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Full text of "Florists' review [microform]"

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A WEEKLY JOUBNAL"» FLORISrS. 5EEDSMENa>» NUBSERYNEn 

FI.ORX8TS' PUBX.ISHIMO OOn SSO Oazten Bolldlns. 608 Sontb Dearborn St., CHICAGO. 



VoLXLIX. 



CHICAGO, JUNE 1, 1922. 



No. 1279. 



Bench Grown Roses 

READY FOR IMMEDIATE SHIPMENT 

- Per 100 Per 1000 
KILLARNEY SI 2.00 Si 00.00 


ALTHOUGH ULY BULBS 
ARE OUR SPECIALTY 

FRENCH AND DUTCH BULBS OF EQUAL, BEST 
QUALITY ARE FOUND IN HORSESHOE BRAND. 
WE MAY NOT BE THE CHEAPEST IN PRICE. 
BUT OUR STOCK IS THE BEST TO BE HAD. 

^yjl^ WE SOLICIT YOUR ORDER. 

1^^ Ralph N. Ward & Company, Inc. 

\^^4r The Lily House 

t "nrw^: 25 Murray Street, NEW YORK 


WHITE KILLARNEY 12.00 100.00 


BUTTERFlY 12.00 100.00 


OPHRLIA 12.00 100.00 

PREMIER ." IS.OO 140.00 

2S0 assorted at 1000 rate. 

Asparagus Plumosus Nanus Seed 

Greenhouse grown $4.00 per 1(X 0; 5000 for $18.00 

Outdoor grown 2.50 per 1000; 5000 for 10.00 

A. HENDERSON & CO., 166 N.Wabash Ave., ChictgO 


Our Book on Bulbs 

Is Ready for 

You Now 

Send for It 

C C Pollworth Co. 

MILWAUKEE, WIS. 


TABLE FERN SEEDLINGS 

READY JUNE AND LATER 

$3.00 for one flat, 5 fiats at $2.75 each, 10 flats at $2.50 each. 
In all the best varieties as follows: 

Pteris Wilsonii, Pteris Mayii, Pteris Serrulata, Pteris Wim- 
settii, Pteris Tremula, Pteris Argyraea, Aspidium Tsus- 
sinense. Cyrtomium Falcatum. Crytomium R^chforoiannm, 
Pteris Cretica AlDo-Lineata. 

TABLE FERNS, 2ii-in., POTS, BEST KINDS. $7.00 per 
100, $60.00 per lOuO. 

2 '4-INCH FFRNS 

Boston, Roosevelt, etc.. SEE CLAS IFIEI) COLUMNS. 

For All Ottaei Plant Stock See ClaMified or Patfc 5. 

ROHAN J. IRWIN, 43 W. 18th St., New York City 


25,000 Own -root 

COLtMBlA 

FOR EARLY JUNE 
All we have left in Rose plants. 

LET US QUOTE YOU 

A. N. PIERSON, Inc., «*?^N^- 


BegoniaSy Melior and Cincinnati 

Strong, clean 2i^-in. plants, ready in June. $30.00 per 100. 

For immediate delivery, Begonia Chatelaine, $7.00 per 100, 
$66.00 per 1000; Mrs. Patten and Pride of Newcastle, $8.00 
per 100. $75.00 per 1000. 

Primulas, Obconica and Townsendii 

specially selected strain, none better, $6.50 per 100. $60.00 
per 1000. 

Jnst looeivetl unusually fine Asp. Plumosus Seed at $1.75 per 1()00, $8.0<) 
per soon, JIS.OO per 10,000. Write for price on larner duantity. Asp. 
Spreutferl Seed, $1.00 per KIK), t'J.OO per 10,000. Write for price on lurper 
quantity. Write for a complete and worthwhile list of SEKUS, PLANTS 
and BULBS 

S. S. Skidelsky & Co., new'^'k^-ctv 


The E. G. Hill Co. 

Wholesale Florists 

Richmond, Indiana 


SPHAGNUM MOSS 

New Consignment of Moss 
Just Received 

Single bale lots, $1.25 per bale 

10 bales for $10.00 

25 bale lots at 90c per bale 

CAN MAKE PROMPT SHIPMENT— F. O. B. Chicago 

The W. W. BARNARD C^.^cWilllTa'' 



INOBX TO ADVUmSmillTS AND TABUi OP CONTENTS-PAQES TWO AND FOUR 



'r.: 



II 



V/ _:^.;:v 'Mf. 



■^h 









The Florists^ Review 






JVND 1. 1922 





Compare These Details 

Of The Two Constructions 

And Come To Your Own Conclusions 




Right you are, the Semi-Iron house has 
our regular guaranteed wrought iron 
post, galvanized angle eave plate and 
sash bar clasps, but it has no steel 
rafters. 

The new Number Two Construction, 
which costs not a penny more than the 
Semi-Iron, has a complete iron frame. 
It has steel rafters extending from the 
eave post to the ridge. 

With the Semi-Iron there are no rafters, 
so the roof bars have to be larger, and 
the roof stiffened and given the needed 
extra support, by purlins and columns. 
That's why the Semi-Iron has so many 



columns, while the Number Two Con- 
struction has but two columns, even in 
a house forty feet wide. 

Not only do you get a full Iron Freune 
Hou?e in the Number Two Construc- 
tion, but you get one of L & B's, hig^ 
class in every particular. 

How we can sell you such a house, up 
to 40 feet w^ide, for exactly the same 
cost as a Semi-Iron, is hard for you to 
figure out. 

The fact is, w^e can do it, so what more 
do you care? 

Quick deliveries. Quick erections. 
You act quick, and you'll get quick 
action. 



or4&]Btirnham6. 




Builders of Greenhouses and Conservatories 

IRVINGTON NEW YORK PHILADELPHIA CHICAGO 

New York 30 Eait 42n(i St. Land Title Bldg. Continental Bank Bids. 

BOSTON- 1 1 CLEVELAND ATLANTA TORONTO 

Little Bldg. 407 Ulmer Bids Atlanta Trust Co. Bldg. Harbor Commisnon Bldg. 

EcMtem Factoiy Western Factory Canadian Factory » 

Irvington. N. Y. Des Plaines. 111. St. Catharines, Ont. 





\ 










U^^P^^^^KUKIM 




.vt^V^ ''O. T'^ - ^1* .'ii^mmMJ v^4J 





The Semi -Iron House has no rafters. The post stops 
at the cave. 



The Numher Two House, really extends its post, as a 
rafter, right up to the ridge. Note that good rugged 
splice plate. It's double — one on each .side. 




Jdnb 1, 1922 



\,- 'rr 



The Florists^ Review 



IT.rUhL 



ABIERICAN BULB CO. 

^^r^^t^o^"^^ 172 N, Wabash Ave., CHICAGO, ILL. 





^^CH us 6^*^ 



This is Planting Time 

For HARDY LILIES in Open Ground or in the 
Greenhouse. (Ideal for the Perennial Border.) 

COMPLETE CULTURAL DIRECTIONS FOR THE ASKING. 




LILIUM SPECI08UM RUBRCM 

Exceptional for Cut Flowers. Blooms in Augua^t, extending 

for a full month. 



JAPANESE LILY BULBS 

Grow^ Your Own Cut Flowers 

Complete Cultiiriil Direotiono for the Asklns 

MAGNIFICUM AND RUBRUM 

Perdoz. Per 25 Per 50 Per 1(K) Per case of 

10 to 12-in..$3.00 $ti.O(i $ll..")(i $21.itO $21.00— 100 Bulbs 



GIGANTEUM 

Per 25 Per 50 Per 100 
6to8-ia. $4.00 $7.50 $14.00 



Per ease of 

$17.50-400 J3ulbs 



Chrysanthemum Rooted Cuttings 

We offer Immediate delivery on the following list of varieties, which 
includes varieties most in demand: 

WHITE — Smith's Advance. Polly Rose, Clias. Racr, White Chieftain, 

Betsy Ross, Mistletoe, White Seidewitz, l':arly Frost. 
YELLOW — Yellow Advance, tJoldon Qucfn, <Jhry.«olora, Sun Glow, 

Marigold, Major Bonnafton, Mrs. Morgan, Yeliow Mistletoe, 

Whittier. 
PINK — Unaka, Pink Polly Rose, Pacific Supreme. Pink Chieftain, Dr. 

