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Full text of "Florists' review [microform]"

March 2, 1911. 



The Weekly Florists^ Review* 



9 



I THE RETAIL 



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THE VACANT CHAIR. 

The accompanying illustration is of- 
fered as an excellent example of a 
difficult design. The average vacant 
chair has two faults: it is apt to be 
shapeless, partly because of unskillful 
workmanship and partly because of the 
second fault — an attempt at too great 
elaboration. In this case the design 
was of sufficient size so that elabora- 
tion in the decoration did not obscure 
the outlines of the design; there was 
space for plain areas to contrast with 
the drapings, and the piece was on the 
whole tremendously effective. 

Instead of the usual wire frame, an 
ordinary green willow porch chair was 
used and mossed over, then covered 
solidly with Enchantress carnations, 
great care being taken to have the 
work smooth and even. With this 
groundwork in place, the design was 
ready for trimming. For this, cattleyas, 
roses, valley, sweet peas and lilies 
were used, with chenille cord and tas- 
sels on the arm and ribbon on the back. 
One of the merits of this piece was 
that it presented an equally good ap- 
pearance from all points of view. 

This chair was made by the Alpha 
Floral Co., Kansas City. 



THE SCIENCE OF FBICE. 



Placing a Value on One's Skill. 

While we may always have to sell 
flowers in bulk by the dozen or hun- 
dred, it does not follow that the price 
of a decoration or design shall be de- 
termined solely by the amount of stock 
which it consumes. If we ever expect 
to see floral decorative art take its 
place in the front rank with other de- 
partments of art, it will be when the 
majority of florists learn to place a 
value upon their work as work, and not 
as so many dozen flowers, so many 
pounds of moss and a frame. Then, 
when that happy day comes, he will no 
longer expect to value a funeral piece 
by dozens, pounds and hundreds only, 
any more than an artist would price 
his picture by the number of paint 
tubes, brushes and square feet of can- 
vas which were required to reproduce 
his ideal for other eyes. 

Eight here, however, we might as 
well understand that we must be able 
to put the art into our work before we 
can expect to get our money out of it. 
But somebody will suggest that he does 
not know how high a grade of work 
his productions are. In the first place, 
if his work is in the prevailing style 
and like everybody else's, he has not 
attained a rank higher than the man 
who can build a brick wall, no matter 
how perfectly he builds. But when 
he can add or take from, some notice 
may be taken of how he adds his orna- 
ments to the brick wall or opens a 
passage through it. 



A Tradesman, but Also an Artist. 

If I can construct a wreath after the 
common fashion and remain satisfied 
with it, I may -have learned my trade 
well, but I have not yet begun to learn 
my profession. But when I can re- 
move some of my flowers from the 
wreath, or bricks from the wall, and 
open a passage through to something 
beyond or opposite, or when I can add 
a flower or a leaf which shall cause 
my wreath to differ from what one Qtay 
see any day, anywhere, then I may 
be encouraged to believe that I have 



name some day, and, other things being 
equal, I shall reap the benefits finan- 
cially. ' 

A Picture in Flowers. 

At this point somebody will say, 
"But we take orders in advance. Peo- 
ple often do not see in advance what 
they are getting. They must have some 
idea of what to expect, some specifica- 
tions as to size and number." To be 
sure, they must. So must one when or- 
dering his portrait. Give him a gen- 
eral idea of what your plan is for 
him, but it is poor policy to promise 
so many dozens of one, so many dozens 
of another, so many inches of length 
and width to the piece. A good general 
description and some idea of the style 
and effect are all that can reasonably 
be demanded. 

Make the piece so that a spray or a 
group may have as ifluch value to the 
whole piece as a bit of drapery or a 
position of the hand may have to the 
portrait as a whole. In short, make a 
picture with your flowers as paint, with 
your stems as brush strokes, your con- 




Thc Vacant Chair de Luxe. 



taken a step in the upward path. When 
I pursue some plan of color distribu- 
tion which is any distance removed 
from hit or miss, I am at least a hope- 
ful, and may be classed as a profes- 
sional artist. I may make all kinds of 
unprofessional blunders, but if my 
courage holds out I shall deserve my 



structive flowers or foliage as back- 
ground, your lighter material as high 
lights, and your individuality as the 
•• little signature across the corner. Then 
let it sell for what it is worth in char- 
acter, in beauty of coloring, in skill of 
blending, in strength and beauty of ex- 
pression. This isn't as difficult as it 



10 



The Weekly Florists^ Review* 



WfW'^Fvr!''^^^''fW*^^^^-^ 



Makch 2, 1911. 



may seem. In every community there 
are people who appreciate the artistic 
touch and are glad to pay its price. 

Better Value with Fewer Flowers. 

Say, then, that you will decorate a 
room or one feature of it for so much, 
and do not bind yourself to a definite 
number of flowers or other materials 
of a certain grade. That will allow 
you an opportunity to use fewer, finer 
and larger specimens if it suits the pur- 
pose, or a larger number of smaller 
ones. If decoration is artistically done 
with reference to the place, not many 
will inquire about the number of flow- 
ers employed. In fact, impress upon 
them that they get better value in an 
artistic effect than in superabundance 
of material. 

All this takes for granted that your 
material is worth so much, your time 
so much and the wear and tear so 
much, added to the value of the pic- 
ture. In other words, do not make the 
selling price of the flowers and the 
making-up materials, added to the time, 
the only determining factors in esti- 
mating the price of work. All these 
things must be considered, but they are 
by no means the only ones. 

"But the other man won't do that." 
Well, probably he has the same opinion 
of you. At any rate, let him go his 
way. Big quantities, too much for the 
money, do not pay. It can not last in 
the long run. Gertrude Blair. 



THE WOBLD DESIGN. 

The accompanying illustration is re- 
produced from a photograph of a unique 
design made by the Fleischman Floral 
Co., Chicago, February 27. The design 
was ordered by the friends of John J. 
Bohn, publisher of the Hotel World, 
who was instantly killed by an auto- 
mobilie. The idea, of course, was to 
connect the name of the paper with the 
form "of the design, a reproduction of 
the world in flowers. George Wien- 
hoeber states that the piece was over 
seven feet high, the oceans on the 
sphere being made in white carnations, 
with violets for the continents. Every 
now and then a maker-up is compelled 
by the necessities of his business tD 
study the design of some society or 
other emblem, but in this case it seems 
a safe assertion that the florist had to 
get out his geography, for the design, 
though it shows only the western hem- 
isphere in the picture, was complete on 
both sides; the whole world was there. 



FEATUBING THE ACCESSOBIES. 

Every modern flower store carries in 
stock a great nuany things besides flow- 
ers, and upon the skill with which they 
are displayed depends to a large extent 
the volume of business done with the 
innumerable accessories which so en- 
hance the attractive qualities of the 
work turned out,- and which add so 
materially to the profit that is made in 




the operation of the store. In fitting 
up a flower store it is worth while to 
give considerable study to the facili- 
ties for the display of the accessories. 
You know the old proverb, "Out of 
sight, out of mind." Pause long enough 
to give a thought to the fact that the 
old saw applies to yourself and your 
clerks as well as to your customers; 
^lesmen are as prone as others to for- 
get. Whatever you have to sell, it 
should be kept in sight — in sight of 
everyone and all the time. 

The illustration on the opposite page 
was prepared from a photograph made 
recently in the new store of C. P. Muel- 
ler, Wichita, Ean., who has achieved 
two worthy ends in his effort to make 
things handy as well as up-to-date. In 
the first place, he has an attractive es- 
tablishment, one that would be a credit 
to a much larger town than Wichita, 
but a no less im,portant fact is that he 
has so arranged his store that the 
basket^, vases, jardinieres, pot covers 
and ribbons are where clerk and cus- 
tomer both have them in view — and 
seeing is believing in this as well as 
in other things. By all means keep 
your accessories attractively in sight — 
play them up and your use of them 
will increase, and with this increase 
will come added profit. 



THE BEGINNEB. 



The World in Flowers. 



I was much interested in the paper 
published in The Review, by S. S. Ski- 
delsky, entitled "Are We Progressive?" 
especially in the question he raises 
about the would-be florist. There is no 
doubt that there is a common delusion 
that there are tremendous profits to be 
made in the growing of flowers that in- 
duces many small capitalists, who have 
absolutely no knowledge of the subject, 
to go into the business; most of them 
after a few years sell out at probably 
one-third to one-half the original cost; a 
few struggle along and by hard work 
manage to make both ends meet. This 
constant flow of capital into the busi- 
ness, for which there is no adequate re- 
turn, must tend to reduce the profits of 
the legitimate grower. 

It does not follow, because a man 
has succeeded in raising a few plants in 
his own little greenhouse or hotbeds, or 
because he has, or thinks he has, a love 
for flowers, that he is competent to 
grow stock for market. If this man 
wishes to become a florist, there are 
opportunities offered in private estab- 
lishments, which work would probably 
suit him better. Is there any other pro- 
fession in which the ways and means 
are so easily accessible to the public as 
the florists'? Could not a more definite 
line be drawn between private and com- 
mercial horticulture? I do not think 
we require horticultural schools so much 
as schools where commercial growing 
can be taught. Why do not some of our 
best growers take pupils? We seem to 
have plenty of colleges, presided over 
by learned professors, which is all very 
well for the private gardener. I believe 
horticultural schools for young men, 
who are not and never have'worked at 
the business, only tend to increase the 
number of incompetents. They get 
chock full of theory, and when they 
start at the practical work they expect 
to begin too high up, without having a 
thorough knowledge of small details, 
which, in this business, is one of the 
chief factors which go to make suc- 
cess in growing; also it tends to make 
them forget the hard work, even 



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March 2, 1911. 



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ThcWeekly Florists' Review. 



11 




The Modern Flower Store Provides for the Attractive Display of the Accessories. 



drudgery, connected with it, which, no 
matter how learned a man may be, has 
to be performed by everyone in most 
commercial establishments. I have 
failed to find or know of any one who 
can recommend one comprehensive and 
really practical work from the market 
growing standpoint on the science of 
the soil. I am as anxious as any one to 
learn and improve my knowledge in this 
line, but where are you to turn to. find 
really reliable instruction? How many 
of our growers have ever had a com- 
plete analysis made of their soil, and, if 
they have, know how to make practical 
use of it in the growing of various 
crops? I should like to see some letters 
on these subjects in the columns of 
The Review by more able men than I, 
who am only a working florist. 

F. Williams. 



A great many people will differ with 
the idea that those who go into the 
florists' business should first gain a com- 
prehensive knowledge of its details. The 
fact is that until recent years few of 
those who made a start in the trade had 
any special knowledge of it. They sim- 
ply made a start and worked out their 
own salvation. Nor will there be agree- 
ment that those who make a start and 
then drop out reduce the profits of the 
established florists. The man who isn't 
making any too good progress is in no 
position to undersell — not for long. The 
consumption of plants and flowers is in- 
creasing far too rapidly to have the 
.mere presence of a few beginners affect 
its profits to any appreciable extent. 



GIGANTEUM LILIES. 

What is the matter with my giganteum 
lily bulbs? I sent my order in early to 
one of the most reliable houses in the 
country, but did not receive the bulbs 
until November 3, when they were at once 
potted and placed on a bed of cinders 
under a bench, where there is no drip, 
in a house run at a temperature of 40 
to 45 degrees and covered with excelsior. 
I have been careful about watering, so 
as not to get them too wet. They are 
only slightly rooted and have not shown 
any signs of top growth. Under the same 
bench and with exactly the same treat- 
ment I have some Formosa and Harrisii 
potted at the same time and they are 
three inches high and finely rooted. 
Kindly advise me what to do to get the 
longiflorums in for Easter. I can give 
any temperature from 35 to 90 degrees. 
I have grown lilies for five years and 
have not failed to have fine lilies and 
on time too. E. W. H. 



growths have appeared above the ground. 
Then move them into a house run at 60 
to 65 degrees at night and you will have 
your plants in nice shape. They will 
be too late for Easter unless you can 
count the buds early in March. If 
late, better carry cool for Memorial 
day than bring in just after Easter, 
when demand is slow. 



The bulbs of Lilium longiflorum gigan- 
teum are always later in arriving than 
other varieties of the Easter lily. L. 
Harrisii and Formosa L. longiflorum are 
both naturally much earlier and are re- 
ceived in the United States two to three 
months earlier than the giganteums, and 
the fact that they had been dormant 
quite a long time before you received 
them would make them form roots and 
start to grow much more quickly than 
the later form. Your treatment for the 
giganteums has been quite right. Leave 
them where they are until the pots are 
well filled with active roots and the 



TO MAKE HYDRANGEAS BLUE. 

One of our customers writes us in- 
quiring what chemical to use and in 
what quantity to make Hydrangea pan- 
iculata grandiflora and Hydrangea ar- 
Borescens sterilis bloom blue. Can you 
give us any information? 

W. B. N. C. 



I do not know the method whereby 
H. arborescens and H. paniculata 
grandiflora can be made to produce 
blue, instead of white flowers. The 
more tender H. Otaksa, a Japanese va- 
riety, frequently produces blue instead 
of pink flowers. Some varieties of this 
are always blue. Some, again, will be 
pink under glass and blue if grown 
outside, and vice versa. Certain chem- 
icals in the soil are believed to cause 
the flowers to become blue. A little 
broken alum mixed with the soil when 
potting will assist in making the flow- 
ers blue. Other growers have found 
that the incorporation of iron filings 
in the compost produces similar results. 
I have no faith, however, in either 
alum, iron filings, or any chemicals 
turning the white varieties blue. 

C. W. 



> ":■ 



12 



The Weekly Florists^ Review* 



Maech 2, 1911. 




SEASONABLE SUGGESTIONS. 



For Outdoors. 

The present is a suitable time to 
make a sowing of sweet peas in pots 
for planting outdoors. These should not 
be placed in any artificial heat at all. 
A coldframe, which can be protected 
with mats and board shutters, is an 
ideal place for them. Stand the pots 
close together on a bed of clean cinders. 
Sow two seeds in each 3-inch pot and 
thin out to one, or five or six in a 4-inch 
pot and thin out to three. Never mind 
if the temperature in the frame falls to 
32 degrees, or even below it; no harm 
will come to the peas. As the seedlings 
germinate, keep them well aired, and be- 
fore planting-out time arrives remove 
the sashes entirely during the day and 
on mild nights. Planting out can be 
done any time from the middle of April 
until the beginning of May. Plant 
those from 3-inch pots a foot apart and 
the 4-ineh ones eighteen inches apart 
in the rows. It is better to have the 
brush or other supports in position be- 
fore setting out the little plants. Closer 
planting than recommended is not ad- 
visable, as at the distances named the 
plants will make strong haulm and soon 
cover the supports. They will also 
carry much finer flower stalks than 
when planted more closely. Of course, 
the ground in which they are planted 
should be rich and well prepared. It is 
a mistake to start the plants in heat. 
They will come along faster, but never 
prove so satisfactory as those raised in 
cooler quarters. 

A small selection of good outdoor va- 
rieties is as follows: White, Dorothy 
Eckford, White Spencer; lavender, Asta 
Ohn Spencer, Frank Dolby; orange 
pink, Helen Lewis, Miss Willmott; 
pink. Countess of Spencer; blush, Mrs. 
Eoutzahn Spencer; scarlet and crimson, 
King Edward VII, John Ingman; blue 
and purple, Navy Blue, Lord Nelson. 
As a general rule the light pink, orange 
pink, white and lavender shades are in 
the best demand. Anyone planting 
mixed seed is away behind the times. 
There are few customers who want mix- 
tures and they are unsalable in the 
flower markets. Plants started at once 
in pots will give flowers ten to four- 
teen days ahead of the earliest outdoor 
sown ones and better flowers at that. 

Under Glass. 

The later sowings of sweet peas are 
now growing rapidly and will soon have 
flowers opening. With the increasing 
sunhcat and longer days, it is now pos- 
sible to ventilate much more freely. 
Avoid, however, anything in the nature 
of cold drafts. In March we frequently 
get a day which starts out hot; soon a 
black cloud will start a snow squall, 
with alternate sunshine and cloud the 
re^ of the day. It is necessary under 



these conditions to watch the venti- 
lators closely, or mildew will get a start, 
and is not easily eradicated. Preven- 
tion is much better and easier than 
cure. With the plants growing so fast, 
the work of stringing and fastening 
them up will need constant attention 
and must never be neglected, as once a 
stem gets bent the flowers are unsalable. 
Houses which are now in full crop 
should have more feeding now, either in 
the form of liquid manure or top-dress- 
ing of cow or sheep manure lightly 
pointed in with a fork. A dressing of 
fine bone, scratched in, is also good. 
Maintain a night temperature of 48 to 
50 degrees and the plants will enjoy it. 
It is a great error to run them at 55 de- 
grees. You may get longer stems, but 
the flowers are softer and do not stand 
up like the cooler grown ones. 



SHAMBOCKS. 

Can you tell me how and when to 
plant shamrock seeds and what care 
to give them in the greenhouse, or out 
in the ground? J. E. W. 



The only time when shamrocks are 
in demand is March 17. It is, of course, 
much too late to secure plants from 
seed now for that date. The seed should 
be sown during October or November, 
in shallow flats in a house kept at 
about 45 degrees at night. When suf- 
ficiently large to handle, prick out in 
other flats and later pot singly, or place 
several plants in small pans. Always 
grow them in full sun and not in any 
temperature exceeding 50 degrees, 5 
degrees lower being better. C. W. 



FOBCING SHBUB BLOOM. 

How long does it take to bring dor- 
mant branches of apple, plum and 
cherry into blossom? We are figuring 
on a decoration for a millinery opening. 

M. & J. 



From two to three weeks in a tem- 
perature of 65 degrees at night will be 
required. Place the branches in a good 
bulk of water and spray freely until 
the flowers start to expand. Forsythia 
will open within two weeks. The ap- 
ples, pears and cherries require a few 
days longer. • C. W. 




SEASONABLE SUGGESTIONS. . 



Propagating. 



Increasing sunlight, longer days and 
the fact that the cuttings are getting 
longer, all serve to warn the chrysan- 
themum grower that he must be getting 
his stock under way for the year 1911. 
If the cuttings are leggy they can be 
topped, leaving about six to ten inches 
of stem, and later these stems will 
throw out an abundance of quite good 
shoots, though the ideal cutting is one 
that is taken from the base of the 
plant and is called a sucker. 

It is assumed that these stock plants 
are growing in a cool house. A tem- 
perature of 40 degrees, with lots of 
light, suits the chrysanthemum fairly 
well. 

If one desires to grow his plants ex- 
ceptionally well, stock of all the slow 
kinds should be in the sand as soon as 
possible. This would include such 
varieties as Beatrice May, A. J. Bal- 
four, October Frost and others of. the 
early varieties, October Frost is not a 
slow growing variety, but it should be 
gotten under way in good season, be- 
cause one must secure an early bud on 
it in order to get a heavy, full flower. 
It is quite impossible to plant October 
Frost from a June cutting and then 
expect a good flower. Some good grow- 
ers take cuttings from their plants in 
November or December, as soon as they 
are through flowering, and these, when 
potted up and benched in the new year 
and afterward planted out in a light. 



airy bench, soon throw an abundance 
of nice, healthy cuttings for late spring 
propagating. 

One Cause of Failure. 

The grower who sticks his stock 
plants under the bench and keeps them 
there until this season of the year, 
always invites failure and nearly al- 
ways meets with it. Where the stock 
plants have been growing cool and. 
hardy and the cuttings are hard, there 
will be practically no loss in the sand 
bed, with reasonable treatment. Where 
the cuttings are soft, they will simply 
melt away in most cases when propa- 
gating begins. 

A sand temperature of 50 degrees ia 
ample, and we find in this season of 
the year that if cuttings in a north 
house receive a good soaking when. 
they are put in the sand, this is gen- 
erally enough water to carry the cut- 
tings until they are rooted and ready 
to come out. When one is propagating 
in a house that is more or less exposed 
to the sunlight and has more ventila- 
tion, it is, of course, a different proposi- 
tion, and cuttings in such a position 
would stand spraying almost every day. 

The process of separating the cut- 
tings is well known to almost every 
grower and consists merely in removing 
the bottom leaves of the cuttings and 
shortening back the tips of the upper 
ones. This permits setting the cut- 
tings closer in the bench and gives the 
air a chance to circulate through them, 
thus lessening the possibility of loss 
by damping. • Chas. H. Totty. 



March 2, 1911. 



The Weekly Florists' Review. 



18 




FEBTILIZINO THE FIELD SOIL. 

I am seeking a little of your valuable 
advice about the planting of carna- 
tions in the field. I sowed the land 
last fall with rye, so as to plow it under 
this spring to serve for manure. Farm 
manure is not obtainable in this sec- 
tion and I have been thinking of put- 
ting bone meal on after it is plowed 
and then harrowing it in. How much 
bone meal per acre would you advise 
me to use? Any other advice would 
be gladly welcomed. A. C. W. 



Be careful that you do not overdo the 
fertilizing of your carnation field. There 
is danger of starting stem-rot by having 
it not in the proper state of decomposi- 
tion. The green crop which you are in- 
tending to turn under this spring would 
be all that I would advise for this 
spring. If you have a lot of wood 
ashes it would be a good idea to put on 
a good sprinkling of it before you har- 
row, instead of the bone. If you need 
more fertilizer on the field, and you 
cannot get stable manure, I would ad- 
vise you to get ground sheep manure 
instead of bone. Plow the field late 
next fall, after you have dug all the 
carnations. Then put on the sheep ma- 
nure at the rate of about two tons to 
the acre and harrow it in slightly. Be 
sure this fall plowing is deep. In the 
spring plow only moderately deep, so 
the manure, will not be worked down 
too deep. 

I might add that it is not considered 
wise to make your field soil too rich. 
You do not want a rank growth in the 
field, and if your soil is moderately rich 
in plant food, so that the plants will 
make a moderate growth, it is better 
than if it were extremely rich. The soil 
in your benches should be a great deal 
richer than that in the field, as that is 
where you want the strong growth. 

A. F. J. B. 



NAME or CAENATION. 

We are sending you under separate 
cover a carnation bloom which was 
taken from an odd plant that is among 
a bench of our Rose-pink Enchantress. 
We consider it something special, for 
it is a strong grower and free bloomer. 
I have taken from it seven blooms and 
forty-eight cuttings and there are five 
flowering shoots left on the plant. 
Please give me the name of the variety. 

A. M. B. 



The plant that is mixed with your 
Rose-pink Enchantress is Afterglow. 
This is a good record for that variety, 
and if you succeed in getting as good 
results on an average per plant next 
season you will find it highly profitable. 
It will give you a high quality of bloom, 
but most growers have found it hardly 
prolific enough in flowering. 

A. F. J. B. 



AMERICAN CAENATION SOCIETY. 



Department of Registration. 

William Kleinheinz, of Ogontz, Pa., 
has registered Carnation Miss Dimple 
Widener, Mrs. Thos. Lawson x Lady 
Bountiful; scarlet; size, three and one- 
half inches; clean grower; free bloomer; 
long, stiff stems and free from disease; 
never splits and every flower comes 
perfect. 

Entries for the Boston Show. 

Members of the American Carnation 
Society will please bear in mind that 
all entries for the Boston show should 
be in the hands of Secretary A. F. J. 
Baur, Indianapolis, Ind., by March 18; 
$2 will be charged for each entry made 
after that date. 

Only members of the A. C. S. are 
eligible to compete in the general car- 
nation classes, excepting section G. If 
you are not a member, send in your ap- 
plication now or when you forward 
your entries. Include $3 to cover the 
first year's dues and entrance fee. The 
fact that you may not be a member 
now need not prevent you from compet- 
ing at the show, but you must become 
a member before your entries will be 
accepted. 

Send for a premium list. Copies have 
been mailed to all members. 

In section H, class 51, the donors re- 
quest that the requirement of five 
inches in size be omitted. The $25 gold 
medal or $25 in gold will be awarded 
to the twelve largest blooms, one or 
more varieties, regardless of size. Make 
a note of this. 

Members of the A. C. S. may now 



secure membership buttons. , A wide 
distribution is desired. The price is 75 
cents. When you send in your dues, 
just add 75 cents for one of these 
buttons. • 

Why not send in your dues now, and 
thereby save the secretary some work 
at the convention? 

A. F. J. Baur, Sec'y. 

THE SOIL OR THE FERTILIZER? 

I am sending you a sample of soil 
from our benches, in which we are try- 
ing to grow roses, carnations, violets, 
lettuce, etc. Will you kindly let us 
know whether it is a suitable soil for 
this purpose, as well as for a full line 
of pot plants? 

I also enclose a sample of a fertilizer 
which we have used on this soil. The 
advertised analysis of the fertilizer is 
as follows: Animal ammonia, 6.5 per 
cent; nitrogen equivalent, 5.85; animal 
phosphate, 1.8; phosphoric acid, 8.26; 
pure potash, 3,0. When used as a top- 
dressing, it creates a mold on the soil, 
and young stock planted in soil in 
which this has been used damps off. 
We have to buy all our soil each year, 
and this is what was delivered last 
year. Our stock is not in the best of 
condition; the plants do not seem to 
take hold and grow as they should, 
especially the roses. We have used 
liberal quantities of both cow manure 
and bone meal. If you can give me 
any information on this, it will be 
much appreciated. W. E. 

The sample of soil has not reached 
me, so I can say nothing about it. 

The fertilizer used, if the analysis is 
correct, should have no ill effect on 
plants. It would be advisable, how- 
ever, to refrain from using it on very 
young stock. By mixing it with twice 
its bulk of good sod, when using it as 
a mulch, it will be rendered safer. Cow 
manure is the safest and most suitable 
manure when it can be had pure, and 
by using it in the proportion of one 
part to four or five of soil good results 
can be obtained. Ribes. 




VALLEY IN COLD STORAGE. 

What temperature is correct for val- 
ley when held in cold storage? How 
should valley be treated upon being 
taken out of cold storage? What is the 
coldest the temperature can become be- 
fore it will hurt valley in cold storage? 
Would not injury be more likely to oc- 
cur if the temperature should run up? 

H. H. K. 

A temperature varying from 25 to 28 
degrees, but as near the latter figure as 
possible, is best. I have had good suc- 
cess in holding them at 26 degrees, but 
28 degrees seemed to give even better 
results. When taken out of cold stor- 
age, valley must not be at once placed 
in a warm, light house, or it will sus- 
tain great injury and will perhaps be 
rendered entirely useless for forcing. 



Thaw out in a cool cellar, shed or other 
building; if dark, so much the better. 

The temperature, if allowed to remain 
below 24 degrees for any considerable 
time, is liable to damage the pips. On 
one occasion a batch was held at 20 de- 
grees for an experiment, but one ex- 
perience of that kind suflSced. The 
greatest injury, of course, comes from 
the temperature running up. Lily of 
the valley in the open ground becomes 
active even when the temperature is 
below freezing, and if your cold storage 
temperature should rise and remain at 
32 degrees or even a degree lower for a 
few days, the pips would sustain injury. 

A fluctuating cold storage plant must 
be avoided. If you cannot keep an even 
temperature, it will be far better to 
purchase from some reliable firm which 
specializes in this class of valley pips. 

C. W. 



" T™'!^~TWr«.'*5i*" 



14 



The Weekly Florists' Review. 



March 2, 1911. 



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SEASONABLE 



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SUGGESTIONS 



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Azalea Mollis. 

The pale yellow and pink shades of 
Azalea mollis are in good demand at 
Easter; in fact, none of these azaleas 
are of the sour, unsalable shades. A 
period of six to seven weeks, in a 
temperature averaging 50 degrees at 
night, is ample to flower Azalea mollis. 
Its treatment differs little from that of 
the lilacs. As the flowers start to ex- 
pand, give them protection from the 
direct rays of the sun and be careful 
never to allow them to become dry. 
One drying out will completely spoil 
the flowers. 

Acacias. 

Acacia paradoxa, or A. armata, as it 
is commonly called, merely requires a 
cool house to flower it for Easter; 45 
degrees at night from this time on will 
suffice. None of the acacias will tol- 
erate forcing. It is also a mistake to 
get such varieties as A. armata in 
flower before Easter, unless there are 
special calls for it, as the little, cir- 
cular, pale yellow flowers soon turn 
brown and, when once they have turned 
this shade, it is quite a task to pick 
them over and make them salable. 
Acacias are among the most beautiful 
of Easter plants. Particularly charm- 
ing is the graceful A. pubescens, while 
heterophylla, Drummondii, Kiceana and 
others are all lovely. 

Amaryllis. 

As the amaryllis spikes advance, 
some liquid manure may advantage- 
ously be given to the plants, using it 
in moderate doses only, at intervals of 
four or five days. Amaryllis, when 
either growing or developing their 
flower spikes, enjoy a little bottom heat 
and always seem to thrive better where 
they can be plunged in leaves, cocoanut 
fiber or some other material. In the 
case of seedlings that are flowering for 
the first time, it is not good policy to 
allow more than one spike to develop. 
The bulbs frequently throw two spikes, 
the flowering of which would be a 
severe strain upon them. Leave a 
single spike and the flowers will be of 
much finer quality. Where the spikes 
are to be cut, it is better to do this 
before the first flower becomes fully 
expanded. Amaryllis are not easily 
packed without damage to the flowers, 
when fully opened. Seedlings sown 
early in the year should be potted off 
singly into 2V:.-inch pots when they 
show their second leaves. Use a light 
compost, containing two-thirds leaf- 
mold, at the first potting. 

Show Pelargoniums. 

Show pelargoniums should, where re- 
quired, now receive their final potting. 
Use a compost containing two-thirds 
fibrous loam,' one-third dry cow manure, 
also a dash each of sand and fine bone. 
Drain the pots efficiently and pot firmly, 
leaving a good margin for water. Con- 
tinue to grow the plants cool and airy 



and they will pay for it when they 
flower; 45 degrees is as high a night 
temperature as they need. Of course, 
they can be grown warmer, but are 
never so good. Green aphis is the arch 
enemy of the show pelargonium and 
must never be allowed even to show 
itself. We often see batches of these 
beautiful plants simply alive with 
aphis. The growers then give them a 
heavy smoking, which is likely to re- 
move the pests and flowers at the same 
time. Fumigate often in light doses. 
Keep the plants spread out and as 
light as possible, and on warm days 
give them a syringing. If they are 
treated thus, you will get nice, stocky 
plants, which will be creditable to you 
and satisfactory to your customers. 

Stevias. 

Of course you remembered to save a 
few old plants of stevia. If not, get 
some cuttings at once and place them 
in the cutting bench. There is, of 
course, still ample time in which to 
propagate them, but you can throw 
away the old plants when your cuttings 



are in, and get all the additional cut- 
tings you will need from them. The 
stevia is an old-fashioned flower, per- 
haps, and one which can be grown 
easily and inexpensively. It remains, 
nevertheless, one of the most useful of 
winter flowers, and no florist who has 
any local trade or design work can 
afford to be without it. 

Gardenias. 

Gardenia cuttings put in after Christ- 
mas should be well rooted and potted 
off before now. Use a moderately 
heavy loam for them and give small 
shifts at a time. A prime cause of 
the yellows, so often seen, is overpot- 
ting and overwatering. In benches the 
trouble is even more general than in 
the case of pot plants. Any growing 
in pots should be fed with chemical 
fertilizers, such as Clay's or Bon Ar- 
bor, in preference to liquid manure. It 
is the same with benches. If the soil is 
shallow and porous, there is little dan- 
ger of their getting sour at the root. 
Judicious top-dressings from this time 
on will keep a veritable network of 
active roots on the surface. The spray 
nozzle must be used twice a week to 
keep down mealy bug. Avoid drench- 
ing syringings directly out of the open 
hose. This soddens the soil and does 
more harm than good. Plants intended 
for late winter and early spring flower- 
ing will now be carrying a heavy crop 
of buds. There is now little danger 
of these falling. Chilly and too damp 
root conditions will, however, cause 
them to fall in showers. 



^^^m 



PEOPAGATma QEEANIUMS. 

My place is heated with a hot water 
system and the pipes are all under the 
benches. ^.Under 'ordinary conditions 
how long does it take a geranium cut- 
ting, put in a 2-inch pot, to root ^d 
be in a good condition to sell? How 
many stock plants should a person have 
to provide cuttings for a bench that 
will hold 10,000 2-inch pots, and keep it 
full? I have a good market, so can 
move them as soon as they have nice 
roots. Are stock plants best grown out- 
side or under glass in benches, or in 
pots? If in ^ots, what size? Also state 
what treatment I should give them 
through the summer. G. L. E. 

Under ordinary conditions geranium 
cuttings in 2-inch pots will make roots 
within four weeks and be fit to sell in 
six to seven weeks. They should have 
a little bottom heat; 60 degrees is suffi- 
cient, with a night temperature of 50 to 
55 degrees, and they should receive full 
sun all the time. 

Some specialists make extravagant 
claims about the quantity of cuttings 
they can secure from a single stock 
plant. Much, of course, depends on the 
kind of stock plant, its size and 
whether bench or pot grown. If you 
can spare bench room it is better to 



plant them out in four inches of soil. 
Then, again, some geraniums produce 
many more cuttings than others. I 
should say you would need 500 to l,00O 
stock plants; the smaller number would 
suffice if they were strong and in a 
sunny house. 

Plants grown under glass all the time 
are decidedly the best, but if you need 
the bench space in summer for other 
purposes you can grow in 7-inch or 
8-inch pots outdoors, plunging them to 
the brims in a bed of ashes. I would, 
however, much prefer indoor culture all 
the time. Cuttings produced under 
glass are harder and less liable to damp 
off than those taken from outdoor 
plants. 

If you are intending to start in the 
business another fall, I would recom- 
mend planting a bench with young 
plants about the time your bedding-out 
would be finishing. Use fibrous loam, 
fine bone and some well-spent old ma- 
nure. Too much animal manure pro- 
duces a soft, sappy growth. When 
propagating time arrives in early fall, 
you would have a splendid lot of cut- 
tings ready. The plants would need no 
sun, but should have plenty of air. It: 
is also better not to water as freely as 
vou would chrysanthemums or carna- 
tions. C. W. 



WWIWWjJ ' 'Tr'r-^T'^^Tr'^V'^r-'!^:: 



March 2, 1911. 



The Weekly Florists^ Review* 



15 



JACKSON DAWSON. 

Jackson T. Dawson, who January 7 
was awarded the George R. White 
medal of honor for eminent services in 
horticulture, has for a long term of 
years been one of the best known hor- 
ticulturists in New England. He is 
also well known all over the United 
States, as well as in Europe. He was 
born at York, England, in 1841. He 
came while a child to the United States 
and at the tender age of 8 years 
worked in the nurseries of an uncle 
at Andover, Mass. A few years later 
he went to Hovey's then noted estab- 
lishment at Cambridge, from which 
many new things were introduced. The 
Civil war found our friend fighting for 
the Union. He was twice wounded 
and has a leg which still reminds him 
of that terrible conflict. Even during 
the war he took an interest in the trees 
of the south, and sent many packages 
of seed home to Massachusetts. 

Mr. Dawson became well known to 
a large part of the public when it was 
stated that he had found a good sized 
colony of the real Scotch heather grow- 
ing wild. In 1871 he was offered a 
position under Francis Parkman, of the 
horticultural department of the Bussey 
Institution. In 1873 Prof. C. S. Sar- 
gent took the place of Mr. Parkman, 
and a little later assumed the director- 
ship of the Harvard Botanic Gardens. 
Mr. Dawson supplied him with many 
plants and thus familiarized himself 
with plants from all parts of the world. 
He became specially interested in the 
wild roses of Japan and started to 
hybridize them, obtaining as a result 
of his crosses such varieties as Dawson, 
the first of the rambler type raised; 
William C. Egan, Lady Duncan; Farqu- 
har, a popular variety; Arnoldiana 
Sargent and others. 

As a result of twenty-five years or 
more of labor the Arnold Arboretum 
has become one of the Meccas for all 
tree lovers in the New World, and 
every European arboriculturist makes 
it his shrine. Here are gathered to- 
gether, from all parts of the globe, all 
trees and shrubs which will withstand 
the winters of New England. All trees 
and plants in the Arboretum have, with 
few exceptions, been planted by Mr. 
Dawson. 

As a propagator he stands without a 
peer. He first showed nurserymen how 
to graft conifers. He was first to raise 
rhododendron seedlings in quantity un- 
der improved methods. Of these latter 
he now has some 20,000 in sixty varie- 
ties from China, introductions of E. H. 
Wilson's. He has grafted many hard- 
wooded trees, such as oaks, chestnuts, 
hickories, maples, etc. In an interview 
he said: "Eternal vigilance has been 
the secret of the success which has 
come to me. All the oaks, elms, ashes, 
catalpas, birches, beeches, conifers, 
junipers and the rest of the thousand 
and one varieties and species of trees 
and shrubs which we have here have 
been under my eye all the time through 
these years. In one year I collected 
50,000 native shrubs to plant in the 
Arboretum. I also collected all the 
laurels and yews." 

Prof. C. S, Sargent said: "Jackson 
Dawson seems to be able to look at a 
plant and tell you what its affinities 
are — that is, what it may be grafted 
upon. He is a real wizard in this line. 
He seems to know the art of grafting 
by intuition, what stock to use, in what 
condition to use it, and how to use it. 




Jackson Dawson. 



This knowledge and skill he has ac- 
quired by patient practice and by lov- 
ing the things with which he works. 
Plants seem to respond to affection 
and he has that affection in large meas- 
ure. In addition to the great numbers 
of trees and shrubs he has raised here, 
no one can tell how many hundreds of 
thousands he has sent to every part of 
the United States and to all the coun- 
tries of Europe." 

Mr. Dawson is a member of the 
Massachusetts Horticultural Society 
and has won many medals at its shows 
for his novelties. He is one of the 
original charter members of the Gar- 
deners' and Florists' Club, serving on 
the executive committee in 1888, as 
vice-president in 1892 and president in 
1893. His youngest son, Henry, oper- 
ates the Eastern Nurseries; an elder 
son, J. Frederick, is a member of the' 
firm of Olmsted Bros., the noted land- 
scape architects; one son, Charles J., 
who for some years was in the nursery 
business and also secretary of the Gar- 
deners ' and Florists' Club, is deceased. 
Two daughters, Mrs. Harold Blossom 
and Miss Laura Dawson, are living. 

Many visitors to the coming national 
show will remember Jackson Dawson 
well, and no doubt many of them will 
embrace the opportunity to see the 
Arnold Arboretum, which is beautiful 
even when vegetation is dormant. Mr. 
Dawson is 70 years of age, but few 
days elapse when he is not to be seen 
at his accustomed stand,^ caring for his 
thousands of seedling trees and shrubs, 
many of which will some years hence 
make wonderful additions to our gar- 
dens. W. N. Craig. 

Randolph, Vt. — H. M. Totman is re- 
modeling his store, adding to its 
attractiveness and improving his facili- 
ties for handling the trade. 



FINE THINGS NOTED BY KNIGHT. 

One of the choicest collections of 
twelve hybrid cypripediums ever exhib- 
ited was .staged by Mr. McKenzie, head 
gardener for E. B. Dane, at the spring 
Boston show last week. It consisted of 
some of the finest crosses and several 
of them exhibited for the first time in 
the United States. The names follow: 
Cypripedium aureum Virginale x Ac- 
tceus; Cypripedium x aureum Candida, 
a most beautiful tj'pe of light colored 
C. aureum; Cypripedium Leonidas mag- 
nificum, one of the darkest of Lathami- 
anum types; Cypripedium "Venus (in- 
signe Sandera? x niveum), carried two 
superb flowers, perfect creamy white; 
Cypripedium aureum Kox had five splen- 
did, well-developed flowers, the best type 
I ever saw; Cypripedium aureum Hyea- 
num, a large, bold flower, choice and 
scarce; Cypripedium Gay Gordon, ex- 
hibited for the first time in the United 
States, a cross between Thompsonianum 
magnificum and Lady Wimburne, the 
most magnificent hybrid I have ever 
admired; Cypripedium signatum car- 
ried seven magnificent flowers; Cypripe- 
dium Thompsonianum and Cypripedium 
Lady Wimburne completed this excel- 
lent group. 

What is acknowledged to be the larg- 
est specimen of Cymbidium Tracyanum 
in the world was exhibited by Mr. Har- 
vey, head gardener to Mr. Leeson, carry- 
ing fifteen spikes of perfect flowers, 
averaging twelve flowers to a spike. 

Dendrobium nobile Virginalis was in 
perfect form and its pure white flowers 
were admired. Thousands of people in- 
spected these groups with great interest, 
denoting that orchids are to become uni- 
versal favorites. The latter was ex- 
hibited bv W. C. Eust, gardener to Dr. 
C. G. Weld. Thomas Knight. 



'r^^^ 



:^«frfTw?iy??efjwp^*wwp^5f^^ 



16 



The Weekly Florists' Review^ 



March 2, 1911. 




rUMiaATION OF VIOIJITS. 

What effect would too much fumi- 
gating with tobacco dust have on Marie 
Louise violets? H. W. & S, W. A. 



Too much fumigating will hurt almost 
any plants, violets being no exception to 
the rule. The effect on Marie Louise vio- 
lets would be to cause a browning of 
the edges of the foliage and a bleaching 
of the color of the flowers. Many of 
the large commercial growers now use 
hydrocj'anic acid gas for fumigation, 
but this must be used with extreme 
caution. A safe method is to use 
one of the tobacco papers, which will 
injure neither foliage nor flowers and 
leave no unpleasant odor behind them. 
C. W. 

THE BEST VIOLETS. 

1 have been growing violets for a 
number of years, and thought of plant- 
ing new stock the coming season. Is 
Princess of Wales better than Cali- 
fornia? I see the former is recom- 
mended as a good violet. T have the 
California, but think that I should have 
new stock, as I have had the same 
plants for nine years. Is Lady Hume 
Campbell subject to leaf-spot, like 
Marie Louise? J. F. J. 



Princess of Wales is a much superior 
violet to California. The latter has 
been discarded for some years by most 
of the big specialists. You can obtain 
voung plants of this finest of all single 
violets from many advertisers in The 
Review a little later. If you once try 
it you will want no more California. 
All the single violets should be left out 
until they have had a few degrees of 
frost. 

Lady Hume Campbell is sometimes 
attacked by leaf -spot, but not so badly 
as Marie Louise. Many who failed 
with Marie Louise have good success 
with Campbell. The latter is of a paler 
color, however, than Marie Louise. My 
own opinion is that, for those who can 
grow it, there is no double violet which 
yet equals the old Marie Louise. 

C. W. 

PROPAGATION OF PETUNIAS. 

Will you tell me what is the trouble 
with my double petunias? When I make 
cuttings the old plant generally dies. 
The cuttings root well, but as soon as 
I cut again over one-half die. What 
temperature do they like? Do they want 
shade or plenty of light? I give them 
all the sun I can and plenty of water. 

J. J. K. 



Petunias root well in a bottom heat 
of 60 degrees, with a top heat of 50 to 
52 degrees. Any cutting bench suitable 
for carnations or chrysanthemums will 
answer equally well for petunias. A 
warm propagating bench, such as is 
necessary for coleus or alternantheras, I 



is unsuitable for petunias. Shade until 
rooted and for a few days after potting, 
until they become established; then give 
full sun and a temperature of 50 de- 
grees at night. Many of the cuttings 
on old petunias are blind. They can be 
rooted, but, like yellow marguerites, 
which often act similarly, they will 
never produce any growths, and if the 
tops are cut off that ends them. Before 
doing any propagating, it is a good 
plan to head back the plants somewhat 
and thus induce a crop of soft, succulent 
cuttings, which are more likely to give 
satisfaction. C. W. 



THE lERIOATOE FLOWEE POT. 

William Whitney Lewis, an architect 
in Boston, Mass., has invented and pat- 
ented a self -watering flower pot which is 
extremely simple in its construction and 
yet is so peculiar in some of its details 
as to challenge attention, if not approval. 

The invention is called the Joy-0 Irri- 
gator Flower Pot. As the illustration 
shows, it consists of a pot within a pot, 
and the interesting peculiarity of the in- 
ner pot is that the bottom of it is not 
perforated, as in common flower pots, 
but is made of a porous quality of clay, 
while the rest of the pot is thoroughly 
waterproof. 

"This inner, or plant-holding pot," 
Mr. Lewis says, "is made of the ordi- 
nary clay or any material suitably por- 
ous, but this pot is imperforate, and 
more or less of the walls of the pot are 




waterproofed on the exterior surfaces. 
The pot is enclosed in a reservoir of any 
material impermeable by water, and the 
water is supplied to the plant by soaking 
through the porous portion of the plant 
pot, the porous surface being, on the 
average, restricted to the bottom of the 
pot. Water also rises, by capillary at- 
traction, in the body of the upright 
walls of the pot, and is given off to the 
soil. One filling of the reservoir will 
water the plant for from eight to fifteen 
days, the length of time depending on 
the temperature, humidity of the atmos- 
phere, etc. The surface of the soil in 
the pot is never caked over, but is al- 
ways porous enough to admit air to the 
soil. The soil is r jt washed away from 
around the stem or roots of the plant, 
as in the usual methods of watering, and 
the plant receives a constant and suffi- 



cient supply of water without flooding 
of the roots. In the case of plants re- 
quiring much fertilizer, the lower por- 
tion of the pot may, previous to filling 
with soil, be packed to a reasonable 
depth with sheep manure or other fer- 
tilizer, which is slowly dissolved by the 
percolating water and carried to the 
plants. ' ' 

Conservative advocates of the different 
sorts of self-watering devices generally 
argue that these inventions, even if not 
always useful to a practical, expert flo- 
rist, may be helpful, nevertheless, to 
many of that same florist's customers, 
since the customers' methods of culture 
are less skillful than those of the flo- 
rist, and more in need of mechanical aid. 
A contrivance, it is maintained, that does 
not add anything to the success of an 
adept may greatly increase the success of 
an amateur. The action of a self -water- 
ing flower pot, even if not absolutely per- 
fect, may easily approach nearer to per- 
fection than the action — or inaction — of 
many unprofessional growers. And the 
conclusion of the argument is, that self- 
watering flower pots and the like may be 
ejefellent articles, therefore, for florists 
to keep in stock and sell to their patrons. 

In support of this opinion, mention 
might be made of the Illinois Heater & 
Mfg. Co., of Chicago, whose self-watering 
flower boxes have been extensively sold 
by florists. There is a good demand, too, 
for the metal reservoir vases, which also 
embody the self-watering principle and 
are intended for use on lawns, and in 
parks, cemeteries, etc. 

The inventor of the Irrigator Flower 
Pot, in describing his own experience 
with it, says again: "When the idea 
is first broached to those interested in 
flower growing, I am told that the plan 
is impractical for many reasons, but 
meanwhile the plants obstinately con- 
tinue to grow and flourish as we never 
before have had them do in the house. 
In fact, our previous want of success is 
what led my attention to the subject of 
the self -watering pot," 

As to the future possibilities that are 
involved in his invention, Mr. Lewis has 
this to say: "My patent covers the 
adaptation of the idea to window boxes, 
tubs for large plants, etc., and is by no 
means confined to the ordinary flower 
pot. I hope to induce florists to adopt a 
modification of the idea by which it 
would be possible to automatically re- 
plenish the water supply for an indefinite 
number of pots, so that the water would 
be supplied the year around with abso- 
lutely no work or attention on the part 
of the florist or his assistants. This 
would be a money-saving device that 
should be of great value in large con- 
servatories. ' ' 



GOOD VABIETTES OF ASTEES. 

What are the best varieties of asters 
for outdoor growing, and when should 
the seed be sown? What is the proba- 
ble number of plants to each ounce of 
seed? K. W. 



The varieties of asters are quite 
numerous. A few good sorts are: 
Dawn of Day, double white, the earliest 
of all to flower; Queen of the Market, 
procurable in a number of shades, early, 
of eirong branching habit, free flower- 
ing; American Branching, robust, large 
flowers, for late crops; Semple's and 
Vick's are excellent, vigorous strains 
for main or late crops; improved Vic- 
toria, Crego of Comet typo and peony 



March 2. 1911. 



.J»|i|PJ«|.l".. iwi ijiim ■J«|VJW i«l l>l''.l'"l"*t!>'" '■.W.J''"'!' IIJ^"" "" "'VVm'.'" IW <' •'.'■W '< 



The Weekly Florists^ Review. 



17 



flowered are other good varieties; Early 
WoD'ler, procurable in pink and white, 
flowers outdoors early in July and is a 
valaable early sort. For early flower- 
ing sow seeds under glass in March. 
Later sowings can be made at fort- 
nightly intervals, and during May the 
seed can be sown outdoors. The latest 
sowing should go in the first week in 
June. If restricted to three varieties, 
grow Queen of the Market, American 
Branching and Victoria. 

The number of plants an ounce of 
seed will produce depends on the qual- 
ity of seed and its treatment after sow- 
ing. If of good quality and intelli- 
gently sown, an ounce should give 
4,000 to 5,000 plants. In purchasing 
seed always secure the best; cheap 
aster seed will only give disappoint- 
ment. Select a sunny piece of ground 
for your plants. Manure at liberally. 
Aster.s naturally thrive best in a heavy 
loam, but will grow in almost any soil 
whicL in well enriched if they are kopc 
thoroughly cultivnteJ while growing. 
' C. W. 

MANDA'S POLYPODIUM. 

Polypodium Mandaianum came into 
the limelight at the national flower show, 
where it defeated two first-class nephrol- 
epis sports for the award as best new 
fern and later captured the gold medal 
offered for the best plant not then an 
article of commerce. The accompanying 
illustration shows a house of it at W. A. 
Manda's, South Orange, N. J. 

Polypodium Mandaianum originated 
at South Orange as a seedUng from Poly- 
podium aureum glaucum. It is a free 
grower under the ordinary treatment 
given ferns, with a temperature of 60 
degrees to 75 degrees. It can be grown 
in pots, or as a basket fern, or on boards, 
like a staghorn fern. The fronds grow 
up to three feet in length and become 
beautifully fringed, a peculiar glaucous 
blue in color. 

At the nation£Q flower show it waa 
said, perhaps as a joke, that possibly the 
judges made their award to this new 
polypodium as a means of gracefully 
sidestepping the unwelcome task of choos- 
ing between two fine nephrolepises, but 
there can be no question that public and 
private conservatories all will want 
Polypodium Mandaianum as soon as thej 
find out about it. 



NATIONAL FLOWER SHOW. 

Arrangements are well under way for 
the national fiower show, to be held in 
Boston March 25 to April 1. The space 
both for competitive and trade exhibits 
is being rapidly taken, and from pres- 
ent indications it will be the largest 
affair ever seen in connection with the 
florists' trade. The final schedules 
have been printed and sent to all the 
members of the different societies un- 
der the auspices of which the exposi- 
tion is held. Manager Chester I. Camp- 
bell has had designed attractive art 
advertising cards for the exposition 
and these will shortly be sent to all the 
larger cities in the country. An adver- 
tising sticker for stationery has also 
been arranged for and these also will 
be sent to all the exhibitors and mem- 
bers of the society. Manager Campbell 
has had long experience in the exposi- 
tion business and realizes fidly the im- 
portance of such advertising. Among 
the many expositions of which he has 
charge are the Boston automobile show, 
the national motor boat and engine 



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House of Polypodium Mandaianum. 



show, the style show, office appliance, 
textile machinery, electric, exhibition 
of aerial craft, and he will also guide 
the destinies of the great Boston 
Chamber of Commerce industrial and 
educational exhibition, which will be 
held next October. 

Every mail is now bringing in appli- 
cations for space from those who in- 
tend making what may be classed as 
show exhibits. A number of Boston 
florists, while not entering in the com- 
petitive classes, intend offering novel- 
ties in artistic decorative effects, and 
it may safely be predicted this exposi- 
tion will long be remembered as por- 
traying the acme of floriculture. 



AMERICAN ROSE SOCIETY. 



Convention Program. 

At a meeting held in New York city 
last week a program was mapped out 
for the general meeting at Boston this 
month. The general business meeting 
will be held Monday, March 27, at 2:30 
p. m. It is planned to have August F. 
Poehlmann and Wallace K. Fierson pre- 
sent two fine papers. Tuesday morn- 
ing election of officers and a general 
discussion on new roses will take place. 
Tuesday at 2:30 p. m. a meeting, desig- 
nated by President Elliott as the ama- 
teurs' meeting, will be held, with papers 
by Richard Vincent, Jr., of White 
Marsh, Md., on what he saw in Belgium; 
by Rev. Dr. Spencer S. SuUiger, of Van- 



couver, Wash., on his visit to the na- 
tional rose show in London, England; 
by William G. McKendrick, the man 
whose aim is to make Toronto beauti- 
ful, an amateur rose grower of exten- 
sive experience. 

Department of Registration. 

A. N. Pierson, Inc., Cromwell, Conn., 
files the following described new roses 
for registration: 

Double White Killarney, a sport of 
White Killarney, originating with the 
J. A. Budlong & Son Co., Auburn, R. I., 
in January, 1910. It is stronger in 
growth than the parent, with the same 
general characteristics of foliage and 
growth. The flower is pure white in 
color, with an average of from forty to 
forty-five petals. It is a wonderful im- 
provement over the parent, having size 
and substance in summer, when White 
Killarney is comparatively single. The 
variety will be disseminated by A. N. 
Pierson, Inc., in 1912. 

Killarney Queen, a deep pink sport of 
Killarney, originating with the J. A. 
Budlong & Son Co., Auburn, R. I., in 
1909, that has the high color of Dark 
Pink Killarney with an increased vigor 
in growth. It compares among Kil- 
larneys as American Beauty does with 
other varieties, the stem and foliage 
being much heavier and the petals near- 
ly twice the size of the petals of Kil- 
larney. The variety will be dissem- 
inated by A. N. Pierson, Inc., in 1912. 
Benj. Hammond, Sec'y. 



16 



The Weekly Florists^ Review^ 



Maucu 2, I'Jll. 




FUMIGATION OF VIOLETS. 

What effect would too mncli fumi- 
gating witli tobacco dust have on Marie 
Louise violets? JI. W. & S. W. A. 



Too much fumigating will hurt almost 
any plants, violets being no exception to 
the rule. The effect on Marie Louise vio- 
lets would be to cause a browning of 
the edges of the foliage and a bleaching 
of the color of the iiowers. Many of 
the large commercial growers now use 
hydrocyanic acid gas for fumigation, 
but this must be used with extreme 
caution. A safe method is to use 
one of the tobacco papers, which will 
injure neither foliage nor flowers and 
leave no unpleasant odor beliind them. 
. C. W. 

THE BEST VIOLETS. 

1 have been growing violets for a 
number of years, and thought of plant- 
ing new stock the coming season. Is 
Princess of "Wales better than Cali- 
fornia? I see the former is recom- 
mended as a good violet. J have the 
California, but think that I should have 
new stock, as I have had the same 
plants for nine years. Is Lady Ilume 
Campbell subject to leaf-spot, like 
Marie Louise ? .T. F. J. 

Princess of Wales is a much superior 
violet to California. The latter has 
been discarded for some years by most 
of the big specialists. You can obtain 
vou}ig plants of this finest of all single 
violets from many advertisers in The 
Review a little later. If you once try 
it you will want no more California. 
All the single violets should be left out 
until they have had a few degrees of 
frost. 

Lady Hume Campbell is sometimes 
attacked by leaf-spot, but not so l)adlv 
as Marie Louise. Many who failed 
with Marie Louise have good success 
with Campbell. The latter is of a paler 
color, however, than Marie Louise. My 
own opinion is that, for those who can 
grow it, there is no double violet which 
jet equals the old Marie Louise. 

C. W. 

PROPAGATION OF PETUNIAS. 

Will you tell me what is the trouble 
with my double petunias? When I make 
cuttings the old plant generally dies. 
The cuttings root well, but as soon as 
I cut again over one-half die. What 
temperature do they like? Do they want 
shade or plenty of light? I give them 
all the sun I can and plentv of water. 

^ J. J. K. 



Petunias root well in a bottom heat 
of 60 degrees, with a top heat of 50 to 
52 degrees. Any cutting bench suitable 
for carnations or chrysanthemums will 
answer equally well for petunias. A 
warm propagating bench, such as is 
necessary for colons or Mlternantheras, 



is unsuitable for petunias. Shade until 
rooted and for a few days after potting, 
until they become established; then give 
full sun and a temperature of 50 de- 
grees at night. Many of the cuttings 
on old petunias are blind. They can be 
rooted, but, like yellow marguerites, 
which often act similarly, they will 
never produce any growths, and if the 
tops are cut off that ends them. Before 
doing any propagating, it is a good 
plan to head back the plants somewhat 
and thus induce a crop of soft, succulent 
cuttings, which are more likely to give 
satisfaction. C. W. 

THE lERIGATOR FLOWER POT. 

William Whitney Lewis, an architect 
in Boston, Mass., has invented and pat- 
ented a self-watering flower pot which is 
extremely simple in its construction and 
yet is so peculiar in some of its details 
as to challenge attention, if not approval. 

The invention is called the Joy-0 Irri- 
gator Flower Pot. As the illustration 
shows, it consists of a pot within a pot, 
and the interesting peculiarity of the in- 
ner pot is that the bottom of it is not 
perforated, as in common flower pots, 
but is made of a porous quality of clay, 
while the rest of the pot is thoroughly 
waterproof. 

"This inner, or plant-holding pot," 
Mr. Lewis says, "is made of the ordi- 
nary clay or any material suitably por- 
ous, but this pot is imperforate, and 
more or less of the walls of the pot are 




The Irrigator Flower Pot. 

waterproofed on the exterior surfaces. 
The pot is enclosed in a reservoir of any 
material impermeable by water, and the 
water is supplied to the plant by soaking 
through the porous portion of the plant 
pot, the porous surface being, on the 
average, restricted to the bottom of the 
pot. Water also rises, by capillary at- 
traction, in the body of the upright 
walls of the pot, and is given off to the 
soil. One filling of the reservoir will 
water the plant for from eight to fifteen 
days, the length of time depending on 
the temperature, humidity of the atmos- 
phere, etc. The surface of the soil in 
the pot is never caked over, but is al- 
ways porous enough to admit air to the 
soil. The soil is not washed away from 
around the stem or foots of the plant, 
as in the usual methods of watering, and 
the plant receives a constant and suffi- 



=x 



cient supply of water without flooding 
of the roots. In the case of plants re- 
quiring much fertilizer, the lower por- 
tion of the pot may, previous to filling 
with soil, be packed to a reasonable 
depth with sheep manure or other fer- 
tilizer, which is slowly dissolved by the 
percolating water and carried to the 
plants." 

Conservative advocates of the different 
sorts of self-watering devices generally 
argue that these inventions, even if not 
always useful to a practical, expert flo- 
rist, may be helpful, nevertheless, to 
many of that same florist's customers^' 
since the customers' methods of culture 
are less skillful than those of the flo- 
rist, and more in need of mechanical aid. 
A contrivance, it is maintained, that does 
not add anything to the success of an 
adept may greatly increase the success of 
an amateur. The action of a self -water- 
ing flower pot, even if not absolutely per- 
fect, may easily approach nearer to per- 
fection than the action — or inaction — of 
many unprofessional growers. And the 
conclusion of the argument is, that self- 
watering flower pots and the like may be 
excellent articles, therefore, for florists 
to keep in stock and sell to their patrons. 

In support of this opinion, mention 
might be made of the Illinois Heater & 
Mfg. Co., of Chicago, whose self-watering 
flower boxes have been extensively sold 
by florists. There is a good demand, too, 
for the metal reservoir vases, which also 
embody the self-watering principle and 
are intended for use on lawns, and in 
parks, cemeteries, etc. 

The inventor of the Irrigator Flower 
Pot, in describing his own experience 
with it, says again: "When the idea 
is first broached to those interested in 
flower growing, I am told that the plan 
is impractical for many reasons, but 
meanwhile the plants obstinately con- 
tinue to grow and flourish as we never 
before have had them do in the house. 
In fact, our previous want of success is 
what led my attention to the subject of 
the self -watering pot. ' ' 

As to the future possibilities that are 
involved in his invention, Mr. Lewis has 
this to say: "My patent covers the 
adaptation of the idea to window boxes, 
tubs for large plants, etc., and is by no 
means confined to the ordinary flower 
pot. I hope to induce florists to adopt a 
modification of the idea by which it 
would be possible to automatically re- 
plenish the water supply for an indefinite 
number of pots, so that the water would 
be supplied the year around with abso- 
lutely no work or attention on the part 
of the florist or his assistants. This 
would be a money-saving device that 
should be of great value in large con- 
servatories. ' ' 



GOOD VARIETIES OF ASTERS. 

What are the best varieties of asters 
for outdoor growing, and when should 
the seed be sown? What is the proba- 
ble number of plants to each ounce of 
seed? K. W. 



The varieties of asters are quite 
numerous. A few good sorts are: 
Dawn of Day, double white, the earliest 
of all to flower; Queen of the Market, 
procurable in a number of shades, early, 
of strong branching habit, free flower- 
ing; American Branching, robust, large 
flowers, for late crops; Semple's and 
Tick's are excellent, vigorous strains 
for main or late crops; improved Vic- 
toria, Crego of Comet typo and peony 



Makcii •_', mil. 



The Weekly Florists^ Review. 



17 



llowered are other good varieties; Early- 
Won' ler, procurable in pink and white, 
flowers outdoors early in July and is a 
vnlaable early sort. For early flower- 
ing sow seeds under glass in March. 
Later sowings can be made at fort- 
nightly intervals, and during May the 
soed can be sown outdoors. The latest 
showing should go in the first week in 
Juno. If restricted to three varieties, 
grow Queen of the Market, American 
Branching and Victoria. 

The number of plants an ounce of 
seed v.'ill produce depends on the qual- 
ity of seed and its treatment after sow- 
ing. If of good quality and intelli- 
gently sown, an ounce should give 
4,000 to 5,000 plants. In purchasing 
seed always secure the best; cheap 
aster seed will only give disappoint- 
ment. Select a sunny piece of ground 
for your plants. Manure it liberally. 
Asters naturally thrive best in a heavy 
loam, but will grow in almost any soil 
wIiicL is well enriched if they are kopt 
thoroughlv cultivTtei while growing. 
■ C. W. 

MANDA'S POLYPODIUM. 

Polypodium Mandaianum came into 
the limelight at the national flower show, 
where it defeated two first-class nephrol- 
epis sports for the award as best new 
fern and later captured the gold medal 
offered for the best plant not then an 
article of commerce. The accompanying 
illustration shows a house of it at W. A. 
Manda's, South Orange, N. J. 

Polypodium Mandaianum originated 
at South Orange as a seedling from Poly- 
podium aureum glaucum. It is a free 
grower under the ordinary treatment 
given ferns, with a temperature of 60 
degrees to 75 degrees. It can be grown 
in pots, or as a basket fern, or on boards, 
like a staghorn fern. The fronds grow 
up to three feet in length and become 
beautifully fringed, a peculiar glaucous 
blue in color. 

At the national flower show it WM 
said, perhaps as a joke, that possibly the 
judges made their award to this new 
polypodium as a means of gracefully 
sidestepping the unwelcome task of choos- 
ing between two fine nephrolepises, but 
there can be no question that public and 
private conservatories all will want 
Polypodium Mandaianum as soon as they 
find out about it. 



NATIONAL FLOWER SHOW. 

Arrangements are well under way for 
the national flower show, to he held in 
Boston March 25 to April 1. The space 
both for competitive and trade exhibits 
is being rapidly taken, and from pres- 
ent indications it will be the largest 
affair ever seen in connection with the 
florists' trade. The final schedules 
have been printed and sent to all the 
members of the different societies un- 
der the auspices of which the exposi- 
tion is held. Manager Chester I. Camp- 
bell has had designed attractive art 
advertising cards for the exposition 
and these will shortly be sent to all the 
larger cities in the country. An adver- 
tising sticker for stationery has also 
been arranged for and these also will 
be sent to all the exhibitors and mem- 
bers of the society. Manager Campbell 
has had long experience in the exposi- 
tion business and realizes fully the im- 
portance of such advertising. Among 
the many expositions of which he has 
charge are the Boston automobile show, 
the national motor boat and engine 




House of Polypodium Mandaianum. 



show, the stylo show, office appliance, 
textile machinery, electric, exhibition 
of aerial craft, and he will also guide 
tiie destinies of the great Boston 
Chamber of Commerce industrial and 
educational exhibition, which will bo 
liehl next October. 

Every mail is now bringing in appli- 
cations for space from those who in- 
tend making what may bo classed as 
show exhibits. A number of Boston 
llorists. while not entering in the com- 
petitive classes, intend offering novel- 
ties in artistic decorative effects, and 
it may safely be predicted this exposi- 
tion will long be remembered as por- 
traying the acme of floriculture. 



AMERICAN ROSE SOCIETY. 



Convention Program. 

At a meeting held in New York city 
last week a program was mapped out 
for the general meeting at Boston this 
month. The general })usinoss meeting 
will be held Monday, March 27, at 2:30 
p. m. It is planned to have August F. 
Poohlmann and Wallace R. Pierson pre- 
sent two fine papers. Tuesday morn- 
ing election of officers and a general 
discussion on new roses will take place. 
Tuesday at 2:30 p. m. a meeting, desig- 
nated by President Elliott as the ama- 
teurs' meeting, will be held, with papers 
by Richard Vincent, Jr., of wiite 
Marsh, Md., on what he saw in Belgium; 
by Rev. Dr. Spencer S. Sulliger, of Van- 



coiivor, Wash., on liis visit to the na- 
tion.'il rose show in London, England; 
by AVilliam G. McKendrick, the man 
whoso aim is to make Toronto beauti- 
ful, :\n ainatenr rose grower of oxtcu- 
siw experience. 

Department of Registration. 

A. X. riorson, Inc.. Cromwell, Conn., 
files the following described new roses 
for registration: 

Double White Killarney, a sport of 
White Killarney, originating with the 
J. A. Budlong iV Son Co.. Auburn, E. I., 
in January, 1010. It is stronger in 
growth than the parent, with the same 
general eharaetoristics of foliage and 
growth. The flower is pure white in 
color, with an average of from forty to 
forty-five petals. It is a wonderfulim- 
jirovcment over the parent, having size 
and substance in summer, when White 
Killarney is comparatively single. The 
variety will be disseminated by A. N. 
Pierson. Inc.. in 1912. 

Killarney Queen, a deep pink sport of 
Killarney, originating with the J. A. 
Budlong & Son Co.. Auburn, E. L, in 
1009, that has the high color of Dark 
Pink Killarney with an increased vigor 
in growth, it compares among Kil- 
larneys as American Beauty does with 
other varieties, the stem and foliage 
being much heavier and the petals near- 
ly twice the size of the petals of Kil- 
larne.v. The variety will be dissem- 
inated by A. N, Pierson, Inc., in 1912. 
Benj. Hammond, Sec'y. 



PUPWfPW 



W^mm 



•^fnwfxr^iau^tjr 



18 



The Weekly Florists^ Review^ 



/■■ 



'TrrT^V'^vf, 



MAncii 2, 1911. 



OUTDOOR CULTUBE OF DAHLIAS. 

Kindly give me the treatment of the 
dahlia, commencing with the large 
dormant roots that have been wintered 
in a frost-proof cellar. ' Having no glass 
to start them under, I should like to 
know the course to pursue to achieve 
the, best results as regards the produc- 
tion of flowers. H. H. 



Dahlias want a sunny spot in which 
to grow and flower. The soil should 
be well manured and deeply plowed or 
spaded. If the soil is heavy, use some 
loose, gritty material, such as sand, fine 
coal ashes or road scrapings, to make it 
freer. For best results, do not plant 
your roots until the middle of May or 
the first part of June. Cut up the roots 
with a sharp knife, leaving a single eye 
to each division. Cover the roots five 
to six inches. Lay them flat with the 
crown point upward. A distance of 
thirty to thirty-six inches between the 
plants gives space for their proper de- 
velopment, but if you intend growing 
a quantity under field culture, eighteen 
to twenty-four inches in the rows will 
suffice. If you plan to support your 
plants, drive the stakes in position be- 
fore setting out your roots. Allow four 
to five feet between the rows. If you 
do not propose to stake the plants — but 
we would advise you to do so if you arc 
only growing a few dozens or hundreds 
— pinch the top out of the young shoot 
when it appears and has made two or 
three pairs of leaves. This will make 
the plants dwarfer and stockier. Cul- 
tivate the plants freely from the time 
they commence to grow. C. W. 



MILE-A-MINUTE VINE. 

A recent issue of The Review con- 
tained the following inquiry, signed by 
G. H. P.: "I should like to know the 
botanical name of a vine that is used 
around Wilkinsburg, Fa., for porches. 
It has a leaf like the oak, about one 
and one-fourth inches wide. They call 
it Mile-a-iviinute, but I have never seen 
it advertised by that name." 

The following reply to this query 
has just been received from William 
M. Turner, who, like G. H. P., is also a 
resident of Wilkinsburg, Pa.: "The 
only name, other than Mile-a-Minute, 
that I have heard used for it is Pilo- 
gyne suavis. It is a rapid grower and 
a beautiful vine, with small, white, 
star-shaped, fragrant flowers. I have 
never seen it grown anywhere but in 
this section, but have had inquiries 
concerning it from many different 
states. The Eeview's columns are cer- 
tainly the right place in which to ask 
questions, if you want to find out any- 
thing." ^ 

Mr. Turner's brief description of the 
vine agrees well, as far as it goes, 
with the description of Pilogyne sua- 
vis which is given in the botanical dic- 
tionaries, and thus the correctness of 
Mr. Turner's identification of the vine 
seems to be confirmed. The rapid 
growth of Pilogyne suavis would also 
make it appear not unlikely that the 
name Mile-a-Minute might be popu- 
larly or locally applied to it. 

Pilogyne suavis, by the way, also 
has at least two other botanical names. 
Bailey's "Cyclopedia of American 
Horticulture" says of it: "Melothria 
punctata is a beautiful climbing her- 
baceous perennial, better known as Pi- 
logyne suavis and sometimes called 



Zehneria suavis. Even when protect- 
ed, it is too tender to stand the north- 
ern winters. It blooms in clusters; 
flowers, small, white and star-shape, 
with a strong musk fragrance; leaves, 
green, small and glossy. Being a very 
rapid grower, it is desirable for cov- 
ering verandas or for house culture. It 
will do well in any part of a living 
room where it has light. It will grow 
as much as sixteen feet high in one 
summer by having a liberal supply of 
water every day and liquid manure 
once a week. After growing outdoors 
it can be cut down to six inches, pot- 
ted and taken into the house for the 
winter. In the spring it can be cut 
back, again planted out and it will do 
well. The roots can almost be called 
tuberous, and can be kept dormant 
during the winter, the same as dahlias, 
buried in sand in a cool, dry place, 
free from frost. Eapidly increased by 
cuttings." 

The opinion of Mr. Turner with refer- 
ence to the name of the vine in ques- 
tion is further supported by a letter, 
just come to hand, from N. E. Beck, of 
Massillon, O. Mr. Beck says: "I no- 
tice, in The Eeview of January 26, that 
G. H. P. wants to know the name of a 
vine which is called in his locality Mile- 
a-Minute vine, and which has a leaf 
like that of the oak. I think this must 
be Pilogyne suavis. We have been 
growing this for some time and it is 
the most rapid growing vine we know 
of. The foliage resembles that of the 
oak, and it blooms through the sum- 
mer and fall until cut down by the 
frost. The flowers are small, pure white, 
literally cover the vines and are partic- 
ularly fragrant. We propagate it by 
taking cuttings in the fall before frost 
and keep it in the house through the 
winter. Four-inch plants planted in 
May, about three feet apart, will cover 
a large space in a short time. This vine 
is preferred by many to hardy vines on 
account of not covering the wood- 
work in the winter and holding the 
moisture." 



TOEONTO. 



The Market. 

Trade has been normal and stock 
coming in quite plentifully. The sun 
has made its presence felt, and on sev- 
eral days last week stock was rushed on 
the market. Daffodils are a glut. Roses 
are coming in good. Violets are plenti- 
ful and of exceptionally good quality. 
Beauties are scarce. Sweet peas are 
also on the short side, but some of the 
stores have a few fine ones. Lilacs of 
excellent quality are coming in, both 
cut and on the plant. Prices are ruling 
good. The T. Eaton Co. and the S. H. 
Knox Co. are holding cheap sales of 
daffodils, carnations and violets. Violets 
sell at 15 cents a bunch, daffodils 15 
cents a dozen, and carnations 30 cents. 
The quality is poor, however. 

Various Notes. 

J. H. Dunlop recently was taken ill 
with appendicitis while on a business 
trip to Barrie, Ont, He was brought to 
Toronto and operated on, with gratify- 
ing success. He is at present in the 
General Hospital and is recovering as 
rapidly as can be expected. 

Recent visitors in town were S. H. 
Waller, of Zanesville, O.; Robert Green- 
law, of the S. S. Pennoek-Meehan Co., I 



Philadelphia, and the representative of 
the Roseville Pottery Co., of Zanesville. 

Geo. Werley, formerly of J. H. Dun- 
lop's, has accepted the management of 
a retail store in Calgary. 

Miller Bros, and P. H, Lawrence both 
report a good wholesale business. 

E. A. F. 



BOSTON. 

The Market. 

Cl.arer skies and somewhat more 
spring-like weather have been our lot 
in the closing week of February, a 
month which has proved unusually cool 
and has caused a heavy drain on the 
coal pile. Supplies are more abundant 
all around and there is a general de- 
cline in prices, Roses average a drop 
of 2 cents to 3 cents. The short-stemmed 
flowers, which were making 6 cents, 
are now down to 3 cents. The decline 
is less pronounced on the better grade 
flowers. Beauties are arriving of excel- 
lent quality and Richmonds show a great 
improvement, Mrs, Aaron Ward con- 
tinues in favor, while Killarney and 
White Killarney continue the prime fa- 
vorites. Carnations are seen in much 
greater abundance and the quality con- 
tinues of the best. Violets are of su- 
perb quality, especially the singles. The 
quantity of th^se arriving is now im- 
mense. The best average 50 cents per 
hundred, many going lower. Sweet 
peas are steadily improving and long- 
stemmed flowers are plentiful. Prices 
are as variable as the quality — 500 for 
$1 in some cases, and 75 cents to $1 per 
hundred for select flowers. Popular 
sorts are Christmas Pink, Mrs, Wallace, 
Mrs, Sim, Greenbrook and Florence 
Denzer. 

The warmer weather has brought in 
an avalanche of Dutch bulbous flowers 
and these have taken a sharp drop in 
price. The quality remains uniformly 
good, Lilium longiflorum is overplenti- 
ful and lower in price. L. speciosum 
is not selling well. Mignonette is plen- 
tiful, but of poorer quality. Callas are 
excellent. Valley has been rather drug- 
gy. The quality is a great deal better 
than it was a month ago. Gardenias 
are in heavier supply and the crop of 
Cattleya TriansB is still ample for all 
demands, Coelogyne cristata is now 
seen in many of the stores, also a vari- 
ety of dendrobiums. Green goods con- 
tinue in good demand. Pot plant trade 
is picking up nicely. Rambler roses in 
variety are getting to be quite a fea- 
ture in many stores, also acacias and 
ericas. 

Midwinter Flower Show. 

Owing to the near- approach of the 
national show, the midwinter exhibition 
of the Massachusetts Horticultural So- 
ciety, February 24 to 26, was much 
smaller than usual, most of the regular 
exhibitors holding back their plants for 
the later show. Still there were some 
interesting and meritorious exhibits. 
Particularly noteworthy was the beauti- 
ful collection of hard-wooded plants 
from George Page, gardener to Mrs, 
Frederick Ayer, which included splendid 
flowered plants of Erica melanthera, E. 
Mediterranea, E, Caflfra densa. Acacia 
verticillata, A. Drummondii, A. longi- 
folia and A. heterophylla. For a grand 
specimen of Erica melanthera a cultural 
certificate was awarded. Winthrop 
Ames, Daniel Wlhyte head gardener, had 
the best specimens of Primula Kewensis 



Mabch 2, 1911. 



^-^ -»r''»'*ffll' ' ^J^vy.*, i/TT-.^" -.-•rr-T"!' t.^.-^^i ■' 



The Weekly Florists' Review* 



19 



and P. obconica, taking first and third 
for the former and first and second for 
the latter, other prizes going to Mrs. F. 
Ayer and Mrs. J. L. Gardner, "William 
Thatcher gardener. In the cyclamen 
classes William Whitman, M. Sullivan 
gardener, Mrs. J. L. Gardner and Mrs. 
F. Ayer were the winners, Mr. Sulli- 
van almost swept the deck in the vari- 
ous bulb classes, including a silver 
medal and first prize for the best group 
of miscellaneous bulbs arranged for ef- 
fect. Some excellent bulbs from ama- 
teurs were staged by Miss Margaret 
Band and Henry L. Band. 

A. W. Preston, John L. Smith gar- 
dener, had a fine bank of cinerarias, 
schizanthus, acacias, primulas, genistas 
and bulbous plants; Mrs. J. L. Gardner, 
specimen cinerarias; William Whitman, 
a table of primulas; Mrs. E. M. Gill, a 
fine general display, and William Sim, a 
splendid table of single violets and 
sweet peas. The latter were of superb 
quality and included Wallace, Green- 
brook, Christmas Pink, Florence Denzer 
and Mrs. W. W. Smalley. E. B. Dane, 
Donald McKenzie gardener, had some 
fine cypripediums. Certificates of merit 
were awarded to C. Maudiae magnificum 
and C. Venus (insigne SandersB x 
niveum). Dr. C. G. Weld, W. C. Bust 
gardener, had the best specimen orchid, 
showing Dendrobium nobile virginale; 
second, J. T. Butterworth, with Cattleya 
Trianas. W. P. Harvey, gardener to J. 
B. Leeson, received a silver medal for 
superior culture of Cymbidium Tracy- 
anum, a superb plant in a tub, carrying 
fifteen spikes. The carnation and rose 
men made no response to the prizes 
and medals offered, with the exception 
of Eber Holmes, who had a fine vase 
of Bichmond roses. W. A. Manda had 
a large display of Cattleya Trianse, in- 
cluding many good types. 

Club Eanquet. 

There was an attendance of about 300 
at the annual club banquet in Horti- 
cultural- hall, February 28. The tables 
were beautifully decorated with roses, 
carnations, sweet peas and other flowers, 
also flowering plants in pots. C. C. 
Whittemore catered in his usual effi- 
cient manner, the menu being the best 
he has ever served. At the postprandial 
exercises W. J. Stewart officiated as 
toastmaster and the speakers included 
Alderman Walter Ballantyne, acting 
mayor of Boston, who spoke felici- 
tously for the city of Boston. Peter 
Fisher responded for the florists; W. N. 
Craig for the private gardeners, and C. 
W. Parker for the Massachusetts Horti- 
cultural Society. P. M. Miller also spoke. 
Miss Eisenhardt played zither. Neill 
Miller sang bass solos. Mrs. McKeon 
and John Miller sang duets. Miss 
Connelly proved an excellent elocu- 
tionist and the Misses Nellie and 
Jeannie Irvine made a great hit with 
their dances. Miss J. S. Eifford offi- 
ciated ably at the piano. After the 
speechmaking the floor was cleared and 
dancing enjoyed until after midnight, 
music being furnished by Hutchins' 
orchestra, nearly all present joining in 
the grand march and circle. 

William McGillivray, as floor director, 
was in his right place. John Beid was 
assistant floor director, while James L. 
Miller, W. J. Patterson, Edward Bose 
and Kenneth Finlayson acted as aids. 
The reception committee consisted of 
P. J. Turley, chairman; Duncan Finlay- 
son, Frank l^urray, W. A. Hastings, P. 
J. Van Baarda, W. D. Nickerson, Eber 
Holmes and 'George W. Butterworth. 



These Are the Little Liners That Do'theBosiness 




Various Notes. 

At H. E. Comley's, on Park street, 
last week I noted some good waxy 
ericas, rambler roses in variety, white 
Lselia anceps, Strelitzia Beginae and a 
fine vase of John Barr's new white 
variegated carnation, Mrs. B. P. Cheney. 

Prof. E. A. White, of Amherst, with 
a number of floricultural students, spent 
two days in Boston and vicinity last 
week, visiting the leading growers, re- 
tailers and the wholesale flower markets. 

W. B. Goodenow, of Stoughton, states 
that double violets with him are bloom- 
ing less freely than usual. He picks 
30,000 a week, against 50,000 a year 
ago. He will follow the violets with 
tomatoes. 

William Sim has one of his large 
sweet pea houses in full crop and will 
have two others in before the national 
show. 

Many of the largest single violet spe- 
cialists who grow for our market are 
in and around Woburn. Among these 
J. H. Newman is one of the best. He 
has 30,000 plants and his average daily 
pick is 20,000, which are all contracted 
for at the retail stores. 

The Exeter Bose Conservatories, of 
Exeter, N. H., are excellent growers of 
Chatenay roses and they have a nice 



coppery yellow sport .from it. Their 
Bichmond and Killarney are also fine. 

David Duncan, of Arlington, has an 
extra good variety of bulb stock, both 
cut and in pans, which finds a ready 
sale at the Boston Cooperative Market. 

Paine Bros., of Eandolph, among bulb 
specialties have fine Victoria and Sir 
Wiatkin narcissi and Couronne d'Or tu- 
lips, which sell much better than the 
single Thomas Moore. Murillo is a good 
seller, also King of the Yellows. In 
sweet peas they have F. J. Dolansky, 
Christmas Pink, Mrs. Wallace and Flor- 
ence Denzer. 

Thomas Eoland, of Nahant, has a 
magnificent lot of acacias, ericas and 
other hard-wooded plants coming on for 
the national show, which will prove 
something of a revelation to many of 
the visitors. 

Visitors last week included Maurice 
Fuld, representing H. F. Michell Co., 
Phi/adelphia; George W. Strange, rep- 
resenting W. A. Manda, and Thomas 
Head, of Stumpp & Walter's. 

Sidney Hoffman is showing some 
beautiful acacias, ericas, genistas, ram- 
bler roses and other pot plants at his 
big Massachusetts avenue store. He 
has his Mount Auburn greenhouses filled 
to repletion with stock coming on for 



20 



The Weekly Florists' Review. 



March 2, 1911. 



Easter. The new store in the financial 
district continues to prosper. 

W. N. Craig. 

Wtilliam F. Aylward, C Park street, 
has filed a petition in bankruptcy. His 
liabilities amount to $4,077, assets $600. 

BUFFALO. 



The Market. 



A terrific blizzard, the worst of the 
season, struck Buffalo on Valentine's 
day and lasted throughout the day. 
Traffic was held up and delivery was 
hard. From reports and from appear- 
ances at the commission house, business 
was exceptionally good and everything 
was cleaned up early. Violets were the 
leader and brought from 75 cents to $1. 
Everything sold well; in fact, the to- 
tals showed a large increase over for- 
mer years. Stock for funeral work 
took a jump in price, and an abund- 
ance of this sort of work cleaned up 
all the available white flowers for the 
last week. Eoses are still a little 
scarce, as well as the light-colored 
carnations. The sale of bulb stock has 
surpassed all records this season, per- 
haps due to the fact that roses and 
carnations have been scarce. Lilies 
and valley have been scarce for the 
last three weeks. 

There was a little brush for Wash- 
ington's birthday, but it has just been 
steady since. Saturday sales make 
things brisk, but as a rule these are 
only one form of advertising and can- 
not be counted much for the pocket- 
book. The temperature makes rapid 
and decided changes, and when it does 
warm up it is quite pleasant. Satur- 
day was an ideal day and violets were 
cleaned up early. Bulb stock came 
next, as it was offered cheap. 

Various Notes. 

A fire near the Anderson green- 
houses, just noticed in time by the fire- 
man and Joe Streit, averted a big loss 
to Mr. Anderson and the building ad- 
joining. An alarm was sent in and 
promptly answered, and for the quick 
work which Mr. Streit and the other 
man did, the owner gave them each a 
$10 gold piece. 

The Lenox Flower Shop had a fine 
decoration at Ithaca last week and the 
force was gone three days, preparing 
the work. Large plants and an abund- 
ance of cut stock were used. 

The snowfall of last week was so 
heavy at Akron, N. Y., that its weight 
broke down the roofs of the houses at 
the establishment of Mrs. Newman. 
Considerable damage was done, as it 
was impossible to secure protection be- 
fore the cold had penetrated to the 
stock. The loss was not estimated. 

John Preisach, of Corfu, N. Y., is 
planning new greenhouses, to replace 
the ones he now occupies. Figures 
were submitted by the J. C. Moninger 
Co., of Chicago. The work will be be- 
gun as soon as the weather moderates. 
Mr. Preisach is rather a new-comer in 
Corfu and was employed by the Will- 
iam Scott Co. before starting on his 
own account. He has been quite suc- 
cessful, as is shown by his plans for 
rebuilding. 

The Buffalo bowlers will visit Eoches- 
ter March 8. It is the intention to 
have as many as possible go down and 
go early in the day, so as to have a 



look around before the games begin. 
It will be gratifying to the committee 
to have a good showing there, so kindly 
plan ahead and come along. 

The Buffalo Florists' Club will hold 
its annual carnation meeting March 7. 
The raisers of new varieties have been 
invited to send along the good things. 

Bowling. 

The Eochester bowlers arrived with- 
out a hitch and were escorted to the 
Hofbrau, where a fine spread was ar- 
ranged for their pleasure. After the 
dinner all visitors and members were 
taken to the bowling alleys and a lively 
and pleasant time followed. The games 
were more even than the scores indi- 
cate, and the bowlers and spectators 
enjoyed every minute of it. The five- 
man match resulted as follows: 

Buffalo. Ist 2d 3d Ave. 

Meubeck 165 191 150 168 

Streit 115 159 160 144 

Kastlng 175 156 153 161 

Cloudsley 131 130 160 140 

Sandlford 169 188 155 170 

Total 783 

Rochester. Ist 2d 3d Ave. 

Jennv 159 171 174 168 

Phillips 166 159 138 154 

C. Vlck 127 I ,07 

P. Keller 137 148 5 ^'^' 

P. Ham 105 l loa 

M. Keller 143 130 J ^^ 

A. Vlck 134 134 143 137 

Total 722 

As the scores will show, Buffalo won 
all three games by a pretty good mar- 
gin. The boys then played a two-man 
match against two Eochester men, Phil- 
lips and Jenny versus McClure and Wal- 
lace. This match the Buffalo boys also 
won. Then everyone enjoyed some more 
fried chicken and green peas. It was a 
pleasant meeting and one to be remem- 
bered. Eleven came from Eochester 
and about thirty turned out for Buffalo. 

E. A. S. 



DAYTON, OHIO. 



The Market. 



The long looked for sunshine has at 
last graced us with its pleasant smiles, 
which are doing wonders everywhere. 
Crops are daily becoming more abund- 
ant, while trade keeps up at a lively 
gait, so that the demand is sufficient to 
consume the output. Stock of no kind 
has to go begging. While the supply 
of bulbous stock is quite heavy, none 
of it gets a glimpse of the ash Isarrel. 
Trade has kept up remarkably well in 
the last ten weeks, so that in many 
cases there has not been enough stock 
to go the rounds. As a general thing 
there is always a great deal of bulbous 
stock that does not find a customer, but 
such has not been the case this year. 

It is surprising to note what a large 
quantity of funeral work has been con- 
tinually coming in from all directions. 
Not in a long time has there been so 
great a demand so long continued. With 
the few days of sunshine great changes 
are noticed in the rose houses. The 
seemingly shy rosebuds are coming 
along in such condition that it is grati- 
fying to the grower to make his rounds 
to cut in the morning. The same is true 
of the carnations. There are com- 
paratively few callas grown; just 
enough to supply the demand. Longi- 
florum lilies seem to have come to the 
front and made callas take a back seat; 
the supply of these is always quite 
heavy, and the demand equal to the 
output. 

Taking the weather conditions into 



consideration, business throughout the 
entire month of February could not 
have been better. Everybody appears 
to be more than satisfied with results. 
Valentine 's day brought quite a demand 
for all kinds of stock, especially violets, 
valley, red carnations and roses, wMle 
the demand for flowers on Washington's 
birthday did its share to help along. 

Various Notes. 

Bernard Haschke and M. Anderson 
have been victims of the grip. 

Mrs. Warren G. Matthews has been 
in the hospital for the last ten days, 
where she will have to undergo an 
operation. 

Harry Garland and wife, of Des 
Plaines, 111., included Dayton in their 
honeymoon trip and were guests at the 
home of George Bartholomew February 
24. Wlhile there several of the em- 
ployees of the Miami Floral Co. gave 
them a musical serenade on tin pans, 
etc. Mr. Garland showed himself equal 
to the occasion and bought the cigars 
for the crowd. 

Mr. and Mrs. D. J. Jones, of Oriskany 
Falls, N. Y., who have been the guests 
of Mr. and Mrs. Geo. Bartholomew for 
the last fortnight, left February 27 for 
Buffalo, where they will spend a few 
days, thence to Eochester, and from 
there home. 

D. Eusconi, of Cincinnati, and Mr. 
Schwake, representing the Chas. F. 
Meyer Co., New York, were in town 
last week. 

Arno Hendrichs left last week for 
New Orleans to attend the Mardi Gras. 
While in that city he will be the guest 
of Mr. and Mrs. M. Cook. 

M. D. Schmidt & Son had some large 
funeral orders last week. 

Mrs. Elizabeth Young reports an ex- 
ceedingly busy week. E. A. B. 



OBITUAEY. 



Jolin H. Taylor. 

John Henry Taylor, one of the best 
known florists in the New York district, 
who returned from Europe in the best 
of health February 22, died suddenly 
of bronchitis and tonsilitis at the Hotel 
Martinique Saturday night, February 25. 

Mr. Taylor was born in 1858, in New 
York city. When he was 3 years old 
his father moved to Bayside, L. I., and 
the family spent seven years there on 
an immense estate. Mr. Taylor went to 
Europe with his family in 1867 and 
spent ten years studying in Switzerland, 
Italy and Berlin, entering Harvard on 
his return. He was graduated in 1881 
with the degree of bachelor of agricul- 
tural science, spent some time in Eu- 
rope studying floriculture and became 
associated with his father when he re- 
turned, the two engaging in the nursery 
and florists' business. The elder Mr. 
Taylor died soon afterward, and John 
H. Taylor bought out the interests of 
the other heirs in the Oakland Tree 
Nursery at Bayside, of which his father 
had been the owner. Later he became 
one of the largest and most successful 
growers of roses and other flowers for 
the New York market. In 1883 Mr. 
Taylor married Miss Julia Armstrong. 
She died ten years ago, and five years 
later he married Miss Mary Stow, of 
New York. Mr. Taylor maintained the 
Oakland Nursery until about six years 
ago, when he sold it, the appreciation of 
the real estate values in the vicinity 
having given him a competence. 



MABCH 2, 1911. 



The Weekly Florists' Review^ 



21 



As the organizer and first president 
of the Oakland Golf Club, Mr. Taylor 
gave a part of his estate at Bayside, 
which .-was /known as the Oaks, to the 
club to ' be uSed as part of tbe course. 
He was alSoi one of the organizers of 
All Saints' Episcopal Church in Flush- 
ing. Besides, he was a member of the 
ll[niversity, Lawyers', New York Flo- 
rists ', Niantic and New York Athletic 
clubs, Cornucopia Lodge, F. and A. M., 
and the New York Horticultural 
Society. 

Mr. Taylor was a nephew of William 
Taylor, proprietor of the St. Denis 
Hotel, and a cousin of Charles Leigh 
Taylor, proprietor of the Hotel Marti- 
nique. He is survived by a widow and 
two children of his first wife, Mrs. 
Adele A. Manning and Beginald Taylor. 

S. J. Galloway. 

A report has just been received of the 
death of S. J. Galloway, well known 
in the trade as a grower of hardy 
herbaceous plants and perennials, at 
Eaton, O. The funeral services were 
held on Sunday afternoon, February 26. 

Robert Bodden. ^ 

Eobert Eodden, a florist in Newton 
<'enter, Mass., and a stallholder in the 
Boston Cooperative Flower Market, died 
suddenly from convulsions February 18. 
Mr. EoVlden visited the flower market 
in Boston ouly two days before his 
<leath. He was, for a number of years 
before going into commercial floricul- 
ture, gardener on the Schlesinger estate 
in Brookline, Mass. 

F. K. Phoenix. 

Fran\lin Kelsey Phccnix, one of the 
pioneer nurserymen of the United 
States, died recently at his home in 
Delavan, Wis., at the age of 86 years. 
He was born in Ferry, Genesee county, 
N. Y., in March, 1825. Twelve years 
later, in March, 1837, he removed with 
his parents to Wisconsinj and in the 
spring of 1842 he began his long career 
as a nurseryman at Delavan. In 1852 
he founded a branch nursery at Bloom- 
ington, 111. This new business received 
almost his entire attention for twenty- 
five years, was developed into a large 
establishment and was afterward con- 
<lucted for a time by his son, F. S. 
Phoenix. In 1877 the elder Mr. Phoenix 
withdrew from the Bloomington busi- 
ness and, after four years of rest, re- 
sumed the management of the Delavan 
nursery, with which he continued his 
active connection until a few years 
before his death. 

In 1850 he married Miss M. E. Top- 
ping, of Darien, Wis. Of their family 
of four sons and two daughters, only 
the second son, F. S., already men- 
tioned, has taken special interest in 
horticultural pursuits. 



Hopkinsville, Ky.— T. L. Metcalfe 
was painfully, though not seriously in- 
jured in a wreck on the Tennessee Cen- 
tral railroad, about one mile from 
Clarksville, Tenn., February 19. Though 
the coaches were destroyed by fire 
within seven minutes after the wreck 
took place, and though he was cut, 
bruised and stunned, he succeeded in 
rescuing three others from the flames 
before saving himself. Mr. Metcalfe 
has greenhouses at Madisonville, Ky.; 
Jackson, Tenn.; Clarksville, Tenn., and 
Springfield, Tenn., as well as in this 
city. He is also proprietor of the Hop- 
kinsville Steam Laundry. 




Portland, Ore.— S. W. Walter is erect- 
ing a greenhouse at 1109 East Twenty- 
ninth street. 

Dows, la^ — Shaffer & Larson, proprie- 
tors of the Dows Greenhouses, are plan- 
ning to erect another greenhouse in 
the coming spring. 

Bridgeport, Conn. — James E. Beaeh 
has purchased property with a frontage 
of 100 feet on North avenue and ad- 
joining his greenhouse property on Park 
avenue. 

Stockbridge, Mass. — C. S. Mellen is 
having plans made for a large green- 
house which is to be erected during 
the coming summer at his country place. 
Council Grove. 

Tarrytown, N. Y. — E. W. Neubrand, 
secretary of the Tarrytown Horticul- 
tural Society, announces that the fall 
show of the organization will be held 
October 31 to November 2. 

Bochester, N. Y. — George J. Morgan, 
of 211 Lexington avenue, who formerly 
made a specialty of growing salvia, 
aster and petunia plants, has sold the 
business to David McGregor. 

Edlnburg, Ind. — Mrs. Thomas Wood- 
ard has been extremely busy this winter 
and she is planning to double the 
capacity of her place, so as to be able 
to meet the increasing demands of her 
trade. 

Hillsdale, Mich. — Carl Hirsch, propri- 
etor of Hillsdale Floral Park, recently 
submitted to a dangerous operation for 
appendicitis and double rupture. He 
believes he is now on the road to entire 
recovery. 

Canton, O. — N. M. Bassinger, who 
several years ago was connected with 
the trade in Calla, O., has now made 
arrangements to engage in the bulb and 
plant business at 1339 Logan avenue, in 
this city. 

Marshalltown, la. — I. 0. Kemble has 
purchased four acres of ground known 
as the Louis Diesing property, near 
the end of North Third street, and ex- 
pects to use it eventually for the ex- 
tension of his business. 

Joplin, Mo.— A friend of H. A. Hall, 
of this city, sends the following report: 
' ' January 26 was a sad day for Mr. 
Hall and his family. The boys were 
bringing the cow home after school — 
an everyday duty — and, knowing the 
cow to be gentle, they tied the rope 
around the youngest one's waist. The 
cow became frightened and dashed 
down the street at full speed, dragging 
the youngster to death." 

Davenport, la. — ^James W. Davis, who 
has been successfully conducting the 
establishment formerly known as the 
Danacher greenhouses, on upper Brady 
street, finds that he is likely to be 
crowded out of that locality by the di- 
vision of the property into city lots. 
He is therefore planning to erect a 
range of greenhouses elsewhere, prob- 
ably at Bettendorf, near this city, 
though at last report he had not fully 
decided. 



Port Huron, Mich. — Thomas Jowett 
has nearly completed his new green- 
house. 

Smithtown Branch, N. Y. — E. G, Lud- 
der announces the arrival of a "new 
and only daughter." 

Los Angeles, Cal. — A local newspaper 
states that ' ' a yellow poinsettia blos- 
som, a freak that grew on an ordinary 
poinsettia plant, was recently presented 
to the chamber of commerce by E. A. 
De Camp, of 4504 Russell avenue." 

Newport, Ky. — Anton Hummel has 
purchased the establishment formerly 
owned by the late H. D. Edwards, on 
Alexandria pike, near Fort Thomas. 
The place includes two greenhouses, 
close to St. Stephen's cemetery. 

Danielson, Conn. — A recent fire on 
the property of W. J. Schoonman, the 
North street florist, caused a loss 
amounting to between $300 and $400, 
chiefly in the barn and its contents. 
The greenhouses were unharmed. 

Albany, N. Y.— W. J. Roberts has re- 
sumed the personal management of his 
establishment at 259 First street, which 
has been leased to others since May, 
1907. Prior to that date, Mr. Roberts 
had conducted the business for many 
years. 

Gasport, N. Y.— White Bros, say the 
report that they had sold their green- 
houses here is incorrect. The range is 
still in their possession and will be oper- 
ated in connection with a new range 
that they expect to build this summer 
at Medina, N. Y. 

Pittsfield, Mass. — Rudolph Mauers- 
berger, who for the last four years has 
been gardener and florist at Stoneover, 
in Lenox, has leased the greenhouses 
and grounds connected with Miss Hall 's 
school, on the Holmes road, and will 
engage in business for himself. 

Bangor, Me.— Mr, and Mrs. A. J. 
Loder, who for many years were resi- 
dents of Pittsfield, Me., have removed 
to this city, where Mr. Loder purchased 
the business of Carl Beers some months 
ago. It is umderstood, however, that 
Mr. Loder will continue to operate his 
range of greenhouses at Pittsfield. 

Eldora, la. — James M. Pierce, owner 
of the Iowa Homestead and one of the 
proprietors of the J. S. Polland Floral 
Co., has purchased seventeen acres of 
ground in the north part of the city 
and will build a handsome residence. 
The Polland Co. recently completed the 
erection of a large range of green- 
houses. 

Saddle Biver, N. J.— John G. Esler, 
secretary of the Florists' Hail Asso- 
ciation, whose injury in a street car 
collision was reported in a recent issue 
of The Review, made the trip from 
New York hospital to his home Feb- 
ruary 21. He arrived without sustain- 
ing any added injury and is able to 
attend to oflice work with the aid of a 
pair of crutches. An auto ride home 
was an antidote to his hospital ex- 
perience. 

1 



22 



The Weekly Florists^ Review. 



" ,'*?',: ^■;'"Vf.^r'V- 



March 2, 1911. 



' 4 



THE FLORISTS' REVIEW 

Q. L. GRANT, Editor and Managkb. 



PUBLISHED BVERY THUESDAT BY 

THE FLORISTS' PUBLISHING CO. 

630-560 Caxton Building, "* 

334 Dearborn Street, Chicago. 

Tklkphonb, Harrison 5429. 

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New York Office: 

Borougb Park Brooklyn, N. Y. 

J.Austin Shaw, Manager. 



Subscription price, $1.00 a year. To Canada. $2.00. 
To Europe, $2.60. 

Adyertising; rates quoted upon request. Only 
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Advertisements must reach us by 6 p. m. Tuesday, 
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Entered as second class matter December 3, 1897. 
kt the post-office at Clilca«o, 111., under tlie act of 
March 3. 1H79. _ ^ 

This paper is a member of the Chicago Trade 
Press Association. 



INDEX TO ADVEBTISERS, PAGE 102. 



CONTENTS. 

The Retail Florist » 

— The Vacant Chair (lllus.) » 

— The Science of Price 8 

— The World Design (lllus.) 10 

— Featuring the Accessories (lllus.) 10 

The B.'giuner 10 

Olganteum Lilies 11 

To Make Hydrangeas Blue 11 

Sweet Peas — Seasonable Suggestions 12 

Shamrocks 12 

Forcing Shrub Bloom 12 

Chrysanthemums — Seasonable Suggestions.... 12 

Carnations— Fertilizing the Field Soil 13 

— Name of Carnation 13 

American Carnation Society 13 

The Soil or the Fertilizer? 13 

Lily of the Valley— Valley In Cold Storage.. 13 

Seasonable Suggestions — Azalea Mollis 14 

— Acacias 14 

— Amaryllis 14 

— Show Pelargoniums 14 

— Stevias 14 

— Gardenias 14 

Geraniums — Propagating Geraniums 14 

Jackson Dawson (portrait) 15 

Fine Things Noted by Knight 15 

Violets — Fumigation of Violets 16 

— The Best Violets 16 

Propagation of Petunias 16 

The Irrigator Flower Pot (lllus. ) 16 

Good Varieties of Asters 16 

Manda's Polypodlum (lllus.) 17 

National Flower Show 17 

American Rose Society 17 

Outdoor Culture of Dahlias 18 

MUe-a-Minute Vine 18 

Toronto 18 

Bonton 18 

Buffalo M 

Dayton, 20 

Obituary— John H. Taylor 20 

— 8. J. Galloway 21 

— Robert Rodden 21 

— F. K. Phoenix 21 

Business and Other Notes 21 

Burning Tobacco Stems 22 

License to Sell Plants 22 

Chicago 22 

Columbus, 27 

PhUadelphla 28 

New York 30 

Milwaukee 38 

Providence 40 

Stenmdr Sailings 44 

Seed Ivrade News 46 

— The Ohio Grass Seed Bill .' 47 

— Imports 48 

— Garden Seeds are "Pure" 48 

— Testing Farm Seeds 54 

— Catalogues Ueceived 65 

Lilies for Memorial Day 55 

Vegetable Forcing 66 

— Vegetable Markets 66 

>— Indoor Brussels Sorouts 56 

— New York Growers Organize 56 

Pacific Coast * 62 

— Portland, Ore 62 

— San Francisco 62 

— Croweanums in California 63 

Nursery News 64 

— Inimical Bill in Iowa 64 

Indianapolis 68 

FIndlay, 70 

FrHmlngbam, Mass 72 

EdwardsvUle, 111 74 

Baltimore 76 

Detroit 78 

Bar Harbor, Me 78 

Greenhouse Heating 90 

— Good Oil Burner Wanted 90 

— Boiler Is Too Large 90 

— A Succession of Troubles 90 

St. Louis 92 

Clay Center, Kan 94 

Lenox. Mass 94 

New Bedford, Mass 96 

Pittsburg 98 

London, Ont 98 

Cincinnati 100 



80CIITT OF AHEBICAN FLOBI8T8. 

Incorporated by Act of Congress, March 4, '01. 

Otflcers for 1011: President, George Asmus, 
Chicago; vice-president, B. Vincent. Jr., White 
Marsh, Md.; secretary, H. B. Domer, Urbana, 
111.; treasurer, W. F. Kastlng, Buffalo, N. Y. 

Special convention and National Flower Show, 
Boston, Mass., March 26 to April 1, 1911. 

Annual convention, Baltimore, Md., Aucoat IB 
to 18, 1911. 



BesultB bring advertising. 
The Review brings results. 

We are in Lent, but Lent in recent 
years has had little effect on the flower 

business. 

Sunshine has come again — and cut 
flowers are no longer at all scarce. The 
condition is generaLaJl over the country. 

Manufactubees of greenhouse build- 
ing material report requests for estimates 
coming in at a quite unprecedented rate, 
probably as a result of the low price of 
glass. 

Western growers are receiving a great 
many inquiries for carnation cuttings 
from the east, indicating scarcity there, 
for buyers ordinarily look for stock near 
home. 

Not a few subscribers save themselves 
the bother of annual renewal by sending 
The Review $2, $3, or sometimes $5, in- 
stead of the dollar-bill that insures fifty- 
two visits of the paper. 

The National Flower Show committee, 
under date of February 22, sent out a 
call for the payment of eighty per cent 
of the guarantee fund, twenty per cent 
having previously been called. 

The complete schedule for the Na- 
tional Flower Show, Boston, March 25 
to April 1, has been issued in pamphlet 
form. Copies may be had by addressing 
Chester I. Campbell, superintendent, 5 
Park Square, Boston, Mass. 

The telegraph companies now send a 
"day letter" of fifty words at half 
again as much as the charge for the 
popular night letter. Transmission is 
at the company's convenience, full rate 
messages having precedence. 

The florists in the towns where work 
has begun on the fall shows are getting 
the benefit of a great deal of publicity 
in their local newspapers. Columbus, O., 
and Rochester, N, Y., are doing specially 
well on the publicity feature. 

Reduced rates to the National Flower 
Show have now been granted from as 
far west as Buffalo. The Central Pas- 
senger Association has a meeting March 
8 at which it is hoped the special fares 
will be made effective from the- Missis- 
sippi river and eastward. 



BUSNINQ TOBACCO STEMS. 

I wish to give others the benefit of 
my method of burning tobacco stems in 
my greenhouse. I had a tinner make 
me some galvanized pig troughs thirty 
inches long. I chop the stems into short 
pieces, so that they will lie close in the 
troughs. Then I set them in the aisles, 
filled with stems, and fire them at one 
end, using a little coal oil. They will 
burn from six to twelve hours, killing 
all insects that the fumes will kill, with 
the least injury to the flowers. 

The iron should be cut nine inches 
wide, bent in the middle and turned 
down a half inch at the edges to stiffen 
it, with end pieces riveted on eight or 
ten inches long to hold the trough in 
position. W. N. Tharp, 



LICENSE TO SELL PLANTS. 

' The seed dealers throughout the coun- 
try have been having quite a little 
trouble during the last few years with 
bills which propose to regulate the sale 
of seeds, but heretofore no legislature 
has been suflBciently foolhardy to un- 
dertake regulating the sale of geraniums, 
roses and other greenhouse plants,, 
bulbs, etc. However, a bill just intro- 
duced by Senator Chapman in the Iowa 
legislature, if passed, would make it 
necessary not only for the florist to 
take out a $5 license, but he would be 
compelled to take out a duplicate 
license costing $1 additional for each 
employee, including the delivery boys. 
He would also have to guarantee each 
plant, root and bulb sold to be true to 
name, to be free from insects and dis- 
ease; to specify whether seedling,, 
grafted or budded, and not misrepre- 
sent by picture or other means the 
stock offered; in other words, every 
plant sold must be exactly like the 
picture in the catalogue. A state in- 
spector would have the right to charge 
him $10 per" day for examining his 
stock, and apparently would have the 
right to confiscate and destroy without 
recourse. 

Chas. N. Page, of Des Moines, is lead- 
ing the fight on the bill, which alt 
Iowa florists, nurserymen and seeds- 
men hope can be killed in committee. 



CHICAGO. 

The Great Central Market. 

A few days of bright sunshine have 
had a pronounced effect on the market. 
The break in prices occurred in the 
later days of last week and the present 
week opened with abundant supplies- 
and prices much lower than those which 
have prevailed since the middle of 
January. 

While the increase in roses is con- 
siderable, prices in this department still 
are holding fairly well. The greater 
part of the receipts are of the better 
grade. There now is an abundance of 
the special lengths of Killarney and 
other varieties; no orders go unfilled. 
Of the shorter lengths the supply still 
is less than the demand, though the de- 
mand is far from being strong. It has 
been six weeks since rose supplies have 
been adequate. During that time or- 
ders have been cut and prices charged 
have seemed high by comparison with 
the prices that prevailed during the 
last months of 1910. As a result, a 
great many buyers have become afraid 
to order roses. As in previous in- 
stances of the kind, it will take them 
a week or two to find out that rose sup- 
plies are once more adequate and start 
the buyers to ordering freely once 
more. Beauties are not in heavy sup- 
ply, though several growers say their 
crops are nearly ready. The quality of 
the special grade of Killarney, White 
Killarney, Maryland and Richmond 
leaves nothing to be desired; finer roses 
seldom have been offered. 

The change in the price of carna- 
tions is called a slump, it is so radical. 
At the first of last week it was impos- 
sible to fill orders, but at the first of 
the present week it was impossible ta 
move all the carnations except by job 
lot sales at buyer's prices. Not only 
have receipts increased decidedly, but 
demand for the small lots has fallen off 
and the big buyers have not yet awak- 



March 2, 1911. 



The Weekly Florists^ Review* 



23 



Killarne ys 

SPLENDID STOCK IN LARGE SUPPLY 

To the users of the best grade of Killarneys it will be good news that our crop 
once more is large— the quality always is the best in this market. While we have a 
fair supply of short to medium, the greater part of the crop is the Select and Special 
grade. The color in the pink Killarney is extra good. We never handled finer 
roses and we invite all retailers who want good stock to order some of these. 

OUR LONG BEAUTIES ARE EXTRA GOOD QUALITY. 

CARNATIONS 



Our spring crop is on, splendid stock in quantity to fill the largest 
orders, and many of them, at prices that will enable the retailer to use the 
quantit]^. Push Carnations— and order of us. 

SWEET PEAS 

For years we have been headquarters for Sweet Peas, but we never 
have had at this date such fine stock or such large quantities as now. Extra 
long stems, carrying large, perfect flowers. All the fancy colors as well as 
white and pink. We are shipping these Peas, fresh picked, in great 
quantities and they never fail to give buyers the best of satisfaction. 

Easter Lilies 



We can supply Easter Lilies 
every day in the year, fine quality. 



Violets 

You get the cream of the crops, 
'double or single, when you order 
of us. 

Fancy Valley 

Fine Valley is something you need, not only for spring weddings, but 
every day in the year. We always have it. Order of us. 

Also place orders with us for home-g^own Ghtrdenias. 

CATTLEYAS 

Our orchids are home-grown, and you always can get your orders filled 
if you place them with us. 



CURRENT PRICE LIST 

ORCHIDS. Oattleyas... per doz., $6.00 to $7.50 
Gardenias " 4.00 

ROSES 

AMERICAN BEAUTY Per doz. 

Extra lonflr st<>mB $6.00 

Stfms 30 1 1 36 Inches ."i.OO 

Stnoas 24 Inches. 4.00 

Stems 12 to 20 Inches $1.50 to 3.00 

Short per 100. $8.00 to $10.00 

ROSES Per 100 



White Killarney, special 



$12 00 



Headquarters for all Green Goods 

Asparagus, long heavy strings, $50.00 per 100. 



select $8.00to 1000 

seconds 4.00to 600 

Killarney, special 1200 

select S.OOto 10.00 

se-onds 4.00to 6.00 

My Maryland, special 12.00 

select S.OOto 1000 

seconds 400to 6.00 

Richmond, special 12.00 

select SOOto 10.00 

seconds 400to 6.00 

Extra special roses billed accordingly. 

CARNATIONS Per 100 

Common $1.50 to $ 2.00 

Select, large and fancy 3.00 

MISCELLANEOUS 

Tiolets, doable 76 to 

single 50to 

Street Peas, fancy 

" " medium 75 to 

Easter Lilies 

Callas per doz., $1.60 

Valley, select 

'* special 

Daisies, white and yellow 1.00 to 

Jonqul'S 

Daffodils 

Paper Whites 3.00to 

Romans 

Freesla , 

TuUps '. 3.00to 

DECORATIVE 

Asparagus Plum68a8 — per string .50 to 
" " ...per bunch .35 to 

" Sprengerl ... '* .25 to 

Adiantum. fancy, lung per 100 

Farleyense " S.OOto 

Smllax per doz.. $1JS0 

Mexican Ivy per 1000, 6.00 

Ferns " 3.00 

Galax " 1.00 

Leucothoe Sprays 

Store open from 7 a. m. to 6 p. m. 

Sundays closed at noon. 

Subject to market chances. 



1.00 

.76 

160 

1.00 

12.60 

3.00 
400 
200 
300 
3.00 
4.00 
300 
4.00 
4.00 



.75 

.50 

.50 

1.00 

10.00 

10.00 

.75 

.30 

.15 

.75 



E. C. AMLING CO. 

The Largest and Best Equipped 
Wholesale Cut Flower House in Chicago 

19 and 21 Randolph St., ftHICAGO 

L«HB DiiUBM TelaphOBM. 1978 ud 1977 Caatrsl. ^^^ ^ ^ ^ ^L^.M^^ ^^ ^J^ 



\ 



24 



.r /hi.;. ■-■^■• 



. \\tirT--ij^-;^ 



The Weekly Florists' Review. 



March 2, 1911. 



LILAC 

Our White Lilac is without equal in this 
, country this season. 

ORCHIDS 



ROSES 

Fine crops of Killarneys and other varieties 
now on — We can supply you. 

Carnations 



In any quantity and long distance shipments 
are our specialty. 



Finest western grown Cattleyas in splendid 
supply. Filling all orders. 

SEND US YOUR ORDERS FOR AMERICAN BEAUTIES. 

What do you need in Florists' Supplies? We have It. 



A. L. Randall Co. 

Wholesale riorists '^3^^'iit" 19-21 Randolph St, Chicago 



Mentioa The Review when you write. 



NeiY Rose 

Now booking orders for HILDA, deep pink 
sport of My Maryland, 'i^a-inch, (20.00 per 100; 
$150.00 per 1000. 

A. L. RANDALL CO. 

16-21 Randolph Street, CHICAGO 
MeptloD The Review when vou write 

ened to the fact that they can get stock 
at prices that will permit of working 
the special sales. Most of the carna- 
tions look good, but there is some com- 
plaint that they do not travel well. 

Every kind of bulbous stock is plenti- 
ful and prices have receded. Callas 
are much more abundant and the same 
may be said of Easter lilies. Sweet 
peas have not yet responded to the in- 
fluence of more favorable weather, but 
increased supplies are expected within 
a few days. There are plenty of cat- 
tleyas and miscellaneous orchids. Val- 
ley is abundant. "Violets are in the 
dumps; the singles have been coming 
in heavily and. though of fine quality, 
have been sold cheaply; the doubles 
are not in specially large supply, but 
quality of much of the stock is poor 
and even the best find only slow sale. 
The wholesalers who handle violets ex- 
tensively have heavy accumulations on 
their hands. 

The green goods market is quiet. The 
price of ferns was generally advanced 
March 1. Asparagus and smilax are 
fairly plentiful. Boxwood is moving 
better than it has. 

February Business. 

On the whole, February was an ex- 
cellent month for all the houses in this 
market. For a good share of the month 
roses were not sufficiently plentiful to 
meet the demand, but the prices real- 
ized went a long way toward compen- 
sating for the lightness of production. 
At the same time demand was turned 
to carnations and other flowers, with 
the result that these, and especially 




^OR Bros. 

Wholesale Growers of Cut Flowers 

51 Wabash Avenue, CHICAGO 

LARGE SUPPLY FINE STOCK 



PRICE LIST 



vN 



AMKRICAN BEAUTT Per doz. 

Extra long stems $4.00 

36-inch stems 3.50 

30-inch stems 3.00 

24-inch stems 2.50 

ao-inch stems 2.00 

18-inch stems 1-50 

15-inch stems 1-25 

12-inch stems 100 

Short stems per 100, |4. 00 to 6.00 

Per 100 
Extra fancy.. 18.00 

Fancy 600 

Good 5.00 

Short 3.00 



Uncle John 

Perle 



Good 
Short. 



Per 100 

16.00 
500 
3.00 



Killamey 
White Killi 
Mrs.'Jardin 
Richmond 



ey. 



ROSES, our selection 

Carnations, fancy ^ 

good $1.50 to 

Valley 4.00 to 

Adiantum 

Sprengeri bunch, 10.50 to 10.75 

Asparagus... " .50 to .75 

Ferns per 1000. 2.60 to 3.00 

Galax " 1.00 to 1.50 



4.00 

3.00 
2.00 
5.00 
1.00 



All other stock at lowest market rates. No charge for packing. 
Prices subject to change without notice. 



»-^ 



bulbous stock, realized much better 
average prices than in other years. St. 
Valentine's turned out to be a little 
Christmas. "With increasing supplies, 
the last days of the month showed a 
falling off in the volume of business, 
but not enough to affect the general re- 
sult. Practically every wholesale house 
showed a good increase in the month's 
sales, compared with the best previous 
February record. 

Chicago to Boston. 

The Chicago Florists' Club is prepar- 
ing to go to the National Flower Show 



at Boston in' feujficient numbers to war- 
rant a special train. The transporta- 
tion committee has made arrangements 
for the party to go over the Lake Shore 
railroad, leaving Chicago on the time 
of the Lake Shore Limited on the eve- 
ning of March 23, arriving at Boston 
at 8:30 p. m., Friday. The big show 
opens Saturday morning. E. F. Winter- 
son, 45 Wabash avenue, will book res- 
ervations of berths. If enough cars 
are filled the Lake Shore people will 
run the florists as a second section of 
the Limited; otherwise the florists' cars 
will be carried on the. Limited itself. 



t; 0^ 



March 2, 1911. 



The Weekly Florists^ Review^ 



25 



CARNATIONS 

We have quality and quantity — prices are where retailers 
can take hold strong. 

SWEET PEAS 

We have a large crop on, long-stemmed fancy stock in 
all colors. Can supply any quantity. 

Pussy WiUows, $5.00 per 100 



Western Grown Gardenias 



JOHN KRICHTEN 

51 Wabash Avenue ^-"'c^n^Ml?""* Chicago, III. 



PRICK I.IST 

Cattleras per doz., $6.00tot7JM> 

Gardenias " 3.00 to 4.00 

BEAUTIBS Per doz. 

Long atems fS.OO 

iBtemsSO InchOB 4.00 

StemB24 Inches 8.00 

StemB20 Inches 2.60 

Stems 16 inches 2.00 

Sten]8l2 Inches 1.60 

Shortstems tO.75 to 1.00 

Per 100 

Klllarney $3.00to $8.00 

Richmond 6.00to 8.00 

White Klllarney 6.00to 8.00 

Maid and Bride S.OOto 8.00 

MyMaryland 6.00to 8.00 

ROSBS , oar selection 4.00 

" exira select lO.OO 

Carnations, common 1.60 to 2.00 

fancy 3.00 

Violets SOto .76 

Valley S.OOto 4.00 

Easter Lilies per doz.. if 1. 60 

Oallas " 1.60 

Paper Whites, Romans 3.00 

Tulips, Jonquils. Daffodils 3.00 

SweetPeas TSto 1.00 

Asparagus Plumosus... per string. .60 to .75 
" " ...per bunch, .86 to .60 

Sprensrerl per 100, 2.00 to 4.00 

Adlantum Oroweanum " .75 to 1.60 

Smllax per doz., $1.60 to $2.00 16.00 

Ferns per 1000. 3.00 .30 

Galax " 1.00 .16 

Leucothoe " 7.60 1.00 

Mexican Ivy 1.00 

Boxwood per case, 7.60 

Subject to Market Chanees 



Mention The Review ■when you writp 






PERCY 



Not the Oldest 

Nor the Largest 






•». * 



Just the Best 






27-29-31 Randolph Street, CHICAGO 



JONES 









Mention The Review when you •write. 



Consequently it is to everyone's ad- 
vantage to communicate with Mr. "Win- 
terson as soon as he is sure of going. 

The Chicago club invites florists west 
to join the Chicago party. The route 
is through Toledo, Cleveland, Buffalo, 
Rochester, Syracuse, Utica and Albany. 
St. Louis and Cincinnati parties are ex- 
pected to join the train en route and 
delegations are expected to be taken on 
at each stop. 



Various Notes. 

John Zech and Matt Mann have put 
in a busy winter and are taking a 
week's rest at New Orleans, seeing the 
Mardi Gras. 

Warren S. Garland, at Des Haines, 
says this has been the most prosperous 
year he ever has had, and circumstances 
bear out his statement, for it recently 
was reported he was buying material 
for two new greenhouses, and it now 



develops that he has invested another 
part of the surplus in one of the extra 
special grade of automobiles. 

With the aid of employees and cus- 
tomers, C. L. Washburn celebrated his 
fifty-third birthday anniversary Febru- 
ary 27. A cake with the appropriate 
number of candles was cut at the store 
during the morning. 

Charles Hunt, who is the florists' in- 
surance man, recently paid Sam Pearce 
$125 sick benefit because of his siege 
with rheumatism. 

The A. L. Eandall Co. savs the Febru- 
ary supply business has run far ahead 
of last year. In spite of the fact that 
Easter is late, Easter orders are early. 

The George W^ttbold Co. had a big 
decoration at the Blackstone hotel Feb- 
ruary 28 for the McCormick ball. 

George Pieser is helping out in Win- 
terson 's Seed Store, where they are get- 
ting ready for the spring rush. L. H. 
Winterson says there is already much 
call for carnatjon dye, which they are 
this year shipping in cans, disaster hav- 
ing overtaken some of last year's ship- 
ments in glass. 

W. F. Schofield has his new delivery 
car on the street. 

Weiland & Kisch are not thoroughly 
satisfied with the appearance of their 
place at Evanston; it looks to them as 
though some of the houses should be 
double the present length. They are 
figuring, but have settled on no plans. 

Eobert Northam, of George Rein- 
berg's staff, was called home February 
27 by word that his little daughter, 5 
years old, had caught her hand in a 
door jam and been painfully injured. 

Sol Garland, at Des Plaines, will 
bench 1,000 Washington carnations next 
season. 

The retailers will mostly stay in their 
present locations during the next year. 
The principal exception is O. J. I^ed- 
man, whose main store on Michigan 
avenue has been leased to parties in 
another line. Mr. Friedman has not 
yet located himself. 

The E. C. Amling Co. had a shipping 
order for 20,000 sweet peas February 
28, thought to be a record for a single 
sale of this flower. 

Victor Bergman is happy over the 
arrival of a son Februarv 21. Mrs. 



•• iTTf-." "T.jry-^^» 



26 



The Weekly Florists^ Review^ 



March 2, 1911. 



ELLIOTT AUCTION CO. 

42 Vesey St., New York, N. Y. 

will commence its spring sales Tuesday, March 14, offering a 
choice consignment of roses, boxwood, rhododendrons, 
Picea pungens, bulbs, valley clumps, roots, etc. 

Sales every Tuesday and Friday, 11 a. m. 

Auctioneer 




W. J. ELLIOTT, 






Mention The Review when you write. 



Bergman is one of the Ludwigs, of 
Pittsburg, 

Miss Frances Brundage, who offici- 
ates as secretary of the E. H, Hunt cor- 
poration, is on duty again after a 
week's illness, 

Word comes from Los Angeles that 
Leonard Kill, who is operating in real 
estate there, has put through a deal 
involving over $160,000. 

The Foley Mfg. Co. reports having 
shipped the material for the second 
range to be put up this season by Poehl- 
mann Bros. Co., the increase in glass 
for the year being twenty-six houses 27x 
250. 

Vaughan & Sherry say boxwood is 
again in good request. 

Kennicott Bros. Co. reports still hav- 
ing nearly two million ferns in cold 
storage. 

When seen at Kyle & Foerster's Feb- 
ruary 27 Charles Klehm said that he 
looks for a fine season on peonies, now 
starting growth in the southern fields. 

C. M. Dickinson was on the sick list 
February 28. 

The Lord & Burnham Co. expects to 
be turning out greenlrt>use material at 
its new factory at Des Plaines in about 
six weeks. 

John Kruchten says good weather 
has helped the sale of gardenias if not 
violets. 

Peter Eeiiiberg is receiving congratu- 
lations on his success as chairman of 
the campaign committee that landed the 
mayoralty nomination for Carter Har- 
rison at the primaries February 28. One 
of his opponents was N. J. Wietor, who 
was a Dunne supporter. Mr. Wietor 's 
candidate fell only 1,556 votes behind 
on the face of the police returns. Both 
candidates left the machine candidate, 
Graham, far in the rear. 

A. H. Budlong says they have not yet 
finished replacing all the glass brokeu 
by last spring's hail storm. It was not 
a heavy storm, and the J. A. Budlong 
place lost only a little glass cleanly 
knocked out. but many hundreds of 
panes were cracked and have kept giv- 
ing way, one by one. 

Among the week's visitors have been 
E. G. Hill, Eichmond, Ind., and W. E. 
Wallace, of Dunstable, England; Max 
Liebman. of the Smedley Co., Fargo, 
N. D. ; Hans Tobler, Traverse City, 
Mich.; .T. A. Evans, Eichmond, Ind.; 
W. G. Haebieh and son, La Crosse, Wis.; 
r.oiiis Hausfhor, Freeport, 111. 




Headquarters 



CURRENT PRICES 

ORCHIDS 

Oattleyas. pinkish lavender Per dos $ 6.00 to $ 7.50 

Dendrobiam Formo8um, wliite " 6.00 to 6.00 

Oncidium splendidum Per 100 fla., 6J00 to 10.00 

Boxes asBorted Urctilds. $5.00 and up. 

ABI£R1CAN BlfiAUIT— Specials.. Per doc. 5.00 

80-ln " 4.00 

20to24-ln " 3.00 

15tol8-in " 2.00 

Sliorter " .76to 1.60 

Klllamey PerlOO. 6.00to 8.00 

White KiUarney " 5.00to 8.00 

My Maryland " 6.00to 8.00 

Richmond " 6.00to 8.00 

Mrs. Field " 5.00to 8.00 

Bridesmaid or Bride " 6.00to 8.00 

ROSES, oar selection " 4.00 

special " 10.00 

CARNATIONS 

Select PerlOO, l.soto 2.00 

Fancy " 3.00 

BflSCIXI^ANEOUS STOCK 

Qardenias, home-grown Per dos., 8.00 

fancy " 4.00 

Stocks, double Per bunch, 1.60 

single " .75 to 1.00 

Valley PerlOO. S.OOto 4.S0 

Easter Lilies Perdos., IM 

Oallas " 1.60 

Daisies PerlOO, 1.00 to 1.M 

SweetPeas " .76to 1.00 

Violets, double " 60to .7» 

single 5 " .60to .75 

PaperWhites " 8.00 

Romans " 8.00 

FreesU " 8.M 

Tulips " 3.00to 4.00 

Daffodils " 300to 4.00 

Jonquils " 2.00to 8 00 

Mignonette " 4.00to 8.00 

DECORATITi: 

Asparagus Plnmosns Perstring. .Mto .75 

Perbunch. .86 to .60 

Sprengeri ** .25to .60 

Adlantnm PerlOO. .75 to 1.00 

Farleyense " lO.OOto 12.00 

Smllax Perdoz.,$1.60 " 12.00 

Mexicanlvr Per 1000, 6.00 " .76 

Ferns " 3.00 " .30 

Oalaz. green and bronse Per 1000. 1.26 

Leucothoe PerlOO. .76 

WildSmilax large case, 6.00 

Boxwood Per bunch, 36c; per case. 7.60 

Store open frum 7 a. m. to 6 p. m. Sundays closed at mxns. 
Subject to market chances 

CHAS. W. McKELLAR 

SI Wabash Ave., CHICAGO 



Mention The Review when you write. 



Bowling. 

Following was the record of bowlers 



made February 22: 
Carnations. 1st 2d 3d 
Kranss ....149 189 114 

Ayers 163 190 157 

Huebner . .192 107 105 

Scbultz 176 171 182 

A. Zech 170 166 187 



Roses. 1st 2d 3d 

Shorty 62 57 70 

Wlnterson. 134 148 176 
Klunder ...115 129 158 
Foerster ...146 143 190 
Wolf 186 178 148 



Totals. 



.850 823 745 Totals 642 655 742 



Violets. 
Wlnterson 
Lieberraann 
Friedman . 
Lohrman . 
KIley 



1st 
114 



2d 

58 
132 124 
.129 136 166 
.121 135 170 
.158 159 161 



3d 
81 
99 



Orchids. 
Huebner 
J. Zech . 
Graff . . 
Degnan . 
Farley . 



1st 2d 3d 
...131 160 131 
...146 223 190 

. . 166 179 165 
...143 125 144 

..178 143 189 



Totals. 



.654 612 677 



Totals.... 764 830 768 



Jersey City, N. J. — The greenhouses 
of B. Soltau, at 199 Grant avenue, were 
recently damaged by fire. The loss was 
about $250. 



"?r!i«i'^f//yb'^"";.'»?«sT'^-¥sf ; •■ '■■ 



March 2, 1911. 



The Weekly Florists^ Review* 



27 



WHITE 
PINK 



KILLARNEY 

Now in full crop— fine quality in all lengths 

Our VALLEY Is exceptionally good 
Extra fine Wisconsin -grown, sweetly fragrant VIOLETS 

Trampets - - Daflodlls - - Freesia - - Sweet Peas 

ORDER ASPARAGUS STRINGS AND SMILAX HERE 

Headquarters for Fancy Cut Perns 

HOLTON & HUNKEL CO. 

462 Milwaukee Street, "'4;?*h'^u%%^. ^.r MILWAUKEE, WIS. 



Mention The Review when you write. 



CINCINNATI, OHIO 

C Roses, Carnations, Violets, Valley, Sweet Peas, Bulbous Stock, Green Sheet Moss, 
Sphagnum, Ferns, Florists' Supplies, Wire Work, Carnation Cuttings (immediate 
delivery). Supply is heavy. Prices right. Phone Main 980. 309 Main Street. 

WILLIAM MURPHY,WholesaleCoininissionHorist 



Mention The Review when you write. 



Fancy Carnations 



Highest 
Quality 



We have an exceptionally 
heavy cut of choicest carna- 
tions fresh from our green- 
houses every day; shipped to 
you the same day they are cut. 
That Is why they please our 
customers all the time. We also 
handle a full line of Roses, Vio- 
lets, Valley, Sweet Peas, Nar- 
cissi and greens of all kinds. 



PRICK UST Per 100 

Carnations , fancy $ 3.00 

select 2.00 

" common n.OOto 160 

Roses e.ovto 10.00 

Violets, double 75 to 1.00 

" single BOto .75 

SweetPeas 76to 1.60 

LlUes 15.00 

Orange Blossoms, choice large 

clusters 1.00to 1.50 

Valley, choice. Blue Ribbon S.UOto 4.00 

Narcissi 3.00 

All Oreens and other Stock at Uarket Rates. 
Subject to Bf arket Chan ares. 



Send us your name and we will send you 
our beautiful calendar, showinf our new 
carnation Wasblnffton in natural color. 



CHICAGO CARNATION CO. 

L. D. Phone Central 8378 

35-37 Randolph Street A.T.rYrER,FUr. CHICAGO 



Mennon The Review when vou wnw 



COLUMBUS, 0. 



The Market, 

Funeral work lately has used up an 
immense lot of stock. While the cuts 
have been heavy, stock has been used 
up closely from day to day, and there 
really has been no surplus of anything 
in the flovirer line. The bright weather 



we have had for a day or two has been 
welcome, indeed, as we have had a great 
deal of cloudy weather in the month of 
February, and it has had a tendency to 
curtail the quantity of stock in the 
market. Bulbous stock has been in good 
supply and demand has been heavy for 
pans of hyacinths, tulips and all stock 
of that kind. It reminds one that we 
are not far from spring. 



Various Notes. 

The Columbus Florists* Association 
held a meeting in the convention parlor 
of the Chittenden hotel, with abont 
sixty members present, to talk over the 
flower show for this fall. There was "a 
fine lot of new roses sent from A. N. 
Pierson, Cromwell, Conn., including the 
following varieties: Kose-pink Killar- 
ney, Prince de Bulgarie, Badiance, Lady^ 
Cromwell. Mr. Jackson, of the Ameri- 
can Rose & Plant Co., was on hand 
with some samples of Roosevelt fern, 
which were in splendid condition. The 
following committees were appointed to 
look after show matters: Finance com- 
mittee, G. H. Woodrow, Frank Miller 
and W, H. Kropp; advertising commit- 
tee, J. Underwood, Wm. Metzmaier and 
Geo. Thompson; arrangement commit- 
tee, F. C. Verrick, Wm. Underwood and 
A. Gampe; decorations committee, P. 
Brownwell, R. A. Currie and R. Buehler; 
amusement committee, I. D. Seibert, C. 
A. Roth and O. Grice. There was a 
great deal of enthusiasm shown at this 
meeting, and the guarantee fund reaches 
about $1,200 at the present time. It 
was decided to hold a meeting in Brent 
h^U the last Friday night of each 
month, and as the meeting will be in 
the dance hall, the ladies will be invited 
in the near future. Frank Good, of 
Springfield, 0., was at the meeting and 
gave us quite a nice talk. Wm. A. 
Sperling, of Stumpp & Walter Co., New 
York, also was on hand and gave us a 



/■ 



28 



The Weekly Florists' Review* 



.'V V^V^ »"'*/." * .7'" 'T-'^VW! TCWi'nf' W^ 



Mabch 2, 1911. 



Big Supply of 
Medium and Short 



PINK KILLARNEY 



>$5.00 to $12.00 per lOOi 



CLOur growers are cutting them in quantity, mostly of the medium grades. 
Well-grown stock, perfect buds. It Your customers will see at once the 
extra value in our fancy, $4.00 per 100 CARNATIONS* Good stock, 
$3.00 per 100. We can prove this fact to your complete satisfaction with 
a sample shipment. In quantity we can quote you attractive prices. Our 
daily supply is large, and we can make immediate shipment on receipt of 
all orders. Mrs. C. W. and Alma Ward, per 100, $6.00. 



The Leo Niessen Co. 



Wholesale Florists 

1209 Arch St. ti Philadelphia 

Open from 7 a. m. to 8 p. m. 



Mention The Review when you write. 



nice talk and donated $10 for the good 
of the show. Several firms from as 
many leading cities have promised to 
send displays of novelties, and E. G. 
Hill will be with us at a meeting in 
April to give us some of his views on 
shows. J. M. 



PHILADELPHIA. 



The Rising Eastern Market. 

The close of the pre-lenten season has 
been quiet; there was not the rush that 
sometimes marks a short season, due 
partly to the fact that there has been 
plenty of opportunity for entertaining, 
with no necessity for crowding many 
parties into the last few days, and 
partly owing to the coming of spring. 

The sun, for so long almost unknown, 
has been with us once more; the 
' weather is milder and is bringing for- 
ward the crops rapidly. Roses, carna- 
tions, violets and sweet peas are in 
heavier supply. There is not enough 
business to maintain the prices in the 
face of the increased receipts. Lower 
figures are recorded on all grades of 
carnations, on the shorter grades of 
roses and on sweet peas. Violets have 
also receded. 

There has been an excellent demand 
for Beauties, the crops of which are 
short. Fancy grades of other roses 
also have sold well. Valley has been 
rather irregular in supply, the market 
failing to absorb., the unexpectedly 
heavy shipments receipted on several 
days. A decided preference is shown 
for Cattleya Trianae, which holds its' 
price, over Cattleya Schroederiana, 
which has to be shaded in price to sell. 
Gardenias are in good demand. Callas 
and Easter lilies have sold well, par- 
ticularly the former, but the buyers are 
loudly demanding lower rates for Lent. 
Daffodils continue to lead the bulbous 
stock, with tulips a good second. Prices 
are receding, due partly to conditions 
and partly, it is whispered, to the first 
shipments of the southern product. 

Greens have been selling exception- 
ally well, particularly Asparagus plu- 
mosus sprays in bunches. Mexican ivy, 
leucothoe and dagger ferns have been 
in good demand. 



SPRING FLOWERS 

WHITE LILAC 

DAFFS, double and single 
FREESIA 

VALLEY 

TULIPS 

SWEET PEAS and VIOLETS 

We can give you excellent value in all these varieties. 

FANCY BRIDES, RICH.1VIOND, MARYLAND 

CARNATIONS In all colors 

EASTER LILIES 



BERGER BROS. 



4 



•••Wholesale Florlsts^^^ 
1305 Filbert Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 



Mention The Review when you write. 



Various Notes. 



E. O. King will deliver an illus- 
trated lecture before the Florists' Club 
in Horticultural hall, Broad street below 
Locust, Tuesday evening, March 7, at 
"8 'clock ; subject, ' ' Greenhouse ' Con- 
struction, Including Eiverview. " ' <^(j^ 

The Philadelphia Florists' Club lias 
issued invitations to all its members for 
the trip to the Henry A. Dreer green- 
house warming at Eiverview, March 
8. The special train will leave Market 
street wharf at 2 p. m., returning leave 
Eiverview at 5:45 p. m. Invitations 
have also Keen issued to the New York, 
Baltimore and Washington Florists' 
Clubs. This invitation is, of course, on 
behalf of the officers of the Henry A. 
Dreer corporation, made at their re- 
quest. It is an E. S. V. P. affair. 

Eobert Craig is expected home from 
the Isle of Pines March 5. 



WILLIAM B. LAKE 

Distributor of " Superior " ''■ 

Ribbons, Specialties 

28S N. t4tk St, rUUMitu, fi. 

Mention The Review wnen you write. 



The Chestnut Hill Floral Exchange 
has closed. 

The deal reported last week that J. 
J. Hunt had taken the store of the late 
Louis Muth, at Fifth and Fairmount 
avenue, is off. Some stock had already 
been ordered in Mr. Hunt's name when 
the deal fell through. 

Ira H. Landis purchased the H. H. 
Girvin place at Paradise, Pa., not the 
W. B. Girvin place, as incorrectly re- 
ported last week. W. B. Girvin is a 



jBl^sswjp^T^'fT'T'?'^^^''^"™ -- 



•iTTf^tttvfJ*'"!'' 



Makcu 2, 1911. 



The Weekly Rorists' Review. 



29 




SWEET PEAS 

Never have we had as fine and choice 
a lot of Sweet Peas to offer as we have now. 
Some beautiful shades in lavender, flesh, 
pink and white. Splendid, long, 
well flowered stems. $1.00 per 100; 
$7.50 per 1000. 

Plenty of medium ones, excellent 
quality, too, at $5.00 per 1000. 




MELODY 

THE BEST YELLOW ROSE TODAY. 



DOUBLE KILLARNEY 



The Killarney that will supersede the Killarney now grown. 

PRINCE DE BULGARIE 

Also entirely different from any 




MELODY 



ROSE QUEEN 

In a class by itself. 

rose grown. 

Write for our Descriptive List and Prices of these and other Introductions. 



Specials for SL Patrick's Day 

SHAMROCK PLANTS, 2X-inch, per 100, $10.00. 

SHAMROCK PANS (empty), shamrock shaped; 2 inches deep, 6 inches diameter, each, 15c. 

SHAMROCK PANS, shamrock shaped; 3 inches deep, 10 inches diameter, each, 25c. 
The latter can be filled from 2%-inch pots and used for table decorations. 

GENUINE IRISH GREEN RIBBON, the Cattleya brand; No. 2 width, 30c per piece; No. 
3 35c* No 5 45c 

FOLIAGE GREEN CHIFFON, 6-inch width only, 4c per yard. 

GREEN CARfdATION DYE, per package, 75c. Enough to color 200 to 300 flowers (pow- 
der) ; package will make two quarts of liquid. 

S. S. Pen nock =Meehan Co. 

^ THE WHOLESALE FLORISTS OF PHILADELPHIA 




PHILADELPHIA 
1608-1620 Ludlow Street 



NEW YORK 
109 West 28th Street 



WASHINGTON 
1212 New York Avenue 



Mpntion The Review -when you write. 



QUALITY 



-BOXWOOD SPRAYS 

Write US your requirements JQI^^S, The Holly Wreath Man, 

Easter and Memorial Day 



MILTON, DELAWARE. 



Mention The Review when you write. 



successful grower of carnations who 
ships to the Leo Niessen Co. 

George F. Christie, Clifton, Pa., has 
been sending some excellently grown 
sweet peas to William J. Baker. They 
are considered equal, if not superior, to 
anything in the market. 



Among the recent visitors were W. E. 
MeKissick, Washington, D. C; W. H. 
Grever, with W. J. Palmer, Buffalo, N. 
Y.; Miss L. H. Dundore, Lancaster, 
Pa.; H. Nusbaum, Clarksburg, W. Va., 
and H. Warendorff, of the Ansonia, 
Xew York city. 



Stephen Mortensen, Southampton, Fa., 
suffered a severe loss from fire on the 
morning of Febnaary 20. Some waste 
is supposed to have been ignited through 
a crack in the flue leading to the smoke- 
stack while the night fireman was pack- 
ing the flowers. The fire gained such 



■•;-.,v.»v ■'•;■. 






30 



The Weekly Florists' Review. 



Mabch 2, 1911. 



headway before it was discovered that 
it was impossible to save the boiler- 
shed, and the ends of the houses open- 
ing into it were badly burned. Two- 
thirds of Mr. Mortensen's fine plants 
were ruined. There is no insurance. 
Neighbors helped board up the ends of 
the houses. The big houses last built 
were uninjured. The boilers are work- 
ing. Mr. Mortensen will rebuild. 

M. Eice and Mrs. Kiee left February 
25 for a two months' vacation. 

Joseph Beavis & Son, Limekiln pike 
and Chelten avenue, Pittville, Pa., will 
build two houses, 35x100, to be planted 
with roses. The order has been placed 
with the King Construction Co. 

Samuel F. Lilley reports an excellent 
demand for the beautiful Mexican ivy. 

The Michell lecture on hardy plants 
February 27 was well attended. 

H. Bayersdorfer & Co. are unloading 
heavy shipments from incoming steam- 
ers this week. 

Stockton & Howe, Princeton, N. J., 
will plant three houses of their new 
rose, Princeton, this season. It has been 
having a great run. 

Edward Eeid spent two days this 
week in Norfolk, Va., at the bedside of 
his friend, L. G. Blick. 

Fred Ehret has been having a brisk 
month with his double-header, as the 
boys of baseball proclivities style his 
two stores. 

B. Eschner, of M. Eice & Co., reports 
increased demand for Easter, with a 
leaning toward hampers, requiring 
night work half of each week. 

Paul Berkowitz, of H. Bayersdorfer 
& Co., is home again, looking sunnier 
than ever. 

Henry M. Weiss & Sons, of Hatboro, 
Pa., will plant their two new houses in 
the Ward carnations, pink and white, 
Mrs. C. W. Ward and Alma Ward. 

Grip is prevalent. Benedict Gibbs 
and William A. Leonard are down with 
it — two good men — for but a brief time, 
it is hoped. Phil. 

NEW YOBK. 



The Market. 

Spring weather, increasing shipments 
and the beginning of Lent have all 
proved adverse influences. Prices are 
receding and before the end of the 
week there probably will be enougb 
and to spare of everything. If there 
is a shortage of anything it is in the 
highest grade of American Beauties. 
Carnations are abundant and 3 cents 
was top for all but the specialties Feb- 
ruary 27. Orchids hold at 50 cents, but 
there is no shortage. Lilies and valley 
hold at last week's quotations and gar- 
denias lose none of their popularity, 
the selected stock holding steadily at 
$5 per dozen. There is no lack of sweet 
peas, with a wide range in quality and 
length of stem. For violets 50 cents 
per hundred is the top price, and likely 
to be during the forty days of Lent. 
Bulbous stock is never scarce and prices 
have been unsatisfactory to the grow- 
ers. Soon the southern daffodils will be 
here, and already the robins and the 
budding trees are harbingers of an early 
spring. A visit to any of the seeds- 
men's headquarters emphasizes this 
most practically, for already every one 
of them is busy with fast accumulat- 
ing orders. 

Various Notes. 

Anton Schultheis, at College Point, 
has everything apparently timed just 



FUNGINE 



The newly discovered FUNGiaDE 

An Invaluable remedy for MIIiDEW. 
BUHT and other funeons diaeases. 



Lenox, Mass., Feb. 24, 1911. 



IT KRADICATES RUST 

"Blantyre" Gardens. 

Thomas Proctor, Supt. 
Aphine Manufacturing Company, Madison, N. J. 

Dear Sirs: — Eeplying to your letter of the 21st, in which you request me to 
advise you as to the results of my trials with your Fungine, I have not had an oppor- 
tunity of testing its merits on mildew, but I can, however, unqualifiedly recommend 
it as being a very effective remedy for carnation rust. I brought in some new car- 
nations some time ago that were in a bad state with rust; on their arrival their 
leaves were completely covered, and after two applications, at proportions of one part 
Fungine to forty parts water, I found it had the desired effect. For this reason I 
gladly endorse it. / Yours very truly, THOMAS PEOOTOE. 

DESTROYS MILDEW 

Farmington, Conn., Feb. 23, 1911. 
Aphine Manufacturing Compain^, Madison, N. J. 

Dear Sirs: — In reply to^^urs of the 21st inst., I would say that my experience 
with Fungine for mildewc^-Ms been very satisfactory. I think it is much better and 
easier than the old way of dusting the plants and painting steam pipes. 

The first time I used it I was rather disappointed, as it turned the woodwork in 
the houses^ wherever the spray hit it, a dir ty yellow, but this all disappeared la a 
few days. 

I have not tried it for rust, but cannot see why Fungine is not going to be to the 
florists and gardeners what the lime and sulphur wash is to the pomologists. 

For black, green and white fly, mealy bug and thrips, I have not used any- 
thing this season but Aphine. The greenhouses have not been fumigated and 
plants are in a fine healthy condition. Yours respectfully, 

WAREEN S. MASON, Grd. to A. A. Pope. 

