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LIBRARY OF THE 

UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS 

AT URBANA-CHAMPAIGN 



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A WEEKLY JOURNAL"''' FLORISTS. SEEDSMEN a"- NURSERYMEN 




CARNATION NUMBER 




'im'rEfv 



A WEEKLY JOURNAL ■^°» FLORISTS. SEEDSMEN*-- NURSERYMEN. 





CARNATION NUMBER 



The Florists^ Review 



Februauy 1, 1917. 





This Lord & Burnham house of the Idle Hour Nurseries 
is CO feet wide and 159 feet long. 



Things to Think Over 

About Our Two 

Constructions 



fpl^Y the two, we mean the Semi-iron or Pipe 
I wj Frame, and the Sectional Iron Frame. 

The Seini-iron materials cost less to 
buy but cost more to erect than the Iron Frame. 

The Iron Frame materials cost more to 
buy but cost less to erect. 

The masonry, the glass, the painting, the 
heating and the benching cost exactly the same 
for either. 

For houses of moderate 
widths, the Semi -iron 
makes the best house 
possible for the money. 

For widths beyond 38 
feet, the Semi-iron re- 
quires so many more col- 
umns than the Iron Frame 
that the Iron Frame be- 



For endurance and absolute rigidity, 
course the Iron Frame is superior. 



of 



In houses up to 78 feet wide, we can build 
them with our improved construction so that 
only two columns are needed. 

Of course, when it gets right down to fine 
facts and figures, the wide houses have proven 
they can produce the best stock at a less cost. 



comes the more desirable. 



The following paragraph is from a letter re- 
cently received from D. C. Ilorgaa, owner of the 
Idle Hour Nurseries, one of whose houses is 
shown above. It speaks for itself: 

"Your concern has been exceedingly kind to 
us in the past, and you cau rest assured that if 
we are ever in the market for any mure green- 
house material we will not show a lack of appre- 
ciation for what you have done for us. When 
concerns treat us rght we believe in sticking to 
them, and we think your concern is one of the 
whitest in the country." 



Why don't you write 
us the size of house you 
are thinking of building, 
along with the particulai'S 
about its location and the 
crops you want to grow ? 
Then we will gladly 
advise you as to the con- 
struction that seems best 
adapted to your purposes. 



NEW TORK 
42d Street Bldf. 



Builders of Greenhouses and Conservatories 

SALES OFFICES 

BOSTON PHfLADELPHIA CHICAGO R0CHB8TBB 

Tremont Bldf. widener Bldg. Bookery Bldg. Granite Bldg. 

DITHOTT TORONTO MONTREAl, 

Pt'iiobsiut Bids;. Boyal Bank Bldg. Transportation Bldf . 

FACTORIES: Irvlngton, N. T. Dea Plalnes, 111. St. Catharlnea, Canada. 



CLEVELAND 
Swetland Bldg. 




(LtS>L\S>\ 



REMOTE STORAGE 

THE 




^•^' -r 



SUBSCRIPTIONS 



$1.80 ^^' 



Year 



2 



in 



^TieyiJEfv 



A WEEKLY JOUBNAL«« FLORISTS. SEaSHEN «» NURSERYMEN. 

VLOBISTS' PUBLISHING CO.. 590 Cazton Bolldlns. 608 South I>e»rboni St., OHIOAOO 



VOL. XXXIX. 



CHICAGO. FEBRUARY 1, 1917. 



NO. 1001. 



Tuberous Rooted Begonias 

Doz. 100 1000 

Single— scarlet, white, crimson, orange, 

pink, yellow $0.50 $3.00 $25.00 

Double— scarlet, white, crimson, pi,nk. .60 4.00 35.00 

Caladiums, fancy-leaved, separate var. 1.75 12.00 

Choice mixed varieties 1.50 10.00 

Gloxinias -In 6 named sorts 50 3.50 30.00 

Asparagus Plumosus Nanus 

Green house -grown seed per 100.50c; per 1000. $3.25; 5u00 for $15.00 

Asparagus Sprengeri per lOO. 15c; per 1000. 86c; 5000 for $3 50 

A. HENDERSON & CO., 211 N. SUte St., Chictgi 



For the best Novelty of the 

Season, see our display 

ad in this issue 

C. C. PoUworth Co., Nilwaukee,Wis. 



GIGANTEUM 

7-9 Case of 300, $15.00; per 100, $ 6.00 

8-10 Case of 225, 17.00; per 100. 8.50 

9-10 Case of 200, 19.00; per 100, 10.00 

MAGNIFICUM 

8-9 Case of 200. $10.50; per 100, $6.00 

Full line of Chrysanthemum and Carnation Cuttings. 
Write for list and prices. 



Wm. F. Kasting Co. 



568-570 Washington SL, 

BUFFALO. N.Y. 



C 



If you have not received our 1917 
Catalogue by the time The Review 
reaches you, drop us a card and we 
will send by first mail. Our special- 
ties: Roses, Carnations and Mums. 



THE E. G. HILL CO. 

RICHMOND, INDIANA 



FOR 



Lily Bulbs 



WRITE WARD 



ROOTED CARNATION CUHINGS 



100 1000 



Clean, healthy stock. 

White Wonder, Ward, Beacon, Matchless and all stand- 
ard varieties $3.00 $26.00 

Yellow Prince, selected stock 4.00 

Rosette, selected stock 4.00 

Enchantress Supreme, selected stock 3.50 

Pink Delight 6.00 

Good Cheer 4.00 

Benora, selected stock 3.50 

All the good new ones at market prices. Ask me about them 
can tell you which ones will pay to grow. 

See classified list for Seasonable plants, rooted cuttings, seeds and 
bulbs. Write for complete stock circular. 

SATISr ACTION GUARANTKKD 

ROMAN J. IRWIN, 108 W. 28th St., New York City 



36.00 
36.00 
30.00 
40 00 
35 00 
30.00 
I 



ORCHIDS 

W. J. & M. S. VESEY 

Fort Wayne, Ind. 



Flower Seeds for Early Sowing 



A Few of Barnard's Specialties 

PANSY. Barnard's FlorisU' Mixture. Made up of the best 
from leading specialists, both at home and abroad. 
Trade pkt.. 26c: ^e oz., $1.00; i« oz.. $3.60; oz., 



$7 00 



BEGONIA, Prima Donna, light rose Trade pkt.. 20c 

PETUNIA, Barnard's Double Mixed Trade pkt., 60c 

SALVIA, FircbaU 14 qz.. 76c; trade pkt,. 30c 

VERBENA, Mammoth Mixed oz.. $1.00; trade pkt.. 16c 

Our preliminary price list of Flower Seed is now ready- write forone. 



THE W. W. BARNARD CO 



8KKD81IXN riiMAMA 
., 231-23S W. IkUnm tL. tUCttl 



INDEX TO ADVERTISEMENTS AND TABLE OF CONTENTS-PAQES TWO AND THREE 



The Florists^ Review 



Fbbbdabt 1, 1917. 




K^ 



<IP-^ 



lo Ihe AdverKseinenls 



Advance Co 125 

Albert & Davidson. .112 
Alfred Lozler Rosery 71 

Allen, J. K 95 

Alpha Flo. Co.. 68-72-91 
American Blower Co.ll2 
American Bulb Co.. 80 
American Gr'nhouse 

Utg. Co Ill 

American Window 

Glass Co lie 

Amllng Co 37 

Anderson, S. A 63 

Angermueller, G. H. 50 

Aphlne Mfg. Co 122 

Archias Floral Co... 68 
Archlas Seed Store. 75 

Armacost & Co 86 

Arnold, A. A 49 

Arnold, F. W 102 

Arnold & Co., D. 0. 94 

Art Floral Co 70 

Aschmann, G 106 

Aschmann Bros 108 

Ashborne Goldfish... 46 
Atchison Seed & 

Flower Store 62 

Attica Floral Co 57 

Auburndale Goldfish. 46 
Audubon Nursery. . . 97 
Augspurger & Sons. 106 
Aurora Grhse. Co... 72 
Avenue Floral Co... 66 

B. 

Bader Co., John 108 

Badgley & Bishop.. 95 

Bailey, Harry 89 

Baker, C. 1 62 

Baker, W. J 46 

Baldwin, W. H 64 

Baldwin Co 107 

Ball. C. D 109 

Ball Floral Co 62 

Barnard Co 1 

Barr & Co., B. F... 64 
Bassett & Wash- 
burn 8-98 

Bassett's Gardens. . . 89 
Batavla Grnhse. Co. 38 

Bath, John H 71 

Baum, Chas. L 64 

Baumer. A. R 64 

Baur Floral Co.. 63-116 
Baur & Steinknrap.. 12 
Baur Window Glass. 117 
Bauscher, John .... 72 
Bayersdorfer & Co. . 47 
Beall Gr'nhouse Co. 90 

Beaven, E. A 57 

Becker's Conserva- 
tories 69 

Beechwood Heights 

Nursery 9 

Bell Floral Co 69 

Bemb Floral Co 66 

Benthey, F. J 93 

Berger Bros 44 

Bernheimer, E. ; ... 46 
Bertermann Bros... 05 

Besancon & Co 62 

Beverly Hills Nur- 
series 90 

Beyer, Chas 68 

Beyer Floral Co 65 

Bills Floral Co 71 

Binswanger & Co... 116 
Blacklstone, Z. D... 62 

Blind Floral Co 63 

Bobblnk & Atkins... 103 
Bolgiano & Son.. 75-76 

Bonnet & Blake 94 

Bonnot Bros 94 

Boston Florist 67 

Bowe, M. A 67 

Bower, Chas. A 122 

Boyle & Darnaud... 70 

Brague & Son 55 

Bramley & Son 65 

Braslan Co 74 

Brecht Co 52 

Breltmeyer Floral 

Co 9 

Breitmeyer's Sons... 66 
Brooklyn Wholesale 
Cut Flower Co... 94 

Brown, A. C 63 

Bruns, H. N 72 

Bryan, A. J 108 

Buchbinder Bros 52 

Buckbee, H. W 72 

Budlong, J. A 40 

Burnett Bros 80 

Burns, H. H 67 

Burpee & Co 74-77 

C. 

Caldwell Co., W. E.123 
Caldwell, Woodsman 57 
California Out 

Flower Co 87 

California Florist... 70 



Callahan, M. J 63 

Camp Conduit Co... 144 

Carbone, J. A 90 

Carbone, Philip L. . 69 
Carey, the Florist. . . 66 
Carnation Support 

Co 124 

Carolina Fl'r Store. 62 

Carroll, M. M 76 

Carter, Geo. M 56 

Cass, W. & T 63 

Chapln Bros 71 

Charleston Cut Flo.. 62 
Chatham Floral Co. 63 
Chattahoochee Floral 

Co 56 

Chicago Feed & 

Fertilizer Co 123 

Chicago Flower 

Growers' Assn.... 91 
Chicago Printed 

String Co 53 

Childs, John Lewis. 78 
Cincinnati Cut 

Flower Exchange. 92 

Clark, G. R 64 

Clark Seed Co 74 

Clarke Bros 70 

Clarke's Sons 67 

Classified Advs 130 

Climax Mfg. Co 50 

Coan, Inc., J. J.... 95 

Coggan, S. W 66 

Cokely, B. E. & J. T. 43 

Colle, Jr., A 101 

Colonial Fl'r Shop.. 70 
Coraley, Henry R... 69 
Conard & Jones.... 

97-99-101-109 

Coombs 69 

Cottage Gardens Co. 10 
Cottage Gardens 

Nurseries 89-90 

Cowee, W. J 52 

Coy Seed Co 75 

Crabb, A. F 66 

Craig Co., R... 100-101 

Crawbuck Co 94 

Crescent Floral Gar- 
den 63 

Critchell, C. E 57 

Crouch, Chas. W... 62 

Crowl Fern Co 57 

Crump, Frank F... 70 

Cumbie, J. L 56 

Cunningham, Jos. H.104 
Currier Bulb Co 88 

D. 

Darbee, Mrs. R. E. 70 

Uards, Chas. A 67 

Darling's Fir. Shop 70 

Darling & Co 123 

Davis Floral Co... 101 

De Buck, John 107 

Denver Wholesale 

Florists' Co 93 

Detroit Nicotine Co. 122 
Dickinson Co., A... 74 

Dietsch Co., A 125 

Dillon, J. L 109 

Dixon Crucible Co.. 115 

Domoto Bros 86 

Donaldson Co 68 

Donart & Stapleton. 70 
Dorner & Sons Co 12 
Dreer, II. A 

81-83-117-120 

Drury, H. F 72 

Dudley Sons Co 64 

Duerr, Chas. A.... 65 
Duluth Floral Co.. 71 

Dunlop. John H 68 

Dux Co 54 

E. 

Eble, Chas 60 

Edwards Floral Hall 63 
Egg Harbor Flower 

shop 6.3 

Ehle, Fred G 00 

Elastic-Lyke Co 110 

Elliott & Sons 76 

Elverson Pottery. . .119 
Erne & Klingel ... 41 
Evans Co., J. A... 144 

Evenden Bros 65 

Ever-Ready Flower 

Pot Co 50 

Exotic Nurseries ... 89 
Expanded Wood Co. 4 

F. 

Fallon, J. J 69 

J'allon, Florist ... 04 

Farmer, L. J 90 

Farmers' & Florists 
Fertilizer Co. ..123 

Faxon, M. B 8.S 

Feast & Sons 67 

Fellouris, J. J 94 

Fenrlch, J. S 04 

Fetters, E. A 66 




CAXTON BUILDING 

508 South Dearborn Street 

CHICAGO 

TT is impossible to s^uarantee 
the insertion, discontinu- 
ance or alteration of any 
advertisement unless instruc- 
tions are received by 4 p. m. 
TUESDAY. 



Fields, I,. C 73 

Fischer, Rudolph . . 87 

Fischer Bros 72 

Fish Seed Co 74 

Flsk. C. H 72 

Florists' Telegraph 

Delivery 60-61 

Flower Shop . .62-64-68 

Foley Co 126 

Forber & Bird 71 

Ford, Wm. P 94 

Ford, M. C 05 

Ford & Kendig Co. 115 
Forrest Fir. Shop. . (i.S 

Fox & Son CO 

Frauenfelder, C. ... 72 
Freeman, Mrs. J. B 66 

Frey & Frey 71 

Frey Co., C. H 71 

Friedman, O. J. . . . 72 

Froment, H. E 94 

Frost, Chas 83 

Furrow & Co 71 

G. 

Galvin. Inc.. Thos.. 67 
Gammage & Sons.. GO 
Garden City Pottery 

Co 88 

Garland Mfg. Co... 125 

Gary Floral Co 65 

Gasser Co 65 

Geltz, F. G 65 

Geny Bros 64 

Germain Seed & 

Plant Co 87 

Ghent Floral Co... 62 

Glbbs Bros 60 

Giblin & Co Ill 

Gleave's Fir. Shop.. 70 

Gloekler Co 53 

Goetz Sons 66-85 

Goldstein & 

Futterman 05 

Goodyear Tire & 

Rubber Co 121 

Gorman, J. F Ill 

Gove, Mrs. C. E... 60 

Graham & Son 65 

Grand Rapids Floral 

Co 66 

Grandv 64 

Grasselli Chem. Co. 122 

Green, Edw 64 

Gritlith, James F. .112 

Grimm & Gorly 68 

Grohe, Fred 89 

Grootendorst & Sons 79 
Growers' Cut Fl'r. 05 

Gude Bros. Co 62 

Gullett & Sons 104 

Gunterberg, M. C . . 41 

Gunther Bros 95 

Guthrie-Lorenz Co. . 71 
Guttman & Ray nor. 04 

H. 

Ilabermehl's Sons.. 63 
Hail Association ..117 
Hammond, Benj. ..120 

Hammond Co 04 

Hansen Grate Co.. Ill 
Harris Bros. Seed 

Co 75 

Hart. Geo. B 01 

Hastings, Frank R. 63 
Haven Seed Co. . . . 75 

Hayashi & Co 88 

Hayes, James .... 68 
Hayman Grhse Co. 64 
Heacock Co., Jos.. 108 



Helnl & Son, J. G. 65 
Heinl & Sons. J... 72 

Heiss Co 65 

Heller & Co 76 

Henderson. Lewis.. 71 
Henderson & Co. . . 1 

Henry Co 54 

Hensley 72 

Herbert & Fleish- 

auer 89 

Herman. O. H 123 

Herman Bros. Co... 63 

Herrmann. A 05 

Hess & Swoboda ... 71 
Hews & Co.. A. H.119 
Hickey & Hollis... 87 

Hill, B. G 1 

Hill Co.. J. H 11 

Hill Floral Co..65-0t! 
Hill's Nursery ..87-07 
Hill Nursery Co.. 06 

Hinchliffe. Mrs 66 

Hinde & Dauch 50 

Hitchcock, N. M 57 

Hltchings & Co 144 

Hoerber Bros 01 

Hoffmeister Floral.. 92 
Hogewoning & Sons. 79 

Hollcraft, M. E 68 

Hollywood Gardens. 70 

Holm & Olson 71 

Holton & Hunkel... 93 
Honaker the Florist. 64 
Horticultural Adver- 
tiser 101 

Horticultural Print. 

Co 92 

Hosp, A. M 70 

Howard Rose Co 90 

Howard & Smith... 70 
Huddart Floral Co.. 70 

Humfeld, C 106 

HurfT, B. F 74 

Uuscroft, O. L 65 

I. 

Ickes-Braun Mill Co.l28 
Ideal Dirt Band Co.. 124 
Idlewild Greenhouses 64 

Igoe Bros 124 

Illinois Fl'r Box Co. 55 
Illinois Malleable... Ill 
Ionia Pottery Co.... 119 

Irwin, Roman J 1 

Isbeil & Co 75 

J. 

Jnckson & Perkins.. 00 

Jacobs Bros 109 

Jacobs & Sons. . .116-124 

Jahn, H. H 67 

James, R. H 74 

Janssen Floral Co... 73 

Johnson, J. L 72 

Johnson Basket Co. . 14 
Johnston Brokerage 

Co 114 

Johnston Bros 69 

Johnston & Co 69 

Johnston Htg. Co... 114 
Jones-Russell Co.... 65 

Joseph, B. M 70 

Joy Floral Co 62 

K. 

Kansas City Tobacco 

Pro. Co 122 

Knsting Co 1-13 

Kay-Dimond Co 65 

Ki'cnan & Co 72 

Keller Co., John A.. 64 



Keller Sons, J. B... 04 

Keller & Son 119 

Kellogg Flower Co. . 68 

Kelway & Son 79 

Kemble, I. 71 

Kennedy & Sons .... 69 

Kennicott Bros 38 

Kent Bros 63 

Kentucky Tobacco 

Pro. Co 122 

Kerr. R. 62 

Kervan Co 56 

Kessler, Wm 95 

Kimberlin Seed Co.. 74 
King Construction . . 

126-129 

Knoble Bros 65 

Knowe & Son, P 111 

Kodak Florist 66 

Koellner Refrigera- 
tor & Ice Machine 52 

Kohr, A. F 119 

Kooyman, 89 

KottmlUer, A 67 

Kramer Bros 89 

Kramer & Son 72 

Kroeschell Bros 110 

Kruchten, John 91 

Kruse, W. H 68 

Kuebler, Wm 95 

Kuehn, 0. A 93 

Kuhl, Geo. A 72-103 

Kusik & Co 91 

Kyle & Foerster 91 

Kyrk, Louis H 92 

L. 

La Crosse Floral Co. 71 
Lagarde & Speelman 79 

L. A. Floral Co 86 

Lager & Hurrell... 106 

Lang Floral Co 62 

Lange, H. F. A 69 

Langhout & Co 79 

Larmon, L. L 71 

Latour-Marliac ,...101 

Laver. J. V 62 

Lawrence Floral Co. 64 

Lechner Bros 79 

Lee. F. & 8 56 

Leedle Floral Co 109 

Lemon & Co 65-107 

Leonard Seed Co 74 

Lilley, O. Baden 89 

Linea weaver & Co.. 110 

Lippman. B. A 122 

Littlefield & Wymanl04 
Livingston Seed.... 65 
Lockland Lbr. Co... 144 
Logan Pottery Co.. 119 
London Flower Shop 63 
Lord's Flower Room. 68 
Lord &, Burnham.... II 
Los Robles Nursery. 89 

Lovett. J. T »6 

Ludwig. B. 72 

K. 

McCallum Co 56-107 

McCarron, Miss 62 

McConnell. Alex.... 67 

McCoy. L. W 70 

McCray Refrigera- 
tor Co 52 

McFarlands 66 

McGee. Walter S...128 
McHutchison & Co.. 80 

McKellar. Chas 72 

McKenna. Ltd 68 

McKenney 67 

McMorran & Co 120 

MacNift Hort. Co... 101 
Madison Basketcraft 43 

Mangel. John 72 

Marine Florist 70 

Marion Floral Co... 62 

Massmann 63 

Matthews. W. G... 65 
Matthewson, J. B... 66 

Meconl, Paul 95 

Meier-Schroeder Co.. 66 

Meisner, A. F 54 

Metairie Ridge Nur. 66 
Metropolitan Mate- 
rial Co... 117-124-128 
Metz & Bateman... 66 

Miami Floral Co 62 

Micheil Co., H. F.. 78 
Michigan Cut 

Flower 56-116 

Millang, Chas 04 

Millnng. Frank 04 

Miller & Musser... 01 
Miller Floral Co... 87 

Mills 02 

Mlnge Floral Co... 62 
Missouri I'ottcry 

Co 110 

Missouri Pottery & 

Supply Co 110 

Modern Mfg. Co... 118 
Moninger Co IV 



Morehead Mfg. Co. .113 

Morse & Beals 69 

Mossbjerg, Chr. . . "79 
Mountain View Flo- 
ral Co 88 

Mulhauser & Son... 65 

Munson. H 115 

Murata & Co 87 

Murphy Co 92 

Murray. Samuel .... 68 
Myers Bros 65 

K. 

Nashville Pottery .-.119 
National Flo. Corp. 43 
National Florists' 
Board of Trade.. 94 

Neumann Co 101 

Neidlnger, J. G 46 

Newbnrys, The ... 71 

Newell. A 68 

Newton Rose Cons. 69 
New York Florists' 

Supply Co 55-95 

Nicotine Mfg. Co. .122 
Niessen Co., Leo... 44 
Noll & Co., T. J.. 42 
North Floral Co 71 

0. 

Oechslln, Ernest ..108 
Oechslin, Frank ...100 

Olinger, P. J 14 

Olsen, Chr 79 

OlsBon, H. L 88 

Ostertag Bros. ... 68 

P. 

Pacific Nurseries.. 88 
Paducah Pottery . . . 110 

Palmer & Son 63 

Park Floral Co. 68-70 
Patterson, H. J... 123 
Peacock Co., E. R. 74 

Pearce, Geo 128 

Pearson, P 43-84 

Pedrlck & Son 75 

Pelrce, E. A 118 

Pellcano, Rossi .... 70 
Peninsula Nursery. 90 

Penn, Henry 69 

Pennock-Meehan .45-99 

Peters, W. E 69 

Peters & Reed 119 

Peterson Nursery. . 96 
Pfaer & Kendall... U5 
PfaltzgrafT Pottery 119 
Phlla. Cut Flower. 48 
Philadelphia Second 

HaMd Pipe Supply 111 
Phila. Wholesale 

Florists' Ex 46 

Philips Bros 62 

Phillips 6T 

Pierce Co., F. 0...117 

Pierson, A. N 98 

Pierson Co., F. R. .107 
Pieters- Wheeler ... 74 
Pikes Peak Flo. Co 

41-70 

Piilsbury, I. L. .72-120 
Pittsburgh Cut Flo. 

Co 42 

Pittsburgh Glass ..117 

Plath, H 8» 

Podesta & Baldocchl 70 
Poehlmann Bros. . .6-7 

Polder Bros 90 

Pollard, A. T 6* 

Pollworth Co. .1-93-106 
Polvkranas, G. J. . . 94 
Potter Co., W. Q. 93 
Potter Floral Co. . . 62- 
Pulverized Manure. 123 
Pyfer & Co., A. T. 41 
Pyfer & Olsem 71 

E. 

Raedlein Basket Co. 43 
Ramm's Fir. Shop. 67 
Ramsburg, G. S. 85-118 
Randall's Flower 

Shop 69 

Randall Co. ...15-39-52- 
Randolph & Mc- 

Clements 73 

Ratcliflfe, John L. . . 64 

Read, G. P 124 

Reburn & Co 80^ 

Red Wing Union 

Stoneware Co. . . .119- 

Reed & Keller 94 

Regan Ptg. House. 120 

Reid, Edw 4S 

Ueimers Floral Art 

Shop 71-90 

Reimers & Son Co. 64 

Reinberg, Geo 91 

Reinberg, P 8-102 

Rennison Co 71 

Reno Florist 62 

Rentschler Flo. Co. 66 



Fbbbuaby 1, 1917. 



The Florists' Review 



8 



Beuter's 69 

Klce. M., Co 16 

Bice Bros 92 

KJchmond Cedar 

Works 116 

Riedel & Meyer.... 95 
Klppley Mfg. Co. .114 

Rober, Ernest 107 

Robinson Seed Co.. 75 
Rochelle & Sons... 92- 

99-102-116-110-118-126 
Rochester Floral Co 63 

Rock Flower Co 68 

Roehrs Co 104 

Roesch, Lewis ... 96 
Rohnert, Waldo ... 74 

Rosala Bros 70 

Rosens, B 95 

Rosery, The 63-69 

Routzahn Seed Co. . 76 

Rumbley Co 54 

Rupp, John F 78 

Rusch & Co., Gust. 93 

Rusconi, D 80 

Russln & Hanfling. 95 
Rynveld & Sons... 79 

S. 
Saltford Fir. Shop. 6S 
Samuelson, C. A... 73 
Santa Cruz Ever- 
green Co 87 

Savo Mfg. Co 55 

Sceery, Edward . . 63 

Schlllo, Adam IT.i 

Schlatter & Son lis 



Schllng, Max .... 67 
Schramm Bros. ... 66 

Schroeter, B 66 

Schroeter, Hugo ... 60 

Schultheis 64 

Schultz & Co 60 

Schulz Co., Jacob.. 64 

Schwake & Co 83 

Scott & Son, Inc. .100 

Scott, Wm., Co 63 

Scrim's 68 

Sefton Mfg. Corp.. 48 
Sharp, Partridge ..117 
Shenandoah Nurs... 96 

Sheridan, W. F 95 

Slebrecht, Jr., H. A. 71 

Slobrecht Co 95 

Slebrecht Bros. ... 67 

Slebrecht, G. O 94 

Skldelsky & Co.... 100 
Skinner Irrigation. .128 

Skinner Co Ill 

Small & Sons 67 

Smely, J. M 72 

Smith, Henry 66 

Smith, H. J 66 

Smith, P. J 95 

Smith & Fetters Co. 65 
Smith & Hemen- 

way 124 

Smith Co., A. W... 73 
Smith & Co., E. D..108 
Smith Co., W. & T. 98 
Smith Wholesale 

Floral Co 93 

Smyth,' AV. J 72 



Soar, F. M 103 

So. California Flower 

Market 87 

Southern Cypress 

Mfrs.' Assn 127 

South Park Flo. Co. 10 
Spokane Florist Co. 70 
Springfield Clay Co.llJ) 
Springfield Seed Co. 68 
St. Louis Seed 

Co 78-83 

St. Louis Wholesale 
Cut Flower Co... 93 

Staack & Sons 71 

Staiger & Flncken. . 88 
Standard Thermom- 
eter Co 114 

State Nursery Co. . 71 
Steele's Pansy Gar- 
dens 88 

Stewart, S. B 71 

Stokes Floral Co... 68 
Storrs & Harrison . . 104 

Strafford Farm 108 

Stroh & Sons 68 

Stuber & Richard- 
son 88 

Stumpp, G. B. M.. 67 
Stumpp & Walter. . 5 
Stuppy Floral Co... 68 
Sunlight Double 
Glass Sash Co... 127 

Superior Boiler 111 

Sutton & Sons 82 

Swanson's 71 

Syracuse Pottery . . .110 



T. 

Tailby & Sons 69 

Tar-Heel Evergreen 

Co 56 

Teahan Fern Co 56 

Thompson Carna- 
tion 101 

Thorbum & Co 78 

Thornton Floral Co. 65 
Throop-Martin Co. .117 
Tonner, O. A. & 

L. A 40-42 

Tonseth Floral Co.. 70 

Toole & Son 97 

Totty, C. H 109 

Traendly & Schenck 94 

Trepel, C. C 67 

Trepel, Joseph 67 

Tucson Seed Co 62 

Tunlln Paint Co. ..119 

Turner, H. W 88 

Turner Bros 116 

Turner & Sons 66 

V. 

Uhl Pottery Co 119 

United Cut Pl'r Co. 94 
U. S. Cut Fl'r Co.. 04 

V. 

Van Lindley Co 62 

Van Meter Flower 

Shop 65 

Vesey, W. J. & 

M. S 1 



Vlck's Sons, J 108 

Vincent, Jr., & 

Sons 103 

Virgin, U. J 64 

Von Canon, J. H... 57 

W. 

Waite, F. W 118 

Waldbart, Geo 68 

Walker Co., F 64 

Want Advs 68 

Warburton, C 69 

Ward & Co., R. M. 1 

Warendorff 67 

Watkins & Simpson 79 

Watson, Geo 88 

Watts, Mrs. J. E. . . 62 

Wax Bros 69 

Weaver, A 63 

Weber, F. C 73 

Weber, F. H 73 

Weber & Sons Co. . 54 
Wetland & Rij-.h. 91-97 

Welch Bros. Co 93 

Welch, Patrick ... 93 

Welch's 92 

Werthelmer Bros. . . 16 
Western Seed & Ir- 
rigation Co 75 

Whitted Floral Co.. 71 
Wlegand's Sonjj Co. 65 

Wienhoeber Co 72 

Wietor Bros 40 

Wilber Corp.. H. R. 74 
Wllks Mfg. Co.... Ill 



Willey's Farm 7(1 

Williams, Ed 71 

Williams & Co 66 

Wilson, H. E 63 

Wilson, R. G 6T 

Wilson Floral Co... 71 

Wilson Seed Co 79 

Wilson's Seed Store 66 

Windiniller Co 66 

Winterson's Seed... 84 
Wittbold. Geo... 72-104 
Wolfskins' & Mor- 
ris Goldenson .... 70 
Woodland Park Flo. 

Co 90 

Woodrow-Marketos . 94 

Wright's 70 

W. & W. Fl'r Store 65 

Y, 

Yokohama Nursery. 78 

Young, J. W U6 

Young & Co., John. 95 
Young & Co., A. L. 94 

Young & Co., V 72 

Young & Sons Co. . . 68 
Young Tool Co 120 

Z. 

Zech & Mann 39-91 

Zetlitz, E. N 65 

ZiHka & Sons, J 91 

Zvolanek, A. C 89 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 



Carnation Men at Hoosier Capital (illus.) 17 

— Those Present 19 

— Secretary 's Eeport 20 

— The President's Annual Address 21 

— Treasurer 's Report 22 

Geraniums 22 

— Some Seasonable Notes 22 

— Geraniums Will Not Flower 23 

— Geraniums for Memorial 23 

Bluecoat 's Star in Flowers 23 

Hardy Flowers for Designs 23 

St. Valentine 's Day (illus.) 24 

— A Trade-Made Flower Day 24 

— Ads and Windows (illus.) 24 

Perennials from Seed 25 

Seasonable Suggestions 26 

— Cyclamens 26 

— Genistas 26 

— Asters 26 

— Fuchsias 26 

— Stevias 26 

— Spiraeas for Easter 26 

Quitch Grass in Lawn 27 

Propagation of Echeverias 27 

Longiflorum Bulbs Diseased 27 

Dutch Bulbs 28 

— Bulb Growing in Holland 28 

Calla Blooms Turn Brown 29 

Asparagus Grown Too Cold 29 

Asters Good But Slow 29 

Tile Benches 29 

A. J. McNutt (portrait) 29 

Tennessee Florists 30 

— Annual Meeting at Nashville 30 

Radiance and Red Radiance 30 

Southern Progress (illus.) 31 

Kansas City 31 

New York 32 

The Raise in Prices 32 

— It Is Easy for Florists 32 

A Retailers' Rialto 33 

— Madison Avenue 33 

Lily of the Valley 33 

— Starting Valley Pips 33 

— Outdoor Lily of the Valley 33 

— Forcing the Pips 33 

Louisville, Ky 34 

Open Letters from Readers 34 

— Down With Street Peddlers 34 

Obituary ' 35 

Providence, R. 1 35 

Missouri Florists 35 

American Rose Society 35 

Amherst, Mass 3,-5 



Mott-ly Musings 35 

WDl Discuss Express Service 36 

Which? 36 

Money in Florists' Pockets 36 

What the S. A. F. Is Doing 36 

Chicago 36 

White Worms in Soil 42 

Philadelphia 44 

Washington, D. C 46 

Rochester, N. Y 48 

High Jinks at Morristown 52 

Brampton, Ont 54 

Dog Grass in Lawns 55 

St. Louis 62 

Boston 64 

Newark, N. J 71 

Newport, R. 1 72 

Seed Trade News 74 

— Detroit Next June 76 

— Australian Seed Crops 76 

— Action for Short Deliveiy 76 

— Seedsmen 's Liens 78 

— Imports from Holland 82 

— Mott-ly Gleanings 82 

Vegetables and Fruits Department 84 

— Tomatoes Fruit Poorly 84 

Pacific Coast Department 86 

— Los Angeles 86 

— San Francisco 87 

— Portland, Ore 89 

— Spokane, Wash 90 

Nursery News 96 

— Missouri Nurserymen 96 

— The Western Association 98 

Brown Scale on Ferns 100 

Pteris Fronds Burn lOO 

Cincinnati 102 

Columbus, O. . . 104 

Indianapolis 106 

New Bedford, Mass 108 

Norfolk, Va 108 

Greenhouse Heating 1 10 

— Better Use Larger Returns no 

— A House on Sloping Ground no 

— When Boiler Is Extra Large 112 

Cromwell, Conn. ng 

Detroit, Mich hq 

Fort Wayne, Ind ..!..!!.] 1 18 

Grand Rapids, Mich ] /[ 120 

I'ittsburgh 120 

Milwaukee 122 

Minneapolis, Minn 124 

Glen Cove, N. Y '.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.126 

Buflfalo 1 28 



The Florists' Review 



Fmbbdabt 1. 1817. 




IT LASTS A SEASON 

The Newest Florists' Accessory 

A^Waterproof Covering: for Flower PotiB and Flower Boxes. Manufactured from 
wood and can be cut with shears. Crepe -wood is an ideal covering for potted plants and 
boxes. It is manufactured from thin sheets of veneer and reinforced with strong thread seams. It 
stands the water and does not become mushy and soiled like paper. For window decorations and 
display stands it is especially suited, as the plants may be sprinkled with a can or hose 
without removing the covering. 



HOW TO MAKE A FLOWER BOX 





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B~^5&^-i£..'i-. '_ ^, ' 


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Simply unroll around any old box and tack in 
position. A liber ribbon tied around the sides of the 
box adds to the appearance. Lath, stained dark 
green and tacked on, to create a paneled effect, 
makes a permanent flower box which may be used 
outdoors if desired. Potted plants may be used in 
the box for display if desired. 



FOR FLOWER POTS AND POTTED PLANTS 

Crepe -wood is tied around the pot with a ribbon, cord or wire. Try it in your window or display 

stand. Don't be afraid to wet it. 



SEND 20 CENTS FOR SAMPLE ROLL. 8 INCHES WIDE. 10 FEET LONG 



PHOTO OF A ROLL OF CREPE-WOOD 



Growers as well as florists 
will find this material fine 
for tacking around small 
boxes of tulips and spring 
flowers. 



Temporarily we will 

fill orders from 

the factory upon receipt 

of cash with order. 

Plain, uncolored rolls fur- 
nished if desired at 15 per 
cent discount from prices on 
green. 




Prices 


Width of 


Doz. lots 


100 lots 


roll 


per roll 


per roll 


5 inches 


16c 


13c 


() inches 


18c 


15c 


7 inches 


20c 


17c 


8 inches 


22c 


19c 


9^4 inches 


25c 


22c 


Colored Green. 




All Rolls 


are 10 feet long. 



NOTE THE GRAIN oF THE WOOD 

EXPANDED WOOD CO., Patentees and Sole ManufacturclT EvaDSVUIe, lod. 



KasBUABY 1. 1917. 



The Florists' Review 



I^rS;;.'!.. Florists' Flower Seeds 



NEW CROP SEED 

ASTERS 

Carlson, or Invincible 

The finest Early Aster for cutting 

Pkt. kOz. Oz. 

White $0.15 $0.40 $1.25 

Pink 15 .40 1.25 

Lavender 15 .40 1.25 

S. & W. Co.*s Late Branching 



Pure White 
Lavender... 

Purple 

Crimson 

Shell-pink.. 
Rose-pink . . 
Mixed 



Pkt. 
.$0.10 
. .10 
. .10 
. .10 
. .10 
. .10 
. .10 



14OZ. 

$0.30 
.30 
.30 
.30 
.30 
.30 
.30 



Oz. 
$1.00 
1.00 
1.00 
1.00 
1.00 
1.00 
1.00 



BrUliant 

Carmine 

Chamois Rose. 

Isabellina 

Purple 

Scarlet 

White 

Mixed 



PHLOX 

Drummondii 

Tall, Large-flowering 

Pkt. 

$0.10 

10 

10 

10 

10 

10 

, 10 

10 



140Z. 

$0.30 
.30 
.30 
.30 
..30 
.30 
.30 
.20 



Oz. 
$1.00 
1.00 
1.00 
1.00 
1.00 
1.00 
1.00 
.60 



BEQONIAS 

Gracilis Prima Donna, pale rose pkt., $ 0. 15 

Gracilis Bonfire, deep scarlet pk t. , .15 

Gracilis Luminosa, scarlet pkt. , . 15 

Semperflorens Erfordii, rose-pink— 

tr. pkt., $1.00; ^V oz., $2.75; pkt., $0.15 



PETUNIAS 

Qiant Single Fringed 

White, Yellow, Rose, Crimson and 

Mixed each, ,.'( oz., $1.00; pkt., $0.15 

Single Bedding Varieties 

.pkt., $0.10; H oz., $1.00 



Crimson 

Erfordii (Rosy Morn) pkt.. 

Snowball, pure white pkt.. 



.10; I4 oz. 
.10; H oz.. 



.85 
.45 



Pkt. Oz. 

Pyrethrum Aureum (Golden Feather) $0.05 $0.50 

Shamrock, true Irish variety . ; 15 .50 

Torenia Fournieri Grandiflora, blue 10 2 . 50 



Write for our Wholesale Seed Catalogue— Free 

on request. 




SALVIAS 



Pkt. 14 Oz. 



Oz. 



Splendens, selected $0.05 $0.50 $1.50 

Zurich, very dwarf 15 1 . 25 4 . 50 



HYACINTH STAKES 

Just the thing for tying up Hyacinths, Tulips, Fuchsias 
and all small pot plants. 

Per 1000 

Plain, 12-inch Jl . 10 

Plain, 18-inch 1 . 25 

Painted, 12-inch \ m 

Painted, 18-inch i . 75 



GREEN BAMBOO CANES 



2 -ft 

2lij-ft 

3 -ft 
312-ft 

4 -ft 

5 -ft 



100 
.$0.40 
. .60 
. .75 
. .80 
. 1.00 
. 1.20 



1000 
$ 3.(50 
4.00 
6 00 
7.00 
7.50 
10.00 



oOOO 

$17.50 
19.00 
29.00 
34. CO 
37 00 
49.00 



10.000 
$34.00 
37 00 
57 00 
G7 CO 
72.00 
95.00 



30-32 Barclay St.. New York 



^^^ISii&e^ 30.32 Barelay St., NEW YORK 



The Florists' Review 



Fkbruabt 1, 1917. 




The first rule in the game of 
business is 

DO IT NOW! 



We offer for VALENTINE'S DAY the foUowing novelties: 
Sweet Peas, Cecile Brunner, Baby Doll, Valley, Violets, Tulips, Jonquils, Freesia, 

Pussy Willowr'llusseli, Carnations, Roses of all Kinds. 

A BIG SUPPLY OF CATTLEYAS. 



Russells— Per doz. 

Extra Long $5.00 

Long 4.00 

Medium $ 2.60 m 3.00 

Short l.OO @ 2.00 



Following is our Current Price List: 



Milady 
Richmonds 
Brillianta 
Sunbursts 






Per 100 
Specials ....S15.00 @ $18.00 

V Long 10.00 @ 12.00 

/Medium 8.00 

I Short 6.00 @ 6.00 



OpheUa 

Klllaniey ) Long 12.00 @ 

White Killarney Y Medium 8 . 00 



Aaron Wards 



J Short 4.00 



15.00 

10 00 

6.00 



For E.xtra Long Special Roses we charge 
accordingly. 



B*|nUc«— Per doz. 

SjSttiikls $8.00 

Seto40-inch $6.00 @ 7.50 

flO*inch 6.00 

»to28-inch..: 3.00 



Miniature Roses— 

Oeo. Elger 

Cecile Brunner 

Baby Doll 

Fireflame $4 

Orcliids- 

Cattleyas $4 

Cy pripediums 



CARNATIONS. Fancy. 

Our Selection 

Splits 



VALLEY, Fancy. 

First 

Second 



Per 100 

$3.00 

8.00 

4.00 

.00 @ 6.00 

Per doz. 
.00 @ $5.00 
2.00 
Per 100 

$4.00 
.H.OO 
2.00 

6.00 
5.00 
4.00 



InEffectWeekof Feb. 1,1917 

Per 100 

Paper Whites $ 8.00 @ $4.00 

Jonauils 4.00 

Tulips 4.00 

Freesia 4.00 

Romans. '. 4.00 

Easter Lilies 12.00 @ 15.00 

Violets 1.00 

Sweet Peas 1.00® 1.60 

Snapdragon doz., $1.00 @ $2.00 

Smilax doz.. 2.50 

Plumosus 3.00 

Sprengeri 3.00 

Adiantum l.OO 

Adiantum Hybridum 1.5G 

Farleyense ... 10.00 @ 12.00 

Oalax. green and brown, 1000. $1.50 .20 

Leucothoe .75 

Mexican Ivy .75 

Flat Ferns 1000, $3.00 .35 

Boxwood, . . bunch. 25c; case. 8.00 

Woodwardia Ferns 8.00 



FLORISTS' SUPPLIES 

VALENTINE BASKETS 

Beart Shaped Valentine Posters 

1000 $5.00 500 $3.00 

VALENTINE HE&RT TUMBLER 

Corsage Ties, all colors, dozen, $1.00 

Made of No. 7 and No. 9 Silk Ribbon 

LACETTES and CELLULOID SHIELDS 

Corsage Pins Green and Violet Foil Boxes 

No. 224 

Two-tone Flower Baskets,^^^ 

Dozen $6 CO i^^^" 

Perfectly Dried Straw Flowers, long stems, assorted colors, 
per 100, $^.00 

SPHAGNUM MOSS, per bale, • . $1.25 





eart Tumbler Basket 



No. 224 



POEHLMANN 



L. D. Phone 



endrAII Orders for Cut riowers and d^M^m^%^^m^%. *-• ■'' Phone 

Supplies to City Store, 72-74 E. Randolph St., l^IllCay U Randolph 35 



i4 



\ \JJ/:\C\j [ 



Fdbbdaby 1, 1917. 



The Florists^ Review 



■> 




I , 7^ ^'^ ^ tr —- •"'"^ BBbt AV*d) 







ROSE PLANTS 

GRAFTED AND OWN ROOT 

The Poehlmann Quality, known favorably throughout the land. 

PRICES IN EFFECT JANUARY 26, 1917 



GRAFTED— 2i^-inch Russell $150.00 per 1000 

Lots of 5000 or more 145.00 per 1000 

GRAFTED — 2^-inch Ophelia, Aaron 
Ward, Milady, Killarney, White Killar- 
ney, Brilliant, Cecile Brunner. Richmond 120.00 per 1000 

Lots of 5000 or more 110.00 per 1000 

These prices are absolutely net cash. 
For 33/^-inch stock an additional $50.00 
per 1000 will be charged. 

MUM ADVERTISEMENT WILL 



OWN ROOT— 2i^-inch Killarney, White 
Killarney, Brilliant, Ophelia, Aaron 
Ward, Milady, Richmond, Cecile Brun- 
ner .... $7.00 per 100; 65.00 per 

Lots of 5000 or more 62.50 per 

Sunburst, own root $10.00 per 100; 90.00 per 

Orders will be booked in strict rotation and none but 
established plants, ready for a shift or ready to 
be benched, will be shipped. 

APPEAR IN LATER ISSUES. 



1000 
1000 
1000 
well 



PLANTS 



AZALEAS 

PANDANUS VBITCHII-4-inch $0.35 each 

5-iQch OOc, .75 each 

6-inch 1 .00 each 

7-inch 1.50 each 

o-inch 2,00 each 

CROTONS-5-iQch 60 each 

RUBBER PLANTS-5-iach . .60c, 75c. $1.00. $1.50. 2.*00 each 

BNQLISH IVY-4-inch $15.00 perlOO 

ASPARAGUS SPRENQBRI-S-iDcb pots 7.00 per 100 

. ^ *:"*°^ Po^ 10.00 per 100 

ASPARAGUS PLUM0SUS-2i2-inch pots .... 3.50 per 100 

3-inch pots 8.00 per 100 

()-mch made-up pots 35.00 per 100 



75c, $1.00, $1.25 and $1.50 

TABLE PERNS-2i2-inch pots $4, 

3-inch pots g 

4-lnch pots .....!... 15 

BOSTON and ROOSEVELT FERNS-5-iiich.. . . 

BEGONIA CH \TBLAINB-5-inch 

AUCUBAS-Well berried $1.00, $1.25, $1.50 to 

CYCLAMBNS-4-inch 

5-inch .".'.'.'.' 

H YACIN THS-4-inch 

In pans .50c 

nobiJi^ri" ?^°^ ^°'" ^'- ^'alentine's Day!. 35c, 50c', 
rKccSI AS— In pans 



BROTHERS CO 



.00 per 100 
.00 per 100 
.00 per 100 

$0.35 each 
.25 each 
3.00 each 
.25 each 
.50 each 
. 1 2 each 
.75 each 

.75 each 
.75 each 



Send all orders for Plants 



to Greenhouses. P. O. Box 127. MOrtOII GrOVe, III. JifJiSS'!^ 1% pM'" 



NO Tou nroM cnicago 



8 



The Florists' Review 



FlBBUABT 1. 1817. 



CARNATIONS -:- ROSES 



American Beauties 



PRICE 



Our cut consists mostly of medium and shorter 
length stems, but very fine flowers. 

Per doz. 
Extra specials, extra long stems. . .$6.00 @ $8.00 

Stems 30 inches . . 4.00 @ 5.00 

Stems 18 to 24 inches 2.00 @ 3 00 

Stems 12 to 18 inches 1.00 @ 1.50 

Shorter lengths 75 @ 1.00 

Rhea Reid \ Per 100 

Richmond (Extra long $12.00 

Ophelia >Good medium $8.00 @ 10.00 

Shawyer i Good short 5.00 @ 6.00 

Sunburst / 

CARNATIONS — Note these low prices 

BULB STOCK 

Paper Whites per 100, 

Jonquils per 100, 

VALLEY per 100, 

Tulips, all colors per 100, 



$3.00 

$3.00@ 4.00 

6.00 

3.00@ 4.00 



LIST 

Cecile Brunner Bunch of 25 buds, 75c 

Baby Doll . Bunch of 25 buds, 50c 

Russells — the best in this market 

Per doz. 

Specials, extra long $3.00 

X.ong 2.50 

Good medium $1.50 @ 2.00 

Good short 1.00 @ 1.25 

«f L^. *^illf/°®^ / Extra long . . . $10.00^@ $ 1 2.00 

White KiUarney > Good medium. 8.00 

Killarney Brilliant ) Good short . . . 5.00 @ 6.00 

Assorted Roses, our selection, one-half white, in 
lots of 200 or more, at the rate of $4.00 per 100^ 

—All colors, per 100, $3.00 @ $4.00 

GREENS 

Asparagus and Sprengeri, per 100, $2.00 @ $3.00 
Galax, green or bronze . . . per 1000, 1.25 

Choice common Ferns . . . per 1000, 3.00 



BASSETT & WASHBURN 



Offfic* and Store, 

178 N. Wabash Avanua 



CHICAGO, ILL. 



Lens Distance Phone 

Central 1487 



GREENHOUSES. HINSDALE AND GREGGS. ILL. 



Sunburst, Richmond, Russell 



FOR VALENTINES 

PRICE LIST 



AMERICAN BEAUTIES— Per doz. 

48-inch to 60-inch stem $5.00 @ 6.00 

36-inch stem 4.00 

30-inch stem 3.00 

24-inch stem 2.00 

20-inch stem l.SO 

Short stem 1.00 

Ophelia \ 

Sunburst 1 c^^^-^ 

Killarney I iT'f ' 

White Killarney ?" m-^?* 

Sy-a "r!""."'::::;:: ) ^r. .:::::::::::: 

MRS. RUSSELL- Per 100 

Special $25.00 

Select 20.00 

Medium 15.00 

Short $6.00 @ 8.00 

RICHMOND— Per 100 

Special $12.00 

Select 10.00 

Medium 8.00 

Short S.OO 

Subject to Chans* 



Per 100 

$12.00 

10.00 

8.00 

S.OO 



MILADY— 

Special 

Select 

Medium 

Short 

ROSES, our selection, a good grade, $4.00 per 100 

Carnations per 100, 

Valley " 

Easter Lilies 

Violets " 

Sweet Peas " 

Paper Whites " 

Stcvia " 

Adiantum " 

Asparagus Sprays per bunch, 

Smilax per doz., 

Ferns per 1,000, 

Galax, green or bronze $1.25 per 1000 

Leucothoe 75c & $1.00 per 100 

Boxwood per bunch, 

without notice. 



Per 100 

$12.00 

10.00 

8.00 

5.00 



$12.50 @ 
1.00 @ 
1.50 @ 
3.00 @ 
1.50 @ 
1.00 @ 
50 @ 



3.00 
6.00 
15.00 
1.50 
2.00 
4.00 
2.00 
1.50 
.75 
2.50 
3.00 

.35 



Order from us and g^et the freshest stock and of best keepings quality and have the assurance 
of supplies such as can only come from 8,000,000 FEET OF MODERN GLASS. 

PETER REjNBERG 

Store open stmaays to noo™only. 

30 E. Randolph St. ""c^STm..^.., CHICAGO, ILL. 



Fbbbuaby 1, 1917. 



The Florists' Review 



SIIUIIIIIIIlllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllUiHIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIllllllUnillllllllllilllllllllllHHIIIIIIIIIIIIIIHIIU 



The Beechwood Heights Nurseries 

Bound Brook, New Jersey 

THOMAS YOUNG, JR., Proprietor 

Have opened a Salesroom for 
the disposal of their flowers at 

57 West 28th Street, New York 

On account of the superior express service from New York 
City, Out of Town Customers are requested to send their 
orders there instead of to the greenhouses. 



niiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiTr 



Announcement 

We have decided to oflFer to the Trade this season a limited number of 
our NEW ROSE, a sport of Ophelia. COLOR, a beautiful rose-pink. 

Named and Registered 

ROSE-PINK OPHELIA 

DISTRIBUTION WILL BE LIMITED TO 40,000 PLANTS 

PRICES -OWN ROOT 

Per 100 plants, $30.00 Per 500 plants, $125.00 
Per 250 plants, 70.00 Per 1000 plants, 250.00 

PRICES - GRAFTED 



THE 



Per 100 plants, $35.00 
Per 250 plants, 82.50 



Per 500 plants, $150.00 
Per 1000 plants, 300.00 



We will furnish eyes for grafting ; price on application. 



Orders will be filled in rotation. 



BREITNEYER FLORAL CONP ANY 



FRED BREITMEYER, Proprietor 



MT. CLEMENS, MICHIGAN 



10 



The Rorists' Review 



FlBBtABT 1, 1917. 



2 Beautiful Novelty Roses 



PRIMEROSE 

It's like Sunburst and it's like Ophelia. 

Better and more even color all winter than Sun- 
burst and grows and produces better. 

Deeper in color and stronger, darker foliage than 
Ophelia. 

A money-maker for the grower and a fine new color 
for the store man that wants novelties. 

Come here and see it growing. 



ROSALIE 

(Baby Chatenay) 

A beautiful small rose. Probably best described as 
junior in size, as it's somewhat larger than Brunner 
and the other small roses. 

A long pointed bud of beautiful clear pink, similar 
to the parent— Abel Chatenay. The foliage and habit 
are also similar. 

Profitable for the grower because so free, and a splen- 
did corsage rose and make-up rose for the store man. 

Come here and see it growing. 



' Per lOO Per lOOO 

Grafted stock of either $30.00 $250.00 

Grafting eyes 150.00 

SOUTH PARK FLORAL COMPANY 

MYBR HBLLBR, President 

NEW CASTLE, INDIANA 

WANTED - BENCH PLANTS RUSSELL ROSES 



COTTAGE MAID ii.'.TJfw.n 

OF A PLEASING SHADE OF FLESH-PINK 

A few reasons why you want it: 

It has the habit and growth of Ward. 
It is the best keeper and shipper of all. 
It is unsurpassed in quality of bloom. 
It will not fade in bright weather. 
Its color sells it on sight. 
It is fine under artificial light. 

COTTAGE MAID is a Market Carnation 
The Public Wants it--YGU NEED IT 

PRICE: $12.00 per 100; $100.00 per 1000 

FEBRUARY DELIVERY 





V 








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COTTAGE GARDENS CO., he, qr'ginators Queens, New York 



FlBBUABT 1, 1917. 



The Florists^ Review ii 



HEW ROSES 




|E are growing on our place the finest collection 
of seedling roses ever produced. 

Such is the verdict of many of the best rose 
growers in America. 

They represent the crowning effort of Mr. E. G. Hill's 
life, spent as a rose hybridizer. 

Ophelia, the queen of present-day "forcers," is the mother 
of them all. 

They possess the sturdy growth and disease-resisting foli- 
age of their parent. 

We wish to announce that we will disseminate, from time 
to time, in conjunction with The E. G. Hill Co., this superb 
lot of real money-making roses. 

Come and see them growing. 



We can give you quotations, in limited quantities, on well 
grown Grafted Roses. 

Carnations and Chrysanthemums, both in cuttings and 
plants. 

Write for quotations. 



THE JOSEPH H. HILL CO. 

Richmond, Indiana 



_ 



^ 



12 



The Florists^ Review 



Fbbbdabx 1, 1017. 



^illllllllllilllllllllllllilllllllllllillillllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllUllllllllllilllllllllllllllllllllllillllllllllilllU: 

I DORNER'S NOVELTIES for 1917 i 

I NEW CARNATIONS | 

5 ROSALIA — Cerise pink, large three and one-half inch flower of a true cerise pink color. Form is per- = 

S feet. Calyx strong, never bursting. Stem is at all times strong and wiry. The growth is far = 

= above the average when we consider vigor, health and early and free flowering qualities. E 

5 ROSALIA is a decided improvement on ROSETTE, having a better color and a better commercial S 

E habit. E 

= OLD GOLD — We offer this as the earliest and most free flowering yellow carnation we have yet pro- E 

S duced. A decided improvement over YELLOW PRINCE, being of a stronger growth, is perfectly E 

S clean and healthy, produces larger stems and more bloom. The color is a deep yellow with faint E 

= pink stripes. s 

E The above two varieties. Price: $12.00 per 100; $100.00 per 1000 = 

I NEW LATE CHRYSANTHEMUM | 

S FALL BEAUTY — A large Japanese reflex of a pleasing pink color with a shading of deep cream to E 

E the base of the petals and center of the flower. Has an extra strong stem, is especially fine for E 

= Thanksgiving, maturing November 25th to December 10th. The color, combined with its being so E 

E late and its extra keeping qualities, makes it of especial commercial value. S 

E Price: $3.50 per doz.; $30.00 per 100 E 



STANDARD VARIETI 

Per 100 Per 1000 

NANCY $6.00 

GOOD CHEER 4.00 

PINK SENSATION 3 00 

ALICE 3.00 

WHITE WONDER 3. 00 

WHITE ENCHANTRESS 3.00 

MATCHLESS 3 . 00 



$50.00 
35 00 
25.00 
25 00 
25 00 
25 00 
25.00 



OF CARNATIONS 

Per 100 Per 1000 

ROSETTE $3.00 $25 .00 

GLORIOS A 3 00 

CHAMPION 3.00 25.00 

MRS.C. W.WARD 3.00 25 00 

ENCHANTRESS 3.00 25.00 

BENORA 3.00 25.00 

YELLOW PRINCE 4.00 



I F. DORNER & SONS CO., 



LAFAYETTE, INDIANA I 



nliiiiiniiiiiHifniiiiniiniiiiiiniiniMniiiiMiiiiiiMiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiiiiiiniiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiinniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiR 



A. F. J. BAUR 



O. E. 8TEINKAMP 



QUALITY STOCK 

We are now shipping out cuttings of all the best standard 
varieties. Money can't buy better quality. They are short 
jointed, well rooted and clean. 




Per 100 1000 

Matchless $3.00 $25.00 

White Wonder .... 3.00 25.00 

White Enchantress, 3.00 25.00 

Alice 3.00 25.00 

Ench. Supreme 3.00 25.00 

Nancy 6.00 50.00 



Per .100 1000 

Mrs. C. W. Ward . . . $3.00 $25.00 

Yellow Prince 3.50 30.00 

Champion 3.00 25.00 

Belle Washburn . . . 6.00 50.00 

Miss Theo 4.00 35.00 



Booking orders now for February 15th delivery on 
Merry Christmas, $12.00 per 100; $100.00 per 1000 



Merry Chri.tm.. GERANIUM PLANTS 

Ctsse. de Harcourt, white; Berthe de Presilly, rose-pink; Mrs. Btmxej, cerise; Bte. de Poitevine, salmon; Decorator 
and Ricard, light scarlet; S. A. Nutt and Marvel, dark red. Fine plants from 2-inch pots, $3.00 per 100; $25.00 per 1000. 



BAUR & STQNKANr, 



Carnation 
Breeders 



Indianapolis, Indiana 



TW'!^* ■ .•<--'^ ■ 



Fbbbuaey 1, 1917. 



The Florists' Review 



Hamburg Late White 
Chrysanthemum 



The examining 



committees of the Chrysanthemum Society of America scored Hamburg Late White as follows: 
PHILADELPHIA, December 14 .... 88 points, commercial 

BOSTON, December 14 83 points, commercial 

NEW YORK, December 18 85 points, commercial 




This picture was taken December 10, 1916, and will give a good idea of what Hamburg Late 
White looks like when grown to single stems, planted six inches each way. 

Hamburg Late White is pure white under all weather conditions, and is a sport of White 
Maud Dean, but has no trace of pink as has the original. 

The average grower of Chrysanthemums must have varieties which are easy to handle, and 
from which he can cut as near 100% of perfect blooms as possible. Hamburg Late White 
has been grown for the last four years, and produces a very high proportion of good flowers. 
It is not an exhibition variety, but for late white, one of the best for commercial purposes. It 
can be had in bloom the latter part of November, by taking an early bud; but by selecting 
later buds, most of the flowers are cut during December, and we would advise a selection of 
late buds, as the later buds come somewhat fuller, and by selecting late buds, flowers can be 
had as late as the middle of January. 

Keeping qualities are excellent, and where a light, graceful white flower is wanted, Hamburg 
Late White cannot be surpassed. 

Hamburg Late White will be disseminated in the spring of 1917. Plants will be ready 
April 1, 1917, and all orders will be filled in rotation. 



Rooted Cuttings, 
2-inch pots, . . 



. $12.00 per 100; $100.00 per 1000 
. 15.00 per 100; 125.00 per 1000 



WILLIAM F. KASTING CO. 



568-570 Washington Street, 



BUFFALO, N. Y. 



13 




14 



The Florists^ Review 



FUBUABT 1, lOlT. 




For this week only i 



we offer 



1 Dozen 



BEST -OF -ALL Cut Flower 
Baskets, as illustrated, with 
liners, all two- tone finishes, for 



$3.S0 



Only one dozen to a customer 

Read what this live florist has to say about our baskets — 

Tampa, Fla., Jan. 22, 1917. 
Johnson Basket Co., Chicago, 111. 

Gentlemen : Ship us at once by express a duplicate of our last order. 
Very well pleased with your baskets and have sold all of them. 

KNULL FLORAL CO. 



Johnson Basket Co. 



FACTORY: 



OFFICE: 



2539 MUwaukee Ave. li/Ill^ AviV/y ILll^. 3 19-2 IW. Randolph St = 



U 



pllllllllllllllillllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll^ 

IradiumI 

1 THE NEW RED CARNATION SEEDLING 1 



A Wonderful Seller Evolved by 

John Brown, Carnation Grower for P. J. Olinger 

New Castle, Indiana 



Parentage, Bassett x Victory. 

Cuttings for March 1 delivery. 

A carnation of great producing power. 

A beautiful scarlet of uniform shade. 

Flower averaging four inches in diameter. 



Strong, sturdy stems, a continuous bloomer 
during the winter months, especially December. 

Will not split, and has never shown any ten- 
dency to sleep, either on the plant or after 
cutting. An A-1 shipper, pronounced by 
growers and retailers as the "BEST RED 
CARNATION" ever produced. 



Prices: $12.00 per 100 - $IOO.OO per 1000 

F. O. B. NEW CASTLE. INDIANA 



I P. J. OUNGER, 



«« 



Indiana's Largest 
Grower" 



New Castle, Indiana i 



sniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiH^^ 



Fbbbcabt 1, 1917. 



The Florists' Review 



15 




^ 



The New Queen of Red Roses 



The color is a new and brilliant red. The petals 
are large (see illustration), and soft and velyety in 
texture. 

Leaves are large, well shaped and rich green in color. 

Its shipping and keeping qualities are remarkable. 
A dozen specimen roses were brought by train from 
Champaign to Chicago, taken to several places, in- 
spected and Anally left lying on a de^k in our office. 
Though in bloom when finally put in water and 
placed in our refrigerator, we 
found them closed to buds in thc 
morning. 

Mrs. Sarah Teats is not an 

experimental rose, but one that 
has been successfully produced 
under ordinary greenhouse con- 
ditions. 

This photographic reproduction 
shows the actual size of the 
bloom on the Mrs. Sarah Yeats 
rose. 

Stems run from eighteen to forty-two inches 
long without pinching. 

Prices 

Thrifty plants in 214-inch pots. Orders now being 
filled in the order of their receipt. 

Per dozen $4.00 Per 100 $30.00 

Per 1000 $250.00 




Send Your Order NOW# Orders Filled 



Rotation 




A Magnificent 
Carnation 

Awarded Certi flcate of 
Merit at Cleveland 
Flower Show, Nov. <>. 
10, 11, 191C. 

Awarded Certificate of 
Merit at Bloomitigton 
Show of Illinois State 
Florists' Association, 
Nov. 9, 10, 1916. 

Also won the Silver 
Sweepstakes Cud and 
First Prize Medal and Ribbons 
awarded by ihe Horticultural 
Society of Chicago. 



Color: Brilliantscarletof uni- 

Kg form shade. Parentage: EUi- 

■ chantress x Red Seedling. This 

; red seedling was a cross of 




^>*W>e'^/ 



'^:^: 




A Productive 
Carnation 

Nelson x Lawson. 
Growth: Habit of 
Scott, but stronger 
stem. Prolific bloom- 
er, averaging 30 flow- 
ers per plant. Pro- 
duction: Average 90 
per cent. 



Prices and Delivery 
. Thenanthos 

Cold -grown cuttings, ready for 
immediate delivery. Price, f.o. 
b. Chicago: Per 100. $12.00; per 
1000, $100.00; 260 cuttings at the 
1000 rate. All shipments made 
in the order received, so send 
in your reauirements early. 



ii 



Prosperity News 



95 



>^ NH39 ON ffwfu nfyyr* 

■ *. • ■-' — ■• ■ 

VOCK OIA FAVOaaCS ARC ucxt 






I 



.^ 



y. 






Showing Valentine Novelties 
and quoting the latest prices on 
Staple Supplies. A buying 
guide for this season and a 
convenient reference for the 
merchant florist. 

Send for Your 
Copy TODAY 



Valentine Heart Stamps 

The Poster of the Chicago Florists' Club advertising St. Valentine's Day. 
Order yours from us today and Increase your Valentine business. 

STANDARD PRICES 

100 stamps for $0 75 net lllOO stamps for $5.00 net 

800 stamps for 3 00 net 2000 stamps for 9.00 net 

5000 stamps for $20. UU net 

Size of stamp, 2x2 inches. 
Window Posters, same design, size T* x 7^4 Inches, per dozon, 50c. 



A. L. RANDALL CO. 



Wabash Ave. 
at Lake St. 



CHICAGO 



1 

..VJ 

J 



■^ 



16 



The Florists^ Review 



Fbbbuaby 1, 1917. 



* 




No. 4402 Only SOc each 

Arrows, $3.00 ner 100 



LAST CALL I 

Get your order in TODAY 
for *' Keystone Quality" 

VALENTINE SPECIALS 



Fine Assortment of 

Heart Baskets and Novelties, 

Heart Pins, Arrows, Red Corsage Cords 

and Silver Hearts 

^May we send you a $5.00, $10.00 or $15.00 
assortment ? Ail our styles are BIQ sellers. 

You will make no mistake if you leave selection to us. 



DO IT NOWl 




1^' 



. RICE CO. 

THE LARGEST AND BEST EQUIPPED 
FLORISTS' SUPPLY HOUSE 

1220-22-24 Spring Garden St., PHUADELPHIA, PA. 



BlOD and ClilllOD Novellies 

You cannot achieve a reputation for artistic work by slapping on your designs 
commonplace ribbons or ordinary chiffons. 

You need our co-operation as experts 

We offer you an immense variety of wondrous weaves and colorings in 
ribbons and an assortment of chiffons positiYoiy distinctive. 

The judicious use of our ribbons and chiffons will surely enhance the value 
of your work. 

You are not thoroughly posted on ribbon and chiffon possibilities until you have 

inspected our line. 

Correspondence solicited. One of our salesmen will call upon you or we 
will be pleased to submit samples. 

Werthelmer Brothers 

THE NATIONAL FLORAL RIBBON HOUSK 
Ownars and Oparators of Warbro Ribben Mfc Co., Pataraon, N. I. 

Salesrooms, 19-25 East 24th St. NEW. YORK 




The American Carnation Society held its twe^itij -sixth annual meeting 
and exhibition this week at Indianapolis, in the heart of the Indiana car- 
nation helt. The success of the affairwas achieved along lines made famil- 
iar by being closely followed for several years. Has progress slowed up? 





ONE of us will concede 
that progress has ceased to 
be made in the develop- 
ment of the carnation, 
once dubbed "pink" and 
^ ^ later rechristened the 
^^ — "divine" flower; but it 

is contended by many that 
the pace has slowed down. 
The exhibition which 
opened at the Claypool hotel, Indian- 
apolis, January 31, while perhaps more 
attractive than any previous showing 
of carnations in the middle west, owed 
its success to the participation of the 
retailers rather than to the advance 
made by the growers. 

This was the twenty-sixth annual ex- 
hibition of the American Carnation 
Society and for several years it 
has been at work along the same lines, 
holding its meeting 
in a popular hotel, 
arranging a show 
for the public and 
inviting the flower- 
lovers of the com- 
munity to come and 
admire. Even at In- 
dianapolis, where 
the carnation at its 
best is well known, 
there was nothing 
but praise for the 
quality of the stock 
shown. It was good 
— almost too good, 
for the average 
grower appreciates 
that he cannot com- 
pete and does rot 
enter his stock, 
with the result that 
the annual shows 
are almost wholly 
made by a few spe- 
cialists. 

Good CultuTe. 

High culture is 
the outstanding fea- 
ture of these shows. 
The exhibitors al- 
most to a man are 
possessed of unusual 
ability as growers 
and the stock they 
stage is of such 
splendid quality 
that it takes a 
mighty good nov- 
elty to make a 
showing that will 
command favorable 
attention when it is 



OFFICERS ELECTED. 

President— W. J. Vesey, Jr., Fort 
Wayne, Ind. 

Vice-President — Charles S. Strout, 
Biddeford, Me. 

Secretary — A. F. J. Baur, Indian- 
apolis, ind. 

Treasurer — F. E. Dorner, Lafay- 
ette, Ind. 

Director for Five Years — Peter 
FisKier, Ellis, IVIass. 

Judges — William Nicholson, J. H. 
Duniop. 

IVIeeting Place for 1918 — Boston. 



set up alongside the older varieties 

grown by these experts. That is why 

progress appears to have slowed down. 

The 1917 show makes it seem more 




William J. Vesey, Jr. 

(President-elect American Carnation Society.) 



than ever apparent that the effort to 
increase the size of the carnation has 
been abandoned; it looks as though, by 
general agreement, the modern carna- 
tion is large enough, at least that 
greater size is not desirable until form, 
substance, fragrance and stem have 
been further developed, while the 
grower of average ability, ground be- 
tween rising costs and falling prices, 
will assert that floriferousness, produc- 
tivity, is what is wanted of the novel- 
ties — sorts that will give more than the 
twenty blooms per plant which now is 
considered a good average by those who 
keep count. 

The size of the Indianapolis show was 
helped by two factors, first of which 
is the fact that carnations have been 
more plentiful and lower in price this 
January than at this time in any of 
the last few years, 
while Indianapolis 
is one of the most 
accessible of west- 
ern cities. The ex- 
hibitor farthest 
from home was 
Strout 's, of Bidde- 
ford, Me., but Bos- 
ton growers were 
well represented 
and the Cottage 
Gardens upheld the 
banner of Long 
Island growers. The 
eastern specialists 
always have been 
staunch supporters 
of the society. 

Dominant Varieties. 

The Indianapolis 
show served to dem- 
onstrate the stay- 
ing qualities of the 
varieties that have 
been in the lead the 
last few years. 

Flesh pink still 
predominates; just 
as Enchantress is 
the most abundant 
variety in the mar- 
kets, so is Enchant- 
ress color the lead- 
ing one in the ex- 
hibitions. But 
where the market 
growers as a body 
cling to Enchant- 
ress, the special- 
ists have discarded 
it and use Enchant- 
ress Supreme, Pink 



16 



The Florists' Review 



Fkbuuauv 1, 1917. 




No. 4402 Only SOc each 

Arrows, $3.00 per 100 



LAST CALL! 

Get your order in TODAY 
for ''Keystone Quality'' 

VALENTINE SPECIALS 



Fine Assortment of 

Heart Baskets and Novelties, 

Heart Pins, Arrows, Red Corsage Cords 

and Silver Hearts 

^/Vlay we send you a $5.00, $10 00 or $15.00 
assortment? All our styles are BIQ sellers. 

Vou will make no Jiiistakc if you leiive selection lo us. 



DO IT NOW! 




. RICE CO. 

THE LARGEST AND BEST EQUIPPED 
FLORISTS' SUPPLY HOUSE 

1220-22-24 Spring Garden St., PHILADELPHIA, PA. 



BilitiOD ami ChilfOD Novellies 

Vou cannot achieve a reputation for artistic work by slapping on your designs 
commonplace ribbons or ordinary chifTons. 

You need our co-operation as experts 

Wr otVer you an immense variety of WOndrous weaves and COiorings in 
ribbons and an assortment of chiffons positively distinctive. 

Th.' judirious use of our ribbons and riiitVons will surety enhance the value 
of your worli. 

Vou are not thorou^^lily posted on riiihon and chitTon possibilities until you have 
inspected our line. 

Correspondence solicited. One of our salesmen will call upon you or we 
will be pleased to submit samples. 

Wertheimer Brothers 

THE NATIONAL FLORAL RIBBON HOUSE 
Owners and Operators of Werbro Ribbon Mfar. Co., Peterson, N. J. 

Salesrooms, 19-25 East 24th St. NEW YORK 



,,,»\W*0 



i'ljiaJAi'/i'^lS 






CARNATION MEN AT 

HOOSIER CAPITAL 

Thr A)))(ric(in (Uirnnliuu Socich/ held its twenty-sixth annual meet iiuj 
and exhibition this week at Indianapolis, In the heart of the Indiana car- 
nation belt. The sueeess of the affair was aehicved alonn (inrs made faanl- 
lar by beinq elosehj followed for several ii<(trs. Has pmurfss shnr(d up.' 



V 





C)\K (if \is will c-oiKicde 
that ]irooi'(ws has rcast'd to 
lie iiiailc ill tlu' tl('\'(']()])- 
iiicnt lit' the cai'iiatiiiii, 
iiiu'(! dubbed ''[diik'' mtil 
1 a t r roC'lii'istciH'd t h c 
■•divine" llower; but it 
is contended by many ll'.at 
the ]iace lias sl(i\v(>d down. 
The exhil)ition \v h i r h 

<i]>ene(l at the C'laypool hotel, Indian- 

ajiolis, January ',U, while perhajis nioic 

attraetivc than any prcn'ious sho\vin;j,' 

ot' carnations in the nuddle west, owed 

its success to the ]iarticM]iatioii ot' tin' 

retailers rather tliau to the adxance 

made by the growers. 

This was tlie twenty-sixth annu.al ex 

hiliitiim of the American Carnation 

Society and for scver.'il yeais it 

lias been at wrulc alonor the same lines, 

holding its meeting 

in a ])opular liotel, 

arranging a show 

for tlit> ]»ublic and 

inviting the flower- 

lo\crs of the com- 
munity to come and 

admire. Even at Tn- 

dianajiolis, w h e r e 

the carnation at its 

liest is well known, 

there wKs nothing 

but praise for the. 

quality of the stock 

shown. It was good 

— almost too good, 

for the average 

grower appreciates 

that he cannot com- 
pete and does not 

ont er his s t o c k, 

with the result that 

the annual shows 

are almost wholly 

made by a few spc- 

<ialists. 

Good Culture. 

High culture is 
the outstanding fea- 
ture of these shows. 
The exhibitors al- 
most to a man are 
]>ossessed of unusupl 
ability as growers 
and the stock thev 
stage is of su<di 
s])lendid quality 
that it takes a 
mighty good nov- 
elty to make a 
showing that will 
command favorable 
attention when it is 



OFFICERS ELECTED 




President- 


W. 


J. Vesey, Jr 


., Fort 


Wayne, Ind. 








Vice-President 


— Charles S. 


Strout. 


Biddeford, M 


e. 






Secretary— 


-A. 


F. J. Baur, 1 


ndian- 


apolis, Ind. 








Treasurer— 


-F. 


E. Dorner, 


Lafay- 


ette, Ind. 








Director f 


or 


Five Yenrs- 


-F'eter 


Fisher, Ellis, 


Mass. 




Judges — W 


i 1 11 r. 


m Nicholson 


. J. H. 


Dunlop. 








Meeting P 


nee 


for 1918— B 


oston. 



set up alongside the older \-arieties helped 1 
grown by these experts. That is why 
urogress ap[iears to ha\<' slowed down. 
The 1!M7 vhdw makes it ^ecni more 




William J. Vesey, Jr. 

I'lv-lclcnl-c'lccl Airni ir.in Caiiiali.'ii S..iMrH.i 



th.au e\ CI- apparent that the (dl'ort to 
increase the size dl' the carnation has 
been .aliandoueil ; it loojcs as though, by 
general agreement, the modern carna- 
tion is large enough, at le.ast tliat 
grt>ater si/e is not ilesirabk' until 1'orni, 
substance, I'r.agi'.ance and <tem have 
lieen fui'thci' developed, wliile the 
grower ol' aNcrage aliility, grouiul be 
tweeu rising costs and falling jirices, 
will assert that lloriftM'ousness, produc 
ti\ity. is what is want(>d of the no\'(d 
ties soi'ts th.at will gixo more th.an thf 
twenty blocnns per plant which now is 
considered a good a\'ei'age by those who 
keep count. 

The size of the I ndianapnlis show wn- 
lelped by two j'actors. lir-l of which 
IS the f.act that c.arn.at ions lia\e been 
more jdentifiil and lower in piice this 
,l;iiiuaiy than ,al this time in any of 
the last iew years, 
wliile Indianapolis 
is one ni' the most 
accessible ui' ^v''st- 
ern citi(^s. The ex 
liibitor f a r t h (^ s t 
from h o m e was 
strout'-;. of I'.idde- 
ford. Ml'., but Bos- 
ton L;rn\vi'rs w e r e 
well represented 
."ind the Cottage 
< hardens upheld the 
banner of Long 
I-land growers. The 
eastern specialists 
always have been 
st;iunch supjiorters 

of the S'lriet V. 

Dominant Varieties. 

I he Indianaiielis 
shdw -ei'X'ed tn deni- 
on-tiate the stay- 
ing qualities of the 
\arieties that have 
lietMi in the le.ad tlu 
last I'ew vears. 

l-'h'-h jdnlc still 
]ii'edomin;ites: jn-t 
as I^nclianti(^ss is 
the most abundant 
varietv in the mar- 
kets, so is Tai(diant- 
ri^ss color the lead- 
ing one in the ex- 
h i b i t i o n •-•. P.ut 
where IIh^ market 
growers a-- a body 
cling to Emhant- 
r e s s, the special- 
ists have discarded 
it and use Enchant- 
ress Supreme, Pink 



18 



The Florists' Review 



Febhuaky 1, 1917. 



Delight, Gloriosa or Alice. 

Matchless is without a serious com- 
petitor among disseminated varieties 
when it comes to a quality white, al- 
though White Enchantress still is far 
more abundant in the average commis- 
sion house. 

Nothing has appeared to displace 
Mrs. C. W. Ward as the best medium 
pink. 

Gorgeous, the quality flower among 
the dark i>inks, nearly has been 
dropped, for slowness, and Eosette is 
the principal variety in its color. 

The keenest competition is in reds. 
Beacon has not been satisfactory, al- 
though still largely grown, and last year 
three new ones. Belle Washburn, Avia- 
tor and Nebraska, lined up with Cham- 
pion in the effort to displace it. They 
have not been in the hands of the gen- 
eral run of growers long enough to have 
settled their relative standing, but this 
year live new reds or scarlets are joining 
in tJie race. Merry Christmas, Thenan- 
thoti, Doris, Radium and Cornell. 

The New Varieties. 

Among the varieties being sent out 
this season interest centers on the fol- 
lowing: 

Eosalia is another of the long line of 
novelties raised by F. Dorner & Sons 
Co., La Fayette, Ind. It is cerise pink, 
a color in which there is little competi- 
tion. Rosette, also a Dorner introduc- 
tion, is almost the only representative 
of the class, but the Dorners assert their 
belief that Rosalia will displace Rosette. 
While the flowers show up well on the 
exhibition table, the originators claim 
its special merit is in the Jiabit of 
growth. 

Cottage Maid, while being dissemi- 
nated this year, is so well known to the 
regular attendants at the A. C. S. meet- 
ings that it seems scarcely to class as 
new. It was the winner in the flesh 
])ink class at St. Louis a year ago at the 
St. Louis show, where it also took the 
sweepstakes for best entry in the color 
classes for 100 blooms. It also has 
been seen at the other shows at Phila- 
dcl[)hia, Cleveland and New York. It 
is a sport of Mrs. C. W. Ward, identical 
in all but color, and the disseminators, 
the Cottage Gardens Co., Queens, L. I., 
have been sending it to the New York 
market for several years. 

Merry Christmas, described as scarlet, 
is the result of a long series of crosses, 
beginning with Victory and Beacon. It 
was raised by Baur & Steinkamp, at 
Indianapolis, and has been a factor in 
the Christmas supply there for several 
years. The bloom is of good size and 
form, carried on strong stems. It is 
claimed that it seldom splits. 

Arawana is a bright crimson seed- 
ling raised by A. N. Pierson, Inc., 
Cromwell, Conn. The color speaks for 
itself and the stem and calyx are good. 
The flower is of moderate size and the 
originator says that as a market va- 
riety it has paid better than any other 
crimson that has been tried at Cromwell. 

Old Gold is yellow, the latest of many 
raised by F. Dorner & Sons Co., La I'ay- 
ette, Ind. While yellow carnations have 
had no vogue in this country, there has 
been a large sale for them abroad and 
the introducers claim this is the best to 
date. 

Radium was raised at the New Castlo 
establishment of P. J. dinger. It is a 
cross of Victory on O. P. Bassett. The 
color is scarlet, the blooms of large size, 
with good stem and calyx. The origina- 



tor claims for the variety that it is an 
excellent producer and is specially good 
for shipping because it does not go to 
sleep. It has/ been known in the Cin- 
cinnati market for the last two years. 

Superb is "a new color in the flesh pink 
class, being decidedly on the salmon or- 
der. It is a seedling of Enchantress 
crossed with Gloriosa. The bloom is of 
good size and form, carried on a stiff 
stem. It has been seen at most of the 
flower shows of the last three years, 
during which time it has been grown 
by the originator, the J. D. Thompson 
Carnation Co., Joliet, 111. 

Thenanthos, raised by Anton Then, 
Chicago, and being distributed by the 
A. L. Randall Co., although red, is t^aid 
to be a seedling of Enchantress, crossed 
with another red seedling that had the 
blood of Mrs. Nelson and Mrs. Lawson. 
It is possible, therefore, to trace its par- 
entage back to Wm. Scott. It has been 
shown at Chicago for three or four years 
and there has been a steady improve- 
ment in the blooms. Strong claims are 
made for it as a producer. 

Doris was first seen at the A. C. S. 
show at St. Louis last year, where it 
scored eighty-eight points after being 
shipped from Framingham, Mass., 
where the seedling was raised by S. J. 
Goddard. It is a crimson, of excellent 
form and substance, with strong stem 
and calyx. 

Cornell is the name given by Ira G. 
Marvin, Wilkes-Barre, Pa., to a red 
seedling grown at his place for several 
years and which now is being shown to 
the trade for the first time. It is not 
of the largest size, but strong claims 
are made for it as a commercial "bread 
and butter" variety. 

Albert Roper is a cerise seedling ex- 
hibited at previous shows as No. 360. It 
was raised by the late Albert Roper, of 
Tewksbury, Mass., and will be dissemi- 
nated in a limited way by his estate. 
It is not a large flower, but is said to 
be a good bloomer and a profitable va- 
riety on the Roper place. It is known 
to many in the Boston market. 

Next Year's Novelties. 

Among the varieties that will be put 
on the market next year Crystal White 
stands out as the finest white thus far 
produced. It is described as an im- 
proved Matchless, being without the 
least trace of pink. In addition to pur- 
ity of color it has excellent form. It 
was raised at Cottage Gardens, the cross 
having been made by C." W. Ward him- 
self. It has won many prizes on the 
exhibition table, having been first 
shown at Cleveland in 1915. 

Olive Whitman is a red seedling 
raised by M. Matheron, at Baldwins, 
Ij. I., who will send it out next year 
jointly with Guttman & Raynor, New 
York. It is a cross of Victory and 
Beacon. 

Other varieties seen for the first time 
which probably will be distributed in 
1918 or later were: No. 1,489, flesh 
pink, Dorner; Bernice, scarlet, Howard; 
Portland's Pride, red, Frank & Sons; 
Laddie, Dorner; No. 414, Baur & Stein- 
kamp; Edna, Zweifel; Serin and Ruffus. 

The Awards. 

On the whole the show was consider- 
ably larger than usual, the retail dis- 
plays and the miscellaneous exhibits as 
well as the competitive entries by local 
growers being numerous. The awards 
in the competitive classes were: 



One huudrod wliite — Strout's, Biddoford, Me., 
first, on Matchless; Cottnge Gardens Co., 
Queens, L. I., second, -on Crystal White. 

One hundred flesh pink — F-. Dorner & Sons 
Co., Lafayette, Ind., first, on No. 1489; J. D. 
'J'iiompson Carnation Co., Joliet, 111., second, 
on Superb. 

One hundred light pink — No entry. 

One hundred medium pink — Cottage Gardens 
Co., first, on Mrs. C. W. Ward; E. A. RlcU- 
iirdson, .second, on No. 110. 

One hundred dark pink— F. Dorner & Sona 
Co., first, on Hosiilia; Mt. Greenwood Ceme- 
tery, Morgan Park, 111., second, on Rosette. 

One hundred .red — Baur & Steinkamp, In- 
dianapolis, first, on Merry Christmas; Bassett 
it Washhurn, Chicago, second, on Belle Wash- 
burn. 

One hundred crimson — S. J. Goddard, Soutli 
Framingham, Mass., first, on Doris; W. D. 
Howard, Milford, Mass., second, on Bernice. 

One hundred yellow — F. Dorner & Sons Co., 
lirst, on Old Gold; no second. 

One hundred white variegated — Halifax Gar- 
dens Co., Halifax, Mass., first, on Benora; no 
second. 

One hundred flaked — No entry. 

One hundred any otlier color — No entry. 

Sweepstakes in above classes — Ilitchings sil- 
ver cup to Cottage Gardens Co., on Mrs. Wanl. 

I'ifty Wliito Enchantress— Hartje & Elder, 
ludianapolis, first; John A. Nelson, Indian- 
Mpolis, second. 

Fifty White Wonder— FVank & Sons, Port- 
liind, Ind., first; Strout's, second. 

Fifty Matchless — Strout's, first; W. II. Gul- 
lett & Sons, Lincoln, 111., second. 

Fifty any other white — Strout's, first, with 
White I'erfection; no second. 

I'ifty Alice — No entry. 

Fifty Enchantress Supreme— Joseph II. Hill 
Co., Uiclimond. Ind., first; J. F. Ammann Co., 
Fdwardsville, 111., second. 

Fifty Pink Delight— Strout's, first; J. A. 
Nelson, second. 

fifty any other flesh pink — Strout's, first, 
on Nancy; Frank & Sons, second, on Mavdav. 

Fifty Pink Sensation— S. J. Goddard, first; 
\V. H. GuUett & Sons, second. 

Fifty any other light pink — S. J. Goddard, 
liist; Gullett & Sons, second. 

Fifty .Mrs. C. W. Ward— Frank & Sons, 
Mi-st: Strout's, second. 

Fifty Goo<l Cheer— Baur & Steinkamp, first: 
Oullett & Sons, second. 

Fifty any oth»r medium , pink — W. R 
S(hro<'der, Milwaukee. Wis., first, on Mrs. 
Akehurst; J. S. .Stuart, Anderson, Ind., sec- 
ond, on Rose-pink Enchantress. 

I'ifty dark pink— Ilartje & Elder, first, on 
Washington; S. J. Go<Idard, second, on Rosette 

Fifty Beacon— W. R. Schroeder, first; S. J. 
(.oddnrd, second. 

Fifty Chatupion — No entry. 

Fifty any otlier scarlet — Bassett & Washburn 
hrst, on Belle Washburn; Frank & Sons, second 
on Portland Pride. 

Fifty Pocahontas— Strout's, first; no second. 

Fifty any other crimson — No entry 

Fifty Benora— Halifax Gardens Co., first; J. A 
Nelson, second. 

.Any other white variegated — No entry 

F'ifty Yellow Prince— S. J. Goddard, first: 
no second. 

Fifty any other yellow— No entry. 

Fifty any flaked variety— No entry. 

Fifty any other color — No entry. 

Fifty Nancy— S. J. Goddard. 

Fifty Alice Coombs— Halifax Gardens Co 

Iifty Belle Washburn — No entry. 

Fifty Miss Theo— No entry. 

F'fty Red Wing— No entry. 

One hundred any variety— Baur & Stein- 
kamp, A. C. S. silver medal, on Merry Christ- 
mas: Cottage Gardens Co., A. C. S. bronze 
inediil, on Cottage Maid; no gold medal awarded 

fifty any undisseminated varletv S A F 
medals class — No entry. " • • • 

One hundred any undisseminated seedling 

Dorner & Sons Co., the Dorner Memorial medal 
on Laddie. ^u»<. 

Preliminary competition for lf)18 Dorner Me- 



iiioriiil medal class— Baur & Steinkamp niial- 
ili.Ml on No. 414; N. Zweifel, North Milwaukee 
en Edna. 

Certificate of Merit— To W. D. Howard on 
seedlings. 

Fifty blooms in four or more varieties open 
to Indiana growers only— Frank & Sons the 
Indiana carnation trophy. 

Miscellaneous Exhibits. 

For probably the first time in the 
history of the A. C. S. there were 
chrysanthemums at its show. The 
varieties were Hamburg Late White, ex- 
hibited by W. F. Kasting Co., Buffalo, 
for the originator, C. F. Guenther, Ham- 
burg, N. Y., and Mistletoe, staged by 
H. P. Smith. ^ 

J. A. Peterson & Sons, Cincinnati, 
sliowed begonias and cyclamens. 

The A. L. Randall Co., Chicago, set 
up a vase of the new red rose, Mrs. 
Sarah Yeats, grown by its originator, J. 
F. Yeats, Champaign, 111. 

Carl Hagenburgcr, Mentor, 0., showed 
a new seedling cherry. 



Febuuauy 1, 1917. 



The Florists^ Review 



19 



Peter Weiland, New Castle, Iiul., 
made a display of sweet peas. 

Deerfield Nursery, Deerfield, 111., 
showed Kadiance, a new seedling sweet 
pea. 

Rose-pink Ophelia, staged by Fred 
Breitmeyer, Mt. Clemens, Mich., at- 
tracted much attention, largely because 
Ophelia, from which it is a sport, has 
proved tractable in the hands of many 
growers who have indifferent success 
with the Killarney varieties and who 
will welcome another color in it. 

Bertermann Bros. Co., Indianapolis, 
showed fine snapdragons. 

W. J. & M. S. Vesey, Fort Wayne, 
Ind., staged an excellent table of 
orchids. 

Zech & Mann, Chicago, put up a dis- 
play of exceptionally long-stemmed 
I'urity freesia. 

Table decorations were staged by the 
Ilill Floral Co., Bertermann Bros. Co., 
A. Wiegand's Sons Co., Claypool Hotel 
Florist, Hensley's Flower Shop and 
Pahud Floral Co. 

The Business Session. 

The cultural ability of those who at- 
tend the annual meeting of the Ameri- 
can Carnation Society is shown by the 
fact that the reading of essays has been 
discontinued; the members no longer 
care to spend the time in listening to set 
papers on topics which, with them at 
least, are threadbare. The nearest ap- 
proach to a program this year was in 
the secretary's announcenient that a 
discussion of the "yellows" would take 
place. 

The morning of the first dav of the 
meeting was devoted to staging the ex- 
hibits, a work which, if not participated 
in, is watched by most of those present. 
The hall was closed in the earlv after- 
noon to all except the judges "and the 
secretary, but was opened to members 
from the completion of the judging until 
8 p. m., when the doorg were opened to 
the public. At the same time the an- 
nual business session started in an ad- 
joining room. 

The address of President Ammaim 
and the report of Secretary Baur appear 
in full in this issue, together with a 
summary of Treasurer Dorner's finan- 
cial statement. 

Those Present. 

The attendance was considcrablv 
larger than last year, although the east- 
ern representation was light. Among 
those from outside of Indianapolis 
whose presence was noted on the open- 
ing day were the following: 

Aniniiinn. .T. F., Kdwarilsvillo, 111. 

.•\siiuis. (JcorKC. CliicaBn, 111. 

Harkcr. M.. Cliioaco, 111. 

liato. W. Q., Newton Falls. O. 

Horning. II. G.. am! wifo, St. I.onis, Mo 

Hitler. W. A., Kokonio. Ind. 

Hlnckburn, Oeorgo II., Evansvillc, Iml 

Hourilet. .lules. St. Ix)iiis, Mo 

Hreitnie.ver. Frod,, Mt. Clemens. Midi. 

Hrown, Thomas F.. Knichtstown, Ind. 

Hiirki, F., I'ittsburKli. I'a 

("olos. W. W., Kokomo. Ind 

("erny, ,S. E., St. Ixinis. Mo. 

Clarke, W. A.. I'ittsluircli, I'a. 

Conner. .T. L.. .Tr., Wabash, Ind 

Critphell, C. E., Cincinnati, O. 

Daillodonze, Engene, and wife, Rrooklvn X Y 

Daiit, I'liilip, Deratnr, 111. . . - • 

Donmead, .T. I.., Marshalltown. la 

I)i<k, .T. II., New York, N. Y 

Dilloff. .Tnlins, New York. N. Y. 

I>orner, F. E.. I.a Fa.vette, Ind. 

Dorner, H. I!.. T'rban.a, 111. 

Dramm. Ensene, Elmhnrst. 111. 

Eitel, J. E., (Jreeneastle, Ind 

Evans, .John A.. Richmond, Ind. 

Field, (Jeorge, Cleveland. (). 

FleoKer, F. A.. Mnncie, Ind. 

Fole.v. I". J.. Chicauo, 111. 

Forder, E. A., Cincinnati, 0. 

Frank, Charles. I'ortland, Ind. 

Friedle.v, F. .\.. Cleveland. (). 

»iano, Nixon, Martinsville, Ind. 




Charles S. Strqut. 

(Vlce-preHklent-eli'ct Anicrican Carnation Society.) 



C,;irdner. Wm., Richmond. Ind. 

(ianse, iivuriif R., Ri<'hmon(l. Ind. 

Ceddis, David S., St. Louis, Mo. 

(;<>dd«ril. S. .1., Fraininuham, Mass. 

(Jorly, Vincent, and wife, St. Louis, .Mo. 

Cuenthcr, C. V., Hamburg, N. Y. 

(Jullett, W.. Lincoln, 111. 

(Juttnian, A. .1.. New York, N. Y. 

IlaKcMhiircer, Carl, and wife. Clevel.ind. O. 

Harvey, E. .\., Hrandywine Summit, I'a. 

Ila.ves, R. H., Shelbv, O. 

Ht'Cht, A. (;., Chaniimipn. 111. 

Hensley. IT. H., Hartford City. Inl. 

Herr, A. M., and wife, Lancaster. I'a. 

Herr, I)., and wife. Lancaster, I'a. 

Ilerre, A. W., Chicago, 111. 

llerron. I). R.. Olean, N. Y. 

Herschtield. ().. Cincinnati, 0. 

Heinl, F., and wife, Terre Haute, Ind. 

Heinl, .7. i;., Terre Haute, Ind. 

Hcnshaw, A. M., New York, .\. Y 

Ilensley. H. F., Knightstown, Ind. 

Hill, E. <;., Richmond, Ind. 

Hill. .loseph, and wife, Richmond, Ind. 

Ilonaker, (). S., Lexington, Kv. 

Howard. \V. I)., and wif«-, Miiford. Mass. 
Huckleberry. \V., North Vernon, Ind. 

Humiston, H. E.. Chicago. 111. 

Ilummert, .\ugust, St. L»nis, Mo. 

Irwin. R. .1., New York, N. Y 

.Tohnson. C. AV., Morgan I'ark, 111 

Jones, II. H., Cleveland, (). 

.Tones, .1. E., Richmond, Ind. 

•Tones, R.. Richmond, Ind. 

Keimel. \V. .1.. Elmhurst, 111. 

Kirch. L., Louisville, Kv. 

Klingsporn, I". R., Chicago, 111 

Knohle. H. I'., and wife. Cleveland O 

Koenig, Otto (J.. St. Louis, Mo 

Knopf, M. L., Richnionrl, Ind. 

Kuehn, C. A., St. Louis, Mo 

Knrowski, E. F., Chicago. Ill 

Lanihorn. L. T.., Alliance. (). 

Lantenschlager, Fred., Chicago 111 

Leganger. M. ,\., Chicago, 111 

Lemon, F. II.. Richmond, Ind 

Loew, William, Pittsburgh, I'a 

Long, Tliomas I)., Chicago, 111. 

Longren. A. F.. Chicago, 111. 

Malhrani', T., .Tohnstown, I'a 

Mann, E., Richmond, Ind. 

Mann. Wm.. Louisville, Ky 

Matthews. \V. C,., and wife, Dnvton O. 

Meinhardt, Fred II.. St. Louis Mo 

-Meyer, Charles, St. Ix)uis, Mo. 

MiclM'lsen, C. .1., Chicago, 111. 

Miller, A., Chicago, 111. 

Jlorris, F. L., Hloomington. Ind. 

Morris, M. F.. Hloomington. Ind 

Mott. Walter. He.icon, N. Y. 

Aluriihy. Charles, Cincinnati, O 

Myers. I)., Hluffton, Ind. 

Neubrand, H. ('., Cromwell, Conn. 



.Newcomb, Robert. Cliicago. III. 
.Nicholson, Wm., I'ramingliam. Mass. 
.N'icliulson, Wm. R., and wife, Framingliam, 
.Mass. 

Otto. C., Toledo, O. 

Rainier, William .L. Huffalo, N. Y. 

I'eirce, E. A., Waltham, Mass. 

Peterson, C. II., Cincinnati, O. 

Peterson, .1. A., Cincinnati, O. 

Pilcher, W. .L, St. Louis. Mo. 

Poeblmann, August. .Morton Crove, 111. 

Pollworth, (;. ('., Milwaukee, Wis. 

Pollworth, J. E., Chicago, III. 

yuallich, .1. E., Chicago, 111. 

Randall. W. W., Chicago, III. 

Rasmiissen, A., and wife. New Albanv, Ind. 

Rasmusseii, Ceorge, New Albanv, Imi. 

Reburn, (Jiiy, Chicago, III. 

Reichling, Eniil, Chicago. 

Ititter. F. C. New Castle, Ind. 

Uodgers, J. W., Dayton, O. 

Rosnosky. I., I'hiladelphia, Pa. 

Rowe. W. A., and wife, St. I.oiiis, .Mo. 

Saunders. Ernest, I.ewiston, Me. 

Schneider, Frank A.. Cincinnali, 

Schroeder, W. R., Milwaukee, Wis 

Schwake, Charles, New York, \ Y 

Smith. Ceo. W.. Cleveland, O 

Smith, H. P.. Piqua, O. 

Stahelin. A. J., Redford. Mich 

Stanch, M. S., Council Hluffs, la 

Stront, C. S., Hiddeford. Me. 

Stuart, J. E., .\ndersoii. Inil. 

'I'heii. .7. A., Chicago, 111. 

'I'rindley, H. F., Park.isbiirg, W. Va. 

Thomas. ,7., C.reeiisliurg, Pa. 

Vesey. .Fudge W. .1,. and wife. Ft. Wavne Ind 

\esey, W. .1.. Jr.. and wife. Ft. Wavne, Ind." 

\esey. Miss .M., Ft. Wavne. Did 

Walker. Will., Louisville. Kv 

Ward. D. S.. Queens. N. Y. " 

Washburn, C. L., and wife, Chicago 111 

Weber. I'. C, Sr., and wife, .St. I.onis, Mo. 

Walker, Wm., Jr., Louisville, Ky. 

Walker, L. S., Louisville. Kv. 

Weir, J. E., Jamesport. N. Y. 

Wilcox, Roy F., Council Hliiffs la 

Williams, R. .7., Minnie, Ind. 

Windier. J. J., and wife. St. Louis M,, 

Witterstaetter. R., Cincinnati, O 

Woodard, Thomas, Edinbiirg. Ind. 

■^eats, .7. E.. Ch.impaign, III. 

■lounge, C. N., .Martinsville, Ind 

Younp, S. II.. Casey, 111 

Zcch. AUie, Chicago' 111. 

Zwoifel, Nic. .Milwaukee, AVis 



Local Arrangements, 



The 



local arrangements, including 
those for the admi.ssion of the public 
if 'id the annual banquet, at the Clavpool 



I'i;i:ki M;^ I. MM' 



The Florists' Review 



19 



li : 1 1 1 ; 1 1 ■ ( 1 1 i -^ . 



I'clcr \\Cil;iinl. \.'\\ ' ;i-l \<\ I ihl. 
i|i;i.|c .•! (I is[il;i \ "iT -~\\ ccr |ic;i'^. 

Itcrrlifl.l .\iir-cr\, I )fci licM, 111. 

■^Iiowcil Ii'.'mI i;i Hit, :i new -I'clliiiL; ^wnl 

|H.-|. 

K'lisr- 1 .i II k ( i| ilirl ill , •>! ;il;i'' I 1 1\ ['vn I 

Ulcit lllcvcr. Ml. < Ic'lllrlis. M Ir I;,, ,-|t 

ti;irt('i| iiiihli ;it t rut idii, l;irL;i'l\ lifr,-in<r 

< )|p1icI ill. I'idlll wllirll il is ,'l ^|Mllt. li;|- 
|i|ii\c.i t I :ii-t .'I Me M tile li,-||his iif iii;iii\ 
^i(i\\ci> wild li.'iNC i ml ilVc: I'lit -n.riv., 
willi tlif l\ ilhiriiry \ ;ili"'t ii's ;iiii| w 1m 
will \\ el 1(1 nil' ;i III it III -I' I nlnr in it . 

I ii'ii criii.'i II II I ',1(1^. ( '(I., 
^Ilnw cil li III' --li;! |ii I I .■|^|p||^. 

W. .1. \ M. S. V,.v,.y, I',,, I W.MV II.'. 

I II' I., ^1 .'iLii'il :> 11 ixiclliii t I .-I I ill' 111' 
iii'iliiil-. 

Xi'ill \ M:illli, < Il ir;i;^ii. |i||1 iiji ;[ il s 

I'l.-i.v i,r cxri'iit iiiii;i My luii^ -tciir I 

riilil\ l'icc-~i;i. 

'{".•llilr (Iciill ;it lull -- Wclc Sl,-I::rii li\ tlir 

I I i II I'liii ;i I I 'ii.. I Ji'i t II iii;i nil I !i u^. ( u., 

A. W ii'Ll.l inl '^ Snliv (',,._ ( '|;i \ |Mi(il IIdIcI 

I'liiii^t . I liMi-|r\ \ I'ldw (I Sliii|i :inil 
l';iliiii| I'li.ial ( u. 

The Business Session. 

'I'll!' i-iill iii;i I .-ilii lit \' III' t liii-i' w liM :it - 
I I'lnl till- :i n n n;i I iiirct i ni; nl tin' A iiirii 
'•:iii < ';i ni;it inn Suricty i- ^Imwn li\ ;hr 
r.'iit tlnit till' ir.'iiliiiL: III i'--^;i\> li;i- Imtii 

i| i--rli||t I lllji',1 ; till' Mli'lll lii'l'v nil liillMCl 

'•.•ii'i- til ^pi'iiil tin- tunc in li-triiiiii; In ^ct 
I'llpi'l-'^ "Il lii|iii'- w liii'h. with t hi'in iit 
l''.'i^t. ;iii' t 111 r,'i.|li;i I r. 'riic iirnri'-t ;iii 
j'li'i'ii'li til ;i |ii (1:^1 ,'1111 tlii^ \c','ir \\,'ix in 
'III' siTi'i't;! r\- 'v ,'i II iiiiiiiii'i'ini'iit tli:it ;i 
'li-rn'---i(ill III' t lie • ' \ cjldw V ■ ■ w (111 I, I 1;| kc 

,ii,-,,..'. 

riic iiKiinin^r (if (j||. fii'^f .j.,^- ,,i' )||,. 

II tillL; w;i- i|('\(iti'i| t(j -t;i^i|i- tile .'V 

'li'iit-. I'l \\iiik wliicli. ir nut |i;irtii'i|i;it('.| 
ill. J- w;itch('(| liy iiio^t 111' tlui^c inocnl. 
Till' In, II w;is ('lose! ill tiif (■;iil\- ;i I'tcr 

"""II '" .'ill «'\/',.[,t til,! iii,|M,.< ';,,,, I the 
-rclct.-liy, lillt \\;is ,i|ic I til III.'IIiIm'Iv 

'■"III '111' r"in|ir('t idii "T till' JiiiImIiim' until 

^ I'- III'. \\ kl'll till' .|(id|'>, w,.|,. |,|,,.HCi| td 

""■ I'lil'lir. At till' v;nni' time tlic ;in 
iHiiil liii-incss sc--idii st;iit(',| in ;ni ;ii| 
.idiiiin^ I'ddiii. 

1 II" .-ulili i's< df I'l'dvi.lrnt .\iiini;iirn 
.;iiii| tlic rc|i(,i't (,r SccK't.'nv I'.;iiir .-i jipc.-i i 
III full ill tlii- i-snc, td-ctlici wit'n .-i 
-"iiiiii.'ii'.^ "I' ■i'id;i>iii'i'r Iidinii''^ liiinn 
li.'il -t.'itcnii'iit. 

Those Present. 

I ll" .'it tl'lhl.-l lice W ,'!-- I'dllSl'Icl {llll \ 

l''ii'-''i' 'li.'iii k'l-t yc;ir, .•iltlidii-h flic (\T«t- 
''III M'lii'cM'iit.'it idii w.-i'.^ liulit. Aiiiiin- 
'li"^»' riiilii "iit-i.lc dl' lin|i;in;i|.dli- 
nlidsc |.rc<cncc w,'iv ndtcil nn the .i|.cn 
!iiu 'l:i\ w ci (■ t he fdlldW i nu : 

•\llil .1 I'.. l:ih\;,|.U\ ill,' lil 

\-iiiii- I, .■.,,-.. I 'lii.'.'i:;,.. IN 

I'iiIm I. M . I hi..i:;ii. Ill 

l'"i'| \\ '■ . \i »\ l.ii, I-'.ilK. II 

I'll inn. II ( , .111,1 V, n.' SI I - \1, 

I'l'I'T- \^ . \ , K..k.iin.i. III. I 

I'l'i' i^i'iiiii. i.i-iii--.' II . i;\,iii-.\ Hi.- |i,,i 

l'""'lilil. .lull'-. SI. I...1II., \|,, 
l''l'''llii''.>|''-. l-'li'il , \ll l|,.|,|. ,;. \| I,. I, 
T'li'V^ii. 111.. IN, I- |-. Kin::lil-l.i\\ I, li.,| 
I'm Ki. I' , rill~l.iij';:li I' 1 
I I'll-. \\ W Ki.k.'ii.M I, Hi 

' ■ iii.> . ■'^ K.. SI. I \|,, 

' kiilM'. W ,\ rili~l,,ii'^|, !•;, 

I Ill- -I I. - Ir.. U :iIki.|, 111, I 

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Charles S. Strqut. 

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Local Arrangements. 



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20 



The Florists^ Review 



Febuuart 1, 1917. 



! 

1 


^ 


.■s*r" 


H 




B\ %r^ 



A. F. J. Baur. 
(Secrelary American Carnaf on Soci^tj.) 



hotel during the evening of February 
1, wer,e in charge of the Indiana State 
Florists' Association, the officers of 
which are as follows: 

President — W. J. Vcscy, Jr., Fort 
Wayne. 

First vice-president — Trwin Berter- 
iiiann, Indianapolis. 

Second vice-president — Theodore Dor- 
ner, La Favette. 

Secretary — O. E. Steinkamp, Indian- 
apolis. 

Treasurer — II. L. Wiegand, Indian- 
apolis. 

The A. C. S. was the first of the trade 
societies to adopt the practice of closing 
its meeting with a banquet for which 
each member buys liis own ticket. 



SECEETABY'S REPORT. 

[The followiiiK is tlio report of Scfrctary A. K. 
,7 Baur, presented to tlii' Aiiiericiiii Ciiriiatioii So- 
ciety at its meeting at Indianapolis, .laniiary :U. 
lltn.] 

During the last twelve months tlie 
secretary's office has been unusually 
busv. With our participation in the 
National Flower Show in Philadelphia 
last March and the soliciting of funds 
in aid of Miss Anna Jarvis, there has 
V)een much extra work and some addi- 
tional expense. The receipts, however, 
have also increased somewhat, though 
not quite so much as the expense, so 
that at the end of this fiscal year we 
find ourselves with somewhat less cash 
in the general fund than a year ago, but 
still in good condition. 

Financial Statement. 

During the last year the secretary's 
office has received: 



Dues $ 729.00 

Advertising 261.85 

Jlisiellancous 46.0.") 

.Mothers' day 154.00 

Total $1,190.90 

All of which was turned over to the 
treasurer and his receipt taken therefor. 

The secretary's and treasurer's books 
^vere checked over by a public auditor 
and found correct. All bills are being 
met promptly and all accounts due the 
society are being collected without loss. 
We are pleased to note that twenty-six 
])ages of advertising space in this year's 
premium schedule were taken by our 
members and friends. We feel that our 
members should make an effort to j.at- 
lonize these adxTrtisers as much as 
))Ossible, in order to make it worth their 
while to use these pages as an advertis- 
ing medium. 

Membership Decreasing. 

The one department that gives your 
secretary more concern than any other 
is the membership list. During the last 
year we have taken in forty-five new 
members and reinstated six; yet, in spite 
of this unusual number of additions, 
we are now thirteen members behind 
last report. The list now stands at .''.12 
annual members and twelve life mem- 
bers, making a total of 324. 

During the year we have lost Albert 
Roper, who died March 1; Wm. F. 
Kasting, who died June 15; Thos. C. 
•Toy, who died November 10, and W. E. 
Krocschell, who died November 23. All 
of these men were favorably known to 
most of you and will be missed at our 
conventions. 

We have 217 members in good stand- 



ing in the Society of American Florists 
and therefore continue to be represented 
on its board of directors. Our present 
president, Mr. Ammann, was selected to 
that position, to serve during the year 
1917. 

New Varieties. 

Since the last meeting, we have re- 
ceived seven new varieties for registra- 
tion. Fourteen others were sent over 
by the Perpetual Flowering Carnation 
Society of England. 

A special silver medal was struck to 
commemorate the society's twenty-fifth 
year and was awarded to each winner of 
a first premium in the carnation section 
at the National Flower Show in Phila- 
delphia last March. Those who received 
the medal are S. J. Goddard, E. G. Hill 
Co., Strafford Flower Farms, J. W. Mi- 
nott Co., E. F. Lieker, Cottage Gardens 
Co., A. A. Pembroke, Strouts, 'Wni. 
Kleinheinz, W. L. Ellis, Wm. Graham, 
Mrs. Wm. Austin, A. Harvey & Sons, 
Countess Eulalia and W. E. Lenk, fif- 
teen in all. 

This society took an active part in 
the National Flower Show in Philadel- 
jdiia last March. Not only did we pre- 
pare the premium schedule and the rules 
for staging the carnation section of the 
show, but members of this society con- 
tributed $515 toward paying the premi- 
ums of this department, thereby reduc- 
ing the liability of the management to 
that extent. 

Changes in Premiums. 

Early in the year the secretary, by 
direction of the board of directors, 
solicited funds from the members for 
the Mothers' Day fund which was be- 
ing raised by the Society of American 
Florists, for the purpose of assisting 
Miss Jarvis in promoting that day. As 
a result, $154 was raised and sent to 
Secretary Young. 

The board of directors held the cus- 
tomary post convention meeting Janu- 
ary 27, in St. Louis. A second meeting 
was held in Philadelphia March 28, in- 
stead of the usual midsummer meeting. 
At this meeting some changes were 
made in the premiums offered in most 
of the classes contained in the premium 
schedule for this year's exhibition. In 
Section A, classes 1 to 11, the premiums 
were raised from $10 and $6 to $15 and 
$10. In Section B, classes 12 to 36, 
the premiums were raised from $5 and 
$3 to $8 and $5. In Section C only 
one premium, $10, is offered instead of 
$6 and $4. These changes have in- 
creased our liability on premiums by 
$219. Five disseminators have again 
generously contributed the premiums in 
Section C. 

The identification badges you are 
wearing were provided as a result of 
the action taken in the meeting at St. 
Louis last year. They are the most 
practical article we were able to find 
for the purpose. If they are satisfac- 
tory, we will continue to use them. 

The arrangements for this meeting 
were left entirely in the hands of our 
vice-president, W. J. Vesey, Jr., and 
his committees selected from the Indi- 
ana State Florists' Society. That 
they have labored earnestly and har- 
moniously y6u can see by the results 
accomplished. The retail men have 
again come forward with a splendid 
demonstration of the carnation's adap- 
tability for decorative effects. They 
should be given credit and every en- 
couragement possible. 



Cbbbuabt 1, 1917. 



The Florists' Review 



21 

=3 




IffldiiiiiiiiiiDffl] IfflrrTniiiiiiiiiffll . lBiiiiiiiiimiTffll |ffliniiiiiiiii5¥] |Baiiiiiiiiiiii]Dffl] 



THE PRESIDENT'S 

s^ ANNUAL ADDRESS 



iiiiiiiiiimn 



nri 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 



iiiiiiiiiiiiiiaJMffliiiiiiiinniiffll ifflniiiiiiiiim 





S presiding oflScer of this 
organization, that has so 
vastly advanced the inter- 
ests not only of carnation 
culture, but floriculture in 
general, I deem it indeed an 
honor to welcome you to 
this, the twenty-sixth annual meeting 
of the American Carnation Society, in 
this beautiful and centrally located 
city of Indianapolis. 

It is not necessary for me to repeat 
at this time the history of this organi- 
zation. SuflSce it to say that I feel 
more and more, as I grow older, the 
touch of good fellowship that a meet- 
ing like this brings with it. 

Making Life Worth Living. 

Here we commingle in brotherly Jcvo 
with fellow craftsmen from all aver 
this fair land of peace and prosperity. 
Here we renew old acquaintances and 
make new ones. Now and then we miss 
an old, familiar face; we ask the rea- 
son, and find that he has passed on to 
the Great Beyond. As with the old va- 
rieties of our beloved carnations, wo 
miss them, but never forget them! It 
is these fond greetings and memories 
that really make life worth living, 
after all. 

To the members of our craft wlio 
are so diligently 
working to produce 
new varieties of 
merit, we are prob- 
ably more indebted 
than we realize, 
for were it not for 
something new occa- 
sionally the public 
interest would soon 
wane. The Amer- 
ican people are 
great on fads, and, 
in order to keep up 
an interest, new 
things of special 
merit are always in 
demand. 

A Good Example. 

I dare say noth- 
ing has popularized 
the rose so much 
the last few years 
as the coming on of 
so many new varie- 
ties of merit, and 
the end is not yet, 
which I am sure 
you will be con- 
vinced of in your 
visit to the E. G. 
Hill Co. place at 
Richmond. A friend 
recently told me it 
was worth a trip 
across the continent 
to see the seedling 
roses there, so I 
went and I now tes- 
tify that the state- 
ment ia true. We 
see here what one 



Tlie full text of the address of J. F. Animaiiii, 
president of the Aniericun Carnation Society, de- 
livered at the convention at Indianapolis, January 
31. 1917. 



firm can do by untiring effort in roses. 
I contend the same must be done in 
I'arnations in order to keep this flower 
as popular in the future as it has been 
in the past. 

Is Something Lacking? 

Much, indeed, is being done along 
this line by quite a few of our trusty 
old friends, but what seems just at this 
time to be lacking in the new produc- 
tion of carnations is that they have not 
enough merit to replace many of thu 
older varieties. Either they do not pro- 
duce enough to be profitably grown as 
standards, or the quality is not good 
(MiOugh to command the extra price a 
fancy should. But all good things 
come to those who wait; so let us be 
l)atient and I am sure we shall soon be 
rewarded. 

I have but a few suggestions to ofiFcr 
at this time. One recommendation I 
would offer is that the number of 
blooms necessary for a preliminary cer- 
tificate for the Dorner memorial medal 
be changed from fifty to twenty-five. 
It has been suggested that many "times 
it is hard to get fifty good blooms from 




J. F. Ammann. 

(President American Carnation Society.) 



a new variety where not so many plants 
are grown. 

We have an ever-growing demand for 
the society's cooperation with local 
flower shows, which I am sure we can 
not afford to ignore. At the meeting of 
the board of directors in Cleveland No- 
vember 12, 1915, a motion Avas passed 
to the effect that the board recommend 
to the convention following in January 
that the A. C. S. lend its cooperation to 
local flower shows, provided the sched- 
ule, the judges and the underwriting of 
said show be approved by the president 
and secretary of this society. 

To Encourage Exhibitors. 

I take it that the intention was to 
liave the society offer its usual medals 
and certificates. However, this matter 
never came before the regular January 
meeting of the society, owing, I guess, 
to an oversight. I feel it is of such im- 
portance that I would recommend that 
at this meeting the officers be author- 
ized to carry out the intent of this reso- 
lution, or that at least some action be 
taken toward such cooperation. For the 
more we can increase the exhibits of 
carnations the more we can popularize 
the flowers. 

I would recommend, also, that the 
secretary be authorized to place an ad- 
vertisement in each 
of the trade papers 
when the premium 
schedule is ready, 
calling attention to 
the fact that pre- 
mium lists are to be 
had for the applica- 
tion, and asking 
those who are not 
members to include 
the membership fee, 
so as to be eligible 
to exhibit. 

Words of Thanks. 

I believe s ;: c h 
publicity will not 
only help us to get 
more exhibitors, 
but also new mem- 
bers. On behalf of 
the society I want 
to extend thanks to 
the trade press for 
the vast amount of 
free publicity given 
the carnation wben- 
e v e r opportunity 
presented itself. 

In closing I want 
to heartily thank 
the secretary, Mr. 
Baur, for his kind 
cooperation and ad- 
vice in many 
things; also Mr. 
Vesey, our worthy 
vice-president, for 
his untiring efforts 
in leading on the 
preliminary work of 
this meeting and 



20 



The Florists^ Review 



Fedruakt 1, 1917. 




A. F. 

liutil ,1:11111^' thf i\fliili- Ml Ti'liiii;i!y 
I. wi'i.i- III .-liaiL;!'' Ill' 111!' lii.|i:iii:i Stiiti' 

rini-ivt-' Assnii.'it iiili. ll|i' ufrh-i'l- lit' 
.\ liirli .-lie :is follnw ~: 

l'i.'<i.l. lit — \V. .1. \'.--'\, .li.. I'ort 
\\":i\K.'. 

I'l 1-1 ■, \<-r |ili'-iili|il 1 I W ill 1 '■(■it rl 
i:::iiili. I iii| III ii;i|M i! i -. 

Si.-ii),.l \ l.-c proi'li'iit 'riitiiilm (_■ l»iir 
Ml I', l.a l'a\('ttr. 

SccM tar\' — <). i;. Si.'inlxaiiip. linliaii- 
apnli-. 

■|'iia-iii'T II. 1.. \N H'Liaii'l. I iiiliaii 
a p()li<. 

Till' A. < '. S. \vas llir lirsl ni' ili-' t ia.|i' 
-uri.tic< In ailiijit Iln' |iiai-liii> 111' I lii-inu 
It- liiiTtilii: \\\\\i a liainiiii'l \'i>v whi.-li 
.■arli ii.i'iiiiifr imys hi- ^'a ii 1 'h-Im ' . 

SECRETARY'S REPORT. 

I h, ],.\\u,\ ill'.- i- th.' Vl-ll -r .-■■■' r.lniv \ V. 
1 '\'.ii\.y. ]. :■•■-. iili-l III till Aim rn;iii < ,i nui I i..;i ^-^i 
.■,.-lv .-It It- iiici'tiii-' at Iii'li.ii.Jl-'ii-- .l;iii'i:iiv ■'.! 

r.MT/! 

iMiiln:,' tlio last 1\\rl\i' niniilli^ tlir 
siTictai v"s (iflice lia- lifcii uimsually 
lius\-. With our iiaitirijiatii.ii in tly 
Natiiinal Flnwcr Shnw in I 'hila(ifl|ilii.'i 
1a>t -March ami l!ir snlii-itinu nf I'uiuls 
ill aiil dl' Mi-> Anna .laixi^, tiicri' lia^ 
luM'ii iiiurli extra wdik an.l -uiiic a'.ili 

Tinlial i'V|ii'll-c. 'I'hr rn-i'i | 't -. hu\\r\cr. 
)ia\i' al-(i iiicroa^'''! -uiinu liat . tlmu^h 
iKit i{uite .'■() imicli a< Ihr cxih'Iisc. sn 
that at tlie cinl oi tlii- li-ral year \v(> 
liini (lursolvcs ^vitll sumcw hat less ens): 
111 tho (Tcnoral fund than a \rar :\<^o, but 
>t ill ill good conditimi. 

Financial Statement. 

During the last year the secretary's 
fift'ieo lias received: 



J. Baur. 

( iii-iiat on So( i My.) 



DlK' 



rjiMMi 



Advertising.' . 

M l-'iil:illi'iiil- 
MlilillT-' (I.IV 



:;ci.85 

m.nri 
i:i».(i(i 



i ..!:il Si r.MI.'.MI 

All lit' wliirh \\;i^ tiiriH'il u\'er to the 

I I rainier and hi- rec-ei|it taken therefor. 
The secretary's and treasurer's books 

Will' rliiMd\e(| ii\cr hy a |iiililic aiiditiir 
and riMiiid ciirrcct. All bill- air being 
Mift iiriini|itly and all aci-niints due the 
-diifty arc bciii:; cnllccted without loss. 
W'c aic I'lc.ascd to note that twenty-six 
pages n1' ad\crti-ing s])ace in thi< year'< 
I iieiii iuiii scli(>diiic wcri' taken by niir 
ineiiiliers Mild I'rieiiiis. ^^'e t'etd that eur 
iiienibers shrmld make .an cfVort te j-at 
iiiiii/c these ad \'er1 i^ei-; as iiiucli as 
|iii->ibh\ ill nrdei tn make it Wdltll their 
■\liile til U-e the-e paLies a- all ;|i|\ci'ii<- 

I I I i,r 1 1 1 1 ■ d i 1 1 n I . 

Membership Decreasing. 

'Ihe line I !e|,ai1 iiieiit lli.'it gi\('s yctir 
-ecret;ii\- mipie cuiiccrn than any other 
I- the nicniliei-hi|i li^t. During th(^ last 
\ear 'We ha\e taken in t'orty-five new 
members and icin-t.ated six; yet, in spili' 
iif this unusual number ni' additions, 
\v(^ are nnw Ihirteen niemliers behind 
la-t re|Mirt. 'J'he list ii<i\v stands ;it '■'■]- 
aiiiiii:il mciiiliers .and t\v(d\(,' life mem 
bef'-, iiial'.iii^ a tdtal el' .'iL'b 

nuiiii;: the Near we li,a\e lust Alliert 
lj(i|ier. wliii died .M.andi 1; Win. i". 
Kastiii^T. who died .Iiine If); Thos. ('. 
.bi\-, who died Niixcmlier Id. and W. \]. 
Kroesi hell, who died November L'.'l. All 
of thi^^e men were fa\or,ably known to 
most of \(iu and will be missed at our 
convent ions. 

Wo have 217 members in good stand- 



ing in the Society of American Florists 
and therefore continue to be represented 
on its board of directors. Our present 
president, .Mr. Aniniaiin, was selected to 
that jiosition, to servo during the year 
lit 17. 

New 'Varieties. 

Since the last meeting, \\c liave re 
cei\iMi se\en new \arieties for registra 
lion. Fourteen others were sent ever 
liy the i'erpetual Flowering Carnation 
Societ.\' of I'jigland. 

A sjiecial silver medal was struck t(» 
commeinoiate the society's twenty-lifth 
.\t'ar and was awarded to each winner of 
.a iirst ]>reniiiim in the carnation section 
.at the National Flower Show in i'hila 
delphi.a last March. Those who received 
the miMlal are S. .1. Coddard, K. G. Hill 
» 'o., Stiaiford Flower Farms, J. "\V. I\Ii 
nott < o., !•:. F. Lieker, Cottage Gardens 
( 'o., A. A. I'emltroke, Strouts, AVm. 
Kleiiih(dnz, W. D. F^lllis, Win. Graham, 
Mrs. Will. Austin, A. Harvey A; Sons, 
I'ounli'ss llulalia :uid W. K. Fenk, tlf 
teen in all. 

This society tiudi an active part in 
the .National FU>wer Show in I'liiladel 
pliia last .March. .Not only did we j)re 
pare the ]ireiiiiuin sidiedule and the rule- 
tor staging the carnation section of the 
show, but members of this society con 
trilnited .-r.'ib") toward jiaying the jirenii 
iiiiis ol' this department, therehy I'edui- 
iiig the liability of the managemen* to 
that extent. 

Changes in Premium.s. 

liaily in the yi'ar the secretary, by 
direction of the Itoaril of director.-, 
s(dicited 1'mids from the members for 
the .MotluTs' I'ay fund whiidi was be- 
ing raised by the Society of American 
Florists, for the purpose of assisting 
.\li-s darxis in ]iroinotiiig that <la.V. As 
a result, ^]')[ was raiscil and sent to 
Sen-ettiry N'ouiig. 

The board of directors ludd the cus- 
tom.aiy post con\eiition meeting Janu- 
ary L'7, in St. Fouis. A second meeting 
was held in I'hiladtdphia Manli 2n. in- 
stead of the usual midsummi'r meeting. 
.\t this mciding some (dianges were 
niaile in the iiri'iniums offered in most 
of the (lasses contained in the premium 
schedule for this year's exhibition. ]ii 
Section A, (lasses 1 to 11, the jiremiums 
were raised from .^10 and $() to .*lo and 
s^lo. In Section li, classes 12 to .">i>, 
the premiums were raised from .^5 and 
^:\ to ^^ and if'). In Section C onlv 
one iiremium, .*lit, is offered instead of 
.-^•i and ^b These changes have in- 
creased onr liability on jiremiums hy 
.•^L'l'.*. Fi\e disseminators ha\e again 
L;(Mier(Misly contributed the iireniiums in 
Sect ion < '. 

The identification badges you are 
wearing were ]iro\id(^d as a result of 
the action taken in the meeting .at St. 
Louis last year. They are tho most 
jiractical arti(de we were able to find 
for th(> ]iii'p()se. If tlie.v are satisfac- 
tory', we will continue to use tluMii. 

The arrangements for this meeting 
were left eiitir(d.v in the hands of our 
\ ice p!('sid(Mit, AV. J. Vesey, Jr.. and 
his committees sidocted from the Indi- 
ana S1at(^ F'lorists' Society. That 
tliev hav(! labored earnestly and liar- 
moiiiouslv you can sec bv the r(>sults 
accoinjdished. The retail men h.ave 
again come forward with a spbMidid 
demonstration of the carnation's ada]« 
tabilitv for decorative effects. Thev 
should be given credit and every en- 
couragement possible. 



Il'lBKUAUY ], 1917. 



The Florists' Review 



21 

=3 




fflcrmniEairiffl a annrjaniD a fflcnmimirDffl fflcmmiuin] 



THE PRESIDENT'S 

ANNUAL ADDRESS 



cunnmni] 



LumnniiD 



QHQIIDim 



ffl OIIIDinUD 





ot our ( rat't -w Im 



y prcsidiiiir oflii^er ol' this 
organization, that has so 
vastly advanced tlitj intor- 
osts not only of caiiiatioii 
culture, but floriculturo in 
jj;eneral, 1 deoni it indeed an 
honor to welcome you to 
this, the 1 wenty-sixtii annual nieetin;^ 
of the American Carnation Hociidy, in 
this lieautiful and centrally locati'd 
city ol' Indianaiiolis. 

It is not necessary for nie to ii']ieat 
at this time the history of this or^aiii 
zation. Sullicc it to say that 1 iCd 
m()r(! and more, as I j^row (dih'r, the 
touch of p;ood fejlowshii) that a iiici^t 
iuc; like this l)rini;s with it. 

Making Life Worth Living. 

Here wc comininult! in hrotherlv h,\c 
with fellow craftsmen from all oxn 
this fair laud of ]ieace and ]U()S|iii ity. 
IKre wc renew old acquaintances and 
make new ones. Now and then we mi>~ 
an old, familiar face; we ask the rea 
son, and find that ho has ])assed ou in 
the Gr(\at Beyond. As with the (dd \a 
riidies of our beloved carnations, wc 
miss them, but never fortrct them! It 
is these fond greetings and menmries 
that really make life worth living, 
after all. 

To the members 
are so diligently 
working to produt'e 
n e w varieties of 
merit, we are prob- 
ably moro indebted 
than we realize, 
for were it not for 
something new occa- 
sionally the public 
interest would s(,oii 
wane. Th(> Amer- 
ican p e o p 1 e a r e 
great ou fads, and, 
in order to keep up 
nn interest, new 
things of sjiecial 
merit ;ire always in 
<leniand. 

A Good Example. 

I dare say noth- 
ing lias popularized 
the r(]se so mu(di 
th<> last few years 
as ilic (ouiiiig on of 
so many now varie- 
Hes ol" merit, and 
tiie oii.i is not yet, 
Avhicli r am sure 
you will ])p p,,,!- 
vii:ced of in your 
visit to the ]•;'. (I. 
Hill Co. place at 
Kitdimond. A friend 
recently told nie it 
was worth a trip 
across the continent 
to sec the seedling 
roses there, so I 
went and I now tes- 
tify that the state- 
ment i.s true. Wo 
seo here what one 



■| lif lull lc\t ..r l|]c n.lcln-^^ I.I .1. 1'. Amiiijiiii 
prcsidi'iit (if till- Aincrli'.-m (':irM:itliiM Sm-ict.w cic 
liviTfil :it ihr loiivi-ridiiri at l]iiliMi]:i|inli~, .I:iniia]i 
.il, liilT. 



linn ran do iiv untiling elfurt in rose-, 
i ciiiitciid tiif same must, be done -in 
'■a mat ions in (uder to kt'('|i this tiowcr 
.■I'- p(i|iiil:ii' in tlir I'utiiic as it lias bccii 
111 till' pa>t. 

Is Something Lacking? 

Mindi, iinlecd, is being done aliu'ii; 
this line by ([iiit<' a few ot" oui- trusty 
old t'riend^, but wh.at seems just at this 
time to be larking in the new jini'lin- 
tioii ot' cariiat ions is that th(\\- lia\c not 
'■nougli merit to i'e|i!ac(> maii\- ot' th.' 
iildei \aiieties. Kilher they do not ]>\i< 
diii-e enough to lie profitably grown a^ 
-^tandai'ds, or the ([iiality is not good 
enough to (■oinmand the extr.a pii •■• a 
l'anc\- should. I'.ul all good thing- 
eiiiin' to those who wait; so let us In- 
I'atieut and I am sure wc shall ^ooii br 
rewarded. 

I ha\'e but a few >ugge>tion< to nl)\'y 
at this titiu'. Oiu' iiM-onimeudat ion 1 
would (dfer is that the number ot 
lilooms iieres<aiy for a ]irelimiii;iiv ccr- 
tilii-ate I'di- the Doiiiei- memorial iiu'-dal 
be rhailLjed t'ldlll fit't,\- to t w r n t \' fi \-e. 
It ha- been su^gestcil that maii>- times 
it i- haul to get lifty good bbxuns from 




J. F. Ammann. 

O'lvsiileni AiiiiMiran CaiMali.in .Society.) 



n new \;iric'l\ wiirri nut -n ni;ni\' plants 
arc gidwij, 

\\ '■ li;i\i' an evergrow in g ilcniaiid for 
till' siH-iety's rmiperation with local 
lliiwer ^liiiw^; wliirli 1 am sure we eae 
not al'idid til JLinnii'. .\ t the iiieeting of 
the Imaid III' iliri'itiirs in <'li'\i'laiid Xn 
\ ember li'. ]|il.",, ;i motion was passcii 
to the etl'nt tli.it the board ii'i-oinmeml 
to the i-iin \ I'lit ion t'ollowiim' in .lanuar\ 
'hat the A. ( '. .-;. lend its rui.j.i'i-a t ion In 

loral llower shows. p!'o\i,|rd tin- ^I'licd 

ule. the , indices nnd the ninlcrw lit i ng ot' 
said show bi' approved bv the prc-^ident 
and s(^cret;i ry nt' t his smiet \'. 

To Encourage Exhibitors. 

1 t.aki^ it tli;it the inti-nti'm was tu 
!ia\e the society otVer its ii<ii,'ii midai- 
and certilieates. However. thi~ matter 
iii'N'er r.anie before the regnlai- .lanuar\- 
niei'ting ot' the soeietx-. owin^', [ "•uess. 
to an oversight. I t'erl it is ol' surh im 

|ioitanre that I \\oulil n mmend that 

at this meeting the (dheers be autiior 
ized to carry out the intent nf this reso- 
lution, or that at least som.' action ]),■ 
taken toward such coi;|iei;it imi. I'or tlu' 

more we can increase t! \hibits oi' 

carnati(uis the more we cnn poimlariz.' 
the tlowers. 

' would I eioinineud. .-iNn. tl,;ii (]),. 

-ccii'tary be authori/ed tn place .an ad- 
\erti-emi'nt in i ach 
of the tradi^ paper- 
when the pii'miiiTi: 
schedule is reiulv. 
'•ailing attention to 
the fact that pre 
mium li.sts are to be 
had for the applica- 
tion, and aslving 
those ^\ ho are not 
member- to incbidc 
the membi'i-.-hip fee. 
so as to 1,,' eligilde 
to exhibit. 

Words of Thanks. 

r brlie\,. - ■: ,. h 
l'ulilicit\- will not 
only help !i< fn get 
m o r e ("xiiiliiturs. 
but a I -I I ]ii'\\' nii'in- 
ber<. ' )ll beii.i; i' or' 
the -ociefy I want 

j to e\tel.,i ] |,;i.'i I.., tn 

I the tr;i.l.' pie-s for 
the \a-t ;iii;iiu!it of 
fr(^' piiMicit\- L;:veu 
the carnat inn w hen- 
e V e r o|ipoit unity 
presented it'-^eli'. 

In closing [ want 
to heartilv thank 
the st'ci'etarv, \[v, 
P>aur, ifi- his Icin^! 
coiipcrat inn and ad- 
vice in 111 a n v 
things; .also .\rr. 
Vesey, our worthy 
vice-president, for 
his untiring efforts 
in leading on tho 
preliminary work of 
this meeting and 



22 



The Florists^ Review 



FBEnuAUY 1, 1917. 



show. To the local committees, ami es- 
pecially to the exliil)itors, I feel (leei)ly 
grateful for their hearty cooperation in 
helping to brinj;; about this creditable 
show. To the members of this society 
I feel much indebted for tlie honor con- 
ferred upon me in my unanimous elec- 
tion as your ])resident. I assure you, 
gentlemen, it will ever bring to nie fond 
memories of your friondsliij) in years to 
come, and my good wishes and praj'ers 
will be Avitli vou alwavs. 




TREASURER'S REPORT. 

,.,,, , „ . , ., , , SOME SEASONABLE NOTES. 

[ I hp followiiiK IS a siiinmary of the rciiort of 

F. E. Dorncr, treasurer of the Ainericiin ("jiriiii- 

tion Society, presented to tiK' coiiviMitioii tit t>^jj4„„ ri„«o.„j.,.vio 

iiuiianapoiis, .Taiiuary 31. i!»i7.i Bedding Oeramums. 

The society this year had trausnc- Grow the fall-propagated geraniums 

tions in four funds, as follows: ,.o(,i and maintain a dry atmosphere. 

(JKNEKAii FIND. Space the i)lants apart from time to 

Iteceipts: , , .^ . t j. i ii i. i i 

Cash on hand .Tan. -(•. iitic, * sss C'.t time, lu Order to keep them stocky an<l 

Cash received i.isiviu at the Same time reduce the number of 

Tot,,i ",$L' 021.(58 ilecaying leaves. Give plenty of fresh 

nisinirsements: ' ' air Oil all ])ossible occasions. Do anv 

«^amJ"n\;and-.,an:-2o:::::;:::;;;:;;*'s?;;:!],l '.ecessary potting before the plants be- 

come too matted with roots. If they 

''""*"' SJ.**:;!.*!:^ ^ret into this condition, be sure to use 

Keeeii.ts: '''''^•^''^^"'•^ •">■'' *•"' ■'^" a pointed stick and scratch the ball a 

Balance .Tan. L'o. lido .<;j,f>j."..:u little in order to loosen the roots before 

Interest .Ian, 1, 1!»17 1_J"'!:''! ]K)tting. Never pot geraniums, or for 

Total $L',7;u.:i.". that matter any other plants, while 

pisi.ursements: ^) ^ ]i gre'drv. You want plants 

Interest, to »,'<'iieral fund .> l(l(i.()4 , . , .,, ■, " , , • • ^ i .u 

Balance invested at 4 i>er (.■111 2.<iL'."..8i which Will make a short -.-jointcd, tirm 

,^ ^ , .. ,~z:,7Z. and stockv growth, and in order to secure 

Total .>j. i.M.:i.i ., •, i!ii.i. £ I 

wmsFAt MEMOuiAh Fi.NU. ^^"^ '"' carcful iiot to use any fresh 

Heeeipts: niaiiuic ill the soil. If you can got 

Balance .Tan. ^'>. ii»i«"' *' •"'^.'HVi i^'^''^" "l'^' ^'^^'l ]>"lverized inanuro, sucli 

Interest .Tan. 1, 1SM7 40.4.S . , , . i ,' /. .i ■, j.j. c 

as IS obtainable iroin the bottom ot 

, .'J""f"' $l.04i.'.4!» an old hotbed, and use one-fourth of 

DislMirsenienfs: ii • j. i.i j; ii i? i -j. -n 
For 1!>17 ni(d;il !< 4il.(Mi this to tlirOC-IOUrths ot loaiU, it Will ail- 
Balance iiiv.stcd at 4 iMT .eat i.(i(ij.4!i swor wcll. Add a dasli of fine bone to 

'i„,;ii ^'i!l.04i.'.4it it and jiot firmly. If you ])ot loosely 

.MOTllKUs' HAY KIND. Iho ]dants will make a softer growth. 

Cash -^ 1.M.II0 ] I' ^.|,,, liapiii'ii to grow mushrooins, the 

I'ald til .lohii V<i\int;. se.ielar.v. tor Aiim.i ,. ' ' , , , i i -ii 

.Tarvis Fund 1."p|.(HI niMlHire IfOIll Mil old lllllshfOOItl bed Will 




/v 



Fred E. Dorner. 

Treasiirei .\iiieiicaii ( aiiiatioii Society.' 



be found just the thing for geraniums. 
Of course you ])ropagated geraniums 
heavily in the fall, but you may wish 
to increase your stock. If so, take Ihe 
tops from the strongest plants, pot 
singly in small pots in sandy loam and 
stand them where they can get a little 
bottom heat. Water well at first, but 
more sparingly later, until the cuttings 
are rooted. Such cuttings can go in 
for the next month or more and will 
make nice 3-incli pot stock for late 
spring sales, but of course will not pro- 
duce as large plants as are obtained 
from fall cuttings. When you have 
taken the cuttings, let the plants run 
somewhat dry for a few days until they 
break away again; then water more 
freely. Throw away any diseased 
])laiits, and if a batch of them shows 
round blotches on the foliage, watch 
them carefully. This trouble is quite 
l)rovalent at this season. It is a safe 
plan to spray with Fungine or Bordeaux 
mixture as soon as it appears. The. 
trouble is most likely to appear on 
]dants which are grown Avarni and which 
have become soft in a too moist atmos- 
phere. Keep water off the foliage all 
you can and see that debris is not 
thrown lielow the benches. 

Standard Geraniums. 

A correspondent asks how he can 
produce standard or tree geraniums. It 
takes rather longer to grow these than 
ordinary bedding jdants and, of course, 
a good price must be got for them. Se- 
lect vigorous young plants which have 
not been pinched. Kub off all side 
shoots. Use a stake for each plant, to 
keep the stems as straight as possible. 
Pinch off all flowers and all side shoots 
as thoy appear and pot on as it be- 
comes necessary. When the ])lants have 
leaclu'd the heiglit desired, wliicli should 
be from eighteen to thirty inches, pinch 
out the top and it will break out in 
several places. The new shoots, in turn, 
will need ]>inching from time to time 
until you build u]* a good head. Be 
sure to use a good stake in each ]>ot, 
to hold the stems and heads securely. 
The stake should rise a little above the 
point where the head starts to branch. 
You will have nice standards by fall, 
and if kept soiiicwlint dry over winter 
they ought to command an excellent 
price the next season. 

In addition to geraniums, standards 
of fuchsia.s, lautanas, hydrangeas, helio- 
tropes, marguerites, in the white varie- 
ties, and otlier plants may be grown 
in the same way. (irown in this way, 
such plants prove to be attractive fea- 
tures at exhibitions and in store win- 
flows. They nr(< also fine for dotting at 
intervals in flower bcijs, with lower- 
growing jilants Ixdow them. 

Winter-flowering Geraniums. 

Any time from now until March 1 is 
a suitable time to ttike cuttings of gera- 
niums wanted for winter blooming. Of 



February 1, 1917. 



The Florists' Review 



23 



course it is possible to propagate even 
as late as May 1 and still have plants 
in 4-inch pots for Thanksgiving or 
Christmas trade. Such plants, however, 
are rather too small. Propagated now, 
they will flower in 6-inch pots, and if 
kept potted on, given one or t"wo neces- 
sary pinches and grown under glass 
through the summer, such plants should 
carry for the holidays anywhere from 
six to fifteen open trusses of flowers 
each, and there will be no trouble in 
selling them. Singles are more florif- 
erous in winter than doubles and are 
best for home trade, but for shipping 
it will be necessary to grow semi-dou- 
bles and doubles. Of course the bright 
colors are what people will mostly buy, 
but try a few of the apricot or salmon- 
orange tints in addition. 

Scented Geraniums. 

Every garden should contain some 
scented plants; in fact, some gardens 
are now being planted with nothing but 
plants with scented leaves or flowers. 
Scented geraniums and lemon verbenas 
continue to retain their popularity in 
this field. The more robust-growing 
scented geraniums are of easy propaga- 
tion and make sizable plants more rap- 
idly than the ordinary bedding ones. 
If you have fewer plants than you think 
you can sell, take more cuttings now. 
Practically every cutting should root 
and all will make nice, bushy plants in 
4-ineh pots before the sales of bedding 
plants start. 

GERANIUMS WILL NOT FLOWER. 

I am sending you another diseased 
geranium, with the hope that it will 
not be frozen in transit. The foliage 
of the plant, as you will notice, is puck- 
ored. I have about 100 plants in 4- 
inch pots. They are thrifty as to growth, 
but I have been informed that they 
will not bloom. Do you think my in- 
formant is correct? Of course, if the 
plants cannot bloom I want to throw 
them out. Buchner seems to be the only 
variety in this diseased condition. 

II. M. M.— 111. 

The geranium plant came through in 
good condition. The leaves were much 
jiuekered, as you say. This is really a 
disease, but I do not know its name. 
It is a fact that plants with such foli- 
age, while they will bloom a little, are 
quite unsatisfactory, and you would be 
well advised in throwing them away. 
I would be particular not to propagate 
from anv plants thus affected. 

C. W. 

GERANIUMS FOR MEMORIAL. 

I have one batch of geraniums which 
I think liavc grown too high. They 
were started in October and now are in 
2V2-inch pots and arc about six inches 
high. I have nipped the tips and they 
show signs of sprouting. Would it be 
best to let tliem continue as they are, 
or shall I cut them off and reroot them? 
The variety is red, like Helen Michell. 
^ly other geraniums are in 2y^-u\ch pots 
and have about filled the pots with 
roots. Shall I shift them to 3-inch pots 
now, or wait another month? I want 
thoni in 4-in('h pots for Decoration dav. 
R. E.— O." 

Tou should have allowed the gera- 
niums to grow sufficiently large so that 
you could secure a cutting from each, 
instoa<l of ])in<hing the tops out. It is 
not wise to jiot nt the same time as 




A Big Design for a Town Marshal's Funeral. 



pinching is done, but as your plants are 
breaking you should pot them at onco 
in 3-inch pots. They can stand in their 
pots about six weeks; then move them 
into 4-inch pots. Always shift the 
plants before the balls become too 
matted with roots. C. W. 



BLUECOAT'S STAR IN FLOWERS. 

The ambitious retailer or designer 
who is inclined to favor the ancient saw 
that "a man should 'do' a thing in his 
brain before lie does it with his hands," 
will find a moment 's food for thought in 
the idea depicted in the accompanying 
illustration. The design represented 
typifies a comparatively new notion in 
funeral work, that of searching out 
some event or circumstance in the life 
of the decedent and embodying it as 
tlie dominant feature of the design, by 
floral representation. 

For instance, at the funeral of a sol- 
dier lad who was killed while serving his 
country on the Mexican border the jirin- 
cipal floral tribute was a replica in flow- 
ers of the Ignited States flag; at tlic 
grave of a noted violinist there was an 
elaborate pedestal of flowers support- 
ing a "violin" of flowers. The design 
in the illustration was a tribute to the 
police chief of Covington, O., who was 
killed by a man resisting arrest. The 
marshal had served his community for 
seventeen years and was unusually well 
liked for an officer of the law. 

Petersime & Son, of Covington, who 
designed this piece for the town's busi- 
ness men, employed the marshal's badge 
or star as the motif of the decoration. 
The arrangement was eleven feet in cir- 
cumference. Tlie "star" was made of 
white carnations, white roses, Easter 



lilies and white sweet peas. The circle 
was formed with pink carnations and 
roses, rubrum lilies, pink sweet peas and 
Easter lilies. Boxwood and plumosus 
were used for the green backing. 

Of course, there are rewards for those 
who now and then rebel against the r cn- 
ventional arrangements in funeral de- 
signs. A little brains added to the de- 
signer's art is bound to please the man 
who pays the bills and in most cases 
makes possible a substantial charge for 
"knowledge of the business." 



HARDY FLOWERS FOR DESIGNS. 

Kindly advise me what hardy plants 
suitable for design work would be prof- 
itable to grow. I am often short of 
stock in the summer. 

H. E. II.— W. Va. 



The following plants would prove use- 
ful to you: Physostegia Virginiana and 
P. Virginiana alba; Lathyrus latifolius 
rink Beauty and "White Pearl, both 
climbing varieties; Clematis recta fl. pi.; 
Euphorbia corollata; Gypsophila panicu- 
lata and the double form, flore pleno; 
Chrysanthemum maximum, or Shasta 
daisies. King Edward VII and Mrs. C. 
Daniels; Boltonia latisquama and as- 
teroides; Pyrthrum uliginosum; Aster 
umbellatus. White Queen, Perry's Pink 
and Dainty; Artemisia lactiflora; Del- 
pliinium Chinense and D. Chinense 
album; Phlox Elizabeth CampbeH, F. G. 
Von Lass])urg and Le Cvgne. 

^ C. W. 

St. Paul, Minn.— The building occu- 
pied by A. W. Lenike, at TOO West Sixth 
street, is to be wrecked to make room 
for a larger structure. 



vX 



24 



The Rorists' Review 



Fbbbuary 1. 1917. 



L^tiS^tyWI^tiSfJl^Jl^t^liS^l^l^l^l^^ 



ST. VALENTINE'S DAY 



">liTT^ifrffirKffrffl?nffirHB^^ 



A TEADE-MADE FLOWER DAY. 



The Work of Four Years. 

Four years is a long while to wait 
for anything, but in the history of a 
trade four years is only a brief time for 
the creation, development and firm es- 
tablishing of another special flower day. 
Those who were in the trade in 1912 
will recall that five years ago St. Val- 
entine's day was without significance 
for florists. 

Indeed, the development of St. Valen- 
tine's day ig one of the best examples 
of what florists can do for themselves, 
once they have their attention called to 
the opportunity. 

How It Started. 

Read up on St. Valentine's day and 
you will find its origin lost in the mists 
of antiquity. Since time immemorial it 
has been the day on which brave men 
have sent fair ladies fond tokens. But 
it was not until 1913 that any attempt 
was made to cause the use of fiowers as 
valentines. January 30, 1913, The Re- 
view published a St. Valentine's Day 
Number in which it was conspicuously 
stated: 

The purpose of this iune it to get 10,000 florists 
each to do at least a little something to attract 
the attention of the public to the appropriateness 
of flowers for use as valentines. 

That was the real beginning of St. 
Valentine's day from a florists' flower 
selling point of view. 

That issue of The Review pointed out 
an opportunity — and showed how to 
take advantage of it. It illustrated the 
methods by which the few retailers who 
had tried to do something with the day 
had made two dollars come in where 
only one dollar came in before, and it 



showed pictures of the corsage bouquets 
and packages that seemed likely to be 
the readiest sellers. 

Everybody Doing It Now. 

Perhaps that 1913 St. Valentine's 
Number of The Review fell short of its 
purpose to get 10,000 florists to push 
flowers for use as valentines, but the 
results really were surprising. Liter- 
ally thousands took up the work and 
the way St. Valentine's day sales 
jumped is matter of common knowledge. 

After only four years we find every- 
body advertising flowers for St. Valen- 
tine's day. It has paid splendidly, for 
it has been demonstrated that, as The 
Review said in its first St. Valentine's 
Day Number, "all the public needs is 
the suggestion to send flowers." 

Although the St. Valentine's day de- 
mand for flowers is based on an ancient 
custom, it is a special flower day of 
the trade's own making; it affords a 
splendid illustration of the results that 
follow united effort. It has come to 
pass because a large number of individ- 
uals each has done and is "doing his 
bit" for his own individual good and 
the sum of the effort makes a push that 
makes the flower business boom. 



ADS AND WINDOWS. 



The Bright Displays. 

If any florist neglects to decorate his 
window with a special display for St. 
Valentine's day he will pass up one of 
the best chances of the season, for it 
pays, pays directly, pays tangibly and 
immediately. Also, it is easy, for hearts 
and flowers go together and with the 



red heart in the window the message 
is easy to get across. 

The St. Valentine's window decora- 
tion shown on page 25 is to give an 
idea capable of many variations. This 
was the 1916 window of the Spokane 
Florist Co., of Spokane, Wash., and it 
paid handsomely for the not great spe- 
cial effort and the small extra expense 
involved. The suggestion, "Let your 
valentine be flowers," should not be 
omitted. 

Newspaper Ads. 

At Washington, D. C, and in many 
other cities, it has proved splendidly 
effective for the florists to get together 
on a large newspaper advertisement 
such as the one reproduced on page 27. 
This is shown, not as an example of 
good copy, for it might be improved, 
but as an illustration of a method whicli 
has brought splendid results at small 
cost to the individual. It is worth do- 
ing in any town where there are three 
or more florists willing to work together 
for the general good of the business. 

Of individual advertising there is no 
end — on the whole it is the best means 
of increasing the sales of flowers. In 
any town where the florists use news- 
paper space to an extent that will make 
an impression on the public the flower 
business is sure to be in a healthy con- 
dition. Intelligently used, individual 
advertising is the greatest power thus 
far discovered for the improvement of 
business. But usually the cost of the 
individual St. Valentine's day adver- 
tisement is much greater than would 
be the individual subscription to a co- 
operative flower advertisement. In the 
original the Fleischman advertisement 
reproduced on page 28 was over four- 
teen inches long and three columns 
wide; it measured 600 agate lines in 
a paper that charges 30 cents to 40 
cents per line. It probably cost the 
florist $200 and an equal space will cost 
more this year, for advertising rates, 
like everything else, have gone up in 
the newspapers that were not charging 




Tulips in Heart-shapied Hamper,' Front and Back View, for St. Valentine's Day. 



FSBBUAKY 1, 1917. 



The Florists' Review 



25 




A St. Valentine's Day Window Display that Paid a Spokane Florist Well Last Year. 



too much under before-the-war condi- 
tions. 

Another Way. 

The Chicago Florists' Club has de- 
veloped another cooperative plan this 
season, involving the use of red hoart- 
shaped stickers which are being sold to 
a large number of florists at about cost 
by a committee of the club. The idea 
is to use them on parcels, on letters, 
bills and everything else that goes out 
the few days before St. Valentine 's day. 
It is a plan that lets every florist partic- 
ipate in the good work, as 100 stickers 
can be had for 75 cents. 



what kinds and how much fertilizer 
should be applied per acre on the aver- 
age New England soil, at the time of 
seed sowing and at transplanting time! 
It would be quite difficult for me to 
procure manure. 

Of the following, state which are the 
most suitable and which are peculiar in 
the germination of their seeds: Achil- 
leas, dianthus, digitalis, geums, alyssunis, 
gailiardias, gypsophilas, aquilcgias, 
hibiscus, hollyhocks, campanulas, lu- 
pinus, lychnis, centaureas, pentstemons, 
physostegias, chrysanthemums, platyco- 
dons, delphiniums, tritomas, stokesias, 
sweet Williams, poppies, pyrethrums. 

F. A. H.— Mass. 



PERENNIALS FROM SEED. 

