos, Miunonettc, Verbeua, iu variety. Cor- 
respoudence solicited. 

S. D.Woodruff & Sons 

SPECIALTIES : 

Garden Seeds in Variety. 

Maine seed potatoes, onion sets, etc. 
Correspondence solicited. 
Miin Office and Seed Farms, OBANGE, CUNN. 
New York City Store, 82-84 I»ey Street. 

PACIFIC SEED GROWERS' GO. 

109 Market St., San Francisco, Gal. 

SPECIALTIES: 

Onion, Carrot, Lettuce, 
Sweet Peas. 

Mention The Heviow when ynu write. 



LEONARD SEED CO. 

Growers and Wiiolesaiers of Superior Garden Seeds 

Seedsmen and Florists Supplied at the shortest notice and at right prices. 
Our Catalogues arc now ready and are mailed upon request. 

Flower Seeds— Onion Sets '« Jll^.'Slndoiphst., CHICAGO 

Mention The Review when you write. 



L A^V N GRASS SEED zFt,.,. 

Dickinsons, Evergreen, and Pine Tree Brands 
SPECIAL MIXTURES SEED FOR GOLF GROUNDS 

THE ALBERT DICKINSON CO. 



MINNEAPOLIS 



CHICAGO 



Mention The Review wlicn you write. 



D. V.'BURRELL, Grower of 

Special Strains of Melons and Cucumbers 

Three of my .Hpeciaittts are tin- Burri'll 
Gem Caiitiiloiipc- Burri'll's Thoroughbred 
Rocky Ford Cant;ili)upf ami Binrfll"H Klon- 
dike Cucumt)er-. Cdiitraet orders sollelted. 

Address. D. V. BURRELL, All, Rocky Ford, Colo. 



Mention 'I'he Review when y<ni write. 

CONNECTICUT CORN. 
Onion, Keet, Carrot, Turnip, Parsnip. 

The Everett B. Clark Company 

MILFOKD, CONN. 

Kast Jordan, Mich. Sister Bay, Wis. 

We arc now writing »rrowitip contracts for 
PEAS ANI> BEANS 

which we trrow in both Miehi^'ati and Wisconsin. 

Mention The Review when yon write. 

C. C. MORSE ft CO. 

Seed GroT^ers 

171-173 Clay St., SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 
Onion, Lettuce, Sweet Peas 

and other California Specialties 



Seed Trade News. 



AMEBICAN SEED TRADE ASSOCIATION. 

Pre»., Henry W. Wood, Richmond, Va.; First 
Vice-Pres . Charles Burpe, Toledo, O.; Sec'y and 
Treas., C. E. Kendel, Cleveland. The 25th annual 
meeting will be held at New York City, June, I'.tUT. 



I.. 1.. May, St. r,nil. :iihI Mrs. M;i,v 
;irr .-il I'rciicli l.i<-k S|)riiij»s, Iml. 

AitxoM) lki.\»;ii;i;. of \V. \V. li;irii;ii<l 
< 11., ( liicMyd. is iii;ikinj; Iiis Mnini:il tour 

uf till' I'Meitic ciiMSl. 

Tin; sc.-ison 's croii ol' St;ite liuic sceil 
liiws is Hilly scriiinl tn tilc rccnlil A'ii'lil cit' 

i;iilMi:ii| r;itf Icyisljit imi. 

'rilK in;iii iiiiJiT houses rt'juiit, ;i lirisk 
lnwiiM'ss. the iiutliiok iudient iii^' :ni iu 
cieusi- ()\cr last _vi;ir. 

.\. i'<. Lkk. the locul sceilsiuiiu. is inter 
cstiriy liiinself iu llic Mower show wliieh 
is to lie hehl al I'mt .Sinitli. .\ik.. iicxi 

\n\ellllier. 

II. II. Iii;i;<;i;i; (.V < n. will remove .May 1 
trnui the store at 47 liaii-lay street, oe 
c-upied vvcv since tlie liusiiiess was es 
(.•ihlishrd in New \'urk, to new iniarters 
at 7i> W'.iireii street. 

TiiK truckers iu tlir \ieiuity of I'.eau 
innut. Tex.. h:i\e uryaui/.i'il an assoeia 
tidii. witli .lauirs l';it t insoii presiileni ;m"l 
.1. A. .Xrnnjij •<eerelary .-luil tii-asiinr. 
Mr. .\ruohi also is sec-retary <>t' the ('liaui 

lii'l' i>\' * 'cUIIMIerer. 

'I'liK (ieatii nf II. ( . liaarluiau, the 
well kiiiiwii llnllau'l Imlli ^^iTwer. \\li<> 
ha-- inaile twehe liips to this eouutrv. 

IS lepcited iu 11 liituary eohmni this 

weik. Ill \\:is n\\i' (if those ilinwueil iu 
the \\ reek of the steamer liellill. • i If llic 
i-nast uf lliill.ainl. I'eliruary L' I . 

In ;ni app;iitiit ly ;iuthnii/e(| sketeh of 
Dexlei Mason I'erry. • ' philant hiupist 
ami Iteiietaftor. ' ■ puldislnMl in the pio- 
yr.'uu of the Detinit hi-eenteiiary eele- 
luatiou (if lildi. it is stated that tlie 
seed iiouse he estalilislied ill 1 S.K! ''did 
in its first year about ."(iO.OOll ; since that 
lime in a siiiole A'car tlie sales have heeii 
im.re than .+ l,r)O0,0l)0. " 



TO THE TRADE... 

J ust issued — our special price list 
giving our position on onion seed. 

We shall send this to the Trade, 
being unable to make the personal 
visit contemplated. Piease write 
for it. 

A. J. Pieters Seed Co. 

HOLLISTER, CAL. 

Mention The Review when yoti write. 

CHAUNCEY P. COY & SON 

Kstablished l,s78. WATERLOO. NBB. 

VINESEEDS 

AND SEED CORN 

Wholesale Growers for the Seed Trade 
Write for 1»U7 Contract Offers 

Mention The Review when yon write. 



I ALFRED J. BROWN SEED CO. 

Growers of 

Garden Peas and Beans 

For tlie Wholesale Trade 

GRAND RAPIDS. MICH. 

Mpntion 'l"hp Itfvifxv ulion voii write. 

, I.'. T. KuwAKDs is in;in;iyer of the The 

1 linyoau (.Mi(di.) interi'sls of X. it. 

', Keeilry \- Son. l.eliiy. \. ^'. 

1 ... ... 

I 111-: eiiiiiilry |p;i|ieis, which ;iie (juito 

iiatuiaily upiiosed tu tlie oreat mail mder 

houses. ha\e <;i(t hold of the fact that the 

seed catalogue of M out jioinery Ward iV 

<'(!. was excluded t'lnm the mail t)e<'aiise 

(if a sn i-alled inttery I'eatme. ;iiiil are 

inakiiiii capital ot' it . 

.\ cilANdK in the I )e|iai t iiieiit nl' .\j4ri 
riiltiire. throiiyli the often lumoreil re 
tiiemeut of Secrt'tary Wilson, or in the 
general ooveniiiioiit, thnnifrli the inaiiyu- 
ratimi of a new administration, will 
doillitless lia\e more or less etVeet ill 
modifying the policy of snperxisin^ sev- 
eral lines of private eiuletivor. The res 
iiiii.atinii of two assistants to the post 



March 7, 1907. 



The Weekly Florists' Review* 



U89 



Dreer's Summer Flowering Bulbs 




The Begonias and Gloxinias offered by ns are the best that skill and 
careful selection can produce, being- {frown tor us by one of the most 
expert Suropean specialists. 

TUBEROUS-ROOTED BEGONIAS 

Single Floivered, Scarlet, Crimson. White. Yellow. Rose and Orange. 40c per 
loz.: $3.00 per 100; $2!S.OO per ICOO. 

Choice Slnele Flowered in Mixture, 35c per do/,.; $2..">0perl00; $22. w per 1000. 

Double Flowerlne, Scarlet, Hose, White and Yellow. (!5c per doz.; $5.00 per 100, 
$40.00 per 1000. C3 

Choicest Double Flowerlne In Mixture, 50c per do/..: $4.00 per 100; $:]5.00 
per 1000. 

NEW HYBRID FRILLED TUBEROUS BEGONIAS 

A most uni<iue form of flowers of immense size with wavy or frilled petals, similar 
to the be st forms of single petunias. '25c each; $2.50 per doz.; $20;00 per ICO. 

GLOXINIA CRASSIFOLIA GRANDIFLORA 

A very fine selected strain, strong, well matured bulbs. Ked, White. Hlue. Ked with 
white border. Blue with white border, in separate colors or in choicest mixture. 60c 
per doz.; $4.00 per 100; $35.00 per 1000. 

FANCY-LEAVED CALADIUMS 

A (.'hoice selection of 25 distinct named varieties, tine large l)Ulbs, $1.50 per do/.: 
$10.00 per 100, Choice mixed varieties, $1.25 per do/,.; $8.00 imt 100. 

Our quarterly Wholesale Iiist offers a full line 
of Seasonable Plants, Seeds and Bulbs. 



HENRY A. DREER, Philadelphia, Pa. 



Mention The Review when yoa write. 



master gcii(M-;il is likely to enso tlie fric- 
tion ill tliat <lcpartiii(Mit. To none of 
the govi'rnment 's new policies can objec- 
tion be made on principle, but the appli- 
cation of tlie rulings has resulted in 
much excessively line hairsplitting and 
caused no eiul of annoyance. 

The conference repfirt on the agricul- 
tural ajipropriation bill, carrying the 
usual j)ro\ision for free seeds, was last 
Saturday ajijiroved by botii branches of 



CALIFORNIA CONDITIONS. 

Ordinarily a fairly satisfactory review 
of the condition of California cro])S at 
this time of the year might be given, but 
this season is so unusual that it is im- 
jiossible to make more than a very gen- 
eral stat'ement. 

Eoot crops are pretty well in the 
ground, but so far (February 25) have 
made very little growth, and there are 
still many sacks in the hands of the 
growers. Onions are finally all planted, 
though only within the last fortnight 
one large grower had 2,000 or 3,000 bags 
still on hand. 

Part of the radish and lettuce seed is 
not yet planted, and some growers are 
still planting sweet peas, though every 
ilay of delay now adds to the risk of 
failure. The success of these late plant- 
ed pe.is will depend somewhat on the 
time when the hot waves come. If all 
goes well, they may make a good crop, 
because the ground is thoroughly soaked. 

The onion crop, on the whole, does 
not look encouraging. Some fields are in 
excellent condition, but many others have 
lieen drowned out, and many more have 
Vieen so affected by water as to greatly 
retard the growth of the onions and to 
cause a thin stand. 

Weeds are also getting quite a start on 
some fields and they will make the work 
of the grower harder in this already dif- 
ficult season. 

Growers are now hustling after their 
bulb men for next rear. Most of the 



JOHNSON'S ircMTVNn c^Pi^r^ for 

HIGH-GRADE /%9 1 tZK 9CI2U FLORISTS 



From the Best American and Kuropean Growers. 

Trade pkt. 

«Jueen of the Miirket, tliree weeks 
earlier than other AsterH. separate 

<M>lur8 ,*U.'-'ti 

Choice iiiixeil l-'i 

Sample's l>ate JtranchinK, hi^li- 
frrade American-tfrown. not Cali- 
fornia, separate colors '.'II 

Choice mixed ','11 

Ostrich Plume, separate colors '-) 

Cliiilce iiii.xed •,'.■> 

Vl<rtoria, iiis-'hl.v prizeil b.v florists for 
bedding and cutiing Hepar.ite colors .'-'.'i 
Choice mixed '.'.'i 

Improved Pe«>ny Perfection, very 
popxilar with tiorists, a profuse 

hliionier, separate colors '-'.'> 

Choice mixed M 

MiKnon, an Invaluable variety for 

cutting, pure while '-•'> 

Choice mi.Ked '''> 

Hohenzollern, enormous Mowers, 

separate colors '-'0 

Choice mixed ','tl 

Comet, a beautiful class, with curled 
and twisted petals, separatt- colors.. .'-'.'> 
Choice mixed '-'■'' 

I>aybreak (originator's stock i. shell- 
pink, one of the most beautiful of 
Asters, early, lont;-stemnied and of 
compact habit :>U 

Purity (originators stock), pure 
while, and identical in form .ind 
habit with Daybreak :ui 

SWKKT' PEAS, florists' standard sorts, oz., r)c; U lb., lllc; pound. '-'.»•. 




()z. 



jD.t'J) 
.■)ll 



1 .M) 



1 ..'ill 



1 .".(I 

!.'.'.■. 

1 ..'>ii 
1. ','.■> 

i.'i.'. 

I.IH) 
L.'ill 

1 .•-'.'. 



,'.(H) 



■i.uu 



JOHNSON SEED COMPANY, 217 Market St., Philadelphia, Pa. 

Herbert W. Johnson, of the late firm of Johnson iV: Stokes. President. 
Mention The Review when you write. 



seed to produce next year's onion crop 
is probably already in the ground, though 
one grower was trying to place contracts 
last week, and the condition of some 
fields already planted or contracted for 
is not the best. It is far too early, how- 
ever, to guess at the prospects for bulbs 
for the 1907 harvest. Ali.ium. 

THE SPIRIT AND THE LETTER. 

The horticultural trades in England 
are by the ears over the Prevention of 
Corruption Act, which prohibited the 
paying of commissions to employees, in- 
cluding gardeners, on purchases made 
for their principals. A trade meeting 
was held and over 800 firms have signe<l 



an agreement to seek no way of evading 
the provisions of the act, but to support 
it loyally. Now, the old seed house of 
Sutton & Sons has issued a circular, well 
within the terms of the act, which, while 
setting forth the firm's aversion to get- 
ting business by feeing customer's em- 
j.loyees. goes (Ml to Say that "while so 
niatiy of our customers ask us to recog- 
nize the care bestowed on our .seeds by 
the gardeners who have the cultivation 
of them, we have imt the least oiijection 
to doing so, if we have the express ap- 
proval of the customer in writing. For 
this jiurpose we append a form, which 
may be signed and returned to us." Ac- 
cording to th(! English trade papers, it 
has raised a storm, as being a violation 



'4;^m' ■■ '^V^TT-*^^''- . "'^^y^\'^^ :i 



:■*':■ '■ • '^ ".'■■■ , •vjr»T-r7tf;-/'VJ'^(t'-»-7ii'V7f(v'vt-'i-V'7-'r ■'V.-V ..^^ V — r'>*y?^rV v^^ t^^^^Tv; •''- 



>v5»^ 



U90 



The Weekly Florists^ Review^ 



Mabch 7, 1907. 



BRITANNIA 

Dutton's White Lawson, Improved 



Bright scarlet of large size similar but better in every point than Victory, 
premier vases of scarlet W. F. C. S. ;^5 per loo, for plants in pots; 25 
at 100 rate. 

This variety sported at Bexley Heath. Quite 
distinct from the American Sport, has improved 
Lawson habit, larger stem, greater perfume and if possible freer in flower, the best market white, size equal to 
White Perfection. For all-round points has no equal. £$ per 100, plants in pots; 25 at 100 rate. 



The beat two EnBlisli Nov«ltl*s 
for 19U7. 



A. F. DUTTON, THE NURSERIES, IVER, BUCKS, ENGLAND 



Mention The Review when you Mrrlte. 



hM 



WIBOLTTS SNOWBALL 
CAULIPLOWER-SEED 

is the earliest of 
all Snowballs, thr | 
. most compact, the 
surest header, is 
(iving the largest and snow* 
whitest heads, and is the 
best keeper in dry-weather. 
Demand it through your 
■ecd-firm or direct from 

R. WIBOLTT, NAKSKOV. OENMARlTl 



Mention The ReTlew when yoo write. 



CAULIFLOWER 
CABBAGE 



S 
E 
E 
D 

HJALMAR HARTUANN Si CO. 

Growara for the Wliolosale Trad* Only. 
12 Stormsrade. COPENHAGSN 

Montton Thp Review when yon write. 



Danish Seed 

OAUItlFIiOWER Snowball and Haase's 
Bxtra Early Krf nrter l>warf . 

CABBAGE, White AmaKer (Stonehead). 
Write direct to the grower. 

CHRIS. OLSEN, ofower Odense, Denmark 



Mention The Review wbeti yog write. 

Maoetti Stocks 

Stronff, healthy, well rooted. EoRlish- 
grown Manetil, Si.OO per 1000. Satis- 
faction guaranteed. 

S. BIDE & SONS """"^i^iSSlina 

Mention Tlie Review when yon write. 

of the spirit of the trado agreement in 
the matter. 



IMPORTS. 

The imports of seeds through the 

port of New York for the week ending 

February 23 were as follows: 

Kind. Bags. Val. Kind. Bags. Val. 

Aniiatto... 285 13.284 Grass 116 $1,398 

Anlstf 20 189 Millet 200 519i 

Canary.... 771 1,063 Mustard 213 2,415 

Caraway.. 50 441 Toppv 580 3,905 

Clover 1,892 5.'i,209 Rape 622 5,290 

Coriander. 268 1.20.'i SuKnrbeet... 5 30 

Fennel 27 20C Other 3,487 

In the same period the imports of 
trees and plants were valued at $4,045. 

FREE SEEDS NOT ALL LOSS. 

A widely circulated farm paper of the 
best class offers the following opinion 
on congressional free seeds: 

"The distribution, as now conducted, 
is really of small moment to established 
seedsmen from a financial standpoint. 
Thirty carloads of cheap seeds made up 
into 8,000,000 allotments of five packets 
each appears formidable on first thought, 
bat the actual distribution is done in 



GENUINE BERMUDA ONION SEED 

-.. CRYSTAL WAX SS^^TSy 

WILDPRET BROS, p*-^ ?c'2l?rsJ[Sf^"*'* 

We are the originators of the True Orystal Wax Onion and are teady to execute orders for this 
item if placed at an early date. Beware of spurious and cheap seed. If you ask some of the Texas 
growers their experience in the past years with a cheap Italian-grown Orystal you will certainly buy 
nothing but our genuine seeds. 
Mention The Review when yon write. 



LILY OF 
THE VALLEY 

Extra fine pipi from Gold Storage 
for shipment any time desired. 

Japanas* and Bsrmnda Xily Bulbs, 

Arancarlaa, Asaleas, Bay Tr««s 
Palms, Peonies, Bhododendrons, 

Boses, Boxwood, Bvergreens, etc. 
BAPPXA BAFPZA 

For prices and catalogues please apply to 

H. Trank Darrow, Importer 

S6 Barolar St., P. O. Box ItSO. Haw Tork 

Mention The Review when yon write. 



DAMMANN & CO. 

Seed and Bulb Growers 
and Merchanta 

San GlOTaaiil a Tedaeelo, near Naplea, Italy 

Established 1877 
By Appointment to H. M. the King of Italy 

HKADQCABTKB8 FOR 

CaulIMower and Tripoli Onion Seed 
(including Crystal Wax and Bermuda) 

And for all other Yecetable Seeds 

Of Unrivaled Quality. 

All Flower Seedi grown on an enormons scale 

Ask for Our Wholesale Catalogue. . 

Mention The Review when yo" write. 
ZJLBOB8T STOCK OF AXtZi 

BELGIAN PLANTS! 

Azaleas, Arancarias, Sweet Bays, 
Palms, Beg^onias, Gloxinias, etc. 

LOUIS VAN HOUTTE PERE 

GHENT, Belgium. 

" Mention The Review when yoo write. 



such a blundering way, the seeds largely 
going to political leaders and triflers wuo 
are ever ready to demand a free 'hand- 
out' whether they have need for it or 
not, rather than to real farmers and 
gardeners, who often disdain to plant 
them when received, that they make but 
little impression on the dealers' annual 
trade. Thousands of packets are thrown 
aside or destroyed in every congressional 
district. The recipient in the northern 
states who plants these seeds in good 



/ 

EstaUislMd 1680. 



CaM* aMrett. Jacrslani 

A. B. C Code used. 



JACQIES ROLLAND 

Seed Grower and Merchant 

NIMES, FRANCE 

Vegetable, Flower and 
Agricultural Seeds 

■peolaltles are Phlox Drummondll 
and Lucerne of Provanee. 



MRS.H.BURNEn 

New Salmon-Pink Carnation for 1907 

A Seedling from Mrs. Lawson and an Bngllsh 
variety. Awarded two first-class certificates and 
an Award of Merit. A lovely warm Balmon-pink 
flower. Petals of good shape and BUbstance. 
Calyx perfect. Delightful clove fragrance. t\i to 
S}^ inches In diameter according to season. Stems 
18 to 86 inches. A rapid and easy grower. Very 
productive. Many shades deeper than Bnchant- 
resB and keeps its color t>etter. Keeps for a long 
time after being cut and travels splendidly. Just 
the shade that everybody wants and one not 
yet produced in America. Price. £6 per 100. 
established in 2-inch pots. 

H. BURNETT 

St. Merararets, GUKRIISKT, BNGLAnD 

Mention The Review when yon write. 

SEED NOVELTIES 

Erynginm Alpbinm Snpfrbnm, as large again 

as ihe prototype: pkt, 20c; 10 pkts $1 60: 100 pkts, 115 00. 

Salvia Bracteata, hardy, much better for groupt 
than Nicotiana Sanderae, flowers lilac, pkt., 15c; 10 
pkts.. tl 25; 100 pkts., 112.00. 

ehyaosteKla Vircinica Compn^ta Rosea, 
pkt , 15c; 10 pkw., 11 25; 100 pkts., •ifoO. 

Remit by International P. O. money order. Send for 
complete list of Valuable Novelties and prices on quan 
titles. KOHUR S RUDEL, Wisriischleuba-Altenkun. Genusy 
Mention The Review when you write. 

J. RTAER. Nurseryman and Seedsman, Wahroonga, 
New South Wales, Australia. Collettor of Austral- 
ian and Island Seeds and Plants. Palms, Ferns, Platy- 
ceriums. Orchids, Eucalyptus, omaaiental trees and 
shrubs. Now ready, per 1000- Araucaria Bidwila, (2.50; 
A. Cunninghami, 11.50; A. Glauca, t2.00. 

Mention The Review when yon write. 

faith is a rarity, and generally an igno- 
ramus in horticulture. The present form 
of government distribution appears to 
be only taken seriously by the backwoods 
politicians or by absolutely uninformed 
gardeners who never think of consulting 
an up-to-date seed catalogue. We must 



■:.\^L ■iMi ^■^.^■..~:l-'-.i^-^-^»^^^^ly«l^^»|Mllli^''^-■"'*^^^■^^■J*''•*^^-^»-^--''^''''■■'°^'--^^^^ 



^7XT»^ " -J" "^TW^*^ . '^7^^^ 'W.V|'l»JfT"'"?^vWT".*"'5 



Mabch 7, 1907. 



^S'; 



T'>'«'T'S"^r"~T*V'-" •''"■'■ » 7 •< V 



The Weekly Florists' Review. 



119J 



The New Perpetual DDITAIillillA 

Flowering Carnation Dili I /\llllll/\ 

The most profitable caxnation in cultivation, and one that never Splits* Color, 
clear scarlet ; blooms of good size on long, stiff stems. Strong plants, £5 per 100. 
Cash with order. Please remit by International Postoffice Order. 

A. Smith, The Nursery, Enfield Highway, Middlesex, England 



Mention The Review when you write. 



New Hybrid 

Tea Rose 

Queeo of Spain 

This grand flesh-colored rose Is undoubtedly 

THE ROSE OF THE SEASON 

ft is a seedling from Antoine Rivoire, with the 
«cent of Souvenir de la Malmaison, very full and 
beautiful form, an ideal exhibition rose, a good 
opener, and robust grower. 

We staged 68 perfect blooms at the Royal 
Horticultural Society's Show at Holland House, 
July 9 and 10, 1906, and after two days' show 
were as good as when first set up, and were ad- 
mitted to be in better condition than any other 
yariety in the show. 

Awarded the Card of Oommendation 

Vational Boee Society, Botanic 

Gardens, July 6. 

▲ward of Merit, Holland Honae Show, 
Boyal Horticnltnral Society. 

Strong- plants ready in pots in April. 
Price, Sl.90 each; 13 plants for 915.00; 
SO for S56.0O; 100 for SIOCOO. 

S. BIDE & SONS 

Boss Growers and Vnrserymen 

Farnham, Surrey, England 

Mention The Review when yon write. 

credit this misguided expenditure of the 
people's revenue with a certain mission- 
ary effect, however. Perchance an occa- 
sional rank amateur who really grows 
his trifling allotment of cucumber, radish 
and turnip seeds bestowed by the con- 
descending favor of his congressman, 
may be led to enlarge his views and buy 
something worth while from his near-by 
seed dealer. The free distribution is not 
all loss to seed merchants, even in the 
present inept way of conducting it, but 
the seed trade generally should relax no 
legitimate effort to lift it to a higher 
plane. ' ' 

CATALOGUES RECEIVED. 

Arthur Cowee, Berlin, N. Y., gladioli; 
Bombayreed Mfg. Co., Columbia, S. C, 
jardinieres; V. Lemoine & Son, Nancy, 
France, plant novelties; J. M. Philips' 
Sons, Pittsburg, Pa., general seed cat- 
alogue; Peter Henderson & Co., New 



Dahlias 



Awarded 10 
Gold Medals 
in 1903, 12 in 
1904. 12 in 1906 
and 12 in 1906. 



Pot Roots 



Awarded the Silver 
Medal by the Inter* 
national Jury 
at the St. Louis 
Exposition. 



POT ROOTS FOR SHIPMENT AT ONCF £very section. Including the popular GAOTUS. 
rvi KVVI3 run Jllirincill Wl vn\,C ^^^^^ ^^^^^ Pompon and SlnRle, at 16 00 per 

100 in 26 sorts. Better and newer kinds at S8.00 and $9.00 per 100. These are post iree 
terms. Note this when comparing prices. Terms cash ^^Ith ord*>r. 

TEMPTING BARGAINS l^o^^ ^ho prefer to have their goods through a forwarding 
■ i.ii»iiim i*f»iiMfiinj bouse instead of by parcels post can be supplied in every section, 
including Cactus, at M.CO. $5.00 and $6.00 per 100 in 25 sorts. 

12 SFFHI ING TAfTIIS OAHI IAS AIII904 sorts and certificated by the Dahlia Societies 
U JCCULIl^U U/ILIUJ UflllLlftJ ,n Eng,and; post free for $2.50 - Dainty, Edith 

Oroom, George Gordon, Hereward. Lauretta, Mr. Keith, Mrs. J. W. Wilkinson, Osprey, 
Pink Pearl, Rainbow, Sweet Nell, Violetta. 

lOOS SEEDLING TACTIIS DAHLIAS ^ rare opportunity: only a few to ofler. One 
lyVJ JCCULIWU t./W,IU3 UftllLlftJ gggfj oj t^g following 12 kinds post free for $3.00: 

Alfred Morgan, Antelope, Cockatoo, Harbour Light, Jeanette, Miss Dorothy Oliver, Nero, 
Rosy Mom, Sir A. Lamb. Tricolour, W. E. Dickson, W. Hopkins. 

I0A6 SFFDI ING TAfTIIS DAHI IAS one each of the following new varieties, which 
lyVOJCCULIl^U W/IUIUJ UflllLI/» jjg^g ^^^ awarded, post free for $i.00: Marjorie 

Caaelton, Silver Wings, The Pilot and White Swan. 

Terms cash with order. Catalogue free on application. 

HOBBIES LIMITEO, - Norfolk Nurseries, - DEREHAM, EN6. 

LONDON DEPOT, 17, Broad Street Place, E. C. 



Mention The Review when yon write. 




Picea PungeuB Uiauua (Hutiier;, iriiuopiituiou '06 

H. DEN OUDEN & SON, ^VS^^^&,^^^':^^o\ 

nuraery stock for the American trade. Catalogue 
free on demand; also views in our nurseries. 

Mention The Review when yon write. 

DOG BRIAR 

3 to 5 mm., each 1000, 6 marks. 
5 to 8 mm , each 1000, 12 marks. 
Splendid Plante. Cbeap Prloea. 
Also LILT or THK VAIXBY PIPS for 

fall shipment. 1907. 

JULIUS HANSEN, Pinneberg, Germany 

Mention The Review when you write. 

York, N. Y., implements; Greenhouse 
Structural Co., Cincinnati, structural ma- 
terial; G. D. Black & Co., Independence, 
la., garden seeds; George S. Woodruff, 
Independence, la., gladioli; Giblin 
& Co., Utica, N. Y., heating appa- 
ratus; Van Namen Bros., Zwijndrecht, 
Holland, seed price list ; Mrs. H. A. 
Jahn, New Bedford, Mass., dahlias; Pe- 
ter Henderson & Co., New York, N. Y., 
farm and seed catalogue ; Wilfrid Whee- 



The Royal Tottenham 
Nurseries, Ltd.^',??SV*» 

Managing Director, A. M. C. VAN DCR ELST 

Dedemsvaart, Holland 

Headquarters for Hardy Perennials, among 
which are the latest and choicest. 13 acres de- 
voted to growing this line, including Anemone, 
Aster, Campanula, Delphinium, Funkias. Hem- 
erocallis, Hepatica. Incarvillea, Iris, Peonies, 
Phlox decussata and suffruticosa. Primula, 
Pyrethrum.Tritoma. Hardy Heath. Hardy Ferns. 
Also 5 acres of Daffodils. 12 acres of Conifers, 
specially young choice varieties to be grown on; 
8 acres Rhododendrons, including the best Amer- 
ican and Alpine varieties; 2 acres Hydrangeas. 
We make it a point to grow all the latebt novel- 
ties In these lines. Ask for Catalog. 
Mention The Review when yon write. 



r 



HOLLAND 
BULBS 



K.Veltliuys,Hillegoin, Holland 

Ask for oar wholesale trade list 
for Holland Bulbs. 

H. B. MAY it SONS 

FERN SPECIALISTS 

The finest collection of Ferns in Enrope. 
Lists on application. 

Upper Edmonton, England 

Mention The Review when you write. 



o 



riVw-r.A-j^t*^— ,..Li»^L.l,.'w4i>>i. ■■■;* ^■,,A.v..A.^.^*i '-'^■■tUMVifiiMfii-rf II r Mr V m1"i)i 



^J^ajB^Ui. it§.:Akrttt J 



■'-•v;vf^">'^rf'S' *'"''7wi? 



1192 



The Weekly Florists' Review* 



Mabch 7, 1907. 



Aster Seed 



Our descriptive price list of High- 
Orade Aster Seed is now ready and 
will be sent free on application. Try 
our new varieties. Cardinal, Sunset 
and Rosy Carmine BranchinK— they 
are winners. Price per packet, 25 
cents; two packets for 40 cents. 

Pointers on how to grow Asters suc- 
cessfully sent free with every order. 

VICK & HILL CO. 

p. 0. Box,6l3. ROCHESTER, N. Y. 



Kentlon The Review when yon write. 



^ 



NEW STOCKS 

Flower Seeds for Florists 

WHOLESALE CATALOGUE READY 

Send for it today. Bat first read our 
advertisement on page 733 in the 
FLORISTS' REVIEW for January 
24th, 1907. It is worth reading. 

James Vick's Sons 

Seedsmen ROCHESTER, N. Y. 



Mention The Kevlew when you write. 

ler, Concord, Mass., strawberries; M. G. 
Madson Seed Co., Manitowoc, Wis., gen- 
eral seed catalogue; Eihachario Tanoi, 
Yokohama, Japan, plants and seeds; 
Harvey B. Snow, Camden, N. J., seed 
catalogue; Wm. H. Moon Co., Morris- 
ville. Pa., general nursery catalogue; 
Schaum & Van Tol, Boskoop, Holland, 
price list of flowers and nursery stock; 
Eennie & Thomson, Providence, R. I., 
general seed catalogue; John H. Sievers 
& Co., San Francisco, Cal., general cata- 
logue; James King Nursery, Elmhurst, 
111., peonies; Ellwanger & Barry, Roch- 
ester, N. Y., novelty list; The Martin 
Grate Co., Chicago, 111., grates; John D. 
Imlay, Zanesville, O., seeds and plants. 



HELP YOURSELF TO SEEDS. 

Barteldes & Co., Lawrence, Kan., think 
they get the brunt of the government 
competition a little hotter than most 
seed houses, as witness the following 
from their daily paper of March 4: 

"The garden seeds sent by Mr. Scott 
to his constituents, to be delivered 
through the "World oflBce, have arrived. 
A mail bag nearly full of packages sits 
in this office and the packages will be 
distributed to those who call for them, 
until they are all gone. Get yours 
early. ' ' 

LOOKING FORWARD. 

The Bucks County Gazette, published 
at Bristol, Pa., which fact may or may 
not have a bearing on the matter, pub- 
lishes the following as of date some 
years hence: 

Sixty-third Conpress. Second Session. 
H. R. 4-11-44. 
In the Honse of Representatives, John Wes- 
ley Golt Introduced the following Bill: 

A BILL 
for the erection of National Homes excluslyely 
for broken-down Seedsmen. 

Be It enacted by the Senate and House of 
Representatives of the United States of Amer- 
ica. In Congress assembled: 

As the contemplated Increase of the Con- 

frresslonal Free Seed Distribution to 500 mll- 
lons of packets will result, it Is assumed, In 



STOKES' STANDARD 
ASTER SEED 

Stoke** Late BranolilnK Aster. Oboice, American- 
Rfown BtockB In separate colors, 75c per oz.; mixed, 
60c per oz. 

Truffaute* Peony Perfection Aster. A splendid 
florist's Aster, loDK-Btemmed sort, in separate colors, 
$1.50 per oz.; mixed, $1.25 per oz. 

New Crop Asparagus Plumosus Nanus 

Greenbouse-iTOwn, per lOO seeds, 60c; per 1000 seeds, $3.50; per 5000 seeds, $15.00. 

SALVIA BONFIRE 

The best Dwarf Salvia, my own "Floracroft" grown seed, trade pkt., 25c; per oz., $1.50; 
per Ji-lb.. $5.00. 

A NEW TYING MATERIAL 




RAFFIATAPE 



Try it on your Easter plants; pleasing, 
brigbt green color; stronger and cbeaper 
and better in every way than string or 
Raffia. 

Sample tree. It is put un in coils 
and on reels. In handling it the coil is 
placed in the pocket and the tape drawn 
from the middle. The brass reels are 
hung from the vest buttonhole. 

Price. Ocils, (enough for tying up 150 plants,) 5c each; 50c per dozen, (by mail). Reels, 
(250 yards), 75c each, $8.00 per dozen, (by express.) 



c^/oAes S^^c/ Store, 

219 Market Street, PHILADELPHIA 



Mention The Review when you write. 



WSSTBRN HBADQUARTERS FOR 



Cold Storage Valley Pips 

ORDER NOW FOR EASTER 

It pays to grow our Valley. Finest selected stock. $1.75 per 100; $14.00 
per 1000. Every case guaranteed and can be returned at our expense 
if not satisfactory on arrival. Place your order now for regular 
shipments as desired through season. 

Finest Cut Valley Constantly on Hand 

ll» V%% DIvlJlN^y Long Distance Phone. " CHICAuU 



Mention The Review when yon write. 



D. E. FISKE SEED CO. 

Faneuil Hall Square, Boston 

New Crop Seeds now ready 

Aster Seeds gSTcSau.: 

Mention The Review when yon write. 



the shutting up of many private Seed Eftab- 
lIsbmentB, the proprietors of which should In 
view of Congress be taken care of as having 
been forced out of their established business, 
Ck)ngress, In line with Its established policy, 
will assume proper measures of relief. 

To this end the Honorable Secretary of Agri- 
culture Is authorized and empowered to pur- 
chase three sites of proper size and location re- 
spectively In the neighborhoods of Atlantic 
City, Chicago and St. Louis, none of which 
pieces of land shall exceed the purchase price 
of $100,000. 

The Honorable Secretary of Agriculture after 
the purchase of the three properties Is author- 
ized and empowered to erect of proper dimen- 
sions upon each tract a building of sufficient 
size and appointments to accommodate five hun- 
dred families of broken-down seedsmen, each 
family estimated In number of five persons. 

When these structures are completed and 
ready for occupancy, the Honorable Secretary 
of Agriculture Is authorized and empowered to 
appoint a Commission to examine applicants for 
accommodation, only those being admitted who 
can prove that they were once engaged In the 



Bridgeman's Seed Warehouse 

Established 1824. BICKABD8 BBOS., Props. 

Importers and growers of high grade 

SEEDS, BULBS, PUNTS, ETC. 

37 East 19th St., NEW YORK CITY 

Telephone 4285 Gramercy. 
Mention The Review when yoa write. 



W.&D. SPECIALTIES for FORCING 

Mignonette "New York Market." Sweet 
Peas. "True," Christmas Flowering. (pink 
and white). Tomato, "The Don," ''Stir- 
ling Castle." Mashroom Spawn, "Eng- 
Ush" and "Pure Culture." Send for 1907 
catalogue. 

Utfaahor A nnn '^ Mercbaits sad Brawert. 

fieBUBr tt UUIIy IHCbaakers St.. HEW YORK 



business of either wholesaling or retailing seeds. 
When these National Homes are completed. 
If the applicants be in excess of the accommo- 
dations, the excess number shall be accommo- 
dated in the outlying sheds; but if In any one 
of the locations of Atlantic City, Chicago or 
St. Louis there be not sufficient applicants to 
fill the structure, the Honorable Secretary of 
Agriculture Is authorized and empowered to at 
once stop the sale of seeds In that locality 
under Injunction processes and east any recal- 
citrant seedsmen into those Houses which a 
paternal nation has provided for them. 



Mabch 7, 1907. 



ThcWeckly Rorists' Review. 



1193 



THE WORLD'S GREATEST ASTER 



Miss Kate Lock 



Colors— White, Enchantress Pink. 91.00 per trade pkt. No checks. InatructlonB. 

"How to Grow Asters," with every order. Not ffoftrantced anlesB bearing my ilmiatBre. 

J. H. LOCK, Aster BpeolaUst, 41 MANCHKSTER AVS.. TOUONTO. ONT. 



Mention The Review when you write. 




Primula Seeds 

Sow Now for ChrUtmaa Flowerlac 

We handle the finest English strains of Prim- 

'*'?. 5»°e°8is and can refer you to hundreds of 

eatlifled customers. >^ Trade Trade 

Boddlngton's Matobleas Giant, Pkt. Pkt. 

mixed. This selection includes all 

my finest Giant Single Primulas of 

the plain-leaved class 60c 11.00 

Giant, pure white eoc 1.00 

^j blush white eOc 1.00 

rose. 60c 1.00 

scarlet 60c 1.00 

royal blue 60c 1.00 

Obconloa Grandlflora Kermeslna, 

beautiful deep rose 50 

Alba, pure white flowers '..!'.'.!!. .50 

Mixed Tarletlea, containing pure white 

to deep rose, height 9 inches 50 

Buttercup, floribunda crandlflora, 
small yellow flowers borne in great pro- 
fusion, fine for pots 60 

■•orbest (Baby Primrose) 26 

PRIMULA KEWENSIS 

See neritts' Review. Bestoi repert, page 1099. Feb. 28. 

This charming addition to our greenhouse 
Primroses originated at the Royal Gardens, Kew, 
as an accidental cross between the small, bright- 
flowered Himalayan species, P. floribunda, and 
the sweet-scented P. verticillata, a native of 
Arabia. The plant is a strong grower, with 
bright green leaves, and numerous erect flower- 
scapes, 10 to 18 inches in height, producing flow- 
ers in whorls at intervals along their whole 
length. The flowers are fragrant, bright yellow 
in color, with a slender tube and spreading limb, 
nearly an inch in diameter. As a winter-flower- 
ing decorative plant it is an acquisition; its 
floriferousness when in a very small state is re- 
markable. Per pkt., 91.00. 

ARTHUR T. BODDINGTON 

848 W. 14th St., New York 

Mention The Review when yon write. 

CATALOGUE ILLUSTRATION. 

After commenting on the absence of 
the usual number of gaudy lithographs in 
this year's catalogues, a writer in the 
Rural New-Yorker says : * ' The substitu- 
tion of accurate photographic reproduc- 
tions of flowers, fruits and plants for the 
old misleading woodcuts gives an air of 
sincerity to many catalogues that was 
formerly lacking, but every halftone is 
not directly made from the object repre- 
sented. This process reproduces as well 
from wash drawings, which may show the 
subject, not as nature produced it, but as 
the artist conceives it should have grown ! 
Little exaggeration, however, is indulged 
in except in the cases of a few incorrigi- 
ble offenders, whose customers must cer- 
tainly be accustomed to discount the 
claims heavily. The catalogues on the 
whole present such good appearance that 
the colored lithograph as an important 
pictorial feature may be largely discon- 
tinued in the future. A similar restraint 
is creeping by degrees into the descrip- 
tive matter, transforming seed and nurs- 
ery catalogues, acknowledged advertise- 
ments as they are, into reliable and in- 
structive monographs of value to every 
■cultivator. ' ' 

The Beview is the florists' best paper. 
— L. J. Brosemeb, Offwego, N. Y. 

We want to thank you for the benefit 
received from our small advertisement 
in the Review. It brought results aU 
right; inquiries and orders from all over 
the country. We are filling one order 
now from New Orleans. — S. Huth, Cuya- 
iioga Falls, 0. 



TUBEROSE BULBS 

Dwarf Exoelalor Pearl, first grade, selected bulbs, $9.00 per 1000. 

GLADIOLI 

100 1000 

▲merloa, the grandest gladiolus up to date, color soft pink $10.00 $75.00 

White and Light Florists' Mixture 1.78 16.00 

Tuberous- Rooted Begonias, Gloxinias, Etc* 

Send for trade price list. 

CURRIE BROS. CO. ,r^^, Milwaukee, Wis. 

Mention The Review when yon write. 



Rawson's Primula Obconica. 

Is absolutely distinct from any other strain offered. IT HAS NO KQUAL. NOR SUPK- 
RIOR. Our FRB8H CROP seeds are In and should be sown at once. 

RAWSON'S IfEW GIANT. RAWSON'B NKW COLOSSAL. 

Per 100 seeds Per 1000 seeds Per 100 seeds 

Mixed $0.60 $4.00 Mixed $0.76 

Pink or Crimson 60 4.00 Rosea 76 

Pure White 50 4.00 DarkLilac 75 

Herms Floral Co., Portsmouth, O., writes ua February 1, 1907: "This season's Primulas 
and Oyclamen were the finest we have ever grown. From your seeds." 

RAWSON'S SKKDS ALWAYS GIVS SATISFACTION. 



W. W. RAWSON & CO., 5 Union St., Boston, Mass. 



P. S. LWe are now Sole Distributors for Boston for CARMAN'S 
ANTI-PKST. If you wish to know what it is, 
send for circular. 




Mention The ReTlew when yoa write. 



GLADIOLI 



Write 
for it. 



Beautifully illustrated cata- 
log, colored plate, etc., des- 
cribing Groff's Hvbrids, 
Named Novelties oi rare 
beauty, Mixtures and Collections to color and Fine Mixtures of all colors 

Arthur Cowee, ""^SS^^tS'^- Berlin, N. Y. 

Mention The Review when yon write. 




We made this halftone 
from a 

WASH DRAWING 

one of many we made 
for 1907 

Seed Catalogues 

Our artists are the best 
in the United States on 
flower and vegetable 
drawing. 

Try our work on some 
of yonr special lists 
and you will give us all 
your order for the 1908 
general catalogue. 

We make a specialty of 

CUTS FOR SEEDSMEN 

All processes. Quick work if necessary. Satis- 
faction guaranteed. Special prices on orders 
placed now for cuts for 1908 catalogues. 
NO STOCK CUTS 

CRESCENT ENGRAVING CO. 

S41.847 Clark St., CHICAGO 

Mention The Review when you write. 

Wb consider the Review well worth 
the price of subscription. — Haines Seed 
Co., Denver, Colo. 




OUR WHOLESALE CATALOGUE 

for florists and market gardeners is NOW 
RKADT and will be sent free to all who ask 



for it. 



NEW CROP 



Flower Seeds are mostly all on hand now 
and we are prepared to fill orders promptly. 
We handle only the highest grade seeds. 
Compare our prices before ordertnc 
elsewhere. 

Gold storage Idly of the VaUey Pips, 

best possible grade, 1000 in case, $12 per 1000. 

J. M. THORBURN ft CO. 

33 Barclay St., through to 38 
Park Placo, NEW YORK. 



Mention The Review when yon write. 



J^Jillt^t^it^JUt^ 



ir''w-')F. ^Tiy'iflT"'- "r ,i?yv"',"T^i"^ ^'■'' 



' "T^^^^^^^^T^^^'^^^rrf'v'^^ ' 



U94 



The Weekly Ronsts' Review^ 



Mabch 7, 1907. 



The Peony- Flowered Dahlias 

MENTIONCD ON PAGK 1081 Or THE "REVIEW" ISSUE TEB. S8. 1007 ARE OrrERED IN 
MT CATALOGUE AS FOLLOWS-AND SECOND SHIPMENT WIIX ARRIVE THIS MONTH 

Tbe Gorareous Nsiv Feony*Flowered Dalilias are an entirely new type of tbis grand decorative plant, and have created a sensation 
In Europe wherever shown. They have also received some of the hixbest honors ever accorded to novelties. 1 he habit of tbese peony- 
flowered dahlias is all that can be desired, being medium tall, free-flowerinir, blooms growing erect on tall stems, of immense size, meas- 
uring 6 to 8 inches across, of distinct and remarkable coloring. They are gtand for cutting and all decorative purposes, and last well in water. 



QUEEN WILHELMINA— Pure white, extraordinary large 

flower: grand form and very free floweiing. 
QUEEN EMMA— Lively rose and yellow margined; very large; 

irregular petals, strong and long ktems. 
DUKE HENRT— Dark red, very gracious form, compact plant; 

four rows of petals, strong stems. 
PIUS X-8oft yellow, rose margined, nearly single; very strong 

and long stems. 
HOLLANDIA— Beautiful dark rose, large flower; free bloomer. 
BARON DE GRANCY— PurH white, with two to four rows of 

petals; u very remarkable flower. 



GLORT or BAARN— Very fine rose-color, large flower, size 8 
inches in diameter. 

PAUL KRUGER— White and parpltsb red; compact plant; very 
long and strong stems. 

DR. K. VAN GORKUM— White rosy tinted, three to four rows 
of petals, very beautiful flower. 

GERMANIA— Brilliant carmine, four rows of petals: compact 

grower, long stems. 
SOUVENIR or PARIS— Pure white, very large single flower; 

long and strong stems. 



We offer the above set, eleven of the best varieties, in strong tubers, as follows: 
Frloe $1.00 each, f 10.00 per doz., $75.00 par 100. Tbe set ol eleven varistles, $8.50 

ARTHIR T. BODDINGTON, F.^rlL.'Trst . New York 



BEST NEW SWEET PEAS. 

A trial of recently introduced varieties 
of sweet peas was held last year in the 
Royal Horticultural Society's Gardens, 
near London, says the Gardeners' Maga- 
zine, the following being highly com- 
mended by the committee of award : 

Countess Spencer — Standard erect, 
waved margin, light pink, shading at the 
margin to a deeper pink; wings erect, 
embracing; flowers very large, bold, 
three to four to a stem. 

Dainty — Standard erect, slightly hood- 
ed, white, shading at the edges to a 
light pink ; flowers of medium size, three 
to four to a stem; distinct. 

Dorothy Eckford — Standard slightly 
hooded, pure white; flowers large, bold, 
three to a stem. 

Helen Lewis — Standard erect, waved, 
orange-pink, wings pink; flowers large, 
three to four to a stem. 

Helen Pierce — Standard erect, flat, pale 
blue, shading to and veined with a deep- 
er blue; flowers of medium size, three 
to a stem. The most distinct of the new 
varieties. 

Hon. Mrs. Kenyon — Standard erect, 
cream; flowers of medium size, mostly 
two to a stem ; the young flowers are of 
a light primrose color and represent the 
nearest approach to yellow. 

Jeannie Gordon — Standard slightly 
hooded, light rose, wings cream-rose; 
flowers of medium size, three to a stem. 

John Ingman — Standard waved, bold, 
bright rose, with deeper colored wings; 
flowers large, three to four to a stem. 

Miss Willmott — Standard hooded, rich 
orange-pink, wings pink; flowers large, 
two to three to a stem. 

Mrs. G. Higginson, Jr. — Standard 
erect, of a pure pale blue ; flowers small, 
three to a stem. 



HUNTINGTON, L.L 

The annual show of the Carnation Club 
was held February 26, in the Trade 
School building. The greenhouses of 
summer residents sent their products to 
vie with those of the professional, and 
the result was keen rivalry. The green- 
houses represented were those of Walter 
Jennings, August Heckscher, Robert W. 
de Forest, John Cartledge, of 249 Clinton 
avenue, Brooklyn; James D. Cockroft, 
of Northport; William O'Hara and H. 
T. and A. H. Tunnell. 

The exhibits included Alma Ward, 




SPRING bulbs' 

IMMEDIATE DELIVERY 

Caladiums 

(Elephants Ear) 

Sound Bulbs; 
litTe Center Shoots. 

5 to 7 inches in ctrcum. 
ference, per 100. t2 00. 

7 to 9 Inches In circum- 
ference, per 100, $3 50. 

it to 12 Inches Id circum- 
ference, per 100, $6.00. 

13 inches and up, per 
100, $14.00. 

TUBEROSES ?eYr!f ^"«»'»«' 

Well cured stock. Now ready. F. o. b. N. Y. 

First size, 4-0 per 1000, $10.00 

Medium size, 3-4 per 1000, 5.00 

We pay freigrht both ways 
if you don't like our ^oods. 

E. F. WINTERSON CO. 

. 45-47-49 Wabasli Ave.. CHICAGO . 

Mention llie Keview when yua write. 

from C. W. Ward, of Queens, and Win- 
sor, from the F. K. Picrson Co., of Tarry- 
town. 

The awards for greenhouse vegetables 
went to Walter Jennings, August Heck- 
scher and John Cartledge, in the order 
named. They showed cauliflower, toma- 
toes, string beans, radishes, lettuce, mush- 
rooms. 

The awards follow: College Gardens, 
Queens, first for dark pink carnation; 
for white carnation; for scarlet carna- 
tion; for crimson carnation. James D. 
Cockroft, second for dark pink; third 
for light pink; second for white; sec- 
ond for scarlet; second for crimson; 
first for any other variety; first for 
twenty-five assorted, and first for any 
variety not disseminated. R. W. de For- 
est, first for light pink variety. H. T. 
and A. H. Tunnell, second for light pink 
variety; third for white; third for crim- 
son; third for blooming plant. Peter 
Fisher, third for scarlet carnation. Au- 
gust Heckscher secured second for as- 
sorted carnations and first for twelve 
tea roses and for twelve other roses; 
first for blooming plant, a cyclamen; 
second for foliage plant; first for spring 
flowers. Walter Jennings was awarded 
first for mignonette. Mr. Cartledge was 



Chrysaothemams 

WHITE 

Early— George S. Kalb, Polly Rose, Willow- 
brook. 

Mtd-seaso n— Mias Minnie Wanamaker, 
Ivory, Mrs. H. BoblnBOn, Niyeus, Queen, 
Alice Byron, Kureka. 

Late— Mrs. McArthur. 

PINK 

Early— Glory of Pacific. 

Bf id-season- Pink Ivory, J. K. Shaw, Adela, 

Mm. PerriD, Ethel.vn, A. J. Balfour, William 

H. Duckham, Or. Eaguehard. 
Late— Maud Dean, The Harriott. 

YELLOW 

Early— Monrovia. 

Mld-aeason-O. Pitcher, Col. D. Appleton, 
Mrs. William Duckham. 

Late— Major Bonnaffon, H. W. Rleman. 
Booted cuttinKB. $2.00 per 100; $15.00 per 1000. 

A.N.PIERSON 

CROMWELL, CONN. 



PerlOWV 

Candace $40.00 

Robert Oraiar 40.00 

Cardinal 25.00 

Uarlo warden 15.00 

Prosperity 16.00 

Boston Market . . . 10.00 



Mention The Keview when you write. 

Stroni^, Well Rooted 

CARNATION CUTTINGS 

Per 1000 

Pink Lawson $10.00 

Var. Lawson 25.00 

Mrs. Patten 20.00 

Jessica 40.00 

Lady Bountiful... 20.00 

My Maryland 30.00 

Enchantress 18.00 

CA9H OR 0. O. D. 

SOL. GARLAND, DK8 PLAINKS, ILL. 

Mpnflon Thf R<>vl<.\v whpn von write. 

CARNATION 

HELEN 60DDARD 

Rooted cuttings. 

$6.00 per 100; $60.00 per 1000. 

S. J. GODDARD, FRAMINOHAM, MASS. 

Mrotloo The Review when yon write. 

given second for azalea and third for 
foliage plant. 

Louisville, Ky. — J. B, Stuessy & Son 
had the opening of their East End Flo- 
ral Bazaar, betvpeen Preston and Jacksoih 
streets, February 28. A som^enir was 
given to every visitor at the openings 
Their greenhouses are located on Halde- 
man avenue. 



!,w''W'')*J|'-W-v!-l*i">".'''^'in.'''*"~-^'*"~ 



r^7v7^;yc-yj ^i- ■ ^!- ■■- 



Habch 7, 1907. 



The Weekly Florists' Review* 



n95 



Vegetable Forciog. 



The price of lettuce at Chicago has 
fallen about one-half in the last fort- 
night. 

Practicallt every florist who sells 
bedding plants, either does or can sell 
vegetable plants if they are shown to the 
people. 

Beussels sprouts were introduced on 
Long Island in 1876 and have become a 
leading item with truckers there. "While 
particularly at home on Long Island, 
there is no reason why they should not 
be grown anywhere that a success is 
made of cabbage and cauliflower. 



FEAST OR FAMINE. 

The season has been far from a favor- 
able one for growers of ^vegetables under 
glass, but the higher prices realized have 
in rf measure made up for the reduced 




S. J. McMichaeU 



yields which have resulted from the long 
continued cloudy weather. The cucumber 
and tomato growers have suffered to the 
greatest extent, because of the diflBculty 




Hothouse Specialties 

Our Mr. Bawson beinr one of the 
larereBt growers of Vegretables undar 
rlasB In this country, we have devel- 
oped many special strains, includlnv: 

_ Rawson's Hothouse Cucumber 

which we confidently believe superior to any 
other on the market; 60c per oz.; 11.60 per M-lh.; 
16.00 per lb. 
BAWSON'S SCARIiET CONICAI. RADISH 

Best for forclngr; many largest growers use it 
exclusively. Brilliant scarlet, conical, short- 
topped, remarkably uniform, tender, crisp; 90o 
lb.; 10 lbs., 18.00; 100 lbs.. 176.00. 

These and many other specialties fully 
described in our Market Gardener's List for 1M7, 
Just Issued. Sent free on reQuest. 

W. W. RAWSON & CO., 5 Union St., Boston 

Mention The Review when yon write. 

We recommend for forcing : 

Gundestnip's Caulltlower New Snowball 

better than Dry Weather for forcing, per oz., 12. OO. 
Lettuce Grand Rapids, per oz., 10c; M-lb., 26. 
Improved Arllngrton White Spine Cacnm- 
ber, per oz , 10c; H-lb., 26c. Uuadeatrup'i 
Barly Scarlet Turnip, white tip for forc- 
ing, H-lb., 20c; 1-ib., 76c. Celerlac, Gunde* 
strap's Oval King. 1-oz., 25c; M-lb., dOc. 

GUNDESTRCP'S 8ESD STORE 
4873 Milwaukee Ave. CHICAGO 

though in a number of parts of the coun- 
try a generally mild winter has served to 
keep expenses at a minimum. 

Now the prospect is for a reversal of 
conditions. With longer days the crops 
are coming on with accustomed rapidity, 
even seeming to grow faster than usual 
in the warm caresses of a stronger sun, 
and markets are generally full of stock, 
with every prospect of a decided drop 
in prices at no distant day. 



McMICHAEL*S PLACE. 

8. J. McMichael has built up a large 
business at Findlay, O., in growing veg- 
etable plants for wholesale trade. He 
recently has built two new houses cover- 
ing 48x136 feet, containing about 11,500 
square feet of glass and costing upwards 
of $3,000. He is sparing no expense to 
have his establishment up to date in every 
way. Following vegetable plants in the 
spring, he does a large business with 
bedding stock. 



VEGETABLE MARKETS. 

N^w York, March 5. — Mushrooms in 
fair demand and steady. Beet greens 
selling well. Cucumbers steady. Lettuce 
poor and dragging. Mint weak. Bad- 







1 






1MB 


■ 


HlllBHHHiiiiiB 


p5SI 





New Houses of S. J. McMichaelt Findlay, O. 



in getting fruit to set, but the lettuce 
and radish growers have also had light 
production, because crops developed so 
slowly. The better prices generally real- 
ized have not made up the difference, al- 



ishes and rhubarb held steady. Toma- 
toes in light supply. Beet tops, 75c to 
$1 bu.; cucumbers, 75e to $2 doz. ; head 
lettuce, 25c to 75c doz.; mushrooms, 35c 
to 60c lb. ; mint, 30c to 60c doz. ; radishes, 



FROM GROWBR 
TO PLANTER 



Peppers 

- jfitj 



Per lb. 

NeapoRtan $150 

Genuine Ruby King.. 1.50 
Bull Note or Bull.... 1.25 

Golden Queen 1.60 

Golden Dawn 1.25 

Golden Upright 2.00 



VEGETABLE 
PLANTS 

f*ADDA|l|r New Early and Succession, tl.50 
VnOD/^VI- per lOOO; 10.000 and over, $1.25 

per 1000. 
I FTTI IPF Orand Rapids, Big Boston, Bos- 
1-1.1 lUV*!- ton Market and Tennis Ball. 

$1.00 per 1000. 

PARSLEY Moss Curled, $1.26 per 1000. 

R. Vincent, Jr. & Son, white Marsh, Md. 

Mention Thf Rpvtew when yon wrltp. 

SEED 

Tomatoes Per lb. 

Livingston's Globe 12 00 

ChalJt'8 Early Jewel 1.75 

Burpee's Matchless 1.50 

Spark's Earliana... 1.75 

Dwarf Champion... 2.00 

Salvia Splendens 10.00 . _ 

New York Improved Spineless Purple Egg Plant 2.0O 

Extra Early White Spine Cucumber 60 

Hubbard and Boston Squash 50 

T. B. TURNER, Swedesboro, N. J. 

Mention The Review when you write. 

Vegetable Growers Should 

Send 5 Dollars 

for a swivel wheel and 20 >-8-lnch nozzles. It wil) 
fit a run of 100 feet of pipe and give you a chance 
to try for yourself the Wittbold Watering 
Byst«in» or send for circular of testimonials. 

The Wtttboid Nozzle, for ^-inch hose ll.OO 

The Special Bote Nozs le 1.00 

Louis Wittbold, 1708 N. Halsted St., Chicaga 

Mention The Review when yon write. 

Comet Tomato 

Those who force tomatoes should give 
"Comet" a trial. This variety has been the talk 
of gardeners around Boston the past season. 
Those who have seen it growing declare there's 
nothing to compare with it. Seed, $6.00 per oz. 

WILLIAM SIM, Clifftondale, Mass. 

Mention The Review when you write. 

600,000 Asparagus Roots loo lOOO 

3 years, Palmetto, heavy 60o t3.50 

2 years. Palmetto, strong 40c 300 

2 years, Conover's Colossal 36c 2.75 

2 yeara, Barr's Mammoth, strong 40c 3.0O 

2year8, Donald's Elmtra 40c 3.00 

2 years. Giant Argenteuil 40c 3.00 

2 years. Columbian White fiOc 3.50 

On 60.000 or over, good discount given. 
On other Nursery stock, send for Trade Liist. 
RIVER VIEW NURSERIES. J. H. O'HaiH, Little Silver. N. J. 
Mention The Review when yoa write. 

Skioner's Irrigation. 

For greenhouses, gardens and lawns. 
Latest improved gasoline pumping out- 
fits at low price. Estimates furnished 
on request. Address, 

C. W. SKINNER, Troy, O. 

Mention The Review when you write. 

COMET TOMATO SEED 

Grown from true stock. Excellent for forcing. 
50c and 11.00 per pkt. H. M. 8ANDRRSON, 
111 LINCOLN ST., WALTHAM. MASS. 

$1.50 to $2.50 per hundred bunches; rhu^ 
barb, $3 to $5 per hundred bunches; to- 
matoes, 15c to 25c lb. 

Boston, March 4. — Cucumbers, $3 to 
$15 box; tomatoes, 40e to 50c lb.; let- 
tuce, 25e to 60c doz.; parsley, $1.50 box p 
rhubarb, 5c to 6c lb.; mint, 75c a doz.. 
bunches; radishes, *25c doz. bunches;- 
mushrooms, 50c to 75c lb.; asparagus, $5 
to $6 doz. bunches; dandelions, $1.25 
box; escarolle, 75c doz.; romaine, 75c 
to $1 doz. 

Chicago, March 6. — Leaf lettuce, 18c 
to 20c; cucumbers, $1 to $2 doz. ; rad- 



,MdL> 



..>iii..^^tt.^ -■.M.u...^..: .'.....:, ^=^v..-A.i-.ii.... -...., -,; 



^/..^A^-^^^-^. .V 1^. 






\y.^' r^j^j H^M '"- 






n96 



The Weekly Florists^ Review* 



March 7, 1907. 



Bolbons Stock, Faocy Carnations, Roses, Rhinebeck Violets. 
PITTSBURG CUT FLOWER CO., Ltd. 

222 Oliver Avenue, PITTSBURG, PA. 

Mention The Review when you write. 

J. B. MIRDOCH & CO. ''""''^r.'i* """' 

545 Liberty Ave., Pittsburg, Pa. and Gardenias 

Mention The Review when yon write. 

The Cleveland Cut Flower Company 

WHOLESALE CUT FLOWERS, FLORISTS' SUPPLIES, WIRE DESIGNS 

215 Huron Road, Cleveland, Ohio 



Mention The Review when yon write. 



GOOD... 
THINGS 



Hammond's Greenhouse White Palnt"» 
Twemlow's Old English Glazing Putty 

In use by some of the largest Florists in the United States. Write (or prices. 

HAMMOND'S PAINT & SLUG SHOT WORKS, "*"^iZ:..y. 



ishes, 30c to 40e doz. bunches; mush- 
rooms, 35c. to 50c lb. , 



aNONNATI MARKET RADISH. 

In speaking of the Cincinnati Market 
radish, the Livingston Seed Co., Colum- 
bus, 0., says: 

"This superb radish originated in the 
vicinity of Cincinnati, with the Glass 
Gardeners there, and has been continu- 
ally used by them for more than twenty 
years. We introduced it to our trade in 
the spring of 1895, and it at once became 
so deservedly popular that we have had 
to grow it ever since by the thousands of 
pounds to supply the demand. The tops 
are so small that the radishes may stand 
touching each other in the rows. One 
grower says that he never thins this va- 
riety as he does other kinds which run to 
seed if left standing too thickly. The 
Cincinnati Market radish grows perfect- 
ly straight and smooth, six to seven 
inches in length. Their attractive scar- 
let skin is very thin, the flesh crisp, 
brittle and of delightful flavor. The 
finest long, red radish in existence for 
forcing, and it outsells all others in 
any market. Eemaining, as it does, a 
long time in perfect condition for the 
table, after it is first ready for gather- 
ing, it is one of the very best varieties 
to plant in the home garden." 



VERBENA MAMMOTH 

Colored orMlxed oz. 10.76 

Petmnla. double large-fl. f ringed.... tr. pkt. 1.00 

" single large-fl. f ringed tr. pkt. .50 

Salvia Splendens • oz. 1.00 

Stocks, large-fl. 10 Weeks' tr. pkt. .26 

Dwarf Snowflake tr. pkt. .26 

Besonia. Dwarf Vernon tr. pkt. .26 

" Vulcan tr. pkt. .26 

" Erfordi tr. pkt .36 

W. C. BECKIRT, AUeghefly, P». 

Always mention the Florists* Review when 
writing; advertisers. 



DAHLIAS 

Now li the time to place year order for Bulbs 
whlob will insure your getting named varieties in 
sny quantity; delivery to be made now or 
•arly spring. 

DAVID HERBERT ft SON 

Suecessors to L. E. Peacock, Inc. ATOO, M. J. 
Mention The Review when yon write. 



Gladiolos Bolbs 

Our bulbs are not better than 
the best, but better than the rest. 
TBT TKBIC. 



■ Cushman Gladiolus Co. 

W STLVAHIA, OHIO. 

Mention The Review when yon write. 

Aster Seed 

Vlck's Brancbiag, late White Aster, $1.00 per 
oz.; 912.00 per lb. The above seed is from care- 
fully selected stock and should give good 
satisfaction. 

WHITE BROS., Gasport, N. Y. 

Mention The Review when yon write. 

^Susta Gladiolus 

First size, IX and up $12.00 per 1000 

Second size, \%-l}^ 8.00 per 1000 

CTash with order. Satisfaction guaranteed. 

RDwehl&6ranz,llicksYille,LI.,N.Y. 

Mention The Review when yon write. 

GLADIOLI 

Write for trade price list of named varieties, 
assorted colors and flne mixtures. 

E. E. STEWART, Rivea Junction, Mich. 

Always mention the Florists' Review wheo 
writing advertisers. 



Sow Now 
The True Thing 

AKcratiun Blue Star, the best of all for pots, S 
tr. pktB., tl.26; tr. pkt., 260. 

Alyasnm Carpet Queen, fine extra dwarf strain, 
6 tr. pkts., •1.2&; tr. pkt., 36c. 

Be'rdnia ferfordl^, fcH- pota t}ie best rosy pink, 
«S^. pkt.,IIJ^; tr. pkt., a6e. 

BiBgDniaa Zangen'a new Bedding Queen, a real 
DaS^ljreiik pink, compact, ball-snaped, wax 
Begobla'wub 'lively green foliage, unexcelled 
for pots and out doors. tr. pkts., I3.&0; tr. 
pkt, 60c. 

Petunia Rosy Morn, a flne bedder, 6 tr. pkts., 
91.S6; tr. pkt., 26c. 

Petunia, California single giants, extra strain, 
6 tr. pkts., $4.00; tr. pkt., 76c. 

Petunia, double fringed Giants, 8 tr. pkts., 16.00; 
tr. pkty^$1.00. 

Salvia Fireball, this is a new, real dwarf com- 
pact early-flowering, flne variety and there is 
hardly a better one for pots. 6 tr. pkts., $2.60; 
tr. pkt., 60c. 

Verbena, Mammoth, unexcelled strains; aa 
Auricolor flowered, scarlet, striped, pink, pur- 
ple, white, each separate. Oz., 11.60; tr. pkt., 36c. 

For larger quantities special quotations, also 
ask for my Wholesale Catalogue. 

0. Y. ZANGEN, Seedsman, HOBOKEN, N. J. 

Mention The Review when yon write. 

SHAMROCK 

IRISH. THK RIAL THIMGt GRKKN 

Strong and fine plants. Better order early. 
$4.00 per 100; or 60c per doz., by mail. 

..XXX SEEDS.. 

Verbena. Improved mammoths ; the very finest 
grown; mixed, lOOQ seeds, S6c. 

Claerarla. Finest large- flowering dwarf, mixed 
colors, 1000 seeds, 60c. 

Chinese Primrose. Finest large-flowering 
fringed varieties, mixed: single and double, 
600 seeds, tl.OO; half pkt., 60c. 

Pansy, Finest Giants. The best large-flower- 
ing varieties, critically selected; mixed, 6000 
seeds, $1.00; half pkt., 60c. Pkt. Mme. Ferret, 
"gratis." 

Petunia. New Star, from the finest marked 
flowers, extra choice. Trade pkt., 26c. 

Cash. Extra count of seeds In all packets. 

JOHN F. RUPP, Shlremanstown, Pa. 



THR HOUR OF FBIMBOeRB. 

Mentl<m The Review when you write. 



Mabch 7, 1907. 



ThcWcckly Florists' Review. 



U97 



EDWARD REID easVerplants 



WHOLESALE FLORIST 

1526 Ranstead St, PHILADELPHIA 



IN ALL THE LKADING VARIETIKS 

Sbipped direct from tbe Nurseries. 

ALL KINDS OF 

SEASONABLE CUT FLOWERS 



Mention The Review when yon write. 



DpMr|^yi| BERGER BROS. 

M%^ .^w 1 ▼ M ^^^ W ^■■^Mii^ have removed to their 



^Wholesale Florists, 
new store at 



1305 FILBERT STREET, 



Where all orders will be promptly and carefully executed. 

Mention The Review when yon write. 



PHILADELPHIA, PA. 



Wholesale Gut Flower Prices. 

Philadelphia, March 6. 

Per doz. 

Beaatles, Specials 19.00 to flo.OO 

Extra e.OOto 7.60 

' " Medium S.OOto 5.00 

Short l.OOto 1.50 

PerlOO 
Brides and BridesmaidB, Fancy...$12.00 to 116.00 

Select... S.OOto 10.00 
Ordinary 4.00 to 

Rtchmond, Liberty, Fancy 15.00 to 

Select lO.OOto 

Ordinary 4.00to 

Killamey . Ohatenay , Select 10.00 to 

Ordinary.... 4.00 to 

Golden Gate, Select lo.OO to 

" Ordinary 4.00to 

Oamations, Fancy 

II Select 2.00to 

Ordinary 

Harrisii LllleB,per doc $1.76 

▲dlantom Ooneatum 

Hybridom 

Aaparagns Plomosas, Strings 50.00 to 

Sprays, bunch 50c 

" Sprengeri, bunch. . .50c 

Smllaz 15.00 to 

Valley S.OOto 

Oattleya Trianse 

OaUas per dos., $1.00 to $1.50 

Violets, Single 

Double 

" White 

Gardenias t2.50per doz. 

Pansles 

fancy S.OOto 

Sweet Peas 50to 

Daisies, White and Tellow 1.00 to 

Paper White Narcissus 2.00 to 

Mignonette 2.00to 

Single Daffodils 2.00to 

White Lilacs per bunch, .60 to 

Freesias 2.00 to 

Golden Spur 2.00to 

Tulips 2.00 to 

Double Daffodils S.OOto 



.35 to 
.60 to 



S.OOto 



6.00 

20.00 

12.00 

6.00 

12.00 

6.00 

12.00 

6.00 

4.00 

S.OO 

1.50 

1.00 

1.60 

75.00 



20.00 

4.00 

60.00 

.50 

.76 

1.60 



.75 
4.00 
10.00 
1.00 
2.00 
S.OO 
5.00 
3.00 
1.00 
4.00 
S.OO 
4.00 
4.00 



Pittsburg, March 6. 
Per doi. 



Beauties, Specials I 4 

Fancy 2, 

Medium 1 

Short 

Brides and Bridesmaids, Fancy... $12 

Medium.. 8. 

Short.... 4 

Richmond, Specials 15. 

Select 10, 

Ordinary 

Killamey 8, 

Ohatenay S 

Perle 

Bon Silene 

Cusin 4 

Oamations, Ordinary 1 

Fancy 

Sweet Peas 

Adiantnm 1 

Asparagus Plumosus, Strings 80. 

" Sprays, bunch, 40c-50c 

Sprengeri, b'h, 40c-50c 

Smllax 12 

VaUey 8 

Violets, double 

Paper Whites 

Roman Hyacinths 2, 

Freesias 1. 

Tulips 

Oypripediums 



00 to 9 6.00 
60 to 8.00 
,25 to 2.00 
.60 
PerlOO 
00 to $15.00 
00 to 10.00 



,00 to 
00 to 
Goto 

00 to 
.00 to 



00 to 
50 to 

50 to 
00 to 
00 to 



.60 to 
.00 to 
60 to 

00 to 
,00 to 



6.00 

20.00 

12.60 

6.00 

15.00 

15.00 

6.00 

4.00 

8.00 

2.00 

S.0« 

1.25 

1.60 

50.00 



16.00 
4.00 
.76 
8.00 
8.00 
8.00 
8.00 

16.00 



Please find enclosed $1 for your tip 
top paper. — Wm. Walker, Louisville, Ky. 



W. E. McKISSICK, Wholesale riorist 

18S1 FILBXRT STREET, PHILADELPHIA 



EASTER PLANTSJ 



choice collection, indading* 
all the leading varieties. 



Mention The Review when yon write. 



HIE CLEVELAND FLORISTS' EXCHANGE 



Carnations and Sweet Peas 



The finest in 
this market 
in full supply. 



^?rat'S.^t'?rice.. ©06 Huroii Rood, CLEVELAND, O. 

Mention The Review when yon write. 

EUGENE BERNHEIMER '^^T^.'^t^^^ »• 

UTOUM lOTPH ■TMBT. PHILADELPHIA, PA. 

* Mention The Review when yon write. 

A Good OpeninQI ca'i-nation 'grower. 

WHXIAM J. MOORK, Wliolessle Florist, 12S7 FUbert St.. Pblladelpbla. 

Mention The Review 'when you write. 



WILLIAM J. BAKER 

CARNATIONS, DAISIES 
SWEET PEAS AND VALLEY. 

WHOLKSALK FLORIST 

1432 So. Pcnn Square. PHIUDELPHIA, PA. 

Mention The Review when yon write. 

MBPHROLBPIS WHITMANI, 

'^ 6-inch pots $12.00 per doz. 

lUXPBROLBPIS SCOTTII. 

*^ 6-inch pots $6.00 per doz. 

DANDANUS VKITCHII. 

■^ 6-inch pots 112.00 per doz. 

8-inch pots $2.00 each. 

JOHN WELSH YOUNG, 

Gennantown, Phlladelplila, Pa. 

Mention The Review when yon write. 

Pinsburg Florists' Exchange 

15 DIAMOND SQUARE 
217-223 DIAMOND STREET 

All Cut Flowers and Florists' Supplies 

Mention The Review when yon write. 
Always Mention tbe 



f\sm^ 



When Writlns Adverttsers 



lEPHILADELPHIA 
CUT FLOWER CO. 

WHOLESALE FL0BI8T8 

Store opens 7 a. m., closes 8 p. m. 

"L'-Sl'syiL.. PHILADELPHIA 

Mention The Review when yon write. 

ROSES 1 CARNATIONS 

FANGT FEBNS aad GALAX-Higk-Grade Stock 

Orders filled satiefactorlly. 

Detroit Gut Flower Supply House 

Wkolesale Coumtsslon Florist. I. T. Psircs, Prsi, 
Adams Ave. West, Detroit, Mlcli. 

Home Phone 164. Bell, Main 974. 

Mention The Review when yon write. 

CHAS. D. BALL 

GROWSR OF 

ALMS, ETC. 

Send for Price List. 

HOLMESeURO, PHILADELPHIA. PA. 

Mention The Review when yon write. 
Always Mention tlie 

Wben Writlna; Advertisers 



P 



—^-^-^- '-■^•^- 



..^^J— ■■^.tl ■^^■ 



'-*- •--- ^"ifleii n' d llMi 



ryl "V^ r* ~^ 






1198 



The Weekly Florists^ Review^ 



Mabch 7, 1907. 



Charles MiUang SL17<^ 

We axe HEADQUARTERS OUT-OF-TOWN FLORISTS 
FOR EVERY RIND of Cut promptly attended to. Telephone 
Flowers in THEIR SEASON for what you want. 
BeMouble Prices, Sansre Deallnff. Tel. 8860, 8861 Madison Saaare. 



F&ANK H. TRABNDLY 



OHARLECI SCHBNOK 



TRAENDLY « SCHENCK 

Wholesale Florists and Cut Flower Exchange 

44 W. 28th street, NEW YORK 

Telephones, 798 and 799 Madison Square. CONSIGNMENTS SOLIOITHD 



THOMAS VOUNG 

Wholesale Florist 
ftS West 28th St., NEW YORK 

Receiver and Shipper of Cat Flowers. 

ConsiKiiineiits Solicited. 

Mention The Rerlew when you write. 



HEADQUARTERS FOR NOVELTIES 

ORCHIDS A SPECIALTY 



THE HIGHEST \/AI I CT V ALWAYS 

GHADE OF V M L. L. tL T ON HAND 

GARDENIAS. DAISIES. ROSES AND CARNATIONS 



ALWAYS 

ON HAND 



JAMES McMANUS,,\*;V,;^:;.42W. 28th St., New York 



WHOLESALE 
COMMISSION 
DEALER. 

CUT FLOWERS 

Consignments Solicited 

Tel. 167 Madison Square. 

Established 1887. 



J. K. ALLEN, 

Room for a few more flrst*class grrowers of American Beantles ^ 

Violets and Carnations. 

Mention The ReTlew when yon write. 



Roses, Violets, 
Carnations, 

Cattleyas, Cyps., Narcissus. 

Open 6 a. m. 

106 W. 28th St., 
NEW YORK 



GEO. SALTFORD 

WHOLESALE FLORIST 

46 W. 29th St., NEW YORK CITY 

Telephone No. 3393 Madisou Square. 

CONSIGNMENTS OF ALL FIRST-CLASS FLOWERS SOLICITED. 

Mention The Review when yon write. 

RONNOT BROS. 

*^ WHOLESALE FLORISTS 

S5 and 57 W. 20th. Street. llCUf YHRIf 
Cut Flower Exotumse, liLff I Uill\ 

OPEN ALL DAY 

All Unexcelled Outlet for COKSIflNED FLOWERS 

Telephone No. 830 Madison Sq. 
Mention The Review when yon write. 

JOHN YOUNG 

Wholesale Florist 

51 W.28tli Street, NEW YORK 

Telephones -4463-4464 MADISON. 
Mention The Rpylew when yon wrltp. 

WALTER F. SHERIDAN 

Wholesale Commission Dealer In 

CUT FLOWERS 

39 W. »8th St., NEW YORK 

(EstabllBQed 1882) 
Receivlnfr Extra Quality American Beauties 

and all oth«r varieties of RoseB. 
Telephone 9.2 Madison Square. Carnations. 

Mention The Review when yon write. 

Reed & Keller 

188 W. 85th St., New York 

FLORISTS' SUPPLIES 

We manufacture all our METAL DESIGNS, 
BASKETS, WIRE WORK and NOVELTIES 

and are dealers in (illassware. Decorative Greens 
and all Florists' requisites. 

Mention The Review when yon write. 



HOU 
WILL 



WILL FIND ALLf THE 



BEST OFFERS ALL THE TIME 
in the REVIEW'S CLASSIFIED ADVS. 



Wholesale Gut Flower Prices. 



New Tork. March 4. 
Per 100 
OOtol 75.00 
.00 to 40.00 



Beaaties, Specials $50. 

Fancy 85 

Extra 20.00to 25.00 

No.l lO.OOto 16.00 

No. 2 S.OOto 10.00 

Shorts 4.00to 6.00 

Brides and Maids, Special 8.00 to 10.00 

Extra S.OOto 6.00 

No. 1 4.00to 5.00 

No. 2 2.00to 4.00 

Golden Gate, Obatenay 3.00 to 12.00 

KiUamey ^ S.OOto 12.00 

Richmond 4.00to 20.00 

Orchids, Oanieyas 40.00to 50.00 

Oypripediums ;.... lO.OOto 15.00 

Gardenias 15.00to 80.00 

Oamations, Oommon 1.00 to 2.00 

Selects 2.00to 8.00 

" Fancies and novelties 4.00to 6.00 

Violets 20to .50 

Adiantum Ouneatam 60to 100 

Oroweanam lOOto 1.26 

Aspar aruB Plumosus, strings 25.00 to 50.00 

" SprenKeri, bunches ... lO.OOto 16.00 

Lilies S.OOto 15.00 

Lily of the Valley l.OOto 2.00 

Smllax S.OOto 12.00 

Narcissus ■. 60to 2.00 

Oallas S.OOto 12.00 

Hyacinths 50to 2.00 

Tulips 50to 2.00 

Lilacs bunch, 50c to 75c 

Daisies l.OOto 2.00 

Mignonette lOOto 6.00 

B. S. SLINN, Jr. 

WHOLESALE FLORIST 
55 and 57 W. S6th St., NEW TORK CITV 

Telephone, 8664 Madison Square. 

Roses and 
Carnations 



Violets 



Mention The Review when yon write. 

Gunther Bros. 

so West 29th Street, 

Phone, 551 Madison Square. NEW TORK 

Violets, Roses, Carnations, Orchids. 

Established 18S8. 

GROWERS— Important — Special advantafree 
for you this season. Write or see us. 

Mention The Review when yon write. 

FOLEY'S FLORAL FOTOGRAPHS 

VLORAL ALBUM, size 12x11, 
containing 24 different funeral designs, 
by express, $5.00 C. O. D. 

226-228 >^ BOWERY. NEW YORK 

Mention The Review when yon write. 



ESTABLISHED 1879 

PERKINS & SCHUMANN 

Wholesale Gommission Florists 
"^oriTA^Sr* NEW YORK 

Tel. No. 1009 Madison Square 

Mention The Review when you vrrlte. 

FORD BROS. 

48 W. 88th Street, NEW YORK 

Telephones. 8870-3871 Madison Square 

"•1.71?.^^;, Fresh Gut Flowers 

49~A complete assortment of the best in the 
market can always be relied upon. 

Mention The Review when yoa write. 



C. BONNET 



G. H. BLAKE 



BONNET ft BLAKE 

Wholesale Florists 

106 Livingston St., BROOKLYN, N.Y. 

Telephone 4638 Main. 
Cors'enments solicited. Out-of-town orders 
caitifuiiy aiiended tu. Give us a trial. 

Mention The Review when yoa write. 



1871 



James Hart: 



1907 



(The OrlKinal Pioneer House) 

"^SSiVr'^S CUT FLOWERS 

108 West 28th St., near 8th Ave., 
Telephone 626 Madison Square, 17BW TORK. 
EVERYTHING IN CUT FLOWERS 

FROM THE BEST GROWERS. 

Mention The Review when yon write. 

WM. STARKE 

Wholesale Florist and Plantsman 

Tel. 45.%2 Madison Sq. 52 W. 20th St. 

Between Broadway and 6th Ave., Ne\ir Tork 

SHIPMENTS OF PLANTS made to any 
part of the country. A trial order solicited. 

SATISFACTION GUARANTEED. 

Mention The Review when yon write. 

Rice Brotiiers 

118 North 6th St. 

Wholesalers and shippers of home-grown Oal 
Flowers, comprising the newest varieties of 
blooms. Pull line of Supplies and Decorative 
Greens. Trial order solicited. Weekly price 
list issued. MINNEAPOLIS, MINN» 
Mention The Review when you write. 






■:Ji" 



Mabch 7, 1907. 



The Weekly Florists' Review* 



n99 



fi 



THE RELIABLE HOUSE" 

1 10 W. 2IIHI a ^^^^^, NEW YORK CITY 

Boa»a, GMnuttlon*, Valley. Orchids, Gardsnlas, Vlotots and 

_. ^ ■▼•ry Vart«ty of Cut Flowam. 

Blonmond Roaas— Ou^of-town BhipmeDts. Write or teleirraph for them. 

JOSEPH S. FENRICH 



Moore, Hentz & Nash 



Wholesale 
Florists 



66-67 W. 86th St. 

NEW YORK CITY 

SHIPPING ON COMMISSION 

Talepbone, 756 Madison Bqoara 



Alexander J. Guttman 
THE WHOLESALE FLORIST OF NEW YORK 

43 WEST 28th STREET 

PHONES, 1664 1665 MADISON SQUARK 

ENOUGH SAID 



H. E. EROMENT 

Wholesale Commission Florist (Successor to "W, Ghormley) 

Receiver and Shipper of All Varieties of Cut Flowers 



Telephones, '220u and 2201 Madison Square. 



S7 West 28tli St., MEW YORK 



WINSOR 

The latest carnation wonder of the F. R. Pier- 
ion Go. Best seller, best keeper, best ever! 
Sold exclusively by the 

NKW YORK CUT FLOWER CO. 

In. A. MinaH, Mgr. Coogan Bldg., New Tork 

Mention The Rerlew when you write. 

THE KERYAN CO. "iS^ro^^- 

Wholesale dealers in Fresh Cut Palmetto and 

Srcas Palm Leaves, Oalax, Leucothoe, Fema, 
OBses, all Decorating' Evergrreuns. 

Mention Thp Review when yon write. 

HENRY R. CRAWBUCK, 

Wholesale Dealer In 

Wild SbIUz, flalax. Palm Leaves, 

Leaeothoe Sprays, Fancy and Dasher Ferns, 

870 Pearl St., BROOKLYN, N. T. 

Mention The Review when you write. 



The History and Culture 

(RAFTED ROSES 

For Forcing 

•v ALEX. MONTGOMERY. JR. 



** The most hnportant cootribtstion to 
the modem uterature of the Rote.** 

"Of much interest to everf Rom 
grower and of utmost value to 
growenof Grafted Roses." 

Cootalnine Practical Description of 
the Process of Grafting with Full 
Details of planting anoculture* also 
Directions for treatment to cany the 
plants a second year. 



FULLY ILLUSTRATED 
PRICE. POSTPAID, 26o. 

ADDRESS 

aORISTS'PUBUSHINGCO. 

Oaxtoa Bldff., 384 Bsattoora St. 

CHICAGO 





N. LEGAKES & GO. 

53 W. 2Bth St., NEW YORK 

Tel. No. 1415.1410 
Madison Square 

Stands at Cut 

Flower Exchange. 

Coogan Bldg.. W. 

26th Street, and 

S4th Street Out 

Flower Market. 

SPECiAiynEs: Galax Leaves. Ferns and Leuco- 
thoe Sprays, Holly. Princess Pine, Moss. Southern 
Wild Smilax and all kinds of Evergreens. 

Green and Bronze Galax Leaves 

Mention The Review when yon write. 

A. M. HENSHAW 

Wholesale Cominlaslon Florist. 

Oonsignments of first-class stock solicited. 
Prompt returns. 

'*THE SQUARE DEAL*' 

guaranteed to all who deal here. ' 

B« West 28tli Street, MFW YHDIf 
Txii. WS."? Martlson Sonare. '^^^ I Vl\l\ 

Mention The Review when yon write. 

The Geller Florist Supply Go. inc. 

110-112 W. 26th St., NEW YORK 

Telephone 62;{9 Madison Square. 

ruU line of IXORISTS* SUPPLIES and 

all Decorative Greens, Ribbons and Novelties. 
We manufacture all our Metal Wreaths. Baskets 
and Wire Work. Come and see the new store. 

WILLIAM H. KUEBLER 

Wbolesale Ck>nunl8slon Dealer In 

CUT FLOWERS 

Room for the products of growers of first-class stock. 
"WATCH US GROW I" 

88 WUIoughby St., Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Tel.. 4591 Maia 



IS 



RONOUNCING 

DICTIONARY 



A list of PLANT NAMES and the 

Botanical Terms most frequently met 

with in articles on trade topics with 

tlie Correct Pronunciation for each* 

Sent postpaid on receipt of 25c* 

FLORISTS' PUBLISHING CO. 
334 Dearborn St Chicago. 




Wholesale and Retail Dealers 
inaUklndsof 

greens ^m 

FANCY 'and ' ^^ 

DAGGER FERNS. 
OAIiAX— Brown and Green. 

50 West 28tb St., NEW YORK CITY. 

LEUCOTHOE SPRAYS. PRINCESS PINE, 
HOLLY. SOUTHERN WILD SMILAX. 

Telephone 1808 Madison. 

Mention The Review when yon write. 

J. Seligman Joseph J. Levy 

JohnSeligman&Co. 

Wholesale Florists 
66 WEST 26th STREET 

Tel. 4878 Madison Sq. NEW YORK 

Opposite New York Cut Flower Co. 

Mention The Review when you wrtte. 

RUSSIN S HANFLING 

Office and Salesroom 
114 West 28th Street, NEW TORK CITT 

Manufacturers and Importers of 

WILLOW and FANCY BASKETS For Florists 

^^ Dealers In Florists* Supplies 

HTOur Specialties, Wheat Sheaves and Basluta 
Mention The Review when yon write. 

C. W. EBERMAN 

WHOLESALE FLORIST 

FLOWERING & DECORATIVE PLANTS 

of Every Description. 

53 West SOth St. New York Gl 

Mention The Review when yon write. 

A. L. YOUNG ft CO. 

WHOLCSALK FLORISTS 
CONSIGNMENTS OP CHOICE 

CUT FLOWERS SOLICITED 

Prompt Payments. Give us a trial. 

54 West 28th St. NEW YORK 

Telephone, 3559 Madison Square. 
Mention The Review when you write. 

A. HERRMANN 

Department Store 
Tor Florists' Supplies 

Factory. 709 First Ave., bet, 40th and 4lBt Sti. 

Office and Warerooms. 404. 406, 408. 410. 412 

East 84tb St.. NKW YORK. 

Mention The Keyjew when you write. 

The best way to collect an accoont Is te 
place it with the 

National Florists' Board Of Trade 

66 PINE ST., NEW YORK 

Why? Because many debtors will pay the Board, 
fearing otherwise a bad ratinir in our Credit List. 
Full infonnatioo as to methods and rates given 
on application. 

Mention The Review when you write. 



.'.A.lii^'L^^m,.. ■ 






)200 



The Weekly Florists' Review* 



March 7, 1907. 



Vaaghan & Sperry 

WHOLESALE FLORISTS 

58-60 Wabash Ave., CHICAGO 

Write for Special Prices 
Montlon The Review when yog write. 

Wholesale Gut Flower Prices. 



Beftutlea, long stems — 
" 86-iDCh stems. 
" 80-inch stems. 
" 24-iacb stems. 
" 20-incta stems. 
" 15-lncb stems. 

12-incb stems. 

Short stems.. 



OblcsKO, March 6. 
Per doz. 

$6.00 

5.00 

4.00 

• • • •• •• o*UU 

2.00 

1.60 

1.00 

.76 

Per 100 

Bridesmaids, Specials I 8.00 to 110.00 

Firsts 4.00 to 6.00 

Brides, Specials lO.OOto 12.00 

Firsts 4.00to 8.00 

Richmond, Specials 12.00 to 18.00 

Firsts 6.00to 

Liberty 5.00 to 

Golden Gate, Specials 10.00 to 

" Firsts 4.00to 

KlUarney 6.00to 

Uncle John 6.00to 

Perle 5.00 to 

Obatenay S.OOto 

Oamations, Select 1.50 to 

Fancy 

Violets, double 

single 

Oattleyas per doz., $6.00 

Dandrobium— 
Formosum....doi., $8.00 to $6.00 

GypripediumB...doz., 2.00 

HarrisU 

OaUas 10.00 to 

Valley.: 2.00 to 

Jonqaili 8.00 to 

Tulips 2.00 to 

Sweet Peas 60 to 

Paper Whites, Romans 

Freesias 2.00to 

Biignonette 6.00to 

Asparagus, Strings 60.00 to 

" Sprays, per bunch 75o 

Sprengreri. " 26-850 

Ferns per 1000, $2.60 to $8.00 

Galax per 1000, 1.00 to 1.50 

Adiantum Ouneatum 1.00 to 

Croweanum 

Smilax per doz. , $2.00 to $3.00 15.00 to 



10.00 

12.00 

12.00 

8.00 

15.00 

12.00 

10.00 

12.00 

2.00 

8.00 

.50 

.60 



15.00 
12.00 
4.00 
4.00 
6.00 
1.00 
8.00 
4.00 
$.00 
60.00 



.80 

.16 

1.60 

2.00 

20.00 



Bufifalo. March 6. 
Per doz. 



Beauties, Specials. 
Fancy... 
Extra.,., 
First 



$9.00 

6.00 

8.00 

2.00 

Per 100 



Brides and Maids, Extra $10.00 to 

No. 1 8.00to 

No. 2 4.00 to 

Liberty 5.00 to 

Golden Gate 5.00 to 

Perle 6.00 to 

Oarnations 1.60 to 

Adiantum Ouneatum 60 to 

Croweanum 1.00 to 

Asparagus Plumosus, Strings 40.00 to 

Sprays l.OOto 

Sprengeri " l.OOto 

Lily of the VaUey 8.00 to 

Smilax 15.00 to 

HarrisU 15.00 to 

Violata 60 to 

Romans and Narcissi 2.00 to 

Tulips 2.00 to 

Dafifodils 2.00 to 

Sweet Peas 60 to 

Mignonette 3.00 to 



$12.50 

10.00 

8.00 

15.00 

10.00 

8,00 

4.00 

1.00 

1.60 

50.00 

2.00 

2.00 

4.00 

20.00 

20.00 

.75 

8.00 

3 00 

3.00 

1.00 

500 



Beauties, Specials. 
Extra... 
Select... 
No. 1.... 
Shorts .. 



Brides and Bridesmaids 

Oarnations 

Violets 

Sweet Peas 

Pansies 

Tulips 

Adiantum Ouneatum 

Asparagus Plumosus, Strings. 
Sprays , 
" Sprengeri, 
Smilax 



Cleveland, March. 6. 

Per doz. 

, $6.00 

, 4.00 

3.00 

2.00 

1.00 

Per 100 
$ 6.00 to $15.00 



2.00 to 


4.00 


.75 to 


1.00 


l.OOto 


1.50 


l.Mto 


1.60 


8.00 to 


4.00 




1.00 


25.00 to 


60.00 


l.OOto 


8.00 


2.09 to 


4.00 




15.00 




Ghicago Rose Co. 

Rose Growers 

and Commission Handlers 

of Cut Flowers 

FLORISTS' SUPPLIES 

Wire Work our Specialty. 

S6-58 Wabaah Avenue, 
CHICAGO. 

Mention The Reylew when yon write. 

Bassett&Washburn 

76 Wabash Ave., CHICAGO, ILL 
'"•'•SSarsfClT FLOWERS 

Greenhouses at Hinsdatef Ilk 

Mention The Review when yon write. 

WIETOR BROS. 

^■^^rf. Cut Flowers 

All tele«:raph and telephone orders 
given prompt attention. 

5t Wabash Ave.> CHICAGO 

Poehlmann Bros. Go. 

^itii'St Cut Flowers 

and Dealers In ^'•■^ ■ ■WWWWI ^ 

All telegraph and telephone orders given prompt 
attention. Greenhouses: Morton Grove. 111. 

S5-87 Ramdolpb Street. CHICAGO, ILL. 

Mention The Review when yon write. 



W£ ARX: HKADQVARTEKS FOB 

CARNATION BLOOMS 

In Cinolnn»tl. 
Other Out Flowers in season. 
OBEKN GOODS, SPHAGNUM and GBEKN 
MOSS, WIRB WORK for Florists. 

Place your order now for Beconla Glolr* de 
Lorraine, 23^-in. pots, June delivery. $12.00 
per 100; $100.00 per 1000. 

CARNATION CUTTINGS, 

Booted or Unrooted. 

Send a list of your wants for prices. 

WILLIAM MURPHY, 

Wholesale Commission Florist. 
1S8 Bast Third Street, CINCINNATI, O. 

L, D. Phones - M 980. W 81 Y 
Mention The Review when yon write. • 

PERCY JONES 

Wholesale Cut Flowers 

Flower Growers' BIf»ket 

60 Wabash Ave., CHICAGO 

STANDING OBDBB8 SOLICITBD. 

Mention The Review when yon write. 

KRDCHTEN&JOflNSON 

Wholesale Cut Flowers 

51 Wabash Ave , CHICAGO 

ROSES and CARNATIONS OUR SPECIALTIES 

Mention The Review when yon write. 



J.A.BUDL0NG 

37-39 Randolph Street, CHICAGO. 

^"^^io'^o z^T^ flllT Fl AWFRS 

A Specialty 8R0WER if ViU I 1 L V Tf L.I\KJ 

Mention The Review when yoa write. 



SINNER BROS. 
WHOLESALE CUT FLOWERS 

60 Wabash Av*., Chicago 

Careful attention to all 

SHIPPING ORDERS 



Mention The Review when yon write. 



WEILAND 



RISCH 



Wholessle Growers sad Shippers of 

CUT FLOWERS 

50 Wabaah Ave. CHICAGO 

Phone, Central 879. 
Write for our wholesale price list. 



WHOLESALE FLORISTS 



Be Your Own Commission Man 

Sell your owa Stock at the 

FLOWER GROWERS' MARKET 

See PERCT JONSS, Manacer 

60 WABASH AVX., CHICAGO 

Mention The Review when yon write. 



Zech&Mann 

Wholesale Orowere and Shippers of 

CUT FLOWERS 

51 Wabash Ave., Chicago 

moom aiB. &. D. Fhone 3884 OeatxaL 

Mention The Reriew when yon write. 



JTHE NEW SEASON 
IS NOW AT HAND 

Ton can get yonr share ot 
the good hnslness which 
will soon be going on hy 
haTing yonr advertise- 
ment appear reffnlarly in 



J. B. DEAMDD CO. 

Wholesale Florists 

51-53 Wabash Ave., CHIGA60 



Mention The Review when yon write. 



NOW IS THE TIME TO 

BEGIN I 



H 



lOU wiia find... 

ALL the BEST offers 
ALL the time in the Re- 
view's Classified Advs 



--^....->.?f.<H<klA%. 



..' •fJr.i^yKq^Y^ty'^'^T*\^yir:' ^'T" TJf:^ ttt^w^ 



,j.jjj^»fjWj«5^l»,VJi^i,ii|jJ^;^.»W].^.i'i^i^''''''^""i'iHr 



"^^ 



Mabch 7, 1907. 



> 



The Weekly Florists' Review. 



1201 



WHOLESALE CUT FLOWERS 

Valley, American Beautiest Brides and Maids, Sprengeri, Asparagus Plumosus, Carnations and Violets and all seasonable 
flowers* Large stock of Stevia on hand; can supply you at lowest mexkct prices at short notice. All orders will have 
our prompt attention* A trial order will convince you* * Telegraph or telephone when you need Cut Flowers to 

HENRY M. ROBINSON & CO., Uii^StS. 15 Province St., 9 Chapman PI., Boston, Mass. 



Wholesale Gut Flower Prices. 

Oincinnatl, March 6. 

Per 100. 

BeaatleB, Extra $40.00 to 160.00 

No. 1 aO.OOto 80.00 

SbortB 10.00 to 16.00 

Brides and Maids, Extra 12.00 

: :: no.i 8,00 

" No. 2 4.00 

Grolden Gate 4.00to 12.00 

Kalserln 4.00to 12.00 

JJberty 6.00 to 20.00 

Meteor.,,. 4.00to 12.00 

Perle and Sunrise S.OOto 8.00 

OamatioDB 2.00to 6.00 

AsparaKus PlumoBus, Stringa 85.00 to 60.00 

„ " . SprayB 2.00 to 4.00 

„ Sprengerl, - 2.00 to 8.00 

Lllimn Harrisii 12.60to 16.00 

fS^^*f:;.'-^v, i2.60to 16.00 

Lily of the Valley S.OOto 6.00 

9»P"- S.OOto 12.60 

Adlantom 75to 1.60 

Violets^. 50to 1.60 

Baby FrlmroBes 86to .60 

PaperWhltes S.OOto 4.00 

Romans S.COto 4.00 

Tulips S.OOto 400 

Dutch Hyacinths 4.00 to 6.00 



C. E CRITCHELL 

Wholesale Commlaslon Florist 

Cut Flowers 1 Florists' Supplies 

WIRE WORK OF ALL KINDS 

Write for price list. .. Oonsigrnments solicited. 
SO Kast Tblrd St. CINCINNATI, OHIO 

Mention Tbe Eerlew when yoa write. 

LOUIS H.KYRK 

Wholesale Commission Florist 
Cut Flowers and Florists* Suppkies 

Phones. Main 8062. West 855-L. 

110-118 East 8rd St., CindnnaU, O. 

Conslsnments Solicited. 

Mention Tbe Review when yon write. 

ThelMJcGullough'sSonsGo. 

WHOLESALE COMMISSION FLORISTS 

CONSIGNMENTS SOLICITED 

Special attention ^ven to shlppinr orders. 
Jobbers of FloriBts' Supplies, Seeds and 
Bulbs. Price lists on application. 

Phone Main 684. 816 Walnut St. Cincinnatl.O. 
Mention The Heriew when yon write. 

LILIUN 
GIGANTEUM 

Sound bulbs. 7x9. 96 60; 8x9, 17.50 per 100. 
Fine condition in cold storage. 

D. RUSGONI, 32 W. 6th St., Cinciniiafl, 0. 

Mention The Review when yon write. 

YOU WILL 
FIND 



OFFERS 



■ I I THE 

*'•'■ BEST 



ALL 



THE TIRIE 

IN T HE 

REVIEV^ CLASSIFIED ADVS. 

Always Mention the.... 

Florists' Review 

When WrltlnB Advertlaers. 



WELCH BROS.. ^^^ "^^'"'^'""^ ^^■' Boston, Mass. 

■■■■■■^'■' ■•■■^^^^■J Phone 6268, 6267, 5419 Main ^^^^•^•'J BWlfcS^^s 



Vew England Headquarters fov 



Carnations, Violets, Roses, Liiy of tne Valley 

Oarefally selected and packed for long distance shipment. 



Mention Hie Review when yoa write. 



WHOLESALE 
FLORIST... 



G. A. KUEHN 

Cut Flowers and Florists' Supplies 

Manufacturer of the Patent Wire Clamp Floral 
Designs. A full line of SUPPLIES always 
on hand. Write for catalogue and prices, 

1122 Pin* St.. - ST. LOUIS, MO. 

Mention The Review when you write. 




HiCBerning 



WKO&BSA^B 
F^OBIBT, 

1402 Pine Street, 
ST. LOUIS, MO. 

Mention The Review when yon write. 

Wholesale Gut Flower Prices. 

St. Looli, March 6. 

Per doi. 

Beauties, Specials I 5.00to 16.00 

Extra S.OOto 4.00 

Shorts l.OOto 2.00 



Per 100 



Brides and Maids, Specials I S.OOto 

No. 1 e.OOto 

Golden Gate e.OOto 

Richmond S.OOto 

Oamot e.OOto 

Oamations, Oommon iMto 

Fancies 3.00to 

Adiantnm 1.00 to 

Asparagus PlamoBUS, Strings 25.00 to 

Sprays.... l.OOto 
Sprengeri, " .... l.OOto 

Lily of the Valley 2.00 to 

Smllax 12.60 to 

Violeta 26 to 

PaperWhltes S.OOto 

Romans l.OOto 

Oallas 12.60 to 

Freesias 2 CO to 

Dutch Hyacinths 4.00 to 

Tulips S.OOto 



112.60 

8.00 

10.00 

10.00 

10.00 

2.00 

4.00 

1.26 

86.00 

1.60 

8.00 

3.00 

16.00 

.35 

4.00 

S.Ofl 

16.00 

800 

6.00 

4.00 



Milwaukee, March 6. 
Per 100 



Beauties, Medium |16 

Shorts 6. 

Bride and Bridesmaid 6. 

Golden Gate, Obatenay 6. 

Richmond 8, 

Perle 6. 

Oamations 2. 

VaUey 

Violets 

Aiparagua Plumosui, Strings 25. 

;: " Sprays 

Sprengeri, " 

Smilaz 

Adlantum 

PaperWhltes, Romans 

Oallas 

Trumpet Major 

Tulips 



,00 to 
60 to 
.00 to 
00 to 
00 to 
00 to 
00 to 

60 to 
00 to 



118.00 
10.00 
10.00 
10.00 

it.eo 
lo.eo 

4.00 

8.00 

.75 

60.00 
8.00 
8.00 

16.00 
1.00 
8.00 

18.00 
8.00 
8.00 



I THINK the Bi!^EW the best paper 
for floriflts. — George Wolf, Elkins, W. 
Va. 

I LIKE the Review the best of any 
florists' paper. — J. M. Hazlewood, Van- 
couver, B. e. 



Wliolesale Gut Flower Prices. 

Boston, March 6. 
Per 100. 

Beauties, Specials $40.00 to S 60.00 

Extra lO.OOto 25.00 

Short Stems 4.00 to 20.00 

Brides, Specials S.OOto 10.00 

" Seconds 2.00to 8.00 

Bridesmaids, Specials S.OOto 10.00 

Seconds 2.00to 8.00 

Ohatenay 2.00to 10.00 

Wellesley, KiUarney 3.00 to 12.00 

Liberty, Richmond 4.00to 20.00 

Oamations, Special S.OOto 4.00 

Select 2.60 

Ordinary 1.50 to 2.00 

Lily of the VaUey S.OOto 4.00 

Asparagus Plumosus, Strings 80.00 to 60.00 

" Sprays, bunches 26.00 to 60,00 

Sprengeri, bunches... 26.00 

Adlantum Cuneatum 60to 1.00 

Smllax 12.00 

Harrisii S.OOto 10.00 

Violets 16to .60 

Oallas 6.00to S.OO 

Antirrhinum 2.00 to 6.00 

Sweet Peas 25to 1.00 

Mignonette 2.00to 4.00 

Tulips 2.00to S.OO 

Daffodils 1.60to 2.50 



flolton & Bnnkel Co. 



WBOLSSAIilBS Or 



Cut Flowers, Palms, Ferns 

and a General Line of Plants 



Manutactubebs Or 



WIRE WORK AND 
FLORISTS' SUPPLIES 

—Write for Catalog— 

462 Milwaukee St. Miiwaukcc. Wli. 

Mention The Reriew when you write. 

Wm.C.Smith&Co. 

Wholesale Florists 

1816 Pine St. ST. LOUIS 

Both long distance phones. 

Supplies and KverytlilnK In Season 
always on hand. 

Mention The Reriew when yon write. 



THE PIKE'S PEAK 
FLORAL CO. 

Exclug^vfty Vhotesale 

COLORADO SPRINGS, COLO. 



Always mention the Florists* Review 
when wrltlns advertisers. 



,' . -.-™- f^^^^wi^ ■ 



■'^Ty • '™» »^i-T**c^ ^7* yi^'>" 



1202 



The Weekly Rorists' Review. 



MA.RCH 7, 1907. 



LEADING RETAIL FLORISTS. 

The following retail florists are prepared to fill orders from other florists for local delivery od 
the asaal basis. If you wish to be represented under this headinsr now is the time to place your order. 

WILLIAM H. DONOHOE 

SS'iaa-i-i^.. no. 2 west 29th st., as.-!- f new york. 

Special attention to theatre orders. Personal and artistic arrangement. No disappointments in catching; steamers and reliable 
deliveries guaranteed. Special rates for my brother florists from any part of the country. One Trial Sufficient. 



..ORDERS FOR.. 

Chicago 

WILL BE FILLED BT 

P. J. HAUSWIRTH 

13 Congress Street 

A.a<litoriam Annex. Telephone Harrison 585. 

Colberg & Lemke 

2t E. 6th St., St Paul, Minn. 

Prompt attention given all orders for 
the Twin Cities, Minnesota, the Dakotas 
and Montana. 

J. B. BOLAND CO. 

■VCCX880B8 TO 8IIVEBS A BOIiAND 

FLORISTS 

47-49 Geary Street. SAN FRANCISCO, GAL. 

ST. PAUL, MINN. 

Order your flowers for delivery 
in this section from the leading 
Florists of the Northwest. 

L. L. MAY & CO. 



8T. PAUL. MINN 




iJUDE BROS.CO. 
rLORISTS 

1214 r 3T.NW 

VHASHINOTONOC 



WASHINGTON, 
D. C 

GUDE'S 



ORDERS for DULUTH 

and vlelnity will be carefully looked after by 

W.W.SEEKINS 

109 W. Superior St., DULUTH, MINN. 

w. A Xi P iiii 

Carolina Floral Co. 

F. W. KUMMER, Mgr. 

339 King St., Qiar lesion, S. C 

GALVESTON, TEXAS 
MRS. M. A. HANSEN 

T. M. 0. A. BUILDING 



FRED C. WEBER 

4326^28 Olhre Street 
ST. LOUIS, MO. 

will carefully execute orders for St. Louis 
and other towns in Misxouri and IlUnois. 
(EstabUshed 1873.) 

SAMUEL MURRAY 

....FLORIST.... 

1017 Broadway, KANSAS QTY, MO. 

Write, Telephone or Telegraph 
All orders Riven promnt attention. 

JOHN BREITMEYER'S 
SONS 

COR. BROADWAY AND GRATIOT AVE. 

DETROIT, MICH. 

C. C. POLLWORTB CO. 

WBOLBSALK S'LORISTS 
MUw^aukee, Wis. 

r WISCONSIN 



will take proper 
of yonr orders 



CHOICEST FLOWERS 

George H. Berke 

FLORIST 

Local and Long Distance Phones. 
1505 Padfic Ave., ATUNTiC CITY, N. J. 

Doughton & Clark 

396 Boylsfon Street, 

Boston, Mass. 

RETAIL ORDERS SOLICITED FOB 

PITTSBURG, PA. 

H* L* Blind & Bros. 

30 FIFTH STREET 

Careful and Prompt Attention to Out-of-town Orders. 

Geo. M. Kellogg 

Wlioletale and Retail llorlst 
906 Grand Ave., KANSAS CITY, MO. 

All Kinds of CUT FLOWERS 

tn their season. Also Rose and Carnation plants 
In season. Greenhouses at Pleasant Hill. Mo. 



TOUR ORDKR8 FOR 

EVERY DEPARTMENT Of FLORAL ART 

are earnestly solicited and my personal atten- 
tion will be Klven even to the smallest detail. 

A. WARENDORFF 

1198 Broadway 1474 Broadway, 
Hadlson Ave. and 71«t St., IfSW YORK 

David Clarke's Sons 

8139-2141 Broadway 
Tel. 1538*1558 Columbu* 

New York City 

Out-of-town orders for delivery fn New York 
carefully and promptly filled at reasonable rates. 

LEIKENS 

7 East 88rd Street 

Belmont Hotel, 48Bd St., New York 

MKWPORT, R. X. 

eV'Orders from any part of the country filled 
carefully and at wholesale prices. 




Buffalo, N. Y. 

W. J. Palmer *goa, 804 MalaHt. 



MillsThc Florist 

36 W. Forsyth Street 
JACKSONVILLE, FLA. 




Wholesale and Retail Florist 

AMSTERDAM. NEW YORK 

The Park Floral Co. 

J. A. VALENTINB. 
Pres. 

DENVER, COLORADO 

Mrs. M. E. Hollcraft 

807 Kan«u Ave.,TOPEKA. KAN. 

FOR OTHER LESDING 

RETAIL FLORISTS 

SEE NEXT PAGE. 



:. ■v'^'t;;T''vry^ 



Mabch f, 1007. 



The Weekly Florists^ Review* 



1203 



LEADING RETAIL FLORISTS. 

Th^ foUowlDgr retail florists are prepared to fill orders from other florists for local delivery on 
the usual basis. If you wish to be represented under this headiugr now is the time to place your order. 



Alexander NcConnell 



571 riFTH AVENUE, Windsor Arcade 



NEW YORK CITY 



Telegraph orders forwarded to any part of the United States, Canada and all principal cities of Europe. Orders transferred or intrusted by 
_ _ the trade to our selection for delivery on sieamsbips or elsewhere receive special attention. 

Telephone Calls: 340 and 341 38th Street. Cable Adddress: AL.UXCONNBL.L.. Western Union Code. 



BROOKLYN, 



NBW JERSEY. | Deliveriea Anywhere j 



NEW YORK, 

LONG ISLAND. 

Trade orders well cared for from all parts of the Country, and delivered at Theatre, Hotel, Steamer 

or Residence. Address 

ROBERT G. WILSON 

taum St. and Greene Ave. ,r„^f'jS!'r.ii 4om BROOKLYN, N. Y. 



Established in 1857. 



FLOMUST 



J657-J659 Buckingham Place 



L. D. Phone 
568 Lake View. 



CHICAGO 



Send UK your retail orders. We 
have the best facilities in the city. 



609-611 

Madison 

Avenue 



MYER 

New York 



Lonff 
Distance 
Phone, 
(297 Plaza 



THAT'S OUR BUSINESS 

$25,000.00 last year. We can care for more 
orders in this vicinity. Write or wire. 

Alpha Floral Co. 

KANSAS QTY, MO. 

LI IVIf=PP Florist, 218 6th St. 
I. nCiry PITTSBURG, PA. 

Personal attention Riven to ont-of-town 
orders for delivery In Plttsbur? and vicinity 

ATLANTA FLORAL Co. 

41 Peachtfee St., ATLANTA, GA. 

.;• ;• BENEKE 

1216 Olhre St, ST. LOUIS, MO. 

Geo. S* Murtfeldt 

MINNEAPOLIS, MINN. 

PORTLAND, OREGON 

CLABKE BROS.. 289 Morrlsoi a 

S. B. STEWART 

U9 No. 16tli Sbeet, OMAHA. NEE 



WILLIAM L ROCK 

FLOWER CO. 

Kansas City, - Mo. 

will carefully execute orders 
for Kansas City and any 
town in Missouri or Kansas. 



U. J. VIRGIN 

S3S Canal Street New Orleans, La. 

STEAMER SAILINGS. 

The tide of European travel has again 
set in. It will gather volume as the 
spring advances and promises to be 
lieavier than ever as summer approaches. 
Eetail florists can add to their business 
with no greater trouble to themselves 
than the posting of a list of steamer 
sailings in the window. Or tell in a neat 
circular that you have facilities for the 
delivery of flowers on any outgoing 
steamer. Then mail or wire the orders 
to be filled to one of the Leading Retail 
Florists in the Review. 

Steamer — From — To — Sails. 

K. Wm. II... New York .Bremen Mar. 12 

Potsdam New York . Rotterdam Mar. 13 

Baltic New Y'ork .Liverpool ..Mar. i;i 

United States New York . Cbrlstlania Mar. 14 

l*lsa Baltimore ..Hamburg ..Mar. 14 

Arcadia Philadelphia Hamburg ..Mar. 10 

Deutschland .New York .Plymouth ..Mar. 16 

Momus New Orleans. Havana ...Mar. 16 

New Amster'm.New York .Itotterdam .Mar. 20 

Sloterdyk Norfolk Rotterdam .Mar. 20 

Bethanla Boston Hamburg ..Mar. 20 

Majestic New York .Liverpool ..Mar. 20 

C. F. Tletgen. . New York . Chrlstlanla Mar. 21 

Cedrlc New York .Liverpool ..Mar. 22 

Koenlgen LulseNew York .Naples Mar. 2:5 

AciUa Baltimore ..Hamburg ..Mar. 2:? 

Campania New York .Liverpool ..Mar. 2."? 

St. Louis New York .Southamp'D Mar. 2."? 

Momus New Orleans Havana ...Mar. 23 

Amerlka New York . Plymouth . . Mar. 23 

Kronprlnz ....New York .Bremen Mar. 26 

Statendam ...New York .Rotterdam .Mar. 27 

Oceanic New York .Liverpool ..Mar. 27 

Oscar II New York . Christlania Mar. 28 

Zeelend New York .Antwerp ...Mar. 30 

Penna New York . Plymouth . .Mar. 30 

Ktrurl.T New York .Liverpool ..Mar. 30 

Cymric Boston Liverpool . . Mar. .^0 

Philadelphia New York . Southamp'n Mar. .30 

Bosnia Philadelphia Hamburg ..Mar. 30 

Momus New Orleans Havana Mar. .30 

Rapallo Boston Hamburg . . Mar. 31 

Kaiser New York .Bremen Apr. 2 

Amsteldyk ...Norfolk Rotterdam .Apr. :*. 

Lucanla New Y'ork .Liverpool ...\pr. 6 

Waldersee ...New York .Plymouth ..Apr. 

Celtic New York .Southamp'n .Apr. 

K. Wm. II New York .Bremen ....Apr. 9 

P. Irene New York .Naples ....Apr. 20 

Cymric Boston Liverpool . . . .\pr.25 



NORTH PACIFIC COAST 



The H* Harrington Co» 

9J2 SECOND AVE. 
SEATTLE^ WASH, 

S. MASIR 

Brooli:lyii,N.Y. 



FLOBIST 
888 FoltOB St. 

Near Clark St. 

Te'..s:H4Mali>. 



Write, Wire or Plione Your Orders to 

YOUNGS' 

1406 Olive St., ST. LOUIS. MO. 

Resrular discount allowed on all orders, either 
Plants or Cut Flowers. 

Pbones: Bell, Main 2306; Kinlock, Central4981. 
Send orders for delivery 

IN OHIO TO 

GRAFF BROS. 

COLUMBUS, OHIO 

In the exact center of the state. 

JULIUS BAER 

J38-J40 E. Fourth St. 
Lonj; Distance Phone. 

Cincinnati^ Ohio 

Young &Nugent 

42 W. 28th St., New York 

We are in the theatre district and also have 
exceptional facilitiea for delivering: flowers on 
uut^oln? steamers. Wire us your orders; they 
win receive prompt and careful attention. 

E. O. LOVELL %l^ 

will give prompt attention KT_^4.t, T\-l.-,i.<, 
to all orders for delivery in INOftn U2ifLO\2^ 

Orders for MINNESOTA or the Northwest wiU 
be properly executed by 

AUG. S. SWANSON, Si Paul Minn. 
LOUISVILLE, KY. 

Personal attention grlven to out-of-town orders 
for Louisville. Ky., and its vicinity. 



JACOB SCHULZ,^*^"*^"*"^*- 



LoulavUle. Ky. 



Always mention the Florists' Review when 
writing advertisers. 



afni^/ahfiW^-*--*! iM-iSiiilfMtM t-''i''rta'nil'i a •!** ■' *- ^-*^^.lfc^ flV.^ 



■^* S-!^' -M/lsSji^ ^--L-A4u. »k ^. ^^AI.>V .y^.J 



-"? ,!r7 ' 



' nf-^i ^ 'innviTi^ >f>.vrr'.,"'i'.."('^.yiiiFri.if i,..ij[^fii^(n^j^»; 



1204 



The Weekly Florists^ Review* 



Mabch 7, 1007. 



200,000 
CALLA BULBS 

Orders now bonked (or July, August 
and September. 

AMITTINC ^7 to 83 Kennan St. 
■ ml I I inU) SANTA CRCZ. CAL. 

Mention The Review when you write. 

PACIFIC COAST. 



SAN FRANOSOO. 



The Market 



Lent is here in full force and the 
results are noticeable in our line of busi- 
ness. The demand for colored stock is 
limited, although there has been no ap- 
preciable oversupply of light colored 
carnations or roses. Enchantress, Pros- 
perity and all the fancy light colored 
flowers offered have been sold quickly 
enough, and the same can be said of 
Brides and Maids. Beauties are few and 
far between in San Francisco at present. 
It looks as though the growers were all 
out of season at this time with their 
supplies. Bulbous stock is scarcer, al- 
though we still have a fair stock of late 
flowering narcissi and quite a few tulips 
are seen. Valley is plentiful and moves 
slowly. Violets are to be had in any 
quantity and the price remains the same. 

Wild maidenhair is coming into town 
in large quantities, much to the relief 
of the retailers, who have had much dif- 
ficulty in getting enough adiantum re- 
cently. 

Business is about as good as can be 
expected at this time and there is a fair 
supply of funeral orders enjoyed by the 
retailers. Over in Oakland business is 
well up to the handle and no complaints 
have been received recently on that score. 

The plant trade is now at its height 
and florists who handle these as well as 
cut flowers are very busy. 

Various Notes. 

W. H. Mann, the Pinole florist, is in 
town. He reports everything booming 
in his locality. 

Hutchings & James will make a spe- 
cialty of poinsettias for the coming sea- 
son. They are splendidly located at 
Elmhurst to handle the wholesale trade. 

Frank Shibeley and Alexander Mann 
have opened in good shape at 1203 Sut- 
ter street. They will carry a full line of 
florists' supplies. 

Domoto Bros, will be in line with three 
houses of Easter lilies. Their stock looks 
well at present. 

J. L. Dorris will take a trip to Los 
Angeles and the southern portion of the 
state in a few days. He expects to be 
absent a month. 

Arnold Eingier, representing W. W. 
Barnard Co., of Chicago, is in town. 

G. 



PLANT TRADE AT FBISCO. 

The effect on trade in the line of 
small plants in San Francisco has not 
been as bad by our late catastrophe as 
was predicted by many people. The plant 
line at present is fully as good as it has 
ever been. There is a good demand for 
stock and prices are better than for 
many years. The retail dealers are hav- 
ing a harvest, as it is doubtful if there 
was ever a season on this coast where 
there was so much stock moving. This 



Young 



Plants 



All propagfated from wood taken from plants in the field. 
This is the same stock as we are now planting^ in the field. 

NOTK OUR LOW PRICK ON HYBRID PKRFKTUALS. 



Special Net Cash Prloea. 



Variety 25 100 

Baby Rambler $1.25 WOO 

Beauty of Glazenwood 65 2 50 

Bessie Brown 75 2.50 

Bride 65 2.60 

Bridesmaid fi6 2.50 

Burbank C5 2 00 

Catherine Mermet B5 2.50 

Cecil Brunner (S 2.50 

Chromatella (Cloth of Gold) . . .«5 2 50 

Cherokee 65 2.25 

Climbing Belle Siebrecht 65 2 50 

Climbingr Bridesmaid 65 2.50 

Climbirg Cecil Brunner 65 2.50 

ClimbingrMme. C. Testout... .75 3.00 

Climtiing: Malmaison 75 2.50 

Climbingr Marie Guillot 65 2 50 

Climbing Meteor 65 2.50 

Climbing Wootton 65 2.50 

Dorothy Perkins 65 2 50 

Francisca Kruger 65 2.50 

Gainsborough 70 3.00 

Gen. Jacq 65 2.50 

Gloire de Dijon 75 3.50 



1000 
950.00 
20.00 
22.00 
22.00 
22.00 
20.00 
22.00 
25 00 

20 00 
22 00 
25 00 
25 00 
27.00 



22.00 
20 00 
22.00 

25.00 



Variety 

Grass an TepHtz tO, 

Hermosa 

James Sprant 

lubilee 

Killamey 1. 

Lamarque 

Mme. Alf . Carriere 

Mme. de Vatry 

Mme. Lambard 

Mme. Wagram 

Magna Charta 

Maman Cochet 

M. P. Wilder 

Marquis de Querhoent 

Mrs. Robt. Garreit 

Phil Cochet 

Prince Camille de Rohan. .. 