IT CURES ROOT ROT 

Zieger & Sons, 

Growers of Decorative Greens 
and Flowers, 
Palms — Ferns — Novelties. Germantown, Philadelphia, Pa., Feb. 23, 1911. 

Aphine Manufacturing Company, Madison, N. J. 

Gentlemen: — Concerning the Fungine: we may say that we have not had much 
occasion to use it; however, we had one delightful experience with it. We had quite 
a few thousand chrysanthemum cuttings inserted in old sand which had been left in 
one of our cold houses. As our propagator is accustomed to do, he saturated the sand 
and kept the cuttings very wet, which caused rot and fungus. The writer, noticing 
this apparent loss, went for the Fungine purchased from you. We used it one part 
to twenty-five parts water and sprayed the entire lot of dampened and partly rotted 
cuttings, thinking that these cuttings (of which there were several thousand) might 
as well die one way as another, but to our great surprise these cuttings after the 
single application, a thorough one at that, turned the cuttings to a light green color 
and seemed to extract the fungus, which sort of foamed up and separated from the 
decay (similar to peroxide on a healing wound). 

Now these cuttings at this writing have nearly all made good healthy roots, 
although a few cuttings rotted in the sand but made roots above the decayed part, 
which seems remarkable to us. It is not necessary to say that for this experience 
alone we are highly pleased with the results obtained with Fungine used as above, 
which is far more than we had ever expected. 

We beg to take the liberty to state that Aphine does all it is recommended to do 
in a very satisfactory manner. Yours very truly, 

ZIEGEE & SONS, Ernest J. F. Zieger, Sec'y. 

FUNGINE, $2.00 per grallon; 75c per quart. 



For 



House 




and 
Garden 



KNOWN AND USED THE WORLD OVER 

Entebbe, Uganda (Central Africa), 16th January, 1911. 

Sirs: — Kindly supply me with suflBcient Aphine to ensure a fair trial. I should 
be glad to experiment with this insecticide. 

W. GOWDEY, Government Entomologist. 
Fritz Bahr says in his article on Lilies in the Florists' Exchange of Feb. 18, 1911: 

"We have given our lilies a weak dose of Aphine once a week since they have 
occupied space on top of the bench, and thus far we haven't noticed even a trace of 
the pests; 'that ought to prove that green flies are not very fond of the stuff, for if 
there's anything they do like it is to get into the tops of the lilies, and it takes an 
awful lot of coaxing to get them out." 

APHINE, $2.50 per saUon; $1.00 per quart. For sale by Seedsmen. 

If you cannot obtain them from your dealer write us for name of nearest selling agent. 

r""": : APHINE MANUFACTURING CO., "'n'.T ' 



jlWfWwpr.^ 



fw^-sri"^ '^"' ;? •■. 7 ' 



Mabch 2, 1911. 



The Weekly Florists^ Review. 



31 



THE FLORISTS' SUPPLY HOUSE OF AMERICA 





Years of experience have enabled us to select 
and to make the most complete assortment 
of new and stylish baskets ever offered in 
America or elsewhere in the world. 

These baskets are at your disposal, the largest 
assortment, the best made, reasonably priced. 

Send us your EASTER ORDERS now, so that 
there may be no delay in having your stock 
complete when you want it, for Easter comes 
but once a year. 

Send for our illustrated catalogue of the best 
of everything in florists' supplies. 

Our factory is at your disposal for novelties 
or special orders. 



H. BAYERSDORFER & CO. 



1129 Arch Street, 






PHILADELPHIA, PA. 



82 



The Weekly Florists' Review. 



March 2, 1911, 



GREEN CARNATIONS 



DON'T 

Be Fooled Aealn 

Buy from 

Tbe OriB^nator 

not tbe 

Imitator 



FOR ST. PATRICK'S DAY. I send you, postpaid to any address, enough pnlverized coloring to make one quart of the 
titronsest liquid dye for $1.00; enough for one gallon, $3.60. I sruarantee my goods to be tlie coloring and does the 
worli satisfactorily. 



ORDER NOW FDFn fiFAD 

>otlon8 wltH each box ■ ■%■— B^ VPL.#^I%. 



Directions 



FREE SAMPLES 

(OriKlnator of Green Flowers) 
1113 VINE STREET, CINCINNATI, OHIO 



Mention The Review when you write. 



GREEN CARNATION FLUID 

Buy the genuine stuff from Mrs. Beu, THZ ORIGINATOR, who made the first fluid and exhibited the first green carnations at 
the r>iicaf?o ChrypanthcD'um show, 8 TEARS AGiO. $1.00 per quart. Cash \^tb order. Can also be had in ponder 
form, enoueh for one quart, $1.00. I've just gotten up a compound that colors carnations a Beautiful Yellow. It is the 

latest thing out and is causing a commotion around the Cliicago Flower Marlcet. Try a sample quart. Trice, same as the green. 

MRS. r. BEU, 27-29-31 Randolph Street, CHICAGO 



Mention Tbe Review when you write. 



Advertisement of 



THE PINE TREE 
SILK MILLS CO. 



A Satin Edge Taffeta Ribbon, 1 Inch wide 
— 52^c for 10 yards. K 



The f atin edge is of a different color from the taffeta. The colors are woven specially for Violets, 
Orchids. Sweet Peas, Roses, Foliages. Samples cost nothing. 

806-808-810 ARCH STREET, 

Mention The Review when you write. 



PHILADELPHIA, PA. 



right for a big Easter supply. The rose 
stock in many of the old and new varie- 
ties of ramblers gives exceptional prom- 
ise of perfect specimens. There is no 
lack of quantity or variety here, nor 
at Dupuy's, Pancock & Schumacher's 
and Darlington 's, whence comes so 
much of the Long Island supply. The 
same careful planning is evident at 
Scott's, Zeller's and Keller's, in Flat- 
bush, and there will be no scarcity of 
high-grade stock among the expert 
growers this season. 

E. Vincent, Jr., of White Marsh, Md., 
writes that the English party, with J. S. 
Brunton in charge, will reach New York 
March 16 or 17, will likely attend the 
banquet of the Florists' Club March 18, 
visit Philadelphia March 19, White 
Marsh March 20, Washington March 
21 to 23, Eichmond March 24 and 25, 
Chicago March 26 and 27, Niagara Falls 
March 28 and 29 and Boston and New 
York from March 30 to April 5. Mr. 
"Vincent and Mrs. Vincent will come to 
New York to meet the party on its ar- 
rival. 

The presence of the English visitors 
will add greatly to the enjoyment of 
the new club's banquet March 18. Al- 
ready nearly 200 seats have been sold 
for this annual affair, which this year 
will go far beyond any in attendance 
and enthusiasm. 

The interest is widespread in the 
effort to secure favorable legislation in 
behalf of the grant of $50,000 for flo- 
rists' experimental greenhouses at Cor- 
nell, and the effort to enlist the florists 
of the state in its behalf has met with 
most gratifying response. 

Kessler Bros, have secured the large 
store and greenhouse now being com- 
pleted by John D. Nicholas on West 
Twenty-eighth street for a term of 
years and the Growers* Cut Flower Co., 
J. J. Coan manager, will occupy the 
other half of the store, both firms mov- 
ing to their new quarters May 1. 



GREEN CARNATIONS 

For St. Patrick^s Day 

Powder to change any white flower to green within a few hours 
Full directions with each package. 

Per Ounce, 35c; | Postpaid to any Post Office 
, Per X Lb., $1.85 ) in the United States. 

Henry R Michell Co. 

518 Market Street, PHILADELPHIA, PA. 



Mention The Review when you write. 



GEO. H. ANGEItNUELLER 

Wholesale Florist 
1884 Pine St., St. Louis, Mo. 

St. Patrick's Carnation Fluid 

(Forcoloring: Carnations Green.) Qt.,$1.00; Pt.,50c. 
Mention Tbe Review when you write 

Green Carnations 

Send 26c and receive by mail a packatre of dye 
that will color 75 to 100 carnations green. Have 
many letters statinsr it is best on market. 3 pack- 
ages, 60c ; (2.00 per doz. 2c stamps accepted. 

LOUIS ELSASS,Chillicothe, Ohio 

Mention The Review when vou writw. 

James McManus has taken a lease on 
the premises now occupied by A. H. 
Langjahr. 

J. B. Nugent, Jr., will open his new 
store at Madison avenue and Sixty- 



St. Patrick's 

Carnation Fluid 

Directions for Use. 

To get the best results put the stems of flowers 
in about 2 inches of Huid, leaving them there 
about 30 minutes. After taking them out of fluid 
put them right in water for about two hours, 
which has a tendency of forcing tbe fluid up to the 
bloom and making that pretty shade of green. 

Pint 50c Quart $1.00 

A. L. Randall Co. 

The Nail Order Sopply Hoise 

19.£1 Randolph St. CHICAGO 

Mention The Review when you write. 

seventh street this week. It is hand- 
somely fitted up and thoroughly up to 
date. 

The annual smoker of the Bernards- 
ville Horticultural and Agricultural So- 
ciety, February 25, was a most enjoy- 



HISUJB^WJi))!^IW*'!yr>*T- ~ A- .^'f^ ■ - ■■> '■3>»7.-y;wr'«.lT -.'■»'■■->- /,:'.•" ••■,-•■ .. --.—r,. 



Mahch 2, 1911. 



TheWeckly Florists' Review. 



33 




...THE ONLY ONE... 

TONE 



— -0*-— **- 



GSB 



CLASS 




Patrick Green 



(The Only True Irish Ck>lor) 



DARK GREEN (The Color BeautiM) 

You have never seen a Carnation Green unless you have used our brand. Our coloring is not a 
foke and should not be classed with the sickly looking, toneless and muddy article — called green — that is try- 
ing to be forced upon the market. Our greens are scientifically prepared, sold under a guarantee and used 
by the leading florists and dealers throughout the United States and Canada. Sent postpaid on receipt of price, 
$1.00 the quart. Order your supply now for St. Patrick's Day. 

We make a Yellow, Blue, American Beauty, Orange, Lavender, Pink, Purple and 
Light Red. All colors $1.00 the quart, except Blue, which is $1.25, postpaid. 

Samples FREE for the Asking 

Burton=Allison Company 

84 Adams St, CDICAGO, ILL, D.S.A. 





MentloD The Review when you write. 



Emerald Green Carnation Fluid 

For St. Patrick's Day Green Carnations Use 

AJSX FLOWER DYE 

The only Dye on the market that will color a beautiful Emerald Green and still allow the flower to retain its natural 
appearance. Money refunded if not satisfactory. Complete instructions free. Per quart, by express, $1.00. 

And a complete line of Florists' Supplies. Headquarters for ' * Perfect Shape ' ' Brand Wire Designs 



-Catalogue Free- 



WINTERSON'S SEED STORE, 



45-47-49 Wabasli Avenue, 
CHICAGO 



Mention The Review wben you write- 



CYACEINE ELOWER COLORING 



is drawn up through the stems, showing in the flowers in 20 A A i 

minutes. It colors and preserves them without harming aIIP DCr flUliri 

either the flower or its fragr.ance. Send your order and remit- ■■VV |rvA l|UUA l> ^iuc, jcuuw, American ueaucy. 

SIS,TubyXtat'«tn°^a^"' C. R. CRANSTON, 73 fifield Avenue, PROVIDENCE, R. I. 



The following colors sent to you post- 
paid, St. Patrick green, pink, orange, 
blue, yellow, American Beauty. 



Mention The Revinw when you write. 



able affair. William Elias, the presi- 
dent of the society, was in charge of 
the entertainment. Messrs. Burnett and 
MacNiff represented the New York 
seedsmen. This week the Elberon so- 
ciety will celebrate. 

The new store Of Mrs, Meissner and 
her son, Paul F., at 423 Bedford ave- 
nue, Brooklyn, is proving a great suc- 
cess. Mrs. Meissner is well known to 



all the florists of this vicinity, her late 
husband's skill as a grower at his 
place in Flatbush, now the property of 
Louis Schmutz, having been widely 
recognized. 

P. Welch, of Welch Bros., Boston, 
was a recent visitor and predicts a 
wonderful attendance at the National 
Flower Show. , 

John T. Withers, of Jersey City, lec- 



tured February 22 before the Dutchess 
County Horticultural Society at Pough- 
keepsie. 

March 14 Wm. Elliott & Sons and the 
MacNiff Horticultural Co. will open the 
auction season. Large importations are 
on the way. 

The sudden death of John H. Taylor 
gave the wholesale section a shock Feb- 
ruary 27. He was one of the best known 



34 



The Weekly Florists' Review* 



March 2, 1911. 




B 



ETTER 

OXES 



would be hard to find than the ones shown here. 
They were made for Chicago's first florists, E. 
Wienhoeber, Samuelson, and others. If you han- 
dle the best trade in your city, you will be inter- 
ested in our boxes, made to your special order — 
any size, shape or design, lined or unlined. Let 
us know your wants — we'll let you know the price. 
They may cost a little more, but they are fully 
worth it. Write today, before the Easter rush. 

H. SCHUITZ & CC^TIJl'^ir^lJ'^' Chicago 



MeutloD The Review wdcd voij w^u^• 



growers in this vicinity up to six years 
ago, and shipped his grand rose stock 
for many seasons to John I. Kaynor. 
Mr, Eayuor and his wife are wintering 
in California. 

Burnett Bros, say business is double 
last year's to date. 

Alex. McConnell has another Gould 
wedding on his slate at an early date, 
but it will be no easy task to exceed 
the beauty and extent of the Lord and 
Lady Decies affair, 

John J. Esler, who was injured in a 
trolley accident the evening of the ban- 
quet of the New York and New Jersey 
Plant Growers' Association, and obliged 
to spend some weeks in the hospital, is 
now at his home at Saddle Eiver and 
rapidly convalescing, 

Charles H, Totty reports a large de- 
mand for his new yellow rose and his 
White House carnation, as well as his 
other novelties, 

Walter Siebrecht, of Siebrecht & Sie- 
brecht, has been confined to his home in 
New Eochelle with a severe attack of 
the grip, 

C. W. Scott, of the Yokohama Nurs- 
ery Co., is away again on his western 
trip. 

Craig Muir has invented a useful cor- 
sage pin and protector. He says the 
call for samples has come from every 
part of the Union and Canada. 

Secretary Siebrecht announces the 
positive opening at an early date of the 
plant market at the Fifty-ninth street 
i)ridge. 

Owing to the expiration of lease and 
the demolition of building in which 
Alex. McConnell 's establishment is now 
located, he will remove May 1 to 611 
Fifth avenue, corner of Forty-ninth 
street. 

M, A. Bowe says he will open a store 
on Fifth avenue, between Forty-second 
and Forty-seventh streets, before 
Easter. His present location he will 
retain until the building is removed to 
make room for another skyscraper. 

Bowling. 

The New York Florists* Bowling Club 
made these scores Friday evening, Feb- 
ruary 24: 

Player— Ist 2d 3(1 

Scott 170 145 175 

Nugent 101 107 125 

Moltz 99 117 129 

Holt 107 129 164 

Shaw 107 117 129 

Kaknda 155 119 114 

Fenrlch 149 127 103 

Young 107 116 

Berry 139 107 

Marshall and Watkina also ran. The 

club bowls Kutherford a return matck 

this week. 



^ ^ ^ ^ ^ 

• • • • • 

The Problem Solved at Last 

A SIMPLE 
PRACTICAL 

Corsage Pin 

COMBINED with a PROTECTOR 

Yon simply tie it to the back of tlie bouqnet 
witli the cnstumarr ribbon. 

Flexible, fantcelor, absolately waterproof. 

Send Twenty Cents for Samples. 

CRAIG MUIR 

P.O. Box 66, Grand Central Station,New York 




NUR'S 
CORSAGE 
BOUQUET 
SHIELD 
AND PIN 

Patented 



Back view 
showing 
corsage pin 
attachment 



Mentloo The Review when you write. 




SPECIAL OFFER IN BASKETS 

Write today for our Catalogue, showing many 
exclusive, new designs, specially adapted for flo- 
rists' use, or ask us to send you one of our Spe- 
cial Assortments. We have them from $5.00 
up. Just what you need to increase your cut 
flower and plant trade. 

These baskets are imponed direct from our own factories in 
Germany. When you buy from us you SSTO the Jobber's profit. 

Raedlein Basket Co.;"<!S;si^*"^ 



Mention The Review when you write, 



There was a large attendance, as 
usual, at the Astoria alleys Thursday 
evening, February 23, The cold bottle 
for high score, given by M. C, Ebel, of 
Madison, who was a guest that evening, 
was won by Henry Siebrecht, Mr. Ar- 
nold gave some interesting exhibits in 
mesmerism, with two subjects, and the 
refreshments were abundant, Thurs- 
day, March 2, is ladies' night, with 
prizes, dinner, etc. The scores were: 

Player — Ist 2d 3d 

Siebrecht, Sr 172 

Siebrecht, Jr 165 

Siebrecht, H 

Mlesem 158 

Elnsman 140 

Kessler 131 

DonaldBOn 128 

Doerhof er 



154 


135 


101 


112 


131 


183 


121 


170 


153 


164 


150 


148 


110 


124 


161 


148 



Lorenz m 124 123 

Jacobson 114 102 138 

Shaw 164 151 120 

Edmlston 102 135 120 

Gicbmanu 175 160 

Holt 161 91 

Blecicmann 141 123 

Heins 99 100 

Arnold 100 111 

Moltz 101 105 

J, Austin Shaw, 



Wm. Elliott & Sons stated February 
27 that they were in possession of their 
first consignment of Holland roses, rho- 
dodendrons, etc. The first spring auc- 
tion will take place March 14. 

Charles A, O'Eeilly has been elected 
president of the Columbus Avenue As- 



/■ 



MiBCU 2, 1911. 



/ 



r' 



The Weekly Florists^ Review* 



35 



e&^^* 



♦r^. 



4*i 



Sefton Corrugated Shipping Cases 



.^.jy^. r^-y 




Strong, Lisht and Convenient 



UfHY UM heavy woodan Boxaa for Shipmante of 
** Flowars and Planta whan you oan gat a box 
bntlar adap«ad to your naada, waighlng about ona« 
half aa muoh? 

Our Boxaa ara made to fold flat; thua Inaurlng eoonomy 
In atorage apaoa and enablea the oommlaaion merchant 
to knock them down and return them in bundlea, reduo* 
Ing return ohargaa— they oan be uaed over and over. 

Our Patented K. O. Tin Comer la the only aatlafaotory K.D. oor- 
ner ever adapted to a Corrugated Shipping Caae. it givea you 
a perfeotly fiat box. Coata no more than aet up oomera. 

WRITE FOR OUR NO. 10 CATALOG. 



THE 5EFT0N MANUFACTURING CO. JS;%Tr^ 
1301 WEST 35'" ST.,CHICAGO. ^**^ 



McBtlon The Review when you wr1f*i 



Standard 
Mlail Tubes 

CThe SAf E, ECONOMICAL, 
SUCCESSFUL device for 
sending by MAIL or EX- 
PRESS all kinds of Plants 

They arrive after long journeys in prime 
condition, and the customer is pleased 
and will come again. 

Samples on Request 

Standard Mfg. Co. 

COATESVILLE, PA. 

Plilladelplila Offloe, 2nd and Vine Sta. 

Meutlon Tbe Kevlew wben you write. 



Cut Flower Boxes 

WATKRPROOF, Comer Look Style 

Tbe best and neatest Oat Flower box 
on the market today. 

No. 8x4x20 n.gOperlOO 

No. 1 8x4>ixl6 1.75perl00 

No. 2 8x6x18 2.25 per 100 

No. 8 4x8x18 2.60perl00 

No. 4 8x6x24 2.60perl00 

No. 5 4x8x22 SOOperlOO 

No. 6 4x8x28 4.00 per 100 

No. 7 6x16x20 4.50perlOO 

No. 9 6x10x85 6.00 per 100 

No. 10 7x20x'» 6.26 per 100 

No.U 8>^x5x30 8.26 per 100 

Tbis list will cancel all former lists. 

The above is a complete list of all sizes of 
boxes we manufacture. We cannot furnish 
other sizes. 

Add 60c for printing on an order for 100 
boxes, and 76o for 200 boxes. No charge for 
printinK on an order of 300 boxes or over of 
assorted sises. Sample cardboard free on 
application. Terms, cash with order. Order 
by nomber only. 

LIVINGSTON SEED CO. 

COLUMBUS, OHIO 



Mention The Review when you write. 

Wired Toothpicks 

Menutactured by 

W. J. COWEE, BERLIN, N. Y. 

10,000.. ..$1.75; 50,000.... $7.50; Sample free. 
Vor Sale by Dealera. 

MenttoB The Review when you write. 




H. & D. 

FLORISTS' 

BOX 

Universally used for 
shipping cut flowers and 
designs. Tlie dead-air 
cells form a perfect non- 
conductor of heat and 
cold, thus preserving con- 
tents much longer than 
ordinary wood box. 

H. & D. Florists' Box 
can be used several times. 
Is much lighter than the 
ordinary box, thus saving , 
in express charges. 

Write for Catalosrue 

"HOW TO PACK IT" 



THE HINDE&DAUCH PAPER CO., Sandusky, 0. 



Mention Tbe Review when vou write 




Cut Flower 
and Design Boxes 

All sizes, lowest prices 
Write 

C. C. POLLWORTH CO. 

MILWAUKSX 



Mention Tbe Review when you write. 



Flowerlnsurance 

No more broken or bruised 

flowers when you use the 
new Security Staple, which 
holds them into place. Try 
a box— and you will want 
more. Exprtiss prepaid. 
$1.75 per box of 500. 

FRANK J. TETTER 

Greenfield, Maaa. 

Mention The Review when you write. 

...YOU... 

Wm Find ALL the BEST OFPERS 
ALL the Time in the REVIEW'S 
CLASSIFIED ADVS. 




iCUTilOWER BOXES 

EDWARDS FOLDING BOX CO 

MANUTACTUHER* 

PHILADELPHIA, PA. 



Every Florist should know about 

Illinois Self-Watering flower Boxes 

Write today for descriptive catolocne. 

ILLINOIS HBATER & MFQ. CO. 

81 D«arbom St., 200 Jeffries Bide, 

CHICAGO LOS ANGELES. CAL 

CONARD & JUNES CO.. West Grove, Pa.. AgenU 
for N. Y., N. J. and Pa. 



36 



The Weekly Florists' Review* 



Ma!r6h 2, 1011. 



Cut flower Folding Boxes 

Satisfaction Guaranteed 



In. Per 100 

18x5x3 $1.75 

21x5x3>« 1.85 

24x5xS^ 2.36 

2Sx5x3^ 2.90 

30x5x3»« 3.00 

21x8x5 2.85 



In. Per 100 

24x8x5 13.50 

28x8x5 3.75 

30i8x5 4.50 

36x8x5 5.50 

30xl2l6 6.25 

36x14x6 7.50 



Double Violet Boxes 

In. Per 100 In. Per 100 

9x4x4 $1.75 10x7x6 $2.50 

9iflx6x5 2.25 12x8x7 3.00 

We print boxes free of charge, in any 
quantity. 



We can save you money on everything 

you buy in 

FLORISTS' SUPPLIES 

Greei and Violet Tin Foil, best qiality per lb., $0.17 

Plain Tin Foil per lb., .09 

Dagger and Fancy Ferns, A No. 1 quality per 1000, 1.50 

Brilliant Bronze and Green Galax $1.00 per 1000; per 10,000, 7.S0 

Boxwood, excellent quality per lb., .16 

Southern Wild Smilax per case, 6.00 

Imported Bronze Magnolia Leaves, per basket, $2.00; Green, per basket, 2.2S 



Imported 
Cycas Leaves 

Finest Quality 

Wo never 
disappoint. 
In. Per 100 

4x 8 $2.00 

8x12 2.50 

12x16 3.00 

16x20 3.50 

20x24 4.00 

24x28 5.00 

28x32 6.00 

32x36 7.00 

36x40 8.00 



We constantly carry a large aasortment of FLORISTS* SUPPLIES and can fill orders at a moment's notice. 

HENRY N. ROBINSON & CO. 

Wholesale Commission Plorists 

Mmnufacturerg mod Importers of Florlgts* Supplies. Hardy Cut Evergreens 

15 Province St. BOSTON, MASS. 9 and 15 Chapman PL 



Telephones: Main 2617-2618-555. Fort Hill 25290-25292. 



Mention The Review when you write. 



sociation, organized to secure improve- 
ments in Columbus avenue between 
Sixty-sixth and Eighty-sixth streets. 

J. Diefenbacher has opened a new 
store at 905 Fulton street, Brooklyn. 

An exhibition of plants and flowers 
will be held at the American Museum 
of Natural History, West Assembly hall, 
Wednesday, March 8, from 1 to 5. A 
welcome is extended to all who may 
wish to exhibit, whether members of 
the society or not. It is desired to make 
these monthly exhibitions informal, so 
that plant-lovers may feel at home, both 
those who exhibit and those who come 
to see. Schedules of classes and pre- 
miums ar« now ready for distribution 
and will be sent on application to the 
secretary, George V. Nash, New York 
Botanical Garden, Bronx Park. 



Concord Junction, Mass. — Leonard 
Cousins, Jr., has a large batch of fine 
shamrocks ready for March 17, and says 
the demand is running ahead of a year 
ago. 

Huntingburg, Ind. — Peter Morgen, 
who is an experienced florist, has come 
to this city from New Castle, Ind., and 
will establish a greenhouse as soon as 
a suitable location can be obtained. 



Soothern Wild Smilax 

NOW READY FOR SHIPMENT 

Write, wire or phone the Introducers 

aiDWCLL THE WOODSMAN CO. 

EVERGREEN. ALA. 

Mention The Keview when you write. 

Fadeless Sheet Moss 

Natural Sheet Moss 
. . Laurel Branches and Stems 
New Stone Tomato Seed 
Write for Prices 

W.Z.n)RNELL, Snow HiD, Hd. 

Mention The Review when you write. 



THE KERVAN CO. 

119 W. 28th Street, NEW YORK 

WHOLESALE 

All Decorating Evergreens — Southern Wild Smilax, Fresh Cut Palmetto and 
Cabbage Palm Leaves, fresh cut Cycaa, Hemlock, Laurel, Spruce and Box- 
wood branches; Ropingsmade on order, all kinds and sizes. 

Fancy and Dagger Ferns, Green and Bronze Galax and Leucothoe Sprays, 
Sphagnum, Dry Green Sheet, Lump and Spanish Mosses. Painted Pal- 
metto, Dyed Sheet Moss, Cocoa Fiber, Birch and Cork Barks, etc., etc. 

Greens. Holly, Mistletoe, Fine Plumes. All Decorating Material in Season. 



EVERGREENS FRESH FROM THE WOODS 



J. H. VON CANON & COMPANY 




Gslsx. bronze, 50e per 1000; $4.00 per case of 10,000. 
Galax, trreen, 50c per 1000; $3.75 per case of 10,000. 
Ferns, fancy and datrger, 80c per 1000 ; $3.50 per case of 5000. 
Green Lencothoe Sprays, regular lengths. $2.00 per 1000. 
Green Lencothoe Sprays, 10 to 16-inch, $1.00 per 1000. 
Lanrel Leares, 35c per 1000, Sheet Moss, 5c per pound. 

g^m"ti?J'** Banners Elk, N, C. 

Telegraph us at Elk Park, N. C. 
Mention The Review when you write ^^^ 



^Mkuk. 



AU 



G.:^^. 



^^« 
^''»»^-<'"'/^- 



^^JPS' 




FERNS 



New Crop, Fresh {rom the Patch 
FaBCT and Dagger rerns, $1.00 per 1000 




Mew Crop Bronze and Green Galax , BOc per 1000. Green Leu- 
eotlioe Sprays, $2.60 per 1000. Green Lieucothoe. short,Tl.2S per 1000. 
Bronze Lencothoe, average lengths, $3.60 per 1000. £.anrel Tips. 6 to 
8 inches, for roping, wreaths, etc., $3.00 per 100 lbs. Discount on larte orders. 
I sm headquarters for Ferns. Seventeen years' experience. Send me your 
orders; fail not. 

J. N. PRITCHARD, - ELK PARK, N. C. 

Mention The Review when you write. ^^ 



Southern Wild Smilax 

stock tliat Will Please Tour Customers. 

Wire, write or phone your orders to 

Chas. S. Lee & Company 

Evergreen. Alabama. 



SOUTHERN WILD SMILAX 

Now Eeady for Shipment 

PERPETUATED AND NATURAL 

SHEET MOSSES 

SATISFACTION GUABANTEKD 

L A. BEAVEN, EVERGREB^, ALA. 






*7^' ■' 1 !T--r' '- t 



Mabch 2, 1911. 



The Weekly Florists' Review^ 



37 



Ferns 



Galax 



Moss 



Headquarters for Southern Wild Smilax, $3.00, $4.00 and $5.00 per case 



N«w Fancy Sastem F«m« 

Par 100 asc FerlOOO |2.00 

Gr«en and Bronze Leuootlioe Sprays 

PsrlOO 600 PerlOOO 4.50 

Boxwood 

P«rlb 20c Per case of 60 Iba.. 7.50 

Per 100 lbs.. $14.00. 



Bronse Oalaz Leaves 

Per 1000 11.00 Per 10.000 $7.50 

Green Galax Leaves 

Par 1000 tl.00 Per 10,000 7.60 



Mexican Ivy 
Per 100 10.75 Per 1000. 



6.00 



Green Sbeet Moss 

Per bundle 11.00 10 bundles 4 •.00 

26 bundles 21.25 

Bphacnum Moss 

Per bale <.. 11.00 10 bales t.M 

26 bundles 21.26 



SFECLAX PRICES ON LARGE QUANTITIES. 



Imported Bronze and Green Magnolia Leaves, $2.25 per basket 

Everj^hing in Florists' Supplies 

Full Line of Cut Flowers and Other Greens at All Times. 



C. E. CRITCHELL, 



Wholesale Commission Florist, 
84-36 East Third Street, 



Cincinnati, Ohio 



Mention The Review when you write. 



FANCY FERN ''^ FANCY FERN 

» Per 1000, $2.00. Special Price on Larg^e Lots. aJUa 

^ Green and'Bronze Galax (1.25 per 1000; $7.50 per 10,000 JH^. 

Leucothoe. Sprays, green and bronze $1.00 per 100 ; $7.50 per 1000 

Sphagnum Moss per bale, $1.25; 6 bales, $7.00; extra fine 

Boxwood per lb., 20c; 50 lbs., $8.50 

Magnolia Leaves, brown and green, imported stock, full baskets. Per basket, $2.50 
each; 6 baskets, $2.00 each. 

Full Line Cut Flowers at All Times. 

MIchigin Cut Flowir Exehiiie, 38-40 Braaiiwir, Oitrolt, Mich. .., 





a A. L. FORTUNES 
93 Broadway, BROOKLYN, N. Y. 
Headquarters for Dagger and 
— '/w|^v^ Fancy Ferns, also Bronze and 
/ ^"^ Green Galax. Fifteen years' expe- 
rience. Full count, and guarantee 
A No. 1 stock or no sale. 
GALAX LEAVES. Write for Prices. 

Mention The Review when you write. 

L. B. Brague & Son 

Wholesale florists' Supplies 

Established 1867. 

HINSDALE. - MASS. 

Me ntion The Review when you write 

TRT MY PRICES 

JIAilCI^V 19 ProviKC street, 
s V AHOIV I f BOSTON, MASS. 

Telephone. 4620 Main. 
MinufactNrer of FLORISTS' WIRE DESIGNS 
_And AU Kinds of riorlsts' Supplies 
Daccer and Vanoy Ferns, 11.25 per 1000. 
tireen and Bronze Galax, tl.OO per 1000. 
Boxwood, 16c per lb.; by the case, $7.50 60 lbs. 
Mention The Review when you write. 

A HALF-INCH ADVERTISEMENT 

here will keep your name and fscilities 
before the whole trade, at a cost of 
only 35c per week on a yearly order. 



Decorative Material 



604b. eases of Smilaz, only $6.00. 



Tel. OfQce, Kew Salem, MaM. 
L. D. Phone Oonnectlon. 




MILLINGTON, MASS. 



Fancy and Dagger Ferns, $1.50 per 1000. 
Galax, bronze or green, 75c per 1000. 
Spbagnum Moss, 12-bbl. bales, $4.00 per 

bale. 
TJse our Laurel Festooning for Decora- 

Uons, 4c, 6c and 6c per yard. M»d« 

fresh daily from the woods. 
Laurel Branches, large bunch foronly36c. 
10,000 lbs. Boxwood, $15.00 per 100 

lbs. 



CROWL FERN CO.,MUIington,Mass. 



Mention The Review when you write- 



50-lb. case extra fine SNUAX, $2.00 per case 

QUALITY GUARANTEED. 

When m need of extra good Smilax in any quantity, 
write or wire 

Henry M. Robinson & Co.,Nmter,Ala. 

You can rest assured that all orders placed with us will be filled to your 
entire satisfaction. Unknown customers, satisfactory references or C. O. D. 

Mention The Review when you write. 



88 



The Weekly Rorists' Reviclv. 



Mabch 2, 1911. 



MILWAUKEE. 



The Market. 

Conditions all around last week were 
a great improvement over those of the 
preceding week. With plenty of sun 
throughout the week, the supply was 
greatly increased and the demand kept 
pace, thus keeping the entire market m 
a wholesome condition. 

Various Notes. 

The bowling tournament which was 
to have taken place between the Flo- 
rists' Bowling League and the Odonahas 
March 1 was postponed indefinitely. 
Great interest by local florists is de- 
veloping since the news spread that 
March 19 a delegation of Chicago flo- 
rists will come to challenge the Mil- 
waukee florists in a bowling match. 
Gust. Kusch, captain of the local 
bowlers, no doubt will leave no stone 
unturned to make their stay a most 
enjoyable one. 

Eichard Leitz is contemplating an 
addition to his store at Fourteenth and 
Walnut streets, in the form of a con- 
servatory. E. O. 

THE BOSKOOP EXHIBITION. 

The preparations for the exhibition 
of forced shrubs and perennials, to be 
held in Boskoop, Holland, in April of 
this year, are well advanced s^nd ap- 
pear to be even more thorough and 
comprehensive than at first expected 
The press committee, of which C. H. 
Claassen is president and C. P. Moer- 
lands, secretary, has sent the following 
report of recent progress: 

"The buildings for the exhibition 
are almost finished. They will be 
heated free of charge by the Dutch 
Central Heating Co., of Amsterdam, 
and will be illuminated in the evening 
by electric light, installed by the firm 
of Strous, of Dordrecht. In the exhibi- 
tion grounds there will be a postoffice 
and telegraph office, and every hour 
a passenger boat will run between 
Boskoop and Gouda, the nearest rail- 
way station. 

"The honorary committee consists of 
forty members. The number of exhib- 
its promised amounts to 500, the num- 
ber of novelties to more than a hun- 
dred, and that of little known plants 
to sixty. All these facts show that the 
exhibition will in every way surpass 
expectations." 

WANT ADVERTISEMENTS. 



tVAdTertlsements nnder this head 10 cents per 
line, cash ^vith order from all who do not do 
other adyertlsinfr. In eendlDK remittance count 
•even words to the Une. 

DlBplay advertisements In this department $1.00 
(or one Inch space. 

When answers are to be sent In our care, aid 10 
eentB for forwardlni;. 

Plant advprtlsementa not admitted under thiS'head. 

SITUATION WANTED— Young man, age 22, 
with several years' greenhouse experience, 
desires position whore he can learn designing and 
decorating; willing to start low; good references. 
Address No. 204, care Florists' Review, Chicago. 

SITUATION WANTED— By a man. 45 years of 
age. 25 rears' experience In the wholesale 
and retail floral business in all branches; A No. 1 
hybridist; wish to have the management in an 
up-to-date commercial or private concern; either 
on shares or good salary. Address care J. K. 
Postma, Union City, Tenn. 



SITUATION WANTED— By competent florist 
and landscape gardener on private place; 
Scandinavian, 31 years, single, with 14 years' 
experience from Scandinavia, Germany, England 
and 4 years In this country; well up In all 
branches of horticulture; can furnish the best 
of references. Address No. 218, care Florists' 
Review, Chicago. 



SITUATION WANTED— By experienced travel- 
ing seed salesman with nrBt-class house. 
Address No. 182, care Florists' Review, Chicago. 

SITUATION WANTED— As steamfltter, carpen- 
ter and handy man on large place. Louis 
Weber, 126 Vernon Ave., Louisville, Ky. 

SITUATION WANTED— By a young florist, six 

years' experience; a trial will prove my 

ability. John Chrlstensen, 212 Locust St., Ist 
floor, Chicago, 111. 

SITUATION WANTED— By young man with 
four years' experience In greenhouse work; 
good reference. Address John Schonatb, Ocono- 
mowoc, Wis. 

SITUATION WANTED— German, lifetime ex- 
perience, wants position, with dwelling pre- 
ferred, in southern Illinois or vicinity. Charles 
Roeper, 40th St., Cairo, 111. 

SITUATION WANTED— On rose section In up- 
to-date commercial place, or as gardener on 
private place; life experience In flowers or 
vegetables; state particulars In first letter. Ad- 
dress No. 222, care Florists' Review, Chicago. 

SITUATION WANTED— By a good grower and 
propagator; open for engagement April 1; 
single, American, age 29, 12 years' experience, 
especially in carnations; state full particulars in 
first letter. Address No. 208, care Florists' Re- 
view, Chicago. 

SITUATION WANTED— By thorough florist and 
gardener, married, 14 years' practical ex- 
perience in everything pertaining to first-class 
place; private place preferred; good wages ex- 
pected. Address No. 214, care Florists' Review, 
Chicago. 

SITUATION WANTED— Carnation specialist, 
from one of the leading establishments, suc- 
cessful exhibitor at the prominent shows. Is 
open to take charge of carnation range; finest 
reference. Address No. 210, care Florists' Re- 
view, Chicago. 

SITUATION WANTED— By German, single, 30 
years of age; 15 years' experience in green- 
house work, especially roses, carnations and all 
kinds of pot plants; able to take full charge; 
first-class references. Address No. 147, care 
Florists' Review, Chicago. 

SITUATION WANTED— To take charge, by 
practical grower of 20 years' experience In 
rofies, carnations and general greenhouse plants; 
middle west; disengaged after April 1; state 
wages. Address No. 220, care Florists' Review, 
Chicago. 

SITUATION WANTED — As gardener on private 
place; has 8 years' experience and good 
references; understands greenhouse flowers, fruit 
and vegetable stocks; has been 9 years in U. S. 
A. ; please state wages and particulars in first 
letter; engagement the first of April. Address 
B. T. DeWllde, Noordwykerhout, Holland. 

SITUATION WANTED— By a middle-aged sin- 
gle man, first-class grower of roses, carna- 
tions, mums and general stock; also a good de- 
signer; sober and honest; competent to take 
charge; ready March 18th; only an up-to-date 
place and good wages expected. Jacob Schmid, 
General Delivery, Newton, Iowa. 

HELP WANTED — An energetic young man of 
neat appearance as assistant store clerk; one 
who has had experience as designer and decorator; 
must be strictly sober; send references from 
previous employers and state wages expected in 
first letter. Address John Reck & Son, 985 Main 
St., Bridgeport, Conn. 

HELP WANTED— By March 15th, experienced 
man to take charge of small retail place, 
growing general line of stock; must be strong 
on mums; married man preferred; send references 
and wages expected in first letter; to take full 
charge, also do designing. Wheeler Floral Co., 
Jamestown, North Dakota. 

HELP WANTED — First-class grower for 30,000 
feet of glass; roses, carnations, bulb stuff 
and bedding plants; also assistant gardener for 
Lake Shore & Mich. Southern Ry. Co.; married 
men for both places preferred ; send references 
with wages expected In first letter to Carl 
Uirsch, Hillsdale, Mich. 

HELP WANTED — A healthy, strong, young 
man, not afraid of work and ambitions to 
advance, who can grow vegetable plants, care 
for hotbeds and assist fiorist in greenhouse; must 
be strictly temperate and honest; wages to start, 
$10 per week and room; location, a live town of 
.'i.OOO In middle west. Address No. 218, care 
Florists' Review, Chicago. 

HELP WANTED — Grower to take full charge 
of an up-to-date establishment of about 
.31,000 sq. feet, growing a general line of stock 
for wholesale trade. Including carnations, roses, 
mums, and violets; this Is a splendid opportunity 
for a good steady man; my former foreman hav- 
ing left to return to Europe; none but a man 
having good reference as to his ability as a 
grower and being sober and industrious need 
npply; good wages and a steady position to the 
right man; German married man preferred., 
August Von Boeselager, Mount Clemens, Mich. 



HELP WANTED — Foreman for greenhouses and 
florist store; state experience and wages. 
Address No. 211, care Florists' Review, Chicago. 

HELP WANTED — An experienced gardener to 
do general garden work; house rent free; 
references required. J. O. Leake, Nashville, 
Teijn. 

HELP WANTED — Good live young man to take 
charge of carnation section; Eilso man to do 
potting and take care of young stock. Address 
Will Bros. Co., Minneapolis, Minn. 

HEL^ WANTED — Good grower of general 
greenhouse stock for retail place; must be 
sober and able to produce the goods. Address 
No. 174, care Florists' Review, Chicago. 

HELP WANTED— An all-round florist, married 
man; state experience and salary In flrst 
letter; reference required. R. C. Hinz, Leaven- 
worth, Kan. 



H 



ELP WANTED — At once, an all-round florist 
for wholesale and retail place; married man, 
no children; S50 per month and 6-room bouse; 
references. Adi" 



Morris, III. 



Lddress The Morris Floral Co., 



HELP WANTED — At once, rose grower; must 
be competent and a willing worker; new 
bouses, stock in good shape; state wages and all 
particulars in flrst letter. C. H. Frey, 1133 O 
St., Lincoln, Neb. 



HELP WANTED — An experienced' grower of 
roses, carnations, mums and other cut flow- 
ers; results expected; must be ambitious and 
steady. Apply with recommendations to Cbas. 
Frueh & Sons, Saginaw, Mich. 

HELP WANTEJD — Young man accustomed to 
filling and checking orders, with some ex- 
perience as shipping clerk; also an experienced 
nurseryman wanted. The BHizabeth Nursery Co., 
Elizabeth, N. J. 

HELP WANTED — A foreman with best of 
reference; state wages wanted; must be 
able to grow roses, carnations, sweet peas and 
plants; have about 50,000 ft. glass, up-to-date. 
J. E. Melnhart, Webb City, Mo. 

HELP WANTED — At once, a good all-round 
florist to take charge of plant; also must 
understand design work as well; send reference 
and state wages; steady Job to a good man. 
W. S. Beebe, Owosso, Mich. 

HELP WANTED — Helper in carnation house; 
should have 2 or :? years' experience with 
carnations; must furnish references and state 
wages wanted. Miller Floral Co., Farmlngton, 
Utah. 

HELP WANTED — Plantsman and foreman for 
large place; only capable and strictly tem- 
perate man need apply; give age, references 
and experience. Address No. 221, care Florists' 
Review, Chicago. 

HELP WANTED — Experienced landscape 
draftsman, understanding drafting and color 
work and must be able to handle men and 
clients; do not apply unless qualified. Address 
Henry C. Klehm, Landscape Architect, Moline, 
IlL 

HELP WANTED — April 1st, working foreman; 
must be sober and able to grow No. 1 carna- 
tions, chrysanthemums, violets, roses and bedding 
plants for retail place, 20,000 ft. of glass; state 
wages and all particulars in flrst letter. Ellis 
Bros. & Co., Keene, N. H. 

HELP WANTED— A German florist and gar- 
dener, one who has some knowledge of land- 
scape work and is a bustler, of good habits and 
a sticker, to grow for the retail trade; will have 
charge of 6,000 ft.; general line Is grown; give 
wages expected with references. Address No. 
181, care Florists' Review, Chicago. 

HELP WANTED— We wish to hire a man for a 
day flreman, who has some knowledge of 
steam fitting and steam heating, who is able 
to put in piping under directions, and who Is 
willing to be a general helper out of firing sea- 
son; want some one that Is looking for a steady 
place of from 2 to 5 years or longer; must be a 
sober man. The Newburys, Mitchell, S. D. 

WANTED — Experienced man to take contract 
for building four 27x100 connected green- 
bouses; owner furnish material; middle Illinois. 
Address No. 170, care Florists' Review, Chicago. 

FOR SALE — Carnation house, 24x70, concrete 
benches; general plant house, 23xC8; botli 
houses concrete walls; hot water boiler; iron 
posts support roof; city water; potting shed, 
10x35: 32 sash, 200 flats; well stocked for 
season's trade; several tons of rotted cow 
manure; 6-room dwelling; ground, 132x132, on 
Main and Grotto streets; town of 3,000; near- 
est florist 27 miles; no competition; trade 
steadily growing; need another house to supply 
demand; large vegetable plant trade; 111 health 
reason for not adding to plant and for selling: 
business will pay 25% net on Investment; $3,500 
for immediate possession; $3,000 July 1; $2,000 
down, balance to suit purchaser; information of 
interest given on request; this will pay In- 
vestigation. W. C. Scovell, Malta, Ohio. 



Makch 2, 1911. 



The Weekly Florists' Review. 



39 



F 



OR SALE — Do you want a good ereenhouBe 
* property at a real bargain (Ohio), large 
acreage Y Address No. 818, care Florists' Re- 
view, Chicago. 

FOR SALE — 12,000 ft. of glass In modern 
greenhouses, and 2 acres of land; central 
Ohio; doing good husiness. Address No. 209, 
ca re Florists' Review, Chicago. 

FOR SALE — $4x125 ft. corner, small greenhouse 
with stock and a first-class cottage. Call or 
write T. Grabowskl, 4523 W. Addison St., west 
of Milwaukee Ave., Chicago. 

FOR SALE — Greenhouse property of 2,500 sq. 
feet of glass, ground 100x587 feet; good 
business; reason for selling; will sell on easy 
terms. F. W. Weldmann, Fort Morgan, Colo. 

FOR SALE — Retail flower store, old established, 
favorable lease; excellent location on north- 
west side of Chicago; doing good business; good 
reason for selling. Address Martin Peterson, 2550 
W. Division St., Chicago. 

FOR SALE— In Iowa, 7,000 ft. of glass, hot 
water heat, well stocked for present and 
spring trade, plenty of pots, plumber's tools and 
a small store down town. Address No. 815, 
care Florists' Review, Chicago. 

FOR SALE — Greenliouses, 18,000 feet of glass; 
a fine house and stable; one and a half 
acres of ground; everything in best condition; 
within four miles of New York city. Address 
No. 141, care Florists' Review, Chicago. 

FOR SALE— 9,000 sq. ft. glass, steam heat, 
own spring water; stocked with carnations, 
Easter stuff, bedding plants; suburbs and town 
100.000 population; trolley at door; cause, sick- 
ness. Irvin H. Anderson, R. D. 1, Reading, Pa. 

FOR SALE — Within twelve miles of the new 
hydro-electric dam, on the Mississippi river, 
at Keokuk, Iowa; a valuable business; new green- 
houses; 3,000 ft. of glass; widow; terms easy. 
Address No. 201, care Florists' Review, Chicago. 

FOR SALE — In Chicago, established retail 
flower store, located in one of the best 
neighborhoods on the south side; no competition; 
best of reasons for selling. Address No. ITT, 
care Florists' Review, Chicago. 

FOR SALE — Greenhouse, well stocked, and 6 
large lots; 46 miles from Spokane, Wash.; 
2 railroads In city; fine climate; best northwest- 
ern market. For particulars and price address 
Newport Floral Co., Box 361, Newport, Wash. 

FOR SALE — Or will exchange for Improved 
farm; greenhouses, 35,000 ft. glass, well 
stocked; 3% acres; in a city of 20,000; no com- 
petition; suitable for wholesale and retail; must 
be sold; reason, death of proprietor. Address 
Dr. C. H. Smith, Marietta, Ohio. 

: • ' 

FOR SALE — Greenhouse, store, dwelling and 
stock, with fixtures complete; all In Al con- 
dition; located on main street in fast growing 
suburb of Chicago. Will make terms or might 
rent. See owner, 731 Barry Ave., 1st Flat, 
Chicago. Phone, Edgewater 2366. 

FOR SALE — 3 new modem greenhouses, 3,000 
feet glass, with first-class hot water heat- 
ing; well stocked; In city of 8,000; trade rapidly 
increasing; owner not a florist and has other 
business In California he wishes to attend to. 
Address Geo. H. Downing, Kearney, Neb. 

FOR SALE — At a great bargain, well stocked 
greenhouses In north central Indiana; 5.000 
sq. ft. of glass, steam heat; In city of 5,000; 
with or without good six-room cottage; death 
of owner reason for selling. Address Eliza Dunn, 
23 Taft Ave., Detroit, Mich. 

FOR SALE— Going to retire, I offer for sale 
my greenhouses. 4,000 feet of glass, nearly 
new. 4 acres of land, 5-room house, barn, hen- 
house; close In; no competition; excellent trade; 
city of 5.000; city water; located in Kansas; 
possession June 1. Address No. 206, care Florists' 
Review, Chicago. 

FOR SALE OR EXCHANGE— Wishing to 
change climate on account of rheumatism, 
1 offer for sale or exchange for greenhouse prop- 
, erty in a drier and milder climate, my business 
consisting of about 12,000 ft. of glass In 4 
greenhouses, 7 acres of land, good 8-room 
dwelling heated by steam from greenhouse boiler, 
Hrteslan well, barn, 2,500 carnation plants and 
other stock, at St. Peter, Minn., a city of 5,000; 
no opposition, good outlet. Write to St. Peter 
Greenhouses, St. Peter, Minn. 

Foreman, Manag^er, Head Gardener 

or will manage plant dep»rtment in first-class 
retail store, salary or commission. American, 29 
years of age ; born in the florist business and have 
been at it ever since. Am not a speciall-t, but 
can make good on any of the following: Green- 
house construction and heating, buying, selling, 
designing, decorating, growing roses, carnations, 
mums, bulbous -itock and general line of bedding 
and orname' tal plants. Not afraid of hard work 
or long hours as long as I can see dollars in sight. 
Open for position after April Ist Don't answer 
unless you want a live man and have a good 
proposition to offer. Address No. 171, care 
Florists' Review, ChicajTo. 



■if OR SALE — Greenhouse, located in thriving 
J? town of 6,000 in northwestern Oklahoma; 
good trade, fine location for florist and gardener; 
no competition ' In either line; price cheap and 
terms reasonable; good reason for selling; write 
about It. Address No. 188, care Florists' Re- 
view, Chicago. 

FOR SALE — Greenhouse property, 3,500 sq. ft. 
of glass, steam heated, new boiler of suffi- 
cient capacity to heat 10,000 sq. ft., and trade 
that would jvstify building of same; ten-room 
house, good cellar, barn and other out buildings; 
eight acres of land within four blocks of public 
square and one block of C. B. & Q. depot; will 
sell at a sacrifice if sold at once. Address S. H. 
Beaver, Seward, Neb. 

FOR SALK— In Iowa, 7,000 ft. of glass, well 
stocked for present and spring trade, small 
store and building in best location downtown, 
plenty of pots and plumbing tools; 10 blocks from 
business center and from 3 railroad depots; in 
city of 12,000; I started 10 years ago with 
$50.00; a splendid opportunity for a capable 
young man; price, $6,000, one-half cash. Ad- 
dress No. 216, care Florists' Review, Chicago. 

FOR SALE — Seven new modem greenhouses In 
Iowa, 25,000 ft. glass; improved cement 
benches; good residence, office, etc.; all steam 
beat; the place Is so handy, can be run with two 
helpers; stocked with roses and carnations; no 
trouble to dispose of all flowers grown; $25,000 
takes the whole outfit; expenses are light — why 
not own a place of your own? Write for terms; 
owner wants to retire. Address No. 182, care 
Florists' Review, Chicago. 

Expert Designer, 
Maker- up and Decorator 

of wide experience, seeks position as manager 
of first-class establishment. Thoroughly trust- 
worthy and of fine ext^cutive ability; can furnisli 
host references. Expect good sa'ary. Washing- 
ton, Oregon, Montana or Dominion preferred. 

Address No. 219, 
Care Florists' Review, CUcasio. 

Situation Wanted 

Expert carnation grower desires position as 
grower and foreman, where A-No. 1 stock is 
wanted : 12 years' experience with good grower. 
Age 30, married. Good references. State particu- 
lars and wages per week. Eastern Pennsylvania 
preferred . 

Address No. 194, care Florists' Reyiew, Chicago. 

WANTED 

Experienced man, married, for pot plants, 
ferns, forcing bulbs, Easter and Cfiristmas 
stock, capable to take charge of this depart- 
ment Address, with age and references, 
S. J. Reuter & Son, Inc., W esterly, R. I. 

Saleslady Wanted 

AT ONCE 

Must be good saleswoman and designer, to 
take charge of an up-to-date store; permanent 
position to right party; state wages and expe- 
rience in first letter. Address No. 153, care 
Florists' Review, Chicago. 

Help Wanted 

Wanted Section Foreman, well up on 
all decorative stock. Married, no family, 
permanent position. 

Washington Florists Company, 
18th and F. Sts.. Washin gton, D. C. 

Wanted to Rent Out 

A nice established florist business, store, 
greenhouses, 4000 sq. ft , and dwelling, 
complete with stock ; reasonable. 
Address No. 807, care Florists' Review, 
Chicago. 



A BEAUTIFUL FARM FOR SALE, la the finest 
■^ fruit-growing and trucking section In the world ; 
fertile boII and fine climate; also a beautiful water 
front farm with tlmbe/. For full particulars address 
Samuel P. Woodcock, Salisbury, Wicomico Oo., Md. 

FULLY EQUirrED GREENHOUSE TOR SALE. 

Established retail and wholesale trade, nine-room, 
dwelling with hot water heat and electric lights, lo- 
cated In city ol 4S 000. Complete, $3,800. Address 
Edgar Q. Banta 412 Fairbanks BIdg.. Springfield. O. 

Here's a Chance 

For any good hustler to make a success. 26,000 ft. 
of glass, modern houses, heating plant, with five 
acres of good, rich land. Local market for all stock 
grown. Best town in the middle west. $6000 takes 
this place, $'JO0O cash, balance to suit. 

Address N*. ISTy care Florists* Review, Chicago 

Sale to Settle Estate 

In Greater Boston, new store building, corner 
lot, with retail flower business of |l,000 a month, 
$(},<iOO. If desired, the greenhouses and 50,000' 
feet of land can also be bought. Price of whole. 
112,000. Business establ shed 18 years. 

W. F. APPLETON 

2 Charles Street. AUBURNDALE. MASS. 

FOR SALE 

An up-to-date florists' plant; modern 
greenhouses; 70,000 feet of glass; 12 
acres of land ; large brick dwelling house, 
heated by steam; two bams. Every- 
thing in nrst-class working order. 

W. W. COLES, Kokomo, Ind. 

For Sale 

Modem greenhouse, almost new, with 12,000 
feet of glass; modern cottage on property, with 
six rooms : property situated on improved street 
near center of city of 25,000 in central Indiana. 
Fine business prospect. Will be sold at a rea- 
sonable price. Address George D. Lindsay* 
Marion, Indiana. 

Greenhouse For Sale 

In a city of 40(10 In eastern Kansas; 11,000 feet of 
glass, steam beat, built in liHiH, just been set to 
cucumbers. I have other business and. to make a 
(lulck sale, I will make the price right. This is a 
good location and a good proposition for either 
gardener or florist; no other greenhouse here. 

Address No. 217, care Florists' Review, Chicago 

FOR SALE"" 

One of the oldest and most successful retail 
stores In the city of Brooklyn. Best family neigh- 
borhood, Kreenhouses, larare store, stable: 
every convenience. Reason lor selling, owner 
going into the growing business. Large stoik of 
palms, ferns, etc., for decorative purposes. A big; 
bargain. Will sell at once so you can have the 
Ea.ster business. Call at '>! ^^tuyvesant Ave., near 
De Kalb Ave. Wni. Muller, Brooklyn, N . Y. 

For Sale or Trade 

Four strong new erecnhouses with the 
latest steam and hot water system, including 
all plants and bulbous stock, also tools; a fine 
two-story residence of seven rooms, and 
large stable; the place is Jennings Heights 
in North St. Louis; plenty of water; gas and 
electric lights; five minutes on railroad or 
fifteen minutes on street car, from city; a 
good big bargain for the right party; ground 
will become double in value in a short time. 
All in first-class condition. Owing to sick- 
ness owner wants to sell. Address 

A. BRIX, 1S18 St. Louis Ave., ST. LOUIS, NO. 



Wanted 3 Buyer 

For a well established, up-to-date greenhouse property 

and residence, 3I3 acres of land on main paved street, in the best town of Missouri, having agencies 
in niteen towns around. Eight modern houses and residence, heated by hot water. Can show every 
day s business for last filwcn years. Place will pay for itself in three or four years. Inquire, if you 
nave Si.OOO or more cash; balance to suit purchaser. This is a life's opportunity. Or will trade for 
line farm. Address No. 205, cate Fiorists' Review, Chicago. 



\ 



^ 



40 



The Weekly Florists' Review^ 



March 2, 1911. 



Six Pages of Retailers' Cards 

This department for the cards of Leading Retail Florists — those florists who have the facili- 
ties for filling the orders sent them by other florists — has made possible the recent rapid develop- 
ment of this branch of the business, a branch of the trade now established for all time and so help^ 
ful that its volume will keep on increasing for many years. 

Are you sending and receiving your share of these orders? You can send your share (and 
make 20 per cent profit without effort) if you let your customers know you cmi perform this service 
for them. To receive your share — well, The Review's department for Retailers' cards remains the 
one way of getting prompt action on the order in hand. If you are the only florist in your city 
represented here, you get the orders coming into your territory from other ftcBists. If you are not 
represented and "the other fellow" is — we can leave it to you what becomes of tibese desirable orders. 

To be represented costs only 70 cents per week on a yearly order. This is for one-inch 
space. Other spaces in proportion. 

Why not send your order today — now — before you forget it? 



We Quarantee Satisfaction 




FLORAL CO. 

413 Madison Ave., Cor. 48th 8t.. NEW YORK 
Established 1859. 

A. Wiegahd & Sons 

Florists and Decorators 

1610 to 1620 N. Illioois SL, Indianapolis, Ind. 

Indiana's oldest, largest and most complete 
retail establishment. 





PHONE P.B.X. 58 139 WEST MAIN ST. 

Oklanoma City, Ok£.a. 

Cleveland, Ohio 

Schneider Floral Co. 

For Flowers and quick service to all Northern 
Ohio points. 

EUCLID AVENUE 

Qeorg:e Q. McClunie, Pioriat 

176 Main St., HARTFORD, CONN. 

Orders eoUctted for delivery any place on earth. 
Floral Deslgna a Specialty. 

DRUMM SSD and TLORAL CO. 

507 Houston St, fORT WORTH, TEX. 

HMdanarters for Cat Flowers and Funeral Designs 

T. L. METCALFE, 4 stares 

HiyldnsTille, Ky., NadisonviUe, Ky., 
Jadon, Tenn., and Claibnlle, Tenn. 

Orders executed anywhere in the two states. 

Ung Floral & Nursery Co., %!f; 

Write or wire headquarters for flowers for Texas, 
Okl^onu, Louisiana, New Mexico. Mo orders too 
larf e, none too small. 



D X* ^ 111 W.J.Minei 
lOIltiaC9llL412E.ray 



W.J.NiDer&Son 

son St. 



CHICAGO 
ORDERS 



SENT TO 




ARE 

CAREFULLY 
EXECUTED 



S182-2134 MICHIGAN AVENUE 



J. H. SMALL & SONS 

FLORISTS 

NEW YORK, WASHINGTON, D.C. 

1163 Broadway. Ckjr. 14th & G Sts. 

AND WALDORF-ASTORIA. 

South and Southwest Texas and sailing from Galveston. 

H. H. KUENANN, Horist 

8607 Jackson St., S. W. Phone. Hadley 1926-2S30 

38526 IVashinsrton St., Opp. Glenwood 
Cemetery, S. W. Phone, Taylor 628-108X. 

Up town, 913 Main St., S,W. Phone. Preston 7741. 

HOUSTON, TEXAS 



PROVIDENCE. 



Tlie Market. 

Business during the last week has 
shown a decided general improvement, 
which, with warmer, clearer weather, 
has made the period more seasonable 
than for some time previously. The 
supply of all kinds of cut flowers has 
been much improved, so that there was 
a slight falling oflE in prices. Two of 
the largest funerals that have been held 
in this city in many months, so far as 
decorations of an expensive character 
are concerned, with the usual number of 
Washington's birthday functions, made 
the week one of considerable activity. 
On all sides the growers are busily en- 
gaged in preparations for Easter, and it 
is expected that the supply will exceed 
that of previous years. 

Club Meeting. 

"Ugly Corners Made Beautiful, or 
Vacant Lot Eose Gardens," was the 
subject of discussion at the monthly 
meeting of the Florists' and Gardeners' 
Club of Rhode Island, February 20. The 
discussion was preceded by the reading 
of the paper on the subject by H. 
Howard Pepper, of the Melrose Rose 
Gardens. He told of the success he has 
had in the raising of hybrid roses in 



S. J. REUTER S SON, Inc. 

NEW LONDON, CONfi. 

The only flower store in the city. Orders 

for any part of Connecticut or Rhode 

Island wul receive prompt and careful 
attention. 



1874 




1911 



WnjjAM A. Phuxifs, Manasrer 
878 Fnlton St. Tel. 819 Main Brooklyn, N. T. 

Careful attention, personal selection and prompt d^ 
livery gaaranteed to any part of New York, Long: I^^ 
and New Jc-sey. Thirty six years* experience. ReU- 
ability assuied. 

Lexington, Ky. 

JOHN A. KELLER, Florist 

Higfh Grade Cut Flowers 
and Desic^ing^ : : : : 

All orders entrusted to us for Central Kentacky 
will have careful attention. 

!S»~- Charleston, W. Va. 

are given prompt and careful attention by the 

CHARLESTON CUT FLOWER AND PLANT CO. 

H. H. Comr, Mgr. Phone Stewart 627 

J£SSEL,SON XXOWER SHOP 
6S3 West 63d Street, :::<;- CHICAGO 

Wajdellver In £nelewood and Woo<1lawn 
A.n orders attended to promptly Klght servle)} 

Orders for southern MINMSSOTA and northern 
IOWA will be properly cared for by 

A. N. KINSMAN, Austin, Minn. 
JOE TOSINI, nORIST 

DeslBns of All Kinds 
202 N. Phillips Ave., SIOUX FAUS. S. D. 



Leading Florltt 
AMSTEBDAH, N. T. 
SCHSNECTABT.N.T. 

£sUb, 1877 




March 2, 1011. 



The Weekly Florists' Review* 



41 



LEADING RETAIL FLORISTS 

The retail florisb whose cards appear on the six pages carrying this head, are prepared to fill orders from other florists for local delivery on the usual 

basis. If you wish to be represented under this heading, now is the time to place your order. 



GREAT BRITAIN 

WILLS & SEGAR 

Royal Exotic Nursery 

OrsIow Crescent, S. Kensington, London 



Florists to His JVlajesty The King 

We shall be pleased to carry out commissions 
from our American confreres to deliver 

Cut Flowers, Floral Baskets, 
Designs, etc., 

to any part of Great Britain. 

Cablegrams-" FLOSCULO, LONDON," 



LOUISVILLE, KENTUCKY 



JACOB SCHULZ, 



Flower Shop, 550 South Fourth Avenue, 
Greenhouses, 831 Cherokee Road. 



Personal attention given to out-of-town orders for Louisville and surrounding territory. 



LOUISVILLE, KY 

WILLIAM WALKER 

826 W. Jefferson 

All orders given careful attention. 



H. W. riELD,The College Horist 

NORTHAMPTON, MASS. 

Home of Smith Colleg^e 

Send your orders to him for prompt 
and careful attention. 



Augusta, Ga. 

All kinds of cut flowers or work delivered 
at the resort hotels or elsewhere in 
AuKusta. Mail or wire your orders to 

BALK'S NURSERY 

Greenliouse and Offloe, 286 Greene St. 

Colorado Springs, Colo. 

Orders Carefully Executed 

PIKES PEAK FLORAL CO. 

Wholesale and Retail 

Dallas, Texas 

The Texas Seed & 
Floral Company 

Orders for cut flowers and designs solicited for 
delive ry iil any part of Texas. 

Send orders for delivery in 

Youngstown, 0.^ 

uA ill points between Pittsburg and Cleveland 
t» JOHN WALKER 



JF Wn fAY & CANC ^^^ Broadway, Council Blufb, Iowa. 
• 1 • Iff IlivUA OL OuilU^ wnolesale and Retail 

Largest Greenhouse Establishment 
West of Chicago. 

Orders delivered anywhere, Incladine Iowa. Nebraska, North Dakota and South 

Dakota. Free deliveries to Omaha. 



KENOSHA, WIS. 

and all points between 

CHICAGO AND MILWAUKEE 

Mail, wire or phone your orders to 

PM ADrDTIM S07 Chloasro St., 
. n. UDLKIiri, BENOSHA, WIS. 



I KILLU tV Des Nouies, Iowa 

Will promptly execute all orders in this vicinity. 

Aurora, E J«s.H.Smely 



and vicinity 



Pbones 147 



BAKER BROS. CO., rt.Worth,Tex. 

Send Orders for the Southwest 

Best Railroad Center in the State. 

MOBILE, ALABAMA 

The MInge Floral Co. 

vacant lots in the Elmwood gectibn of 
this city. 

At the conclusion of his paper, Mr. 
Pepper opened a question box on roses 
and their culture, especially as concerns 
outdoor cultivation, and in the discus- 
sion that followed James Dillon, of 
Swan Point cemetery; Eugene McCar- 
ron, Eugene Appleton, Alexander Mac- 
rae, Charles Macnair, William Hi!ll, 
William Chappcll, Robert Johnston and 
others participated. 

Ttffe business meeting, which was held 
at the rooms of the association, 98 West- 
minster street, was presided over by 
President Eobert Johnston. Frederick 



BOSTON, MASS. 




"Penn, The Telegrraph Florist" 

wire ua and we will reciprocate. We cover all 
points in New England. 

43 BROMFIELD STREET 



DENVER, COLO. 

FLORAL DESIGNS AND FLOWERS 

Best Quality on Shortest Notice. 

Daniels & Fisher. 

Order by mail, telephone, telegraph or 
cablrt. Cable address "Daniels, DeuTer." 



YOUNG & NUGENT 

NEW YORK : 42 W. 28tli SL 

In tlie theater district. Exceptional facilities for 
dellyerlng flowers on ontgolngr steamers. Your or- 
ders win receive prompt and careful attention, 
wire, telephone or write us. 



Spokane, Wash. 
HOYT BROS. CO. 



Leading Florists. 



Try Us. 



Louisville, Ky. 

f . WALKER & CO., 634 Fourth Ave. 



_/.\.' 



The Weekly Florists' Review. 



Mabcr 2, 1911. 



LEADING RETAIL FLORISTS 

Tli< retail florists whose cards appear on the six pages carryiag this head, are prepared to fill orders from other florists for local delivery on the usual 

basis. If you wish to be represented under this heading, now is the time to place your order. 

Alexander NcConnell 

471 Fifth Avenue, Windsor Arcade NEW YORK CITY 

Telegraph orders forwarded to any part of the United States, Canada, and all principal cities of Enrope. Orders transferred or entrusted by 

the trade to our selection for delivery on steamships or elsewhere receive special attention. 

Telephone Calls: 340 and 341 38th Street Cable Address; ALEXCONNBIil. Western Union Code 



A. W. Smith Co. 

...FLORISTS... 

™™^£lding. Pittsburg, Pa. 

Largest Floral Establishment in America 

■■tabllshed t874--IncorVprated 1009 



Wo can nil your floral order* da; 



niffht for 




CLEVELAND a 
STATE or OHIO 

Alwayi tatye complete stock on hand. Resiilat 
discomit allowed the trade. 

KNOBLE BROS., dSf^kSSi'^o. 



DAYTON, OHIO 
Heiss Company 

U2 SOUTH MAIN STREET 



Tonseth Floral Co. 

825 Morrison Street 

GROWERS AND RETMLERS 

Portland, Ore. 

ST. PAUL, MINN. 

The Lftrgrest Store in America. 

The finest and largest stock west of Chicago 
Awake night and day looking for orders. 

HOLM & OLSON, Inc. 

so. 88. 84 W^aMt ilth Rtr«>Mt 

WILSON 

DKI1VKR8 ANTWHERB 

•nMtm New Jersey NewYerk lei«lslsa« 

Trade orders well cared for from all parts of the 

country and delivered at Theater, Hotel 

Steamer or Beeldence. Address 

Mte SL ni^ GrecM Ave.. BROOKLYN, li Y. 

Telephones, Prospect 2840 and 406B. 

MRS. LORD'S KLOWER ROOM 

112 W. 8th Ave. TOPEKA, KAN. 

JkM Y B? n Loaf DistiMc PboM. 
i^l I tL, IC 5297 Plan 

«09-11 Madi<ftn Av<>.. NEW YORK 

Freeport Floral Co. 

Telegraphic orders CDC CBADT III 
»rompUy attended to. rilCCrUn | | ILL. 

PYDpCl 'I'OWSBS OB 




Wm. L Rock Flower Co. 

Kansas City, Mo. 

1116 Walnut Street 

Bell Telephone 213 Grand 

Will oarefnlly execute ordere for Eansas City and 
any town in Miasonri or Kansas. 



DESIGN WORK 



ktUkmimt 



tl VorUt PmtI 8t.. 



▲LBAHT, H. T. 



Bsttic Creek, Mich. '»«;!''£% 

1 1 West Main 9ft . All cut floweri in season. Fu- 
neral designs or potted plants. Careful attention and 
prompt delivery guaranteed to any part of Michigan. 

Hutchinson, Kansas 

I nil 11 CTAIAIA All orders receive prompt 
UUnn OlMmlffl and carefal attention. 

CAPITAL CITY GREENHOUSE CO. 

MADISON, WIS. 
Order of us. Best tbipping service for Wisconsio 

Tenn., Mins., Alabama, Arkansas, Louisiana orders wilj 
be well taken care of. We have all flowers in season 

B. Luther, of this city; William B. 
King, of Apponaug, and Aldimor Chous- 
nard, of Central Falls, were elected to 
active membership. A communication 
was received from the State Grange, 
asking the society to appoint a commit- 
tee to confer with the other agricul- 
tural and horticultural associations of 
the state relative to the establishment 
of a permanent home for the holding of 
the meetings of these organizations, 
which was laid on the table for the spe- 
cial order at the next meeting. 

The treasurer's report showed that 
the society is in a flourishing condition. 
An effort is to be made to recruit the 
membership of the association so as 
to in^^ude the names of all the florists 
and gardeners throughout the state. 

On the president's table were ex- 
hibited three large bunches of roses 
from the J. A. Budlong & Son Co., at 
Auburn, including one vase each of 
Richmond, My Maryland and Killarney, 
which elicited favorable comment. 

Various Notes. 

At the meeting of the Newport Hor- 
ticultural Society, February 14, Walter 
Edmund Eglington, of London, Eng- 
land, read an interesting paper on 
orchid growing. Mr. Eglington was for 
a number of years in the employ of 
William Bull & Sons, one of the great- 
est firms of orchid growers in the world, 
who in three years raised about 30,000 
seedlings. 

G. Battinelli and A. Lombardi have 



WILLIAM J. SMYTH 

FLORIST C"»*- Michigran Ave. 
^^^^^H^^ and8l«t8t.,€^iea^ 

We ship to all points in Illinois and Iowa. 

PHONXx 
Aiding 880. Aldlne 881. Aldln« SOT 

W.J.Palmer&Son 

304 Main SL, BUFFALO, N. Y. 

Memliirs Florists' Telegraph Ass'i. 

Orders by Wire receive Promptaad Careful Execntioa 

J. Newman & Sons 

Corporation 
24 Tremont St., BOSTON 

We can refer to leadinsr fl^^rist sin all principal 
citlei. E^itablished 1870. 

ST. LOUIS, MO. 

Flowers Delivered la Gty or State oa Short Notico 

F. H. WEBER 

BOYLE AND MARYLAND AVENUE& 

Both Lons Distance Phones 

IN HEART OF NEW YORK CITY 

00 W. SSd StTMt, N. T. 

Phone 2270 88th St. Our Motto-Tkt I 



STA1T NURSERY CO. Z 



FLOWERS 



15S.0OO sq. ft. of KlaM 
at year service. 



HELENA, MONTANA 



Metropolitan Floral Co* 

602 N. Grand Ave. 
Telepkoaei. Ste I^OUlSy MOe 



Fayettevine,Ark. 



iMdnnittra Swd Ce. 

man aai Fiansts 

Orders for desiirns and Cut Flowers sriTen so- 
cial attention . 



.'.r. v*^« jv*-' 



, 'T-A 



— March 2, 1911. 



The Weekly Florists' Review. 



43 



LEADING RETAIL FLORISTS 

The retail florists whose cards appear on the six pages carryinc this head, are prepared to fill orders from other florists for local delivery on the usual 

basis. If you wish to be represented under this heading, now is the time to place your order. 



DARDS, 



N. E. Cor. 44th Street and Madison Avenue, 

NEW YORK 



Telephones 
40S6-4086, 88th Street, 



Cable Dardsflor, Weatem Union 



Orders delivered on all the Ocean Liners or telegraphed to our own correspondents 

in Europe and the British Colonies. 



KstabUahea 1894 



Hollywood Gardens 

Artistic Florists and Decorators 

PkOB* Mala 1666 CrATTT V 1171011 
1534 SeoMd Ave., oLHlI ILL, WAOll. 

Orders given prompt attention. 
W. R. GIBSON, Slsr. 

Die Liyiogston Seed Co. 

FLORISTS 

COVER ALL OHIO POINTS 
114 N. Hi«h Su CX)LUMBUS» OHIO 




LINCOLN, NEB.' 



KALAMAZOO, MICH. 

G. Van Bodiove & Bro., ^•'^,„h.1l?i"'^ 
J* WALSH & SON9 i^i^TO 

MALDEN, MASS. 
VBoston and all New Knsland Points. 

CHAPINBROS. 

Betail Florists 
Flowers tor All Oeeastons, from Cradle to GraTe 

R O. LOVELL ^ 

will give prompt attention IVT^vm^U T^«1rM*«« 
to aU orders for deUvery In iNOTUl l/AKOIa 

A r DDAlI/iy SPRINGnClD, 
LABGM GBKKWHOUSIS 

The Anderson Floral Co. 

ANDERSON 
S33 Marshall Ave.. SOUTH CAROLINA 



TERRE HAUTE, IND. 

JOHN G. HBNL & SON, 129 SMtk 7tli Street 



Mrs. M. E. Horicraft 

807 Kmw Aye. TOPEKA, KAN. 

BERTERMANN BROS. CO. 

LKADXHG FLORISTS 

841 Waseadnnetti A ve, lodiaiupolls, IncL 

Hinneapolis Floral Co., \"e«ATf£S&t8 

MINNEAPOLIS. MINN. 

■«ieral desisrr's on short notice. One ol the largest 
estubUsbmentr west of Chicago. 



Washington, 
D.C. 

14th and H Streets 




Also 

1601 MmKsm Avt. 



Balf imore, Md. 



J. IHui Blackiatone 



Frey & Frey , o'st Lincoln, Neb. 

Wholesale and Retail. 
100.000 sq. ft. of glass at your service. Trade discount 

MINNESOTA NORTH DAKOTA MONTANA 

SMEDLEY & CO. 

Fargo. North Dakota aid Miles Oty, Moatana 

QlfkllY riTY inWA Supplies western Iowa. 

JIUUA V.III, lUffH southern Minnesota, all 

of South Dakota, northeastern Nebraska. 

Jo Co RENNISON CO. 

PROVlOtlNCE, Rele 
,„j ,„ T. J. JOHNSTON ac CO. 

New Enpland Points 171 Weybosset St.. PrtvMcace 



PtLlVini 



FtUKiA 

All order. rMelre permnal attentloa. 

Geo. A. KUHU Pekin. Ill 

opened a retail store at 192 Atwell ave- 
nue. 

James Hockey, of Pawtucket, who has 
been on the sick list for a fortnight, is 
able to be out once more. 

W. Doel has taken the agency at Pas- 
coag of the Continental Nurseries, of 
Franklin, Mass. 

Joseph Appleton, of "William Apple- 
ton & Sons, has joined the ranks of the 
benedicts. 

Johnston Bros., of Dorrance street, 
had twenty-five large pieces for the 
funeral of Mrs. Michael Slattery, Feb- 
ruary 20. The display was an unusually 
large one, a moving van being used to 
transfer the flowers from the house to 
the grave. 

Albert Holscher is arranging to go 
into the growing of bulbs extensively 
in his new range of houses. During the 
last week he placed orders for more 
than 150,000 bulbs, 

S. J. Eeuter & Son, of Westerly, had 
decorations at a big wedding there, Feb- 
ruary 22, at which laurel and pink roses 
afforded the color scheme. 

E. Carl, of Johnston, is bringing some 
fine sprays of dwarf lilacs, which find 
ready sale. 

Charles H. Hunt had a large piece for 
the Providence Veteran Firemen's As- 
sociation at the funeral of Charles Tres- 
cott, one of its oflScers. 

J. Kopelman has started the manu- 
facturing of wire designs for florists' 
purposes. He has taken two large rooms 
in the building where his wholesale 



GLETELHP 

J. H. GASSER COMPANY 

EUCLID AVSNUE 

We BUp all points in Ohio. The best 

of everythine in Flo^ieers. 



LUBLINER & TRIN7 

44 Randolph St., CHICAGO 

Located in the center of the city and is 
the same block with the Wholesale Flowa 
Market. 30 fo discount on aU orders from 
otit of tow^n florists. 

DVANCE FLORAL CO.,fKr... 

DAYTON, 0. 



O. M. SoHAxrxB, Mgr, 
Ldading Florists 
«4 TO 52 ARCADK, • 



^ SCHULTHEIS, FLORIST 

'""•"aVffiS.. 8... SCRAWTON, PA. 

Rockfonl,E,II.W.Buckbee 
S. B. STEWART 

U9 No. 16th St., OMAHA^NEE 

Wholesale and retail orders for Cat Flowers. 
Funeral Designs, etc., by telegraph will 
recelre prompt attention at 

IRA G. MARVIN^ Wilkcs-Barrc, Pa. 
Je Je BENEKE 

t2t6 Ofive St., ST. LOUIS, Ma 

Baltimore^ Md. 

ALBHtT G. flEDUR & CCSLSra 

mUNTflEALj aU orders. 

HALL I ROBINSON, ~iS.?^»J^ 



''«/^ ■ '^' .' >■ V -^rs 



. ■il i"^ 



44 



The Weekly Florists^ Review* 



Mabch 2, 1911. 



LEADING RETAIL FLORISTS 

The retail florists whose cards appear on the six pages carrying this head, are prepared to fill orders from other florists for local delivery on the usual 

basis. If you wish to be represented under this heading, now is the time to place your order. 



HUGO H. JAHN 

710 NoBtrand Avenue 

Tel. No. 1952 Bedford BROOKLYN^ N. Y. 

Will deliver to Steamships, Theaters, anrwhere 
within 20 miles of New York. i 

ARTISTIC WORK. PERSONAL ATTENTION. 

Special care of your telegraph orders. 

Samuel Murray 

KANSAS CITY, MO. 

913 Grand Ave. 

an erders elven Drotnpt and carctul •ttentlon. 

BUFFALO 

S. A. ANDERSON 

440 MAIN STREET 

Special Deliveries Niagara Falls and 
Lockport 

Your orden for ATLANTIC CITY, N. J., 



will be carefully filled by 




1505 Pacific Ave. 



WMte, Wire or Fbone Tour Orders to 

YOUNG'S 

1406 Olive St, ST. LOUIS. MO. 

Begnlar discount allowed on all orders, either 
Plants or Cut Flowers. 

Phones: Bell. Main 2306; Einloch, Central 4981 

WOLFSKILL BROS. 

..FLORISTS.. 

Successors to J. W. Wolfskill. 
Telegraph Orders a Specialty. 

218 W. 4th St LOS ANGELES, Ckt 



T 



he Cleveland 
Cut Flower Co. 

CLEVKLAM), OHIO 

Will fill yonr orders for Deeignfl or 
Cnt Flo were in Northern Ohio. 

THE NEWBURYS, Mitchell, S. D. 

40,000 feet of Commercial Cut Flowers. Your 
orders will be promptly and properly executed in 
South Dakota, North Dakota, Iowa and Minn. 

MRS, J. B. FREEMAN, i^^JJS'^^Mfn 

Successor to Geo. A. Heinl TOLEDO, OlIIO. 
All Orders Promptly Executed. 

Orders for MINNl£8U'l A or the Northwest will 
be properly executed by 

AUG. S. SWANSON. St Paul, Miim. 

BEYER FLORAL CO., '*Tnd™-- 

Daily deliveries to Kotre D^me UniversltT 
and St. fiary's Academy. 



4- 

Kansas 
City, 



WE NEVER CLOSE 

Orders filled any bour of the twenty.four 

Alpha Floral Co. 

The Larsest Retail Florists West of 
Mississippi River 



M« • Mississippi River 

|CC/\||I*| A. ELBERFIELD, Proprietor 



UentioD The Review when yon write. 



Benson's Flowers 

Indianapolis, Ind. ""liKSi?, 



ANYWHErE 



Sr^'lXti ALL OVER IOWA 

8 throngh roads. 30.000 ft. glass. High grrade stock. 
Joseph Bancroft & Son. Cedar Falls. Iowa 



Richmond, Ind. 

FRED H.IiBMON & CO. 

Florists and Decorators. Send us your orders. 



GEO. C. BAKER, "orist 

206 E. Park Ave., San Antonio, Texas 

florists' business is located, on Wash- 
ington street. A patent has been ap- 
plied for on the method of doing the 
work. 

Each pupil in the Providence public 
schools will have a chance to plant a 
tree on Arbor day as the result of an 
offer which John Shepard, Jr., has made 
to the school committee. He offers to 
give from 30,000 to 50,000 catalpa trees 
to be distributed to the pupils for 
planting. W. H. M. 



STEAMER SAILINGS. 

Bulletin a few of these steamer sail- 
ings in your window, with the informa- 
tion that you have facilities for deliv- 
ering bon voyage tokens on board any 
outgoing boat, or funeral, or other 
flowers anywhere on short notice: 

steamer — Prom— To — Sails 

Lake Brie Boston Glasgow . . . Mar. 6 

Prince Oskar. . Philadelphia. Hamburg . .Mar. 

Frledrlch Wm. .New York. . . Bremen Mar 

Lulslana New York. 

Caronla New York . 

Chlyo Mara. .. San Fr'sco. 

Celtic New York. 

La Lorraine. . . New York. 

Taormlna New York. 

Baltic New York. . . , 

St. Paul New York. . . S'hampton 

Furnessla New York. . . Glasgow 

Finland New York. . . Antwerp 

P. Grant New York. . . Hamburg 

Merlon Philadelphia. Liverpool 

Hesperian St. John Liverpool 



Genoa Mar. 

Liverpool ..Mar. 
.Hongkong ..Mar. 

Naples Mar. 

Havre Mar. 

. Genoa Mar. 



Liverpool 



Carolina New York . 

Franconla New York 



Mar. 11 
.Mar, 11 
..Mat 11 
.Mar. 11 
.Mar. H 
Mar. 11 
Mar. 11 



Porto Blco..Mar. 11 
Egypt Mar. 11 



Kronprlnz Wm.New York. . . Bremen 

Tamba Maru. . .Seattle Hongkong 

Mauretanla New York . . . Liverpool 

Asia San Fr'sco. . . Hongkong 

Sicilian Portland Glasgow 

Rheln New York . . . Bremen . 

Kalserln New York . . . Hamburg 

La Provence. . . New York. . . Havre Mar. 16 

Virginian St. John Liverpool ..Mar. 17 

Pisa Philadelphia . Hamburg 

Adriatic New York. . . S'hampton 

California New York. .. Glasgow 

Kroonland New York. . . Antwerp 

Frlesland Philadelphia. Liverpool 

Patricia Boston Hamburg 

Canada Portland Liverpool 

Trent New York ... Cuba Mar. 18 

Coamo New York . . . Porto Rico . . Mar. 18 

Oceania New York . . . Genoa Mar. 18 



Mar. 14 
..Mar. 14 
..Mar. 15 
..Mar. 15 
..Mar. 16 
..Mar. 16 

Mar. 16 



Mar. 17 
.Mar. 18 
.Mar. 18 
.Mar. 18 
.Mar. 18 
.Mar. 18 
.Mar. 18 



JOHN BREITMEYER'S 
SONS 

Corner Broadway and Qratlot Ave. 

DETROIT^ MICH. 
FRED EHRET 

WHOLESALE AND RETAIL VLGRIST 

1407 Falrmonnt Ave. and 702 N. Broad St. 

PHILADELPHIA 

Orders for Philadelphia and surrounding country 
carefully filled on short notice. 



Telephone 334 MaiS 




886 Fulton St., Brooklyn, N. Y. 

WELLESLEY COLLEGE 

Dana Hall. Walnnt Hill, Boekridgs Hail Schools 
TAILBT , Wellesley, Mass. 

Long DisUnce Tel.. WellHsley, 44-1. 44 2. 44-3. 

Dallas Floral Co. 

DALLAS, TEX. 



TEXAS 



H . v. ORETK, Prop. 



Rosemont Gardens 

YiiiS^I^ M0IIT60HEBY, ALA. 
HESS &SWOBODA Florists 

Telephones 1501 and L 158S 
1415 Faraupi Stred, OMAHA, NEB. 

U. J. VIRGIN j 

838 Canal St., New Orleam, La. 

Evanston and Chicago 
JOHN WEILANP '^"SIV"- 

MlCIf IQAN ^"^^^caTed fS'r^' 

HENRY SMITH 

WlMtoula ud IttaH Fltrist d GRAND RAPID* 

Minneapolis, Minn. "i^rPsts 

SWANSON'S, 618 Nicollet Ave. 

Spokane Florist Co. 

a».to-dat« 
orlsts 



SPOKANE, WASH. 



w 



Mabch 2, 1911. 



The Weekly Florists^ Review* 



45 



LEADING RETAIL FLORISTS 

The retail florists whose cards appear on the six pages carryias this head, are prepared to fill orders from other florists for local delivery on the usual 

basis. If you wish to be represented under this heading now is the time to place your order. 




Orders lor delivery in 

OKLAHOMA 

will be promptly and care* 
fully executed by 

FURROW d COMPANY 

Guthrie, Oklahoma 



Hartford, 
Conn. 



Orders solicited for all parts of Connecticut. 

D T^nniT Wholesale 

. II. rREY,rHS'^' 

1133 St., LINCOLN, NEB. 

Will fin orders for the West on ibort notlco 

Trade discounts. First-class stock. 

Send flower orders for delivery In 

BOSTON AND ALL 

NEW ENGLAND POINTS 

To THOS. R GALVIN, inc. 

124 TREMONT ST. BOSTON 

All orders receive careful attention. Choice 
Beauties. Orchids and Valley always on hand. 




MONTREAL 



ST. PAUL, MINN. 

Order your flowers for delivery 
in this section from the leadinir 
Florists of the Northwest. 

L. L. MAY & CO. 



ST. PAUL.. MINN. 



WASHINGTON, 
D. C 




CUDEBROS.CO. 
FLORISTS 

jaursT.Nw 

WASHJNCTOWDa 



GUDE'S 



The Park Floral Co. 



J. A. VALENTINE. 
Fres. 



DENVER, COLORADO 



Q. SCHROETeft 

59 Broadwcay ^ 

DETROIT 



Index by Tawns of Leading Retail Flariits. 



ALBAirr, N. Y. 

Eyres. H. O. 
AMBTKRDAK, K. T. 

Hatoher, J. 0. 
ANDEBSON, 8. 0. 

Anderson Floral Oo. 
ATLANTIC OITY, N. 7 

Berke. Geo. H. 
AUOVSTiL OA. 

Balk's IiiirMry. 
AUBOBA, ILL. 

SmelT, Joe. M. 
AUSTIN, MINN. 

Kinsman. A. N. 
BALTIMORE, MD. 

Blaokistone, Z. B. 

Fiedler ft Co., A. O. 



LONDON, ENGLAND 

WiUs tc Segar 
LOB ANGELES, OAL. 

WolfeUU Bros. 
LOUISVILLE, XT. 

Schols, Jacob 

Walker & Co., T. 

Walker. WUliam 
MADISON, WIS. 

Capital City Gnkonae. 
MALDEN, MASS. 

Walsh ft Son, J, 
MEMPHIS, TENN. 

Idlewild Greenhouse*. 
MILWAUKEE, WIS. 

FoUwerth Co., 0. 0. 
MINNEAPOLIS. MINN. 



BATTLE CBEEk, MICH Minneapolis I'lo. Co. 

Coscan, S. W. 
BOSTON, MASS. 

Galvin, Inc., T. F. 

Hoffman, 8. 

Newman ft Sens 

Penn, Henry 
BBOOKLTN, N. Y. 

Jabn, Hofo H. 

Masur, 8. „ 

Phillips, Jno. V. 

Wilson, B. G.__ 
BUFFALO, H. Y. 

Anderson, 8. A. 

Palmer ft Bon, W. 7. 
CEDAB FALLS, lA. 

Bancroft ft Bon, J. 
OHABLEBTON, W. VA. 

Chaileiton Cut. Flo. ft 
Plant Co. 
CHICAGO ^, „^ 

Jesselson Flo. Shop 

LuhUner ft Trina 

Samuelson, Chas. A. 

Smyth, W. J. 

Wittbold Co., Geo. 
CLEVELAND, 0., ^ 

Cleveland Cut Flo. Co. 

Gaaser Co., J. M. 

Knoljle Bros. , ^ 

Schneider Floral Co. 
COLO. SPGB., COLO. 

Pikes Peak Flo. Oo. 
COLUMBUS, p. 

Livingston Seed Co. 
COUNCIL BLUFFS, lA. 

Wilcox ft Sons 
DALLAS, TEX.^ 
Dallas Floral Oo. 



Swanson's 
MITCHELL, 8. D. 

Newburys. The 
MOBILE, ALA. 

Minfe Floral Co. 
MONTGOMEBY, ALA. 

Boaemont Gardens 
MONTBEAL. CANADA 

Hall ft Bobinson 

MoXenna ft Son 
NEW LONDON, CONN. 

Benter ft Son, lao. 
NEW OBLEANS, LA. 

Virgin, U. J. 

NEW YOBK OITY 

ISowe, M. A. 

Bunyard Floral Co. 

Clarke's Sons, David 

Dards, Chas. A. 

McOonnell, Alex. 

Myer 

Small ft Sons, J, E. 

Young: ft Nugent 
NOBTHAMPTON, Mass. 

Field, H. W. 
OAKLAND, CAL. 

Clarke Bros. __, 

OKLAHOMA CY., OXL. 

Stiles Co., The 
OMAHA. NEB. 

Hess ft Swoboda 

Stewart, S. B. 
PEOBIA, ILL. 

Kuhl, Geo. A. _ 
PHILADELPHIA, FA. 

Ehret, Fred 



Fox. 6has. Henry 

, „ PITT8BUBO, PA. 

Lang Floral Co. Bmith Co., A. W. 

Texas Seed ft Flo. Co. PONTIAO, ILL. 



MICHIGAN 



DAYTON, O., , ^ 

Advance Floral Co. 

Heiss Co. 
DENVEB, COLO. 

Daniels ft Fisher 

Park Floral Co. 
DEB MOINES, IOWA 

Trillow, Florist 
DETBOIT. MICH. 

Breltmeyer's Sons 

Schroeter, B. 
EVANBTON, ILL. 

Welland, John 
FABGO. N. D. 

Bmediey ft Oo. 



Miller ft Bon. W. J. 
POBTLAND, OBE. 

Clarke Bros. 

To nset h Floral Oo. 
PBOVIDENCE. B. L 

Johnston ft Cq^ T. J. 
BICHMOND. IND. 

Lemon ft Co., F. H. 
BOCKFOBD. ILL. 

Buckbee. H. W. 
ST. LOXnS, MO. 

Beneke, J. J._ ^ 

Metropolitan Flo. Co. 

Weber, F. H. 

Young ft Sons Co. 



FAYETTEVILLE, Aik. gx. P^^a, MINN. 

Scuthwestem Seed Co. Holm ft Olson, Ino. 
FT. WOBTK. TEX. - ~ ~ 



Baker Bros. Co, 

Dmmm Floral Co. 
FBEEPOBT, ILL. 

Freeport Floral Co. 
GBAND FOBKS, N. D. 

Lovell, E. 0. 
GBAND BAP'S, MICE. 

Smith, Henry 
OUTHBIE, OKLA. 

Furrow ft Co. 
HABTFOBD, CONN. 

Coombs, John 

McClnnie. Geo. G. 
HELENA, MONT. 

State Nursery Oo. 
HOPKINSVILLE, XY. 

Metcalfe, T. L. 
HOUSTON, TEX. 

Kuhlmann, H. H. 
HUTCHINSON, KAN. 

Stamm, John 



May ft Co.. L. L. 

Swanson, A. 8. 

SAN ANTONIO, TEX. 

Baker. Geo. C. 
BCBANTON, PA. 

Bohnltheis, Florist 
SEATTLE, WASH. 

Hollywood Gsrdens 
SIOUX CITY, IOWA. 

Bennison Co., J. C. 
SIOUX FALLS, 8. D. 

Tosini, Joe 
SOUTH BEND. IND. 

Beyer Floral Co. 
SPOKANE, WASH. 

Hoyt Bros. Co. 

Spokane Florist Co. 
SFBINGFIELD, ILL. 

Brown, A. C. 
TEBBE HAUTE, IND. 

Heinl ft Son, Jdm O. 



INDIAnApOUS, IND. TOLEDO, 0. 
Benson, Lester F. Freemsa, Mrs. J. B. 

Bertermann Bros. Oo. TOPEKA, KAN. 



Wiegand ft Sons 
KALAMAZOO, MICH. 

Van Bochove ft Bro. 
KANSAS CITY, MO. 

Alpha Floral C<>. 

Kellogg, Geo. M. 

Murray, Samuel 

Book Flower Co. 
KENOSHA, WIS. 

Obertin. P. N. 
LEXINGTON, KY. 

Keller, John A. 
LINCOLN, NEB. 

Chapin Bros. 

Frey, C. H. 

Frey ft Frey 



HoUcraft, Mrs. M. E. 

Lord's Flower Boom 
TOBONTO. CANADA 

Dunlop. John H. 
WASHINGTON, D. 0. 

Blaokistone, 2. D. 

Gude Bros. Co. 

Small ft Sons, J. H. 
WELLESLEY, MASS. 

Tailby ft Son 
WILKES-BABBE, PA. 

Marvin. Ira G. 
WINNIPEG, Man., Can. 

Bosery, The 
YOUNGSTOWN, 0. 

Walker, John 



EstabUshed 1867. 



FLOMUST^ 

737-739 Bwckingham Place 



L. D. Phone 
1112 Qraceland 



CHICAGO 



Send us your retail orders. We 
have the best facilities iu the city. 



T 



he Rosery 

..FLORISTS.. 

889 DUNAI.D ST. 

Winnipeg, Mapnitoba, Canads 



ORDERS TAKEN FOR DELIVERY ANYWHERE 
BETWEEN PORT ARTHUR AND THE CX>AST. 



Send 
Your 



PHIUDELPBIAr'" 

CHARLES HENRY FOX 

Slcn of tb« Rose 

BROAD AND WALNUT STREETS 

Always on Time 

David Clarke's Sons 

8189.2141 Broadway 

Tel. 1662. 166S Oolnmbiu 

NEW YORK CITY 

Ont-of-town orders for delivery In New York 
Okrefnlly and promptly filled at reasonable rates. 

GEO. M. KELLOGG 
FLOWER & PLANT CO. 

Wbolesale and Retail Florists 

1 122 Graid Avenue, KANSAS CITY. MO. 

All Kinds of CUT FLOWERS 

in their season. Also Rose and Carnation planti 
in season. Greenhouses at Pleasant Hill. Mo. 

Guiada^s Florist 




96 Yonge St, TOROITrO 



CCPOUWORTnCO. 

Wholesale Florists 
MILWAUKEE, WIS. 

'™'li??.S'5;S7.WISCONSIN 




46 



The Weekly Florists' Review. 



March 2, 1911. 



Seed Trade News. 



AMKBICAN SEED TBADE ASSOCIATION. 

Prea., E.L.Pagre.GreeDe.N.Y.; First Vlce-pres.. 
L. H. VauRhan, Chicago; Pec'y and Treas., C. E. 
Kendel, Cleveland, O. Twenty-ninth annual 
meeting, Milwaukee, Wis., June 20 to 22, 1911. 



Now for the rush, and the night work 
— March is here! 

The Lompoc Seed Growers' Associa- 
tion, Lompoc, Cal., will erect a fireproof 
warehouse 75 x 300. 

The residence of the late E. V. Hal- 
lock, Floral Park, N, Y., was practically- 
destroyed by fire February 19. Since the 
death of the seedsman it had been used 
as a boarding house. 

Febeuary always brings bad weather 
to some, if not all, sections of the coun- 
try, BO the failure of mail orders to 
assume hoped for volume can not be 
laid wholly to the storms. 

The Amzi Godden Seed Co., Birming- 
ham, Ala., which was established in 1857, 
is this season doing the largest business 
in its history, in a new building with 
40,000 square feet of floor space. 

The residence of Mrs. Alice 0. Tur- 
geon, secretary of the Missouri Seed Co., 
Kansas City, was burglarized February 
17. Several days later it was discovered 
that $500 worth of jewelry was missing. 

.J. W. Jung Seed Co.. Randolph, Wis., 
recently mailed its 1911 catalogue, typed, 
printed and bound on the place. Mr. 
Jung believes this is the only American 
seed catalogue manufactured complete on 
the same farm where most of the seeds 
it lists are grown. 

March starts out with the seed trade 
on about the normal basis. There must 
be some increase from year to year. Mail 
orders are coming in at about the usual 
rate. Counter trade is more affected by 
local weather conditions; it has hardly 
made a start at most points. 

In the Iowa legislature a bill has been 
introduced requiring that a license be 
obtained to sell nursery stock, green- 
house plants or seeds, and that every 
employee dealing with the public carry 
a duplicate of the license. The text of 
the bill will be found on page 64. 

The Taylor Farmers' Institute, of 
Taylor, Tex., has decided to circulate 
a petition for the introduction of a pure 
seed bill in their state legislature. Such 
action is necessary, the members of the 
institute state, because the pure seed 
laws already existing in many of the 
northern and eastern states have caused 
Texas to become a "dumping ground 
for impure, pest-infested seed." 

The mail order seed trade for Feb- 
ruary turned out about on a par with 
that of January — good, but nothing 
to brag about. Tho absence of a 
record-breaking demand has been a keen 
disappointment to a number of houses, 
for it is difficult to break records during 
the rush months ; the increases are easiest 
handled and are most apparent if they 
come the first two months of the year. 

"Perhaps the most painstaking of 
seed growers," said J. K. M. L. Far- 
quhar in his recent lecture before the 
Massachusetts Horticultural Society, ' ' are 
those of Germany. The growing of Sf^eds 
on a large basis was first established at 



FLORISTS AND SEEDSMEN 

SKXX TOUR OWN SCRATCH OR POITLTRT FOOD. We will make it for you under your 
own brand for $28.00 per ton. Send today for sample lOO-lb. ba?, $1.50. Mr. C. E. Jenson, of Atlantic 
County, N. J., on Oct. 27, 1910, writes as follows: "I want to state that your three grades of poultry 
food— Chick Starter, Developing Food and 'Square Deal' Scratch or Poultry Food— «tand without an 
equal today. They are perfect mixtures and sound in grain and a pleasure to handle." 

JnniriANA &. can importkrsandwholksaubrs 

Mention The Review when you write. 



BALTMORE, ND. 



Lennon Seed and Plant Co. 

Umpoc, Santa Barbara Co., Cal. 

CioBtract growers of Beans, Peas, Kals. Mustard, 
Squash, Pumpkin. Cucambers. Carrots. etc.; Flower 
Seed In variety. Your orders for 1911 crop solicited. 
Oan also furnish an extra fine grade of Eucalyptus 
Olobnlus (Bin* Gum) and Cnpressus Macrocarpa 
(Monterey Oypresa) Seed. 

THE EBBERT SEED CO. 

ROCKY FORD, COL. 

Contract growers of Vine Seeds. 

SPKCIALiTnCS: Rooky Ford Cantaloupe 
and Cucumber Seed. Place your o.uuid 
early. Corre.spoudeuce bolidted. 

Sioux City Seed & Nursery Co. 

Sioux City, Iowa 

Contracting growers of Peas, Beans 
and famous Sw^eet Corn. Introducers 
of the White Mexican Sweet Corn, 

BEECHWOOD SEED FARMS 

Contract Growers 

Okra, Pearl Millet, Seven Top and 

Frost Kingf Turnip. 

Correspondence invited. 

H. H. ARRINGTON, Prop., Rome, Ga. 

Wilbert E. Ashcraft 

SWXDESBORO, N. J. 

WHOLESALE SEED GROWER 

Speciiities: Tamato, Pepper and Eggplant 

Any kind of seed grown by contract 

S.O. Woodruff &Sons 

SPECIALTIKSt 

Garden Seeds in Variety 

Maine seed potatoes, onion sets, etc. 

CORKESPONDENCE SOLICITED. 

HalB Office and Seed Farms, OBANGE. CONN. 
New York City Store, 88-84 Der Street 

Routzahn Seed Co. 

ARROYO GRANDE, CAL. 

SWEET PEA and NASTURTIUM 
SPECIALISTS 

Wholesale growers of full lists of FLOWER 
and GARDEN Seeds. 

Ant. C. Zvolanek 

Originator of all winter-flowering 
.Sweet Peas, all colors. Corres- 
pondence invited. 

Bound Brook, New Jersey 

Mention The Review when you write 

Erfurt. Up to the time of Napoleon's 
campaigns the fields had been devoted 
to vine culture and the vdnes were justly 
celebrated. The business has now spread 




Yokohama Nursery Co. 

IMPORTERS 

Japanese Bulbs. Plants, Seeds 

and Bamboo Stakes. 

New York, N. Y. London, England 

Yokohama, Japan 

Mention The Review when voa write 

Pleters-Wheelir Seed Gompinir 

Hollister, - - California 

Growers of High Grade Seeds 

Onion, Radish, Lettuce. 
Sweet Peas, etc. : : : 

Correspondence Solicited. 

BRASLAN SEED GROWERS' GO. 

Lettuce, Onion, Sweet Peas 

Growers for the Wholesale Trade Only 

San Joae, ^ California 

Waldo Rohnert 

GILROY, CAL. 

Wholesale Seed Grower 

Specialties: Lettuce, Onion. Sweet Peas. Aster. 
Cosmos, Mignonette, Verbena, in variety. 




SEATTLE, WASH. 

Growers of 

PlJGET SOUND CABBAGE SEtD 

■ 

—THE— 

J. C. Robinson Seed Co. 

Waterloo, Neb. 

Contract growers of Cucumber, Canta- 
loupe, Watermelon, Squash and I*umpkin 
Seed; Sugar, Flint and Field Seed Coma. 

The C. Herbert Coy Seed Co. ] 

VALLEY, Douglas County, NEB. 

Wholesale Growers of High Grade Seeds. 

Cucumber, Mtsskmelon, Sqttash and Pump- 
kin, Sweet, Flint and Dent Seed Com. 

Mpntion The Review when vou write 

Henry Fish Seed Co. 



BEAN GROWERS 



For the Wholesale Seed Trade 



CARPINTERIA, 



CAL. 



to the Harz Mountains, including the 
town of Quedlinburg, where one of the 
large seed farms covers an area of 9,000 
iieres. " 



'^f '^ . >, V?"**^ 



J'V; «~."fy;'T- ,}':,< 



March 2, 1911. 



The Weekly Florists^ Review* 



47 



GREAT DROP in COW PEAS 

We offer at less than market prices ten thousand bushels, all varieties, of Cow Peas and Soja Beans. 

Wire, phone or write for samples and special prices, freight paid to your station. 

J. BOLGIANO & SON 



WHOLESALE SEED MERCHANTS 



Founded 1818 



Baltimore, Mid. 



Mention The Review when you write. 



CHIXXICOTIUE 
OHIO 



ONION SEEDSONION SETS 

W* are eztenalve gro^rttrm and dealers. 

Write lor prices on the 1910 crop. We are also 
Fubmittlngr contract flinires for the 1911 crop of 
Onion Heed. 

SCIILDER BROS., 

Mention The Review when you write. 

ONION SETS 

Sound, Clean and Dry 
WRITB FOR PRICES 

D. J. TAMMINGA 

10816-10818 Michifia Ave., CHICAGO 

Mention The Review when you write- 

PEAS !• BEANS 

We are Growers for tbe Wliole- 
sale Seed Trade. 

ALFRED J. BROWN SEED CO. 

GRAND RAPIDS, MICH. 

Mention The Review when you write. 

S. M. ISBELL ft CO. 

JACKSON, MICH. 

Contract Seed Growers 

Bean, Cucumber, Tomato. Radish, Pea, Saoaab, 
Muskmelon, Watermelon, Sweet Com. 

CorreBpondenoe Solicited 

Mention The Review when you writ* 



W. N.'SCARFF 



C. C. Vale 



NIANI VALLEY SEED CO. 

BnCW CARLISLE, OHIO 

We grow all the standard varieties of field 
com. Write for wholesale prices. 



Me ntion The Review when you write. 

It turtied cold in the southern truck- 
ing sections last week, but reports of 
damage to crops are as yet unconfirmed. 

The Seed Trade Association will be 
urged to hold its convention on the 
Pacific coast the- year of the Panama 
Exposition at San Francisco. 



THE OHIO OBASS SEED BILL. 

Protests against passage of the Huber 
pure seed bill were lodged with the 
senate committee on agriculture of the 
Ohio legislature at Columbus, February 
21, by E. L. Southworth, E. W. Kuhn, 



LAWN GRASS 
IN BULK 
AND 
PACKAGES 




For Lawns, Parks and Cemeteries 

Minneapolis THE ALBERT DICKINSON CO. 



BLUB GRASS 

RED TOP 

WHITE CLOVER 

ETC., ETC. 



Chicago 



Arkansas Valley Seed Co. '^Sas 

Contract Growers of Muskmelon, Watermelon and Cucumber Seeds 

Twenty years' experience growing these seeds in the famous Arkansas Valley, 
where irrigation and sunshine are abundant. Write today for contract price list and 
also our surplus list of Muakmelon, Watermelon and Cucumber Seed. 
.._ Mention The Review when you write. ^ 



ONION 




Finest Stock. Tello\7, Red, White. We can make prompt slilpment. 

WRITE FOR PRICES 

KIrkeby & Gundestrup Seed Co.,^'i^^."^l 

Mention The Review when you write. 

LEONARD SEED CO. 

PRODUCERS AND AmI am O a4a Unnt Grawers of Peas. Beans mt BaNea- 

WHOLESALE UlllUll 9619. »••* 228 23o"'""'*'nuin««ifc 
MERCHANTS ^j{JYJ JJS FOR PRICES W.KmziESTRECT. GHICACB 

Me ntion The Review when y ou write. , 



YOU will be satisfied with the products of 

Burpee's "Seeds that Grow" 

Better write to Burpee, Philadelphia,— for new Complete Catalojnie. 



Mention I'be Keview when you write 



.ESAUE ^EED GROW 



Mention The Review when you write. 







The Everett Be Clark Seed Co., ^L^Tk**^ 

Growing Stations at East Jordan, Mlob. , Oreen Bay, Wis., SUter Bay. Wta. 

BEANS, PEAS, SWEET CORN, ONICN, BEET, TURNIP, TOMATO, ETC. 



48 



The Weekly Florists' Rrv^cw. 



IIABCH t, mil. 



Frank Annan and Ed Oulver, Toledo 
grass seed dealers. They did not object 
to, but rather encouraged the general 
idea of legislation to insure purity of 
seed. They protested principally 
against the feature that eliminates the 
farmer and seed grower from operation 
of the bill, permitting them to sell di- 
rectly to consumers, though not to 
dealers, any kind of seed, whether 
tested or not, and irrespective of any 
percentage of noxious weed seed which 
it may contain. 

The Huber bill has already passed 
the house) but members of the senate 
agricultural committee asserted that it 
will undoubtedly be amended in im- 
portant respects, in line with the sug- 
gestions of the Toledoans, before .it 
becomes law. 



IMFOBTS. 

The imports of seed through the port 
of New York for the week ending Feb- 
ruary 18 were as follows: 

Kind. PkKB. Val. Kind. 

Annatto... 228 $ 1,911 Cummin 

. 249 2,422 Grass . . 

. 650 3,326 Millet . 

. 826 4,01G Mustard. 

. 50 785 Poppy . 

.1,014 29,181 Rape 



Anise 
Caraway 
Castor . 
Celery 
Clover 



Pkgs. Val. 

. 250 $ 2,349 

465 2,271 



.1,747 
. 185 
. 203 



251 Other 



6,581 

2,852 

1,370 

28 

22,643 



Coriander. 100 

In the same period the imports of 
bulbs, trees and plants were valued at 
$25,498 



•^ 



GARDEN SEEDS ARE "PUEE." 

The reasons for omitting garden 
seeds from all pure seed legislation 
scarcely could have been better put 
than was done by Kirby B. White, 
secretary of D, M. Ferry & Co., Detroit, 
when he appeared before Mr. Mann's 
committee at Washington recently. Mr. 
White said in part: 

"All of the objects to be covered by 
any seed legislation that anybody ever 
wanted are comprehended under three 
heads — to prevent the spread of weeds, 
to see that the purchaser gets the kind 
of thing he supposes he buys, and to 
see that the seeds that he buys are 
alive and not dead! There is not any- 
thing else in the whole field of seed 
legislation that anybody ever aimed at. 

"Now, with regard to the spread of 
weeds. As the gentleman who preceded 
me said, weeds do not come in garden 
seeds, from the nature of the case, be- 
cause garden seeds are grown under a 
high state of cultivation. The people 
who produce garden seeds in France, 
Germany, Holland, and all over Europe, 
and in California, grow them in gar- 
dens, and it is to their financial inter- 
ests to see that weeds are kept down. 
Those seeds are harvested by pains- 
taking labor, by hand, as a rule, and 
weeds do not have an opportunity to 
get in. In the main, then, and except 
in very extraordinary cases, weeds do 
not appear in garden seeds at all. 
Hence there is no need for any legis- 
lation to keep garden seed clean of 
weeds. 

"The next point is that the pur- 
chaser is expected to get what he buys. 
In our own practice it is very rare in- 
deed that he does not get the -variety 
which he supposes he buys. It is true 
sometimes that the variety which he 
buys does not come up to the descrip- 
tion given in the catalogue. For in- 
stance, when Luther Burbank intro- 
duced the wonderberry, and it was sold 
under glaring advertisements, I do not 
think anybody charged that when a 
man bought wonderberry of Mr. Bur- 
bank, through his representatives, he 



FOTTLER, nSKE, RAWSON CO. 




FOR FORCING OR 

PLANTING OUTSIDE 

Cucumber^ Rawson's Hot House 

We feel confident that tbis strain is not equaled in this country ; it is the result of years 
of selections. Oz., eOo; H lb., $1.50; lb., $6.00. 



Fottler, Fiske, Rawson Co., .ElTt'sT'll.?^. Boston, Mass. 



Mention The ReTiew when you irrlte. 



Bridgeman'a Seed Warehouse 



KstabUshed 1824. 



RICHARDS BROS., FrOlTS. 



Importers and Growers of Higrli'Brade 



SEEDS, BULBS, PLANTS, Etc 

87 East 19th Street, Telephone 4235 Gramercy, NEW YORK CITY 

Mention The Review when you write. 




rorFLORISTS and MARKET GARDENERS 

All hishest srade 
Catalosrue mailed on application - 

J.N.11iorbani&Co."NX%^ 

Mention The Review wb^nybu^^grite. 



NEW CROP FLORISTS' FLOWER SEEDS 

Vinca, separate colors and mixed, oz., 60c. 

Verbena, mammoth, in colors or mixed, oz., 

60c. Salvia splendens, oz., 11.25; Bonfire, oz., 

12.00. Cobaea scandens, Stocks, Lobelia, etc. 

Write for Wholesale Catalogue 

WEEBER & DGN«ViKr 

114 Cauunbers St., New York City 



MentloD The Review when you write. 

SOW NOW! 

Fresh crop only. Asparasas PlumoBus Na- 
nus, tme orreeDhouBe-Krown seed only. Per 1000 
seeds, $4.60; per 6000 seeds, $20.00. For larger lots, 
special prices. This seed has been selected by band 
and will Kermlnate over 90 per cent by right treat- 
ment. Ask also for my catalogae. It's free. 

O. V. ZANGEN, Seedsman 
Hoboken, .... New Jersey 

Mention The Review when you writs. 

AMERICAN PANSY SEEDS 

Hesperian Strain. A selection of the most 
beautlftil varletleB, noticeable for their large size 
and perfection of form and coloring. We offer this 
mixture after 30 years' experience in pansy seed 
and plant growing for both the wholesale and retail 
trade, and recommend It for those having the most 
critical customers. Pkt. 26c; ION seeds 60c; ^-oz. 
$1.26; '4-oz. $2 26; oz. $7.00. Price list of other mix- 
tures and separate varieties free to any address. 

WILUAM TOOLE S SONS. Pansy HeiiMi. Baraboi. Wit. 

MentloD The Review when you write. 

Asparagus Plumosus Nanus 

New Crop— Greenhonse-Krown 

100 seeds. 60c; 600 seeds. $2.00; 1000 seeds. $3.60; 

10,000 seeds, $30.00. 

Spreneeri, 26c per 280 seeds: 76c per 1000 seeds; 

$2.76 per 6000 seeds. 

Our Flower Seed Catalogue free on application. 

THE MOORE SEED CO., ȴi5SS5Sb2- 

Mention The Review when you write. 



V A LLEY 
CLUMPS 



The heavy kind, full of 
leaders, $12.00 per 100. 



WN. ELLIOn & SONS 

42 Vesey Stmst, NEW YORK 



Mention The Review when you write. 



COLD 



STORAGE Uliuin Giganteum 



Per case 1000 

7/ 9 (300 to case) $21.00 $70.00 

9/10 (200 to case) 20.00 100.00 

Write for Complete Cataloanie 

G. H. HUNKEL CO., Seedsmen, MILWAUKEE, WIS. 

Mention The Review when you write. 

LILIUN GIGANTEUN 

A No. 1 QuaUty, 7x9—300 per Case 
Write for Price 

D. RUSCON I 

188 W. 6th St., CINCINNATI, O. 

Mention The Review when you write. 

If in need of Sprine Bulbs, or Seeds 
of Best quality and at reasonable price, 
send for Special Quotations. Also 
Reduced Stocic of Coid Storage Lilies. 

-ADDRESS- 

H. H. BERGER & CO. 

70 Warrea St., NEW YORK 
Mention The Review when you write. 

nest that Krow. We sell 
direct to gardeners and florists 
at wholesale. B<r, beautiful 
calalogrue free. Write today. 

ARCHIA8' SEED STORE, Box 53, SEDALIA, MO. 

Mention The Review when you write. 




SEEDS 



I 



',rs!^?s*^-,^ .' v., •' > .*r ■'i',- 



->«. "^;? -\".--"«7i- 



V r ,:'J»V-TVr 



Mabch 2, 1911. 



The Weekly Florists^ Review* 



49 



Van Zanten Brothers 

Royal Netberlands Bulb Nurseries 
and Kzport Trade. 

HULEGON, HOLLAND. 

Wholesale growers of the leading sorts of 

HyaciHtiis, Tulips, Nardssis, Crocus, Spiraeis, 

Gladiolus, Peoaies, etc, etc 

Write our traveler. MB. G. HTLKEMA, cure of 
HeBsra. Haltns A Ware, 14 Stone Street. New 
York, for Catalogue and Special prices of all 

Holland Bulbs and Plants. 

Mention The Review when you write. 

The S. D. van der Goot & Co. 

Nurseries, .*. Boikoop, Holland. 



BSTABUSHED X«63 



Rhododendrons, Azaleas, Magnolias, Conifers, 
Climbing Plants, Fruit Trees, Dwarf and Stand- 
ard Roses, Ornamental Plants, Peonies, Etc. 

Write for Wholesale Catalogue 
to oar representative 

B. J. DYKSMS, 

P.O.Box No. 9, Muskegon Heights, Mich. 

Mention The Review wben you write. 

Palms, Araucarias, Bay Trees, 



Azaleas 



and all 
other 



Belgian Plants. 

THE VALLEY 




LILY OF 

Extra selected pips for import; also 

COLD STORAGE VALLEY 

for immediate use. 

Roses, Peonies, Rhododendrons, Box Trees and 

all Other Holland Plants. 

JAPANESE, HOLLAND AND FRENCH BULBS. 

—Import only.— 

H. FRANK DARRpW 

p. 0. Box 1250 26 Barclay SL, NEW YORK 

Mention The Review when you write. 

J. HASSLACH 

SEKD GROWKR 

St. Bemy de Prorenee, 
Franee 

has Issued his Seed Cata- 
logue for Specialties in 
flrstclass Flower and 
Garden.Seeds. 

Mention The Review when you write. 

did not get wonderberry. The only 
charge was that possibly Mr. Burbank 
was misled through his enthusiasm as 
to the value of the wonderberry. But 
that is not a matter which federal legis- 
lation can control, so far as I know." 

Mr. Adamson, Member of Congress: 
"He did not have a reliable artist to 
make the pictures; he exaggerated 
them. ' ' 

Mr. White: "As the representative 
of a garden-seed house I shoiJd like to 
say this, we have just gotten out an 
entirely new set of illustrations for our 
packets, and the amount of labor that 
has gone into making those illustra- 
tions accurate is beyond any commer- 
cial expectation whatever. We have 
endeavored to make that thing what it 
is, because we have long since covered 
all the ter>itory of this United States, 
and we have got to sell to the same 



W. & K.-The Sign of Onality 

When dealing direct with us you not only 
receive quality but we save you money. 

Spring Delivery of Bulbs 

Dahlias, Begonias, Gloxinias, ete. We offer some exceptionally fine new 
Dahlias this year, which are illustrated in our special Dahlia Catalogue. 

Fall Delivery of Bulbs 

Hyacinths, Tulips, Daffodils, Iris, Liliums, Gladioli and many others 

that are mentioned in our Bulb Catalogue. 

Write today for these catalogues— they will interest you. 

■ome Office and Nurseries, Sassenbebn, Holland 
Brancli Houses, United States, Germany, Boutli America 

Gt. van Waveren ft Kruljff , ^1iiflTX-!?f!-' 



Mention The Review when you write. 



Buy Your Cabbage Seed in the Cabbage Country. 

MAKE A TRIAL 

with my unsurpassed stocks of Cauliflower and Cabbage. 

Per lb. 

CauUflower earliest Dwarf Erfurt $12.00 

Cabbage Danish Ballhead Amager, short-stemmed, . 2.00 

Mr. R. Snapp, Tacoma, Wash., writes January 15. 1911: 
"Your type of Cabbage 'Amager' is splendid: it brought me 
first prize in the exhibition, and there were none better." 




-Write to- 



L. DiEHNFELDT, Odense, Denmark 

Largest Seed Grower in Scandinavia (5000 acres.) 
Mention The Review whpn vou write. 



TO THE TRADE 

HENRY METTE, Ouedlinbin^, Gennany 

"^■^■^^^^"■"^ (Eotablished in 1787) 

Grower and Exporter on the very larcest scale of all 

CHOICE VEGETABLE, FLOWER and FARM SEEDS 

Speclaltiesi Beans, Beets. Cabbages, Carrots, Kohl-Rabi, Leeks, Lettuces, Onions* 
Peas, Radi s hes, Spinach, Turnips. Swedes, Asters, Balsams, Begonias. Carnations. 
Cinerarias, Qloxiuias, Larkspurs, Nasturtiums, Pansies, Petunias, Phlox, Primulas, Scabious. 
Sto cks, Verb enas. Zi nniaa. etc. Catalog ue free on application. 

HEhRT MXTTK'S triumph of TEm GLANT PANSIES (mixed), the most per. 
feet and most beaatlfal In the world. ^.00 per oz. ; 11.50 per ^ oz. ; 75o per 1-16 oz Postage 
paid. Cash with order. 

All seeds offered are grown under my personal supervision on my own vast srounds, 
and are warranted true to name, of strongest growth, finest stocks and best auallty. I also 
grow largely seeds on contract. 

Mention The Review when you write. 

VAN GRIEKEN S BULBSj well selected 

^Suf:^^.^'^^^d\I^^;£^:r'"' ^O van GRIEKEN, Usse, Honand 



German Stock Seeds 

A GRAND SPECIALTY 

Price list on application 

PAUL TEICHER, Striegau, Germany 

Oldest Special House 

Mention The Review when you write. 

ORCHIDS 

Largest Importers, Exporters, Growers 
and Hybridists in the world. 

SANDER, St. Albans, England 

aid 258 Broadway. Room 721. New York Gty 

Always mention the Florists' Review 
wben writinc advertiners. 





FOR 




s 


E E 


D S 




of an kinds apply to 


w. \ 


l¥. JOHNSON & SON, Ltd. 




BOSTON, ENGLAND ^ 



Mention The Review when yon write. 



AUGUST ROLKER & SONS 

Importers of Azaleas, Rhododendrons, 
IHilms, Amucarias, Bays, Box, Roses, 
Camellias, florists' Bulbs, nurserymen's 
Trees and Shrubs, etc. For lists, address 

P. 0. Box 752, or 31 Baixiay St. NEW YORK 



50 



The Weekly Florists' Review. 



Mauch 2, 1911. 



ASPARAGUS SEED 

TRUE PLUMOSUS NANUS 
Wisconsin Qreenhouse Grown. 

Not to be compared with tho Inferior CaUfornla and 

Florida outdoor grown seed. ^„ „ „„ 

1000 seeds, $4.00; 5000. $18.16; U. 000, $36.00 

C. H. HUNKEL CO. •/ SEEDSMEN 

MILWAUKEE, WIS. 

Mention The Review when you write. 



people again. Now, does it not appeal 
to your sense of commerce that it is 
better for us to sell these people, as we 
have for three generations, what the 
goods are represented to be, than to 
find a new set of suckers every year— 
if you will excuse that word; I forgot 
myself. It is a fact that it is to our 
commercial interest, laying aside all 
matters of honor, to satisfy these peo- 
ple with what they get. In practice, 
the only time that I know of in any 
seedsman's business that the purchaser 
does not get exactly what is repre- 
sented as to the variety is when, by 
some error, a wrong bag gets in; that 
is, when a packet of some other variety 
eets into the packet of the variety 
which is being filled; and we prevent 
that, as far as possible, and no amount 
of legislation could make us any more 
careful than we are. 

"This brings me down to the third 
point, and the thing on which I think 
you are probably most insistent, and 
that is, that the seeds which a man 
buys shall be alive and not dead. It 
would seem this was a matter which 
meant the most careful protection to 
the buyer. As a matter of fact, it is 
not true that the purchaser of garden 
seed needs any federal protection, or 
any state protection, as to the via- 
bilitv of the seeds he buys. As a mat- 
ter of fact, ninety-eight per cent of all 
the garden seeds sold are represented 
by the association which is here repre- 
sented; ninety-eight per cent of all the 
garden seeds sold in this country are 
represented here. In our business we 
have practically no complaint of the 
viability of the seeds we sell. As a 
matter of fact the seeds grow, but the 
value of seeds does not depend upon 
the viability; it depends more upon the 
quality of the product. It is just the 
same as it is with cows. A thorough- 
bred cow is no more alive than a runt. 
But the amount of butter fat that that 
cow will produce may be three times as 
great. The value is not in the viability 
so much as in whether or not it is 
thoroughbred seed, and frequently thor- 
oughbred seed does not test as much as 
seed of poorer quality and much higher 
viability. The highest viability comes 
in the wild stuff. That is a point in 
biology that you can not get around. 

"I should like to adduce, as evidence 
that a purchaser needs no protection, 
not onlv the fact that we, as seedsmen, 
have very little complaint of viability, 
but a circular published by the Depart- 
ment of Agriculture, Bulletin No. 131, 
part 1, on the germination of vegetable 
seed. That bulletin was published in 
March, 1908, so it is comparatively re- 
cent. In that bulletin there are tabu- 
lated twenty-seven diflferent kinds of 
seed — the ordinary kinds of seed — and 
that represents the viability tests of 
the Department of Agriculture on twen- 
ty-seven different packeting houses, rep- 
resenting practically all the seeds that 
are sold in packets, and I think no one 
will claim that the viability of seeds sold 
by the pound or ounce is less than the 
viability of seeds sold by the packet. 




Dreer's Superb Strains of the Best Asters 

Our stoclcs of the following Asters are grown under our own 8ut>ervislon and we are quite sure 
that nothing finer in quality can be had at any price from any source. Our yearly increasing gales 
are the best evidence that they give complete satisfaction. 



DREER'S ♦♦PEERLESS PINK" 

A magnificent new variety which m»y briefly 
be deicribcd as an improved late- branching 
shell-pink. Flowers of largest size, of rich shell- 
pink, borne on long, strong stems, making them 
one of the finest for cutting. 'lO cents per trade 
l>acket: $4.00 per ounce. 

DREER'S SUPERB 
LATE=BRANCHINQ 

The finest of all September-blooming Asters. 
Our stock has been re-selected for a number of 
years and is now as perfect as the most pains- 
taking care can make it. We offer the following 
eight distinct colors : 

Azure Blue or deep lavender Deep Purple 
Pale lavender Roae-plnk 

Deep Crimson Shell-pink 

Deep Rose Pure Wblte 

Any of the above. i'> cents per trade packet ; 
$1.00 per ounce. Finest mixed, all colors. 2.5 
cents per trade packet; 75 cents per ounce. 

CREQO'S QIANT COMET . 

The perfection of Comet Asters, Immense fluffy 
flowers, five Inches and over acroxs. borne on 
long, strong stems, coming into bloom in August, 
continuing through Septemtwr. We offer pure 
white and shell-pink, 40 cents per trade packet; 
$2.00 per ounce. 



DAYBREAK 

A tine mid-season Aster of symmetrical growth, 
18 Inches high, with good--ized. densely double 
soft pink fiowers. 'lO cents per trade packet; ^^.50 
per ounce. 

VIOLET KINO 

A fine late-branching variety of exceptionally 
free growth, bearing very large double flowers of 
a pleasing shade of soft violet. 30 cents per trade 
packet; |l.-')0 per ounce. 

EARLY WONDER 

The earliest of all Afters, blooming at the end 
of .Tune ; flowers of good size on good stems and 
valuable where early flowers are desired. We 
offer pure white and pink, 40 cents per trade 
packet; |2.00 per oiince. 

QUEEN OP THE MARKET 

An early-flowering, first-class Alter, coming 
into bloom in July, lasting well through August; 
flowers of large size on long, strong stems. A 
good variety for growing under glass. We can 
supply in the following six defirab e colors: 
Pink BrlKht Rose 

Purple Crimson 

Wlilte Lavender 

Any of the above, 20 c*nts per trade packet; 60 
cents per ounce. Finest mixed, all colors, 15 
cents per trade packet; 50 cents per ounce. 



The above are but a few of the many Asters which we offer. For a complete list see pages 2 and 3 
of our current wholesale price list. If you do not have a copy we will be pleased to send one to any 
Florist on application. New crop seeds of almost all kinds are now in stock, and early orders from 
the trade are solicited. 

Henry A. Dreer,chl!.tst Philadelphia, Pa. 



■ ^SfT^*^" ' T^^W^. ■ 



* r7\.Trnvwfr>.' '■ \v%r.'.' ' <■ '^ 'V 



Mahch -2, 1911. 



ThcWcckly Florists' Review. 



51 



<i 



Stumpp k Waller Co/s 



BEGONIA and 
GLOXINIA BULBS 







We have the finest stock of these bulbs, and have been supplying the most 
critical trade for a number of years. 

All carefully selected and graded, true to name and color. 

Every florist should grow at least a few of these bulbs, for selling in pots during 
the summer months, and can also, by transplanting in large pots, grow specimen 
plants for September and October blooming. 

We offer them in the following names and colors : 



Begonia Bulbs 



Single flowering. White, yellow, pink, nan- 

keen, rose, red, dark red, salmon, orange, 

or mixed, dozen, 40c; 100, $2.50; 1000, $20.00. 

Begonia Duke of 55eppelin, dozen, $1.00; 100, $7.00. 
Begonia La Fayette, dozen, $1.60; 100, $10.00. 



Begonia Bulbs 



Double flowering. White, orange, yellow, 
rose, dark rose, dark red, red, salmon, or 
mixed, dozen, 60c; 100, $4.00; 1000, $36.00. 

Begonia Worthiana, dozen, $2.00; 100, $15.00. 
Begonia Butterfly, dozen, $3.00; 100, $20.00. 
^^I^m^ SmSa I^|||I%& The handsomest of our blooming plants, the rich and varied coloring of the 
\M I w JV. 1 1 1 1 ll m3 U 1 1# 9 flowers being interesting in the extreme, many of them beautifully speckled ; 
flowers 3 inches long by 2 inches in diameter, upright and pendulous ; colors various and exceedingly rich in appearance. 
Emperor Frederick, red bordered white. Mont Blanc, pure white. Defiance, scarlet. 

Emperor William, violet bordered white. Violacea, dark violet. King of the Reds, deep scarlet. 

Princess EUzabeth, white bordered blue. Madame Helene, white crowned violet. Prince Albert, dark violet. 

Princess Mathilda, wliite bordered rose. Queen Wilhelmina, dark rose. Fine mixed. 

Per dozen, 75c; per 100, $5.00; per 1000, $47.60. 




^Jim^^(mlkt& 



50 Barclay Street, 
NEW YORK 



Mention The Review when you write. 



Aster Seed 

And all other SEEDS for the 
Florist. Send want list and 

get prices by return mail. 

Davis Nursery & Seed Co., 

UTICA, NKW TORK 

Mention The Review when ''ou write 

ASPARAGUS SEED 

TRUE PLUMOSUS NANUS 
Wisconsin Oreenhouse Grown. 

Not to bo compared with the inferior California and 

Florida outdoor grown seed. 
1000 seeds. $4.00; 500U, $18.75; 10.000. $35.00 

G. H. HUNKEL CO. •.• SEEDSMEN 

MILWAUKEE, WIS. 

Mention The Review when you write. 

The average of all the viabilities for 
each kind is reached. For the twenty- 
seven different kinds — and, as it 
chances, the twenty-seven different 
packet houses — the average number of 
plants of all kinds which a purchaser 
would get for 5 cents, putting the seed 
up in the quantity in which most of 
the seeds are put up, is 923 plants for a 
nickel. Of that average the lowest is 
represented by watermelon. The aver- 
age viability of watermelon sent out 
by all these houses is sixty-four. Ther^ 
are, of course, in a packet of water- 
melon only a few seeds, because the 
seeds are so large that the packet will 
not hold very many. The average num- 
ber of plants which would be obtained 
by the average number of seeds is 
forty-nine. That is the lowest of all of 
them. They range from that up 
through the thousands. The average 
number of sprouts which the purchaser 



STOKES' 

NEW CROP 



Aster Seeds 



Queen of the Market. The earliest Aster. 
Separate colort, whit-, plnlt, crimson, blue, 
purple or mixed, trade pkt., 20c; oz., 60c. 

Giant CreKO Aster. Immense flowers. 4 
inches across. White, shell-pinli, each, trade 
plit .40c: oz ,$2.50. 

Giant. Comet Aster. Very long, twisted 
petals. Snow white, pink, crimson and lavender, 
trade pkt., ;Wc; oz , $1.50. 

Stokes* Late BranchinK. Finest strain 
late branching a^ter that is possible to obtain. 
Separate colors, shell-piuk, white, rose, crimson, 
lavender and purple, trade pkt., 30c; oz.,$1.00. 

Daybreak. Delicate shell-pink, trade pkt., 
40c; oz., $2.00. 



Purity. Pure white, companion to Day- 
break, trade Vkt., 40c; oz., $2.00. 

Lavender Gem. The finest lavender aster, 
trade pkt., 40c; oz.. $2.50. 

Violet Kins. Slender curled petals, large 
violet flowers, tiade pkt., 40c; <oz., $1.75. 

Crimson B:in8;. The finest aster of its color, 
trade pkt., 40c; oz., $2.00. 

Stokes* Mixture of Asters for Florists. 

A mixture consisting of white, pink and the 
brightest of re-' , suitable for cut flowers, trade 
pkt., 25c; oz.,$1.25. 



Florists' Wholesale Price List Now Ready. 

STOKES' SEED STORE 

219 Market Street, PHILADELPHIA, PA. 

Mention The Review when you write. 

THE CREGO ASTER 

Buy Tour Seed Direct From The Originator. 

I am offering the CREGO ASTER in four colors, viz.: shell pink, pure white, 
rose-pink and violet blue. The latter color is offered for the first time. It is fully 
up to Crego grade, immense fluffy blossoms of splendid color. 

The price of CREGO ASTER seed is as follows: X oz., $1.00; M oz., $2.00; 
ounce, $4.00; cash with order. Full directions for growing the largest and finest 
Asters will be sent to each purchaser of % oz. or more. 

Q. S. CREQO, 736 E. Main Street, Portland, Ore. 

^ «r Always mention the Florists' RcvieW when writing advertiien. sT iT 



K %'*<'" Y^^^^^^*^ ■'.'..- 



52 



' ■■'( '-■'^ '" ™\v-:!?'ys- 



..,/" ya-^A-- .-..^T^ppTj;,^, 



The Weekly Florists' Review. 



BlABCH 2, 1911. 



James Vick's Sons-Largest Growers of High-Gr 




We ha?e grown Asters longer, intro- 
duced more varieties, grow larger quan- 
tities and seU to more Seedsmen and 
Florists than any other Aster grower in 
America. 



Vick's Imperial Rose 

This illustrates one of the newest of half a 
dozen varieties from the same family as Day- 
break and Purity. A deep, rich rose color. 
One of the best recent introductions. 

PRICES 

1/16 oz...... W.20 

1/8 oz 35 

1/4 oz. 6S 

1/2 oz 1.20 

1 oz 2.00 



Vick's 
Early U^t 

Nunaerous readers of The Review 
will recognize this as a popular 
novelty of laat year. Many Flo- 
rists claim they got more flowers, 
larger blooms and longer stems 
than they could grow of other 
early kinds, because it grows as 
vigorously and yields as abundant- 
ly as many of the Late Asters. 
The flowers are solid, ball shaped 
and considerably above the aver- 
age in size. A medium early 
variety wliich has been a money 
maker wherever tried. Two col- 
ors: White and Lavender Pink. 

PRICES 

1/82 ii. $0.25 

1/16 fx 40 

1/8 n 60 

1/4 «. 1.00 

1/2 oz 1.75 

In 3.00 



Vi 



Inb 

logued ; 
similar 
i,'rowth, 
the quill 
the inne 
and inct 

1/16 oz. . 
1/8 oz. . 
1/4 oz. . 
1/2 oz. . 
I oz. . . . 

Our 

i.iUdesci 
rieties, v 
cial gro 

Asters," 
'>ster Se( 

Jai 



/ ■ 






"«: • V".-. ..-; 



■i~ "'>. 



Mabch 2, 1911. 



The Weekly Florists^ Review* 



58 



Grade Aster Seeds in the World-Rochester, N.Y, 



Vick's 
Nikado Pink 




The Rochester 

One of the most beautiful Asters ever 
introduced. Selected by the Chamber of 
Commerce as the official flower of Roch- 
ester, and re-named by us at their re- 
quest. A mid-season, freely blooming, 
large flowering variety. 

PRICES 

1/64 oz $0.20 

1/32 oz SO 

1/16 oz 4S 

1/8 oz. .78 

1/4 oz. 1.2S 

1/2 oz 2.2S 

1 oz. 4.00 

!1 . ■ 



Vick's Violet King 

Introduced by us several years ago. Cata- 
logued now by all leading seedsmen. Habit is 
similar to Vick's Late Branching, vigorous in 
growth, with long, stiff stems. Flowers resemble 
the quilled varieties, but much larger and broader, 
the inner petals being fantastically twisted, curled 
and incurvetl, completely covering tlu' crown. 

PRICES 

1/16 OZ $0.20 

1/8 oz 30 

1/4 oz SO 

1/2 oz 80 

I oz 1.S0 

Our "Aster Book for Florists," containing 
iall descriptions of these and all the other leading va- 
rieties, will be mailed free to Florists and commer- 
cial growers only. Our booklet, "How to Grow 
Asters," price 10 cents, free with every order of 
'*8ter Seed. 

James Vick's Sons 

ROCHESTER, N. Y* 



S'-'-.^T.- >irT':'' 



^•rrvyj.- 



54 



The Wcdiy Florists*' Review* 



March 2, 1911. 



ASPARAGUS SEED 



TRUE PLUMOSUS NANUS 
Wisconsin Greenhouse Grown. 

Not to be compared with the Inferior CaUfornla and 

Florida outdiKir k rown seed. 
1000 M«d8, $4.00; 6U0U, $18.75; 10.000. $35.00 

G. H. HUNKEL CO. v SEEDSMEN 

MILWAUKEE, WIS. 

Mention The Review when you write. 



would get out of a packet of seeds of 
rutabaga was 2,212; the average num- 
ber of sprouts of lettuce was 2,250. I 
submit to you, gentlemen, that there is 
no practical need for protecting the 
buyer on the viabilitv of commissioned 
packets as sold. 

"There is not only no need of pro- 
tecting the buyer of vegetable packets 
with regard to weed seeds and to see 
that the purchaser gets what he sup- 
poses he buys, or protect him to see 
that the seeds are alive, but I very 
much doubt if you constitutional law- 
yers here would want to legislate on 
this question anyway, because if you 
did so you would be holding the seller 
of seeds responsible for the operation 
of a natural law which he can not con- 
trol and of the actions of which he 
even does not know infallibly. The 
association of seed analysts here repre- 
sented will tell you that there are no 
two experiment stations in the United 
States which infallibly get the same re- 
sult at the same time as to the viability 
of a given lot of seed. 

"If legislation were needed, if you 
were going to legislate, if there were a 
practical demand for it and it were 
needed, on the subject of viability, 
would you want a federal law to pro- 
tect the purchaser in the quality of the 
stuff that he bought, or would you leave 
that, supposing that a law were needed, 
to the states? I ask you, is there any 
case of the Congress of the United 
States passing a law to see that the 
purchaser receives his money's worth 
when he buys a commodity which does 
not affect his health? We all applauded 
and we all rejoiced over the pure-food 
law. The difference is right here. 
When a man buys food that is adulter- 
ated he poisons himself; when a man 
buys seed, supposing there were such a 
case, which was not as much as it 
ought to be, his pocket only is affected. 
Is Congress ready to embark on the 
field of federal regulation with regard 
to saying that the purchaser of every 
5-cent packet of seeds, or every $2 pair 
of shoes, or every ice-cream freezer, or 
anything of that kind, shall get his 
money's worth?" 

Mr. Adamson : 
entered upon it, 
twenty-five years 
corns and toe nails and name 
babies." [Great laughter.] 

Mr. White: "Gentlemen, I do not 
need to say any more." 



' ' We have already 

and in less than 

they will trim the 

the 



TESTING FABM SEEDS. 

The United States Department of 
Agriculture has just issued a bulletin 
of forty-eight pages entitled "Testing 
Farm Seeds in the Home and in the 
Rural School." It relates to grass 
and clover, with a brief paragraph on 
corn. The author is F. H. Hillman, and 
of general seed trade conditions he has 
this to say: 

"Most of the undesirable conditions 
exhibited by seed which make seed 
testing necessary are the result of 
trade influences. The responsibility 



FOR PRESENT 



Currle's Flower Seeds sowing 



Antirrblnatn, giant flowering, separate colore and 

mixed, peroz.,4uc; tr. pkt., lOc. 
Asters, alitfae leading varieties. 
Asparagus Plumosus Nanus, greenhouse-grown, 1000 

seeds, (3.60. 
Asparagus Sprengeri. 1000 seeds, 7Ke. 
Candytuft, giant Uyacinth-flowi red. per oz., 20c. 
Cobaea Scandens, blue and white. 36c and }0c per oz. 



Oale.idula. 

Lobelia, In variety. 1000 seeds, tOc. 

Salvia Bonfire, $i.lK> per oz.; SOO seeds, 26c. 

Salvia Splendens, Precocity, Zurich. 

Petunias, named varieties, 1000 seeds, 26c; Olants of 

CaUfornla and Ruffled Giants. 35c. 
Sweet Peas, Stocks, Verbenas, etc. 



Caladlum Esoulentum, Elephant's Ear. Extra large, 9 to 12-lnch. 8.5c per doz. ; $6.00 per 100. 
Second size. 7 to l>-inch, (lOc per doz. ; lii.oO per 100. Third size. r> to 7-inch, ;i.5c per doz.; fi.OO per 100. 
Mammotli Excelsior Pearl Tuberoses, first size, $l(Ki per 100;- 19.00 per 1000. 
Lily of tbe Valley, giant forcing. From cold storage, ready for forciug, $14.00 per lOOO. 



-Send for 1911 Florists' CataloBue.- 



CURRIE BROS. CO., 312 Broadway, MILWAUKEE, WIS. 



Mention The Review when vou write 



Sure-Blooming 
Double Pearl 



TIBEROSES 



Unsurpassed 
Quality 



3 to 4 inches, splendid quality, per 100, $0.50; per 1000, $4.60 

4 to 6 inches, large bulbs per 100, 1.00: per 1000, 8.00 

Peonies, Cycas Stems, Gladioli, Dahlias, Fern Balls, 

Madeira and Cinnamon Vine Roots, Begonias, 

Cannas, Gloxinias and Caladiums. 

Write for Wholesale Bulb List. 

Johnson Seed Company, 217 Market St., Philadelphia. Pa. 



Mention The Review when you write 



GLADIOLI 



I can supply MADAME MONNERET in 1st, 2nd 
and 3rd si^es, in large quantities* Write for prices* Amer- 
ica, Mrs. King, Easter, Eugene Scribe, Florida, Gea Paul, 
Kbndyke, President Taft, Golden Queen and many others. 

Send for trade list. 

E. E. STEWART, Rives Junction, Mich. 



Mention The Review when you write. 



Western Headquarters 

for finest cold storage 

?I1LIH PiP8 

Order now for Easter forcing. 
$14.00 per 1000; $1.50 per 100. 

H. N. BRUNS 

3040 W. Madison Street, CHICAGO 

Mention Tbe Review when you write. 

GLADIOLUiS 

Gnnamon Vines, Madeira Vines, 
Lilies, Iris, Daphne Cneorum, 
Syrinca Japonica and Wistarias. 

Write tor Price List 

E. S. MILLER, Wa«M Knrer,N.Y. 



"BUDS" 



7fl Barclay Street, 
KKW TOBK CITT 
Hi|h Grade See«t M%i Baft* 
CARL R. OL.OKCKNEK. Alauaser. 




SEEDS Fresh 
Reliable SEEDS 



For Early Sowing 



Oz. 

$2.26 
1.00 



1.50 
1.25 



Trade pkt. 
Salria Clara Bedman, "Bonfli«"..25c 

Salvia Splendeni 15c 

Terbena, S. <& I. choice mammoth 

mixud 25c 

Terbena, S. & I. choice mammoth, 

Separate colors 25c 

Lobelia Crystal Palace Compacta 25c 

Lobelia Speciosa (Trailing) 15c 

Begonia Temon. 1-16 oz., SOc 25c 

Begonia Lnminosa fiery dark scarlet.40c 
Petnnla. Giants of Callforala, 1-16 

oz., 12.00 50c 

Asters ( Vick & Hill grown) . See catalogue. 

SKIDELSKY & IRWIH CO. 

ISIS Bets Bulldlnc 
PHILADELPHIA, PA. 

Send for our new catalogue. 



Mention The Review when you wnte 

BURNETT BROS. 

SEEDS :: BULBS tt PLANTS 
7S Cortlajidt St., NEW TORE CITT 



f^.'^(5'-'.i';7v' "•V*'',"' .v.- 'Tr™JT*^ri^?*^p''~ .'*•■•.. '''*■ ^w7".'w>" ;?fT'T'K^ 



?S-p." 



'!!?T>' yc:--?,^ 



March 2, 1911. 



JhcWeekly Florists' Review. 



55 



XXX SEEDS 

LIBERAL TRADE PACKETS. 

PETUNIA STAR, improved, finest marked 
flowers, very fine, pkt., 20c. 

PETUNIA GIANT, single fringed, large 
and fine, pkt., 20c. 

SALVIA BONFIRE, finest grown, briUiant 
scarlet and compact, large pkt., 20c. 

PHLOX DRUM. PUMILA, very dwarf, 
grand for pots, fine color, pkt., 20c. 

CHINESE PRIMROSE, finest grown, sin- 
gle and double, mixed, 600 seeds, $1.00: 
% pkt., 50c. 

PRIMULA KEWENSIS, the grand new 
sweet-scented yellow Primrose, pkt., 20c. 

CINERARIA, large-flowering, dwarf, 
mixed, 1000 seeds, 60c; % pkt, 26o. 