Next spring I intend to sow a quan- 
tity of perennial seeds, and would like 
some advice from you. How many 
plants can be grown by one man with 
hired help at the transplanting time? 
Can I sow enough perennial seeds to 
produce 600,000 plants and sell them 
the next spring through advertisements 
in The Eeview? Can one reasonably 
expect to sell that many? Can the seed 
be sown out in the field and later trans- 
planted and mulched for winter? Of 
course no plants could be sold during 
the frozen up time, when other nurseries 
sell. 

Would it be better to give the plants 
pot culture? I am afraid that if I 
grow them in pots and winter them in 
frames I could not have many, as I 
have a frame only ninety feet long. If 
I could give the plants field culture, 



It would be a large contract to raise, 
transplant and disi)ose of as many as 
600,000 hardy plants in a season. If 
you included pansies, double daisies and 
forget-me-nots, it would be more nearly 
possible. These three popular spring 
and summer-blooming plants would all 
winter outdoors with you, provided you 
have a gentle slope on your land, which 
would ensure good drainage and re- 
move any possibility of water standing 
about the plants. These plants should 
be sown from July 20 to August 5, and 
they could be started advantageously 
in your coldframe where necessary 
water and shade could bo afforded to 
start them. 

One man undoubtedly could handle a 
large number of plants, but I doubt if 
he could care for 600,000 properly. The 
Review sells many millions of plants 



annually, and if any paper could sell 
your plants The Review certainly could. 
Plants in pots have some advantages. 
It requires a lot of labor to do the need- 
ful potting, and watering is no incon- 
siderable factor, but it is possible to 
dispose of this stock long after the 
sales season for field-grown plants has 
ended. The paper pots offered by several 
concerns have many advantages over 
the earthenware ones. If you never 
have grown any of this class of plants 
before, I would counsel you not to 
plunge too heavily the first season. 
Grow moderate quantities. Find out 
what people really will buj', then go 
ahead on a larger scale the following 
season. 

While all the plants you name can 
be sown outdoors, I would prefer to 
start them in a coldframe, where they 
could get bettor attention. If you only 
had a greenhouse it would pay to start 
a number of seeds now. Failing this, 
I would sow the majority in June. The 
following come up quickly and are easy 
of culture: Dianthus, digitalis, gail- 
iardias, gypsophilas, hollyhocks, hibis- 
cus, campanulas, especially C. Medium; 
lupines, centaureas, geums, clirysantho- 
mums, especially the Shasta daisy sec- 
tion; alyssums, delphiniums, sweet Wil- 
liams, which are a form of dianthus; 
poppies and pyrethrums. These follow- 
ing varieties come a little more slowly: 
Tritomas, stokesias, aquilegias, physos- 
tegias and platycodons. None of these, 
however, are difficult subjects to start. 
Care has to be taken to select suitable 
weather for transplanting, and there 



24 



The Florists^ Review 



Fbbkuary 1, 1917. 



^KajHss»3 5§y{]Miiym^^MMiMi^^ 



ST. VALENTINE'S DAY 



"ffi?^fl^f^>i?^fff^l^f^i??^l?f^ltntM^^ 



A TRADE MADE FLOWER DAY. 



The Work of Four Years. 

Four ycais is a Idii^ while to \\:iit 
lor anytliiii^. l)ut in tlie liisloiy ol' a 
trade lour vt ;trs in only a luicf tiino for 
Iho creation, (leveloj)nient and linn es- 
lablishinc,' of aiiotlior special ilowtM- day. 
Tliose who were in the trade in li)i2 
Avill recall that live years a^o St. \al- 
entine'a day was -without signilieanee 
for florists. 

Indeed, tlie development of St. Valen- 
tine's day is one of the best examples 
of ^vhat florists can do for themsidves, 
once they have their attention calleit to 
tlie opportunity. 

How It Started. 

Read up on St. Valentine's day and 
you will find its origin lost in the mists 
of antiquity. Since time iinmemorial it 
has been the day on whicli brave men 
have .sent fair ladies fond tokens. ]^ut 
it was not until lOi;'> that any attempt 
was made to cause 1h(> use of flowers as 
\alentincs. Januaiy ;j(i, J!)l.'5. The Re- 
view ])ublish(Ml a St. A'alentine '.s Day 
Numlx'i' in wl]i(di it was conspicuously 
stated: 

The purpose of this issue is to get 10,000 florists 
each to do at least a little something to attract 
the attention of the public to the appropriateness 
of flowers for use as valentines. 

That w;is the real beginning of St. 
Valentine's ilay from a llorists' tlow<M' 
selling jioint of view. 

That issue of The Rc\iew ])olnted out 
an opj>ortunity — and showed how to 
take advantage of it. Tt illustrate<l the 
methods by which the fi^v retailers who 
had tried to do something with the <la>' 
had made two dollars come in where 
only one dollar came in before, and it 



showed ]iictures of the corsage bouquets 
.•iml jiackages that seemed likely to be 
the readiest sellers. 

Everybody Doing It Now. 

I'eihajis that 191.'! St. A'alentine's 
Ninnber of The Review fidl short of its 
jiurpose to get 10.000 llorists to push 
llowers for use as \alentincs, but the 
r(»sults really were surprising. Liter- 
;iliy thousands took up the work and 
the way St. Valentine's day sales 
Jiimjied is matter of common knowledge. 

After only four years Ave find every- 
body advertising flowers for St. A'alen- 
tine's day. It has paid splendidly, for 
it has been demonstrated that, as The 
Review said in its first St. A'alentine's 
]^ay Number, "all the public needs is 
1h(> suggt'stion to send flowers."' 

Although the St. Valentine's day de- 
mand for flowers is based on an ancient 
custom, it is a si)ecial flower tlay of 
the trade's own making; it affords a 
sjilemiid ilhistration of the results that 
I'uliow unite(l elTort. It has come to 
jiass because a large number of indi'id- 
uals eacii lias done and is "doing his 
bit" for his own individual good and 
the sum of the effort makes a push that 
makes the flower business boom. 



ADS AND WINDOWS. 



The Bright Displays. 

If any florist neglects to decorate his 
window with a sjiecial display for St. 
X'alentine's day he will pass up one of 
the best chances of the season, for it 
pays, ]iays directly, pays tangibly and 
immcciiat(dy. Also, it is easy, for hearts 
and llowers go together and with the 



red heart in the window the message 
is easy to get across. 

The St. Valentine's window decora- 
tion shown on page 25 is to give an 
idea ca])abli' of many variations. 'J'his 
was the I'JKi window of the Spokane 
Florist Co., of Spokane, Wash., and it 
])aid liandsomely for the not great spe- 
cial effort and the small extra expense 
in\-oi\-ed. The suggestion, "Let your 



\aleiitine li 
omitted. 



lowers," should not bo 

Newspaper Ads. 

At Washington, I). C, and in many 
other cities, it has proved splendidly 
tdfectivc for the florists to get together 
on a large iicwsjiaper advertisement 
such as the one rejiroduced on jiage 27. 
This is shown, not as an example of 
good co])y, for it might be improved, 
but as an illustration of a method which 
has lirought splendid results at small 
cost to the individual. It is W'orth do 
ing in any town where there are three 
or more llorists willing to work together 
for the general good of the business. 

Of individual advertising there is no 
end — on the whole it is the best moans 
of increasing the sales of flowers. In 
any town where the florists use ncws- 
]»aper space to an extent that will make 
an impression on the public the flower 
business is sure to be in a healthy con- 
dition. Int(dligently used, individual 
advertising is the greatest power thus 
far discovered for the improvement of 
business. But usually the cost of the 
indi\idual St. Valentine's day adver- 
tisement is much greater than woubl 
Ite the individual subscription to a co- 
operatiAc flower athertisemcnt. In tin 
original the Fleischman advertisement 
lejuoduced on jiage 2S av;is over four- 
leeii inches long and three columns 
wide; it measured GOO agate lines in 
a jmper that charges T.O cents to 40 
cents ]ier line. It probably cost th(^ 
florist $200 and an equal space will cost 
more this year, for advertising rates, 
like everything else, have gone up in 
the newspajiers that were not charging 




Tulips in Heart-shaped Hamper,'^ Front and Back View, for St. Valentine's Day. 



FEIsaUAKY 1, 1017. 



The Florists' Review 



25 




A St. Valentine's Day Window Display that Paid a Spokane Florist Well Last Year. 



too miu'li under bol'orf-tlip wai- coiidi- 
tioiis. 

Another Way. 

The OliicatTO Florists' Chil> has de- 
\ I'lopod anotlicr oo(ijiorative plan this 
season, involving the usi; of rod hoart- 
sliapcd stickers which are heinrj sold to 
a large minibor of florists at about eost 
by a coniinitteo of the .dub. The idea 
is to use thcni on parc.ds, on letters, 
bills and everything cdsc that goes out 
tli(| few days before St. N'alcn tine's day. 
It is a jdan that lets e\ciy llorist partic- 
il'ate in the good work, as lOU sti(d>ers 
'•an be had for 75 eents. 



PERENNIALS FROM SEED. 

Next spring I inlcmi to sow a "piaii- 
tity ot perennial seeds, and wouM like 
some advice fi-din you. How inniu- 
jd.-ints can !■(> ;^roun i'y one man with 
iered lielp at the transplanting time.' 

''an I sow enough perennial s h to 

l>roduce OOO. 0(111 jilant-; and sell ihem 
Ihe^iiext spring throu-h ad\ ertisements 
in The Review.? ('an one reasonably 
expect to s(dl tii.at nianv .' ("an the «e(-'d 
be sown out in the h(dd ;nid later trans- 
planted ami muhdied for winter? Of 
course no plants could be sold during 
the frozen up time, when other nnr'^erie"^- 

sell. 

Would it be better to give the plant.s 
Jiot otdture.' I am afraid that if I 
grow them in pots and winter them in 
frames I could not have manv, as I 
have a frame only ninety find long. If 
T could give the plants field crdture, 



what kinds and how much ftMdilizer 
slioulcj be apjdied jier acre on the a'.'er 
age Xew J'higland soil, at the time ot' 
seed sowing and at transplanting time.' 
It would be (luite iliHi.ndt for me to 
procuic manure. 

Of tlu! following, state wlii.di are the 
most suitable ami whiidi are peculiar in 
the germination of theii' sects: A. hi! 
le.'is, dianthus, digitalis, geums, aly-sum-. 
uaillardias, gyjisophilas, aipiilegias. 
liiidscns, ludlyiio.dxs. campanulas. In- 
pinus, lychnis, centaureas, pentstemon^, 
physostegias. chrw-aiithemums, jilatyco 
dons, dtdphiniums, tritom.as, stokesias. 
:-\veet \villiams. poppies, pvrcdhrums. 

I'. A. 11.— ^la-s. 

Ir would be a lai'^e contract to rais.'. 
transplant and d;>pose of as iiiaiiv ;i~ 
'•"".""" har.lv pl.ant- in a season.' If 
vou in.duded pansies. .|oubl(> dairies anJ 
foi-et-men.ds it would be more ne;iil.\ 
po-sible. These, thr(M> jiopular spring 
and suminei- blooming ])]ants would all 
winter (Uit.loors with vou, jirov ided vou 
liave ;i -entle slope on' vnuv land, which 
would ensure good drainage and re- 
iiiose anv ]iossibilitv of water standing 
•'l""it the plants. Thes,. pl.ants should 
'"' soun fr(.m July L'O to August ',, and 
the\- could be stinted advantageouslv 
"1 vour coldframe where necessarv 
water .and shade c(Mdd be atTorded to 
start them. 

Olio man undoid)ted]v c(uild handle a 
large niunber of plants, but I doubt if 
he could care for noo,()00 properlv. Tlie 
Review sells many millions of ' plants 



annually, and if any ]iaper could s(dl 
your plants The Review certainly could. 
I'lants in jiots ha\"e some ad\antai'es. 
It rerpiires ;i lot of labor to do the need- 
ful potting, and watering is no incon- 
siflerable factor, but it is possible to 
disjiose of this stixdv long after the 
>ale< season for held grown jdants has 
elide. I. The paper jiots ofTered by several 
conceiii-- ha\f many advantages over 
the e;irt hen ware ones. If \'ou ne\-er 
h;i\e i^rewii an\' oi' this (dass of plants 

I'clole, I \\(Ulld counsel Voil IKit to 
pliniL^e ton he;(\ily the first s,.;|s;oi!. 

• irow nioder.ate qii.-mt it i.'s. I'iinl out 
\^hat pe(ipl(> i-eallv will bnv. then ^o 
^ilioad oil a largei- s,.,-,],. i|,,. f,,l|(,wiiiLr 
seasdn. 

^Vhile all tli(> pi;iiits y.iii name can 
be Miwii (.iitdiMUs. I wuiild picM'er Id 
st:iit them in ;i ci jld : i a ine. w her.^ the\' 

'Ollld get better alteiit iiiM. I r \ nil o|il\- 
h;id .a greenhouse it w.juid p.i \- to ^tart 
a iiiimlM'i- of seeds nuw . failing this-, 
I wdiild s,,\\ the majoiitv in .lime. The 
I'olhiw ine- enme u|i i|ui(dxl\- .and ;n-e easv 
of culture: ni.'intlius. digitalis, ^ai|- 
Ijirdias, eypsophilas. h.dlx heeks. hn.i-- 
cus, c;inip;inulas, es|,e,.lally C. Medium ; 
lupines, cent.aureas, e.Mim-. eh r\saut le - 
mums, especi.ally the .^hiist.a d;iisv s,.,-. 
tiou; alyssnms, didphiniiiiiis. ^wee't wil 
liams, whi(d! ;ire ,a form ni' di:iiithii~; 
I'oppios ;ind pyrethrums. Tiiese f,dlo\\ ■ 
iiiL^ varieties come a little mnie s|,,\\|\ : 
Tritomas. stokesias, aipii!i>ai;is. -[divsos 
tegias and platvcodons. None of these, 
however, are diflicult subjects to start! 
<'are has to be taken to select suitable 
wa'ather for transplanting, and there 



26 



The Florists^ Review 



Febkuaky 1, 1917. 



are some years when but few suitable 
days occur for this work. 

If you can secure barnyard manure, 
it is far superior as fertilizer for your 
plants. Broadcast this at the rate of 
eight to ten cords per acre. If you 
can use even a smaller amount of barn- 
yard manure, and supplement it with 
fertilizer, it will answer well. I would 



suggest applying 600 pounds of finely 
ground bone per acre. This would give 
both nitrogen and phosphoric acid. As 
high-grade forms of potash are at pres- 
ent quite expensive, I would use 1,000 
pounds of unleached wood ashes to help 
out on that end. It would take a large 
and special article to cover your ques- 
tions fullv. C. W. 



I 
€. 

i 



a^=3c 



3^=1C 



3C3C 



ac^c 



3C=C 



SEASONABLE ^ 
nr SUGGESTIONS 



3c=ac 



3C^3C 



3C3C 



3^=]C 



3C=3C 



a 



ft 

1 



Cyclamens. 



If you sowed seeds of cyclamens last 
August, as advised, your plants should 
now be growing well in flats and prob- 
ably a good many of them have at- 
tained sufficient size to be moved into 
3-inch pots. Use a light soil, consisting 
of equal parts of flaky leaf-mold and 
loam, with some sand added. After 
potting, place them in a temperature of 
55 degrees at night on a bench well up 
to the liglit. Encourage later ])lants to 
grow by frequently stirring the surface 
soil in the flats. Old plants which were 
late for Christmas can, if necessary, be 



held in a cold house for Easter. A tem- 
]ierature of 40 degrees at night will suf- 
fice for these. Cyclamens are popular 
plants, however, and there is a fairly 
steady call for them all through the 
winter. 

Genistas. 

About February 1 is a good time to 
house genista plants wanted in bloom 
at Easter. It is well to bring in a few 
of the plants from time to time. They 
are good sellers either at the green- 
house or store and are more quickly 
grown into salable plants than ericas, 
camellias, acacias and other hard- 




A Red Heart-shaped Hamper Containing a Colonial Bouquet. 



wooded plants. It must be confessed 
that genistas as house plants can scarce- 
ly be called a success. If allowed to 
become dry at the root or even if most 
carefully tended, they only stand a 
few days in the average steam-heated 
house. Still, a genista plant will cost 
no more than a dozen roses of good qual- 
ity and more frequently than not a sin- 
gle day will end the roses' usefulness. 

Asters. 

Last summer asters proved a sad 
failure over a large part of the country, 
owing to the excessive rainfalls in the 
early summer, and as a result prices 
ruled much higher than usual in the 
various flower markets. During the 
last year or two growers have in a num- 
ber of cases devoted houses to their 
culture and last season asters paid 
much better than chrysanthemums. 
When grown under glass, the plants are 
immune from the ailments affecting out- 
door stock and the flowers, of course, 
are not battered by rain storms. 4s a 
consequence indoor flowers bring a 
higher price than outdoor ones. For 
anyone who will have a vacant house 
just after Easter, aster growing can be 
safely recommended. Sow the seed 
now; transplant' the seedlings into flats 
and from these plant thejn out in the 
benches. A soil such as you would use 
for chrysanthemums will suit them. 
Sow an early variety; Queen of the 
Market is the best. White is the best 
selling color; next, pink and lavender. 
There is a small sale for other colors. 
If you plant an early variety your house 
will be cleared in time to sow a crop 
of sweet peas or to plant violets, snap- 
dragons or even carnations. 

Fuchsias. 

If you have a few old fuchsia plants 
which have been carried over winter in 
a semi-dormant state, place such stock 
in a warm liouse, spray freely and they 
will soon give quantities of nice, succu- 
lent cuttings, which will root readily in 
a cutting bench. Pot into 2i^-inch pots 
and later into 4-inch pots. One pinch- 
ing will be all tliey will need. Fuchsias 
lied out and do remarkably well in par- 
tial shade and are quite satisfactory fpr 
piazza work. Such varieties as Trail- 
ing Queen make wonderful basket 
jilants, flowering practically the whole 
su minor. Fuchsias should- not be grown 
ill a higher temperature than 50 degrees 
at night. Plants kejit over until a sec- 
coiid year and grown either as pyramids 
or stiiiidards make splendid stock for 
decorative jturposos, but are all too sel- 
dom seen. 

Stevias. 

The flowering season for stevias will 
soon be over and these notes will serve 
as a reminder not to throw away all 
your stock ]ilaiits. Keep a sufficient 
number for cuttings. Head these back 
and as soon as a nice lot of shoots have 
appeared place them in the propagat- 
ing bench. Later the tops can be taken 
from these cuttings and the old plants 
(-an be thrown away. Probably more 
dwarf than tall stevias arc grown. On 
the whole, I jirefer the tall variety, 
wliich has longer and better branched 
stems. 

Spiraeas for Easter. 

The white spira\as, or astilbes, force 
into flower more quickly than the pink 
ones. The old .Taponica comes in ear- 
lier than all others, but is not now 



Febuiahy 1, 1917. 



The Florists' Review 



27 




For St. Valentine's Day 
Give Flowers 

As the legend goes, St. Valentine's Day dates back to the 
time of Emperor Claudius of Rome, though probably the custom 
of making sentimental gifts on this day was stimulated by the 
following, from — 



Shkkespeare: lUmkt iv, 5 

"Tomorrow it St. VaUntine's Day 
ylll in the mornint ktlime, 
And I a maid at your window 
To be your f^alentine." 



I 




The Florists of Washington 

Make special preparations for this day. 

The expression of one's thoughts through presents of Flowers has 
greatly increased from year to year. Flowers breathe the very atmosphere 
of finer sentiment and add a true sense of the beautiful to the purpose 
of a gift. 

Dainty Bouquets of Cut Flowers, Artistic Baskets of Cut Flowers. 
Growing' Flowers and Ferns will b« fou()d at all Floral Shops at prices 
that will enable one and all to gratify their wishes in the sending of ap- 
propriate remembrances of — 

St. Valentine's Day, February 14ih 





JtAn inktitf, Oooi aap*y P. C 
Dmid aitnt, Otntt Park. Mi. 
Z. O. 9Uckiii9nt..etr. nth nd M Stt- 

7r.\W, Fktns 3707. noe. 

Koil. BottdUr A Seta, ittk and I 3lt. 
K. W. U. 718B. 

tirvtkwiek C. Bhg9i, KithourM Plact 
K. W. 



(Jeo. B. Coakt, ItOt Cmh. Avt. S. W 

Harik 994. 
Oeo. A. ComUf, 1X4 Wu. Act. H. W. 

Writ m 
Cdrkf^n Fljwtr Skop. 
D^pamt Flnwtr Skop, 7 DupoUt CwcU 

A W. S 41fi 
J. R Frtfuun, fil2 

2324. 



I\ SI. K. W. M. 



AUi B Gardtn, CnUr Mt'rktl. U 3167. 
Cmb Brot. Co., 1314 f SI. N. «. K. 

4!77-t7:8 4779 
lok% Cvlman. Ctnffrtat Utigkh. D. C. 
Slantty F Holtaitd, Ifllk and Cot. RmuI • 

JV. W Col. 4230. 
<7, L. Jfnk^nt * Smt. /«■., 8uilt<md, Vd. 

TM 5SFI4. 



W: W Kimrtil. 1131 I4tk SI. K. W. K. 

33ie. 

Barry f/tyi Oood Bope. D. C. 

W F. tlartkt * Co.. 733 14lk SI. .V. W 

M. 1953 
It. t. McCabt, Cnlrr Mtrkil. M 3373. 

Lrf XIatiin Co, 1114 B SI. K. W. K. 

7.1?*. 



6. A. r Oikirlrt, 1319 SI .V. W If. 

7417. 
S. S frnA^k Uttkan O) , LIU H SI. 

H. » , K 2ia, H. lU. 
Gto C. Kkifirj'SM I4lh 3f. .V. W. B. 

241* 
I. B SmaH i .'.mi, tnr , S t. cor. ISlk 

and H Sis. n. W. Jf. 138 
Uinry Will, Sttorr BiU, Md. Tol> SSFl. 



' >■_. „ -U . . ^ .^. T 



A Successful Co-operative St. Valentine's Day Advertisement Published in J 916 by the Florists of Washington, D. C. 



grown to tlic same extent as formerly, 
such varieties as Gladstone and astil- 
boides having displaced it. All these 
varieties should be started at once in 
a temperature of 60 degrees. They will 
need a good heat and an abundant water 
supply. Queen Alexandra and Peach 
Blossom are fine peach-pink sorts, which 
should also be started at once. They 
sell better than the wliite varieties, but 
do not force so rapidly or so well. For 
that reason many prefer to hold thorn 
until ]\remoriaI day for cutting. 



QUITCH GRASS IN LAWN. 

Enclosed you will find a piece of root 
of a weed that is covering the law?i in 
my charge. What is the best way to 
get rid of this? The lawn is newly 
made and evidently the man wlio did 
the grading did not pick nut any of this 
grass. I would like to know 'if tlierc 
is any way of getting rid of it without 
plowing the lawn, as there is about ten 
acres of it. A. D. L. — :Mass. 



This pestilent grass weed is botanic- 
ally known as Agropyron repens and 
cominrmly known as witch grass, quack 
grass, quitch grass, quick grass or 
twitch grass. If your lawn is full of 
it you cannot possibly clean it out with- 
out idowing and giving the weed thor- 
ough cultivation through the summer, 
raking off and Inirning all roots brought 
to the surface. You should be able to 
get rid of the grass by August, which is 
the best month in the year to seed down 
lawns in your state. This grass can 



also be subdued in great measure by 
growing a heavy smother crop on the 
land, such as fodder corn, oats, rye, 
millet or cowpeas, but persistent culti- 
vation for a season after plowing would 
be your best remedy. 

Some farmers consider this a valuable 
grass for hay. It will certainly thrive 
where most other grasses fail. It has 
some value for reenforcing banks that 
wash badlv, but a lawn is no place for 
it. " C. W. 



PROPAGATION OF ECHEVERIAS. 

I would like your advice as to the 
treatment, culture and propagation of 
echeverias. Are they considered profit- 
able bedding plants? 

M. E. H.— Tenn. 



Lift the echeveria plants from the 
garden before it becomes too cold and 
(lamp in the fall. Pack the plants in 
boxes of sand, in which they winter 
best. Echeverias are best if propa- 
gated soon after the old stock is housed, 
from October 15 to -January 1. Twist 
off the leaves carefully, so as to bring 
a dormant eye with 'each. The leaf 
without an rye will root, but will never 
]n-oduce a plant. It requires about a 
month to root the leaves in a warm cut- 
ting bench. While in the sand give the 
plantings little water, or they will damp. 
Transjdant the leaves into flats as soon 
as they are rooted. Water the plants 
sparingly while they are in the flats. 
Plants of sufficient si7;e to bed out in 
May can bo had if propagation is done 



before January 1. There is a fair profit 
in growing echeverias, but I should say 
less than in the case of many other bed- 
ding plants. C. W. 

LONGIFLORUM BULBS DISEASED. 

W^e are sending you two lily bulbs 
which, as you will notice, are rotten 
on the bottom. This rot destroys the 
roots, and we would like to know the 
cause of it. We have other lilies of 
the same variety in the same house, 
obtained from a different seedsman, 
whicli are not affected. The plants have 
not liad too much water. We have had 
to throw out about two-thirds of this 
batch. L. A. E. & S.— O. 

The most probable cause of the trou- 
ble is the digging of the bulbs in an im- 
mature condition. Or perhaps these 
bulbs were frozen in transit, which 
would seriously hurt them. Whenever 
bulbs throw up feeble growths svith 
curling foliage, you can make up your 
mind at once that they are of no value 
whatever. C. W. 



Shippensburg, Pa. — Harglerode Bros, 
now conduct the business formerly run 
under the name of U. G. Harglerode. 

South Bend, Ind.— The Bayer Floral 
Co. is reported to have suffered a loss 
of $20,000 by fire January 22. The 
fianies were discovered in a theater ad- 
joining the flower store and gained such 
rapid headway, that both buildings were 
gutted before the firemen had the fire 
under control. 



28 



The Florists^ Review 



Fmkdaby 1, 1017. 




BULB GROWING IN HOLLAND. 

[This is the second Installment of a paper 
read at a recent meeting of the Cleveland Flo- 
rists' Club, in Cleveland, O., by John Van Leeu- 
wen, of Sassenheim, Holland. In describing tlie 
methods of bulb culture used in Holland, Mr. 
Van Leeuwen confined his remarlcs to three 
groups of plants, hyacinths, tulips and narcissi. 
The first section of liis paper had reference to 
hyacinths and was publlslied in The Review of 
January 25. The present section treats of tr- 
lips. The remainder of the paper, with narcissi 
as the subject, will appear in a later issue of 
The Review.] 

The different species of tulips are 
found wild along the northern shores of 
the Mediterranean, in Armenia, the 
Levant, the Caucasus district, Persia, 
and sporadically across north and cen- 
tral Asia as far as Japan. 

The old Due van Thol varieties are 
derived from Tulipa suaveolens, a na- 
tive of the Caspian region, while, the 
other kinds are mostly seedlings of 
Tulipa Gesneriana, which was intro- 
duced from the Levant in 1577 and two 
years later was brought from Constan- 
tinople to Augsburg by Conrad Gesner. 

The name "tulip" was probably tak- 
en from the Turkish word "tulbend," 
a turban, with reference to the shape 
of the flower. 

An Ancient Craze for Tulips. 

It was not long before tulips became 
exceedingly popular — so much so that 
in the early part of the seventeenth cen- 
tury a regular craze broke out in Hol- 
land. In Haarlem one can still find a 
stone on which is inscribed simply the 
date, 1637. This stone was kept as a 
remembrance of the famous tulip trade 
of the year 1637, "when, one fool 
hatched from another, the people were 
rich without substance and wise with- 
out knowledge." 

Wild tales are abundant about what 
was paid for one tulip. For a single 
bulb twelve acres of land in the 
Schermer polder were offered. One va- 
riety. Semper Augustus, must have been 
the rarest and most costly of all, as the 
fabulous price of $5,500 is said to have 
been once paid for it, and soon after- 
ward three of these bulbs were again 
sold for $12,000. 

The price of land and the rent of 
fields in which to grow the bulbs be- 
came extremely high. One gentleman 
was offered $20,000 a year for his field 
for seven years and in addition a share 
of the profits. 

Speculation and Extravagance. 

The rage developed to such a stage 
that nearly every inn and tavern 
around Haarlem was turned into a bulb 
exchange, where bulbs were bought and 
sold long before they were taken from 
the ground. In each of these places a 
bookkeeper was employed, who kept a 
record of every transaction and of the 
profits made, which in most cases 
seemed extraordinarily high. 

Many men, unused to such wealth, be- 



came exceedingly extravagant, spending 
money lavishly and beyond their in- 
comes, buying carriages and horses and 
living at such a rate as only possessors 
of untold wealth could afford. 

What many a wise man had foreseen, 
at last happened. Everyone having be- 
come a bulb grower, so many tulips 
were crowded into the market that 
prices suddenly dropped. A great many 
buyers refused to take the bulbs at the 
price agreed upon, and a good many 
disputes and quarrels .arose. Finally 
the States General of Holland issued a 
decree that, beginning April 27, 1636, 



fbftl>Miai4Z 



T«l«plion« 
H«rriaoB>342 




Ejcclusive Novelties in Floral Valentines 



( Mother 

\Wi/e 

( Swedheari 



Cottage Bouqueti |^ $ 9 
o< Oichkfc. - ^ 



Violcit, M ' 



3PKIAL RED HEART BASKETS OF FljOWEKS ANO CANDY 




Chicago's Leading Florbt 
JACKSON AND MICHIGAN BOULEVARDS 



Furbelows in Flower Ads. 

tulip sellers had the right to force buy- 
ers to accept the bulbs at the prices 
agreed upon. The decree stopped the 
speculation to such an extent that a 
Semper Augustus, for instance, for 
which previously several thousand dol- 
lars had been paid, now brought only 
$20. Many people were ruined. 

Modem Tulip Fields. 
Even though the craze ruined num- 



bers of people, many kept on growing 
them, and today one can see miles and 
miles of tulips in bloom when traveling 
through our district in April and May. 

Tulips do not absolutely require the 
same soil which we use for hyacinths. 
We grow tulips in clay and even in peat 
soil. It must be said, though, that tu- 
lips grown in sand will produce the 
best results in general. 

When grown in sand the tulips are 
planted in the same place from which 
the hyacinths were taken earlier in the 
season. The ground is manured with 
about two bushels of cow manure to 
the square rod. Of course a good deal 
of the manure which was used for the 
hyacinths is still in the soil. The bulbs- 
are planted in the same way as the hya- 
cinths. The beds are covered with a 
light layer of new, long reeds. This i» 
not done to protect them from frost, as 
tulips do not suffer from frost, but to 
shield them from the winds in the 
spring. 

Harvesting and Marketing. 

When the bulbs are ripe they are dug 
and taken to the bulb houses, where 
they are spread out thinly on the 
shelves. They get plenty of air, so as 
to dry them quickly, while care is taken 
that the sun does not shine on them, 
because then the skin bursts. Tulips 
propagate themselves, and the old 
mother bulb splits into two to five 
smaller bulbs, leaving only a lot of old, 
dry skin. 

■ As soon as the bulbs are dry we hire 
a lot of women and girls to clean them. 
When this is done the bulbs are run 
through a sorting machine, which sorts 
them in about ten different sizes. The 
selling size is then put on a table and 
picked over by hand. The bulbs are, 
after that, counted into bags of 250 and 
500, according to the variety. The 
bags are put on shelves and left there 
until we pack them in cases to be 
shipped abroad. 

Present Popularity of Tulips. 

There is no disease in tulips, and of 
all the bulbs we grow they are probably 
the easiest of culture. They are much 
more popular than hyacinths, probably 
on account of the fact that they have 
such a long blooming season and can 
therefore be put to so many more uses. 

Among the great acquisitions are the 
Darwins, of which no one knows the 
origin, and lately the breeders have 
come to the front again. They are 
nothing new. They are the unbroken 
forms of the old florists' tulip, and the 
old Dutch gardeners discarded them be- 
cause a tulip had no value for them 
unless the flower was either striped or 
feathered. Here and there in old, for- 
gotten corners, breeders are found and 
greedily taken up by the present grow- 
ers. They are truly magnificent flowers. 



FaBBUABY 1, 1917. 



The Florists' Review 



29 



The stems are tall and strong, while the 
flowers reach immense sizes and are of 
lasting quality. Their coloring is odd, 
ranging between maroon, purple and 
terra cotta. 



CALI.A BLOOMS TURN BROWN, 

Please tell me what causes calla blooms 
to turn brown at the edges before they 
are fully open. H. H. — Colo. 

A heavy dose of liquid manure as the 
flowers start to. expand, given during 
dark weather which is followed by a 
clear, sunny day, often causes the flow- 
ers to turn brown at the edges. You can- 
not use any safer food for callas than 
fine ground bone. Give the plants a top- 
dressing of bone once in ten days. It is 
really surprising to note how greedily 
the roots devour this food. C. W. 



ASPARAGUS GROWN TOO COLD. 

I have seven solid beds of Asparagus 
plumosus plants, which are growing un- 
satisfactorily. Last September I loos- 
ened the soil thoroughly and gave the 
beds a good top-dressing of cow manure. 
Subsequently I gave a light dressing of 
lime, thinking that the soil was old 
and perhaps sour, but this also failed 
to help the plants. I run the beds 
neither too dry nor too wet and main- 
tain a temperature of 50 to 65 degrees. 
Should I give the plants more water? 
Is there a special food for asparagus? 
Should I change the top soil? Some 
plants in new beds behave similarly. 

J. G. K.— Ind. 



So far as I can judge from this re- 
port, it seems most likely that the as- 
paragus is being grown too cold. This 
crop is seldom satisfactory when grown 
in a temperature lower than 60 degrees 
at night, and better results are secured 
by holding the night temperature at 65 
degrees and by giving the plants an 
abundance of water both overhead and 
at the root. 

When using a dressing of lime on the 
soil, it is better to apply it sometime 
previous to mulching, and to wash the 
lime in with a good watering before 
putting on the manure, for lime on the 
manure is likely to liberate some of the 
ammonia and thus reduce the fertilizer 
value. W. H. T, 



ASTERS GOOD BUT SLOW. 

I have a bed of sweet peas that seem 
to be affected with root-rot. Would it 
be all right to plant the bed to asters? 
If so, what varieties shall I use and 
when shall I put them in? Would the 
late-branching kind be the best? It is 
a good, solid bed and the soil is rich. 

B. B. C— Kan. 



Asters should do well and should make 
a good paying crop. Sow seeds now 
of Queen of the Market, also called 
Queen of the Earlies. Sow the seeds 
in flats, later transplant into other flats 
and plant out from these. The late- 
branching asters would not pay you so 
well as Queen of the Market. You 
might also try a batch of Comet. White 
and pink are the best colors. 

If your peas are badly diseased and 
musf be thrown out at once, there neces- 
sarily must be a long season when your 
house will net you nothing. You could 
sow ten weeks' stocks now and have a 
Memorial day crop; or there is candy- 
tuft. You could procure plants of dou- 



£uiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii>ii"i"iii"i"i">"i"""">""!s 

I WHO'S WHO '^'- AND WHY | 

§iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiniiiiiiiiiiii<>iii<iiiiii>i>>i<ii>iiiiii">>>>>"i""'"""'""<^ 




A. J. McNUTT. 

THOUGH A. J. McNutt once temporarily abandoned the trade, liis "absence 
mada his heart grow fonder" and he renewed his horticultural efforts with a 
resolute energy that scorned difficulties. Note the decisive steps in his progress: 
Born in Knox count}', Tennessee, July 20, 1875; followed his father's occupation 
of market gardening until after his marriage, in 1895; worked at the business 
of candy making for five years; returned to the soil, determined to succeed; built 
his first greenhouse in 1902, making lettuce his main crop; gradually substituted 
jlowcrs for vegetables, until, in 1913, lie was growing flowers only; in February, 
1916, purchased the greenhouse establishment of Chas. W. Crouch, at Knoxville, 
one of the largest ranges in the south; remodeled the Crouch store in elegant and 
modern fashion. He has served as secretary-treasurer and as president of the 
Knoxville Florists' Society. 



ble feverfew or snapdragons, which 
would also net good profits at tliat time. 
It is not a good policy to put all the 
eggs in one basket, so why not sow 
part of the house with asters and the 
remainder with some other flower crop 
that would yield you an earlier return? 
Why not grow a crop of radishes where 
the asters are to go? They would be 
out of the way before your asters were 
ready and would net you a nice sum. 

C. W. 

TILE BENCHES. 

As we are contemplating a change 
from wood benches to tile, we would 
like to know what you think of tile bot- 
toms. Are tile benches satisfactory for 
growing roses and carnations? 

W. E. W. 



those of wood. A bench much in favor 
is one with wooden legs, with heavy 
pecky cypress stringers running length- 
wise. On these stringers is placed the 
tile, which reaches halfway across the 
bench. The edgeboard is then set on 
top of the tile and held fast by either 
wood or metal strips attached to the 
legs. A good method is to run a narrow 
strip of tar paper on top of the stringers, 
the paper being just wide enough to 
shed water from the wood. This will 
lengthen the life of the stringers mate- 
rially. You can buy tile slabs, which 
are the same as a regular conduit tile 
but grooved in such a way as to enable 
one to split them. This makes a slab 
with heavy ribs on one side, which act 
as a reenforcement. They are made in 
any size to suit. A. F. J. B. 



Tile benches are suitable for growing 
any crop that will grow on wooden 
benches;^ in fact, many growers are 
putting in tile bottoms in preference to 



Virginia, Minn.— Alfred Johnson has 
completed the erection of a house 56x 
150 feet, which brings the total footage 
of his range to 30,000. 



28 



The Florists^ Review 



Fbbruauy 1. 1917. 




BULB GROWING IN HOLLAND. 

[This is till' st'coMiI inslnllnu'iit of a imnor 
ri>ail at a iMMciit iiirctiii;; of the C'lcvclaiiil Flo- 
rists' Cliili, ill I'li'vclaml, O., by John Van Lccu- 
wcn. (if Sassi'iihfiiii, llollaiiil. In drscribiii}; tlui 
iricthoils of bulti tiiltiuo iisi'tl in lliillaiul, Mr. 
Van I.couwcn (.•oiitiiii'il his remarks to throf 
groups of iilaiits, hyarinths, tulips and narcissi. 
The lirst section of liis p:ipcr hail reference tc 
liyacihths and was piibli^lied in The Kcmcvv of 
.lainiary LTi. The present section treats of t\i- 
lijis. 'J'lio remainder of tlie jiaper. with narcis-.i 
as tlio siitiject, will appear in a later issue of 
The lleview.] 

Till' (liU'eroiit species <>i' lulijis iwo 
I'oiiiiil ^villl .nliiiior ^j,^. mirtluMii sliores nt' 
llie Mt'.litcrraiioaii, in .\riiiriii;i, tlir 
J.evaiit, tlie ('aiR-asiis ilistrict. l'(>rsia, 
and sjidradically across iidrtli and cen- 
tral Asia as I'ar as Jaiian. 

The oM J)iic' van Tliol vaiiotios Mie 
derived from Tulipri sua\'eolens. a na- 
tive of thi> Caspian roi^ion, wliiie the 
other kinds are mostly scedliiius of 
Tulipa Gcsncriana, Avhicli was intro- 
duced from tlie Levant in 1.377 and two 
years later was broni,dit from Constan- 
tinoplo to Auijjsburjj by Conrad Gesner. 

'J'he name ''tuliji" was jiroliably t;ik- 
en fnim the Turlii-h word " t nlbe-.'d, ' " 
a turban, with reiViciice to the shape 
of the llower. 

An Ancient Craze for Tulips. 

It was not lone; before tnlips beeainc 
e.\i'eedinj,Hy jiopuiar — so inneli so that 
in the early jiart of the seventeenth cen- 
tury a regular craze broke out in Hol- 
land. In Haarlem one can still find a 
stone on wlii( Ii is inscribed simjily the 
date, ]G.i7. This stone was kejit as a 
icmembrancc of the famous tulip tra<le 
of the year ](i;i7, '"when, one fool 
hatched I'luiii another, the jieople were 
rich withofit substance and wise with- 
out knowledeje. ' ' 

Wild t.ales are abundant about what 
was paid for one tulip. For ;i sinprlc 
bulb twelve acres of land in the 
Schermcr polder were ofi'eNMl. C)ne v;i- 
riety, Senijier Auj,nistus. iiiu>t have been 
the rarest and nm-t e<i>tly of all, as the 
fabulous price of .^."..">0U is said to have 
been once ],aid for it. and .'oon after- 
ward three of these I.iulbs were ;i;,rain 
sold for .'^12.0(10. 

The ]irice of land and tho rent of 
fields in which to ^;iow the bulbs bo- 
came extremely hioh. One c;entlem:in 
was offered ,420,000 a year for his lield 
for seven years and In addition a share 
of the jirofits. 

Speculation and Extravagance. 

Th(^ ra^e de\i'lo]ied to smdi .a staple 
that nearly e\civ inn mid tavern 
around Haailein was turned into a bulb 
excjianm', where bulbs \vere lioii<jjht and 
sold liiii^ befipic tliev were taken from 
the fjround. In cai h of these places a 
bookkeeper was employed, who kept a 
record of every transaction and of the 
profits made, which in mo>t oases 
seemed extraordinarily hi^'h. 

Many ineUj unuseil to such wealth, be- 



came exceedingly extravagant, spending 
money lavishly and beyond their in- 
comes, buying carnages and horses rind 
living at such a rate as only possessors 
of untold wealth could afford. 

What many a wise man had foreseen, 
at last happened. Everyone having be- 
come a bulb grower, so many tulips 
were crowded intt) the market that 
prices suddenly dropped. A great many 
liuyers refused to take the bulbs at the 
piicc agreed ujion, and a gt>od many 
disjuites and tpiarrels ..arose. Finally 
ilie St.ates General of Holland issued a 
deci'ce that, beginning Ajiril 27, 1G3G, 




Exclusive Novelties in Flora! Valentines 

^ \f other 
For Wife 

' Suclhcjrl 

CoisaRC Bouquets "_ $ "^ 01 ;■_ $ | 

ol OicHkI". •• " Vlolf,». " ' 



SPTCUL HJJ) HUUIT BA.^KJ.1S * n,(i«tjt A.Nt) 'AM'> 




ChKOgo^ Lcadi:if! Florlit 

J AC KSO N AND MICHIGAN BOLL.EVARDS ' 
Furbelows in Flower Ads. 

tulip Sidlers li.ad the right to force 1 liv- 
ers to accept the bulbs at the jirices 
••i^rectl n]ion. The decree stoppeil the 
speculation to such an extent that a 
.Scinjier Augustus, for instance, for 
which previously several thousand dol- 
lars had been paid, now brought only 
.$20. Many peopile were ruined. 

Modern Tulip Fields. 

F\(n thouixh the craze ruined num- 



bers of people, many kept on growing 
them, and today one can see miles anu 
miles of tulips in bloom when traveling 
through our district in April and May. 

Tulips do not absolutely require the 
same soil which we use for hyacinths. 
"We grow tulips in clay and even in peat 
soil. It must be said, though, that tu- 
lips grown in san<l will produce the 
best results in general. 

When grown in sand the tulips are 
jdanted in the same place from which 
the h>acin1hs were taken earlier in the 
season. The ground is manured with 
about two bushels of cow manure to 
the square rod. Of course a good deal 
of the tnanure which was used for tlu- 
hyacinths is still in the soil. The bulbs, 
are planted in the same way as the hya- 
cinths. The beds are covered with a 
light layer of new, long reeds. This is 
not done to protect them from frost, as 
tulips do not suffer from frost, but to 
shield them from the winds in the 
spring. 

Harvesting and Marketing. 

AVhen the bullis ate rijie they ;ire dug 
and taken to the bidb houses, where 
they arc spread out thinly on tht~ 
shelves. They get plenty of air, so as 
to dry them quickly, while care is taken 
that the sun does not shine on them, 
because then the skin bursts. Tulips 
])ropagat(; themselves, and the old 
mother bulb sjtlits into two to five 
smaller bulbs, leaving only ;i lot of old, 
dry skin. 

As soon as the bulbs are dry we hire 
a lot of women and girls to (dean them. 
When this is done the bulbs aie rui; 
thiough a sorting machin(\ wlii(di sort=^ 
them in about ten different sizes. The 
selling siz(? is then put on a tabh:" and 
jii(d<ed ()\er by hand. The btilbs are. 
at't(M- that, counted into bags of 2*10 and 
500, according to the \"ariety. The 
bags are put on shelves and left tli(M'o 
until we pack them in cases to be 
shi[i[ied abroail. 

Present Popularity of Tulips. 

There is no disease in tulips, am! of 
all the bulbs we grow the\" are pr(d)alJy 
the e;;siest of culture. They are much 
more po|>ulai' than hyacinths, pidbabl>' 
on ttccount of the fact that they have 
sui h a lonix blooming' season and car. 
therefore be put to so many more uses. 

Among the great acquisitieiis are the 
Darwins, of which no one l;no\vs the 
origin, and lately the Vjreoilers hav(^ 
(>oine to the front again. They are 
nothing ne\v. Th(\v are the unl)roken 
forms of the old fhjrists' tulip, ;ind the 
(dd Dutch gardeners discarded them be- 
cause a tulip had no value for them 
unless the flower was either striped or 
feathered. Here and there in old, for- 
gotten corners, breeders are found and 
greedily taken up by the present grow- 
ers. They arc truly magnificent flowers. 



Febri'auy 1, 1!»1T. 



The Florists^ Review 



29 



'I'lio steins are tall and strouo, wliile tlic 
ilowcr.s reacli iiiiniciiHO sizes and are of 
lastiiifj; quality. Their coloring is odd, 
innijiiii; hetwecn niarooii, purple and 
!crra cotta. 



iililllillllllllllllllllllllllllllEllillllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllilllllU: 



CALLA BLOOMS TURN BROWN. 

I'leasc tel! me what i aiise.s calla blooms 
l(» linn brown at the edges before they 
,-ire fully 0]>lii. H. II. — Colo. 

A heavy dose of liciiiid manure as the 
tlowers start to expand, given during 
<lark weatluM- whieh is f()llowe<l by a 
< dear, sunny day, often causes the flow - 
ors to turn brown at the edges. You can- 
not use any safer food for callas than 
!ine ground bone. Give the jilants a top- 
<lressing of bou'' once in ten days. It is 
leally surjirising to note how greedily 
(lie loots devour this food. C. "W. 



ASPARAGUS GROWN TOO COLD. 

I ha\e seven solid beds of Asparagus 
pluniosus plants^ whi(di are growing un- 
satisfactorily. Last yepteniber I loos- 
I'ned the soil thoroughly and gave the 
'leds a good to])-dressing of cow manure. 
Subsequently I gave a light dressing of 
lime, Ihinking tliat the soil was old 
•liul perhajis sour, but this also failed 
to help the ])lants. I run the beds 
neither too dry nor too wet and main- 
lain a temperature of 50 to C5 degrees. 
Slio\dd I give the ])la!its more water.' 
is there a special food for asparagus.' 
.^iioidd I (diange the to]) soil.' Sonn" 
i'lati1< in iieu' beds lichave similarlv. 

J. G. K.— liul. 



So I'ai- as 1 can judge from this re- 
port, it seems most likely that tiie :is- 
jiaragus is being grown too cold. This 
<ro]i is seldom satisfactory wlien grown 
in a temjteraturc lower than (JO degrees 
at nlgiit, ;iiid better results are secured 
I'y holding the night temperature at O." 
degrees and by giving the ]dants an 
.■ibundance of Avater biith o\ei-li(\ad auil 
.■it the root. 

When using ;i dressing of Tune on the 
soil, it is better to apply it sometime 
previous to mulching, and to wash the 
lime in with a go(jd watering before 
lifting on the manure, for lime on the 
manure is likely to liberate some of tho 
amnu)ni:i and thus I'cdiUM" fh(- fertilizer 
\nlue. "W^ ]j 'p 



isters .' 
use and 



ASTERS GOOD BUT SLOW. 

T li.Mve a b(>d of swi.'et peas that seem 
to l>o ;ifi'.>ct(vl witli root-i-ot. Would it 
lie all ri^lit to plant liie bed to 
If So. whiit varieties shall T 
when shall I put them in.' Would the 
iate br;in(diing kind be the best? Tt is 
a goo.l. sulid 1,0.1 ;m,| tlie soil isrirli. 

B. 15. C— Kan. 

.\strrs should do well and should make 
a good paying crop. Sow seeds now 
of Queen of the Market, also called 
;,>ueen of the Karlies. Sow the seeds 
in flats, later transplant into other flats 
and plant out froju these. The late- 
branching asters wonbl not pav you so 
well as Queen of ihe Market. You 
might also try a batch of Comet. White 
anil ]nuk are the li(>st colors. 

If vour peas are badly diseased and 
must be thrown out at once, there neces- 
sarily must be a long season when vour 
house will net you nothing. You could 
sow ten weeks' stocks now and have a 
Menu.rial day crop; or there is ca.ndy- 
tiitt. -i on could procure plants of dou- 



I WHO'S WHO 



IN THE 
TRADE- 



AND WHY I 



rriiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiif? 




A. J. McNUTT. 

T^-"'" ''ll -\- ■'■ M' \nti ..ii.', i( iiipi,i:iril\ abandon, 'd the ti'ade. his ''absenee 

made hi- hoarr l;i,.\\ T \vr" and ho i.airw,.! hi- liort i.n It iiral (dforts with a 

resolute cii.Moy that ,>.roMu d .1 i li',. nit '..■-. \ntr t|,,. ,|rri.;ix,. vi,.,,s in his jirogress: 
lioru ill Knox r(,unt\, Ti'iiiio-,-,'. .Inly ::•;. In:,",; r,,||,,\\,.d hi^ Jailo'iV o,-.iipation 
"', niarkot L;ardoniii- until alt.-r iii-- ma i i iai,'''. in Is'.".',; worked at llio bn-iness 

of candy m;ii<iiig for li\,- \cais: n-tuiiod to ih,. -,,il. dot erininr.l to sur, 1: built 

Ills lir>t orconlioii-o in Mini.', making lottinc his main crop; uradnalh- Mibst it uted 
ilouois for \o-.'tablos, until, in li'i:;, io wa- i^iowin- ildwms oid\:'in Kcd.ruary, 
lOlO. jnir. dialed tlir greenhous,^ est.abli-limont ot ( dias. W. ('rourh, at K'nowille! 
one (.r tho l;n-,'-t lan-cs in tli.^ -outli: romod(dcd the (,'romdi s1(,iv in (degant and 
uiodcrn fa-hion. IIo ha- sor\-,ni as senx'taix tnaMirrr and a-^ piesidoiit" of the 
Know illo florist,- ■ S(i(det\-. 



Me fi^verfcw or -n.apdi-agons. wdiii-n 
would also iK^t good [u-ulits at that liiiio. 
It is not a good poli<'y to j.ut all tlio 
- - ' ■' ■ ' 1,,. ,,^(- „ 




TILE BENCHES. 

As we are contemidating a «diange 
from wood benches to tile, avc wouM 
like to know wdiat you think of tile bot- 
toms. Are tile benidies satisfactorv for 
growing roses and carnations? 

W. E. W. 



those oi' wiiod. A bemdi unndi in fa\oi' 
is oiK^ with wooden legs, wdtli hea\\- 
pecky cyjiress stringers running length- 
wise. Oil these stringers is placed tlu' 
tile, \\hiili reaches halfway across the 
bench. The edgeboard is then set on 
top of tli.^ tile and held fast bv either 
wood or iiKdal sfrijis attached to the 
legs. A -ood inetlioil is to run a narrow 
strip of tar ],;iper on top of the stringers, 
the paper being just wide enough to 
-hed water from the wood. This will 
lengthen the life of the stringers mate- 
rially. Y'ou can buy tile sltPbs, ^vhich 
are the same as a regular conduit tile 
but grooved in such a wav as to enable 
"ne to sfilit them. This 'makes a slab 
with heavy ribs on one side, whiidi act 
as a reenforcemcnt. Thev are made in 
any si/.e to suit. ' A. V. J. P.. 



Tile benches are suitable for growing 
any crop that will grow on wooden 
benches ;^ in fact, many growers are 
putting in tile bottoms in preference to 



Virginia, Minn.— Alfred .lohnson has 
• omidetod the erection of a house 50x 
150 feet, which brings the total footat^c 
of his range to 30,000. " 



30 



The FloristsrRcvicw 



Februaky 1, 1917. 




ANNUAL MEETING AT NASHVILLE. 



Officers Elected. 

The following officers were elected by 
the Tennessee State Florists' Society 
at its annual meeting at Nashville 
January 30: 

President — W. Cleveland Johnson, 
Memphis. 

Vice-president — Leo Geny, Nashville. 

Secretary-treasurer — ^Prof . G. M, Bent- 
ley, reelected. 

Business Meeting. 

The attendance was the largest in 
the liistory of the association; there 
were florists present from the farthest 
parts of the state, as well as from 
a number of other states. The attend- 
ance at the morning business meeting 
was over sixty, with a larger number 
at the afternoon and evening programs. 

Exhibits were staged in the loggia of 
the hotel and the display was by far 
the best ever made at a meeting of the 
association. As nothing was shown for 
competition, there were no judges' re- 
ports. 

The forenoon was taken up by an 
unusually interesting business meeting, 
the county vice-presidents' reports 
showing that a great deal of progress 
was made in the state last year, both 
in new building and in putting the 
business end of tlie trade on a higher 
plane. 

The membership of the society is now 
about seventy-five and there is a de- 
termined effort being made to bring it 
up to 150 by another year. To make 
this possible, a committee was ap- 
pointed to confer with the authorities 
in order to affiliate the society with the 
extension work being conducted by the 
state through the State University. 

The secretary of the State Fair Asso- 
ciation placed $50 at the disposal of the 
society to be offered in premiums at 
the fair this fall. 

David Schein gave a paper on adver- 
tising for florists. It precipitated a 
lively discussion of the propriety of ad- 
vertising special sales, etc. It was the 
consensus that it is not generally best 
to advertise cut flowers at cut rates, but 
that special plant sales may be ad- 
visable. 

Exhibits. 

C. L. Baum, of Knoxville, made an 
interesting display of gladiolus bulbs, 
all grown on his place. He is growing 
several acres of these bulbs and is in- 
creasing. He also showed some mag- 
nificent orchids and good vases of 
^Matchless, Beacon, Enchantress, En- 
chantress Supremo, Mrs. C. E. Akehurst, 
Dr. Sam, Mrs. Ward and Alice carna- 
tions. 

Kcur & Sons, of Ilillogom, Holland, 
had a representative at the show with 
an exhibit of pictures of bulbs growing 
in Holland. 

Chas. Tritchler, of Nashville, showed 
a good collection of ferns, two of which 
appeared good subjects for table use 
and a decided departure from the con- 
ventional table fern. They were 



Smithii and Minisai, both dwarf ferns 
of the ostrich plume type. 

The Grasselli Chemical Co. made a dis- 
play of its fungicides and insecticides. 

Mclntyre Bros, showed large vases of 
Gorgeous and Mrs. Ward carnations, a 
fine display of cyclamens and the best 
vase of Eussell roses we have ever seen. 

Geny Bros, showed the only azaleas 
that were staged; also primulas, hya- 
cinths and roses. 

The Joy Floral Co. showed Enchant- 
ress, Delhi and Belle Washburn carna- 
tions. Delhi seems to many to be the 
best red carnation ever grown in this 
city. Of the Joy cyclamens the best 
carried sixty-three blooms. Baby prim- 
roses also were good. 

J. W. Crouch, of Knoxville, staged a 
number of vases of peas, the most at- 
tractive being Mrs. Skach, Orange 
Orchid, Eose Queen and Christmas Pink 
Orchid. 

There was a good trade exhibit of 
Nico-Fume and kindred products of the 
Kentucky Tobacco Product Co. 

Haury & Sons exhibited made up 
boxes and cyclamens. 

Robert Shoch, of the M. Rice Co., 
Philadelphia, showed a line of baskets 
and other florists' accessories, St. Valen- 
tine's day, St. Patrick's day and Easter 
novelties. 

G..J. Tielman, of Johnson City, Tenn., 
showed a vase of his seedling carnation, 
No. 4. 

Cohen & Hiller, New York, had a dis- 
play of ribbons, etc. 

Schloss Bros., New York, had an ex- 
hibit of ribbons and chiffon. 

Those Present. 

Tliose present from outside Nashville 
were: 
Itniim. Chas. L. , Knoxville. 
.Trihnson. W. Clevoland, Jlt'nipliis. 
Anderson, .T. C, Ijcbnnon. 
Itrnlliar. Flo.vd, Madison. 
Hanni, Karl 1'., Knoxville. 
Kessler, Wm. H., ItirniinKliam, Ala. 
CoKgor, Tlios., Boston, Mass. 



Card, Homer I., Cincinnati. 
Triiett, Ed C, Franklin. 
McNutt, A. J., Knoxville. 
Kimmell, G. A., Chattanooga. 
Uligh, T. E., Cornersville. 
lUigli, A. N., Cornersville. 
.Johnson, O. A., Memphis, 
lilake, J. K., Knoxville. 
Hramm, II. G., Bristol. 
Hamlets, G. L., Crockett. 
Goetz, Mrs. Frank, Knoxville. 
I'oague, George W.. Gra.vsville. 
Wilber, F. B., and wife, CuUeoka. 
Byrn, A. .!., Dickson. 
Shocli, Uobert, I'hiladelphin. 
Selinka, Milton, New York. 
Moore. W. II., Cornersville. 
('la.yton. .1. M.. Cornersville. 



WHITMANI FERNS ON BENCHES. 

Please tell me the best way to grow 
Whitmani ferns on benches through the 
summer. Is it best to buy 2-inch plants 
and bench them through the summer? 
What kind of soil is best for them? 

C. H.— Ore. 



Nephrolepis Whitmani may be grown 
in a bench containing about four inches 
of ordinary potting soil, to which may 
be added enough sand or leaf-mold to 
make the compost more open, if the soil 
is heavy. Strong 2-inch pot plants will 
l)e satisfactory for this purpose if 
planted in May. Give plenty of ventila- 
tion during the summer, but do not water 
too heavily before the plants are estab- 
lished, or the soil may become sour. Use 
a thin shading on the glass, during the 
hot weather, but remove it by the mid- 
dle of September. 

Some growers prefer to keep these 
ferns in pots throughout the season, 
claiming that shorter and more compact 
plants may thus be grown, but when 
grown in this manner they require re- 
potting twice, while the bench-grown 
plants need potting onlv at the time of 
lifting. W. H. T. 

RADIANCE AND RED RADIANCE. 

I wish to grow two varieties of roses 
that will go well with Ophelia. I would 
want a good pink and a good red. What 
do you think of Radiance and Red 
Radiance? Are these varieties easily 
subject to mildew or the spot diseases? 
What is the proper temperature for 
them? E. A. R.— 111. 



Both Radiance and Red Radiance 
are free growers and good producers, 
and whore the stock is grown for local 




Greenhouses and Office of the Lang Floral & Nursery Co., Dallas, Tex. 



February 1, 1917. 



The Florists' Review 



31 



demand they should be profitable varie- 
ties to mate with Ophelia. When grown 
for the wholesale market, especially the 
Chicago market, they have not proven 
profitable, as the demand for the 
blooms of these varieties has not been 
steady enough to pay the growers to 
produce them in quantity. I believe 
they sell well in the eastern markets. 
Both varieties are practically free 
from disease and grow best in a tem- 
perature of 60 degrees at night, with 
4 to 6 degrees higher on cloudy days 
and 10 degrees higher on sunny days. 

W. J. "K. 



LANG 



SOUTHERN PROGRESS. 

The florists' business in all the south 
has been making rapid progress of late, 
but in no section better progress than 
in the southwest. The number of new 
people entering the business has been 
considerable, but the greater part of 
the increased demand has been absorbed, 
thus far, by the old, established florists, 
who have been adding to and improving 
their facilities at a remarkable rate. 

Illustrations in this issue show the 
downtown store of the Lang Floral & 
Nursery Co., of Dallas, Tex., and the 
greenhouse establishment on Ross ave- 
nue, the two constituting an equipment 
modern in every respect. 

The first greenhouses are among the 
oldest in the south, Otto Lang, the presi- 
dent of the company, having been among 
the pioneers in his section, but, as the 
picture indicates, the office building is 
new, as are the greenhouses in its rear, 
the latter being of the wide modern 
type. The greenhouses and sales office, 
originally located in the outskirts of the 
city, now are in the thickly built up 
"heart" of the city, but the policv 
of making it easy for the people of 
Dallas to buy flowers long ago called for 
opening a downtown store. Recently a 
new and better location was secured and 
a few weeks before Christmas the pres- 
ent establishment was opened, on one of 
the best corners in the city. One of the 
illustrations shows the front, with its 
two modern display windows, while the 
other gives an idea of the interior ar- 
rangement, the latter photograph having 
been made without decoration so as to 
better show the fixtures. 



KANSAS CITY. 



The Market. 

Business has been good in all lines. 
There are large receipts of cut flowers, 
but the demand is ahead of the supply 
and all kinds of seasonable stock are 
cleared out every evening. The prices 
on some stock are a little above normal. 
The stiffest market is on Beauties, 
which still are on the short side. Some 
fine Russells arc seen, but the good ones 
are as scarce as Beauties. Roses in 
general are short of the usual supplv 
and prices are high. The supplv of 
carnations is about the same as that 
of last week, the blooms not being any 
too plentiful. There is a sufficient sup- 
ply of lilies for present needs. Sweet 
peas are the most plentiful flowers at 
i'resent, but the prices of these are high. 
The sweet peas this year have better 
and longer stems tiian those of the win- 
tor crop last year. Bulbous stock of all 
kinds IS more plentiful and the quality 
IS good. Stevia is rapidly disappearing. 

Various Notes. 
The Western Association of Nurscry- 
'"on hold its twenty-seventh annual 




Front of the New Store of the Lang Floral & Nursery Co., Dallas, Tex. 



meeting at the Coatcs House in this 
city January 24 and 25. 

L. C. Fields, of Kansas City, Kan., 
has been in business in that city for 
twelve years. He has 4,500 feet of 
glass devoted to pot plants. His son, 
R. H. Fields, is associated with him. 
What with the work in the greenhouse 
and the cut flower trade, both are busy. 
They have large quantities of funeral 
work and their pot plant sales are good, 
especially of cyclamens, begonias and 
lilies. 

Mr. and Mrs. John Stevens were go- 
ing home in their automobile on the 
evening of January 25 when they met 
with an accident. Both were injured, 
but not severely. The car was smashed 
beyond repair. This somewhat crippled 
Mr. Stevens' delivery service, as he 
has been delivering orders in his tour- 
ing car. 

A. Newell had one of the largest 
decorations of the season at the Hotel 
Muehlbach last week. 

C. W. Lemon, who formerly was asso- 
ciated with the Olatlie establishment, 
and L. F. Clivc, of To])eka, have bought 
the St. Mary's greenliouses. These two 
men have had a wide experience in 
landscape, greenhouse and store work. 

R. S. Brown & Son are busilv occu 



l)ie(l with their shipping business and 
are preparing spring stock. This firm 
lias a great many orders already booked 
and inquiries are heavy. ]Mr. Bridge- 
land says that from the looks of things 
it is going to be hard to get enough 
stock to meet the demand. 

The J. G. Peppard Seed Co. has in- 
stalled machinery for mixing lawn grass 
seed. This concern reports that busi- 
ness has started to open up. 

The Harnden Seed Co. states that im- 
ported seeds are alarmingly scarce. This 
company gays that business is good and 
that business this spring will be heavy 
on account of the high cost of living, 
which makes for more vegetable gar- 
dens. 

T. Lee Adams says that seeds are 
higher in price, but that this does not 
seem to affect the sales, as there is too 
large a demand. The shipping business 
has started and a large number of or- 
ders are booked. W. J. B. 



Elmira, N. Y. — Another section is to 
be added to the large range of the 
United States Cut Flower Co. The new 
addition is to be erected at a cost of 
about .$25,000 and will be 300 feet long. 
It is to be devoted exclusively to Mock 
and Ophel'a roses. 




Interior of the New Downtown Store of the Lang Floral & Nursery Co., Dallas. 



33 



The Rorists' Review 



Tbbbuabt 1. 1017. 



NEW YOBK. 



The Market. 



The market continues remarkably 
firm, when the dullness in the retail de- 
partment of the cut flower business is 
considered. Funeral work last week 
seems to have been the only foundation 
for stability. It therefore is fortunate 
that the rose shipments continue light, 
for this doubtless has been what has 
held the market steady. There was not 
H usable rose of the shorter lengths left 
January 27. Extra American Beauties 
were quoted at 60 cents to 75 cents as 
the week closed. Hadley is back to 60 
cents for the selects. Ophelia, Sun- 
burst and all the twenty other varieties 
were held at the same good values as a 
week ago. Rose advisers in the whole- 
sale ranks say we may expect a break 
early in February, when the houses that 
have been oflE crop begin to do duty once 
more. The quality of most of the roses 
arriving is above reproach. 

Carnations were firm at the close of 
the week. Good flowers of any color 
brought $4 per hundred; none sold under 
$3 and a few of the specialties sold at 
$5 per hundred. Cattleyas and other 
orchids continue equal to the demand. 
The quality of the cattleyas is greatly 
improved. Longiflorums are strong at $10 
to $12 per hundred; a few long-stemmed 
flowers were held at 15 cents each. 
Valley has not changed its quotation for 
weeks; "2 to 5 and take your choice." 
The demand seems light. Gardenias are 
improving in stem and quality; the best 
now bring $3 per dozen. There is an 
abundance of the low grades, some sell- 
ing as low as 50 cents per dozen. 

The market is surfeited with short- 
stemmed tulips, for which there is little 
demand. The rest of the bulbous stock 
is selling freely and at excellent prices. 
Callas have sold as high as $20 per 
hundred. Freesia is especially fine at 
present. 

Sweet peas are abundant and some of 
tlie stock is superb, bringing as high as 
$3 per hundred sprays. Yiolets are 
plentiful. The street men are again in 
evidence on the mild days. Pansies, 
daisies, wallflowers, primulas, mignon- 
ette and all the rest of the seasonable 
flowers, flowering shrubs and blooming 
plants, especially azaleas and cyclamens, 
are plentiful. 

Various Notes. 

February 12 is carnation night at the 
Florists' Club. The spring flower show 
is the subject for discussion. Phil Kess- 
ler again is chairman of the house com- 
mittee and has some Virginia hams up 
his sleeve. 

Gus Schmidt, of Eiedel & Meyer's 
force, is in the hospital, ill with pneu- 
monia. 

The George W. Crawbuck Co. has 
leased its branch store at 57 West 
Twenty-eighth street to Thomas Toung, 
Jr. Mr. Young will have his whole- 
sale cut flower enterprise at this ad- 
dress. 

Another wholesaler on West Twenty- 
eighth street, between Sixth and Sev- 
enth avenues, will locate this week over 
the store of the George W. Crawbuck 
Co. ^ 

Arthur Saltford, of Poughkeepsie, 
was in the city last week and was 
quite a purchasing factor in the whole- 
sale market. 

A. L. Young finished his jury duties 
January 27, with the famous Osborn- 
Tanzer case. 



McKinley day was dark and rainy. 
There seems to be little public recogni- 
tion of the anniversary. 

Myers & Samtman, of Chestnut Hill, 
Pa., are sending M. C. Ford a new 
rose, a sport from Old Gold, that prom- 
ises a supply of new gold to its grow- 
ers and distributors. 

Chas. Lenker, of Freeport, has been 
honorably discharged by the grand jury 
from the charge made against him some 
weeks ago. 

D. C. Arnold has returned from a six 
months' pleasure trip in the west. 

Louis Dupuy and family, of White- 
stone, have returned from Bermuda. 

Joseph Fenrich and wife are spend- 
ing week ends at Asbury Park. 

Bowling. 

The bowling elub has many visitors 
at its afternoon sessions and a strong 
team for the S. A. F. convention is 
assured. The following scores wore 
made on January 25: 
Player 1st 2(1 3(1 

John Miesem 193 168 151 

Alex Donaldson 159 193 161 

C. W. Scott 165 147 142 

K. J. Irwin 178 147 150 

M. Kakuda 161 165 140 

W. P. Ford 160 150 147 

Jos. Fenrich 180 159 15G 

P. Jacobson 165 158 131 

W. H. Siebrecht 151 147 140 

J. Austin Shaw. 



It is rumored that the New York Flo- 
rists' Club will give another din-dan 



or dinner dance at the Biltmore, Satur- 
day night, March 17, the first Satur- 
day of the flower show. In addition to 
a dinner of rare goodness, witB the 
happysome accompaniment of dancing, 
there will be a mystery. Chairman A. 
L. Miller says it's going to be "a big 
joy bubble, which will be burst in the 
center of the room at exactly 12 
o'clock." The committee urges an 
early reservation of tables. Tickets, 
for lady or gentleman, will be $5 each. 
T. B. De Forest is secretary, 30 East 
Forty-second street. 

Sydney B. Wertheimer, of Wer- 
theimer Bros., states that the cry of the 
hour from florists is for novelties in 
ribbons. Mr. Wertheimer says that, 
while the consumption of plain ribbons 
is increasing, the constant demand is 
for variations of weaves and colorings. 
Mr. Wertheimer cites this as an exam- 
ple that the florists of the United States 
are distinctly wide-awake and that the 
dry goods and millinery man no longer 
dictates the distinctive styles for florists. 
Salesmen in this house are instructed, 
whenever a new idea is presented to 
them by any of their customers, to im- 
mediately transmit it to the house, 
where it is worked out by experts in 
floral textiles at the Werbro Mills in 
Paterson, N. J. That is why most rib- 
bons now used by florists have a dis- 
tinctly different appearance from those 
displayed in the department stores. 



! m^i^¥i^'ity.¥i^i»y{|tyji»^iu^¥A;jiiLL¥ii»iiyjiu^»i»^^^ 



THE RAISE IN PRICES 



ir«vit«?irir8vir/sflt^r^ri«vir?wr?wr)«>rthrwr)«vir?^ 



IT IS EASY FOB FLOBISTS. 



To Avoid a Loss. 

"Although everything used in the 
business has advanced in price during 
1916 and the cost of running a green- 
house this season is at least seventy- 
flve per cent, and possibly 100 per cent, 
greater than the cost in previous sea- 
sons, I have not raised my prices one 
penny and hope to get through without 
a loss by making such economies as are 
possible." 

The speaker was a grower whose spe- 
cialty is pot plants and whose stock al- 
ways has enjoyed an excellent reputa- 
tion. He is located in the east. But 
from the west, in the same day's mail, 
came a letter from a grower whose spe- 
cialty is cut flowers, partly retailed in 
his own store, but mostly sold at whole- 
sale to florists in nearby towns. This 
is what he said: 

To Make a Profit. 

"You may be interested to know 
that we have this season advanced our 
prices materially and that it apparently 
has had no effect on the business ex- 
cept to save the loss of profits threat- 
ened by the greatly increased cost of 
doing business. Of course we did not 
advance our prices all at once, but made 
small advances steadily; scarcely any 
of our customers made any comment 
and those who asked usually were sat- 
isfied that the small advance then 
made was fully justified by condi- 
tions." 

The fact of the matter is that in- 
creases in the prices of commodities 



have become so general that they no 
longer attract attention. It is taken 
for granted that things cost more this 
season than they did last season and 
the fact that the prices of any given 
article are higher than they were before 
the war passes without notice. 

No Besistance Now. 

In the earlier stages of the advance 
there was resistance, but the resistance 
has been worn down by the fact that 
at practically every attempt to pur- 
chase the buyer has found that it was 
necessary to pay more money than be- 
fore. It applies to everything except a 
few trade-marked commodities, and on 
these original margins of profit were 
unusually good. 

That the florist who does not attempt 
to raise his prices is deliberately sacri- 
ficing his profits is shown by the state- 
ment of the eastern plantsman as com- 
pared with the statement of the western 
cut flower grower. If a man growing cut 
flowers can raise his prices without en- 
countering resistance on the part of his 
wholesale and retail customers, surely 
the plantsman can make moderate ad- 
vances without difficulty. 

An Increase Must Be Asked. 

As a matter of fact nearly all florists 
selling to the public are asking better 
prices this season than heretofore. It 
is easy to get them; Sll one has to do 
is to keep his rates within reason. 

Practically the only reason why re- 
tail prices in this trade have not been 
advanced in any locality is because the 
florists there have been afraid to ask an 
advance. People cannot be expected to 



Fbbeuary 1, 1917. 



The Florists' Review 



pay more than they are asked; if the 
florist still sells carnations for 35 cents 
a dozen and never asks any more, the 
price of carnations among ^is custoiiifsrs 
never will be 50 cents per dozen; but 
if he sets up a fair grade of goods ond 
asks 50 cents per dozen he will get it 
as easily as he formerly^ got 35 cents. 



Only in a few cases will an explanation 
be demanded. The florist who formerly 
got 75 cents per dozen for his carnations 
can get $1 as easily under present con- 
ditions. A cyclamen plant that sold 
for $1 last season will as easily fetch 
$1.^5 this season, if the price is asked, 
not otherwise. 




MADISON AVENUE, NEW YORK. 



Business Home of Many Florists. 

Madison avenue may fairly claim to 
be the retail phenomenal street of the 
florists' business of New York. Com- 
mencing at Forty-fourth street, we find 
the headquarters of Charles Dards, one 
of the big business centers of the indus- 
try, established some forty years. Mr. 
Dards recently returned from a pleasure 
trip to Hawaii, California and Japan. 

Opposite the Dards store is Bamm's 
Flower Shop, one of the latest acquisi- 
tions of the street and a "success from 
the opening," I understand. 

The next store is Ralph Armstrong's, 
at the Forty-seventh street corner. It 
is a handsome place, with a wealth of 
windows. Mr. Armstrong formerly was 
with Wadley & Smythe. He has a 
branch at Newport during the summer 
and it is growing steadily. 

Across the way, at Forty-eighth 
street, A. T. Bunyard has built up a 
remarkable business in the last seven 
years. He spent several years with the 
Rosery and Siebrecht's before launch- 
ing out on the independent sea. Mr. 
Bunyard also has a summer branch at 
Newport, R. I. 

At Forty-ninth street. No. 426, A. 
Kottmiller has established a splendid 
business. He has a branch in the Van- 
derbilt hotel and a growing reputation 
for artistic and original decorative ef- 
fects. A silver cup in the window speaks 
of first honors in this line. 

Next on the avenue. No. 503, is J. H. 
Small & Sons' "handsomest flower store 
in the world." How the S. A. F. vis- 
itors will enjoy this store! 

At No. 509 is H. H. Burns' neat 
headquarters, where this chip of the old 
block is "making good." His brother 
grows fine Hadleys for the wholesale 
market and everybody knows his father. 

Joseph Leikens comes next, at Fifty- 
fifth street. He also has a branch at 
Newport. Joe is the soldier florist and 
did his bit in Mexico last year with his 
regiment, losing some thirty or forty 
pounds while at it, but Joseph is him- 
self again. 

At the Fifty-sixth street corner is 
John W. Hauser 's store, which has been 
in the landscape there more than thirty 
years. 

Two blocks north Myer Gottlieb has 
a big store. He owns the entire build- 
ing. He spent his earlier years with A. 
McConnell, has a branch in the Plaza 
and stays in the business for the love 
of it. 

Close to the corner of Fifty-ninth 
street is Warendorff's branch of the 
Ansonia, and one of the neatest of War- 
endorff's "all-over-town" enterprises. 

At No. 692 Madison avenue, near 



Sixty-first street, the rejuvenated 
Haufft Bros, are to be found. The orig- 
inals of fifty years ago have crossed 
the great divide; their sons now are liv- 
ing in Newark and California. The 
younger members of the family are 
now in the new store, which is more 
roomy and more modern than the old 
one. 

Christatos & Koster come next, at 
No. 717, near Sixty-third street. They 
have a good store, a good reputation and 
have been established at this location 
about a dozen years. 

Between Sixty-third and Sixty-fourth 
streets a new firm has located, by name 
Daniels & Markellos, which makes a 
specialty of Japanese everlasting flow- 
ers. The members say their Christmas 
business was satisfactory. 

William Kather, for years one of 
Wadley & Smythe 's best decorators, has 
a neat store at 754 Madison avenue, 
with a palm department on the second 
floor. He has been in business over a 
year and is well pleased with what he 
has accomplished. 

Just above him, at No. 810, are Rigo 
Bros., who had a long experience with 



Joseph Fenrich and other wholesalers. 

At No. 922, at the intersection of Sev- 
enty-third street, is the new store of 
Siebrecht Bros., with William Siebrecht 
at the helm. The locality is desirable 
and the store roomy and attractive. The 
name of Siebrecht has been a household 
word — floriculturally — in New York for 
nearly half a century. Henry Siebrecht, 
Sr., is still as young and active at 69 
as ever, and devotes his energies to his 
big range and nursery at New Rochelle. 

Then, at No. 924, is the store of An- 
drew Eckrich, successor to Charles 
Grunewald, recently deceased. Mr. Eck- 
rich has been in the florists' business 
for thirty years, the last twenty years 
with Mr. Grunewald, who bequeathed 
his business to his employee. Mr. Eck- 
rich is still a young man and is well 
liked in the trade. 

Next comes Henry Hession 's en- 
larged, redecorated and handsome store. 
There are ample greenhouse attach- 
ments and the establishment is one of 
the finest in upper New York — and 
Madison avenue is only one block dis- 
tant, it must be remembered, from Fifth 
avenue. 

Just above Hession 's, at No. 1000, is 
the fine new store of Lena Hart. It is 
complete in every requirement and is 
considered one of the best locations on 
this famous avenue of flower stores. 

Then last, but not least, at No. 1064, 
the pedestrian is greeted by the smart 
store front of Adolph Meyer. 

So, between Nos. 340 and 1064, or 
between Forty-fourth and Seventy-sixth 
streets, on Madison avenue, a distance 
of less than two and one-half miles, 
there are twenty-one flower stores; and 
every one of them is a credit to the New 
York retail industry and to the gentle- 
men at the head of the enterprises. 

J. A. S. 




STABTINa VALLEY PIPS. 

Which valley pips are best for forc- 
ing, the German, Danish or Dutchf How 
far apart shall I plant them in the 
sand? Will three or four inches of 
sand in the bench be enough? Is it 
best to leave the tip of the bulb a little 
above the sand? A. L. — Mo. 

The German variety, Berlin, is the 
best for forcing. Use six inches of 
sand to plant the valley in; four inches 
is hardly enough. Set the pips one to 
one and one-half inches apart in the 
rows and let the rows run three inches 
apart. You can give an inch more if 
you have ample room. Allow the tips 
of the pips to stand above the sand in 
all cases. c. W. 

OUTDOOR LILY OF THE VALLEY. 

Will you please tell me whether val- 
ley pips, such as are used in a green- 
house, will grow outside to make a per- 
manent bed? C. H. K.— Mich. 

Valley pips, such as are used for 
forcing, will grow outside finely. Be 



sure to trench the ground well where 
they are to be planted, manuring lib- 
erally, as once a bed is planted it will 
last for a number of years. If you can 
secure pips of Forton's valley, I would 
suggest getting it, as it is superior to 
all others outdoors. The spikes are 
strong and the bells are extra large. 
C. W. 

FORCINO THE PIPS. 

Kindly give me information on the 
forcing of lily of the valley. Please 
state the necessary temperature of the 
sand and also the temperature of the 
house. B. & S.— la. 

In the forcing of lily of the valley the 
temperature of the house U of small con- 
sequence; all that is needed is that there 
be means of supplying heat in severe 
weather. It is bottom heat that is of 
prime importance. The degree will de- 
pend largely on the season of the year, 
the earliest forced pips requiring 80 de- 
grees to 85 degrees, but gradually lessen- 
ing toward the natural flowering time, in 
April OP May, to 65 to 70 degrees. The 
piping beneath the bench should be 



M 



The Florists' Review 



FlBBUABT 1, 1917. 



ample to maintain the higher tempera- 
ture, boarded up so as to confine the 
heat beneath the bench, but with part 
of the boards hinged so that some of 
the heat can be liberated in the house 
upon occasion. 

Probably you understand the con- 
struction of the bench, with facilities 
for keeping the valley in the dark until 
it comes time to color it up and harden 
it off. F. K. 

LOUISVILLE, KY. 



The Market. 

Although we have had severe weather 
during the last few weeks, January has 
not by any means been a dull month, as 
it usually is. The heavy funeral work 
has made business better than it usually 
is at this time. Carnations are just be- 
ginning to show up on the profit side 
of the ledger, having been in extremely 
short crop until the last few weeks. 
Although the cut at present is extra 
heavy with most of the growers, the 
demand is far in excess of the supply, 
and large quantities of shipped-in flow- 
ers are being used, which seems con- 
trary to the statement that the carna- 
tion is waning in popularity. From re- 
ports of several growers, even more 
glass will be devoted to carnations next 
year. 

The demand for spring flowers has 
come to life during the last two weeks, 
large quantities of. freesias being 
snapped up as soon as they are offered. 
The same is true of sweet peas. Yar- 
rawa, that wonderful Australian va- 
riety, has been grown especially well by 
some of the growers. Calendulas, an- 
tirrhinums, stocks, mignonette and mar- 
guerites arrive in moderate quantities. 

The roses offered in the stores are, 
with few exceptions, from other cen- 
ters, chiefly Chicago. Local greenhouses, 
having furnished a good crop, are now 
at low ebb, and every attention is be- 
ing given the plants in order to supply 
the ever-increasing demand at Easter. 

Various Notes. 

At the W. L. Korb greenhouses Mr. 
Korb has two carnations of his own 
production. These varieties have gained 
considerable recognition locally. One is 
described by a color expert as a Japa- 
nese red. Besides being a novelty in 
color, it is of large size and is said to 
be a better keeper than any one of the 
present varieties. The other origination 
is a medium pink. Mr. Korb intends to 
disseminate both varieties as soon as 
adequate stock is produced, there being 
only about 200 plants of each at present. 

The Victor Mathis greenhouses are 
beginning to lose their barren appear- 
ance, which was caused by the heavy 
holiday trade. The plants for Valen- 
tine's day and Easter now are getting 
close attention, to bring them to their 
highest development at the right time. 

Anders Rasmussen, the New Albany 
grower, is making shipments of approxi- 
mately 10,000 carnations per week to 
the Philadelphia market, besides supply- 
ing the needs of the Louisville flower 
merchants. His roses at present are off 
crop. 

Webb Frantz, who has been associated 
with the Nanz & Neuner Co. for several 
years, has accepted a position with F. 
Walker & Co. at the Preston road estab- 
lishment. Mr. Frantz, while with the 
Nanz & Neuner Co., was manager of 
the greenhouses at St. Matthews. 

John Doll, who for the last nine years 



has been head gardener on Judge 
Humphrey's estate at Glenview, Ky., 
now is with F. Walker & Co. This con- 
cern can congratulate itself on securing 
two men of such proven ability. 

An old landmark belonging to H. G. 
Walker, president of F. Walker & Co., 
was destroyed by fire last week. Snow 
on the nearby buildings prevented the 
flames from, spreading to the green- 
houses. The family of Kingsley Walker 
occupied the old dwelling. 

H. E. Humiston, of the Chicago Feed 
& Fertilizer Co., was in town recently. 
He expressed regret at being able to 
visit only a few of the growing estab- 
lishments. The weather at the time 
was bad, -there being a foot of snow and 
the temperature at zero. 

Local importers have received hard 
knocks this season. Consignments of 
Christmas stock have just been received. 
Several cases of English hollies, Skim- 
mia Japonica and bay trees, which 



came a short time ago, were in excel- 
lent condition; in fact, it was some of 
the best stock ever received from 
Europe, but it will be absolutely useless 
for the purpose intended. Two cases 
of box evergreens for use last fall came 
in heated, the entire lot a dead loss. 
Several cases of dormant roses were re- 
ceived in fairly good shape. Hero is 
but another argument in favor of the 
made-in-America idea. Bring on those 
wonderful productions we see and hear 
so much about out at Eureka, Cal.! 

G. G. W. 



Des Moines, la. — During the tearing 
down of the old and construction of 
the new building on the northeast cor- 
ner of Seventh and Walnut streets, the 
Alpha Floral Co., occupying the corner 
room, will be .located temporarily at 809 
Walnut street. A. J. Zwart and James 
S. Wilson, Jr., are the owners of the 
company. 




ODEN LCTTEl^y^ READEEi6 



DOWN WITH STREET PEDDLEES! 

In The Review for January 11 there 
appeared an article in which a com- 
mission dealer's views of the faker 
problem were quoted. Now, I disagree 
with the author on several of his opin- 
ions. I maintain that the street ped- 
dler does more harm than good. The 
peddler's stock, being cheap, cannot be 
fresh, and will last such a short time 
that the buyer is made to consider 
flowers a foolish, short-lived luxury. 
The same money expended for a few 
fresh flowers would have the opposite 
result; such sales would tend to make 
permanent customers. No matter what 
the price, stale flowers universally hurt 
the business in two ways: First, the 
growers who retail their own stock are 
forced to sacrifice it because of the 
competition; second, numerous flower 
buyers are lost. 

A more uniform price on flowers is 
advocated; that is, if flowers are high 
during the holiday season they should 
not sell at one-fourth as much the 
following week. When this is the case 
the people think they have been held 
up. Would it not be a better plan to 
have the prices more normal during 
the second week and to give fifteen or 
sixteen flowers instead of a dozen, thus 
making the customers feci that they 
are receiving extra good measure? Or, 
in another way, why not keep the prices 
normal the whole time, and thereby not 
lose after the holidays what was made 
during the holidays! As for explain- 
ing to customers about weather condi- 
tions, etc., as suggested in this article, 
one has neither the time nor patience 
to tell every customer who telephones 
or calls. Moreover, few customers 
would understand how in one week car- 
nation prices can drop from $1.50 to 35 
cents, whereas they could understand 
the change of prices of strawberries 
from March to June — time enough to 
grow and ripen a crop. 

The average commission dealer does 
not give the storemen a chance at the 



bargains. He feels that the storemen 
are the ones he must make his money 
on, and he uses the venders simply to 
work off his surpluses. He would rather 
sell all the surplus at a big sacrifice 
than sell part of the surplus for prac- 
tically the same price. The latter way 
surely is much fairer to both growers 
and storemen. If at any time a sacri- 
fice in prices is to be made, the com- 
missionman should notify the storemen 
— the ones who really keep him in busi- 
ness — and not unload the stock on de- 
partment stores, 5 and 10-cent stores 
and street venders. 

Quoting from this article: "Mr. C'om- 
missionman receives his flowers in the 
morning and holds them all for what he 
thinks a fair price, no matter what class 
the buyer belongs to. Perhaps he does 
not clean up that day and is compelled 
to carry some flowers over until the 
next day. If so, and the flowers are in 
good condition, he tries to get the regu- 
lar price, but if they finally have to be 
sold at cheap prices to save dumping 
them, it at least gives the grower some- 
thing. ' ' The flowers usually have been 
cut the day before the commission- 
man receives them. They, therefore, 
are three days old by the time the store- 
man can buy and give them away as 
advertisements. By that time they 
would be too stale for good advertising, 
and would lead the recipients to believe 
that the advertiser's flowers did not 
last long. Because the commissionmen 
want to make a few cents more for one 
or two growers, many others are harmed 
and the business is hurt in general. 

Would it not be better for the com- 
niissionman to notify the storemen on 
the first day the surplus stock is on 
hand and give them the benefit of the 
oversupply? In this way the business 
would still remain in the hands of the 
florists, and the local growers as well 
as the growers of the shipped-in stock 
would have fair play, since cheap sales 
hurt both of them. 

E. E. Temperley. 



Februabv 1, 1917. 



The Florists' Review 



35 




F. J. Lake. 

r. J. Lake, of Wellesley Hills, Mass., 
one of the oldest florists in the vicinity 
of Boston, died January 27. He was in 
his eighty-fourth year. Mr. Lake was 
one of the pioneer stallholders at the old 
Park Street flower market. His spe- 
cialties were carnations, asparagus and 
asters. His son, A. G. Lake, has for 
some years been managing the business. 
Mr. Lake for a number of years was 
one of the board of assessors of Welles- 
ley Hills, where he resided for twenty- 
. eight years. W. N. C. 

Henry Seger. 

Henry Seger, 1517 West One-hundred- 
twelfth place, AVashington Heights, 
Chicago, died January 26, at the ^gc of 
51 years. Mr. Seger came to this coun- 
try from Germany seventeen years ago. 
Shortly after his arrival he accepted a 
position at the South Park conserva- 
tory, Chicago. About fifteen years ago 
he went into business for himself and 
had ever since been engaged in the 
retail flower trade. Previous to his 
death he had been ailing for many 
years. His wife and two sons survive 
him. 

PROVIDENCE, R. I. 



The Market. 

Business last week was good, orders 
for funerals, weddings and other social 
functions being numerous. A scarcity 
of flowers has kept prices a trifle above 
normal, and with the high price of coal 
and the temperatures below the freezing 
point most of the time, it is doubtful 
if there is a chance for any reduction 
at present. 

Prices on roses are steep and there is 
a decided shortage of good stock. Car- 
nations are good but few. The appear- 
ance of daffodils and tulips, with in- 
creasing quantities of sweet peas, is af- 
fording some relief. 

Various Notes. 

The Butcher greenhouses have made 
a specialty of Ophelia roses. 

W. P. Carpenter, the Union Station 
florist, last week was confined to his 
home by a severe cold. 

F. Jordan is eliminating flowers from 
his greenhouses and will devote the 
space to tomatoes. 

Bert West, manager for William Hay, 
was on the sick list last week. 

Joseph Solomon, who conducts the 
flower department at S. S. Kresge's, 
has taken over the store of the Empire 
Floral Co. 

Marcus Morton Burdick, vice-presi- 
dent of the Rhode Island Horticultural 
Society, died at his home in this city 
last week. He was in his seventy-fourth 
year. He previously was president of 
the society for two years. 

Harry Oakley, formerly in business 
as the Empire Floral Co., has taken a 
position with William Bowers, on Wash- 
ington street. 

E. Brooke, of T. J. Johnston & Co., 
reports a good business since the com- 
pany removed to the location at 107 
Washington street. 

James B. Canning, of Smith street, is 
back in the harness after a long period 
of illness. 



Joseph E. Koppelman is cutting good 
gardenias from his houses at Riverside. 
He is shipping them to Boston and New 
York, as the local market has compara- 
tively little use for these flowers. 

Howard Macrae, son of Alex. Macrae, 
of F. Macrae & Sons, has returned to 
his studies at Cornell University, after 
a year's practical experience at the A. 
N. Pierson establishment at Cromwell, 
Conn. W. H. M. 

MISSOXTRI FLORISTS. 

The appointments of the vice-presi- 
dents of the Missouri State Florists' 
Association were made last week, and 
i-omprise the following: H. Archias, 
Sedalia, Mo., two years; Frank A, 
Windier, St. Louis, Mo., two years; Wil- 
liam L. Rock, Kansas City, Mo., one 
year; Earl Reed, Louisiana, Mo., one 
year. These comprise a representative 
of the wholesalers, retailers, growers, 
and the nurserymen of Missouri and 
President Knapp is to be congratulated 
on the selection of such able and pro- 
gressive material to constitute part of 
the executive board of the Missouri 
State Florists' Association. 

W. S. Wells, Sec'y. 



AMERICAN ROSE SOCIETY. 

The executive committee of the 
American Rose Society held a well at- 
tended meeting in the Bellevue-Strat- 
ford hotel at Philadelphia January 25. 
It was decided to make the whole show 
resemble a great rose garden; that is, 
that the rose garden to be put up by 
the American Rose Society should not 
only be the central feature of the exhi- 
bition, but that the decoration should 
harmonize with it and also the other 
exhibits insofar as that is possible. 
Henry A. Dreer, Inc., courteously al- 
tered its rose garden plan, so as to help 
to carry out this idea. Walter Vanden 
Hengle, of J. J. Habermehl's Sons, has 
drawn a plan for the rose garden that 
he has colored, showing the details, and 



the plan for the hall decoration. This 
will probably be passed upon at the 
meeting February 1. Secretary Benj. » 
Hammond reported that practically all 
of the fifty per cent of the guarantee 
fund called in for February 1 is now in 
the treasury. John B. Geraghty, right- 
hand man to W. F. Therkildson, sub- 
mitted photographs to be used in the 
Sunday and daily papers in the pub- 
licity campaign which is to be opened 
next week.^ Phil. 

LADIES' S. A. F. 

Secretary Mrs. Charles H. Maynard 
announces a change in her address to 
Point Chautasqua, N. Y., and requests 
that communications be addressed to 
her there, instead of Pittsburgh, Pa., as 
formerly. ^^ 

AMHERST, MASS. 

The annual Boston trip of the classes 
in floriculture at the Massachusetts Ag- 
ricultural College will take place Feb- 
ruary 15 to 17. 

Prof. A. H. Nehrling recently re- 
turned from a trip to Indianapolis. 

Prof. F. A. Waugh lectured on "Gar- 
dens," at Ames, la., January 31. 

E, J. Canning spoke on ' ' The Nursery 
Business and Its Relation to Floricul- 
ture" at a recent meeting of the M. A. 
C. Florists' and Gardeners' Club. Aub- 
rey Butler will address the club this 
week on "Retail Store Management." 



WESTERLY, R. I. 



Conrad Schulz has returned from a 
business trip to New York city and vi- 
cinity. 

George L. Stillman is sending out an 
unusually large edition of his dahlia 
catalogue. 

Welcome Carmichael, who has been 
employed elsewhere, hereafter will de- 
vote his entire time to the affairs of the 
Carmichael Orchards at Shannock, 
where peonies and gladioli are the spe- 
cialties. W. H. M, 



£liilllllllllllllllillllllllllllllllilillllllllllllillillllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllillllllllllllllllK: 

I MOTT-LY MUSINGS | 

^iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiir 



A. H. Woeppel, of Corning, N. Y., 
was putting the finishing touches on 
some handsome funeral pieces and re- 
marked how pleasant the task was when 
one had suitable stock for the purpose. 
Some choice carnations were noted, es- 
pecially the Enchantress family and 
White Wonder. Formosa is the favor- 
ite lily for Easter. "We had Formosa 
lily plants last season that carried four- 
teen to fifteen blooms from bulbs 9x11, 
and we look for as good returns this 
Easter, judging from present appear- 
ances," observed Mr. Woeppel. "You," 
added Mr. Woeppel, "will be sorry to 
know that my brother, Jerome, who 
has been my assistant since we began 
business, has been obliged to give up 
owing to an incurable disease." 

W. A. Wettlin, of Hornell, N. Y., re- 
marked that through continuous adver- 
tising he has built up a wholesale plant 
business that takes more stock than he 
can grow. He seriously thinks of build- 
ing greenhouses on the farm he pur- 
chased two years ago, and mentioned 
in passing that the fruit and vegetables 
grown on the farm during the last sum- 



mer and sold at the store in town paid 
the running expenses. 

E. V. B. Felthousen, of Schenectady, 
one of the largest growers of bedding 
plants in the Mohawk valley, says there 
will be a scarcity of bedding stock on 
account of the lateness and mildness of 
the fall season. Heat was withheld 
and plants are backward in consequence. 
Undoubtedly the grower of this class 
of stock will find a ready market for 
his plants. 

L. J. Rowe, of Titusville, Pa., was 
hustling in a shipment of coal and said: 
* ' This is a friend in need at this time, 
when natural gas is undependable. " 

W. M. Deyoe & Co., of Oil City, Pa., 
report excellent business, including much 
funeral work. A decoration for a con- 
cert, consisting of Golden Spur and 
Paper White narcissi, of their own 
growing, was most artistic. 

C. E. Gunton, of the Red Rock Rosery, 
Bradford, Pa., was bothered with an 
iftseet that bored into the buds of roses, 
especially Beauties, and caused much 
damage. He has found a remedy for 
the intruder. W. M. 



86 



The Florists^ Review 



Fbbbuaby 1, 1917. 




The white paper used to print this 
issue of The Eeview weighed 10,645 
pounds, or nearly fiva and one-half tons. 



Batabltehed, 1897. by Q. L. GRANT. 

Published every Thursday by 
The Floeists* Publishing Co., 

620-S60 Caxtoa Bulldinfir, 

608 Soutb Dearborn St., Chicago. 

Tele., Wabash 8196. 

Regrintered cable address, 

Florview, Chicago. 




Entered as second class matter 
Dec. 3, 1897, at the post-office at Chi- 
cago, 111., under the Act of Mar H 
3.1879. 

Subscription price, $1.50 a year. 
To Canada, $2.50; to Europe. $3.00. 

Advertising rat<>8 quoted upon 
request. Only strictly trade ad- 
vertising accepted. 



im iMPMnnniiuMiiriiJba 




NOTICE. 

It is impossible to g^uaranteo 

the insertion, discontinuance or 

alteration of any advertisement 

unless instructions are received 

BY 4 P. M. TUESDAY. 

S0CIET7 OF AMEBICAN FLOHISTS. 
Incorporated by Act of Congress, March 4, 1901. 

Officers for 1917: President, Robert 0. Kerr, 
Honaton, Tex.; vice-president, A. L. Miller, Ja- 
maica, N. Y. ; secretary, John Young, 63 W. 28th 
8t., New York City; treasurer, J. J. Hesa, 
Omaha, Neb. 

Thirty-third annual convention. New York, 
N. Y., August 21 to 24, 1917. 

Besults bring advertising. 
The Review brings results. 

In spite of the higher costs of all ma- 
terials, it looks as though this will prove 
to be a record year for greenhouse build- 
ing. 

Fulsome praise of certain novelties, in 
quarters known not to weigh their words, 
is thought to have been a handicap to 
their sale fliis season. 

Personality still counts for much in 
the flower business. It is difficult to de- 
velop flower growing or selling on the 
impersonal, system plan. 

There are many growers of carnations 
who think roses have been a more profit- 
able crop the last year or two, but after 
they have changed they will wish they 
hadn't. It is ever thus. 

The final premium li.<)t for the St. Louis 
spring show, March 15 to 18, has been 
issued. Correspondence concerning com- 
petitive exhibits should be addressed to 
Frank Weber, Nursery, Mo. 

The excellent returns to rose growers 
this season are being made by a good 
average. Top prices have not been high- 
er than usual, but the bottom has not 
been so low as frequently is the case. A 
demand which makes possible clean sales 
at moderate prices is the secret of the 
season's success. 

Within the last few weeks The Review 
has received several letters from employees 
in greenhouse establishments, the writers 
•explaining that it is with regret they are 
leaving the trade for more profitable em- 
ployment in some other line. It seems 
•clear many florists have not felt able to 
advance wages as they have been advanced 
in most other trades and it affords another 
evidence of the necessity of pushing up 
;the retail prices of plants and cut flowers. 



WILL DISCUSS EXPRESS SERVICE. 

The shortcomings of the express serv- 
ice at Christmas have stirred up the 
whole country, but especially the Phila- 
delphians. In The Review for January 
25, in the Philadelphia column, there 
was a request from members addressed 
to W. F. Therkildson, chairman of the 
Essay Committee, asking that a leader 
be assigned for the discussion of the 
matter at the Florists' Club. Here is 
Mr. Therkildson 's answer. 

Noticing in the Philadelphia Notes the open 
letter addressed to W. F. Therkildson, I am 
liappy to report tliat I have secured, for March 6, 
the very man that the two members and even 
more want to hear. In other words, for March 6 
1 have secured an official of the Wells Fargo Ex- 
press Co., name not yet announced, who will talk 
to the Philadelphia Florists' Club. For February 
6, Max Schling will talk on "Art and Nature." 

It is understood the members are 

privileged to heckle the expressman. 



WHICH? 

One class of people want things cheap. 
Another class want things dear. A third 
class want things good. Which class 
do you cater to ? 

Persons who want things cheap con- 
sider price first, last and all the time. 
It is what they pay, not what they get, 
that is kept in mind. Consequently they 
usually get less value for their money 
than anyone else. Those who want 
things dear also consider price first, 
but they pay enough so the seller usu- 
ally can afford to give the best. But 
neither class of customers is permanent; 
the "cheap" buyers flock to the new 
place that offers low grade goods a little 
cheaper, while the "dear" purchasers 
stampede to the latest place that finds 
fashion's fleeting favor. 

The florist who builds a permanent 
l^atronage is the one who sees to it that 
everything he sells is good — not flashy; 
just plain good. He can not compete in 
price with the fellow whose only idea 
is to undersell, but he will have no 
trouble in getting prices that will sat- 
isfy both buyer and seller; he will 
make the business pay, pay consistently, 
and paying consistently means steadily 
and well. 

MONEY IN FLORISTS' POCKETS. 

Everybody is familiar with the old 
quotation about the man who made two 
blades of grass grow where only one 
blade grew before, and it may not be 
wholly new to apply it to the purposes 
of a trade paper, but the fact is St. 
Valentine's day affords an especially 
fine illustration of how The Review has 
put thousands upon thousands of dollars 
into the pockets of the trade. 

Not that The Review ever has caused 
money to rain on florists like manna 
from heaven — that was a miracle, and 
the days of miracles are over — but that 
the paper can and has, repeatedly, 
shown to enterprising florists opportu- 
nities and methods whereby the trade 
may increase its sales and its profits. 

The beauty of it is The Review's 
suggestions work out in practice — they 
have the punch — they get there. 

To cite a conspicuous example that 
all will remember, there's Mothers' day. 
The Review did not originate Mothers' 
day, but scarcely any florists had heard 
of it before The Review, recognizing 
an opportunity for the trade as a whole 



to add many thousands of dollars to the 
annual sales, made Mothers' day the 
feature of one of its issues. Every flo- 
rist knows what happened: That year 
hundreds of florists pushed Mothers' 
day, and The Review reported how they 
did it, and how the public responded. 
The next year thousands helped, and 
now everybody pushes Mothers' day. 
The result is another special flower day 
has been developed — one that puts, in 
the aggregate, an immense sum of ex- 
tra money into circulation in the trade. 
It might have come to pass, in time, 
without The Review to point out the 
opportunity and the methods of devel- 
oping it — but take the case of St. Val- 
entine's day: 

St. Valentine's day has been known 
to us all since childhood. But what 
did it amount to for florists until The 
Review published a special number to 
tell the trade about the neglected op- 
portunity? Then it was said: 

The purpose of this issue is to get 10,000 florists 
each to do at least a little something to attract 
the attention of the public to the appropriateness 
of flowers for use as valentines. 

If 10,000 florists did not push flowers 

for that St. Valentine's day, in 1913, 

at least they are doing so now — and 

making money by it. 



WHAT THE S. A. F. IS DOING. 

In a circular by Secretary Young, 
sent to the newly appointed state vice- 
presidents of the S. A. F., there are 
these paragraphs: 

The society has much work mapped out for 
the near future, including an effort to induce a 
greater use of flowers on Ihe part of the public. 
It has been painfully evident within the last 
two years that the consumption of flowers is 
woefully short of the production, entailing a 
vast loss to growers. A campaign of publicity 
such as the society has in contemplation will 
entail prodigious expense and can only be en- 
tered upon when those whom it will most interest 
will give the small support asked of them — a 
membership in the society. 

State legislation in regard to the operation 
of greenhouse heating plants is another impor- 
tant problem now receiving the attention of our 
organization, one in which individual action is 
without avail. The growers in every state are 
threatened with legislation to compel them to 
yield to unjust measures to force them to em- 
ploy licensed engineers to run their beating 
plants, and these to work in eight-hour shifts. 
Just stop to think what this would cost florists! 
(:!ould an individual florist do anything to stop it, 
or change it to meet conditions? 

A bureau of credits and collections, to 

be operated under the auspices of the 

society, also is planned. A committee 

headed by C. E. Critchell, of Cincinnati, 

has the matter under consideration. 



CHICACK). 



The Market. 



The main feature which characterized 
the wholesale cut flower market last 
week was a supply insufficient to meet 
the brisk demand which came in during 
the entire week. The market generally 
was better than the preceding week and 
good prices, the best average, in fact, 
since Christmas, prevailed. Although 
business may be said to have been good 
during the entire week, there was actu- 
ally no more stock sold than has been 
the case right along, but the fact that - 
the better demand enabled wholesalers > 
to clean out well from day to day at ' 
good prices, gave an improved tone to ^ 
the market. A general advance in | 
prices on all stock is being made and i 
the lower figures on inferior grades are 
being clipped off. j 

American Beauties are still extremely \ 
scarce and are obtaining premium \ 
prices. Other varieties of roses are in \ 
fair supply, but are clearing readily at l 



FUBBUABY 1, 1917. 



The Florists' Review 



37 



Time to Order for 



St. Valentine's Day 



m^ 



mm 



|0U REMEMBER the way St. Valen- 
tine's Day sales have increased the 
last few years, especially for those 

stores that have pushed! Well, get busy. 

You can be sure of getting all the stock 

you need if you order here. 

February 14 is the big day of the year 
for corsage bouquets. We can supply the 
stock— plenty of Violets, Valley and Spencer 
Sweet Peas. Order enough. Also, St. Val- 
entine's is a big day for boxes of Spring 
Flowers — Jonquils, Tulips, etc. We can 
supply in quantity. 

Rainbow Freesia, in many bright col- 
ors, also will be in large supply for St. Val- 
entine's Day. 

THIS WEEK 

We have a large supply of Carnations, Jonquils, Tulips, 
Lilies, Roses, etc. Excellent quality — splendid values at 
the prices quoted here. 



IN OUR NEW HOME 

We now are in our new home directly across the street from our 
former location. Here we have the largest, lightest, best equipped 
wholesale cut flower house Chicago ever has enjoyed— larger and bet- 
ter equipped than our own best previous efforts. We invite the trade 
to make use of the facilities we have provided. 



Current Price List 



ORCHIDS 



Oattleyas . 



Per dOE. 
$5.00 @ $7.60 

AMBBIOAN BKAUXT Per doc. 

Extra long Btema $7 60 

Stems 80 to 36 Ipchea 6.U0 

Stems 24 Inches 6 00 

Stems 18 Inches 2.00 

Stems 12 Inches..; l.CO 

Short Stems. . .per 100. |4.00@$6.00 

ROS£S Per 100 

Mrs. Russell, epectel $26.00 

select 18.00© 20,00 

medium 12.00 

Milady, special 16.00© 18.t0 

select 10 00© 12.00 

short 6.00© 8.00 

KlUarney Brilliant, special 12.00 @ 16.00 

^^ " select 8.00© 10.00 

short 6.00 

OpheUa. special 18.00 

select 12.00© 16.00 

short 8.00 

White KUlamey. special 10.00 © 12.00 

select 6.00© 8.00 

short 4.00 

KUlamey, special 12.00© 15 00 

select "OO © 10 00 

short 5.00© 6.00 

Mrs. Ward, special 12.00 

select 8.00© 10.00 

short 4.00© 6.00 

Sunburst, special 16.00 

select 10.00© 12.00 

short 6.00© 8.00 

Oecile Bmnner 3 .00 

Baby Doll 3.00 

Extra special roses billed accordingly- 

CARNATIONS 

Common $ 2. TO 

Lai-fire and fancy $3.00© 4.00 

Spllta 1 . 60 



TIOLETS 

home-Krown , 



SinKles 

Doubles, Hudson River 

Home-grown Doubles 



.60 I 



TtflSCELLANEOUS 

Freesia Purity 4 

Jonquils li 

Tulips 3. 

Sweet Peas, Spencer 1, 

Valley 4 

Easter Lilies 10 

Daisies 1. 

MiKnonette 4, 

Stevla 

Calendulas 3 

Paper Whites 

Pansles per bunch, 10c@16c 

DECORATITB 

Plumosui per bunch, 

Sprengerl " 

Adlaotum, fancy long per 100, 

Smllax per doi., $2.00 

Ferns per 1000, 2.60 

nalax " 1.26 

Lencothoe 

Mexican Ivy per 1000. 



00 © 
00 © 

uo @ 

60 © 
00© 
00 © 
60 © 
00© 

00 @ 



.36 
.20 



6.00 



1.00 

.76 

1.00 

5.00 
4.U0 
5.00 
2.00 
6.00 
12 00 
2.(0 
8 00 
2.00 
4.00 
3.00 



.60 

.60 

1.00 

.30 

16 

1.00 
.60 



Subject to market chances 

Store open from 7 a. m. to 6 p. m. 
Sundars and holidays close at noon. 



E. C. AMLING CO. 

The Largest and Best EquipBjed 
Wholesale Cut Flower House In Chicago 

169-175 N. Wabash Ave., CHMi^ \€l£k 

Long Distance Telephont, 1978 Central. ^>M M M^^AmX^^^ 



38 



The Florists^ Review 



Fkbbuabt 1, 1917. 



American Beauties 

$2.00, $2.50, $3.00, $4.00, $5.00, $6.00 

and lots of them. 

Also all other Cut Rowers in season 
BATAVIA GREENHOUSE CO. 

30 E. Randolph Street, L D. Phone, Randolph 2995 CHICAQO, ILL. 



Mention The Review when you write. 



good prices. Carnations are in sufficient 
supply, but are selling well at an ad- 
vanced figure. 

Valley is easier than it has been for 
some time, due to the increased supply 
of freesia which is arriving. The lat- 
ter item is of excellent quality and is 
selling readily, good quantities being 
use<t for corsage work. The supply of 
Easter lilies is large enough to meet 
the demand and stock is selling at 
slightly advanced prices. Orchids are 
in good demand and are clearing well. 
The supply of violets is larger than it 
has been, but the stock is selling well. 
Sweet peas also arrive in larger quan- 
tity. The quality is excellent and bet- 
ter prices are being obtained. Paper 
Whites arrive in good supply, the qual- 
ity is good and they are moving well. 
Small quantities of calendula and mig- 
nonette arrive, but they form only an 
insignificant item. 

Tulips and jonquils are in, large sup- 
]dy, but are selling well. The supply 
of daisies is a little larger than it has 
been. Snapdragons are still slow in ar- 
riving and what little stock comes in 
is readily disposed of. 

The New Amling Store. 

The E. C. Amling Co., previously lo- 
cated in the Le Moyne building, com- 
pleted removal to its new home across 
the Street, at 169 to 3 75 North Wabash 
avenue, in time to write two sales tick- 
ets there January 27. The store since 
then has been inspected by practically 
every florist who comes to the market 
and the opinion is unanimous that the 
move is the best ever made by the .Am- 
ling Co. The room is 60x125, located on 
an alley dignified by the name of Bur- 
ton place, so that there is an excellent 
rear entrance adjacent to safe parking 
space for automobiles. In addition to 
the street floor, the lease includes the 
basement and there is a gallery cover- 
ing the rear half of the main floor. 
Back of the store proper is a large cold 
room, excellent for many kinds of flow- 
ers the greater part of the year. In 
addition to the old, mechanically re- 
frigerated iceboxes, built for the Le 
Moyne block store, a new box has been 
built. A novelty is that two boxes are 
on the north side of the room and two 




KENNICOTT BROS. CO. 

CHICAGO 

Dealers to the Trade in 

Cut Flowers and Plants 



YEARS 



of 



Satisfaction and Appreciation 

with those with whom we have done business 
is THE BEST FORM OF ADVERTISING 

WHOLESALE ONLY 




Mention The Review wben you write. 



on the south side, so that it really makes 
a double store. In addition to its large 
size the store has the great advantage 
of excellent and well diffused light. 
With room to grow, and a ten years' 
lease, the company expects to add mate- 
rially to its business without departing 
from its policy of confining its opera- 
tions to cut flowers and grefens. 

The Amling Co. has leased a portion 
of the basement of the building to a 
new wholesale cut flower house, which 
will be opened about February 10 by 
Joseph E. Wiltgen, Evanston, and Mich- 
ael F. Freres. The new firm will go 
under the name of Wiltgen & Freres. 

Joseph Ziska & Sons are moving into 
the second floor of the building and 
will be transacting business there next 
week. 

The Stickers Are Selling. 

Fred Lautenschlager, chairman of the 
committee handling the Florists' Club's 



St. Valentine's campaign, reports sales 
to January 29 of 260,000 stamps and 
7,000 posters, totaling $1,250. 

The Clevolnnd Florists' Club purchased 10,000 
stamps and 500 posters. 

The florists of Canton, O.. combined their pur- 
chases in one order. 

The florists of Richmond, Ind., purchased 3,600 
stamps and 150 posters. 

Tlie Buffalo florists purchased as a body, order- 
init 10,000 stamps. 

Dudley & Sons, of Parkersburg, W. Va., or- 
dered 5,000 stamps. 

The florists of Louisville, Ky., ordered 10,000 
stamps. 

Atx)ut 10,000 stamps were sold to florists on 
the Pacific coast. 

The St. Louis Wholesale Cut Flower Co. placed 
an order for 25,000 stamps. 

Many orders wore received from Texas. 

Uochestcr, N. Y., ordered about 7,000 stamps. 

Numerous orders were received from New York 
city. 

The records show purchases by the 

best retail florists of the largest cities 

and the committee is making immediate 

shipment, from its headquarters, 444 

West Erie street, as orders are received. 

Mr. Lautenschlager has a stock of 



Febeuabt 1, 1917. 



The Florists' Review 



39 



aiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiHiii"""""""""""""""""""""" Ill"" iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiaiiiiiiiiiiiiiii| 

I Valentine Cut Flowers | 

I Valentine's Day is going to be a big flower day this year. Your customers will want | 

I the best obtainable stock. Make sure of having it for them by sending us your orders. | 

I CARNATIONS I 

i strictly first-class stock. We can ship you in any quantity. 5 

I SWEET PEAS ] 

I Finest quality Spencer Sweet Peas. Large assortment of colors. S 



= GARDENIAS 



VIOLETS FREESIAS ORCHIDS LILIES 

Also a good cut of Roses. 



I A. L RANDALL COMPANY | 

I WABASH AVENUE AT LAKE STREET, CHICAGO, ILL. 

nilllllllllllliiiiiliiiiillliillillilllllllllllllllllllllllllllillllllllllllllllllllllilllllllllllilllllllllllllliiiiiiii 



Z M 
E o A 

H N 



CHICAGO HEADQUARTERS 

RUSSELL-OPHELIA 

Our Specials for Valentine's Day: 

Fancy Freesias, Sweet Peas, Violets, Bulbous Stock 
and all other Seasonable Flowers* 

■^^^R«m«mber whan ordering that our lino Is so comploto that 
l^^F It Includes ovary Item offfforod In tho Qroat Chicago Market. 

30 E. Randolph St., a^^rllsj CHICAGO 



Mention The Review when you write. 



stamps and posters on sale at the In- 
dianapolis carnation show this week. 

Various Notes. 

It is sai(l the recent decision of the 
Ignited States Supreme court, affirming 
the judgment of the Illinois Supreme 
court in favor of Poehlmann Bros. Co., 
which some years ago filed a petition 
with the Illinois Warehouse Commission 
attacking a rate of 40 cents on coal and 
manure from Galewood to Morton 
Grove, will mean not only a lower rate, 
but eventually a reimbursement to that 
company of over $35,000. 

Charles A. Meinersmann, with an of- 
fice in the Steger building, bought out 
a retail shop at 4807 North Kedzie ave- 
nue, about six months ago and now an- 
nounces that he has purchased what 



was formerly the Lister Floral Shop, at 
1008 Belmont avenue. The two stores 
are known as the Albany Florists. Mr. 
Meinersmann takes an active part in 
the work and is acquainted with the 
retail flower business, although his busi- 
ness is landscaping. N. J. Bins is man- 
ager of the Belmont avenue store. 

A. Henderson thinks he sees a change 
in the trade tendencies, in that a large 
number of buyers have ceased to look 
for the cheapest source of supply and 
are earnestly in quest of one that can 
be depended on for first-class stock, 
well packed, even if the prices aro a 
little higher. Mr. Henderson believes 
the trade is beginning to appreciate that 
"the best is the cheapest in the long 
run." 

A little later than usual, Alois Frcy, 



at Crown Point, has begun cutting and 
shipping his annual crop of Rainbow 
freesias. He has 60,000 bulbs to flower, 
not to mention the seedlings under 
trial. 

In an interesting article in the auto- 
mobile number of the Tribune, Peter 
Reinberg, writing as chairman of the 
board of county commissioners instead- 
of as a florist, sent in a word of good 
cheer to those who use the highwavs, 
describing the road-building plans 'of 
the county for 1917. 

Most successful business men have 
an avocation as well as a vocation. C. A. 
Samuelson's is apple orcharding in 
Idaho. He knows the subject in all its 
phases and talks most interestingly on 
it. The varieties he grows are Stav- 
man's Winesap, Jonathan and Rome 



40 



The Florists' Review 



Fbbbuaby 1, 1917. 



If You Want Good Stock and Good Treatment 

SEND YOUR ORDERS TO 

Chicago's Host Up-to4ite and Best Located Wholesale Cut Flower House 

J.A.BUDLONG 



QUALITY 

§PEAKS 

LOUDER 

THAN 

PRICES 



184 North Wabash Avanua* CHICAQ* 



ROSES, TAUiEY ni Hfuni cbale 

CARNATIONS apnuitt rf 

A Bpaoiiatr inUWtn II 



CUT FLOWERS 



PRICES 

AS 

LOW 

AS 

OTHERS 



■^SHIPPING ORDERS GIVEN CAREFUL ATTENTION'VR 

We are in daily touch with market conditions and when a decline takes place you can rely upon orders sent us receiving such benefits. 



Mention The B»Tlew when yon write. 



WIETOR BROS.. 



162 North 
Wabash Avenue, 



CHICAGO 



AMERICAN BEAUTIES Per doz. 

48 to 60-inch stems $5.00 @ $6 00 

36-inch stems 4.00 

30-inch stems 3.00 

24-inch stems 2.00 

Mrs. Chas. Russell Per 100 

Fancy stock $10.00 @ $20.00 

Miniature Roses Per 100 

Baby Doll $2.00 

Elger 2.00 



VALENTINE'S DAY PRICE LIST 

Pink Killarney, White KiUarney^ KiUarney 
Brilliant, Sunburst, Richmona, Ophelia 

Per 100 

Extra Special $10.00 

Select 8.00 

Fancy 7.00 

Medium 6.00 

Gk)od 6.00 

Short stems 4.00 

Carnations— Red 4.00 

Fancy 3.50 

Good 2.00 



Per 100 

$ 6.00 



1.00 



Miscellaneous 

Valley 

Lilies $12.60 @ 16.00 

Ferns per lOOO, $2.50 

Smilax per doz. strings, 2.00 

Adiantum 

Galax (bronze and green), per 

1000 $1.25 

Asparagus Sprengeri. . . . ) bch. 

Asparagus Plumosus ( $0.50 

Boxwood per lb., .26 

Other Green Goods Market Rates. 



ROSES, our selection $4.0O per lOO 



Mention The Rerlew when yon write. 



Beauty, favored by him in the order 
named. 

After spending January 31 at the 
Hill place at Richmond and at New 
Castle, C. J. Michelsen, Eugene Dramm 
and W. i?. Keimel will take in the car- 
nation shfcw at Indianapolis February 1. 

McKinley and O. W. Frese had many 
things in common, including the same 
birthday anniversary, January 29. 
Those who know that Mr. Frese has 
been thirty-six years in the flower busi- 
ness in Chicago can figure out that he 
must have made his start when he was 
only fifteen years old. 

Although there were no azaleas for 
Christmas, the local market now is well 
supplied with plants that are excellent- 
ly flowered, but which are selling below 
their real value. Plantsmen say that 
February and March will see most of 
the azaleas disposed of, with a compara- 
tively small quantity remaining for 
Easter. 

After a minor operation in St. Luke's 
hospital January 25, Mrs. W. J. Smyth 
is recuperating rapidly.- 

Peter Pearson is convinced that the 
prices of Holland bulbs cannot stay on 
the present level of asking prices for 
1917 crops. He says that, to begin with, 
where a grower forces the bulbs for the 
wholesale market, the price obtained 
for the cut flowers does not permit the 
payment of the advances attempted this 
season by the Holland travelers. He 
says that he is told by a number of 
growers that they will not place any 
orders this season, dropping the forcing 
of bulbs next fall unless it proves possi- 
ble to purchase bulbs in the fall at 
something like normal prices. Mr. 
Pearson thinks the general adoption of 
such a policy will result in a fall in the 
market. 

According to George Asmus, the sales 



llllllillllllllllllilllllllllillllllilllllllllllllllllllillllllllllllliliillllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll^ 

I ARE YOU LOOKING [ 

= for a first-class, reliable wholesale house to ship your stock to? S 

s Are you desirous of finding a market for your stock where you will E 

S get maximum returns? If so, we would like to get in touch with 5 

E you. Since our move last spring our business has steadily increased. E 

E We are growing ! But, as the demands upon us grow greater, E 

E we must increase our supply. We need more stock ! We have the E 

S market, we get the prices, we give the service. If you have a stock E 

E of Carnations, Roses, Lilies or miscellaneous stock of any kind, E 

E write us. E 

i O. A. & L. A. TONNER 1 

E WHOLESALK CUT FLOWRRS AND SUPPLIES E 

S 30 E. Randolph St. L- D- Phone Central 6284 CHICAGO, ILL. S 

^lilllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllillllllllllilllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllillllT 

Mention The Berisw whea yoa write. 



of carnations have become a minor mat- 
ter in the Schiller stores. While white 
carnations are used for work, th? sales 
of colored carnations as cut flowers 
have fallen far behind the sales of roses 
and other flowers. 

Frank Oechslin has a new body on 
his Chalmers delivery car. It is painted 
green like the rest of the flock. Mr. 
Oechslin recently purchased a new 
Packard pleasure car. 

Wendland & Keimel Co., Elmhurst, 
will plant 2,000 of Breitmeyer's Rose- 
pink Ophelia for next season. 

While carnations were for a number 
of years the standby at R. Scheffler's 
place at Wheaton, this year only three 
crops now are sweet peas, mums, asters, 
benches were planted to them. The 
gladioli, peonies and novelties, indoor 
and outdoor, with some bedding stock, 
the latter principally for local sales. 



A. L. Randall and Frank Johnson, of 
the A. L. Randall Co., are sojourning in 
Cuba. They expect to be gone about 
four weeks. 

The installation of an ice machine 
and cold storage room by Kroeschell 
Bros. Co., for Stielow Bros., Niles Cen- 
ter, has been completed and the appa- 
ratus is in use. 

Frank and Arthur Pesternick, with 
the Ernst Wienhoeber Co. and Bassett 
& Washburn respectively, are mourning 
the loss of their father, who died Jan- 
uary 27. 

J. P. Risch, of Weiland & Risch, is 
greatly pleased with the manner in 
which the trade is taking to Champ 
Weiland rose. He says it looks as 
though all the growers who did not 
plant it this season want to do so for 
the next one. 

Due to steadily increasing business, 



Febuijaky 1, 1917. 



The Florists' Review 



41 




Quality Stock and Efficient Service 

The assurance of careful attention to the smallest detail of 
your order and a guarantee of your satisfaction, are offered 

you by 

FrNE ^ K UNGEL 

WHOLESALE FLORISTS 
30 E. Randolph St. '^■^'T.'.^'.f!!'.''"' CHICAGO 

BEST QUALITY PRICES RIGHT 



AsrentB for 
TO-:riAK-INE 



\ 



SHIPPING ORDERS A SPECIALTY 



Mention The RcTlew when yon write. 



Colorado-grown Carnations 

FOR COLOR AND QUALITY 

Try them and be convinced. Send for trial shipment. 

THE PIKES PEAK FLORAL CO., Colorado Springs, Colo. 



Mention The Review when you write. 



y 
* 



SWEET PEAS 

and 

VIOLETS 

FOR VALENTINE'S 

Any Quantity Finest Quality 
Prices Right 

M. C. GUNTERBERG 

158 N. Wabash Ave., 

(Main Floor) 

CHICAGO 

Phono 
Central 30C7 



Kennicott Bros. Co. has found it neces- 
sary to add three new members to the 
force. 

Mrs. Henry Kruchten, wife of Henry 
Kruchten, of the John Kruchten Co., 
was operated on for appendicitis last 
week. She is already on the speedy 
road to recovery. 

O. Johnson, of the Batavia Green- 
house Co., says that his concern will in- 
crease its planting of American Beau- 
ties next season and cut down on tea 
roses. This is just the opposite of what 
most growers are doing. 

Light colored asparagus, according to 
Miss O. A. Tonner, of O. A. & L. A. 



CARNATIO 




Select Fancy $3.00 to $4.00 per 100 

Good 2.00 per 100 



Mrs. Chas. Russell- Per 100 

Fancy stock $10.00 @ $20.00 

Pink KlUarney. White KiUarney, 
Killamey BriUiant, Sunburst, 
Richmond, Ophelia- p^i- loo 

Extra Special llO.OO ^ $12. CO 

Select 8 00 

Medium 6.00 @ 6.00 

Short stems 4.00 

Sweet Peas- 
Fancy Butterflies 1.50 

Common 75 



Miscellaneous— Per 100 

Lilies $12.50 «* $15.00 

Tulips 3 00^ 4.00 

Jonquils 3.00 (" 4.00 

Paper Whites 3.00 

Violets 75© 1.00 

Valley 6.00 @ 8.00 

Adiantum l.oo 

Ferns per 1000, 3 00 

Smilax per doz. strings. 2.00 

Galax, bronze and green 1(00, 1.00 

Asparagus Sprengeri bunch, .50 

Asparagus Plumosus bunch, .50 

Boxwood per lb.. .26 

Other Green Goods Market Rates. 



A. T. PYFER & CO. 

30 EAST RANDOLPH ST. 



L. D. Phone 

Central 3373 



WHOLESALE 
FLORISTS 

CHICAGO 



Mention The ReTlgw wh«i yoa writs. 



Tonner, is preferred by many customers 
to the darker colored stock. The light 
color is obtained by special cultural 
methods, she says. 

Two more members of the trade were 
married last week. Peter Bauman, of 
Peter Eeinberg's, was united with Miss 
Clara Meade, and Wm. Johnson, of A. L. 
Vaughan's, was married to Miss Stella 
Glinka. Both marriages took place Jan- 
uary 27. 



Charles Erne, of Erne & Klingel, is 
highly pleased over their shipping busi- 
ness, which he says has shown a mate- 
rial increase over last year. 

Lewis Hoeckner will do the decorat- 
ing work of the Gold Eoom of the Con- 
gress hotel for the ball to be given by 
the Showmen's League of America, of 
which he is a member. 

S. Kitasawa, of the Southern Cali- 
fornia Flower Market, was confined to 



42 



The Florists' Review 



Fbbruakv 1, 1917. 



SPRING FLOWERS 

Jonquils 
Tulips 

Sweet Peas 
Yellow Daisies 
Mignonette 



/^VIOLETS^^^^ 

^VstValcHtinc's/ 



VIOLETS 

We will be in position 
to supply you with Hud- 
son River Violets. All 
you will need. Send 
your orders to us. 



FANCY CARNATIONS, ORCHIDS, ROSES 

NO RAISE IN PRICES 

rinSBURGH CUT FLOWER CO., 116118 Seventh Street, PinSBURGH, FA. 



his bed last week with an attack of the 
grip. 

E. Soderberg and Carl Whitenger, of 
the A. L. Eandall Go., spent the first 
part of the week in Milwaukee. 

G. M. Eeburn returned to the city 
last week after a trip through Kansas 
and Iowa, where he says that he found 
business conditions good. 

Paulus Bros., 3950 North Clark street, 
make a specialty of wreaths and have 
a stock that is interesting because of 
its size and diversity. 

O. Kreitling has moved to his new 
store, 317 South Cicero avenue. He was 
formerly located at 1049 West Twelfth 
street. 

According to Allie Zech, of Zech & 
Mann. Victory is hard to beat for an 
all-around commercial red carnation. 

Visitors. 

J. A. Evans, of Richmond, Ind., '.vas 
in town three days last week and says 
he took some excellent orders for ven- 
tilating apparatus, with the result that 
he has more orders on his books Febru- 
ary 1 than ever before in the history of 
his business. 

W. H. Elliott, of Brighton, Mass., has 
spent several days in looking over this 
market and visiting rose growers in the 
vicinity. 

George W. Hampton, of the Joseph G. 
Neidinger Co., Philadelphia, was one of 
last week 's callers. 

The presence of the following visitors 
was noted last week: H. Jepsen, Crown 
Point, Ind.; G. W. Matthews, Dayton, 
O.; Paul Berkowitz, of Bayersdorfer & 
Co., Philadelphia; Rov Wik-ox, Council 
Bluffs, la.; Wm. McCartv, of M. Rice 
Co.. Philadelphia; F. C. Weber, St. 
Louis, Mo. 

WHITE WORMS IN SOIL. 

There are small white worms in the 
soil around my plants. The worms are 
about a quarter of an inch long, have 
legs like wireworms and two small 
horns, or feelers, on the head. I noticed 
them last spring when I dug the beds 
to plant chrysanthemums. When I took 
the old mum plants out this fall I no- 
ticed that the roots had been eaten. I 
planted daisies and sweet peas in these 
beds and I am having the same trouble 
with them. The sweet peas are about 
one and one-half inches above the 
ground, with roots about the sp.me. 
These little w-orms eat the main root 



Valentine Flowers 



BULB STOCK 

Per 100 

Jonquils $4.00 

Tulips 4.00 

Freesia 4.00 

Narcissus 3.00 

Narcissus, yellow 4.00 

Easter Lilies 12c to 14c 



MISCELLANEOUS 

Per 100 
Valley $7.00 

Local Violets $1 .50 to 2.00 

Calif. Violets . . .doz. bu,, 1.75 

Carnations 3.00 to 4.00 

Splits 1.50 to 2.00 

Roses, Assorted 8c to 15c 



Ferns, per 1000, $3.60 Mexican Ivy, 60c Adiantum, $l.(iO 

Orders not received by 6 P. M. will be shipped 
the following morning. 

T. J. NOLL & CO. 



1109 Grand Avenue, 



KANSAS CITY, MO. 



Mention The BeTlew when yon wrtte. 



CARNATION S-R OSES 

IjARCISSUS-White and YeUow 

fillDDI IFQ Boxes. Magnolia Leaves Waterproof Crepe Paper in all colors. Baskets, Rib- 
OUr ■ LIbV bons. Chiffons and Corsage Shields. A full line of Cut Flower and Plant Bas- 
kets. Send us your supply orders. 

We have a good stock of all seasonable Cut Flowers and Greens. 
Are you gettintf our Weekly Price List ? If not, send us your Name and Address. 

Oe A. & Le A. TONNER 

WHOLESALE CUT FLOWERS AND SUPPLIES 
80 E. Randolph Street l. D. Phone Contra! aS84 CHICAGO, ILL. 

Mention The Rerlew when yon write. 



of the sweet peas, up to the seed. I 
gave the beds a good dose of lime, but 
this has had no effect on the worms. 
The soil is washings taken from the 
roads and has been in the houses for 
five years. I cannot get new soil and 
this is my reason for writing to you. 
Do you think Slug Shot would be effec- 
tive if watered into the soil? 

O. E.— Pa. 



Procure some carbon bisulphide. It 



comes in pound cans at any drug store 
and is inexpensive. Bore holes with a 
pointed stick four inches deep and 
twelve to fifteen inches apart each way 
over your beds. In each hole pour half 
a teaspoonful of the carbon and close 
up the hole at once. Go over your beds 
in this way and you should clean 
out the worms without harming your 
plants. The carbon gives a gas which 
suffocates all soil pests. Use no naked 



. J 



Fbbkuakx 1, 1917. 



The Florists' Review 



43 



tg (.1.1111111111 



Dffl] |«nTrrmnnnnmtal ifflammnnDBal ifflrnTTTmrnffli iBHi iim i i iffl] [am 



iimiiiiiii 



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Special Baskets 

For VALENTINE'S DAY 

" Give her a basket of flowers for Valentine's Day " 

Let this be your slogan for the occasion 

1 doz. white enamel heart-shaped baskets, decorated with red hearts 
pierced by gold arrows, as shown in illustration. Complete, with 
best grade tin liners $ 4.00 

In lots of 100 30.00 

We also have other baskets, decorated with flowers, in two-tone finishes, 
with highest grade tin liners, at $4.U0 per doz., $30.00 per 100. 

If you want ba&kets of QUALITY — order RAEDLEIN 



Send your orders 
in early 



RAEDLEIN (BASKET CO. 

DESICNBRS AIKILHANUFAXTURERS 



CMI BAOO 



1 1 i.wktj K B e — - AV e N u ■ . 

4m ILLINOIS 



Write for our 
New Catalogue 



iiiiiiiillllll 



iillllllllll 



iiiiiimiiiin 



CDDDDODDDDD 



iiiiiimHTi ii 



imiiimiii 



dmnnrnDS 



Mention The Review when yon write. 



WIRE DESIGNS - BUY FROM THE MANUFACTURERS 

50,000 Wire Frames always in stock. Orders filled same day received 




SAVE MONEY 

and let us quote you on your 
next order. 



B. E. and J. T. COKELY 

Everything In Florists' Supplies. Established 21 Years 
201 North Seventh Avenue, SCRANTON, PA. 



Mention The Review when yoii write. 



Tulips 

For your Valentine's Day busi- 
ness, we will have Tulips, short 
and stout stems, well developed fo- 
liage, jusi right for planting in 
baskets and pots. Out of boxes, 
with roots and soil, at $4.00 per 
ICO. Assorted colors, red, yellow 
and pink, in single and double. 

Peter Pearson 

Seedsman and Florist 

5732-5752 Gunnison St., Chicago 



Mention The Review when you write. 



lights while applying it, as it is an ex- 
plosive. 

Your soil cannot be of good quality, 
and I am surprised that after five years 



The Madison Basketcraft Co. 




Madison, Lake Co., Ohio 



Mentlwi Tfc« Brtaw wWa yoa writ*. 



1X7E desire one high grade exclusive National Florist in 
every city of the United States. Write for interest- 
ing literature and further particulars. 
THE NATIONAL FLORAL CORPORATION 



fVUifttfmiiV 



8*0 Broadway, HKW YORK 



Mention The Reylew when yog write. 



you are able to grow anything at all in 
it. I would suggest sterilizing the soil 
before planting another season. Use 



steam if you can, but water as near 
the boiling point as possible is good. 
Formaldehyde, one pint to twenty gal- 



I 



44 



The Florists^ Review 



February 1, 1917. 



When they cannot be had 

elsewhere try 

us on 

Beauties 



THE LEO MESSEN CO. 

WHOUSALI FlfOmSTS 

12th ni Race Sts., niILIU)ELrilU,riL 

BALTIMORE, MD. WASHINGTON, D. C. 



Carnations 

They will cost you no 
more than they are actu- 
ally worth. 



There is a good supply of Bulbous Stock and Spring Flowers, and this will help much 
to relieve the scarcity of flowers in some lines. We beheve that from now on in all lines 
the supply will be increasing. For shipment this week and for 



VIOLETS 

Fin* Large Singles 

Light Doubles 

New York Doubles 

We can supply most any quan- 
tity of them and guarantee them 
to be absolutely fresh at all times. 



St. Valentine's Day 



Cattleyas 

White and Yellow 

Daisies 
Daffodils 
Freesias 
Pussy Willow 
Yellow Narcissus 



Gardenias 

White and Lavender 

Lilac 
Pansies 
Mignonette 
Narcissus 
Calendulas 



Valley 

Pink and Lavender 

Snapdragon 
Tulips 
Baby 

Primula 
Cornflowers 



In all of the above mentioned items, we can furnish you good stock, 
such stock on display, we believe it would increase your sales. 



If you put a large assortment of 



Ions of water, applied at the rate of one 
gallon of liquid to each square foot of 
bench space, is also a good and safe 
sterilizer. Of course, either form af 
sterilization should be done some days 
before you plant your crops. C. W. 

PHILADELPHIA. 



The Market. 



The cut flower market is active, with 
the supply still short of the demand. 
Roses, carnations, sweet peas, daffodils, 
lilies and all other varieties of flowers 
sell well at excellent prices. Violets 
may be considered an exception to the 
rule, for violets are not much used just 
now. Poor flowers find a market at a 
little below list prices, with buyers who 
can use whatever they can find, pro- 
vided the price suits. This explains the 
really excellent prices, quality consid- 
ered, that are realized on ordinary 
stock. Take sweet peas, for example. 
Far and away the larger portion of 
peas are of the Spencer type, the so- 
called orchid peas. The light pinks lire, 
generally speaking, most popular; then 
come the bright pinks, then the whites. 
The cerise blooms are not so much in 
favor; there are few lavenders, so they 
do not count. Last of all come the old 
early-flowering, or grandiflora, type of 
peas. Hardly anyone really wants 
these now. They take them when the 
price suits. Of course, there are ex- 
ceptions. A few grandiflora peas are so 
well grown that they will sell even 
against the Spencers, but these are few. 

Daffodils are becoming more plenti- 
ful and the price is easier. Tulips have 
been strengthened by the arrival of 
Couronne d'Or, probably the greatest 
early double tulip. Valley is getting 
on a better footing, the buyers seeming 
to realize that it may be bad business 
to boycott a friend. White and colored 
lilacs are fine. Orchids are a little more 
plentiful; that is, cattleyas. They are 
mostly Trianffi, with a few Schroederai. 
Gardenias are all right in the upper 



Mention The B«t1«w when yon write. 



BERGER BROS. 

Spring Flowers 

SWEET PEAS, FREESU, DAFFODILS, VIOLETS, 
VALLEY, TULIPS, DAISIES, PAPER WHITES 

OUR CARNATIONS ARE VERY FINE 

PINK. WHITE AND YELLOW ROSES, EASTER LILIES, 

CALLAS AND GREENS 



SHIPPING ORDERS A SPECIALTY 



1225 RACE ST. PHILADELPHIA 



Mention The Beflew when yon write. 



grades, but there are too many poor 
ones to make the general average, in 
price, good. 

Beauties are confined mostly to the 
specials; they are still obtainable in 
quantity by those who can afford them. 
There are a few fine Eussell and Hadley 
roses. Outside of these, most of the 
roses are in the short and medium 
grades. Some extremely fine snapdrag- 
ons are offered; choice lavender and 
yellow blooms bring good prices. Freo.sia 
is good. 

The shipping demand is the life of 
the market. 

While carnations have not been given 
their proper place in this report, they 



continue the mainstay of the market. 
The crop is almost as heavy as that of 
a week ago. It meets with a strong sup- 
port, which is made stronger by those 
who are not able to have their rose 
orders filled in full. 

William Craythom, of Maple Shade. 

There are most cordial people at Ma- 
ple Shade; I may almost say that they 
are affectionate. It is not an unheard- 
of thing at Maple Shade to have an en- 
tirely strange man throw his arms about 
you at the moment of your getting off 
the train on your first and only visit, 
and asking you, in a joyous tone, 
whether you are going to Miss Nether- 



Fbbbuary 1, 1017. 



The Florists' Review 



45 




ACACIA 

With its beautiful long sprays of soft, yellow flowers, and 
delicate green foliage, artistic and beautiful, attracting the 
buyer looking for something unusual. $2^0 per bunch. 




9oai.%<* 



25c, 50c and 75c per 
bunch of 12 sprays 



PUSSY WILLOW 
S. S. Pennock - Meehan Company 

THB WHOUCSAIJ: florists of PHILADELPHIA 

PHILADELPHIA NEW YORK BALTIMORE WASHINGTON 

1608-1620 Ludlow Street 117 W. 28tli Street Frinklin and St. Paul Streets 12IB H Street, N. W. 



Mention The Review when you write. 



Edward Reid 



Recommends 

these flowers 



CARNATIONS 

Now at their best. 



SWEET PEAS DAFFODILS 

Just coming into crop. Single Golden Spur. 

NEW CROP ORCHIDS, $6.00 per doz. 

VALLEY, ROSES, VIOLETS 

ARE NY STEADIES RIGHT ALONG. 



1619-21 Ranstead Street, 



PHILADELPHIA, PA. 



Mention The Review when yon write. 



ji wood's. It seemed really a shame to 
}^ discourage such cordiality, but the 
;* greenhouses of William Craythorn 
'^ri. proved as attractive in reality as their 
">; product had promised. 
^- William Craythorn has a range of 
well built greenhouses devoted to a few 
staple crops. Just now his Purity 
freesias are in full bloom. For years 
he has grown his own bulbs, dried oflE 
and thoroughly ripened and replanted 
again year after year. The little bulb- 
lets he grew on to flowering size in a 
table by themselves. Now he has tried 
California flowering bulbs of Freesia 
Purity. He earnestly asserts that he 
will grow no other kind of freesia, 
never no more. The Purity freesias were 
in 6-inch pots, perhaps a dozen bulbs 
,, to the pot. They stood over two feet 
^ in height, each stem bearing a cluster 
■• of large flowers of waxy whiteness. The 
. ; crop started outdoors in the frame at 
|: the end of July, and followed chrysan- 
■i, themums in the greenhouse. 
2 Carnations appeared to be the main 
;; crop They all looked well. Beacon is 
-|i the leading red; White Wonder, White 
^•i Perfection and White Enchantress are 
#the whites. The second will be dis- 
,^ carded, the third increased. Alice and 
^±.nchantress are the pinks; both do well. 

I A Curious Case. 

There is considerable interest shown 
famong our florists over a law suit pend- 
ing in this city. It appears that a cus- 
\n^^^ purchased a cyclamen from 
*9??®' f- P<":yzee8, for which he paid 
reft \^^ Christmas. He claims that 
ithe salesman assured him that the plant 



would live a year. He asserts that in 
two days it wilted and, on being trans- 
ferred to a larger pot, died. 

The customer took the plant back to 
Mr. Poryzees and asked for a refund of 
his money, on the ground that the plant 
had not lived as promised. Mr. Pory- 
zees said that, while he had no book 
record of this cash sale, he did not 
question the customer's word. He 
thought there had been negligence on 
the customer's part and offered him a 
credit of $2.75. This the customer de- 
clined, claiming his money; hence a suit. 

The Shop Window. 

The window described this week is 
open to the criticism of emptiness; yet 
if you could have seen it, it would not 
have appeared empty. Bather let me say 
it seemed like an elegant drawing room 
in which richness and effect were studied 
rather than display. There was no mass- 
ing, no crowding. The show window of 
J. J. Habermehl's Sons, in the Bellevue- 
Stratford hotel, is of great size. Ex- 
perts will tell you that the glare from 
the Manufacturers' Club opposite spoils 
its appearance in certain lights. That 
may be true, but it is a trifling disadvan- 
tage and one that is often absent. On 
this occasion there was no glare. It 
was dark and dismal outside. The win- 
dow looked warm and inviting. The 
floor and sides were covered with a 
loosely laid carpet of pale green, which 
appeared more like a scarf of some soft 
texture. It harmonized wonderfully 
with the Cibotium Schiedei in the back- 
ground at one side. In front of the 
fern was a vase or wall pocket that 



seemed overflowing with spring flow- 
ers. The flowers looked like the daffo- 
dils sometimes described as butter and 
eggs. The opposite side of the window 
was filled by one of the Boston sisters, 
while the center was occupied by a low 
arrangement of scarlet and white 
blooms, rising from a mirror pool in a 
way that challenges description. Be- 
hind the window, in the store beyond, 
an artist was arranging a bunch of flow- 
ers formed of calla lilies at the top 
and Kose Canadian Queen below, in a 
way that made it appear just as though 
the rosebud was showing out of the 
cornucopias of the callas. 

The Valentine Kids. 

It is encouraging to know that there 
is just as much, nay a little more, op- 
portunity for inventive ingenuity to- 
day as during any time in the history 
of floral arrangement. A simple little 
novelty consisting of a droll-looking 
youthful figure, with an indescribable 
humorous look, and with a heart in one 
hand attached to a small flower vase. 
The figure is neatly dressed in warm 
garments suitable for the season. The 
vase is attached firmly in an inconspicu- 
ous place. There are a dozen styles. 
The whole is serviceable, neat and most 
appealing. 

Sydney H. Bayersdorfer tells me that 
these Valentine kids are having an ex- 
traordinary run of popularity. While 
his modesty forbade the admission that 
he knew in whose brain the kids had 
originated, it was gathered that the hit 
the kids were making for his house 



m 



46 



The Florists' Review 



Febkuary 1, 1917. 




Height of basket, 15 inches. 
$6.00 per dozen. Liner included. 



Valentine Heart Tumbler 

This has been pronounced the best Valentine Day novelty ever put 
out. It has the heart and arrow all complete. Very easily and quickly 
made up (its one great feature), just like filling a tumbler basket. 

The basket is gold, as is also the dart; the heart is red. 

We have only a limited amount, order early. 

Our Easter Basket assortments are the best we have ever offered. 
$10.00 and up per assortment. State if Pot Baskets, Plant Baskets, Cut 
Flower Baskets or Tumblers are wanted in the assortment. 

THE HOUSE OF MERIT 

JOS. C. NEIDIRGER CO., lariTNTdTt, PHILADELPHIA, PA. 



was a source of unmixed gratification. 
Various Notes. 

Max Schling, the prominent New 
York retailer, will speak before the 
Florists' Club in Horticultural hall Tues- 
day evening, February 6, at 8 p. m. 

William J, Baker is fortunate in re- 
ceiving excellent sprays of Asparagus 
plumosus now. 

William H. Vance, of Wilmington, has 
been most successful with sweet peas 
during the last two months. 

The question is sometimes asked: 
"Who are the men of the Philadelphia 
Wholesale Florists' Exchange?" Wil- 
liam A. Leonard, J. M. Deutscher, John 
Cunningham and George Cook are the 
men, hustlers all. They have just added 
a Ford and Maxwell. Phil. 



WASHINGTON, D. C. 



The Market. 



There was a great scarcity of all 
kinds of stock during the last wetk, 
and especially high prices prevailed on 
roses. Everything was bought at sight. 
No orders for roses were filled com- 
pletely. The lowest price on roses was 
$8, with the possible exception of a 
few culls at $6, and from that they 
went up to $20 per hundred. The stand- 
ard prices seem to have been $12 and 
$15 per hundred. The greatest scarcity 
was in the red roses. Next in line of 
scarcity came the white roses, which 
were in heavy demand. 

Carnations are the scarcest of all 
flowers. The price remains standard at 
$6 per hundred, but in all probability 
the situation will be less acute shortly 
and the price will recede. There are 
plenty of narcissi to be had and the re- 
tailers have had to resort to these for 
funeral pieces. It is the cheapest flower 
to be had for filling in, being obtainable 
at $3 per hundred. There have been 
fine Golden Spur daffodils, bringing as 
high as $6 per hundred. 

Good cattleyas were offered at $7.50 
and $9 per dozen, but there were few 
takers. There are plenty of cypripe- 
diums to be had and they hang fire at 
$1.50 per dozen. Gardenias are good 
and sell better than formerly, at $3 per 
dozen. 

Sweet peas sell at sight, the ordi- 
nary varieties at $1 and $1.50 per hun- 
dred and the Spencers at $2 and $2.50. 



WINDOW DISPLAY 



THERE'S MONEY 

FOR 

GOLDFISH 
$3.00 per 100 and up 

Send for Catalogue and our 
ofiFers of Special Assort- 
ments. Largest dealers in 
Ooldflsh and Aquarium 
Supplies in the United 
States. 

We manufacture Aquariums 
in all sizes. Send for 
Wholesale Catalogue. 

SKA MOSa AND JAFAmESS VUH 

AUBURNDilLE GOLDFISH CO. w. >.AitS» ».. 



IN GOLD FISH 
YOU 




GHICUO 



Mention The Rcrtew when yon write. 



THE PHIUDELPHIA WHOLESALE FLORISTS' EXCHANBE 

I tplnM ■fpartMity far a few nara irawera af laad eat flaarera. Gaad pricat. WaaUy rabinia. 

VERY FINE EASTER LILIES 

Night telegrams will receive careful attention. 

1615 RANSTEAD STREET, PHILADELPHIA. PA. 



M«atlwi Hw Barlaw w>— jtm writa. 



. J. BAKERi TaSlilthMoto iSra«t, PHILADELPHlAi PA. 

CARNATIONS— DAFFODILS-PLUMOSUS SPRAYS 

Mcntlan The RcTlew when yog write. 

EUGENE BERNHEilMER, WHOLtSAlEfLORIST 

Rose Growers: Order your plants now. Best light pink rose in the market, September 

Mom, •2'4-inch pots, ili.OO per 100; $100.00 per 1000. Grafting eyes. 160 00 per 1000, 
1631 RANSTKAD STREET. PHILADELPHIA, PA. 
Mention Ths BeTlew whan yon write. 



GOLDFISH 

lArf •, ■•althy Fish »t**BMk B*tUm'* prices. 
Send for special prices. 

ASHBORNE GOLDHSH & SUPPLY CO. 

m iartb Maia ttraat. lUIUIIQTIII. IIWA 



Montlwn Thi* R»t1»w wIiwi yon write. 

The violet market has been spotty. 
There are plenty of doubles to be had, 
but the demand shifts from day to day 
and the prices vary accordingly. All 
colors of tulips are now coming. These 
bring $3 and $5 per hundred and are 
moving well. Froesia makes $2 and $4 



White Lilac 

LAVENDER 

Extra Fine Freesia 
Carnations and Roses 

and all the Latest Novelties in 
Cut Flowers 

PHILADELPHIA CUT FLOWER CO. 

1517 Sansom St., PHIUDEIPHIA, PA. 

Mention The Reylew when you write. 



Fkbrijary 1, 1917. 



The Florists' Review 



47 



THE FLORISTS' SUPPLY HOUSE OF AMERICA 




No. 722. Dozen. $4.0O; $30.00 per 100. With cups. 
Size, 4»4 In. wide. 13 In. hlirh. 



VALENTINE NOVELTIES 



Gold or Silver Metal Ar- 
rows, 3^-in., $2.50 per 
100. 



liarg^e Size Gold Arrows, 

not metal, 6 to 10-in.,$5.00 
per 100. 



Miniature Palm Beach 
Hats, with handle and 
pan, $3.00 per doz. 



Spun Silver Hearts, with 
arrows, $2.00 per doz. 



V io let Cords, with hearts 
attached, $1.00 per doz. 



Corsage Ribbon, all col- 
ors, 60c apiece. 



China Cupids, 75c, $1.50 
and $3.00 per doz. 





No. 724. HKA.BT TUMBLER BASKE1S 

Dozen. $4.00: $30.00 per 100. With cups. 

White enameled, with red heart and (fold arrow. 

Size, 434 In. wide, 13 In. hlRh. 




GOLD OR SILVER METAL INSCRIPTIONS to put on boxes or 

ribbons, etc. Also comes In "A Happy 
Birthday," "I':a8ter GreetlnKS." 

$3.00 per 100. 



VALENTINE KIDS 

Made of cardboard.wlth cloth dress and trousers. In 12 varieties. One dozen 

in box. With pan In back tn hold flowers. 

A nice, cheap way to send valentines of flowers. 

$3.00 per dozen, $22.U0 per 100. 

H. BAYERSDORFER 




-e» GILT METAL ICUPID. For 

Boxes, etc. 

$2.00 per 100. 



The finest assortment 

of Easter Goods 

in America. 

Send for our 1917 
Folder. 



1129-1131 ARCH ST., 

PHILADELPHIA, PA. 



-^j, ^ .,■.■-<..■ 



48 



The Florists^ Review 



Fbekuary 1, 1917. 



Fourth 



75c 



per copy 
postpaid 




Edition 




per doz. 

express 
collect 



npHE original Album of Designs was published in response to many requests from florists who felt the need for 
^ an up-to-date book that could be used in taking orders for Funeral Designs, Wedding Decorations and Bouquets, 
Table Decorations and all cut flower work where it was not practicable to show the customer the finished article as 
it would be when ready for use. With the publication of this album it became possible to show the finished work 
in beautifully printed pictures. The first edition sold like hot cakes, a second and third edition went quickly. Now 
a fourth edition is off the press. Everything is in it— all the standard designs and many new pieces. 

96 pages, nearly 300 designs and decorations, beautifully printed on 
lieavy art paper, handsomely bound in a cover tbat will stand wear 



75c per copy postpaid 

Florists' Publishing Co. 



a 



$6.00 per dozen by express . 

Chicago, III 



508 South Dearborn Street 
(Caxton Building) 





Six 
Colors 



, - -^ >t .v.. 