Reine Marie Henriette 

Reved'Or 

Ulrich Brunner 

White Maman Cochet 

Wm. Allen Richardson , 



25 


100 


1000 


.65 


$2.50 


$20.00 


.(>!> 


2.50 




.(•A 


2.50 




,75 


2.50 


25.00 


.00 


4.00 




.65 


250 


25.00 


.65 


2.50 




.<'>5 


2.50 




M 


250 




.65 


2.50 


22.50 


.ti5 


2 75 


25.00 


.65 


2 50 


18.00 


.75 


2.50 


25.00 


.(» 


2.50 


25.00 


.fi5 


2.50 




.(•)5 


2.50 




.75 


2.50 


25.00 


.65 


2 50 


20.00 


.66 


2.50 


25.00 


.75 


2.50 


25.00 


.65 


2.50 


20 00 


.65 


2.50 


25.00 



CALIFORNIA ROSE CO., Inc., Pomona, Cal. 

(Formerly of Los Aneelea) 

Mention The Reylew vrhen yon write. ^^^ 



Choice Asparagus Plumosus Seed 

win not be as plentiful as anticipated earlier in 
the season and we are compelled to revise our 
prices to meet the changed conditions. No 
orders can be accepted for over 100,000 from one 
firm. Prices for present delivery are as fol- 
lows: 1000 seeds, $2.00; 6000 seeds, $10.00; 18.000 
seeds, $20.00; 26,000 seeds, $li6.00; 50,000 seeds, 
$65.00! 100,000 seeds, $110 00. V. GILMAN TATLOB 
SEED CO. (Inc.), Box 9, Glendale, Cal. 

Mention The Review when you write. 

SHASTA DAISIES 

ALASKA, CALIFORNIA, WESTRALIA 

stronr. field-irrown divisions, true to name, 

$2.60 per 100. Express paid for cash with order. 

The Leedham Bulb Co., Santa Cmz, Cal. 

Mention The Review when you write. 

is not especially noticeable in any one 
line, but the infection apparently has 
struck almost everything. There are so 
few really good nurseries on the coast, 
and such demands are being made on 
them, that they will have little to do 
business with after the season is over. 

Even heavy ornamental stock, such as 
sidewalk trees, hardy palms, cedars and 
material that usually takes many years 
to become salable, has been well cleaned 
out and it will be several seasons, even 
under the best of circumstances, before 
the young stock again will be large 
enough to make a showing. 

The facilities for importing stock from 
the east are so inadequate and the time 
of arrival so uncertain at present that 
many of our largest growers have bought 
sparingly in the east and Europe. This 
also has a tendency to make growing 
stock scarce and as there is no imme- 
diate relief in sight, the effect is bad 
for heavy planting of imported stock. 

Another feature is that large tracts of 
land in the vicinity of our cities, form- 
erly devoted to the nursery business, 
have been cleared off and cut up into 
town lots. This has been the fate of 
several large places in the neighborhood 
of San Francisco this year and the 



SHASTA DAISY 

Alaska, California and Westralia, extra atronff 
field divisions, from divisions of Mr. Burbank'* 
original stock, $2.60 per 100; $22.50 per 1000. Small 
plants, iust right for 3-inch pots, $1.26 per lOOi 
$11.00 per 1000. 

Cyolamen Per. Gleantenm, 2-in., $6 per 100. 

Cineraria, Prize Strain, 4-inch, $4.00 per 100. 

Shasta Daisy Seeds of Alaska, California 
and Westralia only, 50c per 1000; $3.60 per oz. 

Petnnia Giants of California, a good strain, 
60c per 1000; $1.60 per H oz.; $10.00 per oz. 

Champion Strain — After years of careful 
■election and hand fertilizing, using only tho 
most perfect flower for that purpose, I have at 
last obtained a strain that cannot be surpassed 
by anyone. Trial pkt. of 260 seeds, 26c ; 1000 seeds, 
75c; H oz., $2.60; oz., $16.00. Cash please. 

Hybrid Delphiniam, Burbank's Strain, all 
shades of blue. This strain Las been much 
improved the past year. 25c per lOOO seeds; 
$1.60 per oz. 

Send for list of other seeds to 

FRKD GROHB, Sante Rosa, Cal. 

B^^CBC Field'Orown, liOwBndded, 
■CV9I-9 Two Tears Old. Well Rooted. 

CIlmbinK Rosea— Papa Oontler, $1.00 each. 
Mme. Caroline Testout, $18.00 per 100. Kaiserin 
Aurusta Victoria, $13.00 per 100. Beauty of Bu- 
rope, $10 00 per 100. Bridesmaid, $10.00 per 100. 

American Beanty, $18.00 per 100. 

Hme. Caroline Testoat, $13.00 per 100. 

Fran Karl Dmsohkl, $30.00 per 100. 
Send for Rose Price List. 

Ft lll^B^AA Aaiai 8041 Baker St. 
• LULPCniAninisanFranoisco,Cal. 

Mention The Review when yon write. 

chances are that several others will fol- 
low suit in the near future. 

I have not referred to the cut flower 
growers in this article, confining myself 
rather to the plant growers and nurserj- 
men. From indications, however, it is 
perfectly safe to predict that they will 
also have prosperous times and that th© 
idea of overproduction is ridiculous. 
There is more demand for good stock 
than ever in this locality and there is 
no danger of too much good stock. G. 



The Beview is everything one could 
desire. One would think it could not 
possibly be improved, still it does seem 
better every year. — Taos. Waqstait, 
Lake Forest, 111. 



i^iii-^^ii^^^L.'j^ 



T^T''^'*ir'<' ~ ^^^ ■• ' 'n' •■ ' ,'"^^V V^ •^-"T?-?* !}-• .'^-•^.' I IV'Wf^'SiT?' "tS-n^ ■ -^: 



Makcu 7, lOOi 



TheWeckly Horists' Review* 



1205 



BUSINESS ANNOUNCEMENT 



We wish to announce to the trade 
that we are located in Partridge, 
Minn . where we will be engaired in 
RrowinK and selling Seeds. Plants, 
Trees and Small Fruit, and beg to 
be placed on your mailing list for 
Catalogues, Wholesale and Surplus 
Lists. 

Respectfully, 

Ludvi^ Mosbaek & Sons, 

PARTRIDGE. MINN. 
March 1, 1907. 

V / 

Mention The Review when you write. 

Rhododendron 

Maximum ■^-^ 
KALMIA LATIFOLIA 

Finest stock in America, any size from one foot 
to 10 feet high, well furnished from top to bottom. 
Special prices will be (luoted on iar»e orders. 

Also full line of Fruit Trees, Vines and 
Plants; large quantity of Rock or Sucar 
Maple, 8 to 20 feet high. 1 to 3 inches in caliper. 

lUuhtrated catalogue and price lUt of Kbodo- 
dendrons free lor the a«king. Can furnish any 
quantity of Rhododendrons wanted of any size, 
write us. 

THE RIVERSIDE NURSERY CO. 

CONFLUENCE, PA. 

Mention The Review when you write. 

TREE SEEDLINGS, Etc, 

60,000 Snsrar Maple Seedlings, C-12-in., 16.00 

per 1000. 
20,000 Snsar Maple Seedlings, 2-8-ft., tS.OO per 

100; t26.L0 pei TOOU. 
&,C0O Tollp Foplar, 4-U-ft., $6.00 per 100; 150.00 

per lOUO. 
5,000 Catalpa Speclosa, 4-5 ft., 13.00 per 100; 

125.00 per 1000. 
2,000 Swret Gam, C-8-ft., tlO.OO per 100; $90.00 

per 1000. 



fi,000 Ilex Opnco, (American Holly), 3-4-in., 14.00 

per 100; $25.00 p^r 1000. 
10,000 Novae-AiiKliae Aster, stron?, $3.00 per 



per 100: $25.00 per 1000. 
Early shipment. Send for our Special Surplus 
List of Bargains. 

BLL8W0BTH BBOWN A CO., Seabrook, N. H. 

Mention The Review when you write. 

Rose Plants 

on own roots. VOW BEADT. 
Ost onr list before bnylnir- 

C. M. NIUFFER. Springfield, Ohio 

Mention The Review when you write. 

Nanetti 

STOCKS, now ready. $8.50 per 1000. ■ 

ELIZABETH NURSERY CO. 

ElUabeth, N. J. 

MentlOT The Review when you write. 



LARGE TREES 

OAKS and MAPLES. PINKS and 
HKMLOCK8. 

ANDORRA NURSERIES, 

Wm. Warner Harper. Prop. 
C!h«atnnt BSa, Phlladelpbia, Pa. 



NURSERY NEWS. 

AHIBICAN ASSOCIATION OF NUB8EBIMEN. 

Prea., Orlando Harriaon, Berlin, Md.; Vlce- 
Prea., J. W. Hill, Dea Moines, la.; Sec'y, Geo. O. 
Seaver, Bocheater; Treas. C. L. Tatea, Bocheater. 
The 83d annual convention will he held at De- 
troit, Mich.. June, 1807. 



The demise of James B. Ennis, Bloom- 
ington, 111., is chronicled in the obituary 
column. 

The nursery catalogues are now in full 
flight, and better printed, better illus- 
trated and more numerous than ever. 

The demise of Frank Yahnke, propri- 
etor of the Pleasant Valley Nursery^ 
Winona, Minn., is reported in the obitu- 
ary column this week. 

There is reported to be a brisk de- 
mand for peonies that have been heeled 
in over winter, but no one recommends 
spring planting of peonies except on the 
theory that the maxim that ' ' a bird in 
the hand is worth two in the bush" ap- 
plies also to orders. 

The Peterson Nursery, Chicago, re- 
ports an excellent local, business ; so good, 
in fact, that they are not devoting the 
time they once did to the wholesale end. 
They have planted an unusual number of 
large specimens this winter, several hav- 
ing been hauled forty miles from the 
nursery. 

EosA RUGOSA makes a hedge of at- 
tractive appearance from early summer 
right up until winter sets in. The beau- 
tiful flowers of this most accommodating 
rose make a hedge of it especially de- 
sirable, not only on places where it is an 
aim to have something bright and out of 
the ordinary run of hedges, but it also 
appeals to planters who have occasion 
to plant where few things thrive well. 
Rosa rugosa does well almost anywhere 
and in any kind of soil. After the flow- 
ers pass away the seed berries mature 
rapidly and soon pretty nearly take the 
place of the flowers in point of attract- 
iveness. 



EUONYMUS. 



Mention The Review when yon write. 



Euonymus radicans is one of the best, 
if not the very best, climbing plant for 
many purposes, for covering buildings, 
although, perhaps, not so softly pleasing 
as English ivy or Amphelopsis Veitchii, 
it is, nevertheless, better than either of 
these; better than English ivy because 
it does not need the protection in winter 
that the latter does, and better than 
Amphelopsis Veitchii because it is an 
evergreen and, for that reason, especially 
desirable for use in cities and in the 
suburbs of cities, where anything green 
in winter is quite a consideration. This 
euonymus is desirable also because of its 
tenacity in clinging to whatever it is 
placed against. 

Euonymus radicans argenteo-variega- 
tus in habit much resembles the former 
and green variety, but as its name im- 
plies, the foliage is brightly variegated. 
This variety is much used for edging 
large and formal beds, for which purpose 
it is invaluable, not only because of its 
being suitable, but also because it grows 
into such a dense mass that the soil in 
the bed may be piled against it without 
injury. On the contrary, it thrives bet- 
ter when the soil is up to it in that way. 
It can be clipped or sheared in any way 
desirable. This euonymus, like the green 



Going down 

this column * 

you will likely find what you need in 

own O^CPd P<*^- 

rwi V A fi V,4-\iy. 2^-ln. 4-ln. 

•■■ * •^ w • 100 1000 lOO 

Bridesmaid $;V0O $25 00 $800 

Duchess de Brabant 3 00 25.00 

Etolle <Je Lyon 3 00 '2'.M 10 00 

Golden Gate .'l.oo 25 00 s.oo 

Ivory 300 250(1 

Mile Franclsca Krue?«r 3 00 25 00 8.(M) 

Maman Cochet (Pink) 300 25 00 7 00 

MarleGuillot 3 00 25 00 

Marie van Houtte 3 00 25 00 h.(hi 

Papa Gentler 3 (X) 25 00 s (H) 

Tiie Bride 3 (X) 25.(H) 

White Maman Cochet 3(K) ','5.00 s(mi 

BOURBON. 

Hermosa 3.tMi "Sim s.oo 

BENGAL or CHINA. 

Queen's Scarlet 3.00 •,'5.(H) 10.00 

CLIMBING NOISETTES. 

Lamarque 3.00 25.00 «.00 

Marechal Nlel 3..')0 WOO 15.00 

Rplne Marie Henrlette 3.00 25.00 »M 

Solfaterre 3 00 2500 800 

Wm. Allen RlchardBon 3.00 25 00 8.00 

CLIMBING HYBRID POLYANTHA. 

Climhini: Soupert 3.00 25.00 

HYBRID POLTANTHA. 

Clothilde Soupert 3.00 25.00 H.OtJ 

HYBRID BENGAL. 

GrusB an Teplltz 3.50 •.>;.,-.o 

HYBRID TEAS. 

Bessie Brown 3 00 •.'5 00 lu.OO 

Etollede France 10 00 100 00 

HelenGould 300 25 00 10.00 

Kaiserlu Augusta Victoria 3 00 ;«).oo 10 00 

La Prance (Pink) 3 (X) 27 50 10.00 

Madam Abel Chat(>niiy 3.00 27 .50 

Meteor 3 00 25 00 lO.OO 

Richmond 500 45 00 1.5.0tl 

Souvenir du Pres. Carnoi 3.00 30.00 1000 

White La France 8.00 

HARDY CLIMBERS and RAMBLERS. 

Baby Rambler 3.00 :M)00 15.00 

Crimson Rambler 3.00 25 1X1 8.00 

Dorothy Perkins 3 00 25.00 10 00 

Pink Rambler 3.00 2500 8.00 

Yellow Rambler 3.00 2i>.00 8.(X) 

HYBRID PERPETUALS. 

American Beauty (> 00 18 nO 

Anna de Dlesbach .UM :tO(xi idoo 

Baron a e Bonstetten : 2.00 

Clio 3.'M ifO.OO 1000 

Dinsmure 3.50 :«).00 10.00 

Prau Karl Druschki 10.00 IHI.lXl 

Gen. JacQuemlnot 3..'>0 30.00 12.0(» 

Gloin^ Lyonnaise 3.50 :X).0O 12.UI 

Jublloe 4.00 :«.ix) 12.00 

Madam Charles Wood 3..50 WOO 10.00 

MadamMasHon 3 50 :iUOO 

Ma^naCharta 3,50 ;«).(X) 10.00 

Margaret Dickson 5 00 4.5.00 l.i.Wt 

Mrs. John Laing 3 50 ;{5.00 10.00 

Paul Ne.vron 3..50 ;i0.00 12.1X) 

Roger Lam belin 3..t0 W.OO 12.00 

TJlrich Brunner .5,00 45.00 1.5.00 

Vick's Caprice 3.50 iMMX) lO.(X) 

TRAILING. 

Wichuraiana (Memorial) 3 00 25 00 12.(Xi 



All strongly rooted, vigorous and Imalthy. 

Young plants propagated In early Summer and 
two-year-olda potted In Fall of ISXXi; wintered 
cool In new houses free from disease. 

Order at once or send your want list to 

<<LEEDLE^^S 



m-uThiimir'-'''^'^-^*'"*- ' 



^^-■^"•-•fc*"*^-*-^---' ■• 



ifftiiiiirTi I '1 



n I iirii^-'-'-'^""-^'-' 



•''*■- •^-' 



' If -a 'M 'tait fc 



-•^ ■'" *- 



_...l^_l '.^..i.^-. 



1206 



The Weekly Florists' Review^ 



March 7, 1907. 



Fancy Peonies, Extra Cheap 

200 plants of each, ** heeled in" in sand. Not lesa than 26 of a kind at price 
given, lor strong^ divisions of tfeo to four eyes. Ship anytime. Order at once. 



Duchetse de Nemours^ white, no markings each, 20c 



Mme. de Verneville, fragrant, full white . 
La Tulipe, fancy striped white . . 
Edulis Superba, earliest pink .... 
I^. Bretonneau, mid-season pink . 



25c 
25c 
15c 
15c 



Delicatissima, deep flesh pink each, 20c 

M. Boucharlataine, American Beauty shade ** 20c 

Delachei, best dark red ** 15c 

200 mixed pink ** 8c 

200 mixed red ** 10c 



SUBJECT TO STOCK BEING UNSOLD. 



PETERSON NIRSERY, Lincoln aod Peterson Aves., CHICA60 



Mention The Review when you write. 



variety, is much used in cemeteries for 
the ornamentation and outlining of plats. 
Both varieties are propagated from cut- 
tings. K. E. 

ANOTHER BCXJIE. 

The newspapers in Pennsylvania and 
New Jersey are much wrought up over 
a rumor of a nurserymen's trust and 
will not be reassured by the fact that 
they can find no evidence, even of the 
organization of another of the trade as- 
sociations which are so numerous. 

The Trenton Gazette of February 28 
says: 

New Jersey and Pennsylvania nurserymen are 
greatly Interested lu a project to form a com- 
bination to control the entire ornamental nursery 
products of the United States. W. H. Moon, of 
Morrlsvllle, Is said to be Interested in the 
project, but refused to discuss the matter last 
night. 

An organization has been formed. It Is re- 
ported, and It has been named the National 
Association of Ornamental Nurserymen. The 
association held a meeting in New York a short 
time ago and another session is scheduled to 
take place in the same city In the near future. 
The association Is keeping its plans secret for 
the present, but it Is understood that the ob- 
jects are to get every ornamental nurseryman In 
the United States into the association. 

On the same day the Philadelphia 
Public Ledger said: 

Members of the Pennsylvania State Nursery- 
men's Association, which met in secret session 
in the Hotel Walton yesterday afternoon, denied 
that they planned a nurserymen's trust. They 
safd that they favored legislation now pending 
at Harrlsburg, the purpose of which is to create 
a state department of pomology. 

George Achells and Abner Hoopes. of West 
Chester, attended the meeting in the Walton. 
Both were seen in their homes In West Chester 
last night, and both denied that the trust plans 
had been forwarded at the Walton meeting. 
W. H. Moon, of Morrlsvllle, refused to discuss 
the proposed trust, although he said that the 
Walton meeting was to aid the state department 
of pomology plan alone. 

If the "ornamental" nurserymen or- 
ganize we ' ' trust ' ' they ' will do the 
purists the favor of calling it the As- 
sociation of Dealers in Ornamental 
Nursery Stock. 



HARDY ORNAMENTAL SHRUBS. 

The National Council of Horticulture 
says that too much cannot be said to en- 
courage the planting of hardy shrubs to 
decorate home grounds. Great igno- 
rance prevails concerning the varieties 
which are most adapted to the climatic 
conditions in the extreme northern part 
of the United States. The varieties given 
hereafter are chosen as being among the 
best. 

The lilac is early blooming and re- 
mains green in northern latitudes long 
after many other deciduous shrubs have 
shed their leaves. In May its trusses of 
fragrant blossoms give evidence that 



GRAFTED ROSES 

MONEY-MAKERS FOR COMMERCIAL GROWERS 



Our list includes only the most profitable commercial varieties for forcinf;— no "bas- 
beens" nor "freaks." (Consult the Flower Market reports and see what the sellers are.) 
Here is our list: 



F«r 100 

RICHMOND $10.00 

CHATENAY 12.00 

BRIDE 12.00 

BRIDESMAID 12.00 

UNCLE JOHN 12.00 

GOLDEN GATE 12.00 



Per 100 

KILLARNEY $16.00 

WELLESLEY 12.00 

KAISERIN 12.00 

CARNOT 12.00 

IVORY 12.00 

MISS KATE MOULTON.. 16.00 



These are the market's top-notchers. Our plants are vrrafted on the best 
selected Engrllsh Manetti stocks, and we are booking orders now for early delivery or 
when wanted. 

THK 1907 NOVKLTIES— Lady Gay, Minnehaha and Hiawatha, can be had 

in strong stock; descriptions and prices on request. 



8PECIAL-AMKRICAN BEAUTT- 

plants for forcing, at $12.00 per 100. 



•2 years, dormant, (field-grown) budded, fine 



^. 



CELLAR-STORED SHRUBS, VINES, ETC., in full assortment, ready for ini> 
mediate shipment. Send for complete price list. 

JACKSON & PERKINS CO., NEWARK, NEW YORK 

Nurserymen and Florists. Wholesale only. 



Mention The Review when you write. 



Trees, Shrubs and Privet 



Large Lindens, Birch, Catalpas, Oal<s, Maples, 
etc. One of the largest stocks of Evergreens 
in this country. 
76,000 Azalea Amoena of all sizes, 5c to $3.00 ea. 

Herberts Thnnbergli, 12 to 18-in., per 100 $5.00 

18to24-in.. " .... 8.00 

2-ft., " ....lo.eo 

2to3-ft., " ....12.00 

Special prices on Spiraea Van Honttel and 

yirbamnm Plicatnm in quantities. 
Deotzla Lemoine, extra heavy, $7.00 per 100. 
Caryopterls Blastaeanthna, field-grown, $6.00 
per 100. 



Japan Maples, 5 to 6 ft., see wholesale list. 

Privet, 3 to 4- ft perlOOO, $30.00 

4to5-ft " 40.00 

5to6-ft '• 50.00 

Privet Begellana, 18 to 24-in per 100, $5.00 



2to3-lt. 
2 to 3 ft. high and 2 to 
across, $10.00 per 100. 
600,000 Herbaceous Plants. 

wholesale list. 
Large Wistaria, 5-year-old, $20.00 per 100. 
Dogwood of all sizes. 
Catalpa Bangel of all sizes. 



6.50 
8 ft. 



Send for our 



ELIZABETH NURSERY CO., Elizabeth, N. J. 



Mention The Review when yon write. 



summer is near. Prom the common lilac, 
which is in almost every garden, there 
have been produced more than 150 vari- 
eties, of which the following are the 
finest: Ludwig, Spsith, purple; Dr. 
Lindley, large, purple; Charles X, rose 
color; Marie Legraye, white; Rouen, 
feathery white; Persian and Japan tree 
lilac. 



Bush honeysuckles are strong, hardy 
shrubs which bloom early and in the 
autumn have bright red or orange ber- 
ries. Among the choicest varieties may 
be mentioned: Grandiflora, pinlc flow- 
ers; grandiflora alba, white; splendens, 
dark red; orientalis, large, attractive 
fruit. 

Spiraeas are among the most satisfac- 



.MtOAM ■^■"■/^■^■'■t-'i-'-lfu ... ■- ; --W.} ^t.-'-tila^ -:^ Lj^.-t-^.^J^ . .- ■ J^. 



■•<T.- f-r^lf. ^■' 



-J- ,v- 



March 7, 1907. 



The Weekly Florists' Review. 



1207 



Forciflg Plants 

Spiraea Van Houttei 
Azaleas - 

Lilac Rubra de Marley 
DettUia Gracilis 
Qimson Rambler 
Magna Charta Rose 
General Jacq* Rose 



Pyramidal Box Trees, 4-5 feet. Barberry Thunbergii 



Nursery Stock 



Supplied 
to 



Florists 



Trees, Shrubs, Roses, Clematis, Evergreens 



Send for our wholesale trade list. 



W. A T. Smitii Co., Geneva, N.Y. 



BERBERIS THUNBERGII 

12-18-Inch $6.00 per 100; $50.00 per 1000 

18-24-inch 8.00 per 100; 70.00 per 1000 

CAROLINA POPLARS 

8-10 feet $10.00 per 100; $80.00 per 1000 

10-12 feet 12.80 per 100; 100.00 per 1000 

Large stock and fine stufl. Sure to please. 
Send for price list of general stock. 

Aurora Nursery Co., Aurora* 111. 

Mention The Review when yon write. 

American White Elm 

Extra fine nursery-grown, by car-load lots. 

5000 2 to 2}4 Inches diameter $80.00 per 100 

2000 2>^ to 3 inches diameter 100.00 per 100 

3000 3 to 3% inches di ameter 150.00 per 100 

500 3>^ to 4 inches diameter 175.00 per 100 

CHAS. HAWKINSON NURSERY 

KXCKLSIDR. MINN. 

Mention The Review when yon write. 

PEONIES 

Fine collection, leading kinds, all colors named, 

$1.50 per doz.; $10.00 per 100. 
Clematis, large flowerinjr. $2.50 per doz. 
Clematis Panlculata, $1.U0 per doz.; $8.00 per 

100. 
Smllax, fall-sown, nice plants, $3.00 per 1000, 
Pansles, fall transplanted, fine plants, leading 

strains, $1.25 per 100; $10.00 per 1000; young 

plants, $4.00 per 1000. 

r. A. BALLBR, BLOOMINGTON, ILL. 

tory of all shrubs. All the season the 
foliage is delicate and the habit of the 
shrub is graceful. It is perfectly hardy 
and easy of culture. Varieties: Van 
Houttei, white, the queen of them all; 
arguta, early dwarf habit, white; mon- 
gelica, white ; lanceolata, white, blooms in 
June; robusta, double flowers; panlcu- 
lata rosea, rose colored; golden, yellow 
foliage, very effective in groups. 

INSECTS AND PLANT DISEASES. 

[A paper by Arthur H. Rosenfeld. assistant 
entomologist, I>oulslana State Pest Commission, 
read at the annual convention of the Society of 
Southern Florists, at New Orleans, February 14 
to 16, 1907.] 

The subject assigned me by your very 
eflScient secretary was ' ' Injurious Insects 
and Eemedies," but, on account of the 
breadth of this subject, I have decided 
to narrow it down and talk tonight on 
"The Value of Laws and Regulations 
for the Controlling of Insects and Plant 
Diseases." Any sort of talk on injur- 
ious insects at large would take up a 
great deal more time than you gentle- 
men would care to give, so I trust that 
you will bear with me in my choice of 
a more restricted subject than was first 
given me. 

Valtte of Laws and Regtilations. 

The value of laws and regulations of 
this sort cannot be estimated in dollars 
and cents, for even a conservative esti- 
mate would reach such a tremendous 
figure that the mind could hardly grasp 
the vastness of the sum. These laws 
have resulted not only in the direct sav- 



Mentlon The Review when yon write. 



20.000 LARGE 

CALirORMA PRIVET 

5 to 6 feet, $6.00 per 100; 950.00 per 1000. 

6 to 7 feet, 9.00 per 100; 76.00 per 1000. 

It is bright and handsome. I offer it at these low prices because 
it is upon land that must be cleared at once. Speak quickly. 

J. T. LOVETT, LITTLE SILVER, N.J. 



Mention The Review when yon write. 



ROSES 



American Beauty, Clothilde Soupert, Gloire de Dijon, 
Kaiserin Augusta Victoria, La France, Mme. Caroline 
Testout, Frau Karl Druschki, Crimson Rambler, Baby 
STRONG DORMANT PLANTS Rambler, Dorothy Perkins, etc., SUITABLE FOR FORCING. 

Immediate Delivery. Prices Right. General Catalog and Price Lists ready. 

Bay State Nurseries, North Abington, Mass. 

Mention The Review when yon write. 

47,960 Low Budded Roses in 26 Varieties 

I offer for immediate delivery from my cellars here, the entire Surplus Roses grown by the 
Helkes-Biloxi Nurseries. No. 1, $95.00 per 1000; No. iVi, $65.00 per 1000. 

Privet CuttlnBa, $1.25 per 1000; 10,000 for $10.00. Correspondence solicited. 

HIRAM T. JONES, Union County Nurseries, ELIZABETH, N. J. 

Mention The Review when yon write. 



LARGE STOCK OF 



Peonies, M. L Rhubarb, 
Lucretia Dewberry 

—For prices write— 

GILBERT H. WILD. Sarcoxie. Mo. 

Mention The Review when you write. 

ing of millions of dollars, but also in the 
preservation of thousands of human 
lives, the intrinsic worth of which no 
man would venture to conjecture. No 
higher goal can be set for any undertak- 
ing than the preservation of human life; 
that divine fire, which when once ex- 
tinguished, can be no more rekindled by 
hand of man; that flame which, when 
once departed, leaves the vessel which 
contained it forever cold and dark. Had 
these laws accomplished but this, how 
grand would their result be. 

Take for instance the laws against the 
Stegomyia mosquito, the little insect 
which is the connecting link in the trans- 
mission of the most terrible scourge of 
the city in which we are now enjoying 
ourselves, and without which this scourge 
could not exist. By enforcing a system. 



DflCLFCL On Own Roots 
m%.\^^wu^^ 2)f8ars. 

Crlmieii Rambiers, extra strong, at $7.00 per 100. 
Dorothy PerkiDS, Pink, White and Yellow Ramb- 
lers, etc., at $5.00 per 100. 
H. P. Boses and Baby Bamblers, at $8.00 per 100 

GILBERT GOSTiCH,ROCHE$TER,N.Y 

Mention The Review when you write. 

75,000 Azalea Amoena, ^romscto 



PRIVET 

2]4 to 3-ft., ;i-yr., transplanted. 

;j to 4-ft 

;i to 4-ft., XX heavy 

4 to5-ft 

."i tOt)-ft 

5 to G-ft., XX heavy. 



$3.00 each. 
Per 1000 

$25.00 

30.00 

35.00 

40.00 

50.00 

yo.oo 



See wholesale list of other stock. 

ELIZABETH NURSERY CO., Elizabeth, N. J. 

Mention The Review when you write. 

of cistern screening and otherwise reduc- 
ing the number of breeding places of the 
Stegomyia mosquito, epidemics of yellow 
fever have been prevented, thereby sav- 
ing hundreds of lives, and removing one 
of the greatest hindrances to the devel- 
opement of this beautiful Crescent City, 
as well as many others. 

In the course of a few years, with 
proper cooperation, the enforcement of 



t*-' 



''" ^ '- ■">-'-■*'■ 



'a'^ 



1208 



The Weekly Florists^ Review 



Maucii 



10§7. 



fence laws, etc., wo can safely look for- 
ward to the total eradication of the cattle 
fever tick, one of the greatest scourges 
to southern agriculture. "Without cattle 
there can be no really successful agri- 
culture, and with the cattle tick, we can- 
not have the right kind of cattle. At 
present very few southern cattle can 
compete with the northern grown animals 
on account of the continued sapping of 
vitality by the tick. It is estimated and, 
I might add, conservatively estimated, 
that this insect is at present costing the 
south $100,000,000 annually. Think of 
what a vast amount of money this is, 
and then picture to yourself some of the 
advantages of tick eradication; the ad- 
vantage of removing from the fair 
shoulders of our bonny south the load of 
this yearly depletion of her coffers. 

I could continue these comparisons in- 
definitely, but as we are at this time 
most concerned with tlie nurseryman's 
side of the subject, I will speak only of 
those things which bear directly upon 
this phase. 

State Organizations. 

Almost all of the states in the Union 
now have their boards of entomology, 
crop pest commissions, or something of 
the sort, which are engaged in protect- 
ing the farmers, fruit growers, gardeners, 
florists, etc., from the depredations of 
various insects and plant diseases which 
would otherwise soon overrun the states 
and make the growing of any kind of 
plant a practical impossibility. This 
may seem a broad statement; but when 
we think of the destructiven»ss of some 
of our pests, and the wonderful powers 
of reproduction and spreading exhibited 
by them, we can see the truth of it. 

The majority of the organizations 
were formed primarily to fight the San 
Jose scale, the little insect which, thirty 
years ago, practically unknown in the 
United States, is today the most feared 
pest in this country, by all nurserymen 
and fruit growers. 

The southern states will serve as a 
good example of the danger of deferring 
the passage of crop pest laws until many 
insects, which might have otherwise been 
kept out, or their entrance greatly de- 
ferred, have been introduced. Our crop 
pest laws in most cases were not in- 
augurated as soon as in the majority 
of the more northern states and, as a 
consequence, unscrupulous nurserymen 
in the states having such laws and also 
in other states, dumped a great deal of 
stock, unsalable in the states having these 
laws, into the states not so fortunate. 
Here was where the southern states 
came into possession of a number of the 
insects of their neighbors. Had the 
southern states, as a whole, been as wide 
awake to the value of these laws as the 
northern ones, we might have saved our- 
selves thousands, yes millions, of dollars. 



Woodlane Nurseries 

EstabUalied 1837 

CALIFORNIA PRIVET 

3 years old, 3 to 4 feet $30.ro per 1000 

3 and 4 years old, 4 feet and up — 35.00 per 1000 
Transplanted and cut to the ground last spring;. 

NORWAY SPRUCE 

Specimens, 3}4 to 4 feet 150.00 per 100 

Specimens, 4 to 5 feet 60.00 per 100 

Axn«rto»n Arbor- Vltae, 4 to 5 ft. 25.00 per 100 
Large Trees of Oaks, Maples and Oriental Plane. 

Willard H. Rogers, Mt. Holly, N. J. 

Mention The Reriew when you write. 




WILLIAM SAUNDERS 

The flowers are large, of splendid form, and are borne very freely in immense clusters. 
The color is s deep rich shining scarlet slightly dappled with crimson. Foliage is a rlob 
bronze. Height, 3^ to 4 feet. We believe that Wm. Sannders is decidedly the most perfect 
Oanna of this type that has been introduced. 60c each; $5.00 per doz.; $85.00 per 100. 

OTTAWA 

Is a strong grower, very robust and 6 to 6 feet high. The flowers are large and beau- 
tifully formed, color is carmine with tints of old rose and deep coral, add to this the silken 
sheen and you can imagine the effect a few plants will produce. 

NOTE— We had this Canna on trial among the Canadian experimental stations last 
summer and this is the official report of their expert: "Quite distinct and one of the most 
beautiful shades of color I ever saw in Cannas. Of 70 massed in one bed during the past 
season, this was the most floriferous in the collection, coming into bloom eaily and con- 
tinuing until cut down by frost, as many as 13 expanded heads of blooms being counted at 
one time on a plant, and not a poor one among them, all being of immense size." 50c each; 
$5.00 per doz.; $85.00 per 100. 

NEW YORK 

Has the Orchid type of flower. They have much more substance than the flowers of 
the other varieties of this class, and will stand the hot sunshine as well as the toughest 
varieties of cannas. The color is a solid rich scarlet covered with a beautiful glowing sheen. 
The flowers are large and contrast beautifully with the dark bronze foliage. 50c each; 
$6.00 per doz.: $35.00 per 100. 

Send for our list and prices of 60 other leading varieties of Oannas. 

BOSKS, are our great specialty, 2H and 4-inch pot plants we have in great variety — 
Philadelphia Rambler, Crlmsoii Bambler, Dorothy Perkins and other climbers in strong 
field plants. 

SHBVBBEBT, in variety. Tlbamom Plicatom, Spiraeas, Althaeas, Honeysnekles, ete. 

SEND FOR OUR PRICE LISTS. 



THE CONARD & JONES CO., WEST GROVE, PA. 



Mfiitlon The KeTlew when yuu write. 



VERBENAS 



60 FINEST VARIETIES 
PERFECTLY HEALTHY 



Rooted cuttings, our selection $0.75 per 100; $6.00 per 1000 

Plant)), our selection :.., 2.60 per 100; 20.00 per 1000 

Rooted cuttings, purchaser's selection 90 per jOO; 8.i per 1000 

Plants, purchaser's selection 8.00 per 100; 25.00 per 1000 



CHOICE ROOTED CUHINGS 
FREE fROM DISEASE 



CARNATIONS 

Robt. Craiff, scarlet, very productive: My Maryland, pure white, good stems; 
Cardinal, scailet, good flowers; Jaaaloa, .white, penciled with scarlet, $6.00 
per loO; $50.00 per 1000. 

Crisis, Lady Bountiful, Bncliantress, $3.00 per 100; $25.00 per 1000. 

Mrs. M. A. Patten, Judsre Hinsdale, riamlnBo, Buttercup, $2.50 per 
100; $20.C0 per 1000. 

Mrs. Tbomas La'wson, Tbe Queen, $2.00 per 100; $17.50 per 1000. 

Gk>ld*n Beauty, Prosperity, Gov. Roosevelt, Queen Louise, $2.00 per 
100; $15 00 per 1000. 

Mrs. K. A. Nelson, Dorotby, Wm. Soott, Flora EOll, Xthel Crocker, 
mdorado, Mrs. Joost, Portia, $1.50 per 100; $12.00 per 1000. 

J. L. DILLON, Bloomsburg,Pa. 



Mfutlou I'be Kfvifw Hbyn yuu wrrliy. 



CANNAS Queen of CANNAS 

QUEEN OF BEAUTY 

the best of all scarlets, was introduced by us in 190C, it has proved out all that we claimed for it. 
Our list contains nearly 200 varieties. Can we book your order for fall delivery, 1907, or for staited 
plants, strong and hardy, thrown in coldframes, ready April 1 to 15? Prices same as for dry roots. 
Over 50 varieties of dry rootb for immediate delivery. 

ZULU and PBABL DAHLIAS, ABUVOO DOVAZ VABISOATA. BUDBBOXLA 

OOLDBB OLOW; also KUBZV VXVB8, layer plants. Write for quotations. 

FRANK GUMMIN6S BULB AND PUNT CO., MERIDIAN, MISS. 

Mention The Review when yon \^lte. 



rVERGREEN 

B An Immenae Stock of both large and 

^^^ small size BVEROREBN TREKS it 
great variety; also BVBROREBD 
SHRUBS. Correapondence solicited 

THE WM H. MOON CO.. MORRISVILLE, PA. 

Mention Tbe Review when yon write. 



THE BEGAN PRINTING HOUSE 



Larse Runs of 



gy A. 4 OUR 

Catalogues.s;.-r^ 

Plymouth Place. CHICAGO 

Mention The Review when yon write. 



J rt^H-l A. -^ ..-.-..V .■aAmhT$rt-« 



■..■ ^...t -^1 w/. .^. ^■.. •.]r-'..-^V 



^■Li.^.^.1. ---^brni^A jrfu- n rr\- n ri iff "rfr iMrntiiii^'iriWiiri' l iiiTiiariift^df fa^ia^iiBfliai^WrtBiriiMMiiiMaiiMrti 



M&^HA^fiaAi 



.1 -■•'^■\ 



M''i»^*'»*'^t:'\ ■ " 



^lAiicH 7, 1907. 



The Weekly Florists' Review. 



120> 



SOME SPECIALS NOW READY 



Miss Clay Frick 






New 

Chrysanthemums «r — 

(The white sport of W. Duckham), WINTER CHEER and BUTTERCUP, 

2%-inch pots, 50c each; $35.00 per 100. 

American Beauty 

7000 plants in 2X-inch pots, in superb condition, ready to move on. Every plant 
unconditionally guaranteed by me. Price, $8.00 per 100; $75.00 per 1000. 
Samples sent anywhere. 

New Carnations 

WinsOfy the bread and butter Carnation for all of you to grow. Helen Miller 
Gould, Haines* imperial and Pink Imperial, all at $12.00 per 100; 
$100.00 per 1000. 2%-inch pots, $14.00 per 100. A splendid lot of White 
Perfection in 2%-inch pots, $10.00 per 100. 



CHARLES H, TOTTY, Madison, N. J. 

Mention The Kevlew wbeu you write. 



^ 



John E. Haines 

The leading scarlet, brilliant color, fine stem; 
the most productive ever Introduced; blooms 
early until thrown out in July; no extra rrassj 
all shoots make flowers. Watch the papers and 
see what growers say about It. None but well 
rooted, healthy cuttings leave the place. Rooted 
cuttings ready now. Price, 16.00 per 100; 160.00 
per lOUO. John E. Haines, Bethlehem. Pa 
Mention The Review when you write. 

ROOTED CUTTINGS 



Roses 100 loro 

Bride* fl.60 t12.60 

Maid* 1.50 12.60 

Richmond 1.60 12 60 

Kaiserin 2.60 20.00 



Carnations 100 1000 

Lawson 11.50 110.00 

Enchantress... 2.00 16.00 
W. Lawson.... 2.50 20.00 
L. Bountiful... 2.60 30.00 
Harlowarden.. 1.60 12.60 



Frank Garland, Des Piaines, III. 

Mention The Review when you write. 

HEALTHY, ROOTED CARNATION CUHINOS 

Enchantress perl00.$2.50; per 1000. $20.00 

Mrs. Lawson " 1.26 .. 10.00 

White Lawson 2.60 ., 20.00 

WhiteOloud 125 10.00 

Robt. Craig .. 6W 

Candace „^.°^ , 

Cash with order or Chicago reference. 

JOHN UUNO, Touhy near Westem Ave., 
Roffers Park, CHICAGO. 

Mention The Review when yon write. 

Abundance.. 

Rooted ruttingB of this most prolific white 
carnation ready for delivery now. Prices, 
$6 00 per 100; $40.00 per 1000. 250 at 1000 rate. 
6 per cent discount for cash with order. 

RUDOLPH FISCHER 

GREAT RECK, LOSG ISLAND, N. I. 

Mention The Review when yon write. 

Always Mention tlie..«« 

Florists' Review 

Wlien WntinB Advertisers. 



A. F. J. BAUR. 



F. S. SMITH. 



^^E are sending out a fine lot of Carnation Cut" 

tings and should like to supply you with what you 
need in that line. Our price list is out and will be mailed 
to you on receipt of your name and address. Our prices 
are reasonable and B. & S. cuttings and plants thrive. 

We are entirely sold up on young Geranium plants for 
this season, so don't include any of these in your order. 

BSUR & SMITH 

38th St. and Senate Ave., INDIANAPOLIS, IND, 

Mention The Review when you write. 



Grafted ROSES 



Onr Soses are th* finest and best g'rown. liberty, Biobmond, 
lt% France, Killarney, rose pots, $16.00 per 100. 33^-ln. pots, 
•18.00 per 100. Bride, Bridesmaid, Oolden Gate, Kaiserin, 
rose pots, $10.00 per 100. 3>^-in. pots $16.00 per 100. 



J. L. DILLON, 



♦« 



Bloomsburg, Pa* 



Mention The Review when you write. 



"'f'" "■:-^>-«— ■ 



ff r*y; '1-^1^;^' ■^'*'^*-','w^'"7'r;**y,' tt^' ;■. ■tT*' tj.>~v4 ■' 'f'T'«77r W*^^' '^ 's^Tv'T^/Tf ^BFt!P'^rT)|r^''iy , ■■^'^'iKp* ^prT^T^rTT^^^^fS 



I2i0 



The Weekly Florists^ Review* 



March 7, 1907. 



ImperialoxPink Imperial Carnations 

You Cannot Afford to be Without These Two Excellent Varieties 

Price, $12.00 per 100; $100.00 per 1000. 250 at 1000 rate. A discount allowed when cash accompanies the order. 



A. J. eUHMAN, 



The Wholesale Florist of NEW YORK 
43 WEST 28TH ST. 



JOHN E. HAINES, 



BETHLEHEM, 
PA. 



Mention The Review when yon write. 



The Best Commercial White Mam 

White Maud Dean 

Grown by THE WILLIAM SCOTT CO., Buffalo. N.Y. 

Strong, well rooted cuttings, 
ready now, 110.00 per 100. Offered by 

9. S. SkldelBfey, 824 N. 24th St^ Philadelphia, Pa., 
* and Wm. P. Kastlng, Buffalo, N. Y. 

Mention The Review when yon write. 

KANSAS QTY. 



The Market. 



Stock is more plentiful. There are 
carnations enough to fill all demands. 
Violets are also more plentiful, selling 
from 50 cents to $1 per hundred. Amer- 
ican Beauties are selling slowly at pres- 
ent. There has been quite a few cheap 
carnations and one store had 16,000 on 
hand last Saturday and disposed of 14,- 
000 of them. This store had a special 
sale on them at 35 cents a dozen. Two 
or three of the department stores also 
had carnations on sale at 20 cents to 30 
cents a dozen. These sales supplied this 
city with cheap carnations for a week. 

AH of the florists are getting ready 
for the Easter trade. It looks as though 
there will be quite a good many Easter 
lilies that will not be ready for Easter, 
as they are forcing slowly. 

Various Notes. 

D. Freudenthal reports good business. 
Carnations are mostly called for and he 
handles a large quantity every week. 

The Kosery Conservatory, at Westport, 
was incorporated March 1 with $15,000 
capital stock, paid up in full. The stock- 
holders are Ed Ellsworth, president; Al- 
pha Elberfield, vice-president and treas- 
urer, and H. E. Colvin, an attorney in 
the New York Life building, of this 
city, is secretary. These three are also 
directors of this new company. Being 
located in one of the best parts of the 
city, this new firm ought to do well. Its 
new store is completed and is open for 
business. The last two months of good 
weather has been in its favor in com- 
pleting the store and conservatory. 

Amil Eichenaurer, formerly employed 
by the Alpha Floral Co., has been sick 
for the last two weeks, but is now able 
to be out again. 

C. L. Knobe, of the J. W. Sefton Mfg. 
Co., was in Kansas City last week. He 
reports a fine business. W. H. H. 



Madisonville, Ky. — F. A. Chervenka 
has left Ira, O., in order to take up the 
management of the Pleasant View Green- 
houses at this place, for T. L. Metcalfe, 
of Hopkinsville, Ky. 

Wheeling, W. Va. — John Dieckmann 
& Co. have purchased twelve acres of 
land on Mountain View, where they will 
move their eight large greenhouses. Mr. 
Dieckmann will also erect a residence on 
the property. 



Announcefflent — Aristocrat 

As we have not made all the deliveries of Aristocrat as promised, we 
beg to announce to our patrons that all orders are being filled strictly 
in rotation and all orders will be completed by the 20th o! March, as 
we have 50,000 cuttings in the sand nearly rooted and 150,000 cuttings 
that have been put in during the past ten days. These will be ready 
for delivery before the end of March, which is not too late for Aristo- 
crat, as it is a very rapid grower, free from disease and will do as well 
as earlier cuttings when benched in the fall. The variety is an easy 
rooter, but owing to the very unfavorable weather, cuttinss did not 
root as quickly as we expected; besides we are growinw them cool, 
which takes a little longer. All of the stock we have sent out has 
given the best of satisfaction, as it is our aim to see tbat every cutting 
is first-class in every respect. 

We wish to thank our patrons for their patience and assuring 
you of our very best attention and tbat your order will be filled by the 
time stated. 

CHICAGO CARNATION CO. 

A. T. Pyfer, jtf gr. JOLIET, ILL. 



Mention The Review when yon write. 



Place Orders Early for 

Easter Plants 

Lilies, 3, 4, 5 and 6 buds 12>^cper bud 

Azaleas 91.00. $1.25. $1.50 

Spiraeas 85c, 50c, 60c and 75c 

Hyaointlis 4-in., $1.50; 5-in., $2.00 per doz. 

Paper Wliites, Daffodils. Single and Double 

Tulips, etc., 5-in. pans, 25c each: 6-in., 40c< each. 
Clilnese Primroses— Obconioa and Baby, 

3-in., 8e; 4-in., 12>ic. 

Cyclamen, 3-in 8c 

Geraniiuns. $1.60 and $2.00 per doz. 

riowerinB Rez Besonias, 4-in., $12.50; 

5-in., 25c. 

GEO. A. KUHL, Pekin, III. 

Mention The Review when yon write. 

ROOTED CARNATION CUHINGS 



100 1000 
Enchantress... 12.00 118.00 

Moonlight 2.00 1500 

P. Lawson.... 1.60 12.60 

B. Market 1.60 12 60 

CaidinaL 3.00 26.U0 



100 1000 
$2.00 tl5 00 
2.50 20.00 



Patten, Var. 
L. Bountiful 

Skyrocket 3.00 25.00 

Robert Craig. . 6.00 60.00 
Prosperity 2.00 16.00 



WM. WINTER. Kirkwood, Mo. 

CaroatioD Cuttings 

Per 100 Per 1000 

RoBe-Plnk Encliaiitress $7.00 $60.00 

Helen eoddard 6.00 50.00 

Robert Craig 6.00 50.00 

Qneen Lonlse 1.25 10.00 

W. B. GIRVIN, Leola, Pa. 

Mention The Review when yon write. 

The Eeview is the best paper I get. — 
F. C. Green, Warwick, E. I. 

Lansing, Mich. — G. B. Smith has pur- 
chased the house immediately south of 
his greenhouse and will occupy it as his 
residence. The space between the house 
and greenhouses will be filled in with 
glass. 



Rooted Carnation Cuttings 



100 1000 
White Perfection»6.00 $50 
Light Pink Law- 
son..... 6.00 50 

Glendale 6.00 40 

Victory •.. 5.00 40 

Robt. Craig 6.00 40 

Fiancee 3.60 30 

Cardinal 2.50 20 

Lady Bountiful.. 2.50 20 

250 



100 1000 

The Belle $2.50 $20 

White Lawson... 2.60 2o 

Enchantress 2.50 20 

Nelson Fisher... 2.50 20 

Harry Fenn 2.00 15 

Estelle 2.00 15 

Mrs. lawson.... 1.50 12 

Boston Market.. 1.60 12 

White Cloud.... 100 8 



at 1000 rate. 



Ready for Shift, 
Strons. 

3-in.. $4.00 per 100; 



ASPARAGUS 

Asparagus Sprenseri, 

4-ln.,$6.00; 5-ln., fcOOO. 
Asparasms Plnmosus, 3 In., $5.00; 6-ln., $20.00. 
Cash or C. O. D. 

W. J. &M.S.V8S8r, Fort Wayne, Ind. 

Mention The Review when yon write. 

GRAFTED ROSES 

On Dickson's Irish Manetti. 
We are now booking orders for March delivery. 

Kalserin, Bride, Bridesmaid, 
Killarney and Richmond, 

$120.00 per 1000. 

—Order now. — 

ROBERT SCOTT & SON, 

SHARON HILL, DKL. CO., PA. 

Mention The Review when yon write. 

Rooted Cuttings 

knchantreBa per 100, $8.50 

Lawaon " «.00 

The Qneen ^., " 2.00 

Woloott " ».00 

Qneen Lonlse * 1.00 

B. E. Wadsworth. dai^°^^'iix. 

Always mention the Florists* Review 
when writtnar advertisers. 



^^tt. jiUx:i^.A:-,A^^. 



ijJk 



— ti'-:^^*..^!^' 



ii,^l^l^^^i^lP9ii^rrrrrcY7^rTv^-ni«ni^>f^^ .-.• j_. 



Mabch 7. 1907. 



The Weekly Florists^ Review* 



I2U 







CARNATIONS 

Well Rooted Cultings 
Healthy Stock 

PINK Per 100 Per 1000 

Lawson $1.50 $io.00 

Nelson 1.50 10.00 

Nelson Fisher 2.6O 22.50 

LIGHT PINK-Enchantress... 2.50 22.50 

VARIEGATKD 

Mrs. M. A. Patten 2.50 22.50 

WHITE— Boston Market 1.25 10.00 

White Lawson 3.00 26.00 

RED- Robert Craig 6.00 50.00 

Cardinal 2.50 20.00 

Estelle 2.00 17.50 



ROSES 

Strong and Well 
Rooted Cuttings 

Per 100 Per 1000 

Richmond $1.60 $12.60 

Liberty 2.00 17.50 

Bridesmaid 1.50 12.50 

Bride 150 12.60 

Sunrise 8.00 25.00 

Uncle John 1.50 12.60 

Chatenay 1.50 12.50 

Ivory 1.50 12.50 

Perle 2.00 17.60 



ROSES 

FINE PLANTS 

2^ -in. Pots 

Per 100 Per 1000 

Richmond » $3.00 $25.00 

Bridesmaids 3.00 25.00 

Uncle John 8.00 25.00 

Chatenay 8.00 25.00 

Ivory 3.00 25.00 

Liberty 4.00 36.00 

Perle 4.00 85.00 

Sunrise 5.00 40.00 



KILLARNEY 



•inch pots, grafted stock, 
$10.00 per 100. 



Bench Plants 



ONE-TEAR-OLD PLANTS FROM BENCHES 

Liberty, Ivory, Perle $5.00 per 100. $40.00 per 1000 

American Beauty 10.00 per 100; 75.00 per 1000 



PETER REINBERG 



1,500«000 Feet 
of Glaas 



51 Wabash Ave., CHICAGO 



I 



Mention The Review when yon write. 



Clean, Healthy, Well Rooted 

Caroatioo Cuttings 

READY NOW 

Per 100 Per 1000 

Victory $6.00 $50.00 

Knoluuxtreas 2.00 18.00 

Wtalto Lawaon 3.00 26.00 

Ladr Bountiful 3.00 25.00 

Mrs. ■. A. Nelson 2.00 15.00 

Mrs. T. W. Lawaon 1.50 12.50 

Boaton Bfarket 1-50 12.50 

VAUGHAN & SPERRY 

68-60 Wabash Ave. CHICAGO 

Mention The Review when yon write. 

To My Friends and Patrons 

BE PATIENT 

I will fill your orders for 

Rose'Piak Eachaotress 

In good time and with first-class stock. 
For the present and until further notice 
I have discontinued booking additional 
orders for Rose-Pink Enchantress. 

S. S. SKIDELSKY 

•t4 No. t4tll St.. PHILADELPHIA, PA. 

Mention The Review when yon write. 

Aiwaya mention tlie 

When Writinar Advertlaer* 



Rooted Cflttings 

CARNATIONS 

Clean, Healthy Stock 

Per 100 Per 1000 

Knchantreaa $2.50 $22.50 

Lawaon 1.50 10.00 

Nelaon 1.50 10.00 

Cruaader 1.50 12.50 

Boaton Market 1.50 10.00 

RobertCrale 0.00 50.00 

Lady BounUful 8.00 25.00 

ROSES 

American Beauty 8.00 25.00 

Richmond 1.50 12.50 

Blald 1.50 12.50 

Bride 1.50 12.50 

Chatenay 1.50 12.50 

BENCH PLANTS 

One-year-old for immediate delivery. 

Per 100 Per 1000 

Uberty $5.00 $40.00 

Uncle John 5.00 40.00 

American Beauty 10.00 75.00 

GEORGE REINBERG 

Wholeaale Floriat 

i35 Randolph St., Chicago 

Always mention the Florists' Review 'when 
writing advertisers. 



ROOTED 

Carnation Cuttings 

Per 100 Per 1000 

Mra. T. La'waon $1.50 $10.00 

Lady Bountiful 2.50 17.50 

WhlteLawaon 2.50 20.00 

Wlilte Perfection 5.00 45.00 

Victory 500 46.00 

Robt. Craisr 5.00 45.00 

Helen Goddard 5.00 45.00 

Prealdent 2.50 20.00 

MominarGIory 150 12.60 

Lieut. Peary 2.50 20.00 

Knohantreaa 2.00 18.0 

Eli Cross, Grand Rapids, Mich. 

Mention The Review when yon write. 

MABELLE 

NKW PINK CARNATION FOR 1007 

Color— A peculiar shade of lovely pink, with a 
faint yellowish cast; several shades lisrhter than the Law- 
son. Unlike most pinks, the brightest sun does not 
injure the color. Size— 3 to 4 inches in diameter when 
established. Odor — Pleasing:, but not strong. 
8t«ma— Invariably strong, but always grraceful, raoK- 
ins: from 12 to 30 inches during the season. Habit, 
•tc— A very quick, active grrower, making specimen 
plants in a short time, even from late cuttings. On ac- 
count of its rapid growth, requires supporting yery 
soon after benching. Gets away rapidly, blooms early 
and gives long stems right from the start. Prodoot- 
iTeneaa- Prodigious is the best word we know of to 
use here. It is the most incessant bloomer, early and 
late, we have ever grown. Stock limited. No discount. 
Price 112.00 per lOU; 1100.00 per 1000. 

THE H. WEBER & SONS CO., Oakland, Md. 

Mention The Review when yon write. 

Always Mention the 

When Writlns Advertlaera 



--^ '" -r -M. ^^ j:. 



"i iii1iiitii^'i*niaiMiftMi^i^ftflift^/Tn#lli^'i>l|-Ai II I'slfii j- Vn -.^M m^Lt 



«l^.Jft..k./ii£w/., 



&^)ai^^_-k- ; 



I v>- . ...7'-^-' 1 '-^y. *.\ 



.y , .^■,.-.i-'^|.-r Tj- ')i^.i;«i>f myf n i~T'7TTTTT^T^*^'T^f rr^r^Tf^iSsF^' 



1212 



The Weekly Florists^ Review^ 



Mabcu 7, 1907. 



ROOTED CUTTINGS OF ROSES 



Richmond per 100, $1^0 per 1000, $12^ 

Kaiaerin " 2 50 ** 20.00 

Peru ** ZSO ** 20.00 

MacArthnr ** Z50 ** 20.00 



C»rnot per 100, $2.50 per 1000, $20*00 

Bride ** 1.50 ** 12^ 

Brideamaid ** L50 ** 12S0 

Chatenay ** UO ** 12^ 



ROOTED CUTTINGS OF CARNATIONS 



■nchantreaa per 100, $2.50 per 1000, $25.00 

Ladj Bountilul «" 2.50 "^ 25.00 

Lawaon ** 1.50 ** 15.00 



Gov. Wolcott per 100, $1.50 per 1000, $15.00 

Proaperity ** 2.00 «* 15.00 

Harlowarden «" 2.00 "* 15.00 



OUR CUTTINGS ARE ALL STRONG, HEALTHY AND WELL ROOTED. 
We seU 500 at 1000 rate. AU Cuttings Shipped from HINSDALE, ILLINOIS. 

Bassett & Washburn '^'»" I'liE^ii?.*^''!!^!'^"*'"^" 



Mention The Review when you write. 



DETROIT. 

Tkc Market 

The market conditiouR remain about 
the same. Trade is good; but owing to 
the fact tliat the larger retailers grow 
their own bulbous stock, the sales at the 
wholesalers' ai-e comparatively small; 
consequently some stock goes to waste. 

Roses keep well cleaned up and with 
white carnations it is the same. Several 
thousand colored carnations, mostly En- 
chantress, variegated tulips, daffodils, 
etc., were not called for last week. Con- 
siderable valley is being disposed of. 
Sweet peas and forget-me-nots do not 
sell as well as might be expected. Com- 
mon ferns are becoming scarce. Smilax 
and asparagus are also scarce. 

Various Notes. 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert Klagge, of Mount 
Clemens, spent last week in Chicago. 

Some growers are keeping their car- 
nation houses cool in the hope of holding 
back the crop until Easter, when they 
will bring better prices, as in all prob- 
ability the present large supply will not 
last long, it is also apparent that lilies 
will be scarce in this vicinity. Present 
indications point to a good supply of 
the general run of Easter plants. 

Hugo Schroeter has the agency for 
Detroit and vicinity for the Baur clip 
and plier, for mending split carnations. 

The store at 245 Woodward avenue, for 
many years occupied by G. Leadly, is 
being torn down to make way for a large 
music hall. Mrs. Allen P. Cox, who re- 
cently acquired possession of Leadly 's 
business, has opened at 233 Woodward 
avenue, a few doors south of the old 
stand. 

P. F. Reuss is again in Detroit. He 
will be in the employ of B. Schroeter 
until after Easter. 

It would not necessitate a twenty 
years' sleep to make one feel a stranger 
in the business section of Detroit. This 
part of the city is rapidly undergoing 
a complete change. Many new buildings 
are being erected and numerous firms 
are changing their locations. The center 
of attraction for the florists seems to be 
Broadway and there is no doubt but 
what this fine thoroughfare will some day 
be called "florists' row." H. S. 



Hinsdale, Mass. — The fern dealers 
are having bad luck this season. The 
stock in storage has been spoiling, until 
now there is not enough to fill contract 
orders. 



Beacon Carnation 



Will Prove a 

Boon to the 

Average Florist 



...ORANGE-SCARLET.. . 

Has been proved 

the most profitable 

Commercial 

Scarlet. 



Not a fancy uhj- 

bloomings sort, 

but one of the 

**cat and come 

again* * variel ies 



Per 100 $12.00; 60 at 100 rate. 

Per 1000 100.00; 260 at 1000 rate. 

Per 2600 $96.00 per 1000 

Casli wltb Order. 



I Per 6000 $90.00 prr 1000 

Per 10,000 80.00 per 1000 

I In lota of 20,000 or more... 75.00perl000 

MARCH DKLIVKRT. 



Cottage Gardens Co. Peter Fisher, (origi.at.r) 

QUEENS, N. Y. ELLIS, MASS. 

Mention The Review when t<iu write. 



Hrst-class CARNATION CUniNGS 

that %vill give satisfaction 

Per 1000 

Hra. PatteB $16.00 

Hri. Lawaon 16 00 



Per 1000 

B. Craig $60.00 

Cardinal 25.00 

Lad7 Boantlfnl.. tb.VO 
Enehantreaa . . . . 20.00 



Eatelle 16.00 

Qneen Lonlte ... 10 . 00 



6 per cent diccouot for cash with order. 

HENRY BAER, Rpd.s, Peoria, III. 

Mention The Beriew when yon write. 
CARNATION CUTTINGS RKADT 

FINK8T, CLEAN, HEALTHY STOCK lUO 1000 

Bobt. CralB, Caiidace 15.00 140.00 

Bnohantreaa 3.00 18.00 

Cmasder 1.76 H.60 

Boston Market, Harlowarden.. 1.60 10.00 

Mm. T. Lawraon 1.50 1300 

Mra. E. A. Nelson 1.50 13.00 

Variegated Lawaon 4.00 86.00 

Unrooted cuttlng^s Harlowarden and Boston 
Market, 16.00 per lUOO. 
8CHEIDEN A SCHOOS, 60 Wabaah ATe.,Ckie«co 

Mention The BeTlew wben yon write. 

1000 SAND ROOTED GUHINGS 

Robert Crale, $6 00 per 100: 150.00 per 1000; 
an excellent red and a fine Cbribtinas color. 
Also Knobantress, $2.50 per 100: Siu.oo per 1000; 
tbe bestliiiht pink carnatiou on the market. Our 
(took is bealihy, free from all diEoasc and well 
rooted. Write for our price list of other stand- 
ard varieties. Valley View Greenbousea, 
Velie Bros., Prop., Marlborouffb, N. T. 
Mention The Review when you write. 



Carnation Plants 



2 inch Pots 

VERY NICE 

March 1, Delivay 

Per 100 

Thomas Lawson $3 00 

Lady Bountifal 3.50 

■nchantreaa 3.60 

White LawBon 3 50 

Boston Market 3 00 

The Queen 3.00 

Harlowarden 3.00 

United States Gut Flower Go. 

ELMIRA, N. Y. 



Always Mention the.... 

Florists' Review . 

When Writlnsr Advertisers. 



„•- i;..i^ ii*i1aLtf-t .■ 



: ._ —•..-/■ .-..J-.AjJd!;'^....!.^ 



'TC't. "'^ - 



' ' ' ' ' .'■,.»■-' 



Makch 7, 1907. 



The Weekly Florists^ Review^ 



\i\i 



Carnot, 



$4.00 

Per 100 



$35.00 
Per 1000 



Kaiserin, 



RICH M O N Df $25.00 per'^lOOO 



$8.00 per 100 
1.00 per 1000 



Chatenay, Perle, Gate, %^l 
BELL MIILLER, .. •• Springfield, ill. 



•• •• 

Mention The Review when yon write. 



A Grand Fern Novelty 

We are booking orders for 

NEPHROLEPIS AMERPOHLH 

which will be filled strictly In rotation with 
plants OF OUB UWN OBOWING on and after 
October 15. next. To see it is to know It is 
the best Fern on earth. STUCK LIMITED. 

WM. P. CRAIG 

1305 Filbert Street, PHILADELPHIA 



Carnation Cuttings 

A-l STOCK 6UARANTEED 

Per 100 Per lOCO 

VICTORT $6.00 $60.00 

RKD LAWSON 2.50 20.00 

WHITE X^WSON 2.50 20.00 

PINK LAWSON 1.75 16.00 

VAR. LAWSON 8 00 25.00 

KNCHANTRESS 2.60 20.00 

A. LAUB & SON, 

HUGHSONVILLE, Dutchest Co., N. Y. 

Bell Phone 19 Y 2 Wappingers. 

Mention The Review when yon write. 

CARNATIONS 

80,000 Rooted CuttinBrs NOW READY. 

100 1000 1 100 1000 

L. Bountiful $2.50 $20.00 I B. Market... $1.60 $12.60 

Enchantress 2.00 18.00 I Lawson 1.50 12.60 

Queen Louise 100 9.00 

BOSTON FERNS 

from bench, ready for 4 and 5-inch pots, 
$10.00 and $15.00 per 100 respectively. 

Asparagus........ 

Sprenserl, 2K-In.. extra large, $3.00 per 100; 
$25.00 per 1000. 3j^-in., good value, $6.00 per 100. 
Bell Phone— Lackland. 

J. W. DUHFORD, CLAnON, MO. 
Cyclamen ,.„<,„ „„ 

In bud and bloom * »}00 

I" I. •> 5 1.60 

Prlmala Obconica.'ln bud and bloom.. 4 .75 

»i .1 •» *■ ,.0 i.uu 

1. .. ' ..3 .50 

Cinerarias, in bud and bloom -j 1 .50 

it (t »* '* u •^.UU 

J. S. BLOOM, Riegelsville, Pa. 

Mention The Review whe n you write. 

Nephrolepis 
WHITMAN! 

Young plants from bench. 
$0.00 per 100. 

DAVIS BROS., MORRISON, ILL. 



FINEST OF YOUNG STOCK 

Selected from the strong^, healthy, youn^ plants 
we shall use in replanting^ our own houses; propag^ated 
from prise-winning^ stock. All plants guaranteed. 



ROSES 

The new Bose "Morton Orove " winner of 

the Silver Cup at Chicago Flower Show 1906 

for best new rose, will be disseminated in 1908. 

R. O. 234-in. 23^-in. 3%-in. 

per 1000 per 100 per 1000 

Maid $18.00 

Bride 18.00 

Gate 1800 

Uncle John 18.00 

Ckatenay 18 00 

Bieliinond 20.00 

Bosalind Orr 

Bnglisli 20.00 

Kaiierin Angnsta Yletorla 4.50 

CHRYSANTHEMUMS 

We are now rooting all the commercial 
varieties ofOhrysantbemums. Ask for price 
list. 

J. Nonin and Tooset, rooted cuttings, $(.C0 
per 100; $35.00 per 1000: 2>^-in., $6.00 per 100. 



$4 50 


$40.00 


$55.00 


450 


40.00 


55.00 


4.50 


40.00 


56.00 


450 


40.00 


55.00 


4.50 


40.00 


55.00 


450 


40.00 


55.00 



5.00 



45.00 
40.00 



60.00 
65.00 



CARNATIONS 



Rooted Cuttings 

per 100 per loOO 

White Lawson $3.00 $25.00 

L.Perry 3.00 25.00 

Got. Wolcott 2.50 20.00 

Pink Lawson 2.00 17.50 

Enchantress 3.00 25.00 

Victory 6.00 60.00 

Cardinal 3.00 25.00 

Bed Lawson 4.00 36.00 

Prosperity 2.50 20.00 

Patten 200 

Variegated Lawson... 4.00 35.00 

eiendale 6.00 

Craig 400 30.00 

Harlowarden 2.00 15 00 

White Perfection 6.00 60.00 

Lady Bonntltal 3 50 80.00 



2>i-ln. 
per 100 
$4.00 
4.00 
8.60 
3.00 
4.00 
7.00 
6.00 
6.00 
3.60 

6.00 
6.00 
6.00 

7.60 



SPECIAL, rooted cuttings of PBOSPEBIT¥, 6000 ready to go out of sand, $12.60 per 1000. 
Cash or C. 0. D. on Orders From Unknown Parties. 

POEHLNANN BROS. CO. 

1,000,000 FEET OF GLASS 

Send Plant Orders to Greenhonses, 

Morton Grove, III. 



Send Cat Flower Orders to 



35 Randolph St., CHICAGO. 



Mention .The Review when yon write. 



EASTER PLANTS 

HYDRANGEA. OTAK3A. . $9.00, $12.00, $15.00, $18.00 per doz. 

*♦ Specimens $3.00 to $5.00 each. 

BABY RAMBLER ROSES, 3>4-in., va. bloom 20c each. 

** « " 5,6, 8-in.. $5.00, $8.00, $15 00 doz. 

CINERARIAS 5-in., $4.00 per doz.; 6-m., $6.00 per doz. 

PRIMULA OBCONICA. 6-in $5.00 per doz. 

SPIRAEA GLADSTONE, 7-m $6.00 per doz. 

" JAPONICA, 6-m $12.00 per 100. 

GERANIUMS, assorted, 4-ia $4.00 per 1000 

The above will all be in bloom ready for shipment March 20. 

J. W. Dudley & Sons, Parkersburg,W. Va. 



Mention The Review when yon write. 



CARNATIONS, Rooted Cuttings 

READY NOW. PROMPT DKLIVERT. 
RBD CHIZr, rich scarlet. It has the true Christmas color and is the leader 
in productiveness. Order now. Select stock. $12.00 per 100; $100.00 per 1000. 

F. DORNER & SONS CO., :t Lafayette, Ind. 

Mention The Review when yog write. 

^ m m- Always mention the Florists' RevieW when writing advertisers. W W W 



).- ^ — -*^*A.-J ,/.'. 3..-^t-..«. 



L^bi-^. 






1214 



The Weekly Florists^ Review* 



Mabch 7, 1907. 



VICTORY 

Has made good. Place yoar orders early for rooted CDttlngs. Prices, $6.00 per 100; $60.00 per 1000. A dlsconnt for cash with order. 

GUTTMAN & WEBER 



The Wholeaale Florist of Hew York, 43 W. 28tli Street. 

Mention The Review when you write. 



Grower, Lynbrook, Ii. I., N. Y. 



CARNATION CUTTINGS, Ready For Immediate Shipment. 



VICTORY per 100, $6.00 per 1000, $50.00 I LADY BOUNTIFUL. per 100, $3.00 per 1000, $86.00 

PINK PATTEN ** 6.00 ** 40.00 ENCHANTRESS ... . ** S.60 ** SO.OO 

VAR. LAWSON ** 4 00 ** 30.00 | B. MARKET ** 1.60 ** 12.60 

We can also give you immediate delivery on Winsor, one of the best novelties ever ofiFered to the trade. Send for complete list of varieties. 

674 W. Foster Avenue, CHICAGO 

Mention The Review when yon write. 



JENSEN & DEKEMA, 



CINONNATL 



The Market 



Last week developed a weak market 
and things lacked the snap and go which 
has been with us ever since the holidays. 
While this state of things is to be ex- 
pected during Lent, still, as we had es- 
caped so far, we were all in hopes that 
there would be no slack Lenten period 
this year. But it might have been much 
worse. Many of the retail men say that 
business was just as good as ever. But 
there is no question that there was a 
good let down, in the wholesale market 
at least. The demand was poor and 
prices dropped a little at a time till they 
were down to a fairly low level, low 
enough to make us feel a little uneasy. 
Monday there was a decided brace; in 
fact, last Friday and Saturday both 
showed a considerable increase in the 
demand. It would appear now that good 
business will prevail until after Easter. 
The supply of flowers is not heavy and, 
even should there be a few days when 
the demand is not all that could be de- 
sired, it will have little effect on the 
price of stock. 

Various Notea. 

The outlook for Easter continues to be 
good, but we need bright weather or a 
good many growers will fail to get in 
with a crop. W. K. Partridge reports 
that he expects to be in with a fine crop 
of both roses and carnations, which of 
course will go to supply his retail store. 
Max Eudolph says that his houses are 
just in shape to make Easter and he is 
happy over the prospects. As is usually 
the case though, there will be numerous 
growers who will miss it by about a 
week. Easter is early this year and with 
the cloudy weather that March usually 
brings it takes a smart one to be right 
in on the dot. 

February business was a revelation 
this year and every one reports a de- 
cided increase over last year. 

Fred Gear has just completed building 
his home in Clifton. He has spared 
neither expense nor labor to make his 
home right up-to-date and it is one of 
which he may well be proud. 

C. J. Ohmer. 



Kankakee, III. — E. Corbin, formerly 
of Grand Island, Neb., is preparing to 
plant five acres to Malaner Kran horse- 
radish, an imported variety, far superior 
to the domestic article. 



ORCHIDS... 



It is with pleasure we are able to inform our 
many friends that in one or two weeks time we 
shall receive our first importations of 

C. Trianae, C. Labiata, C. Mossiae, etc. 

Advices from our Mr. Carrillo state he is 
sending magnificent consignments. Our quality 
and price are now too well known to need 
further comment by us. We make a specialty 
of supplying the trade. Place your orders now, 
so as not to be disappointed, because we have 
large orders to fill. 

CARRILLO & BALDWIN 

Orcbld Growers and Importers 
SECAUCUS, N. J. 



Mention The Review when you write. 



• • 



• • 



ORCHIDS 

Importations 1907 

Get quotations from us on them — we save 
you money. Cattleya Mosslae, Gigas, Trianae, 
Labiata, Schroederae, Vanda Coerulea,* Den- 
drobium Wardianum and Nobile. Write today. 

JULIUS ROEHRS CO. 

The largest Orchid Growers and Importers In 
the United States. 

Rutherford, N. J. 

Mention The Review when you write. 

Beautiful New Pink Rose 

AURORA 

See announcement and fuU description with 
prices, in Florists' Review, Dec. 20th, issue. 

PAUL NIEHOFF, Lehighton, Pa. 

Mention The Review when yon write. 
Always Mention tbe.... 

Florists' Review 

Wben Wrltlns AdvertlserB. 



ORCHIDS 



Arrived in fine condition: Oattleya Harrl- 
soniae, C. Intermedia, 0. Gigas, G. Trianae, 
0. Speciosissima, C. Leopoldii, Laelia Pur- 
purata, Oncidium Varicosum Rogersii, O. 
Marsballianum, Phalaenopsis Amabilis, P. 
Schilleriana. 

Hurrellfrp^^^'r; Summit, N.J. 

Mention The Review when you write. 



OUUlllt 

Lager & 



/^ D ^ LJ I r%C Direct from 

\^ n W n I L/O the Collectors 

For Spring and Summer Delivery. 
We are giving quotations upon our entire Hat 
of South American, Philippine and East Indian 
Orchids. CholcBBt varieties of Cattleya, Odon- 
togloBsam, Pllamna, Cyprlpedlnm, Fha* 
laenopsia, Dendroblnm aqd Vanda. Among 
them the very rare Vanda Sanderiana for 
delivery June or July. 

A. HELD, 11-19 William St., NEW YORK 

Mention The Review when you write. 

New Pink Rose 

Miss Kate Mouiton 

Is the QujCBXf of all pink roses. 
Write us about it. 

Mlnneaoolis Floral Co., Minneaoolis. Minn. 

Mention The Review when yon write. 



Mabch 7, 1907. 



The Weekly Florists^ Review* 



1215 



SUCTION 



We will open the season March 
12 at noon, offering ten cases of 
Nursery stock per steamer Pots- 
dam, consisting of 



ROSES, RHODODENDRONS, MAGNOLIAS, AZALEAS, 
CONIFERS, VALLEY CLUMPS, BULBS, ETC. 

W. ELLIOTT & SONS, 201 Fulton St., NEW YORK 



Mention The Review when you write. 



We've Got 'Em! 

Eastei Lilies 

Send in your order for Easter Lilies 

$15 00 to $18.00 per 100. 

Cash with order, or satisfactory 
bank references. 

MIAMI FLORAL CO. 

S4 N. Main St. DAYTON, OHIO 

MPTitlon The Review when yon write. 

Elegantissima 

Runners, $1.50 per 100. 

Feverfew, dwarf, nice young plants, $1.00 
per 100; 2-In., 2c. 

Salvia Splendens, Bonfire, 2-in., 2c. 

Rooted Cuttings, ^^^^"^iioo 

Vinca VarieRata, Salvia Splendens, Bgnflre, 90c; 
Heliotropes, 3 kinds, $1.00. Paris Daisy, slant 
white, $1.00; Alexandra, $1.25. Fuchsias, 5 kinds, 
$1.25. Ajceratum Gurney, Pauline and white, 60c. 
Alternantheras, 3 kinds, 50c. Flowering Bego- 
nias, 8 kinds, $1.25. Rex Begonias, 20 kinds, 
mixed, $1.25. Parlor Ivy, 75c. Double Petunias, 
10 kinds, $1.00. Stevia serrate, variegated, 75c. 
Mums— Tranter, Alliance, Weeks. Enguehard, 
Pacific, P. Rose, Golden Age, Silver Wedding, 
Appleton, $1.25. Cash or 0. O. D. 

BYER BROS., CHAMBERSBURG, PA. 

Mention The Review when .von write. 

Easter Stock 

Easter Lily Plants, H. 4. (i, 8 buds, 12c per bud. 
Crimson Ramblers, «1 00 to $1.50 each. 
Hydrangeas, 8-ln. pots, to lU heads, «1.50 to 

$2.00 each. 

Lady Campbell Violets, In pans, 20c each. 

Ramblers Keady Now. 

CRABB & HUNTER FLORAL CO. 

Grand Rapids, Mlcb. 

Mention The Review when yon write. 

ROOTED CARNATION CITTINGS 

CraiK $5.00 per 100 

Lieut. Peary. ... 2 50 per 100 
Prosperity 1.00 per 100 

Above are exceptionally strong, healthy cuttings. 
Extra fine, strong 4-inch pot-grown Boston 

Ferns, $12.00 per ICO. Extra fine, strong 2>i-ln. 

Boston Ferns, $2.75 per 100; $26.00 per 1000. 

F. Wm. Heckenkamp. Jr., Quincy, III. 

Mention The Review whe n tou write. 

Nephrolepis 

Whitmani. 2X-in ^^^'^^ ^ ^^ 

BoBton. 2X-iiu 3.00p«rlOO 

HJ. Barrows &Son jflilt»nan, Mass. 

Always mention the Florists' Review 
when wrltlne advertisers. 



GERANIIMS 

Per 100 

10 var., 2 and 2%-in. pots, my selection $3.00 

10 var., 3>i-In. pots, my selection 4.00 

Alternantheras, red and yellow 2.00 

Pansy Plants, April 1 1.60 

Pansy Seed, giant-flowering oz., $4.00 

cash. JOS. H. CUNNINGHAM. DELAWARE, OHIO 

Mention The Review when yon write. 



CANNSS .„. 

10 var., 1 and 3 eyes, my selection $2.00 

Coleus 2.00 

Double Petunias, mixed 8.00 

Vinoa Var.. 2-in. pots 3.00 

Verbenas, April l 2.00 







COLEUS 

VERSCHAFFELTII.GOLDEN QUEEN, 
FIRE BRAND, LORD PALMER8TON, 
QUEEN VICTORIA, BECKWITH'S 
GEM. 

Prices of Rooted Cuttings by Express, OOc 
per 100: 15.00 per 1000 
GOLDEN BEDDER. Golden Yellow— the 

old original, true to name. Rooted cuttings, 

15c per 100; $<i.00 per 1000. 
FANCY VARIETIES. In addition to those 

named we offer a fine stock of twelve kinds. 

75c per 100; $0 00 per 1000. Strong cuttings. 

Free from Mealy bugs. 

AGERATDM 

STELLA GURNEY. Dwarf blue, 75c per 

100; $6.00 p»^r 1000. 
PRINCESS PAULINE, a combination of 

blue and white In same flower, 75c per 100; 

$G.0O per 1000. 

SALVIA 

SPLENDENS, tall standard, one Of the best, 
rooted cut tings, 75c per 100; $<;.00 per 1000. 

BONFIRE, medium dwarf, very jrood, 
rooted cuttings, 75c per 100; $«.00 per 1000. 

BKLIOTROPE 

ROOTED CUTTINGS, 75c per 100; SU.OO per 
1000. 

A. N. PIERSON, Cromwell, Conn. 


WholesaleTradeLlst 

ASPARAGUS PLUMOSUS,2^-lnch pots, $3.00 
per 100. 

CARNATIONS, Rooted Cuttings- Enchan- 
tress, Lawson, White Lawson, Red Sport. Bos- 
ton Market and Vesper. Price on application. 

FUCHSIAS, HELIOTROPE, YELLOW 

DAISY, from 2)^-lnch pots, 50c per doz.; $3.00 

per 100. 
GERANIUMS, best varieties from 3-lnch pots, 

$4.00 per 100. 
HYACINTHS, first size bulbs, red, white and 

blue, for Easter, $1.50 per doz.; $10.00 per 100. 

IVY, Hardy English, 3-lnch pots, $5.00 per 100; 
4-lnch pots, $1.50 per doz.; $10.00 per 100. 

MOONVINES, the true variety, 3-lnch pots, 75c 
per doz.; 15.00 per 100. 

PRIMULA OBCONICA, In full bloom, 4- in. 
pots, $1.60 per doz.; $10.00 per 100. 

SANSEVIERIA (Zebra plant), 4-lnch pots, 
strong, $1.50 per doz.; 3-lnch pots, $1.00 per doz. 

TULIPS, Tournesol and La Relne, 3 bulbs In 
4-ln. pots, $1.50 per doz.; $10.00 per 100. 

ROOTED CUTTINGS - Heliotrope, dark 
blue: Fuchsia Elm City; Cupheas, Parlor 
Ivy, Ageratum, blue and white, $1.00 per 100. 

SEEDLINGS from flats— Asparagus Spreng- 
eri, Smilax, Ageratum Blue Perfection, 
Petunias Howard's Star and Rosy Morn, $1.00 
per 100. 

^ n O C 1 r ll^b and Roy Streets, 
W. tiaC.I.C., PHILADELPHIA, PA. 


Mention The Review when you write. 


Mention The Review when you write. 




VERBENA KING 

Verbenas, the finest varieties on earth, 60c 
per 100; $5.00 per 1000. Express prepaid. 

Petunias, Dreer's and Henderson's strains, 
including our Kansas Double White, $1.25 per 
100: $10.00 per 1000. 

HeUotropes, $1.00 per 100; $8.00 per 1000. 

Coleus, 70c per 100; $6.00 per 1000. 

White Daisy, CalUomla, $1.00 per 100; 
$8.00 per 1000. 

Chrysanthemums, rooted cuttings, $1.25 
per 100; $10.00 per 1000. Send for list. 

Double Giant Sweet Alyssum, $1.00 per 
100; $8.00 per 1000. 

Cupheas, cigar plant, $1.00 per 100; $8.00 per 
1000. (Express prepaid on all rooted cuttings.) 

C. HUMFELD, Clay Center, Kan. 

Mention The Review when yon write. 


ASPARAGUS 

Asparagus Plumosus, 2-in., $2.50 per 100. 
8-in., $3.00 per 100. 3>^-in., $4.50 per 100. 

Asparasrus Spreneeii, 2-in., $2.00 per 100. 
3-in., $3.00 per 100. 3Ji-in., $4.00 per 100, or will 
exchange for any seasonable stock. 
Cash with order. 

F F Ail FN &^ m Intervals Park Florists 
li Li ALLlH 06 UUi BROCKTON. MASS. 

PIIAUOIAO Li"l» Beauty, strong, 

FUCHSIAS g^s^^r.-"'™- 

COLEUS 

10 varieties, including VerschaffeltUand Golden 
Redder. Absolutely free from mealy bug. 
Ready now. 2-lnch, $2.50 per 100. 
Cash with order. 

Lakeside Greenhouses, lErle, Pa. 


Boston Ferns, 6-ln. pots, $3.00 per doz.: 8-in. 
pots, $15.00 per doz.: 11-ln. pots, 12.50. Specimens 
In 12-ln. pots, $5.00, $6.00 and $7.00 each; 14-ln. pots, 
116 00 per pair. Scottll Ferns, 5^-ln. pots, $3.00 
per doz. ; 6-ln. pots, $6.00 per doz. ; 7 and 8-in. pots, 
|12X0 per doz. N. Elegantissima. 6><-ln. pots, 
$6.00 per doz. N. VFhitmani, 4Hi-in pots, $6.00 
per doz. gnperb Boxwood, just arrived, per- 
fectly shaped. Bushes for window boxes, 24-ln. 
Wgh, $1.00 to $1.50 a pair. Pyramid Box, 3 ft. 
nigh, 12.50 to $3.00 a pair; 3H ft. high, $4.00 a pair; 
* ^t. high, $4.50 and $5.00 a pair; 4Ji ft. high, $6.00 to 
17.00 a pair; 6 ft. high, $8.00. 

Cash or satisfactory New York references. 

ANTON SCHULTHEIS, College Point, N.Y. 

Mention The Review when you write. 


BOSTON FERNS 

Fine pot-grown stock from 6-in., 40c each; Wn., 
26c; 8-in.. $7.00 per 100; 23^-ln., $3.00 per 100. 

Nephrolepis Barrowell, from 5-in., 25o 
each. Write for special discount on large quan- 

*'^^ NELSON & KLOPFER 

1101 ruth Ave. PEORLA, ILL. 

Formerly Cation Greenhouse Co. 


Always Mention the.... 

Florists^ Review 

When Wrltins Advertisers. 



•v-'^^'^-vr- 



-T'jrrjK'.fV'P^Trii'l'^'!^!^ ",»■"";" •)S"VK7W'»»'»T'«»' ' ^'•fW»«.'ll'i|'"<lJ»^f 



1216 



The Weekly Florists' Review* 



March 7, 1907. 



PITTSBURG. 



The Market. 



Another week of Lent has made no 
change in business. There is nothing of 
importance doing in a social way, and, as 
a result, business is quiet. Funerals and 
small trade do not create demand enough 
to use up the stock brought in and prices 
have fallen to the bottom. Bulb stock 
is not in demand, with the exception of 
Murillo and yellow tulips. Good carna- 
tions are selling as cheap as $15 per 
thousand. Roses, alone, are not plenti- 
ful. Violets are in abundance, and if 
you buy in quantities you make the price. 

Various Notes. 

The Pittsburg Cut Flower Co. is re- 
ceiving a limited supply of fine lilies, 
but with prospects of plenty for the last 
of the month. W. Q. Potter is calling 
on out-of-town trade. 

J. B. Murdoch & Co. have been han- 
dling this season some fine stock from 
the E. G. Hill Co., Richmond, Ind. 

John Wyland has a big crop of Rich- 
mond on just now, which are fine. 

Charles Hoffman, of Allison Park, is 
handling real estate, in connection with 
his greenhouses, and says the odds are 
in favor of real estate. 

T. R. Dunn, who is running the old 
Gibb place, has been on the sick list for 
some time. 

The special meeting which had been 
proposed for the Florists ' Club has been 
postponed for the present, the committee 
not having been able to make the de- 
sired arrangement. 

Randolph & McClements have three 
houses going up on their new place. 
These are the first of a new range and 
are intended for palms and decorative 
stock. 

W. J. Smith is supplying A. W. Smith 
with quantities of fine sweet peas and 
bulb stock. 

G. & J. W. Ludwig, of the Allegheny 
Market, have been busy the last week 
with funeral work. 

Ernest Ludwig, we believe, is the only 
florist in this country who keeps his store 
open day and night the year around. His 
stand in the market is worth a visit any 
time. Hoo-Hoo. 

Cameron, Mo. — Allan Pfander, a young 
man 22 years of age, has just started in 
business and is doing well. He will erect 
a house here the coming season. 

Enclosed find $1 for another year's 
subscription to the Review, which so 
long as I am in the business I will never 
be without.— Louis H. Seaman, Danbury, 
Conn. 



Salvia Splendeos 

Per 100 Per 1000 

Aehyrantbes, red, 2-in $2.00 $18.00 

BegonU, Dew Drop. 2K-in 200 

ImpatienR Saltan!, 2^-iD 2.00 

SalTU Splendens, 2H-in 2.00 18.00 

Vines Ysrif gats, 2-Jn 2.00 18.00 

ChryBsnthemnmi, special list and prices 
on request. 

S. W« CaREY 

North End Florist 
801 Bloomfield Arenne, CBBANA, OHIO 



PREPARE FOR EASTER 



t^:^.:6 


v" ^^■Ri. ' 


% 


"^■■^ 


s^^^ 

^^r^' 


f- 


^/m 


^.'^^ 


•f 


1 


Si-/ ;^ 







MentioD The Review when yon write. 



An Immense Stock of Choice 

EASTER PLANTS 

Blooming Caster Week 

or earlier if desired, are now ready 
lor immediate shipment. 

Oome or matl your order direct to the head- 
quarters. Our reputation over the entire country 
from the Atlantic to the Pacific In growing Eas- 
ter stock for the wholesale market for many 
years past ought to be sufficient guarantee as to 
the truth of what we say and aaverilse. We 
have every bouse, nook and corner full of plants 
aijd they were never so fine as ibis year, 1907. 

While laborers, merchants. Jobbers, contract- 
ors, builders, etc., have Increased ihelr prices al- 
most double as u^ual, we have not advanced our 
prices; but look, we sell our plants at the same 
old prices charged two or three years ago when 
the cost of producing plants was much cheaper. 

What was my dnty on my trip to Glient, 

BelKlnm (the land of azaleas, arancarias 

and palms), last fall, 1906 7 Answer: Of 

course, the interests of my customers, not 
speaking of the 1100 souvenir cards which I 
mailed to my customers in America. For the 
betieQt of my customers I also C>ought Azalea 
Indlca for Easter trade, the cream of Belgium's 
production that money could buy. 

AZALEAS 

Now I am able to offer to my customers, and the 
trade in general, two houses full of Mme. Vander 
Cruyssen azaleas, the well known and much 
favored b^st double pink azalea that has given so 
much satisfaction all over America Plants as 
round as an anple. just covered with buds, 6 to 
7-ln. pots, at 60c, 75c. II OU, 11.25 tl.50, 11.75 and 12.00 
each. Other fine varieties auapted for American 
markets, such as Niobe, Benard, Andre Alba, 
Deutsche Perle (double white), Prof. Wolters, 
Empress of India. Vervaeneana (double varie- 
gated), and about eight more fine sorts, all cov- 
ered with buds, 6 to 7-ln. pots, 76c, $1.00, $1.25, $1.50, 
11.75 and $2.00 each; b% to 6-ln. pots, 60c to 60c. 
We have a fine limited quantity of azaleas, 50e to 
60c each, such as Apollo (double dark scarlet), 
Deutsche Perle, Simon Mardner, and a few oth- 
ers. 

Hydrangea Otaksa (pink), 6 to 7-in. pots, 
40c, 60c, 75c to $1.C0 each; also $1.25 and $1 60 each. 

Lillnm Maltlflorum and Japanese Lionsi- 
florum were never so fine as this sear, all sizes, 
and can meet all wants, 6-in. pots, 5 to 8 buds to 
a plant, 10c per bud 4 buds and under, 12c per 
bud. Raised from Henry F. Miche.U Co.'s special 
brand bulbs. 

As we sell ourllliessocheap, some otherplants 
must be taken with them. The cultivation of 
lilies is expensive. 

Spiraea Gladstone, 6 to 7-ln. pots, these 
plants are very larpe and bushy and unusually 
fine, full of buds, at 50c, 'ihc and $1.00 each 

Crimson Ramblrr Koses, 3 feet high and 
over, $1.00, $1.26, $1.60, 11.75 to I2.U0 each. 



In Philadelphia there's a florist noted, 
Aschmann, his name, his plants beyond com- 
pare; 

To a sweet girl his heart is all devoted. 
Next rank his Arancarias, passing fair; 

When seen together they're a pair so charming- 
Brimful of beauty— both hi* cannot keep; 

So to bis heart he'll hold his winsome darling. 
While you may have the Arancarias cheap. 

Arancaria Compacta Robusta, five years 
old, 7-ln. pots, 25 to 3u inches high, 4 to 6 tiers, 
width the same as height, very swell stuff, $1.76, 
$2.00 to t2.5U each 

Araucaria Kxcelsa Glauca, 4 years old, 4 
tiers. 20 luches high, $1 UO, $1.26 to $1.60 each. 
.Specimen Glauca, 7-in. pots, 6 years old, 6 tiers, 
31) to 36 inches high, $3.00 each. 

Araucaria Kxcelsa. 4 years old, 6-in. pots, 20 
to 25 inches high, 6, 6 to 7 tiers, $1.00, $1.26, $1.60 
each. 

Kentia Forsterlana, 7-ln. prts, made-up,one 
larKe plant In center, 3 small around. $1 60 to $1.75 
each. Single plants 36, 45 to 50 inches high, $1.00, 
$1.26 to $1.60 each. 

Cineraria Hvbrlda, have a hou<e full all 
shades, 6, 6i^ to 6-in. pots, $2 hi, $3.L0, $4.00 to $5.00 
per doz. 

BeKonIa, new Improved Erfordil, an immense 
bloomer, blooming the entire summer and win- 
ter, 6^-in. pots, $3.(10 per doz ; 4-in. pots, $1.80 per 
doz. 

Prlmnla Obconica, 5^-in. pots, $2 60 per doz. ; 
4-iu. pots, $1.80 per doz. 

Areca Saplda (palms), 6-in. pots, 60c each. 

Dracaena BraantI, 6-in. pots, 60c each. 

Ferns, NephroIepIs Barrowsll, 6-in. pots, 
60c to 75c each; 7-in. pots, $1.00. 

Scottll, 8-ln. pots, very large, $1.50 each; 6-in 
pots, 35c each; 6^ to 6-in. pots. 60c. 

Boston Ferns, 7-in. pots, 76c; 6 in. pots, 40c to 
60c each; 5-ln. pots, 26c to 30c each. 

Holly Ferns, 3-ln. pots, $1.20 per doz. 

Hyacinths, raised from first-class bulbs of 
my own Importation. These bulbs cannot be 
compared with ordinary stuff flooding the mar- 
ket. King of the Blues, Lavender (blue), Ger- 
trude (best pink). La Grandesse (white), 4-in. 
pots, $12.00 per 100. 

Tonrnesol Tulips, red and yellow variegated, 
the best selling Tulips on the market. Will stay 
in bloom 10 days. 3 bulbs planted in a 4-in. pot, 
I12.b0 per 100 or $1.50 per ooz. 

Double Von Slon Daffodils, tbe best double 
yellow narcissus in the world, will sell on sight. 
3 double-nosed bulbs planted In 5. 6^ and 6-ln. 
pots, $2.50 to $3.00 per doz. pots. All bulbs are 
strictly first-class, of my own importation and 
are now outside In coldfraqie and will bloom in 
about two weeks after bringing in greenhouse. 

Have about 200 pots Von Slon Daffodils, 
6!^-in. pots, 8 plants in a pot, in greenhouse nnw, 
in bud ready to open for immediate sale at $2.00 
per doz. This is a special offer, only good for a 
few weeks. 

Moonvlnes, Ipomaea Noctlflora (A. W. 
Smith, originator), best pure white, largest and 
most fragrant moonvlne in the world. I made 
a specialty of them for the past 16 years and am 
known as the Moonvlne Grower of America and 
grow yearly about 20,000. In 2H-in. pots, $5.00 per 
lUO. |Jow ready. 

Directions to visit myplace: Take Germantown 
or Willow Grove car at 13tb and Market Sts. to 
Ontario St., or 8th and Market St., and take Ger- 
mantown, Chestnut Hill or Willow Grove car to 
Ontario St. In going either route you walk two 
squares east on Ontario St. 

Mention if pots are wanted with all plants. 
Cash with order, please. 

All goods must travel on purchaser's risk. 



Latrobk, Pa., Feb. 18, 1907. 
Mr. Godfrey Aschmann. 

Dear Sir- 1 received your plants in good condi- 
tion, satisfactory to me. I am pleased in every 
way. Bespectrully, 

EDW. LBIZMANN. 
(Above order amounted to $86 25, for 55 azaleas, 
19 kentias and arancarias and ferns.) 

Philadelphia, Feb. 25. 
I hare seen Mr. Aschmann's Easter stock and I 
can truthfully say that it never looked finer, and 
he never before had such a large stock. Am 
pleased to recommend our customers to Mr. 
Aschmann. F. J. MICHELL, 

of the firm of H. F. Michell Co. 
Huntington, L. I., N. Y.. March 1, 1907. 
Godfrey Aschmann Philadelphia. 

Dear Sir— I was well pleased with the plants 
received from you last year, so I send you 
another order this year. (Here follows order.) 
Yours truly. 

LEANDEB D. HUBD. 



GODFREY ASCHMANN 

Importer and Wholesale Grower of Pot Plants 
1012 ONTARIO STREET, PHILADELPHIA, PA. 



lPpr«i^p^Ri(,iiij;im;w;i.nUJJ!i|g|lji!IP!PrfH|pep^!l!piriwr 



^gummim^mum-'' ' •» 



March 7, 1907. 



The Weekly Florists' Review* 



1217 




Azaleas For Easter 



We have a splendid lot of beautifully 
budded plants, just rig^ht for Easter. 



All colors, 50c, 75c, $1.00, $l.50, $2.00 to $5 OO each. 



Can be Shipped by Express 
with or without pots. 



BOBBINK & ATKINS 



Nurserymen and Florists 

Mention The Review when you write. 



RUTHERFORD. N. J. 



Wholesale Price List 

Palffls and Ferns 

Variety Size Each Dozen 100 

Areca Lutescens 4 $3.00 

6 $150 

Assorted Perns for ferneries $3.00 

Asparagus Plomosas 2 .50 3.00 

3 .76 

4 1.60 12,00 

6 3.00 

6 4.20 

Asparagus Sprengeri 2 3.00 

3 7.00 

•' 4 1.25 

5 200 

Boxwood 7 .50 

Standards. 4 ft.. 4.C0 
Pyramids, 4 ft.. 4.00 

Cibotlum Mchiedei 6 1.00 

Oocos, 3 In a P'>t 4 75c-$1.0O 

Dracaena Indlrlsa 3 5.00 

6 5.00 

" 30-34 high 7 .76 9.00 

" " 8 12.00 

Dracaena Teriulnalis 3 2.o0 

6 .76 

4 .25 8.00 

Fleas Elastica 5 .35 4.00 

Kentia Beimoreana, 3-in., 12-14 inches high, 5-6 

leaves $^ 00 uer doz 
Kentia Beimoreana, 7-in., 32-40 inches high, 6-7 

leaves, $2.50 each. 
Kentia Hor^terlaua. 6in., 30-36 inches high, 6-7 

leaves. $1 50 each. 
Kentia Forstenana, 7-in., 32-40 inches high, 5-7 

leaves. $2.50 each. 
Kentia Forsteriana, 8-in., strong, 48-50 inches 
high, 6-7 leaves, $3.50 each. 

Latania Borbonica, 5-in doz. $5.00 

7-in doz. 12.00 

Nephrolepis Bostonlensis, 4-in doz. l.5o 

5-in doz. 3.(;o 

6-ln doz. 4 20 

" 6-in., strong.doz. 6.00 

" 7-ln doz. 9.0O 

" " larger specimens, 

$1 50, $2 00 and $3.C0 each. 

Nephrolepis Elegamissima. 6-ln doz. 6.00 

Nephroleiiis Elegai tissima. 7-in doz. 9.00 

Pteris Wimsetti. 4-in doz 1.25 

Phoenix Canariensis, 9-in., fine busby 

specimens, $3 00 each doz. 36.00 

Phoenix Recilnata. 4-in doz. 3.00 

6-ln doz. 5.00 

Pandanus Dtilus, 5-in doz. 5.00 

6-ln doz, 600 

TheGeo-WittboldCo. 

1657 BuckiDgham Place, CIIICAfiO 

Mention The Review when you write. 



SEASONABLE STOCK 



CANNAS, 



1 



two and three eyes, Alsace, Chas. Henderson, David Harum, Duke of 
Marlborough, Italia, Mme. Berat and Shenandoah. $2.00 per 100: $17.00 
per 1000. Beaute Poitevine, Crimson Bedder. Egandale, Florence Vaughau 8ouv. de 
Antoine Crozy, $3.00 per 100; $25.00 per 1000. (See Catalog No. 5 for complete list). 

TUBEROUS-ROOTED BEGONIAS, white, pink, scarlet, crimson and yellow, single- 
llowered, $2.50 per 100. Double flowered, $4 50 per 100. 

GLOXINIA BULB^, separate colors, white, red', violet, violet bordered, white and rose 
bordered white, $4.00 per 100. 

ANTHERICUM VITTATUM VARIEGATUM. strong plants, grand for vases or baskets, 
$3.00 per 100. 

ASPARAGUS SPRENGERI, 2>^-inch, strong, $2 50 per 100. 

BEGONIA VULCAN and VERNON, 2^ inch, fresh stock ready for shifting, $2 50 per 100, 

HARDY PINKS, 2inch pots, assorted varieties, $2.50 per 100. 

ROSES, strong young plants of Olothilde Soupert, White and Pink Cochet, $3.00 per 100; 
$25.00 per 1000. 

The Slorrs & Harrison Co. 

PAINESVILLE, OHIO. 

Mention The Review when yon write. 






I 



WE NEED MORE ROOM 'V 

ASPARAGUS PLUMOSUS, 3 and 4-incb, $6.00 and $9.00 per 100. Extra fine. 
ASPARAGUS SPRENGERI, 3 and 4-inch, $5.00 and $8.00 per 100. 
BOSTON FERNS, 3, 4, 5. 6-lnch. $7.00. $12.50, $25.00 and $40.00 per 100. 

PIERSONI, ANNA FOSTER and SWORD FERN, 2]^, 3. 4. 5, 6-inch, $4.00, $7.00, $12.50, 

$25 00 and $40.uO per 100. 
PIERSONI, ELKGANTISSIMA and 8COTTII, 2H. 3, 4-incb, $6 00. $10.00, $17.50. 
SALVIAS. In best varieties: HELIOTROPES, in 6 varieties: COLEUS, in standard and 

fancy-!eaved: rooted cuttlnsH and 2}4-inch 
Snedal iirice f>n ►urplus stock of CANNA8. Ask for descriptive list. 
50,000 PERENNIAL PLANTS for Spring delivery. Price list now ready. 

The MOSBAEK GREENHOUSE CO., Onarga, III. 



Mention The Review when you write. 



ALTERNANTHERAS 

Strong rooted cuttings; red and yellow, 
60c per 100; $4.00 per 1000. 

BRILLIANTIS8IMA (the best red), 60c 
per 100; $5.00 per 1000. 

DAVIS BROS., - Morrison, Ul 

Mention The Review when yon write. 
WE ARE BOOKING ORDERS FOR 

NEPHROLEPIS 
AMERPOHLII 

THE SENSATIONAL NEW FERN 

Awarded Highest Certificate of Merit at the 
S. A. F. Convention, 1906. 

JANESVILLE FLORAL CO., Janesville. Wis. 

Mention The Review whan yon write. 



We are HeadQuartera for 

Princess Violet 

stock. Orders booked for immediate deliv- 
ery. Strong, field-grown plants, $50.00 per 1000. 

WILLIAM SIM, Cllftondale, Mass. 

Mention The Review when you write. 

Finest Stock 

of Madeira Vine, Byaclnthns Can<*lcans, 
Oxalla, Spotted Calla and German Iris In 
the United States. Send for list of Bulbs 
and Hardy Plants. 

E. S. MILLER, WADING RIVER. N. Y. 

Mention The Review when you write. 



1218 



The Weekly Florists' Review* 



March 7, 1907. 



TARRYTOWN, N. Y. 

The regular meeting of the Tarrytown 
Horticultural Society was held February 
26, President Howard Nichols in the 
chair. Enoch Evans and A. L. Marshall 
were nominated for active membership. 

A fine vase of the new scarlet carna- 
tion, Beacon, from Peter Fisher, Ellis, 
Mass., was on exhibition and was 
awarded a certificate of merit. Three 
well-grown plants of Primula stellata 
were exhibited by Thomas Atkinson, gar- 
dener to Mrs. Henry Siegle, Mamaron- 
eck, N. Y., who was awarded a cultural 
certificate. The monthly prize for twelve 
roses, other than American Beauty, Avas 
won by James Ballantj^ne, with Brides- 
maid. 

It was decided to hold the June show 
June 14 and the dates were fixed for the 
fall show for November 6 to 8. A 
communication from David Eraser, Pitts- 
burg, offering a prize of $25 for twelve 
blooms Chrysanthemum Miss Clay Frick 
at the fall show, was thankfully re- 
ceived, and it was decided to oifer $15 
for the first and $10 for the second prize. 
A third prize of $10 was then donated 
for the same exhibit by James Requa. 

James I. Donlan read a paper on ' ' Art 
in Plant and Flower ' ' and gave some 
good illustrations in the arrangement of 
cut flowers. Joseph Bradley contributed 
the cut flowers, among which were Roman 
hyacinths. Primula obconica, mignonette, 
cyclamen, carnations and sweet peas. A 
lively discussion followed. This was con- 
ceded to be the most animated meeting 
tlie society has had in many months and 
was thoroughly enjoyed by all. At the 
March meeting an essay will be read on 
* ' Outdoor Roses. ' ' D. McFarlaxe. 



ORANGE, N. J. 

The regular monthly meeting and ex- 
hibition of the New Jersey Floricultural 
Society was held ilarch 1. Displays of 
orchids were made by Lager & Hurrell, 
.Fulius Roehrs Co. and Orson A. Miller, 
and there were the usual contributions 
from neighboring estates of carnations, 
miscellaneous flowers and plants. Reso- 
lutions were passed upon the death of 
O, D. Munn, a patron of the society. The 
ofi'er was made of a prize of $10 for 
twenty-five Winsor carnations at the fall 
show, by the F. R. Pierson Co., by its 
representative, William F. Ross. 

J. B. D. 

The Wide 
Awake Florist 

will write at once for our catalog of 
ROSKS. SHRUBS and aU kinds of 
plants for Florists' use. Write to- 
day, it's free. We have one order for 
this Spring's shipment of five hundred 
and cighty-flve thousand Rose Plants and 
we can still fill your orders. 

THE GOOD & REESE CO. 

The Largest Bose Growers in the World 

SPRINGFIELD, OHIO 

Mention The Review when you write. 

ROOTED CUTTINGS 

PER 100. PREPAID 

AK«ratum, Gurney and Pauline 60c. 

Aiternantheras, beat red and yellow 50e. 

Heliotrope, blue 85o. 

Verbenas, mixed 60c. 

Hardy Pinks, red 75c. 

8HIPPENSBUB6 FLOBAL CO , Shippensborg, Pa. 



HARDY CHRYSANTHEMUMS 

The following list contains a collection of Hardy Chrysanthemums 
which we are satisfied are second to none in the coantry, as we have 
made a specialty of these for the past 15 years, introducing many 
new varieties, representatives of which will be found in every col- 
lection. The demand for them as cut flowers was very heavy last 
fall and commission houses and retail men are advising their grow- 
ers to plant heavy this season. 

HARDY CHRYSANIHEMUMS Hardy Pompon Ghnrsanthemums 



Large Flowering or Aster Varieties 

6O0 per doi.; 83. OO per 100. 

Arabella, crimson-salmon, very dwarf 

Asbbury, eulphur-wbite. 

Aunt Jane, yellow shaded bronze. 

Bertha, larse white, open center. 

Bohemia, fine pure yellow. 

Boston, golden bronze. 

Kthel, exquisite violet-red, long: sprays 

Plndon, violet rose. 

Pred J, red orange. 

Gladys, flushed pearl. 

Gertrude, pure white, open center. 

Hester, pearl-white, t'haded flesh. 

Bl]os, beautiful primrose pink. 

Jerry, rose-lilac. 

Julia Lagrravere, crimson maroon. 

King: Henry, straw white. 

Lady Neylor, white. 

Louisa, large white, long stem. 

Mrs. Porter, bright bronze. 

Mrs. Snyder, splendid early yellow. 

Penelope, large white, tall. 

Peto, rich bronze. 

Paraaron, early white, open center. 

Prince ol Wales, best pure white. 

Queen of Bui, violet rose. 

Salem, silver rose, long quilled. 

Sir Michael, lemon-yellow, open center. 

The Hub, fine white, open center. 

Willie, lilac and white. 



Small Flowered or Button Varieties. 
40c per doz.; $8.00 per 100, 

except as noted. 

Alice Gary, pare yellow. 

Cerise Queen, cerise pink. 

Da^^, daybreak pink. 

■dna, beautiful glowing violet-red. 

Ermine, bright orange scarlet. 

Golden Pheasant, deep orange-yellow. 

Henrietta, bronze, yellow edge. 

James Boon, pure white. 

Jeanetta, silver bronze and rose. 

Uttle Pet, rich violet red. 

Rhoda, pink, shaded white. 

Sunshine, pure gnlden bronze, $3.00 per 100. 

Tennyson, pure yellow. 

ANEHONE VARIETIES 

50c per doz.; $3.00 per 100. 

Earl, pearl-white, silver rose center, dwarf. 

LAdy Olivia, beautiful white. 

Grade, white, full center. 

Mathilda, white. 

Oban, silver pink, full anemone center. 

Success, silver rose, pearl white center. 

SINGLE VARIETIES 

60c per doz.; $3.O0 per 100. 

Aaron, bron7e-scarlet. 
Northumberland, bright Scarlet, yellow 

disc. 
Princess of Thule, red orange. 
Sir Walter Ralelsh, light bronze. 
Rosy Mom, silver pink. 



R. VINCENT, JR., & SON, White Marsh, Md. 



Mention The Review 


when you write. 








ROOTED CUTTING 
BARGAINS 

COLKDS, !.*> best named varieties, all 
distinct, 75c per 100; $6.00 per 1000. 

DOUBLE PETONIAS. white, pink and 
variegated. The varieties. Seafoam, Pk. 
Beauty and Intensity, $2.00 per 100. 




List of Seasonable Stock 

OrPERED BT 

D. L. ALGSPLRGER & SONS 

Box 778, Peoria, lU. 

Boston Ferns, all sizes. Write for prices on 
large or small quantities. 100 1000 
Pleraoni Perns, 'ij^-in $4.00 


SAT VTA 8PLKNDKN8. three of the best 


Plomoana, 3-ln 7.00 


KorldprR to fiatp iSl .SO ner 100. 


Sprengerl, 2 in 2.50 $25.00 




Feverfew, 2-inch 2.60 


Spnd for our Catalogue of 


Tinea Var.. 2-inch 300 2500 


Plants, Cuitings and Seeds. 


Lemon Terbena, 3-inch 6.60 


NATHAN SMITH & SON 


Coleus, rooted cuttings, red and 
yellow 1.00 7.50 


ADRIAN, MICH. 


Geranlnms, 8-inch, in dark red, 

scarlet.etc. for March delivery 6.00 55.00 
Hydrangeas for Eaiter blooming in 6, 8 and 

9-inch pots, line plants. Write for our 

prices. 

All above stock is clean and well grown. 
SATISFACTION GUARANTEED. 






k ^ k ^ ^ A ^^V 


A7AI FAS 




Mention The Review when yon write. 


I have a large quantity of well budded and 
shapely plants. 12 to 14-in., 50c each: 14 to 
16- in., 750 each; 16 to 18-in.,. $1.00 each. 

Cinerarias and Cyclamen, 4-in., $10.00 
per 100: 5-in.. $15 00 per 100. 

Obconica Primroses, 4-in.. 18.(0 per IOC; 
5-in.. $12.00 per 100. 

Araucarlas. 3 to 4 tiers, 50c each; 4 to 5 
tiers. 66c each. 

Rubbers, 18 inches high, 2)C each. 

C. Whitton uTicA. nT'y. 


NOTICE 

To all American Nurserymen and Seedsmen 
desiring to keep in touch with commercial horti- 
culture in England and the (Continent of Europe, 
four best means of doing this is to take in the 

Horticultural Advertiser 

Our circulation covers the whole trade In Great 
Britain and the cream of the European firms. 

Imoartial reports of all novelties, etc. Paper 
free on receipt of 75 cents, covering cost of post- 
age yearly. 

A. & C. PEARSON 

Lowdham, Nottinfirham, England 


Mention The Review when you write. 


Mention The Review when yon write. 



■>'.tfi^'l-.'iiL._ .e^isa..!*.^ 



T|^f5BP'^T"r t"'*i.J''"-V'"?l'v':'"«»^''"'.''"*'<"Mr 



■«|i<m(..* .' 



March 7, 1907. 



The Weekly Florists" Review* 



J2J9 




SPIRAEA FOR rORCING 



GLADSTONS. 



If you have not all th* Spiraea tbat you want tor Decoration Day, we still have a 
few thousand fine clumps left, which we offer as lone as unsold as follows: 

The best of all Spiraeas. Free bloomer, fine large spikes. Extra selected clumps, $12.00 per 100. 
▲STILBOIDK8 FLOBIBUNDA. 15.00 per 100; case of 800 clumps for $12.00. 

COMPACTA MULiTIFLiORA. Strong clumps, $6.00 per 100. JAPONICA. Strong clumps, $5.00 per 100. 

GLADIOLUS COLVILLEI 

ALBA, "The Bride." White 75c per 100; $6.00 per 1000 

RUBRA. Red 60c per 100; $5.00perl000 



Miniature Hyacinths or Dutch Romans 

We still have a few thousand of these left, which we can supply 



in a fine assortment of named varieties. $2.00 per 100; $16.00 per 
1000. These can be potted up, if done at once, and will make nice 
Easter stock. 

NARCISSUS 
DOUBLE VON SION. We have a few thousand extra quality 

bulbs to offer. $1.50 per 100; $12.00 per 1000. 
PRINCEP8. A few thousand extra sized bulbs. 75c per 100; 

$6.60 per 1000. 
SIMGLS VON SION. $1.25 per 100; $10.00 per 1000. 

If you can use any of the stock offered. 



TULIPS 

The best pink for late forcing. 



$1.00 per 100; 
The favorite forcing variety. 



COTTAGK MAID. 

$8.00 per 1000. 
KKIZKRSKROON, (Grand Due.) 
$1.75 per 100; $15.00 per 1000. 

LILY OF THE VALLEY 

PIKRSON'S PRKMHR. Best select Berlin for earliest forcing. 

$1.50 per 100; $13.00 per 1000. Case of 2000 for $24.00. 
, let us have your order quickly. 



F. R. PIERSON CO.,Tarrytown=on=Hudson, N. Y. 



Mention The Review when yon write. 



Seasonable Stock 



100 1000 

Baby Primrose, 2H-in $2.00 

Carex Japonica, 2>>i-in 2.50 

ColeuB, 10 sorts, 21-^-ln 1.80 $15.00 

Geraniums, 2^-in., Jean Viaud, 

Mme. Salleroi 2.50 26.00 

Heliotrope, purple. 4 good sorts, 

21^-ln 2.50 

Tinea, Variegated, 4-in 7.00 

Violets, 2i^-in.TPrlnceB8 ofWales, 

California and Luxonne 2.50 20.00 

Hardy Pink Hibiscus, Mo8cheu> 
tos, 1-year-old field plants, fine 
stock 3.00 26.00 

Hardy Hibiscus, Crimson Eye, 
1-year-old field plants 2.60 

Ferns, Boston, 2H-in 3.00 26.00 

3-ln 6.00 

4-ln 10.00 

Plersonl, 3-ln 6.00 

4-in 10.00 

ROSES, 150 sorts, 2>i^-ln. and 4-ln. Write for 
prices. Send for our General Trade List 
of Roses, Carnations, Geraniums, Mums, 
Miscellaneous Bedding plants, Coleus, 
Cannaa, Hardy Shrubbery and Plants, Palms 
and Miscellaneous Flowering and Orna- 
mental plants. Send for it today. 

SPRINGFIELD FLORAL CO. 

SPRINQFIELD, OHIO 



DAHLIAS... 

15 leading varieties, all under name, miaran- 
teed true, including the best sorts in cultivation, 
such as Clifford W. Bruton. Oban, Queen 
Victoria. Admiral Dewey, Gloriosa. Frank Smith. 
Orange King. Catharine Duer. Maid of Kent, etc. 

We olfer HXAVT PIKLD CLUMPS, JUST 
AS DUG, $5.00 per 100 ; $45.00 per 1000. 

THE DINGEE & CONARD CO. 

WEST GROVE, PA. 




DAHLIAS 



...True to Name... 

The cream of novelties and older 
varieties. Prices always reasonable and 
satisfaction guaranteed. Send for catalogue 
of Dahlias. Hollyhocks. Hardy Perennials. 
Gladioli, etc. 

" THE DAHLIA MANUAL," a new up-to- 
date work on Dahlias and Dahlia culture, 
amply illustrated. Thisbookcontainsnoihing 
in the nature of advertising matter and is 
reliable throughout. If your dealers don't 
have it send direct. Price, 86c. 

W. W. WILMORE 

..Dahlia Specialist.. 
Box 38S, DENVER, COLO. 



Mention The Review when you write. 



FOR SALE 



NEW SINGLE GERANIUM 

SYCAMORE. 

Bright, clear salmon-pink, cross between Mrs. 
E. G. Hill and Paul Bruant. Its tlie BES* ger- 
anium grown. Write for descriptive circular. 

St. Clair Floral Co., - Belletille, III. 

Always mention the Florists' Review when 
writing advertisers. 



Ready now in Excellent Condition; CHOICE COLORED DRACAENAS. 

Terminalia, large plants, 60c to 75c. 

Retina ] Lindeni 1 

Hybrida Massaneeana Linn^^eiKn 

Amabilis aSc to $1.00 Gladstonei [Sl.OO to $1.50 

Stricta-Grandis Imperialis J 

Knerkii J Fraerrans and Brasiliensis, 75c 
Ficns Pandurata, 7-inch pots, 7 to 10 leaves, $2.50; also large specimens. 

ROSE HILL NURSERIES, New Rochelle, N. Y. 

Mention The Review when you write. 



NEPHROLEPIS WHITMANI, 

Strong plants, from 2>i-in. pots. $10.00 per 100. 

NEPHROLEPIS ELEGANTISSIMA, 

2H-in. pots, 16.00 per 100. 

P. R. QIINLAN, Syracuse, N.Y. 

Mention The Review when yon write. 

BAY TREES, PALMS 

Bazus, Azalea Xndica, Bhododendrona, 

Bverg'reens, Kerbaceons Plants, 

Boses, Trained Fmlt Tree*, 

Oreenhouse Orape Vines. 

Ask for catalogue. 

BOBBINK& ATKINS, Ruthorford.N. J. 

Mention The Review when you write. 



BOSTON FERNS 

5-inch. 12.60 per doz. 3-lnch. $7.00 per 100. 

CANNA8, dormant, with two or three eyet, 
Alphonse Bouvler. Florence Vaug-han, Peter 
Henderson, Beaute Poltevine, MarthaWashing:- 
ton, Mme. Crozy. Qneen Charlotte, $2.26 per 100. 

Rooted cuttings of IVY GERANIUM, mixed, 
11.50 per 100. 

ST£VIA, stock plants. 75c per doz.; $1.00 per 100. 
Cash with order. 

CONVERSE GREENHOISES. Webster, Mass. 

Mention The Review when you write. 



Flo^^erlne: 

Plants 

Ncwr 



SPECIALS . 

Azaleas $1.00. $1.25 andr*i..50 each 

Cyclamen .S-lnch, $8.00 per 100 

Chinese Primroses, 3-lnch, $8,00 per 100, 4-lnch, 

$12.50 per 100. 
Obconica, IMn.. $8.00 per 100; 4-ln , $12.,'')0 per 100 

Baby 3-in.,$H.(X) per 100; 4-ln., $12.50 per 100 

Hyacinths, 4 in., $1.50 per doz.; 5-ln.,$2 OOperdoz. 

Order of GEO. A. KUHL, Pekin, 111. 

Mention The Review when yon write. 



-.'>TS?'^™ 



1220 



ThcWeekly Rorists* Review* 



Mabch 7, 1907. 



CLASSIFIED PUNT ADVERTISEMENTS. 

Rates for advertising under this liead 10 cents a line net, per insertion. New advs. and changes must reach us by 
Wednesday morning at latest to secure proper classification. For index to display advertisements see page 1234 



ACHYRANTHES. 



Acbyrantbes, red, 2V4-ln., 3c. Yellow, mot- 
tled red, 21^-In., 3c. 
Hammerschmldt & Clark. Medina, O. 

Achyranthes, red and yellow, 2-ln., 2c. 

A. J. Baldwin, Newark, O. 



ADIANTUMS. 



Adlantum hybrldum, for 2^-ln. pots, $0.00 
per 100; $45.00 per 1000. Orders for future de- 
IlTery booked It desired. 

A. Ley & Bro., Langdon, D. C, or 

0. W. Klcbllng, 3442 St. Charles Ave., New 
Orleans, La. 

ADIANTUM FARLEYENSE, fine, well-grown 
plants, 5 to 6%-ln. pots, $9.00 to $24.00 per doz. 
Julius Roehrs Co.. Rutberford, N. J. 

Adlantum Farleyense, 5-ln., $9.00 doz. 

J. A. Peterson, Westwood, Cincinnati. O. 



AGERATUMS. 



Ageratums Pauline and otbers, 2-ln., $1.50 
per 100; rooted cuttings, 60c per 100, $5.00 per 
1000. Andrew Peterson, Ho opeston. 111. 

Ageratum Little Blue Star, a new true dwarf, 
B. C. and 214-ln., per 100, 75c and $2.00. 
Moabaek Green house Co., Onarga, 111. 

Inimitable giant blue; rooted cuttings, $1.50 
per 100; 2%-ln., $3.00 per 100. 
J. C. Sc h midt Co.. Bristol, Pa . 

Ageratum Princess Pauline, R. C, 50c 100. 
Cash. J. P. Cannata, Mt. Freedom, N. J. 



ALTERNANTHERAS. 

Altemuntheras, red, yellow and brllllantlsslma, 
July struck cuttings, $10.00 per 1000. From 
■and, January struck, $5.00 per 1000. 

Mount Hope Greenhouses, Morgan Park, 111. 

Alternantbera brllllantlsslma, "original stock." 
finest red of all, from soil, $1.00 100. A. nana, 
yellow, 70c 100. Prepaid. 
A. J. Baldwin, Newark. Ohio. 

Alternantheras, red and yellow, fall-struck, 
from soil, 75c per 100; $6.00 per 1000. 
N. O. Caswell, DelaTan, 111. 

Alternantheras, In the best four varieties. 
Can supply In 1000 and 10,000 lots. 
Mosbaek Greenh ouse Co., Onarga, 111. 