Knguehard. Mrs. 10. A. Seldewitz, Maud Dean, XirL-^sa. 
REl) — Harvard, dark crimson, the bist rod yet introduced, double 

from any bud. 

All of the above rooted cuttings at $3..">0 per lOO, $.'{0.00 per 1000. 



Pompons 



\yiIITE— Xiza, Mariana, Diana. 

\EM.O\V — Quinoia Improved, Zcnobia. Golden Climax. Peter Pan, 

Baby, Klondike, Gohlen Wedding, Christmas Cold. 
PINK — Mlnta, Fairy Queen, Lillian Doty. Nella, Western Beauty. 
IJRONZF: — Iva. Hilda Canning, Mrs. Frank Beu. 
WINE COLOR — Annabelle, sport of Godfrey. 

SINGLEg— Men.'-a, Single Salmon, Simplicity, F- Hcity, Mrs. E. D. 
, t'Odfrey, Mrs. Buckingham, Bronze Buckingham. 
ANEMONES — Blanche, Elizabeth, Emma, Graf Von Oriola, Sunshine. 

All of ♦•■- -• __.x-. 

at $3.! 



EMONES — Blanche, Elizabeth, Emma, Graf \'on Oriola, Sunshine. 

of the above poinpon.s, Ringlea and anemones, rooted cuttingn, 

$3.50 per 100, $30.00 per 1000. Add 5% to cover cost of packing. 



Recommend them to your customers 
for garden planting— they will, no 
doubt, prove a "growing advertise- 
ment" for your business. L. Rubrum 
is hardy and thrives from year to year, 
provides late summer and "par-excel- 
lence" Cut Flowers at a nominal cost. 

(Extract from Florists' Exchange, Issue April 22. 1022) 
Hy I'UIT/ HA UK 

RUBRUM LILIES 

"Did you ever plant too many? For the average florist It 
means .'ust this: He can get along without rubrum Lilies 
even not miss them. On the other hand, those who once get 
Into the habit of using them usually And them such a prof- 
itable and at the same time easily handled crop that they 
try each year to do all possible to prolong the flowering period 
which with the help of cold storage bulbs is not hard to do". 
Every florist with a retail trade should grow rubrum Lilies 
1 here is nothing finer for decorative work, for the corsage or 
the floral design. A plant grown in a pot makes a showy 
plant, and if not sold as such will frequently furnish you with 
flowers for three weeks from the time the first flower Is ready 
to bi cut until the last bud begins to open. The further away 
you are located from the larger cut flower markets, the more 
valuable are rubrum lollies In your own establishment the 
more mcessary it Is for you to try and have a few plants to 
cut from. To plant cold storage bulbs now Into 5-ln. or 6-ln 
pots is about all the work you will have with them outside 
of watering. They will grow almost anywhere In or outdoors 
and bioom in late Summer. Try this for a change: Plant In 
tJ-in. pota now; let the plants ^ome along In a cool house. 
About May l;i take them outdoors and plant pot and all In a 
bed or coldfranie. deep enough to cover the top of the pot 
aliout 4 in. When In flower use the Individual blossoms or If 
you plant out leave thom out all Winter. Every plant will 
lldwor again the next year and better than before." 

.Mr. llalir in a "live" Horlst-grower in Highland Park 111 
and a recognized authority on matters hortirultnral. 



LILY OF THE VALLEY 

A. B. C. 
"SUPREME" QUALITY PIPS FOR JUNE WEDDINGS 

Per -JoO, $IO.(K) Per 500. $15.00 I^er 1000, .$28.00 
Per original case o( 2o(k), per 1000, $26.00 

Cyclamen Giganteum Plants 

QUALITY EXCEPTIONAL 

GROWN FROM FISCHER'S TRUE STRAIN AND IN 

THE MOST DESIRABLE COLORS AND SHADES. 

FOR IMMEDIATE SHIPMENT. 

Price i)er KM), 2i2-inch pot, $12.00; 3-inch pot, $15.00. 
- 25 plants at KK) rate. 
Please write for special prices on quantity. 



A. B. C. "Perfected'* Strains of Flower Seeds. Please write for Price List 



The Florists^ Review 



.Ti;nk 1. V.)2- 




A. 

Alili.v Am;, lilisi'. . . 
Ackci's I'll-. Stmr. 
Ailiiiiis l-'lorisl .... 

.\(l:iiiis iVi Suns 

.Vikalc iV Sdii 

AilUissiiii, Wise . . . 

.\ilv.'Ui< !• Ci) 

Akiii's Floral Co. . . 

.Win .Mfi:. Co 

Alki'iMwilc & Son. . . 
,\ll.>j,'li:iMV I'l. Co.. 

Allen. J. K 

AUcisnia, II. \V . . . 
.\l|ilin Flo. C.i. .711 7 

Alliha Florist 

.\in. I'.nlh Co 

.\]M. Floral Sliop. . . 
.\ni. (ilisc. Ml;;. Co 
.\rn. Lnndsoapo 

S,\\u«\ 

.\ni, liovo \- I'lanI . 
.\ni. Window Class 

Ainlin;; Co .'iO:! 

.\ninnilson Co 

.\iiilcrson, S. .V 

.\rnlro\vs, Florist. . . 
Ant'ornMiPlIcr. G. H 

101 

.\nna\ro Fir. Shop. 
Apliim' .Mis;. Co. . . 
Arclnr's lianlrns. . 
Aniior's Mr. Shop. 
Archins Floral Co. 

.\rniarost A: Co 

.\rt Floral Co n 

Art Florist 

Art Fir. Shop 

Artiiiilali- iV Son . . 
Arlistii- Fl. Co. . . . 
Asflnnann I'.ros. . 
Asrhinann. (!. ... 
Aslihornc (Joldlish 



It I' 


. 7(> •'• 

H" I'l' 


. N.-, '■•!■ 


. !MI '•'■ 


. 70 I'-i' 


.14(1 ■! 
7(1 llr 


. !i.s l''i' 


IIHI "i- 


. Ni 


• "'•» ;'■ 


. H4 l-i- 


h-<)2 !■•'■ 


. '7^ '■•'■ 


. 1 ''1' 


.■.111 l>'- 
1>]' 


. 07 '■•II 
III •" 


;i.-.7 '-il 


.' 7(1 i'li 

. OL' ''ii 

Foi 


. O.-! I'll 
.110 



Ashtalnila Fl. I'o. 

Asnniii 

Atrliisoi) Flo. Ston 
Alhli'tic Club Flis 
Atlantic Citv Shop 

Attica Fl. Co 

Anil liros. Co. . . . 
Anrora (Irconhonsc 

Austin Fl. Co 

Anstin, ir 

Austin, J 

.\vcnnc Floral Co. . 
Avi'iinc Fir. Shop. 

Avcr.v Florist 

.\vrcs. S I'.rvson. 



.1-0.-. 
. 04 
. 71 
. liO 

. nr. 
iii.' 

.114 

. OS 
. 01 
. M 
. 0<> 
. 04 
. 74 
. ss 

. .■>!» 
. Sti 
. 7!) 

lo:? 

. 70 

. so 
. s<> 

. 0(> 

km; 



B. 

T.adcr Co.. John 111 

Haihr a Co 11)7 

I'.acr. .Iidiiis 7.'! 

liakcr Fl. Co 70 

r.akcr, W. .T 4.-. 