GIANT PANSY, finest grown, critically 
selected, 6000^ seeds, |1.00; ^ pkt.. 60c: 
oz., $2.60. Pkt. Mme. Perret with avery 
$1.00 pkt. 

COLEUS, New Hybrids, fine colors, pki.. 
20c. Grand. The best new giants. 

LOBELIA EMPEROR WILLIAM, dwarf, 
very dark blue, white eye, finest of all 
the Lobelias, pkt., 20c. 

TORENIA FOURNIERI, new giant, extra 
fine pot plant, pkt.. 20c. Showy. 

CANDYTUFT, new giant hyacinth-flow- 
ered; a great cutter, pkt., 20c. 

ANTIRRHINUM novelUes, Defiance, fiery 
scarlet; Black Prince, nearly black; 
Queen Victoria, flnest white; separate 
or mixed, pkt., 20c. All new giants. 

THUNBERGIA, finest mixed; pkt., 20c. 

COBAEA SCANDENS, purple; pkt., 20c. 

ALYSSUM COM PACTUM. Most dwarf 
and compact variety grown, pkt., 20c. 

VERBENA, Improved Mammoth, flnest 
giants grown, mixed or separate of 
white, scarlet, pink, striped and auri- 
cula-eyed. Large trade pkt. 20c. 

CASH. Liberal extra count. 

JOHN r. RUrr, riorist Seedsman. 

Shiremanstown, Pa. 

Mention The Rpvipw when you write 



YICK & HILL CO. 

P. 0. Bm 613 ROCHESTBt, N. Y. 

Growers of high grade 

Aster Seed 

When in the market for 
quality stock, write us. 



Mention The Review when yoo write. 



,^*, F R EvS H S E;E D 1 



iimRlM: 



A»^^^ -,- 



Unrivaled for size of flower, purity of 
color and hlcbest development. Tliey 
represent THK BEST speolallsta have 
so far produced. 

My seeds, absolutely fresh, of Primula Chinen- 
sis, Forbesi. Kewensis, Obconlca, Ronsdorfer & 
Lattmann's Hybrids are now on hand. List free. 

J. L. SCHILLER, Toledo, O. 

Mention The Review when you write. 
Headquarters for 

Spring Bulbs 

Send for Trade List 

JOHN LEWIS CmUS/^TufJ:!".'?.' 



Al^ 



lye mention tbe norlata' Review 
when writlnc advertiaere. 



Flower Seeds l:;foV!^ 

AsparaeuH PlumoHus Nanas, true greenhoose- 
grown seed, lOUO seeds, $1.00; SOOO seeds, $18.7B. 

AsparaKua Sprensreri. 1000 seeds, 76c; 6000 

seeds, $3.26. Tr. Pkt. Oz. 

AlysBum Little Gem $0.10 $0.36 

Oandytuft, Olant Hyacinth 10 .26 

Oobaea Scandens, blue 10 .30 

Dracaena Indivlsa 10 .30 

ForKet-Me-Not Victoria 16 1.00 

Lobelia Specloea, trailing 10 .60 

Lobelia Crystal Palace Oompacta 16 1.00 

MlKnonette Olant Macbet 10 .60 

Mignonette Allen's Defiance 10 .30 

Petnnla Olants of California 26 

Salvia Splendens J6 1.00 

Salvia Clara Bedman 26 2.26 

Smllax, new crop 10 .26 

Stocks, Ten Weeks 76 2.00 

Verbena, Mammoth 16 1.00 

Complete catalogne Free. Ask for It. 

G. H. HUNKEL CO., Seedsmen, Nilwiukee, Wis. 

Mention The Keview when you write. 



for these conditions doubtless rests 
fully as much with the mass of con- 
sumers who demand low priced seed as 
with the dealers who cater to this de- 
mand. The trade has employed various 
means to meet the demand for low 
priced seed. Large importations are 
made of the same kinds of seed which 
are produced in and are exported from 
this country. The imported seed can 
be sold cheaper than that which is ex- 
ported. Grades of seed which are prac- 
tically unsalable in Europe find a ready 
market here because the better Amer- 
ican grown seed is commonly consid- 
ered too high priced. Various forms 
of seed adulteration have long been 
practiced, and seed ill adapted to our 
climatic conditions has often been sold. 
The results have been frequent failure 
of crops, an excessive cost of the act- 
ually good seed, and a wider distribu- 
tion of many kinds of foreign weeds 
than by any other means. A general 
understanding of these conditions as 
they relate to particular kinds of seeds 
is helpful in making tests." 



CATAIiOOUES BECEIVSD. 

J. L. Moore, Northboro, Mass., dahl- 
ias and gladioli; J. W. Jung Seed Co., 
Eandolph, Wis., regular and wholesale 
seed lists; American Forestry Co., South 
Framingham, Mass., trees and tree 
seeds; the D. Hill Nursery Co., Dundee, 
ni., general nursery stock; Peacock 
Dahlia Farms, Berlin, N. J., dahlias and 
gladioli; Mount Arbor Nurseries, Shen- 
andoah, la., wholesale list; Snow's Seed 
Store, Camden, N. J., "Seed and Plant 
Annual"; Wilhelm Pfitzer, Stuttgart, 
Germany, seeds and plants; Fottler, 
Fiske, Eawson Co., Boston, Mass., whole^ 
sale list of seeds; the Thos. J. Grey Co., 
Boston, Mass., seeds, bulbs, plants and 
supplies; the Leedle Floral Co., Spring- 
field, O., roses. 



ULIES FOB MUMOBIAI. DAY. 

I should like to know when to bring 
Lilium giganteum into heat to have 
them in bloom for Memorial day. 

J. E. S. 



Giganteum lilies should be placed in a 
brisk heat at once for Easter, as the 
buds should show early in March. For 
Memorial day the plants should at pres- 
ent be in a tr-mperature of 45 to 50 de- 
grees, and if the shoots push through 
the pots by the middle of March they 
will be on time, if given a night tem- 
perature of t)0 to 65 degrees. You want 
to see the buds separated thirty-five 
days before Memorial day. Gigantenms 
like warm treatment right along, when 
once they are well started. C. W. 



He was so stingy that he 
used the mole on the back of 
his neck to save a collar- 
button. His soul -cry was 
price, price, price! He held 
the cent so close to his eye > 
that he couldn't see the dol- 
lar behind it. So he bought 
the cheapest lily bulbs in the 
market. Now he has the 
most constipated-looking lot 
of lilies you ever saw in your ^ 
life. He blames the bulbs, 
of course, and he is right, 
but he has forgotten what he 
paid. 

He can cuss now until he 
gets ankylosis of the jaw- 
bone and it won't help mat- 
ters a bit. He got just what 
he paid for, and he's it. 

It is better to buy Horse- 
shoe Brand Giganteum than 
to wish you had. They are 
the best marketed that we 
know of and have averaged 
the best returns of any brand 
in the world. 

RALPH N. WARD 
&C0. 

12 West Broadway 
;:S%V£^^ NEW YORK 

Cold Storage bulbs ready 
for shipment now or any 
time during 1911. Order now. 




■'f - 



w 



ThcWeekly Florists' Review. 



Mabch 2, l»li. 



VegetableForcmg. 



VEGETABLE MABKETS. 

Ohioago, February 28. — Cucumbers, |1.60 to 
fl.75 doc.; lettuce, 22c to 36c case. 

Beaton, February 27. — Tomatoes, 40c to BOc lb. ; 
cucumbers, S6 to $10 J)oz; special fancy cucum- 
bers, |2 to $3 doz.; rhubarb, 6c lb.; lettuce, 60c 
to |1 box; spinach, $1.25 to |1.60 box; romalne, 
76c to $1 doz.; escarolle, 50c to 75c doz.; mint, 

J 1.25 to $1.60 dozen bunches; parsley, $1.50 to 
1.75 box; radishes, 25c to 30c doz. 
New York, February 27.— Fancy cucumbers 
continue firm. Beet tops selling fairly well. 
Mint continues scarce. Mushrooms average 
higher. Tomatoes slightly lower. Beet tops, 
76c to $1 box: cucumbers, 75c to $2.50 doz. ; mint, 
tl.25 to $1.50 dozen bunches, mushrooms, 50c to 
$1.40 4-lb. basket; radishes, $2.50 to $3.50 hun- 
dred bunches; rhubarb, 20c to 55c dozen bunches; 
tomatoes, 15c to S5c lb. 



INDOOB BRUSSELS SPROUTS. 

Can Brussels sprouts be successfully 
grown in a greenhouse with a day tem- 
perature of 60 to 70 degrees and a night 
temperature of 40 to 50 degrees? How 
long should the crop take to mature? 
My plants are making a vigorous 
growth, but have shown no signs of 
sprouts. They are fifteen or eighteen 
inches high, strong, healthy^ and have 
large leaves. I am located m southern 
Wisconsin! J. R. M. 

I have never had any experience with 
Brussels sprouts in the greenhouse. I 
am sure, however, that vour tempera- 
ture is about right, as they belong to 
the cabbage family and like a lettuce 
temperature. I think the reason that 
they have not shown any signs of 
sprouts is that they are not old enough. 
Outside they are not an early vegetable, 
by any means, and you will no doubt 
get a crop later, but I fear they will 
not be a paying crop, on account of 
the southern outdoor-grown article be- 
ing on the market by that time. 

^ H. G. 



NEW YORK GROWERS ORQANIZE. 

The vegetable growers of New York 
state convened at the College of Agri- 
culture, at Ithaca, February 22, and de- 
cided to organize a state association. 
A committee was appointed on that 
day to formulate a constitution and 
by-laws, and report the following day. 
This program was carried out and 
the constitution and by-laws were 
adopted, officers were elected, commit- 
tees appointed, and the association is 
now a full-fledged organization of the 
state, ready to do business. The object 
of the association is stated as follows: 

Article II. The object of this association shall 
be to organize and federate the Interests of those 
engaged in vegetable growing, to the end that 
larger crops of constantly improving quality may 
be grown and marketed with Increased profit. 

The constitution provides for the fol- 
lowing committees: 

Article V. The executive committee shall con- 
sist of the president, the secretary, and three 
members elected at large who shall represent as 
far as possible the different phases of the vege- 
table industry of the state. 

Article VI. The standing committees shall be 
as follows: Marketing, transportation, legisla- 
tion, investigation, federation. They shall con- 
sist of three members each, appointed by the 
president. In appointing these committees for 
the first time, the president shall designate one 
member of each committee for one year, one 
member for two years, and one member for three 
years. Thereafter the Incoming president shall 
appoint one member of each committee to hold 
office for three years, or until his successor is 
appointed. 

Special committees may be appointed by the 
president from time to time as occasion may 
arise. 

It is the aim of the association to in- 
terest local organizations. To this end 
Article VIII has been incorporated: 



ANNOONCEMENT 



- . Findlay, O., February 27, 1911. 

TO THE TRADE: 

I am getting things In shape for one of the biggest stocks of vegetable 
plants that I have ever grown for the wholesale trade. Last season I was fully 
300,000 short, but my greenhouses for this year are under new management, 
Mr. Arthur Marshall, of Columbus Grove, having full charge of them. Eighty 
bushels of sweet potatoes will be put down for plants, which will be ready to 
ship first week in May. My tomato seed was saved from the very choicest 
stock and I know the plants will give entire satisfaction. We shall grow a 
large stock of peppers, eggplant, celery, cauliflower, cabbage, tomato plants 
and asters. A full list will be published in the Florists' Review for the month 
of April. Don't fail to read it. Mr. Marshall will book your ovMtt, large or 
small, for anything in the plant line and ship when wanted. (3?^. ' 

Addross all orders care of If mMI/^DIII?! /^DDFniAflOVO 

ARTHUR T. MARSHAU, ^«SfSfe" HcnilllAtL (iKttfnllllMd, 



of the 
Box 478, or 148 Larkins Street, 



Fini 



Ohio. 



Mention The Review when you write. 



i^; 



Wonderful Fall Bearing 

STRAWBERRY PLANTS 



mm-) 






I.. J. 



Fruit in Fall of first year and in Spring; and Fall of second year. Better than 
a Klondike Gold Mine. From 500 plants set in Spring of 1910 we picked, from 
Aug. 30th to Nov. i2tb, nearly 400 quarts, which sold at 40c to 50c a quart, 
netting us over J200 to the acre. We have the largest stock in the world of 
"Francis." "Amencus," "Productive," and"Superb," the four best varie- 
ties; also "Autumn" and "Pan-American." Now is the time to order these 
plants before everybody begins to grow them. Do not invest in seeds or 
plants of French or other worthless varieties. We are also headquarters for 
plants of "Norwood" and "Early Ozark" Strawberries; "Plum Farmer," 
"Idaho" and "Royal Purple" Raspberries, and all other valuable varieties of 
Berry Plants, Grapes, Currants, Gooseberries, Asparagus, Roses, "Hastings" 
Potatoes, etc. 38 years of experience. Catalogue free. 

PARMER, "Xlie Strawberry Man," Box ig^, Pulaski, Ne-«r VorU. 

MPuMntl The R(>v<»w» whPTi voti xvrlte 





Watch for onr Trade Mark stamped 
on every brick of Lambert's 

Port Cultora Mnshroon Spawn 

Sabstitatlon of cheaper erades is 

thus easily nposed. Fresh sample 

brick, with Olostrated book, mailed 

_ _ -^^ postpaid by manof actnrers upon re- 

,r^Cj^ celpt of 40 cents m postage. Address 

Trade Mark. Amcrioui Spawn Co., St Paul, Miiuk 

Mention The Review when you write. 

TONATO SEED NEW STONE 

Pure, clean stock, single pound, $1.25, 
postage paid. Special price quoted on 
larger quantities. CMTespoadence solicited. 

H. AUSTIN CO., Felton, Del. 

Mention The Review when you write. 

Any local or district organization representing 
vegetable growers may become affiliated with this 
association by the appointment of an official 
representative, and the payment of an annual 
fee of |5. It shall be the dnty of the committee 
on federation to promote the formation of snch 
organizations, and to secnre the affiliation of 
these and existing organizations with the state 
association. 

The constitution provides for two 
types of membership, annual members 
and sustaining members. The annual 
membership fee is $2. Any person de- 
siring to support this good work may 
become a sustaining member on pay- 
ment of $100. 

The following officers were elected: 
President, C. K. "White, Ionia; vice-presi- 
dent, Mason H. Holmwood, Orchard 
Park; secretary, Paul Work, Ithaca; 
treasurer, C. H. Aldrich, Mattituck. " 
Executive committee, C. R. White, 
Ionia; Paul Work, Ithaca; Ezra A. Tut- 
tie, Eastport; G. M. Keller, Brighton; 
Wi. L. Bonney, Batavia. John Craig. 



Essex, Conn. — Henry B. Dolph and 
Miss Nellie G. Miner were married 
February 21. 





— ■■■ !■ mamm^^B'-m 






SSiffW'S 




- # 


n 


^f^ 


^E 


)X1 




^■Itr 


iW-MM^ 




1 




M.?' Onion Seeds 

produce bulbs of good size, correct shape, and 
brilliant color— bulbs that command top-notch 
prices in any market. Correct soil, climate and 
care give to our strains, characteristics not 
found In the ordinary article. Early maturing, 
heavy yielding, good keeping qualities are bred 
Into our stocks, which are dependable. 

Ohio Yellow Globe, most desirable globe, 
enormous yielder. Oz.,16c; ^4 lb., 60c; lb., I1.7B; 
6 lbs., $8 26: 10 lbs., $16.00. 

Sonthport White Globe, nearly perfect 
with us. Oz.. 30c: I4 lb.. 86c: lb., $3.00. 

Sonthport Ked Globe, solid, heavy yielder, 
good keeper. Oz., 16c: '4 lb., 36c; lb, $1.26; 6 
lbs., $6.76: 10 lbs.. $10.00. 

Write for special prices on large qnantities. 

Try a packet of each of above 3 sorts for 10c. 

Profitable Onions 

is the title of a booklet telling all about the new 
and old methods of growlug onions from seed. 
Describes Livingston's superb strains of Ohio 
grown onions and how they are produced. 
Write for it to Desk R, today. 

The Livingston Seed Co., Columbus, Ohio 



Always mention the Florists' Review when, 
writing advertisers. 



IfABMi 2, 1911. 



The Weekly Florists^ Review* 



57 



J,!;.-,.-,-' ;.- V I . -vVv».' 



This is Tiis 



'-'"<£• * 





By William Scott 

SECOND EDITION 

■J . ^ . 

THOROUGHLY REVISED AND 
BROUGHT UP TO DATE 

NO SCIENCE, BUT LOTS OF 
PRACTICAL COMMON SENSE 



I have several times been consujted by those 
who would make a beginning in the Florists' 
business-. - In each case I have said that the first 
step is to. subscribe for a Trade Paper, and the 
next to procure a copy of the Florists' Manual." 
—J. A. Valentine, Pres. Park Floral Co., Den- 
ver, Colo. 

"Find enclosed $5 for the Florists' Manual, by 
William Scott. It is the best book of the age on 
commercial floriculture and should be in the 
home of every gardener." — Conrad Forbach, 
BufiEalo, N. Y. 

No dry-as-dust botanical classifications, but 
tells you just how to produce marketable plants 
and cut flowers in the best and cheapest way. 





c- 


ill Cultural Directions Under Each of these Hei 














Abutilon 


Araucaria 


Camellia 


Decorative pl'ts 


Gloxinia 


Libonia 


Packing flowers 


Seed sowing 


Acacia 


Ardisia 


Candytuft 


Deutzia 


Grasses 


Lilluro 


Packing plants 


Selaginella 


Acalypha 


Aristolochia 


Canna 


Dianthus 


Greenhouse bldg. 


Lily of the Valley 


Pahns 


Shading 


Acanthrophoenix 


Asparagrus 


Carludoviea 


Dracaena 


Grevillea robusta 


Linum trigynum 


Pancratium 


Skimmia jap. 


Acer japonicum 


Aspidistra 


Carnation 


Drainage 


Gypsophila 


Lobelia 


Panda nus 


Smilax 


AchUlea 


Asplenium 


Celosia 


Easter plants 


^ardy climbers 


Lysimachia 


Panicum van 


Soils 


Achimines 


Aster 


Centaurea 


Epacris 


Hardy perennials 


Manettia 


Pansy 


Solanum 


Achyranthes 


Astilbe japonica 


Cheiranthus 


Epiphyllum 


Hardy shrubs 


Maranta 


Pelargonium 


Stephanotis 


Acrophyllutn 


Aialea 


Chorizema 


Erica 


Heating 


Martinezia 


Pennisetum 


Stevia 


Adiantum 


Balsam 


Chrysanthemum 


Eriostemon 


Hedera (Ivy) 


Maurandya 


Peony 


Stocks 


Arapanthus 


Basket plants 


Cineraria 


Eucharis 


Hedge plants 


Metrosideros 


Peperomia 


* Store managem'l 


Agave 


Bay trees 


Clematis 


Eupatorium 


Heliotrope 


Mignonette 


Perilla 


Swainsona 


Agreratum 


Bedding plants 


Cobjea 


Euphorbia 


Hibiscus 


Mimulus 


Petunia 


Sweet Pea 


Allamand^ 


Begonia 


Cold frames 


Ferns 


Hollyhock 


Moonflower 


Phlox 


System 


Alocasia 


Bellis 


Coleus 


Fertilizers 


Hotbed 


Mulching 


Pinks 


Thunbergia 


Aloysia 


Boston Ivy 


Cosmos 


Ficus 


Hoya 


Musa 


Poinsettia 


Torenia 


Alternanthera 


Bottle Brush 


Cotyledon 


Fittonia 


Hyacinth 


Mushroom 


Potting 


Tropzolum 


Amaranthus 


Bottom heat 


Crinum 


Floral Arrange- 


Hydrangea 


Myosotis 


Primula 


Tuberose 


Amaryllis 


Bougainvillea 


Crocos 


Freesia '""»' 


Impatiens 


Narcissus 


Pronouncing 


Vallota 


Ampelopsis 


Bouvardia 


Croton 


Fuchsia 


Insecticides 


Nasturtium 


Dictionary 


' Vases 


Ananas 


Bromeliads 


Cycas 


Fungicides 


Iresine 


Nepenthes 


Rhododendron 


Ventilation 


Annuals 


Biowallia 


Cyclamen 


Gardenia 


Jasminum 


Nierembeigi 


Richard ia 


Veranda boxes 


Anthericum 


Bulbs 


Cytisus 


Geranium 


Kalmia 


Oleander 


Ricinus 


Verbena 


Anthuriura 


Cactus 


DahlU 


Gesnera 


Kceniga 


Orange 


Rose 


Vinca 


Antirrhinum 


Caladium 


Decorationw 


Gladiolus 


Lantana 


Orchid 


Salvia 


Violet 


Aponogreton 


Calamus 


Decorative ma- 


Glazing 


Lapageria 


Othonna 


Santolina 


Wateritw 


Aquatics 


Calceolaria 


terial 


Glechoma 


Lawns 


Oxalis 


Sedum 


Zinnia 



PRICE, $6.00, PREPAID BY EXj^RESS OR MAQ. 

The Best Investment Any Beginner Can Make 



FLORISTS' PUBLISHING CO., 



Caacton Building^, 

884 Dearborn St., 



CHICAGO 



'*.• T^TrV'fir^irT^ . ,'y^^'KVC ■ 



■ r<^*^->w^" t ■ "^f>'"s-T?'^ 



58 



The Weekly Rorists' Review. 



March 2, 1911. 



Edward 

WHOLESALE FLORIST 



Reid 



B««t 



Carnation Rooted Cuttings ""^f: 

« Winsor per 100, $2.50; per 1000, $20.00 

5 Enchantress, AVliite Enchantress, Beacon," 3.00; , " 25.00 

1619-21 Ranstead St., Philadelphia, Pa. 



Mention The Review when you write. 



Wholesale Cut Flower Prices. 

PhlJadelphia, March 1. 1911. 

n ^ o . , Perdoz. 

Beauty. Specials fg.OO 

Short 11.00 @ 2.00 



The Killarneys, Fancy |15 

Select 10 

„, ^ Ordinary 6 

Richmond, Select 15 



Per 100 
00 @ 125.00 
00 @ 12.00 



Ordinary 6 

My Maryland, Bride. Select 12 

„ , ' " Ordinary... 6 

Melody 8 

Carnations, Fancy 

Select 

Ordinary 2 

White Lilac per doz.. fl.OO 

Snapdragons, per doz..|l..'jO @ 2.00 

Cattleyas perdoz., 6.00 

Gardenias... per doz.. |;{.oo@ 5.00 
Easter Lilies, per doz. , 1.50 

Callas per doz. , 1 .25 @ l .75 

Asparagus per bunch, .,50 

Strings, each, fo. 75 @ 1.00 

Adlantum \ 

Smilax 10 

Valley 3 

Violets, single 

double ' 

Daisies { 

SweetPeas 

Mignonette 2 

Paper Whites, Romans ".'.'" 2 

Daffodils ' 1 

Tulips 5 

Freesias :i 

Acacia I'ubescens, per bunch, ti.so 



00 @ 
00 @ 
00 @ 
00 @ 
00 @ 
00 @ 



00 @ 



8.00 

25.00 

10.00 

15.00 

8.00 

15.00 

4.00 

3.00 

2.50 



00 @ 
50 @ 
00 @ 
35 @ 
50 @ 
50 @ 
50 @ 
00 @ 
00 @ 
00 @ 
00 @ 
00 @ 



1.50 

20.00 

5.00 

.50 

.75 

3.00 

1.50 

5.00 

3.00 

4.00 

4.00 

4.00 



Detroit, March 1, 1911. 



Beauties, long stem. 
24to30.in. 
20 to 24-ln. 
16 to 18-in. 

;; 12.in 

short 



Per doz. 

....15.00 
.... 4.00 
.... 3.00 
.... 2.00 
.... 1.00 
.75 



Killarneys * 4 

Richmond 4 

Maid 4 

Bride .:. '[ 4 

RheaKeid ....■.■" 4 

Carnations " •> 

Valley .'.■.■.■" 3 

Easter Lilies " 12 

(alia Lilies per doz.,' fl'so 

Violets 

Sweet IVas 

Paper Whites 

Roman Hyacinths 

Dutch '• 

Tulips 

Daffodils 



Per 100 
00 @ tio.oo 



00 @ 
.00 @ 
00 @ 
00 @ 
00 @ 
00 @ 
50 @ 

75 & 
"5 ^ 



00 fe 



8.00 
8.00 
8.00 

10.00 
3.00 
4.00 

15.00 

1.00 
1.00 
3.00 
3.00 
4.00 
4.00 
3.00 



Boston, March 1, 1911. 



Beauty, Specials 

Extra 

Short stems. 

Bride and Maid 

Killarney. 



.»10 

. 2.") 

. 6 

2 

o 



Per 100 

00 @ $50.00 
00 ^ 30.00 



White Killarney ' 2 

My Maryland •> 

Mrs. Aaron Ward /" 3 

Richmond, Rhea Reid "" 3 

(arnations 1 " 

Cattleyas ;>()" 

Lily of the Valley 1 

Lilium Longiflorum f, 

Gardenias " 

Single Violets 

Double Violets 

Antirrhinums 4 

Mignonette ..[[ 3 

Sweet P'-as 

Paper White Narcissi .."" i 

Yellow Narcissi ] 

Roman Hyacinths " 1 

Tulips ;;;;; i 

Freesias ']] 2 

Callas ' . " s 



00 @ 
00 e 
00 @ 
00 @ 
00 @ 
00 @ 
00 @ 
50 @ 
00 & 
..50 @ 
.00 @ 
.00 @ 
.•25 @ 

.;«) @ 

.00 @ 
.00 & 
.20 @ 
.00 @ 
.00 & 
.00 
.00 @ 
.00 @ 
.00 & 



20.00 

ti.OO 

12.00 

12.00 

12.00 

12.00 

20.00 

4.00 

40.00 

3.00 

H.OO 

15.00 

..50 

.60 

6.00 

6.00 

.75 

1.50 

l.iiO 

1.50 

2.00 

3.00 

10.00 



We would like to let you know that the 
a<l in your paper has been doing fine 
work for U8. — Marinus De Witte, Kala- 
iiiHKoo, Mich. 



Orchids, Easter Lilies, Fancy Roses, 
Valley and Sweet Peas. 

Op«n from 7iS0 a. m. to • p. m. 

Pliiladelphia Cut Flo^^er Company, "^flXu 

We Im cmylUag !■ mmm !■ Crt fWimt. 1517 Sansoni Street, PHILADELPHIA 

Mention The Review when you write. 

WILLIAM J. BAKER '*?HS^^^S,2??lf 

Wholesale florist. Headquarters for PhUaddphn's finest SWEET PEAS 

Mention The Review when you write. 

Carnations, Violets and Tea Roses. 

Eugene Bernheimer, II S. I6tli St., PHIUOELPHIA, PA. 

Mention The Review when you write. 

Fine Sweet Peas, Daffodils, Carnations and Roses 

S A m UAI r. I— lllftVA ^ food Market for More Choice Flower* 
'-^•■■■■**^>" ■ ■-■■■^^^f 6 Molo St., Ptolladolplila, P». 

Mention The Review when you write. 



John W. Nclntyre 

Headquarters for Lilac, DaflTodils, Yel- 
low Daisies. All you want. 

1601 Ranstead St., rHUADELPHIA 

Mention The Review when you write. 

ROSES 

I W VniilUn GERMANTOWN, 
J. TT. IVUIlUy pmiadelphla. Pa. 

Mention The Review when you write. 

UNITED STATES 
CUT FLOWER CO 

Wholesale Florists 
ELIWilRAp NEWYORH 

Mention The Review when vou write. 

Wholesale Cut Flower Prices. 

St. Louis, March 1, 1911. 

Per doz. 

Beauty. Specials $4.00 & $5.00 

Extra 2.00^ 3.00 

Shorts "5 & l.()0 



Per 100 



Bride and Maid t •'>, 

Kichmond •'> 

Maryland 5 

White Killarney ."> 

Killarney T) 

Carnations 2 

Lily of the Valley 2 

Harrisil :. • 10 

V iolets 

Paper Whites 2 

Sweet Peas 

Tulips 2 

•lonquils 2 

Von Sions 



.00 @ 
,00 @ 
.00 @ 
.00 @ 
.00 @ 
.00 & 

.00 e 

.00 & 
.15 @ 
.00 @ 
.2.5 @ 
.00 @ 
.00 @ 
.00 @ 



I 8.00 

8.00 

8.00 

8.00 

8.00 

3.00 

3.00 

12.50 

.50 

3.00 

..50 

3.00 

3.00 

:'..00 



The Munk Floral Co. 

Wholesale Orovrers of 

CUT FLOWERS 

and Jobber* of 

FLORISTS' SUPPLIES 
Columbus^ : Ohio 

JOS. G. NEIDINGER 

1513-15 Gcrmutowa Ave., PHILADEIPHIA 

OUR SPKCXALTIXSt 

Wax Flowers, Wax Flower Designs 

Wheat Sheaves, Wicker Pot Covers, Plant Stand* 

Send for handsomely illustrated cataloflrne; 
can also be used as design book. 

Mention The Review when you write 




H.G.B8rnin£ 



WHOLK8AI.B 
FLOIUSr 

1402 Pine Street 

ST. LOUIS, MO' 



Wholesale 
Florist 



C. A. KUEHN, 

Cat Flowers and Florists' Supplies 

Manufacturer of the Patent Wire (^'lamp Floral 
DeflKUS. A full line of SUHPLlEs always on 
hand. Write for catalogue and prices. 

1128 Pine Street. ST. LOUIS, MO. 

RICE BROTHERS 

Wholesalers of Cut Flowers 
and Florists' Supplies. 

MINNEAPOLIS, - MINN. 



' ™™ 



ir^t*^ v-f •r-.-*^»,/ w.i'»ii i^^T'^i r " 



Mabch 2, 1911. 



The Weekly Florists^ Review^ 



59 



We are prepared to ahip to any parts Our Home Grown Stock of 

Carnations and Roses. Violets, Valley and Sweet Peas 

Alirio anything in the Floriats* Supply Line. 

W. C. Smith Wholesale Floral Co., taie pinTsiTyetr'sT.Touis, mo. 

Mention The KpvIpw when vou wnte 



Wholesale Cut Flower Prices. 



Chlcato, March 1. 1911. 



Beauty, Iouk stems. 

36-Jn. " . 

-30.1n. " . 

"20to24-ln. •• . 

15.in. " . 

12.1n. " . 

" short " . 



Killamey 

White Killarney 

Bridesmaid 

Bride ;;;:;■ 

Richmnnd ] 

Wf Maryland [[[" 

Mrs. JaMine [[[[ 

Rhea Reid 

Cardinal 

Perle ['.',','_] 

Carnations, Common 

Fancy 

Violets, double 

single 

Valley ■'• 

Sweet Peas 

Mignonette 

Paper Whites 

Freesias 

Daffodils "■■ 

Jonauilg 

Tulips ;;;; 

Cattleyas. . . . per doz. , |;i.00 @ (^".50 
Easter Lilies, " 1 50 

Calla Lilies . . " I'go 



Per doz. 

l^i.OO @ $6.00 

4.00 @ 5.00 

3.00 @ 4.00 

2.50 @ 3.00 

2.00 

1.50 

1.00 

Per 100 

fl.OO @ $15.00 

4.00 @ 15.00 

4.00 @ 

4.00 @ 

4.00 @ 

4.00 @ 

4.00 @ 

(i.OO @ 

(>.00 @ 

4.00 @ 

1.50 @ 



.50 @ 
.M) @ 

.3.00 @ 
.75 @ 

4.00 @ 



.3.00 @ 
2 00 @ 
3.00 @ 



12.00 
12.00 
15.00 
15.00 
15.00 
15.00 
15.00 
10.00 
2.00 
3.00 
.75 
.75 
4.00 
1.50 
«.00 
3.00 
4.00 
4.00 
3.00 
4.00 



Milwaukee. March 1. 1'jll. 

T, 4. T Per 100 

" ^'i?"?!: ^-00 @ t40.00 

30.00 

10.00 

10 00 

10.00 

10.00 

12.00 

8.00 

3.00 

4.00 



Medium 20.00.^ 

8hort 6.00 @ 

Bride and Bridesmaid 5 00 @ 

Richmond 4.00 @ 

Killamey 4.00® 

White Killamey 4.00 @ 

J,*erle... ; t.Oo @ 

Carnations ' 00 @ 

Valley 3.00® 

Lilies per doz., |1 .7.") 

Violets 7,-, (3) 

Tulips :; ^ 

Romans, Paper Whites 

Trumpets 



1.00 
3.00 
3.00 
3.00 



Cincinnati, March 1, 191I. 

X „ Per doz. 

Beauty. Extra $-).00 p $g 00 

No.l 3.00® 4.00 

N0.2 2.00® 3.00 

Shorts 1.50® 2.00 

Killarney $ti. 00 @ $12.00 



Rifhmond d.OO @ 

Bride 5.00 @ 

Carnations 2.00 @ 

Lilium Harrisii 

Lily of the Valley 4.00 ® 

Violets 75 @ 

Cattleyas 

Sweet Peas 1 .00 ® 



15.00 
12.00 

3.00 
15.00 

5.00 

1.00 
60.00 

1.50 



Pittsburg, March 1, 1'.dl. 

Per doz. 

Beauty, Specials $'>.00 @ $6 00 

"Fancy 3.00® 4.00 

Medium 2.00® 2.50 

abort L.-iO 

Per 100 

Bride and Bridesmaid $4.00 @ $10.00 

Richmond 5.00 @ 15.00 

Killamey 5.00® 15.00 

White Killarney 5.00® 15.00 

My Maryland 4.00® lO.OO 

Carnations 2.00 @ 

Paper Whit6 Narcissi 

Trumpet Narcissi 3.00 ® 

Tulips 3.00 ® 

Cattleyas.... per doz., $4.00 ii $().(H) 

Valley 3.00 @ 

Lilies HOO ® 

Violets 



3.00 
3.00 
4.00 
4.00 

4.00 
12.00 



Results from advertising to date are 
very satisfactory. — Wm. Toole & Sons. 
Raraboo, Wis. 



WELCH BROS., 226 Devonshire Street, Boston 

The Largest Wholesale House in America 

Orchids :: American Beauties :: Gardenias :: Other Seasonable Flowefs 



Mention The Review when vou wnr* 



Vaughan & Sperry 

WHOLESALE ELORISTS 

52-54 WABASH AVL, CHICAGO 

Write for Special Prices. 
Mention The Review when yog write. 

GEO. REINBERG 

'^SS^ Cut Flowers 

CHOICK AMERICAN BKAUTIKS 

We will take care of your orders at reasonable 
prices. Prompt attention. 

81 WalMwb Arenne, CHICAGO, nx. 

Mention The Review when yon write. 

ZECH & NANN 

Wbotoaale Growers and Slili>pers of 

=CUT FLOWERS= 

61 Wabash Ave., CHICAGO 



Boom 218. 



L. D. Phone 8284 Central 



Hoerber Brothers 

Wholesale Growers of 

Cut Flowers 

D^irs^is:^!!. store, M wd>.a in.. CHICAGO 

Long Distance Phone. Randolph 2758. 
Mention The Review when you write. 

WIETOR BROS. 

Growers oL. Cut FIoWeTS 



Louis H. Kyrk 

Wholesale Commission Florist 

Consignments Solicited 

Cut Flowers, Florist Supplies 

110-112 L 3rd St. QNaNNATI. ONIO 

Mention T^** poHqw whpn vou write. 

TheJ.M.McGullouKli'sSonsCo. 

WHOLESALE COMMISSION FLORISTS 

CONSIGNMENTS HOT.TrTTKP 

Special attention given to sbippins orders. 
Jobbers of Florists' Supplies, Seeds and 
Bulbs. :: :: Price lists on application. 

Phone Main 584. 8 16 Walaat St.. Claeluutl. O* 
Mention The Review when von write 

E. G. GILLETT 

Wholesale Florist 

AIM NuBfacturer of SUPERIOR WIRE WORK 

Send for Catalogue 

131 E. Third St., Cincinnati. Ohio 

Mention The Review when you write. 

George B. Hart 






All telegraph and telephone orders 
given prompt attention. 

5J Wabash Ave^ CHICA 

Mention The Review when you write. 



'WHol 
HOtoi 



Baltimore, Md. 

THE FLORISTS' EXCHANGE 



Franklin and 
St. Paul Sts.. 



Wholesale Florists 



AM Cut Flowers in Season. 

Roses and Carnations our stronir point. 

Mention The Review when you write. 



rsmrMEiiTs 
[(mmriutt 



1^^ V** 89 WABASH AVE. ^W ^ 



IHHIOUni 

vanasa i 



Mention The Review when you write. 



WHOLESALBV 
FLORIST V- 

24 Stone Street. ROfHESTER. N. Y 

Mention The Iteview when vou write. 

ROSES AiiD CARIHATTONS^ 

FANCX FEBNS AND GALAX-High-trade Stock 

ORDERS FILLED S^ISFACTORILY 

Detroit Cut Elo\^er Supply House 



i^lesale Commlislon Florist. H. V. Pearce, Prap. 
i Adams Ave. West, Detroit, Mich. 

ae Phone 1^4. Bell. Main 974. 

Mention 'the Review when you write. 



PinSBURGH CUT FLOWER Ca 

WHOLESALE 
GROWERS.... 

121 Seventh St., PIHSBURGH, PA. 

Mention The Review when you write. 



The McCallum Co. 

Wholesale CUT FLOWERS 



»tnl Kliirl«tJ(' Suinily H»uii> 

Uml.pMtters (It Western l'n-,r,svIviinM ( ir 

*^}7 libtrtv Ave, PITTSBURG, 



PITTSBURG, PA. 



V. ■'' 



?r - 



" > y '"'F.- i "^ 'J" rv'»^'Tif :: »7",.'' ' ■■■'.'■/'. , ' ;■ 



r^'^T*V'*Wf9'.|Pf3I^V 



1^™ ^V' ' " •• ?i r" ."™ 



60 



The Weekly Florists' Review. 



Makch 2, 1911. 



H. E. FROMENT 

WHOLESALE COMMISSION FLORIST 

V - 

Receiver and Shipper ol All Varieties of Cut Flowers 

Telephones 2200 and 2201 Madison Sauare 

57 West 28th Street NEW YORK 



Moore, Hentz & Na$h 

vvnoiesaic f^,-^ york city 
Florists 



SHIPPING ON CX>MMISSIOM 

Telephone 7M Bfadlson Squere 



WALTER E. SHERIDAN 

Wholesale Ctommiaslon Dealer In 

CUT FLOWERS 

181«1SS W. 38th St., NKW TOBK 

(Established 1882) 

ReoelTintr Extra Quality American Beautlea 

and all other varieties of Roses. 

Tel. 8532-8638 Madison Sq. Carnatlona. 

llentton Tbe Review when 70a write. 



HEADQUARTERS FOR NOVELTIES 

ORCHIDS A SPECIALTY 

^"^"innSi^or VALLEY '•■'Ss"Asr, 



'"""tn^Sii^or VALLEY " ONUAND 

GARDENIftS, DAISIES. ROSES AND CARNATIONS 

S McMANUS.,V.'.r;:,'42W.28thSt..NewYorl. 



JAMES McMANUS 



I >l:i«l. Si<. 



WILLIAM P. FORD 

Wholesale Florist _■[ 

Conflignments of Cut Flowers Solicited from Growers. 

45 W. 28th SI., 63<Ja'aS"8,.. New York City 



BADGLEY, RIEDEL & MEYER, Inc. 

(Successon to A. J. Guttman) 

•••Wholesale Florists... 

84 West SSth Street, NEW YORK CITT 

Phones, 1664-1665 Madison Square. ConslBuments Solicited. 



N.LECAKES&CO. 

S3 W. 28th St., NEW YORK 



# 



Tel. No. 1415-14ie 
Madison Square 

Stands at Cut 

Flower Exchange 

Coogan Bldg., W. 

26th utreet. and 34th 

Street 
Cut Flower Market. 



ir 



Specialties: Galax Leaves, Ferns andLeuco- 
thoe Sprays, Holly. Princess Pine. Moss. Southern 
WUd Smilaz and all kinds of Evergreens. 

Green andBronze Galax Leaves 

MsDtlon Tbe Review when you write. 



A. MOLTZ 



Maurice L. Glass 



A. MOLTZ & CO. 

Wholesale Rorlsts 
55-57 W. 26th St., NEW YORK 

Coosan Bulldinff 

Phones 617-618 Madison Square 

Mention Tbe Review when you write. 

Why use GALAX LEAVES 

When you can buy prime prepared 

MAGNOLIA LEAVES 

Oreenand Brown, $1.75 per basket of 1000 
leaTes; 5000 leaves, $7.50 

Wherever Florists' supplies are sold, or from 
OELLER FLORIST SUPPLY CO. 
141 West S8th Street, NKW TOBK CITT 

Mention Tbe Review when you write. 

0. Bomnr (The Busy Bees) G. H. Bi.ake 

BONNET & BLAKE 

Wholesale Florists, BROOKLYN, N. Y. 

130 Livingston St„ Tel. Nos. 1293-1294 Main 

HXADQUARTERS TOR KILLARNKYS 

We handle only top grade stock of all kinds, in- 
OladlDg the famous Demeusy Carnations. 

Growers, let us demonstrate. 

Mention Tbe Review when you write. 



Au< 



MHIang 



41 W^28tli St., NEW YORK 

We areheadquarters for every Idnd of CDT 
FLOWKBb in their season. Out-of-to^vn 

Florists iJromptly attended to. Telephone for 
what yoH^ant. Tel. 8860, 8861 Hadlson Sa. 

Mention Tbe Review when you write. 



Gold Letters 



Gummed gold, silver and purple letters, for 
inscriptions on floral designs. Best and cheap- 
est on the market. Send for samples and prices. 

1564 Avenue A, 
NEW YORK 

Telephone Lenox 5644 
Mention The Review wben you write, 



J. LICflTENBERGER, 



Wholesale Cut Flower Prices. 



New York, February 27, 1911. 



Beauty, Specials $30 

Faniy 20 

Extra 10 

No.l 6 

" N0.2 3 

Bride and Maid 2 

Chatenay 2 

Killamey 2 

Richmond 2 

My Maryland 2 

Orchids 25 

Carnations 1 

Easter Lilies « 

Callas 8 

Lily of the Valley 1 

Gardenias ... per doz. , fO.oO @ $5.00 
Violets 

Sweet PeasVdoz. bchs, 10.75 @ $1.50 

Hyacinths 1 

Narcissi 1 ■ 

Mignonette 2 

Tulips 1. 

Daffodils 1 

Freesias bunch, f0.06 @ f0.2o 



PerlOO 
00 @ $50.00 
00 @ .SO. 00 



00 @ 
00 @ 
00 @ 
00 @ 
00 @ 
00 @ 
00 @ 
00 @ 
00 @ 
50 (S 
00 @ 
00 @ 
OJ @ 

30 @ 
50 @ 

00 @ 
00 @ 
.00 @ 
00 @ 
.00 @ 



20.00 
10.00 

5.00 
10.00 
12.00 
12.00 
15.00 
12.00 
50.00 

3.00 
12.00 
12.00 

3.00 

.50 
2.00 

1..50 
2.00 
6.00 
3.00 
2.00 



VIOLETS 



B.S.SLINN,Jr. 

WHOUBBALK FLORIST 

55 and 57 W. 20th St., NKW YORK CRT 

Phones 4620, 4621. 3864 Madison Square 

Roses and 
Carnations 

MentiOD Tbe Review when you write. 

Reed & Keller 

122 W. 25th St, New York 

nORISTS* SUPPLIES 

We manafactnre all onr Metal Designs, 
Baskets, Wire Work and Novelties. 
Mention Tbe Review wben you write. 

FLORISTS* SUPPLIES 

nC '• IICDDITT ^^* '■' street. 
Ur W. RiClllf I I I y BBOOKLTN. N. T. 

Novelties In Florists' Sapplies. Phone 8699 Main 

Mention Tbe Review when you write. 



The Greek American Florist 
Supply House 




Wholesale and Retail 
Dealers in all kinds of 

Evergreens 

F^ney and Daooer Ferns 
Eslax, Brown and Green 



# 



127 West 28th St., 



NEW YORK CITY 



Leucothoe Sprays, Princess Pine, Holly, 
Southern Wild Smilai. 

Telephone 1202 Madison 

Mention Tbe Review wben you write. 



J. J. FELLOURIS 



Wholesale and 

RcUil 

Dealer In 

ALL KINDS 

...wl ... 





Fancy and 
Dacger Ferns 



Bronze and 
Oreen Oalax 



EVERGREENS 

62 West 28th Street, NEW YORK 

Telephone 2315 Madison Sq. 
Mention The Review wben you write. 

A well-known Nursery House writes of 

Our Credit List 

"Had we had these reports years ago we would 
have saved several thousand dollars." Why don't 
you avoid further losses by joining the NA> 
TIONAL FLORISTS* BOARD OF TRADE, 
58 Pine St., New York? 

Mention The Review when you write. 

P. J. SMITH 

Successor to John I. Ratkob 

Selling Agent For Largest Growers 

WHOLESALE COMMISSION FLORIST 

A full line of Choice Cut Flower Stock for all 
purposes. Comprises every variety grown for New 
York market, at current prices. 

Telephone 1996 Madison Square 

49 West 28th Street, NEW YORK CITY 

Mention The Review when you write 

E. w. Wiles of the Woods 

49 Wiiloughby SL, BROOKLYN, N.Y. 

GREEN GOODS OF EVERY VARIETY 

Always mention the Florists* Re^^Vw 
when wntins: advertisers. 



Mabch 2, 1911. 



The Weekly Florists' Review. 



61 



J. K. ALLEN, 



106 W. 28th Street, NEW YORK 

Phones, 167-4468 Madison Square. 

I887-''THE OLD RELIABLE "-19 11 

A good pointer in this strenuous season : S^^'Let well enougfh alone.''VlS Here, Growers, you can depend on the 
hiifheat market pricea and prompt paymenta. Open at 6 a. m. every day in the year. Orowera : Call and see 
for yourselves. You are always welcome. In the very Center of the Wholesale district. 

Mention The Rpview when you write. 



Charles Millang ^i'Sfll^'^ 

Ground Floor of the Coogan Building, NEW YORK CITY 
55 and 57 West 20tli Street 6 a. m. to 6 p. m. every day in tlie year 

Headquarters for Violets 

Most convenient store for customers in the city. Tel. 7062 Madison. 
Conslenmenta Solicited The Hiebest Values Guaranteed 



N. C. rORD, 



121 W. 28tli street, 

Tel. 3870-3871 

Madison Square 

Successor to Ford Bros. 



New York 



T>c hrtea SMpper »»< «ec«ivef of Fresh Cut FlOWerS 

•^A complete assortment of the best in the market 
can always be reli»»d upon. 



FKANK H. TRAENDLY 



CHARLES SCHENCK 



TRAENDLY & SCHENCK 

Wholesale Florists and Cut Flower Exchange 

131-133 W. 28th St., NEW YORK 

Telephones 79S and 799 Madison Square. CONSIGXMENTS SOLICITED 



1888 



GUNTHER BROS. 

Wholesale Florists 

110 West S8th Street, Mavm/ VawIt 
Tel. 661 MadlBon Square. i^ClY 1 Orli 

Consitrnments Solicited of 

FRESH CUT FLOWERS 



1911 



GROWERS' CUT FLOWER CO. 



Cut Flowers at Wholesale 



J. COAN, Manager 



Consignments Solicited 



Telephone 



3y West 28th Street, 52.^7 M-di^on square. NEW YORK 



Mention The Review when you write. 



KESSLER BROTHERS ^"i^lK™" 

Plants and Cut Flowers of every variety. Orchids our specialty. 

HEADQUARTERS For The Beautiful DREYERH FERN 

Ready for deUvery now. Price, 2>i-in. pots, $26.00 per 100; $200.00 per 1000. 

136-138 W. 28th St., Telephone 2336 Madison Sq., NEW YORK 
Mpntlon The Review when von write. 



A. L. YOUNG & CO., 



WHOLESALE 
FLORISTS 



54. West 28th St., Tel. 3559 Madl.on square. NEW YORK 
'Ctssignments of Choice Cut Flowers solicited. Prompt payments. Give us a trial. 

Mention The Rpview when you wrTte 



rORSTERMANSriaDMrCCO. 

145 West 28tli Street, NEW YORK 

Telephone 4264 Madison 

Ice Boxes and Rehigerators 

Only House Manufacturing 
VKRDIGRIS GRKEN MISSION TUBS 

Mention The Review when you write. 



OAT. MiLUB. Pres. 



RoBKBT a. WiMON. Tress. 



Greater New York 
Florist Association, Inc. 

Wbolesale Commission Dealers 
in Cut Flowers and Supplies 

162 Livingston SL, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

eEOBGE W. CBIWBUCK, Huager. 

Mention The RpvIpw when you write. 

RONNOT BROS. 

^^ WHOLESALE FLORISTS 

55 and 57 W. 26tli Street, 11 C Uf Vfl Dif 
Cut newer Kxohanee, II k If I U II l\ 

OPEN ALL PAY 

An Unexcelled Outlet for CONSIGNED FLOWEBS 

Telephone No. 830 Madison 8q. 

Always irention the Florists* Review 
^inrban wrltinB advertisers. 



WHOLESALE FLORISTS 



136 WEST 28™ STREET 

NEV* YORK 



Orchids, Gardenias, Violets, 
Lily o£ the Valley, etc. 

Mention The Review when you write. 

A. HERRMANN 

Department Store 
for Florists' Supplies 

Factory. 709 First Ave., bet. 40th and 41st Streets. 

Office and Wareroom8.'4ai, 406. 408. 410, 412 

East,:-Mth St.. NKW YORK. 

Mention The Review when you write. 

HENRY R. CRAWBUCK 

S70 Pearl St., BROOBXTN, N. T. 

Wild gmllax, Galax, rems. Palm Leavei, ete. 

Telephone 4831 Main. 

Mways mention the Florists' Review 
i^hen \nitlnB advertisers. 



Tel. No. 1202 Mad. Sq. 



H. Wbiss. Manager 



Wholesale Florists 
187 W. 88th St.. NEW TORK 

Receivers and Growers of Cut Flowers 

Consignments solicited. 
Mention The Review when you write. 

RUSSIN & HANFLING 

OFFICE AND SALESROOM 

114 West 28th Street, NSW TORK CITT 
Tel. 8058 Madison Sq. 

MANUFACTURERS AND IMPORTERS OF 

WIUOW AND FANCY BASKETS FOR FLORISTS 
Dealers In Florists* Supplies 

4V Our Specialties, Wheat Sheaves and BaslietB. 
Mention The Review when yon write. 




48 W. 29th St., NEW TORK 

Teleplione 1757 Had. Sq. 

All the latest novelties in Florists* Supplies. 

Lowest Prices. Selected Gooils. 

Some choice harsrains. Write me and I will till 

you all about them. 

Mention The Review when vou write. 

WILLIAM H. KUEBLER 

) Wholesale Commlsalon Dealer in 

CUT FLOWERS 

Room for the products of trrowers of first-clasa stock 
We have what yon want when yon want It 

28 WiUoug^hby St., Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Tel. 4591 Mai.n 

Mention The Review when yon write. 

JOS. J. LEVY 

Successor to John Seligman <& Go. 

58 W. 26th St., 

Tel. No. 4878 Mad. Sq. NEW TORB 

Opposite New York Cut Flower Co. 
Mention The Rpview when you write 



Qeorgfe Saltford 

WHOLESALE FLORIST ^ 

'^irt^'^::^^:^'' New York City 

We have room lor a few more erood 
erowers. Prompt paynifntK and top prires. 



Mention The Review when you write. 



■ A^.T , <>i':5/>:''T;' '>-v: 



62 



The Weekly Florists' Review. 



Makch 2, 1911. 




Shasta Daisies 

Alaska, Callfomla and WaatraUa, orisi- 
nator'B stock, extra strong diTisions, 12.60 per 
100; 122.60 per 1000: strong diTisions. $2.00 per 
100; 919.00 per 1000. 

Cyclamen Perslomn Olcaataum, nice 
plants, full of buds. 3, 4 and 6-iQ. pots, at t7.00. 
llO.OO and t25.00. 

Delphinium Hybridum Orandlflomm, 
extra select field plants. 1-year-oId, all shades oi 
blue, t7.S0 per 100. Kin* of Delphlnlnma, 
dark blue, with large white eye. 3-in. pots. $6.00 
per 100. Queen Wlllielmtna. the best of the 
new delphiniums, light blue with white eye. 2 in. 
across. $6.00 per 100. 

Grohe'a duunplon Strain of Petunlaa— 
do not fail to try them ; you do not know the 
possibilities of single petunias till you have used 
my strain. 

Glanta of Calif omla, tr. pkt.. 25c; 1000 seeds. 
50c: ^ OZ..I3.00; oz.. $16.00. Ruffled Glanta, 
tr.pkt..36c; 1000 seeds. 60c: ^O2.,$3.60: oz.. 117.50. 

Send for list of other choice plants and seeds. 
Cash, please. 

FRED QROHE, Santa Rosa, Cal. 

Mention The Review when Toa write. 

PHOENIX CANARIENSIS 

By the 
Thouaands 

Stocky plants, from 
clay ground, perfect 
shape, sure to give sat- 
isfaction. 

ligto2 -ft..$O.BO 

2 toSHj-ft.. .60 
2»a to 3 -ft. . .70 

3 to 3»9-ft. . .96 
3)9 to 4 -ft. . 1.25 

Kentia Nnneriei 

SaaU Barbara, Cal. 

Mention The Review when you write. 

RNted Carnation Cuttings loo loco 

Dorothy Gordon $5.00 $4000 

Alma Ward 7.50 65.00 

Victory... 2.00 18.00 

Haplowarden I.75 16.00 

Admiration 400 3000 

Eldorado I.75 15.00 

We are sold out at present on everything 
else. Our carnations are No. 1, and we do not 
send any other kind. 

Loomis Carnation Co., " ^ V*''*'"'* 

Loomla, Placer Co., California 

Mention The Review when you write. 

ECHEVERIAS 

$2.00 per 100, $18.00 per 1000. Cash. 

LAS PALMAS GREENHOUSES 

P. O. Box 468, PALO ALTO, CAL. 

Mention The Review when you write. 

Rooted CarnaUon Cuttings ^^Ui^e.'^^r 

respect. $2.00 per lUO; $18.flO per 1000. 

BAaron vigorous, proUSc and the best keeper of 

UTMXMU. all carnations. 

Enchantress. '^^^ camatlon that anybody can 

OTHER STANDARD VARIETIES. 
Ezpresiage prepaid on $5.00 or over. Cash with order. 

a DDRASNO FIOWER a!iiUaj.Sl: 

Mention The Review when you write. 

ARAUCARIAS 

▲rancarla Kxoelaa, young, healthy plants, 
seedlings with 3 or 4 tiers, at $16.00 per 100. 

Araucarla Kzcelaa, top cuttings from 4-in. 
pots, 8 tiers, 4 branches to each tier, 35c each, 
$32.00 per 100. 

H. KEMPF, Pacific Nureery 

S041 Baker 8t., BAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

Mention The Review when you write. 

RAHN ft HERBERT 

Wholesale Growers 

110 E. 49tli St., PORTLAND, ORE. 

Geranluma, 2-inch, $30.00 per 1000: 3-incb, 
$50.00 »er lOOj. In leading varieties. 

Assortment of Beddlns Planta. Write for 
price list. 

Mention The Review when you write 



PACIFIC COAST. 



PORTLAND, OBE. 



The Market. 

Business of the last week was varied. 
Funeral work was the principal item, 
and of the variety that called for the 
best grade of stock. With a few days 
of sunshine wonders have been wrought 
in bringing out the flowers. Carnations 
are almost perfection, and the best sell- 
ing commodity on the market. Home- 
grown violets are coming in nicely and 
gradually are displacing California 
stock. Spring flowers, such as hyacinths, 
tulips and daffodils, are used principally 
in table decorations. 

With the advance of spring the cata- 
logue departments are unusually busy, 
which necessitates additional help. St. 
Johns, a suburb of Portland, designated 
Washington's birthday as the official 
rose planting day, with a celebration, 
music and speech-making. 

Various Notes. . 

Henry Penn, of Boston, who is on an 
extended western trip, was greatly en- 
thused over the thrift of the cities of 
the northwest. 

Sam B cake is confined at home on ac- 
count of sickness, but shows a steady 
improvement. 

Clarke Br68. had an unusual day last 
week, when they were called on for 
two casket covers, one of violets and 
the other of carnations and lilies. 

Martin & Forbes had a large decora- 
tion countermanded, at the last moment, 
on account of a death in the family, 
after all stock had been secured, in- 
cluding 1,000 strings of smilax. This is 
an unpleasantness that the florist is 
often called upon to bear. E. E. C. 



SAN FBANCISCO. 



The Market. 



The weather has moderated some- 
what in this vicinity and, although the 
nights are a bit frosty, the days are 
quite warm. The effect is noticeable 
in the amount of stock being brought 
into town, and with a continuance of 
the sunshine we may look for plenty 
of blossoms in the near future. The 
prices, too, are considerably lower than 
those in vogue a few days ago. Carna- 
tions are cheaper by fully twenty per 
cent, and roses show an inclination 
along the same lines. 

Violets are rather plentiful again, 
but the quality is commencing to show 
the lateness of the season, and with the 
advent of warmer weather they will be 
more flabby and of poorer color than 
they are now. Valley is in fair supply, 
of good color and form, and moves well. 
Easter lilies, from all appearances, will 
be in suflicient quantity to fill all re- 
quirements. Tulips are not selling as 
well as some of the growers would like. 
Daffodils seem to be a shade scarcer. 
They are in good demand at from $1 
to $2.50 per hundred. Fruit blossoms 
are not yet in their prime, but the' pub- 
lic seems not to tire of them and they 
will be as popular as of old. Maidenhair 
ferns, both the greenhouse stock and 
the wild sorts, are not overplentiful, 
and smilax is quite a scarce article. 
Other kinds of stock are as usual. 



New Red Dahlia 

Mrs. Minna Burgle 

A cross between Joe Thomson and Clown, 
oritrinuted by Mr. J. Burgle of fruitvale, Cal., 
and naiued after his wife, Mrs. Minna Burgle, is 
the best Red Detorative Dahlia ever produced 
and will supersede all other red varieties now 
grown for cut flowers here or abroad. It draws 
your attention instantly when planted in a col- 
lection of Dahlias, for it is one of the most showy 
flowers ever created. True decorative, blight 
scarlet, showing a darker shading in center, bold 
erect flowers. 6 to 8 inches in diam> ter, with ex- 
cellent stem, foliage of remarkable substance, 
height 6 to 6 feet, good keeper and will not bum 
in hot weather, and is a freer bloomer than either 
parent. This variety has been tested by me for 
three yearx and has shown no weak points. 

A vase of 50 blooms shown t>y me, also a basket 
of them exhibited by Sievers Floral Co., of San 
Francisco, both carried first prizes in the fall 
Flower Show in San Francisco, and caused more 
comment among gardeners and visitors than any 
other exhibit. Cut flowers sold for the tlrst time 
last year brought 50 per cent more than any other 
vaiiety of dahlias, including Joe Thomson. 

Each Doz. 

Strong: Tubera $1.00 $9.00 

PAUL H. ECKEUHANN, 

San Kafael, California 

Menoon The Review when you wnte 

Wholesale Only 

Per 100 Per 1000 

Shasta Daisy plants $2.00 112.00 

Golden Glow plants 2.00 12.00 

Goldcnrod plants 2.00 12.00 

Carnation plants, California outdoor 

yarietleg 2.00 15.00 

Sprengerl plants, 3-in. pots 3.60 80.00 

Asparagus plumcsus, 3-ln. pots. . . . 6.00 40.00 

Violet plants, Princess of Wales... .76 6.00 

Los Angeles Flower Market 

414% Sonth Broadway, Los Angeles, Cal. 

Mention The Review when you write. 

Send In your order NOW for 

CUT FLOWERS 

W^a^e growing Daffodils. Paper White Narcissus, 
etc.. of the finest quality, in such large quantity 
that we can maintain a constant supply on all Pacific 
Coast markets. If 70U wish regular shipments or 
rush orders filled at rvasonable prices, telrgraph or 
write The lieedham Bulb Co.. Santa Cruz, 
Cal. Gladiolus America, Tulips, Spanish Iris. etc.. 
In seaaoB 

Mention The Review when yoa write- 

Carnation Plants 

4000 transplanted Winona, from 
flats, f2.50 per 100. 

Bassett*s Floral Gardens 

LOOMIS. CAL. 

Mention The Review when yon write. 

"HIGHEST QUALITY" 

Seeds, Plants, Bulbs and Supplies 

Florists* and Gardeners' Trade solicited. 
Catalogue on request. 

^"^^^teo mmoamD »r.. porixand, orb. 

Mention Tne Keview wt'^n >om write. 

Rooted Carnation Cuttings 

Heel cuttings and well rooted. Ready 
March let and later. 

Per lOe 1000 

Bmoon 11.80 117 60 

WhlteLawson 180 17JM) 

Estelle 1.60 16.00 

Wlnsor 1.60 16.00 

FALLEN LEAF GREENHOUSES. RMCville. CaL 

Mention Tbe Review when you write. 



Washingtonia Robusta 

Balled, 2-3 feet 46c 

Balled, 3-4 feet 76c 

All good stocky plants. 

Write for prices on other palms. 

EXOTIC IfVBSKBIBS. Saata Barbara. Cal. 



V 



W'^^^y^: --^"^ !W't' 



March 2, 1911. 



The Weekly Florists' Review. 



63 



Western Headquarters 

for decorative material. Dass^r Ferns, |1.50 
per 100(). Salal and Orearon Grape, priced 
lurnislied on application. Sample eeut on re- 
quest. All shipments f. o. b. Portland. 

R. STADELI, Arleta,Oregon 

Mention The Review when you write. 

Various Notes. 

J. H. Bhoades, for over twenty years 
in the nursery trade in Honolulu, is on 
a, visit to San Francisco, with the in- 
tention of permanently locating in the 
same line of business on the Pacific 
•coast. 

Adolph Johnson, formerly with the 
California Nursery Co., of Niles, Cal., 
will engage in the general nursery 
trade at Eel Eiver, Humboldt county, 
California. 

W. H. Barker, of the Trumbull Seed 
Co., reports a heavy trade in general 
nursery stock for the last month. 

George C. Eoeding, of Fresno, Cal., 
is in town on a short visit. G. 



CROWEANUMS IN CALIFORNIA. 

This winter I purchased 350 10-inch 
Croweanum ferns, which had producad- 
beautifully last summer, but which 
were kept in a rather cool house until 
January of this year, when I got them. 
They are doing absolutely nothing now, 
owing to the cold they suffered, and I 
learned from their former owner that 
they always go down in winter in his 
cold houses, in which the temperature 
averages anywhere from 35 to 55 de- 
grees at night, and yet they produce 
finely in summer. Now, I should In 
grateful if you would tell me whether 
the Croweanum fern is a winter pro- 
ducer or not, when kept at a tempera- 
ture of, say, 60 degrees at night. Ferns 
with us, in the .vicinity o^ San Fran- 
cisco, are worthless unless they produce 
well in >yinter. Has your experience 
been such as to lead you to believe 
that the Croweanum will do anything 
to repay the cost of heating in winter? 
And if so, how amply? Can you ad- 
vise me of whom I can get a catalogue 
of ferns for cutting and also decora- 
tive? L. M. B. 

The fact that the Adiantum Crowea- 
num ferns were in 10-inch pots would 
lead one to presume that they were 
three or four years old, at least, and 
it could hardly be expected that such 
plants, even under the best of treat- 
ment, would bear fronds heavily again 
in winter without dividing them, for 
this is the only way they can be propa- 
gated. They should never be kept over 
three seasons in the same soil, and 
when divided they should be well 
broken up and planted in pots or in 
solid benches, preferably the latter 
when the object is to grow for cutting. 
It is out of the question to expect to 
get a crop of fronds in the winter 
from plants that have borne heavily 
all summer, as this particular lot is 
said to have done. A. Croweanum is 
a good winter fern, provided the {slants 
have not been forced too much in the 
previous summer. Like almost every- 
thing else, they must have a rest. This 
does not consist, with this variety, in 
letting the plants dry out too much, 
but in keeping the house cool and not 
shading too heavily. 

For winter forcing a temperature of 
~60 degrees at night is imperative, but 



STOCK YOU NEED 



Per 100 

Ageratum |1 00 

Bachelor^a Button 100 

Balsam 1.00 

Carnations ( strong plants) 2.50 

Calliopsls 1.25 

Canterbury Bells 1.25 

Daisies 1.00 

Qaillardla (Grandlflora) 1.25 

Lobelia 1.00 



Per 100 

Asparagus Sprengeri (1-year-old) 12.00 

Pansy 1.00 

Petunia (choice single) 1.00 

Sweet William 1.25 

Stock 1.00 

8cabiof=a 125 

Shasta Daisy (original stock) 2.00 

Snapdragon 125 

Verbena 1.60 

Salvia 2.00 



I. 



Marguerite (yellow and white) 2.00 

Acacia Melanoxylon, 6-inch pots, 5 to 6 feet, per 100, |25.00. 

Carnation Enchantress, rooted cuttings, per 1000, $17.50. 

Chrysanthemums, rooted cuttings, all commercial varieties. Write for special price list 

Phoenix Canariensis, 2ifl-in., 3-in., 4-in., 5-in. pots, |3.00, |5.00. $10.00. $20.00 per 100. 



H. HLHVKSHI St 0(3,. 



Alameda, Cal. 



Mention The Review when you write. 



Large Importation Just to Hand 

PHAL^NOPSIS AMABIUS 

The Finest White Spray Orchid for Cut Flowers 

The plants arrived in splendid condition. Prices per dozen, per 
hundred or per thousand on application. 

MacRORIE-McLAREN COMPANY 

711-714 Wcstbank BIdg.. SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. Narseries, SAN MATEO. CAL 

Mention The Review when you write. 

OREGON GROWN ASTER SEED 

Tamhill Co.. Oregon. Ii the Batoral home of the later and any oae deslrinc seed 
OF HIGH-GRADE COMMERCIAL QUALITY 

will do well to try oar seed for 1911. Ask for onr new descriptive booklet. 
CR£60 ASTKR SEED, pink, shell pink, white or purple.. .Tr. Pkt.. 2ec; 4 Pkts., 76c; Oz.. $4.00 

TICK'S ROCHESTKR. lavender pink Tr. Pkt.. 26c: 4 Pkts.. T6c; Oz.. 4.60 

liADY ROOSEVELiT. bricht pink i Tr. Pkt.. 20c; 4 Pkts., 60c; Oz.. 3.00 

HERBERT & FLEISHAUER, Aster Specialists, McMinnviUe, Oregon 

Special prices to seedsmen. Cuntntcts taken for 1911. 
Mention The Review when you write. ^^_ 



Wholesale Only 

We desire yonr orders for cat flowers and 
decorative green. Oar flowers are all flrst-class 
and our stock Is ample at all times. Oar prices 
are as follows:. 

Violets SI. 00 per doz. bunches 

Sweet Peas $1.00 per dos. boncbes 

Freesias — Parity (February) . .$1.60 per 100 stems 

Paper White Narcissus $1.60 per 100 stems 

Hothouse Roses $4.00 to $8.00 per 100 

Hothouse Carnations >$2.60 to $4.00 per 100 

Field Carnations $1.00 to $1.60 per 100 

Plumosus Sprays $1.00 per 100 

Sprengreri Sprays $1.00 per 100 

Pliimosas Strings, 10 feet 26 cents 

Floral Baskets, Wire Work, Btc. 

Los Angeles Flower Market 

414^ South Broadway. Los Angeles, Cal. 

Mention The Review when you write. 

the heat should not be concentrated 
under the benches, as, in common with 
most varieties, better results will be 
had when the radiation comes from 
above rather than below the roots. A. 
Croweanum produces, under proper con- 
ditions, quantities of long, heavy 
fronds all winter, which always find a 
good market at top prices. To obtain 
these results the soil must be right. It 
can be grown in rather stiflf loam, pro- 
vided the drainage is good. Plant 
about one foot apart each way, and see 
that they have about six inches of soil 
■to grow in. See that they are not 
chilled with too frequent waterings 
over the foliage. Use air-slaked lime 
freely to keep down slugs and sweeten 
the soil. Liquid manure can be used 
occasionally and is of great benefit 
when extra heavy fronds are desired. 
There are many firms throughout the 




Mention The Review when you write. 



eastern states that handle ferns in 
large quantities, whose addresses can 
be found by perusing The Review, and 
in the neighborhood of San Francisco 
I might refer L. M. B. to H. Plath and 
H. J. Kessell, both large growers of 
ferns. G. 

Seattle, Wash.— Geo. W. Barlow is 
building greenhouses here, to be used 
in growing flowers for the wholesale 
trade. 



64 



The Weekly Florists^ Review. 



' 'Sfv: ' ■>• V'" .v^v; Vv^ ,: •y7;>'^> -"' : 

Mabch 2, 1911. 



General Variety of Nursery Stock. Florists' Wants a Specialty. 

W. & T. SMITH COMPANY 

64 Years GENEVA, N. Y. 800 Acres 



NURSERY NEWS. 



AHEBICAN ASSOCIATION OF NUBSEBIHEN. 

Officers for 1910-11 : Pres.. W. P. Stark, Louisi- 
ana, Mo.; Vice-pres.. E. S. Welch, Shenandoah, 
la.; Sec'y, John Hall Rochester. N. Y.; Treas., 
C. L. Yates, Rochester, N. Y. Thirty-sixth an- 
nual meeting, tit. Louis. June. 1911. 



The death of F. K. Phoenix, pioneer 
ulirseryman of Delavan, Wis., is re- 
ported in this week's obituary column. 

The return of cold weather to the 
southeast and southwest last week caused 
some alarm among nurserymen of those 
sections. 

The Waco Nursery Co. has been in- 
corporated at Waco, Tex., with a capital 
■took of $32,500. The incorporators are 
Sam Sanger, T. A. Goldstein, F. S. 
Henry and others. 

W. C. Babry, Eochester, delivered an 
address on "How to Grow Hardy Roses" 
before the Syracuse Eose Society Feb- 
ruary 21. In reporting it one of the 
Eochester papers made it "Hardly" 
roses. 

Nueseetmen in the west and north- 
west apparently are confident that the 
demand for apple trees will continue, as 
preparations are being made for a sup- 
ply that would prove burdensome if the 
boom should burst. 

Down in Texas and Oklahoma, where 
spring is weeks ahead of its arrival in 
other sections, the nursery interests have 
been too busy to make any complaint 
over the conditions, which have not all 
been in their favor. 



INIMICAI. BILI. IN IOWA. 

One of the most objectionable bills 
recently introduced in any state legis- 
lature is now before the Senate Commit- 
tee on Horticulture in Iowa. It concerns 
the florists and seedsmen as well as the 
nurserymen, but it bears specially on 
the tree dealers, W^o have agents in 
every hamlet. The text of the bill is: 

A BILL 

FOR AN ACT TO REGULATE THE SALE OF 
NURSERY STOCK. SUCH AS FRUIT TREES 
SHRUBS. PLANTS. VINES, SEEDS, ETC 
XS tW^^^'^ THE MISRBPRESENTATION 
OP THE SAME. THE SELLING OF DIS- 
g^S^SJ^^^S^I*'^ STOCK. AND PROVIDING 
FOR THE INSPECTION OF SAID NURSERY 
STOCK, AND PROVIDING A PENALTY FOR 
THE VIOLATION OF THIS ACT OR ANY 
SECTION THEREOF. 

Be It Enacted by the General Assembly of the 
State of Iowa: 
Section 1. Any person, firm, association, or 
corporation, wishing to sell, convey, transfer, or 
solicit orders for any nursery stock, including 
trees, shrubs, plants, vines, roots, bulbs, or seed, 
within the state, shall file with the Secretary of 
the Board of Agriculture his written desire to so 
engage In the business as stated above, setting 
forth in his written application the necessary 
information of what he expects to sell, ofTer for 
sale, or solicit orders therefor; said application 
/2, 5Sv accompanied by a fee of five dollars 
(15.00) to cover expense of issuing a certificate, 
and one dollar ($1.00) additional fee for every 
duplicate of said certificate Issued. Upon the 
deposit of above fee and application, the Secre- 
tary of the Board of Agriculture shall Issue to 
the person, firm, association, or corporation a 
certificate and flupllcates as requested, of per- 
mission to sell, offer for sale, or solicit orders 
within the state of Iowa, for nursery stock con- 



MentloD The Review when you write. 



DON'T FORGET 

in the present rush of work, that you'll need stock 
later on. For example, there's your 

MANETTI, for winter grafting; we offer English at $12.00 the thousand, 
French at $10.00. Both good, 3 to 6 millimeters, smooth, evenly graded, 
disbudded, well-rooted stocks, especially selected for florists* 
grafting. 

Llliir OF THE VALLEY. Reimschneider's Exposition, $14.00 the 
thousand ( 1700 to the case) ; Perfection, $12.00 the thousand (2000 to 
the case) ; Holsatia, for storage and later forcing, $11.00 the thousand 
(3000 to the case). 

LILACS, imported, pot-grown, for cut flowers, bushy, suitable for 7 or 8-in. 
pots, 60c each, $5.00 the dozen. Charles X only. 

HALF-STANDARD ROSES. Baby Rambler and Mrs. Cutbush, 

50c each, $5.(X) the dozen. No better at any price. Full-standard 
Baby Rambler, same. 
BUSH ROSES. Fine assortment leading H. P.'s, like Brunner, Charta, 
Druschki, etc. Also Hybrid Teas, Ramblers, Dorothy Perkins, 

etc. 

Write «nd make known yoor wants. We are GBOWERS for the 
Trade and sell only to the Trade. Use printed stationery. 

Jackson & Perkins Co., an/NVerrmT 

Newark (Near Rochester), New York 



Mention The Review when you write. 




The United States Nursery Co. 

Roseacres, Coahoma Co., MISS. 

Mention The Review when you write. 



Clematis Paniculata Seed 

New Crop. Fresb and Fine. 

Price, oz.. 40c; klb.. fi.OO: lb., $1^.00. 

WALTER P. STOKES, Seedsman 

219 Market SL, Philadelphia. Pa. 



Mention The Review when you write. 

Grape Vines 

All old and new varieties. Large stock. 
Warranted true. Can (urnlBh a special 
heavy two-year grade with large roots 
and good tops for florists' retail trade. 
Write for catalogue and price list 

T. S. HUBBARD CO., Fredonia, N. Y. 

Mention The Review when you write. 

slating of trees, shrubs, plants, vines, roots, 
bulbs and seed. 

Sec. 2. Any person, firm, association or cor- 
poration having received the certificate to sell, 
ofTer for sale, or solicit orders for nursery stock, 
as required In Section 1 of this Act, shall furnish 
each of his representatives, salesmen, or any 
person handling said nursery stock and seeds, an 



California 
Privets 

Gro\^'ii by a 
Specialist 

Sell 



I 

strn 

have a 
good stock 
in all grades 
of CalSoTDia 
Privet, and have a 
surplus of 3 to 4 feet 
Let me qttote yx>u be- 
fore buying. 
I can ship you stock that 
will make you trade* 

lik^is C A. BDINdT, ItbtiKville, N. 1. 



PEONIES 

FOR SPRING PLANTING 

Cash prices on following strong divided roots: 
Humel, late rose; R. Hortense, Tyrian red; 
Mme. Douriere, pink uiul salmon ; Tr iumpb 
du Nord, pink, $3.00 per 100; and white, early, 
$5.00 per 100. 

Thomas J. Oberlin, Sinking Spring, Pa. 

PEONIES 

Now is the time to figure with us on Peonies. 
We have one of the finest stocks anywhere in the 
country and should be very glad to figure with 
you on your list of wants. 

PETERSON NURSERY, 

stock SxchanBre Building:, CHICAGO 

Mention The Keview when you write. 

exact duplicate of said certificate, the said sales- 
man, agent, or solicitor to be required to carry 
said duplicate certificate of his principal, setting 
forth the fact that he is duly authorized to 
represent said nursery and that a guarantee is 
made that any written contract entered Into by 
him will he fulfilled unless notifications to the 



March 2, 1011. 



The Weekly Florists' Review* 



65 



BRIGHT SPOT 



The 

best 

dark 

pink 

carnation 

ever 

introduced 



-J!.-/^ , 




& 


IT w 


^ 4k^ 






^Wl^^jy^ I^^^H^^Bb 




U^S 

^ 






1 l-^j"^-^^""^"^^ 


^:r^g 



The 

best 

producer 

ever 

offered 

in its 

color . 



Outclasses everything^ heretofore gprown in the dark pink section. Won first honors in the 100 class for 
best dark pink at the A. C. S. meeting, Pittsburg, January, 1910, and has won many other honors. 

It is a pure, bright, dark pink of even shmle, size 3^ inches, an early and continuous bloomer, brings fully 25 
per cent more flowers to the plant than Lawson at its best ; flowers well shaped on long, wiry stems ; calyx does not split. 
It is a good shipper, and the cuttings root easy. 

While with most carnations early cutting^s are desirable, this is not so much the case w^ith Brig^ht 
Spot ; it is such a strong g^rower that March cuttings make just as good and very large plants by the 
end of July. ^ 

Price, per 100, $18.00; 85 at 100 rate; per 1000, 9100.00; 260 at 1000 rate; per 5000, 9400.00. 

NIC. ZWEIFEL, North Milwaukee, Wis. 



Mention Tbe Review when tou write. 



CALIFORNIA PRIVET. 

Fine, well-rooted, well-graded, 2-year stock. 
18 to 24 in., 8 or more branches, $1.60 per 
100; $10.00 per 1000; 2 to 3 ft., 4 or more 
branches, fine, $2.00 per 100; $15.00 per 1000; 
2V4 to 8 ft.. 6 or more branches, strong, $8.00 per 
100; $26.00 per 1000; 8 to 4 ft., 8 or more 
branches, extra Selected, $4.00 per 100; $86.00 
per 1000. Only strong branches counted in grad- 
ing. Special low rates on car lots. All packed 
to carry safely, free of charge. 

Olias. BUok, Hifbtstown, K. 7. 
Mention The Review when you write. 



LARGE TREES 

OAKS AND MAPLES, PINKS 
AND HKMLOCKS 

ANDORRA NURSERIES 

Wm. Warner Harper. Prop. 
Chestnut Htu. PblUulelphla, Pa. 



Mention Tbe Review when you write. 



^* Nothing but Roses" 

Spring list ready. 
200 old and new sorts, 'ih, and 4-In., on own roots. 

<^l FFni Ff LORAL COMPAMYsl 

Mention The Review when you write. 

ROSES 



Roses 

50 sorts of leading varieties. Teas. Hybrid 
Teas and Hybrid Perpetuals. Nice, thrifty 2-inch 
stoclt or large 2-year-old plants. Write us for list. 
Let us know your wants. 

WAGNER PARK CONSERVATORIES, Sidiey, 0. 

Mention The Review when you write 



A SPECIALTT 



TheOinEee&GonardCo. 



WestGravt 
PA. 



Always mention the Florists' Review 
when writing advertisers. 



X Offer For Fall.... 
5000 KUDZU VINK, 
8000 STAJNDARD BTDRANGEA, 
8000 CATAI^A BUNGII, 

l52*tJ?^ WKKPING irbl3KRRT, 
850,000 PRIVBT. * 

Also my usual aaaortment of Evergreens. Shrubs, 
Shade Trees, etc. 

HIRAM T. JONES 

DalOB CoBnty Nurseries, RLIZABETH. N. J. 

Mention The Review when you write. 



\ 



r; v.- .t.-.- - ;«-;- 



66 



The Weekly Florists' Review. 



._i..-,,-, ,, .-^yv,.:.! 



y::..--^: 



Mabch 2, 1911. 



CANNAS 

We have a very complete stock of Boddington's Cannas, 40 standard varieties, 
ready for immediate shipment or for later delivery. Complete price list mailed for 
the asking. You will make no mistake in booking order now. 

Winterson's Seed Store 

45-47-49 Wabash Avenue, CHICAGO 



MentiOB The Review when you write 



contrary be made In writing to the purchaser 
within thirty days after such order or contract 
Is made. Every contract so entered Into shall 
be In duplicate, every purchaser to have and 
retain said duplicate contract. 

Sec. 3. Any person, firm, association, or cor- 
poration selling, offering for sale or soliciting 
orders for nursery stock, such as trees, shrubs, 
plants, vines, roots, bulbs, or seeds, within the 
state of Iowa, shall only sell, offer for sale, or 
solicit orders for the same true to name, and 
shall specify In a bill of sale. In duplicate, a 
representation of the same — what said nursery 
stock (trees, shrubs, plants, vines, roots, bulbs, 
or seeds) is — and specify whether the same, if It 
be a tree, shrub, plant, or vine, Is seedling, 
grafted, or budded; and shall In no way, by 
imDlication, picture, device or other means, en- 
deavor to misrepresent to the purchaser the kind 
or variety, or whether the same is seedling, 
grafted, or budded stock, and that the same shall 
be true to name, kind, variety, and In no way 
mislead said purchaser. Nor shall said person, 
firm, association, or corporation, sell, offer for 
sale, or solicit orders for, unless duly specified, 
any nuisery stock, trees, shrubs, roots, bulbs, 
plants, vines, or seeds, deficient In vitality or 
germinating power by reason of age or for any 
other reason such as too long exposure or 
freezing. 

Sec. 4. No person, firm, association, or cor- 
poration shall sell, offer for sale, or solicit or- 
ders for, within the state of Iowa, any nursery 
stock, trees, shrubs, plants, vines, roots, bulbs, 
or seeds, which are diseased with any disease 
peculiar to the species, or shall sell, offer for 
sale, or solicit orders for any trees, vines, plants, 
or shrubs, affected with San Jose scale, yellows, 
rosette, or other destructive Insect or fungus 
enemies. 

Any person, firm, association, or corporation, 
who has reason to believe that his nursery stock 
Is so affected, shall cause the same to be in- 
spected by the Secretary of the Board of Agri- 
culture or his assistant, not earlier than June 
first, nor later than September first, of each 
yeai, and said person, firm, association or cor- 
poration shall pay a fee of ten dollars ($10.00) 
per day and five dollars ($5.00) for every half- 
day devoted to said Inspection: (a day shall be 
all time of five hours or more, but not more than 
ten hours; one-half day shall be all time less 
than five hours). And all said trees, shrubs, 
plants, vines, roots, bulbs and seeds so affected 
shall be destroyed; and any shipments within the 
state shall have an inspector's stamp or tag 
plainly attached thereto, showing that the same 
is free from disease, as above stated, and within 
the full meaning of this act. No person, firm, 
association, or corporation, shall in any way 
sell, offer for sale, transfer, solicit orders from, 
or convej- to any person within the state, any 
trees, shrubs, plants, vines, roots, bulbs, or 
seeds, which are diseased. 

Sec. 5. The Secretary of the Board of Agrl- 
cnituro Is hereby empowered to employ an assist- 
ant who siiall be versed in the subject of Horti- 
culture and Agriculture, and thoroughly capable 
and competent to carry out the provisions of 
this act as to the examination and tagging of the 
trees, shrubs, plants, vines, roots, bulbs, and 
seeds, and who shall liavo the same power as the 
Secretary of the Board of Agriculture to enforce 
this act. 

Sec. 6. In order to enforce and provide for 
the enforcement of tills act. and to provide an 
assistant to tlie Secretary of the Board of Agri- 
culture, there is hereby appropriated the sum of 
$5,000 annually, not otherwise appropriated, to 
provide for the salary of the Assistant to the 
Secretary of the Board of Agriculture, and neces- 
sar.v expenses In the performance of their duty. 
Said assistant to receive a salary not exceeding 
$1,800 per annum. 

Sec. 7. Penalty. Any person, firm, association 
or corporation violating any of the provisions of 
this act shall be deemed guilty of a misdemeanor, 
and upon conviction shall be fined not to exceed 
one hundred dollars ($100.00) or less than twenty- 
five dollars ($25.00) for each and every offense; 
and the Secretary of the Board of Agriculture 
shall thereupon revoke the certificate granted to 
sell, offer for sale, or solicit orders for nursery 
stock as by this act contemplated. 



THE IMPROVED CANNA 

"UNCLE SAT 

is one of our Improved Cannaa that the Florists 
in every state in the Union ought to know 
about. It is a magnificent variety for parks — 
or big beds anywhere. Very stately in appear- 
ance with enormous bunches of brilliant Orange 
Scarlet flowers ; height, 6 to 7 feet and magnifi- 
cent every way. 

A bed of 'Uncle Sam" Cannas graced the 
White House grounds at Washington recently 
and was the admiration of its distinguished 
guests. 

The Royal Horticultural Society of England 
thought so much of it that they crowned it with 
an award of merit at their great International 
Trial of Canna Lilies. 
' We have a thousand good strong roots of 

"Uncle Sam" and will accept orders of not 
more than 100 to any one patron, f. o. 1). here, 

at $1.00 per dozen; $7.00 per 100 
It ought to be in every first-class list published. 

Please rememl>er that every one of these 
Cannas we have been talking about were orig- 
inated by our Vice-President, Mr. Wintzer, on 
our grounds here at West Grove. 

Would not your customers pay a little more 
for such superior sorts? W>ite for our list. 

The Conard & Jones Co. 

WEST GROVE, PA. 



Mention The Review when you write. 



•■? 



NOTICE 

Proposals will be received by the West Chicago Park Commissioners, in 
Union Park, Chicago, on the following Roses, dormant plants, 2 years old: 
1700 Mme. Caroline Testout 600 Clothilde Soupert 

400 Hermosa goO Gruss an Teplitz 

50 Mrs. John Laing 

WEST CHICAGO PARK COMMISSIONERS 

By GEO. A. MUQLER, Secretary. 



Mention The Review when you write. 



MAitCH 2, 1911. 



The Weekly Florists' Review, 



67 



.-■■-^'/^r^r^ r - rr •;;^''/-i>y"» -^"- f ■ 



j^. 



true to name, have two to three good 
mant, and give absolute satisfaction. 
000, and not an overgrown kick. 

CRIMSON SHADES 

100 1000 

Alpbonse Bouvier.Tft . . . .$1.75 $lfi.tO 

Black Prince, 3 to 4 It 2.50 22.50 

CbarleB HenderBon. 4 ft... 1.75 14.00 

J. D. Sisele, 5 it 2.00 17.50 

KzplorateuT Crampbel, 

5ifl ft 2.00 15.C0 

Louisiana, 7 ft 1.75 15.00 

Pillar of Fire. 6 to 7 ft 2.75 25 00 

Tarrytown, 3i« It 2.25 20.00 

PINK SHADES 

L. Patry, 4^ ft <1.75 $15.00 

Loul8e,4i«ft 1.75 15.00 

Mile. Berat, 4^ ft 1.75 15.00 



ORANGE SHADES 

Mrs. Kate Gray, 6 ft $1.75 $15.00 

Pennsylvania, 5 ft 2.00 15.00 

Wyomlner, 7 ft 2.00 17.50 



eyes, are well cured, sound and dor- 
Our sales last year were nearly 700,- 



RED, GOLD-EDGED 

100 1000 

Mme. Crozy. b^ ft $2.25 120.00 

Souv. d' Antolne Crozy, 4 ft. 2.75 25.00 
YELLOW SHADES 

Gladiator, 4 f t $2.75 $25.00 

Florence Vaughan . 5 ft.... 1.60 14 00 

Newbury. 4 ft 2 75 25.00 

Queen Cbarlotte, S^s ft . . . . 2.75 25.00 
WHITE SHADES 

Al8ace,3i«ft $1.75 $15.00 

BRONZE-LEAVED 

Brandy wine, 4 to 5 $2.25 $20.00 

Eeandale, 4 ft 1.75 15.00 

Ktng Humbert. 4 ft 275 25.00 

LeonardVauBban, 4^ft... 2.75 25 00 

Musafolia, 10 ft 2.75 25.00 

Robusta, 6 to 8 ft 2.00 17.50 

Sbenandoab, 6 ft 175 15.00 

ORCHID-FLOWERING 

Allemania, 4 too ft $1.75 $15.00 

Austria. 5 It 1-50 14.00 

Indiana, 4is ft 1.75 15.00 

Italia, 4»2ft 1.75 15 00 



ji^ 



Z: Our Cannas[are packed 250 (of one variety) in a box; two can be 
" cleated " logtther and shipped as one. One box of 250 (one variety) sold 
at thousand rate; it is cheaper for you to buy a box of 250 than 2(X) at 100 
rate. 25 (one variety) at'.lCO rate. 

ARTHUR T. BODDINGTON 

SEEDSMAN 
342 West 14ih Street, NEW YORK 

All the above Cannan sold F. O. B. NewYork or Chicago. 

WINTERSON'S SEED STORE, 4S-47-49 Wabash Avenue, CHICAGO 

Chicago and Western AKents for our CannaB. 



I 



'T*»f "'"•■ ■ : f <■'- 



68 



The Weekly Florists^ Review* 



Mabch 2, 1911. 



YOU WHO WANT 



CARNATION CITTINGS 

•*>■ t 

Place your orders now and you will get IMMEDIATE DELIVERY. 

Enchantress, Perfection, Beacon $3.00 per 100; $25.00 per 1000 

Rose-pink Enchantress, Winsor 2.50 per 100; 20.00 per '1000 

White Enchantress, ready April 15 2.50 per 100; 20.00 per 1000 

We can fill orders from 1000 to 100,000 and guarantee the stock. 

Chrysanthemum Cuttings 



NOW READY- 



WHTTK 

Oct. Frost 

Kalb 

V. Poehlmann . . 

Touset 

A. Byron 

T. Eaton 

CHiadwick 

Lynnwood Hall < 



Per 100 Per 1000 



PINK 



Per 100 Per 1000 



$2.00 


$15.00 


2.00 


15.00 


2.00 


15.00 


2.00 


15.00 


2.00 


15.0g 


2.50 


20.00 


2.50 


20.00 


3.00 


27.50 



Balfour 

Enguehard 

Pacific Supreme. 

Gloria 

Amorita 

Jeanne Rosette. . 



.$2.00 
. 2.00 
. 2.00 
. 2.50 
. 2.50 
. 2.00 



$15.00 
15.00 
15.00 
20.00 
20.00 
15.00 



TEIXOW 
Golden Glow.. 
Oct. Sunshine. 

Appleton 

Y. Eaton 

Halliday 

Bonnaffon 



Per 100 
..$2.00 
.. 2.00 
,. 2.00 
,. 2.50 
.. 2.00 
.. 2.00 



Per 1000 
$16.00 
15.00 
16.00 
20.00 
15.00 
15.00 



J. D. Thompson Carnation Co., Joliet, III. 



Mention Tbe Review wben you write. 



INDIANAPOLIS. 



The Market. 



Business has been quite satisfactory. 
The weather continues warm, with nu- 
merous cloudy days, but stock, with 
the exception of roses, is plentiful. 
Bulbous flowers are more numerous 
than at any time this season and are 
meeting with good demand. Violets 
and sweet peas are selling well. Easter 
lilies are scarce, as are roses, the latter 
holding top-notch prices. 

Various Notes. 

The Pahud Floral Co. is figuring on 
tearing down four houses and putting 
up modern houses in their place this 
year. 

Both Bertermann Bros, and A. Wie- 
gand & Sons had a busy week on ac- 
count of the auto show. Every avail- 
able palm and bay tree was used in the 
decorations of the various automobile 
display rooms. 

A. "W. Marshall, formerly with the 
Fahud Floral Co., has taken a position 
with A. WSegand & Sons. Carl Groener, 
formerly with the latter fimi, has de- 
parted for Portland, Ore. 

The Smith & Young Co. has been 
cutting some fine sweet peas, but the 
orchid crop is off at present. 

B. F. Hensley, of Knightstown, has 
been shipping in quantities of carna- 
tions. 

Peter Weiland, of New Castle, was 
a visitor last week. Mr. Weiland was 
inspecting the cement benches and gut- 
ters at the Smith & Young place. He 
is erecting a range of ten houses at 
New Castle and expects to open a com- 
mission house here this fall. Other vis- 
itors were H. Knickman, of MeHutchi- 
son & Co., New York city; H. S. Gar- 
land, of the Geo. M. Garland Co., Des 



Plaines, 111. 



H. L. W. 



The Beview sends Scott's Florists' 
Manual postpaid for $5. 



Carnation Norwood 

This variety has been grown by us for four years and has proven to be the 
best White Carnation we have ever grown. 

NORWOOD is a Pure White, of good form, about 3% inches in diameter, 
exceedingly fragrant, never known to split, and a free and continuous bloomer. 
The most profitable Carnation we have ever grown. An ideal commercial 
variety. Rooted cuttingfs (immediate delivery), $10.00 per 100; 
$76.00 per 1000. 

It will pay every Carnation Grower to plant this variety- 
there' s money in it. 

ROBERT CRAIG CO. 



4900 Market Street, 



PHILADELPHIA, PA. 



Mention The Reylew when you write 



Americaa Beauty 

NOW READY 

Rooted Cuttines: 

Per 1000, $25.00 5000 at $22.50 

10,000 at $20.00 

From 2>^-in. pots, $45.00 per 1000 

Grown by Frederick J. Benthey & G)., 
and shipped from Mew Gutle, md. 

Send orders to 

KYLE & FOERSTER 

51 Wabash Ave., CHICAGO 



Mention The Review when vou wrte 

Dahlia Roots 

'Whole Field Clninps, at tS.OO per 100 and up. 
1000. in 10 dlBtlDct kinds, either Show, Decorative or 
Osctua. our selection of kinds, (or $40.00 cash. 

CANNA ROOTS, Strong Divisions, at |2.00 
per 100, 112.00 per 1000, and up. 

Send for LiUt. 

R. VINCENT, JR., & SONS CO.r&rXS' 

Mention The Review wiien you write. 



GmmiTioi 

ROOTED CUTTINOS 

We supply them of even size and well 

rooted. Present delivery. 

Per 100 1000 

White Wonder (our new white) ... .$12.00 $100.00 

Gloriona (our new pinlc) 12.00 100.09 

Pink Deliglit 6.00 50.00 

Scarlet Glow 6.00 60.00 

Shasta 6.00 60.00 

San^mo 6.00 50.00 

Dorothy Gordon 6.00 60.00 

J.W.Riley 6.00 50.00 

Admiration 6.00 60.00 

White Perfection 3.00 26.00 

Winona 3.00 25.00 

Enchantress 3.00 25.00 

Rose-pinJc Enchantress.. 3.00 25.00 

Beacon 8.00 25.00 

F. Dorner & Sons Co. 

LA FAYETTE, IND 

Always mentloii tbe Florists* Review 
'velien wzitlnar advertisers. 



March 2, 1911. 



The Weekly Florists' Review. 



69 



A. N. riERSON, Inc., Cromwell, Conn. 

ROSES 

If you are in the market for Rose Stock, and are looking for the 
best that can be produced, we are ready to serve you* 



Double Pink Killarney 

Grafted plants only. Each. 75c: per dozen, 16.00: per25, $10 00; per 
50. $17.50: per 100, $30.00: per 250. $70.00: per 1000, $250.00. 

Dark Pink Killarney 

Grafted plants only. 40e each: $3.00 per dozen; $20.00 per 100; 
$180.00 per 1000. 

liady Cromwell 

Grafted plants only. 75c each : $10.00 per 25 ; $17.50 per 50 ; $30.00 per 
100; $70 00 per 250 ; $250.00 per 1000. 

Mrs. Aaron Ward 

Grafted stock: 40c each; $4.00 per dozen; $25.00 per 100; $200.00 per 
1000. Own root stock : 25c each ; $2.50 per dozen ; $12.00 per 100 ; 
$100.00 per 1000. 

Melody 

Own root plants only. 75c each: $6.00 per dozen: $10.00 per 25; 
$17.60 per 50 ; $30.00 per 100 ; $70.00 per 250 ; $250.00 per 1000. 

Radiance 

Grafted stock: $18.00 per 100; $150.00 per 1000. Ovni root stock: 
$10.00 per 100; $90.00 per 1000. 



Prince de Bulgarie 

Grafted stock: 214-inch pots. $3.00 per dozen ; $20.00 per 100; $180.00 
per 1000. Own root stock : 2ia-inch pots, jK.50 per dozen ; $15.00 
per 100; $120.00 per 1000. 

Chrafted Roses of Standard Varieties 
Killarney My Maryland 

Rlobmond Kaiserln Aususta Victoria 

Wblte Killarney Bride 

Bridesmaid Bon Sllene 

Golden Gate Ivory Uncle John 

and other varietlea for forcing;. 
Selected plants for March delivery, grafted, $15.00 per 100; $120.00 
per 1000. A special price quoted on 5000 or more plants. 

Roses on Their Own Roots 
Killarney Perle Des Jardlns 

White Killarney Sunrise 

Richmond Kid4erln Auamsta Victoria 

From 2>«-inch pots, $6.00 per 100: $50.00 per 1000. 



»rfvi<~^^^^N^^^^^^N^M!Ms!!Ktf^^^Mtf^Stftftftf^tftf^fitf^tfS^^t^^t^^M^^!!^&^5Stftftftftftftf^S!!Msi!K!5^M:tK!CAi 



Carnation Mrs. CW.Ward 

The most prolific and profitable variety in the market, producing more flowers and bring- 
ing a higher price than any other Carnation. The Commercial Value of this variety has 
been further demonstrated by the highly satisfactory results obtained by last year's purchasers. 

MRS C We Vlf ARD ^^ ^ ^^^ ^^^ perfectly healthy grower, producing perfect 
^._i^^^— ^~^— i^— i— — flowers on long stems as early as September 1st. 

The color is the clear, deep pink so much in demand. 

Rooted Cuttings, $6.00 per 100; $50.00 per IQOO 



ALMA WARD ^-argest White, Rooted Cuttings, 
MfamM wwftiw ^j^^Q p^^ iQQ. $QQ,oo per 1000. 



Cottage Gardens Co., Inc. 

QUEENS, LONG ISLAND, NEW YORK 



70 



The Weekly Rorists' Review. 



Mabch 2, 1911. 



Rooted 


Cuttings 


Rose Cuttings 

Per 100 Per 1000 

White Killamey $3.50 $30.00 

Perle ZOO 17-50 


Strong 

Clean 

Well 

Rooted 

Sure 

To 

Please. 


Carnation Cuttings 

Per 100 Per 1000 
WtiJfo Fnchantress S3.00 S25.00 


Enchantress ZOO 17.50 

White f'erfection ZOO 17.50 

Rose-pink Enchantress ZOO 17.50 

Beacon 2.50 20.00 

Winsor L50 1Z50 


Richmond 1.50 i?,fiO 

Bride 1.50 1Z50 

Unck John 1.50 1Z50 


Ivory 1.50 12.50 


Mrs. Lawson 1.50 1Z50 


Peter Reinberg, "^SSSiST 



Mention The Review when vou write 



FINDLAY, O. 

S. J. McMichael has placed the man- 
agement of his greenhouse establish- 
ment in the hands of Arthur Marshall, 
formerly of Columbus Grove. Mr. Mc- 
Michael has had so many irons in the 
fire that he has been unable to look 
after all of them the way he would like, 
and he also feels that lightening his 
labors will be of advantage to his 
health. His specialty is vegetable plants 
and preparations are being made for 
growing an immense quantity for the 
approaching season. Last year he was 
fully 300,000 short in filling his orders. 
Eighty bushels of sweet potatoes will 
be put down for plants, the shipping 
season for which starts May 1. Tomato 
plants will be grown by the hundreds 
of thousands from seed saved on the 
place. Peppers, eggplants, celery, cauli- 
flower, cabbage and aster plants also 
are specialties. 

Mr. McMichael also is known as the 
horseradish king, for he has been grow- 
ing the roots and bottling the product 
for many years. He says growing horse- 
radish roots for market is a profitable 
side line for anyone with the necessary 
ground. One acre of land would yield 
$250 worth of salable roots in one year 
if set six inches apart in the rows, with 
the rows two and one-half or three feet 
apart. He says the soil should be 
sandy and the cultivation the same as 
for potatoes. Horseradish roots now 
are selling at 6 cents to 9 cents per 
pound, wholesale. 



Ottawa, Kan. — B. Romstedt, of the 
Eomstedt Greenhouses, has completed 
two new houses, each 18x110, and is 
planting them to lettuce. 

Racine, Wis. — John Bourgaise, pro- 
prietor of the North Side Greenhouses, 
has announced his candidacy for alder- 
man of the Seventh ward on the Re- 
publican ticket. 

Jamestown, N. D. — Manager A. K. 
Wheeler, of the Wheeler Floral Co., has 
purchased the interests of his partner, 
E. A. Williams, and will continue the 
business alone. In spite of a fire and 
other misfortunes, Mr. Wheeler has 
built up a prosperous trade. 



POCAHONTAS 

If you grow any crimson carnations, then why not grow a variety that 
will give you quality equal to the best varieties in the other colors? POCAHONTAS 
will do this, and you will also find it productive enough to be highly profitable. 

STRONG ROOTED CUTTINGS-READY NOW 
$18.00 per 100; $100.00 per 1000 

Geraniums 

We have ready now, in fine young plants, strong 2-inch stock : Marvel 
(deep red), Decorator (orange scarlet), Castellane (red), J. Viaud (pink), 
Castries (pink), Harcourt (white). $8.50 per loO; $80.00 per 1000. 

BAUR & SMITH 



88th Street and Senate Avenue, 



INDIANAPOLIS, IND. 



MeptioD The Review when you write. 



Pink 
Boston Market 



PENNSYLVANIA 

A seedlinjr of Boston Market and Harlowarden that has been under test for the past five years 
and which has shown up so well under all conditions that I now feel ronfldent it is one of the best 
commercial varieties and have pleasure in offering' it for the first time for spring delivery 1911. 

The color is a shade lighter pi Ilk than Lawson; form high built, much like Boston Market ; stem 
long and graceful ; healthy grower; blooms freely from November all through the season. 

This new variety I am confident will prove a money-maker — a pink Boston Market— only much 
larger and better and destined to be one of the most popular commercial varieties. 

Come and see it growing. I guarantee same to be in perfei t health. $6.00 per 100; $50.00 per 1000 

P. M. DeWITT, - Bridgewater, Bucks Co., Pa. 

Or tlirouKli my selling: agrents 

S. S. PENNOCK-MEEHAN CO., 1608 Ludlow Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Mention The Review when you write. 



OUR NEW ROSK8 

Melody 
Double Killarney 

See The Review Feb. 26. page 67. 
— Ad <i rsss — 

Robert Scott & ^on, Sharon Hill, Pa. 

Mention Tbe Review when you write. 

Cleveland, O. — Alex A. Owchak, for- 
merly of Schlaefer & Owchak Co., has 
just started in business for himself at 
7403 Denison avenue. 



8p«oi«l Notioa to 

AMERICAN TRADERS 

If yoa are Interested in European stocki of 
nants and Seeds and latest news concerning 
Kame, subscribe to THE HOBTIC17L.TUBAI. 
TBAOB JOURNAL, published weekly, and 
THB INTBlUf JiTIOKAI. BOBXICVLTVU- 
AL TBADK JOURNAL., Dubllslied quarterly. 
One dollar (International Money Order) sent io 
us now wUl ensure your receivinc each number 
as published for one year. 

Address 

The HORTICULTURAL PRINTING CO. 

BURNLEY. BNGLAND 

llways mention tbe Floriata* Review 
\7taen ^Tiltins; advertlaers. 



r 



Mabch 2, 1911. 



The Weekly Florists' Review. 



71 




A Steady Cut of Fancy Stock 

can be had by getting some of our good, healthy, productive cuttings or 2-inch plants. We have a fine 
lot of Winsor, Mrs. Ward, Alma Ward, Beacon, White Enchantress, White Perfection and Victory. 



-WRITK US- 



C. C. POLLWORTH CO., Milwaukee, Wis. 



When in Philadelphia 
Be Sure to Look Us Up 

Sometimes when you get out and look around and see what other folks in your 
line of trade are doing, you get some good ideas for running your own business — which 
prompts us to suggest that you might be decidedly interested in our establishment at 
Wyncote, and in the work we are doing here. 

So this is a cordial invitation to you to come out to Wyncote to look us over 
whenever you have a couple of hours to spare in Philadelphia — you can do it, comfort- 
ably, in that time, though when you get out here you may possibly be interested 
enough to conclude to prolong the visit ! 

We're easily reached— only 25 minutes from Reading Terminal, 12th and Market 
Streets, Philadelphia. We have fine train service — fifty trains each way on week days 
— so you can suit your convenience both going and coming. 

Our ranges aggregate 130,000 feet of glass; here we grow the Palms, Carnations, 
Orchids and Roses about which we've told you so often in our advertisements. 

Call on us; we're always ready for visitors, and will make you welcome. 

When in Philadelphia Be Sure to Look Us Up 

JOSEPH HEACOCK COMPANY 



Growers of Palms, Orchids, Carnations 
and Roses 



WYNCOTE, PENNSYLVANIA 

Railway Station: JENKINTOWN 



"T^.«(;»i. jj.i, •^jM'ifqpvfnsm^ 



■\m\D\fitmi^mtjm^ii 



72 



The Weekly Florists' Review. 



-JHIlllip.W^Jlii J;l (jppii .i^V'iW ip^ipjl Vi!,'.,«fi^f »^f.f-'. 



March 2, 1911. 



CARNATION CIHINGS 



IMMEDIATE 

DELIVERY 



Enchantress 

Rose-pink Enchantress 

White Enchantress 

White Perfection 
Victory 



»rf( 



per 100 $3.00 per 1000 $25.00 

3.00 " 25.00 

3.00 " 25.00 

3.00 " 25.00 

3.00 " 25.00 



COLUMBUS FLORAL CO., Columbus. 0. 



FBAMINQHAM, MASS. 



J. T. Butterworth. 

J. T. Butterworth keeps adding to 
the numbers of his orchids, not alone 
by importations, but by skillful propa- 
gation at home. There are few grow- 
ers who can increase their stock of 
choice cattleyas as Mr. Butterworth 
does. Cattleya Trianse is the variety 
most largely grown here and large 
quantities were open, varying from 
pure white to deep pink, some beautiful 
forms being noted. If we mistake not, 
one or two specimens from here will 
open visitors* eyes at the coming S. A. 
F. show. All other cattleyas were look- 
ing well. Laelia anceps, both white and 
pink, carried a fine crop. Quantities of 
Dendrobium nobile and Wardianum had 
the buds separated and some ready to 
open. Miltonias are well done. They 
are not the easiest orchids to grow, but 
are quite at home here, as are the frac- 
tious odontoglossums. 

The crop of Cypripedium insigne was 
nearly over for the season. A nice crop 
of phalsenopsis spikes were ready to 
open and some good cymbidiums, includ- 
ing Tracyanum and insigne, were car- 
rying strong spikes. Of the yellow 
forms of Cypripedium insigne quite a 
big batch is being worked up. In the 
carnation houses Pink Delight looked 
as fine as had ever been seen. Beacon, 
Enchantress, Winsor and White Perfec- 
tion all looked well. Lily of the valley 
was excellent, the flowering pips carry- 
ing fine dark foliage. Tulips and nar- 
cissi are each grown in quantity, the 
vellow Prince tulips being of extra qual- 
ity. W. N. Craig. 

Money in Violets, by Saltford, sent by 
The Review for 25 cents. 



CARNATIONS 

100,000 rooted cuttinES. strong, healthy, 
roaranteed. 

Pink Dellsrtat, Dorothy Gordon, 
Ai>ple Blossom, Wanoka, $6.00 per 100; 
150.00 per lOoO. 

Cash or C. O. D, from unknown parties. 

Order no^e tor early delivery. 

By the way. have you ordered 

RAINBOW 

the coming Carnation? Awarded A. C. S^ 
Certificate at Pittsburg. Orders booked noyr 
for January 1912 delivery. $12.00 per 100; 
tlOO.OO per 1000. 

Wantka Greenhauses, BaneTeM, N.Y. 



Mention The Review when yon write. 



Menoon The Review when yog write. 



Carnations 

WHITE HOUSE. The quality white. Won the Silver Cup at Morris- 
town for best undisseminated variety; Bronze Medal at Pittsburg, and five 
other certificates. Abeolutely non-bursting, clean and kind in growth and a 
variety that will make good. We have 10,000 for March delivery and that is 
all we will be in a position to supply of this variety. 

PRINCESS CHARMING. The finest thing in sight in the Enchantress 
shade of pink. Every bud a perfect flower and your net returns per square 
foot will surprise you. 

Our stock is limited, but we are still in a position to supply first-class, 
rooted clottings of both these varieties at $12.00 per 100; $100.Q0 per 1000. 

Chrysanthemums 

We catalogue over 500 varieties and surely we have the kind you want. 

Chas. H. Totty, Madison, N. J. 



Caf nation Coftings 

ROOTED 

Dorothy Gordon, 16.00 per 100. 

Beacon, $3.50 per 100. 

Wblte Perfection, Winsor, Enchantress, 
Rose-pink Enchantress, 'Winona, Vi- 
ola Sinclair and Wanoka, $3.00 per 100. 

Lawson, $2.00 per 100. 

1000 rate on application. 

LIttlefleld & Wyman 

North Abingdon, Mass. 

CARNATIONS 

Enchantress 

Rose -pink Enchantress 

Perfection 

Beacon 

Dorothy Gordon 

Scarlet Glow 

Rooted Cuttings or plants in 2-in. pots. 
Prices on application. 

A. Jablonsky 

Olhette, St. L$ui duty, N$. 



.A. 



CHBYSAJfTHEMUM, R. C. Pacific Su- 
preme. White Cloud, $2.00 per 190. 

CliEMATIS JACKMANI. HENRYII. 
MME. EDWARD ANDRE. 2year.old 
dormant plants, 13.00 per doz. 

CliKMATIS panlculata, strong plants. 
2^ear.old. $10.00 per 100; 1- year-old, $5.00 per 

FERNS for dishes, best varieties, 2ia-ln 
pots, $3.60 per 100. 

•A*^ARAGUS Sprenrerl, 2-ln. pots, $2.00 

I? 00^"' lOo'"' '**'*'' '*''* ^^ **"' ^''°' '^*** 

■^SA'^^-^S''^ Excelsa, Mn. poto, 3 tiers. 
60c each; 6-ln. pots, 4 tiers. 76c each. 

*S?JSiS?t*i"*^* '^o"» Soil, $1.00 per 100. of • 
FUCHSIAS. 4 varieties. GERANIUMS; 
assorted Tarieties. Hardr ENOLIRH 
IVY. SNAPDRAGON .yVhlt^TEuo^^, 
Golden Varleirated; CiUPHEAS. FICU8 
REPENS. AGERATUMS, LOBELIAS. 
donble blue and Emperor William: SWATsl 
80NA8;PILEA8. 2 varieties; PArIoR 
IVY, SALVIA BONFIRE. C^^lon 
t^nslloTsti'i.^*""***' I^antanas.lmpa- 

C. EISELE 

1 m & Westmordai^ Sts.. Pbiladdphit, Pa. 

Mention The Review when you wr ite. 

Carnation Rooted Cuttings 

strong, clean, well rooted stocli 
Winsor. $2.50 pep 100; $20.00 per 1000. 
'"^"plr^So'S^rtoSS."'- ^°<^hantres8, $3.^ 

ALFRED M. CAMPBELL 

1510 Sansom St., Philadelphia. Pa. 



Mabch 2, 1911. 



The Weekly Florists^ Review^ 



73 



r 




Here is The Dark Pink Enchantress 

ITS NAME IS 

WASHINGTON 

HT'All the large growers around 
Chicago have bought Washington 
in quantity, because they recog- 
nize its sterling merits. 

Why not get in on the ground floor ? Order now 
stock of Washington, the dark pink sport of En- 
chantress. 

Same color as Lawson. Never gets streaked; 
never turns blue, always a beautiful cerise. Winner 
of first prize in every competition at Chicago and 
Minneapolis Flower Shows, 1910. 

There is no doubt about Washins^ton being the 
money malcer for you to grow. The only satis- 
factory dark pink in commerce, one that you know 
is all right and feel safe to invest in. Every florist 
knows the Enchantress family, from which Washing- 
ton is a sport. 

Strong, well rooted cuttings, 

guaranteed satisfactory, 

$10.00 per 100; $20.00 per 250; 

$75.00 per 1000. 

SANGAMO 

The variety that has made good and is pleasing everybody who bought it last season. 

SANQAMO is a beautiful brilliant pink (rose-pink class); nicely formed flowers on long, stifi" stems that ar« 

never weak, and the calyx never splits. Will produce two to one of any other variety. If in doubt, ask any of the 
growers around Chicago. Strons: rooted cuttines, ready for immediate delivery, at special price or $5.00 
per 100; $40.00 per 1000. 

PerlOO PerlOOO Per 100 PerlOOO 

Wasliington, beautiful cerise sport of Shasta, very fine white, exceptionally free $6,00 $50.00 

Enchantress, the color of Mrs. Lawson. $10.00 $ 75.00 Pink Delight, deeper flesh than Enchant- 

Prlncess Charming, beautiful flesh pink 12.00 100.00 ress, long wiry stems, excellent keeper. 6.00 50.00 

Christmas Cheer, scarlet, suitable for May Day, flesh pink, exceptionally free, 

pot culture or cut flowers 15.00 120.00 good stem, does not burst its calyx 3.00 25.00 

White Enchantress, pure white .3.00 25.00 Alvina, cerise, a wonderful producer o| 

Enchantress, excellent stock 8.00 25.00 medium sized flowers on good stems. . . 3.00 25.00 

Scarlet Glow, intense scarlet, free O. P. Bassett, scarlet, large flowers, 

flowei", long stem 6.00 50.00 long stem 3.00 25.00 

Mary Tolman, deep flesh, strong stems, Victory, deep scarlet, one of the very best 3.00 25.00 

good producer (i.OO 50.00 Beacon, orange scarlet, very good 3.00 25.00 

Our entire stock of Rooted Cuttings are exceptionally free from disease, strong and well rootetl. 
We guarantee them A No. 1 or money refunded. March 15th and later delivery. 

Chicago Carnation Co. 

35=37 Randolph Street, , ^ ^ '^"^^'^ SK; centr., 3373. CHICAGO 






74 



The Weekly Florists' Review* 



Mabch 2, 1911. 



>»i>yW>W<<»<^S5iiig»W<WWg<>W>S<8SSSWSWi^«^i*>i»s^CPJ^j>j>^«^i>!Ai^9SO>?0MC!P7. 



FERNS 



For Immediate Delivery 
ORDER TODAY 



We make a specialty of FERNS. Try us on a sample order* 



BOSTON Per 100 

4-inch $12.00 

5-inch 25.00 

6-inch 40.00 

7-inch «)0.00 

8-inch 80.00 

9-inch each, 1.25 

10-inch each, 1.50 

12-inch each, 2.00 

SCOTTII 

6-inch each, .50 



WHITMANI Per lOO 

4-inch 115.00 

5-inch 30.00 

6-inch 46.00 

7-inch 60.00 

8-inch 80.00 

SCHOIiZELI 

6-incli eacli, .60 

7-inch each, .75 

SUPERBISSIMA 
6-inch each, .40 



ALTERNANTHERAS 

Rooted cuttings for spring delivery 

Per 1000 

P. Major $4.00 

A. Nana 4.00 

Brilliantissima 5.00 



R. R. DAVIS CO., 



(Successors to 

Davis Bros.) 



Morrison, III. 



MVinMon ThP RpvIpw TOhcn von wWrr 



EDWAEDSVILLE, ILL. 

Eeferring to the item in The Review 
of February 23 regarding the business 
change contemplated by J. F. Ammann, 
it is stated that Mr. Ammann is ar- 
ranging to turn his greenhouse plant 
over to three of his old employees, J. H. 
Buchsenschutz, Edward Buchsenschutz 
and Le Eoy Smith, who expect in the 
near future to incorporate what will 
be known as the J. F. Ammann Go. 
The first named has been in the em- 
ploy of Mr. Ammann for sixteen years, 
the last ten of which he has had en- 
tire charge of the greenhouses, as fore- 
man. Le Eoy Smith has had charge of 
the rose section and has also been with 
Mr. Ammann for over ten years. Edw. 
Buchsenschutz has spent eight years on 
the place and during the latter part 
has had charge of the carnations. The 
company will be incorporated for $6,- 
000, stock fully paid up, and will take 
over all the stock and equipment about 
July 1, and in time purchase the entire 
plant, including greenhouses and five 
acres of land, on which it will hold an 
option for the present. Mr. Ammann 
expects to hold a few shares of stock 
in the new company for a while, in 
order to get the boys well started and 
also to be somewhat in touch with the 
business he has spent the greater part 
of his life in. The active management 
will be in charge of J. H. Buchsen 
schutz. 

Mr. Ammann has been connected 
with the florists' business for over 
twenty-five years, and the present plant 
was established twenty years ago with 
3,000 feet of small sash houses. This 
has been rebuilt three times, until now 
it consists of 40,000 feet of modern 
glass. Mr. Ammann will continue to 
make Edwardsville his home and de- 
vote most of his time to his retail 
stores at Alton and East St. Louis, pur- 
chasing stock for these from the home 
plant. The young men will make 
wholesale growing a specialty. 



Lowell, Mass.— H. .T. F. De Thestrup, 
formerly foreman for A. M. Davenport, 
at Watertown, Mass., is now grower 
and manager for Frank P. Putnam, the 
carnation specialist of this city. 



Geraniums 

While we are sold short on some few kinds, we can put up an excellent collec- 
tion, that will meet all the requirements of the most critical trade, for $2.00 per 100. 
1000, in from 10 to 20 kinds, our selection, for $18.50. Cash. 

Ivy Geraniums, Scented Geraniums, Variegated Geraniums, in sfood assortment, 
described in our catalogue. If you have not got it, you need it. Ask for it. 

Double Petunias, propagated from select stock of the finest colors. Per lOO Per lOOO 

also double white ajad single fringed $2.00 $18.50 

Alyssum, dwarf and giant 2.00 18.50 

Altemanthera, six varieties 2.00 18.50 

Ageratum, six varieties 2.00 18.50 

G)leus, Golden Bedder, Verschaffeltii and others 2.00 18.50 

Fuchsias, six varieties 2.00 18.50 

Lemon Verbenas 2.00 18.50 

Lobelias, Kathleen Mallard and Newport Model 2.00 18.50 

Parlor Ivy, Senecio Scandens 2.00 18.50 

Tradescantia Zebrina Multicolor 3.00 18.50 

Swainsona Alba 2,00 18.50 

Salvias, Bonfire and Zurich 2.00 18.50 

Coleus, rooted cuttings, 60c per 100; $5.00 per 1000. 

Cash with order. Not less than 250 of one variety at 1000 rate 

R. VINCENT, JR., & SONS CO., - White Nanh, Nd. 



Mention The Review when you write 



STOCK READY TO SBIFT S'SS.d'! 

5300 Geraniums: 1300 Sllver-Lpavfd Oeranlumn: 
60(1 Queen Alexandra L>aifiies: oOU Parle DalBles; 8.50 
FuchBlas: 1600 Strong Giant Sweet Alyseums; 800 
Salvias; 400 Verbenas: 100 Feverfew. 

COLEUS— We are In shape to furnish lari^e quan- 
tities on short notice, either In R. C. or 2-ln. 
We are growers to the trade. 

GEO. A. KUHL, Pekin, 111. 

Mriitifri I he Keview wDen you write 

WANTED 

4-in. Asparagus Plumosus, 

in fine condition. State price. 

Alpha Floral Co., Kansas City, Ho. 

Always mention the Florists* Review wher 
writing advertisers. 



Rose Gardens 

Wbolesale Growers 

Daffodils, Peonies, Tulips, 

Gladioli, Iris, etc. 

North Emporia, Virginia 

MeptioD The Review when you write. 
GREEN-LEAVED 

ASPIDISTRAS 

Several large plants, thirty to 
fifty leaves, 8 cents per leaf. 

G. A. HEYNE, Fiorisn 

DUBUQUE, IOWA. 

Always mention tbe Florists* Revleiiv 
wben writins advertisers. 



T^^rWTT;-'v'''f» "<'Tw»i , •7,w-.f'niR TnjJT";' 



March 2, 1911. 



The Weekly Florists' Review. 



75 



New Marguerite Mrs. F. Sander 




New Marguerite, Mrs. F. Sander. 



The most valuable flowering pot plant 
which has been offered to the trade 
since the introduction of the Lorraine 
Beg^onia. 

In this we have unquestionably the most im- 
portant flowering plant introduced in recent 
years, which, like its predecessors, the French 
Marguerite and the later introductions, white 
and blush Queen Alexandra, will be grown exten- 
sively for cut flowers during the winter, while 
its pure white color will make it more valuable 
than any as a pot plant for Easter decorations. 

Unlike all other Marguerites, its color is of 
the purest glistening white throughout; in size it 
frequently measures 5 inches across; the center 
of the flower is a mass of closely arranged 
fringed florets; these are surrounded or edged by 
the broad, shining white ray petals, forming a 
flower which reminds one forcibly of a glorified 
double Pyrethrum. These are produced on long 
stems with a freedom not known in other varie- 
ties of the Marguerite. 

The entire stock of this grand novelty has 
been placed in our hands for American distribu- 
tion and we are now booking orders for delivery 
the latter part of April or early in May: 

Good 214-in. pots, $2.00 per doz.; $15.00 per 100. 

The above prices are intended for the trade only. 

See our current Wliolesale List for a complete 
line of seasonable Plants, Seeds, Bulbs, etc. 



HENRY A. DREER, 



714 

Chestnut Street, 

Mention The Review when vou write 



Philadelphia, Pa. 



We are Headquarters for 

Ferns and Araucarias 

NEPHR0LEPI8 BO8TONIENSI8. 

8COTTII, SCHOLZELI. WHITMANI and 
WHITMAN I COM PACTA, in 6^-ln. pots, 
40c and 60c each; 4-in., $2.00 per doz. 

DI8H FERN8, 2Vi-in., $4.00 per 100. 
Fine assortment. 

ARAUCARIA EXCEL8A, 6^-lnch, 4 to 
6 tiers, 60c, 60c, 76c each. Good value. 

A8PARAQU8 PLUM08U8, 4-in.. $10.00 
per 100. 

FICUS ELA8TICA, 6^-in., 35c and 40o 

KENTIA BELMOREANA, 4-ln.. 80« 
each. 
Cash with order please. 
Mention if you want the pots. 

ASCHNANN BROS. 

Mention The Kevlew when you write. 



Verbenas— Verbenas 



The gem bedding plant. 
Send for circular. 



J. L. DILLON 

Bloomsburg, Pa. 



Mention The Kevlew when you wnte 



Baytrees.'.Boxwood/.Rhododendrons 

A 

Orders booked now for immediate or spring: 

delivery. 

Special low pricesjquoted by mail. 
F. W. O. SCHMITZ9 Importer and Exparter, Prince Bay, N.Y. 

Mention The Review when you write. 







SPECIAL 

Cibotium Schiedei 

Specimen plants in 11-inch pots. 
Single crowns, $7.5(^ 
Double, $10.00 each. 

Also Scottii and Boston Ferns, and 
Pandanus Vdtchii. 

JOHN SCOTT 

Rutland Road and E. 4Sth St., BROOKLYN, N. Y. 


-50,000- 

Shamrocks 

True Irish Shamrocks for your St. Patrick's 

Day trade in 

1-lnch pots per 100, $4.00 


1%-inch pots per 100. 4.00 

4-lnch pans per dozen, l-.W 

Cash with order. 

Get in line now for some extra monej- on 
March 17th 

LEONARD COUSINS, Jr. 

Phone 82 Concord, Concord Junction, Mass. 


Meuuuu The Keview wheu v lu wnte. 


Mention The Kevlew wnen you write. 


CHRYSANTHEMUMS 

AND 

ASTER SEED 

ELMER D. SMITH & CO. 

ADRIAN, MICH. 

Mention The Review when jrou write. 


SHAMROCKS 

2-lnch. $5.00 per 100. 
FKRNS for disbeB asaorted varieties, 2'4-ln. 
pou. #3.00 per 100; $30.00 per 1000. 

Cash with order. 500 at 1000 rate. 

FRANK OECHSLIN 

491 1 W. QMiocy Street. CHICAGO. ILL 

Mention The Review when you write. 



76 



The Weekly Florists' Review. 



Mabch 2, 1911. 



CRAIG SPECIALTIES 



Cyclamen— Exceptionally well-flowered 
6-in., 7-in. and 8-in. pots $1.00. $1.25, $1.50, $2.00 and $2.50 each 

Begonia Glory of Cincinnati— Beautiful plants 
6-in. pots 115.00 and $18.00 per dozen 

Dracaena Matsangeana — Perfect plants 
Each $1.26, $1.50, $2.00. 13.00. $5.00, $i.00 and 17.50 

NEPHROLEPIS FERNS-Extra quality plants 

Nephrolepis Scottii 

2Vin. pots $5.00 per 100 

6 -in. pots $6.00 and 19.00 per dozen 

8-in. pans $12.00 per dozen 

10-in. and 11-in. tubs $18.00, $24.00 and $30.00 per dozen 



Nephrolepis Elegantissima Compacta 

2H-in. pots $8.00 per 100; $75.00 per 1000 

4 -in. pots $20.00 per 100 

6 -in. pots $50.00 per 100 

Nephrolepis Todeaoides 

Zk-in. pots $5.00 per 100 

4 -in. pots $20.00 per 100 

6 -in. pots $50.00perl00 

11 -in. tubs $2.00 each 

Specimen Nephrolepis Bostoniensis 

11-in . tsbs $3.00. $3.50 and $4.00 each 



Every store should use some of this stock for March sales. It will please you 

ROBERT CRAIG COMPANY, „.rk1.?»re... Philadelphia 



Mention The Review when you write. 



BALTIMORE. 



The Market. 



We are unable to report any decided 
improvement in the market. On one 
or two days better clearances have 
been effected, but at a sacrifice in 
values. More flowers are arriving than 
the buying public wants and, with the 
near approach of Lent and a cessation 
of social activity, the chances for a 
stronger market for some weeks are 
far from bright. 

Carnations have so far this season 
constituted the body of the market, 
and nearly every grower expects an 
exceptionally fine crop from now on. 
Violets are to be had at almost any price 
and seem to be moving fairly' well. A 
great influx of tulips and jonquils came 
just at a time when the people were 
ready for a change, and were all the 
more welcome when the bulbous stock 
began to go cheap, as this made a 
clean-up possible. Cyclamens, primroses 
and pans of tulips and hyacinths are 
here in quantity and sell well. 

There is an exceptionally good de- 
mand for azaleas, which are of espe- 
<?ially good quality; light colors are in 
more demand than the darker ones. 
Roses are coming in greater numbers, 
but it will be some time before there 
is a glut of any size. Sweet peas are 
among the best sellers at present, and 
the demand for them is increasing 
every year; the best^ bring about 75 
cents per huadrei * ., A 

The temperatuJI has been about 38 
to 40 degrees at night. 

Varions Notes. 

Edward Kress, of 2506 East North 
avenue, gave the members of the Gar- 
deners' and Florists' Club an oyster 
roast at his establishment March 1, which 
was the fiftieth anniversary of the busi- 
ness, which was started by his father 
at the^resent location, adjoining one of 
the lai^ eemeteries. 

Chas. L. Seybold, one of the crack 
bowlers of the Florists' Club, was con- 
fined to his home with a sprained ankle 
for over ten days; it occurred just as 
the bowling team was finishing a match 
with another local team. Q. 



Pot Plants for Immediate Use 



$30 00 
30.00 
30.00 
30.00 



3-in. 4ia. 6-ln. 6-ln. 

Cyclamen $7.60 115.00 $26.00 

Frtmroaea 7JH) 

Obconlca 7.50 12.50 20.00 

Forbefll 7.60 

Clnnrarlas 26.00 

Tulips 20.00 

Hyacinths lO.OO 2000 

Narcissus 20.00 

Jonquils 20.00 

BeKODlas, fl varieties, at S'^c and 6c. 
Begronlas, Rex, at Sc and 8c. 
Begonias, Spiral Rex, at Sc and 10c, 
Azaleas, $1.00, 11.26 and $1.50 each. 

Order Easter Stock Now 

HydrsDReas, 6-lnch pots, 6 to 8 heads, $1.00 to $1.25 
each, 8-lncb pote. 8 to 12 beads, $1.60 to 12 00 each, 
9-iDCh pots, 10 to 20 beads, at $2.00 to $2.60 each. 

Spiraeas, 3 varieties, 35c, 60c and 76c each. Pink 
Spiraeas, at 50c, 76c and $1.00 each. 

Lilies, can ship these now at 36c, 60c and 76c a plant, 
or send to your order later at 12'2C per bnd. 

Azaleas, $1.00, $1.26 and $1 .60 each. 

Baby Rambler Roses, We have 600 In 6 and 7-lnch 
pots, that are golnir to be fine, larjfe. bushy plants, 
for immediate delivery, 50o and 75c each. After 
Marah 16th. 76c. %IJ)0 and $1.50 each. 

Soupert and Hermosa Roses, 3Vj-lnch, 16c; 4-lnch, 
at 25c: 5-lnch, at 36c. While they last. 

Bulb Stock, all kinds. 

Don't forget our Ferns. A special in Whltmanl and 
Boston, all sizes. 

Write for our list of Soft Wooded Stock. 

GEO. A. KUHL 

Wholesale Grower PEKIN, ILL. 

Mention The Review when you write. 

Funlda Variegata 

Plant in pots now for spring sales. $10,00 per 100. 

I Primula obconica, 4-ln., full of buds. $6.00 per 
^g^OO. Will be fine for Easter. 

Marguerites, S^-in., fine, stocky plants, full of 
buds. $6.00 per 100. 

Marguerites, 2'ii-ln,. $2JW per 100. 

Oeraniums, 3V2-ln.. Beaote Poitevlne. Ricard. 
etc.. $7.00 per 100. 

Geraniums, 2^-ln.. any standard variety, $20,M 
per 1000, 

Rubber Plants, 6-ln. pots, fine. 60c each. 

AsparasruB Sprenareri. 2^1-10.. $2,60 per 100. 
Snapdragon, IHi-ln., white, pink and yellow, 
$6.00p«rIM). 

Thousands upon thousands of all kinds of Bed- 
dlnK, Decorative and Vesetable Plant* on 
hand. Place year orders early, Oorrespondence 
solicited. 

ALONZO J. BRYAN, Washington, N. J. 

Always mentiou the Florists' Review wheo 
writing advertisers. 



Stock For Now 

Per 100 

Shamrocks, 2-iii $ 3.00 

Shamrocks, miniature (with 

pot«) 4.00 

Calla Devoniensis, 3-iii 4.00 

Daisies (Nicholson's white 
and yellow, best for forc- 
ing) 4.00 

Dracaena Indivisa, 5-in 20.00 

Asparagus Sprengeri, strong 

S-in 4.00 

2»00 Victory 

Strong, 2 >^ -inch poU, at $20.00 
per 1000. Other Carnation cuttings 
at bargain prices. 

At the home of the 
Richmond Rose . . . 

FRED H. LEMON & CO. 

RICHMOND, IND. 



Mention The Review when yoa write. 

English Ivy 

2-ioch, choice stock. 

$4.00 per 100; $30.00 per 1000. 

Order at once« stock limited. 

JKCOB SCHUL-Z 

550 S. Foflrtk Avenne, LOUiSVIIlE, KY 

Mention The Review when you write. 

ANTON SCHULTHEIS, College Poiflt, L I. 

. . Headquarters for 

DECORATIVE and fiOWERING PLANTS 

Always mentioa the Florists' Review when 
writing advertisets. 



Mabch 2, 1011. 



The Weekly Florists^ Review. 



77 



DREER'S ADIANTUM FARLEYENSE 

For Fine Decorations Perdoz. Per 100 

Splendid 4-inch pots |5.00 $40.00 

Splendid 5-inch pots 9.00 70.00 

NEPHROLEPIS IN VARIETY Each 

Scholzeli, 6-inch pots $0.60 

Scholzeli, 10-inch pans 2.00 

Scottii, 6-inch pots 60 

Scottii, 10-inch pans 2.00 

Whitmani, 6-inch pots 60 

Whitmani, 10-inch pans 2.00 

ASPLENIUM NIDUS AVIS (The Bird's Nest Fern) 

Perdoz. Per 100 

Splendid 3-inch pots $3.50 $25.00 

Splendid 4-inch pots 5.00 40.00 

CIBOTIUM SCHIEDEI Each 

Elegant plants in 6-inch pots. $1.50 

ADIANTUM HYBBIDUM 

Good 3-inch pots, splendid stock for growing on in pots or for plant- 
ing out for cuttings, $1.25 per doz. ; $8.00 per 100; $70.00 per 1000. 

MIXED FERNS FOR FERN DISHES 

Per 100 Per 1000 

2X-inch pots $3.50 $30.00 

3-inch pots 6.0(» 50.00 

Tlie above Prices are Intended for tbe Trade only. 

HENRY A. DREER, 714 Chestnut St, PBEADELPHU 

Mentfon The Review when vou write. 




STOCK YOl NEED. 

Crclamen Persicum Oisan- 

teumseedUDgrs. (Aug. sowing), doz. 100 1000 

Light red. dark red. pure white, 

white wltheye $ l.SO $12.50 

Light and dark salmon 2.00 16.00 

4-ln. Obconlca Primroses, bud and 

bloom $1.80 10.00 

3-ln. Obconlca Primroses, bud and 

bloom 1.00 7.00 

2-ln. Asparagus Plumosus Nanus. . .60 3.00 26.00 

S-in. Asparagus Plumosus Nanus. . 1.00 7.00 

2-ln. Asparagus Sprengerl 50 2.60 22.60 

3-ln. Asparagus Sprengeri 1.00 6.00 

Asparagus Sprengerl seeddngs.. 1.00 6.00 

2'i2-ln. Boston Ferns 60 4.60 40.00 

S-ln. Boston Ferns 1.00 8.00 75.00 

6-ln. Boston Ferns 3.00 

2i2-ln. Whltmani Ferns 60 6.00 45.00 

S-ln. Whitmanl Ferns 1.00 8.00 75.00 

4-ln. Whltmanl Ferns 2.00 1600 

2-ln . Assorted Ferns for dishes 50 3.00 

2'9-ln. Kentla Palms, BelmoreanB 

andForsterlana., 1.25 10.00 80.00 

2>9-ln. Drac»na Indivlsa 40 3.00 

S-ln. Dracnna Indivtsa 75 6.00 

2>9-ln . Ageratum. blue 40 2M 

Rooted cuttings Ageratum, blue ■ • .76 

2-ln. Rose Geraniums 40 3.00 

2-in. Oeraniums, Nutt. Jean Viaud .40 3.00 25.00 
2Hi-ln. Heliotrope, white and pur- 
ple 40 3.00 

Rooted cuttings. Heliotrope, white 

and purple 1,00 

2>a-ln. Salvia Splendens 40 3.00 25.00 

Rooted cuttings Salvia Splendens. 1.00 9.00 

Rooted cuttings. Coleus 6.00 

3-ln. Moonvlnee 1.00 6.00 

Rooted cuttings, Moonvines 1.50 12.60 

2-ln. Double Petunias 3.00 27.60 

IHi-in. Vinca Yariegata 2.50 22.60 

2>a-ln, Vlnca Variegata 40 3.09 27.60 

All this stock Is seasoDable and if you can use any 

at all It would be well to get same early, as you know 
how hard it is to get good stock as season advances. 

Cash from unknown parties. To buyers with 
approved credit. 60 days' time if wanted. 

D. U, AUGSPURGER & SONS CO. 

Mention The Review when^on write 

Cyclamen ! 

Fine, strong plants, in bud and bloom, 
7-in., $1.00; 6-in., 50c; 5-in.,25c; 4-in., 
12Mc. 

Casb or C. O. D. 

% J. & M. S. VESEY 

FORT WAYNE, IND. 

Mention The Review when you write. 



^ BOSTON, WHITMANI 
^S^ TODEAOIDES, SCOHII 

2'4-inch, $3.50 per 100: 3-inch, $8.00 per 100; 4-lnch, $12.50 per 100: 6-inch, $20.00 per 100. 

These Ferns are thoroughly established ia the above sizes and are ready for a shift into larger 
pots. We pack them to reach you in flrst-class shape, We have 60.000 Ferns ready now. 

Asparaanis Plumosus, 214-inch, $2.50 per 100; 3-inch, $5.00 per 100; 4-inch. $?.00 per 100. 

AsjMtraKUS Sprengrerl, 2-inch. $1.75 per 100; 3.1nch, $4.00 per 100; 4-inch, $7.00 per 100. 

Vlnca Variearata, out of 2J4-inch pots. These are divisions from field-grown plants, taken last 
fall, and will make strong 3-inch, if potted up now. We have 20,000 of these. They will not last long 
at $2.00 per 100 ; $18.00 per 1000. 

Salvia Splendens, 2-inch, $1 50 per 100; $15.00 per 1000. 

Coleus, G. Bedder, Verschaffeltii and 6 others, 2-inch, $1.60 per 100; $15.00 per 1000. 

Coleus, Brilliancy (Xmas Gem. Dr. Ross). Without a doubt the very finest broad leaved Coleus. 
We offer strong 212-inch at $3.00 per 100. 

Impatiens Sultani, 214-inch, $2.50 per 100. 

We have 65,000 Clematis Paniculate, in 2-inch pots. These are for lining out or. if potted 
into 3-inch, will make nice plants for this spring's sales. $2.50 per 100. 

Shasta Daisy Alaska and Plilox Miss Uneard, both indispensable to every florist. 
2-inch, $2.50 per 100. 

Our list for the asking. You should have it. 

We pack our plants t'^ reach you in first-class shape. 



-CASH, PLEASE. 



The Reeser Plant Co., 



Exclushrdy Wholesale Plantsmeo 

SPRINGFIELD, OHIO 





Mention The Review when you write. 




FINE BLOOMING PLANTS 

Azaleas, Primula Obconlca, Rhododendrons, Lilacs and Cydamen. 

A clioice lot of bulbous stock in flats. Prices reaaonable, 

BERTERMANN BROS. CO., 



Indianapolis, Ind. 



Mention The Review when you write. 



P 



CHAS. D. BALL 

GROWXR OV 

ALMS, ETC. 

Send for Price List 

H0LMESBUR6, PHILADELPHIA, PA. 



G. DREYER 



Tel. 228 Newtown 
Jackson Ave 



ELMHURST, L L 

DECORATIVE PLANTS 

BPKCIALTIKS: Palms, Ferns, Arauoa* 
rlas, Cycas, Pandanus, Lilies. 

DRXTXRU IVRN, $25 per 100; 1200 per 1000. 



(' »'7 '" -~- '•'.' .-^r ' 



78 



The Weekly Florists' Review* 






Mabch 2, 1911. 



FINE FERNS 



Ready For Immediate 
Retail Sale 

We have an exceptionally fine and large stock of Ferns in the following varieties— first-class plants of exceedingly 
good value — plants that will please the most critical buyers, both in regard to quality and value. 



Nepbrolepls Elesaiitlssiina ( Improved). The finest of 
this type— nevtr showing a Bo^ton frond ; has not reverted in the 
last four years. Fine plants, 4-in. pots, t2..')0 per doz.; 6-in., |6.00 
perdoz.; 8-in.. $12 00 per doz.; large specimens in 12-in. pans, ¥3.00 
to $5 00 each. 

Neplirolepls Elecantlsslma Compacta. This bearrthe 
same relation to ElegaiitissluiH that Scottii does to Bostonlensis. It 
is a dwarf, compact plant, especially fine in the small sizes. Fine 
plants, 4-in. pots, 13.00 per doz. ; 6-in., $6.00 per doz. 



Nepbrolepls Scholzell. Fine plants, S^s-in. pots, |2.60 per 
doz. : 6-in pans, $6 00 per doz. ; 8-in. pans, $12.00 per doz. 

Nepbrolepls Bostonlensis. Extra strong plants, 8-in. pans. 
$12 00 per doz. 

Nephrolepls SoottU; 8-in. pans, $12 00 per doz. 

Small Ferns for Ferij Pans. Best and hardiest varieties, 
assorted: Pterls Mayii Wimsectl, Adlantoides, Aspidium Tsussi- 
mense. Cyrtomium Falcatum, etc. Strong plants, 2k-in. pots, 18.50 
per 100. 



CROTONS. Nice assortment, well colored, B-in., $9.00 per dosen. 



F. R. PIERSON CO., 



Tarrytown-on-Budson, New York 



Mention The Review when you write. 



DETROIT. 

The Market. 

Business last week was satisfactory 
to all concerned. Boses were not any 
too plentiful, while carnations were in 
heavy supply. Toward the end of the 
week the demand was not equal to the 
occasion. Bulbous stock is moving 
nicely, as are also peas, violets and 
valley. Considerable southern smilax 
was used for decorating last week. 

Various Notes. 

Herman Knope, foreman for Breit- 
meyer's, is suffering from a nervous 
breakdown, having been ill practically 
all winter. 

B. Schroeter has commenced getting 
his temporary quarters at 90 Broadway 
into shape, so that he can move on a 
few days' notice. 

Philip Breitmeyer and wife returned 
home February 26. Mrs. Breitmeyer 
had been in the east, while the ex- 
mayor spent a few weeks in Cuba and 
the south. He will address the mem- 
bers of the Detroit Florists' Club Mon- 
day evening, March 6, giving a talk on 
the trip. H. S. 

BAK HABBOB, ME. 

John H. Stalford, who last fall pur- 
chased the property known as the Mal- 
vern Greenhouses, with an adjoining 
tract of land, has completed the work 
of renovating and rebuilding, and his 
place is now a model of completeness 
and convenience. The grounds them- 
selves are particularly attractive, being 
almost entirely surrounded by tall 
trees. 

The old greenhouses and other build- 
ings were removed and a new range, 
containing 11,000 square feet of glass, 
was built. Two houses will be used for 
melons in summer and for carnations 
the rest of the season. Besides these 
there is a grapery, a house for palms 
and ferns, two plant houses and a 
storage house. All the work of con- 
struction, including the installation of 
the heating system, was in charge of 
the Lord & Burnham Co. The heating 
outfit includes one Burnham boiler, two 
Hitchings boilers and a Castle circu- 
lator. Adjoining the greenhouses is a 
roomy and handily arranged service 
building, containing an office with a 
fireproof vault, a potting room with 
seed cases, a tool shed, a packing room, 
a bulb room, a sleeping apartment pro- 
vided with modern conveniences, and a 
baseinent for storage. 



FERNS IN FINE CONDITIO 

Boston, Piersoni, Whitman!, Scottii and Scholseli, 5-inch, 25c; 6-inch, 
50c; 7-inch» 75c; 8-inch, $1.00. 

Table Ferns, 2K-inch, $3.00 per 100; 3-inch, $6.00 per 100. 

Rubbers, 4-inch, 25c; 6-inch, 35c; 6-inch, 50c and 75c each. 

Ficus Pandurata, fine plants, $2.00 each. 

Araucaria Excelsa, 5-inch, 50c ; 6-inch, 75c. 

Araucaria Compacta, 5-inch, $1.25; 6-inch, $1.75. 

Cinerarias, in full bloom, 4-inch, 10c; 5-inch, 20c; 6-inch, 30c. 

Pot Hyacinths, in bloom, 10c each. 

Kentias, Belmoreana and Forsteriana, 4-inch, 25c and 35c; 5-inch, 50c 
and 75c; 6-inch, $1.00, $1.25 and $1.50; large plants, $2.00 to $35.00 each. 

Kentias, Belmoreana and Forsteriana, made-up, 75c, $1.50, $2.00, $2.50, 
$3.00, $5.00, $7.00, $8.00, $«.00, $10.00, $12.00, $15.00 and $18.00 each. 

Funkia Var., 4-in., 25c; 5-in., 40c. 

Vinca Rosea, Rosea Alba and Alba Pura, 2-in., branched, $2.50 per 100; 
fine plants, ready to shift. 

We bloom about 8000 Azaleas for Easter and do them right. 
All our plants are in fine condition. 

JOHN BADER CO., 43 Ravine Street, N. S., PIHSBURG, PA. 

Mention The Review when you write 

Seasonable Stock 



Heliotrope, purple. In B Kood varietieB, 13.00 
pe> 100; 125.00 per 1000. 

Box-wood, bush shape, for window bozea or 
pot sale, very brlKht foliage and bushy, 10 to 12 in. 
blffh, taO.OO per 100; 12 to IS In. hlKh, $25.00 per 100. 
Full line of sizes in both pyramidal and natural 
bush forms. Prices on application. 

Kentia Belmoreana, iH-in. pots, $8 00 per 
160; 3-ln. poto, $15.00 per 100: 4-in. pots. 12 to IB 
in. hl«h. tSS.OO per 100; 6-in. pots. IB to 18 in. high, 
$60.00 per lOf . 

Nephrolepls SoholEell. 3V>-ln.. $B.0O per 100; 
B-ln., strong. $6.00 per doc.; $40.00 per 100. 



Rhododendrons, fancy forcing varietlM, 6 to 8 
buds, at 60c ; 8 to 12 buds, at 76c ; 12 to 16 bads, at $1.M. 

Dracaena Indlvisa, 2>a-ln. pot stock for grow- 
ing on. at ^.00 per 100. 

Dahlias, fine collection of field-grown clompa. 
Special circular on application. 

Asparaens Sprenreri, strong, 6-ln. pot plants, 
16c. 