Alternantbera rooted cuttings, red and yellow, 
50c 100; $4.00 1000. Cash. 
E. B. Randolph. Delavan. 111. 

Alternantheras, red and yellow, rooted cut- 
tings, 50c 100; $4.00 1000. 
Davis Bros., Morr ison. 111. 

Alternantheras, red and yellow, fall struck 
cuttings, $5.00 per 1000. 
Wlsner Greenhouse, Rockford, 111. 

Alternantheras, 60c 100; $5.00 1000. 

Baur Floral Co., Erie, Pa. 

ALYSSUM. 

Alyssum, giant and dwarf. Rooted cuttings 
and 2-ln., $1.00 and $2.50 per 100. 

Mosbaek Greenhouse Co., Onarga, 111. 



AMPELOPSIS. 



Ampelopsls Engelmannl, 2 yrs. old, $8.00 per 
100; 3 yrs. old. $12.00 per 100. 

Klebm's Nurseries. Arlington Heights. 111. 

ARAUCARIAS. 

Araucarla excelsa," A. excelsa glauca and A. 
compacts robusta In all sizes. Prices are given 
In display adv. 
G. Aschmann, 1012 Ontario St.. Phila. 

Araucarlas, 25c, 50c and 65c each. 

C. Whitton, City St., Utlca. N. Y. 



ASPARAGUS. 



Asparagus plumosus, 2V4-in., $2.50; 4-in., 
$8.00. Sprengeri. 2%-in., $2.50; 3-in., $4.00; 
4-ln., $6.00, $55.00 1000. All are strong plants 
ready for larger pots. 
Goshen Floral Co., Goshen. Ind. 

Asparagus plumosus, 2^, 3 and 4-ln., $3.00, 
$6.00 and fO.OO per lOO. 

Asparagus Sprengeri, 2%, 3 and 4-in., $2.00, 
$4.00 and $8.00. Special prices on 1000 lots. 

Mosbaek Greenhouse Co., Onarga, 111. 

Asparagus Sprengeri, 3-in., $3.50; 4-in., $5.60; 
S-in., extra strong, $17.50 per 100. Cash, please. 
Oak Hill Greenhouses. Lebanon, Ind. 

Asparagus plumosus and Sprengeri, 2-ln., $3.00 
100. Other sizes given in display adv. 
Wlttbold Co., 1657 Buckingham PL, Chicago. 



We want 25,000 Asparagus plumosus, either 
IV^-ln. pots, or seedlings. The stock must be 
first-class. 
Address No. 95, care Florists' Review, Chicago. 

Fine 2-ln. Asparagus plumosus', $2.50 per 100; 
$20.00 per 1000. Cash with order or good refer- 
ences. Erie Floral Co., Erie, Pa., or 
• W. F. Kastlng, Buffalo, N. Y. 

Asparagus plumosus, 4-ln.. strong, $7.60 per 
100, to close out quick. Cash. 

Maple City Greenhouses, Honesdale, Pa. 

Asparagus plumosus and Sprengeri. Sizes and 
prices given in display adv. 

W. J. & M. S. Vesey, Fort Wayne, Ind. 

Asparagus plumosus and Sprengeri; for sizes 
and prices seo display adv. 
F. E. Allen & Co., Brockton, Mass. 

Asparagus plumosus, 2^-ln. and 3-in.. fine, 
$3.00 and $5.00 per 100. 
W. H. Gullett & Sons, Lincoln, 111. 

Asparagus Sprengeri, 2%-in., ready for shift, 
$3.00 100, $25.00 1000. 
J. W. Dunford, Clayton, Mo. 

Asparagus plumosus nanus, strong, 4-ln., 
$10.00 per 100. 

'Jas. Hamilton, Mt. Washington, Md. 

Asparagus Sprengeri, from bench, ready for 
4 and 6-ln.. 4e. 

Hopkins & Hopkins, Chepachet, R. I. 

ASPARAGUS PLUMOSUS NANUS. 

Cut strings, 50 cents each. 

W. H. ELLIOTT, BRIGHTON, MASS. 

Asparagus Plumosus, 500 3-In., 4c, to close out. 
Park Side Greenhouses, 746 E. 70th St., Chicago. 

Asparagus Sprengeri, plants from 4-in. pots, 
$8.00 per 100. M. E. Eaton, Lyons, Iowa. 

Plumosus nanus, 2V^-ln., $2.50; 2-ln.. $2.00 
100. Cash. Fred Grohe, Santa Rosa, Cal. 

Asparagus plumosus, 3-in., fine, $5.00 per 100. 
Schartr Bros., Van Wert, Ohio. 

Asparagus Sprengeri, 2-ln., $2.25 per 100. 

Hammerschmldt & Clark, Medina, 0. 

Asparagus Sprenperl, 2%-in., $2.50 100. 

Storrs & Harrison Co., PalnesviUe, O. 

Asparagus plumosus, 2%-ln., $3.00 100. 
C. Eisele, 11th & Roy, Phila. 

Asparagus Sprengeri, 2-in., $2.50 100. 
D. U. Augspurger & Sons, Bx. 778, Peoria. 111. 

ASTERS. 

Aster plants. New Early Wonder, earliest 
white for cut flowers, earlier than Queen of 
Market, 60c per 100; $5.00 per 1000. Cash. 
Wm. Blerstadt & Son, Springfield, 111. 

Novae-Angliae asters, strong, $3.00 100. $25.00 
1000. Ellsworth Brown & Co., Seabrook, N. H. 

AZALEAS. 

Azaleas, araucarlas, palms, etc., grown espe- 
cially for American florists. 
H. Frank Darrow, Box 1250, New York. 

Azalea Indica, all leading var. Write for 
prices. F. W. O. Schmltz, Prince Bay, N. Y. 

Azaleas, well budded, 60c, 75c and $1.00 ea. 
C. Whitton, City St.. Utlca. N. Y. 

Azalea indica. Ask for catalogue. 
Bobbink & Atkins. Rutherford. N. J. 

Azalea Amcena, 5c to $3.00 each. 

Elizabeth Nursery Co., Elizabeth, N. J. 



BAY TREES. 



Bay trees and box trees, standards and pyra- 
mids. Price list on application. 
Julius Roehrs Co.. Rntherford, N. J. 

Bay trees and buxus. Ask for catalog^ue. 

Bobbink & Atkins, Rutberford, N. J. 



BEGONIAS. 



Blooming t>egonias in assorted varieties, $2.50 
per 100. Rooted cuttings, ready now, $1.25 per 
100. N. O. Caswell, Delavan, 111. 

Tuberous - rooted begonias, single - flowered. 
$2.50; double-flowered, $4.50 100. 

Storrs & Harrison Co., PalnesviUe, O. 

Begonia Gloire de Lorraine, 2^ -In., $12.00 100; 

$100.00 1000. 

Wm. Murphy. 128 E. 3rd St.. Cincinnati, O. 

Begonia Gloire de Lorraine, 4-in., $35.00: 
6-in., $50.00 100. 

J. A. Peterson, Westwood. Cincinnati. O. 

Begonia Vernon, 2%-in., 2%c. R. C, pre- 
pald. $1.50 100. A. J. Baldwin. Newark. Ohio. 

Rex begonias, 2-ln., $3.00 per 100. Cash. 

E. B. Randolph, Delavan, 111. 



Rex begonias, 4-ln., for stock only, $5.00 per 
100. 200 Louise CloBSon, 2V^-in., fine, $5.00 
per 100. Cash. 

Maple City Greenhouses. Honesdale, Pa. 

BELGIAN PLANTS. 

Azaleas, araucarlas, palms, sweet bays, be- 
gonias, gloxinias, etc. We have Immense quan- 
tities of first-class stock, and shall be pleased 
to quote you prices. 

Louis Van Houtte Pere, Ghent, Belgium. 

BERRIED PLANTS. 

Jerusalem cherries, 75 4-ln. plants, 6c each, if 
taken immediately. Cash. 

Maple City Greenhouses, Honesdale, Pa. 

BULBS. 

Bulbs. 100 1000 

Amaryllis formoslsslma, 11-13 cm.. $2.00 $18.00 

Bessera elegans, 7-9 cm 1.00 9.00 

Pancratium, spider lily, 12-15 cm.. 3.00 20.00 

Tlgrldlas, mixed, 7-9 cm 2.00 12.00 

Zephyranthes, white, 7-9 cm 1.00 9.00 

Price Includes carriage paid. 
J. A. McDowell, Ap. 167. City of Mexico. 

Caladium esculentum, fine, healthy bulbs, 5 to 

7 Inches, $1.40 per 100, $11.00 per 1000; 7 to 9 

Inches, $2.40 per 100, $22.00 per lOOO; 9 to 

11 inches, $4.00 per 100, $35.00 per lOOO; 

12 inches and up, $8.00 per 100. $75.00 per 1000. 
T. W. Wood & Sons, Richmond, Va. 

Dreer's summer fiowering bulbs. The be- 
gonias and gloxinias offered by us are the best 
that skill and careful selection can produce. 
Description of varieties and prices are given In 
display adv. 

H. A. Dreer, 714 Chestnut St., Phila., Pa. 

Caladium esculentum bulbs, 5x7, $1.00; 7x9, 
$2.00; 9x11, 14.00; 11x15, $6.00 per 100. 
Tuberoses. 4x6, $1.00 100. Cash. 
C. B. Johnson, Wallace, N. C. 

Mexican tuberoses, single, large bulbs, guar- 
anteed to bloom from June until frost, $16.00 
per 1000, F. O. B. Cook & Cook, Alvln, Tex.. 

What is offered for tuberose bulbs? What is 
offered for dahlia roots? All good stock, well 
cured. Nagy Bros., Egg Harbor. N. J. 

Tuberous begonias, single and double. Adv. 
on cover page gives varieties and prices. 
A. T. Boddlngton. 342 W. 14th St., N. Y. City. 

MicbeU's spring bulbs. A large and complete 
stock of all the Important varieties. 
H. F. Michell Co.. 1018 Market St.. Phila, Pa. 

Tuberoses, dwarf Excelsior Pearl, first size. 
$1.00 per 100; $8.00 per 1000. 
T. W. Wood & Sons. Richmond, Va. 

Tuberoses, gladioli, tuberous-rooted begonias, 
etc. Send for trade price list. 
Currle Bros. Co., Milwaukee. Wis. 

Lllium superbum, extra large bulbs, 25c each; 
$1.50 per 10; $8.00 per 100. 
L. E. Williams, Nottingham. N. H. 

Write for special low prices on selected bulbs, 
plants, roots, etc., to 
F. W. O. Schmltz. Prince Bay. N. Y. 

Spring bulbs for Immediate delivery. See 
display adv. 

Winterson Co., 45 Wabash Ave.. Chicago. 

Importers and growers of high grade bulbs. 

Bridgeman's Seed Warehouse, 37 E. 19tb St.. 

New York City. 

C. KEUR & SONS, Hillegom, Holland, 
or 334 The Bourse. Philadelphia. Pa. 

Write for prices on all bulbs and plants. 

Tuberoses. Armstrong's Ever-blooming, single, 
$10.00 per 1000. A. H. Dailey, Knoxvllle. Tenn. 

Holland bulbs. Ask for our wholesale trade 
list. K. Velthuys. Hillegom, Holland. 

Hyacinths, Ist size, $1.50 doz.; $10.00 100. 
C. Eisele, 11th & Roy, Phila. 

Thorbum's bulbs. Send for trade list. 
J. M. Thorburn & Co., 33 Barclay St.. N. Y. 

Lllium glganteum, 7x9, $6.50 100. 

D. Rusconi. 32 W. 6th St., Cincinnati, 0. 

Calla bulbs for summer delivery. 

A. Mltting. 17 Kennan St.. Santa Cruz, Cal. 

Tuberose bulbs. $8.50 1000. 
W. W. Barnard Co.. 161 Kinzle St.. Chicago. 

Gloxinia bulbs. $4.00 100. 
Storrs & Harrison Co.. PalnesviUe, O. 

Bulbs, plants and seeds. 
W. P. Craig. 1305 Filbert St., Philadelphia. 



CACTI. 



Old Man cactus. 4 to 5 inches high. $3.00 per 
doz.; $22.00 per 100. Carriage paid. 

J. A. McDowell, Ap. 167, City of Mexico. 



PLEASE MENTION THE REVEW WHEN WRITING ANY OF THESE ADVERTISERS. 



Y^T^TwfW^^^ ■ * ■ ■'^' y -V' ^"- '•-,/. .;- 1 '■ 



Mabch 7, 1907. 



The Weekly Florists' Review* 



1221 



Stapella (starflgb cactus), bloomlne Blze for 
borders. fS.do per 100; |20.00 per l(XK) Hche- 
Terla Callfomfca, $1.60 per 100. Jiooo ™.p 
1000; small, |8.00 per 1000. For cash hT Ex- 
press, packed light. ' "' 
Mrs. M. E. Patterson, Glendal e. Cal. 

Cacti. My choice 25 varieties, $2.6o* 60 vari- 
eties, 16.00. Succulent plants, my chol(>o BO 
varieties, f3.00. This offer good until April 1. 
Obarges prepaid. Cash with order. A O Qiwinm 
4419 Natural Bridge Road, St. Lou 1b . Mo. 

An offer of your surplus stock, placed in THH 
REVIEW'S classified advs.. will be i^n by 
nearly every buyer In the trade. 



CANNAS. 



160,000 

CANNAS 

TRUE TO NAME. 

All with two to three eyes. 

Packed 250 in a box; 250 at 1000 rate; 26 

at 100 rate. 

RED CANNAS. 
Beaute Poltevlne, 3Vi ft.. $2.25 100; $20.00 1000 

Chas. Henderson, 4 ft 2.00 100; 17.50 1000 

Crimson Redder, 3 ft 3.00 100; 27.60 1000 

J. D. Elsele, 6 ft 2.25 100; 20.00 1000 

Bxplorateur Crampbel, 6% 

" • 2.00 100; 17.50 1000 

PINK CANNAS. 

L. Patry, 4% ft $2.00 100; $17.60 1000 

Martha Washington, 3% ft. 2.00 100; 17.60 1000 

Mile. Herat, 4% ft 2.25 100; 20.00 1000 

Paul Marquant. 4% ft 1.75 100; 16.00 1000 

ORANGE CANNAS. 
Admiral Avellan, 4% ft. .$1.75 100; $15.00 1000 

J. D. Cabos, 4% ft 2.00 100; 17.50 1000 

Pres. Cleveland, 4 ft 3.00 100; 27.50 1000 

Queen of Holland 2.75 100; 25.00 1000 

Secretary Chabanne, 4 ft.. 2.00 100; 17.50 1000 
GOLD-EDGED CANNAS. 

Mme. Croisy, 3% ft $2.75 100; $25.00 1000 

Souv. de A. Croey, 4 ft... 2.75 100; 25.00 1000 
YELLOW CANNAS. 

Buttercup. 3% ft $5.50 100; $50.00 1000 

Comte de Bouchaud, 4% ft. 2.75 100; 25.00 1000 
Florence Vaughan, 6 ft... 2.00 100; 17.60 1000 

L. B. Bailey, 4% ft 2.00 100; 17.50 1000 

WHITE CANNAS. 

Alsace. 3% ft $2.00 100; $17.60 1000 

Peachblow. 3 ft 1.75 100; 16.00 1000 

BRONZE CANNAS. 

Black Beauty. 5 ft |6.00 100; $50.00 1000 

David Harum. 3% ft 3.25 100; 30.00 1000 

Grand Rouge. 8 ft 1.76 100; 16.00 1000 

Musafolla. 8 ft 2.75 100; 25.00 1000 

Robusta, 6 to 8 ft 1.75 100; 15.00 1000 

ORCHID CANNAS. 

Alemannla, 4 to 6 ft $2.25 100; $18.00 1000 

Austria, 5 ft 1.75 100; 15.00 1000 

Italia. 4% ft 2.26 100; 18.00 1000 

King Humbert, 

4 ft., $2.00 doz 16.00 100 

Kronus, 6 ft 2.75 100; 25.00 1000 

For full description of above and fifty other 

varieties of cannas, see catalogue, mailed free. 

ELEPHANT'S EARS. 

Caladium Esculentum. 

All sound and with eyes. 

100 1000 

S- 8 inches In circumference $1.50 $10.00 

8-10 Inches In circumference 3.50 SO.CO 

10-12 Inches In circumference 5.50 60.00 

12 inches and up In circumference. .10.00 80.00 

ARTHUR T. BODDINGTON, 
342 W. 14TH ST., NEW YORK. 

Cannas, sound roots, 2 to 3 eyes, true to 
name. Alemannla, Austria, Burbank. Italia. 
Robusta, MetalUca, $1.25 per 100; $10.00 per 
1000. Martha Washington, Florence Vaughan. 
Wm. Boffenger. Chas. Henderson, Sec. Chabanne, 
$1.50 per 100. Black Prince, Mrs. Kate Gray, 
Pennsylvania. America, Coronet. $2.00 per 100. 
Plerson's Premier, Souv. d'A. Crozy, Queen Char- 
lotte, W. Virginia, Egandale. $2.50 per 100; 
$22.60 per 1000. Black Beauty, Gladiator, 
Pres. Meyers, new, like King Humbert. $4.00 
per 100. All kinds, mixed. $1.00 per 100; 
$7.60 per 1000. 
Shellroad Greenhonseg . Grange. Baltimore, Md. 

Cannas. Robusta, Pennsylvania, Lou Ray, 
W. Grove. Mile. Berat, Louise, Betsy Ross, Bur- 
bank. $1.50 per 100; $12.00 per loOO; 500 at 
1000 rate. Cash with order. No personal 
checks accepted. 

The Nanz Floral Co.. Inc.. Owensboro. Ky. 

Cannas. Kate Gray, Florence Vaughan. Bur- 
bank, J. C. Vaughan. Robusta. 2c. Souv. de 
Antolne Crozy. West Virginia, 2%c. Egandale. 
3c. Black Beauty. 6c. All fine, solid bulbs. 

A. J. Baldwin. Newark. O. 

Cannas. West Virginia (gold medal St. 
Lonls). $2.50 per 100; Bouvier, $1.50 per 100; 
Italia, $1.25 per 100. Will exchange for geranl- 
urns. Gus. Obermeyer. Parkersbnrg. W. Va. 

Cannas, dry bulbs of Alemannla. Austria, 
F. Vanghan. Marlborough (bronze). J. Montel, 
$1.60 per 100; $12.00 per 1000. , ^ 
A. Thornhlll, R o sedale, Kan. 

Cannas. 10.000 Louisiana. ^J.OO per 100; 
$46.00 per 1000. Good bulbs. .My express office 
Is on main line. _,.. _ 
A. B. Campbell. C oCti ranvllle. Pa. 

Cannas. Dormant bulbs of Ali'ionse Bouvier 
and Sonv. d'AntoIne Crozy. s:''^ Per 1000. 
Cash with order. ^ „ , 

Jas. Ambacher. V' ^t ^^°' "• J. 



Crimson Redder, a very fine canna, the hand- 
somest for bedding, extra fine bulbs, $1.00 per 
100. C ash. A. Corlln. Elberon. N. J. 

New cannas. Wm. Saunders, Ottawa and New 
York, 60c ea.; $5.00 doz.; $35.00 100. 

Conard & Jones Co.. West Grove. Pa. 

Cannas, 18 varieties. Also dahlias and 
gladioli. Write for price list. 

O. B. Stevens. Shenandoah, Iowa . 

Cannas. Louisiana and Mont Blanc. $1.00 
per doz.. by mall, postpaid. 

A. B. Campbell. Cochranvllle. Pa. 

Canna bulbs. Henderson. Austria and Leon- 
ard Vaughan. $2.00 per 100. 

Mount Hope Greenhouses, Morgan Park, III. 

Cannas, 150,000 In the 50 best varieties. De^ 
Bcrlptive list now ready. 

MoBt>eek Greenhouse Co.. Onarga, 111. 

Kate Gray cannas. dormant, strong, $3.50 
per 100. Cash. 

Centre Ave. Greenhouses. Reading . Pa. 

Canna Queen of Beauty, scarlet. The best 
canna grown. 

Cummlngs Bulb & Plant Co., Meridian. Miss. 

King Humbert, plants 8-12 Inches. $20.00 per 
100. Prepaid. Tony Toerner, Scio. Ohio. 

Cannas, very fine list. Send list of needs. 
C. Betscher, Canal Dover, Ohio. 

Cannas. Send for catalogue No. 6 for list. 
Storrs & Harrison Co.. Palnesvllle. O. 

Cannas. See display adv. for price. 
Jos. H. Cunningham. Delaware. O. 

Cannas. dormant. $2.25 100. Cash. 

Converse Greenhouses, Webster, Mass. 

CAREX. 

Carex Japonlca. 2%-in., $2.60 100. 

Springfield Floral Co.. Springfield, O. 

CARNATIONS. 

Carnations, cool-grown, well-rooted cuttings, 
for Immediate or later delivery. 

White Perfection, grandest of all. $6.60 100; 
$60.00 1000. 

Bountiful, $2.75 100; $26.00 1000. 

Nelson Fisher. $2.25 100; $20.00 1000. 

Mrs. T. W. Lawson. $1.75 100; $15.00 1000. 

Boston Market. $1.35 100; $12.00 1000. 

Special attention is called to the variety 
White Perfection. We offer the true sort, and 
quality of cuttings can not be beat. You will 
want this. Book order now. Quality guaran- 
teed. If you don't like them, we pay express 
both ways. 
E. F. Wlnterson Co.. 45 Wabash Ave., Chicago. 

WELL-ROOTED CARNATION CUTTINGS 

READY NOW. 

Mrs. T. W. Lawson. .$2.00 perlOO; $26.00 per 1000 

Guardian Angel ... 1.50 per 100; 10.00 per 1000 

Enchantress 2.50 per 100; 20.00 per 1000 

Lieut. Peary 3.00 per 100; 25.00 per 1000 

Boston Market 1.50 per 100; 11.00 per 1000 

White Cloud 1.25 perlOO; 10.00 per 1000 

Fred Burkl 2.50 per 100; 20.00 per 1000 

Harlowarden 2.00 per 100; 15.00 per 1000 

Chicago 1.50 per 100; 12.50 per 1000 

Estelle 2.00 per 100; 15.00 per 1000 

Bed sport of Maceo 2.0O per 100; 16.00 per lOOO 

WIETOR BROS., 61 Wabash Ave.. Chicago. 

Rooted carnation cuttings. Satisfaction guar- 
anteed. 

Rose-pink Enchantress ...$7.00 100; $60.00 1000 
Daybreak Lawson or 

Melody 6.00 100; 60.00 1000 

Victory 6.00 100; 50.00 1000 

Craig 6.00 100; 40.00 1000 

Helen Goddard 6.00 100; 50.00 1000 

White Lawson 3.00 100; 25.00 1000 

Enchantress 3.00 100; 25.00 1000 

Lawson 2.00 lOO; 17.60 1000 

Boston Market 2.00 100; 17.50 1000 

A. C. Canfleld. Springfield. 111. 

Carnations, strong, healthy, well rooted. 

Per 100 Per 1000 Pots 

White Lawson $3.00 $25.00 $3.50 

Bountiful 3.00 25.00 3.60 

Cardinal 2.50 22.50 3.00 

Enchantress 2.60 22.60 3.00 

Lawson 2.00 15.00 2.50 

Harlowarden 2.00 15.00 2.50 

Queen 2.00 15.00 2.50 

Boston Market 1.50 12.60 2.00 

Cash with order. Satisfaction guaranteed. 
Smith & Gannett, Geneva, N. Y. 

Carnation cuttings 
well-rooted. 

Unrooted. 

100 1000 

Q. Lord $1.00 $ 8.00 

P- Hill 1.00 8.00 

Ertelle 1.50 10.00 

Enchantress 1.50 10.00 



Guaranteed good, and 



Rooted. 

100 1000 

$1.50 $12.00 

1.50 12.00 

2.00 15.00 

-^-u..„o ^.^^ ^^.^ 2.00 16.00 

Q. Louise 1.00 8.00 1.50 12.00 

Boston Market, rooted cuttings, $1.60 100. 
B. G. Merrltt & Co., Grange, Md. 

^BRITANNIA, bright scarlet of large size. 
Similar to but better than Victory, plants In 
pots. £6 per 100. 

Dutton's White Lawson Improved. This vari- 
ety sported at Bexley Heath and Is quite dis- 
tinct from the American sport. Plants In pots. 
£6 per 100. 

A. F. Dutton, Iver, Bucks. England. 



PLEASE MENT'ON THE REVIEW WHEN WRITING ANY 



The new perpetual-flowering carnation. BRI- 
TANNIA, the most profitable carnation In culti- 
vation. Color, clear scarlet; blooms of good 
size, never splits, on long stiff stems. See 
"American Sorts in England," page 704. Jan. 
24th Issue Florists' Review. Strong plants. £5 
per 100. Cash with order. Please remit by 
International postottire order. 

A. Smith. Enfield Highway, Middlesex. England. 

Transplanted rooted carnation cuttings. 

100 1000 

Rose-pink Enchantress $6.00 $50.00 

Enchantress 2.00 15.00 

Lawson 1.50 12.00 

Genevieve Lord 1.50 12.00 

Boston Market 1.50 12.00 

Holton & Hunkel Co., Milwaukee, Wis. 

Rooted carnation cuttings. 1200 Perfection, 
800 Victory, $4.50 per 100; $45.00 per 1000. 
900 Candace, $2.50 per 100. Enchantress, Peary 
and Bountiful, $2.00 per 100, $18.00 per 1000. 
Cardinal. $3.00 per 100. Lawson. $1.50 per 100: 
$12.00 per 1000. Stock guaranteed. Cash with 
order. H. P. Smith. Plqua. Ohio. 

Well rooted carnation cuttings. 

100 1000 100 1000 

Victory $6.00 $50 Lord $2.00 $lfr 

Enchantress.. 2.50 20 L. Peary 2.00 IS 

Lawson 2.00 16 The Queen... 2.00 U 

B. Market .. l.SO 10 Mrs. Patten. 2.00 U 
Welland & Ollnger. New Cast le. Ind. 

Carnations. We offer field plants for delivery 
July 1, for early benching. Owing to our mild 
climate we field plants on high sod ground April 
5. They are immense by July 1. Send for list, 
and make contracts for July 1 delivery. 

Harlowarden Greenhouses. G reenport, N. Y. 

Unrooted carnation cuttings of The Queen. 
Fair Maid. Queen Louise. Enchantress and 
others. Good stock, good count. Write for 
prices. 

Cohanzle Carnation Greenhouses. New London, 
Conn. 

Carnation Mrs. H. Burnett, new salmon-pink 
for 1907. Stems. 18 to 36 Inches, rapid and 
easy grower. Established in 2-ln. pots, £6 per 
100. H. B. Burnett, St. Margarets, Guernsey, 
England. 

New carnations. Winsor, Helen Gould, 
Haines' Imperial and Pink Imperial. $12.00 
loo. $100.00 1000; 2%-ln.. $14.00 100. White 
Perfection, 2\i,-ln., $10.00 100. ^ 
Chas. H. Totty, Madison^ N. J. 

Carnations. 5000 Fair Maid, selected, well 
rooted cuttings, $1.50 per 100; $15.00 per 1000. 
A good variety all the time and the best light 
pink in warm weather. 
Maurice J. Brlnton, Christ iana. Pa. 

Carnations Imperial and Pink Imperial. Se- 
lected cuttings. $2.50 doz.; $12.00 100; $100.00 
1000. John E. Haines. Bethlehem, Pa. 

Or Alex. J. Guttman. 43 West 28th St., N. Y. 

Rooted carnation cuttings. R. Craig, $40.00 

per 1000. Harlowarden, $1.50 per 100; $12.60 

per 1000. Queen Louise, $1.25 per 100; $10.00 
per 1000. Andrew Peterson, Hoopeston , 111. 

Carnations. We want strong, well rooted 
White Lawson cuttings. Will give in exchange 
first-class White Perfection at market value. 
A. T. Lorch & Co.. De Haven. Pa. 

Carnations, strong, healthy, rooted cuttings 
and 2%-ln. pot plants, young stook. leading 
varieties. Prices are given In display adv. 
Poehlmann Bros. Co.. Morton Grove, 111 . 

Carnations, rooted cuttings, clean, healthv 
stock. Enchantress, $2.50 100, $22.50 1000. 
Other varieties given In display adv. 

Geo. Relnberg, 35 Randolph St., Chicago. 

We have an exceptionally fine stock of well 
rooted carnation cuttings from the best growers. 
See display adv. 
Pennock-Meehan Co., 1608 Ludlow St.. Phila. 

Rooted carnation cuttings. 150 Flora Hill. 
$1.25; 400 Peru. $1.00; 200 Morning Glory. 
$1.50 per 100. 
R. A. Mason & Co.. Cadillac, Mich. 

Carnation cuttings ready, healthy and well 
rooted. Varieties and prices are given In dis- 
play adv. 
Schelden & Schoos, 60 Wabash Ave., Chicago. 

Clean, healthy, well rooted carnation cuttings, 
ready now. See display adv. for varieties and 
prices. 
vaughan & Sperry, 58 Wabash Ave.. Chicago. 

Beacon carnation, orange-scarlet. $12.00 100; 
$100.00 1000. Send for descriptive circular. 

Cottage Gardens Co.. Queens, N. Y. 
Peter Fisher. Ellis. Mass. 

Rooted carnation cuttings, Enchantress, $1.50 
per 100; $15.00 per 1000. 

Other varieties all sold. 
Blanksma Bros., Grand Rapids, Mich. 

THE QUEEN. 
The best commercial white, 30,000 fine cut- 
tings now ready. $2.00 per 100; $15.00 per 
1000. J. P. Brooks, Morton Grove, 111. 

Queen, best standard white, summer or win- 
ter. Well rooted cuttings, $15.00 1000. Also 
other varieties. A. Chrlstengen. Stoneham, Mass. 

Rooted carnation cuttings. Crusader, B. Mar- 
ket, $10.00 per 1000. B. Market, unrooted, half 
price. Des Plaines Floral Co.. Des Plalnes. 111. 

OF THESE ADVERTISERS. 



^ a-^bL.J. M^: ■ J- m^Z.K^^ 



■ ■■.-■ ■r:;v. -•f»T— ,»j;^;:y --i VS, ■"■■ • -^ .JL;:'-:.-."-^Z^J'U-:''.'y'?' -vvri^" -'l* 



V" 



1222 



The Weekly Florists' Review* 



Mabch 7, 1907. 



CARWATIONS-Cominu»d. 

Carnation cuttings. Uotie-plnk Kncbautress, 
17.00 lOU; $60.UO luuu. Uttier varieties given In 
display adv. W. B. Ulrviu, Leola, Pa. 

Rooted carnation cuttings, choice, all free 
from disease. Varieties and prices are given In 
display adv. J. L. Dillon, Bloomsburg, Pa. 

John K. Haines, the leading scarlet carnation. 
Rooted cuttings ready now; $8.00 100, $50.00 
1000. Jobn E. Haiues, Bettilehem, Pa. 

Healthy rooted carnation cuttings of the best 
commercial varieties. Prices are given in dis- 
play adv. Jobn Muno, liogers Parli, Cbicago. 

Mabelle, the new pinlc carnation for 1807. 
See display adv., or write us for particulars. 
H. Weber & Sons Co., Oakland. Md. 

Carnations. Boston Market, rooted cuttings, 
110.00 1000; unrooted, $5.00 1000. Cash. 
E. D. Kaulback & Son, Maiden. Mass. 

Well rooted carnation cuttings, bealtby stock. 
Ttor varieties and prices see di^lay adv. 

Peter Keinberg, 51 Wabash Ave., Cbicago. 

Strong, well rooted carnation cuttings. Varie- 
ties and prices are given in display adv . 
Sol Garland, Pes Plalnes, 111. 

Carnation cuttings, Al stock guaranteed. Va- 
rieties and prices given In display adv. 
A. Laub & Son, Hughsonville, N. Y. 

Rose-pink Enchantress, rooted cuttings, $7.00 
100; $60.00 1000. Immediate delivery. 
H. F. Piggott. 2311 Pearl Rd., Cleveland, O. 

Carnation Helen Goddard. Orders booked for 
rooted cuttings, $6.00 100; $50.00 lOOo. 

S. J. Goddard, Framlngbam, Mass. 

Rooted cuttings of Bed Chief carnation, select 
rtock, $12.00 100; $100.00 1000. 
F. Dorner & Sons Co., La Fayette, Ind. 

Rooted carnation cuttings. Varieties and 
prices are given in display adv. 

F. W. Heckenkamp, Jr., Qulncy, 111. 

Rooted carnation cuttings, leading varieties. 
Prices are given in display adv. 
Wm. Winter, Kirkwood, Mo. 

Rooted carnation cuttings. Varieties and 
prices are given in display adv. 
J. W. Dunford, Clayton, Mo. 

Carnation cuttings, leading varieties. List and 
prices are given in display adv. 

Eli Cross, Grand Rapids, Mich. 

Rooted carnation cuttings, best varieties. 
Prices are given in display adv. 

W. J. & M. S. Vesey, Fort Wayne. Ind. 

Send for list of new carnations and the lead 
log commercial varieties. 
Wm. Swayue. Kennett Square, Pa. 

Prices on all the best commercial varieties 
are given in display adv. 
Chicago Carnation Co., Joliet, 111. 

Sand-rooted cuttings, R. Craig, $6.00 100; En- 
chantress. $2.50 loO. 
Valley View Greenhouses, Marlborough. N. Y. 

Abundance carnation, rooted cuttings, $5.00 
100; $40.00 1000. 
Rudolph Fischer, Great Neck, N. Y. 

Rooted carnation cuttings. Enchantress, $2.50 
100. 
B. E. Wadsworth Co.. Box 224, DanTlllc. 111. 

Carnation cuttings for Immediate delivery. 
Jensen, & Dekema, 674 W. Foster Ave., Cbicago. 

Yellow carnations, Eldorado and Clover, also 
others, l%c. Roney Bros., West Grove, Pa. 

Carnation plants, 2-in. pots, ready now. 

U. S. Cut Flower Co., Elmira, N. Y. 

Fair Maid and B. Market, rooted cuttings, 
fl.lO per lOO. Otto Bourdy, Lowell, Mass. 

Carnation Boston Market. $1.25 per 100; $10.00 
per 1000. S. W. Pike. St. Charles. 111. 

Rooted carnation cuttings. See display adv. 
Henry Baer. Peoria, 111. 

Rooted carnation cuttings. See display adv. 
Frank Garland, Des Plalnes, 111. 

CHRYSANTHEMUMS. 

Chrysanthemums, strong, healthy. Ivory, 
Kalb, W. Brook, Pacific, Shaw. Chamberlain, 
Bnguehard. P. Duckham, Bonnafifon, Appleton, 
Halllday, Parr, W. and Y. Jones, Queen, 
N. Pockett, Balfour, Robinson, Wells. Merza, 
Bnitus, Saunders, T. Eaton, W. Chadwick, 
Weeks; rooted cuttings, $1.50; 2-ln., $2.00 
per 100. Jeanne Nonin, rooted cuttings, $2.00; 
2-ln., $2.50 per 100. 

Jas. Hamilton, Mt. Washington, Md. 

Cbrysanthemnms, rooted cuttings. White: 
M. Wanamaker, T. Baton. Estelle. Chadwick. 
Robinson, Polly Rose. Yellow: Col. Appleton. 
G. Wedding, Maj. Bonnaffon, Philadelphia. 
Pink: Maud Dean. G. Pacific, Amorlta, M. 
Uger, V. Morel. Red: Culllngfordli. Price, 
$1.25 per 100; $10.00 per 1000. Cash with 
order. Frank Beu. 2780 N. 40th Ave.. Chicago. 

CLEMENTINE TOUSET. 
The Early Chadwick mum; finest early 
white; large stock on hand: ready now. 
Rooted cuttings. $2.50 per 100. 
WIETOR BROS., 51 Wabash Ave., Chicago. 



Chrysanthemums from sand and soil. Good, 
healthy stock, ready now. 

WHITE. 
Polly Rose M. Friend 

Mrs. Weeks Arline 

N. Pockett Florence Teal 

Princess Pride 

ivory W. Jones ' 

Kalb Ben Wells 

W illowbrook Merza 

Mrs. Robinson Bride 

W. Bonnaffon Niveus 

PINK. 
0. of Pacific V. Morel 

Ermanilda Dr. Knguehard 

Xeno Wm. Duckbam 

YELLOW. 
G. Trophy G. Wedding 

L. Lincoln Bonnaffon 

Y. Jones Appleton 

Halllday Yellow Eaton 

Monrovia 

BED. 
CalUngfordll Intensity 

John Sbrimpton Mildred Ware 

$1.50 per 100; $12.50 per luOO. 

Fred Lemon, Mrs. BrUe, Alliance Oct. Sun- 
shine, Beauty of Sussex, |2.00 per 100. 

We always have 50,000 cuttings in sand, of 76 
commercial varieties. Send us your want list, 
now. Wm. Ehmann, Corfu, N. Y. 

Nothing is worth growing but the best. 
Beatrice May, October Frost, Roslere, M. F. 
Plant, Mayor Weaver and E. J. Brooks, $1.00 
per doz. 

Jeanne Nonin, the unapproachable queen of 
late mums, also C. Touset. Adella, J. K. Shaw, 
Enguehard, Duckbam, and the grand prize- 
winning yellow, Mrs. W. Duckham, only $2.00 
per 100. Postpaid. 
The Union City Greenhouse. Union City, Pa. 

Chrysanthemum rooted cuttings. Omega, Oc- 
tober Sunshine, Pacific, Kalb, Bonnaffon, Apple- 
ton, Duckham, Nellie Pockett, Honesty (good 
second early white), $1.25 per 100; $10.00 per 
1000. October Frost, $4.00 per 100. Cash. 
Other varieties later. 
Wm. Bierstadt & Son, Springfield, 111. 

Can furnish 50,000 rooted cuttings and 2% -In. 
pots, season 1907. Delivery to suit. Best com- 
mercial varieties. Write for list and prices. 
Order now. Geo. M. Brinkerboff, Springfield, 111. 

Chrysanthemums. Jeanne Nonin, Dr. Engue- 
hard, Wm. Duckbam, Robt. Halllday, Major 
Bonnaffon, 2%-ln., $2.60 per 100. Al stock. 
Cash. Edwin Bishop, Roelyn, Md. 

Rooted cuttings of CERAMIC chrysanthemum, 
$3.00 per 100. Polly Rose and Bonnaffon. $1.50 
per 100. Jones and Nonin, $2.00 per 100. 
Chal Peterson, East Liverpool, Ohio. 

Cbrysanthemnms, extra strong, 2% -in. pots, 
March 15 delivery, $2.25 per 100. All colors. 
Money refunded If not as advertised. 
David Wlrth, Ist & Elliott Ave., Springfield, 111. 

Chrysanthemums. Major Bonnaffon, Jeanne 
Nonin. extra fine, well rooted cuttings, $2.00 
per 100; $16.00 per 1000. Casta-. . 
EDWIN BISHOP, Roslyn. Md. 

Hardy chrysanthemums, a collection second to 
none In the country. List of varieties with 
prices is given in display adv. 

R. Vincent Jr. & Son. White Marsh. Md. 

Chrysanthemum stock plants. About 1000 
Jeanne Nonin, $1.00 per doz.; $7.00 per 100. 
W. F. Kasting, 383 Elllcott St.. Buffalo. N. Y. 

New chrysanthemums. Miss Clay Frick, Win- 
ter Cheer and Buttercup, 2H-in., 50c ea.; $36.00 
100. Chas. H. Totty. Madison, N. J. 

Chrysanthemums, leading varieties, rooted cut- 
tings, $2.00 100; $15.00 1000. See display adv. 
A. N. Pierson, Cromwell, Conn. 

Chrysanthemums. Rooted cuttings of J. 
Nonin, Enguehard, Bonnaffon, $1.75 per 100. 
Frank Shearer & Son, Blnghamton, N. Y. 

We are now rooting all the commercial varie- 
ties of chrysanthemums. Send for list. 

Poehlmann Bros. Co., Morton Grove, HI. 

Chrysanthemums. Send for list of young 
stock, including many novelties. 
Harlowarden Greenhouses, Greenport. N. Y. 

Rooted chrysanthemum cuttings. White and 
Yellow Bonnaffon. $2.00 per 100. 

Wisner Greenhouse, Rockford, III. 

Chrysanthemum stock plants, best commercial 
varieties, $10.00 100. 
Bassett & Washburn, 76 Wabash Ave., Chicago. 

500 good, clean cuttings of Clementine Touset, 
$2.00 per 100. 
W. C. Hill Floral Co., Streator, HI. 

Mum stock plant?. Jeanne Nonin, $4.00 per 
100. Klehm's Nurseries, Arlington Heights. 111. 

Cbrysanthemnms, rooted cnttlngs, $2.00 100; 
$15.00 1000. Chicago Carnation Co., JoUet. HI. 

BUSINESS BBINGERS— 

Review 
Classified Advs. 

CENTAUREAS. ~ 

Centaurea gymnocarpa, new. The finest of 
all the Dusty Millers for borders; 2-in., $2.00 
doz., $10.00 100; sample, prepaid, 25c. 

A. J. Baldwin, Newark, O. 



CINERARIAS. 



Cineraria hybrida grandlfiora, best strain, 4 
and &-ln., $15.00 and $20.00 per 100. 
Jobn Stamm, Hutchinson, Kan. 

Cinerarias, Columbian, stellata and James' 
prize, 8-ln., $4.00 per loO. 
J. Sylvester, Florist, Oconto, Wis. 

Cinerarias, 4-ln., $4.00 100. 
Fred Grohe, Santa Rosa, Cal. 

Cinerarias, 5-ln., $1.50 doz. 

J. S. Bloom, Riegelsville, Pa. 



CLEMATIS. 



Clematis paniculata, strong, field-grown plants, 
$16.00 per lOO; strongest, $30.uO per 100. 
Quotations on larger quantities. 
Est, of David Fisher, Woburn, Mass. 

Clematis, large-fiowerlng, $2.50 doz. Panicu- 
lata, $1.00 doz., $8.00 per 100. 
F. A. Bailer, Bloomlngton, 111. 

Clematis, strong, field-grown, large-fiowered, 
18c. Paniculata, 10c. 

W. H. Salter, Rochester, N. Y. 



COLEUS. 



COLEUS. COLEDS. 
Rooted cuttings of Crimson Verschaffeltil, 
Golden Redder and several others, $5.00 per 
lOoO; 60c per 100. Cash with order. 
J. E. Felthousen, Schenectady, N. Y. 

Coleus, mixed. Rooted cuttings, 60c per 100; 
$5.00 per 1000; 2-in., mixed, $2.00 per 100. 
Cash. E. B. Randolph, Delavan, 111. 

Coleus, strong rooted cuttings, 20 varieties. 
70c 100. Cash. The Kaber Co., La Porte, Ind . 

Coleus, 300 2-in., good for cuttings, 10 varie- 
tles, $1.75 100. J. F. Sked, Westerville, O. 

Coleus, standard bedding and fancy varieties. 
N. O. Caswell. Delavan, 111. 

Coleus, 2% -in., $1.80 10(f; $15.00 1000. 



Springfield Floral Co., Springfield, 0. 

Coleus, 2-in., $2.60 100. Cash. 

Lake Side Greenhouses, Erie, Pa. 

CYCLAMEN. 

Cyclamen gig., extra strong plants in sepa- 
rate colors, in good growing condition. Ready 
for 2%-in., $4.00 100; ready for 3-ln., $6.00 
100. ' Twice transplanted. Satisfaction guaran- 
teed. Lehnig & Winnefeld. Hackensack. N. J. - 

Cyclamen, finest strain, nice, stocky plants, 
many in bud, 3-ln., $5.00 per 100. 
John Boehner, Dayton, Ohio. 

Cyclamen, in bud or bloom, fine Easter stock, 
4-in., $12.00 per 100. 
J. Sylvester, Florist. Oconto, Wis. 

Cyclamen pers. gig., 2-ln., $5.00 100. 
Fred Grohe, Santa Rosa, Cal. 

Cyclamen seedlings, $1.25 100. 
Shippensburg Floral Co.. Shlppensburg, Pa. 

Cyclamen. 4-ln., 12c. Cash. 
G. Aschmann, 1012 Ontario St., Philadelphia. 

Cyclamen, 4-in., $1.00 doz. 

J. S. Bloom, Riegelsville, Pa. 

DAHLIAS. 

Dahlias, field roots In 180 varieties, selected 
and adapted to the rich corn soils of the west. 
Standard sorts, $4.50 to $7.00 per 100; 30, all 
different, for $1.50. Fancy and new sorts, in- 
cluding Mrs. Roosevelt, G. D. Alexis, Floradora, 
Krlemhilde, Mrs. Winters, $9.00 to $16.00 per 
100; 12 for $1.00. 
Ferndale Nurseries, Harlan, Iowa. 

Dahlias. Pot roots for shipment at once. 
Every section Including the popular cactus, 
show, fancy, pompon and single, $6.00 per 100 
in 25 sorts; better and newer kinds, $8.00 and 
$9.00 100, post-free, cash with order. See dis- 
play adv. for list of new varieties. Catalogue 
free. HOBBIES LIMITED. Dereham, England. 

I am again ready to handle your business. 
Only the cream of varieties handled. Standards 
and novelties, including Mrs. Winters, Mme. 
Dael, Navajo, Lonsdale, Dainty, Krlemhilde, etc. 

Catalogue of dahlias, hollyhocks, peonies and 
hardy plants now ready. 

W. W. WILMORE. Box 382, Denver, Colo. 

Dahlias. 10,000 strong field roots, sacrificed to 
make room. Kriembilde, Dainty, Mme. Dael, 
Lonsdale. Ruth, $4.00 per 100, $30.00 per 1000. 
Mrs. Winters, $5.00 per 100. Many ottaers. 
Send for list. Cash with order. Held and 
shipped after frost If desired. 

Harlowarden Greenhouses, Greenport. N. Y. 

' THE DAHLIA MANUAL. 

An up-to-date work on dahlias and dablla 
culture, covering the whole field. Illustrated. 
Price. 35c. 

W. W. WILMORE, Box 382, Denver, Colo. 

DAHLIAS— PEACOCK HYBRIDS— a new race 
of giant dahlias. 1907 catalogue now ready. 
Peacock Dahlia Farms, L. K. Peacock, Sec'y and 
Gen. Mgr.. Atco, N. J. 

We have 1,000,000 dahlia roots to sell. Send 
for our list. East Brldgewater Dahlia Gardens, 
J. K. Alexander, Prop.. East Brldgewater, Mass. 



PLEASE MENTION THE REVIEW WHEN WRITING ANY OF THESE ADVERTISERS, 



lili^ r i il^ilrtil I Hill iff ■''■^•'^■^—^-^--^-■^'- - 



"-*"■'■■'"•■- - 



■■'^'■■■■^^•^-^-""''^ 






C-"''-^' TJr^ 



^/,^r:)lT;?f••:'7;'7»•^''^•^if•"7v^'?»y •'•'•" 



Mabch 7, 1907. 



ThcWcekly Horists' Review. 



J 223 



Dahlias. Strong, field-grown roots of Sylvia, 
Strablein Krone, $6.00 100. Gloriosa, C. W. 
Bruton, Miss Dodd, Purity and 60 otlier varie- 
ties. $6.00 100. Mixed Tarietles, f-'..r>0 100. 
Blmburst Nursery, Argeutlue, Kan. 

The gorgeous new peony-flowered dahlias. See 
display adv. or refer to my catalogue. If you 
haven't it, a postal will bring you one. 

A. T. Boddlngton, 342 W. 14th St., New York. 

DAHLIAS. 160 varieties including many 
European novelties, 3c each and up. New list 
now ready. Adams Supply Co., Lowell, Mass. 

Dahlias, fine, strong bulbs. Also cannas and 
gladioli. Write for price list. 

O. B. Stevens, Shenandoah, Iowa. 

Dahlia Sylvia, fine, long-stemmed pink, $1.50 
per doz.; $10.4)0 per 100. 

Cushman Gladiolus Co., Sylvanla, O. 

Zulu and Pearl dahlias, good varieties, and 
the stock is fine. 

Cummings Bulb & Plant Co., Meridian, Miss. 

Dahlias, heavy field clumps, $5.00 100; $45.00 
1000. Dingee & Conard Co., West Grove. Pa. 

40,000 dahlias, field-grown, 4c. List ready. 
H. W. Koerner, Sta. B, Milwaukee, Wis. 

Dahlia roots in any quantity. 
David Herbert & Son, Atco, N. J. 

Dahlias. Send for catalogue. 

E. S. Manuel, 19 Walnut St., Newport, E. I. 



DAISIES. 



Daisy Queen Alexandra. New white. A band- 
acme and free-fiowering pot plant for spring 
and Decoration day sales. Very nice 2 and 2^^- 
in. pot plants, $2.50 and $3.00 per 100. Cash 
prices. 

Theo. F. Beckert, 
9 miles west of Pittsburg. Coraopolis, Pa. 

Shasta daisies, field divisions, $2.50 100; 

J 22.50 1000. Small plants for 3-in., $1.25 100; 
11.00 1000. Cash. Fred Grohe, Santa Rosa, Cal. 

Shasta daisies, field-grown divisions, $2.50 100. 
Leedham Bulb Co., Santa Crus, Cal. 



DRAOENAS. 



Choice colored dracaenas ready now in ex- 
cellent condition. 

Rose Hill Nurseries, New Rochelle, N. Y. 

Dracaena Bruanti, 6-in., 50c; $5.00 doz. Gash. 
G. Aschmann, 1012 Ontario St.. Phila. 

Dracaena indlvisa, 5-in., $2.00 per doz. 
W. C. Rockwell, Bradford, Pa. 

Dracaena indlvisa, 3-in. 

Stuart & Haugb, Anderson, Ind. 

EASTER PLANTS. 

FOR EASTER — Lllium multiflorum, 10c per 
bod. Hydrangea grandlflora, pink, from 4 to 
7-in. pots, 25c to $1.00. Spiraea Gladstone, 
5 to 7-in. pots, from 35c to 75c. Crimson 
Rambler, 2 to 4 ft. high, 50c to $1.50. Beauty, 
Neyron, Laing, Jacqueminot, Magna Cbarta, 
Hermosa, Soupert, La France, Pink and White 
Cochet, 35e to 75 c. Azalea indica, well budded 
plants, all colors, crown 12 to 18 inches, 40c to 
$1.00. Genista fragrans, 4 to 5-in. pots, 20c 
to 30c. Cinerarias, 4-in. pots, 8c. Primula ob- 
conica, 4 to 5-in., 8c to 12c. Von Sion daCTodils, 
3 bulbs to a pot, 20c. Tulips, double only, red, 
yellow and variegated, 4 bulbs to 4-in. pots, 12c. 
Hyandntbs, all colors, 4-in. pots, 12c. Cash, 
please. Riverview Greenhouses, Lewisburg, Pa. 

Prepare for Easter. An immense stock of 
choice Easter plants, to bloom Easter week or 
earlier if desired, now ready. The leading 
varieties of azaleas, araucarias, hyacinths, tu- 
lips, etc., are listed in display adv. 
G. Aschmann. 1012 Ontario St.. Phila- 

Easter plants blooming Easter or earlier. Or- 
der now. Various sizes of hydrangeas, roses, 
etc., are given in display adv. 

J. W. Dudley & Son, Parkersburg, W. Va. 

Place orders early for Easter plants. Lilies, 
azaleas, spiraeas, hyacinths, etc. Prices are 
given in display adv. 
Geo. A. Kuhl, Pekin, 111. 

Easter lilies, plants. 12c bud. C. Ramblers, 
$1.00 to $1.50 ea. Other stock given in display 
adv. 
Crabb & Hunter Floral Co.. Grand Rapids, Mich. 

Azaleas for Easter. See display adv. 
Bobbink & Atkins, Rutherford, N. J. 

Easter lilies. $15.00 to $18.00 100. 

Miami Floral Co., Main St., Dayton, 0. 



ECHEVERIAS. 



Echeverias, 15 to 20 cm. in cir., $3.00 per 
100, $22.00 per 1000. Carriage paid. 

J. A. McDowell, Ap. 167. City of Mexico. 



FERNS. 



Nephrolepis exaltata Bostoniensis, fine, young 
■lock, $10.00 per lOOO. 

N. Elegantissima, good runners, $5.00 per 
100; fine plants. $10.00 per 100. 

N. rufescens tripinnatiflda. fine stock, $5.00 
per 100. Soar Bros., Little River. Fla. 



FERNS MY SPECIALTY. 
Please notice the big reductions. 

CIBOTIUM SCHIEDEI, the king of ferns, 
well known for its unequaled beauty and good 
keeping qualities and as a very easy grower. 
Strong plants in the following sizes: 3-in. pots, 
$20.00; 4-in., $40.00; 5-in., $60.00 per 100; 
7-in., $1.70 each; 10-In. pots, large specimens, 
£5 OO 6&cb * 

Adiantum rhodophyllum, 4-ln., $20.00 per 100. 

Assorted ferns for Jardinieres, in all the lead- 
ing varieties, $3.00 per 100; $25.00 per 1000; 
600 at lOOO rate. ^ , a » 

J. F. ANDERSON, successor to Anderson & 
Chr'istensen, Short Hills, N. J. 

A snap in extra strong ferns. Boston ferns, 
300 4-in. pots, $1.50 per doz., $10.00 per 100; 
200 6-in. pots, 50c ea., $5.00 per doz.; 100 7-in. 
pans, 65c ea., $7.00 per doz.; 100 8-in. pans, 
750 ea., $8.00 doz. 300 Scottii, in 5 and 6-ln. 
pots, extra fine, $3.50 and $5.00 per doz. 
Park side Greenhouses, 746 E. 70th St.. Chicago. 

"Boston ferns, 3-in. pots, $6.00; 4-in., $12.00; 
4%-in., $15.00; 5-ln., $20.00 and $25.00 per 100. 
This is fine, short, strong, well grown stuff and 
will satisfy anyone. „ . * t .. 

Cro wn Point Floral Co., Crown Point, Ind. 

Boston ferns, bench grown, ready for 3-in., 
$4.00 per 100; $35.00 per 1000. Ready for 
2%-in., $3.00 per 100; $30.00 per 1000. 
^■^ Gloede, Evanston, 111. 

Boston ferns, large specimen plants, estab- 
lished in 8-in. pots, $12.00 per doz. Also 6 and 
7-in. plants. 

Ri verbank Greenhouses, Geneva, 111. 

Boston and Piersonl ferns, 200 of each, pretty 
as pictures and a guaranteed bargain at $13.00 
per 100. 

Spach'-Denison Co., New Philadelphia, Ohio. 

Boston, 2%-in., 3c; 3-in., 8c; 4-ln., 12c. 
Piersonl, 3-in.. 8c. Barrowsil, 2%-in.. ready 
for shift. 5c. A. J. Baldwin, Newark, Ohio. 

Bostons and Scottii, bench-grown; and Bos- 
tons, pot-grown. See adv. on cover page. 

Baur Floral Co., Erie, Pa. 

Ferns. Scottii, Piersonl and Bostons at greatly 
reduced prices for March. Write 

Cottage Greenhouses, Bushnell, 111. 

Scottii ferns, 2%-in., $4.00 per 100; 8-ln., 
80c each, to make room. Cash. 

Ma ple City Greenhouses, Honesdale, Pa 

We are booking orders for Nephrolepis Amer> 
pohlli, the sensational new fern. 
Janesville Floral Co., Janesville, Wis. 

We have the finest collection of ferns In 
Europe. Lists on application. 
H. B. May & Sons, Upper Edmonton, England. 

Boston ferns from bench, ready for 4 and 
5-in.. $10.00 and $15.00 100. 
J. W. Dnnford. Clayton, Mo. 

Ferns. Boston, Piersonl. Elegantissima. Prices 
are given in display adv. 
D. U. Augspurger & Sons. Bx. 778, Peoria, HI. 

Boston and Barrowsil ferns. Sizes and prices 
are listed in display adv. 
Nelson & Klopfer, 1101 8th Ave., Peoria. 111. 

Ferns, 2^-ln., Whitman!. $10.00 100. Ele- 
gantissima, $5.00 100. 
P. R. Qninlan. Syracuse, N. Y. 

N. Bostoniensis. 4-ln.. $1.60 doz. Other sizes 
given in display adv. 
Wittbold Co., 1657 Buckingham Pi.. Chicago. 

Fern runners, Boston and Elegantissima, $20.00 
and $30.00 per 1000. 

Mosbaek Greenhouse Co., Onarga, III. 

Ferns, Elegantissima, 300 from 2%-ln. pots, 
$5.00 per 100. 
M. E. Ernsberger, 59 Corwin St., Norwalk, 0. 

Ferns. Wbitmani. 6-in., $12.00 doz. Scottii. 
6-in.. $6.00 doz. 

J. W. Young, Germantown, Phila., Pa. 

Nephrolepis Amerpohlii, a grand novelty. See 
our display adv. 
W. P. Craig, 1305 Filbert St., PhUa. 

Ferns, 2%-in. Wbitmani, 10.00 100. Boston, 
$3.00 100. 
H. H. Barr ows & Son, Whitman, Mass. 

Ferns, all varieties. Prices are given in dis- 
play adv. 
G. Aschmann. 1012 Ontario St.. Phila. 

Nephrolepis Wbitmani, young plants from 
bench. $6.00 100. Davis Bros.. Morrison, 111. 

Boston and Pierson ferns, 2V4-in.. select stock, 
$3..'W per 100. J. T. Cherry, Athens. 111. 

Ferns. Elegantissima, 2M!-ln.. $5.00; 3-in., 
$9.00 per 100. C. W. Bakewell, Gretna, La. 

N. Elegantissima. runners, $1.50 100. Cash. 
Byer Bros. , Chambersburg, Pa. 

Wbitmani ferns, fine. 2V^-in. plants, $8.50 per 
100. Tony Toerner. Scio. Ohio. 

Boston ferns, 5-in., $2.50 doz. Cash. 
Converse Gre enhonses, Webster, Mass. 

Boston ferns, specimens, $18.00 doz. 
J. A. Peterson, Westwood, Cincinnati, O. 

Scottl ferns, 2% -in., $3.00 100. 

Springfield Floral Co., Springfield, O. 

Boston ferns, 4-ln.. $12.00 100. 

F. W. Heckenkamp, Jr., Quincy, 111. 



FEVERFEW. 



Feverfew, double white; strong rooted cut- 
tings, 60c per 100, postpaid. Cash. 

Wm. Bierstadt & Son, Springfield, 111. 

Feverfew, dwarf, young plants, $1.00 100. 
Cash. Byer Bros., Chambersburg, Pa. 

Feverfew Little Gem, 80c per 100; $7.00 per 
1000. S. W. Pike, St. Charles. 111. 

Feverfew, 2-ln.. $3.00 100. 
D. U. Augspurger & Sons, Bx. 778, Peoria, 111. 

FUCHSIAS. 

Fuchsia Little Beauty, strong, 2-in.. $3.60 per 
100. Booted cuttings, $1.50 per lOO. 

N. O. Caswell, Delavan, III. 

Fuchsia Little Beauty, 2%-in.. $4.60 100; 
$40.00 1000. Baur Floral Co., Brie. Pa. 

Fuchsia Little Beauty, 2% -In., $4.00 100. 
Cash. Lake Side Greenhouses, Erie, Pa. 

GERANIUMS. 

GERANIUMS, the following superb bedders: 
S. A. Nutt (crimson), Mme. Buchner (best 
double white), Peter Henderson (bright scarlet), 
J. Viand (pink), strong top cuttings, well 
rooted, $1.75 per 100; $16.00 per 1000. Cash. 
W. T. Buckley Co., Springfield, 111. 

New single geranium, SYCAMORE, bright, 
clear salmon-pink, cross between Mrs. B. O. 
Hill and Paul Bruant. Orders booked now for 
2 4-in. pots at $2.0o doz.; $15.00 100. 
St. Clair Floral Co., Belleville, IlL 

Elegant 2%-inch geraniums, $3.00 per 100. 
S. A. Nutt, Heteranthe, Jean Viand, John 
Doyle, La Favorite, New Life, rose scented, 
Bismarck. 

Spach-Denison Co., New Philadelphia, Ohio. 

Geraniums, best varieties, large. 3-ln.. $40.00 
1000. Double Grant, large, 2-in.. $18.00; 3-ln.. 
$35.00 per 1000. 

Wm. S. Herzog, Morris Plains. N. J. 

Mt. of Snow and Salleroi. pois, $2.00 per 100. 
Mt. of Snow, rooted cuttings. $1.25 per loO. 
Geo. Smith, Manchester. Vt. 

Mixed geraniums, fall rooted, 2-in., 2c; 3-in.. 
4C; Jas. T. Baker, Bustleton, Phila.. Pa. 

Geraniums, 2\(,-la., $2.50 100; $25.00 1000. 
Springfield Floral Co.. Springfield, O. 

Geraniums, 3-ln., $6.00 100; $55.00 1000. 
D. U. Augspurger & Sons, Bx. 778, Peoria, 111. 

Geraniums. For price see display adv. 

Jos. H. Cunningham, Delaware. O. 

Ivy geraniums, R. C, $1.60 100. Cash. 

Converse Greenhouses, Webster, Mass. 

Mme. Salleroi, 2^-ln., 8c. 

Hammerschmidt & Clark, Medina, O. 



GLADIOLI. 



Gladioli, Groff's or Lemoine's, strictly fancy 
stock, nice large bulbs, 150 for $1.00, $6.50 per 
1000; also a good blooming size. 200 for $1.00, 
$4.50 per 1000. 

Femdale Nurseries, Harlan, Iowa. 

Hybrid gladioli. Bulblets, $1.50 per peck; 
small sizes, $1.00 per 1000 and up. Write for 
bargain price on uncleaned planting stock. 
C. H. K^tcham, N. S. D., South Haven, Mich. 

Genuine Grofif hybrids, all colors and combina- 
tions, including the blue shades. No. 1, $8.0U 
per 1000; No. 2, $5.00; No. 3, $3.00. 

A. B. Powell, Camden, New York. 

Gladioli, all sizes. Stock direct from Oroff. 
Nothing better, $1.00 to $5.00 per 1000. 

P. O. Coblentz, New Madison. Ohio. 

BRENCHLEYENSIS GLADIOLUS, second size. 
$8.00 per 1000. Cash with order. 
Estate of Louis Siebrecht, Floral Park, N. Y. 

Gladioli, Al, 3 strains, extra fine bulbs. Also 
cannas and dahlias. Write for price list. 

O. B. Stevens, Shenandoah, Iowa. 

Gladiolus Augusta. 1st size. $12.00; 2nd size. 
$8.00 1000. Cash. 

Rowehl & Granz, HlcksTllle, N. Y. 

Gladioli, good stock; mixed and named varie- 
ties; all sizes. S. Huth, Cuyahoga Falls, Ohio. 

Gladioli as good as the best. Nothing better. 
C. Betscher, Canal Dover, Ohio. 

Augusta, small sizes, $2.00 to $4.50 per 1000. 
John Fay Kennell, Chill, N. Y. 

Gladioli, named varieties. Write for list. 
E. E. Stewart, Rives Junction, Mich. 

Gladiolus America, $8.00 per 100. Cash. 
Cushman Gladiolus Co., Sylvanla, O. 

Gladioli, a mixture of superior quality. 
F. E. Newman. Cuyahoga Falls. O. 

Gladioli. Finest stock in the world. 

Arthur Cowee, Berlin, N. Y. 

HARDY PLANTS. 

We are headquarters for all the latest and 
best hardy perennials. We shall be pleased to 
mail you our catalogue. Royal Tottenham 
Nurseries, Dedemsvaart, Holland. 



PLEASE MENTION THE REVIEW WHEN WRITING ANY OF THESE ADVERTISERS, 



. •-~y^Aitk->jC:w-Wv.fc.M..^L>L,iJiL.jJi||-'^-(ftffcMtf-^i^'-*^ 






■f ^.T^^T-^-vri-^w »i » . ; -^.-7/r .. 



1224 



The Weekly Florists^ Review^ maecht. im. 



HARDY PLANT8-Continu«d. 


German Ivy. R. C. 60c 100; $4.00 1000. Cash. 
J. P. Cannata, Mt. Freedom, N. J. 


Pandanus Veitcbll, 24 in. high, $1.00 ea.; 
large plants, $1.60 to $3.00 ea. 

J. A. Peterson, Westwood, Cincinnati, 0. 


Hydrangea paniculata grandiflora, 2 to 8 ft., 
3 to 6 Btems, 17.00 per 100. Honeysuckle, Bush 
White Tartarian, 3 to 3% ft., $6.00 per 100; 
2 to 3 ft., I5.00 per 100. Golden Glow, $2.00 
per 100. Boltonla asteroides, $3.00 per 100. 


LANTANAS. 


We have some fine specimen kentias and other 
decorative plants. 

Bobblnk & Atkins, Rutherford. N. J. 


Lan tanas. Leo Dex and other varieties, 2-ln., 
2^c. A. J. Baldwin, Newark, Ohio. 


Choice lot Weir's cut-leaved maple, sllver- 
leaTed luaple and American sycamore, 8 to 10 


Pandanus Veltchli, all sizes, $1.00 to $2.00 
each. J. W. Young, Germantown, Phila., Pa. 

Palms and decorative plants. 


ft. Cut-leaved birch, 6 to 6 and 6 to 8 ft. 
Large supply ornamental nursery stock for 


LILACS. 


wholesale trade. Send list of wants for prices. 
Mount Arbor Nurseries, Shenandoah, Iowa. 


Philadelphus grandlflorus, commonly called 
syringa, 3 years, strong, $15.00 per 100. 

John Stamm, Hutchinson, Kan. 


Chas. D. Ball, Holmesburg, Phila.. Pa. 


Large trees of oaks, maples, pines and hem- 
locks. We have a full line of all nursery stock 
and can fill orders promptly. 
Andorra Nurseries, Chestnut Hill, Philadelphia. 


PANSY PLANTS. 


LILY OF THE VALLEY. 


30,000 pansy plants ready now. Fine, stocky 
plants for transplanting, 60c per 100, by mail; 
$3.00 per 1000, by express, or $3.60 prepaid. 
All grown from the best giant fancy mixed 
seed. Also 25,000 large, frame-grown plants 
for March and April delivery. Write for prices. 
S. W. Pike, St. Charles, 111. 


Sugar maple seedlings, ti-12 In., $6.00 1000; 
2-3 ft.. $3.00 100, $2{5.00 1000. Other stock 
listed in display adv. 


Lily of the valley pips, finest quality for early 
and late forcing. 

H. Frank Darrow, Box 1250, New York. 


Ellsworth Brown & Co., Seabrook. N. H. 


Uly of the valley, selected stock, $1.76 100; 
$14.00 1000. 

H. N. Bruns, 1409 Madison St., Chicago. 


An Immense stock of both large and small 
size erergreen trees in great variety; also ever- 


Pansies, fall transplanted, in bud and bloom. 
English, French, Trlmardeau, Mme. Perret, 
Odier, etc., all shades and colors, $1.25 per 
100; $10.00 per 1000. Young plants, $4.00 per 


green shrubs. 

The Wm. H. Moon Co.. MorrisviUe, Pa. 


Lily of the valley, select Berlin, $1.60 100: 
$13.00 1000. 

F. R. Plerson Co., Tarrytown, N. Y. 


Trees and shrubs, immense quantities. Price 


1000. F. A. Bailer, Bloomlngton, 111. 


list on application. Peterson Nursery, 604 
W. Peterson Ave., Chicago. 

Ornamental trees, shrubs, roses, clematis, fruit 
trees and small fruits. Send for price list. 


Lily of the valley pips, cold storage, $12.00 
1000. 
J. M. Thorburn & Co., 83 Barclay St., N. Y. 

Lily of the valley for fall shipment. 

Julius Hansen, Pinneberg, Germany. 


Pansies, frame-grown. Good, strong plants 
of the finest blends of Florists' International 
mixture, $4.00 per 1000; 50c per 100. 

N. E. Beck, Massillon, 0. 


W. & T. Smith Co.. Geneva. N. Y. 


Pansies, cool-grown. Prize strain of Bugnot'a, 


Wholesale growers of nursery stock for the 
American trade. Catalogue on application. 

H. Den Onden & Son. Boskoop. Holland. 


MANETTI STOCKS. 


Cassler's or Odier's, large, transplanted plants, 

50c per 100; $3.00 per 1000. 

Samuel Whitton, 15-16 Gray Ave., Utlca, N. Y. 


strong, healthy, well rooted, English-grown 
Manetti, $4.00 1000. 
S. Bide & Sons, Farnham, Surrey, England. 

English Manetti for florists and nurserymen. 
H. Frank Darrow, Box 1250, New York. 


Trees, shrubs, and evergreens in good assort- 
ment. Catalogue for the asking. 

H. T. Jones, Elizabeth, N. J. 


Fine, strong, healthy, field-grown pansies, 
Roemer strain, mixed or separate colors, $3.00 
per 1000; sample, 60c per 100. 

J. H. Krone, Jr., Fort Smith, Ark. 


Carolina poplars, and a full line of other trees 
and shrubs. Send for list. 

Aurora Nursery Co., Aurora, 111. 


Pansy plants, Perret and Trlmardeau strains, 
strong frame-grown, fine for Easter, $3.00 per 
100; $25.00 per 1000. Cash. 
Gustave Freytag, Hilltop PI., West Orange, N. J. 

Pansies, fall and January seedlings, from a 
very expensive mixture, 50c per 100; $3.60 per 
1000. Mosbaek Greenhouse Co., Onarga, 111. 

Pansy plants, fall transplanted, grown In cold 
frame, $1.00 per 100; $8.60 per 1000. 

A. R. Knowles, Bloomlngton, 111. 


Manetti stocks, $8.50 1000. 

Elizabeth Nursery Co., Elizabeth, N. J. 


Perennial plants, 50,000 field and pot-grown. 


Descriptive list now ready. 

Mosbaek Greenhouse Co., Onarga, 111. 


MINT. 


Vibnmum pUcatum all sizes, spiraeas, deutzlas, 
etc. Write for prices. 

Conard & Jones Co., West Grove, Pa. 


Spearmint, 3-in. rooted slips, $1.60 per 100; 
$10.00 per 1000. Cash. 

M. Molenaar, 7112 Indiana Ave., Chicago. 


Deciduous trees and shrubs. Send for price 
list. Cottage Gardens Co., Queens, N. Y. 


MOONVINES. 


Royal exhibition pansies, frame-grown, $3.00 
per 100. Jas. T. Baker, Bustleton, Phila., Pa. 


American white elm, extra fine, nursery-grown. 
Chas. Hawkinson, Excelsior, Minn. 


Moonvlnes, fine, 2-ln. and rooted cuttings. 
Stoart & Haugh, Anderson, Ind. 


Herbaceous plants, field-grown. Send for Urt. 
Elizabeth Nursery Co., Elizabeth, N. J. 


Moonvlnes, strong plants, $3.50 per 100. 

John Heldenreich, Indianapolis, Ind. 


PELARGONIUMS. 


Norway spruce, oaks and maples. 

Willard H. Rogers, Mt. Holly, N. J. 


MUSHROOM SPAWN. 


Pelargonium peltato zonal, 26c ea.; $2.60 doz. 
R. Vincent Jr. & Son, White Marsh, Md. 


Fruit and ornamental trees. 

Gilbert Costich, Rochester, N. Y. 


Lambert's pure culture mushroom spawn has 
never failed to run. Practical instructions on 
mushroom culture mailed free if you mention 
The REVIEW. 

American Spawn Co., St. Paul. Minn. 


PEONIES. 




Fancy peonies, heeled in in sand, extra cheap. 
Strong divisions of 2 to 4 eyes, all colors, 15c to 
25c each. Mixed pink, 8c; mixed red, 10c. 


HELIOTROPES. 


HeUotropes (dark), good stock, strong and 
well rooted. R. C, 60c 100; $5.00 1000. Cash. 
J. P. Cannata, Mt. Freedom, N. J. 


High-grade mushroom spawn always on band. 
Johnson Seed Co., 217 Market St., Phila., Pa. 


Varieties are given In display adv. 

Peterson Nursery, Lincoln & Peterson Ares., 
Chicago. 


Heliotropes, In the six best varieties. Rooted 
cuttings and 2 14 -in.. $1.00 and $2.50 per 100. 
Mosbaek Greenhouse Co.. Onarga. III. 


NASTURTIUMS. 


Peonies. Queen Victoria (Whitley 11), $9.00> 
per 100; Festlva maxima, $30.00 per 100; Fra- 
grans. the bloom producer, $6.00 per 100. For 


Double nasturtiums, yellow and red, strong 
growers, rooted cuttings, $1.75 per 100. 

Geo. Street, Box 137, Orlllla, Ont. 


Heliotropes, rooted cuttings, $1.00; 2-ln., 
$2.00; nice and bushy, 3-ln., $4.00 per 100. 

Advance Floral Co., Dayton, 0. 


other varieties and 1000 rate, write 

Gilbert H. Wild, Sarcoxie, Mo. 


NURSERY STOCKS. 


Choice mixed single and double seedlings 


Heliotropes, dark; clean, well-rooted cuttings, 
00c 100, $6.00 1000; 2%-in.. 2c. Cash. 

• Edwin Bishop, Roelyn, Md. 


from our noted collection of over three hundred 


Weeping mulberries, strong, l-yr.-old heads, 
grafted, 6 to 6 ft., $45.00 per 100. 

Aralia Japonlca, 4 to 6 ft. high, $20.00 per 
100; 6 to 8 ft. high, $26.00 per 100. 

Catalpa Bungei, 2 and 3-yr. heads, grafted, 
7 ft. h gh, $40.00 per 100. 

Lilac Charles X, on own roots, 4 yrs. old, 
3 to 4 ft., $18.00 per 100; 4 to 6 ft., $20.00 
per 100. 

Barberry Thunbergil, 6 yrs. old, good, heavy 
stock, 2% to 3 ft., $26.00 per 100. 

Privet Amurense, bushy plants, 4 to 6 ft., 
$25.00 per 100; 8 to 4 ft., $18.00 per 100. 
Klehm's Nurseries, Arlington Heights, IlL 


varieties, strong, undivided clumps, $6.00 per 
100. Mt. Desert Nurseries. Bar Harbor, Me. 


Heliotropes, dwarf varieties, 2-in., $2.50. 
Rooted cutUngs, $1.00 per 100. 

N. 0. Caswell, Delavan, 111. 


Wholesale grower of peonies. List of 100 
varieties. J. F. Rosenfleld, West Point, Neb. 


Peonies a specialty. Peterson Nursery, 604 


Dark heliotropes. Rooted cuttings, 60c, pre- 
paid; 2-ln., 2c. 

U. G. Harglerode, Shippensburg, Pa. 


W. Peterson Ave., Chicago. 


Peonies, leading kinds, $1.50 doz.; $10.00 100. 
P. A. Bailer, Bloomlngton, 111. 


Heliotrope Florence Nightingale, R. C, $1.00 
100. prepaid. A. J. Baldwin, Newark. 0. 


Peonies, 1200 sorts. Greatest list anywhere. 
C. Betscher, Canal Dover. Ohio. 


Heliotropes, dark, 2%-ln., 2e. Cash. 

Edwin Bishop, Roslyn, Md. 


Peonies, finest double named, Oc. List free. 
W. H. Salter, Rochester, N. Y. 


HOLLYHOCKS. 


ORCHIDS. 


PETUNIAS. 


HoUvhocks. Large field-grown plants, $8.00 
per 100. Double In separate colors of red, 
white, pink, yellow and maroon; also the 
Allegheny strain. 

Send for catalogue of hollyhocks, dahlias 


Laella anceps, fine plants, $4.00 doz., $25.00 
per 100. Carriage paid. 

J. A. McDowell, Ap. 167, City of Mexico. 


Petunia The Queen, strong plants, 2%-ln., 
$1.50 doz.; $10.00 100; $00.00 1000. Ready 
now. 


Orchids. A large importation In perfect con- 
dition Just received. 

Carrlllo & Baldwin, Secaucus, N. J. 


Yates Floral Co., Canajoharie, N. Y. 
Scranton Florist Supply Co., Scranton. Pa. 


and hardy plants. 

W. W. WILMORB, Box 382, Denver, Colo. 


Double petunias, best var., named, $1.25 100, 
prepaid; $10.00 1000; 2-ln., $3.o0 100. 


Orchids, established and semi-established. 

Julius Roehrs Co., Rutherford, N. J. 


Double hollyhocks, 214-ln., $2.75 per 100. 


Hopkins & Hopkins, Chepachet, B. I. 


H. B. Snow. Camden, New York. 


Orchids for spring and summer delivery. 

A. Held. 11-19 William St., New York. 


Petunias, dble. red, white and pink. 2%-ln., 
3%c. Hammerschmldt & Clark, Medina, 0. 


HYDRANGEAS. 


Orchids, all varieties. 

Lager ft Hurrell, Summit, N. J. 


Petunias, double, Dreer's strain, 2-in.. 3%c. 


strong, bush Hydrangea P. G., 8c; tree, 26c. 
W. H. Salter, Rochester, N. Y. 


A. J. Baldwin, Newark, 0. 


PALMS, ETC. 


Petunias, $1.25 100; $10.00 1000. 

C. Humfeld. Clay Center, Kan. 


IRIS. 


Areca lutescens, cocos, kentia, phoenix and 
pandanus. See display adv. for varieties and 
prices. 

Wittbold Co., 1657 Buckingham PI., Chicago. 


PHLOXES. 


Iris. German, mixed, 2c; Japanese, 4c. 

Jesse P. King, Mt. Airy, Md. 


Twenty choice named varieties, strong, field- 
grown plants, $4.00 per 100; $30.00 per 1000. 
Mt. Desert Nurseries, Bar Harbor, Me. 


IVY. 


Kentia Forsteriana, Belmoreana, Cocos Wed- 
delllana, all sizes. See display adv. for prices. 
G. Aschmann, 1012 Ontario St., Phila. 


German Ivy. Rooted cuttings, 50c per 100; 
2%-ln., fine, $1.50 per 100. 


Hardy phlox, best assortment, standard varie- 
ties, 2-year, field clumps, $3.00 per 100. 

John Stamm. Hutchinson. Kan. 


J. C. Schmidt Co., Bristol, Pa. 


Llvistona rotundlfolla, well-leaved and clean, 
$6.00, $9.00 and $12.00 per doz. 

Julius Roehrs Ca, Rutherford, N. J. 


Hardy English ivy, 4-ln., $1.60 doz.; $10.00 
100. C. Eisele, lltb ft Roy, Philadelphia. 


Hardy phlox, finest named, fleld-grown roots, 
3c, W. H. Salter, Rochester, N. Y. 



PLEASE MENTION THE REVIEW WHEN WRITING ANY OF THESE ADVERTISERS. 



tw.,./:»: - ;•, W,. y, . ... r.:^-^J'\'^:.: ^j.'.. J,». ---'•- ''—'.^l*i-iflili|V a->.: ■-..:- W..A.-..,^.,— ■A-".V-4«'-J.v»<ifc..»;^ 



"tt? .•r*'^i. '/■T''»>'i'*'«'."ip^TOiTPv'*'™"*.'t'"'^^*^^^ ' '■" 



■' yi^^fW r^Tu^T^-'^^ t^' 



•'V :".:«!•? »"f 



-7* 



March 7, 190^ 



The Weekly Florists' Review* 



)225 



POINSETTIAS. 



We have to offer 2000 poinsettias, strong, 
bealthy, dormant stock, at $6.00 per 100, or 
$S0.OO per 1000. Ctaas. Frueb & Sons, 1116 
Hoyt Ave., Saginaw, Mich. 

Poinsettias, 2%-ln., $0.00 100; $45.00 1000. 
Baur Floral Co., Erie, Pa. 



PRIMULAS. 



Primula obconlca grandlflcra, all colors. In- 
cluding pink and carmine, full of flowers, 2^^- 
In., $3.50; 4-ln. $6.00 per 100. Giant obconlca, 
6 and 7-ln., 7 to 10 gigantic trusses, 25c per 
plant. Baby or Forbesl, full of flowers, 3-ln., 
$5.00 per 100. Chinese, full of flowers, all 
colors, 3-ln., $5.00; 4-ln., $10.00; 5-ln., $12.00 
per 100. J. Sylvester, Florist, Oconto, Wis. 

Primulas. Chinese, 3%-ln. pots. In full bloom, 
$8.00 per 100. Buttercup, 3V4-ln. pots. In full 
bloom. $7.00 per 100. All plants are very 
strong. Carl Meier, Green Bay, Wis. 

Primula obconlca gigantea, strong plants in 
bud and bloom, 3-ln., $4.00; 4-ln., $7.00; 5-ln., 
$10.00 per 100. J. H. Gould, Mlddleport, N. Y. 

Primula obconlca, 4000 full of bud and bloom, 
fine for Easter sales, $4.00 per 100. Try them. 
Alonzo J. Bryan, Washington, New Jersey. 

Primula obc. gig., SVi-In., bud and bloom, 6c. 
Hammerschmldt & Clark, Medina, O. 

Baby primroses, 2%-ln., $2.00 100. 
Springfield Floral Co., Sprlngflled, O. 

Primula obconlca, 4-ln., 75c doz. 

J. S. Bloom, Rlegelsvllle, Pa. 



PRIVET. 



Privet Japonlca and Amoor River, 2-year, 
$2.50 and $3.00 per 100. 
John Stamm, Hutchinson. Kan. 

Privet Amurense, bushy, 4 to 5 ft., $25.00; 
3 to 4 ft., $18.00 100. 

Klehm's N urseries, Arlington Heights, 111. 

250,000 California privet, all sizes. Send for 
trade list. Valdeslan Nurseries, Bostic, N. C. 

California privet cuttings, $1.00 1000. 
Caddo N urseries, Shreveport, La. 

California privet, 3 yrs., $30.00 1000. 
Willard H. Rogers, Mt. Holly, N. J. 

.• Privet cuttings, $1.25 1000. 

* H. T. Jones, Elizabeth. N J. 

California privet, all sizes. 

J. T. Lovett, Little Silver, N. J 

RESURRECTION PLANTS. 

Resurrection plants, 30. to 35 cm. In dr., $2.00 
per 100, $15.00 per 1000. Carriage paid. 

J. A. McDowell, Ap. 167, City of Mexico. 

RHODODENDRONS. 

Hardy rhododendrons (R. maximum), sturdy 
clumps, 18 In. high, $6.00; 2 ft., $9.00; 4 ft., 
$18.00; 6 ft., $24.00 per doz. 
L. F. Kinney, Kingston, R. I. 

Rhododendrons, excellent forcing stock, 20 to 
24 In. high, $1.00 ea., $11.00 doz., $90.00 100. 
H. A. Drcer, 714 Chestnut St., Phila. 

Rhododendrons, bushy, leading forcing var., 
\8 to 20 in. high, $9.00; 20 to 24 In., $12.00 
doz. Storrs & Harrison Co., Patnesville, O. 

Rhododendron maximum and Kalmia latlfolia, 
any size. Write for catalogue. 

Riverside Nursery Co., Confluence, Pa. 

ROOTED CUTTINGS. 

Rooted cuttings. Hardy pink carnations, coral 
honeysuckle, Mexican primrose, hardy phlox, 
dahlias, mums, $1.25 100. Parlor, English and 
Kenilworth ivy, Vinca var., 90c. All prepaid. 
Write for list. Geo. O. Klein, Beard. Ky. 

Alternantheras, 60c 100; $5.00 1000. Salvias, 
heliotropes, double sweet alyssum and cuphea 
(cigar plant), $1.00 100; $8.00 1000. Coleus, 
70c 100. Feverfew, $1.25 100. 

• C. Humfeld. C lay C enter. Kan. 

Vinca var.. Salvia splendens, 90c. Helio- 
tropes, double petunias, $1.00. Other stock 
given in display adv. 

Byer Bros., Chambersburg, Pa. 

Ageratums, 60c. Alternantheras, red and yel- 
low, 50c. Other stock is listed In display adv, 
Shippensburg Floral Co.. Shlppensburg, Pa. 

Rooted cuttings of coleus, ageratums, salvias 
and heliotropes. Prices are given in display adv. 
A. N. Pierson, Cromwell, Conn. 

Rooted cuttings, heliotropes, salvias, agera- 
tums, fuchsias. $1.00 100. 
C. Elsele. 11th & Roy, Phila., Pa. 

Bargains in rooted cuttings are offered in dis- 
play adv. N. Smith & Son, Adrian, Mich. 



ROSES. 



Roses, rooted cuttings. Bride, Maid, Gontler, 
La France, $1.25 per 100; $10.00 per 1000. 
Kalserln and Richmond, $2.00 per 100; $15.00 
per 1000. Cash with order. 

Frank Beu, 2780 N. 40th Ave., Chicago. 



AMERICAN BEAUTY 

Bench-grown plants for early delivery, 

$8.00 per 100; $75.00 per 1000. 

Brides, 2 ^^ -Inch pots $3.00 100; $25.00 1000 

Maids, 21/i-lnch pots 3.00 100; 25.00 1000 

Richmond, 2M!-lnch pots.. 3.00 100; 25.00 1000 
Chatenay, 2Vi-lnch pots... 3.00 100; 25.00 1000 
Uncle John, 2Vi-inch pots. 3.00 100; 25.00 1000 

Kalserln, 2iA-lnch pots 4.00 loO; 35.00 1000 

WIETOR BROS.. 51 Wabash Ave., Chicago. 

Roses, 2J/j-ln., .$:{.50; 3-Iu.. $.5.00; 4-in., 
$8.00 100. 

Bride Wool ton 

Maid Si.upert 

Helen Gould (iruss an Teplltz 

Bon Silene Safrauo 

Duchess de lirabuiit 

Americun Beauty, 2-ln., $5.00; 2ya-in., $6.50; 
3-in., $8.00 per IlKJ. Cash with order. 

Marshall Floral Co., Marshall, Mo. 

Uoses. Baby Ramblers, the strongest, dor- 
mant budded stock In the country, $25.00 per 
100; 2-year, No. 1, own root, $15.<X) per 100; 
1-year, No. 1, own root, $12.00 per 100; 2i4-ln. 
pot plants, $4.00 per 100, 250 plants for $7.50; 
4-ln. pot plants, in bloom, March and April, 
$15.00 per 100. 

Brow n Bros. Co., Rochester, N. Y. 

We are now booking orders 

For early delivery 

GRAFTED AND OWN ROOT ROSE PLANTS 

Bride, Maid, Kalserln, Carnot, 

Wellesley, Killarney and Richmond. 

Send for prices. 

W. H. ELLIOTT, Brighton, Mass. 

Roses. Brides, Bridesmaids, Golden Gates, 
Ivorys, Kalserlns, 2-ln. pots, thrifty plants, 
$3.00 per 100, $25.00 per 1000. Rooted cuttings, 
$1.50 per 100. 
Wm. B. Sands, Lake Roland, Baltimore, Md. 

Own rof)t roses, 2 yrs. C. Ramblers, $7.00. 
Dorothy Perkins, P. W. and Y. Ramblers, $5.00. 
H. P. roses and Baby Ramblers, $8.00 100. 
Gilbert Costlch, Rochester. N. Y, 

Rose plants. 

100 lOOO 100 1000 

Carnot $4.00 $35 Richmond ..$3.00 $25 

Kalserln ... 4.00 35 Perle 3.00 25 

Chatenay . . 3.00 25 Gate 3.00 25 

Bell Miller, Springfield, 111. 

New hybrid tea rose, QUEEN OF SPAIN, 
grand flesh color, seedling from Antolne Rivolre, 
ideal exhibition rose, robust grower. Strong 
plants In pots, $1.20 ea.; $15.00 for 13 plants; 
$55.00 for 50; $100.00 100. 

S. Bide & Sons, Farnham, Surrey, England. 

We offer some DECIDED BARGAINS In fleld- 
grown roses. You will find It to your advantage 
to look up our display adv. The stock Is first- 
class. • California Rose Co., Pomona, Cal. 

Roses, strong, healthy cuttings and pot 
plants. Young stock, leading varieties. Prices 
are given In display adv. 
Poehlmann Bros. Co., Morton G rove, 111. 

Grafted roses. Our list Includes only the most 
profitable commercial varieties for forcing. See 
display adv. for prices. 

Jackson & Perkins Co., Newark, New York. 

The beautiful new pink rose, MISS KATE 
MOULTON, Is the queen of all pink roses. 
Write us about It. 

Minneapolis Floral Co., Minneapolis, Minn. 

Field-grown roses, low-budded, 2 yrs. old, well 
rooted. A list of varieties and prices is given 
In display adv. 
F. Ludemann, Baker St., San Francisco, Cal. 

Roses, two-year-old, field-grown, Kalserln Au- 
gusta Victoria, $15.00 per 100. Clean, well 
rooted stock. 
Josiah Young, 4 Grand St., Troy, N. Y. 

Grafted roses. Kalserln, Bride, Maid, Kil- 
larney, Richmond, $120.00 1000. March delivery. 
Robt. Scott & Son, Sharon Hill, Pa. 

Roses. Brides and Maids, well rooted cut- 
tings, $1.50 per 100; $12.50 per 1000. 
Welland & OUnger. New Castle. Ind. 

Roses, rooted cuttings and bench plants. See 
display adv. for varieties and prices. 

Geo. Relnberg, 35 Randolph St., Chicago. 

Roses, strong rooted cuttings, leading varie- . 
ties. See display adv. for prices. 

Peter Relnberg, 51 Wabash Ave.. Chicago. 

Roses. Bride, 2-ln., $2.25 per 100; or will 
exchange for bedding plants. 
^__ Paul O. Tauer, Lebanon, Ind. 

Maman Cochet roses, white and pink, dormant 
stock, 4-ln., $10.00 per 100. 

• John Stamm, Hutchinson, Kan. 

Roses, strong, dormant plants, suitable for 
forcing. Send for list. 
Bay State Nu rseries, North Ablngton, Mass. 

Low-budded roses. No. 1, $95.00; No. li^, 
$65.00 1000. H. T. Jones, Elizabeth, N. J. 

Grafted roses. Our roses are the finest and 
bes^ grown. J. L. Dillon, Bloomsburg, Pa. 

American Beauties, 2%-ln., $8.00 100; $75.00 
1000. Chas. H. Totty, Madison, N. J. 

Hardy, fleld-srown roses, leading sorts, strong, 
80; W. H. Salter. Rochester, N. Y. 

Dog briar, 3 to 5 mm. ea., 5 marks per 1000. 
Julius Hansen, Plnneberg, Germany. 



Roses and all Holland grown planta in choicest , 
varieties. ^^^^^ Parrow, Box 1250, New York . 

Rooted rose cuttings. Fine stock. See dls- 
Bas^sett'& Washburn, 76 Wabash Ave., Chicago. 



Roses, strong plants, $3.00 100; $25 00 1000. 
Storrs & Harrison Co., Palnesvllle, O. 



Rose plants on own roots. Send for list. 

C. M. Niuffer, Springfield, O. 



Hybrid roses, 2-yr., field-grown, $12.00 100. 
Storrs & Harrison Co., Palnesvllle, O. 



Roses, rooted cuttings, $2.00 100; $15.00 1000. 
Chicago Carnation Co., JoUet, 111. 



Roses, rooted cuttings. See display adv. 

Frank Garland, Des Plalnes, 111. 



Roses, 2% and 4-ln. Write for prices. 

Spring field Floral Co., Springfield, O. 

New pink rose, Aurora. ^Wrlte ~ 

Paul Nlehoff, Lehighton, Pa. 



Leedle Co., 101 best sorts. Springfield, O. 



RUBBERS. 



Rubbers, top cuttings, out of 3'8. Strong, 
healthy plants, ready for delivery, $150.00 1000. 
In lots of 500 or less, $16.00 per 100; In lots 
of 100 or less, $17.00 per 100. 

A. C. Oelschlg & Son, Savannah. Ga. 

Rubbers, strong plants, 4-In., 20c; 5-in., extra 
strong, 25c. Cash. 

Fuhlbruegge Bros., Winona, Minn. 



Ficus elastlca, 5-ln., 35c ea.; $4.00 doz. 
Wittbold Co., 1657 Buckingham PI., Chicago 



Ficus pandurata, 7-ln., $2.50. 
Rose Hill Nurseries, New Rochelle, N. Y. 



SALVIAS. 



Salvias Bonfire and St. Louis. Rooted cut 
tings, $1.00 per 100; $8.00 per 1000; 2-in. 
$2.o0 per 100. Cash. 

E. B. Randolph, Delavan, 111. 



Salvia Bonfire, R. C, prepaid, $1.00 100 
express, 2-in., 2^c. ,, , „,_, 

A. J. Baldwin, Newark, Ohio. 



Salvia splendens. Bonfire, 2-in., 2c. Cash 
Byer Bros., Chambersburg, Pa. 



SANSEVIERIAS. 



Sansevlerlas, strong. $4.50 doz. 

C. Eisele, 11th & Roy, Philadelphia. 



SANTOLINAS. 

Santolinas, fine 2-ln., $2.01) per 100. Rooted 
cuttings, fine plants from sand, $1.00 per 100. 
Cash with order, please. 

M. & S. L. Dyslnger. Albion, Mich. 



SEEDS. 



Primula seed should be sown now for Christ- 
mas flowering. We handle only the finest Eng- 
lish strains, and refer you to hundreds of satis- 
fied customers. See display adv. or our cata- 
logue for varieties and prices. If you haven't 
the catalogue, we should like to send you one. 

A. T. Boddington, 342 W. 14th S t., New York. 

Headquarters for cauliflower and Tripoli onion 
seed. Crystal Wax and Bermuda, and all other 
vegetable seeds of unrivaled quality. All flower 
seeds grown on an enormous scale. Ask for 
wholesale catalogue. Dammann & Co., San 
Giovanni a Teduccio, Italy. 

Seeds of palms, ferns, asparagus, callas, 
cyclamen. Primula sinensis, tropical plants; 
white and red Bermuda onions, the true 
Teneriffe seed. Send for illustrated wholesale 
catalogue. Albert Schenkel, Seed Grower, Ham- 
burg, Germany. 

Vegetable seeds. Special stocks of seeds for 
early forcing in frames or greenliouses. We 
offer the best varieties. May we send you our 
catalogue ? 

Watkins & Simpson. 12 Tavistock St., Covent 
Garden , London, England. 

Seed novelties. Eryngium alpinum superbum, 
20c pkt. Salvia bracteata, 15c pkt. Physo- 
stegla Virginica compacta rosea, 15c pkt. 

Kohler & Rudel, Windischleuba, Altenburg, 
Germany. 

Seeds. Suhr's genuine Danish cauliflower. 
Dwarf Erfurter and Danish Giant, and Danish 
Bnll Head cabbage. 

Wholesale only. Write for particulars. 

E. Suhr, Copenhagen . Denmark. 

Vegetable, flower and agricultural seeds. My 
specialties are Phlox Drummondli. and Lucerne 
of Provence (alfalfa). May I send you my 
catalogue? Jacques Rolland, Nimes. France. 

LAWN and PASTURE. Gustav Schott, ex- 
porter and Importer. Aschaffenburg, Germany, 
supplies all kinds of crass seeds of highest 
p urity and growth. Write for offers. 

SIIUPLfS GARDEN PEAS— 50 bu. Alaska. 
.$3.25 per bu.; 40 hu. First and Best, $2.50 per 
hu. Xew crop northern Michigan grown; none 
better. W. F. Allen. Salisbury, Md. 

Asparagus plumosus nanus seed, $2.00 1000 
seeds; $10.00 6000 seeds. 

Taylor Seed Co., Glendale, Cal. 



PLEASE MENTION THE REVIEW WHEN WRITING ANY OF THESE ADVERTISERS. 



■ .,._^.,fcVv-:*.i---..--:*^%.^-»:^ ■.\"'^^cL^'»fi..i^..: jj. T ^■.>.-.^W".-A-.-W^ii-^..-,*»^.:j>j>L. .,i->... --■I'v-. ■ 



^•i^ \*..t ^_'- >,*.t.„t^.f^ ■■■> 



. 'ji^'Mu .^ .m\ . . 



'■.,.7» ',.-;y' 



" ■' '•yvr:\'^-fi y^-.-^.r-T^i^ssfT:- •^■:->^ 



i^7'=fBi\^Ji'>-v«|;./-;^.!|jriij|(jiii;f_,|,i,,j.j,^ 



J 226 



The Weekly Florists^ Review. 



Mabch 7, 1907. 



SEE DS— Continusd . 



High grade flower seeds, grown In California. 
Seeds grown on contract. • 

Send for new price list. 

Theodosla B. Shepherd Co., W. H. Francis, 
Mgr., Ventura, Cal. 

Rawson's Primula obconlca Is absolutely dis- 
tinct from any other strain offered. Our fresh 
crop seeds are in and should be sown at once. 
W. W. Rawsou & Ck>., Boston, Mass. 

High grade aster seed for florists, from the 
best American and European growers. Varieties 
and prices given in display adv. 

Johnson Seed Co., 217 Market St., Phlla. 

Stokes' standard aster seed, new crop 
Asparagus plumosus nanus and Salvia Bonfire. 
Prices are given In display adv. 

Stokes' Seed Store. 219 Market St., Phlla. 

RELIABLE SEEDS. Sow the TRUE thing 
now. A miscellaneous list of varieties with 
prices Is given In display adv. 
O. V. Zangen, Hoboken, N. J. 

Danish seed. Cauliflower Snowball, and Haages 
extra early Erfurter Dwarf. Cabbage White 
Amager (Stonehead). Write 
Chris. Olsen, Odense. Denmark. 

Asparagus Sprengerl seed, 1907 crop now 
ready, $4.00 per lb.; 10 lbs., $35.00. 

Theodosla B. Shepherd Co., W. H. Francis, 
Mgr., Ventura, Cal. 

Araucarla Bidwilil, $2.50; Cunninghami, 
$1.50; glaura, $2.00 1000. 

J. Staer, Wahroonga, New South Wales, Aus- 
tralia. 

Leonard Seed Co. 

Growers and Wholesale Merchants. 

Leading Onion Set Growers. 

79-81 E. Klnzle St., Chicago. 

Genuine Bermuda and Crystal Wax onion seed. 
Grown and exported by Wildpret Bros., Port 
Orotava. Tenerlffe, Canary Islands. 

Berberis Thunbergll seeds, $1.75 lb. Boston 
•Ivy seeds, $2.50 lb. Nursery seeds In variety. 
Frank Hadden, 270 Dudley St., Roxbury, Mass. 

Garden seeds In variety, Maine seed potatoes, 
onion sets, etc. Correspondence solicited. 
S. D. Woodruff & Sons, Orange, Conn. 

Grower of special strains of melons and 
cucumbers. Contract orders solicited. 
D. V. Burrell, A 11, Rocky Ford, Colo. 

ONION SEED. 150 lbs. of Yellow Globe Dan- 
ver onion seed. Make me an offer. 

Wm. Clark, Colorado Springs, Coloi. 

Shasta daisy and petunia seeds. Description 
and price are given in display adv. 

Fred Grohe, Santa Rosa, Cal. 

Mammoth verbena seed, 75c oz. Other seeds 
are offered in display adv. 
W. C. Beckert, Allegheny, Pa. 

Asparagus plumosus nanus and Sprengerl seed. 
Fresh, greenhouse-crop. 
H. H. Berger & Co., 47 Barclay St.. New York. 

Rawson's hothouse cucumber, 60c oz. Scarlet 
Conical radish, 90c lb. 

W. W. Rawson & Co., Boston, Mass. 

ALASKA PEAS, 50 bushels at $3.25 per b"ir 
Write for sample. 

Covington Seed Co., Covington, Ky. 

Farquhar's Perfection forcing cucumber, 25c 
pkt. ; 35c ^ oz. 

R. & J. Farquhar & Co., Boston, Mass. 

Seeds from grower to planter. Varieties and 
prices are given In display adv. 
T. B. Turner. Swedesboro, N. J. 

Wholesale grower of vegetable and flower 
seeds. Selected stocks. 
A. J. Pleters Seed Co.. Holllster, Cal. 

Seed growers for the trade. Write us before 
placing contracts. 
S. M. Isbell & Co., Jackson, Mich. 

.\ster Miss Knte Lock, $1.00 tr. pkt. It's the 
best aster grown. 
J. 11. Lock, 41 Manchester Ave., Toronto, Ont. 

Asparagus Sprengerl seed, 1906 crop, 10c 100; 
60c 1000. Cash. 
F. J. Baker & Co.. Utica. N. Y. 

Growers of garden peas and beans for the 
wholesale trade. 
Alfred J. Brown Seed Co., Grand Rapids. Mich. 

Flower seed for early sowing. Send for our 
preliminary list. 
W. W. Barnard Co., 161 Klnzle St., Chicago. 

Cyclamen glganteum seed, $1.00 200; half 
packet, 50c. 
John F. Rupp. Shlremanstown, Pa. 

Cauliflower and cabbage seed. 
HJalmar Hartmann & Co., Copenhagen, Den- 
mark, or 31 Barclay St.. N. Y. City. 

New crop seeds now ready. Send for our cat- 
alogue. H. E. Flske Seed Co.. Boston, Mass. 

Specialties for forcing. Send for 1907 cata- 
logue. Weeher & Don. 114 Chamber St.. N. Y. 

Wholesale seed grower. Correspondence so- 
licited^ Waldo Rohnert, GUroy, Cal. 

Aster seed, Vlck's Branching, $1.00 oz.; $12.00 
lb. White Bros., Gasport, N. Y. 



Aster seeds, home-grown. Bargain list ready. 
H. W. Koerner, Sta. B, Milwaukee, Wis. 

We are growers of Puget Sound cabbage seed. 
Chas. H. Lilly Co., Seattle, Wash. 

Melon seeds a specialty. Wholesale only. 

Freeman Hurff, Swedesboro. N. J. 



Aster seed, new varieties, 25c tr. pkt. 
Vlck & Hill Co., P. O. Bx. 613. Rochester, N. Y. 

Comet tomato seed, $5.00 oz. 
Wm. Sim, Cllftondale, Mass. 

Seeds for market gardeners. 
K. Gundestrup, 4273 Milwaukee Ave., Chicago. 

Comet tomato seed, 60c pkt. 
H. M. Sanderson, Lincoln St., Waltham, Mass. 

Vine seeds and seed corn. 

Chauncey P. Coy & Son, Waterloo, Neb. 

SEEDLINGS. 

Verbenas, phlox, alyssum, stocks, 40c per 100; 
$3.00 per 1000. Salvias, lobelias. Dusty Miller, 
50c per 100; $4.00 per 1000. Fine little plants 
from the best -of seed. 
J. C. Schmidt Co.. Bristol, Pa. 

Seedlings from flats. A. Sprengerl, smilax, 
etc., $1.00 100. C. Eisele, 11th & Roy, Phlla. 

SHAMROCKS. 

Genuine Irish shamrock (original plant came 
from cemetery of Downpatrick In Ireland) now 
ready, 2%-ln., $4.00 per 100, $35.00 per 1000; 
260 at 1000 rate. 15c ea., 60e doz.. by mall. 
Cash. 
J. D. Harconrt's Sons, Wapplngers Falls. N. Y. 

Irish shamrocks, 60c doz.; $4.00 100. Cash. 
John F. Rupp, Shlremanstown, Pa. 

SHRUBS. 

Syrlngea Japonlca. 8 to 12 In., $6.00 per 100. 
Berberis Sieboldll, allied to Thunbergll, 6 to 12 
In., $5.00 per 100. Wistaria sinensis magnlfica. 
1-yr. seedlings, $2.00 per 100; 2-yr. plants, 
$5.00 per 100. Send for list of bulbs and hardy 
plants. E. S. Miller, Wading River. N. Y. 

Cut leaf Staghoi-n sumach, 2 to 6 ft., 6c. 8c 
and 12c. 

Tamarlx, 4 to 6 ft., 5c; 6 to 7 ft., 6c. 
Elmburst Nursery, Argentine, Kan. 

Berberis Thunbergll and a full line of other 
shrubs and trees. Send for list. 
Aurora Nursery Co.. Aurora, 111. 

Cut leaf Staghom sumach, large stock, 6c, 8c, 
12c and 15c. Edw. Teas, Joplin. Mo. 

All kinds of hardy shrubs. Ask for prices. 
Klehm's Nurseries, Arlington Heights, 111. 

SMALL FRUIT PLANTS. 

Turner red raspberry plants, $6.00 per 1000; 
$25.00 per 5000. 

Dewberry plants, Austin's and Lucretla, $5.00 
per 1000; f20.00 per 5000. Premo, $6.00 per 
1000; $25.00 per 5000. Free catalogue. 

W. F. Allen, Salisbury, Md. 



SMILAX. 



Smllax, fall-sown, $3.00 1000. 

F. A. Bailer, Bloomlngton, 111. 



STEVIAS. 



Stevla, rooted cuttings, present delivery, $1.00 
100. E. T. Wanzer, Wheaton. 111. 

Stevias. stock plants, 75c doz. Cash. 

Converse Greenhouses, Webster. Mass. 

STRAWBERRY PLANTS. 

Virginia, best early, and Chesapeake, best 
late, strawberries. Colored plates and catalogue 
free. 

Strawberry plants, 90 best varieties, stock un- 
excelled. Ask for prices on what you want; 
60-page catalogue free. 

W. F. Allen, Salisbury, Md. 

STOVE— GREENHOUSE PLANTS 

STOVE AND GREENHOUSE PLANTS. 

Largest collection in the U. S. 

Small plants and specimens. 

Catalogue sent on application. 

JULIUS EOEHRS CO., Rutherford, N. J. 



TRITOMAS. 



Tritoma Pfltzerll, extra strong plants, $4.00 
per 100. J. W. Myer, Rosedale, Ind. 

VEGETABLE PLANTS. 

Lettuce, strong seed-bed plants of Grand 
Rapids and May King, $1.00 per 1000; $7.50 
per 10,000. 

Tomatoes. Beauty. Stone, Dwarf Stone. 
Dwarf Champion, Truckers' Favorite, Chalk's 
Early Jewel, Earliana, June Pink, and Burpee's 
Earliest Pink, $1.00 per 1000; $7.50 per 10,000. 
F. Shearer & Son, Bingham ton, N. Y. 

Michigan and Cobbler potatoes. Millions of 
vegetable and strawberry plants. Danish cab- 
bage seed. F. M. Pattlngton, Sclpioville, N. Y. 



Malaner Kran horseradish sets. Imported 
stock. Far superior to the domestic. One doc. 
sets by mall, 40c. Write for prices on larger 
quantities. 

E. Corbin, 57 Orchard Ave., Kankakee, 111. 

Splendid stock large 4-year-old Barr's Mam- 
moth asparagus roots suitable for forcing, $6.00 
per 1000; $25.00 per 5000. 
W. F. Allen, Salisbury, Md. 

100,000 Asparagus Palmetto and Conover's 
Colossal, one and two-year-old, $2.00 and $3.00 
per 1000.' Mosbaek Greenhouse Co., Onarga, 111. 

Cabbage, lettuce, parsley and tomato plant*. 
R. Vincent Jr. & Son, White Marsh. Md. 

VERBENAS. 

Verbena Ellen Willmott, cerise pink, new and 
best in every way> rooted cuttings, $1.60 per 
100. W. W. Stertzlng. 7280 Manchester B<L, 

St. Louis, Mo. 

Mammoth verbenas, mixed, compact growth, 
3-in., $2.00 per 100; 2V^-ln., 75c per 100, $6.00 
per 1000. 

Simon Dumser, 436 McClure Ave.. Elgin, III. 

Verbenas, finest named var., rooted cuttings, 
75e 100; $6.00 1000. Plants, $2.50 100; $20.00 
1000. J. L. Dillon, Bloomsburg. Pa. 

Verbenas, rooted cuttings, 60c 100; $5.00 1000. 
C. Humfeld, Clay Center, Kan. 

VINCAS. 

Vlnca variegated, strong, 2%-in. pots, from 
2 to 4 leads, $3.00 per 100; $27.50 per 1000. 
Money refunded if not as advertised. 
David Wirth, 1st & Elliott Ave., Springfleld, IlL 

Vinca yar., 2i^-ln., $2.60 per 100; $20.00 per 
1000. Strong rooted cuttings. $1.00 per 100; 
$7.00 per KM). Cash. 
BenJ. Connell, West Grove. Pa. 

Vlncas, variegated, green and white, strong 
plants, 2^-ln. pots, $2.50 per 100. Cash. 

Louis Bauscher, Freeport, IlL 

Vlncas, variegated. 3-ln.. $4.00 per 100. Vinca 
minor (myrtle). 3-ln.. $3.00 per 100. 
C. F. Mahan. R. D. 8, Dayton. 0. 

Vlnca var., 2%-ln., $2.50. Rooted cuttings. 
80c per 100. H. B. Snow, Camden, New York. 

Vinca minor (myrtle), $20.00 and $30.00 per 
1000. E. K. Mooney, Madeira. O. 

Vlnca, greep and white, 2%-ln., 2%c. 
A. J. Baldwin, Newark, Ohio.. 

Vinca major, field grown, $6.00 100. 
Baur Floral Co., Brie, Pa. 

Vinca variegata vines, 3-in. 

Stuart & Haugh, Anderson, Ind. 

VINES AND CLIMBERS. 

Kudza Tines, large rtock. 10c, 16c and 25c. 
Edw. Teas, Joplin, Mo. 



VIOLETS. 



Violet blooms, fine crop from cold-frames, and 
rooted runners of Marie Louise. Al stock now 
ready, $1.00 per 100; $7.50 per 1000, Cash 
with order, please. 

C. Lawrltzen, Bx. 261. Rhlnebeck, N. Y. 

Violets, Princess of Wales, strong runners. 
$1.00 per 100. 

Rlverbank Greenhouses, (Jeneva, 111. 

Violets. California, single, rooted runners, 
$1.00 per 100. A. H. Dailey. Knoxvllle, Tenn. 

Princess violets, strong, field-grown plants. 
$50.()0 1000. Wm. Sim, Cllftondale, Mass. 

MISCELLANEOUS. 

We need more room for bedding stock so offer 
a miscellaneous list of fine stock. See display 
adv. Price list now ready. 

Mosbaek Greenhouse Co., Onarga, 111. 

Salvia splendens, red achyranthes, 2-ln.. $2.00 
100. Other stock listed In display adv. 
S. W. Carey. 201 Bloomfleld Ave., Urbana. O. 

Alternantheras, coleus, petunias, etc., are 
listed In display adv. 

Jos. H. Cunningham, Delaware, 0. 

TO EXCHANGE. 

To Exchange — Chrysanthemums, rooted cut- 
tings and 214 -In. pots, of Robinson, Enguehard, 
Golden Wedding, Wm. Duckham, Glory of 
Pacific, White and Yellow Eaton, and others; 
a fine lot of Araucarla excelsa, 12 to 18 Inches 
high, 3 to 6 tiers, 60c and 75c each, for rooted 
cuttings or pot plants of carnations Enchantress. 
Queen Louise, Vesper, Lady Bountiful, Victory 
and Lawson. Must be good stock free from 
disease, as the above stock we offer is in Al 
condition. Arthur L. Raub & Co., Easton, Pa. 

To Exchange — Water hyacinths are a novelty. 
Everyone should have a few for cemetery work, 
$1.00 per 100; $5.00 per 1000. Will exchange 
for bedding plants. 
W. E. Teall, Lake Charles, La. 

To Exchange— Cannas (see classified list this 
Issue), for roses, rooted buttings, or 2, 3 or 4-ln. 
pots. State varieties and prices. 

Nanz Floral Co., Inc.. Owensboro, Ky. 



PLEASE MENTION THE REVIEW WHEN WRITING ANY OF THESE ADVERTISERS, 



-'^mwrr-'^Z 






y^^^'^y^.ff^^^^ 



'.>;jft '*v -v^^ y.-.'^'iK^ 7™ 7*?*v:7^-*' 



[■!*^''Vri^y''.rT>i!r','^ii^7-w,^E» ,;;■-_..■- ,■»■»■ 



Mabck 7, 1907. 



The Weekly Florists' Review. 



1227 



To Exchange — Rooted cuttings of Harlowarden 
and Pink Lawson, $15.00 per 1000; Boston Mar- 
ket, $12.50 per 1000, Al stock to exchange for 
cannas and red alternantheras, or will take 
rooted cuttings of Enchantress. 
Crabb & Hunter Floral Co., Grand Rapids. Mich. 

To Exchange — Asparagus plumosus, strong 
3-inch; Sprengerl ready for 4-inch; Coleus 
Golden Bedder and Verschaffeltil. All very 
cheap in exchange for chrysanthemums or Law- 
son and Enchantress carnations. 
S. C. Templln, Garrettsvllle, 0. 

To Exchange — Rooted cuttings of Boston Mar- 
ket carnations, clean and healthy, at $1.50 per 
100, for Geranium Mme. Salleroi, Vinca varie- 
gata, strong plants, or anything we can use. 
Stenson & McGrall, Uniontown, Pa. 

To Exchange — Cyclamen, August seedlings, 
short grown stuff, $10.00 per 1000; for rooted 
chrysanthemum cuttings of C. Touset, October 
Frost, Duckham and Beatrice May. 

Herman Holtz, Hammond, Ind. 

To Exchange — Polnsettia plants, when ready, 
for Geraniums Heterantbe or John A. Doyle, 
now. Address C. L. Reese, Springfield, Ohio. 

To Exchange — Orchids and palms, for rooted 
cuttings of Enchantress carnations. 

Chase & Son, New London, Ohio. 

To Exchange — See adv. under beading, car- 
natlons. A. T. Lorch & Co., De Haven, Pa. 

To Exchange — See my adv. under heading of 
cannas. Gus Obermeyer, Parkersburg, W. Va. 

To Exchange — See adv. under heading roses. 
Paul 0. Tauer, Lebanon, Ind. 

To Exchange — See display adv. 

F. E. Allen & Co.. Brockton, Mass. 

WANTED. 

Wanted — 1000 each black and red currants 
(three years old) of Black Naples, Lee's Prolific, 
Fay's or Red Dutch. Must be grown north of 
Chicago. 

Also 500 Boston ferns out of 4-in. pots for 
April delivery. Lowest cash prices to 
Saskatoon Nursery Co., Saskatoon, Sask., Can. 

Wanted — 500 good, strong vinca vines. Send 
sample and price. 
Park Side Greenhouse, 746 E. 70th St., Chicago. 

Wanted — Rose Etolle de France, one and two- 
year size, own root or grafted. 

McGregor Bros. Co.. Springfield, 0. 

Wanted — 2000 Begonia Vernon, seedlings or 
rooted cuttings, at once. 

Daniel E. Gorman, Willlamsport, Pa. 

Wanted — Fresh green moss. Give price per 
barrel. H. A. Catlin, Greenock, Pa. 

ASBESTOS GOODS. 

Cover your boilers and flow pipes with asbes- 
tos; makes a grreat saving In coal bills; reason- 
able first cost; easily applied; lasts many years. 
Send for free catalogue. H. W. Johns-Man vllle 
Co., 100 William St., New York; Boston, Phila- 
delphia, St. Louis, Milwaukee, Chicago, Pitts- 
burg, Cleveland, San Francisco, Los Angeles, 
Seattle. London. 

CHARCOAL SCREENINGS. 

KEEPS SOIL SWEET AND ADDS COLOR. 
Ask the editor, or try a sample of 100 lbs. 
for $1.00. B. V. Sldell, Pongbkeepsle. N. T. 

CUT FLOWER BOXES. 

Cut flower boxes. Waterproof. Comer lock 
style. Cheap. Sample free if yon mention Tlie 
Review. 

Livingston Seed Co., Box 104, Columbns, O. 

Folding cut flower boxes, the best made. 
Write for list. 

Holton & Hunkel Co., Milwaukee, Wis. 

We make the best cut flower l>oz made. 
Write us. 
Edwards Folding Box Co., Phlla.. Pa. 

Florists' boxes. The J. W. Sefton Mfg. Co., 
241-247 So. JefTerson St., Chicago. 

Light wood cut flower boxes. 

Getmore Box Factory, Belleville, Ala. 

Parafian-lined paper boxes. 

The Bloomer Bros. Co., St. Mary's, O. 

FERTILIZERS. 

A sample 100-lb. bag of BLATCHFORD'S 
PLANT GROWER AND LAND RENOVATOR 
FERTILIZER only $2.75. This excellent fer- 
tilizer Is composed solely of pure Rose Growers' 
Bone Meal, Nitrate of Soda, Peruvian Guano, 
Sulphate of Ammonia, Sulphate of Potash and 
Gypsum, in the correct proportions and most 
soluble form for the best results. For benches 
and potting plants, for celebrated roses, carna- 
tions, lilies, mums, etc., florists say It has 
never been surpassed. Address 

BLATCHFORD'S CALF MEAL FACTORY, 

Established at Leicester. England, In 1800. 

WAUKEGAN, ILL. 

Bone meal, sheep manure, wood ashes, etc. 
Write us for anything you need. 
W. W. Barnard Co., 161 Klnzle St., Chicago. 



Wizard brand pulverized sheep manure. Write 
for booklet. 

Pulverized Manure Co., 33 Exchange Ave., 
Chicago. 

GALAX LEAVES. 

Green and bronze galax leaves, fresh from 
the woods. Postage prepaid, 50c per 1000; 
stamps taken. 

H. H. Hill, Victoria, Macon Co., N. C. 

Galax leaves, green ana bronze. Write 
F. W. Richards & Co., Banners Elk, N. C. 

Galax. Get our price on case lots. 
S cranton Florist Supply Co., Scranton, Pa. 

Galax leaves and leucothoe sprays. 
J. L. Banner & Co., Montezuma, N. O. 

Galax leaves, green or bronze. 
H. M. Robinson & Co., 11 Province St., Boston. 

Galax leaves, green or bronze. 
N. Lecakeg & Co., S3 W. 28th St., New York. 

Galax leaves, green or bronze. 

Crowl Fern Co., Millington, Mass. 

Green or bronze galax leaves. 
Thos. Williams, Jordanvllle, N. Y. 

Bronze and green galax. 

Ray Bros.. Elk Park. N. C. 

Bronze and green galax. 
C. E. Crltchell. 36 East 3rd St., Cincinnati, O. 

Galax, green or bronze. 
The Kervan Co., 20 W. 27th St., New York. 



GLASS. ETC. 



Large stock of greenhouse sizes on band. 
Write for prices; no order too large for us to 
handle, no order too small to receive our care- 
ful attention. 

Sharp, Partridge & Co., 22d and Cnion. Cbl- 
cago. 111. 

We have constantly on hand a full line of all 
sizes of greenhouse glass and can fill orders 
promptly and at lowest market prices. 

Pittsburg Plate Glass Co., 442 Wabash Ave., 
Chicago. 

Western florists! We can save you money on 
your glass. Write us for estimate before plac- 
ing your order. 
D enver Plate & Window Glass Co., Denver, Colo. 

We can save you money on greenhouse glass. 
Let us quote you prices. 

Standard Plate Glass Co., Boston. Mass. 

Greenhouse glass a specialty. Sprague, Smith 
Co.. 167-168 Randolph St.. Chicago. 

Greenhouse glass, selected quality. 
H. M. Hooker Co., 67 W. Randolph St., Chicago. 

Greenhouse glass a specialty. 
John Lucas & Co.. Philadelphia. 

GLAZING POINTS. 

Slebert's zinc "Never-rust" glazing points. 
Sold by all seedsmen, or 
Slebert Co., Pittsburg. Pa. 

Peerless glazing points are the best. 

H. A. Dreer, Philadelphia, Pa. 



GOLD FISH. 



Gold flsh. Comets, Japanese Fantails, Fringe- 
tails, Telescopes, etc. Fish globes and aqua- 
riums. 

The J. M. McCuUough'a Sons Co., 
816 Walnut St.. Cincinnati, Ohio. 



HOSE. 



Anchor greenhouse hose. Nothing better. 
Mineralized Rubber Co., 18 Cliff St., New York. 

Hose. Better than the rest. 

Scranton Florist Supply Co., Scranton, Pa. 

INSECTICIDES. 

"Nlco-fume," a great improvement over all" 
other tobacco papers, 24 sheets, 75c; 144 sheets, 
$3.50; 288 sheets, $6.50. 

"Nlco-fume" liquid, 40% nicotine, % pint, 60c; 
pint, $1.50; % gallon, $5.50; gallon, $10.50. 
Kentucky Tobacco Product Co., Louisville, Ky. 

Nicoticide kills all greenhouse pests. 

P. R. Palethorpe Co., 

Eleventh St., Louisville, Ky. 

Insecticides. We carry all the reliable kinds. 
W. W. Barnard Co., 161 Klnzle St.. Chicago. 

Century Insecticide, death to insects. Write 
W. H. Kuld, Norwood, Mass. 

Nlkoteen aphis punk. Kills all greenhouse pests. 
Nicotine Mfg. Co., St. Louis, Mo. 

Aphldde, the king of all insecticides. 

H. A. Stoothoff Co.. 116 West St., N. Y. 

Wilson's plant oil kills scale. 

Andrew Wilson, Dept. 5, Summit, N. J. 



LABEL GLUE. 



Magnet glue is used and recommended by 
Chicago wholesale florists; transparent, water- 
proof, economical. Trial tube, 25c, postpaid; 
pint can, 50c; quart, $1.00. 

R. Y. Bradshaw & Co., 5 to 17 W. Madison 
St., Chicago. 



PAINTS. 



Hammond's greenhouse white paint and Twem- 
low's Old English glazing putty. Hammond > 
Paint & Slug Shot Works, Flshklll-on-Hudsott, 
N. Y. 

Patton's Sunproof paint Is the best palnt made 
for greenhouse use. We are the irole distributers. 

Pittsburg Plate Glass Co., 442 Wabaab Ave., 
Chicago. ^ 

Greenhouse paint and putty. 
H. M. Hooker Co., 67 W. Randolph St., Chicago. 



Dependable paint and Putty. ^ , ^, „ 
John Lucas & Co., Philadelphia, Pa. 



PLANT BED CLOTH. 