An appropriate box for any flower that grows. 



.......^v... >.-.v >>...». V.....V...^.^.^>>>«^^ 




Anchor Brand Folding Flower Boxes 

For Cut Flowers, Violets and Corseige Bouquets. Corrugated Express Shipping Boxes* 

Write jor Illustrated Booklet. 

Sefton Manufacturing Corporation 

1331 W. 35th Street, Chicago 



Four 
Styles 




........> T .V. .,.....>.>...>................. V......V >..... Vt....>..V........... >..........>..>..>..... »..»..».\>.»»^111.1.I11>.1.>».»>...».1 




One and two-color cover designs. 



per hundred. Easter lilies are tempo- 
rarily off the market; it seems as though 
all of the growers are out of these flow- 
ers. Mignonette and calendulas are 
helping to fill in, but otherwise the 
demand for these is light. Snapdragon 
is extremely scarce and high and any 
quality stock readily brings $2 per 
dozen. 

Various Notes. 

At the national rose festival of the 
American Eose Society, to be held at 
Philadelphia in March, over $6,000 in 
prizes are oflfered, and several of the 
growers around Washington have ex- 
pressed their intention of competing. 
William F. Gude, of the Gude Bros. Co., 
is a member of the committee on com- 
mercial exhibits. 



S. F. Fletcher, of Zanesville, O., was 
among the visitors at the local stores 
during the last week. 

The local florists are beginning to re- 
ceive tax bills covering the rental of 
sidewalk vaults. 

The regular meeting of the Florists' 
Club of Washington, D. C, will be held 
February 6. As this is the first regu- 
lar meeting before the annual election 
of oflScers, nominations will be in order. 
President Jenkins urges that all mem- 
bers attend. C. L. L. 



ROCHESTER, N. Y. 



The Market. 

Business fluctuated somewhat during 



the week, but it was brisk and lively 
at the week end. Graduations hiive 
commenced and many orders are re- 
ceived for these functions, as well as 
for weddings, dances, etc. 

Every grower and storekeeper is hav- 
ing his troubles just now. The dull 
weather is holding back the flowers con- 
siderably, and it is diflScult to procure 
what is wanted in quantity. Every- 
thing in cut flowers is arriving in 
smaller consignments, and in many 
cases the blooms are not fully developed. 
Prices are considerably higher on some 
items, while others retain their previ- 
ous figures. The supply of roses in the 
shorter grades is far from sufficient. 
Some extra fine Hoosier Beauty, Milady, 
Shawyer, Ward and Maryland roses are 



February 1, 1917. 



The Florists' Review 



49 




A BIG CUT 
BUT NO CUT 



IN PRICES, 
IN QUALITY 



'Arnold Quail 



ck 



boxes at a price far below 
■win be sold at prices listed 



This l8 your opportunity to buy the regular . „„„„„ „„,-, 

present market values. As long as they last our present stock will be sol'^^^t prices iistec 
below. We are unable to guarantee the filling of all orders, as many of our sizes are exhauste^ 
We win, however, fill all orders In rotation as they come In. Place your order now, thus 
making sure that you get yours. 




WHITE CILAZE 

For Violets and Oorsaget 

Per 100 

7x 4x4 2" covers I 8.60 

8x6x6 " 4.80 

10x6x6^ " 6.00 

12x 8x5% " 8-15 

14x10x8 " 10.66 

For Cut Flowers 

16x 4x8 2" covers $ 8.80 

18x6x3 " 4.80 

21x6x3 " 6.00 

24x6x3% " 6-88 

21x 8x4 " 6.60 

24x8x6 " 8.20 

28x8x6 " 9.26 

S6x 8x6 Telescope 12.80 

86x10x6 *' 16.66 

42x10x6 " 21.86 

48x10x6 " 26.60 

VIOLET GLAZE 
For Violets and Corsages 

7x 4x4 2" cover | 8.80 

10x6x6% " 6.26 

14x10x8 " 11.25 

FLAIN VIOLET 

Made of Moisture Proof Board for 

Violets and Corsages 

7x4x4 2" covers $2.66 

8x6x6 " 8.88 

10x6x6% " 8.80 

12x8x5% " 6.26 

MIST OKAY 
For Violets and Corsages 

7x 4 X 4 2" Cot $ 8.60 

8x 6 X 6 " 8.90 

lOr 6 X 5% " 4.80 

14x10 X 8 " 8.60 

15x 6 X 5 " 6.00 



MIST aBAT 
For Designs and Sprays 



30x12 
36x12 
20x12 
12x12 
14x14 
16x16 
20x20 
24x24 
28x28 
24x14 
30x14 
36x14 
40x14 



Per 100 
X 6 Telescope. . . .$14.26 

X 6 " 17.10 

x8 " ....14.28 

X 8 " .... 12.80 

X 8 " .... 18.60 

X 8 " 14.26 

X 8 " 18.60 

X 8 " 21.86 

X 8 " 27.00 

X 8 " 17.80 

X 8 " 20.60 

X 8 " 22.76 

X 8 " 24.88 



For Cut FIoweiB 



16x 4 
18x 5 
24x 6 
28x 6 
18x 6 
21x 7 
21x 8 
24x 8 
36x 6 
28x 8 
28x 8 
36x 8 
42x 8 
48x 8 
30x10 
36x10 
42x10 
48x10 



3 
3 

4 

4 

4 

3% 

4 

4 

6 

4 

5 

5 

6 

6 

6 

6 

5 

6 



2" Gov 



Telescope . 



.$ 2.66 

. 8.05 

. 4.06 

. 6.00 

. 4.80 

. 4.60 

. 4.08 

. 6.60 

. 9.00 

. 6.20 

. 7.10 

. 0.90 

. 15.65 

. 17.80 

. 9.00 

. 12.80 

. 18.50 

. 21.85 



MIST BROWN 
For Violets and Corsages 

Per 100 

7x 4x4 2" covers $ 8.80 

8x6x5 " 4.15 

lOx 6x6% " 4.60 

12x8x6% " 8.26 

14x10x8 " 9.00 

15x6x6 " 6.26 

For Out Flowers 

16x 4x8 2" covers $ 2.80 

20x 4x3 " 8.25 

18x 6x3 " 8.26 

21x 6x3 " 8.80 

86x 6%x3% " 6.75 

21x7x3% " 4.86 

24x 8x4 " 8.80 

28x8x4 " 6.30 

86x 8x6 Telescope 10.65 

40x 8x6 " 13.60 

42x 8x5 •• 16.46 

80x10x6 " 10.56 

86x10x5 " 13.50 

42x10x6 " 19.55 

48x10x5 " 22.60 

For Designs and Sprays 

30x12x6 Telescope $15.00 

36x12x6 " 18.00 

20x12x8 " 16.00 

16x16x8 " 14.75 

24x24x8 " 22.60 

28x28x8 " 28.60 

24x14x8 " 18.76 

30x14x8 " 21.76 

86x14x8 " 24.06 

40x14x8 " 28.80 

42x17x8 " 29.95 

82x32x8 " 37.66 



MANILA 
For Cut Flowers and Designs 

Per 100 

16x 4x3 2" coirers $ 2.50 

20x 4x3 '• 2.90 

18x6x3 " 2.90 

21x6x3 " 8.40 

24x5x3% " 4.05 

36x 6%x3% " 6.06 

18x 6x4 " 4.05 

21x 7x3% " 4.40 

21x8x4 " 4.75 

24x8x4 " 5.20 

24x 8x5 " 5.66 

36x 8x5 Telescope 9.45 

40x 8x5 " 12.16 

42x 8x5 " 14.70 

80x10x6 " 9.46 

30x10x6 " 12.16 

42x10x6 " 17.65 

48x10x6 " 20.20 

40x10x6 " 20.20 

28x 8x6 " 8.10 

30x12x6 " 13.60 

36x12x6 " 16.20 

24x14x8 " 17.66 

30x14x8 " 20.20 

36x14x8 " 21.95 

40x14x8 " 24.06 



SAMPLES WILL BE SENT 

AND 

SPECIAL TRADE AND CASH 

DISCOUNTS aUOTED 

PROMPTLY ON REaUEST. 



SPECIALS 

We will sell these boxes at the prices listed as long as they last. We have only a few 
left. At the prices offered they will not last long, so place your order at once if you want 
your share. They are all the regular well-known "Arnold Quality" boxes. Special trade 
and cash discounts will be gladly quoted upon request. 



PALM GREEN 
For Violets and Corsages 

Per 100 

7x4x4 2" cover $3.80 

15x6x5 Telescope 6.25 

16x7x6% " 7.46 

For Cut Flowers and Designs 

18x 6x8 2" cover $ 3.26 

12x12x8 <• 14.85 

24x24x8 " 22.60 

28x22x8 " 26.00 

28x28x8 " 28.60 

The "Old Favorite" Palm Green. Place 
your order now before they are all gone. 
The Designs and Violet sizes are a great bar- 
gain. 

When cash is received with order we will 
allow a special 6% discount in addition to 
regular trade discounts allowed. 



PEERLESS GREEN 
For Cut Flowers and Designs 



21x 8x4 
28x 8x4 
24x 4x3 
18x 5x3 
21x 5x3 


2" 
Tel 


covers 

eBcope 

tt 

4f 


Per 100 

$ 4.66 

6.60 

8.30 

2.90 

8.85 


28x 8x5 


<l 


6.70 


30x10x5 


tt 


0.25 


30x12x6 


II 


12.30 


36x12x6 


II 


16.00 



A very good looking shade of Light Green, 
slightly lighter weight quality than the Palm 
Green, but a very good box for local deliv- 
eries and a bargain at the prices offered. 



PARCEL POST CONTAINERS 

Per 100 

24x 5x4 2%" cover $ 4.50 

30x 6x4 " 6.06 

28x 6x4 " 6.00 

24x8x4 " 5.75 

28x8x6 " 6.50 

30x12x6 S" " 16.60 

36x12x6 " 17.76 

36x14x8 " 20.00 

40x14x8 " 21.00 

42x17x8 " 24.00 

24x24x8 " 20.00 

26x17x10 4' " 22.00 

24x20x10 " 22.00 

24x24x10 " 24.00 

28x28x10 " 30.00 

80x30x 9 " 81.00 

For Baskets and Potted Plants 

12x12x16 $12.00 

16x15x20 20.00 

18x18x26 29.00 

19x19x30 83.60 

The ideal packer for shipping. Yon will 
find these a great help in having your flowers 
arrive In fine condition. Waterproofed in- 
side and out. 



iHiuTy FOLDING VALENTINE BOXES ii 



RVICE 



QMake your selection 
from the following^ 
sizes : 

Per 100 

10x6x5K $7.00 

12x8x5K 8.25 

24x5x3K 7.35 

30x5x3K 8.45 

24 X 8 X 4 9.50 

THESE PRICES NET. 
NO DISCOUNT. 

A. A. ARNOLD PAPER BOX 




COMPANY, 



fllYOU will no doubt want an 
assortment of these for Val- 
entine's Day. Printed in two 
colors, Red and Gold, as shown 
in the design, with the red heart 
embossed, they make a very 
handsome package. At the 
prices quoted you can well af- 
ford to give these to the custo- 
mer without charge, and thus 
obtain considerable good adver- 
tising. 



1302-1308 W«st 

Division Str««tp 



CHICAGO 



50 



The Florists' Review 



Fkbruabt 1, 1917. 



Red Heart Boxes of Quality 

FOR VALENTINE'S DAY 



Valentine's Day has become a 
live-wire flower day for the live- 
wire florist who will put the 
effort into securing something 
appropriate for the occasion. 

Here is a specialty that cannot 
fail to attract attention and 
create new business. 

These special heart boxes are 
of strong, lasting construction, 
made of heavy, high-grade stock 
and covered with a special red 
cover paper. Each one is 
packed in a container of its own. 



ORDER NOW 




PRICE LIST 

Per doz. Per 100 

8 X 8x5^ $3.00 $20.00 

10x10x612 3.50 25.00 

12x12x7 4.25 30.00 

F. 0. B. Chicago 

QUALITY is the big word in 
the SCHULTZ organization. 
SCHULTZ creations are widely 
imitated and sold by other 
manufacturers, but SCHULTZ 
QUALITY is rarely equaled 
and never surpassed. 

SCHULTZ QUALITY iswell known 
throughout the florists' trade, and 
can be compared with no other. The 
question of price is never considered 
where QUALITY is demanded. 



ORDER NOW 



H^ g^ fV f T f T^ 7 O i^ ^\ SUPERIOR AND ROBERTS STREETS, 

• Ol^riULiliL GL V^vJ.f CHICAGO, ILLINOIS 



Ettabliahcd 1856 



MANUFACTURERS OF BETTER BOXES 



PlioB* Superior 6423 



M«Btloii Ttw B«Ttow whep yoo write. 



quickly disposed of. The carnation sup- 
ply is limited, with much inferior stock, 
but any grade of carnations brings good 
prices. Orchids are good and sell well. 
Valley is irregular in quality and high 
in price. Easter lilies arrive in larger 
shipments and help to meet the large 
funeral demands. Callas are not plenti- 
ful. 

Good freesias sell fast. Violets are 
improving in size and fragrance, but 
the demand does not seem so large as 
usual. Extra fine and long-stemmed 
sweet peas sell easily. Paper Whites, 
yellow narcissi and jonquils are more 
plentiful and move at sight. Lilacs are 
seen in small quantities. Romans and 
bachelor's buttons are easily disposed 
of. The supply of blooming plants is 
large, with the assortment good. The 
receipts of greens are large enough to 
supply present demands. 

Various Notes. 

Edward Brockman is doing a good 
business. His Enchantress Supreme car- 
nations are in good form, with long 
stems and large blooms. He has a large 
quantity of White Wonder. One green- 
house is devoted entirely to geraniums 
and by spring he hopes to have about 
40,000 plants. He has rented a nearby 
farm and expects to plant it to asters 
next season. 

George Kerridge is receiving many 
calls for shrubs and plants, of which 
he has a large selection. 

r. H. Moore, of the Sefton Mfg. Co., 
Chicago, called on the trade this week. 
We are glad to hear that Mr. Moore is 
to become a resident of Rochester. The 
trade will give him a good welcome. 



Plants Sell Better 

when the ngly clay pota 
are hidden by the attrac- 
ttve and artistic 

EVER.READY 
POT COVERS 

strong cardboard fonn- 
d a 1 1 o n . Best quality 
waterproof crepe paper, 
silk fiber ribbon ties at 
top and bottom. Firmly 
held with improved 
metal fastenings. Fnmlshed in fonr colors and 
many sizes. Write for samples and price list 
today. Send 10c for postage. 

ETEB-BEADT FLOWEB POT COVEB CO. 
146 Haehea Ave., Buffalo, N. Y, 




The Climax Cut Flower Boxes 

Climax Manufacturing Co. 

Main Office and Plant, 
200 Factory Street 

CASTORLAND, - - NEW YORK 

Mention The Review when yon writw. 

W. A. Elder, who for the last three 
and one-half years has been connected 
with the Kochester ofiice of the Lord & 
Burnham Co., left January 20 for Cleve- 
land, where he will be associated with 
the company's office in that city. S. J. 
Keister, of Pittsburgh, comes to the 
Rochester office to succeed Mr. Elder. 

The Lord & Burnham Co. reports busi- 
ness as being remarkably good. Its 
])uilding operations extended farther 
into the winter months than ever be- 
fore. The company has practically com- 
pleted the conservatory for F. K. 
Knowlton, on the Pittsford road. Work 



CYCAS LEAVES. 

Sizes Pkg. of 10 Per 100 

8 to 12 Inches $0.36 $3.00 

12 to 16 Inches 40 8.00 

16 to 20 Inches 45 8.76 

20 to 24 Inches 66 4.76 

24 to 28 Inches 66 6.76 

28 to 32 inches 76 6.60 

32 to 36 Inches 86 7.26 

36 to 40 inches 1.00 8.26 

40 to 44 Inches 1.16 0.60 

44 to 48 inches 1.80 11.00 

(50 Cycas at 100 rate) 

WAX FLOWEES. 

Only in desirable colors, as White, Pink, 
Violet, etc. 

Per 100 

Dahlias fS.OO 

Calla Lilies 6.00 

Harrlsii (or Easter Lilies) 8.60 

Chrysanthemums 4.00 

Roses 2.00 

Carnations 2.00 

Try a sample order. Also get our list of other 
supplies. 

GEO. H. ANGERMUELLER 

WHOLESALE FLORIST 

1324 Pine Street, ST. LOUIS, MO. 

M#ntlon Th» R#-r1»w when yon write. 

H. ft D. Design Boxes 

Are made of licht. stronc Corracated Fiber* 
board and can be fumisned with K. D. lock* 
comer covers, safe and convenient. 

Write for full particulars. 

THE HINDE & DAUCH PAPER CO. 

SANDUSKY. OHIO 

Mention The Review when you write. 

is being started on a conservatory for 
the new store of W. J. Palmer & Son, 
at Buffalo. 

William Hooper, of the Whitney Con- 
servatories, is growing some fine carna- 
tions, including the popular Dagmar and 



Fkbbuaby 1, 1917. 



The Florists^ Review 51 



The postage alone 



(If 2-cent stamps were used) 



Would Cost $250.00 

If you attempted to send to every reader of The Review even a simple 
circular advertising your business. 

The circular itself, the paper (it has increased 125 to 150% in price 
since the war), printing, envelopes, addressing, etc., would more than 
double the cost. And even at that, you would be forcing your propo- 
sition upon the attention of the people to whom you sent it. 

On the Other Hand 

No one who buys The Review is forced to do so. He reads it from 
choice. 

Your business announcements stated in The Review come to the 
attention of the buyers you seek in a manner and at a time that is 
psychologically correct. 

You can print in The Review a half page, each issue, for a whole 
year, for what one circular would cost if you attempted to reach the 
entire circulation of The Review just once. 

The Comparison is Startling 

CAcn^^^^ ^"^ distribution of 12,500 circulars would cost approximately 
$650.00-one ''flash in the pan," then silence. 

A half page in The Review would cost only $702.00 for a whole year- 
it would be seen, read and remembered, if not this week then next 
week for 52 issues-650,000 copies. ' 



Every modern business man knows the cumulative value of continuous effort. 



52 



The Florists' Review 



Fbbrdary 1, 1917. 





ImiLiSHCDl^ SI'LOUIS 



FLORISTS' REFRIGERATORS will display your flowers in 
an attractiye manner and keep them in perfect condition. In 
Brecht's Refrigerators there is always a STRONG CIRCULA- 
TION OF DRY, COLD AIR. We build them of oak, or any other 
wood, highly finished and thoroughly insulated. All hardware 
is of brass, quadruple nickel-plated. The best of French beveled 
plate glass used for mirrors and windows. 

Write lor Price* Todjiy 

THE BRECHT COMPANY 

Established 1853 

Main Offices and Factories, 1201 Cass Ave., ST. LOUIS, MO. 

176 PEARL ST.. NEW YORK CITY 



Mention The BsTlsw whwi yon write. 



Enchantress Supreme. His tulips and 
jonquils are in fine condition and yield 
large cuttings. He grew a large batch 
of freesias this year. 

The annual convention of the West- 
ern New York Horticultural Society 
was held in Convention hall, January 
24 to 26. There was a large attendance 
at most of the sessions, and great inter- 
est was shown in the competitive and 
non-competitive exhibits of fruits and 
in the exhibits of Geneva Experimental 
Station. The election of officers was 
keen and resulted as follows: President, 
Seth J. T. Bush, of Morton; vice-presi- 
dents, Charles K. Scoon, of Geneva; 
George T. Powell, of Ghent; B. D. Van 
Buren, of Eiverville; Arthur Barry, of 
this city, son of the late president, Wil- 
liam C. Barry; F. W. Clark, of Wyo- 
ming; Harry L. Brown, of Waterport; 
secretary and treasurer, John Hall, of 
Rochester. H. J. H. 



HIGH JINKS AT MORRISTOWN. 

Tuesday, January 23, the Morris 
County Florists ' and Gardeners ' Society 
became of age, and it celebrated the 
twenty-first birthday of its organiza- 
tion in a manner appropriate for such 
an auspicious occasion. More than 350 
persons participated in the anniversary 
banquet, which was held at Morris- 
town, N. J. The menu for the evening, 
despite the fact that rarebit prices are 
after the aviation altitude record, was 
a lengthy test for even the most blase 
banqueteer, the feasters being required 
to stow away everything from ancho- 
vies on toast down through filet of sole 
with Tartar sauce and Camembert 
cheese to a glorious finish of creme de 
menthe and demi-tasse. The dinner 
committeemen surely outdid themselves, 
and it is hoped that everybody weath- 
ered the aftermath with nothing more 
than a well earned ache. 

The decorations in the banquet hall 
resembled a flower show more than em- 
bellishments for an anniversary feast. 
The speakers' table was decorated with 
some of the varieties of roses that have 
made Charles H. Totty famous. At this 
table, over which R. G. Hollaman, the 
toastmaster, presided, sat Frank Breare, 
president of the society; Edward Rea- 
gan, secretary; W. H. Duckham, treas- 



Mr. J. M. Cochrane 

^^CU^O Chicago, November, l<.Ur>. 

"Tlie lee box yon made for >\s 

is all wp could ask— It looks good— 

»>aey to >fet In and out of— and keeps 

flowers as lonsr as we could ever hope 

to keep them. (Had to go on record as 

belnp satisfied with the service of vour 

Store Fixture Division." 

Yon, too, may enjoy the satisfaction of 
convenience, ser\-lce, beauty and more 
profits In your refrigerators, tables, or 
display cases. If backed by the Kuanin- 
t<'e of our Store Fixture Division. 



iSf:M 



J^ 




iH Refrigerators ■■ 

WE DESIGN 

WE BUILD 

WE SET UP 

WE ARE COM- 
PLETE STORE 
OUTFITTERS 

Write for Catalogue 

Buchbinder Bros. 

680 Milwankee Ave., CHICAGO 



SEND FOR THIS 
BOOK TODAY 

Sixteen pages of interesting information 
illustrated In color and telling you more 
of iUndall Store Fixture Service, Write 
for it today. 



lALR^NDALlCDi 



Mention The Review when yon write. 



M C C R A Y Ref rifirerators 

' w^ 1 • Send today for catalog[ue 

¥f\Y' I'lrkt'lAf'S and prices. Mention size 
IWI IIUIISLS wanted, what kind of cut 
flowers you intend to use in it and whether it is for 
display or storage purposes. 

McCRAY REFRIGERATOR CO, 

788 Lake Street Kendallville, Ind. 

Agencies in all Principal Cities. 



Always mentioo'the Florists' Review wben 
writing axlvertisers. 



Mention The RcTlew when yon write. 

KOELLNER 

REFRIGERATORS 

are'fcbsolutely th« bast in every respect 
and UirXQUAUD by any other. 

Hundreds of 

KOELLNER REFRIGERATORS 

in actual use, proving our claims. 

KOELLNER 
REPRIGERATOR AND ICE MACHINE CO. 

21SI. MichifMlva.. CHICAGOTtl.RiarialsliZni 

The company THAT KNOWS HOW to build 
refrigerators and BUILDS THKM RIGHT. 

Mention The Review when yon write. 

WIRED TOOTHPICKS 

Maanfaoturcd by 

W. J. COWEE. "nIV." 

10,000, $1.85 50,000, $8.00 
■anipl* Fr«« Var Bala by Daalara 

Mention The Review when you write. 



Febbuauy 1, 1917. 



The Florists' Review 



68 



Gloekler Refrigerators 



npHE essential feature 
of a refrigerator for 
cut flowers is a cold, dry 
circulation of air. That 
is the fundamental prin- 
ciple of Gloekler Flower 
Refrigerators. The stock 
keeps to its full limit, 
and at the same time re- 
sults in a saving of ice. 
It requires perfect insula- 
tion to produce this con- 
dition, and the Gloekler 
method of reinforced cork 
insulation has been 
proven by test the only 
practical way of produc- 
ing such a result. 



■".*■■ . 


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@ 


■^". > 


.' '^ -. ^^^ '^^^^^^. ^ . ^ feli^^^H^P 


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The selling power of 
the refrigerator— that is 
a big point. These refrig- 
erators display flowers so 
attractively that the flow- 
ers almost sell them- 
selves. They present an 
insistent appeal to the 
customer to buy, but in an 
unobjectionable way. 

Gloekler Flower Store 
Refrigerators are made of 
selected materials, fin- 
ished to exactly harmon- 
ize with your store inter- 
ior, and completed with 
our own heavy, attractive 
hardware. 



aioekler Fixtures in Store of A. W. Smith Co., Pittsburgh. 

Many splendid styles and sizes in stock for quicic ship- 
ment. We build any size op style to order. Any finish. 

A NEW CATALOGUE of FLORISTS' REFRIGERATORS .how. flower .tore interior, in luU color. Send for your copy. 

It', free and it', worth wliUe. Write TODAY. 



BERNARD GLOEKLER CO. 



Builders of Refrisrerators 
Exclusively 



PinSBURGH, PA. 



Mention The Reylew when yon write. 




^iiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiii iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiii iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii liiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii !. 

PRINT-AD-STRING I 

FOR FLOWER BOXES | 

PRINT-AD-STRING is manufactured in all color designs S 

(to match your boxes) and in any width up to X-inch. S 

It is made of the same materials as twine, consequently E 

not more expensive. 5 

PRINT-AD*STRING makes your packages look neat and = 
attractive, and gives you miles of advertising at i 
almost no expense. E 

Write for FREE COLOR CARD, SAMPLES and PRICES I 

CHICAGO PRINTED STRING CO. 

I 307 SOUTH LA SALLE STREET. CHICAGO. ILLINOIS I 

-wimmiiiiiii iiiiiiiiiiiii iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii „ ,|„„„ „, , „„„ , iiiiiiiiiiii mil 

'""— ™"~^ M ention The Review when yon write. 

T'4 ?; ^i ^^^""' ^- W. Downs and 
^- «. Voorhees. 

v,nt^*r^**^® ,^"* ^*«™8 0° tlie banquet 
bill of fare had been negotiated, ama- 

SL.^°^®'"*^'°^" ^"O'^g tJie members 
rtelivered several popular songs and a 

s^SF ^^.K' *^*°««- Thenceforth the 
flying *^^ ^^®°^"g ^**i *^« ^"'• 

The toastmaster led with "What I 
Pl3 M tlL« .Cannibal or Insect Eating 
i-iant. This address was caleuTatefl 



Beautiful, heavily nickel-plated reel holders 

with cutter attachment. FREE with first order 



to last an hour and a half, but the 
speaker said he was in a deplorable 
state — he had come away from home 
without his paper. He pointed out that 
of the eight men who attended the or- 
ganization meeting of the society twen- 
ty-one years ago, four were present — 
Messrs. Eeagan, Totty, Herrington and 
Duckham. 

Arthur Herrington, who had the 
honor of being the society's first head, 
was the next speaker. He said he had 



long anticipated the twenty-first anni- 
versary, for on that night his infant, 
the society, became of age. He then 
related some reminiscences of the so- 
ciety in its infancy and spoke of the 
advancement of horticulture in New 
Jersey. Mayor Otto Ross, who was next 
called upon, admitted that he was a 
gardener as well as a mayor. Dr. B. D. 
Evans then paid a great tribute to the 
florists and said that, while not a florist, 
he is supposed to place flowers in the 



M 



The Florists' Review 



FSBBCABX 1. 1917. 



FOR YOUR PROTECTION, MR. FLORIST, 



ACCEPT "SUPERIORA" MAGNOLIA LEAVES ONLY 

For they are endorsed by the leading wholesale trade. REFUSE IMITATIONS 

EXTRACTS FROM OUR ENDORSEMENTS 



C. E. Critchell, of Cincinnati, Ohio, writes: "My customers Insist 
on having the 'Superlora' brand of Magnolias, as they claim these 
are the best, and that they do not dry out or become moldy, and that 
every leaf can be used, and when this Is taken into consideration, 
they are also the cheapest, besides being the best." 

The McCalliun Co., of llttsburgh. Pa., says: "Other Magnolia 
preparers have tried to Induce us to stock up their goods 'just as 
good as Dux's' at a cheaper price, but we have In each Instance told 
them frankly that It was a case of quality with us, and that we did 
not think their leaf would give the satisfaction yours did. We con- 
sider our Magnolia trade one of the best assets of our business and 
will not take a chance of losing It; In fact, our traveling men are 
often greeted as 'Magnolia Kings.' " 

rittsburgh Cut Flower Co., of Pittsburgh, Pa., writes: "Your 
'Superlora' Magnolia Leaves are the best leaves that we have ever 
handled, and we have had no complaint from any of our customers 
who bought these leaves from us. We have stored these leaves un- 
der all conditions and found that they will not mould; It is a very 
satisfactory leaf indeed." 

Job. G. Meldlnger Co., of Philadelphia, Pa., says: "We have 
tried all the Magnolia Leaves that are offered, but find your leaves 
to be far superior to all others, etc., etc." 

The Montreal Floral Exchange, Montreal, Canada, writes: "Our 
business has increased with you this year over double of what we 
purchased last season, which Is a good recommendation In itself that 
the trade In Canada appreciates the durability and keeping qualities 
of your leaf. We appreciate the Integrity, promptness and good 
business methods that, have characterized all your dealings with us." 

Michigan Cut Flower Exchange. Detroit, Mich., says: "We have 
been handling your 'Superlora' Magnolia Leaves for the past six 
years and find in all this time that we have had no complaints but 
many compliments on these goods., etc., etc." 

Jog. E. Koppelman, of Providence, R. I., writes: "We feel that 
we can sell your leaves to people who have used them once without 
any trouble. They rather pay the difference than to buy other 
leaves elsewhere, etc., etc." 

New England llorlst Supply Co., of Boston. Mass., writes: "Have 
found 'Superlora' Magnolias the best leaves on the market. The 
sales on this leaf have been growing with the same rapidity as our 
business." 

Wm. F. Hasting Co., of Buffalo, N. Y.. writes: "Have always 
found that the 'Superlora' brand gives our customers entire satisfac- 
tion; in fact, they are the best leaves we have been able to obtain 
in the last few years." 

B. E. and J. T. Cokely, of Scranton, Penn,, write: "We have 
always considered your Magnolia Leaves to be a standard for quality. 



etc" 



The Baltimore Wholesale Florist and Supply Co., of Baltimore. 
Md., writes: "We are confldent that any other manufactured Mag- 
nolia Leaves could not compete with yours, as other brands have 
been offered us, which, after we tried them, we refused to carry 
In stock." 

N. F. McCa:rthy and Co., of Boston, Mass., write: ". . . It 
is the opinion of McCarthy and Co. that your good firm prepares the 
best leaf that has yet been offered In the United States. It Is well 
worth the difference between the prices offered by Inferior manu- 
facturers and your agents." 

Henry M. Robinson and Co., of Boston, Mass., write: "We are 
pleased to state that the quality of your leaves is certainly the best 
ever manufactured In this country, and It Is a pleasure to offer such 

8t.OClC f OI* 8&l6 etc " 

Reed and' Keller, of New York City, say: ". . . and we beg 
leave to acknowledge receipt of your last shipment of Magnolias, 
and we are Indeed pleased to say that they are superior In every 
way. We further state that our experience In leaves from other 
dealers has been very unsatisfactory; colors vary and leaves mould 
quickly, etc." 

The Cleveland Florists' Exchange, Cleveland, O., says: ". . . 
never as yet have we had a complaint on the 'Superlora' brand of 
Magnolia Leaves, nor a carton returned." 

Smith and Young, of Indianapolis, Ind., write: "We will con- 
tinue to use 'Superlora* exclusively as we consider it superior to any 
other leaf In the market. Since we handle 'Superlora' we have not 
had one single complaint, etc., etc." 

The Cleveland Cut Flower Co., of Cleveland, Ohio, writes: 
". . . that we have been sending you orders for 'Superlora' brand 
Magnolia Leaves for several years should prove that we like your 
goods . . ." 

Geo. H. Angermueller, of St. Irouis, Mo., says: "It pleases me 
to say that I have worked up a splendid business on your 'Superlora' 
Magnolia I^eaves, and I credit my success to the fact that the quality 
of your leaves has always been entirely satisfactory to my customers, 
etc." 

Oscar Leistner, of Chicago, 111., writes: ". . . As you know, 
before you gave us the sole agency for the Western country, we were 
handling a different leaf, but these leaves gave us no end of trouble 
and our customers were very much disappointed with the quality. 
Since we have been handling your leaves we find that the complaints 
from our customers have entirely disappeared, and the trade seems 
anxious to buy your leaves exclusively. Only today one of our cus- 
tomers told up that he had bought 100 cartons of Magnolias from 
one of your competitors, but that he has been compelled to return 
them as his customers absolutely refused to accept them, duia to the 



fact that the leaves are 'off-color' as well as mouldy, etc' 

SUPERIOR A" BRAND MAGNOLIA LEAVES ARE SOLD BY EVERY WHOLESALE FLORIST 

IN THE UNITED STATES AND CANADA. 



DR. H. DUX COMPANY, Inc., MANUFACTURERS, JACKSONVILLE. FLORIDA 



Mention The Review when you write. 



human pathway. The medico was sbc- 
ceeded by J. Austin Shaw, New York 
representative of The Eeview, who gave 
a toast to the press and the absent 
ladies. Mr. Shaw was followed by 
Charles Weathered, of New York; Ed- 
ward Reagan, on "The Individual 
Member"; W. H. Duckham; A. T. Bod- 
dington, of New York; W. G. Badgley, 
of Chatham; George W. Downs and 
"Uncle Dan" Voorhees. 

At the close of his address Mr. Rea- 
gan made a presentation speech and pre- 
sented to William II. Duckham a (Ma- 
mond stick pin, as an expression of the 
estimation in which Mr. Duckham is 
held by the members of the society. Mr. 
Duckham was greatly surprised and 
feelingly thanked the members. 



BRAMPTON, ONT. 



The Market. 

The weather continued cold and clear 
throughout January and the stock avail- 
able was not equal to the demand. Busi- 
ness has been good and shows every 
indication of keeping ahead of that of 
last year. Collections leave no room 
for complaint. Conditions generally 
are hopeful, except that the increased 
cost of everything reduces the ])Ossi- 
bility of profits almost to a negligible 
factor for most of the growers in the 
Dominion. 

Daffodils and tulips are eagerly 
sought, the former easily bringing $4 
per hundred while other blooms are so 
scarce. Orchids are not so plentiful 
this week and the best Cattleya Triana; 
blooms easily make 30 cents. Easter 
lilies are being forced in larger quanti- 
ties than usual and are much in request 
the year around. The shortage of 



We manufacture 

Leaves 



That give satisfaction 



THE 
RUNBLEY CO. 

Evergreen, Ala. 




Mention The Review when you write. 



Something New! 

Fantasic Work in Rocks 

Come and see my latest creation of a 
mountain scene with cascades and crater. 

ADOLF F. MEISNER 

1434 N. Talman Ave , CHICAGO 
Landscape Gardening 



Mention The Review when you write. 

greens makes it difficult for most flo- 
rists, and the likelihood of valley be- 
coming scarcer as the season progrcpses 
does not brighten the immediate pros- 
pect. American Beauties now are so 
scarce that money could not buy even 
a single dozen in Toronto this week. 

Various Notes. 

The scarcity of flowers has its bright 
side, for it has left the public more 



Valentine Cards 



100 . . 


. $0.60 


200 . . 


. 1.00 


500 . . 


. 2.00 


1000 . . 


. 3.50 


Terms: Postpaid. 


Cash with order 



The John Henry Company 

Lansinsr, Michigan 



money to give to the Patriotic and Red 
Cross campaign, which in four days 
benefited to the extent of over $3,- 
000,000. 

H. McLellan, of Hammond, Ind., was 
here this week; also F. Brown, of the 
Gasser Co., Cleveland, O. W. G. P. 



Fbbkuaby 1, 1917. 



The Florists' Review 



55 



1 1. Y. FLOBISTS' SUPPLY CO., IIjG. I 



TEL. FARRAGUT^2145 
(2J46 



(2144 



103 West 28th Street, 

NEW YORK 



SEASONABLE EVERGREENS 

Fancy and Dagger Ferns, Green and Bronze Galax Leaves, Leuco- 

thoe Sprays, Southern Smilax, Needle Pines, Fresh Palmetto and 

L Cabbage Leaves, Boxwood, Laurel, Hemlock and Spruce. 

SPHAGNUM MOSS AND SHEET MOSS 

Prepared Oak Leaves in Boxes and Branches, 
Princess Pine, Sea Moss, Maidenhair Fern. 

GREEN AND BROWN MAGNOLIA LEAVES 



I All kinds of Wax Flowers: Roses, Carnations, Chrysanthemums, | 
I Dahlias, Lilacs, Sweet Peas, Cape Flowers, Etc. | 

TlllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllilfllllllllNllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllliilllllllllllllllillllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll^ 

Mention Th«» Review when yon write. 




SAVO 



FLOWER and PLANT BOX 

[Patented Jan. 23. 1917] Made of Heavy Galvanized Steel 

SELF-WATERING :: SUB-IRRIGATING 

Waters plants from the bottom, making longer roots and better plants, leaving top soil mealy and loose. Pour water into 

tube once a week. Perfect air circulation and drainage. 

ALL-YEAR-ROUND FLOWER BOX 

For Windows, Porches and Sun Parlors. Leak-proof and Rust-proof. 

Best made, most effective, durable and artistic Flower Box on the market. 

Good marg^in of profit to dealers 

Write for catalogue and prices. 

SAVO MANUFACTURING COMPANY, 39 South La Salle St., Chicago, III. 



Mention The Review when you write. 



DOG GRASS IN LAWNS. 

Will you please let me know what 
is the best way to get rid of dog grass 
m a newly made lawn? The lawn is 
completely covered with it. There are 
ten acres of lawn. J. J. N.— Mass. 



This grass, also called crab grass and 
wire grass, comes in late summer, not 
only in new but also in old lawns. The 
plant IS an annual and the first frost 
kills it. In small lawns it can be pulled 
or dug out. On larger areas every efifort 
should be made to prevent it from seed- 



ing. Mow the lawn closely, then rake 
over the grass. This will pull up a lot 
of the dog grass, which is prostrate in 
its habit, llun the lawn mowers over 
again and, to still farther reduce it, give 
another raking in the opposite direction 
and mow once more. Keep this up for 
a week or two and you will get rid of 
most of this noxious weed, which asserts 
itself most when the weather is hot and 
dry and when regular lawn grasses are 
more or less parched. C. W. 

IIerrington on the Mum, sent by The 
Review for 50 cents. 



L B. Brague & Son 

Wholesale Dealers in 

CUT FERNS 

MOSS I I miMIIHNS 

■"SiV*" HINSDALE. MASS. 

"ILLINOIS" Self- watering Flower Boxei 

No Leak-No Rot— No Rust , 

Write for onr Catalomie 
Illinois Wlo^vBT Box Company 

180 N. Dearborn St., Phone Central 6630, CHIOAOO 

Mention The Berlew when jron write. 



56 



The Florists' Review 



February 1, 1917. 



jj^ FANCY FERNS 






Finest stock in the country 

We can supply you with good stock the year around. 



$2.00 psr 1000 



$2.00 per 1000 



I 



Place your standinc orders with us 
Full supply at all times. No shortages. 

WUJD 8MIL.AZ. SO'lb. oaa«B per oas*, $5.00 

Imported green and bronze Magnolia Baskets, 11.50; 6 baskets, each 1.26 

Oalaz Leaves, green and bronze, perlOOO, 11.26; case of 10,000 7.60 

Oreen Leucothoe Sprays, extra fine, per 100, tl.OO; per 1000 7.60 

Oreen Sheet Moss, very fine for basket work, trimming pots, etc., per bag.. 2.00 

Sphagnum Moss, per bale 1.60 

BOXWOOD, per lb., SOo; per case, 50 Iba 7.50 

FULL SUPPLY CUT FLOWERS AT ALL TIMBS 






NICHIGAN CUT FLOWER EXCHANCX, 264-266 Randolph St., Detroit, Nich. 



Meatioa The Bevlew when yon write. 



EVERGREENS 



Long Oreen Leu- 
cothoe. .1000, $2.00 




^^^^^V Med. Oreen Leu- 
^^^m cothoe..l000, 1.50 

^^r Short Green Leu- 

^1^ cothoe..l000, 1.00 

Long Bronze Leucothoe per 1000, $2.60 

short Bronze Leucothoe per 1000, 1 .26 

Fancy and Dagger Ferns.. per case of 5000, 3.26 

Oreen Galax per case of 10000. 3.75 

Bronze Galax per case of 10000, 3.75 

We handle nothing but the best and guaran- 
tee entire satisfaction. 

Cash with Order 

TAR-HEEL EVERGREEN CO., Elk Pirk, N. C. 

Mention The Bevlew when you write. 

Southern WOd Smilax 

One 50-lb. case, $2.00 

Over 20 years' experience. 
F. & S. LEE, Marion, Ala. 

FANCY FERNS 

$1.28 per 1000 

Give us one trial. 
Our goods are always first-class. 

TEAHAN FERN CO. 

604-06 River Street. TROY. W. Y. 

PROMPT and RELIABLE 

Wire or write us your needs for 

Wild Smilax 

Seventeen years in business. 

CHATTAHOOCHEE FLORAL CO. 

Hatcher Station, Ga. 
Mention The H«Tlew whwi yoa write. 

Southern WILD SMILAX 

$2.00 per case $1.25 per half case 

Satisfaction Guaranteed 

Wire or Write 

J. L. CUMBIE, MORRIS STA., 6A. 



Ferns 



FANCY and DAGGKR. Mom. 
KveriTeens, Laurel. Sprnc* aad 
Hemlock Bongfat, XmM Treat, 
etc. Finest stock. Get aar low 
■ammer price on Fomt. 

1. J. mmi. iiuMLE. Mua. 




FERNS 



FANCY, per 1000 $1 

DAGGER, per 1000 1 

WILD SMILAX, per case 5 

GALAX, Bronze and Green, per 1000, 1 
GALAX, Bronze and Green, per case, 8 
CYC AS LEAVES, fresh cut, pair. . . 1 

MEXICAN IVY. per 100 

MAHONIA SPRAYS, per 100 

LEUCOTHOE SPRAYS, per 100. . . 

CUT BOXWOOD, per crate 7 

SHEET MOSS, per bag 2 

SPHAGNUM MOSS, per bale 1 

LAUREL SPRAYS, per doz. bchs. . 1 

BIRCH BARK, per lb 

CORK BARK, per lb 

CEDAR BARK, per lb 

MAGNOLIA LEAVES, Superiora 
Brand, 

Brown, per carton 1 

Green, per carton 1 



25 
25 
50 
00 
50 
00 
45 
75 
75 
50 
00 
50 
00 
25 
10 
08 



25 

85 



LAUREL ROPING, per yard 06 

We carry the largest stock of Fresh 
Cut Decorative Evergreens of any 

house in America. Highest standard of 
quality and quick service. 

Florists* Supplies 

THE KERVAN CONPARY 

119 Weit 28tk Street :-: NEW YORK 



Mention The Berlew when yon wrtto. 



Southern Wild Smilax 

50-lb. cases $2.50 

30-lb. cases 1.50 

Gray Moss, per sack of 15 lbs., $1.75 
Natural Sheet Moss, 100 sq. ft., 1.75 

EVERGREEN CARTER 

(Geo. M. Carter) 

Evergreen, Alabama 

The Qttickert Shipper 

41wmys mmtlon fh* norlsta* "Bm^tmm 
wh«n writinc adT^rtUwra. 



CutBoxwood Sprays 

Used extensively as Greens in 
Funeral Work, etc. 

Any amount, - 12c per pound 

THE NcCALLUN CO.. Inc., 

PITTSBURGH, PA. 



Always mention the Florists* Review 
^rlien wrltlna; advertisers. 



FXBRUARY 1, 1917. 



The Florists' Review 



57 



— Moss 

Headquarters for Southern Wild Smilax-Per case, $5.00; 5 or more cases, per case, $4.50 



Ferns 



Galax 



N«w Fancy F«rns 

Per 1000 12 25 

Lots of 5,000 or more 2.00 

Bronze and Green Leucothoe Sprays 
Per 100 10.60 Per 1000 N.60 

Boxwood Sprays 

Per lb 10.20 Per case. 60 IbB.. 17.60 



Bronzo and Qroon Qalax Loavos 

Per 1000 Ii.oo 

Percaseof 10.000 7.60 

Mexican Ivy 

Per 100 60c Per 1000 15.00 

■PKCXAI. PRICKS ON LAR6K QUANTITIKS. 



Sphagnum Moss 

Per bale $1.50 

Qroon Shoot Moss 

Per bundle 11.00 6 bundleB I 4.75 

10 bundles 9.00 26 bundles 21.00 



Brown, Green and Purple Magnolia Leaves $1.60 per carton 

Red Magnolia Leaves 2.00 per carton 

■▼erything in Florists* Supplies. 

Full Line of Cut Flowers and Other Greens at all Times. 



C. E. CRITCHELL, 



Wholesale Commission Florist* 
16 East Third St. 



Cincinnati, Ohio 



Maatlon The BcTlew when yon write. 



FANCY OR DAGGER FERNS 

Fancy Ferns, $1.50 per lOOO 

Dagger Ferns, I.50 per 1000 

Discount on larso orders. 
USE OUR LAUREL FESTOONING 

Nothing better, made fresh daily from the woods, 6c and 6c per yard. 
Bronze and Green Galaz, ll.OO per 1000; Sontherli Smllaz, 60-lb. cases, 16.00. 



17.00 per case of 10,000. 
Spbatnum Moss, large bales, $3.60. 
Pine by ttae pound, 10c; or by the yard. 
Branch Laurel, 86c for a large bundle. 

Tel. Office, New Salem, Mass. 
L. D. Phone Connection. 






^[^^ 



Gtaroon and Bronzo Louootlioo Sprays. 

15.00 per 1000, Bztra fine and large. 
Fine Bozirood, 17.00 per 60-lb. case. 
Fine Laurel Wreaths, 12.60 to 18.00 per doz. 
We also make any special sbea wanted. 
Sample sent if desired. 

PartrldBo Berries, fine Quality, only 10c per 

bunch of 60 berries. 
Pine Fostoonlnc, 7c and 10c per yard; extra 

fine. 
Pine Wreaths, t2.50 to 18.00 per doz. 

Order in advance. 
Write, wire or telephone 13 Rl. 

CROWL FERN CO., Nilluistoa,His. 



Mention The BeTlew when yon write. 




Jo Ho Von Canon 

EVERGREENS FRESH FROM THE WOODS 

Fancy and Dagger Ferns, 80c per 1000; $3.60 per case of 

5000. 
Bronze and Oreen Galax, 60c per 1000; 4.50 per case of 

10,000. 

Green Leucothoe, 10 to 16-lnch $1.00 per irOO 

Green Leucothoe, 16-lnch and up 2.00 per 1000 

Bronze Leucothoe, 10 t» 16-lnch l.-'iO per 1000 

Bronze Leucothoe, 16-inch and up 2.50 per 1000 




Telesraph ELK PARK, N. C. 



BANNERS ELK, N. C. 



Meitloo The BeTlew when yon writs. 



Southern Wild Smilax— 

$2.50 per case 

Natural Qreen Sheet Moss— 

$1.75 per bag of 100 sq. ft. 

Perpetuated Qreen Sheet Moss— 

$3.50 per bag of 100 sq. ft. 

Southern Gray Moss— 

$2.50 per bag of 25 lbs. 

CALDWELL THE WOODSMAN CO. 

EVERGREEN, ALABAMA 

Ment ion The Beriew when yon write. 

FANCY FERNS 

$i.78 par 1000 

Fine stock. Satisfaction guaranteed. 
Give us a trial. 

ATTICA FLORAL CO.. fSSlSii. 



SOUTHERN WILD SMILAX, $2.50 per case 
NATURAL GREEN SHEET MOSS, $1.75 

per bag of 100 square feet 
PERPETUATED GREEN SHEET MOSS, 

$3.50 per bag of 100 square feet 
SOUTHERN GRAY MOSS, $2.50 per bag 

of 25 lbs. 

Eo Ao BEAVEN 

EVERGREEN, ALABAMA 

Mention The Beriew when yon writs. 

No Mo Hitchcock 

Dealer in I 

Cut Ferns, Galax and Moss 

Write or Wire. 

Glenwood, Cass Co., Mich. 



Want and For Sale Department 

SITUATION WANTED— By experienced rose 
grower, also in general line of potted 
plants; 36 years old. Please state salary. Ad- 
dress No. 176, care Florists' Review, Chicago. 

SITUATION "WANTED— By working foreman, 
first class grower of roses, carnations, mums 
and pot-plants. Age 35, single and sober. Mid- 
dle west preferred. Address No. 194, care Flo- 
rists' Review, Chicago. 

ITUATION WANTED— As head gardener on 
private estate; German, 37, experienced In 
all branches in and outdoors. Best of references 
given. Please state wages in first letter. Ad- 
dress No. 169, care Florists' Review, Chicago. 

ITUATION AVANTED— By chrysanthemum 
grower and propagator, 8 years' experience 
in America and Europe; nationality, Swede; can 
furnish best of references. State wages in first 
letter. Address No. 198, care Florists' Review, 
Chicago. 

SITUATION WANTED— By rose and carnation 
grower, good propagator, 14 years' American 
and European expcBlence; nationality, Swede; 
state wages in first letter. Can furnish best of 
references. Address No. 199, care Florists' Re- 
view, Chicago. 

ITUATION WANTED— Young married man, 
good carnation grower, also possessing tiior- 
ough knowledge of general stock, desires position 
commencing Februarj' 2.5. Able to take charge. 
Best of references. Address No. 191, care Flo- 
rists' Review, Chicago. 

ITUATION WANTED— By experienced grower, 
as foreman or in charge of section; 14 
years' experience in roses and other cut flowers; 
age 30, single, sober and have the best of ref- 
erences if needed. State wages in first letter. 
Address No. 186, care Florists' Review, Chicago. 

S~1tUATI0N WANTED— Rose grower, have 
been working as foreman in one of the lead- 
ing rose establishments in America about eight 
years and also in Europe; have good references 
from different places. Please state particulars, 
with salary, in first letter. Address No. 203> 
care Florists' Review, Chicago. 

SITUATION WANTED— Outside of New York, 
by e middle-aged man, expert designer on 
funeral work, bouquets, baskets and window 
decorations. State wages and all particulars 
In first letter. Best of references given. Ad- 
dress Foley The Florist, 242 St. Nicholas Ave., 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 

SITUATION WANTED— By foreman, at pres- 
ent In charge of 80,000 sq. ft. of glass, 
growing roses, carnations, cyclamen and gen- 
eral line of pot stock, desires change. Only 
those that mean business need apply. Am a good 
designer, married and have excellent reference. 
Address No. 186, care Florists' Review, Chicago. 

SITUATION WANTED— Foreman, grower and 
propagator (25 years' experience), in good 
class retail trade of a modern plant-growing es- 
tablishment. Highest recommendations; married, 
interested, trustworthy, good habits; position 
where encouragement is given. State reason- 
able wages required. Address No. 201, care 
Florists' Review, Chicago. 

SITUATION WANTED— By florist and land- 
scape gardener, age 29, married, no children; 
grown up In the business; have experience In 
America and Europe, all branches of greenhouse 
and landscape work; graduate of horticultural 
school; good In window and house decorating, etc. 
Wants position on private estate where No. 1 
quality Is required. Address No. 179, care 
Florists' Review, Chicago. 



58 



The Florists' Review 



Fbbruaby 1, 1917. 



SITUATION WANTED— As manager or work- 
ing foreman, expert grower and propagator 
of greenliouse and nursery stock. Is open for en- 
gagement with a good commercial establisliment. 
Eigliest credentials. Address No. 172, care Flo- 
rists' Review, Chicago. 

SITUATION~WANTED— By young flrst-class 
gardener, married, no children; European 
and Aniorlcun experience in all branches of 
gardening. Best references. Private, state or 
municipal position preferred. Address Jacob 
Vatter, 008 28th Street, Milvtaukee, Wis. 

HELP WANTED — Capable, trustworthy man 
for retail place; 10,000 ft. glass; room and 
board. W. J. Olds , Union City, Pa. 

HELP AVANTED— At once, man for general 
greenhouse work and who understands 
watering; steady position. Aloid Prey, Crown 
Point,_Ind^ 

HELP AVANTED— Girl for retail florist, must 

have at least one yeiir"s experience. (Jood 

references. University Floral Co., 6302 Unl- 
versit y Ave., C hicago. 

HELl' AVANTED— Florist to take full charge 
of small greenhouse and grounds of large 
academy in Central West. Address No. 187, 
care Florists' Review, Chicago. 

HELP AVANTED— In middle west, man with 
some experience in carnations; $14.00 per 
week. State experience and age. Address No. 
202, ca re Flo rists' Review, Chicago. 

HELP WANTED^By~February 1. rose grower 
for place near Chicago. Salary $40.00 per 
month, with board, room and washing. Address 
No. 184 care Florists' Review, Ch icago. 

HELP AA'ANTEI) — At once, a grower for gen- 
eral greenhouse stock, first-class place, 
65,000 siiuure feet of glass; ,$45.00 jmt month 
and boar d. T. M albranc, Johnstown, I'a. 

HELP WANTED^Florist, single, all-round man 
for greenhouse; iwtted i)lants only; also 
garden. State wages in first letter. Mrs. O. G 
McCormick, 922 Helm St., Logansport, Ind. 

ELP AVANTED— All-round man for retail 
country jjlace, where a general stock is 
grown. AVagcs and percentage of protits. Ad- 
dress No. 200, care_Florist8' Review, Chicago. 

HELP A\'.\XTED — At once, competent designer, 
decorator and all-round storeman; state 
references and experience in first letter. Ad- 
dress No. 190, care Florists' Review, Chicago. 

ELP AA'ANTEI)— An all-round florist, single 
man for greenhouse, jmt i)hints grown onlv. 
AVages, $45.00 per month, room and board. Ad- 
dress N(X 196, car e Florists' Review, Chic ago. 

HELP AVANTED— At once, young man with 
several years' experience in genonil green- 
house work. (Jive reference and stale wages 
wanted in first letter. J. A. Bissinger, Lansing, 
Mich. 

HELP AVANTED— Assistant all-round florist; 
must Im good potter and able to handle 
hose: stciidy cniploymeiit for riglit party. AVages 
$15.00 i>er week. Aurora Greenhouse" Co., Au- 
rora, III. 

HELP AA'ANTED— Experienced carnation grow- 
er and propagator at once; must be sober 
and industrious: send references. Wages $16.00 
per week. Address No. 178, care Florists' Re- 
view, Chicago. 

HELP WANTED— AVorklnit foreman who under- 
stands growing carnations, Easter lilies, 
mums, bulbs and bedding plants; 35,000 square 
feet glass. H. T. Mead, 1230 Ilanorer St., 
Manchester, N. H. 

HELP AVANt1:D— Rose grower, one who can 
produce best quality on solid beds. Call 
at A. J. Staheltn's Greenhouses or write, stating 
experience had and wages expected, etc. — A. J. 
Stah elln, Redf ord. Mich. 

HELP AVANTED— At once, good propagator 
and grower of potted plants. Give refer- 
ences and state wages wanted. Good position 
for right man. Must be sober. Crissman Green- 
house Co., Punzsutawney, Pa. 

HELP AV.\NTED — Good propagator and grower 
of j)ot plants. Give reference and state 
wages, (iood position for the right man. Must 
be sober. Harry S. Betz Xurser.v Co., D St. 
and AVyom ing .\ve., Philadelphia, i'a. 

HELP AVANTED—Conipetenl grower of cut 
flowers 1111(1 pot pl:ints: iiiiality coiiiits: 
$CO.flO iicr niiinth with board and room. AVest- 
ern miiii preferred. Keimer's Floral Art Shop, 
807 Riverside .Ave., Spokane. AVasli. 

BELP AVANTED— Active young man to grow 
cut flowers and potted plants; propagate, 
and assist on funeral work, etc. Permanent 
position. State experience and wages. Address 
Ko. 189, care Florists' Review, Chicago. 

HELP AVANTED — Experienced nurser.v men, 
cai)a1)le of taking charge of planting and 
transjilating. Give references and state wages. 
Must be sol)er. Harry S. Betz Nursery Co., D 
St. an d AVy oming Ave., Philadelphia, Pa. 

HEIJ* AVANTED — Experienced American 
Beaut.v grower, must have good references 
and have been growing Beauties commercially 
up to the present time. Ap|ilv at AVright's 
Flower Shop, 224 AV. 4th St., Los Angeles, Cnl. 

HELP AVANTED— A competent storeman of 
executive abilit.v as working manager where 
a large business is done; good salai-y and com- 
mission with unusual opi)ortunities to right 
Sarty. Address No. 197, care Florists' Review, 
hicago. 



HELP WANTED— Landscape architect; young 
man, good address. Permanent position In 
Southern city. Address No. 897, care Florists' 
Review, Chica go. 

HELP AVANTED — At once, experienced man in 
general greenhouse work; capable of tak- 
ing charge and producing results. Wm. Swin- 
bank. Sycamore, IlL 

HELP WANTED— Gardener, competent to take 
charge of country place 40 miles from Chi- 
cago. Must understand care of shrubbery, flowers 
and vegetables; all-year iiosition. Address, stat- 
ing experience and references, No. 209, care Plo- 
r ists' Review, Chicago. 

HELP AVANTED — At once, experienced Ger- 
man for carnations, chrysanthemums, pot 
plants, bedding stock, seed sowing, etc.; must 
be capable to take full charge of growing and 
handle help to advantage; sober. State wages In 
first letter. Hammersctunidt & Clark, Medina, 
OhjO; 

HELP WANTED — Young man with experience, 
German preferred, to take charge of ship- 
ping department in a mail order seed house. 
Must be reliable, willing, industrious and sober. 
Able to handle help. State age, experience and 
salary expected in application. Arehlas Seed 
Store Corp., Sedalia, Mo. 

ELP AVANTED — AVorking foreman who un- 
derstands the growing of roses, carnations, 
mums, potted plants and bedding stock, for a 
first-class retail trade; 35,000 square feet of 
glass. Give reference and state salary In first 
letter. Do not answer unless you can qualify 
as a bove. Aurora Greenhouse Co., Aurora. Til. 

HELP AVANTPTd — For colle-re campus and gar- 
den a practical gardener, middle aged and 
unmarried preferred; must be sober and indus- 
trious. Good board and room furnished. I'er- 
manency desired. State minimum wages to be- 
gin and send references. Address J. AV^. Con- 
ger, I'resident, Centra l Co llege, Conway, Ark. 

HELP~AV ANTED— Alan with^flTirly^extensive 
knowledge of general gardening — vegeta- 
bles, flowers, trees, etc. AVork the year round; 
2 helpers provided. Man about 50 preferred; one 
with required atnount of experience and willing 
to work for reasonable salar.v. Sleeping quar- 
ters provided — must board himself. Address 
F. F. Somniers, 900 No. Michigan Ave., Sagi- 
naw, Mich. 

HELP WANTED— Young man from 18 to 22 
years of age who has had two or three 
.vears' experience in retail store work, to assist 
in design department of large greenhouse estab- 
lishment and work in the greenhouses, with the 
view of learning the business from the ground 
up. Wages $15.00 a week. Good references nec- 
essary as to character. Miller Floral Company, 
Farmington, Utah. 

ANTED TO BUY— Modern greenhouse plant. 

State full particulars and best cash price. 

Address No. 207, care Florists' Review, Chicago. 

ANTED— Front section for a No. 2-27^Mer- 
cer boiler and back section for a 21-inch 
International. Roth hot water. J. Ralph Ed- 
wards, Cochranville, Pa. 

WANTED — Partner, b.v established nursery, 
increased business demands additional in- 
vestment. <;ood chance for experienced nursery- 
man with $1000.00 cash to go in business. Nur- 
sery stocked and equipped. If qualified, address 
No. 192, care Florists' Review, Chicago. 

{! ANTED — A partner in a successful cut flower 
business; specialties are sweet peas, vio- 
lets, myosotis, mums and cosmos. Outgoing 
partner wants to go west. Business established 
twelve years ago. For full particulars address Ed- 
ward Schumann & Sons, Sayler Park, Clncln- 
nati, O. 

WA.NTED— A greenhouse of 25,000 to 50,000 
ft. of glass, to operate on shares, cucum- 
bers and toniiitoes to be tlie crop. Am capable 
of taking entire cliiirge of jilace and cim pro- 
duce the goods. IIav«! had six years' experience 
of successful cucumber growing. Eastern Kansas 
or Missouri preferred. Address O. A. Dugan, 
1544 A'assar Ave., AVichita, Kan. 

FOR RENT — Or lease, 3 greenhouses with store 
front, land and dwelling, in Chicago, 111. 
For further information address No. 177, care 
Florists' Review, C hicago. 

FOR SALE — Pump Jack; also a 2-hor8e|K>wer 
AVagner motor, In flrst-class condition. 
Cheap. Paul E. AVelss, Maywood, 111. 

FOR SALE — At any reasonable offer, splendid 
greenhouse; opportunity to make big money. 
A pply to AV. G. Dudley, Clifton Forge, Va. 

FOR SALE — .\ splendid greenhouse plant in 
No. 1 condition: 16,000 feet of glass. AV. C. 
Smith AVholesale Floral Co., 1316 Pine St., St. 
Ix)uis, Mo. 

FOR SALE— Flower store in city of 22.000; 
location Pa.; good trade. Good reason for 
selling. Mrs. Bertha Cornell, 204 E. Main St., 
Nanticoke. Pa. 

OR S.ALR- 5.000 ft. of glass, with 5 room 
bouse, in good location; retail and whole- 
sale. In good condition. Address No. 208, care 
Florists' Review. Chicago. 

FOR SAI.1B — Cheap, a new store, facing Sheri- 
dan Road in Edgewater Beach Hotel. Fine 
opportunity for energetic party. John Mangel, 
17 E. Monroe St., Chicago. 

FOR SALE — Established, well stocked green- 
houses, doing a splendid business, 0,000 ft. 
of glass; residence; extra groiuul. No competi- 
tion. E. E. Stinson, Montpelier, Ind. 



w 



FOR SALE — Four new sectional Furman boil- 
ers, all in first-class condition, each capable 
of heating about 8000 ft. of glass. Price $125.00 
each. J. H. Gonld, MIddleport, N. Y. 

li'OR SALE — $1,500.00, easy terms, nice green- 
ly house, hot water heat, large lot, good 6-room 
house, good town, cheap fuel; no competition. A 
snap. C. P. Waldo, Chilllcothe, Illinois. 

U" OB SALE — Greenhouse, consisting of 10,600 ft. 
C of glass, doing both wholesale and retail 
business; a bargain for some one. Write for par- 
ticulars and terms. C. P. Bethards, Springfield, 
Ohio. 

FOR SALE— Boilers, two 80 H. P., return 
tubular shells, 66 In., 14 ft. tubes, one 100 
H. P. return tubular 78-ln. shell, 14 ft., 4-ln. 
tubes. Inquire of Beverwyck Brewing Company, 
Albany, N. Y. 

Ij^'OR SALE — 4 greenhouses, 16x100, glass 16x24, 
■ double strength, piped with 2-in. pipe, tubu- 
lar boiler. In A-1 condition, to be torn down at 
once. Cheap for cash. J. M. De Water, 346 
U pton Ave., Battle Creek, M ich. 

FOR SALE^Up-to-date flower store on north 
side; Chicago, business at good location; good 
trade, living rooms and lot for greenhouse; very 
good reason for selling. Cash or terms. Address 
No. 195, care Florists' Review, Chi cago. 

FOR SALE- In I'ortland, Oregon, 4,500 ft. 
glass, house, boiler and work shed, barn, 
y2 acre land, retail and wholesale, now growing 
carnations and bedding plants. Wm. E. Dungey, 
19 26 E. Madison St., I'ortland, Ore. 

FOR SALE — Established, well stocked green- 
houses, 8000 ft. glass, residence, land, good 
market, 15,000 population. Western Oregon. Must 
be sold. Cannot handle from here. John Israel- 
son, 526 Galena Ave., Pasadena, Cal. 

FOR SALE — A good paying retail place for sale 
at a bargain; consisting of 7000 ft. of glass, 
in good condition. Situated in one of the best 
locations in Chicago. Good reason for selling. 
F. J. Munzing, 6101 Broadway, Chicago. 

Foil SALE — 1 Morehead steam trap, 2-ineh, 
nearly new, will handle 1(R),000 ft. of glass; 
$1.50.00 cash takes it; receiver for it, $10.00; 
1 Morehead IMi-inch trap and receiver, $75.00. 
AVill handle 50,000 feet of glass. Krueger Bros., 
T oledo, O. 

FOR SALE — Well established florist store, ex- 
cellent location in Chicago, cash- trade, low 
rental with rooms; fine opix)rtunity. Good rea- 
son for selling. Don't answer unless you mean 
business. Address No. 168, care Florists' Ite- 
vi ew, Clilcag o. 

FOR SALE — A CHANCE for some one with 
$2,500.00 or $3,000.00 cash (bal. on time) to 
buy a specially well located first-class florist's 
establishment, 5000 ft. of glass. Stucco resi- 
dence. Ix)cated near Chicago. Address No. 88, 
care Florists' Review, Chicago. 

FOR SALE — Or rent, greenhouses, 18,000 feet 
of glass, on north side of Chicago. Stocked 
with bedding plants and cut flowers. Good 
location for retailer. Easy terms. Address No. 
141, care Florists' Review, Chicago. 

FOR SALE — Market gardens of six acres; good 
market and good location on two railroads; 
sub-irrigation; small modern greenliouse, well 
stocked; nice six-room cottage and small barn. 
Everything new and easy terms. Good reason 
for selling. Fairview (Jardens, EInora, Ind. 

FOR SALE — One fire box boiler for hot water, 
10 ft. long, was in use up to quitting firing 
this spring, requires no brick work, $110.00. Put- 
ting in larger boiler is reason for selling. Can be 
shipped either by the N. AV. or St. Paul R. B. 
L. Turner & Sons, 352 Park Ave., Kenosha, Wis. 

FOR SALE OR LEASE— One of the best- 
equipped flower stores with greenhouse and 
storehouse in connection; also 6-roora residence 
and garage, located in the most fashionable dis- 
trict in St. Louis. Fine opportunity for energetic 
party. Apply Kalisch Bros., 4508 Delmar Boule- 
vard, St. Louis, Mo. •» 

FOR SALE — 4 greenhouses, 25x100, 1 house 
25x30, 1 residence and 1 cottage, and 325x 
179 ft. Greenhouse well stocked with carnations, 
bedding stock, etc. Must be sold at once. Price 
$18,000.00; two-thirds cash, balance time. Nine 
miles west of Chicago. 5c fare. Address No. 
163. care Florists' Review. Chica go. 

Ij'OR sale — Rebuilt Morehead Return Steam 
X? Traps, ready for use, with complete Instal- 
lation directions from engineer, with eight years' 
experience in design of return trap systems. 
Capacities 65, 1,35 and 200 boiler horse power. 
"Cure your circulation troubles now." James V. 
Colpltts, Engr., 27 South 18th St., Philadelphia, 

FOR SALE— 2 greenhouses, each 18x100, built 
4 years ago, steam heated, good work shed, 
all stocked; 3 lots, 50x165 ft., good 4-room resi- 
dence; doing very good business In a prosperous 
town. Must sell at once on account of poor 
health. Those with cash only need to answer. 
For particulars address Geo. Dill, New XJIm, 
Minn. 

FOR SALE — AVell established, paying retail flo- 
rist business, with 10,000 feet, 16x24-inch 
glass, more glass needed; school city; no com- 
lietition; only florist in county. A'alnable city 
property with plenty of room. Ideal greenhouse 
location, with dwelling. No firing of boilers, 
greenhouses are heated perfectly satisfactorily 
by contract. Excellent prospect for opening 
nursery or handling nursery stock and early vege- 
tables. Price $18,000.00, $9,000.00 cash, balance 
easy terms to suit. Write for full particulars. 
Address No. 193, care Florists' Review, Chicago. 



Februaby 1, 1917. 



The Florists^ Review 



59 



Situation Wanted 

By man capable to manage outside as 
well as inside; also landscape work; ab- 
solute control necessary. State particu- 
lars, etc. 
Address No. 206 , care florists' Review, Chiago 

Situation Wanted 

On country place or institution, by 
capable superintendent to take absolute 
charge of greenhouses, landscape, vege- 
tables, etc. State particulars. 
Address No. 205, care Florists' Review, Chicago 

Situation Wanted 

Hy i)riu-tlcul youiiK Hollander, single, 26 years of 
age, i\ years' experience in florist and landscape 
work as private srardener; no connnercial or retail 
j)lace. At present foreman of a (M-renniai depart- 
ment, but prefer private position. Can furnish best 
of references, (iood salary expected. When writing 
please state particulars and salary In flrst letter. 

Address No. 204, care Florists' Review, Chicago 

Situation Wanted 

As superintendent— foreman; capable 
of handling selling and growing end; 
lifetime experience. First-class position. 

Address No. 188, care Florists' Review, Chicago 

Traveling Salesmen 

Representing Seed and Bulb Establishments 
and calling on country estates can increase 
their incomes considerably by taking up a prof- 
itable side line. Write for particulars and 
with full information regarding territory you 
cover, etc. Address No. 164, care Florists' 
Review, Chicago. 

HUSTLERS' OPPORTUNITY 

A modern establishment, with wholesale, 
retail and landscape opportunities beyond its 
ability to fulfill, wants men with experience, 
brains and push, to assist in forming and 
become a part of a corporation of first magni- 
tude. If you are interested write, explain what 
branch you will fit the best in and how much 
you can invest, salary expected, experience, etc. 
Address No. 89. ctre Florists' Review, Chicago 



HELP WANTED 

Young men with several years 
greenhouse experience in growing 
pot plants. Apply to 

^ ROBT. CRAIG CO. 

4900 Market St ., Philadelphia, Pa. 

HELP WANTED 

A practical man of excellent character for 
«ity store with small greenhouse; also able to 
<lrive I-ord car, A growing business with 
splendid chance for advancement. 

ANNA GRACE SAWYER 

4044 W. Madison St.. CHICAG O 

Help Wanted 

Good all-round experienced grower of 
pot plants, ferns, palms and bedding 
plants. 

BOEHRIN6ER BROS. 

816.818 JeMerson Ave.. Bay City. Mich. 

For Sale or Rent 

ho^sf b^?n?V??'°l ^^'i'^r \^''^- "'odern 6-room 
i?^?Z\ "^\^',^ block of land, under fence- rent I 
JiSOOo, sale $3500.00; southeastern Kansal." 

J. H. ELLIS, Columbus, Kan. 



FOR SALE 

5, 10, 15, 20-acre Blocks of Rich, Black Soil. 
Excellent location for greenhouses, at Mt. Prospect, 

111., 19 miles from the loop on the C. & N. W. Ry. Good 
train service; 42 minutes' ride to city; within % mile of 
paved road. 

For prices and terms, apply to 

BUSSE LAND CO. 

GEO. BUSSE, Mgr. 
Phone 41 M. ArL Heights, lU. Mt« PrOSpOCty III* 



Help Wanted 

Good all-round man, must be A-1 
carnation grower, to take full charge; 
state wages wanted, with or without 
board and room. Send references 
and wages wanted in first letter. 
Large new range of glass. 

SIEBRECHT, FLORIST 

Aberdeen, South Dakota 

Wanted to Bay or Lease 

By a responsible party, a modem greenhouse 
establishment, from thirty to fifty thousand 
feet of glass: must be in good condition and 
located right. Give full particulars. 
Address No. 182, care Florists' Review, Chicago 

Wanted to Buy 

After Easter, anywhere, in live city, green- 
houses, land, dweliin«; state size of all. size of 
glass, how heated, full sun. how stocked: no 
tumble down place wanted; price must be rea- 
sonable; state how much cdsh down and terms 
for balance. State if wholesale or retail. Box 
252, Kinston, N. C. 

WANTED 

Experienced rose grower; also A-1 pot plant 
man; $76.00 month each. Plant located near 
center of city. Meet me Kansas City, Mo., Feb. 
4, at 1317 E. 4 th St.; Omaha, Feb. 6, Henshaw 
Hotel, from 2 to 7 p. m.: Minneapolis, Andrews 
Hotel. 2 to 8 p. m. Ask for H A . Pratt. 

For Sale --Cheap 

ll.non 8(inaro feet of sriass. consisting of four 
eieenliouses, two acres of land well .stocked, situ- 
ated in fastest prowins town in eastern Pennsyl- 
vania. Worth Investigating. 50.000 voget^ible plants 
retailed in spring. 

K. 8. RUIT. EHzabfthtown , Pa. 

FOR SALE 

On account of my wife's serious illness, I 
will offer my 12,000 ft. of glass at a sacrifice for 
Quick sale. H. J. Potomldn, Muncie, Ind. 



FOR SALE 

We offer our greenhouses for sale, consisting 
of 56,000 feet of glass. This is an up-to date 
plant in every way. All houses are practically 
new, only being built 4^2 years. There is no 
better place for a wholesale florist business 
anywhere in the United States than this place. 
Our business has grown wonderfully from the 
very beginning. We have built up a substantial 
business. We have plenty of blue grass soil, 
and city water of a good pressure and a very 
low water rate. No trouble to get plenty of 
labor here, and wages are reasonable. We 
have good reasons for selling, which will be 
explained to prospective buyer. 
Address No. 154, care Florists' Review, Chicago 

For Sale 

Eleven greenhouses, containing about 25.000 
sciuare feet of glass, no^f in operation; will be 
sold altogether or sins<ly. purchasers to tear 
down and remove in June. Also two horizontal 
tubular boilers. 

J. W. YOUNG, rear of 6642 Wayne 
Avenue, Germantown, Phila., Pa. 

FOR SALE 

At a sacrifice, 8000 sq. ft. of glass doing 
a retail business paying 40 7o on invest- 
ment. No competition, immediate posses- 
sion; location, Illinois; ill health only 
reason for selling. 

Address No. 144, care Florists' Review. Chicago 

For Sale 

Modern greenhouse establishment, 75 000 sa. 
ft. of glass. 7 acres of land, private switch, do- 
ing a good local and shipping business to Chi- 
cago. Place stocked, in best of condition, 
vacuum heating, new boiler. Price $19 000— $6000 
cash, balance on time. Address No. 165, care 
Florists' Review. Chicago. 



Wanted 

Knocked-down Greenhouses 

100 ft. in length, any width, cheap for cash; 
f. o. b. shipping point; of standard make, glass, 
piping, even span, etc. Must be in good shape. 
Give particulars in first letter. 

Address No. 129, care Florists' Review, Chicigs 



60 



The Florists* Review 



Fbbkuauv 1, 1917. 




A^i'im 



^^^^^^^P^ 



PATMENT INTO TRUSTEE FUND 

Cities population less than 

6000 $ 1.00 

6000 to 25.000 2. 60 

25.000to 50,000 5.00 

60.000 to 100.000 10 .00 

100,000 to 150,000 15.00 

Above that. ll.OO for each additional 

10.000 population up to 500,000. 
Cities more than 500,000 $.50 00 

The above fund is only for the guarantee 
of accounts and will be returned when mem- 
bership is withdrawn. 

ANNUAL. DUES Per year 

Cities less than 5000 population $2.00 

5000to200.000 4.00 

200.000 population and over 10.00 

Mutual discount 80 per cent 



AKROK, 0. 
The Heepe Co,, 
49 South Main St. 
ALBANY, N, Y, 
Fred A. Danker, 

40 & 42 Maiden Lane 
W, C. Oloeckner, 

97 State St. 
Rosery Flower Shop, 
2.S Steuben St. 
ALLENTOWN, PA. 
Ernest Ashley, 
943 Hamilton St. 
ANDEBSON, S. C. 

Anderson Floral Co. 
ANOOVEB, MASS, 

J. H. Playdon. 
ANN ASBOB, MICH. 
Cousins & Hall, 

1002 S. Ihiiversit.v 
Ave. 
Mrs. Pearl Flanders, 
209 E. Liberty St. 
ASHTABULA, 0. 

Tong & Weeks Floral 
Co. 
21 Center St. 
ATCHISON, KAN, 

Atchison Seed & Flow- 
er Store. 
ATLANTA, OA. 
C. A. Dahl Co. 
ATLANTIC CITY, N. J. 
Geo. H, Berke, 

1.505 Pacitlc Ave. 
Edwards' Floral Hall 

Co. 
Egg Harbor Flower 
Shop, 
13.31 Pacific Ave. 
AUBUBN, N. Y. 
Dobbs & Son, 

140-1.50 Dunning Ave. 
AUGUSTA, GA, 

Stulbs Nursery 
AUBOBA, ILL, 
Aurora Greenhouse 
Co., 
IS Downer PI. 
Joseph K. Smely 
AUSTIN, MINN. 
A. N. Kinsman 
AUSTIN, TEX, 

Hillyer's for Flowers, 
1406 Lavaca St. 
BALTIMOBE, MD. 
Samuel Feast & Sons, 
.331 N. Charles St. 
BAB HABBOB, ME, 
John H. Stalford, 
Main St. 
BATON BOUGE, LA. 
The Boseland Florist, 
S. Scheinuk, Prop. 
BATTLE CBEEK, Mich. 
S. W. Coggan, 

25 W. Main St. 



BAY CITY, MICH. 

Boehringer Bros., 
325 Park Ave. 
BIDDEFOBD, ME. 

Strout's, 

317 Alfred St. 
BINGHAMTON, N. Y. 

A. E. Fancher, 

6-10 Bigelow St. 
Suskana Flower Shop, 
16 Court St. 
BISMABCK, N. D. 

Hoskins Floral Co. 
BLOOMINGTON, ILL, 
A. Washburn Sc Sons, 

318 N. Main St. 
BLOOMINGTON, IND, 

Morris the Florist 
BOSTON, MASS, 
Philip L. Carbone, 
.342 Bo.vlston St. 
John J, Cassidy, 

6 IJeacon St. 
Filenes Sons Co., 

426 Washington St. 
Henry Penn, 

124 Tremont St. 
Wax Bros., 

143 Tremont St. 
BBADFORD, PA. 

C. E. Gunton 
BRIDGEPORT, CONN. 
Reck & Son, 
985 Main St. 
BRISTOL, CONN, 
Andrew Bros. , 
19 Maple St. 
Hubbard & Co,, 
184 Main St. 
BROOKLINE, MASS. 
F. E. Palmer, 

220 Washington St. 
BROOKLYN, N. Y. 
John V. Phillips, 
272 Fulton St. and 
7 Clinton St. 
Weir & Co., Inc., 
Cor 5th Ave & 25tli 
St. 
BRYN MAWB. PA. 
J. J. Connolly Est., 
1226 Lancaster Pk. 
BUFFALO, N, Y. 
S. A, Anderson, 

440 Main St. 

Palmer & Son, 

304 Main St. 

BUBLINGTON, VT. 

Mrs. Cora Gove, 

184 Main St. 
W. E. Peters, 
128 Church .St. 
CALGABY, ALBERTA, 
CAN. 
A. M. Terrill, Ltd. 
CANTON, 0. 
Fred C. Geltz, 

522 N. Market St. 






lllllllllllllllillllllllllllllilllllllllllllllilllllllllllllilllllllllillllllllllllilllllllllllllllililllllllb 



^F.T.D.Armyf 

n^HIS list of F. T. D. members is a veritable "blue list" of ik 
■*■ florists' business. These are the high-grade florists who arc 
co-operating under the F. T. D. banner, who are throwing all their energies 
into building a bigger-than-ever F. T. D. business, who are striving "Foi 
Better and More Efficient Floral Service to the Public as well as from Florist to Florist." 



CAMBRIDGE, MASS. 
Becker's Conservato- 
ries, 
1730 Cambridge St. 
CASPER, WYO, 
Casper Floral Co,, 
H. W. Keefe, Prop. 

CEDAR FALLS, lA. 
Bancroft & Sons 

CEDAR RAPIDS, lA. 

Kramer & Son 
CHARLESTON, S, C. 
T. T. Bolger, 

88 Society St. 
Rodgers Floral Co., 
174 Tradii St. 
CHARLESTON, W. VA, 
Charleston Cut Flower 
& Plant Co,, 
19 Capitol St. 
Winter Floral Co., 
811 Quarrier St. 
CHARLOTTE, N, C, 
Scholtz the Florist, 
Inc., 
306 N. Tyron St. 
CHICAGO, ILL. 

Bohannon Floral Co., 

57 E. Monroe St. 
H. N. Brims, 

3040 W. Madison St. 
Oscar J. Friedman, 
516 S. Michigan 
Ave. 
A. Lange, 

25 E. Madison St. 
Chas. T, Neiglick, 
8.54 N. State St. 
Samuelson, 
2132-2134 Michigan 
Ave. 
Schiller the Florist, 
2221 W. Madison, 
45(»9 Broadway 
W. J. Smyth, 
31st & Michigan 
Ave. 
Ernst Wienhoeber Co., 
22 K. Elm St. 
CINCINNATI, 0. 
Julius Baer, 

138 B. 4th St. 
Edward A. Forter, 

128 W. 4th St. 
Hardesty tc Co., 
150 E. 4th St. 
E. G. Hill Floral Co., 
532 Race St. 
CLEVELAND, O, 
J, M, Gasser Co., 
1006 Euclid Ave. 
A. Graham Sc Son, 
5.523 Euclid Ave. 
Jones-Russell Co. , 
1284 & 1308 Euclid 
Ave. 
Knoble Bros., 

1836 W. 25tli .St. 
CLINTON, lA. 
Estate of Andrew 
Bather 
COLORADO SPRINGS, 
COLO, 
Frank F, Crump 
Pikes Peak Floral Co. 
COLUMBUS, 0, 
Franklin Park Floral 
Co., 
1.3.35 Fair Ave. 
CORSICANA, TEX. 

Alfred Holm 
COUNCIL BLUFFS, lA. 
J. F. Wilcox Sc Sons, 
321 Broadway 
DALLAS, TEX. 
Dallas Floral Co., 

Ross & Masten Ave. 
Lange Floral & Nurs- 
ery Co., 
1214 Main St. 



DAVENPORT, lA, 
Forber & Bird, 
323 Brady St. 
DANVILLE, ILL. 

F. B. Smith & Sons 
DAYTON, 0. 
Heiss Co., 

112 S. Main St. 
DEFIANCE, 0. 
Christ Winterich, 
1119 Jefferson Avi-. 
DENVER, COLO.- 
Park Floral Co., 
1643 Broadway 
DES MOINES, lA, 
Alpha Floral Co,, 

7th & Walnut Sts. 
Lozier the Florist, 

521 B. lx)cust St. 
Wilson Floral Co. 

DETROIT, MICH, 
Bemb Floral Co,, 

1.53 Bates St. 
Breitmeyer's Sons, 
Gratiot Ave. and 
Broadway 
Central Floral Co., 

35-37 Broadway 
Edward A. Fetters, 

17 E. Adams Ave. 
Chas. H. Plumb, 

Burns & Gratiot 
Aves. 
Scribner Floral Co., 

604 E. Fort St. 
Gust H. Taepke, 
95 Gratiot & 4.50 
Elmwood Ave. 
DUBUQUE, lA. 

Harkett's Floral Co, 
DULUTH, MINN. 
Duluth Floral Co., 
121 Superior St. 
EAU CLAIRE, WIS. 

Lauritzen 
EDWARDSVILLE, ILL, 
J. F, Ammann Co., 
1308 St. Louis St. 
ELIZABETH, N, J, 
Henry Leahy, 

1169 E. Jersey St. 
EL PASO, TEX, 
Potter Floral Co., 
Mills Bldg. 
ELYRIA, 0. 

Hecock Floral Co., 
333 E. Broad St. 
ERIE, PA. 
John V. Laver, 
704 State St. 
Miles R. Miller, 
924 Peach St. 
ESCANABA, MICH. 
Christ. Peterson & 
Son, 
202 S. Birch St. 
EVANSTON, ILL. 
Fisher Bros., 

014 Dempster St. 
M. Weiland, 
602 Davis St. 
EVANSVILLE, IND. 
Blackman Floral Co., 

522 Main St. 
EXETER, N. H. 

John B. Perkins, 
23 Lincoln St. 
FAIBBUBY, NEB. 

C. Hurlburt 
FABGO, N. D. 

Smedley Sc Co. 
FAYETTEVILLE, ABK. 

Southwestern Seed Co., 

18 W. Center St. 
FLOBENCE, S. C. 

De Witt House 
Palmetto Nurseriei 
FT. COLLINS, COLO. 
Espelin & Warren 



FLUSHING, L. I. 
Geo. J. Frick, 
2 Jamaica Ave. 

FOND DU LAC, WIS. 
Haentze Co., 
414 Linden St. 

FT, MOBGAN, COLO, 

Morgan Floral Co, 
FT, WOBTH, TEX, 
Baker Bros, Co., 

1013 Houston St. 
J, E, McAdam 
FRAMINGHAM, MASS. 
S. J. Goddard, 
37 Main St. 
FREEPORT, ILL. 
John Bauscher 
104 Chicago St. 
GALESBURG, ILL. 

I. L, Pillsbury 
GRAND RAPIDS, Mich. 
Eli Cross, 

60 Monroe Ave. 
Mary Hartnett, 
Ashton Bldg. 
Henry Smith, 

Monroe & Division 
Aves. 
GREENFIELD, MASS, 

E. A. Richards 
GREENSBORO, N. C. 

Van Lindley Co., 
115 S. Elm St. 
GREENSBURG, PA. 
Joseph Thomas, 
200 N. Main St. 
GUTHRIE, OKLA. 
Furrow Sc Co., 

208 E. Oklahoma St. 
HACKETTSTOWN, N,J, 
Alonzo D, Herrick, 
404 Center St. 
HAMILTON, ONT. 
John Cannon Co., Ltd., 
69 E. King St. 
HARRISBURG, PA, 

F. E. Ridenour, 
1221 N. 3rd St. 

Charles S<!hmidt, 
313 Market St. 
HARTFORD, CONN. 
John F, Coombs 
Spear & McManus, 

242 Asylum St. 
Welch the Florist, 

180 Asylum St. 
J, Albert Brodrib, 
14 Winslow Ave. 
Geo. J. McCIunie, 
165 Main St. 
HELENA, ARK, 

Harry Ball 
HIGHLAND PARK, lU. 
Highland Park Green- 
houses 
HOBOKEN, N. J, 
J. Grulich Sc Sons, 
113 Hudson St. 
HORNELL, N, Y, 

Wettlin Floral Co. 
HOUSTON, TEX. 
Boyle Sc Pendervis, 

721 Main St. 
R, C, Kerr, 

Main & McKinncv 
Sts. 
HUTCHINSON, KAN. 
Stamm Floral Co., 
18 N. Main St. 
INDIANAPOLIS, IND. 
Bertermann Bros. Co,, 
241 Massachusetts 
Ave. 
E. G, Hill noral Co., 
225 N. Pennsylva- 
nia St. 
Wiegand's Sons Co., 
1610-1620 N. Illinois 
St. 



ITHACA, N. Y. 
Bool Floral Co., 
215 E. State St. 
JACKSON, MICH. 

J. B. Blessing 
JACKSONVILLE, FLA 
Mills the Florist, Inc 
36 W. Forsyth A v. 
JANESVILLE, WIS. 

Janesville Floral Co. 
JOLIET, ILL. 
Margaret Labo Co., 
Hohbs Bldg. 

KALAMAZOO, MICH. 
Van Bochove Sc Bro 
141 S. Burdick St. 
KANKAKEE, ILL, 
George Faber, 

162 S. Washington 
St. 

KANSAS CITY, KAN. 
L. C. Fields, 

10th & Splitlog .\\ 
KANSAS CITY, MO. 
Samuel Murray, 

1017 Grand Ave. 
Rock Flower Co., 
1106 Grand Ave. 
KENOSHA, WIS. 

Turner Sc Sons 
KINGSTON, N. Y. 
Burgevin Sons, Inc., 
Fair & Main Sts. 
KNOXVILLE, TENN, 
Chas, L. Baum, 
Charles W. Croucli, 
523 Gay St. 
KOKOMO, IND, 

Cole's Flower Shop 
LA CROSSE, WIS, 
La Crosse Floral Co 
Salzer Seed Co. 
LAFAYETTE, IND. 
Dorner Sc Sons Co. 
LAKE FOREST, ILL 
Calvert Flower Co, 
LANSING, MICH. 
Alpha Floral Co,, 
105 W. Michigiiir 
Ave. 
John A. Bissinger. 

624 N. Capitol .\v. 
Harry E. Saier, 
109 B. Ottawa St. 
LAWRENCE, MASS. 
W. C. Campbell, 
17 Lawrence St. 
LEBANON, PA, 

J, F, Vavrous' Sons, 
335 Guilford St. 
LEXINGTON, KY. 
Honaker the Florist, 

160 W. Main St. 
John A. Keller Co , 
123 E. 6th St. 
LIMA, 0. 
Eggert N. Zetlitz. 
207 W. Market .■<( 
LINCOLN, NEB. 
Frey Sc Frey, 
1.338 O St. 
LITTLE ROCK, ARK, 
Tipton Sc Hurst, 
521 Main St. 
LONDON, ONT., CAN. 
Dick's Flower Shop, 

235 Dundas St. 
J. Gammage Sc Sens 
The West Floral Co.. 
249 Dundas St. 
LONG BRANCH, N. J 
W. G. Eisele, 
327 Cedar Ave. 
LONG ISLAND, JAMES 
POBT, N. Y. 
Weir's Elklawn 
Greenhouse 



MEMBERS 



of the F. T. D. are strongly advertising the F, T. D. service and featuring out-of-town orders in their dif- 
ferent localities. This is in line with the plans made at the Chicago meeting. Reciprocity requires that 
out-of-town orders be addressed to F. T. D. members at the places of delivery. 



niiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiriiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii^ 



Fbbruahy 1, 1917. 



The Florists' Review 



61 



ow 375 Strong! 

ARE YOU AMONG THEM? 

The membership of the F. T. D. is open to retail florists of good repute 
lo are members of the S. A. F. Accounts between F. T. D. members are 
iranteed by the association according to by-laws. 

Mutual discount, 20 per cent. Rate of membership fee, $5.00. 
Iress Albert Pochelon, Secy., care L. Bemb Floral Co., 153 Bates St., Detroit. 




ANGELES. CAL. 
__ idondo Floral Co,, 
''■ L'18 W. 7th St. 
wis H. Freeman, 
212 W. 4th St. 
I8VILLE, KY. 
bgust K. Baumer, 
Masonic Temple 
cob Schulz Co., 
550 8. 4th Ave. 

Walker Co., 
312 W. Chestnut St. 
ELL, MASS. 
torse & Beats, 
<*; 8 Merrimack Sq. 

CHBUEQ, VA. 
iss Julia McCarron, 
1015 Main St. 

N, MASS. 

m. Miller & Sons, 

884 Western Aye. 

ON, OA. 

le Hour Nurseries 
ISON. WIS. 
intsohler Floral Co,, 
;31301 Williamston St. 
ATO. MINN, 
'indmiller Co. 
SFIELD, 0. 
.nsfield Floral Co. 
[TOR, 0. 
irkel & Sons 

GAN CITY, IND. 
ist Belcher, 
i607 Franklin St. 
ORD, MASS. 
S. Howard, 
50 S. Main St. 
AXTEEE, WIS. 
le Bros. Co., 
E. Water St. 
[efsen-Leidiger Co., 
19 Milwaukee St. 
M. Fox & Son, 
i37-41 Milwaukee St. 

.enney ft Co. 
-EAPOLIS, MINN. 
xey the Florist, 
"^id Ave. at 8th St. 
Sanson's, Inc., 
"18 Nicollet Ave. 
itted Floral Co., 
i S. 5th St., 932 
Icollet Ave. 
T, N. D. 
•ker's Greenhouse 
■E, ALA. 
ge Floral Co. 
'CLAIR. N. J. 
W. Massmann, 
16 Hloomfield Ave 
"'GOMERY, ALA. 
iemont Gardens, 
16 Dexter Ave 
7REAL, QUEBEC, 

enna, Ltd., 
.«or St. Catherine & 
,: <!uy Sts. 
MTB^LEMENS, MICH. 

J»ust Von Boeselager 
ira«VERNON, N. Y. 
•hur Dummett, 
'■■ S. 4th St. 
UA, N. H, 
E, Buxton 
VILLE, TENN, 
Floral Co. 
'ARK, 0. 
IS. A. Duerr 
BEDFORD, Mass. 
•ay the Florist 
lURGH, N, Y. 
ISS Gardens Co, 
' Water St. 
CASTLE. PA. 
Bros., 
"'ercer St. 



Me 



NEW HAVEN, CONN. 
J. N. Champion ft Co., 

1026 Chapel St. 
NEW LONDON, CONN. 

Renter's 
NEW ORLEANS, LA. 
Avenue Floral Co., 

3442 St. Charles St. 
Charles F. Eble, 

121 Baronne St. 
Metairie Ridge Nurs- 
ery Co., 

Harry Papworth, 
Pres. 
NEWTON, MASS. 
The Florist Shop, 

406 Center St. 
NEW YORK, N. Y. 
Charles H. Brown, 

2366 Broadway 
Alfred T. Bunyard, 

413 Madison Ave. 
Chas. A. Dards, 

44th St. & Madison 
Ave. 
Drakus ft Co., 

2953 Broadway 
Fred R. Heaton, 

Hotel Biltmore 
J. P. Klausner, 

275 Columbus Ave. 
A. Kottmiller, 

436 Madison Ave. 
J. O. Leikens, 

Madison Ave. at 
55th St. 
Peter F. McKenney, 

503 Fifth Ave. 
Myer the Florist, 

611 Madison Ave., 
cor. 58th St. 
Siebrecht Bros., Inc., 

922 Madison Ave. 
Max Sohling, 

22 W. 59th St. 
J. H. Small ft Sons, 

505 Madison Ave. 
Geo. E. M. Stumpp, 

761 Fifth Ave. 
Alex. Warendoitf, 

1193 Broadway 
Young ft Nugent, 

42 W. 28th St. 

E. J. Hession, 

984 Madison Ave. 
NEWTONVILLE, MASS. 
Newton Rose Conserva- 
tories, 

329 Newtonville 
Ave. 

NORFOLK, VA. 
Grandy the Florist, 
269 Granby St. 
NORTHEAST, PA. 

F. E. Selkregg, 
40 S. Pearl St. 

NORTHAMPTON, Mass. 
Butler ft UUman 

NORWICH, CONN. 
Geduldig's Greenhouse, 

77 Cedar Ct. 
Renter's 
OAKLAND, MD. 

H. Weber ft Sons Co. 
OGDENSBURG, N. Y. 
John Lawrence, 
53 Ford St. 
OKLAHOMA CITY, 
OKLA. 
Furrow ft Co., 

120 W. Main St. 
Stiles Co. 
OMAHA, NEB. 
Lewis Henderson, 
1519 Farnam St. 
Hess ft Swoboda 
OSWEGO, N. Y. 
W. H. Workman, 
CI W. Bridge St. 



OWOSSO, MICH, 
Hermann Thiemann 
Owosso Floral Co. 
PALM BEACH, FLA. 
Foster ft Foster, 
Hotel Royal Poin- 
ciana. 

PARKERSBURG, W.Va. 

J. W, Dudley ft Sons 
PASADENA, CAL. 

Henry A. Siebrecht, 

of New York City 
"House of Flow- 
ers" 
The Orchid, 

13 B. Colorado St. 
PASSAIC, N. J. 
Ed. Sceery, 

Main & Bloomfield 
Aves. 
PATERSON, N. J. 
Edward Sceery, 

85 Broadway 
Wm. Thurston, 

88 Van Houten Ave. 
PEORIA, ILL. 
Charles Loveridge, 
127 S. Jefferson St. 

PHILADELPHIA, PA. 
Charles Henry Fox, 

221 Broad St. 
J. J. Habermehl'ii 
Sons, 
Bellevue-Stratford 
Hotel 
London Flower Shop, 

1800 Cliestnut St. 
Pennock Bros., 

1514 Cliestnut St. 
C. H. Grakelow, 
2452 N. Broad St. 
PHOENIX. ARIZ. 
Donofrio's Floral 
Dept., 
CretuB Way & 
Washington St. 
PITTSBURGH, PA. 
Ludwig Floral Co., 
North Side, 710 E. 
Diamond St. 
Randolph ft McClem- 
ents, 
59.36 Penn Ave. 
A. W. Smith Co., 
Kennan Bldg. 
PIQUA, 0. 

Gerlach the Florist, 
1521 Washington St. 
PITTSFIELD, MASS. 
The Flower Shop, 
40 Fenn St. 
PORTLAND, ORE. 
Tonseth Floral Co., 
133 6th St. 
POTTSVILLE, PA. 
W. Guy Payne, 
21st & Market Sts. 
POUGHKEEPSIE, N. Y. 

Saltford Flower Shop 
PROVIDENCE, R. I. 
Johnston Bros., 
38 Dorrance St. 
QUINCY, ILL. 

Gentemann Floral Co. 
RACINE, WIS. 
Mrs. J. T. Hinch- 
liffe, 
504 Wisconsin St. 
READING, PA. 
J. H. Giles, 
123 S. 5th St. 
RED BANE, N. J. 
Kennedy & Son, 
5 Front St. 
RICHMOND, IND, 
Fred H. Lemon ft Co,, 
1015 Main St. 



RICHMOND, VA. 
Hammond Co., Inc., 
109 B. Broad St. 
ROCHESTER, MINN. 
Rochester Floral Co., 
119 S. Main St. 
ROCHESTER, N. Y. 
J. B. Keller Sons, 
25 Clinton Ave. 
H. E. Wilson, 
88 Main St. 
ROCKFORD, ILL. 
H. W. Buckbee 
ROCEVILLE CENTER, 
N. Y. 
Clarence S. Ankers 
RUGBY, N. D. 
Rugby Greenhouse, 
N. P. Lindberg, 
Prop. 
SAGINAW, MICH. 
Chas. Frueh ft Sons, 

514 Genesee St. 
Grohman the Florist, 

117 S. Jefferson St. 
SALINA, KAH. 

Leighton Floral Co., 
407 B. Iron Ave. 
SALT LAKE CITY, 
UTAH 
Huddart Floral Co., 
62 S. Main St. 

SAN ANTONIO, TEX. 
Edward Oreen, 
Ave. C & 8th St. 
SAN DIEGO, CAX. 
Boyle ft Damaud, 
412 E. C St. 

SANDUSKY, 0. 
Wagner Greenhouses, 
632 Columbus Ave. 
SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 
Art Floral Co., 

255 Powell St. 
R. E. Darbee, 
1036 Hyde St. 

B. M. Joseph, 
233-235 Grant Ave. 

MacRorie ft McLaren, 

141 Powell St. 
Pelicano, Rossi & Co., 
123-125 Kearny St. 
SARATOGA SPRINGS, 
N. Y. 
John Ralph's Green- 
houses 
SAVANNAH, GA. 

A. C. Oelschig ft Sons 
SCRANTON, PA. 
Baldwin the Florist, 

118 Adams Ave. 
G. R. Clark 

SEATTLE. WASH. 
Hollywood Gardens, 
1534 Second Ave. 
SEDALIA, MO. 

Archias Floral Co. 
SHEBOYGAN. WIS. 
J. E. Matthewson, 
625 N. 8th St. 
SHERMAN, TEX. 

Texas Nursery Co. 
SHREVEPORT, LA. 
James W. Begbie, 
614 Market St. 
SIOUX CITY, lA. 
J. C. Rennison Co. 
Rocklin & Lehman, 
402 4th St. 
SOMERVILLE, MASS. 

C. Joseph Sloane, 
Davis Sq. Florist 

SOUTH BEND, IND. 

Williams ft Co., 

138 S. Michigan St. 
SOUTHAMPTON, N. Y. 

G. E. M. Stumpp 






ffijW/BPC K/ WMTO All THc'g^N^ 



OFFICERS 

William F. Gude. Pres Washington 

Geo. Asm us. Vice- pres Chicago 

W. L. Rock, Treasurer Kansas City 

Albert Pochelon, Secretary Detroit 

Directors, Term Kxplrlna; 1917 

H. Papworth New Orleans 

G. E. M. Stumpp New York 

0. J. Olson St. Paul 

Directors, Term ExplrinB: 1918 

August Lange Chicago 

Frank D. Pelicano San Francisco 

Frank X. Stuppy St. Joseph. Mo. 

Directors, Term ExpirlnB 1919 

Lon Thomson Atlanta. Oa. 

Karl P. Baum Knox ville. Tenn . 

T.J. Wolfe Waco. Tex. 

Rate of Membership Fee, $5.00 



SPOKANE, WASH. 
Hoyt Bros. Co., 

11 Post St. 
Spokane Florist Co., 
513 Riverside Ave. 

SPRINGFIELD, ILL. 
Geo. M. Brinkerhoff, 
515 Keys Ave. 
SPRINGFIELD, MASS. 
Mark Aitken, 
484 Main St. 
STERLING, COLO. 
Sterling Greenhouse ft 
Gardens, 
417 Main St. 

STEUBENVILLE, 0. 
Huscroft's Flower 
Shop, 

173 N. 4th St. 
ST. JOSEPH, MO. 

Stuppy Floral Co. 
ST. LOUIS, MO. 
Grimm ft Gorly, 
7th & Washington 
Aves. 
F. A. Meinhardt, 

7041 Florissant Ave. 
Scruggs- Vandervoort 

ft Barney Co. 
Fred C. Weber, 

4326-28 Olive St. 
F. H. Weber, 

Boyle & Maryland 
Aves. 
Windler's Flowers, 
2300 S. Grand Ave. 
ST. PAUL, MINN. 
Holm ft Olson, 
24 W. 5th St. 
SUMMIT, N. J. 
M. Macdonald, 
5 Sayre St. 
SYCAMORE, ILL. 

WUliam Swinbank 
SYRACUSE, N. Y. 
W, E. Day Co., 
342 S. Warren St. 
TARRYTOWN, N. Y. 
Wm. F. McCord Co. 
F. R. Pierson Co., 
TERRE HAUTE, IND. 
J. G, Heinl ft Son, 
139 S. 7th St. 
TOLEDO, 0. 
Mrs. J. B. Freeman, 

336 Superior St. 
Schramm Bros., 

1307-1315 Cherry St. 
Mrs. E. Suder, 

2941-3001 Cherry St. 
Metz ft Bateman, 
414 Madison Ave. 
TOPEKA. KAN. 
Mrs. Lord's Flower 
Room, 
112 W. 8th Ave. 



TORONTO, ONT. 
Dillemuth the Florist, 

123 King St.. W. 
J. H. Dunlop, 

8-10 W. Adelaide St. 
Simmons ft Son, 
348 Yonge St. 
TUCSON, ARIZ. 
Howe Brothers 
TULSA, OKLA. 
Boston's Flower Store, 
16 B. 3rd St. 
TUSCALOOSA, ALA. 
Magnolia Conservato- 
ries, 
2939 18th St. 
URBANA, O. 
S. W. Carey, 
203 BloomQeld Ave. 
UTICA, N. T. 

C. F. Baker ft Son, 
59 Cornelia St. 
VINCENNE8, IND. 
Paul C. Sohultz, 
614 W. Ist St. 
WACO, TEX. 

Wolfe the Florist 
WALLA WALLA, Wash. 
Young ft Lester, 
23 E. Main St. 
WASHINGTON, D. C. 
Gude Bros. Co., 

1214 F. St., N. W. 
J. H. Small ft Sons, 
15th & H. Sta. 

WELLESLEY, MASS. 
The Wellesley Florist 
J. Tailby ft Son 
WESTFIELD, N. J. 
Chas. Doerrer ft Son, 
167 Elm St. 
WHEELING, W. VA. 

Arthur Langhans 
WICHITA, KAN. 
Chas. P. Mueller, 
145 N. Main St. 
WILLIAMSPORT, PA. 

Evenden Bros. 
WILKES-BARRE, PA. 
Ira G. Marvin, 
23 S. Franklin St. 
WILMINGTON, N. C. 

Will Rehder 
WINNIPEG, MAN., Can. 

The Rosery 
WORCESTER, MASS. 
H. F. A. Lange, 
371-73 Main St. 
Randall's Flower Shop, 
3 Peasant St. 
YOUNGSTOWN, 0. 
Kay-Dimond Co. , 
15 N. Phelps St. 
ZANESVILLE, 0. 
The Imlay Co., 
54 N. 5th St. 



information or 
rticulars address 



ALBERT POCHELON, Semtwir' '^is^^.^ToL^^.m... 



iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiii „„„ iiiiiiiiiiiii , I iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii II iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiil 




The Florists' Review 



Fkbkuaky 1, 1917. 





ini0 florist* whose cards avpMtf on tho pases cmrrwing this head, are prepared to fttl orders 
*-— " from other florists for looal delivery on the usual basis. 



SCRANTON, PAs 

A. L Besincon & Company 

FLORISTS AND DECORATORS 

Adams Ave. and Spruce St, ^f#i.^5?2G. 

Both Phones 

Yon can depend on us Order your fl werg on any 
occasion for delivery In Scianton and vicinity. 



J. V. LAYER 

ERIE, PA. 

Write, rkmw Wire t5SSS.'K5S'„ 



MILLS THE FLORIST, he. 

36 Weet Forsyth Stteet 

Jacksonville, Fla. 

We reach all Florida and Sooth Oeoiffla polnta. 



NIANI FLORAL CO. 

ORDERS rRONrriY FILLED 

MIAMI, FLORIDA 

PHILIPS BROS.. 938 Broad SL 

NEWARK, N. J. 

Aftisb'c Floral Woii and Long Stem 
Beauties our Specialty 



MARiON FLORAL 
COMPANY . . . . 



Marlon, Ind. 

Prempt and carefil execution of yonr orders 

ATCHISON. KAN. 

The Atchison Seed and Flower Store Co. 

Members F. T. D. 

TUCSON SEED COMPANY 

TUCSON, ARIZONA 
Florists for all Southern Arizona 

LIT US FHX 
TOUR ORDKBS fori 

or anywhere in Vlrgrtnia 
IHE GHENT FLORAL CO.. NORFOLK. VA. 

gr,'*'* Charleston, W. Va. 

are given prompt and careful attention by the 

CHARLESTON CUT FLOWER AND PLANT CO. 



MOBILE, ALABAMA 

The Minoe Floral Co. 



NORFOLK 




Carolina Floral Sisn 
8S9 Klnar street 

Greenhouses. Meetinsr and Romney Sts. Wesro« 
onr flowers: place orders here for fresh flower* 



Charleston, S. C. 



HELENA, ARKANSAS 

BALL FLORAL CO. 



Send Orders for 

Washington, 
D.C. 

and vicinity to 




Everything 
rirst-Claoa 



14th and H Sfreefe 



LYNCHBURG, VIRGINIA 

Auto and Express Service to all 
Points in Virginia 

Miss McCarron 

Member of Florists' Telegraph Delivery 

MRS. J. E. WAHS, Florist 

HERIDIAN, HISS. 



Cut Flo'wers 
for all Occasions 



ST. Loins. 



The Market. 



The business done last week was most 
satisfactory to the wholesalers. Al- 
though there was considerable stock 
coming in daily, it was not enough for 
the volume of business, and prices .is a 
result advanced. The most noticeable 
shortage was in roses, and the few 
coming in demanded an increase in 
prices. Ophelia and Russell were in 
great demand. The best Beauties 
brought $6 per dozen. The Killarneys 
and Sunburst cleaned up daily. Eed 
roses are far short of the demand. Car- 
nations are bringing $4 per hundred for 
first quality stock. Clean-ups in these 
were reported daily, Enchantress being 
the leader in demand. Good red and 
rose-pink carnations also had a big call. 
The fine weather should bring out a big 
crop for this week's trade. 

Sweet peas last week cleaned up well. 
Extra fancy blooms of the butterfly 
type bring $1.50 per hundred, and the 
demand far exceeds the supply. Violets 
are selling well at 50 cents. Choice 
stock brings $4 in thousand lots. The 
Kirkwood growers report a big crop of 
violets for St. Valentine's day. There 
was a fine supply of orchids all the week, 
the many social events creating a large 
demand for these. Easter lilies and 
callas are scarce, also valley. Paper 
Whites, Romans, jonquils and other 
bulbous stock, usually plentiful at this 
time, were scarce last week. Smilax, 
asparagus and fine adiantum had a good 
call throughout the week. 

Various Notes. 

The St. Louis Florists' Club will hold 
its monthly meeting February 8, when 
a carnation exhibition will be staged. 
The place of meeting has not yet been 
made known. Growers of new varieties 
of carnations will find it to their ad- 
vantage to send a few blooms for ex- 
hibition. The flowers may be sent in 
care of any of the wholesalers, who will 
stage them. 

George Walters, the wire worker, re- 
ports a busy season since the new year 
began. E. Rogers is again with Mr. 
Walters, who has worked up a good 
shipping trade. 

Do not forget the meeting of the St. 




WASHINGTON, 
D. C. 



«^^^GUDE'S 



GUDE BROS.CO. 
JTLORIST* 

l2l4r9T.NW 

WMHINVTOKOa 



H embers 
norlsto* Telegraph DeUTSiy 



NASHVILLE 




JOY'S 



Members of Florists' Telegraoh Delivery Ass'n. 



BIRMINGHAM, ALA. 

The Flower Shop 

Order your flowers on any occasion for delivery 
in this section from the leading florist in the city 

C. I. BAKER 

iai4 So. ThirtMnth HU, BIBVINGHAM, ALA. 

RENO FLORIST 

RENO, NEVADA 

38 W. SECOND ST. 

Prompt and careful attention to orders 
from out-of-town florists. 

EL PASO, TEX. 

"THE FLOWER SHOP" 
D. C. HARTM*WII, Prop. 

EL PASO, TEXAS 

POTTKR FLORAL CO. 

Il«nb«r Florists' TelegntDh DdlvuT Altfm 

Orders for TEXAS 

KBRB The Florist HOUSTON, TEX. 

Member Florlste* Telegraph Delivery 

Lug Flml & Nniiery Co., Dallai, Tex. 

Write or vvire headauarters for flowers for 
Texas. Oklahoma. Louisiana. New Mexico. No 
orders too large, none too small. 

Chas. W. Cnoch, KNOXVILLE, TENN. 

The Leading Florist of the South 
All Ordars Olvan Special Attention 

VAN UNDLEY CO. 

FLORISTS 

GREENSBORO, N. C 



Fkbkuaky 1, 1917. 



The Florists' Review 



63 




J. J. Habennehl's Sons 



The finest floral airansrementg, flowen and plants 
famished on telegraphic orders. 



The 

Bellene 

btratfordt 



Phfladelphia 



Broad and 

Walaot 

Streets 



ORDERS FOR 

WEST PHILADELPHIA 

Carefully and Promptly Execnted 
with Oood Flowers and Oood Taste by 

M. J. CALLAHAN ^'"^pliKADBFim 

PHILADELPHIA 

1800 Chestnut StrMt 

THE LONDON FLOWER 
SHOP. LTD. 

Member Florists' Telegraph Delivery. 

ATLANTIC CITY 

Egg Harbor 

Flower Shop 

1311 Pacific Ave. 

Member Florists' Telegraph Delivery 




PITTSBURGH, PA. 

BLIND FLORAL CO; 

Florists, Decorators and Growers 

liberty Avenue and 5th Street (Empire Bldg,) 

Extensive Variety and Supply. Efficient Service and 
Completed Werk. 




ERIE, PA. 

CRESCENT FLORAL GARDEN 

SHKKM OFFERLE, Prop. 

WARREN. PA. 




COUNCIL BLUFFS, lA. 

HERMAN BROS. CO. 

Leading Retail Florists lO Pearl St. 

The Saltford Flower Shop 

POUGHKEEPSIE. NEW YORK 

Mwher F. T. D. « QUAIITT SHOP IN « QUILin TOWH 

CHATHAM IV Y T''^ ^""'o'" Fi*"'! <:« 

viumAlUtil) i1, 1 , PROMPTNESS. WITH CAW 

toeni NEW YORK and Werteni MASS 

MONTCLAIR, N. J. 

MASSIVIANN 

Member Florigta' Tel. Del. Ass'n 

A. C. BROWN, ^S'"- 

LARGE GREENHOUSES 





ABUNDANTLY PREPARED AT 
ALL TIMES 

Edwards Floral 
Hall Company 

1716 Pacific Avenae 
ATUNTiCCITY, NEW JERSEY 

Nurseries: Mediterranean 
and South Carolina Aves. 

Member Florists' Tele^aph Delivery Ass'n 

Germantown and Chestnut Hill 

ORDERS 

Carefully executed with taste and promptness. 

FRANK Re HASTINGS 

8 West Chelten Avenue, 
Germantown, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Masslilon, Ohio 

A. WEAVER Florist in Rotary 



Louis County Growers' Association to 
be held February 7 at the Eleven Mile 
House. The feature of this meeting 
will be reports of the Carnation Society 
convention by members who attended 
the meeting this week. 

Ernest Lapp has bought the retail in- 
terests of the J. F. Ammann Co., of 
Edwardsville, 111. He has opened a 
store in the city, known as the Palace of 
Sweets and Flowers. Mr. Lapp spent 
a day in the wholesale district last week 
buying supplies. 

The midwinter school graduations 
January 26 caused a big demand for 
flowers. 

The St. Louis party to attend the 
American Carnation Society's meeting 
at Indianapolis left January 31. The 
following made the trip: Jules Bourdet, 
August Hummert, H. G. Berning, David 
S. Geddia, W. J. Pilcher, J. J. Windier, 
C. A. Kuehn, S. E. Cerny, Charles 
Meyer, F. C. Weber, Sr., Vincent Gorly, 
Otto G. Koenig and Fred H. Meinhardt. 
The ladies in the party were Mrs. H. G. 
Berning, Mrs. F. C. Weber, Sr., Mrs. J. 
J. Windier, Mrs. V. Gorly and Mrs. W. 
A. Rowe. The party made the trip in a 
special car over the Pennsylvania rail- 
road and arrived in Indianapolis at 
3 p. m. the same day. 

Paul Hranicka, who has charge of the 
John Milliken greenhouse range at 
Crescent, Mo., is having wonderful suc- 
cess with Ophelia, Eussell and Beauties; 
also, one of the finest crops of the Kil- 
larneys. 

August Hartman is cutting a splendid 
crop of Spencer sweet peas from one of 
his houses at Kirkwood. His carnation 
crop also is of fine quality. 

Samuel Roth, formerly with Grimm & 
Gorly and more recently of the A. L. 
Young Co., now is manager for the 
Diemer Floral Co., on South Broadway. 
Mr. Roth reports a busy week in social 
and funeral work. 

James Bishoflf has been added to the 
sales department of the St. Louis Whole- 
sale Cut Flower Co. His brother, Stan- 
ley, has taken his old position as chauf- 
feur. 

Joseph Witek's handsome establish- 



ROCHESTER, MINN. 

Rochester Floral Co. i^^\ 

florist 

RETAIL STORE-SREENHOUSES 
Member Florists' Telegraph Delivery Au'n. 




S. A. Anderson 

440 Main St., BUfFALO, N. Y. 

Anderson service means fresh, sturdy stock, 
and prompt deliveries in Buffalo, Lockportk 
Niagara Falls and Western New Tork. 

Member of the Floriats' Telegraph Dellven. 

ROCHESTER, N.Y. -t-«>- 

We reach all 
Weetem 
. T. Points. 




SCOTT THE FLORIST 
BUFFALO,NEWYORK 



W. & T. CASS, Horists 

GENEVA, N.Y. 

Telesrraph Orders Promptly Filled 
in Western New York. 

Orders for 

PHILADELPHIA 

AND SURROUNDINQt 

Will be artistically filled at 

THE FORREST FLOWER SHOP 

13t So. Broad 8tr««t. PM ILAPI LPHIA 

ALBANY, N. Y. 

23 
. STEUBEN 
STREET 

SLOWER SHO^ Best service. 
— ^^ Send your 

orders to us. 





NEW JERSEY 

EDWARD SCESRY 
PATKR80N and PAggAIC 

Member Florists' Telegraph Del. 



KHIT BRnTWra-S riowtRSHOP 

r.:sv^r,ss;sNEWARK,OHio 



64 



The Florists' Review 



Fdbhuaby 1, 1917. 




Clarksburg, W. Va, 



Order your flowers on any occasion 
for delivery in this section from tlie 
leading Florists in the State. 

Hayman Greenhouse Co. 

Clarksburg, W. Va. 

WEST VIRGINIA 

WESTERN MARYLAND 

THE H. WEBER & SONS GO. 

rainnont,W.Va. Garksburg, W.Va. Oakland. Md. 

Commissions Promptly Executed. 
Quality— Excellence-Ability 

Members Florists' Telegraph Delivery Ass'n. 

NORFOLK, VA. 

6RANDY THE FLORIST 

Orders also delivered to 
FORTRESS MONROE, VA. 

■amber FloriBts' Telegraph Delivery Anodatloik 

RICHMOND. VA. 

The Hammond Company, Inc. 
LEADING FLORISTS 

109 EAST BROAD STREET 

FOR DELIVERY IN 

GEORGIA 

Consult 

LAWRENCE FLORAL CO. 
atlanta. oa. 

Ohoicb flowers for all occasions 

J. W. Dudley Sons Co. 

PmrkevBhvtrg, W. Vs. 

Clarkabnrgrt W. Va. 

Hnmtinffton, W. Va. 

Slarietta, Ohio 

QBPKBg CAR»FULI.T ■X»CUT»D 

SCroLIBEIS, FLORIST 

Write. Phone or Wire , SCtANTON. PA. 
61S Unden 8tr««t. «JvaJu^iun, i «. 

n APir n abict scbanton. pa. 

LLARA, rLUIUOl, 124 W^ashlnston Ave. 

Member Florists' Telegraph Delivery. 
Orders lor Northeastern Pennsylvania filled 
pitMnptly. Usual discount. Both phones No. 2454. 

FLORAL ORDERSf or Bryn Mawr, Main Line, 
Conshohocken and Norristown '"^'RS^'l, 

WILLIS H. BALDWIN. CoBsiwIwckMtPa . 

ROCHESTER, N. Y. 



TZRNERY 



J.B.IUtUJtRSONS, 

Florists 
25 Clinton Avenne, N. 
Koch. Phone Stone 606. L. D. Bell Phone Main 218t 
Members Florists' Telegraph Delivery 



CHAS. L BAUM-'Ihe Home of flamnT 

KNOXVILLE,TENN. 

Member of the F. T. D. 

U. J. VIRGIN 

S38 Canal St NEW ORLEANS, U 



KICHNOND, VA. 



join L RATCUFFE 



FLORIST 



09 W. Broad St. 



Braaehf Hotel Jelfoiwm, tl^Jl IZiWAiiKim Wkito Salfhat 
Omees t SleluMad, Ta. "■'*» UIWUBIIW, 8pri«f^ WlJa, 



Geny Bros, ^^s?, 

212 Fifth Avenue No. 

NASHVILLE, TENN. 



■# 



fft 



"WE NEVER SLEEP 

wSmum: Nemphis, Teim 

89 South Main Stre«t 

'Up-to-the-minute" Service and Execution 
Every Flower in Season 

SAN ANTONIO, TEXAS 

Ave. c at sth SL EDWARD GREEN, Florist 

Telegraph Orders a Specialty. 

ment on McPherson avenue is one of 
the attractive spots in the west end. 
Business has been rushing. 

William Bouche and L. P. Jensen, 
vi^ho will have charge of the decorating 
corps for the spring flower show to be 
held at the Armory hall next month, are 
hard at work making plans for the big 
job. Two better men for this work 
would be hard to find. 

E. A. McPheron, of the Cottage 
Greenhouses, Litchfield, 111., was a vis- 
itor last week. 

The meeting of the executive com- 
mittee and the various chairmen of the 
spring flower show committees was held 
at the oflSces of the St. Louis Seed Co. 
Reports were heard from all the chair- 
men. The reports of August Hummert, 
of the guarantee fund; J. J. Windier, of 
the program; W. J. Pilcher, for the 
trades' displays; Frank Windier, for 
publicity, and W. A. Rowe, for finance, 
were most gratifying. A meeting of 
these men will be held every Tuesday 
afternoon at the same place from now 
until the time of the show. J. F. Am- 
mann, president of the American Carna- 
tion Society, was present and urged all 
to try to attend the meeting at Indian- 
apolis. J. J. B. 

BOSTON. 



The Market. 



Prices continue to hold up in fiist- 
class shape and no immediate break 
seems probable. Flowers open slowly, 
owing to the continuation of wintry 
weather and many sunless days. Eoses 
still clean up well. There is a slight 
weakening in prices of short-stemmed 
stock, but on other lines there is prac- 
tically no change. American Beauties 
remain unchanged and sell out easily. 
Better grades of Hadley, Russell, Ward 
and Ophelia are soon bought up. White 
Killarney is the only rose which drags 
somewhat. Carnations hold their own. 



K E NTU C KY; 

JACOB SCHULZ CO.: 

Incorporated— Bstablishcd 1873 ' 

THE FLOWER SHOPi 

550 roMth AvcHM, LoaisviHe | 

For painstakinc personal ■ 
service send your orders to ^ 
the South's Most Modem Flo- ■ 
ral and Art Establishment. R 

Member Florists' Telecraph Delivery Ass'n. 




SEND ALL 



NENrms 



OIDERSTO 



THE FLOWER SHOP 

69 Madison Avenue 
MEMPHIS, TENNXSSBl 

LEXINGTON, KY. 

NONUER, The Florist 

Largest Cat Blower Grower in the State 
160 WMt IHaln Str««t 

Mamber Floriste' Telesraph Delivery AH'b. 

LOUISVILLE,KY. 

itUaUST R. RRUMER 

MASONIC TEMPLE 

Member Florists* Telecraph Delivery Attn 

LOUISVILLE, KY, 

THE F. WALKEft CO. 

810-812 West Chestnut Street 

LARGEST FLOWER STORE IN THE CITV 

LEXINGTON, KY. 

JOHN A. KELLER CO. 

INCORPORATED 
123 EAST SIXTH STREET 

Member Florists' Telegraph Delivery AsS^s 

LANCASTER, PA. 

B. f . BARR & CO., Leading Horists 

ROANOKE, VAe 

Fallon, Florist 

LOUISVILLE, KY. 

E. G. REIMERS & SON CO. 

Established 1880. Incorporated 1913 



Fkbruaky 1, 1917. 



The Florists^ Review 



65 





Th« flortats whose oarda avp«ar on tlio paaroa earryliiK this tioad, are proparod to till orders 
~ — from other florists for loeal delivery on the usual basis. 




CLEfELMB 

•••1I1L««« 

J. N. GASSER COMPANY 

EUCLID AVENUE 

We grew the best of everything In 
CUT FLOWERS 

THE KAY-DINOND CO. 

YOUNGSTOWN, O. 

Members Florists' Telegraph Delivery Ass'n 

ALWAYS HAVE- COMPLETE 
STOCK ON HAND 

CLEVELAND 

THE JONES-RUSSELL CO. 

FLOWERS 
1284-1308 Euclid Avenu« 

Hember Florists' Telesrraph Delivery Aas'n. 
Wm can tUl your orders Day or NlBlit tor 

CLEVELAND AND 

STATE OF OHIO 

Always have complete stock on hand. 
) BegulMT discount allowed the Trade. 

VIIADI C DDAC 1S86W. 25th8t.. 

Members Florists* TelejrraDh Delivery Ass'n- 

FLORAL DESIGNS ^j^i} 

C0LUNBUSi£L?si2» 

Telegraph Orders Carefully Executed. 
aOzen's'ssia, £^?l^ain 2903 l>v SO. Hl^h St. 



The Livingston Seed Co. 

FLORISTS 

COVER ALL OHIO POINTS 

114 N. High St, COLUM BUS, OHIO 

CLEVELAND, OHIO 

BRAMIiEY & SON 
*tore and O reeahouses. U81 East Tlst Stree* 

NEWARK, OHIO 

^ CHAS. A. DUERR 

Member Florists' Telegraph Delivery 



■•mb«ra of Flortrts' Telegraph DeUveryAM*. 

EVENDEN BROS. 

^^gggrST'" Williamtport, Pa. 

SYRACUSE, N. Y. 

1703 Court Street 

I. MULHAUSER & SON, Florlste 



BaU If afh 2800 
Cay. Central U6S> 




^leading' 
florists 



^?<6?7r5t,^.dAv«: Cleveland 

CLEVELAND 
OHIO "■ £"sar 

tSM XnCXlD iVKNUK Member F. T. 0. 



DAYTON, OHIO 

16 and 18 W. Srd St. 

Matthews the Florist 

Established In 1883 
Oreenhonses and Nnrseriea in Blrerdale. 



*"i!ll".yi^SOUTlBEND,lin). 

For Nor)ihern Indiana I ISf.S. MloU4;an.8t. 



and South'n Michigan 



Members F7T. D. 



g> M O V FLORAL CO. 

U>^l% ■ 118 West Fifth Afene 



A. T. auSHONQ. Fra*. 



OARV. INK. 



Altoona, Pa. 



MYERS 
BROS. 

▲11 (todors carefully Kxeontod 

CANTON, 0.. and Vicinity 

A. T. POLLARD, rbriit in Ritaiy 



CANTON, 0. 



MASSILLON, ALLIANCE 
and VICINITY 

rSrn C nnX? 522 Market Ave., North 
I llli V u* ULLI £1, Member F. T. D. Asa'n. 

All now are of top-notch quality. The 
loaders are Pink Delight, Alice, Match- 
less, Ward, Benora, White Wonder and 
Kosette. The best violets have made 
$1, with poorer grades as low as 50 to 
GO cents per hundred. 

Bulbous flowers sell well. Daffodils 
are unchanged; tulips, also, move in 
good shape. Narcissus ornatus, Coni- 
jiernelle and Silver Spur are now noted. 
Freesia is dragging more than it did. 
Lilies are abundant; so are callas; but 
there is no great surplus of either. Yel- 
low marguerites are in good demand and 
good flowers realize as much as carna- 
tions. Sweet peas are in good supply, 
with the Spencers selling best. Snap- 
dragons arc not at all plentiful, but of 
mignonette there is an oversupply. 
There still is a good supply of stevia, 
with smaller lots of calendulas, wall- 
flowers, primroses and other miscella- 
neous flowers. Cattleyas are more abun- 
dant and cheaper. There also are 
cypripediums, dendrobiums, phala?nopsis, 
vandas and laclias available. Valley 
sells somewhat slowly, but asparagus 
moves a little better. 

Florists' Bowling League. 

The standing of the local league up 



Eggert N. Zetlitz 

The Leading Florist 

209 West Market Street, 

LIMA, OHIO 

National Florist 

Representative Rotary Florist 

Member of Florists' Telegraph Delivery 

INDIANAPOLIS 

INDIANA , 

225 N. Pannaylvania Street 

E. G. HILL FLORAL CO. 

Indiana's Foremost Florists, 

covering all points In state. 

H«mt>er8 Florists' Telegraph Delivery Assoclatloo. 

Indianapolis, Ind. 

241 Maasachuaatts Avanua 

BERTERNANN BROS. CO. 

LEADINQ FLOMSTS 

Members Florists' Telegraph Delivery Am'b. 

KstabllBbed 1859 

A. WIESAND'S SONS CO. 

Florists and Decorators 

1S10 to 1620 N. Illinais SL lidianapoHs, !■<. 

Indiana's oldest, largest and most complete retail 

establishment. 

Members Florists' Telegraph Delivery Aaa'n. 

STEUBENVILLE, OHIO 

HDSCROn'S FLOWER 

SHOP, 173 Nortt rowtli Sli«l 

All orders DromDtl7 executed 

W. and W. FLOWER STORE 

99 S. Mala St., WASHINGTON, PA. 

Wholesale and Retail Floristi 

Richmond, Ind. 

FRKD H. I.BMON & CO. 




Florists and Decorators. 



Send na yonr ordara 



BEYER FLORAL CO. 



SOUTH BEND 
IND. 



Daily deliveries to Notre Dame University 
and St. Mary's Academy. 



TERRE HAUTE, IND. 

JOHN G. HBNL & S0N;129 South 7tli Sired 




BOSS COMPANY DAYTON 
ill2So.NtinSt OHIO 

Members Ftoristt' Teltiraph DeTnery Ass's. 



STREATOR,ILLI 



THORNTON 
I FLORAL COl 

R«tall-FI.ORISTS— Wholesale 
OIfAI.ITY 18 OUR HOBBY 

VAN METER FLOWER SHOP 

S??i%H. Springfield, Oe 

BEST FLOWERS for EVERY OCCASION 



66 



The Florists^ Review 



FEBRUAnv 1, 1917. 






ni* florlats whose cards am^ear on tho pace* oarrylnc fbla haad* ar« proparvd to fill ordaro 
from other florists for local doUvory on tha usual basis. 



HUGO SCHROETER 

S31 Woodward Ave. INC. 

DETROIT 

MICHIGAN 

GROSSEPOINTE i>«»^«'^ HIGHLAND PARK 



John Breitmeyer's Sons 

Ctfier Bnidwiy ft GntNt Are., 

DETROIT, MICH. 

Member Florists* Telecnoh Delivers Am'n. 



^ SCHROer^A 

*'• 56 Broadway ^•« 

DETROIT 



MICHIGAN 



ANN ARBOR, MICH. 

KODAK FLORIST 

Just Across from the University 

Orders Filled Promptly 

Phone 600 Nickels Arcade 



DETROIT, MICH. 

FETTERS, FLOWERS 

237 WoodwsrdL Avsnos 

Member F. T. D. 



Member Florists' Telegraph Delivery Ass'n. 

DETROIT and VICINITY 

L Benb ntril Co. ^ibert^ocheion. ,53 ^^ ^ 



ff. p. HoFabland 



L. C. MoFabljlND 



McFARLANDS, Florists 

AKRON, OHIO 

J. B. GOETZ SONS 

SAGINAW, MICH. 

or any City in Michigan 

Ci¥#nRiiv Wic Neier-SchroederCo. 

Ul^Cll Ua y , n Id. orders for Cut Flowers 
and Designs delivered anywhere in Wisconsin 
and Northern Michigan at right prices. 

BiinLE CREEK. MICHieAN 

S. W. COGGAN, florist 25 East Main Street 

Member of Florists' Telegraph Delivery 

MRS. J. B. FREEMAN 

OP "THE FLOWERS'* 

•M Superior Street, TOLEDO, OHIO 

GRAND RAPIDS, MICH. 

GRAND RAPIDS FLORAL CO. 

Alfred Hannah & Sons will fill your orders for 
Deilgns and Cut Flowers In Michigan. 

MI^HId/liy ORDERS WILL BE CARE- 
^^■■^■■■W'*'^ FULLY CARED FOR BY 

HENRY SMITH 

Wholesale and Retail Florist of Grand Rapids 



Quality cv^^ 

^ and ■««s'^ ^^ 

pROMPTHeg 



Hnnbers 

F.T.D. 

The — 

Avenue Floral Co. 

3442 ST.CHARLES AVENUE 



TO 
HARRy PAPWORTH 

I^Mdfarte Ri(lge Nursci^ Co.1 
STORC 

ARTHUR F. CRABB 

GRAND RAPIDS, MICH. 

Prompt Bervic. to amy point iH Mlohlsan 

to and including January 25 is as fol- 
lows 

Team. Won. Lost. 

McAlpino & McDonald 38 10 

Galvin's 36 12 

Waban Rose Conservatories 30 18 

Flower Exchange 29 21 

Flower Market 26 22 

Carbone 25 23 

New England Florist Supply Co 19 29 

H. M. Robinson & Co 18 30 

I'enn's 12 36 

15. A. Snyder & Co 9 39 

The highest single score was made by 
A. H. Carr, with 119; high triple score, 
A. H. Carr, 306. 

Various Notes. 

TluTc is no neater, more up-to-date 
and more interesting carnation establish- 
ment in the vicinity of Boston than t'lat 
of John Barr, at South Natick. Mr. 
Bail-, while superintendent on the B. P. 
Cheney estate, was one of the largest 
and most successful exhibitors of pot 
jilants at the Boston shows. lie has 
now dropped the culture of even his old- 
time favorites, cyclamens, and sticks to 
carnations. His houses are on an ideal 
site, with plenty of splendid land ad- 
joining. Water is inexpensively pumped 
from the nearby Charles river. A lierd 
of cattle keeps some of Mr. Barr's 
Avealthy neighbors supplied with milk 
and cream and gives him the necessary 
manure for his houses. Krocschell Eros. 
Co. heaters are used and give complete 
satisfaction. The carnations most ex- 
tensively grown are Pink Delight and 
^latcliless, whicli do wonderfully well 
liere. Eenora is liked as a variegated 
variety and Beacon as a scarlet. The 
old Fenn still does remarkably well and 
will be jdanted at least one more year. 
Alice is grown largely, Imt the plants 
were chopped back for cuttings, which 
were in heavy demand. Xancy here is 
inferior to Pink Delight. Mr. Barr says 
it comes too single. Good Cheer is 
grown as a rose-pink, but Albert Roper 
will take its place next year. Alice 
Coombs also does well here. It sells 
splendidly and is a good keeper. The 
propagating house was a treat; every- 
thing is so clean and thrifty. 

Paine Bros., of Randolph, are cutting 
fine lots of Flamingo, White Hawk, La 
Reine and Couronne d 'Or tulips and 
Golden Spur narcissi. Their Hupp motor 



MEMBERS 

FLORISTS' TELEGRAPH DELIVERY 

TOLEDO, OHIO 

METZ & BATEMAN 
414 Madison Avenue 

NATIONAL FLORISTS 

DETROIT 

6R0SSE POINTE - MT. CLEMENS 
CAREY, The Florist 

491 Woodward Ave., Detroit, Mich. 



SCHRAMM BROS. 

Send us your orders for 

TOLEDO, OHIO 

1307-18 CHERRY STREET 

Members Florists' Teleeraph Deliverj 



CINCINNATI 

532-534 Race St. 
E. G. HILL FLORAL CO. 



Good Stock and 
Good Service 



»i 



For WISCONSIN d«llv«ry •! 

''Home-grown Flowers 

GKT IN TOUCH WITH 

J. E. MATTHEWSON 

SHEBOYGAN, WIS. 

Member Florists' Teleeranh Deliverr Ajl'o 

MANKATO. MINN. > 

THE WINDMILLER GO. i 

Flowers to all points on short notice 

Member Florists' Telegraph Delivery. 

KENOSHA, wis! 

L. Turner & Sons 

FLORISTS 

382 Park Avenue 

GreenhousoB, GonoTa Road 

Members Florists' Telegraph Deliverr Ass'n. 

NEW ORLEANS, LA. 

CHAS. EBLE 

FLORIST 

121 Baronne Street 

Member Florists' Telegraph Delivery 

MADISON, WIS. 

RENTSCHLER HORAL CO. 

Best Sbipplna Bervloe for Wieeonsls 



MRS. I. T. HINCHUFFE, florist 

004-606 WiKoonsln St.. RACIKE, WIS. 
-Memlwr FUirlgU' Telegraph DellTery, J 



Fkbkoary 1, 1917. 



The Florists' Review 



67 





Th» florist* whos* cards avpear on tbe itases oarrytnc this Iimu1» are prepared to fill orders 
■— ~— from otlier florists for looal delivery on the usual basis. 




Alexander NcConnel) 

611 5th Ave., cor. tf 49th SL 
NEW YORK CITY 

Telegraph orders forwarded to any part of 
the United States. Canada and all the princi- 
pal cities of Europe. 

Reference or cash must accompany all orders 
from unknown correspondents. 

Cable Address ALEXCONNELL 




922 Madison Ave., cor. 73d St. 
NEW YORK 

Member Florists' Telegraph Delivery 

P H I L. L. I R S 

272 Fulton Stroot 

BROOKLYN 

Branch Store, 352 Hatbush Avenue 

Telephone, 4202 Ptospcct 

Brooklyn's only member of the Florists' Tele- 
graph Delivery. Floral Deliveries in New 
York. Brooklyn. Long Island. New Jersey, ate. 

Established 1874 

THOS. F. GALViN, Inc. 

NEW YORK -iF.«H*v^ 

799 Boyiston Stroot BOSTON 

Deliveries to Steamers and all Eastern Points. 




IN HEART OF NEW YORK CITY 

338 Fifth Ave., near 33rd St. 

Opposite the Waldorf-Astoria. Phone Mad. Sq. 368-369 
Oar M otto-The Golden Rale 

THE BOSTON FLORIST 

Personal selection. Satisfaction guaranteed. 

In the heart of New York City. 

Close to Theaters and Steamships. 

Established 1902. 

135 E. 34TH ST., ■ HEW YORK 

JOSEPH TREPEL 

Brooklyn's Largest Vlortst 

SEVEN STORES 

MAIN STORK. 884 Lewis Avenue 

Phone 1150 Bedford Brooklyn, N. Y. 

^^^ Y^?kV?f^^R "ielivered to any part of New 
itork City. Brooklyn and L ong Island. 

C. C. TREPEI Main Office. 

ntZ A *^*^* *^*-'» BL00H1N00ALE>8 
^To ^7*'- "°^ *"**» 8*- NEW YORK 

w^lArgest Indlvldnal retell deal«r In Out Flowibb 
and Plants In the world. 



ORDERS 
FOR . . • . 



NEW YORK 



WIRE OR PHONE TO 

MAX SCHLINQ 



22 Wost 89th Stroot, Mtlolnlng Plaza Hotal 

Bta\ Florists in the States as Bef erences European Orders Bxecnttd 

ll«mlMr nortoto'T«l«arapli D«nv«ry Association 



NEW YORK-Estabfishcd 1874 

DARDS 

N. E. cor. 44th St. and Madison Ave. 

Has his own correspondent? in all the largs 
cities of Europe and the British Colonies. 
Cable orders forwarded by private code. 

Member of Florists' Telegraph Delivery 

J. H. SHALL & SONS, Florists 

NEW YORK and WASHINGTON 

FLORAL and LANDSCAPE Work 

WASHINQTON, D. C.-15th and H Sts. 

NEW YORK 
Waldorf-Astoria and 505 Madison Ave. 

HUGO H. JAHN 

710 Nostrand Avonuo 

1952^ Bedford BROOKLYN, N. Y. 

Will deliver to Steamships, Theaters, anywhere 
"Vlthln 20 miles of New York. 

ARTISTIO WORK PERSONAL ATTENTIOS 

Special Care of Tonr Telegraph Orders. 

RAMlvrs 

FLOWER SHOP 

350 Madison Avenue 
IN THE HEART OF NEW YORK 

«»-PROMPT AND EFFICIENT SERVICE-e» 

EW YORK 

ORDERS SENT TO 

H. H. BURNS 

509 MADISON AVE. 

will receive prompt and careful attention 

Long Island Brooklyn Jersey City Newark 

truck proves its value by not only haul- 
ing llowers to the market, but, by using 
a trailer, it also hauls bulb cases from 
the (locks, as well as coal supplies. 

A good Boston delegation left Janu- 
ary 29 for the Indianapolis convention, 
including S. J. Goddard, William Nichol- 
son, Mr. and Mrs. W. R. Nicholson, Mr. 
and Mrs. W. D. Howard, E. A. Peirce, 
C. S. Strout and Ernest Saunders. Quito 
a number of western establishments 
will be visited by the party after the 
convention, and all hope to secure for 
Boston the 1918 convention. 

A. A. Pembroke, of North Beverly, 
grows the beautiful salmon pink carna- 
tion, Lady Northcliflfe, remarkably well. 
This is one of the few English varieties 
succeeding well here. He also has a 




. . . FLORIST. . . 
426 Madison Avenue— and 49th Stred 

▼amdorbUt Hotol NCW I OFK 

Telephone Murray Hill 783 

Highest award at the International Flower 
Show. April 11, Grand Central Palace. 
Location Central Personal Attention 

Member Florists' Telegraph Delivery Ass'n 

McKENNEY 

503 Fifth Avenue N. E. Cor. of 42d St. 

In the center of NEW YORK. 

Orders filled with the same care as if you were here yourself. 

•W QUALITY I EFFICIENCY! "W 

F. T. D. member. 

G. E. M. STUMPP 

761 FIFTH AVINUE 

NEW YORK CITY 

F. T. D. MEMBER 

WARENDORFF 

STORES ALL OVER TOWN 

Send your New York orders to 
The Ansonia, Seventy -fourth 
Street and Broadway. 

id Clarke's Sons 

2139-2141 Broadway 

Tel. 1652, 1553 Columbus 

NEW YORK CITY 

Out-of-town orders for delivery in New York 
carefully and promptly filled atreasonablerates 

Members of Florists' Telegraph Delivery Ass'n 

Send all MARYLAND orders to 

SAMUEL FEAST g SONS 

S. 1. coriMr Chartos and PtoMant tits., 

BALTIMOIIK. MD. 

The firm of 84 years' experience anft repntatloo^ 
Onlck auto delivery Rervicp for pity and sabnrbe 



yy I L80 N --*"*' - ^"^^^ ^^"* 



889 to 84 7 Greene Are. 



BROOKLYN 



n,n,^rn,ntt N£y^ YORK 



68 



The Florists' Review 



FBBRUAKi' 1, 1917. 








nitt flortsts whose card* appear on the pases eanrytnc fhi* head, are prepared to till orders 
■—« >— Irom other florists for local delivery on the usual basis. 



ST. LOUIS, MO. 

Wire or Phone Tour Orders te the 
HODSK OF IXOWBRS 

Ostertag Bros. 

The Largest Retail Supply Hsuse in the West 
Jefferson and Washinfi^ton Avenue 

CHAS. BEYER 

FLOmST 

3619 South Qrand Avenu* 

Long Distance Phones; 
Bell. Sidney 143— Kinloch. Victor 999 

ST. LOUIS, MO. 

OMMIIS FOR 

St Louis, Nos 

YOUNG'S, 1406 OLIVE STREET 

In MINNEAPOLIS, it's 

Donaldson's' 

The Leading Florists of the Northwest 

Special attention to telegraphic orders. 

L S. MNALDSON CO., FGnneipolis, Nim 




Established Over 20 Years 
N. t cor. 10th and Grand Ave.. KANSAS CITY, MO. 

GEO. M. KELLOGG . 
FLOWER & PLANT CO. 

Wholesale and Retail riorlsts 
Ilt2 Grand Ave. KANSAS CITT, MO. 

All Kinds of CUT FLOWERS 

In their season. Also Rose and Carnation plants 
in season. Greenhouses at Plpasant Hill, Mo. 

STUPPY FLORAL CO. 

Orders executed 
Missouri, Iowa, Kansas and Nebraska 

ST. JOSEPH, MO. 

Members Florists' Telegraph Delivery 

R. ABBOTT p^m( pLORAL COMPANY 

VXORISTS 

TRENTON, N. J. 



Both Pbonea 

Oreenhouses: Buchanan, 

Lafayette and Schiller 

Aves., Broad St. Park. 



SPRINGFIELD, MO. 

SPRINGFIELD SEED COMPANY 

Floral Department Open Day and Nisfht 

sprinqfihld; mo. 

J. W. STOKES FLORAL CO. 

Careful attention given all orders. 

St. Louis and Vicinity 

W. H. KRCSK, Florist 



S846 Arsenal Street. 



St. lionts, mo. 



IriMBSniVETOPLEAS^ If SUOIO 
IPHfl "m 



^iFElHMLCa M|s<;nuRl 




ATAVIA, N. Y. 

L. C. STROH & SONS 

Flowers delivered to all nearby towns. 

ST. LOUIS, MO. 

¥nro ORHWIR tk OORLY 

heavy crop of Matchless, White Wonder, 
Pink Delight, Kosette and Champion 

Edward Winkler, of Wakefield, well 
known as the raiser of that popular car- 
nation, Morning Glow, failed to attend 
the recent field day of the club at Fruin- 
ingham. He had a good reason to be 
absent, however — the arrival of a bounc- 
ing boy. I am glad to report mother 
and son as doing well. 

Peter Hylen, of Eandolph, is a s-iic- 
(ossful bulb specialist and is at present 
cutting an excellent lot of Fred Mocre, 
La Heine and White Hawk tulips i nd 
Golden Spur narcissi. Mr. Hylen mow 
feels the need of an auto truck, but is 
as yet undecided as to which make to 
purchase. 

Tickets are selling like the proveii>ial 
hot cakes for the Gardeners' and F'o- 
rists' Club thirtieth annual banqvict, 
which will be held in Horticultural nail 
February 7. The souvenir booklet con- 
taining advertisements has made n lie- 
cided hit and business concerns are sup- 
porting it handsomely. No tickets for 
the banquet will be sold after Febrn- 
arv 5. 

William H. Elliott, of Brighton, left 
January 24 for Berkeley, Cal. He will 
make many stops and take a number of 
side trips, both going and returniiig, 
and as he is an interesting conversation- 
alist as well as a keen observer, he 
should have something interesting to 
say on his return, which will not be 
until May or early June. Mr. Elliott's 
daughter is a professor in a university 
at Berkeley. 

F. J. Lake, of Wellesley Hills, whose 
obituary is given elsewhere in this 
week's issue, was one of the oldest of 
our local florists and was well known 
as a stallholder at the old Park street 
flower market. 

The Arnold Arboretum, the Mecca for 
lovers of hardy trees and shrubs, has 
for some time employed a sportsman 
two days a week to shoot sparrc.ws, 
crows and squirrels in the Arboretum 
grounds. The crows and squirrels un- 
doubtedly kill many young birds and 
destroy their eggs. The sparrows do 
no harm so far as I can learn, but, on 
the other hand, destroy quantities of 
destructive insects and noxious weed 
seeds which our native birds leave se- 
verely alone. 

The Gardeners' and Florists' Club 
will hold its annual carnation night 
February 20. There will be short talks 
by three carnation specialists and a 
notable display of flowers. The mem- 



KANSAS CITY, 
...MISSOURI... 

WILLIAM L. ROCK 
FLOWER COMPANY 

Itenben Florists* Telegraph Delivwy Ass'a. 



ST. LOUIS, 

"I880URI 



GEORGE WALDBART 

816 NORTH GRAND AVCNUK 



Samuel Murray 

KANSAS CITY, MO. 

1017 GRAND AVE. 

M«mb«r off the 
Florists' Telsgraph Dsiivsry Ass'r 

Canada's Florist 




8-10W.AdelaideSt.,TORONTO 

URGEST aOR«LEST«BLISHMENT in dw PROVINCE if QUEBEC 

Corner 

SL Catharine 

and Guy Streets 




Member Florlats' 



Hontreal 



Tel. Deiiverv. 9 St. Jaho SL. OUEBEC. CAN. 

LA CROSSE, WIS. 

Cut: 

-fXowQvShep. 

L. E. METCALF, Prop. 

SCRIM'S, FLORIST 

OTTAWA. CANADA 



Leidnii Florist 
8ia KANSAS AVB 

TOPEKA 
KANSAS 



Mrs. M. E. Holleraft 

807KANSASAVE,TOPEK*,K*H, 

MRS. LORD'S FLOWER ROOM 

1 18 W. 8th Ave., TOPEKA, KAN. 

Member Florists' Telegraph Delivery. 

ARCHIAS nORAL CO., Sedalia, Mo. 

Choice Gat Flowers and Designs on short notice. 

Prompt attention to telegraph and telephone ordera. 

Membem Florists' Telegraph Delivery Ass'n. 





February 1, 1917. 



The Florists' Review 



69 




on the pacea oanrylnc this 
floatoto for looal teltVvnr ma tl 



•TO prapttr«4 to fill ordon 




CARBONE, 



S4S 

Boylaton St., 



BOSTON 



Member Florists' Telegraph Delivery Ass'n 





n't ItliA<4r Ula'-.l pnlrl. 




Ordera 

•oUclted tot 
all parts of 
Connecticnt 

Stores: 

741 Main St 

. 364 Asylnm St, 

' Oreenhonaea ; 

Beaton SW 

MemberFlorMB'Telecnpb Hartford* 
Dellyery Aaaoolatlon. Goniu 

H. F. A. LANCE 

Worcester, Mass. 

Iteliyers to All Poiats in New England 

125.000 Square Feet of QIass 
Member Florists' Telegraph Delivery Asa'ii 

•UMJNaTON. VT.-lrtan fir f irMat uwi Itrtk- 

■n 1. f . fflM ta mr Htira iMIthetiae rt riiM vrliM. 




Milwaukee, Wis. 

J. M. FOX & SON 

437-39-41 Milwaukee Street 

Members Florists' Telegraph 
Deliver? Association 




LONDON, ONTa, CAN. 

J. GANNAGE & SONS, LTD. 

•^HE HOUSE OF FLOWERS" 

All Orders Carefully Executed. 
Members Florists' Telegraph Dftlivery Ass'n. 

VERMONT'S FLORIST 

W. E. PETERS 

137 St. Paul St.. BURUNQTON. VT. 




LYNN, MASS. 



tWAMPSCOn 



GIBBS BROS. 

288 Union Street 
We deliver also 
SAUGUS NAHailT UlUt 



PROVIDENCE, R.I. 

• AND ALL NEW ENGLAND ^POINTS 

T. J. JOHNSTON & CO. '"^ ^gg'c^^ygSg^cK 

WELLESLEY COLLEGE 

>^n« Hall. Walnnt Hill, Boekbrldge Hall SehooU 
^^>09 Distance Tel., Wellealey 44-1. 44-2, 44-8. 



I should like to write a 
little essay on 

''The Sweet Perfume of 
Gwrteous Service'* 

bnt actions speak louder 
than words. Flowers are 
my hobby and my business. 
If you have orders for de- 
livery in N. E., wire us. 



BOSTON, MASS. 




"Penn, the Telegraph Florist" 

Member of Plorista' Telesrapb Delivery Association 
1 2 4 T R E IWI O N T STREET 



Orders for 



NEWTONVILLK 



Newton, Mass 



J WEST NEWTON 
"S NKWTON CENTER 



AUBURNDALE 
NEWTON LOWER FALLS 
NEWTON UPPER FALLS 
NEWTON HIGHLANDS WABAN 

(Above are all in City of Newton) 



Newton Rose Conservatories 

R. C. BRIDGHAM, Proprietor 

Member Florists' Telegraph Delivery Ass'n. Telegraph Address— Newtonville. Mass. 

Boston, Massachusetts 

143 TRKMONT STREET 

The Centrally Located Florist Shop 
Tours lor Reciprocity. We cover all points in New Encland 

Members Florists' Telegraph Delivery. 




BOSTON - BECKER'S 

Send m your telegrams. Prompt service 
» and BOmmABODT BOSTON. Our 

conservatories are in Cambridge, oaly • 
minutes from the heart of Boston. 

BECKER'S €X>NSERVATORIE8 
CAMBBXDGK, .... B1A88. 

Members Florists* Telegraph Delivery. 



Lynchburg, Va* 

J. J. FALLON 

FRANKLIN, PENNA. 
BELL FLORAL CO. 
ALL NORTHWESTERN PA. 

BOSTON, MASS. 

BKNRT R. COMLKT, Vlortat, • Park M. 

60 yean' experience in the floriat batbieM cnanuiteefl 
efficiency to take care of all orders. 20 per cent allowed 

borship will receive a big boost Ihat 
night, from the way applications are 
being received. 

Mann Bros., of Randolph, are cutting, 
among other bulbous flowers, quantities 
of Narcissus poeticus ornatus and Cam- 
pernelle jonquils. 

Some superb Russell, Iladley, Stanley, 
Ophelia and Killarney roses are being 
received at the salesrooms of the 
Waban Rose Conservatories. 

r. J. Dolansky, of Lynn, is cutting 
fine PhahTnopsis Schilleriana, in addi- 
tion to quantities of cattleyas, cypripe- 
diums and other orchids. 

William H. Elliott is receiving good 
shipments of roses, while prices are high. 
Ophelia and Hadley are particularly 
fine. 

Seed stores report that mail ordera 
are arriving in good volume in spite of 
the wintry weather. Customers know 
there is a shortage of many seeds and 
do not want to be left in the lurch. 
Prices on seed potatoes will be record 
ones, judging by the way potatoes con- 
tinue to soar in value. The latest local 



Worcester, Nass. 

RANDAU'S FLOWER SHOP 

Member Florists* Telegraph Delivery. 

LOWELL, NASS. 

HORSE & BEALS, 8 Nerrimtck S«. 