I'.akir ti Son 75 

I'.all. C. I) II.'? 

l-.all Fl. Co SO 

I'.ancrof t iS; Son 71 

I'tarnard Co I 

I'.arncs. W. J 70 

I'.arr & Co., 1!. F. . . 79 

liarr.iws. If. II 114 

r.asscit & Washbnrn 8 
r.alonian. Iiic . II. . . 04 

r.alh. .I<.hn II xS 

llanincarlcii S2 

r.anr \- Stcinkanip. . 12 
llanr Window Class. 121 

llanschcr llros .S," 

r.avcrsdorf.r \- Co.. 47 

l!cai:h. 79 

l;.all (Misc. Co .lO 

Heaven. K. A r>2 

I'.ccker's Cons 72 

I'.ockerfs Seeds 102 

I'.ees, I,ld CO 

I'.elnn.iit Fir. Shop. . 72 
r.entzen Floral ('.>. . 77 

Hercer I'.ros 44 

Ilercer's Sons. Wni 7S 
l'.erk(.lcv Fhirist . . 04 

I'.ernine. II. C 08 

Kert.rmann Itros. . . 88 

licsanron A; Co 70 

r.cstcr & S.nis 84 

Bever & -Weber 88 

Billines Flo. Co 03 

r.ills Flor.-il C. 71 

I'.ird & Soji 122 

I'.issintrer, .1. .\ 84 

I'.lnckistone. Z 1). . . 70 

Itlakos no 

r.lessinc, .T. i: 84 

I'.hissoin Shop 80 

I'.lnMnize I! Shop. . 84 

I'.oas \- Co .')1 

T.obbink & Atkins. Ill 

r..Mk, It. C. 48 

r.ohannon Fl. Co 87 

I'.olL'iano Seed Co.. .102 
ISonwell, Itobin .... 0.'! 

P.oston r.ox Co 48 

Boston Florist 7." 

Boston's Fir. Store. . SO 
r.ovle * Itanmnd. . . O," 
r.raeni> & Son .-.2 



aNhin Co.. X 

cchl Co 

•chnier (ihse 

i-ilni.'\er's Sons. . . 
i^'hl Spot Clisi.. . . 
inkci-hoir (Jhses. . . 
oadw a V Floi'isI . . . 

..derick. It. T 

odrib, .1. A 

own. .\. C 

I'own Bay Fillini; 

Machine ('o 

■own ISros. A: Co. . 
■own's Nnrserics. . 
■own it Keinii.d.v. . 

■owidiiirst 

■ownwood l-'lo. Co. 

rnnrcr, C. .\ 

nns. II. .\ s7- 

r\ an, A. J 

ichbiinli'r I'.ros. . . . 

nilon;;, J. A 

niy.'ird. A. 1" 

iriin;:ton Willow 

Ware 

iriis, II. II 

irns Fir. .Shop. . . . 

irpce Co 

;it. .\lbert .1 

iscliardi. Will. F. . 



102 
.-.1 
01 
S4 
02 
S5 
04 
74 
7'> 
s.-. 

102 

SO 

so 

04 
SI 
70 
04 
105 
115 
07 
;!4 



00 
75 
70 

10.-; 
o:i 

124 



I>i\ 
llodi: 

II 

Horn 
nice 
Drev 
Driir 
Diidl 
Dncr 
Unlu 
Dnni 

I I 

Hiirl 



n Floral Co. . . . 
Cit\ Fl. Co.. 

trio Flo. Co 

{■r \- Sons Co. . 

r. II. A 121 

on 'I'l'^claar . . . 

y, II. F 

I'V Sons Co 

r, Clia«. A 

th Floral Co. . . 

kc Fl. Co 

op. .lohn II 

aril Floral Co. . 



Oil 

70 

115 

140 

105 

S5 

SJ 

01 



so 

SI 



sc. 
i:;o 

]0<l 

m 

50 

78 

125 

82 

85 

. . 84 

OO 

,-. SI 
. . 72 
. . Oo 
S4-02 
. . 01 
. . 70 
. . 88 
. . 82 



. 70 
. KK! 
.0 OH 
. 75 
. 5K 
125 

SO 
. ,S4 
.117 

; 101 

. 88 

. 78 

■(1-88 

00 



F.bli., (has 

Fckc, I'anI 

Fdwards Floral ila 

Fhle, Fred (1 

Fiehc Floral Co. . . 
Fldreil Flower She 

Flias & Co 

Klitih Cardens . . . . 

Fllis Floral Co 

I-'Iincr r.ros. Xiirs. . 
I-Mv(.rson Cot ler,\ . . . 
Fncic Floral Co. . . 

Knid Floral Co 

Fnonioto iV Co 

Krnc & Co 

Ivspelill Flo. Co. . . . 
F.vans Co.. .lohn .\ . 

I''\ell(lcn I'.l^oS 

l-'vcnden's .Sons . . . 
Ivvcr Keady Fl. I'o 
Fxci'll I.aboraloric- 
Fxcello .MfK. Co. . . 
I'xcelsior (llises. . . . 



SO 



0. 

Cade Ihe Florist, 
('.■idillai- (;iass C.I. . 
Caldwell. Woodsniai 
Calit'ornia Florist . . 
California Fl. Co.. 
Callahan. M. .1 . . . 
Callaliaii Co., T. .1. 
Capital City Fl. C 
C.ipitol Flor;il Co. 
Caplc. Waller W . 
('.■irlHiiic. I'liiliji I,. 

Carek. F. (i 

Carolin:! Fir. Sti.r.- 
C.isey Florist Co.. . 
Casper Floral Co. 
Central Fir. Co. . 
Central Fl. Shop. . 
Chaiidlcr Flo. Co. 

Cliaiiin r.ros 

Cli.irlestoii Cat Fl 
('h;.'o. Flower Crow 

ers' Assn :I2 H.'! 

Chickasha Crnliscs.. 80 
Cliioiiiiiati Cut Fir. . 08 

City P'loral Co MO.'t 

City Fir. Shop O.'l 

Clark, (i. It 

Clark Set.d Co 

Clarke Kros ." 

Clarke's Skills 

Clarke, W. B 

Cli'Vc'lanil Soil Co. . 
Climax Mfir. ( o. 
Clody's Fir. Shop. . 

Co(.'i;an. S. AV 

Cokal Stoker Corp. 

Cokcl.\'s 4t 

Coles' Fir. Sho|i. . . 
Colonial Fir. Co. . . 
Colonial Fir. Shop.; 
Crdorndo Seed Co. . 
Cohiinbia Fir. Co 77 

ColiiMibiiK. Fir ('.. 02 
Conard «r .lones. .110 
Conirrcss Fir. shop. .S7 

Connon Co SO 

Constii'ii. P.. F 01 

Coombs 7.'! 

Cotter Co.. C. .\ '. . . . 09 

(Vitton the Flori-;t.. 8.S r,:,U-\u. Tlios, F . 
owau Bros \- ( o S8 ,;,,„„„„^,, .y, Sons 

,""''C' \^-..'^ \lr, Harden City Fir. C 

oy Seed (o 102 ,;,,r,iin.r Flo C,,., 

■ '"""■' V'i.u -i C-iirland C. 

( rane & Hill i4 ,;.,^,jpr Co 

cri.scent Bull. Co...1(h; ,.:,,;.„, j.,,, \„,; ,;; 

fescent (.ardcn . . < f,.,,,^,. ,. ,. 

ntclicll '■-■•••• 1" (Jeneral I'.nlb Co , 

lonch ( has ^^. . M ,;ente.nan. 11. A. . 

rowl l,.rn (o.....I(M ,,,.,j^. „^„^ 

rmnp. I- rank t.... 02 ,, ,,. ,„.„^ ^. ,.„ 

ulp & Co.......... ,.,,,, i,„. 

( nrric &- (o., A.... .S2 r.^t^Thor,- Soa,... 

Cibbs Bros 

D- liiblin & Co 

Danish Seed Imp. ..107 Uillett, K. (J 

Hanker 74 (;ils.,n Mf;r. Co.. 

Dnrboc's 05 (Jiiiil.crs 

Barils 75 (ilcive's Fir Sh..p. 