Protects against frost, insects, etc. 
Mineralized Rubber Co., 18 Cliff St., New York. 



POT HANGERS. 



Kramer's pot hangers. Neat, simple, prac- 
tical Write 

I.* N. Kramer & Son, Cedar Rapids, Iowa. 



POTS. 



Our stock of STANDARD FLOWER POTS la 
always large and complete. 

WhlUdln Pottery Co., 713 Wharton St., Phila- 
delphia, or Kearney and West Side Avea., Jer- 
sey City, N. J. 

Standard Flower Pots. If your greenhoosea 
are within 500 miles of the Capital write ua; 
we can save you money. W. H. Ernest, 28tli 
and M Sts., N. B.. Washington, D. C. 

We make Standard Flower Pots, etc. 

Write us when in need. 

Wilmer Cope & Bro., 

Lincoln University, Chester Co., Pa. 



Flower pots, hanging baskets, ^etc. Write 
for prices. Twin City Pottery Mfg. Co., 240d 
Marshall St., N. B.. Minneapolis, Minn. 

Flower Pots. Before buying write ua for 
prices. Geo. Keller & Sons, 381-363 Hemdoo 
St. (near Wrlghtwood Ave.), Chicago. 

Standard Pots. Catalogues and price llata 
furnished on application. 

A. H. Hews & Co., No. Cambridge, Mass. 

BED POTS. Standard pots at bottom flgurea. 
Harrison Pottery, Harrison. Ohio. 



Red pots, azaleas and bulb pans; get oar 
prices . Keller Pottery Co.. Norristown. Pa. 

Say! Send to FEUSTEL, for prices on BED 
flower pots. . ^ , 

GE O. E. FEUSTEL, Falrport, Iowa. 

Standard red flower pots. Write for prices. 
Paducah Pottery (yo.. Inc., Paducah. Ky. 

RED POTS. STANDARD SIZE. 

SYRACUSE POTTERY CO.. Syracuse. N. Y. 



Ionia pots are the strongest, smoothest, moat 
porous pots made. .,, ^ 

Ionia Pottery Co., Ionia, Mich. 



THERMOSTATS. 



Thermostats and heat regulators. 

Brown Alarm Co., Denver, Colo. 



TOBACCO. 



Fresh tobacco stems. .. „ - 

U. Cutler Ryerson. 108 3rd Ave., Newark, N. J. 



Fresh tobacco stems. _ 

W. C. Beckeret, Allegheny, Pa. 



Fresh tobacco stems. $12.00 per ton. 

Scharff Bros., Van Wert. Ohio. 



TOOTHPICKS. 



Wired toothpicks, 10,000, $1.50; 60,000. $6.2B, 
Sample free. For sale by dealers. „ „ 

W. J. COW BE, Berlin, N. Y. 



WIRE SUPPORTS. 



Galvanized rose stakes, all sizes and lengtba, 
at reasonable prices. Write 

The Helm Support Co., ConnersvlUe, Ind. 

WIRE WORK. 



Wm. H. Woerner, Wire Worker of the West. 
Manufacturer florists' designs only. Second to 
none. Illustrated catalogues. 
1103 N. 18th St.. Omaha, Neb. 

We are the largest manufacturers of wire 
work In the west. E. F. Wlnterson Co., 
45. 47, 49 Wabash Ave., Chicago. 

William B. Hielscher's Wire Works. 88-40 
Broadway, Detroit, Mich. 

Full line of wire work. Write for list. 
Holton & Hunkel Co., Milwaukee, Wis. 

Reed & Keller, 122 W. 25th St., New York. 
Manufacturers of Wire Designs. 

Wire work. Send for price list. 

Frank W. Ball, 31 B. 3rd St.. Cincinnati, 0. 

Special price for this month. 

Scranton Florist Supply Co., Scranton, Pa. 

B. H. Hunt, 76-78 Wabash Ave., Chicago. 



PLEASE MENTION THE REVIEW WHEN WRITING ANY OF THESE ADVERTISERS. 



» ^i.^'.ltm^ jniiiin'-'.'itL ri • y .^■L^i.^ii: 



• ■' • • - /j--' I. ■ • .■ .'.■.••.. .•,'■■.,... ■-• •■■ 

122& 



The Weekly Florists^ Review* 



Mabch 7, 1907. 



The John Davis Co. 

Ealft0d, Md tad Union Street 

CHICAGO. ILL. 



Manufaoturers and Wlioleaalers of 

Wrought Iron Pipe 
Cast-iron Fittings 
Valvesy Pumps 
Steam Traps 

and everythlnB used in a Steam Plant 

A majority of the Houses are changing 
from water to steam. The only pipe to use 
Is the genuine Wrouffbt Iron and "Byers" 
is the best made. Wbitk Us fob Pbioes. 



WX BEFEB TO 

BASSETT * WASHBUBN 

POSHLMANN BB08. CO. 

GEOBflE BEINBEBe 

PETEB BEINBEBe 



Mention The Review when yon write. 

Greenhouse Beating. 



SIZE OF FLOW PIPE. 

How large a flow pipe would be re- 
quired to heat 60,000 feet of glass to 56 
degrees, in zero weather, with ten pounds 
pressure on the boilers? The extreme 
length of the main flow would be 250 
feet. I intend to use a steam trap, thus 
doing awaj"^ with any back pressure on 
returns. A. R. 

A 6-inch main flow pipe should be suf- 
ficient to provide heat for the 8,600 
square feet of radiating surface which 
will be required for 60,000 feet of glass. 

It will be much more satisfactory to 
you to state the dimensions of the houses 
rather than to state the glass area. 
Glass area is only one factor in a heat- 
ing problem; therefore, the above an- 
swer is not as reliable as it could be made 
if dimensions of the houses had been 
stated. L. C. C. 



PIPE REQUIRED. 

How many feet of liA-inch, 2-inch or 
3-inch pipe would I need in a house 22x 
66? The south wall has three feet of 
glass and the north wall five feet. I 
wish to maintain a temperature of 58 
degrees when it is 40 degrees below zero 
outdoors. I have a Wilks self-feeding 
heater 30x48 inches. Can I put a new 
base under this boiler with a Martin 
rocking grate and have boiler capacity 
enough to heat this house and a 5-room 
dwelling house added ? P. J. K. 



To heat the house in question with hot 
water at 180 degrees with l^^-inch pipe 
would require 1,260 feet of pipe, with 
2-inch pipe w'ould require 1,008 feet and 
with 3 -inch pipe would require 630 feet. 
The grate question is one which can only 
be settled by the makers of the boiler. 

L. C. C. 



TROUBLE WITH HEATING. 

I have six east and west houses, each 
20x100, and a north and south house 
on the west end of the range. My boil- 
ers are located at the middle of the west 
side. I have the overhead hot water sys- 
tem, using two Kroeschell boilers, a No. 
9 and a No. 5. These boilers are con- 



ifaf— 4^(vt\V ^jX». 



IMP&OVBD 



Greenhouse Boiler. 

SI KRIK STRXKT, CHICAGO 




Boilers made of steel boiler plate ; shell, fire-box 
■beets and heads of steel ; water space all around, 
front, sides and back. Write for Information. 



IVIoney Saved 

and better service from yonr 
■team ■ystem by installiuK... 

MOREHEAD STEAM TRAPS 

Write for Florists' Catalog. 

MOREHEAD MFG. CO. 

1048 Grand Birer Are., DETBOIT, MICH. 

Mention The Review when yon write. 

High'(irade Boilers 

g£5JJ„, For GREENHOUSES 

STEAM Mtf HOTWATCR 

CIBLIN'&CO.,ltica.N.Y. 



Mention The Review when yon write. 

NO FIRES! NO FROST! 

We protect your buildinfrn from Fires, your green- 
house from Frost. Metal Thermometer, rirgrs a bell 
at your residence when the buildings get too hot or the 
greenhouse too cold. Can fet at any teaiperature. Mr. 
Claud ). Hurt, Florist, 368 Cook St.. Denver, Colo., 
says: They are giving perfect satisfaction, never failing 
to give an alarm at 40 degrees cold and 9VdegTets hot. 
Saves us a nightman and lots of coal. Would not be 
•without it at any price." Complete with 300 ft.ofwire,l6. 

BROWN ALARM CO., DENVXR, COLO. 
Mention The Review when yon write. 

nected with an 8-inch main flow pipe 
which runs through the west house, where 
a tee divides it, and each east and west 
house is fed by a 3-inch pipe. Just in- 
side each house a tee reduces each flow 
to 2-inch. These pipes drop under the 
benches, where they connect with 4-inch 
returns, so that there are three flows to 
six returns in each house. The returns 
are connected to a 5-inch main return by 
2-inch pipe. 

I want to maintain a temperature of 
60 degrees in Illinois climate, but have 
not been able to do so. If more radia- 
tion is necessary, could l^^-inch or 2-inch 
pipe be used? Would it improve mat- 
ters to have one feeder for each house? 
How high should the expansion tank be? 

C. L. E. 



When you have a 



Florence Heater 

installed^ you need not worry — 

yottr mind will be easy. You 

need not dread a cold snap 

because 

Florence Heaters 



are up to their rated capacity. 
There is nothing about them 
to get out of order. They are 
reliable and efficient. Write 
for 1907 catalogue and full 
information. 

Columbia Heater Co. 

BELVIDERE. ILL 
Sales Dept., 80 Dearborn St,, ChicaBO 



FURMAN BOILERS 

SAVE FUEL 

Write tor Gatalocae 

See advertisement In last weelc's 

Review and watch for it next week, 

THE HEBENDEEN MFG. CO., Geneva, N. T. 



The houses with nine runs of 4-inch 



Mention The Review when yon write. 

DO YOU KNOW ABOUT THE 

Martio Rocking Grate 

IT SAVES COAL 

MARTIN BRUTE GO. '^^^^^*- 

Mention The Review when yon write. 

Write Us Your Wants In 

Heating Specialties 

We supply every thlnjr needed for a 
Greenhouse Beatingr Plant. Booklet 
for the asking. 

HENION & HUBBELL 

61-60 N. Jefferson St., CHICAGO. 

Mention The Review when you write. 

S. WILKS MFG. CO. 

Manufacturers of 

Greenhouse Boilers 

35fh and Shields Ave., CHICAGO, ILL. 

Mention Thf Uevlew when you write. 

pipe in them should, with water at 180 
degrees in the boiler, carry a tempera- 
ture between 60 degrees and 70 degrees. 
If a single 4-inch pipe could be carried 
from the boiler direct to the house to be 
heated and there divide to supply the 
three risers in the house, I think greater 
efficiency w^ould result. The flow is cer- 
tainly greatly impeded by reducing to 
two inches, which should be avoided if 
possible. The common riser is not alto- 
gether desirable on a hot water i system. 
With steam there is less danger of cur- 



.v\iw.^^h./ti:i 



im't'il -n I'-iii fi' iii.<lifl1iilriiili'-''- iii'itilniii<i1n'i''ili"iriii1t ilitH'illtlrt <M 'i .■■■>->-^-'-^-"'>'^-.^'^-^-- -^^ 



« f wu^ I mwmif^r 



VOT».v»w^!?i-"^'-"-7;<»'^7"^-r!;~»^ '.'ST"^^ /E~ ^T?"^''?, « 



Mabch 7, 1907. 



The Weekly Florists' Review. 



1229 




The Standard 
of Excellence 



"POCAHONTAS" 
SMOKELESS, 



A Symbol of 
Quality 



Our registered Trade-Mark covering: THB OEI<EBBATED O. O. B. POCAHONTAS SMOKELESS OOAIi 

corresponds to the Sterling Stamp on silver, as the United States Geological Survey has made it The Stondard for 
grading all Steam Fuel. 

C. C. B. POCAHONTAS SMOKELESS 

is the only American Coal that has been otBcially indorsed by the Governments of Great Britain, Germany 
and Austria, and is the favorite fuel with the United States Navy, which lias used It almost exclusively 
for many years. Uneqaaled for the Qeueratlon of Steam and Domestic Purposes. 

CASTNER, CURRAN & BULLITT, Sole Agents 



POCAHONTAS 

TRAOC MARK NtOltTIRM 



Branch Offloea 

1 Broadway, New York City. N. T. 
Citizen's Bank Building, Norfolk. Va. 
Old Colony Building, Chicago, 111. 
126 State Street, Boston, Mass. 



C. O. B. Pocahontas Smokeless Coal Branch Offices 

Main Office: Arcade BIdg. Neave Building, Cincinnati Ohio. 
1 Smith 1 R»k filMial Terry Building, Roanoke, Vt. 

1 90Utn 1 Din Street European Agts.-Hull.BlythA company, 

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania ^ Feuchurch Ave., London, e. c, edit. 



Mention The Review when you write. 



WATERPROOF 

Cut riower and Design Boxes 

PARAFFIN LINED PAPER BOXES 

For mailing and expressing live plants. Get 
prices of others, then write for ours. 

THE BLOOMER BROS. CO., ST. MARYS, 0. 

Mention The Review when yon write. 



CUT FLOWER BOXES 

EDWARDS FOLDING BOX CO 

MANUFACTURERS 

PHILADELPHIA. PA. 



Mention The Review when yon write. 



DON'T throw away your Kaster profits. 
Save your Pinks from splitting by using the 
M. & D. ARTIFICIAL, CALYX. 
Easily applied and removed, 
lasts forever. First cost the 
only cost. $1.75 per 100; $15.00 
per 1000; 250 at 1000 rate. 
MAX FIELD & DIHOND: 
P. O. Box 804>B 
Send for sample. W ABBEN, R. I. Patented. 




Mention The Review when yon write. 

rents in certain directions and a simpler 
system of piping can be used. Unless 
you have reinforced boilers it will not be 
advisable to elevate the expansion tank 
more than twelve or fifteen feet. 

L. C. C. 



PIPE FOR THREE HOUSES. 

How many feet of 2%-inch pipe will 
be necessary, in Missouri climate, to heat 
three east and west houses, connected, 
15x100, seven feet to gutters, and eleven 
feet to the ridges? Hot water will be 
used, with a 4-inch flow in each house. 
The western gables are of glass and the 
south wall has three feet of glass. The 
houses will be used for carnations. Solid 
benches will be used, with one raised 
bench on the south side to accommodate 
return flows under it. The boiler-pit will 
be six feet below the surface. The 
houses slope eighteen inches toward the 
boiler-pit. W. B. O. 

In order to maintain a temperature of 
60 degrees in the houses in question, you 
should install twenty-one 21/2-incb pipes 
in addition to the three 4-inch flow pipes 
you propose to use. If it would be any 
economy to use 2y2-inch flows instead of 
4-inch, three 2 V. -inch risers direct from 
the boiler will do the work just as well 
as the 4-inch pipes, provided the piping 
is properly installed. ^' ^' ^- 



SAVE YOUR SPUT CARNATIONS 

The Baur Clip and Plier 



VISIBLE 
I I 



trade; 






INVISIBLE 



will do it in a 
business-like 
manner at a 
minimum of 
" MARK time and ex- 
pense. Saves 
lotsofmoneT. 
Inexpensive, 
instantaneously applied and practically invisible. 
The clips are made of galvanized wire and are 
colored green, just the color of the calyx, and 
can hardly be detected. Thoroughly up-to-date 
in every particular. PUer, $8.00. 1000 Clips, 
$1.00* postage prepaid. All the leading dealers 
in Florists' Supplies, or direct from 

BAUR FLORAL CO., ERIE, PA. 

Mention The Review when yon write. 

THE HEIM CARNATION SUPPORT 

"The rinest Thins Oat" 

The two twists make it no rigid that the most 
severe spraying does not efifect the position of 
the support or plant. The rings are movable, to 
allow adjustment to the growth of the plants. 
Allows perfect cultivation between the plants. 

THE HEIM SUPPORT CO. 

Write for Prices. CONNERSVILUE, IND. 

Mention The Review when you write. 

THE J. W. SEFTON MFG. CO. 

CHICAOO, ILL., ant ANDERSON, IND. 

FLOWER BOXES, CORRUGATED 

SHIPPING BOXES, CORRUGATED and 

PARAFFINED LIVE PLANT BOXES 

Mention The Review when yon write. 

SIZE OF BOILER. 

I wish to put in a boiler to heat a 
greenhouse with steam. What size will 
I have to use to get 60 degrees temper- 
ature with the mercury 5 degrees below 
zero? I will have to put the boiler 
under the potting-bench in one end of 
the greenhouse, and can put it as low 
as necessary. I will burn gas. The 
greenhouse is 23x68 and fifteen feet to 
the ridge. The side walls are of boards, 
two thicknesses, with tar paper between, 
and four feet high. The greenhouse 
connects with the storeroom on one end. 
I have no cellar. There are three runs 
around the house, of 2-inch pipe under 
the side and end benches. Is that 
enough heating surface? W. M. T. 

If you desire to use steam you should 
secure a boiler with a rated capacity for 
at least 800 square feet of radiation. It 
should be set deep enough so that the 
lowest return in the house will be at 
least eighteen inches above the water line 



BO] 

lAght ^ 

3x 4x20,. 
.Sx 5x24.. 
3x7 x21.. 
6x 6x24.. 

4 X 12x24.. 
6 X 12 X 24.. 
6x 12x30.. 

5 X 12 X 36.. 

6 X 12x 36.. 
6x 15x42.. 
6x 15x48.. 

Write 

Getm 

BI 


CTood Cut Flower B02 
SIZES IN STOCK 


68 

Ke« 

PerlOO 

..$4.00 
... 4.50 
.. 4.50 
.. 6.80 
... 9.00 












... 10.50 
... 12.50 






... 14.00 
... 15.00 






... 20.00 
... 28.00 




for samples. Special prices 
on case lots. 

ore Box Factory 

INCORPORATED 

SLLEVILLE. ALA. 



Mention The Review when you write. 

CUT FLOWER BOXES 

WATERPROOF. Corner Lock Style. 

The best, strongest and neatest folding Cut 
Flower Box ever made. Cheap, durable. 

To try them once is to use them always 
Size No. 0. . . .3x4x20. . . .12.00 per 100. tl».00 per 1000 



" No. l....GA4iixl6.. 1.90 


17.50 




" Ko. 2.... 3x6x18.... 2.00 


19 00 




" No. 3. ...4x8x18.... 2.50 


2300 




" No. 4.... 3x5x24.... 2.75 


26.00 




" No. 5.... 4x8x22.... .3.00 


28.50 




" No. 6.... 3x8x28.... 3.75 


36.00 




" No. 7.... 6x16x20... 6 50 


54.00 




" No. 8.... 3x7x21.... 3.00 


28 60 




" No. 9....fxl0x.36... 6.50 


62.00 




" No. 10...7x2Ux20... 7.50 


67.00 




" No. 11... 3^x5x30.. 3.00 


28.50 " 


Sample free on application 


No charge for 


printing on orders above 250 boxes. Terms cash 


THE LIVINGSTON 


SEED CO. 


BOX 104. 


COLUMBUS. O 


Mention The Review when you write. 



in the boiler; two or three feet would 
be better. Then run a 2-inch riser under 
the ridge from the boiler to the far end 
of the house, drop to the radiating pipes 
and with a built manifold return by two 
coils, one on either side of the house, to 
the boiler; or, if desired, by three coils, 
one under the middle bench. To get best 
results from steam the house should have 
another loop of pipe added ; i. e., another 
2-inch pipe of the same length as those 
already installed. L. C. C, 



Gretna, La. — C. W. Bakewell, who has 
been quite ill for some time, is on his 
feet again and will soon be able to at- 
tend to business. 



■■^.y-^r-* 



"f^;. -^M ■ ^ '^ 



1230 



"> V ■'■ ' .. ■ ••■"';t' .■■■•■'•; ■' ■ ;.\v7' ■-'■■■■■ 

The Weekly Rorists'^ Review* 



•"i 



Mabch 7, 1907. 



The Whilidin Pottery Go. 

STANDARD FLOWER POTS 

Our output of Flower Pots is lars:er tban any concern in tbe World 
Our Stock is always Lars:e and Complete 

Main Office and Factory. 

713 WHARTON STREET. PHILADELPHIA 

WaPehouses: JERSEY CITY. N. J. LONO ISLAND CITY. N. Y. 

Mention The Review when yon write. 





TVIN QTIES. 



Tlie Market 



Business last week could have been a 
great deal better. The first part of the 
week we had a decided change in the 
weather. The temperature dropped to 
10 degrees above zero and was accom- 
panied by a cold, damp wind which, un- 
doubtedly, kept the cut flower buyers at 
home. 

Outside of funeral work there was 
little doing until the latter part of the 
week, when the cold spell passed over 
and trade instantly took a brace. There 
was then a decided demand for bulb 
stock especially. Carnations were also 
quite active. One of the dealers pla- 
carded his windows, offering them at 35 
cents per dozen, but none of the other 
dealers fell in line. The general price 
was 75 cents and $1 per dozen. It is 
needless to say that the 35-cent variety 
was a very inferior lot. 

The situation in roses has not changed 
to any extent. We are still getting an 
ample supply. The quality could be im- 
proved upon with nearly all of the grow- 
ers. Valley and violets are as good as 
we have ever had; the demand is also 
active. Practically all of the dealers are 
carrying a small stock of Easter plants, 
with the exception of Easter lilies. Fine 
specimen plants of azaleas. Baby Ram- 
blers and spiraeas are offered, but are 
slow sale and it is a little too soon to 
show them to secure orders for Easter. 
The city inquiry for Easter stock is 
light, while from the country points a 
great many have been received. 

Minneapolis. 

The Powers Mercantile Co. reports a 
satisfactory trade for last week, the de- 
mand Saturday being especially strong 
for medium priced carnations and roses. 
It has also turned over a great many tu- 
lips and daffodils. 

The Donaldson Co. continues to have 
a heavy run on about everything in cut 
flowers. Its prices are the same as 
asked by the retail florists in general. 

The few bright days that we have had 
have brought a little more competition. 
The Greek candy stores have already 
started to offer stock at reduced prices, 
which takes some trade away from the 
smaller dealers. 

Amundson & Kirschner show some at- 
tractive windows of bulb stock and car- 
nations. Business, they say, has been 
good. 

Our wire worker, Mr. Kusik, has gone 
into the florists' supply line, under the 
name of Kusik, Gerstmann & Co. The 
general impression is that there is a good 
opening here and, if properly conducted, 
a good trade can be worked up. 

St PauL 

William Swanson has returned from 
Ann Arbor, Mich., having taken the 
treatment for hydrophobia. He appears 




THE IONIA POT 



Twin City Pottery Mfg. Co. 

Suooessors to J. G. S^iTalm's Sons 

MANDFACTURER8 OF 

GARDEN VASES, FLOWER POTS, HANGING BASKETS 

Let us flBura on your noods. 
Both telephones. 8406 Marshall St., N. E.* Minneapolis, Minn. 

Mention The Review when yon write. 

Appeals to 

the Aggressive 
Up-to-Date Florist 

BKCAUSE: It has style and is made on honor. It is made from clay rich In tbe ele- 
ments that make thriving: plants. For 86 years It has steadily forged Its way to tbe front. 
TODAY, It is recognized as tbe IDKAL POT, packed in an ideal way. 

We wUl appreciate your order. inMIA DnTTFRV Pfl inillA MIPII 
Sliipment made wben you direct. lUllin rll I I Clf I UUty lUlllAy miUil 

Mention The Review when yog write. 

KELLER POTTERY CO. 

Manufacturers off Florists* Red Flower Pots 
Azalea Pots^ Bulb and Fern Pans, Etc. 

The very best sbipping facilities on both Pennsylvania B. R. and Philadelphia and ReadinR R S, 

213 to 223 PEARL STREET, NORRISTOWN, PA. 

Mention The Review when yon write. 



Your Profits 



are Increased if your 
flowere are superior. 

Syracuse Red Fots 

will do their part In 
mRkln? thrifty plants. 
So light, thin and porous. 
Syraoiue Pottery Co., 
SyTacnte. M. x. 



Mention The Review when yon write. 

Red Standard Pots 

Price per 1000, F O. B. Harrison: 2-in.. 12.50 
2>i in., $2.95: 2>^-iD.. $3 50: 3-in.. $4.60; 8>^-in.. $5.86, 
4-in.. »7 20; 5-in., $11.70: 6-in., $19.80. Cwh matt 
accompany order. Price list for larger sizes, 
Stucers, Fern Pans, Azalea Pots and Hanging 
Bdbkets on application 

HARRISON POTTERY, Harrison, Ohio. 

Mention TTie Review when yon write. 

to be in good health and all serious 
symptoms seem to have passed away. 

Mr. and Mrs. L. L. May are at French 
Lick Springs, Jnd., and will remain for 
two weeks. 

August S. Swanson was favored with 
considerable work for the Tracy funeral. 
Mr. Swanson is sending in some fine bulb 
stock. It appears to be much larger and 
better than the ordinary stock. 

Miss Bussjaeger, daughter of Christ 
Bussjaeger, is now in the employ of L. 
L. May & Co., as stenographer. 

Felix. 




:HHEWS^< 



iinuliuiiiiiiiiiiikiiiUlllil 




Mention The Review when yon write. 

Kramer's Pot Hanger 

For Sale by Wholesale Seedsmen. 
Florists and Supply Dealers. 

Price, $1.00 per doi. by express. 
Sample dos. by mail, $1.26. 

I. N. KRAMER & SON. Cedar Raoids. Iowa 



RED 



Standard Flower Pots 

Price list and samples on application. 

PADUGAH POTTERY CO., INC. 

PADUCAH, KENTUCKY 

Mention The Review when yon write. 

Always mention the Florists' Review when 
writing advertisers. 



'^^^i Mi-^ii 



i.'.^^.<.^.-..,.A.A. 



«JJH*»HIi^M»(U^«»w< ■»!|^_'»'7' '^ — -'>"'(',•■(» •!_?!■• f^f^yi "l>««V '"" 



March 7, 1907. 



.' , -J..-.- ''■■.■ : ■ 

The Weekly Florists^ Review* 



1231 




Is the 

STBONGIST, 

B9ST PACKED, 

BASIXST APPLIID 

24 sheet! $0.75 

144 sheets 3^ 

288sheet8 6.50 

1728 sheets 35^0 



"NICO"FllME"^IS^ 

Furnishes the Most jii.tNotePriee.i 

Pint $1^ 

Nicotine for the Money I ^t£f"::::::::ia5o 

MM. by THE KENTUCKY TOBACCO PRODUCT CO., Louisville, Ky. 5 Gallons...!!... 4725 



Mention The Review when yon write. 



"THE KING OVER ALL" 

X> XXX oxx> xs 



Costs less per effectual fumigation than any other made; If It does not we will refund your money. 
We sell direct to the grower; the Jobbers' 33'/» per cent, profit we put in the quality of the paper 

Trial Boxes for houHc l(M>x2(t. 25 cents p<wt pHid. Hoxcs I'l- slu-cts t'.r, cents pn>t \ninl. 
lioxcs 1 (4 stuH'tii i'.i.'A) and Boies 285! sliwts $fi.r>0, Kxim-ss jirrpaid to all iiouiti^ V^mt of Mississippi Uiver. 

THE H. A. STOOTHOFF CO., I 16 WEST ST.. NEW YORK, Sole Sellers and Wakers. 




THE BEST 
Bug Killer and 
Bloom Saver. 

Drop us a line 
and we will 

prove it.... 

P.R.PALnHORPE 
GO. 

Dept. A* 

LOUISVILLE. KY. 

Mention The Review when yon write. 

WILSON»S PLANT OIL 

KILLS TOUR SCALK. 

Take a can of the oil. dilute to four times Its 
bulk with water and then spray or wash your 
plants. Prices— H pint cans, 26c; pint. 40c; quart, 
fbc; 2 quarts, 11.25; gallon, 12.00; five KtJlons, 
18.00. Cash with order. 

Andrew Wilson, Dept. 6. Summit, N. J. 
or H. A. Oreer, Inc., Philadelphia. 

Mention The Review when yon write. 
WHY NOT TRY 

Anchor Greenhouse liose 

on your next order ? 

PLANT BED CLOTH 

protects from frost, insects, etc., and still allows 
Iree circulation of air. 

Mineralized Rubber Co., 1 8 Cliff St., New York 

Mention The Review when you write. 

Florists' Refrigerators 

Write QB for prices stating: the size yoo 
require, the kind of cut flowers you wish to use 
tbe refrigerator for, and whether for display or 
only tor storage. 

McCRAY REFRIGERATOR CO. 

S58 Mm Str««t. KXNDALLVILLK, IND. 

Mention The Bevlew when yoa write. 



Century Insecticide ^^ms£l% 

Cheapest aad best on market. Once nsed, always nsed. Positively kills green and black fly, mealy 
bugs, red spider, scale, thrips or any Insect on flowers, plants, trees, vegetabl-s, etc. Will not injure, 
scent or discolor tbe most delicate flowers and fol age. Also snre death to Gypsy and Tussock Moths. 

Especially adapted for Boses, Carnations, rhrysanthemoma. Heliotropes, t»nillax and Ferns. 
Handled by Leading 8eedsmen. $8.60 per can of 6 Gallons. 



Prepared by W. H. KULD, 



Mention The Review when you write. 



NORWOOD, MASS, 



To-Bak-lne 
Products 

THEY KILL BUGS 

LIQUID FORM lr»in'er 

FOR SPRAYING. 

FUMIGATING PAPER 

FOR BURNING. 

Fumigating Powder 

FOR SLOW BURNING. 

DUSTING POWDER 

FOR YBGirTABLE GROWERS. 

You will have no trouble with Insect pests 
if you use thet-e products as directed. 

Send for our booklet, " Words of Wisdom," 
by leading growers. It is free. 

E. H. HUNT 

76-78 Wabash Ave., CHICAGO 



Mention The Review when yon write. 

Tobacco Steins 

Fresli ud ttrtai. bales weigh 250 ts 500 lbs.. 75e per 100. 
U. Cntler Byerson, 108 8d Are., Newark, N. J. 

Mention The Review when you write. 

PEERLESS SIJLPHIR BLOWER 

"A great improvement over the bellows." 
Price, $4.00 F. O. B. ChlcaKO. 

McMORRAN & CO. "iS.SSS'.'Si!'- 

Mention The Review when you write. 



/^ 



Put New Life In Your Gardens 



WIZARD BRAND MANURES 



Every greenhouse operator and gardener 
knows that pure Sheep Manure is the most 
efficient and satisfactory fertilizer for putting 
new life and growing power into his gardens, 
and the strongest plants- brightest foliage- 
most beautiful and perfect blooms result 
from its liberal use in the Spring. 

WIZARD DRAND 
PULVERIZED SHEEP MANURE 

is absolutely pure. It is the best and most 
economical Greenhouse and Garden Ferti- 
lizer on the market. 

Write today for prices and booklet. All 
kinds of dried manures, shredded or pulver- 
ized for sale. 

THE PULVERIZED MANURE CO. 

83 Kxchansre Ave., CHICAGO 

Mention The Review when you write. 

Tlie "Japana" Cut Flower Holder 

A handy article for florists. 
Sells to the trade on sijsht 
M.ide of glass in three sizes. 
The "An Rials" Table 
Decoration, something 
enrirely new, lone needed. 
The florist and housewife 
will appreciate this article, 
as it simplifies the art of 
table decorating. Ask for catalog. 

M. V. Garnsey la gkange. ill. 

Mention The Review when yon write. 




• - '^2i.\.^^l^-.^ 



^ , «•>,,'■ '■■'?<-■(>■ .v'^■;• '>'T''"^;r:'^r'. ■'wr*;>(?^' ' ^v'-r?i^T 



1232 



The Weekly Florists^ Review* 



Mabch 7, 1907. 



ITHACA, N. Y. 

The evening of February 25 was dedi- 
cated to carnations at the Lazy Club, 
which is the official organization of the 
horticultural department of Cornell Uni- 
versity. At the solicitation of W. H, 
Griffiths, gardener of the department, a 
number of varieties of carnations were on 
exhibition. The merits of these were 
studied and compared by students and 
visitors. The extraordinary improvement 
which has taken place in the commercial 
qualities of this flower in recent years 
was noted and commented upon. 

Collections of blooms were received 
from John E. Haines, Bethlehem, Pa., 
who forwarded an exceedingly instructive 
and interesting group, largely of his own 
origination. 

The F. E. Pierson Co., Tarrytown, 
N. Y., showed Winsor, Melody, Helen 
M. Gould, White Enchantress, Rose-pink 
Enchantress and Eed Lawson. The in- 
teresting feature about this exhibit is 
that Gould, White Enchantress and Rose- 
pink Enchantress are all sports from the 
original Enchantress. The F. R. Pierson 
Co. I'egard these as among the leading 
commercial varieties which they grow. 

Peter Fisher, Ellis, Mass., showed a 
fine vase of Beacon. 

The Cottage Gardens Co., Queens, - 
L. I., presented the display with a col- 
lection of some fifteen seedlings, show- 
ing a great variety of color and form, 
and illustrating in a general way the pos- 
sibilities of careful breeding when ap- 
plied to the carnation. Many of the 
seedlings were of high merit. 

The Chicago Carnation Co., Joliet, HI., 
provided a striking vase of that hand- 
some carnation. Aristocrat. This variety 
illustrated in splendid fashion the best 
points of a good commercial flower. For 
itself, it attracted much attention from 
visitors. ^ ^, 

The United States Cut Flower Co., El- 
mira, N. Y., showed a general collection, 
prominent among which were Enchant- 
ress, Red Lawson and White Lawson, as 
well as the original Lawson, Bountiful, 
Fred Burki, Vesper and Mrs. M. A. Pat- 
ten. 

It is needless to say that the exhibit 
provided both instruction and inspira- 
tion to the large group of students who 
had the privilege of examining and study- 
ing it. 

Providence, R. I.— The Hall & Lyon 
Co. driig store now has a violet sale each 
Saturday, using 30,000 to 50,000 a week. 
They are sold in bunches of twenty-five 
at 19 cents a bunch and attract many 
people who would not otherwise visit the 
store. 




THE DENTEB PLATE & WINDOW GLARS CO. 
1649 BLAKE ST., DENYEB, COLO. 



Mention The Review when yon write. 



Standard Pumping Engines 

meet every requirement of the 
work of Florists and Garden- 
ers. Catalogue on request. 

The Standard Pump & 
Engine Co. 

CLEVELAND. OHIO. 

Mention The Review when you write. 





XT WILL AFFORD TOU 



SUPREME SATISFACTION 



to know that all of the material for your new 
houses is of strictly first-class grade- 
even if you do not scrutinize it — and that the 
construction is in accordance with the latest approved 

style. Such is the material we furnish, and we can 

prove it by our many satisfied customers. 

S'^?K£l Greenhouse Material 

S. DIETSCH CO. 



681 Sheffield Avenue, 
CHICAGO 



Mention The Review when yon write. 




The Greenhouse Structural Co. 

840 West 4th St., CINCINNATI, OHIO 

MANUFACTUBEBS VT 

IRON-FRAME GREKNHOU8SS 

Re-enforcing for Concrete "Post and Board" Walls, 
Ventilating Machinery, Iron Fittings, Iron Purlins 
and Gutters for Wood Houses, etc. 

Send for Catalogrue and Dealcns. 



Mention The Review when you write. 



Standard Plate Glass Co. 



Mannfacturers, Importers and Jobbers 



AMERICAN AND FRENCH GREENHOUSE GLASS 

26-30 Sudbury Street, QACTAil ilACC 

61-63 Portland Street. DUO I UHj mtkOOm 



Mention The Review when yon write. 



LICAS S 

JOHN LUCAS & CO. 

PHILADELPHIA NEW TOBK CHICAGO 

322 Race St. 89 Maiden Lane. IBth ani Morgan. 

The Pittsburgh Plate Glass Co. 

482 Wabash Ave. 

CHICAGO 

GREENHOUSE GLASS 

A SPECIALTY 

Mention The Review when you write. 

SPRAGUE, SMITH CO. 

Greenhouse Glass 

A SPECIALTY 

169 Randolph Street, • CHICAGO, ILL. 

Mention The Review when you write. 



USE THE BEST 

ECONOMY GREENHOUSE BRACKETS 

are used by leadiue: growers every- 
where. Send for price list and 
descriptive circular 

BUXTON &,ALLARD,oep.'i. Nashua, N.H. 



Always mention tlie Florists* Review 
\7tien x^rltlner advertisers. 



..HOOKER.. 

HOOKER'S OREENHOUSE GLASS 

Selected quality 

HOOKER'S GREENHOUSE PUHY 

Hade with pure linseed oil 

HOOKER'S PAINTS AND BRUSHES 
HOOKER'S FELT ROOFING 

FUnt-coated 

HOOKER'S RUBBER SHEATHING 

Absolutely waterproof 
Always glad to quote prices. 



,H. M. HOOKER CO.,°^g 



. Randolph St. 
CHICAGO, IL.L^ 



Mention The Review when yon write. 

SIEBERT'S ZINC 

Never Rust 

Glazing Points 

ARE POSITITELT THE BEST. LAST KOR- 
EVER. Over 16,0UO pounds now in use. A sure 
preventive of grlass slipplnfr. Eflfectlve on large 
or small glass. Easy to drive. Easy to extract. 
Two sizes, H and %, 40c per lb.; by mall 16c ex- 
tra; 7 lbs. for $S.60; 16 lbs. for 3S.0O by express. 
For sale by the trade. 
8IEBERT COSIPAMT, Sta. B., Plttsbnrg, Pa. 

Mention The Review when you write. 



Holds Glass Firmly 

SEE THE POINTS" 

PEERLESS 

OlaElngPolntsare the best 

No rights or lefts. Box of 
1000 points 76 cts. postpaid. 

HENRT A. DREER 

714 Chestnut St., Phili., Pa. 




Mention The Review when yon write. 



.. ,. 1 ■,---,^ .» .^■.■..i.i'.» i.i..i.,-i' i^- ..>■- .r-.j. . I'lii -ito •-■■■i..' fl- . -■■ ■■V-- nt-^'^— '-'^ '•^•Yi'iid'iftilfH li-ir'nii'iii"'-'-"'-"*"*^ - ■■'■'•'■<. »'i.-^: ■ "^> -*-■'■•■ ^ ■'-^-" >- 



liHi'iV ■»■■*' -~'-''^^-- 



■ '^^^l^^'^T^J^^^^yfV^f^ 



' .T^tv ,Tm ~v ^Y.'J Ir-iyW^-T 



March 7, 1907. 



The Weekly Florists^ Review* 



1233 



..ANNOUNCEMENT.. 



The King Construction Company, of Nortli Tonawanda, N.Y., and Toronto, 
Ont«9 in response to numerous inquiries by mail, states that the trussed roof greenhouses which collapsed 
at Mr. Farenwald's place near Philadelphia were not of the King Construction design or construction. 
Moreover a number of King houses in the same neighborhood passed through the same weather conditions 
without any damage whatever. Also the King Construction Company has just received an order for two 
trussed roof greenhouses, each 500 feet long and 28 feet wide, which are to be built for Mr. Victor Groshens 
on his place which is only a couple of blocks from Mr. Farenwald's place. Owing to having introduced 
the trussed method of greenhouse construction and to having been identified with it for so long, the King 
Construction Company finds it necessary to make this announcement as a matter of self-protection. 

Mention The Review when you write. 



Tlie Advance 
Ventilating 
Apparatus 

We send you just what 
we estimate on — the 
best of everything. Im- 
proved methods of 
manufacturing make 
it possible to give you 
the best of prices, too. 
Get our estimates be- 
fore ordering. 

THE ADVANCE GO. 

RICHMOND, IND. 

Mention The Review when you write. 

Tlie Standard 

Ventilating Machinery 

The original machine with 
self-oUlngcups. ThemoBt 
powerful, least compli- 
cated, very compact wltti 
ease of operation. 

The New Duplex Gutter 

Over six miles In use and 
hlg-h'y recommended by 
all. The only DRI P PROOF 
gutter on the market. 

The Standard Return Steam Trap 

It has no equal for simplicity 
or its working. Catalogue free. 

E.HIPPABD,¥oaiigttOffD,0. 

Mention The Review when yon write. 





NEW WOLF ROLLER BEARING PIPE 

and improved 
cable ventilatinf? 
machines are the 
most powerful on 
the market. Send 
for catalogue. 

The Wolf 
Machine Co. 
Dayton, O. 

Mention The Review when yon write. 





Evans' Improved 
Challenge Ventilating 
Apparatus. B&B. 

Quaker City Machine Worts 



RICHMOND, IND. 

Mention The Review when yog write. 



Always Mention the.... 

Florists' Review 

Whea Wrltlnsr Advertisers. 



^LL H£i(^RT5un Dried G^p/?£ss - . 

GREENH0U5L MATERIAL 

ToLE-Y Mfg. Co. ^i\ri.22^''y^0fic6Go, 

Hfii^E. I r, RiGfhT FROM THE. QULFof M^y^lCO. 
f^nO /VfLL Mi^KE. YOU RiCfHT PRICED -^ 
SEno FOR SKETCNE^ E6T/M/^TES /^MO 

HoT-E>E.D S)n5H yE.HHLf)Tmq fippmeru^ . 

r/TT/rf(^S /^/iO A/Z^/yy OTH^R TH / H<^S » 



Mention The Review when yon write. 



PEOPLE who know a good thine when they see it, and will take advantage 
of the same, must be possessed with good judf^ment and are generally suc- 
cessful. One of our successful growers has this year taken out 6ooo feet of 
wooden gutters, which were only 5 years old, and replaced the same with 6000 feet 
of the GARLAND IRON GUTTER, this being his fifth annual order. 

Our long list of orders of this kind is our best reference. By writing any of 
the large growers at Chicago you will confer a favor on the 

GEO. M. GARLAND CO., - DES PLAINES, ILL. 

Mention The Review when you write. 

SELF-BALilNGING GALVANIZED 
IRON VENTIUTORS p--.., 

It is Common Sense 
Applied to Ventilation. 

A. RASMUSSEN, New Albany, Ind. 

Meiulog The Review when yon write. 




M 



ETROPOLITAN 
ATERIALCO. 

Greenhouse Wreckers 

and Jobbers in 
Everything^ necessary 
to erect Greenhouses. 

1398-1408 Metropolitan 

Ave., Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Mention The Review when you write. 



Special Notice to 

AMERICAN TRADERS 

If you are interested in European Btocks of 
Plants and Seeds and latest newij concerning 
same, subscribe to THE HORTICULTURAL. 
TRADK JOURNAL, published jveekly and 
THE INTERNATIONAL HORTICULTURE 
AL TRADE JOURNAL, published quarterly. 
One dollar (International Money Order) sent to 
us now will ensure your receiving each number 
as published for one year. 

Address) The Horticultural Printing Co. 

BURNLXT. ENGLAND. 

Mention The Review when you write. 



ilf'lA.iliAiiilTi'Mi liff • i«l r'llfl "■liitail litilkt if-^-^"'- - -" 



--•■i;.rr-)TTj...( 



1234 



The Weekly Florists' Review* 



Mabch 7, 1907. 



THE FLORISTS' REVIEW 

G. L GRANT, Editor and Manaokb. 



PUBLISHED EVERY THURSDAY BY 

The FLORISTS' Publishing Co. 

S80-S4O raxton Bnildlne. 
334 Dearborn Street, Cblcagro. 

registered cable addre>s, fi.orvibw, chicago 

New York Office : 

Boroueh Parte B'OOklyn, N. Y. 

J. AUSTIN Shaw, Manager. 



Subscription fl.OO a year. To Eurone, $2.50. 
Subscriptions accepted only from those in the 
trade. 

Advertlslne rates quoted upon request. Only 
strictly trade advertising accepted. 

Advertisements must reach us b.v Wedn<*8day 
mornlnR' to Insura Insprtlon in the issue of that 
week, and earlier will be better. 



Entered at the Chicago post-office as mall mat- 
ter of the second class. 

ThlH paper is a member of the Chicago Trade 
Press Association. 



INDEX TO ADVERTISERS. 



Advance Co 12.33 

Allen, J. K ll'J8 

Allen & Co 1215 

Alpha Floral Co... 1203 

Amllng, E. C 1173 

Andorra Nurseries. 1200 

Aschmann, G 1217 

Atlanta Floral Co.l2('3 
Augspurger & Sons. 1218 
Aurora Nurs. Co..l2ii7 

Baer, H 1212 

Baer, J 1203 

Baker, W. J 1197 

Ball. C. U 1107 

Bailer, F. A 12ii7 

Banner & Co 11S3 

Barnard Co., W.W.llOl 

Barrows & Son 1215 

Bassett & Wash- 
bum 1200-12 

Baumann & Co... 1158 

Baur & Smith 1209 

Baur Floral 

Co 1157-1229 

Bay State Nurs- 
eries 1207 

Bayersdorfer & Co. 1180 

Beaven, E. A 1183 

Beckert, W. C 196 

Beneke, J. J 1203 

Benthey-Coats- 

worth 1178 

Berger Bros 1199 

Berger & Co 1158 

Berke, G. H 1202 

Bernbeimer. E 1197 

Beu. F 1182 

Berning, H. G 1201 

Bide & Sons, S. 1190-91 

Blind Bros 1202 

Bloom, J. S 1213 

Bloomer Bros. Co. 1229 
Bobbink & Atkins. 

1217-19 
Boddhigton, 

A. T 1157-93-94 

Boland Co 1202 

Bombayreed 

Mfg. Co 1179 

Bonnet & Blake. . .1198 

Bonnot Bros 1198 

Breltmeyer 's Sons . 1202 
Bridgeman's Seed 

Warehouses . . . . 1192 
Brown Alarm Co.. 1228 
Brown & Co. , E . . . 1205 

Brown Seed Co 1188 

Bruns. H. N 1102 

Budlong, J. A 1200 

Burnett, H 1190 

Burpee & Co 1188 

Burrel., II. V 1188 

Buxfon & Allard..l232 

Byer Bros 1215 

. Caldwell The Woods- 
man Dec. Co 1183 

California Rose Co. 1204 

Carey, S. W 1216 

Carolina Floral Co.l2()2 
Carrillo & Bald- 
win 1214 

Castner, Currau & 

Bullitt 1129 

Chicago Carnation 

Co 1157-1210 

Chicago Rose Co.. 1200 

Clark Co 1188 

Clarke Bros 1203 

Clarke's Sons 1202 

Classified Advs. . . 1220 
Cleveland Cut 

Flower Co 1196 

Cleveland Florists' 

Exchange 1197 

Colberg & Lemke..l202 
Columbia Heater.. 1228 
Conard & Jones... 1208 
Converse Gnhses. . .1219 



Costich. Gilbert ..1207 
Cotsonas & Co.... 1199 
Cottage Ga rdens. . . 1212 
Cowee, Arthur ...1193 

Cowee, W. J 1158 

Coy & Son, C. P. .1188 
Crabb & Hunter.. 1215 

Craig, Wm. P 1213 

Crawhurk, H. R..1199 
Crescent Engrav. . . 1193 
CiltcUell. C. E.1183-1201 

Cr(;S8. Ell 1211 

Crowl Fern Co 1183 

Cummings Plant & 

Bulb Co 1212 

Cunningham, J. H.1215 
Currle Bros. Co... 1193 
Cushman Gladiolus.1190 
Dammann & Co... 1190 

Harrow. H. F ] 190 

Davis Bros 1213-17 

Davis Co., John... 1228 
D'eamud Co., J. B.120() 
Den Ouden & Son.. 1191 
Denver Plate & 

Window Glass.. 1232 
Detroit Cut Flower 

Supply House ..1197 
Dickinson Co., A.. 1188 

Dletsch Co., A 1232 

Diller, Caskey & 

Keen 12.34 

Dillon. J. L 1208-09 

Dingee & Conard. .1219 
Donohoe. Wm. ...1202 
Dorner & Sons Co. 1213 

Dreer, H. A 

1189-1231 ,32 
Dudley & Sons... 1213 
Dunford, Jas. W..1213 

Dutton, A. F 1190 

Eberman. C. W...1199 

Edwards & Co 1182 

Edwards Folding 

Box Co 1229 

Elsele. C 1215 

Ellzal)eth Nnrserv. 

1205-6-7 

Elliott & Sons 1215 

Elsass. Louis 1182 

Fenrlch. Jos. S. . . .1199 

Fischer, R 12!)9 

Fisher, Peter 1212 

Fiske Seed Co 1192 

Florists' Hail 

Assn lir.S 

Flower Growers' 

Market 1200 

Foley, J. J 1108 

Foley Mfg. Co 12.33 

Ford Bros 1198 

Froment. H. E. . . .1199 
Garland, Prank . . .1209 
Garland Co.. Geo. .12.33 

Garland. Sol 1194 

Garnsey, M. V. . . .1231 

Gear, Fred 1182 

Geller Florist Co. .1199 
Getmore Box 

F.nctorj- 1229 

Glblin & Co 1228 

Glrvln. W. B 1210 

Goddard, S. J 1194 

Goo<l & Reese Co. 1218 

Graff Bros 1203 

Greenliouse-Struc- 

tural Co 1232 

Grohe. Fred 1204 

Groves. R 11.83 

Glide Bros. Co 1202 

Gundestrup's Seed 

Store 1195 

Gunther Bros 1198 

Guttman, 

A. J 1199-1210 

Guttman & Weber. 1214 
Haines. J. E... 1209-10 
Ilainniond. B 1196 



Hansen, Julius ...1191 
Hansen, Mrs. M. A. 1202 
Harrington Co. ...1203 
Harrison L'ottery . .1230 

Hart, James 1198 

Hartmann & Co... 1190 
Hatcher, John C..1202 
Hauswlrth, P. J.. 1202 
Hawklnson Nurs 'y. 1207 
Heckenkanip, 

W. F 1215 

Helm Support Co. .1229 

Held, A 1214 

Henlon & Hubbell.1228 
Henshaw. A. M...1199 
Herbert & Son, D.1196 
Herendeen Mfg. . . . 1228 

Herrmann, A 1190 

Hews & Co., A. H.123<» 
Hill Co.. E. G....1157 

Hlppard, E 1233 

Hitchfock, E. H..1183 
Hltchlngs & Co...l23.-> 

Hobbles Ltd 1191 

Holtou & Hunkel.1201 
Hollcraft, M. E...1202 
Hooker Co., H. M.1232 
Horticultural Ad- 
vertiser 1218 

Horticultural 

Printing Co. . . . 1233 
Houghton & Clark. 1202 

Ilumfeld. C 1215 

Hunt, E. 11.. 1178-1231 
lonla Pottery Co. .12.31) 

Isbell & Co 1188 

Jackson & Perklns.l20e 
JanesvlUe Flo. Co. 1217 
Jensen & Dekema.1214 
Johnson S< ed Co . . 1 1 89 

Jones, H. T 1207 

Jones, P 120.) 

Kasting, W. F. . . . 

1157-1210 
Keller Pottery Co. 12.30 
Kellogg, Geo. M..1202 
Kennicott Bros. ..1179 
Kentucky Tobacco 

Product Co 1231 

Kervan Co 1199 

King Construction. 1233 
Kohler & Biidel.. .1190 

Kramer & Son 1230 

Kroeschell Bros. . . 1228 
Kruchten & John- 
son 1200 

Kuebler, Wm 1199 

Kuehn, C. A 121)1 

Kuhl, Geo. A. 1210-1 9-31 

Kuld, W. H 1231 

Kyrk, Louis H 1201 

Lager & Hurrell. .1214 
Lakeside Green- 
houses 1 21 5 

Laiib & Son. A 1213 

Lecakes & Co 1199 

Leedham Bulb Co. 1204 
Leedle Floal Co. ..1203 

Leikens. Jos 1202 

Leonard Seed Co. .1188 
Lilly Co., C. H.. .1188 
Livingston Seed 

Co 1229 

Lock, J. H 1193 

Lord & Burnham. .1236 

Lovell, E. 1203 

Lovett, J. T 12. '7 

Lucas & Co., J 1232 

Ludemann, F 1204 

McConnell, Alex. . .1203 
McCray Refrigera- 
tor Co 1231 

McCullough's Son8.1201 
McKellar. Chas. ..1184 
McKlssick, W. E..1197 
McManus, Jas. . 1'98 
McMorran & Co. . .1231 
Mancberter Chem- 
ical Co 1182 

Martin Grate Co. .1228 

Masur. S 1203 

Maxfield & Dimond.1229 
May & Co.. L. L..1202 
May & Sons, H. B.1191 
Metropollt m Mate- 
rial Co 12.33 

Miami Floral Co.. 1215 
Mlfhell Co., H. F.1181 
Michigan Cut Flow- 
ex Exchange 1183 



Mlllang, C 1108 

Miller, Bell 1213 

Miller, E. 8 1217 

Mills, The Florist. 1202 
Mineralized Rub- 
ber Co 1231 

Minneapolis Fl. Co. 1214 

Mlttlng, A 1204 

Moninger Co 1235 

Moon Co.. W. H. .1208 

Moore, Wm. J 1107 

Moore, Hentz & 

Nash 1199 

Morehead Mfg. Co. 1228 
Morse & Co., C. C.1188 
Mosbaek & Son . . . 1209 
Mosbaek Green- 
house Co 1217 

Muno, Jchn 1209 

Murdoch & Co 1190 

Murphy, Wm 1200 

Murray, Samuel. . .1202 
Murtfeldt, G. S...1203 

Myer 1203 

National Florists' 

Board of Trade. .1199 

Neff. L. 1 1203 

Neldlnger, J. G...1158 
Nelson & Klopfer. .1215 
New York Cut 

P^lower Co 1199 

New York Tele- 
phone Co 11,86 

NIehoff, Paul 1214 

Nlessen Co., Leo. .1180 

Niuffer, C. M 1205 

Olsen, Chris 1190 

Pacific Seed Grow- 
ers' Co 1188 

Paducah Pott'y Co. 1230 
Paiethorpe Co. ... 1231 

Palmer & Son 12)2 

Park Floral Co 1202 

Pennock-Meehan ..1181 
Perkins & Schu- 
mann 1198 

Peterson, J. A 1157 

Peterson Nursery . . 1206 
Phlla. Cut Flower. 1197 
Plerson, A. N. 1194-1215 
Plerson Co , F. R.1219 
Plerson U-Bar Co. 12.35 
Pieters Seed Co.. 1188 
Pike's Peak Flo. 

Co 1201 

Pine Tree Silk 

Mills 1158 

Pittsburg Cut 

Flower Co 1196 

Pittsburg Florists' 

Exchange 1197 

Pittsburgh Plate 

Glass Co 1232 

Poehlmann Bros... 

1176-1200-13 

Pollworth Co 1202 

Probst & Chrls- 

tlanson 12.33 

Pulverized Manure. 1231 
Quaker CTty Ma- 
chine Works 1233 

Quinlan, P. R 1219 

Randall Co., A. L.1174 
Rasmussen, A. ...12.33 
Rawson & Co... 1193-95 

Ray Bros 1183 

Reed & Keller 1198 

Regan Ptg. House. 1208 

Reld. Edw 1197 

Reiuberg, Geo 

1184-1211 
Reinberg, P.. 1175-1211 

Rice Bros 1198 

Rice & Co., M 1158 

Richards & Co 1183 

Riverside Nurs- 
ery Co 1205 

River View Nurs.. 1195 
Robinson & Co. . . . 

1183-1201 
Rock Co., Wm. L.1203 
Roehrs Co., Julius. 1214 

Rogers. W. H 1208 

Rohnert, Waldo ...1188 

Rolland. Jac 1190 

Rose Hill 

Nurseries ..1158-1219 
Rowehl & Granz. ..1196 
Royal Tottenham 
Nurseries 1191 



Bupp, J. F 1196 

Rusconl. D 1201 

Russin & Hanfllng.1199 

Byerson, U. C 1231 

Saltford, Geo 1198 

Sanderson, H. M..1196 
Schelden & Schoos.1212 

Schlllo, Adam 1234 

Schmitz, F. W. 0.1158 

Schulthels, A 1215 

Schulz, Jacob 1203 

Scott & Son, R 1210 

Scott Co., Wm 1210 

Seekins, W. W 1202 

Sefton Mfy. Co 1229 

Sellgman & Co 1199 

Sharp, Partridge ..12.36 
Sheridan. W. F. ..1198 
Shlpi>en8burg Flo- 
ral Co 1218 

Slebert Co 1232 

Sim, Wm. ...1195-1217 

Sinner Bros 1200 

Skldelsky, S. S. 1210-11 

Skinner, C. W 1105 

Sllnn, B. S 1198 

Smith, A 1191 

Smith Co., W. & T.12)7 
Smith & Son, N. .1218 
Smith & Co., W. C.1201 
Spragiie, Smith Co.l232 
Springfield Flo. Co.1219 

Staer. J 1190 

Standard Plate 

Glass Co 1232 

Standard Pump & 

Engine Co .1232 

Starke, W 119S 

St. Clair Flo. Co.. 1219 

Stern & Co., J 11,58 

Stewart, E. E 1196 

Stewart, S. B 1203 

Stokes' Seed Store.1192 
Stoothoff Co., H. A. 1231 
Storrs & Harrison. 1217 
Swanson, Aug. S..1203 
Syracuse Pot'y Co. 1230 

Taylor Seed Co 1204 

Thorburn & Co. .. .1103 

Totty. C. H 1209 

Traendly & 

Schenck 1198 



l^irner. T. B 1195 

Twin City Pottery 
qq 1230 

U. 8. Cut Fio.Co." 1212 
Valley View Gh8es.l212 
VanHoutte Pere L.1190 
Vaughan & 
Sperry ..1177-1200-11 

Vellhuys, K 1191 

Vesey, W. J. & 

M. S 1210 

Vlck & Hill Co... 1192 

Vlck's Sons, J 1192 

Vincent Jr. & 

Son 1195-1218 

Virgin, U. J 1203 

Wadsworth, B. F.1210 
Want Advs. ...1186-87 
Warendorff, A. ...1202 
Weber & Sons Co. 1211 

Weber, F. C 1202 

Weeber & Don 1192 

Weiland & Rl8ch..l200 

Welch Bros 1201 

Whllldln Pot- 
tery Co 1230 

White Bros 1196 

Whitton, C 1218 

Wiboltt, R 1190 

Wletor Bros. . 1179-1200 

Wild, G. H 1207 

Wildpret Bros. ...1190 

Wllks Mfg. Co 1228 

Williams, Thos. ..1183 
Wllmore, W. W..1219 
Wilson, Andrew . . . 1231 

Wilson, R. G 1203 

Winter. Wm 1210 

Wlnterson Co 

1177-82-94 

Wlttbold, Louis ..1195 
Wlttbold Co. ..1203-17 

Wolf Mch. Co 1233 

Woodruff & Sons.. 1188 

Young, John 1108 

Young, J. W 1197 

Young, Thos 1198 

Young & Co 1199 

Young & Nugent . . 1203 
Young & Sons Co. 1203 

Zaiigen, O. V 1196 

Zech & Mann 1200 



1 WATCH for the coming of the Bb- 
viEw each week and certainly get much 
pleasure and profit from reading it. — 
E. P. Hill, Shelbyville, Ky. 




For Greenhotue Benches. By far 
the best materiaL 

PLACE ORDBRS NOW 

For delivery Spring, 1007 

It will be open-air dried in the 
South and delivered when you 

want it. 
Ship Lap, Drop Siding, Sheathing, 
Flooring, White Cedar Posts, Etc 

Write for Price8.=== 

ADAM SGHILLO LUMBER CO. 

Cor. W«<*d Street and C* M I i^ /t £L£\ 
HHWtborne Avenne, x^lllVrAvUf^ 

Telepbone North 1626 and 1627 



Uentlon Tta« Review wben juq write. 



SEE THAT LED6E. 



Fat. Sept. 



THE 



Use Our 




IMPROVE 



JENNINGS 
IRON CUTTER. 




Patent Iron Bench Fittings and Roof Supports 

Ventilating Apparatus 
Improved Vaporizing Pans for Tobacco Extracts, Etc. 

Send for Clroulars. 

DILLER, CASKEY & KEEN, 6»!;7i.^:: s... PHILADELPHIA, PA. 

Mention The Review when yon write. 



a..^^.. .(.ub.t; 1 •■'■■■■ 3ti^»..-.-^-.---' ■-=■■-■.■ .■.-".A-j-~-<.Ji.-^-— -.■'.'.-- .- -■-.-- i-Uf.;»-..v-.- A. -.^.w,.^ .;.C^ .^ i- ■■■,... —-■... .v. -.i»^J,t-^:—l—-.»_- ^/^ ■.■■....■...■ -j^- .•■■..... .■,:...A:-^,..iJ.-. <.'.!k^. 



^fW 



F.iiiij>,|j»*>"!,j'f"*y I" • 1.1 ,-jp'vi. I'^^'Vii'VW-^ . W*"^,'*!?'^-' •"^>i'' *r~- 



X— '^ • . •-' ■ V "-'r -■ ~^ I ■» , 1 ■ . , / ■ »^ - '^^T'^ 



March 7, 1907. 



The Weekly Florists^ Review* 



1235 



"^ANP ^ O 




All This '^Bot Air" Aboat Boilers 

and the big sums of money saved if you use them, is interestiag 
reading, but we don't ask you to take only our say-so on our boilers. 
All we want it a chance to show you what they have done for 
others as a proof of what they will do for you. Our boilers are 
greenhouse boilers, not simply boilers. Send for new catalog. 

HITCHINGS AND CO. 

GREENHOUSE DESIGNERS AND BUUiDERS. 

Ij^annfacturprs of Heating and Ventilatlnit Apparatus. 




1170 Broadway, 



NEW YORK 



■I 1 



AND* 



Mention The Review when you write. 




G 



u-aAR 



reenhouse 
owners are 
constantly de- 
man ding less 
shading members 
— but why not increase 
the glass spacing as well? 
U-Bar greenhouses are 
the best greenhouses 
built because it is the 
only construction that 
uses 24-inch glass — the 
only house combining 
sashbar and rafter in 
one. Send for catalog. 
Pierson L-Bar Company, 
Designers and Builders 
of IJ-Bar Greenhouses, 
Metropolitan Building, 
4th Avenue and 23rd 
Street, New York. 




Mention The Review when yon write. 

YOD HND ALL THE BEST 

OFFERS ALL the time in the 
Review's Gassified Advs. 



• 
i 

I 

* 

* 

i 
i 

t 
t 

* 
* 
* 

* 

t 



If this catches your eye.write u^ and we will tell you 
about the beat greenhouse roof material in America. 

JOHN C. MONINGER CO 

CHICAGO 

129 E. Blackhawk Street. 

Mention The Rerlew when yon write. 



I 




I 




a Specialty 



HORTICULTURAL ARCHITECTS 
and Builders of State and Private 
Conservatories and Greenhouses 

Sketches and Estlinates free on application. 

Sole Agents west of Detroit, Mich^ for the American Tufa Incrustation G)., and 
builders of Tufa Stone Ornamental Water Fountains, Grottoes, Rockeries, Ferneries, 
etc« Tufa Stone furnished in car lots or less. Prices upon applicatiotu 

PROBST & CHRISTIANSON, 

124 N. Seventh Street, DE KALB, ILL. 






Mention The ReTlew when you write. 



flafiriifiirtmiiiiirriifiitfttiV ii'*i'« m' fn 



J 



v_-i^pr:y-, . jj'-vwwi-jy?^ •»-'■ .j/^ir-.- ' , — v!»'ry7<7i»f.r^'^»,n»v<«.-;j7jir,y»,>Tj^»»V'iT'^':.- 



1236 



The Weekly Rorists' Re^dew. 



Mabch 7, 1907. 



cx>csci>[i>c?cx>i:sirr>c5'C3ccacDC]cac3txi(a3'C3CD 




Thl8 shows you exactly how our Interchang'eable 
Clamp Column Fittings are used. 



a 

a 
a 

a 
a 

a 
a 
a 
a 
a 
a 

a 
a 




a 

Here is exactly the a 

a 
a 
a 
a 
a 
a 
a 
a 
a 
a 
a 
a 
a 



Tt Clj TT C U^C our Interchangeable 

Clamp Column Fittings in that Giant Arch we have 
been telling you about lately. See how the Purlin is 
secured to the Gable Bar by that Purlin Clamp — how 
every Sashbar is firmly fastened to the Purlin by the 
Heavy Purlin Clasp — that the Column Fittings are 
split and tightened together by a single strong bolt, 
making them easily adjustable. The whole thing is 
a most convincing argument of the strength and 
neatness of this combination of 1% inches Purlin, 
Column and Cross Tie, forming a light but absolutely 
rigid Giant Arch running the entire length of your 
house. It is not only a matter of strength but a 
mighty lot of time saved in erecting, and when used 
with our Cast-Iron Foot Pieces, makes a certainty of 
perfect and easy line-up of your roof. 

It's this way— we sell you the house complete 
or any fitting or part of It you want— out what- 
ever you do. use these Column Fittings and have 
the Olant Arch, then you can be sure your house 
won't spread. Write for prices. 

FOR SALE: every part or any parts 
for good greenhouses. 



Lord & Burnham go. 



Greenhouse Deaigners and Mi 



When you compare our estimate ■with be the 
fellow's, jnst keep In mind that our price Includes al 
these iron parts. 



1133 Broadway, corner 26th St., 



NEW YORK. 



BOSTON BBANCH. 819 Tremont Bnlldlntf. 



Q 



GLASS 



There is no question but what NOW is the time to buy your Glass. 
Prices are on the up-turn. BE QUICK or you will pay more. 
WRITE US TODAY. We are headquarters for 



I 



GREENHOUSE GLSSS 

SBARP, PARTRlDfiE & CO. JSiii'^VAr 



CHICAGO 



;/■ .K'. J 



■■ ■ : 'jik J-—..:. - >.'.Lrf-><i ., -w^- -^.^.lt^■. . ■■ , , j m^'ijjlLnii , .- 



iTi [liirttitlr^l'irtiiailn^ hi i 



■ ' --;^a:*-W'»imii«ii'miriifi ih iia'ii 






U,f*l^,"!»-'^^P '/■!! '. Vf- tS r^-^' - t wv>»-^-T~r .V "^^ITT'.r'" 7^ 



^^^'^^I^'tHE WEEKt^ 







►zi^K^ 



VoLXCC 



A journal™- florists, seedsmen an» nurserymen. 

FL.OK18TS' fUUljISHUlO UU., 6SU CHXton Kalldlns, 884 Dearborn 8t., OMIVAUO. 

CHICAGO AND NEW YORK, MARCH J4, J907. 



No. 435. 




Clever Florists 

Should read our full page adv. on page 
1275; our Primula Seed adv. on page 1272; 
also our classified adv. of Cannas and Calad- 
iums on page 1301 and profit thereby — 

DO IT NOW! 

Florists' Catalogue of Seasonable Seeds, Etc., 
' Free for the Asking. 



ARTHUR T. RODOINBTON, 



842 WK8T 
14TH 8T 



Z New York Gii} 



BEGONIA 



New 
Winter-flowering 

Aeatha. (Vcitch) $25.00 per 100 

Triomphe de I'Est (Lemoine) 25.00 per 100 

Begonia Gloire de Lorraine .... $15.00 per 100} $140^ per 1000 

I am now booking orders for the above stock, June 

delivery; all propagated from single leaf. All 

orders are filled strictly in rotation. 

J. A. PETERSON, WESTWOOD, GINCINIUTI, 0. 



THE BEST COMMERCIAL WHITE MUM 

Wfiite laud Dean 

Strong well rooted cuttings, ready now, 
$10.00 per 100. 
Terms: Cash with order from unknown parties. 

WM. F. KASTING, f«u^^„t. Buffalo, N. Y. 



Fuchsia Little Beauty 

2X-inch, thrifty plants, $4.00 per 100. 

Boston Ferns, bench-grown, ready for 6-inch, $20.00 per 
100. Pot-grown, 5-inch, $26.00 per 100. 

Scottii, bench-grown, ready for 4 and5-in., $8.00 per 100. 

English Ivy, 3-in., $5.00 per 100; rooted cuttings, $1.00 
per 100. 

Alternanthera Brilliantissima, best red, and Aurea 
Nana, best yellow, rooted cuttings, 60c per 100; $5.00 
per 1000. 

B41JR FLORAL CO., ERIE, PA. 



Carnations — Rooted Cuttings — Mums 



riRST'CLASS IN XVXRT 



White Perfection, pure white. 
White LawBon , 



Lady Bountiful 

Lieut. Peary 

Red Riding Hood, new scarlet 

Cardinal 

Red La wson -. 

Daybreak Lawson or Melody 

Helen Ooddard 

Variegated Lawson 

Aristocrat, beautiful cerise, the best variety 
April 1. $12.10 per 100 ; 1100.00 per 1000. 



RESPECT 

$4.00 per 100; 


• 

$50.00 per 1000 


8.00 




25.00 * 




. 8.00 




2500 ' 




4.00 




30.00 ' 




12.00 




100.00 ' 




.4.00 




80.00 ' 




4.00 




30.00 ' 




6.00 




50.00 ' 




<M)Q 




46.00 ' 




. 909 




25.00 • 
d this sea 




disseminate 


son. 



$2.00 per 100; $15.00 per 1000. 



Mrs. Mary Mann 

Golden Cbadwick 

Oremo 

Mrs. Nathan Smith 

Majestic Ivory 



Merstham Yellow 

Adelia 

Yellow Bonnaffon 

White BonnaiTon 

Pink Ivory 



W. H. Chadwick 
Estelle 
Touset 

Glory of Pacific 
Mrs. Robinson 



Roses 



$2.00 per 100: $15.00 per 1000. 

Mme. Chatenay Bridesmaid 

Bride Uncle John 

Richmond Golden Gate 



CHICAGO CARNATION CO. 



A. T. PYFER, Mgr., JOLIET, ILL. 



THE E. G. HILL CO. 

RICHMOND, INDIANA 

Our general list qooting 

Roses, Carnations, 
Mums, Geraniums 

IS NOW READY. 

Hlgh-Crade NoveUies Our Specialty 



TUBEROSE BULBS 

Ready Now. Well Cured Stock, $8.50 per 1000 

For SPRING PLANTING 

Taberous-rooted Begonias, Caladiums, Cannas, Dahlias, 
Gladiolus, Lines, etc. Send your order early. 
Avoid delays incident to spring rush. : : : : 

Complete line of Flower and Vegetable Seeds ready 

Florists' Wholesale List free for the asking. 

THE W. W. BARNARD CO., ^,^^•'SSS^,t.. GHICA60 



■. v>' ^- vr». ■' ■' *v^ ■" > •■ ■■ 



' ^' *n: IV y.yy ::\y\ri^'-- 



1238 



The Weekly Florists^ Review* 



Mabch 14, 1907. 



REMEMBER! 



RECOLLECT! 



LOST ! ! ! 



Recently in the comdor of the Federal buildings at the southwest corner of Ninth and Market streets^ 
Philadelphia^ Pa.^ two hundred complete sets of Ombre Ribbons. Any florist who may chance 
across one of these unique Easter Novelties, can secure a complete line of Ombre Ribbons 
by writing, telegraphing or telephoning order to 



M. RICE & CO., 



1220 RACE STREET 
PHILADELPHIA, PA. 



Ribbon Specialists. The Leading Florists' Supply House. 



Mention The Review when you write. 



J 



SPRING 1907 



Write for Special 
Low Prices on 

SELECTED PLANTS 

BULBS, ROOTS 

Etc., to 

F. W. 0. SCHMITZ 

PRINCE BAY, N. Y. 

Mention The Review when you write. 

JOS. G. NEIDINGER 

1438 No. 1 0th St. PHIUDELPHIA 

OUR SPKCIALTIES: 

Wax Flowers, Wax Flower Designs 

WHEAT 8HKAVEB 
Wicker Pot Covers, Plant Stands. 

Mention The Review when you write. 

Keep your " I " on the enterprising 
FLORISTS* SUPPLY HOUSS 

J. STERN & CO. 

125 N. lOth Street, PHILADELPHIA 

Mention The Review when yon write. 

Wired Toothpicks 

Manufactured by 

W. J. COWEE, BERLIN, N. Y. 

10,000.... $1.50; 50.000.... $8.25. Sample free. 
For sale by dealers. 

Mention The Review when you write. 



WHY NOT? 

Pine Tree Ribbons are unusually lustrctis and brilliant. 

Pine Tree Ribbons have band, firmness and touch. 

Pine Tree Ribbons match perfectly flowers and all foliagfes. 

Why not then order your ribbons from the Pine Tree 
Silk Mills Co. All the wanted colors and shades are con- 
stantly in stock. All the new and desirable qualities are 
ready for the asking. And with these advantages. Pine Tree 
Ribbons still cost you less than the usual sort, for you buy 
direct from the mill and 

SAVE ALL BETWEEN PROFITS. 

®I|f"Pm? Exn Bx\k iiiUfi CUnmJimtg 

Office and lalesroomi, 806>808-810 Areh St., 62-64 N. Eighth St. 
Write a postal for samples and prices. 



Rose Hill Nurseries, 



NEW ROCHELLE, 
NEW YORK. 



ESTABLISHED 40 YEARS 



Most Complete Horticultural Establishment in America. 
New York Office, Siebfecht Building, 5th Ave. and 38th St. 



L. BAUMANN & CO. 

Importers and Mannfactarers of 

Florists' Supplies 

76-78 Wabasb Ave.. CHICAGO 

"'rite for supplement tocatalogue F, it will interest you. 

Always Mention tlie 

When Writlnsr Advertisers 




ASPARAGUS 
PLUMOSUS NANUS 



100 



1000 
$3.50 
175 
.75 



Greenhouse crop, fresh 60c 

AsparaKus Pi. Nanus, free air grown 26c 
Asparagus Sprenserl 16c 

H. H. BERGER A CO. 

47 BARCi;.AT ST. NSW YORK 

Mention The Rerlew when yon write. 

THE FLORISTS* HAIL ASS'N 
HAS PAID $101,000.00 

for glass broken by hail in the past twenty years. 

For particulars address 
JOHN O. ESLiBB. 8«o't. Saddle Blver.N. J. 

Mention The Review when yon write. 



March 14, 1907. 



The Weekly Florists' Review^ 



J239 



NO NATIONAL FLOWER SHOW. 

There will be no national flower show 
at Chicago in November, 1908. The ex- 
ecutive board of the Society of American 
Florists in session at Philadelphia March 
11 and 12 came to the conclusion that 
the year of the national election would 
not be a propitious time to try to arouse 
national interest in flowers and voted 
down the project in spite of the $7,000 
guarantee fund which had been raised. 

Those present at the Hotel Walton, in 
addition to the Philadelphians, were: 
President W. J. Stewart, Boston; Secre- 
tary P. J. Hauswirth, Chicago ;rthe fol- 
lowing directors, W. H. Elliott, Brighton, 
Mass.; Sam Murray, Kansas City; Theo. 
Wirth, Minneapolis; F. H. Traendly, 



New York; J. K. M. L. Farquhar, Bos- 
ton; ex-president W. F. Kasting, Buf- 
falo; Patrick Welsh, Boston; G. X. 
Amhryn, New Haven, Conn.; Felix 
Mense, Glen Cove, N. Y. 

Instead of a November show a spring 
exhibition was taken under considera- 
tion. 

Sentiment was shown to be strongly 
in favor of continuing the summer meet- 
ings of the S. A. F. as in previous years. 

Horticultural hall was selected for the 
trade exhibition at the convention at 
Philadelphia next August and the ftroad 
street theater for the meetings of the 
society. David Rust was seldctcSd to be 
superintendent of the trade exhibition. 
A program was partially prepared. 



THE AMERICAN 

ROSE SOCIETY 








Vr^ *<*f9"^'^^>*-^ ■" ■<^^ ^-m-^*." ^ •«- •■■W-^ Vr»''**-^>«t-» " ^■^U-^, w -^ ..^^ '.*-^. ■str^. 



THE WASHINGTON MEETING. 

The annual convention and exhibition 
of the American Eose Society is on this 
week in connection with the spring show 
of the Florists' Club of Washington, D. 
C. The exhibition is held in Washington 
Light Infantry hall and is one of the 
best ever staged by the society. Much 
active work has been done during the 
year, with the result that the premium 
list contained more special offers of valu- 
able trophies than ever in the history of 
the society's many successful exhibi- 
tions. The quality of the exhibits is of 
the usual high character, and the rose ex- 
hibits are supplemented by the spring 
plants shown for the premiums offered 
by the local Florists' Club. Altogether 
it makes an exhibition of which those 
responsible for its being have reason to 
be proud. 

The judges of the exhibition were: P. 
J. Hauswirth, Chicago; W. F. Kasting, 
Buffalo, and Eobert Craig, Philadelphia. 
The plan was to have their work com- 
pleted at the time the show was opened 
to the public at 6 p. m. on Wednesday, 
March 13. 

The first of the business sessions was 
called to order Wednesday evening with 
a large attendance of members, includ- 
ing both those in the trade and many 
private gardeners. President Eobert 
Simpson delivered his address, which 
will be found in full in this issue. Sec- 
retary Hammond reported on the suc- 
cessful year's work. The treasurer's 
report also was presented. The first of 
the papers to be read was that of E. G. 
Hill. The titles of the papers and the 
essayists are as follows: 

"The Hybridization of Eoses, the 
Ideals Before the Worker, and the Means 
Used to Work Up to Those Ideals," by 
E. Gurney Hill, Eichmond, Ind. ; "Ever- 
Blooming Eoses for the Garden: What 
to Grow and How to Grow Them," by 
Theodore Wirth, superintendent of parks, 
Minneapolis, Minn.; "Climbing and 
Trailing Eoses in the Hardy Eose Gar- 
den," by M. H. Walsh, Woods Hole, 
Mass. 

The invitation to Chicago for 1908 is 
almost certain to be accepted. 



Trcastirer's Report. 

The report of Treasurer Harry O. May 
showed cash receipts in the year as 
$1,235.91; disbursements, $911; balance 
on hand, $324.91. 

Officers Elected. 

Officers were elected as follows: 

President — Eobert Simpson,- Clifton, 
N. J. .\ . 

Vice-President — Fred Br^ifjHieyer, 
Mt. Clemens, Mich. ^** ' 

Secretary — Benj. Hammond, Fishkill, 
N..Y.. 

Treasurer — Harry O. May, Summit, 
N. J. 

The Awards. 

Special for 100 Eichmond, W. H. El- 
liott, Brighton, Mass., first. 

Twenty-five Bride, Stephen Morten- 
sen, Philadelphia, first. 

Twenty-five Maid, L. B. Coddington, 
Murray Hill, N. J., first; Campbell, sec- 
ond. 

Twenty-five Golden Gate, John N. 
May, Summit, N. J., first; F. H. Kram- 
er, Washington, second. 

Twenty-five Mrs. Oliver Ames, John 
N. May, first. 

Twenty-five Chatenay, Eobert Simp- 
son, Clifton, N. J., first. 

Twenty-five Ivory, F. H. Kramer, 
first. 

Twenty -five Liberty, Edward Towill, 
Eoslyn, Pa., first. 

Twenty-five Killarney, W. H. Elliott, 
first. 

Twenty-five Uncle John, Eobert 
Simpson, first; John N. May, second. 

Twenty-five Eichmond, Stephen Mor- 
tensen, first; Campbell, second. 

Twenty-five any other color, Edward 
Towill, first. 

Twelve Bridesmaid, F. H. Kramer, 
first. 

Twelve Ivory, F. H. Kramer, first. 

Twelve Liberty, Edward Towill, first. 

Twelve Eichmond, F. H. Kramer, 
first. 

Twelve Golden Gate, F. H. Ki*amer, 
first. • 

Fifty Eichmond, Edward Towill, 
first, the Micnjell silver cup. 

Fifty Be^jities, George Burton, Phila- 
delphia, special premium. 



Twenty-five Ivory, F. H. Kramer, 
special premium. , 

Fifty Wellesley, W. H. Elliott, first. 

New rose, W. S. Clark, first on un- 
named variety. 

Fifty Eichmond, Eobert Simpson, 
first, the E. G. Hill special premium. 

The awards of the Washington Flo- 
rists' Club premiums were as follows: 

Three pans of hyacinths, F.. H. 
Kramer, first. 

One pan hyacinths, F. H. Kramer, 
first and second. 

Six pots valley, S. C. Briggs, first. 

Best fern from dwelling, Nettie 
Briggs, first. 

Elybrid geranium, S. C. Briggs, first. 

One hundred carnation blooms, H. 
Weber & Sons Co., Oakland, Md., first. 

Twenty-five dark pink carnations, P. 

A. B. Weidner, first; Weber & Sons 
Co., second. 

Twenty-five crimson carnations, P. A. 

B. Weidner, first; Weber & Sons Co., 
second. 

Twenty-five light pink carnations, 
Weber & Sons Co., first; S. C. Briggs, 
second. 

Twenty-five scarlet carnations, P. A. 
B. Weidner, first; Guttman & Weber, 
New York, second. 

Twenty-five white carnations, Weber 
& Sons Co., first; P. A. B. Weidner, sec- 
ond. 

Twenty- five variegated carnations, P. 
A. B. Weidner, first; Weber & Sons Co., 
second. 

Best seedling carnation, Weber & 
Sons Co., first; Manda, second and 
third. 

Pansies, S. C. Briggs, first. 

Double violets, Theo. Deitrich, first. 

Princess of Wales violets, David Bis- 
set, first and second. 

Any other single violet, Theo. Deit- 
rich, first; F. G, Mense, second. 

Orchids, Lager & Hurrell, first. 



PRESIDENT SIMPSON'S ADDRESS. 

[Delivered before the annual convention of 
the American Rose Society, Washington, D. C, 
March 13, 1907.] 

We meet today in the capital city of 
our country as guests of the Washing- 
ton Florists' Club. Many of us are 
growers, and I am sure that all of us 
are lovers of the rose. Some of you have 
come to Washington to place on exhibi- 
tion your beautiful flowers, some of you 
have come chiefly it may be to admire 
the wonderful productions of others, but 
a goodly number of you, I trust, are here 
to discuss with us problems in rose grow- 
ing and problems that confront our rose 
society. In any event I am sure that 
no one will say that mercenary motives 
have drawn you, some from the east, 
some from the west, some from the south, 
and others from the north, at consider- 
able expense of time and money at this 
busy season of the year to attend this 
meeting; it is to gratify your love for 
the beautiful in nature, and to signify 
your willingness to do your part towards 
making this earth more beautiful and 
attractive that you are here today. 

I trust that our meeting may be help- 
ful and encouraging to every grower of 
the rose, that we all as a result may have 
higher ideals, and go home more than 
ever in love with our business and call- 
ing and that this shall prove to be an 
epoch-making meeting of the rose society. 

Preparations for the Meeting;. 

At the 1906 meeting in Boston, the 
matter of selecting the place in which 



JA^..il-^-.J.._- >wt.^-<^-_-.. . . -^jf. ., 



1240 



The Weekly Florists* Review. 



March 14, 1907. 



to hold the exhibition and annual meet- 
ing of 1907 was left in the hands of 
the executive committee, after a discus- 
sion, however, which showed plainly that 
the sentiment of the meeting was in 
favor of going to some city in the west, 
should the way be open for us, and 
should such a course seem to be for the 
best interests of the society. The ex- 
ecutive committee left the mattes open 
until July, thus giving every section of 
the country an equal chance to compete 
for the privilege of having the rose ex- 
hibition. 

The society did not receive any invi- 
tation from the west; but it did have a 
very hearty and pressing invitation from 
tho Washington Florists' Club, which 
sent its president to New York to back 
up its formal written invitation. 

The president, Mr. Bisset, assured us 
that "Washington and its people would 
see that the local detail work of the ex- 
hibition was taken care of properly and 
that an exhibition there would be a suc- 
cess financially. Whether they have kept 
their promise you will see for yourselves; 

There is a great amount of detail work 
to be done in arranging for an exhibition 
of this kind, particularly when it is not 
held in connection with some regularly 
organized horticultural society where 
men have been trained for the work, and 
where all the facilities for the holding 
of exhibitions are at hand; more, per- 
haps, than many of you realize; and I 
wish at this time to express my appre- 
ciation of the hearty enthusiasm with 
which the ofl5cers and local members of 
the executive committee have entered into 
this work, and have done willingly and 
gladly, whatever was in their power to 
do. Several meetings have been held in 
the city of New York, and some of the 
oflBcers have not failed to attend a single 
meeting. If the exhibition of 1907 shall 
prove to be equal in point of interest and 
enthusiasm to that of 1906 much of the 
credit is due to the push and energy and 
painstaking work of our secretary and 
the enthusiasm of our young treasurer. 

The position of secretary of the Amer- 
ican Pcae Society is no sinecure I assure 
you if the incumbent tries to do faith- 
fully the work that he finds to do, and 
just in proportion to the quality of the 
man in office will depend how much of 
the work shall be done, or how much 
shall be left undone. For good work the 
salary is totally inadequate, but in the 
present state of our treasury I dare not 
ask for an increase. The work of our 
present secretary during the last nine 
months will meet with your entire ap- 
proval, I am sure. 

PUn and Scope of Meeting. 

As the program for this meeting indi- 
cates, we have arranged for the reading 
of papers on interesting subjects by men 
eminently qualified to talk on the sub- 
jects treated, and I trust we may give 
to them our undivided attention during 
the delivery of the same, and in the dis- 
cussions that shall follow we may be able 
to give out and gather in a vast store of 
useful information. The society is to be 
congratulated on the personnel of its es- 
sayists. 

It has been arranged that gentlemen 
of large experience and observation shall 
start discussions on matters of vital in- 
terest to the society; that of increased 
membership, and new work that may be 
done by the society as an organization 
for its members and the public. I do 
not wish to anticipate or forestall what 




Robert Simpson. 



these gentleman may advise, as I hope 
for a very full discussion when, in the 
order of business, these subjects are 
taken up; however, in this connection I 
may be permitted, perhaps, to make a 
few observations, and possibly offer a 
few suggestions. 

Suggestions for Enlargement. 

Much good work might be done by the 
society if we had at command funds with 
which to do the work; much work should 
be done that has as yet not been even 
attempted. For instance, a committee of 
half a dozen men, representing different 
sections of the country and competient to 
deal with the peculiar climatic and other 
conditions of that particular section, 
might, in conjunction with the secretary, 
prepare a list of roses with general cul- 
tural directions, suitable to the condi- 
tions prevailing in those various sections, 
that would be worth much more to rose 
lovers than the annual membership fee. 
This committee could also advise as to 
the best roses to purchase, Dutch, 
French, English, home-grown budded, or 
own root plants, department store stock, 
or stock direct from nursery. There is 
a vast amount of ignorance among the 
general public along these lines, and their 
ignorance is frequently taken advantage 
of by unscrupulous dealers. 

What the society can offer its pros- 
pective members as an inducement to 
membership will no doubt be a controll- 
ing factor in seeking to enlarge that 
membership; on the other hand, larger 
resources, as a result of larger member- 



ship, will permit the society to under- 
take greater things. 

If the American Rose Society should 
identify itself with the various horticul- 
tural societies of the country to the ex- 
tent of offering its silver medal once a 
year for collections of cut roses, roses 
in pots, etc., to be judged according to 
the scale of the Rose Society, it would 
add much interest to the exhibitions and 
our society would gather strength ana 
prestige thereby. 

If the financial resources of the so- 
ciety were adequate, I would favor the 
holding of an exhibition in June, as well 
as March, so that the rose-loving public 
could see and become acquainted with the 
beautiful outdoor roses that we oannot 
place before them in March, such as 
Frau Karl Druschki, Baroness Rothschild, 
Mrs. John Laing, etc. The June exhibi- 
tion would be more popular, more inter- 
esting and do more to educate the masses 
in rose culture than it is possible to do 
with an exhibition of indoor roses in 
March. 

If the catalogue men of the country — 
we have some of the gentlemen here to- 
day — could be induced to give a page of 
their catalogues each year to a statement 
of the aims and purposes of the Rose 
Society and advocate membership in it 
to their customers, great possibilities 
would immediately loom up before the 
society. 

It is reasonable to suppose that our 
membership could be multiplied several 
times within a year if all present would 
resolve to make a point to interest their 



IffmH-V'-V ■'-' li'T^ - ^"^''^Wlf "W I*f7^ '••KWi^TT ^"T* «:'^^ 



Fi w"U!'.^"( • 'i~<»'"r '/ri''.vyT ■ 



Mabch 14, 1907. 



The Weekly Florists' Review. 



124t 



I 



friends and business acquaintances by 
correspondence, by personal appeal or in 
any other legitimate way that presented 
itself. 

Rule Governing Novelties. 

The society offers gold and silver 
medals at its exhibitions for new varie- 
ties, the object in offering these being to 
encourage the production of novelties of 
sterling merit; but in ruling that a nov- 
elty must score at least ninety-five points 
to win the gold medal we practically 
make it impossible to win it at all. 

Very few judges would be willing to 
say that a flower was perfect in form, in 
color, in fragrance or distinctiveness or, 
in fact, in any one particular, yet a 
variety with as many good points as 
Liberty or Killarney or Eichmond should 
have a chance to win the gold medal of 
the society. . We should of course main- 
tain a high standard in the giving of 
such awards, but we should at the same 
time avoid exacting impossible condi> 
tions. 

I ask you to consider whether gr not 
the rule governing the judging of novel- 
ties needs to be revised. 

The Permanent Fund. 

At the 1906 meeting you will remem- 
ber that much time was taken up dis- 
cussing the desirability and practicabil- 
ity of establishing a permanent fund, of 
considerable size, for the uses of the 
society j all agreed that it was desirable, 
but the meeting could not agree on any 
particular plan of action. We have to- 
day in America many men, so enriched 
with this world's goods, that their chief 
concern in life is to find the best way 
to spend this vast accumulation of 
wealth that it may accomplish the great- 
est amount of good for the largest num- 
ber of people. 

Art, education, science, religion, hu- 
manitarianism, have each received their 
millions to aid in prosecuting the work 
of blessing mankind along their particu- 
lar lines. It is a good thing to pay out 
$100,000 for a fine painting and present 
it to a museum of art, where it can be 
seen and admired and furnish inspiration 
to thousands of people. It is noble to 
endow our institutions of learning so that 
our youth may have the privileges of 
higher education. It is still better to 
provide the means for caring for the 
sick, the suffering, the aged and the 
homeless; but it is a question if, in es- 
tablishing a fund of ample proportions 
out of which this society might dis- 
seminate information and furnish the in- 
spiration which would result in the beau- 
tifying of hundreds of thousands of 
homes all over our land, and bringing 
joy and brightness into the hearts and 
lives of still larger numbers of our peo- 
ple, the man of means would not be 
choosing the very best way, from an 
artistic, educational, humanitarian or 
sociological point of view, of investing 
the wealth which a kind Providence 
has placed in his hands and made him 
the steward and custodian. I am suffi- 
ciently optimistic to think that if a com- 
mittee composed of the right men should 
take hold of this matter and present it 
properly to men of large means and 
philanthropic tendencies, that a fund 
could be established, permanent in char- 
acter, the income of which only could be 
used by the society. 

Gentlemen, it rests with you to take 
such action on this and other matters as 




E. Gumey Hill. 



your combined wisdom may consider best. 
I trust your stay in the city of Wash- 
ington may be both pleasant and profit- 
able. 



ORDER AND CLEANLINESS. 

Having recently had occasion to visit 
a number of greenhouse establishments, 
the writer has been impressed with the 
fact that the order and cleanliness which 
obtain in greenhouses are almost al- 
ways in direct proportion to the pros- 
perity of the establishment. It does not 
follow that the cleanliness is the result 
of prosperity, but that prosperity is the 
result of cleanliness. 

When a man keeps his greenhouse clean 
and neat he also keeps the stock grow- 
ing in it in the same condition. The 
result is that it is better stock than is 
grown in a disorderly establii^hment. It 
sells quicker and it brings a better price. 
You would not look for fine plants in a 
slovenly establishment. It is an old say- 
ing that the clothes make the man. By 
the same token, order makes the success- 
ful business man. 

They say that cleanliness is next to 
godliness. There certainly is no other 
way in which we may so easily approach 
godliness. It costs little to be clean. 
It takes only a moment to throw the rub- 
bish where it belongs, instead of under 
the benches. Five minutes once a week 
will rake the gravel or ashes beneath the 
bench and habit quickly will cause a 
careful man to keep his pot plants 
straightly aligned. 



Geand Rapids, Mich. — The Florists' 
Club is going ahead with preparations 
for a flower show this fall. 



THE ROSE GROWER'S IDEAL. 

[A paper by E. G. Hill, of Ulchmond, Ind.. 
read before the annual convention of the Amer- 
ican Rose Society at Washington, D. C, March 
13, 1907.] 

Your president and executive commit- 
tee have suggested as a subject for my 
paper, * * The Advisability of Having 
an Ideal in Mind when Attempcing to 
Eaise New and Improved Varieties of 
Roses. ' ' 

It would have been better if you had 
selected some one to prepare this paper 
who has had a broader and more ex- 
tended experience bearing upon this par- 
ticular line of work than myself. It 
is a subject full of interest, of mystery 
and of elusive leadings, and of which 
I am free to confess I have little exact 
knowledge. The more I have tried to 
inquire into the laws governing cross 
fertilization, the more surprised I have 
been at the very little tangible knowl- 
edge possessed by plant growers, for it 
would seem that after generations of 
attempts at crossing we should find 
much more accurate information at hand, 
and, at least, a few formulas which 
might be followed with some certfiinty. 

These, however, are not yet at hand, 
but that is no occasion for discourage- 
ment, for of one thing I am convinced, 
there are underlying laws which guide 
to certain results, and while at present 
we are only groping toward them in 
the dark, patient persistence will finally 
give us our working theorem which will 
prevent the present waste of utterly 
haphazard effort, and reduce it to a 
science and an art at least approaching 
the exact. Nature does finally reward 
the painstaking investigator and she does 
reveal enough concerning her manners 



'^■^L^t^'fi^JJiAl^:. 



■^^T^' (V^'* »7~'^r' T^'Xr* 



rrr* r- — T^^^f^T^j^ 



1242 



The Weekly Florists^ Review* 



Mabch 14, 1907. 



and methods to give incentive to those 
who would know her better. 

Have an Ideal. 

I should say, by all means have an 
ideal in mind when attempting the pro- 
duction of a new variety of rose through 
the medium of cross-fertilization; ii; 
fact, the ideal is persistently forced upon 
the working florist by the very short- 
comings of his everyday favorites. The 
amateur may please his fancy and de- 
light himself with the odd and curious 
results of haphazard work, and there 
is much pure pleasure to be derived from 
it; bpt the florist, with all his love and 
reverence for the beautiful in nature, 
has a sterner purpose in view. The rose 
has descended to commercialism; the 
rose grower must raise it to a pinnacle 
of perfection, where it can dominate its 
special line of commerce, without apol- 
ogy for any weakness. And it must be 
confessed at the present time that the 
usefulness and the profit of nearly every 
variety of commercial rose is greatly 
impaired by some serious drawback to 
its reliability. To eradicate Hhese faults 
in thJB parent is impossible ; ' to produce 
a seedling that shall retain the good 
points of the parent with the weakness 



varieties, and only after a good lapse 
of time hiave results been forthcoming. 
The purpose in view was first to secure 
a \igorous constitution in the progeny; 
that must always be first. Seedlings 
showing exceptional vigor have again 
been bred with. Liberty, Richmond, 
American Beauty, ••Quffen of Edgely and 
several of the best "♦hybrid perpetuals. 
My aim has been in this particular line 
of work to secure a red rose that would 
flower freely under glass in winter. Fur- 
thering this idea of improving the red 
varieties, pollen was taken from Amer- 
ican Beauty and ovetv 300 crosses were 
successfully made laSt year, 1906, and 
these latest seedlings *are now nice little 
plants growing vigorously in their lit- 
tle pots. My hope in thus using Amer- 
ican Beauty pollen is to secure, if pos- 
sible, a long-stemmed, free-blooming win- 
ter-forcing variety. A previous effort in 
this line has given us a rose superior 
in color and size to American Beauty, 
with the additional advantage of produc- 
ing flowers as freely as Richmond or 
Bridesmaid. - *< . 

Quite a separate line of crossing has 
been to improve upon the size of Rosa- 
lind Orr English while retaining its gen- 
eral color scheme. With this in view, 





\ 


A^i 


iM, 


\ 




MMm 


^J<'' 


mk 


^^^ 


L'^^^V 'iU < 


Wr 


■ 


4 




1 


I 




% 


^ 


^SiBG^H 


»: 






^■^-^ >#^-- 


" ^H 


I 


r '^ 1 



Pan of Red Tulips Dressed in Green Crepe Paper. 



eliminated is well worth working for. 
This, then, forms an ideal; definiteness 
of purpose in any line of activity is es- 
sential to results, and quite as important 
: 1 the ideal is the working plan which 
must be formulated to attain the end 
in view. 

Examples of an Ideal. 

Some years ago I began working on 
red roses, hoping to secure something 
better than Meteor, Teplitz and Litta, 
all fine in their way, though stubborn 
material in the hands of the rose forcer. 
My initial work was begun with these . 



hundreds of crosses were made with 
pollen taken from Richmond, Queen of 
, Edgely, American Beauty and Paul Ney- 
ron during the season of 1905. The 
progeny from these have mostly flpw- 
eied, with a result that some thirty have 
been retained for a second year's trial. 
Two out of the thirty selected are of 
unusual promise. One of these is 
American Beauty x Rosalind Orr English 
and is specially notable for its stiff, long 
stem and large size. The other cross is 
Richmond x Rosalind Orr English, which 
is intermediate in color between its two 
parents, with the additional merit of 



possessing double the number of petals 
that either of its parents possess. The 
above two instances are cited to show 
concentrated effort on a given line in a 
multiplicity of crosses. I give the above 
in detail to illustrate my conviction of 
having an ideal in mind when working 
for a given end. Perhaps some day we 
will find a means to the end desired by 
simply making one direct cross. 

I do not know to a certainty, yet I 
believe that Joseph Pernet, of Lyons^ 
has followed out a similar certain line 
in his raising of new varieties. I judge 
this by the similarity in growth, foliage 
and the general build of the flowers in 
his originations. Take Pres. Carnot and 
Antoine Rivoire; note their general char- 
acteristics and I think it is easy to de- 
tect a similarity of lineage running on 
down through his Madam Rivary, Le 
Progress, Joseph Hill, Mme. Jenny Gille- 
mot, Mme. Philip Rivoire, Mme. Melanie 
Soupert and Baronne de Sinety, and 
three of his very latest introductions, 
Mrs. Aaron Ward, Mme. de Luze and 
Renee Wilmart Urban show the same 
general characteristics. It would be in- 
teresting to know if M. Pernet had been 
following out Mendel's theory in his 
breeding of roses. Not all his produc- 
tions are allied to the varieties men- 
tioned above, for his Etoile de France, 
Marquise Litta, Soliel d'Or and Laurent 
Carle are quite distinct from the type 
cited above. 

Transmission of Visor. 

If the law of interbreeding be cor- 
rect, gathering in only pollen from 
closely related varieties, then the law of 
heredity as applied to the animal king- 
dom would not hold good in the vege- 
table family. My suggestion would be 
to follow both lines of work, interbreed- 
ing and promiscuous breeding, if I may 
thus put it, but always have in mind the 
design of a given improvement. 

Of laje my one thought has been to 
select the most vigorous grower for the 
mother plant, for without health, vigor 
and a good constitution the Anest new 
rose is a failure. I am thoroughly con- 
vinced by observation and experience 
that the mother plant has the most to 
do in giving health, vitality and consti- 
tution to the offspring. This being the 
case, we can see at a glance how impor- 
tant it is to select only the very strong- 
est among the everblooming varieties to 
serve as the female parent. We should 
select the pollen from those varieties 
which have pronounced qualities in the 
way of color, stem, length of bud and 
fragrance. If these qualities are present 
in the male you may hope that they will 
have an influence upon your crosses. 

With the increased vigor possessed by 
many of the later productions in tea and 
hybrid tea roses, such as Betty, Phari- 
saer, Killarney, Kate Moulton, and 
others of like vigor, it need not be many 
years before a race bred from such 
parents will give greatly increased vigor 
over present existing varieties, and with 
this increased strength of growth great 
good will come to the grower. 

The infusion of hybrid perpetual blood 
will also have a marked tendency to in- 
crease the vigor and growth of seedling 
roses, and, by using the everbloomers 
for the seed bearer, freedom of bloom 
will in large measure be preserved. It 
ought not to be many years until the 
present non-flowering hybrid perpetual 
roses are superseded by a race equally as 
virile but which will give continuous 



March 14, 1907. 



The Weekly Florists' Review. 



1243 




that will grow and bloom as do most of 
the present standard varieties in Eng- 
land, on the Pacific coast and in many 
of our southern states; but here in the 
north only a pitifully small number can 
be depended upon. And right here is a 
wide field for the hybridist to enter. A 
good, reliable, everblooming garden rose 
will give pleasure and delight to mil- 
lions of American citizens. It is to be 
hoped that many rose lovers may enter 
this sadly neglected field. My ideas on 
this line of the subject were given in a 
paper read before the S. A. F. at its 
annual meeting at St. Louis, 1905. 

This line of work might have received 
a fine stimulus if the trustees of the 
Carnegie fund had been empowered to 
set aside certain funds to be awarded 
for meritorious new garden roses. The 
field is not inviting to one who must 
earn a maintenance, but if a prize or a 
money consideration could be offered 
of suflScient size it would stimulate ef- 
forts in this direction. 



EASTER STOCK. 



Primulas in a Birchbark Pan. 



bloom. If we get vigor of growth with 
certainty of bud, flowers on the ends of 
long straight stems, that will be the type 
that shall give us larger and finer flowers 
for our winter forcing as well as better 
varieties for our gardens. 

I know that you will say that predic- 
tions of this sort are easy to make; but 
kindly indulge me a little; let us use any 
means to impress upon the minds of 
those just taking up this work that con- 
stitution is the foundation upon which 
all effort must proceed. 

Skilled Workmen at Work. 

A great number of skilled and prac- 
ticed workmen are enthusiastically bend- 
ing their best energies toward improving 
the rose and we are surely making a 
steady advance in the right direction 
under such men as the Dicksons, the 
Pauls, the Souperts, Pernet and others 
in France, and Peter Lambert and his 
colleagues in Germany, together with 
CJook, Walsh and others in this country; 
we have a right to expect even better 
results than have yet been obtained. 

Even with the combined efforts put 
forth by the rosarians in this *id other 
countries, progress will a,ppear slow to 
the impatient workers in our ranks; 
trifling advance will be noted, but better 
types and varieties will surely gladden 
our eyes and hearts, for nature has been 
kind in the past, both in bud-variation 
and by cross-fertilization and the com- 
ing years will be no less fruitful than 
the past. We shall improve upon Mal- 
niaison, Marechal Niel, Catherine Mer- 
met, Bride, Perle des Jardins, Kaiserin 
Augusta Victoria, American Beauty, 
Frau Karl Druschki, Liberty and the 
two Cochets, or, at least, she will reward 
us with varieties more readily amenable 
to our twentieth century requirements, 
which are stringent in the extreme. 

By all means let us study Mendel and 
his theory, note the deductions of De 
Vries, and gather all the information 
possible from whatever source it can be 
had, remembering that nature's working 
theorems are to be discovered only by 
the painstaking application of the knowl- 



edge at hand, and that no amount of 
speculative theory will take the place of 
intelligent persistent experiment person- 
ally conducted. 

Let no one think for a moment that 
good results may not be obtained by the 
simple direct crossing of two varieties 
of roses, for such is quite possible with- 
out interbreeding. Eichmond was ob- 
tained by using pollen from Liberty 
upon Lady Battersea, but it was the one 
valuable result out of a very large num- 
ber of the same cross, so that we may 
say there is a chance of a good return, 
though it is not probable from this pro- 
cedure. 

I have carefully avoided the use of 
any scientific or technical terms and have 
only tried to embody in this very imper- 
fect paper my own ideas and to chron- 
icle the results of my own observations. 

The Need in Northern States. 

Our gardens are sadly in need of roses 



It is time every retail florist was look- 
ing to his stock for Easter. If it is not 
already under way in the greenhouses, 
it should be oVdered of the wholesaler. 
And if you have stock provided, have 
you all the necessary accessories? A 
large part of the sales will be growing 
plants and nowadays no plant is salable 
unless properly dressed with the many 
accessories provided by the supply houses. 

In a great majority of the stores there 
is only a limited sale for the large and 
expensive plants and for the staple items 
of the average store only the less costly 
accessories are needed — but they are no 
less necessary because inexpensive, and 
adequate supplies should be on hand for 
a record trade. Unless all signs fail 
this is to be a banner Eastet. It is the 
purpose of the Review to show in this 
and the following issue the plant ar- 
rangements which sold well last Easter, 
not so much that they may be copied as 
to offer suggestions to the thoughtful 
store man as to how the stock may be 
varied. Variety is not only the spice of 
life, but in a flower store it is the sauce 
which does as much as novelty to retain 
the interest of the public. 

Birch bark ware is one of the best 




Pan of Lily of the Valley Dressed in G-epe Paper, 



-.(Tfw^. T~»7 v."' 



'T^^T^^v^ 1^ .:7;;;7i 



1244 



The Weekly Florists^ Review^ 



Mabch 14, 1007. 



sellers at Easter. You can fill all sorts 
of bark receptacles with all sorts of 
plants and make a pleasing combination 
in every case, but don't overdo the birch- 
bark feature. Provide styles, sizes, colors 
and kinds of boxes, baskets, hampers, 
etc. The twig basket is no longer a nov- 
elty, but it is a good seller. If you have 
not provided these things, lose no time 
in sending an order to your supply house. 
If you don't know just what you want, 
leave the selection to the house, simply 
indicating how many pieces you want, the 
amount you want to invest, or the price 
per piece you want to pay. Of course 
you want a few big pieces, but most of 
them should fit an average purse among 
your customers. 

It is the same with pot covers, crepe 
papers and the staples, but mats, etc., 
should be on hand to add variety. Rib- 
bons, too, are necessary in large assort- 
ment of styles and colors. Order now 
what you will need. 



TROUBLE WITH SWEET PEAS. 

Will you tell me what is the matter 
with the branch and leaf of the sweet 
pea enclosed? You will notice the double 
branch is grown from the same stalk 
below and I cannot understand why one 
branch is grown from the same stalk 
as healthy as it can be. It is the same 
with the leaf I am enclosing. Occa- 
sionally through the house there is a 
whole stalk affected this way, while the 
ones all around are healthy. The sweet 
peas are growing in some old fern soil 
with some horse manure mixed into it. 
Most of the plants are now looking fine 
with the exception of a few that are 
affected as you can see by the enclosed 
leaves. The house was run for a while 
at 60 degrees at night and 70 degrees 
during the day. Now it is run 44 de- 
grees to 50 degrees at night and 60 
degrees days. Do you think the disease 
is caused by having run the house too 
warm, or by ammonia rising from the 
horse manure in the soil, or do you think 
it is an insect invisible to the naked 
eyef J* -A-. J. 

Undoubtedly the high temperature 
maintained during the early stages of 
growth must have been harmful to the 
sweet peas, which naturally love a cool 
and moist atmosphere. The temperature 
you are now keeping is much more to 
the liking of the plants. We do not 
think the soil can have been of the best 
nature. Old fern soil, even when mixed 
with manure, is hardly what we would 
want to plant sweet peas in for best 
results. They like a good loam in which 
a liberal supply of well decomposed cow 
manure has been incorporated. If you 
used horse manure and it was rather 
new, some ammonia would undoubtedly 
arise, but nothing but thoroughly de- 
cayed manure should be used in the 
soil for any crops. 

It is difficult to tell what has caused 
the dying of the shoots. It may have 
been partially due to the causes you 
have suggested, or again, the trouble 
may be the work of minute bacteria 
which work inside the stems and no 
spraying solution can reach them. Cut- 
ting off or pulling up and burning af- 
fected stems is 5l that can be done 
to mitigate the evil. C W. 

CAMPANULAS. 

Campanulas, which are also known as 
bluebells, harebells and Canterbury bells, 
are among the most beautiful of our 



hardy flowers. Some of the dwarf spe- 
cies are not over six inches high, while 
the tallest reach five feet and over. There 
are many species in cultivation, of which 
the following six, according to the Na- 
tional Council of Horticulture, are most 
deserving of mention: 

Campanula persicifolia in the northern 
states is an almost continuous bloomer, 
is a perennial, will grow in any soil, and 
is, perhaps, the most beautiful species 
cultivated. The type has blue flowers, 
but there is a white variety. . There is a 
semi-double variety which is beautiful, 
growing two to two and one-half feet 
high, and is best adapted to a hardy bor- 
der or old-fashioned garden. It should 
be planted in irregular masses, mixing 
colors. 

Campanula Medium, the common Can- 
terbury bells, is the showiest species. 
When in bloom it is often such a solid 
mass of flowers that no leaves can be 
seen. It varies from darkest to lightest 
blue, pink and white. It is biennial and 



will die immediately after the seeds have 
ripened. There is a distinct variety 
called cup and saucer, and several that 
are decidedly double. The young plants 
should be set out not later than June. 

Campanula Carpatica is the prettiest 
of the dwarf species. It is perennial, of 
easy culture, producing flowers in great 
abundance the second year from seed. 
Campanula turbinata is another dwarf 
species suited for open rockeries or small 
borders. For rockeries, Campanula ro- 
tundifolia, the English harebell, is best. 
One of the tallest varieties is Campanula 
pyramidalis, which sometimes reaches five 
feet. Its numerous spikes are covered 
with blue and white flowers. 



Springfield, Mo. — The Summerfield 
Floral Co. has placed in its store win- 
dow a glass aquarium twelve feet long 
and stocked it with goldfish. Among 
them are some fine American and Jap- 
anese fantails, and it serves to keep a 
crowd in front of the window all day. 



y^^^^'^^n.^^^i^ 



'♦^F».<^^^^»?^<#-f>. 



SEASONABLE 





SUGGESTIONS 



^ide^iie^'^'n.'Uems^^em>''U>^^<^'n<-%*--m>>-Uf^'*irm^-U^\-%d^^'^!^'*dfm^i:^'^^ 






Salvia Splendens. 

That brilliant and ever popular fiow- 
ering plant. Salvia splendens, grows very 
rapidly, either from cuttings or seed, 
and a mistake is often made by start- 
ing it too early, with the result that the 
plants become too tall and, if in pots, 
so matted with roots that they never 
sufficiently recover from it. Where stock 
plants have been carried over they 
should now be producing an adundance 
of cuttings, which should be placed in 
sand at once. Keep the cuttings shaded, 
well watered daily and they will soon 
root. We consider seedlings, however, 
preferable to plants raised from cut- 
tings, as they possess vigor. Seedlings 
should be transferred to flats or be 
potted off as soon as they produce a 
second pair of leaves. They grow very 
fast and even if seed is not sown be- 
fore April 1, excellent plants will be pro- 
duced. 

Sweet Peas, 

It may seem a little out of place to 
discuss the sowing of sweet peas in the 
open when the snow lies deep and frost 
is two or three feet in the ground, as 
it still does in some sections, but we can- 
not tell how soon a change may come. 
It arrives with cyclonic force sometimes. 
Sweet peas are annuals which love a 
cool, moist climate and the outdoor crop 
should be gotten in as soon as the frost 
leaves the ground and it is sufficiently 
dry to work. Points to remember in 
sweet pea culture are: Liberal enrich- 
ment of the soil. Burying the seeds at 
least three inches deep, being careful 
not to sow thickly, and if you have 
done so, thin in good season. Give them 
brush and other supports before they 
start to climb. Eemove all seed-pOds as 
soon as formed. Water, if possible, 
during dry weather and mulch the plants 
to assist in keeping them cool and moist 
at the roots. 

A few good varieties of sweet peas 



are: Dorothy Eckford, white; Hon. 
.Mrs. Kenyon, primrose; King Edward 
VII., scarlet; Lady Grisel Hamilton, 
lavender; Prince of Wales, rose; Miss 
Wilmott and Helen Lewis, orange; 
Gladys Unwin, pink; America, varie- 
gated; Black Knight, maroon. For 
early flowers sow some of Earliest of 
All and Mont Blanc. 

Poinsettias. 

Stock plants of poinsettias will have 
been resting under the benches for the 
last ten weeks. While there is no imme- 
diate hurry about starting them, if you 
desire to bench some of the rooted cut- 
tings and desire long, strong stems, they 
should be overhauled some time during 
the present month. Shake the soil away 
from the roots, cut the tops back well 
and place in as small a pot as the roots 
can be comfortably squeezed in. Place 
on a sunny bench over steam or hot 
water pipes, give a good soaking of 
water and then keep rather on the dry 
side until the plants start to break. Cut- 
tings rubbed off with a heel, or cut 
below a joint, root readily in bottom 
heat, care of course being taken to allow 
no sun to strike them and to water well 
daily. Sand of a moderately coarse 
nature from which water passes away at 
once is preferable to the finer sort, which 
is more liable to scum over. As soon as 
roots are an inch long, pot up. Care 
must be taken not to break the roots and 
it is a great mistake to allow them to 
make long roots before removing them 
from the cutting bench. It always re- 
sults in a loss of foliage. 

Smilax. 

Seedlings of smilax are much more 
profitable for planting than are divided 
roots. If seed was sown last month the 
little plants will now be ready for 2%- 
inch pots. A further shift, may be given 
them about the end of Apnl, and in 
these latter pots they can remain until 



'■V'*'*f^^f¥'^irf-~t !f^-^ ^^^r^-% f-' «"™' ' 



.I!I»p^'r•7■.YH-'■■^^J~^^.•7-f^"I^// 



Mabch 14, 1907. 



The Weekly Florists^ Review* 



1245 



they can be set out in the beds during 
June or July. They should have not 
less than six inches of good soil and if 
liberally treated will yield several crops 
of strings during the season. A top- 
dressing of well-rotted manure and occa- 
sional soakings of liquid stimulants will 
materially improve them. Eed spider 
disfigures the foliage if not kept well 
syringed, especially where the plants 
are near the heating pipes. The demand 
for smilax is not what it used to be 
before the advent of Asparagus plumo- 
sus, but we find a bench of it always 
pays well. 

Variegated Viocas. 

For vases, veranda or window-boxes 
Vinca variegata is indispensable. If 
you want a good supply of strong plants 
for another year it is not yet too late to 
put in a good batch of cuttings. Rub 
these off with heels from the base of 
the plants and they will soon root in 
sand. Do not cut the tops from the 
long, trailing shoots. They are slower 
and more uncertain of propagation. Pot 
off the little cuttings when nicely rooted 
and plant out in the open ground. Cul- 
tivate well all summer and by fall you 
will have fine stock which you can 
squeeze into 4-inch pots and stand in 
single rows along the edges of your 
cool house benches. This will make the 
finest possible material for use the fol- 
lowing bedding season. There never 
seems to be any surplus of this pretty 
and most useful plant and if you chance 
to grow more than you need yourself 
you will always find it easy to dispose 
of. Vincas need a cool house and, be- 
ing hardy, an occasional freezing does 
not harm them. Fall cuttings, taken 
about the last of September, will make 
nice plants for use the following May. 

Lorraine Begoaiis, 

If you are in the habit of raising your 
own stock of this most useful of all 
begonias you will now be able to se- 
cure some nice base cuttings from old, 
cut-back plants which have been rested 
a little but kept lightly syringed. These 
cuttings, as soon as two inches long, 
should be taken off with a sharp knife 
and inserted in clean, sharp sand, where 
they can have a bottom heat of 70 de- 
grees to 75 degrees and a top heat of 
60 degrees to 65 degrees. Use care in 
watering and nearly all will root. 

If leaf cuttings were used and put in 
sand some six weeks ago they will now 
be rooted nicely and young growths will 
be making their appearance. Pot them 
up in light, sandy compost and keep a 
little on the dry side until the roots 
are running around the sides of the pots. 

Some growers propagate the shoots 
coming from these leaf cuttings and con- 
sider that so treated they make better 
plants. Our experience has been that 
plants from leaf cuttings are more ro- 
bust, make larger leaves and have larger 
flowers than those raised from cuttings, 
but flowers are more loosely scattered 
on the plant. This is rather an advan- 
tage, however, as Lorraines really carry 
too many flowers in proportion to the 
foliage they carry. 

Preparations for Easter. 

The early buds on many of the lilies 
will now be showing white. These can 
now safely be given a cooler house and 
will be out in good season. While the 
principal call for lilies is for single 
stalks in pots, made up plants carrying 



three to five each make very handsome 
specimens and always sell well. It is 
possible now to make up these plants 
by selecting those which will flower to- 
gether. No compunction need be used 
about shaking away or chopping off 
some of the balls to make them fit into 
the new receptacles. They will flower 
just as well if kept well watered. Prob- 
ably you have noticed how stalks cut 
off containing only buds open out finely 
in water. The same applies to the made- 
up plants. 

Tulips and narcissi which are usually 
grown in flats can be taken out and 
placed in pans now. They will open just 
as well and last as long as if grown 
in them. Do not attempt this unless 
the plants are short and stocky and do 
it just before the flowers open. Hya- 
cinths can be treated in the same way. 
It is inadvisable to pull apart the very 
vigorous narcissi, like Emperor, Sir 
Watkin and Horsfieldii, in this way, but 
Golden Spur we find stands it well. 

Pansies and double daisies sold well 
in little baskets last Easter. If you 
have these in a cold house and they are 



coming into flower make up some pans 
or baskets of them. English primroses 
are also salable if treated in the same 
way. Many customers prefer these little 
harbingers of spring to the larger and 
more showy plants associated with Eas- 
ter. 

Flowering shrubs, such as lilac, deut- 
zias, cherries, double plums, etc., should 
now be coming into flower and ought to 
be opened in a cooler house. Wistarias 
also need similar treatment. Do not 
allow the latter to become too fully ex- 
panded. 

Rambler roses, hydrangeas, spirseas 
and in fact all flowering stock will now 
be matted with roots and copious sup- 
plies of water are necessary to keep 
them in good condition. A little care- 
lessness now may mean a heavy pe- 
cuniary loss. What a treasure a man 
is who is a really careful hand at water- 
ing. He who does not skip a few plants 
on a bench every time he waters it is 
the exception, not the rule. Nothing so 
stamps the successful grower as one 
who knows how to use the hose ai 
watering pot. 




CARNATION NOTES.— VEST. 



Forcing an Easter Crop. 

Two weeks after you get these notes 
you will be in the thick of the Easter 
rush, the biggest day of the year for 
the trade. No doubt you are trying even 
now to estimate what your cut of blooms 
will be for that week and wondering 
whether you will be able to deliver as 
many as you may have already prom- 
ised. If you could count on bright 
weather you could make a close esti- 
mate, but when you have to run the risk 
of a bad week it becomes an uncertain 
proposition, and here is where trouble 
commences. You accept orders for as 
many blooms as you cut during the 
heaviest weeks, and when the sun refuses 
to show itself, and the blooms fail to 
materialize, you shove on the heat to 
force them out. Consequently you weaken 
your plants so much that for some weeks 
your cut will be away below its usual 
quality. 

The danger at this time of the year is 
not so great as it is at Christmas and 
with a little foresight the plants can 
be forced to give a few extra blooms 
without danger, but be reasonable. The 
sun is stronger now aijd more ventila- 
tion can be given, thus causing the 
plants to grow stronger and to build up 
and overcome the effects of a slight 
strain quicker than in midwinter. By 
starting the temperature upward a 
week before you deliver tlie blooms and 
raising the temperature a degree each 
night until you have raised 6 degrees, 
and after you are through cutting drop 
again in the same manner, you can make 
it comparatively easy for the plants. 
But under no conditions should you 
jump the temperature all at one time, 
or drop it, especially if the weather is 



bad. Do not raise it more than f de- 
grees. That is enough to push out as 
many blooms as will be forced out with- 
out injury to the plants. Remember 
that the time of gluts and oversupply 
is not far away. During those times 
only the best of stock is wanted and 
you cannot afford to do anything now 
that will lower your quality at that 
time. 

Next week I will tell you what may 
safely be done in the matter of storing 
up your cut to provide a holiday supply. 

A. F. J. BAint. 



EXPERIENCE VITH CARNATIONS. 

[A paper by A. J. Stalielln. of Redford. Mlfh.. 
rond before the Detroit Florists' Club, March 6. 
1907.] 

With my short and limited experience 
in carnation growing I do not feel that 
I am competent to write anything new 
or of instructive value to our carnation 
growers, especially when our trade 
papers are continually printing all the 
information that any one possibly could 
desire. Nevertheless, what little expe- 
rience I have had I will only be too glad 
to give. 

Getting; a Start. 

In the spring of 1903 I concluded that 
every young man at the age of 25 should 
decide what his future vocation should 
be — then get busy at it. Especially did 
I think this time of myself, so I at once 
secured a position with the Chicago Car- 
nation Co., Joliet, 111., one of the largest 
and most up-to-date carnation growing 
establishments in this country, where 
many important ideas in greenhouse con- 
struction, as well as carnation growing, 
were easily picked up. 

In the fall of 190.*? I returned home, 
built one evonspan house .30x200, with 
gutters six feet high and raised benches, 
installing a Superior hot water boiler. 



^..^■■-.^V 



■ ■.>■— ^. ..^—1- ^ .L - . x^. 



ig.lJii i - --- ^'Ifiiaai' 



-i.-... 



■V" » -""-^ 






1246 



The Weekly Florists^ Review* 



Mabch 14, 1907. 



It was altogether much the same as many 
houses seen at Chicago. 

The first year lettuce was grown and 
also young carnation stock for the fol- 
lowing year, which was the season of 
1904-1905, when the carnation market 
was glutted almost continually, causing 
profits to be almost unknown. The fol- 
lowing year another house was added to 
the old one, with solid beds made with 
12-inch boards for sides, filled with soil. 
This house was planted to carnations be- 
fore the glass was oc^ with very satis- 
factory results. The following year, 
which was 1906, another house was 
added and planted to mums. 

My Way of Growing Carnations. 

To start with, the propagating bench 
is built of 1x6 tamarack boards with 
three hot water pipes underneath. After 
whitewashing the inside of the bench it 
is filled two inches deep with fine cin- 
ders, and is then filled with three inches 
more of coarse, clean sand, leveled and 
well packed. While this is not the mod- 
ern style of propagating bench, still I 
find no fault with it, as it is inexpen- 
sive, easily constructed and, if properly 
taken care of, nearly every cutting will 
be strongly rooted. 