Nemben Flirists* Telefnpk DeEreir AmdatM 

Providence, RHODE ISLAND 

Johnston Brothers 

LEADING FLORISTS 

38 Dorrance Street 

Members Florists' Telegraph Delivery Ass'n. 



Red Bank, N. J. 

W. W. KENNEDY & SONS 
FLORISTS 

Members of F. T. D. and National Florist 

5 East Front Street 



REUTER'8 

For Rhode Island and Connecticut 

STORES 

New London, Conn.; Nor%vlch, Conn., 

and Westerly, R. L 

Members Florists' Telegraph Delivery Ass'n. 



The Rosery 



Elmira,N.Y. 
^ 182 Main SL, N. 

Flowers DeUvered to All Nearby Town*, 
■embere Flortete* Telegraph Delivery Aaeoclatlon. 




The Florists^ Review 



Febuuauy 1, 1917. 



nia florlsta whose oarda appear on fhe paces oanrylnc fhls head* are prepared to fUl order* 
from other florist* for local delivery on the neual basis. 




SEATTLE, WASH. 

HOLLYWOOD (iiUtDEIIS 

Seattle's he&ding Flower Shop 
1534 SECOND AVE. 

SEHBEBS FLOBISTg' TELEGBAPH DELIYEB1 



ROSAIA BROS. 

Florists and Decorators 

1003 Third Avenue 
SEATTLE, WASH. 



SPOKANE FLORIST CO. 

(Kipp't Flower Store) 

SPOKANE, WASH. 

Orders promptly filled for 
WASHINGTON. IDAHO. MONTANA 

SAN FRAHCISCO 

Podesta & Baldocchi 

224-226 Grant Avenue 

Prompt and careful attention to orders 
kTom out-of-town florists. 

San Francisco, Cal. 

Psiicano, Rossi & Co. 

188-186 Kearny Street 
FLOWERS BY TELEGRAPH 

SAN FRANCISCO 

JOSEPH'S 

233-23S ORANT AVENUB 

Members of Florists' Telegraph Delivery and 
National Florists of this District. A specialty 
made of "Welcoming" and "Bon Voyacre" packayea. 



(gauusueD I890 




TWRIST 



SAN FRANCISCO* 
CAL. 

1036 Hyde Street ) 

Chvict SelecUd ' 

flow*r» 

We received first prize for VIOLETS, Iris. Gladioli, 
Carnations and Arti.tic Designing: at Panama-Pacific 
lut. Expo. We ship flowers from California to eastern 
florists. At our post night and day. 

DARLING'S SHOP 

"Flowers for Her" 
208 West Sixth Street, LOS ANGELES, CAL. 

Cut flowers or good design work by best 
artists and designers delivered anywhere 
in the west on receipt of mail or telegraph 
orders. Usual discount to the trade. 



LONG BEACH, CAL. 

MARINE FLORIST 

Sfarlne Hank Buildlne 

Choice Out jrjowers Floral Designs 




Santa Barbara, Cal. 

010 STATS ST. 

GLEAVE'8 FLOWER SHOP 

ARTHUR GLEAVB. Prop. 

Choicest Cut Flowers and Floral Designs on 

Short Notice. 

Both Phones 1018 




SeattlcWasL^^^S^ 

GROWER, WHOLESALER 
AND RETAILER 

Careful and prompt attention given to 
orders. Alaska, Washington and Oregon. 

San Francisco, Cal. 

ART FLORAL CO. 

255 Powdl Street and SL Francis Hotd 

Best attention given your orders. 
Members Florists' Telesraph Delivery 

Portland, Ore. 

TONSETH'S. 285 WASH. 

GROWERS and RETAILERS 

Mciiiben Florists' Telegraph DdivcfY 

SPOKANE, WASHINBTON 

DON ART- STAPLETON 

ART FLORISTS 
Growers of Choice Cut Flowers 

RIVERSIDE, CAL. BAKERSFIELD.CAL. 

A. M. HOSP, Leading florist 

Iiricos arc $2.25 per bushel iu carload 
lots. 

V. E. I'alnicr, of Brookline, has incor- 
jioratcil his business, taking in several 
members of his family as partners. He 
has a large and increasing landscape 
gardening business and now lias a nice 
nursery on recently acquired land near 
his Newton street home. His store 
business has been good this winter. 

Six members of the ^Massachusetts 
Horticultural Society have given guar- 
antees of $1,000 eacli toward the big 
June show to be held on the grounds of 
the Weutworth Institute. The total 
guarantees amount to over $12,000, and 
an impressive show is assured. 

The Houghton-Gorney Co., on Trc- 
mont street, has a fine display of cho- 
rizemas, acacias and ericas of the waxy 
type. This concern's window displays 
are most attractive. 



UfRIGHrS FLOWER SBOF 

"* 284 West Fourth St. 

LOS ANGELES, CAL. 

Letdim Eetoa Fltrist in the Gty 

BOYLE & DARNAUD 

Wholesale and retail florists. We grow 
our own flowers. Telegraph orders 
carefully executed. Usual discount. 

SAN DIEGO AND CORONADO 



WOLPSKILLS* and 
MORRIS GOLDENSON 

FLORISTS and DECORATORS 

We Solicit Telegraph Orders. 
Regular Trade Discount. 

229 W. Third St.. LOS ANGKLK8, CAL 



J 



LOS ANGELES, GAL. 

HOWARD & SMITH 

NINTH AND OLIVB STREETS 

Ton can depend on us for all orders for 
t\fi\\-<r^rv in this <»«ction 

CALIFORNIA FLORIST 

TAGOMA. WASH. 

Orders for Cut Flowers and Designs de- 
livered anywhere in the United States 
and Canada. 

Colorado Springs, Colo. 

Orders Carefully Kzecuted 

PIKES PEAK FLORAL COc 

Wholesale and Retail 

Member Florists' Telegraph Delivery 

The Park Floral Go. 

J. A. VALENTINE. Pres. 
Member Florists' Telegraph Delivery. 

DEWER. - MLOUMO 

SALT LAKE CITY 

ALSO PARTS OP COLORADO. IDAHO. 
MONTANA AND NEVADA 

HUDDART FLORAL CO. 

6!i South Main Street 
fflembers FIorlatB' Telegraph Delivery AM'n. 

Colorado Springs, Colo. 
Frank F. Crump Klf^lSrTs? 

Member Florists' Telegraph Delivery 



The Colonial Flower Shop 

518 N. MAIN ST.. PUEBLO. COLO. 
Wilf rtmptlytxecute allorderi ia thitviciait) 




Fkbruarv 1, 1917. 



The Florists^ Review 



71 




Th* florist* wtaove eaxds avPMV on the pac** oarrylns this liMid* are praparwd to UU ordara 
— — - from othor florists tor local dcavery on tha uaual basis. 




Swaneon'e 

Incorporated 

618 Nicollet Avenue, offers the trade its 
unexcelled facilities for filling orders in 

7WTI NNET^ROLIS 




MOINES 

XN THK CBN T m OV IOWA 

J. S. WILSON FLORAL CO. 

Orders filled with the kind of core we 
hope will be osed when we tend 
jou an order. 
Hember* Florlata' Telegraph DeUverF Aseoclatlon. 

Send Iowa and Western Illinois Orders 

TO 

Bills Floral Co. 

M. A. TIERNEY. Owner 
104 West Second 

DAVENPORT, IOWA 

MOLINE, ILL. 

Orders for Western Illinois and Iowa 
handled with care and dispatch. 

J. STAACK & SONS 

MITCHELL, S. D. 

rOR SOUTH DAKOTA 
AHB til* HORTHWXST 

THEllEWBDRYS,Iiic. 




WE RAISE 'EM 



SPOKANE, WASHINGTON 

Reimers Floral Art Shop 

RETAILERS AND GROWERS 



S.^^y^" FLORAL CO. 

HP«4"-?ireSt DULUTH,MINN. 

(Northwest. Daily deliveries to Superior. Wis. 



La Crosse, Wis. ?to?:i 

Member Florists' Telegraph Delivery 



rosse 
Co. 



HESS & SWOBODA, ftORISTS 

Telephones ISOi and L 1882 
'*^5 Fa raum Street OHiAHA, WK B. 

OMAHA, NEB. 

JOHN H. BATH 

The Careful Ftarisl. 1804 Famam Street 




UWIS HENDERSON, norist 

1619 Farnnn. a* . ' " •"*•*•' 



" M«^^™^"* ^"•*«*' OMAHA. NEB. 



STATE NORSERY CO. "^^ 

HELENA, NONT. 



»W 000 ,q. „. „, ^,„, 
M your serTlce 



I 

o 
w 

A 




Marshalltown, Boone, 
Centerville, Ames, 
Oskaloosa, Oelwein, 
Mason City, Waterloo 



SEND YOUR ORDER TO HOUSE NEAREST PLACE OF DELIVERY 



QUALITY 

PLUS 

SERVICE 



DAVENPORT, IOWA 

and Western Illinois 

rORBER & BIRD, 31S Bnlr Street 



PYFER & OLSEN 

Wilmette, IIL 

Careful attention to all mail or telegraph or- 
ders for delivery in Wilmette and Chicago's 
north shore suburbs, Kvanston, Kenll^^ortli. 
WInnetka, Glencoe and Lake Forest. 

Pasadena, Cal.*«LL 
Southern California 

House of Flowers 
HENRY A. SirBRECHT, JR. 

of N«w York City 

Member Florists' TcleKraiili Delivery 

DES MOINES, IOWA 

GUTHRIE-LORENZ CO. 

S. B. STEWART 

H9No.tfthSU OMAHA, NEB. 

OMAHA, NEB. 

LEE L. LARMON 

Fontenelle Florist, 1814 Douglas St. 

At Teiiii's preparations for a big 
trade St. X'alentiiie's day are being 
made. Both the i)lant and cut llowcr 
trade lias been good. i-orccd shrubs 
n(i\v are being used to good advantage. 

W. N. C. 




NEWARK. N. J. 



The Market. 

Business continues good. There is 
ail adeipiate sup])ly of stock, but prices 
keep uj) well. Carnations are coming 
in satisfactorily. While sweet peas are 
more plentiful, some complain that it 
is liard to g(t tliem in quantity. (!ood 
Kaster lilies are more abundant but 
Jiigher in jirice. Callas arc good but 
exjiensive, the best costing $.3 per dozen. 
White lilacs are more plentiful, as well 
as i>()tted tulips. .Jonquils are coming 
in more frecdy. There has been quite 
an addition to the supply of marguerites 
during the last week. Boston ferns are 
selling well. 




ST. PAUL, MINN. 

THK LARaCST STORE IN AMERICA 

Members F. T. D. Ass'n 
The finest and largest stock west 
of Chicago. Awake night and day 
looking for orders. 

HOLM&OLSON,lnc.|^:gysV 

C.H.FREY 

WHOUSAU ui warn. noMsi 
1133 ST., UNCOLN, NEB. 

Will Fill Orders for the West on Short Notice. 
Trade DiacountB. First-nlass Stock. 

FREY & FREY 

1338 O St., LINCOLN, NEB. 

WHOLESALE AND RETAIL 

100,000 BQuare feet of glass at your service. 

Trade discount 

Members of the Florists' Telegraph Delivery, 




A Card This Size 

Costs only OOc per Week 
on Yearly Orclor 

It would kerp your iimiiio and your spo- 
(iiilty l)('f«re the wluilo trade. 

\ half-iiKh card costs only 45c per week 
on yearly order. 



FURROW a COMPANY 

OKLAHOMA CITY GUTHRIC 

OKLAHOMA 

ai«"fcbTS Blorists' Telegreph DeliverF 




NORTH FLORAL CO 

9I5CentraIAve.rT.D0DCE,Iil 



MINNEAPOUS, MINN.Iia^ffe?in 

WHITTED FLORAL CO. 

Member Florists' Telegraph Delivery Ass'n 



Supplies western Iowa, souUi 
|f>l«f A _ ' ern Minnesota, all of South 

■"■'^ Dakota and northeastern Nebrask". 



SIOUX CITY, 

'©''''A DakoL . ,„_. 

J. C. RENNISON CO. 

Lincoln, Neb. S*Mg5; 



Flowers for All Oecaslons. from Cradle to Graft 

SSSr^ NEBRASKA ^^'^-"^s. 

ED WILUAMS, Grand Island 

Coiuuetent Florist Rai'road Center 



72 



The Florists' Review 



Fbbrcary 1, 1917. 








The florists whose oarda appear on the paces oarrylnc fhls head* are prepared to fill orders 
■— — — from other florists for local dellvenr oa the usual basis. 



CHICAGO 



Send Your 
Orders to«e 

William J. 



SMYTH 



Member Florists' Telegraph Delivery Association Michigan Avenue at 31st Street 




THE UNEXCELLED FACILITIES OF THE 

E. WIENHOEBER CO. 

22 E. ELM ST., CHICAGO 

Are available to the trade In flilinif all orders, 

MKMBER p. T. D. 



I FOR ALL 

CHICAGO 

ORDERS USE 

Tlirc« auto* Insura 
prompt delivery. 




1581 Ogden Ave 



CHICAGO 

ALPHA FLORAL GO. 

Northwest corner Wabash Ave. at Adams St. 

Most centrally located store in the city. All 
orders given prompt attention. 

PITTSBURGH, PA. 

710 E. Diamond St. 

COURTESIES EXTENDED 
TO THE TRADE 

OPEN DAT and NIGHT 

Members of the Florists' Telesraph Delivery 



ICt 



CDCCDADT III We are the largest 
mCCrUnif ILUi growers in the 

Northwest. 100,000 square feet of glass, 
JOHN BAUSCHER, Prop. 

U Oriers Receive Careful Attention and Prompt Delivery. 



Deliveries to Northwestern University and all North 
Shore Towns. 

614 Dempster St.. 
EVANSTON. I IX. 

L D. Phone 2642 



nSCBER BROS. 



AURORA GREENHOUSE CO. 

AURORA, ILL. 

Our service is the best. 

Rockford, III., H. W. Buckbee 

Member norists* Telegraph Delivery 



DE KALB, ILL. 



1. L. JOHNSON 

Northern Illinois 
Soathern Wisconsin 
Your order will receive oar proiii|>t and 
careful attention. 



PEKIN 



PEORIA 



AH Orders ReceiTe Pertonsl Atteulien 

GEO. A. KUHU PeMn, m. 

JACKSONVILLE, ILL. 

JOS. HEINL & SONS 

Lareest Orowers in Ontral IllindU 




CHICAGO 

THE PALMER 
HOUSE FLORIST 

17 CAST 

MONROE ST. 



ROCK ISLAND 

Tri-Gty Orders Handled with Promptness 
HENSLEY'S 

4tii Ave.eiMl 20th SU ROCK ISLAND. ILU 



Send Your CHICAGO Orders to 

H. N. BRUNS 

Best Equipped Retail Store on the West Side 

3040 W. Madison St., Chicago, 111. 




3343 W. MADISON ST. 

NBAR OAKriKLU PAKK 

CHICAGO 

Various Notes. 

Tlio S. A. Kogers Nursery Co. has 
moved to new quarters at 453 Broad 
street, where the late Jacob H. Harvey 
conducted a flower store for many years. 

Charles Witheridge reports that busi- 
ness this January has been better than 
that of January last year, but that 
prices are so high that there is not the 
profit in sales there should be. 

August C. Begerow had an attractive 
window last week. In the center was 
a mass of marguerites arranged in pyra- 
mid form. Around the base of this pyra- 
mid were pots of pink azaleas. 

K. B. M 



NEWPORT, R. I. 

^Ir. and Mrs. Andrew S. Meikle last 
week were pleasantly surprised at their 
home when a score of their friends 
called to congratulate them on their 
twenty-fifth wedding anniversary. A 
supper was served and a most enjoyable 
evening spent, with music, games and 
dancing. Mr. and Mrs. Meikle received 
numerous gifts. 

Mr. and Mrs. Edward R. Ilass have 
returned from a visit to New York city. 

C. S. Ritchie is preparing to plant 
the last greenhouse which has under- 
gone reconstruction to sweet peas. This 
completes the overhauling and recon- 
struction of his entire range. 

W. H. M. 



Establiahed 1867. 



745 Buckingham Place 

L.D. Phone P HIP AGO 

1112 Graceland V*niV.»/\\»W 

Send us your retail orders. We 
have the best facilities in the city 

Your orders may be placed by mail, phone or teleffrapb 

with assurance that they will be accorded most 

exacting personal attention. 

VICTOR YOUNG 

C/ /^ o rri p e»^r^;y 

Phone Superior 1960 
1S39 North Clark Street, CHICAGO 

We are prepared to take care of 
out-of-town orders for 

CHICAGO 

Delivery or shipment anywherb. 

C. W. McKCLLAR, 
22 Bast Ranifolph St. CHICAaC 

FRIEDMAN 

FLOWERS 

CHICAGO, ILL. 

628 S. mehlKan Aye., Cenireat Hotel ^ 
COUBTESIES EXTENDED TO ALL FLOBISTC 

ORDERS FOR CHICAGO 

EVERYTHING IN FLOWERS 
DELIVERED ANYWHERB 

PHONE. WRm OR WIRK 

A. F. KEENAN & CO. 

1222.130e K. 63rd Street 

Tele. Hyde Park 876.6418 

SPECIAL SE21VICE TO CHIOAaO INIVBaism 

GALESBURG, ILL. 

1. 1.. PrLLSBUBY— For Central III. 

Member Florlsta' Telegraph Delivery Aasoclatloa. 

GALESBURG, ILL. 

n r nVITPV -^l orders filled promptb 
D* f • IIIIUII 1 and carefully. 

A«w>ra,III JOS.H.Sm 

AMD VICIWITY Phonee 147 

I. N. KRAMER & SON 
CEDAR RAPIDS, I A. 




Fkbkuary 1, 1917. 



The Florists' Review 



73 




iry . uc^£Bf ptifiG 



ni* florist* whose oards appear on tbe pacea oarrytnc fbis head, are prepared to fin or dere 
— from eUier flortots for looal deUvenr on ttie nanal iMwla* '" 




INDEX BY TOWNS OF LEADING RETAIL FLORISTS 



AZBOH. 0. 
KoFurUndi 

ALBANY, V. T. 

Koaery. Th* 
ALTOOKA. FA. 

Myen Bros. 
ANK ABBOB, HIGH. 

Kodak, Florist 

ATLANTA. OA. , ^ 
Lawrano* Floral Oo. 

ATLANTIC CITY, N. J. 

Edwudi Floral Hall 

Enr Harbor Fl'r Shop 
AVBOBA, ILL. 

Avzora Qroenhonie Oo. 

BoMly, JTos. M. 
BAXEBSFIELD, OAL. 

Hosp, A. M. 
BALTIHOBE. XB. 

Feaat te Bona, 8. 
BATAVIA. V. T. 

Btroh A Bona, L. 0. 
BATTLE OB'K. MIOH. 

OMmin, 8. W. 

BndaNaHAM. ala. 

Baker, O. I. 
BOONE. IOWA 

Xembla'a Oreanhousea 
BOSTON. MASS. 

OarboBo 

Oomloy. Henry B. 

Oalvlii, Inc.. X. F. 

Penn. Henry 

Wax Broa. 
BBOOKLYN. N. Y. 

7aha, Hngp H. 

naiups, noriat 

Timel, 7oaeph 

Wll ioii. X. O. 
BUFFALO, N. Y. 

AaderaoB. S. A. 

Falmer A Bon, W. J, 

Beett. the Florist 
BVXLnrOTON, VT. 

O«T0. tbe Floriat 

Peters, W. E. 
OAMBKIDGE, KASS. 

Becker Coniervatoriei 
CANTON. 0. 

Oelta, Fred &. 

Pellard, A. T. 
OEBAR BAPIBS. lA. 

Hram er A Bon, I. N. 
OBNTEKVILLE, lA. 

Hemble'a Oreenkonaea 
OHABLESTON, S. O. 

Carolina Floral Store 
CKABLESTON. W. VA. 

Oha'aton Out Flo. Oo. 
CHATHAM, N. Y. 

Ch atham Floral Oo. 
OHIOAOO 

Alpha Floral Oo. 

Bmaa, H. N. 

Jlak. Inc., 0. H. 

Franeafelder. 0. 

Friedman. O. t. 

5««ian, A. F.. A Oo. 

Maacel, Floriat 

MeXellar, 0. W. 

Bamnelaon, Ohaa. A. 

toyth, W. J. 

Wleaheeber Co., E. 

WIttbold Co.. c(eo. 

Hill Floral Oo. 

CL&BKBBTrBO. W. VA. 
Badley A Bona 
Hayman Orhse. Oo. 

..XSkP * Bona Oo. 

CLEVELAND, O. 
Bramley A Son 
fMeer Co.. J. M. 
fraham A Bon 
'onea-BosseU Oo. 
beble Bros. 

OOT^. BPK08.. COLO. 
a«np. F. F. 
KljMPeak Flo. Oo. 

IMatston BMd Oo. 
luS^^l: Beed Btore 
00N8H0H00KEN. PA. 

Baldwin. Willi. H. 

COTNciL BiTrrrs, ia. 

Herman Bros. Oo. 
»ALI^8,TEX. 

»AVBrPOBT, IOWA 
S'^• Floral Oo. 

"^yroN. 0. 

Baias Oo. 

TokaaoB, j. L. 
■" >J0INE8. IA. 
fM«»d Losier Boaerr 
O;tiirie-Lorens Oo. 
wnsaa Floral Oo. 



For pases of Advertisements, consult the seneral Alphabetical Index to Advertisements 

OMAHA, NEB. 
Bath, John H. 
HendeiBon. Lewia 
Hess A Swobod* 

Larmon, Lee L. 
Stewart. 8. B. 



J. 



OENVEB. COLO. 

Park Floral Co. 
DETROIT, MIOH. 

Bemb Floral Oo. 

Braitmeyer'a Sena, 

Oarey The Florist 

Fetters, E. A. 

Bohroeter, B. 

Sohroeter, Hnco 

DTTLUTH, MINN. 

Dnlath Floral Co. 
ELMIBA, N. Y. 

Bosery. The 

EL PASO, TEX. 

Flower Shop, The 

Potter Floral Co. 
EBIE, PA. 

Baur Floral Oo. 

Laver. J, V. 

EVAN8T0N, ILL. 
Fiaoher Bros. 

FAIRMONT, W. VA. 

Weber A 8ens Oo. 
FALL RIVER. MASS. 

Warburton 

FORT DODOE. IOWA 

North Floral Oo. 
FRANKLIN. PA. 

Bell Floral Oo. 
FBEEPOBT. ILL. 

Banachar, John 
OALESBirBO, ILL. 

DmiT, H. F. 

Pillabnry. X. L, 
OARY. IND. 

G ary Floral Oo. 
OENXVA. N. Y. 

Oaas. w. A T. 

OBANO ISLAHD, NEB. 

Williams til* Florist 
CXAND RAP'S, XXCH. 

Orabb, Arthnz F. 

Grand Rapids Flo. Oo. 

Smith, Henry 
GREEN BAY, WXB. 

Meiei^Sohroedar Oo. 
GREENBBOBO, N. 0. 

Van Lindley Co. 
GUTHRIE. OXLA. 

Furrow h Oo. 
HARTFORD. CONN. 

Coombs, John 
HELENA, AXX. 

Ball Floral Oo, 
HOUSTON, TEXAS 

Kerr. B. 0. 
HUNTINGTON, W. VA. 

Dudley A Sons 
INDIANAP0LI8, IND. 

Bertermann Bros. Co. 

Hill Floral Oo. 

Wlecand's Bona Co. 
JACKSONVILLE. FLA. 

Milli the Floriat 



JACKSONVILLE, ILL. 

Heinl A Sons, J. 
KANSAS CITY, KAN. 

Alpha Floral Co. 

Fields, L. 0. 

KANSAS CITY. MO. 

Kellon, Geo. M. 

Murray, Samuel 

NeweU, A. 

Rook Flower Oo. 
KENOSHA, WIS. 

Turner A Sona 
KNOXVILLE, TENN. 

Baum. Ohaa. L. 

Cb«uon. Ohaa. W. 
LA CROSSE, VnS. 

Flower Shop 

La Crosae Floral Oo. 
LANCASTER. PA. 

Barr A Co., B. F. 
LEXINGTON, KY. 

Honaker the Florist 

Keller Co., John A. 
LIMA, 0. 

ZetUts. ERort X. 
LINCOLN, NEB. 

Chapln Bros. 

Frey, 0. H. 

Frey A Fray 
LONDON, ONT^ CAN. 

GammaM A Bona 
LONG BEACH, CAL. 

Marine Floriat 
LOS ANGELES, OAL. 

DaxUac's Flower Shop 

Howard A Smith 

Wolf skiU h Goldenaon 

Wri ght's Flower Shop 
LOUISVILLE, XY. 

Baumor, An>. B. 

Reimors A Boa Oo. 

Sohnla, Jaeob 

Walker Co., F. 
LOWELL. MASS. 

Morse h Boals 
LYNCHBUBG, VA. 

Miss McCarron 

Fallon. J. J. 
LYNN. MASS. 

Gibba Broa. 
MADISON. WIS. 

Beatsehler Floral Oo. 
MANKATO. MINN. 

Windmlller Co., The 
MARIETTA. O. 

Dudley A Bona 
MARION. IND. 

Marion Floral Oo. 
MARSHALLTOWN. IA. 

Kemble'a Greenhouses 
MASON OITY, IA. 

Kemble'a Greenhouses 
MASSILLON, O. 

Weaver, A. 
MERIDIAN. MISS. 

Watts. Mrs. J. E. 



MEMPHIS. TENN. 
Flower Shop, The 
Idlewlld Greenhouses 

MIAMI, FLA. 
Miami Floral Co. 

MILWAUKEE, WIS. 
Fox A Son. J. M. 

MINNEAPOLIS, MINN. 

Donaldaon Co., L. 8. 

Swanaoa'a 

Whitted Floral Oo. 
SaTOHELL. 8. D. 

Newburya, The 
MOBILE, ALA. 

Minre Floral Oo. 
MOUNE, ILL. 

Staaek A Sons, J. 
MONTOLAIR, N. J. 

Maaamann, Floriat 
MONTREAL. CANADA 

MoKenna. Ltd. 
NASHVILLE. TENN. 

Geny Broa. 

Joy Floral Oo. 
NEWABK, N. J. 

Philipa Broa. 
NEWA^, O. 

Duerr, Ohaa. A. 

Kent Bros. 
NEW LONDON. OONN. 

Beuter A Sons, lao. 
NEW ORLEANS, LA. 

Avenue Floral Oo. 

Eble, Chas. 

Metairie Ridge Oo. 

Vinrin. U. J. 
NEWTONVILLE, MASS 

Newton Con gerv atories 
NEW YORK OITY 

Boston Florist 

Bowe, M. A. 

Bums, H. H. 

Clarke's Sons, David 

Dards, Ohas. A. 

Galvin, Inc., T. F. 

Kottmlller, A. 

MoConnell, Alexaader 

McKanney 

Ramm'a Flower Shop 

Sohliac, Max 

Siebrecht Bros., Ine. 

Small A Boas, 7. H. 

Stumpp, Geo. M. 

TrepM, 0. 0. 

WarendoriT 
NORFOLK. VA. 

Ghent Floral Oo. 

Grandy the Florist 
NORWICH, OONN. 

Router A Sona, lae. 
OAKLAND, CAL. 

Clarke Broa. 
OAKLAND, MD. 

Weber A Sons Oo. 
OKLAHOMA CITY. OK. 

Furrow A Oo. 



OSKALOOSA, IA. 
Kemble's Greenhouses 

OTTAWA, CANADA 

Scrim's, Florist 
PARKERSB'G, W. VA. 

Dudley A Sons 
PASADENA, CAL. 

House of Flowers 
PASSAIC, N. J. 

Sceery, Edward 
PATER80N, N. J. 

Soeery, Edward 
PEKIN, ILL. 

Kuhl. Geo. A. 
PEORIA. ILL. 

Kuhl. Geo. A. 
PHILADELPHIA, PA. 

Callahan, M. J. 

Forrest Flower Blum 

Habormahl's Boas, X, J. 

Hastings, Frank R. 

Loadon Flowor Shop 
PITTSBURGH, PA. 

Bllad Floral Oo. 

E. O. Lndwig FlrL Oo. 

Bandolph A MeOlem- 
eats 

Smith Co., A. W. 
PORTLAND, ORE. 

Clarke Bros. 

Toa soth's 
P0UGHKEEP8IE, N. Y. 

Sa ltfor d Flower Shop 
PBOVIDENOE, B. I. 

Johastoa A Co., T. J. 

Jehastoa Bros. 
PUEBLO. COLO. 

OoloalsJ Flowor Shop 
aUEBEC, OANAOA. 

MoXoana, Ltd. 

RACINE. Wis. 

Hiaohllire. Mrs. J. T. 
RED BANK, N. J. 

Kennedy A Boas 
BENO, NEV. 

Bono Florist__ 
BIOHMOND, IND. 

Lemon A Co.. F. B. 
RICHMOND. VA. 

Hammond Co. 

Rateliif 0, Joha L. 
RIVERSIDE, OAL. 

Heap, A. M. 
ROANOKE. VA. 

Falloa. Floriat 
ROCHESTER, MINN. 

Roeheater Floral Oo. 
ROCHESTER, N. Y. 

Keller Sona, J. B. 

Wilson. H. E. 



CHICAGO 
ORDERS 



SENT TO 
8188.2184 




ARE 

CAREFULLY 
EXECUTED 



MICHIGAN AVENUE 



Si. Louis, Moe 

FLOWERS DEUVERED IN CITT BR STATE ON SHORT NOTICE 

F. Ho WEBER 

Boyle and Uaryland Avenuos 

Both Long Distance Phones 
Members Florists' Telegraph Delivery Ass'n. 

A.W. Smith Co. 



FLORISTS 



KEENAN 
BUILDING, 



Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Largest Floral Establishment in America 

Established 1874-lncorpor&ted lOOQ 

Springfield, III. 

JANSSEN FLORAL €K>. 

B«st Bervioe lor CNitraJ Qllnols 



FRED C. WEBER 

4326-28 Olive Street 

ST. LOUIS, MO. 

We Have no Branch Store 

SEIiLINO FLOWERS 42 YEARS 

Member Florists' T. D. Assn. 




PITTSBURGH, PA. 

RANDOLPH & McQEMENTS 

Floral Ixports 
8936 PENN AVENUE 

Member! of the Florists' Telecraph Delivary 



KANSAS CITY. KANSAS 

L. O. FIKLDS 

Uombor Florists' Telegraph DellTery 



KOCKFOBD, HX. 

Bttckbeo, H. W. 
BOOK ISLAND, IZX. 

Hensley's 
ST. JOSEPH, HO. 

Stnppy Floral Oo. 
ST. LOUIS. MO. 

BoTor, COias. 

arimin a, Qorly 

Kruse, Florist 

Oatertac Bros. 

Waldbut, Ooorvo 

Wober, Fred 0. 

Wobor, F. H. 

xounj ft Sons Co., 0. 

ST. PAUL, unra. 

Holm ft OlsoB 
SAGINAW, MIOH. 

Ooots Sons, 7. B. 
SALT LAKE Om 

Huddart Floral Co. 
SAN ANTONIO. TEX. 

Oroon. Edward 
SAN BIEOO. OAL. 
oJIfJit* Bamaud 

Art Floral Oo. 

Darboe 

Joseph, B. M. 

PeUcaao. Boss! ft Co. 

Podosta ft BaldoooU 
SANTA BAKBABaTcSi. 

aioavo's Flowor khn 
SCKANTON, PA. " 

Bosaaoon ft Oo. 

Olark, Florist 

Sohnltheis. Floriat 
SEATTLE, WASH. 

Hollywood Oardoia 

McCoy, L. W. 
_ Bosaia Bros. 
SEOALIA, MO. 

SOTBOTOAN, WIS. 

Matthowson. J. X. 
SIOUX CITY, IOWA 

Beaniaon Oo.. J. 0. 
SOUTH BEND, INS. 

Boyor Floral Oo. 

WilUams ft Oo. 
SPOKANE. WASH. 

Donart ft Stapleton. 

Beimers Flo. Art Shoi 

Spokaao FlorUt Oo. 
SPBINOFIELD, ILL. 

Brown, A. 0. 

JansaoB Floral Oo. 
SPBINGFIELD, MO. 

Springlleld Sood Oo. 

Stokos Floral Oo. 
SPBINOFIELD, O. 

Van Motor Fl'r Shoi 
STEUBEWILIiB. 0. 

Hnseroft, O. L. 
STBEATOB, ILL. 

ThoratoD Floral Oo. 
SmAOUSB, H. T. 

Mnlhavsor ft Bona, J, 
TACOMA, WASH. 

California Floriat 
TEBBE HAUTB, IHD. 

Heinl ft Sons 
TOLEDO, 0. 

Frooman, Mrs. J'. B. 

Mots ft Bataman 

Sehranun Bros. 
TOPEXA, KAH. 

Hajos, James 

HoUcroft. Mrs. M. ■. 

Lord's Flowor Booa 
TOBONTO, CANADA 

Dnnlop, Joha H. 
TBENTON, N. J. 

Park Floral Co. 
TUCSON, ABIZONA 

Tucson Sood Co. 
WABBEN, PA. 

Crescent Floral Garde 
WASHINGTON. D. O. 

BlaoUstono, Z. D. 

Gnde Bros. Oo. 

SmaU ft Bona. 7. H. 

washtkotohI pa. 
watebloo. iowa 

Jf SJSiSll .OrowihoBaoo 
WAU^BHA. WIS. 

'Wankeidiajrioral Oo. 
^ELLESLET, MASS. 

WESTnLT. K. L 

Boater ft Boa, Ine. 
WHITE BULPHUK 
SPBINGS. W. YA. 

Batelliro, John L. 
WILLIAMSPOBT, PA. 

Er ondon Bros. 
WTLMETTE, ILL. 
_Pyfor ft Olsem 
WOBGESTEB, MASS. 

Lanro. R. P. A. 
_Bandall's Flowor Bhot 
T0UNO8TOWK. 0. 

Kar-Dlmond Oo. 



74 



The Florists' Review 



February 1, 1917. 



TOMATO SEED 

Pepper, Bge Plant, Saaash, Pumpkin, 
Cuoumber, Cantaloupe and WatermeloD 
Seed and Field Corn, on contract. 

EDGAR F. HURFF 

GorresDondence Solicited. 8^r«d«aboro,M. J. 

Mention The RcTlew when yon write. 

Seed Trade News 

^ ■ ^ 

AMEKICAN SEED XKADE ASSOCIATION 
President, Klrby B. White, Detroit, Mich.; 

Secretary-Treasurer, 0. B. Kendel, Cleveland, O. 



Contract prices on all seeds, and espe- 
cially on beans and peas, are steadily ad- 
vancing. 

Charles P. Guelf, of the Jerome B. 
Rice Seed Co., is on a trip through the 
northeast. 

The pioneer seedsman of Bismarck, S. 
D., Oscar H. Will, has been seriously ill 
at Bismarck hospital, but while still con- 
fined to his bed at the hospital, is slowly 
recovering. 

Paper and printing cost even more in 
England than now is the case in the 
United States and most British trade 
catalogues for 1917 show a sharp re- 
trenchment. 

Onion sets advanced sharply last week. 
The supply is being steadily reduced by 
shipment and present indications are that 
it will be diflScult to obtain good stock by 
the early part of March. 

The canners' convention will attract a 
considerable number of seedsmen to Cleve- 
land February 5 to 9. Conditions in the 
canning trade arc nuch tliat the largest 
convention on record is expected and 
seedsmen 's representatives are looking 
forward to an active week's business. 

The Holland salesmen came over this 
season under instructions to get higher 
prices, especially from the small buyers 
out in the country, whose orders have been 
costing too much. But it isn't proving 
as easy as it would have been had there 
not been so many cheap offers at the close 
of last season. 

The Sweet Pea Annual, issued by the 
National Sweet Pea Society of England, 
makes America a conspicuous feature of 
the 1917 issue, just to hand. It contains 
full-page portraits of the late W. Atlee 
Burpee and of George \V. Kerr, with an 
appreciation of the former and an article 
by the latter, with nuich other material 
of American origin. 

The Sioux City Seed & Nursery Co., of 
Sioux City,. la., "has been granted a re- 
fund by the Interstate Commerce Commis- 
sion of' $.'563.68, to be paid by tlie Chicago, 
Burlington & Quincy Eailroad Co., on ac- 
count of an excessive rate charged on 
three cars of clover seed from Cowley and 
Lovell, Wyo., and Silesia, Mont., to Sioux 
City, in December, 1915. 

A meeting of the Wholesale Grass Seed 
Dealers' Association was held at Chi- 
cago January 29, at which the matter of 
trade rules and seed legislation were dis- 
cussed. About fifteen firms were re]»re- 
sented. E. Brown, botanist in charge of 
the seed lalioratory of the bureau of ]>lant 
industry of the U. S. Department of Agri- 
culture, Washington, D. C, uas among 
those present. 



We have over and above our contract requirements for 1916 and 1917 

A Surplus of High-grade 
Vegetable and Flower Seeds 

which we offer at attractive prices considering market conditions at 
home and abroad. Our contracts were placed with the largest and 
most reliable growers in the world, and their names will be furnished 
upon request. 

Send us list of your requirements 
THE H. R. WILBER CORP., 56 Steele St., JAMESTOWN, N. Y. 



Braslan 



Grower for the Wholesale Trade Only, Onion, Zjcttuok, Oabbot, 

PaBBNIF, PABSIiKY, CKI.EBT, ENDIVX, SALBIFT, NAMXD AND Mrym 

Gbandibxoba and Sfsnoxb Svkst Pkas, and Sunixowkb. 



Seed Growers 



SAN JOSE, CALIFORNIA 



Company 



ONION SETS 



LEO 



an SEED 



CO. 



22C-X30 w. •««" GROWERS fOR THE TRADE 

EAHS, PEAS AND COBH w,it. t.r Pnc 



YOU will be satisfied with the products of 

Burpee's "Seeds that Grow" 



The Everett B. Clark Seed Co., MllfonI, Com. 

•rewkic StaltoM at Bast l erdea. MMk. Olreea Bay. ¥n8..St. Aatboay, Maha 

Beans, Peas, Sweet Corn, Onion, Beet, Turnip, Tomato, Etc. Etc. 



Grass Mixtures for 
Golf - Tennis - Polo 

Meet all reauirements for all soils 

THE ALBERT DICKINSON CO. 
CHICAGO, IIX. 

Waldo Rohnert 

GELROY. CAL. 

Wholesale Seed Grower 

SpedaltiM: Lettaoe, Onion. Sweet Pbm, Astez, 
Cosmoa, Mlmonette, Verbenfte in ruisty^ 
CorrnMDondenoe loUeited 

Pieters-Wheeler Seed Company 




ailroy. 



California 



Growers of High Grade Seeds 

Onion, Radish, Lettuce, 
Sweet Peas, Etc. :: :: 



Correspondence Solicited. 
CONTRACT GROWER 

of 

Cucumber and Nuskmelon Seed 

I ofifer Pure Stock, Personal Service, Intimate 
Knowledge of Stocks and Local Conditions, 
Good Deliveries and Moderate Prices. 

R. H. JANES, Rocky Ford, Colo. 



EVERETTE R. PEACOCK CO. 

ONION ^<^ssn-^ SETS 




ONION 

40ia Mllwaak 



:ee Avenue, 



SEED 
CNicaao 



THE KINBERLIN SEED C0< 

SeedGrow«*ri SANTA CLARAi CALc 

Growers of 
ONION, LETTUCE, RADISH, Etc 

CorresDondence Solicited 

Henry Fish Seed Co. 

BEAN GROWERS 

For the Wholesale Seed Trade. 
CARPINTERIA, CALIFORNIA 



Fkbuuakv 1, 1917. 



The Florists^ Review 



75 




Improved White Spine Cucumber 

grown under irrigation by 

Western Seed & Irrigation Co. 

Seed Growers and Dealers. Specialties: 

Cucumber, Musk and Watermelon. Pumpkin, 
Sduash, Sweet and Field Corn. 

FREMONT - - - - NEBRASKA 

Mention The Review wben jrou \vrite. 

The C. Herbert Coy Seed Co. 

VAUEY, J?;£V"f NEB. 

Wholesale Growers of High-grade Seeds 

Cucumber, Muskmelon, Squash and Pump- 
kin. SwPPt. Flint and D^nt. Reed Corn. 
Mt ntlon Tlf BotUw w>€« you write. 

TOMATO SEED 

Orown for the 
Wholesale Seed Trade 

HAVEN SEED CO, 

SANTA AHA, CALirORNXA 

Men tion The R«t1<w whtn yoa write. 

— THI— 

J. C. Robinson SeedCo. 

WATERLOO, NKB. 

ROCKY FORD, COLO. 

Contract jrrowera of Cucumber. Cantaloupe. 
w%ir"- • n <oi.aaK and Punjokin Seed, Sugar 

Me"tlo« The Review when you write. 

Contract Seed Growers 

Specialties: «-^"5ic?=. J^i*". ™m«to. 

VINE SEED MO FIELD CORN. 

Correspondence Solicited. 

George R. Pedrick & Son 

Mention The Review when you write. 



BEANS 

The Scarcest Item in the 

Catalogue 

For immediate delivery while they last 

DWARF GREEN PODS DWARF WAX BEANS 

Black Valentine $ 7.50 Wardwell's Kidney Wax 

Extra Early Eed Valen- (Annie's Rust Proof 

ine . • • • • • • • • • • • • ■ • • • Improved Black Wax 

Long Yellow Six Weeks 8 50 t^ •, t^ i -r>i , ,,r 

Bountiful 8.50 l^'^ ^"^^ ^^""^^ ^^ ^^ 

Longfellow 8.00 Godson Wax 1 Prices 

Refugee (1,000 to 1).... 8.50 Refugee Wax \ on 

Burpee's Stringless 11.00 Davis Kidney Wax / Application 

Giant Stringless 11.00 Violet Flageolet 

White Kidney 8.00 Improved Golden Wax 

Lowe's Champion 7.50 Keeney's Rust Proof Golden Wax! 

Michigan Wonder Pea Grcnell's Rust Proof Golden Wax 

Beans 7.50 Webber Wax 

Improved Red Kidney.. 8.50 Michigan White Wax 
Yellow Eye Baking 

Beans 7.50 

Arrival draft terms. Inspection allowed. Orders may be wired at our ex- 
pense. All fine stock. New crop. Hand picked. Bags at cost. F, 0. B. Mount 
Pleasant, Michigan. 

Never was such an opportunity for seedsmen as to be able to supply beans 
this year. The price is high but no seed will cost the grower less. Nothing can be 
substituted for beans. A quart of beans will go farther than the same value of 
any other seed. We are booking orders for delivery crop of 1917. Write for 
prices. Our growing facilities are good. We grow our seed stock on our own 
farms. We specialize in Dwarf Garden Beans and feel that we can give seedsmen 
the best of service and larger -average deliveries than other growers located far- 
ther from the center of growing operations. We are about booked up on Wax 
Beans and the finer types of Green Pods, so urge prompt inquiry. 

Harris Bros. Seed Company 

728 South Main Street 

Mount Pleasant, Michigan 



J.BOLGIANO&SQN 

Careful Seed Growers for 99 years. 

Send for our 1917 wholesale prices 
to Florists and Market Gardeners 

BALTIMORE, MARYLAND 



Routzahn Seed Co. 

ARROYO GRANDE, CAL. 

SWEET PEA and NASTURTIUM 
SPECIALISTS 

WholeMla growers of full lists of FLOWIB 
and GARDEN SEEDS 



S. M. Isbell & Co. 

JACKSON, MICH. 

CONTRACT SEED GROWERS 

Beans, Cucumbers. Muskmelon, 
Watermelon, Squash, Sweet Corn 

Michigan-grown Radlsti our Specialty 

Correspondence Solicited 



f% ■■ V* 1% J% Best that arrow. We mU dl- 
^ L L 1 1 W ^^^ ^ srardsnera and florlata at 
h1 ■ ■ 1 1 ■« wholeaale. Biff beaatlfol cata- 
VkkW loffnefree. Write today. 
ABGHIA8 SEED 8T0BE, Box S4. 8ED1LIA, MO. 



76 



The Florists^ Review 



Febuuauv 1, 1917. 



Sixty kinds of beans and peas are 
grown in China, but few of these find a 
place in tlio oxjiort trade. 

The stocks of America gladiolus are 
believed to lie principally in two hands 
this season, and prices (pioted earlier in 
the season have been advanced twenty- 
five per cent. 

Among those who will have booths at 
the National Canners' Convention at 
Cleveland February 5, is the Leonard Seed 
Co., Chicago, whose exhibit will be in 
charge of .lohn C. Leonard. 

The seed trade's advortisiiig this sea- 
Bon will be light, because of the belief 
that demand wi.l exceed suitp.y, and 
practically confined to class publica- 
tions, because of the belief that the use 
of general publications does not pay as 
well. 

DETROIT NEXT JUNE. 

The executive committee of the Amer- 
ican Seed Trade Association has desig- 
nated Detroit as the place for the thir- 
ty-fifth annual convention, to be held 
next June. 

The committee held its annual mid- 
winter meeting at New York, January 
30. Those present were President Kir- 
by B. White, Detroit; Secretary C. E. 
Kendel, Cleveland; J. M. Lupton, Mat- 
tituck, L. I.; Leonard H. Vaughan, Chi- 
cago; Howard M. Earl, Philadelphia; 
W. G. Scarlett, Baltimore; J. L. Hunt, 
Cambridge, N. Y., which is the full com- 
mittee with the exception of the vice- 
presidents. By invitation there also 
were present W. S. Woodruff, M. H. 
Durvoa and Charles D. Boyles. 



AUSTRALIAN SEED CROPS. 

In Australia seasonal conditions are 
the reverse of our own and 1916-1917 
seed crops there are approaching the 
harvest time. With reference to the 
crop prospect, F. H. Brunning, Ltd., by 
Leslie H. Brunning, secretary, says 
under date of December 19: 

"We have had heavy rains during 
1916, tlie fall to date being thirty-eight 
inches. The average for the last forty 
years is twenty-five inches, and last 
year's total for the same period was 
twentv and one-half inches. As the 
bulk of the rain has fallen since Sep- 
tember and has been accompanied by 
heavy hail from time to time, you will 
understand the crops have suffered se- 
verely. In the Portarlington district, 
what has not been washed out will bear 
well, but even so we cannot look for 
more than a fifty per cent return. The 
carrot and parsnip crops we are afraid 
will be almost total failures, owing to 
the fact that, on top of the floods, the 
Rutherglen fly has made its appearance. 

"At time "of writing, it is hard to 
give an opinion on the onion crop, but 
it seems to us that it will not be a 
heavy one.'^^ 

ACTION FOR SHORT DELIVERY. 

The California Lima Bean Growers' 
Association is likely to be brought into 
court in the near future to ascertain 
whether or not it can be compelled to 
make good its obligations to deliver fu- 
ture goods. S. Pfeifer, a New Orleans 
jobber, has sued the organization and 
has rather got the start of the bean men 
by tying up money due them, now in 
the Louisiana jurisdiction. It appears 
that Pfeifer got a portion of the beans 
for which he contracted and January 
20 paid a draft for $4,683.10. Then 




Bolglano's Tomato Seeds 

ARE 6R0WN BY US AS 
FAR NORTH AS TOMA- 
TOES WILL MATURE. 

They are free from blight, ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ 
most carefully grown, mostj^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ 
carefully selected, most care- J 
fully saved— 

Just for Seed 

Bolglano's Tomato Seeds 
are well known for their big 
yields of large, firm, solid, 
meaty, uniform Tomatoes. 

We grow Tomatoes justfor 
seed— even the pulp we de- 
stroy. Not an ounce of Can- 
ning House Tomato Seed is 
allowed to enter our estab- john Baer Tomato 

lishment. The Earliest and Best Tomato on Earth 

WHOLESALE TOMATO SEED PRICES -TO THE TRADE ONLY 

Oz. % lb. % lb. Lb. 

John Baer Tomato Seed $0.75 $2.00 $3.75 $7.50 

Greater Baltimore Tomato Seed 25 .75 1.25 2..50 

Greater Baltimore Tomato (Special Stock Seed) 30 1.00 1.75 3.50 

My Maryland Tomato Seed 25 .75 1.25 2.50 

My Maryland Tomato Seed (Special Stock Seed) 30 1.00 1.75 3.50 

The Great B B Bolglano's Best 20 .50 .90 1.75 

Red Rock Extra Fine Stock 20 .50 .90 1.75 

Red Rock (Special Stock Seed) 25 .75 1.25 2.50 

Burpee's Matchless Tomato 20 .50 .90 1.75 

Livingston's Perfection Tomato 15 .40 .75 1.50 

Brlnton's Best Tomato Seed l.'i .40 .75 1.50 

World's Fair Tomato Seed 15 .40 .75 1.50 

Bolglano's New Century Tomato 15 .40 .75 1.50 

Bolglano's New Queen Tomato 15 .40 .75 1.50 

Dwarf Stone Tomato Seed 15 .40 .75 1.50 

I. X. L. Bolglano's Extra Early 25 .85 1.50 3.00 

Bonny Best (Purest Stock) 25 .75 1.15 2.25 

Livingston's New Stone (Pure) 20 .50 .90 1.76 

Livingston's New Stone (Special Stock Seed) 25 .75 1.25 2.50 

Livingston's Paragon Tomato 20 .50 .90 1.75 

Maule's Success Tomato Seed 20 .50 .90 1.75 

Kelly Red or Wade Tomato Seed 2.") .75 1.15 2.25 

Livingston's Favorite Tomato 20 .50 .90 1.75 

King of the Earliest Tomato 25 .GO 1.00 2.00 

Spark's Earliana Tomato 20 .50 .90 l!76 

Chalk's Jewel Tomato (Pure) 25 .CO 1.00 200 

Ten Ton Tomato 1.5 .-40 [75 ]|50 

New Jersey Red Tomato 15 .40 .'75 150 

Trophy Tomato Seed 15 .40 .75 1I50 

TOMATO SEED FOR YOUR 1917 CROP 

You will get an enormous crop of Tomatoes from Bolglano's Tomato Seed this year. 
Our Seed was saved from one of the largest crops we have ever had, due to being 
favored by weather conditions. The vines were loaded with Large. Solid, Red Fruit 
We know positively by planting Seed from this "Big Crop" your yield will be much 
larger than If you had bought seed grown where the weather conditions were not 
favorable, 

J. BOLGIANO & SON 

Growers of Pedigreed Tomato Seeds-This Is Our 99th Year 

BALTIMORE, MD. 

Send for our complete catalog, giving lowest prices to florists and market gardeners 



Mention The Berlew when yog wrlt«. 



PIN MONEY 

MUSHROOM SPAWN 

8 lbs. for $1.00 Directions Included 

WM. ELLIOTT & SONS 
48 VESET ST. NEW YORK 

Mention The Review when yon write. 

GENUINE 

BALCH'S FILLBASKET or STOKES' BONNY BEST 

TOMATO SEED 

Specially Selected Stock 

Greenhouse Grown 

$1.00 per packet of about 260 seeds 

WILLEY'S FARM, East Patchogue. 1. 1.. N. Y. 

Mention The Review when yon write. 



PAPER WHITES 

$8.50 per 1000 
SPIRAEA-Gladstone and Pink 

M. M. CARROLL 

NORWOOD (Cincinnati) OHIO 

Mention The BcTlew when yon writs. 



HELLERS 
MICE 

PROOF 
SEED 

CASES. 


Send for CaUlosHC 

HELLER & CO. 

Montpelier, Ohio 





FEBnuARV 1, 1917. 



The Florists' Review 



77 



Burpee^s Seeds Grow 



With the close of 1916 forty years of 
Burpee Effort have passed into Seed 
History. These were constructive years, 
years of careful, intensive, scientific in- 
vestigation and experimenting. Starting 
in a very modest way, acre after acre, 
building after building, have been added until 
today we enjoy the distinction of being the 
World's Largest Mail Order Seed House. 

The House of Burpee 

in this forty years has introduced more distinct 
new varieties of Vegetable and P'lower Seeds 
that are now in general cultivation, than have 
any three other American Seed Firms, but never 
have we cataloged any one of these varieties 
until it has passed all the exacting require- 
ments of the Burpee Standard. This Burpee 
Standard js maintained by rigid tests at Fordhook Farms, America's largest and most complete Trial 
Grounds. These tests are made each year for the purpose of strengthening the bond of confidence 
between our customers and ourselves. 

With the culmination of these forty years we 
enter the- fifth decade of our active business 
life, with the firm intention of continuing to 
Better Serve. 




BURPEE'S ANNUAL 
The Leading American Seed Catalog 



Burpee Annual for 1 9 1 7 

The Leading American Seed Catalog is bigger, 
better and brighter than ever before. Twenty- 
two pages have been added, and best of all, you 
will find thirty Burpee Specialties illustrated in 
color. Never before have we issued a catalog 
with so many accurate color illustrations. 

Florists and Market Gardeners, in addition to 
Burpee's Annual, should have Burpee's Blue 
List, the Market Growers' Handbook. This is 
a wholesale price list for commercial planters. 
Write for these catalogs today. A post card 
will bring them. 




BURPEE'S BLUE LIST 
The Narlcet Growers' Handbook 



W. ATLEE BURPEE & CO. 

Q SEED GROWERS 

Burpee Buildings, Philadelphia, Pa. 



78 



The Florists' Review 



FKBRUAnv 1, 1917. 



NichelFs New Crop Flower Seeds 




ASPARAGUS PI.UMOSUS NANUS 
Northern Greenhouse-grown Seed 

1000 seeds $ 3.50 10,000 seeds. . .$30.00 

5000 seeds 15.56 25.000 seeds... 72.60 

ASPARAGUS HATCH£RI 

100 seeds $1.00 500 seeds $3.00 

1000 seeds $5.00 

ASPARAGUS SPRENGERI 

1000 seeds $0.75 10,000 seeds... $ 5.50 

iflOOO seeds 3.00 25,000 seeds... 12.50 

Special prices on larger quantities 

CENTAUREA 1000 Seeds Oz. 

Candidissima $0.30 $2.00 

Gymnoc-ari>a 15 .50 



LOBELIA 

Crystal Palace Compacta. 
Crystal Palace Speciosa. . . 



Tr. pkt. Oz. 
..$0.30 $1.25 



.15 



jO 



PETUNIA i 

Mlchell's Slonstrosus 1.00 

California Giants 50 

Grandiflora Fringed 50 

Dwarf Inimitable 90 1.25 

HENRY F. NICHELL CO., 



SALVIA 



Tr. pkt. Oz. 



Scarlet Glow (Mlchell's) $0.50 

Bonfire 40 

Zurfch 50 

King of Carpets 50 

Splendens 25 



VERBENAS 

Mammoth Fancy Blue 
Pink 



Scarlet 
Striped 
Whfte 
Mixed 



THUNBERGIA 

Mixed 

VINCA 

Alba 

Alba Puta . . . 

Rosea 

Mixed 



.30 
.30 
.30 
.30 
.30 
.30 



.15 



.15 

.1.") 
.15 



$3.00 
2.50 
4.00 
2. .50 
1.25 



1.2.'-. 
1.2.-) 
1.25 
1.2,- 
1.2.-. 
1.00 



.CC 



.CC 
.50 



Also all other Seasonable Seeds, Bulbs 
and Supplies. Send for New Whole- 
sale Catalogue. 



518 Market Street, 

PHILADELPHIA, PA. 



Pfeifer's lawyer went to the Civil Dis- 
trict court with a claim for $2,000 po- 
tential profit on undelivered beans and 
asked the court to seize the $4,68.3.10. 
Bailiffs soon had the money tied up. 
The idea of paying drafts and then seiz- 
ing the money to secure profits lost by 
the failure of the bean barons to come 
across with beans is a new one. 

The New Orleans merchants claim the 
crop was not so badly damaged as eon- 
tended and that the association and its 
commission merchants are selling at the 
market price in other cities instead of 
deliveiing here at the contract price. 
The difference is 2 cents a pound. Prof- 
its on a car in ordinary times run from 
$150 to $200. The difference between 
a car at contract and at market price 
today is $S00 to $1,000. The dealers 
are much distressed liy the impression 
that the growers are pocketing $800 to 
$1,000 a ear and delivering excuses in- 
stead of beans. 



SEEDSMEN'S LIENS. 



SEEDS 



Oz. 
$0.40 
.35 

1.00 
.75 

1.00 
.60 
.00 
.50 
.50 

1.50 
1.50 
1.40 
.50 
1.50 
1.00 



Lien on Crop For Seeds' Price. 

The laws of the states in which retail 
seedsmen are given liens against crops 
for the price of seeds furnished to grow 
the crops, have given rise to consider- 
able litigation of practical importance 
to the trade, coneerning the right to en- 
force lions. 

The Supreme Court of North Dakota 
was called upon to determine whether 
a person wlio in good faith furnishes 
seed is entitled to a lien for the entire 
purchase price, regardless of whether 
all of the seeds were actually sown. Tn 
deciding the point in favor of the right 
to lien, tlie court said: 

"We think it clear, under the statute 
in question, that a ]ierson who furnishes 
seCH^ls to another to be sown upon cer- 
tain land is entitled, upon compliance 
with the statute, to a lien for the pur- 
chase ]>rice of all seeds so furnished 
upon the crop grown from such seeds or 
any portion of such seeds. In other 
words, it is not incumbent upon the 
seller of the seeds to see to it at his 
peril that all such seeds are actually 
sown as agreed." 

One Lien for Each Crop. 

In tlie same case aTU)ther (|uestion was 



Tr. pkt. 

Alysstun, Little Gem $0.10 

Alyssum, Carpet of Snow 10 

Antirrhinum, Giant Venus 25 

Antirrhinum, Giant Queen Victoria.. .20 

Antirrhinum, Giant Silver Pink 25 

Antirrhinum, Giant Scarlet 20 

Antirrhinum, Giant Yellow 20 

Antirrhinum, Giant Mixed 15 

Antirrhinum, Dwarf Mixed 15 

Begonia Gracilis Luminosa 50 

Bellis, Longfellow Rose 40 

Bellis, Snowball White 40 

Bellis, Mixed 40 

Candytuft, Giant Empress 15 

Celosia, Dwarf Glasgow Prize 25 

Mignonette, St. L. S. Co. Macliet 25 

Higmonette, Red Goliath Extra 50 

Petunia, Giant Fid. Dwarf Mixed... .25 

Petunia, Howard's Star 25 

Petunia, Snowball 25 

Petunia, Rosy Morn 25 

Petunia, Choice Mixed 15 

Salvia, Splendens Scarlet 25 

Salvia, Splendens Ronfire 50 

Salvia, Splendens St. Louis 50 

Salvia, Splendens Fireball 50 

Verbena, Mammoth White 25 

Verbena, Mammoth Scarlet 25 

Verbena, Mammoth Purple .and Rlue. .25 

Verbena, Mammoth Pink 25 

Verbena, Mammoth Mixed 25 

Vinca, Rosea 15 

Vinca, Rosea Alba 15 

Vinca, Mixed '. . .15 

St. Louis Seed Co. 

411 Washington Ave., St. Louis, Mo. 

Mention The Review when you write. 



1.25 

1.25 

1.25 

.50 

1.25 

2.00 

2.50 

2.00 

1.00 

1.00 

1.00 

1.00 

1.00 

.60 

.60 

.50 




ALYSSUM SnowblH. Th«» only true dwarf. 20e. 
CHINESE FRIMKOSE. Finest crown, single and 

double. Mixed, 6.'.() seeds. %\M): l^ pkt. 50c 
CINERARIA. Large-Howorjui,', dwarf, mixed, 

fine. 1000 seeds, 50c: V- pkt. '1m-. 
COBAEA Scandens. Purple. Pkt. 20c. 
COLEUS. New giants, finest llirgc; leaved. 20c. 
CANDYTTTFT. New wliite giant, grand. Pkt. 20c. 
CHRISTMAS PEPPERS, Very fine deep red. 20c. 
JERUSALEM CHERRY Melvinii. Conical, new, 

and FRA UlAVOLO, large, round. Each 20c. 
CYCLAMEN GIGANTEUM, finest Giants, mixed. 

:i.-)0 seeds. $1.00; % pkt., 50c; 10(M1 seeds, $3. .")(!. 
MOONFLOWER, Improved Giant Flowering, 20c. 
PANSY, Giants Mixed. Finest grown, critically 

selected. 0000 seeds, $1.00; '.j pkt. 50c. 
PETUNIA New Star. Finest marked. 20c. 
PETUNIA New California Giants. Mixed. 20c. 
PETUNIA Blue Jacket, New deep blue, single, 

very sliowy and profuse bloomer, fine. 20c. 
PHLOX Drummondii. New dwarf, large flower- 
ing. Grand, finest colors and beauties. 20e. 
SALVIA Scarlet Glow. The finest intense dark 

scarlet, medium tall, early hjooining. 20c. 
THUNBERGIA. lilack Eyed Siisan, fine. 20c. 
VERBENA. .New giants. FitWst grown, mixed 

or separate colors, in pink, purple, scarlet, 

white and white-eyed. Each, per pkt. 20c. 
Cash. Liberal pkts. Six 20c pkts. $1.00. 

JOHN F. RUPP, Shiremanstown, Pa. 

Mention The Hevlew when yon write. 

raised, as to whether, under the North 
Dakota seed lien law, a person furnish- 
ing two or more kinds of seeds under a 



Dwarf Gladioli 



Ramosus Ne Plus Ultra, at $6.00 
per 1000. 

Dwarf Double Pearl Tuberoses 

—special prices on application. 

Caladium Esculentutn bulbs. 

Lilium Multiflorum, 7 to 9, 9 to 

10 and 10 to 11— attractive prices 
on application. 

Lilium Formosum, 7 to 9 and 9 

to 10, black stem. 

Please tell us how many you can use 
and we shall make prices accordingly 

Selected strains of Ageratum. Alyssum, 
Aster. Begonia Erf ordii. Calendula 
Meteor, Prince of Orange, Candytuft, 
Celosia, Centaurea, Cobaea Scandens, 
Cosmos, Gyosophila. Lobelia, Petunia 
and Verbena. Special prices on the 
above on application. 

J. N. THORBURN & CO. 

53 Barclay Street 
throusrh tor 54 Park Place 

NEW YORK CITY 



Mention The Rerlew when yoii write. 

Lilium Giganteum, 79 and 9 10 

For immediate delivery. 

Write for prioea. 

rOKOHAHA NUKSERY CO., Ui 

Woolworth BldflT** New Tork Citr 

Mention Thg R«t1«w wh«n yon writ*. _ 

GLADIOLI 

New Catalogue Ready 

JOHN LEWIS CHILDS, Inc. 

Flowerfield, L. I., N. Y. 

Mention Tlie Review when ynn write. ^. 

single contract might perfect a lien ■ i' 
foctive against all the crops produ< ou 
from the two kinds of seeds for the i D' 



Febriakt 1, 1917. 



The Florists^ Review 



79 



^llllllllllllllllllllllilllliiilllllllUllllllllliillillillilllllllliilllHlllllllllilllllllilllllililllllilllllllllllHlli>lllll>>ll"l""ll"l'''l^ 

NO DUTCH IMITATION 

S We offer the = 

I ORIGINAL BELGIUM-GROWN TUBEROUS-ROOTED BEGONIAS | 
I FOR IMMEDIATE SHIPMENT. Penoo Periooo | 



$16.00 
18.00 



Single Flowering Type $1-80 

Double Flowering Type 2.00 

In Red, White, Rose. Yellow, Orange and Mixed. F.O.B. Cars New York. Thi^. means all expenses paid. 

One of the largest shipments of Begonias ever imported in this country reached our warehouse in exceptionally fine 

condition last week. 

ORDER IMMEDIATELY If YOU WANT TO SECURE SOME Of THE fINEST STOCK OBTAINABLE- ONLY A fEW THOUSAND LEfT. 

HOGEWONING & SONS 



i RYNSBURG, HOLLAND 



32 BROADWAY, NEW YORK = 



Tiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiliiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiim^^^^ 

Mention The Beylew when yon write. ^^______^_____.^.^^__ 



SEEDS FOR FLORISTS 



CATALOGUE READY 



F. RYNVELD & SONS, HOLLIND-FRANCE-25 W. BROADWAY, NEW YORK 



Mention The Review when yon write. 



Holland Bulbs 

Grootendorsl's choice Holland 
15ulbs have been used by American 
florists for a quarter century, so 
their quality is well known. 

This year our bulbs are extra- 
quality. Give your order to our 
salesman, who will call on you 
soon, or make your selection from 
our catalogue, mailing the list to 
our American branch. 

F.J.Grootendorst&Sons 

Room 1101, 10 Broadway 
New York City 






Mention The Review when you write. 



THE BEST 
Begonias 

Gloxinias 

LAN6H0UT & CO. 

SASSENHCIM. 



HOLLAND 

Write for prices 

care of AMERICAN SHIPPING CO. 

Rector Building. Chicago. 111. 



Mention The Review when you write. 



PEDIGREE SEEDS 
AND NOVELTIES FOR 1917 

Our New Catalogue is now ready. If you have not received a 

copy, send a postcard 

WATKINS & SIMPSON, Ltd. 

27. 28 &, 29 DRURY LANE, LONDON, ENG. 



Mention The Reylcw when yog write. 



FRENCH BULBS 

FOR 1917 DELIVERY 

Lagarde & Speelman 

OLLIOl^ES, VAR. FRANCE 

Largest grovvet^ of 

fRENCH GOLDEN SPUR 

fRENCH DUTCH CNRISTMAS HYACINTHS 

fREESIA EXCELSIOR, ETC., ETC. 

Prices from our branch : 
P. O. Box 124, HOBOKEN, N. J. 

CSee our prices on Gladioli in Classified 
Ad Department. 

<LWrite for prices on Cold Storage Gigan- 
teum. 

LECflNER BROS., Caxton Bidg., ST. LOUIS. NO. 

Agents for The Growers Association, 
Anna Paulowna, Holland. 

Rill lift 1 1 BULBSII BULBSIII Send 
DULDO i I your list for prices. 

CHEAPER TN«N BUYING AT AUCTION. Toy knw what yoaict 
J.J. WILSON 8KKD CO., NKWARE.N.J. 



DANISH SEEDS 




Cabbase, Cauliflower, 
Carrot, MMi£el, Swede, 
Turnip, etc. 

CHR. OLSEN 

Seed Qrower 

(ErtsbllMied 1863) 
ODBNSB. DENMARK 

Contrkot Offers andSftm* 
plei at roar leryic*. 



CaMi U4reii~"rR00LIEN." Ci4i: Stb U., k. B. C. 

Amer. Se«d Trade Amd 

KELWAY'S SEEDS 

f LOWER, VEGETABLE and FARM 

for present delivery or on contract. Special 
quotations for next season and from harvest 
1917 now ready. 

Langport, England 

Mention The BeTlew when yon write. 

DANISH SEED IMPORT 

ImtMrt of all kindi of Seeds direct from seed 
Rowera in Denmark. Please send for price list 
Clw. Mosbjerc. 21«7tk St. N., Minn«iRs. yias. 



80 



The Florists^ Review 



February 1, 1917. 



By planting A. B. C. Bulbs every month you will cut 
supply all sizes in any quantity at the regular Fall import 



blooms every day. We can 
prices. 



Lilium Giganteum in the following sizes: 

()-S, 400 to case 7-9, 300 to case 8-9, 275 to case 

8-10, 250 to case 9-10. 200 to case 

HARDY LILIES 

Rubrum and Magnificum 

7- 9, 190 to case 9-10, 150 to case 9-10, 100 to case 

9-11, l;W to case 9-11, 100 to case 11-13, 80 to case 



7- 9, 
9-11, 



80 to ca^e 
to case 



8-9, 190 to case 



Lilium Auratum 

8- 9, 170 to case 
11-13, 70 to case 
13-15, 60 to case 

Lilium Album 

9-11, 130 to case 
Lilium Tigrinum 

8-10« 150 to case 



9-10, 120 to case 
12-13, (K) to case 



11-13, 80 to case 




^OH US G^ 

Cable Address "BULBS'* 



We have a good stock of Cannas, Tuberoses, Caladium Esculentum and Fancy Leaf. 

Seeds and Florists' Supplies at market price. 

American Bulb Company 

172 North Wabash Avenue, Phone Randolph 3316 CHICAGO, ILL, 

Mention The ReTlew when yon write. ^^^^^^^^^ 



i-n 



LILY BULBS 



OUR MOTTO: "Your dollar's value." 



Those who know will grow Reburn & Co. lily bulbs, for they are fertilized (the truth without fear or favor), and 
feeding the bulbs at growing stage positively produces the best results, maturing a healthy, sound bulb; three times 
rogued and cultivated by the oldest and best experienced growers in Japan. 



MULTIFLORUM for early Easter, true Kiota type, as you knew 
Multifloruni twelve to fifteen years ago. Easter, 1918, is March 31, 
Try a few cases. Supply limited. 7/9. $65.00 per 1000; 9/10, $100.00 
per 1000. 



GIGANTEUMS of superb quality, fall 1917. 7/9, $5.50 per 100; 
case of 300, $14.00. 8/10, $8.00 per 100; case of 225, $16.50. 9/10. $9.00 
per 100: case of 2no, $18.00, 

FORMOSUM, black and green stem. The best Oshimo ev?r 
produced, fall 1917. 7/9. case of 300. $17.50; per 1000. $56.00. 8/10. case 
of 200. $17.00; per 1000. $80.00. 9/10. case of 200, $18.00; per 1000, $85,00, 



Let us figure on your French and Dutch order for fall, 1917, Our connections are reliable. Read our motto. 
Cold storage GIGANTEUM BULBS all the year. All sizes. Ask for prices.' See offer of Gladioli in Classified Department. 

G. M. REBURN & CO., 160 N. Wabash Ave., CHICAGO 



Mention The ReTlew when yon write. 



tire purchase price. The court said that 
this was a doubtful question, and re- 
fused to pass on it directly, because, 
under the peculiar facts of the case be- 
fore the court, it was unnecessary to de- 
cide the point. It appeared that 200 
■ bushels of seed wheat and sixty bushels 
of seed flax had been sold to the same 
person at different prices per bushel, and 
that the seller filed a single lien state- 
ment for the whole price, claiming a 
lien against both crops, but specifying 
the number of bushels of each kind of 
seed furnished, and the price per bushel. 
On these facts, the court held that the 
contract should be regarded as divisible 
as to the two kinds of seed, and the lien 
construed as separate as to each crop 
— one upon the wheat crop for the value 
of the seeds furnished for it, and one 
on the flax crop for the value of the 
seeds furnished for it. 

But it is clear that no lien can be 
enforced under a seed-grain note, unless 
seeds have been actually furnished for 
the crop against which the lien is as- 
serted. In another interesting case it 
appeared that a seed-grain note was 
taken for grain furnished for a certain 
crop. The note was not paid and the 
lien was not enforced, but the seedsman 
took a new note in renewal of the old 
one, and in the same lien form. Under 
these circumstances, the Minnesota Su- 
preme court decided that no lien could 
be enforced against the new crop, for 
which the seedsman furnished no seeds, 
as against a third person to whom the 
farmer gave a chattel mortgage after 
the renewal note was executed. The 
court said of the renewal note: 

Another Aspect. 

"Though duly filed, it did not entitle 
the plaintiff to claim any other than the 
specific lien therein provided, upon grain 



JAP LILY BULBS 

At Import Prices — Including Storage Charges to Date 

F. O. B. CHICAGO F. O. B. LONDON, ONT. ' 

Lilium Giganteum ' 7-9, 8-10, 9-10 Lilium Giganteum 7-9, 8-10, 9-10 

F. O. B. NEW YORK 
Lilium Giganteum 7-9, 8-10, 9-10, 10-11 Lilium Album < 9-11 



Lilium Multiflorum 7- 9. 

Lilium Auratum 7- 9, 



8-10 
9-11 



Lilium Uubrum 7-9, 8-10, 9-11 

Lilium Melpomene 9-11 



Write for prices and details, stating quantity desired. 

McHutchison & Co.^"&«J?Jir^ 

95 CHAMBERS ST.. NEW YORK 

Mention The Beriew when yon write. 



BURNETT BROS. 



I BULBS 8 PLANTS 
98 ChamlMrs 9*rmmt, NEW YORK CITY 

Mention The Reriew when yon write. 

raised from seeds furnished by the de- 
fendant. But it is admitted that the 
note was not given for seeds from which 
the grain in controversy was raised, and 
that the defendant furnished no seed 
grain to the maker of it that year. No 
lien was therefore created under the 
statute." 

On failure of the buyer jof seeds to pay 
therefor, the seller, havi^ properly pre- 
served his lien, is entitlld to take pos- 
session of the crop for the purpose of 
foreclosure, or he may enforce the lien 
as against the holder of a subordinate 
lien who has taken possession. If the 
junior lienor disposes of the property, 
the seedsman may hold him liable as for 
conversion of the crop. (Minnesota Su- 
preme court, Nash versus Brewster, 41 
Northwestern Eeporter, 105.) 

But when the buyer of seeds fails to 



mJUN GIGANTEUn, 7/9 bolbi 

300 to case (20.00 per caae 

Kcheverlas, fine stock, 3-ln. pots S30.00 per 1000 

Also have a fine lot of Freach and Dutch Bulbs. 

Prices on application. 

DDTICrnin l»S IVest eth street, 
• »W»»vVm, CINCINNATI. OHIO 

Mention The Reriew when yon write. 

make settlement and the seedsman per- 
mits him to retain part of the grain 
covered by the lien for the purpose of 
growing a crop for the succeeding year, 
taking a new lien note for the wheat so 
retained, a lien may be enforced against 
the new crop, according to another deci- 
sion of the Minnesota Supreme court. 
The court holds that a new lien note 
may not be taken as a device to secure 
.a preexisting debt, and that a lien may 
be enforced only against the crop for 
which seed was furnished by the lien 
claimant, but that it is not necessary 
that the seedsman have had actual pos- 
session of the seed or that he make ac- 
tual manual delivery thereof to the 



^ :A 



February 1, 1917. 



The Florists' Review 



81 



\ 



DREER'S SWEET PEAS FOR CUTTING 

We oflfer below a short list of the very best varieties for cutting. For complete list of va- 
rieties see our New Wholesale Catalogue. 

ORCHID FLOWERED OR SPENCER SWEET PEAS 

This type is distinguished from the grandiflora sorts by the extraordinary sizp. of their 
flowers and by the standard being crinkled and wavy. They usually bear four blu&soms on a 
stem, and are as easy to grow as the commonest sorts. 

% Lb. I.b. 

A beautiful rich salmon $0.60 $2.00 

Ferry Spencer. An extra selected 



Ba'rbara 

Blanche . . 

stock of this fine pink and white, of very 
large size 50 

Constance Hinton. The largest and finest 
white, flowers frequently 2\ii Inches across, 
black seeded and a strong vigorous grower 
with very long strong stems 1.25 

Countess Spencer. (True.) A lovely clear 
pink 50 

Dobl>le'B Cream. The finest primrose-yellow .CO 

Klfrida Pearson. The largest and finest light 
pink 

Florence Nightingale. The largest and finest 
pure lavender CO 

Helen lewis. Brilliant orange rose 50 

King Edward Spencer. Crimson scarlet... .50 

King White. Considered the largest and 
finest pure white, white seeded 75 

Margaret Atlee. The largest and finest rich 
pink Sweet Pea — the "Spencer Supreme". .75 

Mrs. Cuthbertson. The finest bicolor. stan- 
dards rose-pink, wings blush white 

MrN. Hugh Dickson. Salmon-pink on a 
cioam ground 50 

Orchid. Deep lavender suffused with pink, 
similar in tint to the color tones found in 
Cattleya Orchids 1.00 

Kotiabelle. The finest rich rose variety. . . . ; .CO 

Ro.vul I'uri'le. Rich royal purple, a very 
distinct color 1.50 

S<-arlet Empero'r. Brilliant deep scarlet... 1.00 

Tlios. Stevenson. Brilliant orange-scarlet. . .CO 

Wj'dgwood. A beautiful Wedgwood or sil- 
very blue 1.00 

White Spencer. A pure white Countess 
.Sjjencer of very large size 50 

Orchid-flowered Mixed 30 

GRANDIFI.ORA SWEET TEAS 

Blanche Ferry. Pink and white $0.20 

Dorothy Eckford. The finest white 20 

Fran^ Dolby. A large wavy flower, pale 

lavender 30 

Flora Norton. The most pronounced bright 

blue 20 

Gladys L'nwin. A large wavy, pale rose- 
pink 30 

Hon. Mrs. E. Kenyon. The flne.'^t primrose- 
yellow 20 

Janet .Scott. Grand, rich, deep pink 20 

King Edward VIl, Rich deep crimson scar- 



1.50 



4.00 

1..50 
2.00 



75 2.50 



2.00 
1.60 
1.50 



lot 



CO 2.00 



1.50 



3.50 
2.00 

5.00 
3.50 
2.00 

3.50 

1.50 
1.00 



$0,.50 
.50 

1.00 

.50 

1.00 

.60 
.50 

.50 
.50 
.CO 
.60 
.60 

1.00 
.50 
.40 



.20 



Lady Crisel Hamilton. Pale lavender 20 

Lord Nelson. Rich navy blue 20 

Lovely. Shell pink, extra fine 20 

Miss Willnnott. Rich, d^ep orange pink 20 

Nora l'nwin. A superb pure white cut flower 

variety with wavy petals 30 

Prima Donna. Deep pink, fine 20 

Dreer's Peerless Mixed 15 

DREER'S EAMOUS AMERICAN ASTERS 

Xoiwithstanding the very short crop of high grade 
i'-'istcrn grown Aster seed we are fortunate In having 
a v-iy good supply of the choicest varieties. 

\\ (■ offer but a few here; for i(imi)lite list see our new 
W hciesale Catalogue. 

CREGO'S GL\NT COMET ASTERS 

Magnificent fluffy flowers, with long strong stems, and 
unlike most of the Comet sorts, stands when cut and 

\4V''i.*^°°'k "°"''^'" t° ^l^'P- Trade pkt. Oz. 

iV .^' Purest white $0.40 

innk Delicate shell pink 40 

luritle. Bright purple . . 40 

Kose. Rich deep rose '40 

i^J»'"«'Vr,- ■'^ rich deep shade ■.■.■.■. '.40 

linest .Mixed. All colors 30 



$2.00 
2.00 
2.00 
2.00 
2.00 
1.50 



KING ASTERS 

inJ'lr.n'^'^io^r-^-''*^''^ ^^^ "f strong, sturdy habit, grow- 
f!iK„ ^' IS, '"ches high, and bear from August to Oc- 
Ivl L ^°'"-^' 'i""^° double blossoms, the petals of which 
are more or less quilled, forming vcrv attractive flowers. 

Oz. 
$3.00 



i)i..>„.- f • Trade pkt. 

lA^bV- '"^'*" K'"K- Rif^h crimson $0.50 

si,..ii '."^•> -'^^ attractive shade of delicate 
hliell-pink 4Q 

^^ri.^'"*^- '^ beautiful' ' bViil'lanV ' rose 
,^ arieiy .^ 

Violet King. Pleasing so'f t'shade of violet .' '. .30 



nREER'S "PEERLESS PINK" ASTER 



2.00 

2.00 
1.50 




per Trade pkt. ; $2.50 per oz. 
DREERS SUPERB LATE BRANCHLNG ASTERS 

blooming.'"^' "^^^^^ fo'' late August and September 

th^8*tem8'"n?inl=^1!^"'^^''^■ tosether with the length of 
"lems, places them at the head of Asters for cut- 



HENRY A. DREER, 




ting. They come into bloom from two to three weeks 
after the average type, usually being at their best dur- 
ing September. Trade 

pkt. 

.\7.ure Blue. A rich, deep lavender $0.30 

I'nre While. Kxtra fine stock :\0 

Shell I'ink. An exquisite shade .".0 

Rose I'ink. A very desirable color .SO 

Deep Rose. Rich and brilliant ,">0 

Deep I'urple. Royal deep purple :',0 

Lavender. A pale grayish lavender 30 

Crimson. Very rich 30 

Finest Mixed. .\11 the colors 25 



Oz. 

$1.50 
l.,50 
1.50 
l.-W 
1..50 
1..50 
1.50 



1.00 

IMPROVED D.WBREAK OR AMERICAN VICTORI.A 
ASTERS. 

As .a class these are characterized by their even, sym- 
metrical growth and free flowering qualities, which 
make them the finest of all Asters for bedding and 
very desirable for cutting. Trade pkt. Oz. 

Daybreak. Delicate La France pink .$0.40 

I'urlty. .Snow white 40 

Pale Lavender. A pretty shade 50 

Rose Pink. Rose shading to blush 50 

Salmon Pink. Rich salmon pink ."lO 

Azurea. Rich deep lavender blue 50 

Choicest Mi.ved. All colors 40 



$2.00 
2.00 
3.00 
3.00 
3.00 
3.00 
2.00 



FLOWER SEED SPECIALISTS 



: 714 CHESTNUT ST,, PHILADELPHIA, PA, 



82 



The Florists* Review 



Fbbuuary 1, 1917. 



A J. 




(ilinipsp 111 a Garden at 
Lenox, Mass. 



Make It Possible for Your Customers to Duplicate 
the Charms of the Gardens of Lenox 






8ISIT0RS to the famous gardens at Lenox, 
Glen Cove, Tuxedo Park and like places al- 
most invariably come away filled with 
wonderment at their charm, and wistfully 
wishing that they might duplicate those charms in 
their own gardens. 

Just as the florists of Lenox, Glen Cove, Tuxedo 
Park and similar places made possible those charms, 
by supplying their customers with the choice good 
things in Sutton's catalogue, just so can you make 



it-i)ossible for your customers to duplicate those 
charms. 

You will find it profitable business— business 
that will give you an entering wedge with a number 
of people you have found it hard to reach before.. 

In Sutton's catalogue you will find certain 
things that only Sutton has. 

Send 35c for 1917 catalogue, which price will be 
credited to you when your orders amount to 15 or 
more. 



WINTER, SON & CO. 

66-A Wall Street, 

New York 

Sole Agents East of the 
Rocky Mountains 



MlCterK/tit 



otto 



Royal Seed Establishment 
Reading, England 



THE SHERMAN T. BLAKE CO. 

431-A Sacramento Street, 

San Francisco, Cal. 

Sole Agents West of the 
Rocky Mountains 



J. * 



* 4- 



Mention The ReTlew when yon write. 



farmer; it being sufficient that the seeds- 
man be entitled to claim the grain sold 
as seeds and "furnish" it for the grow- 
ing of the crop against which a lien is 

asserted. S. 

■ — i 

IMPORTS FROM HOLLAND. 

Considerable quantities of seeds are 
arriving from Holland, but imports of 
bulbs and plants at present are negli- 
gible. The following consignments of 
trade commodities were on the Ryndam, 
which reached New York January 24: 

T Xle.adows & Co., 1 case seeds. 

Vandegrift & Co., 19 packages seeds; 7 cases 
plants. 

K. F. Downing & Co.. 1.") bags seeds. 

R. ,T. Moon & Co., 22 packages seeds. 

•T. M. Thorburn & Co., 21 bags seeds; 11 cases 
bulbs. 

Ueddin & Martin. 23 bags seeds. 

N. & W. Dispatcli,- 38 bags seeds. 

F. II. narrow. C bags seeds. 

E. J. Bauer, 59 packages seeds. 

P. Henderson & Co., IT bags seeds. 

Tice & I.yncli, .S7 bags seeds. 

Kennedy & Moon. lH bags seeds. 

American Express Co., ".">" bags seeds; 52 cases 
plants; 23 cases bulbs. 

American Shipping Co., 20 bids, seeds. 

(). (1. Hempstead & Son. 40 bbls. seeds. 

O. II. Wyman & Co., 43 packages seeds. 

O. W. Sheldon & Co., 41 bags seeds. 

Vaughan's Seed Store, 13 bags seeds. 

P. Ouwerkerk, 24 cases plants. 

Richards & Co.. 2 cases trees. 

R. F. Lang, 4 cases plants; 3 cases lily pips. 

P. t". Kuyper & Co., 60 cases shrubs; 30 cases 
bulbs: 2 cases trees. 

J. W. Hampton, Jr., & Co., 12 cases bulbs. 



.McIIutchison & Co., 56 packages trees. 

M. Van Waveren & Sons, 36 cases bulbs; 21 
cases plants. 

T. Cogger. C cases lily pips. 

Maltus & Ware, 42 cases roots; 20 cases trees; 
17 eases bulbs; 126 cases plants. 



MOTT-LY GLEANINGS. 

Manager Harry Holmes, of the 
IIolmes-Letherman Seed Co., Canton, 0., 
tells me that his house has secured laud 
in Montana for the purpose of seed 
growing. "Our experience iu Idaho is 
most satisfactory, ' ' said Mr. Holmes, 
"and with our home farm of 160 acres 
it will give us the opportunity we need 
to grow and try out stoclis before dis- 
tributing seeds to our patrons. Of a 
supply of Golden Wax beans purchased 
from three growers, two lots proved true 
to type, the third developed runners. 
It has become necessary to raise as 
much of our own seed as we possibly 
can. Wc have engaged J. J. Garland, 
of the University of Wisconsin, to lake 
charge of the home farm." A fine lot 
of Stowell's Evergreen and Golden Ban- 
tam sweet corn was noted. 

The Van Gorder-Hapgood Seed Co., of 
Warren, O., is installing a complete set 
of seed fixtures, to enable the force to 
better handle the steadily increasing 
trade. 



The management of the Moody Seed 
Store, of Youngstown, O., says it beats 
all how the aliens of its large clientele 
surpass the natives in producing the 
best vegetables seen in town. The for- 
eigners are critical seed buyers. 

The Livingston Seed Co., of Colum 
bus, O., reports a good call for seed for 
early sowing. The retail store is ad- 
vertising seeds and feeds for wild birds, 
and is making good sales, in addition t'l 
ireating considerable interest. Manage;" 
Sherry predicts a banner season and i-- 
preparing for it. W. M. 

CATALOGUES RECEIVED. 

Northrup, King & Co., Minneapolis, Minn.- 
Thirty-third annual catalogue of "Sterling" 
seeds, plants, bulbs, tools, nursery stock an i 
supplies; a notably comprehensive "book of 16' 
well illustrated pages, in a tasteful, distinctive 
cover. At the beginning is an explanation of 
tlie purposes of the firm's seven brands or trade- 
marks, which, it is said, "are not merely namo-i 
and symbols, but represent real standards of 
quality." On accoinit of the extraordinary mar 
ket fluctuations, prices are not quoted on som ' 
items, especially in clover and millet, but en- 
closed with the catalogue is a "Red Flgnr' 
Price List," which "supplements and supersedes 
the prices in the catalogue on all grass and fiel 1 
seeds and poultry feeds." The cental systei ' 
generally is used, though some items are priced 
both by pound and bushel. 

Burton Seed Co., Denver. Colo. — "Burton •< 
1917 Seed Book," offering seeds, bulbs, plants 
and sundries; eighty-four pages, illustrated, and 
cover. "Never were good seeds so scarce." sa.v-i 
the company; "it is not so mucli a question <f 



1 




Fbbuuaky 1, 1917. 



The Florists' Review 



83 




Seasonable Bulbs, Fancy Caladiums, Tuberous Begonias, Gloxinias 



Tuberous Begonias and Gloxinias 



We are pleased to state that our supply of these 
important Bulbs which we oflfer are of superior 

quality. They have been grown for us by the same Belgian expert and specialist who has been supplying us for more than a 

quarter of a century and with the quality of which our customers are familiar. 



YOU MAY BUY CHEAPER BUT NO BETTER STOCK 

Begonia, Single Varieties to Color 

Scarlet, Crimson, White, Rose, Yellow, Orange, 40c per dozen: 
$3.00 per 100; $25.00 per 1000. 

Begonia, Single Varieties in Choicest Mixture 

35c per dozen; $2.50 per 100; $22.50 per 1000. 
Begonia, Double Varieties to Color 

Scarlet, Eose, White and Yellow, 60c per dozen; $4.50 per 100; 
$40.00 per 1000. 

Begonia, Double Varieties in Choicest Mixture 

50c per dozen; $4.00 per 100; $35.00 per 1000. 
Begonia, Double Fringed Varieties (new) 

White, Scarlet and Eose, $1.50 per dozen; $10.00 per 100. 
Begonia Zeppelin 

$1.25 per dozen; $8.00 per 100; $70.00 per 1000. 
Begonia Lafayette 

$1.50 per dozen; $12.00 per 100. 

Begonia, Single Frilled 

Scarlet, White, Pink and Yellow, S5c per dozen, $(5.00 per 100. 
Gloxinia 

Blue, Bed, White, Blue with White Edge, Bed with White Edge, 
Spotted or Finest Mixture, 60c per dozen; $4.00 per 100; $35.00 
per 1000. 

FANCY LEAVED CALADIUMS. 

Largest stock and most extensive assortment of varieties. 

Dozen 100 1000 

Fine Standard Varieties $1.75 $12.00 $100.00 

Rare and New Varieties 2.25 15.00 140.00 

Rare New Varieties 3.50 25.00 

Choice Mixed Varieties 1.50 10.00 $90.00 

For a complete list of seasonable Seeds, Bulbs and Plants, see our 
Garden Book for 1917 and our Current Wholesale List just issued. If 
you have not received copies write us. 




New Double-Frineed Tuberous Beeonias 



HENRY A. DREER, 714 716 Chestnut St., PhOadelphia, Pa. 



-THE ABOVE PRICES ARE FOR THE TRADE ONLY 



Lily Bulbs 

Per case 

Ulium Giganteum, 7- 9 in.. .300 to case . .$16.00 

LUium Giganteum, it-io in.. 200 to case .. 19.00 

Formosa LUle«, black stem, 9-10 in.. 

■-'OO to case 19 00 

Lily of the Valley 

German Strain 

•''^•^ of 1000 $21.00 

ST. LOUIS SEED CO. 

411 Waghing ton Ave.. St. Loui s 

Always mention the Florists' Review 
when wrltlna: advertisers. 



OUR MOTTO: THE BEST THE MARKET AFFORDS 



Valley 



Orders taken now for 1917 crop 

of 
German— Swedish— Dutch Pips 



CHAS. SCHWAKE & CO., Inc., 90-92 W. Broadway, NEW YORK 



PANSY 

MY BEST MIXTURE 

Trade Packet. ...$1.00. Ounce $10.00 

N. B. FAXON, Seedsman, Foxborough, Mass. 




GIANT PANSY SEED 



Keriilwoitli Mixture 
Ki'iiilwoitli Cut Kldw.T Mixture 
• llatitTlirooandFivi'lJIotciiccl 
.M!>stcri)i«'Co, ciirlo'l wavy 
urn) sctMlg. 2.5c: 500(1, $1.00 
■t-07.., $1.2."); ()/.., Ht.DO 

Early I< lou crine or AVInter- 

bloominK Giant Pansion 

r)(H) Heeds, 25c: 1000,40c- 

'8-oz., $1.10; 'i-oz., 12.00 




84 



The Florists^ Review 



Fbbruary 1, 1917. 



SEASdtlABLE STOCK OF 



WORTH-WHILE 
DUALITY 



M 



13 



TUBEROUS BEGONIAS 

1st sizR Belfjiuni grown. Not to be 
compared with Dutch stock. 

Single while, pink, scarlet, yel- 
low, orange, bronze; per 100, 
$2.75; per 1000. $-_'5.00. 

Double white, pink, yellow 
scarlet; per 100, $4.00; 
1000, $;',5.00. 

Gloxinias, six sorts; per 
$4 00; per 1000. $.35.00. 

Begonia Doz. 

Count Zeppelin. .$1.L'5 $ 

Lafayette 1.50 

Frilled 1.50 



19 



MAKE US PROVE IT. 

We pay freight both ways if you 
don't agree with us. 

CANNAS Ey^e*5o?t. 

We are Western headauarters 

KING HUMBERT, the 

■•King" of all, orange- 100 1000 

scarlet, bronze foliage. .14.00 $;55.0O 

AlphoDse Bouvier, dark- 
crimson 225 20,00 

Austria, canary yellow , 1,90 17.00 

Etfandale, currant red, 

bronze leaf 2,25 20,00 

Chas. Henderson, 

bright crimson 2,(0 18.00 

David Harum, bronze 

foliage 2,50 22.00 

Florence Vaughan, yel- 
low spotted crimson ... 2.2,'> 20,00 

Hungaria, best pink .,. , 4.00 35,00 

Mme. Berat, pink 2,25 20.00 

25 at the 100 rate: 250 at the 1000 rale. 

I from 
Cold Storage 



Lily Bulbs 

We ask you to try 100 or more of 
our "specially graded" stock and 
compare them with the other fellows. 

Lilium Giganteum 

Per 100 

7 to 9-inch $ (>.00 

Per case of 300, $17.50. 

9 to 10-inch 9.00 

Allow us to ship you 100 or 
more every two weeks. We be- 
lieve you will find them profit- 
able. 

Lily of the Valley 

New Crop, Fancy 

Per case 

Case of 250 $ i>.50 

Case of 500 l'-'.50 

Dielytra 

(Bleeding Heart) 

Large clumps for forcing. 

Per case 
Case of 50 $5.00 

Chinese Sacred 
Lilies 

Mammoth bulbs, in good 
condition. They have been in 
cold storage. 
Per basket of :^0 bulbs, only $ 1 .CO 



and 
per 

100, 

100 

S.OO 
12.00 
10.00 



El 



WINTERSON'S 
SEED STORE 

166 N. Wabash Ave. Jft CHICAGO 



prloo as being ablo t(i secure them at all," This 
Is one of the few seed catalogues in which the 
cental system ot pricing secm.s to liave been 
fully adopted, 

George Hoist, Jr,, Landscape Gardener, Flush- 
ing, N. Y.- — A persuasive appeal, in the form of 
a well written, well illustrated brochure ot six- 
teen pages; not a catalogue in the ordinary sense 
of the word, as it quotes no prices, but it briefly 
describes some of the possibilities in landscape 
work and gives some suggestions in regard to the 
stock to be used, 

William Toole & Son, Raraboo, Wis.— An 8-page 
wholesale list of hardy perennials^ also pansy 
l)lants and seeds, with suggestions as to what 
perennials are best suited for c\it flowers. In- 
cluded is a selection ot fourteen varieties of 
peonies, 

Austin-Coleman Co., AVayland, O. — An attrac- 
tive 12-page catalogue of Elm Hill gladioli, 
luirdy chrysanthemums, dahlias and tuberous 
hcgonlas. In the first two or three pages are 
listed a number of gladioli originated by the 
company, several of them "now offered for 
the first time"; then follow some "leading pro- 
ductions of other growers." There are three 
illustrations, one of which shows Gladiolus 
Kvelyn Kirtland and the lUtle lady for whom 
the variety is named. 

L, E. Williams, Exeter, N. II. — A neat, blue- 
covered IG-page price list of collected native 
trees, shrubs and plants; tlie hard-wooded stock 
varies in measurement from large specimens to 
small sizes for lining up in tlie nursery, Mr. 
Williams also states that he makes a specialty 
of collecting native tree and plant seeds in 
different parts of the country, 

Geo. H. Mellen Co., Springfield, O. — Plants, 
bulhs, seeds, nursery stock and miscellaneous 
supplies; ninety-six freely illustrated pages, in 
a colored cover. Sixteen pages are devoted to 
roses, of which only own-root stock is offered. 
Among the specialties are "frost-proof" cabbage 
plants. 

Warnaar &.Co., Sassenheim, Holland. — A cata- 
logue of dahlias, mostly of the peony-flowered 
class and all raised hy II. llornsveld, the special- 
ist of Baarn, Holland. The booklet also contains 
a brief account of Mr, Ilornsveld's experimental 
work and there is a portrait of Mr, llornsveld on 
the cover. Colored pictures of two new dahlias 
are enclosed, 

A. E. Kunderd, Goshen, Ind. — A beautifully 
illustrated 40-page catalogue of gladioli of the 
Kunderdi type, with directions for culture and 
storage. "Tlie gladioli described in this cata- 
logue," says Mr. Kunderd, "are all of our own 
production and quite different, especially the 
ruffled varieties, from any otlier strains." A 
page is devoted to explaining "why we catalogue 
only our own productions." Among the varieties 
offered are seven of "an entirely new race, now 
first offered." 

G, H, Hunkel Co,, Milwaukee, Wis. — Whole- 
sale list of seeds, "for florists and market 
gardeners," a comprehensive though condensed 
catalogue, devoting about equal space to vege- 
table and flower seeds, witli offerings, also, of 
bulbs, insecticides, tools and sundries; sixteen 
pages. Illustrated, Attention is drawn to the 
scarcity of certain seeds, sucli as beans, sweet 
corn and spinach. 

Wm, Elliott & Sons, New York, N, Y. — A 
■H-page wholesale seed catalogue, "for the trade 
only." In ad<lition to seeds and bulbs, tlie lists 
loniprise large assortments of otlier lines of 
stock, such as tools, fertilizers and other horti- 
cultural reciuisites. Grass seeds are a specialty. 
The receipt of tliis company's general catalogue 
was announced in The R(?view of January 2'i. 

Werter Do Vaughn, Omalia, Neb. — Two seed 
catalogues, general and wholesale. The general 
catalogue is illustrated, contains 112 pages, be- 
sides the colored cover, and offers liulhs, plants, 
roses, nursery stock and a full line of supplies, 
as well as seeds. The wliolesale list is con- 
densed to sixteen pages and cover, in narrow 
jioeket form, and is devoted almost entirely to 
seeds. The cental system is followed in quoting 
Iiriees. Tree seeds are included. 

Farmer Seed & Nursery Co., Faribault, Minn. — 
A l)ook so closely packed with text, in spite of 
the illustrations, that its 1'2H pages contain lists 
of almost everything which is likely to be wanted 
in seeds, nursery stock or supplies. Grass and 
forage seeds are especially prominent and more 
tlian ordinary attention is given to mixtures for 
both lawn and pasture. "There will be many 
shortages in seed stocks this year," says the 
company. 

Milton Nursery Co., Milton, Ore.— General cata- 
logue of nurserv stock, roses, perennials and 
otlier plants; forty pages, illustrated, in a taste- 
ful cover. The nursery department comprises 
nut trees, as well as tlie usual lines of fruit- 
bearing and ornamental stock. Tlie rose list 
occupies ten pages. 

Schultz's Seed Store, Washington, D. C— An 
accurate, well printed catalogue of seeds, bulbs, 
roots, plants, tools and sundries; sixty-four 
pages and cover. The implements make a par- 
ticularlv good showing, occupying the greater 
part of "sixteen pages and including nearly every- 
■ thing from plows and horse rakes down to dibbles 
and hand weeders. 



Pittsburgh, Pa.— B. L. Elliott, of the 
John Bader Co., estimates the cost of 
doing business this season as having in- 
creased at least seventy-five per cent as 
compared with last season. 





HE BULB 
Agent's per- 
sistent effort, cou- 
pled with his var- 
ious excuses and 
reasons for plac- 
ing your order 
now at a high 
price, should in itself be rea- 
son enough for you, Mr. 
Florist, to ponder over. 

Frankly, does it not sound possible 
that there is something wrong some- 
where? 

Does it not look as if the Dutchmen 
are especially anxious to get all the 
business they can at a good, high 
figure ? 

Well, never mind the market. If it 
goes down, do you get the benefit of 
a lower price? If it rises, will you 
get what you contracted for? It 
does not matter which way it may 
go — the auction houses, department 
and 10-cent stores will still get 
good stock at a low figure, while 
you are buying early and paying 
their price. 

Now, Mr. Florist, are you ready to 
place your order at advanced fig- 
ures, when there is lime from now 
until November 1 for buying of 
Dutch bulbs? 



PETER PEARSON 

Seedsman and Florist 

5732-5752 Gunnison St., 
CHICAGO 





Mention The Review when you write. 

ii M iii i i wiiiii iiiniinniiMiiBni ini iii iffl i in iiit yMM 

VEGETABLES AND 
FRUITS DEPARTMENT 

■iiiiniiiiiiH 

TOMATOES FRUIT POOELY. 

I am growing some tomatoes undei 
glass and they are not doing well. Th( 
plants have made good growth and the 
foliage looks well, but the blooms arc 
constantly dropping off and they arc 
setting but few fruits. We are growing 
Stirling Castle, Comet and Livingston 'f^ 



Fkbuuary 1, 1917. 



The Florists' Review 



85 




View of Fruit Setting and Plant Habit of BEST YET. 



NOW READY 

FORCING TOMATO 

Qoetz's BEST YET 

We especially recommend this new 
forcer as the best yet introduced. 
For forcing under glass it has no 
equal; as a producer it stands alone 
at the top of the forcing list. The 
fruit is smooth, large, bright red. 
Ripens ail over at once; an ex- 
tremely early setter. The skin is 
firm, but still thin, making it an 
ideal shipper. Goetz's BEST YET 
is offered to all who desire some- 
thing especially choice for green- 
house forcing. The success with 
BEST YET as a forcer with the 
greenhousemen will be most aston- 
ishing. 

Seed Stock Limited 
True and original stock — trade 
pkt. of 100 seeds, $1.00; (> pkts., 
$5.00, postpaid. 



Strong Transplanted Seedlings, $1.00 per dozen; $6.00 per lOO; $50.00 per lOOO. Cultural circular with order 



J. B. QOETZ SONS, Introducers, 



SAGINAW, MICH. 




SNAPDRAGON 

Prepare early for bedding out stock. By sowing seed 
of Snapdragon now you can have plants nicely in bloom in 
bands and pots for spring sales. We have all of the good 
ones and offer seed as follows: 

Our famous Silver Pink, $1.00 per pkt.; 
3 for $2.50; 7 for $5.00. Seed of White, 
Yellow^, Light Pink, Garnet and Nelrose, 
36c per pkt.; 3 for $1.00. All orders cash. 

Free cultural directions. 

See our display ad of square paper pots and dirt bands, 
the proper articles for the growing of all small plants. 

G. S. RAMSBURG 

Somersworth, N. H. 



J^iirple Globe. Stirling Castle an<l 
(oniet are doing better than Living- 
ston s Purple Globe. Our day tempera- 
ture ranges from 70 to 75 degrees and the 
mght teinperature from 65 to 70 de- 
crees. The plants were watered about 

Wr"^ ^''""^^ ^"^ ^<^^'^ gi^'cn a little liquid 
lertilizer about once a week, consisting 
or Jiquid cow manure in a mild form. 
1 lie house^ is well ventilated each dav. 
1, ! T^'' fertilized the blooms by shak- 
mVv ^\'?"*'- ^"y information you 
P nL '^ ^ ^ ^"^ 8ive me will be apprc- 
'^^*^''- J. E. F.— O. 

win^'l """'^ Stirling Castle arc good 
^nter tomatoes. Livingston's Purple 
t, ro t\'-*^^' a'^apted for outdoor cul- 
vnnr^r . ^^^ principal reasons why 
tW J w*! '''■° '^^^"g so poorly are, first, 
the night temperature is excessive; sec- 



ond, the plants are being overwatcrcd; 
third, you are overfeeding them. In 
addition, they probably are growing in 
solid beds and have an almost unlimited 
root run. A suitable night temperature 
for tomatoes in winter is GO to 62 de- 
grees. They prefer a dry atmosphere; 
they should have a good drying out be- 
tween waterings. In solid beds, with a 
big root run, fruit will not set satisfac- 
torily during midwinter. If in benches 
with a limited root run, where rampant 
growth can be restricted, a good set can 
be assured, provided artificial pollina- 
tion is practiced. 

You should not have applied liquid 
manure at this season. The plants can- 
not need it. A little given when the 
crop was well set would have been of 
benefit, but earlier it would be more 
likely to be harmful. Remove all the 



laterals and shorten back the leaves, 
which help to keep the sunshine from 
the branches. Plants in solid beds are 
all right when the sun is higher in the 
heavens, but they are at best an uncer- 
tain crop in midwinter unless the roots 
can be restricted. • C. \V. 



Houghton, Mich.— Alfred W. York, 
manager of the Lakeside Floral Co. for 
the last ten years, and Stephen Pana- 
suk, foreman at the Lakeside green- 
houses, have formed a partnership un- 
der the name of York & Panasuk. The 
new firm has purchased the stock of the 
Chassell, Mich., range and the fixtures 
and stock of the Lakeside Floral Co. 
stores at Calumet, Houghton and Lau- 
rium. The greenhouses and the store 
buildings have been leased. 



86 



The Florists' Review 



FBBnUARY 1, 1917. 



^ *^^^^s^^sm^sm^<^^s^^.^^^.i»%.im^?^<m^.<^^J^t^j^^s^^:^r^-^^ 



Pacific Coast Department 



^ 



^•^<*^.'<^.'i»^.<<^.'»^.<<J^.^#^.'#j^.;»j^<;»^.(^^.<;^j^.;#^.i;»^;'yr#^-^^-^r»>'4i^ 



Eureka, Cal.— C. W. Ward has been 
in bed for ten days with an attack of 
asthmatic grip. 



LOS ANGELES. 



The Market. 



Another cold week and a week of 
good business has come to pass, though 
stock is still so scarce that wholesalers 
have had to turn down many local as 
well as shipping orders. It is the gen- 
eral opinion that there never has been 
so much cold weather. The glass has 
read lower on many previous occasions, 
but never for so long a period. All out- 
door stock is at a standstill, and also 
even that under glass. Despite the 
large amount of oil burned, neither car- 
nations nor roses open freely. "Without 
some help from the north, roses would 
have been extremely scarce during the 
last ten days, and even with this north- 
ern supply wholesalers have not been 
able to fill orders. 

The call for good stock for parties 
and decorations has been excellent, be- 
sides which there has been a large de- 
mand for funeral work, which has kept 
the cheaper stock under. Violets dur- 
ing the heavy rains were poor .ind 
scentless, but now are improving every 
day. Stock has been shipped as far as 
Minneapolis from this jnarket, but, 
while the flowers arrived in good con- 
dition, their fragrance on arrival must 
have been poor. Bulbous stock comes in 
slowly and it will be another week or 
ten (lays before there are really good 
daffodils on the market. Stocks, corn- 
flowers and marigolds are the best of 
the cheaper flowers. Easter lilies are 
coming in rapidly, both cut and in pots. 
Callas arrive slowly on account of the 
cold. Plumosus is extremely scarce 
and likely to be for some time yet. The 
usual quantity of brake and huckle- 
berry is coming in, but maidenhair 
ferns are short in supply. Pot plants 
are more plentiful. 

Various Notes. 

Arthur Oleave, of Gleave's Flower 
Shop, Santa Barbara, was in town this 
week Inning stock. He says that busi- 
ness has hocn rtMuarkably good all 
through the season so far, while during 
the holidays it was a great rush. This 
shows what careful attention to details 
and a thorough knowledge of the busi- 
ness will do, for it should be-<^emenibered 
that Mr. Gleave has only been in busi- 
ness a little over a year. 

C. C. Wooden, formerly connected 
with the trade here, has obtained the 
lease and fixtures of tlie Abbey Flower 
Shop, at Eighth and Figueroa streets, 
the late proprietors of which seem to 
have vanished. 

Martin Reukauf, representing H. 
Bayersdorfcr & Co., of Fhiladelphia, and 
F. W. Treadup, representing the A. L. 
Randall Co., of Chicago, are calling on 
the trade here this week. 

Boyle & Darnaud, of San Diego, write 
that business is exceptionally good now 
and that they are adding another large 
new greenhouse. 

Frank Lichtenberg reports business 
fine. 



J. W. Wolters has had several large 
decorations of late that have used up 
large quantities of good stock. Big 
fronds of tree ferns, long sprays of 
heather and acacia were used in one 
decoration with good effect. 

Bernard Tassano, of the Santa Cruz 
Evergreen Co., who has returned from 
a trip to the north, reports doing a fine 
business, even as far ahead as July. 
These young men, Bernard and N. Gon- 
dolfa, have worked up a nice business 
in a short time. They get on well to- 
gether and their cheerfulness at all 
times helps to make them many friends. 

The Broadway Florist reports good 
business, but like everyone else, says 
it is difficult to get enough stock. Jack 
d 'Ortense is now with the firm. 



Walter Garbett, recently connected 
with the California Cut Flower & Ever- 
green Co., is now with Tassano Bros. 

W. Snyders, representing S. Murata 
& Co., has returned from a successful 
northern trip. 

The California Cut Flower & Ever- 
green Co. is improving its store by the 
addition of a mezzanine floor. 

Fred Sperry, manager of the L. A. 
Floral Co., continues to receive encour- 
aging letters regarding the excellence of 
the stock shipped and the careful meth- 
ods of packing. 

S. Murata & Co. are getting settled 
in their new quarters and report ship- 
ping business as being in excess of the 
average for this season, despite the 
scarcitv of stock. 



^(Illllllllllllllilllllilllilllllllllllllllillllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllillllllllllllllllllllllll>£ 

I L. A. FLORAL CO. f 

= FRED SPERRY, Mgr. = 

i HOUSE OF QUALITY AND SERVICE I 



LARGE CUTS OF- 



Lilies — Freesias — Daffodils 
Roses — Carnations — Violets 
Novelties and Greens of all kinds 



I 407 So. Los Angeles Street, LOS ANGELES, CAL. | 

= LONG DISTANCE SHIPPING OUR SPECIALTY | 

^illlilllllllilllllililliilillllllillililllilillillliliiillililllllllllllllliilllliliiillllililllliillllll^ 

Mention The Review when yon write. 

VIOLETS = CARNATIONS 



ROSES 



And Other Seasonable 
CUT PLOWERS 



GREENS 



ASK FOR SPECIAL QUOTATION 



DOMOTO BROS. "To'^l^f 

Nurseries: 78th to 79th Aves., East Oakland, Cal. 

440 Bush Street - SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

Mention The ReTlew when yon write. 



POT HYACINTHS 

We now have ready to ship, Pot Hyacinths in 
assorted sizes and colors. Prices, 4-inch, at 15c 
to 2r)C; 5-inch, at 20c to 35c; 6-inch, at 50c to 
75c; 7-inch, at 60cto75c; 8-inch, at 75c to $1.00. 

WALTER ARNACOST & CO. 

Sawtelle, Cal. 



Mention The Beylew when yon write. 



Fbbruarx 1, 1917. 



The Florists' Review 



87 



SO. CAUFOKNIA FLOWER MARKET, Inc. 

CHICAGO OFFICE: 30 East Randolph Street 

Acacias Freesias Stocks Special Sale on Violets 

Double Calendulas Strawflowers 

string Asparagus—Sprengeri California Novelties 

Always Something New Direct From the Growers 

Main Office : 421-423 Wall Street, LOS ANGELES, CAL. 

LARGEST WHOLESALE FLORISTS IN THE WEST 



Mention The ReYleTr when yon write. 



Dl AIITC Stokesia Cyanea, blue and white. 
rLnR I u from soil, year old, $2.00 per 100 
Shasta Daisy, Alaska and California, strong di- 
visions, 12.50 per 100. Digitalis, extra strong, 
•2i«-inch, $3,oO per 100. 

QCpno Statice Sinuata Hybrida, mixed, yel- 
OLLUO low, purple, light shades, trade pkt,, 
26c; oz., 4Cc. Asters, Queen of the Market,mixed; 
Smith's Peerless, shell pink and white; Giant 
Late Branching, mixed; Extra Selected, mixed, 
trade pkt., 25c, 50c. Shasta Daisy. 26c, 50c pkts. 

HICKEY & MOLLIS, Seedsmen and Flarists 

130 Kentucky St. Petaluma, Cal. 

Mention The Rerlew when yon write. 

Germain Seed & Plant Co. 

Seeds, Nursery Stock, Ornamen- 
tal Plants, Poultry Supplies. 

326-28 30 S0. Main St.. LOS ANGELES, CAL 

Nurseries, MontebeUo 
Mention The ReTlew when yog write. 

CAUrORNIA CUT FLOWER 
and EVERGREEN CO. 

WHOLESALE FLORISTS AND SUPPLIES 

316 S. Broadway, LOS ANGELES, CAL. 

Phone Broadway 2369 

Me ntion The Review when you write. 

SAN FRANCISCO. 

The Market. 

An active demand and only moderate 
supplies of most varieties of flowers 
leaves practically no surplus of any 
jteni from day to dav. Sweet peas are 
incrcasirijr j-ather slowly in quantity, 
out the quality is good and the stock 
fontinues to be picked up as soon as it 
^PPff",'" tlic market. Carnations are 
a little Letter, but several of the grow- 
ers are not bringing in any at present, 
wlucli leaves tl.e supply as a whole 
rather short and all offerings clean up 
at good prices. 

w K^^!^^''^ situation is influenced large- 
Z ,1 T "'^^'^'^ shipping demand. Few 
"i tne Japanese growers are bringing 
in any roses and the large growers are 
whTil!"^; «"t a great deal of stock, 
tTr on "^^^.Tt-^'is up the local supply ma- 
terially.. p„^g ^f ^^^ j^^^^ retailers re- 

It-^L^ ''P\P^ ^°«««' ^ut in n^ost in- 
loZT f t^^^J^^nd they have a private 
source of supply and are not affected by 
Vinl«f\"^^ condition of the market, 
violets have been scarce, but plenty arc 



CARNATIONS ROSES 

EASTER LILIES 
DAFFODILS VIOLETS 

and everything else of the best in season. 
We control the entire Fischer output of 

PURITY FREESIAS 

Our flowers are the best on this market and are carefully packed for long distance shipping 

S. MURATA & CO. 

386 So. Los Ansreles Street LOS ANGELES, CAL. 

Oldest and most experienced shippers in Southern California 



Mention The R<Tlew when yon write. 



Santa Cruz Evergreen Co. 

WHOLESALE EVERGREENS 

Headquarters for the best Mexican Ivy on the coast. 
Hard and soft Brake. 



101 Winston Street, 



LOS ANGELES, CAL. 



Mention Tbe Review when yon write. 



Shamrock Seedlings 

True Irish Shamrock seedlings, ready 
to pot into 2-inch, $3.50 per 1000, 
postpaid. 

Ull I C UIIDOCDV Avon and Morton SU. 
nILLo NUnOtni I LOS ANGELES, CAL. 

Mention Tbe Berlew when yon write. 

RUDOLPH FISCHER 

SAN 6ABRIEL, CAL. 



Fr««sla 
Spsciallst 

Mention The ReTlew when yon write. 



expected from now on. Little actual 
damage was done by the frost. Most 
of the violet farms, it has been ascer- 
tained, felt only the heaviest freezes. 
The cold has held back the blooms for 
so long that they are ready to come 
out in profusion. Some members of the 
trade are of the opinion, however, that 
a little rain is needed to bring out an 
abundance of flowers. 

The demand still exceeds the supply 
of spring bulb stock, but this condition 



WHOLESALE PRICES 

Subject to Change. 
Beauties perdoz., 75c, $1.S0. $2.50. $4.00. $8.00 

Short Med. Look 

Hoosler Beauty per 100, $6.00 $9.00 $12.00 

Ophelia " 6.00 9.00 12.00 

Shawyer " 6.00 9.00 12.00 

Helen Taft " 6.00 9.00 12.00 

Richmond " 6.00 8.00 10.00 

KlUarney Brilliant " S.OO 8.00 10.00 

White Klllarney " 5.00 8.00 10.00 

KlUarney " 5.00 8.00 10.00 

CARNATIONS " 2.00 4.00 5.00 

Specially selected Roj^esof any variety, per 100, 15.00 

Spreotferl, Plumosus per bunch, .60 

Hardy Ferna per doz. bunches, 2.00 



Killer Floral Co. 



UTAH 



FARMINGTON. 

Mention TTie RctIcw when yon write. 

is not expected to prevail much longer, 
as several varieties will soon be in full 
crop. There is an excellent cut of free- 
sias and this large crop comes in nicely 
at this time, in view of the real need 
for flowers. Growers are making a 
good profit. Forced pot tulips and hya- 
cinths find a readv sale. The market 



88 



The Florists' Review 



February 1, 1917. 



IS well siqipliod with orchids, there be- 
ing sufficient ofl'erinp to fill all require- 
ments. Prices remain the same. Valley 
is a little more plentiful. Supplies of 
acacia and manzanita blooms, fruit blos- 
soms and pussy willow are increasing 
rapidly. 

Various Notes. 

The principal feature of an elaborate 
decoration arranged recently at the Na- 
tive Sons' hall by Pelicano, Rossi & Co. 
was a gold horn of plenty which stood 
about eighteen feet high. The column 
was garlanded with violets and the horn 
Avas treated spirally with violets and 
purple ribbon. Out of the horn pro- 
jected fifteen dozen American Beauty 
roses. About fifteen dozen bunches of 
fifty violets each were used. At the 
base of the column was a garden elToct 
of cinerarias. 

Ferrari Bros, are attaining consider- 
able importance as commercial orchid 
growers. They decided to go into this 
line more strongly some time ago and 
now are bringing in a nice cut. They 
also have a fine cut of tulips. 

It is understood that V. H. Forrest, 
until recently with MacRorie & Mc- 
Laren, intends to engage in the deco- 
ration business on his own account. 

The California Dahlia Growers' Asso- 
ciation will hold a meeting at the Palace 
hotel February 6. 

Albert O. Stein made a pall of sweet 
peas, the first of the season, for the fu- 
neral of Betty de Jong. • lie also made 
a pall of orchids and lily of the valley 
for a noted rabbi's funeral the same 
week. Mr. Stein reports numerous 
table decorations and an important wed- 
ding, so his force is winding up a busy 
January. 

The general ap]ioarance of the store 
of the Francis Floral Co., at Powell and 
Sutter streets, has been greatly im- 
proved by the thorough renovation it 
has just received. Under the new ar- 
rangement excellent display facilities 
arc provided for the company's own 
basket creations, which are its special- 
ty. Francis Schlotzhauer, the pro- 
])rietor, has just brought out a new line 
of novelties resembling in design and 
finisli work that was done in Italy many 
years ago. No two of these baskets are 
alike, and after being used as orna- 
mental containers for flowers, they make 
handsome fruit baskets, carcl trays, etc. 
Mr. Schlotzhauer says these novelties 
are popular witli tourists. 

Mrs. R. E. Darbee usually ships 
many violets for St. Valentine's day, 
but she is afraid stock will be scarce 
this year unless there should come a 
little rain and plenty of sunshine in the 
meanwhile. She has an order to supply 
the bou([uets of violets to be distrib- 
uted at the National Fruit Jobbers' con- 
vention at New Orleans by the Cali- 
fornia delegates. The practice of send- 
ing California flowers for distribution 
at conventions outside the state, she 
says, is rapidly gaining in favor and 
should be encouraged by the florists. 
Mrs. Darbee has just received a hand- 
some silver cup awarded for the l)Ost 
collection of chrysanthemums at the 
convention of the International Soil 
Products Co., in El Paso, Tex., also a 
number of ribbons from that exhibition, 
as well as from the recent state fair 
held at Dallas, Tex. These she is dis- 
playing prominently at her retail store 
on Hyde street, in conjunction with the 
five medals and other awards she re- 
ceived from the P. P. T. E. 

MacRorie & McLaren have been 




l^ua^n-ift. BABY RAMBLERS %tV 

This new class of miniature roses is raining: won- 
derfully in popularity, and most deservedly so. Their 
exceeding freedom and continuity of bloom is unsur- 
passed in any other bedding or border plant. Their 
possibilities are worth your attention and consideration. 
A Few of tlie Best: 



Echo 

Phyllis 

Ema Teschendorff 

Jessie 



Orleans Mrs. Taft 

Ellen Poulsen Jeanne d'Arc 

Baby Dorothy Maman Turbat 

Baby Elegance Geo. Elger 

BABY DOLL 

The most rapturously and strikingly beautiful little 
rose ever introduced. The color is absolutely new and 
startling in its biilliancy- golden yellow, tipped with 
clear cerise. The little buds and open flowers are ele- 
gantly finished and of most perfect form. Habit of the 
very best, strong and compact; freedom of bloom is 
remarkable and continuous throughout the entire sea- 
son. We have given it a fair and thorough trial and 
have no hesitancy in offering it as the one best selling 
rose you ever handled. It is a money-maker. 

Also special prices on all commerial varieties of 
Hybrid Teas. 

Catalogue on request. 

HENRY W. TURNER.Whoiisaie Florist. Montebello, Cal. 



Mention The Review when you write. 



WE ARE THE LARGEST GROWERS OF 

ROSES-PORTLAND ROSES 

Superior Quality— Choice Varieties— Sell better, grow better. 
Ask for catalogue— Place your order now. 

MOUNTAIN VIEW FLORAL CO., PORTLAND, OREGON 

Mention The Review when you write. 



STEELE'S PANSY GARDENS 

PORTLAND, OREGON 

Superb MastoSon Private Stock Seedlings, per 
1000, $4.00; extra large, coming into bud, per 
1000, $5.00: transDlanted. many in bud, extra 
fine, per 100, $1.00; per 600, $4,50; per 1000. $8.00. 

SEED 

Mastodon Mixed. ^4 oz., $1.25; oz., $4.00; 4 ozs., 

Jfl'2.t0. 
Private Stock, mixed, ^ oz., $1.00; oz., $6.00; 

4 ozs., $20.00. 
Greenhouse Special, ^e oz„ $1.0C': oz., $8.00. 
Catalogue. 
Mention The Review when yon write. 

BOSTON FERNS 

Boston Ferns. 2-in,, strong, 100,11.00; 1000, IJ6.00 

Boston Ferns. 3-in.. strong per 100, 7.50 

Whitmani Ferns, 2-in„ strong per 100, 5.00 

Boston and Roosevelt, 6-in per doz,, 6.00 

Boston and Roosevelt. 7-in per doz., 9.00 

Whitmani, 6-in per doz.. 6.00 

Cyclamen, 4 in per 100. 15.00 

Cash with order, please. 

H. HAYASHI & CO. 

2Sn 78d Avenue, ELMHURST, CAL. 

Mention The ReTlew when yon write. 

CARNATION ROOTED CUTTINGS 



Per 1000 

Beacon S.'o.oo 

Victory 20.' 

Chanii Ion 2.'i TO 

K. P. Enchantress... 20.00 
Phlladelplila 20.00 



Per 1000 

Alice $25 00 

Kncliantregg 20.00 

Wh. Knclmntress 20.(0 
Wh. Wonder .... 25.00 
Matchless 25.00 



Cash with Order 

STUBER & RICHARDSON 
4852 Holly St., Seattle, Wash. 

Mention Tlie Review when yon write. 

Amncaria BidwilHI, 2-ln. pots, 1 ft. hfirh $14 00 
per 100. 4-ln. pots, IHi ft. hljfh, $25.00 per 100. 

Erica Melanthera, rooted cuttlnps, 1 year old 
never ' ffered before, $50.00 |)er 1000- not less than 
1000 sold. 

KHca Melantliem, 2-ln. pots, 2 years old, $14.00 
per 100. 4-ln. pots, 2 years old, $25.00 per 100. 

Larper stock on application. 

PACIFIC NURSERIES, Colma, San Nateo. Cal. 

Mention The Review when you write. 

STAIGER A FINCKEN 

1869 Well WMhlBf ton 8t., LOS ANeSLES, CIL. 

Kentlas, fine stock. In all sizes, at bargain rates. 

Write for prices. 

Mention The Review when you wri te. 

aw.ardod the contract for decorating the 
Civic Center auditorium for the automo- 
bile show to be held February 10. In 



FERNS 

100,000 READY NOW 

IN FLATS 



Best varieties for Fern dishes 
$1.50 per 100 

Write for Wholesale Catalogue of Ferns, 
Kenlias, etc., to 



H. PLATH 

"THE FERNERIES" 

Lawrence and Winnipeg Avenues 
SAN PRANCISCO, CAL 



RED POTS 



Honestly made. Standard in 
size. Unexcelled In quality. 
„ Nothlnirbutthebestniaterlals 

used. The Pots you will eventually buy. We carry 
the largrest stcx-k In the west. 

All Sizes of Standard Pots. Azalea and Fern Pots. 

Bulb and Seed Pang. Fern Dishes, Saucers. Etc. 

Special Prices on Carload Lots. 

GARDEN CITY POTTERY CO., Inc. 

Pottery and Office: San Jose, Cal. 

Warehouse: 129 2d Street, Oakland, Cal. 

Mention The Reylew when you wr ite. 

Primnia Obconlca Gisrantea. strong, ready 
for shift: 3-ln., $:i.0U per 100; 2.1n., $150 per 100. 

Pelargoniums, strong, 214-ln., standard varieties, 
mixed only, $:i.00 per 100. 

Samples of above stock will he sent H|)on request. 
600 Karly Frost stock plants, best early white 
mum, full of cuttings, $7.00 per 100. LUt of stan- 
dard varieties on application. 
Above stock Is all quality. Satisfaction sruaranteed. 

H. L. OLSSON 
Wholesale Florist, 11 Post St.. Spokane, Wash, 
Mention The Review when you write. 

CARNATIONS 

Bnj of th« grower and sare intermediate 
profits. We are ■peciallsts and sblp eTery- 
wnere. 

GKO. WATSON 

2861 Dobinaon St. Log Angeles. Cal. 

Greenhnuees at Covina Junction. 

Mention The Review when you write. 



'M 



r^ 



Febrdart 1, 1917. 



The Florists'' Review 



89 



California Grown Bulbs 

CONTRACT NOW 

Preesia Purity 

Calla Aethiopica 

Paper White 
Emperor Daffodil 

Amaryllis Belladonna 

C. KOOYMAN 

431 Bush Street SAN rRANClSCO, CAL. 

Mention The ReTlciT when yon write. 

BULBS, CAUFORNIA-GROWN 

Freesia Purity (true). Daffodils, Poeticus 
Narcissus, Gesneriana Tulips, Early-flowering 
(Baby) Gladiolus and others, Spanish Iris, 
Ixias, etc. Splendid quality. Best varieties. 
Prices reasonable. 

I get repeat orders for my bulbs, season after 
season, from well satisfied customers whom I 
have supplied in previous seasons. 

Write for Price List, 

C. EADEN LILLEY 

Whilttale Ftoriit ni Balb Brawar. SANTA CRUZ. CALIF. 
Mention Hw B«Ttow whea j tm writ*. 

ASTERS 

Send your order at once for' 1916 crop Aster 
seed. Quality the best yet. Florists every- 
where getting good results. 

"THE HOMK OF A8TKRS" 

HERBERT & FLEISHAUER 

MoMINNVILLE, OREGON 

Mention Tlie R»t1>w wh«« yow writ*. 

Gladioli, Young Stock 

America, Francis King, Augusta, Principine, 

Baron Hulot. Peace, Panama, Golden 
King, Mrs. Pendleton. Also baby Glads. 

Get our pricas. 

CURRIER BULB CO., Seabright, Cal. 

Mention The ReTlew when yon write. 

Rooted Carnation Cuttings 

Per 100 lOOO 

.ncliiintit'ss $•_) 00 $-.>o.OO 

\Miilo Kiicliaiitie.ss -i.Od 20. (H) 

^'''''' -.'.(Ht •Itt.m 

( .oririMiiis .J 51, ._.,-,,„, 

\\hiU- W.ind.M- -2.5(1 .25, no 

-^spaiiiKus I'luiiiosus, -iVi-incli pi'ts. ... ;i,(J(l :iO.(KJ 

KRAMER BROS. 

ONTAIilO, CAI.IKORM A 

Mention The Review when you write. 

beautifying the place $10,000 is to be 
spent and the floral decoration is to be 
an important item. 

Mr. Suzuki, of the Yokohaina Nur- 
sery Co., passed through San Francisco 

[Continued on page 144.1 

PORTLAND, ORE. 

The Market. 

Business has been better than usual 
tor the period following the holidays, 
ilie improvement consists in an in- 
^'I'oased daily demand, which so far has 
'icon steady. Excellent winter weather 
nay account for part of the increase, 
,7 most of it comes from a general 
we r'T"* ifi business conditions. Last 

eek, tor the graduating exercises in 
T'le I'ubhc schools, large quantities of 

nnff"v,''''''"° "^^'l ^y *^« girl graduates. 

finodils, ro.ses, carnations and bulbous 
iiowers were used as arm bouquets and 

orsages Several classes expecting to 
"■^e violets were disappointed, as the 



CUTTINGS 

Carnations Carnations 

As Carnation lovers well know, I have always had a penchant for growing 

fancy Carnations and am 

At It Again 

in a small way, but the quality we are growing at Eureka, California, is 

BETTER THAN EVER 

Only a few varieties to offer, but these are all right with us. 

Matchless (Ward).. $3.00 per 100; $25.00 per 1000 

Mrs. C.W.Ward (Ward) 3.00 per 100: 25.00 per 1000 

Alice' (Fisher) 3.00 per 100: 25.00 per 1000 

Belle Washburn (Bassett & Washburn) 6.00 per 100: 50.00 per 1000 

NOVELTY FOR 1917 DELIVERY 

Cottage Maid ( Ward ) $12.00 per 100: $100.00 per 1000 

Beautiful sport of Mrs, C. W. Waid, rivaling Pink Sensation in size and more 
brilliant in color. 

NOVELTY FOR 1918 DELIVERY 

Crystal White (Ward) $12.00 per 100: $100.00 per 1000 

As it grows with us at Eureka, Crystal White is all one can desire for a Pancy 
White Carnation. The color is there, the stem is there, the size is there, ilie sub- 
stance is llieie, the fragrance (pure, strong Clove) is there, the vigor of growth, 
blooming, keeping and shipping Qualities are all there and it is 

PURE WHITE 

Advance orders will be booked for 1918 delivery. Send your orders early— Pacific 
Coast stock is limited. 

We solicit orders from points west of Chicago only. Eastern territory can be 
better served from our Queens Carnation Houses. 

Address orders to 

Cottage Gardens Nurseries, Inc. 

*^=^^^cTridl^n^^'' Eureka, California 



Mention The Revlfcw 



GLADIOLUS AMERICA 

l>2-lnch....$8.00 114-Inch.... $6.00 l-lneh....$4.00 

GLADIOLUS MRS. FRANCIS KING 

liij-lnch.... $12.00 114-Inch.... $8.00 1-lnch. . . .$6.00 

CALLA ELLIOTTIANA 

A. florists' novelty that pays, 
$1.80 per doien; $12.50 per 100. 

Los Robles Nursery and Garden 
Santa Cruz, California 

ANT. C. ZVOLANEK 

SWEET PEA RANCH 

OrifiTinator of Over Seventy-five Varieties of 
Winter-Flowerinir Orchid Sweet Peas. 

See my Classified Ad. under Seeds. 

Mention The BgTlew when j<m write. 

Asparagus Sprengeri Seed 

1917 Crop, ready now, 75c per 1000 

Write for prices in Quantity. 

HARRY BAILEY 

R. F. D. 6. LOS ANGELES. CAL. 

Mention Tha Ttsrivw when yon writa. 

local supply was short and few could be 
obtained from (California. 

Midwinter prices on cut stock 'lave 
been slightly stiffer than usual — carna- 
tions, 75 cents to $1; roses, $1.50 and 
up. Tulips, freesias, daffodils, Paper 
Whites and Eomans are fairly plentiful, 
but often the supply does not meet the 
demand. Valley is seldom seen. Orchids 
are in sufficient supply. Roses are 
scarce. Carnations are cleaned up daily, 
with freque'nt shortages. 

Tulips, cinerarias, daffodils, prim- 
roses, azaleas and cj-clamens are the 



I 



when yon write. 

ROOTED CARNATION CUTTINGS 

Per 100 1000 

White Enchantress |2.25 120.00 

Light Pinic Enchantress 2.25 20.00 

Alice 2.25 '20.00 

Mrs. C. W. Ward 2.25 20.00 

Belle Washburn 5.00 45.00 

Aviator 5.00 4^ 00 

25 of a variety at 100 rates. 250 at 1000 rates 

CARNATION PLANTS 

From 214-inch pots. Now ready. 

White Enchantress Per 100, $3.00 

Light Pink Enchantress Per 100. 3.00 

Rose-pink Enchantress Per 1 00, 3.00 

Alice Per 100, 3.00 

Mrs. C. W. Ward Per 100. 3.00 

Belle Washburn Per 100. 5.00 

Aviator Per 100, 5.00 

25 of a variety at 100 rates 

BASSETT'S FLORAL GARDENS. LOONIS, CAL. 

H. S. BASSETT, Prop. 

Mention The Review when you write. 

CYCLAMEN 

■nKllah-BTOTen Seed, 5 named varieties, 
from 4-inch pots, assorted. $15.00 per 100, $2 00 
per dozen. 

Primula Obconica, mixed colors. 4-inch, 
$10.00 per 100. 

Cash, please. 

■ nCD GROIICi santa' rosa. cal. 

Mention The ReTlew when yon write. 

PALMS PALMS t 

Palms aro onr specialty. Kentla, Oocoe < 
plomosa, Phoenlx,Wa8hln(rtonUt, SeaforUila* O 
Corypba, etc., by tho carloads. 

Ask for our wholesale Illustrated palm Ust. 9 

EXOTIC NURSERIES i 

Santn Barbara, Cal. & 

Mention The Review when yon write. 

chief varieties of potted blooming 
plants. 

Easter lilies, calla lilies and a lew 
late Maud Dean mums arc the only 



90 



The Florists' Review 



February 1, 1917, 



large flowers shown. There have been 
a great number of funerals, perhaps 
more than usual, and floral tokens have 
been used to a greater extent than they 
have been for several years. 

Various Notes. 

The Tonseth Floral Co. has arranged 
to keep permanently the premises it 
used for the holidays and the partition 
has been removed, doubling the space 
occupied previously. A better oppor- 
tunity for display and more room for 
customers is gained by the change. 

Martin & Forbes Co. is cutting a fine 
lot of orchids. 

Rahn & Herbert Co. is cutting some 
calendulas, flowers not often seen on 
this market in midwinter. 

Clarke Bros., A. F. Lalane, S. G. Lub- 
liner, E. R. Chappell and Niklas & Son, 
proprietors of the five flower stores on 
Morrison street, all report business good. 
The five stores are all in the downtown 
district, between Fourth and Eleventh 
streets. 

The nurserymen are busy lifting and 
shipping stock. J. B. Pilkington re- 
ports a satisfactory business so far this 
season. S. W. "W. 



SPOKANE, WASH. 



The Market. 



The rush of business which continued 
during tlio weeks following the holi- 
days now is showing a tendency to re- 
lax a little. Business, however, is still 
good and about as much as can 
be easily and conveniently handled. 
Stock is not plentiful and the quality is 
just ordinary. Home-grown roses are 
practically out of the market, but good 
stock is being received from eastern 
sources. The shipped-in stock has good 
keeping qualities; in many cases it is 
in the carriers' hands from fifty to 
seventy-two hours. Carnations are of 
fair quality and in supply hardly equal 
to demand. Bulbous stock is fair but 
scarce, Golden Spurs, Paper Whites and 
freesias being about the only items of- 
fered. The delay in bulb shipments 
last year is responsible for the stock's 
late appearance. 

Various Notes. 

Bornson & Halle are cutting good 
sweet peas with stems from sixteen to 
twenty-four inches long. Stems over 
twenty inches are common with this 
firm. They are trying out Carnation 
Aviator this year and speak highly of 
it. Tliey are propagating this variety 
heavily and intend to plant it exten- 
sively another year. 

Donart & Stapleton report business 
good, so good that Mr. Donart is prac- 
tically quitting the production of cu- 
cumliors and tomatoes nt his vegetable 
range and is devoting the space to flow- 
ers, to supply the retail store trade. 
He is contemplating the erection of 
another range of houses just outside 
the city of Coeur d 'Aleno, Idaho. 

A call at the store of the Spokane 
Florist Co. found the force busy. The 
windows wore bright with genistas, 
jonquils and yellow tulips. 

Superintendent of Parks .Tohn W. 
Duncan was the principal speaker at 
the annual banquet of the Spokane 
Robert Burns Society. Mr. Duncan, a 
Scotchman and a great admirer of the 
Scotch poet, was well qualified to per- 
form the task asked of him. 

L. B. n. 



LMIIIllllllllllllllllllllllllllillllllllllllllilllilllllllililllllllllillllllllHlill""""""""""!^ 

I BEVERLY HILLS NURSERIES | 

i Carolina Poplar 8 to 10 feet ^^'^ ^^"^ }?2. = 

= Ligustrum Ibota, extra heavy 4 to 6 feet 10.00 per 100 - 

= Acer Wieri laciniatum 8 to 10 feet 20.00 per 100 = 

= Acer Wieri laciniatum 12 to 14 feet 35.00 per 100 = 

= American Elm 8 to 10 feet 10.00 per 100 - 

= Acer negundo 6 to 8 feet 8.00 per 100 = 

= Cotoneaster frigida, heavy 4 to (> feet 30.00 per 100 = 

i BEVERLY HILLS, CALIFORHIA | 

ft iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiilllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll Illllillllllllllllllli: 

Mention Tlie Review when you write. 



CARNATIONS, Rooted Cuttings 



1000 
$20.00 
20.00 
20.00 
20.00 
20.00 
20.00 
20.00 



•26.00 
16.00 
15.00 
16.00 
16.00 



Healthy stock and true to name. 

Per 100 

Enchantress, light pink $2.2.') 

Enchantress, white 2.26 

Enchantress, rose-pink 2.25 

Herald, red 2.26 

Victory, scarlet 2.25 

Philadelphia, rose-pink 2.25 

Mrs. C. W. Ward, dark pink 2.'25 

OUTDOOR VARIETIES 

H. W. Turner. Jr 2.75 

Fair Maid, white 3 .75 

Fair Maid, pink 1.75 

Dr. Choate, red 1.75 

Roosevelt, crimson 1.75 

POLDER BROS., Wholesale Florists 

Montebello, Cal. 
P. O. Address, R. R. No. 6, Los Angeles, Cal. 

M»iiMoii Th« ReTtew when yon writ*. 

ONCIDIUM 

(.lusl received direct from Brazil) 

All who fjrow Orchids should not fail 
to acquire these easy growing varieties. 

QiK'idiuni Varicosutii R perlOO, $f)5.00 

Oncidiuni Forbesii per dozen. 10.00 

Ont'idiuni CrispuTii per dozen, 10.00 

Oncldiuin Flexuosuni per dozen, 9,00 

J. A. CARBONE 

ORCHID GROWER 
2216 Fifth St., Berkeley, Cal. 

Mention The Review when yon writfe. 

Specialists in Specimen Stock 
for Landscape Work 

Hardy Rhododendrons, Azaleas, Boxwoods, 

Hollies and a complete line nf 

Coniferous Evergreens 

Write for prices 

Cottage Gardens Nurseries, Inc. 
Eureka, California 

Mention The Review when yon write. 

Woodland Park Floral Co. 

Wholesale Growers of 
Carnation and Chrysanthemum Cuttings. 

Write for Prices. 

WOODLAND PARK FLORAL CO. 

Telephone 814 SUMNKR. WASH. 

M—tloa Th» H*t1>w whw y— writs. 

ROSES 

Own Root. 1st grade, 8c: 2d Rradc, Be. 
Hush. Bridesmaid, Hon SUene, Ceclle Brunner, 
Catherine Merniet. Dr. Grill, Duchesse de Brabant, 
Gru89 an Tei>llt/., Ceneral .Tac, La France. Maman 
Cochet I'llrlch Brunner, Yellow Kalscrln. 

Climbers : Blue Kanibler, Ceclle Brunner, Dor- 
othy Perkins, Double Cheiokee, Glolro de Dijon. 
Pink Cherokee, K. M. Henriette, Tausendschon and 
others. . „, ,, 

KRED G. KHLK 
324 Sanborn Avo., San Jose, (ill. 

' Mention The Review when you write. 




5ic per Zone 

i. c— In 4th Zone, Ic additional; in 5th 
Zone, iHc additional; in 6th, mc; in 7th, 
l^c; in 8th, 2c. Added to list price gives 
net at .vour door by express. 

HcntT . CAMroi(NiA 




Mention The Review when yon write. 

Rooted 
Carnation Cuttings 

We offer splendid stock of Alice, also 
Benora, White Wonder, Mrs. C. W. Ward, 
Yellow Prince, Pocahontas and Victory. 

$3.00 per 100, $25.00 per 1000 

250 at 1000 rale. 

PENINSULA NURSERY 

SAN MATEO, CAL. 

Mention The Review when you write. 

PREPARE FOR XNAS, 1917 

5000 Cin. Begonias, 2i<2-in. pots, 100, $10.00 
Chrysanthemum Stock, per 100, $4,00 

Golden Chadwick, Major Ronnaffon, Rager, 
Nonin, Dean. Mistletoe, Patty. Jones. Nagoya. 
Chieftain. White and Pink Mensa, Seidewitz. 
Klondyke, Burnola, Thomas. Lulu. Elva. 

Cash with order. 

BEALL GREENHOUSE CO. 

VASHON, WASH. 

Mention The R»Tlew when yoo wrlta. 

Well Rooted Carnation Cuttings 

From healthy, cool-grown stock, $2.50 per 100, 
$20.00 per ICCO; Beacon, Perfection. Enchantress, 
White Wonder, Philadelphia and Rosette. The 
following at $3.00 per 100, $'25.00 ppr 1000: Match- 
less, Alice, Champion, Enchantress and Su- 
preme, 

REINERS rLGRALART SHOP. '^spomne'!' VrVsli. 

Mention The Review when you write. 



FEimtTARY 1, 1917. 



The Florists^ Review 



91 



JOHN KRUCHTEN 



HENRY KRUCHTEN 



JOHN KRUCHTEN CO. 

Wholenia Rorteli "•» n.««S**SS.*!2!,"~' CHICAGO, ILL 



Mention The Berlew when yon write. 



KYLE & rOERSTER 



WholeaaU 

CommissloB 

Florists 



L. D. PHONE RANDOLPH {SSs 



160 N. WABASH AVE.. CHICAGO 



Mention The Rarlcw when yon write. 



J 



Wholesale Cut Flower Prices. 

Chicago, Jan. 31, 1917. 
Per doz. 

Bfauty, long stems $ 6.00 & $ 8.00 

.•^0 to 36-in. stems 4.00 & 6.00 

24-ln. stems 2.00® 3.00 

12 to 20-ln. stems 1.00 @ 1»50 

Per 100 

Kilhirnov $ 4.00 @ $15.00 

White Killiiniey 4.00® 16.00 

Double White Killiiriic.v 4.00® 15.00 

Killaniev lirilliaiit 4.00® 15.00 

Mrs. lUissell 8.00 @ 40.00 

Cliamp AVciland 4.00 @ 15.00 

Uichmond 4.00 @ 15.00 

Uliea Iteid 4.00 @ 15.00 

Mrs. Aaron 'Wiiid 4.00 @ 15.00 

Sunburst 4.00 @ 15.00 

Ophelia 4.00 @ 15.00 

Milady 4.00® 15.00 

Hoosiir Hcauty 4.00® 15.00 

Carnations 1.50® 4.00 

Valley 4.00 @ 6.00 

Easter Lilies 10.00 ® 12.60 

Cattleyas, |ier doz. . .$C.00@7..50 

Violets 76 @ 1.60 

Sweet Peas 50 @ 2.00 

Romans 2.50 @ 4.00 

Calendulas 2.00 @ 4.00 

Mignonette 4.00 ® 6.00 

Paper AVhites 2.00 @ 4.00 

'''"'ip« • 3.00 ® n.oo 

.Tonouils o 50 @ 4 00 

J/eesias 3.00 ® 4.00 

iJalsles 1.00 ® 2.00 

Bouvardia 4.00 @ 8.00 

"tevia : 1 50 @ 2.00 

Snapdragons, doz 75c@$2.00 

We have had great success with our ads 
in The Review; we are completely sold out 
of Chatelaine begonias and Asparagus 
SpreriKcii. — Temperley 's, Indianapolis, 
Ind. 

Ple.vsk discontinue our ad, as we have 
f^old out 00,000 vincas and cannot supply 
nn.v more. All anybody needs is the goods 
••ml an ad in The Review.— Lampert 
Jloralfo.. Xenia, O. 

We arc much pleased with the results 
ohtaincd from our plant advertisements in 
1 he Review: orders have come in freely 
nnci from a wide range of territory.— Ger- 
main iSced & Plant Co., Los Angeles, Cal. 

^ -innniDiiiniiinuiuiiiniiiuuuiiiiniiiDiiiiiiiiiiiiinii 

I Bailey's Cyclopedia I 

I -florists' e.volum* library | 

i o!fu,^J"-'"''';i^"'3a'"<JC.vclopediaof Horti- I 

I beit«?...r*^f*'-rS°.^.'^ed authority, the 1 

I ristVi"^ Its kind, the best for flo- i 

I [nifi^2»"l-^?'^""^s.^''y'"en. is offered 1 

i W^ I^^^'^'"''?- Six volumes of ad- 1 

I ^'ce-4000engravings-% full-page cuts. 1 

i Fi've^v^i"''*'"'^ "^"^^ ^8 SO.OO per volume. I 

I and la^f r"^!^?^ *'■? '■eady, the sixth 1 

i anv w«vv 1° ^°"°^. shortly. Buy them 1 

i five vnin*™°" '^''"'.to-one at a time, the i 

I n\e Nolumes ready or the entire set. I 

I For sale by the § 

I FLORISTS' PUBLISHING CO. I 

I . ^^^ ^- Dearborn St. CHICAGO, III. I 

'""nmimrammmminmmnmimnnmmnniminnmmimnimimiimiii^ 



The CHICAGO FLOWER GROWERS' ASSOCIATION 

Wholesale Grotv^ers of Cut Flo-w^era and Plants 

182 North Wabash Ave., l, d. phone, Randolph csi CHICAGO 

Spring Flowers, Roses, Carnations, Pussy Willows 
and Everything Seasonable. 

Order Here— You Can't do Better Else vehere— Often Not Nearly as Good 
«- SHIPPING ORDERS GIVEN PROMPT AND CAREFUL ATTENTION 




154 North 
Wabash Ava. 



ALPHA'S 

Money-Making Funeral 
Design Catalogue 

Write for information. Don't 
delay— tomorrow may be too 
late. We will tell you why 
when you Write. 

Alpha Floral Company 

Lock Box 675 Kansas City, Mo. 



ZECH S MANN 

WHOLESALE FLORISTS 
30 E. Randolph St., Chicago 
Telephene CENTRAL 3284 

MILLER &IIUSSER 

Wholesale Cut Flowers 

Phones— Central 42 Auto. 44864 

181 NORTH WABASH AVE., 
CHICAGO, ILL. 

Mention The Reylew when Ton write. 

George B. Hart 

WHOLESALE 
FLORIST 

47-51 Stone Street, ROCHESTER, N. Y. 

Mention The Berlew when ron write. 



H.KISIK&CO. 

Largest Shippers of 
Fresh Cut Flowers 
at Kansas City. 



Florists' Supplies 
Manofaotorers of Wire Designs 

1018 Mcaaa Straat 

KANSAS CITY, MO. 



Hoerber Brothers 

Wholesale /^ . T7f 

Growers of... ^Ut FlOWCrS 

Greenhouses, Des Plaines. 111. 

Store, 162 N. Wabash Avenue, Chicago 

Long Distance Phone, Ran dolph 27?^ 

GEO. REINBERG 

SlJiS^; Cut Flowers 

Richmond, Sanbnrst, Ophelia, Pink 
and White KiUarney 

162 No. Wabash Ave., CHICAGO, ILL 

lfent1«m The Itnyimw ■whtjt rrn write. 



Joseph Ziska & Sons 

ISl'lSS N. WalMMh Ave., CHICAGO 

WIRE DESIGNS ami WHOLKSAU 

FLORISTS' SUPPLIES 

WRITk VOR OUR new CATAIX>GUK 



MeatlM The BeTlew wfeea rev wilt*. 



92 



The Florists^ Review 



February 1, 1917. 



Wholesale Cut Flower Prices. 

Cincinnati, Jan. 31, 1917. 
Per doz. 

Beauties, extra long stems $7.50 

30 to 30-inch, special.. 6.00 

" 24 to 30-Incli, fancy... 5.00 

18 to 24-inch, extra 4.00 

12 to 18-inch, first 2.00 

8 to 12-inch, second... 1.00 

Shorts .60 

I'er 100 

Killarney, wliito and pink $ 5.00 (g! $12.00 

Richmond 6.00 @ 15.00 

Carnations 3.00 (^ 4.00 

Easter Lilies 12.50 ® 15.00 

Lliy of the Valley 7.00 

Orchids, per doz. .$7.50 @ $ 9.00 

Callas 10.00 @ 12.50 

Sweet Peas 75 ^ 1.50 

Paper AVhites 3.00 

Violets 75 (S 1.00 

Romans 3.00 @ 4.00 

Calendulas 3.00 62 4.00 

Rubrum Lilies 4.00 @ 10.00 

Jonquils 4.00 © 5.00 

I5aby Primrose 1.00 @ 1.50 

Freesias 3.00 @ 4.00 

Snapdragons 4.00 @ 6.00 

Marguerites 75 @ 1.00 

I'liiladelphia, Jan. 31, 1917. 
Per doz. 

lU'anties, Long $7.50 @ $9.00 

Short 1.50® 2.00 

Per 100 

Killarney, Long $10.00 @ $12.00 

Short 6.00® 8.00 

Iladley — Mrs. Kussell, I'riina 

Donna, Long 15.00 @ 25.00 

Short 8.00® 12.00 

Maryland, Long 10.00 @ 12.00 

Short 6.00® 8.00 

Ophelia, Sunburst, Ward, iMug... 10.00 ® 15.00 

Short.. . 0.00 ® 8.00 

Carnations, Fancy 6.00 

Select 5.00 

Ordinary 3.00® 4.00 

Easter Lilies 12.50 ® 15.00 

Lilium Splendens 8.00 

Valley 4.00 @ 0.00 

Cattleya, per doz. . .$5.00 @ 6.00 
Snapdragon, per doz. $1.00 @ 2.00 
Gardenias, per doz. .$2.00@$4.00 

Daffodils 4.00 

Sweet Peas, Orchid 1.50 @ 2.50 

Ordinary 75® 1.00 

Violets, Double .75 

Single 40 @ .50 

Mignonette 4.00 ® 6.00 

Pansies, per 100 bunches 5.00 ® 7.00 

Paper Whites 2.50 ® 3.00 

Daisies 1.50® 2.00 

White Lilac, bunch. .$1.00@$1. 50 

Callas. per doz $1.50(U$2.00 

Freesia 4.00 @ 5.00 

Primroses 50 ® .75 

Tulips 3.00 @ 5.00 

Pittsburgh, Jiin. 31, 1917. 
I'er 100 

Beauty, Special $50.00 

Fancy $30.00® 40.00 

Killarney 0.00® 12.00 

White Killarney 6.00 ® 12.00 

Richmond 8.00® 15.00 

Mrs. Aaron Ward 6.00® 12.00 

Ophelia 8.00 ® 20.00 

Shawyer 8.00 ® 12.00 

Mock 12.00 @ 15.00 

Sweet Hearts 2.00 

Mrs. Charles Russell 10.00 ® 20.00 

Carnations 3.00 @ 4.00 

Lilies 12.00 ® 15.00 

Violets 75 ® 1.00 

Valley 6.00 

Sweet Pens 1.50 ® 2.00 

Yellow Daisies 2.00 ® 3.00 

Snapdragon 4.00 ® 10.00 

Mignonette 4.00 ® 6.00 

Paper Whites 3.00 ® 4.00 

Calendula 4.00 

Tulips 3.00® 4.00 

Trumpet narcissi 4.00 

White Lilac, per bunch $0.75 

I THANK Tlie Review for good results. 
— Charl&s Taynor, New Carlisle, O. 



Rice Brothers 

WHOLESALE FLORISTS 
and FLORISTS' SUPPLIES 

We are the largest Cut Flower 
shippers in MINNEAPOLIS. Let 

us supply your wants. If it is on 
the market, we can furnish it. 

Floriflts* Supplies 

Get our prices before placing order. 
% We guarantee satisfaction. 




FINE FRESH LILIES Every Day in the Year 

Also long and short cut Magniflcum Lilies— the improved Rubrum lilies. 
Central Location— Quick Deliveries 



Can supply jobbers as well as re- 
tailers—large users please write. 



We also have fine Adiantum Croweanum 
fronds, at $1.00 per 100. 