Spiraeas, large forcing clumps. Gladstone, 
$9.00 per 100; Floribunda, $4.60 per 100; 8ii- 
perba, $6iX) per 100; Blondin, $6.00 per 100; 
WaMhinston, $6.00 per 100; Japonica, at $4.00 
per 100. 



THE STORRS & HARRISON CO. 



Painesville, Ohio 

Mention The Review when you write. 


ORCHIDS 

We claim tc be the largest Collectors 
and Importers of Orchids in this country. 
We are booking orders for spring deliv- 
ery. Investig^ate us. 

CAKRULO & BALDWIN, NANARONECK, N. Y. 

Mention The Review when you write. 


DAHLIAS 

We are grrowers of the very best; havealargre 
collection to select from . Send for prices . 

DAVID HERBERT & SON 

ATCO. N. J. 

MpTitlon Tho R«»iH»»w whpn von write 


ORCHIDS 

Established and imported in great variety ; 
also material in which to grow them. 

LAGER & HURRELU Summit. N. L 
Orchid Growers and Importers. 


Julius Roehrs Co. 

RUTHERFORD, N. J. 

Palms, Plants, Orchids, Etc. 

Send lor Price List. 


Always mention the Florists* Review 
when writdne advertisers. 


Always mention the Florists' Review 
when writitr % advertisers. 



Mabch 2, 1911. 



The Weekly Florists^ Review. 



79 



81^ The old reliable firm, GODFREY ASCHNANN, is not connected with any other firm and is more active than ever 

PREPARE FOR EASTER 

FROM WHOM WILL WE PURCHASE OUR EASTER SUPPLY? 

From our old friend, Godfrey Aschinann, of Philadelphia, of course. He was our man of the past and he shall bt' our 
man this Easter, and, as long as he ships us good plants, he shall be our man in the futun^ He always treated us right before, 
and we can rely upon him. What he advertises is true and is no bluff. 




What Florists Say About Our Lilies 

Daily visitors to our establishment, among 
them two well known growers, one from Cincin- 
nati, Ohio, the other from South Orange, N. J., 
■say: "You !iave the best lilies we ever have 
seen on our visits to many florists' establlsh- 
wents. We congratulate you. You certainly 
■can be proud." 

An immense stock of choice Easter plants, 
tilooming Easter week, or earlier, if desired, are 
■now ready for immediate shipment. Come your- 
■self or. mail your order direct to headquarters. 

Our reputation in growing Easter plants for 
the wholesale market, to which we ship all over 
the entire country, Canada and Mexico, from 
the Atlantic to the Pacific oceans, for many 
jears past, is sufficient guarantee to prove our 
ability. 

Go to Hfadquartf rs for Azaleas 

Azalea Indica is a specialty with us, grown 
tor us under contract by an Azalea specialist In 
Belgium for the last twenty years. Have four 
tiouses full of the choicest. Only best well- 
known American varieties are imported, and are 
«ow in excellent condition, covered with buds, 
just right for Easter. We ship only good stock, 
full of buds and flowers. 

What is the name of the best double pink 
azalea? Hme. Van der Cruyssen Is the name, 
originated by the well-known azalea specialist 
Mr. Van der Cruyssen of Belgium. Millions are 
raised every year and shipped to every point of 



the globe from Belgium. We have a big stock 
on hand of this so well-known and favorite vari- 
ety In tip top condition. Every plant is as round 
as an apple, covered with buds, Just right for 
Easter trade. 6 to 7-in. pots, 60c, 75c, $1.00, 
$1.25, $1.50 to $2.00 each. 

Deutsche Perle. This is the best pure double 
white. 6-in. pots, 75c, $1.00 to $1.50. Outside 
the Deutsche Perle we have no white to offer in 
small sizes, because the other varieties, Nlobe 
and Bernard Andrea alba, of which we had a 
large stock, during transportation across the 
sea and during winter lost all their buds and 
have to be carried over for another year. This 
first variety the year Imported does not do well, 
hut makes fine plants the next year. 

Bernard Andrea alba (white). We have 
mostly big plants, $1.50, $2.00 to $3.00 each; 
a few smaller sizes, 75c, $1.00 to $1.25; Niobe, 
also white, 50c, 75c, $1.00, $1.25, $1.50 to $2.00 
each. Vervaeneana, De Schryreriana (double 
variegated), 75c, $1.00, $1.25, $1.50 to $2.00. 

Frofesseur Welters, $1.00, $1.25 to $1.50. 
Pres, Oswald de Kerchore, $1.00, $1.25 to $2.00. 
Empress of India, 50c, 75c, $1.00, $1.25 to $1.50. 
Apollo (red), 50c, COc, 75c to $1.00. Other good 
varieties, such as Helene Thelemann, etc., 75c, 
$1.00, $1.25. $1.50 to $2.00. When we are out 
of one color, we send the next similar color; 
also, if we are out of the size ordered, we send 
the nest size either above or below the price 
mentioned. 

Hydrangea Otaksa never was as good as this 
year, green as grass, full of buds, every branch 
stocked up. oV", 6 to 7-in. pots, 23c, 35c, 50c, 
75c, $1.00, $1.25 to $1.50. 

Easter Lilies, Lilium multlflorum, the genuine 
.Tapanese Easter Lily, directly imported by us. 
We have a friend in Japan who looks after our 
interests there. He picks out for us only the 
good, healthy ones, and marks them while they 
are growing, the 10-in. bult>s, and therefore he 
ships to us the cream of the plants of Japan. 
We have lilies this year to bum; can supply. If 
nothing happens, every customer and others 
who want HIIps. If you see them growing in our 
greenhouses you must all admit they are "crack- 
erjacks." We sell them cheap, too. Where 
other florists get 15c per bud, we only charge 
you 10c per bud, for plants In 6-ln. pots, having 
5, 8, 10 and more buds to the plant. Plants 
under 5 buds, 12c per bud, 6-ln. pots. 

Tournesol Tulips, best double tulips, varie- 
gated, three bulbs in a pot, $1.80 per dozen pots; 
$14.00 per 100. 

Begonia, new. Improved Erfordii, 5-in. pots, 
$2..50 per dozen. Flambeau, 5-in., $2.00 per 
dozen; 6-ln., $3.00 per dozen. 

Primula obconica. 5-In., $2.00 to $2.50 per 
dozen. 

Yellow and White Daisies, 5-in. pots, $2.00 
dozen. 

Cineraria Hybrida Orandiflora. Henry F. 
Michell Co.'s new Improved strain. Our plants 
and flowers of this strain are twice the size of 
those of other years, with perfect green foliage, 
almost as big as a bushel basket, 6-in. pots, 25c, 
35c, 50c, 750 to $1.00 each. 



Spiraea Gladstone, This variety, owing to the 
dry summer in Holland last year, will be very 
scarce this Easter, but we, fortunately, secured 
enough to fill two houses full, and they are now 
In fine condition, full of buds, 6-in. to 7-ln. pots, 
50c. 7.5c to $1.00 each. 

Ipomoea Noctiflora, purest white moonflower, 
for which we have a world-wide reputation, now 
re.tdy, 2V4-in. pots, $5.00 per 100. 

Hyacinths, four best colors. King of the Blues 
(dark blue). Grand Maitre (light blue), Gertrude 
(best pink). La Grandesse (best white), right 
for Easter, In cold frame, 4-in. pots, 10c to 12c. 

Crimson Hambler, nicely staked up, 30, 36, 40, 
50 Inches high, 50c, 75c to $1.00. 

Daffodil Von Sion, double-nosed bulbs. This 
is the best double yellow narcissus in existence. 
5% to 6-ln. pots, 3 bulbs in one pot, $2.60 to 
$3.00 per dozen pots. 

Araucaria Robusta Compacta, Olauca and £x- 
celsa. Our reputation of being one of the largest 
importers and shippers of this beautiful ever- 
green decorative plant Is so well known, dating 
far back into the 19th century, that our name, 
as well as the Araucaria itself, shall never die 
out, and is still fresh In people's minds same 
as when we first started. Why the Araucaria Is 
so popular Is because it is an ancient plant, kept 
by Greeks and Romans as a special favorite in 
their household, as a good omen. 

Araucaria Rohusta Compacta, specimen plants, 
7 to 8 In. pots, 4 to 5 years old, 3, 4 and 5 
tiers, 20, 25 and 30 Inches high, same In width, 
$1.50, $1.75, $2.00, $2.50 to $3.00 each. 

Araucaria Excelsa Glauoa. This Is a beauti- 
ful blue variety, very graceful and beautiful. 
Specimen plants, 6-in., 7-in., 8-in. pots, 4 and 5 
years old, 4, 5 and 6 tiers, 20, 25, 30 and 32 In. 
high, same in width, $1.25, $1.50, $1.75 to $2.00 
each. 

Araucaria Excelsa, 3, 4 and 5 years old, 4, 5, 
6 and 7 tiers. 6-in. pots, 25, 30, 35 and 40 in. 
high, 75c, $1.00, $1.25, $1.50 to $2.00 each. Can 
meet all applications. 

Two houses of ferns, Scholzeli and Wbltmanl 
ferns, 6-ln., 7-ln. and 8-ln. pots, 75c, $1.00 to 
fl.M); 7-ln. pots, very large, 50c. 75c, $1.00, 
$1.25 to $1.50. 

Boston Ferns, 5%-in. to 6-in.. 7-ln. and 8 In. 
pots, 40c, 50c, 75c, $1.00, $1.25 to $1.50. 

Scottii Ferns, 51^-ln. to 6-In., 7-In. and 8-in. 
pots, 40c, 50c, 75c, $1.00, $1.25 to $1.60. 

Aspara^s Plumosus, 4-in. pots, 10c. 

Kentia Fonteriana, in fine shape, 5% to 6-in. 
pots, 4, 5 and 6 year-old, 30, 35, 40 and 45 Inches 
high, 75c, $1.00, $1.25, $1.50, $2.00 to $2.50. 

Kentia Belmoreana, 5, 6 to 7-year-old, 5V^, 6 
to 7-in. pots, $1.00, $1.25, $1.60 to $2.00 each; 
4-in., 20 to 25 inches high, 20c to 26c. 

Kentia Belmoreana, combination plants, 3 
plants In and 7-in. pots, 25, 30 to 35 inches 
high, $1.00, $1.25 to $1.50 each. -This is a 
special bargain, seldom offered. 



All gfoods must travel at purchaser's risk. Cash with order, please. Please state if 
you want stock shipped in or out of pots. All bulbs are now under cover in cold 
frame and w^ill bloom in two weeks from time of bring^ing^ them in the g^reenhouse. 



GODFREY ASCHMANN, 



1018 
West Ontario Street, 



Philadelphia, Pa. 



IMPORTSR, WHOUCSAUC GROWSR AND 8HIPPKR OF POT PLANTS 



PRIMROSES 

Chinese, 4-in., in bloom, fine Perioo 

plants ....; 15.00 

1 rimula Obconica, 3-in. , in 

bloom, fine plants • 4.00 

Asparagus Plumosus, 4-in 7.00 

Salvia Zurich, 2>4-in 2.00 

Colens, 2-in., 10 varieties 2.00 

Coleus, rooted cuttinsrp, 1000, f 5.(X) ; .60 
I>ORMANT CANNAS, Allemania 
and Austria, 2 to 3-eye roots, per 

1000, $10 00 1.2o 

Satisfaction Guaranteed 

Miller's, Tlorists :•: Newark, Ohio 



Tritoma Pfifzeri 



$4.50 per 100; $30.00 per 1000. 
GOOD DIVISION 

Cash with order, please. 
Address all orders to 

ROWEHL & GRANZ 

Hicksville, L. I., N. Y. 



PRIMROSES 

Obconica Giants, the largest flowering. Large. 
thrifty plants. 3-in., $3.00 per 100; 2-in., strong. $1.50 
per 1<>0. 

Keivensis, the grand new swe«t scented cut 
flower primrose, also makes a fine pot plant. 3-in., 
$3.00 per too. 

Cinerarias, large-flowering dwarf; this Is strong, 
thrifty stock, fine for Easter bloom. 3-in.. $3.U0 per 
100. 

Mme.Salleroi Geraninms, 2-ln.,t2.(IO per 100. 

Shamrocks, One plants. $3.0> per I0<>. 

PelareonUiiUM, 3-in., fine plants $5.00 per 100. 

These are well grown plants and will please you. 
Obconlcas will be one of the leading plants for 
Easter. April I6th. 



Cash, please. 



J. W. MILLER, Shiremanstown, Pa. 



The Weekly Florists^ Review* 



March 2, 1911. 



Classifie 



ABUTILONS. 



Abutllon SouTCDlr de Bonn, busby plants, 2\t,. 
In., 5c. Llewellyn, Florist, OLEAN, N. Y. 



AGERATUMS. 



Ageratums, blue, rooted cuttings, $5.00 1000: 
.•Jin.. $4.00 per 100, $35.00 per 1000. 

The Geo. Wlttbold Co., 
Edgebrook, Chicago, Illinois 

Ageratum Little Blue Star, rooted cuttings, 50c 
100, $4.00 1000; 2-ln., 2c. Cash. 
W. E. Trimble Greenhouse Co., P rinceton, 111. 

Ageratum Stella Gurney, very bushy, 3^-ln., 
$5.00; 2^-ln., $1.75 per 100; rooted cuttings, 50c. 
Cash. C. H. Jacobs, Westfield , Mass. 

Dark ageratum rooted cuttings, 50c 100. 

U. G. Harglerode, Shlppensburg, Pa. 



Ageratum Stella Gurney R. C, 50c 100; $4.00 
1000. Cash. J. P. Cannata, Mt. Freedom, N . J. 

Ageratums, White Cap, S. Gurney, 50c 100; 
prepaid, 60c. A. J. Baldwin, Newark, Ohio. 

Ageratums, blue. See display adv. 
D. U. Augspurger & Sons Co., Peoria, 111. 

Ageratums, 4 kinds, $5.00 per 1000; 2-ln., l\i,c. 
'-ash. Byer Bros., Chambersburg, Pa. 

Ageratums, well rooted, 60c; 2%-In., $2.00. 
Burden Floral Co.. Bowling Green, Ky. 



ALTERNANTHERAS. 



ALTERNANTHERAS. 

Rooted cuttings for spring delivery. 

?• -V.4i9^ *4.00 per 1000 

A. >ANA 4.00 ner 1000 

BRILLIANTISSIMA 5.00 per 1000 

R. R. Davis Co., Morrison, 111. 

Alternautheras, red and yellow. Rooted cut- 
tings, 60c per 100, $5.00 per 1000; 2%-in., $2.00 
per 100, $18.00 per 1000. 
Mosbaek Green house Co., Onarga, 111. 

Altemantheras, red and yellow. Strong rooted 
cuttings, the kind that will please you, 50c per 
100; ^.00 per 1000. J , ^ i«=i 

J. W. Davis, 225 W. 16th, Davenport, Iowa. 

Altemantheras, aurea, rosea nana and parony- 
chloldes major. Rooted cuttings, 60c per 100: 
2%-ln., $2.00 per 100. 
Addems, Morgan & Co., Loda, 111. 

Altemantheras, red and yellow. Rooted cut- 
tlngs, 60c per 100; 2%-In., $18.00 per 1000. 
H. C. Otto & Co., 1422 N. Glendale, Peoria, 111. 

Altemantheras, yellow. Rooted cnttlngs, 60c 
per 100; $5.00 per 1000. Cash. 
Jos. H. Cunningham, Delaw are, Ohio. 

Altemantheras, red and yellow, best ever. 
Rooted cuttings, 60c; 2-ln., $2.00. Cash. 
Geo. M. Brinkerhoff, Sprin gfield, 111. 

Altemantheras, red and yellow. Rooted cut- 
tings, 60c per 100; $4.50 per 1000. Cash with 
order. Aurora Greenhouse Co ., Aurora, 111. 

Altemantheras. strong R. C, 60c 100. 

Keeney's Greenhouses, Monongahela, Pa. 



.Altemantheras, red and yellow, 2^-ln., $2.00. 
Burden Floral Co., Bowling Green, Ky, 



Altemantheras, red and yellow, $4.60 per 1000. 
Cash. Byer Bros., Chambersburg, Pa. 



ALYSSUM. 



Double alyssum. 2-In. pots, 2c. Cash, please. 
South View Floral Co., R. D. No. 1, Fair Haven, 
Pa. 

Alyssum, double giant. Rooted cuttings, 50c 
per 100, $4.00 per 1000; 2-In., 2c. Cash. 
W. E. Trimble Greenhouse Co., Princeto n, HI. 

Alyssum, double and single, 2%-ln., $2.00 per 
100; 300 for $5.00. J. C. Schmidt, Bristol, Pa. 

Alyssum, double giant, well rooted, 60c. 
Burden Floral Co., Bowling -Green, Ky. 

Double giant alyssum, 70c per 100; $6.00 per 
1000, prepaid. C. Humfeld, Clay Center, Kan. 

Alyssum, giant, 60c 100; prepaid, 70c. 
A. J. Baldwin. Newark, Ohio. 

Double alyssum and verbenas, 60c 100; $5.00 
1000. Cash. H. Stabenow, Jr., Reading, Pa. 

AMPELOPSIS. 

Ampelopsls Veltchll. Fine 2-year plants, trans- 
planted when 1 year old. No. 1 selected, 2% to 
4 ft., strong tope, $6.00 per 100. No. 2, fine 
plants, 2 to 3 ft. tops, $4.00 per 100; $30.00 per 
1000. Fine 1-year, 2 to 3 ft. tops, $3.00 per 100; 
$25.00 per 1000; 60 by mall for $2.00. 

Chas. Black, HIghtstown, N. J. 




Department 



Rate for advertising in this department 
10 cents a line net, per insertion. 



AQUATICS. 



Water hyacinths, water cabbage and parrot's 
feather, $2.00 per 100; $10.00 per 1000. Cabomba 
and other fish grasses, 25c per lb. ; $15.00 per 
100 lbs. Prepared black moss, for fish to spawn 
on, 25c per lb. Water lilies, aU colors, 25c ea. 
B. M. WIchers & Co., Gretna, La. 



ARAUCARIAS. 



Araucaria ezcelsa, 3 tiers, 50c each; $6.00 per 
doz. 

The Geo. Wlttbold Co., 
Edgebrook. Chicago, Illinois. 



ASPARAGUS. 



Asparagus plumosus, 2^-In., $2.50 per 100; 
3-In., $5.00 per 100; 4-in., $8.00 per 100. As- 
paragus Sprengerl, 2%-In., $1.75 per 100; 3-ln., 
$4.00 per 100; 4-ln., $7.00 per 100. Cash, please. 
See our display adv. Reeser Plant Co., Sprlng- 
fleld, Ohio. 

Asparagus plumosus, from bench, strong, 
healthy plants, for 4-in. pots, $5.00 per 100. 
Sprengerl, from bench, for 3%-ln. pots, $3.00 per 
100. Cash. 

W. B. Bowen, Florist, Whitman, Mass. 

Asparagus Sprengerl, 214-in., extra strong, 
$2.00 per 100; 3-in., $5.00 per 100; strong seed- 
lings, $1.00 per 100, $6.00 per 1000; maUIng 10c. 
Cash. 

W. E. Trimble Greenhouse Co., Princeton, 111. 

Asparagus Sprengerl seedlings, $1.00 per 100; 
$7.00 per 1000. Asparagus plumosus, $1.25 per 
100; $10.00 per 1000. AprU 1. Cash. 

Jos. H. Cunningham, Delaware, Ohio. 

Asparagus plumosus, 3-in., ready for a shift, 
$6.00 per 100; one-year-old clumps, from bench, 
$5.00 per 100. 

Charles L. Smith, Pennsgrove, N. J. 

Asparagus plumosus, 2-in., $2.50 per 100; 3-in., 
$5.00 per 100; 4-ln., $10.00 per 100. Asparagus 
Sprengerl, 3-in., $4.00 per lOO. 
J. W. Ross Co., Centralia, in. 

Asparagus plumosus, 2^-ln., $3.00 per 100, 
$27.60 per 1000; 3-In., $6.00 per 100. Asparagus 
Sprengerl, 2%-In., 2c; 3-ln., 4c; 4-ln., 8c. 

MosbKk Greenhouse Co., Onarga, III. 

ASPARAGUS PLUMOSUS NANUS. 
Extra iirge heavy strings, 

W. H. ELLIOTT, BRIGHTON, MASS. 

Asparagus Sprengerl, 4-in., $1.50 per doz., 
$10.00 per 100, $80.00 per 1000; 500 at 1000 rate. 

The Geo. Wlttbold Co., 
Edgebrook, Chicago, 111. 

Asparagus plumosus, extra heavy, out of 3^- 
in. pots, $4.50 per 100. A. Sprengerl, 3%-in., 
$4.00 per 100. 

Wagner Park Conservatories, Sidney, Ohio. 

Asparagus Sprengeri, strong, healthy, 4-ln., 
$6.00 per 100. Order quick. 

N. C. Moore Co., Morton Grove, m. 

400 strong 2-in. Asparagus plumosus plants, 
$2.50 per 100. Cash. 

West Side Greenhouses, Barberton, Ohio. 

Asparagus Sprengerl, strong 2-ln., ready for 
shift, $2.00 per 100. Cash with order, please. 
J. A. Swartley & Sons, Sterling, 111. 



Asparagus plumosus nanus and Sprengerl. See 
display adv. 

D. U. Augspurger & Sons Co., Peoria, 111. 

Asparagus Sprengeri, strong 3-in. plants, 6c; 
4-ln., 8c. 

South Bend Floral Co., South Bend, Ind. 



Asparagus Sprengerl, strong 3%-ln. plants 
please. 



Anpaia|;u8 oprengeri, strong a^-iu. iimuio 
ready to shift, $4.60 per 100. Cash with order, 
"'"— » Albert Lies, Niles Center, III. 



Asparagus plumosus, fine 3-in., $5.00 per 100; 
2%-in. Sprengerl, $2.00 per 100. 
Weber Bros ., Ironton, Ohio. 

Asparagus Sprengerl, strong 4-In., $5.00 per 
100; 2Vj-In., $1.60 per 100. 
J. O. Schmidt, Bristol, Pa. 

Asparagus Sprengeri, strong 3-in., $5.00 per 
100. A. plumosus, 3-in., $3.00 to $5.00 per 100. 
S. Dumser, 436 McClure Ave., Elgin, in. 

Asparagus, 2%-ln., $3.00 per 100; 4-ln., $8.00 
per 100. Cash. 

J. B. Mllley, 346 Masten St., Buffalo, N. Y. 

Asparagus Sprengeri, strong 3-in., ready for 
shift, $3.00 per 100. Cash. 
J. S. Ashbrldge, E. Downingtown, Pa. 

Asparagus Sprengeri. Strong plants, ready for 
shift, 2Vi-ln., $2.50 100. Cash.. 
Freeport Floral Co., Freeport, 111. 

Asparagus Sprengerl, strong 3-in., $4.00 per 
100. Fred H. Lemon & Co., Richmond, Ind. 

Asparagus Sprengerl, 4-in., extra strong, $5.00 
per 100. W. B. Woodrutr, Florist, Westfield, N. J. 

Asparagus Sprengeri, extra heavy, 2-in., 2c. 
J. L. Schiller, Toledo, O. 

Asparagus Sprengeri, strong 5-In. pot plants, 
15c. Storrs & Harrison Co., Palnesvllle, Ohio. 



Asparagus plumosus, 3-In., $6.00 per 100. 
Hoi ton & Hunkel Co., Milwaukee, 



Wis. 



Asparagus Sprengerl, 2-In., $1.50 per 100. 
Wettlln Floral Co., Horaril, N. Y. 

Asparagus Sprengerl, ready for shift, 3-ln., 4c. 
Cash. Morris Floral Co., Morris, 111. 

ASPIDISTRAS. 

Green leaf aspidistras, 4c per leaf. 
F. Zlegeler, Jr., 6037 Hurst St., New Orleans, La. 



ASTERS. 



Aster sinensis, all sorts. Vick'.s Branching, 
mixed, true, $1.50 lb. J. Hasslach, Seed Grower, 
St. Remy de Province, France. 

Asters, any variety and quantity. Seetf now, 
plants spring. E. T. Barnes. Spencer, Ind. 



AZALEAS. 



Azalea Indica, all fresh Imported stock; fine, 
shapely plants, full of buds and in the best of 
condition for Easter. Van der Cruyssen, Ver- 
vaeneana, Simon Mardner, Empress of India and 
Niobe, 60c, 75c and $1.00 each. 
Whltton & Sons, City & Green Sts., Utica. N. Y. 

BEDDING PLANTS. 

Geraniums, Nutt, Grant, Castellane, Buchner, 
Hni and Dale, rooted cuttings, li^c; $11.00 1000. 
Ageratum, mixed coleus, double lobelia, English 
and German Ivy, snapdragon, cuphea, lantana 
and heliotrope rooted cuttings, 75c lOO. Carna- 
tion rooted cuttings, $2.25 100. Geraniums, 
double petunlnas, mixed, 2-In., 2c; $18.00 1000. 
Lord CornwaUis pelargoniums and rose geraniums, 
2V4-ln., 4c; 3-In., 8c. Sallerol, new double lobelia 
and snapdragon, 2-In., $1.90 100; 3-in., 5c. Stock 
chrysanthemums, 3c. Stock polnsettlas, 5c. Cash. 
Port Allegany Greenhouses, Port Allegany, Pa. 

Bedding Plants — Fuchsias, best market va- 
rieties; Salvias splendens, Zurich, Fauntleroy; 
Lobelia Kathleen Mallard, double; hollyhocks, 
finest double red; feverfew, double white; Coleus 
Golden Redder and others. AU choice 2-ln. plants. 
$2.00 per 100. Salvia rooted cuttings, 90c 100; 
coleus. 60c 100. 
Wingert & Ulcry, Maiden Lane. Springfield, O. 

Bedding plants, Achyranthes, dbl. white fever- 
few, Stella Gurney ageratum, Jerusalem cherries, 
strong 2^4-ln., 2%c. Pelargoniums, pink and 
maroon, 2W-ln., 4c; 3-ln., 6c. Primula obc. gig., 
3-in.. In bloom, 4c. 

Hammerschmldt & Clark, Medina, Ohio. 



BEGONIAS. 



Blooming begonias In good assortment. Rooted 
cuttings, $1.75 per 100; 2-in., $2.50 per 100. 
Thurstoni, Pink Marguerite (new) and Brfordll. 
Rooted cuttings, $2.00 per 100; 2-in., $3.00 per 
100. N. 0. Caswell, Delavan, 111. 



PLEASE MENTION THE REVIEW WHEN WRITING ANY OF THESE ADVERTISERS 



March 2, 1911. 



The Weekly Florists' Review* 



81 



We have six or more varieties of flowering 
begonias at :p3.50 per 100 for 2x2V^-in. stock. 
Bex bejconlas, 2Vi-lii., fS.OO per 100; 3-ln., $8.00; 
4-1n., $15.00. .Spiral varieties, 2%-ln., $8.00. 
Geo. A. Kuhl. Pekln, 111. 

Begonias, blooming varieties, 4-in., $1.S0 per 
d08.; $10.00 per 100. 
Llewellyn. Florist, OLEAN, N. Y. 

Begonias, 15 varieties. First-class rooted cut- 
tings, $2.00; 2-in., $2.76 per 100. 
Geo. M. Brlnkerhotf, Springfield, 111. 

"Begonia Gloire de Lorraine, 2V4-in., fine stuft 
(or filling made up baskets, $10.00 per 100. Cash, 
please. Joseph Traudt. Canajobarle, N. Y. 

Begonia Lorraine, twice transplanted, 2V&-in., 
$12.(X) per 100; in 500 lots, $50.00 the 500. 

Julius Roehrs Co., Rutherford, N. J. 

Begonia Gloire de Lorraine, for Easter or 
propagation, 2% -In., 12c; 8-ln., 20c. Cash, 
please. J. Sylvester, Florist, Oconto, Wis. 

REX BEGONIAS my specialty. Largest collec- 
tion, $5.00 per 100. 
B. C. BLAKE, Springfield, Ohio. 

Begonia Feastii, 3-in., 2c; 4-in., 3c. 

Loyd C. Bunch, Fredonia, Kan. 

Begonia Vernon, 234-in., $2.00 per 100. 
G. E. Fink. Kenilworth, N. J. 

BERRIED PLANTS. 

Jerusalem cherry plants, good healthy stock, 
$8.00 per 100. 

The Hammond Co.. Inc., Richmond. Va. 

BIRCH. 

Birch, cut-leaf. Straight trees, well branched 
to the ground. Per 100: 6 to 8 ft., $50.00; 8 to 
10 ft.. $65.00; 10 to 12 ft., $85.00. 

Klehm's Nurseries, Arlington Heights, 111. 

BOUVARDIAS. 

BOUVARDIA STOCK PLANTS. 
From 4-in. pots; single, white, red and pink, 
$25.00 per 100. 

S. S. PENNOCK-MEEHAN CO., 
1608-20 Ludlow St., Philadelphia, Pa. 



BOX. 



Boxwood, bush shape, for window boxes or pot 
sale, very bright foliage and bushy. 10 to 12 in. 
high, $20.00 per 100; 12 to 15 in. high, $25.00 per 
100. Full line of sizes in both pyramidal and 
natural bush forms. Prices on application. 

Storrs & Harrison Co., Painesvllle, Ohio. 

Bnxus, pyramids, 2% to 3 ft., $4.50 per 10; 
$40.00 per 100. Buxus, standards, 30 in. diameter 
of heads, $2.50 each. 
F. J. Grootendorst & Sons, Boskoop, Holland. 

Box trees, all sizes. Ask for special list. 
Julius Roehrs Co., Rutherford, N. J. 

BOXWOOD. 

Quality boxwood, both the hedge and tree 
varieties. Packed only in 50-pound crates. 
Jones The Holly Wreath Man. Milton, Del. 

BULBS. 

Caladium esculentum, 5, to 7, $1.00; 7 to 9, 
$2.00; 9 to 11, $4.00; 11 to 15, $6.00 per 100. 
Tuberoses, No. 1, $lj)0 per 100; $7.00 per 1000. 
Cash with order. e, 

0. B. Johnson, Wallace, N. C. 

Ismene calathinum, large size, $4.00 per 100; 
small, $2.00 per 100. 

The Geo. Wlttbold Co., 
Bdgebrook, Chicago, 111. 

Caladiums, 5 to 7, Ic; 7 to 9, 2c; 9 to 11, 4c. 
Oood bulbs. C. L. Bmnson & Co., Padneab, Ky. 



CACTI. 



Cacti, different varieties. Ask for prices. 
Wm. Tell. Austin, Texas. 

CALCEOLARIAS. 

Calceolarias, 2%-ln. pots, 3c. 

M. ,D. Schmidt & Son. Park St., Dayton, 0. 



CANNAS. 



Cannas. Express, Niagara, Brandywlne, Queen 
Charlotte, Mrs. G. A. Strohlein, $4.00 per 100; 
$35.00 per 1000. Washington, Mme. Crozy, But- 
tercup. F. Vaughan, Gladiator, Louisiana, $3.50 
per 100; $30.00 per 1000. Philadelphia. Egan- 
dale, Chautauqua, D. of Marlborough, $3.00 per 
100; $25.00 per 1000. Venus, King Humbert, 
Wyoming, $4.50 per 100: $40.00 per 1000. East- 
ern Beauty, P. of Fire. $2.50 per 100; $20.00 per 
1000. Alsace, California. $2.00 per 100; $15.00 
per 1000. New York and Jupiter, $5.00 per 100. 
Louis B. Eastburn, Kennett Square, Pa. 

BODDINGTON'S QUALITY CANNAS. ' 

True to name; sound and dormant. See our 
page adv. in this week's issue. 
Catalogue free. 
ARTHUR T. BODDINGTON. SEEDSMAN. 
342 W. 14tb St.. New York, N. Y. 

Cannas. Henderson, Marlborough. Charlotte, 
F. Vaughan, Antoine Crozy and Philadelphia, 
$12.00 per 1000. King Humbert. $3.00 per 100. 
Geo. Just, Jacksonville, Fla. 



Canna roots true to name, large and sound, 
thoroughly cured, grown by canna specialists 
whose motto is quality. Surplus of the following 
varieties: 

GIANT ORCHID-FLOWERING. 
GREEN FOLIAGE. 

100 100 

Allemanla $1.25 Louisiana $1.50 

Austria 1.25 Mrs. Kate Gray . . . 1.75 

Burbank 1.25 Pennsylvania .... 1.60 

Italia 1.50 Sen. Vlger 2.00 

The following are especially fine: 

Atlanta, orange red, beautifully shaded $1.25 

Indiana, orange salmon, vfitb, golden sheen.. 1.50 

Oceanus, rich yellow, variegated red 1.50 

Parthenope, reddish orange, scarlet shadings 1.25 

Perseus, buttercup yellow, red dots 2.00 

Wyoming, rich reddish orange, most beauti- 
ful bronze foliage 2.00 

CROZY VARIETIES. 
RED FLOWERS, GREEN FOLIAGE.. 

100 100 

Exp. Craropbell. ..$1.50 Flamingo $1.50 

Felix Crouse 1.25 Giant Crimson 2.50 

J. D. Eisele 2.50 Papa Nardy 2.00 

Mrs. C. W. Ward. 2.00 Pres. McKlnley... 1.75 

Patrie 2.50 Sec. Chabanne 1.75 

J. Aymard, rich carmine pink 1.50 

L. Patry, soft rose-pink, dotted red 1.25 

Lorraine (imp.), beautiful pink, cream edge 2.00 
Mme. Alf. Blanc, salmon pink, edged yellow 1.75 

Mile. Berat, dark carmine pink 1.50 

West Grove, pinkish carmine 2.00 

YELLOW FLOWERS, GREEN FOLIAGE. 

100 100 

Coronet $1.50 Richard Wallace. $2. 50 

Eldorado 1.50 Morning Star 1.50 

Mme. Celestine Dubost, sulphur yellow, 

blotched pink 1.75 

Shenandoah, rose-pink, bronze foliage 1.50 

RED FLOWERS, BRONZE FOLIAGE. 

100 100 

Brandywine $1.75 Pres. Meyers $1.75 

David Harum 2.25 Royal Bronze 2.50 

Leonard Vaughan. 1.75 Rubin 2.00 

FOLIAGE VARIETIES. 

100 100 

Musaefolia $2.00 Pres. Carnot $1.50 

Robusta 1.50 

Wo do not hesitate to recommend the three 
following varieties as being among the finest 
of all foliage cannas: 

100 100 

Bronze King $1..50 King of Bronzes. .$1.50 

Mar. Valllante... 1.25 

Send for complete list, also quotations on large 
quantities. 

CLEAR VIEW GARDENS, 

The Cummlngs Co., Inc., Proprietors. 

MERIDIAN, MISSISSIPPI. 

Our canna roots are not to be compared with 
contract-grown that have been kept in boxes for 
several months, mostly badly mixed and shriv- 
elled up. Our stock is true to name, extra se- 
lected, plump and sound 2, 3 and 4-eye roots. 

100 100 

Austria $1.20 King Humbert ...$3.50 

Allemanla 1.20 Louise, pink 2.00 

Alph. Bouvier . . . 1.75 Louisiana 1.50 

B. Poltevine 2.00 Mme. Crozy 2.25 

Buttercup, new .. 2.25 M. Washington... 2.25 

Burbank 1.20 Mont Blanc 5.00 

Black Prince 2.25 Musaefolia, new.. 1.50 

Black Beauty 2.75 Mrs. K. Gray 1.50 

Coronet Yellow . . 1.80 Niagara 2.50 

Cbas. Henderson . 1.70 Oscoda, new 3.00 

Crimson Redder... 2.00 Papa Nardy 2.00 

D. Marlborough . . 1.76 Pennsylvania .... 1.76 
David Harum .... 2.60 Premier, gold . . . 2.25 

Egandale ; 2.00 Pres. Cleveland... 2.00 

Express, dwarf . ." 2.70 Pres. Meyers 2.00 

Flor. Vaughan . . . 1.76 Queen Charlotte. . 2.25 

Gladiator, new . . . 2.25 Robusta, red 1.60 

Gloriosa, gold 2.00 Souv. d' A. Crozy. 2.25 

Gladiolaeflora 2.00 West Grove 1.80 

Italia, extra 1.60 Wm. Bofflnger . . . 1.80 

J. D. Eisele 2.00 Venus, new 2.60 

All kinds, In separate colors or mixed, $1.00 
100. Write for 1000 rate on larger lots. 
CALADIUM ESCULENTUM. Doz. 100 1000 

6 to 8 in. circ $0.25 $1.75 $13.00 

8 to 10 In. circ 60 3.60 30.00 

10 to 12 in. circ 76 5.60 60.00 

GLADIOLUS. Superfine 
florists' mixture 10 .80 7.00 

See our full page adv. in Jan. 19 issue, page 5. 

Shellroad Greenhouses, Orange, Baltimore, Md. 

Cannas. Austria, Italia, Pennsylvania, Chas. 
Henderson, Pillar of Fire, Egandale, Florence 
Vaughan, Mme. Crozy, Mile. Berat, Alsace, Vic- 
tory. Grand Rouge, King Edward, Parthenope, 
H. Wendlandt, several eyej, $1.60 per 100; $12.50 
per 1000. Cash, please. 

John F. Flood, Montvale, Mass. 

Canna roots. Ex. Crampbel, Austria, Chas. 
Henderson. Mile. Berat, Chicago, Iroquois Chief, 
Alsace and David Harum, $2.50 per 100. 

Mosbtek Greenhouse Co., Onarga, 111. 

CANNAS. Sec. Chabanne, Cinnabar, M. Berat. 
$1.75 per 100; Mrs. Kate Gray, $2.00; Robusta 
and mixed (all good sorts), $1.00. 

Wagner Park Conservatories, Sidney, Ohio. 

BEST CANNAS IN THE WORLD. 
Send for our new list of latest and best 65 
kinds. Stock excellent. Prices right. 

Conard & Jones Co., West Grove, Pa. 

Cannas. K. Humbert, 3c; Burbank, Kate Gray, 
Chas. Henderson, J. 0. Vaughan. 2c; Souv. d' An- 
toine Croey, Egansdale, F. Vaughan, 2MiC. 

A. J. Baldwin, Newark, Ohio. 

Canna King Humbert, $3.00 100. 

A. B. Campbell, Cochranvllle, Pa. 



Cannas, strong divisions. King Humbert, $2.60 
per 100, $20.00 per 1000; Cbas. Henderson, J. D. 
Eisele, Kate Gray, $2.00 per 100, $17.00 per 1000. 
Furrow & Co., Guthrie, Okla. 

Cannas, true and good. Mt. Blanc, Buttercup. 
Humbert, 3c; Crozy, 2c; Venus, 6c; Saunders, 
10c; F. Vaughan, l%c. 

Roney Bros., West Qrove, Pa. 

Cannas. Chas. Henderson, strong, selected 
roots, $2.00 per 100; $18.00 per 1000. 

J. L. Johnson, DeKalb, 111. 

Cannas, strong, sound divisions. Mile. Berat 
and Allemanla. $1.50 per 100. Cash. 
Wlngert & Ulery, Maiden Lane, Springfield, O. 

Austria canna roots, extra strong, healthy 
stock. $1.50 per 100. 

Fifth Ave. Floral Co., Columbus, Ohio. 

Cannas. Cbas. Henderson, l^c. Good bulbs. 
C. L. Brunson & Co., Paducab, Ky. 

Cannas, best kinds, $2.00 per 100. 

Burden Floral Co., Bowling Green, Ky. 

Cannas. King Humbert, $3.00 100. 

Vern L. Schluraff, Erie, Pa. 

CARNATIONS. 

ROOTED CARNATION CUTTINGS. 
The Wards we believe are the best and will 
be the greatest money makers commercially of 
any carnation on the market today. In addition 
to these we offer the following carnation cuttings, 
grown by the most successful growers in this 
country : 

100 1000 

Mrs. C. W. Ward $6.00 $50.00 

Alma Ward 7.50 60.00 

Sangamo 6.00 50.00 

Mary Tolman 6.00 50.00 

Scarlet Glow 6.00 50.00 

Dorothy Gordon 6.00 50.00 

Pink Delight 6.00 50.00 

May Day 3.00 26.00 

White Perfection 3.50 30.00 

White Enchantress 3.50 30.00 

WInsor 3.00 26.00 

Afterglow 3.00 26.00 

Beacon 3.50 30.00 

Enchantress 3.50 30.00 

Eldorado 2.60 20.00 

Pennsylvania (Pink Boston Market)6.00 50.00 

Norwood (Craig) 10.00 75.00 

White Wonder 12.00 100.00 

Gloriosa 12.00 100.00 

Princess Charming 12.00 100.00 

S. S. PENNOCK-MEEHAN CO. 
1608-20 Ludlow St., Philadelphia, Pa. 

BEST COMMERCIAL VARIETIES. 

Well rooted cuttings, clean and healthy. Cut- 
tings all taken from fiower stems and rooted 
without shade. 

WHITE— Alma Ward, $7.50 per 100, Bon Aral, 
$6.00 per 100; $50.00 per 1000. White Enchan- 
tress (pure white, western strain only). White 
Perfection, $3.00 per 100; $25.00 per 1000. 

PINK — Sangamo, Mary Tolman, $6.00 per 100; 
$50.00 per lOOO. May Day, WInsor, Afterglow, 
$3.00 per 100; $25.00 per 1000. 

SCARLET— Scarlet Glow, $6.00 per 100; $50.00 
per 1000. Beacon, $3.00 per 100; $25.00 per 1000. 

CRIMSON— Ruby, $3.00 per 100; $25.00 per 
1000. 

YELLOW — J. Whltcomb Riley, Canary Bird, 
$6.00 per 100; $60.00 per 1000. 

VARIEGATED — Conquest, $6.00 per 100; 
$50.00 per 1000. 

260 at 1000 rate. 

S. J. Renter & Son, Inc., Westerly, R. I. 

Carnations, strong, clean, healthy, well rooted 

cuttings taken from our fancy Flower Show stock. 
Place your orders now. 

100 1000 

Enchantress $3.00 $25.00 

W. Enchantress 3.00 25.00 

Rose-pink Enchantress 3.00 25.00 

Winsor 2.60 20.00 

O. P. Bassett 6.00 415.00 

Beacon 3.00 25.00 

Victory 3.00 25.00 

White Perfection 3.00 25.00 

Cash with order, please. 

W. E. Trimble Greenhouse Co., Princeton, 111. 

CARNATION ROOTED CUTTINGS. 
Perfectly healthy; excellent condition. 

Enchantress $3.00 100; $25.00 1000 

Rose-pink Enchantress . 3.00 100; 25.00 1000 

White Enchantress 3.50 100; 30.00 1000 

White Perfection 3.00 100; 25.00 1000 

Dorothy Gordon 6.00 100; 

Mrs. C. W. Ward 5.00 100; 

Alma Ward 6.00 100; 

Stock guaranteed to be as represented. Cash 
with order or good references. 

SMITH & GANNETT, GENEVA, N. Y. 

ROOTED CARNATION CUTTINGS. 

100 1000 

Enchantress $3.00 $25.00 

Rose pink Enchantress 3.00 25.00 

White Enchantress 3.00 25.00 

White Perfection 3.00 26.00 

Victory 3.00 26.00 

Columbus Floral Co., Columbus, Ohio. 

CARNATIONS. 

New carnation. White House, the best and 
largest, white in cultivation; Washington, a 
cerise sport from Enchantress; Princess Charm- 
ing, splendid free growing light pink; Christmas 
Cheer, a scarlet to make money on at Christmas. 
All the above. $12.00 per 100; $100.00 per 1000. 
Chas. H. Totty, Madison, N. J. 



PLEASE MENTION THE REVIEW WHEN WRITING ANY OF THESE ADVERTISERS 



82 



The Weekly Florists' Review* 



March 2, 1911, 



CARNATIONS Continued. 

ROOTED CARNATION CUTTINGS. 

EnchantresB $2.U0 100; $16.00 1000 

Roee-iilnk Enchantress 2.00 100; 15.00 1000 

Wlnsor 1.60 lOO; 12.50 1000 

O. P. Bassett 2.60 100; 20.00 1000 

Lady Bountiful 1.80 100; 12..'50 1000 

Lawson Enchantress 1.50 100; VZ.HO 1000 

M. A. Patten 1.00 100; 10.00 1000 

Boston MarkPt 1.00 100; 10.00 1000 

Cash or O. O. D. Immpdlate delivery. 
JobB H. Miller. 6fir>8 N. Lincoln. St., Chicago. 

ROOTED CARNATION CUTTINGS. 

100 1000 

Washington $10.00 $75.00 

Sangamo 6.00 50.00 

Mary Tol;uJin 6.00 60.00 

Conquest 6.00 60.00 

White Perfection 2.60 20.00 

Enchantress 2.50 20.00 

Winona 2.60 20.00 

Satisfaction guaranteed. 
DBS PLAINES FLORAL CO.. Des Plalnes. 111. 

Early carnation cuttings. Place your orders 
now and you will get Immediate delivery. 

Enchantress $3.00 100; $25.00 1000 

Perfection 3.00 100; 25.00 1000 

Beacon 3.00 100; 25.00 lOtK) 

Rose-pink Enchantress ... 2.50 100; 20.00 1000 
White enchantress, ready 

Apr. 15 2..'50 100; 20.00 1000 

Wlnsor 2.60 100; 20.00 1000 

We can fill orders from 1000 to 100,000 and 
guarantee the stock. 

J. D. Thompson Carnation Co., Joliet. III. 

CARNATION ROOTED CUTTINGS. 
Strong, healthy stock. 

100 1000 

Enchantress $3.00 ?25.00 

Rose-pink Enchantress 3.00 25.00 

White Perfection 3.00 25.00 

Pure White Enchantress 3.50 30.00 

Beacon 3.60 30.00 

Cash with order or reference. _ 

A. A. GANNETT, GENEVA, N. Y. 

Strong R. C. From soil. 

100 1000 100 1000 

Enchantress $2..'-.0 $20.00 $3.00 $2.').00 

W. Enchantress ... 3.00 25.00 3.50 30.00 

R. P. Enchantress. 2..50 20.00 3.00 25.00 

I^wsonEnchantress 3.00 25.00 3.50 25.00 

O P. Bassett 3.00 25.00 3.50 30.00 

W. Perfection 2.50 20.00 3.00 25.00 

L. Bountiful 2.50 20.00 3.00 25.00 

KRUEGER BROS., Toledo. Ohio. 

Carnations. I-ast season's successes. Extra 
fine strong cuttings and 2-in. stock. 

R.C. R.C. 2-in. 2-ln. 

100 1000 100 1000 

Alma Ward $7.60 $60.00 $8.00 $75.00 

Mrs. C. W. Ward... 6.00 50.00 6.50 60.00 

Dorothy Gordon 6.00 60.00 6.50 60.00 

T. B. Stronp, New Philadelphia. Ohio. 

CARNATION ROOTED CUTTINGS. 

100 1000 

Sangamo $6.00 $50.00 

Scariet Glow 6.00 50.00 

J. W. Rilev, yellow 6.00 60.00 

White Enchantress 3.00 25.00 

White Perfection 8.00 2.5.00 

A. C. Brown, Springfield, 111. 

Carnations, 2-In. pots, fine stock, $3.50 per 100. 
Cash, please. 

Enchantress. Melody. 

R. P. Enchantress. Lawson. 

Wlnsor, White Perfection. 

South View Floral Co., 

B. D. No. 1^ Fair Haven, Pa. 

10,000 rooted carnation cuttings from strong, 
healthy stock, ready for shipment. White En- 
chantress, Perfection and Beacon, $3.00 per 100; 
$26.00 per lOOO. Enchantress, Wlnsor, Lawson 
and Victory, $2.50 per 100; $20.00 per 1000. Some 
cash with order, please, _ ^ 

Chas. A. Moss, Spartanburg, 8, C, 

We need room and offer the following carna- 
tion plants from 2-ln. pots, in fine, healthy con- 
dition: 350 Rose-pink Enchantress, 1000 En- 
chantress, 150 Harlowarden, 400 Lawson. 800 
Bountiful, 3.50 White Lawson, 100 Perfection, at 
rooted cutting price of $3.00 per 100. Cash with 
order. T he Johnwon Floral Co., Kendall vllle, Ind. 

BOOTED CARNATION CUTTINGS. 
Good healthy stock, now ready, 

100 1000 

2000 Lawson-Enchantress $2.00 $15.00 

600 Victory 2.00 16.00 

500 Lawson 1-60 

ROLF ZETLITZ. LIMA, OHIO. 

Carnation rooted cuttings, now ready. Red 
Nelson Fisher, sport, color of Bassett, retains 
freeness of parent variety, most satisfactory red, 
$3.60 per 100; $.S0.0O per 1000. White Perfection, 
$3.00 per 100; $26.00 per 1000. Wlnsor, $2.50 per 
100; $20.00 per 1000. 

' A. C. Canfleld. Springfield. 111. 

Sangamo and Admiration cuttings $6.00 per 100, 
$60.00 per 1000; 2 in. pots, $7.50 per 100, or will 
exchange for Dorothy Gordon and Alma Ward. 
White Perfection, Apple Blossom and Enchant- 
ress, $2.60 per 100. $20.00 per 1000; 2-ln. pots, 
$3 .00 per 100. Scharff Brothers, Van Wert, Ohio. 

Rooted carnation cuttings. Dorothy Gordon, 
Sangamo, Scarlet Glow, $6.00 per 100; $50.00 
per 1000. Shasta, $6.00 per 100. White Enchant- 
ress, Rose-pink Enchantress, May Day, Beacon, 
$3.00 per 100; $26.00 per 1000. Cash with order. 
,o w I, , w g fp gmjtj,^ Piqna, Ohio. 



Carnation cuttings. Victory, Melody, Wlnsor, 
Lawson, Variegated Lawson, Victoria, rooted, 

f2.00 per lOO, $16.00 per 1000; unrooted, Ic each. 
V^inona and Beacon, rooted, $25.00 per 1000. 
Halifax Garden Co., Halifax, Mass. 

Wlnsor carnation rooted cuttings, $3.00 per 100, 
$26.00 per 1000; 2^-in. pots, $4.00 per 100, 
$36.00 per 1000. 
Hammond Co., Inc., Richmond, Va, 

100,000 rooted carnation cuttings, guaranteed. 
Dorothy Gordon, Pink Delight, Wanoka, Apple 
Blossom, $50.00 per 1000; $6.00 per 100. 

Wanoka Greenhouses, Barneveld, N. Y. 

Rooted carnation cuttings from strong, healthy 
stock. White Perfection, Enchantress, Victory 
and Beacon, $3.00 per 100; $25.00 per 1000. 

N. Bommershach, Decatur, 111. 

Good, strong, well rooted Enchantress cama 
tion cuttings, $2.00 per 100; Lawson-Enchantress, 
$1.75 per 100. 

C. C. Walker, 1227 Logan Ave.. Danville, 111. 

Carnations. Alma Ward, Mrs. Ward, Wlnsor, 
Victory. Beacon, White Enchantress and White 
Perfection. See our display adv. In this Issue. 
C. C. Pollwortb Co.. Milwaukee, Wis. 

Carnation rooted cuttings. Lawson. Wlnsor. 
Harlowarden, Lady Bountiful, $2.25 100; $21.50 
1000. Cash. 
Port Allegany Gre enhouses, Port Allegany, Pa. 

Young carnation plants. 6000 white seedling. 
$3.00 100; 4000 red .seedling, $.3.00 100; 3000 
Prosperity. $2.00 100. Cash with order. 
Postma The Florist. Union City. Tenn. 

Strong healthy carnation cuttings from flats. 
1000 F. Maid, 500 Harlowarden. 500 Queen, 400 
Lawson, $2.25 per 100. 
Albion D. Emerson, Westvllle, N. H. 

Carnations. lOnchantress, White Perfection, 
White Enchantress, May Day, $2.60 per 100; 
$20.00 per 1000. 

W. Frank & Sons, Portland, Ind. 

Carnation rooted cuttings us good as the best, 
better than the average. Send for list and prices. 
Geo. A. Relyea, Orchard PI.. Poughkeepsle, N, Y. 

Strong, healthy, well rooted carnation cuttings. 
Beacon, $2.50 per 100; Enchantress and Wlnsor, 
$2.00 per 100. H. E. Mitting, Atchison, Kan. 

Enchantress and Wlnsor, strong rooted cut- 
tings, $2.50 per 100; $22.00 per 1000, prepaid. 
C. Humfeld, Clay Center, Kan. 

Carnation James Whitcomb Riley (Lawson 
seedling), the best yellow, $(j.00 per 100. 

Rertermann Bros. Co., Indianapolis, Ind. 

Well rooted cuttings. Beacon, Enchantress, 
W. Enchantress, R. P. Enchantress, $2.00 100. 
Wright's Greenhouses, Pittsburg, Kan. 

Strong, healthy Enchantress carnation rooted 
cuttings, from sand or soil; $2.50 per 100; $20.00 
per 1000. A. C. Buterbaugh, Waynesboro, Pa. 

Enchantress and Lawson-Enchantress rooted 
cuttings, $20.00 per 1000. 

Geny Bros., 212 5th Ave., Nashville, Tenn. 

New and standard carnation rooted cattings. 
Send for price list. 

Wm. Swayne, Kennett Square, Pa. 

Carnation cuttings, well rooted. Lawson, Bos- 
ton Market and Queen, $12.00 per 1000. 

E. D. Kaulback & Son, Maiden, Mass, 

Carnations, March delivery. Send for list. 
Albert M. Herr, Lancaster, Pa. 

Carnations. 300 Victory, 2-in., $3.60 per 100. 
Cash. West Side Greenhouses, Barberton, Ohio. 

CHRYSANTHEMUMS. 

CHRYSANTHEMUM CUTTINGS. 
Now ready. 

100 1000 

WHITE— Oct. Frost $2.00 $15.00 

Kalb 2.00 16.00 

V. Poehlmann 2.00 15.00 

Tonset 2.00 16.00 

A. Byron 2.00 16.00 

T. Eaton 2.50 20.00 

Chadwlck 2.60 20.00 

Lynnwood Hall 3.00 27.50 

PINK— Balfour 2.00 15.00 

Enguehard 2.00 18.00 

Pacific Supreme 2.00 15.00 

Gloria 2.60 20.00 

Amorlta 2.60 20.00 

Jeanne Rosette 2.00 16.00 

YELLOW— Golden Glow 2.00 16.00 

Oct. Sunshine 2.00 16.00 

Appleton 2.00 15.00 

Y. Eaton 2.60 20.00 

Halliday 2.00 16.00 

Bonnaffon 2.00 16.00 

J. D. Thompson Carnation Co., Joliet, III. 

YELLOW TOUSET. 

Certificate of Horticulture Society of St. Louis. 
Grown by us for three years, being an early 
yellow, color as deep as any of mid-season 
varieties. Cuttings, $6.00 per 100; $56.00 per 
1000. Plants, $8.00 per 100; $75.00 per 1000. 
NOW READY. Also Ivory, $12.50 per 1000; J. 
Nonln. Byron and C. Touset. $15.00 per 1000; 
W. H. Chadwlck. G. Wedding. $3.00 per 100, 
$26.00 per 1000. Ready last of this month and 
later. Stock guaranteed. 

West End Floral Park. Belleville. 111. 

Large, hardy, rose-pink chrysanthemum. Rosy 
Morn. Strong, field-grown plants, $2.00 per 100. 
Hillside Hardy Flower Gardens, Turtle Creek, Pa. 



n ,. ... CHRYSANTHEMUMS. 

Pockett's Crimson, the finest crimson: Mrs. 
O. H. Kahn, easily the finest bronee; Miriam 
Hankey, the best late pink; Col. Appleton, the 
well known yellow variety. 

Mrs. H. Partridge, Polly Rose, Wm. Duckham, 
Jeanne Nonln and Leslie Morrison, now ready 
for sale, 2%-ln. pots. Immediate delivery, splen- 
did stock, $3.00 per 100; $26.00 per 1000. 
0. H. Totty, Madison, N. J. 

CHRYSANTHEMUM ROOTED CUTTINGS. 
From clean, bench grown stock. 

Golden Glow $1.75 100; $15.00 1000 

Mme. Bergman 1.76 100; 15.00 1000 

P. and W. Ivory i.so 100; 12.60 1000 

W. and Y. Bonnafton 1.25 100; 10.00 lOOO 

Glory of Pacific 1.25 100; 10.00 1000 

Polly Rose 1.25 100; 10.00 1000 

Swan Peterson Floral Co., Gibson City, 111. 

Strong, clean chrysanthemum rooted cuttings: 
Halliday, Appleton, Weeks, Pacific Supreme, 
Enguehard, Golden Glow, Robinson, Baasett, 
Dean and White Dean, $2.00 per 100; $15.00 per 
1000. You may return them if not first-class and 
we will refund your money. 
Furrow & Co., Guthrie, Okla. 

Chrysanthemum rooted cuttings. White Bon- 
nafTon, Pink Chadwlck, Enguehard, October Frost, 
Touset. Lynnwood Hall, Gloria. Pacific Supreme. 
Golden Eagle, Eaton, Helen Frick, White Frlck. 
$3.00 100: $25.00 1000. 

Lakeside Floral Co., Hough ton, Mich. 

CHRYSANTHEMUM ROOTED CUTTINGS. 

20.000 Golden Chadwlck $30.00 1000 

20,000 White Chiidwlck 25.00 1000 

3.000 Yellow Eaton 26.00 1000 

1,000 W. Brock (late pink), $6.00 per 100. 
Jacob Hauck, ns Montgomery, Bloomfield, N. J. 

Chrysanthemum rooted cuttings for March 15 
delivery; very strong. Bonnaffon. Enguehard, 
T. Eaton and Appleton. $12.00 per 1000, or will 
exchange for 4000 Golden Glow rooted cuttings of 
like quality. Wheatland Aquarium & Greenhouse 
Co.. Lancaster, Pa. 

Chrysanthemum rooted cuttings. Estelle, Oct. 
Frost, Nonln, Golden Glow. Monrovia, Cremo, 
Halliday. Bonnaffon. Pacific, Eneiiehard, Bailey. 
Blackhawk. $1.25 100; $12.00 1009. 
T. W. Baylls & Sous, West Grove, Pa. 

Chrysanthemum rooted cuttings. October Frost. 
Ivory. Enguehard. Jeanne Nonln, Monrovia and 
Bonnaffon, $2.00 per 100. Polly Rose, Glory of 
Pacific, $1.50 per 100. Prepaid. Cash. 
L. E. Cook & Co.. Calla. Ohio. 

Chrysanthemum cuttings. R. Halliday. Amo- 
rita, Y. Bonnaffon. White Jones. Rosiere, Y. 
Jones, Ivory, Golden Glow, Minnie Bailey, $10.00 
per 1000. Cash, please. 
Hilpert & Hammen, Belair Rd., Baltimore, Md. 

ChrysanthemuAi, a yellow sport of Clementine 
Touset, beautiful, clear canary yellow; one of 
the novelties of 1910. Strong rooted cuttings, 
$10.00 per 100. Cash, please. 
H. P. Smith, Piqna, Ohio. 

Chrysanthemums. Polly Rose, Alice Byron, 
Chadwlck, Enguehard, Pacific Supreme, Halliday. 
$2.00 per 100. 
McRae-Jenkinson CV)., Che swick, Pa. 

Chrysanthemum stock plants or rooted cuttings. 
Write for prices or will exchange for others stock. 
What have you? Schneider Floral Co., 426 
Euclid Ave., Cleveland,iO. 

Chrysanthemums, strong, healthy 2-in. stock. 
Bonnaffon, Enguehard and Napier, $2.00 per 100; 
$18.00 per 1000. Cash. 
H. E. Mitting, Atchison, Kan. 

Mum cuttings, strictly first-class stock. Stand- 
ard pompon and single varieties, $2.00 per 100; 
$15.00 per 1000. Satisfaction guaranteed. Send 
for list. Ehmann'8, Corfu, N. Y. 

Pompon chrysanthemum clumps, finest com- 
mercial varieties. All colors, $5.00 per 100. 
Canh with order. 

G. Lynam, 35 B. Bailey Rd.. Lansdowne, Pa. 

Extra strong rooted cuttings of O. P. Bassett. 
$3.00 per 100; 2% -In. pots, $5.00 per 100. 

La Crosse Floral Co.. La Cfrosse, Wis. 

Good, strong, fancy stock of Golden Glow in 
2% -in. pots, $3.00 per 100, 

La Crosse Floral <3o.. La Crosse. Wis. 

Chrysanthemums, the best leading varieties. 
Send for price list. 

La Crosse Floral Co., La Crosse, Wis. 

Strong well rooted cuttings of Willowbrook, 
$2.00 per 100. 
M a. Wiecklng C!o., Blnffton, Ind. 

750 chrysanthemum rooted cuttings, 14 best 
varieties, $10.00 for the lot. 
Rolf Zetlitz. Lima. Ohio. 

Chrysanthemum rooted cuttings. Golden Glow. 
Poehlmann, Desjouls. Pacific Supreme, $1.00 per 
100. Edw. Wallis, Atco, N. 3. 

Mums, the best leading varieties, $1.60 per 
100; $12.00 per 1000. prepaid. 

0. Humfeld, Clay Outer, Kan. 

Chrysanthemum rooted cuttings. Send for price 
list. Wm. Swayne. Kennett Square. Pa. 

CINERARIAS. 

cinerarias, 3-in., ready for 4 and 6, 8^c; 2-ln., 
ready for 8 and 4, large and fine, 2c. 
Hill City Greenhouses, Forest City, Iowa. 



PLEASE MENTION THE REVIEW WHEN WRITING ANY OF THESE ADVERTISERS 



March 2, 1911. 



The Weekly Florists^ Review* 



83 



ClnerarlaB. Buy now for Easter. Columbian, 
James' Prize, Scarlet Queen, old rose, blood red, 
asure blue, wulte, crimRon, 3-ln., ^.00; 4-ln., 
$6.00 per 100. Fine, clean stock, ready for a 
shift. Also in bud or bloom, 3-ln., $5.00; 4-ln., 
$8.00; 5-ln., $12.00 per 100. Cash, please. 

J. Sylvester, Florist, Oconto, Wis. 

Cinerarias. A most beautiful strain of the 
brightest and choicest of colors, clean foliage 
and right for Easter, 4-in., $8.00 per 100; S-ln., 
$1.50 per dozen. 
Whitton & Sons, City and Green Sts., Utica, N. Y. 

Cinesarias, strong, thrifty stock, in flnest mixed 
colors, 3^-ln., $4.00 per 100; 4V^-in., $12.00 per 
100. Cash, please. 
Rober & Radke, 1712 S. 4th Ave., Maywood, 111. 

Cinerarias. See display adr. 
J. W. Miller, Shlremanstow n, Pa. 

Cinerarias, 3^-in., $3.50 100, or will exchange. 
M. D. Schmidt & Son, Park St., Dayton, O. 

Cinerarias, best strain, 4- in., for Raster, $5.00 
per 100. J. 0. Schmidt, Bristol, Pa. 

CLEMATIS. 

Clematis. A few good large flowering yarletles 
left. 10,000 pnnlculata, 2-yr., good strong plants. 
Write for prices. 

Parks & Schaufelberger, Penfleld, N. T. 

Clematis paniculata, strong 3-year, $1.00 per 
10; $7.50 per 100: $70.00 per 1000. 

F. A. Bailer, Bloomington, 111. 

Clematis paniculata, strong, $10.00 per 100. 
The Geo. Wlttbold Co., 
Edgebrook. Chicago, Illinois. 

COB>EAS. 

Cobaea scandens, 3-ln., $4.00 per doz. 
The Geo. Wlttbold Co., 
Edgebrook. Chicago. 111. 



COLEUS. 



Coleus rooted cuttings, 75c per 100; $5.00 per 
1000. Such varieties as Golden Bedder, Fire- 
brand, VerschatTeltll, His Majesty and many 
others. Large stock. 

Swan Peterson Floral Co., Gibson City, 111. 

Coleus rooted cuttings. Golden Bedder, Ver- 
schafreltii, Victoria, Lyon, Firebrand, Butterfly 
and other standard kinds, 60c 100, prepaid: 
$5.00 per 100 0. G. E. Fink, Kenilworth, N. J. 

Coleus. Verschafreltii, Golden Bedder, Fire- 
brand, Red and Yellow Pflster and 6 others, well 
rooted, 60c; 2% -in., $2.00. 

Burdell Floral Co., Bowling Green, Ky. 

Coleus. Verschaffeltli, Golden Bedder a|id 
other varieties, good, clean stock, 2%-in., $2.00 
100. Cash with order. 
Aurora Greenhouse Co., Aurora, 111. 

Coleus, strong 2-in., 2c; rooted cuttings, 60c 
per 100. Golden Bedder, Best Red Bedder, Beck- 
witb Gem and other leading sorts. 

Wlngert & Ulery, Maiden Lane. Springfield, O. 

Coleus, standard varieties, including Golden 
Bedder and VerscbatTeltli. Rooted cuttings, 75c 
per 100, $6.00 per 1000; 2^4-ln., 2c. 
Mosbeek Greenhouse Co., Onarga, 111. 

Coleus rooted cuttings. Verschaffeltli, Golden 
Bedder, Victoria, 60c per 100, $5.00 per 1000; 
strong 2-ln. stock, $16.00 per 1000; $2.00 per 100. 
Cash. Rudolf Nagel, Lancaster, Pa. 

Coleus In great variety, some new, 3-in., $4.00; 
2-ln., l%c. 

W. B. Woodrutr, Florist, Westfleld, N. J. 

Coleus, yellow, red and variegated, 2-in., heavy, 
$2.00 per 100. 
Wagner P ark Conservatoriea, Sidney, Ohio. 

Coleus. Choice collection of 12 leading va- 
rieties, 2%-in., $2.00 per 100. 
W. W. Rike. Le Roy, 111. 

Coleus, Golden Bedder and assorted. Rooted 
cuttings, 60c; 2U-in.. J2.00 per 100. 
J. P. Herzog, Cadillac, Mich. 

Coleus rooted cuttings. Golden Bedder, Ver- 
schafTeltli and others, §!)c 100; $5.00 1000. 

B. B. Randolph, Delavan, 111. 

Coleus, 20 varieties, choice standards, strong, 
eOc; 2-ln., strong plants, $2.00. Cash. 
Geo. M. Brlnkerhoff, Springfield, 111. 

Coleus, a grand collection, named, 70c per 100; 
$6.00 per 1000, prepaid. 
C. Humfeld, Clay Center, Kan. 

Coleus. Giant, $1.25; G. Bedder and Verschaf- 
feltli, 60c; mixed standard, 50c per 100. 
Albert M. Herr, Lancaster, Pa. 

Coleus, 10 varieties, my selection, 2^-in. pots, 
$2.00 per 100. Cash. 

Jos. H. Cunningham, Delaware, Ohio. 

Coleus rooted cuttings, 17 leading vars., 75c 
100, by mall; $5.00 1000. Cash. 
Fowlerville Floral Co., Flushing, N. Y. 

Coleus, 2-in., well branched, $1.76 100; rooted 
cuttings, 60c 100, $4.00 1000. 

Ponce de Leon Floral Co., Atlanta, Ga. 

Coleus. See display adv. 

D. U. Augspurger & Sons Co., Peoria, 111. 

Coleus rooted cuttings, 12 varieties, $6.00 per 
1000. U. G. Harglerode, Shippensburg, Pa. 



Coleus rooted cuttings, 10 fine sorts, $6.00 1000; 
2-ln., 2c. Cash. Byer Bros., Chambersburg, Pa. 

CUPHEAS. 

Cuphea rooted cuttings, 76c 100, prepaid, 2M- 
In., $1.50 100. G. E. Fink, Kenilworth. N. J. 

Cuphea (cigar plant), $1.00 per 100; $8.00 per 
1000, prepaid. C. Humfeld, Clay Center, Kan. 

Cuphea rooted cuttings, 75c per 100; 2-in., l%c. 
Cash. Byer Bros., Cuambersburg, Pa. 

CYCLAMEN. 

GIANT CYCLAMEN. For the last 16 years we 
always select % of our seed-bearing cyclamen 
stock before Xmas, to assure early l)loonilng 
plants, and claim the finest commercial strain In 
this country, no fizzle of many so called English 
varieties. Our aim is strong growers, that don't 
have to be petted to be grown Into a choice 
salable plant, a well built five petalled flower, 
many of them at one time, with well marked 
foliage; every plant an Ideal, a prize winner. 
Received first and second prizes at the Toledo 
Florists* Club meeting early in November when 
blooming cyclamen were scarce. We back our 
claims with stock worth seeing and InvUe every- 
body for Inspection. Here is one of the many 
letters we receive from satisfied customers, W. H. 
Gordon, Richmond, Va., says: "We were so 
much pleased with the 500 cyclamen seedlings 
shipped us last week that we have decided to 
order 500 more." Transplanted seedlings, ready 
for 2V4 or 3-ln., $3.00 per 100, $25.00 per 1000. 
Cash. Cultural directions with every order. 

C. Winterlch, Cyclamen Specialist, Defiance, 0. 

Cyclamen, transplanted seedlings, the best 
strains in existence, 15 separate colors. Strcmg 
plants, ready for pot, $3.00 per 100; $25.00 per 
1000. 500 at 1000 rate. Cash, please. 
Rober & Radke, 1712 S. 4th Ave., M aywood, JU. 

Cyclamen, transplanted seedlings, BEST GIANT 
COMMERCIAL STRAIN. Sound, stocky plants, 
3 to 6 leaves, 8 separate colors or mixed, 2i^c. 
J. L. Schiller, Toledo, O. 

CYCLAMEN GIGANTEUM HYBRIDS (August 
seedlings) In five colors; transplanted from flats, 
$3.00 per 100; $25.00 per 1000. 

Paul Mader, East Stroudsburg, Pa. 

Cyclamen, fine, bushy plants, full of buds and 
flowers. 4-in., $10.00 per 100; 6-ln., $15.00 per 
100. 
Wultton & Sons, City a nd Green S t s., Utica, N. Y . 

Cyclamen, 2%-ln., $3.^ per 10(X 
The Geo. Wlttbold Co., 
Edgebrook, Chicago, 111. 

Cyclamen persicum, finest mixture, $3.25 oz. 
J. Hasslach, Seed Grower, St. Remy de Provence, 
France. 

Cyclamen glganteum, 8-ln., $5.00; 4-ln., $10.00; 
strong, well budded. 2%-ln.. for growing on, 
$3.00 100. Cash. Freeport Floral Co., Freeport, 111. 

Cyclamen seedlings. See display adv. 
D. U. Augspurger & Sons Co., Peoria, HI. 

500 cyclamen seedlings, $8.00. 

M. D. Schmidt & Son, Park St., Dayton, O. 

DAHLIAS. 

Dahlias. Surplus of divisions from field stock. 
Henry Lyndhurst, ClitTord Brnton, Catherine 
Dner, Gen. Buller, Queen Victoria, Indian Chief, 
Jumbo, Black Beauty, Pretoria, $2.50 per 100; 
$20.00 per 1000. Souvenir de Oustave Doazon, 
$4.00 per 100; $35.00 per 1000. Stock all grown 
from roots, none from cuttings, therefore no 
blinds, no broken necks. Cash, please. 
W. A. Finger, Hlcksvllle, L. I., N. Y. 

DAHLIAS. 200,000 field-grown No. 1 atock. 

60,000 clumps, balance separated. Order early 

for spring uelivery. Catalogue free. 

J. L. MOORE, 

Northboro Dahlia and Gladiolus Gardens, 

Northboro, Massachusetts. 

Dahlias. Best of novelties and standard va- 
rieties, true to name. A choice lot of Introdnc- 
tions. Send for catalogue of dahlias, boilybocks, 
hardy plants, etc. E*rTces reasonable. 

W. W. Wilmore, Box 382, D e nver, Colo. 

Dahlias, strong field divisions, cfifford Brnton, 
Wm. Agnew, 20th Century, $5.00 per 100. Cash, 
please. Will exchange for namea gladioli. 
Thompson & Sons, Sta. D., R. 1, Milwaukee, Wis. 

Dahlias. All the best cut fiower sorts, $1.60 
per 100 and up. See display adv. in Florists' 
Review of Feb. 9. 

W. K. Fletcher, R. 6, Pes Moines, Iowa. 

Dahlias. 750,000 clumps to offer. Send list 
of your wants to 

THE EASTERN DAHLIA KING 
J. K. ALEXANDER, E. BRIDGEWATBR, MASS. 

Dahlias, divided roots, from 1 to 3 eyes to the 
piece. Send for list and get the latest varieties. 

W. P. Lotbrop, 
Brockton Dahlia Farm, E. B ridgewater. Mass. 

Dahlias, fine collection of field-grown clumps. 
Special circular on application. 
Storrs & Harrison Co., Painesvllle, O. 

Dahlias, field-grown clnmps. No. 1 stock. 

Nymphaea, Agnew and Krlembilde, $6.00 per 100. 

Wm. E. Maynard, R. D. 13, Knoxville, Tenn. 

Dahlias. 500 named sorts. Send list of your 
wants. Will exchange for named gladiolus. 
Nat'I Co-operative Snow Gardens, Spencer, Ind. 



Catalogue^f dahlias, cannas, iris, shrubs, berry 
plants, etc. W. L. L ux, R. D. 7, Topeka, Kan. 

Big bargain in dahlia clumps, named vara. 
C. H. Ketcham, N.S.D., South Haven, Mich. 

45,000 field-grown clumps, 2c and up. List 
ready. H. W. Koerner, Sta. B., Milwaukee, Wis. 

DAISIES. 

Shasta daisy seed, $1.00 per 1000. Saved from 
selected stock grown In the east from California 
seed. Cut of 1909 from 4 to 5% inches in 
diameter, wholesaled at $2.00 per 100. Entire 
crop of 1910 saved for seed. 

L. J. Bates, Rock Stream, Yates Co., N. Y. 

Reve d'Or, tlie only winter-blooming yellow 
marguerite; large flowers, long stems. From 
3V4-rn. pots, $2.00 per doz., $12.50 per 100; 2-ln» 
pots, $6.00 per KtO. Cash. 

Riveralue Greenhous es, Auburndale, Mass. 

Daisies, hardy (Chrysanthemum maximum), 
snow white, fine for cutting during summer. Field 
stock, 1-year-old, $2.00 per 100; $15.00 per 1000. 
Cash. W. A. Finger, Hlcksvllle, N. Y. 

Daisies. Marguerites, Queen Alexandra and 
Queen of Belgians, all budded, 3Vi In., $6.00; 
4^4-in.. $10.00; 6-in., $16.00 per 100. Cash, 
please. J. Sylvester, F lurlst, Oconto, Wis. 

Marguerites. Queen Alexandra, Giant of Call- 
fornla and Paris or many-flowered, 2-in. pots, 
strong, $2.75 100; $25.00 1000. 
Henry Krlnke & Son, St. Paul. Minn. 

UNEXCELLED yellow wlnter-bloomlng daisy. 
Rooted cuttings, $3.00; 2-in., pots, $6.00 per 100. 
Cash. P. A. Baker, Media, Pa. 



Daisies, $4.00 per 1000. 

The Geo. Wlttbold Co., 

Edgebrook, Chic ago, 111. 

Daisies, bellls. red and white, double, $2.00 per 
1000. Cash. Prepaid. 
L. E. Cook & Co., Calla, Ohio. 

Bellls daisies, Longfellow, Snowball and Alas- 
ka. Seedlings, 50c per 100. Cash. Mailing, 10c. 
W- E. Trimble Greenhouse Co., Princeton, 111. 

Yellow marguerite daisies, ready to shift, 2%- 
In., 2c; rooted cuttings, 50c to clean up. 
U. G. H arglerode, Shippensburg, Pa. 

Paris daisy, yellow, 2-in., 2c; white and yellow, 
rooted cutings. $1.00 per 100. Cash. 
Byer Bros., Chambersb urg, Pa. 

Daisies, white and yellow, named, $1.00 per 
100: $8.00 per 1000, prepaid. 
0. Humfeld, Clay Center, Kan. 

Yellow daisies, Etolle d'Or, large 2-in., $3.00 
per 100; ^.00 per 1000. 
Waverly Greenhouses, Wave rly, 111. 

Marguerites, white. Nice 2>^-in. stock, ready 
tot 4-rn., $3.00 per 100. 

Wm. Eschrich Co., No rth Milwaukee, Wis. 

Marguerites, California, strong stock] $1.25 
per 100. prepaid. S. W. Pike, St. Charles, 111. 

Shasta, strong, field-grown, $2.00 100. 
Electric Park Greenhouses, Fort Smith, Ark. 



DRACiENAS. 



BUCKBEE'S "FULL OP LIFE" DRACAENAS. 
Select stock. Doz. 100 

Indivisa, 4-ln $1.60 $10.00 

Indivisa, 6-ln 8.60 26.00 

Termtnalls, 2^-in 1.00 7.00 

Termlnalls, 3-ln 2.00 12.60 

Cash. Prompt express shipment. 
Rockford Seed Farms, H. W. Backbee, 
Forest City Greenhouses, Rock ford, 111. 

Dracaena fragrans, 2V^-ln., $1.60 per do«.; 8- 
In., $2.00 per doz.; 4-in., $3.00 per dot.; 6-in., 
$6.00 per doz. 

The Geo. Wlttbold Co., 
Edgebrook, Chicago, nilnola. 

Have you something that you don't want and 
would you trade it for something you have use 
for? Then don't fail to read the To Exchange 
advs. over in the back part of thi s department. 

Dracaena indivisa, fine stock, 3-in., 6c; 4-ln., 
$10.00 per 100, $80.00 per 1000. 
S. M. Harbison, Danville, Ky. 

Dracaena indivisa, 2%-in., 2c; seedlings, 70c 
per 100, $5.00 per 1000. Cash. Mailing, 10c. 
W. E. Trimble Greenhouse Co., Princeto n, 111. 

Dracaena indivisa, strong stock for growing on. 
3-ln., $5.00 100. Cash. 
Freeport Floral Co., Freeport, HI. 

Dracaena indivisa, fine stock for growing on, 
from 2-in. pots, $2.00 ner 100; 2% in., $2.60 per 
100. Cash. Wettlln Floral Co., Hornell, N. Y. 

Dracaena indivisa, 2%-in. pot stock for growing 
on, $3.00 per 100. 
Storrs A Harrison Co., Paine avllle, O. 

Dracaena indivisa, good 4-in., $10.00 per 100. 
Cash, please. Van Aken Bros., Coldwater, M ich . 

Dracaena indivisa, 6-ln., 20c each. 

Fred H. Lemon & Co., Richmond, Ind. 



Dracaena indivisa, strong 3-in., 6c; 6-ln., 16c. 
Cash. Morris Floral Co., Morris, III. 

700 Dracaena indivisa, fine 4-in. stock, pot- 
grown, 10c each. A. J. Packer, Caro, Iflcn. 

Dracaena Indivisa. See display adv. 
D. U. Angspnrger & Sona Co., Peoria, III. 



PLEASE MENTION THE REVIEW WHEN WRITING ANY OF THESE ADVERTISERS 



.w-T:?v,7r-v , , 



:-v?v»\^'' 



84 



The Weekly Florists' Review* 



MARCH 2, 1911. 



FERNS. 



FERNS FOR IMMEHJIATB DELIVERY. 
EXTRA GOOD QUALITY STOCK. 
BOSTON. 
100 100 

4-lnch $12.00 8-Inch $80.00 

5-inch 26.00 O-inch each, 1.2& 

6-lnch 40.00 10-lnch each, 1.60 

7-lnch 60.00 12-lnch each, 2.00 

WHITMANI. 

100 100 

4-lnch $15.00 7-lnch $60.00 

5-lnch 30.00 8-lnch 80.00 

6-lnch 46.00 

AMERPHOLII. SUPERBISSIMA. 

5-lnch 30.00 3-lnch 10.00 

6-lnch 60.00 SCHOLZBLI. 

SCOTTII. (Crested Scott Fern) 

.3-lnch 8.00 3-lnch 10.00 

R. R. Davis Co., MORRISON, ILL. 

FERNS FOR FERN DISHES. 

Largest stock In the country. Several hundred 
thousand strong, healthy, bushy 2%-ln. stock, 
DOW ready, assortment of 12 best varieties, $3.00 
per 100: $25.00 per 1000; 5000 for $100.00. 

CIBOTIUM SCHIEDEI, extra strong 4-ln. 
stock, ready for 5-ln. pots, $8.00 per doz. ; $65.00 
per 100. 

DICKSONIA ANTARCTICA, beautiful fast 
growing tree fern of great commercial value, 
4-in., $8.00 per doz.; $65.00 per 100. 

FERN SEEDLINGS In 6 good fern dish va- 
rieties; large clumps, $1.00 per 100, $9.50 per 
1000. 

ASPARAGUS SPRENGERI, 2i4-in., $3.00 per 
100; $25.00 per 1000. 

J. F. ANDERSON, 
Fern Specialist Short Hills, N. J. 

30,000 FINEST FERNS EVER OFFERED. 
Express charges prepaid. 

Boston, 2V> and 3-ln., $5.00 and $7.00 100. 

W^hltmani, 2, 2% and 3-in., $3.50, $5.00 and 
S7 00 100 

Amerpo'hlii, 2, 2i/4 and 3-ln., $3.50, $5.00 and 
$7.00 100. 

Plersonl, 2V. and 3-ln., $5.00 and $7.00 100. 

Annie Foster, 2% and 3-in., $5.00 and $7.00 
100. 

Scottll, 2V2 and 3-ln.. $5.00 and $7.00 100. 

Sword, 2% and 3-ln., $5.00 and $7.00 100. 

Todeaoldes, 2% and 3-ln., $6.00 and $8.00 100. 

Write for quotations on larger sizes and 
varieties. Cash, please. Samples, 10c each. 

DOESCHER & JONES, 
1861 Gentllly Ave.. New Orleans, La. 

Ferns. Boston, Whltmanl, Scottll and Todea- 
oldes, 214-in., $3.50 per 100; 3-ln., $8.00 per 100; 
4-in., $12.50 per 100; 5-in., $20.00 per 100. These 
ferns are thoroughly established in the pots we 
list and are ready for shift. We pack them to 
reach you In first-class shape. Cash, please. 
See our display adv. 

Reeser Plant Co., Springfield, Ohio. 

BOSTON FERNS. 
A 1 STOCKY PLANTS. 
4-in., $15.00 per 100; 5-ln., $25.00 per 100; 
6-ln., $40.00 per 100. Money and express re- 
funded If not as advertised. 

WIRTH & GAUPP, 
SPRINGFIELD, ILLINOIS 

Nephrolepis exaltata Bostoniensls. Booking 
orders now. Fine, strong runners, $10.00 per 1000. 
Nephrolepis exaltata, game price as above. Ne- 
phrolepis davallloldes furcans, strong rnnners, 
$2.50 per 100. Elegantissima, $15.00 per 1000. 
J. J. Soar, LitUe River, Fla. 

Boston ferns, 2-ln., $3.60 per 100, $30.00 per 
1000; 3-ln., $8.00 per 100, $60.00 per 1000; 4-ln., 
$1.50 per doz., $12.00 per 100, $100.00 per 1000; 
500 at 1000 rate. 

The Geo. Wittbold Co., 
Edgebrook. Chicago, 111. 

Bijautlfully finished Whitman!, 5-in., 30c. 
Orders booked for finely grown Bostons for 
delivery April 1 on, 5-ln., 25c; 6-ln., 50c; 7-ln., 
75c; 8-in., $1.00. Full values. 

Gullett & Sons, Lincoln, 111. 

.3000 Boston and Plersonl ferns, choice plants, 
fi-in., 25e. Young stock: Boston, Whltmanl, 
Scottll and Piersonl, 2%-in., $3.50 100; 3-ln.. 
$5.00 100. Cash. 

A. G. Lake, Wellesley Hills, Mass. 

GOOD SHORT STOCK. 

Ferns. 200 3-ln. Whltmanl, 5%c; 500 3-ln. 

Boston, 5e; 1500 2-in. Boston, 3c; 300 2-ln. 

Whltmanl, 3%c. We must have the room. Cash 

with order, please. E. A. Johannes, Rockford, 111. 

Boston ferns, fine stock, 5-ln., $25.00 per 100; 
•fi-in.. $40.00 per 100; 7-ln., $75.00 per 100. Table 
ferns, very good value, $3.00 per 100; $25.00 per 
1000. Cash. 

J. B. Mllley, 346 Masten St., BufTalo. N. Y. 

Boston ferns, strong, fine, first-class plants. 
4%-in. pots, $15.00 per 100; 5-ln. pots, $2>'5.00 
per 100; 6-in. pots, $40.00 per 100. Good value. 

Cr own Point Floral Co., Crown Point. Ind. 

WHITMANI AND BOSTONS. 

Ferns. Boston and Whltmanl, 3-ln., $6.00 per 
100; 5-in.. $25.00 per 100; 6-ln.. $35.00 per 100; 
7-ln., $60.00 per 100; 8-ln., $75.00 per 100. 

J. W. Davis, 225 W. 16 St., Davenport, Iowa. 

Boston ferns, 6-ln. pots, fine for box and 
liasket work. $25.00 per 100. 

Fred H. Lemon & Co., Richmond, Ind. 

Ferns. Boston, Whltmanl, Amerpohlil, Spren- 
Reri. pUimosus, maidenhair and small ferns. Ask 
for prices. Geo. A. Kuhl, Pekln, 111. 



Ferns, 4-ln.; heavy, well rooted plants. Pler- 
sonl, Elegantissima, BarrowBli, $14.00 per 100; 
Boston, $15.00 per 100. 

Wagner Park Conservatories, Sidney, Ohio. 

Assorted ferns for dishes. Strong healthy 
plants from 2V4-ln., $3.00 100; $25.00 1000; 3-ln., 
$6.00 100; 4-in., $12.00 100; $100.00 1000. 
Frank N. Eskesen, Madison, N. J. 

Ferns for dishes, assorted varieties, 2V4-in. 
pots, $3.50 per 100; $30.00 per 1000. 500 at 1000 
rate. Cash with order. 

Frank OechsUn, 4911 W. Qnlncy St., Chicago. 

Ferns. Amerpohlil, Boston, Superbisslma and 
Whltmanl, 6-in., $5.00 doz.; 4-ln., $12.00 100. 
Stock guaranteed strictly choice. 
J. T. Cherry, Athens, 111. 

Ferns. Boston and Whltmanl, strong, $3.60 per 
100. Boston, 5-in., 20c; 6-In., 25c. Good stock; 
bargains. Must sell. 

W. B. Woodruff, Florist, Westfleld. N. J. 

Ferns. Boston, Plersonl, Scottll, 2%-in., 4c; 
.•{-in., 8c. Elegantissima and Whltmanl, 2^4-ln.. 
5c; 3-in., 10c. Special prices on large specimen 
ferns. Mosbsek Greenhouse Co., Onarga, 111. 

Fine Boston ferns, from bench, to make room, 
large, for 7 and 8-ln. pots, 35c each. 

Hill City Greenhouses, Forest City, Iowa. 

Boston ferns, A No. 1, bushy stock, 6-in., 35c; 
5-ln., 20c; 4-ln., 12c; 3-ln., 8c each. Cash with 
order. Thos. Salveson, Petersburg, 111. 

Mixed ferns, from bench. Boston, Plersonl and 
Whltmanl, ready for 5 and 6-ln. pots, 20c. Cash 
with order. Aurora Greenhouse Co., Aurora, 111. 

Boston ferns, extra fine, bushy 6-in. plants, 
$4.00 per 10; $35.00 per 100. 

Alois Frey, Crown Point, Ind. 

Nephrolepis Scholzell, 2%-in., $5.00 per 100 ; 
5-ln., strong, $6.00 per doz., $40.00 per 100. 

Storrs & Harrison Co., Painesville, Ohio. 

Boston ferns, strong runners, $10.00 per 1000. 
Write for special prices on 5,000 to 20,000 lots. 
F. M. Soar, Little River, Fla. 

Ferns, Boston and Whltmanl, heavy stock, 2%- 
in., 3%c; 3-ln., 8c; 4-ln., 12c. 

A. J. Baldwin, Newark, Ohio. 



Ferns. Boston, Whltmanl and ferns for dishes. 
See display adv. 

D. U. Augspurger & Sons Co., Peoria, 111. 

Boston ferns, strong, established in 2^-ln. 
pots, $4.00 per 100; $40.00 per 1000. Cash. 

P. N. Obertin, Kenosha, Wis. 

~~Fems for dishes, 2-ln., $2.50 per 100; $20.00 
per 1000. Cash. 

F. Sokol, College St., Worcester, Mass. 

Ferns. Boston, Scottll, Whltmanl, 6-in., 40c, 
fine, worth more; 2% -in., $3.00. 

Burden Floral Co., Bowling Green, Ky. 

Boston ferns, 5-ln., busby plants, $3.00 and 
$4.00 per doz. Cash, please. 

E. C. Rogers, Roslindale, Mass. 

Boston and Plersonl ferns, 2%-in., 3c; 3-in., 
6c; 4-ln.. 10c. Cash with order. 

Postma The Florist, Union City, Tenn. 

Extra strong 6-ln. Boston ferns, $35.00 per 
100. Daniel Branch, 313 E. 51st St., Chicago. 

BUSINESS BRINGERS— 
REVIEW Classified Advs. 

Boston ferns, very strong, 2%-in., $5.00 per 
100. I. O. Kemble, Marshalltown, Iowa. 

Whltmanl and Boston ferns. Fine stock, 35c 
to 75c each. Smith & Gannett, Geneva, N. Y. 

Ferns. Boston, Whltmanl, 0-in., 35c; 8-ln., 76c. 
L. D. Eastman & Sons, 1800 E. 77 St., Chicago. 

FEVERFEW. 

Feverfew Little Gem. the best, $1.25 per 100, 
$10.00 per 1000, prepaid. 

C. Humfeld. Clay Center, Kan. 

Feverfew. Strong, well rooted cattlngs, $10.00 
1000; $1.25 100, by mall. 

Henry Krlnke & Son. St. Paul, Minn. 

Feverfew, dwarf, 2-ln., strong, $1.50 per 100. 
Cash, please. 

J. A. Swartley & Sons, Sterling, 111. 

Feverfew Little Gem, strong, well rooted, $1.00 
per 100; $8.00 per 1000, prepaid. 
S. W. Pike, St. Charles, 111. 

Feverfew, large double white, R. C, $1.00 100, 
prepaid. Chas. Frost, Kenllworth, N. J. 

FORGET-ME-NOTS. 

ForgPt-me-not Winter Queen, strong rooted cut- 
tings, S1.25 per 100 by mail. 

S. W. Pike, St. Charles, 111. 

FUCHSIAS. 

Fuchsias in good assortment, 2-ln., $2.50 per 
100. Royal Purple and Excelsior. 75c per doz. 
N. O. Caswell, Delavan, 111. 

Fuchsias, Lord Byron, Beauty and Phenomenal. 
2-ln. _pot8, 2c. Cash, please. South View Floral 
Co.. R. D. No. 1, Fair Haven, Pa. 

Finest double fuchsias, dwarf habit. Strong, 
well rooted cuttings, $1.00 100; $8.00 1000. Cash. 
J. P. Cannata, Mt. Freedom, N. J. 

Best fuchsias In the market, 2-in., $2.00 per 
100, M. Fenton, West Newton, Pa. 



FUNKIAS. 



Funkia undulata medio varlegata, 3 eyes and 
up, $6.00 per 100; $45.00 per 1000. The finest , 
permanent border around a bed of geraitinms. 

F. J. Grootendorst & Sons, Boskoo p, Holland. 

FUNKIA UNDULATA VARIEGATA, hardy, ' 
3 to 6 eyes, will make fine 4-in. pot plants by , 
Decoration day, $6.00 per 100. 
John D. Imlay, Zanesville, Ohio. 



GENISTAS. 



Genistas, nice large plants, all In bud, a good 
yellow flower for Easter, 4-ln., $10.00 per 100; 
$1.26 per doz. 
Whltton & Sons, City & Green Sts., Utica, N. Y. 



GERANIUMS. 



Geraniums, strong, out of 2 and 2%-ln. pots. 
Double Grant, S. A. Nutt, La Favorite (Relnonlt 
dbl. salmon), $2.00 per 100. A. Ricard, Mme. 
Barney, Thos. Meehan, $2.50 per 100. 

Rooted cuttings: Double Grant, La Favorite, 
$1.00 per 100; Ricard, Mme. ftamey, Thos. 
Meehan, $1.26 per 100. 

Wm. Schwan & Son, Fredonla, N. Y. 

ROOTED CUTTINGS. 
Strictly Al ^.tock of the following "BIG 
FOUR" bedders: S. A. Nutt (greatest dark red), 
Gen. Grant (best seml-dbl. scarlet), Beaute Polte- 
vlne (salmon), Mme. Buchner (only dbl. white). 
Large top cuttings, well rooted, $1.50 per 100, 
$15.00 per 1000. Delivery March 1 to 10. 
W. T. Buckley Co., Springfield, 111. 

Geraniums, strong 2%-in. S. A. Nutt, Polte- 
vlne, Heteranthe, E. H. Trego, La France, $2.00 
per 100; $20.00 per 1000. Same from 3-in.. 
$3.00 per 100. Mixed, good assortment, mostly 
red, not named, 2i^-ln., $1.75 per 100; 3-in., $2.50 
per 100. This is all fine stock. 

.\ndrcw Peterson, Hoopeston. 111. 

GERANIUM 
ROOTED CUTTINGS. 
Buchner, Grant, $10.00 1000. Doyle, Vlaud, 
Ricard and Castellane. $12.00 1000. 

FRED W. RITCHY 
First & Ruby Sts., Lancaster, Pa. 

Geranium rooted cuttings. Meehan, PreslUy, 
Nutt, Buchner, $1.25 per 100; $10.00 per 1000. 
Ricard, Vlaud, $12.00 per 1000. Montmort, 
Trego, $1.35 per 100. Dagata, single and double 
Dryden, $1.50 per 100. March delivery. Cash, 
please. J. P. Slebold, Lancaster, Pa. 

3000 Nutt, 500 Ricard, 300 Poitevlne, 250 Cas- 
tries, 2,50 Meehan, 2^4 and 2%-ln., $2.25 100; 
$20.00 1000. 100 pansy geraniums, 2y3-ln., $4.00. 
200 Ivy geraniums, 224-ln., $2.50 100. 500 double 
petunias, pure white and variegated, 2%-ln., 
$2.00 100. The Corry Floral Co., Corry, Pa. 

Geraniums, 2-ln., good strong stock. Gloire de 
France, Berthe de Presily, J. J. Harrison and 
others, $2.25 per 100. A. Ricard, strong 3-ln.. 
stock, $3.00 per 100. Mme. Sallerol, 2-ln., $2.00 
per 100. Cash. Addems, Morgan & Co., Loda, 111. 

To make room, Nutt and Harrison, 4 shades 
pink, and ^ood white, all double, assorted. Good, 
stocky, healthy plants, 2-in., $2.00; 3-ln., $3.00 
per 100. Cash, please. 

A. M. Stackhouse, Box 168, Minerva, Ohio. 

Mme. Sallerol geraniums, fine 2%-ln., $2.00 per 
100: extra fine 2V'-ln., ready to shift into 3%-In.. 
$2.50 per 100. Special rate on 1000 lots. See 
lantana adv. 

S. Dumser, 436 McClure Ave., Eagin, 111. 

Geraniums. Gen. Grant, Nutt, $2.00 per 100: 
$18.00 per 1000. Ricard, Poitevlne, $2.50 per 100; 
$24.00 per 1000. All good, strong, healthy plants 
from 214-in. pots. 

Jas. .\mbacher. West End, N. J. 

Geraniums, S. A. Nutt, John Doyle and La 
Favorite. Strong plants from 2V4-ln. pots, $2.25 
per 100; $20.00 per 1000. Cash with order. 

Rutledge Nurseries, Rutledge, Del. Co., Pa. 

Double red, pink and Nutt geraniums, mixed. 
Strong R. C. $1.00 100. Mme. Sallerol, strong 
R. C. 90c 100. 

Keeney's Greenhouses, Monongahela, Pa. 

10,000 geranium R. C, S. A. Nutt, Gen. Grant 
and 6 other selected varieties, $1.50 per 100; 2%- 
In., $3.00 per 100. Cash. 

W. E. Trimble Greenhouse Co., Princeton, 111. 

Fine S. A. Nutt and Ricard geraniums, out of 
3-ln., ready for 4-ln., fall struck cuttings, no 
finer stock grown. $40.00 per 1000. Cash. 

F. E. Cremer, Hanover, Pa. 

Geraniums. Extra strong 2-ln. Mme. Sallerol, 
all guaranteed strong and healthy, $2.00 per 100. 
Must have room. Cash, please. 

J. A. Swartley & Sons, Sterling, 111. 

Ivv geraniums, 3-ln., $4.00 per 100, $35.00 per 
lOOO'. , „ 

The Geo. Wittbold Co., 
Edgebrook. Chicago, Illinois . 

Geraniums. S. A. Nutt, 2-ln., $2.00 per 100; 
$18.50 per 1000. Mme. Sallerol, 2-In., $2.00 per 
100; $20.00 per 1000. ^ ^, ,. „ , „ 

Vern L. Schluraff, Erie, Pa. 

Geraniums. S. A. Nutt and six other varieties, 
mv selection, 2i^-ln. pots, $3.00 per 100; $25.00 
per 1000. Cash. „ , 

Jos. H. Cunningham. Delaware, Ohio. 

Geraniums. See display adv. 
D. U. Augspurger & Sons Co., Peoria, 111. 



PLEASE MENTION THE REVIEW WHEN WRITING ANY OF THESE ADVERTISERS 



Mabch 2, 1911. 



ThcWeckly Florists^ Review* 



85 



Geranliuns, 2V4-iii., strong stock, |2.0O per 100. 
1000 Rlcard. 400 E. 0. Hill and 500 mixed, 
standard varieties. 

Arthur Harbison, Harrodsburg, Ky. 

Geraniums for Easter. Strong 8-ln. Rlcard and 
Grant, ready for 4-ln., to make room, |4.00 per 
100. Thos. Salveson, Petersburg, 111. 

Geraniums, 2%-ln. 50O La Favorite, $1.80 per 
100; 500 S. A. Nutt, 12.00 per 100. Casb. 


HARDY SHRUBS. 
Hydrangea arborescens grandlflora, 15 to 20 in., 
$10.00 100, $00.00 1000; 8 to 12 In., $6.00 100, 
$60.00 1000. Althea seedlings, mixed colors, 
transplanted, 2% to 3% ft., $2.00 100; $16.00 
1000. Barberry Thunbergil, 1% to 2 ft., trans- 
planted. $5.00 100, $40.00 1000; 8 to 12 In., $3.00 
100; $20.00 1000. Privet Ibota, 1% to 2% ft., 
transplanted, $4.00 100; $30.00 1000. Privet 
Regeflanum, 12 to 18 in., transplanted, $3.00 100. 
Privet California, 2 to 3 ft., $2.50 100, $18.00 
1000; 1% to 2 ft., $2.00 100, $14.00 1000; 10 to 
12 In.. $1.25 100, $9.00 1000. Spiraea Van Hout- 
tel, IV, to 2 ft., $4.00 100, $30.00 1000; 12 to 18 
In., $2.00 100. Clematis paniculata, 2-yr., $4.00 
100; $30.00 1000. Trltoma Pfltzeri, $5.00 100. 
Vlnca minor, transplanted, strong, $3.00 100; 
$25.00 1000. B. Y. Teas Sc Son, Centerville, Ind. 


IRISES. 


IRIS, PHLOX, PEONY. 

Price-list free. 

FRANK H. WILD FLORAL CO., 

SARCOXIB, MISSOURI. 

IRISES. Sans Souci, Siberian Blue and De- 
licata, $2.50 per 100. 

C. S. Harrison's Select Nursery, York, Neb. 


J. J. Clayton, West Grove, Pa. 


IVIES. 




4c. Cash with order. 

Postma The Florist, Union City, Tenn. 


English Ivy B. C, $1.00 per 100; $9.00 per 
1000. Parlor Ivy R. C, 50c per 100; $4.00 per 
1000. Cash. Mailing, 10c. 

W. B. Trimble Greenhouse Co., Princeton, 111. 

English ivy rooted cuttings, $1.00 per 100, 


Geraniums, 2-ln. S. A. Nutt, Buchner, La 
Favorite, |2.00 per 100; $18.00 per 1000. 

D. R. Herron, CLEAN, N. Y. 


Geranium rooted cuttings. Rlcard, Poltevlne 
and Nutt for delivery In March. 

Albert M. Herr, Lancaster, Pa. 


Double hardy pinks, finest colors, and sweet 
Williams. Extra large clumps, transplanted last 
spring, $3.00 per 100. 

Gustav Pltzonka. Bristol, Pa. 


prepaid. 

G. B. Fink, Kenllworth (formerly Roselle), N. J. 

Advertisers have learned from experience that 


Mme. Sallerol, 2%-ln., strong plants, $2.00 per 
100; $18.00 per 1000. 
Rober & Radke. 1712 S. 4th Ave., May wood. 111. 


THE REVIEW 


HELIOTROPES. 


PAYS BEST. 


English Ivy, 4-in. plants, 3 to 4 ft. runners, 
20c each. C. C. Pollworth Co., Milwaukee, Wis. 

Ivy rooted cuttings. English, $1.00, German, 
50c 100. prepaid. Chas. Frost, Kenllworth, N. J. 


Mme. Sallerol geranium rooted cuttings, $1.00 
per 100; 2%-ln., $2.00 per 100. 

J. P. Herzog, Cadillac, Mich. 


Heliotropes, dark, 2-In. pots, 2c. Cash, please. 
South View Floral Co., R. D. No. 1, Fair 
Haven, Pa. 

Heliotropes, dark blue, very bushy, 3%-ln., 
$6.00; 2%-ln., $2.00 per 100; rooted cuttings, 660. 
Cash. C. H. Jacobs, Westfleld, Mass. 

Heliotropes, purple. In five good varieties, $3.00 
per 100; $25.00 per 1000. 

Storrs & Harrison Co., Painesvllle, Ohio. 


Red Wing, the best 1910 novelty, deep cardinal 
red. Rooted cuttings, 75c per doz., prepaid. 


German Ivy, 3-ln., 4c. 

Llewellyn, Florist, CLEAN, N. Y. 


Chas. Frost, Kenllworth, N. J. 


German ivy rooted cuttings, 50c 100. 

U. G. Harglerode, Shlppensburg, Pa. 


Geraniums. Mme. Sallerol, 2^-ln., strong cool 
grown plants, $2.00 per 100; special price on 1000. 
J. L. Stone, Trumansburg, N. T. 


English Ivy, 2%-ln., $2.50. 

Burden Floral Co., Bowling Green, Ky. 


Mme. Sallerol geraniums, $1.25 per 100; $10.00 
per 1000, prepaid. 

C. Humfeld, Clay Center, Kan. 


Heliotropes, dark ; good stock. Strong and well 
rooted cuttings, 75c 100; $6.00 1000. Cash. 
J. P. Cannata, Mt. Freedom, N. J. 


German ivy rooted cuttings, 50c per 100. 

J. P. Herzog, Cadillac, Mich. 


Geranium S. A. Nutt, 2%-ln. pots, $3.00 per 
100; $25.00 per 1000. 

McRae-Jenkinson Co., Cheswlck, Pa. 


Fine heliotrope, blue and white, 2-ln., $2.50 
per 100; 2V4-In., $3.50 per 100. Centefieur. 75c 
per doz. N. 0. Caswell, Delavan, 111. 

Heliotrope rooted cuttings, 90c per 100; $8.00 
per 1000. Aurora Greenhouse Co., Aurora, 111. 

Heliotropes. See display adv. 
D. U. Augspurger & Sons Co., Peoria, 111. 


JASMINES. 


BUCKBEE'S "FULL OF LIFE" JASMINES. 


Geraniums, strong, from 2%-ln. pots, our se- 
lection of good varieties, $2.50 per 100. 

S. D. Brant, Clay Center, Kan. 


Select 2%-lnch. 

Maid of Orleans $0.50 doz. ; $3.50 100 

Grand Duke 75 doz. ; 6.00 100 

Grandiflorum 50 doz. ; 3.00 100 


Geraniums, 2i^-ln., all kinds, also Ivy and 
Sallerol, $2.00 per 100; 300 for $5.00. 

J. C. Schmidt, Bristol, Pa. 


Gracillimum 50 doz. ■ 3.50 100 




Heliotropes, dark, rooted cuttings, 75c per 100, 
prepaid. G. E. Fink, Kenllworth, N. J. 

Heliotrope R. C, 3 kinds, $1.00 100; 2-ln., l%c. 
Cash. Byer Bros., Chambersburg, Pa. 

Heliotropes, blue; rooted cuttings, $1.00 100, 
prepaid. A. J. Baldwin, Newark, Ohio. 

Heliotrope rooted cuttings, 75 per 100, prepaid. 
Chas. Frost, Ken Iworth, N. J. 


Cash. Prompt express shipment. 
Roekford Seed Farms, H. W. Buckbee, 
Forest City Greenhouses, Roekford, 111. 

Jasmines, night-blooming, R. C, $1.00; 2^-ln., 
$2.50. Burden Floral Co., Bowling Green, Ky. 

LANTANAS. 


BUSINESS BRINGERS— 

Review 
Classified Advs. 


Mme. Sallerol geraniums, 2^-in., heavy plants, 
$3.00 per 100. 

Wagner Park Conservatories, Sidney, Ohio. 


Mme. Sallerol rooted cuttings, $1.00 per 100, 


Lantanas, strong 2>^-in., orange and pink. 


$8.00 per 1000; 214-ln., $2.00 per 100, $18.00 per 
1000. Krueger Bros., Toledo, Ohio. 


Heliotropes, well rooted, 75c; 2J4-ln., bushy, 
$2.00. Burden Floral Co., Bowling Green, Ky. 

Heliotropes, two varieties, 2-in., $2.50 per 100. 
J. W. Ross Co., Centralla, 111. 


have been pinched back, $2.50 per 100. 
S. Dumser, 436 McClure Ave., Elgin, 111. 


Mme. Sallerol geraniums, 2-ln., 2c. 

F. J. Prouty, Spencer, Mass. 


LILACS. 


3000 Mme. Sallerol, 2-ln., strong plants. $1.75 
100. Cash. E. Glauser, Toledo, Ohio. 

600 La Favorite. 400 Dble. Grant. 2V6-in., 
$17..')0 the lot. Boney Bros., West Grove, Pa. 


Heliotropes, strong 2-ln., $2.00 per 100. Cash, 
please. J. A. Swartley & Sons, Sterling, 111. 


LILACS, Rouens, on their own roots. 1 to 2 
ft., $5.00; 2 to 3 ft., $10.00; 3 to 4 ft., $15.00 
per 100. 


HEMEROCALLIS. 


C. S. Harrison's Select Nursery, York, Neb. 


Rose geraniums, 2-ln., $2.50 per 100. 

J. W. Ross Co., Centralla, 111. 


LILY OF THE VALLEY. 


Hemerocallls Dumortierl. Strong plants of this 
popular early-flowering day lily. $5.00 per 100. 
Hillside Hardy Flower Gardens, Turtle Creek, 
Pa. 


GERBERAS. 


LILY OF THE VALLEY. 
Lily of the valley, giant forcing. We offer 
preeminently the finest lily of the valley In the 


Gerbera Jamesonl, my own hybrids, 4-ln. pots, 
will bloom this spring, 15c each, $12.50 100; 
2-ln. pots, 75c doz., $5.00 100. 

Henry Krlnke & Son, St. Paul, Minn. 


HOLLYHOCKS. 


market today. Pips selected with the greatest 
care. Cold storage valley, ready for forcing, 
$14.00 per 1000. 


Hollyhock seedlings, $10.00 per 1000. 
The Geo. Wittbold Co., 
Edgebrook. Chicago, in. 

Hollyhocks, field, 4 colors, double, $3.00 per 100. 
Byer Bros., Chambersburg, Pa. 


Currie Bros. Co., 312 Broadway, Milwaukee, Wis. 


GLADIOLI. 


Western headquarters for finest cold storage 
valley pips. Order now for Easter forcing. 
$14.00 per 1000; $1.50 per 100. 

H. N. Bruns, 3040 W. Madison St., Chicago. 


Gladioli. America, select buibs, $5.00 per 100; 
3000 3rd size blooming bulbs. $20.00 per 1000. 


500 Augusta, select bulbs, $3.00 per 100; 600 
2nd size, $1.50 per 100. 3000 Meadowvllle, $7.60 


HONEYSUCKLES. 


LOBELIAS. 


per 1000. 2000 white and light, fine mixture, 
.$10.00 per 1000. 1000 Groft's, $7.50 per 1000. 
5000 mixed, $5.00 per 1000. White Lady, select 
bulbs, $25.00 per 100. Cash. Send stamps for 
samples. Haentze Co., Fond du Lac, Wis. 

GLADIOLUS PINK BEAUTY. 
Great forcing early bloomer, throws 2 or 3 
spikes; May in character, color pink; straight 
long spikes, fine for sprays, decorations or stem 
flowers. $2.50 per 100; $20.00 per 1000. 250 at 
1000 rate. Cas 1. 


Lobelia Kathleen Mallard, the new double. I 
have 50.000 extra large and well-rooted cuttings, 
transplanted Into soil, and. If you want good, 
clean, healthy stock for spring trade, order now. 
Well packed to stand any weather, satisfactloiit 
guaranteed, 75c per 100, by mail; $5.00 per 1000, 
by express. 
S. A. Pinkstone, 206 Court St., Utlca, N. Y. 

Lobelia Kathleen Mallard, the new double. 
Rooted cuttings taken In September and kept 


"FULL OP LIFE" select 2%-in. honeysuckles. 
Hall's Japan and aurea reticulata (golden 
leaved), 50c doz.; $3.00 per 100. Cash. Prompt 
express shipment. 

Roekford Seed Farms, H. W. Buckbee, 
Forest City Greenhouses, Roekford, 111. 

Honeysuckles, Hall's Japanese and Chinese 
climbing. Extra heavy, 2-year, field-grown, $5.00 
per 100. Elmhurst Nursery, Argentine, Kan. 


Stevens' Gladioli Co., Saginaw W. S., Mich. 
Gladiolus Alice Carey, the best commercial 


HYACINTHS. 


growing on In soil, large plants for 2 or 3-ln. 
pots, 75c 100, by man; $5.00 1000, express. 
Whittou & Sons, City and Green Sts., Utlca, N. Y. 


white In cultivation. Flowers of rare substance 
and extra shipping qualities. No. 1 buibs, $5.00 
per 100; $40.00 per 1000. Circulars free. 

E. Y. Teas & Son, Centervllie, Ind. 


Hyacinths. Write for catalogue and prices. 
C. Keiir & Sons. 32 Laight St., New York. 


Lobelia Kathleen Mallard. Rooted cuttings, 
."iOc per 100; strong stock from soU, $1.00 per 100. 


HYDRANGEAS. 


Cash. 
J. B. MUley, 346 Masten St., Buffalo, N. Y. 


Gladiolus, Groft's and Chlldsli, finest mixed. 


Lobelias. Kathleen MaUard R. C, 75c per 100, 
$7.00 per 1000; 2-ln., 2%c. Crystal Palace R. C, 
70c per 100; 2-in., 2c. Cash. Maning, 10c. 

W. E. Trimble Greenhouse Co., Princeton, 111. 


$6.50 per 1000. E. T. Barnes, Spencer, Ind. 

Gladioli. See display adv. In this Issue. 

E. E. Stewart, Rives Junction, Mich. 


Hydrangea Dr. Thomas Hogg, pure white, pot- 
growa, in splendid condition for spring blooming; 
4-in. pots, branched, $10.00 per 100; 5-in. pots, 
$15.00: 6-in. pots, $20.00; 7-in. pots, $25.00 per 
100. Hydrangea Otaksa, pot-grown, 5-in. pots, 
$15.00; 6-in. pots, $20.00; 7-in. pots, $25.00. 

Avenue Floral Co., 
3442 St. Charles St., New Orleans, La. 

Hydrangea Otaksa, 3-in. pots, fine strong 
plants, will all bloom this spring, $4.00 per 100. 
Crown Point Floral Co., Crown Point, Ind. 


Send for our list of choice gladioli and dahlias. 
Cushman Gladiolus Co., Sylvania, 0. 


Lobenas Kathleen MaHard and Emperor Wni- 
1am. best single, 75c per 100, $8.00 per 1000. 
prepaid. S. W. Pike, St. Charles, HI. 

Lobelia Kathleen Mallard, new double. Rooted 


HARDY PLANTS. 


Hardy perennial plants, field-grown. German 
Iris, named, $2.00 100; mixed, $1.50. Japan Iris, 


cuttings, 65c per 100. Cash. 

W. C. Nlchol, Barrlngton Center, R. I. 


Gold Bound, Eclipse, etc., $5.00 100; mixed, $3.00 
100. Phlox, named, $4.00 to $5.00 100; mixed, 
$3.00 100. Aqullegla nlvea grandlflora, double 
mixed, canadensis; Asters, novae-angllae mnltl- 


MOONVINES. 


IMPATIENS. 


Moonvlnes. See display adv. 

D. U. Augspurger & Sons Co., Peoria, 111. 


florus and tatarlcus; Funkia coerulea, $4.00 100. 


Impatlens Holstil rooted cuttings, 75c per 100; 
2VL-la., $2.00 per 100, $18.00 per 1000. 

Krueger Bros., Toledo, Ohio. 


Baptlsla australls. Hibiscus Crimson Eye, Boc- 
conla cordata, ornamental grasses, $5.00 100. 
Hemerocallls, flava and Kuanso, and pardanthus, 
$3.00 100. Dahlias, named, $5.00; mixed, $3.00. 
H. H. Kern, Bonner Springs, Kan. 


NARCISSI. 


Impatlens HolstU rooted cuttings, 75c; 2%-ln., 
$2.00 per 100. J. P. Herzog, Cadillac, Mlcb. 


Narcissi. Write for catalogue and prices. 
0. Keur & Sons, 32 Laight St., New York. 



PLEASE MENTION THE REVIEW WHEN WRITING ANY OF THESE ADVERTISERS 



. If'J •'(.'^w-7 



86 



ThcWcekly Florists' Review. 



Mabch 2, 1911. 



NOVELTIES. 



REAL NOVELTIES AND NOVEL REALITIES 
IN HARDY PLANTS. 

The blEECSt collection offered anywhere, is 
found !n our NOVELTY CATALOGUE. Ju?t out. 

Of great Interest to the amateur and com- 
mercial grower alike. _i_„*„ 

It describes and illustrates uncommon Plants 
of singular beauty, desirability, and simplicity 
of erowth ; inexpensive to acquire. 

Besides our low prices, plants are big, making 
them valuable, in small or large quantities. 

Mailed along with our Illustrated wholesale 
catalogue of Hardy Perennials, etc., on receipt 
of three 2c stamps, which pays postage only, and 
which amount is credited on first order. 

PAUSADES NURSERIES, INC., 
SPARKILL. ^.. NEW YORK. 
Imperative to mention this paper. 

NURSERY STOCK. 



Altheas, Jeanne d'Arc, violet and rose, 3 to 4 
ft., $6.00 per 100; 2 to 3 ft., $5.00 per 100. 
Forsythia, 4 to 5 ft., $8.00 per lOp- JJeutzias, 
Lemoinel and gracilis, 18 to 30 in., $6.00 per 100. 
Spiraeas. Van Houttel and Anthony Waterer, 6 to 
8 In., $4.00 per 100. Hopeysuckle Heckrothl, 
l-yr. size, $5.00 per 100. Weigellas, Candida and 
rosea, 3 and 4-yr. sizes, $5.00 per 100; variegated 
leaved, $8.00 per 100. Boxing charged at cost. 
L ouis B. Eastburn, Kennett Square. Pa. 

2000 Spiraea Van Houttel, 18 to 24 In., $5.00 
ner 100. 1000 Forsythia viridlssima, 12 to 18 In.. 
$4.00 per 100. 1000 Deutzla Pride of Rochester, 
18 to ^ m^ $4.00 per 100. 1000 Philadelphus 
coronarlus, 12 to 18 in., $4.00 per 100. Ready for 
shipment from cold storage now. 

The Geo. Wlttbold Co., 
Edgebrook, Chicago, 111. 

Rhododendrons. Finest American stock on the 
market. All sizes for spring planting. Write for 
prices. H. L. Lauscher, Box 74, Abingdon, Va. 

My catalogue for 1911 of natives trees, shrubs, 
bulbs and plants Is now ready to mall. 

^ L. E. Williams, Exeter, N. H. 

TREES, SHRUBS, ROSES, EVERGREENS, 
'peonies, HARDY PLANTS. ^, ^ 
ELLWANGER & BARRY. ROCHESTER, N. Y. 

Shade trees, Carolina poplar, shrubs, hardy 
priyet^ Onarga Nursery, Onarga, 111. 



ONION SETS. 



Choice, sound, unsprouted onion sets. Yellow, 
$1:20; red, $1.25; white, $1.60 per 32 lb. busheL 

^'suflB^See"d^^Store, 544 W. 63rd St.. Chicago. 

1200 bu. red and yellow onion sets. A No. 1. 
Write for prices; wholesale or retail. 

Henry Meyer. Council Bluffs. Iowa. 



ORCHIDS. 



Orchids. largest stock In the country. 

Julius Roehrs Co., Rntherford, N. J. 



PALMS, ETC. 



Pandanus utills, 8-ln., $2.00 per doz.. $15.00 
ner 100- 4-in., $3.00 per doz.; 5-in., $5.00 per 
dS^.;Tn.; $9:00 per doz.; 7-in., $12.00 per/oz. 

Phoenix r'clinata. 4-ln., 25c ea.. $3.00 per doz.. 

*^Lat^anlY borbonlca, 3-ln., 8c, $1.00 per doz., 
$60.00 per 100. ,^ „ 

The Geo. Wlttbold Co., 

Edgebrook, Chicago, III. 

Pandanus Veitchll. Booking orders for 3 and 
4-ln. pot plants, $10.00 and $2S.0Oper 100; bench- 
grown, 10 m. high. $10.00 per lOO; 15 in. high, 
$16.00 per 100. A few nice plants, not colored, 
good, cSeap to clejin^out.^^^ ^^^^^^ ^^^^^ ^^^ 

Kentia Belmoreana, 2%-in. pots, $8.00 per 100; 
3-in. pots, $15.00 per 100; 4-in. pots, 12 to 16 In. 
high, >35.00 per 100; 5-in. pots, 15 to 18 in. high, 

$60.00 per 100. „ „ , .„ ny.t^ 

Storra & Harrison Co., Painesvllle, Ohio. 

Phoenlr reclinata, 4-in., 18 to 24 in. Wgh. 5 to 
8 leaves, 12M!c; 3-in.. 6c; seedlings. $2.00 per 
100. Cash with order. „ „ , . .„ 

W. E. Trim ble Greenhouse Co.. Princeton, iii. 

Palms. Kentia Forsteriana and Belmoreana, 
2^i-in.. $6.00 per 100. Chamaerops excelsa, 2V4- 
lo; $3.00 per 100. Geo. Just, Jacksonville, Fla. 

Palms. Washlngtonia robusta, 8 to 10-ln. pots, 
$10.00 per doz.; f 75.00 per 100. 
F. Ziegeler, Jr.. 6037 Hurst St., New Orleans, La. 

Palms. Kentia Belmoreana and Forsteriana. 
See display adv. _ „ „ . th 

D. U. Angspnrger & Sons Co.. Peoria. 111. 

Pandanus Veitchll cuttings, $1.00 per 25, post- 
paid^ F. M. Soar, Little River, Fla. 



PANSIES. 



Pansy plants of my largest flowering mixture 
of show varieties, unsurpassed quality. S^ong, 
stocky plants, wUl bloom next month, $3.00 per 
1W»; 50<K) l6ts, $2.50 per 1000. 5W) at 1000 
rate. Gustav Pltzonka. Pansy Farm, Bristol. Pa. 

Pansies, large, transplanted plants. Vantier's 
Mammoth. Bugnot, Cassier and Germanla prize 
strains including the new odorous strain, Orchl- 
fleaeflora $3 00 per 1000; 2000 for $5.00. Cash. 
Imperial Seed & Plant Co.. Grange. Balto.. Md. 



Pansies. Strong plants from seed beds, $4.00 
per 1000; transplanted from frames, $0.00 per 
1000; transplanted, bushy plants, $10.00 per 1000, 
$1.25 per 100. F. A. Bailer, Bloomington, 111. 

Giant pansies. Our strains are unsurpassed. 
Sturdy, field-grown, $3.00 per 1000; 2000 for 
$5.00. We sell to the trade only. 
E. Rawllngs. Wholesale Grower, OLEAN, N. Y. 

Pansies, a superior strain from London show 
prize flowers. Large transplanted plants, grown 
In cold houses, $3.00 per 1000; 2000 for $5.00. 
Whltton & Sons, City & Green Sts., Utica. N. Y. 

Pansy plants, field-grown, only a few to offer 
this year, $3.00 per 1000. 
J. H. Krone, Jr., R. D. 1, Fort Smith, Ark. 

Pansy plant seedlings, $4.00 per 1000. Will 
exchange for Jerome Jones chrysanthemums, un- 
rooted. Alex A. Laub, New Hamburgh, JN. Y. 

Pansy plants, mixed colors. Large, strong 
plants, $2.00 per 1000 while they last. 
Chas. E. Sharp, Mt. Vernon, Ohio. 

Pansies, Trlmardeau and Vaughan's giant mix- 
ture, $5.00 per 1000. 

^ Mosbsek Greenhouse Co., Onarga, 111. 

Pansies, $4.00 per 1000. 

The Geo. Wlttbold Co., 

Edgebrook. Chicago, 111. 

100,000 pansy plants, strong, from cold frames, 
.$3..'>0 per 1000. Orders booked now. Grand 
Rapids Greenhouse Co., Grand Rapids, Mich. 

PELARGONIUIVIS. 

Pelargoniums for Easter, from our stock of 

80 best varieties, 41^-in., ready now, $12.00 per 

100; March 1, 2i^-ln., $5.00; 3%-in., $8.00 per 

100. Perfectly clean and first-class. Cash, please. 

J. Sylvester. Florist, Oconto, Wis. 

Pelargoniums, strong 2V^-in. stock. In fine 
selection, $5.00 per 100. 
Alois Frey. Crown Point. Ind. 

Pelargoniums. See display adv. 
J. W. Miller, Shlremanstown, Pa. 

Pelargoniums. 15 varieties mixed, 2-ln. stock, 
$4.50 per 100. D. R. Herron, OLEAN, N. Y. 

PEONIES. 

Paeonla Candida? A very free blooming, extra 
early, pure white; comes in with Old Crimson 
or officinalis. Have grown this quietly for a 
number of years until I have a fair stock of it 
now to offer at $1.50 per doz.; $10.00 per 100. 
Fifty varieties in fine named sorts, $1.00 doz.; 
$7.00 per 100. F. A. Bailer, Bloomington, 111. 

DOUBLE CHINESE PEONIES, select stock, 
3 to 7 eyes, $6.00 per 100. Write for florists' 
wholesale list. 

JOHNSON SEED CO., 
217 Market St., Philadelphia, Pa. 

An offer of your surplus stock, carried in THB 
REVIEW'S classified department for a week or 
two, win be seen by nearly every buyer in the 
trade. 

Peonies only, by the wholesale. Best 100 va- 
rieties. J. F. Rosenfleld, West Point, Neb. 

PETUNIAS. 

Dreer's double petunias, selected large fiower- 
Ing doubles, finely fringed, mixed colors. Rooted 
cuttings, $1.00 100; $9.00 1000. Cash. 

J. P. Cannata, Mt. Freedom, N. J. 

Petunias, Dreer's double mixed, 2^-in., $2.00 
per 100; 300 for $5.00. 
J. C. Schmidt, Bristol, P«. 

Petunias, Dreer's double fringed, mixed colors, 
2-in., 2c; 3-in., 3c; 3%-in., 4c. Cash. 

Twin City Greenhouses, Basil, Ohio. 

Double fringed petunia R. C. $1.00 100. 
Keeney's Greenhouses, Monongahela, Pa. 

Double petunias. See display advertisement. 
D. U. Augspurger & Sons Co., Peoria, 111. 

Petunias, California Giants, 75c per 100, pre- 
paid^ S. W. Pike, St. Charles, 111. 



PHLOXES. 



Phlox Miss Lingard, best white for cutting, 
blooms early and late. Strong divisions of field 
stock, $2.00 per 100: $15.00 per 1000. Cash. 
W. A. Finger, Hicksville, N. Y. 

POINSETTIAS. 

Polnsettla stock plants, extra heavy, from 6 
and 7-ln. pots, $10.00 per 100; strong 6-in., $7.50; 
5-in., $5.00 per 100. Express prepaid. Such 
stock is scarce, don't get left again. 

Avenue Floral Co., 
3442 St. Charles Ave., New Orleans, La. 

Poinsettias, strong, thrifty stock plants, $4.00 
and $5.00 per 100. Cash, please. 
Rober & Rsdke. 1712 S. 4th Ave., Maywood, 111. 

Poinsettias. Strong, healthy stock plants, 
$6.00 per 100; $50.00 per 1000. 

Thos. Salveson, Petersburg, 111. 

Polnsettla stock plants, $6.00 per 100; 75c per 
doz. Cash with order. 

M. Weiland, 602 Davis St., Evanston, 111. 

Polnsettla stock plants, $5.00 100. Cash. 
Thompson & Sons, Sta. D. R. 1, Milwaukee, Wis. 



POPPIES. 



Oriental poppies, hardy, mammoth flowered; 
strong roots, will bloom this season, 3-in., 76c 
doz.. $5.00 100; 2-in., $3.00. 
Wingert & Ulery, Springfleld, Ohio. 



PRIMULAS. 



Primula obconica grandiflora and gigantea, all 
colors. Buy now for Easter. 2>^-ln., $3.60; 
3%-in., $6.00; 4-in., $8.00; 6-in., $15.00 per 100. 
All well budded and full of bloom. Kewensis, 
new giant yellow, full of flowers, blooms all 
summer, 3-ln., $4.00; 4-ln., $6.00 per 100. Cash, 
please. J. Sylvester. Florist. Oconto, Wis. 

Primula obconica gigantea, in bright colors, 
21^-in., $2.50 100. Kewensis, 3-ln., $5.00 100. 
This is all very strong and well budded stock and 
good value. Try a sample order. Cash. 
Freeport Floral Co., Freeport, 111. 

Chinese primroses and P. obconica, 2-ln., 
$2.00; 2%-ln., $3.00; 3-ln., $5.00 per 100. 
N. O. Caswell, Delavan, 111. 

Primula sinensis, finest, mixed, $5.00 oz. 
J. Hasslach, Seed Grower, St. Remy de Provence, 
France. 

Primulas, Chinese and obconica, in bud and 
bloom, 4-ln., $6.00 per 100; 200 for $10.00. 
Whltton & Sons, City & Green Sts.. Utica, N. Y. 

Primula obconica grandiflora, good pink color, 
4-in., in bloom, for ready sale, $10.00 per 100. 
Naumann & Son, 10515 Sup erior, Cleveland, O. 

Primula obconica. See display adv. 

D. U. Augspurger & Sons Co., Peoria, 111. 

Primulas, Chinese and Baby, In full bloom 
4-ln., $5.00 per 100. J. C. Schmidt, Bristol, Pa. 

Primula obconica, 2-ln., 2c; 3-in., 4c; 4-ln., 6c. 
U. G. Harglerode, Shippensburg, Pa. 

Primulas. See display adv. 
J. W. Miller, Shlremanstown, Pa. 

PRIVET. 

200,000 CALIFORNIA PRIVET, strictly No. 1, 
2-year-old. 

18 to 24 in $1.75 100; $13.00 1000 

24 to 30 In 2.25 100; 18.00 1000 

2% to 3 ft 2.75 100; 22.00 1000 

3% to 4 ft 3.50 100; 28.00 1000 

AMPELOPSIS VEITOHII. strong 2-yr.-old, 
field-grown. No. 1, 2% to 8 ft,. $9.00 per 100; 
l-yr. -old. 2 to 3 ft. vines. $4.00 per 100. 
CLEMATIS PANICULATA. extra heavy. 2-yr.- 
old. fleld-grown vines. $9.00 per 100. All f.o.b. 
BenJ. Connell. Florist, Merchantvllle. N. J. 

CALIFORNIA PRIVET OUR SPECIALTY. 
600,000 2- YEAR PLANTS. 

16 to 20 In., 4 to 6 branches $10.00 1000 

2 feet, 6 to 8 branches 16.00 1000 

2 to 3 feet, 8 to 12 branches 20.00 1000 

250 at 1000 rate. 

Wrtte for prices on car lots. 

Cuttings from 2-year plants, $1.00 per 1000. 

JOHN BENNETT, 

HUlside Nnrsery, Atlantic Highlands, N. J. 

Amoor River, 2-yr., all well bran.: 12 to 18 In., 
$12.50 1000; 18 to 24, $16.50 1000; 24 to 30, $20 
1000; 30 to 36, $25 1000; 36 to 48, $30 1000. 
Cal. privet, 2 yr. : 12 to 18 In., 2 to 4 bran., $7.60 
1000; 18 to 24, 3 to 6 bran., $10 1000; 24 to 80, 
4 to 6 bran., $14.60 1000; 30 to 36, 6 to 10 bran., 
$20 1000. F. O. B. Cash with order. 

Valdeslan Nurseries, Bostic, N. C. 

California privet, 3 to 5 branches, 12 to 18 in., 
$7.00 per 1000; 18 to 24 in., $9.00 per 1000; 2 to 
8 ft., $12.00 per 1000. 5 to 8 branches, 18 to 24 
in., $12.00 per 1000; 2 and 2% ft., $15.00 per 
1000; 2% to 3 ft., $20.00 per 1000; 3 to 4 ft., 
$26.00 per 1000; 8 to 12 In., for lining out, $4.00 
per 1000. F. O. B. Cash with order. 260 at 
1000 rate. Sonthslde Nurseries, Chester, Va. 

CALIFORNIA PRIVET, any quantity, Blse, 
age. Others say ours is the best grown. Writ* 
for prices; also on shrubbery, ornamentals, fruit 
trees, asparagns, etc. 

Franklin Davis Nursery Co., Baltimore, Md. 

.50,000 2-vear California privet, cut back once 
and well branched, 1 to 2 ft., $12.00 per 1000; 

2 to 8 ft., $15.00 per 1000. 

Chas. L. Smith, Pennsgrove, N. J. 

Amoor River or California, 2 to 8 ft., $16.00; 

3 to 4 ft., $20.00 per 1000. Well-branched. 
Packing free. Cash with order. 

Ashford Park Nurseries, Atlanta, Ga. 

California privet, 2-year, very fine heavy stock, 
18 to 24 in., $1.60 per 100, $12.00 per 1000; 2 to 8 
ft., $Z26 per 100, $20.00 per 1000. 

Furrow & Co., Guthrie, Okla. 

Privet, Amoor River, North (hardy) California, 
$1.00 per 100 and up. 

Onarga Nnrsery, Onarga, 111. 

3-year-old CallforBla privet at a bargain. 
A. H. Dailey, Knoxville. Tenn. 

RESURRECTION PLANTS. 

Resurrection plants. Reduced prices for four 
weeks. Order now. Wm. Tell, Austin, Texas. 

RHODODENDRONS. 

Rhododendrons, fancy forcing varieties, 6 to 8 
buds, 60c; 8 to 12 buds, 75c; 12 to 16 buds, $1.00. 
Storrs & Harrison Co., Painesvllle, 0. 



PLEASE MENTION THE REVIEW WHEN WRITING ANY OF THESE ADVERTISERS 



"W^Wl* i,i '.', . 



Mabch 2, 1911. 



The Weekly Florists^ Review* 



87 



ROOTED CUTTINGS. 

ROOTED CUTTINGS. 
Alyssum, giant double, 70c 100. 
Marguerites, white, t>Oc 100. 
Petunias, double, the cream of the varieties 
from the noted specialists, $1.00 100. 
Salvia spiendens, 00c 100. 
Ageratums, Gurney and Pauline, 65c 100. 
Heliotropes, best varieties, 75c 100. 
Bnglish ivy, $1.00 100. 
German Ivy, 65c 100. 
Coleus, assorted varieties, 60c per 100. 
Vlnca variegata, 80c per 100. 
Fuchsias, best market sorts, $1.00 100. 
Ivy geraniums, assorted varieties, $1.50 100. 
Cash with order. 

John Irvine & Sons, Bay City, Mich. 

Rooted cuttings, prepaid, per 100: Hardy pinks, 
6 kinds, genista; Paris daisy, white, yellow; 
Swalnsona alba; heliotropes, 3 kinds; fuchsias, 
5 kinds; Feverfew Gem; $1.00. Salvias, 3 kinds; 
Vlnca variegata, 90c; $8.00 per 1000. Cuphea, 
alyssum, giant double; 75c. Coleus, 10 kindsi 
ageratum, 4 kinds, 60c; $5.00 per 1000. Alter- 
nanthera rosea, aura nana and P. major, $4.50 
per 1000. BrlUlantlsslma, $5.00 per 1000. Cash 
with order. Byer Bros., Chambersburg, Pa. 

ROOTED CUTTINGS FREE BY MAIL. 
Alyssum, cuphea, ground ivy, German Ivy, 
gnaphalium. Lobelia compacta, ageratums, 3 
vars. blue; thyme, 50c 100. Gazania, heliotrope, 
itiargnerite, 75e 100. 600 heavy marguerites, 
from soil, $1.00 100, by express. 400 strong 2%- 
In. marguerites, and 300 2^-in. feverfew, $2.50 
100. Cash with order. 
A. B. Graves, 421 Bridge St., Northampton, Mass. 

R. C. per 100: Alternanthera, 50c. Beg. Rex., 
$1.25. Coleus, 60c. Genistas, dbl. petunias, 
fuchsias, $1.00. Salvias, Bonfire and spiendens, 
85c. Cash. List free. Shlppenshurg Floral Co., 
E. W. Byer, Prop., Shlppenshurg, Pa. 

Rooted cuttings: Verbenas, mixed, 75c 100; 
petunias, double, mixed, $1.00 100. 

Hcndra & Son, Sta. D, St. Joseph, Mo. 

Rooted cuttings. Mme. Salleroi geraniums, 
salvias. $1.00 per 100; sweet alyssum, 75c per 
100. E. V. Myers, St. Joseph. Mo. 

ROSES. 

ROSES. 

GRAFTED. 100 1000 

Double KlUarney, 2i^-ln $30.00 $250.00 

White Klilarney, 2>4-In 15.00 120.00 

My Maryland, 2%-ln 15.00 120.00 

KUlamey, 2>^-ln 15.00 120.00 

Richmond, 2%-in 15.00 120.00 

Bride, 2%-ln 15.00 120.00 

Bridesmaid, 2%-ln 15.00 120.00 

Kalserln, 2%-ln 16.00 120.00 

OWN ROOTS. 

Melody, 2%-ln $30.00 $250.00 

Double Klilarney, 2% -In 20.00 150.00 

White Klilarney, 2i^-ln 8.00 75.00 

My Maryland, 2%-ln 6.00 BO.OO 

KUlamey, 2%-ln 6.00 50.00 

Richmond, 2%-in 6.00 50.00 

Bride, 2%-ln 0.00 60.00 

Bridesmaid, 2%-ln 6.00 60.00 

Kalserln, 2%-In 6.00 60.00 

S. S. PENNOCK-MEEHAN CO., 
1608-20 Ludlow St., Philadelphia. Pa. 

ROSE PLANTS. 

Strong, clean stock, now ready 

out of 2-ln. pots. 

Bride $6.00 100; $50.00 1000 

Bridesmaid 6.00 100; 50.00 1000 

Richmond 6.00 100; 50.00 100<J 

Perle 6.00 100; 50.00 1000 

Klilarney 6.00 100; 50.00 1000 

White KUlamey 7.00 100; 65.00 1000 

GEO. M. KELLOGG FLOWER & PLANT CO., 
PLKASANT HILL, MISSOURI. 

Roses, on their own roots, 3 to 6 branches, 3 to 
8 ft. long, $30.00 per 1000, $3.50 per 100. Crlm- 
Bon Rambler, Tausendschon, Thalia, Aglaia, 
Dorothy Perkins, Lady Gay, Hiawatha. 

Roses, budded, 2-year, field-grown; 3 branchea 
and up. Baby Rambler, 5c; Catherine Zelmet, 
Be; Vellchenblau, 15c; General Jacqueminot, 4c; 
Mrs. W. Cutbush, 7c; Ulrlch Brunner, 6c; and 
many other varieties. 

F. J. Grootendorst & Sons, Boskoop, Holland. 

NEW ROSES. 

LADT HILLINGDON, the finest yellow for 
forcing or outdoor use, $50.00 per 100. 

ROSE QUEEN, the sensational new pink rose, 
$35.00 per 100. „ ^ _, ^ 

MRS. AARON WARD, Indian yeUow, shaded 
lemon and cream. $15.00 per 100. ,^^„ 

DOUBLE PINK KILLARNEY AND MELODY. 
$20.00 per 100. Chas. H. Totty, Madison, N. J. 

GRAFTED ROSBJS. 71 

100 1000 

White Klilarney $15.00 $120.00 

KUlamey 15.00 120.00 

Richmond 15.00 120.00 

Fine lot of own root plants will be ready in 
30 days. A. C. Brown, Springfield, lU. 

AMERICAN BEAUTIES— BENCH STOCK. 
Beauties, 2-yr., In splendid shape, $10.00 per 
too. Delivery at once. Potted now will make 
elegant plants In flower for spring trade or early 
forcing. Light packing. 
Gullett ft Sons, Lincoln, lU. 

3000 Marvland, 2%-ln. pots, 1-year-old, dor- 
mant, just the thing to plant for summer roses, 
$5.00 per 100; $40.00 per 1000. 

Cole Bros., Peoria, 111. 



ROSE PLANTS. 
My Maryland, strong, healthy 2^-ln. stock, 
$50.00 1000. Write for prices on other varieties. 

WIBLAND & BISCH, 
69 Wabash Ave., Chicago. 

1400 Maid, 214-in., $3.00 per 100; $25.00 per 
1000. 1200 Bride, 2V4-ln., $3.00 per 100; $25.00 
per 1000. 600 Maid, 3-in., $5.00 per 100. Extra 
strong, taken from healthy stock. 
Fifth Ave. Floral Co., Columbus, Ohio. 

Roses. Pres. Carnot and about 1400 W. R. 

Smith, from the bench, two years old, extra 

strong, that are ready to ship now, $10.00 per 

100; $85.00 per 1000. Satisfaction guaranteed. 

Chas. Knopf Floral Co., Richmond, Ind. 

Roses. White Baby Rambler, in bud, 4-ln., 
$3.00 per doz. ; 4-ln., $5.00 per doz. 
The Geo. WIttbold Co., 
Edgebrook, Chicago, 111. 

Roses. Kalserln A. V., 2%-ln., A No. 1 plants, 
ready to shift, $3.50 per lOO; $30.00 per 1000. 
Cash with order, please. 
f Albert Lies, Nlles Center, 111. 

5000 Kalserln rose plants, 2%-in. pots, $3.00 
per 100; $25.00 per 1000. 3000 dormant Kalserln 
rose plants, $10.00 per 100. Cash with order. 

Cleveland Cut Flower Co., Cleveland, Ohio. 

Kalserln and Perle rose plants, 2^4 -In. pots, 
$3.50 per 100; $30.00 per 1000. 

Holton & Hunkel Co., Milwaukee, Wis. 

Roses. Dorothy Perkins, 2-ln., $2.50 per 100; 
3-ln., $6.00 per 100. Yellow Rambler, 2-ln., $2.50 
per 100. J. W. Ross Co., Centralla, 111. 

H. P. roses and 600 White Baby Ramblers. 
Write for prices. 

Parks & Schaufelberger, Penfleld, N. Y. 

Rooted cuttings of Maid roses, $2.00 per 100; 
$15.00 per 1000. Rolf Zetlitz, Lima, Ohio. 

Nothing but roses. Spring list now ready. 
Leedle Co.. Expert Rose Growers, Springfield, O. 

RUBBERS. 

Rubbers, 6-ln. pots, 12 to 24 In. high, strong 
plants, $3.00 and $4.00 per doz. Cash, please. 
E. C. Rogers, Roslindale. Mass. 

RUDBECKIAS. 

Rudbeckla Golden Glow, $8.00 per 1000. 

Thos. J. Oberlln, Sinking Spring, Pa. 



SALVIAS. 



Salvia spiendens, fall propagated from stock 
grown under glass all summer; will bloom two 
weeks ahead of spring cuttings and three weeks, 
or more ahead of seedlings. Rooted cuttings. 90c 
per 100; $8.00 per 1000. 
John Irvine & Sons, Bay City, Mich. 

New salvia. King of Carpets, best of all dwarfs, 
compact habit, early, free bloomer. Rooted cut- 
tings, $1.25 per 100, postpaid. Cash. 
Wm. Bierstadt & Son, Springfield, 111. 

Salvias, Bonfire and Zurich. Transplanted 
plants, ready for 2%-ln., $1.00 per 100, by mall; 
$7.00 per 1000, by express. 
Whltton & Sons, City & Green Sta., Utlca, N. Y. 

Salvia Zurich, dwarf, absolutely true to name. 
Rooted cuttings, $1.00 100; $8.00 per 1000. Sal- 
via Bonfire, 80c per 100; $7.00 per 1000. Cash. 
J. P. Cannata, Mt. Freedom, N. J. 

Salvias Bonfire and Spotted Beauty, $1.00 per 
100, $8.00 per 1000; 2%-ln., $25.00 per 1000. 
Swan Peterson Floral Co., Gllson City, 111. 

Salvia Bonfire, strong transplanted seedlings, 
90c per 100; $8.00 per lOOO. Cash with order. 
Aurora Greenhouse Co., Aurora, HI. 

Salvias. Zurich and Bedman; rooted cuttings, 
$1.00 100; 2-in., 2c. 
U. G. Harglerode, Shlppenshurg, Pa. 

Salvias, Zurich and spiendens. Rooted cut- 
tings, ic; 2%-In., 2%c. 
Mosbaek Greenhouse Co., Onarga, III. 

Salvias, spiendens and Bonfire, 2V4-ln., 2%c; 
R. C, 00c per 100. Cash. MaUlng, 10c. 

W. E. Trimble Greenhouse Co., Princeton, 111. 

Salvia Bonfire, the true variety. Heavy stock, 
2-In., ready for shift, $2.00 per 100. Cash. 
F. E. Cremer, Hanover, Pa. 

Salvia Zurich rooted cuttings, $1.00 per 100, 
$8.00 per 1000; 2-ln., $2.00 per 100, $18.00 per 
1000. Krueger Bros., Toledo, Ohio. 

Salvia spiendens, 2-ln., very fine, $2.00 per 100. 
Wagner Park Conservatories, Sidney, Ohio. 

Salvia spiendens. See display adv. 

D. U. Augspurger & Sons Co., Peoria, III. 

Salvia Bonfire, well rooted, 75c. 
Burden Floral Co., Bowling Green, Ky. 

Salvia Zurich rooted cuttings, Ic, prepaid; 
2-ln., 2c. J. L. Schiller, Toledo, O. 

Salvia Bonfire rooted cuttings, 90c 100; $8.00 
1000. E. B. Randolph, Delavan, 111. 



SEEDS. 



Seed packets and bags. Catalogue, clasp and 
commercial envelopes, printed or plain. "If it's 
a Spangler bag it's a good one." Estimates 
fnmished. 
E. J. Spangler Co., N. Howard St., Phila., Pa. 



BUCKBEE'S "FULL OF LIFE" SEEDS. 
SPECIAL STOCKS. 

CABBAGE— Or. Lb. 

Early Jersey Wakefield $0.18 $1.85 

Buckbee's Early New Queen 30 2.60 

Early Spring 12 1.60 

Early Summer 12 1.30 

Buckbee's New Early Race Horse 

(tlie earliest) 20 2.0Q 

CAULIFLOWER— 

True Early Snowball 1.60 20.00 

Buckbee's New Early Chief 2.00 28.00 

CUCUMBER— 

Arlington White Spine 10 .60 

Davis Perfect 10 .80 

Emerald 10 .70 

EGG PLANT— 

Buckbee's New Ex. Ea. Lg. Purple 

Spineless 30 .... 

PEPPER— 

Improved Ruby King 20 .... 

Sweet Mountain or Bull Nose 18 .... 

New Chinese Giant .30 .... 

Celestial 20 .... 

Long Red Cayenne 18 .... 

TOMATO— 

Buckbee's Beefsteak 60 6.10 

Biickliee's Earliest Market 35 2.60 

Nev?^ Earllana, select 35 2.00 

New Early June Pink 35 2.36> 

Chalk's Early Jewel 36 1.85 

Stone Perfected 16 1.50 

Buckbee's New Masterpiece (self- 
supporting) 76 .... 

Prompt shipment. Charges prepaid. Terms 

cash. Send for wholesale catalogue. 
H. W. BUCKBEB 
Established 1871 

Rockford Seed Farms, Rockford, 111. 

WELLS' EARLY FLOWERING SINGLE 
CHRYSANTHEMUM SEED 
25c and $1.00 per packet. 
PENTSTEMON SEED. 
Wells' Gold Medal pentstemons. Time to sow 
seed now for this summer's flowering. The 
finest s):raln of pentstemon seed in the market, 
producing flowers 2i^ In. across. Trial packets, 
25c and $1.00 per packet. 
Chas. H. Totty, Madison, N. J. 