I try and select cuttings at the stage 
where there is about one-half inch or a 
little more of base without any leaves, 
then cut as small amount as possible off 
of the base and still leave a nice, smooth 
surface. If plenty of room is at hand 
on the propagating bench leave on all 
the leaves except when it is necessary 



rooted and of tener when much ventilation 
is given. The cuttings should never see 
bright sunlight until well rooted, when 
they should be planted up as soon as 
possible. I always have planted in flats, 
simply because it saves a lot of work 
and, when plants are planted out in the 
field, I believe it to be just as good as 
if pots are used. The advantage of 
growing young carnations in flats, at 
least in my soil, which is clay loam, is: 
First, a saving of a lot of labor potting, 
repotting and handling; second, they do 
not suffer from want of water so easily, 
which is worth while, because in the 
spring rush they might happen to be 
neglected; third, about the last of 
April or first part of May they can 
be placed outdoors. This outdoor treat- 
ment with cool nights brings the strength 
and vigor right into them and they are 
then in tip-top shape to plant- in the 
field. In case of a hard frost they are 
easily covered with a large piece of light 
cotton, which is enough protection at 
this time of year. 

Field Culture. 

By cutting with a sharp knife, both 
ways, between the rows of plants, then 
holding the flat on one side, giving it a 
sharp downward tap upon a solid block, 
the plants are loosened and easily taken 
out in good shape, with all the soil cling- 
ing to the nice mass of roots which they 
always have. These plants with roots 
looking out in every direction, not like 
pot-bound plants, but ready to take hold 
of their new quarters, always make fine, 




H. Thaden Expatiating on His Patent Truss Construction. 



to remove some of the small lower ones. 
When a batch is ready, make a cut in 
the sand with a tool about the width of 
a table knife and one-sixteenth of an 
inch thick. The distance apart to stick 
the cuttings is governed by their size. 
Three-quarters of an inch apart in the 
rows and the rows two and one-half 
inches apart is about right for medium 
.size cuttings. 

Spray the cuttings every day until 



healthy stock. So far I have planted 
out in the field as early as possible, some- 
times the last part of April, when we 
still have hard frosts and find the earliest 
ones out always make the best plants. 
They are planted eight inches to nine 
inches apart and the rows thirty-nine 
inches apart, so all cultivating can be 
done with a horse. This should be done 
as soon as possible after every rain. 
Topping should be looked after in 



time, not allowing the plants to produce 
a lot of buds unnecessarily, which is 
only a waste of energy on the part of 
the plants. This also should be done 
often and not more than two or three 
shoots on any plant stopped at once. Do- 
ing this often helps much to have plants 
in continuous bloom. 

Indoor Culture. 

Lifting and planting in the houses 
should always be accomplished as early 
as possible. I have always planted in 
August, but would plant earlier if possi- 
ble. By keeping the plants well culti- 
vated they can be taken up at any time, 
regardless of the weather, although a dry 
time is best, as then the foliage is rather 
hard and not easily injured by wilting. 
I like to leave on a ball of dirt about 
three inches in diameter, which, when 
planted, helps to keep them erect and 
also from wilting badly the first few 
days. 

Until the plants begin to send out lit- 
tle rootlets they should be sprayed once 
or twice a day, according to the weather ; 
also keep them well watered after the 
roots have taken good hold. Watering 
is only done when needed and then thor- 
oughly. At first it is necessary to keep 
the soil wet enough, still not too wet, as 
the plants have not as yet taken a strong 
hold, and the soil, not being full of roots, 
is easily and quickly soured. Thorough 
cultivation will help much to avoid this 
and should be done often. 

As soon as growth commences, the 
shade on the houses should be removed, 
plenty of ventilation given and the plants 
never allowed to suffer for want of 
water. After the plants are larger and 
are beginning to bloom, the soil, being 
full of roots, is kept sweet, so it is not 
necessary to cultivate so often. 

Fumigating and syringing should be 
attended to. Greenfly and red spider 
must be kept out of sight. Nothing 
causes so much loss and annoyance as a 
good crop of these pests. 

Marketing and Varieties. 

Every grower has his own way of dis- 
posing of his stock. So far I have sent 
the bulk of my stock to the Michigan Cut 
Flower Exchange, except at a few short 
periods when I have relieved a glut, to a 
certain extent at least, by selling on the 
street; which method by some has been 
severely ridiculed, and by others upheld, 
as the only method that will satisfac- 
torily relieve a glut. 

I am at present growing Thos. W. 
Lawson, White Lawson, Variegated Law- 
son, Enchantress, Eose-pink Enchantress, 
Mrs. M. A. Patten, Nelson Fisher, Har- 
lowarden, Ethel Ward, Helen Goddard 
and two seedlings, one white and one 
red. Of these varieties I will discard 
M. A. Patten, Harlowarden, Ethel Ward 
and Helen Goddard, and will add to my 
list for next season Aristocrat, Beacon 
and White Enchantress. I have also 
done a little hybridizing, which every 
grower should practice, at least on a 
small scale; it keeps up a lively interest, 
gives one something to look forward to 
at all times and, perhaps, may result 
profitably financially. 



Westboeo, Mass. — K. O. Stockbridge 
& Co. have had a hard winter, especially 
since their boiler broke down in the cold 
snap in February. They were able to 
keep frost out by using oil stoves, but 
it has hurt later crops.^ 



,.p)i^i, 111. n.i.iwi.fw'.i-". »,'».»■..' ,p«'"- A"' «i-i "'.'.'' "w,'"',fv'W'!^«^P'^^|J'JlW^^W'w.;'^g^?M'i.'.,'^■ 



■^IF ■-'■»».■" »»*».-. (V* 



March 14, 1907. 



The Weekly Florists^ Review* 



1247 




H. Thadeot of Atlanta^ Ga^ in his Newly Patented Truss-roofed Greenhouse. 



MR. THADEN AND HIS HOUSE. 

The accompanying illustrations show 
H. Thaden, dean of the craft in the 
south, in one of his greenhouses at At- 
lanta, explaining the merits of his new 
truss construction to a visitor. In for- 
warding the pictures Mr. Thaden says: 

"We mail you today photographs of 
a greenhouse embracing our recently pat- 
ented equalizing truss. Perhaps you 
would like to make use of it in the 
Review, as it embraces something radi- 
cally new and different from all old 
methods at construction, eliminating not 
only the post supports for the purlins, 
but also any and all cross bracing, thus 
clearing the greenhouse of all obstruc- 
tion from floor to ridge. As you are 
aware, we were awarded a certificate on 
our modest exhibit last summer at Day- 
ton, and our invention was highly recom- 
mended by the judges. We thought you 
would no doubt like to show it up to 
better advantage than has heretofore 
been done, as we are one of your old 
patrons, ' ' 

PANSIES. 

The pansy is one of the oldest garden 
flowers and most popular. Every florist 
can sell quantities, put up in baskets at 
25 cents or 50 cents a basket, so the 
customer can readily carry them and 
plant at his convenience. In one of its 
widely circulated press notices the Na- 
tional Council of Horticulture says it is 
best for the home garden-maker to have 
in the spring pansy plants which his flo- 
rist has carried through the winter in a 
coldframe. The plants should be set out 
as soon as the ground is in condition for 
working. The only cultivation necessary 
is to keep the ground reasonably well 
stirred to prevent baking, and keep it 
free from weeds. The blooms should be 
kept picked closely, so the blooming sea- 
son may be lengthened. 

In favorable localities, where the soil 
is moist and not too warm, the seeds 
may be sown early in the spring and if 
thinned and the flowers picked closely 



will give a succession of bloom almost 
until winter. 

In rather warm and dry localities, sow 
seeds in August or September and trans- 
plant the seedlings to pots, or better, to 
a coldframe with good soil, where they 
may remain until cold weather, when they 
should be protected by glass and boards. 
They are best kept in the frames until 
spring, when the boards may be removed 
and the plants allowed to make early 
growth in the frames. 



STOCKS AND CANNAS. 

I have a fine strain of Cut-and-come- 
again stock and would like to raise my 
own seed. Please tell me when and how 
to fertilize the blossoms. I have both 
double and single. Which will be the 
seed-bearing parent? How are cannas 
hybridized? G. O. K. 

Presuming that there are no other 
colors or varieties of stock in the same 
house, there is no reason why you cannot 
secure some good home-saved seed. The 
single flowering plants are the ones 
which produce the seed. Bees and tap- 
ping the plants should sufficiently scatter 
tho pollen at this season. The plants 
must be left in the pots or benches until 
the seed shows signs of ripening, when 
they can be pulled out, the roots and 
part of the stems removed and the re- 
maining portion of the plants hung up 
in a dry, airy shed or room until the 
pods are all ripened. The pods show 
by their size and shape those which will 
give a high percentage of double flowers 
and all inferior ones should be discarded. 
Culture in pots of stocks intended for 
seed is desirable, for they can be moved 
around, whereas in benches the space, 
however valuable it may be, cannot be 
utilized for other crops until they are 
pulled up. 

A French method given by M. Chate 
is to place the plants in a position out- 
doors well exposed to the morning sun. 
When flowering, a number of shoots are 
nipped off, leaving ten or twelve pods on 
the secondary branches. All other 



branches made are carefully removed. All 
the sap goes to the few pods left and 
they average eighty per cent double flow- 
ers. The upper portions of the pod were 
separated, as they averaged eighty per 
cent single flowers against an equal pro- 
portion of doubles for the lower half. 

In Erfurt, Germany, where an im- 
mense business is done in stock and aster 
seeds, many of the choicer strains are 
obtained from plants in pots grown in 
sunny houses. The plants are watered 
only enough to keep them from dying. 
Thus treated the plants are weakened, 
pods shortened, seeds better ripened and 
they yield sixty to seventy per cent of 
doubles. 

Cannas for purposes of hybridization 
ought to be grown in pots. Place them 
in a sunny location in a temperature of 
55 degrees to 60 degrees at night. Use 
a small camel 's-hair brush to remove the 
pollen from the flower of one variety and 
touch the pistils of the future seed- 
bearing plant with it. Bemove all flow- 
ers not fertilized, allow the plant to pro- 
duce no more blooms and enclose the 
fertilized flowers with fine muslin to keep 
out bees and other insects to make sure 
that no outside agencies are at work on 
the flowers. It is best to enclose them 
from insects before they open. If fer- 
tilized during winter, sown as soon as 
ripe in a brisk bottom heat and grown 
right along, seedlings will flower the 
same year. Use celluloid labels to re- 
cord the cross. They will not decay, like 
wood or paper ones. C. W. 



Albion, Mich. — A. H. Dew will erect 
two new houses this spring. One will 
be a truss house 37x100, the other a 
carnation house 27x100. A retail store 
will be opened in a new building on 
Perry street. Mr. Dew has been at it 
twelve years. 

Waverly, Mass. — Vernon T. Sher- 
wood, formerly with Thomas Rochford 
& Son, the famous English growera, is 
now with W. W. Edgar & Co., in charge 
of the new houses here. 



ri'i •■tlittdimit^^-' 11 1 1 hi--— --•-»^- 



-*^*-' -^^ • 



-.^^r^T-1^4?-' I'" ■ f,^! I ii^ii«i^»^p!|fif^w.i'.''?vw»^if»iP!!P|ppij 1111.11 iiipawwiiipii/ . f^mf^i^f^^^^f^ • 



1248 



The Weekly Florists^ Review* 



March 14, 1907. 



THE JEWEL CASKET. 

One of the novelties is the jewel 
casket shown in the accompanying illus- 
tration. It looks as though it were made 
of heavy iron and as if it were very old. 
A few of the best stores in New York, 
Chicago and other cities have had it as 
an exclusive specialty and have found it 
sold well with such flowers as violets, 
the sizes being just right for this pur- 
l)ose. Now the Geller Florists' Supply 
Co., which states that it is sole importer, 
is sending the jewel box broadcast in the 
trade. 



PLANTS BY MAIL. 

[A paper bj- P. J. Lynch, of West Grove, Pa., 
read before the Florists' Club of Philadelphia 
March 5, 1907.] 

While the subject assigned me only 
treats of roses by mail, I shall neverthe- 
less take the liberty of extending the 
scope to the mail-order plant trade in 
general. At first glance it might seem 
that this subject is too prosaic to admit 
of much that is new and interesting, es- 
pecially to those not engaged in the mail 
order business. There is, however, much 
in common between the mail trade man 
and the numerous other branches of the 
florists' trade. 

The Pioneer. 

From the most humble beginning the 
mail order trade, beset as it has been 
with so many vicissitudes, has made mar- 
velous strides. Few of us realize the 
great work that is being done in this 
branch of our trade, a work that has 
brought untold advantages to everyone 
engaged in the florists' business. I can 
do no better than to repeat the opinion 
expressed upon a previous occasion, that 
your mail order man is the pioneer and 
pathfinder of the craft, and he has car- 
ried the gospel of loving flowers, es- 
pecially roses, and how to get them and 
grow them, to the most remote parts of 
the country, and, in a measure, has been 
the educator of the masses, those who 



He has had much to combat: First 
of all, the skeptical public in early times 
refused to believe that it was possible 
to send rose plants, or plants of any 
kind, safely by mail, particularly to dis- 
tant points. Then, too, in the beginning 
it would seem that the postal laws were 
framed with special reference to the mail 
order business, to prevent it from spread- 
ing to any material extent. Thirty-five 
years ago the rate of postage was the 
same as that of letter postage. No plant 
was allowed to bear a label, nor was the 
name of the firm sending the package 
allowed to appear on the outside. It 
would be hard to imagine a condition 
of affairs more discouraging than this, 
but the germ of the mail order business 
was firmly rooted, and the early pioneers 
kept after the postoffice department un- 
til these obnoxious conditions were modi- 
fied and placed upon their present basis. 
The efficiency of the mail service has 
been improved, and now we are allowed 
to send seeds, roots and plants of all 
kinds under the rate of the third-class 
postage, 1 cent for each two ounces or 
fractional part thereof. 

Postal Reforms Needed. 

While the postal authorities have done 
much to encourage the mail order busi- 
ness, there is yet ample room for fur- 
ther reform; in fact, with the annual de- 
ficiency in the revenues of the postoffice 
department it would seem that there is a 
great opportunity to place the depart- 
ment upon a business-like basis. Not 
until there is concerted action in the mail 
order trade will we secure such conces- 
sions as we should have, and could un- 
doubtedly get by unity of movement in 
this direction. 

While I will not cite the rates of the 
express companies as a criterion of all 
that is equitable and fair, yet in some 
respects they are far superior to our 
postal rates. For example, the express 
company will carry 100 pounds from 
Philadelphia to Pittsburg for 40 cents, 




The Jewel Case for Violets. 



are not in close touch with the large cen- 
ters of population where the rose, grown 
for cut flowers, can make its own appeal. 
He has been a factor in beautifying the 
waste places of our land, and the great 
work in which he is engaged has but 
commenced. 



while the postofiice department would 
charge $8 for 100 pounds of mail mat- 
ter. The express companies conduct their 
business upon a profitable basis, and 
even the railroad companies provide 
splendid accommodations for the public 
in the passenger traffic at a much less 



rate than they charge the government to 
carry the mails. 

It seems to me that mail matter, par- 
ticularly in bulk, should be carried with 
reference to the distance covered, just 
the same as passenger traffic or express 
rates. It might be urged that this would 
bring about a great deal of unnecessary 
confusion, but were the country divided 
into sections or by meridians, and have- 
a rate of postage to each section, it 
would not bring about any more con- 
fusion than is incident to the selling of 
railroad tickets or making express rates 
to various parts of the country. T he- 
question is one, however, so broad in its 
aspect that I shall not treat it further 
at this time, but it is a subject that 
might be carefully considered by the na- 
tional society. And, too, the matter of 
a parcels post system, similar ; to that 
in vogue in Great Britain, should be- 
sought after as a measure that would 
revolutionize the mail order business to 
a very great extent. 

Abuses in tlie Trade. 

I do not want to be classed among 
pessimists, but in these days of reform 
there is an opportunity to apply some 
of it to the mail order trade. Sending 
roses and plants of all kinds by mail 
and guaranteeing their safe delivery to 
any postoffice or express office in the 
United States is the fundamental princi- 
ple which has made the sending of plant* 
by mail no longer a risk from the pur- 
chaser 's viewpoint. 

Year after year large sums of money 
are spent in advertising and the send- 
ing out of catalogues, and the skeptical 
public has been won and has confidence 
in the mail order man; but in the en- 
deavor to still further increase our busi- 
ness there has crept in here and there 
abuses which should be eliminated. 
Through the trade papers there has been 
considerable discussion as to the advis- 
ability of giving premiums with every 
order. The practice is a pernicious one,, 
to my mind, and there is really no ex- 
cuse for it. We oppose the free distri- 
bution of seeds, but in our own business 
we do not oppose the free distribution of 
plants. There should be a flat price, a 
price that leaves a legitimate margin of 
profit; then the buyer*^ knows just ex- 
actly what he is getting and what he has 
to pay for. 

There are other abuses which could be 
easily modified which would add much 
to the moral tone of the mail order 
trade, such as misleading guarantees, 
which seem to grow more radical year 
by year, and the sending out of plants 
that are not true to name, which to my 
mind is one of the most damaging prac- 
tices which besets our trade. 

I am not an advocate of trusts and 
so-called community of interests, but 
there should be a common interest among 
those engaged in the mail trade to bring 
them in closer touch with each other and 
modify many of the abuses which have 
crept in. 

The mail order trade is one of inter- 
minable detail, and a visit to an estab- 
lishment at this time of year would 
prove a revelation to the novice. A cor- 
respondent, whose airy persiflage is al- 
ways heard above the roar and din of 
the battle, recently paid a visit to a 
mail order establishment, where he was 
shown upwards of a million small rose 
plants, being sent to nearly every state 
in the Union, and to foreign countries, 
such as China and ^apan, where, not- 
withstanding the trip of four to five 



7'«i^MpqP9|i!*P"*!^i9i^!''*^" v'.m'wm^mr^^mtf'r 'WP^^r^^^'^jww^iiPP'iW'lP'T^iPf^T'l'T^sip?'^^ 



March 14, 1907. 



The Weekly Florists' Review. 



J249 



weeks, they invariably reach their desti- 
nation in first-class condition. For a 
person who is never surprised at any- 
thing his astonishment at the vast 
amount of detail involved came in the 
nature of a real triumph. 

Nature Demands Novelty. 

Human nature enters largely into our 
trade, and it must be realized that to sell 
goods to an army of different individuals 
through printer's ink and to hold this 
trade requires, first of all, honesty of 
purpose and individual care for each 
and every order that is sent out. 

The mail trade man encourages the 
production of novelties, especially in 
roses, because each year he must have a 
leader in the different branches of his 
business, and nothing is so attractive as 
a new rose. There have been so many 
disappointments in the new roses from 
Europe that we must depend upon our 
own hybridizers; and for that reason it 
seems proper at this point to ask the 
earnest support for the American Eose 
Society, and encourage it by attending 
the forthcoming exhibition in Washing- 
ton. The demand for good roses is ever 
present. "We cannot secure too many 
Killarneys, Eichmonds, Golden Gates, 
Kate Moultons and new roses of these 
types. The hardiness of the hybrid tea 
class has brought about a revolution in 
amateur circles, because the planter of 
the north can have roses throughout the 
entire growing season and at the same 
time they are sufficiently h6,rdy to with- 
stand the rigors of the most severe win- 
ters. We should undoubtedly secure a 
greater variety of hybrid teas, and our 
exhibitors of new varieties should be en- 
couraged in every possible way. 

I could say much more with reference 
to the sending of roses by mail, but I 
fear that the details would, perhaps, 
prove tiresome, and I shall therefore 
draw my remarks to a close by thanking 
you for your patience and kind atten- 
tion. 



THE ST. LOUIS EXHIBITION. 

The St. Louis Horticultural Society 
opened its first spring flower show Tues- 
day afternoon, March 5, in the Masonic 
Temple building on Grand avenue. The 
exhibition in itself was very pretty and 
the society is to be congratulated on ar- 
ranging in such a short time so successful 
a show. 

The display of bulbous stock was fine, 
especially that exhibited by F. C. Weber 
and G. B. Windier. C. Young & Sons 
and Wm. Schray & Sons had two fine 
groups of plants in bloom. The booth 
put up by F. C. Weber was handsome, 
showing good taste in every way. C. 
Young & Sons also had a finely arranged 
booth. In the booth of the St. Louis 
Seed Co. there was a general display of 
seeds, bulbs and birds. The Koenig 
Floral Co. also had a booth made of 
smilax which was pretty. 

Theodore Miller displayed a dinner 
table Wednesday afternoon, which was 
tastefully arranged and attracted a 
great deal of attention. His floral bas- 
ket, which took first prize, was also a fine 
piece of workmanship. F. C. Weber and 
E. J. Windier also displayed handsome 
made up baskets. 

The E. G. Hill Co., Richmond, Ind., 
staged a vase of the new rose Ehea Eeid, 
through S. S. Skidelsky, which was ad- 
mired by all the visitors. Geo. A. Kuhl, 
of Pekin, 111., showed some good speci- 
men ferns and Peter Eeinberg, Chicago, 
a, new pink rose which came in for its 




P. J. Lynch. 



share of praise. Mr. Kill, of Eeinberg 's, 
was present with a large display of roses. 

C. L, Washburn, of Bassett & Wash- 
burn, Chicago, had a fine vase of No. 20, 
a new red carnation. 

The attendance was good throughout 
the three days and evenings, for society 
people were sent free tickets. The judges 
Avere Alex. Waldbart, E. F. Tesson and 
Andrew Meyer, Sr. The prizes were 
awarded as follows: 

Collection of plants in bloom, Wm. 
Schray & Sons first; G. B. Windier sec- 
ond; Koenig Floral Co. third. 

Collection of bulbous plants in bloom, 
F. C. Weber first; Wm. Schray & Sons 
second; G. B. Windier third. 

Fifty foliage and blooming plants, C. 
Young & Sons first ; Wm. Schray & Sons 
second; C. C. Sanders third. 

Specimen plant, Wm. Schray & Sons 
first on Kentia Belmoreana; Koenig 
Floral Co. second; C. C. Sanders third. 

Specimen blooming plant, A. Jablon- 
sky first, with a handsome Acacia arma- 
ta; F. C. Weber second. 

Six blooming lily plants, C. Young & 
Sons first, with longiflorum; A. Jablon- 
sky second; Fred Meinhardt third. 

Display of lily of the valley, H. N, 
Bruns, Chicago, first; Wm. Schray sec- 
ond. 

Display of pansies, E, J. Windier 
first; C. C. Sanders second. 

Display of violets, Wm. Schray & Sons 
first ; F. C. Weber second ; Wm. Winter 
third. 

Display of bulbous cut flowers, F. C. 
Weber second; no first. 

Display of carnation blooms, five vari- 



eties, twenty-five in a vase, Chicago Car- 
nation Co., of Joliet, 111., first on White 
Perfection, Eed Elding Hood, Aristocrat, 
J. A. Valentine and Enchantress; J. D. 
Thompson Carnation Co. second. 

Fifty white carnations, Chicago Carna- 
tion Co. first, on White Perfection; John 
Steidle second, on Lady Bountiful. 

Fifty light pink carnations, Chicago 
Carnation Co, first, on Enchantress; J. 
I). Thompson Carnation Co. second, on 
Evangeline, 

Fifty dark pink carnations, Chicago 
Carnation Co. first, on Aristocrat; J. D. 
Thompson Carnation Co. second, on Law- 
son. 

Fifty red carnations, J. D. Thompson 
Carnation Co. first, on Eobert Craig; A. 
Jablonsky second, on Cardinal. 

Fifty variegated carnations, J. D. 
Thompson Carnation Co. first; A, Ja- 
blonsky second, both on Mrs. Patten. 

Fifty carnations any other color, A. 
Jablonsky first, on Harlowarden; J. Stei- 
dle second, on Enchantress. 

Four vases of roses in four varieties, 
twenty-five in a vase, Peter Eeinberg 
first ; W. J. & M. S. Vesey second. 

Twenty-five American Beauties, W. J. 
& M. S. Vesey first; F. C. Weber sec- 
ond. 

Twenty-five pink roses, Peter Eeinberg 
first; W. J. & M. S. Vesey second, both 
on Bridesmaid. 

Twenty-five white roses, Peter Eein- 
berg first; W. J. & M. S. Vesey sec- 
ond, on Bride. 

Twenty-five red roses, Peter Eeinberg 
first; W. J. & ]\I. S. Vesey second, both 
on Eichmond. 



i 

1 

I 
'; 



4 



^ T'»i7^»r7';'^T^(!^™*f 



J 250 



The Weekly Florists'" Review* 



March 14, 1907. 



Twenty-five, any other color, Peter 
Eeinberg first, on Uncle John. 

Basket of flowers, Theo. Miller first; 
F. C. Weber second ; E. J, Windier third. 

Vase of flowers, F. C. Weber first; 
Theo. Miller second. 

There were many visitors in town. 
Among them were Leonard Kill, Chi- 
cago; Peter Olsen, A. F. Longren and 
J. D. Thompson, Joliet, 111.; A. C. 
Brown, Mrs. A. C. Canfield, Springfield, 
111.; C. L. Washburn, Chicago; Geo. 
Kuhl, Pekin, 111. ; A. E. Knowles, Bloom- 
ington, III.; M. Barker, Chicago; J. S. 
Wilson, Western Springs, 111. 

On Wednesday afternoon the society 
gave a dinner to all the members and 
visitors, at the Colonial Cafe. 

In the evening the society held its an- 
nual meeting and elected officers as fol- 
lows: President, Edward Mallenckrodt ; 
vice-president, Leonard Mathews; secre- 
tary, 0. G. Koenig; treasurer, Fred C. 
Weber. The society, it is said, will at 
once make preparations for a fall show. 

J. J. B. 



Special prizes were awarded to the 
following exhibitors for booths erected 
in the show: St. Louis Plant and Seed 
Co., Koenig Floral Co., C. Young & Sons 
Co. and Fred C. Weber. All the first 



display a large collection of Whitmani 
ferns, dracajnas, blooming azaleas and 
Philadelphia Eamblers. 



HOW ST. LOUIS LOOKED TO ME. 

The spring flower show at St. Louis 
last week was a decided success in my 
opinion. There were a number of novel 
features which were very attractive. The 
best feature was the beautiful appear- 
ance of the hall on entering. The first 
view the visitor got made the hall seem 
like an enchanted island, filled with flow- 
ers artistically arranged to blend their 
colors in a most delightful manner. 
This pleasing effect started the visitor 
o^ a tour of admiration around the hall 
and it accomplished a vast amount of 
favorable advertising for the flower 
trade in St. Louis. 

The exhibit of spring flowers was the 
largest and most complete I ever saw. 
The arrangement of tulips, daffs, hya- 
cinths and valley in baskets, pots, etc., 
decorated with ribbons and coverings, 
showed excellent taste, Mr. Weber's 
booth had a mantel decoration, a very 
handsome basket of roses and several 
vases all well done, which, with the ar- 
rangement of plants, made a fine adver- 
tisement for his business; Theo. Miller 



immense flower, four inches in diameter, 
well built and a peculiar dark wine 
shade in color. It is certainly a fine 
novelty. The Chicago Carnation Co. 
had a choice exhibit and Aristocrat 
showed up well. They had a vase of 
Witterstatter 's J. A. Valentine, a fine 
carnation of a color between Enchantress 
and Win^or that looks like a good thing. 
Tlie J. D. Thompson Co. had a good lot 
of flowers. A vase of Eobert Craig was 
exceptionally good. There were a num- 
ber of other good carnation exhibits. 
(Bassett & Washburn's i\o. 20 at- 
tracted its share of attention. — Ed.) In 
the roses, Peter Eeinberg had two vases, 
one of Chatenay and one of Eichmond,. 
with stems four to five feet long. We 
don't wonder the alderman has to keep 
raising the roofs of his greenhouses if 
he grows that kind of stock. The E. G. 
Hill Co. had a vase of its new rose,. 
Ehea Eeid, similar in color to the Amer- 
ican Beauty. The flower is very solid, 
though not as large as a Beauty. The 
stems and foliage were fine. The color 
appears a little dull at first, but we 
think if the plants were grown m our 
rich Illinois corn soil that the color 
might be brightened up a little. 

The welcome extended the visitors 
made one feel right at home and the 




A Bench of Enchantress. A House of Beauties Just Setting Bud. 

Scenes at George M. Kellogg's, Pleasant Hill^ Mo. 



and second awards carried a cash prize 
in addition to ribbons. 

Special mention was made of the fol- 
lowing: 

George A. Kuhl, Pekin, 111., exhibitor 
of four varieties of ferns, the most nota- 
ble of which were the Whitmani and 
Piersoni. 

The E. G. Hill Co., Eichmond, Ind., 
showed a vase of Ehea Eeid rose, a good, 
large flower on stiff stem. 

Bassett & Washburn, Hinsdale, 111., 
exhibited a vase of seedling No, 20, a 
bright red carnation, large size and good 
stem, 

A, C. Brown, Springfield, 111., showed 
a lairge vase of mixed carnations, con- 
taining a number of well-giown varie- 
ties. 

Heller Bros., Newcastle, Ind., showed 
three vases of carnations for exhibition 
only. 

Theodore Miller, St, Louis, a table 
decoration of yellow jonquils and violets, 

F, H, Meinhardt, fifty-seven varieties 
of cut flowers, 

Alex, Waldbart & Sons, a group of 
beautiful specimen palms. 

Vaughan 's Seed Store, Chicago, had on 



had a number of artistic baskets, vases, 
etc, and must have made a decided hit 
with the visitors. Another firm had a 
small "greenhouse" made of smilax and 
filled with plants and flowers, forming a 
novel and handsome exhibit. 

There were several choice exhibits of 
plants arranged for effect that were fine. 

J. S. Wilson, of Vaughan 's Green- 
houses, brought down two beautiful 
specimen azaleas and several other 
plants. Geo. A. Kuhl, of Pekin, had a 
fine show of bulbous plants and there 
were several exhibits of Japanese and 
Bermuda Easter lilies which were splen- 
did considering how late all lilies are. 

In the cut flowers the show of carna- 
tions was very good. A. C. Brown, of 
Springfield, had a fine vase of his new 
carnation. Gov. Deneen. Brother Brown 
is a sly dog and though a little deaf has. 
extremely good eyesight. He had deco- 
rated his fellow townswoman, Mrs. Ar- 
thur Canfield, with an immense specimen 
of the Governor and, as Mrs. Canfield 
was the "belle of the ball," it took the 
wind all out of the sails of the rest of 
us. However, the Gov. Deneen is an 



many courtesies which were extended us 
will cause us to always remember with 
pleasure the first exhibition of the St. 
Louis Horticultural Society. St. Louia 
is a good flower town, a city of well to 
do, appreciative people, and the exhi- 
bition cannot but have done much to add 
to the love of flowers. Thus it helps all 
in the trade and is worthy of all sup- 
port. C. L. Washburn. 



BOSTON. 

The Market 

There is considerable improvement in 
conditions as compared with a week ago. 
A good supply of flowers of all kinds 
is arriving, but stock cleans out much 
better. Wintry conditions still prevail 
and we have plenty of snow, altkough 
clearer skies have been vouchsafed to us. 
Eoses are in tolerably good supply ex- 
cept Brides, which are quite scarce. 
Beauties are in fair supply, but not in 
much demand, other roses and spring 
flowering stock having the preference. 
Eichmond, Killarney, ^ Wellesley and 



ij.4'ji. j\„.;. 



^'^piW^^Ff7^^"?'r'^in'''l"'"'»^^iT"'WWPBP|llPfWf^^ 



r '^.r,""^w **''yw, ^Htt-j-" tv~ - ;'-\-^ y^- - 



Mabch 14. 1907. 



The Weekly Florists^ Review* 



)25J 



Chatenay are all of good quality. Some 
fine Brunners come from one or two 
growers. 

Carnations are selling better. White 
ones are rather scarce and selling as 
well as the colored sorts. Violets are 
abundant, $2 per thousand seeming to 
be quite a general price, although good 
stock realizes up to 50 cents per hun- 
dred. Sweet peas are of superlative 
quality and sell better. Callas and Eas- 
ter lilies are also doing rather better. 
Dutch bulbous stock meets with a more 
ready sale. There is no special change 
in adiantum or asparagus, but hardy 
ferns promise to be scarce and dearer 
unless snow soon disappears. 

A good variety of pot plants is now 
arriving, including rambler roses, genis- 
tas, rhododendrons, bulbous stock, 
spiraeas, etc. The sale on these is im- 
proving somewhat. 

North Shore Jottings. 

A. E. Parsons, at E. S. Grew's, finds 
lupins an excellent annual for winter 
flowering in benches. His carnation 
house looked remarkably well. Enchant- 
ress, of course, took the lead, but Pat- 
ten, White Lawson and other sorts were 
all good. Fischer's Purity freesia was 
fine and preferred to all others. 



fine shape. Melons were still being cut 
from one house. These are now grown 
here the year around. The first lot 
of nectarines were just setting. In car- 
nations, Enchantress and its rose-pink 
and striped sports were all splendid. 
Lady Bountiful and White Lawson were 
also fine. A house of yellow and white 
antirrhinums was first-class and there 
were fine lots of sehizanthus, geraniums, 
cyclamens and other decorative plants. 
Lupins were found a fine bench crop for 
Christmas. A good many orchids are 
grown. One house is devoted to cat- 
tleyas and considerable batches of Pha- 
Isenopsis, ccelogynes, Vanda ccerulea and 
calanthes are grown. 

Alexander Shaw presides at Judge 
Wm. H. Moore's estate. The glass here 
is not extensive but divisions are devoted 
to roses, carnations, violets, bedding 
plants and stove plants. The carna- 
tions, as elsewhere, were very good. 

J. W. Duncan will address the North 
Shore Horticultural Society on shrubs 
at its meeting on March 15. 

At W. B. Thomas', where Mr. Con- 
nolly has charge, carnations again looked 
well, Lawson, White Lawson and En- 
chantress especially so. Nectarines in 
tubs were coming into flower. A house 
of grapes and figs was just being 



per magnate pale into utter insignifi- 
cance. Reading such articles will make 
the general public believe that seedling 
raising is a perfect Klondyke for the 
growers of the divine flower. 

Horticultural hall is this week given 
up to a part of Boston's automobile 
show. The spring exhibition, which 
opens March 22, promises to be unusu- 
ally interesting and attractive. Many 
entries are already to hand for it. 

Tom Butterworth, at the recent pres- 
entation banquet, proved himself a first- 
class poet. His verbal bouquets for the 
club ofl5cers past and present made the 
hit of the evening. Tom is one of tae 
few examples of the successfill orchid 
cultivator and poet combined we have 
heard of. 

William Sim visited A. C. Zvolanek, of 
Bound Brook, N. J., this week to see 
his new "creations" in sweet peas flow- 
ering. At Cliftondale the sweet peas 
are superb at present. 

There is only a small delegation from 
this section to the meeting and exhibi- 
tion of the American Eose Society in 
Washington. 

William isieholson is having a heavy 
sale for shamrocks. He grew some 50,- 
000 this season. 

"Some Bacterial Diseases of Plants, 











^-^^s^>i■i*' 






i»-^ J^^fr.^ 




The Momlng Cut from this Section. Mr. Kellogg and the Mule Going to the Train. 

Scenes at George M. Kellogg's, Pleasant Hill, Mo. 



At Dr. Sear's we noted some fine car- 
nation seedlings raised by the head gar- 
dener, Mr. Mitchell. One, a white with 
a 4-inch flower, quite took our eye. Nec- 
tarines here were just coming into flower 
and promised well. 

James Salter, at Mrs. Philip Dexter 's, 
has several divisions devoted to fruit, 
including grapes, nectarines and melons. 
In carnations Enchantress looked fine. 
Some nice seedlings were under trial. 

Two fine new houses, each 150 feet 
long and even span, are nearing comple- 
tion for W. S. Paulding. They are 
located some considerable distance from 
his other houses and will be used mostly 
for fruit and vegetable forcing. At the 
older place the gardener, P. E. Cole, has 
a nice house of carnations and good 
batches of cyclamens. Primula obconica, 
antirrhinums and other seasonable flow- 
ers were noted. 

At H. C. Prick's, George Wyness, 
gardener, the most extensive range of 
glass on the North Shore will shortly be 
started upon. A great deal of planting 
was done last season, including thou- 
sands of hybrid rhododendrons. 

At R. C. Hooper's everything was in 



started. Eoses fill one house and others 
are devoted to melons and a general as- 
sortment of useful plants for cutting 
and decorative effect. 

Various Notes. 

P. E. Palmer will open a discussion 
on carnations at the meeting of the 
Gardeners' and Florists' Club March 
19. A number of carnation experts will 
take part in the discussion. Exhibits of 
many of the newer introductions, as well 
as standard varieties, will be forthcom- 
ing and other attractive features are 
being planned. 

The Gardeners' and Florists' Club 
will hold a field day with W. W. Edgar 
& Co., Waverley, Saturday, March 23. 
Members and friends are invited to take 
the 1:30 p. m. electrics from Park 
street subway station for Waverley. Eas- 
ter flowering plants are the special fea- 
tures at this establishment. 

Peirce Bros.* new scarlet carnation, 
Governor Guild, was the subject of an 
exhaustive and highfalutin article in the 
Boston Sunday Post of March 3. It 
made the story of the Lawson carnation 
at the time of its sale to the Boston cop- 



Their Nature and Eemedies," was the 
subject of an interesting and practical 
stereopticon lecture at Horticultural 
hall on March 9 by Prof. H. H. Wetzel, 
Ithaca, N. Y. There will be no lectures 
on March 16 and 23, owing to the halls 
all being rented on those days. 

W. N. C. 



DUTCH HYACINTHS FOR EASTER. 

Will you tell me which are the best 
Dutch hyacinths, in different colors, to 
grow for Easter? C. W. 

Commercially, we consider single hya- 
cinths much more desirable than double 
ones. A few of the best of the several 
colors are: Single red or pink. Norma, 
Gertrude, Eobert Steiger; single yellow, 
King of the Yellows; single blue. Baron 
van Tuyll; single white, Grandeur a 
Merveille, Baroness van Tuyll, L 'Inno- 
cence. 

One or two fine double varieties are: 
White, Bouquet Eoyal; red. Bouquet 
tendre ; blue, Charles Dickens and 
Bloksberg; yellow. Bouquet d 'Orange. 

W. N. C. 



aj***..- ..l-^-.CTI-VJ-. ^^,.*^~ L. t.: '^ 



Y^-V* TT-- 'J''»'."'».1 



■ifV-IIM ff^>fl'J"|;F«<!::i 



^"''x^'T^;^7iT-^''w'iFn'^^ 



1252 



The Weekly Florists^ Review. 



March 14, 1907. 






ic printed "Wednesday evening and 
mailed early Thursday morning. It 
is earnestly requested tliat all adver- 
tisers and correspondents mail their 
**copy** to reach us by Monday op 
Tuesday morning at latest, instead 
of Wednesday morning, as many 
have done in the oast. 



CONTENTS. 

No National Flower Show 1239 

American Rose Society 1230 

— The Washington Meeting 1239 

I'resident Simpson's Address 1240 

Robert Simpson (portrait) 1240 

The Rose Grower's Ideal 1241 

E. Gurney Hill (portrait) 1241 

Easter Stock (lllus.) 1243 

Trouble with Sweet Peas 1244 

Seasonable Suggestions — Salvia Splendens.. 1244 

— Sweet Peas 1244 

— Polnsettlas 1244 

— Smllax 1245 

— Variegated Vlncas 1245 

— Lorraine Begonias 1245 

— Preparations for Easter 1245 

Carnations — Carnation Notes — West 1245 

— Experience with Carnations 1245 

Mr. Thaden and His House (lllus.) 1247 

Pansles 1247 

Stocks and Cannas 1247 

The Jewel Casket (illuff.) 1248 

Plants by Mall 1248 

P. J. Lynch (portrait) 1249 

Black Fly 1249 

The St. Louis Exhibition 1249 

How St. Louis Looked to Me 1250 

Scenes at Range of G. M. Kellogg (lllus.). 1250 

Boston 1250 

State of Business 1252 

The Death Roll— Mrs. Minnie G. Bunde... 1252 

— Arlene Ratekin 1252 

— Bartholomew Menke 1252 

— Lawrence Heinl 1252 

— William Griffin 1252 

Chicago 1253 

St. Louis 125G 

New Orleans 1257 

Philadelphia 1258 

New York •. 1261 

Trouble with Ferns 1264 

Vegetable Forcing 1265 

— Vegetable Markets 1265 

— The Last Crop of Lettuce 1265 

— The Grand Rapids Combine 1265 

Indianapolis 1266 

Springfield, 111 1266 

Want Advertisements 1266 

Seed Trade News 1268 

— Sampling 1269 

— Weather and Trade 1269 

— The Tulip Disease 1270 

— The Best Tuberoses 1271 

— Catalogues Received 1271 

— Types of Candidum Lilies 1272 

Newport, R. 1 1272 

Baltimore 1273 

Pittsburg 1276 

Pacific Coast— Portland, Ore 1284 

— San Francisco 1284 

Twin Cities 1285 

Nursery News 1286 

— Hardy Ornamental Shrubs 1286 

— Insects and Plant Diseases 1286 

Lenox, Mass. 1288 

Denver 1290 

Grand Rapids 1292 

Cincinnati 1296 

Washington 1298 

Greenhouse Heating 1309 

— Heating Two Houses 1309 

— Piping Two Houses 1309 

Toledo. Ohio 1310 

Detroit 1312 



E. T. Barnes, of Spencer, Ind., states 
that the dahlia growers of the middle 
states are talking organizing a dahlia 
society and invites correspondence from 
those interested. 

A PLANT peddler in Chicago has a 
miniature greenhouse on his wagon. It 
is worth its cost as an advertisement, to 
say nothing of the protection it affords 
his stock. 



There was from six to ten inches of 
snow over the north Atlantic states Sun- 
day, March 10, extending as far south 
as Philadelphia. 

Every florist should have a printed 
letter-head J many of the best houses de- 
cline to give wholesale prices to those 
whose requests do not bear this evidence 
that they are in the trade. 

J. W. Bakwell, whose fertilizer fac- 
tory was established at Leicester, Eng- 
land, in 1800, and located at Waukegan, 
111., since 1900, says a great many retail 
florists are doing a nice business in sell- 
ing his packets of fertilizer for house 
plants. 

In the Review of February 28 there 
were notes on a new race of peony-flow- 
ered dahlias. A. T. Boddington, New 
York, handles this novelty, although the 
editor did not know it when the article 
was published. Being wide awake, Mr. 
Boddington had in the next issue an ad- 
vertisement of these new dahlias, and, in 
fact, the Review had before the adver- 
tisement appeared received inquiries as 
to where stock was to be obtained. Ad- 
vertisers have frequent opportunity to 
turn to good account the interest in their 
specialties sure to be cteated by articles 
in the Review. 



STATE OF BUSINESS. 

Bradstreet 's Mercantile Agency reports 
as follows on the state of general busi- 
ness: 

* * Trade conditions continue to im- 



I enclose money-order to pay for 
last moiith's advertising in 



M 



also a change of copy. It pays to 
advertise'in the Review. 

WM. EHMANN. 
Corfu, N. Y. 
Feb. 27, 1907. 



prove. Dry goods, millinery, hats and 
caps, and, in fact, all wearing apparel, 
are in the forefront as regards activity, 
an early Easter making for an early 
opening of spring trade. In such lines 
as cotton goods, gome of which tend to 
further advances, it is not a question of 
procuring business, but rather one of 
making deliveries on orders booked 
months ago. 

"As regards manufacturing lines, it 
is the old story of heavily filled order 
books and of capacity being worked to 
the utmost, despite which deliveries are 
backward. Collections, though satisfac- 
tory in some lines, are, on the whole, 
backward, the tightness of money and 
the enormous volume of business out- 
standing being the main factors." 



Pittsburg has an all-night florist. 

The post-office department has re- 
scinded its recent ruling against detach- 
able advertisements and coupons in ad- 
vertisements and will shortly promulgate 
a ruling with regard to their permissible 
size. 

THE DEATH ROLL. 



Mrs* Minnie G. Bunde. 

Mrs. Minnie G. Bunde, wife of A. H. 
Bunde, St. Paul's oldest florist, died 
March 4, at her home, 162 Tenth street. 
The deceased had never known good 
health since the sudden death of her 
daughter, four years ago. 

Mrs. Bunde was born in Dunkirk, 
N. Y., and removed to St. Paul in 1868. 
She is survived by her husband two sons, 
William G. and Philip C. Bunde. The 
funeral took place March 6, from the 
residence. Interment was at Oakland. 

Arlene Ratekin. 

Arlene, the 6-year-old daughter of J. 
W. Ratekin, Shenandoah, In., died March 
4, of strychnine poisoning, a short time 
after taking some of the drug she had 
found in the house. When found she 
was dying, and although a pliysician was 
called immediately there was no chance 
of saving the little girl's life. J. W. 
Ratekin is a well-known seed merchant 
with a large establishment in Shenan- 
doah. 

Bartholomew Menke. 

Bartholomew Menke, an aged florist 
at Hope, Ind., is dead, having expired 
March 7, after a long illness. Mr. 
Menke was a native of Prussia, but lo- 
cated at Hope in his early manhood, 
where for a number of years he was the 
florist and gardner for the Moravian 
college. 

Lawrence Heinl. 

The passing of Lawrence Heinl at his 
home in Terre Haute, Ind., occurred 
March 1. He was born in Austria in 
1840 and came to America when x-x. 
years of age. He located in Terre Haute 
in 1863. Mr. Heinl was not only a vet- 
eran florist but also a veteran of the 
War of the Rebellion. Hfe was a mem- 
ber of the Nineteenth Indiana Battery 
and served with credit until wounded at 
Perryville, Ky., when he was honorably 
discharged. 

The funeral was conducted from the 
residence by the Terre Haute Comma nd- 
ery No. 16, Knights Templar; Morton 
Post No. 1, G. A. R. ; Eastern Star, 
Terre Haute Lodge No. 19, F. and A. M., 
also attended. Mr, Heinl is survived by 
a widow and three brothers: Joseph, of 
Jacksonville, 111.; George, of Toledo, O., 
and John G., of Terre Haute. 

Villiam Griffin. 

William Griffin, for years a member of 
the firm of Griffin Bros., of Frankford, 
Pa., died March 7 at his home, No. 4915 
Willow street, after a long illness. He 
was 58 years old and had lived in Frank- 
ford all his life. He retired from active 
business some time ago and spent several 

^ months in Europe in search of health. 

' He .was a member of the school board of 
the twenty-third section and a vestryman 
of St. Mark's P. E. Church. He was 
buried on Monday afternoon with Ma- 
sonic, honors. The services were held 
in St. Mark's Church. A widow survives 
him. ^ 






.-•' .-.li. V. 



^^^^TT^ff^'TWy'TT'^T'^f^^'^^r^^^^^^s^ '^ 



• r\ *■"-? ~~w '.' Tj"^ jf 



MabcH 14, 1907. 



The Weekly Florists' Review. 



1253 



LILIES 



For 
Easter 



We shall have a large supply off our usual good stock. Orders 

booked NOW we guarantee to ffill at the ffollowing prices: 

$15.00 per lOO; $I50.00 per lOOO. 



Send Today's Order to Amiing for 

CARNATIONS 

A large supply in all grades, including the finest 
lot of fancy stock to be found in the West. 
Especially fine Enchantress and Lawson. 
Plenty White (for dyeing) for St. Patrick's Day. 

BULB STOCK 

Plenty of Tulips, all colors, single and double; 
also Jonquils and Daffodils, Callas and Harrisii. 



Violets 



Doable and Single. Fine 
quality and lots of them. 



Sweet Peas 

Wliite and Pink. Splendid 
quality and a large supply. 



FANCY VALLEY ALWAYS ON HAND 



CURRENT PRICE LIST 

AMERICAN BEAUTIES Per doz. 

Stems, 30 to 36 Inches $6.00 to 16 00 

Stems, 20 to 24 Inches 3.00 to 4.00 

Stems, 12 to 16 inches 1.50 to 2.00 

Seconds 75 to 1.00 

Bridesmaid per 100, 4.00 to 12.00 

Bride " 4.00 to 12 00 

Chatenay " 5 00 to 12.00 

Golden Gate " 500to 12.00 

Richmond and Liberty... " 5.00 to 12.00 

Carnations, select " 2.00 

white and fancy " 3.00 to 4.00 

Miaoellaneons Stock 

Violets, N. Y. double " .5n to ^5 

singrle " .50 to .76 

Valley, select •' 2.00 to 4.00 

Callas per doz. 1.50 

Easter Lilies " 2.00 

Mignonette " .35 to .75 

Sweet Peas per 100, .75 to 1.50 

Romans " 3.00 

PaperWhites " 3.00 

Jonquils, Daffodils " 3.00 

Tulips, all colors " 3.00 to 6.00 

Green Goods 

Asparagus Plumosus, per string. .35 to .60 

■• " per buiioh, .35 to .76 

Sprengeri per 100, 2.00 to 5.00 

Adiantum " 1.00 

Smilax....per 100, 120.00: per doz. 2.60 

Ferns per 1000, 13.00; per 100. .30 

Leucothoe Sprays, per 1000,16.50; per 100, 75c 
Galax, green and bronze, per 1000, 11.00. 

per case, 10.000, $7.50 

Boxwood 35c per bunch ; $7.50 per case 

Subject to change without notice. 

Store open 7 a. m. to 6 p. m. Sundays and 

holidays closed at noon. 



E. C. AMLING 



The Larg^est, Best 
Equipped and Most 
Centrally Located 
Wholesale Cut Tlower 
House in Chicago. 



L 



32-36 Randolph St. 



Long Dlstsnee Telephones, 

1978 and 1977 Central, 

7846 Antomatie 



^ 



Chicago, III. 



Mention The Review when you write. 



CHICAGO. 

The Great Central Market 

The market was decidedly weak March 
6 and 7, but on Friday a large number 
of big orders for cheap stock for special 
sales served to clean up the accumula- 
tion in fair shape, and put a more en- 
couraging aspect on affairs. Monday 
always is a day which gives the whole- 
salers high hopes for the week. Ke- 
cently Tuesday and Wednesday have 
dashed these hopes, but the indications 
now are that the approach of Easter 
will have a stimulating effect. It may 
not be that the demand will at once 
increase appreciably, but already a re- 
duction in supply is noted. It is stated 
that this is due entirely to crops having 
passed their height, but for the next 
fortnight it may be expected that grow- 
ers will be bringing in nothing more 
than is necessary. They will, without 



doubt, do what they safely may to ac- 
cumulate supplies for Easter. 

Beauties are not abundant, but there 
is no great demand for them. While 
rose crops are slightly less than a week 
ago, the supply of better grades is 
slightly ahead of the demand, for the 
principal call seems to be for cheaper 
stock in quantity. The quality of roses 
is excellent with practically all growers. 

The receipts of carnations are not so 
heavy this week as last, but are fully 
equal to all requirements. One whole- 
saler stated that last week he handled 
more carnations than in any week in 
June last year. It is no wonder cheap 
sales are made. The crop of splits is 
lighter now and quality generally is 
all that one could ask. Enchantress has 
brought no more than good white in 
the last week and the prospects are that 
white the latter part of this week, for 
dyeing for St. Patrick's day, will com- 
mand a premium. The dealers in dye all 
report a large business. 



The receipts of violets have fallen off, 
but quality also has retrograded. It 
looks as though the sepson will end 
shortly after Easter. Prices are just a 
trifle better than last week; the top 
prices no higher, but the low prices not 
quite so bad. 

The crops of Eomans and Paper 
Whites are out of the way earlier this 
year than usual. Few now are seen. No 
great quantities of daffodils or jonquils 
obstruct the market. Callas sometimes 
go to waste. There now are plenty of 
longiflorum. Sweet peas are doing well. 
Valley is abundant. Some fancy migno- 
nette is selling well. 

(ireen goods would better be ordered a 
day in advance, if possible. 

Easter Prospects. 

The wholesalers have been busy can- 
vassing the Easter prospects. They find 
that most of the lilies will be ready; in 
fact, there are more plants that are a 
little bit early than there are which need 



»■ --}--.... ...•■... ...X-^- — -.- 



u,^.,-.^f^ 



■ii .^V 111 ■ I I i' 1 



\ ■: 



1254 



The Weekly Florists^ Review^ 






Mabch 14, 1907. 



Lilies for Easter 

Our lilies are better than ever this year and we will have a big lot just 
right for Easter. We will book now a limited number of orders at 
$15.00 per 100; $150.00 per 1000. Later market sure to be higher. 

All Cut Flowers Now in Sood Sopply 



LET YOUR 
ORDERS COME 



▲BIERICAN BKAUTIKS Per dos. 

Extra long $6.00 

80 to 36-Inch 4.00 

20to24-lnch 8.00 

16 to 18-inch 2.00 

Per 100 

Short $8.00 to $12.00 

Richmond, select, 86-in. stem. . . 18 00 

fancy 12 00 to 16.00 

Medium S.OOto 10.00 

short 4.00 to 6.00 

Maid and Bride, select, long... 10.00 to 12.00 
" medium 6.00to 8.00 



CURRENT PRICE LIST 

Per 100 

Maid and Bride, short 13.00 to $4.00 

Uhatenay, Gate, select, long 12.00 

" medium 8.00 

" short 4.00to 6.00 

Perle, Sunrise, select, long 8.00 

" medium and short 3.00 to 6.00 
Carnations, Lawson and white.. 2.00 to 3.00 
Select red. Enchantress, 

Prosperity 4.00 

Good Split 1.50 

Harrisii Lilies 20.00 

Freesias 3.00 to 4.00 



Per 100 

Paper Whites, Romans $3.00 

Valley, fancy 8.00 

Jonquils and Daffodils 3.00 

Mignonette, fancy, large spikes. 6.00 

Snapdragon, fancy yellow 10.00 

Plumosus Sprays, Sprengeri.... 8.00 

Strings 60.C0 

Smilax 16.00 

Galax per 1000, $1.26 

Ferns per 1000, 3.00 

Adi antum 1.60 

Tulips S.OOto 6.00 



Write or wire (or special quotations on large lots. Subject to change without notice. -■ 

POEHLMANN BROS. CO 



33-35 Randolph St. 



L. D. Phone 
Central 3573 



CHICAGO 



Mention The Review when yog write. 



hard forcing. Quality will be nothing to 
brag of in most cases. It looks as 
though good liUes might command a 
premium as Easter approaches but that 
there will be plenty others which wijl 
stand a long time awaiting a purchaser. 
Several of the largest growers report 
that they will be reauy with special 
crops of Beauties for Easter. Other 
stocit will be in about the normal sup- 
ply, but not in such heavy supply as a 
year ago, when Easter was two weeks 
later. 

Reinberg Changes Base. 

Several years ago Peter Eeinberg, with 
an eye to the future, bought a farm a 
couple of miles northwest of his present 
location and it has been understood that 
eventually he would remove his base of 
operations from the old stand, where land 
commands a premium. Arrangements 
have been made for a sidetrack and 500 
boxes of glass have been ordered for the 
start of the new range there. Plans 
have not been completed, but it may be 
foreseen that a big modern plant will be 
the outcome. 

Various Notes. 

The supremacy of the great central 
market and the possibilities which lie in 
united effort for the common weal were 
the themes Tuesday evening, March 12, 
at the banquet of the Chicago Commer- 
cial Association at the Coliseum, where 
2,100 business men, each with a pink car- 
nation in his buttonhole, attended what 
was undoubtedly the biggest banquet ever 
given in this country. The 250 waiters 
went on strike just as the guests were 
seated, but instead of giving in the 



diners repaired to the kitchens and served 
themselves, so the affair was thoroughly 
typical of Chicago. 

H. N. Bruns sent a display of lily of 
the valley to the St. Lojjis show last 
week and, as usual, took first prize. 

N. J. Wietor spent this week visiting 
Eichmond, Columbus and Cleveland. 

The wife of Duncan Eobinson, of E. 
Wienhoeber's staff, is ill in the Passa- 
vant hospital. 

The A. L. Eandall Co. this week re- 
ceived a large importation of German 
Easter novelties. They came just in 
time, for some of them have yet to reach 
the Pacific coast. 

Arthur Dietsch has sold the Winandy 
place to jfohn Becker, a lettuce grower 
at Evanston, who took possession last 
week. Zech & Mann handle the stock 
as heretofore. 

C. W. McKellar is receiving some nice 
spikes of the Beauty of Nice stock. 
They sell well. 

Joe Beaver is now with J. L. Raske, 
on Jackson boulevard. 

Bassett & Washburn have on exhi- 
bition some blooms of a longiflorum 
which Henry & Lee call the Togo lily. 
It is a longiflorum grown in the north 
of Japan and has a heavy texture and 
every evidence of health and vigor. It 
is to be regretted that the north of 
Japan does not produce liUes in quan- 
tity. 

E. C. Amling says one of his grow-' 
ers will be ready with a special crop of 
mignonette for Easter. 

Mons Olson is the latest addition to 
the staff at the store of the Poehlmann 
Bros. Co. 

George Eeinberg is almost ready to 



plant six houses of American Beauties. 
He expects to get at it the latter part 
of this week, rather earlier than ever 
before. 

N. C. Moore & Co. say their lilies will 
be better than usual this year and that 
they are now carrying them as cool as 
possible, for they are in ample time. 

C. M. Dickinson, at Hunt's, says that 
if the present demand for To-bak-ine 
products is any indication, the growers 
will have a strenuous time this spring 
fighting insects. He says the call for 
To-bak-ine comes from every corner of 
the country and is heavier than ever 
before. 

This is club night. It is hoped there 
will be a large attendance. 

John Sinner was at Joliet last week 
and was much pleased with the Condi- 
tion of stock with the Chicago Carna- 
tion Co. He says that Mr. Pyfer told 
him that by the end of the season they 
expect to have propagated half a mil- 
lion cuttings of Aristocrat. 

The Benthey-Coatsworth Co. is ex- 
perimenting with a cork linoleum table 
cover. It looks as though it would be 
just the thing for retailers to use to 
cover their work-tables. 

W, E. Wadsworth, at one time with 
Lange and later in charge of Muir's 
Forty-seventh street store, has gone to 
St. Louis to enter the employ of Fred 
C. Weber. 

Fred Sperry, of Vaughan & Sperry, 
says they are well satisfied with the 
quality of lilies and that theirs are 
plenty early. 

P. J. Hauswirth, secretary of the 
S. A. F., went to Philadelphia last Fri- 
day to be on hand for the executive com- 



Ak^kS^A LA ..«.'';..'ilk^<..<^:.L&iv^^.. l^Lji '^•^h n' i i*'f, ''irli', l ^n nn'liJli ilt,tk',h,^i 



. 1.,^ ■..■-— a.l./tiJ<i.^'- ■■ — -'■ -I- 



jMutuUi^nl^itiJtiMML 



Mliiipipimeqpi 



I. i.mij »^ III! ,^iu iipii ,1 ■..pi ii.'?nqppiii|pi|ppivRR9'iii'i,tP^ jtpf p<"yiu.>J4P9H ('fFTr-^r'7'7 



Mabch 14, 1907. 



The Weekly Florists^ Review* 



1255 



CHATENAY 



We have a big cut of this Popular Pink Rose, Splendid Quality^ 

RICHMOND AND MAID 

Send your orders for all stock In season; we have a full line. 



ALSO LARGE 

SUPPLIES OF 



CURRENT PRICE LIST 



AMERICAN BEAUTIES 



Per doi. 
$6.00 
5.00 
4.00 
3.00 
2.50 
2.00 
1.50 
Short $0.75 to 1.25 



Long stem. 
SO-inch.... 
24-iiidi .... 
20-inch.... 
18-inch.... 
15-inch . . . . 
12-inch . . . . 



Maid and Bride $5.00 

Uncle John 5.00 

Cliatenay 5.00 

Liberty 5.00 



Richmond 

Sunrise 

Perle 

Golden Gate 

Killarney 

Ivory. 



5.00 
5.00 
5.00 
5.00 
8.00 
5.00 



ROSES* our selection 



Per 100 
to $10.00 
to 10.00 
10.00 
10.00 
10.00 
10.00 
8.00 
10.00 
15.00 
10.00 
6.00 



to 
to 
to 
to 
to 
to 
to 
to 



Carnation* $2.00 

Valley 3.00 

Violets 50 

Paper Whites 3J)0 

Romans 3.00 

Callas per doz. 1.50 

HarriBii....per 100, 15.00 
Asparacfus Plumosus, 

per bunch .50 

Ferns per 1000 

Galax ** 



Per 100 
to $3.00 
to 4.00 



to 
to 
to 
to 



.75 
4.00 
4.00 
2.00 



to 20.00 

to .75 
3.00 
1.00 



WATCH FOR EASTER PRICES NEXT WEEK. 



PETER REINBERG 



i,500,000 feet of glass. 



51 Wabash Ave., CHICAGO 



Mention The Review when yon write. 



AND 



Sweet I 
Peas I 



I Best Roses 

j The Benthey-Coatsworth Co. 
I 



Also all other Stock In Season. We have large supplies of special fancy 
stock>nd should like to supply your needs. Book orders now for Easter. 



L 



Wholesale Cut Flowers, Room 202, 35 Randolph St., Chicago 



I 

J 



mittee meeting Monday and Tuesday of 
this week. Now he is at Washington, 
judging at the rose show. He will be 
home some time next week. 

Peter Keinberg's people all stand by 
Chatenay. They may be credited with 
the discovery of its commercial possi- 
bilities. 

One of the wagons of the George 
Wittbold Co. broke an axle last Satur- 
day while on the way downtown with 
three rush orders for retail florists. The 
plants were badly broken up. The Witt- 
bolds have some big decorations on this 
week, notably that of C. A. Stevens & 
Bro. and at the Altenheim, with a dozen 
smaller ones between now and Easter. 

It isn't quite true that Winterson's 
never close, but E. F. Winterson person- 



Mention The Review when yon write. 



ally is on duty from 7 a. m. to 8 p. m. 
every week day. 

E. E. Pieser, of Kennicott's, says they 
already are figuring on peonies for 
spring and expect to break all records 
for business done with them. 

P. C. Schupp, at J. A. Budlong's, 
says the correspondence about Easter 
orders has begun earUer than last year. 

Miss Hattie E. Carlson, on Jackson 
boulevard, is doing a nice business, and 
deserves it, for she is a hard worker 
and carries a good stock. 

Fred Lautenschlager, of Kroeschell's, 
was at Milwaukee last week and sold 
boilers to heat 90,000 square feet of 
glass. 

Killarney is beginning to give its 
spring crop with Weiland & Risch. 



They have sold out on young stock very 
quickly. 

A part of the troubles of the manu- 
facturers of greenhouse building mate- 
rial is in getting cars for prompt ship- 
ment. They all report orders received 
to date as being ahead of the business 
booked at this time last year. 

John Thorpe takes his pen in hand 
to tell the readers of the Daily News 
all about Easter flowers. 

There .have been many visitors in 
town this week, among them Axel Ag- 
gerholm, manager of the Mosbaek 
Greenhouse Co., Onarga, 111.; C. H. 
Chapin, El Reno, Okla.; Hermann Thie- 
mann, the dahlia grower at Belchertown, 
Mass., who is looking for a western loca- 
tion, and several others. 



S 



•trfia'iiiir'iiiiir^ I tMi'i irrr-if n i - i ^,^ 



•nm'.mi.! i't«inw.¥v^^,<itj^j^9mw'^!'Kwmmmiitw 



^'f^r'rmfimm9immm^f'mtirmmm!!^'ir^wr!fr''^^w9^f!Pfr^flfP^^^ 



1256 



The Weekly Florists' Review. 



March 14, 1907. 



Carnations 

Heavy receipts of all varieties. 

Good stock $2.00 to $2.50 per 100 

Fancy stock 3.00 to 4.00 per 100 



TILIPS 

Plenty of all colors ; common, $2.50 to 
$3.00 per 100 ; fancy, $4.00 per 100. 



LILIES 



VIOLETS 



In large supply for Easter. $15.00 per 
100, on orders booked now. 



Fine Single and Double, 60c to 75c per 
100. 



ROSES 



Lar?e cuts now on and prices lower. 
$5.00 to $10.00 per 100. 



VALLEY 



Abundant at $3.00 to $4.00 per 100. 
Fancy stock always on band. 



All Other Stock in Large Supply. If you can use special large lots of our selection, write, wire or phone for 
our Special Quotations. There is no one able to serve you better. Time to think about your Easter orders. 

VAUGHAN & SPERRY 

58-60 WABASH AVE., CHICAGO 



Mention The Review when yon write. 



COOL-GROWN 
LARGE-FLOWERED 

EASTER LILIES 

$15.00 per lOO; $I50.00 per 1000 

Book order now for Easter shipment. You have all to gain and 
nothing to lose in arranging for your probable needs now. 

WK ARE RKCKIVING DAILY GOOD SUPPLIKS OF ALL 
CUT VLOWKRS. GIVS US A TRIAL ORDKR. 

BOXWOOD OUR SPECIALTY 

E. F. WINTERSON CO. 

45-47-49 Wabash Ave., CHICAGO 




CURRENT PRICES 

BBAUTIES Per doz. 

30 to 36 inches $6.00 to tti.OO 

20 to 24 iDches 3.00 to 4 00 

12 to 15 inches 1.50 to 2.00 

Shorts 76to 1.00 

B08B8 Per 100 

Bride and Maid 16.00 to tlO.OO 

Richmond and Liberty v . 6.00 to 10 00 

Golden Gate and Uncle John 5.00 to 10 00 

Chatenay 6.00 to 10.00 

Klllamey SOOto 16.00 

Boses, our selection 6.00 

CARNATIONS 1.50 to 2 00 

fancy 3.00to 4.00 

MISCELLANEOUS 

Violets, double 75 

" single 60to .76 

Harrisli Lilies, doz., 12.00 to $2.50 

Callas " 1.60 to 2.00 

Valley 2.00.to 4,00 

Paper Whites and Romans 3.00 to 1^00 

Jonquils, Daffodils 8.00 to 4 00 

SweetPeas 1.00 to i;60 

Tulips S.OOto 6,00 

ORESNS 

Smllax StrlDffB per doz., 2.OO 

Asparagus Strings each, .48 to .eo 

Asparagus Bunches " .36 to .60 

Sprengerl Bunches " .26 to 60 

Adiantum per 100 1.00 to 1.60 

Ferns, common per 1000 2.50 

Galax, Green and Bronze " I.OO to 1.60 

Leucothoe Sprays •' 7.60 

Boxwood 60-lb. case, 7.6O 

Prices Subject to Change Wlthont Notice. 




Mention The Review when yon write. 



ST. LOUIS. 

The Market 

The market conditions were satisfac- 
tory last week. The retail trade, too, 
was good all over the city. Some of the 
large establishments say it was surpris- 
ingly large in all kinds of work. Among 
the downtown florists prices are low. 
Some claim they are disposing of some 
4,000 or 5,000 carnations every day. 
Those located in the central part and 
west end are also using large amounts of 
stock each day and at much better prices. 
One of the features of the market last 
week was that roses were more plentiful 
in all varieties, and the wholesalers re- 
port that from now on until after Easter 
they look for a large supply in almost 
everything. Prices are not so high on 
roses and carnations as they have been, 
only the extra select being up in price. 

Carnations are plentiful in all grades 
at all commission houses and the demand 
is large. Violets were not so many Mon- 
day morning. It may be that the grow- 



ers are holding them back for Easter. 
Bulbous stock is in large supply and of 
the finest quality. Callas and lily of the 
valley are too many at present. Dutch 
hyacinths are selling well, also Von Sion 
and tulips. Harrisii and longiflorum are 
scarce at present. More are looked for 
by next week. Smilax has a good call, 
also all other greens. 

Vixioiu Notet. 

S. S. Skidelsky, of Philadelphia, vis- 
ited Edwardsville and Belleville last 
week, calling on the trade at those places. 

Pierre Schneider, head man for the 
Oakland Floral Co., at East Kirkwood, 
reports that the company will put up a 
number of new houses for roses this 
spring. They made a grand success of 
carnations this, their first year. 

The Foster Floral Co. will move, April 
], from its present quarters to 612 Olive 
street. The new location years ago was 
occupied by the Jordan Floral Co. 

Frank Fillmore reports that he will 
give up growing roses after this year, as 



the surroundings are not adapted to suc- 
cessful rose growing. The big house will 
be put into carnations, as these are doing 
nicely in all the other houses. The grow- 
ing of market plants will also be don© 
away with. His retail store, a few 
blocks away, is now doing a nice cut 
flower trade. 

Beyer Bros, have a fine lot of blooming 
plants for Easter. Their bulb stock is 
grand. 

F. Meinhardt, father of Fred H. Mein- 
hardt, has been very ill but is much im- 
proved. 

Judging from the stock shown by our 
local growers at the spring flower show 
held last week, the local buyers will have 
a fine lot of blooming plants for Easter 
sales. 

The Florists' Club meeting for this 
week Thursday afternoon should be well 
attended. A great amount of business 
is to be transacted. 

George Waldbart's place is somewhat 
blocked up, owing to a large building 
being erected at the corner. But Mr. 



•BPPWwnjIpiiiiy^iLiw^.'jippjj.i^ifl!"! ,".! ■,wpiiP«,»i«i .^■K4ipjtiiivij!L|i |ij III, i 1 



March 14, 1907. 



The Weekly Florists^ Review. 



1257 



Cut Flowers for Easter 

LONGIFLORUMS for Easter, $15.00 per 100 

Plenty of fancy HUDSON RIVER VIOLETS; also fan^^^^ 
singles. Get our prices on Violets m 1000 lots for Easter. 

-' «- ■ 'hr. n«**^ri;ic *< 00 andSSOOperlOOfor 

fancy Murillo Tulips a'"p',?'S,%K'r K '■"' f^-^Y J»n<ri"ls. Daffodils K„«r. ,35 oo p.r i<k». 
La Reine and White Tulips ,»...e,..o<or=.,«r White L.lac - B.s.er...5.pe,...». 

A ^( oil v,-nfls before placing orders, as we can save you money on all kinds 
Write us for prices on large orders of all kinds Jf/^^^ P'^^"Vnest aualitv. 
of Novelties; also Roses, Carnations, Valley, Etc., of the finest quality. 

....EASTER NOVELTIES.... 



AUSTRIAN JARDINIERES,, very neat and pretty. 
BOHEMIAN VASES, in different shapes and colors, 

suitable for holding about a half-dozen carnations 

or roses. 
GliASS BOWLS and BASKETS, for holding violets 

or any other small flowers; very attractive. 



TIFFANY GLASSWARE, the best grade to select 

from . 

FANCY BASKETS, all kinds. 

CREPE PAPERS, the original Westphalia':Water- 
proof New Moire Two-toned, New Crinkled and 
Pebbled Pleated Crepe Papers always on hand. 



ALL OUR OWN IMPORTATIONS 



A. L. RANDALL CO. 

19-21 Randolph St., CHICAGO. ILL. 



Have you our Catalogue? Sent free on request. 



NOW BOOKING 



Easter 



LILIES 



Orders 



:bet ns hear from yon as to yonr 
probable needs, especially on 

WB shall have the g'oods— can compete with any honse on 
quality and price. Write us today. 

Plenty of all stock now in market except possibly Beanties. 
Quality fine and prices reasonable. 

E. H.HUNT 

CHICAGO, ILL. 



76-78 Wabash Avenue, 

I,. D. Phone 1761 



CURRKNT PRICES 
BBAUTIBS Per doz. 

30to36-lnch ^.00 to $.00 

24to30-lnch 4-OOto b.oo 

15to20-lnch 2.00 to 3.00 

8tol2-lnch 'X-r^--\'- 1-00 to *S0 

ROSES (Teas) Per 100 

Bride and Mai" '^'SS i° '{fJ-JS 

Richmond, Chatenay 6.00 to 12.00 

Golden Gate and Uncle John 6.00 to 10.00 

pgpjg 0.00 to o.UO 

Boses. our seiection , «, t« 9nn 

CARNATIONS..^, j^.^...;;;...;.;; l-gg to 2.00 

" extra fancy. 4.00 
MISCBIil-ANKOUS 

Violets, double -^5 

Violets, singrle • • • • ■ • • • • •»" 

Harri«il Lilies .;;;;;; P^f.^o^- ^ ^ ^^ f^ 

vaiily'::::::::::::: aooto 4.oo 

Paper Whites j^-"" 

Romans onntn inn 

Tulips ,?-SSi° fXX 

Daflodlle. Jonquils f-^io 4.00 

^-^eetPe^s ^^^^^ 1-00 to 1.25 

Smilax Strings P®'"Jl°?: ^-fll !° ^SS 

Asparagus Strings each .50 to .60 

Asparagus Bunches „ -^o to .m 

Sprengerl Bunches • " •; , nn 1 m 

Adiantum ;Sr imS \m 

Perns, Fancy .per 1000 , 3.00 

Qjjlax 1.00 to 1.50 

Leucot'hoe Sprays ••••• " 7.50 

Boxwood . . . per 60 lb. case, 7.50 
""qfTRJinnT TO MARKET CHANaw 



Mention The Review when yon write. 



Waldbart is making a fine show of cut 
stock and spring plants. 

J. S. Wilson, who Avas here last week, 
is still a bowling fan. He visited the 
bowling alleys where the florists bowl 
every Monday night. J. J. B. 



NORWALK, 0. — A new store was opened 
March 9 under the name of the Laible 
Floral Co. F. G. Laible is the manager. 
Cut flowers, pot plants and goldfish are 
•carried. 



NEW ORLEANS. 



Current Comment. 

Business is brisk in plants at the mar- 
ket. Cut flowers are in good demand. 
Our roses are abundant and good. 

O. Werner, formerly associated with 
F. & O. Ziegler, has moved over to J. 
Fonta's, opposite. 

At a meeting of the Society of South- 
ern Florists, held March 7, the business 
of the annual convention was terminated 



and after all expenses were paid Treas- 
urer Joseph Stockier reported a nice bal- 
ance in favor of the association, 

J. A. Ncwsham has purchased C. 
Hoist's place. The location is a choice 
one for business, being in the neighbor- 
hood of several cemeteries. No doubt 
in tlie hands of the new proprietor the 
place will prosper and tliat is the wish of 
his many friends. Mr. Newsham is re- 
ceiving his first consignment of orchids 
from Central America. m. M. L. 



I -■ t ■ ■ • f 



1258 



The Weekly Florists^ Review* 



Mabch 14, 1907. 



..CATTLEYAS.. 



Pink and White Spray Orchids. 



Phalaenopsis 



The Leo Niessen Co« 

Note otif new number. 

1209 Arch Street, 



WHOLESXLE FLORISTS 

Philadelphia, Pa. 



Open Irom 7 ». m. to 8 p. m. Our Service Is Unexcelled. 



Mention The Review when you write. 



PHILADELPHIA. 



The Rising Eastern Market. 

It is diflScult to give an accurate idea 
of existing conditions. The market is 
fair; possibly a little better than a week 
ago. Prices are excellent, when obtained, 
but many really fine fiowers deteriorate 
to lower grades through lack of active 
demand. Beauties continue extremely 
scarce, the price obtained being far in 
excess of that of any previous year in 
March. But it is doubtful if any of the 
gprowers is realizing as much from his 
Beauty houses at these fancy figures as 
he did in other seasons, when production 
was so much larger. The extra and me- 
dium grades are still conspicuous by their 
absence, though a few dozens can occa- 
sionally be obtained. Shorts are improv- 
ing. Bride, Maid, Eichmond, Liberty, 
Chatenay, Gate and Killarney are all 
very fine, especially the first three. But 
the stock does not average as high as 
listed quotations. Carnations have fallen 
in price. The quality is fine. Enchan- 
tress and white seem the best sellers. 
Bed is diflBcult to market. There is no 
demand for Lawson. Sweet peas are ex- 
traordinarily plentiful and many lots of 
really good flowers remain unsold. Prices 
are absurdly low. Valley is fine, and 
very plentiful. The demand, though ex- 
cellent, is hardly equal to the supply. 
Cattleya Schrcederae has made its appear- 
ance in quantity and is fine. Dendro- 
biums and spray orchids are also in evi- 
dence. Gardeni&s are deteriorating a lit- 
tle. Calla lilies are in good supply and 
Easter lilies are increasing in number. 
The situation in bulbous flowers is un- 
satisfactory. Many are wasted and many 
sold for a song. Curiously enough, greens 
appear to be selling better than cut 
flowers. Violets are not in especial de- 
mand; prices are low and irregular. 

Easter Plants. 
It is a recognized fact that the Robert 
Craig Co. has the largest stock of Easter 
plants grown in or near Philadelphia. 
Almost all its houses are devoted to pro- 
ducing blooming stock for this great 
church holiday. A visit to the place is 
full of interest. The staples, so to speak, 
are azaleas, Which fill house after house. 



THE Florists' Supply House of America 

Easter Novelties 

It will be a great Easter. Are you prepared? 

ABPFy CFA iinCC "• beautiful JAPANESE 
UntlBll Wbll IflUwWy AIR PLANT, very decorative. 

FANCY BASKETS— Our show room contains the FINEST collec- 
tion of baskets ever {fathered together, including many CHOICE 
NOVELTIES. DAISY HAMPERS. VIOLET HAMPERS. 

FANCY CREPE PAPER-PLEATED AND WATERPROOF, COMBINA- 
TION COLORS. FANCY POT COVERS, to fit pots of standard size 
FANCY TONE WARE VASES -Grecian, very choice soft coloring. 
POMPEIAN AND COLORED TONEWARE. LOOSE BAY AND 
MAGNOLIA LEAVES. JARDINIERES, FERNERIES, etc. 

H. BAYERSDORFER ^ CO. 

ourcataicue 1129 ArcH St., PHILADELPHIA, PA. 

Mention The Rerlew when yon write. 



They are chiefly in 6-inch and 7-inch 
pots, splendid plants, well furnished with 
buds. The timing is reduced to a science, 
so that it gives Mr. Craig little uneasi- 
ness. Next in importance come the lilies, 
which fill a couple of houses. They are 
stocky plants, well budded and in healthy 
condition. Spiraea Gladstone is probably 
the next most important of the blooming 
plants. The stock when I saw it was not 
suflSciently advanced for one to be able 
to tell just how they would look when 
finished, but Mr. Craig's skill, and the 
good qualities of this sterling variety 
make it easy to guess that they will be in 
fine shape before these lines see print.- 
English hawthorn was one of the novel- 
ties that interested me greatly. A lim- 
ited quantity is grown to good sized 
specimens. Among the roses, great in- 
terest centers in Lady Gay and Dorothy 
Perkins, which are this season made spe- 



cialties alongside the well-known Crimson 
Rambler. All three varieties were nicely 
set with buds, giving promise of fine 
specimens before Easter. A house that 
interested me very much was filled with 
daisies; Queen Alexandra was there in 
fine form, and opposite to it Nicholson's 
Pride, a long-stemmed variety, more use- 
ful for cut flowers than the Queen, but 
less shapely for pot culture. Hydrangea ' 
Otaksa, genistas, and bulbous flowers 
complete an assortment that is worth go- 
ing a long way to see. Mr. Craig is, as 
is well known, making a specialty of 
Ficus pandurata, which he does in fine 
shape. Gardenias are also an interesting 
specialty here. 

Various Notes. 

H, Bayersdorfer & Co. are expecting 
large shipments of Easter stock by the 
steamers Arcadia, Marquette and Me- 



March 14, 1907. 



The Weekly Florists' Review* 



1259 



VALLEY 



The Finest in America 
$3.00 and $4.00 per 100 



Choice ESSTER Plants 



AZALEAS. $1.00, $1.25, $1.50, $2.00, $3.00, $5.00, $7.50, 
$10.00, $12.50: lO-in. pans, $3.50, $5.00. 

BOUGAIN VILLEA. specimens, $7.50, $16.00, $20.00, $25 CO. 

CRIMSON RAMBLERS, $1.00, $1.50, $2.00, $2.50, $3.00, 
$4.00. 

LILIES, plants, medium quality, choice, 12c. 

*' cut, medium quality, choice, 15c. 
SPIRAEA JAPONICA, 54.00, $5.00 per doz. 



SPIRAEA GLADSTONE, 7-in. pots, 50c each; 10-in. pans, 

$1.50, $2.00 each. 

FARLKYENSE, plants, 5-in„ $1.00, $1.50; 6-in„ $2.00; 7-in., 
$3.00. 

PANDANUS VEITCHII, 6-in., $1.00; 8-in., $2.00. 

SCOTTII FERNS, 5-in., 35c ($3.50 per doz.); 6-in., 50c; 

8-in., $1.00; 12-in., $3.00; 10-in. pans, $1.50, $2.00; 12-in, 

pans, $3.00. 



S. S. PENNOCK-MEEHAN CO. 

THE Wholesale Florists of PHILADELPHIA, 1608-1618 Ludlow St. 






Mention The Review when you write. 



DAHLIA ROOTS 

These are larg^e, well developed, divided field 
clumps from w^hich plenty of stock can be propa- 
g^ated and an abundance of blooms cut. 



DOUBLE DAHLIAS 

Admiral Dewey. Bleb purple. 

Adolf Peffehorn. Purplish crimson. 

Aleta. Blush pink, tipped darker. 

Arabella. PrlmroBe sbd, pink and lavender. 

Bine Oban. Lavender blue. 

Camelia Alba. Pure white. 

Chang. Striped crimson. 

Electric. Soft rosy magenta. 

Klegrans. Rosy purple, tipped white. 

Fern Leaved Beauty. W., striped crimson. 

Flora Nova. Bleb purple. 

Gen'l Grant. Yellow, striped crimson. 

Georee Smith. Larg-e crimson. 

Frank Goodman. Purple, tipped white. 

Gilt Edee. White, margined deep gold. 

Hero. Deep crimson, shaded purple. 

Hercnlea. Red, penciled yellow. 

Jamaica. Purple, tipped white. 

John £litch. Deep crimson. 
Jas. Stephens. Orange scarlet. 
Jndah. Yellow striped, crimson. 

Japan Pink. Deep pink. 

Jas. Vick. Bich plum color. 

Jambo. Bich crimson. 

Keystone. Pink, striped crimson. 

Kynerith. Bed, margined maroon. 

I.emon Giant. Pure Lemon. 

l.ady G. Herbert. White, tipped purple. 

I.ady Jane Ellis. Pinkish white, veined 

purple. 
I.eiberheimer. Crimson, tipped white. 
Mainiifioent. Dwarf, yellow. 
Maid of Kent. Cherry red, tipped white. 
Bfargaret Bell. Soft purple. 
Model of Perfection. Peep rose. 
Miss Cannell. White, suffused pink. 
MissDodd. Pure yellow. 
Mrs. Dexter. Bich salmon. 
Mrs. Keith. Primrose, overlaid pink. 
Prince Bismarck. Bich plum color. 
Paul's Scarlet. Brightest scarlet. 
Queen of the Yellows. Clear yellow. 
Qneen Victoria . Deep yellow. 
Knby Queen. Yellow, tipped red 
Rudolph Knhl. Maroon, tipped white. 
Ronald. Bich orango. 
Sport. A. clear lavender. 
Stanley. Yellow, tipped red. 
Triomphe de Solferino. Bright solferlno. 
Yeridtflora. Green flowers, a curiosity. 
Wm.Agnew. Dazzling scarlet. 

PBICE-Of any of the above in strong 
roots 10c each; per doz , $1; $8 per 100. 



CACTUS DAHLIAS 

Arachne. Crimson striped white. 

Aunt Chloe. Bich black maroon. 

Aegir. Cardinal red. 

Atlanta. Bright rich red. 

Bridesmaid. Primrose, shading pink. 

Bertha Blawley. Scarlet, overlaid crimson. 

Countess of Lonsdale. Salmon pink. 

Capstan. Orange shaded red. 

Dankward. Dark rose. 

Earl of Pembroke. Plum colored. 

Hohenzollern. Bich red. 

Keynes White. Pure white. 

Kreimhilde. Pmk suffused white. 1.5c each; 

dozen $1 50; $10.00 per 100. 
Mrs. J. J. Crowe. Clear light yellow. 
Mrs. Jowett. Orange red. 
Progenitor. Bright carmine. 
Porcupine. Deep crimson. 
Primrose Dame. Primrose yellow. 
Rosenhagen. Salmon rose. 
Ranji. Maroon, base white, suffused red. 
Standard Bearer. Fiery scarlet. 

Price of any of the above cactus dahlias 
(except where noted) in strong roots, 10c 
each; per dozen $1.00; $8.00 per 100. 

DAHLIAS OF SPECIAL MERIT 

Brunhilde. Plum color. 

« atherine Dner. Crimson scarlet. 

Bloise. Blush pink shading to white, petals 

margined crimson. 
Eureka. Deep rose. 
Habriel. White, edged crimson. 
Gen'l Bnller. Bed, tipped wi ite. 
Oracle. White suffused blush. 
J. H. Jackson. Crimson maroon. 
, Miss Grace Cook. Deep rose. 
Mrs. H. J. Jones. Bich scarlet. 
Olympia. Bose pink, spotted rich crimson. 
Profrress. Bose penciled crimson. 
Sylvia. White shaded pink. 
Storm King. Pure white. 
The Fairy. Soft rose, profuse. 
Venus. A pompon cactus type, pure white. 
Volker. Pure yellow. 

Price of any of the above in strong roots, 
15c each; per doz.. $1 50; $10 00 per 100. 



In our Florists' Wholesale Catalogue we offer a 
complete list of Dahlias. Write for a copy. 



HENRY F. MICHELL CO. 



1018 Market St. 
Philadelphia, Pa. 



nominee. The last named, it will be re- 
membered, ran aground in the English 
channel. Fortunately it got oflf in good 
shape. 

The Leo Niessen Co. is receiving some 
fine Cattleya Schroederae, which are a 
welcome addition to the list of orchids. 

William GriflBn, formerly of Griffin 
Bros., Frankford, Pa., died last week and 
was buried on Monday, March 11. 

The Philadelphia Florists' Club ten- 
dered a banquet to the executive commit- 
tee of the S. A. F. in Horticultural hall 
Tuesday evening, March 12. 

A. M. Campbell will handle a splendid- 
ly grown lot of Easter lilies from Henry 
I. Faust, of Merion. Mr. Faust's skill 
as a grower of choice lilies is too well 
known to need further words. 

C, H. Twinn, of the King Construction 
Co., Tonawanda, N. Y., is in this city ar- 
ranging for the two large houses to be 
built for Victor Groshens, at Eoslyn, Pa. 
He has also secured orders for two 
houses 28x150 and 25x150 from Dr. Wil- 
son, of Art Museum fame, at Hoyt, Pa., 
and from William Munro, for one house 
35x150 at Garrettford, Pa. 

Alex. B. Scott returned from the south 
this week. His friends hope he is en- 
tirely well again. 

Wm. Jurgens, of Newport, E. I., was 
a visitor in this city Monday. Mr. Jur- 
gens says that it is his first holiday in 
five years. 

Among those present at the March 
meeting of the Florists' Club were P. J. 
Lynch and Edward Parker, West Grove; 
John E. Haines, South Bethlehem; F. H. 
Kramer, Washington; C. H. Twinn, 
Tonawanda, and a genial young man rep- 
resenting Benj. Hammond, Fishkill-on- 
the-Huuson. 

February was the busiest month in the 
history of M. Eice & Co. 

P. J. Hauswirth brought his son with 
him to this city on Monday. 

Mrs. Sarah I. Smith and E. C. Smith, 
of Secane, were visitors at the establish- 
ment of the S. S. Pennock-Meehan Co. 
this week. Their violets continue fine. 

Edward Eeid has many duplicate or- 
ders for Easter plants. 

Philip Freud wisely decided that this 
was not the year for suggesting to the 
flower-loving public that they plant their 



"^wji », w'i'*'Ta? ' 



1260 



The Weekly Florists^ Review* 



liABCH 14, 1907. 



,^, EASTER OF 1907„, 

WK INVITK INSPKCTION OF OUR 

Azaleas Daisies, Rhododendrons, 

Hydrangeas, "y''"^ ^^^^^' Gardenias, 

•^Ljlj^^ Pink Ramblers, S&%rk.„.. Ferns, 

Crimson Ramblers, Genistas. Tulips, Pots and Pans. 

Also the New Violin Rubber Plant, FICUS PANDURATA. 

COMK AND LOOK US OV.B — ™CE: LIST ON APPOCATION. 

ROBERT CRAIG CO. 

49th and Market Streets, PHILADELPHIA, PA. 



J 



Mention The Review when you write. 



sweet peas on St. Patrick's day. In- 
stead L arranged a beautiful wxn^ow 
suggestive of spring. It was filef^itb 
litd! sprouting bulbs cherry treesin 

::!=^^-L.«eslieC!^ 

Horticultural Society was l^^g^jj /;' 
tended. Dr. Kobert A Huey gave a 
most interesting rose lecture which j as 
beautifully illustrated by l^^t^rn slides 
Among the exhibitors were Edward 
Towm! Samuel Batchelor, Charles Davis 

'"chaSeTs. Ford was called borne from 
Cincinnati last week by the sad death 
of his daughter, Miss Charlotte M Ford 
who was burted Saturday, ^iss Ford 
was a stenographer at Henry F. Jf^«^ 
ell's. She was stricken with appendicitis 

wliile at work. Mr. Ford ,>« ««^ ^^■ 
tained at home by his wife's ^ondit^n. 
TMs is the fifth time in four years Mr 
FoJd has been recalled from the road by 
death in the family. 

Answers to Correspondents. 

Review readers are invited to se„.^ ^-.ynue^^^ 
tlons relating to <;;ilt«'re oi "'«'^^Vl in <-are of 
and flowers n P/'Ha^^'P'''^^ conTmission Houses. 

aulrv but will not l)e published. 

78 -Will you aid in forming growers 
association? 'Our aim will be to secure 
better prices for our cut flovvers We be 
lieve that the wholesa ers ^ave not se 
cured an advance in prices proportionate 
to the increased cost of production this 

'^ Ans'-Four years ago I did everything 

• \.r. +r. nrlvance the interests of 

in my power to advance ino ^ 

the Flower Market, believing that to be 

to the best interests of the profession. 1 

am now satisfied that the growers cannot 

b^ combined as a unit. ^ The wholesaler 

offer today the most satisfactory means 

for distributing flowprs in this c^y.^^ 



r 



Last Call for Advertising Copy 



FOR THE ANNUAL 



SPECUL SPRING NUMBER 




For Easter, 1907 

To be issued on MARCH 21 

IT WIIX BE IN KBEPIMO WITH THE BEST PREVIOUS SPECIAI. 
ISSUES OF THE REVIEW, AND THAT'S "ENOUGH SAID." 

AdTtfTttaers ^ho ^sh to avail themsalves of this opportunity 
for pottlnff ttaelr speolaltlea belore tho WHOLE trade slioald 

SEND COPY AT ONCE 



SOUTH BEND, IND.-Irving Ging'";^'. °f 
the South BeAd Floral Co. ^^jf^J 
the new retail store into S^^f^lf^l^^f 
refrigerator show window has been built 
A card system of accounting has been 
adopted. 



JMANCHESTER, MASS. 

The North Shore Horticultural Soci- 
ety held its regular meeting March 1. 
W. B. Jackson was elected president pro 
tern. M. J. Callahan was elected a mem- 
ber of the society. The subject dis- 
cussed was "Annuals Suitable for Forc- 
ing. " A. E. Parsons was awarded a 
certificate of merit for a vase of lupi- 
nus. Mr. Parsons recommended growing 



■:* 



lupinus for cut flowers. With a night 
temperature of 50 degrees to 55 degrees, 
seed sown in benches the early part of 
.September will produce flowers for cut- 
ting by Christmas, and with feeding and 
ordinary treatment several crops of cut 
blooms can be secured. J. W. Duncan, 
assistant superintendent of the Boston 
park department, will speak at the next 
meeting. ^ W. T. 



_J 



•^mpfp^iH^ipiiiiiiii ,^r"T 



Mabch 14, 1907. 



>7^Rj(fl|pw!T!r''7'v»^*^-'" ''^ ■' ^^v?»Tr 



The Weekly Florists^ Review* 



1261 



Head quarteis for Easter Plants 

E have a Saperb Stock of all the Leading Va- 
rieties of Easter Plants in splendid condition, 
which will be shipped direct from our Nurseries 
to purchasers, lightly and carefully packed. 

Order Early as the Stock is Limited 
QUALITY GUARANTEED 




EDWARD REID PH^A^lLPmA'pA. 

Wholesale Florist. Everything Seasonable in Cut Flowers. 



Mention The Review when you write. 



NEir YORK. 



TheMaricet 



History repeats itself sometimes. It 
has been exactly nineteen years since 
the great blizzard knocked out New 
York. The anniversary -was a repetiton 
of the storm on a smaller scale. All 
day Sunday and far into the night the 
beautiful came down, but next Friday 
the ground-hog prediction will have been 
fulfilled and the winter over. Judging 
by the opening of the week, it might 
last a month longer and yet Easter is 
only a little more than a fortnight 
away. Little enough time to prepare for 
the great festival. 

The sunlight of the latter part of 
last week filled everyone with hope. A 
few more days like Saturday and there 
will be no further complaint of short 
supply of roses. In fact, the growers 
now assert that there will be enough and 
to spare of everything for Easter and 
that prices cannot advance to unrea- 
sonable figures. Just now 40 cents 
looks large for violets and thousands of 
fresh ones go at 25 cents per hundred. 
Over the cleaning up process the morn- 
ing after it is better to cast the veil of 
silence. Anybody could have afforded 
a pall of violets last week. There was 
not a funeral piece made that did not 
have violets in it. Most of the designs 
were- violet wreaths and crosses and on 
the streets the Athenians certainly did 
their share in popularizing the modest 
flower. . 

The street merchants were offering 
valley in large quantities Saturday. The 
best was sold no higher than $2 and fine 



stock fell to $1.50. Narcissi were every- 
where. The outdoor display made the 
corners of the principal streets very 
springlike. 

Carnations show no improvement in 
price, though the quality grows con- 
stantly better. On Saturday the green 
carnation will close its career. At best, 
it is a mongrel, but there must be a 
call for it else the supply houses would 
not dispose of such quantities of dye. 

All roses, except Beauties, displayed a 
downward tendency last week and yet $3 
per hundred was about the bottom for 
the shortest. The best American Beau- 
ties held strong at $9 per dozen. They 
may double this for Easter if the short 
supply continues. 

With such a supply of blooming- 
plants as is already assured there can 
be no abnormal rise in cut flower prices 
and the picklers, if there be any left, 
will get what they deserve. It won 't 
pay this year to ship aged goods of any 
kind to the New York market. 

Club Meeting. 

The club meeting Monday evening was 
one of the best. Over fifty members were 
present and many visitors. President 
Totty occupied the chair. Mr. Sheridan 
made the report for the dinner commit- 
tee. The outing committee announced 
progress, with a palatial steamer secured 
and the date fixed, July 2, for the sum- 
mer festival. A motion to appropriate 
$100 for contests at the outing, after a 
discussion participated in by Messrs. 
O'Mara, Atkins, Weathered, Scott, Gutt- 
man and others, was defeated. Four gen- 
tlemen proposed at the last meeting were 
elected to membership and Messrs. Geo. 



Baldwin and Mr. Bolles were proposed. 

Mr. Wallace, in behalf of the club, 
presented a handsome diamond pin to the 
retiring president, Mr. John Scott, as a 
token of the appreciation of his fellow 
members and a tangible recognition of 
his faithful service. Mr. Scott was com- 
pletely surprised and spoke feelingly of 
the loyalty and appreciation of the club 
during his occupancy of the chair and of 
the pleasure it had afforded him. 

The resignation of John J. Phelps was 
accepted with regret. 

Julius Koehrs, Jr., the recently elected 
trustee of the club, made his maiden ad- 
dress, promising devotion and good 
service and expressing apijreciation of 
the honor. 

A. J. Guttman proposed that the board 
of trustees and the oflScers of the club 
be empowered to devise ways and means 
for providing a suitable home for the 
club. He was seconded by P. O'Mara 
and by President Totty, whose ambition 
is the comfortable and permanent hous- 
ing of the club during his incumbency. 
C. B. Weathered also spoke in behalf of 
the enterprise. 

John Birnie gave a practical and in- 
teresting address on * * The Needs of New 
York as Regards a Plant Market, in 
which he referred to the remissness of 
the city and the "crying need" of a 
market in New York, declaring it is 
of vital importance to the florists' busi- 
ness and dwelling upon the missionary 
influence of plants in every household. 
He said 10,000 square :^eet of space is 
needed and a place where seasonable 
plants can be displayed and sold all the 
year around. 



"- -■ <- ■■-■'j i ^ —- 'f'-y.>,lm. J.1 \ 1^ »l.. .^ j.»<...j-„ 



^1. bA^.U.. 



'vvy ^»'^',".;'T 



/'i^, •■"S^'vtpTT •"KS^e ''* w^^swjy*:*! 



1262 



The Weekly Florists' Review* 



March 14, 1907. 



WILD SMILAX 



Large supply constantly on hand. 

Fine quality. 

Large cases, only $5.00. 

The only it«m we see soaroe Is American Beantles. Send as your 
orders for all ont flowers in season. 

Kennicott Bros. Co. 

WHOZiBBAIiE COmCISSIOV FIiOBISTS 

CHICAGO 



40-42-4.4 Randolph Street, 

li. D. Phone, Central 466. 



CURRENT PRICES 

BBAUTIBS Per doz. 

30toS6-inch $6.00 to $0.00 

24to28-lnch 8 00 to 4.00 

15 to 20-inch 1.60 to 2.00 

8tol2-inch 50to 1.00 

SJiorts .76 

BOSBS (Teas) Per 100 

Bride $6 00 to $12 00 

Maid 500to 10.00 

Richmond O.OOto 12.00 

Oolden Gate and Uncle John 6.U0 to 10.00 

Chatenay 6 QO to 12.00 

Roses, our selection 5.00 

CARNATIONS 1.60 to 2 00 

fancy . 3.00 

" extra special.... ^ 4.00 
MISCELLANBOUS 

Violets, double or single 60 to 1 .00 

Harrisii lillies per doz. 1.60 to 2.00 

Callas " 1.60to 200 

Valley S.OOto 4.00 

Romans 3.00 

Tulips 3.00to 4.00 

Daffodils, Jonquils 8.00 to 4.00 

GREBNS 

Smilax Strings per doz. 2.00 to 3.00 

Aspararus Strings each .40 to .60 

Asparagus Bunches " .86 to .60 

Sprengeri Bunches *' .36 to .60 

Adiantum per 100 l.OOto 1.60 

Ferns, common per 1001 2. 60 

Galax " l.OOto 160 

Leucothoe Sprays per 1000, green, .76 

Leucothoe Sprays " bronze, 1.00 

SUBJECT TO MARKET CHANGE. 



J 



Mention The Reylew when yon write. 



A, Jaenecke, of Floral Park, spoke of 
the fine plant markets in the large cities 
of Europe and declared it shameful that 
New York should be without one. Mr. 
O'Mara spoke of the Gansvoort market 
and the hope that the city would use the 
site for the erection of a large and suit- 
able building in which a great plant mar- 
ket was to be included. Mr. Daly an- 
nounced the impossibility of using the 
old plant market this year. 

The award committee, which visited 
Anton Zvolanek's plant at Bound Brook, 
N. J., last month, reported the awarding 
of several certificates of merit to the new 
varieties of sweet peas investigated, 
Messrs. Duckham, Pye and Manda at- 
tending. 

The award committee made its report 
upon the splendid exhibits of the even- 
ing: 

Vase of crimson seedling carnations, 
from A. Demeusy, of Flatbush, already 
awarded a preliminary certificate. 

Vase of Carnation Mrs. Eobert Harts- 
horne, from Malachi Tierney, of High- 
lands, N. Y., scored eighty points, a 
beautiful scarlet, strong grower and per- 
fect calyx. 

Vase of Kaiserin roses, from E. H. 
Pye, Nyack, N. Y., cultural certificate. 

Vase of pink roses, Aurora, from Paul 
Niehoff, of Lehighton, Pa., cultural cer- 
tificate. 

Eose Queen Beatrice, from F. H. 
Kramer, of Washington, preliminary cer- 
tificate. 

Artificial calyx, from Maxfield & 
Dimond, Warren, E. I., vote of thanks. 

Samples of dyed carnations, by W. C. 
Krick, of Brooklyn. 

F. H. Kramer, of Washington, who 
brought 100 fine specimens of his new 
rose. Queen Beatrice, spoke interestingly 
of it,, and said many of the roses had 
already been exhibited at the Phila- 
delphia meeting a week ago and 
that none of the flowers shown had been 
out less than three days before. The 
exhibit was a remarkable one and under 
electric light the rose made a splendid 
showing. 

H. Weezenaar, of Hillegom, Holland, 
gave a vivid address on bulb growing 
that held the interest of the audience to 
its close. 




Extra fine FANCYo PPDMCI 
and DAGGER^^ L^ICI^»9 



$2.00 per 1000. 

DlBCoont on larsre orders. 
BOXWOOD, 20c per lb.; 60 Ibi.. $8.50. GALAX, Bronze and GreeiK 11.26 
per 1000; $7.50 per case. LEUCOTHOE SPBITS. 11.00 per 106; $7.50 per 1000. 
Let us have your standinc order for Ferns. 

Send for out weekly price list of Out Flowers. 

MICHIGAN CUT FLOWER EXCHANGE, incorporated 

88-40 BROADWAY, DETROIT, MICH. 



Mention The Review when you writft. 





ilCllf PDAD a°<l Perteot Stook, Green 
nClff unUr Galax, Leucothoe Sprays, 
Fancy and Dagger Ferns. 
All strictly fresh 

from the world's fin- , 

I est patch. Are now 

ready for shipment. 

Galax, 60c per 1000; 

Fancy and Dagger 
Ferns, 80c per 1000; Leucothoe 
Sprays. $2.60 per 1000. Discount 
on large orders. Write for prices in case lots. 
Terms: Cash or good references with orders 
from unknown parties. Place your order with 
us and get just what you want, and get it quick. 

RAY BROS., ELK PARK, N.C. 

Mention The Review when yon write. 

FERNS 

Largest stock of any 
dealer in the trade* 
Fancy» $1.50 per 1000 
Dagger, iJ25 per 1000 

ROBERT GROVES 

ADAMS, MASS. 

Mention The Review when you write. 

Various Notes. 

The rose convention at Washington is 
exciting a great deal of local inter§st 
and a good many from New York and 
vicinity will attend. 

Ex-President F. H. Traendly left 
Monday to attend the meeting of the 
executive committee of the S. A. F., at 
Philadelphia, missing the New York 
Club meeting for the first time in eight 
years. 

A large importation of rhododendrons 
and hardy roses for Wm. Elliott & Sons 
arrived last Friday and the first auc- 
tion sale of the spring season was held 
Tuesday. Every Tuesday and Friday 
Mr. Elliott will conduct the services at 




Wietor Bros. 

51 Wabash Avenue, 
CHICAGO 



Current Price List 



AMERICAN BEAUTIES 

Long stems 

30-inch 

24-inch 

20-inch 

18-inch 

15-inch 

12rinch 



Per doi. 
A 600 
500 
400 
300 
250 
200 
150 

Short $075to 125 

Per 100 
Maid and Bride $5 00 to $10 00 



Uncle John 5 00 to 

Chatenay 5 00 to 

Richmond 5 00 to 

Perle 5 00 to 

Golden Gate 5 00 to 

Killarney 8 00 to 

ROSES, our selection 

Carnations 2 00 to 

Vallcyl 3 00 to 

Violets 50 to 

Paper Whites 300 to 

Romans 3 00 to 

Callas per doz., 1 50 to 

Harrisii ** 1 50 to 

Asp. Plumosus. . .bunch, 50 to 

Ferns per 1000, 

Galax. 



H 



10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
800 
10 00 
15 00 

600 

300 
400 

75 
400 
400 
200 
200 

75 
300 
100 



Always mention the Florists* Review wheo 
writing advertisers. 



/ 



i<tL -.'-ji ..■■ 



u^^^. ivyV <M_i,^o- viJL ^j4..k^ ----^ "'--''^^'-^-^'*^*•-*^Jt»^^^>^^^'•'*'^'^^il^Trt'^tfltt1rf^•— -'-^'^ 



IT'^^^T'TB ^iy^^ . 



■ . .)f'«r.',<";-,.!f-V*TPi*7 ' '-I 



Mabch 14, 1907. 



The Weekly Florists^ Review* 



1263 



Southern WILD SMILAX 

NOW READY IN QUANTITY. 

E. A. BEAVEN, EVERGREEN, ALA. 



Mention The Reylew when yon write. 




WILD SMILAX, *i^. 



tiAM tf»neA The only place 
per ^a»C« ^yhere you can 
AI.WATS GET IT. LONG NEEDLE PINES, 
■doz. PALM CROWNS, $2.80 per doi. 
Extra nice long-stemmed PALM LEAVES. $2.50 per 100. MAGNOLIA, $2.50 per 16-cublc-foot case. 
SHEET MOSS, $2.00 per sack. GREY MOSS. $2.00 per sack. GALAX, $1.00 per 1000. 

Speed a specialty. Write for catalogue. 



Caldwell the Woodsman, 
Introducer of the Wild Smllax 



CALDWELL THE WOODSMAN DECORATING CO., ■■ -■ EVERGREEN, AU. 



Mention The Rerlew when yon write. 



Fenis-§alax'Leocotlioe 

Hardy Fancy Ferns 

PerlOO 25c PerlOOO $2.00 

Green and Bronxe GmJax Leaves 
PerlOOO $1.00 PerSOOO $8.76 

Green and Bronze Leuootboe Sprays 
PerlOO 60c PerlOOO $5.00 

Box\70od 
Perlb 15c Per case $6.50 

Green Sbeet Moss 

Per bale 25c Bundle, 5 bales... $1.00 

Sptaasnum Moss 

1 bale, $1.25 5 bales, $5.60 10 bales, $10.00 



G. E. GRITCHELL, 



Wholesale 
Commission Florist 

SO Bast TMrd St.. CINCimrATI.* OHIO 

Mention The Review when yon write. 



GALAX 



Green or 
Bronze 

$6.60 per case of 10,000; 5,000 lots, 75c per 1000; 
2000 lots, 80c per 1000; 1000 lots, $1.00 per 1000. 
Terms cash, P. O. B. Little Falls, N. T. 

THOMAS WILLIAMS, Jordan*ille,N.Y, 

Mention -The Review when you write. 



the old stand from now until the roses 
bloom. 

The venerable Dr. F. M. Hexamer, 
president of the Farmers' Club, has re- 
gained his health and is a regular at- 
tendant at the lectures of the American 
Institute, where Henry Siebrecht, Sr., 
talks March 27. 

Mr. and Mrs. Jurgens, of Newport, 
were visiting friends in this city last 
> week. Mr. Jurgens' shipments of val- 
ley and other cut flowers to New York 
are handled by Ford Bros. 

Wm. Hagemann has returned from a 
western trip and reports business double 
that of last year. He will soon enjoy 
a prolonged trip in Europe. 

Eeed & Keller report an unprecedented 
call for their carnation dye. Their list 
of Easter novelties is larger and more 
interesting than ever. It's a cold week 
when Mr. Eeed's inventive genius is not 
working in behalf of the florist. 

Lion & Co. have over thirty varieties 
in chiffon novelties to offer this year 
for the Easter trade, a great increase 
above last season's supply. 

All the ribbon men are overwhelmed 
with business. Schloss Bros, are com- 
plaining of too much night work, but 
they cannot fill their orders without it. 
Emil Schloss has just completed a west- 
«ern trip, ahead of all past records. 

Sidney Wertheimer, of Wertheimer 
Bros., now at 550 Broadway, returned 
from Europe last Saturday and has a 
profusion of European novelties to offer. 




FANCY FERNS 

$1.75 per 1000. 

DAGGER FERNS.. 

$1.50 per 1000. 

GALAX, GREEN OR BRONZE 

^Sc per 1000. 

BOXWOOD. No. 1 stock, 60 lb. cases, $8.50. 

I.AURBL FX8TOONING, 4e, 6c and 6c per yard. ^ 

Finest qoallty LAURKL WRKATHS, $3.00 per doz. Cheaper grades if wanted. 

80UTHBRN BMTTiAX. fancy stock in 50-lb. cases, $5.60. 

LiAnRBL BRANCHB8. 85o per bundle. 

Telecrapli Offloe. NKW SAIJEM. MASS. 
Lone Distance Telephone Connection. 

CROWL FERN CO., MILLINGTON, MASS. 



Mention The Review when yon write. 



HBADQUARTERS FOR 



V 



Hardy Cut Greens and Florists' Supplies 



FANCY AND DAGGER FERNS, fine qaality, $2.00 

per 1000. 
NEW CROP BRILLIANT BRONZE AND GREEN 

GALAX, $1.00 par 1000; $7.50 per case of 10,000. 

SOUTHERN WILD SMILAX. $3.50 and $7.00 per case. 




LAUREL FESTOONING 




Good and full, 5c and 6c per yard. 
BRANCH LAUREL, 50c per bunch. 
LEUCOTHOE SPRATS, $1.00 per 109. 
SPHAGNUM MOSS. 50c per bag; five bags, $2.00. GREEN MOSS. $1.00 per bbl. 

FLORISTS* SUPFLIES-A full line of Florists' Supplies, Wire Frames. Corrugated Boxes, 
Out Flower Boxes, Immortelles, Oycas Leaves, Sheaves of Wheat, Tin Foil, Out Wire, etc. 

HENRY M. ROBINSON & CO. 

Ttl. 2617-2818 Main. 16 Province St., 9 Chapman PI., Boston, Mass. 



Mention The Review when yon write. 



The new store is a model of convenience 
and its location is in the center of the 
ribbon trade. 

John King Duer, one of the 400, has 
opened a handsome flower shop at Fifty- 
ninth street andi^adison avenue. He is 
right in the midst of some of the best 
floral artists of New York and close to 
many established stores, among them 
Warendorflf, Hanft, Myer and Bloom- 
ingdale. Mr. Coan, formerly with Bloom- 
ingdale, is manager. Mr. Duer is related 
to Clarence Mackay and other million- 
aires and expects to absorb some of their 
surplus funds. The big dailies published 
his picture and made quite a fuss about 
the venture. 

John Cuff, of East One Hundred and 
Thirty-eighth street, the Manhattan flo- 
rist, tells some interesting stories of his I 



Very Best Quality Bronze and 
Green Galax Leaves Jie^Jo^oo 

Beantlfnl Bronze Lencothoe Sprays. .$0.60 per 100 

Green " " .. .50 perlOO 

Rhododendron Sprays, very choice.. . 1.50 per 100 

Fancy and Dagger Ferns $2.00 per 1000 

I guarantee all stock satisfactory. 

■. H. HITCHCOCK, Glenwood, Mich. 

Mention The Review when yon write. 

experiences as ensign with Dewey at Ma- 
nila, and Schley at Santiago. The flo- 
rists ' trade is not as thrilling as the 
scream of the shell and the booming of 
the cannon. 

One of the most unique floral designs 
of the season was made by J. J. Foley 
for the Letter Carriers' Association and 
presented by them to the members of 
congress from New York on their de- 






1264 



The Weekly Florists^ Review^ 



March 14, 1907. 



I Beauties, Richmond, Maids, 
Brides, Uncle John, Chatenay, 
Killarney, Liberty, Carnations 

and an abundant supply off everything at the lowest market price. We should 

appreciate YOUR Order. 

GEORGE REINBERG 



35 Randolph Street, 



CHICAGO 



Mention The Review when you write. 



CW.McKELLAR 




CHICAGO 




51 Wabash Ave. 

Ihavcman)^ 
Novelties in 

Ribbons 

and 

Chiffons 



GREEN DYE ^^^^*^^ 

For Si, Patrick's Day Carnations. Best there is, 7Sc per quart. 



KASTVR PItICK LIST , 

ORCHIDS, a apedalty. Per doz. 

Dendrobiums tS.no to t0.OO 

Cattleyaa 6.U0 to ».00 

Auorted, box, 16.00 to 126. 

Beantiea, Extra Fancy. . 6.00 

24 to <0-lncb stems 4.00 to 6.00 

12 to 20-lnch stems 1.60 to 3.00 

Short stems per 100, 8.b0 to IV.Of 

Per 100 
Bride, Maid, Ivory, Gate .. 6.00 to 12.00 

Lll>erty, Richmond 6 00 to 16.00 

Ohatenay, Sunrise, Perle. . 6.00 to 10.00 

Roses, my selection 6.00 

Carnations, large fancy. . . 6.00 to G.OO 

" grood stock.... 8.00 to 4 00 

Violets, double or singrle. . .76 to 1.00 

Harrlsll 15.00 to 18.00 

Callas 12.00 to 16.00 

VaUey 2.ooto 4,oy 

Paper Whites, Romans ... 3.00 to 4.00 
Tulips, Jonquils, Daffodils 3.00 to 4.00 

Mlrnonf>tte 4.00 to 8.00 

Dutch Hyacinths 6.00 to 6.00 

Smllax per dos., 2.00 to 2.60 

Asparatrus String's... each, .ii6 to .60 
Asp. Plu.iSprengeri, bunch, .36 to .76 

Adiantum per 100, 1.00 

ferns per 1000, 3.60 

Oalax " 1.00 

Boxwood Sprays, t>er bunch .86 

Subject to change without notice. 



Mention The Review when you write. 



parture for Panama. The design was 
a magnificent horn of plenty containing 
over 500 American Beauty roses, 1,000 
violets and other flowers in proportion. 
It was over six feet in height and gave 
great satisfaction to the distinguished 
recipients. Mr. Foley is on deck again, 
quite recovered from his long illness, and 
his hand has not lost its cunning. 

Henshaw Bros. ' new rose, cerise pink, 
of fine stem, fragrance and body, should 
be on exhibition at the rose show this 
week in Washington. A. M. Henshaw 
is receiving a limited quantity daily 
asd all that arrive are engaged for the 
season by one of the leading Broadway 
retailers. 

F. D. Long, of Denver, proprietor of 
the famous Elitch Gardens, is in the city 
arranging for an additional 150,000 
square feet of glass to his 50,000 already 
devoted to commercial purposes. 

W. H. Donohoe had charge of the Ber- 
thelet funeral laat week and many expen- 
sive and original designs were sent, in- 
cluding A cajsket cover of white roses and 
violets, an empire wreath nine feet high, 
a pillow with «. violet crow« in ceator 
and a bow of Enchantress carnations, 



and a victor wreath of valley and orchids 
with boAv of violets, the whole aggregat- 
ing close to four figures. John Brown 
has lately joined the force of Mr. Dono- 
hoe. 

The sympathy of his many friends is 
extended L. W. Wheeler, treasurer of the 
New York Florists' Club, in the loss of 
his mother. 

The Summit wagon express gave up 
the fight because of Sunday's storm and 
flowers from Jersey were late and had 
to come in by express. There was a 
large shipment of roses Monday and 
prices fell with quite a thud. 

The retail windows are now things of 
beauty. In fact, decoration of this kind 
is now a necessity for any who would 
do a first-class trade. 

J. Austin Shaw, 



Media, Pa. — Peter Vervaecker, a vio- 
let grower near this place, was severely 
injured March 2 by being thrown from . 
the platform of a car of the Chester 
Traction Co. bound for Media. The 
shock resulted in a severe contusion, a 
broken collarbone iind, it is feared, in- 
ternal injuries. 



TROUBLE WITH FERNS. 

I am troubled with a small white bug 
on my fern plants. It works on the 
tips of young fronds and seems to kill 
them, some fronds having as many as 
ten bugs on them. I would like to know 
what it is and how to get rid of it. 
L. L. W. 

We do not know of any white bug 
which affects ferns in the manner de- 
scribed. The white fly, about which so 
much has been written, is sometimes 
very troublesome on nephrolepis and 
other species. Fumigation with hydro- 
cyanic acid gas has frequently been de- 
scribed in the Review, and, if carefully 
done, little injury need result. In sum- 
mer when the temperature runs higher 
there is greater danger. If the pest is 
not the white fly we wouW like to have 
a sample sent in an envelope for identi- 
fication. C. W. 



Houghton, Mich. — A. E. Lutey, of 
the Lutey Floral Co., spent the greater 
part of last week in Chassell superintend- 
i»g the repairing of the portion of ht» 
plant recently destroyed by fire. 



».-Ll t.,t.MAMrti-...^.v:,-,,i..>.. «^».-.. -^l.~.>.. 



.... \ - -J..- 1-., ■■ .-JL.: .t:..^.A^.Y......t.^— .-.*. 



iajM 






Mabch 14, 1907. 



The Weekly Florists' Review. 



1265 



Vegetable Forciag. 



Chamberlin & Bunker, the growers 
of vegetables under glass at Fremont, 
Mich., have invested in twenty acre^ of 
land in Florida for growing vegetables 
in the open. 



VEGETABLE MARKETS. 

Chicago, March 13. — Cucumbers, $1 
to $1.50 doz.; leaf lettuce, 25c to 30c 
case; radishes, 30c to 40c doz. bunches. 

Boston, March 11. — Tomatoes, 30c to 
40c lb.; cucumbers, $3 to $12 box; let- 
tuce, 25c to 50c doz.; radishes, 25c doz.; 
rhubarb, 4c to 5c lb.; mushrooms, 50c 
to 75c lb.; romaine, 75c to $1 doz.; 
escarolle, 75c to $1 doz.; parsley, $1.25 
to $1.50 box; mint, 75c doz. 

New York, March 12. — Mushrooms in 
active demand and market cleaned up 
closely with some sales slightly higher 
than quoted. Cucumbers quite plenty 
and prices show further decline. Let- 
tuce poor and dragging heavily. Ead- 
ishes firm under light offerings. Ehu- 
barb held steady. Tomatoes in light 
demand. Cucumbers, 75c to $1.75 doz.; 
lettuce, 15c to 50c doz.; mushrooms, 
35c to 50c lb.; radishes, $2 to $3 per 
hundred bunches; tomatoes, 15c to 
75c lb. 



THE LAST CROP OF LETTUCE. 

If the last crop of the season has not 
been got into the benches, it should be 
done now, without delay. Where a gen- 
eral stock is grown this crop is usually 
omitted, as the room can be utilized to" 
bettor advantage for general bedding 
material. A nice thing to have in a 
case like this is a good supply of cold- 
frames. In an average season lettuce 
can be planted about, or even before, 
this date in coldframes and kept com- 
fortably warm by covering, but in a 
season like this, with so much zero 
weather even in March, not much could 
be gained by planting early. Though 
'the sun is strong enough to heat the 
frames up well through the day, it 
would take a great deal of covering to 
keep the frost out, even if the frames 
were shut up early and all possible heat 
reserved. "• 

The greenhouse crop will require a 
good deal more water now than it did 
■earlier in the season and, although there 
is less danger of an overabundance of 
atmospheric moisture, nevertheless judg- 
ment should be used in its application. 
Water should always be applied early 
in the day, so that the moisture will be 
well dried up before night. On mild 
nights, a little air should be left on 
from this out, if someone is in close 
touch with the house, so that the venti- 
lators could be closed in the case of a 
sudden change. March weather is an un- 
certain proposition and sudden changes 
must be looked for and guarded against. 
Greenfly is apt to put in its appear- 
ance frequently and should be checked 
as soon as seen. Tobacco fumigation is 
about the simplest and easiest means of 
keeping it down, only it has to be done 
frequently to be effective. Tlie variety 
of greenfly that affect^ lettuce is a big, 
fat, healthy-looking i^eTlow, but he is 
not a hard one to destroy if taken in 
time. But if he once gets a good foot- 
hold, it will take several fumigations to 



get the pest under control. It is better 
to fumigate two or three nights in suc- 
cession, if the fly is bad, rather than 
try to use the tobacco strong enough to 
destroy them with one dose. 

Tobacco can be had in several forms, 
but we find the dust the easiest to han- 
dle. There is a kind of specially pre- 
pared for burning. When once this is 
started it will keep on burning for sev- 
eral hours. The smoke is never so dense 
in the house as it would be if stems 
were used, but the length of time it 
keeps on smoking seems to wear them 
down and do them more harm than a 
sudden filling of the house would, with a 
good deal less danger of damage to the 
plants. There are several liquid forms 
of tobacco extract that are applied by 
evaporation. They certainly do the work 
well and are used by many, but are 
more expensive to use than the dust. 

W. S. Croydon. 



THE GRAND RAPIDS COMBINE. 

In speaking of the new corporation 
formed by a number of Grand Kapids 
growers, a local paper says: 

"Lettuce will probably be the princi- 
pal crop raised by the Grand Rapids 
Greenhouse Co., the new $160,000 com- 
pany which was recently organized for 
the purpose of consolidating several of 
the largest greenhouses in the city. 

"Grand Eapids has long been supreme 
as a growing and shipping point for let- 
tuce, and the organization will strive to 
uphold this supremacy. The market has 
been rather demoralized for the last year 
or two and it is believed that it will soon 
find its equilibrium. 

"Nothing definite has been decided 
regarding a central plant, but the one 
most talked of is to use the greenhouses 
of E. E. Taylor, on the South Division 
street road, and make extensive altera- 
tions and improvements there. 

* ' Although lettuce will probably be the 
staple crop, other vegetables- will be 
grown, and flowers will form no small 
part of the business, chrysanthemums es- 
pecially being grown in quantity to pre- 
cede the lettuce." 



Please cancel my ad. for rose plants. 
The Eeview did the work, as usual. — J. 
F. Ammann, Edwardsville, HI. 

We recommend for forcing : 

Gundestnip's Cauliflower New Snowball 

better than Dry Weather for forcing, peroz., 12.00. 
liettace Grand Rapida, peroz., 10c; i>^-lb., 26. 
Improved Arlington White Spine Cncnm* 
ber, per oz., 10c: !4-lb., 25c. Gnndestrnp'a 
Barly Scarlet Turnip, white tip for forc- 
in«r, M-lb., 20c; 1-lb., 76c. Celeriac, Gunde- 
■tmp's Oval King:. 1-oz., 25c; J4-lb., dOc. 