HOFFMEISTER FLORAL CO. 



Lick Run, 



White St., CINCINNATI, OHIO 



Mention The Review when yon write. 



Cut Flowers 

GREENS - SUPPLIES 

THE WM. MURPHY CO. 

L D. Tdepbone, Maia 980-981 329 Main St., CINCINNATIp OHIO 



Mention The R.tIcw when yon wrlt>. 



DAVID WELCH 



EDWARD J. WELCH 



Welch's, Wholesale and Commission Florists 



FLORISTS' SUPPLIES 

280-282 Devonshire Street, phones: fort hill isbmsss 

Mention The Review when you write. 



BOSTON, NASS. 



Cut Flowers Greens Supplies 

Everything a Florist Needs 

CINCINNATI CUT FLOWER EXCHANGE 

Wholesale Commission Florists 16 E. Third St., Cincinnati, Ohio 



Mention The Review when yon write. 



Louis H. Kyrk 

Wholesale Commission Florist 

Consignments Solicited 

Cut riowers, Wire Work, Florists* Supplies 

110-112 L Third St. CINCINNATI, OHIO 

Mention The Review when you write. 

ROCHELLE 

Paper Pots and Dirt Bands. See pace 116 



SPECIAL. NOTICE TO 

AMERICAN TRADERS 

If yon are Interested in Enropean stocks of Plants 
»nd Seeds and latest news concerninfl' same, sub- 
scribe to The Horticultnrai Trade Joamal. 
ppbllshed weekly, and The International Hor- 
ncnltaral Trade Joamal, published quarterly. 
Obs dojtor (International Money Order), sent to ns 
'"^?.. T'H. ■'•■'ire your receiving each number as 
published for one year. 

Address 

The HORTICULTURAL PRINTING CO. 

BURNLEY. ENGLAND 

Mention The Review when yon write. 



i 



Febbuauv 1, 1917. 



The Florists^ Review 



93 



C Remember, we are Headquarters in St. Louis for your 
Supplies. Also anything seasonable in Cut Flowers 
Orchids, Valley, Carnations, Roses. 



Violets and Lilies always in 

big supply. Also Greens. 

ST. LOUIS WHOLESALE CUT FLOWER CO.. 1410 PINE STREET. ST. LOUIS. MO. 

via taww-w -^ Mentton Tbt B«Tlew when yoa write. . 



CCPOUMIlKi) 



TRY US ON 



RUSSELLandKILLARNtY 

ROSES 

LILIES and VALLtr 

'▲ MILWAUKEE. WIS 



DAT TAWI nTTinf ri TA Fancy White and Pink 
nULlUll anUnnLL LU. Klllarney, Carnations, 

462 Hwaukee Street, Mflwaakee, Wis. ^"'"y' """' 



AND ALL OTHm SIASONABLI STOCK. 



GUST. RUSCH a CO. 

WHOLESALE FLORISTS 

444-446 Milwaukee St, Milwaukee, Wis. 

CUT FLOWERS and 
FLORISTS' SUPPUES 

Mention The Rerlew when yon wrif . 

Wholesale Cut Flower Prices. 

Boston, Jan. 31, 1917. 
Per 100 
00 (rS 160.00 



WELCH BROS. CO. 

Wholesale Cut Flower Market 



262 Devonshire St., BOSTON, MASS. 

Consignments of all the leading varieties of cut flowers reeeived daily, 
line of Florists' Supplies. Price list mailed weekly. 



Selected 



Beauty, Specials $40. 

Kxtra 20. 

Short stems 6. 

Rhnw-jor, Russell 6. 

Killarncy T>. 

Stanley, Miller 6. 

White Killarnoy tt. 

Dark Pink Killarncv 6, 

Douhle White Killainey ',. 

Killarney Queen 0, 

, Mrs. Aaron Ward 5 

Hadley 6 

Oplielia 8, 

Sunburst C 

Fraufis Spott Key (5 

Trinee d'Arenherg (i 

Hoosi.T Heauty 

Carnations 4 

Cattle.vas 30 

Uly of the Vallev. 4 

Raster Lilies . . ." ] 12 

Gardenias oq 

Sweet I'eas ...].!!]!.!!! 

Prei-sias .... q 

naffodil^ '.'.'.'.'.'.'.'. 4 

I'ansies j^ 

Violets, RinRle ...........] . . ' 

double 

Snapdrajrons ' q 

Yellow Marguerites . 1 

Paper White Narcissi ...'.'.'.'.'.'" 3 

Bachelor's Buttons 1 

htevla, per bunch 25c 

Calendulas 2 

Koman Hyacinths '..'.'. 9 

'ulips 4 

Mignonette '■'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'. 3 



00 
00 
00 

00 

00 

00 

00 

00 

00 

00 

00 

00 

00 

00 

00 

00 

00 

,00 

00 

,00 

00 

,75 

,00 

00 

,00 

,60 

.50 @ 

,00 @ 

..50 ® 

,00 @ 

.00 m 

.00 @ 
.00 (n). 
.00 @ 
.00 @ 



@ 



® 
® 



@ 
@ 
@ 



@ 



@ 



30.00 

15.00 

20.00 

12.00 

12.00 

10.00 

12.00 

12.00 

12.00 

15.00 

20.00 

20.00 

15.00 

12.00 

12.00 

12.00 

6.00 

45.00 

5.00 

15.00 

25.00 

2.00 

4.00 

5.00 

1.50 

1.00 

.75 

8.00 

4.00 

4.00 

2.00 

4.00 
3.00 
5.00 
8.00 



Milwaukee, 



Mrs. ( luirl.' 



.Tan. 31, 1917. 
Per 100 



Hoosier Beauty"''*"" *^H« ® ^^Q-OO 

Killarnov !i"" 



irnov 
Wliite ■ 



5.00 



^^lnte Killarnoy ... r/Y^ 

Mrs. Ward i'^ 

Ophelia '-^ 

^■••'niations ....■::■.; sSx 

Vallev .. -J-^^ 

Violets 5.00 

st.'vi.i .;;;;; i-oo 

rfl?nJ" ^'"eV," doz.$1.5b' '® $2 00 

^nm'wh.?e7 '"" '"^ ® '-^^ 

^alendulas . . 

Sweet Pena 

Tulips ^ 100 

D.ilTodiu 2.00 



18.00 

115.00 

15.00 

15.00 

18.00 

4.00 

6.00 

1.50 

2.00 



3.00 
4.00 
2.00 
3.00 
4.00 



PATRICK WELCH 

262 D«TOBsliir* Straat 



Wholesale Florist 

BOSTON. MASS. 



Mf AMERICAN BEAUTIES. Orchids. Valley. Carnations. All the noTeltiei 
^U« in the Cut Flower Market furnished on short notice. Prices Quoted on 
application. No retail orders accepted. Flowers shipped out of Boston on 
early trains. Store open for business at 6 a. m. Tdepboae Mais 2698 



Mention Tha B»Tlew wh«» yog write. 



FANCY FERNS 



Special picked. Leave your regular orders with us. 

Lily of ttie Valley and Orchids, LUles, Rubrum LlUes and Callas 
Fancy Roses and Carnations, Pussy Willows, all seasonable stock. 

Florists' Supplies and Manufacturers of Wire Designs. 



C. A. KUEHN, Wholesale riorlst. 



1312 Pine Street, St. Louis, Mo. 



Mention The Review when you write. 



Wholesale Cut Flower Prices. 



St. rx)uis. .Tan. 31, 1917. 



thort «! '" *'"'■ ^^5 ^e did not know 
as ron^ip'? f T""^ '"^ *^« "^"^ted States 
kins FW , n *l^* ^^^* insertion.-Hos- 
«i'is Floral Co., Bismarck, N. D 



Beauty, Specials $ 3. 

" Kxtra 1. 

Sliorts 5. 

Richmond 2. 

Kaiserin 5. 

White Killarney 5. 

Killarney 5. 

Ward, Hadley 5. 

Milady and Ophelia 8. 

Uussell S, 

Carnations 3. 

Lily of ~ the Valley 6. 

Easter Lilies 10. 

Callas 10, 

Orchids, doz $6.00 

Daisies Shasta 

Snapdragon 2 

Violets 

Paper Whites 2 



rer doz. 
00 @ $ 6.00 
00 @ 2.50 
00 @ 12.00 
I'er 100 
00 @ 5.00 



00 ® 

00 @ 

00 @ 

00 @ 

00 @ 

00 @ 

00 @ 

00 @ 

00 @ 

00 @ 

25 @ 
00 O 
35 m 
,00 ® 



12.00 
12.00 
12.00 
12.00 
12.00 
25.00 
4.00 
7.00 
12.50 
12.50 

.50 
4.00 

.50 
3.00 



COMPLETE LINE OF 
FLORISTS' SUPPLIES 

W. Q. POTTER CO. 

Successor to 

NcCAlLUN CO., 421 Bi^h Aie , Clevelaid, 0. 



C. SMITH 
Wholesale Floral Co. 

Wholesale Florists 

1316 Pine St. BothLD.PbMcs ST. LOUU 
SupsrMt Md EvenrlhiM h Mntm aKnyt m kaad 

THE 

DeRver Wholesale Floristi^ 



Co. 



Al'ways mention the Flortsts* Review 
\elien vrrltlnB advertisers. 



!4S»8 Cilifinia Street DENVER. COIA 

Mention Tha Ren.w whaa yoa write. 

F. J. BENTHEY 

WHOLXSAUE 
165 N. Wabash Ave., CHICAGO 

GRKEITHOUSKS and RKTAIL 

NEW CASTLEe INP. 

Al^eaya mention the Florists* Review 
^vtien 'wrltlnK advertisers. 



94 



The Florists' Review 



Febuuauy 1, 1917. 



H. E. FROMENT 



WHOLISALI 
COMMISSION FLORIST 

ll«e«lv«r and Shipper of All Vari«tl«« of Cut Fiowar* 

SPECIALTY -CHOICE ROSES 

ALL NEW VARIETIES 

Telephones 800 unci 801 Farragut 

14-8 West 28th Street, NEW yo oK 

A Golll Nedal ^^ 'J"* expected by us for doing our duty by our consignors 

H uviu iicuai and customers W e have 22 years' experience behind us. 

Fancy Grade Orchids. September Morn, American Beauty, Prima 
Donna and all other Roses. 

Lilies. Carnations, Violets, Asparagus and Smilax. All other Season- 
able Flowers. 

PHONES : Farracut, 558, 2036. 2037 

GUnNAN & RAYNOR, hc.,l01W.28tliSt.,NewYork 



WHOLKSALE FLORISTS 



GEORGE J. POLYKRANAS 

WHOLESALE COMMISSION FLORIST 

Leadinflf Varieties of Cut Flowers 

Consignments Solicited 

104 W. 28th St., TJr^AVut^^ieA NEW YORK 



PRANK H. -fRAUIDLY 



CHARLKS SCHKNCft 



TRAENDLY S SCHENCK 

Wholesale Florists and Cut Hower Exchange 

436 6th Av«nu«, between 2Gth and 27tli Sts., NEW YORK 

Telephones W. 798 and 799 Farra«ut CONSIGNMENTS SOLICITEE 

WOODROW & MARKETOS 

WHOLESALE PLANTSMEN 
AND FLORISTS 

37-39 West 28th Street, NEW YORK 

Talaphona 3860 Madlaon Squara 



Fancy and 
Daggrer Ferns 



TELEPHONE 



J. J. FELLOURIS 

116 W. 28th St., NEW YORK 

Wholesale Dealer in 
all kinds of 

EVERGREENS 




Bronze and 
Oreen Qalax 

2315 FARRABUT 



Frank Nillang 

Coogan Building— Third Floor 

55 West 26th Street, NEW YORK 

Talaphona 299 Farranrut 

SPECIALTIES: Roses and Asparagus 

Mention The B«Ttew when y«m writ*. 

William P. rord 

It? West 28tk Street. Na^|/ Ynrlff 

Pbana 5335 Farrarut l^^^T ■ VWWk 

SEASONABLE FLOWERS i^dlhl'^thr.^^k^i 

affords eTery day In the year. Prompt ahlpmenta at 
a moment'* notice. 

■oma. Beeoa, Caniatiens. Valley. VinUt^. Etc. 

lUntloa The Baylew irhea job write. 

BONNOT BROS., Inc. 

WH9IJESALI FLSmST 

SB and 87 W. 26th St, HtfUf VnDIT 
Cut nawar Kxcbansa. 11 Elf lUllii 

OPKN AIX DAT 

Aa Cnexcelled Ontlet for CONSIONED FLOWERB 
Telephone No. 830 Madlaon Sq. 

Mention The Berlew when yon write. 

D. C. ARNOLD & CO., Inc. 

WholMal* Florists 

112 W. 28th St., NEW YORK 

Tel. 2287 Farragut 
Consignments Solicited 

GEO.W.CRAWBDCKCO.,Ihc. 

47 W. 28th St., New York City 

24 Years' Experience 
Everything in Cut Flowers 

Tel. 5296 Mad. Sq. Consignments Solicited 



€1 



A recent subscriber to our Credit 
and Information List says : 

" Think it tiie best money 
we have ever spent." 

for full particulars, write NATIONAL FLORISTS' 
BOARD or TRADE, 56 Pine SL, New York City. 

Telephone 1813 Main 

The Brooklyn Wholesale Cut Flower Market, Inc. 

FLORAL DESIGNS A SPECIALTY 

358 Fulton Street, corner Red Hook Lane, BROOKLYN, N. V. 



Wholesale Cut Hower Prices. 

New York, Jan. 29, 1917. 
Per 100 

Beauty, Specials $35.00 @ $60.00 

Fancy 20.00 & 35.00 

Extra 8.00 @ 12.00 

No. 1 4.00 @ 8.00 

No. 2 3.00 @ 4.00 

I'rima Doiiua 4.00 @ 20.00 

Klilarneys 3.00 @ 12.00 

My Maryland 3.00 (S 10.00 

Hoosler Beauty 3.00 @ 15.00 

nichmond 2.00 @ 10.00 

Sunburst 3.00 @ 12.00 

Mrs. Aaron Ward 3.00 @ 12.00 

Mrs. Shawycr 3.00 @ 12.00 

Mock 4.00 (fi! 16.00 

Russell 4.00 @ 20.00 

Ophelia 3.00 @ 15.00 

Lady Stanley 3.00 @ 12.00 

PrancU Scott Key 4.00 @ 16.00 

Hartley COO @ 00.00 

OrchUls— rattleyas 25.00® 40.00 

Cypripedluiiis, doz.$1.50 (Vf $2.00 

Carnations 2.00 @ 5.00 

Easter IJli.'s 8.00 ® 12.00 

Lily of the Valley 2.00 ® 5.00 

Sweet Peas, doz. 

bunches $0.7.'') ® $2.00 

Oardenias, doz 50® 2.50 

Violets 25 gi ..50 

Narcissi, bunch 20 @ .50 

Callas, doz 1.50 ® 2.00 

Bouvardias, bunch. .20 @ .35 

Tulips, doz 25 @ .75 

Freesia, bunch ...$0.25 @ $0.35 
Daffodils, hunch... ..H5 @ .00 
I.ilac. bunch 50 @ 1.50 

Buffalo, Jan. 31, 1917. 
Per doz. 

Beauty, Special $G.00 

Fancy 4.00 

Extra 3.00 

Firsts 2.00 

Per 100 

Mrs. Shawyer $4.00 ® $12.00 

KiUarncy 4.00 ® 15.00 

White Killarncy 4.00 ® 12.00 

Double White Klllarnoy 5.00® 15.00 

lUchmond 5.00 ® 15.00 

Maryland 5.00 (§ 12.00 

Taft 5.00® 10.00 

Ophelia 5.00 ® 15.00 

Mrs. Ward 4.00 @ 6.00 

Bon Silene 3.00 @ 4.00 

Killamey Queen 6.00 ® 10.00 

Stanley 6.00® 12.00 

Russell 10.00 ® 20.00 

Mock 6.00 @ 8.00 

Sunburst 4.00 @ 12.00 

Carnations 3.00 @ 5.00 

Lily of the Valley 6.00 @ 7.00 

Longlflorums 10.00 @ 12.00 

Rubrum Lilies 6.00 @ 7.00 

Cattleyas 40.00 @ 60.00 

Violets 40 @ .76 

Stevla 1.00 @ 1.25 

Paper Whites 2.00 © 3.00 

Romans 2.00 @ 3.00 

Daffodils 4.00 @ 5.00 

Freesia 3.00 @ 6.00 

Tulips 3.00 ® 5.00 

Mums— Hamburg, late white... 15.00 @ 25.00 



A. L. YOUNG & CO., Inc.'^LSiP 

54 Waat 38th St., NKW YORK 
CONSIGNMKNTS BOLICITKD 

MeatioD The Review when you write. 



JOSEPH S. FENRICH 

81 West 28th Street, NEW YORK 

Telephones 1623-24-25 Madison Square 

My Purpose is to treat any business entrusted 
to me in such a fair and liberal manner as to 
make the customer's relations with me satis- 
factory and profitable. 

Mention The Review when yon write. 

GE0R6E C. SIEBRECHT 

WHOLESALE FLORIST 

109 W. 28th St., NEW YORK 

Phones' 601 and 609 Farraeut 

Gmsifnintnti tf Qnilitr Stock Solicited 

Mention The Review when yon write. 

UNITED CUT FLOWER CO., Inc. 

WHOLES ALfRS 

111 West 28th Street, NEW YORK 

Telephones Farragut 4422-4423 
D. J. PAPPAS, President 

BONNET & BLAKE 

WHOLESALE FLORISTS 

130 Llvineston Street. RDnnVI Vlil M V 
TeL Noe. 1293-1291 Main. DRUUAL I H, H. I> 

THE BUSY BEES 

Hesdqnartere for all kinds of top-grade stock. tn» 
the BKST Eastern Growers. 

Established 1903 Prompt Payments 

UNITED STATES 
CUT FLOWER CO. 

Wholesale Growers 
ELMIRA, NEW YORK 

Meitl— The Review whes yoa write. 

Reed & Keller 

122 W. 2Sth St., New York 

Florists' Supplies 

We manufacture all our Metal Desltrns, 
Baskets. Wire Work and Novelties' 



CHARLES MILLANG ^*°^**^* 



Florist 



55-57 W. 26th St., NEW YORK CITY 

Tel. No. 7062 Madison Sauare 



Fkbbuary 1, 1917. 



The Florists' Review 



95 



J. K« Allen 



KSTABLISHED 1887 

Telephones 167-3068 Farragut Open at 6 a. m. every day 

ROSES CARNATIONS 
LILIES VALLEY VIOLETS ETC. 



11 R WEST 28TH STREET - NEW YORK 

Our new stor* Is ■ p«rf*ct c«nt«r to handl* ■ busin*** off any dimonslon. 

Mention The Berlew when yon write 



Every variety of Cut Flowers. Growers, study your bes* 
interests and ship to me this season. 



RIEDEL&MEYERJnc. 

49 West 28th St., NEW YORK 

Growers, attention I We haye twenty-flye years' experience. 

Consifimments solicited. 
p ■ Toleplionesi 40M-40SS Itadlson Bqaaro ' ' 

WILLIAM KESSLER 

WHOUESAU FLORIST 

Lilies, Roses, Carnations. Orchids, Valley, etc. The largest assortment 
of summer flowers and novelties in the New York market. 
49- A Qrand Oponlns for Qood ROSK OROWBRSneii 

113 Wert 28th Street, Telephone No,^ 2335.2336 p4£^ YORK 

GOLDSTEIN & FUTTERNAN 

WHOLESALE fLORISTS ||Ef|f YQRK CITY 102 West 28tli Street 

Telephone No. 0761 Farrasnt 

Id the Exact Center of the Wholesale Cut Flower Section 

Prompt and Careful Attention to Your Interests 

Consignments Solicited .———^^— 

N. Y. FLORISTS' SUPPLY CO., 

INC. 
103 WMt 2Sth Str««t, NIW YORK CITY 

Wholetale and Retail Dealers In all kinds of 

EVEROREENS tS&f^ FLORISTS' SUPPLIES 

Telephones S144-S14S-S146 FarniKnt. 




. C. FORD 

121 W. 28TH ST., NEW YORK CITY 

Telephones 8870-8871 Farragut 

AMERICAN BEAUTIES AND CARNATIONS 

BADGLEY & BISHOP, iic. 

SucceBBorB to Badgley. Riedel A Meyer, Inc. 
WHOLUALI FLORISTS 

34 W. 28th street, NEW YORK CITY 

Tela. 1664-1666 Madison Sauare Consignments Solicited 



J. J. COAN, Inc. 

115 W. 28th Street, ly ^wm, V^^ixlr 



GROWERS' CUT FLOWER CO. 



■. J. VAN RKYPKR. MaMcer 

Cvt riiwen at Whilenle CeiisiiuieBts Silidted 

129 West 28th Street, NEW YORK 

Telaptaonaa e2S7-S9es Farragnt 



JOHN YOUNG S CO. 

WHOLISALK FLORISTS 
CholcMt Stock In Amorlca 

63 W. 28th St., New York 

Telephone 7362 Madison Square 

WILLIAM H.*KUEBLER 

Wholesale OonmUsslon Dealei- In 

CUT FLOWERS 

^5^™ 'or the products of growers of flrBtK:Iass 
nocK. We have what jou want when you want IC 

28 WiUoa^hby St.. Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Telep hone 4691 Main. 

RUSSIN & HANFLING 

««- ^_. OfBce and Saleflroomi 

■•• west asth Street, NEW TOBK CITY 

TeU 3053 Farraent 
»-- Kanufacturers and Importers of 
*n*OW an« FANCT BASKETS ter FL0BIST8 
j__ -__**^'"" *n Florists' Supplies 
^ot SoeelalUes; Wheat Sheares and 



IDNTHERBRO? "•*""*- 



KsUbUsbed un 



NEW YOU 



B. ROSENS 



112 West 28l!i SL, 

Arm. - NEW YORK, H.Y, 

* FUU UWK OP FLORISTS' SU PPUIS 

^***SL^.^'*^'^''* Co., Inc. 

Wlwlewje Commlssloo Rorists 

m^.SS'S^stn,^ New York 



You need Bailey's books 

Get the knowledge you need, hints and practical suggestions that will help 
in your work, by buying Bailey's "Standard Cyclopedia of Horticulture" — 
the florists' fi-volunie library. 

The new edition has 4,000 engravings, 'M> full-page cuts, fine color work— better 
than ever! The price is $6.00 per volume. Fi\e now ready, sixth to follow. Hay 
one at a time, the five ready or send $36.00 for the complete set of six \olunies. 



FLORISTS' PUBLISHING CO., 



.5U8 South 
Dearborn St., 



CHICAGO 



ORCHIDS ■ ■ GARDENIAS 

HEADQUARTERS for the entire output of the 
BEECHWOOD HEIGHTS HURSERIES, off Bound Brook, H. I. 

PAUL MECONI Wholesale Rorist NEW YORK 

Telephone Nos. 8864 »nd 8364 MadiBOn Sauure 



87 WBST 26th STRBT 



Artificial 



Cycaa Leaves and Wreaths, Wheat Sheavee, 
Baskets, Artificial and Wax Wreaths, Metal 
^^m Wreaths, Crosses, eto. Colored Teasels, red, 

r lO^^d^Ss Pi^n>le,_white and bine Roping, and everything 



404-412 East 34th Street. 



in the Florists' Supply line. 

A. HERRMANN, 

Mention The tteylew when yon write. 



NEW YORK OF 



P. J. SMITH 

Snccesaor to John I. Raynor. Wholesale Florist. 
Selllnir agent for the largest growers. A full line of 
choice Odwlower Stock for all purposes, by the 100, 
1000 or 10,000. Consignments solicited. Telephone 
1996 Farragnt. 

Tlio Horn* of ttao Uly 

131 West 28th St., NEW YORK CITY 



WALTER F. SHERIDAN 

Wholesale 
.. Florist .. 

131-133 West 28th St., NEW YORK 

Telephones 3532-3533 Farragut 



96 



THc Florists^ Review 



February 1, 1917. 




California Privet 



Over two millions California Privet of finest 
quality; in all sizes, from one to four feet. Send 
for our new spring Trade List giving revised and 
reduced prices. Especially attractive prices in 
carload lots. The illustration shows the make-up 
of our best grade of 2 to 3-foot size. We have 
the largest and best stock of California Privet of 
any nursery upon this planet. 

Polish or Iron Clad Privet. We of- 
fer a nice lot of this in sizes from 6 inches up to 
3 feet. 

J. T. LOVETT, Inc. 

Little Silver, New Jersey 



:OUR TVJO TO THREE FOOT PRIVET; 



Mention The RcTlew when yon write. 



*',^ 



NURSERY NEWS. 



AMERICAN ASSOCIATION OF NTTRSERTMEN. 
President, John Watson, Newark, N. Y.; Vice- 
president, Lloyd O. Stark, Louisiana, Mo.; Secre- 
tary and General Manager, Curtis Nye Smith, 
Boston, Mass.; Treasurer, Teter Youngers, 
Geneva, Neb. 

At the annual meeting of the Mocsa- 
chusetts Nurserymen's Association, held 
in Boston, the following officers were 
elected for the ensuing year: President, 
E. W. Breed, of Clinton; vice-president, 
John Kirkegaard, of Bedford; secre- 
tary-treasurer, W. H. Thurlow, of West 
Newbury. The executive committee 
consists of the above officers and G. 
Howard Frost, James Bradley and Sid- 
ney Littlefield. 

The suit for trade-mark infringement 
and unfair competition brought by the 
Stark Bros. Nurseries & Orchards Co., 
of Louisiana, Mo., against the W. P. 
Stark Nurseries, of Stark City, Mo., 
which has been on the docket for 
months, now is before the Missouri Su- 
preme court. William P. Stark was 
one of the original brothers, an officer 
and director of the plaintiff company 
before he established his present busi- 
ness at stark City. Certain motions 
filed in the case have been overruled, 
and the case will be tried on its merits. 
The plaintiff therefore will proceed to 
give proofs upon the issues involved. 



= FRUIT AND ORNAiVIENTAL== 
1,500,000, SHRUBBERY 230 Varieties 
200,000 PERENNIALS 120 Varieties 



StroiiK, younpr and thrifty, witli excellent fibrous roots. 

Heferoiices: The Mercantile Apencles. 

LEWIS ROESCH. BOX X. 



Guaranteed strictly true to name. 
Trice list ready. 

FREDONIA, N. Y. 



Mention The ReTlaw when von writ*. 



WONDERFUL 
EVERBEARING 



Strawberry 



t;^^ 'S^ 



Fruits in Fall of first year and in Spring 
and Fall of second year. Three 
crops in two years. 500 plants 
set in May produced in 
Aug., Sept., Oct. and Nov. 
nearly 400 quarts, which 
sold at 20c to 40c per qf., net- 
tine at rate of $2,000 to the 
acre. We are headquarters 
for Everbearing and all other 
Strawberries. Raspberries, Black- 
berries, Gooseberries, Elderberries, 
Currants and Grapes, Fruit Trees, Roses, Orna- 
mentals, Vegetable Plants, Eggs for Hatching, 
Crates and Baskets. 34 years experience. Cata- 
logue Free. 

L. a. FA.R1VIER 

Box 786 Pulaski, N. Y. 




MISSOURI NURSERYMEN. 

During the meeting of the Western 
Association of Nurserymen at Kansas 
City last week the Missouri nursery- 
men present got together and organized 
a state association, electing the follow- 
ing officers: 



Mention The Reylew when you write. 

PEONIES 

and General Nursery Stock 

Send for Catalogue. 

PETERSON NURSERY 

80 N. LaSalle Street, CHICAGO, ILL. 

President — F. A. Weber, St. Louis. 

Vice-president — Lloyd Stark, Louis- 
iana. 

Secretary and treasurer — F. E. Von 
Windegger, St. Louis. 

Legislative committee — W. A. Weber, 
St. Louis; W. P. Stark, Neosho; E. L. 



NURSERY STOCK 

AT WHOLESALE 

A complete assortment of general nurserv 
stock— shrubs, roses, vines, shade trees, fruit 
trees, etc., well grown and well graded, such as 
will satisfy your customers and build up yoir 
trade. 

We solicit a trial order, believing that oi^r 
stock, service and reasonable prices will make 
you our regular customer. 

Our Wholesale Trade List free upon request. 

SHENANDOAH NURSERIES 

D. S. LAKE, Pres. 

SHENANDOAH, IOWA 

Mention The Rerlew when yon write. 



HILL'S EVERGREENS 

Best for Over Half a Centary. Firs, Spmce, 
Fines, Jnnlpers, Arborvitaes, Tews, In sm^ 
and large sizes. Price List Now Beady. 

THI D. HILL NUBSCRY CO. 

Evergreen Specialists. Largest Growers in America 
Box 403. Dundee, 111. 



Mention Tte Review whea yn write. 

Bagby, New Haven; G. L. Welch, S. 
Joseph; Geo. H. Johnson, Kansas City; 
Frank B. Wild, Sarcoxie; William Camp- 
bell, St. Joseph; Lloyd Stark, Louisiana; 
F. E. Von Windegger, St. Louis. 

The Missouri State Nurserymen's A: ■ 
sociation will hold its annual meeting 



Vis 



Fbbhcakt 1, 1917. 



The Florists* Review 



97 



Toole's Hardy Plants for Cot Flowers 

The following varieties are the most valuable for summer cut flow- 
ers Why not grow some of them? The wholesale market uses Im- 
mense quantities. You will find them valuable in your retail trade to 
furnish variety, and to fill in when other flowers are scarce. 

In growing hardy plants you have no expense for coal, no depre- 
ciation and Interest charges on expensive glass. 

Your original investment is comparatively small and should be 
returned several fold the first season. 

A few of Toole's hardy perennials for cut flowers will increase your 
net profits for the year, and it is net profits rather than gross sales 
that count. 

Let us book your order now for early spring shipment as soon as 
our season opens here, from April 1 to 15. All fresh dug, healthy stock. 

Strong one-year-old field grown plants or strong divisions. 

Doz. 100 

Achillea Ptarmlca The Pearl $0.75 $5.00 

Achillea Ptarmlca, Perry's New Variety 1.25 8.00 

Acliillea Millefolium roseum, rose Yarrow 75 5.00 

Aquilepia in variety 75 5.00 

<:anterbury Bells, mixed colors. Biennial 75 5.00 

(Canterbury Bells, separate colors. Biennial 85 6.00 

t'oreopsis lanceolata grandlflora 75 5.00 

Chrysanthemum maximum, Shasta Daisy 75 5. 00 

Chrysanthemum leucanthemum. Memorial Daisy 75 5.00 

Delphinium Belladonna, sky-blue 75 5.00 

Delphinium formosum, deep blue 75 5.00 

Dianthus barbatus. Sweet William, mixed 75 5. 00 

Dianthus barbatus, Newport Pink 75 5.00 

Dianthus barbatus. Hardy Garden Pink 75 5.00 

< ;aillardia grandlflora 75 5.00 

tlypsophila paniculata. Baby's Breath 75 5.00 

Iris orlentalls, blue 75 5.00 

Iris, Mme. Chereau, white edged with blue '75 5.00 

Iris, Silver King, silvery light blue 75 5. 00 

Lily of the Valley 75 5.00 

Lychnis Chalcedonlca 75 5.00 

I'yrethrum roseum hybrldum 75 s'qo 

If you are interested in other varieties, send for our wholesale list 
of hardy plants, pansy plants, aster plants and pansy seeds. 

TERMS 

Our terms are 3 per cent discount for cash with order, 2 per cent 
for cash in ten days, or thirty days net. Cash or satisfactory ref- 
erences must accompany orders from parties not known to us. 

Throe plants at dozen rate, 25 at rate per 100, and 250 at rate 
per 1,000. 

PACKING 

All our plants are carefully packed in light weight boxes or pack- 

" Usually we remove most of the dirt but use plenty of damn 

about the roots. We make no extra charge for boxes or labor 



ap( s 
moss 
of packing. 



WM. TOOLE & SON 

HARDY PLANT AND PANSY FARM 




BARABOO. WIS. 



PYRETHRUM ROSEUM HYBRIDUM 



Mention The Review when you write. 



CHAMP 
WEILAND 




We will have a surplus of 
'-^0,000 plants of this rose 
to oiler for spring delivery. 

•Subject to prior sale, we quote 
strong, own root stock from 2^4- 

per'lOOO ""^ ^^~'^ ^^'' ^^' ^^^-^ 
Kyes for grafting. $(;5.00 per 1000 

WEILAND & RISCH 

ISi N. Wabash Avenue, CHICAGO 



HILL'S CHOICE LANDSCAPE, DECORATIVE 
and FORCING STOCK for FLORISTS' TRADE 

BOXWOODS— Pyramids, Standards, Globes, Bush, Dwarf— one of our leading spe- 
cialties. Stocked in enormous quantities. 

BAY TREES— Standards, Half-standards, Pyramids. We can save you money and 
give better quality. Let us prove it. 

HARDY TUBBED EVERGREENS— Clipped specimens in Taxus, Thuyas, Junl- 
peruB, Abies varieties, in Pyramids, Globes and natural shaped in large assortment. 

ARAUCARIAS— Best sorts, best values, in l>otb small and large sizes, for immediate 
effects and growing on. 

LANDSCAPE EVERGREENS AND CONIFERS-New, rare and standard 
varieties. Small, medium and large sizes supplied in perfect siteclmens, with ball 
and burlap. Largest and most extensive collection In America. 

FORCING STOCK— Azaleas, Rhododendrons, Aucubas, Sklmmla Japonica, Hy- 
drangeas, Lilacs, Spiraeas, Magnolias, Japanese Maples, Wistaria Chinensts, Japanese 
Flowering Cherry, Peonies, Hoses, In large assortment, choicest quality, best com- 
mercial sorts. 

WINDOW-BOX PLANTS— Hardy Coniferous Evergreens for winter use. All hardy 
and desirable sorts, best selection, lowest prices. Also Bush Box and Dwarf Kdging. 
This line offers wide-awake florists grand opportunity to increase their sales and 
profits. 

DECIDUOUS TREES AND SHRUBS-Our leaders-Norway Maple. American 
White Elm and Japanese Barberry. 

YOUNG STOCK FOR LINING OUT-Ornamental Evergreens and Deciduous 
Trees and Shrub Seedlings, rooted cuttings, grafts, etc., in large assortment, at 
very low prices. Annual output, 10,000,000 plants. 



Wholesale price list will be 
mailed promptly on request. 



Write for information 
aud prices today. 



THE D. HILL NURSERY COMPANY, Inc. 

BVERGREEN SPECIALISTS n yino rkff1Kir\E>C< lY v 

LARGEST GROWERS IN AMERICA **OX **UO, UUniLI£.t., ILL. 

WHOUESALE GROWERS AND IMPORTERS 



SPIRAEAS * 

Vigorously rooted and sturdily grown. 
Send for complete prices. 

THE CONARD & JONES CO. 

West Grove, Pa. 



flFor Spring 1917 we offer a com- 
plete list of Shade Trees, Shrubs 
and Evergreens. Will be pleased 
to submit prices. 

AUDUBON NURSERY 

p. O. Box 7S1, WUmlncton. N. C. 



98 



The Florists' Review 



February 1, 1917. 



NURSERY STOCK for Florists' Trade 

FRUIT TREES, ORNAMENTAL TREES. SHRUBS, SMALL FRUITS. ROSES, CLEMATIS, PHLOX, PEONIES, HERBACEOUS 
PERENNIALS. AMPELOPSIS VEITCHII, CALIFORNIA PRIVET, BARBERRY THUNBERQII 

Writ* tor our wholesale trade llat 

W. & T. SMITH COMPANY 'o-" acres 



70 YEARS 



GSraVA. MXW TORK 



at Kansas City the fourth week in Jan- 
uary each year. E. J. B. 



THE WESTERN ASSOCIATION. 



Officers Elected. 

At the twenty-seventh annual meet- 
ing of the Western Association of Nur- 
serymen, held at Kansas City January 
24 and 25, the following officers were 
elected: 

President — E. M. Sherman, Charles 
Citv, la. 

Vice-president — W. C. Reed, Vin- 
cennes, Ind. 

Secretary and treasurer — Geo. W. Hol- 
singer, Rosedale, Kan. 

Executive committee — Geo. A. Mar- 
shall, Arlington, Neb.; Milton Moss, 
Huntsville, Ala.; H. W. Hobbs, Bridge- 
port, Ind.; E. H. Balco, Lansing, Kan.; 
Geo. H. Johnson, Kansas City, Mo. 

Next meeting — Kansas City, January 
23 and 24, 1918. 

A Successful Meeting. 

It was agreed that this was the most 
successful meeting the trade in the west 
has had. Forty-five nurseries were ifp- 
resented, with an attendance of sixty. 
Not only was the discussion of trade 
problems of much value to the individ- 
uals, but the business done in the pur- 
chase and sale of stock made a larger 
total than ever before. 

Action on three matters of special im- 
portance was deferred to await the ac- 
tion of the national organization: Stand- 
ardization of sales practices; coopera- 
tive hail insurance; recommendation of 
an increase in import duties on orna- 
mental stock. 

Trade Topics Discussed. 

There was a long program of talks. 
Few of those named to lead discussions 
had written out what they had to say 
and most of the remarks were short and 
to the point. This is a summary: 

' ' Would a National Eetail Associa- 
tion as a Branch of the American Asso- 
ciation Benefit the Trade?" by J. R. 
Mayhew. Ans. — Yes, and help the re- 
tailer as well, by making the business 
more safe in every way. 

"How are We to Raise Our Prices, 
Wholesale and Retail, to Meet the In- 
creased Cost of Production and of Do- 
ing Business?" by G. A. Marshall. Ans. 
—An increase in price is going to come, 
but it will be gradual and can not start 
before next fall, as many now liave 
their catalogues out. 

"How Can We Meet the Advanced 
Cost of Materials, Such as Boxes, 
Straps. Lumber, Paper, Twine, Burlap 
and Nails?" by. Bert Lake. Ans.— Tho 
only way to get around this is by co- 
operative buying through the headquar- 
ters of the association. 

"What Will be the Outcome of the 
Apple Tree Market this Spring?" by 
J. H. Skinner. Ans.^-There will be a 
shortage in most varieties. 

"What Was the Matter with the 



Do It Now! 

Go over your Rose Houses carefully and estimate the plants you need 
for replanting this Spring, and place your order. Roses are going to be 
scarce. The Manetti situation is such that those who get it are fortunate, and the 
demand is far greater than the limited supply. We have sold over lOO.OiO grafted 
Roses in the last two weeks. We have 'iCO.OOO more to sell. There is considerable 
building contemplated. "Changing from Carnations to Roses" is a frenuenl expla- 
nation made when placing an order. If you are short at planting time it will be 
your fault and not ours. The growing of grafted Roses is an industry in itself. At 
Cromwell the large quantity of Roses grown for cut flowers makes it possible to get 
scions that are first-class. We want your Rose Plant order, and we want to be able 
to say "yes" to your inuuiry. Estimate your reauirements and write us. 

GRAFTED ROSES, for Greenhouse Growing 

The Best Varieties for the Average Grower. 
Opiielia Mrs. Aaron Ward Mrs. George Sliawyer Hoosier Beauty 
Hadley Jonlclieer J. L. Mock Lady Alice Stanley Killamey 

Milady KiUamev Brilliant White Killamey Kaiserin 

Double White Killamey 
Grafted 2i4-in. tots, $12,S0 per 100: $120.00 per 1000. 2500 at $110.00 per lOCO. 250 of a 

variety at the 1000 rate. 

Own Root, 2'4-in., ST-.-iO per 100; $60X0 per ICOO. 

Sunburst, own root, $10.00 per 100; $9D.00 per 1000. 

My Maryland and Mrs. Wm. R. Hearst, grafted only, $12,50 per 100; 

$120,00 per 1000. 
The time to buy your Roses is NOW. 

M.N. PIERSON,.r.c. 

CROMWELL, CONN. 



Mention The BcTlew when yon write. 



Mention The Rerlew when yon write. 



Belle Washburn 

ROOTED CUTTINGS 

The best red Carnation of the new introductions of last year. 
Watch its flowers sell. No other Carnation is in the same class 
for red flowers. 

Rooted cuttings ready to ship at once. Price in lots of 250 i 
or more, at the rate of $45.00 per 1000. In lots of 100 or 200, \ 
$5.00 per 100. All cuttings guaranteed first-class in every respect. ! 

BASSETT & WASHBURN ! 

Store and Office: 178 No. Wabash Avenue, Chicago 
Greenhouses: Hinsdale, Ilk 



Cherry Tree Trade Last Fall?" by 
Harry Hobbs and W, C. Reed. Ans. — 
Some sold out while others had too 
many and the trouble was only in local- 
ities. 

"What it Costs to Grow and Cellar 
a Three-year Apple Tree," by W. A. 
Harrison. Ans. — The cost varies, but 



at present not enough is asked for thei ■; 
they are sold under price compared o 
younger trees and compared to the spa e 
taken up in the nursery, 

"How to Eliminate Dead Beats," i y 
M. E. Chandler. Ans.— Watch the list 
more closely and don't trv to sell o 
everybody. 



Febuuaky 1, 1917. 



The Florists' Review 



99 



NEW ROSES 





GOLDEN GEN 



DONALD MacDONALD 

A new Hawlmark lied Rose sent out this year by Alex. Dickson and Sons. 
Tliis rose lias been tested for winter forcing for two years, and it produces more 
red roses during the winter than any rose now being grown. It is not a large 
rose, but has perfectly formed, medium sized flowers that sell at sight. Color 
bright orange carmine; will not turn blue because the base of the petals are 
orange. 

It is not a summer lose, as it has the same substance as Killarney, and from 
Thanksgiving until May it is a money maker for the rose grower, as no pinching 
is necessary. 

Strong Grafted Plants $35.00 per 100 $300.00 per 1000 

Own Root Plants 30.00 per 100 250.00 per 1000 

Grafting Eyes 200.00 per 1000 

GOLDEN GEM 
Golden yellow seedling Hose. A most beautiful shade of deep golden >ellow. 
A medium sized rose; long pointed bud well formed. A good keeper and very 
free bloomer, and a color that will sell. 

Own Root plants only $30.00 per 100, $250.00 per 1000. 

ROSE-PINK OPHELIA 

A sport of Ophelia, (^^olor clear Hose I'ink. Limited quantity this seasun. 
Better order quickly if you want a supply. 

Prices — Own Root 

Per 100, $30.00; per 250, $70.00; per 1000, $250.00. 

Grafted 
Per 100, $35.00; per 250, $82.50; per 1000, $300.00. 

PRIMEROSE 

This beautiful forcing rose is of the general type of Ophelia. The \((ung 
foliage is a lovely bronzy maroon, finishing bronzy green, and is of good habit 
and free growth. 

The bud is long and pointed, ideal in form, and the color is Indian-yellow 
with apricot shadings, color at base of petals deep golden; has splendid stem. A 
fine novelty. Qwn Root, $25.00 per 100, $200.00 per 1000. 

Grafted, $30.00 per 100, $250.00 per 1000. 

WE ADVISE ORDERING YOUR ROSES EARLY THIS SEASON 



Own Root 

100 1000 

Red Radiance $ 7.50 $ 60.00 

Mrs. William R. Hearst 7.50 60.00 

Cleveland 12.00 100.00 

Gorgeous 12.00 100. 00 

Champ Weiland 12.00 100.00 

Mrs. Charles Russell 14.00 120.00 

Bayard Thayer 14.00 120.00 

Prima Donna 10.00 90.00 

Mavourneen 10.00 90.00 

September Morn 10.00 90.00 

Sunburst 9.00 85.00 



Grafted 



100 
$14.00 
14.00 
17.50 
17.50 
17.50 
16.00 
16.00 
16.00 



1000 
$120.00 
120.00 
150.00 
150.00 
150.00 
150.00 
150.00 
150.00 



16.50 150.00 



SEE CLASSIFIED COLUMNS FOR CARNATION CUTTINGS AND OTHER STOCK 

For a complete list of Plants and Cuttings, send for a copy of our new Plant Bulletin. 

S. S. Pennock-Meehan Company 



THE WHOLKSALK FLORISTS OF FHILADKLFHIA 



PHILADELPHIA 
1608-1620 Ludlcyv Street 



NEW YORK 
1 1 7 West 28th Street 



BALTIMORE 
Franklin and St. Paul Streets 



WASHINGTON 
1216 H Street, N. W. 



The following varieties: 

Own Root, $7.50 per 100, $60.00 per 1000. 

Grafted, $14.00 per 100, $120.00 per 1000. 

Hadley, Hoosier Beauty, Ophelia, J. L. Mock, I^ouble 

White Killarney, Mrs. George Shawyer, Pink Killarney, White 

Killarney, Killarney Brilliant, Radiance, Maryland, Mrs. 

Aaron Ward, Arenberg, Richmond, Kaiserin. 

5000 Canlna Seedlings three years old, 3 to 5 feet high, for 
budding standards, $15.00 per 100. 

One year old seedlings of the Rosa Multiflora Japonica, 
$14.00 per 1000. 

Tills is found to be one of the best stocks for budding. 



Mention The Review when yon write. 



HYDRANGEAS* 

Vigorously rooted and sturdily 

grown. Send for complete prices. 

THE CONARD & JONES CO. 

West Grove, Pa. 



ROCHELLE 

■nper F„ts and PIrt Itandi.. See page 115 

"Will tlic Kotnilor Who Scnd.s Out a 

ifap Cut-I'riec List to the Trade at 

o, \^fKi"iiiii{r of the Buying Season, 

^oW.^^^'■"^*>' •" the Same Place as 
'! f Wholesaler Who Sends Out a Whole- 

'iorald''T \"r t^' ^^'^""'^ Buyer?" by 

nffZl ^- Holsingor. Ans.— The two 

"omlers should be forced to fight it out 

'/'l.^^''' "ther-,lon't patronize them. 

Should the Wholesale Nurseryman 



FORCING STOCK 

ROSES 

Field-grown, selected forcing grade 

Climbers $15.00 per 100 

E.vcolsa (Red Dorothy Perkins) Lady Gay Climbing American Heauty 

American Pillar Dorothy Perkins 

Hybrid Perpetual*, assorted $14.00 per lOO 

HYDRANGEAS 

Single stem plants, set with good, plump flower buds 

2>2-inch poU $4.00 per lOO 

Otaksa Mme. Emil Mouillere Mme. Maurice Hamar 

We offer a complete assortment of Roses, Shrubs, Vines, and Perennials for Spring 

out-of door planting. Send for current list. 

JACKSON & PERKINS CO., Newark, New York 



Mention The Review when yon write. 



Who Wants to Take Orders from Re- 
tail Customers Issue a Retail Catalogue 
or Price List?" by \V. A. Harrison. 
Ans. — Yes and also when a wholesaler 



gets an inquiry for a wholesale price 
list he should make sure that the party 
is in business. As an example, a law- 
yer went to a printer and bought 500 



100 



The Florists* Review 



February 1, 1917. 



A CORDIAL INVITATION 

is extended to all local and visiting florists and their friends 
to call and see our stock of plants for all occasions. 

DECORATIVE AHD BLOOMING PLAHTS 

Blooming Plants for Easter a Specialty 

Take Garfield Park Branch of the Metropolitan Elevated to Cicero Ave., walk four blocks north and 
one block west, or take Madison St. car to Cicero Ave., walk two blocks south and one block west. 

FRANK OECHSLIN 



4911 West Quincy Street, 



CHICAGO, ILL. 



Mention The Review when you write. 



letterheads with his name as a nursery- 
man, wrote to different wholesale firms 
for prices, bought his trees, and that 
was the end of his nursery business. 

"Is it Fair to the Retail Nurserymen 
Who Advertise for Papers to Give 
Trees and Plants as Premiums for J>ub- 
scription?" by Carl Sonderegger. Ans. 
— This question was a hard one and 
different nurserymen have different 
opinions. 

A number of other discussions grew 
out of the foregoing, and from ques- 
tions. 

The annual dinner was held at the 
Coates House during the evening of 
Januarv 24. W. J. B. 



BROWN SCALE ON FERNS. 

I enclose a Boston fern frond cov- 
ered with brown scales, and as I have 
had little experience in the culture of 
ferns, I would like to have your ad- 
vice as to the cause of this condition. 

B. & B.— Wis. 



The fern frond in question was badly 
infested with the common brown fern 
scale insect. For this particular insect 
a solution of tobacco extract, consist- 
ing of one part, by measure, of the 
tobacco extract to fifty parts of water, 
will prove a good exterminator, pro- 
vided the solution is used faithfully for 
several applications. If the plants are 
in pots, it is an easy matter to dip them 
at intervals of ten days; and if they 
are planted out on a bench, a weekly 
application of the solution by means of 
a spray pump will answer the purpose. 

W. H. T. 



PTERIS FRONDS BURN. 

Please inform me through The Eeview 
wliat is responsible for the poor con- 
dition of the enclosed pteris plants. 
Tho fronds seem to burn at the tips. 

W. F. J.— la. 



The condition of the pteris fronds 
would indicate that the plants were 
overwatcred after they were repotted. 
Pteris plants of this type will stand 
much water after they are well rooted, 
but they are frequently finicky when 
heavilv watered after a late potting. 



To Avoid Disappointment 

We advise early placing of orders for immediate or future 
delivery for CRAIG QUALITY STOCK. 

Crotons— 4-inch pots. $35.00 per 100; 5-inch pots, $6.00, $9.00 and $12.00 per doz.; 
6-inch pots, $12.00, $15.00 and $18.00 per doz. 

Otaheite Oranges — 2VL'-inch pots, heavy plants for growing on, $8.00 per 100; 
$75.00 per 1000. 

Dracaena Kelleriana— 2V(!-inch pot.s, $12.00 per 100; $110.00 per 1000. 

Areca Lutescens — C-inch pots, heavy made-up, $15.00 per doz.; 7-inch pots, heavy 
made-up, $2.50 and $3.00 each. 

Gardenia Veitchii— 2i/i-inch pots, $S.00 per 100; $75.00 per 1000; 4-inch pots, 
$25.00 per 100. 

Ficus Pandurata— 6-inch pots. 2i/. feet tall, $2.00 each; 7-inch pots, 3 to 4 feet 
tall, $2.50 and $3.00 each. Large specimens at $4.00, $5.00, $6.00 and $7.50 each. 

Ficus Utills— 6-inch pots, $2.00 each. Large specimens at $2.50, $3.00, $4.00, 
$5.00 and $7.50 each. 

Pelargoniums— Easter Greeting. 2Vj-inch pots, very fine stock, $10.00 per 100. 

NEPHROLEPIS FERNS 
including Scottii, Elegantissima Improved, Todeaoides, Robusta, Scholzelii, John 
Wanamaker, Elegantissima Compacta, Teddy, Jr., Harrisll— 214-inch pots, $6.00 
per 100; $50.00 per 1000. 4-inch pots, $25.00 per 100; $200.00 per 1000. 6-inch 
, pots, $50.00 per 100. Specimens in 11-inch tubs, at $2.50 and $3.00 each. 

Nephrolepis, Teddy, Jr., Sport, Dwarf Boston, Smithll and Verona— 2Vi-inch 
pots, $8.00 per 100; $75.00 per 1000. 4-inch pots, $25.00 per 100. 6-inch pots, 
$50.00 per 100. 

Asparagus Plumosus— 4-inch pots, $12.00 per 100; $110.00 per 1000. 
Asparagus Sprengerl— 4-inch pots, heavy, $10.00 per 100; $90.00 per 1000. 

ROBERT CRAIQ COMPANY 

PHILADELPHIA, PA. 



4900 Market Street 



Mention Tlio Review wlion you write. 



New Red Rose DONALD NacDONALD 

A New HAWIMARK Red Rose sent out this year by Alex. Dickson & Sons 

We have tested this rcsc for winter forcing for two years, and with us it produces 
niore red roses during tiie winter than any rose we ha\e ever grown. It is not a large rose, 
but has perfectly formed, medium-sized flowers that sell at sight. Color bright orange- 
carmine: will not turn blue because the ba.se of the petals is orange. It is not a summer 
rose, as it has the same substance as KiU.arney. We build ths plants up until November, 
and from Thanksgiving until Ma.v it is a money-maUer for the Rose Grower as no pinch- 
ing is necessary. ' 

Strong Grafted Plants, $35.00 per lOO, $3O0.00 per lOOO 
Own Root Plants, $30.00 per lOO, $250.00 per lOOO 

ROBERT SCOTT & SON, Inc. 

SHARON HILL, Delaware County, PENNSYLVANIA 



Mention The RotIcw when you write. 



A little more care in watering, no ex- 
tra fertilizers and a night temperature 



of 60 degrees will do much to overcome 
this trouble. "W. H. T. 



FBBROAnY 1, 1017. 



The Florists' Review 



101 



CYCLAMENS 

Ready Now-- Full of Flowers and Buds 

4inch, at 20c 5-inch, at 35c G-inch, at 50c 7-mch, at 80c 

White— Salmon Pink— Crimson 
GET IN YOUR PLANTS NOW FOR VALENTINE'S DAY 



DAVIS FLORAL CO., 



WHOLESALE 
FLORISTS 



DAVENPORT, IOWA 



Mention The Review when yon write. 




T 




THE LARBEST 



HORTICULTURAL AUCTION 

M»Btlon Th« R«t1«w wbg« y<w wrif . 



54andS6VeseySt. 

.NEWYGRKCmr 

ROOMS IN THE WORLD 



NOTICE 



To all American Nurserymen and Seedsmen deslr- 
loK to keep In touch with commercial horticulture 
In Kngland and the continent of Europe: Your 
best iiieane of doing this Is to take in the 

Horticultural Adv«rtls«r 

Our circulation covers the whole trade In Great 
Britain and the cream of the European flrma. Im- 
partial reports on all novelties, etc. Paper free on 
receipt of $1.60, covering cost of postage yearly. As 
the H.^A. is a purely trade medium, applicants 
should, with the subscription, send a copy of their 
cataloKue or other evidence that they belong to the 
nursery or seed trade. 

A. & C. Peantn, Lowdham, Nottiighim, England 

Menttoa The Review when you write. 

Could you sell Azalea Indica with 
a profit at Christmas, 1917? 

If so, ask for price list for guaranteed deliv- 
ery from A. ColleA Sons. Destelbergen. Belgium. 

Correspondence to 

A. COLLE, JR., Doylestown, Pa. 

Mention The Review when yon write^ 



VIBURNUMS* 

Vigorously rooted and sturdily grown. 
Send for complete prices. 

THE CONARD & JONES CO. 

West Grove, Pa. 



Me ntion The Review when .you write. 

HARDY WATER LILIES 

Beautiful Novelties. 

NELUMBIUMS and OTBER AQUATIC PLANTS. 
LATOUR-MARLIAC 

., , Nurseryman 

«t icmpje-sur-lol (Lot and Garonne), f RANGE 

•■■nKlish catalogues free on application. 
^I^Ptlon Th e Review when you write. 

THE NAUIMANN CO. 

1111 w ,„^®*«"*l«PIaiitBmen 
**i E. l«6th St., CLEVELAND. OHIO 




i 



I 



I 



I 



ROOTED CARNATION CUTTINGS 



IMMEDIATE DELIVERY 

CWe are now booking orders for our new seedling Superb, $12.00 per 100, 
$100.00 per 1000. 

Superb is a seedling of Gloriosa and Enchantress. It has the good stem of Glori- 
osa and the fine growing habit of Enchantress. The color is a flesh pink and it 
keeps its color at all seasons. The flowersaverage about three inches, are very full 
and generally receive full score on substance. The flowers are all perfect and do 
not split. In the four years we have grown it, it has proved the best commercial 
variety, barring none. 

AVIATOR 

Clf you want scarlet carnations for Christmas, grow Aviator, $6.00 per 
100, $50.00 per 1000. 



STANDARD AND NEW VARIETIES 



wmte - Per 100 1000 

Matchless S 2.60 S 20.00 

White Enchantress 2.50 20.00 

White Wonder 3.00 25.00 

Flesh Pink- 
Superb 12.00 100.00 

Enchantress 2.50 20.00 

Alice 3. CO 26.00 



Medium Pink— Per 100 

MissTheo fe 00 

Pink Sensation 3.50 

Dark Pink- 
Peerless Pink 2 50 

C.W.Ward 2.50 

Red- 
Aviator 6.00 

Champion 3.00 



1000 

$50.00 

30.00 

20.00 
20.00 

60.00 
25.00 



J. D. THOMPSON CARNATION CO., Joliet, III. 




Mention The Review when yon write 



i«|lilllllllllilllllllllillillilllililllilillllllillillliillliilll|||||||||||||||l|||||||||||||||||||||||,^ 

I CYCLAMEN | 

S Well grown 4-inch plants, in 4-inch pots, in an assortment of good colors, s 
= $25.00 per 100. = 

I ROBERT CRAIG CO., 4900 MARKET ST., PHILADELPHIA, PA. I 



m 



iiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii iiiiiiiiiiii 11 iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiimiiiiiiij? 

Meotlon Tbe Beview when yoa writ*. 



102 



The Florists' Review 



Februauy 1, 1917, 



:llllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllilllllllllllllllllllllllllillllllllllllllllllllilllilllllinillllllillll 

I ROOTED CARNATION GUHINGS 



600,000 



Ready for 
immediate shipment 



Strong, clean, healthy, well rooted cuttings ready for immediate shipment. Reioberg's stock 
is known everywhere for its supreme quality and is the stock for you to buy. Order TODAY. 



IMMEDIATE DELIVERY 



Per lOOO 100 

White Enchantress . . : $16.00 $2 00 

White Perfection 16.00 2.00 

White Wonder 18.00 2.00 

Enchantress 16.00 2.00 

Rose-pink Enchantress 16.00 2 00 

PETER REINBERG 



Per 1000 

Ward $18.00 

Beacon 18.00 

Herald 18,00 

Joy 16.00 

Belle Washburn 30.00 



100 
$2.00 
2.00 
2 00 
2.00 
4.00 



30 E. Randolph St., 

CHICAGO, ILL. 



^iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiir 

Mention Tbe Rerlew when roii write. 



CINCINNATI. 



The Market. 

Business is good. The supply of 
stock, however, is rather short, find 
practically everything cleans up read- 
ily. Choice American Beauties are in 
good supply, but they do not have a 
lively market. Other roses are scarce 
and sell on sight. Carnations are in 
fair supply and sell easily. Easter 
lilies are cleaning up from day to day. 
Sweet peas are in abundance and sell 
satisfactorily. Valley, orchids and sin- 
gle violets are offered. Bulbous stock, 
including narcissi, daffodils, tulips and 
freesias, sells readily. Rubrum lilies, 
callas, snapdragons and forget-me-nots 
wind up the miscellaneous list. Greens 
are plentiful. 

Various Notes. 

Cincinnatians attending the carna- 
tion convention at Indianapolis this 
week are C. f]. Critchell, Mr. and Mrs. 
J. A. Peterson, R. Witterstaetter, W. 
Ray Murphy, Otto Herschfeld, Frank 
Schneider, Henry Sheppard, Fred Bach- 
meier and P. J. Olinger. 

C. E. Critchell got in a heavy ship- 
ment of sheet moss last week for his 
early spring business in this line. 

H. F. Winter, of Charleston, W. Va.; 
Harry O. May, of Summit, N. J.; A. M. 
Henshaw, of New York city, and 0. S. 
Honaker, of liexington, Ky., stopped 
off in this city January 29 on their way 
to Indianapolis. 

Julius Baer is displaying an excellent 
lot of azaleas in his show windows this 
week. C. H. H. 



iLiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiin:: 





Grand Junction, Mich. — The White 
Rock Poultry Farms, Inc., of which E. 
B. Eddy is secretary, treasurer and gen- 
eral manager, as a side line grows dahl- 
ias for cut flowers for sale to the trade 
and this year has a surplus of about 
10,000 tubers. 



( 1 ) Begonia Ririnifolia = 

•_'i4-inch pot lOc each = 

(2) Begonia Rex— Two Varieties | 

2-inch pot 8c each E 

(3) Begonia Sunderbruchi i 

L'i4-inch pot 10c each E 

(4) Faster Greeting Pelargonium = 

2-inch pot 7c each 5 

15,000 BEGONIAS E 

6,OO0 PELARGONIUMS 5 

(Photograph of slock Jan. 5. l'.»17) S 

Do you need 10 or 1000? Send your order E 

at once, — 

FRED W. ARNOLD, Florist I 

CAMBRIDGE, OHIO = 

TJiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiniiimiiiiiiiiiiiiimimiininiiiiiiiiini iiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiii n? 



Grand Rapids, Mich.— The Crabb & 
Hunter Floral Co. ceased to do business 
at the end of 1916 and was succeeded 
by the Crabb & Hunter Flower Shop, 
a change in name made desirable by the 
death of one of the partners. 



ROCHELLE 

Paper PotB and Dirt Ban dg. Si-o pate 118 

Always mention the riorists* Review 
wh«n wrltlns advertisers. 



Fkbuuakv 1, 1917. 



The Florists' Review 



103 



Ferns and Pandanus 



B 



El 



Exceptionally good stock— 20% discount for cash 

BOSTON FERNS 

Bushy, compact plants, 3-inch and 4-inch pot size, 
$4.00 and $5.00 per 100 

Thrifty, well rooted runners at $10.00 per 1000 

PANDANUS VEITCHII 

Beautifully Variegated Foliage 

2^-inch pot siz6 $6.00 per 100 4-inch pot size $10.00 per 100 

3 -inch pot size 8.00 per 100 6inch pot size 15.00 per 100 

8-inch pot size $25.00 per 100 

Large specimen plants, 35c and 50c each Cuttings at $4.00 and $6.00 per 100 

Remember the 20% discount for cash 



□ 



r. M. SOAR, Little River, Fla 



Blooming Plants 

For Immediate sales -we offer an extra fine 
lot of Chinese Primroses, 3-inch, $7.60 per hun- 
dred, 41nch $10.00 per hundred. We also Include 
Malacoides and Forbesl at the same price. 
These prices of course are very low and for 
CASH only. 

Nice Cinerarias coming into bloom, S-incb, 
J«c ^ach; also have stock in 3 and 4-inch at 
♦8.00 and $15.00 ready to grow on. Get your 
stock now for Easter. 

Begonias: we still offer 2-lnch blooming Chate- 
laine and lumlnosa, $6.00 per hundred. These 
I f„"\f 2E*J" 2x2Mi-lnch pots. Fine plants In 
3-Inch, $8.00; 4-lnch, $16.00. 

ead^*'*"*' ^P**^'"^ ^^^^ week, 75c, $1.00 and $1.26 

„nw*'* \^^X. ^'^^ Easter. Order your Hydrangeas 
H? 7r„ t,^^^^^ ^^^^^ '^ne lot of imported stock 
at 75c, $1.00 and $1.60 each. 

Bt'V^i^°^.,'2r ni'<lwinter and Easter blooming 

?hls^6tock'*nlw.°° ^"'^- " "^"^ ^"^ y°" *" ^"y 

uA^nv^o*^^ ^^^ ^"*'»t 'ot Of Lilies started that 
HtAl L^Z^^ }\^^'' ^ t" 12 inches above the pots 
HI -5c each, all stock shipped in paper pots. 

niillfT*^ ^°^y Eamblers and Tausendschon 
for V,.i?o''°<'^^'«^**'"^«''' that will be in bloom 
Thpsp tm " '^^^ ^''ape «t 36c and 60c each. 
weeks. ^°''"* '"*""® ^^^° double in four 

Ka7tPr%'-Il l^^? ^^ K'^il *o enter your order for 
pSScel'sTeach.'"'' ''' """^ ^''^ ^"^" = 
"o^'trouble."'" ^°^^ °^^^^ ^^'^y *° y°" ^'" ^"^^ 



'■ A. KUHL 

l>ir»-*«. Wholesale Grower 

1*^^^ ILLINOIS 

Bobbink & Atkins 

NURSERYMEN 
FLORISTS and PLANTERS 

RUTHERFORD, NEW JERSEY 

Mention The Review when yen write. 



GERANIUMS 

S. A. Nutt, Gen. Grant, Mme. Buchner, Jean Oberle, Abbie Schaffer, 
B. H. Trego, etc., $2.00 per 100; $18.50 per 1000 for 2-inch. $3.C0 per 100; 
$25.00 per 1000 for .S-inch. 

We list several hundred varieties in an assortment that covers every class 
of Geraniums, single, semi-double, double, ivy-leaved, variegated foliage and 
scented, including such varieties as Rose, Nutmeg, Lemon, etc., $2.00 per 100 
for 2-inch; $3.00 per 100 for 3-inch. Novelties and New Varieties up to 50c 
each. 

MISCELLANEOUS PLANTS 

2-inch, $2.00 per 100; $18.50 per 1000. 3-inch, $3.00 per 100; $25.00 per 1000. 

Alyssum, Giant and Dwarf. Altemantheras, 10 varieties. Ageratum, 
6 varieties. Begonias, Luminosa, Vernon, Erfordii, Pfltzer's Triumph, Graci- 
lis Rose. Coleus, 10 varieties. Cuphea. Hardy English Ivy. Heliotrope, 
Lemon Verbenas, Lantanas, 10 varieties. Moonvines, White and Blue. 
Parlor Ivy. Petunias, Double and Fringed, Mixed colors. Pompon Chry- 
santhemums, large assortment. Salvia, Bonfire and Zurich. Swainsona, 
White. 

Abutilon, Savitzii. 2-inch, $3.00 per 100. 3-inch, $4.00 per 100. 

FERNS 

Boston, 4-inch, $2.00 per dozen; $15.00 per 100. 7-inch, $6.00 per dozen. 
Large specimen plants, 11 to 12-inch pots, from $2.00 to $5.00 each. 

Send for Catalogue. 

CASH WITH ORDKR 

R. VINCENT, JR., & SONS CO. 

WHITE MARSH, MD. 



104 



The Florists' Review 



February 1, 1917. 



Gullett's Offer of Young Stock 



Cyclamen 



., „ Handsomely flowered Cyclamens, 4-lnch to 7-lnch, at 25c, 40c, 60c, 76c, 
11.00 and $1.50. Splendid sellers. In most desirable colors. 

Ferns, Pahdanus, Dracaenas, Rubbers, Primulas 

strong Plumosus, 4 in., 8c. 
Kicus Elastica, excellent plants, 5 and 6-in.. 60c and 75c each. 
Primula Obconica. nicely in bloom. 3-in.. 8c; 4-in . 15c. 
Fine Table Ferns, 2^4 -In., |3.60 per 100; $80 per 1000. 
Dracaena Termlnalls, well colored, 6-ln.. 76c and $1.00 each. Pandanua 
Veltchll. beautifully variegated, 6-ln., 60c; 6-ln., $1.00. 
A Moderate Charge Is Made for Packing. 



GULLETT S SONS, 



Lincoln, III. 



DnCPQ Own Boot Grafted 

IS.\JOCii3 Per 1000 Per 1000 

Mrs. Chas. Russell $160.00 

Mrs. Bayard Thayer $100.00 160.00 

Tip-Top (Baby Doll) 100.00 120.00 

American Beauty 80.00 

Ophelia 60.00 120.00 

Mrs. Shawj-er 60.00 120.00 

KlUamey kinds 60.00 120.00 

Richmond 60.00 120.00 

Hoosler Beauty 60.00 120.00 

CARNATION CUTTINGS 

Per 100 Per 1000 

Champion »3.00 $25.00 

Mrs. 0. W. Ward 3.00 26.00 

Philadelphia 2.60 20.00 



COLUMBUS, O. 

The Market. 

Business has been extremely heavy 
(luring the last two weeks. Much stock 
has come in, but not enough in some 
lines to meet the demand. Eoses are 
badly off crop and those that come in 
are sold quickly. Prices are high for 
these, considering the time of year. 
Ophelia seems to be more plentiful than 
the other varieties and its quality is 
fine. Russell sells in a hurry. Killarney 
and White Killarney roses move well 
by reason of the scarcity of pther va- 
rieties. Carnations arrive in good quan- 
tities, but they are cleaned up early 
and some growers are called on two and 
three times daily. Some of the stock 
is cut rather closely, but all blooms go 
in the rush. 

Narcissi are more plentiful than any 
other flowers and quantities of them 
are disposed of. They fill in nicely. 
Romans are not plentiful as yet and 
arc in great demand. Sweet peas now 
are extra fine and a great number of 
them are disposed of at good prices. A 
few jonquils are to be seen, but not 
enough to cut any figure. Freesias are 
more plentiful and sell well. Valley is 
scarce and the demand is heavy. 

Ferns have been scarce during the 
last ten days. Lilies are not plentiful 
and the demand for them is strong. 
Violets are moving nicely and the qual- 
ity is all that could be desired. The 
demand for potted plants is strong. 
These include azaleas, primulas, be- 
gonias, cyclamens, ferns, palms, etc. 

Various Notes. 

The Indianola Florists report that 
business is rushing and that it is hard 
to get enough stock. 

E. Metzmaier says he can hardly find 
enough stock to go around. 

The Livingston Seed Co. has a fine 
line of cyclamens. These plants have 
had a good sale. 

The Columbus Floral Co. says that 
stock never has been so scarce as at the 
present time. 

The Munk Floral Co. is marketing a 
good cut of roses, in addition to a line 
of potted plants. 

The Fifth Avenue Floral Co. has been 
hard pushed in getting settled in its 
new store. 

Walter Marion, of Marion Bros., Cir- 
cleville, was a visitor last week. He 
says the firm is cutting the finest sweet 
peas ever and that Marion brand car- 
nations are of top-notch quality at 
present. J. M. . 



Mention The Berlew when yon write. 



■LillillllllilllllllllllllllllllllllllllliiiillllilllllllllllllllllllillllllllllllllllilllllllllllllllllllU: 

I Ferns, Palms, Rhododendrons, etc. | 

5 Our stock of Kentias is larger than usual, with bright, clean stock in all sizes. = 



6 leaves. 15 inches high 

5 to 6 leaves, 18 to 20 inches high.. 

5 to 6 leaves, 20 to 24 inches high.. 

6 to 6 leaves. 24 to 28 inches high . . 



.each. 



7-inch tubs. 36 inches high 

8-inch tubs, 38 to 40 inches high 

8-inch tubs, 40 to 44 inches high — 
10-inch tubs, 60 to 66 inches high 



= KENTIA BKLMOREANA, 4 -inch pots. 
S 5-inch pots. 

Si 6-inch pois, 

S 6-inch pots. 

S KKNTIA FORSTERIANA, 6-inch pots, 6 to 6 leaves, 30 inches high.. 

— 6-inch pots, 6 to 7 leaves, 34 inches high.. 

— 7-inch pots, 6 to 7 leaves, 36 inches high.. 

= KENTIA FORSTERIANA. Made-up- 

2 3 and 4 plants in 

2 3 and 4 plants in 

^ 3 and 4 plants in 

2 3 and 4 plants in 

E FERNS, Tmldy Jr., extra auality- 

S 5'inch pots 

^ b-inch pots " 

E FERNS, Boston, fine stock— 

— 5-incn pots " 

— 6-inch pots " 

— 8-inch pots " 

~ 10-inch pots " 

= ASPARAGUS SPRENGERI, heavy field plants, new in 4-inch pots per 100. 

— 5-.inch pots, extra heavy 

S ENGLISH IVT, 4-inch pot plants- 

S 2 and 8 shoots, 2 to 3-foot tops 

E RHODODENDRONS, special forcing varieties- 

S 8 to 12 buds each, 

S 12 to 16 buds " 

S Pink Pearl, 6 to 8 buds " 

— Pink Pearl, 8 to 12 buds " 

= AZALEA MOLLIS, Seedlings- 

— 12 to 15-inch, full of buds per doz., 

— 15 to 18-inch, very bushy 

I THE STORRS & HARRISON CO. | 

= NUBSERTMEN. FLORISTS AND SEEDSMEN E 

I PAINESVILLE, OHIO | 

rniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii iiiiiiiiiiiiiir 

Mention The ReTlew when yon write. 

OBCONICA PRIMULAS 

Fine 4-inch stock $io.oo per 100 

Asparagus Plumosus, 2-inch 2.OO per 100 

Vinca Variegata, 'J-inch 2.OO per 100 

S. A. Nutt Geraniums, 2-inch 2.OO per 100 

S. A. Nult Geraniums, 2i^-inch 2.50 per 100 

Cash, please. 

JOS. H. CUNNINGHAM, Delaware, Ohio 

Mention The Review when yon write. 



$0.40 
1.00 
1.25 
1.50 
1.50 
2.00 
2.50 

3.50 
4.50 
6.01) 
8.50 

.35 
.50 

.36 

.60 

1.00 

2.60 

12.00 
18.00 

12.00 

.80 
1.10 

.80 
1.25 

4.50 
6.40 



Miss Theo 

HAS MADE GOOD 

Rooted Cuttings, $6.00 100, $50.00 1000 

LITTLEFIELD&WYMAN 

NO. ABINGTON.MASS. 

IfaatloB The B«rl«w wkn jtm writ*. 



JULIUS ROEHRS CO. 

RUTHERFORD,N.J. 

ORCHIDS, PALMS 
and plants off avery varlaty 



Hentlra TIm IUt1«w wkn jm writ*. 



February 1, 1917. 



The Florists' Review 



106 



Special Trade Offerings 

WINTER -- 1917 - SPRING 



Select your items now and mail in your order— sixty years' experience is your guarantee of satisfaction. 



2-inch, 
3-incli, 
4-lnch, 
5-lnch, 
6-inch, 



BOSTON FERNS: 

$4 per 100. 

$7 per 100. 

*2 per doz.; $15 per 100. 

i3 per doz.; $25 per 100. 

;n nor Ant • S.'^O npr 100 



)u I'^i uv/A. , ^^o pt^i ±\nj, 

0-incn, ?!e per doz.; $50 per 100. 
7-inch, $9 per doz. 
8-inch, $12 per doz. 

WHITMANI FERNS: 

2-incli, $4 per 100. 
3-incli, $7 per 100. 
4-inch, $2 per doz.; $15 per 100. 

SCOTTII FERNS: 
5-inch, $3.00 per doz. 

ASSORTED FERNS FOR DISHES: 
2V4-inch, $3.00 per 100. 
3-inch, $6.00 per 100. 
4-inch, $10.00 per 100. 

CYRTOMIITM FALCATUM: 

2 V, -inch, $3.00 per 100. 
3-inch, $6.00 per 100. 
4-inch, $10.00 per 100. 
5-incli, $2.50 per doz. 



LATTRO CERASUS: 
A slirub similar to the Aucuba, with dark 
(rrcon wax-like leaves, splendid for decora- 
tive purposes. 18-24-inch bushy plants, $1.00 
and $1.25 each. 

ASPIDISTRA ELATIOR: 

Tall, fine plants, green leaved, 10c per leaf. 
inch pots, $1.00 and $1.25 each. 
Variegated, 15c per leaf. 
6-inch pots, $1.25 and $1.50 each. 

SANSEVIERA ZETLANICA: 
3-inch, $1.00 per dozen. 

FICUS PANDURATA: 
4-lnch, $6.00 per doz. 

FICUS ELASTIC A: 
4-in., S3. 00 per doz. 6-ln., $6.00 per doz. 
^5.00 per doz. 7-in., 75c eacli. 




in. 



FICUS NITIDA: 

A small-leaved rubber plant which is very 
desirable as a house plant for jardinieres, 
window boxes, basket arrangements, etc. 
Will stand the sun exposure perfectly. 

2-inch, 75c per doz.; $5.00 per 100. 

3-inch, $1.25 per doz.; $10.00 per 100. 

4-inch, $3.00 per doz. 



4-inch, 



PANDANUS UTILIS: 
3.00 per dozen. 



PANDANUS VEITCHII: 

4- i noli very line, well colored stock, 
I)CT dozen, $45.00 per 100. 
.'i-inoli, 7.5c each. 
Cinch, $1.00 each. 



$6.00 



MRS. F. SANDER DAISIES: 
Much., $3.00 per 100. 3-inch, $6.00 per 100. 



COLEUS: 
Trailing Queen, 2-inch, $2.50 per 100. 
Veischaffelti, 2-inch, $2.50 per 100. 
Oolden Redder, 2-inch, $2.50 per 100. 



PETUNIAS— DOUBLE 

2-inch, $3.00 per 100. 
3 inch, $6.00 per 100. 

PALMS : 
Areca Lutescens, 2-inoli, 
$8.00 per 100. 



ASSORTED: 



$1.00 per doz. ; 



Size. 
2-inch 
3 incli 
4-incli 
■"i-inch 



KENTIA BELMOREANA: 



Leaves 

4 

4-5 

4-5 

5-6 



Height. 

8-inch 

8-10-inch 

12-14-inch 

15-18-inch 



Doz. 

$1.50 
2.00 
4.50 
9.00 



KENTIA FORSTERIANA: 

>ize. Leaves. Height. D<Jz. 

;j!'"l' 4 8-inch $1.50 

.5 moll 4-5 8-10-inch 2.00 

LATANIA BORBONICA: 

2-irioli, .$8.00 per 100. 
3 inch, $12.00 per 100. 



100 

$12.00 

15.00 



100 

$12.00 

15.00 



LIVISTONA ALTISSIHA: 
2-incli, $1.25 per doz.; $10.00 per 100. 

PHOENIX RECLINATA: 

2-inch, $1.25 per doz.; $10.00 per 100. 
3-inch, $2.00 per doz.; $15.00 per 100. 

FTYCHOSPERMA ALEXANDRAE: 
4-lnch, $3.00 per dozen. 

AZALEAS: 

Van der Cruyssen, Vervaenana, Empress of 
India, Ernest Eechhaute, Schryveriana, Pro- 
fessor Wolters, Apollo: 

12 to 20-inch crowns, $1,00, $1.25, $1.50, 
$1.75 each. 

BULBS: 

Gladiolus, America, 1st size $10.00 per 1000. 

Gladiolus, Mrs. Francis King, 1st size, 
$10.00 per 1000. 

Gladiolus, mixed, 1st, 2nd, 3rd sizes, $4.00 
per 1000. 

Montbretias, orange scarlet, $6.00 per 1000. 

Cannas, field grown clumps, assorted, $10.00 
per 100. 

Dahlias, field grown clumps, assorted, $8.00 
per 100. 

PEONIES: 

Pink, Light pink, Liglit red. Dark red. 
White, large field grown clumps, 9 to 15 
eyes, 25c and 35c each. 

HYACINTHS, TULIPS AND DAFFODILS. 
Assorted : 
3'/i-inch pots, $6.00 per 100, ready to force. 

RHODODENDRONS: 

8 and 9-inch, $1.50 and $1.75 eacli. 

spir.s:as: 

Peach Blossom at $1.25 per doz. 

Gladstone at $1.25 per doz. 

Funkia, dormant, 50c per doz. ; potted, $3.00 
per 100. 

Euonymous var. climbers, 4-in. pots, $1.00 
per doz. 

ENGLISH IVY: 

4-inch, $1.50 per doz.; $12.00 per 100. 

8-inch wire pyramids, covered with vines, 
fine specimens, $2.50 and $3.00 each. 

VINCA MAJOR VARIEGATA: 

214-inch. $3.00 per 100. 
3-incli, $6.00 per 100. 

ORNAMENTAL NURSERY STOCK: 

This stock has been frequently trans- 
planted and lias developed large and thrifty 
plants by planting wide apart. First-class 
bushy stock: Old. Ft. Per 100 

Spiraea Van Houttei 3-yr. 2-2% $15.00 

4-yr. 2%-3 30.00 

Herboris Tluinbergii 2-yr. 1-1% 10.00 

3-yr. lMi-2 20.00 

Amoor River Privet 2-yr. 12.00 

Ligustrum Ibotn 2-yr. 12.00 

" 3-yr. 20.00 

Indian Currant 2-yr. 10.00 

Deutzia, Pride of 

Rochester 2-yr. 10.00 

Spiraea Billnrdii 2-yr. 10.00 

Carolina Poplar 2-yr. 3-5 10.00 



ADIANTUM CUNEATUM: 
6-inch, $6.00 per doz. 

ASPARAGUS PLUMOSUS: 

3-inch, .$6.00 per 100. 
4-inch, $12.00 per 100. 

ASPARAGUS SPRENGERI: 

Wire baskets witli vines, 11-inch, $1.00 
each. 

DRACAENA INDIVISA: 
2-inch, $3.00 per 100. 
3-incli, 75c per doz.; $6 per 100. 
4-lnoh, $1.25 per doz.; $10 per 100. 
C-inch, fine plants, $9 per doz. 

FLOWERED PLANTS FOR IMMEDIATE 

USE, 

Primula Obconica: 

Assorted, rich colors: 

4-inch, $1.50 per doz.; $12.00 per 100. 

5-inch, $3.00 per doz. 

Cyclamen : 
3-inch, $1.00 per doz. ; $8.00 per 100. 
5-inch, $4.50 per doz.; $35.00 per 100. 
6-inch, $12.00 per doz. 

Chatelaine Begonias: 
2-inch, $4.00 per 100. 
3-inch, $1.25 per doz. 

BOXWOOD 

BUSH FORM: 
10-inch, 25e each. 
10 and 12-inch, heavy, 35c eacli. 
15-inch, 50c each. 
18-inch, 75c each. 
22 and 24-inch, $1 and $1.25 each. 

STANDARDS: 
18-inch stem, 15-inch crown, $2.00 each. 

PYRAMIDS: 

2 feet high, $2.00 each. 

3 feet high, $3.00 each. 
31/3 feet high, $3.50 each. 

4 feet high, $4.00 each. 

5 feet high, $8.00 each. 

6 feet high, $15.00 eacli. 

GLOBES: 

18-incli, .'J4.00 each. 




AUCUBA JAPONICA VARIEGATA: 

These semi hard.v evergreen shrubs with 
leaves handsomel.v spotted yellow are very 
useful in cool places for ornamental pur- 
poses, as they will stand seveial degrees 
of frost. We have a large stock of these 
desirable plants. 

18 to 21- inch bushy plants al $1.00 and 
$1.25 each. 



THE GEO. WITTBOLD CO. 



745 Buckingham Place, 



CHICAGO 



106 



INDIANAPOLIS. 



The Market. 



No complaints are being made as to 
business, but all kinds of grumblings 
and mumblings about the shortage of 
stock are being heard. Much sickness 
in the city has accelerated the demand 
for carnations, roses, sweet peas and 
freesias, while many funerals also have 
drawn heavily on the supply of roses 
and carnations, making a severe short- 
age in these two flowers. The prices 
have not increased greatly; roses make 
$3 to $15 and carnations $3 to $4 per 
hundred, but there are not nearly 
enough of them to meet the demand. 

The supply of sweet peas is limited, 
but the prospects are bright for a tig 
crop. 

More bulbous stock is available. Paper 
Whites are numerous, tulips are making 
a better appearance and freesias ar« al- 
most plentiful at $1.50 to $4 per hun- 
dred. Easter lilies are still rare, but 
callas have increased in numbers con- 
siderably. 

Good potted stock is abundant and m 
good demand. Cyclamens, begonias nnd 
primroses are especially attractive and 
in good favor. Smilax, plumosus and 
Sprengeri are plentiful and of good 
quality, but fern leaves, although abun- 
dant, "arc of only fair quality. 
Vaxious Notes. 

F. Stoelte, formerly with the A. 
Wiegand's Sons Co., now is in the em- 
ploy of the Indianapolis Flower & 
Plant Co. , ^ 

The Smith & Young Co. has stocked 
a complete line of wire designs from the 
Young Tool Co., of Casey, 111. 

Baur & Steinkamp are booked up 
until February 15 on their new carna- 
tion, Merrv Christmas. 

Henry W. Rieman reports excellent 
business, especially in funeral work. 
The sales have been so active that it has 
been necessary to cut stock green to 

fill orders. ,. t^, <- 

A visit to the Indianapolis Flower & 
Plant Co. range is of special interest. 
The rose's are in fine shape and m good 
crop. An exceedingly heavy crop of 
carnations is coming on. The pot plants 
are especially attractive, ferns, prim- 
roses, cyclamens, begonias and cin- 
erarias being in fine condition. One of 
the most important items in the houses 
was the full line of promising looking 
bedding stock. E. E. T. 

Springfield, 111.— Hembreiker & Cole 
have ordered material for another house, 
of the John C. Moninger Co., Chicago. 
It is to be 35x150. 

Reinbeck, la.— A greenhouse has been 
erected here by H. J. Watson, who is 
going after the Reinbeck people hard to 
make his first season's business a big 
one. Mr. Watson believes that a good 
start is a good omen. 



SEASONABLE B. C. 



AND 2-IN. STOCK. 

Per 100 
•o 50 

2-in. ciftar plants . • • • • • • ■ • "^S ,«) 

2-ln. pelargoniums, mixed, fine <^VV 

2-ln. mixed geraniums ^J^ 

2%-in- rose geraniums, elegant ^"V 

2-in. German ivy „'^q 

2-in. moonvincs . '05 

R. C. rose geraniums ;f •" 

" " English ivy \V^ 



The Florists' Review 



Fbbkuary 1, 1917. 




c. 

c. 



trailing coleus :J 

Brilliancy colons ^ 



R. C. Brillic . 

R 0. ngeratuni, Mup. 

R. C. lieliotrope, blue 

r IT. AUGSPTTRGER & SONS CO,, 

PEORIA. 



50 
.75 



MRS. C. C. POLLWORTH 

THIS MUM was entered at the meeting of the Chrysanthemum 
Society of America at their show in Chicago, in the Seedling 
Class, as an improved Chrysolora, and captured the Bronze 
Medal as the best entry. This fall it scored 89 points at Philadel- 
phia, 89 at Chicago and 86 at Cincinnati. 

It is an excellent commercial variety, has good foliage and stiff stem. A 
good keeper and shipper. To get best blooms, leave terminal bud. February 
and later delivery at a popular price. 

Strong 214-inch stock, 25 for $4.00; 100 for $15.00 

Other varieties in best commercial sorts also. Price List on application. 



ROOTED CUTTINGS OF CARNATIONS 

February and March delivery. The best stock obtainable. 

Per 100 1000 

Alice, fine, prolific Light Pink S 3.00 $25.00 

Enchantress Supreme, improved Enchantress 3.00 25.00 

Beacon, good old standard Red 3.00 25.00 

White Perfection, good While 2.50 20.00 

White Wonder, good White 3.00 25.00 

C. W. Ward, best Dark Pink 3.00 25.00 

Shell-pink Sport of C. W. Ward, same habit as Ward, but Light Pink 

in color 10,00 76.00 

C. C. POLLWORTH CO., MILWAUKEE, WIS. 



Mention The Review when yon write. 



Azaleas, Rhododendrons, Hydrangeas 

Write for prices. 

GODFREY A8CHMANN, 'p'bWId^I^S^'.'^pa. 



Mention Th« B«t1>w whep yon write. 



BOX 394 



ILL. 



Mention The Review ■when you write. 



ORCHIDS 

We srow and sell Orchid* only. Can fur- 
nish you with anything in this line. 

If you intend investing in Orchids, do so 
now while prices are low. 

Special lists on application. 

LAGER ft HURRELL, Suunit, New Jerter 



Always mention the Florists' Review 
'wben 'wriJ^nts advertisers. 




C. HUMFELU, 



COLEUS 
ALTERNANTHERAS 

See Classified Ads. 
Rooted Cuttings: 
Feverfew; SnapdrsKOns, 
Sliver Pink, CHant White; 
Lantanas, $1.26 per JOO. 
Salvias; Mme. Sallerol 
Ger., $100 per 100. Agera- 
tuni, new blue, 60c per 
100. Coleus, Verbenas, 70c 
per li'O, All rooted cut- 
tings sent prepaid. 
Clar Center, Kan. 



February 1, 1917, 



The Florists' Review 



107 



m- — ~ 


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'*15>^^4» *wn\ 


•- ■ * - ^^ • 




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i°' • - . ■^J^B^ > ' ' 


^ - *■ ■« '-n ■ 






>i- r-'' '•■''S^S''';;.. '-'■»»_ 




* ■'' ' '''"■ K^f^^^SM^'- '^ ■'' ^'^f^ ^ ' 




•''■^ " m^?*'V '''W»«. 


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ft 






:• ^^ ■ ..#^t^". 




■<♦«- .,:_f;| ^'^ ■■ 


_<■ 









Prepare for Easter 



ROCOCO ERECTA (New) 

OTCI.AMEN 

Rococo Ereota, BeedlingB (new), flneat «Ter In- 
troduced (not to compare with the old Rococo), 
tu be well recommended for commercial growing. 
Strong seedlings, $5.00 per 100; $40.00 per 1000. 
Transplanted, $6.00 per 100; $50.00 per 1000. 

Cyclamen glganteum. Improved Wandabek type, 
sopdllnKs in 8 varieties, equally divided, $4.00 

J)pr 100, $30.00 per 1000. Same transplanted, 
;5.00 per 100, $40.00 per 1000. 

2Vi and 3-in. ready May 15. Orders booked 
In advance. \^e grow over 350,000 and can show 
many testimonials as to quality of our strain and 
stock. 

Cyclamen, 4-in., $15.00 per 100; 5-ln., 35c and 
80c each; 6-ln., 75c and $1.00 each. In bud only. 

SEED 

Oyolamen se«d. Improred Wandabek tym, 
eight varieties, equally dlTlded, $9.06 per 1000; 
11.26 per 100. Flneat mixed, $8.00 per 1000; 
11.00 per 100. 

Koooco Ereota, new, finest eTer Introduced, 
114.00 per 1000; $2.00 per 100, in leparat* colon, 
equally divided. 



Nunery Stock for Forcing 

Asaleas, early and late va- 
rieties, well budded, 68c, 76c. 
00c and $1.26 each. 

Boxwood, bush shaped, 12- 
Inch, $8.00 per doz.; 16-lnch, 
$4.60 per doz.: 18-24-inch, 
heavy, $1.00 and |1.26 each. 
Pyramids, 2 feet, $1.60 each; 
2U feet, $1.76 each; 8 feet, 
$2.60 each; 4 feet, heavy 
baae, $4.60 each, extra fine. 

Aucuba Japonica Variecata, 
heavy bushes, 18-24-lnch, 76c 
each. 

Golden Euonymua, 66c and 
76c each, fit for 6-lnch pots. 

Roses, baby varieties, for 
pots, $16.00 and $18.00 per 
100; $1.76 per doz. 

Spiraea Gladstone and 
Queen Alexandra, extra strong 
clumps, $12.00 per 100. 

Hydrangeas, French 
rietles, 5-8 shoots, 46c; 
shoots, 65c; 8-12 shoots. 

Hydrangea Otaksa, 
grown, 5-7 shoots, 45c; 
shoots, 65c; 7-10 shoots, 

Launs Oerasus, 18-inch bushes, 76c each. 

Laums Oerasus, pyramids, 8^-4 ft.,' $2.60; 
4 Ml ft., $3.50. 

Rhododendrons, Fink Pearl, $1.26-$2.60 each. 
Other varieties, $1.00, $1.26 and $1.60 each. 

Frunus Triloba. Acaoia Faradoxa, Lilao, 
Japanese Cherry, Acer Kegundo, Wistaria, Cra- 
taegus, Mains, pot grown up from $1.00-$2.00 
each. 

Fancy Evergreens for 6-lnch pots, 76o each. 

Eoster Blue Spruce, 18-lnch, $1.60 each; 24- 
Inch, $2.00 each. 

Lily of the Valley, German pips, $26.00 per 



1000. 

Funkia variegata, for forcing, heavy clumps, 
10 to IS eyes, $16.00 per 100. 

SEED 

f nmuia oDoonioa ' glgantea and grandiflora 
teed, separate or mixed, trade pkt., 60c. 

Begonia Frima Donna, trade pkt., 60c. 

Begonia Lumlnosa, trade pkt., 60o. 

Pansy seed. Finest mixture German Giant, 
per oz., $4.00; trade pkt., 60c. 



ERNEST ROBER, 



Cash, please. 



fentlon The Review when yon write. 



POT PLANTfl 

Begonia Chatelaine, 2-ln., $3.60 per 100. 
Luminosa, 2-ln., $8.00 per 100. Christmas Bed, 
2-ln., $6.00 per 100. 

Ahutllon Savltzll, $4.00 per 100. 

Reineckia, var., 2%-in., $10.00 per 100. 

Lantanas, mixed yellow and pink, separate, 
2-lncb, $3.60 per 10(); 8-lnch, $7.00 per 100. 

Weeping Lantanas, $8.00 per 100; 8-lnoh, 
$6.00 per 100. 

Geraniums, S. A. Nutt, 2^-inch, $8.00 per 
100; $26.00 per 1000. 

Vines, 8-lnch, $6.00 per 100. 

OalendnU, 2^-ln., $8.00 per 100. 

Caloeolaria, 2-lnch, $4.00 per 100; transplant- 
ed, strong, $2.60 per 100. 

Cineraria, 2)4-lnch, $8.00 per 100; transplant- 
ed, $2.00 per 100. 

Vinca, 8-lnch, $6.00 per 100; rooted cuttings, 
out of flats, $1.25 per 100; $12.0W per 1000. 

Coleus, 8-lnch, $8.00 per 10b, mixed. 

Aspidistra variegata, 6-in., $1.25 and $1.M 
each. 

Aspidistra, green, 6-in., $1.00 and $1.26 ea<A. 

Kentla Belmoreana, 6-in., 60o and 76o. 

Eentia Belmoreana, 6-ln., $1.00 and $1.26. 

Kentia Forsteriana, made op, 6-l»., $1.26 and 
$1.60 each, and larger sizes. 

Ferns for fern dishes, $8.00 per 100; $26.M 
per lOCO. 

Pandanus Veltohii, 4-in., 86o and 60o: 6-la., 
75c; 6-in., $1.26. 

Asparagus plomosus seedlings, $1.00 per IM; 
$9.00 per 1000. 

Asparagus Spreagerl seedlings, $1.00 per 10«; 
$9.00 per 1000. 

Asparagus Spvengeri, 8-inch, $6.00 per 10$. 

Asparagns pinmosus, 2)4-in., $8.00 per IM. 

Asparagns Sprengeri, 2%-in., $2.60 per 100. 

Sansevlerla Zebrlna, 4-ln., 86o; $4.20 per dot 

Primula Ohinensis, 2-inch, $8.00 per IM; 
8-inch, $6.00. 

English Iry, 8-6 leads, 2 feet long, $8.00 pei 
doz.; 8-inch, $8.00 per lOO; 2^-inoh, $4.00 per 
100, strong plants. 

WILMETTE, ILL. 



va- 

7-9 

66c. 

%* 
86c. 



FERNS, ETC. 

Nephrolepis Teddy. Jr., 214-inch pots, $6.00 per 
KK): S'-.'-lnch pots, $15.00 per 100; 6-lnch, $6.00 per 
dozen; 8-lncli, $12.00 per dozen. 

Nephrolepis Smithii, .S '•2-lnch pots, $3.00 per 
dozen: 5-inch, $6.00 per dozen. 

Nephrolepis mnocoHa. 3''2-incii, $:^.00 per dozen. 

Kiciis elastlca, 50c, 75c and $1.00 each. 

F. R. PIERSON CO. 

TAKRYTOWN, NEW YORK 

Mention The Review when yon write. 

ORCHIDS 

We received the following imported Orchids 
dnnag June: 

C. Triaata. C. UUata, C. Masslas, C. BasktMaaa. C. 
■^7*'*r». C. PsreivaHasa Bigaa: OseMJasis, tiUnMimm 
•■iVarieaasBi: Laalias, OdsstsilassBBis. etc. 

One of the largest Importers of Orchids In America. 

GEO. E. BALDWIN CO. B$z 98. Ninanieck.N. Y. 

Men tion The Review when you write. 

ORCHIDS 

«„9°"?5*?' Jo"*" De Buck will collect C.Tri- 
anae C. Labiata. C. Mossiae. C. Gaskelliana. 
^mc o^?^*"^^' ^- Percivaliana Gigas; Oncidi- 
f.i^* P^^"°i^"™ and Varicosum; Laelias, 
v-Hontoglossums, etc. For price write to 

E DeBUCK, 719 Chestnut Place, SECAUCUS, N. J. 

.Mention Th«. Tii.yiew when yon write. 



A Card This Size 

Costs only 90c per W^eek 
J. on Yearly Ordor 

< ii.u ^? , ^(•('P your name and your spe- 

\ h ,'i'*^'"''' ♦he whole trade. 

A half-inch rard costs only 45c per week 
"" >i>\T\y order. 



MRS. M. R. MORGAN 

- The Golden Yellow Eaton 

HAS MADE GOOD EVERYWHERE 

Ask the traveling men. 
ROOTED CUTTINGS $7.00 par lOO 



THE MeCALLUM CO., 



PITTSBURGH. PA. 



Mention The Review when yon write. 



Primula Halacoides Rosea 

4-inch pot plants, ready for 5-inch 
Right for Easter, $1.50 per dozen 

FRED H. LENON & CO., Richmond, Ind. 



jl Always mention the Florists' Review when writing advertisers J^ 



108 



The Florists' Review 



Fkbuuary 1, 1917. 



Joseph Heacock Co/s Palms and Ferns 



Keutia Belmoreana 

2%-in. pot 

3-in. pot 

4-in. pot 

pot 

pot 

pot 

cedar tub . . . 

cedar tub. . . 
9-in. cedar tub. . . 
9-in. cedar tub. . . 



5-in. 
6-in. 
6-in. 
7-in. 
7-in. 



Leaves 

4 
. 5 

5-6 

6-7 

6-7 

6-7 

6-7 

6-7 

6-7 

6-7 



Inches 

High 

8-10 

12 

15 

18-20 

22-24 

26-28 

34-36 

38-40 

40-42 

42-48 



WNOLISALC PRICE LIST 



Each 



$0.45 
.75 
1.00 
1.50 
3.00 
4.00 
5.00 
6.00 



Per doz. 

$ 1.50 

2.50 

5.00 

9.00 

12.00 

18.00 

36.00 

48.00 

60.00 



Kentia Forsteriaua 

6-in. pot 

6-in. pot 



Leaves 
. 5-6 
5-6 



Inches 
High Each 



24 
30-32 



Kentia Forsteriana 

7-in. cedar tub . . 
7-in. cedar tub. . 
9-in. cedar tub. . 
9-in. cedar tub. . 
9-in. cedar tub . . 
12-in. cedar tub. . 



Plants in tub 
made-up 
4 



4 
4 
4 
4 
4 



$1.00 
1.50 
Inches 
High 
30-36 
38-40 
40-42 
42-48 
48-54 
60 



Home-grown 

JOSEPH HEACOCK CO., 



WeU Established 



RAILWAY STATION 
JENKINTOWN 



Strong and Healthy 

WYNCOTE, 



Per 
Doz. 
$12.00 
18.00 

Each 
$ 3.00 
4.00 
5.00 
6.00 
7.50 

10.00 



PA. 



Mention The ReTlew when yon write. 



NEW BEDFOED, MASS. 



The Market. 



The dark, cold weather prevailing 
has influenced the market. Prices are 
high and the indications are they will 
remain so for some time. Bulbous stock 
is to be had, but it is not of good qual- 
ity. Tulips are short, narcissi are 
small and violets are still scarce. Sweet 
peas are of better quality than they 
have been, but are not in great de- 
mand. 

Various Notes. 

William H. Davenport declares busi- 
ness is about normal. His cut flower 
trade now far exceeds his pot plant 
business. 

S. E. Shaw is cutting some good 
spikes of Snapdragon Keystone. He 
will soon be offering narcissi in quan- 
tity. 

James Garthley has been cutting fine 
olooms of Carnation Philadelphia. Mr. 
Garthley is the only grower in this 
vicinity who has been successful with 
this variety. 

Edward M. Pierce states that he has 
no complaint to make as to the amount 
of business done. Carnations with him 
are a little off crop, but they were 
flowering heavily until the dark weather 
set in. 

E. H. Woodhouse has had consider- 
ably funeral work lately. Mr. Wood- 
house has some fine Easter lilies that 
promise a splendid crop for Easter. He 
is growing the variety known as For- 
mosa. W. M. P. 



NORFOLK. VA. 



January 24 J. W. Grandy, Jr., of 
Grandy the Florist, gave a banquet to 
his employees. Covers were laid for six- 
teen. 

Mr. Grandy took this occasion to ex- 
press to his employees his appreciation 
of their services, services that have in 
a measure been responsible for the 
steady growth of the business. In a 
few brief remarks he emphasized the 
importance of a continuance of that 
courteous, fair treatment of customers 
which has always been the policy of the 
concern. Much stress was laid on serv- 
ice and cooperation. 

Mr. Grandy announced that the busi- 
ness in the future would be put on a 
cooperative profit-sharing plan, and that 
each and every employee would share 
in the profits of the business. The din- 
ner will be made an annual affair. 



POT GROWN FERNS 



ASFARAaUS SFKENOEBI 

2%-lnch $3.00 per 100 

3-lnch 6.00 per 100 

ASPARAGUS FLUMOSVS 
2V4-Inch 4c 

ASPIDISTRAS 

Variegated, 5-inch, strong $1.50 

Green, 6-inch, strong 1.25 

FICUS PANDVRATA 
5-inch, 75c; 6-inch, $1.50; 8-inch $3.00 

FICUS ELASTICA 

4-lnch 25c 

6-inch 40c 

O-incn 60c and 75c 

BEGONIA THURSTONII 
4-lnch lOc 

NEFHROLEPIS 
Scottli, Whitmanii, Bostoniensis and Pierioni 

4-Jnch 15c each 

5-}nch 25c each 

6-jnch 60c each 

J-pch 76c each 

8-lnch 11.00 each 

Large Plants $1.60 to $3.00 each 

Cordata Compacta, 2J4-lnch, 4c; 3-inch, 8c; 
4-inch, 15c; 5-lnch, 25c. 

Small Ferns for dishes, 2%-lnch $3.00 per 100 

Small Ferns for dishes, 3-inch 6.00 per 100 

NEFHROLEPIS VERONA 
2V6-lnch loc 



.76c 



ik'" 



60 



DRACAENA HASSANGEANA 

5-lnch 

0-inch $1.00 and 

7-inch 

FERN PANS FOR TABLES 

5-inch pans 30c 

0-inch pans 35c 

7-inch pans 60c 

BIRD'S NEST FERNS 
5-inch : 75c 

ARECA LUTESCENS 

3-inch 15c 

5-lnch 50c and 75c 

6-lnch $i.6c 

7-lnch 2.00 

8-lnch, tubs 4.00 

PALMS 

Kentia Forsteriana, 4-lnch pots $40.00 per 100 

5-lnch pots 75.00 per 100 

6-inch pots $1.50 each 

Kentia Forsteriana, Combinations 

^, ^, , 75c up to $35.00 each 

Kentia Belmoreana, 4-lnch pots. . .$40.00 per 100 

5-inch pots 75.00 per 100 

Cocos Weddelllana, 2M!-lnch pots.. 15.00 per 100 

Lantanas, 6-lnch 40c 

Lantanas, 6-lnch '. .] "76c 

Lantanas, 7-lnch $1.00 

Lantanas, 8-lnch 1.50 

Phoenix Roebehjnii, 8-inch pots 2 50 

Phoenix Roebelenli, 8-lnch tubs 4.00 

Phoenix Roebelenil, 10-inch tubs 6 00 



JOHN BADER CO., "oJ^er""' 826 Rialto St., North side, Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Mention Th« B«Tlew w1i«b yon write. 



CHRYSANTHENUNS 

Preliminary List of 

Novelties and 

Standard Varieties 

Now ready 

ASK FOR A COPY 

Elmer D. Smith & Co. 

Adrian, Mich. 



FERNS 

Nephrolepis Scottii and Teddy Jr. 

6-inch pots tS.COand $6.00 per doz. 

7-inch pots $0.75 each 

8-inch pots 1.00 each 

Dish Ferns $4.00 per 100 

Cash with Order 

ASCHMANN BROS. 

2d and Bristol Sts., PhUadelphia, Pa. 

Mention The Review when yon w rite. 

100,000 Geraniums— Ready Now 

2 and 214-in. pots: Poitevine, Ricard. Nutt 
Doyle, Viaud. Oberle, Buchner. etc.. $2.50 uer 
100, $22.50 per 1000. 

2>4-in. Fuchsias, 15 vars.; Double Petunias 
12 vars.; Marguerites, 3 vars.; Lantanas. 8 
vars.. $2.75 per 100. $25.00 per 1000. 

ALONZO J. BRYiM.s.x':.':;':; 

Mention The Reylew when yon write. 



FERNS 

FOR FERN DISHES 

Ready NOW. $3.00 per 100; $26.00 per 1000 



CMh with order. 



ERNEST OECHSLI)l,'"«.':;t."S.?.'m 

9 mllei directly weet of Ohlca^ Oonrt Hobm 
on Madlion Street. 



MenUon The Beylew when yen write. 

Per 100 



1000 
$10.0(' 

25.00 
20.0(' 
30.00 



VINCAS- Rooted Cuttings 

Strong, field rooted tips, 1 to 3 
leads, 214-inch pots $3.00 

CARNATIONS- Rooted Cuttings 
White Enchantress and Beacon.. 2.50 

TABLE FERNS-fine stock. 214- 
inch 350 

JAMES VICK'S SONS, Rochester, N. Y. 

Mention The Review when yoo write. 

Asparagus Plumosus 

,. 100 1000 

2^"inch $3.00 $25.00 

3 -inch 50.00 

STRAFFORD FLOWER FARM, Collingdale. Pa. 

Mention The, Review when you write. 



Fbbeoaby 1, 1917. 



The Florists' Review 



109 



WE can not possibly crowd into an advertisement all the items that might interest the pro- 
gressive grower. Our catalogue, mailed for the asking, contains a complete list of things, 
both horticultural and floricultural. A few seasonable items, however, require mentioning, and 
here they are: 

Tuberous Rooted Begonias, fine stocic, just received 

Single, separate colors $2.75 per 100, $25.00 per 1000 

Single, mixed 2.50 per 100, 22.50 per 1000 

Double, separate colors 4.25 per 100, 37.50 per 1000 

Double, mixed 4.00 per 100, 33.00 per 1000 

250 at lOOO rate. 

Cold Storage Giganteum, Rubrum, Magnificum, Mel- FERNS 

pomene and Album, A-1 stock, all sizes. Write for prices. Assorted Table Ferns: $3.oo per lOO; $27.50 per lOOO. 

Bostons: 2»fl-inch, $4.00 per 100: $35.00 per 1000. 

CARNATION ROOTED CUTTINGS Roosevelt: 2»fl-inch. $5.00 per 100: $40.00 per 1000. 

.,^. , a . J., u ij 4 • A i- Whitmani Compacta: 2ifl-inch, $5.00 perlOO; $40.00 per 1000. 

First come, first served holds true in every case, and particu- Elegantissima Compacta; 2'a-inch, $6.00 per 100; $50.00 per 1000. 

larly so. as years of experience have taught us. as regards Carnation Scottii: 2>fl-inch. $5.00 per 100: $45.00 per 1000. 

Kooted Cuttings. To insure early deliveries to our customers we in- rpeddy Jr.: 2>«-inch. $6.00 per 100: $45.00 per 1000. 

variably. contract for quantities a year m advance. The following Scholzeli: 2>fl-inch. $5.00 per 100; $40.00 per 1000. 

new varieties of special merit deserve the consideration of every Prices for larger sizes on application 
Carnation grower: 

Rosalia ( Dorner). deep pink. MYOSOTIS NIXENAUGE 

Old Gold ( Dorner), yellow. Fine winter bloomer, rooted cuttings 80c per 100; 2-in., $2.00 per 100 

Merry Christmas (Baur & Steinkamp), scarlet. 

Doris (S. J. Goddard), crimson. PELARGONIUMS 

Cottage Maid (Cottage Gardens), salmon sport of C. W. Ward. Easter Greeting, Swabian Maid. Wurtsmbergia. Lucy Becker. $8.00 

Prices $12.00 per 100; $100.00 per 1000. per 100. 

See our classified ad for complete list of Standard varieties, and i»i?T<TrMf AC nrkf TRf K* 

place your order early to insure early delivery, , . , rr. i um£A», i*«-fwd*-e. ,^ ,„^ ^ ,™, 

2'fl-inch $4.00 per 100, $35.00 per 1000 

ASPARAGUS PLUNOSUS 3 -inch g.OOperlOO, 85.00perl000 

■2>4-inch pots. $3.00 per 100. $25.00 per 1000; Seedlings, $8.00 per 1000. SNAPDRAGON 

lots of 5000 at $7.00 per 1000. Phelps* White, Yellow. Silver Pink, Nelrose. $4.60 per 100. $40.00 per 
Asparagus Sprengeri, $3.00 per 100. $25.00 per 1000; Seedlings, $6.00 looO; Keystone, $5.00 per 100, $45.00 per 1000. 

per 1000. 

Asparagus Hatcherl, $3.50 per 100. $30.00 per 1000; Seedlings, $8.00 VINCAS 

per 1000. 2ifl-inch $3.00 per 100, $25.00 per 1000 

BEGONIA CHATELAINE Strong rooted cuttings 1.25perl00. lO.OOperlOOO 

2'4-inch $5.00 per 100; $45.00 per lOCO MAGIC HOSE 

CANNA ROOTS— Northern Grn%vn The most satisfactory hose for greenhouse purposes offered: »«-inch. 

v^Ai^wA M^\JKJ I a x^onnern orown ^^ p^^ j^^, sg-inch, I7c per foot; ^-inch, I8c per foot. Couplings 

Best varieties. Write for prices. included. 

CALENDULA NICO-FUME LIQUID 

„. „ . K.it^M:.L^Rj^K^r^ 1 gallon, $10.50; i« gallon, $5.50. Express prepaid, 
Orange King. Best for forcing. 2i«-inch...$3.00 per 100; $25.00 per 1000 

3-inch 5.00 per 100; 45.00 per 1000 NICO-FUME PAPER 

DRACAENA INDIVISA ^'^^ sheets, $4.50; 288 sheets, $7.50. Express prepaid. 

Seedlings.l$2.50 per 100, $20.00 per 1000; 2i«-inch $3.50 per 100; 4-inch, For Seasonable Seed, consult our catalogue. 

$15.00 per 100; 5-inch, $25.00 per 100; 6-inch, $35.00 per 100. For complete list of Zvolanek's Winter- flowering Orchid Sweet 

uvTkD A KTr>i? A c Pea Seed consult previous issues of the Florists' Review, or write us. 

HYDRANGEAS Qy^ j^j^, jg j^ satisfy you, for by doing so we enhance our own 

Hest. French varieties. 214-inch. $4.00 per 100; 3-inch, $6.00 per 100: 6- interests. We make no promises which we can not fulfill, believing 

inch, $25 00 per 100; 6-inch, $ai.00 per 100. that glittering promises are worthless. 

See classified columns for complete list of Carnation Cuttings. Clean, well rooted stock. 

New catalogue just out. Write for copy. 

S. S. SKIDELSKY & COMPANY 

1004 Lincoln Building, PHILADELPHIA, PA. 




> entlai Ths Bevle-w when yon write. 



ROSES-CANNAS 



CONARD 4 JONES CO. 
W«st Qrov*. Pa. 



^tnUoB Ths BeTlew when yon write. 



Chrysanthemums 

MY SPECIALTY 

CHAS. H. TOTTY 

Madison. N. J. 

Mention The Reylew when yon write. 



Roses - Carnations 
Verbenas 

J. L. DILLON 

BLOOMSBURQ, PA. 

Mention The BeTlew when yon write. 



P^OWN ROOT 

Roses 



^OWN ROOT Pot-grown, 

2I4 and 4-inch. 

Field-grown, 
to pot, 4 to 5-in. 



^Sl LL L. L£ ^SPI^IWQncUD•OHIO 



COMPANY' 



Mention The Berlew whea yon write. 



D 



BEGONIAS - PRIMULAS 

Begonias, strong 4- inch Luminosa and 
Erfordii loo, JlO.OO 

Obconica Grandiflora, 4-inch, n bud 

and bloom 100, 7.00 

Sprengeri, heavy 4 -inch 100, 8.00 

;Mnch 100, 5.00 

2-inch 100, 2.00 

Cash 

JACOBS BROS., Box 413, Peoria, lU. 

Mention The Bevlew when von write. 

CHAS. D. BALL 

POROWSR OP 
ALMS, ETC. 

Band tor Prto* Liat 

HOLMESBURG, : PHIUDELPHIA, PA. 

Mention The BeTlew when jvn write. 



110 



The Florists' Revkw 



Febuuahv 1, 1917. 



H. H. LINEAWEAVER & CO., Inc. 

•^r ™ e ft A l_ 

MTUMINOUS %# \^ #% ^m 
Wait Bnd Trust Building. PHILADELPHIA 

17 Battery Place. NKW TORK 
Nattinc Buildins. LEBANON. PA. 
MentloD The B«t1«w wb«ii yon write. 

Greenhouse Heating. 

Subscribers are invited to write the 
Editor of this Department with regard to 
any details of greenhouse heating that 
are not understood. But please do not 
ask The Review to make a choice of ap- 
paratus for you. The greenhouse heating 
equipment advertised in this paper is, we 
believe, the best for the trade to buy, 
and each article the best in the special 
field of its adaptation. 



BETTER USE I^RGER RETURNS. 

I intend to build a sash house 10x70, 
running east and west, with the boiler 
room at the east end. Tlie side walls 
will be fifty inches high. There will be 
no glass in the north wall, but there 
will be twenty inches of glass in the 
south wall. The walls will be construct- 
ed of sheathing and roofing paper, 
with shingles on the outside. Would 
two 2-inch flow pipes be satisfactory, 
with four 11/^ -inch pipes at the south 
side and five l^/i-inch pipes at the north 
side, as returns under the benches? The 
expansion tank will be connected to 
the highest point of the system. 

C.'L. F.— Til. 

Since tlie letter from C. L. F. does 
not state the temperature he desires to 
maintain in the house, we are not able 
to determine whether or not the instal- 
lation of the heating system described 
will give the desired results. Theoret- 
ically, tlic amount of radiation sug- 
gested is amply large for 60 degrees 
when the outsi(le temperature is 10 de- 
grees below zero. In actual practice, 
however, we do not advise the use of 
li/i-inc'li pipe for returns in houses more 
than forty or fifty feet in length, and 
then only when they are three or four 
feet a"bove the top of the boiler, or when 
they are used in a closed system. For 
60 degrees we would substitute four 
li/^-inch returns for the five iVi-lnch 
pipes suggested. Or, better yet, use six 
2-inch returns in the house. 

In case the house is much exposed to 
high winds, or if the walls and roof are 
not tight, we would use two 214-inch 
flow pipes and six 2-ineh returns, for 
60 degrees. Provided 50 to 55 degrees 
will suflico, one 2-inch flow and two 2- 
inch returns might be used on the wall 
where there is no glass. If the flow 
pipes are run downhill and the highest 
point of each flow pipe is connected 
with the expansion tank, there will be 
no occasion for using air valves. 



A HOUSE ON SLOPING GROUND. 

I have erected a greenhouse and shall 
soon be ready to install the heating 
pipes, I shall'heat with hot water. The 
house is 13x60 and nine feet high to the 
ridge. There are three feet of glass in 
the south wall for a distance of thirty- 
six feet in the length of the house; the 
remainder is boarded. The north side is 
well protected by buildings. The boiler 
shed is at the west end and there is a 






The World's Supreme 

Greenhouse Boiler 

Record 



The past year has developed unheard of commercial records for 
the business interests of this country. 

U. S. exports have reached the enormous sum of $4,000,000,000. 

The bank clearings of our country were $260,102,653,054. 

The tonnage in steel assumed the astounding figures of 40.000,C()0 
(forty million) tons. 

The year's earnings in freiglit and transportation of the rail- 
roads ran into billions. 

HORTICULTURALLY speaking, 1916 also made remark- 
able history. 

Cut Flowers and Greenhouse Products, $70,000,000 to 
$72,000,000. 

(According to the best available figures.) 

These figures we hope will leave a generous and well deserved 
profit for our numerous florist friends. 

Our company takes pride in announcing that the year just 
closed goes on record as the world's highest mark in the sales 
of greenhouse boilers. During the year of 1916 we sold direct 
from factory to user the following boilers for gi-eenhouse heating: 

Kroeschell Greenhouse Hot Water Boilers l,i'):l<t,500 so. ft. «lass 

Kroescliell Tubeless Hot Water Boilers 104,850 sij. ft. glass 

Kroeschell Tubeless Steam Boilers (>."), 40(t sq. ft. glass 

Kroeschell Water Tube Steam Boilers *JO:'>,200 sq. ft. glass 

Kroeschell High Pressure Steam Boilers UliCO.illUi sq. ft. glass 

TOTAL 3,313,286 sq. ft. glass 

In making the above statement we are very thankful that every 
boiler referred to was sold by us to be used for the peaceful, inspir- 
ing and beautiful industry of producing flowers— ( iod's greatest gift. 



WHEN YOU BUY- GET A KROESCHELL 

Kroeschell Bros. Co. 

444 W. ErU St., CHICASO, IlL. 






February 1, 1917. 



The Florists^ Review 



111 




Set Your Boiler Rig^ht 

We make a specialty of all kinds of fire-brick work. 
No order is too large, and the smallest order receives 
the same careful attention. Let us call on you. 
Estimates cheerfully furnished. 

By special permission we oft'er tlie followini; Dames for reference: 
L, A. Budlong Co. 

Bassett & Washburn, 131 N. Wabash Ave., Chicago, 111. 
Fred SUelow, Niles Center, 111. 
A. F. AniUnp Co., Maywooil, III. 
W. H. AmllnK, Maywood, 111. 

Kroeschell Bros. Co., 444 W. Krlo St., ChlcaKO, 111. 
Kmll Buettner, Park Rldgre, 111. 

Peter Knowe & Son/\V3';';Srw^^L7.rs%Ter- Chicago, III. 

Phone Main 3760 



Mention The Review when you write. 



\'()r can use this \alve 
resealer. It re-cuts 
t he valve seat cleanly and 
accurately and puts old 
\ alves back into service — 
TIGHT! Your first few- 
jobs uay for it. Write for 
catalogu2. 

M. B. SKINNER CO. 

5.">S-5(12 Washington 
Houlevard, Chicaso. 



skinner 
\ alve 
IteHfentinvr 
Tool. 




.Meutlon The Review when you write. 

^ Gorman's 

Special Greenhouse 

Steam-Air Vent 

Stops"Airiii-ripe"Tronbles 

Will positively take air 
out of heating plants and 
will keep your coils hot. 
No waste or blowing of 
steam. 

Valves in use for twelve 
years now good as when 
put in. 

J. F. GORMAN, 

250 W. 128th St.. NEW YORK 

Mention The Review when you write. 

Pipe and Tubes 

ALL SIZES CUT TO SKETCH 



^Philadelphia Second Hand Pipe Supply 

1003 N. 7lh St., PHIIADEIPHIA, PA, 

J^IentloD The Review when you write. 




Hansel! Rocker Grates 

i.Are best for greenhouse use. 
Write for particulars. 

HANSELL GRATE CO. 

«54 Railway Exchange Bldg., CHICAGO 

Mention The Review when you write. 




IMICO 

Hot Water Boilers 

Made b7 

Ofinois Malleable Iron Coi 

180M825 Divefsey Boulevard 

CHICAGO 

ll«t«d for coal oconomy and 
rosults Konorally 

SEND FOR CATALOQUV 

Mention The Review when you write. 



HIGHEST PRICED and CHEAPEST 



BOILERS MADE 



GiBLiN Greenhouse Boilers 



GIBUN tt CO. 

109 Broad St.. Utica, N. Y. 



LET US TELL YOU 
ABOUT THEM 



Mention The Review when you write. 



^^Superior^' 

INTERNAL-FIRED 
BOILER 



For Hot Wator Hoatlng 




Superior Machine & Boiler Works 

840-850 W. Suporlor Stroot 
CHICAQO 

Mention The Review when you write. 



WILKS SELF-rEEDING 
HOT WATER BOILER 

For Economy, Durability, Dependability 




Install a WILKS 
and forget your 
troubles. 



No night fire- 
man required— 
as the magazine 
or coal chamber 
holds sufficient 
fuel to keep tire 
10 to 12 hours 
without atten- 
tion. Best made 
for a small 
greenhouse. 

Send for Catalogue 
and Prices 

Telephone 
Yarch 866 

S. WILKS 
MFG. CO. 

3523 Shields Ave.. 
CHICAGO, ILL. 



Mention The Review when you write. 



112 



The Florists* Review 



Fbbbuaby 1, 1917. 



gradual upward slope of the ground, 
amounting to a little over three feet, 
from the west to the east end. So I 
have set the boiler on the surface of the 
ground at the west end. Is not that the 
same as putting the boiler down three 
feet where the ground is level? Do you 
think two 2^-inch flow pipes overhead, 
■with six 2-inch returns, would be suffi- 
cient to hold a temperature of 55 degrees 
here, in southwest Missouri? 

O. C. M.— Mo. 



There should be no difficulty in heat- 
ing the house described to 55 degrees 
with two 2iA-inch flow pipes and six 
2-inch returns, sO far as the amount of 
radiation is concerned. 

The three feet of rise in the pipes is 
only equal to one and one-half feet so 
far as its effect upon the circulation is 
concerned, since it is the average height 
of the pipes that must be taken into ac- 
count. We would prefer to carry the 
flow pipes upon the plates and the re- 
turns either on the walls or under the 
benches, but in order to secure a satis- 
factory circulation with uphill flows it 
may be necessary to run them about two 
feet below the ridge. The returns should 
be carried as high as possible, but even 
then it would be better to drop the 
boiler so that its top would not be more 
than two feet above the floor of the 
greenhouse. 

WHEN BOILEB IS EXTRA LARGE. 

We have built a greenhouse 12x56 
and are putting in a Furman 6-section 
hot water boiler, rated at 1,650. The 
radiation for this house figures about 
300 feet. We bought the extra large 
boiler so we could build a larger house 
later. We arc putting the boiler in a 
cellar eight feet deep; this will allow 
the returns to be about two feet above 
the top of the boiler. We have run a 
2-inch flow pipe through the center of 
the house and connected it with nine 
ly^-iuch returns, four under one side 
bench and five under the other side 
bench. Later in the season we expect 
to put two 11/4 -inch returns in a hotbed 
at the south side of the greenhouse. 
These returns will be about one foot 
lower than the returns in the green- 
house. 

We are told that our boiler is so large 
that the water will not flow, but will 
foam and go out at the expansion tank 
outlet. If that is correct, should we 
reduce the radiation of the boiler by 
running only a few sections of it? 
Should the highest point of the flow 
pipe be over the boiler or at the farther 
end of the house? We could have it at 
either place. We understand that the 
expansion tank should be above the 
highest point of the flow pipe. If so, 
should it be attached to the flow pipe 
or to a main return at the boiler? We 
find so Tiianv differences of opinion on 
where the tank should be attached, and 
on the size of tank for this size of 
boiler, that we are at a loss to know 
what to do, as we have always used 
steam heretofore. 

C. P. H. & S.— Pa. 



From the data given wc cannot deter- 
mine what temperature is desired, but 
if the amount of radiation has been fig- 
ured correctly we would say that a 
temperature "of 55 degrees could be 
readily secured with 300 square feet of 
radiation in a house 12x56 feet, pro- 
vided there is no glass in the side walls. 

Particularly when the boiler capacity 



STEAM AND 
AIR PIPE 




INLET 



"Detroit" Return Trap-the heart of the OUTLET 

"Detroit" System*. 



You can rely on your greenhouses 
having a uniform temperature, 
throughout, if you install a 

" DETROIT " 
SYSTEM 

Condensation is handled automatically, 
and returned to the boiler— hot. 



Write for Bulletin No. 19037 



American Blower Company 

DETROIT, MICHIGAN 



Branches Everywhere 



Mention The Review when you write. 



TUBING, ALL SIZES 



PIPE CUT TO SKETCH 



SECOND HAND PIPE 

Large stock, all sizes, furnished with new threads and couplings. 
lAlirC P I^RimTU 416-24 Moyer Street, 

OAlVlbO r- unirriiriy Philadelphia, pa. 



Mention The Berlew when yon write. 



PIPK CUT TO 
8KKTCH 




It -wVtX pay to 
correspond T^itli ua 



Wrought Iron Pipe, Tubes and! Fittings 

New and jSecondHwid— Thoroughly overhauled, with new threads and 
couplings, in lengths of 16 feet and over. Guaranteed to give satisfaction. 

ALBf RT & DAVIDSON, Inc., 256 284 Oakland SL-218 228 Kent St., BROOKLYN, N. Y. 

Mention The Review when yon write. 



Fbbruaby 1, 1917. 



The Florists' Review 



113 




tii^i 



Prize Winning 
Stock 



— the kind which takes honors consistently year after year, is 
usually grown by the man who has spent a lifetime scientifically 
studying his work. 

But even the most skillful veteran finds help in the convenience 
and dependability of the 

SI >Baeh4&B ofep=C> 



He knows that with this inexpensive equipment installed in his plant he can 
always be sure of a uniform growing temperature — that he will never again 
be bothered with a messy steam pump. 

r^asily attached to your present boiler room apparatus, the "Morehead" System 

Eliminates Sluggish Circulation 
in Your Steam Lines 

at once — and thereby gives you absortute control of temperature in your 
.greenhouses the whole year 'round. 

, ?, ^?"^^"s^tion itself is immediately returned to the boilers as feed water 
while it is pure and hot — thus saving a large per cent of your fuel. 

1 f»* pictures and data which show how other florists are using the "More- 
nead ' System to help grow prize winning stock, simply write for your free 
'^opy of the latest Back-to-Boiler book. Tell us your conditions and our 
<^ngmeers will advise you (without obligation) how to overcome your 
■ "■esent difficulties. 

Morehead Manufacturing Company 

DEPT. "M" .«. DETROIT, MICHIGAN 



These Florists have 
Temperature Conditions 
Under Real Control 

iiiiiiiiiiniiiiuiiniiiiiiiiiimniiniiiiiiiiitiiiiiuuniimiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiuiiiiiuiiiiiiiiiiinniif 

E. J. Reimers, Louisville, Ky. 
Hess & Swoboda, Omaha, Neb. 
Wm. Clark, Colorado Springs, 

Colo. 

Peter Reinberg, Chicago, 111. 

Minneapolis Floral Co., Min- 
neapolis, Minn. 

F. H. Kramer, Washington, 
D. C. 

C. C. Pollworth Co., Milwau- 
kee, Wis. 

Horn Bros, Allentown, Pa. 

Massachusetts Agricultural 
College, Amherst, Mass. 

Adachi Bros., Stege, Cal. 

Blackman Floral Co., Evans- 
ville, Ind. 

J. M. Gasser Co.. Cleveland, O. 

Memphis Floral Co., Memphis, 
Tenn. 

Green Floral Co., Dallas, Tex. 

Metairie Ridge Nursery Co., 
New Orleans, La. 

Crane Co., Toledo, O. 

W. J. Palmer & Son, Buffalo, 

N. Y. 

Pittsburgh Floral Co., Pitts- 
burgh, Pa. 

Imlay Company, Zanesville, O. 



For complete details get your Free 
copy of the new Morehead Book 



385 



miiii 



''l::!:!|||||llllllllllllllllllllllilllliiiiiiiiiniiiiiiii 




114 



The Florists' Review 



February 1, 1917. 



HIQH = QRADE 



Haod=made Greeahoase Glass 



We are the largest distributors of Hand-made Greenhouse Glass in 
the United States. 

Factories located in Pennsylvania, West Virginia, Ohio, Indiana. 

Careful selection and packing. Uniform quality guaranteed. 
Shipping^ facilities unequaled. 

Our Specialty: QUALITY and SERVICE. 

All reputable dealers handle our brands. Send us your inquiries. 

JOHNSTON BROKERAGE COMPANY 

, 2106 First National Bank Buildins:, PITTSBURQH, PA. 



EASTERN REPKESKNTATIVE: 



V tl VI rkon i Room 807. 309 Broadway, New York. N. Y. 
H. 11. *!-"""» ^ Franklin Bank Bldg.. Philadelphia. Pa. 

WESTERN kepre.sentative: 

H. A. COLE, 323 Manhattan Building. Chicago. 111. 



KANSAS CITY OFFICES: 

P. E. CUNNINGHAM, Sec'y-Treasurer 
1019 Commerce Bids., Kansas City. Mo. 



DALLAS office: 



A. D. MARTIN, Sumpter Bldg., Dallas, Texas 



*^1fi*:1tys?lf>4^1l■^1:ys?l:ys?1:^tya^ 



is greater than is needed, it is impor- 
tant that the heating pipes be of good 
size and thus assist in obtaining a 
rapid circulation. "When a large num- 
ber of small pipes are used as returns, 
the water often circulates only in the 
upper pipes in the coils, or in those in 
which the circulation is favored. This 
may reduce the circulation one-half or 
more and will greatly increase the tend- 
ency of the water to "boil over." 

Provided there is no glass in the 
walls, and a temperature of 55 degrees 
is desired, we would use not less than 
one 214-inch flow under the ridge and 
eight li^-inch returns under the 
benches, and the tendency toward iioil- 
ing over will be lessened if one 2^ -inch 
flow pipe is run upon each plate and 
connected with three 2-inch returns 
under each side bench. Even though 
only one 214-inch flow is used, we would 
prefer to use seven 2-inch returns 
rather than eight l^^-inch. Except for 
the danger of boiling over, two 2-inch 
flows might be used in the house instead 
of two 214-iDch, as suggested above. 

For 300 square feet of radiation, not 
more than 400 square inches of grate 
surface are needed. In cast the boiler 
has a rocking grate, we would suggest 
disconnecting two of the sections, one 
on each side, by taking out the bolts 
which fasten them to the rocking bars. 
Fire brick may be used to cover these 
grate sections and lessen the size of 
the firebox. Unless the size of the grate 
is reduced, little will be gained by tak- 
ing off one or more of the sections. If 
careful attention is given to the firing 
we would not consider it necessarj'. 

The flow pipes should run downhill, 
with the highest point over the boiler, 



Your Best Friend! 




^EACH 



The Standard Thermostat 

is the best business partner and 
friend you can have. It protects 
your growing things from ruin by 
sudden changes in temperatures. It 
is infallible, inexpensive— more re- 
liable than a night fireman. 

The Standard Thermostat will 
ring a bell whenever your green- 

. house temperature rises or falls to 
the danger point. Place the bell 
at your bedside or anywhere you 
please. 

This is a word to the wise— a buy 

word to the wise grower. Sudden 

temperature ups and downs ruin 

thousands of plants every year. 

Protect yours! Install a Standard 

Thermostat now. It costs only 

$10.00. Write today. 

(G. H. 3. same as G. H. 4. only 
not in locked case. $7.00.) 

STANDARD THERMOMETER CO. 

68 Shiriay Str««t. BOSTON. MASS. 




T E E L 



MCTP RN 
TUBULAR 



BOILERS 



Johnston Hoattng Co. 

tai ■. 2«th StPMt NEW YORK 

and from such highest point a %-iuch 
pipe should run to a 1-inch pipe leading 
to a 20-gallon expansion tank. (A 10- 
gallon tank will answer for 300 square 




Use Rippley's 

No. 200 Hot Water Heater 

In greenhouges, i^araRes, hog and 
poultry houses, small buildlnffs. 
Price, $42.50, freight paid. 
Louis J. L. Amoureauz, Norton 
Mass., says: "Yonr No. 200 Heater 
cared for our greenhouse, 76x14x9 
ft., last winter at 23 below Eero." 

Mall orders direct. Write for cir- 
culars of heaters and steamers. 

RIPPLEY MfG. & STEEL BOAT CO. 

Box F, Qrafton, Illinola 



Hantion The Scriew when yon write. 



Fkbri'ARY 1, 1917. 



The Florists^ Review 



115 



ROCHELLE 

PAPER POTS 



Prices of Our Square DOUBLE Bottom Pots. 
(Folding Block and Tacks included) 



Our Paper Pots are the Original Improved DOUBLE Bot- 
1 oni Square Paper Pots. They are by far the Best Pot on the 
r raket today. No other approaches them in record or in 
tiiorit. They are made with one tack. No glue. By actual 
t.st they can be made up MORE THAN TWICE AS FAST 
as a stamped out pot can be folded, assembled and "locked." 

They are made of the same new, expensive, tough paper 
that has made our Paper Pots and Dirt Bands Famous, after 
4 years' test by the U. S. Government, the Canadian Govern- 
ment, International Expositions, large numbers of State Agri- 
cultural Experiment Stations, City Parks, Public Institutions 
and many thousands of Florists and Truckers in all parts of 
the Country and Canada. 

FEEE— Samples of ALL SIZES of our Paper Pots free and POSTAGE PAID. Also the Experiences of 131 Superintend- 
ents, Florists and Truckers who have used our Pots and Bands. SEND FOE THEM. YOUR NAME on a POSTAL 
CARD is ENOUGH. 

You are under no obligations to buy, but we WANT YOU TO SEE what many others use every year. Send today. 

F.W. Rochelle & Sons,iME:Chester, N. J. 



Sizes 500 


1000 3000 5000 


10000 


20000 


50000 


l%in..$ .70 


$1.00 $ 2.90 $ 4.75 


$ 9.00 


$17.80 


$ 44.00 


2 in., .85 


1.20 3.50 5.70 


10.80 


21.50 


52.80 


21^ in.. 1.20 


1.70 4.95 8.10 


15.60 


30,50 


74.80 


3 in.. 1.50 


2.40 7.00 11,25 


21.50 


42.00 


102.00 


4' in.. 2,00 


3.50 10.20 16,00 


30.50 


60.00 


147.00 


5 in.. 2.75 


5.00 14.50 21.25 


40.50 


80.00 


197.00 


6 in.. 3.50 


6.50 18.00 29.50 


58.00 


115.00 


225.00 


State whether to ship by freight or 


express 


. 




Immediate Shipment. 








We will ship from Chicago, St. Louis or 


Kansas 


City the 


following lots at the prices named, but cannot break the lots: 


For $15.00, 


18,000 1% Pots For $12,00 7,000 2% Pots 


For $15.00 


14,000 2 Pots For $12,00 5,000 3 


Pots 


For $15.00 


4,000 4 Pots For $12.00 2,000 5 


Pots 



Mention The Rgrlir whtn yon write. 



aic 




BOILER FLUES 

We make a specialty of handling 
carefully selected Boiler Fines, 4-in. 
diameter and other sizes, for irreen- 
house piping, Gutter Posts, etc. Also, 
we make a specialty of flues for 
r e t u b i n g boilers. All flues are 
thoroughly cleaned inside and out, 
^mmed. and are ready for nse. 
General Sales Agents for Stuttle's 
Patent Clamp and Elbow for joininK 
flues— no packing, no leaks. New 
standard pipe and all kinds of trreen- 
house fittingrs. Right prices and 
prompt shipment. 

_ H. MUNSON 

Est. 1896 Phone Superior 572 
1353 N. Clark St. Chlcase 



3it 



:0 



Sixteen Years' Paint Service 

Mr. Chas. H. Allen, the well-known florist of 
J loral Park. N.Y., says that 

DIXON sI'^I^A^^^p^Ij^T 

"SR Kiven 16 years of service on his hot water 
Hpes and they are still free from rust. Write 
l'>r booklet No. 84 B. 

It will eive yon eqnal service. 

Made In Jersey City, N. J., by the 

Joseph Dixon Crucible Company 

Kstablished 1827 



eet of radiation.) The tank should be 
placed as high as possible and, if there 
-s no danger of freezing, a vent pipe 
should be carried several feet higher, 
^■ith an overflow pipe leading out from 



PLANT TUBS 

EVERLASTING VIRGINIA WHITE CEDAR 

HVEBYBODY agrees that Plant Tubs made of 
everlasting: Virc^inia White Cedar will, 
best resist rot or decay. The "Keystone" brandi 
of White Cedar Plant Tubs are made of this cele- 
brated wood, and these goods are painted inside 
and oat with best oil paints, a rich green. 

They are bound with heavy steel hoops for the large 
size, and electric- welded wire hoops (galvanized) 
on the small size. The large sizes are trimmed 
with handsome drop handles and metal feet, and 
have perforated, removable bottoms. 

These Cedar Tubs are made in all sizes, from 24^ 
inches top diameter down to 6 inches, amply large 
for a Bay Tree and small enough for a Hyacinth. 
Every one guaranteed. Booklet in colors, with 
prices, furnished upon reauest. 

RICHMOND CEDAR WORKS, ^i^R^G^NrA 





Full Weight Wrought Iron 
and Spollarbed Stool Plpo 

Coils, Bends, Railings, etc, oiade to Sketch 

FORD & KENDIG CO. 

Kt^^a'^S^Sol'STrLu PHLADELPHIA 

Mention The Heyiew when yon write. 



PIPE 



Wrought Iron of sound second-hand Quality 
with new threads and coupling, 16-ft. lengths 
and up. Also pipe cut to sketch. We guarantee 
entire satisfaction or return money. 

Established 1902. 

PFAIT & KENDAU, FiiBdrr St., Newtrk, N. J. 

Mention The Review when yon write. 



116 



The Florists' Review 



FSBBUABT 1, 1917. 



the side near the top. When the expan- 
sion tank is connected with the main 
return, in case the water boils there ia 
a back pressure on the return, which 
tends to check the circulation and etill 
further increase the difficulty. This is 
particularly likely to occur when the 
boiler is too large for the radiation. 

For the hotbed we would prefer to 
use two 2-inch returns. These may be 
connected with the 2%-inch flow pipe 
on the plate nearest the hotbed. Pro- 
vided a temperature more or less than 
55 degrees is desired, it is merely neces- 
sary to increase or lessen the number of 
the returns, one return making a differ- 
ence of about 5 degrees. 



CEOMWELL, CONN. 

A. N. Pierson, Inc., is cutting fine 
freesias in quantity, which find a ready 
Bale. Of the 500,000 planted this season, 
approximately one-fifth have been cut. 
About 75,000 rose plants are already out 
of the grafting frames and grafting is 
now proceeding at the rate of 10,000 
plants per day; 7,000 own-root cuttings 
are placed in the sand daily. Among 
the new carnations Belle "Washburn is' 
doing splendidly. There is not a split 
flower to be found of the variety, and 
as large a stock as possible is being 
worked up. For the benefit of the unmar- 
ried employees, especially those from 
out of town, A. N. Pierson, Inc., is 
building a boarding house to accommo- 
date about thirty-five men. It will be 
equipped with all modern conveniences. 
At the present cost of living few fam- 
ilies are willing to take boarders. 

Eobert Karlstrom is still laid up with 
neuralgia. He has been under the doc- 
tor's care ever since his return from a 
western trip December 15. 

Victor Streckfus, son of Hugo Strock- 
fus, of Syracuse, N. Y., after seven 
months of training on the Mexican bor- 
der, has returned to the florists' busi- 
ness. He now is getting practical expe- 
rience in rose growing at the Cromwell 
Gardens. R- C. S. 



DETROIT, MICH. 



Last week stock was hard to obtain, 
except carnations and, perhaps, violets. 
American Beauties are few and the 
price touches $9 for the specials. Choice 
peas arrive each day and all roses clear 
at fancy prices. 

Hugo Schroeter 's window representa- 
tive of the auto show was a clever af- 
fair. 

Philip Breitmeyer has left for Cuba, 
where ho expects to vacation a few 
weeks. 

Fred Breitmeyer, of Mount Clemens, 
reports that his Rose-pink Ophelia is 
selling well. 

Among visitors last week were W. J. 
Vesev, Jr., of Fort Wayne, Ind.; Mr. 
Manda, of East Orange, N. J., who is 
spending a few weeks here; Joseph 
Marks, of the American Bulb Co., Chi- 
cago. 

Miss Delia Lanier has left the employ 
of the Central Floral Co. H. T. 



The RAINBOW SYRINGE 

IB made of brass. It wlU fit a '4-lnch hose and Is 

easily adjusted for fine or coarse spray of water. 

The bPst jtreenhonBe svrlnpeon the market. 

Price urepnlil. $1.50 each; 

$18 OO per doz. 

JOHN WELSH YOUNG 

Upsal Station, P. P. R., Philadelphia. Pa. 



Mention The Review when you write. 



Greenhouse Glass 

WE ARE THE WORLD'S LARGEST PRODUCERS 

Ask the dealers for prices, or write us direct if the dealer doesn't handle 
our product. We guarantee uniform Gradingr, Flattening^, Annealings and 
Careful Packing^. 

"BET AOOUAINTED" WITH OUR SPECIALTIES 

29 -34 -39 -ounce Glass 

AMERICAN WINDOW GLASS CO. 

General OfTKa: ranDcn* Bank Building, nTTSBURGIt, PA. 




THE BAUR CMNATION CLIP 

The most practical device on the market for mending 
Split Carnations. Let us convince you by Ten Days* 
l^ee Trial. Send no money for trial outfit. Price per 
outfit (1 Plier and 1000 Clips). $2.00. Clips, per 1000. 75c; 2000. 
$1.26: 6000. $3.00; 10,000. $4.75; 25,000, $11.25; 60.000. $20.00. 
Postage prepaid. All Seedsmen. Used the world over. 



BAUR FLORAL CO., 



Mention Ttie Btrlew wlwa ytm wrlt». 



, Pa. 




SU'PERIOR CARNATION SJAPLES 

Best staple on the market. 35c per 1000; 3000 for $1.00, postage paid. 

MICHIGAN CUT FLOWER EXCHANGE 

S84 Randolpli Btrsat, DKTROIT MICH. 



GREENHOUSE 
GLASS 

Largest and Beat Selected 

Stocks 

in South and Southwest 

BlNSWANGER & QO. 



MKMPHIS 



RICHMOND 



MantloB The RwtIcw when yon write. 

THS ORIGINAL AND ONLT 

ELASTIC -LYKE 

LIQUID PUTTT 
P*(iltlT*lr wiu not ^t harf, ran 
In hot nor heaye ia cold WDntber. 
EMlly appUed at any leaaon, with 
bulb or machine. 

THE ELASTIC-LYKE CO. 
80 Eaat Randolph StrMt. Ohioao* 
Mention Tht Brlaw when yon write. 




(Nat lac) 



GLASS CLOTH 

A transparent waterproof fabric, guaran- 
teed to generate about the same warmth 
and light as glazed sash, or money back. 
For all forcing purposes. Sample 3x6 feet. 
60c prepaid. Plant forcers. 

TURNER BROS., Bladen, Neb. 



Mentlmi The Bevlew when yon writ*. 

ROCHELLE 

Paper Pots and Dirt nandM. See pajre 116 
Mention The BeTlew when yon write. 





Quality 
Greenhouses 

At Minimum Coat 



For Greenhouses of recogaized 
merit— 

For Greenhouses of proven de- 
pendability— 

For Greenhouses of the very fln- 
estmaterialandconstruction— 

For Greenhouses which have 
demonstrated for over 45 years 
that 

WE KNOW WHAT TO DO 
AND WHAT NOT TO DO 



SEE US 
S. JACOBS & SONS 

Greenhouse Builders 
1 363-1 381 riushlngAve., Brooklyn.N.Y. 




Fbbbuaby 1, 1917. 



The Florists' Review 



117 




Made with a Particular Use in Hind- 

Made to give paint satisfaction under the difficult conditions encountered at 
greenhouses — 

Made to withstand the constant dampness from the inside, and the beating sun 
from without — 

Made to diffuse and re-use precious sunlight, so necessary and valuable — 

Made pure white and to stay white — 

That is Greenhouse White. 

Prices on application to 

Pittsburgh Plate Glass Company 

^ 431-451 St. Clair St., 

Phone Randolph 4540 CHICAGO, ILLINOIS 



LARGEST JOBBERS GREENHOUSE GLASS 

IN THE WORLD 



I » i 



." SEND US YOUR INQUIRY 

LOWEST PRICES BEST QUALITY 



Mention The Review when yon write. 



Greenhouse 
GLASS 

WE HAVE THE STOCK 
AND RIQHT PRICKS 

Sharp, Partridge & Co. 

CHICAGO, ILL. 

Mention The BeTlew when yon write. 




_Mentlon The BeTlew when yon write. 



JHE FLORISTS HAIL ASSOCUTION 

2^'^** ttjOOOiOM M- ft. ef rlaat and hu a reeenre fond 
'J*f9KXM. Inaure year cUu new. ForparticaUn 
Utrat* JMM* FtlFR tee'v t«4«e River. R. J. 

Mention The HeTlew when yon write. 



GREENHOUSE GLASS 

DIRECT FROM FACTORY TO FLORIST 

Our "first-cost" prices will saye your money, and the quality of our glass will 

give perfect satisfaction. 

When figuring upon new houses, write for our prices, furnish your own glass 

and cut down the cost of your buildings. 

Buy a reserye stock at the present low prices and ayoid delay and loss in case 

of breakage by hail or fire. 

In asking* prices, g^ive sises, thickness and number of boxes wanted 



THE THROOP-MARTIN CO.. 



COLUMBUS. 0. 



Mention The Review when yon write. 



GREENHOUSE AND HOTBED GLASS 

8x10, 10x12 and 10x14 inch. Single, $2.16 per box of 60 square feet. 
ALL SIZES, SINOLE AND DOUBLE STRENGTH 

Write us for prices. 

BAUR WINDOW GLASS CO., EATON, IND. 



THE ONLY PERFECT 

Liquid Putty 
Machine 

Wni last a llfeUme. 
$1.25 BACH 

Adjustable— can and frame 
separate — easily cleaned. 
Frame all one piece, of 
malleable iron. More 
practical and more easily 
operated than any other. 

SEAL TIGHT LIQUID PUTn. $1.35 PER GALLOR 

in 10-gallon lots. Sl.40 per single gallon 




MKTROPOLITAN 

1398-1410 MetroMlitM Ave.. 



MATERIAL CO. 

BROOKLYN, N.Y. 



ASTICA 




usEmnnK. 

F.O.PiERCE(!0l 

P. O. Box aM 

NEW TORK 

Mastica Is elastic and tei>aclons, admits of 
expansion and contractloD. Patty become* 
hard and brittle. Broken glass more easily 
removed without breaking of other glass as 
occurs with hard patty. 

LASTS LONOKR THAN PUTTY. 
KASY TO APPLY. 



118 



The Florists* Review 



February 1, 1917. 







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HIGH COST OF — 

The most interesting thing nowadays is the high cost of things, 
and the next most interesting thing is how to combat the high cost. 
Agree with us? If so, lay in a supply of our square paper locking 
bands and pots and improve the quality of your plants, save a lot o 
time and be up-to-date. Our square paper pots will cut the cost of 
plant growing. 

THE RAMSBURQ LOCKING POT 

is the ideal soil container. It is made of first quality manila board 
and will last the entire season and remain in shape to market the 
plants in. We have a size for every requirement, both in bands and 
pots. Send a postal for samples and price list. 
Tlie advantages are all with the square paper pot. Give them a trial. 

G. S. RAMSBURG, - 

Mention The BcTJew when yon write. 



Somersworth, N. H. 



FORT WAYNE, IND. 



The Market. 



The demand last week, although hold- 
ing up well, was not so good aa that of 
the week previous. The supply of cut 
stock is still short, as the weather has 
continued dark and cold. There is just 
enough stock to meet the demand, and 
most of the florists clean up their sup- 
ply each night. Roses are none too plen- 
tiful, Russells and American Beauties 
being almost at a premium. The Kil- 
larneys are off color on account of the 
dark weather. Ward roses are in bet- 
ter supply, hut Ophelia and Sunburst 
are short. White roses are extremely 
sparce. Tho supply of carnations is 
smaller than it was a week ago. Spencer 
sweet peas arc arriving in large quan- 
tities and arc selling well. Jonquils 
appeared in the market last week for 
the first time this season. Forget-me- 
nots have also arrived. There is a good 
supply of Easter lilies and a few callas. 
Valley continues high-priced. Some 
splendid single violets arc offered. 
Stevia is on the short side and'the sup- 
ply of narcissi is heginning to diminish. 
Tulips are in fine demand. The call for 
funeral work during the week was large. 
Blooming plants are in fine demand, 
especially yellow narcissi, cyclamens, 
tulips, azaleas and rhododendrons. 

I'roparations are well under way for 
St. Valentine's day business. Indica- 
tions point to a good supply of \iolcts 
for this day. 

Various Notes. 

A visitor last week was S. L. Nelaon, 
of the Burlington Willow Ware Shops, 
of Burlington, la. 

Miss Margaret Flick, of the Flick 
Floral Co., is spending a week at De- 
troit, where she is combining business 
with pleasure. The Flick Floral Co. had 
a busy week of funeral work. The men 
are cutting some fine Spencer sweet 
peas, and are showing the first jonquils 
and forgot-menots of the season. 

Miss Margaret Vesey returned last 
week from Muncie, Ind., where she had 
been visiting her sister. 

The Doswell Floral Co. had a good 
business last week, with just enough 
cut flowers to meet the demand. The 
company is cutting good Shawyer, 
Ophelia and Killarney roses. The sin- 
gle violets arc excellent. 

Edgar Wenninglioff had some attrac- 
tive baskets of sweet ]ieas and Shawyer 
roses in his window decoration lf;st 

F. .T. Knecht did a heavy shipping 
business last week, his Russell roses be- 
ing in good demand. 




POSTPAID 
35c per lOOO $1.00 for 3000 



WHY NOT USE THE BEST? 

Ordering direct from the manufacturer 
assures Kettinir this particular staple 

Marshfield, Ore.. Dec. 6. 1916. 
F. W. Waite, Springfield. Mass. 

Dear Sir: Enclosed is our check for $1 00 
for 3000 Supreme Carnation Staples. Have 
been using ihese staples for several years 
and they are exactly what we like best. 
Very truly. Marshfield Florist Co. 

Minot. N. D., Nov. 28. 1916. 
F. W. Waite, Springfield, Mass. 

Dear Sir: Your letter of the 23d at hand 
and will say that you may ship me at once, 
via parcel post, 24,000. or 8 boxes of 3000 
each, of the Supreme Carnation Staples. 

Thank you for the favor. You will receive 

my future orders, as I think your staple is 

the best on the market, as the wire is fine 

but stronger than any other I have ever seen. 

Yours ver.v truly, 

Valker's Minot Greenhouses. 
(ByGeo. E. Valker.) 



F. W. WA<TE, MANUFACTURER 
85 Balmont Avenue SPRINGFIELD, MASS., U. S. A. 



Mention The ReTlew Tfhen yon write. 



The Niller Lock-Process, Easy-to-Fold Dirt Band and Pot 

PRICES ON BANDS-LOCK-PROCESS 

Inches 1000 '.mO 5000 10,000 20,000 60,000 

2 $1.00 $3.00 $5,00 $10.00 $20.00 $50.00 
2»9 1.50 4.50 7.00 13.00 24.00 58.00 
8 1.75 5.25 8.00 15.60 31.00 77.00 

PRICE LIST ON SPECIAL SIZE DIRT BANDS-LOCK-PROCESS 
Inches 1000 3000 5000 10,000 20,000 50.000 

2»2x2>a.\2 $1.15 $3.25 $6.00 $11.00 $21.00 $53.00 

3 X 3 X 2i2 1 40 4 00 r..50 13.00 26 00 65.00 

4 X 4 X 3>2 2.25 r,.'>0 10.00 20.00 40.00 100,00 
WARNING:— The grower that wastes liis valuable time in making up a common strip of paper into a 

Pot or liand, is like the man that plows his field with a spade. 
Write for samples of the only and original Locking Pot and Band, and note the difference. 

MODERN HFUCa.-.Ssr 543 N. Lawrence St., rhUadelphii, Pa. 



Mpnti.-in Th«» Rpview when yon write. 




■%,v.* 






■» 




l'^- 




M' 




M. 





No loii if 70a 
mend your iplit 
cunatioBi with 

■UPBRIOR 

CARHATIOH 

■TAFLU 

86o per 1000; 8000 
for 11.00. postpaid. 

WB^klitterlSti 

422 Main St. 
BUOU Sprlnrtleld, Ma««, i^mi 

Atcntlon The Review when you write. 

A hc.ivy run of fiiiioral work List 
woek w.Ts reported by A. .1. Tjantcrnicr 
& Co. They have a fine line of bloom- 
injT plants this season. 

The next meetinfr of the Florists' 
Club will be held with Frank J. Knecht, 
Fairfield avenue and Rudisell boule- 
vard, February 6. This will be an 



The best Paper Pot 
for shipping and grow- 
ing purposes. Sizes 
from 2 to (i in. Ask 
your dealer for them. 
Samples free. 