ASPARAGUS PLUMOSUS NANUS SEED, 
hous^e grown; a high grade seed and absolutely 
true to name. 

1000 1000 

1000 seed $2.60 10,000 seed $2.00 

5000 seed 2.26 20,000 seed 1.75 

On larger quantities write for quotations. 

LOS ANGELES FLOWER MARKET, 

414% So. Broadway, Los Angeles, Cal. 

CONTRACT NOW for southern-grown WATER- 
MELON SEED and GEORGIA COLLARD SEED. 
Grown In southern soil, producing perfect seed of 
highest germination tests. We also contemplate 
growing VELVET BEANS another season. If 
interested, write quick. It's our pleasure to an- 
swer promptly. 

MAULDIN BROS., Box 41, Cairo, Ga. 

CREGO ASTERS. 
Stock grown for cut flower purposes. Caught 
by rain, blooms damaged so were not marketable. 
Seed will be slightly discolored, germination O. 
K. White or light pink, $1.25 oz.; $4.50 % lb. 
Dark pink and purple mixed, $1.00 oz.; $3.50 
V4 lb. Cash. L. TempHn Seed Co., CaUa, Ohio. 

Aster Lady Roosevelt, gorgeous pink, scien- 
tiflcally grown and separated seed. Special for 
florists, 1/5 oz., $1.00; 1 oz., $5.00. This seed 
is taken from extra select flowers and long 
stems. Trial pkt., 60c. 

JOHN S. WBAVEE, DEPT. F, 
Glen Mawr Seed Farms, Kineers, Pa. 

By actual competition it has been demonstrated 
that the CREGO ASTER is "the best aster in the 
market." Colors: Shell-pink, pure white, rose- 
pink and violet-blue, at $1.00 per \i oz., $2.00 
per % oz., $4.00 per oz. Cash with order. 

G. S. Crego, 736 E. Main St., Portland, Ore. 

ASPARAGUS PLUMOSUS NANUS SEED. 
New crop, greenhouse grown, $4.60 per 1000; 
$20.00 per 5000. Special quotatlona on large 
quantities. 

S. S. PENNOCK-MEEHAN CO., 
1608-20 Ludlow St., PhUadelphla, Pa. 

An offer of your surplus stock, carried In THE 
REVIEW'S classifled department for a week or 
two, will be seen by nearly every buyer in the 
trade. 

Asparagus plumoeus seed, guaranteed fresh, 
picked this Jan., 1911, $3.50 per 1000. Cash. 
Victor Roekens , Glenslde, Pa. 

Asparagus plumosus seed, greenhouse grown, 
now ripe, $2.50 per 1000. 
B. M. Wlchers & Co., Gretna, La. 

Asparagus plumosus nanus, northern greenhouse 
grown seed. 1000 seeds, $4.00; 5000, $18.75. 
G. H. Hunkel Co., Milwaukee, Wis. 

ASPARAGUS PLUMOSUS NANUS SEED 

$2.50 per 1000. March delivery. 

PETER MACK. ORLANDO. FLA. 

Asparagus plumosus seed, fresh gathered, 
greenliouse grown. $2.50 per 1000; $20.00 per 
10.000. Cash. Wachendorff Bros., Atlanta, Ga. 

Asparagus plumosus seed, new crop, $4.00 1000. 
Wm. Terry, Owlngs Mills, Md. 

Asparagus plumosus seed, new crop, $2.60 per 
1000. Cash. Jos. H. Cunningham, Delaware, Ohio. 

Guava seed, 20c oz. Tested smllax seed, 25c 
oz. C. H. Gardiner, South Pasadena, Calif. 



PLEASE MENTION THE REVIEW WHEN WRITING ANY OF THESE ADVERTISERS 



88 



The Weekly Florists^ Review* march 2. ion 



SEEDS— Contlnuad. 

BUCKBEE'S "FULL OF LIFE" FLOWER SEEDS 
RELIABLE STRAINS. 
I ALYSSUM, Carpet of Snow, tr. pkt., 10c. 
ASTER, Buckbee'8 Perfected Branching, white, 
crimson, lavender, purple, shell-pink, choicest 
mixed; each, tr. pkt. (1000 seeds), 26c. GOLDEN 
FEATHER FEVERFEW, tr. pkt., 10c. LO- 
BELIA, Bedding Queen, tr. pkt., 16c. MAU- 
RANDIA, mixed, tr. pkt., 10c; % oz., 40c. PE- 
TUNIAS, giant flowered single, mixed, tr. pkt. 
(lOOO seeds), 50c. SALVIAS, splendens, Clara 
Bedman or Bonfire, tr. pkt., 25c. SMILAX, new 
crop, tr. pkt., 10c; oz., 25c; lb., $3.00. STOCKS, 
Princess Alice, tr. pkt., 25c. THUNBBRGIA, 
tr. pkt., 10c; oz., 40c. VERBENA, Buckbee's 
Cosmopolitan Mammoth, white, pink, scarlet, bine 
and mixed; each, tr. pkt., 25c. LEMON VER- 
BENA, tr. pkt., 20c. Orders filled quickly. 
Charges prepaid. Cash. Send for wholesale 
catalogue. 

H. W. BUCKBEE 

Established 1871 

Rockford Seed Farms, Rockford, 111. 

SHAMROCKS. ~ 

SHAMROCK, ORIGINAL, from cemetery of 
Downpatrlck, In Ireland. Plants from 2^-ln. 
pots, $4.00 100, $35.00 1000; 250 at 1000 rate. 
Cash with order. Order early, as stock Is limited. 
J. D. Harcourt's Sons, Wapplngera Falls, N. Y. 

Shamrocks (Boddlngton's strain), the genuine 
dark green shade, 2^4-in. pots, $4.00 per 100. 
Cash with order. Sample free. 

Alex A. Laub, New Hamburgh , N. Y. 

Shamrocks, 2-iu., $5.00 per 100. Cash with 
order. 

Frank Oechslln, 4911 W. Qulncy St., Chicago. 

Shamrocks, 2-ln., $3.00 per 100; shamrocks, 
miniature, In pots, $4.00 per 100. 

Fred H. I>emon & Co., Richmond, Ind. 

' Shamrocks, fine 2-ln. plants, $8.00 per 100. 
Cash, please. M. S. Etter, successor to John V. 
Rupp, Sblremanstown, Pa. 

Shamrocks, 2-ln., $4.00 per 100; shamrocks, 
miniature. In pots, $5.00 per 100. 

Fred H. Lemon & Co., Richmond, Ind. 

I Shamrocks, from 2V4-In., $2.00 per 100; 300 
for 85.00. J. C. Schmidt, Bristol, Pa. 

Shamrock. See display adT. 
J. W. Miller, Sblremanstown, Pa. 

SMILAX. ~ 

Smllax seedlings, strong stock, cut back, good 
value. 50c 100, $4.00 1000; 2% -In., $2.00 100, 
$17.00 1000. Cash. 
Freeport Floral Co., Freeport. 111. 

Smllax, 2-In., 2c; seedlings, 50c per 100, $4.00 
per 1000; mailing, 10c. Cash. 

W. E. Trimble Greenhouse Co., Princeton, III. 

Smllax, out of 2%-ln. pots, very strong, sev- 
eral times cut back, $2.00 per 100; $18.00 per 
1000. Wm. Schwan & Son, Fredonla, N. Y. 

Smllax seedlings, 50c 100; prepaid, 60c. 
A. J. Baldwin, Newark, Ohio. 

Smllax, 2-In., $1.25 per 100; $10.00 per 1000. 
C. Humfeld, Clay Center, Kan. 

SNAPDRAGONS. 

Snapdragons, giant white; rooted cuttings, 
$1.00 per 100, postpaid. 

J. L. Johnson, De Kalb, 111. 

Snapdragons, giant white, yellow and red, 3-ln. 
pots, $5.00per 100. 
The Hammond Co., Inc., Richmond, Va. 

Snapdragon seedlings, Ic; 2^4 -In., 2c. 
Mosbaek Greenhouse Co., Onarga, 111. 

Snapdragons, 2Mi-ln., fine plants, $2.00 per 100; 
300 for $5.00. J. C. Schmidt, Bristol, Pa. 

SPIRAEAS. 

Spiraeas, large forcing clumps. Gladstone, 
$9.00 per 100. Florlbunda, $4.50 per 100. Superba, 
$6.00 per 100. Blondln, $6.00 per 100. Washing- 
ton, $6.00 per 100. Japonica, $4.00 per lOO. 

Storrs & Harrison Co., Palnesvllle, Ohio. 

Spiraea Gladstone, In leaf and bud, $4.00 per 
doz. 

The Geo. Wlttbold Co., 
Rdgcbrook. Chicago. 111. 

Stove-Greenhouse Plants. 

stove plants and crotons, finest collection. 
Julius Roehrs Co., Rutherford, N. J. 

STRAWBERRY PLANTS. ~ 

SEND $10.00 for 1000 strawberry plants that 
will bear fruit continuously from early spring 
until November; $5.00 for 600. 

Senator Dunlap $1.60 per 1000 

Haverland 2.00 per 1000 

KloDdyke 1.50 per 1000 

Gandy Prize 1.75 per 1000 

Excelsior 1.75 per 1000 

Aroma 1.76 per 1000 

HofTman 1.75 per 1000 

All plants guaranteed strictly THOROUGH- 
BRED and true to name, with highest fruiting 
power. Price list of over seventy-five varieties 
mailed on application. 

E. W. TOWNSEND CO., 

The FAIR dealing nurseries. 

SALISBURY, MARYLAND. 



Strawberries. Stephen's, Parson's Beauty, $2.50 
per 1000; Chesapeake, $3.50. 
Hugo Kind, Hammonton, N. J. 

SWAINSONAS. 

Swainsona rooted cnttinga, $1.00. 
Burden Floral Co., Bowling Green, Ky. 

TRAPESCANTIAS. 

Tradescantlas. 10,000 Wandering Jew R. C, 
60c per IfK), $5.00 per 1000; 2%-in., 2%c. Cash. 
Mailing, 10c. 

W. K. Trimble Gr eenhouse Co., Pr inceton, 111. 

Tradescantia rooted cuttings, 60c per 100. 
Vem L. Schluraff, Erie, Pa. 

Tradescantia tricolor, rooted cuttings, 75c per 
100, prepaid. G. B. Fink, Kenllworth, N. J. 

Tradescantia rooted cuttings, 60c per 100. 
Mosbaek Greenhouse Co., Onarga, 111. 

TRITOMAS. 

Trltoma Pfitzerl (red hot poker), divisions, 
single crowns, $4.00 per 100, $30.00 per 1000; 
double and triple crown, $6.00 per 100, $50.00 
per 1000. ThoB. J. Oberlin, Sinking Spring, Pa. 

TULIPS. 

Tulips. Write for catalc^ue and prices. 
C. Keur & Sons, 32 Lafght St., New York. 

VEGETABLE PLANTS. 

10,000 horse radish sets, from 4 to 6 in. long, 
$2.00 per 1000. 5 pounds of select tomato seed, 
saved from fancy stock, 1910 main crop, $2.50 
per lb. 5000 Grand Rapids lettuce plants, ready 
March 15, $1.00 per 1000. 

S. J. McMlchael, Flndlay, Ohio. 

Grand Rapids lettuce, transplanted, $3.00 per 
1000; iseedlings, $1.00 per 1000. Cash. 

Tomatoes, Forcing Comet, Beauty, New Stone, 
seedlings, $2.00 per 1000; transplanted, $5.00 per 
1000; 2%-in., 2c. Cash. 

W. E. Trimble Greenhouse Co., Princeton, 111. 

Wakefield cabbage, Earllana tomatoes. Snow- 
ball cauliflower. Black Beauty eggplant, Chinese 
Giant pepper, strong plants, cool-grown, $2.00 
1000. Fields Greenhouses, Montpeller, Ind. 

20th Century tomato, extremely early, a 
money maker, heavy cropper all season. Trade 
pkt., 50c; transplanted, $1.00 per 100. 
J. T. Duquette, Albion, N. Y. 

Vegetable plants from seed bed. leading vars. 
Prices quoted. A. S. Pett, Crawfordsvllle, Ind. 

50,000 Grand Rapids lettuce, seed-bed, 90c 
1000. Keeney's Greenhouses, Monongabela, Pa. 

5000 Comet tomatoes, 2%-ln., $2.00 100. 

Roney Bros., West Grove, Pa. 

Transplanted lettuce, $2.00 per 1000. 

Loyd C. Bunch, Fredonla, Kan. 

Lettuce plants, $1.00 per 1000. 

C. W. Espy & Son, Brookvllle, Pa. 



VERBENAS. 



Verbena rooted cuttings, 60c 100. 

Burdell Floral Co., Bowling Green, Ky. 

Verbenas and double alyssum, 60c 100; $5.00 
1000. Cash. H. Stabenow, Jr., Reading, Pa. 



VINCAS. 



VInca minor, a hardy evergreen trailing vine, 
green leaves, blue flowers, useful for planting 
under trees, for binding banks to prevent wash- 
ing, for covering graves, etc. Strong trans- 
planted plants, $3.00 per 100; $25.00 per 1000. 

Vlnca minor variegata aurea, similar to above, 
only the green leaves are broadly banded with 
golden yellow. Transplanted plants, $1.00 per 
doz.; $5.00 per 100. 

E. Y. Teas & Son, CentervlUe, Ind. 

Vlnca variegata, out of 2i4-<n. pots. These 
are divisions from field-grown plants, taken last 
fall, and will make strong 3-ln. If potted up now. 
We have 20,000 of these, but they will not last 
long at $2.00 per 100; $18.00 per 1000. Cash, 
please. See our display adv. 

Reeser Plant Co., Springfield, Ohio. 

Vlncas, extra strong 2-in., plain green and 
green banded with yellow, ready for immediate 
shift. Must have room and to close out quick, 
$1.50 per lOO. Cash, please. 

J. A. Swartley & Sons, Sterling, HI. 

Variegata vlnca vines, rooted cuttings, $7.50 
per 1000. NOW READY, 2000 variegated vlnca 
vines, bench plants, ready for 4-ln. pots, $0.00 per 
100. Fine stock. Grand Rapids Greenhouse Co., 
Grand Rap ids, Mich. 

7000 Vlnca variegata, 214-in., $2.50 per 100; 
$20.00 per 1000. 1800 green vlncas, 214-ln., $2.00 
per 100; $18.00 per 1000. Extra strong, taken 
from healthy stock. 
Fifth Ave. Floral Co., Columbns, Ohio. 

Vlnca variegata rooted cuttings, 90c 100, $8.00 
1000; 2^4-ln., $2.00 100, $19.00 1000; 3-ln., $6.00 
100. Cash with order. 
Aurora Greenhouse Co.. Aurora, 111. 

Big 4-in. Vlnca variegata, field clumps, potted, 
grown in cool house, ready, $6.00 per 100. 

Bagan Bros., Springfield, Ohio. 



Vlnca variegata, fine 4-ln., $6.00 per 100, 
$50.00 per 1000; 2Vi-in., $2.00 per 100, 300 for 
$5.00. J. C. Schmidt, Bristol, Pa. 

Vlnca variegata, 4-in., 10 to 20 leads, can still 
be divided, $6.00 per 100; $55.00 per 1000. 
Cherry Park Gardens, Fredonla, N. Y. 

Good, well rooted Vlnca variegata cuttings, 75c 
per 100. 
C. C. Walker, 1227 Logan Ave., DanvlUe, 111. 

Vlnca variegata R. C, 90c per 100; green 80c 
per 100. Cash. Mailing, 10c. 

W. E. Trimble Greenhouse Co., Princeton, 111. 

Vlnca variegata. 2%-ln., 2c. 
F . J. Prouty, Spencer, Mass. 

Vlnca var. R. C, fine, $1.00 100. Prepaid, 10c 
extra. A. J. Baldwin, Newark, 0. 

Vlnca variegata rooted cuttings, 76c 100. 
Cash. Freeport Floral Co., Freeport, 111. 

Vlnca variegata rooted cuttings, 90c; $8.00 per 
1000. Byer Bros., Chambersbnrg, Pa. 

Vlnca variegata. See display adv. 
D. U. Augspurger & Sons Co., Peoria. 111. 

Vlnca variegata rooted cuttings, 75c per 100; 
$7.00 per 1000. M. M. Lathrop, Cortland, N. Y. 

Vlnca variegata rooted cuttings, 75c per 100, 
prepaid. Chas. Frost, Kenllworth, N. J. 

Vlnca variegata, well rooted, 90c. 
Burdell Floral Co., Bowling Green, Ky. 

Vlnca variegata rooted cuttings, $1.00 per 100. 
Vem L. Schluraff, Erie, Pa. 

Vlnca variegata rooted cuttings, $1.00 per 100. 
U. G. Harglerode, S hlppensburg, Pa. 

Vlnca variegata, 214-In., $2.50 per 100. 
Mosbaek Greenhouse Co., Onarga, 111. 



VIOLETS. 



Marie Louise violets. Rooted runners now 
ready, clean and free from disease, from A No. 1 
stock, $1.00 per 100; $7.50^ per 1000. Good 
blooms from same, A No. 1 quality; specials, 60c 
per 100; ordinary, 50c per 100. Cash with order, 
please. 

C. Lawrltzen, Box 261, Rhlnebeck, N. Y. 

Violet plants. Princess of Wales, Luxonne, 
California. Clean, healthy, well rooted plants, 
$1.00 per 100; $8.00 per 1000. Cash with order. 
Jacques GlUmet, Moylan, Del. Co., Pa. 



Violets. 6000 fall rooted plants of Lady Camp- 
bell, $1.00 per 100; $9.00 per 1000. 
A. B. Campbell, CochranvlUe, P a. 

Violets, Boston. Fall rooted plants from soil, 
$2.50 per 100. A. B. Campbell, CochranvlUe, Pa. 



MISCELLANEOUS. 

Pansy plants. Small seedlings of finest strains, 
in mixture, once transplanted, 35c per 100; $3.00 
per 1000. Vlnca variegata rooted cuttings, $1.00 
per 100; $8.00 per 1000. Orders booked for de- 
livery at any time. 

Russell Bros., B. R. 4, Syracuse, N. Y. 



LOOK under the headings of asparagus, cycla- 
men, dracaenas, primulas, smllax and vlncas and 
note what we have to offer this week. 
Freeport Floral Co., F reeport, 111. 

500 Mme. Sallerol geraniums, from soil, can 
be cut back for cuttings at once, $1.50 per 100, 
also 600 Dracaena Indivlsa, June sown, 5 to 10 
in. taU, strong, $1.60 per 100. Will take $11.00 
for the two lots, prepaid. Cash. 
N. P. Colberg, Princeton, 1 11. 

Rooted variegated vlncas, $1.00 100; $8.00 1000 
Jerusalem cherries, 2%-ln., $2.00 100; $18 00 
1000. lakeside Floral Co., Houghton, Mic h. 

TO EXCHANGE. 

To Exchange — Chrysanthemum rooted cuttings. 
Adella, Mrs. Weeks, Glitter, Golden Glow, 
Jeanne Rosette, Shrimpton, Oct. Frost, Black 
Hawk, Perrin. Dr. Enguehard, White and Yellow 
Bonnaffon, $2.00 per 100; Lily Crlnum fim- 
brlatulum, $5.00 per 100 (no order for less than 
50), for carnation rooted cuttings. 

Wolfe The Florist, Waco, Texas. 

To Exchange — 250 Chinese primroses, 4-ln., in 
bud and bloom, Al stock, $9.00 per 100; Lobelia 
Kathleen Mallard rooted cuttings, from soil, 76c 
per 100, for carnation rooted cuttings of White 
Enchantress (must be pure white). Pink De- 
light or Rose-pink Enchantress. 

S. A. Plnkstone, 206 Court St., Utlca , N. Y. 

To Exchange — Cannas: David Harum, Bgan- 
dale, Florence Vaughan, AUemania; Bnrbank, 
crimson giant, for caladlnms, geraniums, rooted 
or in pots, or what bave yoa? 

Chas. Schafer, Kankakee, 111. 

To Exchange — Salvia Zurich and feverfew 
double white, 2-in., $2.00 per 100, for geraninm 
rooted cuttings or 2-ln. polnsettla stock plants 
or adlantums. 

Rose-Lea Greenhouses, Shrereport, La. 

To Exchange — Or will sell. 1000 fine 2V4-ln. 
Yanoma mums and other bedding plants for 
mums, carnations or asparagus plumosus. 

Cottage Floral Co., Little Rock, Ark. 

To Exchange— 600 lem^ lilies, field-grownT 
$6.00 per 100, cash, or will exchange for other 
hardy Jblants I can use. 

Vinegar Hill Nursery, Rnshford, KOnn. 



PLEASE MENTION THE REVIEW WHEN WRITING ANY OF THESE ADVERTISERS 



March 2, 1011. 



The Weekly Florists' Review, 



89 



To Exchange — Canna Pennsylvania, Btrong 
roots, and some 5-ln. pot-grown Whltmanl ferns, 
ready for shift, for 3-ln. dracaenas and carna- 
tion cuttings. Rentz & Son, Peru, Ind. 

To Exchange — Coleus, 2-ln. or rooted cuttings, 
for anything you may have. 

Ponce de Leon Flora l Co., Atlanta, Ga. 

To Exchange — Fine Austria cannas for rooted 
cuttings of carnations and ferns. 

Sunnyslde Gardens, HogansvUle, Ga. 

To Exchange — Armstrong's Everbloomlng single 
tuberose bulbs for cannas. 
A. H. Dalley, Knoxvllle, Tenn. 

To Exchange — Dahlias for gladiolus, named. 
Nat'l Co-operative Show Gardens, Spencer, Ind. 

WANTED. 

Wanted — Let us know what you have to offer In 
2 or S-ln. Asparagus plumosus; state price per 
1000. 
Geo. Wlttbold Co.. 737 Buckingham PI., Chicago. 

Wanted — Rose plants of any kind. 
Melrose Garden Co., 90 Melrose St., Providence, 
R. I. ___^ 

Wanted — Carnation and geranium rooted cut- 
tings. Quote prices In exchange for spring stock. 
Wm. Eschrlcb Co.. Nortn Milwaukee, Wis. 

Wanted — Contracts to grow all kinds of spring 
plants. Address. 
Greenhouse, 1849 E. Main St., Decatur, 111. 

Wanted — Chinese arbor-vitae seedlings. Quote 
for Immediate delivery. 

Florence Nursery, Florence, S. 0. 

Wanted — Named gladioli, now or fall delivery. 
Nat'l Co-operative Show Gardens, Spencer, Ind. 

Wanted — Rose plants from benches. 
Address No. 25, care Florists' Review, Chicago. 

Wanted — Small stock of America gladiolus. 
Cash. C. H. Ketcham. South Haven. Mich. 

ASHES. 

Hardwood ashes, best fertilizer In use. 
George Stevens, Peterborough, Ont., Can. 

CARNATION STAPLES. 

PlUsbury's carnation staples, 60c per 1000. 
Postpaid. I. L. Plllsbury, Galesburg, 111. 



COAL. 



Coal, coarse and lumpy, no dirt. Makes steam 
and heat to beat the band; does not coke-up or 
clinker; can ship promptly. $1.20 net f.o.b. 
mines near Altoona. 

C. W. Ellfler, 1915 2nd Ave., Altoo na, Pa. 

CUT FLOWER BOXES. 

All sizes of cut flower and floral design boxes. 
Write for our box catalogues. 
C. C. PoUworth Co., Milwaukee, Wis. 

Buyers of corrugated shipping boxes, send for 
catalogue Just Issued. See display adv. 

Hlnde & Dauch Paper Co., Sandusky, O. 

Folding cut flower boxes, the best made. Write 
for list. Holton & Hunkel Co., Milwaukee, Wis. 

DECORATIVE MATERIAL. 

Write for our special price on a special lot of 
dagger ferns. 

Try our laurel festooning for your decorations, 
only 5c per yd.; 10 yds. free with first order. 
Crowl Fern Co., Milllngton, Mass. 

EGGS FOR SETTINGS. 

S. and R. C. Rhode Island Red, eggs from 
choice matings, De Graff strain, $1.00 to $3.00 
for 15. S. C. Buff Orpingtons, Cook strain, $3.00 
for 15. ... - 



H. P. Smith, Piqna, O. 



FLOWER COLORINGS. 

CYACEINB FLOWER COLORING, yellow, 
orange, pink, blue, green, American Beauty, 20c 
per qt. by mail. 
C. R. Cranston, 73 Flfleld Ave., Providence, R. I. 



GOLD FISH. 



GOLD FISH. 
Price list now ready. If you have not re- 
ceived it write us. One hundred customers have 
voluntarily pronounced our fish the best In the 
country. 

GLEN MARY FISH FARM, 

Chas. Pomraert, Prop., Amelia, Ohio. 

Largest gold fis h hatchery in the world. 

Grold fish, aquarium plants, castles, globes and 
all supplies. Send for catalogue. 

AUBURNDALE GOLDFISH CO., 

Telephone Haymarket 162 

920 Randolph St., Chicago, 111. 



LIME. 



Lime, best In the world for florists' nse. In 
bags, $4.00 per half ton. Cash. 

Albert M. Herr, Lancaster, Pa. 



MATS. 



Cheapest and most practical hott>ed mat on the 
market. Send for circular. 

J. P. Watts, Kerrmoor, Pa. 



PAPER POTS. 



Special Introductory price of $1.00 per 1000 
3-ln. paper pots, f.o.b. Baltimore; shipped flat; 
regular price, $1.40. 

P. B. Crowby & Son. Catonsvtlle. Balto., Md. 

PHOTOGRAPHS. 

I make a specialty of photographing flowers, 
plants, etc., for reproduction. Let me submit 
samples and prices on material for the next 
catalogue or circular. Special work to order at 
reasonable prices. Nathan R. Graves, 414 Hay- 
ward Bldg., Rochester, N. Y. 



POTS. 



standard Flower Pots. If your greenhouses 
are within .50 miles of the Capital, write us; we 
can save yoii money. W. H. Ernest, 28th and 
M St s , N. E., Washington, D. C. 

We make Standard Flower Pots, etc. 

Write U8 when in need. 

Wilmer Cope & Bro., 

Lincoln University, Chester Co., Pa. 

Red pots, none better. 
Colesburg Pottery Co., Colesburg, Iowa. 

Millions of best red pots. 
U. Cutler Rycrson, 108 3rd Ave., Newark, N. J. 

"NUF SED." Best red pots are made by 
Geo. E. Feustel, Falrport, Iowa. 



PRINTING. 



Special for florists. 500 each, letterheads, 
billheads, envelopes, cards and tags, $6.00. Sam- 
ples, 50 visiting cards, by mall, 28c. 

Fred F. Sotter, DouglassvlUe, Pa. 

Florists' printing. Samples free. Prices and 
work the best. O. K. Fink, Pottstown, Pa. 



RAFFIA. 



Rafii:i (colored). 20 beautiful shades. Samples 
free. R. 11. Comey Co., Camden, N. J. 
Or 2440-2454 Washburne Ave., Chicago. 

Raflia for tying vegetables, roses, carnations, 
etc. Bale lots or less. Write for prices. 

McHutchlson & Co.. 17 Murray St.. New York. 

SPHAGNUM MOSS. 

Sphagnum moss, burlapped. 10 bbl. bales, 
selected stock, $4.00; choice. $3.25; natural 
growth, $2.75 per bale. 5 bbl. bales, $2.25, $1.75 
and $1.50 per bale. Rotted peat. 90c per sack. 
Write for prices on large quantities. 

3. H. Sprague, Barnegat, N. J. 

Sphagnum moss, clean and fresh In burlapped 
bales — 

10 bbl. bales $3.50 

7 bbl. bales 2.25 

I'enuock-Meehan Co., 
1608-1C20 Ludlow St., Philadelphia, Pa. 

Live sphagnum moss, fine and clean, for or- 
chids. Large sacks, 75c. 

Hugo Kind, Hammonton, N. J. 

Sphagnum moss, best quality, 75c per bale; 
10 bales, $6.00. Cash with order. 

L. Amundson & Son, City Point, Wis. 

Ten bales sphagnum moss, $7.00. 

Z. K. Jewett Co., Sparta, Wis. 



TIN FOIL. 



Tin foil, 10 lbs., 10c per lb.; 100 lbs., $9.00. 
Wm. Schlatter & Son, Springfield, Mass. 



TOBACCO. 



Fresh tobacco stems, per bale, $1.50; 1000 lbs., 
$6.50; ton, $12.00. Special prices on large lots. 
G. H. Hunkel Co., Milwaukee, Wis. 

Fresh tobacco stems, in bales, 200 lbs., $1.50; 
500 lbs., $3..';0; 1000 lbs., $6.50; ton, $12.00. 
Scharff Bros., Van Wert, Ohio. 



WIRE WORK. 



Florists' wire designs and hanging baskets. 

Wyandotte Wire Works Co., 

700 Ferry St., Kansas City, Kan. 

We are the largest manufacturers of wire work 
In the west. B. P. Winterson Co., 
45, 47, 49 Wabash Ave., Chicago. 

FALLS CITY WIRE WORKS, 
451 S. Third St., Louisville, Ky. 

William E. Hielscher's Wire Works, 
38 and 40 Broadway, Detroit, Mich. 

Illustrated book, 250 designs free. 

C. 0. PoUworth Mfg. Co., Milwaukee, Wig. 

E. H. Hunt. 76-78 Wabash Ave.. Chicago. 

Wm. H. Woerner, 620 N. 16th St., Omaha, Neb. 

Enclosed is $1 for a year's subscrip- 
tion to The Beview. Thought I could 
get along reading my partner's copy, 
but we both find so much interesting 
reading matter that we both want it to 
read the same evenings, so it's a case of 
get two copies. May you live long, and 
your publication live forever. — ^W. T. 
Packard, Pittsburg, Kan. 



Horticultural Books 

Ve can supply any of the fol- 
lowing books at the prices 
ootedt postpaid, and any other 
book at publishers' price t 

Pronounolnsr Dlotlonary. 

A list of plant names and the botanical terms most 
frequently met with in articles on trade topics, with the 
correct pronunciation for each. M oenta 

Fraotloal Florloultur*. 

By Peter Henderson. lAn illustrated guide to 
the successful propagation of florists' plants. A de- 
tailed account of the requisites to success and a clear 
explanation of improved methods. For the amateur 
and professional florist. 325 pages. Cloth. 91.ftO 

Tomato Cultnra. 

Bv W. W. Tracy, U. S. Dept. of Agriculture. The 
book deals with every phase of tomato culture and 
was written for the man who wants the latest and most 
complete information on the subject. Cloth. 150 
pages. Illustrated. AO cents 

Omamontal Gardenlnc tor Amariouis. 

By EIjIAS a. Long, landscape architect. A treatise 
on beautifying homes, rural districts and cemeteries. 
A plain and practical work, with numerous illustrations 
and instructions so plain that they may be readily fol- 
lowed. Illustrated. Cloth. 3t)U pages. HkX.SO 

Til* norlsts* Manual. 

ByWM. Scott. A practical guide for the florist, 
covering the successful management of all the usual 
florists' plants; including many topics, such as green- 
house building, heating and floral decorating, etc. 
Written so you can understand it and profit by its 
guidance. Fully illustrated. $5.00 

The rorolns: Book. 

(By L. H. BaiLiEY. In this work the author has 
compiled in handy form the cream of all the available 
information on the subject of forcing vegetables under 
glass. In addition to this, the experience of many 
practical growers in different localities is furnished. 

91.25 

Greanhouae Construction. 

By Prof. L. R. Taft. A complete manual on the 
building, heating, ventilating and arrangement of 
greenhouses, and the construction of hotbeds, frames 
and plant pits. Lucid descriptions and 118 diagrams 
and illustrations make every detail clear to the amateur 
and professional gardener and florist. Cloth. 218 
pages. tl.OO 

Gardening, Hints on Good Taste In. 

By Mrs. Schuyler Van Ben.sselaer Land- 
scape gardening as an art, in its practical application to 
the beautifying of country places, is the subject of this 
book._ Mrs. Van Rensselaer gives information and 
hints in abundance relating to the treatment of grrounds, 
roads and paths, piazzas, pattern beds, trees and shrubs, 
etc., all animated by a fine artistic taste and a very 
genuine love of nature. $1.50 

The Chrysamthemum. 

By Arthur Hkrrtnqton. formerly president of 
Chrysanthemum Society of America. The most com- 
plete and comprehensive work on the cultivation of the 
chrysanthemum that has yet been published in Amer- 
ica. The book will be welcomed for the lucid, com- 
prehensive, as well as the practical character of its 
contents. Handsomely illustrated. 168 pages, 5x7 
inches. 5u cents 

Water Gardening. 

By Piter Bisset. This work supersedes all 
other books that have previously been wntten on the 
subject of aquatics and their surroundings, and gives 
in full detail all the practical information necessary to 
the selection, grouping and successful cultivation of 
aquatic and othei plants required in the making of a 
water ^rden and its environments, and covering all 
conditions from that of the amateur with a few nlants 
in tubs, to the large estate or park. M.50 

The Nursery Book. 

-By L. H. Batley. A complete guide to the multi- 
plication of plants. The book comprises full practical 
directions for sowing, the making of all kinds of layers, 
stools, cuttings, propagation by bulbs and tubers, and 
very complete accounts of all the leading kinds of bud- 
ding, grafting and inarching. An alphabetical catalogue 
of about 1500 plants- of fruit, kitchen-garden, orna- 
mental and greenhouse species— with directions for 
theu- multiplication. Cloth. 91. M 

The PrunlnK Book. 

By L. H. B.\ILKY. This is the first American work 
exclusively devoted to pruning. It differs from most 
other treatises on this subject in that the author takes 
particular pains to explain the principles of each oper- 
ation in every detail. Specific advice is given on the 
pruning of the various kinds of fruits and ornamental 
trees, shrubs and hedges. Considerable space is de- 
voted to the pruning and training of grape vines, both 
American and foreign. 530 pages. Illustrated. $1.80 



Florists* Publishing Co. 

StO.Sao Oazton BnUdtnc 
884 Dearborn St. CHICAOO 



"^-TTzwrj.T ^7*7 






•.'T'/n'™ • 



90 



The Weekly Florists' Review. 



March 2, 1911. 



MONTGOMERY COUNTY COAL CO: 




OOAL 



FISHER BUILDING, CHICAGtO 



Mention The Review when you write. 



SMITH, UNEAWEAVER& CO. 



C'O'A L 



AnthrMlte, Bitnminons, Coke and Gas Coal 

TmTt'^^'ufi^U Philadelphia 

Mention The Review when you write. 

Greenhouse Heating. 



GOOD OIL BURNER WANTED. 

I am a young florist, with one year 
in my own greenhouses. I have been 
burning soft coal, but find it to be much 
trouble and dirty. I would like to burn 
crude oil next year, but I do not know 
ot any good burner. I have 7,350 square 
feet of glass. Do you know of any 
good burner? If not, will you please 
ask the readers of The Review if any 
florist is using the crude oil in his 
boilers, also what kind of a burner he 
is using? K. L. K. 



If any reader can recommend a 
burner The Review will be pleased to 
publish the name and address of the 
maker. 



BOILER IS TOO LARGE. 

This summer I put in a new boiler. 
Everyone advised me to put in one large 
enough for present needs, with a good 
margin, saying it would not take much 
more fuel than a smaller one. I did as ad- 
vised, but think it takes more fuel than 
one which would do the work for fifty 
per cent or more of the time. I do not 
regret putting in the big boiler, but 
should like to know whether I could 
save enough on fuel to justify me in 
installing also a smaller boiler. During 
fifty per cent or more of the winter 1,000 
linear feet of 1-inch pipe, with ten 
pounds of steam, give me the required 
temperature. Only three or four times 
during the winter do I need the 
maximum of about 3,500 feet of 1-inch 
pipe. 

My boiler is a return flue boiler, 44 
inches x 12 feet, and contains forty-six 
3-inch flues. The grate is 45x48 inches. 
The stack is twenty-four inches wide 
and thirty feet high. I think the com- 
bustion is practically perfect. Would a 
smaller boiler be a paying investment, 
and what percentage could I save? 

L. C. B. 



The boiler is evidently of about forty 
horse-power and should be large enough 
for 6,000 or 8.000 linear feet of 1-inch 
pipe in the coils. If 3,500 linear feet is 
all that is required in the most severe 
weather, it would save at least twenty- 
five per cent of the fuel if a twenty 
horse-power boiler could be installed, 
and perhaps fifty per cent at limes when 
only 1,000 linear feet is needed. These 
figures are mainly approximations, as 
nothing is stated regarding the size and 
construction of the house. 

It is, of course, always well to have 




I 



Successors to the 
John Davis Company 



No loss from sudden drops in 
temperature if you use the 

Hughson Regulating Valve 

In connection with a steam heating plant. Carry 40 or 
60 pounds pressure on the boiler and set the valve for 6 
or 10 pounds— it will do the rest. You'll b© free from 
worry this winter, if you follow this advice: " Install a 
HuKhson Regulating; Valve when making your 
repairs " Ask for our Catalogue, which also shows 
Steam Traps and other devices. 

HUGHSON STEAM SPECIALTY CO. 

5021-5023 S. State St., CHICAGO, ILL. 



Mention The Review when you write. 



Harrisburg- Franklin Coal Co. 

1816 FISHER BLDG., CHICAGO 

Tbe Better Grades ONLT of 

INDIANA AND ILLINOIS COALS 

Preparation and Quality as tbey should be. Write to-day for Prices* 

Mention The Keview when you write. 



WRITK TO 



GEO. B. LIMBERT & CO. 

557 Fiiltoa SL, CHIUGO 

—For Prices on— 

fienoiiie 
YfnngU Irofl Pipe 

Ask For CataloKue. 



Mention The Review when you write. 

Ford & Kendig Co. 

"SpeBerized" Wrought Pipe 

Bspecially adapted for Greenhouse Work, 
Fittines, Valves, Tools, etc. 

1428-30-32 Callowhill St, PHIUDELPHIA, PA. 

Mention The Review when you write. 



Emergency Pipe Clamps 





the boiler of ample size to furnish the 
required heat without being forced, but 
the above estimate of the capacity of 
the boiler in terms of radiation allows 
for an excess of at least twenty-five per 
cent. 

A SUCCESSION OF TROUBLES. 

We are having trouble in the heating 
of our greenhouse, which is 15x20, with 
a shed on the north end, eight feet 
wide. When we purchased our boiler, 
a Wilks hot water heater, 36x24, we in- 
stalled it with an outlet connecting to a 
pipe on each side, which formed a con- 
tinuous circuit, with bends at the ends, 
until they connected at the south end 
with the inlet pipe. We placed four 
pipes under each bench, and these, with 
the inlet, made five under the middle 



To repair splits 
and rust holes 
on pipe. Made 
of malleable 
iron, and guar- 
anteed to stop 
the leaka. 

Send for cat- 
alogue of 
Pipe Repairs and Steam Specialties 

JAMES McCREA & CO. 

Manufacturers 
558-560 Washington Blvd., CHICAGO 

Mention The Review when you write 

HIGH-GRADE BOILERS 



Get Onr 
Cataloirae 



For GREENHOUSES 

STEAM and HOT WATER 

GIBLIN & CO., Utica, N.Y. 

Mention The Review when you write. 

bench, each having a circuit of more 
than 100 feet. The outlet pipe went 
up from the rear of the heater about 
three feet and then at right angles to 
the south end, with the expansion pipe 
attached to the inflow just twelve 
inches from the heater, then up eight 
feet, then to the right four feet and 
then up eight inches to the tank. First 
the circulation was too slow and the 
' frequent back action caused the heater 



WT'V^'^^rffr^''. ''^^r^W'' Ti^- ■"'' 



March 2, 1911. 



The Weekly Florists' Review. 



91 



€LYou don't need to burn out your fire 

trying to get heat quickly into the greenhouse farthest from your boiler. A 

Castle Automatic Circulator 

will force the hot water throughout the 
system and do it without putting on a 
pressure that is liable to cause leakage. 
It does it by mechanically setting the 
water in motion and keeping it moving 
until the desired heat is just where you 
want it. 

The Castle Circulator has entirely cured 
the faults of hot- water systems which 
could not be satisfactorily operated be- 
fore it was put in. We would like to 
show you the results of tests. 

Our new booklet tells how the circula- 
tor works. 

Write at once to the 

American Auxiliary Heating Company, *^IS"s°t"o^!mas8. 




no-t 



Mention The Kevlew wben you write 



to leak, but the worst of all was the 
overflowing of the tank, siphoning the 
water out. 

Then we were advised that the sys- 
tem was all wrong and were supplied 
with a pencil sketch showing how the 
work ought to be done. We enclose the 
sketch. In changing, we left out the 
longest pipes, thus having only three 
pipes under some of the benches, in- 
stead of four. Our expansion pipe still 
bothers us nearly as badly as before, 
but, with experience, we have more con- 
trol of it by lessening the fire. Of 
course we heat it so the water would 
boil if it had space. During our cold- 
est spells, 8 degrees above zero, we 
could hardly keep the temperature 
above 40 degrees in the far corners. 
We may have much colder weather, of 
course, and we do not know how we can 
keep from freezing. Our being two and 
one-half feet below the ground level 
helps us. It is a tight house and well 
protected on all sides, except the south- 
east. 

If the expansion is the safety valve 
of the hot water, should it not be 
moved a short distance farther away, 
which would place it at practically the 
farthest point on the system? Of course 
we can put it where back action can not 
touch it, if that is all that is necessary 
to remedy the trouble. The capacity of 
the heater is for a much larger house 
and we ought to be able to keep this 
baby plant hot if we wished, instead of 
holding it at 50 to 60 degrees, which 
we cannot do now. 

We have one air valve at the highest 
part of the outflow, and though all 
pipes are carefully tested with a level 



GREENHOUSE HEATING 

!■ a perplexing qnestion to all florists EXCEPT those nslng 

MOREHEAD STEAM TRAPS 

n The installation of a Morehead Return Steam Trap in a 
Greenhouse is absolute evidence of progressivenesa on the 
part of the florist. 

It is further evidence of good management, for the "More- 
head " is an investment in both satisfaction and economy. 
n The majority of florists are using Morehead Traps. If you 

^ are one of the exceptions, it will be to your , 

interest to write us — we will make you a 
liberal trial offer proposition. 

£t Byway of srettlneacqualntedjustsend your 
^ name and address and ask for "Trap Book." 

Morehead Mfg. Co. 



Dept. M 



DETROIT, MICH. 




Mention The Hcvlew when v ju write. 



we often find air in it. The heater 
now leaks badly and we fill the tank 
twice a day, eight to fourteen gallons 
at a time. J, F. T. 



The sketch shows one 2-inch over- 
head flow pipe and nine li/^-inch re- 
turns, distributed in three coils under 
the benches. This should make it possi- 
ble to maintain a temperature of 45 
degrees in zero weather, provided the 
piping is properly arranged. One im- 
portant point, the relative height of the 
heater and return pipes, is not clear. 
The heater is evidently several times 
as large as is necessary, and, with the 
piping arranged as described, it is not 
strange that the boiler is leaking or 
that it boils over. 



WRITE FOR 



Chicago Pump Co.'s 

Bulletin on Rapid Circulation 
in Heating: Systems, 'wbich 
saves 20% to 50% coal. 



1059 Fulton 'Street, 



CHICAGO, ni. 



Mention Thp Review when yon write. 

While at best careful firing will be 
required to avoid the boiling over, the 
strain on the boiler and the trouble 
from air collecting in the flow pipe can 
be easily done away with and this will 
go far to correct the trouble with the 
heating plant. 

It is stated that the flow pipe rises 
three feet between the boiler shed and 






92 



The Weekly Florists' Review. 



March 2, 1911. 




Kroeschell Versus Cast Iron 

The No. 7 Boiler I bought from you is heating 14,000 square feet of glass; I think it 

can take care of 16,000 feet. I do not have any trouble to keep up temperature of 50 degrees 

in the coldest weather. I fire only once after 12 o'clock midnight. The boiler has given 

perfect satisfaction. I have toiir cast Iron boilers— like the "Kroesohell" the 

beat of all. If any one wishes to inquire about your boiler, let them write me, for I 

think your boilers are good ones. ^.„.„ a„„,„ w _. in ^ 

Chas. Schultz, Menominee, Mich. 



SEND FOR 
CATALOGUE 



KROESCHELL BROS. CO., 



444 West Erie St., 
CHICAGO, ILL. 



Mention The KevJew wbeu you write. 



the farther end of the house. The 
proper way is to carry the flow pipe as 
quickly as possible to a point about 
two feet below the ridge and then run 
it, with a drop of two inches, to the 
farther end of the house. Connect the 
expansion tank with the highest point 
of the flow pipe. There will then be 
no need of air valves and no chance 
for air to collect in the flow pipe. No 
change is necessary in the returns, ex- 
cept that they should be raised as high 
as possible. Keally the best way, unless 
they are now above the top of the 
heater, is to place them on the side 
walls, just below the plates. If more 
than 45 degrees is desired, the number 
of return pipes should be increased, two 
pipes being added for each five degrees 
of additional heat desired, with 2^^- 
inch main flow and return. Care should 
be taken that the expansion tank does 
not freeze, as an explosion might result. 



ST. LOUIS. 



The Market. 



The business of last week was really 
good among the store men out in the 
west end. They say they had a great 
deal of social work of all kinds and so- 
ciety was crowding in as many func- 
tions as possible before Lent. 

The wholesalers have had a good de- 
mand, but are not cleaning up daily 
now, as stock of all kinds is plentiful 
at all the wholesale houses and prices 
are not nearly so high. The violet 
growers at Kirkwood say the cold 
weather of last week saved the violet 
crop, the previous week being too hot 
for them to continue blooming. So this 
week the market had a good supply of 
them, as usual. !Roses are becoming 
more plentiful and some good Killar- 
neys. White Killarneys and Bicbmonds 
were seen at greatly reduced prices. Of 
carnations there were more than the 
demand could use in any one day last 
week, and good fancies could be had for 
$2 per hundred in all varieties. 

Bulb stock was heavy in quantity 
and of good quality all of last week. 
All the wholesalers were stocked up 
with it and prices on this, too, have 
been cut. Sweet peas are much too 
plentiful for the demand and, unless 
low prices prevail, are left over. Calla 
lilies have been plentiful, with prices 
at $10 per hundred. In green goods, 
too, there is enough of everything. 

Various Notes. 

Fred Ammann has advised his friends 
in St. Louis that he has not retired 
altogether from business, but is just 
going to "let up" some and will retain 



''SUPERIOR" 

To- all others for Greenhouse Heating. 




Made in Nine (9) sizes for Hot Water. 
Send forfcataloffue and list of Krowers that are uslnc this boiler. 

Superior Machine S Boiler Works 

840-860 West Superior Street, CHICAGO, ILL. 



Mention The Review when you wrtte. 




The Standard 
Steam Trap 

Is acknowledged tlie best for the 
florist, because it is durable and do«8 
its work without trouble and annoy 
ance, saving its cost by the economy 
in coal bills. 



t HIPPARD CO., Youngstown, 0. 



Mention The Review ^hen yon write. 



Pipe Fittings.-- Imico Boilers 



-rOB GRKiaiHOUSX WORK- 



ILLINOIS MALLEABLE IRON CO. 

1801-1825 DIVXRSKT BOUIXVARD CHICAGO 



Mention The Review when you write. 



a few shares in the company, to be 
known as the J. P. Ammann Co., and 
that three of his old employees will 
run the place in the future. 

C. E. De Wever has bought a range 
of greenhouses from the old St. Louis 
Carnation Co., at Clayton, and is mov- 
ing them to his place, nearby. The 
work of rebuilding them has already 
commenced. He will thus have an addi- 
tion of four houses, each 25x100, in 



which he will grow mostly pot plants 
for the local trade. 

George H. Angermueller says that 
the sale of orchids has been quite good 
of late. He has been receiving nice 
consignments from Vesey's. The de- 
mand for supplies, too, has been good. 

The C. Young & Sons Co. is, as usual 
at this time of the year, showing fine 
blooming plants. White lilac plants in 
full bloom were the attraction last 



March 2, 1911. 



The Weekly Florists' Review^ 



93 






TO MAINTAIN AN EVEN TEMPERATURE IN YOUR GREENHOUSES, USE A 

Foster Pressure Regulator 

With this simple device attached to your steam main just inside the greenhouse the pres- 
sure on the heating coils will be absolutely constant, anywhere from 1 to 15 pounds (whatever 
the grower sets the Regulator at), no matter how the pressure on the boilers runs up and down. 

If the weather changes, or the sun heat varies, Instead of turningr on more pipes, just turn a nut on the 
Regulator, and get more steam, or less steam, at once. Made in sizes from ^inch to KVinch just for this work. 

" The Foster Pressure ReKulators which have been Installed in our greenhouses are giving 
perfect satisfaction."— Peter Relnberg, Chicago, March 16, 1910. 



We manufacture a 



Write for circulars and prices 

State your conditions; it wiU give us pleasure to help you if we can. 
large number of steam specialties. 

Foster Engfineering Co., Newark, N. J. 




(Patent Applied for.) 
The above cut is illustration of Currle's Re- 
volving Flower Stand. This Stand Is equipped 
with or without Fountain. To the Florist, to the 
flower lover, it will Immediately appeal. There is a 
rea8< n why it is euperlor to any other m«thod now 
In use for the displaying of flowers— whether the 
display Is made In the shop for sale purposes— or in 
the home, where the flowers can be arranged to suit 
the most exacting. A descriptive booklet mailed 
on application. Write 

Hillsboro Novelty Works, 

HILLSBORO, OHIO. 

Mention The Review wnen you write. 

week. This firm's seed and bulb de- 
partments have been exceedingly busy 
of late. 

C. A. Kuehn received last week a big 
consignment of extra fine cut tulips 
and Dutch hyacinths, which met with a 
good local demand. Shipping trade 
here has been excellent of late. 

George Schrief er, manager of Kuehn 's 
cut flower department, selected Wash- 
ington's birthday as the date for his 
marriage to Miss Fredonia Primble, and 
they have gone to housekeeping on 
Lansdowne avenue, East St. Louis, 111. 

Our greenhouse men, Messrs. Sanders, 
Jablonsky, Windier, Beyer and Schray, 
say they will be well supplied with fine 
blooming plants for the Easter trade. 
John Held and Charles Bleekert will 
also be in good shape for the local de- 
mand from now on until Easter. 

The Eggeling Floral Co. has reglazed 
the show house in the rear of the store 
at Grand and Lafayette avenues, and 
will have it well stocked with blooming 
plants. 

H, G. Berning's consignments of car- 
nations were large and of extra good 
quality last week. Both shipping trade 
and local trade were good, with stock 
of all kinds plentiful. 

Frank A. Weber, of the H. J. Weber 
& Sons Nursery Co., in a notice in a 




Stick Your Labels 

Shipping Tags, Etc., 

on your packages with. . . • 

Cold Water Paste. It is a powder, which, oh the addition of cold water, becomea S 

THICK, STICKY PASTE. 

1 lb. Instanter + 9 lbs. cold 'water does the work. 

From 1 to 25 lbs., 8c per lb. ; 25.1b. drum, 5isc per lb. ; 50-lb. drum, 5^40 per lb.: lOO-Ib. bag. 
5c per lb. ; 300-lb. bbl., 4^20 per lb. Larger quantities, price on application. 

F. O. B. Eiiston, Pa. Samples free— try it. 
Ask for Catalosrue of " Shippers' and Business Specialties." 

BINNEY & SMITH CO., 83 Fulton SL, NEW YORK, N. Y. 



Mention Tbe Review when you write. 



Hotchkiss Auto^"" 



Maciiine 

The simplest, best and the only ma- 
' chine made for tag:g:iDg boxes, barrels 
or any wooden package. Does the 
work m less than one-half the time re- 
quired with tacks and hammer— cost 
being: practically the same. 




WWUHMi»iMMUiWWUUilM^ 



PRIfF • Macblne and 1000 Staples $9 AA 
lAll/L. Bent prepaid lor .... V^'WW 

Special rates for staples in quantities. 



A. Henderson & Co.,^^ 



Wabash Ave. 
CHICAGO 



Mention The Review when you wiite. 



BENCHES 

rail 

TILE BOnOMS 

Furnish any qaani 

The Camp Conduit Co.^^«{^^;^^^A\»i?^o: 



TILE or 

FIFE FRAME 

Write for prices. Drainage perfect. 

12x24 and 
9x24 

Furnish any quantity. 



local newspaper, says that the recent 
cold snap badly damaged the plum trees, 
but did little or no damage to any of 
the other fruit trees. Other local nurs- 
erymen say the same. 

The St. Louis Florists' Club will hold 
its monthly meeting on Thursday after- 
noon, March 9. There is a great deal 
of important business on hand, which 
should attract a large attendance. The 
twenty-fifth anniversary celebration 
will come up for a final vote. 

J. J. B. 



BUY THE 



Taylor Automatic 
RETURN TRAP 



ClnaoutPloc 




■ShuftTkln 
Adjustment 

WMerblet 



etewnlal* 

AND SAVE MONET 

Write for our Guarantee 
and Best Prices 

TAYLOR STEAM SPECIALTY CO. 

* BAHLC CREEK, MiCtU U. S. A. 



Mention The Review when you write. 

WILKS 

Hot Water Boilers 



The Most Koonomical Boilers 
for Greenhouses :: :: 

No night fireman required with our 
Self-feeding Hot Water Boilers. 

Seiri for Cataloaaa md Prices. 

S. WILKS MFG. CO. 

S528 Shields Ave.. CHICAGO 



p?, -w '( V. .F'; ' ^''^.:;7'y w?- -'F'^*;^^ ;/' '^-, 






94 



The Weekly Florists' Review* 



March 2, 1911. 



Tobacco Paper << 



Is the 

STRONGEST, 

BEST PACKED, 

EASIEST APPLIED 

24 sheets $ 0.75 

144 sheets 3.50 

288 sheets 6.50 

1728 sheets 35.10 



NICO-FUME 



»' UQUID 



Furnlshes^the Most 
Nicotine for\iie IMoneyl 

Mfd. by THE KENTUCKY TOBACCO PRODUQ CO., Louisville, Ky. 



Over 40^ Nicotine 

By far the 
CHEAPEST. 

Just Note PricesI 

Pint $ 1.50 

yi Gallon 5.50 

Gallon 10,50 

5 Gallons 4725 



Mention The Review when you write. 



CLAY CENTER, KAN. 

There are three railroads running 
through this town and C. Humfeld has 
worked up an excellent shipping busi- 
ness in funeral designs, covering the 
surrounding towns. He has been excep- 
tionally busy of late. Carnations are 
in excellent condition, the Enchantress 
varieties being grown most extensively. 
Winsor and Queen Louise also do well 
here and O. P. Bassett is grown for red. 
Boses are good, but have been off crop 
for some time. The business in rooted 
cuttings is heavier than ever this sea- 
son. Three houses are devoted to let- 
tuce and radishes for the home trade. 
Rhubarb grown under the benches is a 
profitable crop. Preparations are now 
being made for planting a large quan- 
tity of early vegetables. As many as 
twenty-two acres of sweet potatoes are 
grown. 

S. D. Brandt also finds business in 
rooted cuttings heavy this season. Pel- 
argoniums are one of his specialties. 
The propagating benches are full of 
young stock. He has four houses of 
roses and three houses of carnations 
and has found the demand this season 
exceeding his supply. Mrs. Brandt has 
been ill for more than two months. 

W. H. Humfeld, of Kansas City, re- 
cently visited his brother here. 



LEiNOX, MASS. 



About 250 florists and others were 
present at th3 annual assembly and ball 
of the Lenox Horticultural Society, held 
in the town hall, and though this attend- 
ance was not as large as that of some 
former years, yet the affair was in some 
respects a greater success than any of 
its predecessors. Indeed, it was stated 
that there were just enough participants 
to make the dancing enjoyable. The 
music was furnished by Carl Esher's 
orchestra. 

James O. Clifford was chairman of 
the committo of arrangements and he 
and his aids arranged well for the 
affair. The others on the committee 
were George W. Ferguson, Frank H. 
Butler, Eobert Grindrod and L. H. Pet- 
ers. 

On the reception committee were: 
George Foulsham, chairman; Alex Mac- 
Connachie, A H. Wingett, George H. 
Thompson, "William Henry, E. J. Nor- 
man, S. Carlquist, E. Jenkins and 
Walter Jack. 

The floor committee consisted of S. 
Whitney, Frank Howard, William G. 
Clifford, H. P. Wookey, Fred Heere- 
mans and A. J. Loveless. 

The grand march was led by Presi- 
dent George Foulsham and Mrs. Foul- 
sham. 



NIKOTEEN 



NIkoteen Aphis Punic 



The most effective and economical material there is 
for spraying plants and blooms. 
Mlkoteen is skillfully extracted from leaf tobacco and carefully refined, it is clean and easy to apply 

NIkoteen does the work when vaporized either in pans, on pipes or over a flame. „.,„., 

Full pint bottles, $1.50. 

Specially prepared for fumigating closed houses. 
It vaporizes the Nicotine evenly and without 
waste. N< ithing keeps a house free from Aphis so 
cheaply. Price, $5.50 per cas** of 12 paraffined boxes. AH Seedsmen. 



inzHi^ 



Cattle Manure in Ba^ 

Shredded or Pulverized 

Pnre — dry— uniform and reliable. 
The beet of all manures for the 
greenhouse. Florists all over the 
country are using It Instead of 
rough manure. 

Pulverized 
Sheep Manure 

Absolutely the best Sheep Manure 
SAon the market. Pure manure and 
** notlilDg else. The best fertilizer for 
carnations and for liquid top-dressing. Unequaled 
for all field use. Write for circulars and prices. 

The Pulverized Manure Company 
38 Union Stock Tarda CHICAGO 

Mention Tbe Review when you write. 



Nature's Best Fertilizer 
is Slieep Manure 

Sheep's Head Brand furnishes the 

valuable organic matter and hunius 

necessary to grow crops. It improves 

the mechanical conditions of the soil. 

Makes compact clay more open and por- 

^ous, makes ll^bt, sandy soils more retentive 

of moisture, keeps soluble plant 

foods within reach of rootlets 

of growing veirptitlon. 

Fanners, orchardists, florists, 

truc'K and market gardeners 

, should send for our book 

"Fertile Facts" to learn how 

properly and most effectively 

to fertilize the soil. 

NATURAL GUANO CO. 

DepL 28. Anrora. DUiMis 




Mention The Hfvtpw wht-n vim write 

''FRIEDMAN'S BEST'' 
TOBACCO POWDER 

For fimitgatlng and sprinkling combined, 3 
cents per lb. In luO lb. sacks. (60 per ton. 

TOBACCO STEMS, 60 cents per 100 lbs. 
TOBACCO DUST, for sprinkling, 1 cent per lb. 
ROTAL INSECT POWDKR. 60 cents per doz. 
boxes, 6 cents per lb. In 100 lb. sacks. 

J. J. rriednan, 285-289 Metrapsiitm Ave. Brooklyn. N.Y. 

Mention The Review wber vpu write 

Peerless Sulphur Blower 

"A great improvement over the beUowa." 
Prioe, $4*00 F. O. B. Chloago 

McMORRAN & CO."«ik%AU"?Ll.'." 

Mention The Review when you write. 

THE f LORISTS' HAIL ASSOCIATION 

Has paid $192,000.00 for glass broken daring tbe 

last 23 years. For particulars conoernln g 

Hall Insurance, address 

John 6. Esler, Sec'y, Saddle River N. J . 



To-Bak-lne 
Products 



THEY KHJ. BUGS 



cent 



LIQUID FORM %\,V^: 

FOR SFRATING 

FUMIGATING PAPER 

FOR BURNINO 

Fumigating Powder 

FOR SLOW BURNING 

DUSTING POWDER 

FOR vboftabij: orowbbs 

Tou will have no trouble with insect pests 
if you use these products as directed. 

Send lor our booklet, "Words of Wisdom," 
by leading growers. It is free. 

E.*H. HUNT 

76-78 Wabash Ave. CHIGACK). 




THE BEST 

Bug Killer and 
Bloom Saver 

Drop us a line and 

We will 
prove it 

P. R. PALCTHORPE 
COMPANY 

Dept. A, 
O^rensboro, Ky«. 



are easy to kill with 

The fumigating Kiod Tobacci Powder 

$3.00 per bag 100 lbs. 

Ratlsf action guaranteed or money baek; 
why try cheap snbitltntet that malun d* 
not dare to guarantee t 

TBI L A. sTooTHorr 00, MotnT nuoi, I T. 



I^JI^f>»»njjn;'l«T^.»nniR,--X;T'^Jf-^^^ '.-irT^ •"" ■.•/■'• ■ T • 



March 2, 1911. 



The Weekly Florists' Review. 



95 



MT. GILEAD POHERY CO., Mt. Gllead, Ohio 

Successors to SMITH-THOMAS POTTXRT 
Manufacturers of CHERRY RED STANDARD POTS of all bmos 

Our clay is mined from the old Morrow County Beaver Swamp, which enables us to furnish florists with 
pots noted tor strength, porosity, beauty in color, lightness in weight and smoothness in surface, making 
them especially adapted to the successful growth of plants. 

Our factory is equipped with new and up-to-date machinery. Our capacity is greater and our ware- 
house full of stock. We are ready to give all orders prompt attention. Give us your order and we will 
satisfy you. 

OUR PRICES WILL INTEREST YOU. PRICE LIST ON APPLICATION 

Mention The Review when you write. 




PAPER POTS 




(Neponset) 
Waterproof, Liflrht* 

Durable. 

Just the thinsr for 

shipplne plants. 

100 1000 

2i4.inch lO.BO $2.42 

2i«-incb 35 2.78 

3-inch 45 3.82 

3ifl-inch 60 5.24 

4-inch 75 6.60 

5-inch 1.15 10.9€ 

e-inch 1.60 14.68 

Write for prices on 
10,000 lots. 



E. H. HUNT, " 'gSSiSV- 



Syracuse Red Pots 

€["A little pot is soon hot"; so 
is a thin pot. Our pots are 
much thinner and tougher 
than others. It's the quality 
of the clay. Write for our 
latest price list if you did not 
get one. 

Syracuse Pottery Co. 

SYRACUSE, NEW YORK 

Mention The Review when yoa write. 

GEO. KELUR & SON 

Manoiacturers of 

RED POTS 

Before buying write for prices. 
8614-8628 HenidoB Street 

WrightwfJd Ave.. CHICAGO, ILL 

Mention The Review when vou write. 




•RED- 



Standard Flower Pots 

Price list and samples on appllcatioii. 

PADUCAH POHERY GOh H6. 

PADUCAH. KKNTUCET 

Mention The Review when yon write 

Standard Red Pots 

Price list and samples on application. 
We carry a complete line of Florists' pots. 

Weis & Schmidt Pottery Co. 

MILWAUKEE* WIS. 

Mention The Review whpn you write. 

RED STANDARD POTS .Tir^JirT. 

2-ln.. $2.50; 2>4-ln,. $2.96; a^a-ln., $.3.80: 3-ln.. $4.50; 
S>a-ln.. $6.86; 4-1d..$7.20; 6-ln.. $11.10; 6-ln.. $19.80. 

Cash mufft accompany order. 
HARRISON POTTKRY. Harrison. Ohio 

Mention The Review when you write. 



For ''Pot Luck'' Try Us 

HEWS STANDARD POTS 

POT MAKERS FOR 140 YEARS 

World's Largest Manufacturers 

, ■ Write for Catalogue and Discounts. 



A. H. NEWS & CO., Inc., 



Established 1765 

CAMBBIDGK, MASS. 

PursM St., Lmi lilaid City, N. T, 



Mention The Review when yon write. 



DREER'S ''RIVERTON SPECIAL'' PLANT TUB 

No. Diam. Each Doz. 100 




10 


20 in. 


$1.45 116 00 


$30.00 


20 


18 in. 


1.30 14.00 


ll.S.Of. 


30 


16 in. 


1.00 11.25 


92.00 


40 


Win. 


.65 7.00 


56.00 


50 


12 in. 


.45 5.00 


40 00 


60 


10 in. 


.88 4 00 


32 00 


70 


Sin. 


.30 8.50 


28.00 



Manufactured for us exclusively. The best tub ever introduced. The neatest, ligrhtest and cheapest. 
Painted grreen, with electric-welded hoops. The four largest sizes have drop handles. 

BENRY A. DREER, ^^i-icTr^'piS?*^' 714 Chestnut St., PHILADELPHIA, PA. 



Mention The Review when you write. 



You Can't Get Anythingf Better Than Our 

Louisiana Red Cypress Greenhouse Material 

' Your Orders Filled Promptly 

GalTanlzed Steel Gutters, Trusaes, Purlins, Pipe, Flttlnca, Hot Bed Saali, 
Glass, Peoky Cypress, VentllatlnB: Machinery 

THE FOLEY MANUFACTURING CO., westin A«a. a.d 26ib st., Chicago 

Mention The Review when you write. 

THE FAMOUS IONIA POTS 

STRONGEST, LIGHTEST. MOST POROUS. 

Packed in strong, hardwood orates. Plenty of straw. 
We BolTed the breakagre problem years ago. 

We are ready for that order NOW. 

M - - IONIA. NirH. 



IONIA POTTERY CO 



All the Clay i^ Florists' Red Pots 

l3 prepared by passingr through a screen 1600 meshes to the square 
inch. If in a hurry for pots order from us. We can ship over five 
lines of railroad, by river or interurban. Write for catalogue show- 
ing all the articles we make for florisu' use. 

THE PETERS & REED POnOlY CO., - Zanesville, Ohio 




PENNSYLVANIA 



is the State to get the nice Red Standard Pota, Pans, 
Azalea Pots, etc. , and NORRISTOWN is the town 

where they manufacture them and burn them a nice red color. Try Us and see if 

they are not just as cheap, too. 

THE KELLER POTTERY CO. 



213-223 Pearl Street 



NORRISTOWN, PA. 



Mention The Review when you write. 



',*W7'^ 



96 



The Weekly Florists' Review^ 



Mabch 2, 1911. 



EXHAUST 
VALVE 




Standard Durability 

Durability is one of the chief points of advantage in Standard Pump- 
ingf Engfines, just as it is a feature of all high priced automobile engines, and 
the high grade stationary engines for electric light and power purposes. The 
Standard engine design is similar to that of the best automobiles in having a 
vertical, water cooled engine. The vertical engine is far preferable to 
the horizontal for its superior wearing qualities, as long experience has 
demonstrated. The inlet and exhaust valves are of the vertical poppet type, 
are mechanically operated by means of steel cams, and have extremely long guide 
bushings, which hold them in line and absolutely air-tight. The side strain on 
horizontal valves gradually wears them out, but the vertical valve, mechanically 
operated, is the acme of durability. 

Standard Pumping Engines For Water Supply. 

Send for a catalogue to 



The Ensrine Cylinder of 
The Standard Pumplne Engine. 



The Standard Pump & Engine Co.," 



Michigan Street, 
CLEVELAND, OHIO 



Ours Is the longest experience. 



Mention The Review when you wnte 



NEW BEDFORD, MASS. 



The Market. 



Trade has been fairly good during the 
last week. Funeral work has been quite 
plentiful. Flowers are not quite so 
scarce. Carnations still retail at 75 
cents per dozen, roses at $2 per dozen; 
single tulips at 60 cents, double tulips 
at 75 cents per dozen; daffodils at 50 
cents and 60 cents per dozen; Paper 
Whites at 50 cents per dozen, retail; 
violets at $1 per hundred blooms, sweet 
peas at $1 per hundred blooms, snap- 
dragons at $1 per dozen, callas at $2 
per dozen, Easter lilies at $3 per dozen. 
Freesia still helps out, as also does 
alyssum. 

The plant trade continues good. Some 
nice flowering plants are to be seen in 
the store windows. 

During the last week we have had 
more days of sunshine than we have 
had for months. The weather is mild, 
with occasional cold nights. 

Various Notes. 

E. H. Chamberlain had a nice window 
display of flowering plants Saturday, 
February 25, consisting of azaleas, tu- 
lips, cyclamens, daffodils, lily of the 
valley and cinerarias. 

"William P. Peirce was busy last week 
with funeral work. He reports a good 
call for plants. 

Peter Murray is sending in some nice 
obconica primroses. His place is in 
fine shape. 

'R. E. Nofftz is cutting some excellent 
bulb stock. He had a handsome window 
display last week. 

R. H. Woodhouse had a good wed- 
ding order recently, requiring a large 
quantity of palms, ferns and flowering 
plants. W. L. 

Greenfield, Mass.— E. A. Richards, of 
the Sunny Dell Greenhouses, makes a 
specialty of growing carnations for the 
retail trade, and he modestly states 
that he hopes some of his stock may 
be good enough for exhibition at the 
Boston show in March. He says he has 
a light pink sport of White Perfection 
that he is watching closely, believing 
that it will prove to be valuable. He 
thinks highly of May Day and expects 
to plant it more extensively next 
season. 




evero 

G ARDET^ 

HOSE 



Light 
Strong 
nexible 



An indestructible 
moulded Hose for 
Lawn, Greenhouse, 
Stable, Garage. Of 
braided constructijDn, 
cannot unwrap, kink 
or burst like old-style 
wrapped duck con- 
struction . Made in 
continuous lengths up 
to 600 feet, which gives 
you any length you 
want and avoids leaky 
couplings. 

Manufactured b 

Revere Rubber Co. 

Wnrlc* Chelsea. Mass. 
noru. Frovidence. K.I. 

BRANCHES: 

BOSTON, MASS. 

New York, Philadelphia, 

Pittsburg:, Chicagro, 
Minneapolis, New Orleans, 
San Francisco. 



Mention The Review when you write. 



Pansy and Verbena Baskets 

Small size, measure 9 inches long, 6 
inches wide, 3 inches deep, put up 500 

in a crate, per 1000 $ 9.00 

Large size, measure 13 inches long, 7ji 
IlllSfVlll'l'lliE111f'l!i''W'''"'''l'[^ inches wide, 4 inches deep, put up 250 

—'"*"'"'■'•" ' Jr in a crate, per 1000 15.00 

Detachable wire handles for either of the above, per 1000 8.00 

Have ten other sizes. Send for descriptive circular 

COLES & CO., 109-111 Warren St., New York, N. Y. 




Mention The Review when you write. 



■wFiW77-T'i* ■ " - 1 '"":•■' ''-7 1 ;•* ■■^'"^.'' «, 'j,' 



Mabch 2, 1011. 



The Weekly Florists^ Review* 



97 

=3 



^iw^ 



A PERFECTGREENHOtJSE HOSE 



MAOIC 



NtWYORKBILliNG 

PACKING CO. IS 

9r-93 CHAMBERS ST. NEW YORK 



FURNISHED in continuous lengths of ^oo feet. 
An exceptionally high grade hose manufactured 

with a woven jacket insertion instead of cotton 
duck, and with specially.§.elected rubber in the inner 
tube and cover." , . , i 

The woven jacket construction makes a stronger 
hose than can be obtained from cotton duck, and [ 
absolutely precludes the possibility of cover opening 
at seam— a common cause of failure of hose made on 
cotton duck. " This constmction also gives a more 
flexible hose and reduces the possibility of kinking. ' 

"Magic" Hose is guaranteed to stand a pressure 
of 500 pounds per square inch, although its bursting 
pressure is f ar in excess ot this. 

PHILADELPHIA. PA. PITTSBURGH. PA. 

CHICAGO. ILL, Portland: ORE. boston, mass. 

STL0UiS.MO. SPOKANE. WASH. BUFFALO. N.Y.^ 
lltniANAPOtlS«l(lD. SAN FRAHCISCO. CAL. ^ 



Mention The Kevlew when you write. 




Spray 

Our new catalogue on 
sprayingr just out. It's full 
of information that will help 
all florists and nurserymen. 

Drop a card for a copy to 

The Crestline Mfg. Co. 

Drawer "D," Crestline, OIilo 

Mention The Review when vou write. 

GET OUR PRICES ON 

Galvanized Wire Rose Stakes 
and Tying Wire 

Hannfactnrer8 ot the Model Plant Supports for 
Carnationfi, Dahlias, Golden tilon. Peonies, 

('hrysantheniDmN and Tomatoes. 
Lawn Fence, Flower Bed Onard, Trellis. 

IGOE BROTHERS 

63-71 Metropoliton Avenne, BROOKLYN, X. T. 

Mention The Review when you write. 

CALDWCU TANKS and TOWERS 

are of the 
Hlsrhest Quality of Constmction, 

f)roauciiig: the greatest durability, longrest 
ife and best service. Give florists at fcmall 
L expense same water service as in cities. 
r Write for list of users in your vicinity, and 
illustrated catalogue. 
W. £. CiXDWELL CO., Incorporated 
Louisville, Ky. 

TANKS{s^«i^j-|-}TOWCRS 

Wlndntills, Pntnus, Oaa Vnslnes 

Mention The Review when you write. 

NOTICE 

To all American Nnrserymen and Seedsmen desiring 
to keep in touch with commercial horticulture in Eng- 
land and the continent of Europe : Your best means 
of doing this is to take in the 

Horticultural Advertiser 

Our circulation covers the whole trade in Great Brit- 
ain and the cream of the European firms. Impartial 
reports of all novelties, etc. Paper free on receipt of 
76 cents, covering cost of postage yearly. As the H. A. 
is a purely trade medium, applicants should, with the 
subscription, send a copy of their catalogue or other 
evidence that they belong to the nursery or seed trade. 

A. & G. Pearson. Lowdham, Nottingliain, Eng. 










RESERVOIR VASES 




r 


For Cemeteries, Parks and Lawns. 

MADE OF CAST IRON 


^^^^H^^l 




i 


The reservoir aupplies the plants with mois- 
ture by capillary attraction. 

Not necessary to water plants oftener than 
once in ten days. 

We make nearly 100 styles, ranging in price 
from $6.00 to $100.00 each. 

None better made. Send for catalogue. 

Walbrldge S Company 

The Orlffliial Patentees and Makers 

Buffalo, N. Y. 




i 











Mention The Review when you write. 



Mr. Carnation Grower: 

^70U KNOW that potted cutting^s make stronger plants 
* and better plants; they can be planted without water, at 
any time, and do not even wilt; there is no check in their 
growtli. Crosby's Paper Pots are the best on the market, 
easiest folded and most convenient, and the prices are next to 
nothing. Look at these prices on lots of 5000 : 

2-inch. . . .per 1000, $0.70 2^-mch.. . .per 1000, fO.85 

3-inch.... per 1000, 1.00 4 -inch .... per 1000, 1.50 

Freight paid on $10.00 orders east of the Mississippi 



P. B. CROSBY & SON, 



CATONSVILLK, 
(Balto.) MD. 



Mention The Review wben you write. 



96 



The Weekly Florists^ Review* 



Maucu 2, 1911. 



EXHAUST 
VALVf. 




Standard Durability 



ing 



MIXING 
VALVE 



VALVC 
BUSHINGS 



Durability is one of tlie cliit'f jjoints of iK 1 van lii^'e in Standard Pump- 
„ Enj^ines, just as it is a feature of all liifj;li prieed automobile en^'ines, and 
tile hifxh ^'rade stationary enjjines for elei'tric light and power purposes. The 
Standard t'n<;ine desitrn is similar to tliat of the best automobiles in having a 
vertical, water cooled engine. The vertical engine is far preferable to 
the hoii/ontal for its superior wearing qualities, as long experience has 
demonstrated. The inlet and exhaust valves are of the vertical poppet type, 
are nieehanieally operated by means of steel cams, and have extremely long guide 
bushings, which hold them in line and absolutely air-tight. The siile strain on 
horizontal valves gradually wears them out, but the vertical valve, mechanically 
operated, is the acme of durability. 

Standard Pumping Engines For Water Supply. 

Send for a catalogue to 



The liiijjine Cylinder of 
The Standard Pumpinjf Lnsinc. 



The Standard Pump & Engine Co., 



14 Michigan Street, 
CLEVELAND, OHIO 



Ours is the longest experience. 



Meiitiou The Review when you write 



NEW BEDFORD, MASS. 



The Market. 

I i;h!c li.-is Ih'cii r.'iii'ly gnoil during tlic 
'■'^' \\i'i'li. I'liiii'r.'il wiiik li;i< l.iccii (juite 
I'l'iii il'ni. I'ldwcis :\vr imt <|uite so 
'■'■•■111'''. < .'ini;!! inns xiil] i-cjail ;it 7.") 
(•(■Ill'- [jcr (Idzrii, r(iS('>< ;it .*'J jicr tlo/.oii; 
-iii.uN' tulips .-it (ill t-ciits. (loiiMo tuli]is 
:il :.", cents jH'T (Id/en; (i;i I'Idd ils at 50 
cciit'^ and • ilii cents per dn/.oii; I'apor 
AVliites ;it ."■)() cents jht dd/.eii, retail; 
\iiilcts .'it i 1 ])er luin(lre<l bldoins, sweet 
l'<';is ;it ."rl ]ier Inuidrcil Mdoins, snaj)- 
dragoiis at Jil per do/.en, callas at $2 
]Hr do/.oii. 7:;ister lilies at .*:; per dozen. 
lMVcsi;i still helps out, as also docs 
alyssiim. 

The jijant trade continues good. Some 
Jiico flowering pliints are to be scon in 
tiie store windows. 

During the ];ist wepjc Ave liavc liad 
more (lays of sunsliine than wo liave 
had for months. Tlie weather is mild 
with occasional cold nights. 

Various Notes. 

v.. TI. ('ha?)ili(>rlaiii had a nic-e -window 
display (it' lloweiing plants Saturdav, 
I'cliruary L'."), consist ing of n/.alcas. tii- 
Jip^. cyidamcns. datfodils, lily of the 
\all(\v and cim^rarias. 

AVilliam ]'. J'eirce was Imsy last week 
witii fiiner;il amuK-. He rejiorts a good 
call for jilants. 

I'cter .MiiiTiiA' is sending in some nice 
oliconica priiiiidses. His jilace is in 
line shape. 

li'. ]•'.. Xofft/ is cutting some excellent 
bull, stock, lie had a handsome window 
display last weejv. 

li*. 11. Woddlnnisc had a good wed- 
ding order recently. re(iuiring a largo 
(|uaiitity of j.alni'-. ferns and fldweriier 
I''''>'t^- AV. L. ° 

Greenfield, Mass.— K. A. ];i(diards. of 
the Sunny J)(dl < irciMihouscs, makes a 
sj.ecialty of growing carnations for the 
retail trade, ami lie modestly states 
that he hopes some of Ids stock mav 
be good eiiougli lor exhibition at the 
i'.oston show in ]\Iarch. He savs he has 
a light ]unk spoit of White J'erfei-tion 
that he is watfdiing closidv, lieliesing 
that it will pro\'e to l,e \;'iliiable. He 
Hiinks hii:Iil.\- of M.-iy Day and expects 
to jdant it more cxti'iisi V(dy next 
seanoii. 




Ivevero 

G AR DETvI 

HOSE 



Light 
Strong 
Flexible 

All indestructible 
moulded Hose I'lr 
Lawn, < i rceii house, 
Stable, (iarage. Of 
braided const i net idi. 
cannot unwrap, kink 
or burst like old-style 
wrajipfd (link con- 
st ruction. M ade in 
continuous lengths up 
to 500 f eet , w h i c b gi ves 
you any length you 
want and avoids leaky 
couplings. 

Miiiiiil'acturcd I* 

Revere Rubber Co. 



Wnrlc- <"J>«'lsea. >lns8 



K.I. 



BRANCHES: 



BOSTON, MASS, 

.\pn ^ork. I'liihidclDhiu. 

I'itlsbiir;;, <'lii('ai;o, 
MiiiiicaiKiliN. Ncn Orh'sri**. 
San Kriiiicisfd. 



Mention The Heview when you write. 



Pansy and Verbena Baskets 

■ gg~n\ \ ^:^T-— — Small size, measure '■' inches long, (1 

»!^^a IirWltlllll'limmmS-; " ' ""-—==5% illelieS wide, :"> inclieS deep put Up oOQ 

'^fS^^^p^mm^ ill a crate, p.-r lOnQ ..........$ 9.00 

Hetachable wire handles for either of the above, |)er lOO"' 2.00 

Have ten other sizes. Send for descriptive circular 

COLES & CO., 109111 Warren St., New York, N. Y. 

Aleiition The Review when you write. 



March 2, 1911. 



The Weekly Florists^ Review* 



97 



m 



■vv^. ■^viej '■'i<[j 



A PERFECTGREENHOCSE HOSE 



MAG IC 

I 



NEWYORKBELTiNc 

PACKING CO.US 

91-93 CHAMBERS STNEWYORK 



FURNISHED in coininuous lont^ths of i;;oo feet."' 
An exceptionally high f;rade hose manufactured 
with a woven jacket insertion instead of cotton 
duck, and with specially selected rubberin the inner 
tube and cover." i 

The woven jacket construction makes"a stronger | 
hose than can be obtained from cotton duck, and , 
absolutely precludes the possibility of cover opening 
at seam— a common cause of failure of hose made on 
cotton duck. ' This construction also gives a more I 
flexible hose and reduces the possibility of kinking. 

"Magic" Hose is guaranteed to stand a pressure 
of ijoo pounds per square inch, although its bursting 
pressure is far in excess of this. 

PHILADELPHIA, PA. PITTSBURGH. PA. 

CHICAGO. ILL. PORTLAND. ORE. BOSTON. MASS. 
STLOUiS.MO. SPOKANE.WASH. BUFFALO. N.Y.. 

lHlllANAPQUS«lilD. SAN FRANCISCO. CAL. * 






Mention The Keview when you write. 




Spray 

Our new catalogue on 
spraying just out. It's full 
of information that will help 
all florists and nurserymen. 
Prop a card for a copy to 

The Crestline IVIfg. Co. 

Drawer "D," Crestline, Ohio 

Mention Tho Ki ^iow when v()\i write. 

GET OUR PRICES ON 

Galvanized Wire Rose Stakes 
and Tying Wire 

.ManiifactiirorN oi" the >Iod('l I'liiiit Supports for 
CarnutioiiN, Italilias. <ii)ldrn (^lon. I't'onics, 

('hrysantliPiiiiiiiiN and Toiiiiitocs. 
Lawn Koiicc, Flower Itt'd (iiiard. Trellis. 

IGOE BROTHERS 

(i:i-71 .'netropolitun Avenue, itUOOKI.lX. N. V. 

Mention The Review when you write. 

aiDWELL TANKS and TOWERS 

are of the 
Hifirliest Quality of Constmction, 

f)roaiicingrthe greatest durability, longest 
ife and bestservice. Give florists at s-niall 
expense same water strvitc as in cities. 
Write for list of users in your vicinity, and 
illustrated catalogue. 
W. E. CALDWELL CO. , Incorporated 
Louisville, K y. 

TANKS{^;t,taS' ^TOWERS 

XVilKllltills. fiillilis. <;!i« Vn^iims 

Mention The Hi-vicw when von write. 

NOTICE 

To all American Nurserymen and Seedsmen desiring 
to keep in touch with commercial horticulture in Eng- 
land and the continent of Europe : Your best means 
of doing this is to take in the 

Horticultural Advertiser 

Our circulation covers the whole trade in Great Brit- 
ain and the cream of the European firms. Impartial 
reports of all novelties, etc. I'aper free on receipt of 
75 cents, covering cost of postage yearly. As the H. A. 
is a purely trade medium, applicants should, with the 
subscription, send a copy of their catalogue or other 
evidence that they belong to the nursery or seed trade. 

A. & C. Pearson. Lowdham, Nottingham, Eng. 





RESERVOIR VASES 

For Cemeteries, Parks and Lawns. 

MADE OF CAST IRON 



The reservoir supplies the plants with mois- 
ture by capillary attraction. 

Not necessary to water plants oftener than 
once in ten days. 

We make nearly 100 styles, ranging in price 
from $6.00 to $100.00 each. 

None better made. Send for catalogue. 

Walbridge S Company 

The Orierlnal Patentees and Makers 

Buffalo, N. Y. 



Mention The Kcviow when yon write. 



Mr. Carnation Grower: 

^/or KNoW tliat potted cuttinfs^s niakc stfuii'j-i r plants 
* ainl hcttcr |plant-; tlicy ran !"■ plaiitcil uitln'Ut walif. at 
any tiiiir, ami ilu ina i'\fii wilt; tlurr i.~ im clicik in llnii 
<:ii>\vtli. Crosby's Paper Pots aiv tli<- I't-i nn tin- markit. 
easiest I'liMfd an<l ni(»t innvcniinl , and ihr piict- arc next to 
imtliinL:'. \.i»>k at tlir.-c |(rircs i>ii jols of oCuJ: 

L'-incIt per liiOo, >;().7n L'>^-ini-h pn- lunO, |n.s.") 

:;-ini-li , , . . per Inilo, I.OQ -1 -iiifh . . . . per |in"i. |..")ii 

Freieht paid on $10.00 orders east of the Mississippi 



P. B. CROSBY & SON, 



CATONSVILLE, 
Balto. I MD. 



JUention The Review when you write. 



r ta^r-.""-. ^i . ""^r" i ' 



98 



The Weekly Florists^ Review* 



March 2, 1911. 



Our prices on HAND MADE 



vK': 



GREENHOISE GLASS 

Are always the lowest. Our qualities are the best. 
We are MANUFACTURERS. Write us for prices. 

THE COLE GLASS CO., Lancaster, Ohio 



Mention Tbe Review wben \ou write. 



PITTSBURG. 



The Market. 

Pittsburg has been having some of 
the most delightful weather; the first 
robin has made its appearance and the 
buds of a fine magnolia are bursting and 
showing the new green, and flowers are 
becoming a little more plentiful. 

Eoses are fine in color, but are still 
on the scarce side, although carnations 
are coming in quantities that satisfy 
all demands. Bulbous stock is quite 
plentiful, and the tulips are fine. Vio- 
lets are coming about right to clean up 
every day. Smilax is not plentiful, and 
adiantum is decidedly scarce. 

There has been nothing large doing, 
but the regular trade has been quite sat- 
isfactory, and February was quite a 
good month. 

Various Notes. 

Geo. Schemer, of Connellsville, Pa., 
lost one of his greenhouses by fire, 
caused by the burning of a neighbor's 
stable; the loss was considerable, as the 
house was filled with plants. 

Paul Bandolph, who is quite a chicken 
fancier, captured a few prizes at the 
poultry show with his fancy bantams 
and pigeons. 

Mr. and Mrs. L. J. Eowe, of Titus- 
ville, Pa., were visitors last week. 

Hoo-Hoo. 



LONDON, ONT. 



The range of J. Gammage & Sons 
now contains fifteen houses, each from 
200 to 400 feet long, with service build- 
ing 50x68 feet in the center. About 
60,000 feet is used for growing cut 
flowers and the remaining ten houses 
are given to growing plants, principally 
for Christmas and Easter trade. In 
cut flowers, roses, carnations, chrysan- 
themums, sweet peas and violets are 
grown. These are for the retail trade, 
and with the addition of the bloom 
from 150,000 to 200,000 bulbs are sold 
in the retail store. The plants are 
largely sold at wholesale, the shipping 
points covering practically the whole 
of the Dominion. The plant is heated 
from a battery of five seventy horse- 
power boilers, so arranged that one or 
more may be used, as the conditions 
of the weather demand. In addition 
to the range of glass, several acres of 
shrubs, herbaceous plants and peren- 
nials are grown. Peonies have been an 
excellent cut flower crop for spring. 



Built Especially For Greenhouse Use 



Costs Only 
$4.00 r. 0. B 
Can 
TiMc. 




Yovr Honey 
Back, if 
Not 
Satisfied. 



A wheelbarrow that embodies the suffgestlons of many leading florists and Is just what you 

Because— It Is built to be used In the narrow walks of greenhouses. 

Because— The handle srnards protect the user's knuckles. 

Note the substantial construction. Angle Iron legs and sockets for side boards. Our patented 
"Never Break" wheels. Careful workmanship throughout. 

Dimensions— Handles. I'ax2x69 in. Width inside, in front, IS^a in. Width inside, at handles, 
18b in. Extreme width, including handle guards, 24 in. 20-ln. wheel. 

Send your order today— or ask for more particulars. 

THE TOLEDO WHEELBARROW CO., Toledo, Ohio 



Mention The Review when you write 



The Heim Safety Clip 

. Price, 30c per 100; $2.60 per 1000.^=^=^=^= 

The Clip that's safe, the SaJFety Clip. 
They'll tie your guy wires every trip; 
1 Strings will rot. strings will slip- 

But the best of all is the Safety Clip. 

The Heiin Safety Clips are for Roses, Chrysanthemums and Carnations and 
are the neatest, most up-to-date articles on the market. So well do they 
accomplish their work that you cannot afford to be without them. They will 
not rust and with a little care will last a lifetime. Get out of the old twine 
and string rut and get in line with the Heim Safety Clip and be up-to-date. 
They are the hold-fast kind, and when you put them on they won't come off, 
unless you take them off. They are quickly applied and quickly removed. 

"^^"^h'^th. TRIPLE SIGN CO., Connersville, Ind. 



Mention The Review when you write. 



JAMES H. RICE CO. 



Get Our Special Prices on 



GREENHOUSE GLASS 

NOW 

Window and Plate Glass, Paint, White Lead, Putty, etc. 

Telephon e Cent ral 1944. 

Office and Warehouse: Illinois and St. Clalr Streets, GHICSAGO 



Mention Tbe Review when you write. 



March 2, 1911. 



The Weekly Florists' Review. 



99 



a s««»g'ggggiwggg«»ggggg»g!g»g«g»»»gg«!g»g^^ 



Get Acquainted with THE LATEST on 

Greenhouse Glass 

— WPMTF MJg 

PinSBURGH PLATE GIASS COMPANY 

442 Wabash Avenue, Phone Harrison 8839, CHICAGO 



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Greenhouse Glass 

Best Quality, lowest prices. 

Greenhouse White 

Whitest and most durable paint made. 

Greenhouse Putty 

Made with Pure Linseed Oil. 
—Write today— 

H. M. HOOKER COMPANY 

•ftl-669 WathlnctOB Bird., CHICAOO. ILL. 

Phone Monroe 4994. 

Mention The Review when you write. 



"ELASTIC-LYKE" 

GREENHOUSE GLAZING FUTTT 

Absolutely the best glazing product ever 
produced, (iuamntetd to be made of purest 
double boiled Linseed Oil and to contain 
a greater proportion of Pure White Lead 
tJian any other product. Can be used in 
machine or putty bulb. Impervious to water 
and will not heave in cold, nor run in warm 
weather. 1 gal., $1.40; 5 Kals.. $6.75; 
10 8»ls., $18.85; 20 eals., $25.45; 1 bbl. 
(50 sals.), $62.50. 

Will be pleased to supply special 
quotations to jobbers. 

* £• H* HUNT) Distrtlfutor 
7e<78 Wabash Avenue, CHICAGO 



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.Peerless Qfff^O^^^ 
%-^ Glass I>^:1-' 




TO MtND CRACntD CLAAa IMMtOlATtl-f »r<0 PCHMAHtNTLV 



There are two classes of growers— one 
that uses Peerless Glass Repair 
Clamps, the other that is going to use 
them. $1.00 per 100. Ask your dealer 
or write to 



iEOKNER, 



Wauwatosa, 
Wisconsin 



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Holds Glass Flrmlr 

SEE THE POINX^r- 

PEERLESS 

Glaslng Points are the best 
No rights or leits. Box of 
1000 points 76 cts. postpaid 
HENRY A. DREER 
714 ChsttMrt It.. PHia..Pt 




GREENHOUSE GLASS 

We are the World's 
Largest Producers. 

Ask the dealers for prices, or write us direct if the dealer doesn't handle 
our product. We guarantee uniform Grading^, Flattening^, Annealing; 
and Careful Packing;. 

*^ Get acquainted " with our 
Specialties 



29 OL Crystal Sheet 3-16 in. Polished Crystal Sheet 



AMERICAN WINDOW GLASS CO. 



General Offices, Farmers' Bank Building, 



PinSBURG, PA. 



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NOW IS THE TIME TO BUY 

GREENHOUSE GLASS 

WRITE FOR PRICES 

The Toledo Plate ft Window Glass Co. 

TOLEDO, OHIO 

Mention The Review when you write. 



SUPERIOR QUALITY 



LOW PRICES 



QUICK DELIVERY 



Greenhouse Glass 

Our quality is the best and our prices are extremely 
low at tills time. Don't fall to send us your enquiries. 

BADR WINDOW GLASS CO., - Eaton, Indiana. 



The REGAN PRINTING HOUSE 



LARGE RUNS OT 



l/AlALUlllIu GETOURnGURE 
83-91 Plymouth Place, CHICAGO 



SIEBERT'B ZINC 
MEVSR-RUST 

GLAZING POINTS are Positivelr the Best. 
Last Forever. Over 60,000 pounds now In use. 
A sure preventive of ^lass Bllpping. Effective on 
large or small glass. Easy to drive. Easy to ex- 
tract. Two sizes, '^ and ''g. 40o per lb.; by mail, 
16c extra; 7 lbs. for $2.50; IB lbs. for $5.00, by 
express. For sale by the trade. Randolph & 
McCIements, Sncceisors to Chas. T. Slebert, 
Banm and Ueatty Sts., Pittsburtr, Pa. 



100 



The Weekly Florists^ Review* 



March 2. 1911. 



CINCINNATI. 



The Gateway to the South. 

With the advent of bulbous stock in 
quantity and a heavy supply of carna- 
tions, the market became easy in nearly 
all lines. A heavy shipping business 
has taken up many blooms. Local re- 
tail business is creating no exceptional 
stir. Many consignments, the quality 
of which is extremely good for dumped 
stock, have been arriving from smaller 
growing centers. 

All roses except red are now appar- 
ently sufficient in quantity, and the 
quality, too, is getting back to mid- 
winter form. Kichmond and Khea Keid 
are off crop and, judging from what 
does come into the market, it will be a 
fortnight before they are strong in 
numbers. The market on Beauties is 
easy. 

In the early part of the week the 
wholesalers were long on carnations. 
The call is strong for white, which alone 
cleans up properly. Enchantress, too, 
enjoys a good call, but is arriving in 
such large quantities that the demand 
does not absorb it as fast as the white. 
The prices of all have dropped a notch. 

Bulbous stock is now having its in- 
ning. The good hyacinths, tulips, jon- 
quils, daffodils and freesias find a ready 
sale, but the poorer stock cleans up 
only at low prices. Plenty callas may 
be easily obtained, while Easter lilies 
are again here in quantity. lily of the 
valley is a glut. Violets, both single 
and double, are more than s;ifficient in 
quantity to meet requests. Sweet peas 
clean up every day. 

The market is long on everything in 
the line of greens, especially good 
Sprengeri and plumosus. 

Various Notes. 

Miss Edith Kyrk reports that _ Gus 
Adrian is cutting extra fine Narcissus 
Victoria, Dutch hyacinths and tulips. 

Ed Fries has a fine crop of Formosa 
lilies coming on. The stems are long, 
stiff and erect and nearly every plant 
has five or more buds. He also has a 
large quantity of Spiraea Gladstone that 
look fine. 

Among the auto enthusiasts that came 
to this city for the show were Mr. and 
Mrs. Dudley, of Parkersburg, W. Va.; 
Mrs. Buck, of Washington C. H., 0., 
and O. C. Heberling, of Georgetown, 
Ky. 

Charles Bosworth, of J. M. McCul- 
lough's Sons Co., is wearing a smile 
that won't come off. It's a boy. 

Peter Herb, of Mt. Healthy, O., is 
cutting excellent hyacinths for Otto 
Walke. 

Local florists regret to hear of the 
death of S. J. Galloway, of Eaton, O. 
The funeral services were held Sunday 
afternoon, February 26. 

The following were among the recent 
callers: C. S. Ford, of Philadelphia, 
representing A. Herrmann, of New 
York; Kupert E. Hall, representing 
Eeed & Keller, New York, and William 
Eisner, of the Newark Parafl&ne & 
Parchment Co., Newark, N. J. 

Don't forget the bowling on Monday, 
March 6, at Finke & Craig's, 120 East 
Sixth street. C. H. H. 



Osborne, Kan. — John McFarland is 
preparing plans for the erection of an 
iron-frame greenhouse here this spring, 
for commercial use. 



COST 



Should not be the only consideration 



in 



Greenhouse Building 

KING 

Greenhouses, however, are really econom- 
ical because the additional, put into 
extra strength and rigidity, is a very 
small part of the total cost, and adds 
many times its value to the life of 
the house, and the satisfaction it gives. 

King Construction Co. 



Home Office and Factory, 

N. TONA WANDA, 

N. Y. 



Kastem Sales Office, 

No. 1 MADISON AVE., 

NEW YORK 






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S. JACOBS & SONS 

1361-1365 riushing Ave., Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Mannfftotorera and Jobbers In 

Greeflhoose Coostroctioo Material 



Takp NnlirP ^^ famlBh working: plans with each order free. We make no cbarge 
lanc liuu^c jqj ^uy information you may require while erecting your house. 

Particular people will find our material, workmanship and prompt dellverieB 
come up to their entire satisfaction. 



Most complete 

Factory of its kind 

in the 

United States. 

Estabfished 
38 Years. 

Absolute 
Reliability. 

Personal Attention 

Given to 

Every Order. 




Let us quote you 

LOUISIANA RED 

CYPRESS, 

B0ILB6, 

PIPE, 

nniNGS, 

VENTILATING 

APPARATUS, 

GLASS, 

We carry 20,000 boxes 
in stock. 

PUTTY. 



ON« OF OtJB NEW ADDITIONS. 



w sr 



Always mention the PloristS* RevicW when writing advertisers. 



^fr*': •.■ ■ 



Maucu 2. 1011. 



The Weekly Florists^ Review* 



101 



Pillsbury's Carnation Staple '^^^l: 

quickest, simplest and easiest way to fix your 
split carnations. No tools required. 

I find tltese staples very useful, are easily applied 
and not objected to by customers in the least. 

Frank M. Paine, Florist. 



.3 

— • O •^ 

S *> a 

00 «> 

d <* 



1 4^' 





I. L. PILLSBURY, Florist 

GAUESBURG. ILL. 

Mention The Review when you write. 

Evans* Improved 
Challenge Ventilating 
Apparatus 

Write for >llu$trated catalogue. 

Quaker City Naciiine Works 

RICHMOND, IMIX 

Mention The Review when you write- 

Kramer's Pot Hanger 

For Sale by Wholesale Seedsmen, 
Florists and Supply Dealers. 

Price, $1.00 per doz. by express. 
Sample doz. by mail, $1.26. 

L N. KRAMER & SON, Cedar Rapids, lowt 

Mention The Review when you write. 

THE GRANITE STATE 

MOWING MACHINE CO. 

HINBDALK, N. H., U. S. A. 

Manufadurers of Granite State Lawn ami Field 
Mowers, Capitol Trimmers 

•ad Specialties for Garden and Ctnwtwy «e. 

MenooD rae Review when you wnie 

Tri-State Center 1936. 
Flortsta* Wire Work Our Specialty. 

All work guaranteed. 

NORTHWESTERN WIRE WORKS 

LOUIS P. DANCIK, Prop. 

Special attention to all orders. Oive us a trial. 
Write or call. 

629 Second Ave. No., Minneapolis, Minn. 

Mention The Review when you writa. 
American Flower & Tree Tub 



No. Top Deep 

1 13 "a 12. 

2 141a 14. 

3 16 16. 

4 19 18. 

5 21 20. 
r, 25 22 
7 26-'4 24 

Tlie American Woodcnware 

Htg. Co., Toledo, Ohio 
OataloRue free. 

Mention The Review when you write. 




I 



Superior 

^ Carnation Staple 

(PATKNT APPUKD FOB.) 

For repsuringr split carnations. 1000 for BO cents. 
Postpaid. Sample free. Special prices to jobbers. 

SCBUTTER iiSm^iS^lVu 

Ifentlon The Review when yoa write. 




There Is No Use Talking When You 
Are Up Against Facts 

The fa(;t8 are these: In all our quarter of a century of gnvnhouse l)uildiii>j; not 
one, no not one grower has ever gone back to a wootlen liouse after luvving bouglit 
one of our Half Iron Frame Houses. Neither have they ever l)Ought a Half Iron 
Frame after buying one of our Full Iron Frame. 

Don't you go backward when the other fellows are doing their danuMlest to go 
forward. Get in line — and keep there. Write us. 



Hitching^ &Compaiiy^ 



Elizabetli, N. J. 

and 

1170 Broadway, N.Y. 



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To Tefl AD the Good Points of Our Construction 



in this advertisement 
are planning any 
tions, it will pay 



is impossible. If you 
rebuilding or addi- 
you to write us. 



TRUSSED 

SASH BAR 

AND 

RON FRAME 

HOUSES 




CONCRETE 
BENCH MOULDS 
AND 

GREENHOUSE 
APPLIANCES 



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SEE THAT LED6E. 

Pal Sept. 18, 



Use Our 



>t.i8,i9ooV n ^ ' 



^« JENNINGS!^~« 
IRON GUTTER. 




Patent Iron Bench Fittings and Roof Supports 

VENTILATING APPARATUS 
Improved Vaporiziosr Pans for Tobacco Extracts, BtCii 

■end for Clroulan. 

DILLER, GA8KEY & KEEN, ,»iriSS:»,.. PHILADELPHIA, PA. 

Mention The Review when you write. 



< 



102 



I '1^; ' 



The Weekly Florists^ Review^ 



. i ■ 

MAitC'U '2, IttlJ. 



'"WW 




ALPHABE/TICAL INDEX 
ro ADVBRTISERS - 



> 



Af; 




A. 

Advance Co 103 

Advance Floral Co.. 43 

Allen, .T. K fil 

Alpba Kloinl Co... 44 74 
American Anxlllar.v 

HcatlnK Co 01 

American Spawn Co. Ttfi 
.\merlcan Window 

GlaRS Co SIO 

American Wooden- 
ware Mfg. Co 101 

Amllng Co ^"J 

Anderson, S. A 44 

.\nderson Floral Co. 4.5 
.\ndorra Nurseries.. fl.T 
Angermneller, G. H. 32 

.Vphlne Mfg. Co 30 

Archlas' Seed Store. 48 
Arkansas Valley 

Seed Co 47 

.Vschmann, G 7» 

Aschmann Bros "5 

Ashcraft, W. E. . . . 40 
Angspurger & Sons. 77 
Austin Co 58 

B. 

n^der Co., John 78 

Badgley, Rledel & 

Meyer 60 

Baker, Geo. C 44 

Baker, W. J 58 

Baker Bros. Co 41 

Balk's Nursery 41 

Ball, C. D 'l 

Bancroft & Son 44 

Barnard Co 1 

Bassett & Washburn 4 
Bassett's Floral 

Gardens 62 

Baumann & Co 7 

Baur & Smith 70 

Baur Floral Co 1 

Baur Window Glass. 99 
Bayersdorfer & Co.. .31 

Beaven, E. A 36 

Beechwood Seed 

Farms 46 

Beneko, J. J 43 

Bennett, C. A 64 

Benson, Lester 44 

Berger & Co 48 

Berger Bros 28 

Berke, G. H 44 

Bemhelmer, E •>» 

Bemlng, H. G 58 

Bertermann BroB..43-7( 

Beu, Mrs. F 32 

Beyer Floral Co 44 

Blnney & Smith Co. 93 

Black, Chas 65 

Blacktstone, Z. D . . 43 
Boddlngton, A. T..1-67 
Bolglano & Son... 40-47 

Bonnet & Blake 60 

Bonnot Bros 61 

Bowe, M. A 42 

Braguo & Sou 3( 

Braslan Seed 

Growers' Co 46 

Breitmeyer's Sons.. 44 
Brldgeman'B Seed 

Warehouse 48 

Brown, A. C 43 

Brown Seed Co 47 

Bnins, H. N 54 

Bryan. A. J 76 

Backbee, H. W 43 

Bndlong, J. A 4 

•'Buds''^ 54 

Bunyard Floral Co . . 40 

Burnett Bros 54 

Burpee & Co 47 

Burton- Allison Co. . 33 
Buxton, F. T 103 

C. 

Caldwell Co., W. E. 97 
Caldwell The Woods- 
man Co 36 

Camp Conduit Co. . . 93 

Campbell, A. M 72 

Capital City Green- 

- house Co 42 

Carrlllo & Baldwin. 78 

Chapln Bros 43 

Charleston Cut 

Flo. & Plant Co.. 40 
Chicago Artificial 

Flower Co ^ 

Chicago Carnation. . 

1-27-73 

Chicago Pump Co... 91 
Chllds, .Tohn Lewis. 55 

Olark Seed Co 47 

Clarke Bros 43 

Clarke's Sons 45 

Clasidfled Advs 80 

(!leveland Cut Flower 44 

Coggan, S. W 42 

Cole Glass Co 98 

Coles & Co 96 

Columbus Floral Co. (2 

Conard & Jones 66 

Coombs, John 45 

OofBonas & Co 60 

Cottage Gardens Co. 69 
Cousins, Leonard... 76 

Cowee. W. J 30 

Ooy Seed Co 4« 



Craig Co., R 68-76 

Cranston, C. K .^3 

Crawbuck, H. K 01 

Crego, G. S ."il 

Crestline Mfg. Co . . 97 

Crltchell. C. E 87 

Crosby & Son 97 

Crowl Fern Co 37 

Currle Bros. Co 54 

D. 

Daehnfeldt. L 49 

Dallas Floral Co 44 

Daniels & Fisher... 41 

Daids, Chas. A 43 

narrow, H. F 49 

Davis Co., R. R 74 

Davis Nursery & 

Seed Co 61 

Dennlson Mfg. Co. . 3 
Detroit Cut Flower 

Supply House 59 

DeWltt, P. M 70 

Dickinson Co 47 

Dietseh Co., A 103 

Dlller, Caskey & 

Keen 101 

Dillon, J. L 75 

Dlngee & Conard... 65 
Dorner & Sons Co. . . 68 
Dreer, H. A 

50-75-77-95-99 

Dreyer, G 77 

Drumm Seed & 

Flo. Co 40 

Dunlop, John H . . . . 45 
Dnrasno Flower Co. C2 

E. 

Ebbert Seed Co 46 

Eckelmann, P. H... 62 
Edwards Folding 

Box Co 35 

Ehret, Fred 44 

Eisele, C 72 

Elliott & Sons 26-48 

Elsass, Louis 32 

Exotic Nurseries ... 62 

E.rres. H. G 42 

F. 
Fallen Leaf Green- 
houses 62 

Farmer, L. J 56 

Fellourls, J. J 60 

Fiedler & Co 43 

Field, H. W 41 

Fish Seed Co 46 

Florists' Exchange.. 59 
Florists' Hall Assn. 94 

Foley Mfg. Co 95 

Ford, M. C 61 

Ford, W. P 60 

Ford & Kendlg Co. . 90 
Forster-Mansfield ... 61 

Fortunes, A. L .37 

Foster Engineering 

Co 03 

Fottler, FIske, Raw- 
son Co 48 

Fox, C. H 45 

Freeman, Mrs. J. B. 44 
Freeport Floral Co.. 42 

Frey, C. H 45 

Frey & Frey 43 

Friedman, J. J 94 

Froment, H. E 60 

Furrow & Co 45 

O. 

Galvin, Inc., ThoB.. 45 

Garland Co 101 

Gasser Co 43 

Gear, Fred 32 

Geller Florist Co... 60 

Glblln & Co 90 

Glllett, E. G 59 

Granite State Mow- 
ing Machine Co... 101 
Greater N. Y. Flo- 
rist Assn 61 

Grohe, Fred 62 

Growers' Cut Flower 

Co 61 

Gude Bros. Co 46 

Gunther Bros 61 

H. 

Hahn Co 104 

Hall & Robinson 43 

Harrlsburg-Franklln 

Coal Co 90 

Harrison Pottery ... 95 

Hart, Geo. B 59 

Hasslach, Jacques.. 49 

Hatcher, J. C 40 

HayashI & Co 63 

Heacock Co., Jos... 71 

Helnl & Son, J. G.. 43 

Helss Co 42 

Henderson & Co 93 

Herbert & Son 78 

Herbert & Flelshauer 63 

Herrmann, A 61 

Hess & Swoboda .... 44 

Hews & Co., A. H.. 95 

Heyne, G. A 74 

Hill Co., B. G 1 

Hlllsboro Novelty 

Works 93 

Hlnde ft Dauch 85 

HIppard, B 92-108 

HltcblncB ft Oo 101 



k^J^ 




Carton BIdff. 
334 Dearborn St. CHICAQO 



Advertising forms close 

TUESDAY 

The latest hour at which ad- 
vertisements, or changes of 
advertisements, can be accepted 
Is 5 p. m. Tuesday. 



Hoerber Bros 59 

Hoffman, S 45 

Hollcraft, M. E 43 

Hollywood Gardens. 43 

Holm & Olson 42 

Ilolton ft Hunkel... 27 
Hooker Co., H. M.. 99 
Horfl Advertiser... 97 
Hort'l Printing Co. . 70 

Hoyt Bros. Co 41 

Hubbard Co 64 

Hughson Steam Spe- 
cialty Co 90 

Hunkel Co 

48-50-51-54-55 

Hunt, B. H.. 5-94-95-99 

I. 
Idlewlld Greenh'ses. 42 

Igoe Bros 97 

Illinois Heater & 

Mfg. Co 35 

Illinois Malleable 

Iron Co 92 

Ionia Pottery Co. . . 95 
Isbell & Co., S. M.. 47 

J. 

Jablonsky, A 72 

Jackson ft Perkins.. 64 

Jacobs & Sons 100 

Jahn, H. H 44 

Jansky, J 37 

Jesselson Flower 

Shop 40 

.Tohuson ft Son, Ltd. 49 
Johnson Seed Co ... . 54 

.Tohnston & Co 43 

Jones. H. T 65 

Jones, P 25 

Jones, The Holly 

Wreath Man 29 

K. 

Kastlng Co 1 

Keller. John A 40 

Keller & Son 95 

Keller Pottery Co. . 95 
Kellogg Flower & 

Plant Co 45 

Kempf. U 62 

Kennicott Bros 2 

Kentia Nurseries... 62 
Kentucky Tobacco 

Product Co 94 

Kervan Co 36 

Kessler Bros 61 

Kinsman, A. N 40 

King Construction .. 100 
Klrkeby ft Gunde- 

strup Seed Co 47 

Klokner, A 99 

Knoble Bros 42 

Kramer ft Son 101 

Kroescbell Bros 92 

Krncbten, John 25 

Kuebler. Wm 61 

Kuehn, C. A 68 

Kuhl, Geo. A... 43-74-76 
Kuhlmann, H. H... 40 
Kyle ft Foerster...2-68 
Kyrk, Louis H 59 

I.. 

Lager & Hurrell 78 

Lake, Wm. B 28 

Lang Floral & 

Nursery Co. 40 

Las Palmas Green- 
bouses 62 

Lecakes & Co 60 

Lee & Co 36 

Leedham Bulb Co. . . 62 

Leedle Floral Co... 65 

Lemon ft Co 44-76 

Lennon Seed ft 

Plant Co 46 

Leonard Seed Co 47 

Lery. J. J 61 



Llchtenberger, J 60 

Ulley, S. P .58 

Lilly Co 46 

LImbert & Co., G. B. 90 

Lion & Co 8 

Llttlefleld & Wyman 72 

Livingston Seed 

35-43-5G 

Loomls Carnation Co. 62 
Lord & Burnham.. .103 
Lord's Flower Room 42 
Los Angeles Flower 

Market 62-63 

Lovell, B. 43 

Luhllner & Trinz... 43 

M, 

McCallum Co 59 

McClunle, G. G 40 

McConnell, Alex 42 

McCray Refrigerator C 

McCrea & Co 90 

McCullough's Sons.. 59 

McGregor Bros. Co. 1' 

Mclntyre, J. W .'>8 

McKellar, Chas 26 

McKenna & Son 45 

McManus, Jas GO 

McMichael, S. J 56 

McMorran ft Co 94 

MacRorie-McLaren. . 63 

Marvin, Ira G 43 

Masur. S 44 

.May & Co., L. L. . . 45 

Merritt. J. W 60 

Metcalfe. T. L 40 

Metropolitan Floral 

Co 42 

Mette. Henry 49 

Miami Valley Seed. 47 

Mlchell Co., H. F... 32 
Michigan Cut Flower 

Exchange 37 

Mlllang, August 60 

Mlllang, Chas 61 

Miller, E. S 54 

Miller, J. W 70 

Miller & Son 40 

Miller's. Florists ... 79 

MInge Floral Co 41 

Minneapolis Floral 

Co 43 

Moltz & Co 60 

Monlnger Co 104 

Montgomery County 

Coal Co 90 

Moore, Hentz & 

Nash 60 

Moore Seed Co 48 

Morehead Mfg. Co.. 91 

Morse ft Co.. C. C. 47 

Mt. Gllead Pottery. 95 

Mulr, Craig ^4 

Munk Floral Co 58 

Murphy, Wm 27 

Murray, Samuel 44 

Myer 42 

N. 

National Floral Rib- 
bon House 8 

National Florists' 

Board of Trade ... 60 

Natural Guano Co.. 94 

Neldlnger, J. G 58 

Newburys, The 44 

Newman ft Sons 42 

New York Belting & 

Packing Co 97 

Nicotine Mfg. Co... 94 

Niessen Co., Leo... 28 
Northwestern Wire 

Works 101 

O. 

Oberlln, T. J 64 

Obertln, P. N 41 

OeGtasliD, P 75 



P. 

Paducah Pott'y Co. 95 

Palcthorpe Co 94 

Palmer & Son 42 

Park Floral Co 45 

Pntton Woodenware 

Co 63 

I'enn, Henry 41 

Pennock-Meehan Co. 29 

Peters & Reed 95 

Peterson, J. A 1 

Peterson Nursery ... 64 

Phlla. Cut Flower.. 58 

Phillips, J. V 40 

IMerson Co., F. R... 78 

Plerson, Inc., A. N. 69 
Pieters- Wheeler Seed 

Co 46 

Pikes Peak Flo. Co. 41 

Pillsbury, I. L 101 

Pine Tree Silk Mills 32 
Pittsburg Cut , 

Flower Co 59 

Pittsburgh Plate 

Glass Co 99 

Poehlmann Bros.... 7 
Pollworth Co. . .35-45-71 

Pritcliard. J. N 36 

Pulverized Manure . . 94 

Purnell, W. Z .36 

Q- 

Quaker City Ma- 
chine Works 101 

R. 

Raedlelu Basket Co. .34 

Rahn & Herbert 62 

Randall Co 24-32 

Randolph & 

McClements 99 

Reed & Keller 60 

Reeser Plant Co 77 

Regan Ptg. House . . 99 

Reld, Edw 58 

Relnberg, Geo 59 

Reinberg, P 6-70 

Rennlson Co 43 

Retail Florists 

40-41-42-43-44-45 

Renter & Son 40 

Revere Rubber Co.. 06 

Rice & Co., M 8 

Rice Bros 58 

Rice Co., J. H 98 

RIckards Bros 48 

Robinson & Co 36-37 

Robinson Seed Co . . . 46 

Rock Co., Wm 42 

Roelirs Co 78 

Rohnert, Waldo 4fi 

Rolker & Sons 49 

Rose Gardens 74 

Rosemont Gardens . . 44 

Rosens, B 61 

Rosery, The 45 

Routledge, Seed & 

Floral Co 02 

Routzahn Seed Co.. 40 
Rowehl & Granz.... 79 

Rupp, J. F 55 

Rusconl. D 48 

Russin & Hanfllng.. 61 

S. 

Saltford, Geo 61 

Samuelson, C. A 40 

Sander 49 

Scbilder Bros 47 

Schiller, J. L 55 

SchlUo, Adam 103 

Schlatter & Son 101 

Schmltz, F. W. O.. 75 
Schneider Floral Co. 40 

Schroeter, B 45 

Schultheis, Anton... 76 
Schulthels. Florist.. 43 

Schulz, Jacob 41-76 

Schultz & Co 34 

Scott, John 75 

Scott & Son 70 

Sefton Mfg. Co 35 

Sharp, Partridge ... 104 

Sheridan, W. F 60 

Siebrecht ft Slebrecht 61 
Sioux City Seed & 

Nursery Co 46 

Skldelsky & Irwin.. 54 

Slinn, B. S 60 

Small & Sons 40 

Smedley & Co 43 

Smely, J. M 41 

Smith, Henry 44 

Smith, P. J 60 

Smith & Co.. E. D.. 75 
Smith Co., A. W... 42 
Smith Co., W. ft T. 64 
Smith, Llneaweaver. 90 
Smith Wholesale 

Floral Co 59 

Smyth, W. J 42 

Southwestern Seed 

Co 42 



Spokane Florist Co. 41 

Stadell, R at 

Stamm, John 42 

Standard Mfg. Co... :i'> 
Standard Pump & 

Engine Co Of. 

State Nursery Co. .. 42 

Stewart. B. E 5-1 

Stewart, S. B 4" 

Stiles Co 40 

Stokes' Seed St(>r<".."il-(il 

Stoothoff Co !>1 

Storrs & Harrison.. 7S 
Stumpp & Walter. . 51 
Superior Machine & 

Boiler Works »'_' 

Swanson. Aug. S . . . 4^ 

Swanson's 44 

Syracuse Pott'y Co. 't.". 

T. 

Tailby & Son 44 

Tammlnga, D. J. . . . 47 
Taylor Steam Spe- 
cialty Co o:i 

Telcher. Paul '4!)' 

Texas Seed & Floral 

Co 41 

Thompson Carnation OS 

Thorburn & Co 4S 

Toledo Plate & Win- 
dow Glass Co 99 

Toledo Wheelbarrow 98 
Tonseth Floral Co.. 42 

Toole & Sons 4S 

Tosini, J 40 

Totty, C. H 72 

Traendly A Schenck 01 

Trillow, Florist 41 

Triple Sign Co OS 

U. 

U. S. Cut Flo. Co. . . .-iS 
r. S. Nursery Co... (U 

V. 

Van Bochove & Bro. 4.". 
Van der Goot Nurs- 
eries 40 

Van Grleken, L J!) 

Van Waveren & 

Kruljft 40 

V'nn ZantPi) Bros.. 4!i 
Vaughan & Sperry.5-59 
Vesey, W. J. & 

M. S 77 

Vick & HIU Co 5B 

Vlck's Sons, J -yZ-r,:: 

Vincent, Jr., & Sons 

08-74 

Virgin, U. J 44 

Von Canon & Co ... . 3(i 

W. 

Wagner Park Con- 
servatories 65 

Walbrldge & Co.. . ;i7 

Walker, Joliii 41 

Walker, Wm H 

Walker & Co H 

Walsh & Son 4" 

Wanoka Greeniiouses T2 

Want Advs :!s 

Ward & Oo 55 

Weber, F. H 42 

Weeber & Don 4S 

Weiland, John 44 

Weiland & Riscli . . . 5!t 

Weis & Schmidt 0." 

Weiss & Sons 61 

Welch Bros ,".0 

Wertheimer Bros... S 
West Chicago Park 

Commissioners . . . OC 
Wiegand & Sons. . . lo 

Wietor Bros 24 5! i 

Wilcox & Sons 41 

Wiles, E. W f,(i 

Wllks Mfg. Co 0.". 

Willlamson-Kunv 

Mill & Lbr. CO...10.T 

Wills & Segar 41 

Wilson, R. G IL* 

Wintcrson's Seed 

Store n:i-6r, 

WIttbold Co 4.- 

Wolf skill Bros 44 

Woodruff & Sons... k; 

Y. 

Yetter, Frank J ;!.". 

Yokohama Nurserv. 40 

Young, J. W 5S 

Young & Co., A. L. f.l 

Young & Nugent... 41 

Young & Sons Co. . . 41 

Z. 

Zangen, O. V 4S 

Zech & Mann .".0 

Zvolanek, A. C li; 

Zwelfel, Nlc (i." 



The good people keep sending me their 
money and, much as I hate to do it, I 
have to send it back, for the advertise- 
ment in The Eeview sold all the stock. — 
J. L. JohnBon, De Ealb, HI. 



■:SWT 



■"■ "ilT •"». ','."■"" e^'w ^H'llirTi-T ■ '^- ■ , ■»^- 



March 0, 1011. 



The Weekly Florists' Review, 



l<;mirk^^^<^^<^^^m^(^^.<^^'^^'^i^'U:^i^^'i^c^'i^^ 



THE RETAIL 





FLORIST 



k<*^.<»^.<»^<^^<»=a<*^<<^.<»^ •fef»)'y:»)-fer»)'fe»>''yf»!>'fer»)'-fer»)-'yf»>--fe»>' 



fer»>j 



AUTOMOBILE DELIVERY CAES. 



The New vs. the Old. 

Men in all lines of business are pon- 
dering over the question of adopting the 
automobile for delivery purposes. Many 
have done so to a limited extent, while 
some already have abolished the horse. 
It is only in the last few years that 
automobile concerns have gone exten- 
sively into the manufacture of commer- 
cial vehicles. The pioneer companies are 
all getting into that end of the busi- 
ness and in this city (Detroit), at least, 
new companies, manufacturing commer- 
cial automobiles exclusively, are spring- 
ing up like mushrooms. 

It is the use of the motor car for 
business purposes that will put it on a 
substantial basis. The number of peo- 
ple who have used horses only for pleas- 
ure or convenience is small compared 
with the thousands who have employed 
horses as a means of business trans- 
portation — for doctors, salesmen, rural 
mail carriers, delivery purposes, etc. 
Here lies the life of the motor car. 

Florists' Cars — ^A Difficult Problem. 

The practical business automobile is 
still in the process of development, 
although the progress has been remark- 
ably fast; the years to come will see 
many changes, and naturally many im- 
provements. Neverthelew, there are al- 
ready many good commercial cars on the 
market that are adapted to our busi- 
ness. I am speaking from the stand- 
point of the retail florist, who is up 
against a problem such as perhaps no 
olher merchant has to contend with. 

A florist is expected to have a neat, 
stylish wagon. Our goods ' will not 
stand much vibration or jarring, or ex- 
posure to frost or extreme heat. Flow- 
ers can not be delivered "any old 
time;" often a half hour's delay is 
fatal. Except during the holiday 
rushes, as at Easter and Christmas, the 
average flower store does not have 
enough deliveries to make in one day 
to warrant keeping a number of wagons, 
one for each section of the city; con- 
sequently one wagon, perhaps, must de- 
liver to the two extreme points in a 
city on the same day. 

Comparative Cost. 

In the business with which the writer 
is identified we are usifag an automo- 
bile for delivering and hardly a week 
passes but some one says, "Do you 
find it cheaper than the horse?" Peo- 
ple might just as well compare electric 
lights and kerosene lamps. 

We all know that the actual cost in 
dollars and cents for lighting our stores 
with electricity is more than it was 
when we used kerosene. Why, then, do 
we use electricity? Because it is clean, 
safe, convenient, odorless, flexible, gives 
a better light, and. modern times de- 
mand it. Taking all these reasons into 
consideration, the extra cost of electric 
light seldom is considered. So it is, or 



will eventually be, with the automobile. 
One-half to three-fourths of an hour 
spent every morning in oiling up and 
cleaning the mechanism of an auto will 
keep it in fine condition. A horse re- 
quires about that much time for groom- 
ing each day, to say nothing of the 
time for feeding at morning, nopn and 
evening. And if a horse comfes into 
the stall warm at night, he can not be 
fed at once. The stable also needs at- 
tention every day. 

Speed and Convenience. 

You can drive an auto all day long, 
seven days a week, at a speed of twelve 
to fifteen miles per hour. It never 
gets tired, but what of the horse? 

If you have a long run t'o make, to 
some suburban town, say twenty-five 
miles, round trip, it can be done in one 
and one-half to two hours with the auto. 
In fact, as soon as you have the facili- 
ties for quicker and more prompt de- 
livering, so many uses for it will spring 
up that ere long you will be wondering 
how it was ever possible to do the 
work with horses. 

Tire Trouble. 

Many florists dread the thought of 
tire trouble. This can be entirely elim- 
inated by equipping the car with solid 
or cushion tires, although for a light 



delay caused by an occasional puncture 
or blow-out does not compare with the 
annoyance of the horse with dull shoes 
when the roads are icy, and the delays 
at the horseshoer's. 

When an auto is standing idle, the 
cost can only be measured by the money 
invested, and this is not as much as 
horse-feed, unless the first cost of your 
car ran into the thousands, which is 
unnecessary. 

Many say an auto is a fine advertise- 
ment. This is true, although a fine de- 
livery wagon, drawn by a span of well 
groomed and well harnessed horses, also 
speaks well for the firm. 

The Driver. ,; 

One feature about the horse which 
appeals to many is that a boy at $6 or 
$8 per week can drrxe it", while in- such 
hands an auto would be a big expense 
and short-lived. Here, in my estima- 
tion, lies the whole secret of making 
the commercial auto pay. Put a good, 
practical, trustworthy man on it, pay 
him well and you will have no trouljle. 

If you are located in a sraall city or 
only do a little retail business, calling 
for but few deliveries, drive the car 
yourself. An hour or two a day will do 
all your delivering, give you a little 
change from the regular routine and 
enable you to dispense with the driver 
altogether. 

There can be no doubt that we all 
agree as to the advantages of the auto, 
and in my next article 1 will endeavor 
to give an estimate of the relative cost 
of operation, from actual experience. 

Hugo Schroeter. 



THE BECOBD TO DATE. 

I have read with interest the item in 
The Review of February 16 with the 
accompanying illustration of the man- 
tel in flowers. This is good and de- 




The Record to Date— An Auto in Flowers for a Funeral. 



commercial wagon, which is to travel 
rapidly, my advice, based on experience, 
would be to use pneumatic tires. The 
solid tires will jar the machinery, caus- 
ing a continual need for adjustment, 
and flowers will not carry so well, be- 
cause of the greater vibration. The 



scribes a situation we all are up against 
at times. People insist on ordering the 
most unusual articles reproduced in 
flowers, and we either have to follow 
out their wishes or see the business go 
to some (•omi>etitor. who is content to 
su]ipiy what is asked for and pocket 



The Weekly Florists^ Review^ 



Mabch 9, 1011. 




Store of Miss Lou Helen Dundore, Lancaster, Pa 



the dollars. The Chatham Floral Co., 
Chatham, N. Y., had such a piece to 
make last summer, in the shape of an 
automobile in flowers. The outcome is 
shown in the snapshot sent herewith. 
The design was correctly proportioned 
and six feet long, the body and tires 
being made of asters, the hood or radia- 
tor, etc., of American Beauties, lilies, 
valley and other flowers. The lamps 
were of yellow flowers, with white 
flowers for the glass. The steering 
wheel, levers and wheel spokes were 
wound with chenille. Every detail' 
was carried out, even to the number on 
the back of the machine. The design 
was made on a specially built wire 
frame, with six rods affording contact 
with the ground and holding the de- 
sign so that the weight would not come 
upon the wheels. The design stood 
several days in a cemetery and at- 
tracted great crowds. Of course, there 
is nothing artistic to commenti in puch 
a design; but mechanical excellence 
probably counts for as much with the 
purchasers, and certainly such a design 
as this automobile attracts vastly more 
attention than would any number of 
the most skillfully arranged sprays. 

E. E. Shuphelt. 



THE BOSEBY. 



The illustrations on this page show 
the attractive little flower shop known 
as The Rosery, at Lancaster, Pa., which 
was opened for business November 17, 
1910, by Miss Lou Helen Dundore, who 
has been connected with the florists' 
business for some years and is thor- 
oughly qualified to make her venture a 
success. The color scheme of the shop 
is white and green, the woodwork being 
finished in white enamel, with green 
for walls and fixtures. The window is 
tiled in white and green, and the fur- 
niture is of the mission style, the re- 
frigerator, of McCray manufacture, also 
being in the forest green finish. The 
Eosery is up-to-date in all its equip- 
ment and work, and Miss Dundore has 
enjoyed an excellent patronage ever 
since her opening day. 



TO GBOW WITH CABNATIONS. 

We grow carnations and should like 
to grow some other plants for cut flow- 
ers in the same temperature. Will sweet 
peas and candytuft grow in that tem- 
perature? L. F. C. 



marguerites and all kind3 of Dutch 
bulbous flowers, including hyacinths, 
tulips and narcissi, will succeed well in 
a carnation house. C. W. 



CYCLAMEN CULTUBE. 



Sweet peas will do well in a carna- 
tion house. They enjoy a temperature 
of 48 to 50 degrees at night. Candytuft, 
while it can be grown with carnations, 
will succeed better if grown 5 degrees 
cooler. Gladioli, both the small and 
large l;ulbed varieties, lupines, lark- 
spurs, jintirrhinums, Spanish irises, ten 
weeks' stocks, niyosotis, sweet alyssums, 



Sowing the Seed. 

My years of experience in the grow- 
ing of the cyclamen may perhaps be of 
use to some of my brother florists in 
the cultivation of this beautiful winter 
blooming plant. 

The time to sow cyclamen seed varies 
according to when you want them in 
bloom. The latter part of July or the' 
first part of August is a good time to 
sow in order to make good plants in 
fifteen to sixteen months, or by the 
second Christmas after the sowing. 
Other sowings can be made until Janu- 
ary. Seed sown as late as January 
would, perhaps, with good culture and 
everything favorable, make strong 4- 
inch and 5-inch pot plants, but do not 
expect them to bloom as early as those 
from seed sown in August. Your suc- 
cess in growing cyclamens depends 
greatly upon the strain of seed used. 
Always get the best seed grown and 
of the highest standard, and your dis- 
appointments will be less. 

We are sowing our cylamens in flats 
12x20x3 inches, inside measure, in rows 
one and one-half inches apart, and we 
drop 500 seeds about one-fourth of an 
inch apart in the rows. Of course, we 
usually make a sowing of from 30,000 
to 60,000 at a time. For a florist that 
grows only from 100 to several thou- 
sands, I would advise that he sow the 
single seeds about one inch apart each 
way, grow them on until the plants 
have a nice ball of roots established 
and then shift them into flats, about 
two to two and one-half inches apart, 
or into 2Vi-inch pots. I recommend the 
latter method, as they are thus handled 
better and make stockier plants. 

A good soil to sow in would be a 




Stof e of Mfss Lou Hrlen Dundore, Lancaster, Pa. 



:• 



Jt.'»(P' " VI -iry-T i'f^fr^ *.;«• 'iT»vwy,T- ■": j^'v .»=v.*r-T-'^'-'"T/-ir -■« 



Mabch 9, 1911- 



The Weekly Florists' Review. 



9 




Mr. Winterich is Growing One Hundred Seven Thousand Cyclamen Plants this Season. 



loose mixture of about two-thirds leaf- 
mold, with some loam and sand added. 
This soil may do also for the first shift. 
For each successive shift add more 
loam and old hotbed soil. For the last 
two shifts we use some horn shavings 
or meal, mixed with the soil in the 
proportion of a 4-inch potful to a 
bushel of soil. 

Care of the Seedlings. 

Set the seed flats, thinly covered 
with sphagnum moss, on a mild hotbed, 
with not too much ventilation, or in a 
greenhouse where you can keep the 
air moderately moist until the seeds 
germinate, which takes about four to 
five weeks. Keep the flats shaded and 
moist until the seedlings make the first 
leaf; then remove the sphagnum moss 
and increase the light and ventilation 
gradually. Loosen the soil around the 
plants with a label and keep the green 
moss which forms on the soil removed. 
Do this every two or three weeks, as 
this is essential to the growing of 
strong and healthy plants. 

We transplant the first batch into 
other flats about eight to ten weeks 
after the sowing of the seed, planting 
them about one and one-half inches 
apart. Set them on shelves near the 
glass and give them an average night 
temperature of about 52 to 55 degrees, 
with 10 degrees more heat in the day- 
time. Give them plenty of fresh air; 
never let the air become close, or they 
will weaken, and such plants are hard 
to get through the hot summer months. 
Do not shade cyclamens from the mid- 
dle of October until about March 1. 
Give all the Jight possible until you 
see the plants are in danger of wilt- 
ing; then, with two or three fine 
sprinklings, you might have to shade 



them only during the hottest part of 
the day. A sprinkling two or three 
times on a hot day will help to make 
large bulblets and, of course, the plant 
will greatly benefit by it. I use a 
spray that produces a fine mist, as a 
coarse spray would keep the plants 
wet and soggy. 

Set the. plants so that the bulblets 
are just covered after the first good 
watering. I warn you not to plant too 
deep, as that would make spindly 
plants and weak bulbs. If planted too 
high, the bulbs grow hard and will 
never make a thriving plant. 

Semoval to the Hotbed. 

We manage to have our plants from 
the first sowing in 3-inch pots by 
the end of March, when they go on a 
mild hotbed. In the beginning keep 
the bed rather close, until you notice 
their root action. Shade them only in 
bright sunshine and sprinkle them at 
least once or twice a day, according to 
the weather. Keep the bottom heat at 
about 70 to 80 degrees. Gradually give 
more ventilation and maintain a tem- 
perature of about 55 to 65 degrees 
above the plantsj a much warmer 
atmosphere will tnake spindly plants 
and a much cooler one will give them a 
backset. Shift whenever the pot ball 
is fairly well rooted. Do not let them 
get potbound and do not give them too 
large a shift. Put in about one-fifth 
drainage, for which washed coal ashes 
or coarse sand is the best material. 
Cyclamens, more than any other plant, 
enjoy clean pots. They also enjoy a 
mild hotbed, though this is not abso- 
lutely necessary. 

When shifting into larger pots, set 
the plants now so that the bulb is 
about covered with soil. The first 



watering will then settle the soil to 
about three-fourths or one-half the 
bulb. If planted too high, the bulb 
will get hard too soon and may burst 
and set the buds on too early. On the 
other hand, when planted too deep, the 
plants get spindly and the flower stems 
rot easily. 

The Watering and Shading. 

Most of the mistakes are made in 
watering, by keeping the plants too 
wet and soggy. Let them dry out 
fairly well before you give another 
watering. This will keep the soil 
sweet, which is of the iitmost impor- 
tance for growing choice - cyclamen 
plants. - ■-' ' I 

The shade should not be too deiise. 
I use thin burlap or sashes made out 
of plaster strips, also mats of bamboo 
sticks, but I believe burlap is the 
easiest to handle and the cheapest in 
the long run. •-'*• 

The last shift we usuajly* make in 
August or September. It»"is now ad- 
visable to set the plants so the bulb 
comes to stand about one-half in the 
soil. This is important to the setting 
of the buds. The plants bloom with 
more flowers at one time; also, the 
buds are not so liable to rot off and 
the plants are more ej»aily kept clean. 

During the warm ni. hts of August 
and September the Mt/ies should be 
removed from the plants. The dew 
freshens up the plants, keeps them 
short and is quite helpful in setting 
the buds. 

With the beginning of hot weather 
we set the sashes on a railing, so that 
the space between the lower part of 
the sash and the hotbed frame is about 
six to eight inches; the upper part of 



8 



The Weekly Florists' Review. 



March 9, 1911. 





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niaiguerites and all kinds of Dutch 
bulbous flowers, including hyacinths, 
tulips and narcissi, will succeed well in 
a carnation house. C. W. 



CYCLAMEN CULTURE. 



Store of Miss Lou Helen Dundore, Lancaster, Pa 



th;- dollars. The Chatham Floral Co., 
Chatham, X. Y., had such a jtioce to 
make last summer, in the shape of an 
automobile in flowers. Tlie outcome is 
shown ill the sna]>shot sent herewith. 
The design was cdrrectly proportioned 
and six feet long, the body and tires 
being made of asters, the hood or radia- 
tor, etc., of American Beauties, lilies, 
valley and other flowers. The lamps 
were of yellow flowers, with white 
flowers for the glass. The steering 
wheel, lexers and wliei'l spokes were 
wound with chenille. Every detail' 
was carried out. even to the number on 
the back of the machine. The design 
was iiiaile en a specially built wire 
frame, with six roils affording contact 
with the ground and holding the de- 
sign so that the Aveight would not come 
upon tli<' wheels. The design stood 
several days in a cemeterv and at- 
tracted great crowds. Of cours(\ there 
is nothing artistic to comnieiid in such 
a design; but mechanical excellence 
probably counts for as much with the 
|>iirchasers, and certainly sutrh a design 
as this automobile attracts vastly more 
attention than would any number of 
the nuist ^^killfully arranged sprays. 

R, E. Shuphelt. 



TO GROW WITH CARNATIONS. 

We grow carnations and should like 
to grow some other plants for cut flow- 
ers in the same temperature. Will sweet 
peas and candytuft grow in that tem- 
perature'.' " L. F. C. 



Sweet [K\is will do well in a carna- 
tion house. They enjoy a temperature 
of 4S to ."id degrees at night. Candytuft, 
while it can be grown with carnations, 
\\ ill succeed 1 etter if grown •") degrees 
cooler. (iladioli, both the small and 
large I idbed varieties, lupines, lark- 
spurs, ant ii rhiniinis. Sjiaiiisli irises, ten 
weeks" stocks, nnosotis, sweet aKssunis. 



Sowing the Seed. 

My years of experience in the grow- 
ing of the cyclamen may perhaps be of 
use to some of my brother florists in 
the cultivation of this beautiful winter 
blooming plant. 

The time to sow cyclamen seed varies 
according to when you want them in 
bloom. The latter part of July or the 
first part of August is a good time to 
sow in order to make good plants in 
fifteen to sixteen months, or by the 
second Christmas after the sowing. 
Other sowings can be made until Janu- 
ary. Seed sown as late as January 
would, perhaps, with good culture and 
everything favorable, make strong 4- 
inch and 5 inch pot plants, but do not 
expect them to bloom as early as those 
from seed sown in August. Your suc- 
cess in growing cyclamens depends 
greatly upon the strain of seed used. 
Always get the best seed grown and 
of the highest standard, and your dis- 
appointments will be less. 

We are sowing our cylamens in flats 
12x20x3 inches, inside measure, in rows 
one and one-half inches apart, and we 
drop 500 seeds about one-fourth of an 
inch apart in the rows. Of course, we 
usually make a sowing of from 30,000 
to C0,000 at a time. For a florist that 
grows only from 100 to several thou- 
sands, 1 would advise that he sow the 
single seeds about one inch apart each 
wa\', grow them on until the plants 
have :i nice ball of roots established 
and then shift them into flats, about 
two to two and f)iie-lialf inches apart, 
or into 2'/_.-inch pots. 1 recommend the 
latter method, as they are thus handled 
better and make stockier jilants. 

A good soil to sow in would be a 



THE ROSERY. 



The illustrations on this page show 
the attractiye little flower shop known 
as The l^osery, at Lancaster, Pa., which 
was opened for business November 17, 
1910, by Miss Lou Helen Dundore, who 
has been connected with the florists' 
business for some years and is thor- 
oughly qualified to make her venture a 
success. The color scheme of the shop 
is white and green, the woodwork being 
finished in white enamel, with green 
for walls and fixtures. The window is 
tiled in white and green, and the fur- 
niture is of the mission style, the re- 
frigerator, of McCray manufacture, also 
being in the forest green finish. The 
Rosery is up-to-date in all its equij)- 
ment and work, and Miss Dundore has 
enjoyed an excellent patronage ever 
since her opening day. 




Stoie of Miss Lou Hrfen Dundore, Lancaster, Pa. 



March 9, 1911. 



The Weekly Florists^ Review^ 



9 




Mr. Winterich is Growing One Hundred Seven Thousand Cyclamen Plants this Season. 



loose mixture of about two-thirds leaf- 
mold, with some loam aud sand added. 
This soil may do also for the first shift. 
For each successive shift add more 
loam and old hotbed soil. For the last 
two shifts we use some horn shavings 
or meal, mixed with the soil in the 
proportion of a 4-inch potful to a 
bushel of soil. 

Care of the Seedlings. 

Set the seed flats, thinly covered 
witli sphagnum moss, on a mild hotbed, 
with not too much ventilation, or in a 
greenhouse where you can keep the 
air moderately moist until the seeds 
germinate, which takes about four to 
five weeks. Keep the flats shaded and 
moist until the seedlings make the first 
leaf; then remove the sphagnum moss 
and increase the light and ventilation 
gradually. Loosen the soil around the 
plants with a label and keep the green 
moss which forms on the soil removed. 
Do this every two or three weeks, as 
this is essential to the growing of 
strong and healthy plants. 

We transplant the first batch into 
other flats about eight to ten weeks 
after the sowing of the seed, planting 
them about one and one-half inches 
apart. Set them on shelves near the 
glass and give them an average night 
temperature of about o2 to oo degrees, 
with 10 degrees more heat in the day- 
time. Give them plenty of fresh air; 
never let the air become close, or they 
will weaken, and such plants are hard 
to get through the hot summer months. 
Do not shade cyclamens from the mid- 
dle of October until about March 1. 
Give all the light possible until you 
see the plants are in danger of wilt- 
ing; then, with two or three fine 
sprinklings, you might have to shade 



them only during the hottest part of 
the day. A sprinkling two or three 
times on a hot day will help to make 
large bulblets and, of course, the plant 
will greatly benefit by it. I use a 
spray that produces a fine mist, as a 
coarse spray would keep the plants 
wet and soggy. 

Set the plants so that the bulblets 
are just covered after the first good 
watering. I warn you not to plant too 
deep, as that would make spindly 
plants and weak bulbs. If planted too 
high, the bulbs grow hard and will 
never make a thriving plant. 

Removal to the Hotbed. 

We manage to have our plants from 
the first sowing in 3-inch pots by 
the end of March, when they go on a 
mild hotbed. In the beginning keep 
the bed rather close, until you notice 
their root action. Shade them only in 
bright sunshine and sprinkle them at 
least once or twice a day, according to 
the weather. Keep the bottom heat at 
about 70 to 80 degrees. Gradually give 
more ventilation and maintain a tem- 
perature of about 55 to 65 degrees 
above the plants; a much warmer 
atmosphere will make spindly plants 
and a much cooler one will give them a 
backset. Shift whenever the pot ball 
is fairly well rooted. Do not let them 
get potbound and do not give them too 
large a shift. Put in about one-fifth 
drainage, for which washed coal ashes 
or coarse sand is the best material. 
Cyclamens, more than any other plant, 
enjoy clean pots. They also enjoy a 
mild hotbed, though this is not abso- 
lutely necessary. 

When shifting into larger pots, set 
the plants now so that the bulb is 
about covered with soil. The first 



watering will then settle the soil to 
about three fourths or one half the 
bulb. If planted too high, the bulb 
will got hard too soon and may burst 
and set the buds on too early. On the 
other hand, when planted too deep, the 
plants get spindly and the flower stems 
rot easily. 

The Watering and Shading. 

Most of the mistakes are made in 
watering, l)y keeping the plants too 
wet and soggy. Let them dry out 
fairly well before you give another 
watering. This will keep the soil 
sweet, which is of the utmost impor- 
tance for growing choice cyclamen 
plants. 

The shade should not be too dcqse. 
I use thin burlap or sashes made out 
of plaster strips, also mats of bamboo 
sticks, but I believe burlap is the 
easiest to handle and the chejipest in 
the long run. 

The last shift we usually make in 
August or September. It is now ad- 
visable to set the plants so the bulb 
comes to stand about one-half in the 
soil. This is important to the setting 
of the buds. The plants bloom with 
more flowers at one time; also, the 
buds are not so liable to rot off and 
the plants are more ec».sily kept clean. 

During the warm ni, hts of August 
and September the MkAes should be 
removed from the plants. The dew 
freshens up the plants, keeps them 
short and is quite helpful in setting 
the buds. 

With the beginning of hot weather 
we set the sashes on a railing, so that 
the space between the lower part of 
the sash and the hotbed frame is about 
six to eigiit im-lies; the upper part of 



10 



The Weekly I^orists* Reviewl 



Mabch 9, 1911. 



the sashes is raised or lowered according 
to the amount of ventilation you want 
on the plants. On windy days let the 
ventilation down in the direction of the 
wind. 

The Return to the House. 

In the latter part of October we com- 
mence to house the plants. Up to this 
time we have the beds covered with 
mats during cold nights. Do not make 
the mistake of setting your plants too 
close together, as now is the time when 
plants should have all the room you 
can spare them, to make shapely speci- 
mens. No shade is now required. 
Should the sun make it unpleasant for 
the plants, give them a fine sprinkling 
to keep them from wilting, and they 
should havtf been gradually accustomed 
to the bright weather while they were 
out in the- beds; ■ 

A free circulation of fresh air all 
the time is beneficial. Water care- 
fully; never drop the water right on 
the head of the plant, as it might rot 
the buds and leaves close to the bulb. 
The plants should be set over almost 
every two weeks. They will need more 
room every time you clean them out. 
Pull the flower and leaf stems ri§kt 
out; do not cut them off, as they might 
rot down to the bulb. 

Do not try to force a cyclamen by 
raising the temperature, for if this is 
done the plants will get spindly and 
the flowers will be small and imperfect. 
The only way to help a cyclamen along 
in bringing it to bloom early is to give 
it a good, bright house, with a night 
temperature not above 55 degrees and 
a good circulation of fresh air around 
the plants. Some growers set the plants 
on inverted pots to get the desired re- 
sult. Should it be desired to hold them 
back until late in the spring or for 



thrips are the only ones that can injure 
cyclamens. The green fly is easily kept 
in check by using the nicotine solution 
regularly once a week. It is advisable 
not to make the solution too strong, as 
it may burn some of the tender leaves. 
The thrips are bothersome if they get 
a hold, but can be kept in check by 
using the solution of Paris green and 
sugar. This, however, should be han- 
dled carefully. Spray late in the after- 
noon with this solution, and early the 
next morning spray over with fresh 
water to prevent burning of the foliage. 
To grow good cyclamens, they must 
never be neglected in any way. Good 
common sense should be used in grow- 
ing them, and if a good strain. of seed 
is procured they should be among the 
most profitable of plants, as well as 
favorites of both the grower and his 
customers. Christ. Winterich. 