OUNDESTRUP'S SEBD STORB 
4S73 Milwaukee Ave. , CHICAGO 

Comet Tomato 

Those who force tomatoes should give 
"Comet" a trial. This variety has been the talk 
of srardeners around Boston the past season. 
Those who have seen it growing declare there's 
nothing to compare with it. 8eed, $6.00 per oz. 

WILLIAM SIM, Cliftondale, Mass. 

Mention The Revtew when yon write. 

600,000 Aaparag^uB Roots loo looo 

3 years, Palmetto, heavy 60o {3.60 

2 years, Palmetto, strong: 40c 3.00 

2 years, Conover's Colossal 8&c 2.76 

2 years, Barr's Mammoth, strong 40c 8.00 

2 years, Donald's Blmlra 40c 3.00 

2 years, Olant Argenteull 40o 3.00 

2 years. Columbian White 60c 3.60 

On 60.000 or over, good discount given. 

On other Nursery stock, send for Trade List. 

RIVER VIEW NURSERIES. J. H. O'Haim. Utile SUver. N. J. 
Mention The Review when you write. 



(( 



TRUE BLUE" SEEDS 

FOR MARKKT GROWKR8 

Strains you can depend on. 

Grand Rapids Lettnoe, M-lb., 30c; lb , 11.00 
Biff Boston Lettnco.... " 3Uc " 1.00 
White Hpine Cuoamber, 

select stock " 20c " .60 

Davis' Perfect Cucumber" 00c " 2.00 
I.iTing:ston's lireenhouse 

Forcer Cauliflower. ..^i-oz., 75c; oz., 250 
liivlnirston's Ifiarliest 

Cauliflower " 75c " 2.50 

Cincinnati Market 

Radish M-lb., 16c; lb., .50 

Improved Scarlet Globe 

Radish " 26c " .75 

Farly Snarlet Turnip 

Forcing: Radish " )5c " .50 

LiviuKSton's Hummer 

Tomato, (new) pkt., 20c; 3 for 50c 

Livingston's Dwarf 

Htone Tomato oz., 20c; lb., 2.00 

Livingston's Beauty 

Tomato " 20c " 1.85 

Champion Moas Curled 

Parsley M-lb., 15c: lb., .45 

LivlnicBton's New Ohio 

Crimson Pepper pkt., IDc: oz., .50 

If to be mailed add 8c per lb for 

postasre. 

Send for 40-page catalogue of "True Blue" 

Seeds, best for Market Gardeners. 

LIVING8T0M SEED CO., 



Columbus, 0. 




Mention The Review when you write. 

Hothoose Specialties 

Our Mr. Ra'^son being one of th« 
largest growers of Vegetables under 
glass in this country, we have devel- 
oped many special strains, including: 

Rawson's Hothouse Cucumber 

which we confidently believe supet4or to any 
other on the market; 60c per oz.; 11.50 per X-lb.; 
16.00 per lb. 

R4WSON'8 SCARLET CONICAL RADISH 

Best for forcing: many largest growers use it 
exclusively. Brilliant scarlet, conical, short- 
topped, remarkably uniform, tender, crisp; DOo 
lb.; 10 lbs., 18.00; 100 lbs., $76.00. 

These and many other specialties fully 
described In our Market Gardener's List for 1907, 
just Issued. Sent free on request. 

W. W. RAWSON & CO., 5 UniOD St., Boston 

Mention The Review when you write. 

Vegetable Plants 

Cabbaice New Early and Succession, 26c per 

100; $1.50 per 1000. 
Lettuce Grand Rapids, Bisr Boston, Boston 

Market and Termis Ball, $1.00 per 1000. 
Parsley Moss Hurled, 25c per 100; $1 25 per 1000. 
Beet EcliDSe, 25c per 100; $1.25 per 1000. 
Celery White Plume, white Solid also Celeriac 

G. Parague. 20c p,--r 100; $1.25 per 1000. 
Egsr Plants, N. York, Improved, small, $3.00 per 

Pepners, Bull Nose and Sweet Mountain, small, 
$2.00 per 1000. 

Tomatoes, small plants, Earllana, Early Jewel, 
r.orlllard, Ma.v Flower xnd other early kinds, 
30c per 100; $2.00 per 1000. Stone, Perfection 
and other later kinds, $1.00 per 100. 
Cash with Order. 

R. Vincent, Jr. & Son, white Marsh, Md. 

Mention The Review when .vou write. 

Vegetable Growers Should 

Send 5 Dollars 

for a swivel wheel and 20 >s-inch nozzles. It will 
fit a run of 100 feet of pipe and give you a chance 
to try for yourself the Wlttbold Waterins 
System, or send for circular of testimonials. 

The Wittbold Noxzle, for ?4-inch hose $1 00 

The Special Boce Nossie i.oo 

Louis Wittbold, 1708 N. Halsted St., Chicago 

Mention The Review when you write. 

Sltinner's Irrigation. 

For greenhonses, gardens and lawns. 
Latest improved gasoline pnmping out- 
fits at low price. Estimates larntshed 
on request. Address, 

C. W. SKINNER, Troy, O. 

Mention The Review when yon w1*lte. 



■»i' I t rnV ..'. ..• 









1266 



The Weekly Florists^ Review* 



March 14, 1907. 



INDIANAPOLIS. 



Current Comment* 

At the last meeting of the State Flo- 
rists' Association it was decided to hold 
a spring show April 10. A committee 
was appointed, consisting of H. W. Kie- 
man, H. Schilling, F. B. Alley and F. E. 
Harritt, to take charge.' Premiums will 
be awarded for plants and cut blooms. 
The lists will be out in a few days and 
can be obtained by applying to the sec- 
retary of the society. 

Mrs. James Nelson, mother of E. A. 
Nelson, died suddenly, March 3, from an 
attack of the grip. The son has the 
sympathy of his many friends. 

Albin Schrieber's wife and daughter 
have been sick with typhoid fever. "Vve 
are glad to report that both are conva- 
lescent. 

There promises to be a great demand 
for white carnations to be used on St. 
Patrick's day. The green carnation is 
quite popular and each year brings an 
increased demand. 

A. Wiegand was at Terre Haute March 
5, attending the funeral of Lawrence 
Hienl, of that city. S. 



SPRINGFIELD, ILL. 

As a result of the decision of the 
Illinois State Florists* Association to 
hold its next annual convention at 
Springfield, the Springfield florists are 
waking up, and a meeting was held 
March 7 in A. C. Brown's store with a 
view to a local organization. The fol- 
lowing oflScers were elected: President, 
A. C. Brown; vice-president, George M. 
Brinkerhoflf; secretary, George Jack; 
treasurer, George Van Horn. The organ- 
ization starts oflf with a membership ojf 
thirty, with a good prospect of forty by 
next meeting, March 21. 

The objects of the organization are* 
■ To promote interest in and prepare for 
the coming convention, to improve the 
city in a horticultural way, to inspire to 
civic beauty and to promote fellowship 
among the growers and tradesmen. It is 
expected that later the growers out in 
the county will come into the organiza- 
tion. F. A, F. 



One insertion of our advertisement in 
the Eeview sold all the cinerarias we 
had ready. — Bay H. PAiiMZR, Randolph, 
N. T. 

Greenfieu), Ind.— Henry Hasting, a 
newspaper man who has gone into market 
gardening here, has added a greenhouse 
to his equipment. 

JOPLIN, Mo. — Edward Teas and H. B. 
Briggs will furnish, free of charge, suf- 
ficient trees to decorate the grounds of 
the Children 's Home, as soon as the work 
of filling in the lot is completed. 

WANT ADVERTISEMENTS. 



Advertisements under tblH head one cent a 
word. CASH WITH ORDER. When answers 
are to be addressed In our care, add 10 cents for 
forwarding. 

SITUATION WANTED— By a married man. as 
private gardener on a g'entleman's place: 
thorousrhly understands the management of 
grreenhouses. frultH, flowers, veeetables, lawns, 
etc.; open for enjraffement April 1. Address No. 
ISS, care Florists' Review, Chicago. 

SITUATION WANTED— By young- man 29 years 
old, with 12 years' experience, 4 years in pres- 
ent position, wish position as gardener or assis- 
tant on pMvate place now or April 1; Swedish; 
best of reference; eastern states preferred. Ad- 
dress No. 96, care Florists' Review, Chicago. 






"TELEPBONE YOUR ORDER EARLY 
AND AVOID TBE RUSH" 



This is the substance of a notice that 
a large New York florist is sending to all 
his customers. He has several telephones 
in his store and caters to telephone trade. 

If you haven't a telephone, order one 
now before the Easter rush begins. 

It pays others, it will pay you. 

For rates and full information call 
NEW YORK TELEPHONE COMPANY 

15 DEY STREET 

Ck>ntraot Department, Telephone No. 9010 Cortlandt 

Mention The Review when you write. 



PUATION WANTED— By sober, young man, 
22; experienced In growing roses, carnations 

and general stock; able to take charge of section; 

state wages. Address No. 116, care Florists' 

Review, Chicago. 

SITUATION WANTED— By first-class gardener 
and florist; 25 years' experience in green- 
houses; flowers, fruits and vegetables; German, 
single, a hustler, wants steady position on private 
place; first-class Chicago references; over 7 
years with present employer; state full par- 
ticulars; good wages expected. Address No. 
113, care Florists' Review, Chicago. 

HELP WANTED— A young man for rose grow- 
ing; situation open April 15; must have 
some experience in a flret-class place. Address 
Joseph Bancroft & Son, Cedar Falls, Iowa. 

HELP WANTED— An experienced rose, carna- 
tion and mum grower; state wages expected 
with board and room; send reference at once. 
Address J. W. Rentz k Son, Peru, Ind. 

HELP WANTED— Three single young men, at 
once, with some experience in this business, 
willing to further their knowledge. Address No. 
lia, care Florists' Review, Chicago. 

HELP WANTED— Single man for general green- 
house work; must know how to handle 
bedding plants; state wages. Address No. 114, 
Florists' Review, Chlcage. 

HELP WANTED— A good g^rower of roses and 
carnations, mums and general stock; $40 00 
per month, board and room for first year; send 
references. C. Humfeld, Clay Center, Kan. 

HELP WANTED— Salesman acquainted with 
the trade to carry side line, pocket sample; 
quick seller; large profits. Address The Coving- 
ton Seed Co., Covington, Ky. 

HELP WANTED— A sober and capable man to 
handle retail trade, make-up and design; 
references; state salary. Address No. 1, care 
Florists' Review, Chicago. 

HELP WANTED— At once, first-class grower 
of carnations and a general plant line, sin- 
gle; must Jbe sober and industrious; wages $50.00 
per month, room and board. Address No. 104, 
care Florists' Review, Chicago. 

HELP WANTED — A thoroughly up-to-date 
store man for first-class Chicago retail store. 
Must be Al designer and decorator, also first- 
class salesman; good salary to right party. Ad- 
dress No. 10», care Florists' Review, Chicago. 

HELP WANTED— Competent man to grow car- 
nations; roses and mums, and general stock; 
20,000 ft. of glass; steady job; must be all right, 
with good reference. W. E. Gravett, Lancaster, 
Ohio. 



HELP WANTED— At once or by April 1. An 
experienced helper for general work In 
retail catalogue place. Well up on potting, etc.; 
must be steady and sober; state wages, experi- 
ence, reference and age; steady place for right 
man. Address J. E. Jackson, Oainesvllle, Oa. 



HELP WANTED— Man who understands grow- 
ing roses and general stock; good all-round> 
man; permanent position; married man pre- 
ferred; wages. $15.00 per week. Apply Howard 
P. Klelnhans, 66 Center Square, Easton, Pa. 

HELP WANTED— At once, a rapid potter, and 
one thoroughly acquainted with planting- 
out of spring bedding plants; must be a steady 
and sober man; reference required. Address- 
John Reck & Son, Bridgeport, Conn. 



HELP WANTED— Good man for roses and pot 
plants; also man for bedding plants, who- 
has had experience in planting out and taking 
care of private lawns, etc.; good pay to the right 
men; give references and wages desired. Ad- 
dress No. 1J80, care Florists' Review, Chicago. 

HELP WANTED— Competent grower of carna- 
tions and roses for modem place on Pacific- 
Coast; give particulars, wages expected and ref- 
erences in first letter; transportation advanced 
if necessary. Address No. 181, care Florists* 
Review, Chicago. 

HELP WANTED— At once; three men with at 
least a moderate knowledge of common- 
greenhouse work to work under direction. 
Steady work to the right men; wages $10 per 
week without board. Address J. W. Dunford, 
Clayton, Mo. 

HELP WANTED— A young man assistant to 
foreman in growing carnations and roses 
principally; must also be able to do design work 
and some little outside gardening; wages $10< 

ger week with room and washing: board can be 
ad for $3 per week. Address T. L. Metcalfe, 
Hopklnsville, Ky. 

HELP WANTED— A thoroughly up-to-date 
store man to take charge and manage one- 
of the finest floral establishments in the west; . 
must be an Al designer and decorator and a first- 
class salesman; good salary and commission to- 
right party. Address with references as to char- 
acter and ability. No. 73, care Florists' Review, 
Chicago. 

HELP WANTED — Married man preferred; 
must be sober, understand raising cut flow- 
ers, general stock, propagating and designing; 
also competent to take entire charge and handle- 
help; give references and experience; salary, 
$60.00 per month and opportunity to work out 
rent of cottage connected with greenhouses. 
Merryvale Greenhouses, Helena, Ark. 

HELP WANTED— A corporation on the Pacific 
Coast doing a growing and shipping business, 
can arrange for a profitable position for a wide- 
awake, competent young man; he must be a. 
worker in every sense of the word, have a fair 
education and more than just ordinary intelli- 
gence; the position carries with it the necessity 
of buying from the man whose place he will take 
with the Company about one thousand dollars' 
worth of the capital stock of said corporation; 
applications must be accompanied by full parti- 
culars concerning applicant, just what line of 
work competent in, what concerns engaged with 
during past five years, age, married or single^ 
nationality. Address No. 119, care Florists*^ 
Review, Chicago. 



/ 



-i-i'j ' k' i>4. S. ...-1^ 



■ ■ ^.^.,::. * 1-. .^,^A^.;^- jAqt -j ..iy^.gt .-^fLJiaiMhAiMiiiiA^-^--"-*'^- ^-^ f^'t^<-^'~^---- w---**^-:.^»^>-'^-slj^ ^ 



' ; *rf^,f7 T»^- »n-l77 7"^» *7V>"X^/ ^ • ?' ■▼ ^i ?^ r 



»^TTT" V 



March 14, 1907. 



The Weekly Florists^ Review* 



1267 



BE A CARNATION EXPERT, A SPECIALIST 

and make money. Don't lag: behind. Time is too short to waste it grubbing along poking at it. Push yourself. If you don't 
know how. we will tell you how, we will teach you how to grow Carnations that will sell, sell fast, faster than you can tumble 
them out; big ones, long stemmed, clear colored fellows. We will teach you how to grow the varieties than make money. They 
are few, but, oh my! We will teach you what to grow them in; not in dirt, but in soil, compost. We will teach you how to be a 
carnation specialist. Write today for particulars, enclosing a 2c stamp. 

The Florists' Correspondence School, P. O. Box 426, Missoula, Montana 



HELP WANTED — Two men experienced in 
potting and general greenhouse work. 
Steady position. J. P. Wilcox, Council Bluffs, la. 



HELP WANTED— Young man to take care of 
private place and garden, and one horse; 
wages $25.00 per month, board and room. Ad- 
dress No. ll*?, care Florists' Review, Chicago. 

HELP WANTED— Settled married man of ex- 
perience to take management of established 
florist's store; salary and part Interest or all 
salary If desired. Address No. 88, care Plorlets' 
Review, Chicago. 



HELP WANTED— A sober and competent man 
to take charge of 22,000 ft. glass; must be a 
flrst-class grower of cut flowers and plants; 
none but a good man need apply; state age, sal- 
ary and references In application. Apply Arthur 
L. Raub & Co., Easton, Pa. 



HELP WANTED — A young man for general 
greenhouse work where carnations and 
chrysanthemums are grown; would be expected 
to wait on customers, assist in design work and 
pack orders for plants; apply, stating wages 
with rooms, with or without board. Morton's 
Evergreen Lodge Flower Garden, ClarksvlUe. 
Tenn. 



HELP WANTED-A bright young man to assist 
in our, flower department; one with exper- 
ience in flrst-class flower stores; must be able 
to make up designs quickly and artistically; per- 
manent position and good chance for advance- 
ment; give full particulars in first letter and sal- 
ary desired. Address Superintendent, William 
Donaldson & Company, Minneapolis, Minn. 



HELP WANTED- A good all-round greenhouse 
man as foreman of 2500 feet of glass; a 
grower of cut flower and general greenhouse 
stock ; a man wanted that wants to stay If the 
place is agreeable; $55.00 for the first month, 
$60.00 for the next four months; at the end of the 
4 months if he and we are agreeable we will con- 
tract for a year at an advance over the 4 month 
price; we want the man at once. Address The 
Newburys, Mitchell, S. D. 

WANTED— Good 8l«ed aquarium in perfect 
order. Box 593, Troy, N. Y. 

WANTED— To lease on May 1, 15,000 to 25,000 sq. 
ft. of glass; for 5 years or so; good rent for 
good place. A. Ley & Bro., Langdon, D. C. 

WANTED— To rent. 10,000. or more, feet of glass 
in good condition; must be near Chicago. 
Address No. 91, care Florists' Review, Chicago. 

FOR SALE OR RENT— Carnation greenhouses; 
good market, established business; land as 
needed for outdoor work and gardening if de- 
sired; reasonable rent or sale on easy terms. 
For particulars siddress C. T. Phelps, North 
Adams, Mass. 

FOR SALE— A Chicago range of new green- 
houses; 70,000 feet of glass; complete, full 
running condition; now In fine crop; don't 
answer unless prepared to deal; good dwelling 
and out buildiags. Address N. Reeves, 420 Ash- 
land Block, Chicago. 

FOR SALE— In Denver, Colo.; wholesale and 
retail business; an up-to-date place, 7 green- 
houses, 121018, one boiler 80 H. P.; everything in 
flrst-class condition: trade is A 1; write for par- 
ticulars. Address W. C. Walter, 448 Josephine 
St., Denver, Colo. 

FOR SALE— Five greenhouses and 50 acres of 
ground within easy reach of Philadelphia; 
good house, barn, and water supply; the best 
rose soil; an ideal place for building up a paying 
business. Address No. 100, care Floristi^' Re- 
view, Chicago. 

FOR SALE— Five new greenhouses, containing 
20.000 square feet of glass, in operation one 
year; four hours from Pittsburg, Cleveland, Erie 
and Buffalo; good central location. For partic- 
ulars, write Henry F. Michell Co., Philadel- 
phia. Pa. 

FOR SALE— Greenhouse; 4000 feet of glass. 
7-room residence, bam, three lots for sum- 
mer work; city water and sewer connections; 
natural gas for fuel (no night fireman): cut 
flower trade In city of 1200. Address lola Green- 
house, 704 E. Lincoln St., lola, Kan. 1 

FOR SALE— A list of over 15,000 names of live 
plant buyers In the Southern states; revised 
and corrected to date; no fakes or dead ones; 
nicely gotten up in a separate b3ok for each 
state; price $50 00. Address No. 105, care Plo- 
rista' Review, Chicago. 



B|entlon The Review when you write. 



FOR sUlE— 3000 feet of glass, fine location; can 
sell all you grow and then have to buy; will 
stand jtSlose Investigation, good reason for sell- 
ing. -Address No. 99, care Florists' Review, 
Chicago. 

FOR SALE— Equity in well established whole- 
sale and retail florists' business In good lo- 
cation in Chicago; doing good business; well 
stocked with Boston ferns, bedding plants and 
miscellaneous stock; will sell for $800 cash; 
fullest investigation invited. Address P. Pear- 
son, 920 North Campbell Ave., Chicago. 

FOR SALE- 7,000 feet of glass, 3 greenhouses 
stocked with roses, carnations and a general 
assortment of window and bedding plants; have 
a quantity of bulbous stock In good shape for 
Easter; hot water heat. Dwelling house with 
six rooms; lot 175 feet front, 190 feet deep; fine 
local and outside trade; do not miss this chance 
for It is a good one. Address W. H. Searing, 
712 13th Street, Greeley, Colo. 

ForSale, an Old Established Business 

Greenhouses and stock. Allison-Pope Co. 
By Victor L. Littig, Receiver, Davenport, la. 



WANTED 

200 feet second hand 4-incb pipe. 
200 feet second hand 3 inch pipe. 
200 feet second hand 2-inch pipe. 
Also globe valves to match, 
must be cheap for cash. 

A. B. HUNTER, Belleville, Ala. 



IX/am^Ail A man who thoroughly understands 
. . •" growing lettuce and carnations to buy 

an interest in my business and take full charge of new 
house 47x186x166 feet; small capital required; will 
guarantee the sale of all the lettuce and carnations that 
we can grow; no better opportunity to make money ever 
offered; give full particulars in first letter as to where 
you have worked and what you have done; ill health is 
the only reason I have for wanting to take in a partner: 
the dwelling house has 11 rooms, city water and natural 
gas. Address No. 107, care Florists' Re- 
Tiew, ChicaKo. 



Wanted 



Grower of bulb stock, 
ferns, etc.; also thor- 
oughly experienced propagator for gen- 
eral stock; experienced help dnly need 
apply. Give references and state salary 
in first letter. Tfae Ga8sc>r Company. 
Wholesale and Ketail Growers, 1013 
Prospect Avenue, Cleveland, Ohio. 



Wanted, Landscape 
Gardener and Florist 

to handle Pure Kentucky Lawn Grass 

Mixture and Kentucky Blue Grass Seed direct 
from the blue grass state. Big profits. Write now. 

THE COVINGTON SEED CO., Covington, Ky. 

WANTED 

Wire worfcers, up-to-date and capable^ 
for Florists' wire work. Good washes. 
Apply at once to... 

H. KENNEY 

1801 Dean St., B ROOKLYN, N. Y. 

WANTED 

Salesman calling; on Greenhouse trade to 
handle high grade steam specialties. 

Address No. 118, 

Care Florists' Review, Chicago. ' 



FOR SALE— Florists' business, consistingr of 
15000 feet of glass, 8^ acres of land, 6-room 
house, barn, wagron-sbed, 2 boilers, 65 hotbed 
sash, 3 wagons, bugrey, surrey, 3 horses, 1 cow; 
greenhouses well stocked with Easter and bed- 
ding stock; 35 minutes on Carrlck car from Pitts- 
burg or 1 hour and 15 minutes' drive; will sell at 
reasonable price; good chance for quick buyer 
Address No. lOO, care Florists* Review, Chicago 

FOR SALE 

Greenhouse plant of 25,000 feet of glass; an 
up-to-date place, heated by steam and cheap fuel; 
the houses are in good condition, well stocked 
with everything for wholesale and retail trade; 
also Flower and Seed Store with fixtures, seven- 
room house and eight acres of land; If desired, 
will sell half Interest or lease the plant for term 
of years. This is an excellent opportunity and 
is worth investigating. Address No. 48, care 
Florists' Review, Chicago. 

FOR SALE 

T/^TJ ROY used four months. 16 ft. long, 
l\^n.-D\JS^f 7 ft. wide, 8}4 ft. high. 

Accommodation for commercial or wholesale 
florist. Will sell at a sacrifice. 

CHAS. MILLANG, 

50 Vest 29th Street, NEW YORK QTY. 

FOR SALE 

Retail store and greenhouse combined, 22x46 
feet, stocked with plants suitable for Florists' 
trade. Established 1900; rent $12.00 per month; . 
good location; reason for selling, have other 
business. Address ' 

AUEX WIECZOROW8KI, 

238 K. Webster Ave., CHICAGO, ILL. 

FOR SALE 

Colorado Springs, Colo. 

Wholesale and retail business well located; 34 
greenhouses: 13 acres of land; 4 boilers, 16-60; 3 
dwelling houses. For terms, 

WM. CLARK, Colorado Springs, Colo. 

On account of my health, I 
am compelled to take uie 
world easier, and for that reason, I will offer my entire 
manufacturing business which has the distinction of 
being the best established reputation of its nature in 
this country. The sale includes the Duplex Gutter. 
the Standard Ventilating Machine and the Standard 
Steam Trap, of which a great many were installed in 
the last 2 years with the best results ._ Also the gutter 
had a very latve run, and I am shipping a large range 
at present to California. Address 

K. HIPPABD, YOUNGSTOWN, OHIO 

FOR SALE 
GREENHOUSE PIPE 

4-IN. BOILER TUBES, second-hand, in fine 
condition, absolutely free from scale and with 
ends cut square. Sample and prices on appli- 
cation. KROESCHELL BROS. CO. 

51 KrlB Street, Chicago 



FOR SALE ! 



The Second Edition 

—of the— 

Florists^ Manual 

Is Now Ready 

Price, $5.00 a copy, 
carriage charges prepaid* 



.J(^.-.. ..W. ■■...^.. .«-■>,.. L..^,.^. 



^ 



1268 



The Weekly Florists^ Review* 



; ' . ..■* ;■ •..;, .■ ■ t^ ' ^ 



March 14, 1907. 







SEATTLE, WASH. 

Growers of 



D. V. BURRELL, grower of 

Special Strains of Melons and Cucumbers 

Three of my specialties are the Burrell 
Gem Cantaloupe. Burrell's Thoroughbred 
Rocky Ford Cantaloupe and Burrell's Klon- 
dike Cucumber. Contract orders solicited. 

«iMre(s. 0. V. BURRELL, All, Rocky Ford. Cota. 



Mention The Review when you write. 

CONNECTICUT CORN. 
Onion, Beet, Carrot, Tnrnlp, Parsnip. 

Tile Everett B. Clark Company 

MILFORD, CONN. 
East Jordan, Mich. Slater Bay, Wla. 

We are now writing: g'rowlngr contracts for 
PBAS AND BEANS 

which we grrow In both Mlchlgran and Wisconsin. 

Mention The Review when you write. 

C. C. MORSE « CO. 

Seed Grcvrers 

l7M73ClaySt., SAN FRANCISCO, GAL. 
Onion, Lettuce, Sweet Peas 

and other California Specialties 



PUGET SOUND 
CABBAGE SEED 



Alyutlon The Review when .vou write. 

S. M, ISBELL & CO. 

JACKSON, MICH. 

Seed GroWers for tbe Trade 

BEANS, CUCLMBER, TOMATO, 
Radish, Peas, Muskmelon 

Squash, Watarmalon, Sweat Corn 

We are now booking: orders for 1907 fall deliv- 
ery. Send for contract prices; also surplus list. 
Mention The Review when .von write. 

Waldo Rohnert 

GILBOY, CAL. 

Wholesale Seed Grower 

Specialties: Lettuce, Onion, Sweet Peas, Aster, 
Oosmos, Mitrnonette, Verbena, in variety. Gor- 
reBpoadence solicited. 

S.D. Woodruff & Sons 

BFKCIALTIXSt 

Garden Seeds In Variety. 

Maine seed potatoes, onion sets, etc. 
Oorrespondence solicited. 
■alB Office and Seed Farms, OBANGE, COKN. 
New York City Store, 82-84 Dey Street. 

ALFRED J, BROWN SEED CO. 

Growers of 

Garden Peas and Beans 

For tbe Wboleaale Trade 

GRAND RAPIDS. MICH. 

Mention The Review when yon write. 



[ BMrpee's Seeds Grow | 



Mention The Review when you wrl te. 



LEONARD SEED CO. 

Growers and Wholesalers off Superior Garden Seeds 

Seedsmen and Florists Supplied at the shortest notice and at right prices. 
Our Catalogues are now ready and are mailed upon request. 



Flower Seeds — Onion Sets 



79 East Klnale St., 
146 W.BandolpkSt., 



CHICAGO 



Mention The Review when .vou write. 



in Bulk 
and Packages 



LAWN GRASS SEED 

Dickinsons, Evergreen, and Pine Tree Brandt 
SPECIAL MIXTURES SEED FOR GOLF GROUNDS 

THE ALBERT DICKINSON CO. 



MINNEAPOLIS 



CHICAGO 



Mention The Review when yon write. 



Seed Trade News. 



AMEBICllf SEED TBIDE ASSOCIATION. 

Pres., Henry W. Wood, Blchmond, Va.; Firat 
Vlce-Pres , Charles Burgre, Toledo, O.; Sec'y and 
Treaa., C. E. Kendal, Cleveland. The 26th annual 
meeUnff will be held at New York City, June, 1907. 



The demand for Stone tomato is tax- 
ing the sources of supply. 

Seed stock of the Early Ohio potato 
begins to look good to those 'who have a 
supply. 

Seed travelers report competition so 
keen that profits will be but a side issue 
if business is booked by them. 

It is reported that there are still a few 
pounds of onion seed available. White 
Globe, however, is said to be cleaned out. 

Theee are yet some acres needed for 
pea planting for the coming year's seed 
crop and reports have it that they are 
getting hard to find. 

Visited Chicago: — W. H. Barrett, 
Adrian, Mich. ; B. F. Adams, Peoria, 111, ; 
Chas. P. Guelf, with Jerome B. Rice Seed 
Co., Cambridge, N. Y. 

Nothing much is being said about the 
probable size of the pickle acreage for 
the coming year. But the pickle men 
will likely get busy later on. 

The idea that all garden seeds are 
sold by means of catalogues is a mis- 
taken one. Every country newspaper is 
now carrying the advertisement of the 
local seed dealer. 

It is reported that John Lewis Childs, 
of Moral Park, who sold the Mayflower 
a year or so ago, is contemplating start- 
ing another "floral" paper, with D. J. 
Thomas, founder of Floral Life, as edi- 
tor. 

If the sales of narcissus bulbs were 
based on the prices realized for the cut 
blooms since the latter part of Febru- 
ary the demand would be considerably 
curtailed. Early prices were satisfac- 
tory. 



TO THE TRADE... 

Just issued — oar special price list 
giving our position on onion seed. 

We shall send this to the Trade, 
being unable to make the personal 
visit contemplated. Please write 
for it. 

A. J. Pleters Seed Co* 

HOLLISTER, CAL. 

Mention The Review when you write. 

CHAUNCEY P. COY & SON 

Established 1878. WATKRLOO. NKB. 

VINESEEDS 

AND SEKD CORN 

Wholesale Growers for the Seed Trade 
Write for 1»U7 Gontraet Offers 

Mention The Review when you write. 

The accidental death, by poisoning, of 
the daughter of J. W. Ratekin, Shenan- 
doah, la., is reported in our obituary col- 
umn this week. 

It looks as though the onion set grow- 
ers will not plant as much seed this yesir 
as last. Onion sets are going at good 
prices, though, and perhaps this will 
stimulate things before the planting sea- 
son is over. 

A COMBINATION, Or an agreement of 
some kind that would restrain one dealer 
from cutting another's prices, is much 
desired and talked about by the whole- 
sale seed dealers, but they fail to do 
anything definite. 

Boston seed houses report counter 
trade much behind that of a year ago at 
this date, due to the continued severe 
weather, and a congestion of business is 
sure to follow the breaking of winter. 
Mail orders have been over the average. 

When P. T. Poulsen, traveling for A. 
T. Poulsen, seed grower, of Copenhagen, 
Denmark, reached Chicago on his jour- 
ney he liked the town and the people so 
well he decided to settle down there, but 



iLi:^. ■'---■- .'.tJ.:^:.Lt- ...^~i^.!-i — 



,^iiut:,aiii^ 



» J 



Mabch 14, 1907. 



The Weekly Florists^ Review^ 



^'*r- 



1269 



Dreer's Summer Flowering Bulbs 




The Beffonlas and Oloxinlag offered by nu are the best that akill and 
oarefdl selection can produce, being' grrown tor ns by one of the most 
expert European specialists. 

TUBEROUS-ROOTED BEGONIAS 

single Flo'wered, Scarlet, Orimson, White, Tellow, Rose and Orange, 40c per 
doz.: $8.00 per 100: $2'>.00 per ICOO. 

Choice SinBle Flowered In Mixture. 35c per doz.; $2.50 per 100; $22.00 per 1000. 

Double Flow^erins, Scarlet, Rose, White and Yellow, 65c per doz.; $5.00 per 100; 
$40.00 per 1000. 

Choicest Double Flowerins in Bflxture, 50c per doz.: $4.00 per 100; $35.00 
per 1000. 

NEW HYBRID FRILLED TUBEROUS BEGONIAS 

A most unique form of flowers of immense size with wavy or frilled petals, similar 
to the best forms of single petunias, 25c each; $2.50 per doz.; $20.00 per 110. 

GLOXINIA CRASSIFOLIA GRANDIFLORA 

A very fine selected strain, strong, well matured bulbs. Red, White, Blue, Red with 
white border. Blue with white border, in separate colors or in choicest mixture, 60c 
per doz.; $4.00 per 100; $35.00 per lOOO. 

FANCY-LEAVED CALADIUMS 

A choice selection of 25 distinct named varieties, fine large bulbs, $1.50 per doz. ; 
$10.00 per 100. Choice mixed varieties, $1.25 per doz.; $8.00 per 100. 

Our quarterly Wholesale £ist offers a full line,' 
of Seasonable Plants, Seeds and Bulbs. 



HENRY A. DREER, Philadelphia, Pa. 



Mention The Review when you write. 



will continue to represent the Poulsen 
firm in this country. 

A PURE seed bill is pending in the 
Michigan legislature. 

The acreage of beans in Michigan is 
likely to show another increase this year. 

The Evans Seed Co., West Branch, 
Mich., suffered $10,000 damage by fire 
March 5; partially insured. 

The H. E. Fiske Seed Co., Boston, re- 
ports counter trade as having opened 
well since the weather moderated. 

J. J. Grullemans, Jr., of J. J. Grulle- 
mans & Sons, Lisse, Holland, is making 
his first trip to the United States. 

W. Atlee Burpee & Co., Philadelphia, 
are advertising their Farm Annual for 
1907 in leading European gardening pa- 
pers. 

It is reported that one English firm 
handles annually ten million valley pips, 
nearly all of which spend some mouths 
in cold storage. 

W. W. Eawson & Co., Boston, report 
that Gladiolus Harvard took so well that 
they were entirely sold out of it before 
the end of February. 

Henry Carr, president of the Ogemaw 
Grain and Seed Co., West Branch, Mich., 
says that sixty carloads of beans were 
shipped from Saginaw to Cuba last year. 

Does not the offering of seeds as 
premiums, or premiums on the purchase 
of seeds, lead the public to the belief 
that the seedsmen's stock in trade is of 
little real value? 

Josiah Young is moving to a new 
location, 375 to 377 Eiver street, Troy, 
N. Y., and when settled will have one 
of the finest stores in the country for 
handling seeds and flowers. 

The building occupied by the Spring- 
field Seed Co., Springfield, Mo., has been 
sold for $22,500, but as the purchasers 
bought purely for investment, the firm 



Giant-Flowering 



Highest Quality 



BEGONIA BULBS 



Extra Larg^ Size Bulbs, measuring 1^ to 2 inches 

BEGONiAS-TUBEROUS-ROOTED pe,.„, p„™ p,„». 

Single, separate colors, Scarlet, Crimson, Rose, White and Orange $0.35 $2.50 $28.00 

Single, choice mixed S*) 2 25 22.00 

Double, separate colors, same as above colors 60 4.25 38.00 

Double, choice mixed ; 50 4.00 85.00 

GLOXI Nl AS-GiSNT- FLO WERI NG "'^f^^^.S^^r i™. 

Separate colors, Spotted, Red, White, Blue, Red with white border, and 

Blue with white border, or mixed $0.50 $4.00 $35.00 

"•"^^^e^nIS?"'^ CHINESE PEONIES 

Exceptionally Fine Roots yrlth. 2 to 7 Eyes. 

Double white $1.50 per doz.; $8 00 per 100 Double red $1.25 per doz.; $7.50 per 100 

Double dark red 1.25perdoz.; 7.00 per 100 Double mixed l.OOperdoz.; 6.00 per 100 

Write for our Complete Bulb and Flo'^er Seed Cataloerue for Florists. 

JOHNSON SEED CO. M.rl'J.s.. Philadelphia, Pa. 

Herbert W. Johnson, of the Iat6 firm of Johnson & Stokes, President. 
Mention The Review when yon write. 



doubtless will not be disturbed at the ex- 
piration of its lease, which has some time 
to run. 

The onion set is still holding its own 
and, by the way, if it is true as reported, 
that southern California shipped 1,000 
tons of onion sets into Texas the past 
year, it is remarkable that so large a lot 
was overlooked when the crop reporter 
was sizing up the year's product. 



SAMPLING. 



Our congressmen have been setting an 
example for our seedsmen to follow, so 
that now we are getting free samples 
with at least one-half of the seed cata- 
logues that come to our tables. These 
are all intended as baits to catch trade, 
and as such are a menace to square deal- 
ing and to the honest seedsman. I take 
it that the honest seedsman with an es- 
tablished reputation does not need to 



send out these free samples, and the hon- 
est buyer does not care to be worked 
in this way. T"he average buyer of seeds 
does not care to take the time and trou- 
ble to test these sample packets, but pre- 
fers to rely upon the reputation of the 
seedsman for honest goods. Nineteen- 
twentieths of the sample packets thus 
sent out by our seedsmen were un- 
doubtedly never intended to be tested, 
but are calculated as baits for a con- 
stantly wavering trade. 

L. 0, Williams, 



WEATHER AND TRADE. 

Unseasonably cold weather west and 
south is holding trade back. The whole- 
salers are well caught up on advance or- 
ders and report fill-in business hardly up 
to expectations. It is thought that an 
unusual rush will take place when the 
east and south get thawed out. The cen- 



J,.^^-, ^..,.^ -^^, 



"* . ■ » ^^ ' ' ' ' .' 



•'•^■^•■•■.', ;T-P|»?-- 



1270 



The Weekly Florists' Review* mabch ^4. im. 



BRITANNIA 

Dutton's White Lawson, Improved 



Bright scarlet of large size limilar but better in every point than Victory, 
premier vases of scarlet W. F. C. S. £s P^^ ^oo, for plants in pots; 25 
at 100 rate. 

This variety sported at Bexley Heath. Qaite 
distinct from the American Sport, has improved 

Lawson habit, larger stem, greater perfume and if possible freer in flower, the best market white, size equal to 
White Perfection. For all-round points has no equal. £5 per 100, plants in pots; 25 at 100 rate. 



Tba best two KnKlisli Novaltlvs 
for 1907. 



A. F. DUTTON, THE NURSERIES, IYER, BUCKS, ENGLAND 



Mention The Review when you write. 



X^LBOBST STOCK OF AI.X; 

BELGIAN PLANTS! 

Asaleas, Araucarias, Sweet Bays, 
Palms, Beg^onias, Gloxinias, etc. 

LOUIS VAN HOUTTE PERE 

GHENT, Belgrium. 

Mention The Review when yog write. 

Manetti Stocks 

strong, healthy, well rooted, Enrliih- 
grown Manetti. $4.00 per 1000. IjatlB- 
factlon guaranteed. 

S. BIDE & SONS '^^iSSHna 

Mention The Review when yon write. 

tral west has not experienced the cold 
weather that has prevailed at other 
points; consequently the smaller dealers 
throughout Illinois, Ohio and Iowa are 
well ahead of the rush. This will ease 
things up somewhat when the wholesalers 
are called upon to meet the requirements 
elsewhere. Mail trade is coming about 
as usual and counter trade is beginning 
to open up. An early spring is predicted 
in the central west, as there is little frost 
left in the ground. The demand for 
onion seed is not as brisk as it should 
be; the high prices seem to be a factor 
here, many of the planters being inclined 
to hold off for lower prices. It is 
thought that the conditions fully warrant 
the high prices, however, and no anxiety 
is felt by those who have onion seed to 
sell. 



THE TULIP DISEASE. 

The many complaints that have been 
received during the last few years 
through the seedsmen and the trade gen- 
erally, in consequence of the fact that 
so often tulips in the beds of parks and 
private gardens failed to bloom, and 
even in many places failed to come alto- 
gether, now justify us in giving the re- 
sults of our trials and investigations in 
this direction for the benefit of all those 
interested. We have, for the last three 
years been making extensive trials based 
upon the discoveries of Prof. H. Kle- 
bahn, of Hamburg, who not only suc- 
ceeded in finding the cause of the tulip 
disease, but also the fact that it shows 
its existence in two distinct forms caused 
by the fungi Botrytis parasiticus and 
Sclerotium Tuliparum. 

To make a long story short, we might 
as well refrain from going too much 
into the details, and we therefore only 
give the main points here. Generally 
the disease caused by Botrytis shows it- 
self in the early spring, by the non- 
appearance or by the backward and sick- 
ly sprouts that come above the ground, 
and upon lifting such diseased bulbs one 
can easily find the cause of it in the 
shape of numerous small black fungi. 



GENIINE BERMUDA ONION SEED 

-.. CRYSTAL WAX SSSSJ^y 

WILDPRET BROS. ^"^ ?i2lS.^Sil«s?«"ff« 

We are the originators of the True Orystal Wax Onion and are ready to execute orders for this 
item if placed at an early date. Beware of spurious and cheap seed. If you ask some of the Texas 
growers their experience in the past years with a cheap Italian-grown Crystal you will certainly buy 
nothing but oar genuine seeds. 

Mention The Review when yog write. 



LILY OF 
THE VALLEY 

Extra fine pipS from Gold Storage 
for shipment any time desired. 

Japanss* and B«nnnd|k Jsilj Bnlbs, 

Amnoarlas, Asaleas, Bay TrMS 
Palms, Peonies, Bhododendrons, 

Boses, Bozweod, Bverffreens, eto. 
BAFFZA BArrZA 

For prices and catalogues please apply to 

H. Frank Darrow* Importer 

M Barclay St., P. O. Box 1*50. MairTork 

Mention The Review when yon write. 



"dammanjT&co/ 

Seed and Bulb Ghrowera 
mnd Merchant* 

San GioTannI a Tedncelo, near Naples, Italy 

EstabllBtaed 1877 
By Appointment to H. M. the King of Italy 

HEADQnABTBRS FOR 

CauHHower and Tripoli Onion Seed 
(Including Crystal Wax and Bermuda) 

And for all other Vegetable Seeds 

of Unrivaled Quality. 

All Flower Seeds grown on an enormous scale 

Ask for Our Wholesale Catalogue. 

Mention The Review when yon write. 



about the size of a pinhead; or in the 
case of Sclerotium Tuliparum, by larg- 
er dark brown fungi, that adhere to the 
old bulb or what is left of it. These 
fungi are usually to be found in many 
hundreds together and under certain fa- 
vorable circumstances in damp atmos- 
phere, they spore freely in the spring, 
and thus cause a rapid infection of the 
soil or of the surrounding plants of tu- 
lips. 

As these fungi keep alive in the ground 
and retain their vitality for at least two 
years, it is certainly not surprising that 
some grounds are so badly infected by 
the neglect of proper attention to de- 
cayed bulbs that no tulip bulbs can grow 
in them any more. It would be an easy 
matter to kill these fungi in the ground 
by the application of a good dose of car- 
bolineum or similar disinfectant, but ex- 
perience has shown that the cure is worse 



EstaUislicd 1B80. CaMn aMratt. Jaer^M Itan 
A. B. C Ck>de used. 

JACQUES ROLUND 

Seed Grower and Merchant 

NIMES. FRANCE 

Vegetable, Flower and 
Agricultural Seeds 

■peotelttes are Phlox DruaunondU 
and Lucerne of ProTonoe* 



MRS.H.BURNEn 

New Salmon-Pink Carnation for 1907 

A Seedling from Mrs. Lawson and an Bnglish 
variety. Awarded two first-class certificates and 
an Award of Merit. A lovely warm salmon-pink 
flower. Petals of rood shape and substance. 
Calyz perfect. Delightful clove fragrance. tH to 
ayi inches In diameter accordingr to season. Sterna 
18 to 36 inches. A rapid and easy grower. Very 
productive. Many shades deeper thanJIncluuit- 
ress and keeps its color better. Keeps lor a Ion? 
-time after being cut and travels splendidly. Just 
the shade that everybody wants and one not 
yet produced in America. Price, £6 per 100. 
established in 2-inch pots. 

H. BURNETT 

St. MarcwretB, GUKRITSKT, KNOLAND 

Mention The Review when yon writ*. 

SEED NOVELTIES 

ErynKlnm Alphlnm Superbam, as large again 
as the prototype; pkt, 20c; 10 pkts $1 CO; 100 pkts, 115 00. 

Salvia Bracteata, handy, much better for groups 
than Nicotiana Sanderae, flowers lilac, pkt., 15c: 10 
pkts., $1 25; 100 pkts., $12.00. 

Physostegia Vlriclnlca Compacta Rosea. 
pkt., 15c: 10 pltts., Jl 25; 100 pkts., $lf00. 

Remit by International P. O. money order. Send for 
complete list of Valuable Novelties and prices on quan 
titles. KOHLER S RUDEL, Windischleuba-Altenhurg. Germany 
Mention The Review when yon write. 

than the disease, because it will make 
it impossible to grow any crops whatever 
on ground thus disinfected for many 
years afterwards. The only practical 
plan, therefore, is to lift out any of 
the affected bulbs at the earliest possi- 
ble date in the spring, together with the 
surrounding soil, taking great care that 
nothing is being spilled, and have it all 
carefully destroyed by burning. If this 
process is, however, not done with great 
care, it had better not be done at all. 



' ...^^.li^ ■■■•■' ■■'*'■ - - .M«-ij.^i> ■•!.. yj^. V.-' A.U-X ^.:., ..■ w^.,.>.> : ..igj d.^,.>oviw-'.. .,-■>■ litv.w. .jL« ;-.::^ 



Mabch 14, 1007. 



The Weekly Florists' Review. 



127J 



The New Perpetual D DIT i lil lil I A 

Flowering Carnation Dill l/\lllllll/\ 

The moBt profitable camatioi^ in cultivation, aind one that never splits* Color, 
clear scarlet ; blooms of good size on long, stiff stems. Strong plants, £5 per 100. 
Cash with order. Please remit by International Postofiice Order. 

A. Smith, The Nursery, Enfield Bighway, Middlesex, England 



Mention The RpvIpw when" yon write. 



Danish Cabbage Seed 

Genuine White Amager 
Cabbage, $1.00 per lb. 

Improved Bed Danish 
Cabbage, $1.25 per lb. 

Brussels Spouts, New Im- 

grt»ved Danish, medium 
eight, a very fine hardy 
variety, 75c an oz. 

Mall orders will receive prompt attention. 

D.T.POULSEN SEED GROWERS 

70 Boskildeveg', Copanhag'en, Denmark. 

Mention The Review when you write. 




No.34i 



WiBOLTTS SNOWBALL 

cauufloWer-seed 

is the earliest of 
all Snowballs, thr<| 
. most compact, the 
surest header, is 

living the largest and snow. 

whitest heads, and is the 

best keefier in dry-wrailier. 

Demand it through your 

ired-firm or direct from 

R. WIBOLTT, NAKSKOV. DENMRlTj 



Mcntlwi The Bevlew when yoo write. 



CAULIFLOWER 
CABBAGE 



s 

E 
E 
D 

HJALMAR HARTMANN Si CO. 

Gro'wers for the Wholesale Trade Only. 
12 Stormcade. COPKNHAGKN 

Mention The Review when yon write. 

as the slightest spilling of any of the 
infected ground will cause more spread- 
ing and more infection. 

The foregoing suggestions are based 
upon the results of our own trials so 
far, but may be improved upon in the 
future, as experience will teach us. The 
fact that there are two distinct forms of 
fungi, which cause almost similar re- 
sults, may as well be left alone for the 
present, especially as sometimes the two 
diseases are mixed up together and thus 
make the distinction difficult. 

POLMAN-MOOY, 

Haarlem, Holland. 



THE BEST TUBEROSES. 

The best tuberose bulbs are not neces- 
sarily the largest, but they should be 
heavy and solid in proportion to their 
bulk, and it is in the choice of bulbs 
that one of the most important points 
in successful culture lies. Another thing 
is choice of variety, says the Gardeners' 
Magazine. * ' The African form does not 
compare favorably with the American 
form, known as The Pearl, which is the 
best type on the market, being naturally 
dwarfer and stouter and producing fully 
double flo\fers of good form and sub- 



Dahlias 



Awarded 10 
Gold Medals 
in 1903, 12 in 
1904, 12 in 1905 
and 12 in 1906. 



Pot Roots 



Awarded the Silver 
Medal by the Inter* 
national Jury 
at the St. Louia 
Exposition. 



POT ROOTS FOR SHIPMENT AT ONCF £:very section, IncludinRthe popular CACTUS. 
rvi KVVIJ rUKJHirincWI ni UWUC gj^^^ ^^^^ Pompon and single, at $6.00 per 

100 In 25 sorts. Better and newer kinds at S8.00 and S9.00 per 100. These are po«t xree 
terms. Note this when comparing: prices. Terms cash with order. 

TEMPTING BARGAINS ^hose who prefer to have their goods through a forwarding: 
■ ».i»a ■■»»« i»rai»wra«i».» house instead of by parcels post can be supplied in every section. 
Including Cactus, at S4.00, 95.00 and 06.00 per 100 in 25 sorts. 

12 SEEDLING CACTUS DAHLIAS AinjJ^-tf ^Brf-J^/^^r^a'tJ^SiK^lllr^ 

Groom, Gteorg e Gordon, Hereward, Lauretta. Mr. Keith, Mrs. J. W. Wilkinson, Osprey, 
Pink Pearl. Rainbow, Sweet Nell, Violetta. 

lOOS SEEDLING CACTUS DAHI IAS ^ rare opportunity; only a few to offer. One 
IWJ3CCUMWU ^,Wl.m3 U/tllLlftJ ^^^^ ^f ^^^ following 12 kinds post free for $8.00: 

Alfred Morgan. Antelope, Cockatoo, Harbour Light, Jeanette, Miss Dorothy Oliver, Nero, 
Rosy Mom, SirA. Lambi Tricolour, W. £. DickBon. W.Hopkins. 

1906 SEEPUNG CACTUS DAHLIAS gJ5A^°?AL^ti?g7J?.'.°'-".-!t?a'.'f-..?,ys^ 

Oaselton, Silver Wings. The Pilot and White Swan. 

Terms cash with order. Catalogue free on application. 

HOBBIES LIMITED, - Norfolk Nursorlos, - DEREHAM, EN6. 

LONDON DEPOT, 17, Broad Street Place. E. C. 



Meutiuu ihe Keview wheu you write. 




Plcea Pungens Glauca Eoster and Abies. 

H. DEN OUDEN & SON. ^^^^^JtiS^^SSti 

nursery stock for the American trade. Catalogue 
free on demand; also views in our nurseries. 
Mention The Review when yon write. 

stance; consequently it is the most de- 
sirable type to obtain for the main 
batches, though it does not reach us so 
early as the African form does. ' ' 

Before planting examine each bu^b, 
stripping off some of the outer scales, 
if necessary, and remove all prominent 
bulblets at the base. Any of these that] 
are overlooked will break away into 
growth later on, and must be rubbed off 
if the best is to be done with the main 
growth and spike. 



CATALCXJUES RECEIVED. 

Fruitland Nurseries, Augusta, Ga., 
wholesale trade catalogue; Monmouth 
Nursery, Little Silver, N. J., trade price 
list; Connon Floral Co., Hamilton, Out., 
wholesale price list of plants; Joseph 
Bancroft & Son, Cedar Falls, la., flowers 
and plants; Arthur De Meyer, Ghent, 



The Royal Tottenham 
Nurseries, Ltd.^'i'YIft** 

Managing Director, A. M. C. VAN DER £LST 

Dedemsvaart, Holland 

Headquarters for Hardy Perennlala, among 
which are the latest and choicest. 13 acres de- 
voted to growing this line, including Anemone, 
Aster, Campanula, Delphinium, Funkias, Hem- 
erocallis, Hepatica, Incarvillea, Iris, Peonies, 
Phlox decussata and suffruticosa, Primula, 
Pyrethrum.Tritoma. Hardy Heath, Hardy Ferns. 
Also 5 acres of Daffodils. 12 acres of Conifers, 
specially young choice varieties to be grown on; 
8 acres Rhododendrons, includiiig the best Amer- 
ican and Alpine varieties; 2 acres Hydrangeas. 
We make it a point to grow all the latest novel* 
ties m these lines. Ask for Catalog. 

Mention The Review when yon write. 



HOLLAND 
BULBS 



K.Veltliuys,Hille£om, Holland 

Ask for our wholesale trade list 
for Holland Bulbs. 

H. Be MAY & SONS 

FERN SPECIALISTS 

The finest collection of Ferns in Europe. 
Lists on application. 

Upper Edmonton, England 

Mention The Revle;w when you write. 



1272 



The Weekly Florists' Review* 



Mabch 14, 1907. 



Belgium, nursery price list; John H. 
Umpleby, Lake View, N. Y., gladioli; 
Charles Black, Hightstown, N. J., nur- 
sery price list. 



TYPES OF CANDIDUM LILIES. 

The bulbs of Lilium candidum are 
usually imported from the warm climate 
of the south of France, and are more 
or less liable to disease, against which 
there does not at present appear to be 
any really reliable preventive or rem- 
edy. Much of this trouble is caused 
through the bulbs being imported from 
such a warm climate, as the bulbs im- 
ported from Holland and North Ger- 
many are much more successful. Un- 
doubtedly the finest bulbs obtainable, 
especially for early forcing, are those 
grown undisturbed for some years in 
England, and such as are obtained by 
dealers from small country cottage-gar- 
dens. Another cause of trouble is the 
drying the bulbs undergo in lifting and 
transit, for of all bulbs of plants, Lilium 
candidum most resents disturbance, and 
it is better treated as a green plant than 
as a dry bulb. Another cause of trouble 
is that many Continental stocks, and 
more especially the French, are of a 
different variety to the English and, al- 
though many persons would deny it, two 
distinct types of this plant exist. The 
less valuable, and the type to be rigor- 
ously avoided, is in growth much shorter 
than the other. The blooms are smaller, 
not so pure white, and are not so freely 
produced. The leaves are also much 
narrower and less numerous on the stem; 
the bulb can also be easily distinguished, 
as the scales are much smaller and nar- 
rower, while the bulb is inclined to 'de- 
velop a "neck," and is almost identical 
in shape with that of the old purple 
"tiger lily," Lilium tigrinum purpu- 
reum, whereas the English type has very 
fat, thick scales, and the bulb is per- 
fectly flat on the top, with an entire ab- 
sence of any neck. — Gardeners' Chroni- 
cle, 

NEWPORT, R.L 



Current G>mment. 

Dahlia growers, commercial and pri- 
vate, are now hard at work propagating 
from cuttings for the increase of stock. 
Some of the choicest and largest col- 
lections of dahlias in the country are to 
be found here. Hitherto the largest col- 
lections were in the possession of private 
growers; this year it seems that two 
commercial men have, by recent heavy 
purchases, become the leaders in this 
respect. 

The ladies ' night of the Newport Hor- 
ticultural Society, March 5, was a de- 
cidefl success. 

In years past several Newport grow- 
ers experienced much diflBculty in re- 
tarding Cactleya gigas so as to have 
them when the season is at . its height 
afxd the flowers in greatest demand. This 
year the condition of a great many 
plants indicates that there need be no 
fear of their coming in too early. 

William Jurgens and wife have gone 
to Philadelphia for a short visit. Mr. 
Jurgens is one of the pushing young 
men in the business, so much so that a 
short vacation is well earned. 

Gibson Bros., despite the fact that 
their own cut of carnations was fully 
up to the average, purchased a great 
many more carnations from out of town 
this winter than ever before. Their 



PRIMULA SEEDS 



We handle the finest English strains of 
Primula Sinensis and can refer you to hun- 
dreds of satisfied customers. 14 Trade Trade 
Boddinston's Matcliless Pkt. Pkt. 
Giant, mixed. This selection in- 
cludes all my finest Giant Single 
Primulas of the plain-leaved class 60c 91.00 

Giant, pure white 60c 1.00 

blush white 60c 1.00 

" rose 60c 1.00 

§carlet 60c 1.00 

royalblue 60o 1.00 

Oboonloa Grandinora Konueslna* 

beautiful deep rose 50 

Alba, pure white flowers 50 

Mixed varieties, containing pure 

white to deep rose, height 9 inches 50 

Buttercup, floribunda erandUIora, 
small yellow flowers borne in great 

profusion, fine for pots 60 

Vorbesl (Baby Primrose) 26 



Sow now for 
Christmas Flowering 

PRIMULA KEWENSIS 

See Florists' Review, Boston report, 
page 1099, February 28. 

This charming addition to our greenhouse 
Primroses originated at the Royal Gardens, 
Kew. as an accidental cross between the 
small, bright-flowered Himalayan species, 
P. floribunda, and the sweet-scented P. verti- 
cillata, a native of \rabia. The plant is a 
strong grower, with bright green leaves, 
and numerous erect flowerscapes, 10 to 18 
inches in height, producing flowers in whorls 
at intervals along their whole length. The 
flowers are fragrant, bright yellow in color, 
with a slender tube and spreading limb, 
nearly an inch in diameter. As a winter- 
flowering decorative plant it is an acquisi- 
tion: its floriferousnesn when in a very small 
state is remarkable. Per pkt., $1.00. 



ARTHUR T. BODDINGTON, 348 w. i4th St.. new yore 



Mention The Review when you write. 



Aster Seed 

LATS BRANCHING, the best for florists' 
use; ideal form, very large, always on long 
stiff stems. In separate colors, large 
trade pkt., 20c; H oz., 30c; 1 oz., 80c. 

BABLT SNOWDRIFT, the earliest white. 
Trade pkt., 36c; % oz.. $1.00; 1 oz., $3.00. 

DAYBREAK, extra flne, trade pkt., 25c; 
14 oz., 40c; 1 oz., $1.25. 

Otber Seeds equally reasonable. 

Send for catalogue. 

NATHAN SMITH & SON 

Adrian, Mich. 



Mention The Review when you write. 



Dahlias 

Named varieties. 

Send for list. -,. 

OAVID HERBERT ft SQ^ ' 

SaocesBOirB to L. E. Peaibock. Inc. 4Xf?fk^Vj» 
Mention The Review when youwtlte. 



Sow now and save trouble in making 
cuttings, the Real Dwarf 

Ageratum, Mixed, Blue Star 

Trade pkt., 25c; 6 trade pkts, $1.26. 

My Wholesale Catalogue will guide you to 
Reliable Flower Seeds. Ask for same. 

0. Y. ZANGEN, Seedsman, Hoboken, N. J. 



Mention The Review when you write. 

sales of roses have increased in equal 
proportion. This firm has one house full 
of Easter lilies coming in just right, 
but they have in another house a great 
many that will not be in, right or wrong. 
Gibson Bros.' greenhouses are located 
in the heart of the best residence part 
of the city, which has of late increased 
in value to such an extent as to cause 
the owners to think seriously of build- 
ing residences on the ground and locat- 
ing their greenbbuses elsewhere. In the 
event of that taking place they will 
build several up-to-date houses. 

John Marshal], in his ' * By-the-Sea * ' 
greenhouses, has this, the second, season 
demonstrated to his entire satisfaction 
that his new seedling carnation is su- 
perior to Eobert Craig. In color and 
strength it is ahead of Eobert Craig, 
while as a bloomer it is much freer and 
has stifiFer and longer stems. Mr. Mar- 
shall has both varieties growing in the 
same house, under exactly similar con- 




fSPRING bulbs' 

IT 

IMBfEDIATK DELIVKRY 

Caladiums 

(Elephants Ear) 

Sound Bnlba; 
Live Center Shoots. 

5 to 7 inches in circiMn- 
ference, per 100. $2.00. 

7 to 9 Inches In circum- 
ference, per 100, $3.50. 

9 to 12 Inches in circum- 
ference, per 100, $6.00. 

12 inches and up, per 
100, $14.00. 

TUBEROSES Fe^a^'f ^''«*»"»°' 

Well cured stock. Now ready. 

First Blze. 4-6 per 1000, $10.00 

Medium size, 3-4 per 1000, 5.00 

We pay freight both ways 
if you don't like our goods. 

E. F. WINTERSON CO. 

.45-47.49 Wabash Ave.. CHICAGO 

Mention The Review when .von write. 



XXX SEEDS 

Terbena. Improved mammoths ; the Tery fineat 
grown; mixed, 1000 seeds, 26c. 

Cineraria. Finest large«flowerlng dwarf, mixed 
colors, 1000 seeds, 50c. 

Chinese Primrose. Finest larr«»flowerinr 
fringed varieties, mixed: single and double^ 
600 seeds, $1.00; half pkt., 60c. 

Pansy, Finest Giants. The best lar^e-flower- 
1ns varieties, critically selected; mixed, 600O 
seeds, 11.00; half pkt., 60c. Pkt. Mme. Perret« 
"gratis." 

Petunia. New Star, from the finest marked 
flowers, extra choice. Trade pkt., 2&c. 

Cash. Extra count of seeds in all packets. 

JOHN F. RUPP, Shiremanstown, Pa. 

THB HOMB OF PBUfBOSBS. 

Mention The Review when yon write. 

ditions, expressly provided for trial and 
comparison. It is understood that ani 
offer has been made to Mr. Marshall 
for this carnation, but that he has de- 
clined it. 

Several large consignments of hybrid 
perpetual and hybrid tea roses arrived 
here last week for private estates. 

The long continued cold weather i» 
telling heavily on growers of early 
grapes. James Mclrish lost nearly every 
vine in his grapery as a consequence of 
fumigating with hydrocyanic gas. This, 
is a dangerous agent, even in the hands 
of experts, as the above instance demon- 
strates. Growers of grapes have in late 
years been able to keep mealy bug at 
a safe distance by frequent fumigations 
with Nicoticide and, in the light of re- 






. ..■» -. -"-^■•■-.■■^- ■ ,l:.■-l^ .4.i^,-.'.' -f vj~-^.^...' V|,%, ■ ,J.(,^^|^.^I■■||^^^f.-.■^ .i<..f..^^ifc'j,j^ 



1' !, JW'TTT. 'T ^T" ^'l^: ■^yyi^^^r^^^'' ~y'™'''''^'^~' -"vv'fv- • ■""«•",.» '^■•'"'-^■..r. ■• •k'-. 



Mabch 14, 1907. 



The Weekly Florists' Review* 



J273 



3s: 



THE WORLD'S GREATEST ASTER 



Miss Kate Lock 



Colors— White, EnchanfereBS Pink. $1.00 per trade pkt. No checks. InstructlonB, 

"How to Grow Asters," with every order. Not gnsranteed anless bearing mj slRiiatare. 

J. H. LOCK, Aster SpeolaUst. 41 MANCHKSTER AVE., TOBONTO, ONT. 



Mention The Revlevy when yog write. 




GL3DIOLI 

GroflE's Hybrids, original stock. Gold Medal 
and Silver Trophy Strain: Sec. 1, 13.00; Sec. 2, 
9S 50 and Sec. 3, $4.00 per 100, in first sizes. Seed- 
lings of same, blooming size, uncalled, $2.00, $2.60 
and $3.00 per 100 respectively. Also in first sizes 
Crawford Strain, $1.00 per lOO; $7.00 per 1000. 
Seedlings of same, select, $2;00 per 100; $16.00 per 
ICOO. Lemoinei, select seedlings, $2.00 per lOO; 
$12.00 per 1000. Superb Mixture, $7.00 per 1000. 
May, $12.00 per 1000, and others. Send for list. 
My soil, climate and method are well adapted to 
(he production of mature, sound stock. 

JOHN H.UMPLEBY, LAKE VIEW, N.Y. 

Mention The Bevlew when yon write. 

Gladiolos Bolbs 

Our bulbs are not better than 
the best, but better than the rest. 
THY THEM. 

Gushman Gladiolus Go. 

STI^VAHIA, OHIO. 

Mentl<m The Review when yon write. 

Aster Seed 

Vick's Branching, late White Aster, $1.00 per 
oz.; $12.00 per lb. The above seed is from care- 
fully selected stock and should give good 
eatisfactlon. 

WHITE BROS., Gasport, N. Y. 

Mention The Bevlew when yon write. 

Augasta Gladiolus 

First size, 1% and up $12.00 per 1000 

Second size, 1M-1>^ 8.00 per 1000 

Gash with order. Satisfaction guaranteed. 

Rowelil&6ranz,Hlck$Yille,L.I.,N.Y. 

Mention The BeTle\^ when you write. 

GLADIOLI 

Write for trade price list of named Tarietles, 
assorted colors and fine mixtures. 

E. E. STEWART, Rlvea Jnnotlon, Mich. 

Mention The Review when yon write. 

cent happenings, they will continue to 
confine themselves to that preventive. 

Dealers in hard-wood ashes were here 
this week and booked a large number of 
orders. As a fertilizer hard-wood ashes 
is excellent, but great care is necessary 
i"n its application so as to avoid over- 
doing it. It should never be applied to 
land that is to be planted with potatoes, 
because it has the effect of making po- 
tatoes scabby and unfit for market. 

R. E. 



BALTIMORE. 



The Market 



Trade last week was fairly good and 
nearly everything was used up. There 
was a good demand for roses and carna- 
tions. The funeral of the late ex-Mayor 
Malster called for much funeral work 
and some expensive designs were made up. 

There is a glut of carnations. The 
street boys have them by the hundreds 
and dispose of them at almost any price. 
Eoses are steady, from $5 up, according 
to the quality. Violets are plentiful, 



TUBEROSE bulbs' 

Dwmrf Kxoelstor Pearl, first grade, selected bulbs, $9.00 per 1000. 

GLADIOLI 

100 1000 

America, the grandest gladiolus up to date, color soft pink $10.00 176.00 

White and Light Florists' Mixture 1.75 15.00 

Tuberous- Roofed Begonias, Gloxinias, Etc. 

Send for trade price list. 

CIRRIE BROS. CO. .r,^.r. Milwaukee, Wis. 

Mention The Review when yon write* 



Rawson's Primula Obconica. 

Is absolutely distinct from any other strain offered. IT HAS NO EQUAL NOR SUPK- 
RIOR. Our FRBSH CROP seeds are in and should be sown at once. 

RAWSON'S NEW GIANT. RAWSON'S NEW COLOSSAL. 

Per 100 seeds Per 1000 seeds Per 100 seeds 

Mixed $0.50 $4.00 Mixed $0.76 

Pink or Crimson !50 4.00 Rosea 75 

Pure White 50 4.00 Dark Lilac .75 

Herms Floral Co., Portsmouth, O., writes us February 1, 1907: "This season's Primulas 
andjOyclamen were the finest we have ever grown. From your seeds." 

RAWSON'S SEEDS ALWATS GIVE SATISFACTION. 



W. W. RAWSON & CO., 5 Inion St., Boston, Mass. 



P. S. We are now Sole Distributors for Boston for CARMAN'S 
ANTI-PEST. If you wish to know what it is, 
send for circular. 




Mention The ReTlew when yon write. 



GLADIOLI 



Beaatifully illustrated cata- 
log, colored plate, etc., des- 
cribing GrofiE's Hybrids, 

of 



Named 



GrofiE's 
Novelties 



rare 



Write 
for it. 



beauty, Mixtures and Collections to color and Fine Mixtares of all colors 

Arthur Cowee, "^I'^^rHiS' Berlin, N. Y. 



Mention The Review when yon write. 




We made this halftone 
from a 

WASH DRAWING 

one of many we made 
for 1907 

Seed Catalogues 

Our artists are the best 
in the United States on 
flower and vegetable 
drawing. 

Try our work on some 
of your special lists 
and you will give us all 
your order for the 1908 
general catalogue. 

We make a specialty of 

CUTS FOR SEEDSMEN 

All processes. Quick work if necessary. Satis- 
faction guaranteed. Special prices on orders 
placed now for cuts for 1908 catalogues. 
NO STOCK CUTS 

CRESCENT ENGRAVING CO. 

841-347 Clark St., CHICAGO 

Mention The Review when yog write. 

selling at fair prices. Many southern 
violets are on the market. Callas are a 
little more regular, bringing $2 a dozen. 




OUR WHOLESALE CATikL06UE 

for florists and market gardeners is NOW 
READY and will be sent free to all who ask 



for it. 



NEW CROP 



Flower Seeds are mostly all on hand now 
and we are prepared to fill orders {^-omptly. 
We handle only the highest grade seeds. 
Compare our prices before Drdertnc 
elsewhere. 

Gold storage Lily of the Valley Pips. 

best possible grade, 1000 in case, 112 per 1000. 

J. M. THORBURN ft GO. 

33 Barclay St., throufh to 38 
Park Placa, NEW YORK. 



Mention The Review when you write. 



Un^-tO* WW. *-...- ■■■■■.■■■ ■■ ■.. 1-:.-^ 



...k .......lu^.. 



£^A£>^>^....m1^ 



•T.-. -^T 



•••■v.'^^Y'..-; 



-; ■■> ■■ • :i^^^''"jji;^:.T 



MIA 



The Weekly Florists^ Review^ 



Maboh 14, 1907. 



^ 



Aster Seed 



Our descriptive price Hit of High- 
Grade Aster Seed is now ready and 
•will be sent free on application. Try 
our new varieties. Cardinal, Sunset 
and Rosy Carmine JBranching— they 
are winners. Price per pacltet, 25 
cents; two packets fot 40 cents. 

Puintera on how to grow Asters suc- 
cessfully Bent free with every order. 

VICK A HILL CO. 

p. 0. Box 6 1 3. aOCHESTER, N. Y. 

Mention The Review when you write. 



ri 



NEW STOCKS 

Flower Seeds for Florists 

WHOLESALE CATALOGUE READY 

Send for it today. But first read our 
advertisement on jpage 733 in the 
FLORISTS' REVIEW lor January 
24th, 1907. It is worth reading. 

James Vick's Sons 

Seedsmen ROCHESTER, N. Y. 



Mention The Review when you write. 

Greens are Btill scarce. Easter lilies are 
scarce and will be a short crop, it is 
feared, for Easter. BulbousN stock is in 
heavy supply and some of it has ad- 
vanced. 

The seedsmen are beginning to have 
their spring rush. ?-. 

QubMeetlnf. 

The regular meeting of the Baltimore 
Gardeners' and Florists' Club was held 
March 11. Officers were elected as fol- 
lows: President, F. C. Bauer; vice-presi- 
dent, M. Richmond; secretary, J. J. 
Perry; financial seerettiry, F. Talbert; 
treasurer, F. G. Burger; librarian, C. M. 
Wagner. The prize offered for the one 
who should secure the most new members 
during the year was won by J. J. Perry. 

Prof. T. B. Symons, of College Park, 
gave a fine talk on Jamestown. B. Vin- 
cent, Jr., & Son will make a big display 
of dahlias there. E. A. Seidewitz, F. 
Bauer, R. Vincent, Jr., C. L. Seybold 
and E. Frazer were appointed a commit- 
tee to keep up a floral display. J. Keur, 
of C. Keur & Sons, Hillegom, Holland, 
was present and told us about bulb grow- 
ing. 

I. H. Moss brought some splendid roses 
and Stevenson Bros, some good seedling 
carnations. 

Variout Notes. 

Shaw Bros., Dickeyville, Md., had 
e^OOO Lady Hume Campbell violets last 
Saturday which brought B5 cents to 40 
cents a hundred, wholesale, and retailed 
at 60 cents a hundred. They occupied 
Mr. Brummeral's stall in the market. 
Tnis was the first lot of double violets 
offered for months. 

August Eberhardt had one of the most 
tastefully arranged stalls in the retail 
market. Many persons stood and ad- 
mired the lovely blooms and business was 

StGSdV 

E. Holton has laid out the plans for 
a new greenhouse for John R. Bland, 
Catonsville. 




STOKES' STANDARD 
ASTER SEED 

Stole*** Late Branoblns Aater. Choice, American- 
Rp wn stocks in separate colors, 75o per oz.; mixed, 
60c per oz. 

Truffauta* Paony Perfection Aater. A splendid 
florist's Aster, lonar- stemmed sort, in separate colors, 
$1.60 per oz.; mixed, $1.25 per oz. 

New Crop Asparagus Plumosus Nanus 

Green]M>uae>Kroi;iai( per 100 seeds, 60c; per 1000 seeds, $3.60; per 6000 seeds, $15.00. 

SALVIA BONFIRE 

The best Dwarf Salvia, my own "Floracroft" crown seed, trade pkt., 25c; per oz., $1.50; 
per ^-Ib., $5.00. 

A NEW TYING MATERIAL 

Try it on your Easter plants; pleasins:, 
bright Kreen color; stronger and cheaper 
and better in every way than string or 
Raffia. 

Sample free. It is put uo in coils 
and on reels. In haddllog it the coil is 
placed In the pocket and the tape drawn 
from the middle. The brass reels are 
hung from the vest buttonhole. 

Price. Ocils, (enough for tying up 160 plants,) 60 each; 50c per dozen, (by mall). Reels, 
(250 yards), 76c each, $8.00 per dozen, (by express.) 



RAFFIATAPE 



gglTP 



\%^^ 



219 Market Street, PHILADELPHIA 



Mention The KeTlew when yon write. 



WKSTERM HKADQUARTKRS FOB 



Cold Storage Valley Pips 

ORDXR NOW FOR EASTER 

It pays to grow our Valley. Finest selected stock, $1.75 per 100; $14.00 
per 1000. Every case guaranteed and can be returned at our expense 
if not satisfactory on arrival. Place your order now for regular 
shipments as desired through season. 

Finest Cut Valley Constantly on Hand 

■ ■• nl« DlCUl^Sf Long Distance Phone. ** dllLAATU 



Mention The Reylew when yon write. 



B. E. FISKE SEED CO. 

Faneuil Hall Square, Boston 

New Crop Seeds now ready 

Aster Seeds gSTcSaSSa 

Mention The Review when yon write. 

M. M. Fiedler & Co. are displaying a 
choice variety of various kinds of ferns, 
palms and cut flowers in their large win- 
dow. Their store is one of the finest 
in northwest Baltimore. 

The labor question here is becoming a 
serious matter, as a new sewerage sys- 
tem is started and the docks are taking 
many hands ±rom the country, so the 
gardeners find it difficult to secure help. 

N. E. Shipley, Arlington, Md., out of 
three sashes picked 300 double violets in 
one day, the stems averaging about eight 
inches long and the blooms one inch in 
diameter. 

Part of the old McEoberts property is 
being divided into building lots. 

G. A. Lotze, Glen Burnie, is sending 



Bridgeman's Seed Warehouse 

Kstabllshed 18S4. BICKABD8 BBOS., Props. 

Importers and growers of high grade 

SEEDS, BULBS, PUNTS, ETC. 

37 East 19th St., NEW YORK CITY 

Telephone 4285 Gramercy. 



W.&D. SPECIALTIES for FORCING 

Mlcnonette "New York Market." Sweet 
Peas. "True," Christmas Flowering, (pink 
and white). Tomato, "The Don," "Stir- 
ling Castle." Mnshroom Spawn, "Eng- 
Ush" and "Pure Culture." Send for 1907 
catalogue. 

Woahor A. Ilnil ^^^ Merchants asd Growers. 

If BHllOl Ob UUII) 114 Chambers St., NEW YORK 



Mention The Review when you write. 

some extra fine Enchantress carnations 
to the Baltimore Cut Flower Exchange, 
and also some of his novelties in mums 
to Germany. J. L. T. 

Thb Eeview is the best, the most 
helpful and the most satisfactory^ paper 
in the trade today. — ^W. G. Newell, 
Galesburg, 111. 



._'lv ^±.A.. 



,.!.< ...A:. 



i^'M .....■■.■.,.'>.> -■j./.ie. lfc;t,iw-.f-.^--'»-.'.^l|f>i||||«nj||l •g'-. 



^•^J^ll.t^ 



t^.^fl..-. >^ -■>.., 



?>>r'7/< ' ' *PT 



'.'•-T^' ->^'^,''r'>'* -j^r«r.. ,- ■.-Ttr'T.-.i-j, ;7^-V 1 .• 



Mabch 14, 1907. 



The Weekly Florists^ Review, 



i275 






Boddington's Quality Begonias 




■lnBle-flow«r«d B«8onla. 



Doubleoflowered Besonia. 



SINGLE 

Large bulbs meas- 
nrinff 1% Inches 
and upward. 



f CMmson 

Boarlat 

Wlitta, pur* 

Boao 

Plnk.llclit 
{ Yellow 

Salmon 
I Orans* 
L Copper J 

Extra lartre bulbs, l^^incbes and up, same colors as above 50c 
per dot.; $2.75 per IbO; 135.00 per 1000. 



Separate colors, or 
all colors mixed. 

Doz. 100 1000 
85o $2.25 $20.00 



DOUBLE 

Large bulbs meas- 
uring lyi inches 
and upward. 

L 
Extra large bulbs. 



Crimson 1 

Scarlet 
Rose 

Wliite, pure 
Oranse 1- 

Sstlmon { 

Yellow 

Copper Bronze 1 
LlBht Pink J 

1}4 innhes and up. 



Separate colors, or 
all colors mixed. 

Doz. 100 1000 
55o $4.00 $S5.00 



75o per doz.; $4.50 per luO; $40.00 per 1000. 



same colors as above, 



BODDINGTON'S "QUALITY" GLOXINIAS fS^.T^i^Sy'S,^'!^. 



Blanobe de Vera, white, rose bordered. 
Defianeet glittering crimson. 
Kmperor William, blue, white border. 
Etolle de Feu, carmine red. 
Kalaer Frederick, scarlet, white margin. 
Kinc of the Beds, dark scarlet. 



60c per doz. 

$4.50 per 100 

$40.00 per 1000 

All Colors Mixed, 50c per doz.; 
$4.00 per 100; $35.00 per 1000. 



Bfme. Helene, white, with violet crown. 

Marquise de Peralta, white, red bordered. 

Mont Blanc, snow white. 

Prince Albert, deen purple. 

Princess Elizabetb, white, bordered blue. 

Princess Matbltde, white, with rose crown. 

Queen WlUielmina, dark rose. 



HARDY JAPANESE LILIES 



LILIUM AUBATUM ' Doz. 100 lOOO 

8to 9-lnch $0.76 $1.50 $60.00 

9toll-inch 1.00 8.00 76.00 

ntolS-inch 1.76 14.00 137.00 

LILIUM SPBCI08UM ALBUM 

8 to 9-inch bulbs 1.00 7.00 65.00 

9 to ll-inch bulbs 1.76 12.50 120.00 

11-iQCh and over 2.60 20.00 176.00 

DECORATION DAY ROSES 



LILIUM SFECI08UM MELPOMENE Doz. 

8to 9-inch bulhfl $0.75 

9 to H-inch bulbs 1.25 

LILIUM SPECI08UM RUBRUM 

8 to 9-inch bulbs 76 

9 to ll-inch bulbs 1.25 

11-inch and over 1.75 



100 

$6.00 

8.60 



1000 

$V5 00 
80.00 



5.50 60.00 

8.50 80.00 

12.60 110.00 



HARDY H. P. ROSES 



Pot now tor 
Decoration Day 

We offer exceptionally strong two-year-old dormant, low-budded stock (on Manetti), in the following varieties: 

Alfred Colomb, carmine. General Washlnarton, beautiful red, shaded carmine. 

Anna de Dlesbacb. bright carmine. John Hopper, beautiful rose-plok. 

a.ii »> B«A» ^„,.^ ™hif« ^^ France, the finest light pink. 

Bail ol Snow, pure white. Margaret Dickson, while, pale flesh center. 

Baron de Bonstetten, dark crimson, shaded. Blasna Charta, clear rosy pink. 

Baroness Rotbscblld, satiny pink, extra. Mme. Gabriel Lulzet, light, satiny pink. 

Captain Christr* delicate flesh color. Mme. Plantier, white. 

Duke o( Edlnbureb, bright vermilion, very fine. Mrs. John Laing:, soft pink; most desirable variety. 

Fisher Holmes, dark ricn scarlet. Paul Neyron, beautiful dark pink. 

Frau Karl Druscbki, the flnest white in existence. Prince CamiUe de Rohan, velvety crimson. 

General Jacqueminot, rich velvety crimson. Ulrioh Brunner, cherry red. 

Prices on H. P. Roses, $1.25 per 10; $11.00 per .100; $100.00 per 1000. 



HYBRID TEA ROSES 



THE KILLARNEY ROSE, Irish- STOwn from the raiser, 

good strong two-year-old plants, $3.00 per 10; $27.50 per 100. 

ETOILE DE^ FRANCE, superb crimson red velvet, the center 
o( the bloom vivid cerise red. The flowers are very fragrant and 
last long. This new variety is the result of a cross between Mme. 
Abel Ohatenay and Fisher Holmes. Field-grown, strong 2-year-old 
plants, $2.76 per 10; $26.00 per 100. 



Maman Cochet, pink. Maman Cochet, white. Un- 
equalled as bedders for summer blooming, producing buds of large 
size and ideal form. 

American Beauty, Clothllde Soupert, Kalserin Au- 

Srusta Victoria, Caroline Testout, Hermosa, strong, 2-year- 
old, $1.60 per 10; $12.00 per 100. 



ARTHUR T. BODDINGTON, 324 West 14th Street, NEW YORK 



^-^^-k-^j,!..^^^— .»j<.;^.:.-. ■■- -^^,1--. r-.rivt| j,-,-;- U'n-miiMTtJitUTiani'i'itV i" i r ..^,^:.^-^.l^-£ 



4 






1276 



The Weekly Florists^ Review* 



Mabch 14, 1007. 



VIOLETS— Plucked in evening, received 8 a. m* next day. Fancy Rliinebecic 
Steele, direct from the growers. Can supply any quantity. Write for EASTER Prices. 

PITTSBURG CUT FLOWER CO., Ltd. 

222 Oliver Avenue, PITTSBURG, PA. 

; Mention The Review when yon write. 



J. B. MURDOCH & CO. '°-"'=^J!:!'"« '^"~ 



545 Liberty Ave^ PiMai|, Pa. 



and 




i'Jd 




las 



MM^ 



The Cleveland Cut Flowel* ^Company 

WHOLESALE euf FLQWERS, FLOlRiSTS' SUPPLIES, WIRE DESiCNSj^f ^ 

U\5; Huron Road, / V W Cleveland, Ohio 



■sf* 



lientlon The ReTlew when yon write. 



LSST 

Call for 



ElKESiU) 6REEN CarnatioD Fliiil 



We Make 
Shipment on 
Day Order 
is Received 



p^M Ch4 Diri#rltf*lii^tt ria V ^^^^^ Carnations use AJAZ FLOWKR DTK. The only Dye on the market that will color 
■ or ^1. l^Oin^^ip: » mm^mj a beautiful Emerald Green and still allow the flower to retaiq its natural appearance. 
Money refunded if not satisfactory. Complete instructions free. Per quart by express $1.00. ^ Can only be had from 



!E. F. WINTERSGN CO., 



45-47-49 WABASH AVE., 

Mention The RcTlew when yow write. 



CHICAGO, ILL. 



PITTSBUHG. 



The Market 

The retailers in this city -will be 
glad to see the last of this Lenten sea- 
son. For several years Lent has not af- 
fected the trade to a great extent, but 
this season either religion has struck in 
deeper or the flower buyers were worn 
out with the busy, fashionable season 

:and are resting entirely. There were 
several funerals of prominent men last 
week, which created an exceptional de- 
mand for that kind of stock and made 
a fair week in a general way. There 
was great complaint of the slow trade. 

Among the wholesalers you do not 
hear so much complaint, for they seem 

.to think it has a depressing effect on 
their customers and for that reason re- 

• port business as all that can be ex- 
pected, but the evidence is in the ice- 
boxes full of stock and the quantities of 
stock the fakirs are carrying around. 

Various Notes. 

The Florists' Club met Tuesday even- 
ing, March 5, and had a fine display of 
blooming plants ^ otr exhibition. The 
subject for discussion being '/Easter 
Plants," there was a fair crowd pres- 
ent, although many were delayed so 
much getting home on account of the 
terrible snow storm and gale which came 
oVer the city at 6 p. m. that they were 
unable to get back for the meeting. 

John Bader was a visitor in the east 
last week. 

Miss Stoner, formerly with Miss Max- 
well, of Wilkinsburg, was married last 
week. Hoo-Hoo. 



Oswego, N. Y. — Patrick G. Campbell, 
whose greenhouses, consisting of 8,000 
feet of glass, were established in 1900, is 
enjoying a good business. The store, lo- 
cated on West Bridge street, was started 
in 1905, and enjoys a good patronage. — 



BOMBAYREED 
Window Boxes 
and Jardinieres 



are the best on the market; largely handled by lead- 
ing florists. We want YOU to know our full line. 
YOU can use it. Prices low and inviting. 

Write today for price list and Interest* 
ins cataloKue. 

BOMBAYREED MFG. CO. 

COLUMBIA, S. C. 




Mention The Review when yon write. 



Green 
Carnation Fluid 

Buy the genuine stuff from Mrs. Beu, THE 

ORIGINATOR, who made the first fluid and 

exhibited the first Oreen Carnations at the 

Chicago Chrysanthemum Show, 4 years aco. 

$1.00 per Quart. Pint. 50o. 

MRS. F. BEU 

60 Wabash Ave., or 2700 N. 40tli Ave.. 
CHICAGO 

Mention The Review when you write. 

The "Japana" Gut Flower Holder 

A handy article for florists. 
Sells to the trade on sight 
Made of glass in three sizes. 
The '^AnKlais" Table 
Decoration, something 
entirely new, long needed. 
The florist and housewife 
will appreciate this article, 
as it simplifies the art ot 
table decorating. Ask for catalog. 

M. V. Gornsey la gkI&gk, ill. 

Mention The Review when you write. 




Emerald Green Coloring, the best for Car- 
nations. Beady for use, tl.OO per quart. 

Manchester Chemical Co. 

8804 Hanehester Ave., ST. LOUIS, HO. 

Phones, Klnloch, Central 5313; Bell, Beaumont 81 
or C. A. KUIHN, 118« Pine St., St. Loala, Ho. 

Mention The Review when yon write. 

. GREEN 

Carnation Fluid 

For coloring white carnations green for St. Pat- 
rick's Day, price, Sl.OO per bottle. Write today 
for Vree Samples with full instructions. 

Edwards & Co., NewportyKy. 

Mention The Review when you write. 

Glenwood, Ia. — Mrs. E. E. Whipple 
is closing out her greenhouse stock and 
will handle cut flowers through the store 
for other florists. She is cutting some 
fine Lawson and Enchantress, but says 
the reds do not pay for bench room. 



;v .*-■ i.-i— '^ 



. V \..^^«&-La1*^i 



A^ 



^i|^)U(|jfWIJj|i_iff.J)J|LiJ«^'W!»9/'f'W^«t'v^^^ 



^?T 



T.T' 



Mabch 14, 190T. 



The Weekly Florists^ Review* 



M77 



Easter LHi 

A. M. CAMPBELL, Wholesale Florist, 




From the greenhouses of Henry I. Faust, Merion, Pa. 

These Lilies are the best grown plants around 
Philadelphia, averaging three flowers to the stalk, 
which is of good length. Price, $15.00 per 100. 

. 1510 Sansom St., PHILADELPHIA, PA; 



Mention The Review when you write. 



DFIViri V A I BERGER BROS. 

H^^^^wl^M^^^ W T'^LMm^ have removed to their 



^Wholesale Florists, 
new store at 



1305 FILBERT STREET, 



Where all orders will be promptly and carefully executed. 

^ " Mention The Review when yon write. 



PHILADELPHIA, PS. 



Wholesale Gut Flower Prices. 

Pblladelpbia. March 13. 

Per doB. 

BeaatleB, SpeclalB 98.00to 19.00 

Extra 

* •' Medium 

Short l.OOto 1.50 

Per 100 
•ridea and Bridesmaids, Fancy... $12.00 to 115 

Select... 8.00 to 10 
Ordinary 3.00 to 

Blchmond, Liberty, Fancy 15.00 to 

" , Select lo.ooto 

" Ordinary 4.00to 

Cfilalrttey, Ohatenay, Select 10.00 to 

ordinary.... 4.00 to 

€(oldenQate, Select 10.00 to 

" Ordinary 4.00to 

Ctiirnations, Fancy. ...» 3.00 to 

^ " Select : 2.00to 

Ordinary.... l.OOto 

aarrlsli Ulies.per dOE.,$1.50 to $1.75 

Adiantum Ouneatum 

Hybridmn 

Asparagus Plumosus, Strings 

" Sprays, bunch 50c 

X ^'' Sprengeri, bunch... 60c 

flimlax 15.00 to 

Valley 8.00 to 

Cattleya Schrocderse 60.00 to 

Callas per dos., 11.00 to $1.60 

Violets, Single 25 to 

, ", Double 60to 

" White 

Gardenias. . . $2.00 to $2.60 per doz. 

Pansies 

Snapdragon 2.00 to 

fancy e.OOto 

Sweet Peas 40to 

Daisies, White and Yellow 1.00 to 

Paper White Varcissus 2.00 to 

Mignonette 2.00to 

Daflodils 2.00 to 

White Lil acs, peH>nnch, 60c 

Freesias .../...;> 2.00 to 

Tulips 2.00 to 

Dendrobiums 8.00 to 



,00 
00 
.00 
.00 
.00 
.00 
.00 
00 
.00 
.00 
.00 
.50 
.60 

.00 

.50 
00 



20 
4 

75 



.00 
.00 
00 

.50 
.75 
.60 

.50 
00 
00 
75 
00 
00 
.00 
00 

.00 
00 
00 



Pittsburg, March 13. 
Per doz. 



Beauties, Specials $ 4. 

Fancy 2. 

Medium 1 

Short 

Brides and Bridesmaids, Fancy... $12 

Medium.. 8, 
Short.... 4. 
fUchmond, Specials 

Select 10. 

Ordinary 

Klllamey 8. 

€hatenay 8 

Ferle 

Bon Silene 

Cusln 4, 

Carnations, Ordinary 1. 

Fancy 

Sweet Peas 

Adiantum 1 

Asparagus Plumosus, Strings 80, 

Sprays, bunch, 40c-50c 

Sprengeri, b'h, 40c-50c 

SmUax 16 

Valley 8 

Violets, double 

Paper Whites 

Roman Hyacinths 2, 

Freeslas 1 

Tulips 



.00 to $ 6.00 
60 to 8.00 
.25 to 2.00 
.60 
Per 100 
.00 to $15.00 
00 to 10.00 



.00 to 

00 to 

00 to 
00 to 



00 to 
50 to 

60 to 
00 to 
00 to 



00 to 
00 to 
60 to 

00 to 
00 to 



6.00 

15.00 

12.60 

6.00 

15.00 

16.00 

6.00 

4.00 

8.00 

2.00 

8.00 

1.26 

1.60 

60.00 



20.00 
4.00 
.76 
8.00 
8.00 
8.00 
8.00 



I THINK the Beview is the best paper 
for florists. It is a great help and very 
instructive. — P. W. Mason, Bernardsville, 
N. J. 



W. E. McKISSICK, Wholesale Florist 

1881 FILBSRT STRUT, PHILADKLPHIA 

['▲CTE'D m AIWITC^ choice collection, including 
LAO I LK r LAnI I ^ >» the leadim t v>rietie,. 

Mention The Review when yon write. 



EUQENE BERNHEIMER ^^^'^r^'^Jr'- *• 

11 SOUTH 16TH 8TBBBT. PHIIiADBLPHIA, PA. 

Mention The Review when yon write. 

All Growers not Satisfied with present returns will do 
well by consigning to WILLIAM J. MOORE, 

Wholesale florist, 1237 Filbert St., Philadelphia, Pa. 

Mention The Review when yon write. 



WILLIAM J. BAKER 

CARNATIONS, DAISIES 
SWEET PEAS AND VALLEY. 

WHOLKSAUE FLORIST 

1432 So. Penn Square. PHIUDELPHIA. PA. 

Mention The Review when you write. 

MEFHROLKPI8 WHITMANI, 

* ^ 6-inch pots $12.00 per doz. 

lUKPHROLXFIS SCOTTII. 

*^ 6-inch pots $6.00 per doz. 

DANDANUS VKITCHII, 

■^ 6-inch pota $12.00 per doz. 

8-inch pots $2.00 each. 

JOHN Welsh young, 

Germantown, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Mention The Review when you write. 

Pittsburg Florists' Excliange 

15 DIAMOND SQUARE 
217-223 DIAMOND STREET 

All Cut Flowers and Florists' Supplies 

Mentl<m The Review when yon write. 

Rice Brothers 

113 North 6th St. 

Wholesalers and shippers of home-grown Out 
Flowers, comprising the newest varieties of 
blooms. Full line of Supplies and DecoratiTe 
Greens. Trial order solicited. Weekly price 
Ust Issued. MINNEAPOLIS, MINN. 



BiPHILADELPHIA 
CUT FLOWER CO. 

WHOLESALE FL0BIST8 

Store opens 7 a. m., closes 8 p. m. 

PHILADELPHIA 



1616 and 1618 
Sansom Street, 

Mention The Review when yon write. 



Men 



ROSES i CARNATIONS 

FAIfCT FERNS and eALAX-Hlgh-Grade Stock 

Orders filled Batlafactorlly. 

Detroit Cut Flower Supply House 

Wholesale CoaimfssiOB Florist. I. T. hires, Prap. 
6 Adams Ave. West, Detroit, Mloh. 

Home Phone 164. Bell, Main 974. 
Mention The Review when yon write. 



P 



CHAS. D. BALL 

GROWER or 

ALMS, ETC. 

Send for Price List. 

HOLMESBURG, PHILADELPHIA, PA. 

Mention The Review when yon write. 

UNITED STATES 
CUT FLOWER CO. 

Wholesale Florists 
ELMIRA, NEW YORK 



Always Mention the.... 

Florists' Review 

" ~ . When Writing^ Advertisers 



/ 



r-^-5ir?^,T^^^;r.q^fc,^^^Wiy^'.r. •4^r^^'fr;vt^g^:^-*i 



TrvrrtTT.' 



^"^-m-^:^, ■ 



-rw^TTTSic^^ir 



.^*!tT!w!? 



1278 



The Weekly Florists' Re view» 



March 14, 1907.' 



Charles MiUang fZT^ 



OUT-OF-TOWN FLORISTS 
FOR EVERY KIND of Cut promptly attended to. Telephone 
Flowen in THEIR SEASON for what yoti want. 
BeMoaable Priees, S«bu« Dealiog. Tel. 8860* S861 Msdlion Saure. 



We are HEADQUARTERS 
VERY KIND of Cat 



FBANK H. TBABMDLY 



CHABLB9 SCHBMOK 



TRAENDLY « SCHENCK 

Wholesale Florists and Cut Flower Exchani^e 

44 W. 28th street. NEW YORK 

Telephones, 798 and 799 Madison Square. CONSiaNMENTS SOLICITBD 



THOMAS YOUNG 

Wholesale Florist 

48 West 88th St., NEW YORK 

BaceWer and Shipper of Cut Flowers. 

OonslKnments Solicited. 

Mention The Berlpw wben 70a write. 



HEADQUARTERS FOR NOVELTIES 

ORCHIDS A SPECIALTY 



THE HIGHEST \/AI I TV ALWAYS 

GKADK OF V M L.L.EL T ON HAND 

GARDENIAS, DAISIES, ROSES AND CARNATIONS 



ALWAYS 

ON HANI) 



JAMES McMANUS, 



■»lil.l >9.» 



:;.42W. 28th St.. New York 



WHOLESALE 
COMMISSION 
DEALER* 

CUT FLOWERS 

Coi|slgnment9 Solicited 

T«l. 107 IbuUaon Sqiuur*. 

Established 1887. 



J. K. ALLEN, 

Boom for • few more f lrit«elasa, aroweni of Amertoan Beacntles w 

Violets and Carnations. 



Rosesy VIoletSy 
Carnations, 

Gattleyas, Cyps., Narcissus. 

Open 6 a. m. 

106 W. 28th SU 
NEW YORK 



Mention The Beylew when yon write. 



GEO. SALTFORD 

WHOLESALE FLORIST 

46 W. 29th St.. NEW YORK CITY 

Telephone No. 8393 Madison Square. 

C8NSI6IIMENTS OF ALL FMST-CLASS FLOWERS SOLICITED. 

Mention The BeTlew when yon write. 

RONNOT BROS. 

^^ WHOLESALE FLORISTS 
BS and 57 W. MtH Street. llCyU YnRK 

Cut nowar szoiwnre. ntff I univ 

OPEN ALL DAY 

Aa Uaexeelled Oatlet for CONSieilED FL0WEB8 

Telephone No. 830 Madison Sq. 
Mention The ReTlew when yon write. 

JODN YOUNG 

Wholesale Florist 

51 W. 28tb Street, NEW YORK 

Telepbone8-4463-1464 MADISON. 
Mention The Reriew when yon write. 

WALTER F. SHERIDAN 

Wholesale CommlMlon Dealer In 

CUT FLOWERS 

39 W. 88th St.. NKW YOBK 

(Kstabliahed 1882) 
ReceiTlnr Kxtra Quality American Beauties 

and all other rarieiles of Roites. 
Tel. 3&32-35a» MadiBon Sq. Carnatlona. 
Mention The Reylew when yon write. 

Reed & Keller 

122 W. 25th St.. New York 

FLORISTS' SUPPLIES 

We manufacture all our MKTAI. DK8IGNS. 
BASKETS, WIRE WORK and NOVELTIES 

and are dealers in Glassware, Decorative Greens 

and all Florists' requisites. 

Mention The Reriew when yon write. 



HOU 
WILL 



WILL FIND ALLf THE 



BEST OFFERS ALL the time 

in the REVIEW'S CLASSIFIED ADVS. 



Wholesale Cut Flower Prices. 

New York. March 11. 
PerlOO 

Beaotlei, Specials ISO.ootoS 60.00 

Fancy 85.00to 40.00 

Extra ao.OOto 25.00 

No.l lO.OOto 18.00 

No. 2 6.00to 8.00 

Shorts 2.00to 4.00 

Brides and Maids, Special 6.00 to 10.00 

Extra S.OOto 6.00 

No.l S.OOto 4.00 

No. 2 2.00to 8.00 

Golden Gate. Obatenay 8.00 to 12.00 

Kfllamey S.OOto 12.00 

RldimoDd 4.00to 20.00 

Orchids. Oattteyas 40.00to 60.00 

Oypripediams lO.OOto 15.00 

Gardenias 15.00to 80.00 

Oamations, Oommon l.OOto 1.S0 

Selects 1.60 to 2.60 

" Fancies and Boyelties S.OOto 6.00 

Violets .16ta .40 

Adlantom Onneatnin 60to 100 

Oroweanum l.OOto 1.26 

Asparagus Plnmosas, Btrlngs 26.00 to 60.00 

Sprengeri, boncbes ... 10.00 to 16.00 

Lilies S.OOto 12.00 

Uly of tbe Valley l.OOto 2.00 

Smllax S.OOto 16.00 

Narcissus 50to 2.00 

Dallas S.OOto 12.00 

Hyacinths 50to 2.00 

Tulips 60to 4.00 

Lilacs btmch, 35c to 60c 

Daisies.... l.OOto 2.00 

Mignonette lOOto 6.00 

B, S. SLINN, Jr. 

WHOLESAI^ FLORIST 
U and 57 W. Mth St.. NEW YORK Cm 

Telephone, 8864 Madison Square. 

Roses and 
Caraations 



Violets 



Mention The Review when yon write. 

Gunther Bros. 

so West Mth Stre et, f 
Pbone, 551 Madison Square, N«W YORK 

VioletSt Roses, Carnations, Orchids. 

Established 1SS8. 

GROWERS— Important — Special advantages 

for you this season. Wxite or see us. 

Mention The Review when yon write. 

FOLEY'S FLORAL FOTOSRAPHS 

FLORAL ALBUM, size 12x11, 
containing 24 diiTerent funeral designs, 
by express, $5.00 0. O. D. 

226-228>^ BOWERY, NEW YORK 

Mention The Review when yon write. 



ESTABLISHED 1879 



PERKINS &SCflDMANN 

Wholesale Coininissioii Florists 
""S^i^xVir'' NEW YORK 

Tel. No. 1000 Madison Sanare 

Mention The Review when yon write. 

FORD BROSi. 

48 W. 28th Street. NEW YORK 

Telephones. 8870-3871 Madison Square 

"•.':?sL'r7,Fresli Cut Flowers 

4^A complete assortment of tbe best in tbe 
marliet can always be relied upon. 

Mention The Review when yon write. 



o. BONNxrr 



O. H. BLAKE 



BONNET & BLAKE 

Wholesale Florists 

106 Livingston St., BROOKLYN, N.Y. 

Telephone 4638 Main. 
Conslg^nmentB solicited. Out-of-town ordera 
cai-efuily attended to. Give ub a tria:t. 

Mention The Review when yon write. 



1871 



James Hart: 



1007 



(Tbe OrlaHnal Pioneer Houae) 

"^SaVr^iS CUT FLOWERS 

108 West 88tli St., near om Ave., 

Telephone 626 Madison Square, NEW YORK. 
BVERTTHINO IN CUT FLOWERS 

FROM THE BEST GROWERS. 

Mention The Review when yon write. 

WM. STARKE 

Wholesale Florist and Plantsman 

Tel. 4532 Madison Sq. 82 W. 20tll St. 

Between Broadway and 6th Ave., Ilmvr York 
SHIPMENTS OF PLANTS made to any 
part of the country. A trial order solicited. 

SATISFACTION GUARANTEED. 

Mention The Review when yon write. 

H. KENNEY 

Wire Desigrns Packing Moss 

88 Bockester Ave. and 1801 Dean St. 
^ BROOKLYN. N. Y. 

GREEN MOSS, 75c a Bag 

Mention nie Review when you write. 



^ 



.a.... .'i^JiJLJ-ijJiA.'^'Li.^\-S^..iiJkV3l\t 



.■''■:^ .j^ .'^an.^ .Ji.tt\^.. *■• 



„.uuJ^ 



y?r?s«'WT'(5t'^T<?r 






, n * r.f* r"^-^ 



^/■' 



March 14, 1907. 



The Weekly Florists^ Review* 



127? 



11 



THE RELIABLE HOUSE" 

now. 28tli Sf. ^.Tt^-SS'-k NEW YORK CITY 

Bos*a, CSBnuttlons, VaII«r. Orolilda, <3acd«nia«. Violeta and 

Kvery VaxMty of Cut Flower*. 
Blohmond Roses— Out-of-town staipmenta. Write or telegraph for them. 

JOSEPH S. FENRICH 



Moore, Hentz & Nash 



Wholesale 
Florists 



BS.BT W. 86th St. 

NEW YORK CITY 
SHipprao ON coionssioH 

T«l«plioiM. 7M Madison Sqiuws 



Alexander J. Guttman 
THE WHOLESALE FLORIST OF NEW YORK 

43 WEST 28th STREET 

PHONES, 1664 1665 .MADISON SQUARE 

ENOUGH SAID 



H. E. FRONENT 

Wholesale Commission Florist (Successor to W. Ghonnley) 

Receiver and Shipper of All Varieties off Cut Flowers 



Telephones, 2200 and 2201 Madison Square. 



S7 Wost astb St., NEW YORK 



WINSOR 

The latest carnation wonder of the F. R. Pier- 
son Go. Best seller, best keeper, best everl 
Sold exclusively by the 

NEW YORK CUT FLOWER CO. 

Jss. A. Milssi, M|r. Csofaa Bldff., Nsw York 

Mention The Reylcw when yom write. 

THE KERVAN CO. ^^iS^'VSi*- 

Wholesale dealers in Freah Cut Palmetto and 

Sroaa Palm Leaves, Oalax, lieucothoe. Ferns, 
oases, all Decorating Bvergrreens. 

Mention The Beview when yon write. 

HENRY R. CRAWBUCK, 

Wholesale Djsaler in 

Wild SsiUax, Galax, Palm Lssres, 

Leaeothoe Sprays, Faaey and Daner Fans, 

S70 Fowl St., BBOOKLTN, N. T. 

Mention The Review when yon write. 



Tfie History and Culture 

GRAFTED ROSES 

For Forcing 

BY ALEX. MONTGOMENY, JR. 



** The most lutportant contribution to 
the modem literature of the Rote." 

"Of much interest to every Rom 
grower and of utmost value to 
growers ol Grafted Roses.'' 

Containing Practical Description of 
the Process of Grafting with FuU 
Details of planting andculture, also 
Directions for treatment to carry tiic 
plants a second year. 



FULLY ILLUSTRATED 
PRICE, POSTPAID, 26o. 

ADDRESS 

FLORISTS' PUBUSHIN6 GO. 

Oastoa Bldg., 834 S«axl>oni St. 

CHICAGO 





N. LECAKES & CO. 

S3 W. 28th St., NEW YORK 

Tel. No. 1415.1416 
Madison Sqvuuro 

Stands at Out 
Flower Exchansre. 
Ooogan Bldg.. W. 

26th Street, and 

84th Street Out 

Flower Market. 

SPEOiAiynss: Galax Leaves, Ferns and Leaco- 
thoe Sprays, Holly, Princess Pine. Moss, Southern 
Wild Smllax and all kinds of Evergreens. 

Green and Bronze Oalax Leaves 

Mention The Review when yon write. 

A. M. HENSHAW 

Wholesale Commission Florist. 

Consignments of first-class stock solicited. 
Prompt returns. 

''THE SQUARE DEAL** 

guaranteed to all who deal here. 

8S Wsst 28tli Street. MRW YHPK 
Tel. 6588 Madison Square, '^s-" l\/l\l\ 

Mention The Review when yon write. 

The Geller Florist Supply Co. Inc. 

110-112 W. 26tb St.. NKW YORK 

Telephone 6239 Madison Square. 

PuU line of FLORISTS* SUPPLIES and 

all Decorative Greens, Ribbons and Novelties. 
We manufacture all our Metal Wreaths, Baskets 
and Wire Work. Come and see the new store. 

WILLIAM H. KIEBLER 

Wholosale Commission Dealer In 

CUT FLOWERS 

Room for the products of growers of first-class stock. 
"WATCH US GROW I" 

88 Willoui^hby St., Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Tel., 4591 Main. 



H" 



ONOUNCING 

DICTIONARY 



A list of PLANT NAMES and the 

Botanical Terms most frequently met 

with in articles on tnide topics witii 

the G>rrect Pronunciation for each. 

Sent postpaid on receipt of 25c. 

FLORISTS' PUBLISHING CO. 
334 Dearborn St. Chicago. 



Ty^eorae ^o/<k>na^ ^ ^oo. 




Wholesale and Setail Dealers 

laaUkindaof 

greens ^V 

FANCY and ' ^^ 

DAGOBB FBBNS. 
GAIjAX— Brown and Green. 

50 West28tii St., NEW YORK CITY. 

LEUCOTHOE SPRAYS, PRINCESS PINE. 
HOUY. SOUTHERN WILD SMILAX. 

Telepbone 1S09 BCadlsoa. 

Mention The Review when yon write. 

J. Soligman Josoph J. Lovy 

JohnSeligman&Co. 

Wholesale Florists 

66 WEST 26th STREET 

Tel. 4878 Madison Sq. NEW YORK 

Opposite New York Cut Flower Co. 

Mention The Review when yon write. 

RUSSINSHANFLING 

Office and Salesroom 
114 West 28tli Street, NBW YORK CITY 

Manoiacturera and Importers of 

WILLOW and FANCY BASKETS For Florists 

Dealers In Florists* Snpplles 

IVOur Specialties, Wheat Sheaves and Baskets 

Mention The Review when yon write. 

C. W. EBERMAN 

WHOLKSALK FLORIST 

FL0WERIN6 & OECORATIVE PLANTS 

of Brery Description. 

53 West 30th St. New York Oity 

Mention The Review when yon write. 

A. L YOUNG « CO. 

WHOLKSAI.I: FLORISTS 

CONSIGNMENTS OF CHOICB 

CUT FLOWERS SOLICITED 

Prompt Payments. Give us a trial. 

64 West 88th St. NEW YORK 

Telephone, 8559 Madison Square. 
Mention The Review when yon write. 

A. HERRMANN 

Deparfmenf Store 
For Florists* Supplies 

Factory, 709 First Ave., bet. 40th and 4lBt Sti. 

Office and Warerooms, 404, 406, 406, 410. 412 
East 84th St.. NBW YORK. 

Mention The Review when yon write. 

The best way to collect an account la te 
place it with the 

National Florists' Board Of Trado 

66 PINE ST., NEW YORK 

WhyT Because many debtors will pay the Board, 
fearing otherwise a bad ratine in our Credit List. 
Full information as to methods and rates giveo 
on application. 

Mention The Review when yon write. 



hyi. 



-"•'•-^' -'••-"'•- hrfinif lUi-- -■«- -■-'■-J-'-^^:-^ ■J.—' "■■^-'^■*-"' 



^ 



■ r-'^.-.^T' 



i.x-»T> T\py^''7^r^y--.T^'T-' i^sis"!^", t?3JPiw^f .■!■.*>"■:' •^'^ 



12S0 



The Weekly Florists^ Review* 



Mabch 14, 1907. 



Vaoghao & Sperry 

WHOLESALE aORISTS 

58-60 Wabash Ave., CHICAGO 

Write for Special Prices 
Mention The Review when yon write. 



Wholesale Gut Flowe 

Oblcai 
Beantlei. Ions stems. ....... ....... 


r Prk 

to, Marct 
Per do 

Perl 
$ 8.00 to 
4.00 to 

10.00 to 
4.00 to 

12.00 to 
6.00 to 
5.00 to 

10.00 to 
4.00 to 
5.00 to 
5.00 to 
5.00 to 
5.00 to 
2.00 to 
8.00 to 

15.00 to 

12.00 to 

2.00 to 

3.00 to 

2.00 to 

.60 to 

2.00 to 
8.00 to 


les. 

1 13. 
z. 
$6.00 


" 86-lncb Btems 


5.00 


" 80-lDchBtema 


4.00 


24-lnch stems 


8.00 


" 20-inch stems 


2.00 


" 15-inch stems 


1.50 


'* 12-inch stems 


1.00 


" Short stems 


.75 


Bridesmaids, Specials 

Firsts 


90 

$10.00 
6.00 


Brides, Specials 

Firsts 

Richmond, Specials 

Firsts 


12.00 

8.00 

18.00 

10.00 


Uherty 


12.00 


Golden Gate, Specials 

" " Firsts 


12.00 
8.00 


Killamey 

Uncle John 


16.00 
12.00 


Perle 


10.00 


Ohatenay 

Oarnattons. Select 

Fancy 

Violets, double 


12.00 

2.60 

4.00 

.60 


single 

Oattleyas per doz., $6.00 

D«ndrobium— 
FornlOBiim....dos., 18.00 to $6.00 

Oypripediums...doz., 2.00 

Harrisii 


.5$ 
20.00 


Oallas 


15.00 


Valley 


4.00 


Jonquil... 


4.00 


Tulips 


5.00 


Sweet Peas 


1.00 


Paper Whites, Romans 

Freesias 


8.00 
4.00 


Mlflmnnettfi - 


10.00 


Asparagns. Strings 

" Sprays, per bunch 75c 

" Sprengeri, " 25-85C 

Ferns per lOOO. $2.60 to $8.00 

Galax per 1000. 1.00 to 1.60 

Adiantnm Onneatum.............. 


60.00 to 

1.00 to 
15.00 to 

D, March 
Per d 

PerK 

$ 8.00 to 
6.00 to 
3.00 to 

20.00 to 
8.00 to 
6.00 to 
1.60 to 
.60 to 
1.00 to 

40.00 to 
1.00 to 
1.00 to 
8.00 to 

15.00 to 

10.00 to 
.40 to 
2.00 to 
2.00 to 
2.00 to 
.60 to 
3 00 to 
$.00 to 

1, March 
Per do 

PerK 
1 6.00 to 
2.00 to 
.75 to 
1.00 to 
1.00 to 
3.00 to 

25.00 to 
1.00 to 
2.0$ to 


60.00 

.80 

.15 

1.60 


Croweanum 

Smllaz per doi., 92.00 to $3.00 


2.00 
20.00 


Buflali 

Beauties, Specials .'.\r.4.. 

Fancy 

Extra 

First 


13. 

9Z. 

$8.00 
5.00 
8.00 
2.00 


Brides and Maids, Extra 

No.l 

No. 2 


M 

$10.00 
8.00 
6.00 


Ulrich^runner 

Golden Gate 


26.00 
6.00 


Perle 


8.00 


Oamations 

Adiantnm Onneatum.............. 


3.50 
1.00 


Croweanum 

Asparagus Plumosus, Strings 

Sprays 

Sprengeri " 

Smllax 

Harrisii 

VJolefci ,.. 

Romans and Nardssi....... 


1.50 

50.00 

2.00 

2.00 

4.00 

20.00 

15.00 

.75 

8.00 


Tulips ^ 

Daffodils 


300 
8.00 


Sweet Peas 


1.00 


MifTDonette • . . 

OaIIar 


5 00 
12.00 






Olevelanc 

Beauties, Specials 

Extra 


13. 

$6.00 
4.00 


Select 


8.00 


No. 1 


2.00 


Shorts 

Brides and BrideBmaids 


1.00 
W 
115.00 




4.00 


Violets ............................ 


1.00 


Sweet Peas 


1.50 


Panslea 


1.50 


TulIpB ^.....i 


4.00 


Adiantnm Ouneatum 


1.00 


SprayB 

Sprengeri, " 

Smllax 


60.00 
8.00 
4.00 

20.00 




Chicago Rose Co. 

Rose Growers 

and Commission Handlers 

of Cut Flowers 

FLORISTS' SUPPIilBS 

Wire Work our Specialty. 

56'58 Wabash ATeuae« 

CHICAGO. 



Mention The Rerlew when yon write. ' ' 

Bassett&Wasbliurn 

76 Wabask Ave., CHICA60, ILL. 
"'•'•Klfte??.".'ClT FLOWERS 

Greenhouses at Hinsdale* III. 

Mention The Review when yon write. 

WIETOR BROS. 

^t^«,t. Cut Flowers 

.All telegraph and telephone orders 
given prompt attention. 

51 Wabash Ave,, CHICAGO 

Poelilmann Bros. Co. 

^uiif Cut Flowers 

and Dealers In ^^•■^ ■ "WWWWI « 

All telegraph and telephone orders given prompt 
attention. Greenhouses: Morton Grove. 111. 

•^•S7 Randolpli Street. CHICAGO* ILL. 

Mention The Review when yon write. 



WILLIAM MURPHY 

Wholesale Oommlssion Dealer in 

CUT FLOWERS and 
FLORISTS' SUPPLIES 

Headquarters in Gincinnati for 

Carnation Blooms 



All other Out Flowers in Season. 

Ob* Dollars worth of Green Carnation Powder 
will color your White Carnations for St. 
Patrick's Day. 

Write, Wire or Phone to 

128 E. Third St., CINCINNATI, OHIO 

Long Distance Phones, M. 980; W. 81-Y. 
Mention The Review when yon write. 

PERCY JONES 

Wholesale Cut Flowers 

Flower Orowers' Market 

60 Wabash Ave., CHICAGO 

STANDING ORDBBS SOLICITBD. 

Mention The Review when yon write. 

KRUCBTEN&JODNSON 

Wholesale Cut Flowers 

51 Wabash Ave., CHICAGO 

ROSES and CARNATIONS OUR SPECIALTIES 

Mention The Review when yon write. 



J.A.BUDL0NG 

37-39 Randolph Street, CHICAGO. 

^T».ty sRowErrtCUT FLOWERS 

Mention The Review when yon write. 



SINNER BROS. 
WHOLESALE CUT FLOWERS 

60 Wabash Av«., Chicago 

Careful attention to all 

SHIPPING ORDERS 



Mention The Review when yon write. 



WEILAMD 



RISCH 



Wholesale Growers and Shippers of 

CUT FLOWERS 

69 WabAsh A^e. CHICAGO 

Phone, Central 879. 
Write for our wholesale price list. 



WHOLESALE FLORISTS 



Be Yoar Own Commission Man 

Sell your owa Stock at the 

FLOWER GROWERS' IV1ARKET 

See PKRCT JONES, Kanaaer 

eo WABASH AVK., CHXCAGO 

Mention The Review when yon write. 



J. B. DEAMUO CO. 

Wholesale Florists 

Si-53 Wabash An., CHICAGO 



Kentloa The Review when yon write. 



Zech&Mann 

Wholesale Orowera and Sliippers of 

CUT FLOWERS 

51 Wabash Xve., Chicago 

Boom S18. A. D. Phono S&84 Oeatral. 

Mention The Review when yon write. 

JTHE NEW SEASON 
IS NOW AT HAND 

Ton can g-et your share ot 
the irood hnelneee which 
will soon be going on by 
having' your advertise- 
ment appear regularly In 

NOW IS THE TBUE TO 

BEGIN I 



IT 



U will find... 
ALL the BEST (£ers 
ALL the time in the Re- 
view's Qassified Advs 



V 



.~Ji^^ ' ^m. 



. '.Xk :^ .-M-.i 



i-'j'ki^'ij'S'---*- "*'* ■rt''iii*iTs bf'a'i'rfMiMiiiiin^iiAi ii-i 



•tj.^ir-v. ■ 



Wf-^y 



Mabch 14, 1007. 



The Weekly Florists^ Review* 



J28I 



WHOLESALE CUT FLOWERS 

Valley, American Beautiest Brides and Maids, Spren£eri, Asparagus Plumosus, Carnations and Violets and all seasonable 
flowers* Large stock of Stevia on hand) can supply you at lowest tnzskct prices at short notice* All orders will have 
our prompt attention. A trial order will convince you* » Telegraph or telephone when you need Cut Flowers to 

HENRY M. ROBINSON & CO., Sfi-^. 15 Province St., 9 Chapman Pr., Boston, Mass. 



Wholesale Gut Flower Prices. 

OincinnRti, Marcb IS. 

Per 100. 

Beaaties, Extra $40.00 to 160.00 

'' No. 1 20.00to 80.00 

Shorts lO.OOto 16.00 

Brides and Maids, Extra 12.00 

:; ;: no.i 8.00 

" No. 2 4.00 

Golden Gate 4.00to 12.00 

KalserlD 4.00to 12.00 

Uberty 6.00 to 20.00 

Meteor 4.00to 12.00 

Perle and Sunrise 8.00 to 8.00 

Oamatlons 2.00to 6.00 

▲sparagus Plumosus, Strings 85.00 to 60.00 

Sprays 2.00 to 4.00 

Sprengeri, " 2.00 to 8.00 

Llllam Harrlsil 12.50to 16.00 

Smllax 12.50to 16.00 

Lily of the Valley 8.00to 6.00 

^ wllHB >••• •••• •••••••••••••• ■■•« •••• 0*00 to X^aOO 

Adlantmn 76to 1.60 

Violets 50to 1.60 

Baby Primroses 35to .60 

PaperWhltes 8.00to 4.00 

Romans S.OOto 4.00 

Tulips 8.00tO 4.00 

Dutch Hyacinths.;...;.;.......;... 4.00to 6.00 

C E. CRITCHELL 

Wliolesale Comiulaslon Florist 

Cut Flowers 1 Florists' Supplies 

WIRE WORK OF ALL KINDS 

Write for price list. ^ Gonslgnments solicited. 
M last Third St. CINCINNATI. OHIO 

Mention The Review when yon write. 

LOUIS H.KYRK 

Wholesale Commission Florist 
Cut Flowers and Florists* SuppUes 

Phones. Main 8062. West 855-L. 

110-118 East 8rd St., Cincinnati, O. 

Ck>nsla:nments Bolloitad. 

Mention The Review when yon write. 

ThBJ.M.McGullough'sSonsCo. 

WHOLESALE COMMISSION FLORISTS 

CONSIGNMENTS SOLICITED 

- Special attention grl ven to shipping orders. 
Jobbers of Florists' Supplies, Seeds and 
Bulbs. Price lists on application. 

Phone Main 684. 816 Walnat St. Clndnnatl.O. 
Mention The Review when yon write. ^ 

Wood or Sheet Moss 

LARGK FULL BALKS 

$65.00 per 100 bales. $35.00 for 50 bales. 
18.75 for 25 bales. 9.00 for 10 bales. 

D. RUSGONI, 32 W. 6tli St., CiRCinnaH, 0. 

Mention The Review when yon write. 

YOU WILL 
FIND 



OFFERS 



■ I I THE 

ff^ BEST 



ALL 



THE TIME 

IN T HE 

REVIEWS CLASSIFIED ADVS. 

Always Mention the.... 

Florists* Review 

When Writing Advertisers, 



WELCH BROS.. ^^^ "^vo"^"'"^ ^- Boston, Mass. 

■■■■■■^'■' ■•■■^^^^■J Phone 6268. 6267. 6419 Main ■•^^•^■■J Bwsae^tps 



Hew England Headquarters for 



Carnations, Violets, Roses, Liiy of the Valley 

Carefally selected and packed for long* distance shipment. 



Mention The Review when yon write. 



WHOLESALE 
FLORISL.. 



C. A. KUEHN 

Cut Flowere and Flori$t$' Supplie$ 

Manufacturer of the Patent Wire Clamp Floral 
Designs. A full line of SUPPLIES always 
on band. Write for catalogue and prices. 

1122 Pine St., - ST. LOUIS, MO. 

Mention The Review when yon write. 

H.G.Berning 

WKO£BSA£B 
FliOBZBT, 

J402 Pine Street, 
ST. LOUIS. MO. 

Mention The Review when yon write. 

Wholesale Gut Flower Prices. 

St. LotilB. March 13. 

Per doz. 