Darlinc's Shop 04 (Iloe.kinr. Win. .. 

Iiant Bros S5 (iloekler ( .... li.... 

Uavis Co.. .1. ■W....14(; Cn.ilt ('.. . Ove... 

Davis Flo. Co.... 80-112 Coetz Sons 

Il.'ivis .t Kishler.... .84 Coldsboro Fl.., Co.. 

Dav Co 74 Ciddstein. 1 

Ileal, S. I. 71 lo.odbrail Fl.n.il . . 

lie Kalb Fir. Shop.. .85 lo.ve. Mi-v c c... 

Denver Wholesale... 11 ".r.iliam 

Derr's Fir. Shop.... 70 liraham A; S..ii 

Dethlcfs, AVm .8,5 i.r.ik'Iow. C II... 

Detroit In'll Co 102 (;r F..rks Fl C.. . 

Dicner Co., U 58 Craii.l .Metal W..rk. 

Dietsch Co., A 147 (;i n the Florist,. 

Diiiirley's 00 Creensmith. F. 

Dittnicr the Florist. 71 i;re,.nville Fl. ('.., 



II 74 
. (!(> 

. 88 
p 04 
. 120 
. 00 
. 88 
.100 
.122 
. 01 
. SO 
. 58 
*I7 
. OL' 
IV 
. 70 
. 70 
t. 50 
;.110 
.121 



F.il..-r. lico Sf. 

I''alliai, Florist. . . .si.'-.v; 
Fallon Co.. ,1. J. . .81-s:; 

Fnllon. ,Iolin s.', 

Feast, S.. .(L- Sons. . . ^4 
I'elton's Fir. Shop. . 70 

Fisher A- I'.ro S7 

Fisher (oiveriior Co. 117 
F. \- I. Toll. IToil. .110 

FlasTL' Flo. Co 70 

Flatiroii Fir. Shop. . 88 
Florists' Crdt. Assn. 147 
Florists' Co Op. Slip. 08 
Florists' Slip. Use. . 97 
Florists' Hall As.sn.I21 

Flower Shop 

72-8O-81-Ki;-80 

erster Co 39 

lev .Mf;;. Co 121 

rb..r. a. F 71 

ord. M. C 99 

ordlnim Florist . . . 75 
ox. ('has. Ilcnrv . . 78 

ox's, lile 82 

raiiklin I'.irk Fl.. . 00 

raser A: Son 57 

rederi.'k Fl. Sliop. . 78 
i.'d's Fir. (iar.leii, . ,S1 
rci'imrt Flo. Co. . . . 8.5 

rev. C. H 8S 

r.'V \- Fr<.\ .88 

r.isl. (has 104 

r..iitc. .M 00 

iichs. Henry S3 

iilbriiKc's Firs. . . . 02 

iirnival >V .Son sl 

iirr.iw A- Co NO 

ntternian. Clia^. 00 



G. 



. vi 
. o:i 
. 71 

, i-j:; 

. 01 

. 7o 
ss 
.lot 
. S5 
. SI 
71t 

. 8:t 
no 

.lis 



.50 
s| 
N1 
!ltl 
Ml 
73 
St 
01 



SI 



tin-\er. Win II 
tiriniin A (loi'lx . . 

i;r..li. J. din 

(Jrolie Co.. Fred. 
Croves Floral ('.. 
I i roves. Inc.. li.ib 
(irnlicli A: Sons. . , 
lirnllemaiis A- S.ii 
(liidi. Itros. Co. . . 
Ciiiletl & Sons, . . 

(iiiinz, A. \V 

Ciiniey (Jlise. Co. 
Cuthrie IjorcM/. C< 

H, 

llabermeht's Sons 
llae^er Flo. Co. . , 



Hall & Co., C. 
Hall A: Itobins. 
Ilalliday, Win. 
Hamilton Bros 



C.i. 
Co. 



r.. F. 



. A 

Fl. 



F 



Co, 
Niir, 



1! 



'. Co 
.los. 



11. 

He. 

Ill 

II. 

Ill 

111 



ll 



. 117 
5 s 
. 0(1 
. 51 
. 74 
.101 
. 70 
5- 12 
. OS 
S5 
, 71 



01 

SO 

SI 

S3 
50 
00 
70 
SI 
71 
7S 
122 

Sll 
100 
103 

SI 

lOL' 
50 
00 

S'J 
113 
S5 
01 
01 
77 
ss 
107 



>l. 



Haininoud 
Hammond 
llaiitlinu ( 
Hannah A: 
Hansen N 
llarkelt's 
Harris I'.ros. . . . 
Harris .Mft;. C... 
Harris Seeil Co. 
Hart. (!eo. B. . . 
Hart A- Vick . . 
Ilasselbrini; .... 
1 l;ist iiiiis, h'raiiU 

Haven Seed Co. 

Ila\ ashi A- Co. 

Hayes. .]-. s . 

llM\lll;in (ills 
llc.i.-..ck C... 
kenkamp 
■k Fl..r: 
i.jic C... . ., 

■il. I'. T... 

■inl A- Son. 

•Her A Co. . 
Heiiibreik.'r A' 

Henderioii & C Ill" 

llenes. L.iiiis .1 01 

llenrj Co., .1 5it 

Herbert A; Flei- 

sli;iiier 50 

llerron. H.ina U . . . . 71 
Hess & SwolM.da .... ><s 

Hews A: Co l'-'3 

HiUL'ins. ,T. .1 80 

lli).-liland I'ark Clis. 87 

Hill Niiiscrv Co 100 

Hill A: Co., Dave. . . 7s 

Hill Co., F. C I 

Hill Co.. J. H Ill 

Hill's Fir. Slio(i 7s 

Hillyer's 70 

Hinde A: Dailcli 51 

Ilitc'hiiiKs A: Co I Is 

IIoKun iV Kvers 05 

Ilo^'ewonint; A; Son».l04 

IIold(.n Fl. C.I 50 

Ilollvvvo.id Fir, Sh..:. 01 
HoUvwoo.l Car.lcns. o:i 

Holm A; Olson OL' 

Ilolton A: Iliinkel. . . OS 
HonaktT the Florist . s:{ 

Hopper's Chsi' 03 

Iloran A: Son 7'. 

Horn Fir, Co 00 

lloiit'litoii (Joriiey ... 72 
lloH.ird Itose Co. . . 57 
1 1. .ward A: Smith. . . 04 
Ihima-oi, C,,.. .\ . . . . 50 
lliiniboldt Fvcriirii. . 57 
lliiniphr..y, C. F. . , . 00 
HnrlT. I'., F 103 

I. 

I rk.'^ I'.la Mil 121 

I. II.- 1 1. .Ill- Fl..r.il C.., s.-, 
bill' Hour \iiis. ... so 

l.llcwil.l Chse si 

mill.. I- M.illcible. . .117 

Insi-it s Fab 110 

b.nia I'ottcry Co. . . .123 
Irwin. Iloiiiaii .1 . . . . 15 
Isitt A Son. C. i:. .lis 
ls|i..ru...M| (Ills... . , , 77 



,Iabl..iisk,\-. .\ 

.lackson Cm Fir. C. 
,)acksoii I'Ir. Shoji. 
,lackson A: I'l-rkins, 

.Taejrer A: Son 

Jahn. II. H 

,Tnmes. Fric 

.lames i(t .Son 

.lens. 11 I'.ros 

.lohnson. ,r. I 

.1.. litis.. II. .1. O 

.lohnson A- .Icnscn . . 
.lohiis.iirs (ilises. . , . 
.lohnston. .V. K. , 
.l.ihnston I'.ros. . , , 
.loliiist..ii it Co. , , 



.lohnstoi 
,Tointles> 
.lolict Floral 
.[ones. I'ercv 



.\Iary . 
Fire I'.rii k. 
Co. . . . 