COTTAGE AND DABWIN TUUFS. 

What is the difference between May- 
flowering tulips and Darwin tulips and 
how should they be cultivated here, in 
the eastern part of New York state? 
E. M. 

May-flowering tulips, perhaps better 
and more correctly known as Cottage 
tulips, comprise the many beautiful va- 
rieties, practically all late flowering, 
found growing in old cottage gardens in 
England, Scotland, Ireland and France. 
They comprise a wonderful variety of 
forms and colors and have none of the 
stiffness of other tulips. They are hardy 
and many of them live from year to 
year and improve, rather than deteri- 
orate. 

Darwin tulips are late flowering and 
are much taller growing than the early 
bedding varieties. This late flowering 




Five Acres of Daffodils at the Rose Gardens. 



Easter, it can be done by giving them 
as low a temperature as 42 degrees. 

In the Blooming Pots. 

After the plants are well rooted in 
their blooming pots, it is beneficial to 
water them with cow manure and soot 
water, to give them the finishing 
touches of a glossy foliage and larger 
flowers, with a good color. 

As to insects, the green fly and 



class of self-colored tulips are improved 
breeders and iiave come wonderfully to 
the front in America during the last 
few years. For cutting they are splen- 
did and in some sections they flower for 
Memorial day. 

The cultiv-ation of both these classes 
of late blooming tulips differs in no 
way from that of the ordinary bedding 
sorts. From October 15 to November 
15 is a suitable time to plant the bulbs 



in your latitude. They make excellent 
beds, especially if one variety only is 
used, or can be planted in clumps in 
flower borders. In the latter case there 
is no need of taking them up each fall, 
as they improve with age, if given a 
good mulch of rotten manure each fall. 
C. W. 

FUCHSIAS FOR WINDOW BOX. 

The fuchsia is not a window-box 
plant, but W. C. Egan, at Highland 
Park, 111., uses it as such, in shady 
situations. In reply to an inquiry as 
to the variety, he writes: "I obtained 
cuttings some years ago under the 
name Arabella. My gardener thinks it 
identical -.with what he knew in Eng- 
land as Mrs. Marshall. Lincoln park, 
Chicago, had it as Arabella; probably 
has it now. I have never seen it cata,- 
logued. ' ' 

SOUTHERN BULB FIELDS. 

The southern bulbous stock is begin- 
ning to move to northern markets iand 
the next few weeks will see immense 
quantities of the outdoor daffodils in 
all the wholesale markets. Just to 
give an idea of the way the bulbous 
stock flourishes in the section south and 
east of Richmond, here is an illustra- 
tion showing a part of a 5-acre field of 
daffodils at C. W. Beman's place, at 
North Emporia, Va. He calls his place 
the Rose Gardens, though the reason it 
is known as far west as Chicago is be- 
cause of its immense output of daffodil 
blooms each spring. 



THREE CROPS A YEAR. 

Will you kindly give me the names of 
stock from which three crops can be 
taken in a year! I have heard from 
time to time that to make a success of 
greenhouses three crops should be taken. 
I have planned several, but would like 
to hear what others say about the mat- 
ter. J. C. 



So much depends upon the market 
you would have for your products that 
it is a little diflScult to answer your 
question briefly in such a way that it 
will have practical value. The state- 
ment that a greenhouse must be made 
to produce three crops annually to be 
profitable is far from correct. Carna- 
tions, occupying benches for ten or 
eleven months in the year, are probably 
as profitable as any crop grown by the 
average florist. The same holds good 
with roses. Coming, however, to shorter 
season or catch crops, as some may be 
termed, a good many present them- 
selves. Where two crops are grown, 
chrysanthemums, including the early 
and midseason sorts, which can be 
cleared early in November, followed by 
sweet peas, make a good double crop. If 
early mums only are grown, antirrhinums 
in 3-inch or 4-inch pots could be planted 
to follow them and cleared by the be- 
ginning of April, when Spiraea Japonica 
planted directly in the beds could be 
got in for Memorial day, which would 
give nice time to clear out and refill 
the beds and plant the mums from the 
middle to the end of June. 

Single violets are another crop which 
need not be planted until early chrysan- 
themums are gone. The violets are gone 
before the end of March. Large-flow- 
ered gladioli planted among them about 
the last of February would give a good 
crop of spikes at Memorial day and un- 
til the next crop of chrysanthemums is 




■■■yf^rn.rr'u-^ ^TJ' TtjK-* •;^''r^J!'!^:,'rTr^irj''JV/^^^Tilf^'^pr'-] WK^-'-^rrTj" 



The Weekly Florists' Review* 



11 



to be planted, or if preferred, sweet 
peas sown in rows five feet apart, of the 
best outdoor varieties, especially the 
Spencer sorts, will yield a profitable 
late spring and early summer crop. Of 
course, where sweet peas are grown 
there must be ample head room. Another 
combination would be chrysanthemums, 
single violets and lilies or spiraea for 
Memorial day trade. Still another, 
chrysanthemums, single violets and ten 
weeks' stocks for Memorial day. 

I do not know whether the growing 
of pot plants is to be considered or 
not. I included Easter lilies, which are 
grown largely as a succession crop. 
There is a considerable variety of stock 
which could be brought in to follow 
chrysanthemums. One would be Paper 
White narcissi and Koman hyacinths; 
later, tulips and narcissi in variety, and 
about the middle or end of March fol- 
low these with hydrangeas for Memo- 
rial day or June trade. A good many 
violet specialists now grow tomatoes to 
fill in the summer months. Some prefer 
cucumbers. The tomatoes come in bear- 
ing early in June and prices for indoor 
fruit are always much higher than for 
the outdoor article. I do not know 
what crops would pay you best in your 
market. It is often necessary to change 
crops year by year. The up-to-date 
florist always needs to have something 
up his sleeve in the way of a crop his 
competitors have not thought of. 

C. W. 

SOCIETY OF AMEBIC AN FLOBISTS. 



National Show Admissions. 

It has been ordered that each mem- 
ber in good standing of the S. A. F. 
and allied societies holding meetings 
and exhibitions in conjunction with the 
National Flower Show in Boston, 
March 25 to April 1, shall be entitled 
to one members' season ticket admit- 
ting the owner to the exhibition hall. 
Only one ticket, however, will be is- 
sued to any one person even though he 
belong to several societies. These 
tickets will be nontransferable. Orders 
for members' tickets are being sent to 
all members of the S. A. F. in good 
standing; that is, to all those who have 
paid their 1911 dues or are life or pio- 
neer members. These orders must be 
presented to the proper officials at the 
exhibition hall and be exchanged for 
regular members' tickets. These or- 
ders must be presented by the owners 
in person, as all orders presented by 
others than the owners will be taken 
up and canceled. 

Bailroad Bates to Boston. 

A rate of one and three-fifths on the 
certificate plan has been granted by 
the New England and Trunk Line Pas- 
senger associations. The Southeastern 
and Western associations have refused 
to grant rates, owing to small numbers 
and 2-cent rate now in existence. The 
Central association and Eastern Cana- 
dian association will report early in 
March and their decisions will be pre- 
sented in The Review. 

Additional Appointments. 

The following gentlemen have been 
appointed as state vice-presidents: 

Massachusetts, East — W. A. Hastings, 
Boston. 

Massachusetts, West — G. H. Sinclair, 
Holyoke. 

Pennsylvania, West — W. J. Smith, 
Pittsburg. 




At Hill City Greenhouses, Forest City, Iowa. 



Department of Begistration. 

Public notice is hereby given that 
A. N. Pierson, Inc., of Cromwell, Conn., 
offers for registration the roses de- 
scribed below. Any person objecting 
to the registration, or to the use of the 
proposed names, is requested to com- 
municate with the secretary at once. 
Failing to receive objection to the 
registration, the same will be made 
three weeks from this date. 

Double White Killarney — A sport of White 
Killarney originating with the J. A. Budlong & 
Son Co., Auburn, R. I., In January, 1910. It is 
stronger In prrowth than the parent, with the 
Bame general characteristics of foliage and 
growth. The flower is pure white In color, with 
an average of from forty to forty-five petals. 
It is a wonderful inaprovement over the parent, 
having size and substance in summer, when 
White Killarney is comparatively single. The 
varietv will be disseminated by A. N. Pierson, 
Inc.. in 1012. 

Killarney Queen — A deep pink sport of Kil- 
larney, originating with the J. A. Budlong & 
Son Co., Auburn. K. I., in 1900. that has the 
high color of Dark Pink Killarney with an in- 
creased vigor In growth. It compares among 
Killanicys as American Beauty does with other 
varieties, the stem and foliage being much 
heavier, and the petals nearly twice the size of 
the petals of Killarney. The variety will be 
disseminated by A. N. Pierson, Inc., in 1912. 

As no objections have been filed, pub- 
lic notice is hereby given that the 
registration of the geraniums. Dr. E. M. 
Moore and A. B. Lamberton, by Robert 
Dukelou, Rochester, N. Y., becomes 
complete. 

H. B. Dorner, Sec'y. 

March 2, 1911. 

WATEB ULIES. 

I have a steel tank 3 x 12 feet and 
wish to grow some water lilies in it. 
Would it be necessary to sink it in the 
ground, or would the bulbs keep cool 
enough above ground? How many 
good bulbs should be planted in it? 
Could I grow blooming sized bulbs 
from seed if planted now? R. F. 



tity will suffice for the more moderate 
growing varieties. If you use dormant 
bulbs, only cover with two or three 
inches of water at first. Use a good 
bed of cow manure and loam for the 
lilies to grow in. It will be much bet- 
ter for you to buy dormant bulbs 
rather than to try to raise seedlings. 
A few suitable varieties of moderate 
growth for tank culture are: Nymph- 
lea Aurora, rosy yellow changing to 
deep red; lilarliaeea. carnea, flesh pink; 
Marliacea albida, white; Marliacea 
chromatella, bright yellow; odorata, 
white; tuberosa rosea, pink. You 
could, if you wished, use a plant or 
two of other aquatics with your lilies, 
such as Sagittaria Montevidensis, 
Eichhornia crassipes major, Jussieua 
longifolia, Limnanthemum Indicum and 
Scirpus Tabernaemontanus zebrina. All 
these aquatics, of course, want full 
sunshine. C. W. 

A FOBEST CITY PLACE. 

The state of Iowa is full of flourish- 
ing florists. The accompanying illus- 
tration gives a view in one of the 
houses of the Hill City Greenhouses, at 
Forest City. Willard Secor is the pro- 
prietor. He is one of the men who did 
not wait until he learned it all before 
he started in the florists' business — it 
looked ^ good to him, so he made the 
venture. He has been successful from 
the start, watching the business end 
himself and placing the technical work 
in the hands of a competent manager. 



The tank will be better adapted for 
the culture of the lilies if plunged in the 
ground and the plants themselves will 
look better. You cannot grow more 
than four bulbs in your tank. It is 
better not to have over a foot of water 
above the bulbs and half that quan- 



HAEDY DOUBLE PYBETHBUMS. 

Of what species is the hardy double 
pyrethrum blooming in May? . Can it 
be grown from seed, and how? E. M. 

All are forms of Pyrethrum roseum. 
While you can secure some doubles from 
seed, the best are only to be had by 
division of the roots. If you start pyre- 
thrum seeds i;i flats now, plant outdoors 
in nursery rows and cultivate well all 
summer, you will have strong plants in 
the fall, which will flower well the fol- 
lowing May and June. C. W. 



12 



The Weekly Florists' Review^ 



Mauch 9, 1911.' 



SEASONABLE 




SUGGESTIONS 



^sa^^j^rmr^r^^^^r^rsfr^n^r^r^KJ^r^fr^Kr^rs!^ 



Jerusalem Cherries. 

If your Jerusalem cherries are not 
already sown, start a batch of them 
now. Select a few good berries from 
your own plants. They will be just as 
good as any you could buy. Pot off 
singly when of sufficient size. Gradu- 
ally harden off in coldframes after the 
middle of April and plant outdoors 
about the middle of May. You can 
grow them in pots, but the plants lifted 
from the open ground will be finer and 
more heavily fruited. You can also 
propagate from cuttings and get an 
earlier crop of ripe fruit. The plants 
grown from cuttings are, however, too 
low and prostrate and far inferior to 
seedlings. 

Genistas. 

Bring genistas wanted for Easter into 
a cool house now. They are better 
grown cool all the time and nothing in 
the nature of forcing is necessary with 
Easter coming so late as it does. The 
closely cropped plants so much in evi- 
dence are not so pretty nor so salable 
as those which are allowed to grow 
more naturally. The sheared plants are 
too formal and topiary-like and the 
bulk of customers seeing the two types 
would select those less closely sheared. 
Cuttings which are rooted should be 
potted off singly into 2-inch pots and 
grown along in a cool house; 45 degrees 
at night will suffice. Finch off any 
flowers they throw, to send more 
strength into the growths. 

Fancy Caladiums. 

Fancy-leaved caladiums need a brisk 
heat to start them; unless a night tem- 
perature of 60 to 65 degrees is at com- 
mand it will be better to leave the 
tubers dormant a few weeks longer, but 
if you have a warm house shake out 
the tubers carefully and stand them in 
flats of sand and sphagnum. Only par- 
tially cover the tubers and water spar- 
ingly at first, or the tubers are liable to 
rot. These fancy caladiums are useful 
in the summer months, when flowering 
plants in pots are scarce and drop 
quickly when placed in living rooms, 
while the caladiums with their rich 
colors last a long time. 

Dahlias. 

It is much too soon yet to think about 
starting dahlias for planting in the field, 
or even for retail trade, but there may 
be one or two special varieties of which 
you may te desirous of increasing the 
stock by means of soft-wood cuttings. 
Lay these on a bench where they will 
get some bottom heat. Scatter some 
sphagnum moss about them and give 
light sprayings until the growths ap- 
pear, when a more generous supply will 
be appreciated. Look over the stock of 
tubers and remove any decaying por- 
tions. Mold spreads fast and affected 
portions should be cut off as soon as 
they are seen. 



Flowering Shrubs for Easter. 
Such varieties as deutzias, lilacs, pyr- 
us, prunus and Philadelphus Lemoinei, if 
wanted for Easter, should be placed in 
heat if they are not already there. The 
flowering apples, cherries and plums will 
open in a month and are better not 
forced too hard. Lilacs will still flower 
if started in a brisk heat and moved 
into cooler quarters as the flowers oj)en. 
Deutzias require a longer season to get 
them into flower and can be forced 
hard, like lilacs, in the earlier stages of 
growth. Of course all these flowering 
shrubs are better when opened in a tem- 
perature not exceeding 50 degrees at 
night and come on quite fast in even 
this heat during March and April. All 
should be freely syringed until the buds 
are ready to expand. ' 

Bambler Boses. 

Eamblor roses should now have the 
flower trusses peeping, which being the 
case they are all right. Carefully avoid 
fold drafts, which will surely start 
mildew. Also use care in syringing, so 
that the plants will be dry before night- 
fall. When syringing — and this is neces- 
sary' when the plants are being hard 
forced, in order to prevent attacks of 
spider — select bright mornings for the 
work, and if it chances to cloud up be- 
fore noon, shake the plants individual- 
ly so as to remove as much water as 



possible from them. An abundant water 
supply is now necessary and, the pots 
being filled with active roots, supple- 
ment this with liquid manure twice a 
week. Do not allow the plants to stand 
too closely. Elevate good specimens on 
pots, in which case it is a good plan to 
place a saucer below them. 

Dutch Bulbous Stock. 

As Easter comes quite late this year, 
it will only take a matter of a fort- 
night to flower any of the narcissi, 
tulips and hyacinths after housing. In 
the meantime they cannot be kept too 
cool. A cold cellar will hold them back 
later than a frame. If in the latter, 
keep board shutters over them to ex- 
clude sun heat. See that the pots, pans 
or flats are sufficiently moist. As the 
bulbs have a mass of roots, they be- 
come somewhat stunted if not copiously 
watered. Keep the water, however, off 
the flower stalks of the hyacinths. 
Spanish iris and Gladiolus nanus in va- 
riety will need to be growing on now 
in a temperature of 50 degrees, or will 
be too late. 

Spiraeas. 

Spiraeas will now be making rapid 
growth and will require frequent spread- 
ing apart. As the pots speedily be- 
come a perfect mat of roots, the water 
supply can hardly be too liberal. Use 
diluted liquid cow or sheep manure three 
times a week. Eaise up the larger 
plants on stands or pots, using saucers 
under them. A temperature of 60 to 65 
degrees at night can be maintained 
until the flowers show color, then 
gradually lower it. In fumigating al- 
ways remember that spira'as are suscep- 
tible to injury and give light doses. 
That beautiful peach pink variety, 
Queen Alexandra, in order to retain its 
coloi;, should not le exposed to sun- 
shine. It fades out badly in the full 
sun. 



« 









OUTDOOB SWEET PEAS. 

Just as soon as the ground can be 
worked is the right time to make the 
first outdoor sowing of sweet peas. It 
is an old and utterly erroneous idea 
that we must wait for the ground to 
become well dried and warmed before 
sowing sweet peas. It is quite true that 
if one batch is sown, say, at the end of 
March and a second one a month later, 
the seedlings of the later sowing 
may appear only three or four days be- 
hind the first sowing, but compare the 
strength of huulm and flower stems and 
it will soon become apparent that the 
March seedlings have a big superiority. 
Sweet peas revel in cool, moist ground, 
such as exists when winter is passing. 
They get a strong root hold before the 
tops appear, whereas the later sowings 



have few roots when the tops appear 
and suffer much sooner from drought. 

If the land was heavily manured and 
plowed in late fall, all the better. If 
not, do it now, and be sure to plow 
deeply. If you want fancy flowers which 
will beat those of your neighbors, take 
out trenches two feet deep and the 
same width; half fill these with rotted 
cow manure. Cover with three inches 
of loam, then sow the seeds; cover 
these two and one-half to three inches 
deep, firming the soil well with the 
back of a rake. Never mind if the rows 
have a hollowed appearance. This will 
be something of an advantage when 
rain comes. Avoid sowing the seeds 
thickly. If you do, have courage to 
thin severely. The more space allotted 
the individual seedling, the more robust 
will be the growth and finer the flower 
stalks. 



,^Ji. T^-^-^'TWy\-n:t r'- 



Mabcii 0, 1011. 



The Weekly Florists^ Review* 



13 




NEW BOSES WORTH GEOWING. 

[Extracts from a paper by S. W. Crowell, of 
Roseacres, Miss., read at the convention of tlje 
Tennessee Nurserymen's Association in Nasiiville, 
Tenn., January 28, 1911.] 

The subject of this paper is, in my 
judgment, one of paramount importance 
to the nurseryman who sells roses in 
any quantity. His endeavor should be 
to supply his customers with the best 
roses extant that are suitable for the 
purpose required. This end can only 
be attained by planting and testing the 
more promising varieties in his own 
grounds, as they appear from year to 
year. The time has passed when, with 
only an assortment of cheap, indifferent 
varieties, he may present his wares to 
an overindulgent buying public and 
hope to reap the full benefits there- 
from and still retain the confidence of 
the buyer. 

We live in an age when to stand 
still means retrogression, and retrogres- 
sion inevitably means elimination. Ex- 
pansion from small things into great, 
and from great into still greater things, 
is the rule of progress all the world 
over. What satisfies the wants of today 
will prove totally insuflScient for to- 
morrow, and the marvel which excited 
our wonderment yesterday is today 
calmly accepted as a matter of course. 
The prosperity of an industry must de- 
pend upon its healthy, constant growth, 
and the country in which it is located 
will increase or diminish in prosperity 
in accordance with the success or in- 
competent management of that indus- 
try. It is well for the craft that the 
buyer is now demanding the best that 
grows — skill, proper selection of varie- 
ties, scientific fertilization, careful cul- 
tivation, storing and shipping — in other 
words, the best obtainable product. 
This is the day of good roses. The wise 
dealer will take notice and profit 
thereby. 

An Awakening. 

By way of illustration, I have in 
mind a customer who must have felt 
that a rose was just a rose, regardless 
of name. His shop worn lithographed 
book, which delineated in pronounced 
colors the beauties of such sorts as 
Prairie Queen, George the Fourth, 
Seven Sisters and others of like nature, 
covered the list of roses with which he 
hoped to embellish the gardens of his 
customers and help, in some measure, 
to mend nature. He asked that we 
supply a few hundred plants of Mme. 
Plantier for a certain planting, and 
before booking the order we suggested 
that he use Frau Karl Druschki. He 




promptly told us that he knew his 
business. When the order went for- 
ward, we included ten plants each of 
Druschki, Capt. Hayward and a few 
other desirable varieties, and requested 
that these be planted in his own 
grounds and watched for results. The 
following summer and fall there was a 
revelation for this man. A new condi- 
tion was about him. A new field was 
open for greater and earnest exploita- 
tion. He saw the writing on the wall. 
He is now doing a profitable business, 
besides giving every customer a rose 
that will beautify any nook or corner in 
which it is planted, "a thing of beauty 
and a joy forever." 

The Need of Trial Grounds. 

If the rose grower would do his work 
well, it is absolutely necessary that he 
establish a trial ground upon his own 
premises. This may be accomplished 
without much extravagance and it is 
not only necessary with roses, but 
should be done with every type of fruit 
or flower. It is only now and then that 
we find a Coehet, Killarney or Druschki, 
but it is the only method by which 
actual comparison can be made with the 



older commercial varieties and where 
all conditions are actually the same. 

To make these tests with fruits is 
often quite expensive, but the love of 
the work should appeal to the laborer. 
If the task seems too arduous to him, 
he should leave the craft and let those 
who are willing to labor for the greater 
good take his place. However, with 
roses and various ornamentals the ex- 
pense is only nominal, and no rose 
grower or dealer should ever offer a rose 
for dissemination until it has proved 
worthy. This is quite necessary, for 
the reason that the buyer is often wary 
and does not care to make investments 
when there is a possibility that a new 
rose will fail to make good. This should 
appeal to the vendor. The old path 
that father walked, the old rut, the 
old variety, the old woodcuts that did 
service years ago should be laid aside 
for the new order of things that are 
sane and of mutual int;erest to all. 

We Must Fay for Experience. 

A new rose is always an object of 
consideration. After it is planted and 
proves to be distinct, the interest in 
it is twofold. A new pleasure is found 
and an added avenue toward material 
advantage is given. The one makes us 
better morally; the other fills in a 
space that usually needs replenishing 
with many of the craft, for the needs 
are many. But, after all, we must pay 
for experience, and should only one 
good rose be found in a list of fifty or 
even 100 varieties, the investment 
would still be profitable, not even con- 
sidering the knowledge obtained by the 
experiment. And, on the othei* hand, 
sliould our trials and experiments prove 
futile as to dollars and cents, we owe 
something to the creators and dissem- 
inators of new roses. We should step 

[Concluded on page 66.] 




S. V. CrowelL 



> ^Tsi^'wvw' i*y>w»»r K'liijWT'^'. w».''r</' 



14 



The Weekly Florists^ Review. 



March 0, 1911. 



SHADING. 

The sun now lias considerable power 
and it is necessary to give shade to 
palms, as even under ground glass 
it strikes in brightly and will soon 
cause the foliage to become pale. A 
light coat of naphtha or kerosene and 
white lead, applied through a garden 
pump or syringe or by means of an 
ordinary whitewash brush on a long 
handle, will spread the shading satis- 
factorily. Such ferns as adiantums, 
especially the Farleyenses, must have 
shade. On the other hand, the tougher 
fronded nephrolepises will stand and are 
indeed benefited by a fair amount of 
sunlight. 

Houses where flowering plants are 
kept until sold should have the glass 
shaded, as this keeps the temperature 
down. 

Temporary shadings only, in the way 
of cheescloth or paper, should be used 
for seedlings or cuttings. Shading the 
glass makes them drawn and weak, 
especially when we get a succession of 
sunless days, as is not infrequent in late 
winter. 



ASTERS. 

The earliest sowing of asters will 
have been transplanted before now and 
be well established in flats. These will 
prove useful for planting on any spare 
bench or benches, and they will give a 




GEOWING VIOLETS IN TEXAS. 

I have received so much valuable in- 
formation from the replies to other 
people's questions in The Eeview, that 
I have now decided to ask a question 
of my own through its columns. Can 
any florist near my locality, south- 
central Texas, tell me when to plant 
violets for winter blooms and what 
varieties to plant? I planted Cali- 
fornia and Princess of Wales and main- 
tained a night temperature of 45 to 50 
degrees. I succeeded in growing beau- 
tiful, long, green, healthy leaves, but 
hardly any blooms. The plapts pre- 
tended to bloom, but "faked it" with 
only a few poor flowers. I want in- 
formation in regard to planting for 
next season. H. L. N. 



There are few violets grown under 
glass in or near this city, Austin, which 
is in the same general locality as that 



violets are always those which are 
grown the coolest. For this reason 
flowers produced in coldframes in a low 
temperature and without any artificial 
heat are always of a deeper blue than 
those grown in greenhouses, C. W. 

DEEER ' S NEW ESTABLISHMENT. 

Eiverview, the new plant of Henry 
A. Dreer, Inc., has been fully described 
iu The Review during the course of its 
construction, but the house warming at 
Kiverview, March 8, when some 200 
guests from Philadelphia, New York, 
Baltimore, Washington and other cities 
inspected the range, presents a favor- 
able opportunity for picturing the new 
establishment. The Dreer corporation 
never does anything by halves, and has 
built at Eiverview the first section of 
a thoroughly up-to-date plant-growing 
establishment. One of the illustrations 
presents an exterior view of the range. 
Another shows a typical interior, this 
house being occupied by the variegated 
pineapple. The third view shows one 
end of the service building, which is 
one of the most important features of 
the establishment. 



THE STOCK THAT PAYS. 



How Many Know Which It Is? 

There is a large number of green- 
house establishments in this country 
that come under the head of small or 



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valuable lot of flowers when carnations 
are getting poor and ahead of the out- 
door aster crop. This is a suitable time 
to make an additional sowing of such a 
variety as Queen of the Market for out- 
door planting. There is plenty of time 
yet to sow such standard sorts as Vick's 
Branching, Victoria, Ostrich Plume, 
Comet and Scmple's. 

The ground on which asters are to be 
planted is always better broken up the 
previous fall, especially if it is in grass, 
and left rough over winter. If this 
has not been done, do the necessary 
plowing or spading as soon as frost is 
out of the ground. A liberal dressing of 
well decayed barnyard manure makes 
the best fertilizer, but where this 
is difficult to secure, harrow in 
1,000 pounds per acre of a good 
comp}ete chemical fertilizer a week 
or two before planting. While as- 
ters will grow in almost any soil, 
they succeed best in a moderately strong 
loam of good depth. If the soil is of 
good thickness, no matter how long and 
severe the summer drought may be, the 
plants will show few ill effects if the 
surface is kept persistently cultivated. 



referred to by H. L. N. The best re- 
sults may be obtained by having strong 
plants in 2% -inch pots to plant out in 
September, in coldframes, where the 
plants can be protected during cold 
snaps. If the beds are below the out- 
side ground level' and well drained, so 
much the better. Do not give any 
artificial heat, but plenty of air at all 
times. When grown in greenhouses, 
the hot, sunny days promote leaf 
growth, l3ut produce few blooms. 

A. J. Seiders. 

TO GIVE VIOLETS MORE COLOR. 

What is there to give my violets more 
color? F. H. R. 



You do not state whether you are 
growing single or double violets. If 
doubles, the variety Lady Hume Camp- 
bell is naturally light and cannot by 
any course of treatment be made to 
produce blooms of the deep color of 
Marie Louise. In the case of single 
violets, grow them cool and airy, and 
after the early part of March a little 
shade on the glass will help to prevent 
the flowers fading out. The best colored 



medium sized plants. Most of them 
are making money; that is, the owner 
is getting his living and paying some- 
thing on the mortgage, or building 
more houses, or buying other property, 
as the case may be. But a great many 
are not paying the amount of profit 
that they should, considering the capi- 
tal invested. These businesses must of 
necessity consist of diversified produc- 
tion. It is not often that a man may 
specialize in one thing, or even as few 
as half a dozen things. Also, the 
methods of handling the business and 
the accounts have not been reduced to 
a system. Because the production is so 
diversified and because the system for 
handling it is so inadequate, there are 
great chances for losses on unprofitable 
items which nearly eat up good sized 
profits on the successful items. 

"How," it is asked, "can we tell 
just how much profit or loss each item 
is making? Our labor and other ex- 
penses are divided over so many things 
that we cannot tell what amount goes 
to each, whereas the big fellow who 
has so much space, so many men, so 
much fuel, etc., for this product and so 



' »^5 " .-'? v^fc'??^ T^™ " ^"^^ ^ ^ ^ ""^ 'Y!^ ^^i"^ "^-^r^ 



March 0, 1011. ' 



The Weekly Florists^ Review^ 



15 




A Typical Interior at Riverview. 



much for that product knows just how 
he stands on each. ' ' 

Did it ever occur to you that per- 
haps one reason why the big fellow has 
become a big fellow is because he has 
kept posted and played only the win- 
ning games? 

I will admit that the man who grows 
miscellaneous stock is handicapped in 
keeping records, but are you doing the 
best you can? You cannot tell how 
much it costs to grow Killarney and 
how much it produces, when you have 
a bench and a half in a mixed house; 
while the man who grows a section 
finds it possible to figure profit or loss 
almost to the penny. Are you keeping 
track of the number of blooms? This 
will mean something to you, even 
though you cannot tell what they sell 
for. Are you growing three shades of 
pink carnations that are nearly the 
same and yet will not go with each 
other, when the same number of plants 
in either of the three would enable you 
to fill larger orders? I have noticed 
that the larger a place becomes, the 
fewer varieties there are grown. 

Things That Never Pay. 

There are many things that show 
themselves to be unprofitable without 
figures if a person just goes over the 
list and gives them a little thought. 
There are palms that have been kept 
from one year to another until they 
have become too large for the custom- 
ers' needs. "When this happens, they 
are a dead loss, taking up space and 
producing nothing. They should be dis- 
posed of to firms that use the larger 
sizes, and the space filled with stock 
that can be turned. A lady once called 
up a florist and informed him that her 
palm had died the day before. Most 
of us cannot be so definite on such a 
subject; neither can we tell the exact 
date when a plant ceases to be profit- 
able, but we should try to come as near 
it as possible, because poor guessing or 
indifference means steady losses. 

Often there are pets in the shape of 
vines or plants that have grown up a 
post or in the end of a house, that year 
by year get larger, shade the other 
stock and sap the strength from it. 
They often produce flowers that are 
handy for funeral work, and for this 
reason are allowed to keep on growing. 



It is well to stop once in a while and 
decide whether or not such a vine is 
producing more than it is damaging. 

Then there is stock kept year after 
year that produces nothing, yet the 
owner does not throw it away. I know 
of a batch of orchids that do not have 
and can not have proper attention. 
They produce practically nothing. The 
owner says he can not afford to throw 
them away, and he is ashamed to offer 
them for sale until he gets them into 
better shape. They never get into bet- 
ter shape, and they owe three years' 
board bill already. 

The Thing to Do. 

Stop for a moment and figure. A 
total loss on one bench eats up all of 
a twenty-five per cent profit on four 
other benches. You would be just as 
well off with none of the five. If the 
loss is half of total it eats up the 
profits of two others producing twenty- 
five per cent profit. You would be just 
as well off with none 6f the three. 
This shows how important it is to have 
every square foot producing. 



To keep posted means to take some 
time once in a while from the general 
rush of business, collect what figures 
are available, and guess as intelligently 
as possible on the rest. Then you are 
in a position to decide what is paying 
and what is not. Of course, the next 
step is to drop the unprofitable, or, if 
it is something that has to be kept, 
devise means to make it profitable. 

Hoosier. 

SMILAX FROM SEED. 

Please tell us how to grow smilax. 
How long does it take for the seed to 
germinate? J. W. E. & C. 

The seed of smilax will germinate in 
from two to three weeks in a warm, 
moist house. Sow in flats of light, 
sandy compost. Pot off singly into 2- 
inch pots before the seedlings get 
crowded. Later shift into 3-inch or 
31/^-inch pots, and from those plant out 
in a greenhouse where a night tempera- 
ture of 55 to 60 degrees can be main- 
tained. Solid beds are much preferable 
to raised benches, and a generous com- 
post containing plenty of well rotted 
cow manure should be used. Plant out 
in June or July, eight inches between 
the plants, a foot between the rows. 
Strings, which should be of green 
twine, must be run up for the shoots 
to cling to before they can become 
entangled. Keep a moist atmosphere 
and syringe freely to keep down spider. 
After the strings are cut keep the roots 
dry for a time. Then give a liberal 
top-dressing and resting and start up 
for another crop. You should have no 
trouble in getting three crops in a 
year. The old roots may be carried 
over for several years, but the general 
and better plan is to plant young stock 
annually. C. W. 

Hoffmans, N. Y.— J. C. Hatcher is 
sending out his new asparagus in thrifty 
stock. One requirement for' the suc- 
cessful growing of it is plenty of drain- 
age — the more the better. This variety, 
Ilatcherii, is said to be a freer grower 
than plumosus, producing a much 
heavier string, bushier and a longer 
keeper. It is said that strings cut three 
weeks ago and placed in the basement 
cooler, recently built, look as fresh as 
when first gathered. 




End of the Service Building at Riverview. 



1»1f!(V!!'."Wf, 'TJT^fW™ ■ 



16 



The Weekly Florists^ Review* 



March 9, 1911. 



SOME NEW THINGS. 

, [A paper by E. (i. Hill, read before the Illi- 
nois State Florists' Asisuelatlou at Urbana, Feb- 
ruary 9, continued from The Review ol 
February 16.] 

Carnations. 

Following the rose comes the carna- 
tion, but after the recent symposiums 
in the trade papers little is left to say, 
for they were sifted as the fine dust of 
the balance. Among recent novelties 
Pink Delight and Mrs. Ward seem ab- 
solutely sure of permanent place; also 
Scarlet Glow wherever it can be grown 
with a strong stem, and Dorothy Gordon 
as a substitute for Rose-pink Enchant- 
ress. It is not only a duty but a privilege 
to test the few offerings of the present 
year, as they give promise of outrank- 
ing in their several colors, and we shall 
probably soon need substitutes to take 
the place of the four standards which 
are now so hard worked in every carna- 
tion establishment. 

Wodenethe is one of these aspirants 
for place; it will be sent out next year. 
It is probably the most perfect white 
carnation in existence, and those who 
saw it in 1910 at Philadelphia and at 



magnificent Mrs. David Syme, E. F. 
Felton, Well's Late Pink and Glacier. 
Strongly entrenched already in favor 
with the trade as money-making com- 
mercials are Chadwick Improved, love- 
ly in its purity of color; Chas. Eazer, a 
grand white of perfect, approved form 
for shipping; Cfanford Pink, the pretty 
early English variety; Elise Papworth, 
a fine all-round white for every pur- 
pose; Heston White and Winter Cheer, 
clean-eut and close-clipped, perfect in 
color tone. To these will be added 
Golden Gem, round as a ball and com- 
pact, and the lovely new singles. What 
interest would be lost to the yearly 
procession should the mum family drop 
out! 

Miscellaneous Plants. 

Among miscellaneous plants Julius 
Peterson is to be warmly congratulated 
on his Lorraine begonia, Cincinnati. 
While surpassing the parent in beauty 
of habit and of color, its splendid keep- 
ing qualities make it a house plant of 
wonderful effectiveness and durability, 
while the parent variety always gave 
concern for fear it might speedily "go 




Charles J. Maloy. 



the National Bose Show will be ready 
to greet it with open arms when dis- 
seminated. 

Chrysanthemums. 

In mums we can hardly wait for 
autumn to roll around to see the Wells- 
Pockett and other accepted novelties 
display their splendors. It is one of 
the keenest pleasures of the floral year, 
and the long wait only whets the ap- 
petite. 

Among last year's novelties which 
we are impatient to see again are the 



down ' ' on removal from the greenhouse. 
(!incinnati probably ranks as premier of 
the entire list of pot plants. 

Wilhelm Pfitzer, of Stuttgart, has 
given us a new white gladiolus, Europa, 
which in all probability will rank with 
America in necessary qualifications for 
the American trade. This is bound to 
meet a hearty reception. 

Then there is the comparatively new 
heliotrope, Centefleur. It is worth all 
the other varieties put together where 
a mass of glorious color and waves of 



fragrance are desired. Compact and 
clean, this variety will give the helio- 
trope a new place as a garden plant. 

Some cut flower grower will soon take 
up and grow successfully the lovely 
double gypsophila, one of the prettiest 
things that I saw abroad. I am sure 
that its dainty beauty would make a 
place for it. It adds grace and ele- 
gance to any bunch of flowers where 
it is used. 

Wlntzer's Cannas. 

To Antoine Wintzer belongs the 
credit of producing the finest cannas 
in existence, excepting only King 
Humbert. His Venus was a revelation 
to everyone who planted it, and now he 
has made a further record with Mrs. 
Alfred Conard, a lovely peach pink, 
with petals as long as they are broad. 
The canna is no longer a foliage plant 
only, but is now a blooming bedder, 
producing the most stunning color 
effects procurable. 

Nothing can excite more enthusiasm 
among plantsmen than the excellent 
new hydrangeas raised by Mouillere and 
Lemoine. Tbese varieties of tpe Hor- 
tensia type are certainly of int^^est to 
all who use this useful plant for pot 
culture. They are crosses between 
Hortensia, Otsaka, rosea and others of 
the class. There has been a long lapse 
of time between the old Hortensia and 
the present improvements. Bouquet 
Rose, Henri David, Mme. Mouillere, 
Radiant, Mont Rose — these are a few 
of the ten or a dozen distinct improve- 
ments in this noted family of plants. 

A striking and beautiful novelty 
seen at Bruges, Belgium, was the new 
marguerite, Mrs. F. Sander. It looked 
much like a chaste and beautiful 
anemone-flowered chrysanthemum. It is 
a glistening, pure white flower, produced 
on long stems. I can imagine no more 
useful plant either for the production 
of white flowers or as a pot plant. If 
it does as well in America as it did at 
Bruges, it will certainly prove a most 
valuable commercial plant. 

This is far from a complete list of 
novelty offerings for the year, but 
enough to engage the time and atten- 
tion of the progressive florist for the 
present. 

CHARLES J. MALOY. 

Thirty years is a long time to work 
on one job, but Charles J. Maloy has 
spent his entire business life in the 
firm of EUwanger & Barry, Rochester, 
N. Y. There are few nurserymen more 
widely known than Mr. Maloy. Going 
with EUwanger & Barry as soon as he 
had finished his course in the public 
schools of Rochester, where he was 
born, he quickly made his way into re- 
sponsible positions and is now assistant 
secretary of both the EUwanger & 
Barry Nursery Co. and the EUwanger 
& Barry Realty Co. Mr. Maloy also is 
secretary and treasurer of the Orna- 
mental Growers ' Association, an organi- 
zation of nurserymen whose interests 
lie chiefly in the production of orna- 
mental stock. Mr. Maloy is a member 
of practically all the trade societies 
the interests of which concern the 
growing of plants in the open ground, 
and wherever a willing worker is 
needed he is to be found. 



• Kissimmee, Fla. — Miss Jean Caldwell, 
an experienced florist, is preparing to 
build a greenhouse here and supply the 
local demand for flowers. 



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Mahch 9, 1911. 



The Weekly Florists^ Review* 



17 



A CORN DECORATION. 

At Columbus, O., the Livingston Seed 
€o. conducts an up-to-date seed store 
and also does a large business in cut 
flowers. The decoration of the store 
always receives attention, and many 
seasonable or timely displays are made. 
The accompanying illustration shows 
the decoration arranged by Fred M. 
Brownwell during the recent national 
corn exposition at Columbus. The per- 
gola was decorated with southern wild 
smilax and ears of corn. 



OROWINQ ASPARAQUS FOR SEED. 

For the benefit of myself and other 
growers of Asparagus plumosus nanus, 
will you please publish the best method 
of growing asparagus for seed? I have 
a small bed, 4 years old, which gave 
me a large quantity of seed this year 
for the first time, and I should like to 
know whether I can grow another crop 
on the old vines or should cut down the 
old vines and mulch for new sprouts. 
They are planted in a solid bed. 

F. N. B. 



The best method to follow in this case 
would be to cut down the old growth, 
give a good mulching of well rotted 
manure and start a fresh growth. Do 
not water too heavily until the new 
growth gets a start, but after the young 
shoots get away nicely the bed will 
take an abundance of water. With 
plenty of food, such a bed should con- 
tinue to produce satisfactorily for sev- 
eral years. . W. H. T. 



OAS LIME. 



What is gas lime? Where can I get 
it and how should it be used? E. M. 



Gas lime is a by-product of gas works 
and is to be obtained there only. As 
a general rule, the companies are will- 
ing to give it away. It is useful to 
apply to land which is badly infested 
with cutworms, wireworms and similar 
pests. A light dose, 300 to 400 pounds 
per acre, in late fall or early spring 
will go a long way toward ridding the 
ground of these pests. C. W. 



CINCINNATI. 



The Gateway to the South. 

Business is good, but the supply in 
some lines is so large that it is not 
possible to clean up regularly. The 
wholesalers could have told in a moment, 
without any outside information, that 
Lent was here. For a few days after the 
beginning of this season consignments 
from the smaller towns seemed as 
though the flowers had all suddenly 
come into crop. The purchases of others 
in this market fell off slightly. This 
week the latter came back strong and 
business is going its old merry way. 

Carnations are one bright feature 
locally. The warmer, clearer weather 
continues to bring them in stronger; in 
fact, so much stronger that the market 
can scarcely absorb all. The stems and 
color are both in good shape. The 
Enchantress varieties, White Perfection, 
Beacon and C. C. Murphy's new seed- 
ling, are the best. There is such a 
strong request for white that they are 
snapped up quickly every day. 

Eoses have taken second place, tem- 
porarily so, perhaps. More good teas 
might have been used, especially in 



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Store of Livingston Seed G>., During National Corn Show. 



pink. The supply of pink and red is 
short, while white is apparently equal 
to the demand. Still, at times it seemed 
that more of these, especially of short 
and medium grades, might have been 
used. The call for Beauties is good, 
while the supply is not what it should 
be. 

The larger quantities of lilies offered 
bespeaks the approach of Easter. The 
first part of this week the quantity of 
this flower was more than the market 
could readily use. Callas continue in 
large supply. The other bulbous stock 
is of good quality as a whole, and a 
large part of it finds a market. The 
prices realized, however, are none too 
high. 

Single violets are forcing the doubles 
so hard that they have practically made 
them a back number. The latter are 
now generally used only in work. Sweet 
peas and valley are in oversupply. Mig- 
nonette, marguerites and forget-me- 
nots are offered. The supply of orchids 
is easily sufficient for the demand. The 
green goods market is well supplied. 

Various Notes. 

The regular meeting of the Florists' 
Society will be held Monday, March 13, 
at P. J. Olinger's, 128 East Third street. 
Mr. Olinger will provide refreshments. 

Those of the Queen City who expect 
to attend the National Flower Show 
are Mr. and Mrs. C. E. Critchell, Mr. 
and Mrs. J. A. Peterson and E. Witter- 
staetter. The last named will be one of 
the judges at the show. 

Wm. Murphy is now settled in his new 
quarters at 309 Main street and is 
pleased with the change. He will use 
the first floor for cut flowers, the second 
for offices and supplies, the third for 
moss; the top floor for wire-work, and 
the basement for fertilizers and bulbs. 
The rapid increase of Mr. Murphy's 
business is the reason for this change 
to the more commodious quarters. 

The Miami Floral Co., of Dayton, O., 
is a heavy consignor of Easter lilies 



to C. E. Critchell and, according to ad- 
vices from George Bartholomew, the 
manager, expects to have 10,000 or more 
for this market for Easter. 

February 25 the marriage of Geo. 
Durban, Jr., of the Northside Flower 
Store, and Miss Amelia Stible was 
solemnized at a large church wedding. 
After the ceremony all adjourned to a 
feast at the bride's home. 

Tom Windram left for Leesburg, Fla., 
early this week. 

Eddie Bossmeyer, of C. E. Critchell 's, 
is on the sick list. 

Geo. Klotter, of West Price Hill, has 
been sending fine forget-me-nots to L. 
H. Kyrk. 

The Anglo-Importation Co., under the 
management of Mrs. Thaden, will open 
in the Sinton hotel March 17. Flowers, 
fruits and wines will be handled. 

Clarence J. Ohmer, of West Palm 
Beach, Fla., is shipping Asparagus 
plumosus to E. G. Gillett. 

Miss Margaret Anstead, of E. G. Gil- 
lett 's, and Geo. Tromey have returned 
from the Mardi Gras. Miss Anstead 
says that she had one glorious time. 

Bowling. 

Following is the week's bowling 
record : 

Player— 1st 2d Are. 

Al. Sunderbruch 168 211 168 

Wm. Schumann 123 158 167 

C. E. Critchell 137 158 163 

vV m. Sunderbruch 158 164 161 

Ray Murphy 191 182 160 

Al Horning 151 122 158 

Ld. Schumann 176 166 166 

R. C. Wltterstaetter 129 180 152 

Al. Ueckman 131 169 151 

Fred. Frlcke 149 145 147 

J- Allen 138 155 145 

Tom Jackson 150 176 139 

Wm. Murphy 117 124 125 

0. H. Hoffmelster 149 100 120 

O. II. Hoffmelster 100 103 107 

In two other games Ed. Schumann 
rolled 205 and 229. C. H. H. 



Idaho Falls, Ida.— E. F. H. Lawrence, 
proprietor of Lawrence's Greenhouses, 
is just finishing a new greenhouse, bad- 
ly needed for spring trade. 



'r;^i^j,.m. ",W» IP', ' w >! ^myf:fi^fi^tw,fl'rv;\^mjia!fj,\ 



18 



The Weekly Florists^ Review. 



Makch 9, 1911.. 



THE FLORISTS' REVIEW 

G. L. GRANT, Editob and Mamageb. ^ 



PXTBLISHBD XVXBT THUBSDAT BT 

THE FLORISTS' PUBLISHING CO. 

080-560 Caxton BaUdlnKi 

334 Dearborn Street, Chicaso. 

Tklkphonk, Harrison 5429. 

•■oibtxxxd oabuc addbx88, ixobvixw, ohioaoo 

Nkw York Office: 

BorouKh Park Brookl3m, N. Y. 

J. Austin Shaw, Manaosb. 



SnbBcription price, 11.00 a year. To Canada. $2.00. 
To Europe. $2JS0. 

AdTertialnsr rates qaoted upon request. Only 
■trictly f>^e adyerttslng accepted. 

AdvertlBements must reach us by 5 p. m. Tuesday, 
to Insure Insertion In the Issue of that week. 



Entered as second class matter December 3. 1897. 
at the post-office at Chicago, 111., under the act of 
March 3. 1879. 

This paper is a member of the Chicago Trade 
Press Association. 

INDEX TO ADVERTISERS, PAGE 98. 

CONTENTS. 

The Retail Florist 7 

— Automobile Delivery Cars 7 

— The Record to Date (illus. ) 7 

— The Kosery (illus. ) 8 

To Grow with Carnations 8 

Cyclameu Culture (illus. ) 8 

Cottage and Darwin Tulips 10 

Fuchsias for Window Box 10 

Southern Bulb Fields (illus.) 10 

Tliree Crops a Year 10 

Society of American Florists H 

Water Lilies 11 

A Forest City Place (illus.) 11 

Hardy Double Pyrethrums 11 

Seasonable Suggestions — Jerusalem Cherries.. 12 

— Genistas 12 

— Fancy Caladiums 12 

— Dahlias 12 

— Flowering Shrubs for Easter 12 

— Rambler Roses 12 

— Dutch Bulbous Stock 12 

— Spiraeas 12 

Sweet Peas — Outdoor Sweet Peas 12 

Roses — New Roses Worth Growing 13 

S. W. Crowell (portrait) 13 

Shading 14 

Asters 14 

Violets — Growing Violets In Texas 14 

— To Give Violets More Color 14 

Dreer's New Establishment (illus.) 14 

The Stock that Pays 14 

Smilax from Seed 15 

Some New Things 16 

Charles J. Maloy (portrait) 16 

A Corn Decoration (Illus. ) 17 

Growing Asparagus for Seed 17 

Gas Lime 17 

Cincinnati 17 

Obituary 18 

National Flower Show 18 

Chicago 18 

New York 24 

Philadelphia 26 

Cleveland 28 

Boston 28 

St. Louis 30 

Dayton, 32 

Merlden, Conn 36 

Jollet, 111 36 

Bedding Plants 38 

Tulips for Forcing 38 

Westerly, R. 1 40 

Providence 40 

Steamer Sailings 44 

Seed Trade News 46 

— Ferrv's Canadian Branch 46 

— Weights in Nebraska 46 

— In the Pea Country 47 

— Imports 48 

— National Seed Legislation 48 

— The Davis Seed Co 54 

— Seed Notes from Holland 55 

Pacific Coast— Portland, Ore 60 

— San Francisco, Cal 60 

— Outdoor Mums in Oregon 61 

Buffalo 01 

Des Plftlnes, 111 61 

Nursery News — Filberts 62 

— Albaugb Nursery Affairs 62 

American Peony Society 6a 

Oranges in Pots (J3 

Vegetable Forcing — Vegetable Markets 64 

— Aphis on Lettuce 64 

Toronto 68 

Goshen, Ind 70 

Tarrytown, N. Y 70 

Do Ferns Need Protection ? 72 

Pittsburg 74 

Rochester, N. Y 76 

Greenhouse Heating 88 

— When Boiler is Too Large 88 

— Boiler Probably Too Small 8h 

— A Three-Section House 89 

New Bedford, Mass 92 

ConnersviUe, Ind 92 

Wichita, Kan. . .• 94 

Zanesville, Ohio 94 

Milwaukee 96 

Southington, Conn 96 



80CIITT OF AIEBICAN riOBISTS. 

Incorporated by Act of Congress, March 4, '01. 

Officers for 1911: President, George Asmns, 
Chicago; vice-president, R. Vincent, Jr., White 
Marsh, Md.; secretary, H. B. Domer, Urbana, 
111.; treasurer, W. F. Hasting, Buffalo, N. Y. 

Special convention and National Flower Show, 
Boeton, Mass., March 26 to April 1, 1911. 

Annual convention, Baltimore, Md., Aognat 16 
to 18, 1911. 



BESULTS. 

We give them. You get them. 
"We both have them. 

Time to be making your preparations 
for Easter. 

The twenty-second assessment of the 
Florists' Hail Association will be levied 
April 1, 1911. 

The price of linseed oil still is climb- 
ing, and with it the cost of glazing 
materials is going up. 

If there is one part of the country in 
which the florists' business is expanding 
faster than in other parts of the country, 
that fastest growing part is the Pacific 
northwest. 

The year 1911 will see an increase 
in greenhouse area considerably greater 
than the building record of any previous 
season. The new glass will run into 
millions of feet. 

Not a few subscribers save themselves 
the bother of annual renewal by sending 
The Keview $2, $3, or sometimes $5, in- 
stead of the dollar-bill that insures fifty- 
two visits of the paper. 

Although Lent has cut little figure in 
the cut flower business the last year or 
two, this season the week following Ash 
Wednesday has been dull in almost 
every big city market, which is the 
strongest of evidence of quiet times in 
the country at large. 



GOOD MEASUBE. 



It is a pleasure to feel that one is 
giving full measure and that the fact 
is appreciated: 

Please discontinue our ad of Vlnca varlegata, 
as we are sold out. The classified department 
of The Review is a great seller; It always tries 
to sell more than a fellow has for sale. — Ragan 
Bros., Springfield, O., March 6, 1911. 

You have done your share of the work so well 
it will not be necessary for me to use any more 
display ads this spring. I am about cleaned up 
on dahlias; gladioli sold out. — W. K. Fletcher, 
Des Moines, la., March 6, 1911. 



OBITUARY. 



Patrick Fogarty. 

There passed away at Toronto, Ont., 
Sunday, March 5, one of the oldest 
florists in that district, Patrick Fogar- 
ty. Mr. Fogarty was 70 years of age 
and had been in the florists' business 
since he was 13 years old. He was born 
at what is now known as the corner of 
Scott and Wellington streets, in Toronto, 
in what is now the busiest section of 
the citj'. He soon moved to the east 
end and lived there continuously up to 
the time of his death. For many years 
he found a ready market for his plants 
in the old St. Lawrence market, before 
there were anj flower stores on Yonge 
street. Mr. Fogarty had been ailing 
for the last four years, but up till then 
had been actively engaged in the busi- 
ness. During the course of his career 
he had built up an enviable reputation 
as a pansy grower, his stock being 
known all over the province. He is 
survived by three sons, all of whom are 
engaged in the florists' business. 



NATIONAL FLOWEB SHOW. 

The National Flower Show commit- 
tee announces the following additional 
prizes to the schedule: 

KING CONSTRUCTION CO. SPECIAL PRIZES: 

No. 446. Vase of 30 blooms of any rose intro- 
duced since January 1, 1900, silver cup. 

No. 447. Display of cut lilac blooms, first 
prize, $15; second prize, flO. 

No. 448. Display of cut blooms of lily of the 
valley, first prize, $15; second prize, $10. 

No. 449. Display of cut blooms of amaryllls, 
first prize, $15; second prize, $10. 

No. 450. Display of blooms of marguerites, 
first prize, $10; second prize, $5. 

All to be staged Saturday, March 25; Judging 
at 3 p. m. 

No. 461. Ladles' Auxiliary Society prize, for 
the best table decoration, a silver cup. To be 
staged Friday, March 31; judging at 3 p. m. 

No. 452. Boston Flower Exchange special 
prize, for the best floral design, originality to 
count twenty-five points, first prize, $50; second 
prize, $30; third prize, $20. 

The National Society of Gardeners 
will also offer about thirty silver cups 
and numerous medals for prizes to be 
competed for at the National Flower 
Show, schedule of which will be issued 
in a few days. 

John K. M. L. Farquhar, Sec'y. 



CHICAGO. 

The Great Central Market. 

Lent has made practically no 
difference in the flower business 
in Chicago in the last year or two, but 
it-will take a great deal of argument to 
convince the wholesalers that it is not 
affecting the trade this season. Ash 
Wednesday and the following day busi- 
ness was exceedingly dull. Friday a 
number of large shipping orders for 
special sales purposes cleaned up the 
market in fair shape, though, of course, 
at low prices, and Saturday, March 4, 
local demand by the special sales con- 
tingent was fair. The present week 
opened with light demand and no pros- 
pect of a clean-up in the market until 
the latter part of the week, when prices 
doubtless will be made cheap enough to 
move the accumulation, whatever it is. 

Keceipts at the beginning of this 
week were not heavy, which is the only 
salvation for the market, as prices 
steadily are weakening. Roses hold 
their own much better than other 
flowers, and better than was expected. 
Beauties are in light supply and should 
there be active demand trouble would 
be met with in filling orders. Of other 
roses there are enough to meet all re- 
quirements. It is again possible to pro- 
cure short roses at moderate prices. The 
bulk of the stock continues to be of the 
better grades and it is on these that 
the sale is slowest. There are calls for 
thousands of the medium lengths where 
the orders require hundreds of the extra 
long stems. The quality of the roses 
leaves nothing to be desired. 

Carnations continue to come in heav- 
ily, but erratically; some days all the 
growers seem to take a vacation, and it 
is necessary to call in supplies if orders 
are to be filled. Wholesalers comment 
on the fact that the call is for the me- 
dium grade of roses, but that nothing 
but the best of carnations will do. 
Consequently there is a wide range 
between the values of the best stock 
and the medium and lower grades. The 
accumulation of last week was jobbed 
off March 3 and 4 at the lowest prices 
thus far quoted this season. 

Not all the wholesale houses handle 
violets in large quantity, but those who 
do the bulk of this business had 
trouble last week, and it still is with 
them. Locally grown Princess of Wales 



Mabch 9, 1911. 



The Weekly Florists' Review* 



19 




f 



splendid Stock In Large Supply 



The season has arrived for featuring the Carnation in all the steadily increasing 
number of retail flower stores that look to us for their supply. We have never had 
a finer lot of stock, nor do we recall a season when prices have been more reasonable. 
Write for quotations on thousand lots — push for business and you will find this one 
of the most profitable seasons of the year. 

SWEET PEaS 



For years we have been headquarters for Sweet Peas, but we never 
have had at this date such fine stock or such large quantities as now. Extra 
long stems, carrying large, perfect flowers. All the fancy colors as well as 
white and pink. We are shipping these Peas, fresh picked, in great 
quantities and they never fail to give buyers the best of satisfaction. 



Killarneys 



To the users of the best grade of Killarneys it will be good news that 
our crop once more is large— the quality always is the best in this market. 
While we have a fair supply of short to medium, the greater part of the 
crop is the Select and Special grades. The color in the pink Killarney is 
exti a good. We never handled finer roses, and we invite all retailers who 
want good stock to order some of these. 

Our liongr BEAUTIES Are Extra Good Quality 



Valley 

Fine Valley is something you need 
every day in the year. We always 
have it. Order of us and get the best. 



Violets 

You get the cream of the crops, 
double or single, when you order 
of us. Thousand lots our specialty. 



Easter Lilies Bulb Stock 



We can supply Easter Lilies 
every day in the year, fine quality. 



Tulips, all colors ; Daffs, JonquUs, 
Paper Whites in large supply. 



CATTLEYAS 

Our orchids are home-grown, and you always can get your orders filled 
if you place them with us. 

Also place orders with us for hoine*en^wn Gardenias. 



Headquarters for ail Green Goods 

Asparagus, long heavy strings, $50.00 per 100. 



CURRENT PRICE 

ORCHIDS. Cattle7a8...per doz.. 


: LIST 

16.00 to riJBO 
4.00 

IT Per doz. 

16.00 

6.00 

4.00 

tl.50 to 3.00 

Per 100 

$12 00 

$8.00 to 10.00 

4.00 to 6 00 

12 00 

S.OOto 10.00 

4.00 to 6.00 

12.00 

8.00 to 10 00 

4 00 to 6.00 

12.00 

8 00 to 10.00 

4 00 to 6.00 

rdingly. 

Per 100 
$l.fiOto$2.00 
son 
4.00 to 5.00 

.50 to .76 

JWto .76 

1V6 

.60 to 1.00 

12JS0 

800 
400 

1.00 to 2 00 
300 
3.00 

3.00 to 4.00 
300 
4.00 

3.00 to t.OO 

.60 to .76 

.36 to JSO 

.26 to .60 

1.00 to 1.60 

8.00 to 10.00 

.76 
.30 
.16 

.76 

to 6 p. m. 
ases. 


ROBES 
AMERICAN BEAVT 

Extra loDir stems 


St»»m8 30 t'l 36 Inches 


Stems 24 Inches 


Stems 12 to 20 InchM 

Snort per 100. 18.00 to 110.00 

ROSES 

White Killarney. Boeclal 


•• '""?.™^y' ^'f' ;••;; 


'* ** seconds 


Kl li&rney . SDecial .....••••• 


St)l6Ct -•«•••••#••••••••••• 

se'*ond8 


Mt Maryland. BL>eclal ••••• 


select ..4 

** ** SHconds.... 


Richmond, special , 


" select 


'* seconds...... 


Extra special roses billed accc 

CARNATIONS 

Oommon 

Relect, large and fancy 

White, for St. Patrick's Day 

MISCEIiliANEOUS 

Violets, doable 


BiDffle 


8*17061 Pens, fancy ...••• 


" " medium 


Easter Lilies 


Callas per doz., $1.60 

Valley, select 

'* special 


Daisies, white and yellow 

Jonqul 8 .. 


Daffodils 


Paper Whites 


Romans. 




TuUps 

DECORATIVE 

Asparagus Plamosus — per string 
. -per bunch 
Sprengerl ... 

Adlantum. fancy, long per 100 

Farleyense " 

Smllax per do7., 11.80 to $2.00 

Mexican Ivy oerlOOO. 6.00 


Forns '• a no 


Galax *• 1.00 


store open from 7 a. m. 1 

Sundays closed at noon. 

Subject to market chai 



E. C. AMLING CO. 

The Largest and Best Equipped 
Wholesale Cut Flower House in Chicago 

19 and 21 Randolph St., CHICAIafl 



«* .■^: 



W' 



;r, T',jn>^.»,v; ?,' ;■ >_*■,■ 



20 



The Weekly Florists' Review. 



March 9, 1911. 



■TiT 



WHITE CARNATIONS 

^= FOR ST. PATRICK'S DAY === 

Shall have a splendid lot of fine white carnations for dyeing for March 17, but the 
demand is sure to be strong and we advise ordering early. 



ROSES 

Fine crops of Killarneys and 
other varieties now on — we have 
the Beauties. 



ORCHIDS 

Finest western grown Cattleyas 
in splendid supply. Filling all 
orders. 



LILAC 

Our White Lilac is without equal 
in this country this season. 



What do you need in Florists' Supplies? We have It. 

A. L. Randall Co. 

19-21 Randolph St, Chicago 



Wholesale Florists 



L. D. Phona Central 1496 

PriTftto Exchange all 

DcDartments 



Mentioa The Review when you write. 



New Rose 

Now booking orders for HILDA, deep pink 
sport of My Maryland. 2i2-inch, $20.00 per 100; 
$150.00 per 1000. 

A. L. RANDALL CO. 

19>81 Randolph Street, CHICAGO 
Mention The Review when vou write 

continue to come in heavily and of good 
quality, selling fairly well. The Hudson 
River stock last week came in consider- 
ably heavier than heretofore and the 
quality in many instances is finer than 
usual at this date, but sales have been 
extremely slow. Even for the Saturday 
bargain day it was not possible to make 
a clearance, though many sales were 
made as low as $1.50 per thousand for 
the stock that had been standing around 
for the better part of the week. Of 
course the best of each day's arrivals 
are selling at fair prices, but the de- 
mand is so much less than the supply 
that only a small fraction of the re- 
ceipts realize regular prices. Sweet peas 
are somewhat more abundant. The qual- 
ity is exceptionally good and sales are 
fairly satisfactory. There are, of course, 
many short-stemmed peas that realize 
little. Some of the growers have not 
yet awakened to the fact that peas, to 
be profitable, must be good. Bulbous 
stock is coming in more abundantly, in 
spite of the fact that during Lent many 
seek to reduce their shipments. Some 
extremely good tulips are to be had of 
such varieties as Murillo and Couronno 
d'Or, but other tulips are well sold if 
they realize 2 cents. Eomans are not 
often seen and Paper Whites are less 
abundant, as is freesia. Daffodils and 
Jonquils are plentiful. There is an abun- 
dance of Easter lilies and callas and 
valley is slow sale, weddings for the mo- 
ment not being numerous. 

The green goods situation remains 
quiet. Ferns are now generally held at 
.$3. Boxwood is selling fairly well. 
Asparagus bunches are scarce, but there 
is a good supply of strings. Smilax is 
less plentiful. Adiantum is in slightly 
better request. 

Budlong'S'New Quarters. 

For its city store the J. A. Budlong 
estate has taken a two vears' lease on 



PERCY 

Not Ihe Oldest 

Nor the Largest 

Just the Pest 

27-29-31 Randolph Street, CHICAGO 

JONES 



Mention The Review when you write 



a second floor space in the Bryant & 
Stratton building on Randolph street, 
opposite the Public Library. The room 
is 45x80, with freight elevator, light 
and in every way well adapted to the 
wholesale cut flower business. Occupy- 
ing the room with Budlong will be 
Sinner Bros., M. C. Gunterberg and 
probably others now in the Flower 
Growers' market, though Mr. Sinner 
states that he acted for his firm and 
not for the Flower Growers' Co., of 
which he is manager, in the negotia- 
tions just concluded. The room will be 
fitted up in first-class style. Removal 
is to be about April 1. 

One of the interesting features of 
the deal is that it marks the market's 
further progress eastward on Randolph 
street, toward Michigan avenue, to 
which thoro'ighfare many observers 
think the cut flower business will gravi- 
tate. The location is two doors east of 
Randall and Angling. 

Club Meeting. 

Vice-president A. C. Kohlbrand occu- 
pied the chair at the meeting of the 
Florists' Club, March 2. President Phil- 



pott postponed his monthly trip from 
Winnipeg so as to be here for the trip 
to Boston. The transportation commit- 
tee reported that arrangements had been 
made to go via the Lake Shore, leaving 
at 5.30 p. m. March 23, arriving at Bos- 
ton the evening before the National 
Flower Show opens. All who will go 
were asked to notify E. F. Winterson, 
of the committee, 45 Wabash avenue, 
who will reserve berths. If a suflicient 
number make reservations a special 
train will be run; otherwise special cars 
will be carried on the Lake Shore 
Limited, one of the finest trains in the 
world. Of those present A. T. Pyfer, 
August Jurgens and C. W. Johnson sig 
nified their intention of going. 

The bowling committee reported that 
two teams will go to Milwaukee on the 
11:30 train, March 19, for a match with 
the Milwaukee Florists' Club bcSwlers. 
They invited all the rooters to go along. 

Harry F. Gray, Wm. Wolf, R. E. 
Newcomb, Edward Goldstein and C. A. 
Beatty were elected to membership, and 
applications were received from G. L. 
Klimmeck, Wm. Harbitz, F. J. Krai, Jr., 
and E. A. Ollinger. 



M.,cHe,i9n The Weekly Florists' Review. 



21 



We Can Supply You with 



ROSES, BEAUTIES 

The best the market affords, in any quantity and any length of stem 

Quality of all our stock is fine 



PRICE LIST 

Richmoud 



1 



Select . . . 
>• Medium. 



AMERICAN BEAUTIES Per Doe. 

Extra long $5.00 

36-inch stem 4.00 

30-inch stem 3.60 

24-inch Btem. 3.00 

20-inch stem 2.50 

18-inch stem 2.00 

16-inch stem ., . . 1.50 

12-inch stem 1.26 

Short stem 75c to 1.00 

ROSES, OUR SELECTION, $4.00 per 100 

CARNATIONS Per lOO 

Good $1.50 to $2.00 

gele(>^ ■ 3 00 

Whitt^ for St. Patrick's bay...*."..".'.. 4.00 to 6^00 

Harrisii per doz., $1.50 

Valley 3.00 to 4.00 

Violets 76to 1.00 

Sweet Peas 76 to 1.25 



Killamey | Special . 

White Killamey J- °?lec* • • 

Field , I Medimn 

My Maryland. '..'.....*. J Short. . . 

Uncle John 

Bride. 

Ivory 

Sunrise 

Gate I Short 

Perle J 



Per 100 

$10.00 
S.OO 
6.00 
4.00 



8.00 
6.00 
4.00 



Per 100 
$3.00 



Subject to ohanee witbout notice. 



Jonquils 

Daflfodila $3.00 to 4.00 

Tulips 3.00 to 4.00 

Adiantiun i.oo 

Asparagus. per bunch, $0.60 

Ferns per 1000, 3.00 



Order from ua and get the freshest stock and of best keeping quality and have the assurance 
of supplies such as can only come from 8,000,000 FEET OF MODERN GLASS. 

PETER REINBERG 

WHOLESALE GROWER OF CUT FLOWERS 



35 Randolph Street, 



CHICAGO, ILL. 



Mieiicioti I mh Keview wtieo vou wnie 



The exhibits of the evening consisted 
of vases of White Wonder and Gloriosa 
carnations from F. Dorner & Sons Co., 
Lafayette, Ind. A committee consisting 
of C. W. Johnson, P. Olsem and H. N. 
Yepsen scored Gloriosa eighty-six 
points, entitling it to the club's certifi- 
cate. White Wonder had suffered so 
that it did not show its true form, so 
was not scored. 

J. G. Schuman, of Bassett & Wash- 
burn's, Hinsdale, brought two blooms of 
Killamey that each had nearly thirty 
petals, and stated that he had a plant 
in charge that had produced blooms 
with thirty-six petals. 

Joseph Kohout reported on the trip 
of the club members to the meeting of 
the Illinois State Florists' Association. 
The session closed with a discussion of 
matters concerning express shipments, 
in which the representatives of the ex- 
press companies paid good natured com- 
pliments to each other. The shippers 
present agreed that the practice of the 



companies that solicit routing orders 
from the out of towrt buyers should be 
discouraged. 

Eeinberg's Planting 

Peter Reinberg is planning to bench 
the quite considerable number of 220,- 
000 ciarnation plants for the season of 
1911-12. Here is his list of varieties 
and number of each: 

White Enchantress 25,000 

White Perfection 36,000 

White Lawson 6,000 

Enchantress .'^S.OOO 

Wlnsor 30,000 

Rnee-pink Enchantress 30,000 

Mrs. Lawson 30,000 

Beacon 25,000 



Total 220,000 

February Weather. 

Tlie month was exceptionally warm 
for February, the mean temperature be- 
ing 32.4 degrees. It equaled the aver- 
age of February, 1890 and 1909, and 
has not been exceeded since 1882. The 




percentage of possible sunshine was 
forty-four, as compared with the normal 
of fifty, and the total precipitation, rain 
and melted snow. 2.27 inches, was close 
to the average. 

Various Notes. 

Peterson Nursery has just put up a 
propagating house 22x50. 

Allie Zech was on the sick list 
March 7. 

The Kenwood Co., of which George 
Wagner is one of the stockholders, in 
its articles of incorporation declares the 
florists' business to be one of the lines 
in which it will engage. 

O. W. Frese, of Poehlmann Bros. Co., 
says that White Perfection takes the 
St. Patrick's dye better than any other 
carnation. 

W. W. Randall is again at St. Louis 
on business for the A. L. Randall Co. 
A. L. Randall himself is at West Baden. 

Harry Rowe, in the Palmer Hous» 



f.Tf 7T:''l»fV^,«^<TW-^"T- -T^'-lVT^»>.«7l>y^,i''?i',TIKW7)r7^3?ri'- 



22 



The Weekly Florists^ Review. 



■*.■■■:' f"t 



Mabch 9, 1011. 



ROSES 



Bride and Maid, 
fiie.KiHarneys 
and Riciiniond. 

These are now in fine crop with us — splendid quality and 
the quantity that warrants us in inviting the orders of new 
customers. 

CARNATIONS 

We have quality and quantity — prices are where retailers 
can take hold strong. Good supply of white for St. Patrick's 
Day. 
WESTERN GROWN GARDENIAS FANCY SWEET PEAS 

JOHN KRICHTEN 

51 Wabasii Avenue ^°°»cJigS%M°°* Ciiicago, 111. 



PKICIS LIST 

Oattleyas p«r doz., $6.00 to tTJSO 

Oardenlaa " S.OOto 6.00 

BBAUnSS Per doc. 

Lonffitema |S.M 

Sterna 80 iiKliQ) 4.00 

Stems 24 lQCh«^ J.OO 

Steiiu20 Incheh. ^M 

Sttmsie inches 2.00 

Stems 12 Inches » ^.. IM 

Shortstems > n 90.76 to 1.00 

Per 100 

Klllamer (6.00to 18.00 

Richmond 6.00to 8.00 

White ElUBmey 6.00to 8.00 

Maid and Bride S.00to 8.00 

My Maryland 6.00to 8.00 

BOS£8, oar selection 4.00 

" extra select lO.OO 

Carnations, common 1.S0 to 2.00 

** fftDcy • • • S tMI 

white, for St." Patrick's 4.00 to 6.00 

Violets JMito .76 

Valley S.OOto 4.00 

Easter LiUes per doc.. $1.60 

CaUas " 1.60 

Paper Whites. Romans 3.00 

Tnlips, Jonquils, Daffodils 8.00 

SweetPeas 76to 1.26 

Aspararns Pltunoeus. . . per string, .60 to .76 

" ...per bunch, .86 to .60 

Sprengeri per 100, 2.00 to 4.00 

Adlantum Croweanom. ... " .76 to IM 

Smllax per dot., 91JS0 to $2.00 16.00 

Ferns per 1000. 8.00 .80 

Galax " 1.00 .16 

Lencothoe " 7Ji0 1.00 

Mexican Ivy l.oo 

Boxwood percaae, 7.60 

8abJ«ot to Market Chan ares 



Mention The Review when you writp 



block, now has one of the most attrac- 
tive stores in town. The window on 
Mo^nroe street has been lowered to the 
floor level and the store opened through 
to the rotunda of the hotel. 

E. B. Washburn and wife are on their 
way home from California and are ex- 
pected to arrive here March 11. C. L. 
Washburn is planning to go to West 
Baden next week in the hope that the 
waters will help him to get rid of the 
carbuncles with which he has been suf- 
fering for some weeks, 

Vaughan So Sperry have added W. O. 
Johnson to their staff. 

Harry Manheim, with Hoerber Bros., 
has been ill for a few days. At Des 
Plaines the firm is now beginning to 
cut the second crop of roses from the 
houses put up last season. 

A number of growers had a meeting 
at a downtown hotel March 3 to dis- 
cuss the organization of a mutual sell- 
ing corporatiom. 

John Zech and Matt Mann returned 
from New Orleans March 5. They re- 
port a thoroughly enjoyable trip. 

Frank Schramm, of Park Eidge has 
recovered from an illness of several 
weeks and is busy cutting White Law- 
son carnations. 

E. E. Pieser, of Kennicott Bros. Co., 
and Mrs. Pieser plan to go to West 
Baden March 13, to be absent a couple 
of weeks. 

Henry Van Gelder has added a sten- 
ographer to the force of Percy Jones. 
The Batavia Greenhouse Co., at Ba- 
tavia, recently completed a house to be 
devoted to the forcing of valley. The 
company recently bought 600 boxes of 
glass, which will be put into an addi- 
tion this spring. 

Louis Winkleman. for some years 
with Bassett & Washburn, is preparing 
to go into the retail coal business with 
his father-in-law at Western Springs, 
about May 1. 

John Kruchten reports that the Deer- 
field Nurseries are now off crop on gar- 
denias, cutting only a few dozens a 
day, but that a new crop is expected 
by Manager Kottrasch in time for 
Easter. 

Mons Olsou and the stenographer of 
Poehlmann Bros. Co. are on the sick 
list, so that the store has been short- 
handed this week. 



H. N. Bruns has purchased a fine 
new 10-room residence at 3023 Warren 
avenue and expects to move in about 
May 1. It is almost directly in back 
of his store on Madison street, making 
it decidedly convenient. Mr. Bruns is 
contemplating the purchase of an auto 
for delivery purposes. He already has a 
touring car. 

Mr. Gelderman, of L. Baumann & Co., 
recently returned from a three weeks' 



ffQVERY now and then a well- 
BA pleased reader speaks the word 
which is the means of bringing a 
new advertiser to 



eV/eo^ 




Such friendly assistance is thoroughly 
appreciated. 

Give us the name of anyone from 
whom you are buying, not an adver- 
tiser. "Wc especially wish to interest 
those selling articles of florist's use 
not at present advertised. 

FLORISTS' PUBLISHING CO. 
530-^ Cazton Bldg. Chicago 



trip in Cuba. While there he became 
much interested in metallic designs 
used in cemeteries and says he saw 
many over eight feet high that had 
been standing at the graves for ten or 
more years. 

The E. C. Amling Co. reports having 
one order for 20,000 single violets to 
be filled this week, 

Fischer Bros., Evanston, say they 
sold a large part of their February out- 
put of tulips, etc., in the Chicago whole- 
sale market at as good a figure as the 
retail prices ordinarily prevailing at 
home. 

Kyle & Foerster say business with 
them continues much ahead of last year. 



Cut Flowers 

CURRENT PRICE LIST 

WKKK OF MARCH « 

Orange Bloisoms.... large cluster. $1.00 @ $1 50 

Orchldfi. Cattleyas perdoz.. 6.00 @ 7.50 

Gardenias " 4.00 

CARNATIONS Per 100 

Common $1.50 @ $2 00 

Select, large and fancy 3.00 

White, for St. Patrick's Day 4.00 @ 5 00 

ROSES 

American Beauty, 

perdoz.. $1.50 @ $6.00 

White Killamey 4.00 @ 10.00 

Killarney 4.00® 10.00 

My Maryland 4.00® 10.00 

Richmond 4.00® 10.00 

Extra special roses billed accordiugly. 

BnSCEIXANKOUS Per 100 

Violets, double $0.75 @ $ i.oo 

single 50® .75 

Sweet Peas, fancy 1.50 

■' medium 75® I.OO 

Easter Lilies 12.50 

Callas per doz., $1.50 

Valley, select 3.00 

special 4.00 

Daisies, white and yellow 1.00® 2. 00 

Jonquils 3.00 

Daffodils 3.00 

PaperWhites 3.00® 4.00 

Romans 3.00 

Kreesia 4.00 

Tulips 3.00® 4.00 

DECORATIVE 

Asparagus Plumosus 

per string $0.50 @ $0.75 

Asparagus Plumosus 

per bunch 35® .50 

Asparagus Sprengeri 

per bunch 25® .50 

Adiantum, fancy, long. 1.00 

Farleyense 8.00® 10.00 

Smilax per doz., $1.50 10.00 

Mexican Ivy per 1000, 6.00 .7,'> 

Ferns " 3.00 .30 

Galax. " 1.00 .15 

Leucothoe Sprays .75 

Subject to market changes. 

Pend us your name and we will send you our 
beautiful calendar, showing our new carnation 
Washington in natural colors. 

CHICftiiO CARNATION C0.« 

L. D. Phon* Central 337S 

3S-37 Randolpli St. «. t. pyfer. Mgr. CHICAGO 

Mention The Review when you write. 

C. W. McKellar, basing Ms judgment 
on the call for dye, says there will be 
a big demand for white carnations for 
St. Patrick's day. 



Mabch 9, 1911. 



The Weekly Florists' Review. 



St. Patrick's Day 

Will fall on the 17th of March this year* and in all proba- 
bility for several years to come, but several other things have 
fallen in the last few days, which will probably interest you more, 
as it includes nearly everything in the Cut Flower line, notably 
in Roses and Carnations; in fact, everything is lower in price 
and better in quality. Increased supplies in nearly everything 
now coming in; only shortage, long stem Beauties, and there is a 
fair supply of these. BulbOUS ptock plentiful, also Easter 
Lilies, Callas and Valley. Violets are coming iu heavy. 
Ferns have advanced to $3.00 per 1000; other Greens remain at 
the old price. 

St. Patrick's Green 

This fluid will absolutely color white carnations, or other white 
flowers, a vivid Irish green. One quart is sufficient to color three to 
four hundred carnations. One pint, 50c ; one quart, $1.00 ; six 
pints, $2.75 ; six quarts, $5.00. 



E. H. HUNT 



PRICK LI8T 
AMERICAN BKACTIES. Per dot. 

Mto48-lnah ^ _^ W.OO 

24to8«-inoli $1.00 to 4.00 

18to24-lncll 2.(iOto 8.00 

IStolS-lnch 1.60to 2.00 

UtolS-lnoh l.OOto LN 

8tol24noh * -W 

ROSBS Per 100 

BrldM $ 6.00 to$ 8.00 

Maids e.ooto 800 

Rlobmonds 6.00to 8.00 

Klllamey. white, pink 0.00 to 8.00 

My Maryland 6.00 to 8.00 

Psrlea S.OOto 7.00 

Koeee. onr selection .4.00 

'* extra select 10.00 

BIISCEI'I.ANEOUS 

CARNATIONS, medlom 2.00 

fancy 3.00 

extra fancy 4.00 

HarrlsUIilUea 12.u0 

Oallas 12.60 

VaUey S.OOto 4.U0 

Violets, single »• to .75 

double BO to l.bO 

Mignonette 4.00to 8.00 

Swewt Peas 76to 1.00 

Jonquils, Daffodils 8.00 to 4.00 

Paper Whites 8.00 

TuUpe S.OOto 4.00 

Leucothoe .76 

ildlantnm 76to 1.00 

Asparagus Strings each, .00 to .80 

Asparagus Bunches " .SOto .00 

Sprengerl Bunches " .SB to .50 

Smilaz per doc.. l.BOto 2.00 

Oalax per 1000, 1.00 

rems per 1000. 3.00 

Boxwood per lb,. .26 

Mexican ITT 75 to 1.00 

Wild Smllax per case. 18.00. $4.00 and 6.00 

Subject to change without notice. Store open 7.S0 
a.m. to 6 p.m. Sundays and holidays close at noon 



76-78 Wabash Avenue, 
CHICAGO, ILL 



UaMiskei 1878 



Wholesale Cut Flowers 

(Ntat llMse ia Ifce Wot 



iMorpmtei tMf 



Mention The Review when you write. 




IroR Bros. 

Wholesale Grawers af Cut flawen 

51 Wabash Avenue, CHICAGO 

LARGE SUPPLY-FINE STOCK 



PRICE LIST 



AMERICAN BKAUTT Perdoz. 

Extra long stums $4.00 

86 inch stems 3.50 

30-incb stems v 3.00 

24-inch stems 250 

20-Inch stems 2.00 

18-lnch stems 1.60 

15-inch stems 1.25 

12-inch stems 1.00 

Short stems per 100, $4.00 to 6 00 

Per 100 
Extra fancy.. $8.00 

Fancy 6 00 

Good 5.00 

Short 3.00 



{ 



Killamey 

White Killamey. 

Mrs. Jardine 

Richmond 



Bride 

Maid I Fancy 

Uncle John l fJood 

Porle ' Short 

ROSBS, our selection 

Carnations, fancy 

good |1.50to 

white, for St. Pat- 

ricli's day 4.00to 

Valley 4.00 to 

Adiantum 

Sprengerl bunch, 10.50 to 10.75 

Asparagus... " .50 to .75 

Ferns per 1000. 2.60 to 3.0a 

Galax " 1.00 to 1.50 



PerlOO 
16.00 
600 
3 00 
8.00 
3.tK) 
2.00 

6.00 
5.00 
1.00 



I^l<* 



.v.tKm 



Ho change without notice. 



Mention The Review wben you write 



Fred Stielow has placed with Kroe- 
schell Bros. Co. the contract for heat- 
ina; the Garland houses he is building at 
Niles Center for his son. Kroeschell's 
are this season making two new sizes 



of hot water heater. No. 17 being de- 
signed to heat 70,000 feet of glass to a 
rose temperature, and No. 18 to heat 
100,000 feet to a carnation temperature. 
Mr. Stielow is using the No. 17 with 



threaded boiler tube piping and forced 
circulation by means of a pump driven 
by a gasoline engine. 

Winterson 's Seed Store reports counter 
trade begiuning. Mail orders were 
prompt in response to the mailing of 
the catalogue. 

Wietor Bros, say their carnations are 
doing considerably better, as the result 
of the effort they have been making 
to avoid overpropagation. 

At E. H. Hunt's W. E, Lynch saya 
he finds business better than it was a 
year ago during the first week in Lent. 

B. Eldredge, Belvidere, is sending 
sprays cut from his famous orange tree 
to the Chicago Carnation Co. 

H. Roth, Lafayette, Ind., was a vis- 
itor last week, buying greenhouse ma- 
terial. A. C. Rott, of Joliet, was in town 
March 6. 

H. C. Blewitt still is confined to hia 
home at Des Plaines by rheumatism. 
He has been laid up since about Janu- 
ary 1. 

Bowling. 

A large party is expected to go to 
Milwaukee March 19 with the bowlers. 

The scores made March 1 were as 
follows : 



Roses. 



1st 2d 3d Carnations. 1st 2d 3d 



Craig 103 HI 165 Krauss 146 154 14» 

Sweeney ...106 103 184 Ayers trie? 134 172 

Myers 148 146 140 Goerlsch ...164 175 126 

Katzel 101 120 110 Schultz ...126 125 145 

Fischer ...158 111 149 A. Zeeh 161 182 157 



Totals . . . 

violets. 
Winterson.. 
Schuneman 
Friedman . 

Riley 

Lobrman 



616 591 748 
1st 2d 3d 
79 84 69 
141 120 120 
107 165 137 
104 156 126 
.101 115 136 



Totals 

Orchids. 
Huebner . . 

Graff 

Huebner, Jr 
Degnan . . 
Farley . . . 



.764 770 748 

1st 2d 3d 
.146 176 163 
.169 150 176 
.104 188 lOT 
.132 150 134 
.151 197 138 



Totals . . .622 640 58& Totals 702 820 748 



24 



The Weekly Florists' Review. 



Mahch 9, 1911. 



^^'^R KILLARNEY 

Now in full crop— fine quality In all lengths 

Our VALLEY Is exceptionally good 
Extra fine Wisconsin -grown, sweetly fragrant VIOLETS 

Trumpets •- Daffodils - - Freesia - - Sweet Peas 
ORDER ASPARAGUS STRINGS AND SMILAX HERE 

Headquarters for Fancy Cut Perns 

HOLTON & HUNKEL CO. 

462 Milwaukee Street, "■^irH^u'iSl?^. ^S' MILWAUKEE, WIS. 



Mention The Review vrben you write. 



NEW YORK. 



The Market. 



The market became almost demoral- 
ized at the close of last week, and at the 
opening of the present week showed no 
sign of recovery. There were more vio- 
fets left over March 6 than this market 
ever was called on to distribute in a 
day. Some of the wholesalers had as 
high as 100 boxes on hand. The whole 
market feels, as it has not for years, the 
advent of Lent, and to this may be 
added the increasing daily shipments. 
Roses, especially, have fallen and few 
commanded a higher price than 8 cents, 
and from this down rapidly to $1 per 
hundred. Carnations also struck a lower 
level and 1 cent to 2 cents was the pre- 
vailing quotation; only the selected 
novelties were higher. The best Amer- 
ican Beauties seem to be the only stock 
that held at anywhere near its real 
value. Most of the Beauty stock is 
mediocre and "slow of sale. Even the 
street was offering the short-stemmed 
ones Saturday. For cattleyas 50 cents 
was top, though a few Mossise touched 
60 cents the first of the season. Gar- 
denias are lower and lilies of all kinds 
have fallen. Bulbous stock of all kinds 
is overabundant. Yellow tulips were 
selling at 10 cents a bunch March 6. 

The retailers' windows are gay with 
blooming plants of all kinds. The signs 
of an early spring are abundant. The 
general expectation is that the present 
week will see the end of winter. The 
nurserymen already are busy with their 
early shipments, the seedsmen are work- 
ing night and day, and the plantsmen 
are already almost sold out of Easter 
blooming stock. Everyone seems to be 
anticipating a remarkably good holiday 
season. 

Various Notes. 

The plant auctions, including roses, 
bulbs, hardy shrubs and evergreens, be- 
gin Tuesday, March 14, at Elliott's and 
NacNiff 's, on Vesey street, the center of 
this branch of the business. 

The New York Florists ' Club 's month- 
ly meeting will be held next Monday 
evening, March 13, at its rooms in the 
Grand Opera House building. There will 
be bowling at the club 's alleys, 115 West 



WESTERN 



O 
R 

H 
1 
D 

S 



e 
o 



S 

m 

m 



9 
> 

m 



Headquarters 



St. Patrick's Green Dye 

I handle only the origrinal true Irish dye. Put up in powder form, 
which is easily diluted. Do not buy liquid dye when you can ^et 
this powder so cheap and dilute it yourself . Full directions with 
each package. One package will dye from 100 to 160 carnations. Per 
pkg., 26c; 5 pkgs., $1.00; per doz., $2.00. By mail postage prepaid. 

CURRENT PRICES 

01iCHII>8 

Oattleyas. pinkish lavender Perdoc $6.00 tot 7.80 

Dendroblom Formosnm. white " 6.00 to 6.00 

Oncldlnm Bplendldum PerlOOfls., 6.00 to 10.00 

Boxes assorted Orchids, $6.00 and up. 

AMBBICAM BKAUTY— Specials.. Per doe.. 6.00 

M-ln " 4.00 

20to24-in " 3.00 

16tol8-ln " 2.00 

Shorter " .76to 1.S0 

KlUamey PerlOO. B.OOto 8.00 

White Killamey " S.OOto 8.00 

Uy Maryland " S.OOto 8.00 

Richmond " S.OOto 8.00 

Mrs. neld " 6.00to 8.00 

Brldeonald or Bride " 6.00 to 8.00 

BOSBS, oar selection " 4.00 

special •' 10.00 

GABNATIONS 

Select PerlOO. 1.50to 2.00 

Fancy " 8.00 

White, for St. Patrick's Day " 4.00 to 6.0O 

MISCIXLANEOUS STOCK 

Oardeniaa, home-grrown Perdos., 3.00 to 4.00 

Stocks, doable Per bancb, 1.60 

single " .76to 1.00 

YaUey ..PerlOO, S.OOto 4.M 

Eaater lilUee, OaUas PerdoE.. 1.60 

DaUlea PerlOO, l.OOto IM 

SweetPeas " .76to 1.00 

Violets, doable and single " BOto .76 

Paper Whites, Romans " S.OO 

Freesia " 8.00 

Tulips '• 3.00to 4.00 

Daffodils " SOOto 4.00 

Jonquils " 2.0«to 3 00 

Mignonette " 4.00to 8.00 

DSCOBATITE 

Asparagus Plomoeaa Perstring. .Mto .76 

Perbunch. .86to JJO 

" Sprengert " .26to .60 

▲dlantnm PerlOO. .76lo 1.00 

Farleyenae " lO.OOto 12.00 

Smllax Perdos..$1.60 " 12.00 

Mexlcanlry Per 1000, 6.00 " .76 

Ferns " 3.00 " .30 

Oalax, green and bronse PerlOOO, 1.25 

Lencothoe PerlOO. .76 

WlldSmllaz largecaae. 6.00 

Boxwood Per bunch. 86c; per caa*. 7.60 

Subject to market clianKes 

CHAS. W. McKELLAR 

51 Wabash Ave., CHICAGO 



Mention The Review when you write. 



Twenty-third street, in the afternoon. 
There will be exhibits, refreshments and 
ten-minute essays and addresses by a 
dozen of the club's members. The ban- 
quet at Shanley's, Saturday evening, 
March 18, is an assured success. Nearly 
250 seats have been spoken for. Presi- 



dent Nugent will be toastmaster and a 
fine entertainment will follow the ban- 
quet. If any club members have failed 
to send for their tickets, to Chairman 
Weathered, there is no time to lose. 

The Greater New York Florists ' Asso- 
ciation, Brooklyn, will hold its first an- 



.'r.f'. 



March 9, 1911. 



The Weekly Florists^ Review* 



25 



ANNOUNCEMENT 

We are now occupying our new quarters at 309 Main Street, one 
door south of our old stand. FIRST FLOOR will be devoted to the 
handling of CUT FLOWfRS; SECOND, to FLORISTS' SUPPLIES and 
OFFICES ; THIRD FLOOR, SPHAGNUM and GREEN MOSS ; FOURTH 
FLOOR, WIRE WORK for FLORISTS' USE ; BASEMENT, for FERTILIZERS 
and BULBS. We are now receiving a heavy cut of all kinds of cut 
flowers, especially white carnations, which will be in heavy aop for 
St. Patrick's Day ; plenty of colors for openings or special occasions. 
Let me quote prices. 

Now is the time to order your hanging baskets and green moss 
for same. Our list of green goods is complete. We are agents for 
Evergreen Fertilizer for florists' and lawn uses. I would be pleased to 
make you quotations on any of the above stock. Thanking the trade 
for past favors, I trust a continuance of same. 

Yours truly. 



WN. MURPHY, 



wholesale Commisalon Florist, 
309 Main Street, 
Day Telephone, Main 980 NiKbt Phone, West 2590 



Cincinnati, Oiiio 



Mptitlop ThP Review when you write. 



nual dinner and reception at Raub's 
restaurant Thursday evening of this 
week. The object is "to stimulate a 
stronger sociability among the trade." 
Secretary Phillips expects an attendance 
•of 150. 

L. W. C. Tuthill's new offices at 1133 
Broadway are large and convenient, 
situated on the top floor of the sky- 
scraper and with gallery facilities. 

Charles Millang has secured a judg- 
ment for $335 against the Valentine Co., 
158 East One Hundred and Tenth street. 

Siebrecht & Siebrecht received some 
splendid Mossiae last week, which sold 
readily at 60 cents each. 

Walter Siebrecht has recovered from 
an attack of the grip. 

Wm. Duckham was in the city March 
6. He is a member of the Waverly 
Bowling Club, of Madison, and last 
week made the remarkable score of 279. 
His highest previous scores have been 
278 and 277. Mr. Duckham 's team will 
shortly challenge the New York Flo- 
rists' Bowling Club to a match to be 
rolled at Madison. 

Fred Sander, of St. Albans, England, 
has been a guest of Julius Roehrs for 
some time, and returns home this week. 

Percy B. Eigby, of the Pennock-Mee- 
han Co., left March 4 for a trip to the 
soijth. He was accompanied bv Mrs. 

B%by. ^.^mmmh. 

J. B. Nugent, Jr., is much pleased 
with the location of "his new branch 
store at Sixty-seventh street and Madi- 
son avenue, and his opening March 4 
was encouraging. Between his place and 
Fifty-eighth street are some of the best 
retail flower establishments of the city. 

Alex. McConnell has consented to 
take charge of the decorations for the 



banquet of the New York Florists ' Club 
March 18. 

April 1 is the date W. H. Siebrecht, 
Jr., announces for the opening of the 
plant market at Fifty-ninth street. 

A number of New Yorkers went to 
Philadelphia March 8 to visit the new 
plant of Henry A. Dreer, and some 
took in the Philadelphia club meeting 
and lecture Tuesday evening. 

Matthew Sampson has been appointed 
manager for Noe & Noe, of the New 
York Cut Flower Co. 

John D. Nicholas has leased three 
more buildings on West Twenty-eighth 
street and will take possession May 1, 
1912. The Pennock-Meehan Co. now 
occupies one of the buildings. They are 
to be fitted up with a view to accom- 
modating the prospective moving of 
wholesalers later, from Twenty-eighth 
street, between Sixth avenue and Broad- 
way, where already several skyscrapers 
have been completed. 

August Millang has purchased the 
stock of the Miller store and green- 
houses, 57 Stuyvesant avenue, Brook- 
lyn, where he will conduct a retail busi- 
ness. 

J. K. Allen disposed of a lot of fine 
azaleas in bloom last week. 

The stork made its second call at A. 
T. Bunyard's home last week and left 
>)!iranother partner for his fast growing 
business. 

Some notable wedding and dinner 
decorations have been featured in the 
metropolitan journals lately, done by 
Bowe, McConnell, Dajrds and others of 
the leading retailers. 

J. B. McArdle will be married March 
12. Miss May Concannon is to be the 
life partner of the popular drummer. 



H. H. Berger & Co. report an en- 
couraging growth in their business this 
spring. 

Bowling. 

The Eutherford boys lost the return 
match, but led New York by sixty pins 
in the total. A splendid lunch was fur- 
nished the visitors and the best of good 
fellowship prevailed. 

The scores were: 

Rutherford. 1st 2d 3d New York. Ist 2d 3d 

Teller 135 180 160 Cbadwlck ..163 174 184 

Rlchter ...137 128 114 Rlckards.W.llO 97 115 

Hasselhahn 167 163 156 Shaw 157 110 141 

Roehrs, J.. 79 106 146 Rlckards.A. 90 106 168 

Roehrs, E..105 183 168 Manda 145 149 170 

Totals 623 760 744 Totals 665 636 766 

Ladies' night at Astoria, March 2, 
drew an attendance of twenty. Every 
lady received a prize. A splendid din- 
ner followed the early bowling, and the 
fun lasted until after midnight. The 
ladies won in order named: 

Mrs. Einsman, gold candlesticks. 

Mrs. Lorenz, handbag. 

Mrs. Jacobson, Mexican tablecloth. 

Mrs. Doerhofer, handsatchel. 

Mrs. Boice, volume of poems. 

Mrs. Donaldson, purse. 

Mrs. Arnold, bonbon dish. 

Mrs. Shaw, bottle kimmel. 

Mrs. Siebrecht, beaded moire bag. 

The high scores of the gentlemen 

were: 

Doerhofer 156 Boise 136 

Einsman 151 Siebrecht 134 

.150 Kessler 128 



Edmlston 

Lorenz 144 Arnold '.'..... 112 

Jacobson 142 

John Donaldson is seriously ill with 

an attack of rheumatism. 

J. Austin Shaw. 



Mt. Vernon, O. — J. W. Ahem is 
building a truss house, 18x75, with 
Garland materials. - . - i 



■■'■''' A 

1^ 



The Weekly Florists^ Review^ 



Mabch 9, 1911. 



We Always Protect You 

If the market changes in your favor, we give you the benefit of the change at once, either in a higher 
grade of flowers, or a reduction in price. That is worth something to yOU. 

When compating priced, do not overlook the fact that there is a difference in quality. We believe 
that our shipments represent the largest value to be had in Cut Flowors. 



Carnations, our $3.00 grade will please anyone. ^ 

Callas and Easter Lilies, $1.50 per dozen; $10.00 per 100. 
Valley, good stock, $3.00 per 100. 

In ROSES we offer you splendid values in Richmond, Killarneys, Maryland, 

Bride and Maid. 



The Leo ffiessen Co. 



Wholesale Florists 

1209 Arch St. st Philadelphia 

Open from 7 a. m. to 8 p. m. 



MentioD The Review when you write. 



PHII.ADELPHIA. 



The Bising Eastern Market. 

The first week of Lent has been dull 
in the cut flower market. Business has 
fallen away decidedly. Prices are low- 
er; the average prices much lower, job 
lots and leftovers playing havoc with 
the total of sales. Yet there is 
no special increase in the sup- 
ply. The weather is decidedly Marchy 
— cold, snow, clouds, just enough sun- 
shine to encourage growth after the 
long, dark winter. 

Beauties are the only staple flowers 
that hold their price of a week ago. 
This is due more to the extremely light 
cut than to any special demand. The 
better grades of Richmond, Bride and 
Killarney are firmer than the shorts, 
except in white, where values hold fair- 
ly. Carnations are in an unhappy state, 
needing Mothers', Fathers', Daughters' 
and Sens' days to cheer them up into 
fresh life. Prices move downward. 
They take pushing of the hardest kind. 
The lower grades of white are more 
sought than the lower grades of colored. 
Valley is in only fair demand. The 
market is overstocked at times, with oc- 
casional periods of improvement. Sweet 
peas are falling off a little in quality. 
The prices have in consequence attract- 
ed the cheap buyers, who are using 
them in quantity. Violets are the weak- 
est feature of the market; because the 
violets have increased in numbers with 
the arrival of Lent, low prices rule. 
Atlantic City is the bright spot in the 
violet cloud. Many flower lovers spend 
Sunday at the city by the sea and the 
violet sales there are excellent. Gar- 
denias are rather scarce, with values 
fairly well maintained. Cattleya 
Schroederae is not up to the market 
standard of orchid merit when there 
is a chance of securing Trianse. Callas 
are abundant. The withdrawal of the 
support of the large decorations has 
left them without a sufficient outlet. 
Easter lilies are in better shape. All 
bulbous stock is down. This time the 
southern daffs cannot be blamed. The 
cold weather has retarded the army to 
follow last month's scouts. Southern 
arbutus has come, i 



SPRING FLOWERS 

WHITE LILAC 

DAFFS, double and single 
FREESIA 

VALLEY 

TULIPS 

SWEET PEAS and VIOLETS 

We can give you excellent value in all these varieties. 

FANCY BRIDES, RICHMOND, MARYLAND 

CARNATIONS in all colors 

EASTER LILIES 

BERGER BROS. 

•••Wholesale Florists... 
1305 nibert Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 



MentloD The Review when you write. 



House Warming at Eivervlew. 

About 200 guests of Henry A. Dreer, 
Inc., left Market street wharf at 2 
o'clock Wednesday afternoon, March 
8, to visit the new 2-acre greenhouse 
plant at Kiverview. Nearly one-fourth 
of this number were from New York, 
Baltimore and Washington, while over 
one-half were members of the Philadel- 
phia Florists' Club, the remaining 
fourth being made up of persons inter- 
ested. There were no formalities — ^just 
a hearty welcome from each and all of 
the hosts, an inspection of the magnifi- 
cent new plant, with the well appointed 
power house, and a generous collation 
in the well named service house. The 
party left the iBiverview station of the 
Pennsylvania railroad at 5:15, reaching 
the city a half hour later. The affair 
was a great success. 



WILLIAM B. LAKE 

Distributor of "Superior" 

Ribbons, Specialties 

2S3S N. S«k St. niUMrku, Ta. 

Mention The Review wnen you write. 

Easter Fashions. 

B. Eschner, of M. Eice & Co., says 
that Idng^-handled plant baskets will be 
great favorites this Easter. These bas- 
kets, Mr. Eschner says, are made either 
for specimen plants or for combina- 
tions of plants. When asked whether 
natural bark finish was in vogue, Mr. 
Eschner said, "Oh, no! At Easter col- 
ors are wanted — white, green, yellow 
and, most stylish of all, the blue with 



Mabch 9, 1911/ 



The Weekly Florists* Review. 






27 




GARDENIAS 



With their purity and fragrance, and 
rich glossy gre6n foliage, nothing choicer 
or more beautiful. 

Specials, per doz., $4.00; 
$3.00; Firsts, per doz., $2.00. 
100 or more at $25.00 per 100. 

CATTLEYAS 

$6.00 per doz.; $40.00 
per 100. 

BOXWOOD SPRAYS 

50-lb. cases, $7.50. 




Fancies, per doz.. 
Best quality in lots of 



*#» 



Some Splendid 
New Roses 



MELODY, the best yellow rose 
today. 

DOUBLE KILLARNEY, the 

Ki Harney that will supersede the 
Killarney now grown. 

PRINCE DE BULGARIE, 

entirely different from any rose 
grown. 

Write for our Descriptive List and Prices of these and other Introductions. 




MELOD? 



SPECIALS FOR ST. PATRICK'S DAY 

SHAMROCK PLANTS, 2X-inch, per 100, $10.00. 

SHAMROCK PANS (empty), shamrock shaped; 2 inches deep, 6 inches diameter, each, 15c. 

SHAMROCK PANS, shamrock shaped; 3 inches deep, 10 inches diameter, each, 25c. 

The latter can be filled from 2/^-inch pots and used for table decorations. 
GENUINE IRISH GREEN RIBBON, the Cattleya brand; No. 2 width, 30c per piece; No. 
3, 35c; No. 5, 45c. 
. FOLIAGE GREEN CHIFFON, 6-inch width only, 4c per yard. 

GREEN CARNATION DYE, per package, 75c. Enough powder to color 200 to 300 flowers; 
package makes two quarts of liquid. 

S- Sa Pen nock =Meehan Co. 

THE WHOLESALE FLORISTS OF PHILADELPHIA 




^U^%A<* 



PHILADELPHIA 
1608-1620 Ludlow Street 



NEW YORK 
109 West 28th Street 



WASHINGTON 
1212 New York Avenue 



M»*ntion I'tif KpvIpw whpn vnu wnte 



antique finish." Some of the baskets 
he pointed out were extremely graceful 
in outline, with the proportions in per- 
fect harmony. 

Various Notes. 

The statement made last week that 
the Chestnut Hill Floral Exchange had 
closed is an error. It was made by the 
former manager, who has left. 

Robert Crawford, Jr., took his em- 
ployees to the theater to see ' 'The Man 
from Home" March 1, closing a pleas- 
ant evening with a banquet at the 
Rathskeller. The affair was a great 
success. Everyone invited accepted, ex- 
cept one chap newly married, and every- 
one had a good time. 

H. Bayersdorfer celebrated his fif- 
tieth birthday March 1, or, properly 



speaking, it was celebrated for him. 
Mr. Bayersdorfer was called on in hia 
office, was presented with gifts and car- 
ried off in state by his many friends, 
while in the evening Mrs. Bayersdorfer 
gave a party in his honor. It was all 
surprising and nice. 

Victor Groshens will plant his new 
500-foot house with American Beauties. 

Robert Craig returned from the Isle 
of Pines March 1, decidedly better for 
the trip. 

Alexander B. Scott returned from 
Hot Springs, Va., March 7. 

L. B. Eastburn, of Kennett, Pa., lost 
his barn and contents by fire March 4. 
Fortunately house and greenhouses 
were uninjured. 

Eugene Bernheimer has plenty of 
nice Golden Gates from the Floral Ex- 



change, Edgely, Pa., a rose not often 
seen now. 

William C. Herbert, Atco, N. J., re- 
ports an unusually fine lot of dahlia 
cuttings this month. 

Leo Niessen believes the crop of cut 
Easter lilies will be large and of fine 
quality. The vanguard is arriving. 

The president's cup, offered by 
William Kleinheinz, and the Michell 
trophy were displayed this week in the 
window of the Henry F. Michell Co. 
Both are for competition at the Na- 
tional Flower Show in Boston, March 25. 

Edward Habermehl has the deep sym- 
pathy of his host of business friends in 
the death of Mrs. Habermehl, which oc- 
curred this week. 

There was an excellent audien6e at 
the meeting of the Florists ' Club March 



i 



'vy-' .^w' f .vr^«"^ ^'^ yp^^^ .f-'i^ ■ ^^ ' ^^T^'Wff 



^yfyf:',- "^^^-W vf ^*vi • 



28 



The Weekly Florists' Review. 



Mabch 9, 1911. 




EASTER 
NOVELTIES 

€L We are receiving some of the most beautiful novelties ever offered for Easter. They will give you 
just the variety you need, enabling you to put the touch of originality to your work that means so 
much to the successful florist. Send us your order for Caster Baskets and tell us what you 
would like to have — you will be delighted with what we have to offer you. 

€t Before closing, we want to call your attention to our Lace Handkerchiefs — they are very effect- 
ive as a dress shield for violets or other corsage flowers and are most dainty, presenting that natural 
appearance so much desired in floral work. Remember that our factory is at your command for 
any special orders. 

€LWe can still fill orders for Green Dye for St. Patrick's i)ay. 

SEND FOR OUR ILLUSTRATED CATALOGUE 



H. BAYERSDORFER & CO., 



1129 Arch Street, 

PHILADELPHIA, PA. 



Mention The Keview wnen you write. 



7 to listen to E. O. King and see his 
stereopticon views on greenhouse con- 
struction, which made a feature of Eiv- 
erview, present and future. 

Charles Henry Fox has moved the 
Sign of the Rose seven doors south on 
Broad street. 

Adolph Farenwald, of Eoslyn, has or- 
dered two houses of the King Construc- 
tion Co., each house 42x300 feet. 

Phil. 

CLEVELAND. 



The Market. 

Roses continue on the short side so 
far as Cleveland is concerned, although 
there is an abundance of all the spring 
flowers. Business has continued excel- 
lent, so that all stock is cleaning up in 
good shape, though much heavier pro- 
duction in all departments is momenta- 
rily expected because of the better 
growing weather. 

Organize to Advertise. 

Friday evening, March 3, the florists 
of Cleveland held another meeting 
around the supper table at the Hof- 
brau, the attendance numbering twenty- 
nine. As a result of the meeting the 
Flower Club was organized, with the 
following ofiiccrs: 

President— H. P. Knoble. 

Vice-president — C. M. Wagner. 

Second vice-president — F. W. GrifSn. 

Secretary — Harry D. Jones. 

Treasurer — F. E. Williams. 

The action was the result of a meet- 
ing held February 24, at which there 
was discussion of the subject of general 
publicity for the flower interests of 



Cleveland. It was the general opinion 
that Cleveland does not consume half 
the flowers that should be used in a 
city of this size, the reason being that 
the flower business is not exploited as 
it should be. Mr. Knoble was the 
prime mover and suggested the plan of 
inviting each florist to contribute, pro 
rata to his volume of business, to a 
publicity fund to be spent in running 
advertisements in the leading daily 
and Sunday paper, the advertisements 
to have no name signed and to be 
published in the interest of the 
whole trade in the city. At both 
the first and second meetings there was 
general discussion of the details of the 
proposition. After the election of offi- 
cers committees of five members each 
were appointed on publicity, finance 
and entertainment. It was arranged to 
meet once a month for the present and 
it is hoped to accomplish much in a 
broad sense for the flower business of 
Cleveland. Everyone will be asked to 
aid in the work, grower, wholesaler and 
retailer. 

Various Notes. 

C. D. Fell, of Knoble Bros., has been 
on the sick list for a couple of weeks, 
but is now able to be about again. 

The Cleveland Florists' Club antici- 
pates taking a big delegation to Boston 
for the National Flower Show. Ar- 
rangements have been made for a spe 
eial car and Frank A. Friedley, secre- 
tary of the club and state vice-presi- 
dent of the S. A. F., is working with 
the intention of filling all the berths. 



The Mum Manual, by Elmer D. Smith, 
for 40 cents sent to The Eeview. 



Florists' Refrigerators 

Write ns for catalogue and prices, statintr size 
you require and for what kind of out flowers 
you wish to use the refrigerator: also state 
whether you want it for display or only for 
•torase. 

McCray Refrigerator Co. Aitf^Mf^. 

Mention The Review when you write. 
BOSTON. 



The Market. 



Clear skies, heavy supplies, moderate 
demand and a considerable slump in 
prices have been features of the open- 
ing week in Lent. Of late years there 
has been less of a cessation in social 
festivities, but the clear skies follow- 
ing a comparatively dark month caused 
a congestion, not at all uncommon at 
this season. Roses are much more plen- 
tiful and, while they clean out toler- 
ably well, it is only at a sacrifice in 
values. The quality remains of the 
best. Carnations, while abundant, clean 
up tolerably well, but values have been 
slaughtered. The warmer weather has 
taken considerable color out of flowers 
of pink shades which were not picked 
fairly close. Violets are overabundant 
and they need to be gilt-edged stock to 
bring 50 cent« per hundred. Many are 
sold at half this price and some even 
lower. Another fortnight of clear 
weather will see a large part of the 
singles in houses picked, but doubles 
usually carry us along until May. Sweet 
peas are arriving in tremendous quan- 
tities. While some make 50 cents to 75 
cents per hundred, there are others sell- 



Mabch 9, 1911. ' 



The Weekly Florists' Review. 



29 




Headquarters for 
Cold Storage Lilies 



Orders Booked 

INOW 

and Delivered as Desired. 



LILIDN GIGANTEUH 

(OUR OWN DISTINCTIVE QUALITY) 

In tiie following sizes: 

6 to 8; 7 to 8; 7 to 9; 9 to 10 



Write for Prices 



HENRY F. NICHELL CO., wft'Lt. Philadelphia 



Advertisement of 



THE PINE TREE 
SILK MILLS CO. 



Mention The Review when you write. 

Our pattern 1458 is a lustrous, brilliant satin face, taffeta back ribbon, in sixteen 
different widths, from No. 1 to No. 150, in all florists' colors. (Samples cost nothing. ) 

- - $1.50 
- 1.80 

PHILADELPHIA. PA. 



No. 100 — 4 >^ inches wide, 
No. 150 — 5% inches wide, 



806-808-810 ARCH STREET, 

Memion The Review when you write. 



ing as low as $1.50 per thousand. Some 
of the best stock now has stems fifteen 
inches long. 

Bulbous stock, which sold well dur- 
ing February's cloudy weather, is now 
something of a glut. Double Von Sions 
are in heavy supply and it is surprising 
that 80 many of these coarse looking 
flowers are grown, when the singles 
are so much more beautiful and usually 
less expensive. Victbria, Sir Watkin, 
Emperor, Golden Spur and poeticus or- 
natus are the narcissi seen in greatest 
abundance. Hyacinths are abundant 
and good, but do not sell well. An- 
tirrhinums are fine but away down in 
value. Lilies and callas are each heavily 
oversupplied and lily of the valley is 
hard to move. Marguerites are more 
plentiful, but sell well. There are still 
a fair number of Cattleya Trianae and 
an abundance of dendrobiums and 
coelogynes. Gardenias are arriving more 
freely. Adiantum is coming of better 
quality and sales of aspai'agus and smi- 
lax continue quite good. 

Various Notes. 

Everything is progressing swimming- 
ly for the S. A. F. National Show. The 
clearer skies ;which have been vouch- 
safed to us of late were just what many 
growers were praying for, and those who 



had some doubts about their rambler 
roses and other plants being in season 
are now feeling happy. In every city 
and town in Massachusetts which one 
visits the chief topic now is the Na- 
tional Show, and the tremendous de- 
mand for space shows that even the big 
Mechanics' building will be taxed to 
accommodate all the exhibits. 

The many friends of H. S. Chandler, 
of Tewksbury, were pleased to see him 
back in the market again last week. 
Mr. Chandler broke a bone in one of 
his ankles a month ago. 

John McFarland, of North Easton, 
showed a beautiful seedling cattleya, 
C. Dowiana x C. Lawrenceana, at Hor- 
ticultural hall March 4. The sepals, 
petals and exterior of the lip were of a 
rich rosy color. The yellow coloring in- 
side the lip clearly showed the influ- 
ence of C. Dowiana. This plant was a 
seedling raised by W. W. Lunt, and Mr. 
McFarland has been nursing it along 
for over six years. 

Extra fine antirrhinums are now 
arriving at the flower markets from, 
among others, B. P. Winch, Framing- 
ham; J. G. Holmes, Saugus, and W. J. 
Dana, Wellesley. 

At present callas are unusually abun- 
dant in the markets and of extra fine 
quality. A few who grow these in quan- 



tity are William Patterson, of WoUas- 
ton; J. T. Butterworth, of South Fram- 
ingham; William Capstick, of Auburn- 
dale; Paine Bros., of Eandolph, and 
Willow Hill Greenhouses, of West Kox- 
bury. 

Trade in shamrocks is now becoming 
quite active in the markets. Leonard 
Cousins, of Concord Junction, has many 
thousands, as also has William Nichol- 
son, of Framingham. The latter has an 
extra fine lot of marguerites at present 
and his Godfrey callas are popular. 

John Barr's new variegated carna- 
tion, Mrs. B. P. Cheney, continues to 
keep up the excellent reputation it has 
made. For so large a flower, it is an 
unusually prolific bloomer and it is fea- 
tured in several of the most up-to-date 
retail stores. 

At the greenhouses of E. B. Dane^in 
Chestnut Hill, where Donald McKenzie 
has charge, is to be found what is prob- 
ably the finest private collection of 
orchids in America. A house of phalse- 
nopsis is a grand sight at present. There 
are also scores of rare and choice 
cypripediuras and other varieties in 
flower. 

At the big Waltham establishment of 
Peirce Bros, many thousands of gigan- 
teum lilies are in just the right condi- 
tion for Easter. The firm is cutting 



vp'-r 



vrr.T'Ty^. ,'i;T;7T''T-'"'3,v7rf(:t'.'-r^»«y-75»tr '^il^i*^: ••^;' 



80 



The Weekly Florists' Review. 



Mabch 9, 1911. 



Dress Up 




your Easter plants and flowers. Put on the added touches that give 

the bright cheerfulness and joy of the Eastertide— a streamer here, 

a bow there, and always a Raedlein imported basket or pot cover to hide the ugly clay pot and 

give that air of distinction that everyone wants. 

Your plants may be far superior to any others in town, but unless they are set off with the 
proper accessories the sales are apt to be unsatisfactory. It's really surprising what a big 
difference an artistic basket makes. Try it this year — we have baskets in all sizes, brought 
direct from our own factories in Germany, and can supply 




Good Easter Assortments from $5.00 up 



Send us your check for the amount you wish to spend — we 
will promptly ship a representative line of Easter plant bas- 
kets to you. If you don't like them, send them back and we 
will promptly refund your money. These baskets are all 
newly imported stock, no left-overs. We do our best to please 
you, because we want your future as well as present orders. 

NO TIME TO LOSE, SO WRITE TODAY TO 

THE RAEDLEIN BASKET CO., .awA^LvE. Chicago 



Mention The Review when vou write. 



some thousands of flowers weekly, of 
the earlier batches. They have also an 
excellent lot of azaleas, with fine 
faouses of Asparagus Sprengeri and 
adiantum. Pink Delight is a favorite 
among carnations. Gardenias and cat- 
tleyas are each looking well. 

J. H. Hale's lecture at Horticultural 
hall will come March 25 and no doubt 
many 8. A. F. visitors will be glad to 
hear it. Mr. Hale, by the way, has just 
been appointed one of the railroad 
commissioners for Connecticut. 

Henry S. Dawson, of the Eastern 
' Nurseries, Hollister, states that advance 
orders for nursery stock are this sea- 
son heavier than ever and he is im- 
patiently waiting for the passing of 
snow and frost to start digging. At the 
Bay State Nurseries of W. H. Wyman 
I found great activity prevailing and 
many shipments were being prepared 
for southern parts. Orders here point to 
a record-breaking spring trade. 

Carnation Dorothy Gordon is now 
arriving of fine quality at the markets. 
Those from S. J. Goddard, handled by 
Thomas Pegler, are extra fine. 

The Halifax Garden Co. has just fin- 
ished cutting a 300-foot house of sweet 
K»as, which have been cropping since 
te September. They have two other 
iar^e houses just coming into crop and 
their pick averages 6,000 daily, which 
are handled by H. T. Capers. 

John McFarland, of North Easton, 
has some thousands of giganteum lilies 
in just the right condition for Easter 
flpwering. He is cutting 2,000 valley a 
dfty at present, also nice lots of gar- 
denias and calendulas. 

Huge hampers containing purple and 
white lilacs of large size and others 




Stick Your Labels 

Shipping Tags, Etc.y 

on your packages with. . . • 

Cold Water Paste. It is a powder, which, on the addition of cold water, becomes ft 
THICK, STICKY PASTE. 

1 lb. Instanter + 9 lbs. cold 'water does the work. 

From 1 to 26 lbs., 8c per lb. ; 25-Ib. drum, 5^ p«r lb. ; 50-lb. drum, 5^c per lb. ; 100-Ib. bag, 
5c per lb.; 800-lb. bbl.. 4*80 per lb. Larger quantities, price on application. 

F. O. B. Ettston. Pa. Samples free— try it. 
Ask for Catalogue of " Shippers' and Business Specialties." . 

BINNEY & SMITH CO., 83 rulton St, NEW YORK, N. Y. 



Mention Tbe Review when you write. 



with specimen forsythias were telling 
features in P. L. Carbone's windows 
last week. 

Fritz Berkhahn, of Wellesley Hills, 
returned on the steamship Amerika 
February 27, after an enjoyable Euro- 
pean trip 

Much credit is due to George M. 
Anderson, of Milton, for the exceeding- 
ly tasteful decorations he carried out on 
the occasion of the late successful ban- 
quet of the Gardeners' and Florists' 
Club. Mr. Anderson has donated his 
services for several years and they are 
thoroughly appreciated. 

According to the weather bureau the 
February just gone was the warmest in 
over forty years, with a mean tempera- 
ture of 34 to 40 degrees. 

W. N. Craig. 

Des Moines, la. — H. Lozier will erect 
a three-story building of enameled 
brick on his East Sixth street property. 



ST. LOUIS. 



The Market. 



The first few days of Lent did not 
seem to aflfect trade much, as most of 
the leading retailers report business 
good all of last week. There were a 
number of downtown openings and con- 
siderable funeral work was put up by 
the downtown florists. They have also 
had a big run of transient business of 
late and are disposing of thousands of 
bunches of violets and carnations. 

TheoMreather has been fine all tile 
week and stock of all kinds and in all 
grades has become so plentiful that the 
wholesalers have been unable to dis- 
pose of it all. Prices, too, have come 
down considerably during the week. A 
lot of roses of extra good' qiMtHty are 
coming in, especially Killarney, White 
Killarney, Richmond, Maryland and 
Ivory. 



Mabch 9, 1911. 



■ -' -\-^ ■ . . '■;■,■ ■■ ■ 



The Weekly Florists' Review. 



31 



.i-i*^ 



FLOHl 



ST^ 



^j w Mj%< 



^^—^ t^, FLORISTS' 
4L Send vout otdetsjot^ ^^^^^^ 
S13PPUBS and ^^^^^..tets- 

\ BOXBS to ^ _^^_^ 

c- c. pouwowir CO 



Mention The Review when you write. 



NOTICE! 



We wish to announce the opening of our 
Auction Department March 14-fh* If 
you have surplus Sfock* eend same 
to us and we will convert it into cash for 
you. €t To insure bringing top prices, let 
us know what you have to consign, so 
that we may advertise same and advise 
you as to the manner of packing and 
shipping goods for auction. 



The NacNiff Horticultural Co. 

R. MacNiff, Pres. and Auctioneer. Louis Schmutz, Jr., Sec'y. 

62 Vesey St. (Nev creeiwick St.) New York,N. Y. 

Mention The Review when you write, 




Carnations are in good demand and 
are selling at about $15 per thousand, 
and $2 in hundred lots. Common sorts 
and splits are down to $1 per hundred. 
A heavy crop is expected in these this 
week. In California violeitsy ./too,' the 
supply is greater than the demand ; good 
Californias sell at about 25 cents per 
hundred. Callas and Harrisii lilies are 
plentiful, with the demand good. Cat- 
tleyas have sold well at $5 per dozen. 
Bulb stock is becoming more and more 
abundant each day. Dutch hyacinths, 
tulips, jonquils, Von Sions, valley, 
freesias, Romans and Paper Whites can 



be had in any quantities from any of 
the wholesalers. The market now is in 
better shape than at any time since the 
first of the year. Fancy ferns, smilax 
and asparagus also are in big supply. 

Various Notes. 

Martin Reukauf, traveling salesman 
for H. Bayersdorfer & Co., Philadelphia, 
spent part of last week in this city. 

J. Nielsen, lately with the C. C. Poll- 
worth Co., Milwaukee, visited the trade 
here last week. 

William C. Young, head of the C. 
Young & Sons Co. greenhouse plant. 



says they will have a grand lot of lilies 
for Easter, as well as other kinds of 
blooming plants. 

A. Werner & Bro., rose growers at 
Clayton, are again in crop with rcses 
and are sending to this market an ex- 
cellent quality of Killarney, White KU- 
larney and Richmond. The W. C. Smith 
Wholesale Floral Co. handles all their 
stock. 

Jule Koenig, of the city forester's 
office, is out for the appointment as city 
forester when the mayor hands in his 
slate of new appointments next month. 
We hope Mr. Koenig 's name will be 
among the lot. 

C. C. Sanders, head of the Sanders 
Nurseries, reports that he will soon 
start building a 2-story store at his 
Clara avenue place. The lower floor 
will be used for his retail store, with a 
large show house in the rear. The store 
will be under the management of bis 
son, Oliver K. Sanders. 

Miss Matilda Meinhardt, who is well 
known in the trade and a year ago was 
president of the Ladies' S. A. F., will 
be missed this year at the August meet- 
ing, as she is to travel through Europe 
this summer. 

The opening of the big Hill Grocery- 
Co., March 4, made a good call for de- 
signs sent by friends of the firm. One 
of the most attractive designs was a 
full sized eagle of flowers, sent by the 
Eagle Trading Stamp Co. 

The H. J. Weber & Sons Nursery Co. 
says there is an abundance of orders 
ahead to keep all the force busy until 
late in the spring. This firm is now cut- 
ting some fine roses and carnatioiitf: 
These have been off crop for some time. 

C. A. Kuehn received large consigB- 
ments of fancy carnations last week. 



■ •'^■- •^,<^-'^:v7^'^*' ' ^■v''i■"v^f*5v■ 



V ■ "^"^/'-rt^'nr^ 



32 



The Weekly Florists' Review* 



Mabch 9, 1911. 



GREEN CARNATIONS 



DON'T 

Be Fooled Aealn 

Buy from 

The Originator 

not the 

Imitator 



FOR ST. PATRICK'S DAY. I send you, prtstpaid to any address, enough pulverized coloring to make one quart of the 
strongest liquid dye for $1.00; enough for one gallon, $3.60. I guarantee my goods to be the colorins: and does tlie 
work satisfactorily. 



ORDER NOW 

Directions ^tb each box 

1113 VINE 



FRED GEAR 



FREE SAMPLES 

(Originator of Green Flowers) 
STREET, CINCINNATI, OHIO 



Mention The Review when you write. 



GREEN CARNATION FLUID 

Buy the genuine stuff from Mrs. Beu, THS ORIGINATOR, who made the first fluid and exhibited the first green carnations at 
the Chicago Chrysanthemum show, 8 TEARS AGO. $1.00 per quart. Ctesta i^th order. Can also be bad In po\7der 
form, enoueb for one quart, $1.00. I've just gotten up a compound that colors carnations a Beautiful Tello\(r. It is the 

latest thing out and is causing a commotion aroond the Chicago Flower Marlcet. Try a sample quart. Price, same as the green. 

MRS. F. BEU, 27.29-31 Randolph Street, CHICAGO 



Mention The Review when yoa write. 



St. Patrick's 

Carnation Fluid 

Directions for Use. 

To get the best results put the stems of flowers 
in about 2 inches of fluid, leaving them there 
about 30 minutes. After talcing them out of fluid 
put them right in water for about two hours, 
which has a tendency of forcing the fluid up to the 
bloom and making that pretty shade of green. 
Pint 50c Quart $1.00 

A. L. Randall Co. 

The Nail Order Snpply House 

19-Sl Randolph St. CHICAGO 

Mention The Review when you write. 

He is the local agent for the Burton- 
Allison Co. 's carnation green dye, for 
vehich there is a good call. Consign- 
ments of roses are coming in more 
heavily here each day. 

The regular buyers at the wholesale 
market made up a purse last week, with 
Fred Aloes, of George H. Angermuel- 
ler's, as treasurer, and Charles Schoenle 
and Al. Gums as committee in charge, 
and presented to Mr. and Mrs. George 
Schriefer a handsome cut glass water 
set as a bridal present from his many 
friends in the trade. 

Charles J. Bleeckert is supplying the 
local store men with extra fine bloom- 
ing plants. Mr. Bleeckert says his 
Easter stock is coming along finely. 

George H. Angermueller received 
large consignments of fine bulb stock 
and carnations. He says his green car- 
nation dye is meeting with a good call. 

Charles W. Fullgraf, William Bouche, 
John Houlihan and William Mackle, 
landscape gardeners, say that the fine 
weather of late has put them to a test. 
Their entire forces are at work and 
mote men are needed. 

The Kirkwood growers last week sent 
in great lots of carnations, sweet peas 
and violets. Everyone seems to be in 
crop now, with an abundance of stock 
of good quality. All four of our whole- 
salers received some of the consign- 
ments. 

William C. Smith, head of the W, C. 
Smith Wholesale Floral Co., Ifeads to 
the altar on Thursday, March 9, Miss 
Helen West, a handsome young lady of 




The Florists' 
Manual 

A Business Book for Business Men 
Second Edition 

TborouKbly Revised and BrouKbt 
up to Date 

No dry-aa-daBt botanical olassifica- 
tions, bat tells yon jnst how to prodace 
marketable plants and cut flowers in 
the best and cheapest way. 

Treats of oyer 200 snbjects and is 
freely illuBtrated with fine half-tone 
engravings. 



Price* $6.00« prepaid bj ezpreaa or mail* 



FLORISTS' PUBLISHING CO.) 



SM Oevrbom St., lylllCADU 



Mention The Review when you write. 



Green Carnations 

Send 25c and receive hy mail a package of dye 
that will color 75 to 100 carnations green. Have 
many letters stating it is best on market 3 pack- 
ages, 60c ; $2.00 per doz. 2c stamps accepted. 

LOUIS ELSASS,Chillicothe, Ohio 

Mention The Review when vou wrif.a. 

Edwardsville, 111. The happy couple 
will spend ten days visiting up north, 
after which they will be at home to 
friends in a fine apartment at the corner 
of Eussell and Compton avenues. 

J. J. B. 

DAYTON, O. 



The Market. 

Stock is coming in more plentifully 
each day, and t'le demand, of course, 
is somewhat on ^he decline. Funeral 
work slacked up considerably last 



GEO. H. ANGERMUELLER 

Wbolesale Florist 
13ie4 Pine St., St. Louis, Mo. 

St. Patrick's Carnation Fluid 

(For coloringr Carnations Green.) Qt.. $1.00; Pt., 50c. 
Mention The Review when vou write 

week. As Lent has now commenced, 
most florists know full well how to 
appreciate business when it comes their 
way. Nevertheless, no one seems to be 
complaining, for trade has kept up sur- 
prisingly well, even if it has been rather 
spasmodic, and if the lenten season 
continues as well as it has begun the 
florist will be in a good position to con- 
gratulate himself. 

Of course, at such times some things 
will spoil, especially when the weather 
keeps so bright and crops come in so 
abundantly. Easter lilies seem to be the 



'^rifv'T"fT':'T'?y- '^■^ 



"^r ^ .; '^*.V''^' 'V. ' ','• " * 7 



Mabch 9, 1911. 



The Weekly Florists^ Review^ 



33 




THE ONLY ONE 



TONE 



GSB 



CLASS 




Patrick Green 

(The Only True Irish Color) 

DARK GREEN (The Color Beautiful) 

You have never seen a Carnation Green unless you have used our brand'. Our coloring is not a 
foke and should not be classed with the sickly looking, toneless and muddy article — called green — that is try- 
ing to be forced upon the market. Our greens are scientifically prepared, sold under a guarantee and used 
by the leading florists and dealers throughout the United States and Canada. Sent postpaid on receipt of price, 
$1.00 the quart. Order your supply noW for St. Patrick's Day. 

We make a Yellow, Blue, American Beauty, Orange, Lavender, Pink, Purple and 
Light Red* All colors $1.00 the quart, except Blue, which is $1.25, postpaid. 

Samples FREE for the Asking 

Burton^Allison Company 

84 Adams St, CDICAfiO, ILL, U.S.A. 





Mention The Review •when you write. 



Emerald Green Carnation Fluid 

For St. Patrick's Day Green Carnations Use 

3JAX FLOWER DYE 

The only Dye on the market that will color a beautiful Emerald Green and still allow the flower to retain its natural 
appearance. Money refunded if not satisfactory. Complete instructions free. Per quart, by express, $1.00. 

And a complete line of Florists' Supplies. Headquarters for "Perfect Shape" Brand Wire Designs 



-Catalog^ue Free- 



WINTERSON'S SEED STORE, 



45-47-49 Wabasii Avenue, 
CHICAGO 



Mention The Review when you write. 



CYACEINE ELOWER COLORING 



is drawn up through the stems, showing in the flowers in 20 
minutes. It colors and preserves them without harming 
either the flower or its fragrance. Send your order and remit- 

^Tet^^XteSX^^^S^Si C. R. CRANSTON, 73 fifield Avenue, PROVIDfNCE, R. I. 



20c per quart 



The following colors sent to you post- 
paid, St. Patrick green, pink, orange, 
blue, yellow, American Beauty. 



Mention The Revipw vhen you write. 



greatest problem; everybody appears to 
be overstocked with them, so that it is 
necessary to make occaBional sacrifices 
along this line. The carnation crop 
continues to get heavier, but up to the 
present time none of the supply has 
been wasted, though at times it is neces- 
sary to cut on the price and send out 
some job lots. The same can be said 
of roses. Bulbous stock is not in heavy 



supply, much to the gratification of the 
growers. 

Club Banquet. 

A great success in every respect was 
the third annual banquet of the Day- 
ton Florists' Club, which was held on 
the evening of March 1 at the Hotel 
Phillips. Nearly all the members were 
present, accompanied by their wives 



and sweethearts. The tables were beau- 
tifully decorated in seasonable style, 
which displayed the artistic tastes of 
the Dayton florists. The menu proved 
to be a most interesting part of the en- 
tertainment, and all present did justice 
to it. A splendid program was fur- 
nished by the orchestra. 

Horace M. Frank acted as toast- 
master, while H. H. Rittei;, Arthur 



84 






The Weekly Florists' Review^ 



March 9, 1911. 



r 



Illinois Self-Watering 

Window and Porch Boxes, 
Hanging Baskets, Pots, etc> 

Pat. January 89, 1907; June 22, 1909. 

Mr. Florist, you can easily double your salies of plants by offering them in these self- 
watering devices, for the very simple reason that the plants wiU live and thrive in them, in the 
homes of youT customers, in spite of careless watering, and the better success your customers 
have, the better your reputation will be for selling good healthy plants. 

We are selling these boxes all over the United States to florists and consumers. We much prefer to sell them 
through the florist only, and give him the benefit of our publicity advertising and a handsome profit besides. 

If you doubt tlieir efficiency, send us a trial order and return the goods to us if they prove different from our claims. 

We are now making a complete line of Brass and Copper Fern Dishes, Boxes, etc., all equipped with the 
self-watering device. Write at once for our catalogue and get in line for Easter. 

American Metal Box Co. 

31 Dearborn Street, Chicago, 111. 

Conard & Jones Co., West Grove, Pa., Agents for N. Y., N. J. and Pa. 





Mentlou The Heview wnen you wnte 





ETTER 

OXES 



would be hard to find than the ones shown here. 
They were made for Chicago's first florists, E. 
Wienhoeber, Samuelson, and others. If you han- 
dle the best trade in your city, you will be inter- 
ested in our boxes, made to your special order — 
any size, shape or design, lined or unlined. Let 
us know your wants — we'll let you know the price. 
They may cost a little more, but they are fully 
worth it. Write today, before the Easter rush. 

H. SCHUITZ & C0.,5"Ke">SL!?.^J^- Chicago 



Mentioo The Review woeo tou wnu- 



Schmidt, J. W. McNary and Mrs. J. F. 
Young responded. A little surprise was 
sprung by the ladies, who all gave short 
and appropriate toasts to the gentlemen. 
Mr. and Mrs. H. M. Frank favored the 
guests with several vocal selections, 
which were immensely enjoyed, and at 
the close the entire company sang 
"Should Auld Acquaintance Be For- 
got!" 

A rising vote of thanks was tendered 
the banquet committee for the pleasing 
way in which everything ha!d been 
arranged. The committee consisted of 
Horaee M. Frank, George Bartholomew 
and E. E. Schaefer. 

Various Notes. 

Unfortunately, Warren G. Matthews 
was prevented from attending the an- 
nual banquet on account of sickness in 
his family. He was on the program for 
a paper on ' ' The Sterilizing of Soil' aiid 
the Hybridizing and Chemicalizing 
of' the Chrysanthemum for Future 
Profit." We are glad to report that 
Mrs. Warren G. Matthews is able to 
be up again. • -.'^ 



A. Miller, representing the Skidelsky 
& Irwin Co., Philadelphia, took a little 
side trip to Dayton, March 5, where he 
celebrated his birthday at the home of 
Mr. and Mrs. Geo. Bartholomew. Mr. 
Miller is on his way home to Texas to 
visit his relatives, whom he has not seen 
for ten years. He expects to remain 
there about two weeks. 

The Miami Floral Co. has a splendid 
crop of lilies coming on for Easter and 
the roses and carnations are also in a 
flourishing condition. The firm reports 
business to be most gratifying. 

The Dayton Floral Co. has just re- 
ceived a large shipment of box trees, all 
sizes, from Holland. They emphatically 
state that the lenten season "cuts no 
figure ' ' with their business, as they are 
kept busy filling orders. 

Word comes from Arno Hendrichs, 
who is now in Jacksonville, Fla., that 
he is having the finest kind of a time, 
thoroughly enjoyisg the southern 
climate. 

Among the visitors during the last 
few days were Fred Lempke, of the 
W. W.' Barnard Co., Chicago; Mr. Sperl- 



ing, represen^Hr^he Stumpp & Walter 
Co., New York city, and Henry Ehr- 
hardt, of Sidney, O. 

Mr. and Mrs. Jacob Weber and 
daughter, Gladys, of Cincinnati, O., were 
the guests of the Bartholomew family 
last week. 

The Heiss Co. reports that, while 
trade last week was not quite as brisk 
as in the preceding week, yet results 
were quite satisfactory. 

There does not seem to be much en- 
thusiasm among the Dayton florists re- 
garding the National Flower Show at 
Boston. All seem to be so busy prepar- 
ing for Easter that they will be unable 
to get away. 

Mr. a^d Mrs. H. H. Ritter spent sev- 
eral /^je^jsVlg,,, Indianapolis, Ind., last 
week. R. A. B. 



Detroit, Miclj.— The Florists' Club 
listened to an exceptionally interesting 
travelogue March 6, Philip > Breitmeyer 
describing his trip to Cuba^ d^^ribing 
especially the florieultural features of 
that country. A. Colyn, of Voorhout, 
Holland, described the bulb district. 



" • 7 'T--^" 



MikRCH 9, 1011. 



i \ 



The Weekly Florists^ Review^ 



35 



iISefton Corrugated Shipping Case5# 







Strong, Light and Convenient 



yu HY use heavy wood«n Boxes for Shipments of 
** Flowers and Plants when yog oan get a box 
batter adapted to your needs, weighing about one- 
half as much? 

Our Boxes are made to fold flat; thus insuring eoonomy 
in storage space and enables the oommission merohant 
to knooic them down and return them in bundles, reduc- 
ing return charges— they oan be used over and over. 

Our Patented K. D.Tin Corner Is the only satisfactory K.D. cor- 
ner ever adapted to a Corrugated Shipping Case. It gives you 
a perfeotly fiat box. Costs no more than set up comers. 

WRITE FOR OUR NO. 10 CATALOG. ; 



m^^-J^--^ 



THE 5EFT0N MANUFACTURING CO. JSJ^^* 
1301 WEST 35"*ST.,CHICAGO. "'**"^ 



Mention The Review when you wrltp. 



Standard 
Mail Tubes 

ilThe SAFE, ECONOMICAL, 

SUCCESSFUL device for 

sending by MAIL or EX- 

PRESS all kinds of Plants 

They arrive after long journeys in prime 
condition, and the customer is pleased 
and will come again. 

Samples on Request 

Standard M^, Co. 

COATESVILLE, PA. 

Pblladelpbia omce, 2nd and Vine Sts. 

Mention The Review when you write. 



Cut Flower Boxes 

WATERPROOF, Corner Lock Style 

The best and neatest Ont Flower box 
on the market today. 

No. 3x4x20 $1.90perl00 

No. 1 8x4j<xl6 1.76 per 100 

No. 2 8x6x18 2.25 per 100 

No. 3 4x8x18 2.60perl00 

No. 4 8x6x24 2.60 perlOO 

No. 5 4x8x22 S.OOperlOO 

No. 6 4x8x28..... 4.00 per 100 

No. 7 6x16x20 4.50perl00 

No. 9 5x10x35 6.00 per 100 

No. 10 7x20x'» 6.26 per 100 

No. 11 8Jix5x30 8.25 per 100 

This list will cancel all former lists. 

Tbe above is a complete list of all sizes of 
boxes we manaf actare. We cannot furnish 
other sizes. 

Add 60c for printing; on an order for 100 
boxes, and 75c for 200 boxes. No charge for 
printing on an order of 300 boxes or over of 
assorted sizes. Sample cardboard free on 
application. Terms, cash with order. Order 
by Domber only. 

LIVINGSTON SEED CO. 

COLUMBUS. OHIO 



Mention The Review when you write. 

Wired Toothpicks 

Manufactured by 
W. J. COWEE, BERLIN, N. Y. 

10,000.. ..$1.75; 60,000.... $7.50; Sample free. 
For Sale by Dealers. 

Mention The Review when you write. 




H. & D. 

FLORISTS' 

BOX 

Universally used for 
shipping cut flowers and 
designs. The dead-air 
cells form a perfect non- 
conductor of heat and 
cold, thus preserving con- 
tents much longer than 
ordinary wood box. 

H. & D. Florists' Box 
can be used several times. 
Is much lighter than the 
ordinary box, thus sax-ing 
in express charges. 

Write for Catalosrue 

"HOW TO PACK IT" 



THE HINDE&DAUCH PAPER CO., Sandusky, 0. 



Mention The Review when vou write 




Cut Flower 
and Desi^ Boxes 

All sizes, lowest prices 
Write 

C. C. POLLWORTH CO. 

MTLWAUKXX 



Mention The Review when vou write 



Flowerlnsurance 

No more broken or bruised 

flowers when you use the 
new Security Staple, which 
holds them into place. Try 
a box— and you will want 
more. Express prepaid, 
$1.75 per box of 500. 

FRANK J. TETTER 
Greenfield, Mass. 

Mention Tbe Review when you write. 

...YOU... 

win Find ALL tlie BEST OFFERS 
ALL tlie Time In tlie REVIEW'S 
CLASSIFIED ADVS. 




CIT FLOWER BOXES 



EDWARDS FOLDING BOX CO 

MANUFACTURERS 

PHILADELPHIA. PA. 



YOU 



Will find all the best offers 
all the time in the Re- 
view's Classified Advs. . 



36 



The Weekly Florists' Review. mabch o, 1911. 



m<^ 






Cut Flower Folding Boxes 

Satisfaction Guaranteed 



In. Per 100 

18x5x3 $1.75 

21x5x3»« 1.85 

24x5xSia 2.35 

28x5x3^ 2.90 

30x5x3i« 3.00 

21x8x5 2.85 



In. Per 100 

24x8x5 $3.50 

28x8x5 3.76 

80x8x5 4.50 

36x8x5 5.50 

30xl2l6 6.25 

36x14x6 7.50 



Double Violet Boxes 



In. Per 100 

9x4x4 $1.75 

9iflx6x5 2.25 

No charge for printing in lots of 500. 



In. Per 100 

10x7x6 $2.50 

12x8x7 3.00 



We can save you money on everything 

you buy in 

FLORISTS' SUPPLIES 

Green and Violet Tin Toil, best quality per lb., $0.17 

Plain Tin Foil per lb., .09 

Dagger and Taney Terns, A No. 1 quality per 1000, 1.50 

Brilliant Bronze and Green Galax $1.00 per 1000; per 10,000, 7.S0 

Boxwood, excellent pality per lb., .16 

Southern Wild Smilax per case, 6.00 

Imported Bronze Magnolia Leaves, per basket, $2.00; Green, per basket, 2.25 



Imported 
Cycas Leaves 

Tinest Quality 

We never 
disappoint. 
In. Per 100 

4x 8 $2.00 

8x12 2.50 

12x16 3.00 

16x20... 3.50 

20x24 4.00 

24x28 5.00 

28x32 6.00 

32x36 7.00 

36x40 8.00 



We constantly carry a large assortment of FLORISTS' SUPPLIES and can fill orders at a moment's notice. 

HENRY M. ROBINSON & CO. 

Wholesale Commission Florists 

Manufacturers and Importers of Florists' Supplies, Hardy Cut Evergreens 

15 Province St. BOSTON, MASS. 9 and 15 Chapman PI. 

Telephones: Main 2617-2618-555. Fort Hill 25290-25292. 



Mention The Review when you write. 



MERIDEN, CONN. 

E. W. Barrow has had exceptionally 
fine window displays of late. Last week 
he made some handsome showings of 
cinerarias and pans of bulb stock, such 
as daffodils, tulips and hyacinths. Mr. 
Barrow reports a good season and is 
looking forward to a record-breaking 
Easter. 

Out at Joseph Greenbacker 's place 
everything is spick and span, as usual. 
Carnations are one of the heaviest crops 
grown here and Mr. Greenbacker cer- 
tainly knows how to grow them. Bulb 
stock also is grown quite extensively. 

E. S. B. 



JOLIET, ILL. 



Herman Labo, the 4-year-old son of 
Joseph Labo, disappeared March 6 and 
had not been found March 8. It is sup- 
posed he was abducted. Mr. Labo is 
well known in the trade in the northern 
part of Illinois. He and Mrs. Labo 
were in the Chicago market on the day 
of the supposed abduction, leaving the 
child in the care of a housekeeper at 
the Labo establishment east of town. 

Later. — ^Bloodhounds traced the trail 
to a covered well, in which the boy 's body 
was found. 

SoDtheni Wfld Smilax 

NOW READY FOR SHIPMENT 

Write, Mrtre or pbone tlie introducers 

CALDWELL THE WOODSMAN CO. 

EVERGREEN. ALA. 

NEW STONE TOMATO SEED, $1.00 per ib. 
GREEN SHEET or LOG MOSS, **'t?ES[."'"-' 

LAUREL STEMS, I^a^ge bas. $1.00. 
LAUREL BRANCHES, 2*2x4 feet, case, $2.50. 
Correspondence solicited. 

W. Z. rURNELL, SiwwHiU,nd. 

Mention The Kevlew when you write. 



THE KERVAN CO. 

119 W. 28th Street, NEW YORK 

WHOLESALE 

All Decorating Evergreens — Southern Wild Smilax, Fresh Cut Palmetto and 
Cabbage Palm Leaves, fresh cut Cycas, Hemlock, Laurel, Spruce and Box- 
wood branches ; Ropings made on order, all kinds and sizes. 

Fancy and Dagger Ferns, Green and Bronze Galax and Leucothoe Sprays* 
Sphagnum, Dry Green Sheet, Lump and Spanish Mosses. Painted Pal- 
metto, Dyed Sheet Moss, Cocoa Fiber, Birch and Cork Barks, etc. , etc. 

Greens. Holly, Mistletoe, Pine Plumes. All Decorating Material in Season* 



J. H. VON CANON &, COMPANY 

EVERGREENS FRESH FROM THE WOODS 

Gslsx, bronze. 50c per 1000 ; $4.00 per case of 10,000. 
Galax, green, 50c per 1000; $3.75 per case of 10,000. 
Ferns, fancy and datrger, 80c per 1000 ; 13.50 per case of 5000. 
Green Lencothoe Sprays, regular lengths, 12.00 per 1000. 
Green Leocotlioe Sprays, 10 to 16-inch, $1.00 per 1000. 
Lanrel Leares, 35c per 1000, Sheet Moss, 5c per pound. 