E. Allan Peirce 

400 Oaks Road 
WALTHAM, :: MASS. 
_ Mention The Review when you write. 




ROCHELLE 

Paper Pots and Dirt Band s. See pace 11 •'^ 

important meeting, as the constitution 
of the club will be voted on, and every 
member is urged to be present. B. F. ' 



Fbbbuary 1, 1917. 



The Florists^ Review 



119 



STANDARD 




STRONG 



UHL POTTERY CO. 



EVANSVILLE - HUNTINQBURG 
INDIANA 



ivsviitlou The Review wben yon write. 



SYRACUSE RED POTS 

Made in Standard Slies 

Their lichtneaa is » strons point whan 
freight rates are hish and coins higher. 

Iheir strength added to careful packing 
saves waste in breakage. 

Write for Catalogue 

Syracuse Pottery 

C. BRBITSCHWBRTH, Prop. 
SYRACUSE, N. Y. 




Mention The Bevlew when yon write. 

(iEO.KEU£R&SON 

UtamtmoUKntrm ol 

RED POTS 

•afore bnjtaig will* for priM* 
, I fl«14<l«tt mumMm Btnet 

wrightH^ AT...cacAiio Jjl 

Mention The Berlew when yon write. 
fOR THE SMOOTHEST. MOST POROUS 

RED POT 

in which plants d* th« bMt, writ* to 

MISSOURI POUERY CO. 

1227 W. 8th St., KaiiMW City, Mo. 

Mention The Review when yon write. 

ThercuthNitiinairiiwer 
ShowitPhiiadelphit 

awarded us a certificate of 
merit. We have earned in 
every test the slogan, "We 
lead in Quality and Finish." 
Give us a sample order— we 
will prove it to YOU- 
The PfattzgriH Pott'y Ci., York. Pa. 
.Mention The Review when yon write. 




RED 



Standard Flower Pots 

I'rice list and samples on application. 

^ADUCAH POTTERY CO., Inc. 

PADUCAH. KKNTUCKT 

- Ment ion The Review when yon write. 

RED POTS 

Standard Aialen 

Pans 

NASHVILLE POTTERY COMPANY 

_ NA8HVILLK, T»NN. 

Mways mention the Florists' Review 
wtoen WTttlniEc advertisers. 



■■tabUshed 1708 



Ineorporated IM 



HEWS 



STRONG 

RED 
POROUS 



POTS 



standard, Azalea, Bidb, Orchid, Pern, Hanging, Embossed, Rose, Carnation, Pafan, Cyda- 
men. Cut Pkmer, Special Shapes to order. Chicken Founts, Pigeon Nests, Bean Pots, etc 



POT iNAKmS FOR A CENTUIIY AND A HALF 
WORLD'S LAROIST MANUFACTURBRS 



Warebooses 




A. H. HEWS & CO., hCe, Cambridge, Hass. ''ftg^ToPR^w.'S^ff 

Mention The Review when yon write 

THE ELVERSON POT 

It is a dollars and cents saving proposition — plus sat- 
isfaction — to use the pot that proves its merit in the test 
of actual service. Write for free samples of that pot. 

W. H. ELVBRSON POTTKRY CO., New Brighton, Pa. 

Mention The Krlew when yon write. 

IONIA POTS ARE STRONG 

Always burned to the same degree of hardness. Oar kilns are equipped witt 
heat-measuring pyrometers and other up-to-the-minute improvements. Every detail 
of manufacture, from the clay bank to the strong crates in which Ionia pots are car- 
ried to you, marks an advancement over old-time methods. Let us have your order 
now. We will ship when you are ready. 

■ggiffSJiir.irwgrf.g* ioni* pottery co.. lom*. mcH. 

THE POT THAT EXCELS IN QUALITY 

Made from the finest quality of porous clay— the pot that has proved 
its merit, in the tests made by the largest growers, in making ex- 
ceptional growth. Ask the florists that use them. Write us for 
special prices TODAY. 

SPRINGFIELD CLAY MFG. CO., SnBNCnELD. OBO 

LOGAN POTS 

ARE BEST by TEST 

Flower Pots, Rose Pots, Azalea 
Pots, Bnlb Pans, HanKlng: Bas- 
kets, Oemetery Vases, Cnt 
Flower Vases and Lawn Vases. 
Askforonr catalOKaeand prices. 

The Login Pottery Co., Logon, 0. 

M^Ofltorn Officd 
Popch Box, Buff or Green Ooler. 101 8. Fifth Ave.. Chicago, III. 






HE 





standard Florist Pots 

AZALEA POTS, BULB PANS, ETC. 

Pots of exceptional quality at a reasonable price. 

Let us figure on your requirements. 

Write for samples. 

RED WING UNION STONEWARE CO. 

Dept. B, RED WING, MINN. 

COMPETITION PROVES OUR QUALITY 



"MOSS AZTEC" 
Ware 

Azalea Pots 
Hanging Baskets 
Lawn Vases 
Bird Batlis, Etc 



RED POTS 



Best Materials— Skilled Labor— Uniformly 
Burned— Carefully- Packed. 



The Peters & Reed Pottery Co., 



AVM. M. AVAKKIN 

ICW. L>;ii<l St., New York 



So. Zanesville, Ohio 



TUNLIN PAINT CO. chestnut hill, rHUADELPmA 

"The moisture win not get nnder the paint," as our paint penetrates the surface 
coated. It is BEST for priming, as well as top coats. REMEMBER THIS and 

have it used by your builders on all new work. 




GUARANTEED POTS 



MISSOURI 

4219 Iowa Avenue, 



Write for samples 
and prices. 

POTTERY Afl 

and SUPPLY uUs 

ST. LOUIS, MO. 




I!«UtUUiUi«d 1885 

Standard Fliwer Pots 

Porosity and Strengtb 
Unsurpassed. 

Write for Prices. 

A. F. KOHR 

M84-36-38 N. Leavltt St, Chicago 
Oor. solicited In Oer. and Edc. 



120 



The Florists' Review 



FlBHUABY 1, 1917. 



GRAND RAPIDS, MICH. 



The Market. 

Business during January -was unusu- 
ally good. Stock of late has been a lit- 
tle short at times, particularly lilies and 
roses. Callas are almost unobtainable, 
but Easter lilies are now less scarce 
and of good quality. Carnations arrive 
in sufficient quantities to supply the 
demand. Bulbous stock is coming in 
slowly. Yellow narcissi and a few tu- 
lips are about all to be had, but another 
week may see quite an increase. 

Some good freesias are now offered. 
Violets are plentiful and command a 
good price. Sweet peas are slow in ar- 
riving and the demand is becoming 
heavier. Good smilax is hard to find, 
but other greens are good. Cyclamens 
and azaleas certainly are having their 
innings now. Primroses are plentiful 
in all varieties. 

Various Notes. 

Eli Cross has had some fine azalea 
plants on display in his store window. 

Miss Mary Hartnett reports business 
good. She expects to move to her new 
location soon. 

Arthur Crabb has been busy with 
numerous funeral orders. 

The Wealthy Avenue Floral Co. has 
some cyclamen plants that are bound 
to please the buyer. A. F. C. 



PITTSBURGH. 



The Market. 



Conditions have not changed much 
in the last week. Stock of all kinds 
is plentiful, except roses, which have 
not shown much increase in quantity. 
The demand for them far exceeds the 
supply every day. The retail stores all 
seem to have been quite busy, except on 
Saturday, when there was some com- 
plaint, as the big fire in the downtown 
district seemed to cause a certain 
amount of excitement and the usual 
counter trade fell off as a result. 

Various Notes. 

The Karl Koenig estate is sending to 
the Pittsburgh Cut Flower Co. some ex- 
cellent lilies, narcissi and tulips. 

Murray McGrew, of G. P. Weaklen & 
Co., seems to be exceedingly happy; at 
any rate he is whistling a good deal. 
It is a girl. 

The attendants at the carnation con- 
vention from this vicinity include 
T. Malbranc, of Johnstown; Ed Blind, 
William Loew, Fred Burki and W. A. 
Clarke, of Pittsburgh. 

Hayes Carney, aged 12 years, died 
January 24, after a month 's illness. He 
was the son of Walter H. Carney, who 
was associated with J. B. Murdoch & Co. 
for some years. Mr. Carney has the sym- 
pathy of his many friends in the trade. 

Clarke. 



Young Tool Company 

Casey, Illinois 

Carnation Supports for 

use as first tier with wire and 
string. Single ring, 7 inches 
in diameter, with 10 -inch 
electric welded legs on oppo- 
site sides. Gives proper ven- 
tilation, growing space and 
allows easy working of the 
soil. Price, $12.50 per 1000, 
Sample free. 



I 



3=> 




Hammond's Thrip Juice No. 2 

IN USE SINCE 1883. 

TESTIMONIALS 

Bradford, Pa„ Jan. 13, 1917. 
Mr. Benjamin Hammond, Beacon, N. Y. 

Dear Sir:— I received some Beauty Rose Plants that 
were infesȣd with a fly similar to the house fly; it pierces 
the bud arid lays eggs from which maggots are hatched. 
Thrip Jurce No. 2 kills the vermin, and "Beauty" growers 

should all know of this remedy, ^„ 

Very truly yours, C. E. GUNTON. 

Springfield, Ohio, Jan. 22, 1917, 
Hammond's Paint <fe Slug Shot Works, Beacon, N. Y. 
Dear Sirs:— Thrip Juice No. 2 is the most effective in- 
B I secticide I have ever used. Our Chrysanthemums were the 

'«*ol.(A^w•■■ finest grown in our city, and I credit Hammond's Thrip 

Juice for much of the vigorous growth of plants and Quantity of bloom. Believe me, it is 
putting color into our Carnations at this time. We spray constantly through a brass ball 
attached to the hose and never had finer stock. Very truly yours. 

GUSTAV SCHNEIDER. 22 E. High St. 

Fort Wayne, Ind.. Jan. 26, 1917. 
Hammond's Paint & Slug Shot Works, Beacon. N. Y. 

Gentlemen:— For two years we have used Hammond's No. 2 Thrip Juice for the Cattleya 
scale and found it the most effective of any insecticide. Send on another five sallons at 
once, and oblige. Very truly yours, W. J. & M, S. VESEY. 

Fort Wayne, Ind., Jan. 25, 1917. 
Mr. Benjamin Hammond. Beacon, N. Y. 

Dear Sir:— Last summer we found Hammond's No. 2 Thrip Juice very effective in keep- 
ing down the leaf roller on Roses and Chrysanthemums. By spraying heavily once a week 
it catches the young as they hatch out and before they become millers. In previous sea- 
sons we have been kept busy catching the miller by hand, but last year we were saved the 
trouble and annoyance. Send ten gallons more, right along. 

Very truly yours, AARON SHIVES, 

Supt. of Flick Floral Co. Greenhouses. 

Hammond's Paint & Slug Shot Works 

BEACON, NEW YORK 




Trade mark 



Mention The ReTlew when yon write. 




SPU1 URNAnONb 

Pilhbwy't CniliM Stipli 

"BMtdoTlceonths 

■arket" JoMph Tisntii 
"Oonld not gefc along wttti. 
out t hOTau ** 8. W. Plka 
INI. Ha; MM hr 11 .N. Hit>aW 

lLmikmy, (Mul km g ,m. 



Mention Th« Barlew wlwn y<m writ*. 



THE 

REGAN PRINTING HOUSE 

Large Runs of 

CATALOGUES 

Our Specialty — Get Our Figures. 
531-537 Plymouth PI., CHICAQO 




O R £ £ R'S 

Florist SpeclaltUs 

New Brand. New Style. 
HOSE "RIVEBTON" 

Furnished in lengths up 
to 600 feet without seam or 
Joint 
The HOSE far the FLORIST 

Vlnch perft.,lS C 

Reel of 000 ft. " UHmj 
2reel8.1000ft ** 14 O 

'a-lneh ♦* 13 C 

Reel,600ft... •* 12>«C 
OonpUngs famished. 

HiNRV A. Dmm 

7U0hestnatSt, 
Phii.adki.phu, Pa- 



Peerless Sulphur Blower 

'^ Cy l«P«>T*ment orer the beUows." 
PriM. t4.eo F. O. B. c 



Ohteace 

McMORRAN t CO ^*^ ^- <}>>i<» stmt. 



FlBEUAHT 1, 1917. 



The Florists' Review 



121 




Lawn Hose Made 
for Rough Usage 



We know all about the trouble florists have with 
the ordinary kind of lawn hose. 

We know that nothing but the very best grade of 
hose will give satisfactory service against the hard 
I j|uisage it must, withstand around the greenhouse. 

Therefore when we say that Goodyear Wingfoot 
Lawn Hose is made to meet the most trying condi- 
tions, we have in mind especially the use of this hose 
around the greenhouse. 

You can drag Goodyear Wingfoot Lawn Hose 
over cinder and concrete walks and around sharp 
bench legs. You can leave it lying in the sun and 
where wheelbarrows run over iu We do not expect 
you to always put it away and dry it out. 

We have all these things in mind when we tell you 
that Goody ear Wingfoot Lawn Hose is the most serv- 
iceable, all-around good hose that the florist can 
possibly buy. 

Goodyear Wingfoot Lawn Hose is made in such 
a way that it cannot kink and it is guaranteed not to 
burst at any time within two whole lawn hose seasons. 

The Goodyear Tire & Rubber Company, Akron, Ohio 




122 



The Florists' Review 



Fbbruart 1, 1917. 



LIQUID 



49% NICOTINI. 



"NICO-FUME" 



S-lk.O»B 110.60 

4-lb. can 6.60 

1-lb. can 1.60 

^-Ib. nn 60 



TMRIPS 



PAPER 



288 sheet Oku 17.1 

144 sheet c»n 4.i 

24sheet0»ii .86 



8PRAYING-VAPORIZING-FUMIGATINQ 

YOUR DEALER HAS THESE PRICES 

ManuffaeturMl by THI KENTUCKY TOBACCO PHODUCT COMPANY, lneorporat«d, Loulsvlll*, Ky. 



Mention The Review when yon •write. 



MILWAUKEE. 

The Market. 

Business in general has shown some 
improvement during the last week. The 
demand for all classes of stock has been 
good and the available supply has been 
cleaned up at satisfactory prices. Car- 
nations are in good supply, but the de- 
mand is sufficiently large so that there 
is no surplus on anything but reds. 
These seem to be in abundance and the 
call is not sufficiently strong to use up 
the cut. Prices, however, show no de- 
cline and are holding firm at from $3 to 
$4 per hundred. 

Eoses are scarce. There is a medium 
cut of the different varieties, but the 
demand seems to be extra heavy and 
the shorter grades are cleaned up each 
morning. Russell, Hoosier Beauty and 
Ophelia are particularly scarce and it is 
impossible to get these varieties in any 
quantity. The supply of double violets 
seems to be about equal to the demand. 
Singles are hard to obtain and few or- 
ders are being filled on this item. The 
quality of the doubles is good and fair 
prices' are being realized. Sweet peas 
are coming in more heavily at this time, 
but the supply is as yet far short of the 
demand. Cattleyas are in medium sup- 
ply, but the demand is light just now. 
Consequently there are plenty to go 
around. Spring stock, such as tulips, 
narcissi, daffodils, etc., arc coming in 
more heavily, but the cut is moving 
readilv. Easter lilies are scarce at this 
time, ' due to the shortage of supply 
rather than to an excessive demand. 
Plants are moving nicely and there is 
quite a call for hyacinths. 

Taken all in all, the condition of the 
market is a healthy one, although more 
stock could be disposed of if it were to 
be had. The shortage of coal, together 
with the extremely cold weather, has 
placed a burden on the growers, and 
this is an item that will go far toward 
increasing the cost of production this 

vear. 

Various Notes. 

F. H. Holton, who has been ill for 
about six weeks, left January 20 for 
Hot Springs, Ark. Mr. Holton is feel- 
ing much better and expects to return 
fully recovered in about three weeks. 
Mrs. Holton and their daughter, Ruth, 
accompanied him to the south. 

Alfred Schiller, who underwent an 
operation recently, is reported to be 
feeling somewhat better and his many 
friends are extending him their best 
wishes for a complete recovery. 

II. J. o. 

Chadds Ford, Pa. — A landscape con- 
tracting business has been started here 
bv T. A. Leonard. 



12 sheets, Uin.aft. 



8 lbs. 



4 lbs. 



lib. 



i« lb. 1% 01. 




NanihctiiKd by NICOTINE NFG. COMPANY, 117 N. Main St, ST. LOUIS, U. S. A. 



Mention The Review when yon write. 



\%^ ^insecticide JAap 
vf-m*vny Af iecie ^ 



r 



TNE RECOBNIZEO STMDMO INSECTICIBE. 

A ipny remedy foi* ffreen. black, white flr, 
thripfl and aoft scale. 

Quart. $1.00; OaUon, 12.60. 

NIKOTIANA 

A 12 per cent nicotine eolation properly 
diluted (or fumliratlnK or raporlilnK. 
Quart, tl.SO; Gallon, $4.S0. 

Until farther notice shipments on onr pro- 
ducts Fonclne, Tennlne and Scaline 
will be subject to conditions of the chemi- 
cal market. 

Prompt shipments can be guaranteed on 
Aphine and Nikotiana. 

APHINE MFG. CO. 

MADISON, N. I. 



Mention The Review when yon write. 

White Fly, Red Spider and 
Cyclamen Mite 

I have a recipe that will clean them out, 
which is non-poisonous and makes a very cheap 
spray. Will not bum or discolor the foliage. 
Sent to any address for $1.00. 

CHAS. A. BOWER 

724 Haynes Street, DAYTON, OHIO 

Mention The Review when yon writ e. 

Use the only Shading 

E. A. LIPPMAN 

6 HIGH STREET 
Morristo^t^n, New Jersey 

Send for Uooklets. 



TO-Bfll-HE 

STANDARD FOR INSECTICIDES 

Liquid, the strongest and cheapest 
Nicotine (45^) to use. 

Paper, fumigatins, contains more 
Nicotine and therefore cheaper 
than any other to use. 

Powder, for fumigating and dust- 
ing, is standardized on Nicotine 
contents and is light and fluffy. 
Very superior product. 

DETROIT NICOnNE CO. 

DETROIT, MICH. 






Mention The Review when yon write. 



Ad rAcicnt Aphii Remedy (or house 

(ltd lawn pluUi. A leaMMuble ieller ioi 

tonai <)m>|x. Pnte $9.00 per giom f. 

o. b., K*aus City. 1 2 tube* oo 'leana* 

1 T>f. I. o. b. Kiittu City. 

Kansas City Tobacco Products Co., Inc. 



KANSAS Crrv. MO. 



NICOTINE 4096 

QUARANTEED BY 

The GRASSELU CHEMICAL CO. 

0»-eVELANO NEW YORK CINCINNATI 

CHICAQO MILWAUKEE ST. PAUb 

ST. LOUIS 

WBITB FOR PBIOBS 



Fkbrdary 1, 1917. 



The Florists^ Review 



123 




You wouldn't expect a 
sick horse to pull a full 
load. 

Are you expecting that 
tired, starved soil to pro- 
duce the greatest number 
of flowers or vegetables, 
the remainder of the grow- 
ing season — a most criti- 
cal time for you? 

Why not safeguard 
yourself right now? 

Buy the Magic Fer- 
tilizers specially mixed 
for your particular 
soil and plants, and 
feed the Magic way. 

Take the word of hun- 
dreds of your fellow grow- 
ers: "There is no invest- 
ment you could make that 
would yield better and 
surer returns, namely, 
bigger and better crops, 
than to invest in the 
Magic Fertilizers." 

We'll gladly send you the 
booklet, "Fertilizatioa and 
Methods Adaptable in the 
Modern Greenhouse." and 
our Famous Fertilizer Charts. 
A postal card will bring them 
to you promptly. 

Chicago Feed & 
Fertilizer Co. 

Manufacturers of 
Pure Fertilizers 

Stock Yards, CHICAGO 



^llllllllllllllillllllllllllllllllllilllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll!: 

! ypjmi I 

= PuLvcRizEb Sheep- Pulverized Cattlz = 

i SHREbbEb C/iTTLE = 

M/INURE 

I Write Wizard Brand into your supply | 

E house order for manure— or drop us a pos- i 

= tal for latest price list and freight rates. 5 

I The Pulverized Manure Co. I 



E 33 Union Stock Yards, 



CHICAGO E 



Tiiiimiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii? 

Mention The Review •when yoa write. 



PECKY CYPRESS 



WE ARE SPECIALISTS 

We were practicaUy the first to seU to this trade, and cruarantee perfect satis- 
faction and rock- bottom prices. Get the value of our long experience. 
PECKY CYPRESS, because of its durability, is the only wood now being 
used for greenhouse benches. Will ship in any Quantity, carload or less. 

Drop Siding, Ship Lap, Flooring, White Cedar Posts, Everything in Lumt)er 

WRITE FOR PRICES 

Kingsbury and Weed Sts. 
CHICAGO 
L. D. Phones Lincoln 410 and '411 



Adam Schlllo Lumber Co., 



Mention The Herlew irh<B yon wrlta. 



Prepare Your Soil with 

HERMAN'S SOIL AND 
MANURE GRINDER 

and have it ready when 
spring comes. Now is 
the time to order. 

O. H. HERMAN 

lO Pearl Street 
COUNCIL BLUFFS, IOWA 

Mention The Bevlew when yon write. 





SheepNamore 



0ARUN6 S COMPANY. 4160 S. Athlani Ave. Chicaio. III. 
Mention The BeTlew when yon write. 

AETNA BRAND 
TANKAGE FERTILIZER 

Is the best balanced fertilizer manufactured. 
It contains the ten salts constituting soil. It 
is giving satisfactory results wherever used. 

Farmers' and Florists' Fertilizer Co. 

M9 Exchange Ave., Room 5. Tel. Drover 1932 

U. S. YARDS, CHICAQO. ILL. 

Meatlia Tfe« Berlaw wUa r** wilte. 






^x; 



\4 



FOR KCOOMY 

Caldwell Steel Tanks 

Caldwell Steel 
T.Tnks are economical 
because they are scien- 
tifically cf)nsti'>icte(l. 

Special attention Is 
given torivetinc thereliy 
assurlnfr strenptli, safety 
and freedom from leak- 
age. Sizes lip to 1200 pal- 
Ions shipped anywhere. 

Write for Illus- 
trated Cntnloeue. 

W.C. CALDWELL CO. 

Incori«)rated 
Louisville, Kentucky -^ 



FLORISTS. ATTKNTION 

Greenhouse flats made from Michigan Cedar, vermin- 
proof, strongr and durable, lie each k. d., f. o. b. cars 
Chassell, Mich. Prompt shipments. Sample flats on 
application. Try them. Address H. J. Patterson, 
Chassell, Michigan. 

Ifention The Review when yon write. 



124 



The Florists^ Review 



Fbbbuabt 1, 1017. 



MINNEAPOLIS, MINN. 



The Market. 



Business in general seems to iiave 
/een good, although rather erratic by 
reason of much funeral work one day 
and practically nothing the next. The 
market has been adequately supplied 
with cut flowers. The roses, Richmond, 
Killarney and Eussell, ranged in price 
from $6 to $8. Violets were quoted at 
$1 per hundred, with tulips and nar- 
cissi making $4. Valley is difficult to 
procure and the price is stiff; the same 
applies to orchids. Easter lilies have 
been in robust demand and the good 
prices have pleased the growers of this 
stock. Flowering plants continue to 
sell readily, primroses and begonias 
probably leading in popularity. Good 
Boston ferns clear easily. 

Various Notes. 

The W. H. Lill Co., which now occu- 
pies the store formerly conducted by 
the R. M. Chapman Co., is doing a splen- 
did business in its attractive flower de- 
partment, over which Miss Hayden 
presides. 

The Minneapolis Market Gardeners' 
Association held its annual midwinter 
picnic January 20. This was the sev- 
enteenth winter picnic held by the 
Minneapolis gardeners, who find the 
summer months too busy for such an 
event. About 400 gardeners and friends 
took part in the celebration, a feature 
of which was a basket supply, served 
picnic style, each member or family 
bringing the food to the auditorium 
in a basket. A lengthy vaudeville pro- 
gram in the afternoon was followed at 
night by dancing and games. The offi- 
cers of the association are: President, 
Nelson H. Reeves; secretary, E. O. Bal- 
lard; treasurer, F. M. Lehrby. W. M. 
Bofferding, as head of the reception 
committee, had a busy time of it to 
make evervbody meet everybody else. 

The Whitted Floral Co. forces have 
been hard pushed by a large quantity 
of funeral work. 

The Minnesota Garden Flower So- 
ciety will hold an interesting meeting 
February 9 at the Public Library. 

Messrs. Stein and Keeley, of Holm & 
Olson, St. Paul, recently visited friends 
at the Whitted Floral Co. stores. They 
were dressed up in their gayest attire 
and came over with 8,000 others sim- 
ilarly "dolled up," to boost the carnival 
being held at St. Paul this week. 

E. M. P. 



Lincoln, Neb. — Nick Arrigo, market 
gardener, will erect another greenhouse 
in the spring. The Foley Greenhouse 
Mfg. Co., Chicago, has the order for the 
material. 



NON-KINK WOVEN HOSE 

In any length (one piece), 
with couplings, 15c per ft. 
Unequaled at the price. 



Hose Valve, 70c 

All bfMB, except the hand wheel. 
H»8 tk removable leather disk, 
which is easily replaced to keep 
watertight. Stuffins box prevents 
leaks at stem. 

METROPOLITAN MATERIAL CO. 

1S96-1410 MetropollUa Are.. Brooklra. H. T. 





PANSY AND VERBENA BASKETS 

Their use assures the Florist and Greenhouse man the largest 
cash return for their plants. 



Specify 




Small size, No. 
9 in. long, 6 in. wide 

3 in. deep. 
Nested 600 in a crate. 





CrowirSfand 

Wire Handles, detached 
$2.00 per 1000 extra 



Large size. No. 2 

13 inches long, 7^ inches wide 

3^1 inches deep. 

Nested 250 in a crate. 



Samples sent free upon request 



G. P. READ, Inc., 199 Duane St., NEW YORK 



Fenton's Square 

THE BEST WAY 




Patent applied for. 
MADE OF WOOD 

PRICES Per 500 1000 

134-Inch $ .91 $1.85 

2 -Inch 1.00 1.50 

214-lDCh 1.25 2.00 

2>a-lnch 1.50 2.2» 



Wood Dirt Bands 

Our new wood dirt bands have met 
with instant favor, and why not? 
You can't help but like them. 
Saves time and money, with better 
results. 

The Ideal Dirt Band 

is made of strips of wob4. ,fliin as 
cardboard, -cut to lock together, 
mak4hg a' stronger and more eco- 
nomical, dirt Imnd than those made 
of paper.' Try them and be convinced. 
We cut them to fit any bench or flat. 
Thousands can be set up in a few min- 
utes. Better give us a sample order, 
NOW. 

Special prices on larger quantities. 

THEIDEALDIRTBANDCO.,EvaiisnUe,bd. 



Mention The ReTlew when you write. 



We Namiiactnre Hotbed Sash at 80c each 




Ours are all made from the very 
best grade of Oulf Cypress. 

Olmsed Hotb«4l Saali from 91.65 ny 

Double UKbt Basil up to 94.00 

We carry a largs stock of all 
sizes. Write us for estimates. 



S. JACOBS & SONS, 13631381 nuking Afenne, BROOKLYN, N. Y. 



Mentlw The B«t1«w 



yo wTtf. 



CARNATION SUPPORTS 

AND 

ROSE STAKES 

Our prices and deliveries suit. 

THE CARNATION SUPPORT CO. 

Connersville, Indiana 



Mention The Review when yon write. 




ERECT YOUR OWN WIRE 
-^ FENCIS 

with this "Red Devil" fence tool you 
can make and repair wire fences, drive 
and pull staples, stralehton, stretch and 
tie wire, etc. Style 1900, 10 Inches long. 
Sample, $1.00. Booklet free. 

SMITH & HCMCNWAY CO , Inc 

80 Chamber8 St.. New York City 



GIT OUR PRICES ON 

OUOVANIZED WIRI ROSE STAKIf 

AND TYING WIRI 

Manafactorers of the Model Plant SapMrtt 
for Carnations, Dahlias. Golden Glow. Peonie** 
Chrysanthemums and Tomatoes. Lawn FanCAi 
Flower Bed Guard. Trellis. 

IGOE BROS.. 266 N. 9th SU BKOOKLYN. N. T. 

llntlw n« mnUm 



■^TipT''^ - V "^ ^^ ' •' '■-. 



FasBUART 1, 1917. 



The Florists' Review 




KALISPELL GARDENS (W. E. Mills, Owner), KalispeU, Mont. 

AN ACRE OF GLASS 

IN THE MONTANA MOUNTAINS 



^ For the greenhouses at KalispeU Gardens, Mr. Mills 
obtained the material from half-way across the con- 



#T The same painstaking care, from the time we figured 
the estimate until the last shipment was made, is 
tinent. His choice came after a careful study of the most yours for the asking. If you intend to build, let us hear 

modern methods of construction. fr.om you. 

H.It will pay you to investigate Dietsch greenhouse materials and methods of construction. 

I 






A. DIETSCH COMPANY 

2640 SheffieIaoAvenuej»Chicago 




Honor- Quality - Strength - Service 



are to be found in GARLAND QUALITY PRODUCT 



. 1 



Garland patent cast iron gutters were never better than at present, and our other greenhouse 
materials and supplies are such as to uphold the wonderful reputation this superior gutter has 
gained in the past twenty-five years. 

We solicit your inquiries for greenhouse materials of all kinds. 

GARLAND MFG. CO., louis wiuboid, Prcsident Des Plaines, 111. 



. . • Notice . . . 

Recently we made a slight advance on prices of Ventilating Devices and Greenhouse Fittings. 

No change has been made in our business policies. From us you always get a fair and square 
transaction, and the same price governs each and every purchase. You know the quality of 
ADVANCE materials and you are possibly acquainted with our excellent service. 

Please get our latest prices before sending in your further orders. 

Just ask for a catalogue— it covers everything. 

ADVANCE CO., Richmond, Ind. 




126 



The Florists' Review 



FCBRUARY 1, 1917. 



FOLEY PIPE FRAME GREENHOUSES 

require no nails for attaching roof bars to ridge and gutter sills. 
Galvanized ties and galvanized screws are used entirely. 



An 

Exclusive 
Foley 
Feature 





All Hcrew holes in bai's 
aroaccmately bored at 
factory. 



Greatly 
adds to 
Strength of 
House 



A Our patented malleable iron bar bracket hooks over top of flange on channel gutter and is then driven firmly in 
place with a hammer. No bolts or drilling of gutters necessary. Screw hole in roof bar is bored at factory. End of 
roof bar is exposed, allowing free circulation of air; end of bar can be easily painted, thereby preventing decay. 

B Method of attaching roof bars to ridge. Galvanized ridge and bar tie below is screwed lo under sides of ridge 
and roof bars. On top of roof a screw is driven through tongue of bar into ridge. 

C Galvanized sill and bar tie where wooden gutters are used. Also long screw through tongue of roof bar, se- 
curely fastens bar to concentric sill. 

D Bars cut concentric principle, permitting condensation from drip grooves in bars to fall free of sill into drip 
conductor, thereby preventing decay so commonly found where the old style bevel sill and bevel cut bars are used. 

The boring of the roof bars at the factory and furnishing galvanized ridge and sill ties with galvan- 
ized screws eliminates the poor job and extra work which "toe-nailing" invariably means. Actual tests 
have proven that this improved construction of ours is considerably stronger than the old way. 

This is not an experiment. It is just one of the many features which make the "Foley House" super- 
ior to any other type. 

THE FOLEY GREENHOUSE MFG. CO. 

3248 West 31st Street, CHICAGO, ILL. 



GLEN COVE, N. Y. 

The eleventh annual dinner of the 
Nassau County Horticultural Society 
was held in the Oriental hotel, Glen 
Cove, January 23. Nearly 100 members 
and friends sat down to a sumptuous 
repast, which made one forget the high 
cost of living for a while. The tables 
were decorated with cut flowers and pot 
plants. After everyone had taken good 
care of the inner man and nearly every- 
one present was enjoying his Eobert 
Burns, President James McCarthy, with 
a few well chosen words, presented to 
James MacDonald a small present, as a 
token of appreciation of his services as 
president during the last year. William 
Stewart, of Boston, Mass., was then in- 
troduced as toastmaster for the evening. 
Toasts were responded to as follows: 
For the Nassau County Horticultural 
Society, John F. Johnson; New York 
Florists' Club, A. Guttman; the seed 
trade, William Sperling; the nursery 
trade, W. E. Maynard. A telegram of 
good wishes from M. C. Ebel, of Madi- 
son, N. J., was read and best wishes also 
were received from the Massachusetts 
Horticultural Society and the Horticul- 
tural Society of Boston. Many of the 
important nursery and seed houses in 
the country were represented by mem- 
bers or by salesmen. Among those who 
helped to relieve the monotony of 
speech-making by singing were: Messrs. 
Ferguson, Twigg, Wilson, Jones, Collins 
and French. 

At the conclusion of the most success- 
ful dinner in the society's history every- 
body crossed hands and sang "Should 
auld acquaintance be forgot t" 

Harry Goodband, Cor. Sec'y. 



Kind Greenhouses 



KEEP SUMMER WITH YOU THE WHOLE YEAR ROUND, 

On account of their sturdy special construction, which permits of great 
strength without the need of heavy, shadow-casting supports, these houses 
are so warm and sunny that they are filled with a riot of bloom and fruit 
when Jack Frost has stripped the garden of its beauty. 

The ventilating and heating systems are the result of years of experi- 
ence in building for professional growers. Things just have to grow in a King. 

Write today for Bulletin No. 43. See how beautiful and how productive 
a greenhouse can l»e erected for the price you want to pay. 

KING CONSTRUCTION CO., King's Road, NORTH TONAWANDA, N. Y. 

ALL THE SUNLIGHT ALL DAY HOUSES 



)^: 



v: 




Mention The Rerlew when yon write. 



Grand Ledge, Mich.— The death of 
Mrs. Ellis E. Doty came January 27 
after a long illness. She was the mother 
of Mark Doty, of Doty & Huggett, well 
known florists here. 



ROCHELUI 

Paper Pots and Dirt Bands. See pas;< 1^ ' 
Mention The Review when yon write. 



FUBEUABX 1, 1917. 



The Florists^ Review 



127 




Sunlight Sash for Bedding Plants 

Its successful use by hundreds of florists has proved that Sunlight Double Glass Sash gives 
far better service than single glass, and at half the operating cost. 

Plants have all the light all the time, growing faster, stronger and healthier. No possibility 
of sudden chilling at night and no expensive mats and shutters to move and remove. 




beds 
aadOoU-tnines 



THE STANDARD 

Scientific and practical endorse- 
ment by leading florists and 
gardeners have made Sunlight 
Double Glass Sash the standard. 

Sunlight quality is also maintained 
in the complete line of single glass 
which we carry in stock— prompt 
shipment. 

Write us today for valuable cata- 
logue and present low prices. 




Small Sunlight Greenhouses 

for Special Growing 

For many varieties of flowers, one or 
more small ready-made, inexpensive 
Sunlight Greenhouses are a decided ad- 
vance in floriculture. Enables you to 
maintain temperatures best suited to 
growing special varieties, or to season 
bedding and half hardy plants before 
setting them out. 



SUNUGHT DOUBLE GLASS SASH CO., 



948 E. Broadway, 
LOUISVILLE, KY. 




"THE WOOD 
THAT ALL ITS 
USERS PRIZE, 
THE WISE IN- 
VESTOR SAFE- 
LY BUYS." 

NOW FOR A FREE BOOK 

from the internationally famous Cy- 
press Pocket Library— 42 vols, (the 
Greenhouse Book is Vol. 3). Vol. 1 
has a full list of the other volumes 
and the unabridged U. S. Gov't. Re- 
port on "the Wood Eternal." Have 
you had it yet ? 



SOUTHERN CYPRESS MANUFACTURERS' ASSOCIATION 



1230 HIBERNIA BANK BLDG.. 
NEW ORLEANS. LA. 




1230 HEARD NAT'L BANK BLDG. 
JACKSONVILLE. FLA. 



(Pleas* AddreM naareat offle*) 



128 



The Florists^ Review 



FlBBUABY 1, 1917. 




wm 



GREEN- 
HOUSE 
MATERIAL 



>.. v* 



J- 







HARDWARE 

HOTOED 

SASH 



t-.^yK~f^ 



y\ ' Qreenbouses of W. S. Lohr, Ottawa, 111. 

BELOW IS A LHTER RECEIVED FROM MR. LOHR, AFTER A TERRIFIC STORM IN HIS VICINITY: 

The Ickes-Braun Mill Co., Chicago, 111. 

Dear Sir*:- We had a very severe storm here today, and the vn-iter was in the greenhouses and took particular notice of the effect 
it had on the buildings. There was not the slightest shake or tremble in any part of the building. The same storm blew down telephone 
wires, poles, baros, and did a lot of damage. We are also pleased to tell you that we have the finest show for carnations we have ever had. 
We are more than pleased with the houses. ' Yours truly, W. S. LOHR, Ottawa, 111. 

This letter from one of our customers simply proves tlie tfood features of our construction. ICKES-BRAUN con- 
struction features are Strengtli— Permanency- Reliability. We build eflKdent houses. Write for our sketches and estimates. 
Order what you need either for repairs or new houses. 

ICKES-BRAUN MILL CO. 



2330 WABANSIA AVENUE, 



(Near Western and North Aves.) 



CHICAGO, ILL. 



Mention Th« Herlew when yon trrite. 



BUPFAIiO. 

The Market. 

Although January business was a lit- 
tle slow,- the month 's totals would show 
that it was fairly good for a first month 
of the year. Stock, however, has been 
scarce from the beginning, and there is 
no relief in sight. There has been a 
good demand for roses, but roses have 
been scarce. Carnations are a little 
more plentiful, due to the fact that we 
have had some sunshine lately. Spring 
flowers are arriving in larger quantities 
every day, especially jonquils, which 
realize good sales. Tulips, freesias, 
snapdragons, mignonette, hyacinths and 
sweet peas add to the assortment and 
are essential to basket combinations 
and table decorations. Orchids, violets, 
gardenias and valley are plentiful and 
have a good demand. The present sup- 
ply of greens is sufficient for all de- 
mands. 

Various Notes. 

If no misfortune befalls the azalea 
plants of Frank Baum, he will have a 
fine batch for Easter sales. 

Among the unusual things at the store 
of "W. J. Palmer & Son last week was 
a floral replica of a locomotive. The 
"engfine" was about two and one-half 
feet in height and about four feet in 
length. It was made principally of 
white carnations. The base consisted 
of pink roses and white carnations. 

The noted evangelist, "Billy" Sun- 
day, arrived in Buffalo January 27. He 
opened his campaign Sunday, January 
28, and will remain here eight weeks. 
The florists' business to a certain extent 
will be benefited by the augmented de- 
mand for flowers on the part of the 
crowds that flock to the evangelist's 
meetings. 

Prof. D. Lumsden, of Cornell Univer- 
sity, February 8 will give the second 
of his series of lectures on "Gardens 
and Garden Flowers," at the Perkins 
Memorial hall. A. E. 





Saves Labor in Handling 
Small Aster Plants 

Following Is an extract from a letter 
received from J. G. Botkin, of Urbana, 
Ohio: 

"One of our great savings in labor 
with Skinner Irrigation has been in 
handling the small aster plants. This 
plant is very susceptible to heat and 
drought. Formerly we potted off all 
the small plants in 2-inch stand of 
plants when planting out, even in 
hot weather. Now we take good 
seedling plants and by using the ir- 
rigation right after the planting, we 
can get a much better stand at great- 
ly reduced cost." 



KINNER 

YSTE M 



THB SKINNER IRRIQATION CO. 
223 Water St., Troy. Ohio 



s3 




Mention Tb« BeTlew when jon writ*. 

IF YOU WANT THE BEST 



r^l 









GET A 



Paarce- built Brsenhouse 

GEORGE PEARCE 

Tel. 9«8-H. 808 Tremont Are., OBAIieE. N. 3. 
Mention The Rerlew when yon write. 




Square Dealing Fertlllzei/ 
WALTER S. McOEK /I 

ffS27 Ellis Ave. Chicasro, III./ 1 

Oreenhonse Snppltee and Material/ ■ 
Tel. H P. fifiT 7 t 

Mention The Berlew when yon write. 



i)0 



■;;t^ 




For COMMERCIAL 
GREENHOUSES 




This Metropolitan semi-iron commer 
cial greenhouse. 18 x 200 feet, was 
erected for the Springfield Floral Co. 
of Springfield, N. .1. 

Note the neat general appearance of ibis 
greenhouse, particularly of the walls. 
This is made possible by the Metropolitan 
patented cast iron eave, which, besides 
being ice-clearing, also has a combination 
drip conductor feature which carries off 
all waters of condensation from the iv^'i^^ 
of the roof. Notice, too, that no v ooJ 
headers are necessary with this eave. 

PUT YOUR GREENHOUSE PROBLEMS UP TO 0$ 

We Ko anywhere in the U. S. 
to submit plans and prices. 

NETROrOUTAN MATERIAL CO 

Patxntkd Oreenhoubes 

1896-1410 Metropolitan Are. 

BROOKLYN, N. Y. 



Pbbeuaky 1, 1917. 



The Florists' Review 



129 




Z THIS IS THE WAY IT WOULD LOOK IF YOU STOOD AT ONE END OF A ; 
BASSETT & WASHBURN KING CARNATION HOUSE 



Bassett & Washburn are among the largest and 
most successful Rose and Carnation growers in 
America — read what they say of their King houses : 



BASSETT & WASHBURN 

Wholesale Cut Flowers 



Gentlemen : 



Chicago, Nov. 1, 1916. 



Regarding the three 500x:^>4 ft. all iron frame houses you furnished us 
three years ago, would say we are very much pleased with them, as they have 
stood all kinds of storms and weather without the slightest deterioration that 
we can find. We have not seen any better type of houses than these, and cer- 
tainly the stock we are growing in these houses is the best in this market. 

Respectfully yours, 

(Signed) BASSETT & WASHBURN. 

We will be very glad to furnish you a "King" with which you will be pleased. Write for bulletin. 

King Construction Co. 

NORTH TONA WANDA, N. Y. 

ALL THE SUNLIGHT ALL DAY HOUSES 



130 



The Florists' Review 



Februauy 1, 1917. 



Classifie 



A 



AOHYRANTHKS. 



Achyranthes McNally, yellow and green, R. 0., 
$1.00 per 100, $9.00 per 1000. 
W. E. Trimble Greenhouse Co., Princeton, 111. 



AQERATUMS. 



AGEUATTnU. 
Blue and white, six varieties. 

Per 100 Per 1000 

2-ln $3.00 $25.00 

2%-ln 4.00 36.00 

8-ln 6.00 60.00 

Booted cuttings 8.00 

S. S. PENNOCK-ilEEHAN CO., 
1608-20 Ludlow St., Philadelphia, Pa. 



AGERATUM STELLA (UUNEY, clo.intop cut- 
tings, well rooted, (Utr per 100. See our ads 
for vprbeniis, carniitions, and salvias in these 
columns. 
STtJPPY FLORAL CO., ST. JOSEPn, M O. 

Ageratum, rooted cuttings,: Blue Star, Stella 
Guerney and Pauline, 85c per 100, $7.00 pfer 
1000. 

AngUn & Walsh Co., Wllllamsbridge, N. Y. 

Ageratum Stella Gurney, 60c per 100, $5.00 per 
1000; well rooted cuttings. Cash, please. 

W. Bezdek, Cedar Rapids, Iowa. 

Ageratums, R. C, Gurney, Pauline and Blue 
Star, 60c per 100; $5.00 per 1000; 2-ln., 2c. Cash. 
Byer Bros., Chambersburg, Pa. 

Booted cuttings ageratums, 4 Tar., 60c per 
100. $5.00 per 1000. Prepaid. 
S. D. Brant, Clay Center, Kan. 

R. 0. ageratum, dark blue, 60c per 100 or 
$6.00 per 1000. Harglerode Bros., successors to 
U. Q. Harglerode, Shlppensburg, Pa. 

Ageratum Stella Onmey, well rooted cnttinKS, 
OOo per 100; $5.00 per 1000. Capb. 

3. P. Cannata, Mt. Freedom, N. J. 

Aceratum, blue, li. ('., 7.">c per 100. 
i). U. Augspureer & Sons Co., I'oorla, 111. 

Ageratum Little Blue Star, R. C, 60c per 100. 
W. B. Trimble Greenliouse Co., Princeton, III. 

ALTERNANTMERAS. 

Alternanthera rooted cuttings, beautiful stock 
of red and yellow, ready for 2?4-in. pots, $1.00 
per 100, $7.50 per 1000; from sand. Stock plants, 
full of cuttings, $2.00 per 100; $15.00 per 1000; 
from soil. Cash, please. Quality is our bobby. 
Thornton Floral Co., Streator, 111. 

Altornantheras, Brilliaiitissinia. -best rod. 70o 
per 100, $C.(K) per 1000; I'. Major, red, «0c l»er 
100, $5.00 per 1000; A. Nana, yellow, 60c per 100, 
$5.00 per KMM). i:. R. Davis Co., Morrison, 111. 

Alternantlipras. rooted cuttings, red and yel- 
low, from soil, almost as large as t.'-in. plants, 
70o 100; $5.00 1000. 
('. .Nielsen. Florist. .330 N. Lake St., Aurora. 111. 

Alternantheras, 4 best varieties, fall cuttings, 
from soil, cut back once and full of cuttings, 
$1.00 per 100; $8.00 per 1000. Express prepaid. 
C. Humfeld, Clay Center. Kan. 

Alternantheras, rooted cuttings, BrllUantls- 
slma. Rosea, P. Major, Yellow, 85c per 100, 
$7.00 per 1000. 

Anglin & Walsh Co., Wllllamsbridge, N. Y. 

Alternantheras, red and yellow, extra fine, 
Angnst-rooted, from soil, 76c per 100 by mall; 
$6.00 per 1000 by express. 
S. W. Pike. St. Charlea, 111. 

Alternantheras, red and yellow, R. C, 75c per 
100; 2M-ln., 2c. 
W. B. Trimble Greenhouse Co., Princeton, 111. 

Alternantheras, red, R. C, 50c per 100, by 
mall. Cash. 

Anderson Floral Co., Anderson, S. 0. 

Alternantheras, R. C, Brilllantlsslma, P. Ma- 
jor, rosea, and yellow, 60c per 100, $5.00 per 
1000. Cash. Byer Bros.. Chambersburg, Pa. 

Aiternantherns, red and yellow, August-root- 
ed, from soil, 60c per 100, $5.00 per 1000. 

Knull Floral Co., Tampa, Fla. 

Alternantheras, red and yellow, extra fine and 
well rooted, 60c per 100 by mall; $4.00 per 1000 
by express. Cash. S. A. Plnkstone, TJtlca, N. Y. 



ALY8SUM. 



Double giant alyssum, in bloom, 2>4-l°.> $2.00 
per 100; 300 for $5.00. 
J. C. Schmidt, Bristol, Pa. 

Alyssum double giant, branched stock, 2 In., 
$2.00 per 100. Cash, please. 

W. Bezdek, Cedar Rapids, Iowa. 




Department 



c 



Rate for advertising in this department 

12^ cents a line net, per insertion. 

No advertisement for less than 25c aaepted. 



.A.iyaaujii, uouoie (laui, ;<-iii., $;<.uu imit XUU; 

S 18.00 per 1000. 
I. Bawlings. Wholeaale Grower. Allegany, N. Y . 

Alyssum double giant, R. C, $1.00 per 100, pre- 
paid. George Bros. & Co., Sprlngdale , Pa. 

Alyssum double giant, R. C, 75c per 100. 
W. B. Trimble Greenliouse Co.. Princeton, 111. 

Alyssum, double, $1.00 per 100; prepaid. 

S. D. Brant, Clay Center, Kan. 

AMARYLLIS. 

AMARYLLIS VITTATA HYBRIDS. 
A magnificent strain, equal to many of the 
very expensive named varieties, 4-year-old bulbs, 
extra vigorous, $25.00 per 100, 25 at 100 rate; 
$3.60 per doz. H. J. Condron, Amaryllis Spe- 
clalist, Dickinson, Tex. 

Amaryllis bulbs, flowering size, in mixed col- 
ors, $2.00 per doz. Cash, please. 
^ J. Sylvester, Oconto, Wis. 

AMPELOPSIS. 

Anipplopsis Boston Ivy, extra strong, 3-yr. , 3 
to 4 ft., $8.00 per 100; 2-yr. strong roots, sliort 
tops, .$.S.00 per 100, $20.00 per 1000; 1-yr. strong 
2 to 3 ft., $3.00 per 100. by mail; $20.00 per 1000 
by express. Cliarles Black, Hightstown, N. J. 

Ampelopsls quInquefoUa, extra heavy, 2-yT., 5 
to 6 ft., $5.00 per 100; strong 3 to 4 ft., $3.00 per 
100. Chas. Black, HIghtatown, N. J. 

ARAUCARIAS. 

BEAUTIFUL SPECIMEN PLANTS. 

Excelsa, 5 to 6 tiers, 

$1.00 each, $10.00 per doz. 

Rockford Seed Farms, U. W. Buckbec, 

Forest City Greenhouses, Rockford ,_1 11 . 

ASPARAOUS. 

ASPARAGUS PLUMOSUS. 
EXCEPTIONAL VALUE. 

100 1000 

2V4-lnch $ 3.00 $ 25.00 

.3-inch, equal to 4-inch 6.00 50.00 

4-lnch, very heavy 12.00 100.00 

Asparagus plumosus seedlings, $1.00 per 100; 
$7.50 per 1000. 

ASPARAGUS SPRENGERL 

2%-Inch $ 3.00 | 25.00 

3-inch 6.00 50.00 

4-inch 10.00 90.00 

Our NEW plant bulletin now ready. 

Yours for the asking. 

S. S. PENNOCK-ifEEHAN CO., 

1608-20 LUDLOW ST.. PHILADELPHIA. PA. 

Per 100 Per 1000 

Asparagus plumosus seedlings $1.00 $ 8.00 

2.500 plumosus seedlings @ per 7.50 

5000 plumosus seedlings @ per 7.00 

Asparagus Hatcherl seedlings 1.25 10.00 

Asparagus Hatcherl, strong 2%-ln. 4.00 35.00 

Asparagus plumosus and Spreng- 

eri, 2V4-ln. pots 3.00 25.00 

3-in. pots 6.00 60.00 

Roman J. Irwin, 108 W. 28th St., New Y ork. 

Asparagus plumosus and Sprengeri, 2V4-in, 
pots, $3.00 per 100. $25.00 per 1000; 3-in. pots, 
$0.00 per 100, $50.00 per 1000; Asparagus Hatch- 



Asparagnis plumosus nanus and Sprengeri, 2% 
in., fine stock, $3.00 per 100, $25.00 per 1000 
3-ln., $6.00 per 100; $50.00 per 1000; Hatcherl 
2%-ln., 13.50 per 100; $30.00 per 1000. 

Plumosus seedlings, $1.00 per 100; $8.00 pe 
1000; Hatcherl, $1.00 per 100; $8.00 per 1000. 

S. S. SKIDELSKY & CO., 
1004 Lincoln Bldg., Philadelphia, P e 

Asparagus plumosus sprays, $2.00 per IOC' 
Telegraph orders shipped promptly — have > 
'phone direct to the station. Express prepaid o 
$6.00 worth. Cash with order. 
The Pennock Plantation, Jupiter, Fla . 

Asparagus plumosus seedlings, $1.00 per 100. 
$9.00 per 1000; Sprengeri, $1.00 per 100, $0.0' 
per 1000; Hatcherl, $1.00 per 100, $9.00 per lOOC 
Sprengeri, 3-in., $5.00 per 100. 
Ernest Rober, Wllmette, 111. 

ASPARAGUS PLUMOSUS, 4-IN. POTS. 
BUSHY PLANTS, $7.00 PER 100. 

LAKEWOOD CEMETERY GREENHOUSES, 

.3600 HENNEPIN AVE., SO.. 

AHNNEAPOLIS. MINNESOTA . 

Asparagus Sprengeri, extra large, transplante<i 
plants, ready to pot, $8.00 per 1000; fine, large, 
plumosus nanus, 3-ln., ready for 4-in., $3.00 per 
100. 

Edward Whitton, City & Green, Utica, N. Y. 

6000 Asparagus plumosus, "The good kind," 
strong, 2-in., ready for a shift, $2.00 per 100. 
Cash, please. 
Emporia Floral Co., Emporia, Kan. 

ALBUM OF DESIGNS. 

Fourth Edition Now Ready. 

76c per copy prepaid. 

Florists' Pub. Co., Caxton Bldg., Chicago. 

Asparagus plumosus, good, strong, well-grown 
plants, 4-ln., $10.00 per 100. 

HENRY A. BESTBR & SONS, 
40-50 B. Baltimore St., Hagerstown. Md. 

ASPARAGUS. 
Asparagus plumosus, 2V6-in. pots, good, strong 
plants, $3.00 per 100; $25.00 per 1000. Cash. 
W. B. Glrvln, Leola, Pa. 

Asparagus Sprengeri, heavy field plants, now 
in 4-in. pots, $12.00 per 100; 6-in., extra heavy, 
$18.00 per 100. 

The Storrs & Harrison Co., Palnesville, O. 

ASPARAGUS PLUMOSUS. 

Strong bushy young stock $4.00 per 100 

Rockford Seed B'arms, H. W. Buckbee, 
Forest City Greenhouses. Rockford, 111. 

Asparagus Sprengeri, 3-in., 4c; 3V->-in., 6c; 
4-in., 8c. Casli, pleuso. 

Felsch Bros. Co., Maywood, 111. 

Asparagus Sprengeri, strong plants, out of 3V<- 
in. iwts, ready to sliift, $8.00 per 100. Cash, 
please. E. D. Kaulback & Son, Maiden, Mass. 

Asparagus plumosus, strong A-1 stock, 3-lu., 
$3.00 per 100. 200 for $5.00. 

Chas. Whitton, York & Gray, Utica, N. Y. 

Asparagus plumosus, 2V4-in., $3.00 per 100, 
$25.00 per 1000; 3-ln., $50.00 per 1000. 
Collingdale Greenhouses, Collingdale, Pa. _ 

Asparagus plumosus, 3-in., fine stock, 76c per 
doz.; $4.00 per 100; 4-in., $1.60 per dos.; $10.00 
per 100. Cash. Ullrich Floral Co., Tlffln, 0. 

Asparagus plumosus, 2V4-ln., $3.00 per lO*, 
$26.00 per 1000; Sprengeri, 2V4-1d., $2.00 per 
100. $18.00 per 1000. Baur Floral Co., Erie, ft. 

Asparagus plumosus, big stuff for beddinft 
3-ln., $4.00 per 100. Cash. 
J. W. Miller, Shlremanstown, Pa. 

4-ln., large, field-grown Asparagus Sprenge**!. 
$1.00 per doz., $8.00 per 100. Fine to cut frcin 
Oak Grove Greenhouses, Tuskegee, Alt. 

ASPARAGUS SPRENGERI, 2%-in., $3.00 P«I 
100. 
REESER PLANT CO., SPRINGFIELD, 0. 

Asparagus Sprengeri, 3-in., strong, 4c, $38 OO 
per 1000; new crop seed, $3.00 per 1000. Ca:h. 
Port Allegany Greenhouses, Port Allegany, I's- 

Asparagus Sprengeri, fine stock for benchl' Si 
3%-in., $7.50 per 100. 
Kilbury & Co., R. R. 1, Dayton, O ^ 

Sprengeri, 2%-in., very fine, $2.50 per 100. 
The El Paso Carnation Co., El Paso, 111 _ 

Asparagus Sprengeri, 3-in., $5.00 per 100. 

Fred H. Lemon & Co., Richmond, Ind __ 

Asparagus Sprengeri, 3-in., 4c; 4-ln., 6c. Cs•^l^• 
H. A. Cook, Oberlin, _ 

Asparagus plumosus, 3-in., 4c; Sprengeri, i'jr 
in., 214c. Constien Bros., Upper Sandusky, 0. 

Asparagus Sprengeri, strong 214-in., $2.00 ,''«' 
100; 300 for $5.00. J. C. Schmidt, Bristol, ^ t 

Asparagus Sprengeri, 3-ln., $5.00; 2V4.- Q-' 
$2.25. Chas. Sherwood, Waterloo, le 



PLEASE MENTION THE REVIEW WHEN WRITING ANY OF THESE ADVERTISERS 



Fkbruauy 1, 1917. 



The Florists^ Review 



131 



ASPIDISTRAS. 

"AonirtlBtras, green, 4, S, 6 and 8-ln. pots. 
..„th with order. H. O. Doescher, 2000-48 Gen- 
,:illy Ave., New OrleanB, La. 



TiFldlstra Tarlegata, «jin., S1.25J1.60: aipt- 
^i.fn preen. 6-ln., $1.00-fl.2o. Caab. 
dlitra . green. ^^^^^'^ ^^^^ Wllmette. III. 

ASTERS. 

NATIONAL SHOW GARDENS, INC., 

^ripclallsts In asters, dahlias, gladioli, peonies. 

No 1 Lovers Lane, Spencer, Ind. 

ASTEKS" The world's finest florists' yarletles, 

,ir our Sunerb Florists' long-stemmed cut flower 

ports. TrVe Packet^,^26c;^oz.. n.OO. Plants, 



Mny 1, 35c 



12.60 1000. 
AZALEAS. 



AZALEAS 

\zalcn Imlica, white, 85c, $1.00 each, $7.75, 
.«<) 'ill per doz. : varlegiited, 60c, 70c, 85c each, 
\'i\->:. $0.75, $7.75 per doz.; pink, 85e, $1.00 
i-icli $7.75, $9.50 per doz. Ilexe at $3.75 and 
SI M per doz. Tlirifty, well budded plants. 
Casli with order 



DOVLESTOWN, 



A. COLLE 



PENNSYLVANIA 



.\z.ileas for Easter forcing, well budded. Van 
<lci- Cnivsseii, Simon Mardner, Vervaeneana, John 
l.lcuillin, lUushing Bride, $1.00, $1.25, $1.50, 
.•<" (Ml eac'li. Daybreak, .Tolin Peters, Petrick, Su- 
lierl'i. $1.50, $2.00. $2..50 each. Pyramids. $3.50, 
.Sl.t"i. $5.00, and $0.00 eacli. Limited quantity 
to (ilTiT now. 

S. S. PBNNOCK-MEEIIAN CO.. 
KKi.s 20 LUDLOW ST., PHILAUELPIIIA, PA . 

Azalea Mollis seedlings, 12 to 15 In., full of 
bnds. $4.50 per doz., 15 to 18 In., very bushy, 
$5.40 per doz. 

The Storrs & Harrison Co., Painesvllle, 0; 

BAY TREES. 

BAT TREES. Write for wholesale price list. 
Julius Roehrs Co., Rutherford, N. J. 

BEOONIAS. 

BEGONIAS. 

We are now tracking orders for BEGONIAS 

mi:liou and Cincinnati for spring deliv- 
ery. Clean stock with good heavy crowns, 
sliipped in 2%-ln. paper pots. Packing free. 

Cincinnati $15.00 per 100 

Mtlior 18.00 per 100 

You will appreciate our good packing. See our 
Jills for earnations, verbenas and Kex begonias 
ilsewlicn; in this issue. 
STCPl'Y FLORAL CO.. ST. JOSEPH, MO. 

UBX BEGONIAS, ASSORTED, IN 214-IN., 
VERY LARGE, READY FOR 4-IN., 8c BACH. 

RICINIFOLIA AND SUNDERBUUCHII BE- 
GONIAS (COMMONLY CALLED STAR BEGO- 
NIAS), 2H-IN., 10c EACH; ARE BECOMING 
VERY POPULAR FOR PI^NTS FOR A SUN- 
LESS ROOM AND ARE GOOD SELLERS. 

SEE OUR DISPLAY AD. THIS ISSUE. 
FKED W. ARNOLD, FLORIST, 
CAMBRIDGE, OHIO. 

BEGONIAS. 

Heavy, stocky 3-ln. REX BEGONIAS In as- 
sortment, ready for 4-in. pots, $10.00 per 100; 
lir.mcliy 4-in. plants of ARGBNTEO GUTTATA, 
r.iidy for 5-in. pots, $10.00 per 100. 

lou will appreciate our good packing. See 
;'iir ads for carnations and verbenas elsewhere 
111 these columns. 
s nPI'Y FLORAL CO., ST. JOSEPH, M O. 

400 Begonia lumlnosa, 3-ln., strong 8c 

J..0 Begonia luminosa, 3-ln., fine 5c 

•MO ^!''S°"'a luminosa, 2-ln 3c 

•"i 1, *''""!'' luminosa, 4-in., extra strong 15c. 

-uu Begonia luminosa, 4-ln., fine 12c 

T>n,i >j ^ ^^^l* ^Ith order. 

' "rKside^Gree nhouses, 1457 E. 70th St.. Chicago. 

cn'ft'.ftn°"*rfno ^''^'Vo^lii.' Marguerite, argenteo 
K li i„'H^?P ^'^'■A *300 per 100. Mme. de Les- 
lu fw„in'"^"-.,^*''°°t' 80c per doz., $4.00 per 
" loS "wMf''* Lucerne, $f.00 per doz., $8 00 
•'" doz.-, $Ioo'per°10o"' ''^™'"''«"' ^Mi-ln.. 50c 
2i j^ Grove Greenliouses, Tuskegee, Ala. 

s''n'i''Th^rstnn'?^'l,^}°^"'"S Beponlas," Sander- 
"tlors from oV/ ?''^**' ""^^P" nnd a good list of 
ni.is Rpv 'Vn^^*"'"- P°t8, $4.00 per 100. Bego- 
vnrieties roo-i "5 assortment of the very best 

'-'l00;'$r5':00^;^ri(^^-'"- P"*^' ^^^ ^*^*«-°° 

4^1glll_&:VVa l8h Co.. Williamsbrldge. N. Y. 

nil" wlnl'eThi'lml""''"!!'' "« ^^^t^e, the best of 
'" 1 ud and w^'"^o ^S^^'ns- extra fine stock 
100, "•* *•'»<»"■ 3-ln., $2.00 doz., $15.00 per 

IVe't'cUy^Gleen^^^' «• ^^ ^"Ckbee. 

-Yn-— ^^^^^-2££5B!!2}«er Rockford, 111. 

"W;Tmino8^a^°«l"' '? »«»ortment, |2.50 per 
^12,00 iK^r ?Oft'- ^'.'^^ P'""*"' *-•"•' *1000 and 
100; 2- n $■< nn J^"" ^^^^ '<»" *-'»•• S8.00 per 
'- 100; n;ef^,fi?a,^|!i„^°%.^''-/;U-'-. ^ 
-n:^;:^^^y^--^JL_Q- Caswell. Delavan. 111. 
'IK shoots onlv o?/^'. P'"0Pagated from flower- 

•^'"frican Bulb Co ^^Vto fi'*",l^V*5 0° P" ^^■ 
:ilKo, 111. """» ^o-. 172 N. Wabash Ave., Chl- 

'■ '»t'lM%p!;,'d,\";'^'°»Jl« nnd Erfordii. strong trans- 

UriU CoWv*^? .P*""" ^""- Cash. 

^fitry Garden, Kalamazoo, Mich. 

PLEASE MENTION THE 



Begonias Chatelaine, 4-In., |12.00 per 100. 
Rex begonias. In an assortment of about 16. of 
the very best varieties frpm 2V4-iii> pots, Feb. 
5th, $6.00 per 100; $55.00 per 1000. 

Anglln A Walsh Co., Williamsbrldge, N. Y. 

BEGONIA GROMANII. 
The best red bedding begonia. Can alto b« 

trovni for Xmas pot plant, |1.00 per trade pkt. 
ow now for raring sales. Grohman the Flo- 
rist, 117 S. Jefferson Ave., Saginaw, Mich. 

Rex begonias, 2-in., assorted, $5.00 100; Clos- 
Ron, Erdody, Bronze King and Emerald Queen, 
$6.00 100. Cash, please. 
E. B. Randolph. Delavan, 111. 

Begonia Vernon, 100 stock plants, full of cut- 
tings, $2.00. 

Strang Line Greenliouses, Rosedale, Kan. 

Begonia Chatelaine, rooted cuttings, |1.50 
per 100. Cash, please. 
Peter Rush. 1520 Michigan Ave., Detroit, Mich. 

Begonias, Vernon and Erfordii, R. C, $1.00 
per 100; 2% -In., 3c. 
W. E. Trimble Greenhouse Co.. Princeton, 111. 

Begonias. Chatelaine, Vernon, Erfordii, Prima 
Donna, 2Mi-in., 5c. 
Pyfer & Olsem, Wllmette, HI. 

Begonias, Chatelaine, 4-in., $8.00 per 100; 
rooted cuttings $1.50 per 100 
Gould Bros.. Qlenvlew, 111. 

Begonia Chatelaine, 2%-in., $5.00 per 100; 
strong 4-ln., $15.00 jper 100. 
Roman J. Irwin, 108 W. 28th St., New Tor k. 

Begonia Chatelaine, 5-ln 20o 

^ Tripp Floral Co., Walton, N. Y. 

BERBERIS. 

Berberls Thunbergii, heavy, bushy plants, 12- 
15-ln., $5.00 per 100, $40.00 per 1000; 15-18-ln., 
$6.00 per 100, $50.00 per 1000; 18-24-in., $7.50 per 
100, $60.00 per 1000. Send for surplus list. 

Littlefleld & Wyman. North Ablngton. Mass. 

BERBERIS THUNBERGII. 
Extraordinarily fine stock, grown from cat- 
tings. Send for price list. 

THE CONARD & JONES CO., 
WEST GROVE, PENNSYLVANIA. 

Berberls Thunbergii, lining out stock, 6 to 19 
in., 16.50 1000. R. E. Huntington. Painesvllle, O. 

BERRIED PLANTS. 

CHERRIES FOR WASHINGTON'S BIRTH- 
DAY, fine 4-ln., bushy, with large berries. $15.00 
and $20.00 per 100. W. J. Olds, Union City, Pa. 

Jerusalem cherries, full of berries, 4-ln., 25o; 
6-ln., 35c each. Ullrich Floral Co., Tiffin, O. 

BOXWOOD. 

BOXWOODS. 

PYRAMIDS, broad heavy specimens. 

2, 2%. 3, 3%. 4, 4%. 5 and 5% ft. 

BUSH-SHAPED, 10-12-ln., 18-ln., 80-in. 

See display adv. for complete list and prices. 

The D. Hill Nursery Co., Inc., 

Box 403, Dundee, 111. 

BOXWOOD and BAY TREES. 

Prices on application. 

Ernest Rober, Wllmette, III 

BOX TREES, standards, pyramids and bush. 
Price list on demand. 
Julius Roehrs Co., Rutherford, N. J. 

BUDDLEIAS. 

Buddlela magniflca, the hardy, everbloomini 
Butterfly Bush or Southern Lilac; flowers from 
early summer until late frost, splendid for cnt- 
tlng, and will thrive anywhere; nice bushj 
plants, 2V4-ln., $1.00 per doz., $7.00 per 100. 
Buddlela Asiatica, white, wlnter-bloomfng, fln« 
to grow In the greenhouse as a cut flower or pol 
plant, 2V4-ln., 75c per doz., $5.00 per 100. 
Oak Grove Greenhouse, Tuskegee, Ala. 

BULBS. 

HIGH GRADE SURPLUS BULBS. 

Special low prices to close out. Bulbs are all 

first size, and of the very best quality. Prompt 

shipment. Cash with order. 250 at 1000 rate. 

NARCISSUS. 

Golden Spur, double nose $1.76 $16.00 

Victoria, double nose 1.75 16.00 

SPIRAEAS. 
Spiraea, Gladstone, white, $1.20 per doi., $0.00 
per 100. 

Spiraea, Queen Alexandra, pink, |1.S5 per doa., 
$10.00 per 100. 

SLUIS SEED STORE. 
544 West 63rd St.. Chicago, Dl. 

AMERICAN-GROWN BULBS. 
NARCISSUS AND GLADIOLUS 
FOR FORCING. 
SPURS. Our extra early are money-makers. 
Record — planted Sept. 15. benched Dec. 2, cut 
Jan. 4. 1017. 500,000 for 1917 delivery. GLA- 
DIOLUS: America, Augusta. Brenchleyensls and 
Pink Beauty, 2-ln., 1%-in., 1-ln. 

List and prices on application. 
Geo. P. Buck & Son, Collingswood. N. J. 

LILIUM GIGAITTBUM 

100 1000 

7 to 9, 300 per case, |14.00 $6.60 I5O.00 

8 to 10, 250 per case, 17.50 7.60 67.S0 

Our new plant bulletin now ready. 

Yours for the asking. 

S. S. PBNNOOK-MBBHAN CO., 

1608-20 Ludlow St., Philadelphia, Pa. 



Bulbs: Hyacinths, tulips (early and late), 
narcissi, daffodils, peonies, gladioli, spiraeas 
and hardy plants. New list now ready. Write 
us today for yo>ir contracts for fall delivery. 
Vantil-Hartman, Bulb Growers. Hillegom, Hol- 
land, care P. 0. Kuyper, 10 Broadway, New 
York, N. Y. 

The Holland Bulb-Growers' First Co-operative 
Syndicate, Sassenheim, Holland, also agents for 
John Spek, Boskoop, Holland, and Ohas. Jos, 
Wllle, Belgium. Catalogues and special prices 
on application. Correspondence to John Stammes, 
8-10 Bridge Bt., New York City. 

Headquarters for Holland-grown bulbs, flower 
roots and plants. Wholesale catalog on appli- 
cation. Gt. Van Waveren & Kruljff, 14 Stone 
St., New Tork City, Nurseries, Sassenheim, 
Holland. __^ 

Mexican ever-blooming tuberose bulbs, 1st size, 
60c per lOO, $5.00 per 1000; 2nd size, 60c per 
100, $4.00 per 1000. Cash. Satex Seed Co., 
420 S. Flores St., San Antonio, Te x. 

Tulip Imltis, fine single bulbs, $7.50 per 1000. 
in red, yellow, white, red and yellow. 

(ieo. A. Kiihl, Wholesiile (Jrovver, Pekin, III. 

BULBS, GLADIOLUS AND YELLOW CALLA 
(Elllotlaua). 
W. W. Ayerg, P. 0. Box 42. Santa Cruz, Cal. 

Bulbs of all descriptions. Write for prices. 
C. KEUR & SONS, HILLEGOM, HOLLAND. 
New York Branch, 8-10 Bridge St. 

CACTI. 

Sun cactus, 2yi!-in., $3.00 per 1(X). 
L. A. Eaton & Sons. Coiiiieaut, O. 

CALADIUMS. 

FANOY-LBAVED CALADIUMS ONLY. 

Mixed, $8.00; named, $10.00, $12.00 and $15.00 
per 100. Cash. No catalog Issued. 

Orders for next year's delivery taken now. 

GERBING FLORAL GARDEN CO., 

FBRNANDINA. FLORIDA. 

CALCEOLARIAS. 

Calceolaria hybrldum, best strain, strong 
plants, 2^-in. pots, $8.00 per 100. Cash with 
order. Frank Oechslin, 4911 Qulncy St., Chicago. 

Calceolaria hybrldum, best strong plants, 2%- 
In., 7c; Pyfer & Olsem. Wllmette. 111. 

600 calceolarias, 2i4-in.. fine plants. 6c each. 
R. P. Atwell, Ft. Dodge, Iowa. 

CALENDULAS. 

CALENDULA ORANGE KING. 

Select stock $3.00 per 100 

Rockford Seed Farms, H. W. Buckbee, 

Forest City Greenhouses, Rockford, 111. 

Calendulas, Orange King and Lemon Queen. 
2V4-in. pots, '$3.00 per 100; $25.00 per 1000. 
Anglin & Walsh Co.. Williamsbridge. N. Y. 

Calendulas. Orange King and Special Orange 
Yellow, $3.00 per 100. 
Baur Floral Co., Erie, Pa. 

CALLAS. 

Godfrey callas, started In 4-ln., $10.00 per 100; 
3-in. planta that will bloom this season, $8.00 
per 100; a lot of started bulbs, ready for 3 and 
4-in. pots, will make blooming stock If potted 
or planted now, $5.00 per 100; small bulbleta, 
dry, $1.00 per 100 prepaid. 
N. O. Caswell, Delavan, Hi. 

(Jodfre.v callas. :ilX)0 in 4-in., .$*!.00 per 100. See 
our carnation adv. 

("OLUMHIA CITY FLORAL CO.. 
COLTMHU CITY. INDIANA. 

Callas, Godfrey, well started In 4 and 6-ln., 
in buds, 16.00 per 100. Cash, please. 
LajCrosse Floral Co., La Crosse, Wis. 

Godfrey calla, 3-in., $5.00 per 100. 

Attica Floral Co.. Attica. Ind. 

CAMPANULAS. 

Campannlas (Canterbury Bells), white, blue 
and pink, extra fine plants, in 8-in., $5.00 per 
100. Send for list of perennial plants. 
r* Croaae Floral Co.. I^ Crosse, Wi s. 

CAMPANULA FRAGILIS. Basket Blue B^eUi 
transplanted seedlings. $1.00 per 100. 

Geo. F. Brayton, Kent, O. 

CANWAS. 

lAN.VAS, 2 TO 3 EYE ROOTS. 

100 1(X)0 

.Mplionse Ilouvier, dark crimson. .. .$2.25 $20. (»0 

.Viistria. canary yellow 1.90 17.00 

Kitandale, currant red. bronze leaf. . 2.25 20.00 
('has. Henderson. liriKht crimson. .. . 2.00 18.00 

David Ilariim, bronze foliage 2.50 22.00 

Florence Vauglian, yellow spotted 

crimson 2.25 20.00 

lliingaria, best pink 4.00 35^00 

King Ilnmbcrt, orange scarlet, 

hronzfi foliage 4.00 35.00 

Mme. Herat, pink 2.25 20 00 

250 at 1000 rate. Write for full list. 
A. Henderson & Co., Box 125, C hicago. 

Canna roots, home-grown stock of Hungaria, 
Pennsylvania, Queen Charlotte, Louisiana and 
Mme. Crozy, at $2.50 per 100, $20.00 per 1000; 
good pink and mixed varieties, $1.50 per 100. 
$12.50 per 1000. 
EUtch Gardens Co., Denver, C olo. 

Canna roots, in best varietiea, Long Island- 
grown. Prices on application. 
Roman J. Irwin, 108 W. 28th St., New York. 



REVIEW WHEN WRITING ANY OF THESE ADVERTISERS 



132 



The Florists^ Review 



February 1, 1917. 



CANNAS-Continued. 



CANNAS 

Fresh out, liomp-Brown stock, true to name. 
Extra sflected, plumi>, sound, 2, 3 and 4 eye 
roots. 

Per 100 Per 100 

Austria $1.60 Louisiana $1.80 

AUemanla 1.50 Mrs. Kate Gray. . 1.80 

Alpli. Bouvicr 2.00 Mont Blanc 3.50 

Alsace, white 2.00 Mine. Crozy 2.25 

B. Poitevlne 2.70 Mile. Berat, pink. 2.00 

Black Prince 2.25 I'ennsylvania 1.80 

Buttercup, new... 2.50 Premier, gold edge 2.25 

Crimson Bedder. . . 2.75 MusscfoUa 2.00 

Chas. Henderson.. 1.50 Queen Charlotte.. 2.75 

David Harum 2.00 Kobusta perfec... 1.60 

Fire Fly 3.00 K. Wallace, yel.. 1.65 

Bgandale 2.00 Meteor, new 4,00 

Florence Vaughnu. 1.80 Souv. d'A Crozv.. 2.50 
Gustav Gumpper. . 3.00 Shenandoah, pink. 2.00 

Italia 1.50 Venus, dwarf 3.00 

J. D. Eiselo 2.00 Wni. Saunders... 3.50 

Orange Bedder 1.50 Wni. Bofflnger 2.00 

King Humbert... 3.50 Wyoming 1.80 

Louise, pink 1.80 All colors, mixed. 1.20 

For other kinds, new varieties, also begonias, 
caladlums, dahlias, gloxinias, gladioli, tuberoses, 
etc., see 2-page adv., pp. 12, 13, Review, Jan. 25. 
Shellroad Canna Farms, Grange, Baltim ore, Md. 

CANNA ROOTS. 

Per 1000 

Wyoming $20.00 

Chas. Henderson 20.00 

Richard Wallace 20.00 

Pennsylvania 20.00 

Musaefolia 20.00 

Mile. Berat 20.00 

Mrs. Kate Gray 20.00 

J. D. Bisele 20.00 

Italia 20.00 

Austria 20.00 

Bgandale 20.00 

King Humbert 35.00 

Florence Vaughan 20.00 

David Harum 20.00 

America 20.00 

A. Bouvler 20.00 

Express ; 28.00 

Gustav Gumpper 36.00 

Hungaria 32.00 

Venus , 27.00 

Any of the above varieties ordered In lota of 
less than 250, please add 75c per 100 to the 1000 
price. 

ANGLIN & WALSH CO., 
WILLIA^tSBRIDGE. NEW YORK. 

CANNAS. 
Get list of cannas which were awarded Gold 
Medals at both San Francisco and Saa Diego 
Expositions. Write today. 

THE CONARD & JONES CO., 
WEST GROVE, PENNSYLVANIA. 

Cannas, 9000 Robusta, 2500 Louisiana, 8000 
Poitevlne and 3000 Austria, $10.00 per 1000. In 
extra good shape, plump and fine. 
W. R. Maxwell, Alva, Okla. 

Cannas, strong 2 and 3-eye divisions, divided 
from healthy clumps, In all leading varieties. 
Write us for special price. American Bulb Co., 
172 N. Wabash Ave., Chicago, III. 

Canna roots, Richard Wallace, 2 to 4 eyes, 
$15.00 per 1000; J. D. Eisele, 2 to 4 eyes, $15.00 

ger 1000. Cash with order, please. 
Irdman & Ulrlch, Belalr Road, Baltimore, Md. 

Cannas. Vaughn and Henderson, 2 to 5 eyes, 
$8.00 1000. P. L. Graves & Co., Jonesboro, Ark. 

Cannas, strong, Wallace, Gen. Merkel, Penn, 
$2.50 100. John F. Rupp, Shlremanstown, Pa. 



CARNATIONS. 



CARNATION ROOTED CUTTINGS. 
NEW VARIETIES FOR 1917. 

100 1000 

Old Gold, best yellow (Domer).. .$12.00 $100.00 

Rosalia, deep pink (Domer) 12.00 100.00 

Merry Christmas (deep scarlet) . . 12.00 100.00 

Doris (crimson) 12.00 100.00 

A. Boper (cerise) 12.00 100.00 

RECENT INTRODUCTIONS. 

Red Wing (fine scarlet) COO 60.00 

Nebraska (scarlet) 6.00 50.00 

Belle Washburn (scarlet) 6.00 50.00 

Alice Coombs (pink) 0.00 50.00 

Aviator (scarlet) 6.00 50.00 

Miss Theo (rose pink) 5.00 40.00 

Pink Delight (fine pink) 5.00 40.00 

Good Cheer (pink; a money- 
maker) 4.00 35.00 

. STANDARD VARIETIES. 

Enchantress Supreme (pink) 3.00 25.00 

Alice, Enchantress in Pink, Rose and White; 
Eureka (red), Mrs. C. W. Ward, Matchless, 
White Wonder, White Enchantress, Beacon and 
Comfort (red). Yellow Prince, Benora varie- 
gated, and a full list complete of all other 
standard, well-known varieties, 13.00 per 100, 
$26.00 per 1000. 

ANGLIN & WALSH CO., 
WILLLAMSB RIDGE, NEW YORK. 

Cool-grown carnation rooted cuttings, from 
plants of perfect health: 

White Enchantress $2.00 100; $17..''.0 1000 

Pink Enchantress 1.75 100; 15.00 1000 

Enchantress Supreme 2.75 100; 25.00 1000 

Alice 2.25 100; 20.00 1000 

White Wonder 2.00 100; 18.00 1000 

Wlnsor and Victory 1.75 100; 15.00 1000 

Herald 2.00 100: 17.50 1000 

V. BEZDEK, GROSS POINT, ILL. 



CARNATION CUTTINGS. 

Per 100 Per 1000 

Cottage Maid $12.00 $100.00 

Merry Christmas 12.00 100.00 

Doris 12.00 100.00 

Rosalia 12.00 100.00 

Old Gold 12.00 100.00 

Superb 12.00 100.00 

Albert Roper 12.00 100.00 

Cornell 6.00 60.00 

Belle Washburn, brilliant red... 6.00 60.00 

Nancy, light salmon 7.00 60.00 

Nebraska, bright scarlet 6.00 60.00 

Aviator, bright scarlet 6.00 60.00 

Miss Theo, true rose pink 6.00 40.00 

Alice Coombs, salmon pink 6.00 60.00 

Good Cheer, will have large supply. 4.00 35.00 

Alice 3.00 25.00 

Pink Delight, will have large sup- 
ply for Jan., Feb 6.00 40.00 

Enchantress Supreme 3.50 30.00 

Enchantress 3.00 25.00 

Rose-pink Enchantress 3.00 25.00 

Chas. Siegwart, equal to Enchan- 
tress Supreme 3.00 25.00 

Rosette 3.00 25.00 

Mrs. C. W. Ward 3.00 25.00 

Pink Sensation 4.00 35.00 

Gloriosa, limited quantity 4.00 35.00 

Mrs. C. Edward Akehurst 3.00 25.00 

May Day 3.00 25.00 

Champion 3.00 25.00 

Beacon 3.00 25.00 

Princess Dagmar 3.00 25.00 

Pocohontas 3.00 25.00 

Harlowarden 3.00 25.00 

The Herald 3.00 25.00 

Rubv 3.00 25.00 

Eureka 3.00 25.00 

Matchless 3.00 22.50 

White Wonder 3.00 26.00 

White Enchantress 3.00 25.00 

White Perfection 3.00 25.00 

Alma Ward 3.00 25.00 

Benora, exceptionally good 3.50 30.00 

Yellow Prince, limited quantity. . 4.00 35.00 
Our guarantee back of every cutting sent out. 
S. 8. PENNOCK-MBEHAN CO., 

1608-20 Ludlow St., Philadelphia, Pa. 

CARNATIONS 

STRONG, HBALTHY, WBLL-ROOTHD 

CUTTINGS 

Per Per 

100 1000 

THBNANTHOS, brilliant scarlet. $12.00 $100.00 

Superb 12.00 100.00 

Aviator, red 6.00 60.00 

Nebraska 6.00 60.00 

Belle Washburn 6.00 60.00 

Beacon, red 8.00 25.00 

Champion, red 2.60 20.00 

Joy, red 2.60 20.00 

Peerless Pink, pink 2.60 20.00 

0. W. Ward, pink 2.60 20.00 

Pink Sensation, pink 3.60 80.00 

Mrs. Akehurst, pink 8.00 26.00 

Miss Theo, pink 6.00 

Good Cheer, pink 4.00 86.00 

Matchless, white 2.60 20.00 

White Enchantress, white 2.60 20.00 

White Wonder, white 8.00 26.00 

Enchantress, flesh pink 2.60 20.00 

Enchantress Supreme, flesh pink.... 3.50 30.00 

Alice, flesh pink 8.50 80.00 

Benora, variegated 3.00 26.00 

Wlnsor 2.50 20.00 

Victory 2.50 20.00 

25 at 100 rate, 260 at 1000 rate 

A. L. RANDALL CO., 

Wabash At., at Lake St., Chicago, III. 

ROOTED CARNATION CUTTINGS. 
A-1 STOCK. 

100 1000 

White Enchantress $3.00 $25.00 

White Perfection 3.00 25.00 

Matchless 3.00 25.00 

White Wonder 3.00 25.00 

Enchantress 3.00 26.00 

Enchantress Supreme 3.00 25.00 

Alice 3.00 25.00 

Peerless Pink 3.00 25.00 

Ward 3.00 25.00 

Wlnsor 2..50 20.00 

AVashington 3.00 25.00 

Herald 3.00 25.00 

Vlctorv 2.50 20.00 

Aviator 6.00 50.00 

Good Cheer C.OO 50.00 

Nebraska 0.00 50.00 

Belle Washburn 6.00 50.00 

Superb 12.00 100.00 

Thenanthos 12.00 100.00 

Yellow Prince 4.00 30.00 

Pocahontas 4.00 30.00 

A. T. PYFER & CO.. 
30 E. RANDOLPH ST.. CHICAGO, ILL. 

CARNATIONS. 

Strong rooted cuttings from flowering wood 
only. Guaranteed clean and healthy. 

100 1000 

Nebraska, best of all scarlets |5.00 $45.00 

Belle Washburn 5.00 45.00 

Good Cheer, fine new Rose-pink.... 6.00 60.00 

Enchantress 2.60 20.00 

Matchless 2.60 20.00 

Mrs. Akehurst, good early rose pink 2.60 20.00 

Alice 8.00 26.00 

See our ads for verbenas elsewhere in these 
columns. 
STUPPY FLOR A L CO.. ST. JOSEPH, MO. 

ALBUM OF DESIGNS. 

75c per copy prepaid. 

Florists' Pub. Co., Caxton Bldg., Chicago. 



FOR IMMBDIATB SHIPMENT 
We can save you money on Strong Rooted Car- 
nation Cuttings. 

Per 100 Per 1000 

White Enchantress $2.00 $17.60 

White Perfection 2.00 16.00 

White Wonder 2.00 17.60 

Victory, red 2.00 16.00 

Joy, red 2.00 16.00 

Champion, red 2.00 16.00 

Herald, red 2.00 16.00 

Aviator, red 6.00 45.00 

Nebraska, red 5.00 46.00 

C. W. Ward, dark pink 2.00 16.00 

Afterglow, dark pink 2.00 16.00 

Washington, rose pink 2.00 16.00 

Don Gordon, rose pink 2.00 16.00 

Wlnsor, rose pink 2.00 13.00 

Enchantress, light pink 2.00 14.00 

Look over your wants and send in your orders 
now, while low prices are prevailing. 
J. A. BUDLONG, 
S. W. cor. Wabash Ave. and Lake St., 
CHICAGO. 

CARNATIONS, STRONG, WELL BOOTED 
CUTTINGS. 

Rosalia (cerise pink), Old Gold (deep yellow), 
Merry Christmas (deep scarlet). Cottage Maid 
(flesh pink), and Doris (brilliant maroon). 
$12.00 per 100; $100.00 per 1000. 

Cornell (a new scarlet), Mrs. Alice Coombs, 
Nebraska, Nancy, Red Wing, Belle Washburn, 
Pink Sensation, Good Cheer. 

$6.00 per 100; $50.00 per 1000. 

SCARLET — Beacon, Herald, Champion, Vic- 
tory, Eureka. PINK — Alice, Enchantress, Rose- 
pink Enchantress, Rosett e, M rs. O. W. Ward, 
Gloriosa, Philadelphia. WHITE — ^White Won- 
der, White Perfection, White Enchantress, 
Matchless. CRIMSON— Harlowarden, Baby, Po- 

$3.00 per 100; $26.00 per 1000. 
Enchantress Supreme and Benora. 

$3.60 per 100; $30.00 per 1000. 
Pink Delight. 

$5.00 per 100; $40.00 per 1000. 

S. S. SKIDELSKY & CO.. 

1004 Lincoln Bldg., Philadelphia, Pa. 

ROOTED CARNATION CUTTINGS. 

IMMEDIATE DELIVERY. 

STANDARD AND NEW VARIETIES. 

WHITE— 100 1000 

Matchless $ 2.60 $ 20.00 

White Enchantress 2.60 20.00 

White Wonder 8.00 26.00 

FLESH PINK— 

Superb 12.00 100.00 

Enchantress 2.60 20.00 

Alice , 8.00 25.00 

MEDIUM PINK— 

Miss Theo 6.00 60.00 

Pink Sensation 3.60 80.00 

DARK PINK— 

Peerless Pink 2.50 20.00 

C. W. Ward 2.60 20.00 

RED— 

Aviator 6.0O 60.00 

Champion 8.00 20.00 

J. D. THOMPSON CARNATION CO., 

JOLIET, ILLINOIS. 

CARNATIONS, STRONG, WELL ROOTED 
CUTTINGS. 
RED — Beacon, Victory, Joy, Champion. 

$20.00 per 1000. 
Aviator, Belle Washburn, Red Wing. 

$.-)0.00 per 1000. 
PINK — Winsor, Peerless, Enchantress, Philadel- 
phia, C. W. Ward, Mrs. Akehurst. 
$20.00 per 1000. 
Sensation, Alice. 

$30.00 per 1000. 
Superb. 

$100.00 per 1000. 
WHITE— Matchless, Enchantress, White Won- 
der. White I'erfection. 
$20.00 per 1000. 
MIS(;p:lLANEOUS— Benora, Yellow Prince. 
$25.00 per 1000. 

30 days on approved credit. 

2% discount for cash with order. 

KENNICOTT BROS. CO.. 

165 N, AVabash Ave., Chicago, 111 . 

ROOTED CARNATION CUTTINGS. 
600,000 strong, well rooted cuttings, propa- 
gated from plants grown for cuttings only. The 
quality of our cuttings will please the most ex- 
acting. 

100 1000 

Nebraska $6.00 $60.00 

Aviator 6.00 60.00 

Belle Washburn 6.00 60.00 

Good Cheer 4.00 86.00 

Alice 3.00 26.00 

Mrs. C. W. Ward 3.00 26.00 

Akehurst 8.00 26.00 

Matchless 8.00 26.00 

White Wonder 8.00 26.00 

Champion 8.00 25.00 

Pocahontas 3.00 25.00 

Benora 3.00 25.00 

Enchantress varieties 3.00 20.00 

250 at 1000 rate. 

ROLF ZBTLITZ, 

Woodlawn Ave., Lima, O. 

CARNATIONS. BOOTED CUTTINOS; 
Enchantress, Rose-pink Enchantress, White Kn- 
chantress. May Day and Philadelphia, $2.60 par 
100, $20.00 per 1000; Victory, $2.00 per 100, 
$18.00 per 1000. January or Febrnarj dellTeriea. 
Cash from nnknown parties. 

The Columbus Floral Co., Oolmnboa, 0. 



PLEASE MENTION THE REVIEW WHEN WRITING ANY OF THESE ADVERTISERS 



February 1, 1917. 



The Florists' Review 



133 



WELL ROOTBD CARNATION CUTTINGS 

PerlOO FerlOOO 

Knchantresi Supreme |2.60 |20.00 

Vlatchelss 2.60 20.00 

.iampion 2.60 20.00 

lice 2.80 20.00 

,\ hite Enchantress 2.00 18.00 

\Uite Wonder 2.60 20.00 

.' W. AVard 2.00 18.00 

/nchantresu 2.00 18.00 

MiBhluglou 2.00 18.00 

lorothy Gordon 2.00 18.00 

I'l.iludelphla 2.00 18.00 

; <trles» Pink 2.60 • 20.00 

ihrald 2.00 18.00 

;.,.acon 2.60 20.00 

, i.tory 2.00 18.00 

,nk Sensation 3.00 25.00 

MILLER BROS., 
, ,5 8 NORTH LINCOLN ST., CHICAGO. 

"hooted CUTTINGS OP CARNATIONS. 

February and March delivery. The best stock 
btninable. 

100 1000 

Alire, flne prolific light pink $ 3.00 $25.00 

lOucliantress Supreme, Improved 

Enchantress S.OO 26.00 

T.ciuon, good old standard red 3.00 26.00 

Wliite Enchantress, good white 3.00 25.00 

White Perfection, good white 2.60 20.00 

White AVonder, good white 3.00 25.00 

Nancy, pink 6.00 60.00 

C. W. Ward, best dark pink 3.00 26.00 

Shell Pink sport of C. W. Ward, 

snine habit as Ward but light 

piuk in color 10.00 76.00 

Striped White and Red sport of 

Mrs. 0. W. Ward 10.00 76.00 

C. 0. POLLWORTH CO., 
^ 1 1 LWAUKEE, WISCONSIN. 

ROOTED CARNATION 
CUTTINGS. 

100 1000 

Nancy $7.00 $66.00 

Alice Coombs 6.00 60.00 

Miss Theo 6.00 40.00 

Good Cheer 4.00 86.00 

I'ink Delight 6.00 40.00 

.Supreme S.60 80.00 

Gloriosa 4.00 85.00 

Nebraska 6.00 60.00 

Belle Washburn 6.00 60.00 

Red Wing 6.00 60.00 

Alice, Slegwart, Rosette, Enchantress, 0. W. 
Ward, Akehurst, Matchless, Wonder, Perfection, 
Alma Ward, Eureka, Champion, Beacon, Victory, 
$3.00 per 100; $26.00 per 1000. 

THE LEO NIESSBN CO., 
1201- 5 Race St., Philadelphia. Pa. 

Well rooted, strong carnation cuttings, ready 
for sale: 

100 1000 

I'liil.iilelphia $3.00 $25.00 

I'l-erless 2.50 22.50 

H'Hcon ". . 2.50 20.00 

•iirn.'Kic 3.00 25.00 

White Perfection 3.00 25.00 

Miitcliloss 2.50 20.00 

Nortliport 2.50 20.00 

Wliite Enchantress 2.50 25.00 

I'iiik Enchantress 2..50 25.00 

^\ I ii-<ir 2.00 20.00 

N\ liite Wonder 2.00 20.00 

Cash with order, please. 
l.vno, FLORIST, JOLIET, ILL. 

CARNATION CUTTINGS. 

Order now and Insure prompt delivery. 

The following varieties: 



Alire 

Kiicliantress 
Kriclmntress Supreme 
Wliite Perfection 
White Wonder 
Matchless 

Mrs. C. 

$3.00 per 100; , , . 

Aviator, Nebraska, Washburn, 
$0.00 per 100; $50.00 per 1000. 
WM. F. KASTING CO., 

■iH3j^l Hcott St., Buffalo, N. Y . 

Ciirnntiniis, rooted cuttings, propagated from 
healthy blooming plants: 



Philadelphia 
Prospector 
Champion 
Beacon 
Akehurst 
Benora 
W. Ward. 
$25.00 per 1000. 



1000 

Champion $22.50 

Benora 25.00 

Pocahontas 25.00 

Ench. Supreme... 25.00 

Peerless Pink 25.00 

Herald 22.00 

Pink Sensation... 25.00 
Dorothy Gordon.. 20.00 
$20.00. 
BULB CO., 

Chicago, 111. 



.- , , 1000 

'^••"•nska $50.00 

;V i"""" 50.00 

j.elle Washburn. 60.00 

V,. "• ^^ard 22.50 

■,^"",'' 26.W 

^.•^•^''J'fst 25 00 

Aintf'hless 22 50 

White Wonder. .'. 22.60 
Victory, 
... ^, AMERICAN 
Lilijor th Wabash A ve.. 

ROOTED CARNATION CUTTINGS. 
n..»*i* °^^ *** ^^^'^ strong well rooted carnation 
(,""'"S8 that win be sure to please. These cut- 
prc. K?""^ propagated from healthy stock and 
■re snipped out with a guarantee that If same 
vl^?,-"*"- satisfactory they may be returned and 
3 our money refunded. 

M... o ^ 100 1000 

mI?^,,?- ^- '"^"d $2.26 $20.00 

■HBtchless 2 25 20 00 

■^Kn^J«^"s'^ limited):."!!.":::;:::: 3:00 25:00 

hnnuo 1 *"' ^^^^^ cuttings now ready and orders 
"ooked for later delivery. 

Enos W. Kohr L ancaster, Pa. 

^ ALBUM OF DESIGNS^ 
Fourth Edition on the Presi. 

tr.1 > . . '^'^c per copy prepaid. 

I'lorlsts' Pub. Co., Caxton Bldg., Chicago. 



ROOTED CARNATION CUTTINGS. 

Per 100 

Enchantress Supreme $3.00 

White Enchantress 2.60 

Rose-pink Enchantress 2.60 

Ward 8.00 

St. Nicholas 8.00 

W. Wonder 8.00 

Matchless 4.00 

Pocahontas 8.00 

Yellow Prince 8.00 

Champion 8.00 

All free from disease. Cash with order. 
Morris the Florist, Bloomlngton, Ind. 

STRUNG ROOTED CARNATION CUTTINGS, 

PerlOO Per 1000 

Enchantress $2.50 $20.00 

W. Echantress 2.50 20.00 

R. P. Enchantress 2.50 20.00 

Washington 2.50 20.00 

Mrs. C. W. Ward 3.00 25.00 

Beacon 3.00 25.00 

$1.00 per 100 for the above potted. 

Belle Washburn 6.00 46.00 

Nebraska 6.00 60.00 

Above prices cash. 
J. C. Stelnhauser, Pittsburg, Kan. 

CARNATION CUTTINGS, - 

Strong rooted cuttings. Satisfaction guaranteed. 

100 1000 

Champion $3.00 $25.00 

C. W. Ward 3.00 25.00 

Matchless 3.00 25.00 

Supreme 3.00 26.00 

Victory 2.00 18.00 

Winsor 1.75 15.00 

White Enchantress 3.00 26.00 

White Wonder 3.00 25.00 

A. Henderson & Co., Box 126, Chicago. 

ROOTED CARNATION CUTTINGS. 
READY NOW. 

100 1000 

Champion $2.50 $20.00 

Victory 2.60 20.00 

Bonfire 2.50 20.00 

Carnegie 2.50 20.00 

Enchantress 2.50 20.00 

White Enchantress 2.50 20.00 

Alice 3.00 25.00 

WIBTOR BROS., 
162 N. Wabash Ave., Chicago, 111. 

EXTRA QUALITY CARNATION CUTTINGS, 
rooted in the bright sunshine of Colorado. In- 
crease your profits by planting early rooted stock, 
insuring early crop In fall. 

Our success with C. W. Ward and Matchless Is 
proof of this assertion. Well rooted stock now- 
ready. MATCHLESS, C. W. WARD AND 
ALICE, $25.00 per 1000. 

THE MAUFF FLORAL CO., 
1225 Logan St., Denver, Colo. 

Rooted carnation cuttings, first-class stock. 

100 1000 

White Enchantress $3.00 $26.00 

Matchless 3.00 25.00 

White Wonder 3.00 26.00 

Enchantress 8.00 25.00 

Mrs. C. W. Ward 3.00 26.00 

Rose-pink Enchantress 3.00 25.00 

Herald (extra fine stock) 3.00 26.00 

LA CROSSE FLORAL CO., L A CROS SE. WIS. 

STRONG ROOTBD CUTTINaS 

Per 100 Per 1000 

O. W. Ward $3.00 $25.00 

Matchless 3.00 25.00 

Supreme 3.00 26.00 

White Wonder 3.00 25.00 

Champion 3.00 26.00 

White Enchantress 3.00 25.00 

Pink Enchantress 2.50 20.00 

Crown Point Floral Co., Crown Point, Ind. 

Strong, well rooted carnation cuttings. 

100 1000 

Enchantress $2.00 $14.00 

White Enchantress 2.50 17.00 

Peerless Pink 3.00 20.00 

Victory 2.00 14.00 

Aviator 4.00 29.00 

Enchantress, unrooted cuttings 7.00 

Cash with order. 
FRANK HLAVACEK. GROSS POINT, ILL. 

Carnations, R. C. : White Enchantress and 
Matchless, $25.00; Pink Enchantress, Enchan- 
tress Supreme, $25.00; Dark Pink Washington, 
$25.00; Beacon, red, $25.00; Nebraska, red, 
$.^)0.00 per 1000. 
W. E. Trimble Greenhouse Co., Princeton, 111. 

STRONGLY ROOTED CUTTINGS! 

Matchless $3.00 per 100; $25.00 per 1000 

Mrs. C. W. Ward.. 3.00 per 100; 25.00 per 1000 

Philadelphia 2.50 per 100; 20.00 per 1000 

Champion 3.00 per 100; 25.00 per 1000 

GULLETT & SONS, LINCOLN, ILL . 

Carnation cuttings: Well rooted cuttings of 
White Enchantress, Mrs. Ward and Beacon. 
$25.00 per 1000; 500 at 1000 rate. 2-in. stock of 
same varieties, $35.00 per 1000, or will exchange 
2-in. stock of AVard or White Enchantress for 
R. C. of Alice. Elitch Gardens Co., Denver, Colo. 

CARNATION ROOTED CUTTINGS. 
.'iO.OOO Philadelphia, $2.50 per 100; $20.00 per 
1000. Cash. See onr calla adv. 

COLUMBIA CITY FLOR.\L CO.. 
COLUMBIA CITY, INDIANA. 

Carnation rooted cuttings. Pink Delight, $5.00 
per 100; C. W. Ward, White Wonder and Beacon, 
$3.00 per 100; $25.00 per 1000. 

Erie Floral Co., Erie, Pa. 



Carnations, rooted cuttings White Bncban- 
tresi, Rose-pink Enchantress, Washington, Bn- 
cbantress. Herald, $2.50 per 100; $20.00 p«r 
1000; 2-In., $26.00 per 1000. Cash. 

Daut Bros., Decatur, 111. 

Carnations, R. C, ready to ship at once; Win- 
sor and Victory, $13.00 per 1000; White En- 
chantress and Enchantress, $15.00 per 1000. 
Cash with order. Phone Wllmette 1236. 
Frank Felke, Gross Point, 111. 

Strong, healthy, well rooted carnation cut- 
tings, $2.50 per 100, $20.00 per 1000; Mrs. Ward 
and Matchless. 

Home Nursery Greenhouse, La Fayette, 111. 

Carnation cuttings: White Perfection, Match- 
less, Rose-pink Enchantress, Enchantress, $2.00 
per 100; Aviator and Belle Washburn, $6.00 per 
100. 0. J. Frew Jr., Conneaut. O. 

Carnations, well rooted Bnchantress cut- 
tings $1.50 per 100; Enchantress and Match- 
less, In 2-ln. pots, $2.50 per 100. Cash. 
West Side Greenhouses, Independence. la. 

2.-In. strong carnation plants. Pink and White 
Bnchantress, Beacon, C. W. Ward, $30.00 per 
1000. Cash. 
City Floral Co., 1446 Krameria St., Denver. Colo. 

Carnation cuttings. Enchantress, well-rooted, 
ready new; Perfection, Herald, Enchantress, Jan- 
uary delivery, $15.00 per 1000. 
E. A. Raasch. Hoopeston. III. 

CARNATION CUTTINGS, for prices and va- 
rieties refer to my advertisement on front 
cover. 
Roman J. Irwin, 108 W. 28th St.. New York. 

Carnations, 2-in. pots, clean, strong plants: 
Enchantress, White Wonder, Beacon and Phila- 
delphia, $3.00 per 100. 

Spokane Greenhouses, Spokane, Wash. 

Carnations, W. Bnchantress, R. C, $2.00 per 
100; $15.00 per 1000; from soil, $2.50 per 100; 
$22.50 per 1000. Krueger Bros., Toledo, O. 

Carnation R. C. : Rose-pink Bnchantress, $2.50 
per 100; White Enchantress, $2.50 per 100. 

Pana Greenhouses, Pana, 111. 

Carnations, White Enchantress, strong, clean, 
well rooted cuttings, $2.00 per 100; $17.00 per 
1000. E. A. Muchow, Clarence, N. Y. 

2000 rooted Alice carnation cuttings, ready for 
delivery now, $2.00 per 100 or the lot for $35.00 
Cash. J. F. Ammann Co., BdwardsvlU e, III. 

Carnation cuttings. Light Pink Enchantress, 
strong well rooted stock, $10.00 per 1000. 
Fluegge Bros., 4840 N. Leavltt St., Chicago, HI . 

Strong rooted carnation cuttings. Matchless 
and Alice, $20.00 per 1000; mirooted, $10.00 per 
1000. C. B. Johnson, Wobum, Mass . 

R. C. Carnations, Philadelphia, $2.60 per lOo! 
J. V. Laver. Erie. Pa. 

CHRYSANTHEMUMS. 

CHRYSANTHEMUMS. 

500,000 chrysanthemums for present and later 
delivery; rooted cuttings, $2.25 per 100, $20.00 
per 1000, unless otherwise noted. 

Chas. Rager, 3 ft., pure w., shaped like Bon- 
naffon; early Nov. 

Chieftain, 3% ft., Inc., pink, mid Nov. 

Chrysolora, 4 ft., yellow, mid Oct. 

C. Touset, 4 ft., large white tinged pink; mid 
Oct. 

Col. Appleton, 4 ft., yellow, early Nov. 

Dec. Gem., 3% ft., tinged lavender, late Nov. 
and Dec. 

Dr. Euguehard, 5 ft., pink, mid Nov. 

Edwin Seidewltz, 5 ft., pink, late Nov. and 
Dec. 

Early Snow, 3 ft., pure white, mid Oct. 

Golden Glow, 4 ft., standard earliest yellow, 
Sept. 

Harvard, 4 ft., best red, late Nov., $2.00 per 
100, $17.50 per 1000. 

Helen Frick. 2 ft., pink, late Dec. 

J. Burton, 3 ft., white shaded pink, late Dec. 

Lena Baum, 3 ft., yellow, much like Bormaf- 
fon. 

MaJ. Bonnaffon, 4 ft., grand old standard inc. 
yellow, long blooming season, all through Nov., 
$2.00 per 100, $17.50 per 1000. 

Oconto, 3 ft., white, indispensable, mid Oct. 

Oct. Frost, 4 ft., fine pure white, early Oct. 

Patty, 21,^ ft., silvery-pink, late Nov. and Dec, 

Ramapo, 4 in., yellow ,late Oct. 

Robt. Halliday, 3 ft., yellow, late Oct. 

Roman Gold, 4 ft., golden yellow, late Nov. 

Smith's Advance, 3 ft., earliest white, mid 
Sept. 

Unaka, 4 ft., pink, early Oct. 

White Helen Frick, 2 ft., late Dec. 

White J. K. Shaw, 4 ft., flne pure white, late 
Oct. 

Wm. Turner, 4 ft., pure white, mid Nov. 
BAUR FLORAL CO., ERIE, PA. 

Chrysanthemum rooted cuttings. A-1 stock: 
Yellow and White Bonnaffon. Chrysolora. Halli- 
day, Golden Glow. Chas. Rager, P.icific Supreme, 
C. Touset, Dr. Enguehnrd, Glenview. Give us 
your order now to be delivered when you want 
them, if you want good stock. 
Van Aker Bros., Col dwater, Mich. 

Chrysanthemums, Alex Guttman, the best Early 
Lavender-pink; Blanche, a new anemone white; 
Elizabeth, a new anemone yellow; Emina, a new 
anemone pink. Stock plants or 2%-ln., stock 
ready. Guttman &. Raynor, Inc., AVholesale 
Florists, 101 W. 28th St., New York, or Frank 
Dinda, Farmingdale, N. Y. 



PLEASE MENTION THE REVIEW WHEN WRITING ANY OF THESE ADVERTISERS 



134 



The Florists^ Review 



Fbbruauy 1, 1917. 



CHRYSANTHEMUMS- Continued. 

Order now, chryBanthemum rooted cuttings for 

dellTery when wanted, from strong stock plants, 

held In cool house, cuttings vigorous, clean and 

well rooted. 

YELLOW— Per 100 

Ohrysolora $2.00 

Boman Gold 1.80 

Yellow Bager 8.00 

Bonnaffon 1.50 

Nagoya 2.00 

Yellow Eaton 2.60 

Go lden Chadwlck 2.50 

WHITE— 

Oconto 2.00 

White Chieftain 2.20 

Turner 2.00 

Chas. Rager 2.00 

White Maud Dean 2.60 

White Eaton 2.50 

White Chadwlck 2.60 

Jeanne Nonin 2.20 

PINK— 

Chieftain 1.80 

Maud Dean 2.00 

Bnguehard 2.00 

Dr. Seldewltz 2.00 

8USKANA GREENHOUSES, 

Growers small plants and rooted cuttings for 
the trade, 

21 Broome St., Blnghamton, N. Y . 

Booking orders now for rooted cuttings: Clean, 
healthy stock, many varieties ready for ship- 
ment now. Frank Dinda's new Anemone seed- 
lings, Blanche (white), Elizabeth (yellow). Cut 
flowers brought good prices In the New York 
Cut Flower Market. Stock plants ready now, 
$7.50 per doz., $60.00 per 100; rooted cuttings 
ready Feb. 1, $10.00 per 100, $80.00 per 1000; 
2%-ln. pots, $12.00 per 100, $100.00 per 1000. 
BEST OF LAST SEASON'S INTRODUCTIONS. 
BOOTED CUTTINGS: 

100 1000 

▲lex Gnttmann (lavender pink) $7.00 $60.00 

Autocrat (late white) 6.00 60.00 

Early Bose (bright pink, early) 7.00 60.00 

Golden Gleam (brightest yellow).. 6.00 60.00 

Hodello (Uke a bronze dahlia) 4.00 35.00 

CHADWICK VARIETIES. 

Golden Chadwlck, White Chadwlck, Yellow 
Chadwlck and a full list of other standard va- 
rieties. Ask for a complete price list. POM- 
PONS, r«oted cuttings In the Dest varieties. 

ANGLIN & WALSH CO., 
WILLIAMSBRIDGE, NEW YORK. 

CHETSANTHEMUMS. 
NOW READY, 2%-IN. POT PLANTS. SPLEN- 
DID STOCK THAT HAS BEEN PROPAGATED 
PROM PLANTS GROWN OUTDOORS ALL 
SUMMER, SOLELY FOR THIS PURPOSE. 
CLEAN AND HEALTHY, JUST THE THING 
FOR PLANTING NOW TO INCREASE STOCK 
AND USB FOR REJUVENATING YOUR WORN- 
OUT GREENHOUSE STOCK. 

OCTOBER FROST, MARIGOLD, GOLDEN 
GLOW. CHRYSOLORA, BOB PULLING, AU- 
TOCRAT, TINTS OP GOLD, CRANFORDIA, 
UNAKA, ETC. 

$5.00 PER 100, $40.00 PER 1000. 

NOVELTY MUMS. 

"LOUISA POCKETT." 

$1.60 PER PLANT. $16.00 PER DOZ., 

$100.00 PER 100. 

OUR EIGHTY PAGE CATALOG DESCRIB- 

INO BOTH ROSES AND MUMS, BESIDES 

OTHER GENERAL STOCK, IS YOURS FOR 

THE ASKING. 

CHARLES H. TOTTY, 
MADISON, NEW JERSEY. 

CHRYSANTHEMUMS. 
Our new plant bulletin contains a complete 
list with descriptions and prices of 
25 exhibition varieties, 
8 new commercial varieties, 
67 standard varieties. 
POMPONS. 
33 varieties. 
You are sure to find the varieties you deslrs 
in our list. 

CAPRICE VARIETIES (For pot culture). 
Butler's Caprice, Caprice du Prlnceps, 

Yellow Caprice, White Caprice. 

Purple Caprice, Lilac Caprice. 

Mrs. Greening, Kathleen Thompson. 

100 1000 

Rooted Cuttings $4.00 $30.00 

2l4-ln., plants 5.00 40.00 

S. S. PENNOCK-MEEHAN CO., 
1608-20 Ludlow St., Philadelphia, Pa. 

CHRYSANTHEMUM CUTTINGS. 

Per 100 

Wm. Turner $2.00 

Maj. nonnafTon 2.00 

MaJ. Bonnaffon, 2>4-inch 2.50 

Donatello 2.00 

Intensity 2.00 

J. Rosette 2.00 

Dolly Dimple 2.00 

W. Bonnaffon 2.00 

Yanoma 2.00 

Chadwlck 2.00 

Golden Wedding 2.00 

Chieftain 2.50 

White Chieftain 2.60 

Early Frost 2.00 

Pompons, assorted, named varieties 2.00 

Cash. 
Morris the Florist. Bloomlngton, Ind. 

Chrysanthemum stock plants: 600 BonnaflTon, 
60 Dr. Engnebard, 60 0. Touset, to close out, 60o 
per doz., $3.00 per 100. Cash. This Is all good I 
stock. Addems, Morgan & Co., Pazton, HI. ' 



THE ORBAM OF THE NEW MUMS, TIGER. 
Pres. Wilson has named this grand yellow, which 
Is a seedling from Chrysolora. October Queen; 
this variety has scored 93 points and Is one «f the 
purest whites; Early Rose, surpasses all other 
early pinks, maturing Oct. 6. C. 8. A. certificate. 
Rooted cuttings, $10.00 per 100. 
Josephine Foley, winner of the Foley prize at 
Indianapolis, for best seedling, one of the largest 
and best whites grown. 

Booted cuttings, $12.60 per 100. 
1916 introduction of Golden Queen and Mari- 
gold. 

Booted cuttings, $2.60 per 100. 

max b. schbieber, 
McDonald. Pennsylvania. 

chrysanthemums oub specialty. 

Rooted cuttings, $1.80 per 100; $15.00 per 1000. 
2Mi-ln. plants, $3.00 per 100, $25.00 per 1000. 
Now booking orders. First crop ready in Feb- 
ruary. Send for list of 70 varieties, large flower- 
ing singles and pompons, all money-making sorts, 
not one Inferior sort In list, cool-grown, healthy 
and clean. It will pay you big to place order 
with us; low price; good stock guaranteed. For 
cash only. 
G. Schneider, Florist, Springfield, O. 

Clirysanthemums, fine 2-in. pot plants, clean, 
iiealthy and well rooted, for delivery at once: 
('lirysolora, Estelle, Golden Glow, Glory of Pa- 
«-iflc, Mrs. H. Robiusou, October Frost, Patty, 
Pacific Supreme, Percy Phimeridge, Polly Rose. 
Kol de Italia, Roman Gold. Smitli's Advance and 
T'lmka, $2.2.') per 100; $20.00 per 1000. 250 at 
1000 rate. Casli, please. 

Hillside Greenliouses, West Liberty, O. 

MARIGOLD, the wonderful new yellow; SEI- 
DEWITZ, the peerless late pink that IS PINK, 
strong rooted cuttings of these two fine varieties, 
for January delivery, $3.00 per 100, $26.00 per 
1000. Booking orders now. 

Furrow & Co., Guthrie, Okla. 

Mum cuttings, true to name. Golden Queen 
and Marigold, $2.50 per 100, $22.50 per 1000; 
Oconto, Crystal Gem (early white) and Nonin 
(late white), Chrysolora and Pink Chieftain, 
$15.00 per 1000; Golden Glow and Unaka, $10.00 
per 1000. Cash. J. P. Siebold, Lancaster, Pa. 

Chrysanthemum stock plants; White and Pink 
Frlck, Adelia, Estelle, Halliday, Chrysolora, 
Maud Dean, Unaka, Duckham, $3.00 per 100; 50c 
per doz.; R. C, $1.25 per 100. Cash. 
Port Allegany Greenhouses, Port Allegany, Pa. 

POMPON CHRYSANTHEMUMS. 
STRONG ROOTED CUTTINGS. 

Golden Wedding $6.00 per 100 

A. L. RANDALL CO., 
Wabash Ave., at Lake St., Chicago, 111. 

CHRYSANTHEMUM STOCK PLANTS. 

BonnafTon, Pompons, Soliel d'Or, 

Qulnola, Diana, Klondyke and Babjr, 

$3.00 per 100. 

WHITE BBOS., MEDINA. W. T. 

Chr.vsantliemum stock plants: White Ivory, 
Yel. Honnnffon, Nonin, Chieftain, Helen Frick, 
4c each. Good, healthy stock. 

WashinRton Flornl Co., Washington, Pa. 

Chrysanthemum rooted ciittings: Yellow Tur- 
ner, $15.00 per 100, 18c each; Mrs. Gibson, $10.00 
per loo. Marcli delivery. 

Pierce the Florist, Medford, Ore. 

Chrysanthemum rooted cuttings: Golden Glow, 
Smith's Advance, $1.75 per 100; $15.00 per 1000. 
W. A. Ballou, Wheaton. 111. 

Mum stock: Halliday, Chrysolora, Modesto, 
Nagoya, Bonnaffon, Nonin, Dr. Enguehard and 
Patty, 2V^c ea. Cash. H. A. Cook, Oberlin. 0. 

Chrysanthemum stock plants: Smith's Ad- 
vance, $4.00 per 100. 

John Bauscher, Freeport, 111. 

Mum stock plants, In all varieties, clean, 
healthy stock, prices on application. 
Roman J. Irwfii, 108 W. 28th St., New York. 

CINERARIAS. 

Cinerarias, giant flowering, liaif dwarf, best 
seed strain, 750 4-in. plants ready for the flow- 
ering pots; have been spaced and grown cool. 
Carefully packed to save all the large leaves, 8c 
each; 1500 2%-ln., 2^.c each. 

Doty & Huggett, Grand Ledge, Mich. 

Cinerarias, from 4-in. pots, $8.00 per 100; 
plants thrifty and coming to bud; best seed; 
mixed colors. Cash, please. 

W. R. P. Stewart, R. F. D. 2, Marietta, O. 

Cinerarias, dwarf and semi-dwarf, beautiful 
mixed colors. A-1, strong .3-in., readv for 4-in., 
$3.00 per 100; 200 for $.5.00. 

Chas. Whitton, York & Gray, Utica, N. Y. 

Cinerarias, Dreer's prize, tall 2-in., $2.00 per 
100; fine 4-in., $10.00 per 100. 

Wagner's Greenhouses, Tlflln, O. 

Cinerarias, best mixed, 2^-In., $2.60 per 100; 
4-ln., $10.00 per 100. 

John B ausc her, F re«port. 111. 

Cinerarias, selected strains, best colors from 
8-ln., fine, healthy stock, $6.00 per 1(M. 
Stnhldrcher Bros.. Manafleld, O. 

Cinerarias, half dwarf, 3-ln. pots, $6.60 per 
100, $50.00 per 1000. 
Anglln & Walsh Co., Williamsbrldge, N. Y. 

Cinerarias, Stellata and half dwarf, choicest 
mixed, 3-ln. pots, $6.00 per 100. 
Roman J, Irwin, 108 W. 28th St., New York. 



Cinerarias, dwarf mix.. 8-in., 4c; 4-ln., 10 , 
Pyfer A Olsem, Wllmette, 111. 

Cinerarias, in bud and bloom, 4-ln., 10c an i 
16c. 0. J. Frew, Jr.. Conneaut, O. 

Cinerarias, strong 8-ln., |4.00 100. Cash. 
J. W. Miller. Shiremanstovrn, Pa. 

COI.EUS. ° 

COLEUS. 

100 100< 

RrllUancy, 2Vi-lnch $6.00 $40. ( i 

Rooted cuttings, $12.00 per 1000. 
Other varieties also. 
Buy your cuttings NOW and propagate yov- 
own stock from them. 

Our NEW plant bulletin now ready. 
Yours for the asking. 

S. S. PENNOCK-MEEHAN CO., 
lfl08-20 LUDLOW ST.. PHILADELPHIA. P/. 

Coleus leading varieties such as Tralliu? 
Queen, Beckwlth Gem, Golden Bedder, Flrebram', 
Verschaffeltll, Count Courier, Mrs. Barr, Amei- 
ican Beauty, Blizzard, Chicago Bedder, Lorl 
Palmerton, Neptune, Hurricane, Hero, Rettii, 
Klrkpatrlck, Queen Victoria, John and Anni« 
Pflster R. C, prepaid by parcel post, 85c prr 
100, by express 75c per 100, $7.00 per 1000 net 
prepaid. Our coleus are free from mealy bug. 
2Vt-in.. $2.00 per 100. 

OAK GROVE GREENHOUSES, 
TUSKEGEE, ALABAMA . 

Coleus Defiance, the prettiest of all coleus. 
It defies any other coleus, in beauty, as well as 
for commercial purposes, as pretty as a poin- 
settla at its best. Send for colored plate. Try 
It, $1.50 per doz., $10.00 per 100 from 2%-iii. 
with plenty of fine cuttings on them. See my 
cyclamen and begonia ads. 
C. Wlnterlch, Cyclamen Specialist, Defiance, 0. 

The home of the new yellow Trailing Queen, 
60c per doz., $4.00 per 100. Brilliancy or Xmas 
Gem, 60c per doz., $3.00 per 100; Defiance, $1.50 
per doz. Emperor William. 75c per doz., $5.00 
per 100. 

OAK GROVE GREENHOUSES, 
TUSKEGEE, ALABAAIA. 

Coleus Xmas Gem (Brilliancy), rooted cut- 
tings, $1.60 per 100; 2-ln., $3.00 per 100; 2%-in., 
$4.00 per 100. Cash, please. 

Mixed coleus R. C, 76c per 100, prepaid, all 
best popular varieties named. 

Royston A Fenton, Evansvllle, Ind. 

COLEUS : Rooted cuttings, 10 best standard 
varieties. We will include some of our new- 
seedlings with every order. $1.00 per 100; $7.5(» 
per 1000. 

Rockford Seed Farms, H. W. Buckbee. 
Forest City Greenhouses, Rockford, 111. 

R. C. Coleus, Firebrand, Golden Bedder, Ver- 
schaffeltll and five other leading varieties. We 
can send these by parcel post for 75c per 100; 
66c per 100, by express, $6.00 per 1000. 
J. V. Laver, Erie. Pa. 

Coleus, strong R. C, leading varieties. Dr. 
Ross, Brilliancy, Trailing Queen, Golden Bed- 
der and other good varieties, 75c per 100; 2-ln., 
strong plants, $2.25 per 100. Joseph Austin, 
3111 Troost Ave., Kansas City. Mo. 

Coleus rooted cuttings, ready for delivery. In 
all the best varieties, 00c per 100; $7.50 per 1000. 
These are excellent cuttings, well rooted. 

Anglin & Walsh Co., Williamsbrldge, N. Y. 

Coleus, 12 best varieties, strong rooted cut- 
tings, 80c per 100, $7.00 per 1000; 2Vi-ln. poU, 
$2.60 per 100. Cash. 
William M. Turner, Wllklnsbnrg, Pa. 

New Trailing Queen coleus, rooted cuttings, 
strong plants, ready for 2-in. pots, 60c per 100. 
Fred Ziegler, Jr., 6037 Hurst Ave., New Orleans, 

La. ____^___ 

Coleus, Trailing Queen, of red and new yello^v 
varieties, rooted cuttings, 75c per 100, $6.00 ptr 
1000; 2-ln.. $2.00 per 100. Cash, please. 
W. Bezdek, Cedar Rapids, Iowa. 

Coleus Trailing Queen, yellow, red, 2-in. pot^. 
good stock plants, while tliey last, $1.75 per 10<'. 
R. C, $1.00 per 100, $8.00 per 1000. 

C. H. Tritschler, Florist, Nashville, Tenn . 

Colons, Trailing Queen, Golden Bedder, Vo' 
sella ffeltii. rooted cuttings, 75c per 100; 2-in . 
$1.75 per 100. 

Wm. Swinhank, Sycamore. 111. 

Coleus Trailing Queen, pink and yellow, 2V> *" ■ 
.$2.00 per 100; 3 in., .$5.(K) per 100. 

U. U. Davis Co., Morrison, 111. 

Trailing colons, R. C, $1.00 per 100; Bri - 
liancy, U. C, $1.50 per 100. 

D. U. Augspurger & Sons Co., Peoria. 111. 

Coleus R. C: Golden Bedder, Verschaffelt i 
and 12 otlier varieties, 70c 100; $6.00 1000. Casl . 
please. . E. B. Randolph, Delavan, 111. 

Coleus rooted cuttings, Brilliancy, $1.50 p< >■ 
100; Trailing Queen, $1.00 per 100. Cash wit i 
order. York & Panasuk, Houghton, Mich. 

R. C. coleus, in 16 varieties, 60c per 100 or 
$6.00 per 1000. Harglerode Bros., successors t" 
U. Q. Harglerode, Shlppensburg, Pa. 

Coleus, Xmas Gem, 2-ln., 3c; R. C, $1.5( 
mixed coleus, B. C, 75c. 
Williams & Matthews, Anderson, Ind. 

BUSINESS BBINOBB8— 

BEYIBW CLASSIFIED ADS 



PLEASE MENTION THE REVIEW WHEN WRITING ANY OF THESE ADVERTISERS 



Fbbruakv 1, 1917. 



The Florists^ Review 



135 



Coleuf B. C, 25 leaders, 70c per 100; $6.00 
ler 1000 prepaid. 

0. Humfeld, Clay Center, Kan. 

Coleua rooted cuttings, 70c per 100, $6.00 per 
000, all named. Prepaid. 

S. D. Brant, Clay Center, Kan. 

Coleus rooted cuttings. In separate varieties, 
3.00 per 1000. 

Geo. H. Mellen Co., Springfield, O. 

Coleus, nice 2-ln., In good assortment, $2.00 per 
,00: $15.00 per 1000. 

Thornton Floral Co., Streator, 111. 

R. 0. coleus, 10 best varieties. Just right, 76c 
1 .r 100, postpaid. 

Tbe EI Paso Carnation Co., El Paso, 111. 

Coleus Yellow Trailing Queen, R. C, 25c per 
'oz.; $1.50 per 100. 

Sunnysl de Greenhouse, R. 1, Jeannette, Pa. 

Coleus, assorted varieties, 2>4-in., 2c. 
\V. B. Trimble Greenhouse Co., Princeton, III. 

Coleus, Christmas Gem or Brilliancy, 2-ln., 
t.R.00 per 100. N. O. Caswell, Delavan, 111. 

COTONEASTER. 

C'otoneaster liorlzontalis, extra fine, all sizes, 
l.'c, 25c, 3r)C, 50c each. Cash with order; satis- 
faction Kiiiiranteed. 
Mountain View Floral Co., Portland, Ore. 

CUPHEAS. 



CUPHBA-PLATYCBNTRA. 

Fine young plants $3.00 per 100 

Koclsford Seed Farms, H. W. Buckbee, 

Forest City Greenliouses, Rockford, lU. 

2-in., cigar plants, $2.50 per 100. 
D. V. Augspurger & Sons Co., Peoria, 111. 

Cigar plants, 2^-in., extra strong, $3.00 per 
100. Chas. Bherwood, Waterloo, Iowa. 

Cigar plants, 2-in., 2c; R. C, 00c; big cuttings. 
Williams & Matthews, Anderson, Ind. 

Cuphea R. C, 75c per 100; 2-in., $1.60 per 100. 
Cash. Byer Bros., Chambersburg, Pa. 

Cigar plants, R. C, T5c per 100. 

D. U. Augspurger & Sons Co., Peoria, HI. 

CYCLAMEN. 



CYCLAMEN. 

Glory of Wandsbek 
Wender of Wandsbek 
Princess May 
Bright Rose 
Christmas Red 
Rose of Marlenthal 
Rococo Brecta, finest of all varieties. 

Per 100 Per 1000 



Pure White 

Dark Red 

Salmon Queen 

Roseum 

White with Red Bye 

Duke of Connaught 



$35.00 
60.00 
76.00 
90.00 

100.00 



60.00 
100.00 



Seedlings, will average 4 leaves. .$4.00 

2H-in 7.50 

2H-ln., selected 8.00 

S-ln 10.00 

3-in., selected 12.00 

4-ln., selected 26.00 

Rococo Brecta, 

Seedlings 6.00 

2%-Jn 12.00 

8-ln 20.00 

For purchaser's selection of Wandsbek's 
Christmas red and dark red, add $1.00 per 100. 

Our new Plant Bulletin now ready for mailing. 
Do you want a copy? 
,-„„ ^ S. 8. PBNNOCK-MEBHAN CO., 
1608-20 LUDLOW ST., PHILADELPHIA, PA. 

Cyclamen glganteum. Improved Wandsbek 
i,yP«; strong seedlings, in 8 varieties, equally 
5i "i^l' f'*"" P^"" 100; $30.00 per 1000; trans- 
planted, $5.00 per 100; $40.00 per 1000. 

Rococo Erecta (new), finest ever Introduced 
(not to compare with the old Rococo), to be well 
recommended for commercial growing. Strong 
n^o5l"PiJ^^ °<^ P«i" 100: *40.00 per 1000; trans- 
planted, $0.00 per 100: $50.00 per 1000. 
hr.^^ . °."'' ^"'"- ^^°^^ ""eady May 15. Orders 
DooKpti In advance. We grow over 350,000 and 
can show many testimonials as to the quality 
of our strain and stock. 

Pi^hi^'"™?".. ^^^^- Improved Wandsbek type, 
eignt varieties, equally divided, $9.00 per 1000; 

$1.00 perm"' ^''""^^^ ""''^''' ^^-^ P^"" ^°^ = 

Sl?nft°^° ^nn^*"! "«^' ""P8t ever introduced, 

equa°VdivWed= ''"^ ^^ '°^' '" ^"P"''*^ ^''•°"' 

5£^£5LR?5£^_1__ Wilmette, HI. 

ns^n r?,^'^r '"'^■*', "*^'»'" proven their popiilarity 
for t d 1 1^?** "'•'"'f- ^"^ those immense plants 
}yl "^'le holHinys, von simn1<l i^nt nnr STItONG 

Immense 

of finest strains only; 

Imonoid, Am. 

red rn„^ \i:i"\''"-' '^','V" viieeii, .vmas Red, briglit 

reii, rose white, white with eye, etc., your se- 



TnAv«nT"4"».';.Mr' •^°" slioiild get our SI 
stock ,^^"^-^^^.D SKEDLINGS .NOW. Ir 
dark --■•'•" ■ ''(""Itliy, 



Keautv"'nl'^'''' '°'."^°"- importe.l Sal. 
red ;^' "<^'l;>nce, Snow Queen, Xmas 

im'ion «-'?;^'"*'' ^■'''t« ^'t" We, et.., ,uu. »,- 
Hon $4"^;o^„''",i00. $45.00 per 1000; our selec- 
":.•._**••»' per 100: S4n no no,, mnn 

ERIE, PA. 



nAlIR*1.^:{)irV^Ll^;.$^«00 per 1000. 



f'yrla 



men. 



fine' l.innmiV, '*"''*' transplanted. It yon want 

of tl em ?n o„ *** ,>*tiirt now. We have 100,000 
1000 itoro^n <■".'""■ ^S.OO per 100, $45.00 per 
Hefianre n 7'- f '^'^'•-P<lBe pink and red, and 
extra p.-V "Jon '^n''" ?'"'''' . P"'"Pl'" salmon, $1.00 
be too InV^-, """' "^'"'t "ntil spring, it will 

tions'wuf.M.Vi^rder^"*"' ^•""'^- ^"'^^-^ ^''''■ 
^lJl!lEic h, Cyclamen Specialist. Defiance, O . 



CYCLAMEN SEED, GLANT FLOWERING. . . 

Best German strain, in the best colors, $6.60 
per 1000. Seedlings in the best colors; bright 
red, dark red, pink, pure white, white with eye, 
and salmon; best stock which we guarantee to 
be as good as any. Seedlings vrlth four leaves or 
more, 13.60 per 100, $30.00 per 1000. Ready for. 
Immediate delivery. 

Anglln & Walsh Co., WlUlamsbridge, N. Y. 

Cyclamen seedlings, from best German-rrvwB 
strain. In all colors, including Salmon, $8.oQ per 
100, $80.00 per 1000; extra strong seedlinfi, 
selected, |5.00 per lOO, $45.00 per 1000; very nice 
6-in. pots, best colors, separate or mizeid, at 
$30.00 per 100 for Immediate shipment. 
Roman J. Irwin, 108 W. 28th St.. New York. 

Cyclamen, having a few 5-ln. plants left, I 
will offer these while they last at 20c. This is 
cool-grown stock, well set with buds, but not In 
bloom. Will be just right for Easter. Can ship 
in paper pots. Casli, please. 
Geo. Fountain, P. O. Box 260, Wilmington, Del. 

CYCLAMEN. 
Red, pink, salmon and wliite, in hud and bloom 
for immediate delivery, 4-in., 20c; 5-in., 35c; 
(Jin., 50c; 7-in., 80o. 

Davis Floral Co., Davenport, la. 

CYCLAMEN, 6-IN., IN BUD AND BLOOM, 
LARGE NICE PLANTS. 40c AND 50c EACH; 
4-IN., IN BUD, 15c. CASH. THIS IS A SPE- 
CIAL PRICE AS WE NEED ROOM. 
McADAMS & McCOMB, COLUMBUS GROVE, O. 

Cyclamen, extra heavy, full of buds and 
blooms, 5-in., 40c each; 6-in., 75c to $1.00 ea. 
Cash with order. 

York & Panasuk, Houghton, Mich. 

Cyclamen, in full bud and bloom, 4-ln., $25.00 
and $;i5.00 per 100; 5-ln., $40.00 and $50.00 per 
100; 6-in., $75.00 per 100. 

Hembreiker Bros., Lincoln, 111. 

Cyclamen, large 4-in.. iieavily budded, some 
buds showing color, 15c each. 

Wm. Krleger, Lansing, Mich. 

Cyclamen, in bud and bloom, 6-in., 40c each. 
Fine plants. Cash. Central Greenhouse Co., 
618 N. 8th St., Yincennes, Ind. 

Cyclamen, in bloom. Just right for Chrl•^ 
mas, 6-ln. pots, 60c and 76c. 
J. B. Knapp, Sayre. Pa. 

Cyclamen, full of bud and bloom, 6-in., 60c; 
6-in., 60c; 7-la., 75e. 

■ Pyfer & Olsem, Wilmette, III. 

Cyclamen, 4 in., 10c; 3 in., 8c; strong stock, 
in hloom. (^asli. 

Chas. Cassier, 1400 So. 4th Ave.. May wood, 111. 

Cyclamen, 4-in., 15c: 5-in., 25c. Cash, please. 
Felscli Bros. Co., May wood. 111. 

Cyclamen, 5-In., in bud and bloom, $3.00 per 
doz. Cash. John Bauscher, Freeport, 111. 

Cyclamen in bud and bloom, select; 5-in., 50c; 
6-in., 75c each. Ullrich Floral Co., Tiffin, O. 

Cyclamen, 4-in., heavily in bloom, good plants, 
20c each. H. S. Ely & Co., Neosho, Mo. 

Cyclamen, 6-in., in bloom, $3.00 per doz. Cash. 
W. F. Dunteman, BensenvlUe, 111. 

Cyclamen, in bloom, 4-ln., 25c each; 6-in., 40c. 
South Bend Floral Co., South Bend, Ind. 

Cyclamen, In bud and bloom, 6-ln., 60c; 7-ln., 
75c. Reicherts' Florists, Buffalo, N. Y. 

3YPERUS. 

600 cyperus, umbrella plants, out of 6-ln. 

Eots, strong and bushy, $12.50 per 100. Cash. 
amples sent. A. R. Tischlnger, Govans, Md. 

CYPRIPEDIUMS. 

Cyprlpedium acaule, pubescens and spectablle. 
I have made arrangements to collect in large 
quantities. Price list on application. 
L. E. Williams, Exeter, N. H. 

Cyprlpedium Insigne, fine plants In 6-lnch 
pans, established two years, in fine condition, 
$18.00 per doz.; $135.00 per 100. 

Altimo Culture Co., Canfleld, 0. 

DAHLIAS. 

Dahlias, assortment of 6 of the most useful 
kinds to date for cutting: 2 shades of white, 2 
of pink, 1 of red and 1 of yellow, equal number 
of each kind (18), $4.00 per 100, $35.00 per 1000. 
An up-to-date assortment of 20 kinds, including 
all types and colors for retail counter trade, 
same amount of each kind, $4.00 per 100, $36.00 
per 1000. All of the above offered stock are 
good, strong divisions, labeled true to name and 
description. Strictly cash. We guarantee entire 
satisfaction or money back. Descriptive whole- 
sale list on application. 

Mannetto Hill Nurseries, Hicksvllle, N. Y. 

Dahlias. The Brocton Dahlia Farm has a 
large stock of the leading commercial varieties 
to offer, strong divisions, from 1 to 3 eyes to the 
division, good, clean stock, true to name. Send 
for trade list. 
W. I'. T.otlirop. Prop., East Briilgewater. ilass. 

Write "The Dahlia King" for wholesale 
prices on dahlias before ordering elsewhere. 
Catalog now ready. 

J. K. ALEXANDER, 
EAST BRIBGEWATER, MASS. 

Dahlias, 180 popular sorts, prices from $6.00 
per 100 clumps and up. List waiting for you. 
Shady Liawn Nursery, Hammonton, N. J. 



PLEASE MENTION THE REVIEW WHEN WRITING ANY 



DAHLIA 0A3£BLIAFXX>RA. WHITE. The 
best cut flower dahlia, produces from 40 to 80 
blooms. Grow It in the greenhooae; started 
tubers, 60c ea., $6.00 per doz. Ready April 1. 
Grohman the Florist, Saginaw, Mich. 

Dahlias. Write for catalogue and trade list 
of leading varieties for cut flowers and gardens. 
Ixing Island Dahlia Gardens, Hicksvllle, L. 1., 

N. Y. 

Mina Burgle, guaranteed bulbs, $1..~>U per doz. 
Cash with order. Star Dahlia Gardens, 703 Cres- 
cent Ave., San Francisco, Cal. 

Wholesale list and catalog free. The North- 
boro Dahlia & Gladiolus Gardens, J. L. Moore, 
Prop., Northboro, Mass. 

Dabllaa, field-grown ehunpa, for apriDf or fall 
delivery, all the leading varieties, write for 
price Ust. Van Klr> floral Oo., Atco. N. J. 

DAISIES. 

DAISIES. Rooted cuttings of Giant White, 
$2.00 per 100, $17.50 per 1000. 

BOSTON YELLOW rooted cuttings, $4.50 per 
100; $40.00 per 1000. 

MRS. SANDER AND GIANT WHITE, 2i4-ln., 
$3.00 per 100, $25.00 per 1000. 

BOSTON YELLOW, 214-ln., $7.00 per 100, 
$60.00 per 1000. 

PARIS DAISIES, WHITE, 6-ln. pots, in bud 
and full of bloom, very nice plants, 75c, $1.00, 
$1.25 and $2.50. These are fine plants for imme- 
diate sales and for growing on for Easter. 

Anglin & Walsh Co., Williamsbridge, N . Y. 

DAISIES, 2V4-IN. ■ 

100 1000 

Boston Yellow $7.00 $60.00 

(Jiant White 4.00 35.00 

Marguerites c.OO 50.00 

Mrs. Sander 4.(K) 35. 00 

Boston Yellow, 4-in 15.00 

Boston Yellow, rooted cuttings 5]00 '.'.'.. 

Our NEW plant bulletin now ready. 

Yours for tlie asking. 

S. S. PENNOCK-MEEIIAN CO., 

1608-20 Ludlow St., Philadelphia. Pa . 

Boston Yellow daisies, best winter cut flower- 
ing variety, 2%-in. pots, $6.00 per 100. 

Boston Yellow rooted cuttings, $4.00 per 100: 
$86.00 per 1000. 

Single white daisies, best variety for pots, 
large flowering, 2%-in., $6.00 per 100. 

Mrs. Sander, rooted cuttings, also rooted oat- 
tlugs of Giant White, $2.00 per 100. 
Roman J. Irwin, 108 W. 28th St., .New York. 

DAISIES. 

Cuttings. 2%-ln. plants. 

Marguerites $1.00 per 100; $3.00 per 100 

Giant White 1.00 per 100; 3.00 per 100 

A. L. RANDALL CO., 
Wabash Ave, at Lake St., Chicago, 11 1. 

Daisies, Marguerites (single). In 2-ln. rose 
pots, good, strong plants, $3.50 per 100; Mrs. 
Sanders, in 2-ln. rose pots, good, strong plants, 
$4.00 per 100. Chas. Sherwood, Waterloo, la. 

Daisy, new Anemone flowered Mrs. Sander, 
60c doz., $4.00 per 100. Extra fine selected stock. 
Rockford Seed Farms, H. W. Buckbee, 
Forest City Greenhouses, Rockford , 111. 

Daisies, R. C, Giant White, Mrs. Sander, 
$1.00 per 100; Boston Yellow and BtoUe d'Or, 
R. C, $3.00 per 100. Cash. 
Byer Bros., Chambers burg, Pa. 

Shasta daisies, selected strain, strong divisions 
for 4-ln. pots or benching, $3.00 per 100; $25.00 
per 1000. Cash. 

Manetto Hill Nurseries, Hicksvllle, N. Y. 

DAIBIXS: Oilcago White rooted entttncs, 
$8.00 per 100; Boston Yellow, $3.00 per loo; 
Btolle d'Or (yellow), $3.00 per 100. (Tash, please. 

A. B. Hunt A Co., 80 B. Randolph St.. Chicago . 
Daisies, Mrs. Sander, R. C, selected stock 

and well rooted, $1.00 per 100 by mall; $9.00 per 
1000 by express. Cash. 

8. A. Plnkstone, Utlca, N. Y. 

Daisies, Mrs. Sander, selected stock, 2%-ln 
$2.50 per 100, $22.00 per 1000; ready to ship. 
Cash, please. W. Bezdek, Cedar Rapids, Iowa . 

Boston Yellow daisies, rooted cuttings, $2.75 
per 100; $25.00 per 1000. 
W. A. Ballou, Wheato n, 111. 

Daisies: Mrs. F. Sander (true stock). 2-ln.. 
$2.00 per 100. 

B. Rawlings, Wholesale Grower, Allegany, N. T. 

Boston Yellow daisies. 2'?, in., $7.00 per 100- 
Marguerite daisies, 2i.> in.. ?.").00 per 100 3'!, in ' 
.ST.OO per 100. It. R. Davis Co.. M orrison, U'l. " 

50,000 field-grown Shasta daisies. $1.00 no- 
100; $7..'->0 per 1000. Cash or c. o. d. 

Alvin Jessamine & Floral Co., Alvin, Tex. 

Daisies, Mrs. Sander and Ox-eve marguerite 
2-in., $2.r>0 p<T 100; stocky and thrifty. Cash' 

Burdick Bros., R. R. 7. Rockford, 111. 

ALBUM OF DESIGNST 
76c per copy prepaid. 

Florists' Pub. Co.. Caxton Bldg., Chicago. 

Mrs. Sander daisies, rooted cuttings, 75c; 2-in 
$1.75 per 100. Wm. Swinbank, Sycamore, l ij'. 

Strong Mrs. Sander, 2%-in., $2.50 per lOO" 
C. H. Ketcham, South Haven, Mi ch. 

Yellow daisies (Etolle d'Or), 2-ln., 6c 
^ J. A. Wlbe, SnUivan. HI. 

R. O. daisies, California White, $1.00 per 100. 
Prepaid. S. D. Brant, Clay Center, Kan. 

OF THESE ADVERTISERS 



136 



The Florists^ Review 



Fkbbuauy 1, 1917. 



'-'"^ ^-' DIOITALIS. 

Tiigltalis, assorted or In separate colors, extra 
fine plants, 3-in., 75c per doz., $5.00 per 100. 
Cash, please. 

La Crosse Floral Co., La Crosse, Wi s. 

DRACAENAS. 

DRACAENA INDITISA 

Of our usual good grade. 

Now la tbe time to get them. 

2-ln., 12.00 per 100; $18.00 per 1000. 

B. RAWUNGS, WHOLKSALB GROWER, 

ALLEGANY, NEW YORK. 

Dracaena Indlvlaa, 2^-ln., $3.60 per 100; 
8-ln., $7.60 per 100; strong 4-ln., $16.00 per 100; 
■trong tranaplapted seedlings, $2.60 per 100; 
Sl'O.OO per 1000. 
Roman J. Irwin, 108 W. 28th St., New Tort. 

DRACAENA INDIVISA, 2i4-ln., $3.00 per 100; 
$25.00 per 1000; 4-ln., $10.00 per 100. 

Anglin & Walsh Co., WiUiamsbrldge, N. Y. 

DraciU'iia indivisa, good, strong, transplanted 
plants, ready for 3-ln., $2.00 per 100; $18.00 per 
1000. Cash. F. S. Hale, Hamburg, N. Y. 

Dracaena indivisa, strong 3-in., ready for a 
sliift, $5.00 per 100. Koupmauu Bros., 202 South 
Ave., Daveni)ort, Iowa. 

Draraena, indivisa, strong 4-in., 10c. 
O. A. StoU, Hillsdale, Mich. 

Dracaena indivisa, strong, 5-ln., 25c. 

H. E. Rogers & Son, Spencerport, N. Y. 

Drac'aena Indivisa, strong 4-ln., $10.00 per 100; 
$80.00 per 1000. J. C. Schmidt, Bristol, Pa. 

BUSINESS BBINGBRS— 

BEVraW OLASSUIB D ADS. 

Dracaena Indlrlaa, 23^-ln., 8c ; 8-ln„ Be. 
8. WlecMng. Blnrfton. Ib<. 

ECHEVERIAS. 

Echeveria secunda. hen and chickens, large, 
$5.00 per 100; $40.00 per 1000; medium, $3.00 
per 100; $25.00 per 1000. Cash with order. 
(Jeo. Sjoerdsma, 2344 West 111th St., Chicago, 
IlL 

Echeverias, small size, $1.50 per 100; middle 
size, $3.00 per 100. Jacob Bussler, 11350 So. 
Fairfield Ave., Chicago, 111. 

ERICAS. 

ERICAS, young stock for growing on, strong 
plants, out of 2V^, 3 and 3%-in. pots: Fragrans 
Melanthera, $15.00 per 100; Regermlnans, $16.00 
per 100; Cupresslma, $20.00 per 100; Gracilis 
Autumnale, $15.00 per 100; Globularla, $15.00 
per 100; Persoluta rosea $15.00 per 100; Perso- 
luta alba, $16.00 per 100. Cash with order, 
please. Anton Schulthels, 316 19th St., College 
Point. N. Y. 

FERNS. 

FERNS AfY SPECIALTY. 

FERNS FOR FERN DISHES, splendid 2i4-ln. 
stock, in largest and best assortment, $3.50 per 
100, J.-^O.OO per 1000, 500 at 1000 rate. 

KENTIA BELMOREANA, clean, thrifty, 2V4- 
In. stock, right size for center plants, $1.30 per 
doz., $10.00 per 100. 

ADIANTUM FARLEYENSE (qneen of maiden- 
hair ferns), extra strong, 4-in., $0.50 per doz., 
$50.00 per 100. 

ADIANTUM FARLEYENSE GLORIOSA, 
strongest, prettiest and most productive of fancy 
adiantums, always in demand, require no more 
heat or care than a Boston fern. Well grown 
2%-in. stock, $1.30 per doz., $10.00 per 100. 
Large cut fronds, shipped safely any distance, 
$15.00 per 100. 

ADIANTUM CUNEATUM AND GRICILLI- 
MUM, extra strong 214-In. stock, $3.50 per 100, 
$30.00 per 1000. 

ADIANTUM SEEDLINGS, In assortment of 8 
best most desirable varieties for store purpose, 
strong undivided clumps, ready for potting, 
$1.25 per 100; $11.00 per 1000; 2Vi-ln., fn same 
assortment, $3.50 per 100; $30.00 per 1000. 

BOSTON AND TEDDY, JR., PERNS, com- 
pact, shapely plants grown with sufficient space 
and in most perfect condition, 6-in., $0.00 per 
doz., $45.00 per 100. Boston, 7-in., $12.00 per 
doz., $05.00 per 100. 

J. F. ANDERSON, 

FERN SPECIALIST, 

SHORT HILLS, NEAV JERSEY. 

FERNS. 

100 1000 

Scottll, 2%-1n I 5.00 $ 45.00 

Boston, 2 V4 -in 8.00 40.00 

Roosevelt, 2%-ln 6.00 40.00 

Teddv, Jr., 2M!-ln 5.00 46.00 

Whttmanl. 2Vi-ln 6.00 40.00 

Scottll, 4-ln 26.00 200.00 

Teddy. Jr., 4-ln 25.00 200.00 

Roosevelt, 4-ln 25.00 200.00 

Teddy, Jr., 6-ln., fine 60.00 

Teddy, Jr., 8-ln., fine Each 1.60 

Teddy, Jr., 10-ln., fine Each 2.60 

Scottll, Boston, Roosevelt, Whltmanl, prices 
same as Teddy, Jr., 

e-ln. of the above, $60.00 to $75.00 per 100. 

Assorted dish-ferns, 2^-ln., $4.00 per 100; 
$35.00 per 1000. 

Assorted dish-ferns, 8-ln., $6.00 per 100; 
$50.00 per 1000. 

Table ferns, 2%-ln., $4.00 per 100; $35.00 per 
1000. 

Table ferns, 3-ln., $6.00 per 100; $60.00 per 
1000. 

S. S. PENNOCK-MEKHAN CO., 
1608-20 Ludlow St., Philadelphia, Pa. 



FERNS. 

Booking orders for Immediate shipment, also 
for shipment right after Easter. 

100 1000 

Bostons $4.00 $35.00 

Roosevelt 6.00 40.00 

Whltmanl 5.00 40.00 

Whitmaul Compacts 6.00 40.00 

Scottll 6.00 40.00 

Scholzell 6.00 40.00 

Elegantisslma 6.00 60.00 

Elegantissima Compacta 6.00 60.00 

Teddy, Jr 6.00 46.00 

Verona (new fern), 2%-ln. pots 8.00 76.00 

TABLE FERNS, best varieties, 2%-in., $3.60 
per 100; $30.00 per 1000. 

Anglin & Walsh Co., WiUiamsbrldge, N. Y. 

Hardy ferns, wholesale price. 100 10 Bach 
Adiantum pedatum, Maidenhair. $6.00 $0.70 $0.10 
Aspldium crista tum, Evergreen. 6.00 .70 .10 

Aspldlum goldlana 7.00 .80 .10 

Aspldium splnulosum, Wood Fern 6.00 .70 .10 
Asplenlum fellx foemlna, hardy. 6.00 .70 .10 
Aspl. thely. Sliver Spleen worth. 7.00 .80 .10 
Dryopterls thelypteris. Shield.. 6.00 .60 .10 

Onoclea senslblUs 4.00 .60 .10 

Onoclea strutlopterls, Ostrich.. 7.00 .80 .10 

Osmunda clnnamomea 8.00 .80 .10 

Osmunda claytonlana 8.00 .90 .10 

Full 100 ferns, your seleclon, at 100 rate. 
LUDWIG MOSBiEK, ASKOV, MINN. 

Ferns for fern dishes, well established, In aii 
varieties, 2)4-ln., $3.60 per 100; $30.00 pw 
1000: 

Size 100 1000 

Boston 2^-lnch $4.00 $86.00 

Roosevelt 2%-lnch 6.00 40.00 

Whltmpnl Compacta 214-Inch 6.00 40.00 

Scottll 214-Inch 6.00 40.00 

Elegantissima Compacta. .2 V4 -Inch 6.00 60.00 

Elegantisslma 2i4-lnch 6.00 60.00 

Teddy, Jr 2%-lnch 8.00 46.00 

Smlthll 2^-lnch 12.00 

Roman J. Irwin, 108 W. 28th St.. New York. 

BOSTON AND ROOSEVELT FBBN^. 
4-ln., 12c; 6-ln., 40c; 
8-ln., 80c; 
0-ln., $1.00; 
These ferns are all pot-grown, and in A-1 con- 
dition, and guaranteed to be as good as any on 
the market. Cash with order. 

FELIX KRAMER, 

Blaine Street. 

NILES. OHIO. 

QUALITY FERNS. 

Boston, 6-ln $0.50 each 

Boston, 7-ln 75 ekch 

Boston, 8-ln 1.00 each 

Boston, 10-ln 1.50 each 

Scottii, 6-ln 50 each 

Scottll, 7-ln 75 each 

Scottll, 8-ln 1.00 each 

I Shelby Crall Co., Monongahela, Pa. 

Ferns, assorted varieties for fern dishes; good 
214-ln., $3.60 per 100; $30.00 per 1000. Boston, 
2M!-ln., $4.00 per 100; $36.00 per 1000. Whlt- 
manl and Roosevelt, $6.00 per 100; $40.00 per 
1000; also all other varieties. Prices en applica- 
tion. Larger sizes likewise. 

S. S. SKIDELSKT & CO., 
1004 Lincoln Bldg.. Philadelphia, Pa. 

FERNS. 