115 

. SI 

so 

lOS 

05 
74 
50 

.si; 

S5 
140 
87 
81 
74 
73 
73 
84 
118 
85 
07 



.loseph, I'.. M 05 

.lov Floral Co 

81-114-115 

.limclion (ihscs." .... 82 



K. 

Pottery 



Co 



Kahle 

Kai, .\I 

Kan. City Cnl Fl. . 
Keller Co., John . . . 
Keller Sons. J. P>. . 
Keller Pottery Co. 

Kciiible Fl. Co 

K.^ndi^' FhirisI .... 
Kenncdv A Sons. . . 
Kcniiii-i'.lt ISros. Co. 

K.'iit Itros 

Kerr. It. () 

Keiir A: Sons 

Ki^cr, X 

Kimberlin .Seed Co. 
Kinder A: Bio., S. . 

Kiiit' Cons. Co 

"Kiii^'" Florist, 'I'll. 
Kinsman, .\. N . . . . 
Kirchhoir's Cons. . . 
Kirkwood Fl. Co. . . 
Kirchen A- (iitlord. 

Kni'i'S A: Sons 

Koplielinaii, .los. . . 

K.>ltiiiiller. .\ 

Kramer the Florist 

Kraiiz, C 

Krocschell llros. . . 
Kriiclileii Co., ,lohii 
Kriie;;er Co.. C. F. 
Knit' Floral Co. . . . 

Kneliii. C. .\ 

Kiihl. (;. .\ S5 

Kiisik A- Co 



122 

105 

4,'! 

s;i 

lu:; 

71 
4 5 
74 

,**,5 
01 
70 

10(i 
01 

102 
73 

147 

■ SO 

02 

113 
71 

100 
S7 
t)0 
7.5 
70 
71 

110 
07 
7S 
87 

OS 

112 

07 



L. 

\.:i Crosse FL.ral Co. 
l,ai.'ardc A- S]ii.eliiiaii 
l.a;rar.lc A: \aiidcr- 

yoort 

Ijiitfpr & llnirell . . . . 
I.iikevicw Kose (Jdn. 

I,. A. Fl.iral Co 

l.amboiirne. K 

Fane. (Jeo. F 

I.ani; Floral Co 

I.aiii,'e A: Son. II. C. . 

I.anirc, A 

Ii!uii;ers Flo. i'o. . . . 

Faiicohr. .M 

I.anktord. W, A 

l.armon. F. F 

Faver. .1. V 

Kiwrence Flo. Co. . . 
Leach Fir. Shop. . . . 
Fcau'iie till' Florist . . 
I.civciiwerth Fl. Co. 
Fee A^ Co., C. S. . . . 

I.ehde A: (iaUey 

Fciuhtoii Floral C... 

I.eliioli >Si Co 

Leonard Seed Co . . . . 

Lev A- .McAllan 

Li;:Kil, C. r 

I.iiidley Box 

Ixihr. Will. S 

Lord's Fir. Itoom . . . 
Lord A.- P.nrnham. . . 

Los Itobles Co 

Lotos .Mfi,'. Co 

l/niisc I'l.iwer Shop 
Ivonisvilb- Pot'y Co 
I^.vcrid^c. ('has. . . 
Lowe's Fir. .Shop. . 

Lnbliner 

Lucas Co.. I!. M. .. 
Lildw iir Co., K. C 



1114 



1(15 
112 



87 
87 
70 
O.'l 

s;i 
ss 
70 
80 



00 
.52 
70 
0(» 
SS 

102 
S!l 

111 

40 

so 
00 

II 

,50 
51 » 
70 
12,'l 
S7 
04 

s-j 

124 

78 



M. 

M.Calliim ('.. ...lol 
.M. Carroll. .Miss . . . . 
,\1. Carroll Flo, Co. . . 
.^lcClcnallan (Ilises. . 
.MeCliir.^ ('..iriiiaii .. . 



.M. 

t 
Ml 
M( 
M. 
Ml 
Ml 
\I. 
M.' 
Ma 



Cra,\ Itel'riL'cra- 

ol 

Flroy. T. P 

Ilntchisnn A- Co 
Keiitia, Ltd. . . . 

Lellaii Co 

Leod & Henry. . 

Murray. K. S. . . 

Itac-.Tenkinsoii .. 

i\v Bros 



.M.idison St. Fir. . . 
.Madson S.'cd Co. . . 
Majestic Floral Co. 
.Majors, The First. 
Malandrc Bros. . . . 

.Manircl. J,,hn 

.Mankab. Fl. Co. . . . 
.March Irrit'ator Ci 
Marf-'rave, Susan . . 
Marion F'lornl Co. . 
Marret iV: Miller. . . 
.Marshall. Ceo. W.. 
-Martin (irate Co. . . 
.Martin A- Forbes. . 

.Martins. The 

.Maryiii. Ira (1 

Mas-Art Basket . .. 



1 25 
. S,'l 
. 81 
. OS 

SJ 

. 07 
S5 
.103 
. 80 
. OO 
.117 
. 1 25 
70 
.112 

. .SO 
. si; 
. 70 

• II' 
. 7.5 

. 87 

. 02 

.147 

. !MI 

. 88 

, s;! 

, so 

,117 

, 03 

00 

, 78 
50 



.Massmann 

.Mathesoii. Ilm;l 
.Man, Otto F. . 
.Maiiir Floral C. 



71 
. li;: 
, 80 

02 



.Ma.\, Harry () 74 



02 

120 

99 

45 

1 



H. t 

Fir. 

(;dii> 



c 



Maz<.y 
.Mead-Sny ilaiii 

.Meconi. Paul 

.Me(.|ian, ('has. F, , . 
.Mefjchelseii Fl. Shop 
.Meier-Schroi'der Co. . 
Meinliart. J. F. . . 

Meiiand, II. L 

.Mct:iirie UiiUe Niir. 
.Mclropolilan Mate 

rial Co 117-123 12; 

Metz Bros. . . . 
.Mexia Flo. Co. 
Meyi.r. F. C. . . 
.Meyer Thread ( 
-Miihal, John A 
.Michell Co., 
.Michigan Cut 
Middlemoiint 
Miller, A. L. 
Miller, H. C. 
-Miller, 11. T. 
.Miller, J. S. 
Miller Flor.il 
.Miller Print Shop. 

Miller & Son 

Mills the Florist . 
Minue Floral C... 
Mission Fir. Shoi.i 
Missouri Potter\ 
Mo. Polt'y Siipjilj 

.Moniiif.'(.r Co 

Mono Service .... 
Montiromerv (ilises 
Moorby, Chas. \\ . 
Morehead Mfii. ('.. 
.Mort-enrotli. W. . 
Morrell. Ceo. i: , 
.Morris. Fh.rist . , . 
.Morse &• Ilea Is , . , 

Morse A: C.I 

Moseley, Mrs. T. .\ . 
Mosniillcr, Fr.-iiik . . 

Moss. Chas. A 

Monnt.iin View Fl... 
.Miiehleliach Fl. Shop 

Miiir, John T 

Mnllanpliy 

.Miiiitz, s. i; 

Miirala & Co 

Mnrdoch. W. .\ . . . 

Miiriiliy Co 

Murr.iy. Saiiiu.l . . , 
-Murray AC. 



71 

so 



. 00 

70 
. 00 
. 42 
. 80 
. 104 

.52 

. SI 

.113 
.110 

. 0(1 
. 7s 
•,S-<,(5 
. 100 
. S5 
. 71 
. SO 

•. OO 
.pj:: 
.12L' 
. IV 
. 47 
. 71 
, 7's 
.117 
. 81 
.110 
. 05, 

!l(')[; 
. 7b 
. S3 
. SI 
1. CO 

i; 



N, 
.Vanz Flor.il ( .. 
N.ircissi .\ssii. 
N; 
Ni 
\. 
.\i 
N. 
\i 
N. 



s;; 

1(»0 

. 95 

. 45 

. 0(» 

OL' 

no 
. 70 

Oil 

. il'.i 

ss 

, 5:t 
11 

112 
. 43 

. SS 

, 5:i 

, 00 



I Viet Co 

■idincer. J. O 
il Flower Shop 

'iUeii. Inc. , .\ 
Krnnswii-k N. 