^g^Sfp^u^*'* Banners Elk, N. C. 

Telegraph us at Elk Park, N. C. 
Mentiop The Review when you write 






X 




PERNS 



New Crop, Fresh from the Patch 
Fancy and Dagger Ferns, $1.00 per 1000 



Neir Crop Bronze and Green Galax , 60c per 1000. Green Len- 
oothoe Sprays, $2.60 per 1000. Green Leacothoe, short, $1.26 per 1000. 
Bronze Leucothoe, averag:e lengths, $3.60 per 1000. I^anrel Tips. 6 to 
8 inches, for ropingr, wreaths, etc., $3.00 per 100 lbs. Discount on large orders. 
I am headquarters for Ferns. Seventeen years' experience. Send me your 
orders; fail not. 




J. N. PRITCHARD, 



Mention The Review when you write. 



ELK PARK, N. C. 



Southern Wild Smilax 

stock that Will Please Tour Customers. 

Wire, write or phone your orders to 

Chas. S. Lee & Company 

Evergreen. Alabama. 



SOUTHERN WILD SMILAX 

Now Eeady for Shipment 

PERPETUATED AND NATURAL 

SHEET MOSSES 

SATISrACTZOM GUARANTEKD 

L A. BEAYEN, EVERGRFEN, AU. 



March 9, 1911. 



-'rrf^'^'f 



"J'.^f.^^l- '. ■-■ 



The Weekly Florists^ Review. 



37 




N«w Fancy Kastem Terna 
Per 100 25c Per 1000 |2.25 

Green and Bronze Leuoothoe Sprays 
Per 100 60c Per 1000 4.50 

Boz^eood 

Per lb 20c. Per case of 50 Ibi.. 7.60 

Per 100 lbs., $14.00. 



Bronze Galax Leaves 

Per 1000 11.00 Per 10,000 $7.60 

Green Galax Lieaves 

Per 1000 tl.00 Per 10,000 7.G0 

Mexican Ivy 
Per 100 $0.75 Per 1000 6.00 



Green Sheet Moss 

Per bundle 11.00 10 bundles $ J.OO 

25 bundles 21.25 

Spbagmiun Moss 

Per bale $1.00 10 bales 9.00 

25 bundles 21.25 



SFKCIAL, PRICKS ON LARGE QUANTITIES. 

Imported Bronze and Green (Vlagnolia Leaves, $2.25 per basket 

Everything in Florists' Supplies 

Full Line of Cut Flowers and Other Greens at All Times. 



C. E. CRITCHELL, 



Wholesale Commission Florist, 
84-36 East Third Street, 



Cincinnati, Ohio 



Mention The Review •when you write. 



FANCY FERN "«r^ FANCY FERN 

Par 1000, $2.00. Special Price on Lari^e Lota. aJLa 

Green and Bronze Galax v- . . .$1.25 per 1000; $7.50 per 10,000 jtBm^: 

Leucothoe Sprays, green and bronze $1.00 per 100 ; $7.50 per 1000 

Sphagnum Moss per bale, $1.25 ; 6 bales, $7.00 ; extra fine 

Boxwood per lb., 20c; 50 lbs., $8.50 

Magnolia Leaves, brown and green, imported stock, full baskets. Per basket, $2.50 
each; 6 baskets, $2.00 each. 

Full Line Cut Flowers at All Times. 

Mlchigin Cut Flower Exchange, 38-40 Bnadwir, Detroit, Mich. , , 








GALAX LEAVES. 



A. L. FORTUNES 

93 Broadway, BROOKLYN, N. Y. 

HeadquarttTS for Dagger and 
Fancy Ferns, also Bronze and 
Green Oalax. Fifteen years' expe- 
rience. Full count, and tfuai an tee 
A No. 1 stock or no sale. 

Write for Prices. 
Mention The Review when you write 

L. B. Brague ft Son 

Wholesale florists' Supplies 



Established 1867. 

HINSDALE, MASS. 

Mention The Rpvtpw when vou writp 



J. JANSKY, 



TRY MY PRICES 

19 Province Street, 
BOSTON. MASS. 

Telephone, 4620 Main. 

Manufacturer of FLORISTS' WIRE DESIGNS 

And All Kinds of riorists' Supplies 

Oagrcer and fancy Ferns, $1.25 per 1000. 

Green and Bronze Galax, 11.00 per 1000. 

Box'wood, 16c per lb.; by the case, $7.50 50 lbs. 

Mention The Review when you write. 

Southern Wild Smilax f"", «!" Jv^grhns 

— In limited quantities. 

Louisville Plonil Co., Louisville, Ala. 

Mention The Review when you write. 



Decorative Material 



60-lb. cases of Smilax, only $6.00. 



Tel. Office. New Salem, Mau. 
L. D. Phone OonnectloD. 




MILLINGTON, MASS. 



Fancy and Dagger Ferns, $1.50 per 1000. 

Galax, bronze or green, 75c per 1000. 

Sphagnum Moss, 12-bbl. bales, $4.00 per 
bale. 

Use our Laurel Festooning for Decora- 
tions, 4c, 6c and 6c per yard. Made 
fresh daily from the wooda. 

Laurel Branches, large bunch for only 36c. 

10,000 lbs. Boxwood, $15.00 per 100 
lbs. 



CROWL TERN CO.,Millington,Mass. 



Mention The Review when you write. 



50-Ib. case extra fine SWLAX, $2.00 per case 

QUALITY GUARANTEED. 

When in need of extra good Smilax in any quantity, 
write or wire 

Henry M. Robinson & Co.,Nmter,Aia. 

You can rest assured that all orders placed with us will be filled to your 
entire satisfaction. Unknown customers, satisfactory references or C. O. D. 

Mention The Review when you write. 



r» "' '■v».»l*.W y ■' '"^ ■• 1? V^ T" " I "^ fTSTTT ^'- 



38 



The Weekly Florists^ Review. 



Mabch 9, 1011. 



BEDDINO PLANTS. 

What time should I sow the follow- 
ing seeds to have nice plants by May 
20 in plant boxes: Petunias, alyssums, 
mignonettes, nicotianas, lobelias, sal- 
vias, salpiglossis and nasturtiums? 

F. H. E. 



Petunias and lobelias should be sown 
now. Salpiglossis, salvias, nicotianas 
and nasturtiums need not be sown be- 
fore March 20 or the end of the month. 
The three last named all make rapid 
growth. Mignonettes and alyssums 
would also be in time if sown 
towards the end of the present 
month. It would be well not to 
try transplanting the mignonettes into 
flats, but keep them in pots, as they are 
not easy annuals to transplant. In fact, 
all the plants you name would give 
more satisfactory results if grown in 
pots singly than when pricked out in 
shallow boxes. C. W. 



TULIPS FOB FOBOINa. 

"Which are the best forcing tulips com- 
ing to the cut flower market now in 
red, white and yellow? E. M. 

The best forcing single tulips at pres- 
ent in season are: La Heine, white; 
Keizerskroon, red and yellow; Yellow 
Prince, yellow; Belle Alliance, scarlet; 
Thomas Moore, terra cotta buflf. In 
doubles, Murillo, delicate rose; Couronne 
d'Or, yellow, flushed orange; Imperator 
rubrorum, scarlet; Salvator rosa, rose- 
^pink, are the best sellers. C. W. 

WANT ADVERTISEMENTS. 



^fAdvertlsementa under this head 10 cents p«r 
Une. caHh with order from all who do not do 
other advertising. In sending remittance count 
•eyen words to the line. 

Display advertisements in this department $1.00 
for one inch space. 

When answers are to be sent in our care, aid 10 
cents for forwardlns;. 

Plantadvertisements not admitted under this head. 



SITUATION WANTED— By all-round florist and 
gardener, commercial or private place; sin- 
gle, mldd'.e-nged. life experience, strictly sober 
and honest; steady worker; please state wages 
and particulars In first letter. Address H. A. B., 
l&SO N. Mozart St., Chicago, 111. 

SITUATION WANTED— As working foreman; 
good rose grower; experienced in general cut 
flowers; able to take charge of place or range of 
houses; German, 35 years of age, married; can 
give references; please state wages in first letter. 
Address No. 284, care Florists' Review, Chicago. 

SITUATION WANTED— As head gardener; 
thoroughly competent to take charge of 
gentleman's estate; life experience inside and 
outside; can furnish good references for past 16 
years; English, married; when suited. Address 
No. 282, care Florists' Review, Chicago. 



SITUATION WANTED— By a young man, 25, 
married, 10 years' experience in greenhouse, 
designing, etc.. as an assistant in a steady 
place In Illinois or Ind.; strictly sober; good 
worker- first-class references; state particulars 
in first letter. Address No. 227, care Florists' 
Review, Chicago. 



SITUATION WANTED— Young man, 22, ex- 
perienced rose and carnation grower, also 
mums and general line, desires position as section 
hand under foreman, or as first-class helper; near 
New York, Philadelphia or Washington preferred; 
excellent references and a worker; moderate 
salary for a start. Address No. 225, care 
Florists' Review, Chicago. 



SITUATION WANTED— By Hollander, 26 
years, single; life experience in growing 
roses, carnations, mums and general pot plants; 
capable of taking charge; for the past 3 years 
employed as first assistant on up-to-date private 
place near N. Y. C; good references; disengaged 
beginning April; vicinity of Chicago preferred, 
either on private or commercial place; please 
state particulars in first letter. Address No. 286, 
care Florists' Review, Chicago. 



SITUATION WANTED— By experienced travel- 
O ing seed salesman with first-class house. 
Address No. 182, care Florists' Review, Chicago. 

SITUATION WANTED— By a young florist, six 
years' experience; a trial will prove my 
ability. John Chrlstensen, 212 Locust St., 1st 
tluor, Chicago, 111. 

SITUATION WANTED— German, lifetime ex- 
O perience, wants position, with dwelling pre- 
ferred. In southern Illinois or vicinity. Charles 
Roeper, 40th St., Cairo, 111. 

SITl'.\TION WANTED— By young man with 
three years' experience in general greenhouse 
work : can furnish reference. Address No. 286, 
care Florists' Review, Chicago. 

SITUATION WANTED— By a grower, Swedish, 
O 24 years old, 7 years' experience in this 
country; near or in Chicago preferred. Address 
No. 228, care Florists' Review, Chicago. 

SITUATION WANTED— By April; 12 years' ex- 
perience, including roses, carnations, orchids, 
plants, etc.; west preferred; age 27, single; well 
recommended. Address Florist, 1327 Buffalo 
St., Frauklln, Pa. 

SITUATION WANTED— As florist or gardener, 
12 years' experience in all branches In 
England and America; can take charge or as 
first assistant; good references; age 27; single. 
Burton, 317'/^ South Fourth St., Richmond, Ind. 

SITUATION WANTED— By grower of pot and 
bedding plants, carnations mums, etc.; 
single, reliable and sober; 12 years' experience;, 
references; please state particulars and wages. 
Address No. 230, care Florists' Review, Chicago. 

SITUATION WANTED— To take charge, by 
practical grower of 20 years' experience in 
roses, carnations -and general greenhouse plants; 
middle west; disengaged after April 1; state 
wages. Address No. 220, care Florists' Review, 
Chicago. 

SITUATION WANTED— By a good grower and 
propagator; open for engagement April 1; 
single. American, age 29, 12 years' experience, 
especially in carnations; state full particulars In 
first letter. Address No. 208, care Florists' Re- 
view, Chicago. 

SITUATION WANTED— By a life-experienced 
grower of roses, carnations, violets, mums, 
bedding and pot plants; middle-aged, single, 
sober, industrious; state wages. Address A. G., 
Florist. Progress Hotel, 12 Chatham Square, 
New York City. 

SITUATION WANTED— Middle-aged German, 
sober, industrious, energetic, all-around 
florist, wishes a steady, responsible position on 
medium private or florist place; give particulars. 
Address William, care F. O. Kedner, 803 Federal 
St., N. S., Pittsburg, Pa. 

SITUATION WANTED— Practical, single florist 
wishes position in south to take charge of 
5,000 to 7,000 ft. of glass, where carnations, 
mums and potted stock are grown; reference, 
Graser & Humphreys, Mt. Sterling, Ky. Address 
"A", P. O. Box, Owensboro, Ky. 

SITUATION WANTED— By young man, Scan- 
dinavian, 30, single, with 14 years' ex- 
perience in landscape and general greenhouse 
work in Scandinavia, Germany, England and 4 
years in this country; can furnish the best of 
references; private place preferred. Address 
Florist, Empress Hotel, 1110 N. Clark St., 
Chicago. 

HELP WANTED — April Ist, working foreman; 
must be sober and able to grow No. 1 carna- 
tions, chrysanthemums, violets, roses and bedding 
plants for retail place, 20,000 ft. of glass; state 
wages and all particulars in first letter. Ellis 
Bros. & Co., Keene, N. H. 

HELP WANTED — At once, a flrst-class grower 
of roses, carnations and pot stuff, also a 
good designer, who can act as working foreman 
of 35,000 feet of glass; salary $15.00 per week 
for first year; house furnished and laundry free. 
Address at once, with reference. T. L. Metcalfe, 
HopklnsvlUe, Ky. 

HELP WANTED— By March 15th, experienced 
man to take charge of small retail place, 
growing general line of fitock; must be strong 
on mums; married man preferred; send references 
and wages expected In first letter; to take fall 
charge, also do designing. Wheeler Floral Co., 
Jamestown, North Dakota. 

HELP WANTED — A German florist and gar- 
dener, one who has some knowledge of land- 
scape work and Is a hastier, of good habits and 
a sticker, to grow for the retail trade; will have 
charge of 6,000 ft.; general line Is grown; give 
wages expected with references. Address No. 
181, care Florists' Review, Chicago. 

HELP WANTED— We wish to hire a man for a 
day fireman, who has some knowledge of 
steam fitting and steam heating, who Is able 
to put in piping under directions, and who is 
willing to be a general helper out of flring sea- 
son; want some one that U looking for a steady 
place of from 2 to 5 years or longer; most be a 
sober man. The Newburyg, Mitchell, S. D. 



HELP WANTED — Good general grower, carna- 
tions particularly; wholesale. Address, with 
references, Erie Floral Co., Erie, Pa. 

HELP WANTED — An experienced gardener to 
do general garden work; house rent free; 
references required. J. O. Leake, Nashville, 
Teun. 

HELP WANTED — An all-round florist, married 
man; state experience and salary In flrst 
letter; reference required. R. C. Hius, Leaven- 
worth, Kan. 

HELP WANTED — Helper In carnation bouse; 
should have 2 or 3 years' experience with 
carnations; must furnish references and state 
wages wanted. Miller Floral Co., Farmlngton, 
Utah. 

HELP WANTED— A good all-round florist to 
take charge of plant; one who understands 
design work; give references and state wages; 
a steady job for a good man. Address No. 287, 
care Florists' Review, Chicago. 

HELP WANTED— An experienced grower of 
roses, carnations, mums and other cut flow- 
ers; results expected; must be ambitious and 
steady. Apply with recommendations to Chaa. 
Frueh & Sons, Saginaw, Mich. 

HELP WANTED — Young man accustomed to 
fllUng and checking orders, with some ex- 
perience as shipping clerk; also an experienced 
nurseryman wanted. The Elizabeth Nursery Co.> 
Elizabeth, N. J. 

HELP WANTED — A foreman with best of 
reference; state wages wanted; must be 
able to grow roses, carnations, sweet peas and 
plants; have about 50,000 ft. glass, up-to-date. 
J. E. Melnhart, Webb City, Mo. 

HELP WANTED — Experienced landscape 
draftsman, understanding drafting and color 
work and must be able to handle men and 
clients; do not apply unless quallfled. Address 
Henry 0. Klehm, Landscape Architect, Mollne, 

HELP WANTED — A strictly sober and In- 
dustrious man for the potting bench; one 
who has had experience at potting and bedding 
out; wages $12.00 per week; references required. 
Address John Reck & Son, 985 Main St., Bridge- 
port, Conn. 

WANTED — There is a message for Charles 
Colnick from his nephew In Germany. 
Address A. Klokner, Wauwatosa, Wis. 

WANTED— P. A. King, Greenville, Texas, 
come or write me care G. R. L. ; going 
west soon; am making hard fight. Lily. 

WANTED— Florists' refrigerator, either with 
glass or plain doors; front width not to 
exceed 4 ft over all. Address C. Pfund Co., 
Oak Park, 111. 

WANTED — Address of F. G. Heldemann, who 
left MasslUon, O., Feb. 9, 1911, and Is 
supposed to be In Chicago or vicinity. Address 
Chief Cook, State Hospital, Massillon, Ohio. 

WANTED — Capable young man, who can fur- 
nish p.irt of the capital, to Join us in 
starting flower business in unoccupied territory, 
in a prosperous and growing town in most 
favored section of the South; investigation 
courted. Sloan Bros., Druggists, Greenville, S. Cv 

FOR SALE — 3 new modem greenhouses, 3,000 
feet glass, with first-class hot water heat- 
ing; well stocked; in city of 8,000; trade rapidly 
Increasing; owner not a florist and has other 
business in California he wishes to attend to. 
Address Geo. H. Downing, Kearney, Neb. 

FOR SALE — Greenhouse, located in Green- 
spring, Ohio, a town of 1000 Inhabitants; 
the town has a fine summer hotel and two rall- 
wa.vs communicating with Sandusky, Tiffin. 
Springfield, Dayton, Ft. Wayne and other good 
cities; over 4000 square feet of glass, built In 
1906. Inquire of Mrs. Ida Unser, Qreensprlng, 
Ohio, or of D. A. Heffner, Clyde, Ohio. 

FOR SALE — In Iowa, 7,000 ft. of glass, hot 
water heat, well stocked for present and 
spring trade; small store in best location down- 
town; plenty of pots and plumber's tools; 7-room 
residence; cement sidewalks; property 240x180 
ft.; 10 blocks from 3 R. R. depots and business 
center;' in city of 12,000; splendid opportunity 
for a younger man; price $6,000, % cash. Ad- 
dress No. 281, care Florists' Review, Chicago. 

FOR SALE — Carnation house, 24x70, concrete 
benches; general plant bouse, 23x68; both 
houses concrete walls; hot water boiler; iron 
posts support roof; city water; potting shed, 
10x35; 32 sash, 200 flats; well stocked for 
season's trade; several tons of rotted cow 
manure; 6-room dwelling; ground, 132x132, on 
Main and Grotto streets; town of 3,000; near- 
est florist 27 miles; no competition; trade 
steadily growing; need another house to supply 
demand; large vegetable plant trade; 111 health 
reason for not adding to plant and for selling; 
business will pay 25% net on Investment; $3,500 
for Immediate possession; $3,000 July 1; $2,000 
down, balance to suit purchaser; Information of 
i Interest given on request; this will pay in- 
' vestlgatlon. W. C. Scovell, Malta, Ohio. 






Mabch 0, 1911. 



The Weekly Florists' Review* 



39 



FOR SALK — Pipe; we have some fine 2 and 3 
Inch pipe at low prices; write us for prices. 
Banr Gas Company, Eaton, Indiana. 

FOR SALE — At once, store and greenhouse, 
good established business, at a bargain. 
Address No. 288, care Florists' Review, Chicago. 

FOR SALE— Greenhouse property, 12,000 ft. 
glass, in good repair; large dwelling bouse 
and barn and 6 acres land; near Boston. Address 
No. 824, care Florists' Review, Chicago. 

EOR SALE — 84x125 ft. corner, small greenhonse 
with stocic and a first-class cottage. Call or 
write T. Grabowslii, 4523 W. Addison St., west 
of Mllwaultee Ave., Chicago. 

FOR SALE — Greenhouse property of 2,500 sq. 
feet of glass, ground 100x587 feet; good 
business; reason for selling; will sell on easy 
terms. F. W. Weldmann, Fort Morgan, Colo. 

FOR SALE — Retail Qower store, old established, 
, favorable lease; excellent location on north- 
west side of Chicago; doing good business; good 
reason for Helling. Address Martin Peterson, 2550 
W. Division St., Chicago. 

FOR SALE— At l%c per foot, 1,200 lineal feet 
of white pine bars, new, for greenhouse 
building; 10 ft. long, 1% in. square; grooved, 
ready for use. Fryer Floral Co., 1731 Liberty 
Ave., Pittsburg, Pa. 

FOR SALE— In Chicago, established retail 
flower store, located in one of the best 
neighborhoods on the south side; no competition; 
best of reasons for selling. Address No. 177, 
care Florists' Review, Chicago. 

FOR SALE — Greenhouses, 18,000 feet of glass; 
a fine house and stable; one and a half 
acres of ground; everything in best condition; 
within four miles of New Yorl£ city. Address 
No. 141, care Florists' Review, Chicago. 

FOR SALE— 9,000 sq. ft. glass, steam heat, 
own spring water; stocked with carnations, 
Easter stuff, bedding plants; suburbs and town 
100.000 population; trolley at door; cause, sick- 
ness. Irvln H. Anderson, R. D. 1, Reading, Pa. 

FOR SALE— Carmody boiler, 10 sections. No. 2 
pattern, only been used 7 winters; will sell 
It for J75.0O or exchange for greenhouse glass, 
hot-bed sash or anything I can use to advantage. 
W. P. Ranson, Florist, Junction City, Kan. 

FOR SALE — Or will exchange for improved 
farm; greenhouses, 35,000 ft. glass, well 
stocked; 3% acres; in a city of 20,000; no com- 
petition; suitable for wholesale and retail; must 
be sold; reason, death of proprietor. Address 
Dr. C. H. Smith, Marietta, Ohio. 

FOR SALE — Going to retire, I offer for sale 
my greenhouses, 4,000 feet of glass, nearly 
new. 4 acres of land, 5-room house, bam, hen- 
house; close in; no competition; excellent trade; 
city of 6.000; city water; located in Kansas; 
possession June 1. Address No. 206, care Florists' 
Review. Chica go. 

FOR SALE — Greenhouse property, 3.500 sq. ft. 
of glass, steam heated, new boiler of 8Ufl9- 
clent capacity to heat 10,000 sq. ft., and trade 
that would justify building of same; ten-room 
house, good cellar, barn and other out buildings; 
eight acres of land within four blocks of public 
square and one block of C. B. & Q. depot; will 
sell at a sacrifice If sold at once. Address S. H. 
Beaver, Seward. Neb. 

FOR SALE — Seven new modem greenhODses In 
Iowa, 25.000 ft. glass; Improved cement 
benches; good residence, oflSce, etc.; all steam 
heat; the place Is so bandy, can be run with two 
helpers; stocked with roses and carnations; no 
trouble to dispose of all fiowers grown; $25,000 
takes the whole outfit; expenses are light — why 
not own a place of your own? Write for terms; 
owner wants to retire. Address No. 132, care 
Florists' Review. Chicago. 

WANTED 

A good rose Kroner with some experience 
on Beauties; w«ges lUl.OO per week. 
WILLIAM DITTMAN. New Caatl e, Ind. 

SI riATION WANTED 

By practical grower, 15 years' experience in 
rosfts, carnations, mums, and general line of 
stock; good propagator; able to take charge; 
sober and steady; single; best of references. 

Address No. 233, care Florists' Review, Ciiicago. 

Expert Designer, 
Maker-up and Decorator 

of wide experience, seeks position as manager 
of first-class establishment. Thoroughly trust- 
wortiiy and of fine executive ability; can furnisli 
best references. Expect good sa'ary. Washing- 
ton, Oregon. Montana or Dominion preferred. 

Address No. 219, 
Care Florists* Review, Chlcagro. 



FOR SALE — Will sell my place or sell stock 
and rent for a term of years. Mrs. May 
Bradley, 1001 S. A St., Elwood, Ind. 

WANTED 

Experienced man, married, for pot plants, 
ferns, forcing btilbs, Easter and Christmas 
stock, capable to take charge of this depart- 
ment. Address, with age and references, 
S. J. Reuter & Son, Inc., w esterly, R. L 

Saleslady Wanted 

AT ONCE 

Must be good saleswoman and designer, to 
take charge of an up-to-date store; permanent 
position to right party; state wages and expe- 
rience in first letter. Address No. 158, care 
Florists' Review. Chicago. 

Wanted 

Young man, not afraid of work, as assistant gar- 
dener on place of X. W. Harris. Lake Geneva, Wis.; 
pays t65,0U per month from start. Increased to $60.00 
at end of six months' satisfactory service; man 
pays |5.0() per week for board. Apply by letter or in 
person to .losepli J. Krupa, Foreman, Lake 
Geneva, Wis. 

Wanted at Once 

Assistant florist who is a good ali-round 
grower, one who has been accustomed to filling 
mail orders preferred; must be sober and in- 
dustrious; wages fl'i.OO a week. 

The Texas Seed & Floral Company 

DALLAS, TEXAS 

Wanted a Southern Grower 

A man who has bad a ions experience in f^rowinK 
a general line of S'ock for the retail trade. Can use 
only a married man. Must be strictly sober, relia- 
ble and Industrious, and be able to produce results. 
APPLY TO 

ROBT. C. KERR FLORAL CO. 

2415 Travis Street, Houston, Texas. 

Partner Wanted 

If you are an A-1 grower, with some capital 
(not very large, but just enough to give you a 
good working interest), I want yon to go into 
partnership with nie, and put up houses to supply 
my two old established retail stores. You must 
be willing to assume all the responsibility of the 
putting up of the houses and the growing of the 
stock. If you are the right kind of a man, you 
will find this a very good proposition. Location, 
North Dakota, Address, stating all particulars. 

No. 229, 

Care Florists* Review, Chicago. 



A BEAUTIFUL FAHM FOB SALE, in the finest 
•^ fruit-growing and trucking section In the world; 
fertile soil and fine climate; also a beautiful water 
front farm with timber. For full particulars address 
Samuel P. Woodcock, Salisbury, Wicomico Co.. Md. 

FULLY EQUIPPED GREENHOUSE FOR SALE. 

Kstablished retail and wholesale trade, nine-room 
dwelling with hot water heat and electric lights, lo- 
cated in city of 46 000, Complete, $3,400. Address 
Edsrar G. Banta 412 Fairbanks BIdg.. Springfield. O. 

Help Wanted 

Wanted Section Foreman, well up on 
all decorative stock. Married, no family, 
permanent position. 

Washingfton Florists Company, 
IStli and F. Sts., Wasblncton, D. C. 

Wanted to Rent Out 

A nice established florist business, store, 
greenhouses, 4000 sq. ft. , and dwelling, 
complete with stock ; reasonable. 
Address No. 207, care Florists' Review, 
Chicago. 

Here's a Chance 

For any good hustler to make a success. 26.000 ft. 
of glass, modern houses, heating plant, with five 
acres of good, rich land. Local market for all stock 
grown. Best town in the middle west. $6000 takes 
this place, $VOOO cash, balance to suit. 

Address No. 187> care Florists' Review, Chicago 

FOR SALE 

An up-to-date florists' plant; modern 
greenhouses; 70,000 feet of glass; 12 
acres of land ; large brick dwelling house, 
heated by steam; two barns. Every- 
thing in first-class working order. 

W. W. COLES, Kokomo, Ind. 

^ ■ 

For Sale or Trade 

Four strong; new greenhouses with the 
latest steam and hot water system, indudins; 
all plants and bulbous stock, also tool^ a fine 
two-story residence of seven rooms, and 
lar(;e stable; the place is Jennings Heights 
in North St. Louis; plenty of water; gas and 
electric lights; five minutes on railroad or 
fifteen minutes on street car, from city; a 
good big bargain for the right party; ground 
will become double in value in a short time. 
All in first-class condition. Owing to sick- 
ness owner wants to sell. Address 

A. BRIX, 1518 St. Louis Ave., ST. LOUIS, NO. 



TRAVELER WANTED. 

By flrst-class European seed house, to travel through the eastern states during the month of 
April; fixed salary and commission. A young, energetic man, well up in the seed line and 
acquainted with the principal seed houses, will, if he gives satisfaction, have the best chance 
lo be the permanent representative for a larger part of America. Give references, state age, 
etc. Address No, 226, care Florists' Review, Chicago. 

Personal interview in New York about the 23rd required. 



PRONOUNCING DICTIONARY 

A list of PLANT NAMES and the Botanical Terms most frequently met with 

in articles on trade topicst with the CORRECT PRONUNCIATION for each. 

"The Pronouncing Dictionary is just what I have wanted.'* 
"The Pronouncing Dictionary fills a long-felt want," 

"The Pronouncing Dictionary aione was much more value than the Bubscription price ot 
the Review." 

A Booklet jast the sise to fit a desk plg^eon-hole and "be 

always available. Sent postpaid on receipt of 860. 

, Florists' Publishing Co. 33?SSKnV Chicago . 

M OiHHBS OBHMS MHi^HB •■■■HB aBBBMB OBBBBB AmI 



•''^~~<- 7 "S'' ;r>v- ■ ■'•• ,7' 



^ 



The Weekly Florists' Review* 






Mabch 9, 1911. 



Six Pages of Retailers' Cards 

This department for the cards of Leading Retail Florists — those florists who have the facili- 
ties for filling the orders sent them by other florists — has made possible the recent rapid develop- 
ment of this branch of the business, a branch of the trade now established for all time and so help- 
ful that its volume will keep on increasing for many years. 

Are you sending and receiving your share of these orders? You can send your share (and 
make 20 per cent profit without effort) if you let your customers know you can perform this service 
for them. To receive your share — well, The Review's department for Retailers' cards remains the 
one way of getting prompt action on the order in hand. If you are the only florist in your city 
represented here, you get the orders coming into your territory from other florists. If you are not 
represented aqd "the other fellow" is — we can leave it to you what becomes of these desirable orders. 

To be represented costs only 70 cents per week on a yearly order. This is for one-inch 
space. Other spaces in proportion. 

Why not send your order today — now — before you forget it? 



We Quarantee Satisfactida 




FLORAL CO. 

413 Madison Ave., Cor. 48th St.. NEW YORK 
Established 1859. 

A. WIegand & Sons 

Florists and Decorators 

1610 to 1620 N. Illinois SL, Indianapolis, Ind. 

Indiana's oldest, largest and most complete 
retail establishment. 





PHONE P.B.X.58 139 WEST MAIN ST. 

OiCLA/fOMA City; Okjla., 

Cleveland, Ohio 

Schneider Floral Co. 

For Flowers and quick service to all Northern 
Ohio points. 

EUCLID AVENUE 

Qeorgfe 0. McClunle, Florist 

175 Main St.. HARTFORD, CONN . 

Orders BoUclted for delivery any place on earth. 
Floral Designs a Specialty. 

DRUMMSEEDandrLORALCO. 

507 Houston St. FORT WORTH, TEX. 
HeAdanarters tor Cot Flowers and Faneral Designs 

T.L.METCALFE, 4. stores 

HopkinsTille, Ky., Nadisonville, Ky., 
Jidson, Tenn., and Clarksville, Tenn. 

Orders executed anywhere in the two states. 

Lang Floral & Nursery Co., %!;i 

Write or wire headquarters for flowers for Texas, 
Oklahoma, Louisiana, New Mexico. No orders too 
large, none too small. 

Pah^-ia/i 111 WJ-MlM&Son 
rOnilaC,lU.412E.PiyMnSt. 



CHICAGO 
ORDERS 



SENT TO 




ARE 

CAREFULLY 
EXECUTED 



2132-2134 MICHIGAN AVENUE 



J. H. SNAU & SONS 



FLORISTS 

NEW YORK, WASHINGTON, D. C. 

1153 Broa-lway. Cor. 14th &. G Sts. 

AND WAJLDORF-ASTORIA. 

WESTERLY, E. I. 

Among those who have come rapidly 
to the front in the florists' business 
here is Conrad S. Schultz. Three years 
ago he purchased the old H. G. York 
greenhouses, on Beach street, and re- 
modeled the store and greenhouses. In 
addition to this store and range, he 
jmrehased one year ago the Smith green- 
liouses, on Quarry Hill, and was for- 
tunate enough to secure Charles Meyer, 
formerly of Eeuter & Son, to take 
charge of this range. 

Business with Mr. Schultz has grown 
rapidly, for. in addition to doi«g a 
large retail trade in Westerly and Ston- 
ington, he also does a considerable 
wholesale business. Thomas Young, of 
New York city, handles all of Mr. 
Schultz 's surplus stock. He expects to 
])ut up two more large greenhouses this 
season, and tliese, with the two ranges 
he now has, will make him one of the 
largest wholesalers and retailers in this 
vicinity. This has been a case where 
perseverance, together with a thorough 
knowledge of the business, has won for 
him gratifying success. B. 



PR0VIDENC3E. 



The Market. 



The opening week of the lenten sea- 
son had but little deteriorating effect 
on the flower market in this city, owing 
to the large number of big funerals 
that occurred. The last two days pre- 
ceding Ash Wednesday were marked 
by an unusual mimber of entertain- 
ments and other social functions and 
flowers were in good demand. The 



S. J. REUTER S SON, Inc. 

NEW LONDON, CONN. 

The only flower store in the city* Orders 

for any part of Connectictit or Rhode 

Island will receive prompt and careful 
attention. 



1874 




1911 



WnjiiAM A. PHUiLiPS. Manager 
272 Falton St. Tel. 319 Main Brooklrn. N. T. 

Careful attention, personal selection and prompt de- 
livery guaranteed to any part of New York, Long Island 
and New Jc'sey. Thirty six years' experience. Reli- 
ability assured. 

Lexington, Ky. 

JOHN A. KELLER, Florist 

High Ghrade Cut Flowers 
and Designing : : : : 

All orders entrusted to us for Cen'oral Kentacky 
will have careful attention. 

orders chaHcston, W. Va. 

are given prompt and careful attention by the 

CHARLESTON CUT FLOWER AND PLANT CO. 

H. H. Conn, Mgr. Phone Stewart 627 

J£SSEL80N FI.OW£R SHOP 
623 West 63d Street, : : : : CHICAGO 

We deliver In Enslewood and TVondlaivn 
AH orders attended to promptly Night aervice 

Orders for southern MINNESOTA and northern 
IOWA will t)e properly cared for by 

A. N. KINSMAN, AusUn, Minn. 
JOE TOSINI, FLORIST 

DeslKHS of All Kinds 
202 N. Phillips Ave., SIOUX FALLS, S. D. 



Leading Florist 
AHSTEBDAH, N. T. 
SCHBNECTA9T.N.T. 

Estab. '«77 




VTT^T'TTT"' •■■''■ *■ ■'^,?V'»':|J, ": '»•■•• •^^ ••'j'^V * , .' . ■ *, *■ "■ 



March 9, 1911. 



The Weekly Florists' Review. 



.""^ 



41 



LEADING RETAIL FLORISTS 

The retail florists whose cards appear on the six pages carrying this head, are prepared to fill orders from other florists for local delivery on the usual 

basis. If you wish to be represented under this heading, now is the time to place your order. 

LOUISVILLE, KENTUCKY 

Flower Shop, 550 South Fourth Avenuo, 
Greenhouses, 831 Cherokee Road. 



JACOB SCHULZ, 



Personal attention given to out-of-town orders for Louisville and surrounding territory. 



LOUISVILLE, KY. 

WILLIAM WALKER 

326 W. Jefferson 

All orders given careful attention. 



H. W. riELDJhe CoUege Horist 

NORTHAMPTON, MASS. 

Home o£ Smith College 

Send your orders to him for prompt 
and careful attention. 



Augusta, Ga. 

All kinds of cut flowers or work delivered 
at the resort hotels or elsewhere in 
Augusta. Mail or wire your orders to 

BALK'S NURSERY 

Greenliouse and Office, 226 Greene St. 

Colorado Springs, Colo. 

Orders Carefully Executed 

PIKES PEAK FLORAL CO. 

Wholesale and Retail 

Dallas, Texas 

The Texas Seed & 
Floral Company 

Orders for cut flowers and designs solicited for 
delivery in any part of Texas. 

Send orders for delivery in 

Youngstown, 0., 

ind all points between Pittsburg and Geveland 
to JOHN WALKER 

South and Southwest Texas and sailing: from Galveston. 

H. H. KUHLNANN, Horist 

2507 Jackson St., S. W. Phone. Hadley 1926-2330 

2526 Washington St.. 0pp. Olenwood 
Cemetery, S. W. Phone. Taylor 628-1081. 

Up town. 913 Main St.. S.W. Phone. Preston 7741. 

HOUSTON, TEXAS 

I KILLUW Des Noines, Iowa 

Will promptly execute all orders in this vicinity. 

Aurora, 10. Jos»M.Smely 



JF WII fAY fL CnNC ^^^ Broadway, CouncO Bluffs, Iowa. 
• I • II IliV V A ft IjUllp, Wbolesale and Retail 

Largest Greenhouse Establishment 
West of Chicago. 

Orders delivered anywhere, incIndinK Iowa. Nebraiika. North Dakota and South 

Dakota. Free deliveries to Omaha. 



KENOSHA, WIS. 

and all points between 

CHICAGO AND MILWAUKEE 

Mall, wire or phone your orders to 

FM ADrDTIM 50'' Chicago St., 
. n. UDLKlin, BENOSHA, WIS. 



Deliveries to Xorthwestern University and all 
North Shore Towns. 

614 Dempster St . , 
EVANSTON. ILL. 

L. D. Phone 2642 



nSCHER BROS. 



and vicinity 



Phones 147 



All orders receive prompt and personal attention. 

LOU HELEN DUNDORE, l^^s^y 

now. King St., LANCASTER, PA. 

CORNELL and WELLS COLLEGES and 

CENTRAL NEW YORK ORDERS 

DpbbH A Hon, Wholesale and Retail Florists, Anbnrn.N.Y. 

clearing weather last week sent all 
kinds of blooms forward so that the 
supply has been fully equal to the de- 
mand. There was a slight falling off 
in prices. Everywhere preparations for 
Easter are in evidence and the report 
from the growers seems to indicate that 
there will be a plentiful supply of every- 
thing. On Saturday, March 4, nearly 
all of the downtown florists held a cut 
price sale on violets in opposition to the 
drug and department stores. Several 
hundred thousand blooms were thus dis- 
posed of at 15 cents per bunch of twenty- 
five, as against 19 cents for similar 
bunches by the other stores. 

Various Notes. 

H. Howard Pepper, of the Melrose 
Eose Gardens, has been promoted to the 
position of trust oflScer at the Indus- 
trial Trust Co., of this city. 

Ed Brooks, of T. J. Johnston & Co., 
went to a strange barber a few days 
ago, with the result that his best friends 
hardly recognize him. 

James Hackins, of Centr£tl Falls, is 
entering upon his thirty-third year as 
superintendent of the Moshasuck ceme- 
tery in that city. He reports that his 
florist business this season has exceeded 
anything in his experience. 

James Tefft, of Peacedale, recently 
buried his wife and mother, who died 
within a few days of each other. 

Johnston Bros, had the decorations 
for the recent banquet of the Rhode 
Island Automobile Club. 

Edward B. Williams, with W. E. Bar- 



BOSTON, MASS. 



i^M^/. 



'* Penn, The Telegfraph Florist " 

wire us and we will reciprocate. We cover all 
points In New England. 

43 BROMFIELD STREET 



DENVER, COLO. 

FLORAL DESIGNS AND FLOWERS 

Best Quality on Shortest Notice. 

Daniels & Fisher. 

Order by mail, telephone, telegraph or 
cable. Cable address ''Daniels, DenTer." 



YOUNG & NUGENT 

NEW YORK : 42 W. 28tli St. 

In the theater district. Exceptional facllltlefl (or 
dellTerlng flowers on outsoln? steamers. Year or* 
ders win receive prompt and careful attention. 
Wire, telephone or write us. 



Spokane, Wash. 
HOYT BROS. CO. 



Leading Florists. 



Try Us. 



Louisville, Ky« 

f . WALKER ^ CO., 634 Fourth Ave. 
BAKER BROS. CO., Ft. Worth Jex. 

Send Orders tor the Soutli^^est 

Best Railroad Center in the State. 

MOBILE, ALABAMA 

The Minge Floral Co. 



p 



ROVIDENCE, R.L 

T. J. JOHNSTON & CO. 

171 Weybosset St., ProvMence 



and all 
New Eagland Points 



PEKIN 



PEORIA 



All orders reeelTe penonal atteotloa. 

Geo. A. KUHL, Pekin, III 






r/'"^. '«• f^"'*, '^-ij'.sff iV/'V' , '7,^1:':Ti™' 



42 



The Weekly Florists' Review. 



MAncn 0. 1011. 



LEADING RETAIL FLORISTS 

The retail florists whose cards appear on the six pages carryiag this head, are prepared to fill orders from other florists for local delivery on the usual 

basis. If you wish to be represented under this heading, now is the time to place your order. 

Alexander NcConnell 

(171 Fifth Avenue, Windsor Arcade NEW YORK CITY 

Teleirniph orders forwarded to any part of the United States, Canada, and all principal cities of Europe. Orders transferred or entrusted by 
the trade to our selection for delivery on steamshipB or elsewhere receive special attention. 
Telephone Calls: 340 and 341 38th Street 



Cable Address: AI.EXCONN£LI< 



Western Union Code 



A. W. Smitii Co. 

...FLORISTS... 

™™^SLDmG. Pittsburg, Pa. 

Largest Floral Establishment in America 

KatabllsheA 1874- -Incorporated 1909 
W« can fUI your floral orders day at nlffht for 

CLEVELAND and 
STATE OF OHIO 

Alwsya bave complete stock on hand. BeKnlar 
dlBCoimt allo\red the trade. 

KNOBLE BROS., cS^^iS?o"iko. 



DAYTON, OHIO 

Heiss Company 

U2 SOUTH MAIN STREET 



Tonsetli Floral Co. 

385 Morrison Street 

GROWERS AND RETAILERS 

Portland, Ore. 

ST. PAUL, MINN. 

The Largest Store in America. 

The finest and largest stock west of Chicago. 
Awake night and day looking for orders. 

HOLM & OLSON, Inc. 

20. 22. 24 West Sth Strent 

WILSON 

DKLIVEKS ANTWHXRK 

•raaUyp New Jersey NewYorli LoHgltlaml 

Trade orders well cared for from all parts of the 

country and delivered at Theater, Hotel 

Steamer or Residence. Address 

fidtofl SL and Greene Ave.. BROOiaYN, N.Y. 

Telephones, Prospect 2840 and 4066. 

»RS. LORD'S FLOWER ROOM 

112 W. 8th Ave. TOPEKA, KAN. 

1^1 '^f Wp W% Lone Distance Phone, 
I™ M L^IC 5297 Plaza 

B09-11 Madison Ave.. NEWYOttK 

Freeport Floral Co. 

Telegraphic orders CQCCDHDT II I 
•rompUy attended to. rilCCrUII I , ILL. 

P'VDPd FLOWERS OR 
EL I ICI^3 DESIGN WORK 

Oeivered is Abany mi vicinity sa teiearaphic order. 
)l Nortb Feari St.. - ALBANY. N. T. 




Wm. I. Rock Flower Co. 

Kansas City, Mo. 

1116 Walnut Street 

Bell Telephone 213 Grand 

Will carefully execute ordera for Kansaa City and 
any town in Miaaonri or Kanaaa. 



BdttiB Creek, Mich, tuin fu>m\ 

1 1 West Main St. All cut flowers in season. Fu- 
neral designs or potted plants. Careful attention and 
prompt delivery guaranteed to any part of Michigan. 

Hutchinson, Kansas 

inilM OT A M M ■*^l' orders receive pr >n pt 
UUnn Ollllflill and careful attention. 

CAPITAL CITY GREENHOUSE CO. 

MADISON, WIS. 
Order of us. Best ihipping service for Wisconsin 

MEMPfflS,TENN."'S?rrrsr 

Tenn., Miss., Alabama, Arkansas, Louisiana orders will 
be well taken care of. We have all flowers in season, 

rett & Co., is receiving the congratula- 
tions of friends on the advent of twins 
in his family circle. Mother and little 
ones are getting along nicely. 

William Jurgens, of Newport, was a 
caller among the trade last week. 

Mrs. "William Butcher left last week 
for a month's stay in Illinois. 

Michael Sweeney is at Atlantic City, 
N. J., for a few weeks' sojourn. 
* Eugene Appleton, of William Apple- 
ton & Sons, was a recent visitor in 
Boston. 

John Foster, of the Westminster 
Greenhouses, fell and fractured the 
bones in the ankle of his right foot 
Tuesday, February 28. 

George McWilliams, gardener for G. 
Marston Whitin, of Whitinsville, exhib- 
ited a number of fine orchids at the 
Worcester County Horticultural Society 
at Worcester last Thursday. These 
orchids were all of his own producing, 
having been raised by crossing. Will- 
iam McAllister, gardener for John C. 
Whitin, also showed some fine orchids, 
winning several prizes on them. 

Edgar Nock, of Edgewood, has pur- 
chased the greenhouses and stock on the 
estate of Mrs. T. P. Shepard, of this 
city. He will remove them to his place 
after the spring season. 

W. H. Pierce, of Rehoboth, Mass., has 
finished cutting his crop of violets. He 
now has over 20,000 cabbage and 10,000 
tomato plants started for spring supply. 

It is expected that a large delegation 
from the Florists' and Gardeners' Club 



WILLIAM J. SMYTH 

FLORIST Cor. Michigan Ave. 
^^^MM^^ and31atSt.,Chicairo 

We ship to all points in Illinois and Iowa. 

PHONS: 

Aldlne 880. Aimne 881. Aldlne 888 

W.J.Palmer&Son 

304 Main St, BUFFALO, N.Y. 

Membirs Florists' Telegraph As$*i, 

Orders by Wire receive Promptand Careful bcecution 

J. Newman & Sons 

Corporation 
24 Tremont St., BOSTON 

We can refer to leading florist s in all principal 
cltie». Established 1870. 

ST. LOUIS, MO. 

Hewers Delivered in City or State on Short Notic* 

F. H. WEBER 

BOYLE AND MARYLAND AVENUES 

Both Long Distance Phones 




IN HEART OF NEW YORK CITY 
60 W. 33d Street, N. T. 

Phone 2270 38th St. Our Motto— The GoMea Rult 

STATE NURSERY CO. Z 



FLOWERS 



US.OOO sq. ft. of KlasB 
at yoar serrlce. 



HELENA, MONTANA 



Metropolitan Floral Coi 

608 N. Ch'and Ave. 

Both LoBg- Distance 
Telephones. 



St* Louis* No. 



Fayetteville,Ark. 

Orders for designs and Cut Flowers glren Bp» 
cial attention. 



Snithwestera Seed Ce. 
Seedsmeii *»i FItrittt 



J5»^»)<r,y--«!**i^'- 



V ■^•^T^^^'vyTv^^f ]' '^^^^ , f •~T]5»:y'T^'^'^'^tv*"^^^wv[.?'-^i:" f TT 'i'*', *ri'rrir^«»y--' 



Mabch 0, 1911. 



The Weekly Florists' Review* 



48 



LEADING RETAIL FLORISTS 

The retail florists whose cards appear on the six pages carryiag this head, are prepared to fill orders from other florists for local delivery on the usual 

basis. If you wish to be represented under this heading, now is the time to place your order. 



DARDS, 



N. E. Cor. 44th Street and Madison Avenue, 

NEW YORK 



Telephones 
4026-4026, 38th Street, 



Cable Dardsflor, Western Union 



Orders delivered on all the Ocean Liners or telegraphed to our own correspondents 

in Europe and the British Colonies. 



EstabUflhed 1874 




Gardens 



1534 Second Ave., OLAI ILL, W AMI. 

Orders ffiven prompt attention. 
W. B. GIBSON. Mgr. 

The Liyiogston Seed Co. 

FLORISTS 

COVER ALL OHIO POINTS 
U4 N. High Su COLUMBUS, OHIO 




KALAMAZOO, MICH. 

G. Van Bodiove & Bro., ™Fior"ti°' 
J. WALSH & SON, ^SSI^ 

MAIJ>EN, MASS. 

n^Boston and all New Kusland Points. 



LINCOLN, NE6.< 



CHAPINBROS. 

Betall Florists 
Flowers tor All Occasions, from Cradle to Grare 

E. O. LOVELL ?^^ 

will grlve prompt attention M^*..*!* Tk^l^^^.^ 
toaU orders for deUvery in INOrin Lf3LKOX2L 

A. C. BROWN, ^'Sr 

LABGB GREKNHOUSKS 

The Anderson Floral Co. 

ANDERSON 
533 JVUrsball Ave., SOUTH CAROLINA 



TERRE HAUTE, IND. 

JOHN G. HCINL & SON. 129 South 7th Street 



Mrs. Me E. Hollcraft 

807 KiiuasAYe.. TOPEKA, KAN. 

BERTERMANN BROS. CO. 

LSAOING VLORISTS 

241 Massachusetts Ave., Indianapolis, Ind. 

NinneapoUs Floral Co., TE^ffi^^LVrn'sTs 

MINNKAPOLIS. MINN. 

B^neral deei^ns on short notice. One of the largest 
estDblishuientB west of Chicago. 



Washington, 
D. C. 

Uib and H Sireets 




Also 

1601 MadisM Av*. 



Baltimore, Md. 

J. Dan Blaokistone 



Frey&Frer,i'lt' Lincoln, Neb. 

Wholesale and Retail. 
100.000 sq. ft. of glass at yonr serrlce. Trade discount 

MINNESOTA NORTH DAKOTA MONTANA 

SNEDLEY & CO. 

Fargo. North Dakota aid Miles Gty, Montana 

^101 IX riTY IflWA Sapplles western Iowa. 

OIUUA VIII, lUTTfl southern Minnesota, all 

of South Dakota, northeastern Nebraska. 

J, C. RENNISON CO. 

Richmond, Ind. 

FRED H. LESION & CO. 

Florists and Decorators. Send us your orders. 

GEO. C. BAKER. Florist 

206 E. Park Ave., San Antonio, Texas 

of Rhode Island will attend the annual 
exhibition at Boston the latter part of 
this month. 

Walter Macrae, of F. Macrae & Sons, 
had an operation on his nose last week, 
which was successful. 

J. A. Budlong & Son Co., of Auburn, 
have several houses of fine roses from 
which they are cutting thousands every 
day. They will make a large exhibit 
at the national show in Boston. 

William Appleton & Sons had the 
decorations for the recent dinner of the 
Commercial Club at the Churchill 
House. 

Timothy O'Connor had the decora- 
tions for the recent dinner and recep- 
tion of Lady D'ecies in this city. 

Mr. McCullough, of East Providence, 
has returned from a several days' visit 
in New York. 

The flower store and greenhouse of 
Michael Sweeney, at 512 Pine street, 
was broken into on the night of Feb- 
ruary 28, the front door being forced, 
and a lot of lead pencils, cigars and 
other property valued at only a few 
dollars was stolen, but several hundred 
dollars of damage was joccasioned by 
running over beds and benches and 
breaking down flowers, as well as by 
the chilling from leaving doors open. 

John H. Forester is passing around 
the cigars because of the birth of a 
daughter. 

James Nisbet, of Pawtucket, has just 
purchased a Hupmobile runabout. 

Among the recent visitors in this city I 



6LEVELIIND 

J. H. GASSERCONPANY 

KUCUD AVENUE 

We ship all points in Ohio. The best 

of everythlne In Flowers. 



LUBLINER & TRIN7 

44 Randolph St., CHICAGO 

Located in the center of the city and io 
the same block with the Wholesale Flowet 
Market. 30 9b discount on all orders from 
out of town florists. 

DVANCE FLORAL CO., Fl?... 
DAYTON, 0. 



AO. M. SOHAEFKB, Mgr 
Lfadine FiorlHts 
44 TO 52 ARCADE, • 



1^ SCHDLTHEIS, FLORIST 

Write. Phone or wire CrPAMTAM PA 

61S Linden St., OtRAPIIUfI, lA. 

Rockford,E,H.W.Buckbee 
S. B. STEWART 

»» No. t6th St, OMAHA. P^EB. 

Wholesale and retail orders for Cut Flowers, 
Funeral Desiens, etc., by telegraph will 
receive prompt atcentlon at 

IRA G. MARVIN'S, Wllkes-Barre, Pa. 

J. J. BENEKE 

m6 OBvc St., ST. LOUIS, Ma 

Baltimore, Nd. 

AlBERT G. REDIER & CO.,?JLg;"a. 



MONTREAL, 



We can fill 
all orders. 

HALL I ROBINSON, •^I&.J^^IS?* 



44 



The Weekly Florists^ Review. ^^^"- ^ i^" 



LEADING RETAIL FLORISTS 

The retail florists whose cards appear on the six pages carryiog this head, are prepared to fill orders from other florisb for local delivery on the usual 

basis. If you wish to be represented under this heading, now is the time to place your order. 



HUGO H. JAHN 

710 Nostrand Avenue 

Tel. No. 1952 Bedford BROOKLYN, N. Y. 

Will deliver to Steamehlps, Theaters, anrwhere 
within 20 miles of New York. 

AETISTIO WORK. PERSONAL ATTENTION. 

Special care of your telegraph orders. 

Samuel Murray 

KANSAS CITY. MO. 

913 Grand Ave. 

an erders elven prompt and carckal attention. 

BUFFALO 

S. A. ANDERSON 

440 MAIN STREET 

Special Dellvertes Niaeara Falls and 
Lockport 

Yenr onlers for ATLANTIC GTY, N. J., 

will be carefuUy tilled by 




1605 Pacific Ave. 



Wxtte, Wire or Pbone Tour Orders to 

YOUNG'S 

1406 dive SL, ST. LOUIS, MO. 

Begnlar discount allowed on all orders, either 
Plants or Cut Flowers. 

Phones: Bell. Main 2306; Einloch. Central 4981 

WOLFSKILL BROS. 

..FLORISTS.. 

Successors to J. W. Wolfskill. 
Telegraph Orders a Specialty. 

218 W. 4th St LOS ANGELES, CAL 



T 



he Cleveland 
Cut Flower Co, 

CLEVELAND, OHIO 

Will fill yonr orders for Designs or 
Oat Flowers in Northern Ohio. 

THE NEWBURYS, Mitchell, S. D. 

40,000 fept of Commercial Cut Flowers. Your 
orders will be promptly and properly executed in 
South Dakota, North Dakota, Iowa and Minn. 

MRS, J. B. FREEMAN, "^J^SSJ^^^k 

Successor to Oeo. A. Heinl TOLlDO, OIIIO. 
All Orders Promptly Executed. 

Orders for MINNESOTA or the Northwest will 
be properly executed by 

AUG. S. SWANSON. SL Paul, Minn. 

BEYER FLORAL CO., «^1'™- 

Daily deliveries to Notre Dame University 
and St. Mary's Academy. 



Kansas 
City, 

Missouri. 



WE NEVER CLOSE 

Orders tilled any hour of the twenty-tour 



Alpha Floral Co. 

The lATsest Retail Florists West of 
Mississippi River 
A. ELBERFIELD, Proprietor 



Mention The Review when you write. 



Benson's Flowers 

Indianapolis, ind. "^^^.e 



KlJfr^S ALL OVER IOWA 

S through roads. SO.OOO ft. glass. High grade stock. 
Joseph Bancroft & Son. Cedar Falls, Iowa 



were Mr. Blanchard, of New York; Mr. 
Johnson, representing Albert Dickinson 
Co., of Chicago; Mr. Zirkman, of M. 
Kice & Co., Philadelphia; Thomas J. 
Kemp, representing the Illinois Seed 
Co., of Chicago, and Mr. Schneider, rep- 
resenting the Edwards Folding Box Co., 
of Philadelphia. W. H. M. 



STEAMER SAILINOS. 

Bulletin a few of 'these steamer sail- 
ings in your window, with the informa- 
tion that you have facilities for deliv- 
ering bon voyage tokens on board any 
outgoing boat, or funeral, or other 
flowers anywhere on short notice: 



steamer — 

Baltic 

St. Paul 

Furnessla 

Finland 

P. Grant 

Merlon 

Hesperian 

Carolina 

Franconla 

Kronprlnz Wm 
Tamba Maru. . 
Mauretanla. . . . 

Asia 

Sicilian 

Rhein 

Kal»erin 

La Provence. . 

Virginian 

Pisa 

Adriatic , 

California 

Kroonland 

Friesland 

Patricia 

Canada 

Trent 

Coamo 

Oceania 

K. Albert 

Perugia 

Romanic 

Ivernia , 

Mongolia 

Lusitania , 

Emp. of India. . 
La Tonraine . . . 
Pennsylvania. .. 

Zleten 

Numidian 

Ultonia 

Laurentlc 

Columbia < 

Dominion 

Sado Maru. . . 

Avon 

K. Luise 

Virginia 

Cinpinnati. . . . 

Campania 

America Maru 

Cretic 

Washington. . 

La Savoie 

Parisian 

Saxonia 



From — 
New York . . . 
New York . . . 
New York.. . 
New York. . . 
New York . . . 
Philadelphia. 

St. John 

New York . . . 
New York. . . 
New York . . . 

Seattle .. 

New York . . . 
,San Fr'sco. . , 

Portland 

New York. *. 
New York . . . 
New York . . . 

St. John 

Philadelphia. 
New York . . , 
New York. ., 
New York . . . 
Philadelphia. 

Boston 

Portland .... 
, New York . . , 
, New York . . . 
,New York . , 
New York . . . 
New York . . , 
New York . . . 

Boston 

San Fr'sco . . 
New York . . . 
Vancouver. . . 
New York. . . 
New York . . . 
New York . . . 

Boston 

New York . . . 
New York . . . 
New York . . . 

Portland 

Seattle 

New York . . . 
New York . . . 
New York . . . 
New York . . . 
New York . . . 
San Fr'sco. . 
New York . . . 
New York . . . 
New York . . . 

Portland 

New York . . . 



To— 
Liverpool . 
S'hampton 
Glasgow . . 
Antwerp . . 
Hamburg . 
Liverpool . 
Liverpool . 
Porto Rico. 

Egypt 

Bremen . . . 
Hongkong . 
Liverpool . 
Hongkong . 
Glasgow 
Bremen . . . 
Hamburg 

Havre 

Liverpool . 
Hamburg 
S'hampton 
Glasgow 
Antwerp . , 
Liverpool 
. Hamburg . 
Liverpool 

Cuba 

Porto Rico, 

Genoa 

Genoa 

Naples ... 
Naples . . . , 
, Liverpool 

Manila 

Liverpool 
Philippines 

Havre 

Hamburg 
Bremen 
Glasgow . . 

Naples 

Liverpool 
Glasgow . , 
Liverpool 
Yokohama 
Porto Rico 

Genoa 

Genoa . . . . 
Genoa . . . . 
Liverpool 
Hongkong . 

Naples 

Bremen . . . 

Havre 

Glasgow 
Egypt . . . . 



Sails. 
.Mar. 11 
.Mar. 11 
..Mar 11 
.Mar. 11 
.Mar. 11 
.Mar. 11 
.Mar. 11 
.Mar. 11 
.Mar. 11 
.Mar. 14 
.Mar. 14 
• Mar. 15 
.Mar. 15 
.Mar. 16 
.Mar. 16 
.Mar. 16 
.Mar. 16 
.Mar. 17 
.Mar. 17 
.Mar. 18 
.Mar. 18 
.Mar. 18 
.Mar. 18 
.Mar. 18 
.Mar. 18 
.Mar. 18 
.Mar. 18 
.Mar. 18 
.Mar. 18 
.Mar. 18 
.Mar. 18 
.Mar. 21 
.Mar. 21 
.Mar. 22 
.Mar. 22 
.Mar. 23 
.Mar. 23 
.Mar. 23 
.Mar. 23 
.Mar. 23 
.Mar. 25 
.Mar. 25 
.Mar. 25 
.Mar. 25 
.Mar. 25 
.Mar. 25 
.Mar. 25 
.Mar. 28 
.Mar. 29 
.Mar. 29 
.Mar. 29 
.Mar. 30 
.Mar. 30 
.Mar. 30 
.Mar. 30 



JOHN BREITMEYER*S 
SONS 

Corner Broadway and Gratiot Ave. 

DETROIT, MICH. 
rRED EHRET 

WHOLESALE AND RETAIL IXORIST 

1407 Fairmonnt Ave. and 702 N. Broad St. 

PHILADELPHIA 

Orders for Philadelphia and surrounding country 
carefully filled on short notice. 



Telephone 334 Mala 




886 Fnlton St., Brooklyn, N. Y. 

WELLESLEY COLLEGE 

Dana Hall, WalnntHill, Bockridge Hall Schools 
TAILB'X , WeUesley, Mass. 

Long Distonce Tel., Wellesley. 44-1. 44-2, 44-3. 



TEXAS 



Dallas Floral Co. 

DALLAS, TEX. 

H. V. GREVE. Prop. 

Rosemont Gardens 

■?iSSSi^-r^ H0IIT60MEBY, ALA. 
HESS &SWOBODA, Florists 

Telephones 1501 and L 1583 
1415 Faw Street, OMAHA, N»B. 

U. J. VIRGIN 

338 Canal St., New Orleans, La. 

Evanston and Chicago 
JOHN WEILAND 



KVAmTOH. 
XIX. 



MICHIGAN <^«"eaSd for*^^' 

HENRY SMITH 

■fliflsult srf ■■tiH Rsriit sf GRAMD RAPIPa 

Minneapolis, Minn, "^^gxs 

SWANSON'S, 618 Nicollet Ave. 

Spokane Florist Co. 

SPOKANE, WASH. SteST* 



' ^f^?^'^"^r>*f\^'}iijr>---f!^^^ 



^5I»'T!!v''yy*r^'T^7''^^!°^^'*?.'^^^^ 



■" , ■1^'^/T*"*»^ 



March 9, 1911. 



The Weekly Florists' Review; 



45 



LEADING RETAIL FLORISTS 

The retail florists whose cards appear on the six pages carrying this head, are prepared to fill orders from other florists for local delivery on the usual 

basis. If you wish to be represented under this heading, now is the time to place your order. 




Orders for delivery in 

OKLAHOMA 

will be promptly and care- 
fully executed by 

FURROW & COMPANY 

Guthrie, Oklahoma 



Hartford, 
Conn. 



Orders solicited for a',1 parts of Connecticut. 

D I^nr^l7 Wholesale 

. H. FKEY,?ix'Hr ' 

11330 St., LINCOLN, NEB. 

Will fiU orderi for the West on short notics 

Trade discounts. First-class stock. 

Send flower orders for delivery in 

BOSTON AND ALL 

NEW ENGLAND POINTS 

ToTHOS. F. GALVIN,inc 

124 TREMONT ST. BOSTON 

All orders receive careful attention. Choice 
Beauties. Orchids and Valley always on hand. 




MONTREAL 



ST. PAUL, MINN. 

Order yohr flowers for delivery 
In this section from the leading 
Florists of the Northwest. 

L. L. MAY & CO. 

ST. PAUL, MINN. 



WASHINGTON, 
D. C 




GUDEBROS.CO. 

TLORISTS 
1214 r STNW 
WASHlNGTON.Oa 



GUDE'S 



The Park Floral Co. 



J. A. VALENTINE, 
Pres. 



DENVER, 



COLORADO 



Index by Towns of Leading Retail Florists. 



^ scHROEreo 

^' 59 Broadway ^ 

DETROIT 



ALBANY, N. Y. 

Eyres, H. G. 
AMSTERDAM, K. Y. 

Hatcher, J, C, 
ANDERSON, S. C. 

Anderson Floral Co, 



LINCOLN, NEB. 

Chapin Bros. 

Frey, C. H. 

Frey & Frey 
LOS ANOELEB, CAL. 

Wolfskin Bros. 



ATLANTIC CITY, N. J. LOXTISVILLE, KY. 



Berke, Geo. H. 
AUBURN, N. Y. 

Dobbs & Son. 
AUGUSTA, GA. 

Balk's Nursery. 
AURORA. ILL. 

Smely, Jos. M. 
AUSTIN, MINN. 

Kinsman, A. N. 
BALTIMORE, MD. 

Blackistone, Z. D. 

Fiedler & Co., A, 



G. 



Sohulz, Jacob 

Walker & Co., F. 

Walker, William 
MADISON, WIS. 

Capital City Qnhouse. 
MALDEN, MASS. 

Walsh & Son, J. 
MEMPHIS, TENN. 

Idlewild Greenhouses. 
MILWAUKEE, WIS. 

PoUworth Co., C. C. 
MINNEAPOLIS, MINN. 



BATTLE CREEK, Mich. Minneapolis Flo. Co. 



Cogrgran, S. W 
BOSTON, MASS. 

Galvin, Inc., T, F. 

Hoifman, S. 

Newman & Sons. 

Penn, Henry. 
BROOKLYN, N. Y. 

Jahn, Hugo H. 

Masur,' S. 

Phillips, Jno. V. 

Wilson, R. G. 
BXTFFALO, N. Y. 

Anderson, S. A. 

Palmer & Son, W. J. 
CEDAR FALLS. lA. 

Bancroft & Son, J. 
CHARLESTON, W.VA. 

Charleston Cut. Flo. & 
Plant Co. 
CHICAGO 

Jesselson Flo. Shop 

Lubliner & Trinz 

Samuelson, Chas. A. 

Smyth, W. J. 

Wittbold Co., Geo. 
CLEVELAND, 0. 

Cleveland Cut Flo. Co, 

Gasser Co., J, M. 

Knoble Bros. 

Schneider Floral Co. 
COLO. SPGS., COLO. 

Pikes Peak Flo. Co. 
COLUMBUS, O. 

Livingston Seed Co. _ 

COUNCIL BLUFFS, lA. PHILADELPHIA, PA 

Wilcox & Sons Ehret, Fred 

DALLAS, TEX. Fox. Chas. Henry 

Dallas Floral Co. PITTSBURG, PA. 

Lang Floral Co. Smith Co.. A. W. 

Texas Seed & Flo. Co. PONTIAC, ILL. 
DAYTON, O. Miller & Son. W. J. 

Advance Floral Co. PORTLAND, ORE. 



Swanson's 
MITCHELL, S. D. 

Newburys, The 
MOBILE, ALA. 

Minge Floral Co. 
MONTGOMERY, ALA. 

Rosemont Gardens 
MONTREAL, CANADA 

Hall & Robinson 

McKenna & Son 
NEW LONDON, CONN. 

Router Sc Son, Inc. 
NEW ORLEANS, LA. 

Virgin, U. J. 
NEW YORK CITY. 

Bowe, M. A. 

Bunyard Floral Co. 

Clarke's Sons, David 

Dards, Chas. A. 

McConnell, Alex. 

Meyer 

Small & Sons, J. H. 

Youri? & Nugent 
NORTHAMPTON, Mass. 

Field. H. W. 
OAKLAND. CAL. 

Clarke Bros. 
OKLAHOMA CY., OKL. 

Stiles Co.. The 
OMAHA. NEB. 

Hess & Swoboda 

Stewart, S. B. 
PEORIA, ILL. 

Kuhl, Geo. A. 



Established 1857. 



Heiss Co 
DENVER, COLO. 

Daniels & Fisher 

Park Floral Co. 
DBS MOINES, IOWA 

Trillow, Florist 
DETROIT, MICH. 

Breitmeyer's Sons 

Schroeter, B. 
EVAN8T0N, ILL. 

Fischer Bros. 

Weiland, John 
FARGO, N. D. 

Smedley & Co. 
FAYETTEVILLE, Ark. 

Southwestern Seed Co. 
FT. WORTH, TEX. 

Baker Bros. Co. 

Drumm Floral Cc. 
FREEPORT, ILL. 

Freeport Floral Co. 
GRAND FORKS, N. D 

Lovell, £. O 



Clarke Bros. 

Tonseth Floral Co. 
PROVIDENCE, R. I. 

Johnston & Co., T. J 
RICHMOND. IND. 

Lemon & Co.. F. H, 
ROCKFORD. ILL. 

Buckbee, H. W. 
ST. LOUIS, MO. 

Beneke, J. J. 

Metropolitan Flo. Co. 

Weber, F. H. 

Young & Sons Co. 
ST. PAUL, MINN. 

Holm & Olson, Inc. 

May & Co., L. L. 

Swanson, A. S. 
SAN ANTONIO, TEX. 

Baker, Geo. C. 
SCRANTON, PA. 

Schultheis. Florist 
SEATTLE, WASH. 

Hollywood Gardens 



GRAND RAP'S, MICH. SIOUX CITY, IOWA 



MICHIGAN 



Smith, Henry 
GUTHRIE. OKLA. 

Furrow & Co. 
HARTFORD, CONN. 

Coombs, John. 

McClunie, Geo. G. 
HELENA, MONT. 

State Nursery Co. 
HOPKINSVILLE, KY. 

Metcalfe, T. L. 
HOUSTON, TEX. 

Kuhlmann, H. H. 
HUTCHINSON, KAN, 

Stamm, John 
INDIANAPOLIS, IND. 

Benson, Lester F. 

Bertermann Bros, Co 

Wiegaud & Sons 
KALAMAZOO, MICH. 

Van Bochove & Bro. 
KANSAS CITY, MO. 

Alpha Floral Co. 

Kellogg, Geo. M. 

Murray. Samuel 

Rock Flower Co. 
KENOSHA, WIS. 

Obertin, P. N. 
LANCASTER, PA. 

Dundore. L. H. 
LEXINGTON, KY. 

Keller, John A, 



Rennison Co., J. C. 
SIOUX FALLS, S. D. 

Tosini, Joe 
SOUTH BEND, IND. 

Beyer Floral Co. 
SPOKANE. WASH. 

Hoyt Bros. Co. 

Spokane Florist Co. 
SPRINGFIELD, ILL. 

Brown, A. C. 
TERRE HAUTE, IND. 

Heinl & Son, John G. 
TOLEDO, 0. 

Freeman, Mrs. J. B. 
TOPEKA. KAN. 

Hollcraft, Mrs, M. E. 

Lord's Flower Room 
TORONTO, CANADA 

Dunlop, John H. 
WASHINGTON. D. C. 

Blackistone, Z. D. 

Gude Bros. Co. 

Small & Sous, J. H. 
WELLESLEY, MASS. 

Tailby & Son 
WILKES-BARRE, PA. 

Marvin, Ira G. 
WINNIPEG. Man., Can. 

Rosery, The 
YOUNGSTOWN, 0. 

Walker, John 



FLOMUST^ 

737-739 Bockingham Place 



CHICAGO 



L. D. Phone 
1112 Graceland 

Send us your retail orders. We 
have the best facilities iu the city. 



T 



he Rosery 

..FLORISTS.. 

889 DUNALD ST. 

Winnipeg* Manitoba, Canada; 

OBDERS TAKEN FOB DELIVERY ANYWHERE 
BETWEEN PORT ARTHUR AND THE COAST. 

CHARLES HENRY FOX 

Slsn of tlio Rose 

BROAD AND WALNUT STREETS 

Always on Time 

David Clarke's Sons 

8189-8141 Broadway 

Tel. 1662, 1563 OolnmboB 

NEW YORK CITY 

Ont-of-town orders for delivery in New York 
esrefnlly and promptly filled at reasonable rates. 

GEO. M. KELLOGG 
FLOWER & PLANT CO. 

Wliolesale and Retail Florists 

1122 Grand Avenup, KANSAS CITY, MO. 

All Kinds of CUT FLOWERS 

in their season. Al.>o Rose and Carnation plant! 
in season. Qreenboubes at I'laabant Hill, Mo. 

Gtnada^s Florist 




96 Yonge St, TORONTO 

C C. POUWORTH CO. 

Wholesale Florists 
MILWAUKEE, WIS. 

Will Take Proper Care U/ICmMQIN 
of Yoar Ortlers in TT l3V^V/1^3lll 




46 



The Weekly Florists' Review^ 



Mabch 0, 1911. 



Seed Trade News. 



AHEBIGAN SEED TBADE ASSOCIATION. 

Pres , E.L. Page, Greene. N.Y.; First Vlce-pres., 
L. H. Vaughan, Chicago; Pec'y and Treas.. C. E. 
Kendel, Cleveland. O. Twenty-ninth annual 
meeting. June 20 to 2i, 1911. 



The Kerr pure seed bill was passed by 
the lower branch of the South Dakota 
legislature. 

J. W. Jung Seed Co., Eandolph, Wis., 
plans to largely increase its acreage in 
flower seed crops this season. 

The Western Canners' Association will 
hold its annual convention at the Sher- 
man House, Chicago, March 16. 

John Prendergast, with the Leonard 
Seed Co., Chicago, and Miss Stella M. 
Corwin, of Janesville, Wis., were married 
February 25. 

The Sioux City Seed and Nursery Co., 
Sioux City, la., has disposed of its 
nursery department to the Whiting 
Nursery Co., Yankton, S. D. 

L. E. HiGGiNS, a bean grower at Loni- 
poc, Cal., has acquired a tract of land 
just outside Port O'Connor, Tex., and 
will embark in seed growing there. 

The free lectures in the store of the 
H. F. JNIichell Co., Philadelphia, are 
drawing increasingly large audiences as 
the season advances. 

Carlos Jensen, representing L. Daehn- 
feldt, cabbage and cauliflower seed 
grower, 'at Odense, Denmark, is prepar- 
ing to make a trip through the United 
States in April. 

C. E. Kendel, secretary of the Amer- 
ican Seed Trade Association, states that, 
although it has been decided not to hold 
the 1911 convention at Milwaukee, be- 
cause of lack of hotel accommodations, 
no other city has as yet been selected. 

At a meeting in the store of Barteldes 
Seed Co., Oklahoma City, Okla., February 
^5, the Oklahoma County Poultry Asso- 
ciation was organized. A poultry show 
was held at the same time and more 
than 1,000 people visited the store during 
the day. 

James Vick's Sons have one of the 
tastiest catalogue covers of the season. 
The stock is white, with an embossed 
border and lithographed and embossed 
pansies, a purple pansy on the front and 
three bright colored blooms on the back. 
It is simplicity itself — a Stecher job. 



FERRY'S CANADIAN BRANCH. 

The proposed reciprocity treaty be- 
tween Canada and the United States, 
which names seeds among the articles 
for the free list, will have no effect on 
the plans of D. M. Ferry & Co. for the 
Canadian branch yi Windsor. Since 
the destruction by fire of the old D. M. 
Ferry building, on the Windsor river 
front, last spring, the company has been 
occupj'ing temporary quarters with the 
intention of erecting a suitable build- 
ing for the Canadian interests of the 
firm. A lot 90x100 feet, at the corner 
of McDougall and Sandwich streets, 
was purchased last summer. Plans are 
now being prepared for the building. 
The structure will bo of reinforced con- 
crete, four stories at least in height. 
Ground will be broken within a few 
weeks. 



FLORISTS AND SEEDSMEN 

SELL TOUR OWN SCRATCH OR FOTJLTRT FOOD. We will make it for you under your 
own brand for 128.00 per ton. .Send today for sample lOO-lb. bag, $1.50. Mr. C. E. Jenson, of Atlantic 
County, N. J., on Oct. 27, 1910, writes as follows: "I want to state that your three grades of poultry 
food— Chick Starter, Developing Food and 'Square Deal' Scratch or Poultry Food — stand without an 
equal today. They are perfect mixtures and sound in grain and a pleasure to handle." 

JRHiriANn 9. CON IMPORTERS AND WHOLKSALKRS 
. DULUIAHU a OUllf EstabUsbea for 92 Tears 

Mention The Review when you write. 



BALTINORE, HD. 



Lennon Seed and Plant Co. 

Lompoc, Santa Barbara Co., Cal. 

Contract growers of Beans, Peas. Kale, Mustard, 
Squafh. Pumpkin, Cucumbers. Carrots. etc.; Flower 
Seed In variety. Your orders for 1911 crop solicited. 
Can also furnish an extra fine grade of Eucalyptus 
Globulus (Blue Gum) and Cupressus Macrocarpa 
(Monterey Cypress) Seed. 

S. M. ISBELL « CO. 

JACKSON, MICH. 

Contract Seed Growers 

Bean, Cucmnber, Tomato, Radish, Pea, Sanasb. 
Muskmelon, Watermelon, Sweet Com. 

Correspondence Solicited 

Sioux City Seed & Nursery Co. 

Sioux City, Iowa 

Contracting growers of Peas, Beans 
and famous Sweet Corn. Introducers 
of the White Mexican Siveet Corn. 

BEECHWOOD SEED FARMS 

Contract Growers 

Okra, Pearl Millet, Seven Top and 

Frost King; Turnip. 

Correspondence invited. 

H. H. ARRINGTON, Prop., Rome, Ga. 

Wllbert E. Ashcraft 

SWEDESBORO, N. J.' 

WHOLESALE SEED GROWER 

Specialties: Tomato, Pepper and Eggplant 

Any kind of seed grown by contract 

S.D.WoodrufF&Sons 

SFECIALTISS : 

Garden Seeds in Variety 

Maine seed potatoes, onion sets, etc. 

OOKRE8PONDENCE SOLICirED. 

lain Office and Seed Farms, OKANGE, CONN. 
New Totk City Store. 88-84 Dey Street 

Routzahn Seed Co. 

ARROYO GRANDE, CAL. 

SWEET PEA and NASTURTIUM 
SPECIALISTS 

Wholesale arrowers of full lists of FLOWER 
and GARDEN Seeds. 

Mention The Review when you write. 

Ant. C. Zvolanek 

Originator of all winter-flowering 
Sweet Peas, all colors. Corres- 
pondence invited. 

Bound Brook, New Jersey 

Mention The Review when you write 

WEIGHTS IN NEBRASKA.. 

A bill is pending in the legislature 
of the state of Nebraska which, among 



Yokohama Nursery Co. 

IIVIPORTERS 

Japanese Bulbs, Plants, Seeds 

and Bamboo Stakes. 

New York, N. Y. London, England 

Yokohama, Japan 

Mention The Review when vou write. 

Pleters-Wheeler Seed Company 




Hollister, 



California 



Growers of High Grade Seeds 

Onion, Radish, Letttice, 
Sweet Peas, etc. : : : 

Correspondence Solicited. 



BRASLAN SEED GROWERS' GO. 

Lettuce, Onion, Sweet Peas 

Growers for the Wholesale Trade Only 

S«B Jose, California 

Waldo Rohnert 

GILROY, CAL. 

Wholesale Seed Grower 

Specialties: Lettuce. Onion. Sweet Peas. Aster. 
Cosmos, Mignonette. Verbyna, in variety. 
CorresDondHnoH solioit<vi 




SEATTLE, WASH. 

Growers of 

PLGET SOUND CABBAGE SEEP 

—THE— 

J. C. Robinson Seed Co. 

Waterloo, Neb. 

Contract growers of Cucumber, Canta- 
loupe, Watermelon, Squash and Pumpkin 
Seed ; Sugar, Flint and Field Seed Corns. 

The C. Herbert Coy Seed Co. 

VALLEY, Douglas Ck>anty, NEB. 

Wholesale Growers of High Grade Seeds. 

Cucumber, Muskmelon, Squash and Pump- 
kin, Sweet, Flint and Dent Seed Corn. 

Moiitioii The Review when vou write 

Henry Fish Seed Co. 

BEAN GROWERS 

For the Wholesale Seed Trade 
CARPINTERIA. - CAL. 



other tilings, provides that "whenever 
any of the following articles shall be 
contracted for, or sold, or delivered, 
and no special contract or agreement 



..|j^W!jl?ijy_lfM|pJt5- ■ i'.'-<^i.",H' '^5l^"Wi_Mi'»l!'.WJ!Wit«WVWA^I*!'?l''T''^J»' *•!''''!'•*' ■i«M.»'i wju HilJ- 



Mabch 9, 1011. 



The Weekly Florists' Review* 



47 




I 

Improved White Spine Cucumber, grown 
under Irrigratlon by 

Western Seed and Irrigation Co. 

Seed Orowers and Dealers. Specialties: 
Cucumber. Musk and Watermelon, Pump- 
kin. Squash, Sweet and Field Corn, 
FREMONT, NEBRASKA 

JUentlon The Review wneo you wn*"" 

shall be made to the contrary, such sale 
and all computations for payment or 
settlement therefor shall be by 
weight." The legal weights of a few 
enumerated articles are: 

Lbs. 

Corn, in the ear 70 

Corn, shelled 56 

Sorghum seed 50 

Beans 60 

Dried Peas 60 

Clover seed 60 

Hungarian and Millet 50 

Potatoes 60 

Onions 57 

Hemp seed 44 

Native Bluegrass 14 

English Bluegrass 22 

Timothy 45 

Alfalfa seed 60 

IN THE PEA OOUNTEY. 

Deerfield, Wis. — Luther Jones, a 
representative of H, W. Buckbee, 
Eockford, 111., has been here of late, 
contracting with farmers for the grow- 
ing of seed peas. 

Barron, Wis. — A representative of 
Northrup, King & Co., Minneapolis, 
was here recently and in company with 
C. A. Westrom was soliciting acreage 
for growing seed peas. The company 
wants to contract for 100 acres to be 
grown. 

Crandon, Wis. — Wm. Ward, traveling 
representative of the Landreth Seed 
Co., of Manitowoc, has been looking 
over Forest county farms with the in- 
tention of making contracts with the 
owners to raise peas. 

Denmark, Wis. — Michael Moore, man- 
ager of the Dorr County Seed Co., will 
be here soon and will make contracts 
with farmers for growing seed peas. 

Sturgeon Bay, Wis. — T. H. Hopkins, 



LAWN GRASS 
IN BULK 
AND 
PACKAGES 



BLUE GRASS 
RED TOP 
WHITE CLOVER 
For Lawna, Parks and Cemeteries ETC., ETC. 




Minneapolis THE ALBERT DICKINSON CO. Chicago 



Arkansas Valley Seed Co. '^Sas 

Contract Growers of Muskmelon, Watermelon and Cucumber Seeds 

Twenty years' experience growing these seeds in the famous Arkansas Valley, 
where irrigation and sunshine are abundant. Write today for contract price list and 
also our surplus list of Muskmelon, Watermelon and Cucumber Seed. 

Mention The Review when you write. 

ONION SETS 



Finest Stock. Yellow, Red, Wlilte. We can make prompt shipment. 

WRITE FOR PRICKS 

KIrkeby & Gundestrup Seed Co.,^croo.''^': 



Mention The Review when you write. 



LEONARD SEED CO. 



""■SSSSSx Onion Sets. » 



Largest Srowers af Peas, Beans and 6ardn 
WHOLESALE WiHMII W«P«9. »«"• 22».23J"'""''"* 
MERCHANTS ^jm£ yj FOR PRICES * '"«'E»™EET. 



CHICAGO 



Mention The Review when you write. 



YOU will be satisfied with the products of 

Burpee's "Seeds that Grow" 

Better write to Burpee, Philadelphia,— for new Complete Catalogue. 



MenDoo I'be Keview wnen tuu wnie 




Mdntlon The Fftvlgw when you write 



The Everett B. Clark Seed Co., '•^SST- 

GrowlnB Btatlons at Kast Jordan, Mloli., Graen Bay, Wla., Sister Bay. Wis. 

BEANS, PEAS, SWEET CORN, ONION, BEET, TURNIP, TOMATO, ETC. 

Mention The Review when you write. 



ONION SEEDbONION SETS 

We are extensive sroveers and dealers. 

Write for prices on the 1910 crop. We are also 
pubmitting contract figures for the 1911 crop of 
Onion Seed. 

SCHILDER BROS., '"^JT" 

Mention The Review when you write. 

ONION SETS 

Sound, Clean and Dry 
WRITE FOR PRICES 

D. J. TANMINGA 

10816-10818 Michifan Ave., CHICAGO 

Always mention the Florists' Review when 
writing; advertisers* 



PEAS ^ BEANS 

We are Gro^rers for the Whole- 
sale Seed Trade. 

ALFRED J. BROWN SEED CO. 

GRAND RAPIDS. MICH. 

Mention The Review when you write. 



W. N.rSCARFF 



C. C. Vale 



NIANI VALLEY SEED CO. 

NKW CARLISLK, OHIO 

We grow all the standard varieties of field 
com. Write for wholesale prices. 



Always mention the Florists' Review wheo 
writing advertisers. 



'' ?»■. ^ l"S''<"':'">^-7'fyjtT.V 



^48 



The Weekly Florists' Review. 



March 9, 1911. 



Van Zanten Brothers 

Royal Nettaerlands Bulb Nuraeries 
and Export Trade. 

HILLEGON, HOLLAND. 

Wholesale growers of the leading sorts of 

Hyacinths, Tulips, Narcissus, Crocus, Spiraeas, 

Gladiolus, Peonies, etc, etc. 

Write our traveler. MR. G. HYLKEMA, cmre of 
MessrH. MaltDS & Ware, 14 Stone Street, New 
York, for Catalogue and Special pnces of all 

Holland Bulbs and Plants. 

Mention The Review when you write. 

manager for the .Tolm H. Allan Seed 
Co., has purchased from the Reynolds 
Preserving Co. the Buick automobile 
used by them last season. Mr. Hopkins 
expects to make good use of the ma- 
chine, as he has a great deal of travel- 
ing to do in looking after and inspect- 
ing the immense acreage of seed peae 
which will be contracted for by his 
company this year, their, operations 
now extending over a large part of this 
state. 

IMPORTS. 

The imports of seed through the port 
of New York for the week ending Feb- 
ruary 25 were as follows: 

Kind. Pkgs. Val. Kind. Pkgs. Val. 

Annatto .. 25$ 170 Millet 178$ 480 

Canary ...1,526 3,944 Mustard 50 674 

Clover ... 401 11,310 Poppy 500 1,980 

Cummin ..20 300 Rape 200 1,418 

Fenugreek. 280 1,082 Sugar beet.. 2 29 

Lycopodlum 10 1,000 Other 6,374 

In the same period the imports of 

bulbs, trees and plants were valued at 

$9,65.3. 

NATIONAL SEED LEGISLATION. 

The seed trade always has deplored 
the method by which seed legislation is 
considered in Congress. While the deal- 
ers in garden seeds never have admitted 
any need for legislation, the grass seed 
interests would welcome the enactment 
of a national law prohibiting the im- 
portation of seeds unfit for planting. 
Seed legislation always has come up 
during the seedsmen's busy season, and 
consideration has been by means of a 
public hearing before a large committee. 
The conditions have not been favorable 
for getting a final and right decision 
of the whole question. In the hope of 
getting such a decision as will put a 
satisfactory end to the agitation, at the 
recent hearing in Washington George 
S. Green, of the Illinois Seed Co., Chi- 
cago, proposed the appointment of a 
commission to cons«der the whole ques- 
tion with deliberation — but the con- 
gressmen did not take kindly to the 
idea. Here is the germane part of the 
dialogue: 

Mr. Green. I believe we are here 
constructively, not obstructively, and in 
furtherance of this constructive method 
I have this final suggestion to make. 
Mr. Mann has said that he thinks there 
is no probability that action will be 
taken on this bill, 29163, at this session 
of Congress. I want to suggest that 
as' soon as practicable after the urgent 
work that you people in Washington 
have in hand is attended to, a commis- 
sion be appointed of three congressmen, 
preferably from this committee, three 
expert seed analysts, or representatives 
of the national or state departments, 
three experienced grass-seed dealers, 
and three garden-seed dealers. 
(Contlnned on page 52.) 



=«!«fc 



W. & K.-The Sign of Quality 

When dealing direct with us you not only 
receive quality but we save you money. 

Spring Delivery of Bulbs 

Dahlias, Begonias, Gloxinias, etc. We offer some exceptionally fine new 
Dahlias this year, which are illustrated in our special Dahlia Catalogue. 

Fall Delivery of Bulbs 

Hyacinths, Tulips, Daffodils, Iris, Liliums, Gladioli and many others 
that are mentioned in our Bulb Catalogue. , 

Write today for these catalogues— they will interest you. 

Home Otfloe and Nurseries, 'Sassenbelm, Holland 
Branoli Houses, United States, Germany, South America 

Gt. van Waveren & Kruljff, f^ifs^^^^fr^tl"- 

Meet us at the National Sbo^^ In Boston. 



Mention The Review when vnn write. 



TUJE TRADE- 



HENRY METTE, Ouedlinbin^, Germany 

^^m^^^mt^^mmm (ESTABLISHED IN 1787) 

Grcwer and Exporter on the very larerest scale of all 

CHOICE VEGETABLE, FLOWER and FARM SEEDS 

Specialties: Beans, Beets. Cabbages, Carrots, Xohl-Rabi, Leeks, Lettuces. Onions, 
Peas, Radishes, Spinach, Turnips, Swedes, Asters, Balsams, Begonias. Carnations, 
Cinerarias. Oluxiuias. Larkspurs. Nasturtiums, Pansles, >'etimias. Phlox. Primulas. Scabious. 
Sto cks , Verb enas. Zinnlan , etc. Catalog ue free on application. 

HENRY MBTTB'S TRIUMPH OP THE GIANT PANSIES (mixed), the most per. 
feet and most beaatifol In the world, $5.00 per oz. ; $1.50 per '■4 oz.; 76o per 1-16 oz Fo6ta«e 
paid. Cash with order. 

All seeds offered are grown nnder my personal snpervision on my own vast srounds* 
and are warranted true to name, of strongest growth, finest stocks and best Quality. I also 
_ grow largely seeds on contract* 

Mention The Review when you write. 

VAN GRIEKEN S BULBSy well selected 

High-grade Hyacinths, Tulips, Narcissus, 
Crocus, etc. Write for Catalogue. 



LEO VAN GRIEKEN, Lisse, HoDand 



The S. D. van der Goot & Co. 

Nurseries, .*. Boskoop, Holland. 



ESTABLISHED 1883 



Rhododendrons, Azaleas, Magnolias, Conifers, 
Climbing Plants, Fruit Trees, Dwarf and Stand- 
ard Roses, Ornamental Plants, Peonies, Etc. 

.. Write for Wholesale Catalogue 
to our representative 

B. J. DYKSIVI3, 

P.O. Box No. 9, Muskegon Heights, Mich. 

Mention The Review when you writ*> 

German Stock Seeds 

A GRA^D SPECIALTY 

Price list on application 

PAUL TEICHER, Striegau, Germany 

Oldest Special House 

Mention The lieview when you write. 



AUGUST ROLKER & SONS 

Importers of Azaleas, Rhododendrons, 
Palms, Araucarias, Bays, Box, Roses, 
Camellias, florists' Bulbs, nurserymen's 
Trees and Shrubs, etc. For lists, address 

P. 0. Box 752, or 31 Barclay SL, NEW YORK 



Always mention the Florists' Review 
when writing advertiners. 



Palms, Araucarias, Bay Trees, 
Azaleas ^£r'" Belgian Plants. 

LILY OF THE VALLEY 

Extra selected pips for import; also 

COLD STORAGE VALLEY 

for immediate use. 

Roses, Peonies, Rhododendrons, Box Trees and 

all Other Holland Plants. 

JAPANESE, HOLLAND AND FRENCH BULBS. 

—Import only.— 

H. FRANK DARROW 

p. 0. Box 1250 26 Barday St, NEW YORK 

Mention The Review when you write. 



FOR 



SEEDS 

of all kinds apply to 
W. W. JOHNSON & SON, Ltd. 

BOSTON, ENGLAND 



Mention The Review when yon write. 



ORCHIDS 

Largest Importers, Exporters, Growers 
and Hybridists in the world. 

SANDER, St. Albans, England 

and 258 Broadway, Room 721, New York Qty 



.1 .' '' ■ 



-l 



MaBCH g, 1911. 



The Weekly Florists^ Review* 



49 



ESTABLISHED 1904 



YOU PAY TOO MUCH 



Import Costs 



on Bulbs from Europe* 



Save Your Money 



We tell how* 

Write us for through rates* 



ROSE GARDENS, 



Importers and 
Wholesale Growers 



North Emporia, Ya. 



Mention The Keview wben you wnte. 



VALLEY 
CLUMPS 

The heavy kind, full of 
leaders, $12.00 per 100. 



WN. ELLIOn & SONS 

42 Vesey Street, NEW YORK 



Mention Tbe Review wb^n you write. 




rorFLORISTS and MARKET GARDENERS 

All biebeat grade 
Cataloarue mailed on application 

J.N.11iorbunl&Co.''.li;'??.i' 

Mention The Review when you write. 



FOTTLER, nSKE, RAWSON CO. 




FOR FORCING OR 

PLANTING OUTSIDE 

Cucumber, Rawson's Hot House 

We feel confident that this strain is not equaled in this country: it Is the result of yean 
of selections. Oz., 60o; H lb., $1.50; lb., $6.00. 



Fottler, Fiske, Rawson Co., ;:'?«"s:il^^ Boston, Nass. 



. I 



Mention The Review when you write. 



Bridgeman's Seed Warehouse 

KstabUsbed 1824. BICKARDS BROS., Props. 

< Importers and Gro'wers of HlBb-erade 

SEEDS, BULBS, PLANTS, Etc 

87 East 19th Street, Telephone 4235 Gramercy, NEW TORk CITY 

Mention The Review when you "write, T 



LILIUN GIGANTEUN 

A No. 1 Quality, 7x9—300 per Case 
Write lor Price 

D. RUSCONI 

188 W. eth St., CINCINNATI, O. 

Always Mention the... 

FLORISTS' REVIEW 

When Writing Advertisers 



STORAGE Lilium Giganteum 

Per case 1000 

7/ 9 (300 to case.)...,,.. $21.00 $ 70.00 
9/10 (200 to case) ...... 20.00 100.00 

Write tor Complete Cataloane 

G. H. HUNKEL CO., Seedsmen, NIL WAUKCE, WIS. 

Always Mention the... 

FLORISTS* REVIEW 

When Writinsr Advertisers 



■•'• -i v •- ■ T T. \^T''j»^T-\'7,;'';rT^'''^".iS'-'_ ;i;(PiJ^v<'vfl"if ■ 



50 



The Weekly Florists' Review* 



Mabch 0, 1911. 



James Vick's Sons^Largest Growers of High-G 




We have grown Asters longer, intro- 
duced more varieties, grow larger quan- 
tities and sell to more Seedsmen and 
Florists than any other Aster grower in 
America. 



Vick's Imperial Rose 

This illustrates one of the newest of half a 
dozen varieties from the same family as Day- 
break and Purity. A deep, ricli rose (;olor. 
One of the best recent introductions. 

PRICES 

1/16 oz. $0.20 

1/8 oz 3S 

1/4 OL 6S 

1/2 OL 1.20 

1 oz. 2.00 



M's 
Early Dpright 

Numerous readers of The Review 
will recognize this as a popular 
novelty of last year. Many Flo- 
rists claim they got more flowers, 
larger blooms and longer stems 
than they could grow of other 
early kinds, because it grows as 
vigorously and yields as abundant- 
ly as many of the Late Asters. 
The flowers are solid, ball shaped 
and considerably above the aver- 
age in size. A medium early 
variety which haa been a money 
maker wherever tried. Two col- 
ors: White and Lavender Pink. 

PRICES 

1/82 OL $0.2S 

1/16 oz. 40 

1/8 oz 60 

1/4 oz. 1.00 

1/2 OL 1.7S 

Iff 8.00 



.»*-^«wyr-.?' vriryv 



■ ■''K'vr^ ~f ";■'» 'TIJ' •f.7^-' 'V > /!■.;'■»■• "■, v-.r -. •. >_ ,_ 



March 0, 1011. 



J^ 



The Weekly Florists' Review. 



^ 



51 



Grade Aster Seeds m the World-Rochester,N.Y. 



.,-ji :: .\.'.-r »■ -it'., 




Vick's Violet King 

Introduced by us several years ago. Cata- 
gued now by all leading seedsmen. Habit is 
milar to Vick's Late Branching, vigorous in 
owth, with long, stiflF stems. Flowers resemble 
e quilled varieties, but much larger and broader, 
e inner petals being fantastically twisted, curled 
id incurved, completely covering the crown. 

PRICES 

16 oz $0.20 

B oz 30 

4 oz 50 

2 oz 80 

iz 1.50 

Our "Aster Book £or Florists, "containing 
11 descriptionET of these and all the other leading va- 
3ties, will be mailed free to Florists and commer- 
al growers only. Our booklet, "How to Grow 
3ters." price 10 cents, free with every order of 
3ter Seeci. 

[ames Vick's Sons 

ROCHESTER, N. Y. 



Vick's 
Hikado Pink 



The Rochester 

One of the most beautiful Asters ever 
introduced. Selected by the Chamber of 
Commerce as the oflBcial flower of Roch- 
ester, and re-named by us at their re- 
^ quest. A mid-season, freely blooming, 
large flowering variety. 

PRICES 

1/84 01 $0.20 

1/32 02 30 

1/16 oz. 45 

1/8 oz. 75 

1/4 oz. 1.25 

i/2 oz 2.25 

j oz 4.00 



J.. 



■ -^ f^T'^ri'*^ fW" r^:^y^\- 



:.^y:jr^- 



52 



The Weekly Florists' Review* 



Mabch 9, 1911. 



ASPARAGUS SEED 

TRUE PLUMOSUS NANUS 
Wisconsin Greenhouse Grown. 

Not to be compared with tlie Inferior Calit'ornla and 

Florida outdoor Krown seed. 
1000 seeds, $4.00: 6U0U. $18.75; 10,000, $35.00 

G. H. HUNKEL CO. •.* SEEDSMEN 

MILWAUKEE, WIS. 

Mention The Review when you write. 

Mr. Richardson. Do you not take 
any of them from the Agricultural De- 
partment? 

Mr. Green. Yes; three seed analysts 
from the Agricultural Department; in 
other words, scientific men versed in 
the testing of seeds. 

Mr. Richardson. You struck this 
committee at an unfortunate time. We 
have just had a good deal of experience 
about getting scientific boards or com- 
missions. 

Mr. Green. I am sorry for that. We 
like the scientific fellows pretty well, 
sometimes; and sometimes we do not. 
They are like all people; they are prone 
to error at times. 

Mr. Adamson. I suppose he thought 
this committee looked like a good group 
to select hayseeds from. (Laughter.) 

Mr. Green. Gentlemen, speaking se- 
riously, some such method as that is 
likely, in my opinion, to prove far more 
effective for proper regulation of the 
seed trade of the country — ^of the grass 
seed trade of the country, as these gen- 
tlemen [the garden seed dealers pres- 
ent] wish me to correct myself — than 
any such hearing as this in the brief 
time at our disposal. 

Mr. Townsend. Did I understand that 
improvements are being made all the 
while; that this is growing better con- 
stantly by the agitation you and these 
gentlemen are giving to the subject? 

Mr. Green. I would not like to put it 
personally that way. But things are 
growing better by the general agitation. 

Mr. Townsend. The farmers are grad- 
ually coming to understand that it pays 
to plant good seeds rather than weeds? 

Mr. Green. Yes; and gradually be- 
coming more and more willing to pay 
for them. 

Mr. Esch. How many states have 
regulations against seed adulteration? 

Mr. Green. I do not know whether 
there is any gentleman here who could 
answer that question accurately or not. 
Mr. Boyles, could you? 

Mr. Boyles. I think Mr. Smith, our 
attorney, could answer it better than I. 
Probably there are twelve. I think 
there were five bills introduced this 
winter. 

Mr. Esch. Is there any uniformity in 
the standards fixed by those states? 

Mr. Boyles. A few states have stand- 
ards fixed, but most of them have not. 
Most of them have realized the unwise 
feature of standards. 

Mr. Green. I am perfectly in earnest 
about this commission. 

The Chairman. You are just wasting 
breath on it. 

Mr. Richardson. Do not think about 
a commission. 

Mr. Adamson. I do not think you 
could pass any sort of a commission bill 
through the House now. 

The Chairman. In view of the fact 
that no one can distinguish between 
many seeds that pay a duty under the 
tariff bill from those that come in free, 
we might refer it to the tariff board. 

Mr. Richardson. Take these gentle- 
men sitting around here; they have 
plenty of sense and they understand 




Dreer's Superb Strains of the Best Asters 

Our stocks of the following Asters are grown under our own supervision and we are quite sure 
that nothing finer in quality can be had at any price from any source. Our yearly increasing sales 
are the best evidence that they give complete satisfaction. 



DREER'S "PEERLESS PINK" 

A magnificent new variety which may briefly 
be described as an improved late - branching 
shell-pink. Flowers of largest size, of rich shell- 
pinli. borno nn long, strong stems, making them 
one of the finest for cutting. 50 cents per trade 
packet; JM.OO per o.unce. 

DREER'S SUPERB 
LATE-BRANCHING 

The finest of all September-blooming Asters. 
Our stock has been re-selected for a number of 
years and is n> w as perft^ct as the most pains- 
taking care ran make it, We offer the following 
eight distinct colors: 

Azure Blue or (leei> lavender Deep Purple 
Pale Lavender Rose-pink 

Deep Crimson Sbell-pink 

Deep Rose Pure Wbtte 

Any of the above. 2.) cents per trade packet; 
$1.00 per ounce. Finest mixed, all colors. 2'> 
cents per trade packet; 75 cents per ounce. 

CREGO'S GIANT COMET 

The perfection of Comet Asters, immense fluffy 
flowers, five Inches and over anro-s. borne on 
long, strong stf ms, coming into bloom in August, 
continuing through September. We offer pure 
white and sheD-plnk, 40 cents per trade packet ; 
|2 00 per ounce. 



DAYBREAK 

A fine mid-season Aster of symmetrical growth. 
18 inches high, with good- ized, densely double 
soft pink flowers. 50 cents per trade packet; $2.50 
per ounce. 

VIOLET KING 

A fine late-branching variety of exceptionally 
fret* growth, bearing verv/Targe double flowers of 
a pleasing shade of sof^^iolet. 30 cents per trade 
packet ; |1 .50 per ounc 

EAI^ WONDER 

The earliest of all Afters, blooming at the end 
of June ; flowers of good size on good stems and 
valuable where early flowers are desired. We 
offer pure white and pink, 40 cents per trade 
packet; 12.00 per ounce. 

QUEEN OP THE MARKET 

.\n early-flowering, first-class Aster, coming 
into bloom in July, lasting well through August; 
llowers of large size on long, strong stems. A 
good variety for growing under glass. We can 
supply in the following six defirab e colors: 

Pink Brifirht Rose 

Purple Crimson 

White Lavender 

Any of the above, 20 cents per trade packet; 60 
cents per ounce. Finest mixed, all colors, 15 
cents per trade packet; 50 cents per ounce. 



The above are hut a few of the many Asters which we offer. For a complete list see pages 2 and 3 
of our current wholesale price list. If you do not have a copy we will be pleased to send one to any 
Florist on application. New crop seeds of almost all kinds are now in stock, and early orders from 
the trade are solicited. 

Henry A. Dreer,ci.el.'.tst, Philadelphia, Pa. 



^'7"^»'r7''Jw3if7'T*fJTW^ 



*£>rfB<.>yu» ^.1- • «7 -yr •^. r- f "Tfr'T^r ^ 



March 9, 1911. 



The Wcc WFlorists' Review^ 



53 








BEGONIA and 
GLOXINIA BULBS 



We have the finest stock of these bulbs, and have been supplying the most 
critical trade for a number of years. 

All carefully selected and graded, true to name and color. 

Every florist should grow at least a few of these bulbs, for selling in pots during 
the summer months, and can also, by transplanting in large pots, grow specimen 
plants for September and October blooming. 



We offer them in the following names and colors : 



Begonia Bulbs 



Single flowering. 
_ keen, rose, red, 

or mixed, dozen, 40c; 100, $2.50; 1000, $20.00. 

Begonia Duke of Zeppelin, dozen, $1.00; 100, $7.00. 
Begonia La Fayette, dozen, $1.50; 100, $10.00. 



White, yellow, pink, nan- 
dark red, salmon, orange. 



Begonia Bulbs 



orange, yellow, 
red, salmon, or 



Double flowering. White, 
rose, dark rose, dark red, 
mixed, dozen, 60c; 100, $4.00; 1000, $35.00. 

Begonia Worthiana, dozen, $2.00; 100, $15.00. 

Begonia Butterfly, dozen, $3.00; 100, $20.00. 

^^1 l^-y i n i A IRll I h^ '^^^ handsomest of our blooming plants, the rich and varied coloring of the 
^^ ■ w.^. I II lU mJ U I E#9 flowers being interesting in the extreme, many of them beautifully speckled ; 
flowers 3 inches long by 2 inches in diameter, upright and pendulous ; colors various and exceedingly rich in appearance. 
Emperor Frederick, red bordered white. Mont Blanc, pure white. _ Defiance, scarlet. 

Emperor William, violet bordered white. Violacea, dark violet. King of the Reds, deep scarlet. 

Princess Elizabeth, white bordered blue. Madame Helene, white crowned violet. Prince Albert, dark violet. 

Princess Mathilda, white bordered rose. Queen Wilhelmina, dark rose. Fine mixed. 

Per dozen, 76c; per 100, $5.00; per 1000, $47.50. 




50 Barclay Street, 
NEW YORK 



MeDtion The Review wheu you write. 



ASPARAGUS SEED 

TRUE PLUMOSUS NANUS 
Wisconsin Oreenhouse Grown. 

Not to bo compared with the Inferior California and 

Florida outdoor grown seed. 
1000 seeds. $4. OO: 500i>, $18.75; 10.000. $35.00 

G. H. HUNKEL CO. / SEEDSMEN 

MILWAUKEE, WIS. 

this seed business, and if they come and 
tell us a plain tale do you not think 
this committee can pass on it fairly? 

Mr. Green. I have great confidence 
in the fairness of this committee. 

Mr. Richardson. They will pass upon 
it fairly after hearing you gentlemen 
giving facts and statements; we do not 
want any commissions. 

Mr. Green. I have confidence in this 
^^-committee. I do not care whether you 
have scientific men on it or not. But 
I would like to get together with some 
men where I could have an interchange 
of views with them. 

Mr, Richardson. They would bring 
their report in and we would probably 
not pay any attention to it. But you 
come in here, practical men, talking 
common sense, and the committee has 
no other purpose than to do what is 
right for the good of the country, and 
we will pass on it all right, instead of 
having a commission. 

The Chairman. We have been mak- 
ing progress in reference to this legiala- 
■ tion, I think; do you not, Mr. Green? 
j Mr. Green. Yes; I think there is 

I very marked progress, 
j The Chairman. On both sides? 

Mr. Green. Yes. 
j The Chairman. The committee has 

learned some things and so has the seed 
trade. 



STOKES' 

NEW CROP 



Aster Seeds 



Queen of Hxe Blarket. The earliest Aster. 
Separate colors, white, pink, crimson, blue, 
purple or mixed, trade pkt., 20c; oz., 60c. 

Giant Cresro Aster. Immense flowers, 4 
inches across. White, shell-pink, each, trade 
pkt ,40c; oz .I2..W. 

Giant Comet Aster. Very lonjr, twisted 
petals. Snow white, pink, crimson and lavender, 
trade pkt., .SOc; oz , $1.50. 

Stokes* Late BrancUnK. Finest strain 
late branching aster that is possible to obtain. 
Separate colors, shell-pink, white, rose, crimson, 
lavender and purple, trade pkt., SOc; oz., $1.00. 

Daybreak^ Delicate shell-pink, trade pkt., 
40c; oz., $2.00. 



Purity. Pure white, companion to Day- 
break, trade pkt., 40c; oz., |2.00. 

Lavender Gem. The finest lavender aster, 
trade pkt., 40c; oz., |2.50. 

Violet King. Slender curled petals, large 
violet flowers, trade pkt., 40c; oz., $1.75. 

Crimson King:. The finest aster of its color, 
trade pkt., 40c; oz., $2.00. 

Stokes' Mixture of Asters for Florists. 

A mixture consisting of white, pink and the 
brightest of red, suitable for cut flowers, trade 
pkt., 25c; oz.,$1.25. 



Florists' Wholesale Price List Now Ready. 

STOKES' SEED STORE 

219 Market Street, PHILADELPHIA, PA. 



Mention The Review when you write. 



Aster Seed 

And all other SEEDS for the 
Florist. Send want list and 

get prices by return mail. 

Davis Nursery & Seed Co., 

UnCA, NKW TORK 

Mention The Review when "'ou write 



SEEDS 



Best that srrow • We sell 
direct to gardeners and florists 
at wholesale. B'g:, beautiful 
catalogue free. Wiite today. 

ABGHIA8' SEED STORE, Box 63, 8EDALIA, MO. 

Mention The Review when you write. 






r*"r*frHF 



Unrivaled for size of flower, purity of 
color and highest development. They 
represent THB BKST specialists have 
so far produced. 

My seeds, absolutely fresh, of Primula Chinen- 
sis, Forbesi. Kewensis, Obconica, Ronsdorfer & 
Lattmann's Hybrids are now on hand. List free. 

J. L. SCHILLER, Toledo, O. 

Always mention the Florists' Review 
when writing: advertisers. 



!'■ 



54 



The Weekly Florists' Review. 



Mabch 9, 1011. 



ASPARAGUS SEED 

TRUE PLUMOSUS NANUS 
Wisconsin Qreenhouse Qrown. 

Not to be compared with the Inferior California and 

Florida outdoor grown seed. 
lOOOsoeds. $4.0u; 5(XiO, $18.75; It.OOO, $35.00 

G. H. HUNKEL CO. •.' SEEDSMEN 

MILWAUKEE, WIS. 

Mention The Review when you write. 

Mr. Green. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. And we are much 
nearer now than we were when we re- 
ported the bill originally? 

Mr. Green. Yes, unquestionably. 

The Chairman. I think after a while 
we will find you will come in here, as 
some people did the other day on an- 
other bill to which they were opposed 
some years ago, and all advocate a 
proposition. 

Mr. Green. I think so. 

Mr. Richardson. I can tell you what 
you could expect if you got a commis- 
sion. You would expect this committee 
to take the verdict of that commission 
and act on it. 

Mr. Green. No; I would not expect 
that of any congressional committee. 
I would think that the report of that 
commission would receive due weight. 

Mr. Hubbard. You would expect 
them to agree with you, would you not, 
substantially, and if so, they would sim- 
ply come here and say what you would 
say, would they not? 

Mr. Adamson. You would like to 
know that the commission has your 
views when you parted, would you not? 
That is generally the situation. 

Mr. Green. Yes. 

Mr. Eichardson, You would give the 
commission your views, and you would 
expect them to carry them out. 

Mr. Adamson. Nobody wants a com- 
mission except to adopt his views. 

Mr. Green. Yes. We have great con- 
fidence in them, because we believe our 
views are right. 

Mr. Eichardson. You see, we have 
seen all that demonstrated with other 
commissions, and we are tired of them. 



THE DAVIS SEED CO. 

The incorporation of the John B. 
Davis Seed Co., Sturgeon Bay, Wis., 
was reported in this column a few 
weeks ago. The following is from a 
recent issue of the Sturgeon Bay Advo- 
cate, where it appeared under the head, 
"Shipbuilders Engage in Seed Busi- 
ness " : 

"A new seed company that will bid 
for the patronage of the public and 
good will of the farming community in 
this county the ensuing season is the 
John B. Davis Seed Co., recently incor- 
porated under the state law. The or- 
ganization is composed of John B. 
Davis, president and general manager; 
August Eieboldt, vice-president; Jo- 
seph Wolter, treasurer, and Jos. M. 
Schauer, secretary. Each one of these 
individuals is well known in the busi- 
ness life of our city and is counted 
among its most stable and reliable 
citizens. Mr. Davis, the head of the 
concern, has for a number of years 
been identified with the W. W. Bar- 
nard Co., and is therefore well known 
to the farming community of the 
county. The new company will make 
its headquarters in the building and 
premises formerly occupied by the W. 
W. Barnard Co., the latter having with- 
drawn from the county entirely. The 
company are seedsmen, growers of 



Currle's Flower Seeds '^l^^^^"*^ 



Antlrrblnum, arlant flowering, separate colors and 

mixed, per oz.,4wc; tr. pkt., 10c. 
Asters, all the leading varieties. 
Asparagrus Plumosus Nanu8,KreenhouBe-Krown,1000 

seeds, $3.50. 
Asparagus Spreofirerl, 1000 seeds, 7Kc. 
Candytuft, giant Uyaclnth-flowt red. per oz., 20c. 
Oobaea Scandens, blue and white, 86c and 70c per oz. 



Oaleadula. 

Lobelia, in variety, 1000 seeds, 10c. 

Salvia Bonfire, ti.BO per oz.; 600 seeds, 26c, 

Salvia Splendens, Precocity, Zurich. 

Petunias, named varieties, 1000 seeds, 26c; Oiants of 

California and Ruffled Oiants, 3Sc. 
Sweet Peas, Stocks, Verbenas, etc. 



Caladium Esoulentmn, Elephant's Ear. Extra large. 9 to 12-inch, 85c per doz ; $6.00 per 100. 
Second size. 7 to 9-inch, 60c per doz. ; $3.50 per 100. Third size. 5 to 7-lnch, 35c per doz. ; |2.00 per 100. 
Mammotli Excelsior Pearl Tuberoses, first size, 11.00 per 100; $9.00 per 1000. 
Lily ol tlie Valley, giant forcing. From cold storage, roady for forcing, $14.00 per 1000. 

Send lor 1911 Florists* CataloBue. 



CURRIE BROS. CO., 312 Broadway, MILWAUKEE, WIS. 



Mention The Review when you write 



Sure-Blooming 
Double Pearl 



TUBEROSES 



Quality 



3 to 4 inches, splendid quality, per 100, $0.50; per 1000, $4.50 

4 to 6 inches, large bulbs per 100, 1.00 ; per 1000, 9.00 

Peonies, Cycas Steins, Gladioli, Dalilias, Fern Balls, 

Madeira and Cinnamon Vine Roots, Begonias, 

Cannas, Gloxinias and Caladiums. 

Write for Wholesale Bulb List. 

Johnson Seed Company, 217 Market St., Philadelphia, Pa. 



Mentioo The Review when you write 



GLADIOLI 

I can supply MADAME MONNERET in 1st, 2nd 
and 3rd sizes, in large quantities. Write for prices. Amer- 
ica, Mrs. King, Easter, Eugene Scribe, Florida, Gea Paul, 
Klondyke, President Taft, Golden Queen and many others. 

Send for trade list. 

E. E. STEWART, Rives Junction, Mich. 



MentloD The Review when you write. 



Western Headquarters 

for finest cold storage 

MLEY PIPS 

Order now for Easter forcing. 
$14.00 per 1000; $1.50 per 100. 

H. N. BRUNS 

3040 W. Madiapn Street, CHICAQO 

Mention The Review when you write. 

GLADIOLUS 

Cinnamon Vines, Madeira Vines, 
Lilies, Iris, Dapline Cneorum, 
Syrinsa Japonica and Wistarias. 

Write tor Price list 

E, S. MILLER, Wading River. N.Y. 

ICf%|||%A99 76 Barclay street. 
U|I|IV NKW YORK CITt 

U U M U Hiih Gride leeat a%i Bulbs 

CARL. R. OLOJBCKMER, Manager. 



w 



SEEDS Fresh 
Mable SEEDS 



For Early Sowing 

Trade pkt. Oz. 
SsItU Clara Bedman, "Bon fire "..25c |2.26 

Salvia Splendena 16c 1.00 

Verbena, S. & I. choice mammoth 

mixed 26c 1.50 

Verbena, 8. <& I. choice mammoth, 

separate colon 25c 1.26 

Lobelia Crystal Palace Compaeta 25c 

Lobelia Speelosa (Trailing) 15c 

Besonla Vernon, 1-16 oz., 50c 25c 

BegOBla Lamlnosa. Aery dark scarlet.40c 
Petania, Gianti of Califomla, 1-16 

oz.. |2.00 60c 

Asters (Vick&Hill trrown). See catalogue. 

SKIDELSKY & IIWIN CO. 

1215 Betz BulldinK 
PHILADELPHIA, PA. 

Send for our new catalogue. 



Mention The Review when you write 

BURNETT BROS. 

SEEDS :: BULBS t: PLANTS 
72 Ck>rtlandt St.. NEW YORK CITT 



,"■>'' "«'« 



MABCH 9. 1911. The Weekly Florists^ Review* 



■,T.. .^'T. •» ;' 



55 



XXX SEEDS 

LIBERAL TRADE PACKETS. 

PETUNIA STAR, improved, finest marked 

flowers, very fine, pkt., 20c. 
PETUNIA GIANT, single fringed, large 

and fine, pkt., 20c. 
SALVIA BONFIRE, .finest grown, bril- 
liant scarlet and compact, large pkt., 

20c. 
PHLOX DRUM, PUMILA, very dwarf, 

grand for pots, fine color, pkt., 20c. 
CHINESE PRIMROSE, finest grown, sin- 
gle and double, mixed, 600 seeds, $1.00; 

% pkt., 50c. 
PRIMULA KEWENSIS, the grand new 

sweet-scented yellow Primrose, pkt., 

20c. 
PRIMULA OBCONICA, large flowering 

hybrids, mixed, very fine; 1,500 seeds, 

50c. 
PRIMULA OBCONICA GIGANTEA. The 

new giants, immense flowers, mixed; 

1,000 seeds, BOc. 
CINERARIA, large- flowering dwarf, 

mixed, 1,000 seeds, 50c; % pkt., 25c. 
CilANT PANSY, finest grown, critically 
. selected, 6,000 seeds, $1.00; % pkt., 50c; 

oz., $2.50. Pkt. Mme. Perret with every 

$1.00 pkt. 
COLEUS, New Hybrids, fine colors, pkt., 

20c. Grand. The best new giants. 
LOBELIA EMPEROR WILLIAM, dwarf, 

very dark blue, white eye, finest of all 

the Lobelias, pkt., 20c. 
rORENIA FOURNIERI, new giant, extra 

fine pot plant, pkt., 20c. Showy. 
CANDYTUFT, new giant hyacinth-fiow- 

ered; a great cutter, pkt., 20c. 
THUNBERGIA, finest mixed; pkt., 20c. 
COBAEA SCANDENS, purple; pkt., 20c. 
ALYSSUM COMPACTUM. Most dwarf 

and compact variety grown; pkt., 20c. 
VERBENA, finest giants mixed; pkt., 20c. 

CASH. Liberal extra count. 

JOHN r. RUrr, Florist Seedsman. 

Shiremanstown, Pa. 

Mention The Review wHen you write 



VICK & HILL CO. 

P. 0. Box 61 3 ROCHESTBt, N. Y. 

Growers of high grade 

Aster Seed 

When in the market for 
quality stock, write us. 



Mention The Keview when you wnte. 

Asparagus Plumosus Nanus 

Ne'w Crop — 6re«nhou8e-Erown 

100 seeds, 50c; SOO seeds. $2.00; 1000 seeds. $3.60; 

10,000 seeds. $30.00. 

Sprenseri, 26c per 260 seeds: 76c per 1000 seeds; 

$2.75 per 6000 seeds. 

Oar Viewer Seed Catalogue free on application. 

THE MOORE SEED CO., ȴifflS5gbS- 

Mention The Review when you wnte. 

If in need of Sprlne Bulbs, or Seeds 
of Best quality and at reasonable price, 
send for Special Quotations. Also 
Reduced Stock of Cold Storage Lilies. 

-ADDRESS— 

H. H. BERGER & CO. 

70 Warren St., NEW lOBK 

Mention The Review when you write. 

Headquarters for 

Spring Bulbs 

Send tor Trade List 

JOHN LEWIS CHUDS/^^'iffS:;',".- 

Mention The Review when you write. 




Flower Seeds l:^*^!^ 

Asparacrus Plumosas Nanus, true greenhouse- 

grown seed, 1000 seeds, $1.00; 60OO seeds, $18.76. 

Asparasus Spreneeri, 1000 seeds, 76c; 6000 

seeds, $3.26. Tr. Pkt. Oz. 

Alyssum Little Gem.... $0.10 $0.36 

Candytuft, Oiant Hyacinth 10 .26 

Cobaea Scandens. blue 10 .30 

Dracaena Indlvlsa 10 .30 

Forgret-Me-Not Victoria 16 1.00 

Lobelia Speciosa, trailing 10 .60 

Lobelia Crystal Palace Compacta 16 1.00 

MlKUonette Olant Machet 10 .60 

Mignonette Allen's Defiance 10 .30 

Petunia Giants of California. 26 

Salvia Splendens 16 1.00 

Salvia Clara Bedman 26 2.26 

Smllax. new crop 10 .26 

Stocks, Ten Weeks 76 2.00 

Verbena, Mammoth 16 1.00 

Complete catalogue Free. Ask for it. 

G. H. HUNKEL CO., Seedsmen, Milwaukee, Wis. 

Mention The Review when you write. 



NEW CROP FIORISTS' FLOWER SEEDS 

Vinca, separate colors and mixed, oz-, 50c. 

Verbena, mammoth, in colors or mlxod, oz., 

60c. Salvia splendens, oz., 11.25; Bonfire, oz.. 

12.00. Cobaea sca^d^ns, "tocks. Lobelia, etc. 

Writp for Wholesale Pfltalngue 

WEEBER & DON'VnIittrr 

114 ChambOTB St., Ne\r York City 



Mention The Review when you write. 

SOW NOW! 

Fresh crop only. Asparaenn Plnmosng Na- 

nun, true greenhouse-grown seed only. Per 1000 
seeds. $4.60; per 5000 sepds, $?0.00. For larger lots, 
special prices. This 8»ed has been selected by hand 
and will germinate over 90 per cent by right treat- 
ment. Ask also for my catalogue. It's free. 

O. V. ZAN6EN, Seedsman 
Hoboken, .... New Jersey 

Ment ion The Review when you writs. 

AMERICAN PANST SEEDS 

Hesperian Strain. A selection of the most 
beautiful varieties, noticeable for their large size 
and perfection of form and co'orlng. We offer this 
mixture aft<»r 30 years' experience In pansv seed 
and plant growing for both the wholesale and retail 
trade, and recommend it for those having the most 
critical customers. Pkt. 26c: 1000 seeds eoc; ^-oz. 
$1.25: >4-oz. $2 26: oz. $7 00. Price list of other mix- 
tures and separate varieties free to any address. 

WILLIAM TOOLE A SONS. Pansy Heiglrts. Baraboo, Wis. 

Mention The Review when vou write. 



fancy varieties and buyers of commer- 
cial peas and beans, dealers in garden, 
flower and field seeds, growers and 
dealers in trees and plants and bulbs, 
and especially gladiolus bulbs." 



SEED NOTES FBOM HOLLAND. 

, Writing to one of the English trade 
.iournals, a Hollander said under a late 
February date: 

"In general the farmers here prefer 
to sow their summer crops early, and 
some of them have alreadv sown beans, 
peas and spinach. Seed growers at 
Andijk are already planting cabbages 
for seed. This early sowing and plant- 
ing may cause heavy losses if we get 
some days of sharp frost, but at present 
the plants are budding. Several grow- 
ers around Andi.ik are laying out gar- 
dens to grow rhubarb. Kale crops look 
well, and this article yielded well in 
North Holland, but this culture is going 
backwards in the Gron districts, as in- 
sect pests destroyed the seed crops dur- 
ing several years. 

"After a two years' slow trade in 
nasturtium, a demand has again sprung 
up for it, and the leading English 
houses have placed contract orders in 
this country. Large quantities of nas- 
turtium are grown yearly on the Zea- 
land Isles. Several acres of curled 
Mustard Southern Giant will be grown 
here this summer for the American 
trade." 



Lily bulbs have two arch 
enemies — green fly and too 
much water. When lilies are 
bad, one or both prevail as a 
general thing. Of course, 
sometimes the bulbs are at 
fault, but 75 9^ of the time 
they are not. Any grower 
who permits his lilies to be 
infested with green fly doesn't 
deserve good lilies. He has 
no more business to allow 
green fly on his lilies than 
he has to allow fleas on his 
body. Again, a grower will 
permit a greenhorn to water 
the bulbs, whereas it takes a 
man who knows how and 
when. Any grower who buys 
Horseshoe Brand Giganteum 
Lily Bulbs and gives them 
the attention they deserve, 
cannot help but have first- 
class lilies at any time of the 
year, with a minimum of loss. 
There are positively no better 
bulbs grown anywhere in the 
world and no one takes as 
much pains toward quality 
as the producers of the Horse- 
shoe Brand Products. 

Of course, they cost more 
than others, because they cost 
more to produce. But they 
don't cost more than they are 
worth. Try them. 

RALPH N. WAKD 
&C0. 

12 West Broadway 

Not How Cheftp j^ w: mm/ V O D K' 
Bnt H«w Good Hi C TT I LP K IV 

Cold storage Giganteum 
and Speciosum ready for de- 
livery now or at any time 
during 1911. Order now for 
summer flowering. 




The Weekly Florists^ Review. 



Mabch 9, 1911. 



Carnation Rooted Cuttings ""^SL^" 

Winsor per 100, $2.50; per 1000, $20.00 

Enchantress, White Enchantress, Beacon," 3.00; " 25.00 



Edward Reid, 

WHOLESALE FLORIST 1619-21 Ranstead St., Philadelphia, Pa. 



Mention The Review when you write. 



Wholesale Cut Flower Prices. 

Philadelphia. March 8. 1911. 

Per doz. 

Beauty. Specials $7.50 @ #9.00 

Short 1.00® 2.00 

Per 100 
115.00 
12.00 



The Killarneys. Fancy 

Select 110.00 @ 

Ordinary 4.00® 

Richmond, Splect . ; 15.00 @ 

Ordinary 4.00 @ 

My Maryland. Bride, Select 10.00 @ 

Ordinary... 4.00 @ 

Melody 8.00 @ 

Carnations. Fancy 3.00 @ 

[[ Select 

Ordinary 

White Lilac, .per doz., JO 75 @ |1.00 
Snapdragons, per doz.. 1.50 @ 2.00 

Cattleyas perdoz.. 6.00 

Gardenias... per doz., 12.00 @ 4.00 
Easter Lilies, per doz., 1.50 

Callas perdoz., 1.00® 1.25 

Asparagus per bunch. 

Strings, each. t0.75@ 

Adiantiun 1 . 

Smilax [\',\ 12 

Valley ' ,[ 2 

Violets, single .' .' " 

double 

Daisies 1 

Sweet Peas 

Mignonette 2 

Paper Whites. Romans 2 

Daffodils 2 

Tuiip« ;;; 2 

Freesias 2 

Acacia Pubescens, per bunch, ^.50 



8.00 
20.00 

8.00 
12.00 

6.00 
15.00 

4.00 

2.50 
.00 



.50 
1.00 



00 
50 
00 
35 
50 
,50 
50 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 



1.50 

20.00 

4.00 

.50 

.75 

3.00 

1.00 

4.00 

3.00 

3.00 

3.00 

3.00 



Boston, March H, 1911. 



Beauty. Specials ^0 

Extra 25 

Short Stems 6 

Bride and Maid ... 2 

Killarney 2 

Whito Killarney ....[ 2 

My Maryland 2 

Mrs. Aaron Ward 2 

Richmond, Rhea Reid 2 

Carnations 1 

Cattleyas 30 

Lily of the Valley 1 

Lilium Longiflorum 6 

Gardenias 6 

Single Violets 

Double Violets 

Antirrhinums . 4 

Mignonette ] 3 

Sweet Pf as 

Paper White Narcissi ['. 1 

Yellow Narcissi 1 

Roman Hyacinths l 

Tulips 1 

Callas 8 

Marguerites 



Per 100 
00 @ $50.00 
00 ® 30.00 



00 @ 
00 @ 
.00 @ 
.00 @ 
.00 @ 
.00 @ 
.00 @ 
.50 @ 
.00 @ 
.50 @ 
.00 @ 
.00 @ 
.25 @ 
.25 @ 
.00 @ 
.00 @ 
.20 @ 
.00 @ 
.00 @ 
.00 @ 
.00 @ 
.00 @ 
.50 @ 



20.00 
6.00 

10.00 

10.00 

10.00 
8.00 

16.00 
3.00 

40.00 
3.00 
8.00 

10.00 

..50 

.50 

6.00 

6.00 

.75 

1.50 

1.50 

1.50 

1.50 

10.00 
1..50 



Buffalo, March H, 1911. 



Per 

Beauty. Specials $40.00 @ 

Fancy 30.00 <(t 

Extra 15.00 it 

Firsts 10.00 ^ 

Shorts .").00 ® 

Bride and Maid (j.OO in 

Killarney .5.00 ® 

White Killarney 6.00 ® 

Richmond C.OO ® 

Maryland .l.OO & 

Carnations 2.00 ii 

Lily of the Valley 3.00 ® 

Longiflorams 12.00 tr 

Violets AO 61 

Sweet Peas m ii 

Calla Lilies 12.00 it 

Double Von Sion 2.00 fe 

Romans 3.(X) it 

Trumpet Major 2.00 (ct 

Tulips :!.00 (f^ 



100 
$;")0.00 

:».00 

20.00 

15.00 

8.00 

10.00 

12.. 50 

15.00 

15.00 

10.00 

3.00 

4.00 

15.(M) 

.'<0 

1.00 

15.00 

3.00 

4.00 

3.00 

5.00 



The Eeview sends Scott's Florists' 
Manual postpaid for $5. 

The Mum Manual, by Elmer D. Smith, 
for 40 cents sent to The Eeview. 

Montgomery on Grafted Boses, sent 
by The Review for 25 cents. 



Orchids, Easter Lilies, Fancy Roses, 

Carnations, Valley and Sweet Peas 

Open from 7:S0 a. m. to 8 p. m. 

Pliiladelpliia Cut Flower Company, "^"^^U 

We have everythiag in season in Cut Flowers. 1517 Sansom Street, PHILADELPHIA 

Mention The Review when you write. 

WILLIAM J. BAKER '*rHg%^SLii??i!" 

Wholesale Florist CLT FLOWERS in variety. Hne quality. 

Mention T^ Review when you write. 

Carnations, violets and Tea Roses. 

Eugene Bernhelmer, IIS. I6tli St., PHILADELPHIA, PA. 

Mention The Review when you write. 

Fine Sweet Peas, Daffodils, Carnations and Roses 

^^nmiltf^l r^ I IIIkVa 1 Kood murket for more Choice Floweri 
^*^*"*****^^* ■ • ■-■■■^>^f S Mole St., PhUadelplila, Pa. 

Mention The Review when you write. 



John W. Hclntyre 

Headquarters for Lilac, DaflFodils, Yel- 
low Daisies. All you want. 

1601 Ranstead St., PHILADELPHIA 

Mention The Review when you write. 

ROSES 



I W VnilNH GERMANTOWN. 
J» ff» IvfUll\Jj Plilladelplila. X*a. 

Mention The Review when you write. 

UNITED STATES 
CUT FLOWER CO 

Wholesale Florists 
ELIVIIRA. NEWYORH 

Mention The Review when von write. 

Wholesale Cut Flower Prices. 

St. Louis. March S, 1911. 
Per doz. 

Beauty. Specials 14.00 @ $5.00 

" Extfa 2.00® 3.00 

Shorts 75® 1.00 

Per 100 

Bride and Maid I :<00 @ $ C.OO 

Hichmond :!.00 @ 8.00 

Maryland :i.00 8.00 

White Killarney ;!.00 @ 8.00 

Killarney 3.00® S.OO 

Carnations 1.00® 2.00 

Lily of the Valley 2.00® 3.00 

Harrisii 10.00 & 12.50 

\iolets 15® .-lO 

Paper Whites 2.00 @ 3.00 

Sweet Peas 2.5 @ .50 

Tulips 2.00® 3.00 

.Tnrquils 2.00® 3.00 

VonSions 2.00® 1.00 



The Munk Floral Co. 

Wbolesale Gro^^ers of 

CUT FLOWERS 

and Jobbers of 

FLORISTS' SUPPLIES 
Columbus, t Ohio 

JOS. G. NEIDINGER 

1513-15 Germaatown Ave., PHIIADEIPHIA 

OUR SPECIALTIES: 

Wax Flowers, Wax Flower Designs 

Wheat Sheaves, Wicker Pot Covers, Plant Stands 

Send for handsomely Illustrated catalogue; 
can also be used as design book. 

Mention The Review when you write 



H.G.Berning 



WHOLKSALB 
nx>RI8T 

1402 Pine Street 
ST. LOUIS. MO« 




Wholesale 
Florist 



C. A. KUEHN, 

Cut Flowers and riorisis' Supplies 

Manufacturer of the Patent Wire Olamp Floral 
Designs. A full line of SUPPLIES always on 
hand. Write for catalogue and prices. 

1182 Pine Street, ST. LOUIS, MO. 

Wm. C. Smith 

Wholesale Floral Co. 

Wholesale Florists 

1316 Pine St., Both L.O. Phones. ST. LOUIS 
Supplies and Everythino in Sesson always on hand. 



"vy^f--:'fffi :-■.:.•?. 



Mabch 9, 1911. 



The Weekly Florists' Review* 



57 



Wholesale Cut Flower Prices. 



Chicago, March 8, 1911. 



Beauty, long stems. 

36-ln. " . 

30-ln. " . 

"20to24-ln. " . 

15-in. " . 

12-In. •' . 

short " . 



Per doz. 
15.00 @ 16.00 
4.00® 
3.00 @ 
2.50 @ 



Killamey 

White Killarney 

Bridesmaid 

Bride 

Richmond 

Mf Maryland 

Mrs. Jarrtine 

Rhea Reid 

Cardinal 

Perl^ 

Carnations, Common 

Fancy 

Violets, double 

single 

Valley 

Sweet Peas 

Mignonette 

Paper Whites 

Freesias 

Daffodils 

Jonquils 

Tulips 

Cattleyas. ... per doz., $5.00 @ |7.50 
Easter Lilies, " 1.50 

Calla Lilies . . " 1.50 



5.00 

4.00 

3.00 

2.00 

1.50 

1.00 

PerlOO 

$4.00 @ $15.00 

4.00 @ 15.00 

4.00 @ 

4.00 @ 

4.00 @ 

4.00 @ 

4.00 @ 

6.00 @ 

6.00 @ 

4.00 @ 

1.50 @ 

3.00 @ 

.50 @ 

.50 @ 

3.00 @ 

.75 @ 

4.00 @ 



3.00 @ 
2.00 @ 
2.00 @ 



12.00 
12.00 
15.00 
15.00 
15.00 
15.00 
15.00 
10.00 
2.00 
4.00 
.75 
.75 
4.00 
1.25 
8.00 
3.00 
4.00 
4.00 
3.00 
4.00 



Milwaukee, March 8, 1911. 



Beauty, Long 

Medium 

Short 

Bride and Bridesmaid 

Richmond 

Killarney 

White Killamey 

Perle 

Carnations 

Valley 

Lilies per doz. , $1.75 

Violets 

Tulips 

Romans, Paper Whites 

Trumpets 

Sweet Peas 



PerlOO 
$30.00 @ $40.00 



20.00 
6.00 @ 
4.00 @ 
4.00 @ 
4.00 @ 
4.00 @ 
4.00 @ 
2.00 @ 



.50 @ 



..■>o @ 



30.00 

10.00 

10 00 

10.00 

10.00 

10.00 

8.00 

4.00 

4.00 

12.. 50 

.75 

3.00 

3.00 

3.00 

l.iiO 



Cincinnati, March 8, 1911. 

Per doz. 

Beauty.Extra $5.00 @ $6.00 

No. 1 3.00® 4.00 

No.2 2.00® 3.00 

Shorts 1.50 @ 2.00 

PerlOO 

Killarney $ 6.00 @ $ 8.00 

8.00 
S.OO 
3.00 
15.00 
4.00 
1.00 
60.00 
1.50 
4.00 
2.00 
1..50 



Richmond 6.00 @ 

Bride 5.00 ® 

Carnations 2.00 @ 

Lilium Harrisii 10.00 @ 

Lily of the Valley 3.00 @ 

Violets 75 @ 

Cattleyas 

Sweet Peas 1 .00 @ 

Tulips 3.00 @ 

Freesias 

Jonquils 1.00 @ 



Pittsburg, March 8,^911 . 



Beauty, Specials $5 

Fancy 3 

Medium 2 

Short 

Bride and Bridesmaid ^ 

Richmond 

Killarney 5 

White Killarney 5 

My Maryland 4 

Carnations , 2 

Paper White Narcissi 

Trumpet Narcissi 3 

Tulips 3 

Cattleyas....per doz., $4.00 ® $6.00 

Valley 3. 

Lilies 8 

Violets 



Per doz. 

.00 @ $6.00 
00 @ 4.00 
00 @ 2.50 
1.50 
PerlOO 
.00 @ $10.00 
00 @ 15.00 



00 @ 
00 ® 
00 @ 
00 @ 

00 @ 
00 @ 



15.00 
15.00 
10.00 
3.00 
3.00 
4.00 
4.00 



00 @ 4.00 
00 @ 12.00 
.50 @ .75 



Your ad got us busy on Killarney; 
had to send back over $100. — Frey & 
Frey, Lincoln, Neb. 

Please discontinue my ad in the 
Classified Department; sold out. — John 
F. Flood, Montvale, Mass. 

Cut out our ad for asparagus, as we 
are entirely sold out. — Daut Bros., Deca- 

'"'■.111- „ .flill 



WELCH BROS., 226 Devonshire Street, Boston 

The Largest Wholesale House in America 

Orchids :: American Beauties :: Gardenias :: Other Seasonable Flowers 



Mention The Review when you write 



KUSIK-ECKHARDT COMPANY 

WHOLESALE CUT FLOWERS and SUPPLIES 

Manufacturers of Florists* Wire Designs 
....Shippers of Home-Grown Flowers.... 

226 North Fifth Street MINNEAPOLIS, MINN. 

Mention The Review when you write. 



Vaughan & Sperry 

WHOLESALE FLORISTS 
52-54 WABASH AVL, CHICAGO 

Write for Special Prices. 
Mention The Review when you write. 

ZECH & MANN 

Wliolesale Growers and Shippers of 

=CUT FLOWERS= 

61 Wabash Ave., CHICAGO 

Boom 218. L. D. Phone 3281 Central 
Mentiop The Review when you write. 

Hoerber Brothers 

Wholesale Growers of 

Cut Flowers 

£r^aii. Start, 01 wtf»A 1.... CHICAGO 

Long Distance Phone, Randolph 2758. 
Mention The Review when you write. 

WIETOR BROS. 

Growers of... CtSt FloWCTS 

All teletrraph and telephone orders 
given prompt attention. 

5J Wabash Ave., CHICAGO 

Mention The Review when you write. 

RICE BROTHERS 

Wholesalers of Cut Flowers 
and Florists' Supplies. 

MINNEAPOLIS, - MINN. 

Mention The Review when you write. 

Baltimore, Md. 

THE FLORISTS* EXCHANGE 

f^:^S^"sr^ Wholesale Florists 

AJl Cut Flowers in Season. 

Roses and Carnations our strong point. 

Mention The Review when you write. 



' GROWERS w SHIPPERS * 

funrwHUtt/'IjT fLOW£|CX'*'""'^ 



IHHEDUai^ 
DIUVBUISj 



Mention The Review when you write. 



Louis H. Kyrk 

Wholesale Commission Florist 

Consignments Solicited 

Cut Flowers, Florist Supplies 

110-112 L 3rd SL, CINCINNATI. OHIO 

Mention Thp RpHpw when you write. 

TheJ.M.McGullougti'sSonsCo. 

WHOLESALE COMMISSION FLORISTS 

CONSIGNMENTS SOLICITED 

Special attention given to shipping orders. 
Jobbers ol Florists' Supplies. Seeds and 
Bulbs. : : : : Price lists on application. 

Phone Main 584. 8 16 Walnnt St.. CfBclmiatl. O* 

Mention The Review when yoa write. 

E. G. GILLETT 

Wholesale Florist 

Alsi Nannfacturer of SUPERIOR WIRE WORK 

Send tor Catalogne 

131 E. Third St., Cincinnati. Ohio 

Mention The Review when you write. 

George B. Hart 

WHOLBSALB 
FLORIST 

24 Stone Street, ROCHESTER, N. Y. 

Mention The Review when you write. 

ROSES MD CARNATIONS 

FANCI FERNS AND GALAX-Hlgh-grade Stock 

OKDER8 FILLED SATISFACTORILY 

Detroit Cut Flower Supply tlouse 

Wholesale Commission Florist. H. V. Pearce, PrH. 
6 Adams Ave. West, Detroit, Mich. 

Home Phone 164. Bell. Main 974. 

Mention The Review when you write. 

PITTSBUR6H CUT FLOWER Ca 

WHOLESALE 
GROWERS.... 

121 Seventh St., PIHSBURGH, PA. 

Mention The Review when yon write. 



The McCallum Co. 

Wholesale CUT FLOWERS 

anil KliirlRtN' Sniiplr House 

Ufadqunrters ot Western Peni,sylvanu Crowers 

937 Liberty Ave.. PITTSBURG, PA. 



• fTy •: ; *t'"'fV' " 



58 



The Weekly Florists' Review* 



Mabch 9, 1911. 



H. E. FROMENT 

WHOLESALE COIIMISSION FLORIST 

Receiver and Shipper of All VarletleB of Cut Flo^i^era 

Telephones 2200 and 2201 Madison Square 

57 West 28th Street NEW YORK 



Moore, Hentz & Nash 



Wholesale 
Florists 



66-67 W. 26th St. 

NEW YORK CITY 

SHIPPING ON COMMISSION 

Telepbone 756 Madison Square 



WALTER r. SHERIDAN 

wholesale Commiaalon Dealer In 

CUT FLOWERS 

181-1S8 W. SStb St., NEW YORK 

(Established 1882) 

RecelTlnir Extra Quality American Beauties 

and all other varieties of Roses. 

Tel. 8nR2-3AS.S Madison Sq. Carnations. 

Mention Tbe Review when you write. 



HEADQUARTERS FOR NOVELTIES 

ORCHIDS A SPECIALTY 



^"'-■"'c>ir.¥ior VALLEY ""S-N^l-lNn 
GARDENIAS. DAISIES, ROSES AND CARNATIONS 

JAMES McM AN US, S.i 'c:,'. 42 W. 26th St., New Yorl. 



WILLIAM P. FORD 

Wholesale Florist 

ConBignments of Cut Flowers Solicited from Growers. 

45 W. 28th St., saasMSrs,.. New York City 



BADGLEY, RIEDEL & MEYER, Inc. 

(Successors to A. J. Guttman) 

•••Wholesale Florists... 

84 West 28th Street. NEW YORK CITY 

Phones, 1664-1665 Madison Square. Conslenments SoUelted. 



N.LECAKES&CO. 

53 W. 28th St., NEW YORK 




Tel. No. 1415-1416 
Madison Square 

Stands at CMt 

Flower Exchange 

Coogan Bldg., W. 

26th Btreet. and 34th 

Street 
Cut Flower Market. 
Specialtibs: Galax Leaves. Ferns andLeuco- 
thoe Sprays. Holly , Princess Pine. Moss. Southern 
Wild Smilax and all kinds of Evergreens. 

Creen and Bronze Galax Leaves 

Mention The Review when you write. 



9 

if 



A. MOLTZ 



Maurice L. Glass 



A. MOLTZ & CO. 

Wholesale Florists 
55-57 W. 26th St., NEW YORK 

Coosran Building 

Phones 617-618 iVIadison Square 

Mention The Review when you write. 

Why use GALAX LEAVES 

When you can buy prime prepared 

MAGNOLIA LEAVES 

Oreen and Brown, tl. 75 per basket of 1000 
leaves; 5000 leaves. $7.50 

Wherever Florists' supplies are sold, or from 

SELLER FLORIST SUPPLY CO. 
147 West 28tb Street. NSW TORK CITT 

Mention The Review when you write. 

C. BoHinra (The Busy Bees) G. H. Blakb 

BONNET S BLAKE 

Wholesale Florists. BROOKLYN, N. T. 

130 Livinsrston St., Tel. Nob. 1293-1294 Main 

HKAOQUARTERS FOR KILLARNETS 

We handle only top grrade stock of all kinds, In- 
ClndlDK the famous ppmeusy Carnations. 

Growers, Int us deinunstrate. 

MentlOD The Review when you write. 

August IVIillang 

41 W. 28th St., NEW YORK 

We are headquarters for every kind of CUT 
FLOWSRS in their season. Out-of-town 
Florists promptly attended to. Telephone for 
what you want. Tel. 8860, 8861 Hadlson Sa. 
Mention The Review when you write. 



Gold Letters 

Gummed gold, silver and purple letters, for 
inscriptions on floral desisrns. Best and cheap- 
est on the market. Send for samples and prices. 

J. LICHTENBERCER, '^*7o"^ 

Telephone Lenox 5644 
Mention The Review when vou write 

Wholesale Cut Flower Prices. 



New York, March 6, 1911. 



Beauty, Specials $30 

Fancy 20 

Extra 10 

No.l 4 

No.2 1 

Bride and Maid 1 

Chatenay 1 

Klllarney 1 

Richmond 1 

My Maryland 1 

Orchids 2o 

Carnations 1 

Easter Lllieil (> 

Callas 

Lily of the Valley 1 

Gardenias...perdoz.,$0.50 @$4.00 

Violets 

Daisies 

Sweet Peas, doz.bchs, $0.75 @$1.00 

Hyacinths 1 

Narcissi 1 • 

Mitmonette 2 

Tulips 

Daffodils 1 

Freeslas bunch. $0.06 @ $0.25 



Per 100 
00 @ $')0.00 
00 @ 30.00 



00 @ 
,00 @ 
00 @ 
00 @ 
00 @ 
00 
00 @ 
00 @ 
00 @ 
.00 fe) 
00 @ 
,00 @ 
00 @ 

10 @ 
50 @ 

,00 @ 
00 @ 
00 @ 
25 @ 
00 @ 



20.00 
8.00 
4.00 
H.OO 

10.00 
8.00 

10.00 
8.00 

50.00 
3.00 

10.00 

10.00 
2.. 50 

.35 
2.00 

1.50 
2.00 
6.00 
2.00 
2.00 



VIOLETS 



B.S.SLINN,Jr. 