Roosevelt, 2>4-ln $3.60 per 100 

Boston, 214-in 3.50 per 100 

Whitmani, 214-In 3.50 per 100 

Scholzell, 2V*-in 3.50 per 100 

Teddy, Jr., 2%-ln 4.50 per 100 

THE REESER PLANT CO.. SPRIN GFIELD, O. 

'4-ln. Bostons $7.50 per 100 

4-ln. Sprinfleldil 7..'>0 per 100 

3-in. Boston, Springfieldii 5.50 per 100 

Large Stag Horns 25c each 

Plumosus cut sprays, 300 to crate $3.50 crate 

Wholesale grower. 
NEWELL & USTLER, APOPKA. FLA . 

Ferns, Boston, 2%-in., $40.00 per 1000; Roose- 
velt, 2^^-ln., $40.00 per 1000; Teddv. Jr., $42.00 
per 1000; AVhItmani, 2M!-in., $40.00 per 1000; 
Scottii, 2Vj-in., $40.00 per 1000. Ferns for fern 
dishes, 150 clumps to a flat, 52.50 per flat. 
American Bulb Co., 172 N. Wabash Ave., Chi- 
cago, 111. 

Boston, Whttmanl, Scholzell, AmerpohlU and 
Asparagus plumosus, 2V^-ln., $4.00 per 100; 
$35.00 per 1000; Boston and AmerpohlU runners, 
$10.00 per 1000. All above stock full and well 
established. Cash with order. H. 0. Doeacher, 
2000-48 Gentllly Ave.. New Orleans, La. 

FERNS, Elegantisslma Improved, 8-ln. pots. 
$1.00 each; very fine 6-ln. pots, Scottll and 
Teddy, Jr., 60c each; also excellent Scholzell 
and Tuberosa, 4-ln., $15.00 per 100. 

STRATFORD FLOWER FARM, 
STRAFFORD. PENNSYLVANIA. 

BOSTON FERNS. 
Strong runners, ready for Immediate delivery, 
$10.00 per 1000. Write for special price on 
quantities. Bushy, compact 8 and 4-ln. pot size 
plants, $4.00 and $6.00 per 100. 20% discount 
for cash. F. M. Soar. Littl e Ri ver. Fla. 

Ferns, good, extra strong, 8-ln., pot-grovm 
Boston and Roosevelt, fine for shifting, $7.00 per 
100; 2V4-ln., $3.00 per 100; bench-grown, large 
4-ln., $8.00 per 100. 

0. P. Bethards, Sprlngfleld. O. 

BUSINESS BEINGERS^ 

REVIBW CLASSIFIBD ADS. 



WELL H8TABLISHED POT-GROWN BOSTONS 

6 In 40c 

7 In eoc 

8 in 8O0 

B. B. DAVIS CO.. MORRISON, ILL. 

Ferns, Teddy, Jr., extra quality, 6-ln. pots, 
36c; 6-ln. pots, 60c; Bo*ston, fine stock, e-ln. 
pots, 86c; 6-ln. pots, 60c; 8-ln. pots, $1.00; 10- 
ln. pots, $2.60. 

The Storrs & Harrison Co., Palnesvl l le, 0. 

FERNS, YOUNG THRIFTY STOCK. 

Boston $4.00 per 100 

Roosevelt 4.00 per 100 

Rockford Seed Farms, H. W. Buckbee, 

Forest City Greenhouses, Rockford, 111. 

FERNS FOR DISHES, best assortment of va- 
rietles, 214-In. pots, $3.00 per 100; $26.00 per 
1000. 600 or more at 1000 rates. Caah with 
order. 
Frank OechsUn, 4911 Qulncy St.. Chicago. 111. 

Table ferns, best varieties, strong 214-ln., $8.00 
per 100. Boston ferns, 4-ln., S16.00 per 100; 
6-ln., $30.00 per 100; 6-ln., 40c each. 
Baur Floral Co., Brie. Pa. 

Ferns for fern dishes, now, $3.00 per 100, 
$25.00 i>er 1000. 600 at 1000 rate. Cash with 
order. E. Oechslln, Madison St. ft Gale Ave., 
River Forest, 111. 

Ferns, fine, well-grown plants, Boston, Whit- 
man!, AmerpohlU and Piersoni, 214-in., 4c; 3-in., 
8c.; 4-in., 12c. 

Truitt's Greenhouses, Chanute, Kan. 

Boston ferns, big bench-grown heavy plants, big 
enough for 8-in. pots. We need the room. 
Will sell for 25c each. Try a doz. 

Keeney's' Greenliouse, Monongahela, Pa. 

Boston ferns, fine, pot-grown plants, 4 to 8-In., 
20c to $1.00; 2%-in. pots, $4.00 per 100. 

Erie Floral Co., Erie, Pa. 

Wnnamaker runners for March delivery, $30.00 
per 1000. Cash with order. 

Berno Floral Co., Orlando, Fla. 

Perns, very strong, ready for shifting, Boston, 
$4.00 and $5.00 per 100. 
W. B. Woodrufl*, Westflcld, N. J. 

Wanamaker ferns, 2%-in. pots, strong, $7.00 
per 100. See Salvia America. 

C. H. Tritschler, Florist, Nashville, Tenn. 

Teddy, Jr., fern runners, $10.00 per 1000; 
Teddy Jr., 2i4-ln. pots, $4.00 per 100. 

J. M. Cochran, 446 W. 119th St., Chicago. 

Bench-grown Boston ferns, 6 and 6-ln., good, 
clean stock, 20c. Cash with order. 
B. B. Pohlmann, Hlllsboro, 111. 

Fern runners, $1.75 per 100; $16.00 per 1000: 
Whltmanl, Piersoni, Boston and sword. 
H. N. GAGE CO., INC., MONTEBELLO, OAL. 

Long leaf Boston ferns, out of 6-In. pots, 20o 
each. Cash, please. 

Edgar Easterday, Nokomis, III. 

Table ferns, Wilsonl, Cyrtomlum-Rochfordl- 
anum, Mayll, Wimsettl, $3.00 per 100. Cash. 
Bannister Bros., Syracuse, N. Y. 

4-in. Boston ferns, pot-grovm, nice stock, ready 
for immediate sales, $12.00 per 100. Gash, 
please. Wm. Krleger, Lansing, Mich. 

Table ferns, best varieties, fine stock, 2-ln., 
$3.00 per 100; 8-In., $6.00 per 100, $40.00 per 
1000. Henry Smith, Grand Rapids, Mich. 

Strong table ferns, out of 2 and 2H-ln. pota, 
$3.00 per 100; assorted. Cash, please. 
Kemble Floral Co., Waterloo, la. 

Table ferns, $3.00 per 100. Park Manor Green- 
houses, 7111 Indiana Ave., Chicago. 

ALBUM OP DESIGNS, 76c per copy, prepaid. 
Florists' Pub. Co.. Caxton Bldg.. Chicago. 
Boston ferns, 214-In., 5c; 3-ln., 7c. 
W. E. Trimble Greenhouse Co., Princeton, 111. 

FEVERFE>A/. 

FEVERFEW PLANTS. 

froTn 4Tin. pots 

.?2.50 per 100 or .3c each. 

CHAS. H. RICE, 

BEDFORD ST., LEXINGTON, Ma ss. 

Feverfew Little Gem. 2-In., $2.00 per 100. 
Cash. .North Madison Floral Co., North Mad- 
ison, Ind. 

Feverfew Gem, R. C, $1.00 per 100, $9.00 per 
1000; 2-in., $2.00 per 100. Cash. 
Byer Bros.. Chambersburg, Pa. 

150 strong 214-in. feverfew, $3.00 per 100. 
F. L. Tornquist, Benton Harbor, Mich. 

Feverfew, double white, rooted cuttings, $1.00 
per 100, prepaid. G. B. Fink, Kenllworth, N. J. 

Strong 214-In. feverfew, fine plants, 3c. Cash. 
R. P. Atwell, Ft. Dodge, Iowa. 

Feverfew, dbl. white, $1.00 per 100. 
Manthey's. Greenlee Ave., St. Bernard, O. 

FOROET ME NOTS. 

FORGET-ME-NOT, BVERBLOOMING. 
Strong young plants for winter blooming, 60c 
per doz., $4.00 tier 100. 

Rockford Seed Farms, H. W. Buckbee. 

Forest City Greenhouses, Rockford, III. 

Forget-me-nots (alpestrla, Boyal Blue), strong 
plants, for winter blooming; 8-in. pota. 76o per 
doz.; $6.00 per 100. 

La Croaae Floral Co.. La Croaae. Wla. 



PLEASE MENTION THE REVEW WHEN WRITING ANY OF THESE ADVERTISERS 



Fbbkuaey 1, 1917. 



The Florists^ Review 



137 



iToreet-me-not, SylTMtw't Perpetual, alwaya In 
flow"? 8-ta. $4-00 per 100. Cash, pleate. 
Hower, oiu., r' ^ Sylvester, Oconto. WU. 

~ Fnreet-me-nota. Myoeotia Nixenange. fine bine, 
wlSflowerlng *TiSlety. B. O.. $1.00 per 100. 
ya n o ncr 1000. Banr Floral Co.. Brie. Pa. 

FUCHSIAS. 



Phenomenal. 

Minnesota. 

Elm City, ^ ^ ,. 

Duchess of Albany. 



Bmest Benau. 
White Beauty, 



Black Prince. 

100 1000 

o.n *300 $2A.OO 

S4°in 400 86.00 

8ln 6.00 40.00 

Our new Plant Bulletin, now ready for mall- 

Ine. Do you want a copy? ,_,,^, „„ 

S. S. PBNNOCK-MEBHAN CO., 
160 8-20 Ludlow St. P hiladelphia, Pa. 

Fuchsias, ready by February 15, the following 
varieties ready to shift to 3 and 4-in. pots. Send 
in vour orders for 2-in. Little Beauty, $4.00 per 
100- R C, $2.00 per 100; Purple Prince, 2-in., 
.s;i cfo per 100; K. C, $1.75 per 100; Blncli Prince, 
•■-in $3.00 per 100, $25.00 per 1000; 500 for 
.1;14 00. I will have 10 varieties of Ivy gera- 
niums ready by March 1. See my ad on mesem- 
l)rvanthemums. „„ „ ,, „ 

].oui 8 r. Faulk. B. F. D. 3, Box C3, Bcllevuc, Pa. 

FUCHSIAS. 
Extra fine, strong young stock, In six varieties, 
$4.00 per 100. „ ,„ „ . ^ 
Rockford Seed Farms, H. W. Buckbee, 
Forest C ity Greenhouses, Rockford, 111. 

Fuchsias, 4 of the best varieties, including 
Black Prince, double white, double red and 
double purple, strong 2%-ln., A-1 stock, $2.50 
i)er 100; 300 for $6.00; ready to shift. 

Chas. Whitton, York & Gray, Utlca, N. Y. 

Fuchsias, Little Beauty, rooted cuttings, $1.75 
per 100, $15.00 per 1000. Good list of other be»t 
varieties. $1.60 per 100, $11.00 per 1000. 

Anglin & Walsh Co., WUliamsbrldge, N. Y. 

Fuchsias, fine 2%-ln., Little Beauty, $6.00 
per 100; Glory des Marches, Walter Long, Black 
Prince. Elm City and Lustre, $3.00 per 100. 
Banr Floral Co., Brie, Pa. 

Finest double tuctaslas, dwarf habit, strong, 
well rooted cuttings, $1.00 per 100, $9.00 per 
1000. Cash. J. P. Cannata, Mt. Freedom. N. J. 

Advertisers bare lea rned fro m experience tliat 
THB BBVIHW 
P AYS B1D8T. 

Fuchsia B. C, 6 kinds. $1.00 per 100. Beady 
Feb. 10. Cash. Byer Bros., Chambersburg. Pa . 

FUNKIAS. 

Fnnklas, strong clmnpa, 10 to 16 eyes. flS.OO 
per 100. Bmeat Sober. Wllmette. 111. 

OENISTAS. 

GENISTAS. 
2»4-in., $5.00 per 100; $40.00 per 1000. 
4% -in., $40.00 per 100. 
5-in., $00.00 per 100. 
6-in.. $75.00 per 100. 

S. S. PENNOCK-MEEHAN CO., 
1608 20 LUDLOW ST.. PHILADELPHIA, P A. 

Genista Canariensis, fine young plants, $4.00 
per 100. 

Rockford Seed Farms. H. W. Buckbee, 
Forest City Oreenhouses. Rockford. 111. 



QERANIUM8. 



AVe strongly advise ordering early, as the 
iisiinl shortage of standard varieties will be 
greater this year than ever before. 
2-in. 
Rose pots 
"" 1000 



Houble 100 

Maryland $3 00 

Alphonsp Rioard . .. . .S 00 

Beaute Poiteyine ,S 00 

Berthp de Prcsilly ,•{ 00 

Jean Viaiul 3 00 

La Favorite 300 

Castollano 3 00 

Miss F. Perkins..!!.'." .■?!oO 

Miiio. ]',u<hner 3 OO 

C; ^^- ^'"tt 3.00 

Merry Widow 3 oO 

Abhie SchaofTor . . 3 00 

Doulilo Drvdcn ... 300 

Kjliiiona Ulanc ! 3'00 

Flcuve Blanc 300 

Mrs. E. G. Iim ^'Too- 

fS".'"" Ill 

Nuit Poitevine!!!!!! 300 
bnnwdrop 3;q0 

tor prices on " 
to 2-in. jiriccs;. 



$25.00 
25.00 
25.00 
25.00 
25.00 
25.00 
25.00 
25.00 
25.00 
25.00 
25.00 
25.00 
25.00 
25.00 
25.00 

."^O.OO 
25.00 
25.00 
25.00 
25.00 
plants, ad 



3-ln. 
Standard 
100 1000 
$4.00 $;{5.00 
4.00 .^5.00 



4.00 
4.00 
4.00 
4.00 
4.00 
4.00 
4.00 
4.00 
4.00 
4.00 
4.00 
4.00 
4.00 

5.00 
4.00 
4.00 
4.00 
4.00 



35.00 
.•?5.00 
35.00 
35.00 
36.00 
35.00 
35.00 
35.00 
35.00 
.S5.00 
35.00 
35.00 
35.00 

40.00 
35.00 
35.00 
.S5.00 
35.00 



$1.00 per 100 



1008-20 LUDLOW S.. PHILADELPHIA, PA. 



Geraniums out of 2-inch pots 

S- A. Nutt *V^ 

Kuchner H^^ 

S?'tevine ..!;!!! f^ 

RIcard .... ii^ 

MIchell. new light" red! !!!!!!!!!!! 2!60 



W0beVre".T''"" Hi 

2«rney $•$» 

B- G. Hill...!!!!!!:!:::; 225 

This stock is A-i.' * Ready Jan. 
Tnkn r> r**'' ^'*'' order, please. 
John Guglno. 89 Rlsley St., Fredonla, N. T, 



1000 
$18.00 
18.00 
22.00 
22.00 
22.00 
22.00 
22.00 
22.00 



GERANIUMS. 
2%-ln., excellent stock for immediate delivery, 
rose scented geraniums, Poitevine, Ricard, S. A. 
Nutt, Grant and other Tarieties. $3.00 per 100; 
$26.00 per 1000. 

ROMAN J. IRWIN. 
108 W. 28TH ST., NEW YORK. 



Oeraninms. extra strong 3^-ln. stock, for 
immediate and later delivery. Onr stock plants 
are all carefolly selected and planted in solid 
l>eds in onr houses where they remain from year 
to year, which insures extra strong, healthy 
plants, free from disease. We do not propagate 
from spring left-OTers: A. RIcard, B. Poiterine 
and Berthe D. Presilly (best clear pink), $3.00 
per 100, $28.00 per 1000; S. A. Nntt and Mme. 
Bnchner (best white), $8.00 per 100; $22.B0 per 
1000. Cash with order, please. 
N. B. Beck Floral Co., MassiHon. 0. 

ROOTED GERANIUM CUTTINGS. 
STRONG, SELECTED STOCK ONLY. 

100 1000 

S. A. Nutt (greatest dark red) $1.50 $14.00 

Gen. Grant (best scarlet bedder)... 1.50 14.00 
Mme. Buchner (best dble. white) . . 1.50 14.00 

Beaute Poitevine 1.75 17.60 

Merry Widow (new salmon) 3.00 

THE W. T. BUCKLEY CO., 
Springfield. Illinois. 

GBRANITTMS. 
S. A. Nntt, strong plants, from 2-in. iiots, 
$1.76 per 100, |17.00 per 1000; Poiteyine. 2-in.. 
$2.00 per 100; Jean Vlaud, 2-in., $2.00 per 100; 
Ricard, 2-in., $2.00 per 100. Also 10 other 
sorts, 2-in., $2.00 per 100. Stock plants, from 
4-ln. pots, S. A. Nutt, $6.00 per 100. 

B. RAWLINGS, WHOLBSALB OBOWBB. 
ALLEGANY , NEW YORK. 

GERANIUMS. 
Strong stock, out of 2%-ln. pots, for Imme- 
diate shipment: S. A. Nutt and Buchner, $20.00 
per 1000, $2.25 per 100; RIcard. Poitevine and 
Jean Viaud, $22.50 per 1000, $2.50 per 100. 
Cash with order. 

QUAKER HILL NURSERY CO., 
MONROE. NEW YORK. 

GERANIUMS. 

ROOTED CUTTINGS ARE ALL BOOKED 

FOR THIS MONTH. 

NEXT LOT WILL BE READY 

FEB. 5TH. 

PETER BROWN, 

124 Ruby St., Lancaster, Pa. 

GERANIUMS. 

100 1000 

S. A. Nutt, red $3.00 $26.00 

Francis Perkins, pink 3.00 25.00 

La Favorite, white 8.00 25.00 

Immediate delivery. Cash with order. 
Paul M. Halbrooks. Florist. Newark, O. 

Geranlnms, from 2%-ln. pots, A-1, pinched 
back and branched, $26.00 per 1000, of the fol- 
lowing varieties: Bnchner, La Favorite. S. A. 
Nutt and Poiteyine, Dnc de Montmort, Tifflin, 
Achievement; also 6000 mixed of 16 Tarieties, 
$20.00 per 1000. Cash. 
Dana R. Herron, Glean. N. Y. 

Strong rooted cuttings. Double Grant, the 
hardiest of all geraniums, for February deliv- 
ery, $7.50 per 1000, if ordered now, with cash; 
unrooted cuttings, $4.60 per 1000, for this month. 
Prices win advance in February. Shipments 
guaranteed. California Geranium Co., Box 662, 
Santa Monica, Cal. 

Geraniums, 3-in. stock. 

Poitevine $00.00 per 1000 

S. A. Nutt 50.00 per 1000 

J. A. Ricard .50.00 per 1000 

American Beauty 50.00 per 1CK)0 

Jean Viaud .50.00 per 1000 

Pyfer & Olsem, Wilmetto, 111. 

Geranium rooted cuttings all sold for the pres- 
ent; next lot of Rirard, Poitevine, Povle. Per- 
kins and Viaud, will bo ready Feb. 26: $15.00 
per 1000; also Nutt and Buchner, $12.50 per 1000. 
Cash with order. 

FRED W. BITCHY. 
LANCASTER. PEN,\SYLVANI.\. 

Geraniums, 2-in., ready and coniing on. S. A. 
Nutt. Buchner. .$30.00 per 1000; Poitevine, Ricard. 
Viaud, Thos. Meehan. Barney and several other 
kinds, $22. .50 per 1000: 10 varieties, our choice, 
$20.00 per 1000. Descriptive price list on appli- 
cation. Cash with order. 

Cherry Park Gardens, Fredonia, N. Y. 

Geraniums, extra strong 2-in.. of the following 
sorts: Nutt. $20.00 per 1000: Poitevine, Castel- 
lane. Ricard and Viaud. $22.00 per 1000. Ready 
for Feb. 25 delivery. This is stock that is well 
rooted and only such is sent oiit. Cash or c. O. d., 
please. J. A. Swartley & Sons, Sterling. 111. 

Geraniums, strong, healthy plants, from Sept. 
cuttings, read.v for a shift: A. Blcard. B. Poi- 
tevine. Jean Viaud, 2J4-ln. pots. $2.60 per 100; 
$24.00 per 1000; S. A. Nutt. Cash with order. 
Please. J. Ambacher, West End, N. J. 

Geranium rooted cuttings: S. A. Nntt. Viand, 
Perkins and Harrison, $1.26 per 100; $12.00 per 
1000. Same from 2^-in. pots. $17.60 per 1000; 
8-ln.. 126.00. 

Peterson Floral Co.. Olbson City. DL 



Geraniums. R. C, postpaid: Dble. Grant, 
Ricard, $1.25 per 100; Maryland and MIchell, 
$1.75 per 100; assorted, 5 each of 20 newer va- 
rieties, $2.00 per 100. 

0. W. Smyth, R. D. 20, Sawtelle, Cal. 

Geraniums, S. A. Nutt and Grant, $7.00 per 
1000 unrooted; rooted. $12.00 per 1000; mixed 
Nutt, Grant. Trego, Viaud and Poitevine, same 
as above. Cash with order. 

Ross Bros.. Dubois, Pa. 

Geranium B. C, strong: S. A. Nutt. Gran- 
ville, double red; Pres. Newman, red: Buchner, 
white; Perkins, pink and mixed. $1.25 per 100; 
$12.00 per 1000. Cash. 
G. E. Berthold. Nebraska City, Neb. 

Geraniums, 4000 S. A. Nutt, good, strong, 
healthy stock, 2V2 in.. $22.50 per 1000. Cash. 
Zorn & Gaertner, 990 Brockway St., Saginaw. 
W. S., Mich. 

Geraniums, 2Vi in.: Perkins, S. A. Nutt, $25.00 
per 1000; $3.00 per 100; Mme. Salleroi. $1.00 per 
100; $9.00 per 1000. Cash. 
Chas. Cassler, 1400 So. 4th Ave., Maywood. 111. 

Geraniums: S. A. Nutt, La Favorite, Beaute 
Poitevine, 214 in.. $2.00 per 100. Booking orders 
for Feb. 15. Cash, please. 
J. J. Clayton & Son, West Grove, Pa. 

Extra fine 2-in. S. A. Nutt, B. G. Hill, Poite- 
vine and Ricard, $2.00 per 100; 3-in., same va- 
rieties, $4.00 per 100. Cash. 

L. G. Barbier, Dunkirk, Ind. 

S. A. Nutt, 1%-in., selected, slightly mixed, 
$1.75 per 100. Dish ferns, adiantum cuneatum 
and Pteris, mixed, $2.00 per 100. 

J. G. Burrows, Onset, Mass. 

2-in. mixed geraniums, $2.50 per 100; 2%-In. 
rose geraniums, elegant, $3.00 per 100; rose gera- 
niums, li. C. $1.25 per 100. 

D. U. Augspurger & Sons Co., Peoria, 111. 

1000 extra strong 2i/a-in. Nutt geraniums. $2.50 
per 100. 

B. L. TUTTLE. 
PAW PAW, MICHIGAN . 

Geranium rooted cuttings. Nutt, $1.35 per 100, 
$12.00 per 1000; Jean Viaud and Mrs. Lawrence, 
$1.65 per 100. 

Shafer's Greenhouses, Coraopolis, Pa. 

Geraniums, rooted cuttings only: Nutt and 
Buchner, $13.60 per 1000; Ricard and Poiteyine. 
$16.00 per 1000; with a guarantee that guaran- 
tees. Albert M. Herr. Lancaster. Pa. 

Geraniums, walnut-scented, rose and skeleton, 
fine stock, 2-ln., $2.50 per 100, $20.00 per 1000; 
2>^-ln.. $3.00 per 100. $25.00 per 1000. 

Ernest E. Slgle, Calla. O. 

Geraniums: Ricard, Poitevine, Nutt. La Fa- 
vorite, Hin and Rose, 2 14 -in., $2.26 per 100 or 
$20.00 per 1000; fine stock; pot-bound. 
S. M. Harbison, Danville, Ky. 

Geraniums, S. A. Nutt, Jean Vlaud and Per- 
kins, 2^-ln., ready for 4-ln., $22.50 per 1000; 
$2.50 per 100. Cash. 
P. N. Obertln. 1948 Asylum Ave., Racine, Wis. 

Geraniums, extra strong 2i/^-In., ready for 
3-In., $22.50 per 1000, $2.50 per 100. Grant and a 
light shade of pink. 
R. P. Bohlander, It. F. D. 1, Melrose Pa rk. 111. 

Geraniums, from 2V4-in. pots, Francis Perkins, 
Beaute Poitevine. S. A. Nutt, $2.00 per 100. 
Cash, please. 
T. W. Baylls & Son, West Grove, Pa. 

geraniums! 

S. A. Nutt and Salleroi, 2-in.. $2.00 per 100; 
8. A. Nutt and Jean Oberle, 2M!-in., $2.50 per 
100. E. O. Bverhard, Wadsworth. O. 

Geraniiims, 2-in.: S, A. Nutt, Poitevine, Buch- 
ner, Jean Viaud and rose geraniums, $2.50 100; 
$20.00 1000. Cash, please. 

E. B. Randolph, Delavan, 111. 

Geraniums, best commercial sorts, 2Vj-ln., 
pinched, ready for 4-in., $3.00 per 100. Cash. 
McRae-Jenkinson Co., New Kensington, Pa. 

.500 strong 2i4-In. Beaute Poitevine geraniums, 
$2.50 per 100. 
F. L. Tomqulst. Be nton Harbor, Mich. 

Geraniums, Mme. Salleroi, 2'^.-ln., $2.50 per 
100; $20.00 per 1000. Cash witirorder. 
York & Panasuk. Houghton, Mich. 

Geraniums, R. C. White Snow Queen and La 
Favorite, $1.50 per 100; $12.00 per 1000. 
W. E. Trimble Green house Co., Princeton, 111. 

Geranium Mme. Salleroi. strong R. C. 75c per 
100. Cash, please. 
Stuhldreher Bros., Man sfield, O. 

Geranitims, Mme. Salleroi, strong, well estab- 
lished 2-ln.. $2.00 per 100; $18.00 per 1000. 
Hopkins & Hopkins. Chepacbet, R. I. 

Rose geraniums, extra strong rooted cuttings. 
$1.00 per 100, postpaid. 
Rosalind Gardens. Orlando , Fla. 

Geraniums, strong 2%-ln. Nutt, ready for 
shift, $2.00 per 100. 
Wm. A. Murdoch, Tltusvllle, Pa. 

Geraniums, 2-ln.. Mme. Salleroi, extra fine 
stock, $2.50 per 100. 
EUtch Gardens Co ., Denyer, Colo. 

2%-ln. geraniums. $2.00 per 100: Marvel, 
Ricard. Harcourt and Jean Vlaud. 
North Madison Floral Co., North Madison, Ind. 



PLEASE MENTION THE REVIEW WHEN WRITING ANY OF THESE ADVERTISERS 



138 



The Florists* Review 



February 1, 1917. 



agWAWIUMS-Conttnaed. 

S. A. Nutt geranlumB, extra strong, 2-ln., 
$18.00 per 1000; |2.00 per 100. Cash with order. 
F. Sokol, College St., Worcester, Maag. 

Geraniums, Mme. Sallerol, rooted cuttings, 
$1.00 per 100, postpaid; $8.00 per 1000 by ex- 
press. The Swaby Greenhouses, St. Charles, 111. 

Geraniums, KICAKD, JEAN VIAUD AND 
PERKINS, $2.50 100; $22.50 1000. Cash. 
Jacobs Bros., Box 413, Peoria, 111. 

Strong 2V.-in. Mme. Sallerol, $2.00 per 100; 
$17.50 per 1000. Cash, please. Miller's Green- 
liouses, 007 X. Madison St., Muncie, Ind. 

Geraniums, ^'i in., Mme. Sallerol, $2.00 per 
100. K. It . Davis Co., Morrison, 111. 

Mme. Sallerol, 2i/i-in. iwts, $2.25 per 100. 

Ch as. Slierwood, Waterloo, Iowa. 

Mme. Sallerol, 2-in., 2c. Cash. 

Maple City Floral Co., Monmouth, 111. 



Geranium R. C; Mme. Sallerol, $1.00 per 100. 
Dlnstell Bros., 1851 Melyina Ave., Chicago, 111 . 

Geraniums, Madam Sallerol, 2Vi-in., $2.50 per 
100. O. J. Frew, Jr., Conneaut, OhIo._ 

Geraniums, Mme. Sallerol, strong R. C, 90c 
100; $8.00 1000. W. E. Fink, Elmhurst, 111. 

R. O., Mme. Sallerol geraniums, $1.26 per 
100. Prepaid. S. D. Brant, Clay Center, Kan . 

Geraniums, Mme. Sallerol, fine 2-In., $2.60 100. 
Cash. M. S. Etter, Shlremanatown, Pa. 

Rose geranloma. strong 2^-ln., $2.00 per 100. 
Cash. Byer Bros.. Chambemburt. Pa. 



QLADIOLI. 



FOB 



BEST VARIETIES OF GLADIOLI 
FORCING. Fine Long Island grown. 

Per 1000 

America (pink) $16.00 

Halley (salmon pink) 10.00 

Peace (white) 40.00 

Baron Hulot (deep blue) 20.00 

Groff's Hybrids, mixed finest quality 12.00 

Augusta (white) J5'22 

Brenchleyensis "•"? 

Mrs. F. King (scarlet) 16.00 

Primulinus hybrids (light scarlet) 20.00 

These hybrids are a grand collection •f colors 
for artistic decorations, the finest shades of 
orange, sulphur-yeUow, to the deepest yellow. 
These are worth a trial. We also have a good 
list of all other best Tarletles, famished on ai>- 
pllcatlon. . _ 

Anglln & Walsh Co., Wllllamsbrldge, N. Y. 

GLADIOLUS FOR APRIL, 1917, DELIVERY. 
SIZES OF BULBS, 1V4 TO 1%-INCH. 

America $ 6-50 per 1000 

Augusta 6.50 per 1000 

Baron Hulot 6.50 per 1000 

Brenchleyensis 6.50 per 1000 

Francis King 8.00 per 1000 

Glory of Holland 8.50 per 1000 

Halley 5.50 per 1000 

Lily Lehmann 10.00 per 1000 

Panama 10.00 per 1000 

Pink Beauty 6.50 per 1000 

Princeps 700 per 1000 

Willy Wigman 10.00 per 1000 

Prices on other sizes and varieties furnished 
on application. 

LECHNER BROS., 
CAXTON BLDG., ST. LOUIS. MO. 

HOME GROWN BULBS. 

1st size 2nd size 
1000 1000 

America, pink $ 15.00 $10.00 

Augusta, white 14.00 10.00 

Klondyke, yellow 15.00 9.00 

Brenchlevensis, scarlet 15.00 10.00 

Mrs. F. King, scarlet 15.00 10.00 

Baron Hulot, blue 15.00 

Halley, salmon pink 18.00 

Niagara, yellow 60.00 

Prlmulus, yellow 18.00 12.00 

Our new plant bulletin now ready. 

Yours for the asking. 

S. S. PENNOCK-MBEHAN CO., 

1C08-20 Ludlow St., Philadelphia, Pa. 

GLADIOLUS FOB FORCING. 

American-grown only. Ist Size 2d Sire 

Per 1000 Per 1000 

America, pink $12.50 $9.00 

Augusta, white 12.50 9.00 

Mrs. Francis King 12.50 9.00 

Pink Beauty 12.50 9.00 

Halley l-'.-'O 9.00 

Lily Ivehman 12.^0 9.00 

Niagara 40.0(» 

Panama :^<».««> 20.00 

Brenclileyonsis 10.00 9.00 

See Lily adv., this issue. 

G. M. RKBURN & CO., 
160 N. Wabash Ave. Chicago, HI. 

GLADIOLI, 1% TO 2-INCII. 

100 1000 

Brenchleyensis, scarlet $1.35 $11.00 

Francis King, scarlet 1.65 14.00 

Klondyke, yellow 1.80 16.00 

Niagara, yellow 6.00 60.00 

Panama, pink 3.00 26.00 

Peace, white 6.00 40.00 

Pendleton, 2nd size 5.00 46.00 

Pendleton, 3rd size 4.00 .15.00 

Princepine 2.00 18.00 

Primulinus species, yellow 3.25 27.00 

Solid Gold 2.76 20.00 

A. Henderson & Co., Box 125, Chicago. 



GLADIOLUS BULBS. 

1000 

America, 1% to 2-ln $14.00 

F. King, 1% to 2-ln 14.00 

Chicago Whfte, 1% to 2-In 18.00 

Panama, IV^ to 2-In 40.00 

America, I14 In. up 10.00 . 

Augusta 11^ to 2-In 14.00 

Niagara, 1^ to 2-ln 60.00 

Halley, 1% to 2-ln 16.00 

Write for prices on smaller sizes. 

AMERICAN BULB CO., 

172 North Wabash Ave., Chicago, 111. 

MDKUBI. attracted the moat attenUon at tka 
Boaton allow: larcett atockholdara la Holland; 
per doa.. (U.OO; per 100. $80.00. Oaah with 
order. 

WAB, BliUS JAY, tme. HILDA, bea t red, 
PINK PBRFBOTION, PANAMA, SOHWABDN, 
LOYBLIMBSSfYXSLLOW HAMMBB, NIAGARA. 
BliEOTRA. BBD KMPBROB and all the rare and 
■tandard rarletlea. In let. 2Dd and plantlns ataa: 
offered tnr P. Hopman A Bona. oladloU Spe- 
dallsta. HoUegom. Holland. Price list on ap- 
plication. 

Gladiolus bulbs and bulWets. 

y2-%-in. Bulblets 

100 1000 1000 5000 

Schwaben $1.50, $10.00 $2.00 $9.00 

Pink rerfet-tion 12.00 2.00 7.50 

War 2.00 15.00 2.50 9.00 

Europa l.m 12.00 1.80 7.50 

Peace 1.30 10.00 1.20 5.00 

Panama 60 5.00 .60 2.50 

Fine stoclf, 50 at 100 rate; 500 at 1000 rate. 
W. E. Ki rehoit Co., Pembroke, N. Y. 

GLADIOLUS, BEST LONG ISLAND GROWN, 
FIRST SIZED BULBS FOR FOROINO. 

America and Augusta, also Mrs. Franda King. 
$2.00 per 100; $16.00 per 1000. 

Halley and Primulinus hybrids, $2.50 per 100; 
$20.00 per 1000. 

Florists' White and Light mixture. $2.00 per 
100, $16.00 per 1000. 

All other varieties, prices on application. 
Boman J. Irwin, 108 W. 28th, New York. N. T . 

1(X),000 Koerner's giant hybrids, mixed, in first 
and socond size. This strain has stood the test 
of beliifj the best mixture on the maricet today. 
ViRorous Krowers, large flowers, beautiful shades 
and many open at one time. I have been holding 
them at $10.00 and $8.00, but to reduce my stock 
I will close them out nt $8.00 for first and $6.00 
for second size, per 1000, and a special 5% dis- 
count for cash with order. 

H. W. Koerner, Sta. B, Milwaukee, Wis. 

BLOOMING BULBS FOR SALE. 

Excelsior Mixture, l-lH-in $1.00 per 100 

Empress of India, l-lV,-in 1.2.') per 100 

Mrs. F. Pendleton, l-114-in 5.00 per 100 

Schwaben, l-li/i-in 4.00 per 1(H) 

I'rlncppine, 1-1 14 -in 1.50 per 100 

Brooitland Gardens. Lexington St., Woburn, Mass. 

Gladiolus Hilda, undoubtedly the best velvet- 
red grown. Won sweepstakes for us against 
sixty-four varieties in various exhibits last year. 
Price $5.00 per 100; $3.00 for 50; $1.00 for 1 
doz. 

GARDENS OF AVON, 
523 Securities Bldg., Dcs Moines. Iowa. 

GRETCHEN ZANG. 
A grand new gladiolus. Soft melting shade 
of pink, blending into deep salmon; nearest ap- 

5 roach to oolor of Beaute Poitevlne geranium; 
6 choice bulbs, $3.76. List of standard va- 
rieties and novelties now ready. 
AUSTIN-COLE>LAN CO., WAYLAND, O. 

Send us $2.00 and we will send you prepaid 
1000 gladiolus bulbs, Halley or America, under 
14-ln., or send us $16.50 and we will send yon 
10,000 by prepaid express. 

GARDENS OF AVON, 
623 Securities Bldg., Des Moines, la. 

Gladioli, Pence, iilaiiting stock. 10(M) or 50.000 
lots, pure stock. Write for quot.ntions on large 
quantities. Bulblets, $2.25 per qt.; $13.50 per peck, 
ri.nnting stock of Mrs. Watt, (Jhlcago White, 
Princepine, Uougc Torch, Sulphur Queen, Hulot 
iiud Ida Van. Homer F. Chase, Wilton. N. H. 

A limited quantity of the following gladiolus, 
various sizes at prices defying competition. Write 
for prices: Panama, Sulphur King, Golden 
King and Mrs. F. Pendleton. 
J. G. Burrows, Onset, Mass. 

Gladioli, America, Mrs. F. King. Augusta. 
Pink Beauty. Hnlley, Klondyke. Write for our 
special prices on first sisie bulbs for February 
delivery. S. W. Pike. St. Cha rl es, 111. 

Choice Northern Michigan-grown bulbs; Amer- 
ica, No. 1, $12.00: No. 2. $0.00: Florists' mix- 
ture, No. 1, .$10.00; No. 2, $8.00; Giant Pink, 
No. 1, $15.00. 
Frank Winans, Florist, Pctoskey , Mich. 

Gladioli, America, Augusta, Mrs. Francis 
King and other leading varieties, home-grown 
stock, healthy, true to name. Write for prices. 
N. Leon Wintzer, West Grove, Pa. 

Headquarters for Gladiolus Augusta, the flo- 
rists' white, all sizes; many others. Long- Island 
grown. Send for list. 

(3eo. J. Joerg, New Hyde Park, L. I., N. Y. 

MRS. FRANK PENDLETON, 2nd size, best 
for mall orders, $60.00 per 1000; 3rd size, $40.00 
per 1000. Worcester Bulb Co., 146 West St., 
Worcester, Mass. 

Halley, Empress of India, under %-in., $2.50 
1000. C. H. Ketcham, South Haven, Mich. 



Gladioli, imported and honu-grown, atandard 
and new varieties. Prices right. 
L. F. Dintelmann^ Belleville. 111. 

Gladiolus, all leading varieties. Get our prices. 
Currier Bulb Co., Seabrlght. OaL 

America, Augusta, Klondyke. Write for prices. 
O. L. Cook, Maplehome Farm, Bndolph. O. 

HARDY FgRNS. __^ 

ni. Descrlpt. Oat. mailed free. For wholeaale 
pricea see my fern adv. L. Mosbtek. Askov. Minn. 

Hardy fema, 80 varietlea. 

L. B. Wllllama. Bxeter. V. H. 

HARPY PLANTS. 

HARDY PERENNIALS. 

10 100 

Aster Amellus, Perry's Favorite $ .75 $6.00 

Aster liybr. assorted 50 4.00 

Anchusa Itallca, Dropmore var 75 6.00 

Aquilegia Coenilea assorted 60 5.00 

Campanula perc. blue, white 60 5.00 

(Campanula perc. Moerheimii, double. 1.00 8.00 

Centaurea Alba and Coeruieu 60 5.00 

Delphinium hybr. from novelties 75 6.00 

Digitalis, Foxglove 60 5.00 

Doronicum Clusli 60 5.00 

Echinops Uitro 60 5.00 

Eulalia, Japonica, Zebrina 80 7.00 

Gynerium, Pampas Grass 1.00 8.00 

Helenium Riverton Beauty 60 5.00 

Helianthus Sparsifolius 60 5.00 

Heucliera Sanguinea 60 5.0(1 

Luplnus polyph. Moerlieimii, pink..,. 1.00 8.(K) 

Lychnis Chalcedonica 60 5.00 

I'apaver Orientali 60 5.00 

Phlox Decussate, in variety 60 5.(Kt 

Phlox Subulata, white, lavender 60 5.00 

Piatycodon Grandlflorum 60 5.0(» 

Primula Denticulata 75 6.00 

Primula Auricula 75 6.00 

Pyrethrum, Ullglnosum Stellata 1.20 10.00 

Rudbekia, Golden Glow 60 5.00 

Saxifraga Cordifolla 1.20 10.00 

Saxifraga Pyramidalis 75 6.00 

Sedum Spectabills 75 6.(X> 

Scabiosa Caucasia, blue, white 90 8.00 

Trollius Asiaticus 75 6.00 

Veronica Spicata 60 5.00 

Cash with order. Satisfaction guaranteed. 
Mountain View Floral Co., Portland. Ore. 

HEATHER. 

Heather melanthera and Cotonoides veitchil, 
well shaped plants, full of flowers, 6-ln., 75c ea. 
J. L. SCHILLER, TOLEDO, O. 

HELIOTROPES. 

Heliotrope rooted cuttings, best dark blue va- 
rieties, fragrant, $1.25 per 100, $9.00 per 1000; 
2-in. iwts, $3.00 per 100, $25.00 per 1000. New 
heliotrope Elizal>eth Dennison, a dark blue, which 
is the most fragrant heliotrope in existence; 
strong 2-in. pots, ready March 15, $5.00 per 100, 
$40.00 per 1000.» 

Anglin & Walsh Co., Williamshridge, N. Y. 

HELIOTROPE ELIZABETH DENNISON. 
The finest heliotrope In cnltivatlon. We were 
awarded the Grand Medal of Honor at the Pan- 
ama-Pacific Exposition for this variety; 2H-In., 
pot planta, ready for Immediate delivery, $10.00 
per 100, $80.00 per 1000. 

CHABLBS H. TOTTT, 
MADISON. NEW JERSEY. 

ALBUM OF DESIGNS. 

Fourth Edlt.'vn Now Ready. 

75c per copy prepaid. 

Florists' Pub. Co., Caxton Bldg., Ch icago. 

Heliotropes, dark, fragrant, strong well rooted 
cuttings, 80c per 100, $7.00 per 1000. Cash. 
J. P. Cannata, Mt. Freedom, N. J . 

Heliotropes, fragrant, dark blue, fine bedder, 
2%-in., $2.25 per 100; $20.00 per 1000. Cash, 
please. W. Bezdek, Cedar Ita plds, Iowa. 

Heliotropes, blue, R. C, 75c per 100; $7.00 
per 1000. Harglerode Bros., successors to U. G. 
Harglerode, Shippensburg, Pa. 

R. O. Heliotrope, 10 var., $1.00 per 100, $8.00 
per 1000. Prepaid. 
S. D. Brant, C!lay Center, Kan. 

Purple heliotropes. 2i4-in. pots, $2.50 per 100. 
Chas. Sherwood, W^aterloo, Iowa. 

Heliotropes, blue, U. C, $1.25 per 100. ~" ' 

D. U. Augspurger & Sons Co., Peoria, 111. 

Heliotropes, white and purple, 2V4-in. pots, 
$3.00 per 100. Geo. H. Mellen Co., Springfield, O. 

Heliotropes 2V2-in., $2.,50 per 100. Cash. 
Mcltac-Jenkinson Co., Now Kensington , Pa. 

Heliotrope R. C, blue, 75c per 100; $7.00 per 
KKX). Cash. Byer Bros., Chambersburg, Pa. 

HIBISCUS. 

Chinese hibiscna, mbra, dbl. red: Peach Blow, 
dbl. pink: Tersicolor, a single red. 2H-in., 80o 
per doa., $8.00 per 100. 

Oak Grove Qreenhonaea, Tnskegee. Ala. 

HOLLY. 

English holly. Berry bearing. 3 and 3'.^ ft., 
50c and 7.5c each. Cash with order; satisfaction 
guaranteed. 

Mountain View Floral Co., Portland, Ore. 

HYACINTHS. 

Hyacinth Candlcans, 1st size, 2-in.. $1.76 per 
100, $16.00 per 1000; 2nd size. IH-ln.. $1.25 per 
100; $12.00 per 1000. 

N. Leon Wintzer, West Orove. Pa. 



PLEASE MENTION THE REVIEW WHEN WRITING ANY OF THESE ADVERTISERS 



Februahy 1, 1917. 



The Florists^ Review 



139 



HYDRANQBAS. 



HTDRANGHAS. 
All the best new French, also Otaksa. 

Eh' ^^■!"?^;.;;;;;.:::::::::::'6:w ^l iS8 

jf-mcn .. g g SKIDBLSKY & CO.. 

10 04 Lincoln Bldg., Philadelphia. Pa. 

Hvdrangeas, Pl G., strong, thrifty shrubs, 
splendid roots, 2 to 3 ft., $8.00 per 100; $70.00 

vvest Hill Nurseries, Box X, Fredonia, N. Y . 
Hydrangea Otaksa, pink; hydrangea French, 
white- all sizes, 25c to 75c each. Cash with 
order:' satisfaction guaranteed. 

Mou ntain View Floral Co., Portland, Ore. 

Hydrangea Otaksa, for forcing, pot plant*, 
well ripened wood, 2%-ln.. 5c; 4-ln.. 12 to 20c, 
Field-grown. 1 shoot. 8c. 

Erie Floral Co .. Erie, Pa. 

"hydrangeas, otaksa, B. MOUILLBRB, 
for forcing, from 5-in. pots, 25c. 

J. L. Schiller, Toledo, O. 

Hydrangea otaksa, 2%-ln., 4c; 3-ln., 5c; 4-in., 
10c; large plants, 25c to $3.00. Cash. 
Fort Allegany Greenhouses, Fort All eg any, P a . 

Hydrangea Otaksa, 3-ln., $5.00 per 100; flower- 
ing sizes, pot-grown, 25c to 50c each. 

Henry Smith, Grand Rapids, Mich. 

Hydrangea Otaksa, 6-ln., 40c. 

C. J. Frew, Jr.. Conneant. O. 



IMPATIgNS. 

Impatiens Sultanl, white, orange, pink and 
violet-rose, 2%-ln.. 40c per doz. ; $2.50 per 100. 
Oak G rove Greenhouses, Tuskegee, Ala. 

Impatiens. B. C. $1.50 per 100 prepaid; 3 
colors. Cash. 
Royaton & Fenton, Evansvllle, Ind. 

IRISES. 

IRIS— GERMAN — IRIS 

10 100 

Flnrontina alba, white $.50 $4.00 

Goedidissiina varg., evergreen foliage. . .50 4.00 

Mnio. Chereau, white, edged blue 50 4.00 

Niebelungen, olivo green, surf, yellow. lOO 8.00 

Princess Vic. Louise, sulphur 1.00 8.00 

Qiicen of May, rose lilac 1.00 8.00 

Cash with order; satisfaction guaranteed. 
Mountain View Floral Co., Portland, Ore. 

Japanese iris, royal collection of over 25 
varieties, $0.00 per 100, our selection. Cash 
with order; satisfaction guaranteed. 
Mountain View Floral Co., Portland. Ore. 

German iris, of 8 finest varieties, strong divi- 
wlons, $2.00 per 100; $1,").00 per 1000. 
West Hill Nurseries, Hox X, Fredonia, N. Y. 

Iris, German, 10 named varieties, $2.00 per 
100. Amon Heights Nurseries, Camden. N. J. 

IVIES. 

ivies, English, R. 0., $1.00 per 100, $9.00 per 
1000; 2 1/4 -in., 3c; German, R. C, 60c per 100; 
$5.00 per 1000; 2%-ln., 2c; Kenllworth Ivy, 
R. C, 60c per 100. 
W. E. Trimble Greenh ouse Co ., Pri nceton . 111. 

2-in. German ivy, $2.50 per 100; Englisli ivy, 
R. r., $1.00 per 100. 

D. U. Augspurger & Sons Co., Pe oria,. 1 11. _ 

R. C. German ivy, COc per 100; $5.00 per 1000. 
Harglerode Bros., successors to U. G. Harglerode, 
Sliippe nshiirg, I'a. 

English ivy, 4-in. pot plants, 2 and 3 shoota, 
2 to .1 ft. tops, $12.00 per 100. 

The Storrs & Harrison Co., Palnesville, O. 

LANTAWAS. 

LANT ANAS— WEEPING. 
Strong, clean, young stock. 

Mrs. McKlnley, COc per doz.. $4.00 per 100. 
Rockford Seed Farms, H. W. Buekbee, 
Forest City Greenhouses, Rockford. 11 1. 

Lantanas, strong R. C, fine assortment of 
nwarf beddcrs, named varieties, $1..50 per 100 
by mall, $12.00 per 1000 by express. 
- S. W. Pike, St. Charles, H I. 

Lantanas, 4 colors, mixed, extra 2-ln.. $3.00 
Tnn 100, also weeping; R. C. mixed, $1.50 per 
^0". Williams & Matthews. Anderson. Ind. 

^ ^*2n''J"'^' ^^'^' ^bite. pink and weeping, 2%- 
in.. $3.00 per 100. 

Oak_Groye Greenhouse, Tu skegee, Ala. 

„^""tana8, yellow, pink and mixed7~2>4-ln., 
9-i.M per 100; weeping, $3.00 per 100. 
Ernest Rober, Wilmette, 111. 

Untanas, weeping, R. C., $1.00 per 100; 2-ln.. 
~ *^a8h. Byer Bros.. Chambersburg. Pa. 

Weeping lantana, fall rooted, good, strong 
plants, 2Vi-ln.. $3.00 per 100. Cash. 
J. T. Keheley. Columbus, Ga. 

Lantanas, weeping, 3-ln., $3.00 per 100. Cash. 
Fel sch Bros. Co., Maywood, 111. 

LENIONS. 

niJ!.°f1'^^''"l**, lemons, will make very lorely 
k^nni ^V'J?^^ ''"■ BTO'wlng on at 75c per doz.. 
npr^JS^^'.^o'^u''""™ 2y4-ln. pots; 4-In. pots. $4.60 
^ I °?.- *25.00 per 100. i- . i- 

_ Angim A Walsh Co.. WlRlamsbrldge. N. Y. 



LILIUMS. 



LILACS. 



anM JJ^l'i grafted stock, well branched, double 
"?c JP K**' i^*"'*^ ""•! purple, 20c each,' 2-vr. old; 
fa^finn''^ ^'^Z- "•''• Cash witli order ;■ satis- 
laction guaranteed. 

ilountain View Floral Co., Portland, Ore. 



STARTED LILIES. ALL GIOAl?TBUMS. 
4-in. pots, well started, 4 to 6 in. high, 

7-8 bulbs, $20.00 per 100; 

8-10 bulbs, $25.00 per 100. 

S. 8. Pennock-Meehan Co., 
1608-20 Ludlow St., Philadelphia. Pa. 



Li Hums canadense. mixed, flavum and rubrum. 
and Lllium philadelphlcum, in large quantities. 
Also native plants and bulbs. Price list on ap- 
pUcatlon. L. E. WilUama^ Exeter. N. H. 

LOBELIAS. 

Lobelia Sapphire, best basket blue, twice trans- 
planted seedlings, 50c per 100. 

GEO. P. BRAYBOX, 
KENT, OHIO. 

Lobelia Kathleen Mallard, strong, healthy 
R. C, from soil, 60c per 100 by mail; $3.60 per 
1000 by express. Cash. 

S. A. Plnkstone, Utlca, N. Y. 

MARIOOLDS. ° 

Marigolds, Prince of Orange, strong plants, 
out of 2%-ln., $2.00 per 100; 300 for $5.00. 
J. O. Schmidt, Bristol. Pa. 

Marigolds, Prince of Orange and Llliput, $3.00 
per 100. Baur Floral Co., Erie. Pa. 

MESEMBRYANTMEMUMS. 

Mesembryanthemums, special notice to tlie 
trade on following stocks, as I have introduced 
this only pink variety to the trade. The flower 
is 2% in. in diameter, with a very attractive 
yellow center. My stock will be in fine shape by 
February 15, just the right time to repot for 
your trade. Have your orders read.v for this 
date; 2-in., ready for 3-in., $4.00 per 100, $35.00 
per 1000; R. C, $2.50 per 100; also small, tiny 
mesembryanthemums, commonly called dew plant. 
2-in., $3.00 per 100; R. C, $2.00 per 100; also 
will have my 10 varieties of Ivy geraniums ready 
by Marcli 1. Will be choice 2-ln. stock, See my 
ad on Fuchsias. 
I.iOuis P. Fault;, R. F. P. 3, Box 63, Bellevue, Pa. 

MESEMBRYANTHBMT7HS. 
The best pink variety. 

100 1000 

Rooted cuttings $3.00 $26.00 

2%-inch 6.00 60.00 

S. S. PENNOCK-MEBHAN CO.. 
1608-20 Ludlow Sta., Philadelphia, P a. 

Mesembryanthemums, strong rooted cuttings, 
the large Pink blooming kind. $3.00 per 100; 
$25.00 per 1000. 

S. S. SKIDELSKY & CO., 
1004 Lincoln Bldg., Philadelphia. Pa. 

Mesembryanthemums, rooted cuttings, $1.60 
100; $12.50 1000. M. Barrett, Deiaware._0; 

MIQNONETTES. 

Mignonette, Colossal, 2-ln., 3c. 
Hammerschmidt & Clark, Medina. O. 

MOOWVINES. 

MOONVINE. GRANDIFLORA. WHITE. 
Fine young stock, per doz., 60c; per 100, $4.00. 
Rockford Seed Farms, H. W. Buekbee, 

Forest City Greenhouses, Rockford. 111. 

2-in. moonvines, $3.50 per 100. 
D. U. Augspurger & Sons Co., Peoria, 111. 

Rooted moonvine cuttings, $1.50 per 100. 
J. S. Stuart & Son, Anderson, Ind. 

IVIYOSOTIS. 

Myosotis Nixenauge, a fine winter blooming 
variety, rooted cuttings, 80c per 100; 2-in., $2.00 
per 100. 

S. S. SKIDELSKY & CO., 
1004 Lincoln Bldg., Philadelphia, Pa. 

NURSERY STOCK. "^ 

ONARGA NURSERY COMPANY. 

LARGEST WHOLESALE GROWERS OF 

TREES, SHRUBS. ROSES AND PERENNIALS 

IN THE WEST. 

SPECIAL PRICES IN CAItLOAD LOTS. 

WE GROW LINING-OUT STOCK BY THE 

MILLIONS. 

SOME OF OUR BARGAINS: 

1000 5000 

Barberry Thunbergii, 8-12-ln.$10.00 $ 8.00 per M. 

Coriius sibirlca, 12-18-in 15.00 12.00 per M. 

Forsythia, 12-18-ln 15.00 12.00 per M. 

Honeysuckle, 12-18-ln 15.00 12..50 per M. 

Phiiadelphhus, 12-18-in 15.00 12.50 per M. 

Snowberry, 12-18-in 15.00 12.50 per M. 

Write for wholesale surplus list containing 
full list of our lining-out stock. 

CULTRA BROS., MORS., 
ONARGA, ILLINOIS. 

NURSERY STOCK. 
FIELD-GROWN. 2-YR. NO. 1 STOCK. 
Hall's Japan honeysuckle, Chi- 
nese variety honeysuckle $ 6.00 per 100 

Coral 7.00 per 100 

Amp. Quinquefolla 6.00 per 100 

Dorothy Perkins roses 7.00 per 100 

German Iris, named var 2.00 per 100 

California privet, 18 to 24-ln., 

branched 15.00 per 1000 

Elmhurst Landscape & Nursery Co., Argentine, 
Kan. 



BEVERLY HILLS NURSERIES. 

Carolina poplar, 8 to 10 ft $ 8.00 100 

Ligustrum Ibota, extra lieavy, 4 to 6 ft. 10.00 100 

Acer Wieri lacinatum, 8 to 10 ft 20.00 100 

Acer Wieri lacinatum, 12 to 14 ft 35.00 100 

American Elm, 8 to 10 ft 10.00 100 

Acer negundo, 6 to 8 ft 8.00 100 

Cotoneaster frigida, heavy, 4 to 6 ft. . 30.00 100 
BEVERLY HILLS, CALIFORNIA. 



CHOICE SHRUBS, GROWN RIGHT— DUG 
RIGHT— PACKED RIGHT. When not right, 
we make it right. Our new trade list now 
ready. Send for it today. 
AURORA NURSERIES AURORA, ILL . 

Barberry Thunbergii, 12-18-ln $17.50 1000 

Barberry Thunbergii, 18-24-in .SO.OO 1000 

California privet, 12-18-in 10.00 1000 

California privet, 18-24-in 12.50 1000 

L. G. Tingle. Box 160. Pittsville. Md. 

SHRUBS. 
Hydrangeas, viburnums, spiraeas, deutzias and 
wegeiias. Send for price list. 

THE CONARD & JONES CO.. 
WEST GROVE. PENNSYLVANIA. 

10,000 apple trees, 2 and 3-yr., 20 varieties; 
also peach, pear, cherry and plum trees. 
L. F. Dintelmann. BellevlUe, 111 . 

WBITB FOB WHOLBSALB PBICB LIST OF 
ORNAMENTALS. 
MAYWOOD NURSERY CO., MAYWOOD. ILL. 

ORCHIDS. 

Cypripedlum Inslgne, fine plants In 6-inch 
pans, established two years, In fine condition. 
$18.00 per doz., $136.00 per 100. 

Altimo Culture Co.. Canfleld, O. 

OXALIS. 

Oxails Ortglesi (Star of Bethlehem), 6O0 per 
doz.; 13.00 per 100. 

Oak Grove Greenhouse. Tuskegee. Ala. 

PALMS ETC. 

Our stock of Kentlas is larger than usual, with 
bright clean stock in all sizes. Kentlas, Bel- 
moreana, 4-ln. pots, 6 leaves, 16-ln. high, 40o 
each; 6-in. pots, 5 to 6 leaves, 18 to 20 in. high, 
$1.00; e-in. pots. 6 to 6 leaves. 20 to 24 In. 
high. $1.25; 6-in. pots, 6 to 6 leaves, 24 to 28 
In. high. $1.50. 

Kentlas, Forsteriana. 6-ln. pots, 6 to 6 leaves, 
30 In. high, $1.60; 6-in. pots, 6 to 7 leaves, 84 
In. high, $2.00; 7-in. pots, 6 to 7 leaves, 86 In. 
high. $2.60. 

Kentlas, Forsteriana, made up, 3 and 4 plants 
in 7-in. tub, 36 in. high, $3.60 each; 3 and 4 
plants, in 8-ln. tub, 38 to 40 in. high, $4.60; 3 
and 4 plants, in 8-ln. tub, 40 to 44 in. high, 
$6.00; 3 and 4 plants. In 10-ln. tub, 60 to 68 
in. high, $8.50. 

The Storrs & Harrison Co., Pa lnesville, O. 

Palms, Phoenix Canariensls, 2%-in., 4c: 
Chamserops Excelsa, 4-in., 25c; 6-ln.. 36c; 6-ln.. 
50c; Washlngtonia Robusta, 2-ln.. 4c; 4-in., 26c; 
5-in., 35c; 6-in., 50c; Latnnia Borbonica, 3-in., 
10c; 4-ln.. 25c; 5-ln., 35c; 6-in., 50c; 8-in.. $1.00; 
Areca iutescens, 4-in.. 30c; 6-ln., 75c; 7-ln., 
$1.00; 8-ln., $1.50; Kentia Belmoreana, 6-ln., 
$1.00; 7-ln., $1.25; 8-ln., $1.50; Sago palms, all 
sizes, 10c per leaf. For larger sizes, write. All 
above stock is full and saleable. Cash with 
order. H. C. Doescher, 2000-48 Gentllly Ave . 
New Orleans, La. 

PANDANUS VEITCHII— from open for ' 

S-'n- pots $ 6.00 per 100 

4-ln. pots 8.00 per 100 

6-in. pots 12.00 per 100 

Will book orders for 3-ln. pot-grown, for 
spring delivery at $10.00 per 100. 
J. J. Soar^ Little River. Fla. 

Pandanus Veltchll. nicely variegated plants, 
2%-ln. pot sizes, $6.00 per 100; 3-ln. pot, $8.00 
i^l^P^'- *-'°- P°t' 510.00 per 100; 6-ln. pot, 
$15.00 per 100; 8-ln. pot, $25.00 per lOo! 
Larger sizes at 35c and 50c each; cuttings at 
$4.00 and $6.00 per 100. 20% discount for 
cash. F. M. Soar. Little River, F la. 

Latania Borbonica, 2^4-ln., 4c, $35.00 per 
1000; .3-in., lOc, $90.00 per 1000; 3%-ln 15c 
$125.00 per 1000; 4-ln., 20c. $175.00 per 'lOOO' 
Chamaerops Excelsa, 2%-ln., 7c; 3-ln 15c' 
First-class stock. Send for sample. Cash with 
order. Gentllly Terrace Nursery, GenUlly Ter- 
race, New Orleans, La. 

ALBUM OF DESIGNS. 

Better than ever before. 

You cannot afford to be without It. 

75c per copy, prepaid. 

$0.00 per doz. by express. 

Florists' Pub. Co.. Caxton Bldg., Chicago. 

Medhim sized and large specimens of kentlas 
and all kinds of palms. ' 

Kentia Nurscrieg. Santa Barbara, Cal. 



5000 Kentia Belmoreana, 2V4-ln.. clean stock 
$8.00 per 100; $76.00 per lOW. ' 

Roman J. Irwin. 108 W. 28th St.. New York. 

PAN8IE8. 



Pansies, giant flowering, extra fine strain, 
Sept.-sown, well packed, $2.50 per 1000. Cash! 
C. C. Breece, Delawar e, O. 

^^",Sl*'*L ^"*^ seedlings, best giant mixture, 50c 
per 100, by mail; $2.50 per 1000, express 

S. W. Pike, St. Charies, 111. 



PLEASE MENTION THE REVIEW WHEN WRITING ANY OF THESE ADVERTISERS 



140 



The Florists^ Review 



Fkbkuary 1, 1917. 



PELARQONIUMS. 

PELAllGONIUMS, sports of E. G., Lucy Beck- 
er, Swubiiin Maid, Wurtemborgia; also Gardener's 
.loy, 2-in., $7.00 per 100; Mrs. I.ayal, $5.00 per 
100. Absolutely free of white fly aud guaranteed 
strong, clean stock. Directions for fumigating 
with K. C. N. on request. 
Hartford City Floral Co., Hartford City, Ind. 

Felargoniums: Mme. Thibaut, Mrs. R. Sandl- 
ford, Sandiford'B Best, Countess, Champion, 
Purity and 50 other flrst-class varieties, 3-In., 
$8.00 per 100; Easter Greeting, 3-in., $10.00 per 
100, clean stock and ready for a shift. Cash 
please. J. Sylvester Oconto, Wis. 

Pelargoniums, In 4 best varieties, Lucy Becker, 
Wurtembergla, Swabian Maid, Easter Greeting, 
from 2-ln. pots, $7.50 per 100, $70.00 per 1000. 
All varieties ready now. Easter Greeting ready 
Feb. 15th. 

Anglln & Walsh Co., Willlamsbridge, N. Y. 

PELARGONIUMS. 

EASTER GREETING, 

2M!-IN., $7.00 PER 100. 

1. SHELBY CRALL CO., 

MONONGAHELA. PENNSYLVANIA. 

Pelargoniums, 2%-in., ready for 4-ln., B. 
Greeting, Lucy Becker, Victoria, Wurtembergla, 
7c; Gardeners Joy, Goethe, 9c; novelties mixed, 
6c. Cash. Baker Floral & Seed Co., Baker, Ore. 

PELARGONIUMS, EASTER GREETING. 
SEE OUR DISPLAY "AD" THIS ISSUE. 

FRED W. ARNOLD, FLORIST. 
CAMBRIDGE, OHIO. 

Pelargonlams, Mrs. Layal, strong 2V^-ln., $4.00 
per 100. Cash, please. Miller's GreenhonsM, 
607 N. Madisoa St., Muncle, Ind. 

Pelargoniums, 2M!-ln., $2.25 per 100. " 

R. R. Davis Co., Morrison, 111. 

2-in. pelnrgoniums, mixed, fine, $3.00 per 100. 
D. U. Augspurger & Sons Co., Peoria, 111. 

Pelargoniums, rooted cuttings, $2.60 per 100. 
S. D. Brant. Clay Center, Kan. 

PEONIES. 

Peonies, 20 varieties, 6c and up. 
- L. F. Dlntelmann, Belleville, HI. 

30 acres of peonies. Write for prices. 

Gilbert H. Wild, Sarcoxle, Mo. 

PETUNIAS. 

DOUBLE PETUNIAS. 

White Dorothy, pure white; Edna, old rose; 
Jubilee, reddish purple blotched white; Bright- 
ness, bright pink; Aspana, light pink tinged 
gold; Splendor, mauve pink, mottled white; 
Mariana, rosy pink; Diadem, light pinkish pur- 
ple; Gertrude, soft mottled white; Admiration, 
reddish violet, var. white; Victoria, pale pink; 
Pink Beauty, delicate pink; Murillo, lavender 
purple lined; Ceres, deep salmon pink; Undine, 
reddish purple; Rosy Morn, similar to Edna; 
Achville, rosy purple blotched white; Peerless, 
shell pink; Violet Spray, violet; Bon Ton, shell 
pink, purple blotch. 

Per 100 Per 1000 

2-in $3.00 $25.00 

2%-in 4.00 35.00 

3-in 9.00 85.00 

Our new Plant Bulletin now ready for mailing. 
Do you want a copy? 

S. S. PENNOCK-MEEHAN CO., 
1608-20 LUDLOW ST., PHILADELPHIA. PA. 

PETUNIAS, best double sorts, about 18 va- 
rieties. In all shades, pale pink, deep rose, 
purple and white, separate colors or mixed, now 
ready, from 2^-ln. pots, $4.00 per 100 936.00 
per 1000. Rooted cuttings of best double, large 
flowering varieties, fringed, mixed colors, $1.50 
per 100, $12.00 per 1000. 

Anglln & Walsh Co.. Willlamsbridg e , N. Y. 

Petunias, our well known strain of doubles, 
all strong growing varieties, carrying Immense 
blossoms, perfectly healthy, well rooted cuttings, 
labelpd, If requested, $1.25 per 100, prepaid, 
$10.00 per 1000 by express. 

Hopkins & Hopkins, Chcpncliet, R. I. 

Double fringed petunias, R. C, In 20 varieties, 
heavy stock in white, red, pink and mottled, 
$1.00 per 100; $9.00 per 1000. Harglerode Bros., 
successors to U. G. Harglerode, Shippensburg, 
Pa. 

Petimins, best douhle sorts in about 18 va- 
rieties, at $4.00 per 100, $35.00 per 1000, for Im- 
mediate shipment. 
Roman J. Irwin, 108 W. 28th St., New York . 

Petunias, 2i.4-in., double white, double white 
and purple, double variegated, extra strong, 
ready for shift, $3.25 per 100. 
Chas. Sherwood, Waterloo, Iowa. 

BUSINESS BRINGERS— 

Review 
Classified Advs. 

Pink Benutv petunias, 2>^-in. stock, fine 
plants, $2.50 per 100. Cash. 

J. T. Ke heley. Columbus. Ga. 

R. C. Petunias dbl., $1.25 per 100, $10.00 per 
1000. Prepaid. S. D. Brant. Clay Center, Kan. 

PHLOXES. 

Hardy phlox. In 16 leading varieties, true to 
name. Send for trade list. 

THE NILES NURSERY CO., 
1401 R egent St., Niles, Mich. 

Phlox Mrs. Jenkins, best white, 3-yr.-old, $3.00 
100. Amon Heights Nurseries, Camden, N. J. 



POIWSETTIAS. 

POINSETTIA STOCK PLANTS. 
Very fine strain, true Christmas red, $12.00 
per 100. 

Common strain, $9.00 per 100. 

S. S. PENNOCK-MEEHAN CO., 
1608-20 Ludlow St., Philadelphia, Pa . 

Dormant polnsettlas l-yr.-old stalks, 10 to 18- 
In., $8.00 per 100; 3-yr.-old, 3 to 4 ft., fine for 
cuttings, $12.60 per 100. 
Krueger Bros ., Toledo, O. 

Poinsettia stock plants, true Christmas Red, 
heavy 6-in., $10.00 per 100. 
Addems, Morgan A Co., Paxton, 111. 

Poinsettia stock plants, 2K-ln., So; 4-ln., Sc; 
from bench, heavy, 8c and 10c. 
Erie Floral Co., Erie, Pa. 

Polnsettlas, 4-in., 15c, 20c and 25c each; made 
up, 35c, 50c, 75c, $1.00 and $1.50 each. 
Ernest Rober, Wllmette, 111. 

Poinsettia stock plants, heavy and strong, Cc. 
Furrow & Co.. Guthrie, Okla. 

POPPIES. 

Oriental poppy, Kuerten Lind, Goliath, Rose 
Queen, extra line plants; also Iceland poppy, all 
in 21/2 and 3-in. pots, 70c per doz. ; $5.00 per 100. 
Casli, please. 

La Crosse Floral Co., La Crosse, Wis. 

Oriental poppies, strong, 2-yr., field-grown, 
$5.00 per 100; $45.00 per 1000. 
West Hill Nurseries, Box X, Frcdonia, N. Y. 

PRIMULAS. 

FINE STOCK, BEST STRAINS. 

100 1000 

Malacoldes, 2%-lnch $ 4.00 $35.00 

Malacoides, 3-inch 7.00 60.00 

Malacoldes, 4-lnch 15.00 .... 

Obconlca, 2%-lnch 5.00 40.00 

Obconlca, 3-lnch 7.00 60.00 

Obconlca, 4-lnch 16.00 

Chlnensls, 2%-lnch 4.00 86.00 

Polyanthus, hardy red, white and 

yellow, 2%-inch 6.00 40.00 

Hardy English primula, Elatlor, 

3-lnch 10.00 90.00 

Our NEW plant bulletin now ready. 

Yours for the asking. 

S. S. PENNOCK-MEEHAN CO., 

1608-20 LUDLOW ST., PHILADELPHIA, PA. 



PRIMULA OBCONICA. 

STRONG STOCK. 

ASSORTED COLORS. 

IN BUD AND BLOOM. 

3-inch I 6.00 per 100 

4-lnch 10.00 per 100 

5-lnch 20.00 per 100 

Cash with order. 

R. S. McMURRAY, 

BELLEFONTAINE, eHIO. 



PRIMULA OBOONICA SEEDS: Alba (white), 
Appleblossom (soft pink), kermesina (red), rosea 
(rose); all grandiflora type; also gigantcum type 
of kermesina and rosea, all ready now, 50c per 
pkt.. 10 pkts., 40c per pkt. Fresh seeds just 
received. 

AnKlin & Walsh Co.. Williamsbridge, N. Y. 

OliCOXICA PRIMTLAS. well grown 4-in. 
stock, just coming into bloom, will make excep- 
tioiiiilly nice pot plants for Easter and Mothers' 
D.Ty sales, $10.00 per 100. 

HEE oru DI.Sl'LAV AD IN' THIS ISSUE. 

Cash. ])lease. 

JOS. II. rr.NMNGHAM. DELAWARE, O. 

Primroses in Imd and bloom, select Chinese 
•1 ill., $1.50 per doz,; obconica, 4-iii.. $1.,50 per 
doz.. ,$5.(M) per 100: 5-in., $3.00 per doz., $25.00 
per 100; C-in., $5.00 per doz., .$40.00 per 100. 
Ullrich Floral Co., Tiffin, O. 

Primula obconlca gigantea rosea, kermensina, 
oculata, grandiflorn, magnlfica, kermensina ro- 
sea crispa, Appleblossom and alba, 3-in., ready 
for a shift, $5.00 per 100. Cash, plea.se. 

J. Sylvester, Oconto, Wis. 

200 Primula concinna, 5 In., 12c each. 
200 Primula obconlca, 3 in., 5c each. 
Cash with order. 
Parkside Greenhouses, 1457 E. 70th St., Chicago. 

Primula obconlca, best varieties, from Schil- 
ler's seed, 4-in., $10.00 per 100; Malacoides, 
4-ln., $12.50 per 100. 

Elitch Greenhouses, Denver, Colo. 

Primula obconlca, Chlnensls, malacoides and 
kewensis, strong 3-in. pots, $0.00 per 100, $50.00 
per 1000. 
Roman J. Irwin,, 108 W. 28th St., New York. 

Primula obconlca. Miller's Ginnt, big 8-ln., 
ready for 6-in. pans, $4.00 per 100. Cash. 

J. W. Miller, Shlremanstown, Pa. 

Chinese primroses, 5-in., In bud and bloom, 
$3.00 per doz. Cash. 

John Baupcher, Freeport, 111. 



Primula obconlca, 6-ln., In bloom, extra fine 
strain, $16.00 per 100. 
Gould Bros., Glenvlew, 111. 

Primula malacoldes. In bloom, 4-ln., $10.00 i>er 
100. Cash, please. 

John G. Witt, 10429 Wallace St., Chicag o. 

Chinese primroses, 3-ln., $4.00; obconicas, 8-ln., 
$4.00. Cash. M. S. Etter, the House of Prim- 
roses, Shlremanstown, Pa. 

Fine Chinese primroses, In bloom, 4-in. pots, 
$10.00 per 100. 

Cousins & Hall, Ann Arbor, Mich. 

Primula obconlca, 4-ln., 3 to 4 flowers each, 
$2.00 per doz.; 6-ln., $4.00 per doz. Cash. 
P. N. Obertin, 1948 Asylum Ave., Racine, Wis . 

Primrose malacoides, 2%-ln., 3c; 3-in., $6; 
4-ln., 10c; 6-ln., 15c; Primrose obconlca, 4-ln., 
10c; 6-ln., 15c. Pyfer & Olsem, Wllmette. 111. 

Chinese primroses, extra strong, 3-in., assorted 
colors, $6.00 per 100. 
Chas. Sherwood, Waterloo, Iowa. 

Primulas 4-in., $10.00 per 100; Chlnensls, 2^4- 
In., $3.00 per 100; 3-ln., $6.00 per 100. 
Ernest Rober, \VlImette, 111. 

Primula obconlca, Chinese and malacoides, 
2-ln. pots, $3.00 per 100. 
Henry Smith, Grand Rapids , M i ch. 

Primula Chinensls and malacoides, in bloom, 
strong 4-in., 8c. J. F. Jonash, Kenton, O. 

Chinese primrose, 4-in., in bloom, $8.00 100. 
Wm. Robinson, R. D., La Fayette, Ind 



per 



wm. itoomson, 11. u., i.a Fayette, inu. 

Primula malacoides, fine plants, 2-ln., $2.00 
T 100. Cas h. Byer Bros., Chambersburg, Pa. 



Primula obconlca, 4-i. ., 2 and 3 flowers, in 
bloom, $8.00 per 100; 6-ln., $15.00 per 100. Cash. 
Riverside Greenhouses, Appleton, Wis. 

Primula obconlca. in bloom, very fine plants 
(Schiller's strain), $3.00 per doz.; $20.00 per 100. 
La Crosse Floral Co., La Crosse, Wis. 



Primulas, malacoides, 4-in., in bloom, $8.00 
per 100. Cash. Felsch Bros. Co.. Maywood. 111. 

PRIVET. 

PRIVET, California, 2-yr., strong, 3 to 4 ft., 
$4.00 per 100; 2% to 3 ft., 6 or more branches, 
$3.00 per 100, $26.00 per 1000; 2-3 ft., 4 "- ""»"» 
branches, $2.50 per 100, $17.50 per 100< 



Lfviia, ^-o AL,, well uiauv-iieu, .p-x.w ^c* 

100, $30.00 per 1000; 18-24 in., $2.50 per 100, 
$20.00 per 1000. All 2-yr., strong, well graded 
stock, packed free. 
Chas. Black, Hlghtstovm, N. J. 

CALIFORNIA PRIVET. 

100 1000 

12 to 18 in., 3 branches up $1.26 $ 9.60 

18 to 24 in., 3 branches up 1.50 12.00 

12 to 18 in., 5 branches up 1.60 12.00 

18 to 24 in., 6 branches up 2.00 16.00 

2 to 3 ft., 5 branches up 2.25 18.00 

8 to 4 ft., 5 branches up 2.60 22.00 

3 to 4 ff., 8 branches up 3.00 26.00 

SOUTHSIDE NURSERIES, . CHESTER. VA. 

100 1000 
An'oor River North privet, 2-3 ft... $6.00 $60.00 

Ca Jfornla privet, 2-3 ft 3.00 25.00 

English privet, 2-3 ft 6.00 46.00 

Ibota privet, 2-8 ft 6.00 86.00 

Polish privet, 2-3 ft 6.00 60.00 

Begel's privet, 2-3 ft 6.00 40.00 

Prices on smaller or larger grades in 1000 lets. 
ONARGA NURSERY CO., 
CULTRA BROS., MGRS., ON ARGA. ILL. 

Privet, California and Amoor River, 2-yr.-old, 
nice bushy plaijts, $3.00 per 100; Amoor River 
3-yr.-old, $5.00 per 100; none better for the 
money. 10% off on 1000 lots. 250 at 1000 rate. 
Oak Grove Greenhouse, Tuskegee, . Ala. 

200,000 California privet and Berberls Thun- 
bergii, all sizes and prices. Get complete list. 
Ben], Connell. Florist, Merchantville, N. J . 

California privet, 6 to 12-ln., $7.50 per 1000: 
12 to 18-ln., $12.00; 18 to 24-in., $15.00. 

L. F. Dintleman, Belleville, HI. 

POULTRY AND SUPPLIES. 

New French pussy willow, the best that goes 
to the New York market, very large catkins. 
This Is something extra good; 12-in. cuttings, 
.50c doz., prepaid; $2.50 per 100; $20.00 per 1000, 
liy express. G. E. Fink. Kenilworth. N. J. 

RHODODENDRONS. 

Rhododendrons, special forcing varieties, 8 to 
12 buds, 80c; 12 to 16 buds, $1.10; Rhododendron 
Pink Pearl, 6 to 8 buds, 80c each; 8 to 12 buds. 
$1.25 each. 

The Storrs & Harrison Co.. Painesvllle, 0. 

ROSES. 

2'/i-In. and 4-ln. own root roses, for outside 
planting. 100 100 

214-in. 4-ln. 

Kals. A. Victoria (white) $3.50 $12 00 

J. J. L. Mock (pink) 4.6O 16.00 

Lady Alice Stanley (pink) 4.50 15.00 

Mrs. Geo. Shaveyer (pink) 4.50 16.00 

Radiance (pink) 4.00 12.00 

My Maryland (pink) 4.6O 16.00 

Hadley (red) 6.00 20.00 

Hoosler Beauty (pink) 6.00 20 00 

Rhea Reld (pink) 4.00 15.0O 

Sunburst (yellow) 4.50 15 00 

Lady Hlllingdon (yellow) 4.OO 16.00 

Ophelia (shell pink) 4.50 I6.OO 

Prima Donna (pink) 6.00 16.00 

Baby Rambler (crimson) 4.00 12.00 

Also an extensive list of other varieties. Ask 
for list of best varieties for cut flower purposes. 
Order early. 

Anglln & Walsh Co., Willlamsbridge N. Y. 



PLEASE MENTION THE REVIEW WHEN WRITING ANY OF THESE ADVERTISERS 



Fkbruary 1, 1917. 



The Florists' Review 



141 



ROSES— PORTLAND ROSES: Quality su- 
preme, fleld-grown, budded stock and on their 
own roots, $10.00 per 100; no charges for pack- 
ing. American Beauty, pink, Alfred Colomb, 
red, Anna de Dlesbach, pink, Avoca, scarlet. 
Baron de Bonstetten, red. Baroness Rothschild, 
pink. Beauty of Glazenwood, yellow, Captain 
Hayward, crimson, Chateau de Clos Vougeot, 
velvet red. Climb. Caroline Testout, pink, Climb. 
Kaiserln, creamy white. Climb. White Mamon 
Cochet, Climb, Belle Slebrecht, pink, Climb, Cecil 
Brunner, pink, Dorothy Perkins, pink. Dean 
Hole, carmine, Duke of Edlnburg, br. red, Earl 
of Pembroke, crimson, Edw. Meyer, yellow. 
Flower of Fairfield, crimson, Frau Karl Drusch- 
ki, white, Frau Karl Druschkl, pink, Frle- 
drichsruh, crimson. General Jack, red. General 
MacArthur, red, Glolre de Chedane Gulnoisseau, 
red, Gruss an TepUtz, red, His Majesty, crimson, 
Hugh Dickson, red, Kaiserln, creamy white, J. 
B. Clark, red, KUlarney, pink. Lady Ashtown, 
pink. La France, pink or white, Mme. Caro- 
line Testout, pink, Mme. Jules Grolez, pink, 
Mme. Wagram, pink, Maman Cochet, pink or 
white, Marie Baumann, red. Miss Kate Moulton, 
pink, Mildred Grant, white, Papa Gontler, red, 
Paul Neyron, pink. Prince Camille de Rohan, 
red, Rhea Reld, red, Richmond, red, Soliel d'Or, 
vellow, Ulrlch Brunner, pink, "White Dorothy 
Perkins, Winnie Davis, salmon pink. 

Mox mtain View Floral Co., Portland, Ore. 

Large fleld-grown, 2-year-old roses: White and 
Pink Cochet, Etolle de France, Mrs. B. R. Cant, 
Mile. Franzisca Kruger, Pres. Camot, Climbing 
American Beauty, $1.75 per doz., $12.50 per 100. 
Climbing varieties. Pillar of Gold, Marie Gulllot, 
Silver Moon, Mme. Alfred Carrlere, Fortune's 
Dble. Yellow, Hermosa or Imp. Pink Rambler, 
Pink, White and Red Dorothy Perkins, Lady Gay, 
$1.75 per doz., $12.50 per 100. Nice stock. Also 
ofTer some large 2-yr.-old field grown Lady Gay, 
Pink and Red Perkins that were mixed in the 
field at $1.00 per doz., $8.00 per 100, good stock. 

OAK GROVE GREENHOUSES, 
TUSKEGEE, ALABAMA. 



OUR ADVICE TO TOU. 
Order your rose plants early this season. 
See our display adv. In this Issue and send for 
a copy of our new plant bulletin. 

S. S. PENNOCK-MEEHAN CO., 
1G08-20 Ludlow St., Philadelphia, Pa. 



ROSE OPHELIA. 
SPLENDID PLANTS, 2%-IN. POTS, OWN 
ROOT, READY FOR IMMEDIATE DELIVERY. 
IF YOU HAVE A BENCH THAT IS NOT DO- 
ING WELL, PLANT THESE OPHELIA ROSES 
AND GET A FINE SPRING CROP, $7.00 PER 
100, $60.00 PER 1000. 

CHARLES H. TOTTY, 
MADISON. NEW JERSEY. 

ROOTED CUTTINGS. 

100 1000 

Smburst $3.60 $30.00 

Richmond 2.50 20.00 

Pink KUlarney 2.60 20.00 

White Killanrey 2.50 20.00 

Ophelia 4.00 35.00 

,o« ^, ^ GEO. REINBBRO, 

169 N. Wabash Ave., Chicago, III. 

r^ ~ 100 1000 

Mrs. Chas. Russell, grafted plants.$15.00 $140.00 

Ophelia, grafted plants '. 14.00 120.00 

Pink KUlarney, grafted plants.. 14.00 120.00 

wn'teKlUarney, grafted plants . . 14.00 120.00 

Mrs. Ward, grafted plants 14.00 120.00 

HooBler Beauty, grafted plants.. 14.00 120.00 
,„^ .„ . I^OLTON & HUNKEL CO., 

AHLWAUKEE, WISCONSIN. 

Roses: Crimson Baby Rambler, field-grown, 
l-yr., select stock, suitable 4^^-ln. pots, $1.25 
per doz., $8.00 per 100; ready now. Holland 
fi2^ Crimson Baby Rambler, $2.00 per doz.; 
516.00 per 100. Erna Teschendorff, $2.50 per 
doz.; $18.00 per 100. 
K7t'> r-,Ao ^ PETER PEARSON, 
57J--0748 Gunnison St., Jefferson, Chicago, HI. 

CHAMP WEILAND, 
w .,?^° ^°°^ '""O"* 2J4-ln. pots. 
ni.)^f '^l" accept orders for a limited number 
Plants of the above variety, for delivery this 
spring. Price $100.00 per 1000, $12.00 per 100. 
1^ K- -..r.^'^^^^II^AND & RISCH, 
154 ^. WABASH AVE.. CHICAGO. 

ROSES. 
_, Own root, field-grown. 
otwI''^«?««?^P"*'=' Edward Mawley and many 
l/in i- *10.00 per 100 (300 assorted at 1000 rate 
1/10 less). We guarantee EXPRESS charges, 
oee lone map. 
gOj^A RD ROSE CO.. HEMET, C AL. 

lov o^nn' T ^x'°\ ^"^ '■"<"• ^Irs. Shawyer, Had- 
loon- w,., • -^^ ^^°^''' 5800 per 100, $55.00 per 
«7 nn £. n«„^r""*' Sept. Morn and Scott Ker, 
1 rr J?h'^4'^^\ *^°00 per 1000; 500 at 1000 ratel 
^ i r.-oia Hadley from bencli at $10.00 per 100. 

— Elitch^Gardens Co., Denver, Colo. 

oth^^^^l^^^ RAMBLER EXCELSA (Red Dor- 
SK p«T6o ^^'■•' field-grown, $2.25 per doz.. 
The McGregor Bros. Co., Springfield, O. 

WhUn'^^Win'^'""""'' ^«'-"<^l> plants, S.^.OO per 100; 
Ratnvi.n "'■"':'' ''«'"'■'* P'«"t«' «400 per 100. 
Chiaigo, p,[f«'>"«"«e Co., 30 B. Randolph St., 



Bench grown roses, Milady, $8.00; Richmond, 
$7.00 per 100. 

A. Henderson & Co., Boi 125, Chicago, 111. 

American Beauty bench plants, $8.00 per 100; 
$75.00 per 1000. Ready now. 
Wm. Dlttman, New Castle, Ind. 

600,000 fleld-grown own root roses. See our 
display adv. Oct. 5 Issue. 
Western Rose Co., Pasadena, Cal. 

Bench plants, grafted White and Pink KlUar- 
ney. South Park Floral Co.. New Castle, Ind. 

Grafting eyes of the new roses Primrose and 
Rosalie. South Park Floral Co., New Castle, Ind. 

2%, 4-ln. pots. Field-grown, to pot, 4 to 6-ln. 
Leedle Co., Expert Rose Growers, Springfield, O. 

RUBBERS. 

FICUS ELASTICA. 
4-lnch, $25.00 per 100. 
6-lnch, $40.00 and $50.00 per 100. 
7-inch, $76.00 per 100. 

Our NEW plant bulletin now ready. 

Yours for the asking. 

S. S. PENNOCK-MEEHAN CO., 

1608-20 LUDLOW ST., PHILADELPHIA, PA. 

Rubber plants, 6-ln., 18 to 24-In. tall, foliage 
from pot up, 50c each, $5.00 per doz. 

Oak Grove Greenhouses, Tuskegee, Ala. 

SALVIAS. 

SALVIA AMERICA. 
Our new type which Is far superior to any 
salvia so far Introduced; constitution is particu- 
larly healthy; dwarf and ideal for bedding. It 
Is the only perpetual blooming salvia; will flower 
just as well in the greenhouse for Xmas and 
Easter as it will In the garden In summer. 2%- 
In. pot plants; excellent for stock, $10.00 per 
100, $80.00 per 1000. 

CHAS. H. TOTTY, 
MADISON, NEW JERSEY. 

SALVIAS. 
Large well rooted cuttings of Salvia Fire Ball, 
free of white fly and other pests, $1.00 per 100; 
$9.00 per 1000. See our ads for carnations and 
verbenas elsewhere in these columns. 
STUPPY FLORAL CO., ST. JOSEPH, MO . 

Salvia rooted cuttings. Bonfire, Zurich and 
Splendens, at $1.25 per 100, $9.00 per 1000; 
2i^-in. pots, strong bushy plants, $3.00 per 100, 
$25.00 per 1000. 

Anglin & Walsh Co., Wllllamsbrldge, N. Y. 

Salvia America, rooted cuttings, 80c per doz., 
$6.00 per 100, postpaid. Stock direct from Mr. 
Totty. See Wanamaker ferns. 

C. n. Tritschler. Florist. Nashville. Tenn . 

Salvia Bonfire, rooted cuttings, 80c per 100, 
$8.50 per 1000; 2>4-in., $2.25 per 100, $20.00 
per 1000. None better. Cash, please. 

W. Bezdek, Cedar Rapids, Iowa. 

Salvias, Bonfire and Zurich, strong, healthy 
rooted cuttings, 75c per 100, prepaid. 

J. F. Link. 1124 Rammers. Louisville, Ky. 

Salvia Zurich, R. C, 80c per 100; $7.00 per 
1000. Harglerode Bros., successors to U. G. 
Harglerode, Shippensburg, Pa. 

Salvias, splendens and Bonfire, 2i^-in., 35c per 
doz.; $2.00 per 100. 

Oak Grove Greenhouse, Tuskegee, Ala. 

Salvia Bonfire, 2%-in., strong, $2.50 per 100; 
rooted cuttings, 80c per 100. $7.00 per 1000. 
Cash. Wm. M. Turner, Wilklnsburg, Pa._ 

Salvias, Bonfire, splendens R. C, 80c per 100; 
$7.00 per 1000. Cash. 

Byer Bros., Chambersburg, Pa. 

Salvias, 2ya-in., $2.50 per loa 

R. R. Davis Co., Morrison, 111. 



Salvia splendens, R. C, 90c per 100; 2%-ln., 2c. 
W. E. Trimble Greenhouse Co., Prince ton, 111. 

R. C. Salvias, 4 vara., $1.00 per 100. $8.00 per 
1000. Prepaid. S. D. Brant, Clay Center, K an. 

SANTOLINAS. 



SANTOLINA ARGENTEA. 

Nice young stock $3.00 per 100 

Rockford Seed Farms. H. W. Buckbee, 

Forest City Greenhouses, Rockford, 111. 

Suntolinas. well R. C, $1.10 100, $10.00 1000. 
Cash. M. W. Fink, Elmhurst, Jll.^ 

SEEDS. 

200 lbs. Landroth Am-crown. pur. top. globe 

turnip seed, crop 1910 $0.22 

.lO lbs. Detroit d.irk red beets 23 

7.5 lbs. Crimson Globe beets 22 

80 lbs. Crosby's Ejryptian beets 22 

50 lbs. Early Blood turnip beets 21 

American-Brown, fancy stoclc. Ger. 90To. 

200 lbs. Geo. Collards. 95% Ger 10 

3(K) lbs. cabbage seed. Am-grown. crop 191G. 

assorted. 12 varieties 85 

Sacks extra on all goods. 
This stock must be closed out. Complete stocks 
of all garden seeds. Ask for prices. 

Memphis Seed & Plant Co.. Memphis. Tenn. 

ASPARAGUS SEED. 
Asparagus plumosus nanus, new crop, northern 
greenhouse grown. 100 seeds, 50c; 500 seeds, 
$1.85; 1000 seeds, $3.25; 5000 seeds, $15.00; 10,- 
000 seeds, $27.50. Asparagus Sprengeri, 260 
seeds, 35c; 1000 seeds, 75c; 5000 seeds, $3.00. 
Asparagus Hatcheri. 75c per 100; $3.00 per 600. 

THE MOORE SEED CO., 
125 Market St., Philadelphia, P. 



ASPARAGUS PLUMOSUS NANUS AND SPREN- 
GERI SEED. 
New crop of guaranteed quality, northern 
greenhouse grown seeds, true to type, now ready. 
ASPARAGUS PLUMOSUS NANUS. 

Per 1,000 seeds $4.00 per 1000 

Per 10,000 seeds 3.60 per 1000 

Per 26,000 seeds 3.00 per 1000 

ASPARAGUS SPRENGERI. 

Per 1,000 seeds $1.50 per 1000 

Per 10,000 seeds 1.26 per 1000 

S. S. PENNOCK-MEEHAN CO., 
1608-20 Ludlow St., Philadelphia, Pa. 

WINTER ORCHID FLOWERING SWEET PEA 
SEED at reduced prices: Pink and White Or- 
chid, White Orchid, Mrs. A. A. Skach, Orchid 
Beauty, Miss Fl. Fabing, Lavender Orchid, all at 
50c per oz., $6.00 per lb. Florist's Orchid Mix- 
ture, $4.00 per lb., LATE SPENCER'S, any sepa- 
rate color, 30c per oz., $2.60 per lb. Ask for 
Price List for other varieties. 

Ant. O. Zvolanek, Lompoc, Cnl. 

ASPARAGUS PLUMOSUS NANUS SEED. 
Greenhouse-grown, well developed and plump; 
our own production. Quality extra good. 

Per 1000 $3.00 

Lots of 6000 $2.75 per 1000 

Lots of 10,000 2.50 per 1000 

PITTSBURGH CUT FLOWER CO., 
110-18 Seventh St., Pittsburgh, Pa. 

SALVIA ZURICH, 

$3.50 per oz. 

$40.00 per lb. 

Well cleaned seed. 

S. S. PENNOCK-MEEHAN CO., 

1608-20 Ludlow St., Philadelphia. Pa. 

Asparagus plumosus nanus, greenhouse-grown. 

Per 1,000 seeds $ 3.00 

Per 5,000 seeds 12.50 

Per 10,000 seeds 22.50 

Chas. Pommert, Amelia, O. 

Asparagus seed, plumosus. Northern green- 
house-grown, $3.50 per 1000; Sprengeri, $1.00 
per 1000. Write for price in large quantities. 
American Bulb Co., 172 N. Wabash Ave., Chl- 
cago. 111. 

Cyclamen seed, German strain. Wonder of 
Wandsbek, salmon, bright pink, Christmas Red, 
dark red, white with red eye, $8.00 per 1000; 
$10.00 for Wonder of Wandsbek. American 
Bulb Co., 172 N. Wabash Ave., Chicago, 111. 

Improved, large fiowerlng Begonia seed, ever- 
blooiplng, especially In the fall and winter, 
dark red and pink, pkt., $1.00. Cash with order. 
J. F. Wlndt. 901-09 Bayard Ave.. St. Louis. Mo. 

Asparagus Sprengeri, new crop, immediate de- 
livery, 75c per 1000. 
H. N. GAGE CO., INC., MONTEBELLO, CAL. 

Asparagus plumosus nanus seed, our own green- 
house-grown, new crop, 50c per 100 seeds; $3.00 
per 1000. B. H. Haverland. Mount Healthy, O. 

SHAMROCKS. 

SHAMROCK SEEDLINGS. 
Fine Irish shamrock seedlings. 
Ready to pot Into 2-lnch, $3.50 per 1000 post- 
paid: 

HILL'S NURSERY, 

AVON AND MORTON. 

LOS ANGELES, CALIFORNIA. 



8MILAX. 

Smllax, strong, 2%-In., $3.00 
Thornton Floral Co., 



In., $3.00 per 100. 

toral Co., Streator, III. 



450 smllax, 3-In., twice cut back, $3.00 per 
100. Lautemier, Florist, Ft. Wayne, Ind. 



SNAPDRAQONS. 



SNAPDRAGONS. 

100 1000 

Ramsbnrg's Silver Pink, 214-In.. .$5.00 |40.00 

Phelps' White, 2^4-ln 6.00 40.00 

Phelps* Yellow, 2V4-in 6.00 40.00 

Giant Yellow, 2%-in 6.00 40.00 

Nelrose, 2%-in 6.00 40.00 

Keystone, 2V^-in 6.00 40.00 

Keystone, 3-In 8.00 75.00 

Our nfew Plant Bulletin now ready for maillnK. 
Do you want a copy? 

S. S. PENNOCK-MEEHAN CO., 
1608-20, Ludlow St., Philadelphia. Pa. 

Snapdragon, 2Vi-in. pots. Keystone, Silver 
Pink, Giant, white, yollow. red, Nelrose. $5.()0 
per 100. $40.00 per 1000: Garnet, $6.00 per 100. 
Silver Pink R. C, $2.00 per 100. Rooted cut- 
tings of yellow and wliite, $1.75 per 100. $14.00 
per 1(X)0. Keystone rooted cuttings, $3.50 per 
100; $30.00 per 1000. Fresh seed, Ramsburg's 
Silver Pink. $1.00 per pkt. The following colors 
at .50c per pkt. : Nelrose, White, Yellow, Light 
Pink and Garnet. 

Anglin & Walsh Co., Williamsbridge, N. Y. 

Buxton's, Ramsburg's and Nelrose Silver Pink, 
$4.00 per 100, $35.00 per 1000. 

Keystone, 2V4-ln., $5.00 per 100, $46.00 per 
1000. 

Phelps* White and Phelps' Giant YeUow, $6.00 
per 100, $45.00 per 1000. 

Buxton's Silver Pink, rooted cuttings, $2.00 
per 100, $17.60 per 1000. Roman J. Irwin, 108 
W. 28th St.. New York, N. Y. 

2%-ln. Ramsburg's Silver Pink and Nelrose 
seedling snapdragons, strong plants, ready to 
bench, $2.60 per 100: $20.00 per 1000; rooted Sil- 
ver Pink cuttings, $1.00 per 100; $8.60 per 1000. 
Cash. 
W. A. Ballon, Wholesale Grower, Wheaton, IlL 



PLEASE MENTION THE REVIEW WHEN WRITING ANY OF THESE ADVERTISERS 



142 



ThcFIorists' Review 



Febuuauy 1, 1917. 



SNAPDRAOONS-Continued 

Snapdragon, Silver Pink, ready now, Phelps' 
White and Yellow, 2%-ln., $4.60 per 100; $40.00 
per 1000. Keystone snapdragon, 2^-in., $6.00 
per 100, $45.00 per 1000. 

Do not fall to order a packet of our new Key- 
stone snapdragon seed, clear pink, and an all 
winter bloomer, $1.00 per packet. 

S. S. SKIDBLSKY & CO., 
1004 Lincoln Bldg., Philadelphia, Pa . 

SNAPS— SEEDLINGS. 

If you want tine stocky 2^-ln. pinched snaps, 
buy ours. 

Ramsburir'B Sliver Pink, Phelps' White, Tel- 
low, 2l4-ln., 4c; Garnet, New Red, and Davis, 
New Pink, 2%,-ln., 6c; 2-ln. of above, 3c. Grand 
plants, sure to please; bench now. Order early. 
Hanunerschmldt & Clark, Akron, O., or Me- 
dlna, O. 

Snapdragons, Keystone, pink, Rarasburg's 
strain of wliite, yellow and Garnet, pinched and 
branching, clean, strong, husky plants, $4.00 per 
100. Grown and shipped in paper pots. 
Jersey Grecnliouse, Rushville, I nd. 

Snapdragons, 2-in., from sppd, pinched and 
branched. Golden Yellow, AVhitc, no rust in our 
plants, $.S.00 per 100. 
Dlnstell Bros., 1851 Mclvina Ave., Chicago, 1 11. 

Snapdragons, Ramsburg's Silver Pink, Phelps' 
AVliite, Nelrose, Giant Yellow, extra strong 3-in., 
$5.00 per 100. Cash, please. 
Van Aker Bros., Coldwatcr, Mi ch. 

Snapdragons, well rooted, bushy 2-in., Rams- 
burg's Silver Pink, Phelps' White and Garnet, 
$3.00 per 100; Nelrose, $2.50 per 100. Cash. 
R. K. Stokesberry, Letonla, O. 

Snapdragons, Silver Pink, Int. Golden Queen 
and tall Queen Victoria (white), 2V4-in., $3.00 
per 100; $25.00 per 1000. 
Baur Floral Co., Erie, Pa. 

Snapdragon rooted cuttings, all best varieties, 
Including Ramsburg's and Davis' Pinks, Nelrose, 
etc., 11.60 per 100, $12.00 per 1000. 
Elltch Greenhouses, Denver, Colo. 

Snapdragons, Ramsburg's Silver Pink, Nel- 
rose and Phelps* White, 2V4-ln., $3.00 per 100; 
extra heavy branched, $4.00 per 100. Cash. 
Addems, Morgan & Co., Paxton, 111. 

Snap bargain! Extra fine, branched Silver 
Pink, Vaughan's Special Mixture, Firefly, bril- 
liant scarlet, 2^4 and 2%-in.. 3c; same from 
flats. 2c. Will A. Gain. Astoria, 111. 

Snapdragons, Giant Pink, white and yollow, 
dandy plants, $2..50 per 100: 100 of each for $7.00 
BROWN'S GREENHOUSES, CLYDE, O. 

Snapdragons, Silver Pink and white, fine trans- 
planted seedlings, $1.00 per 100. 
Wagner's Greenhouses, TiflBn, O . 

Snapdragon, Nelrose, Buxton's. Garnet, 
Phelps' White, Silver Pink, S-ln., $4.00 per 100. 
Cash, p lease. J. Sylvester, Oconto, Wi s. 

Snapdragons, Ramsburg's aeedUng, elfht 
leaves, $1.00 per 100. Cash with order. 
John Faber, Kankakee. 111. 

Snapdragons, Nelrose. 2-ln., $3.00 per 100, 
$26.00 per 1000: 8-ln., $6.00 per 100. Cash. 
John B. Rudy, Elmlra, N. T. 

Snapdragons, Silver Pink, white and yellow, 
strong ii^-ln. poU, $2.00 per 100; 800 for $8.00. 
J. 0. Schmidt, Bristol, Pa. 

Snapdragons, Nelrose, from seed. 8-ln. pinched 
back, 16.00 per 100. 

Holton A Hnnkel Co., Milwankee, Wis. 

Snapdragons, Silver Pink, 2V'-in., $3.00 per 
100. L. A. Eaton & Sons, Conneaut, O. 

Snapdragon Keystone, R. C, |2.00 per 100. 
Cash. Byer Bros., Chambersburg, Pa. 

Snapdragons, Silver Pink, in 2>^-in., $2.60 per 
100. Aberdeen Floral Co., Aberdeen, Miss. 

STOCKS. 

Stocks, Queen Alexandria, Beautv of Nice, 
strong 2^-ln., $2.00 per 100; 300 for $6.00. 

J. O. Schmidt. Bristol. Pa. 

8TWAWBEWWY PLANTS. 

Progressive and Superb, at $6.00 py 1000. 
Other varieties as low as $1.60 per 1000. Cata- 
log free. 
L. G. Ti ngle, Box 160, Plttsvllle, Md. 

Strawberry plants. $2.50 per 1000. Catalogue 
free. Basil Perry, Georgetown. Del. 

STROBILANTHES. 

STROBILANTHES SUPERBA. 

Highly colored foliage plants equal to croton. 

Strong young plants, per doz., 60c: per 100, $4.00. 

Rockford Seed Farms, H. AV. Buckbee, 

Forest City Greenhouses. Rockford, Illinois . 

«%WA»lll»OliAfc. 

Swainsona, alba and rosea, nice strong plants, 
60c doz., $4.00 per 100. 

Rockford Seed Farms, H. W. Buckbee, 
Forest City Greenhouses, Rockford, 111. 

Swainsona alba, strong 3-ln., $6.00 per 100. 

Baur Floral Co., Erie, Pa. 

TRAPESCANTIAS. 

Wandering Jew, plain green, rooted cuttings, 
75c per 100. 

Willis H. Baldwin. Consliohocken, Pa._ 

Tradescantia blcolor, rooted cuttings, 60c 100. 
Cash. J. P. Cannata, Mt. Freedom, N. J. 



Wandering Jew, Zebrina and blcolor, 2^-ln., 
35c per dozen; $2.00 per 100. 

Oak Grove Greenhouse. Tuskegee, Ala. 

TRITOiWAS. 

Tritoma Pfltzerl, strong, selected, fleld-grown 
crowns, $5.00 per 100; $45.00 per 1000. Cash 
with order. 

Oberlln Peony Gardens, Sinking Springs, Pa. 

TUBEROSES. 

40000 A-1 Mexican tuberose bulbs, $1.00 per 
100; $7.50 per 1000. Ready now. Cash or c. o. d. 
Alvin Jessamine & Floral Co., Alvin, Tex. 

VEQETABLE PLANTS. 

THE NEW EARLY TOMATO "ALACRITY," 
originated in Canada, was 10 days earlier than 
John Baer; last year's seed saved from June- 
picked fruit. Plant rather of a dwarf habit, 
fruit nearly all round and smooth, and In the 
extreme drought last season ripened a heavy 
crop of perfect tomatoes. Seeds, 25c per trade 
pkt. Morris Greenhouses & Vegetable Gardens, 
Rantoul, 111. 

CHICORY ROOm 
Brussels Wltloof. genuine Belgian strain. 
Produces the so-called French Endive, so much 
sought after by the better class of grocery 
stores, restaurants and hotels. We have a lim- 
ited quantity of selected roots for forcing, $1.78 
per 100; $18.00 per 1000. SLUIS SEED STOBB, 
644-546 W. 63rd St., Chicago, 111. 

RHUBARB ROOTS, forcing size, for growing 
in cellar or greenhouse during winter, 90c per 
doz.; $4.50 per 100. Directions for growing sent 
free with each order. Also 2-yr. A-1 rhubarb 
roots, $2.00 per 100; $19.00 per 1000. 

Harry J. Squires, Good Ground, N. Y. 

COMET TOMATOES, fine plants, grown from 
Rodney's special forcing strain in sterilized soil. 
Strong 214-in. plants, $2.50 per 100; $22.50 per 
1000. Cash, please. 
J. J. CLAYTON & SON, WEST GROVE, PA. 

Extra strong 2-in. Goetz's Best Yet tomatoes, 
a fancy forcing variety. These will be extra 
fine plants, ready Feb. 20, $3.00 per 100; $20.00 
per 1000. 500 at 1000 rate. Cash or <■. o. d., 
please. J. A. Swartley & Sons, Sterling, 111. 

100,000 transplanted Grand Rapids lettuce, 
$2.50 per 1000; $2.00 in 6000 lots or over. We 
are giving special attention to growing plants 
for the trade. We guarantee to please you in 
every way, no matter where you live. 
S. T. Danley & Son, Macomb, 111. 

Frostproof cabbage plants, lettuce, tomato and 
other plants. Write us your wants. Shipped 
anywhere. Guaranteed. 

Tidewater Plant Co., Box C8. Franklin. Va. 

True J. B. Goetz Best Yet strain of tomato 
seed, trade pkt., 50c; 1000 seeds, 75o: 14 oz., 
$1.00; i/i oz., $1.75; oz., 2.50. Cash, jilease. 

"Cottage Greenhouses, Westplains, Mo. 

LETTUCE, GRAND RAPIDS PLANTS, 
TRANSPr.ANTED IN FLATS, EXTRA STRONG, 
$2.50 PER 1000. CASH. 
McADAMS & McCOMB, COLUMBUS GROVE, O. 

Small quantity of our own select strain of 
HOT HOUSE Comet tomato seed, $3.00 per oz., 
while they last. 

Ann Arbor Greenhouse C o., A nn Arbor, Mich. 

Strong well rooted, transplanted Grand Rapids 
lettuce plants. $2.00 per 1000. Cash. 

Walter N. Trentman, Delphos, O. 

Lettuce, Grand Rapids, transplanted, $2.60 
per 1000. 
W. E. Trimble Greenhouse Co., Princeton, 1 11. 

Strong, transplanted Grand Rapids lettuce 
plants, flat-grown, $2.50 per 1000. Cash. 

H. E. & C. W. Krebs. Cedar Rapids, Iowa. 

Grand Rapids lettuce, transplanted, no dis- 
ease, stocky plants, $2.26 per 1000; seedlings, 
$1.00. Morris Greenhouse, Rantoul, 111. 

"Best Yet" tomato seed, pkt., 50c: oz., $2.50. 
Fillbasket, (Balch's), flic new forcing tomato, 
pkt., $1.00. Toerner Greenhouses, Logan, O. 

Over 100,000 transplanted Grand Rapids let- 
tuce, $2.00 per 1000. 

Ferguson Bros., Sta. D. Omaha, Neb. 

Transplanted lionny Best and Earliana, $1.50 
100. .V. t'. Spcrry, Xooileslia, Kan. 

Field-grown parsley roots, postpaid, $1.00 100; 
$3.00 1000. Cash. J. D. Hume, Encanto, Cal. 

Transplanted Grand Rapids lettuce, |2.60 per 
1000. J. Rolfe, H ammonton, N. J. 

Rhubarb roots, 2-jt.-oIA, $26.00 per 1000. 

A. 0. Bperry, Neodesha, Kan. 

VERBENAS. 

VERBENAS. 
Large well rooted top cuttings of verbenas In 
8 good named varieties. Clean, healthy stock, 
free from mildew, shipped under separate labels, 
but In collection only, $1.00 per 100; $9.00 per 
1000. See our ads for carnations elsewhere in 
these columns. 
STUPPY FLORAL CO., ST. JOSEPH, MO. 

Verbena rooted cuttings of the very best va- 
rieties, $1.00 per 100, $8.50 per 1000; 2Vi-in. 
pots, $3.50 per 100: .$30.00 per 1000. 

Anglin & Walsh Co., Williamsbridge. N. Y. 

Verbenas, R. 0., 70o per 100, $6.00 per 1000, 
all named. Prepaid. 
I B. D. Brant. Clay Center, Kan. 



Verbena, Improved Beauty of Oxford, the bet' 
of all pink verbenas, strong young stock, 60c' 
per doz., $3.00 per 100. Lemon verbenas, strong 
stock, 50c doz., $4.00 per 100. 
Rockford Seed Farms, H. W. Buckbee 

Forest City Greenhouses, Rockford, 111 

The finest collection of verbenas to be foao< 
anywhere; over 40 varieties. Send for onr list 
with prices. Onr new Plant Bulletin now read} 
for mailing. Do yon want a copy? 

S. S. PBNNOCK-MEEHAN CO.. 
1608-20 LUDLOW ST., PHILADELPHIA, PA 

VINCAS. 

Vinca varlegata and green, 2500 July field- 
rooted layers, 3 and more strong leads, $2.2C 
per 100, $20.00 per 1000; 2500 August layers, 2 
and more strong leads, $1.75 per 100, $15.00 pet 
1000; medium field clumps, well set with leads, 
$5.00 per 100. The above is flrst-class stock 
that is ready for business. Speak quick with the 
Cash. W. J. Engle, R. 8, D ayton, O. 

Vinca variegata, strong well rooted cuttings, 
90c per 100, $8.00 per 1000. Extra good A.spara- 
gus plumosus, 2-in., $2.25 per 100. Begonias, 
iuminosa and Prima Donna, mixed, 2'/i-in.. very 
strong, $3.00 per 100. Cigar plants, K. C, 75c 
per 100. Cash. Peter Herb, Mt. Healthy, O. 

VINCA VARIEGATA. 

100 1000 

50,000 2%-ln $3.00 $25.00 

Immediate delivery. Cash with order. 
Paul M. Halbrooks, Florist, Newark, O. 

Vinca variegata, well rooted cuttings, full 
1000, $8.00, less than 1000, $1.00 per 100; soU 
established, $1.25 per 100, $12.00 per 1000; 2^- 
in. pots, $2.00 per 100. 
C. H. Jacobs. Westfield. Mass. 

Vincas variegata, 2%-in. pots, $3.00 per 100; 
$25.00 per 1000; 3-in. pOts, $6.00 per 100, $50.00 
per 1000; 4-in. pots, $9.00 per 100, $80.00 per 
1000; rooted tips, $1.00 per 100, $9.00 per 1000. 

Anglin & Walsh Co., Williamsbridge, N. Y. 

75,000 fine variegated vincas. sand rooted cut- 
tings, well branched, will make good plants for 
spring, worth double what you usually get, $1.50 
per 100; $12.00 per 1000. Cash, please. 
Dobbs & Son, Vinca Specialists, Auburn, N. Y. 

Vinca variegata, 2-ln. pots, |2.50 per 100, 
$20.00 per 1000. 

La Crosse Floral Co., La Crosse, Wis. 

Vinca variegata, 2-ln., $2.00 per 100, in any 
quantity. 
B. Rawlings, Wholesale Grower, Allegany, N. T. 

Vinca variegata, rooted cuttings, A-1 stook, 
$1.60 per 100, $10.00 per 1000. 

Elltch Greenhouses, Denver, Colo. 

Vinca variegata, bed stock, ready for 3^-ln., 
6c; 3-in., 4c; fall tips, Ic. 
E. D. Van Antwerp, R. F. D. 1, Syracuse, N. Y. 

R. C. Vinca variegata, Ic; 2-in., $2.00 per 100; 
3-in., 4c, $35.00 per 1000; field clumps, 7c. Cash. 
Port Allegany Greenhouses, Port Allegany, Pa. 

Vinca variegata, field-grown, from 3-in. pots, 
heavy plants, $7.00 per 100, $65.00 per 1000. 
Erie Floral Co., Erie, Pa. 

Vinca variegata and green, from flats, Ic; 
2-in., 2c; strong 4-ln., $7.00 per 100. 

W. H. Wetherbee, Charles City, Iowa. 

Vinca variegata, rooted cuttings, good itook, 
$1.00 per 100; $9.00 per 1000. 

Wm. Schwan & Son, Fredonia, N. T. 

Vinca variegata, strong 214-in.. ready for 
3-in., A-1 stock, $2.00 per 100; 300 for $5.00 
Chas. Whitton, York & Gray, Utica, N. Y. 

Tineas, 2 '/-in.. $3.00 per 100. 
R. R. Davis Co., Morrison, 111. 

Vinca variegata. rooted tip cuttings, fine, $1.00 
per 100. Wagner's Greenhouses, Tiffin, O. 

Vinca var.. 4-in., 7o, to make room during 
Feb. 11. A. Maximer, Greensburg, Ind. 

Vinca, variegata, 2iA-in., $2.50 per 100. 

L. A. Eaton & Sons, Conneaut, O. 

Vinca var., 2^^-in., .3c: 3-ln., 6c; 4-ln., 80. 
Tripp Floral Co., Walton, N. Y. 

Vinca variegata, R. 0., OOc per 100; fS.OO par 
1000. Cash. Byer Bros., Chambersbnrg, Pa. 

Vinca R. C, $10.00 per 1000. Cash. 
D. R. Herron, Olean, N. T. 

VIOLETS. 

VIOLETS— CALIFORNIA VIOLETS. 
The only Growers' Association in sonthem 
California which supplies local and distant 
wholesalers and shippers with qnallty California 
violets. See our display adv., this Isane. 
SOUTHERN CAL. FLOWBB MARKET. XNC, 
421-28 Wall St., Los Angelea. Pal. 

Violets. Swanley White. 2i4-in., $2.50 per 100; 
sand rooted cuttings, 1.25 per 100. 

A. B. Campbell, Cochransville, Pa. 

MISCELLANEOUS. 

Yellow Jasmine, Gelsemium, heavy, well root- 
ed, $12.60 per 100; Gardenias, R. C, 4 to O-ln., 
$1.60 per 100; whIte-flowerIng dogwood seedlings, 
$1.00 per 100. Magnolia glauca seedlings, $1.00 
per 100. Calycanthus, true, Florida's under- 
ground suckers, well rooted, 4 to 6-ln.. $2.78 
per 100. All prepaid. Cash with order. 

Sam Stokes & Son, Lecompte, La. 



PLEASE MENTION THE REVIEW WHEN WRITING ANY OF THESE ADVERTISERS 



February 1, 1917. 



The Florists' Review 



143 



Fererfew, 2%-ln., 2c; Gov. Herrlck and Rus- 
sian Tlolet divisions, Ic. Hooted ground runners 
of the following mums: Chas. Eager, Wells' 
Late Pink, Buckingham, Diana, Queen of 
Whites, Qulnola, IMic. Started cannas, ready 
to pot: Mrs. Conard and King Humbert, 4c; 
Florence Vaughan, 2c. Wandering Jew, tri- 
color and green, Ic. Variegated leaved and 
Armstrong's single tuberoses, fleld-grown clumps, 
$2 00 per bushel. Pallida Dalmatlca and white 
Japanese Iris, 8c. Everbearing strawberry, l%c. 
Spiraea Van Houttei, 3 to 4 ft., 15c. 500 silver 
maples, 2-ln., 12 ft. high, 25c. 100 pin oak, 
2-in., 10 ft. high, $1.50. Kudzu vines, 3c. Al- 
theas, mixed seedlings, Ic. Amoor River South 
privet seedlings, Ic. Will exchange. What have 
you? A. H. Dalley, Knoxvllle, Tenn. 

YELLOW JASMINES. HEAVY; CLIMRING 
KOSES, FIELD-GROWN; LEMON LILY, 
HP:AVY; PEONIES, 3 TO 5 EYES, 4 VARS., 6c; 
IKIS, 17 VARS., COREOPSIS, 214c. 

LESLIE LITTELL, 
MADISON, TENNESSE E. 

("olcus, Rod and White Trailing Queen, R. C, 
COc per 100; 2-in., $2.00 per 100. R. C. Helio- 
tropes, 75c per 100; 2-in. Asparagus Spreugerl, 
.$i;.00 per 100; $18.00 per 1000. 
Abbey Ave. Greenhouses, Dayton, O. 

TO EXCMAWae. 

To Exchange: — ^Alternantheras, beautiful 
stock, from sand, red and yellow, $1.00 per 
100; $7.50 per 1000; blp stock plants, full of 
cuttings, $2.00 per 100; $15.00 per 1000; Coleus, 
fine 2-in., in assortment, $2.00 per 100; Smilax, 
strong, 2%-in., $3.00 per 100; John Wana- 
niaker ferns, 4-in., $20.00 per 100; for cuttings 
of Carnation Nebraska or 2-in. vincas. What 
have you? Write quick. 
Thornton Floral Co., Streator, III. 

To Exchange — Or will sell: Enchantress car- 
ii.ntions, 2 and 2V4-in., SVsc; White Enchantress, 
Ited Rcacon, Winsor, W. Wonder and Perfec- 
tion, R. C, 3c; fuchsia, 2-in., 4 best varieties, 
.3(": English Ivy R. C. 2c; 4-ln.. 10c; canna mu- 
s;ofolin, bulbs, IMjc; Egnndale, bronze, 2c; snap- 
dragons, white, 3-in., 4c, for S. A. Nutt, Poite- 
vine, Jean Vlaud cuttings, or 2-in. stock. 

Hill City Greenliouses, Fores t City, Iowa. 

I'o Exohangp— Or will sell: 2V'i-ln. Mme. Sal- 
loroi, 2K'C; 4-in. Primula chinensis, 10c; 4-in 
Primula ohconica, 10c; 2i/i-in. geraniums, 2%c- 
tlie primulas are in bud and bloom, for coleus' 
ferns, cannas, or wliat have you? ' 

^ J. S. Bennett, Paw Paw, 111. 

To Exchange:— Cyclamen, 4-ln., good flower 
and fine plants, all colors, 15c, for plumosus 
seedlings, hydrangeas, dracaenas or anything 
we can use. 
Briscoe & Stowell, Charles City, Iow a. 

To Exchange— Carnations, snapdragons, vin- 
cas and canna roots (see classified ads) for dou- 
ble petunias. Begonia Melior, fuchsias, single 
red or white geraniums or what have you 
Elitch Gardens Co.. Denver, Colo. 

To Exchange:— 400 English ivy, in 3i/4-In. 

5?i^'„''""*^^^'.*^,^"^ ^'°^ KlUamey roses. In 
.^Mi-ln. pots. J. Welmann, Flemlngton. N. J. 

naTi°on^R''''c"^^~^''"^'°'"''' ^'^'^^enas, for car- 
C. C. Warburton, Battle Creek, Mich. 

fn?^°ov''i^^"^^*~f^^P*'"^S"' Sprengerl, 3-ln.. 6c. 
tin^o*"^* "•^^'^'■''"'"'"8 or carnation rooted cut- 
tings. Current Floral Co.. Lexington. Ky. 



WANTED. 



Wanted— Shrubs and evorKreens for lining out. 
Edwin Bishop, Milford, Va. 



Wanted— Bench plants of Russell roses, 
houth Park Floral Co., New Castle, Ind. 



Prw"nn''TK~< lyse roots of Antigonon leptopus. 
i rl. no ob ject. Dave Turner, Phoefllx, Ariz. 

CANE STAKES. 



CANE STAKES. 

Green .lapaneso, 21^-ft... $l^r r-?m 

Green Japanese 3i|-ft ! ^^'fi *g'oo 

^aturaIJ„paue,e,''c-ft. :.:::::::::: -k Iw 

A. Henderson & Co.. Box 125, Chicago. 

to'^bafe"*tio''^^ ^*^1^^?' ^^^"^ f^^^^' 3 'eet. 2000 
$13 50 npr i?*', P" ?"'^: 3% feet, 2000 to bale, 
g^Jg^^l ^Amerlcan Bulb Co.. 172 N. 

Cane stakes, 4 to 6 ft, $5.00 per 1000. 

- — "^- R. Craddock, Humboldt, Tenn. 

Japanese cane stakes, 6, 8 and 10 ft. 

B. E. />r J. T. Cokely, Scranton, Pa. 

CARNATION STAPLES. 

marZT'^^^^^^tlon staples, best Btaples on the 
paid P" ^^^'- 3000 for $1.00. postage 

2e4^RSf;H»C^ FLOWER EXCHANGE. 
^^Tij55fi2lP»LSt^ Detroit. Mic h. 

for $1 S?"^'" carnation staples. 35c per 1000; 3000 
tgLHiOO^. I. L. P Hlabury. Qalesburg, 111. 

-=-^ PgCOWATIVE MATERIAL. 

daggMferns 'P**^'"^ »''<=«"» <"» a special lot of 

on?y'V"n»i^^^!, 'estoonlng for your decorations, 
only 6c per yard. 10 yds. free with first order. 

-_____Cro wl Fern Co.. Mil Ungton. Mass. 

ALBUaToF DESIGNS. 

Florlifn- t>Jk J?*' ^'^P^ prepaid. 

"ori.ts Pnb, Co.. Ckxton Bldjr., Chicago. 



FLOWER COLORINQS. 



CYACBINB FLOWER COLORING, yellow, 
blue, orange, pink, American Beauty, 20c per 
qt. Delivered to you by mall. 
0. R. Cranston, 6 Gouverneur St.. Newark, N. J. 



QLASS. 



60 boxes. 16x18 D. S. A., flasa $4.60 per 
box. This is extra good glass, no thin panes 
mixed in. 

L. R. Frlederlchsen, Wilton Junction, Iowa. 

GLASS. 6x8, 8x10, 10x12. 10x14. $2.00 per box. 
Other sizes at factory prices. 
0. N. Robinson & Bro.. Dept. 26 Baltimore, Md. 



QOLO FISH. 



Goldflsli, aqnarlnm plants, mails, castles, 
globes, aquariums, fish food, nets, etc., whole- 
sale. Send for price lists. Large breedlnKpairs 
for sale. Franklin Barrett, Breeder, 4810 D 
St., Philadelphia. Pa. 

Goldfish, aquarium plants, castles, globes and 
all supplies. Send for wholesale catalogues. 

AUBURNDALB GOLDFISH CO., 
1449 Madison St.. Tel. Haymarket 152. Chicago. 



qrecns. 



Asparagus plumosus sprays. $2.00 per 100; 
extras to help cover express charges. Prompt 
shipment. Satisfaction guaranteed. Cash, 
please. Norman C. Miller, Fort Pierce, Fla. 

Southern wild smilax, $2.00 per case. 

Wintergreen Gardens, Marion, Ala. 



MOSS. 



Sheet moss, natural, $2.00 per sack; sphag- 
num moss, burlap bales, dry and clean, $1.35. 
American Bulb Co., 172 N. Wabash Ave., Chl- 
cago, 111. 

Natural sheet moss, $2.00 per sack; 10 sacks. 
$1.75 each; 25 sacks and over, $1.C5 each. Ex- 
tra large pieces. G. M. Reburn & Co., 100 N. 
Wabash Ave., Chicago. 

PAINT. 

TABOR WHITE PAINT FOR GREENHOUSES. 

Write for free sample can and prices. 

TABOR PAINT CO. (Not Inc.), 

803 W. Madison St., Chicago, 111. 

PRINTINQ. 

CATALOGUES, PRICE LISTS, CIRCULARS, 
liBTTBRHBADS, envelopes, calendars, shipplnf 
tags, and all kinds of high-grade printing in 
black or colors, for florists, nurserymen and seeds- 
men. Large issues of catalogues a specialty. 
Samples and prices sent free. 
Harry J. Squires. Goo d G roun d. N. Y. 

Typewritten form letters, office stationery and 
florists' labels a specialty. Samples on request. 
Snow the Circular Letter Man, Camden, N. Y. 

PUSSY \A/ILLOWS. 

Pussy willows, scions, $3.00 per 100; |26.00 

{>er 1000. The money-making kind. Jacob Buss- 
er, 11360 So. Fairfield Ave.. Cliicago, 111. 

SASH. 

Standard hotbed sash with cross-bar, 85c eadt; 
lots of 25 and over, 80c each. Satisfaction guar- 
anteed or money refunded. Glass. " 6x8. 8x10, 
10x12 or 10x14. $2.00 per box of 50 sq. ft. 
C. N. Robinson & Bro.. Dept. 26. Baltimore, Md. 

SPHAQWUM MOSS. 

SPHAGNUM MOSS. 

10 bbl. bales, burlaped $4.50 each 

5 bale lots 4.00 each 

10 bale lots 3.75 each 

Our NEW plant bulletin now ready. 

Yours for the asking. 

S. S. PENNOCK-MEEHAN CO., 

1608-20 Ludlow St., Philadelphia. Pa. 

Sphagnum moss, 10 bbl. bale, $2.25; 5 bales, 
$10.25; 5 bbl. bale, $1.30; 5 bales, $5.50; orchard 
peat and rooted peat, 70c sack; peat moss, 65c 
sack, 5 sacks, $3.(K), burlaped, 30c extra. Cash, 5c 
less. Jos. H. Paul, Box 156, Manahawkin, N. J. 

10 bales spliagnum moss, choicest selected 
stock, standard size, in burlap, $10.00; wired, 
.$S.00. Cash. 
M. L. HANCOCK & SONS. CITY POINT, WIS. 

Sphagnum moss, standard .'iize, burlap bales, 
$1.00; wire bound, 80c earli. 
Z. K. Jewott. Sparta, Wis. 

Sphagnum moss, burlap bales, $1.35 each; 10 
bales $12 75. 
A. 'Henderson & Co., Box 125, Chicago, 111. 

Sphagnum moss, very best quality, $1.20 per 
bale; 10 bales for $12.00. 

H. W. Buckbee, Rockford, 111. 

TOBACCO. ^ 

Fresh tobacco stems. In bales. 200 lbs., $3.00;; 
500 lbs., $5.50; 1000 lbs.. $10.00; ton. $18.00. 
Cash with order. Scharfif Bros.. Va n Wert. O. 

Strong tobacco dust, $1.75 per 100 lbs.; 200 
lbs., $3.00. G. H. Hunkel, Milwaukee. Wis. 

WAX FLOWERS. 

Wax flower designs. AVe are the leaders. 

B. E. & J. T. Cokely. Scranton. Pa. 

WIRE WORK. 

We are the largest manufacturers of wire work 
In the west. E. F. Winterson Co., 166 North 
Wabash Ave.. Chicago. 



To save money, let us quote you on your next 
order. B. B. A J. T. Cokely, Scranton, Pa. 

Falls City Wire Works. 
451 3rd St., Louisville, Ky. 

William E. Hlelscher's Wire Works, 

264-266 Randolph St., Detroit, Mlcli. 

WOOD LABELS. 

LABELS FOR NURSERYMEN AND FLORISTS. 
Benjamin Chase Co., Perry Village, N. H. 

Horticultural Books 

We can tttpply any of the {ol- 
lowing books at the price* 
notedt postpaidt and any odur 
kook at publishers' price i 

Daflodlla and How to Grow Them 

*By A. M. "Ktebt. Ati that is reaHyworth while 
about these most popular of spring bulbs, written from 
the standpoint of American conditions. $I.SU 



Hardy Perennials and Old-taslxloned 
Garden Flow^era. 

By J. Wood. Describing the most desirable plants 
for boKders, shrubberies, etc., foli.'ige and flowering. 
Illustrated. $».00 

Tomato Culture. 

By W. W. Tracy, U. S. Dept. of Agriculture. The 
book deals with every phase of tomato culture and 
was written for tlie man wlio wants tiie latest and most 
complete information on the subject. Cloth. 150 
pages. Illustrated. &U cents 



The Forcine Book. 

(By L. H. Bailky. In this work the author has 
compiled in handy form the cream of all the available 
information on the subject of forcing vegetables under 
glass. In addition to this, the experience of many 
practical growers in different localities is furnished. 

Sl*9fi 

Celery Culture. 

By W. R. Beattie, Bureau of Plant Industry, 
U. S. Dept. of Agriculture. A practical guide for be- 
ginners and a standard reference for those already 
engaged in celery growing. Cloth. 150 pages. Illus- 
trated. fiO cents 



Bulbs and Tuberous Rooted Plants. 

By O. L. AlTjKN. A complete history, description, 
methods of propagation and full directions for the suc- 
cessful culture of bulbs in the garden, dwelling or 
greenhouse. The illustrations which embellish this 
work have been drawn from nature, and have been 
engraved especially for this book. Cloth. $1.50 



The Chrysanthemum. 

By Arthur Hkrrington. formerly president of 
Chrysanthemum Society of America. 'I'he most com- 
plete and compreliensive work on the cultivation of the 
chrysanthemum tiiat has yet been published in Amer- 
ica. Tlie book will l)e welcomed for tlie lucid, com- 
prehensive, as well as tlie practical cliaracter of its 
contents. Haudsomely illustrated. 108 pages. 5x7 
inches. &u cents 

Cabbaee. Canlinower and Allied 
VeBotables. 

By C. L. Allen. An explanation of the require- 
ments, conditions, cultivation and (general management 
pertaining to the entire cal)l)aKe group. The chapter 
on seed raising is prol)ably tlie most authoritative treat- 
ise on this subject ever publislied. Insects and fungi 
are given due attention. Illustrated. 128 pages. 
Cloth. 60 cents 



Gardenlne (or Pleasure. 

By Pkter Henderson. An illustrated guide to 
the amateur in the fruit, vegetable and flower garden, 
with full directions for the greenhouse, conservatory 
and window garden. Technical terms and phrases 
professional gardeners use in writing or speaking on 
matters relating to horticulture liave been avoided as 
far as possible. 404 pages. Cloth. $I.SO 

Greenhouse Construction. 

By Prof. L. R. Tajt. A complete manual on the 
building, heating, ventilating and arrangement of 
greenhouses, and the construction of hotbeds, frames 
and plant pits. Lucid descriptions and 118 diagrams 
and illustrations make every detail clear to the amateur 
and professional gardener and florist. Cloth. 218 
pages. $l.aO 



Florists' Publishing Co. 

5S0-56O Caxton Buildlnc 
506 So. Dearborn St. CHICAGO 



PLEASE MENTION THE REVIE77 WHEN WRITING ANY OF THTtsE ADVERTISERS 



144 



Tht Florists' Review 



Fbbbuabt 1, 1917. 



SAN FEANCISOO NOTES. 

[Continued from page 89.] 

recently on his way home from the 
Orient. 

Mr. Eowe, well known landscape gar- 
dener of Santa Barbara, Cal., was a 
recent visitor. 

S. Murata & Co., of Los Angeles, 
have sent in large inquiries for roses to 
the San Francisco market. 

Domoto Bros, have a nice cut of For- 
mosa lilies and report a strong demand; 
also plenty of business in pot stock, 
cyclamens, cinerarias, azaleas, etc. 

C. Kooyman has changed the arrange- 
ment of his new store, so that his stock 
shows to much better advantage. The 
window extends back several feet on 
one side of the store and he has made 
provision to show flowers on that side 
and supplies on the other. 

Senator Eigdon, of San Luis Obispo, 
has introduced a bill in the legislature, 
which seeks to establish the office of 
seed commissioner under the jurisdic- 
tion of the State Horticultural Commis- 
sioner at a salary of $2,400 a year. It 
•would be the duty of the new officer to 
establish a standard of purity of seeds 
for agricultural purposes. 

Alfred T. Christenson, Berkeley gar- 
dener, died at the Cottage hospital in 
San Rafael, January 22, from injuries 
sustained the night before in Mill Val- 
ley, when an interurban train severed 
both of his legs at the knees. 

Manager Picetti, of the flower and 
plant stand in the Emporium, which is 
operated by C. Navlet & Co., of San 
Jose, says his force is rushed, as every- 
body seems to be starting to plant roses 
and general nursery stock. 

The Misses Hannon report business 
good at their store on Sutter street and 
stock better than it was a week ago. 

In speaking of his experiences with 
street competition, a florist whose shop 
IS in a locality particularlv favorable 
to Street vending remarked that fre- 
quently women buy flowers from the 
stands at the corner and then bring 
them in to him to make over and add a 
few first-class blooms or some fresh 
foliage. Sometimes they go farther than 
that, too. They buy violets from the 
street men and come into his place for 
a pin to pin them on with. 

Mr. Stappenbeck, the American Flo- 
rist, on Polk street, says he has had 
plenty of first-class roses all season for 
his own use. Wild buttercups have been 
shown at this store since before Christ- 
mas. Some wild irises have been re- 
ceived also. 

As the result of a recent visit to San 
Francisco from New York officials of 
the American Express Co., local flower 
shippers are hopeful of getting a lower 
rate on all eastern shipments of Cali- 
fornia flowers, greens, etc. This, it is 
claimed, would have considerable influ- 
ence in making toward a wider distribu- 
tion of flowers from this state 

S. H. G. 

Dajrton, O.— William Hardert has 
leased the greenhouse formerly conduct- 
ed by Mrs. E. M. Phebus, on rural route 
No. 14. 

Portland, Ind. — Ophelia, Iloosier 
Beauty and Killarney Brilliant roses, 
grown "hy W. Frank' & Son, won the 
Indiana silver rose trophy awarded at 
the recent Indianapolis meeting and 
exhibition of the State Florists' Asso- 
ciation. The Portland men have car- 
ried off the prize for three consecutive 
years. 




DOU 

THIS illustration shows 
you how the column 
rafter and truss are all bolted 
together. 

Note that word bolted. 

We do not trust to set 
screws or clamps to hold. 
Everything is bolted fast, 
even to the column cap being 
bolted through and through 
the pipe. 

Now notice how all the 
members carry either double 
bolts or double pairs of bolts. 

Particularly notice that 
the truss is a double angle 

Hitckities 



BLE 

iron, bolted to and on both 
sidesof the rafter splice plate. 

Observe in what a mechan- 
ically perfect way the splice 
plate is used as a joiner for 
all the members brought to- 
gether at this point. 

Following then, as we do, 
this same mechanical thor- 
oughness in the entire con- 
struction, you can well under- 
stand why our houses have 
the reputation tHey have. 

You know we go anywhere 
for business. Or to talk 
business. 




NEW YORK OFFICE 
1170 Oreadway 



GENERAL OFFICER «ND FACTORY, ELIZARHH. N. J. 
ROSTON OFFICE 
49 ftUnl Rt. 



PNIUDELPNU OFFICE 
4R Ra. ISth Rt. 



Mention The ReTlew when yon write. 



1886-1917 



GREENHOUSE 
LUMBER 

LOCKLAND LUMBER CO., Lockland, O. 



"ALL-HEART" CYPRESS 

WORKED TO SHAPES. 
HOTBED SASH. 
PECKY CYPRESS. 
SQUARE RED CEDAR POSTS. 



GREENHODSE TILE BENCHES 

(Burned day, same aa flower pota) 
are rapidly taklof; the place of wood. Onr benchea 
are easily erected and will last a lifetime. Write ua 
today regardlDi; your requirements. 

Are now furnishing our new beveled roundtni; cor- 
ner, 9-lnch width. Floor Tile. Write for partlcplars. 

CAMP CONDUIT CO., Cleveland, Ohio 

Always mention the Florists* Review wheo 
writing advertisers. 




EVANS' 
CHALLENGE 
THE BEST 

Write for Catalogue 

John A. Evans Co., 
Richmond, Ind. 



Always mention the Florists* Review 
wben writing; adveriisers. 



Febiuiauy 1, 1917. 



The Florists^ Review 



III 



IDI 



!□! 



c/Tmerican GreenHou«/e Manufacturing Co., Chicago 



A 
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YouVe been looking for 



You can't trade dollars with us 
every day, but we're willing to let 
you do it for a few days just to 
make you acquainted with two 
things you'll learn to swear by — 

— American Snow White Paint and 
— American Simon Pure Putty 

"Pigs is pigs" all right, but paint isn't paint. 
There's a difference. Paint for greenhouse 
purposes must stand a test that would make or- 
dinarily good paint look like whitewash. Try any 
of it out on a piece of cypress — just like paint- 
ing a sponge with water colors, you say ? Surely. 
Then try American Snow White. Ifs its own 
advocate — it needs no defense. 

$5000.00 worth of American Snow White Paint 
has been set aside by us to be sold AT COST— 
$2.10 a gallon, ^vith an additional discount of 
5'( for cash with order. This is your chance. 

You'll need American Simon Pure Putty in replacing 
your broken lights. Now don't buy this putty if you 

can buy the same quality cheaper— we can't. 

100-lb. tin, $3.35 50-lb. tin, $1.75 25-lb. tin, 90c 

The best recommendation we can give to American Snow 
White Paint and American Simon Pure Putty is the fact 
that they are used on the AGMCO Supergrreenhouse— 

— the highest-priced and the cheapest greenhouse. 
Where do you want your order delivered ? 




$2.10 a gal. 



5'( off for cash 



I 



$2.00 



A 
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a chance like this^ 



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/m 



Office: Masonic Temple, Chicago 

Just around the corner from the Wholesale Flower Market 

Factory: Cicero, 111. 

i'iziMiziiC'izii={ini*ini={in»AGMcn*iiziMin«iin!=ici*ioj=4izi*i 



Q^QQg^^ 



/(M 



IV 



The Florists' Review 



Fkbkuakv 1. 1917. 




MuiiMiiiiiMiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiHiiiiiiiiiiiiuiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiHiiMmnnnnn^^^^ 



Customers Are Our Best Advertisers 





Erected for Miller Floral Co., Farmington (near Salt Lake City), Utah 

Whenever we sell or wherever we sell, our goods 
and service always have the same high quality 



MILLER FLORAL COMPANY 

Wholesale Florists 



FarmiDgton, Utah, Aug. 28, 1916. 

John C. Moninger Co., Chicago, 111. 

Gentlemen: The three large houses you put up 
this year for us are now completed and planted with 
roses and carnat ons, and we wish to compliment you 
on your new style of steel construction. 

We consider that the use of channel iron in the 
construction of greenhouses is tiie best idea ever put 
into use in greenhouse building, as it gives more 
strength to the house for the amount of shade than 
any other type we know of. 

This last addition to our plant gives us now about 
800,000 feet of glass, all of which is of your construc- 
tion, and the new houses are so much superior to the 



old that there is no comparison between them, although 
the old houses are very Hue houses. 

Your new all-steel house is a marvel of strength, 
lightness and beauty, and not nearly as expensive as 
we thought it would be ; and we would like to have the 
privilege of recommending it to other growers who 
want to build good greenhouses, and would be glad to 
show our new houses to anyone as an example of fine 
greenhouse construction. 

We wish to thank you also lor the prompt attention 
you gave to the few kicks we made on questions of 
immaterial imi)ortance, and hope to have the pleasure 
of doing more business with you. Respectfully youis, 

(Signed) Miller Floral Co.. 
KM/OF By Robert Miller. Mgr. 



Send for Proof Book 



JOHN C. MONINGER COMPANY 




CHICAGO 

914 BLACKHAWK STREET 



NEW YORK 

807 MARBRIDGE BLDG. 



CINCINNATI 

2309 UNION CENTRAL BLDG. 



illlNIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIM 



EVERYTHING FOR THE GREENHOUSE 



MiiiiiiiiniinmiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiniiDimini 




I I 




SUBSCRIPTIONS 



$1.50 ^"-^ 



Yt-nr 



^JlEyrjEh^ 



A WEEKLY JOURNAL «« FLORISTS. SEEDSMEN *"■» NURSERYMEN. 

IXOBISTS' PUBLISHING CO.. 6S0 Cazton BuUdlnar. 608 South DMtrborn St.. OHIO AGO 



VOL. XXXIX. 



CHICAQO. FEBRUARY 8. 1917. 



NO. 1002. 



Fancy Leaved Caladiumii» 

Kxtra fine large bulbs, in ten named varieties, per doz., $1.75; |)pr 

100, $12.00. 
Choice mixed varieties, per doz., $1.60; per 100, $10.00. 

Tuberous Rooted Begonias 

Single— scarlet, white, crimson, orange, pink, yellow, per doz., 50c; 
per 100. $3.00; per 1000. $26.00. 

Gloxinias- In siv named sorts, per doz., 50c; per 100, $3.50; per lOOO. 
$30.00. 

Asparagus Plumosus Nanus 

Greenhouse-grown seed per 100. 50c: per 1000, $3.2,5; 5u00 for $15.00 

Asparagus Sprengeri per 100, 15c; per lOCO. 85c; 5000 for $3 50 

A. HENDERSON & CO., 211 N. SUte St., Chicato 


FOR 

Lily Bulbs 

WRITE WARD 


For the best of this Sea- 
son's offering, see our 
display ad in this issue. 

C. C. PoUworth Co., Nilwaukee,Wis. 


ROOTED CARNATION CUHINGS 

Clean, healthy stock. 100 1000 

White Wonder. Ward. Beacon. Matchless and all stand- 
ard varieties $3 00 $25.00 


Yellow Prince, selected stock 4.00 35 00 


Rosette. S3lected stock 4.00 35.00 

Enchantress Supreme, selected stock 3.50 30. oo 

Pink Delight 5.00 4000 


Good Cheer 4.00 ;<•"> 00 


IJenora. selected stock 3.50 30.00 


All the good new ones at market prices. Ask me about t!\em. I 
can tell you which ones will pay to grow. 

See classified list for Seasonable plants, rooted cuttings, seeds and 
bulbs. Write for complete stock circular. 

SATISFACTION GUARANTKKD 

ROMAN J. IRWIN, 108 W. 28th St., New York City 


GIGANTEUM 

7- W Case of :'.()0, $1 i.OO; per lOd, $ C.Od 

s- 10 Case of 225. J 7.0(1; per UK), 8.50 

it-10 Case of 200, l!».O0; per 100. 10.00 

MAGNIFICUM 

S-i». . Case of 200, $10.50; per 100, $().00 


ORCHIDS 

W. J. & M. S. VESEY 

Fort Wayne, Ind. 


Full lioe of Chrysanthemum and Carnation Cuttings. 
Write for list and prices. 

Wm. F. Kasting Co.'''BLV°pr:"n ' 


^|T If you have not receiveti our 15)17 
^^ Catalogue by the time The Review 
reaches you, drop us a card and we 
will send by first mail. Our special- 
ties: Roses, Carnations and Mums. 

THE E. G. HILL CO. 

RICHMOND, INDIANA 


SEASONABLE SUGGESTIONS- -SOW NOW 

ASTERS-Our stork is the finest to be liad. 

Queen of the Market, separate colors, trade pkt,. 10c: k o/... 

:st)c; oz. '.'Oc 
Queen of the Market, all colors, mixed, trade pkt., lOc; ^ m.. 

25c; 0/... I'iii;. 
Sempie's Branching, separate colors, trade pkt.. 10c; H oz., 

;io: oz.. '.lie. 
Sempie's Branching, all colors, mi,\ed, trade pkt.. 10c: H o/., 

'lf)v: oz.. lie. 

ALYSSUM, F.ittle Gem ( Barnard's .Strain) trade pkt., 15( ; oz.. :5c. 
PETUNIA, H;irnard s .Mammoth Single Mi.ved. trade pkt.. $1.00. 
Send for Our Complete Florists" Catalogue. 

TflE W. W. BARNARD CO.,».!S%°£r.VCIiica(i 



INDEX TO ADVERTISEMENTS AND TABLE OF CONTENTS PAGES T>A/0 AND THREE 



II 



The Florists' Review 



Fbbbuaby 8, 1917. 




It Is 18 feet wide by 85 feet lonsr, and lias one pompartment. 

Catholic Cemetery Greenhouse 

At Fort Wayne, Indiana 



THE day of cheap wooden 
houses is past with cem- 
eteries—past, just as it is 
wiih everything else, if pen- 
cils are sharpened and some 
real figuring done. 

You know how those old 
houses used to be put away 
oflf out of sight. And no 
wonder— they certainly were 
not anything to look at. 

But now, with the attrac- 
tive houses we are building, 
they become part of the orna- 




mental landscape scheme. 
Often they are the very cen- 
ter of it. 

This one at Fort Wayne is 
next the superintendent's 
residence, right along the 
main driveway, before the 
burial plots are reached . 1 1 is 
built with our Construction 
of Everlasting Lastingness. 

That greenhouse problem of 
yours -let's talk it over to- 
gether. Say when and wliere 
and we'll be there. 



That is SiiiXTlntcndeiit Tims, liiitli' 
entrance door-s jrlve ample room to 



r's house at tlie left. Double 
brInK In ornamental tub plant**. 




At the l>a«eof the curved cave is an antfie iron, to wiiich the side sash ai'c hinged. 



At tlie loft, midway up this ilrive. the cieenhouse is located. 



lof4 &Riinihamio. 



NirW TORK 
4ad SteMt Bld< 



Builders of Qrcenhouses and Conservatories 

BALKS OFFICES 

BOSTON PHIIADBIPHIA CHICAGO ROCHXSTSB CLBVBLANI) 

Tnmont Bids. Wldener Bldg. Bookerr Bldg. Oranlto Bide. Swetland Bids. 

DKTHOTT TORONTO MONTREAL 

Penobscot BldK- Boyal Bank Bids. Traniportatlon Bids. 

FAOTOBIESt Irvlnston. N. T. Dea Plainea, IlL St. Catharlnea. Caaadft. 





Fbbbuaky 8, 1917. 



The Florists' Review 



SELECTED 



fiSlsL Florists' Flower Seeds 



NEW CROP SEED 
ASTERS 

Carlson, or Invincible 

The finest Early Aster for cutting 

Pkt. H Oz. 

White $0.15 $0.40 

Pink 15 .40 

Lavender 15 .40 



Oz. 
$1.25 
1.25 
1.25 



S. & W. Co.*s Late Branching 



Pkt. 

Pure White $0. 10 

Lavender 10 

Purple 10 

Crimson 10 

Shell-pink 10 

Rose-pink 10 

Mixed 10 



14OZ. 

$0.30 
.30 
.30 
.30 
.30 
.30 
.30 



Oz. 
$1.00 
1.00 
1.00 
1.00 
1.00 
1.00 
1.00 



PHLOX 

Drummondil 

Tall, Large-flowering 

Pkt. 

Brilliant $0.10 

Carmine 10 

Chamois Rose 10 

Isabellina 10 

Purple 10 

Scarlet 10 

White 10 

Mixed 10 



14 Oz. 
$0.30 

.:iO 

.30 
.30 
.30 
.30 
.30 
.20 



Oz. 
$1.00 
1.00 
1.00 
1.00 
1.00 
1.00 
1.00 
.60 



c 



BEQONIAS 

Gracilis Prima Donna, pale rose pkt., $ 0. 15 

Gracilis Bonfire, deep scarlet pkt., . 1 5 

Gracilis Luminosa, scarlet pkt., .15 

Semperflorens Erfordii, rose-pink— 

tr. pkt., $1.00; ^\ oz., $2.75; pkt., $0.15 



PETUNIAS 

Qiant Single Fringed 

White, Yellow, Rose, Crimson and 

Mixed each, ^\ oz., $1.00; pkt., $0.15 

Single Bedding Varieties 

Crimson pkt., $0.10; H oz., $1.C0 

Erf ordii (Rosy Morn) pkt., .10; I4 oz., .85 

Snowball, pure white pkt., AO; h oz., .45 



Pkt. Oz. 

Pyrethrum Aureum (Golden Feather) $0.05 $0.50 

Shamrock, true Irish variety 15 .50 

Torenia Fournieri Grandiflora, bl ue 10 2 . 50 



Write for our Wholesale Seed Catalogue— Free 

on request. 




^AL<VIA^ Pkt. 14OZ. Oz. 

Splendens, selected $0.05 $0.50 $1.50 

Zurich, very dwarf 15 1.25 4.50 



HYACINTH STAKES 

Just the thing for tying up Hyacinths, Tulips, Fuchsias 
and all small pot plants. 

Per 1000 

Plain, 12-inch $1 . 10 

Plain, 18-inch 1 .25 

Painted, 12-inch 1 .(JO 

Painted, 18-inch 1 . 75 



GREEN BA/WBOO CANES 



2 -ft 

3 -ft 
312-ft 

4 -ft 

5 -ft 



100 
.$0.40 
. .50 
.75 
. .80 
. 1.00 
. 1.20 



1000 

i .S.(K) 
4.00 
H 00 
7.00 
7.50 

10.00 



$17.50 
19.00 
29.00 
34. CO 
37 CO 
49.00 



10,000 
$34.00 
37.00 
57.00 
tl7.C0 
72.00 
95.00 



30-3'2 Barclay St.. New York 



^ISm^^^il^ 30-32 Barclay St., HEW YORK 



m 



The Florists' Review 



. Fbbbcaby 8, 1917. 




f^p-^ 



*^ Adverliseinenls 



'^ 



A. 

Advance Co 116 

Albert & Davidson.. 91 
Alfred Lozler Rosery 55 

Allen, J. K 77 

Alpha Flo. Co.. 52-56-73 
American Bulb Co.. 62 
American Gr'nbouse 

Mfg. Co Ill 

American Window 

Glass Co 94 

Amllng Co 2r> 

Anderson, S. A 50 

Angermueller, 0. H. 38 

Apbine Mfg. Co 98 

Archias Floral Co... 5l' 
Archias Seed Store. . 59 

Armacost & Co 6S 

Arnold, A. A 39 

Arnold & Co.. D. ('. 7(i 

Art Floral Co 54 

Aschmann, G &\ 

Aschmann Bros 88 

Ashborne Goldfish ... 34 
Atchison Seed & 

Flower Store 46 

Atlas Floral Co 47 

Attica Floral Co 43 

Auburndale Goldfish. 34 
Audubon Nursery... 81 
Augspurger & Sons. 84 
Aurora Gr'nhouse Co. 5(i 
Avenue Floral Co . . . 47 

B, 

Bader Co., John 88 

Badgley & Bisliop. . . 77 

Bailey, Harry 71 

Baker, G. 1 46 

Baker, W. J 34 

Baldwin, W. H 48 

Baldwin Co 87 

Ball, C. D 89 

Ball Floral Co 46 

Barnard Co I 

Barr & Co., B. F. . . 48 
Bassett & Wasli- 

burn G-81 

Bassett's Gardens... 71 
Batavia Grnhse. Co. . 26 

Bath, John H 55 

Baum, Chas. L 48 

Baumer, A. R 48 

Baur Floral Co.. .50-93 
Baur & Steinkamp.. 8 
Baur Window Glass. 95 
Bauscher, John .... 56 
Bayersdorf er & Co . . 35 
Beall Gr'nliouse Co. 72 

Beaven, E. A 43 

Becker's Conserva- 
tories 53 

Bell Floral Co 53 

Bemb Floral Co 47 

Benthey, F. J 75 

Berger Bros 3'2 

Bernbeimer, E 34 

Bertermann Bros ... 49 

Beaancon & Co 4G 

Beyer, Chas 52 

Beyer Floral Co 49 

BUls Floral Co 55 

Binswanger & Co... 94 
Blackistone. Z. D. . . 46 

Blind Floral Co 50 

Bobbink & Atkins.. . 89 
Bolgiano & Son... 59 60 

Bonnet & Blake 76 

Bonnot Bros 76 

Boston Florist 51 

Bowe, M. A 51 

Bower, Chas. A 98 

Boyle & Darnaud... 54 

Brague & Son 43 

Bramley & Son 49 

Braslan Co 58 

Brecht Co 40 

Breitmoyer Flo. Co. . 10 
Breitmeyer's Sons. . . 47 
Brooklyn Wholesale 

Cut Flower Co 70 

Brown, A. C 50 

Bruns, H. N m 

Bryan, A. J 88 

Buchbinder Uros. ... 40 

Buckbee, H. W 56 

Endlong, J. A 29 

Burnett Bros G2 

Burns, II. II 51 

Burpee & Co 58 

C. 