■well, A 

V. Fh.nsts- Sll 
.Nicotine .Mfu. ( ■. 
.N iediia).'(.l, Jiilii)-, 
.^lessen. Kiiiid 
Nicssi n Co . I/" .. 

.Noble. (!. It 

Noll Floral Co. 
Norfolk Fh.ral C.i 
N.iithcrn Fern d 
.Norton (Jhse, . , 

0. 

Oakes. O. B 01 

Obcrtin. P. N 82 

O'Brien. J. J 72 

O'Connell Fir, Sh.iii. 70 

(ielschi- & Son so 

Oestirlint.'. .Mfr.-.l. . 107 

Ohio Class Co 11!0 

O'Le.irv Florist .... 87 
Olsson Co., II. L. . , 00 
Onarc.i Nursery . . . .100 
Oli|ieiilieim. .Manuel. 7t 
0|.ln'rmaiiii. .\ii'..ii . . 77 
Orchid. The . .01 

Osborne Co 100 

Oslcrlai; llr..s. 77 

Owen A; Soil 115 

Owi.ss.i Fl.iral I .. St 



P. 

icilic .Nurseries. 
II liner. Inc.. F, K 

iilmer A- Son 

irk Floral Co . . 

1 rk Florist 

iirkci's Fir, St.ir. 
itri. k Fl Co. 

Ittell. Helen F 

iMi.'s Fir, Sli..|. 

drick A: .Son 

lic.inoltossi 

II n 

niiock C... . - 
rman. John 
rry's Fir, Sh. 
rsiiind. K. II 
rstein. Harr 



.|||i. 



to 

. SO 

01 

OO 

S5 

.102 

. 00 

72 

. 45 

100 
01 

88 

, Sl; 



[CONCLUDED ON PAGE 4.] 



»;».».':> ■»> .!.r 1^ 



I ''.•;,.■ i." '■■■?<ff'\ 



■,:^"s?Vvf,T«7-s,,.'->- »■; ri(f ;; . _■ :r:--, 



JUNB 1, 1022 



The Florists' Review 



Commencement 

and 

Bridal Accessories 

Are you prepared for these occasions? 



Lace Handkerchiefs 




Trice $8.00 per doz. 

Bridal Shower 

Pink and White 

Price yOc cacii 

$l().()() per (loz. 

Mescaline Gauze 

50 yds. to a bolt. All colors 

Per holt $1..=^0 

Shower G^tuze 

Pink and White 

No. 2 widtli $2.50 i)er l)olt 

No. .5 widtli ?i.7S per boll 




PRINCESS BASKET 



Chiffon Corsage Shields 

Kej.;iilar Cliiffoii Kdge Shields. Best 
made on the market. In all colors. 

1 'riee $2.25 per doz. 

$25.00 per gr. 

Celluloid Corsage Shields 

Plain Transparent 

I'rice 40c per doz. 

$.150 per gr. 

Satin Corsage Ties 




Made iii' all colors with a narrow 
satin taffeta ril)hon with gold or sil- 
ver l^nckle. 
Price $3.50 per doz. 



Satin Ribbon 



, All colors 



No. 

No. 

No. 

No. 

No. ■ 

No. 

No. 

No. 

No. 

No. 



0- 

7- 
9- 
12- 
16- 
22- 
40- 
60- 
80- 
100- 



No. 150- 
No. 200- 



- 'A ■ 
-1%". 
-1/2". 
-17/8"- 

-2J4". 
-25A". 
-SVs". 
-31^". 
-4"... 

-m". 

-5H". 
-6". . . 



.$0.75 

. .90 

. 1.10 

. 1.25 

. 1.50 

. 1.75 

. 2.00 

. 2.40 

. 2.70 

. 3.00 

. 3.60 

. 4.00 



per bolt 

per bolt 

per bolt 

per bolt 

per bolt 

per bolt 

per bolt 

per bolt 

per bolt 

per bolt 

per bolt 

per bolt 



Plain Tin Foil 

Put up in 1-lb. pkge. 

Per lb $ 0.15 

Per 100 lbs 13.50 

Colored Tin Foil 

Green or Purple 
Put up in 1-lb. pkge. 

Per lb $ 0.45 

Per 100 lbs 40.00 

Aluminum Foil 

Put up in 1-lb. rolls 

10 in. wide 

Per lb $1.00 

10-lb. lots, per lb 75 

White Wax Paper 

24 X 36 480 count 

Per ream $2.75 

Green 3.00 

White Tissue Paper 

Glazed on one side 
24x36 480 count 

i'er bnndle $13.75 



Princess Basket 



Tiiis basket comes in fonr .sizes and is ideal for the use of a Flower Girl 
or a Favor Basket. These are made up in natural Willow color and are 
adaptable for almost any use. 

No. 79037/.? $1.35 each $14.00 per doz. 

No. 79037/4 1.50 each 15.00 per doz. 

SMALL PRINCESS BASKET (Open Weave) 

Each $0.65 | Per dozen $7.50 



PITTSBURGH CUT FLOWER CO. 



"We Serve to Sell You Again." 



116-118 Seventh Street 



PITTSBURGH, PA. 



. .Xj^:*' 



^■•jff!' 



The Florists^ Review 



JuNi 1. 1922 



Peters & Sons 69 

Peterson Nursery. . .111 
Peterson & Haywood 94 
Peterson & Sons, 

J. A 13 

Peterson & Son, S.. 87 

Pfaff & Kendull 117 

Pfaltigraff Potterj-.123 
Phlla. Cut Flower.. 45 
Pbila. Florists' Ex.. 45 
Phlla. Gr'wrs' Mkt. 46 
Phlla. Pipe Supply. 117 

Philips Bros 74 

Piedmont Fir. Shop. 81 

Plerson, A. N 1-146 

Pierson, F. B 110 

Pikes Peak If'io. Co. 92 
PlUsbury, I. L... 85 124 
Pinehurst Fir. Shop. 93 
Pittsburgh Cut Flo. 

3-99-100 

Plater, B. W 86 

Plath. H 60 

Podesta & Baldocohi 95 
Poehlmann Bros . . .6-7-9 

Poll worth Co I 101 

Pomona Fl. Co 94 

Pooley's Fir. Shop.. 94 

Poor, C. 1 89 

Posie Shoppe 91 

Potter Floral Co 79 

Power Fl. Sliop 83 

Prechtl & Woitella. 60 
Premier Rose Gdns. 56 

Progressive Clay 122 

Pueblo Flo. Co 92 

Pulos, Christy S 53 

Pulverized Manure.. 147 
Pul. Pltry. Manure. 147 

Purnell. W. Z 53 

Putnam, B. J 98 

Pyfer & Co.. A. T.. 41 

a. 

Quality Brands Co. .124 
Quality Fir. Store. . 89 

B. 

Raebel ft Son 91 

Raedlein Basket Co. 46 

Rahn ft Herbert 59 

Bamm's Fir. Shop. . 75 

Ramburg, G. S 106 

Bamsay, Ltd 89 

Randall's Flo. Shop. 72 
Randall Co. .37-38-39-97 
Randall Di8players..l46 
Randolph & Mc- 

Clements 78 

Ravier ft Sons 80 

Reck ft Son 73 

Redline Co 84 

Redondo Flo. Co 94 

Regan Ptg. House.. 98 




[CONCLUDED FROM PAOI 2.] 