WHOLXSAJJE FLORIST 
55 and 57 W. Setli St., NXW TORK CITT 

Phones 4620, 4621. 3864 Madison Square 

Roses and 
Carnations 

Mention The Review when you write. 

Reed & Keller 

122 W. 25th St., New York 

FLORISTS' SUPPLIES 

We manufacture all onr Metal Desltrns, 
Baskets, Wire Work and Novelties. 

Mention The Review when you write. 

rLORlSTS* SUPPLIES 

nC J. iiCPblTT ^^* '<^7 street. 
Ur W. mCnlll I I ) BBOOKLTN. N. T., 

Novelties in Florists' Sapplies. Phone 3699 Main 

Mention The Review when you write. 



The Greek American Florist 
Supply House 



"/' 



Wholesale and Retail 
Dealers in all kinds of 




reens 



Fancy and Daooer Ferns 
Galax, Brown and Green 




127We8t28tbSt., 



NEW TORK CITT 



Leucothoe Sprays, Princess Pine. Holly, 
Southern Wild Smilax. 

Telephone 1202 Madison 

Mention The Review when you write. 



J. J. FELLOURIS 



Wholesale and 

Retail 

Dealer in 

ALL KINDS 

...vl ... 





Fancy and 
Daceer Ferns 



Bronze and 
Qreen Oalax 



EVERGREENS 

58 West 28th Street, NEW YORK 

Telephone 2316 Madison Sq. 
Mention The Review when you write. 

A well-known Nursery House writes of 

Our Credit List 

"Had we had these reports years ago we would 
have saved several thousand dollars." Why don't 
you avoid further losses bv joining the NA- 
TIONAL FLORISTS' BOARD OF TRADE, 
S« Pine St., NewTork? 

Mention The Review when you write. 

P. J. SMITH 

Successor to Johk I. Ratnob 

Selling: Agent For Largest Orowere 

WHOLESALE COMMISSION FLORIST 

A full line of Choice Cut Flowor Stock for all 
purpo8«»s. Comprises every variety grown for New 
York market, at current prices. 

Telephone 1998 Madison Square 

49 West 28tli Street, NEW TORK CITT 

Mention The Review ^hen you writp 

E.w. Wiles of the Woods 

49 Willoughby SL, BROOKLYN, N. Y. 

GREEN GOODS OF EVERT VARIETT 

Always mention the Florists* Re«*Vw 
when wrltlns advertisers. 



ywK'?j'rf^~ 



■ *5^jf7'ipTnrY'v^^?'w •'^j^'''^^." Tf"*' 



r^T^'^-r^' 



Mabch 9, 1911. 



The Weekly Florists^ Review* 



59 



J. K* ALLEN, 



106 y^. 28th Street, NEW YORK 

Phones. 167-4468 Madison Square. 

1887-*«THE OLD RELIABLE '*-19 11 



A good pointer in this strenuous season : BQ^Let well enoug^h alone.''^plS Here, Growers, you can depend on the 
hlflfhest market prices and prompt payments. Open at 6 a. m. every day in the year. Growers : Call and see 
for yourselves. You are always welcome. In the very Center of the Wholesale district. 

Mention The Review vyhen you write. 



Charles Millang ^^l^'^'' 

Ground Floor of the Coogan Building, NIW YORK CITY 
55 and 57 West 26th Street 6 a. m. to 6 p. m. every day in the year 

Headquarters for Violets 

Most convenient store for customers In the city. Tel. 7062 Madison. 
Conslemxnents Solicited The HiKhest Values Guaranteed 



M C CADn '^^ '^' ^^^ street, mj VI 

lA* V« 1 vlll/^ ^' Madison Square 11 vW 1 Ul K 

Successor to Ford Bros. 
The Inricst Shipper and Receiver of presh Cut FlOWOrS 

<^A complete assortment of the best in the market 
can always be relied upon. 



FRANK H. TRAENDLY 



CHARLES 8CHENCK 



TRAENDLY & SCHENCK 

Wholesale Florists and Cut Flower Exchange 

131- 1S3 W. 88th St., NEW YORK 

Telephones 793 and 799 Madison Square. CONSIGNMENTS SOLICITED 



1888 



GUNTHER BROS. 



1911 



Wholesale Florists 

■* 10 Went 88th Street, lyA^mr 'VAstlr 
.el. 651 Madison Square. l^tSwV 1 UllV 

Consignments Solicited of 

FRESH CUT FLOWERS 



GROWERS' CUT FLOWER CO. 



.1. J. COAN, Manager 



Cut Flowers at Wholesale 

nager Consignments Srilicited 



Telephone 



3M West 28th Street, 6237 MaTi^:rs.u.re. NEW YORK 



Mention The Revlevr wben you write. 



KESSLER BROTHERS ^-^Sr'-^ 

Plants and Cut Flowers of every variety. Orchids our specialty. 

HEADQUARTERS For The Beautiful DREYERIi FERN 

Eeady for delivery now. Price, 2>i-in. pots, $25.00 per 100; $200.00 per 1000. 

136-138 W. 28th St., Telephone 2336 Madison Sq., NEW YORK 

Mpntion The Reyiew when vou write. 

A. L. YOUNG & CO., ^1.%'^t^k^ 

54 West 28th St., Tel. 3559 Madison square. NEW YORK 
t^CMsigofflents of Choice Cut Flowers solicited. Prompt payments. Give us a trial. 

Mention The RpvIpw when you write- 



roRSTERMANSriELDMFG.CO. 

145 West 28tli Street, NEW TORK 

Telephone 4254 Madison 

Ice Boxes and Refrigerators 

Only House Manufacturing 

VKRDIGRIS GREKN MISSION TUBS 

Mention The Review when you write. 



0.1T. MwT.T.TH. Pres. 



RoBSBT O. WOiSON, Trema. 



Greater New York 
Florist Association, Inc. 

Wholesale Commission Dealers 
, in Cat Flowers and Supplies 

162 Livingston St, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

GEOBGE W. CBAWBUCK, Hunger. 

Mention Thp Rpvipw when you write. 

BONHOT BROS. 

■■^ WHOLESALE FLORISTS 

55 and 57 W. 26tli Street, ||C||f VnDlf 
Cut Flower Exchanee, II C Iff I U II l\ 

OPEN AI.I. PAY 

An Unexcelled Ontlet for CONSIONKD FLOWEBS 

Ttieiilione No. K^) MaaioOii Su. 

Always irention the Florists' Review 
ixrbr.n writinK advertisers. 



WHOLESALE FLORISTS 




Orchids, Gardenias, Violets, 
Lily of the Valley, etc. 

Mention The Review when you write. 

A. HERRMANN 

Department Store 
for Florists* Supplies 

Factory. 709 First Ave., bet. 40th and 41st Streets. 

Office and Warerooms, 4(M, 406. 408. 410. 412 
East, Mt.h St.. NEW YORK. 

Mention The Review when you write. 

HENRY R. CRAWBUCK 

270 Pearl St.. BROOKLYN, N. T. 

wild Saili«x, H*Ux, l''emM, P»lm Leaves, etc, 

Tolephone 4Hin Main. 

^ways mention the Florists' Review 
vrhen vrriting: advertisers. 



Tel. No. 1202 Mad. Sq. 



H. Weiss. Manager. 





^^J^ 



^aJ^ 



Wholesale Florists 
187 W. 28th St., NEW YORK 

Receivers and Growers of Cut Flowers 

Consignments solicited. 
Mention The Review when yon write. 

RUSSIN & HANFLING 

OFFICE AND SALESROOM 

114 West 28th Street, NEW TORK CITY 
Tel. 3053 Madison Sq. 

MANUFACTURERS AND IMPORTERS OP 

WIUOW AND FANCY BASKeiS FOR FLORISTS 
Dealers in Florists* Supplies 

iW Our Specialties, Wheat Sheaves and Baskets. 
Mention The Review when you write. 




48 W. 29th St., NEW TORK 

Telephone 1767 Mad. Sq. 

All the latest novelties in Florists* Supplies. 

Lowest Prices. Selected Goods. 

Some choice bargains. Write me and I will tsB 

you all about them. 

Mention The Review when vou writs. 

WILLIAM H. KIEBLER 

, Wholesale Commigsion Dealer in 

CUT FLOWERS 

Room for the products of grrowers of first-clasa stock 
We have what yon want when yon want it 

88 WiUougrhby St., Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Tel. 4591 Main 
Mention The Review when yon write. 

JOS. J. LEVY 

Successor to John Seligman & Co. 

56 W. 2ath St., 

Tel. No. 4878 Mad. Sq. NEW TORK 

Opposite New York Cut Flower Co. 
Mention The Review when you write 



Georgfe Saltford 

WHOLESALE FLORIST ' 



^^^'-^•^::^!^':!r'' New York f ity 

We have room for a few more cood 
BTOwers. Prompt payments and top prlrp<i. 



Mention The Review when you write. 



■•/ •rr^v.T'm 



'J^r^rT'^^^^W^'^^riy ' 



^^Fv/J^^^r^P^T^^^-'vy V r!r'y:v»T«f5s" " 



60 



The Weekly Florists' Review^ 



Mahch 9, 1911. 




Shasta Daisies 

Alaska, CalUomla and Westxalla, origi- 
nator's stoclt, extra Btrong divisions. $2.50 per 
100; $22.50 per 1000: strong divisions. $2.00 per 
100; $19.00 per 1000. 

Cyolamen Perslouxn GiKanteum, nice 
plants, full of buds, 3, 4 and 5-iu. pots, at $7.00, 
$10.00 and $25.00. 

Delpblnlum Hybridum Grandlflorum, 
extra select field plants. 1-year-old, all shades of 
blue, $7.50 per 100. Kins of Delplilnluma, 
dark blue, with large white eye, 3-in. pots. $6.00 
per 100. Queen Wlllielmina, the best of the 
new delphiniums, light blue with white eye, 2 in. 
across, $6.00 per 100. 

Grohe's Champion Strain of Petunias— 
do not fail to try them ; you do not know the 
possibilities of single petunias till you have used 
my strain. 

Giants of California, tr. pkt.. 2.')c ; 1000 seeds, 
50c; ^ oz., $3.00; oz.. $15.00. Ruffled Giants, 
tr.pkt..35c; 1000 seeds. 60c; ^oz.,$3.50; oz., 117.50. 

Send for list of other choice plants and seeds. 
Cash, please. 

FRED QROHE, Santa Rosa, Cal. 

Mention The Review when you write. 

PHOENIX CAN ARIENSIS 

By tbe 
Thousands 

stocky plants, balled 
from clayground.per- 
fect shape, sure to 
give satisfaction. 

2 to2V2-ft..t0.66 
2»9to3 -ft.. .75 

3 to3itJ-ft.. 1.00 
3"u to 4 -ft. . 1.25 

Kentia Nurseries 

Santa Barbara, Cal. 

Mention The Review when you write. 

Rooted Carnation Cuttings loo loco 

Dorothy Gordon $5.00 $40.00 

Alma Ward 7.60 65.00 

Victory 2.00 18.00 

Harlowarden 1.75 is.oo 

Admiration 4 00 30 00 

Eldorado 1.75 15.00 

We are sold out at prngent on everything 
else. Our carnations are No. 1, and we do not 
send any other kind. 

loomis Carnation Co., " ^ ViVrs* '""• 

Loomls, Placer Co., California 

Mention The Review when you write. 

Western Headquarters 

for decorativo material. Daeser Ferns, $1.50 
Der 1000. Salal and Oreeon Grape, prices 
furnished on application. Sample feut on re- 
quest. All shipments f. o. b. Portland. 

R. STADELI, Arieta, Oregon 

Mention The Review when you write. 

Rooted Carnation Cuttings ^^i^ciSVerJ 

respect. $2.00 per lUO; $18.00 per 1000. 

Rparnn vigorous, prolific and the best keeper of 

WMLUII. all carnations. 

Enchantress. ^^^ carnation that anybody can 

grow. 

OTHER STANDARD VARIETIES. 
Expressage prepaid on $6.00 or over. Cash with order. 

a DURASNO nOWER CO.irAcffi& 

Mention Tbe Review when you write. 

ARAUCARIAS 

Araucarla Excelsa, young, healthy plants, 
seedlings with 3 or 4 tiers, at $16.00 per 100. 

Araucarla Excelsa, top cuttings from 4-in. 
pots. 3 tiers, 4 branches to each tier, 35c each. 
$32.00 per 100. 

H. KEMPF, Pacific Nursery 

S041 Baker St., SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

Mention The Review when you write. 

RAHN & HERBERT 

Wholesale Growers 
110 E. 49th St., PORTLAND, ORE. 

Ger anium s, 2-inch. $30.00 per 1000: 3-inch. 
$50.00 per lOOj. In leading varieties. 

Assortment of Beddlne Plants. Write for 
price list. 

MentioQ The Review when you write. 



PACIFIC COAST. 



PORTLAND, ORE. 



The Market. 



Business last week was nothing start- 
ling; counter trade was normal and 
funeral work kept down tbe surplus. 
The continued sunshine is improving 
matters wonderfully, yet the carnations 
are a little off crop. Roses are unu- 
sually scarce, with a heavy demand. 
Violets are plentiful, but daffodils are 
scarce and it is impossible to supply 
the demand, although other spring flow- 
ers are hard to move. 

Potted stock is plentiful, especially 
tulips and hyacinths. The question of 
greens is alarming; there is practically 
no asparagus on the market and smilax 
is running low; shipments from Cali- 
fornia are usually of poor quality, being 
grown on the outside. 

Sweet peas are becoming more plenti- 
ful and bring top prices. 

Various Notes. 

C. C. Taylor, representing the Ken- 
tucky Tobacco Product Co., of Louis- 
ville, is calling on the trade this week. 

L. W. Judges, of North Yakima, 
Wash., stopped over on his return trip 
from the south. 

George Baldwin, of Carrillo & Bald- 
win, Mamaroneck, N. Y., is in town. 

Waldo Rohnert, of Gilroy, Cal., also 
is in town, talking sweet pea seed. 

Louis Goodfriend, representing Wer- 
theimer Bros., is also here. E. R. C. 



SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



The Market. 

The weather last week was quite a 
mixture of rain, hail, snow and drying 
winds. As a consequence stock of all 
kinds, with the possible exception of 
violets, has been scarce. This has been 
particularly noticeable with everything 
in the lin^e of light-colored flowers and, 
as there has been quite a bit of funeral 
work distributed among the retailers, 
much scurrying for roses and carnations 
has resulted. A big wedding February 
28 used all the orchids in town and 
neighboring cities, as well as a goodly 
assortment of other kinds of stock. Val- 
ley is in fair supply and daffodils, al- 
though showing the rough weather, are 
in suflieient quantity to fill require- 
ments. Narcissi are not abundant and 
are quickly bought when brought to 
town. Freesias are holding out well 
and have proved to be a valuable flower 
when all blossoms are only in limited 
supply. 

We are looking for more moderate 
weather and if the signs are correct 
we shall be favored with it in a few 
days. The fsct that Lent has arrived 
will put a quietus on some lines of 
trade for quite a while, but the funeral 
orders do not show any signs of dimin- 
ishing at present. 

Various Notes. 

J. C. Littlepage is erecting a range 
of houses at Marine View, San Mateo 
county. 

Arthur Simpson has accepted a posi- 
tion as landscape gardener at the 
Presidio. 

The committee of arrangements of the 



New Red Dahlia 

Mrs. Minna Burgle 

A cross between Joe Thomson and Clown, 
originated by Mr. J. Burgle of Pruitvale, Cal., 
and named after his wife, Mrs. Minna Burgle, Is 
the best Red Decorative Dahlia ever produced 
and will supejsede all other red varieties now 
grown for cut flowers here or abroad. It draws 
your attenHoh instantly when planted in a col- 
lection of Dahlias, for it is one of the most showy 
flowers ever created. True decorative, bright 
scarlet, showing a darker shading in center, bold 
erect flowers. 6 to 8 Inches in diameter, with ex- 
cellent stem, foliage of remarkable substance. 
height 5 to 6 feet, good keeper and will not burn 
in hot weather, and is a freer bloomer than either 
parent. This variety has been tested by me for 
three years and has shown no weak points. 

A vase of 50 blooms shown by me, also a basket 
of them exhibited by Sievers Floral Co., of San 
Francisco, both carried tint prizes in the Fall 
Flower Show la San Francisco, and caused more 
comment among gardeners and vibitors than any 
other exhibit. Cut flowers sold for the Brst time 
last year brought 50 per cent more than any other 
variety of dahlias, including Joe Thomson. 

Each Doz. 

Strone Tubers $1.00 $9.00 

PAUL H. ECKELMANN, 

San Rafael, California 

Mention The Review when you write. 

OREGON GROWN 

ASTER SEED 

Yamhill Co., Oregon, 1b the natural home of the 
Aster and any one desiring seed of hieh-erade 
coininercial Quality will do well to try our seed 
for 1911. Ask for oar new descriptive booklet. 

CREOO AST£R SE£D, pink, shell pink, 
'White or purple. 

Tr. Pkt.. 26c: 4 Pkts., 75c: Oz.. M.f 

VICK'S ROCHESTER, lavender pink. 

Tr. Pkt.. 26c: 4 Pkts.. 7Bc: Oz.. ll.Oo 

LADY ROOSEVELT, briitht pink. 

Tr. Pkt.. 20c; 4 Pkts.. 60c: Oz.. $3.00 

Special prices to seedsmen. Contracts taken for 

1911. 

HERBERT & FLEISHAUER, 

Aster Specialists. 
McMinnville, Oreeon. 

Mention The Review when you write. 

Wholesale Only 

Per 100 Per 1000 

Shasta Daisy plants |2.00 |12.00 

Golden Glow plants 2.00 12.00 

Goldenrod plants 2.00 12.00 

Carnation plants, California outdoor 

varieties 2.00 16.00 

Sprengeri plants, 3-ln. pots 3.60 30.00 

Asparagus plumosus, 3-ln. pots 6.00 40.00 

Violet plants, Princess of wales... .76 6.00 

Los Angeles Flower Market 

414% South Broadway, Los Angeles, Cal. 

Mention The Review when you write. 

Send in your order NO"W for 

CUT FLOWERS 

We are growing Daffodils. Paper White NarcUsus. 
etc.. of the flneet quality. In such large quantity 
that we ran maintain a constant supply on all Pacific 
Coast markets. If you wish regular shipments or 
rush orders filled at reasonable prices, telegraph or 
write The Leedham Balb Co., Santa Cruz. 
Cal. Oladlolus America. Tulips. Spanish Iris. etc.. 
in seaaoB 

Mention The Review when voa write 

Carnation Plants 

4000 transplanted Winona, from 
flats, $2.50 per 100. 

Bassett^s Floral Gardens 

LOOMIS, CAL. 

Mention The Review when you write. 



Washingtonia Robusta 

Balled. 2-3 feet 46c 

Balled. 3-4 feet 75c 

All good stocky plants. 
Write for prices on other palms. 

EXOTIC NUB8EBIE8, Santa Barbara. Cal. 



Mention The Review when you write. 



L . 






.»wr 



March 9, 1911. 



The Weekly Florists' Review. 



61 



spring flower show has issued its list 
of premiums. As the proceeds are to 
be donated to a charitable institution, 
the awards will consist only of diplomas 
and certificates of merit. A. J. Kossi 
will manage the show, which will be 
held Marcn 30, 31 and April 1 at the 
Fairmount hotel. 

Much ill feeling exists among the 
street hucksters in the neighborhood of 
the Chronicle building. Within the last 
few weeks the Greeks and Turks have 
reduced the ])rice of violets to 5 cents 
a bunch and this is not pleasing to the 
Italians, who are the pioneers in this 
branch of the trade. Meanwhile the 
dear public continues to patronize 
whichever faction happens to sell 
cheapest. G. 

OUTDOOR MUMS IN OREGON. 

I should like to know whether chrys- 
anthemums can be grown outside by 
having a framework built over them 
for cover in case of storms or frost in 
the early fall. Will they grow large 
enough to be of commercial value? 

L. A. P. 



This query comes from Oregon and it 
is only necessary to remind the corre- 
spondent that not over one per cent of 
the chrysanthemums grown and mar- 
keted on the Pacific coast are produced 
under glass. The largest fields are in 
the neighborhood of San Francisco, 
where the climatic conditions are ideal 
for the developing of quantities of 
blossoms with the least effort. Al- 
though the weather is slightly different 
in Oregon, the writer has seen many 
patches of well-paying mums in the 
northern country. They are essentially 
a fall flower and covering is not re- 
quired, unless for the late flowering of 
particularly delicate sorts. It is true 
that a much finer flower can be grown 
if a light shading is used, and there is 
no more grateful blossom in the flo- 
rists ' category when any extra atten- 
tion is shown them, and any effort to 
assist will always be met with an extra 
fine output on the part of the plant. 
Late blooming kinds will need some 
protection from early frosts and an ex- 
cess of moisture on the petals, but for 
anything outside of this, if judgment 
is used in the selection of varieties, 
there will be no difficulty in growing a 
well-paying crop without paying much 
attention to the subject of shading. 
G. 

BUFFALO. 



The Market. 



March started in with a grand rush 
and the wind raged at a terrific pace 
for about twelve hours. Slight dam- 
ages were reported, but nothing really 
serious happened. The weather then 
moderated nicely and it has been pleas- 
ant since, with a bright sun. Stock has 
not increased or, properly speaking, the 
business has demanded considerable 
stock and no surplus has accumulated 
as yet. From close observation, the 
large demand seems to be more the rea- 
son for the scarcity than the lack of a 
good number of blooms per plant. Every 
occasion now demands more or less flow- 
ers, and as this custom has been in- 
creasing rapidly, we do not seem pre- 
pared for it. Call it what you may, 
the stock has not been overplentiful for 
months, and even now the lenten sea- 
son has not been noticed to any extent. 
Funeral work has been plentiful and 



Large Importation Just to Hand 

PHAL^NOPSIS AMABIUS 

The Finest White Spray Orchid for Cut Flowers 

The plants arrived in splendid condition. Prices per dozen, per 
hundred or per thousand on application. 

MacRORIE-McLAREN COMPANY 

711-714 Wcstbink BIdg., SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. Nurseries, SAN MATEO. CAL 

Meution The Review when you write. 

THE CREGO ASTER 

Buy Your Seed Direct From The Orig^inator. 

I am offering the CREGO ASTER in four colors, viz, : shell pink, pure white, 
rose-pink and violet blue. The latter color is offered for the first time. It is fully 
up to Crego grade, immense fluffy blossoms of splendid color. 

The price of CREGO ASTER seed is as follows: X oz., $1.00; 14 oz., $2.00; 
ounce, $4.00; cash with order. Full directions for growing the largest and finest 
Asters will be sent to each purchaser of X oz. or more. 

Q. S. CREGO, 736 E. Ma!n Street, Portland, Ore. 



Wholesale Only 

We desire your orders for cnt flowers and 
decorative green. Our flowers are all flrst-class 
and our stoclc is ample at all times. Our prices 
are as follows: 

Violets SI. 00 per doz. bunches 

Sweet Peas |1.00 per doz. bnncties 

Freesias — Purity (February) . .S1.50 per 100 stems 

Paper White Narcissus $1.50 per 100 stems 

Hothouse Roses S4.00 to S8.00 per 100 

Hothouse Carnations $2.50 to $4.00 per 100 

Field Carnations $1.00 to $1.60 per 100 

Plumosus Sprays $1.00 per 100 

Sprengeri Sprays $1.00 per 100 

Plnmoeus Strings, 10 feet 25 cents 

Floral Baskets, Wire Work, Btc. 

Los Angeles Flower Market 

414Vi South Broadway. Los Angeles, Cal. 

Mention The Review when you write. 



this feature has used a tremendous 
amount of stock. 

Last week the usual Saturday sales 
were displayed and some lively compe- 
tition ensued. The result was violets 
selling at 25 and 35 cents per bunch 
and carnations two dozen for 35 cents. 
This method may be all right, but it 
hurts the trade in general and makes 
money for nobody. 

Various Notes. 

C. F. Christensen, of Eggertsville, has 
again succeeded in growing his usual 
lot of spring stock to perfection. Gera- 
niums now in 4-inch pots are particu- 
larly fine. 

Thomas Doyle, of Corfu, has pur- 
chased the I'arnham greenhouses and 
will engage in the growing of carna- 
tions and peas for the Buffalo market. 

R. A. S. 



DES PLAINES, ILL. 

Frank Garland had trouble about 
Christmas time as a result of insuffi- 
cient heat from a faulty boiler, but the 
stock has recovered and is coming along 
in good shape. Mr. Garland says that 
adiantum is the most profitable thing 
he grows. 

Charles Wiffin recently completed a 
new house, 21x70, for sweet peas and 
has started another of the same size, to 
be used for miscellaneous plants. The 



CEDAR 



TUBS 



Will Last for Years 

Made of Kiln dried Codar. 

CANNOT FAI.L, TO PIECES 

Hoops Imbedded in the staves. 

Five Sizes: 

13 In.. M'lJ in., 16><jin., M'g in.. 24 In. 

Across the top of Tnb. 

Write for Prices. 

PAnON WOODEN WARE CO. 

Snattle. Wash. 



Meption The Rpview whpn you write. 
"HIGHEST QUALITY" 

Seeds, Plants, Bulbs and Supplies 

Florists' and Gardeners' Trade solicited. 
CataioKue on request. 

^ ^^*^ieO SBCOHD ST., PORTLAND, ORB. 

materials were supplied by the J. C. 
Moninger Co. 

The D'cs Flaines Floral Co. is rebuild- 
ing four houses, each 20x100, using the 
Garland truss construction and cement 
benches. 

Sol. Garland has been sick in bed for 
nearly two weeks with erysipelas, but is 
now considerably improved. It was 
stated at his range that carnations 
have made a good growth, but have 
furnished comparatively few cuttings. 

The Geo. M. Garland Co. has been 
surprised at the large number of in- 
quiries for greenhouse material that 
have been received from the east. This 
firm is also shipping an order to Leth- 
bridge, near Calgary, Alberta, Canada. 



'^•'■'..f ' .T/^r'-^^; 



•^K 



62 



The Weekly Florists' Review* 



Mabch 9, 1011. 



New York State Grown Roses 

General variety of Nursery Stock* Florists' wants a specialty. 

Berberry Thunbergii, Lilacs, Tree Snowball, Hydrangeas, Peonies, Fruit Trees, Ampelopsis, 
Evergreens, Azaleas, Rhododendrons, Weigelias, Spiraeas, Clematis Paniculata. .*. .*. 

W. & T. SMITH COMPANY, Geneva, NY. 



64 Years. 



Write for our Spring Trade List. 



800 Acres. 



Mention The Review when you write. 



NURSERY NEWS. 



AHEBICAN ASSOCIATION OF NUBSEBTHEN. 

Officers for 1910-11: Pres.. W. P. Starli, Louisi- 
ana, Mo.; Viee-pres.. E, S. Welch, Shenandoah, 
la.; Sec'y. John Hall Rochester, N. Y.; Treas., 
C. L. Yates. Rochester, N. Y. Thirty-sixth an- 
nual meeting, at. Louis, June. 1911. 



The demand for ornamental gtock 
keeps right on increasing. 

J. C. Hale is now proprietor of the 
Chattanooga Nurseries, on Mission Eidge, 
Chattanooga, Tenn., formerly owned by 
D. W. Hunter. 

The Morris Nursery Co., of West Ches- 
ter, Pa., is erecting a 2-story building, 
36x80 feet, on the site of the burned 
packing shed, near Maple Avenue station. 

The Maryland Agricultural Experi- 
ment Station, College Park, Md., has just 
issued a bulletin on the ' * Control of San 
Jose Scale" and another on "Terr.ipin 
Scale. ' ' 

E. F. COE, of the Elm City Nursery 
Co., New Haven, Conn., is in Japan with 
Mrs. Coe, and the Japanese newspapers 
are industriously reporting their pilgrim- 
age and purchases. 

It is reported from Dayton, Wash., 
that between 675,000 and 750,000 trees 
will be planted in apple orchards in the 
upper Touchet valley this spring. Spring 
planting will commence as soon as freez- 
ing weather terminates, probably about 
April 1. 

The Fairbury Nurseries, of Fairbury, 
Neb., recently secured a certificate of au- 
thority to transact business in Texas. 
This, says a Texas correspondent, makes 
a total of 142 certificates that have been 
issued by the department of agriculture 
to nurseries outside the state, and it 
would seem, therefore, that Texas is a 
most profitable field for such enterprise. 

The Jewell Nursery Co., Lake City, 
Minn., has purchased a forty horse-power 
auto truck weighing 6,000 pounds, capac- 
ity five tons, speed twenty miles per hour, 
price $3,200. The truck is to be used for 
carrying men from the field as well as 
loads of nursery stock. It can also be 
Tjsed for general trucking, plowing, har- 
rowing, etc. It is estimated this machine 
will do the work of eight horses. 



FILBERTS. 



What is the best way to germinate 
filbert nuts? J. J, K. 




The nuts can either be sown in fall 
or spring. When carried over winter 
they should be stratified by being 



The United States Nursery Co. 

Roseacres, Coahoma Co., MISS. 

Mention The Review when you write. 

PEONIES 

Now is the time to fltrure with us on Peonies. 
We have one of the finest stocks anywhere in the 
country and should be very glad to figure with 
you on your list of wants. 

PETERSON NURSERY, 

stock KzolianBe BuUdinsr, CHICAGO 

Mention The Keview when you write. 

PEONIES 

FOR SPRING PLANTING 

Cash prices on following strong divided roots: 
Humel, late rose; R. Hortense, Tyrian red; 
Bfme. Douriere, pink and salmon; Triumph 
du Nord, pink, $3.00 per 100; and whit«j, early 
$5.00 per 100. 

Thomas J. Oberlin, Sinking Spring, Pa. 

M ention The Review when yo-i write. 

^^ Nothing but Roses" 

Spring list ready. 
200 old and new sorts. 2^ and 4-in., on own roots. 



^ Sb LL L U LL ^SPRII««^^EUD^0HI0 



COMPANY* 

•lEUD-O 

Mention The Review when you write 



3 



packed in damp sand in a cool cellar. 
You can sow in flats now in sandy loam 
two or three inches apart each way, or 
wait if preferred until the weather 
breaks, and drop in nursery rows, cov- 
ering the individual nuts two or three 
inches. They should germinate by the 
early part of June if fresh. Keep well 
cultivated all summer and the following 
season transfer to other nursery rows 
three feet apart, allowing fifteen inches 
between the seedlings. C. W. 



AliBAUGH NURSERY AFFAIRS. 

Stockholders of the Albaugh Nursery & 
Orchard Co., Dayton, O., will be assessed 
amounts varying from $1,000 to $2,000 
to satisfy the claims of the Fourth 
National Bank, if the report of Eeferee 
Hobert R. Nevin, Jr., is confirmed by 



California 
Privet^: ^ 



ill 

ave a 

g[ood stock 

in all grades 

of California 

'rivet, and have a 

surplus of 3 to 4 feet. 

,et me quote you be- 

buyingf. 

I can ship you stock that 

will make you trade. 

[m13 C.A.BENNETT,RobbinsviUe,N.J. 



Groivii by act 
Specialist^ 

Sell 



Mention The Review when you write. 

CALIFORNIA PRIV£T. 

Fine, well-rooted, well-graded, 2-year stock, 
18 to 24 in., 3 or more branches, $1.50 p«r 
100; $10.00 per 1000; 2 to 3 ft., 4 or more 
branches, fine, $2.00 per 100; $15.00 per 1000; 
2Vt to 3 ft., 6 or more branches, strong, $8.00 p«r 
100; $25.00 per 1000; 3 to 4 ft., 8 or mors 
branches, extra selected, $4.00 per 100; $35.00 
per 1000. Only strong branches connted In grad- 
ing. Special low rates on car lots. All packed 
to carry safely, free of charge. 

Chat. Blaok, Hightstown, "S, 3. 
Mention The Review when you write. 

I Offer ror Fall.... 

5000 KUDZU VINK, 
SOOO STANDARD HTDRANGKA, 
2000 CATALPA BUNGII, 
1500 TEAS WEEPING MULBERRT, 
250,000 PRIVET. 
Also my usual assortment of Evergreens, Shruba^ 
Shade Trees, i tc. 

HIRAM T. JONES 

Dalon Coontr Narii«iries. RLIZABETH. N. J. 

Mention The Review when you write. 

Grape Vines 

All old and new varieties. Large stock. 
Warranted true. Can furnish a special 
heavy two-year grade with large roots 
and good tops for florists' retail trade. 
Write for catalogue and price list 

T. S. HUBBARD CO., rredonia, N. Y. 

Mention The Rpview when vou write. 

Judge 0. B. Brown. The report recent- 
ly filed shows the liabilities of the 
stockholders and names the sum to be 
assessed against each. Postmaster Fred 
Withoft is slated to pay $2,078; Prof. 
A. D. Wilt, $1,090; A. J. Conover, 
$1,417; John Stoddard, $1,000; Charles 
F. Ware estate, $2,180, and Judge Mc- 
Kemy, $545. 



AMERICAN PEONY SOCIETY. 

Bertrand H. Farr, president of the 
American Peony Society; J. H. Hum- 
])hreys, of the Andorra Nurseries; H. C. 
Simm, with Henry A. Dreer; S. Men- 
delssohn Meehan, of Thomas Meehan & 
Sons; J. H. Styer, of Concordville, Pa.; 
David Eust, secretary of the Pennsyl- 



Mabch 9, 1011. 



The Weekly Florists^ Review* 



63 



The Two New Carnationsforl9ll 



White Wonder 

The largest and most productive White 

Carnation. Has all the white varieties out- 
classed. 




Gloriosa 

Pure, glistening, bright pink. A decided im- 
provement over all the pink varieties in color 
and every other respect. 



The two Carnations that will prove to please all growers and the most critical buyers. Commercially, they will 
head the list of varieties grown in the future. Do not fail to grow these varieties that have been inspected and have met 
the approval of many of our beat Carnation growers. 

If you have not already ordered, do so now. We have only a few thousand of each left for March 15 delivery. 
Our next delivery after that will be March 27. 

PRICE: $18.00 per 100; $100.00 per 1000; 250O for $237.50; 5000 for $460.00 

F. Dor net & Sons Co., La Fayette, Ind. 



Mention The Review when you wrlt«. 



Plans and Specifications 

furnished and visits for consultation made. 
hong experience in natural and aitlflcial work. 
A. 8CHAEFER, Landscape Architect, formerly 
head jrardencr for the King's Gaiden of Saxony, 
Oermany. 

Address P. 0. Box 284, Crystal Lake, III. 

Mention The Review when you write. 

vania Horticultural Society, and K. T. 
Brown, of the Cottage Gardens Co., 
<^ueens, N. Y., met at Philadelphia 
March 1 to arrange for the June show 
of the American Peony Society. The 
meeting gave promise of a most suc- 
cessful exhibition. The committee was 
assured by Mr. Bust of the hearty co- 
operation of the Pennsylvania Horti- 
cultural Society and local exhibitors. 
It is intended, if possible, to arrange 
the date so that the local midseason 
varieties will be in their prime, which 
will allow exhibitors from the north to 
send their earlier varieties and those 
from the south to send their later kinds. 



GRANGES IN POTS. 

May I ask to be informed as to the 
orange which is grown as a pot plant 
for Christmas and Easter? What va- 
rieties are they and what is the name 
of the base on which the small-growing 
varieties are grafted? I did some of 
the grafting in Germany, but cannot 
remember the names of stock and scion. 
Where could such plants be obtained; 
also can thev be grown from seeds? 
M. L. 

The oranges in pots, commonly seen 
at Christmas and later in the winter, 
are commonly called the Otaheite, 
which is really a dwarf form of the 
common sweet orange, but which by 
some is supposed to be a hybrid be- 
tween an orange and a lemon. The 
leaves resemble those of the lemon. 
The flowers are pinkish. Under pot 
culture fine fruiting plants no more 
than a foot high can be produced. The 
botanical name of the Otaheite orange 
is Citrus Aurantium Sinensis, although 
it has also been called C. Aurantium 
Otaitense. Stocks are usually raised 
from seed. Some of these might give 
desirable fruit, but many would not. 



DON'T FORGET 

in the present rush of work, that you'll need stock 
later on. For example, there's your 

MANETTI, for winter grafting; we offer English at $12.00 the thousand, 
French at $10.00. Both good, 3 to 5 millimeters, smooth, evenly graded, 
disbudded, well-rooted stocks, especially selected lor florists* 
S^rafting. 

LILT OF THE VALLEY. Reimschneider's Exposition, $14.00 the 
thousand ( 1700 to the case) ; Perfection, $12.00 the thousand (2000 to 
the case) ; Holsatia, for storage and later forcing, $11.00 the thousand 
(3000 to the case). 

LILACS, imported, pot-grown, for cut flowers, bushy, suitable for 7 or 8-in. 
pots, 60c each, $5.00 the dozen. Charles X only. 

HALF-STANDARD ROSES. Baby Rambler and Mrs. Cutbush, 

60c each, $5.00 the dozen. No better at any price. Full-standard 
Baby Rambler, same. 

BUSH ROSES. F.ine assortment leading H. P.'s, like Brunner, Charta, 
Druschki, etc. Also Hybrid Teas, Ramblers, Dorothy Perkins, 

etc. 



Write and make known yonr wants. 
Trade and sell only to the Trade. 



We are GROWERS for the 
Use printed stationery. 



Jackson & Perkins Co., Tdtt^llf 

Newark (Near Rochester), NcW York 



Mention The Review when you write. 



The common sweet orange will make 
desirable stock and budding is prefer- 
able to grafting. In order to insure 
a good crop of flowers and a set of 
fruit, the plants should have a period 
of partial rest in the late fall and early 
winter, when they must be kept cooler 
and drier at the root. Bud the young 
seedlings with scions from a true Ota- 


1 


ROSES 

A SPECIALTY 

rheDineee&GonardGo.''"Vr' 


heite as soon as they are nicely estab- 
lished in their pots. C. W. 








LARGE TREES 

OAKS AND MAPLES, PINES 
AND HEMLOCKS 

ANDORRA NUR8ERIE8 

Wm. Warner Harper. Prop. 
Chestnut HUI, Phlladelpbla, Pa. 


Wilkes-barre, Pa. — James M. Norris, 
county controller, is advertising in local 
papers for bids for furnishing 3,000 
geraniums and quantities of other bed- 
ding stock. 


Conneaut, 0.— L. A. Eaton has ordered 
a handsome McCray refrigerator and 
will open a new and modern flower 
store March 18. Mr. Eaton's green- 
houses are on Center street and are do- 
ing a good business. 




Mention The Review when vou write. 


Dover, N. H.— Miss Marion Davis, 
laughter of Charles A. Davis, the Wash- 
ington street florist, was married Feb- 
ruary 22 to M. K. Hall, of this city. 



nw"^*- :■ 



64 



The Weekly Florists' Review. 



Maucu 0, 1911. 



W>f 



CANNAS 

We have a very complete stock of Boddington's Cannas, 40 standard varieties, 
ready for immediate shipment or for later delivery. Complete price list mailed for 
the asking. You will make no mistake in booking order now. 

Winterson's Seed Store 

45-47-49 Wabash Avenue, CHICAGO 



Mention The Review when you write 



Vegetable Forcing. 



VEGETABLE MASEETS. 

Chicago, March 7. — Cucumbers, $1.50 to $1.75 
doz. ; lettuce, 25c case. 

New York, March 6. — Mushrooms In free sup- 
tjly and selling well. Cucumbers plenty and 
weak. Lettuce steady. Mint scarce. Kadlshes 
and rhubarb without change. Tomatoes dull. 
Beet tops, 75c to 90c box; cucumbers, 6oc to 
S1.50 doz.; lettuce, 75c to fl.25 strap; mint, 
$1.25 to $2 dozen bunches; mushrooms, 40c to 
$1.25 4-lb. basket; radishes, $2.50 to $4 hundred 
bunches; rhubarb. 15c to 50c dozen bunches; 
tomatoes, 7c to 20c lb. 

Bolton, March 6. — Mushrooms, 30c to 4oc lb.; 
cucumbers, $5 to $14 box; cucumbers, select, 
$1.75 to $2.50 doz.: rhubarb, 6c to ic lb.; 
tomatoes, 35c to 40c lb.; bunch beets, $1.50 dozen 
bunches; bunch carrots, 75c to $1 dozen bunches; 
bunch radishes, 25c to 30c dozen bunclies; 
parsley, $1.50 to $1.75 box; dandelions. $1.(5 
to $2 box; beet greens, 85c to $1 box; lettuce, 
'35c to 75c box: mint, $1.25 to $1.50 doz.; 
escarolle, 50c to 75c doz. ; romaine, 75c to $1 doz. 



APHIS ON LETTUCE. 

I noticed in The Review of February 
23, page 62, the inquiry of W. E. C. in 
regard to green aphis on lettuce. T 
have been growing lettuce for about 
fifteen years and have had convincing 
evidence that prevention in this matter 
is worth more than all the cures put on 
the market. I have often been in the 
difficulty he speaks of, especially in 
the earlier part of my experience. 

My practice now is to get tobacco 
stems at a cigar store, run them 
through a cutting machine, and then, 
immediately after planting a bed, 
cover the soil lightly between the plants 
with these stems. Later, when the 
crop is about half grown, I repeat the 
dose of stems and thus avoid all trouble 
with green fly. 

Of course, when a crop becomes badly 
infested it is hard to get rid of the 
pests, but if you start in with the 
young crop and keep right after them 
in the way I have suggested, you will 
be surprised to find how easy it is to 
have clean lettuce, and that means 
quick sales. But if there is a bug on 
the lettuce, the good housewife will be 
sure to see it and will quickly lose her 
appetite for the vegetable. 

I never smoke my lettuce houses and 
have never used cyanide, yet I have 
not seen a dozen aphis on my lettuce 
this winter. The secret of success, in 
this as in everything else, is everlast- 
ingly keeping at it. No matter if there 
are no bugs to be seen, give them a 
dose of cut tobacco stems regularly 
and "keep on a-keeping on," as 
Speaker Cannon says. H. L. Clapp. 



THE CANNA OF TODAY 

"Antoinc Wlntzer. the dean of Caona hybridizers In America, has 3(XJ0 Oanna BeedllDirs 
on trial this season. Of these fully :iOO have been marked for further trial. His efforts In 
securinK promiBing varieties are more than usuallir successful; the experience of 17 years, 
aided by a favorable season, has produced splendid results. A flower that would have 
been conslden d an improvement 10 years ago is scarcely noticed now; size, substance, 
color, form, foliage, each and all must be better than in some existing variety, or the 
claimant is discarded." 

Extract from "The Weekly Florists' Review." Sept. 22. 1910. 
Describing a visit to our Nurseries. 

We have introduced in the past dozen years about 75 varieties of Cannas, 
most of which are still prominent. Our introductions have not been confined 
to any certain class or color, but represent the best to be had today in practi- 
cally every color and class. Take for example the Yellows— We suppose every 
florist in the United States knows the BUTTERCUP, which was one of our 
earliest introductions. And you know GLADLA,TOR ? If not you surely 
should, so distinctly is it marked with brilliant red spots on a solid yellow 
ground and a fiery red tongue in the center. But this week we want to intro- 
duce to you a now variety, BRILLIANT. This is one favorite with the 
Department of Agriculture at Washington. A bed of these on our office lawn, 
last summer, called forth repeated praise. It has the same pure, brilliant 
yellow as the Buttercup, but is far more striking as a result of a bright red 
center petal, which is a regular eye-catcher— You would Hke BRILLIANT; 
you could not help it. 

If we had the space, we would like to introduce to you the giant, orchid- 
flowering, heat resisting, praise winning Cannas, WYOMING and INDIANA, 
six and seven feet, magnificent foliage. They are majestic in every sense. 
Wyoming with its orange color; rounded petals and handsome purple foliage— 
and Indiana almost a ])rototype with green foliage. 

The above varieties can be supplied at 75c per doz. ; fo.OO per 100, subject 
to stock unsold. We have other yellow varieties, but none letter than these; 
all of which are our own introductions. 

BRILLIANT, 90c per doz. ; $7.00 per 100. 

You can make money on thtsse. 

If interested, write for our complete list of improved Cannaa. 

The Conard & Jones Co., west Grove, Pa. 



Mention The Review when you write. 



APHIS ON LETTUCE. 

I noticed in The Review of February 
23, page 62, the questions of W. E. C. 
in regard to aphis on lettuce. From 
my experience, I cannot believe that 
fumigating will ever effectually rid one 
of the pest. It might do so if only 
leaf lettuce were grown, but only a 
spray will get at the insects in the 
head lettuce. I have used nicotine ex- 
tract with satisfactory results, putting 
about a teaspoonful of the liquid in a 
gallon of water and spraying the let- 
tuce thoroughly with an auto-spray. If 
the spray is used at night the aphis 
will have disappeared by morning and 
no ill effects will come from eating 
the lettuce at once. 

C. M. Boardman. 




Watch for onr Trade Mark stamped 
on every brick of Lambert's 

Pun Culture Moshroom Spawn 



Substitation of cheaper grrades Is 
thus easily exposed. Fresh sample 
brick, with illustrated book, mailed 



postpaid by manufacturers upon re- 
ceipt of 40ceDts in postage. Address 

TradeMark. American Spawn Co., St Paul, Minn. 

Mention The Review when you write. 



TONATO SEED NEW STONE 

Pure, clean stock, single pound, $1.25, 
postage paid. Special price quoted on 
larger quantities. Correspondence solicited. 

H. AUSTIN CO., Felton, Del. 

Mention The Review when yon write. 



March 9, 1911. 



The Weekly Florists' Review^ 



^% ^.-^^ 



65 



true to name, have two to three|good eyee, are well cured, sound and dor- 
mant, and give absolute satisfaction. Our sales last year were nearly 700,- 
000, and not an overgrown kick. 

RED, GOLD -EDGED 

100 1000 

Mme. Crozy. 5'a ft 12.25 $20.00 

Souv. d' Antolne Crozy, 4 ft. 2.75 25.00 

TEIXOW SHADES 

Gladiator, 4 ft |2.75 125.00 

Florence Vaugban . 5 ft 1.50 14 00 

Newbury, 4 ft 2.75 25.00 

Queen Cbarlotte, S^s ft . . . . 2.75 25.00 

WHITE SHADES 

Alsace, 3ifift $1.75 $15.00 

BRONZE-LEAVED 

Brandywlne, 4 to 5 |2.25 $20.00 

EBandale,4ft 1.75 15.00 

King Humbert. 4 ft 2.75 25.00 

Leonard Vaugban, 4^ ft... 2.75 25.00 

MusaioUa, 10 ft 2.75 25.00 

Robusta, t> to 8 ft 2.00 17.50 

Sbenandoab, 6 ft 1.75 15.00 

ORCHID-FLOWERING 

Allemanla, 4 to 5 ft |l.75 $15.00 

Austria. 5 it 1.50 14.00 

Indiana. 4ifl ft 1.75 15.00 

Italia, 4I2 ft 1.75 15.00 



CRIMSON SHADES 

100 1000 

Alpbonae Bouvler, 5 ft . . . .$1.75 $15.00 

Black Prince, 3 to 4 ft 2.50 22.£0 

Cbarles Henderson, 4 ft... 1.76 14.00 

J. D. Elsele, 5 It 2.00 17.50 

Ezplorateur Crampbel, 

b^ ft 2.00 15.00 

Lculslana, 7 ft 1.75 15.00 

Fl. lar of Fire, 6 to 7 ft 2.75 25.00 

Tarrytown, S'a ft 2.25 20.00 



PINK SHADES 

L. Patry, 4k) ft $1.75 $15.00 

Louise, 414 ft 1.75 15.00 

Mile. Berat. 4^^ ft 1.75 15.00 



ORANGE SHADES 

Mrs. Kate Gray, 6 ft ....!., .$1.75 s: $15.00 

Pennsylvania, 5 ft 2.00/- 15.00 

2.00—117.50 



I Wyoming, 17 ft. 



Our Cannas are packed 250 (of one variety) in a box; two can be 
" cleatedl" together and shipped as one. One box of 250 (one variety) sold 
a thousand rate ; it is cheaper for you to buy a box of 250 than 200 at 100 
rate. 25 (one variety) at lOO^rate. 

ARTHUR T. BODDINGTON 

SEEDSMAN 
342 West 14th Street, NEW YORK 

A 11 the above Cannas sold F. O. B. New York or Chicago. 

WINTERSON*S SEED STORE, 4S-47-49 Wabash Avenue, CHICAGO 

Chicago and Western Agents for our Cannas. 



^y;/^' 



kyis^ 



V>^ . 






V ,- ' 



fi-S' f_ 



r^'— •» f 'i,, 



' •; ;'v.- 



66 



The Weekly Florists^ Review^ 



Y'T'. 



Mabch 0, 1911. 



Rooted 




Rose Cuttings 

Per 100 Per lOOO 

Perk $2.00 $17.50 

Richmond 1.50 12.50 

UncU John 1.50 12.50 

Ivory 1.50 12.50 



Strong 

Clean 

Well 

Rooted 

Sure 

To 

Please. 



Carnation Cuttings 

Per 100 Per 1000 

White Enchantress. $3.00 $25.00 

Enchantress 2.00 17.50 

White Perfection ' 2.00 17.50 

Rose-pink Enchantress 2.00 17.50 

Beacon 2.50 20.00 

Winsor 1.50 12.50 

Mrs. Lawson 1.50 12.50 



Peter Reinberg, 



35 Randolph Street, 
CHICAGO, ILL. 



Mention The Review when vou write. 



NEW BOSES WORTH GROWING. 

[Continued from pagre 13.1 
to the front and give not only our moral 
support, but actual money in trying out 
those things that give promise of honest 
and real advances over existing types. 
The list of new roses which I submit 
for your consideration embraces only 
those sorts which have been thoroughly 
tested, and T am confident they will 
stand up under all normal conditions 
and prove worthy of any attention that 
* the grower may wish to give. These 
varieties have been under observation 
from two to five years, and my notes 
thereon have been strengthened by tests 
made in other sections of the south, 
and, of course, under varying climatic 
conditions. The varieties in question 
are considered wholly from a garden 
viewpoint, and in connection therewith 
comparisons were made with all of the 
older varieties, of similar characteris- 
tics, now commercially grown. 

Hybrid Tea Boses. 

Antoine Rivoire is the best hybrid 
tea of its color. Not a new rose, but 
many retail houses fail to realize the 
value of this variety. There is no gar- 
den rose of greater substance. Color, 
creamy white, with delicate pink tinge. 

Aurora is another variety which has 
been overlooked. An honest rose, that 
is always doing something just right. 
One of the best varieties, doing well in 
all soils. Color, clear, bright pink. 
Full and very double, fragrant and con- 
stant in flower. 

Betty is a bold rank grower, one of 
the best fancy colored garden roses. 
Long pointed buds, opening into a per- 
fectly formed bloom. Always beautiful. 
Color, coppery rose, overspread with 
srolden yellow, shaded with deeper and 
lighter tints which can not well be de- 
scribed. 

Chateau de Clos Vougeot has a most 
wonderful color and texture. Color, 
deepest velvety maroon red, shading to 
blackest crimson. Much darker than 
Prince Camille. Flowers are large and 
of splendid substance. 

Colonel Leclerc is a strong grower, 
of branching habit; good foliage; buds 
borne singly; open blooms of excellent 
form. Color, lovely cherry red. 

Countess of Gosford is salmon pink 



POCAHONTAS 

If you grow any crimson carnations, then why not grow a variety that 
will give you quality equal to the best varieties in the other colors? POCAHONTAS 
will do this, and you will also find it productive enough to be highly profitable. 

STRONG ROOTED CUTTINGS-READY NOW 
$12.00 per 100; $100.00 per 1000 

Geraniums 

We have ready now, in fine young plants, strong 2-inch stock : Marvel 
(deep red). Decorator (orange scarlet), Castellane (red), J. Viaud (pink), 
Castries (pink), Harcourt (white). $2.60 per 100; $20.00 per 1000. 

BAUR & SMITH 



88th Street and Senate Avenue, 



INDIANAPOLIS, IND. 



Mention The Review when you write. 



Pink 
Boston Market 



PENNSYLVANIA 

A seedling of Boston Market and Harlowarden that has been under test for the past five years 
and which has shown up so well under all conditions that I now feel confident it is one of the best 
commercial varieties and have pleasure in offering it for the first time for spring delivery 1911. 

The color is a shade lighter pink than Lawson; form high built, much like Boston Market ; stem 
long and graceful : healthy grower; blooms freely from November all through the season. 

This new variety I am confident will prove a money-maker^a pink Boston Market— only much 
larger and better and destined to be one of the most popular commercial varieties. 

Come and see it growing. I guarantee same to be In perfect health. $6.00 per 100; $50.00 per 1000 

P. M. DeWITT, - Bridgewater, Bucks Co., Pa. 

Or throuBli my selllne; aeents 
S. S. PENNOCK-MEEELAN CO., 1608 Ludlow Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Mention The Review when yoii write. 



Carnation Rooted Cuttings 

strong, clean, well rooted stock. 



$3.00 



strong. Clean, weii rooieu smjck. 

Winsor. $2..j0 perlOO ; $20.00 per 1000. 
White Enchantress, Beacon, Enchantress, 
per 100 riJ.OO per 1000. 

ALFRED M. CAMPBELL 

1510 Sansom St., Philadelphia, Pa. 



and rose; base of petals suffused salmon 
yellow. Free and distinct. 

Florence Pemberton is a good grower, 
with splendid buds and open blooms. 
Color, lively pink, edged whiter. 
(To be continued) 



MELODY, own root, from 2i2-in. pots. $0 00 per 
dozen; $;i0.00 per 100 ; $70.00 per 250 ; $250.00 per 
1000. 

DODBLK PINK KILLARBTET, own root, 
$4.00 per dozen; $20.00 per 100; $10 00 per 250; 
150.00 per 1000. Grafted plants on Dickson's 
Manetti stock. $10.00 extra per 100. 

ROBERT SCOTT & SON, . 

SHARON HILL, Delaware Co., FA. 



(: 



Ton WILL FIND ALL THB BEST 
OrnCRS ALL THK TIMK IN THX 
BSVIKW'S CLASSiriKD AOVS. 






Mabch 9, 1911. 



The Weekly Florists' Review. 



67 



■ hSMAM .M«>< > 



t ■■■- . * ^ --J 

A. N. PIERSON, Inc., Cromwell, Conn. 

ROSES 

If you are in the market for Rose Stock, and are looking for tiie 
best tiiat can be produced, we are ready to serve you. 



Double Pink Killarney 

Grafted plants only. Ench,75c; per dozen, $6.00: per 25, $10 00; per 
50, $17.50; per 100, $30.00; per 250, $70.00; per 1000. $250.00. 

Dark Pink Killarney 

Grafted plants only. 40c each; $3.00 per dozen; $20.00 per 100; 
$180.00 per 1000. 

Lady Cromwell 

Grafted plants only. 75c each ; $10.00 per 25 ; $17.50 per 50 ; $30.00 per 
100; $70 00 per 250; $250.00 per 1000. 

Mrs. Aaron Ward 

Grafted stock : 40c each ; $4 00 per dozen ; $25.00 per 100 ; $200.00 per 
1000. Own root stock : 25c each ; $2.50 per dozen ; $12.00 per 100 ; 
$100.00 per 1000. 

Melody 

Own root plants only. 75c each: $6.00 per dozen; $10.00 per 25; 
$17.50 per 50 ; $30.00 per 100 ; $70.00 per 250 ; $250.00 per 1000. 

Radiance 

Grafted stock: $18.00 per 100; $150.00 per 1000. Own root stock: 
$10.00 per 100; $90.00 per 1000. 



Prince de Bulgarie 

Grafted stock: 214-inch pot<*. $3.00 per dozen ; $20.00 per 100; $180.00 
per 1000. Own root ntock: 2ia-lnch pots, $2.50 per dozen; $15.00 
per 100; $120.00 per 1000. 

Grafted Roaes of Standard Varieties 
Klllamey My Maryland 

Rlolunond Kaiserln Aususta Victoria 

Wliite KiUamey Bride 

Bridesmaid Bon Silene 

Golden Gate iTory Uncle John 

and other varieties tor toroins. 
Selected plants for March delivery, srraft'>d, $15.00 per 100; $120.00 
per 1000. A special price quoted on 5000 or more plants. 

Roses on Their Own Roots 
Klllamey Perle Des Jardlns 

Wblte Klllamey Sunrise 

Rictunond Kaiserln Augrusta Victoria 

From 2^inch pots, $6.00 per 100; $50.00 per 1000. 



The best dark pink carnation ever 
introduced. The best producer ever 
offered in its color. 



BRIGHT SPOT 

Outclasses everything heretofore g^own in the dark pink section. Won first honors in the 100 class for 
best dark pink at the A. C. S. meeting, Pittsburg, January, 1910, and has won many other honors. 

It is a pure, bright, dark pink of even shade, size 3^ inches, an early and continuous bloomer, brings fully 25 
per cent more flowers to the plant than Laweon at its best ; flowers well shaped on long, wiry stems ; calyx does not split. 
It is a good shipper, and the cuttings root easy. 

While with most carnations early cnttingfs are desirable, this is not so much the case w^ith Brig^ht 
Spot ; it is such a strong; grower that March cuttings make just as good and very large plants by the 
end of July. 

Price, per 100, $18.00; 86 at 100 rate; per 1000, $100.00; 260 at 1000 rate; per 6000, $400.00. 

NIC. ZWEIFEL, North Milwaukee, Wis. 



Mention The Review when yon write. 



Carnation Cnttiflgs 

ROOTED 

Dorothy Gordon, $6.00 per 100. 

Beacon, $3.50 per 100. 

White Perfection, Wlnaor, Xnotaantresa, 

Rose-pink Knohantresa, Wt|iona, Vl. 

ola Sinclair and Wanoka,(^.(k> per 100. 
Lawson, $2.00 per 100. 

1000 rat^ on application. 

Uttlefield ft Wyman 

North Ablngton, Mass. 

Always mention the llorlsta* Review 
when wTltlnr advertisers. 



ROSES! ROSES! ROSESI 

Special Own Root Stock. 

WHITE KILLARNEY, PINK KILLARNEY, RICHMOND, 
MY MARYLAND, MRS. JARDINE, AMERICAN BEAUTY. 

214-lnch pots $7.00 per 100 

3 -inch pots 9.00 per 100 

BRIDE, BRIDESMAID, PERLE, SUNRISE, 
KAISERIN, CHATENAY, GOLDEN GATE. 

2>9-inch potB $5.00 per 100 

3 -inch pota 7.00 per 100 

Stock ready for shipping in small pots. Standard varieties of Carnations ready, in cuttings 

or 214-inch pots. Send for Circular. 

J. L. DILLON9 Bloomsburg, Pa* 

r m Alwayi mention the Flofists' RevieW when writing advertisen. m y 



■;-V '^■■' »r ■^■, 






68 



The Weekly Florists^ Review* 



March 9, 1911. 



YOU WHO WANT 



I 



CARNATION CITTINGS 

Place your orders now and you will get IMMEDIATE DELIVERY. 

Enchantress, Perfection, Beacon $3.00 per 100 ; $25.00 per 1000 

Rose-pink Enchantress, Winsor 2.50 per 100; 20.00 per 1000 

White Enchantress, ready April 15 2.50 per 100; 20.00 per 1000 

We can fill orders from 1000 to 100,000 and guarantee tfie stock. 

Chrysanthemum Cuttings 



-NOW READY- 



WHITE 

Oct. Frost 

Kalb 

V. Poehlmann . . 

Touset 

A. Byron 

T. Eaton. 

Chadwick 

Lynnw^ood Hall , 



Per 100 Per 1000 



PINK 



Per 100 Per 1000 



YSLLOW 



Perl 00 



$2.00 


$15.00 


2.00 


15.00 


2.00 


15.00 


2.00 


15.00 


2.00 


15.00 


2.50 


20.00 


2.50 


20.00 


3.00 


27.50 



Balfour 

Eng^uehard 

Pacific Supreme 

Gloria 

Amorita 

Jeanne Rosette. . 



.$2.00 
. 2.00 
. 2.00 
. 2.50 
. 2.50 
. 2.00 



$15.00 
15.00 
15.00 
20.00 
20.00 
15.00 



CSolden Glow $2.00 

Oct. Sunshine 2.00 

Appleton 2.00 

Y. Eaton 2.50 

Halliday 2.00 

Bonnaffon 2.00 



Per 1000 
$15.00 
15.00 
15.00 
20.00 
15.00 
15.00 



J. D. Thompson Carnation Co., Joliet, III. 



Mention The Review when vou write 



TOEONTO. 

The Market. 

All stock is coining in plentifully 
afnd, while the demand is fair, there is 
the natural lull on account of the lenten 
season. Beauties continue scarce. Sweet 
peas also are short, although those who 
grow their own stock have a good sup- 
ply. Violets are in their prime. The 
quality of the stock on the market is 
superb, particularly so with the singles. 

Various Notes. 

W. E. Wallace, F. E. H. S., of Eaton 
Bray Nurseries, of Dunstable, Bedford- 
shire, England, is visiting the different 
greenhouses in and around Toronto. 
"While here, he is the guest of J. H. 
Dunlop. 

The Toronto Horticultural Society 
held its regular monthly meeting in St. 
George's hall March 7. An interesting 
paper on "What an Enthusiast on Hor- 
ticulture Has Seen in the Old Land and 
the New" was read by A. Gilchrist, of 
West Toronto. 

Patrick Fogarty, Toronto's oldest^, 
grower, died March 5. He was fifty- 
seven years in the business. 

P. Fogarty & Sons have a fine stock 
of spiraeas and primroses for Easter. 

J. H. Dunlop recently wrote the gov- 
ernment officials protesting on the in- 
troduction of chemicals for disinfect- 
ants in the city water supply, used by 
the growers. E. A. F. 



Hot Springs, Ark. — Fire which broke 
out at midnight, February 25, destroyed 
two dwellings formerly owned by J. M. 
Starke, on Harrel avenue near the north 
city limits, and damaged the adjoining 
greenhouse. Mr. Starke, who occupied 
one of the dwellings, succeeded only in 
saving a part of his household goods. 
The propertj^ had been purchased a few 
weeks previously by J. Wi" Vestal & 
Son, of Little R9(;k, Aljc., who expected 
to take possession' soon. v. 



Carnation Norwood 

This variety has been grown by us for four years and has proven to be the 
best White Carnation we have ever grown. 

NORWOOD is a Pure White, of good form, about 3J^ inches in diameter, 
exceedingly fragrant, never known to split, and a free and continuous bloomer. 
The most profitable Carnation we have ever grown. An ideal commercial 
variety. Rooted cuttings (immediate delivery), $10.00 per 100; 
$76.00 per 1000. 

It will pay every Carnation Grower to plant this variety- 
there' s money in it. 

ROBERT CRAIG CO. 

4900 Market Street, PHILADELPHIA, PA. 



Mention Tbe Review wben tou write 



American Beaoty 

NOW READY 

Rooted Cuttincs: 

Per 1000, $25.00 5000 at $2Z50 

10,000 at $20.00 

From 2}4-in, pots, $45,00 per 1000 

Gfown by Frederick J. Benthey & G)., 
and shipped from New Gistle, Ind. 

Send orders to 

KYLE & FOERSTER 

51 Wabash Ave., CHICAGO 



Mention The Review when vou wrte 

Dahlia Roots 

Whole Field Clumps, at tS.OO per 100 and ap. 
1000, In 10 distinct klnda, either Show, Decorative or 
Oactna, our selection of kinds, for 140.00 cash. 

CANNA ROOTS, Stro«K DlTislons, at $2.00 
per 100. $12.00 per 1000, and up. 

Send for I^lst. 

R. VINCENT, JR., & SONS CO.,*"!:^;;;" 

Mention The Review wben you write.. 



ROSES 

ROOTED CUTTINGS 

Per 100 Per 1000 

Richmond $1.60 $12.60 

White Killamey 3.60 30.00 

Plants from 2>^-inch Pols 

Per 100 Per 1000 

Richmond $3.00 $25.00 

White Killamey 7.00 60.00 

GEO. REINBERQ 

51 Wabash Avenue, CHICXaO 

Mention The Review when yau writft 

Roses 

See oar list in classified columns. 

Best varieties a<>d best quality. 

Order today. 4, * 

Stock will be ^e»er^•ed. 

WAGNER PARK CONSERVATORIES, Sidney, 0. 

Mention The Review when you write 



■i!--' '. <-^j 



Mabch », 1911. 



The Weekly Florists' Review* 



69 



''Expect to Grow Dorothy Gordon 
Next Year— Good Size and Color'' 

' —writes one of our friends who gave Carnation "Dorothy 
Gordon ' ' a thorough trial last year. This customer is a 
prominent florist of New England, and his letter was in an- 
swer to an inquiry sent him and many other growers a few 
weeks ago, asking about their success with ' ' Dorothy Gor- 
don." These replies varied in their tone, of course— but 
most growers expressed satisfaction with its good qualities ; 
many voluntarily stated their intention of growing it again. 
"Dorothy Gordon " is a money-maker ; is succeeding 

• for growers in many states. The plant is unusually vig- 
orous and productive, the stem is generally long and stiff, 
and the flower is a clear, 
bright pink, quite uniform 
in shade. ' ' Dorothy Gor- 
don" is a carnation of 
rare merit- your trade 
wants it and 
will gladly pay 
a good price 

■ to get it. 

We offer choice 
Rooted Cuttings: 

$ 6.00 per 100 
50.00 per 1000 

for delivery 
now or later. 

Let us hear 
from you. 



Joseph Heacock Co. 

Wyncote, Pa. 




Our Palms Are Now Making a 
Better Showing Tiian Ever Before 

Better stock, larger stock, more room to grow it in — 
these features are going to make 1911 a banner year for 
Heacock' s palms and for dealers handling them. 

We're pretty proud of the palms we grow, and if 
you've ever sold any of them you know why— healthy, 
vigorous growth, plants fine and stocky; in our home- 
grown palms you get a quality that lasts. _ 

Wherever used, Heacock' s Palms please your custo- 
mers — on the porch or lawn in summer or indoors in cold 
weather. There's a fine opportunity, too, for you to do 
a good business renting them for decorative purposes. 
You can handle Heacock' s Palms at a profit- hun- 
dreds of dealers have been doing 
it for years. Rememlx^r, all our 
stock is liome- 
grown— started 
from the seed in 
our own houses. 
They cost no more 
than foreign- 
grown plants, though, 
and your trade will 
quickly appreciate the 
difference. 

Let us know your requirements at 
once; we'll gladly quote prices. 



When in Philadelphia, 
Be Sure to Look Us Up 




Rulway 
Station : 
Jenldntown 



Joseph Heacock Company 

Wyncote, Pa. 



Mention The Review when you write. 



CARNATIONS 

100,000 rooted cuttintrs, strong, healthy, 
guaranteed. 

Pink DellBlitj_ Dorotby Gordon, 
Applo Blossom, waaoka, 16.00 per 100; 
160.00 per lOuO. 

Cash or C. O. D, from unknown parties. 

Order now for early delivery. 
By the way. have you ordered 

RAINBOW 

the coming Carnation? Awarded A. C. S. 
Certificate at Pittsburg. Orders booked now 
for January 1912 delivery. $12.00 per 100; 
llOO.OO per 1000. 

Wanoka Greenhouses, Barneveld, N.Y. 



Mention The Review when you write. 

CARNATIONS 

Enchantress 

Rose -pink Enchantress 

Perfection 

Beacon 

Dorothy Goircl^ 

Scarlet Glow 

Rooted Cuttings or plants in 2-in. pots. 
Prices on application. 

A. Jablonsky 

Olivette, St. Louis Connty, Hi. 

Mention The Review when you write. 



Carnations 

WHITE HOUSE. The quality white. Won the Silver Cup at Morris- 
town for best undisseminated variety; Bronze Medal at Pittsburg, and five 
other certificates. Absolutely non-bursting, clean and kind in growth and a 
variety that will make good. We have 10,000 for March delivery and that is 
all we will be in a position to supply of this variety. 

PRINCESS CHARMING. The finest thing in sight in the Enchantress 
shade of pink. Every bud a perfect flower and your net returns per square 
foot will surprise you. 

Our stock is limited, but we are still in a position to supply first-class, 
rooted cuttings of both these varieties at $12.00 per 100; $100.00 per 1000. 

Chrysanthemums 

We catalogue over 500 varieties and surely we have the kind you want. 

Chas. H. Totty, Madison, N. J. 



WeQ-rooted Sangamo Carnation Cuttings 

$5.00 per 100; $40^.00 per 1000; 2-ia. pot plants, $5.00 nore per 1000— quality guaranteed. 

Cuttings shipped direct from Lima, Oiiio ' 

C. E. Critchell, It^sTE^rTMrasuZt, Cincinnati, Ohio 



/.■'.; '>:;';s-v>"=?v/ :-^- 



70 



The Weekly Florists' Review. 



March 9, 1911. 



aOSHEN. IND. 

E. A. Kunderd has sold to Montague 
Chamberlain, Groton, Mass., his collec- 
tion of plain petaled gladioli, the trans- 
action including all the separate colors 
in the large collection, except some 
twenty varieties. Mr. Kunderd retains, 
besides, his ruiiied sorts and his mixed 
stock. 

Mr. Kunderd 's collection was the re- 
sult of fifteen years' study and breed- 
ing. One of his productions, Mrs. Frank 
Pendleton, Jr., secured by Eawson and 
exhibited last season at several flower 
shows, was awarded a certificate of 
merit by the Massachusetts Horticul- 
tural Society. Mr. Kunderd 's greatest 
achievement, of course, is the produc- 
tion of ruffled gladioli, an entirely dis- 
tinct type. His collection of these was 
becoming so large that he decided to 
dispose of his plain petaled varieties, 
and devote his time and means to the 
new type. The collection secured by 
Mr. Chamberlain includes over 300 va- 
rieties and only some half dozen of 
these have been named. Among them 
is a pure white which Mr, Chamberlain 
says will rank with Eeine Blanche and 
Europa; another he thinks will be a 
strong rival of the famous Princeps, 
having the advantage of Princeps in 
displaying more blossoms at a time. The 
popular America also has a rival in this 
collection, the new-comer being of some- 
what deeper pink and of larger size. 

Mr. Chamberlain has been for some 
time building up a collection of gladioli 
by propagation and by purchasing from 
the leading American and foreign grow- 
ers, until his collection is one of the 
fipest in the country. He is connected 
with one of Boston's largest dry goods 
houses, but his farm is at Groton, in 
the midst of the famous New England 
apple belt. Always a student of nature, 
he was for a number of years connected 
with the Scientific School of Harvard, 
is an author of note, and will undoubt- 
edly become a leading grower of gladoli. 



TAEBYTOWN", N. Y. 

The monthly meeting of the Tarry- 
town Horticultural Society was held on 
Friday evening, February 24, with 
President Brunger in the chair. T. W. 
Stobo, R. Franke and W. MacBean 
were elected active members and one 
application for membership was re- 
ceived. 

A communication was read from the 
New York Florists' Club asking the 
cooperation of the Tarrytown society in 
securing the passage of a bill through 
the legislature appropriating $50,000 to 
erect greenhouses at Cornell for experi- 
mental purposes. 

It was announced that the fall show 
will be held October 31 to November 2, 
in the Music hall, Tarrytown. 

The discussion and exhibition at the 
next meeting will be in the line of 
"Roses and Bulbous Flowers." 

G. M. 



Oeueva, O. — F. E. Chapman is build- 
ing four houses, each 24x200, using 
Garland materials, and will devote them 
to vegetables. 

Orand Bapids, Mich. — Two model 
vegetable houses, each 34x275, are be- 
ing erected here for R. E. Yonkers. 
They are iron-frame construction of 
the Garland type and are to be heated 
by a No. 15 Kroeschell boiler, using 
threaded boileri,tuJ)^,,piping on the 
gravity plan. 




New Tradescantia "SILVER QUEEN" 



A MONET-MAKKR FROM THE START 



Extra strong 2-inch pot plants, $1.0O per doz. 

^^OTTO PEMMLER, ■ Eau Claire, Wis. 



Mention The Itovlew whaa you wru. 



FERNS IN FINE CONDITION 

Boston, Piersoni, Whitnuuii, Soottii and Scholaeli, 5-inch, 25c; 6-inch, 
60c; 7-inch, 75c; 8-inch, $1.00. 

Table Ferns, 2><-inch, $3.00 per 100; 3-inch, $6.00 per 100. 

Rubbers, 4-inch, 25c; 5-inch, 35c; 6-inch, 50c and 75c each. 

Ficus Pandurata, fine plants, $2.00 each. 

Araucaria Ezcelsa, 5-inch, 50c ; 6-inch, 75c. 

Araucaria Compacta, 5-inch, $1.25; 6-inch, $1.75. 

Cinerarias, in full bloom, 4-inch, 10c ; 5-inch, 20c ; 6-inch, 30c. 

Pot Hyacinths, in bloom, 10c each. 

Kentias, Belmoreana and Forsteriana, 4-inch, 25c and 35c ; 5-inch, 50c 
and 75c; 6-inch, $1.00, $1.25 and $1.50; large plants, $2.00 to $35.00 each. 

Kentias, Belmoreana and Forsteriana, made-up, 75c, $1.50, $2.00, $2.50, 
$3.00, $5.00, $7.00, $8.U0, $9.00, $10.00, $12.00, $15.00 and $18.00 each. 

Funkia Var., 4-in., 25c; 5-in., 40c. 

Vinca Rosea, Rosea Alba and Alba Pura, 2-in., branched, $2.50 per 100; 
fine plants, ready to shift. 

We bloom about 8000 Azaleas for Easter and do them right. 
All our plants are in fine condition. 

JOHN BADER CO., 43 Ravine Street, N. S., PIUSBURG, PA. 

MentloD The Review when you write. 



SHAMROCKS 

BY PREPAID EXPRESS 

Where money accompanies order. 

Per 100 

Shamrocki, 2-in $ 3.00 

Shamrocks, miniature (with 

pots) 4.00 

Calla Devonicnsis, 3>in .... 4.00 
Daisies (Nicholsoa's white 
and yellow, best for forc- 
ing) 4.00 

Dracaena Indivisa, 5-in 20.00 

Asparagus Sprengeri, strong 

S-in 4.00 

2IIHI Victory 

Strong, 2;^ -inch pots, at $20.00 
per 1000. Other Carnation cuttings 
at bargain prices. 

At the home of the 
Richmond Rose . . . 

FRED H. LEMON & CO. 

RICHMOND, IND. 



ANTON SCnULTNCIS, College Point, L I. 

HeadQuarten for 

MCORATIVE and FIOWEMNG PUNTS 



Easter Bargains 

HYACIHTHS, 4-ln., light blue, dark bine, 
pink, and white, right for Easter, $9.00 per 100. 

TTTLIPS, 4-in., 3 to pot, $10.00 per 100. 

FSIMTTLA OBCONICA, 4-in., mixed colors, 
full of buds and bloom, |5.00 per 100. 

CHINESE FaiMBOBES, mixed colors, |8.00 
per 100. 

OERANimCS, 4-ln., In bud and bloom. Polte- 
▼ine, Ricard, La FaTorite, and 6 fancy kinds, 
$7.00 per 100. 

BUBBER PLANTS, 6-ln. pots, fine plants, 50c 
each. 

KAROUEBITES, 3V>-1d., in bud and bloom, 
$5.00 per 100; 2^-ln., in bud and bloom, $2.50 
per 100. 

FUNKIA, VABIEGATED, 3%-ln., $10.00 per 
100. 

2i^-in. ALTEBNANTHEBAS, red anil yellow, 
fine plants, $2.50 per 100. 

3-in. ABXTTILONS, 7 kinds, $5.00 per 100. 

2Vi-ln. AaEBATVMS, $2.00 per 100. 

8-iB. BEGONIAS, flowering, 7 fine kinds, $5.00 
per 100. 

2V4-ln. COLEUS, red, yellow or 5 kinds, $2.50 
per 100. 

2H-in. FTTCHBIAS, 8 varieties, fine plants, 
$2.50 per 100. 

3-in. DOUBLE FETXTNIAS, 4 kinds, $5.00 per 
100. 

3%-ln. SNAFDBAGONS, bud and bloom, $5.00 
per 100. 

4-ln. HELI0TB0FE8, in bloom, mixed, $7.00 
per 100. 

21^-in. XME. SALLEBOI OEBANIITMS, $2.00 
per 100. 

FEBNg,, W'\U"MlL Scottil, Plersoni, Boston, 
nice plants, it)c, l5c, "25c each. 

CANNA BOOTS, fancy varieties mixed, $1.50 
per 100. 

TOMATO, CABBAftS. CAtXLIFLOWEB, LET- 
TUCE. PEPFEB8 Allb OTHEB VEGETABLE 
PLANTS BY THE MILLION. COBBESPOND- 
ENCE SOLICITED. 

Send your order today and we will ship when 
you are ready. Although our stocU Is large and 
in grand ubape, this adv. may not appear again. 

ALONZD J. BRYAN, wsahtactos. v. j. 



"WJWf^T'W 



March 9, 1911. 



ThcWeckly Florists' Review. 



71 



DREER'S ADIANTUN FARLEYENSE 



w 



'FT' 



.■v^ 



w 


' ' ■ ^'k. .^^_A_/ 


1 Ji 


HIk^'^ 


^flJ^^PV^^^^^^^^^^^I 


^^I^^^^K" 




^^^^^^Vw74/t an ru tti 


-^ 


^^^^^y ^curlii.u9rLSt. 



PerlOO 

$40.00 

70.00 



For Fine Decorations Perdoz. 

Splendid 4-inch pots $6.00 

Splendid 6-inch pots 9.00 

NEPHROLEPIS IN VARIETY Each 

Scholzeli, 6-inch pots $0.60 

Scholzeli, 10-inch pans 2. 00 

Scottii', 6-inch pots 50 

Scottii, 10-inch pans 2.00 

Whitmani, 6-inch pots 60 

Whitman!, 10-inch pans 2.00 

'ASPLENIUM NIDUS AVIS (The Bird's Nest Fern) 

Per doz. Per 100 

Splendid 3-inch pots $3.50 $25.00 

Splendid 4-inch pots 6.00 40.00 

CIBOTIUM SCHIEDEI Each 

Elegant plants in 6-inch potg $1,60 

ADIANTUM HYBBIDUM 

Good 3-inch pots, splendid stock for growing on in pots or for plant- 
ing out for cuttings, $1.25 per doz. ; $8.00 per 100; $70.00 per 1000. 

MIXED FERNS FOR FERN DISHES 

Per 100 Per 1000 

2X-inch pots $3.50 $30 00 

3-inch pots 6.00 50.00 

The above Frloea are Intended for the Trade only. 



HENRY A. DREER, 714 Chestnut St, PHLADELPHIA 



Metitton The Review when vou write. 



Arancarlali:xcel8a,6-in. pots, 3-4 tiers. 60c; 
6-ln. pots, T5c. 

Clematts, large floweringr varieties, 2-year- 
old plants, 13.00 per doz ; l-year-old plants. $2.00 
per doz. 

Clematin Paniculata. strong 2-year-oId. 
$10.00 per 100; l-year-old, »5.00 per 100. 

AxparnKus Spreiicreri stronv, 3-in. pots, 
$4.00 per 100; 2'a-ln. pots, $2 50 per 100, 2-ln. pots, 
$2.00 iMT 100, 

l*ra<-a«-iia Indlvlsa, 4-in. pots, 10c; 5-ln. 
pots, 20c; 6-ln. pots, 30c each. 

^tovk from 3-ln. pots, $100 per 100: 
l<«inon Verbena; Moonvlne. larKe flow»'r- 
ing, the tnie variety; Fachnias, 4 vailetles; 
Kcheveria Ulaui-a; Malvlan, Bonflre and 
Zurich; Vartesated Oeraninm. Mrs. Par- 
ker; OeranianiH, best commercial varieties; 
Swainnona Alba 

ht<'ck from SH2-tn. poto. $2.60 per 100: 
Oerman Ivy; ImpatienH. Sultaniand Hnls- 
til; Cnpheax; SnapdraKon. white; Fm-h- 
8la8, 4 varieties; Varleeated VlncaA; liO- 
belias. double and siiicrle, blue; Aa;eratam. 
blue: (Uemnti* Fanlculata; Variecrated 
I«'e Plants; Hardy PtnkM. Napoleon III; 
Abatilon Savllzii; NatmeK and Bose 
Oeraninnis. 

Kooted Cattinss from floil. $1 00 per 100: 
Carnation, the Queen; Oerman lvy;Hal- 
vla«. Bontlre and Zurich; Pileas. 2 varieties; 
Htevla: .'%Keratum ; Tradescantia; I<'icu8 
Repens; LantanaH, 3 varieties; Lobelias, 
BlnRle and double; Santolina; Swainsona 
Alba; Verbenan. separate ci lors. 

Chrysaiitliemnm Koo*ed Cnttlnars 
from soil: White Cloud, Pacific Supreme. 
Bailey. Golden Glow, $2.00 per 100. 

C. EISELE 

11th ft Westmordaid Sts., Philadelphia. Pa, 



Aieuiiuu I'De Keview when you write. 

GREEN-LEAVED 

ASPIDISTRAS 

Several large plants, thirty to 
fifty leaves, 8 cents per leaf. 

G. A. HEYNE, Florist, 

DUBUQUg. lOVA. 

G. DREY^R 

Tel. 228 Kewtown CI ifUIIDCT I I 
Jaeluon Ave., CLmllUIIO I | La ii 

DECORATIVE PLANTS 

SPXCtALTXSSt Palms, Ferns, Arauca* 
rias, Cyeas, Pantfanus, Lilies. 

BRKTKRII PSRN, |25 perlOO; $200 per lOOO 

Mention Tbe Review when you write. 



Seasonable Stock 



Azalea Mollis. Bu'hy Seedlintrs. 12 to 15 in., 
125.00 per 100; 15 lo 18 in.. $35 00 per 100 

Rhododendrons, best named varieties. 18 
to 24 la., $75 00; 24 to 30 in . $100.00 per 100; bushy 
seedlintrs, 18 to 24 in., $60 00; 24 to 30 m.. $75 00 
perlOO. 

Roses. Baby Dorothy, White Baby Rambler 
and Clothilde Soupeit, one-year, fleld-grown 
plants, cut baclt and grown cool in three and 
four-inch nots all winter, now in full growth, fine 
stock, $10.00 per 100. 

Neptarolepis Scholzell, stronsr 5-in., $5.00 
per dozen ; ISi5.00 per 100. 

Nephrolepls Bostoniensls, fine 2^-in. 

stock, f 100 perlOO. 

Nephrolepls Scottll, strong 4-in., $25.00 
per 100. 



Primula Kewensts, 3-in., $5.00 per 100. 

Moonnower, Ipoma;a Grandiflora, $3.00 per 
100. 

Antberlcum Varieeatum, 2^-in., $3.00 
per 100. 

Dracaena Indlvlsa, fine 2^-in., for growing 
on. $3 00 per 100. 

Kentla Belmoreana. Young stock, in fine 
conaitlon, 2»3 In., 18 00 per 100: 3-in , $1.5.00 per 
100; 4.ln., $35.00 per 100; 5-in.. $50 00 per 100. 

Kentia Forsteriana. Bushy made-up plants 
in tubs 40 to 44-iii. high. $4.00 each; 44to^8-in. 
high, $5 (K) each; 52 to 56-in. high, $7.00 e*ch. 

Areca Lutesoens, 7-in. pots, 3 In a pot. 26 to 
28 in. ,$1.00 each: 8-ln.pots. 3 in a pot, 34 to 36 in.. 
$2 50 each. 



Send for catalog^ue No. 6 if you have not received it. 

THE STORRS & HARRISON CO. 

Painesville, Ohio 

Mention Tbe iteview when you write. 



CARNATIONS 

A surplus of exceptionally fine, healthy stock, 
grown for onr own use: p^y jqq 

1000 LawaoD. out of 2-iDch pots $2 50 

800 Welcome, out of 2.lncfa pots 2.60 

600 Imperial, out ot 2-lDch pota 2.60 

1000 Rose-pink EncbantreHS, out of 2-lnch pots., 3 00 

1000 Mrs. A. Ward, out of 2-lDch pots 6.00 

Asparagus Sprengeri. oat of 2>a>inch pots. 

ready for 4 Inch pots- 2.60 

Pandanus Utills. out of 2U-lnch pots, ready for 
4-inch pots 7.00 

Cash with order. 

A.L. NiOer, opp. 8ciieiick^ATe.,BrMldyii, N.Y. 

Mention Tbe Keview wben you write. 

SHAMROCKS 

2-inch, $5.00 per 100. 
FKRira for dishes, jutsorted varieties, 2H-in. 
pota, I3.0U per 100: $30.00 ^er 1000. 

Cash with order. .600 at 1000 rate. 

FRANK OECHSLIN 

491 1 W. Qaiacy Street. CHICAGO. ILL 

Mention The Review when you write. 



A Real Bargain 

OKRANIUM8 — 2^-in.. $2 00: 3-in.. $3.00 per 
100; 4 in., in bud and bloom, fine for Eastt-r. $7.00 
perlOO; 5-in. f^tock plants. S to 4 cuttings. $10 00 
perliO; rooted cuttings, $12.50 per 10<'0. Wh have 
a large stock of Nutt, Rlcard, Grant, Polte- 
vine. La Favorite, TUtln, Connover, Lan. 
dry and many other varieties. 

8ALVIAS-3-in..$3 50oerl00; 2>a.in., $2.50 per 
100. Rooted cuttings, 18.00 per 1000. 

CHRT8ANTHCMUMS — We have a large 
stock of good varieties, in small plants or rooted 
cuttings. 

SwanPetersonFloralCo. 

Gibson City, 111. 

Always mention the Florists' Review iA^kd 
writing advertisers. 



70 



The Weekly Florists^ Review* 



March 9, 1911. 



GOSHEN. IND. 

E. A. Kunderd has sold to Montague 
Chamberlain, Groton, Mass., his collec- 
tion of plain petaled gladioli, the trans- 
action including all the separate colors 
in the large collection, except some 
twenty varieties. Mr. Kunderd retains, 
besides, his ruffled sorts and his mixed 
stock. 

Mr. Kunderd 's collection was the re- 
sult of fifteen years' study and breed- 
ing. One of his productions, Mrs. Frank 
Pendleton, Jr., secured by Eawson and 
exhibited last season at several flower 
shows, was awarded a certificate of 
merit by the Massachusetts Horticul- 
tural Society. Mr. Kunderd 's greatest 
achievement, of course, is the produc- 
tion of ruffled gladioli, an entirely dis- 
tinct type. His collection of these was 
becoming so large that he decided to 
dispose of his plain petaled varieties, 
and devote his time and means to the 
new type. The collection secured by 
Mr. Chamberlain includes over 300 va- 
rieties and only some half dozen of 
these have been named. Among them 
is a pure white which Mr. Chamberlain 
says will rank with Keine Blanche and 
Europa; another he thinks will be a 
strong rival of the famous Princeps, 
having the advantage of Princeps in 
displaying more blossoms at a time. The 
popular America also has a rival in this 
collection, the new-comer being of some- 
what deeper pink and of larger size. 

Mr. Chamberlain has been for some 
time building up a collection of gladioli 
by propagation and by purchasing from 
the leading American and foreign grow- 
ers, until his collection is one of the 
finest in the country. He is connected 
with one of Boston's largest dry goods 
houses, but his farm is at Groton, in 
the midst of the famous New England 
apple belt. Always a student of nature, 
he was for a number of years connected 
with the Scientific School of Harvard, 
is an author of note, and will undoubt- 
edly become a leading grower of gladoli. 



TARRYTOWN, N. Y. 

The monthly meeting of the Tarry- 
town Horticultural Society was held on 
Friday evening, February 24, with 
President Brunger in the chair. T. W. 
Stobo, K. Franke and W. MacBean 
were elected active members and one 
application for membershij) was re- 
ceived. 

A communication was read from the 
New York Florists' Club asking the 
cooperation of the Tarrytown society in 
securing the passage of a bill through 
the legislature appropriating $50,000 to 
erect greenhouses at Cornell for experi- 
mental purposes. 

It was announced that the fall show 
will be held October 31 to November 2, 
in the Music hall, Tarrytown. 

The discussion and exhibition at the 
next meeting will be in the line of 
' ' Roses and Bulbous Flowers. ' ' 

G. M. 



Geneva, O.— F. E. Chapman is build- 
ing four houses, each 24x200, using 
Garland materials, and will devote them 
to vegetables. 

Grand Rapids, Mich.— Two model 
vegetable houses, each 34x275, are be- 
ing erected here for R. E. Yonkers. 
They are iron-frame construction of 
the Garland type and are to be heated 
by a No. 15 Kroeschell boiler, using 
threaded boiler tube piping on the 
gravity plan. 




New Tradescantia "SILVER QUEEN" 



A MONEY-MAKER FROM THE START 



Extra strong 2-inch pot plants, $1.0O per doz. 

OTTO DEMMLER, - Eau Claire, Wis. 



Mention Tbe K«vlew when you vmh' 



FERNS IN FINE CONDITION 

Boston, Piersoni, Whitmani, Soottii and Scholzeli, 5-inch, 25c ; 6-inch, 
50c; 7-inch, 75c; 8-inch, $1.00. 

Table Ferns, 2^-inch, $3.00 per 100; 3-inch, $6.00 per 100. 

Rubbers, 4-inch, 25c; 5-inch, 35c; 6-inch, 50c and 75c each. 

Ficus Pandurata, fine plants, $2.00 each. 

Araucaria Excelsa, 5-inch, 50c ; 6-inch, 75c. 

Araucaria Compacta, 5-inch, $1.25; 6-inch, $1.75. 

Cinerarias, in full bloom, 4-inch, 10c; 5-inch, 20c; 6-inch, 30c. 

Pot Hyacinths, in bloom, 10c each. 

Kentias, Belmoreana and Forsteriana, 4-inch, 25c and 35c; 5-inch, 50c 
and 75c; 6-inch, $1.00, $1.25 and $1.50; large plants, $2.00 to $35.00 each. 

Kentias, Belmoreana and Forsteriana, made-up, 75c, $1.50, $2.00, $2.50, 
$3.00, $5.00, $7.00, $8.U0, $9.00, $10.00, $12.00, $15.00 and $18.00 each. 

Funkia Var., 4-in., 25c; 5-in., 40c. 

Vinca Rosea, Rosea Alba and Alba Pura, 2-in., branched, $2.50 per 100; 
fine plants, ready to shift. 

We bloom about 8000 Azaleas for Easter and do them right. 
All our plants are in fine condition. 

JOHN BADER CO., 43 Ravine Street, N. S., PIHSBURG, PA. 

Mention The Review when you write. 







SHAMROCKS 

BY PREPAID EXPRESS 

Where money accompanies onier. 

Per 100 

Shamrock*, 2-in $ 3.00 

Shamrock*, miniature (with 

pots) 4 00 

Calla Devoniensis, 3-in .... 4.00 
Daisies (Nicholson's white 
and yellow, best for forc- 
ing) 4.00 

Dracaena Indivisa, 5-in 20.00 

Asparagus Sprengeri, strong 

3.in 4.00 


Easter Bargains 

HYACINTHS, 4-in.. light blue, dark blue, 
pink, and wlilte, right for Easter, $9.00 per 100. 

TULIPS, 4-in., ."5 to pot, $10.00 per 100. 

PRIMULA OBCONICA, 4-in., mixed colors, 
full of buds and bloom, $5.00 per 100. 

CHINESE PRIMROSES, mixed colors, $8.00 
per 100. 

GERANIUMS, 4-ln., In bud and bloom. Poite- 
vine, Uicard, La Favorite, and 5 fancy kinds, 
$7.00 per 100. 

RUBBER PLANTS, 6 in. pots, fine plants, 50c 
each. 

MARGUERITES, .SV^-ln., In bud and bloom, 
$5.00 per 100; 2V.-in., in bud and bloom, $2.50 
per 100. 

FUNKIA, VARIEGATED, SVii-ln., $10.00 per 
100. 

2V'-in. ALTERNANTHERAS, red iind yellow, 
flni' plants. .$2.50 per 100. 

.■{■in. ABUTILONS, 7 kinds, $5.00 per 100. 

2ii-in. AGERATUMS, $2.00 per 100. 

3-in. BEGONIAS, flowering, 7 fine kinds, $5.00 
per 100. 

2 '/.-in. COLEUS, red, yellow or 5 kinds, $2.50 
per 100. 

2V.-in. FUCHSIAS, S varieties, fine plants, 
$2.50 per 100. 

3-in. DOUBLE PETUNIAS, 4 kinds, $5.00 per 
100. 

ni/.-in. SNAPDRAGONS, bud and bloom, $5.00 
per ioO. 

4-in. HELIOTROPES, in bloom, mixed, $7.00 
per IOO. 

2M!-in. MME. SALLEROI GERANIUMS, $2.00 
per 100. 

FERNS. Whltmanl. Scottii, Piersoni, Boston, 
nice plants, 10c, 15c, 25c each. 

CANNA ROOTS, fancy varieties mixed, $1.50 
per 100. 

TOMATO. CABBAGE. CAULIFLO WKR , LET- 
TUCE. PEPPERS AND OTHER VEGETABLE 
PLANTS BY THE MILLION. CORRESPOND- 
ENCE SOLICITED. 


2IHI0 Victory 

Strong, 2^^-inch pots, at $20.00 
per 1000. Other Carnation cuttings 
at bargain prices. 

At the home of the 
Richmond Rose . . . 

FRED H. LEMON & CO. 

RICHMOND. IND. 


ANTON SCnULTHEIS, College Point, L 1. 

Headquarters for 

KCORATIVE and FLOWERING PUNTS 


Send your order today and we will ship when 
you are ready. Although our stock Is large and 
in grand shape, this adv. may not appear again. 

ALONZO J. BRYAN, !siii?ngto>';°N"j. 



March 9, 1911. 



The Weekly Florists' Review. 



71 



DREER'S ADIANTUM EARLEYENSE 







s 

^►^ 
"*%• 

r 


felr^>. 


JA 


r ^^--.si" 




MQ 




t 


iSi@^ 




^^H^k^HK^^^ 





For Fine Decorations 



Per 100 

$40.00 

70.00 



Per doz. 

Splendid 4-inc'h pots $5.00 

Splendid 5-inch pots 9.00 

NEPHROIiEPIS IN VARIETY Each 

Scholzeli, 6-inch pots $0.50 

Scholzeli, 10-inch pans 2.00 

Scottir, H-inch pots 50 

Scottii, 10-inch pans 2.00 

Whitmani, 6-inch pots 50 

Whitmani, 10-inch pans 2.00 

ASPLENIUM NIDUS AVIS (The Bird's Nest Fern) 

Per (loz. Per 100 

Splendid :5-inch pots $:^,.50 $25.00 

Splendid 4-inch pots 5.00 40.00 

CIBOTIUM SCHIEDEI Each 

Elegant plants in 6-incli pots. $1.50 

ADIANTUM HYBBIDUM 

Good ;>-inch pota, splendid stock for <?rowing on in pots or for plant- 
ing out for cuttings, $1.25 per doz. ; $8.00 per 1(K); §70.00 per lOOO. 

MIXED FERNS FOR FERN DISHES 

Per 100 

2X-inch pots $3.50 

3-inch pots 6.00 

Tlie above Prices are intended for the Trade only 



Per 1000 

$30 00 

50.00 



HENRY A. DREER, 714 Chestnut St, PHUADELPHU 



Mention The Review when von write. 



AraucarlaKxcel8a,5-ln. pot8,a-4Uers. .')()c; 
6-ln. pots. 7.5c. 

Clematis, larco flowering varieties, 2-ye»r- 
old plants, ii.OO per do/. ; l-year-olcl plants. 12.00 
per doz. 

ClematlH Paniculata. atronjr 2-vear-old. 
$10.00 per 1(K); 1-year-old. ».').(I0 per KK). 

A^parnKUH Spreii«r«»ri strong. 3-1 n. pots, 
$4.(XI per 100; l^iAn. pots, fi ,")0 per KKI, '.'-In. pots, 
%-l.m XH'V 100. 

I>ra<-ai-iia Indivisa, 41n. pots, 10c; .')-ln. 
pots, -JOc; fi-in. pots, :<0i- each. 

Stock frnm 3-ln. pot», W OO per 100: 
Liomon Verbena; Mooiivine, large flow^r- 
inp. the true variety; Fuchsiatt, 4 vaiieties; 
Ki'heveria Ulniica; Salvias, Bonfire and 
Zurich; VarieKaleil Geranium. Mrs. Par- 
ker; Geraniums, best comnicrclal varieties; 
Swainsona Alba 

htick from 3V2-in. pot". $2.50 per 100: 
German Ivy; Impatienx. Sultan! and Hols- 
tli: Cuphea>«; Snaixlravon, white; Fuch- 
sias. 4 varlt-tles; Variegated Xiiicas; Lo- 
belias, double and finele, blue; Aeeratum . 
blue: nematis Paniculata; Varieirated 
I«'e Plants; Hardy Pinks. Napoleon III; 
Abnrilon 8aviizii; Nutmee and Bose 
Geraniums. 

Kooted Outtines from soil. $1 00 pcrlOO: 
Carnation, the Queen; German lvy;Sal- 
vian. Bonfire and Zurich; Pileas. 2 varieties; 
Stevia; .^Keratuni ; Tradescantia; Kicus 
Kt'pens; Lantanas, :! varieties; Lobelias, 
single and double; Santollna; Swainsona 
Allta; Verbt-nas. separate ci lors. 

Chrysanthemum Koo'ed Cuttings 
from soil: Whiff Cloud. Pacific .Supreme. 
Bailey, Golden Glow, 12.00 per lOO. 

C. EISELE 

11th & WestinorelaN Sts.. Philadelphia, Pa. 



♦Ueiiinju I'liC Keview when yuu write. 

GREEN-LEAVED 

ASPIDISTRAS 

Several large plants, thirty to 
fifty leaves, 8 cents per leaf. 

G. A. HEYNE, Florist, 

DUBUQUE. IOWA. 

G. DREYER 

Tel. 228 Newtown ri iiUIIPCT I I 
Jackson Ave., CLinillUIIO I | Li ■■ 

DECORATIVE PLANTS 

8PKCIAL.TIKS: Palms, Ferns, Arauoa* 
Has, Cyoas, Pandanus, Lilies. 

DRKTERII PERN, $25 per 100; $200 perlOOO 

Mention The Review when you write. 



Seasonable Stock 



Azalea Mollis. Biuhy Soedlinfrj^. I.' to l.~> in.. 
}J.">.00 per 100; 1') lo l^s in., |;!,') 00 per KXI 

Rhododendrons, l)>st nflmed varieties. Is 
to 21 in., $7."i 00; 21 to :J0 in . $100.00 per 100; bushy 
seedlings, IS to L'l in..|CiO0O; L'l to oO lu., $7"i (V) 
per 100. 

Roses. lUiby Dorothy, White Baby Rambler 
and Ciothilde Soupeit, one-year, tield-grown 
plants, cut back and grown cool in tliree and 
four-inch nots ail winter, now In full growili. fine 
stock. $10.00 per 100. 

Nepbrolepis Scbolzeli, strong ~>-in., $.'i.r)0 
per dozen ; $:>).00 per UK). 

Nepbrolepis Bostoniensis, fine '-'^2-in. 
stock. $1 00 per KHt. 

Nepbrolepis Scottil, strong l-in., %'i:im 
per 1(H). 



Primula Kev^ensis, :i-in., $~).00 per 100. 
Moonflow^er, Ipomcea Grandiflora, $3.00 per 



KHJ. 



»«-in., $;;.0o 
•2-in., for growing 



Antbericum Varieeatum, 

per 100. 

Dracaena Indivisa, fine 2^ 
on. %\\ 00 per loo. 

Kentia Belmoreana. Young stock, in fine 
oonoiiion. l^i in., fsiK) per Hki; :;.in , ll'i.oo per 
KK); 1 in., t:!'>.00 per KM); .Vin., l-'.o m per loo. 

Kentia Forsteriana. liu^liy innde-up plants 
in tub.s 10 to 4 l-in. high. $1 <K) each; llto"ls-in. 
lugh, t'l (H) each ; Vj to "Hi in. higli, $7.tK) e*ch. 

Areca Lutescens, 7-in. pots, :! in a pot. 2ti to 
•JS in.,|l.tK) each; s-in.pot.-, :! in a pot, ;!l to :">('. in.. 
$J .lo each. 



Send for catalogue No. 5 if you have not received it. 

THE STORRS & HARRISON CO. 

Painesville, Ohio 

Mention The Review when you write. 



CARNATIONS 

A surplus of exceptionally fine, healthy stock, 
grown for onr own use: pg^ joo 

1000 Lawson.eutof 21nch pots ii2 .'50 

800 WeUome. out of '2-lnch pots 2 50 

.500 Imperial, out or 2-lnch pots. . 2.50 

1000 Hose-pink EnchantreHS. out of 2-lnch pots.. 3 (Kl 

KKK) Mrs. A. Ward, outof 2-lnch pots 6.(K) 

Asparagus Sprengerl. out of 2Hi-lnch pots. 

ready for 4 Inch pots 2..50 

Pandanus Titllis, out of 2'4-lnch pots, ready for 
l-inch pots 7.00 

Cash with order. 

A.L. Niller, oppfscVnck^ATc.. Brooklyn, N.Y. 

Mention The Keview when you write. 

SHAMROCKS 

2-inch, $,5.00 per 100. 
FERNS for dishes tMsorted varieties, 2H-in. 
pou. <3.oU per 100; $30.00 per 1000. 

Cash with order. 500 at 1000 rate. 

FRANK OECHSLIN 

491 1 W. Qdiflcy Street. CHICAGO. ILL 

Mention The Review when you write. 



A Real Bargain 

GERANIUMS -2i2-in.. $2 00; 3-in.. $;?.00 per 
100; 1 in., in bud and l)ioom, tine for Easter. $7.00 
perlOO; S-in. stock plant*. S to 1 cuttings, $10 00 
perliO; rooted cuttings, $12..')0 per 10<'0. We have 
a large stock of Nutt, Ricard, Grant, Poite- 
vine. La Favorite, Tiffin, Connover, Lan- 
dry and many other varieties. 

SALVIAS- :'.-in.,$;! :>0 per 100; 2i2-in.,$2.'i0pcr 
UK). Roottid cuttings. $s.00 per 1000. 

CHRYSANTHEMUMS — We have a large 
stock of gootl varieties, in small plants or rooted 
cuttings. 

SwanPetersonFloralCo. 

Gibson City, 111. 

Always in<;ntion the Florists' Review when 
writing advertisers. 



, 'J; .1' f.:^^ ' 



72 



The Weekly Florists' Review. 



March 9, 1911. . 



CRAIG SPECIALTIES 



Cyclamen— Exceptionally well-flowered 
6-in.. 7-in. and 8-in. pots $100, 11.25. 11.50. $2.00 and $2.50 each 

Begonia Glory of Cincinnati— Beautiful plants 
64n. pots tl5.00 and $18.00 per dozen 

Dracaena Massangeana — Perfect plants 
Each $1.25, $1.50, $2.00, $3.00, $5.00. $S.00 and 17.50 

NEPHROLEPIS FERNS-Extra quaUty plants 

Nephrolepis Scottii 

2H-in.pot8 $5.00 per 100 

6 -in. pots $6.00 and 19.00 per dozen 

8-in. pans $12.00 per dozen 

10-in. and U-in tubs $18.00, $24.00 and $30.00 per dozen 



Nephrolepis Elegantissima Compacta 

2J4-in. pots $8.00 per 100; $75.00 per 1000 

4 -in. pots $20.00 per 100 

6 -in . pots $50 .00 per 100 

Nephrolepis Todeaoides 

2H-ln. pots $5.00 per 100 

4 -in. pots $20.00 per 100 

6 -in. pots fcO.OOperlOO 

11 -in. tubs $2.00 each 



Specimen Nephrolepis Bostoniensis 



ll-in.tubs.. 



.$3.00. $3.50 and $4.00 each 



Every store should use some of this stock for March sales. It will please you 

ROBERT CRAIG COMPANY, M.rkl?^r.... Philadelphia 



Mention The Review when you write. 



DO FEBXS NEED FBOTECTION? 

While it is said that Vermonters may 
have to prevent the stripping of ferns 
from their mountain sides by means of 
legislation similar to recent enactments 
to protect their Christmas trees, florists 
in the big eastern cities probably will 
not become anxious over that prospect 
so long as the other New England states 
overlook the matter. Regardless of 
Vermont's reputed dissatisfaction be- 
cause the industry of gathering ferns 
ns alleged to be systematically organ- 
ized in the big outside cities, employees 
being sent up to do the work, it is pos- 
sible that the inroads made upon these 
plants have been largely overestimated. 

Vermont is the first state to call at- 
tention tq the possibility that ferns, as 
well as fir trees, might be in need of 
conservation. In reality, florists get 
their principal supplies of ferns from 
Massachusetts, and also draw largely 
on New Hampshire, Maine, Connecti- 
cut and even Bbode Island. These 
states, evidently, have found no rea- 
son as yet to complain. Furthermore, 
investigation discloses that it is the 
common brake variety of fern which is 
in greatest demand, and, like the rest 
of the fern family, the brake is a peren- 
nial instead of an annual. 

If the claim that 50,000,000 ferns 
were sent out last fall from four Ver- 
mont towns is authentic, of course, some 
alarm might be regarded as justifiable 
in the face of such figures. As to any 
lasting damage resulting to the fern 
growth, however, there is plenty of 
room for doubt. Hence, it would seem 
that Vermonters might arrange to earn 
themselves the $25,000 or $30,000 said 
to be paid fern gatherers there each 
fall, for if a prohibitive tax were placed 
on Green mountain fronds, that attrac- 
tive income would surely be diverted 
to other parts of New England. — Boston 
Daily Paper. 



Geraniums 

While we are sold short on some few kinds, we can put up an excellent collec- 
tion, that will meet all the requirements of the most critical trade, for $2.00 per 100. 
1000, in from 10 to 20 kinds, our selection, for $18.50. Cash. 

Ivy Geraniums, Scented Geraniums, Variegated Geraniums, in good assortment, 
described in our catalogue. If you have not got it, you need it. Ask for it« 



. 2.in. s 

E>ouble Petunias, propagated from select stock of the finest colors. Per lOO Per lOOO 

also double white suid single fringed $2.00 $18.50 

Alyssum, dwarf and giant 2.00 18.50 

Alternanthera, six varieties 2.00 18.50 

Ageratum, six varieties 2.00 18.50 

Coleus, Golden Bedder, Verschaffeltii and others 2.00 18.50 

Fuchsias, six varieties 2.00 18.50 

Lemon Verbenas 2.00 18.50 

Lobelias, Kathleen Mallard and Newport Model 2.00 18.50 

Parlor Ivy, Senecio Scandens 2.00 18.50 

Tradescantia Zebrina Multicolor 3.00 18.50 

Swainsona Alba 2.00 18.50 

Salvias, Bonfire and Zurich 2.00 18.50 

Coleus, rooted cuttings, 60c per 100; $5.00 per 1000. 

Cash with order. Not less than 250 of one variety at 1000 rate 

R. VINCENT, JR., & SONS CO., • White Narsh, Nd. 



Mention The Review when you writ*. 



McMlnnville, Ore. — Herbert & Fleis- 
hauer say the demand for cut flowers 
has been heavier this season than ever 
before, and that it will be necessary 
for them to increase their output of 
carnations in order to supply the call 
from surrounding towns. 



ALTERNANTHERAS 

strong rooted cuttings, the kind that will please 

you. 
P Maior (red) .">0c per 100: $4 00 per 1000 


CHAS. D. BALL 

■p^ GROWKR OV 


A. Nana (yellow) riOcperlOO; 4 00 per 1000 

Brilliantissima C.Oc per 100 ; .5.00 per 1000 

Salvias from .'-in. pots. Bondro or Zurich, t2.00 
per 100 

J. W. DAVIS, 22S W. 16th St, Davenport, Iowa. 

Mention The Keview when you write- 


I' ALMS, ETC. 

S«nd for Price list 

H0LMESBUR6. PHILAOaPHIA. PA. 


- 




DAHLIAS 

We are jrrowers of the very best; have a large 
collection to select from. Send for prices. 

DAVID HERBPRT & SON 

ATCO. N. J. 


Julius fioehrs Co. 

RUTHERFORD, N. J. 

Palms, Plants, Orchids, Etc. 

Send for Price List. 






Always oiention the Florists' Review when 
writing advertisers. 


Always mention the Florists* Review 
when wrltiti^ advertisers. 



r':m\ '.*J1 ■■»■' - 



'-T: 



»■ ■ •■.(";■■'■:■'• r. 



Mabch 9, 1911. 



The Weekly Florists^ Review^ 



73 



f \ • 



THE GRANDEST FERN OF THE AGE 



NEPHROLEPIS ROOSEVELT 




BJHjEPHROLEPIS ROOSEVELT is a sport from Nephrolepis Bostoniensis, but a wonderful improvement over the parent 
|fVl| variety and others of stiff, upright growing habit, known as Harrisii or the Harrisii type. It is a stronger maker of 

fronds and young plants than any other variety and will produce a larger finished plant in a six-inch pot than 
Boston or Harrisii will produce in a larger size. 

The finished fronds of Nephrolepis Roosevelt are at least a third wider than Boston and have more graceful droop- 
ing habit. The pinna? are distinctly undulated, giving them a beautiful wavy effect which attracts the eye instantly. Cut 
flower dealers will find fronds of Roosevelt invaluable for design work. A single plant of Roosevelt grown in a six-inch 
pot will when finished almost double the number of fronds produced by Boston or Harrisii type varieties and while Boston 
and Harrisii show stiff, upright growth in a six-inch, the wide, wavy fronds of Roosevelt droop gracefully over the pot, 
hiding it completely from view. Finished three-inch plants of Roosevelt are equally lar^ and more attractive than the 
average well-grown four-inch Boston, and growers of Harrisii and the Harrisii type admit they cannot produce attractive 
plants of these varieties in pots smaller than ten-inch. Without an exception Nephrolepis Roosevelt is the most valuable 
fern ever offered for florists' use. It has the vitality to withstand more rough treatment than other varieties and does not 
revert to the parent type. In our long experience we have never offered the trade any plant with greater assurance of 
entire satisfaction and predict Nephrolepis Roosevelt will very soon lead in popular demand, sweeping from the list Boston, 
Harrisii and the Harrisii type. We are booking orders for delivery, June 1st, 1911, and will fill them in strict rotation 
as to the date received. Get yours in early; you will not be disappointed in this fern. 2X'iach pots, 40c each; 
$3.50 per dozen; $25.00 per 100; $200.00 per 1000. 25 plants at 100 rate; 250 plants at 1000 rate. 



Good & Reese Co., 



LARGEST ROHE 0R0WEB8 
IN THE WORLD 



Springfield, Ohio 



Mention The Review when "ou write. 



NOTICE 



To all American N ura ery m en and Seedsmen desirins 
to keep in touch with zcnunercial horticulture in Eng- 
land and the continent of Europe : Your best meana 
of doing this is to take in the 

Horticultural ^dVeHiser 

Our circulation covers the whole trade in Great Brit- 
ain and the cream of the European firms. Impartial 
reports of all novelties, etc. Paper free on receipt of 
7& cents, covering cost of postage yearly. As the H. A. 
is a purely trade medium, applicants should, with the 
■ubscription, send a copy of their catalogue or other 
evidence that they belong to the nursery or seed trade. 

A. & G. Pearson. Lowdham, Nottingliain, Eng. 

Mention The Review when you write. 



Baytrees/.Boxwood.*.Rhododendrons 

Orders booked now for immediate or spring 

delivery. 

Spatial low prices quoted by mail. 
F« W. O. SCHMITZ9 Importer and Exporter, Prince Bay 9 N.Y* 



Mention The Review when you write. 



74 



I 



'•m^'^f :;"' "^ ♦ 7 



The Weekly Florists' Review* 



Maech 9, 19ir. 



FINE TERNS 



Ready For Imtnedlate 
Retail Sale 



We have an exceptionally fine and large stock of Ferns in the following varieties— first-claiB plants of exceedingly 
good value — plants that will please the most critical buyers, both iji regard to Quality and value. ' ^ti^?^ • v 

Neplirolepis Soholxell. Fine plants, 3^-in. pots, 12.50 per 
doz.: 6-in pans, 16 00 per doz.; 8-1n. pans, $12.00 per doz. 

Neplirol«pls Bostonlensis. Extra strong plants, 8-in. pans. 



Nepbrolepls ElesantlBBlina (Improved). The finest of 
this type— nevtr showing a Bobtou frond: has not reverted in the 
last four years. Pine plants, 4-in. pots, $2.60 per doz.; 6-in., $6.00 
per doz.; 8-in., $12 00 per doz.; large specimens in 12-in. pans, $3.00 
to $5 00 each. 

Nepbrolepla Baesantlsslina Compacta. This bears the 
same relation to Elegantibsiiuu that Scotiii does to Bostonlensis. It 
is a dwarf, compact plant, especially fine in the small sizes. Fine 
plants, 4-in. pots, $3.00 per doz. ; 6-in., $6.00 per doz. 



$12 00 per doz. 

Nepbrolepls Boottlli 3-in. pans, $12.00 pier doz. 

Snull rerns for Ferij Pans. Best and hardiest varieties, 
assorted: Pteris Mayii Wlmsecti, Adiantoides, Aspidlum Tsussi- 
mense. Cyrtomium Falcatum, etc. Strong plants, 214-in. pots, IS.60 
per 100. 



CROTONS. Nice assortment, well colored, 6-in., $9.00 per dosen. 



F. R. PIERSON CO., 



Tarrytown-on-Hudson, New York 



Mention The Review when you write 



PITTSBUEG. 



The Market. 

The lenten season has really had 
some effect on the posy business, at 
least on prices. Several days' sunshine 
brought an increased cut and down went 
the price of flowers; not that there were 
so many more flowers, but that there 
was so much less demand. Everything 
suffered except roses, which still hold 
their own. Stock of all kinds is show- 
ing the benefit of a few days' sunshine 
and it will probably bring carnations 
in such quantities that the bottom will 
drop out of prices entirely. 

The retail shops are looking pretty 
just now, with all the blooming plants, 
as the help has enough time to put on a 
few extra touches. They will have a 
few slow days and then will forget all 
about Lent, as the cheaper flowers will 
bring increased sales and they will be 
busy as ever. 

Various Notes. 

One of our retailers advertised four 
<lozen carnations and spring flowers for 
$1 last Saturday. 

Mrs. E. A. Williams took advantage 
of the lenten season to get a well de- 
served rest after one of the best of sea- 
sons. She sailed Saturday, March 4, for 
the West Indian Islands, where all 
points of interest will be visited. She 
expects to be gone about six weeks. 

Tuesday evening, February 28, in the 
English room at the Fort Pitt hotel, the 
reception to Prof. Hichard Vincent and 
Mrs. Vincent, of White Marsh, Mary- 
land, was the social event of the season. 
The members of the club, with their 
ladies, after viewing Prof. Vincent's 
pictures and hearing his delightful lec- 
ture, which was interspersed with a solo 
by Miss Voelp and topical songs with 
local hits by Allen Langhans, retired to 
the dining room, where a nice lunch 
was served, completing a most delightful 
evening. 

The John Bader Co. has several 
houses of azaleas which are looking 
fine and will just come right for Easter. 
This company never had as fine a show 
of plants as at the present time. 

Chas. Moenig, the bi^ lily grower of 
this section, says the lilies are just com- 
ing right for Easter. He is also cutting 
fine Valley, all of which goes to the 
Pittsburg Cut Flower Co. 

Hoo-Hoo. 

Syracuse, N. Y. — L. J. Mulhauser is 
building a Garland iron-frame house, 
32x75. 



Easter Stock 

Baby Ramblem. 6-in. pots, nicely budded, just 
right for Easter: with 6 to 7 clusters of buds, clean 
healthy follRg<>, no mildew: height, 16 to 18 inches 
above pot. $6.00 por doz ; $47.80 p.T 100. 

Spiraea Oladfttoue, 6 and 7-lu. pots, perfect 
follRKe. budded, flae stock. $4.60 per doz.; $36.00 
perlUO. 

Hydrancrea Otakoa. TbU stock Is nicely bud- 
ded, will be right for Kaster: these are good sellers. 
Order now. 6-in. pots. $4 60 and $6.00 per doz : 
$36.00 and $47.60 per 100; 7-in. pots, $7,50 aod |9.0() 
per doz.: $60.00 and $70 00 per 100. 

Seedllnra that are ready now. 

Per 100 - 1000 

Kentia Belmoreana Palms 12.60 $20 00 

AsparaguH Planiusus Mauns 

(write for prices < n larger quantity).. 1.26 10.00 

AsiiarMsras Sprensrerl 75 6.00 

Cyclamen Perslcam GiKantenm, 

4-6 colors. Order quick, as only about 

eoooareleft 1.50 12.50 

Bedding Stock 

Per doz. 100 1000 

2-in. Asparagus Spi-engerl $2.60 $i2.6U 

R-in. AsparaKus Sprpngerl $0 75 6.00 

3 In Obconlca Primroses 1.00 7.a» 

4-ln. Oboonica Primroses 2(0 

i-in. Anparagus Plumosue Nanus.. 1.00 7.00 

2-ln. Queen Alexandra Daisies 40 3.00 

Kooted cuttloKS Salvia Splendens. 1.00 

Rooted outttngrs Afreratum, blue ■ ■ .75 

IHi-ia. Dractena Indlvlsa 2.60 

2i4-ln. Dracena Indlvlsa 40 3.0U 

3-in. Dracnna Indlvlsa 76 6.00 

2-in. Mme. Salleroi Oeranlum 40 3.00 

l<g-in. Lobnila K. Mallard 40 3 00 

2 io EDgiltth Ivy 40 3.00 

2-in. Ferns Aspidlum Tsusslmense 2.60 20.00 

All this stock is eeasoiiabic and If you can use any 
at all it would be well to get same early, as you know 
how hard It is to gnt Kood stock as season advances. 

Cash from unknown parties. To buyers with 
approved credit, 60 days' time if wanted. 

D. U. AUGSPURGER & SONS CO. 

PKORIA. ILL. 

Mention The Keview when you write 

SPECIAL 

Cibotium Sciiiedei 

Specimen plants in 11-inch pots. 
Sins;le crowns, $7.50; 
Double, $10.00 each. 

Also Scottii and Boston Ferns, and 
Pandantis Veitchii. 

JOHN SCOTT 

Ratlind Rwd and L 4Stli St, BROOKLYN, N. Y. 

CHRYSANTHEMUMS 

AND 

ASTER SEED 

ELMER D. SMITH & CO. 

ADRIAN, MICH. 



Pot Plants for Immediate Use 



6-in. 
126.00 



6-ln. 



$30 00 
30.00 
30.00 
30.00 



8iD. 41a. 

Cyclamen $7.60 116.00 

Primroses 7.60 

Obconlca 7.00 12.60 20.00 

Forbesi. 7.60 

CinHTarUs 96.00 

Tulips 20.00 

Hyacinths 10.00 2000 

Narcissus 2000 

Jonquils 20.00 

HeKoniax. 6 varieties, at SVzc and 6c. 
Begonias, Rex. at 6c and 8c. 
Begonias, Spiral Hex, at 8c and 10c. 
Azaleas. $1 00, $1.26 and $1.60 each. 

Get Order in for Easter Stock Now 

Hydrangeas, 6-lnch pots. 6 to 8 heads. 75o to $1.00 

each. 8-inch pnts, R to 12 heads. $1.60 to ti 00 each. 

9-lncb pots. 10 to 20 heads, at $2.00 to $2.6)' each. 
Spiraeas, 3 varieties, 3.5c, cOc and 76c each. Fink 

Siiiraeas, at 50c, 75c and II .00 each. 
Lillys, can ship these now at 36c. 60c and 7Sc a plant. 

or rend to y )ur order later at 12 H2C per bud. 
Azaleas, $1 00. $1.'.>6 and l<.6ueach. 
Baby Rambler Roses. We have 600 in 6 and 7-lnch 

pots, that are golnir to be fine, large, bushy plants, 

for immediate delivery, 60c and 75c each. 
Sonpert and Hermosa Roses, SHi-inch, 16c; 4-inch, 

at •iHe; 6-lnch. at 35c. While tbey last. 
Bulh Stock, all kinds. 
Don't forget our Ferns. A special in Whitmani and 

Boston, all sizes. 

R. 0. 2ia-ln. 3in. 4-ln. 

Asters $2 60 . 

Agenitum $0.75 2 50 $ 4 00 

Alyosum, Giant 76 260 600 

Dwarf 75 2 60 5 00 

Alternantheras 60 2.50 6.00 

AchyranthPS 1.00 2.60 600 

Begonias, flowering varieties — 3.60 600 

Rex 500 800 

Spiral Rex 7.60 1000 

Ccntaurea 2.60 5.00 . . 

Cinerarias. 5-ln.. $26.00 6 00 . $12 60 

Cyclamen, .-i in.. $35.00 5 00 7.50 15.00 

OolKUS 60 2.50 

Cobwas 6.00 

Cupheas. 350 . 

Daisies. Paris 1.60 360 600 . ... 

Yellow 200 500 860 

Q.Alexandra.. 2.00 5.00 8.60 . 

Dracaenas. 5 in.. $36.00 7.50 16.00 

Feverfew 2 00 3r«) 7 50 12 60 

Fuchsias. 4 varieties 2 60 5 00 7.60 12 60 

Geraniums, red. white, pink S.OOto 

and salmon 1.76 3.50 5.00 10.00 

Rose 200 360 600 10.00 

Silver-leaf 160 3 00 600 . 

Heliotrope 2 00 3 60 7 60 12 60 

Ivies.Oerman 2 OO 6.00 7 50 

Impatiens. Saltanl 2.60 6.00 800 . 

lADtaoas 160 600 800 . ... 

Lemon Verbenas 2.60 600 8.00 

Lobelia. 2 varieties 6 50 6.00 

Moonvtnes. 5-ln.. $25.00 2.50 6 00 10.00 12.60 

Mignonette 3 60 

Nasturtiums 2 60 . 

Petunias. Dreer's best 2.00 6.00 8 00 12.50 

Pyretbrum 3.60 5.00 

Primroses. Obconica.Cbinese 

andForbesl 500 800 12.60 

Periwinkle 3 60 6.00 . 

Salvia 2.00 360 6.00 12.50 

Santolina 6.00 . . ... 

Smilax 360 600 

Stcks .'.'. 6.00 7.60 . ...; 

Thunbergla 2.60 

Umbrella Plants 500 1000 

Verbenas 3.00 600 

Vlncas, variegated 3 60 7.50 

Green. 3 60 7.50 

RoaeaandAlba 6.00 8.00 

Ask for our List of Cannas, OamationB. Rosea, 
Chrysanthemums and Decorativ* Plants. 

GEO. A. KUHL 

Wholesale ChH>wer PEKIET, ILL. 

Mention The Review when you write. 



MabCh 9. 1011. 



The Weekly Florists' Review. 



76 



New Marguerite Mrs. F. Sander 




New Marguerite, Mrs. F. Sander. 



The most valuable flowering pot plant 
which has been offered to the trade 
since the introduction of the Lorraine 
Begonia. 

In this we have unquestionably the njost im- 
portant flowering plant introduced in recent 
years, which, like its predecessors, the French 
Marguerite and the later introductions, white 
and blush Queen Alexandra, will be grown exten- 
sively for cut flowers during the winter, while 
its pure white color will make it more valuable 
than any as a pot plant for Easter decorations. 

Unlike all other Marguerites, its color is of 
the purest glistening white throughout; in size it 
frequently measures 5 inches across; the center 
of the flower is a mass of closely arranged 
fringed florets; these are surrounded or edged by 
the broad, shining white ray petals, forming a 
flower which reminds one forcibly of a glorified 
double Pyrethrum. These are produced on long 
stems with a freedom not known in other varie- 
ties of the Marguerite. 

The entire stock of this grand novelty has 
been placed in our hands for American distribu- 
tion and we are now booking orders for delivery 
the latter part of April or early in May: 

Good 214-in. pots, $2.00 per doz.; $15.00 per 100. 
The above prices are intended for the trade only. 

See our current Wliolesale List for a complete 
line of seasonable Plants, Seeds, Bulbs, etc. 



HENRY A. DREER, 



714 
Chestnut Street, 

Mention Tbe Review when you write. 



Philadelphia, Pa. 



We are Headquaiten fer 

Ferns and Araucarias 

NEPHROLEPIS B08TONIENSIS, 
8COTTII, 8CHOLZELI, WHITMANI and 
WHITMAN I COM PACTA. In 6H-ln. pots, 
40c and 60c each; 4-in., |2.00 per doz. 

D;SH FERNS, 2Vi-in., |4.00 per 100. 
Fine assortment. 

ARAUCARIA EXCEL8A, 5%-lnch, 4 to 
6 tiers. 60c, 60c. 76c each. Good value. 

ASPARAGUS PLUMOSUS, 4-in.. 110.00 
per 100. 

FICU8 ELASTICA, 5H-in., 35c and 40o 
oftch 

KENTIA BELMOREANA, 4-ln.. 80* 
each. 

Cash with order please. 

Mention if you want the pots. 

ASCHNANN BROS. 

Second and Bristol Sta.and Bim AnnPIIIA 
RisioE San Ave.. - - ■ lUlLAllLLrlUA 

Mention The Kevlew when you write. 



Tritoma Pfitzeri 



$4.50 per 100; $30.00 per 1000. 
GOOD DIVISION 

Cash with order, please. 
Address aU orders to 

ROWEHL & GRANZ 

Ifldksville, L. I., N. Y. 



Mention rne Keview wneu you wnio. 




BOSTON, WHITMANI 
TODEAOIDES, SCOHII 

214-Inch, $3.(50 per 100: 8-inch, $8.00 per 100; 4-lnch. $12.50 per 100; 5-inch. $20.00 per 100. 
These Fernit are thoroughly established in the above sizes and are ready for a shift into larger 
pots. We pack them to reach you in first-class shape. We have 60,000 Keriis ready now. 

Asparacus Plumosus, 2^-inch, $2.50 per 100; 3-inch, $'>.00 per 100; 4-inch. $-<.00 per 100. 

Asparacus Sprensrerl, 2-inch. $1.76 per 100; 3-inch. <i.00 per 100; 4-inch t7.u0 per 100. 

Vinca Variesata, out of 2^-inch pots. Theae are divisions from field-grown plants, taken last 
fall, and will make strong 3-inch, if potted up now. We have 20,000 of these. They will not last long 
at $2 00 per 10<> ; $18.00 per 1000. 

Salvia Splendens, 2-inoh. $1 50 per 100; $15.00 per 1000. 

Coleus, y. Bfdder. Versohafleltii and 6 others. 2-inch, $l.fO per 100; $15.00 per 1000. 

Coleus, Brilliancy ( Xmas Gem. Dr. Ross). Without a doubt the very finest broad leaved Coleus. 
We off'T strong 2i2-inch at $:i.00 per 100. 

Impatiens Sultanl, 2>4-inch, $2 50 per 100. 

We have 05,000 Clematis Panloulata, in 2-inrh pots. These are for lining out or, if potted 
into 3-iiK'h. wt H make nic^ plants for this spring's sales. $2.50 p^r 100. 

Shasta Daisy Alaska and Phlox MUss LinKard, both indispensable to every florist. 
2-inch, $2.5u per 100. 

<tur list for the asking. You should have it. 

We pack our plants to reach you in first-class shape. 



-CASH. PLEASE. 



HI Q ^1 ■ g^ Etclusiveiy Wholesale Plantsmen 

Tne nCeser rl3ni UO., springfield, omo 






Mention The Review when von writp 



ORCHIDS 

We claim to be the larj;^ Collectors 
and Importers of Orchids in this country. 
We are booking orders for spring deliv- 
ery. Inveetifl^ate na. 

CAKRILLO & BALDWIN. NANARONECK, N. Y. 

Mention The Review when you write. 



ORCHIDS 

Established and imported in great variety; 
also material in which to grow them. 

LAGER & HURRELL Summit. N. J. 

Orchid Growen and Importers. 

Mention The Review when you write. 



.v»--. 



»t/. ^';^7-"':'■'*V''^<V^'"f7IV^^^ T.w-'T-' ■■^*---^-*- • -\-J . -"ar yTT-TT'wy 



76 



The Weekly Florists' Review* 



March 9, 1911. 



MT. GILEAD POHERY CO., Mt. Gllead, Ohio 

' Suooessors to SMITH-THOMAS POTTKRT ' -^ 

Manulacturers of CHERRY RED STANDARD P.OTS of all sices 

Our clay is mined from the old Morrow County Beaver Swamp, which enables us to furnish florists with 
pots noted for strength, porosity, beauty in color, lightness in weight and smoothness in surface, making 
them especially adapted to the successful growth of plants. 

Our factory is equipped with new and up-to-date machinery. Our capacity is greater and our ware- 
house full of stock. We are ready to give all orders prompt attention. Give us your order and we will 
satisfy you. 

OUR PRICES WILL INTEREST YOU. PRICE LIST ON APPLICATION 

Mention The Review when you write. 




EOCHESTER, N. Y. 



The Market. 

Weather conditious have greatly im- 
proved; sunny days have been more nu- 
merous, so that the supply has been 
ample for all needs and trade has been 
good. Carnations are again in the mar- 
ket in large quantities, after a marked 
shortage for several weeks. 

Roses ari> plentiful; American 
Beauties retail at from $1 to $1.25 per 
dozen; Killarney are not quite as popu- 
lar and retail at $1 per dozen. One of 
the leading florists of the city offered 
as a special attraction for Saturday 
sweet violets at 25 cents per bunch. The 
best Hudson river violets have been 
selling at 50 cents per bunch. Potted 
hyacinths, tulips and daffodils are plen- 
tiful. 

Various Notes. 

The largest single order of carnations 
ever sent from Rochester went to Syra- 
cuse Friday, March 3, to be sold on the 
streets of that city for the hospital 
fund 

The Rochester bowling team enter- 
tained the Buffalo association bowling 
team Wednesday evening, March 8, at 
Lang's alleys. 

The Rochester Florists' Association 
will meet Monday evening, March 13. 
The special business will be the con- 
sideration of an amendment to the con- 
stitution to increase the dues to $2 a 
year. This resolution was introduced 
by R. G. Salter. E. F. R. 



Janesville, Wis.— The Janes ville Flo 
ral Co. recently had a large wedding dec- 
oration at Broadhead. The work of 
both Mr. Amerpohl and Mr. Myers, of 
the firm, was required to execute the 
plans. 

Canon City, Colo.— J. T. Calvert, the 
vegetable grower who recently com- 
pleted a $5,000 iron-frame greenhouse in 
the Hot Springs district, now has the 
house well stocked with vegetables in 
all stages of growth. He is one of the 
most successful growers in this vicinity 
and realizes especially good profits from 
his celery. 



GEO. KELLER & SON 

Manufacturers of 

RED POTS 

Before buying write for prices. 
8614-8628 Hemdon Street 

Wri^tw^ Ave.. OilCAGO, ILL 

Mention The Review when tou write. 

RED STANDARD POTS r!-i?S.1'JrZ. 

Wn.. $2.60: 2>4-ln.. $2.96; aVj-ln.. $3.60; 3-ln..$4.60; 
l>a-ln.. $6.86; 4-ln..$7.20; 6-ln., $11.70; 6-ln.. $19.80. 

Cash must accompany oMer. 
HARRISON POTTERY, HarrlBon, Ohio 

Mention The Review /when you write. 




For "Pot Luck'' Try Us 

HEWS STANDARD POTS 

POT MAKERS TOR 140 YEARS 
World's Largest Manufacturers 

' ' Write for Catalogue and Discounts. 



A. H. HEWS & CO., Inc., 



Established 1766 

CAMBBXSGK. MASS. 

PeariM St., Lsdi Islaad City. N. T. 



Mention The Review when you -write. 



THE rANOUS IONIA POTS 

STRONGEST, UOHTIST, MOST POROUS. 

Packed in strong, hardwood orates. Plenty of straw. 
We Bolved the breaJka^e problem years a^o. 

We are ready for that order NOW. 



IONIA POTTERY CO., 



IONIA, MICH 



All the Clay ^=^M Florists' Red Pots 

Is prepared by passinsr through a screen 1600 meshes to the square 
inch. If in a hurry for pots order from us. We can ship over five 
lines of railroad, by river or interurban . Write for catalosrue show- 
ing all the articles we make for floriste' use. 

THE PHERS & REED POnOtY CO., • Zanesville, Ohio 




PENNSYLVANIA 



is the State to get the nice Red Standard Pota, Pans, 
'^ Azalea Pots, etc., and NORRISTOWN is the town 
where they manufacture them and burn them a nice red color. Try Ua and see if 
they are not just as cheap, too. 

THE KELLER POTTERY CO. 

NORRISTOWN, PA. 



S 13-223 Pearl Street 



PAPER POTS 




(Neponset) 
Waterproof, Llflrbt, 

Durable. 

Just the thins: for 

shlpplnar plants. 

100 1000 

2'4-lnch 10.30 $2.42 

2»«-inch 35 2.78 

S-inch 45 3.82 

3»«-inch 60 5.24 

4-inch 75 CM 

6-lnch 1.15 10.96 

6-inch 1.60 14.68 

Write for prices on 
10,000 lots. 



E. H. HUNT,'«'SS^^i2^V- 



-RED- 



Standard Flower Pots 

Price list and samples on application. 

PADUCAH POHERY CO., UK. 

PADDCAB. KEMTDCKT 

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Syracuse Red Pots 

€l"A little pot is soon hot"; so 
is a thin pot. Our pots are 
much thinner and tougher 
than others. It's the quality 
of the clay. Write for our 
latest price list if you did not 
get one. 

Syracuse Pottery Co. 

SYRACUSE, NEW YORK 

Standard Red Pots 

Price list and samples on application. 

We carry a complete line of Florists' pots. . 

Weis & Schmidt Poff^i^o. 

nXLWAUKCE, WIS. 

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March 9, 1911. 



The Weekly Florists^ Review* 



77 



■^The old reliable firm, GODFREY ASCHNANN, is not connected with any other firm and is more iCctive than ever 

PREPARE FOR EASTER 

FROM WHOM WILL WE PURCHASE OUR EASTER SUPPLY? 

From our old friend, Godfrey Aschmann, of Philadelphia, of course. He was our man of the past and he shall be our 
man this Easter, and, as long as he ships us good plants, he shall be our man in the future. He always treated us right before, 
and we can rely upon him. What he advertises is true and is no bluff. 




What Florists Say About Our Lilies 

Daily visitors to our establishment, among 
tbem two well known growers, one from Cincin- 
nati, Ohio, the other from South Orange, N. J., 
say: "Yon have the best lilies we ever have 
seen on our visits to many florists' establish- 
ments. We congratulate you. You certainly 
can be proud." . 

An immense stock of choice Easter plants, 
blooming Easter week, or earlier, if desired, are 
now ready for immediate shipment. Come your- 
self or mail your order direct to headquarters. 

Our reputation in growing Easter plants for 
the wholesale market, to which we ship all over 
the entire country, Canada and Mexico, from 
the Atlantic to the Pacific oceans, for many 
years past. Is sufficient guarantee to prove our 
ability. 

Go to Hcadquartf rs for Azaleas 

Azalea Indica is a specialty with us, grown 
for UB under contract by an Azalea specialist in 
Belginm for the last twenty years. Have four 
houses full of the choicest. Only best well- 
known American varieties are imported, and are 
now in excellent condition, covered with buds, 
just right for Easter. We ship only good stock, 
full of buds and flowers. 

What is the name of the best double pink 
azalea? Mme. Van der Cruyssen is the name, 
originated by the well-known azalea specialist 
Mr. Van der Cruyssen of Belgium. Millions are 
raised every year and shipped to every point of 
the globe from Belgium. We have a big stock 
on hand of this so well-known and favorite vari- 
ety in tip top condition. Every plant is as round 



as an apple, covered with buds, just right for 
Raster trade. 6 to 7-ln. pots, 60c, 75c, $1.00, 
$1.25, $1.50 to $2.00 each. 

Deutsche Ferle. This is the best pure double 
white. 6-in. pots, 75c, $1.00 to $1.50. Outside 
tlie Deutsche Perle we have no white to offer in 
small sizes, because the other varieties, Niobe 
and Bernard Andrea alba, of which we had a 
large stock, during transportation across the 
sea and during winter lost all their buds and 
have to be carried over for another year. This 
first variety the year imported does not do well, 
l>ut makes fine plants the next year. 

Bernard Andrea alba (white). We have 
mostly big plants, $1.50, $2.00 to $3.00 each; 
.1 few smaller sizes, 75c, $1.00 to $1.25; Niobe, 
also white, 50c, 75c, $1.00, $1.25, $1.50 to $2.00 
each. Vervaeneana, De Sohryveriana (double 
variegated), 75c, $1.00, $1.25, $1.60 to $2.00. 

Frofesseur Welters, $1.00, $1.25 to $1.50. 
Fras. Oswald de Kerchove, $1.00, $1.25 to $2.00. 
Empress of India, 50c, 75c, $1.00, $1.25 to $1.50. 
Apollo (red), 50c, 60c, 75c to $1.00. Other good 
varieties, such as Helene Thelemann, etc., 75c, 
$1.00, $1.25, $1.50 to $2.00. When we are out 
of one color, we send the next similar color; 
also, If we are out of the size ordered, we send 
the next size either above or below the price 
mentioned. 

Hydrangea Otaksa never was as good as this 
year, green as grass, full of buds, every branch 
stocked up. SVi, 6 to 7-ln. pots, 25c, 35c, 50c, 
75c, $1.00, $1.25 to $1.50. 

Easter Ulies, Lillum multlflorum, the genuine 
Japanese Easter Lily, directly imported by us. 
We have a friend in Japan who looks after our 
interests there. He picks out for us only the 
good, healthy ones, and marks them while they 
are growing, the 10-in. bulbs, and therefore he 
ships to us the cream of the plants of Japan. 
We have lilies this year to bum; can supply, if 
nothing happens, every customer and others 
who want lilies. If you see them growing in our 
greenhouses you must all admit they are "crack- 
erjacks." We sell them cheap, too. Where 
other florists get 15c per bud, we only charge 
you lOo per bud, for plants in 6-in. pots, having 
5, 8, 10 and more buds to the plant. Plants 
under 5 buds, 12c per bud, 6-in. pots. 

Murillo Tulips, double, pinkish pearl, valued 
very highly as a pot tulip, 3 bulbs in a 4-in. pot, 
$1.80 per dozen pots; $14.00 per 100. 

Tournesol Tulips, best double tulips, varie- 
gated, three bulbs in a pot, $1.80 per dozen pots; 
$14.00 per 100. 

Primula Obconica. 5-in., $2.00 to $2.60 per 
dozen. 

White Daisies, 5-in. pots, $2.00 dozen. 

Cineraria Hybrlda Grandiflora. Henry F. 
Michell Co.'s new Improved strain. Our plants 
and flowers of this strain are twice the size of 
those of other years, with perfect green foliage, 
almost as big as a bushel basket, 6-in. pots, 25c, 
35c, 50c, 75c to $1.00 each. 

Spiraea Gladstone. This variety, owing to the 
dry summer in Holland last year, will be very 
scarce this Easter, but we, fortunately, secured 
enough to fill two houses full, and they are now 
in fine condition, full of buds, 5, 5^, 6 to 7-ln. 
pots, 26c, 35c, 50c, 75c to $1.00 each; dozen or 
100 the same. 



Ipomoea Noctiflora, purest white moonflower, 
for which we have a world-wide reputation, now- 
ready, 2Vt-in. pots. $5.00 per 100. 

Hyacinths, four best colors. King of the Blues 
(dark blue), Grand Maltre (light blue), Gertrude 
(best pink). La Grandesse (best white), right 
for Easter, in cold frame, 4-ln. pots, 10c to 12c. 

Crimson Rambler, nicely staked up, 30, 36, 40, 
50 inches high, 50c, 75c to $1.00. 

Daffodil Von Sion, double-nosed bulbs. This 
is the best double yellow narcissus in existence. 
5% to 6-in. pots, 3 bulbs in one pot, $2.50 to 
$3.00 per dozen pots. 

Araucaria Bobusta Compacta, Glauca and Ex- 
celsa. Our reputation of being one of the largest 
Importers and shippers of this beautiful ever- 
green decorative plant is so well known, dating 
far back Into the 19th century, that our name, 
as well as the Araucaria itself, shall never die 
out, and Is still fresh in people's minds same 
as when we first started. Why the Araucaria is 
80 popular is because it is an ancient plant, kept 
by Greeks and Romans as a special favorite in 
their household, as a good omen. 

Araucaria Bobusta Compaota, specimen plants, 
spring 1910 Importation, 6 to 7-in. pots, 5 years 
old, 3 good tiers, 20, 25 and 30 inches high, same 
in width, very handsome, $1.50 to $2.00 each. 

Arauoaxla Excelsa Glauca. This is a beauti- 
ful blue variety, very graceful and beautiful. 
Specimen plants, 6-in., 7-in., 8-in. pots, 4 and 5 
years old, 4, 5 and 6 tiers, 20, 25, 30 and 32 in. 
high, same in width. $1.25, $1.50, $1.75 to $2.00 
each; spring 1910 importation. 

Araucaria Excelsa, 3, 4 and 5 yeau old, 4, 5, 
6 and 7 tiers. 6-ln. pots, 25, 30, 35 and 40 in. 
hiish, 75c, $1.00, $1.25, $1.50 to $2.00 each. Can 
meet all applications; spring 1910 importation. 

Scholzeli and Whitman! ferns, 6-in., 7-in. and 
8-ln. pots, 60c, 76c, $1.00, $1.25 to $1.50. 

Boston Fema, 6%-in. to 6-in., 7-in. and 8-in. 
pots, 40c, 60c, 75c, $1.00, $1.25 to $1.60. 

Scottii Fema, 5%-in. to 6-ln., 7-ln. and 8-in. 
pots, 40c, 50c, 76c, $1.00, $1.25 to $1.60. 

Nephrolepis Giatrasii. This is a very hand- 
some fern, resembling the Scottii, but shorter 
and bushier, with weeping habit, which gives it 
a very fine appearance and makes it valuable. 
5, oVt to 6-ln. pots, 40c, 50c and 75c; small 
4-in., 26c. 

Ferns for dishes, 2^-ln., assorted, $4.00 per 
100. 

Asparagrna Flumoeua Nanus. We have a nice 
lot out of the seedbed, big enough for 2V^-in. 
pots, $16.00 per 1000. Asparaerus Bprengeri, 4-in. 
pots, strong, 10c; 2%-in., strong, $4.00 per 100. 

Kentia Forsteriana, In fine shape, 5% to 6-ln. 
pots, 4, 5 and 6-year-old, 30, 35, 40 and 45 inches 
high, 75c, $1.00, $1.25, $1.50, $2.00 to $2.60. 

Kentia Belmoreaaa, 5, 6 to 7-year-old, 6 to 
7-iu. pots, $1.25, $1.50 to $2.00 each. 

Kentia Belmoreana, combination plants, S 
plants in 6 and 7-in. pots, 25, 30 to 36 Inches 
high, $1.00, $1.25 to $1.50 each. This is a 
special bargain, seldom ottered. 

Latania Borbonica, 6 to 7-in. pots, 30 inches 
high, 50c to 76c. 

Dracaena Bruanti, 6-in. pots, 25 to 30 inches 
high, 40c to 60c. 

We have no catalogue. 



All goods must travel at purchaser's risk. Cash inrith order, please. Please state if 
you "want stock shipped in or out of pots. All bulbs are now^ under cover in cold 
frame and w^ill bloom in t'wo creeks from time of bring^ing them in the g^reenhouse. 



GODFREY ASCHMANN, 



lOlS 
West Ontario Street, 



Philadelphia, Pa. 



IMPORTKR, WHOLKSAUC GROWKR AND SHIPPER OF POT PLANTS 

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Cyclamen ! 

Fine, strong plants, in bud and-bloom, 
7-in., $1.00; 6-m., 60cjii6-in., 26c; 4-in., 
12^0. 

Casta or C. O. D. 

W. J..& M. S. VESEY 

FORT WATNE, IND. 

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English Ivy 

2-iDchf choice stock. 

$4.00 per 100; $30.00 per 1000. 

Order at once, stock limited. 

JKCOB SCHUL-Z 

550 S. fourtk Avenue, LOUISVILLE, KY 

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PRIMROSES 

Obconica. 2-inch, extra strong, rea^Ror 3^-iD. 
pots. $1 60 per 100; coming in bud. 3-ln..t3.0D per 100, 

Cinerarias. 3-tnch, fine, strong plants, $3.00 per 
100. Will come In for Easter. 
Shamroclis, 2-inch, fine plants, $3.00 per 100. 
PelarKoniums, 3-lnch, fine plants, $6.00 per lOU. 
Cash, please. , 

J. W. MILLER, Shiremanstown, Pa. 

Mention The Review wbe» yoa write 



78 



The Weekly Florists' Review* 



Mabch 9, 1911. 



Classifie 



ACHYRANTHES. 



Acliyrantlies McNally, also red, 214-in., 2c: 
2%-ln,. 2%c. 

Hammerschmidt & Clark, Medina, O. 



ABUTILONS. 



Abutilon Souvenir de Bonn, buahy plants, 2^- 
In., 6c. Llewellyn. Florist, OLEAN. N. Y