Beauties. Specials....! $ S.OOto $6.00 

Extra S.OOto 4.00 

Shorts l.OOto 2.00 




Per 100 



Brides and Maids, Specials $ S.OOto 

" No. 1... 4.00to 

Golden Gat#./. 4.00 to 

Richmond 4.00 to 

Oamot 4.00 to 

Oamatlons, Common 1.60 to 

Fancies S.OOto 

Adiantam 1.00 to 

Asparagus Plumosus. Strings..... 25.00 to 

Sprays.... l.OOto 

Sprengeri, " .... l.OOto 

Lily of the Valley 2.00 to 

Smllax 12.50 to 

Violets 26 to 

PaperWhltes S.OOto 

Romans l.OOto 

Oallas 12.50 to 

Freesias 2 00 to 

Dutch BTyacinlhs 4.00to 

Tulips S.OOto 



$10.00 
6.00 
8.00 
8.00 
8.00 
2.00 
4.00 
1.26 

85.00 
1.50 
S.OO 
S.OO 

15.00 

.35 

4.00 

2.00 

15.00 
BOO 
6.00 
4.00 



Milwaukee. March 13. 
Per 100 



Beauties. Medium $16 

Shorts 6. 

Bride and Bridesmaid 6 

Golden Gate. Chatenay 6, 

Richmond 8. 

Perle 6. 

Oamatlons 2, 

VaUey 

Violets 

Asparagus Plumosus, Strings 26. 

;; " Sprays 

Sprengeri, " 

Smllax , 

Adiantum 

Paper Whites. Romans 

Oallas 

TulipR..., 

Cornflowers 

Daffodils 

Forget-me-nots 

Mignonette 2. 

Longlflorum 



.00 to 
50 to 
00 to 
«0<0| 
00 to 
00 to 
00 to 

50 to 
00 to 



00 to 



$18.00 
Id.OO 
10.00 
10.00 

it.to 

10.00 

4.00 

S.OO 

.75 

60.00 
8.00 
8.00 

20.00 
1.00 
S.OO 

18.00 

S.OO 

.30 

2.00 

.50 

3.00 

18.00 



I LIKE the Review the best of any 
florists' paper. — J. M. Hazlewood, Van- 
couver, B. C. 



Wholesale Gut Flower Prices. 

Boston, March 13. 
Per 100. 

Beauties, Specials $30.00to$ 60.0S 

Extra lO.OOto 25.00 

Short Stems 4.00 to 20.00 

Brides, Specials S.OOto lO.OO 

Seconds S.OOto 4.00 

Bridesmaids, Specials S.OOto 10.00 

Seconds 2.00to 4.00 

Chatenay S.OOto 10.00 

Wellesley. Killarney 3.00 to 12.00 

Liberty. Richmond 4.00to 25.00 

Carnations. Special 4.00to 5.00 

Select 2.60to 3.00 

Ordinary 1.50 to 2.00 

Lily of the Valley S.OOto 4.00 

Asparagus Plumosus, Strings 30.00 to 60.00 

" Sprays, bunches 25.00 to 60,00 

" Sprengeri. bunches... 26.00 

Adiantum Cuneatum 50 to 1.00 

Smllax 12.00 

Harrisii... S.OOto 10.00 

Violets 16to .60 

OaUas e.OOto 8.0S 

Antirrhinum 2.00 to 6.00 

Sweet Peas 25to 1.00 

Mignonette 2.00to 4.00 

Tulips , 2.00to 8.00 

Daffodils X... 1.60to 2.50 

\t 



Bolton & Dfuikel Co. 



Wholxsalxbs Or 



Cut Flowers, Palms, Ferns 

and a General Line of Plants 

— Manufactttbebs Or 



WIRE WORK AND 
FLORISTS' SUPPLIES 

—Write for Catalog— 

462 Milwaukee St, Milwaukee, Wit. 

Mention Hie Review when yon write. 

Wm.C.Smith&Co. 

Wholesale Florists 

1316 Pine St. ST. LOUIS 

Both long distance phones. 

Supplies and Everytliinsr In Season 
al^mtYa on liand. 

Mention The Beriew when yon write. 



THE PIKE'S PEAK 
FLORAL CO. 

Exclustvfly Wholesale 

COLORADO SPRINGS, COLO. 



Al^vays mention the Florists* Revlew^ 
when writlns advertisers. 



■'■•-"■*' - ' 



-'— ■^'•^^' ' •- ' in I miiiitoiViii Till Y - '-'— "iriMif tr'iilr^ :.. ..;■..-■ . 



L'^^ i; rl.^. 



JT^ ■ 



■■'W'^'TT^TvYrT''*'^''^^- "^^^^•■T'^-K^ 



M*|«»w;ifcj^ 



1282 



The Weekly Florists^ Review* ^«^« "' ^^^ 



LEADING RETAIL FLORISTS. 

The followingr retail florists are prepared to fill orders from other florists for local delivery tm 
the UBvud basis. If you wish to be represented under this headinsr now is the timie to place your order. 

WILLIAM H. DONOHOE 



T«l«l 
Ho. 



•iSS*i«ii«>n. No. 2 WEST 29th ST., iSIL^lV.?!' NEW YORK. 

Special attention to theatre orders. Penonal and artistic arransemeot. No disappointments in catching steamers and reliable 
deliveries guaranteed. Special rates for my brother florists from any part of the country. One Trial Sufficient. 



..ORDERS FOR.. 

Chicago 

WILL BE FILLED BY 

P. J. HAUSWIRTH 

13 Congress Street 

Aoditorinm Annex. Telephone Harrison 586. 

J. W. WOLFSKILL 



Telegraph Orders 
a Specialty. 



218 W. 4th St.. LOS ANGELES. CAL. 

J. B. BOLAND CO. 

■UOOISSOBS TO 8UVXBS * BOLAND 

FLORISTS 

47-49 Geary Street. SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

ST. PAUL, MINN. 

Order your floorers for delivery 
in this section from the leading 
Florists of the Northwest. 

L. L. MAY & CO. 

ST. PAUL. MINN 



WASHINGTON, 
D. C 




•CUDE BROS.CO. 
fLORISTS 
1214 r 3T.NW 

VAaHINQTONOC 



GUDE'S 



ORDERS for DULUTH 

and vielnlty 'will be carefully looked after by 

W.W.SEEKINS 

109 W. Super'ior St., DULUTH, MINN. 

w,THEm» 

G^OLiNA Flc«al Co. 

F. W. SUMMER. Hgr. 

339 King St, Char Iestoii» S. C 

GALVESTON, TEXAS 
MRS. M. A. HANSEN 

T. M. 0. A. BUILDING 



FRED C WEBER 

4326-4328 Olhre Street 
ST. LOUIS, MO. 

Will carefully execute orders for St. Louis 
and other towns in Missouri and Illinois. 
(Established 1878.) 

SAMUEL MURRAY 

....FLORIST.... 

1017 Broadway, KANSAS QTY, MO. 

Write, Telephone or Telegraph 
All orders given prompt attention. 

JOHN BREITMEYEirS 

SONS 

COB. BROADWAY AND GRATIOT AVE. 

DETROIT. MICH. 

C. C. POLLWORTD CO. 

VHOUBSALS TLORISTS 
Milwaukee, Wis. 

Will take proper car. U/ICPnWCIW 
of your orders la If li3v^Vrlli3li 1 

CHOICEST FLOWERS 

George H* Berke 

FLORIST 

Local and Long Distance Phones. 
1505 Pacific Ave., ATUNTIC CITY, N. J. 

Honghtoo & Clark 

396 Boylsfon Street, 

Boston, Mass. 

BiCTAIL ORDERS SOLICITED FOB 

PITTSBURG, PA. 

H. L. Blind & Bros. 

30 FIFTH STREET 

Careful and Prompt Attention to Out-of-town Orders. 

Geo. M. Kellogg 

Wholesale and Retail norlst 

906 Grand Ave., KANSAS CITY, MO. 

AU Kinds of CUT FLOWERS 

In their season. Also Rose and Carnation plants 
in season. Oreenhouses at Pleasant Hill, Mo. 



TOUR ORDKRS FOR 

EVERY DEPARTMENT Of FLORAL ART 

are earnestly solicited and my personal atten- 
tion will be given even to the smallest detail. 

A.WARENDORFF 

119S Broadway 1474 Broadway* 
aiadlson Ave, stnd 71st St.. WCW YORK 

David Clarke's Sons 

S189-8141 Broadway 
Tel. 1558-1598 Columbus 

New York City 

Out-of-town orders for delivery In New York 
carefully and promptly filled at reasonable rates. 

leikens 

7 East 88rd Street 

Belmont Hotel, 42nd St., New York 

NEWPORT, R. I. 

i^Orders from any part of the country filled 
carefully and at wholesale prices. 




BuHalo, N. Y. 

W. J. Palmer * Sob. 804 Hals M. 



MillsThc Florist 

36 W. Forsyth Street 
JACKSONVILLE, FLA. 




Wholesale and Retail Florist 

AMSTERDAM, NEW YORK 

The Park Floral Co. 

J. A. VALENTINE. 
Pres. 

DENVER, COLORADO 

Mrs. M. E. Hollcraft 

807 Kansas Ave.,TOPEKA. KAN. 

FOR OTHER LEADING 

RETAIL FLORISTS 

SEE NEXT PAGE. 



^JlflK^l^ 






- " * :' *,. Xi." :r-^<, V • ■■ 1 :;- 



March 14, 1007. 



t 



TheWcckly Horists' Review. 



1283 



LEADING RETAIL FLORISTS. 



The following retail florists are prepared to fill orders from other florists for local delivery on 
the usual basis. If you wish to be represented under this heading now is the time to place your order. 

Alexander NcConnell 

571 nrra avenue, Windsor Arcade NEW YORK CITY 

Telearrapb orders forwarded to any part of the United States, Oanada and all principal cities of Earope. Orders transferred or intrusted by 

the trade to our selection for delivery on steamships or elsewhere receive special attention. 
Telephone Calls: 840 and 341 88th Street. Cable Adddreaa: AUfiXCONNKLL. Western Union Code. 



BROOKLYN, 



NEW JBRSEY, } !>«"▼««•*•■ Anywhere j 



NEW YORK, 

LONG ISLAND. 

Itade orders well cared for from all parts of the Country, and delivered at Theatre, Hotel, Steamer 

or Residence. Address 

ROBERT G. WILSON 

FaHoa St. and Greene Ave. p„. JJiayni ,„, BROOKLYN, N. Y. 



Established in 1857. 



J657-J659 Buckingham Place 



L. D. Phone 
668:Lake View. 



CHICAGO 



Send us your retail orders. We 
have the best facilities in the city. 



MYER 



609-611 

Madison 

Avenue 



IiODff 

Diatance 
Phone, 
Wn Plata. 



New York 



THAT'S OUR BUSINESS 

126,000.00 last year. We can care for more 
orders in this vicinity. Write or wire. 

Alpha Floral Co. 

KANSAS QTY, MO. 



LI MFFF Florist. 818 6t 
I* 11 err, PITTSBURG, 



6th St. 

PA. 

Personal attention given to out-of-town 
ordera for delivery In Pittsburg and viclmty 



ATLANTA FLORAL Co. 

41 Peachtree St, ATLANTA, GA. 

Je Je BENEKE 

1216 Olhre St, ST. LOUIS, MO, 

Geo. Se MURTFELDT 

MINNEAPOLIS. MINN. 

PORTLAND, OREGON 

CLARKE BMS., 289 Motrlsoi a 

S. B. STEWART 

U9 No. 16tfi Stnet. OMAHA, NEE 



WILLIAM L ROCK 

FLOWER CO. 

Kansas City, - Mo. 

will carefully execute orders 
for Kansas City and any 
town in Missouri or Kansas. 

U. J. VIRGIN 

83S Canal Street^ New Orleans, La. 



STEAMER SAILINGS. 

The tide of European travel has again 
set in. It will gather volume as the 
spring advances and promises to be 
heavier than ever as summer approaches. 
Betail florists can add to their business 
with no greater trouble to themselves 
than the posting of a list of steamer 
sailings in the window. Or tell in a neat 
circular that you have facilities for the 
delivery of flowers on any outgoing 
steamer. Then mail or wire the orders 
to be filled to one of the Leading Betail 
Florists in the Eeview. 



steamer — 


From — 


To— 


Sails. 


Arcadia 


..Philadelphia 


Hamburg . 


.Mar. 


18 


Deutschland 


.New York 


. Plymouth . 


.Mar. 


le 


Momus 


. .New Orleans 


. Havana 


.Mar. 


1« 


New Amster' 


m .New York 


. Rotterdam 


.Mar. 


20 


Sloterdyk . . 


..Norfolk ... 


.Rotterdam 


.Mar. 


20 


Bethanla 


. . Boston . . . 


. Hamburg . 


.Mar. 


20 


Majestic . . . 


..New York 


.Liverpool 


.Mar. 


20 


C. F. Tletgen 


..New York 


. Christlania 


Mar. 


21 


Cedrlc 


. .New York 


. Liverpool . 


.Mar. 


22 


Koenlgen Luise New York 


. Naples . . . 


.Mar. 


2.S 


Acllla 


. .Baltimore . 


.Hamburg . 


.Mar. 


2.1 


Campania . . 


..New York 


. Liverpool . 


.Mar. 


2.3 


St. Louis .. 


..New York 


.Southamo'D 


Mar. 


23 


Momus 


..New Orleans Havana .. 


.Mar. 


23 


Amerika 


...New York 


. Plymouth . 


.Mar. 


23 


Kronprlnz . . 


. .New York 


. Bremen . . . 


.Mar. 


20 


Statendam . 


. .New York 


. Rotterdam 


.Mar. 


27 


Oceanic .... 


..New York 


. Liverpool 


.Mar. 


27 


Oscar II ... 


..New York 


. Christlania 


Mar. 


28 


Zeeland 


. . New York 


.Antwerp .. 


.Mar. 


30 


Penna 


..New York 


.Plymouth . 


.Mar. 


30 


Etrurla 


..New York 


. Liverpool 


.Mar. 


.30 


Cymric 


. . Boston . . . 


. Liverpool . 


.Mar. 


30 


Philadelphia 


New York 


. Southamp'n 


Mar. 


30 


Bosnia 


..Philadelphia 


Hamburg . 


.Mar. 


30 


Momus 


. . New Orleans Havana . . . 


.Mar. 


30 


Rapallo 


. .Boston 


. Hamburg 


.Mar. 


31 


Ka ser 


..New York 


. Bremen . . . 


.Apr. 


2 


Amsteldyk . 


. .Norfolk . . . 


. Rotterdam 


.Apr. 


3 


Lucania . . . 


..New York 


. Liverpool . 


• Apr. 


« 


Waldersee 


..New York 


.Plymouth . 


.Apr. 


6 


Celtic 


..New York 


.Southamp'n 


Apr. 


6 


K. Wm. II.. 


..New York 


. Bremen . . . 


.Apr. 





P. Irene ... 


..New York 


. Naples . . . 


.Apr. 


20 


Cymric 


. .Boston 


. Liverpool 


..Apr.25 



The Eeview is worth five times the 
price to any florist, large or small. — H. 
D. Caldwell, Danville, HI. 



NORTH PACIFIC COAST 



The H* Harrington Co* 

9J2 SECOND AVE. 
SEATTLE, WASH. 

S. MASIR 

BrooklmN.¥. 



FLOBIST 

8S8 FiltOB St. 
Near Clark St. 

Tel. 3.S4 MalD. 



Write, Wire or Phone Your Orders to 

YOUNG'S 

1406 OUto St., ST. LOUIS. HO. 

Regular discoant allowed on all orders, either 
Plants or Cut Flowers. 

Phones: Bell, Main 2306; Kinlock, Central 4981. 
Send orders for delivery 

IN OHIO TO 

GRAFF BROS. 

COLUMBUS, OHIO 

In the exact center of tbe state. 

JULIUS BAER 

J38-J40 E. Fourth St. 
Long Distance Phone. 

Cincinnati^ Ohio 

Young & Nugent 

42 W. 28th St., New York 

We sre in the theatre district and also have 
exceptional facilities for delivering flowers on 
outgoing: steamers Wire us your orders; they 
will receive prompt and careful attention. 

E O. LOVELL g?^ 

will grive prompt attention TVr^_i,t, Fi-t.^*/. 
to all orders for delivery in iNOfUl UZXXXSA 

Orders for MINNESOTA or the Northwest will 
be properly executed by 

AUG. S. SWANSON, St Paul Minn. 
LOUISVILLE, KY. 

Personal attention given to out-of-town orders 
for Louisville. Ky., and its vicinity. 

JACOB SCHULZ. ^j^:rr,\ 

Always mention the Flonsls' Review when 
writing advertisen. 



'■-' • "•'*■- ii'^tiiii^ii^y^'*-'-'" *''^--»-t--.^^> 



riri'tii'vii'iianiiiiii 



itcH^i^amcSm'.i^^^^^^ij-i.^ •.jLa.^i^. > . I . .r,, cl. ;-...,:_ 



i~')jysw^^r^'' 



■'^^ivffrr^y^'ir'.'mt.y^ .."f"'.|',fT(''(HT^''j7T'>^ ■-•' 



■ "l^f .WiW^ 



rjwirpM)*^!^ vf\«:, ^>;^^rj»»rf TW?fv 



t264 



The Weekly Florists^ Review^ 



Mabch 14, 1907. 



200,000 

CALLA BULBS 

Orders now booked for July, August 
and September. 

AUITTIIIP 17 to 83 Kennan St. 
I nil I I mU) SANTA CRUZ, CAL. 

Mention The Review when yon write. 

PACIFIC COAST. 



PORTLAND. ORE. 



State of Business. 

We are pleased to be able to report a 
continuance of great business activity 
and a market well supplied in the gen- 
eral lines. Everything under glass is 
showing a vigorous growth in response 
.to the bright spring sunshine. Violets 
are a feast and anyone with "two bits" 
to spare can wear a bunch. No one has 
reason to regret haying grown them, and 
the retailers find the home product more 
profitable than those imported from 
California. Not until this month was 
the supply of carnations equal to the 
demand and prices are holding up well. 

Roses are maintaining the season's 
usual standard of quality, only a little 
shy in quantity. Bulbous stuff has been 
our salvation, for without it we would 
have been up against it, owing to the 
unprecedented^ call for design work. 
Never onc^tj^li'ris it accumulated, although 
handled in large quantities. Daffodils 
have been popular for festive occasions 
and we do not think there was any 
money lost on them at 75 cents and $1 
per dozen. 

Surely spring has come to stay, as 
Mr. Eobin demands his breakfast at six 
o'clock, crocuses are blooming outside 
and, unless unfavorable symptoms set 
in, there should be an aoundance of 
everything for the Easter trade. 

VariotM Notes. 

The building fever is spreading and 
several of our leading growers will add 
substantially to their respective places. 
George Betz tells us with great dignity 
that he has already commencea opera- 
tions up the valley on a new range of 
15,000 feet. 

Charles Street, of Clackamas, will put 
some of his violet money into two new 
houses. Robinson Bros., of Woodstock, 
will do likewise. 

Tonseth & Co. also announce that there 
will be more than one smoke stack on 
their premises a few months hence. 

Clarke Bros, have outgrown the space 
they occupy and, surrounding property 
being too valuable for greenhouse pur- 
poses, we are informed that this firm 
will build a strictly modern range about 
seven miles from town. 

We have not had the opportunity of 
interviewing Mr. Sibson recently, but we 
venture to say that he will need more 
room for Richmond and Kate Moulton 
another year. He reports a sale for 
everything and orders increasing from 
out of town. There are others talking 
expansion, but we have been too busy 
to call on them, so will refer to them 
later. 

J. R. Fotheringham, representing the 
F. R. Pierson Co., spent last week with 
as, emphasizing the good points of all 
the new carnations. When giving the 



Young Rose Plants 

All propagated from wood taken from plants in the field. 
This is the same stock as we are now planting^ in the field. 

NOTK OUR LOW PRICK ON HYBRID PERPKTUALS. 
Special Net Cash Prices. 



^ 



Variety 25 100 

Baby Rambler 11.25 W.OO 

Beauty of Glazenwood ♦>6 2.60 

Bessie Brown 75 2.50 

Bride .65 2.50 

Bridesmaid 65 2.50 

Burbank 65 2.00 

Catherine Mermet 66 2.60 

Cecil Brunner 65 2.60 

Chromatella (Cloth Of Gold).. .66 2.50 

Cherokee 66 2.26 

Climbing Belle Siebrecht 65 2.50 

Climbing: Bridesmaid 66 2.60 

Climbingr Cecil Brunner 65 2.60 

ClimbingrMme. C. Testout... .75 8.00 

Climbing: Malmaison 75 2.50 

Climbing: Marie Guillot 65 2.50 

Climbing Meteor 66 2.60 

Climbing Wootton 65 2.50 

Dorothy Perkins 66 2.50 

Francisca Kruger 66 2.50 

Gainsborough 70 3.00 

Gen. Jacq 65 2.50 

Gloire de Dijon 75 3.50 



1000 
$60.00 
20.00 
22.00 
22.00 
22.00 
20.00 
22.00 
25.00 

20.00 
22.00 
26.00 
26.00 
27.00 



22.00 
20.00 
22.00 

25.00 



Variety 

Grass an Teplitz 

Hermosa 


25 
..W.66 

.. .66 


100 
$2.50 
2.60 
2.60 
2.60 
4.00 
2.50 
2.60 
2.50 
2.50 
2.60 
2.75 
260 
2.60 
2.50 
2.50 
2.50 
2.50 
2.50 
2.50 
2.50 
2.60 
2.60 


1000 
$20.00 


. ames Sprant 

ubilee. .... .... 


.. .65 
.75 


25.00 


Killamey 

Lamarque 

Mme. Alf. Carriere 

Mme. de Vatrv 


.. 1.00 
.. .65 
.. .66 
.. .65 


25.00 


Mine. L«atnbard 


.. .65 




Mme. Wagram 

Magna Charta 


.. .65 
.. .65 


22.60 
26.00 


Maman Cochet 


.. .66 


18.00 


M. P. Wilder 

Marquis de Querhoent 

Mrs. Robt Garrett 


.. .75 
... .65 
. . . .66 


25.00 
26.00 


Phil Cochet 


... .66 




Prince Camille de Rohan.. 

Reine Mane Henriette 

Reved'Or 


. . . .75 

... .65 

.. .65 


26.00 
20.00 
26.00 


Ulrich Brunner 


. . . .75 


25.00 


White Maman Cochet 

Wm. Allen Richardson 


... .65 
... .65 


20.00 
26.00 



I. 



CALIFORNIA ROSE CO., Inc., Pomona, Cal. 

(Formerly of Lob Anseles) 



I 

J 



Mention The Reylew when you write. 



Choice Asparagus Plumosus Seed 

will not be as plentiful as anticipated earlier in 
the season and we are compelled to revise our 
prices to meet the changed conditions. No 
orders can be accepted for over 100,000 from one 
firm. Prices for present delivery are as fol- 
lows: lOOO seeds, $2.00; 6000 seeds, $10.00; 13.000 
seeds, $30.00; 26,000 seeds, $)>6.00; 60,000 seeds, 
$66.00! 100,000 seeds, $110 00. F. OILMAN TATLOB 
SEED CO. (Ine.), Aox 9, Glendale, Cal. 

Mention The Review when you write. 

high sign of departure he said, "Port- 
land is all right and my business has 
doubled here. " H. J. M. 



SAN FRANCXSOO.' 



The Market 



Lent is still with us and the weather 
has not been conducive to much transient 
trade, but notwithstanding these draw- 
backs we have had a fair share of busi- 
ness during the last week. Flowers are 
gradually getting lower in price, with 
the exception of roses. Violets are com- 
mencing to take on their spring growth 
and are getting scarce in consequence. 
The price has been advanced 25 cents 
per dozen bunches by the wholesalers. 

Bulbous stock is not so plentiful as it 
has been and not much is seen except 
some late daffodils. Eomans are out 
of the market. A few Dutch hyacinths 
are being used by the retailers. Tulips 
seem to have lost their hold on the 
public and few have been shown this 
year. Quite a quantity of freesias are 
being brought in and find ready sale at 
$2 per hundred. 

Carnations are a shade lower than 
last week and the supply is good, but 
not in excess of the demand. 

Outdoor stock, with the exception of 
bulbous flowers, is not in evidence yet 
and it will be several weeks before we 
have anything to draw from. Maiden- 
hair fern of the wild variety is plentiful 
and it has proven a godsend to the re- 
tailers, who have been woefully short of 
everything in the line of green stuff 
since the holidays. 



SHASTA DAISY 

Alaska, California and Westralia. extra stronr 
field divisions, from divisions of Mr. Burbank'* 
original stock, $2.50 per 100; $22.50 per 1000. Small 
plants. Just right for 3-inch pots, $1.26 per 100; 
$11.00 per 1000. 

Cyolamen Per. Oigantenm, 2-in., $5 per lOO. 

Cineraria, Prize Strain, 4-iDch, $1.00 per 100. 

Shasta Daisy Seeds of Alaska, Callfomlik 
and Westralia only, 60c per 1000; $8.50 per oz. 

Petunia Giants of California, a good strain, 
60c per 1000; $1.60 per )4 oz.; $10.00 per oz. 

Champion Strain — After years of careful 
■election and hand fertilizing, using only the 
most perfect flower for that purpose, I have at 
last obtained a strain that cannot be surpassed' 
by anyone. Trial pkt. of 260 seeds, 2&c; 1000 seeds, 
76c; }^oz., $2.50; oz., $15.00. Cash, please. 

Hybrid Delphinlnm, Burbank's Strain, al> 
shades of blue. This strain has been much' 
Improved the past year. 26c per 1000 seeds; 
$1.50 per oz. 

Send for list of other seeds to 

FRED GROHE, Santa Roaa, Cal. 

Mention The Review when yon write. 

n^vcBC Fleld'Grown, I<owBndded, 
■C V9I.9 Two Tears Old, WeU Rooted.. 

CIlmblnK Roses— Papa Oontier, $1.00 each. 
Mme. Caroline Testout, $18.00 per 100. Kaiserln 
Augusta Victoria, $12.00 per 100. Beauty of Eu- 
rope, $10 00 per 100. Bridesmaid, $10.00 per 100. 

American Beauty, $18.00 per 100. 

Mme. Caroline Testout, $12.00 per 100. 

Fran Karl Dmschki, $20.00 per 100. 
Send for Rose Price List. 

F. LUDEMANN 8a2^A»?c"£^S.!fi. 

Mention The Hevlew wten you write. 

Vuiout Notes. ' 

The grounds of Emery Winship, at 
Ross Station, have been taken charge of 
by J. Heatherington, who will plant sev- 
eral acres as a private park. Mr. Heath- 
erington had charge of the laying out 
of the grounds at the Portland exposi- 
tion. 

C. W. Scott, representing Vaughan, is 
on a trip to southern California. 

E. J. Eeynolds, for several years in 
the florists' business at Denver, has affi- 
liated with the Forrest Floral Co., on 
Mission street, near Twenty-second 
street. 

A. Eingier, representing W. W. Bar- 



''>,<Lv \^.''•''. ■■*■ <■•'- ■1* .■■.•.■»>- ...1/-V.' ^^. w*.t\.i..j.x.'r^^:^-..-..j.. 'A/. 



SPiWCTS J* .; TJ^eTT'S"^ 



■■i«fjmwjif^'^^^^^r^'.^:^.'-:^-^i^^f,r,i,^m^^,%i^'y^^^ rr^-- 



Mabch 14, 1907. 



The Weekly Florists' Review* 



1285 



J^¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥m¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥'9^ 



t 










FL.OWER 





IDEAL GRADE SE**"' 
ELITE GRADE SSr"'" 
IVY GRADE IS^' 




VIOLET BOXES 

Violet Color or White with S-color bunch of Violets on comer. 




J 



CORRUGATED PAPER 
SHIPPING BOXES 




FOR MAKING 
EXPRESS SHIPMENTS 

LIGHT, STRONG, 
DURABLE. 

PROTECTS CONTENTS FROM 
HEAT OR FROST. 

SHIPPED FLAT. EASILY SET UP. 

METAL OR K. D. CLOTH CORNERS. 






THE J. W. SEFTON MFG. CO., 



CHICAGO, ILLINOIS 

ANDERSON. INDIANA 



^4««4«l4#4i|4i|«|«|#4«4«#«|«|«4«|«#«|«|«4«|«l4#«l«l#«l44«l44#«|4#<|«|«|«<|«t(|«|«#44«|««|«|4«|il|^ 



Mention The Review when you write. 



nard Co., Chicago, has departed for Ore- 
gon and Washington. 

James Niven, gardener to John Mar- 
tin, at San Rafael, will erect several 
more greenhouses for orchids and flow- 
ering plants in the near future. 

Martin Reukauf, representing H. 
Buyersdorfer & Co., Philadelphia, is in 
town. G. 



TWIN QTIES. 



The Market. 



Trade has showed that we are in the 
midst of Lent, as outside of funeral 
Avork there is little doing. Everyone 
seems to have an abundance of stock and 
prices have declined, especially on bulb 
stock. Some fine Yellow Prince tulips 
were on the market during the week at 
$1 per hundred. The quality of all 
stock could hardly be improved and as 
the demand is light, some loss has been 
sustained. 

Easter plants are slowly coming in. 
Easter stock with all of the growers 
looks promising and there is no anxiety 
as to having practically everything 
ready. While there are some lilies that 
cannot possibly be got in, a large ma- 
jority will be all right. 

Minneapolis. 

Ralph Latham has enlarged his place 
considerably and is in shape for a 
good Easter trade. 

Carlson & Sandberg continue to cut 
some of the finest stock offered here. 
Their Easter lilies are good and they 
figure on having all their roses in full 
crop. Although this concern has been in 



WATERPROOF 

Cut Flower and Design Boxes 

PARAFFIN UNKD PAPER BOXKS 

For mailing and expressing live plants. Get 
prices of others, then write for ours. 

THE BLOOMER BROS. CO., ST. MARYS, 0. 

Mention The ReTlew when yon write. 



CUT FLOWER BOXES 



EDWARDS FOLDING BDX CO 

MANUFACTURERS 

PHILADELPHIA, PA. 



Mention The ReTlew when yog write. 

business but a few years, they now have 
30,000 feet of glass and contemplate 
adding more this spring. 

The Minneapolis Floral Co. has with- 
out question the largest stock of plants 
for the Easter trade in this section. They 
count on having fully 10,000 lilies in 
bloom, also hydrangeas, azaleas, spirass 
and Baby Ramblers in large numbers. 

Nagel & Son have been sending in 
a great many carnations. 

StPattL 

The Ramaley Floral Co. has turned 
out a number of orders for funerals the 
last few days, one of them being a 
traveling man's valise in flowers. 

About all of the florists are branching 
out into the nursery business. A recent 
issue of one of our daily papers had the 
advertisements of not less than five of 
them, soliciting nursery orders. 



CUT FLOWER BOXES 

WATBRPBOOF. Corner Lock Style. 

The l>ent, Btrongest and neatest fol^ingr Cut 
Flower Box ever made. Cheap, durable. 

To try them once Is to use them always 
Size No. 0... .3x4x20. ...t2.00 per 100, $19.00 per 1000 



" No. 1....5*4«xl6.. 1.90 




17.50 




" Ko. 2.... 3x6x18.... 2.00 




19 00 




" No. 3. ...4x8x18.... 2.60 




23 00 




" No. 4.... 3x6x24.... 2.76 




26.00 




" No. 6.... 4x8x22.... 3.0O 




28 50 




" No. 6.... 3x8x28.... 3 76 




36.00 




" No. 7.... 6x16x20... 5 50 




64.00 




" No. 8.... 3x7x21.... 3.00 




28 50 




" No. 9.... 6x10x36... 6.50 




62.00 




•' No. 10... 7x20x20... 7.50 




67.00 




" No. 1 1... 3^x5x30 . 3.00 




2850 '• 


Sample free on application 




No charge for 


printing on orders above 250 boxes. Terms cash. 


THE LIVINGSTON SEED CO. 


BOX 104. 


COLUMBUS. O. 



SIEBERT'S ZINC 

N«v«r Rust 

Glazing Points 

ABE POSITIVELTTHB BEST. LAST KOB- 
EVKB. Over 16,UliO pounds now In use. A sure 
preventive of glass slipping. Bffectlve on large 
or small glass. Easy to drive. Easy to extract. 
Two sizes, 96 and %, 40c per lb.; by mall 16c ex- 
tra; 7 lbs. for $S.aO; 16 lbs. for )S.0O by express. 
For sale by the trade. 
8IEBEBT COMPANT. Sta. B., Plttibnrsr. Pa. 

L. L. May & Co are making elaborate 
preparations for a heavy Easter busi- 
ness. 

Holm & Olson have added a landscape 
department to their business. Felix. 



El Reno, Okl.v. — C. H. Chapin, for- 
merly of Bristol, Vt., has leased from 
Mrs. Kelley the Perry greenhouses. The 
property will be overhauled and restocked 
to meet El Reno's demand for first-class 
stock. On Mr. Chapin 's recent visit to 
Chicago he purchased a full line of 
florists' supplies. 



., nlif'riiViiWiiViillf itiiiravTh^Tiili'inii.'-fiiir-ilii'' iJ "'ir '^iA^-s-^^ 



■,,.,»-,--<,.—....■.».■ /■■.^■'..■.■-;.,il.-». .. -:> .. ;^., 



M- . " /**^ ",>'. \ -^ 



■-:" 7^T^> ^ ■ -TS 



i286 



The Weekly Florists' Review* 



Mabch 14, 1907. 



NURSERY NEWS. 

AMBBICAN ASSOCIATION OF NVBSEBYHBN. 

Pres., Orlando Hurlson, Berlin, Md.; Vlce- 
Prea., J. W. Hill, Des Moines, la. ; Sec'y, Geo. O. 
Seacer, Rochester; Treas. C. L. Yates, Rochester. 
The 83d annual convention will be held at De- 
troit, Mich., June, 1007. 



The sin Jose scale is reported at 
Grand Eapids, Mich. 

C. S. Harrison has issued a second 
edition of his Peony Manual. 

There -was a meeting of New Eng- 
land nurserymen at New Haven, Conn., 
March 4. 

Baudry's Nursery Co., Chicago, has 
been incorporated, with $5,000 capital 
stock, by Peter C. King, Frank M. Bur- 
wash and John T. Booz. 

A BILL has been introduced in the Min- 
nesota legislature providing for inspec- 
tion of nurseries at least twice a year 
and making it a misdemeanor to misrep- 
resent in making a sale. 

The New England Nurseries, Bostouj 
has been incorporated with dn author- 
ized capital stock of $30,000. The pres- 
ident is W. M. Richardson, Cambridge, 
and the treasurer A. E. Eobinson, North 
Abington. 

The Bed Bank Nursery Co., Bed 
Bank, N. J., has been incorporated with 
$100,000 authorized capital. The inter- 
ested parties are J. McColgan, of Eed 
Bank, and E. Runyan, president of the 
Elizabeth Nursery Co., Elizabeth, N. J. 

A HORTICULTURAL inspector makes the 
suggestion that the way to secure the 
spraying of trees in infected localities is 
to levy a tax of so much per tree on 
property owners, the taxing body then to 
see that the spraying is done and done 
properly. 

Wm. a. Peterson, Chicago, says he 
feels that there has been no overdoing of 
the peony, as many have predicted; in- 
deed, he thinks it quite the opposite and 
looks for a much wider demand in fu- 
ture. As a result he has just about 
twice as many plants in the ground as a 
year ago. 

The U. S. Department of Agriculture, 
through the forest service, gives prac- 
tical assistance to land owners in estab- 
lishing commercial forest plantations, 
shelter belts, windbreaks and snowbreaks, 
and in reclaiming shifting sands and 
other waste lands by forest planting. In 
connection with this work, information 
will be given, when possible, to inter- 
ested communities by public meetings. 
The department furnishes blanks on 
which application is to be made for its 
assistance. 

A. J. Perkins, of Jackson & Perkins 
Co., Newark, N. Y., after a winter in 
California, at the branch nursery of the 
Jackson & Perkins Co., has been for 
several weeks in the Sandwich Islands, 
and expects to sail March 15 from Hono- 
lulu for Yokohama. He will remain in 
Japan several months and will visit the 
leading nurseries and places of horticul- 
tural interest. Mr. Perkins is a well- 
informed botanist, which, along with his 
knowledge of commercial horticulture, 
should enable him to make the trip a 
particularly interesting and profitable 
one. 

Yucca filamentosa, Adam 's needle, is 
evergreen and quite hardy almost every- 



where. When planted in a group or bed 
it forms a unique contrast to most other 
things around. The foliage, although 
green, is decorative. It is also appro- 
priate for use in borders and in corners 
or other parts of extensive shrubberies. 
In midsummer Yucca filamentosa pushes 
up long, straight stalks, covered at the 
top with handsome ivory-white flowers. 



HARDY ORNAMENTAL SHRUBS. 

One of the most satisfactory of large 
shrubs is the grand old snowball. There 
are several varieties of viburnum. The 
Japanese snowball is smaller than the 
common American variety, but is a fine 
bloomer. The highbush cranberry closely 
resembles the snowball in its foliage, 
and has an additional attraction in its 
brilliant clusters of red berries which 
sometimes remain through the winter. In 
the autumn its foliage turns to bright 
colors, which remain until freezing 
weather. 

Philadelphus, also known as syringa 
and mock orange, has flowers which some 
think resemble orange blossoms. The 
foliage comes out rather late, but it is 
an extremely valuable shrub to have in a 
collection, especially where one has con- 
siderable room. It is as hardy as the 
oak and does well in the shade. The best 
varieties are grandiflora, which has large 
white flowers; flore-pleno, with double 
flowers, and Pekinensis, with fragrant 
white flowers.. 

The barberry is a pretty shrub for 
groups. Its red varieties are ornamental 
in autumn and winter. The purple- 
leaved variety makes a fine contrast with 
the green. Canadensis is the species na- 
tive to America. Berberis Ilicifolia has 
leaves like the holly and Berberis pur- 
purea has foliage of purple. The Na- 
tional Council of Horticulture recom- 
mends these shrubs in one of its press 
bulletins. 



INSECTS AND PLANT DISEASES. 

[A paper by Arthur H. Rosenfeld; assistant 
entomologist. Louisiana State Pest Commission, 
read at the annual convention of the Society of 
Southern Florists, at New Orleans, February 14 
to 16, 1907, continued from the issue of 
March 7.] 

Nature of Protection Afforded. 

The principal protection afforded by 
any commission or board of entomology 
is in the inspection and certification of 
nursery stock, the best method of pre- 
venting the spread of most insects. Were 
it not for the inspection laws against 
the San Jose scale alone, it is doubtful 
if there would be a single large orchard 
in the United States unharmed by this 
insect. 

The different state laws for the in- 
spection and certification of nursery 
stock are fairly uniform. In brief, the 
requirements are that every nursery de- 
siring to sell stock shall be inspected 
once each year, and in case any danger- 
ously injurious insects or plant diseases 
are found therein, no stock shall be al- 
lowed to go out of this nursery, even as 
a gift, until same has been properly 
cleared of the pest. When the nursery 
is apparently free of the insects or dis- 
eases quarantined against, a certificate 
of inspection is granted the nurseryman, 
which entitles him to do business until 
July 1, following. Copies of the certifi- 
cate of inspection are printed upon or- 
dinary shipping tags, and at least one of 
these tags must be attached to every 
package or bundle of nursery stock leav- 
ing the premises. 



Rhododendron 

MJaximum -^ 
KALMIA LATIFOLIA 

Finest stock in America, any size from one foot, 
to 10 feet high, -well furnisbed from top to bottom. 
Special prices will be quoted on large orders. 

Also full line of Fruit Trees, Vines and 
Plants; large quantity of Rook or Sucar 
Bfaple, 8 to 20 feet high. 1 to 8 inches in caliper. 

Illustrated catalogue and price list of Rhodo- 
dendrons free for the asking. Oan furnish any^ 
quantity of Rhododendrons wanted of any size, 
write us. 

THE RIVERSIDE NURSERY C0» 

CONFLUBNCB. PA. 

Mention The Review when you write. 

TREE SEEDLINGS, Etc. 

50,000 Snjcar Maple Seedlings, 6-12-in., $6.00 

per 1000. 
20,000 Susrar Maple Seedlings, 2-3-ft., tS.OO per 

100; 65.00 per 1000. 
5,000 Talip Poplar, 4-6-ft., 16.00 per 100; $60.00 

per 1000. 
-5,000 Catalpa Speciosa, 4-5-ft., 13.00 per 100; 

125.00 per 1000. 
2,000 Sweet Gnm, 6-8-ft., 110.00 per 100; $90.00 

per 1000. 
5,000 Ilex Opaco, (American Holly), 3-«-in., $4.00 

perlOO; ^.00 per 1000. 
10,000 Xovae-Angrliae Aster, strong, $3.00 per 

per 100; $25.00 per 1000. 
Early shipment. Send for our Special Surplua 

List of Bargains. > 

ELLSWORTH BROWN & CO., Seabrook, N. H» 

Mention The Review when you write. 

PEONIES 

Fine collection, leading kinds, all colors named,. 
$1.50 per doz.; $10.00 per 100. 

Clematis, large flowering, $2.50 per doz. 

Clematis Panlculata, $1.00 per dozf; $8.00 per 
100. 

Smilax, fall- sown, nice plants, $3.00 per 1000, 

Pansles, fall transplanted, fine plants, leading 
strains, $1.25 per 100; $10.00 per 1000; young- 
plants, $4.00 per 1000. 

F. A. BALLKB, BLOOMIN6TON, ILL» 



2-year*old 



4-lnoh pot* 



P. & W. Cochets and Crimson Rambler, 7c: La France^ 
Meteor, Hermosa and Soupert, 8c; Diesbach, Dins- 
more, Charta and Laing, 9c; Gen. Jacqueminot and 
Paul Neyron, lOc; Marechal Niel, 15c; Baby Ram- 
bler, 18c. 

101 choice sorts in S^t^-in. pots. 

<^\ Frni Ff LORAL COMPAHYA 
^^■il LLL LULL >spRiWQrieuPOHio- J 

Mention Tbe Review when yon write. 

Rose Plants 

on own roots. VOW BBADT. 
Get onr list before "bnyiug. 

C. M. NIUFFER. Springndd, Ohio. 

Mention The Review when yon write. 

Manetti 

STOCKS, now ready, $8.50 per 1000. 

ELIZABETH NURSERY CO. 

Elisabeth, N. J. 

Mention The Review when you write. 



LARGE TREES 

OAKS and MAPLK8. PINES and 
HKMLOCKS. 

ANDORRA NURSERIES, 

Wm. Warner Harper. Prop. 

Chestnat Hill, Philadelphia, Pa. 



Mention The Review whjen yon write. 



. .J^Ar^- '. :. '■-'^•-■-■^-^■" ^- f-^^-i--^- ' ^-.'' 



lJ. "-T r'^'M i'm<A'^imi^'^^^'*^''--v\fii\iW\'ih^itii^''a^m-^ 



TjBj^Tf'WP'iBIWfWW'WPW^lWrT'''^^ -■,. .•..,,.,-.. 



Mabch 14, 1907. 



The Weekly Florists' Review^ 



J287 



Forcing Plants 

Spiraea Van Houttei 

Azaleas 

Lilac Rubra de Marley 

DeuUia Gracilis 

Oimson Rambler 

Magna Charta Rose 

General Jacq* Rose 



Pyramidal Box Trees, 4-5 feet. Barberry Thunbergii 



Nursery Stock ^"T^"" Florists 
Trees, Shrubs, Roses, Clematis, Evergreens 



Send for our wholesale trade list. 



W. & T. Smith Co., Geneva, N.Y. 



Mention The Review when you write. 



BERBERIS THUNBERGII 

12-18-inch $6.00 per 100; $50.00 per 1000 

l»-24-inch 8.00 per 100; 70.00 per 1000 

CAROLINA POPLARS 

8-10 feet $10.00 per 100; $80.00 per 1000 

10-12 feet 12.50 per 100; 100.00 per 1000 

Large stock and fine stufl. Sure to please. 
Send for price list of general stock. 

Aurora Nursery Co., Aurora, 111. 

Mention The Review whea you vrrite. 

American White Elm 

Extra fine nursery-grown, by car-load lots. 

6000 2 to 2>^ inches diameter $80.00 per 100 

2000 04 to 3 inches diameter 100.00 per 100 

8000 3 to syi inches diameter 150.00 per 100 

500 3>^ to 4 Inches diameter 175.00 per 100 

CHAS. HAWKINSON NURSERY 

KZCELSIOR, MINN. 

Mention The Review when you write. 

How Commissions are Maintained* 

The manner of paying for this inspec- 
tion varies in the different states. For 
instance, in Illinois the expenses of the 
inspector are borne by each nurseryman 
according to the time required by the 
inspector to go over the premises. This 
is about the best system where the 
nurseryman has to pay the expenses him- 
self, as the small nurseryman has to pay 
only his proportion of what the large 
grower does. 

In Virginia, the arrangement is not 
quite so satisfactory for the nurseryman. 
Every person, firm, or corporation, sell- 
ing, or shipping nursery stock into the 
state, must pay a fee of $20 annually, 
be he a large or small dealer. While 
the bigger nurserymen in the state can 
well afford this amount, the small 
nurseryman has to pay just the same 
amount. 

In Louisiana the nurseryman pays 
practically nothing, as all expenses in- 
cident to inspection are paid out of the 
fund appropriated for the maintenance 
of the state crop pest commission. The 
only expense which the nurserymen have 
to undergo is the very nominal one of 
paying for the actual printing of copies 
of their certificates of inspection upon 
shipping tags, which tags are paid for 
by the commission. 

Certificate an Advantage. 

And in this connection, I might men- 
tion a direct advantage to the nursery- 
man, gained through the use of these 
tags. This is their value as advertise- 
ments. They are veritable health cer- 
tificates, showing, as they do, that the 
stock to which they are attached, is 
grown by a reliable nurseryman, who has 
complied with all the requirements of 
law. While no certificates can be posi- 
tive guarantees, they serve as the best 
possible indication that all stock to 
which they are attached is free of dan- 
gerously injurious insects and plant dis- 



20.000 LARGE 

CALIFORNIA PRIVET 

6 to 6 feet, $6.00 per 100; $50.00 per 1000. 
6 to 7 feet, 9.00 per 100; 76.00 per 1000. 

It is bright and handsome. I ofiEer it at these low prices because 
it is upon land that must be cleared at once. Speak quickly. 

J. T. LOVETT, LITTLE SILVER, N.J. 



Mention The Review when yon write. 



ROSES 



American Beauty, Clothilde Soupert, Gloire de Dijon^ 
Kaiserin Augusta Victoria, La France, Mme. Caroline 
Testout, Frau Karl Druschki, Crimson Rambler, Baby 
STRONG DORMANT PUNTS Rambler, Dorothy Perkins, etc., SUITABLE FOR FORCING. 

Immediate Delivery. Prices Rig^ht. General Catalog and Price Lists ready. 

Bay State Nurseries, North Abington, Mass 

Mention The Review when yon write. * 

47,960 Low Budded Roses in 26 Varieties 

I offer for immediate delivery from my cellars here, the entire Surplus Roses grown by the 

Helkes-Biloxl Nurseries. No. 1, $95.00 per 1000; No. 1>^, $65.00 per 1000. 
Privet Cuttlncs, $1.25 per 1000; 10,000 for $10.00. Correspondence solicited. 

HIRAM T. JONES, Union County Nursories, ELIZABETH, N. J. 

Mention The Review when yon write. 



eases. Buyers of nursery stock all over 
the country are beginning to realize the 
importance of these certificate tags, and 
nurserymen who succeed in shipping 
without them, are at a decided disad- 
vantage with the trade. 

Results. 

A vast amount of good results have 
been obtained by this law alone. Many 
states, whose orchard industries would 
have beeh entirely ruined by the dread 
San Jose scale, now have their fruit 
businesses in more flourishing condition 
than before, while added confidence in- 
spired by these protective rules and 
regulations have given tone to the nur- 
sery stock market. The work in Louis- 
iana will serve as a good example of th© 
advantage of these laws, for the nursery 
inspection work has been in force but 
two years, and the improvement in nur- 
sery conditions are easily noted. I will 
close by quoting from this year's report 
on "The Nursery Business of Louisi- 
ana," which I made to Mr. Newell sev- 
eral weeks ago. 

"The second year of the nursery in- 
spection work of the state crop pest 
commission of Louisiana has just been 
completed, and the nursery conditions 



DACLFQ Onjpwn Roots 
M%>\W\^K^\^ 2 years. 

Crimson Bamblers, extra strong, at $7.00 per 100. 
Dorothy Perkins, Pink, White and Tellow Ramb- 
lers, etc., at $5.00 per 100. 
H. F. Boies and Baby Bamblers, at $8.00 per 100 

GILBERT GOSTICH,ROCHESTER,N.Y 

Mention The Review when you write. 

throughout the state are very good. 
"Forty-nine nurseries have been in- 
spected, just twenty-one more than were 
inspected last season. In the case of 
fourteen out of this forty-nine, San Jose 
scale in slight quantity was found either 
in the nurseries themselves, or so close 
to them as to endanger the nursery stock 
by spreading, while chaff scale on orange 
was found in one. To date all, except 
five nurserymen, have followed the direc- 
tions of the commission and have suc- 
ceeded in eradicating the scale from their 
premises. In the case of the delinquent 
five, certificates of inspection have been 
refused until the premises are thoroughly 
cleaned up, kept under quarantine a suffi- 
cient time, then reinspected and pro- 
nounced apparently free of scale by the 
inspector. Most of these premises will 






•:^'!%\f^\\^ '^^ "^"^ ^ .r^ 



■7 iT> 



■••yf~'' '■'^^^''y\ry^~i 



1288 



The Weekly Florists^ Review* 



MAncH 14, 1907. 



probably be cleared of scale in the near 
future, as almost all of the nurserymen 
in Louisiana fully realize the importance 
of getting rid of these pests. Forty- 
three certificates of inspection have been 
issued. 

"Since this inspection syste^i was in- 
augurated last season the amount of nur- 
sery stock grown in the state has in- 
creased almost 400 per cent. Last season 
the inspectors of the commission ex- 
amined 683,550 growing marketable trees 
and shrubs. This season the number has 
been increased to 2,172,632. 

"In addition to the above, several 
thousand orchard trees, which were grow- 
ing in close proximity to nurseries, were 
examined. 

"On the whole, the status of the nur- 
. scry business of the state is most en- 
couraging. The extraordinary increase 
of salable stock in one season, the in- 
creased number of nurseries inspectea, 
and the diminution in percentage of 
nurseries infested, all point to the fact 
that the protection and assistance given 
to both buyers and sellers of nurseiy 
stock by the commission, has had the 
effect of stimulating the state's fruit 
industries. 



LENOX, MASS. 

The regular meeting of the Lenox 
Horticultural Society was held Saturday, 
March 2, President F. Heeremans in the 
chair. The schedules for the June, Au- 
gust and fall exhibitions were read and 
adopted. This being carnation night, it 
brought out some fine exhibits. The fol- 
lowing exhibitors were awarded first 
prizes: A. J, Loveless, for a fine vase 
of Robert Craig; F. H«eremans, for En- 
chantress; A. McConnachie, for Mrs. T. 
W. Lawson, also winning for a vase of 
mixed varieties. A. H. Wingett staged 
a vase of Stock Queen Alexandra which 
was much admired, some of the spikes 
being fully three feet in length, and was 
awarded a cultural certificate, also for 
two fine vases of President Carnot and 
Bichmond roses. I may say that Rich- 
mond is doing remarkably well here, al- 
though we have had a dull winter, and 
all the growers speak highly of it. 

Three silver cups were offered and ac- 
cepted for competition at our fall exhi- 
bition by the following firms: Henry A. 
Dreer, Philadelphia; R. & J. Farquhar, 
Boston, and E. Jaques, Lenox. The fol- 
lowing firms have also offered premiums: 
A. T. Boddin^on, New York; Chas. H. 
Totty, Madison, N. J.; Julius Roehrs 
Co., Rutherford, N. J.; A. N. Pierson, 
Cromwell, Conn.; Bay State Nurseries, 
South Abington, Mass.; Vaughan's Seed 
Store, New York, and Howard & Morrow, 
Pittsfield, Mass. G. I. 

Woodlane Nurseries 

EstabUalied 1887 - 

CALIFORNIA PRIVET 

8 years old. 3 to 4 feet $30.00 per 1000 

S'.and 4 years old, 4 feet and up ... . 35.00 per 1000 
Transplanted and cut to the ground last spring. 

NORWAY SPRUCE 

Specimens, 3i4 to 4 feet $50.00 perlOO 

Specimens. 4 to 6 feet 60.00 per 100 

▲merioan Arbor- Vltae, 4 to 5 ft. 25.00 per 100 
Large Trees of Oaks, Maples and Oriental Plane. 

Willard H. Roflrera, Mt. HoUy, N. J. 

Always Mentton tlie 

Wli«n Wrltlnc AdTsrUswr* 




WILLIAM SAUNDERS 

The flowers are large, of splendid form, and are borne very freely in immense clusters. 
The color Is a deep rich shining scarlet slightly dappled with crimson. Pollage is a rioli 
bronze. Height, 3H to 4 feet. We believe that Wm. Saunders is decidedly the most perfeot 
Oanna of this type that has been introduced. 60c each; $5.00 per doz.; $85.00 per 100. 

OTTAWA 

Is a strong grower. Tery robust and 5 to 6 feet high. The flowers are large and beau- 
tifully formed, color is carmine with tints of old rose and deep coral, add to this the silken 
sheen and you can imagine the effect a few plants will produce. 

NOTE— We bad this Oanna on trial among the Oanadian experimental stations last 
summer and this is the official report of their expert: "Quite distinct and one of the most 
beautiful shades of color I ever saw in Oannas. Of 70 massed in one bed during the past 
season, this was the most floriferous in the collection, coming into bloom early and con- 
tinuing until cut down by frost, as many as 13 expanded beads of blooms being counted at 
one time on a plant, and not a poor one among them, all being of immense size." 50c each; 
$6.00 per doz.; $35.00 per 100. 

NEW YORK 

Has the Orchid type of flower. They have much more substance than the flowers of 
the other varieties of this class, and will stand the hot sanshine as well as the toughest 
varieties of cannas. The color is ji solid rich scarlet covered with a beautiful glowing sheen. 
The flowers are large and contrast beantifully with the dark bronze foliage. 50c each; 
$5.00 per doz.: $35.00 per 100. 

Send for our list and prices of 60 other leading varieties of Oannas. 

BOSES, are our great specialty, 2}4 and 4-inch pot plants we have in great variety — 
Philadelphia Bambler, Crimson Bambler, Dorothy Perkins and other climbers in strong 
field plants. 

SHBCBBEBT, in variety. TIbnmnm Plieatnai, Spiraeas, Althaeas, Honeyraekles, etc. 



-SEND FOB OUR PRICE LISTS. 



THE CONARD & JONES CO., WEST GAOVE, PA. 



Mention The Bevlew when you write. 



VERBENAS 



60 FINEST VARIETIES 
PERFECTLY HEAL1HY 



Rooted cuttings, our selection $0.75 per 100; $6.00 per 1000 

Plants, our selection 2.60 per 100; 20.00 per 1000 

Rooted cuttings, purchaser's selection 90 per lOO; 8.< per 1000 

Plants, purchaser's selection 8.00 per 100; 25.00 per 1000 



CHOICE ROOTED CUHINGS 
FREE FROM DISEASE 



CARNATIONS 

Bobt. Cntlc scarlet, very productive; My Maryland, pure white, good stems; 
Cardinal, scailet. good flowers; Jasaioa, white, penciled with scarlet, $6.00 
per 100; $50.00 per 1000. 

Crisis, Lady Bountiful, Bnohantress, $8.00 per 100; $25.00 per 1000. 

Mrs. M. A. Patten, Judare Hlnsdala, Flamingo, Buttercup, $2.60 per 
100; $20.C0 per 1000. 

Mrs. Thomas Lawson, Tbe Queen, $2.00 per 100; $17.60 per 1000. 

Golden Beauty, Prosperity, Gov. Boosevelt, Queen Louise, $2.80 per 
100; $15 00 per 1000. 

Mrs, K. A. Nelson, Dorothy, Wm. Soott, Flora Hill, Kthel Crocker, 
Kldorado, Mrs. Joost, Portia, $1.50 per 100; $12.00 per 1009. 

J. L. DILLON, Bioomsburg,Pa. 




Mention The Review when you write. 



CANNAS Queen of CANNAS 

QUEEN OF BEAUTY 

the best of all scarlets, was introduced by us in 1906, it has proved out all that we claimed for it. 
Our list contains nearly 200 varieties. Can we book your order for fall delivery. 1907, or for started 
plants, strong and hardy, grown in coldfraines, ready April 1 to 15? Prices same as for dry roots. 
Over 50 varieties of dry roots for immediate delivery. 

BULU and PBABI. DAK&XAB. AB0VOO DOVAX VABIBOATA, BUDBBOXIA 

GOLDBV aiiOW; also KUOZU TIBBB, layer plants. Write for quotations. 

FRANK GUMMIN6S BULB AND PLANT GO , MERIDIAN, MISS. 

Mention The Review when you write. 



rVERGREEN 

B An Immense Stock of both large and 

^^^ small Blze ETEROBEBN TBBB8 in 
great variety; also BVEBOREBIi 
SHBUBS. Correspondence solicited 

THE WM H. MOON CO., MORRISViLLE, PA. 

ICentioa The Bevlew when yoa writs. 



THE REGAN PRINTING HOUSE 

Largre Buns of 

Catalogues..%H^ 



88-91 
Plymoutli Place, 

Mention The Review when yon write. 



CHiaGO 



..- .\^1l.-L. liM^A..-: 



■ >i;^-..;,u..^^,V.V-!.....<.-,W-\v.....-\-V.t^^l fi-jffl .^^f'^ ■■■■'-• ^. - - 



■T ,f '^F'''*fTW'-F'7', "\-iyv^^--m.-ryrv-^jifij,irwr','7;^rrr', *'^f /JfV^l ■'■'' "J. Y- V 



*TT^ 



Mabcu 14, 1907. 



The Weekly Florists* Review. 



1289 



SOME SPECIALS NOW READY 

Chrysanthemums MlSS l>l&y rriCK 

(The white sport of W. Duckham), WINTER CHEER and BUTTERCUP, 

2%-inch pots, 50c each; $35.00 per 100. 

American Beauty 

7000 plants in 2%-inch pots, in superb condition, ready to move on. Every plant 
unconditionally guaranteed by me. Price, $8.00 per 100; $75.00 per 1000. 
Samples sent anywhere. 

New Carnations 

WinSOfy the bread and butter Carnation for all of you to grow. Helen Miller 
Gould, Haines' imperial and Pink Imperial, all at $12.00 per 100; 
$100.00 per 1000. 2%-inch pots, $14.00 per 100. A splendid lot of White 
Perfection in 2%-inch pots, $10.00 per 100. 

CHARLES H. TOTTY, Madison, N. J. 



Mention The Review when you write. 



John E. Haines 

The leading scarlet, brilliant color, fine stem; 
the most productive ever Introduced; blooms 
early an til thrown out In July; no extra trrass: 
all shoots make flowers. Watch the papers and 
see what crrowers say about It. None but well 
rooted, healthy cuttinsrs leave the place. Rooted 
cuttinsrs ready now. Price, 16.00 per 100; 160.00 
per 1000. John E. Haines. Bethlehem. Pa. 
Mention The Review when yon write. 

ROOTED CUTTINGS 

Carnations 100 1000 

Lawson 11.60 110.00 

Enchantress... 2.00 16.00 
W. Lawson.... 2.80 20.00 
L. BountifuL . . 2.60 20.00 
Harlowarden.. 1.60 13.M 

Frank Garland, Des Plaines, 111. 

Mention The Review when yon write. 

HEALTHY, ROOTED CARNATION CUniNGS 

Enchantress per 100, $2.50 ; per 1000, $20.00 

Mrs Lawson " 1.26 " 10.00 

White Lawson " 2.60 " 20.00 

White Cloud " 1.25 " 10.00 

Bobt. Craig " 6.00 

Candace " 600 

Gash with order or GhicaKo reference. 

JOHN IfUMO. Touby near Western Ave., 
Roarers Park, CHICAGO. 

Mention The Review when you write. 



Roses 100 lOCO 

Brides 11.50 112.60 

Maids 1.50 12.60 

Richmond 1.60 12.60 

Kaiserin 8.60 30.00 



Abundance.. 

Rooted cattlngs of this most prolific white 
carnation ready for delivery now. Prices, 
15.00 per 100; $40.00 per 1000. 250 at 1000 rate. 
6 per cent discount for cash with order. 

RUDOLPH FISCHER 

6BIAT NECK, LONG ISLAftD, N. T. 

Mention The Review when yon write. 

Always Mention tbe.... 

Flerists' Review 

Wben Wntlnar Adyertlswrs, 



A. F. J. BAUR. 



F. S. SMITH. 



^^E are sending out a fine lot of Carnation Cut- 
tings and should like to supply you with what you 
need in that line. Our price list is out and will be mailed 
to you on receipt of your name and address. Our prices 
are reasonable and B. & S. cuttings and plants thrive. 

We are entirely sold up on young Geranium plants for 
this season, so don't include any of these in your order. 

BXUR & SMITH 

38th St. and Senate Ave.. INDIANAPOLIS, IND. 

.Vieotlon I'he Keview when you write. 



Grafted ROSES 



Oar Roses are tlis finest and best irrown. liberty, Riohmond, ii|, 
Jb% Franoe, Killarnty, rose pots, flS.CO per lOO. 8>{-ln. pots, 
918.00 per lOO. Bride, Bridesmaid, Oolden Gate, Raiserln, 
rose pots, 91,0.00 per 100. 8>^-ln. pots 915.0O per 100. 



J. L. DILLON, 



♦♦ 



Bloomsburg^ Pa* 



W w 0r Always oientioii the Florists' RcvieW when writinc advertisen. W 






"J.i,»«njJ!U..nj J,,, jiiiu'ttl"" wi*'-." "wiv" "iWi.'PWHI'iil**** "^ ' ' ', 



■Tjyy.ij»-~?i»ia y ..u .j i » M i .j j ijy.kij jl» p .p^ i . < i i i j ; iyj i i. iy t ■. ■f.'jf^ ^ | i i i ^ i^f : M ' ^^ •^' • :'^^^.vw3!pt:-'r'r^r>^'^sf!rfit \j ' ^ ^ jfpyn! . r wi r \ !! W*J|t ' ' 



1290 



The Weekly Florists^ Review* 



Mabch 14, 1907. 



Fancy Peonies, Extra Cheap 

200 plants of each, ** heeled in" in sand. Not less than 85 of a kind at price 
g^iven, for strong^ divisions of two to four eyes. Ship anytime. Order at once. 



Ducheise de Nemours, white, no markingfs each, 20c 



Mme. de Verneville, fragrant, full white . 
La Tulipe, fancy striped white . . 
Edulis Superba, earliest pink .... 
Dr. Bretonneau, mid-season pink. 



25c 
25c 
15c 
15c 



Delicatissima, deep flesh pink each, 20c 

M. Boucharlataine, American Beauty shade ** 20c 

Delachei, best dark red ** 15c 

200 mixed pink ** 8c 

200 mixed red ** 10c 



SUBJECT TO STOCK BBING UNSOLD. 



PETERSON NIRSERY, Lincolfl and Peterson Aves., CHICA60 



Mention The Review when you write. 



DENVER. 

The Market. 

Favorable weather the last two weeks 
made the cut flower and plant trade 
good. Dinners and parties are not plen- 
tiful but a large demand for funeral 
v/ork helped to use up the accumulation 
of stock. The market is well supplied 
with a general line. 

American Beauty roses, especially the 
select, long-stemmed ones, are not seen 
in any large quantities, but these, as 
well as tea roses, are beginning to come 
in much more satisfactorily. White roses, 
on account of funeral demands, have 
cleaned up nicely and Bridesmaids near- 
ly as well. Both of these, as well as 
Eichmond, Liberty and Chatenay, are 
of good quality. 

Carnations are in good supply, but the 
prices remain about the same. They will 
be in fine condition for Easter unless 
they" go off crop ; some indications point 
that way, 

Violets are plentiful and any number 
can be had at this time. It is said some 
sold under a dollar, but not first-class 
stock. Air bulbous stock is in abundance, 
the demand not being quite so strong. 

Variottf Notes. 

Geo. M. Kessler, of St. Louis, has been 
called to take up the work of improving 
the park and boulevard system here. 

N. A. Benson, the carnation grower, 
had a large bunch of Aristocrat, sent by 
the Chicago Carnation Co., on exhibition 
at the Park Floral Co. 's store, so that 
the growers and storemen might see it. 
It is certainly a good keeper and that 
seemed to be the one fact all were 
agreed upon. 

The Western Bowling Congress, now 
in session here, with teams from all over 
the west, from Kansas City to Port- 
land, opened March 7 at the Coliseum. 
The Florists' League had a five-men 
team entered, and bowled the first night. 
To Boss Mahan, of the Alpha Floral 
€p., belongs the honor of the first strike 
of the series. N. A. Benson had high 
score, namely, 213. 

The Denver Dry Goods Co. contem- 
plates opening a flower department in 
its new building. E. S. K. 

Eltria, O. — The following gentlemen 
have incorporated the L. C. Hecock Flo- 
ral Co., with a capitalization of $20,000: 
Louis C. Hecock, John E. Hecock, Louis 
E. Sutliff, Earl E. Smith and E. A. 
Phipps. 



GRAFTED ROSES 

" MONEY-MAKERS FOR COMMERCIAL GROWERS 



Our list includes only the most profitable commercial varieties for forcing:— no "has- 
beens" nor "freaks." (Consult the Flower Market reports and see what the sellers are.) 
Here is our list: 



Far 100 

RICHMOND $10.00 

CHATENAY 12.00 

BRIDE 12.00 

BRIDESIff AID 12.00 

UNCLE JOHN 12.00 

GOLDEN GATE 12.00 



■Per 100 

KILLARNET $16.00 

WELLESLEY 12 00 

KAISERIN 12.00 

CARNOT llS.OO 

IVORY 12.00 

MISS KATE MOULTON. . 15.00 



Tliese are tbe market's top-notobers. Our plants are grafted on the best 
selected EnsUsb Manettl stocks, and we are booking orders now for early delivery or 
when wanted. 

THE 1907 NOVELTIES— Lady Gay, Mlnnebaba and Hlawatba, can be had 

in strong stock; descriptions and prices on request. 

SPECIAL— AMERICAN BEAUTT— 2 years, dormant, (field-grown) budded, fine 
plants for forcing, at $12.00 per 100. 

CELLAR-STORED SHRUBS, VINES, ETC., in full assortment, ready for lin« 
mediate shipment. Send for complete price list. 

JACKSON & PERKINS CO., NEWARK, NEW YORK 

Nurserymen and Florists. Wholesale only. 

Mention The Review when you write. 



Annotiflcefflent- — Aristocrat 

As we have not made all the deliveries of Aristocrat as promised, we 
beg to announce to our patrons that all orders are being filled strictly 
in rotation and all orders will be completed by the 20th of March, as 
we have 50,000 cuttings in the sand nearly rooted and 150,000 cuttings 
that have been put in during tbe past ten days. These will be ready 
for delivery before the end of March, which is not too late for Aristo- 
crat, as it is a very rapid grower, free from disease and will do as well 
as earlier cuttings when benched in the fall. The variety is an easy 
rooter, but owing to tbe very unfavorable weather, cuttines did not 
root as quickly as we expected; besides we are growing them cool, 
which takes a little longer. All of the stock we have sent out has 
given the best of satisfaction, as it is oar aim to see that every cutting 
Is first-class in every respect. 

We wish to thank our patrons for their patience and assuring 
you of our very best attention and that your order will be filled by the 
time stated. 

CHICAGO CARNATION CO. 

A. T. Pyfer, Mgr. JOLIET, ILL. 



Mention The Review when yon write. 



■I'jr^tL^ ..'^Lww xl 



vv^M r»i*vA 'i I "i-ywW-iiiiir riiiriirlliii 



ifjff^flffffff^ff^^^lffffB^^^^f^rf^^jrifi^amrmT^^ :"^^t.^'-'^-'-,""^t 



March 14, 1907. 



The Weekly Florists^ Review* 



J29J 



CARNATIONS 

Well Rooted Culfings 
Healthy Stock 

PINK Per 100 Per 1000 

Lawson $1.50 flO.OO 

Nelson 1.60 10.00 

Nelson Fisher 2.50 22.60 

LIGHT PINK-Enchantress... 2.50 22.60 

VARIE6ATKD 

Mrs. M. A. Patten 2.50 22.50 

WHITK— Boston Market 1.25 10.00 

White Lawson 3.00 26.00 

RED— Robert Oralg 6.00 60.00 

Cardinal 2.6O 20.00 

Estelle 2.00 17.60 



ROSES 

Strong and Weil 
Rooted Cuttings;'^ 

Per 100 Per 1000 

Richmond $1.50 $12.50 

Liberty 2.00 17.60 

Bridesmaid 1.60 12.50 

Bride 1.50 12.60 

Sunrise 8.00 25.00 

Uncle John 1.50 12.60 

Chatenay 1.50 12.50 

Ivory 1.50 12.60 

Perle 2.00 17.60 



ROSES 

FINE PLANTS 

2^-in. Pots 

Per 100 Per 1000 

Richmond $3.00 $26.00 

Bridesmaids 8.00 25.00 

Uncle John 8.00 25.00 

Chatenay 8.00 26.00 

Ivory 3.00 28.00 

Liberty 4.00 86.00 

Perle 4.00 36.00 

Sunrise 5.00 40.00 



KILLARNEY 



2K-incli pots, grafted stock, 
$12.50 per lOO. 



Bench Plants 



ONE-YEAR-OLD PLANTS FROM BENCHES 

Liberty, Ivory, Perle $5.00 per lOOj $40.00 per 1000 

American Beauty..' 10.00 per 100; 75.00 per 1000 



PETER REINBERG 

x.5...^ree. 31 Wabash Ave., CHICAGO 



Mention The Review when yon write. 



Glean, Healthy, Well Rooted 

CaroationCattiags 

READY NOW 

Per 100 Per 1000 

Victory $6.00 160.00 

■nohantreaa 2.00 18.00 

Whit* Lawaon 3.00 26.00 

Lady Bountiful 3.00 25.00 

Mrs. ■. A. Nelson 2.00 16.00 

Mrs. T. W. Lawson 1.60 12.50 

Boston Market 1.50 12.60 

VAUGHSN A SPERRY 

B8-6O Wabash Ave. CHICAGO 

Mention The Review when yon write. 

To My Friends and Patrons 

BE PATIENT 

I will fill your orders for 

Rose^Piok Enchantress 

in good time and with firstclasB stock. 
For the present and until further notice 
I have discontinued booking additional 
orders for Rose-Pink Enchantress. 

S. S. SKIDELSKY 

•M No. S4th St., PHILADELPHIA, PA. 

Mention The Review when yon write. 

Always Mention tlie 

When Writlnc Advertisers 



Rooted Cnttiflgs 



ROSES 



30,000 Beauty Cuttings 

Well rooted stock, now ready 
$3.00 per 100, $85.00 per 1000 

Per 100 Per 1000 

Richmond $1.50 $12.50 

Maid 1.50 12.50 

Bride 1.50 12.50 

Chatenay 1.50 12.50 

CARNATIONS 

Clean, Healthy Stock 

Per 100 Per 1000 

Knchantress $2.50 $22.50 

Lawson 1.50 10.00 

Nelson 1.50 10.00 

Crusader 1.50 12.50 

Boston Market 1.50 10.00 

RobertCrale 0.00 50.00 

Lady Bountlfnl 8.00 25.00 

BENCH PLSNTS 

One-year-old for Immediate delivery. 

Per 100 Per 1000 

Liberty $5.00 $40.00 

Unole John 5.00 40.00 

American Beauty 10.00 75.00 

GEORGE REINBERG 

wholesale Florist 

35 Randolph St., Chicago 



Always mention the Florists' Review when 
writing advertisers. 



ROOTED 

Carnation Cuttings 

Per 100 Per 1000 

Mrs. T. Lawson $1.50 $10.00 

Lady Bountiful 2.50 17.60 

WblteLawson 2.50 20.00 

Wlilte Perfection 5.00 45.00 

Victory 500 45.00 

Robt. CralB 5.00 45.00 

Helen Goddard 5.00 45.00 

President 2.50 20.00 

MomlnsGlory 150 12.60 

Ueut. Peary 2.50 20.00 

Knchantress 2.00 18.0 

Eli Cross, Grand Rapids, Mich. 

Mention The Review when yon write. 

MABELLE 

NKW PINK CARNATION FOR 1907 

Color — A peculiar shade of lovely pink, with a 
faint yellowish cast; several shades lig-hter than the Law- 
son. Unlike most pinks, the brightest sun does not 
injure the color. Slse— 3 to 4 inches in diameter when 
established. Odor — Pleasing^, but not stronsr. 
Sterna— Invariably strong, but always graceful, rang- 
ing from 12 to 30 inches during the season. Habit, 
etc. — A very quick, active grower, making specimen 
plants in a short time, even from late cuttings. On ac- 
count of its rapid growth, requires supporting very 
soon after benching. Gets away rapidly, blooms early 
and giv^s long stems right from the start. Prodnct- 
iTeneaa— Prodigious is the best word we know of to 
use here. It is the most incessant bloomer, early and 
late, we have ever grown. Stock limited. No discount. - 
Price tl2.00 per lOU; tlOO.OO per 1000. 

THE H. WEBER & SONS CO., Oakland, Md. 

Mention The Review when yon write. 
Always Mention the 

When Wrltins Advertisers 



r 



ri:cW>.^ta ^^L^.. 



■'.V+" 



rwi '^w^^^ ,,.,^-^^^^^gi I ^,1 J ^11 1 |j.ii^m 11 . . I I ji. 'w 'w^-'j" • TW" JI.J1 ,1, 'M i.gnpi^ upi^ ^5iP,^,i^j,y ijMMim' iJ (jlKiVH-lpi 



J 292 



The Weekly Florists^ Review* 



Mabch 14, 1907. 



Iniperial«">Pink Imperial Carnations 

You Cannot Afford to be Without These Two Excellent Varieties 

Price, $l2i)0 per 100; $100.00 per 1000. 250 at 1000 rate* A discount allowed when cash accompanies the order. 



A.J.6DTTMAN, 



The Wholesale Florist of NEW YORK 
43 WEST 28TH ST. 



JOHN E. HAINES, 



BETHLEHEM, 
PA. 



Mention The Review when yon write. 



* GRAND RAPIDS. 

Bright weather is helping the tardy 
lily crop along and if it continues most 
of the lilies intended for Easter will 
be out. There is no doubt about the 
Crimson Eamblers being ready, as the 
buds are showing color now. Hydrangeas 
will be in, but, as it were, at the eleventh 
hour. Some of the buds are showing 
color. Of tulips, hyacinths and daffodils 
there will be the usual big Easter crop. 
Violet plants in 6-inch pans, while in 
seeming good supply, will be exhausted 
before Easter arrives. 

In cut flowers, roses are still scarce, 
although coming in more freely and of 
improved quality. Carnations are more 
plentiful but moving nicely, with white 
scarce. The plants give promise of hold- 
ing out for Easter with generous cuts. 
Eoses will be in better crop at Easter 
than now. 

The West Michigan State Fair people 
were hot after the state legislature for 
an appropriation of $5,000 to help en- 
large its educational scope and offer 
additional premiums, but were at the 
last moment turned down, and $20,000 
voted for exhibiting Michigan industries 
at the Jamestown exposition. G. F. C. 



ELBERON, N. J. 

The regular meeting of the Elberon 
Horticultural Society was held' March 
4, Vice-president Henry "Wood in'v'the 
chair. Three new members were elected. 
The schedule of the second annual flower 
show, which will be held July '^i and 
25, was adopted. 

Some fine exhibits were staged, nota- 
bly a vase of stocks. Queen Alexandra, 
shown by A. Bauer; vases of Proser- 
pine and Belle Alliance tulips, shown 
by J. Kennedy; a vase of Marie Louise 
violets, by A. Greib ; a vase of La France 
violets, by F, Dettlinger; cauliflower 
and lettuce, by P. Murray, and carna- 
tions, by W. Swain. 

A delegation of the society recently 
visited the establishment of F. R. Pier- 
son Co., at Tarrytown, and had a most 
enjoyable trip. G. M. 



Davenport, Ia. — Victor H. Littig has 
been appointed receiver for the Allison- 
Pope Co. 

GRAFTED ROSES 

On Dickson's Irish Msnettl. 
We are now booking orderi for March delivery. 

Kaiscrin, Bride, Bridesmaid* 
Killarney and Ricl^mond» 

ilSO.OO p«r 1000. 

—Order now.— 

ROBERT SCOTT it SON, 

SHARON HUX, DKL. CJO.. PA. 

Mention The RcTlew when you write. 



Beacon Carnation 



Needs no special 
culture. A nig^ht 

temperature of 
60 to 62 dei^rees 

suits it admir- 
ably. 



...ORA11QE.SCARLET.. . 

Has been proved 

the most profitable 

Commercial 

Scarlet. 



An early bloom' 
er and very free 
flowerine^. Will 
rank with the 
best yet intro- 
duced in this 
respect. 



Per 100 $12.00: 60 at 100 rate. I Per 6000 $90.00 per 1000 

Per 1000 100.00: 260 at 1000 rate. Per 10,000 80.00 per 1000 

Per 2600 $96.00 per 1000 I !■ lots of 20,000 or more... 76.00 per 1000 

Cash wltb Order. MARCH DBUVKRT. 4. 

Cottage Gardens Co. Peter Fisher, (ongmator) 



QUEENS, N. Y. 



ELLIS, MASS. 



Mention The Review when yon write. 



Sport of Chatenay 

As free as Chatenay, color of Bon Silent, 2>^-lnch plants, $25.00 per 100. 

^EMIL GLAUBER, : : Montclair, Colo. 



Mention The Review when you write. 



Carnation Cuttings 

Per 100 Per 1000 

RoBe>PiBk EnehaBtreas 17.00 $60 00 

Helen eoddard.... 6 00 50.00 

Bobert Crals 6.00 5000 

Qneea Loala* 1.26 1000 

W. D. GIRVIN, Leola, Pa. 

Mention The Review when yon write. 

1000 SAND RODTEO CUniNGS 

Robert CralK. S6 00 per 100: 150.00 per 1000; 
an excellent red and a fine CbrlKtmas cnlor. 
Also Bnohantreaa, $2.50 per 100: $20.00 per 1000; 
tbe best lUht pink carnation on tbe market. Our 
(took is bealtby. free from all disease and well 
rooted. Write for our price list of other stand- 
ard varieties. VsUey View Greenhouses, 
Velie Bros., Prop., HarlborouBbt R. >• 
Mention The Review when you write. 

ROOTED CUTTINGS 

FRR 100, PRRPAID 

Ageratum, Gumey and Pauline $0.60 

Alternantheraa, best red and yellow 60 

Fuchsias 1.00 

Heliotrope, blue 86 

Salvia Bonfire T6 

Hardy PInka, red 16 

CASH 

HHIPPKMBBIJKH TXOBIL CO , SkippeBBbirr, Pa. 

Mention The Review when you write. 



in Soft 
Wooded Stock 



R. C. 



3-ln. 
$5.00 



5.00 



Specials 

CaBnas, started in flats, true 

to name 

AlternaBthera, red and yellow. $0.60 

AlyaKnm, giant 1.00 

Rr^Biaa, 5 to 10 varieties 2.50 

Coleaa, red yellow and mixed. .76 

Ualsiei, 3 best varieties 2.60 

Englisb seedlings 1.00 

Hhasta 

Feverfew 1.50 

Faehslas, 4 varieties 2.60 

Lantaaas, 2 varieties 1.60 

GcraBlBBB, red, wbite, pink and 

salmon 2.00 

Mme Salleroi 1.M 

Heliotrope 2.50 

PetBBlas 2.50 

Salvias t... 1.50 

T» rbeaas 1 50 

TlBcas, Variegata and green... 1.60 

CiBerailas 

Cyelaaien 

PriBimies, all kinds 

FEKN8— All kinds at low prices 
Write for list. 
B08I8 ! BORER I 60.000 ready. 
References or Oasb. 

GEO. A. KUHL, Pekin, III. 

All plants for Baster shipped in waterproof 
paper pots, saving you express charges. 

Aiwayt mention the Florists' Review when 
writing advertisers. 



2>i-ln. 
$tf.oo 

2.50 
8.00 
600 
250 
8.60 



2.50 
5.00 

3.60 

3.60 
800 
3.50 
600 
2.50 
8.00 
8.60 
5.00 

5.00 



6.00 



8.00 

18.00 

8.00 



for quality 



,^.AtLtl,'tijik^ .^t> 



j|^j^p^p(5'^V»7'?a!(""^''W" r'jff.f'n'ifw.viw'r''. ^t:. .v 'mjivn i.jiu n i"» ',■•■ p'. »^'n'T---j^ f-^ 



March 14, 1907. 



The Weekly Florists' Review* 



1293 



ROOTED CUTTINGS OF ROSES 



Richmond per 100, $1^ per 1000, $12.50 

Kaiaeria ** 250 ** 20.00 

Peru ** 2^ ** 20.00 

MacArthur ** 2.50 ** 20.00 



Carnot per 100, $2.50 per 1000, $20K)0 

Bride ** 1.50 ** 1Z50 

Bridesmaid « 1.50 ** 12.50 

Chatenay ** 1.50 ** 12.50 



ROOTED CUTTINGS OF CARNATIONS 



Enchantreaa per 100, $2.50 

Lady Bountiful ** 2.50 

Lawaon ** 1.50 



per 1000, $25.00 
** 25.00 

** 15.00 



OoT. Wolcott per 100, $1.50 

Prosperity ** 2.00 

Harlowarden ** 2.00 



per 1000, $15.00 
15.00 
15.00 



OUR CUTTINGS ARE ALL STRONG. HEALTHY AND WELL ROOTED. 
We sell 500 at 1000 rate. All Cuttinss Shipped from HINSDALE, ILLINOIS. 



Basset! & Washburn 



store and Office, 76 Wabash Ave., Chicago 

GRESNHOUSES. HINSDALK. ILL. 



Mention The Review when you write. 



EASTER LILIES 

15o per bud. 

Spiraeas 40c. BOc and 60c each 

Azaleas $1.00. Sl.25, and $1.50 each 

Hydranareas. . ..11.00. $1.60. $2.00 and $2 50 each 

Hyacinths 4-1d., $1.60; 6-in.. $2.60 per doz. 

Tulips 5-iD. pans, $3.00 per doz 

Narcissus, 5-iD. pans $3.00 per doz.; 6-in.. $1.00 

per doz. 
Daffodils, Einele and double. Sin. pans, $3 00 

per doz.; 6-in.. $1 00 per doz. 

Geraniums 4-in.. $1.50; 5-iD., $2 00 per doz. 

Beeonlas in flower, 8 to 10 var.. 3-iD.. $8 00; 

4-iD., $12 50. 

Bfarguerltes 3-in.. 8c 

Gash or reference. 

GEO. A. KUHL, Pekin, III. 

Mention The Review when you write. 

ROSE and CARNATION ^^X" 

FINEST, CLEAN, HEALTHY STOCK 100 1000 

Bobt. CralK, Candace 15.00 $40.00 

Bncbantrcss 2.00 18.00 

Cmaader 1.75 12.60 

Boston Market, Harlowarden.. 1.60 10.00 

Mrs. T. Lawson 1.50 12.00 

Mrs. B. A. Nelson 1.50 12.00 

Variegated Lawson 4.00 86.00 

ft Unrooted cutting's Harlowarden 
and Boston Market. $6.00 per 1000. 

Blcbmond, from 2ii^-in. pots 4 00 35.00 

Bride, from 2ii^-in. pots 4.U0 35.00 

Maid, from 2!-^-ln pots 4 00 35.00 

Chatenay, from 2>^-ln. pots 4.00 35.00 

SCHEIDEN & SCH008, 60 Wabash Ave., Chicago 

Mention The Review when you write. 

Boston Ferns, 6-in. pots, $3.00 per doz.: 8-in. 

f>ot8, $16.00 per doz.; 11-ln. pots, $2.50. Specimens 
n 12- in. pots, $5.00, $6.00 and $7.00 each; 14-ln. pots, 
$16 00 per pair. Scottii Ferns, 5^-ln. pots. $3.00 
per doz.; 6-ln. pots, $6.00 per doz. : 7and8-ln. pots, 
$12.00 per doz. N. KleKantlssima. &%-in. pots, 
$6.00 per doz. N. Whitmani, 4^-ln pots, $6.00 
per doz. Snperb Boxwood, Just arrived, per- 
fectly shapedl Bushes for window boxes. 24-in. 
hl^h, $1.00 to $1.50 a pair. Pyramid Box, 8 ft. 
high, $2.60 to $3.00 a pair; 3^ ft. high, $4.00 a pair; 
4 ft. high, $4 50 and $6.00 a pair; 4^ ft. high, $6.00 to 
$7.00 a pair; 6 ft. high, $8.00. 

Cash or satisfactory New Vork referenees. 

ANTON SCHCLTHEI8, College Point, N.T. 

Mention The Review when yon write. 

ROOTED CUTTINGS 

Felargoninms, 15 var., named $2.25 per 100 

Daisies, white and yellow 100 per 100 

Verbenas 60c per 100; 5.00 per 1000 

Colens 70c per 100: 6.00 per 1000 

Heliotrope $1.00 per 100; 8 00 per 1000 

Petunias, double $1.25 per 100: 10.00 per lOOO 

Ageratums 60c per 100; 5.00 per 1000 

Salvias $1.00 per 100; H.OO per 1000 

Alyssum, double 1.00 per 100; 8.00 per 1000 

Express prepaid. Cash with order. Write 
8. D. BRANT, CLAT CENTER, KAN. 
Mention Tne Review when you write. 

Beautiful New Pink Rose 

AURORA 

See EDDOuncement aod full descriptioD with 
prices. Id Florists' Review, Dec. 20th, Issue. 

PAUL NIEHOFF, Lchighton, Pa. 

Hention The Review when yoa write. 



Chrysanthemuais 

WHITE 

Early— George S. Kalb, Polly Rose, Willow- 
brook. 

Mld-seaso n— Miss Minnie Wanamaker, 
Ivory, Mrs. H. Robinson, Nlveus, Queen, 
Alice Byron, Eureka. 

Late— Mrs. McArthur. 

PINK 

Early— Glory of Pacific. 

Mid-season— Pink Ivory, J. K. Shaw, Adela, 

Mrs. Perrln, Ethel.vn. A. J. Balfour, William 

H. Duckham, Dr. Enguehard. 
liBte— Maud Dean, The Harriott. 

YELLOW 

Early— Monrovia. 

Mid-season - G. Pitcher, Col. D. Appleton, 
Mrs. William Duckham. 

Late— Major Bonnaflon, H. W. Rleman. 

Rooted cuttings. $2.00 per 100; $15.00 per 1000. 

A.N.PIERSON 

CROMWEIL, CONN. 



Mention The Review when you write. 

Rooted Carnatioo Cuttings 



100 1000 
White Perfection$6.00 $50 
Light Pink Law- 
son 6.00 50 

Glendale 6.00 40 

Victory 5.00 40 

Robt. Craig 5.00 40 

Fiancee 3.60 30 

Cardinal 2.50 20 



The Belle $2.50 

Lady Bountiful.. 2.50 
White Lawson... 2.60 

Ercliantress 2.60 

Nelson Fisher. . . 2.50 

Harry Fenn 2.00 

Mrs. Lawson.... 1.50 
Boston Market.. 1.50 



100 1000 



$20 
20 
20 
20 
20 
15 
12 
12 



250 at 1000 rate. 



ASPARAGUS ^•'JUn,?'**"* 

Asparagus Sprengeri, 3-in., $4.00 per 100; 
4-in., $6 00; 5-ln., $20.00. 

Asparagus Plumosus, 3-ln., $5.00; 6-in., $20.00. 
Cash or C. O. D. 

W. J. &M.S.Ves8]f, Fort Wayne, Ind. 

Mention The Review when yon write. 

Azaleas for Easter 

Vander Cruyssen. Andre Alba. Empress of Id- 
dia, VervaeneaDa and others, all well budded 
aDd shapely plaDts, 50c, 75c aDd $1.00 each. 

„. Per doz. 

Cinerarias and Cyclamen 4-incb. fl.OO 

_^ " " " 6-iDch. 1.60 

Obconica Primroses 4-incb, I.OO 

5iDCh, 1.60 

Araucarias, 8 to 4 tiers. 5Cc each; 4 to 5 tiers. 
<">5c each. 

Rubbers, 18 inches high. 25c each. 

Lilacs, f Oc to 75c each. 

Rbododendrons, 75c to $1 00 each. 

All of the above in bloom and in perfect shape 
for Easter. 

C. Whitton, City St., Utica, N,Y. 

Mention The Review when yon write. 



CARNATIONS. 

We have ready for immediate delivery the fol- 
lowing CarDatlons in 2 and 2>^-lnoh pots. This 
stock is extra tine, propagated from healthy 
Ftock aDd guaraDteed to please the most fastid- 
ious grower. We have 50 COO plants in all to offer. 



Per 100 

Heiba $3 

Blctamond Gem.. 3 

Flamingo 3 

Crane 3 

Kstelle 3 

Order at once and 
If you wish will 
bold the stock for 



Per 100 1000 

Eneliantress $4 $35 

BonntlfDl 4 35 

Patten 4 35 

Pink Lawson 3 25 

Prosperity 8 25 

Harlowarden 3 25 

Crusader 3 25 

Boston Market 8 25 

you until planting out time. 

GERANinMS. 

We are heavy growers of this very necessary, 
popular bedding plaDt. From all Indications 
stocks are golDg to run very short this year. 
Place your order wilh us now to insure future de- 
livery. We grow only the cream of the best vari- 
eties including 8. A. NUIT, VIAUD, BUCHNRB, 
CASTELLANE, POITEVINE, BICABD and PEB- 
KINS. We have 4-inch only to oflfer. $8 per lOO. 

SPIRAEAS. 

These are fine order now for Easter. GLAD- 
STONE, $8 per doz. A8TILB01DE8 8UPEBBE, 

$6 per doz. 

ASPARAGUS. 
PLIJHOSUS NANUS, 25^-inch. $4 per 100 
MPBENGEBI, 2>^-lnch. $4 per 100; 3>^-lnch. 
$6 per 100; 4-inch, $8 per 100. 

Long: Distance Bell Phone. Lackland. 
•• *• Klnlooli •• CreveCoeur. 

TKRBIS CASH. 

J. W. DUNFORD, CLAYTON, MO. 



Mention The Review when you write. 

FEVERFEW 

D^'arf, nice young: plants, 

$1.00 per 100: 2inch. 2c. 

Salvia Splendens, Bonfire, 2-in.. 2c. 

Rooted Cuttings, ^'^''"iJ.ioo 

Vlnca Varlegata. Salvia Splendens, Bonfire. 90c; 
Heliotropes, 3 kinds. $1.00. Paris Daisy, giant 
white. $1.00. Fuchsias. 5 kinds, $1.25. Ageratum 
Qurney, Pauline and white, 60c. AlternaDtheras, 
3 kinds, 50c. Flowering Begonias, 8 kinds, $1.25. 
Rex Begonias, 20 kinds, mixed, $1.25. Parlor 
Ivy, 75c. Double Petunias. 10 kinds, $1.00. Stevia 
serrata. variegated, 75c. Mums-Tranter, Alli- 
ance, Weeks Pacific. P. Rose. Golden Age. Silver 
Wedding, Appleton, $1.25. Cash or 0. O. D. 

BYER BROS., CHAMBERSBURG, PA. 

Mention The Review when you write. 

New Pink Rose 

Miss Kate Moulton 

Ib the QUKKN of all pink roses. 
Write us about it. 

Minneapolis Floral Co., Minneapolis, Minn. 

Mention The Review when yon write. 



1294 



The Weekly Florists^ Review* 



Mabch 14, 1907. 



VICTORY 

Has niade good. Place Tonr orders early for rooted cnttings. Prices, $6.00 per 100; $60.00 per 1000. A dlsconnt for cash with order. 

GUTTMAN & WEBER 



The Wholesale Florist ot New Tor](^43 W. 88th Street. 

Mention The Review when you write. 



York^4 



Grower, £ynl)r4>Qk, Im. X., N. Y. 



CARNATIC^N CUTTINGS, Ready For Immediate Shipment. 



VICTORY per 100, $6.00 per 1000, $50.00 

PINK PATTEN •* 5.00 " 40.00 

VAR. LAWSON •* 4 00 ** 80.00 



LAD7 BOUNTIFUL. per 100, $3.00 per 1000, $86.00 
ENCHANTRESS .... " 8.50 •• 20.00 

B. MARKET ** 1.50 ** 18.50 



We can also give you immediate delivery on Winsor, one of the best novelties ever offered to the trade. Send for complete list of varieties. 

JENSEN & DEKEMA, .. .. 674 W. Foster Avenue, CHICAGO 

Mention The Review when you write. 



yiNEST STOCK OF 

ROOTED CUTTINGS 

at the following low prices : ICO 1000 

Coleus, 14 best varieties $ .60 $5.00 

Salvia (Bonfire) 75 6.00 

Cuphea (Cisar Plant) 60 

Fuchsia. K.G. Hill, TiailinR Queen .60 

Coleus, best 14 varieties, 2-mch 2 00 18.00 

Salvia (Bonfire), 2-inch 2 00 18.00 

Salvia (Bonfire), 3-incn 4.00 35.00 

Cigar Plants 2-inch 2 00 

Double Sweet AlysMim, 2-inch ,. i.OO 

Carex Japonica, 2j^-inch 2.^0 

Fuchsia Mrs. E. G. Hill, 2-inch 2.t0 

Fuchsia Trailing Queen. 2-incn 2 00 

Address all ordeis to 

Mrs. J. L. MILLER, 

12 East Park Place, NEWARK, OHIO. 

Mention The Review when you write. 

Carnation Cuttings 



A- 1 STOCK GUARANTEED 



VICTORY 

WHITE LAWSON. 

FINE LAWSON.... 

VAR. LAWSON.... 
ENCHANTRESS . . . 



Per 100 
...16.00 

... 2.60 

... 1.75 

,,.. 3 00 
... 2.60 



Per lOCO 
$50.00 

20.00 

16.00 

25.00 
20.00 



A. LAUB & SON, 

HUGHSONVILLE, Dutchess Co., N. Y. 

Bell Phone 19 T 2 Wappingers. 
Mention The Review when you write. 

Special Easter Offering 

LUles, 3,4, 5 and 6 buds 15c 

Spiraeas 40c, 50c and 60c 

Azedeas Sl.OO. $1 .26 and $1 .60 

HydraneesB Sl.CO, SI. 50, $2.00 and $2.50 

Bulb Stock and other Blooming Plants. Write 

GEO. A. KUHL, Pekin, 111. 

Mention The Review when you write. 

Rooted Cuttings 

Enchantress per 100, fS.50 

Lawson •• ».00 

The Qneen " 2.00 

Wolcott ♦* 8.00 

Queen Louise ** 1.00 

B. E. Wadsworth, danv°^'e?'ill. 

Mention The Review when you write. 

Always Mention the 



f&ffl| 



*&7£^ 



When Wrltina: Advertiser*- 



• • 



• • 



VERBENA KINO 

Verbenas, the finest varieties on earth, 60c 
per 100; $5.00 per 1000. Express prepaid. 

Petunias, Dreer's and Hender&on's strains, 
including our Kansas Double White, $1.26 per 
100: $10.00 ner 1000. 

Heliotropes, $1.00 per 100; $8.00 per 1000. 

Coleus, 70c per 100; $6.00 per 1000. 

Wbite Daisy, California, $1.00 per 100; 
$8.00 per 1000. 

Clirysantliemums, rooted cuttings, $1.26 
per 100; $10.00 per 1000. Send for list. 

Double Giant Sweet Alyssum, $1.00 per 
100; $8.00 per 1000. 

Cupheas, cigar plant. $1.00 per 100; $8.00 per 
1000. (Express prepaid on all rooted cuttings.) 

C. HUMFELD, Clay Center, Kan. 

Mention The Review when yon write. 

ORCHIDS 

Importations 1907 

Get quotations from us on them — we save 
you money. Cattleya Mossiae, Gigas, Trianae, 
Labiata, Schroederae, Vanda Coerulea, Den- 
drobium Wardianum and Nobile. Write today. 

JULIUS ROEHRS CO. 

The largest Orchid Growers and Importers in 
the United States. 

Rutherford, N. J. 

Mention The Review when you write. 

ORCHIDS 

FRESHLY IMPORTED 

Our facilities for handling large consignments 
are second to none. Prices are very low, quality 
considered. Fine stock of established Orchids on 
hand. 

CARRILLO & BALDWIN, Secaucus, N. J. 

Mention The Review when yon write. 

ORCHIDS 

Arrived in fine condition: Cattleya Harri- 
Boniae. C. Intermedia, C. Gigas, C. Trianae, 
0. Speciosissima, C. Leopoldii, Laelia Pur- 
purata, Oncidlum Varicosum Rogersii, O. 
Marsballianum, Phalaenopsis Amabilis, P. 
Schillerlana. 

Lager & Hurrsll f^p^^^t Summit, N.J. 

Mention The Review when you write. 



ORCHIDS 



Direct from 

the Collectors 

For Spring and Summer Delivery. 
We are giving quotations upon our entire list 
of South American, Philippine and East Indian 
OrchldB. Choicest varieties of Cattleya, Odon* 
tOKlossam, Pllnmna, Cyprlpedium,*^ Pha* 
laenopsis, Dendrobinm and vanda. Among 
them the very rare Vanda Sandertana for 
delivery June or July. 
A. HELD, 11-19 William St., NEW YORK 

Mention The Review when yon write. 



List of Seasonable Stock Offered by 
D. U. ALGSPLRGER & SONS 

Box 778, Peoria, 111. 

Boston Ferns, all. sizes. Write for prices on 

large or small quantities. 100 1000 

Plersonl ferns, 2>^-in $4.00 

Plamosos, 3-in ,. 7.00 

Sprengeri, 2in 2.50 $26.00 

Feverfew, 2-in 2.60 

VInca Ysr., 2-in 3.00 25.00 

Lemon Verbena, 3 in 6.00 

Coleus, rooted cuttings, red and 

yellow 1.00 7.50 

Geraninms, 8-in., in dark red, 

scarlet, etc 6.00 56.00 

Hydrangeas for Easter blooming in 6, 8 and 

9-in. pots, fine plants. Writfe for our 

prices. 
We have a few thousand extra fine Cyclamen 

seedlings left, in 4 varieties, $1.00 per icO; 

$8.00 per 1000. 

All above stoek is rlean and well grown. 
SATISFACTION GUARANTEED. 



Mention The Review when you write. 

Strong^, Well Rooted 

CARNATION CUTTINGS 



Per 1000 

Pink Lawson $10.00 

Var. Lawson 25.00 

Mrs. Patten 20.00 

Jessica 40.00 

Lady Bountiful... 20.00 

My Maryland 30.00 

Enchantress 18.00 

CASH OR 0. O 



Per 1000 

Candace $40.00 

Robert Craig 40.00 

Cardinal 26.00 

Harlowarden 15.00 

Prosperity 16.00 

Boston Market . . . 10.00 



D. 



SOL. GARLAND, DES PLAINES, ILL. 

Mention The Review when yon write. 

ROOTED CARNATION CLTTINGS 

CralB $5.00 per 100 

Lieut. Peary. . . . 2.60 per 100 
Prosperity l.ooperioo 

Above are exceptionally strong, healthy cuttings. 
Extra fine, strong 4-incb pot-grown Bosto'n 

Ferns, $12.00 per If 0. Extra fine, strong 2j^-in. 

Boston Perns, $2.75 per 100; $25.00 per 1000. 

F. Wm. Heckenkamp, Jr.. Quincy, III. 

Mention The Review when you write. 

Easter Stock 

Easter Lily Plants, 3. 4. ti, 8 buds, 12c per bud. 
Crimson Ramblers, $1 00 to $1.50 each. 
Hydrangeas, 8-ln. pots, 6 to 10 heads, $1.50 to 

$2.00 each. 
Lady Campbell Violets, in pans, 20c each. 
Ramblers Ready Now. 

CRABB Sc HUNTER FLORAL CO. 
Grand Rapids, Mich. 

Mention The Review when you write. 

Nephrolepis 

Whitman!, 2X-in $10.00 per 100 

Boston, 2X-in. 3.00 per 100 

H. H. Barrows & Son,Whitman, Mass. 



«aj 



Jl»!!«"iai'l""»!PH^B»'ll! 'f ' «y".'J»,«»?."f»f/,:*l«".W "I.HvlW/!WF.|!MIH^^iV»-'!«-"ip"W«»-^W 



• TfTTyT'TV' 



Mabch 14, 1007. 



The Weekly Florists^ Review* 



J295 



Carnot, 



$4.00 
Per too 



$35.00 
Per 1000 



Kaiserin, 



Rl C> ll M U IN Uf $86.00 per'lOOO 



$3.00 per 100 
1.00 per 1000 



Chatenay, Perle, Gate, $2^ 
BELL MILLER, .. .. Springfield, ill. 



•• •• 

Mention The Review when yon write. 



WholesaleTradeUst 

ASPARAGUS PJ^UjnOSUS, 2^-inch pots, $3.00 
per 100. 

CARNATIONS, Rooted Cattings - Enchan- 
tresB, LawBon, White Lawson, Red Sport. Bos- 
ton Market and Vesper. Price on application. 

FUCHSIAS, HELIOTROPE, YEL,I.OW 

DAISY, rrom 2i^-lnch potB, 50c perdoz.; $3.00 

per 100. 
GERANIUMS, best varieties from 3-lncli pots, 

$4.00 per 100. 
HYACINTHS, first size bulbs, red, white and 

blue, for Easter, $1.50 per doz.; $10.00 per 100. 

ITY, Hardy Ensrllsh, 3-lnch pots, $5.00 per 100; 
4-lnch pots, $1.50 per doz., $10.00 per 100. 

MOON VINES, the true variety, 3-inch pots, 76c 
perdoz.; 15.00 per 100. 

PRIMULA OBCONICA, In full bloom, 4- In. 
pots, $1.50 per doz. ; $10.00 per 100. 

SAN8EVIERIA (Zebra plant), 4-lnch pots, 
strong:, $1.50 per doz.; 3-lnch pots, $1.00 per doz. 

TUIilPS, Tournesol and La Relne, 3 bulbs In 
4-ln. pots, $1.50 per doz.; $10.00 per 100. 

ROOTED CUTTINGS — Heliotrope, dark 
blue; Fncbsia Elm City; Cupheas, Parlor 
Ivy, Ageratum, blue and white, $1.00 per 100. 

SEEDLINGS from flats— Asparagas Spreng- 
erl, Smilax, Ageratum Blue Perfection, 
Petanias HowariTB Star and Rosy Morn, $1.00 
per 100. 

Cp I ^ p I c* 11th and Roy Streets, 
. C. la CLt I PHILADELPHIA. PA. 

Mention The Review when yon write. 



A Graod Fern Novelty 

We are bookinK orders for 

NEPHROLEPIS AMERPOHLII 

which will be filled strictly in rotation with 
plants OF ODB OWN GROWING on and after 
October 15, next. To see it is to know it is 
the best Fern on earth. STOCK LIMITED. 

WM. P. CRAIG 

1305 Filbert Street, PHILADELPHIA 



We've Got 'Em! 

Eastei Lilies 

Send in your order for Easter Lilies 

$15 00 to $18.00 per 100. 

Cash with order, or satisfactory 
bank references. 

MIAMI FLORAL CO. 

24 N. Main St. DAYTON, OHIO 

Mention The Review when yon write. 

Cyclamen ,,pots do. 

In bud and bloom * $1-00 

•• '• >' 5 1.50 

Prtmnla Obconlca. in bud and bloom.. 4 .75 
" •' " " '• .5 1.00 

" " " " " . 3 .,50 

ClneraTlas, In bud and bloom 5 1.60 

'• >» " " 6 2.00 

J. S. BLOOM, RiegelsTille. Pa. 

Mention The RcTlew when you write. 



r 



RNEST OF YOUNG STOCK 

Selected from the strong^, healthy, youngs plants 
we shall use in replanting^ our own housefs; propag^ated 
from prize-winningf stock. All plants gfuaranteed. 



ROSES 



The new Rose * ' Morton Grore ' ' winner of 

the Silver Cup at Chicago Klower Show 1906 

for best new rose, will be disseminated in 1908. 

R. C. 2}^-in. 2>^-in. 33^-in. 

per 1000 per 100 per 1000 

Maid $18.00 $4.50 $40.00 $55.00 

Bride 18.00 

Gate 18.00 

Uncle John 18.00 

Chatenay 18 00 

Bictamond 20.00 

Bosallnd Orr 

English 20.00 

Kaiaerln Aaguata Tictorla 4.50 

CHRYSXNTHEIVIUMS 

We are now rooting all the commercial 
varieties of Chrysanthemums. Ask for price 
list. 

J. Nonln and Tonset, rooted cuttings, $1.C0 
per 100, $35.00 per lOOO; 23^-in., $5.00 per 100. 



450 


40.00 


55.00 


4.50 


40.00 


55.00 


4.50 


40.00 


55.00 


4.50 


40.00 


55.00 


4.50 


40.00 


55.00 



5.00 



45.00 
40.00 



60.00 
55.00 



CARNATIONS 



Rooted Cuttings 

per 100 per 1000 

White LawBOn $3.00 $25.00 

L.Perry 3.00 25.00 

Got. Wolcott 2.50 20.00 

Pinl( Lawson 2.00 17.50 

Enchantress 3.00 25.00 

Victory 6.00 50.00 

Cardinal 3.00 25.00 

Bed Lawson 4.00 35.00 

Prosperity 2.50 20.00 

Patten 2.00 

Variegated Lawson... 4.00 35.00 

Glendale 5.00 

Craig 4.00 30.00 

Harlowarden 2.00 15 00 

White Perfection 6.00 50.00 

Lady Bonntiful 3.50 30.00 



2>4-in. 

per 100 
$4.00 
4.00 
3.50 
3.00 
4.00 
7.00 
5.00 
5.00 
3.50 

5.00 
6.00 
6.00 

7.60 



SPECIAL, rooted cuttings of PBOSPEBITY, 6000 ready to go out of sand, $12.50 per 1000. 
Cash or C. 0. D. on Orders From Unknown Parties. 

POEHLMANN BROS. CO. 

1,000,000 FEET OF GLASS 

Send Plant Orders to Greenhonset, 



Send Cot Flower Orders to 

35 Randolph St., CHICAGO. 



Morton Grove, III. 



Mention The Review when yon write. 



EASTER PLANTS 

HYDRANGEA OTAKSA. . .$9.00, $12.00, $15.00, $18.00 per do^ 

** ** Specimens $3.00 to $5.00 e*ch. " 

/ BABY RAMBLER ROSES, Z'A-itUf in bloom 20c each. 

5, 6, 8-in. . .$5.00, $8.00, $15.00 doz. 

CINERARIAS 5-in., $4.00 per doz.; 6-in., $6.00 per doz. 

PRIMULA OBCONICA, 6-in $5.00 per doz. 

SPIRAEA GLADSTONE, 7-in $6.00 per doz. 

♦* JAPONICA, 6-in $4.00 per doz. 

GERANIUMS, assorted, 4-ia $12.00 per 100 

Tlie above will all be in bloom ready for shipment March 20* 

J. W. Dudley & Sons, Parkersburg,W. Va. 



Mention The Review when you write. 



CARNATIONS, Rooted Cuttings 

RBADT NOW. PROMFT DELIVERY. 

RED CHIEF, rich scarlets It has the true Christmas color and is the leader 
in productiveuess. Order now. Select stock. $12.00 per 100; $100.00 per 1000. 

F. DORNER & SONS CO., :: Lafayette, Ind. 

Mention The Review when you write. 



«r tr Always utentioo the FlOTIStS* RcvicW when writing advertisers. W 



,r.>^^^ 



\7*{ 



1296 



The Weekly Florists' Revie w» 



March 14, 1007. 



CINaNNATL 



The Market. 



Business was good during the last 
week and made up in great part for 
wliat slowness there was the week pre- 
vious. Prices stiffened and the demand 
had some snap. While there was a plen- 
tiful supply of all kinds of flowers, still, 
after the morning's rush was over, 
there was little left. There was a 
scarcity of American Beauties; in fact, 
this flower has been scarce on this mar- 
ket all season. Red roses and white car- 
nations are not equal to the demand. 

VariouB Note*. 

We are beginning to notice the usual 
comments on the green carnation for St. 
Patrick's day. That there are thou- 
sands of carnations so doctored for this 
day could be well realized if you could 
see tlie number of orders for the dye 
that are being filled by the various firms 
selling this stutf. The advance orders 
for white carnations for that time call 
for more than there will be any chance 
of getting. While there is a demand 
for them, there will be green carnations, 
and all that can be said will have little 
effect upon those who are meeting this 
demand. There is nothing that can ,be 
said in favor of this practice and a 
whole lot against it. 

A meeting of the Florists' Society was 
held Saturday evening and while the at- 
tendance was light, those present made 
up in enthusiasm. The subject of 
flower shows was again talked over and 
it was decided that the society could not 
afford to have no show at all. As it had 
been found to be impracticable to hold 
a large mum show, as was at first talked 
of, it was decided that we will have a 
show next fall and it will be made just 
as big as we can afford. A committee 
was appointed to report at the next meet- 
ing, with full plans laid so that sched- 
ules can then be issued and distributed. 
Within a couple of weeks I hope to be 
able to give in these columns a full re- 
port of our plans for next season. 

John E. Haines, of Bethlehem, Pa., 
sent three carnations to be exhibited 
at this meeting, but owing to some delay 
they were not received till Sunday morn- 
ing. Nevertheless they were in good 
condition. They were Pink Imperial, on 
the order of Lawson; John E. Haines, 
a beautiful scarlet color, introduced last 
year, and Imperial, a pink variegated. 

Visitor: E. J, Fancourt, of Philadel- 
phia. C. J. Ohmer. 



Beaufort, S. C. — S. B. Bitter is about 
to move from this place to Athens, Ga., 
where he will open a store. 



Salvia Splendens 

Per 100 Per 1000 
Aehyranthes, red, 2-iD S2.00 $18.00 

BegonU Dew Drop, 2>i-iD 2.00 

Impatiens Saltani, 2>^-in 2.00 

SsItU Splendens, 2^-in 2.00 18.00 

Tinea Tariegrata, 2-in 2.00 18.00 

Chrysanthemnms, special list and prices 
on request. 

S, W. CAREY 

North End Florist 
801 Bloomfield Arenae, CBBANA, OHIO 



Mention The Review when you write. 



PREPARE FOR EASTER 




An ImmeiiBe Stock of Choice 

EASTER PLANTS 

Blooming Caster Week 

or earlier if desired, are now ready 
for immediate shipment. 

Come or mall your order direct to the head- 
quarters. Our reputation over the entire country 
from the Atlantic to the Pacific In growing Eas- 
ter stock for the wholesale market for many 
years past ought to be sufflclem guarantee as to 
the truih of what we say and aavenlse. We 
have every house, nook and corner full of plants 
and they were never so fine as this year, 1907. 

While laborers, merchants, jobbers, contract- 
ors, builders, etc., have increased their prices al- 
most double as usual, we have not advanced our 
prices; but look, we sell our plants at the same 
old prices charged two or three years ago when 
the cost of producing plants was much cheaper. 

What was my daty on my trip to Ghent, 

Belginm (the land of azaleas, aranoariaa 

and palms), last fall, 1906? Answer: Of 

course, the interests of my customers, not 
speaking of the IIQO souvenir cards which I 
mailed to my customers in America. For the 
benefit of my customers I also nought Azalea 
Indlca for Easter trade, the cream of Belgium's 
production that money could buy. 

AZ/ILEAS 

Now I am able to offer to my customers, and the 
tradeln general, two houses full of Mme. Vander 
Cruyssen azaleas, the wtll known and much 
favored bpst double pink azalea that has given so 
much satisfaction all over America Plants as 
round as an anple. just covered with buds, 6 to 
7-ln. pots, at 60c, 76c. II 00, 11.25. $1.60, 11.75 and 12.00 
each. Other fine varieties ac anted for American 
markets, duch as Niobe, Bernard Andrn- Alba, 
Deutsche Perle (double white). Prof. Wolters, 
Empress of India, Vervaeneana (double varie- 
gated), and about eight more fine sorts, all cov- 
ered with buns, 6 to 7-ln. pots, 75c, 11.00, 11.26, $1.60, 
$1.76 and $2.00 each b]4 to 6 In. potP, 60c to 60c. 
We have a fine limited quantity of azaleas, 50c to 
tJOc each, such as Apollo (double dark scarlet), 
Deutsche Perle, Simon Mardner, and a few oth- 
ers. 

Hydrangea Otaksa (pink), 6 to 7-in. pots, 
40c, fabc, 76c to $1.C0 each; also 11.25 and II 50 each. 

Llllnm Maltiflornm and Japanese LonKi- 
florum were never so fine as this .vear. all sizes, 
and can meet all wants, 6-in. pots, 5 to 8 buds to 
a plant, IQc per bud. 4 buds and under, 12c per 
bud. Raised from Henry P. Mlchell Co.'s special 
brand bulbs. 

As we sell our lilies so cheap, some other plants 
must be taken with them. The cultivation of 
lilies Is expensive. 

Spiraea Gladstone, 6 to 7-ln. pots, these 
plants are very large and bushy and unusually 
fine, full of buds, ai 50c, i5c and $I.OU each 

Crimson RambWr Roses, 3 feet high and 
over, $1.00, $1.25, $1.L0, $1.76 to $2.U0 each. 



In Philadelphia there's a florist noted, 
Aschmann, his name, his plants beyond com- 
pare; 

To a sweet girl hts heart is all devoted, 
Next rank his Araucarlas, passing fair; 

When seen together they're a pair so charming- 
Brimful of beauty— both h" cannot keep; 

So to his heart he'll hold his winsome darling. 
While you may have the Araucarlas cheap. 

Arancaria Compacta Robnsta, five years 
old, 7-in. pots, 26 to 8u Inches high, * to 6 tiers, 
width the same as height, very swell stuff, $1.76, 
$2.00 to $2.6U each 

Arancaria Kxcelsa Glanca, 4 years old, 4 
tiers. 20 inches high, $1 (lU, $1.26 to I1.6U each. 
Specimen Olauca, 7-in. pots, 6 years old, 5 tiers, 
30 to 35 Inches high, 13.00 each. 

Araucarla Kxcelsa, 4 years old, 6-in. pots, 20 
to 26 Inches high, 6, 6 to 7 tiers, 11.00, 11.26, $1.60 
each. 

Kentia Forateriana, 7-ln. pr ts, made-up.one 
large plant in center, 3 small around. 11 60 to 11.75 
each. Single plants 36, 45 to 611 inches high, $1.00, 
$1.26 to $1.60 each. 

Cineraria Hybrida, have a hou^e full all 
shades, 6, 5^ to 6-in. pots, ii 5J, $3.10, $4 00 to $6.00 
per doz. 

Begonia, new improved Erfordil, an immense 
bloomer, blooming the entire summer and win- 
ter, 5^-ln. pots, $3.ti0 per doz.; 4-in. pots, $1.80 per 
doz. 

Primnla Obconica, 6M-in. pots, $2 50 per doz.; 
4-ln. pots, $1.80 per doz. 

Areca Sapida (palms), 6-in. pots, 50c each. 

Dracaena Braantl, 6-in. pots, &0c each. 

Ferns. Nephrolepia Barrowtli, 6-in. pots, 
6(lc to 76c each; 7-in. pots, $1.00. 

Scottii, 8-in. pots, very large, $1.50 each; 6-in 
pots, 35c each; bii to 6-in. pots. &0c. 

Boston Ferns, 7-in. pots, 76c: 6 in. pots, 40c to 
5Cc each; 5-in. pots, 25c to 30c each 

Holly Ferns, 3-ln. pots, $1.2U per doz 

Hyacinths, raised from first-class bulbs of 
my own importation. Tbese bul^s cannot be 
compared with ordinary stuff flooding the mar- 
ket. King of the Blues, Lavend^-r (blue), Ger- 
trude (best pink), La Grandesse (white), 4-in. 
pots, $12.00 per lOU. 

Tonrnesol Tnlips, red and yellow variegated, 
the best selling Tulips on the market. Will stay 
in bloom 10 days. 3 bulbs planted in a 4-ln. pot, 
$12.10 per 100 or $1.50 per ooz. 

Doable Von Slon Daffodils, the best double 
yellow narcissus in the world, will sell on sight. 
3 double-nosed bulbs planted in 6. 6^ and 6-in. 
pots, $2.50 to $3.00 per doz. pots. All bulbs are 
strictly first-class, of my own importation and 
are now outside in coldframe and will bloom in 
about two weeks after bringing in greenhouse. 

Have about 200 pots Von 8ion Daffodils, 
5Ji-ln. pots, 8 plants in a pot, in greenhouse now, 
in bud ready to open for Immediate sale at $2.00 
per doz. This is a special offer, only good for a 
few weeks. 

Moonvlnes, Ipomaea Noctiflora (A. W. 
Smith, originator), best pure white, largest and 
most fragrant moonvlne in the world. I made ' 
a specialty of them for the past 15 years and am 
known as the Moonvlne Grower of America and 
grow yearly about 20,O0U. In 2Ji-ln. pots, $5.00 per 
100. Now ready. ^ 

Directions to visit my pi ace: Take Oerm ante wn 
or Willow Grove car at 13th and Market Sts. to 
Ontario St., or 8th and Market St., and take Ger- 
mantown. Chestnut Hill or Willow Grove car to 
Ontario St. In going either route you walk two 
squares east on Ontario St. 

Mention if pots are wanted with all plants. 
Cash with order, please. 

All goods must travel on purchaser's risk. 



Latrobe, Pa., Feb. 18, 1907. 
Mr. Godfrey Aschmann. 

Dear Sir— I received your plants in good condi- 
tion, satisfactory to me. I am pleasea in every 
way. Respectfully, 

BDW. LEIZMANN. 
(Above order amounted to $86 26, for 66 azaleas, 
19 kentias and araucarlas and ferns.) 

Philadelphia, Feb. 25. 
I have seen Mr. Aschmann 's Easter stock and I 
can truthfully say that it never looked finer, and 
he never before had such a large stock. Am 
pleased to recommend our customers to Mr. 
Aschmann. F. J. MICHELL, 

of the firm of H. F. Mlchell Co. 
Huntington, L. I., N. Y. March 1, 1907. 
Godfrey Aschmann Philadelphia. 

Dear Sir- 1 was well pleased with the plants 
received from you last year, so I send you 
another order this year. (Here follows order.) 
Yours truly. 

LEANDER D. HURD. 



GODFREY ASCHMANN 

Importer and Wholesale Grower of Pot Plants 
1012 ONTARIO STREET, PHILADELPHIA, PA. 



'■ 111 I I II ■ i< ii 



. 4. ■ <' . ^ .. ^.■■l.fc.^.^- 



^ jJUlzj — •■^■•- — ■^»^- -V--.**. 



- CT...^- w.'_'>f .A..^ .. .- ,w- .i-cavj>^.- .^i^^ :.^.;i^^w, ..?^-..j:V^/'-J 



rjrVJTT.Jt^.f^"*^- ,' 



'^TT*^ 7T:rTif^"WVfc-#TT^v ip^ ^ "t 



Mabch 14, 1907. 



The Weekly Florists' Review* 



1297 




'^^ 



FLOMUST 



Wholesale Price List 

Palms and Ferns 

Variety Size Each Dozen 100 

Areca Luteflcens. 4 $3.00 

6 $150 

Assorted Ferns for ferneries $3.00 

Asparagns Plnmosns 2 .50 3.00 

3 .75 

4 1.50 12.00 

6 3.00 

6 4.20 

Aaparagns Sprengerl 2 3.00 

3 7.00 

" 4 1.25 

.... 5 2.00 

Boxwood 7 .50 

;; Standards, 4 ft.. 4.C0 
Pyramids, 4 It.. 4.00 

Cibotium Schiedei 6 1.00 

Oocos, 3 in a pot 4 75c- $1.00 

Dracaena IndlTisa 3 5.00 

6 5.00 

" 30-34 high 7 .75 9.00 

g 12.00 

Dracaena TerminalU ...... 3 2.uO 

6 .75 

" " ... 4 .25 3.00 

FIcna Elastlca *.!'.'.'.! 5 .35 4^00 

Kentia Bcimoreana, 8-in., 12-14 inches high, 5-6 

leaves, $2.00 per doz 
Kentia Belmoreana, 7-ln., 32-40 Inches high, 6-7 

leaves, $2.50 each. 
Kentia Poreteriana, 6-in., 30-36 inches high, 6-7 

leaves, $1.50 each. 
Kentia Forsteriana, 7-in., 32-40 inches high, 5-7 

leaves. $2.50 each. 
Kentia Forsteriana, 8-in.. strong, 48-50 inches 
high, 6-7 leaves, $3.50 each. 

Latania Borbonica, 5-in doz. $5.00 

7-in doz. 12.00 

Nepbrolepis Bostoniensis, 4-in doz. 1.50 

5-in doz. 3.00 

6-in doz. 4.20 

6-in., strong.doz. 6.00 

7-in doz. 9.00 

" " larger specimens, 

$1.50, $2.00 and $3.00 each. 

Nepbrolepis Elegantissima, 6-ln doz. 6.00 

Nepbrolepis Elegaijtlssima, 7-in doz. 9.00 

Pteris Wimsetti.4-in doz. 1.25 

Phoenix Canariensis, 9-ln., fine bashy 

specimens, $3 00 each doz. 36.00 

Phoenix Reclinata, 4-in doz. 3.00 

5-ln doz. 5.00 

Pandanus Utilus, 5-in doz. 5.00 

" 6-In doz, 6.00 

The Geo. Wittbold Co. 

1657 Buckingham Place, CHICAGO 

Mention The Review when you write. 



Azaleas For Easter 

We have a splendid lot of beautifully 
budded plants, just right for Easter. 