Regina Flo. Co 89 

Reid, Edward 44 

Relmers ft Son Co. . 83 
Relnhart & Adams.. 88 

Relnberg, Geo 97 

Reinberg, P 36 

Reliance Seed Co... 91 

Rennlson Co 71 

Rentsehler Flo. Co. . 82 

Reyes & Co 80 

Rlbsam, Klartin C. . 74 

Rice Bros 98 

Rice Co., M 16 

Rice Seed Co 103 

Ridenour, Victor. ... 78 
Riverside Fl. Shop. 71 

Riverside Ghses 82 

Robbins Bros 72 

Robinson Seed Co. . .102 

Robinson & Co 51 

Rochester Ghses.... 92 
Rock Flower Co.... 76 
Rockford Floral Co. 87 
Rocklin ft liehman. 71 
Rock River Irig. Co.l22 

Rodgers, J. W 91 

Roehrs Co 109 

Rogers, Louis M. . . . 88 

Rohnert, Waldo 102 

Roos, Jelle 107 

Rosaia Bros 93 

Roseland Florist 80 

Rosemont Gardens.. 80 
Rosendale Fir. Shop 75 

Ross, J. W 85 

Ruch, D. E 80 

Rueker's Fir. Shop. . 83 

Rumbley Co 100 

Rusch ft Co :. 98 

Buttle, Robert D,.. 83 

Ryan, H. A 72 

Ryan ft Culver 91 

Rye, George 89 

Rynveld & Sons 107 

S. 

Saake, O. 94 

Sakata ft Co 103 

Salem Fir. Shop 72 

Salem Gmhses 93 

Snlzer's Flo. Gdns.. 82 

Samuelson, C. A 87 

Sanders Nursery.... 77 

Sandiford, Chas 76 

Sayre Fir. Co 79 



Sceery, Edward 74 

.SchaelTer, J. E 77 

Schafer Fl. Co 86 

Scheiuuk, Max 80 

Schiller. J. L 113 

Schillo, Adam 118 

Schlatter ft Son 124 

Schling, Max 65 

Schmaus Bros 83 

Schmidt ft Meine... 91 

Schneider, A. H 86 

Scholtz, Florist 81 

Schoorl, Adrian J... 58 

Schultheis 78 

Schulz Co., J 83 

Schwa ke & Co 106 

Scott, Wm., Co 76 

Scribner Floral Co.. 84 

Scrim's 80 

Seattle F. ft M. Co. 60 
Secure Hose Washer 59 
Segers Bros., Ltd... 107 

Seibert, F. C 82 

Seibert. L. M 77 

Semler-Leidlger Co.. 82 

Sharp, Partridge 121 

Shaw, Fred R 71 

Sheely Bros 74 

Shellgrain ft Rltter 95 

Sheppard, H. W 88 

Sheridan Ghse. Co. . 93 
Shoemaker, B. H...120 

Shotwell Fir. Co 85 

Shrauger ft Johnson. 50 
Siebrecht. Jr., H. A. 94 

Sievers, W. H 76 

Singman ft Co 12 

Skidelsky ft Co I 

Skinner Co., M. B..118 
Skinner Irrigation. .124 

Smedley Flo. Co 85 

.Smely, J. M 86 

.Smith Co., A. W... 78 
Smith Co., W. ft T.108 
Smith Flo. Co., H.. 84 

Smith Ghse. Co 80 

Smith Wholesale 98 

Smith ft Co 116 

Smyth, W. J 86 

Souster, George .... 86 
Speelman ft Sons... 104 
Springfield Fl. Co... 114 
Springfield Seed Co. 77 

St. Joseph Box 51 

St. Louis Pott'y Co.122 



St. I»uis Seed Co.. 102 
St. I^ouis Wholesale. 38 

Stache, H. C 73 

Stallings Fir. Shop. 80 
Starr the Florist... 81 

State Fair F. Co 77 

State Floral Co 93 

State Nursery Co. . . 93 
Stecher Litho. Co... 107 

Steele's Pansies 61 

Stein, A. 95 

Stemme ft Sons. ... 85 
Stenson ft McGrail.. 79 
Rtiles. Mrs. R. B... 83 

Stoll, O. A 84 

Storrs ft Harrison. .110 
Straus Flowers .... 69 
Stroufs, Inc. ...72-115 

Stuehe Fir. Co 82 

Stumpp, G. E. M... 69 
Stumpp ft Walter.. 103 

Stuppy Flo. Co 77 

Stuppy Sup. Co 42 

Suckling ft Chase... 89 

Suder, A. A 90 

Sunnyside Ghses.... 74 
Superior Dahlia 

Gardens 68 

Superior Fir. Co 82 

Suzanne Floral Co.. 95 

Swanson's, Inc 92 

Swanson the Florist 87 
Swartley ft Sons 85 

T. 

Tarentum Fir. Co... 78 

Tassano Bros 50 

Teahnn Fern Co 52 

Tegelaar Bros 105 

Temblett, Wm. H.. 91 

Thim. C 69 

Thomas, Victor H.. 83 
Thompson. W. W... 52 
Thornton Fir. Shop. 85 

Thorsted Fl. Co 95 

Throop-Martin Co... 120 

Tipton ft Hurst 89 

Tonner 36-41 

Toole ft Son 109 

Totty Co., C. H 111 

Traendlv ft Schenck. 99 
Trepel ft Bershad.. 74 

Trimble Co 10-86 

Trinidad Fl. Store.. 92 



Tupelo Floral Co... 85 

Turner Bros 120 

Turner, Wm. H 79 

V. 

T'ecke. Chas. F 36 

Union Construction.. 97 

United Bulb Co 107 

United Bulb Grs 105 

United Cut Fir. Co. 99 
United Flower & 

Supply 59 

U. S. Cut Fir. Co... 96 
TTniversity Florist.. 93 

TTsinger. W. T 99 

Utiea Floral Co 75 

T. 

Valdesian Nurs. ...109 
Valker's Floral Co.. 85 
Van Aart, John. ... 83 

Van Aken Bros 84 

Van Bochove ft Bro. 84 
Van Der Sclioot. 

B. A 106 

Vandervoort ft Co.. 106 

Van Lindley Co 81 

Van Meter Fl. Shop. 90 
Van Zanten & Sons. 105 
Van Zonneveld Bros. 

ft Philippo 104 

Vavrous Sons 79 

Vesey's 88 

Vlck's Sons, J 102 

Victoria Nursery.... 89 
Violet Dell Florist.. 71 

Virgin, U. J 80 

Vogt's Greenhouse. . 84 
Vos & Son 107 

W. 

Waldbart Flo. Co... 77 

Waller Seed Co 103 

Walsh ft Son 72 

Walther, H. C 90 

Walther ft Sons 77 

Want Ads 62 63-64 

Warburton Co 72 

Ward ft Co., R. M. I 
Watkins & Simpson. 103 

Wayside Gdns 109 

Wax Bros 72 

Weaver, Wm 86 



Weber, F. C 77 

Wel)er, Fred H 77 

Weber ft .Sons Co,. 82 

Webster Ghses 8!> 

Weeber & Race 121 

Weiland, John 87 

Weiland-Rlsch 48 

Weinstock's 80 

Weir, Inc., James.. '74 
Welch's Fir. Shop.. 73 

Welke Co 82 

Weller Nurs. Co 100 

Wertheimer Bros ... 16 
Weatman ft Getz... 91 
Westmoreland Gdn.. 71 

Wettlln Flo. Co 74 

White Bros 74 

Whltford's 04 

Wiegand's Sons 88 

Wienhoeber Co. ... 87 

Wilcox ft Co 57 

Wilcox ft Sons 71 

Wilks Mfg. Co 117 

Williams, Mrs. E. A. 78 

Willinras, Ed 88 

Williams the Florist 88 
Willson, Herbert H. 80 

Wilson, A 110 

Wilson, H. B 76 

Wilson Floral Co... 90 
Wllson-Crout-Gehr . . 60 

Wiltshire, O. H 48 

Wlnandy, Jr., Mike.147 
Windier Wholesale. 08 

Windmiller Co 92 

Winter Floral Co... 82 

Wlnterson Co 52 

Wltek, Joseph 77 

Wlttbold ft Son... 86-87 

Wlttbold, Geo 87 

Wolf, John 80 

Wolfe the Florist... 79 

Wood Floral Co 79 

Woodcock Fl. Co... 71 
Woodland Park Co.. 60 
Woodman's Fl. Shop 90 
Woodruff ft Sons... 103 
Woodruff's Son ....100 