Caldwoll Co.. W. E. 9it 

Caldwell, Woodsman 43 
California Cut 

Flower Co 09 

California Florist... 54 

Callahan, M. J .50 

Camp Conduit Co. . . 98 

Carbone, Philip L. . .'■.3 

Carey, the Florist. . . 47 

Carolina Fl'r Store. . 40 

Carroll, M. M 00 



Carter, Geo. M 42 

Cass, W. & T 50 

Chapin Bros 55 

Charleston Cut Flo.. 46 
t'hatham Floral Co.. 50 
Chicago Feed & 

Fertilizer Co 99 

Chicago Flower 

Crowers' Assn.... 27 
Chicago Printed 

String Co 37 

Childs, John Lewis.. 64 
Cincinnati Cut 

Flower Exchange. 74 

Clark, G. K 48 

Clark Seed Co 58 

Clarke Bros 54 

Cliirke's Sons 51 

Classified Adv^s 102 

Climax Mfg. Co 38 

Coan, Inc., J. J. . . . 77 

Coggan, S. W 47 

Cokely, B. E. & J. T. 31 

CoUe, Jr.. A GG 

Colonial ¥Vr Shop... iA 
Comley, Henry R... 53 
("ouard & Jones. . . . 

78-79-81-83-89 

Coombs 53 

Cottage Gardens 

Nurseries 71-72 

f'oivcr., W. J .37 

Cov SeeS Co 59 

Crubb, A. F 47 

Craig Co., R 80-85 

rrawbu<'k Co 76 

Crescent Floral Gar- 
den 50 

Critchell. C. E 43 

Croom & Bro 59 

Crouch, Chas. W. .. 4« 

Crowl Fern Co . . 43 

Crump, Frank F . . . . 54 

Curable, J. L 43 

(Cunningham, Jos. H. 80 
Currier Bulb Co 71 

D. 

Darbee, Mrs. R. E.. 54 

Dards, Chas. A CI 

Darling's Fir. Shop 54 

Darling & Co 99 

De Buck, John 87 

Denver Wholesale 

Florists' Co 75 

Detroit Nicotine Co. 98 
Dickinson Co., A... 58 

Dietsch Co., A 101 

Dillon, J. L 89 

Dixon Crucible Co.. 91 

Domoto Bros 68 

Donaldson Co 52 

Donart & Stapleton. . 54 
Dorner & Sons Co.. 8 

Dreer, H. A 

61-63-95 96 

Drury, H. F 56 

Dudley Sons Co 48 

Duerr, Chas. A 49 

Duluth Floral Co. .. 55 
Dunlop, John H.... 52 
Dux Co 10-41 

£. 

Eble, Chas 47 

Edward Floral Hall. 50 
Egg Harbor Flower 

Shop 50 

Eble, Fred G 72 

Elastic-Lyke Co 94 

Elliott & Sons 62 

Elverson Pottery. . . 97 
Erne & Klingel... 28 
Evans Co.. J. A... IV 

Evenden Bros 49 

Ever- Ready Flower 

Pot Co 37 

Exotic Nurseries... 71 

F. 

Kallou, J. J 53 

Fallon, Florist 48 

Farmers' & Florists' 

Fertilizer Co. ... 99 

Feast & Sons 51 

Fellouris, J. J 70 

Fenrich, J. S 70 

Fetters, E. A 47 

Fields, L. C 57 

Fischer, Rudolph... 70 

Fischer Bros 56 

Fish Seed Co 58 

Fisk, C. H 56 

Flower Shop ..46-48 52 

FMey Co 101 

Forber & Bird 55 

Ford, Wm. P 76 

Ford, M. C 77 

Ford & Kendip Co. 90 

Forrest Fir. Shop. 50 

P'orter, E. A 47 

Kottler, Fisk.'. 

Rawson 07 




CAXTON BUIU)ING 

508 South Dearborn Street 

CHICAGO 

f T is impossible to sruarantee 
the insertion, discontinu- 
ance or alteration of any, 
advertisement unless instruc- 
tions are received by 4 p. m. 
TUESDAY. 



Fox & Son 53 

Frauenfelder, C. . . 56 

Freeman, Mrs. J. H. 47 

Frey & Frey 55 

Prey Co., C. H 55 

Friedman, O. J 56 

Froment, H. E 76 

Frost, Chas 63 

Furrow & Co 55 

G. 

Gale, J. T 84 

Galvin, Inc., Thos.. 51 
Gammage & Sons.. 53 
Garden City Pottery 

Co 70 

Garland Mfg. Co... 101 

Gary Floral Co 49 

Gasser Co 49 

Geltz, F. G 49 

Geny Bros 48 

Germain Seed & 

Plant Co 70 

Ghent Floral Co... 46 

Gibbs Bros 53 

Giblin & Co 90 

Gleave's Fir. Shop.. 54 

• Jloekler Co 40 

Goetz Sons 47 

Goldstein & 

Futterman 77 

Gorman, J. F 91 

Gove, Mrs. C. E... 53 

Graliam & Son 49 

Grand Rapids Floral 

Co 47 

Grandy 48 

Green, Edw 48 

Griffith, James F. . 91 

Orimm & Gorly 52 

Grohe, Fred 71 

Grootendorst & Sons 81 
Growers' Cut Fl'r. 77 

Gude Bros. Co 40 

Gullett & Sons 86 

Gunterberg, M. C. 28-29 

Gunther Bros 77 

Guthrie-Lorenz Co.. 55 
Guttman & Raynor. 76 

H. 

Habermehl's Sons. . 50 
Hail Association.... 95 

Hammond Co 48 

Hansen Grate Co. . 91 

Hart, Geo. B 73 

Hastings, Frank R. 50 

Haven Seed Co r,Q 

Hayes, James 52 

Hayman Grhse. Co. 48 
Heacock Co., Jos.. 88 
Helnl & Son, J. G. 49 
Heinl & Sons, J . . . 56 

Heiss Co 49 

Heller & Co 07 

Henderson, Lewis. . 55 
Henderson & Co... I 60 

Henry Co 37 

Hensley 56 

Herbert & Flelsh- 

auer 71 

Herman Bros. Co... 50 

Herrmann, A 77 

Hess & Swoboda... 55 
Hews & Co., A. II.. 97 
Hickey & Ilollis. .. 72 

Hill, E. G I 

Hill Floral Co.. 47-49 
Hill's Nursery .... 70 
Hill Nursery Co.. .78 80 
Ilinchliffe, Mrs. ... 47 



Hinde & Dauch 38 

Hitchcock, N. M 43 

Hitchings & Co... 101 

Hoerber Bros 73 

Hoffmeister Floral.. 74 

Hogewoning & Sons 60 

Hollcraft, M. B 52 

Hollywood Gardens. 54 

Holm & Olson 55 

Holton & Hunkel.. 75 
Honaker the Florist. 48 
Horticultural Adver- 
tiser 74 

Horticultural Print. 

Co 74 

IIosp, A. M 54 

Howard Rose Co 72 

Howard & Smith. . . 54 

Iluddart Floral Co.. 54 

Humfeld. C 84 

Hurff, E. F 58 

Uuscroft, G. I. 49 

I. 

Ickes-Braun Mill 

Co 100 

Ideal Dirt Band Co. 96 
Idlewild Greenhouses 48 

Igoe Bros 100 

Illinois Fl'r Box Co. 37 
Illinois Malleable... 90 
Ionia Pottery Co... 97 
Irwin. Roman J... I 
Isbell & Co B» 

J. 

Jackson & Perkins. 80-83 

Jacobs Bros 89 

Jacobs & Sons 92-94 

Jahn, H. H 51 

James, R. H 58 

Janssen Floral Co... 57 

Johnson, J. L 56 

Johnson Basket Co.. 36 

Johnstop Bros 53 

Johnston & Co 53 

Johnston Htg. Co.. 90 
Jones-Russell Co... 49 

Joseph, B. M 54 

Joy Floral Co 4G 

K. 

Kansas City Tobacco 

Pro. Co 98 

Kasting Co I 

Kay-Dimond Co 49 

Keenan & Co 56 

Keller Co.. John A.. 48 

Keller Song, J. B... 48 

Keller & Son 97 

Kellogg Flower Co.. 52 

Kelway & Son 06 

Kemble. I. 55 

Kennedy & Sons.... 53 

Kennicott Bros 26 

Kent Bros .""lO 

Kerr. R. C 46 

Kervan Co 42 

Kessler, Wm 77 

Kimberlin Seed Co.. 58 

King Construction.. 98 

Knoble Bros 49 

Knowe & Son, P... 90 

Kodak Florist 47 

Koellner Refrigera- 
tor & Ice Machine 40 

Kohr, A. F 97 

Kooyman, C 71 

Kottmiller, A 61 

Kramer Bros 71 

Kramer & Son 66 



Kroeschell Bros.... 91 

Kruchten, John 78 

Kruse, W. H 52 

Kuebler, Wm 77 

Kuehn, C. A 75 

Kuhl, Geo. A 56-85 

Kusik & Co 73 

Kyle & Foerster... 73 
Kyrk, Louis H 74 

L. 
La Crosse Floral Co. 55 
Lagarde & Speelman 66 
L. A. Floral Co... 68 

Lang Floral Co 46 

Lange, H. F. A 53 

Langhout & Co 66 

Larmon, L. L .55 

Latour-Marliac .... 66 

Laver, J. V 46 

Lawrence Floral Co. 48 

I.«chner Bros 62 

Lee, F. & S 43 

Leedle Floral Co... 89 

Lemon & Co 49 

Leonard Seed Co ... . 58 

Lilley, C. Baden 71 

Ltneaweaver & Co . . 90 

Lippman, B. A 94 

Littlefleld & Wyman 86 

Livingston Seed 49 

Lockland Lbr. Co... 92 
Logan Pottery Co . . 97 
London Flower Shop 50 
Long Island Dahlia 

Gardens 65 

Lord's Flower Room. 52 
Lord & Burnham... II 
Los Robles Nursery. 71 

Lovett, J. T 78 

Ludwlg, E. C 56 

M. 

McCallum Co 38 

McCarcon, Miss .... 40 

McConnell, Alex 51 

McCoy, L. W 54 

McCray Refrigera- 
tor Co 37 

McFarlands 47 

McGee, Walter S...100 
McHutchison & Co.. 62 
McKellar, Chas. ... 66 

McKenna, Ltd 52 

McKenney . .' 61 

McMorran & Co 98 

MacNitt Hort. Co... 81 
Madison Basketcraft 35 

Maber & Grosh 93 

Mangel, John 56 

Marine Florist 64 

Marion Floral Co... 46 

Massmann 60 

Matthews, W. G... 49 
Matthewson, J. B... 47 

Meconi, Paul 77 

Meier-Schroeder Co.. 47 

Meisner. A. F 37 

Metairie Ridge Nur. 47 
Metropolitan Mate- 
rial Co 95-98-100 

Metz & Bateman... 47 

Miami Floral Co 46 

Michell Co., H. F.. 60 
Michigan Cut 

Flower 42-93 

Millang, Chas 76 

Millang, Frank 76 

Miller. A. L 87 

Miller & Musser 73 

Miller Floral Co 69 

Mills 46 

Minge Floral Co.... 40 
Missouri Pottery 

Co 97 

Missouri Pottery & 

Supply Co 97 

Modern Mfg. Co 96 

Moninger Co IV 

Morehead Mfg. Co.. 90 

Morse & Beals 53 

Mosbjerg, Chr 66 

Mountain View Flo- 
ral Co 70 

Mulhauser & Son... 49 

Munson, H 91 

Murata & Co 69 

Murphy Co 74 

Murray. Samuel .... 52 
Myers Bros 49 

Nashville Pottery.. 97 
National Cash Reg- 
ister Co 11 

National Florists' 

Board of Trade ... 76 
Natnral Guano Co.. 99 

Naumann Co 84 

Neidinger. J. G...34 30 
Newburys, The .... 55 

Newell, A 52 

New York Florists' 
Supply Co 41 77 



Nicotine Mfg. Co... 98 

Niessen Co., Leo... 32 

Noll & Co., T. J 80 

North Floral Co 55 

0. 

Oechslin, Ernest ... 88 

Olsen, Chr 66 

Olsson, H. L 70 

Ostertag Bros 62 

P. 

Pacific Nurseries... 70 
Paducah Pottery ... 97 

Palmer & Son 50 

Park Floral Co 62-64 

Patterson, H. J 99 

Peacock Co., B. R.. 58 

Pearce, Geo 100 

Pearson, P 31-64 

Pedrick & Son 59 

Peirce, B. A 96 

Pellcano, Rossi .... 54 
Peninsula Nursery.. 72 

Penn, Henry 53 

Pennock-Meehan ..33-83 

Peters, W. B 68 

Peters & Reed 97 

Peterson Nursery... 78 

Pfaff & Kendall 90 

Pfaltzgraft Pottery. 97 
Phlla. Cut Flower.. 34 
Philadelphia Second 

Hand Pipe Supply 91 
Phila. Wholesale 

Florists' Bx 34 

Philips Bros 46 

Phillips 61 

Pierce Co., F. O 95 

Pierson, A. N 81 

Pierson Co., F. R. . 87 
Pieters- Wheeler .... 58 
Pikes Peak Flo. Co. 64 

Pillsbury, I. L 56-93 

Pittsburgh Cut Flo. 

Co 30 

Pittsburgh Glass .. 95 

Plath, H 70 

Podesta & Baldocchi 54 
Poehlmann Bros. . . .4-5 

Polder Bros 72 

Pollard, A. T 40 

PoUworth Co. ..1-76-85 
Polykranas, O. J... 76 
Potter Co., W. Q.. 75 

Potter Floral Co 46 

Pulverized Manure.. 99 
Pyfer & Co., A. T.. 27 
Pyfer & Olsem 65 

B. 

Raedlein Basket Co. 31 
Ramm's Fir. Shop.. 61 
Ramsburg, G. S.. 67-96 
Randall's Flower 

Shop 63 

Randall Co 27-40 

Randolph & Mc- 

Clements 67 

Ratcliffe, John L... 48 

Rebum & Co 62 

Red Wing Union 

Stoneware Co. ... 97 

Reed & Keller 76 

Regan Ptg. House.. 96 

Reid, Bdw 83 

Relmcrs Floral Art 

Shop 65-72 

Reimers & Son Co.. 48 

Ueinberg, Geo 73 

Reinberg, P 29-82 

Rennison Co 55 

Reno Florist 46 

Rentschler Flo. Co.. 47 

Renter's 63 

Rice, M., Co 12 

Rice Bros 74 

Richmond Cedar 

Works 92 

Riedel & Meyer 77 

Rippley Mfg. Co... 90 

Rober, Ernest 87 

Robinson Seed Co... 69 
Rochelle & Sons... 

.74-83-87-93-94-100-101 
Rochester Floral Co. 60 

Rock Flower Co 62 

Roehrs Co 86 

Roesch, Lewis 78 

Rohnert, Waldo 68 

Rosaia Bros 64 

Rosens, B 77 

Rosery, The 50-53 

Routzahn Seed Co . . 59 

Rumbley Co 41 

Rupp, John F 67 

Rusch & Co., Gust. . 75 

Rusconl, D 62 

Russin & Hanfling.. 77 
Rynveld & Sons 66 

S. 

Saltford Fir. Shop. . 50 
Samuelson, C. A.... 57 



FIBBUABY 8, 1917 

T 

Santa. Cruz Ever-. 

green "Co. ...:... 69 

Sceecy, Edward ... 50 

SchtiTo, Adam 99 

Schlatter & Son 93 

HchllnK, Max 7-51 

Schramm Bros 47 

Schroeter, B 47 

Schroeter, Hugo ... 47 

Schulthels 48 

Schultz & Co 38 

Schulz Co., Jacob.. . 48 

schwake & Co...*.. 63 

Scott & Son, Inc.. 83 

Scott, Wm., Co 50 

Scrim's 52 

Sharp, Partridge ... 95 

Shenandoah Nurs... 78 

Sheridan, W. F 77 

Siebrecht, Jr., H. A. 55 

Slebrecht Co 77 

Siebrecht Bros 51 

Siebrecht, G. C 76 

Skldelsky & Co 89 

Skinner Irrigation. .100 

Skinner Co 90 

Small & Sons 61 

Sraely, J. M 56 

Smith, Henry 47 



The. Florists' Review 



8 



Smith, H. J 43 

Smith, P. J..'...'. . . '77 
Smith & Fetters Co. 49 
Smith & Hemenway 94 
Smith & Young Co . . 74 
Smith Co., A. W... 87 
Smith & Co., E. D. . 88 
Smith Co., W. & T. 80 
Smith Wholesale 

Floral Co 75 

Smyth, W. J 66 

So. California Flower 

Market 72 

Southern Cypress 

Mfrs.' Assn 116 

South Park Flo. Co. 9 
Spokane Florist Co. 54 
Springfield Clay Co. 97 
Springfield Seed Co. 52 
St. Louis Seed Co. 63-67 
St. Louis Wliolesale 

Cut Flower Co 75 

Staack & Sons 55 

Staiger & Fincken.. 70 
Standard Thermom- 
eter Co 92 

State Nursery Co . . . 55 
Steele's Pansy Gar- 
dens 70 



Stewart, S. B 55 

Stofes Floral Co 52 

Storrs & Harrison.. 86 

Strafford Farm 88 

Stroh & Sons 52 

Stuber & Richardson 70 

Stumpp, G. E. M.. 51 

Stumpp & Walter. . 1 

Stuppy Floral Co... 52 

Superior Boiler .... 91 

Swanson's 55 

Syracuse Pottery. . . 97 

T. 

Tailby & Sons 53 

Tar-Heel Evergreen 

Co 43 

Teahan Fern Co 43 

Thompson Carnation 

Co 87 

Thorburn & Co 67 

Thornton Floral Co. 49 

Throop-Martin Co... 95 

Toaner, O. A. & L. A. 28 

Tonseth Floral Co... 54 

Toole & Son 63 

Totty, 0. H 6 

Tracy, B. H 67 

Traendly & Schenck 76 



Trepel, C. C 51 

'i^Tfepel, Joseph 61 

Tucson Seed Co 46 

Tunlin Paint Co 97 

Turner, H. W 70 

Turner Bros 94 

Turner & Sons 47 

V. 

Uhl Pottery Co 97 

United Cut Fir. Co. 76 
U. S. Cut Fir. Co.. 76 

V. 

Van Llndley Co 46 

Van Meter Flower 

Shop 49 

Vesey, W. J. & M. S. I 

Vick's Sons, J 88 

Vincent, Jr., & Sons 82 

Virgin, U. J 48 

Von Canon, J. H 43 

W. 

Walte, F. W 92 

Waldbart, Geo 52 

Walker Co., F 48 

Want Advs 44 



Warburton, C 53 

Ward & Co., Ei. M. . I 

Warendorff 61 

Watkins & Simpson 66 
Watts, Mrs. J. E... 46 

Wax Bros 53 

Weaver, A 50 

Weber, F. C 57 

Weber, F. H 67 

Weber & Sons Co... 48 
Weiland & Risch... 81 

Welch Bros. Co 75 

Welch, Patrick 75 

Welch's 74 

Wertheimer Bros. ... 12 
Western Rose Co . . . 69 
Western Seed & Ir- 
rigation Co 59 

Whitted Floral Co.. 55 
Wiegand's Sons Co. . 49 

Wienhoeber Co 66 

Wilber Corp., H. R. 68 

Wietor Bros 28 

Wilks Mfg. Co 90 

WiUey's Farm 69 

Williams, Ed 55 

Williams & Co 49 

Wilson, H. E 60 

Wilson, B. G 51 



Wilson Floral Co... 65 

Wilson Seed Oo 67 

Wilson's Seed iNwe 49 

Windmiller Co 47 

Winterson's Seed... 64 

Wittbold, Geo 58-84 

Wolfskins' & Morris 

Goldenson 64 

Woodland Park Flo. 

Co 72 

Woodrow-Marketos. 76 

Wright's 64 

W. & W. Fl'r Store 49 

Y. 

Young, J. W 94 

Young & Co., John. 77 

Young & Co., A. L.. 76 

Young & Co., V 66 

Young & Sons Co... 52 

Young Tool Co 88 

Z. 

Zech & Mann 73 

Zetlitz, E. N 49 

Ziska & Sons. J 73 

Zvolanek, A. C 71 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 



Page 

Aftermath of the Carnation Meeting (illus.) 13 

A Club at Columbus 16 

May Quarantine All Our Stock 17 

— Proposed New Legislation 17 

Thripa on Cyclamens 17 

St. Valentine 's Day 18 

— Getting New Business 18 

Carpet Bedding Plants 18 

Shrapnel 18 

Roses 19 

— Rose Grafting 19 

Under Sunny Southern Skies 19 

Floor Plan for Rose Show (illus.) 20 

Open Letters from Readers 20 

— Cure for Primula Poisoning 20 

— Tomatoes Under Glass 20 

— "When Formosa Bulbs Fail 20 

— The Nebraskans 20 

Vine for Sun Porch 20 

Flower Show Publicity (illus.) 21 

Chrysanthemums 21 

— Growing Exhibition Mums 21 

Orchids 22 

— Seasonable Notes 22 

01)ituary 23 

Limitations of the Horse 23 

Xashville, Tenn 23 

Mott-ly Musings 23 

What Circulation Docs 24 

Pity the Poor Plantsman 24 

Society of American Florists 24 

Speaking of Hardships 24 

Chicago 24 

Louisville, Ky 30 

Cincinnati 31 

Philadelphia 32 

Washington, D. C 33 



Page 

New York 34 

Milwaukee 36 

Rochester, N. Y 38 

Minneapolis, Minn 41 

Providence, R. 1 42 

Pittsburgh, Pa 42 

Newark, N. J 44 

Newport, R. 1 44 

New Bedford, Mass 44 

St. Louis 46 

Boston 49 

Seed Trade News 58 

— Get Government Contracts 60 

— Spinach 62 

— Cold Wave in the South 64 

— Imports via Rotterdam 64 

— Catalogues Received 64 

Pacific Coast Department 68 

— Spokane, Wash 68 

— Los Angeles 68 

— Seattle, Wash 70 

— Portland, Ore 71 

— San Francisco 72 

Nursery News 78 

— New England Nurserymen 78 

— In Union Lies Strength 80 

Fort W^ayne, Ind 86 

Buffalo 88 

Greenhouse Heating 90 

— Piping a Southern House 90 

— The Height of the Flows 90 

Toledo 92 

Indianapolis 94 

Kansas City, Mo 96 

Detroit 100 

Cleveland 100 



The Horists' Review 



Fbbbdaby 8, 1017. 



For Valentine's Day 

CATTLEYAS--VALLEY 

Big Supply Fresh Stock 

FARLEYENSE FERNS 



Russells— Perdoz. 

Extra Long tS.OO 

Long 4.00 

Medium $ 2.50 @ 3.00 

Short 1.00 @ 2.00 



Milady 
Richmonds 
BriUiants 
Sunbursts 



\ Per 100 

I Specials ....$18.00 @ $20.00 

VLong 12.00^ 15.00 

/Medium 9.00 

jShort 6.00 @ 7.00 



Ophelia 

Killamey ) Long 12.00 @ 16.00 

White KUlamey ^Medium ^-^^ @ 10.00 

Aaron Wards 



J Short 5.00 @ 7.00 



For E.xtra Long St>ecial Roses we charge 
accordingly. 



CURRENT PRICE LIST 

Beauties— 



Per doz. 



Specials 

86 to 40-inch 


$8.00 

$6.00 @ 7.50 


30-inch 


6.00 


24 to 28-inch 


3.00 


Miniature Roses— 

Oeo. Elger 


Per 100 
$8.00 


Cecile Brunner 


8.00 


Baby Doll 


4.00 


Fireflame 


$4.00 @ 6.00 


Orchids- 

Cattleyas 

Cypripediums 

CARNATIONS. Fancy .. . . 
Our Selection 


Per doz. 
....$4.00, 5.00, $6.00 

$2.00 @ 3.00 

Per 100 

$4.00 

3.00 


Splits 


2.00 



VALLEY, Fancy. 

First 

Second 



6.00 
5.00 
4.00 



InEffectWeekof feb. 8, 1917 

Per 100 



Paper Whites $ 8.00 

Jonauils 

Tulips 4.00 @ 

Freesia, long, 8trong;stock 4.00 @ 

Romans 

Easter Lilies 12.00 @ 

Violets 

Sweet Peas 1.00 @ 

Snapdragon doz., $1,00 @ $2,00 

Smilax doz., 2,60 

Plumosus 

Sprengeri 

Adiantum 

Adiantum Hybridum 

Farleyense 10.00 @ 

Galax, green and brown, 1000, $1,50 

Leucothoe 

Mexican Ivy 

Flat Ferns 1000. $3,00 

Boxwood... bunch, 25c; case, 8.00 
Woodwardia Ferns 



$4.00 
■1.00 
5.00 

s.oo 

4.00 

15.00 

1.00 

1.50 



:i.00 

:i.00 

1.00 

1.50 

V2.00 

.20 

.75 

.75 

.35 

8.00 



FLORISTS' SUPPLIES 

LAST CALL FOR 

VALENTINE BASKETS 

Beart Shaped Valentine Posters 

1000 $5.00 500 $3.00 

VALENTINE HEART TUMBLER 

Corsage Ties, ail colors, dozen, $1.00 

Made of No. 7 and No. 9 Silk Ribbon 

LACETTES and CELLULOID SHIELDS 

Corsage Pins Green and Violet Foil Boxes 

No. 224 

Two-tone Flower Baskets,a^^ 

Dozen $6.00 i^^^ 

Perfectly Dried Straw Flowers, long stems, assorted colors, 
per 100, $2.00 

- . $1.25 




SPHAGNUN MOSS, per bale, 




Heart Tumbler Basket, $G 00 per doz. 



No. 224 



POEHLMANN 

Send All Orders for Cut Flowers and d^M^Z^%^am^% ^* ^* Phone 

Supplies to City Store, 72-74 E. Randolph St., V^niCtiy U Randolph 35 



FBBauABY 8, 1917. 



The Florists' Review 



ROSE PLANTS 

GRAFTED AND OWN ROOT 

Tfie Poehlmann Quality, known favorably throughout the land. 

PRICES IN EFFECT JANUARY 26. 1917 



GKAFTED— 2j4-inch Russell $150.00 per 1000 

! .ots of 5000 or more 145.00 per 1000 

GRAFTED — 2H-inch Ophelia, Aaron 
Ward, Milady, Killarney, White Killar- 
ncy. Brilliant, Cecile Brunner, Richmond 120.00 per 1000 

Lots of 5000 or more 110.00 per 1000 

These prices are absolutely net cash. 
For 3j^-inch stock an additional $50.00 
per 1000 will be charged. 

MUM ADVERTISEMENT WILL 



OWN ROOT— 2j^-inch Killarney, White 
Killarney, Brilliant, Ophelia, Aaron 
Ward, Milady, Richmond, Cecile Brun- 
ner $7.00 per 100; 65.00 per 1000 

Lots of 5000 or more 62.50 per 1000 

Sunburst, own root $10.00 per 100; 90.00 per 1000 

Orders will be booked in strict rotation and none but well 

established plants, ready for a shift or ready to 

be benched, will be shipped. 

APPEAR IN LATER ISSUES. 



PLANTS 



AZALEAS. 



PANDANUS VBITCHII-4-mch $0.35 each 

5-iiich 60c, .75 each 

6-inch 1.00 each 

7-iiich 1.50 each 

8-inch 2.00 each 

CROTONS— 5-inch : 60 each 

RUBBER PLANTS-5-inch . .50c, 75c, $1.00, $1.50, 2.00 each 

ENGLISH IVY-4-inch $15.00 per 100 

ASPARAGUS SPRBNQBRI-S-inch pots 7.00 per 100 

4-inch pots 10.00 per 100 

ASPARAGUS PLUM0SUS-2i2-inch pots .... 3.50 per 100 

3-inch pots 8.00 per 100 

C-inch made-up pots 35.00 per 100 



75c, $1.00, $1.25 and $1.50 

TABLB PERNS-2ia-inch pots $4, 

3-inch pots 8. 

4-Inch pots 15. 

BOSTON and ROOSEVELT FERNS-5-inch 

BEQONIA CH ATBLAINB-5-inch 

AUCUBAS-Well berried $1.00, $1.25, $1.50 to 

CYCLAMENS-4-inch 

5-inch 

HYACINTHS-4-inch 

In pans 50c, 

TULIPS— In pans for St. Valentine's Day.. 35c, 50c, 
FREESI AS-In pans 



,00 per 100 
,00 per 100 
,00 per 100 

$0.35 each 

.25 each 

3.00 each 

.25 each 
.60 each 
.12 each 
.75 each 

.75 each 
.75 each 



PALMS — PALMS 

STRONG - HEALTHY - CLEAN 



KENTIA FORSTERIANA 



-'4-inch pots 
per lOOO. 



SIngI* Plants 

$1.50 per doz,; $12.00 per 100; $100.00 



6-inch 
6-inch 
6-inch 
8-inch 
8-inch 
8-inch 
8-inch 
10-inch 
10-inch 



pots 
pots 
pots 
tubs 
tabs 
tubs 
tubs 
tubs 
tubs 



16-inch tubs 
15-inch tubs 



Leaves 
6-6 
6-7 
6-7 
6-7 
6-7 
6-7 
6-7 
6-7 
«-7 

6-7 
6-7 



Ins. high 

26-28 

80-82 

84-36 

40-42 

42-46 
60 

62-54 

64-60 

60-64 
Ft. high! 
8 

9-10 



heavy... 
heavy. . 
heavy... 

heavy... 
heavy... 



Each 

$ 1.26 

1.60 

2.00 

8.se 

4.00 
5.00 
7.00 
8.00 
12.00 

40.00 
60.00 



KENTIA FORSTERIANA 

Mad«-up Plants 



6-inch pots 

7-inch tubs 

8-inch tubs 

8-inch tubs 

S-inch tubs 

10-inch tubs 

l-i-inch tubs 

12-inch tubs 

15-inch tubs 

15-inch tubs 



Plants 
8 
8 
8 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4 



Ins. high 

26 
80-82 

88 
46-18 

62 

64 
55-60 

66 
72-78 
76-80 



heavy, 
heavy. 



Each 
.$ 2.00 
. 2.60 
. 4.00 
. 6.00 
. 6.00 
. 8.00 
. 12.00 
. 15.00 
. 25.00 
. 80.00 



KENTIA BELMOREANA 
Single Plants 

214-inch pots, $1.50 per doz.; $12.00 per 100; $100.00 
per 1000. 

3-inch pots. 5 leaves, 10-12 inches high, $2.50 per 
doz.; $18.00 per 100; $150.00 per 1000. 

4-inch pots, 6-6 leaves 16 inches high, 46c 
each; $5.00 per doz.; $40.00 per 100. 



6-inch pots 
6-inch pots 
8-inch tubs 



Leaves Ins. high 

6-6 22 

5-6 26-28 

5-6 42 



Each 
..$1.26 
.. 1.60 
.. 5.00 



Specimen Plants, 15-inch tubs, $75.00 each. 



ARECA LUTESCENS 



6-inch pots 
7-inch tubs 



Plants Ins. high Each 

4 bushy, 24-26 $1.26 

4 bushy. 30 2.50 



ASPIDISTRAS 



5-inch pots, green, 
6- inch pots. 
6-inch pots, vari. 



Leaves Each 

10-12 $1.00 

16-20 1.50 

10-12 1.60 



PHOENIX ROEBELENII 

4-inch nots $0.50 each 

6-inch pots i.oo each 

PTYCH08PERMA ALEXANDRAE 

2H-inch pots 90c per doz,; $7.00 per 100 

LIVISTONA ALTI8SIMA 

2H-inch pots $1.00 per doz.; $8.00 per 100 

LIVISTONA ROTUNDIFOLIA 

4-inch i 50c each 

STEVENSONIA GRANDIFOLIA 

4-inch pots 50c each 

DRACAENAS 

Each Do/.. 100 

5-inch Amabilis $0.90 $10.00 $80.00 

6-inch In\perialis 1.00 12.00 

6 inch Fragrans 1.00 10.00 

6 inch Baptistii 1.00 10.00 

6-inch Terniinalis 60 7.00 

4-inch Terminalis 40 1.20 

3-inch Terniinalis 25 22.00 

5-inch Lindenii 80 9.00 

4-inch GodsefBana 25 2.50 



BROTHERS CO. 

Send all orders for Plants ilASi^AM r^s>MwA III L*I>l'hone,MortonGrove31 J. 

*o Greenhouses, P. O. Box 127, liHiriUll UlUYOi Ilia Ciiybiiy« we Rogers Paii 684 



NO TOLL rROM CHICAGO 



The Florists* RcWew 



FUBBUABT 8, 1917. 



A Big Crop ROSES Now Coining On 



American Beauties 



PRICE LIST 



Our cut consists mostly of medium and shorter 

length stems, but very fine flowers. 

Per doz. 
Extra specials, extra long stems . . . $6.00 @ $8.00 

Stems 30 inches 4.00 @ 5.00 

Stems 18 to 24 inches 2.00 @ 3.00 

Stems 12 to 18 inches 1.00 @ 1.50 

Shorter lengths 75 @ 1.00 

Rhea Reid ^ Per lOO 

Richmond (Extra long $12.00 

Ophelia >Grood medium $8.00 @ 10.00 

Shawyer I Good short 5.00 @ 6.00 

Sunburst / 



Cecile Brunner Bunch of 25 .buds, 75c 

Baby Doll Bunch of 25 buds, 50c 

Russells — the best in this market 

Per doz. 

Specials, extra long $3.00 

Long 2.50 

Good medium $1.50 @ 2.00 

Good short 1.00 @ 1.25 



Pink Killarney 
White Killarney 
Killarney Brilliant 

Assorted Roses, our selection, one-half white, in 
lots of 200 or more, at the rate of $4.00 per 100. 



Extra long . . 
Good medium 
Good short . . 



Per 100 
.$10.00 @$U.OO 
8.00 
4.00 @ 5 00 



CARNATIONS— Note these low prices— All colors, per 100, $3.00 @ $4.00 



BULB STOCK 

Paper Whites per 100, $3.00 

Jonquils per 100, $3.00@ 4.00 

VALLEY per 100, 6.00 

Tulips, all colors per 100, 2.00@ 4.00 



GREENS 

Asparagus and Sprengeri, per 100, $2.00 @ $3.00 
Galax, green or bronze. . .per 1000, 1.25 

Choice common Ferns . . . per 1000, 3.00 



BASSETT & WASHBURN 



Office and Store, 

178 N. Wabash Avanua 



CHICAGO, ILL. 

GREENHOUSES. HINSDALE AND GREGQS, ILL. 



Long Distance Phone 

Central 1487 



New Chrysanthemums 

" LOUISA POCKETT " 

is the name of the new Chrysanthemum that is announced by its raiser, Mr. Pockett, 
as being the superior in every way of Wm. Turner, of which it is a seedling. Since he 
raised both varieties, we may safely take his word for it. Louisa Pockett is larger than 
Turner; a better shape and as strong a grower as Marigold. We have 3000 plants 
ready for immediate delivery from 23^-in. pots, which if set out in the benches now will 
make ideal stock plants to propagate from. You must eventually have this variety — 
why not buy it now? 

Also: Nag-ir-roc, W. H. Waite, Bol d'Or and President Everitt, our other Nov- 
elties for delivery at this time. 

Trade Prices: $1.60 plant; $16.00 dozen; $100.00 hundred. 

CHAS. H. TOTTY, Madison, New Jersey 



FMBDABT 8. 1917. The Florists^ Review 



■ 1' "W ■ VJ^ 




MY VALENTINES 



HIGHEST GRADE FLOWERS, 
TASTE, GOOD WORK, ATTEN- 
TION AND SERVICE, FOR 
ANY AND EVERY OCCASION. 



MAX SCHLING 

22 West 59th Street 
NEW YORK CITY 

Long Distance Phones, Plaza 1241-2022 



8 



Tlie Rorists' Review 



Fbbbuaby 8, 1917. 



^iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiuiiiin 

I DORNER'S NOVELTIES for 1917 | 

I NEW CARNATIONS | 

= ROSALIA — Cerise pink, large three and one-half inch flower of a true cerise pink color. Form is per- = 

E feet. Calyx strong, never bursting. Stem is at all times strong and wiry. The growth is far = 

B above the average when we consider vigor, health and early and free flowering qualities. S 

5 ROSALIA is a decided improvement on ROSETTE, having a better color and a better commercial E 

E habit. E 

E OLD GOLD — We offer this as the earliest and most free flowering yellow carnation we have yet liro- E 

E duced. A decided improvement over YELLOW PRINCE, being of a stronger growth, is perfectly S 

2 clean and healthy, produces larger stems and more bloom. The color is a deep yellow with faint E 

s pink stripes. E 

S The above two varieties, Price: $12.00 per 100; $100.00 per 1000 E 

I NEW LATE CHRYSANTHEMUM 

S FALL BEAUTY — A large Japanese reflex of a pleasing pink color with a shading of deep cream to = 

E the base of the petals and center of the flower. Has an extra strong stem, is especially fine for E 

S Thanksgiving, maturing November 25th to December 10th. The color, combined with its being so E 

5 late and its extra keeping qualities, makes it of especial commercial value. E 

S Price: $3.50 per doz.; $30.00 per 100 E 



STANDARD VARIETI 

Per 100 Per 1000 

NANCY., $6.00 

GOOD CHEER 4.00 

PINK SENSATION 3 00 

ALICE 3.00 

WHITE WONDER 3 . 00 

WHITE ENCHAN PRESS 3.00 

MATCHLESS 3 .00 



$50.00 
35 00 
25.00 
25.00 
25 00 
26.00 
25.00 



OF CARNATIONS 

Per 100 Per 1000 

ROSETTE $3 .00 $25.00 

GLORIOS A 3 00 

CHAMPION 3.00 25.00 

MRS.C. W.WARD 3.00 25 00 

ENCHANTRESS 3.00 25.00 

BENORA 3.00 25.00 

YELLOW PRINCE 4.00 



I F. DORNER & SONS CO.. 



UFAYETTE, INDIANA i 



niiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiin 



A. F. J. BAUR 



O. E. 8TEINKAMP 



QUALITY STOCK 

We are now shipping out cuttings of all the best standard 
varieties. Money can't buy better quality. They are short 
jointed, well rooted and clean. 




Per 100 1000 

Matchless $3.00 $25.00 

White Wonder .... 3.00 25.00 

White Enchantress, 3.00 25.00 

Alice 3.00 25.00 

Ench. Supreme 3.00 25.00 

Nancy 6.00 50.00 



Per 100 - 1000 

Mrs. C. W. Ward . . . $3.00 $25.00 

Yellow Prince 3.50 30.00 

Champion 3.00 25.00 

Belle Washburn . . . 6.00 50.00 

Miss Theo 4.00 35.00 




erry Christmas 



Winner of the A. C. S. Silver Medal. Also first in the open hundred 
scarlet class, demonstrating its superiority over all other scarlet varie- 
ties. The commercial grower will find Merry Christmas as valuable 
as the exhibitor. It's the variety you will all grow, eventually. February delivery nearly all sold. Order 
at once if you want February delivery. $12. OO per lOO, $100.06 per lOOO. 



Merry Christmas 



BAUR & SIEINKANr, 



Carnation 
Breeders 



IndianapoGs, Indiana 



Febhuauv 8, 1917. 



The Florists^ Review 




NOVELTY ROSES 

PRIMEROSE — ROSALIE ( Baby Chatenay ) 

PRIMEROSE is very beautiful — a good healthy grower and free in produc- 
tion. Similar to Sunburst in color, except that it is a more vivid yellow, blended 
with coral pink. Large full buds, dark green large foliage and stiff stems. To 
the store man wanting something new in type and coloriog, it will be a good 
attraction that will sell at fancy price. 

ROSALIE, or Baby Chatenay, is a httle charmer. Very long pointed buds, 
with stiff neck and full good foliage, very similar to its parent, the old Chatenay. 
A clear silver pink that is ideal for corsage work, because of its soft shade that 
will blend well with almost any shade of costume. Not as small as Brunner or 
the other small roses, but smaller than other standard varieties. 

We have booked large orders for both these varieties for some growers that 
are considered expert judges of roses, which is best evidence of their worth. 

$30.00 per 100; $250.00 per 1000— Graf tinsr eyes, $150.00 per 1000 

South Park Floral Co., New Castle, Ind. 



M. HELLER 



10 



The florists' Review 



Fbbruaey 8, 1917. 



FOR YOUR PROTECTION. MR. FLORIST, 

8UPERIORA" MAGNOLIA LEAVES 

For they are endorsed by the leading wholesale trade. REFUSE IMITATIONS 



ACCEPT 



ii 



ONLY 



EXTRACTS FROM OUR ENDORSEMENTS 



PittBbararh Cut Flower Co., of rittaburgh, Pa., writes: "Your 
'Superlora' Magnolia Leaves are the best leaves that we have ever 
handled, and we have had no complaint from any of our customers 
who bought these leaves from us. We have stored these leaves un- 
der all conditions and found that they will not mould; it is a very 
satisfactory leaf indeed." 

W. Q. Potter Co., succeNHor to the McCallum Co., of Cleveland, 

O., states: "Your 'Superlora' Magnolia Leaves are of the highest 
obtainable quality and .second to none, such as has never been on 
the market before, for tlxey are all of a one uniform size, which is 
the main thing in the malting of wreaths. Also your leaves aro 
uniform in color, which gives the finished wreath a rich tone qual- 
ity, and this gets the results for the florists. Up to now all imi- 
tators of your leaves have failed in producing a quality which is 
worth mentioning. Every wholesale florist who wants to protect 
his trade should sell only your product. We have found that you 
have kept up the quality always, and we hope that you will con- 
tinue to do so. The florists are wilttng to pay a few cents more per 
case on your goods, which are really cheaper in comparison with 
any other brands which are flooding the markets from time to 
time." 

Jos. G. Neidinsrer Co., of Philadelphia, Pa., says: "We have 
tried all the Magnolia Leaves that are offered, but find your leaves 
to be far superior to all others, etc., etc." 

The Barteldes Seed Store, of -Denver, Colo., writes: "In regard 
to the quality of the 'Superlora' brand of Magnolia Leaves, we 
take pleasure in advising that we have found all of these leaves 
which we received from you to be of an even size and medium 
length. Both the size and the length being extremely uniform. 
They have also reached us in pliable condition, and altogether 
we have been quite well satisfied with them." 

The Kervan Co., of New York City, writes: "We have handled 
your Magnolia leaves for several years and we take pleasure in 
announcing that our already long list of satisfied customers con- 
tinues to grow. Since we have handled your leaves we have never 
had a complaint, but before that there was dissatisfaction." 

The Montreal Floral Exchansre, Montreal, Canada, writes: "Our 
business has increased with you this year over double of what we 
purchased last season, which is a good recommendation in Itself that 
the trade in Canada appreciates the durability and keeping qualities 
of your leaf. We appreciate the integrity, promptness and good 
business methods that have characterized all your dealings with us." 



Michigan Cat Flower Fxchange, Detroit, Mich., says: "We have 
been handling your 'Superlora' Magnolia Leaves for the past six 
years and And in all this time that we have had no complaints but 
many compliments on these goods., etc., etc." 

Jos. B. Koppelman, of Providence, B. I., writes: "We feel that 
we can sell your leaves to people who have used them once without 
any trouble. They rather pay the difference than to buy other 
leaves elsewhere, etc., etc." 

McAlpine & McDonald, of Boston, Mass., write: "In answer 
to your letter of January 5th, requesting our endorsenment on 
'Superlora' Magnolia Leaves, would say that you might put us 
down as saying that we have found them a most satisfactory leaf 
in every respect, our trade being well pleased with them. We also 
wish to say that our business dealings with the Dr. H. Dux Co. 
have been the finest ever." 

New England FloHst Supply Co., of Boston, Blass., writes: "Have 
found 'Superlora' Magnolias the best leaves on the market. The 
sales on this leaf have been growing with the same rapidity as our 
business." 

Wm. F. Kaatinr Co., of Buffalo, N. Y., writes: "Have always 
found that the 'Superlora' brand gives our customers entire satisfac- 
tion; in fact, they are the best leaves we have been able to obtain 
in the last few years." 

Russin & Hanfling, of New Vorit City, write: "In response to 
your letter of recent date, it gives us great pleasure to state tliat 
we have been very much satisfied with the quality of your 'Supe- 
rlora' brand Magnolia Leaves. We have tried the Magnolias of 
several other manufacturers, but in consequence we find your 
leaves to be pre-eminent to all others placed upon the market, 
particularly with the view that your leaves are all of one uniform 
color, as well as being pliable and non-moulding." 

Henry M. Robinson & Co., of Boston, Mass., write: "We are 
pleased to state that the quality of your leaves is certainly the best 
ever manufactured In this country, and it Is a pleasure to offer such 
stock for sale, etc." 

Reed & Keller, of New York City, say: ". . . and we beg 
leave to acknowledge receipt of your last shipment of Magnolias, 
and we are Indeed pleased to say that they are superior in every 
way. We further state that our experience In leaves from other 
dealers has been very unsatisfactory; colors vary and leaves mould 
quWkly, etc." 



"SrPERIORA" BRAND MAGNOLIA LEAVES ARE SOLD BY EVERY WHOLESALE FLORIST 

IN THE UNITED STATES AND CANADA 

DR. H. DUX COMPANY, Inc., MANUFACTURERS, JACKSONVILLE. FLORrOA 

Mention The Review when yon write. 



Announcement 

We have decided to offer to the Trade this season a limited number of 
our NEW ROSE, a sport of Ophelia. COLOR, a beautiful rose-pink. 



Named and Registered 



ROSE-PINK OPHELIA 






THE 



DISTRIBUTION WILL BE LIMITED TO 

PRICES -OWN ROOT 



40,000 PLANTS 



Per 100 plants, $30.00 Per 500 plants, $125.00 
Per 250 plants, 70.00 Per 1000 plants, 250.00 

PRICES - GRAFTED 



Per 100 plants, $35.00 
Per 250 plants, 82.50 



Per 500 plants, $150.00 
Per 1000 plants, 300.00 



We will furnish eyes for grafting ; price on application. 



Orders will be filled in rotation. 



BREITNEYER FLORAL COMPANY 



FRED BREITMEYER, Proprietor 



MT. CLEMENS, MICHIGAN 



Mention Tbe Rerlew when 70a write. 



FiBRDARY 8, 1917. 



The Florists' Review 



11 



;*3'' 



* : * 




A New N. C. R. Invention 



As important to you as your 
telephone or cash register 



It's a new credit file that safeguards your credit 
business — in a better, easier, safer, quicker 
way than you thought possible. 

// is so simple that anyone can operate it. 

// is so speedy that all entries are made in the 
presence of the customer, who leaves with a 
statement of the purchase — plus a record of the 
balance carried forward. 

// is so convenient that you can set it on any 
size counter, table or desk. The exact balance 
due from any customer is instandy available, and 
the file can be operated with one hand while the 
other holds the telephone receiver. 

// is so complete that a true record of the whole 
credit business is always available in short order. 



And this knowledge alone is worth more than 
the cost of the file. 

// is so safe that records once filed in its locked 
compartment cannot be lost or destroyed. 
Records can be seen, but not tampered with. 

A few weeks' use will pay for it. 

There's nothing else like it, and it can be 
seen at the NCR office near you, or a 
letter to us will bring you complete 
information. 

See this new file or find out 
how it will stop your losses, , ^ ,. ,-, 

, /^ new Credit File. 

please your customers, /behave about.... 

and relieve you of / ChargeandC.O.D.accounts 

work and worry. 
Use the coupon. 



The 

National 

Cash 

Register Co. 

Dayton, Ohio 

Please send full in- 
formation about your 



N, 



ante . 



The National Cash Register Company 

Dayton, Ohio 



Address. 



Florists' Review 



12 



The Florists' Review 



February 8, 1917. 



M. 

iRICEj 

<CO.i 



MORE DOLLARS 

FOR YOU ? SURE I 

TELEGRAPH YOUR ORDER 
FOR VALENTINE SPECIALS 

" RICE SERVICE " on the Job ! 

;-- . v:---;^. , -- ■■ ■■■.■;^.>. . -v^— ;.^- OrdcFs Cau still be Filled. 

March 17th -St. Patrick's Day 

(Another Floral Event) 

Write for Our Special Bulletin at Once. 

When our Salesman comes to your city— don't fail to see his line. It's a dandy I 

. RICE CO., 

THE LAROEST AND BEST EQUIPPED FLORISTS' SUPPLY HOUSE 

1220-22-24 SPRING GARDEN ST., PHILADELPHIA, PA. 



M. 
IRICEi 






Everything in 

RIBBONS and CHIFFONS 



We show, not a mere skeleton Iidb, but a collection embracing every ivanted fabric 
used by florists, and in quantities sufficiently large to supply the entire country. 
PROnPT SERVICE, FAIR PRICES AND UP-TO-THE-MINUTE MERCHANDISE are the 

Contributing Causes for the constant increase in our business. Many customers send us Open Orders just giving 
a general idea of colors and styles desired. You can safely do likewise. 

SATISFACTION GUARANTEED. 

WERTHEIMER BROTHERS 

THE NATIONAL FLORAL RIBBON HOUSt 

Owners and Operators of WERBRO RIBBON MFG. CO., Paterson, N. J. 

Salesrooms, 19-25 East 24th Street, NEW YORK 



DESIGNS 



The 

Album 

of 



Post 
Paid 
75c 



FOURTH EDITiON-JUST OUT 



The Florists' Review, 508 South Dearborn Street, Chicago, 111. 






mmm 



AFTERMATH OF THE 

CARNATION MEETING 

By unanimous consent, last week's meeting and exhibition of the 
American Carnation Society is put on record as one of the most suc- 
cessful in the history of the organization, interest, attendance and quality 
all being higher than in recent years. A mark set for Boston to emulate 



mmm 




N many respects the Indian- 
apolis meeting of the 
American Carnation So- 
ciety, held last week, was 
the best in years, but the 
finest feature of it, prob- 
ably, was the fact that so 
many different people par- 
ticipated. Anyone reading 
the list of prize-winners 
in last week 's issue of The Eeview could 
not fail to note the unusual number of 
growers awarded premiums — there was 
no walk-away. No matter how fine it is 
for the individual to sweep the decks, 
it adds perceptibly to the general inter- 
est when the premiums are well divided. 
Facetiously, this was called the home 
meeting of the Indiana Carnation So- 
ciety — vice-president, secretary and 
treasurer were Hoosiers, and the presi- 
dent came from a contiguous state. Per- 
haps it had its effect in bringing out the 
local growers, but at any rate more of 
them exhibited than usual and most of 
them feel well repaid for it by the prizes 
they took. 

The Meetings. 

In the meetings, 
also, the general 
participation was a 
distinct stimulus to 
the interest. The 
elimination of long 
essays and the sub- 
stitution of extem- 
poraneous discus- 
cuss i o n bro^ight 
many members to 
their feet with a 
few words on one 
I'oiiit or another 
and made the ses- 
sions bright and 
snappy. 

While it was vot- 
ed to hold the next 
annual meeting at 
the usual date in 
1918, at Boston, it 
was decided to ac- 
cept an invitation 
of the Society of 
American Florists 
to participate in the 
National Flower 
Sliow at St. Louis in 
the spring of that 
year, the S. A. F. 
placing $1,000 in 
premium monov at 
the disposal of the 
society. The result, 



The full list of premiums awarded 
in the exhibition, the election of 
officers, with their portraits, com- 
ment on the new varieties, reports 
of officers, etc., appeared in The 
Review for February 1. 



therefore, will be that the east and the 
west both will have a chance next year 
to work up a carnation show as interest- 
ing as the Indiana one was. 

The announced discussion of the 
"yellows" disease of carnations was 
led by Prof. Lempke, of the florists' ex- 
periment station at the University of 
Illinois. Eichard Witterstaetter told of 
his experience with the variety Mrs. 
Valentine, having nearly lost the stock 
at one time by this disease. He found 
that the best way to grow the jdants 




Table Decoration of Carnation Cottage Maid Arranged by the Hill Floral Co. 



was in pots during the summer. Charles 
S. Strout stated that he experienced 
most trouble with Pink Delight. A. F. J. 
Baur described an experiment in which 
he took a dozen plants of each of sev- 
eral varieties, heavily feeding the eleven 
but leaving the other in the natural soil 
of early fall. In each case the eleven 
became diseased and the one plant con- 
tinued healthy, convincing him to a cer- 
tain extent that improper nutrition has 
a great deal to do with the yellows. 
After feeding some of these diseased 
plants one kind of food and others a 
different kind, some became better and 
others worse, which has partially proven 
to him that the proper nourishment will 
overcome this disease. 

The Market. 

Nothing that has come up at a trade 
convention in recent years has been of 
greater interest to those concerned than 
was the discussion of the demand for 
carnations and the methods by which 
they are marketed. It has been assert- 
ed many times of late that the de- 
mand for carnations 
is decreasing, but 
there have been 
emphatic denials 
that this is the case. 
W. A. Clarke, of the 
Pittsburgh Cut 
Flower Co., started 
the ball rolling. He 
believes the demand 
is less vigorous than 
it was and he places 
the responsibility 
for it on the grow- 
ers. He thinks the 
carnation of today 
does not have the 
keeping qualities of 
those of some years 
ago and that they 
have lost a great 
percentage of their 
fragrance. He also 
})lamed the growers 
for rough handling 
and careless pack- 
ing, causing the 
flowers to be in bad 
condition when they 
reach the market. 
David Ward disa- 
greed, saying he be- 
lieves most of the 
rough handling is 
done by the commis- 
sion merchant. He 
also stated that the 



12 



The Florists^ Review 



rKiiKi AKv s. i;ii7. 




M. 

^RICEj 

CO. 



MORE DOLLARS 

FOR YOU ? SURE ! 

TKLKliRAPH YOUR ORDER 

FOR X'AT.KNTINE SPPXIALS 

"RICK SERVICE" on the Job! 

Orders Can Still be Filled. 



March 17th -St. Patrick's Day 

(Another l'"loral Kveiit) 

Write for Our Special Bulletin at Onee. 

When our Salesman eomes to 5'our eity — don'i fail to see his line. It's a dandy' 

. RICE CO., 



THE LARGEST AND BEST EQUIPPED FLORISTS' SUPPLY HOUSE 

1220-22-24 SPRING GARDEN ST., PHILADELPHIA, PA. 



\rice/ 
\co./ 




Everything in 

RIBBONS and CHIFFONS 

W'e >iio\\ , nol a mere >keletoii line, but a collection embracing every >vanted fabric 
used by tlor^-ts. and in quantities sufficiently larjje to supply the entire country. 

PROMPT SERVICE, FAIR PRICES AND UP-TO-THE-MINUTE MERCHANDISE are the 

Contribiiliii^' (.uuses for the eons'ant inerease in uur business. Many cusloniers send us Open Orders ,iust K'i^iti^' 
a ^^ener^il idea ot eolors and styles desired. You can safely do likewise. 

SATISFACTION GUARANTEED. 

WERTHEIIMER BROTHERS 

THE NATIONAL FIORAL RIBBON HOUSE 

g^ Owners and Operators of VVEKBRO RIBBON MFG. CO., Paterson, N. J. 

Salesrooms, 19-25 East 24th Street, NEW YORK 





DESIGNS 



The 

Album 

of 



Post 
Paid 
75c 



FOURTH EDIT. ON-JUST OUT 



The Florists' Review, 508 South Dearborn Street, Chicago, 111. 



,V>*W„„ 



'the> 



J&RISI5^ 



'^ 



AFTERMATH OF THE 

CARNATION MEETING 

By utiauiwoiis consent, last icwek's meeting and cx/iihition of the 
American Carnation Society is put on record as one of the most suc- 
cessful in the history of the organization, interest, attendance and quality 
all being higher than in recent years. A mark set for Boston to emulate 





N iiiiiiiy rcs|u'(ts t lie 1 iiiliiui 

I, -I pcilis meet iiiji lit' t li I- 
Aineririiii ( 'aiiiat idii So 
riety. Iiclil last week, was 
the best, ill years, lillt tli<^ 
tinest t'catuie (it' it, |>i()li 
alily, was the t'art that sn 
iiiaii.N' ilifTerent |ie(i]ile |iar 
tiei]iatei|. Anyone readine- 
the list lit' |ii'i/.e u iiineis 
ill last wiM'k 's issue (if The lieview cdiilil 
lint fail til iiiitc the unusual iiiiinlier nt' 
^.Tdwers awanleil |ireiiiiiinis there was 
11(1 walkaway. XnTiiatter how tine it is 
lor the iiiili\iiliial to sweep the decks, 
It .■((Ills |iei'ceiitilily to the "general inter 
est when the preiniiiins are well (li\iile<l. 
I'-acetiously, this was ealled the lioiiie 
iiU'etiiii^' of the Imliana t'ariiation So 
liety - vice i>it'si(leiit, secretary ami 
treasurer wer(^ Hoosiers, and the presi 
dent canK' from a cout ij^uoiis state. I'er- 
liaps it had its efCect in hrin^iiiie out the 
local c;rowers, but at any rate more ot' 
them exliiliited than tisiial and most of 
them fe(d well repaid for it by the pri/es 
they took. 

The Meetings. 

Ill the nieetillJ^S, 
.1 I s o . t he Lionel al 

|>:i It icipat ion was a 

■ li'^tiiict stiniiibis to 
• lie interest. T li 
'liiii illation ot' long 
' ssays and the siih- 
-titiition of exteiii- 
I '(I ra neons ilisciis- 
'■ II s s i o n liroiiL;ht 
iiianv iiieiiiliers to 

tiieir I'eet witll U 

' ' w wiifils on one 

V'Mit III aimtlier 

nd made t he srs- 

iiiiis li r i ^ h t .•iiid 
nappy. 

While it u;i- \cit- 
■1 lo Imlil the next 

■ liimal iinet iiii; at 
'lie ii-iial date in 
I'-Ms, at I'.o-tnii, it 

\\a^ derided to aC- 

■ pt an iii\ i tat ioi\ 

-I' the S,iri(.t> of 

\iiiericaii I'loiists 
' " I'art ici|i;ite in the 
"^iit i.iiial I" 1 o w e r 
^ii"\\ .-it St. l,,,ni> in 
''le spiin;^r |,|- that 
■^'■•■ir. the S. A. V. 

I'hir 1 1|^ 4; 1 , i n 

!''eiiiiiini nioiiix at 

'lie displ:s:il III' the 
^"clet\-. 'I'he irsnlt. 



The fiiil list of premiums awarded 
in the exhibition, the election of 
officers, with their portraits, com- 
ment en the new varieties, reports 
of officers, etc., appeared m The 
Review for February 1. 



thend'ore, will lie that the east and the 
west both will ha\c a i liaiice next \f;ii 
to work up a carnation show as intere'^t 
iiie- as the Indiana one w;is. 

The aniioiinced discussion ot' the 
' ■ VtdloW s ' ' disease ot' c.'l Ilia 1 i oil s was 
led ii\ I'idt'. i.eliipke. ot' the llorists' eX 

perinieiit station at the I'liix crsity ol' 
Illinois. Kiidiard Wit terstaet ter told of 
his experience with the \;iiiety .\lr^. 
Valentine, lia\iiie neailv lost the stoids 
.•it one time liy this disejise. lie t'olllld 
that the liest \\;i\' tn ei-dw the plant- 




Table Decoration of Carnation Cottage Maid Arranged by the Hill Horal Co. 



v\';is ill pots (liiriiiL; the siiiniiiei. I'harles 
S. Stroiit stated that he e\ peiicii, cl 
ino>t troiilile with I'iiik heliuht. A. I'. .1. 
r.aiir descrilH'il an ex peiinieiit in wliitdi 
lie took ;i do/.eii jihaiit- ol' e.-ndi ot' se\ - 
eral \;irieties, heaxily I'eidiiiL; the eleven 
iiiit leaving' the other in the nat iir;i I soil 

of early t'all. In each ca-i- tl Ie\en 

liec.-inie diseased and the iiiie pl.allt con- 
liiiiieij healthy, con \ i iici iiu liiiu tu a cer- 
tain extent tli.at iiiipiiiper iiiitiition lia.s 
;i er|.;it deal to dn with the xtdlows. 
At'ter I'eediiiL; snnie di' tlie-e diseased 
plants one kind ot' lood and ntliers a 
different kind, -dine liec.-niie lietti r .and 
dtlier- wdrse, \\lii(di ha- jia it i;i ll\' pinx en 
td him that the prdper iinii i i-li iin'iit will 
d\ crcome this disease. 

The Market. 

Ndthiiii; tli;ii has cniue up ;it .a trade 
cdii \ eiit idii in leriiit year- h;ts lieen ot 
;4r(;iter iliteie-t td those cdin-rriied than 
w;is the discii-sidii nt' the dem.and t'nr 

c:i I ll;tt inn- ;illd tile lllethdds li\- wliiidi 
llie\ ;iii- 111,1 1 kited. It li;is liceii .assert 
I'd iiiaiiv times ,,i' l;it,. that the de- 
iii.and I'lir carnat inns 
IS decli'.a-illL;', hut 
t her,' h ;i \ o been 
einplia tic d e n i a 1 s 
t li.at t his is the case. 
\\'. .\. < 'larke, df till- 
r I t t s b u r L,^ h Cut 
I'huver Co.. started 
the l,;ill r.illiim. He 
III lie\ e- t he demand 
i- le-- \ i^iirous than 
it w ;i- .'I lid he places 

till |■l■^[ldl|sil li I jty 

t'or it du the i^i'dw 
el-. II, ■ thinks the 
c:i Ilia t idii dl' tiiday 
due- nor ha\e the 

keeplllL; iplalitil'S n\ 
tlld-e III' sdine \i;il- 
.-i^d .-iiid that tlie\ 
h;i\e jii-f ;i ^leat 

percill t aue nt' iheil' 
!l :iL:ra lice. He al-n 
I'l.'i lied the :; I'n Wi-i- 
!dr iMllLih liaiidliuLr 
and caiele-s p.ack- 
iii'4', e a u s i n e- the 
iliiwi-r^ td be in bad 
idiidit idii wlieu they 
lejih the market. 
I»:i\id \\;ird di-a- 
U'l'eed, -.ayiuL;' m- be- 

1 le\ e- nio-t dl' the 
ii.u^li h;ii!dlili:X i" 
ddlie by t he collliuis- 

-ii:ii nierchaiit. He 
.•il-i. -tated tiiat the 



14 



The Florists^ Review 



FBBauABX 8, 1917. 



fancy stock grown at his establishment 
is not put up in bunches, as is the jjoorer 
grade, and that it was a bad method 
with good stock. 

A. Easraussen stated his opinion that 
cheap sales do the greatest damage, 
along with the small grower who tries 
to produce quantity, not quality, and 
sells the product at retail at a lower 
figure than good stock is worth at whole- 
sale. He admitted, however, that lo- 
cality makes a difference, such condi- 
tions perhaps not being met with every- 
where. 

Fred E. Dorner's views were that a 
better and closer selection of new va- 
rieties should be made and that pack- 
ing and grading constitute a big item. 

Charles S. Strout differed with Mr. 
Clarke, saying that the demand in his 
locality is growing rapidly and that the 
prices are good. He believes that the 
cheap sale conducted on the right plan 
is beneficial. He said that he makes 
special effort to let the people know 
when they are offering a bargain. This 
stock, which is the best on the place, is 
sold at 25 cents per dozen for one day 
only. It is not boxed or delivered and 
is sold strictly on a cash basis. The 
following day the price is back to 75 
cents or $1, whatever the case may be. 
He believes that this method has in- 
creased the popularity of the carnation 
in his locality. At other times, when 
surplus stock is on hand, two hospitals 
and an old ladies' home have furnished 
an excellent outlet and the gifts were 
gratefully received. 

A. F. J. Baur said he spoke merely 
from observation, as he sells his crop 
directly to the stores instead of through 
an agent and the largest part of the con- 
sumption is local. His belief is that 
most of the abuse of flowers happens in 
the retail establishments, through not 
giving this flower the proper care, as is 
given the rose. 

R. B. Hayes seemed to think that car- 
nations are marketed too soon after pick- 
ing, saying that they should remain in 
water from eighteen to twenty hours in 
order to be well water-soaked. He stated 
that he has had good results by leaving 
them in water two or three days, while 



he has suffered from marketing freshly 
cut stock. 

J. F. Ammann was of the opinion that 
it is a case of every man to his place — 
a good man for growing and a good man 
for grading, not a boy, but a man pro- 
ficient in his line. If this course were 
pursued, stock would reach the market 
in much better condition. 

A. J. Guttma'n vehemently declared 
that the demand for good carnations is 
growing in his locality. He feels that 
ignorance on the part of the venders 
causes careless handling. He feels con- 
fident that in the near future a closer co- 
operation between grower and retailer 
will be effected, which will be of benefit 
to both. 

J. W. Rodgers also was of the opinion 
that grading is an important factor 
and that the setting of the prices should 
be left to the grower, the commission 
merchant and retailer governing them- 
selves accordingly. C. Hagenburger 
agreed perfectly with this idea. 

W. J. Vesey, Jr., seemed to think 
some wholesale customers are chronic 
complainers, that kind being in the mi- 
nority, however. He said-he has adopted 
a system of postcards, which he places 
with every invoice sheet sent out, ask- 
ing for a report on the condition in 
which the stock arrived. The consignee 
is asked merely to write one word, yes 
or no, with his name, and to mail the 
card. These are put on file and at the 
end of the year are looked over to find 
who are the satisfied customers and who 
are not. He found this experiment so 
successful that he has installed it in all 
of his departments. 

George Gause insisted that harmony 
is what is needed — harmony between 
growers, commission men and retailers. 
If this were accomplished a better mar- 
ket would follow. W. W. Coles believed 
that supply and demand should regulate 
the price. 

The discussion closed as the judges 
returned with the premium for the best 
keeping vase of carnations, which was 
awarded to Hartje & Elder, of Indian- 
apolis. This firm broke the record, tak- 
ing three firsts on only two entries, one 



of fifty White Enchantress and on^ of 
fifty Washington. 

A discussion arose as to who is re- 
sponsible for goods shipped, the shipper 
or the consignee. This subject being a 
large one, it was barely touched upon, 
and, seeing that no satisfactory conclu- 
sion was in sight, adjournment was 
asked for and agreed upon. 

Routine Affairs. 

The committee appointed to pass on 
the reports of officers was as follows: 
S. J. Goddard, Framingham, Mass.; C. 
W. Johnson, Morgan Park, lU.; John 
H. Dunlop, Toronto, Ont. 

In the matter of the preliminary com- 
petition for the Dorner Memorial medal 
a recommendation was made to reduce 
the number of blooms required, but the 
decision was that the number remain 
fifty, instead of being reduced to twen- 
ty-five. 

The secretary was authorized to con- 
tinue the identification badge. Prof. 
Dorner moved that the names in these 
badges be typewritten rather than by 
hand, which was approved. 

A committee of three on final resolu- 
tions was appointed: J. W. Eodgers, of 
Dayton, O.; J. H. Dick, of New York, 
and Prof. H- B. Dorner, of Urbana, 111., 
the report to be heard at the close of 
the banquet. 

The question of the similarity of the 
old variety. Beacon, and a variety dis- 
tributed to a limited extent in the east 
last season under the name of Red Wing, 
was brought up. Although several as- 
serted that the two varieties are prac- 
tically identical, an equal number de- 
clared that as far as color and form 
of bloom are concerned they are similar, 
but that Red Wing is a more robust 
grower, growing taller, having a 
stronger calax and not splitting so 
badly. The matter was referred to a 
committee which will be appointed by 
the incoming president, as the society 
stands to discountenance the renaming 
of old varieties or the introduction of 
too-much-alike varieties under different 
names. 

A. J. Guttman asked to have the new 
variety^ Olive Whitman, rejudged for 




Annual Banquet of the American Carnation Society, Qaypool Hotel, Indianapolis, February I, 19 J 7. 



FUBBUABT 8, 1917. 



The Florists' Review 



15 







•mi m* .»» m*-'-' 






#S*6 ^i. . 1'^' 



'IISF* 




A General View of the Twenty-sixth Annual Exhibition of the American Carnation Society> Indianapolis, January 3J, I9I7. 



the certificate of merit. This was grant- 
ed, with the result of a score of eighty- 
two points. 

The Banquet. 

As the banquet was given iu the Kiley 
room, where the show was held, the ex- 
hibition flowers were used as decora- 
tions, making an elaborate display. 
During the evening the entertainment 
included an orchestra and cabaret danc- 
ing. The special feature of the evening 
was a chariot of carnations and sweet 
peas drawn by two little girls, in which 
was seated the maid of honor represent- 
ing the American Carnation Society. 
Attending her and seated at her feet 
■was a smaller maid, representing the In- 
diana State Florists' Association. E. 
G. Hill, acting as toastmaster, intro- 
duced in his humorous way the follow- 
ing: Irwin Bertermann, to speak for the 
Indiana State Florists' Association; J. 
y. Ammann, to speak for the American 
Carnation Society; Hon. Chas. W. Book- 
waiter, to speak for the city; David 
Ward, to speak for the carnation; John 
H. Dunlop, to speak for Canada; David 
Geddis, to speak for the St. Louis spring 
show; A. F. J. Baur, to speak as secre- 
tary; Wm. J. Vesey, Jr., the president- 
<^lect; August Poehlmann, as an inter- 
ested visitor; Albert Pochelon, to speak 
for the F. T. D., and Wm. Nicholson, as 
representative of the old guard. Wm. 
F. Gude telegraphed his regrets. 

W. J. Vesey, Jr., as retiring president 
of the Indiana State Florists' Associa- 
tion and incoming president of the 
American Carnation Society, thanked 
his committees in general, especially 
commending the efforts of John Berter- 
mann, Henry W. Eieman, Homer L, 
Wiegand, Fred H. Lemon, O. E. Stein- 
kamp, Joseph H. Hill and Clarence 
Thomas. Following this, the report on 
final resolutions was read and the enter- 



tainment was closed by a verse from 
James Whitcomb Riley's "Old Sweet- 
heart of Mine," in honor of the ladies. 

Excursions. 

While the men were attending the 
final session during the morning of the 
closing day, the ladies were shown the 
interesting sights of the city. In the 
afternoon the ladies and gentlemen 
joined in an auto trip that was filled 
with excitement. Just as the party was 
leaving, a fire broke out in the base- 
ment of the hotel and the fire depart- 
ment gave an exhibition run. Later, on 
the return trip, the driver of one of the 
machines was arrested for speeding and 
the occupants of the car walked the re- 
mainder of the way to the Maennerchor, 
where a buffet luncheon was served. 

The party journeyed to the Baur & 
Steinkamp establishment, where there 
were several features of interest, the 
most noteworthy being a beautiful bed 
of Merrj' Christmas carnation, a bed of 
seedlings that provoked great admira- 
tion and a new propagating house in 
which were 90,000 cuttings. 

An interesting trip via the boulevards 
ended at Bertermann 's Cumberland 
range. Although the roses and carna- 
tions, which are the chief crops, were 
in excellent condition, there were other 
interesting sights, including a house of 
sweet peas and violets and a house of 
delphiniums, centaureas, snapdragons, 
winter-flowering giant pansies and mi- 
gnonette. E. E. T. 



Notes by Another Observer. 

A few notes taken during the gather- 
ing of the clans at the American Carna- 
tion Society's annual meeting at In- 
dianapolis, January 31, may be of in- 
terest at this time. 

S. J. Goddard, of Framingham, Mass., 
stated, while unpacking his prize-win- 



ning carnations, that the blooms were 
picked January 25, packed January 29 
and unpacked January 31 at Indian- 
apolis. Although no ice was used, when 
the boxes were opened the blooms looked 
perfect. This remarkable condition was 
noted in practically all other shipments, 
and the atmospheric conditions at the 
exhibition were highly favorable to the 
blooms. 

A striking contrast between the way 
Carnation Belle Washburn was grown 
by two local growers proved that this 
variety may be well grown by one 
grower and less so by another, even in 
the same locality. 

That old favorite, Lawson, as seen at 
the Bertermann Bros. Co. place, showed 
itself as full of vigor and as floriferous 
as when it was more largely grown. 
Did the sight of this grand actor in- 
spire some to question as to whether 
varieties of more recent introduction 
possess the stamina of their predeces- 
sors? The fine beds of Violet Princess 
of Wales seen at the Bertermann range 
were much admired. J. G. Heinl, of 
Terre Haute, Ind., said he was proud 
of the fact that he brought the first 
plants grown here, from Paris, and 
turned tliem over to J. A. Peterson, of 
Cincinnati, who grew them even finer 
than the I'arisians. "This was in 1871," 
observe<l Mr. Heinl, "and just see how 
vigorous is the plant yet." 

John H. Dunlop, of Toronto, ably 
represented the Dominion and, in com- 
menting upon this, the best exhibition 
yet, he said that business was remark- 
ably good at home, incidentally mention- 
ing that the wholesale department for 
the month of December showed an in- 
crease of twenty-three per cent and 
the retail end an advance in proportion. 

Albert Herr, of Lancaster, Pa., ob- 
served that positively all his fellow 
craftsmen would be at Boston next year, 



14 



The Florists^ Review 



FKUUUAUi 8, 1917. 



r;iiM\ '■tuck L;i'ii\vn ;il lii^ c"-! a lilisliiiii-nf 

1^ IHil |illt U|i ill Iplllhlic^, ;i-. iv till- IKinrci' 

li'iailc. Jiiiil 1h;it il \\;i^ ;i I'.'id iiirtliinl 
\\ it li ^iMhl vt iii-k . 

A. I\:ismus,st'n >1;ilri| ln^ opininii lliat 
i-iif;i]i salt's (in the l; i "■.'i t i"~l i|a inai;i\ 
aloiiL; \\ith till' small ^^rnWii who tries 
to |ii'iii| iicc i|iiantit\, licit '|iialitv. aii<l 
-rlU tlir |iiniliirr al L-tail at a lowir 
tij^iir.' than l;'iii(| xtcM-l; is wmtli al whclc 
-aif. II'- a<liiiitl( 'I. I](i\\i-\rr. that h. 
'•Mlily iiiakf- a Wi fl'i-i i in-.-, vii.-li rniiili 
tiiiiis iiriliap^ Hot lii-iiiL; iin-t with i-\ii\ 

A\il('l'C. 

l-'rcij K. I»iiriii-i's \ii-\\s wi-ii- that a 

lirttiM' ainl rliisi'l -i-lrc-t inn nl IH-W \a 
i-irlifs shuiiM In- iiiaih aiiil tliat |iark 
mil: .'nhl ^laiJiiiL; i-Miivt it iit i- a liii: iti-in. 

<'liailcs S. Stn.iit JitTi-n-.l with Mr. 
<'larkt'. saying that tin- ih-niaii'i in lii- 
liit-aiity i>. j^rnwiiiL; i.-!|iiill\ aii'l tliat tin- 
|ii let"- ail' ;;iHiil. ill 111 lii-Ni-v that thr 

'•hi-a|' ~ah' i-nllcl llc-l i-.i nil thr li^ilt fihlll 

IS ln-iirlirial. Ill- ^aiil thai In- iiiaki-s 

s|ii-'-ial cl'l'nrt In li-i till- I plr kimw 

w lii-ii lhi-\' ai'i- nlTi-iiii^ a liar^aiii. 'rhi--^ 

-tnc-k, which is till- III ^I nil till- plai-l'. IS 

-nhl at :!.") cents [M'l iln/eii inr line ijay 

nnl\ . It is lint linNcij nr ihli \ i-li-i| ami 

is snlil -tiii-tly nil a cash lia^is. The 

InllnwillL; i|a\ the plici- |v liack tn 7n 

cents (>i- $1, \vhate\i-r tin- case may he. 
lie lielie\('s that this nietlinil has in- 
c|-(-ase.l the |in|iiila I it \ ni' the c-arnatinn 

in lli< lncMlit>. At nther times, when 

siii-|iliis stuck is nn liaml, twn li(is|iitals 
ami an nhl lailies" jimne ha\e t'litiiislied 
an excellent nutlet an'l the yit'ts weic' 
n latc-t'iilly l-ecei \ ei|, 

A. 1'. .1. liaUl s;ili| III- s|,,,ke li|i-ri-|\ 

iinin nlisei-\ at inn, as In- sells his cr-dp 
iliiectly to the stores instead of through 
an a;^ent ami the laierst ]iart ot' the con- 
siiiiijit ion is Ljcal. His heliel' is that 

must nl' the aliuse nl (lowers liai>]iens ill 
the retail estalilishllielit s, thrnlltih lint 
Ul\in;^ this tinwei the )i|'n|iel caie. as is 
-^i\e|i thi> rose. 

I\. [',. Ifayi'-- s.-rim i| to think that car- 
iiatiniis are inaiketdl ton snnn after jiick- 
iiil:, sayinn that thi\ shniihl ii-main in 

water I'lnlii einhti'i-ll tn t\\i-|it\ hniils in 
nldel- tn lie Well Watel s(,;ikei|. lie stated 

that he has had nnn,| results |i\ Icaviiii,' 
tln'in in water twn m three davs, while 



he has suflcri'd I'lnm ma ik et inj^' treshly 
cut stn(d<. 

.1. r. .\minann was n|' the n|iiiiion tiiat 
It is .-I case ol' cNcry man to his ]ilace 
a L;n(ii| man I'nr <;row iii;^ and a j;'ooi| man 
for L;radin;i', not a lio\, lint a man jno- 
licieiit in his line. if this course were 
I 111 I siii-d, stock would reach thi' market 
in milch liettei condition. 

A. .1. fiiiftinan vehemently declared 
that the demand tor "idod carnations is 

Lllowinn ill his loi-ality. lie I'eels that 
iL;iioiaiice on the jiait of tin- venders 
c.ansi-s careless liandliii>4. lie t'eels con 
liijeiit that in the m-ar future a closer co 
n|i(-iatinn lietween nmwer and retailei 

will lie effi-cted. W hich W ill In- nf 'lelii'tit 
tn Init II. 

.1. W . Iuid;;ers alsn was nl tin- ninninli 
lh;il n|-;|i||||o 1^ ;iii iin|pnilan1 t'actm 
.Hid that the setting; of the prices shniild 

lie li-t't In tin i^l-nwer, the cnmmissinli 

im-iidiant and letailer nuii ein inj^ them 
srhes accnrd i ni;ly . < '. I la^eiilm i-i^ei 
anr<-ed |ier1'ectly with this idea. 

W. .1. X'esey, dr., sccined tn think 
sniiii' whnh'sale customers are chronic 
'-om|p|iniU'rs, that kind heiii;^ in the mi 
iioi it\', however. He said he has adn|itei| 
a system of [postcards, whith he phaci's 
with every invdice sliced sent nut. ask 

inn Inr ;i l-i'|pn|t nil the cnllditinli ill 

which the stuck airivt'd. Th(> consinm-i 
is askc-d nieielv to write one \V(p|-(|. yes 

or IMP, with his name, ;ind to mail tlie 
caid. These are put on tile and ;it the 
i-lid nt' the year al'e lipoked over to find 
whip are the s.atistied ciistoniers and who 
.111- not. lie I'ound this ex|ieriment so 
siiccessl'ul th.at he has inst.alled it in all 
nl' his i|e|partnieiits. 

<ieni-i.'e (iause insisted that liaininiiv 
Is what is needed — liarinnny Ipctwceii 
L;inwers, cninmission men and retailers. 
It this were accnm[plished a hetter inar- 
ki-t wniild follnvv. \V. \V. Coles Ipelievcd 
fli.at sii|i|i|y and demand should renulate 
t he [piice. 

The discussion closed as the judnes 
leturiied with till- |il-emiuiii I'ni the host 
l\ee|iiii;,f vase nt' ca Ilia t inns, which vv;is 
aw.aided tn Haitje A: I'ilder. nt' liidian- 
apnlis. This tiriii lunke the lecoid, tak 
111^ thii-e liisfs mi i,|||\ two i-litries, one 



of lifty White Enchantress and one of 
liftv Washiiifiton. 

.\ discussion .arose as to who is re- 
s|p(Piisil)Ie for j^dods shi]iped, the shipper 
or the .-nnsi^nee. This subject being a 
l;ir;;e niie, it w.as bartdy touched upon, 
and, seeing that no satisfacdory conclu 
sioii was in sight, iidjoiirnnient was 
.•isked I'nr and anreed u|ion. 

Routine Affairs. 

The cninmittee a|i|pninteil to pass on 
tile i-e|ports of ollicers was as follows: 
s. .1. (loddard, I'rainingliani, Mass.; C. 
W. .InhiisiPii, Morgan- Park, Jll.; John 
II. l>nnl(Pip, Toronto, Ont. 

In the matter of the jiri liminary com 
|ietition for the Dnrner .Memorial medal 
.1 1 ecninmemlat ion was made to reduce 
'he nnmlier of Iploonis reijuired, but the 
deiMsion was that the number remain 
lil'tv, iiiste;i(| nl' lieiiiL; reduced to twen- 
IV live. 

The secietary was iiut hoii/.ed to con- 
tinue the identification badge. Prof. 
Dorm-r moved th.at the names in these 
badges be t vpevvritten rather than by 
hand, vvhii h was apipidveil. 

A committne of three nn final resolu- 
'iniis vv;is ap|pniiited: .1. \V. K'odgers, of 
|);iyton, < >. ; .1. II. Dick, of New York, 
;iml I'ripf. li. I'.. I )oi-ner, Of 1,'rbana, 111., 
the report tn lie heard at tlu; close of 
the b;nii|Uet. 

The (|uestion ol' the similarity of the 
old variety, lie.acnii, .-iiid a \ariety dis- 
tributed to a limited extent in the east 
last season under t he name of Hed Wing, 
was brought u|i. Altliougli several as- 
serted that the two v;irieties are prac- 
tically identicitl, an eipial number de 
clared that as far as color and form 
of bloom are concerned they are similar, 
but that Hed Wing is a more robust 
gr(pwer, growing taller, liaving ;i 
str(pnger ctilax and n<pf splitting so 
badly. The matter was referred to a 
committee whicdi will be .appointed by 
the iiiccpining president, as the soidety 
stands to discountenance the renaming 
of old varieties or the introdmdioii of 
tiKP much alike varieties under different 
iia im-s. 

.\. .1. (iiittinan asked In have the new 
v.ariety, Ulive Whitman, rejudged for 




Annual Banquet of the American Carnation Society, Claypool Hotel, Indianapolis, February I, IT 



Febuuaui 8, 1917. 



The Florists^ Review 



15 




— "^-^j 



A General View of the Twenty-sixth Annual Exhibition of the American Carnation Society, Indianapolis, January 31, I9I7. 



till' ccrtiliiato of merit. This was j;raiit 
'■'I, with the result of a score of eii'lity 
tw<i points. 

The Banqtuet. 

As tlie haii(|uet was <fi\i'ii in tlie Riley 
ruoni. wlier<> tlu' sliow was lielil, the ex- 
hihitiiiii ildwers -were used as docora- 
tidiis, making an elahorate disjilay. 
I)uriiig the cveninii: the eiitei tainment 
nududed an ondiestra and eaharet (hin«- 
iiit^. Tlie speeial feature cd" tlie cNcniiig 
was a (diariot (d" eariiations and sweet 
I'las cirawn }>\ two little girls, in whii li 
i\as seated the maid (d' honor represent 
iii^- thr American < 'aiiiat ion Society. 
\tteudinj; her and seate(| at hei' feet 
'\asa smaller maid, re]iresent in^ the In 
liana State l-'lorists" Asso<dation. V.. 
' '. Hill, acting as toastmaspT. iniio 
liiced in Ids humorous way the follnw 
'lu: Irwin Bertermann, to speak lor the 
'iidiaiia State Florists' Ass(j(dat ion : d. 
.\mm;nin, to speak tor the Atmrican 
■ iination Societv; lion. <'h:i^. \\'. Hook 
■' •dtei , III speak l'o|- I lo- (it \ ; I )a \ id 
^■■ird, til sjieaJi till the carnation; dohn 
' '■ I 'iildiip. til ■-peak foi ( 'anada : l'a\ id 
■• 'Ml-;, to -.peak for the St. Lniii^ -prin^ 
'"'\\ : A. r. .1. IJaiir. In ^pe;ik as seen 
'I \ ; Win. d. Xe^ey. .1 r., tiie president 
''■'■'; \iigM>t roelilniaiiii, ;i- an iuter- 
"''■d \isitor: Ailu'it i'oidichm, to speak 
'I the r. T. |»., ;niil Will. Nicholson, ;is 
' |'i'oseiitati\e of tlie old guard. Vv'iii. 
• . •iiide teli'giapheil his regrets. 

\V . d. \C>ey, dr., as retii'ing |iresideiit 
'' the Indi.-ina State I-dorists" A<-;ocia- 
'"II •'iii'l iiicoiniiio ]iresi,|ent oi' tlu' 
\"i'iicaii < 'ani;it ion Smdety, thanked 
'!> ciPMimit tees in general. es|u'ciall\ 
■ oniniendiiig the (dforts of dohn lierter 
"'I'lii, Jlenry W. hNeiiian, liotiier 1.. 
Wie-;ini|, Fn^il |p Lemon, (>. !•:. Stein 
|V""1'. dnseph 11. Hill .-iiid Clareii.-e 
'I'honiav. J'idlowing this, the repmt dii 
'"'■d lesiihitions w.as read ;iiii| the eiiier 



tainment was (dosed hy a \crse from 
d;inies Wdiitcoinl. Riley's ••Old Sweet 
lie;tii ol' .Mine,'' in honor ot' the holie--. 

Excursions. 

While the men were attending the 
li?ial session dining the morning of the 
(dosing day, the ladies were shown the 
interesting sights oi' the (dty. In the 
afternoon the l;idies and gentlemen 
/|(dne(| in an aiitn trip that was tille(| 
with e.\(dtenient. .Iii^t as the ji.arty was 
]ea\ ing, a lire hroke out m the liase- 
meiit of the hol(d ;inil the lire depart 
meiit ga\(' an exhiliition run. Later, on 
the return tiiji, the i|ri\cr ol' one of the 
nuKdiines \\as arrested for >ipeeding and 
the occupants of the c,-ir walked the re- 
inaiioler of the way to the .\I aeiinerclidr, 
where a lillffet llllKdieoll \\a> -erv ed. 

The party ioiirne\cd to the Baur A: 
>-teinkamp est;i Idishment , where there 
were se\ei;il t'e;i t li res nf interest, tile 
llio-t not e\\ (lit h V lieillL; a lie.autiflll lied 

111' .\Ieiiy ('hri^tnias ca rii.at ioii, a hed of 
see, nine-- that provoked eii-at adniir.a 
tioii ;ini| a new piii]iag;it i iil; lioii^e in 
w hi(di w ere ;io,oiHi c-ntl ine-. 

.\ n i iit( rest i n^ trip \ i:i the Imulev ;i rds 

1 loleil .'it I lei t el ma II M '- t ' lUII 1 lel l;i 10 I 

range. Although the i o-.i - .■md ciriia 

tlon-,, wlliidl .-lie the I hiel cliip-. Weli 

111 excellent cmi . 1 1 1 I on , there were nther 
interesting siliIiIs, i ncliiil iiil;' a house ol 
swi-et pea-- ;ini| violets and a house of 
delphinium-., cent a ii ic.-i-, -iia pd ra^dii-, 
wintertlow cii lie ei^ini p:in--ies ainl iiii 
UMonet t e. ]•;. i;. T. 

Notes hy Another Observer. 

,\ ft'w notes taken during the iiathei 
ing of the id.ans at the .\inericaii ' ;inia 
tioii Sdciety's annii.al nieetine at In 
dian.'ijiidis, danuaiv '.'<\ , iii;ty lie of in 
terest .'It this time. 

S. d. (duddard, of l-^ainiiij.;ham. .Mass., 
stated, while nnpaidviiig his jiri/e win 



ning carnations, that the Idoonis were 
pitdied .laiinary l'."), jiacdved danuary L'9 
and uniia(d\ed danuary ■'>! at liidian- 
apidis. Although no ii'o was used, when 
the bo.xes were (>pen(>(i the Idooms lookt>(| 
perfect. This reinai'k.alde condit ion was 
noted ill practically all other shipments, 
and the at mos|iheric conilitious at the 
exhiliitioii were liigliK t'avorable to the 

Idoollis. 

A stiiUiiie iMUitrast between the way 
<ai nation Melle Washburn was :;rowii 
by two local e|-|,\\,.rs proved that this 
varietv ni.-iv lie well grown b v one 
erower and less so bv another, even in 

I he ^.-l me loc;i lit v . 

Tli;it old faviirite. l.awson. as seen at 
the 1 le It eiina 11 u I'.io--. ('ii. place, sliiiw'od 
itself .a- full of V iLim- .•md ;is llorit'erous 
;is when it vvas more largely grown. 
I)i(l the siLzht of this uraiid a(dor in 
^piie -(line to (jue-lion as to whether 
vnrietie- ol' more rt'ceiit introduction 
|ii)sse-'- the -lamina of tlndr predeees- 
-ois .' The line beds (if \ ioh't I'rilicess 
ot' W;iles seen at the I !e It e mi.'i 11 II range 
Were iiiiich ;elii]irei|. .1. <■. Ileiid, of 

relTe llnllte. Ind., s,-|i,| lie Wa- |ir(illd 
ol' the |';ict th.-it he bldlieilt the tirsf 
plant- uiown here, I'loni I'aris, .aioi 
Iiiined tiieiii (iver to .1. A. I'etei-oii, of 
« ilK i II n.lt i, wllii ei|..,\ iheiii even lillei' 

t hnii the 1 '.-I lisia II-. ' " This was in I s7 I , ' ' 
oliserveil Mr. lleini, •"and just ^ee how 
V ieiii on- i- t he I ihl III Vet . ' ' 

didiii II. l'iinlo]i, (it Tdi'diito, ably 
represent e, I the liomiiiidii .and, in com- 
ineiitine iip(Mi lliis. thi> best exhibition 
\('t, he -aid that biisiiie-s wiis remark- 
;iMy -oo'l :it liouie, iiuMih'iit ally meiitioii- 
iiiii that the wholesale departllleiil for 
the iiioiith of |)ec('mber shovved an in- 
(•re.a-e of twelltv three Jiei- cent and 
the retnil (Mill an ;iilv;ince in I'ldport ion . 

Albeit lle;-r, of b.-iiica-ter, I'a., ob- 
-ei\ e.l I h;it posit i V el V all hi- I'elluw 

II :i 1 1 -iiieii Wdiild be a! I'.d-ldii next vcar. 



16 



The Florists' Review 



Fbbrdaby 8, 1917. 



and doubtless would have been present 
this time had they the least idea of the 
great treat, floricultural and gastronom- 
ical, prepared for and enjoyed by those 
fortunate enough to be present. 

Carl Hagenburger, of Mentor, O., 
showed a few plants of his dwarf sola- 
nuin, which were covered with berries. 
This variety is sure to find favor. 

Van Bochove & Bro., of Kalamazoo, 
Mich., sent their grower, A. Westveer, 
just to see what was beiiig done by 
others. ' ' For, ' ' observed Mr. West- 
veer, "this is the grandest object lesson 
to the grower who is interested in the 
new varieties. The grower notes the 
product, quizzes the introducer, and 
should — if he is the right sort — learn 
enough to more than pay for the expense 
incurred on the trip.'' 

The charming display of sweet peas 
staged by Peter Weiland, of Newcastle, 
Ind., was the center of attraction. John 
Dunlop, in commenting on the lovely 
bunch of Rose Queen, incidentally men- 
tioned that he is trying out eleven va- 
rieties of Yarrawa type and looks for 
big results. Discussing the frequent 
failure of sweet pea seeds to germinate, 
Mr. Dunlop says they usually soak the 
seeds for twenty-four hours, and if the 
skin is hard crack it. The grower then 
invariably obtains almost a full per- 
centage of germination, especially so in 
whites, the ehyest to seed and the hard- 
est to sprout. 

John Bertermann remarked that he is 
not worrying about foreign valley pips, 
as he has been successful in raising his 
own stock. 

It was a felicitous moment when, dur- 
ing the visit to the Hill establishments 
at Richmond, a member of the party sug- 
gested the name Columbia for a lovely 
debutante rose of next year. The sug- 
g stion was immediately adopted and 
later pledged at the gathering at the 
Country Club, coupling it with the name 
of its popular owner, E. G. Hill. Red 
Rover, a glowing crimson, is to be in- 
troduced at the same time; an escort, 
as it were. Other beautiful seedlings 
were noted, from pure white through 
the loveliest tints and shades to deep 
crimson, some of perfect form and lack- 
ing in fragrance, others the reverse. 



The unanimous verdict was that right 
here is found much that goes to make 
the queen of flowers so justly popular. 
Mr. Hill later in a postprandial talk 
urged those present to equally interest 
themselves in the advancement of the 
divine flower, as he was doing with the 
rose. W. M. 

Continuing the Discussion. 

The twenty-sixth annual meeting of 
the American Carnation Society, as re- 
gards number and quality of exhibits, 
undoubtedly was the most successful 
ever held. One of the outstanding im- 
pressions was that of the prevailing 
good fellowship and unity of interest 
among members. It would seem that 
the business meetings are not attended 
by all of the visiting members, as they 
should be. Many of the members lose 
the best part of these conventions by 
not attending the meetings and enter- 
ing into the general discussions. While 
the social side of our conventions should 
not be lost sight of, it would seem im- 
portant, if the carnation growers are 
desirous of placing the flower back on 
the pedestal of popular favor, that they 
should not neglect the educational side, 
including those opportunities for an ex- 
change of ideas that are open to the 
members at these meetings. 

The discussion on the marketing of 
carnations was both vigorous and to the 
point and brought out many valuable 
ideas. It is quite evident that both the 
growers and the wholesalers can in many 
instances improve their methods of han- 
dling carnations, to the end that they 
go into the hands of the buyers in proper 
condition. The lack of demand for car- 
nations does not seem to be due to any 
lack of varieties possessing all the ad- 
mirable qualities of size, color, fragrance 
and keeping qualities, but is due more to 
the smaller margin of profit realized in 
the handling than is possible with roses 
and, in fact, many other flowers han- 
dled by the retailer. Would it not be 
well for the retailer to demand only the 
l)i'st in quality, when buying, and then 
ask a price that will give him a proper 
margin of profit f It is a well known 
fact that the better grades of carnations 
liave sold at a lower price than they 




should, when cost of production is taken 
into consideration. If the retailer will 
put a ban on the poorer grades of car- 
nations, at the same time showing a 
willingness to pay the grower a fair 
price for quality, and insist on stock that 
has been properly cut, packed and han- 
dled by both grower and wholesaler, he 
will soon force both grower and whole- 
saler to deliver, carnations that will 
bring a price commensurate with the 
quality. True, this will force an im- 
mense number of carnations into the 
hands of the street peddlers at a low 
price and would mean practically no re- 
turns to the growers of poor stock, but 
it would seem that if the carnation is 
to retain its proper degree of popularity 
with the buying public the large num- 
ber of growers of uniformly inferior 
stock are due to receive the jolt of find- 
ing their stock practically unsalable. I 
believe the wholesale men could do a 
great deal to aid by notifying their con- 
signors immediately on the reception of 
poor grade stock that the stock in ques- 
tion is practically unsalable, and im- 
pressing upon their consignors that ship- 
ments of such stock will not pay for 
the express and commission for selling. 

H. E. Humiston. 



A CLUB AT COLUMBUS. 

Thirteen enthusiastic florists assem- 
bled at the Neil House on the evening of 
January 29 and formed what will be 
known as the Columbus Florists' Club. 
After several hours of lively discussion, 
it was agreed that the club be conducted 
on a business basis, the object of the 
organization being to study all phases 
of the business, but particularly adver- 
tising, selling and growing. At each of 
the meetings, which are scheduled to be 
held twice a month, a paper prepared by 
a member on any subject of interest to 
the trade will be read. At different times 
arrangements will be made with promi- 
nent florists of other cities to address 
the club members on florists' problems. 

The following were elected officers 
for one year: President, Alfred C. 
Hottes, professor in floriculture of the 
Ohio State University; vice-president, 
Walter Stephens, of S. F. Stephens & 
Son; secretary, A. Munk, of Munk Flo- 
ral Co.; treasurer, Walter Engel, super- 
intendent of the Munk Floral Co. range. 
The various committees and the work of 
the committees will be worked out by 
the officers before the next meeting. 

Memberships in the club will be lim- 
ited to proprietors, managers and ad- 
vanced students of floriculture. Any 
candidate for membership present at 
the next meeting will be admitted. 
Thereafter new members will be elect- 
ed, as customary. The fee for charter 
members will be $1, after which the en- 
trance fee will be $5, with 50 cents 
monthly dues. 



New Carnation Radium in Tabic Decoration by Claypool Hotel Flor'st. 



Emporia, Kan. — Mrs. E. R. Lewis has 

leased her Cliarlsen Flower Shop and 
for the time being is taking a vacation. 

Mantorville, Minn. — W. E. Fryer has 
raised numerous seedling phloxes and 
has produced three new varieties that 
are said to be of surpassing merit. 

Lisbon, O. — John Scott has been un- 
dergoing special treatment at a Cleve- 
land hospital for a serious skin trouble 
on the face. Mr. Scott has suffered from 
a disease of the skin for a number of 
years, but during the last few months it 
has grown much worse. 



Fbbeuaky 8, 1917. 



The Florists' Review 



17 



MAY QUARANTINE ALL OUR STOCK 

SENATE PASSES BILL GIVING DANGEROUS AUTHORITY 



PROPOSED NEW LEOISLATION. 



Drastic and Dangerous. 

Prior to the passage of the plant quar- 
antine law of 1912, agitation was worked 
up by lectures, magazine articles, pam- 
phlets, etc., with the evident object of 
creating an atmosphere favorable to its 
passage. The impression was given that 
about all of the insect pests and plant 
diseases that affect our forests and farm 
crops were imported into the United 
States by selfish nurserymen and florists 
— along with the plants and nursery 
stock which they imported from Europe. 
This propaganda resulted in the passage 
of the plant guarantine act in 1912, 
though the agitation continues. 

To operate the plant quarantine act, 
the Federal Horticultural Board was 
created, with headquarters in Washing- 
ton, D. C; it consists of five bureau 
chiefs of the Department of Agriculture, 
with Dr. C. L. Marlatt as chairman. 
All of these men are well qualified for 
their duties and though the law gives 
them almost autocratic powers, power 
to quarantine any foreign country or 
locality, they have used this power with 
commendable discretion and moderation. 
But this does not satisfy a group of 
state entomologists, who demand noth- 
ing less than an absolute quarantine 
against the importation of plant life 
from all foreign sources. 

State Entomologists Get Busy. 

At a meeting of entomologists about 
a year ago, resolutions were passed 
which in effect requested the Federal 
Horticultural Board to put this absolute 
quarantine into effect, but as no action 
was taken, the entomologists interested 
the American Forestry Association in 
its plans. This association consists 
largely of foresters, entomologists, lum- 
ber men and others interested in our 
forests. JNaturally, such men know lit- 
tle about the commercial side of the nur- 
sery or florists' business, but when they 
were informed — by men who should 
l<now better — that an absolute quaran- 
tine of all imported plant life was neces- 
sary for the protection of our forests 
and farm crops, they took up the sub- 
ject with enthusiasm and called a spe- 
cial conference in "Washington, D. C, to 
adopt measures to stop importation, even 
of the raw materials. 

A One-sided Conference. 

The conference was held January 19. 
^, as chairman of the legislative com- 
mittee of the S. A. F., and J. McHutchi- 
son, of New York, a member of my com- 
i«ittee, were present on behalf of the 
°- A. F. The legislative committee of 
the American Association of Nnrsery- 
luen was also there, besides several in- 
dividual members of the nurserymen's 
a.nd florists' organizations. Many 
speeches and papers were delivered ad- 
vocating an absolute quarantine, but 
iio opportunity was given for discus- 
sion after each paper; so the 1. /"'^nl- 



THE SENATE ACTS. 

February 3 the Senate gave the 
Secretary of Agriculture unlim- 
ited authority to establish abso- 
lute quarantine of all horticultural 
products by adopting an amend- 
ment to the present quarantine 
law, making Section 8 read as 
follows: 

Sec. 8. That the Secretary of Agri- 
culture is authorized and directed to 
quarantine any state, territory or dis- 
trict of the United States, or any portion 
thereof, when he shall determine that 
such quarantine is necessary to prevent 
the spread of a dangrerous plant disease 
or insect infestation, new to or not there- 
tofore widely prevalent or distributed 
within and throughout the United States. 

The amendment goes on to pro- 
vide that the law shall apply to 

any class of nursery stock or any other 
class of plants, fruits, vegetables, roots, 
hulbs, seeds, or other plant products, or 
any class of stone or quarry products, 
or any other article of any character what- 
soever, capable of carrying any dangerous 
Slant disease or insect infestation, speci- 
ed in the notice of quarantine. 

The secretary is required to 
hold a public hearing before pro- 
mulgating a quarantine. 



The House already had passed 
the agricultural appropriation bill. 
It now goes to a conference com- 
mittee. If the conference agrees 
to the quarantine amendment it 
no doubt will become the law. 



tural side of the question was not voiced. 
Resolutions were unanimously adopted 
favoring an absolute quarantine, and to 
show what it means to the florists and 
nurserymen, I quote from the proposed 
bill the first two sections, as follows: 

Sec. 1. That It shall be unlawful for any 
person to import or offer for entry Into the United 
States any nursery stock, Provided: That the 
Secretary of Agriculture may Import, grow and 
propagate nursery stock in small quantities for 
experiment-il and scientific purposes, upon such 
oonrlitions and under such regulations as he may 
advise. 

Sec. 2. That for the purpose of this Act the 
term "nursery stock" shall Include all field- 
grown florists' stock, trees, shrubs, vines, cut- 
tings, grafts, scions, buds, bedding plants, all 
herbaceous plants, bulbs, roots, and other plants 
and plant products for propagation, except field, 
vegetable, flower and tree seeds. 

Effect of the Bill. 

This bill, if passed, will shut out 
practically everything the florists now 
import, including Azalea Indica, bay 
trees and araucarias, valley pips for 
forcing or any other purpose, Japanese 
lily bulbs, French bulbs, Dutch bulbs, 
Manetti stocks used for greenhouse 
grafting of roses, orchids and nursery 
stock of every kind. It would not only 
shut out dracsena plants, but the canes 
which are necessary to produce them. 
It would shut out kentia plants; also the 
seeds necessary to grow our own plants. 
"What for?" you ask; the answer is, 
"To save our forests." If any member 
of the S. A. F. thinks it necessary to 
stop the importation of valley pips, 
Manetti stocks or Japanese lily bulbs to 



protect our forests, I should like to hear 
from him. 

Arrangements were made in the con- 
ference committee so that the measure 
would not be introduced in Congress 
until committees from the national asso- 
ciations of florists and nurserymen had 
an opportunity of conferring with a 
special committee of the American For- 
estry Association appointed for that 
purpose. This arrangement shows the 
right spirit, and, though the special com- 
mittee consists mostly of state inspect- 
ors, we hope to be able to show them 
that while their plan, if put into opera- 
tion, would put back the florists' busi- 
ness many years, it would not go far in 
protecting our forests or farm crops or 
reduce the diseases which afflict them 
to any appreciable degree. 

A Crisis in Trade Affairs. 

The measures that have threatened 
our interests for several years have now 
reached a crisis. We shall need on our 
committee men of ability who are will- 
ing to subordinate their personal inter- 
ests to the welfare of the trade — men 
who understand why stock is imported, 
why at least the raw materials are nec- 
essary to our welfare — men who know 
something about insect pests and plant 
diseases and who can adequately express 
their views. 

Since our policy will likely have to be 
defined before our annual convention in 
August, the nurserymen 's convention 
being held in June, I will seek the ad- 
vice of the executive committee of the 
S. A. F. on the subject, but as the mat- 
ter is such a vital one to many of our 
members, I deem it wise to inform the 
general trade -through the medium of 
The Review and trust the Editor will 
give this report the publicity it de- 
serves. Wm. F. Gude, 
Chairman Legislative Committee of the 

S. A. F. 



THRIPS ON CYCLAMENS. 

Kindly let me know what ails the en- 
closed cyclamen leaf. Can you tell me 
the cause and the remedy for this trou- 
ble! I had plants in the same condition 
last year. P. H. — O. 



The leaf forwarded was covered with 
thrips. This usually comes from an 
dry atmosphere and is accentuated if 
the plants, in addition, get too dry at 
the roots. A remedy is to keep more 
moisture in the atmosphere and spray 
the affected plants frequently with a 
fine spray nozzle. If you lay the plants 
on their sides and use a nicotine or soap 
spray and direct it carefully at the 
lower sides of the leaves, you will ex- 
terminate a large majority of the pests. 

C. W. 



Fargo, N. D. — Several blocks of a new 
addition to the town have been acquired 
by the Smedley Floral Co., which con- 
templates the erection of greenhouses 
on the property. 



16 



The Florists^ Review 



Februauy 8, 1917. 



.'III. I 'liUll 't li'---- Wcillhl li;i\(' Im'i'II |||(■^-(■|lt 
t lii^ 1 illic ii;|i| I lirv t lie liMst ii|c;i (iT t he 
l;ii:i! tir:il. llm ii-ii It n r;i I :iinl L;:i--t i niKini- 
Ic.'ll, 1 11 i;|i:i II ' I I'lir ;iiii| (11 i(p\c.| \i\ tlinsi' 

I'l 'I t II ii;i I !■ cimiiil;!! t u I u' {ii c^i'ii t . 

< ai i I l.-im'iiliii I'l^rr, n[ M cntni-. ( )., 
--lidWi'.l .-I few i.|;iiit> III his ilwiiiT sola 
iiiiiii, wli'hli WiTv iii\rifi| with lu'iiics. 
'I'liK \ a I ill \ is sii I !■ til Ii 11"! la \ III'. 

\'aii llurliiivc vV lliii., Ill' l\ a lama/ (HI. 
Miili., -I'lit tlii'ii l:iii\\''I", a. West \ ccr. 
just In -('!■ wliat \\as Ih'Iiil; iliiiu' li\ 
lit Ihi-. ■ • J'lir. ■ ' I'.l.v.'iv I'll M r. W'i'vt 

\ I'll , ■ • t lli^ IS I lir ;^| allilrsi nil jcit Irssnll 
til tlir L;|-ii\\rr wllii is i lltrli'st I'll ill till' 
lii'W \ .a I art i('s. Till' ^inWiT llnti'S Ill(> 
|i|ii.|llit. i|ui//i'^ lllr illt 1 lulllccr, aihl 
sliiilllil il' lir i- tlir liL;llt Sdfl Icaiii 
i'Iiiiul; Ii t u iiiiii c than pa v I nr t lii' rxiicii-^r 
i iini n I' ! mi tlir t i i |i. 

Tlir 1- lia I ill i li'j iji'-lilav lit' swri't |ira^ 
st;iL;i'l li\ I'ltrr Wiil.ainl. Ill' New lasf Ic. 
Ili'l.. w a - llic .rlitrl' (iT .a 1 1 r.art ioll. .Idllll 
1 > 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 . ill I ■ 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 11 ' 1 1 1 i 1 1 l; nil the I ( I \ r 1 \ 
liiDii 11 111' li'iiv,. (jiiua'ii. iiiiiiliMit.ally iih'Ii 
tiiiiiiil tli.at 111' is IrviiiL: mit rliAcli \ .a 
iiitii"- III ^'.a^la\\a t\l'i' .aii'l limiis I'm 
I'Il; icsilhs, I lisiUssiii^; till' riri|iirlit 
lailiiii' III ^wi'i't pi'.a si'i'iU 111 l;i'I mi iiat I'. 
Ml. l>iiiilii|' s.a \ s ilii'\ Usually su.-ik tlu' 
st'i'iU tor twriity rmii liuuis_ aial it tin 
skill is liar. I riarl^ it. Tlir ijrnwci thru 
1 11 \ a li.a I il \ nlilaiiis aliimst n lull |ii'i 

I'l'lltanr 111 :^i'MII i liaf inll. rS|ii'rial ly sn ill 

whitrs, till' shyest In scml aiiii tin' liai'l 

I's; In sjiriiiit. 

.Inhii I 'ii'i tri iiiaiiii rriii.aikfil that lii' i^ 
lint wiHiyiiiL; ;iliiiul I'mi inii \;illi'y |'i|is. 
.•is hr has 1 u siirii"- st'ul iu i.'iisini; his 

nW II st IM k. 

It W.as .'I t'lliiitnUs liinliii'Ul wlli'll, lilll 
iii^; t In- \ isit tn t Im llill i st a 1 .1 ish mi'ut s 
at lii I'll II 1 11 ml. .-1 111 I nil Hi nl' t Im p.a i t y su;_. 
ni'sti-'l till' iiaiiin ' nl mil Ilia ini a ln\il\ 
■ li'liuta lit 1' rnsi' lit' iii'St \iav. 'I'lm su;^ 
n stinii \\;is i 111)111'. I iati'l\ .•nlnpti'.] .-iiiil 
lati'i |.|i''lui'.| .-it Ihi' -.at lim ill- at tin 

«(illllt|-\ ('lull. rnU|ilill- it with till' llallli' 
nl lis pnjuij.ar n\\ lli'l , K. < < . llill. lic! 
li'ilNl'l, ;i ^Inwilli; rlilllsnll, is til 111' il, 

liiiilurcil at ;lii' saiiii' tiiiii': an I'smit, 
.as it wi'ic. (>tlirr lir.-nilirul s,.|',Hiii;_;s 

Wi'li' llntcl. t'lnin |iilli' wliiti' tlllnllijli 

1hi. ln\i'lii'si tints ami sha.lis tn i|i'c|. 
iiiliisnn, siiiiii' 111' jHit'i.t t'niin .iml hnk 
iiiij ill I 1 a l: i:i nil', ntln'is ihn inviis,.. 



Till' ii n:i n i iniiiis \i'r.|irf \v;is that ri-lit 
lii'ir is t'luiml !iiiii-h lli.at l;(k's tn iiiakt' 

till' i|U('rll 111' llnWi'ls sn justly |i(i|illlar. 

M r. llill l.-i tri i 11 a |inst iir.aiiili.a I talk 
ui-i'.l tlinsi' |ui'S('iit tn ciiually iiitcii'st 
! hrijisrl \ cs ill tlin ;ii|\ a lircllii'lit nl' the 
.jixiiii' lliiwcr. as he \\;is ilniiiu with the 

ins... W. M. 

Continuing the Discu.ssion. 

The t wi'iity sixth annual mcctiii^f iit' 
thi' .\ ini-rica n Cariiatinii Snrirty, as ro- 
uaiils iiuiiilii'i' aiiil (|iiality nl' I'xliihits, 
iiiiiliiiiliti'illy was the iiinst siioconst'iil 
i'\i'r hi'hl. One nl' tlin nut st andiiifj im- 
|iri'ssiiiiis w.'is that nl' till' [ircxaiiiiii;' 
mini] t'clliiw shi]) ami iinitx' nl" iiitcrost 
ainniin iiii'inlicrs. it wniilil sccin that 
thr liiisiiii'ss nii'i'tin-s arc tint a 1 1 i'IhIciI 
liv .all nl' thr \ isit in-' iiii'inlicrs. as tlicy 
shniilil !if. Maii\ 111' till' iiirinlicrs Insc 
the licst [lart nl' tlu'sc cniu rut inns ]^y 
lint attciiili iil; tlu' niri't iiiL;s anil tMitcr- 
iii- intn the -ciimal liisciissidiis. WTiilo 
thr snci.'il siili' nt' nur laUIX ClI t inilS shdillil 
lint 111' Inst si-ht nl', it Wnllhl SOCHI illl 

lioit.ant. i r the raiiiatinii yrnwcrs aie 
ilesifiins lit' |ilarin-' the tinwor l>nck nii 
the ]icilest,al III' )iii|iiilar t'a\nr, that the\' 

shiiuM lint lle^lei-t lllC ei 1 Heat inlKI 1 slilc. 
i llrlllilillL;' Ihnse n|ipnltllllit ies t'nr an ex 

rh.anne III' i.leas tli.at arc npen tn tin- 
ineniliiTs at these iHcctiiii;s. 

'I"he ilisi-Hssinli nil tlic Hiaikct iiii; nt' 
rarii.at iniis ^\.as Imth \i-nrnns and to the 
pniiit .aiiil hiniinjit (Hit iii.aiiy \aliialile 
iile.as. It is ipiite e\ iilent that Initll the 
L;rn\vi'rs ;inil the wlidh^salei's can in many 
instanees iinpinxc their inethdils d1' linn 
illiiiL; c.a niat iniis, tn tlu^ end that tlipy 
-II inin tile hands nt' the liuyers in jirnjier 
iniiditimi. 'i'he l.aik nt' diMiiaiid I'or car- 

ll.atinlls lines lint Si'i'lll tn ])0 dllO tO ailV 

laelv III' \,aiieties pii>vess!iin' all the ad- 
iiiir.alilc ipialitii'S nt' si/e, i-nlm-, I'raLiraiire 
.ami keepiii- ipi:ilit irs, luit is ilue iniHa' tn 
the smaller inarnin nt' pmlit reali/ed in 
the hamllin- than is pussilde witji vdses 
;iii.|. in t;ii-t, iiian\ ntlier ilnwers haii 
did li\ the ii't.aihr. Wnllhl it imt he 
well I'nr the let.ailei tn delliand nllly the 
I'.'st ill ipi.-ilitv, wlli'll liiixiiiL;, and then 
.•isk a prii'i' that will -i\e him a prnper 
iii;i r-iii 111 pi nlit .' It is a w nil know n 
I'.art tli:i1 till' liettii -ladi's nl' rariiatidiis 
ii;i\e siild ;it a Inwer prii-c than they 




shnuld. when cdst nt' |Hdiluct ion is taken 
intn idiisiderat imi. il' the retailer will 
put a ban nn the ]id(u-er j^rades of car- 
nal inns, at the same time sliowiiifr a 
willin-ness tn pay the <ir()wcr a fair 
|Hice I'nr (|Hality, and insist on stock tliat 
li.as lieeii prnpeily cut, pa(ds('(l and han- 
dled hy hnth j^rnwcr and wholesalor, he 
will snnn I'nrie liidli j^rowcr and wlude- 
s;iler td dclixcr carnations that will 
brill- a |ii'ice c(uiiinonsurate Avitli tho 
(liiality. True, this will force an im- 
meiis(> number nl' carnations into tlu> 
li.ands of the street peddlers at a low 
price and would mean practically no re- 
turns to the -inwcrs nl' poor stdc'k, but 
it Wdiild seem that it' the carnation is 
td ret.aiii its jnaiper de-ree ot'*]H)|mlarit.\' 
with the biiyin<x jniblic the laiffi! niun- 
lier nl' -I'oucis of iniit'ormly inferior 
stock are due in recei\e the J(dt of find- 
in- their stock ]u-act iially unsalable, f 
believe the wholesale men could do a 
-real deal to aid by not i I'y ill;;' their con- 
siliums iinmediately (m the i'ece])tion of 
pddl- -lade ^ock that the stoidv ill (l|Ues- 
tioii is jiractically niisalable. and im- 
piessin-' upon their consifiiiois that ship- 
ments nt' siiidi std(d\ will not pay for 
the express and commissitin I'or s(dlin^'. 

II. 1]. Iliimiston. 



A CLUB AT COLUMBUS. 

Thiitei'ii enthusiastic tlorists asseiii- 
Ided at the Neil House on the eviMiiiig of 
.lanu.iiy !'!• and formed what will be 
known ,as the « ■idiimbns Florists' Club. 
.\t'ter scNcr.al hniiis of lixely discussion. 
it ^\as ;i-reed that the club b(> c()nductod 
nil a business basis, the object of the 
ni-'ani/at i(Hi beiiiii' to study all ]diases 
nt' the business, but particularly advor- 
tisjne, si'lliiio; and crrowiiic;. At each of 
the iiieetiH-s, wlii(di are sclu'duled to be 
licM twice a month, a paper prepared by 
a luembi'i- mi any siibji'ct of interest to 
the tr.ide will be read. At difl'erent times 
.an aH-eineiits will b(> maile with jiromi- 
neiit tlmists lit' nther cities to address 
the club members on florists' problems. 

The t'nlldwiii- wert> elected otlicers 
inr niu' ye.ar: I'resident, Alfred C'. 
Ilntt.'s. )irnfess,,i' in llnricultuie of the 
<)liiii St.ate l'ni\ersity; \ice-president, 
Walter Stephens, o\' S. F. Stephens & 
.'^du: secietary, A. ^luiik, of Miink Flo- 
ral Co.: treasurer. W.alter En>;el, super- 
iiitendent nf the Munk Floral Co. ranc;e. 
The \arimis committees and the wurk of 
the cmnmittees will Ik^ worked mit by 
the ntllcers liefdi'e the next meetine;. 

M I'liiberships in the club will be lim- 
ited tn ]>ropi'ietors, managers .and ad- 
-. aiice.l students ol' tldriculture. .\ny 
I'.andid.at e t'or meniberslii]i [ireseiit at 
thr iii'xt meetiiiix will be admitted. 
Thereafter iiew" members will be clect- 
I'.l. as iiistnmary. The fee fur charter 
iiii'iiibeis will be si, .aft-er which the en 

1i;ince fee will be s.". with ''>' .Clits 
mmitlilv' 'lues. 



New Carnation Radium in Table Decoration by Claypool Hotel Flor'st. 



Emporia, Kan. .\lis. K. i;. Lewis has 

li'.'isi'.l lim t iiaiisei, I'lnwer Shop and 
fnr the time beiie^ is t.alUiiLJ a \a< iitioii. 

Mantorville. Minn. AV. ]■]. Fryer lias 

i.ii-e.l in;ii,e nus seedliii'^ phloxes and 
has pin. 111. -e.; thiee imw \arieties that 
.'lie sai.l t'l il.' nf siirpassiucj merit. 

Lisbon, O. .Inlin Smtt has been uii- 
.ler-oiiiL; spi'i-iul treatment ;it a <'!e\('- 
laii.j iii.spital fdi .a seriiuis skin trdiifile 
nil the i.-ne. Mr. Sr, it t has sulVerod from 
a diseasi' nt' tlie skin t'nr a nunilier of 
\i','iis. Imt .liniii- the last t'cw mmitlis it 

li;ls - 1 nW 11 milch W nl'se. 



Feiuuauy S, 1'.)17. 



The Florists^ Review 



17 



MAY QUARANTINE ALL OUR STOCK 

SENATE PASSES BILL GIVING DANGEROUS AUTHORITY 



PROPOSED NEW LEGISLATION. 



Drastic and Dangerous. 

Prior to tlie i);i.ssagc of tlie plant quar- 
.-iritiiic law of 1!)12, aj;itatioii was worked 
up hy lectures, magazine articles, pani- 
plilets, etc., with tlie eviilent oliject of 
creatiiij;' an atniospheie faxoralile to its 
{lassa^ic. The impression was <j;iveu that 
about all of the insect ])ests and plant 
diseases that al'I'eet our forests and farm 
<'roj)s were imported into the I'nited 
states by sellish nurserynuMi and llorists 
— along with the ])h-uits and nursery 
stock which they imported from i'lurope. 
This ])ro])agaiida resulted in the passaj^(> 
of the jilant ipiaiJintiiie act in I'.M'J, 
thoiiyh the agitation continues. 

To operate the plant quarantine act, 
<he Federal Horticultural Board was 
created, with headcpiarters in Washing- 
ton, D. C; it consists of live bureau 
chiefs of the JJepartnient of Agriculture, 
with Dr. C. L. Marlatt as chairman. 
-Ml of tiiese men are well qualified for 
their duties and though the law gives 
them almost autocratic powers, power 
to ()uarantine any foicign country or 
locality, they have used this power witli 
<'ommondable discretion and moderation. 
Hut this does not satisfy a group of 
state entomologists, who deiuaiid noth- 
ing less than an absolut(^ (|uaiantine 
against the importation of plant life 
from all foreign sourcM^s. 

State Entomologists Get Busy. 

At a meeting of entomologists about 

a year ago, resolutions were ]iassed 

which in elVect re(iuesteil the Federal 

Horticultural Board to put this absolute 

luarantinc into effect, but as no action 

•vas taken, tlio entomologists interested 

I he American Forestry Association in 

■ 's plans. This association consists 

■irgely of foresters, entomologists, lum- 

"'r men and others interested in our 

I "rests. .Naturally, sucli men know lit- 

' 'c about the commercial side of the nur- 

■ry or florists' business, but when they 

'"re informed — by men who sliould 

NOW better — that an altsolute quaran- 

■'*'• of all imported jilant life was neccs- 

'i.^' for the j>rotection of our forests 

'I farm crops, they took u]i the suli- 

♦ with enthusiasm and c;illed a sjte- 

:il conference in Washington, 1). C, to 

ii'pt measures to stop inijiortation, e\eu 

' ' he raw materials. 

A One-sided Conference. 

I he conference was lield .lanuary 10. 
. as chairman of the legislative com- 
mittee of the S. A. v., and .1. Mcllutchi- 
"». of New Yorl\, a member of my com- 
iftee, were present on behalf of the 
A. F. The legis];iti\e committee of 
''"' American Association of Nui-sery- 
'"f 1 was also there, besiiles several in- 
'ividual members of the nurserymen \s 
"I'l florists' organizations. Many 
-fieeclios and papeis were delivered ad- 
' ocating an absolute quarantine, but 
'lo opportunity was given for discus- 
sion after each paper; so tli-' '.. ' 'd- 



THE SENATE ACTS. 

i'"cbruaiy '.'> the Heiiate gave the 

Secretary of Agriculture unliin 

ited authority to establish abso- 

lutt' (piarantine of all horticultural 

pKiducts by adopting an anieiid- 

iiieut to tiie present (juarantiiie 

law, making Section S read as 

t'olhiw s: 

Sec. 8. That the Secretary of Agri- 
culture is authorized and directed to 
quarantine anv — stjrtt^i-^ territory or dis- 
trict of thiyWiitcd Starts, or any portion 
thereof, i*1u'n he shaU TtrtrrmrrW flTar" 
such qu.-yrantine is necessary to prevent 
the spread of a dangerous plant disease 
or insect infestation, new to or not there- 
tofore widely prevalent or distributed 
within and throughout the United States. 

The amciidniciit goes on to ]>r<)- 

\ ide that the law sh.all ajijily to 

any class of nursery stock or any other 
class of plants, fruits, vegetables, roots, 
bulbs, seeds, or other plant products, or 
any class of stone or quarry products, 
or any other article of any character what- 
soever, capable of carrying any dangerous 
plant disease or insect infestation, speci- 
fied in the notice of quarantine. 

The sei-retarv is requirccl to 

h(dd a public he;iriiig bcl'ore [iro- 

nnilg.-it iiiL;- u quarantine. 

The House nlready had passc^d 
the ;igricult ur.al ;iiipi-opri;ition bill. 
It now goes to :i con fcicMice com- 
mitted'. If the conference .agrees 
to the (|uai;intiiie amendment it 
no doubt will become the l.aw. 



tiii'al siile of the question was not \'oi<-eil. 
lu'solutions were unanimously adopted 
l'a\()ring an absolute ipiarantine, and to 
show what it means to the llorists and 
nurserymen, I quote i'rom tin- jirojioseii 
bill tlu^ first two sections, as I'ollows: 

Sec. 1. Ph.it it shall be \iiila\vfMl for any 
person to iinpiirt or offer for entry into the I'nited 
states any inirsery stock. I'rovided; 'rii.-it the 
Seeret.iry of Ai;riciilture ni.iy import, yrow and 
propai-'ale nursery stoik in small (luantilies for 
■ ■\liirimiiit.il .•iihI sricntilic purposes, upon such 
loiiilitions anil under siiih re^-iilatioris as lie m.'iy 
•Tdvise. 

Si'e. L'. Tliat for tlie purpose of this .\ct the 
lei.ni "nursery stoi'k" shall imliidi- .ill lield- 
L'rouM llorists' stock, trees, shrubs, vineV. cnt- 
tiMi.'s, j;rafts. seions. buds, bedding plants, all 
hi'rbaceoiis idants. b-ilbs. roots, .■iiid otiier |)lanls 
ind plant prodiirts for jiroji.i^'.atioii, except field. 
M i,'et,-ilile, lluwer and tree seeds 

Effect of the Bill. 

This bill, if passed, will shut out 
ln-.-ictically everything tlic florists now 
import, iiududing Azalea ]n<lica, bay 
trees and araiaarias, valley pips for 
forcing or any other juirpose, .lapanese 
lily liulbs, Freneli bulbs, Dutch bulbs, 
Manetti stocks used for greenhouse 
grafting of roses, orchids and nursery 
stock of every kind. It would not only 
sliut out dracipna plants, but the canes 
which ar(^ tiecessary to produce them. 
it would shut out kenti;i plants; also the 
seeds necessary to grow our own jilants. 
"What for?" you ask; the answer is, 
"To save our forests.'' Tf any member 
of the S. A. F. thinks it necessary to 
stop the importation of valley pips, 
Manetti stocks or .Tapanosc lily bulbs to 



protect our forests, T should like to hear 
from liini. 

Arraiigenieuts were made it the con- 
ference committee so th.it tlio measure 
would not be iiilroduced in- Congress 
until coniiiiittees from the ii.it ional asso- 
ciations ol' florists and nurseiynien had 
an ojqport unit \ of conlrerring with a 
sjieeial committee of the American For- 
estry Association appointeil t'or that 
juirpose. This anaiigement shows the 
right spirit, and, though the s]iei ial com- 
mittee consists mostly of state inspect- 
ors, we hope to be abl(> to show them 
that while their plan, if put into opera- 
tion, would jiut ba(d\. the llmists' busi- 
ness many years, it woidd not go far in 
|irotecting our forests or farm crojis or 
I'cduce the dis(>ases whi(di afflict them 
to any ajipreciable degree. 

A Crisis in Trade Affairs. 

The measures that lia\(' threatened 
(Mir interests for se\er;il ye.'irs lia\e now 
I'e.nidied a crisis. We sh;ill need on our 
committee men of' ability who are will- 
ing to subordinate their |ieison;il inter- 
ests to the W(dfare of the tr;ide — men 
who understand why stotd; is imjioiteil, 
\vhy .at least the raw niateiials .are nec- 
essary to our widfaie — men who know 
something .alioiu insect ])ests and plant 
diseases and \vlio can adequately (-xjiress 
their \iews. 

Since our policy will liueiy haxe to be 
defined before our annual con\ention in 
August, till' nuf-;eryiuen 's conv(Mitiou 
beiiiL;' ludd in .lune, I will <eek the ad- 
\ ice ot' the executi\(> committee of the 
S. A. 1\ on the subject, but as the mat- 
ter is such a \"ital on(> to in.any of our 
members, I deem it wise to inform the 
gi>ner,al trade^ tiirough the medium of 
The l\'e\ lew jiijil trust the Ivlitor will 
give this repoit the publicity it de- 
■<erves. Win. F. Ciude, 

<h;iirm:in l.eLrlslat i\ e Committee of tlie 

s. A. F. 



THRIPS ON CYCLAMENS. 

Kindly let me know what ails the en- 
closed cyclamen leaf. <_'an you tell me 
the cause .and tlie remedy t'or this trou- 
ble.' I had plants in the same condition 
last vear. P. H.— 0. 



Th(^ leal' I'orwarded ^\as covered with 
Ihrips. This usually comes from an 
dry atui()s(iliere and is accentuated if 
tlie plants, in addition, gi^t too drv at 
the roots. A remedy is to keep more 
moisture in the atmosphere and spray 
the affected jilants frequently \\ith a 
fine spray nozzle. Tf you lay the plants 
on their sides and use a nicotine or soap 
spray and direct it carefully at the 
lowt'i' sides of the leaves, you will ex- 
terminate a large majoritv of the pests. 

C. W. 



Fargo, N. D. — Several blocks of a new 
addition to the town have been actpiired 
by the Smedley Floral Co., which con- 
templates the erection of greenhouses 
on the property. 



18 



The Florists' Review 



Fhbruary 8, 1917. 



iiiiiii^i^i^i^i^t^iiiyi^tisyixs^i^iiS^iASiJi^i^^ 



VALENTINE'S DAY 



rrs\ir/*>rtr)«tiri«^irrwri«virr«^ir^rrwh«vir^wr>»irr^ 



GETTINa NEW BUSINESS. 



Ideas in Salefonanship. 

Bealizing that florists as a class have 
given comparatively little thought to 
that phase of salesmanship which re- 
lates to drawing customers within 
voice-range, HUmer V. Swenson has 
prepared the following letter on meth- 
ods of attracting attention at St. 
Valentine's day: 

"To create business for St. Valen- 
tine's day as much thought should be 
given the advertising and sales prob- 
lems as is ordinarily given to the selec- 
tion of flowers. The new avenue for 
sales, which St. Valentine's day has 
opened, proves conclusively that you 
don't have to rely entirely on the 
every-day use of flowers for increased 
business. 

"Suggestion has made St. Valen- 
tine's day what it is for the florist — 
and suggestion's most powerful tool 
has been advertising. Advertising in 
some form or other, whether it has 
been by word of mouth, signs in win- 
dows, ads in the newspapers, circulars 
or what not, is responsible for the 
great volume of business done on this 
day and no one can dispute it. 

An Unlimited Field. 

"Other flower days as good as St. 
Valentine's day, Mothers' day and 
Thanksgiving, ean be eventually cre- 
ated by suggestion or, in broader terms, 
advertising. But the development still 
to be done for St. Valentine's day is 
today the most urgent problem, so let 
us then consider a few ways and means 
to accomplish this. 

"It has been proven that older 
people make use of flowers as valen- 
tines as much as younger people. 
Therefore, your chance for appeal is 
almost unlimited. We urge, then, that 
you direct your advertising to the 
older men as much as the younger and 
we give, in the following, several sugges- 
tions on how to go about it: 

"A good way to reach the younger 
set is to obtain a list of members of 
dancing and social clubs of your city. 
In many cases, these clubs feature a 
St. Valentine's day affair. Mail each 
member a folder about four days be- 
fore the date affair is to be given. 
Every young man having an engage- 
ment for this party will be a most ex- 
cellent prospect for a flower valentine 
purchase. One of our customers re- 
alized 200 orders from 500 names cir- 
culated in this manner. Another ex- 
cellent way to get a good list of young 
men is to obtain a list of all the school, 
college or university fraternity mem- 
bers. Nine fraternities out of ten give 
a St. Valentine's function of some sort. 
Aside from that, few fraternity mem- 
bers are without a 'girl' and are prod- 
igal in bestowing floral gifts on her. 

The Older Men. 

"Older men will respond to the sug- 
gestion, 'Send her a Flower Valentine,' 
and this class of business is extremely 
satisfactory because of the larger 



amount of the purchase. One . of the 
best means of reaching the right buy- 
ers is to obtain a list of secret society 
members. One of our customers ob- 
tained a list of all the Shriners in his 
city and mailed a folder the day before 
St. Valentine's day, so that it reached 
these men at their offices on the morn- 
ing of St. Valentine's day. He informs 
us his telephone was kept busy most of 
the day. In soliciting the business man, 
bear in mind that the average man is 
busy, so don't mail the folder to him 
a week before St. Valentine's day and 
expect him to remember, no matter how 
favorable the appeal to him. You must 
catch the busy business man at the 
psychological moment. 

Stunt Delivery. 

"Occasionally a 'stunt' is a good 
thing. To those interested enough to 
go to a little trouble, we suggest a plan 
originated by us for one of our custom- 
ers and which proved the talk of the 
town in which he was located. He 
selected a bright little boy about 8 
years old, a nervy little fellow who was 
not afraid to carry out his part. He 
dressed this boy in a bright red suit, 
attached a pair of wings to him, and 
over his shoulder hung a bow and ar- 
rows — in other words, he reproduced 
Cupid. In a heart-shaped bag, this boy 
carried a number of St. Valentine's day 
folders. He then had the boy call on 



every business man in his neighborhood 
and instructed him to deliver the folder 
to the man personally with the remark, 
something like this, 'Mr. (naming the 
florist) requested me to deliver this mes- 
sage to yOu personally, Mr. Smith.' The 
method of delivery of these folders could 
not help but make the busiest business 
man stop and read the message and the 
message was brought most forcibly to 
his attention because of the unique way 
the florist used to deliver it. This 
stunt brought excellent returns in orders 
and to this day is talked about in the 
community. ' ' 



CAKPET BEDDING PLANTS. 

Are Alyssum Little Gem and Tom 
Thumb suitable for bordering a bed of 
alternantheras and similar bedding 
plants? How far apart should these 
plants be set? Do you think the blue 
varieties of lobelias will do well in our 
Minnesota climate? How far apart 
should they be set? How far apart 
should plants of dwarf Phlox Drum- 
mondii be set? S. J. U. — Minn. 



Such alyssums as Tom Thumb and 
Little Gem are of erect habit, growing 
on the average to a height of six inches 
and six inches in diameter. Plant them 
five to six inches apart. Blue lobelias, 
I am afraid, would only succeed mod- 
erately well in Minnesota. Near the sea- 
board, where the nights are cool, they 
do fairly well. They are close-growing 
plants and during spells of hot, moist 
and sunless weather rot badly. I would 
not consider them as dependable as alys- 
sums, although they are beautiful where 
they succeed. Dwarf Phlox Drummondii 
should be set six inches apart for bed- 
ding purposes. C. W. 




SHRAPNTT 




London, England. — Blockade restric- 
tions on the importation of clover seed 
into Norway have been abolished. 

London, England. — Because of war 
conditions the E. H. S. has decided to 
abandon tne Chelsea and Holland House 
shows for 1917. 

Copenhagen, Denmark. — There are 
said to be upwards of 6,000,000 lily of 
the valley pips of German origin in 
Danish hands, shipment of which is 
prevented by the refusal of the British 
authorities to issue permits for the 
stock to pass the blockade. 

Belfast, Ireland. — Alex. Dickson & 
Sons, Ltd., known the world over as the 
introducers of about 200 varieties of 
roses from the nursery at Newtownards 
and allied with Eobert Scott & Son, of 
Sharon Hill, Pa., have just opened a 
new double 5-story building here for 
the flower seed business. 

London, England. — An English trade 
paper says: "There seems to be consid- 
erable and not unnatural soreness among 
American seedsmen over the confisca- 
tion of remittances sent to Germany for 
cyclamen and other seeds. Such re- 
mittances are, of course, contraband and 
a considerable number have passed into 
the hands of the British authorities." 



London, England. — The war office has 
given notice of its intention to take 
possession of all raffia except stocks of 
less than 200 pounds, no dealings being 
permitted without special license. 

Hamilton, Bermuda. — The acreage of 
Harrisii has again been reduced, be- 
tween increased demand for food crops 
and decreased demand for bulbs, and 
it looks as though a continuation of 
present conditions might result in the 
practical extinction of the bulb industry. 

Paris, France. — The nursery and seed 
trade interests in this country are look- 
ing beyond the approaching season, to 
the one in which war restraints shall be 
removed. On every hand the discussion 
is not of present conditions, but of the 
conditions which must be met when the 
war is over. The demand is for organi- 
zation to meet German competition. 

London, England. — The plan of the 
Board of Agriculture to regulate the 
area and labor given to each crop, in the 
interest of the national food supply, re- 
sulted in a meeting January 15 of 150 
leading growers of cut flowers and pot 
plants, who organized the National Flo- 
rists' Association of Great Britain to 
look after the interests of market 
growers. 



Fbbbuaet 8, 1917. 



The Florists^ Review 



19 




BOSE aKAFTING. 



The Stocks. 



The Manetti stocks should be potted 
in 2%-inch pots and placed in a temper- 
ature of about 45 to 48 degrees. They 
should be thoroughly watered and then 
sprayed at least twice a day. The 
water from the spraying will be suffi- 
cient until they begin to show root ac- 
tion. 

It is not necessary to wait until they 
start breaking before using them. As 
soon as they show root action the sap 
is active enough to start grafting. 

Watch the root action. It will pay 
to knock out the first ones potted, se- 
lect those that are starting and begin 
grafting at once, so as to get as many 
as possible in during the first part of 
February. 

"When the Manetti begins to make 
growth, especially when it is leafing out, 
you will find that you are not striking 
as good a percentage of grafts as before. 

So much for the care of the Manetti 
stocks. 

The Grafting Case. 

The next most important part of 
grafting is the building of the grafting 
box or getting it ready. If one has a 
box built for the purpose, clean it out 
thoroughly and give it a good coat of 
whitewash. Be sure that the sashes 
are properly fitted, so that the box will 
be as near air-tight as possible. The 
least draught on fresh cut grafts is 
dangerous, especially where the wood is 
a little soft. If once they wilt you 
may as well throw them away, for they 
will not catch. 

For the benefit of those who have no 
box and intend building one, I will offer 
a few suggestions: Often you visit 
places where they graft only for their 
own use and have a poorly constructed 
box on a side bench, where drip from 
the gutter or babk wall is causing fun- 
gus. With such equipment or without 
the proper piping to keep the temper- 
ature right, grafting is discouraging 
and far from profitable. 

The Best Location. 

Select a middle bench five and a half 
or six feet \tide and fit sashes to both 
sides. Place a ridge of 2x4 through 
the center of the bench. Make it high 
enough so that the sashes will have the 
proper pitch to drain the moisture that 
accumulates inside when the box has 
been watered down and closed. Hinge 
the sashes to the ridge, which wfll save 



a lot of trouble in raising and lowering, 
when it comes time to ventilate. 

Use an 8-inch sideboard, so that the 
plants will have plenty of room after 
about five inches of sifted ashes are 
put in to stand the grafts on. Ashes 
are a great deal better than sand, as 
one is less liable to get fungus in the 
box. Put a tight partition across the 
box for every three sashes, so that the 
plants can be ventilated in sections as 
they grow. It generally takes ten days 
before the grafts are caught well 
enough to stand ventilating. Give them 
only a little air to start with, increas- 
ing each day as they harden up. 

Selecting the Wood. 

When selecting the grafting wood be 
careful not to get wood that is too 
hard. If the thorns are beginning to 
turn black the wood is by all means too 
hard. Care must also be taken in re- 
gard to wood that is too soft. Wood 
that can be easily crushed by placing 
it between thumb and forefinger is too 
soft. Any wood infested with red spi- 
der or from sickly, overwatered stock is 
always sure to be a failure. 

Do not take off any large quantity 
of wood at one time, the object being 
to prevent it from drying out. It is 



important to keep it wet from the time 
it is cut off until it is grafted and 
placed in the case. 

In making the cuts on the Manetti 
and on the scion be sure they are per- 
fectly clean; the slightest speck of dirt 
on either cut when it is tied will cause 
trouble. Often they catch and start 
growing (I have seen them make fine 
4-inch stock) before they show black 
spots on the graft and become loose on 
one side, eventually dying. It is safe 
to say that ninety-eight per cent of all 
grafts acting in this manner do so be- 
cause of carelessness in getting dirt 
between the cuts, or from the use of a 
dull knife that ruffled the pith of the 
wood. 

A Close Union. 

When tying the grafts care should 
be taken not to move the wood out of 
place, especially where the Manetti 
stock is heavier than the scion. The 
bark of the two must be a perfect fit 
on one side. The same applies to side 
grafts or those inserted on two-eyed 
grafts; the wood should be cut on both 
sides. 

Either rafiKa or string can be used 
for tying. I prefer common white 
string; it is quicker to work and does 
not hold water around the cut so much 
as raffia, although either can be used 
with good results. 

Little water should be used on the 
grafts the first ten days they are in the 
case. If the Manetti is thoroughly 
soaked when grafting, a light spraying 
daily with a rubber cut flower sprayer 
is sufficient, providing the cinders in 
the bottom of the case have been well 
soaked before the pots are placed on it. 

When the grafts are ready to take 
out of the box and be placed on the 
bench they should be shaded a little on 
bright days, as the growth is soft. It 
generally takes six to ten days before 
they can stand the full rays of the sun. 
Jerry P. Jorgensen. 




Waycross, Ga. — The Satilla Pecan 
Orchard & Stock Co., capitalized at $50,- 
000, has been organized here, Parks & 
Reed being the attorneys. The charter 
permits a general nursery and florists' 
business being done. 

Montgomery, Ala. — At the recent 
''Made in Montgomery" exposition the 
Rosemont Gardens had an elaborate dis- 
play in connection with the electric 
company, the florist showing a wedding 
decoration and the electric concern stag- 
ing household utility wedding gifts. 

Prescott, Ariz. — One of the pioneers 
of the western country, William Need- 
ham Kelly, who settled in Prescott fifty 
years ago, died last month from acute 
indigestion, at the age of 81. He was 
a prominent Mason and had been asso- 
ciated with his wife in the Terrace Cot- 
tage Greenhouse. Mrs. Kelly and a 
daughter survive. 



Dallas, Tex. — Tlie mayor designated 
the week beginning January 29 as "Rose 
and Shrubbery Planting Week " and 
the trade felt the stimulus. 

Atlanta, Ga. — Wachendorf Bros, say 
they are having "considerable trouble 
with a fungus which originates in the 
wood of the floor of our greenhouse 
benches. This fungus spreads through 
the ashes, then makes its way through 
the drain holes in the pots to the soil, 
where it spreads until the soil has the 
appearance of a ball of frost, resulting 
in the loss of every plant. Our benches 
are repaired every summer, allowed to 
dry out thoroughly, all decayed wood re- 
moved and then whitewashed with hot 
lime.'' If some of the readers of The 
Review who have had similar trouble 
will suggest a remedy this paper will 
be pleased to print it for the informa- 
tion of all. 



20 



The Florists' Review 



February 8, 1917. 




CSm LETTEa^y^<» DEADEG6 



CUBE FOR PRIMULA POISONING. 

Under "Open Letters from Readers" 
there recently appeared several articles 
in which the writers suggested remedies 
for primula poisoning of the hands and 
face. Two of my family, as well as 
myself and an employee, ar^- subject 
to this form of poisoning, but we have 
a simple remedy that never fails to 
stamp out the irritation whenever it 
appears. Instantaneous relief is found 
by applying to the affected parts a mix- 
ture consisting of equal parts of lime 
water and olive oil. The one afflicted 
does not have to wait even two or three 
days for results. The irritation is 
checked at once and in a day or two the 
effects of the poisoning have disap- 
peared. Fred C. Morris. 



TOMATOES UNDER GLASS. 

Here is a new one and a good one for 
your subscriber, T. E. H. — Can., who 
asks for the best method of poUenizing 
tomatoes. Providing his houses have 
electric wiring, as have most of those 
recently, erected, let him take a portable 
electric fan with a long feed wire; with 
one of the boys to jar the plants and 
shake the pollen loose, let him move the 
fan about in the house, directing the 
breeze over the plants, first from one 
angle and then from another. The gen- 
tle breeze created by the fan will dis- 
tribute the pollen thoroughly through- 
out the house. The work should be done 
on a bright day, when the air in the 
house is as dry as possible. 

Wo recently published a small adver- 



tisement of tomato seed in The Review 
and received so many inquiries that we 
are inclined to think a nice business 
might be built up on greenhouse-grown 
tomato seeds. So far as we know, no one 
in this country is growing tomato seeds 
under glass. The seedsmen here supply 
only outdoor-grown seeds, but the Eng- 
lish seedsmen recognize the importance 
of supplying indoor-grown seed, grown 
and ripened under the artificial condi- 
tions required of the plants in the future 
crop. Winter crops of tomatoes in Eng- 
land yield ten to twelve pounds to the 
plant, while in this country the winter 
does not average over two to four 
pounds to the plant. By judicious seed 
selection from disease-resistant, prolific 
plants grown in the greenhouse, we 
think we can obtain just as large a crop 
as the growers do in England. 

Willey's Farm. 



WHEN FORMOSA BULBS FAIL. 

I force only a few Easter lilies, but 
enough of them to know that the lily 
grower has his troubles and sorrows. 
During the last two years I have visited 
growers who make Easter lilies a fea- 
ture, and, to a man, each of them com- 
plained, and vigorously, too. When one 
sees 100 lilies in the hands of a com- 
petent grower, lilies that were all potted 
the same day, with some of them com- 
plete failures, others with twisted foli- 
age and those that look fairly well 
ranging in height from two to eighteen 
inches, one knows at once that there 
is something vitally wrong with the 



\ I t r r I I ) t> 



At lit lt> 







• *!>•■■ "^••^'~ •- ■ 




bulbs. My observations lead me to 
place the entire blame on the bulb grow- 
ers in Japan, or Formosa; not in ship- 
ping diseased biilbs, but in harvesting 
the builds .before they are mature, in 
order to beat the other fellows to the 
market. The Japanese in a way at- 
tempt to put blinds over our eyes by 
packing the bulbs in soil, so that the 
bulbs may ripen en route. The real 
trouble is not here, as this method 
brings the bulbs to us in a fresh and 
plump condition. The actual injury is 
done when the growers, in their anx- 
iety to reach our market early, cut 
off the tops too soon and thereby rob 
the bulbs of Nature's finishing touch, 
which is so essential to perfect matur- 
ity. 

It is well known that Nature's last 
effort, in all such cases, is her greatest. 
At the last moment, so to speak, she 
draws on the reserve forces in stems 
and leaves, and finishes her work. This 
is easily evident to any onion grower. 
He can easily see the superficial effect 
on the bulbs at the last stages of 
ripening. Of how much greater im- 
portance must be the effect on the 
vitals of the bulbs! If we harvest lily 
bulbs before Nature says "Ready," we 
are certain to suffer. 

The bulbs may appear all right, ' ' ripe 
and solid," but if they have been 
robbed of Nature's cream by the un- 
scrupulous or ignorant grower, then 
we, at this end of the line, are certain 
to suffer. I maintain that a few days 
are of such vital importance that a 
grower, having an acre or two to 
harvest, may begin to harvest too soon, 
but the latter half of his crop will be 
perfectly matured before he reaches it. 
Nature puts her "Ready" sign on every 
bulb in the dead stem. Every grower 
knows full well when they should be 
dug. Our importers are to blame if 
they hurry orders. I predict that in 
the near future the slogan of the lily 
bulb dealer will be "Perfectly matured 
bulbs," and the pot grower will know 
what to expect in his crop and will 
hold the importer strictly to account. 

We Americans count too much on 
days, and too little on the ills our hurry 
may bring. The lily business is run on 
a too high speed. We must * ' shift into 
second" if we would attain that maxi- 
mum success which Nature intends and 
for which we all work. 

S. C. Templin. 



THE NEBRASKANS. 

I would like to make a statement in 
regard to the report in The Review in 
the issue of January 25, about the 
"Nebraskans' Meeting." The Ne- 
braska Florists' Society up to the last 
session did not have an independent or- 
ganization, but held its annual meeting 
in conjunction with the Nebraska State 
Horticulturists' Society; also the flower 
show was staged under that society, 
which also paid the premiums offered, 
as was the case this year. 

Paul B. Floth. 



Halftone of the Floor Plan for the Philadelphia Show of the American Rose Society 



VINE FOR SUN PORCH. 

I enclose a rough diagram of my sun 
porch. This porch is heated in winter by 
hot water and is enclosed with double 
windows. The temperature probably 
never falls below 50 degrees at night 
and rises to 70 and 80 degrees during the 
day. The north wall, of course, is the 
side of the house, and the chimney from / 
the furnace runs up through it. The wall,/ 



Fbbbdabx 8, 1917. 



The Florists' Review 



21 



is of rough cement. An abundance of 
daylight gets through the windows, but 
probably little direct sunlight falls on 
the wall itself. 

I am desirous of growing some kind of 
vine on this wall, flowering preferred, 
of an evergreen nature, either clinging 
or one that needs support. Your sug- 
gestion as to the best vine for this pur- 
pose would be appreciated. 

G. M.— la. 

There could be no better plant for 



your purpose than Ficus repens, which 
grows rapidly and clings closely to 
stone, brick or wood. This vine would 
soon cover the entire wall, if given 
proper care. I cannot recommend any 
evergreen flowering plant that would 
thrive under such conditions as you 
describe. The ficus can be planted in 
boxes seven inches deep, eight inches 
wide and of any given length, or in a 
bed, if such could be provided. 

C. W. 



FLOWER SHOW PUBLICITY. 

In the publicity work for the New 
York spring flower show a lithographed 
design is being used in many ways, as 
a poster, as a posterette and as the cover 
for the ofiicial catalogue, which is full 
of ads. The design is shown in the ac- 
companying illustration. The idea is 
that by using the same i)icture for the 
several purposes the publicity is co- 
ordinated. 




GROWING EXHIBITION MUMS. 

[A paper by Elmer D. Smith, of Adrian, Mlcli., 
read at a meeting of the Cleveland Florists' Club, 
in Cleveland, O., February 5, 1917.] 

Strong cuttings make strong plants; 
let us first consider the care of the old 
plants from which we intend to propa- 
gate. The method employed by most 
gardeners on private estates, setting 
aside pots of the previous year in a 
light, airy position, giving them a low 
temperature with careful attention to 
watering, will supply excellent cuttings. 
Those who are not so fortunate as to 
have pot-grown stock can, by careful 
selection from bench-grown plants, pro- 
duce fine blooms, provided they fully ap- 
preciate that light, air, moderate water- 
ings and a temperature of 40 to 50 de- 
grees are most congenial. 

When shall we begin propagating! 
This depends upon the varieties to be 
grown. All kinds requiring early or 
crown buds — say the first week of Au- 
gust — to produce double flowers, should 
be inserted in the propagating beds by 
the middle of the present month. The 
varieties referred to are Alice Lemon, 
Bob Pulling, C. H. Totty, Cheltoni, F. S. 
Vallis, Hon. Mrs. Lopes, James Fraser, 
Morristown, Mrs. Gilbert Drabble, Mrs. 
H. J. Jones, Mrs. James Gibson, Mrs. 
R. C. Pulling, Mrs. R. H. Boggs, 
Pockett's Crimson, Wm. Rigby, W. 
Woodmason and some others. All of 
these should be disbudded on or a few 
days before August 10. Then there are 
many which give better blooms from 
buds selected between August 10 and 
August 20, and cuttings from these 
should be in the sand by approximately 
March 1. The remainder of the exhibi- 
tion sorts give smoother and better 
blooms from buds reserved August 25 to 
September 5. These should be inserted 
about March 15, and would include such 
varieties as Adonis, Calumet, Daily Mail, 
Elberon, Lady Hopetoun, Mankato, 
Mrs. Paul Moore, Nakota, Nerissa, 
Ogontz, Odessa, Reginald Vallis, Silver 
King, Wm. Turner, Yellow Turner, and 
possibly others. 

Growing Them in Pots. 

Chrysanthemums root so easily it seems 
scarcely necessary to go into detail, un- 
less it is to guard against the use of too 
strong bottom heat. They are much 
slower in making roots when no heat is 



given underneath, but are better, as this 
course does not draw or weaken them. 

Before the cuttings are rooted, soil 
for potting must be provided, and for 
this, do not make it extra rich, but of 
a friable nature. Avoid heavy compost, 
as this retards the roots from reaching 
the side of the pots. As soon as the 
small plants show the roots are begin- 
ning to crowd, they should be repotted 
into the 4-inch size, and if they are to 
be flowered in pots — which is accepted 
as giving the best results — this opera- 
tion will have to be repeated until they 



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MARCH 1^-2Z. 1917 

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The New York Show Poster. 



receive the final j)otting, which is 
usually into 8-inch pots. Here I wish to 
say, some of the finest flowers I saw at 
Philadelphia last fall were flowered in 
6-iuch pots. 

For each subsequent repotting, tliat is, 
from the smallest to the largest pots. 



slightly richer and coarser soil should be 
used. There are conflicting opinions re- 
garding the amount of manure or other 
material to be incorporated, but we pre- 
fer to be moderate in this matter, inas- 
much as the feeding with liquids be- 
gins as soon as the final pots are filfed 
with roots, and these repeated applica- 
tions furnish about all they can prop- 
erly assimilate. 

Growing Them in Benches. 

Before going further, let us go back 
to the plants in 4-inch pots. There are 
many who cannot conveniently adopt 
the pot system, and so must resort to the 
commercial method of benching. When 
the 4-inch pots begin to fill with roots, 
it is time the mums should be planted, 
and the soil should be the same as fo