All colors, 50c, 75c, $1.00, $l.50, $2.00 to $5 00 each. 



Can be Shipped by Express 
with or without pots. 



BOBBINK & ATKINS 



Nurserymen and Florists 

Mention The Review when you write. 



RUTHERFORD, N. J. 



1 



SEASONABLE STOCK^ ] 



#^/l MM y%C two and three eyes, Alsace, Chas. Henderson. David Harum, Dake of 
^-»**'^'^**'^> Marlborough, Italia, Mme. Berat and Shenandoah. $2.00 per 100: $17.00 
per 1000. Beaute Foitevine, Crimson Bedder. £gandale, Florence Vaughan, Souv. de 
Antoine Crozy, $3.00 per 100; $25.00 per 1000. (See Catalog No. 5 for complete list). 

TUBSROUS-ROOTED BEGONIAS, white, pink, scarlet, crimson and yellow, single- 
flowered, $2.50 per 100. Double-flowered, $4 60 per 100. 

GLOXINIA BULBS, separate colors, white, red, violet, violet bordered, white and rose 
bordered white, $4.00 per 100. 

ANTHKRICUM VITTATUM VARIEGATUM. strong plants, grand for vases or baskets, 
$3.00 per 100. 

ASPARAGUS SPRENGERI, 2>^-inch. strong, $2.50 per 100. 

BEGONIA VULCAN and VERNON, 2>>^ inch, fresh stock ready for shifting, $2 50 per 100, 
HARDY FINKS, 2-inch pots, assorted varieties, $2.50 per 100. 

ROSES, strong young plants of Olothilde Soupert, White and Pink Cochet, $3.00 per 100; 
$25.C0 per 1000. 

The Sforrs & Harrison Co. 

PAINESVILLE, OHIO. 

Mention The Review when you write. 



m 



WE NEED MORE ROOM 'Tk'"' 

ASPARAGUS PLUMOSUS, 3 and 4-inch, $6.00 and $0.00 per 100. Extra fine. 
ASPARAGUS SPRENGERI, 3 and 4 inch, $5.00 and $8.00 per 100. 
BOSTON FERNS, 3, 4, 5, 6-inch. $7.00. $12.50, $25.00 and $40.00 per 100. 

PIBRSONI, ANNA FOSTER and SWORD FERN, 2%, 3. 4, 5, 6-inch, $4.00, $7.00, $12.50, 

$25.00 and $40.00 per 100. 
PIERSONI, ELEGANTISSIIMA and SCOTTII, 2^, 3, 4-lncb, $6.00, $10.00, $17.50. 
SALVIAS, in best varieties: HELIOTROPES, in 6 varieties; COLEUS, in standard and 

fancy-leaved; rooted cuttings and 2J4-inch. 
Sneeial price on f^urnlus stock of CANNAS. Ask for descriptive list. 
50.000 PERENNIAL PLANTS for Spring delivery. Price list now ready. 

The MOSBAEK GREENHOUSE CO., Onarga, III. 



Mention The Review when yon write. 



ALTERNANTHERAS 

Strong rooted cuttings; red and yellow, 
50c per 100; $4.00 per 1000. 

BRILLIANTISSIMA (the best red), 60c 
per 100; $5.00 per 1000. 

DAVIS BROS., - Morrison, III. 

Mention The Review when you write. 
WE ARE BOOKING ORDERS FOR 

NEPHROLEPIS 
AMERPOHLII 

THE SENSATIONAL NEW FERN 

Awarded Highest Certificate of Merit at the 
S. A. P. Convention, 1906. 

JANESVILLE FLORAL CO., Janesville. Wis. 

Mention The Review when you write. 



We are Headquarters for 

Princess Violet 

Stock. Orders booked for immediate deliv- 
ery. Strong, field-grown plants, $50.00 per 1000. 

WILLIAM SIM, Cliftondale, Mass. 

Mention The Review when you write. 

Finest Stock 

of Madeira Vine, Hyaolnthns Candicans, 
Oxalls, Spotted Calla and aerman Iris in 
the United States. Send for list of Bulbs 
and Hardy Plants. 

E. S. MILLER, WADING RIVER, N. Y. 

Mention The Review when you write. 




'-'^^■^■'- -■ ■ — "*• •-" Ju<f:^:l^ .V' 



"T'^r»':-*~''-*^>*TF,-- •^•yrf^tgffv :*'■■' "j-.. ' v^^^s^ ■* ' 



.■-■rv"-., - ■•."♦^ .' 



V",- '^"-'7- '^r7^"*fl77^ ,.'*"■ ' ^ .*^t';a;^. • ^t *i^' • -»'r;^ '"T- --FH^T''5r'«7WF*"T5T'T™rT^^^f'5^. 



1298 



The Weekly Florists^ Review* 



Mabch 14, 1007. 



WASHINGTON. 



Qub Meeting. 

The last regular monthly meeting of the 
Washington ilorists' Club, prior to the 
convention, was held March 5, with a good 
attendance. All oflSoers of the preced- 
ing year were unanimously reelected, as 
follows: President Peter Bisset; vice- 
president, Z. D. Blackistone; secretary, 
Charles McCauley; treasurer, W. H. Er- 
nest; board of directors, George C. Shaf- 
fer and W. S. Clark; awards committee, 
Charles McCauley, W. S. Clark, John 
Eobertson, Joseph Freeman, Jr., and 
JfitOSxa.a Field. Much satisfaction was 
expressed by the club at the efficient 
work accomplished by each officer, and 
the reports were excellent. The commit- 
tee on arrangements for the convention 
this week reported good progress. No 
stone has been left unturned to make 
the show one of Washington's greatest 
exhibitions. Advertising in local daily 
papers was resorted to and they have 
shown a keen interest and published much 
to attract the general public. F. H. Kra- 
mer offered a cup valued at $50 to be 
bowled for March 15. 

Mr. Shaffer has the decorative work 
of the banquet hall at Arlington hotel. 

Peter Bisset had on exhibition eight 
magnificent specimens of the newer types 
of primroses, which attracted much at- 
tention. James L. Carbery showed a 
vase of Enchantress and one of Fla- 
mingo carnations. 



LovTELLViLLE, O. — The high wind of 
March 2 blew the sashes off the green- 
houses of Keuben Darrow and broke 
them badly. 

HooPESTON, III. — Andrew Peterson, of 
Anderson, Peterson & Co., of Paxton and 
Hoopeston, and who recently transferred 
his residence from Paxton to Hoopeston, 
has been announced as a candidate for 
alderman in the First ward, with good 
prospects of being elected. 

Albany, N. Y. — William C. Gloeckner 
has opened a store on State street, be- 
tween Chapel and Lodge streets. He is 
the son of Mrs. Catherine Gloeckner, who 
for twenty-five years has conducted a 
greenhouse business on Cemetery avenue. 
Her 30,000 feet of glass will, as far as 
possible, supply the stock for Mr. Gloeck- 
ner 's store. 



The Wide 
Awake Florist 

will write at once for our catalog of 
R08KS. SHRUBS and aU kinds of 
plants for Florists* use. Write to- 
day, it's free. We have one order for 
this Spring's fibipment of five hundred 
and eighty-five thousand Rose Plants and 
we can still fill your orders. 

THE GOOD & REESE CO. 

The Largest Rose Growers In the World 

SPRINGFIELD, OHIO 

Mention The Review when yon write. 

ASPARAGUS 

▲sparacus Pliunosus, 2-In., $2.50 per 100. 
8-in., $3.00 per 100. 8}^-in., $4.50 per 100. 

▲■parasns 8prena:«ri, 2-in., $2.00 per 100. 
8-iD., $8.00 per 100. 8^-in., $4.00 per 100, or will 
exchange for any seasonable stock. 
Cash with order. 

FC Al I Cll & on Intervale Park Florists 
I Li ALLlH 06 uUi BROCKTON. MASS. 



MISCELLANEOUS PLANTS 



100 1000 
Altemantheras, 6 varieties $2.00 $18.00 

Ageratum Stella Gurney and 
Dwarf White 2.00 18.00 

Ageratam Inimitable 3.00 25.00 

Begonias Vernon and Gracilis.... 2.00 18.00 

Cannas, 3-in. pots, 12 yarieties... 4.00 35.00 

Caladlum Esculentum 2.00 

Cnphea, Cigar plants 2.00 18.00 

Geraninms, Ivy, Caesar Franck.. 20.00 

Ivy, Mrs. Banks 3.00 

Ivy Zonal, Alliance.. 20.00 
Cactus, 4 varieties... 10.00 

Sycamore 16.00 

Hardy Chrysanthemnms, small- 

flowering or button 2.00 18.00 

Hardy Chrysanthemnms, large- 
flowering or Aster 3.00 25.00 

Dahlia Boots, named varieties. . . 6.00 



100 1000 

Dahlia Boots, mixed $4.00 

'• " single mixed, from 
Twentieth Century 6.00 

Hardy English Iry 2.00 $17.60 

Hollyhock, 3-in. 0ots, double 
whits and mixed 3.00 25.00 

Hardy Phlox, 10 varieties 8.00 

Lobelia Crystal Palace Gem 3.00 

Lemon Terbena, Aloysia Citrio- 
dora 2.00 18.00 

Petnnlss, Dreer's Superb, single 
fringed 2.00 18.00 

Parlor Ivy, Senecio Scandens... 2.00 18.00 

Swalnsona Alba, fine stock 2.00 18.00 

Terbena, large-fiowering, sepa- 
rate colors 2.00 18.00 

Terbena, large-flowering, mixed. 1.50 15.00 

Water Lilies, Nympbaea Odorata 
Gigantea, strong roots 13.00 



CASH WITH ORDER 



I 



R. VINCENT, JR., & SON, White Marsh, Md. 




Mention The Review when .vou write. 



Per 100 



GERANIIMS 

10 var.. 2 and 2>{-ln. pots, my selection — $3.00 

10 var.. 3j<-in. pots, my pelection 4.00 

Altemsntlieras, red and yelloiv 2.00 

Pansy Plants, April 1 1.60 

Pansy Seed, giant-flowering oz. , $4.00 



Per 100 



CANNAS 

10 var., 1 and 3 eyes, my selection $2.00 

Coleus 2.00 

Double Petunias, mixed 8.00 

Vinca Var.. 2-in. pots 8.00 

Verbenas, April l 2.00 



Cash. JOS. H. CUNNINGHAM, DELAWARE, OHIO 



Mention The Review when yon write. 



TO CLOSE ODT 

50 Arancaria Excelsa, 6-in., 3 to 4 tiers, 10 to 12 

Indies high, 76c each. 
15 Araucaria Exnelsa Glanca, 3 to 4 tierB, 13 

to 15 inches high. $1.00 each. 
8 Arancaria Robneta Conapacta, 3 to 4 tiers, 

12 Inches high, $1.25 each. 
75 Asparasnis Plumosns. fine young bushy 

clumps, lOc each. 
4 AlsopbUa Anstralfs, 7-ln.. 75c each. 
Cyclamen, in flower, 5-in., $25.00 per 100. 
Carnation Cnttlnes- Queen, Fair Maid, Queen 

Louise, Joost, $15 00 per 1000. 
Chrysanthemum R. C. standard varieties, 

orders boohed. 
1500 Cannas, 2 to 3 eyes, $3.50 per 100; $30 per 1000. 
5000 Dahlia (lamps— Show, $4.00 per 100. Cactus, 

$8.00 per 100. 
Dracaena Indlvlsa, 7 in., heavy. $3.50 per doz. 
14 Dracaena Terminalia, 4 and 5-in., $2.50 for lot. 
1000 Small Ferns, $3.00 per 100; $25 00 per 1000. 
50 Ferns, Tarrytown, 3-lii., 8c each. 
26 " ^' 6-ln., 50c each. 

10 " " and Scottii, 8-ln.. $1 each. 

40 " Scottll, 4-ln., 10c each. 
30 " " 5-lD., 25c each. 

25 Ficus, 4 In., 20c each. 
Fleas, branched, 6-ln.. $3.00 per doz. 
2000 Feverfew Little Gem, 2!4-ln., $2.00 per 100. 
100 Genistas. 2M-ln., $2.50 per 100. 
SlarKaeritea, R. C. yellow and white, $1.00 per 

100. Qneen Alexandra, $2.00 per 100. 
Polusettias. stoc* plants, 75c per doz. 
7 F»ndanu8 Sanderi, 5-ln.. 50c each. 
500 H. P. Roses, grafted, $10.00 per 100. 
3000 Ylncas, 4-ln., $6 DO per 100. Cash, please. 

S. S. PECKHAM, Fairhaven, Mass. 

Mention The Review when yon write. 

BOSTON FERNS 

Fine pot-grown stocic from 6-in., 40c each; 5-in., 
26c; 8-in., $7.00 per 100: 2J4-in., $3.00 per 100. 

Nepbrolepls Barrow^sU, from 5-in., 26o 
each. Write for special discount on large quan- 

^^y NELSON & BLOPFER 

1101 riftb Ave. PBORIA. ILL. 

Formerly Cation Greenhouse Co. 



COLEUS 

VER8CHAFFELTII^OU>EN QUEEN, 
FIRE BRAND, LORD PALMER8TON, 
QUEEN VICTORIA, BECKWITH'8 
GEM. 

Price? of Rooted Cuttings by Bxpreas, 60c 
per 100: $5.00 per 1000 
GOLDEN REDDER. Golden Yellow— ths 

old original, true to n ame. Rooted cuttings, 

75c per 100: $6.00 per 1000. 
FANCY VARIETIES. In addition to those 

named we offer a fine «toc*of twelve kinds. 

76c per 100; $6 00 per 1000. Strong cuttlnga. 

Free from Mealy bugs. 

AGERATDM 
STELLA GURNEY. Dwarf blue, 75c per 

100; $6.00 p<^r 1000. 
PRINCESS PAULINE, a, combination of 
blue and white in same flower, 75c per 100; 
$6.00 per 1000. 

SALVIA 

8PLENDEN8, tall standard, one of the beat, 
rooted cuitlngs. 75c per 100; $6.00 per 1000. 

BONFIRE, mefiium dwarf, very cood, 
rooted cuttings, 75c per 100; $6 00 per 1000. ^^ 

BSLIOTROPK 
ROOTED CUTTINGS, 75c per 100; $6.00 per 
1000. 

A. N. PIERSON, Cromwell, Conn. 



Mention The Review when yon write. 

NOTICE 

To all American Nurserymen and Seedsmen 
desiring to keep in touch with commercial horti- 
culture in England and theOontinentof Europe. 
Your best means of doing this is to take in the 

Horticultural Advertiser 

Our circulation covers the whole trade in Great 
Britain and the cream of the European firms. 

impartial reports of all novelties, etc. Paper 
free on receipt of 75 cents, covering cost of post- 
age yearly. _ 
A. & C. PEARSON 

Lowdham, Nottingham, England 

Mention The Review when you write. 



I.. — J- - • -^.. wA,'\--. -•■ -.1. t;-».'T 



in I-* lift rrfiiiirAiiiMfi'iiTi^fciit' ^"^^^- ^^'^--"■^^*-' -^ 









March 14, 1907. 



The Weekly Florists^ Review* 



J299 



SPIRAEA FOR FORCING 



GLADSTONE. 



If you have not all tli* Spiraea that you w^ant for Decoration Day, ■we still have a 
few thousand fine oliunps left, 'which w^e offer as long: as unsold as follows: 

The best of all Spiraeas. Free bloomer, fine large fipikes. Extra selected clumps, $12.00 per 100. 
ASTILBOIDK8 FLORIBUNDA. $5.00 per 100; case of 300 clumps for $12.00. 

COMPACTA BfULTIIXORA. Strong clumps, $6.00 per 100. JAPONICA. Strong clumps, $5.00 per 100. 



Miniature Hyacinths or Dutch Romans 

We still have a few thousand of these left, which we can supply 
in a fine assortment of named varieties. $2.00 per 100; $16.00 per 
1000. These can be potted up, if done at once, and will make nice 
Easter stock. 

NARCISSUS 
DOUBXJE VON SION. We have a few thousand extra quality 
bulbs to offer. $1.60 per 100; $12.00 per 1000. 

PRINCXPS. A few thousand extra sized bulbs. 75c per 100; 

$6.50 per 1000. 
SINGLK VON SION. $1.25 per 100; $10.00 per 1000. 

If you can use any of the stock offered 



GLADIOLUS COLVILLEI 

ALBA, "The Bride." White 75c per 100; $6.00 per 1000 

RUBRA. Red 60c per 100; $5.00 per 1000 

TULIPS 

The best pink for late forcing, 



$1.00 per 100: 
The favorite forcing variety. 



COTTAGK MAID. 

$8.00 per 1000. 
EKIZER8KROON, (Grand Due.) 
$1.76 per 100; $15.00 per 1000. 

LILT OF THE VALLEY 
PIBRSON'S PRKMIKR. Best select Berlin for earliest forcing 
$1.50 per 100; $13.00 per 1000. Case of 2000 for $24.00. 
let us have your order quickly. 



F. R. PIERSON CO.,Tarrytown=on=Bndson, N. ¥. 



Mention The Review when you write. 



Seasonable Stock 



100 1000 

Baby Primrose, 2^-in 12.00 

Carex Japonica, 2^-in 2.50 

Coleus, 10 sorts, 2^-in 1.80 $15.00 

Geraninma, 2H-la., Jean Viaud, 

Mme.Sallerol 2.50 25.00 

Heliotrope, purple. 4 good sorts, 

2«-in 2.50 

Vlnca, Yarieg;ated, 4in 7.00 

Violets, 2i^-inr7PrlnceBS of Wales, 

California and Luxonne 2.50 20.00 

Hardy Fink Hibiscus.Moscheu- 
t08, 1-year-old field plants, fine 
stock 3.00 25.00 

Hardy Hibiscus, Crimson Eye"; 
1-year-old field plants 2.50 

Ferns, Boston, 2\i-in 8.00 25.00 

8-ln 6.00 

" " 4-ln 10.00 

Plersonl, 3-ln 6.00 

" " 4-ln 10.00 

BOSES, 150 sorts, 2Jig-ln. and 4-ln. Write for 
prices. Send for our General Trade List 
of Roses, Carnations, Geraniums, Mums, 
Miscellaneous Bedding' plants, Coleus, 
Cannas, Hai-dy Shrubbery and Plants, Palms 
and Miscellaneous Flowering and Orna- 
mental plants. Send for it today. 

SPRINGFIELD FLORAL CO. 

SPRINQFIELD, OHIO 



Mention The Review when you write. 



DAHLIAS... 

16 leading varieties, all under name, guaran- 
teed true, including the best sorts in cultivation, 
such as Clifford W. Bruton. Oban, Queen 
Victoria, Admiral Dewey, Gloriosa, Prank Smith, 
Orange King, Catharine Duer, Maid of Kent, etc. 

We offer HKAVT FIKLD CLUMPS, JUST 
AS DUG, $5.00 per 100 ; $45.00 per 1000. 

THE DINGEE & CONARD CO. 

' WBST GROVE, PA. 

Mention The Review when you write. 

NEW SINGLE GERANIIM 

SYCAMORE. 

Bright, clear salmon-pink, cross between Mrs. 
E. G. Hill and Paul Bruant. It's the BEST ger- 
anium grown. Write for descriptive circular. 

St. Clair Floral Co., - Belleville, III. 

Mention The Review when yon write. 




DAHLIAS 

...True to Name... 

The cream of novelties and older 
varieties. Prices always reasonable and 
satisfaction guaranteed. Send for catalogue 
of Dahlias, Hollyhocks, Hardy Perennials, 
GladioU, etc. 

** THE DAHLIA MANUAL," a new up-to- 
date work on Dahlias and Dahlia culture, 
amply illustrated. Thisbookcontainsnoihing 
in the nature of advertising matter and is 
reliable throughout. If your dealers don't 
have it, send direct. Price, 86c. 

W. W. WILMORE 

..Dahlia Specialist.. 
Box 38S, DENVER, COLO. 



Mention The Review when you write. 



FOR SALE 



Ready now in Excellent Condition; CHOICE COLORED DRACAENAS. 

Terminalis, large plants, 60c to 76c. 
Regrina 1 Lindeni ] 

Hybrida MasBang^eana [•inn^^eiKn 

Amabilis ^ 76c to $1.00 Gladstonei f f LOO to *1.60 

Stricta-Grandis Imperialis J 

Fra§rranB and Brasilienaia, 76c 



Knerkii 



PicuB Pandurata, 7-inch pots, 7 to 10 leaves, $2.50; also large specimens. 

ROSE HILL NURSERIES, New Rochelle, N. Y. 



Mention The Review when yon write. 



CHOICE CANNAS 

Alsace, Chas. Henderson, Ex. Crampbel, Flor- 
ence Vauglian, L. Patry, Martha Washington, 
$17.00 per 1000. 

Alemannla, Brandywlne, Coronet, Mile. Berat, 
Pennsylvania, $19.00 per 1000. 

America, Atlanta. King of Bronzes, $22.00 per 1000. 

Black Prince, Chtcaeo, Epandale, Eastern Beauty, 

Musafolia, President Cleveland, Triumph, 

West Virginia, $24.00 per 1000. 

W. C. BKCKilKT, AL.L,S:GH£NY, PA. 

Mention The Review when yon write. 

BAY TREES, PALMS 

Bnzns, Aialea Indlca, Bhododendrons, 

EvergrreenM, Herbaceous Plants, 

Boses, Trained Fruit Trees, 

Oreenhonse Grape Vines. 

Ask for catalogue. 

BOBBINK& ATKINS, Rutlierfor(l,N. J. 

Mention The Review when you write. 
/ 



BOSTON FERNS 

5-lnch, 12.50 per doz. 3-inch. $7.00 per 100. 

CANNAS, dormant, with two or three eyes, 
Alphonse Bouvler, Florence Vaughan, Peter 
Henderson, Beaute Poltevlne, Martha Washing- 
ton, Mme. Crozy, Queen Charlotte, $2.25 per 100. 

Rooted cuttingra of IVY OBRANIUM, mixed, 
$1.50 per 100. 

ST£VIA, stock plants. 75c per doz.; $(.00 per 100. 
Cash with order. 

CONVERSE GREENHOUSES, Webster, Mass. 

Mention The Review when yon write. 

Nephrolepis 
WHiTMANI 

Too^Qg plants from bench. 
$0.00 per 100. 

DAVIS BROS., MORRISON, ILL. 

Mention The Review when you write. 



^^■-^^.■...„,.,._^^. -v_._i.,.i- , 



■■ ■■ — fc><^— ^ 



.^^ 



SP"~.- 



■T'^^ 



■.•pn-:r' ^-^^''.Jv'WT^. 



J 300 



The Weekly Florists' Review^ 



Mabch 14, 1907. 



CLASSIFIED PLANT ADVERTISEMENTS. 

Rates for advertising under this head 10 cents a line net, per insertion. New advs. and changes must reach us by 
Wednesdaj^ morning at latest to secure proper classification. For index to display advertisements see page 1314 



ACHYRANTHES. 



Achyranthes, yellow, 2Vi-ln., only 2%c. 

Hammerachmldt & Clark, Medina, O. 

AcUyranthes, red and yellow, 2-ln., 2c. 

A. J. Baldwin, Newark, O. 



ADIANTUMS. 



Adiantum hybrldum, for 2%-ln. pots, $5.00 
per 100; 145.00 per 1000. Orders for future de- 
Uvery booked if desired. 

A. Ley & Bro., Langdon, D. C, or 

C. W. Elchllng, 3442 St. Charles Ave., New 
Orleans, La. 

ADIANTUM FARLEYBNSE, fine, well-grown 
plants, 5 to 6%-ln. pots, $9.00 to $24.00 per doz. 
Julius Roehrs Co., Rutherford, N. J. 



AGERATUMS. 



Ageratums Gurney and dwarf white, $2.00 
100; $18.00 1000. Look up display adv. for 
other stock. 

R. Vincent Jr. & Son, White Marsh, Md. 

Ageratums Pauline and others, 2-in., $1.50 
per 100; rooted cuttings, 60c per 100, $5.00 per 
1000. Andrew Peterso n, Hoopeston, 111. 

Ageratum Little Blue Star, a new true dwarf, 
R. C. and 2%-in., per 100, 75c and $2.00. 
Mosbaek Green house Co., Onarga, 111. 

Inimitable giant blue; rooted cuttings, $1.60 
per 100; 2% -In., $3.00 per 100. 
J. C. Sc h midt Co.. Bristol, Pa. 

Ageratum Princess Pauline, R. C, 50c 100. 
Cash. J. p. Cannata, Mt. Freedom, N. J. 



ALTERNANTHERAS. 

Alternanthera brilliantissima, true and orig- 
inal stock, red, soil, $1.00 100. A. nana. 
yellow, 75c 100, prepaid; pot plants, 2e and 
2%c. A. J. Baldwin, Newark. O. 

Alternantheras, red, yellow and brilliantissima, 
July struck cuttings, $10.00 per 1000. From 
sand, January struck, $5.00 per 1000. 

Mount Hope Greenhouses, Morgan Park, 111. 

Alternantheras, 6 varieties, $2.00 100; $18.00 
1000. Other stock listed in display adv. 

R. Vincent Jr. & Son, White Marsh, Md. 

Alternantheras, red and yellow, fall-struck, 
from soil, 76c per 100; $6.00 per 1000. 
N. O. Caswell, Delavan, 111. 

Alternantheras, In the best four varieties. 
Can Bupply in 1000 and 10.000 lots. 
Mosbaek Greenhouse Co., Onarga, 111. 

Alternanthera rooted cuttings, red and yellow. 
60c 100; $4.00 1000. Cash. 
E. B. Randolph, Delava n, 111. 

Alternantheras, red and yellow, rooted cut- 
tings, 60c 100; $4.00 1000. 

Davis Bros., Morrison. 111. 



Alternantheras, red and yellow, fall struck 
cuttings, $5.00 per 1000. 
Wisner Greenhouse, Roc kford, 111. 

Alternantheras, 60c 100; $5.00 1000. 
Baur Floral Co., Erie, Pa. 



ALYSSUM. 



Alyssum, giant and dwarf. Rooted cuttings 
and 2-in., $1.00 and $2.50 per 100. 

Mosbaek Greenhouse Co., Onarga, 111. 



AMPELOPSIS. 



5000 Ampelopsis Veitchii, strong pot-grown, 
dormant, long tips, $4.00 per 100. Clean seed, 
sow now, $1.50 per lb. Cash. 
BenJ. Connell, West Grove, Pa . 

Ampelopsls Engelmanni, 2 yrs. old, $8.00 per 
100; .3 yrs. old, $12.00 per 100. 

Klehm's Nurseries, Arlington Heights, 111. 



AQUATICS. 



Elfhhomla (water hyacinth), $2.00 per 100: 
$15.00 per 1000. 
C. Dornberger, Brenham , Tex. 

Water lilies, strong roots, $13.00 100. Cash. 
R. Vincent Jr. & Son, White Marsh, Md. 



ARAUCARIAS. 



Araucaria excelsa, A. excelsa plauca and A. 
compacta robusta in all sizes. Prices are given 
In display adv. 

G. Aschmann, 1012 Ontario St., Phila. 



ASPARAGUS. 



Asparagus plumosu.s, 3 and 4-in., $6.00 and 
$9.00 per 100. 

Asparagus Sprengerl, 2%, 3 arid 4-in., $2.00, 
$4.00 and $8.00, Special prifes on 1000 lots. 
Mosbaek Greenhouse Co., Onarga, 111. 



Asparagus plumosus, 214-in.. $2.50; 3-in., 
§5.00. Sprengeri, 2^-ln., $2.50; 3-ln., $4.00; 
4-in., $6.00. All are strong plants, ready for 
larger pots. Goshen Floral Co., Goshen, Ind. 

Fine 2-in. Asparagus plumosus, $2.50 per 100; 
$20.00 per 1000. Cash with order or good refer- 
ences. Erie Floral Co., Erie, Pa., or 
W. F. Kasting, Buffalo, N. Y. 

Asparagus Sprengeri plants, another lot from 
flats only; larger than those sent out before, 
$1.00 per 100 plants, $4.00 for 500. 
B. H. Haverland, R. R. 2, Mt. Healthy, Ohio. 

Asparagus plumosus, 3-in., strong, $5.00 100; 
$40.00 1000. 

Christ Winterich, Cyclamen Specialist, Defi- 
ance, O. 

Asparagus plumosus and Sprengeri, 2-in., $3.00 
100. Other sizes given in display adv. 

Wittbold Co., 1657 Buckingham PL, Chicago . 

Asparagus plumosus, 4-in., strong, $7.50 per 
100, to close out quick. Cash. 

Maple City Greenhouses, Honesdale, Pa. 

Asparagusf plumosus and Sprengeri. Sizes and 
prices given in display adv. 

W. J. & M, S. Vesey. Fort Wayne, Ind. 

Asparagus plumosus and Sprengeri; for sizes 
and prices see display adv. 
F. E. Allen & Co., Brockton, Mass. 

Asparag;us plumosus, 2i^-ln. and 3-in., fine, 
$3.00 and $5.00 per 100. 
W. H. Gullett & Sons, Lincoln, 111. 

Asparagus plumosus nanus, strong, 4-in., 
$10.00 per 100. 

Jas. Hamilton, Mt. Washington, Md. 

ASPARAGUS PLUMOSUS NANUS. 

Cut strings, 50 cents each. 

W. H. ELLIOTT, BRIGHTON, MASS. 

Asparagus Plumosus, 500 3-in., 4c, to close out. 
Park Side Greenhouses, 746 E. 70th St., Chicago. 

Plumosus nanus, 2M!-ln., $2.50; 2-ln., $2.00 
100. Cash. Fred Grohe, Santa Rosa, Cal. 

Asparagus plumosus nanus and Sprengeri, 2'/^- 
In., $4.00 100. J. W. Dunford, Clayton, Mo. 

Asparagus plumosus. 3-in. fine, $5.00 per 100. 
Scharft Bros., Van Wert, Ohio. 

Asparagus Sprengeri, 2-in., $2.50 100. 
D. TJ. Augspurger & Sons, Bx. 778, Peoria. 111. 

Asparagus Sprengeri, 2^4-in., $2.25 per 100. 
Hammerschmldt & Clark, Medina, 0. 

Asparagus Sprengeri, 2%-in., $2.50 100. 
Storrs & Harrison Co., Palnesville, O. 

Asparagus plumoeus, 2V6-in., $3.00 100. 

C. Eisele, 11th & Roy, Phila. 

ASTERS. 

Aster plants. New Early Wonder, earliest 
white for cut flowers, earlier than Queen of 
Market, 60c per 100; $5.00 per 1000. Cash. 
Wm. Bierstadt & Son, Springfield, 111. 

Novae-Angllae asters, strong, $3.00 100, $26.00 
1000. Ellsworth Brown & Co., Seabrook, N. H. 

AZALEAS. 

Azaleas, araucarlas, palms, etc., grown espe- 
cially for American florists. 
H. Frank Darrow, Box 1250, New York. 

Azalea indlca. all leading var. Write for 
prices. F. W. O. Schmitz, Prince Bay, N. Y. 

Azalea indica. Ask for catalogue. 

Bobblnk & Atkins, Rutherford, N. J. 



BAY TREES. 



Bay trees and box trees, standards and pyra- 
mids. Price list on application. 

Julius Roehrs Co.. Rutherford, N. J. 

Bay trees and buxus. Ask for catalogue. 

Bobblnk & Atkins, Rutherford, N. J. 



BEGONIAS. 



Rex begonias, 4-ln., for stock only, $5.00 per 
100. 200 Louise Closson, 2% -in., fine, $5.00 
per 100. Cash. 

Maple City Greenhouses, Honesdale, Pa. 

New begonias, Agatha and Triomphe de I'Est; 
also Glolre de Lorraine. June delivery. See 
display adv. 

J. A. Peterson, Westwood. Cincinnati, O. 

Tuberous - rooted begonias, single - flowered, 
$2.50; double-flowered, $4.50 100. 

Storrs & Harrison Co., Palnesville, O. 

Begonia Vernon, R. C, prepaid, $1.50 100. 
A. J. Baldwin, Newark, O. 

Rex begonias, 2-ln., $3.00 per 100. Cash. 
^ E. B. Randolph, Delavan, 111. 

Begonias. 2%-in.. mixed var., 2ViC. 

Hammerschmldt & Clark, Medina, 0. 



PLEASE MENTION THE REVIEW WHEN WRITING ANY 



Blooming begonias in assorted varieties, $2.50 
per 100. Rooted cuttings, ready now, $1.25 per 
100. N. 0. Caswell, DelaTan. III. 

BELGIAN PLANTS. 

Azaleas, araucarlas, palms, sweet bays, be- 
gonias, gloxinias, etc. We have immense quan- 
tities of first-class stock, and shall be pleased 
to quote you prices. 

Louis Van Houtte Pere, Ghent, Belgium. 

BERRIED PLANTS. 

Jerusalem cherries, 75 4-in. plants, 5c each, If 
taken Immediately. Cash. 

Maple City Greenhouses, Honesdale, Pa. 

BULBS. 

Bulbs. 100 1000 

Amaryllis formoslsslma, 11-13 cm.. $2.00 $18.00 

Bessera elegans, 7-9 cm 1.00 9.00 

Pancratium, spider Illy, 12-15 cm.. 3.00 20.00 

Tlgrldias, mixed, 7-9 cm 2.00 12.00 

Zephyranthes, white, 7-9 cm 1.00 9.00 

Price Includes carriage paid. 
J. A. McDowell, Ap. 167. City of Mexico. 

Caladium esculentum, fine, healthy bulbs, 5 to 

7 inches, $1.40 per 100, $11.00 per 1000; 7 to 9 

Inches, $2.40 per 100, $22.00 per 1000; 9 to 

11 inches, $4.00 per 100, $35.00 per 1000; 

12 Inches and up, $8.00 per 100, $75.00 per 1000. 
T. W. Wood & Sons, Richmond, Va. 

Dreer's summer flowering bulbs. The be- 
gonias and gloxinias offered by us are the best 
that skill and careful selection can produce. 
Description of varieties and prices are given In 
display adv. 

H. A. Dreer, 714 Chestnut St., Phila., Pa. 

Caladium esculentum bulbs, 5x7, $1.00; 7x9, 

$2.00; 9x11, $4.00; 11x15, $6.00 per 100. 
Tuberoses, 4x6, $1.00 100. Cash. 

C. B. Johnson, Wallace, N. C. 

BODDINGTON'S QUALITY BEGQNIAS, glox- 
inias and hardy Japanese lilies. _ Prices ai* 
given in page adv. _ 

A. T. Boddlngton, 324 W. 14th St.. N. Y. 

What is offered for tuberose bulbs? What is 
oftered for dahlia roots? All good stock, well 
cured. Nagy Broa., Egg Harbor. N. J. 

Tuberous-rooted begonias and giant-flowering 
gloxinias, highest quality. For prices see dis- 
play adv. 

■Tohnson Seed Co., 217 Market St., Phila. 

Tuberoses, dwarf Excelsior Pearl, flrst size, 
$1.00 per 100; $8.00 per 1000. 
T. W. Wood & Sons. Richmond, Va. 

Tuberoses, gladioli, tuberous-rooted begonias, 
etc. Send for trade price list. 

Currle Bros. Co., Milwaukee, Wis. 

Lilium superbum, extra large bulbs, 25c each; 
$1.50 per 10; $8.00 per 100. 
L. E. Williams, Nottingham, N. H. 

Write for special low prices on selected bulbs, 
plants, roots, etc., to 
F. W. O. Schmitz, Prince Bay, N. Y. 

Spring bulbs for Immediate.^ delivery. See 
display adv. 

Wlnterson Co., 45 Wabash Ave., Chicago. 

C. KEUR & SONS, Hlllegom, Holland, 
or 334 The Bourse, Philadelphia, Pa. 
Write for prices on all bulbs and plants. 

Importers and growers of high grade bulbs. 

Bridgeman's Seed Warehouse, 37 E. 19th St., 

New York City. 

Hemerocallis fulva and Kwanso fl. pi., $2.00 
per 100. H. H. Kern, Bonner Springs, Kan. 

Tuberoses. Armstrong's Ever-blooming, single, 
$10.00 per 1000. A. H. Dalley. Knoxville, Tenn. 

Holland bulbs. Ask for our wholesale trade 
list. K. Velthuys, Hlllegom, Holland. 

Hyacinths, Ist size, $1.50 doz.; $10.00 100. 
C. Eisele, 11th & Roy, Phila. 

Thorbum's bulbs. Send for trade list. 
J. M. Thorbum & Co., 33 Barclay St., N. Y. 

Calla bulbs for summer delivery. 

A. Mitting, 17 Kennan St.. Santa Cruz, Cal. 

Tuberose bulbs, $8.50 1000. 
W. W. Barnard Co., 161 Kinzie St.. Chicago. 

Gloxinia bulbs, $4.00 100. 

Storrs & Harrison Co., Palnesville, 0. 

Bulbs, plants and seeds. 
W. P. Craig. 1305 Filbert St., Philadelphia. 

CACTI. 

Cacti. My choice 25 varieties, $2.50; 50 vari- 
eties, $5.00. Succulent plants, my choice. 80 
varieties, $3.00. This ofTer good until April 1. 
Charges prepaid. Cash with order. A. G. Greiner, 
4419 Natural Bridge Road, St. Louis, Mo. 

OF THESE ADVERTISERS. 



■i^T,:^y^-'^■ '^.' 



v.-;j -...f ^.vC ■, ■*>'^^ 



.., -f^-, 



•■y.- 



Mabch 14, 1907. 



The Weekly Florists^ Review* 



1301 



27.60 1000 
20.00 1000 

17.60 1000 



27.50 1000 
25.00 1000 
17.50 1000 



Old Man cactus, 4 to 5 Inches high, $3.00 per 
<loz.; 122.00 pel- 100. Carriage paid. 

J. A. McDowell, Ap. 167, Ci ty of Mexico. 

CANNAS. 

160,000 
CANNAS 

TRUE TO NAME. 
All with, two to three eyea. 
Packed 250 in a box; 260 at 1000 rate; 26 
at 100 rate. 

RED CANNAS. 
Beaute PolteTlne, 3% ft. .|2.25 100; $20.00 1000 

Chaa. Henderson, 4 ft 2.00 100; 17.60 1000 

Crimson Bedder, 3 ft 8.00 100; 

J. D. Elsele, 5 ft 2.25 100; 

Uxplorateur Crampbel, 6^ 

ft 2.00 100; 

PINK CANNAS. 

L. Patry, 4% ft. $2.00 100; $17.60 1000 

Martha Washington, 3% ft. 2.00 100; 17.60 1000 

Mile. Herat. 4i^ ft 2.26 100; 20.00 1000 

Paul Marquant, 4% ft 1.76 100; 15.00 1000 

ORANGE CANNAS. 
Admiral Avellan, 4% ft. .$1.75 100; $16.00 1000 

J. D. Cabos, 4% ft 2.00 100; 17.60 1000 

Pres. Clereland, 4 ft 3.00 100; 

ijueen of Holland 2.76 100; 

Secretary Chabanne, 4 ft. . 2.00 100; 
GOLD-EDGED CANNAS. 

Mme. Crozy, 3% ft $2.76 100; $26.00 1000 

Souv. de A. Crozy, 4 ft... 2.75 100; 25.00 1000 
YELLOW CANNAS. 

Buttercup, 3% ft $5.60 100; $50.00 1000 

Comte de Bouchaud, 4% ft. 2.75 100; 25.00 1000 
Florence Vaugban, 6 ft... 2.00 100; 17.50 1000 

L. B. Bailey, 4Vi ft 2.00 100; 17.50 1000 

WHITE CANNAS. 

Alsace, 3% ft $2.00 100; $17.60 1000 

I'eactablow, 3 ft 1.76 100; 16.00 1000 

BRONZE CANNAS. 

Black Beauty, 6 ft |6.00 100; $60.00 1000 

Uavld Harum, 3% ft 3.26 100; 30.00 1000 

<;rand Rouge, 8 ft 1.75 100; 16.00 1000 

Musafolla, 8 ft 2.75 100; 25.00 1000 

Robusta, 6 to 8 ft 1.75 100; 15.00 1000 

ORCHID CANNAS. 

Alemannla, 4 to 6 ft $2.25 100; $18.00 1000 

Austria, 5 ft 1.75 100; 15.00 1000 

Italia, 4% ft 2.26 100; 18.00 1000 

King Humbert, 

4 ft., $2.00 dos 16.00 100 

Kronus, 5 ft 2.75 100; 25.00 1000 

FQr full description of above and fifty other 

▼urietiea of cannas, see catalogue, mailed free. 

ELEPHANTS EARS. 

Caladlum Esculentum. 

All sound and with eyes. 

100 

0- 8 Inches in circumference $1.60 

8-10 inches in circumference 3.60 

10-12 Inches In circumference 6.60 

12 Inches and up in circumference. .10.00 

ARTHUR T. BODDINGTON, 
842 W. 14TH ST., NEW YORK. 

Cannas. Robusta, Pennsylvania, Lou Ray, 
W. Grove, Mile. Herat. Louise, Betsy Roes, Bur- 
tank, $1.50 per 100; $12.00 per 1000; 500 at 
lOOo rate. Cash with order. No personal 
checks accepted. 

The Nanz Floral Co., Inc., Owensboro, Ky. 

Cannas. Kate Gray, Florence Vaughan, Bur- 
bank, J. C. Vaughan, Robusta, 2c. Souv. 
d'Antolne Crozy, West Virginia, 2^c. Egan- 
dale, 3c. Black Beauty, 6c. 
A. J. Baldwin, Newark. O. 

Cannas, dormant roots, 2 to 3 eyes. Duke 
of Marlborough. $1.25 per 100; $10.00 per 1000. 
Burbank and Florence Vaugban, $1.50 per 100; 
$12.50 per 1000. 
H. D. Relmers, Louisville, Ky. 

Cannas. dry bulbs of Alemannla. Austria, 
F. Vaugban, Marlborough (bronze), J. Montel, 
$1.50 per 100; $12.00 per 1000. 
A. Thornhlll, Rosedale, Kan. 

Cannas. lO.OOO Louisiana, $5.00 per 100; 
$45.00 per 1000. Good bulbs. My express office 
is on main line. 
A. B. Campbell. Cochranvllle. Pa. 

Cannas. Dormant bulbs of Alphonse Bouvler 
«nd Souv. d'Antoine Crozy, $18.00 per 1000. 
Cash with order. 
Jas. Amb acher. West Knd. N. .T. 

New cannas, Wm. Saunders, Ottawa and New 
York, 50c ea.; J5.00 doz. ; $.35.00 100. 
Conard & Jones Co.. West Grove, Pa. 

Cannas. Louisiana and Mont Blanc, $1.00 
per doz., by mall, postpaid. 
A. B. Campbell. Cochranvllle. Pa. 

Canna bulbs. Henderson. Austria and Leon- 
ard Vaughan, $2.00 per 100. 

Mount Hope Greenho uses. Morgan Park, 111. 

Kate Gray cannas, dormant, strong, $3.50 
per 100. Cash. 
Centre Ave. G reenhouses. Reading. Pa. 

King Humbert, plants 8-12 Inches. $20.00 per 
100. Prepaid. Tony Toerner. Sclo, Ohio. 

Cannas, very fine list. Send list of needs. 
C. Betscher, Canal Dover. Ohio. 

Canna.s. Send for catalogue No. 5 for list. 
Storrs & Harrison Co.. PalnesvlUe. O. 

Cannas. Special price on surplus stock. 
Moebaek Greenhouse Co., Onarga, 111. 

Cannas. See display adv. for price. 

Tos. H. Cunningham, Delaware, 0. 



1000 

$10.00 

80.00 

60.00 

90.00 



Cannas, 18 varieties. Also dahlias and 
gladioli. Write for price list. 
O. B. Stevens, Shenandoah, Iowa. 

Canna Queen of Beauty, scarlet. The beat 
canna grown. 
Cummlngs Bulb & Plant Co., Meridian, Miss. 

Cannas, dormant, $2.25 100. Cash. 

Converse Greenhouses, Webster, Mass. 

Choice cannas, leading varieties. 

W. C. Beckert, Allegheny, Pa. 

CAREX. 

Carex japonlca, 2>^-ln., $2.50 100. 

Springfield tloral Co., Springfield, 0. 

CARNATIONS. 

Fine plants, established in soil. 

Per 100 Per 1000 

Melody $6.00 $50.00 

Helen Goddard 4.00 35.00 

Robert Craig 4.00 30.00 

Nelson Fisher 3.00 25.00 

Queen 2.00 17.50 

Lawson 2.00 17.50 

White Lawson 2.50 20.00 

Enchantress 2.50 20.00 

Belle 2.50 20.00 

Boston Market 2.00 17.50 

Naumann, fine summer bloomer.. 2.00 17.50 
A. C. Canfleld. Springfield, 111. 

Carnations, cool-grown, well^rooted cuttings, 
for immediate or later delivery. 

White Perfection, grandest of all, $5.50 100; 
$50.00 1000. 

Bountiful, $2.75 100; $25.00 1000. 

Nelson Fisher, $2.25 100; $20.00 1000. 

Mrs. T. W. Lawson, $1.75 100; $15.00 1000. 

Boston Market, $1.35 100; $12.00 1000. 

Special attention is called to the variety 
White Perfection. We offer the true sort, and 
quality of cuttings can not be beat. You will 
want this. Book order now. Quality guaran- 
teed. If you don't like them, we pay express 
both ways. 
E P. Wlnterson Co., 45 Wabash Ave., Chicago. 

WELL-ROOTED CARNATION CUTTINGS 

READY NOW. 

Mrs. T. W. Laws6n.$2.00per 100; $15.00 per 1000 

Guardian Angel ... 1.50 per 100; 10.00 per 1000 

Enchantress 2.50 per 100; 20.00 per 1000 

Lieut. Peary 3.00 per 100; 25.00 per 1000 

Boston Market 1.50 per 100; 11.00 per 1000 

White Cloud 1.25 per 100; 10.00 per 1000 

Fred Burkl 2.50 per 100; 20.00 per 1000 

Harlowarden 2.00 per 100; 15.00 per 1000 

Chicago 1.50 per 100; 12.50 per 1000 

Estelle 2.00 per 100; 15.00 per 1000 

Red sport of Maceo 2.00 per 100; 15.00 per lOOO 

WIETOR BROS., 51 Wabash Ave., Chicago. 

Carnations, strong, healthy, well rooted. 

Per 100 Per 1000 Pots 

White Lawson $3.00 $25.00 $3.60 

Bountiful 3.00 25.00 8.60 

Cardinal 2.50 22.50 3.00 

Enchantress 2.50 22.50 3.00 

Lawson 2.00 16.00 2.60 

Harlowarden 2.00 15.00 2.60 

Queen 2.00 15.00 2.60 

Boston Market 1.50 12.60 2.00 

Cash with order. Satisfaction guaranteed. 
Smith & Gannett , Geneva, N. Y. 

Carnation 
well-rooted. 



cuttings. Guaranteed good, and 



Unrooted. 



Rooted. 



100 1000 100 1000 

G. Lord $1.00 $8.00 $1.60 $12.00 

F. HIU 1.00 8.00 1.50 12.00 

Estelle 1.60 10.00 2.00 15.00 

Enchantress 1.60 10.00 2.00 15.00 

Q. Louise 1.00 8.0O 1.60 12.00 

Boston Market, rooted cuttings, $1.60 100. 
B. G. Merrltt & Co., Grange, Md. 

Carnations from 2-ln. pots, strong, healthy 
plants, ready to shift to 3-in. pots. 
1000 Pink Lawson $1.50 100; $12.50 1000 

500 White Lawson 2.50 100; 

1000 Harlowarden 1.50 100; 12.50 1000 

1000 Prosperity 1.50 100; 12.50 1000 

500 White Perfection . . . 6.00 100. 
H. D. Relmers. Louisville, Ky. 

BRITANNIA, bright scarlet of large size, 
similar to but better than Victory, plants In 
pots, £5 per 100. 

Dutton's White Lawson Improved. This vari- 
ety sported at Bexley Heath and is quite dis- 
tinct from the American sport. Plants in pots, 
£6 per 100. 
A. F. Dutton. Iver. Bucks. England. 

Transplanted rooted carnation cuttings. 

100 1000 

Rose-pink Enchantress $6.00 $50.00 

Enchantress 2.00 15.00 

Lawson 1.50 12.00 

Genevieve Lord 1.50 12.00 

Boston Market 1.50 12.00 

Holton & Hunkel Co., Milwaukee, Wis. 



Rooted carnation cuttings. R. Craig, $40.00 
per 1000. Harlowarden, $1.60 per 100; $12.50 
per 1000. Queen Louise, $1.25 per 100; $10.00 
per 1000. Andrew Peterson, Hoopeston. 111. 

Carnations. We want strong, well rooted 
White Lawson cuttings. Will give In exchange 
first-class White Perfection at market valne. 
. A. T. Lorch A Co.. De Haven. Pa. 

Fair Maid and B. Market, rooted cuttings, 
$1.10 per 100. Otto Bourdy, Lowell, Mass. 



Rooted carnation cuttings. 1200 Perfection, 
800 Victory, $4.50 per 100; $45.00 per 1000. 
900 Candace, $2.50 per 100. Enchantress, Peary 
and Bountiful, $2.00 per 100, $18.00 per 1000. 
Cardinal, $3.00 per 100. Lawson, $1.50 per 100; 
$12.00 per 1000. Stock guaranteed. Cash with 
order. H. P. Smith, Plqua, Ohio. 

BRITANNIA, the new perpetual-flowering car- 
nation, is the most profitable carnation In culti- 
vation. Color, clear scarlet; blooms of good 
size, never splits, on long stiff stems. Strong 
plants, £5 per 100. Cash with order. Please 
remit by international postofflce order. 

A. Smith. Enfield Highway. Middlesex, England. 

Well rooted carnation cuttings. 

100 1000 100 1000 

Victory $6.00 $50 Lord $2.00 $15 

Enchantress.. 2.50 20 L. Peary.... 2.00 16 

Lawson 2.00 15 The Queen... 2.00 16 

B. Market . . 1.60 10 Mrs. Patten. 2.00 15 
Wclland & Olinger, New Castle, Ind . 

Carnations. We offer field plants for delivery 
July 1, for early benching. Owing to our mUd 
cllniate we field plants on high sod ground April 
5. They are Immense by July 1. Send for list, 
and make contracts for July 1 delivery. 

Harlowarden Greenhouses, Greenport, N . Y. 

CARNATION ABUNDANCE, 
Rooted cuttings, $40.00 per 1000. 
2-ln. pot plants, |60.00 per 1000. 

Always in crop. ! 

Cash. 
L. I. NEFF, PITTSBURG, PA. 



Unrooted carnation cuttings of The Queen, 
Balr Maid, Queen Louise, Enchantress and 
others. Good stock, good count. Write for 
prices. 

Cobanzle Carnation Greenhouses, New London. 
Conn. 



* *^*J"?^i**"*«^'"'*- H. Burnett, new salmon-pink 
for 1907. Stems, 18 to 36 inches, rapid and 
fasy grower. Established in 2-ln. pots, £6 per 
EI d' ^' ^"™*"' ^*- Margarets, Guernsey, 

New carnations. Wlnsor, Helen Gould, 
Haines' Imperial and Pink Imperial S12.00 
100 $100.00 1000; 2%-ln., $14.S) 100.' WWte 
Perfection, 2%-ln.. $10.00 lOoT 
Chas. H. Totty, Madison, N. J. 

Carnations. 5000 Fair Maid, selected, well 
rooted cuttings, $1.50 per 100; $15.00 per 1000. 
A good variety all the time and the best light 
pink in warm weather. 
. Maurice J. Brlnton, Christian a. Pa. 

Rooted carnation cuttings. Per 100- 

Abundance $3.00 B. Market ..."...$1.00 

W. Lawson 2.00 Red Sport 

Enchantress 2.00 of Maceo 2 00 

Chas. Wlfl3n, Des Plalnes, III. 

Carnations Imperial and Pink Imperial. Se- 
i^5?^ cuttings, $2.50 doz.; $12.00 100; $100.00 
^"9?- ., , ^°^° ^- Haines, Bethlehem, Pa. 

Or Alex. J. Guttman, 43 West 28th St., N. Y. 

Carnations, strong, healthy, rooted cuttinga 
and 2%-in. pot plants, young stock, leading 
varieties. Prices are given in display adv. 
Poehlmann Bros. Co., Morton Grove , IlL 

Carnations. Rooted cuttings of Pink Law- 
son and B. Market, true stock, $15.00 per 1000. 
Same from 2% -in. pots, $25.00 per 1000. 
John Pickering, Troy, N. Y. 

Carnations, rooted cuttings, clean, healthy 
stock. Enchantress, $2.50 100, $22.50 1000. 
Other varieties given In display adv. 

Geo. Relnberg, 35 Randolph St., Chicago. 

Carnation cuttings ready, healthy and well 
rooted. Varieties and prices are given In dis- 
play adv. 
Schelden & Schoos, 60 Wabash Ave., Chicago. 

Clean, healthy, well rooted carnation cuttings, 
ready now. See display adv. for varieties and 
prices. 
Vaughan & Sperry, 58 Wabash Ave., Chicago. 

Beacon carnation, orange-scarlet, $12.00 100: 
$100.00 1000. Send for descriptive circular. 

Cottage Gardens Co., Queens, N. Y. 
Peter Fisher, Ellis. Mass. 

Rooted carnation cuttings. Enchantress. S1.50 
per 100; $15.00 per 1000. 

Other varieties all sold. 
Blanksma Bros., Grand Rapids, Mich . 

THE QUEEN^ 
The best commercial white, 30,000 fine cut- 
tings now ready. $2.00 per 100; $16.00 per 
1000. J. P. Brooks, Morton Grove, HI. 

Queen, best standard white, summer or win- 
ter. Well rooted cuttings, $15.00 1000. Also 
other varieties. A. Chrlstensen, Stoneham, Mass. 

Rooted carnation cuttings. Crusader, B. Mar- 
ket, $10.00 per 1000. B. Market, unrooted, half 
pric e. Des Plalnes Floral Co., Des Plalnes. HI. 

.-^^''^?;**'>°- cuttings. Rose-pink Enchantress, 
$7.00 100; $60.00 1000. Other varieties given in 
display adv. W. B. Glrvin. Leola. Pa. 

Rooted carnation cuttings, choice, all free 
from disease. Varieties and prices are given in 
display adv. J. L. Dillon. Bloomsburg, P a. 

John E. Haines, the leading scarlet carnation. 
Rooted cuttings ready now; $6.00 100, $50.00 
1000. John E. Haines. Bethlehem, Pa. 

Carnations in 2 and 2i,i-ln. pots, ready for de- 
llTery. J. W. Dunford, Clayton, Mo. 



PLEASE MENTION THE REVIEW WHEN WRITING ANY OF THESE ADVERTISERS. 



I^^>.^^ iiiJ-A»r.i,^.,4.<-..,».v.<.-»m::,>kx>..:^.l.w^^.^-.>, '^/^A^-., t.i^^aA: . 



A.Ai..'A .*.L-^*-fc ^.^■>--.t:/.i^^-.*-*,^ 



1302 



The Weekly Florists' Review* 



'■ « ri^yy-"'.; ' .r • ':y:.^yi,\>;^-ifr^.-'^Gr^;n 



Mabch 14, 1007. 



CARNATIONS-Contlnu»d. 

Healthy rooted carnation cuttings of tbe best 
commercial varieties. Prices are given In dla- 
play adv. John Mono, Kogera Park, Chicago. 

Mabelle, the new pink carnation for 1007. 
See display adv., or write us for particulars. 
H. Weber & Sons Co., Oakland, Md. 

Carnations. Boston Market, rooted cuttings, 
$10.00 1000; unrooted, |5.00 1000. Cash. 

E. D. Kaulback & Son, Maiden, Mass. 

Well rooted carnation cuttings, healthy stock. 
For varieties and prices see display adv. 

Peter Relnberg, 61 Wabash Ave., Chicago. 

Strong, well rooted carnation cuttings. Varie- 
ties and prices are given in display adv . 
Sol Garland, Pea Plaines, III. 

Carnation cuttings, Al stock guaranteed. Va- 
rieties and prices given in display adv. 
A. Laub & Son, Hughsonvllle, N. Y. 

Rose-pink Enchantress, rooted cuttings, $7.00 
100; $60.00 1000. Immediate delivery. 
H. F. Piggott, 2311 Pearl Rd., Cleveland. O. 

Rooted cuttings of Red Chief carnation, select 
Vtock. $12.00 100; $100.00 1000. 
F. Dorner & Sons Co., La Fayette, Ind. 

Rooted carnation cuttings. Varieties and 
prices are given in display adv. 
F. W. Heckenkamp, Jr., Quincy, 111. 

Carnation cuttings, leading varieties. List and 
prices are given in display adv. 
Ell Cross, Grand Rapids, Mich. 

Rooted carnation cuttings, best varieties. 
Prices are given In display adv. 

W. J. & M. S. Vesey, Fort Wayne. Ind. 

Boston Market, from sand, $8.00; soil, $10.00 
per 1000. Unrooted, $4.00. 
S. W. Pike, St. Charles, 111. 

Carnation Harlowarden, rooted cuttings, $2.00 
per 100; $15.00 per 1000. 

John S. Leach, Hartford City, Ind. 

Send for list of new carnations and the lead- 
ing commercial varieties. 

Wm. Swayue, Kennett Square, Pa. 

Prices on all the best commercial varieties 
are given in display adv. 
Chicago Carnation Co., Jollet, III. 

Sand-rooted cuttings, R. Craig, $6.00 100; En- 
chantress, $2.50 100. 
Valley View Greenhouses, Marlborough, N. Y. 

Abundance carnation, rooted cuttings, $5.00 
100; $40.00 1000. 
Rudolph Fischer, Great Neck, N. Y. 

Rooted carnation cuttings. See display adv. 
Frank Garland, Des Plaines, 111. 

Carnation cuttings for Immediate delivery. 
Jensen & Dekema, 674 W. Foster Ave., Chicago. 

CENTAUREAS. ~ 

Centaurea gymnocarpa, new. The finest of 
all the Dusty Millers for borders; 2-ln., $2.00 
doz., $10.00 100; sample, prepaid, 25c. 

A. J. Baldwin, Newark, O. 

CHRYSANTHEMUMS. 

Chrysanthemums from sand and soil. Good, 
healthy stock, ready now. 

WHITE. 
Polly Rose M. Friend 

Mrs. Weeks Arline 

N. Pockett Florence Teal 

Princess ' Pride 

Ivory W. Jonesf 

Kalb Ben Wells 

Wlllowbrook Merza 

Mrs. Robinson Bride 

W. Bonnaffou Niveus 

PINK. 
G. of Pacific V. Morel 

Ermanllda Dr. Enguehard 

Xeno Wm. Duckbam 

YELLOW. 
G. Trophy G. Wedding 

L. Lincoln Bonnaffon 

Y. Jones Appleton 

Halliday Yellow Eaton 

Monrovia 

RED. 
Culllngfordll Intensity 

John Shrlmpton Mildred Ware 

$1.50 per 100; $12.50 per 1000. 

Fred Lemon, Mrs. Brice, Alliance, Oct. Sun- 
shine, Beauty of Sussex. $2.00 per 100. 

We always have 50,000 cuttings in sand, of 75 
commercial varieties. Send us your want list, 
now. Wm. Ehmann. Corfu, N. Y. 

Nothing Is worth growing but the best. 
Beatrice May, October Frost, Roeiere, M. F. 
Plant. Mayor Weaver and E. J. Brooks, $1.00 
per doz. 

Jeanne Nonln. the unapproachable queen of 
lale mums, also C. Touset, Adelia, J. K. Shaw, 
Enguehard, Duckhnm, and the grand prize- 
winning yellow, Mrs. W. Duckham, only $2.00 
per 100. Postpaid. 
The Union City Greenhouse. Union City, Pa. 

CLEMENTINE TODSET. 
The Early Chadwlck mum; finest early 
white; large stock on hand; ready now. 
Rooted cuttings. $2.50 per 100. 
WIETOR BROS., 51 Wabash Ave., Chicago. 



The following mums from 2-In. pots. Imme- 
diate delivery: 175 Ivory, 375 May Foster, auO 
Timothy Eaton, 130 Chadwlck, 800 White Bon- 
naffon, 140 Glory of the Pacific, 450 J. K. 
Shaw, 200 Wm. Duckham, 376 Newell, 350 
Vlvland-Morel, 650 Pres. Smith, 40 Mary 
Vulllermet, 50 lora, 900 W. C. Egan, 100 A. J. 
Balfour, 200 Walter Molatsch, 50 Yellow Eaton, 
700 Major Bounaffon, 500 Golden Wedding, 50 
Black Hawk, $3.00 per 100; $25.00 per 1000. 
Also 1200 Clementine Touset, $5.00 per 100; 
$45.00 'per 1000. 

South Bend Floral Co., South Bend, Ind. 

' EARLIEST MUMS. 

ROSIERE, pink. OCTOBER FROST, white. 

If you are staging two or more varieties 
of mums, you should plant the above. Roslere, 
larger, brighter, earlier than Pacific. October 
Frost, the largest, earliest white, earlier than 
Touset. Recognized as such by leading grow- 
ers' convincing comments in trade Journals 
during mum season. Order now for April, May 
and June delivery. 2-ln., $5.00 per 100; 2V4-In., 
$6.00 per 100. 
J. H. Myers. Falrvlew Greenhouses. Altoona, Pa. 

Chrysanthemums, strong, healthy. Ivory, 
Kalb, W. Brook, Pacific, Shaw, Chamberlain, 
Enguehard, P. Duckham, Bonnaffon, Appleton, 
Halliday, Parr, W. and Y. Jones, Queen, 
N. Pockett, Balfour, Robinson, Wells, Merza, 
Brutus, Saunders, T. Eaton, W. Chadwlck, 
Weeks; rooted cuttings, $1.50; 2-ln., $2.00 
per 100. Jeanne Nonln, rooted cuttings, $2.00; 
2-in., $2.50 per 100. 

Jas. Hamilton, Mt. Washington, Md. 

250,000 CHRYSANTHEMUMS. ' 
Monrovia, Polly Rose, Robinson, Wm. Duck- 
ham, Pink Pacific, Bounaffon, J. Jones, rooted 
cuttings, $1.25 per 100; $10.00 per 1000. 

Alice Byron, Cheltoni, Appleton, Eaton, Ivory, 
Dr. Enguehard, $2.00 per 100; $15.00 per 1000. 
Healthy stock. "Enough said." 
Wm. Becker, Box 48, Farmlngdale, L. I., N. Y. 

Chrysanthemum rooted cuttings. Omega, Oc- 
tober Sunshine, Pacific, Kalb, Bonnaffon, Apple- 
ton, Duckham, Nellie Pockett, Honesty (good 
second early white), $1.25 per 100; $10.00 per 
1000. October Frost, $4.00 per 100. Cash. 
Other varieties later. 
Wm. Bierstadt & Son, Springfield, 111. 

Can furnish 50,000 rooted cuttings and 2^^-ln. 
pots, season 1907. Delivery to suit. Best com- 
mercial varieties. Write for list and prices. 
Order now. Geo. M. Brlnkerhoff, Springfield, HI. 

Chrysanthemums. Jeanne Nonln, Dr. Engue- 
hard, Wm. Duckham, Robt. Halliday, Major 
Bonnaffon, 2%-ln., $2.60 per 100. Al stock. 
Cash. Edwin Bishop, Roslyn, Md. 

Chrysanthemums. Extra strong cuttings of 
Jeanne Nonln and C. Touset, $2.00 per 100. Dr. 
Enguehard and Mrs. Jerome Jones, $1.50 per 
100. McCaslin Bros., Zanesville, Ohio. 

Chrysanthemums, extra strong, 2% -in. pots, 
March 15 delivery, $2.25 per 100. All colors. 
Money refunded if not as advertised. 
David Wlrth, 1st & Elliott Ave., Springfield, 111. 

Chrysanthemums. Major Bonnaffon, Jeanne 
Nonln, extra fine, well rooted cuttings, $2.00 
per 100; $15.00 per 1000. Cash. 
EDWIN BISHOP, Roslyn, Md. 

Rooted cuttings of CERAMIC chrysanthemum, 
$3.00 per 100. Polly Rose and Bonnaffon, $1.60 
per 100. Jones and Nonln, $2.00 per 100. 

Chal Peterson, East Liverpool, Ohio. 

Chrysanthemum stock plants. About 1000 
Jeanne Nonln, $1.00 per doz.; $7.00 per 100. 
W. F. Kasting. 383 Elllcott St., Buffalo, N. Y. 

New chrysanthemums. Miss Clay BYlck, Win- 
ter Cheer and Buttercup, 2%-in., 50c ea.; $35.00 
100. Chas. H. Totty, Madison, N. J. 

Chrysanthemums, leading varieties, rooted cut- 
tings, $2.00 100; $15.00 1000. See display adv. 
A. N. Plerson, Cromwell, Conn. 

Chrysanthemums. Rooted cuttings of J. 
Nonln. Enguehard, Bonnaffon, $1.75 per 100. 
Frank Shearer & Son, Blnghamton, N. Y. 

We are now rooting all the commercial varie- 
ties of chrysantbemuras. Send for list. 

Poehlmann Bros. Co., Morton Grove, 111. 

Chrysanthemums. Send for list of young 
stock, including many novelties. 

Harlowarden Greenhouses, Greenport, N. Y. 

Chrysanthemum Jeanne Nonin, the money- 
maker for late blooms, rooted cuttings, $2.00 
per 100, postpaid. Cash. 
Riverbank Greenhouses, Geneva, 111. 

Chrysanthemum stock plants, best commercial 
varieties, $10.00 100. 
Bassett & Washburn, 76 Wabash Ave., Chicago. 

Mum stock plants, Jeanne Nonin. $4.00 per 
100. Klehm's Nurseries, Arlington Heights, 111. 

Chrysanthemums, rooted cuttings, $2.00 100; 
$15.00 1000. Chicago Carnation Co., Jollet, 111. 

CINERARIAS. 

Cinerarias. Columbian, stellata and James' 
prize, 3-in., $4 00 per 100. 

J. Sylvester, Florist, Oconto, Wis. 

Cinerarias, 4-ln., $4.00 100. ' 
Fred Grohe, Santa Rosa. Cal. 

Cinerarias, 5-in.. $1.50 doz. 

J. S. Bloom. BlegelsvlUe, Pa. 



Cineraria bybrida, 4%-in. pots, mixed colors, 
clean plants, In bud, 5c each. 

Alonzo J. Bryan, Washington, New Jersey. 

CLEMATIS. 

Clematis paniculata, strong, field-grown plants, 
$16.00 per 100; strongest, $30.00 per 100. 
Quotations on larger quantities. 

Est. of David Fisher, Woburn, Mass. 

Clematis, large-flowering, $2.50 doz. Panicu- 
lata, $1.00 doz., $8.00 per 100. 
F. A. Bailer, Bloomlngton, HI. 

Clematis, strong, field-grown, large-fiowered, 
18c. Paniculata, 10c. 

W. H. Salter, Rochester, N. Y. 

COLEUS. 

COLEUS. COLEUS. 
Rooted cuttings of Golden Bedder and sev- 
eral others, $5.00 per 1000; 60c per 100. Cash 
with order. 
J. E. Felthousen, Schenectady, N. Y. 

Coleus, mixed. Rooted cuttings, 60c per 100; 
$5.00 per 1000; 2-in., mixed, $2.00 per 100. 
Cash. E. B. Randolph, Delavan, 111. 

Coleus In variety, rooted cuttings, 60c 100; 
$5.00 1000. 
Hopkins & Hopkins, Chepachet. R. I. 

Coleus, strong rooted cuttings, 20 varieties, 
70c 100. Cash. The Kaber Co., La Porte, Ind. 

Coleus, standard bedding and fancy varieties. 
N. O. Caswell, Delavan, 111. 

Coleus, 2Mi-ln., $1.80 100; $15.00 1000. 

Springfield Floral Co., Springfield, O. 



CYCLAMEN. 



Cyclamen. Giant hybrids, transplanted, ready 
for 2 and 3-in., $3.50 100; $30.00 1000. Plants 
grown of seed taken from the cream of my own 
well-known strain. 

Christ Wlnterich, Cyclamen Specialist, Defi- 
ance, O. 

Cyclamen gig., extra strong plants In sepa- 
rate colors. In good growing condition. Ready 
for 214-ln., $4.00 100; ready for 3-in., $6.00 
100. Twice transplanted. Satisfaction guaran- 
teed. Lehnlg & Winuefeld, Hackensack, N. J. 

Cyclamen gig.. In 4 colors, twice transplanted 
Into fiats, 4 to 5 leaves, ready tv 2V^-ln. pots; 
extra strong, healthy plants, $2.00 per 100; 
$18.00 per 1000. Carl Meier. Green Bay, Wis. 

Cyclamen, grand prize fimbriated strain, 
seedlings, $2.00 per 100, postpaid. Cash. 

Riverbank Greenhouses, Geneva, 111. 

Cyclamen, finest strain, nice, stocky plants, 
many In bud, 3-ln., $5.00 per 100. 

John Boehner, Dayton, Ohio. 

Cyclamen pers. gig., 2-in., $5.00 100. 
Fred Grohe, Sianta Rosa, Cal. 

Cyclamen seedlings, $1.25 100. 
Shippensburg Floral Co., Shippensburg, Pa. 

Cyclamen, 4-ln., 12c. Cash. 
G. Aschmann, 1012 Ontario St.. Philadelphia. 

Cyclamen, 4-ln., $1.00 doz. 

J. S. Bloom, Riegelsvllle, Pa. 



DAHLIAS. 



Dahlias, field roots In 180 varieties, selected 
and adapted to the rich corn soils of the west. 
Standard sorts, $4.60 to $7.00 per 100; 30. all 
different, for $1.60. Fancy and new sorts, in- 
cluding Mrs. Roosevelt, G. D> Alexis, Floradora, 
Kriemhllde, Mrs. Winters, $9.00 to $16.00 per 
100; 12 for $1.00. 
Ferndale Nurseries, Harlan. Iowa. 

Dahlias. Pot roots for shipment at once. 
Every section Including the popular cactus, 
show, fancy, pompon and single, $6.00 per 100 
In 25 sorts; better and newer kinds. $8.00 and 
$9.00 100, post-free, cash with order. See dis- 
play adv. for list of new varieties. Catalogue 
free. HOBBIES LIMITED, Dereham, England. 

I am again ready to handle your business. 
Only the cream of varieties handled. Standards 
and novelties, including Mrs. Winters, Mme. 
Dael, Navajo, Lonsdale, Dainty, Kriemhllde, etc. 

Catalogue of dahlias, hollyhocks, peonies and 
hardy plants now ready. 

W. W. WILMORE, Box 382, Denver. Colo. 

Dahlias. Strong, field-grown roots of Sylvia, 
Strahlein Krone. $6.00 100. Glorlosa, C. W. 
Bruton, Miss*Dodd, Purity and 50 other varie- 
ties, $5.00 100. Mixed varieties, $3.50 100. 
Elmhurst Nursery, Argentine, Kan. 

THE DAHLIA MANUAL. 
An up-to-date work on dahlias and dahlia 
culture, covering the whole field. Illustrated. 
Price. 36c. 

W. W. WILMORE, Box 382, Denver, Colo. 

The gorgeous new peony-flowered dahlias. See 
display adv. or refer to my catalogue. If yoa 
haven't it, a postal will bring you one. 

A. T. Boddlngton, 342 W. 14th St., New York. 

We have 1,000.000 dahlia roots to sell. Send 
for our list. East Brldgewater Dahlia Gardens, 
J. K. Alexander. Prop.. East Brldgewater, Mass. 

Dahlias, heavy field clumps, $5.00 100; $45.00 
lOOD. DIngee & Conard Co., West Grove, Pa. 



PLEASE MENTION THE REVIEW WHEN WRITING ANY OF THESE ADVERTISERS. 



.-1 ■ ^o ^,._^ 



■ '■- .a:--.-. >-;. « A , ..oj.-.^.^JiL.-'.-i-i'.i.^.. .---.iLva..- 



■ut^u 



^•*v ■ ■ "r^^ . *!• 'i-^ ffy^'^^^^t^^ f". '< 'v> 



March 14, 1907. 



The Weekly Florists^ Review* 



1303 



Dabliaff, fleld-grown clumps of A. D. Llvonl 
and Arabella, $3.60 100; $30.00 1000. Cash with 
order. Wm. F. Bassett, Hammonton, N. J. 

DAHLIAS. 150 varieties Including many 
European novelties, 3c each and up. New list 
now ready. Adams Supply Co., Lowell, Mass. 

Dahlias, tine, strong bulbs. Also cannas and 
gladioli. Write for price list. 

O. B. Stevens, Shenandoah, Iowa. 

Dahlia Sylvia, tine, long-stemmed plnl£, $1.50 
per doz. ; $10.00 per 100. 
Cusliman Gladiolus Co.. Sylvanla, O. 

Zulu and Pearl dahlias, good varieties, and 
the stock is fine. 

Cummings Bulb & Plant Co.. Meridian, Miss. 

Dahlia roots, large, well developed tleld 
clumps. 

H. F. Michell Co., 1018 Market St., Phlla. 

20,000 DAHLIAS, fleld-grown. 4c. List ready. 
H. W. Koerner, Sta. B. Milwaukee. Wis. 

Dahlia roots in any quantity. 

David Herbert & Son, Atco, N. J. 

DAISIES. 

Daisy Queen Alexandra. New white. A hand- 
some and free-flowering pot plant for spring 
and Decoration day sales. Very nice 2 and 2%- 
in. pot plants, $2.50 and $3.00 per 100. Cash 
prices . 

Theo. F. Beckert, 
9 miles west of Pittsburg. Coraopolls, Pa. 

Shasta daisies, field divisions, $2.50 100; 
$22.50 1000. Small plants for 3-ln., $1.25 100; 
$11.00 1000. Cash. Fred Grohe, Santa Rosa, Cal. 

Shasta daisies, strong divisions, field-grown, 
$2.00 per 100. 

H. H. Kern, Bonner Springs, Kan. 

PRAOENAS. 

Dracaena indivlsa, extra nice plants, 6 and 
8-ln., $2.50, $3.00, $4.00 per doz. Cash. 
Geo. H. Benedict, Yorkvllle, N. Y. 

Choice colored dracaenas ready now in ex- 
cellent condition. 

Rose Hill Nurseries, New Rochelle, N. Y. 

Dracaena indivlsa, from $2.00 to $10.00 per 
100. E. Fryer, Johnstown, Pa. 

Dracaena Bruantl, 6-ln., 50c; $5.00 doz. Cash. 
G. Aschmann, 1012 Ontario St., Phlla. 

Dracaena Indivlsa, 5-in., $2.00 per doz. 

W. C. Rockwell, Bradford, Pa. 

EASTER PLANTS. 

FOR EASTER — Lilium multiflorum, 10c per 
bud. Hydrangea grandiflora, pink, from 4 to 
7-ln. pots, 25c to $1.00. Spiraea Gladstone, 
5 to 7-ln. pots, from 35c to 75c. Crimson 
Rambler, 2 to 4 ft. high, 50c to $1.50. Beauty, 
Neyron, Lalng, Jacqueminot, Magna Cbarta, 
Hermoea, Soupert, La France, Pink and White 
Cochet, 35c to 75c. Azalea indica, well budded 
plants, all colors, crown 12 to 18 Inches, 40c to 
$1.00. Genista fragrans, 4 to 5-ln. pots, 20c 
to 30c. Baby Rambler roses, in bloom, 4-ln. 
pots, 25c. Primula obconica. 4 to 5-ln., 8c to 
12c. Von Slon daffodils, 3 bulbs to a pot, 20c. 
Tulips, double only, red, yellow and variegated, 
4 bulbs to 4-in. pots. 12c. Hyacinths, all colors, 
4-in. pots, 12c. Cash, please. 

Riverview Greenhouses. Lewlsburg, Pa. 

Easter lilies, green from top to bottom, nice 
flowers, 4 to 6 flowers, 10c; under 4 flowers, 
12c. Spiraea Gladstone, fine bush plants, full 
of flowers, $6.00 per doz. Azaleas, mixed colors, 
very fine, 75c each; these are extra flne for the 
money. Spiraeas and azaleas to accompany 
Easter lily orders. Cash with order. All goods 
shipped at purchaser's risk. Will take the 
greatest care in packing. Mention if pots are 
wanted. 

Samuel V. Smith, East of 3323 Germantown 
Ave., Phlla. Take 8th St. car going North of 
Market St. 

Prepare for Easter. An immense stock of 
choice Easter plants, to bloom Easter week or 
earlier if desired, now ready. The leading 
varieties of azaleas, araucarias. hyacinths, 
tulips, etc., are listed In display adv. 

Q. Aschmann, 1012 Ontario St.. Phlla. 

Easter plants blooming Easter or earlier. Or- 
der now. Various sizes of hydrangeas, roses, 
etc., are given in display adv. 

J. W. Dudley & Son, Parkersburg. W. Va. 

Place orders early for Easter plants. Lilies, 
azaleas, spiraeas, hyacinths, etc. Prices are 
given in display adv. 
Geo. A. Kuhl. Pekln. 111. 

Easter lilies, plants. 12c bud. C. Ramblers, 
$1.00 to $1.50 ea. Other stock given in display 
adv. 
Crabb & Hunter Floral Co., Grand Rapids. Mich. 

Azaleas, primroses, cinerarias, etc., for Easter. 
All are in bloom. 
C. Whltton, City St., Utlca, N. Y. 

A choice lot of Easter plants. List Is given In 
display adv. „ „^„ 

Pennock-Meehan Co., 1608 Ludlow St., Phlla. 

Azaleas for Easter. See display adv. 

Bobbink & Atkins, Rutherford, N. J. 



Easter lilies, $15.00 to $18.00 lOO. 

Miami Floral Co., Main St., Dayton, O. 

ECHEVERIAS. 

Kcheverias, 15 to 20 cm. In dr., $3.00 per 
100, $22.00 per 1000. Carriage paid. 

J. A. McDowell, Ap. 167. City of Mexico. 

An offer of.your 'surplus stock, placed in THE 
REVIEW'S classified advs., will be seen by 
nearly every buyer in the trade. 

FERNS. 

FERNS MY SPECIALTY. 
Please notice the big reductions. 

CIBOTIUM SCHIEDBI, the king of ferns, 
well known for its unequaled beauty and good 
keeping qualities and as a very easy grower. 
Strong plants in the following sizes: 3-lu. pots, 
$20.00; 4-iu., $40.00; 5-in., $80.00 per 100; 
7-in., $1.70 each; 10-ln. pots, large specimens, 
$5.00 each. 

Adlantum rhodophyllum, 4-ln., $20.00 per 100. 

Assorted ferns tor Jardinieres, in all the lend- 
ing varieties, $3.00 per 100; $25.00 per 1000; 
50O at 1000 rate. 

i'^resh fern spores. Choice collection in 55 va- 
rieties, true to name. Including all the best 
market sorts, 30c per trade pkt. ; $3.00 per doz. ; 
$12.00 for the whole collection. Write for list 
of varieties. 
J. F. ANDERSON, Short Hills, N. J. 

Nephrolepis exaltata Bostonlensis, fine, young 
stock, $10.00 per 1000. 

N. Elegantlssima, good runners, $5.00 per 
100; flne plants, $10.00 per loO. 

N. rufescens triplnnatlflda, fine stock, $5.00 
per 100. Soar Bros., Little River, Fla. 

Boston ferns, 3-ln. pots, $6.00; 4-ln., $12.00; 
4%-in.. $15.00; 5-ln., $20.00 and $25.00 per 100. 
This is fine, short, strong, well grown stuff and 
will satisfy anyone. 

Crown Point Floral Co., Crown Point, Ind. 

Boston ferns, pot-grown, strong plants, 5-iu., 
25c; 6-ln., 35c. 

Scottii. 5-ln., 25c; 6-ln., 35c; 7-ln., 45c. 

Elegantlssima, 5-ln., 35c; 6-ln., 60c. 
S. J. REUTER, Westerly, R. I. 

10,000 Boston and Piersonl, 2%-in., $3.00 per 
100. Boston and Piersonl, from 4-in., 10c. 
Barrowsli and Scottii, 3-in., 10c. Cash. 
BenJ. Connell, West Grove, Pa. 

Boston ferns, bench grown, ready for 3-ln., 
$4.00 per 100; $35.00 per 1000. Ready for 
2%-in., $3.00 per 100; $30.00 per 1000. 

Gioede, Evanston, 111. 

Ferns. Last offer Piersonl, Scottii, Barrowsli, 
3-ln., 75c; 3yo-in., $1.15; 4-In., $1.40; 4%-ln., 
$1.75; 5-in., $2.25 per doz. 

Cottage Greenhouses, Bushnell, 111. 

Boston ferns, large specimen plants, estab- 
lished in 8-in. pots, $12.00 per doz. Also 6 and 
7-ln. plants. 

Riverbank Greenhouses, Geneva, 111. 

Boston and Piersonl ferns. 200 of each, pretty 
as pictures and a guaranteed bargain at $13.00 
per 100. 

Spach-Denlson Co., New Philadelphia, Ohio. 

Boston, 2V^-in., 3c^ 3-ln., 8c; 4-in., 12cl 
Piersonl, 3-ln., 8c. Barrowsli, 2i^-in., ready 
for shift, 6c. A. J. Baldwin, Newark, Ohio. 

Bostons and Scottii, bench-grown; and Bos- 
tons, pot-grown. See adv. on cover page. 
Baur Floral Co., Erie, Pa. 

Scottii ferns, 2%-ln., $4.00 per 100; 8-in., 
80c each, to make room. Cash. 
Maple City Greenhonses, Honeadale, Pa 

We are booking orders for Nephrolepis Amer- 
pohlii, the sensational new fern. 

Janesville Floral Co., Janesvllle, Wis. 

We have the finest collection of ferns in 
Europe. Lists on application. 
H. B. May & Sons, Upper Edmonton, England. 

Ferns. Boston, Piersonl, Elegantlssima. Prices 
are given in display adv. 
D. U. Augspurger & Sons, Bx. 778, Peoria, IlL 

Boston and Barrowsli ferns. Sizes and prices 
are listed in display adv. 
Nelson & Klopfer, 1101 6th Ave., Peoria, 111. 

N. Bostonlensis, 4-ln., $1.60 doz. Other sizes 
given in display adv. 

Wlttbold Co., 1657 Bncklngham PL, Chicago. 

Fern runners, Boston and Elegantlssima, $20.00 
and $30.00 per 1000. 

Mosbaek Greenhouse Co., Onarga, 111. 

Ferns, Elegantlssima, 300 from 2^-ln. pots, 
$5.00 per 100. 
M. E. Ernsberger, 59 Corwin St., Norwalk, O. 

Ferns. Whltmanl, 6-ln., $12.00 doz. Scottii, 
6-in., $6.00 doz. 
J. W. Young, Germantown. Phlla.. Pa. 

Nephrolepis Amerpohlli, a grand novelty. See 
our display adv. 
W. P. Craig, 1305 Filbert St., Phlla. 

Ferns, 2Vi-ln. Whltmanl, $10.00 100. Boston, 
$3.00 100. 
H. H. Barrows & Son, Whitman, Mass. 

Nephrolepis Whltmanl, young plants from 
bench. $6.00 100. Davis Bros.. Morrison, IlL 

Boston and Pierson ferns, 2^-ln., select stock, 
13.60 per 100. J. T. Cherry, Athens, 111. 



Ferns, all varieties. Prices are given in dis- 
play adv. 
G. Aschmann. 1012 Ontario St., Phlla. 

Ferns. Elegantlssima. 2i^-in.. $5.00; 3-in., 
$9.00 per 100. C. W. Bakewell, Gretna, La. 

Whltmanl ferns, flne. 2>^-in. plants, $8.50 per 
100. Tony Toerner. Sclo. Ohio. 

Boston ferns, 5-ln., $2.50 doz. Cash. 
Converse Greenhouses, Webster, Mass. 

Scotti ferns. 2V^-in., $3.00 100. 
Sprlngfleld Floral Co., Springfield, O. 

Boston ferns, 4-ln., $12.00 100. 

F. W. Heckenkamp, Jr., Quincy, 111. 

FEVERFEW. 

Feverfew, double white; strong rooted cut- 
tings, 60c per 100, postpaid. Cash. 
Wm. Bierstadt & Son, Sprlngfleld, 111. 

Feverfew, dwarf, young plants, $1.00 100. 
Cash. Byer Bros., Chambersburg, Pa. 

Feverfew Little Gem, 80c per 100; $7.00 per 
1000. S. W. Pike, St. Charles, 111. 

Feverfew, 2-ln., $3.00 100. 
D. U. Augspurger & Sons, Bx. 778, Peoria, 111. 

FUCHSIAS. 

Fuchsia Little Beauty, strong, 2-tn., $3.50 per 
100. Rooted cuttings, $1.50 per 100. 
N. 0. Caswell. Delavan. IlL 

Fuchsia Little Beauty, 214-ln., $4.00 100. 

Baur Floral Co., Erie, Pa. 



GERANIUMS. 



GERANIUMS, the following superb bedders: 
S. A. Nutt (crimson), Mme. Buchner (best 
double white), Peter Henderson (bright scarlet), 
J. Viaud (pink), strong top cuttings, well 
rooted, $1.75 per 100; $16.00 per 1000. Cash. 
W. T. Buckley Co., Sprlngfleld, 111. 

New single geranium, SYCAMORE, bright, 
clear salmon-pink, cross between Mrs. E. G. 
Hill and Paul Bruant. Orders booked now for 
21^-in. pots at $2.00 doz.; $15.00 100. 
St. Clair Floral Co., Belleville, 111. 

Elegant 2i^-inch geraniums, $3.00 per 100. 
S. A. Nutt, Heteranthe, Jean. Viaud, John 
Doyle. La Favorite, New Life, rose scented, 
Bismarck. 

Spach-Denlson Co., New Philadelphia, Ohio. 

Geraniums, best varieties, large, 3-ln., $40.00 
1000. Double Grant, large, 2-ln., $18.00; 3-ln., 
$35.00 per 1000. 
Wm. S. Hcrzog, Morris Plains, N. J. 

Mt. of Snow and Salleroi. pots, $2.00 per 100. 
Mt. of Snow, rooted cuttings, $1.25 per 100. 
Geo. Smith, Manchester, Vt. 

Geraniums. 250 S. A. Nutt, 306 Viaud, 300 
La Favorite, 214-in., $2.25 per 100. Cash, please. 
Arthur Harbison, Harrodsburg, Ky. 

Geraniums, best varieties, 4-in., $8.00 100. 
Cash. J. W. Dunford, Clayton, Mo. 

Mixed geraniums, fall rooted, 2-in., 2c; 3-ln., 
4c^ Jas. T. Baker, Bustleton, Phlla., Pa. 

Geraniums. 2i^-in., $2.50 100; $25.00 1000. 
Springfield Floral Co.. Springfield, O. 

Geraniums, 3-in., $6.00 100; $55.00 1000. 
D. U. Augspurger & Sons. Bx. 778. Peoria, HI. 

Geraniums. For price see display adv. 

Jos. H. Cunningham, Delaware, O. 

Ivy geraniums, R. C, $1.50 100. Cash. 

Converse Greenhouses, Webster, Mass. 



GLADIOLI. 



Gladioli, Groff's or Lemolne's, strictly fancy 
stock, nice large bulbs, 150 for $1.00, $6.60 per 
1000; also a good blooming size, 200 for $1.00, 
$4.50 per 1000. 

Femdale Nurseries, Harlan, Iowa. 

Hybrid gladioli. Bulblets, $1.50 per peck; 
small sizes, $1.00 per 1000 and up. Write for 
bargain price on uncleaned planting stock. 
C. H. Ketcham, N. S. D., South Haven, Mich. 

Genuine Grotf hybrids, all -colors and combina- 
tions, including the blue shades. No. 1, $8.00 
per 1000; No. 2, $5.00; No. 3, $3.00. 

A. B. Powell, Camden, New York. 

Hybrid gladiolus seedlings. Have more than 
want to plant, offer half of planting stock. All 
sizes, IV^-in. down. A bargain. 
S. Huth, Cuyahoga Falls, Ohio. 

Gladioli, Al, 3 strains, extra fine bulbs. Also 
cannas and dahlias. Write for price list. 

O. B. Stevens, Shenandoah. Iowa. 

Gladioli. Groff's, Crawford's and Lemolne's 
strains. Prices are given in display adv. 
J. H. Umpleby. Lake View, N. Y. 

Gladioli, all sizes. Stock direct from Groff. 
Nothing better, $1.00 to $5.00 per 1000. 
P. O. Coblentz. New Madison. Ohio. 

Gladiolus Augusta, 1st size, $12.00; 2nd size, 
$8.00 1000. Cash. 
Rowehl & Granz. Hlcksville, N. Y. 

Gladioli, good stock; mixed and named varie- 
ties; all sizes. S. Huth, Cuyahoga Falls, Ohio. 



PLEASE MENTION THE REVIEW WHEN WRITING ANY OF THESE ADVERTISERS. 



L.< I^L. ;^.L*. J. ^...^A-.^aPw^xr<, 






•■■V ■'■■ -, •• 



» • .m-'-^i ''^^ :■]■ 






1304 



The Weekly Florists^ Review. 



Mabch 14, X907. 



GLADIOLI-Continuvd. 



Gladioli aa good as the best. Nothing better. 
0. Betscher, Canal Dover, Ohio. 

Augusta, small sizes, |2.00 to |4.50 per 1000. 
John Fay Kennell. Chill. N. Y. 

UladloU. named varieties. Write for list. 

E. E. Stewart, Rives Junction, Mich. 

Gladiolus America, $8.00 per 100. Cash. 

Cusbman Gladiolus Co., Sylvanla, O. 

GliidioU. Finest stock In the world. 

Arthur Cowee, Berlin, N. Y. 



GRASSES. 



I'eiuilsetum (purple fountain grass), $2.00 per 
lOtJ. McCaslln Bros., Zanesvllle, Ohio. 

HARDY PLANTS. 

Hydrangea panlculata grandlUora, 2 to 8 ft., 
a to 5 stems, $7.00 per 100. Honeysuckle, Bush 
White Tartarian, 3 to 3Mi ft.. $«.00 per 100; 
2 to 3 ft., $5.00 per 100. Golden Glow, $2.00 
per loO. Boltonla asteroides, $3.00 per 100. 

Choice lot Weir's cut-leaved maple, silver- 
leaved maple and American sycamore, 8 to 10 
ft. Cut-leaved birch, 6 to 6 and 6 to 8 ft. 

Large supply ornamental nursery stock for 
wholesale trade. Send list of wants for prices. 

Mount Arbor Nurseries, Shenandoah, Iowa. 

We are headquarters for all the latest and 
best hardy perennials. We shall be pleased to 
mall you our catalogue. Royal Tottenham 
N uraerl es, Dedemsvaart. Holland. 

Large trees of oaks, maples, pines and hem- 
locks. We have a full line of all nursery stock 
and Clin fill orders promptly. 
Andorra Nurseries, Chestnut Hill, Philadelphia. 

Sugar maple seedlings, 6-12 in., $6.00 1000; 
2-3 ft.. $3.00 100, $25.00 1000. Other stock 
listed In display adv. 

Ellsworth Brown & Co., Seabrook. N. H. 

An Immense stock of both large and small 
size evergreen trees in great variety; also ever- 
green shrubs. 

The Wm. H. Moon Co., Morrlsville, Pa. 

Trees and shrubs. Immense quantities. Price 
list on application. Peterson Nursery, 504 
W. Peterson Ave., Chicago. 

Ornamental trees, shrubs, roses, clematis, fruit 
trees and small fruits. Send for price UaU 
W. & T. Smith Co., Geneva, N. Y. 

Wholesale growers of nursery stock for the 
American trade. Catalogue on application. 

H. Den Onden & Son, Boskoop, Holland. 

Trees, shrubs, and evergreens in good assort- 
ment. Catalogue for the asking. 
H. T. Jones, Elizabeth, N. J. 

Carolina poplars, and a full line of other trees 
and shrubs. Send for list. 
Aurora Nursery Co., Aurora, 111. 

Perennial plants. 50,000 field and pot-grown. 
Descriptive list now ready. 
Moebaek Greenhouse Co., Onarga, 111. 

Viburnum plicatum all sizes, spiraeas, deutzias, 
etc. Write for prices. 
Conard & Jones Co., West Grove. Pa. 

Deciduous trees and shrubs. Send for price 
list. Cottage Gardens Co., Queens, N. Y. 

American white elm, extra fine, nursery-grown. 
Chaa. Hawkinson, Excelsior, Minn. 

Horlmoeous plants, field-grown. Send for list. 
Elizabeth Nursery Co.> Elizabeth, N. J. 

Norway spruce, oaks and maples. 
Wlllard H. Rogers, Mt. Holly, N. J. 

Fruit and ornamental trees. 

Gilbert Costlch, Rochester, N. T. 

HELIOTROPES. 

Heliotropes, in the six best varieties. Rooted 
cuttings and 2%-ln., $1.00 and $2.50 per 100. 
Mo sbaek Greenhouse Co., Onarga, 111. 

Heliotropes (dark), good stock, strong and 
well rooted. R. C, 60c 100; $5.00 1000. Cash. 
J. P. Cannata, Mt. Freedom, N. J. 

Heliotropes, rooted cuttings, $1.00; 2-ln., 
$2.00; nice and bushy, 3-ln., $4-00 per 100. 

Advance Floral Co., Dayton, O. 

Heliotropes, dwarf varieties, 2-ln., $2.50. 
Rooted cuttings, $1.00 per 100. 
N. O. Caswell, Delavan, HI. 

Dark heliotropes. Rooted cuttings, 60c, pre- 
paid; 2-ln., 2c. 
U. G. Harglerode, Shlppensbnrg, Pa. 

Heliotrope Florence Nightingale, R. €.. $1.00 
100. prepaid^ A. J. Baldwin. Newark, Q. 

Heliotropes, dark, 214-in., 2c. Cash. 

Edwin Bishop, Roslyn, Md. 

HOLLYHOCKS. 

Hollyhocks. Large field-grown plants, $3.00 

per 100. Double in separate colors of red. 

white, pink, yellow and maroon; also the 
Allegheny strain. 

Send for catalogue of hollyhocks, dahlias 
and hardy plants. 

W. W. WILMORE, Box 382. Denver, Colo. 



Double hollyhocks, 2% -in., $2.75 per 100. 

H. B. Snow, Camden, New York. 



HYDRANGEAS. 



Hydrangea Hortensls 

grandlflora. 

Rooted cuttings, $00.00 per 1000. 

Cash. 

L. I. Neff, Pittsburg, Pa. 

Hydrangeas, strong, 4-ln. stock, $8.00 per 100. 
E. Fryer, Johnstown, Pa. 

Strong, bush Hydrangea P. O., 8c; tree, 26c. 
W. H. Salter, Rochester, N. Y. 



IRIS. 



German iris, fine named kinds, $2.00 per 100; 
$15.00 per 1000. 

H. n. Kern, Bonner Springs. Kan. 

Iris. German, mixed. 2c; Japanese. 4c. 

Jesse P. King. Mt. Airy. Md. 



IVY. 



German Ivy. Rooted cuttings, 5Uc per 100; 
2%-ln., fine, $1.60 per 100. 
J. C. Schmidt Co., Bristol, Pa. 

Hardy English ivy, 4-ln., $1.50 doz.; $10.00 
100. C. Eisele, 11th & Roy. Philadelphia. 

German ivy. R. C, 50c 100; $4.00 1000. 
Cash. J. P. Cannata, Mt. Freedom, N. J. 



LANTANAS. 



Lantanas. Leo Dex and other varieties, 2-in., 
2%c. A. J. Baldwin, Newark, Ohio. 

LILY OF THE VALLEY. 

Lily of the valley pips, finest quality for early 
and late forcing. 

H. Frank Darrow, Box 1250, New York. 

Lily of the valley, selected stock, $1.76 100; 
$14.00 KOOO. 

^. N. Bruns, 1409 Madison St., Chicago. 

Lily, of the valley, select Berlin, $1.50 100; 
$13.00 1000. 
. F. R. Plerson Co., Tarrytown, N. Y. 

Lily of the valley pips, cold storage, $12.00 
1000. 
J. M. Thorbnrn & Co.. 33 Barclay St., N. Y. 

Lily of the valley for 'fall shipment. 

Julius Hansen, Plnneberg, Germany. 



LOBELIAS. 



Lobelia Etnperor, 2i^-in., fine,, bushy plants, 
$2.00 100. F. J. Prputy, Spencer, Mass. 

MANETTI STOCKS. 

strong, healthy, well rooted, English-grown 
Manetti, $4.00 1000. 

S. Bide & Sons, Farnham, Surrey, England. 

English Manetti for florists and nurserymen. 
H. Frank Darrow, Box 1250. New York. 

Manetti stocks, $8.50 1000. 

Elizabeth Nursery Co., Elizabeth, N. J. 



MINT. 



Spearmint, 3-ln. rooted slips, $1.50 per 100; 
$10.00 per 1000. Cash. 

M. Molenaar, 7112 Indiana Ave., CMcago. 



MOONVINES. 



Moonvlnes, strong plants, $3t50 per 100. 

John Heidenrelch, Indianapolis, Ind. 

MUSHROOM SPAWN. 

Lambert's pure culture qiushroom spawn has 
never failed to run. Practical instructions on 
mushroom culture mailed free if you mention 
The REVIEW. 
American Spawn Co., St. Patil. Minn. 

High-grade mushroom spawn always on band. 
Johnson Seed Co., 217 Market St., Pblla., Pa. 

NASTURTIUMS. 

Double nasturtiums, rooted cuttings, $1.75 per 
100; 2 1/4 -in. plants, $3.00 per 100. Cash. 

Hudson Greenhouse, Hudson, Mich. 

An offer of your surplus stock, placed In THE 
REVIEW'S classified advs., will be seen by 
nearly every buyer in the trade. 

NURSERY STOCKS. 

Weeping mulberries, strong, l-yr.-old heads, 
grafted, 5 to 6 ft., $45.00 per 100. 

Aralla Japonica, 4 to 6 ft. high, $20.00 per 
100; e to 8 ft. high, $26.00 per 100. 

Catalpa Bnngei, 2 and 3-yr. beads, grafted, 
7 ft. high. $40.00 per 100. 

Lilac Charles X, on own roota, 4 yrs. old, 
3 to 4 ft., $18.00 per 100; 4 to 6 ft., $20.00 
per 100. 

Barberry Thnnbergii, 6 yrs. old, good, beavr 
stock, 2M, to 3 ft., $25.00 per 100. 

Privet Amurense, bushy plants, 4 to 5 ft,, 
$25.00 per 100; 3 to 4 ft., $18.00 jer 100. 
Kleotn's Nurseries, Arlington Heights, 111. 



ORCHIDS. 



Laella anceps, fine plants, $4.00 doz., $25.00 



le p 
paid. 



per 100. Carriage pal 

J. A. McDoweU, Ap. 167, City of Mexico. 

Orchids. A large importation in perfect con* 
dltlon Just received. 
Carrlllo & Baldwin, Secaucus, N. J. 

Orchids, established and seml-establlsbed. 
Julius Roehrs Co., Rutherford. N. J. 

Orchids for spring and summer delivery. 

A. Held. 1119 William St.. NeW York. 

Orchids, all varieties. 

Lager & Hnrrell, Summit, N. J. 



PALMS, ETC. 



Areca lutescens, cocos, kentla, phoenix and 

pandaniis. See display adv. for varieties and 
prices. 

Wlttbold Co., 1657 Buckingham PI., Chicago. 

Kentla Forsteriana, Belmoreana, Cocos Wed- 
delliana, all sizes. See display adv. for prices. 
Q. Aschmann, 1012 Ontario St., Phlla. 

Livistona rotundifolia, well-leaved and clean, 
$6.00, $9.00 and $12.00 per doz. 
1 Julius Roehrs Co.. Ruther ford, N. J. 

We hav'(^ some fine specimen kentias and other 
decorative plants. 
Bobbink & Atkins, Rutherford, N. J. 

PandanuK Veitchll, all sizes, $1.00 to $2.00 
each. J. W.. Young, Germantown, Pblla., Pa. 

Palms and decorative plants. 

Cbas. D. Ball, Holmesburg, Phlla., Pa., 

PANSY PLANTS. 

Pansies, young transplanted stock, 50c per 
100, by mail; by express, $3.00 per 1000. Un- 
transplanted stock, $2.00 to $2.50 per 1000. 
Larger plants, ready to bloom, $5.00 per 1000. 
Splendid colors and largest blooms. Grown in 
cold (sash) bouses. Cash with order. 
E. Fryer, John stown. Pa. 

Pansies, fall transplanted, in bud and bloom. 
English, French,. Trlmardeau, Mme. Perret, 
Odier, etc., all shades and colors, $1.26 per 
100; $10.00 per 1000. Young plants, $4.00 per 
1000. F. A. Bailer. Bloomington, 111. 

Pansies, frame-grown. Good, strong plants 
of the finest blends of Florists' international 
mixture, $4.00 per 1000; 50c per 100. 
N. E. Beck, Massilton. O. 

Pansies, cool-grown. Prize strain of Bugnot'a, 
Cassler's or Odler's, large, transplanted plants, 
50c per 100; $3.00 per 1000. 
Samuel Whltton, 15-16 Gray Ave., Dtlca. N. Y. 

Fine, strong, healthy, field-grown pansies, 
Roemer strain, mixed or separate colors, $3.00 
per 1000; sample, 50c per 100. 
J. H. Krone, Jr., Fort Smith, Ark. 

Pansy plants, Perret and Trlmardeau strains, 
strong frame-grown, fine for Easter, $3.00 per 
100; $25.00 per 1000. Cash. 
Gustave Freytag, Hilltop Pi., West Orange, N. J. 

Pansies, fall and January seedlings, from a 
very expensive mixture, 50c per 100; $3.50 per 
1000. Mosbaek Gre enhouse Co., Onarga, 111. 

Pansy plants, fall transplanted, grown in cold 
frame, $1.00 per 100; $8.50 per 1000. 
A. R. Knowles, Bloomington. 111. ' 

Royal exhibition pansies, frame-grown, $3.00 
per 100. Jas. T. Baker, Bustleton, Phlla., Pa. 

PELARGONIUMS. 

Pelargonium peltato zonal, 25c ea. ; $2.60 dos. 
R. Vincent Jr. & Son, White Marsh, Md. 



PEONIES. 



Fancy peonies, heeled in in sand, extra cheap. 
Strong divisions of 2 to 4 eyes, all colors, 16c to 
25c each. Mixed pink, 8c; mixed red, lOo. 
Varieties are given in display adv. 

Peterson Nursery; Lincoln & Peterson Ares., 
Chicago. 

Choice mixed single and double seedlings 
from our noted collection of over three hundred 
varieties, strong, undivided clumps, $6.00 per 
100. Mt. Desert Nurseries, Bar Harbor, Me. 

O. S. Harrison, York, Neb. Splendid lot of 
peonies and perennials. Send 25c for new up-to- 
date nursery manual. Just out. 

Wholesale grower of peonies. List of 100 
varieties. J. F. Rosenfleld, West Point, Neb. 

Peonies, leading kinds, $1.50 doz.; $10.00 100. 
F. A. Bailer, Bloomington, 111. 

Peonies, 1200 sorts. Greatest list anywhere. 
C. Betscher, Canal Dover, Ohio. 

Peonies, finest double named, 9c. List free. 
W. H. Salter, Rochester, N. Y. 

Chinese peonies, double, swiet-scented. 
Johnson Seed Co., 217 Market. St., Phlla. 



PETUNIAS. 



Double petunias, best var., named, $1.25 100, 
prepaid; $10.00 1000; 2-ln.. $3.00 100. 

Hopkins & Hopkins, Chepachet, B. I. 



PLEASE MENTION THE REVIEW WHEN WRITING ANY OF THESE ADVERTISERS. 



.i-vj..^.,. ..,:>. ._..„.-: ...v,.' '-■— '— -^-'iii'iii.iiiitiifl.ii'iiiiif'^jn-i I 



■t».. .L.«<^ *'-^'-.-'- 'w. ..'j.. jli^j 



'•3F^^f*<-o'yi^ar^'»7Sir"«',v7'-*/ ■ ''^y ^ "^^ .; '^^v -■<«?■ 



"^•4^ •■■ Tf'y^;J'r- T ~ .!• ,.'^'^flw:'v^*:=^* ; 



- ,"Wt"-T:iX",;^5j(-,- ai J y ,»f ^jy»f»- /j; .•;"-^-' 7-)p-^--" "iWHWju^'.s^-^-* .^^"^ 



March 14, 1907. 



ThcWeekly Rorists' Review. 



1305 



Petunia The Queen, strong plants, 2U-ln., 
11.60 doz.; $10.00 100; |90.00 lOOO. Ueady 
now. 

Tates Floral Co., Canajobarle, N. Y. 
Scranton Florist Supply Co., Scranton. Pa. 

Petunias, dble. red, white and pink, 2V4-ln-> 
only 3c. Hammerschmldt & Clark, Medina, O. 

Petunias, double, Dreer's strain, 2-ln., 3^c. 
A. J. Baldwin, Newark. O. 

Petunias, |1.25 100; flO.OO 1000. 

C. Humfeld, Clay Center, Kan. 

PHLOXES. 

Hardy Phlox 

Miss Llngard, 

the best white 

summer cut flower. 

Rooted cuttings that will bloom 

first season, $30.00 per' 1000. 

Cash. 

L. I. NEFF, PITTSBURG, PA. 

Twenty choice named varieties, strong, field- 
grown plants, $4.00 per 100; $30.00 per 1000. 
. Mt. Desert Nurseries, Bar Harbor, Me. 

Hardy phlox, best assortment, standard Tarie- 
tles, 2-year, field clumps, |3.00 per 100, 
John Stamm. Hutchinson. Kan. 

Hardy phlox, finest namied, field-grown roots, 
3c^ W. H. Sa lter, Rochester, N. Y. 

POINSETTIAS. 

We have to offer 2000 polnsettlaS, strong, 
healthy, dormant stock, at $6.00 per 100, or 
$60.00 per 1000. Chas. Frueh & Sons, 1116 
Hoyt Ave., Saginaw, Mich. 

PRIMULAS. 

Primula obconlca graudiflora, all colors. In- 
cluding pink and carmine, full of flowers, 2>4- 
In., $3.50; 3-ln., $4.00; 3%-ln., $5.00 per 100. 
Giant obconlca, new, 7 to 10 gigantic trusses, 
6 and 7-in. pots, 25c each, fine for Easter. 
Baby or Forbosl, 3-in., $5.00 per 100. Chinese, 
3-ln., $5.00 per 100, all full of flowers. 
^___ J. Sylvester. Florist, Oconto, Wis. 

Primulas. Chinese, 3V^-ln. pots, in full bloom, 
$8.00 per 100. Buttercup, 3V&-in. pots. In full 
bloom. $7.00 per 100. All plants are very 
strong. Carl Meier, Green Bay, Wis. 

Primula obconlca gigantea. strong plants In 
bud and bloom, 3-ln.. $4.00; 4-ln.. $7.00; 5-ln., 
$10.00 per 100. J. H. Gould, Middleport, N. Y. 

Primula obconlca, 4000 full of bud and bloom, 
fine for Easter sales, $4.00 per 100. Try them. 
Alonzo J. Bryan. Washington. New Jersey. 

Primula obc. gig., 3%-ln., bud and bloom, 6c. 
Hammerschmldt & Clark, Medina, O. 

Baby primroses. 2Vi-in., $2.00 100. 
Springfield Floral Co., Springfl}ed, O. 

Primula obconlca, 4-in., 75c doz. 

J. S. Bloom, Riegelsvllle, Pa. 



PRIVET. 



Privet Amurense, bushy, 4 to 5 ft., $25.00; 
8 to 4 ft., $18.00 100. 

Klehm's N urseries, Arlington Heights. 111. 

250.000 California privet, all sizes. Send for 
trade list. Valdesian Nurseries, Bostlc, N. C. 

California privet cuttings. $1.00 1000. 
Caddo Nurseries, Shreveport, La. 

California privet, 3 yrs., $30.00 1000. 
Willard H. Rogers, Mt. Holly, N. J. 

Privet cuttings. $1.25 1000. 
H. T. Jones. Elizabeth. N J. 

California privet, all sizes. 

J. T. Lovett, Little Silver, N. J. 

RESURRECTION PLANTS. 

, Resurrection plants. 30 to 35 cm. in dr., $2.00 
per 100, $15.00 per 1000. Carriage paid. 

J. A. McDowell, Ap. 167, City of Mexico. 

RHODODENDRONS. 

Hardy rhododendrons (R. maximum), sturdy 
clumps, 18 in. high, $6.00; 2 ft.. $9.00; 4 ft., 
$18.00; 6 ft., $24.00 per doz. 
L. F. Kinney, Kingston, R. I. 

Rhododendrons, bushy, leading forcing var., 
18 to 20 In. high. $9.00; 20 to 24 in., $12.00 
doz. Stwrs. & Harrison Co.. Palnesvllle, O. 

Rhododendron maximum and Kalmia latifolla, 
any size. Write for catalogue. 

Riverside Nursery Co., Confluence, Pa. 

ROOTED CUTTINGS. 

Alternantheras, 60c 100; $5.00 1000. Salvias, 
heliotropes, double sweet alyssum and cupbea 
(cigar plant). $1.00 100; $8.00 1000. Coleus, 
70c 100. Feverfew, $1.25 100. 

C. Humfel d. Clay Center, Kan. 

Coleus, 60c 100; $5.00 1000. Salvia Bonfire, 
75c 100; $6.00 1000. Other stock listed in dis- 
play adv. Mrs. J. L. Miller, Newark, O. 

Ageratums. 60c. Alternantheras. red and yel- 
low, 50c. Other stock is listed in display adv. 
Shlppensburg Floral Co.. Shlppensburg, Pa. 



Vinca var.. Salvia splendens, 90c. Hello- 
tropes, double petunias, $1.00. Other stock 
given in display adv. 

Byer Bros., Chambersburg, Pa. 

Rooted cuttings of coleus, ageratums, salvias 
and heliotropes. Prices are given In display adv. 
A. N. Pierson. Cromwell. Conn. 

Rooted cuttings, heliotropes, salvias, agera- 
tums, fuchsias, $1.00 100. 
C. Elsele, 11th & Roy, P hila., Pa. 

Rooted cuttings, best varieties. Express pre- 
paid. See displa.v adv. 

S. D. Brant. Clay Center, Kan. 

ROSES. 

AMERICAN BEAUTY 

Bench-grown plants for early delivery, 

$8.00 per 100; $75.00 per 1000. 

Brides, 2>4-lnch pots $3.00 100; $25.00 1000 

Maids, 21^-lnch pots 3.00 100; 25.00 1000 

Richmond, 2M(-lnch pots.. 3.00 100; 25.00 1000 
Chatenay. 2^-lnch pots... 3.00 100; 25.00 1000 
Uncle John, 2i^-lnch pots. 3.00 100; 25.00 1000 

Kaiserln, 2%-lnch pots 4.00 100; 35.00 1000 

WlETOlt BROS.. 51 Wabash Ave., Chicago. 

Roses, 2^-ln., $3.50; 3-ln., $5.00; 4-in., 
$8.00 100. 

Bride Wootton 

Maid Soupert 

Helen Gould Gruss an Teplitz 

Bon Sllene Safrano 

Dachess de Brabant 

American Beauty, 2-ln., $5.00; 2^^-in., $6.50; 
3-ln., $8.00 per 100. Cash with order. 

Marshall Floral Co., Marshall, Mo. 

Roses. Baby Ramblers, the strongest, dor- 
mant budded stock in the country, $25.00 per 
100; 2-year, No. 1, own root, $15.00 per 100; 
1-year, No. 1, own root, $12.00 per 100; 2%-ln. 
pot plants, $4.00 per 100. 250 plants for $7.60; 
4-ln. pot plants. In bloom, March and April, 
$15.00 per 100. 
Brown Bros. Co., Rochester, N. Y. 

We are now booking orders 

For early delivery 

GRAFTED AND OWN ROOT ROSE PLANTS 

Bride, Maid, Kaiserln, Carnot, 

Wellesley, KiUarney and Richmond. 

Send for prices. 

W. H. ELLIOTT, Brighton, Mass. 

New hybrid tea rose, QUEEN OF SPAIN, 
grand flesh color, seedling from Antoine Rivoire, 
ideal exhibition rose, robust grower. Strong 
plants in pots, $1.20 ea.; $15.00 for 13 plants; 
$55.00 for 50; $100.00 100. 

S. Bide & Sons. Farnbam, Surrey, England. 

Rose plants. 

100 1000 

Carnot $4.00 |35 

Kaiserln . . . 4.00 "" 
Chatenay .. 3.00 



100 1000 
Richmond . .$3.00 $25 

35 Perle 3.00 25 

25 Gate 3.00 2S 



Bell Miller, Springfield, 111. 



Roses. Bride, Bridesmaid, Golden Gate, Ivory, 
Kaiserln, 2-in. pots, thrifty plants. $3.00 per 
100. $25.00 per 1000. Rooted cuttings of Bride, 
Maid and Ivory, $1.50 per 100. 

Wm. B. Sands. Lake Roland, Baltimore, Md. 

We offer some DECIDED BARGAINS in fleld- 
grown roses. You will find It to your advantage 
to look up our display adv. The stock is first- 
class. California Rose Co., Pomona, Cal. 

Own root roses. 2 yrs. C. Ramblers, $7.00. 
Dorothy Perkins, P. W. and Y. Ramblers, $5.00. 
H. P. roses and Baby Ramblers. $8.00 100. 
Gilbert Costlch, Rochester. N. Y. 

Roses, strong, healthy cuttings and pot 
plants. Young stock, leading varieties. Prices 
are given In display adv. 
Poehlmann Bros. Co.. Morton Grove. 111. 

Grafted roses. Our list includes only the most 
profitable commercial varieties for forcing. See 
display adv. tor prices. 

Jackson & Perkins Co., N ewark, New York. 

The beautiful new pink rose, MISS KATE 
MOULTON, is the queen of all pink roses. 
Write us about it. 

Minneapolis Floral Co., Minneapolis, Minn. 

Field-grown roses, low-budded. 2 yrs. old, well 
rooted. A list of varieties and prices is given 
In display adv. 
F. Ludemann, Baker St.. San Francisco, Cal. 

Strong, well-rooted heel cuttings of Bride. 
Maid, Perle, Kichmond. $1.25 per 100; $10.00 
per 1000. E. B. Sage. Foster Brook. Pa. 

Grafted roses. Kaiserln, Bride, Maid. Kil- 
lamey, Richmond, $120.00 1000'. March delivery. 
Robt. Scott & Son, Sharon Hill. Pa. 

Roses, 1000 Kaiserln, 3%-in. pots, strong 
plants, $5.00 per 100; $50.00 per 1000. 
John Pickering, Troy. N. Y. 

Roses for Decoration day. Pot now. List of 
varieties and prices is given In page adv. 

A. T. Boddlngton. 342 W. 14th St.. N. Y. 

Roses. Brides and Maids, well rooted cut- 
tings, $1.50 per 100; $12.50 per 1000. 
Weiland & Ollnger. New Castle. Ind. 

Roses, rooted cuttings and bench plants. See 
display adv. for varieties and prices. 

Geo. Reinberg, 35 Randolph St.. Chicago. 

Roses, strong rooted cuttings, leading rarie- 
ties. See display adv. for prices. 

Peter Reinberg, 61 Wabash Ave., Chicago. 



Roses. Bride, 2-in., $2.25 per 100; or will 
exchange for bedding plants. 

Pa ul O. Tauer. Lebanon, Ind. 

Maman Cochet roses, white and pink, dormant 
stock, 4-ln., $10.00 per 100. 

John Stamm. Hutchinson, Kan. 

Roses, strong, dormant plants, suitable for 
forcing. Send for lUt. ., __ 

B ay State Nurseries. North Ablngton. Ma««. . 

Roses and all Holland grown, planU In choicest 
varieties. ^^^^ Parrow, Box 1260, New York . 

Rooted rose cuttings. Fine stock. See dto- 
Bas sett & Washburn, 76 Wabash Ave., Chicago. 

Low-budded roses. No. 1. fSS.OO: ,,^'?; \^' 
$65.00 1000. H. T. Jones, Elizabeth, N. J. 

Grafted roses. Our roses are the finest and 
best g rown'. J. L. Dillon, Bloomsburg, Pa. 

American Beauties, 2V<.-ln., *8 00 l^O- *'^$-'» 
1000 Chas. H. Totty, Madison. N. J. 

Hardy, field-grown roses, leading sorts, strong, 
8e. W. H. Salter. Rochester, N. Y. . 

Dog briar, 3 to 5 mm. ea., 6 marks per 1000. 
Julius Hansen. Plnneberg. Germany 



Roses, strong plants $3.00 100; $25.00 1000. 
Storrs & Harrison Co., Palnesvllle, O. 



Rose plants on own roots. Send /or^H'J' . 
^ C. M. Niuffer. Springfield, O. 



Hybrid roses. 2-yr.. field-grown. $12.00 100. 
Storrs & Harrison Co., Palnesvllle, O. 



Roses, rooted cuttings, $2.00 100; $15.00 1000. 
Chicago Carnation Co.. Jollet. 111. 



Roses, rooted cuttings. See display adv. 

Frank Garland. Des Plaines. HI. 



Roses, 2Mt and 4-ln. Write for prices. 

Springfield Floral Co., Springfield, O. 



Sport of Chatenay, 2%-ln., $25.00 100. 

Emll Glauber, Montclair, Colo. 



Roses. 2%-ln.. $4.00 100; $.'^5.00 1000. 
S cheiden & Schoos. 60 Wabash Ave.. CTtlcago. 

New pink rose, Aurora. Write 

'^ Paul Niehoff, Lehlghton. Pa. 



Leedle Co., 101 best sorts, Springfield. O. 



RUBBERS. 



Rubbers, top cuttings, out of 3% Str^g. 
healthy plants, ready for delivery, *J50O0„1000. 
In lots of 500 or less. $16.00 per 100; in lot« 
of 100 or less, $17.00 per 100. 

A. C. Oelschlg & Son, Savannah. Ga. 

Rubbers, strong plants, 4-ln.. 20c; 5-in., extra 
strong, 25c. Cash. 

Fu hlbruegge Bros.. Winona, Minn. 

Flcus elastics, 5-in.. 36c ea.; $4.00 doz. 
Wltttwld Co., 1657 Buckingham PI., Chicago. 



Flcus pandurata, 7-in., $2.50. 

Rose Hill Nurseries, New Bochelle. N. Y. 



SALVIAS. 



Salvias Bonfire and St. Louis. Rooted cut- 
tings, $1.00 per 100; $8.00 per 1000; 2-ln., 
$2.00 per 100. Cash. ^ „ , 

E. B. Randolph, Delavan. 111. 

Salvias, rooted cuttings and 2-ln., best new 
and old standard varieties. $1.00 and $2.00 per 
10 0. Mosbaek Greenhouse Co., Onarga. 111. 

Salvia Bonfire, R. C, prepaid, $1.00 100; 
express, 2-ln., 2ViC. . ^^, 
A. J. Baldwin, Newark, Ohio. 

Salvia splendens. Bonfire. 2-in., 2c. Caah. 
Byer Bros., Chambersburg, Pa. 

SANSEVIERIAS. 

Sansevlerlas, strong, $4.50 doz. 

C. Elsele, 11th & Roy. Philadelphia. 

SANTOLINAS. 

Santollnas, fine 2-in., $2.00 per 100. Rooted 
cuttings, fine plants from sand, $1.00 per 100. 
Cash with order, please. 

M. & S. L. Dyslnger. Albion, Mich. 

SEEDS. 

Primula seed should be sown now for Christ- 
raas flowering. We handle only the finest Eng- 
lish strains, and refer you to hundreds of satla- 
fled customers. See display adv. or our cata- 
logue for varieties and prices. If you haven't 
the catalogue, we should like to send you one. 

A. T. Boddlngton. 342 W. 14th St., New York. 

Headquarters for cauliflower and Tripoli, 
Crystal Wax and Bermuda onion seed, and all 
other vegetable seeds of unrivaled quality. All 
flower seeds grown on an enormous scale. Ask 
for wholesale catalogue. Dammann & Co.. San 
Giovanni a Teducclo. Italy. 

Vegetable, fiower and agricultural seeds. Mj 
specialties are Phlox Drummondll, and Lucerne 
of Provence (alfalfa). May I send you my 
catalogue? Jacques Rolland, Nlmes, France. 

Genuine Bermuda and Crystal Wax onion seed. 
Grown and exported by Wlldpret Bros.. Port 
Orotava, Tenerlffe, Canary Islands. 



PLEASE MENTION THE REVIEW WHEN WRITING ANY OF THESE ADVERTISERS. 



:k...i- .»-.l; .:, ^^,y .j^t, .^t, .,- !j ■■■ t. .^^j.. ...,.,-■,>.■ 



LjL.'^*.u.ao^.. 



, . .. ■: J^--^i^^\ '. 



^A^^ 



A'^.X.J2~I>'j1. <b>jr 1--^ 



, ^•'.■f. "iry^^tKiTr ^-r- '- '\ 



)306 



The Weekly Florists' Review^ - 



March 14, 1907. 



SEEDS— Continued. 



Seeds of palms, ferus, asparagus, callaa, 
cyclamen. Primula sinensis, tropical plants; 
wblte and red Bermuda onions, tlie true 
Tenerlffe seed. Send for illustrated wholesale 
catalogue. Albert Scbenkel, Seed Grower, Ham- 
burg, Germany. 

Vegetable seeds. Special stocks of seeds for 
early forcing in frames or greenbouses. We 
offer the best varieties. May we send you our 
catalogue? 

Watkins & Simpson, 12 Tavistock St., Covent 
Garden, Loudon, England. 

Cabbage seed. Genuine White Amager, $1.00 
lb. Improved Ked Danish and Brussels Sprouts,