Wood's Fl. Shop 79 

Woodward, A. J 89 

Wright's Fl. Shop. 67 

T, 

Yeagle. W. P 114 

Yetter, F. J 97 

Young, Fred M 60 

Young ft Lester.... 93 

Z, 

Zane Pottery Co 123 

Zech ft Mann 40 

Zetlitz, E. N 90 

Zetlitz Flo. Pro 91 

Zvolanek, A. C 60 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 



Page 
Flowers for June Brides (Illus- 
trated) 3 7 

— Lila Lee, the Bride (lUus.) 18 

— Siebrecht's Bridal Bouquet (Il- 
lustrated ) 18 

— For Bride and Bridesmaids (il- 
lustrated) 18 

Canners' .Advertising 19 

Wisconsin Florists to Meet 19 

New Yorkers' Big Trip 19 

Hollanders' Congress 20 

Opium Poppy 20 

Fuchsia Leaves Falling 20 

Iris Society Meets 21 

— American Iris Society 21 

Quarantine 37 22 

— Changes in Quarantine 22 

— Society of American Florists.. 22 

Pay for Partners 22 

Making Space Count (illus.) 23 

Growing Delphiniums 23 

Texas-(>rown Freesias 23 

Geraniums 24 

— Commercial Geraniums 24 

— Blind Wood on Geraniums 24 

Carrying Roses Over 24 

Polnsettia Cuttings 24 

Carnations 24 

— Wilting Carrmtions . .' 24 

— Carnations Outdoors 24 



Page 

Roses 25 

— ^ American Rose Society 25 

— Blight on Roses 25 

Newsy Items from All Over 25 

Obituary 26 

— Charles W. Phillips (portrait). 26 

— Mrs. May Bonnot 26 

— C. C. Thomas 26 

— John F. Hargrave 26 

— Professor William Parsons.... 26 

— Lorenz P. Geiger 26 

— Patrick Welch (portrait) 26 

The Official Catalogue 27 

Freight Reduction 28 

The Coal Market 28 

Recovery Permanent 28 

Plenty of Demand .' 28 

New York 29 

Chicago 29 

Philadelphia 44 

Boston 46 

Rust on Hydrangeas 52 

Pacific Coast Department 54 

— Los Angeles 54 

— San Francisco, Calif 54 

— Portland, Ore 59 

— Seattle, Wash 60 

The Retail Store 68 

— Flowers for Ujfr,Llvlng 68 

.;— Windows Can Increase Sales.. 68 

— Inaurinir ■^(yjf. Own Success... 68 




Page 

Knapp vs. Sayre, Pa 68 

Fort Smith's New Florist 68 

St. Louis 69 

Newark, N. J-. 74 

Baltimore, Md 74 

Kansas City, Mo 75 

Worcester, Mass 77 

Terre Haute, Ind 77 

Omaha. Neb 78 

Rochester, N. Y 80 

Boast of Badger Trade 83 

Mott-ly Musings 88 

Washington, D. C 91 

Steamer Sailings 94 

Seed Trade News 102 

— French Bulbs 102 

— Seed Trade Problems 104 

— Joseph Sleekier (portrait) .... 104 

— California Seed Outlook 106 

News of the Nursery Trade 108 

— California Nurserymen 108 

— Nurserymen to Convene 108 

Toronto, Ont 114 

Greenhouse Heating 116 

— For High-Pressure Steam 116 

— Heating Two Houses 116 

Indianapolis, Ind 118 

Crown-Gall, or Plant Cancer 120 

Cincinnati, 122 

^tnfl Wayne, Ind 124 



/■Ill 



■Tf,- 







Jdnx 1, 1922 



' ' ' 

The Florists^ Review 5 



Choice Florists^ Flower Seeds 

/ aim to procure the best obtainable. Less 5% for cash with order. 



ANTIRRHINUM. Greenhouae Forcins va> 
rieties. Selected Seed. 

Pkt. 

Keystone $1.0C 

Ranuburg'a and Buxton's Silver 

Pink 1.00 

Nelrose, Deep Pink and Giant Yellow .50 

Phelps' White ajid Scarlet SO 

Garnet and Giant Bronze 50 

Fancy Mixed Colors 50 

Golden Pink Queen I.OO 

Hybrid Pink, Soft Orchid 1.00 

Orlando 1.00 

Golden Delight -. I.OO 

Philadelphia Pink i.oo 

ASPARAGUS, Plumosus Nanus, new crop 
seed, Northern Greenhouse Grown, $4.00 
per 1000 seeds, 5000 seeds $19.00; lath- 
tiouse grown, $2.50 per thousand seeds, 
10,000 seeds $20.00. 

Sprenceri, 1000 seeds, $1.50 




CELOSIA, Contii^a Chry4antheflora 

(Novelty), $5.00 per trade packet. 
Cultural directions on appliba^tion. 



CYCLAMEN SEED GROWN BY L. & W. 

And other Cyclamen Specialists. Amer- 
ican grown from the best German Wands- 
bek Strain. 

Giant Brilliant Red 

Giant Xmas Red (Dark Glowing Red) 

Giant Pink, with rose-pink eye 

Giant Rose of Mau-ienthal 

Giant White, with pink eye 

Giant Pure White 

Giant Glory of Wandsbek, salmon 

Giant American Beauty 

Giant AU Colors Mixed 

Prices on all above, 100 seeds $2.00; 1000 
seeds $15.00. 




PANSY SEEDS 

Home grown. Best money can buy. 

Giant Masterpiece Giant Lavender 

Giant Red Shades Giant White 

Giant Beaconsfieid Giant Yellow 

Giant Bronze Shades 

Mixtures: Giant Florist Mixture, Trade 
pkt., 75c; 'A oz., $1.50; }4 oz., $2.25; 
K' oz., $4.00; oz., $7.50. 

Steele's Mastodon Private Stock Mix- 
ture, "4 oz., $1.50; Yj oz., $2.75; oz., 
$5.00. 

Steele's Greenhouse Special, Long- 
Stemmed Mixture, % oz., $1.75; yi oz., 
$3.25; oz., $6.00. 

Irwin's Finest Exhibition Mixture. A 
mixture of the finest exhibition Pan- 
sies grown in this country, % oz., 
$2.00; 'A oz., $3.50; yi oz., $6.50; oz., 
$12.00. 



ANNUAL LUPINES, Hartwegii Rose, 
Hartwegii Dark Blue, Hartwegii Sky Blue, 
Hartwegii White, % oz., 25c; oz., 75c. 

PERENNIAL LUPINES, Polyphyllus 
Mixed, '/i oz., 25c; oz., 75c. 



PALM SEEDS. Phoenix Roebelenil and 
Kentia Belmoreana, see front cover 
ad. 



PRIMULA. Primula Obconica new crop 
seeds. This is Geo. Arends' Ronsdorf 
strain, the best in the world. Sold in his 
original packets. Primula Obconica Gi- 
gantea, blue, salmon, red, rose, apple 
blossom, crispa mixed, lavender, white, 
oculata, compacta, also all colors mixed. 
Prices on the above as follows: 1 Pkt., 
400 seeds, 75c; 5 Pkts., $3.25; 10 Pkts., 
$6.00; 25 Pkts., $10.00. 

Chinensis, Defiance, Xmas Red, La 
Duchesse, flesh color with white center; 
blood red, dark velvety color; Rosea, 
bright pink, blue, pure white, salmon, 
also all colors mixed, 1 Pkt., 250 seeds, 
75c; 2 Pkts., $1.25; 4 Pkts., $2.25. 

Malacoides, dbl., rosy -pink, Tr. Pkt., 75c. 

Malacoides Superba, new, large flower- 
ing, deep rosy-pink, very fine. Tr. Pkt., 
75c. 

Malacoides Alba, large flowering, new. 
Tr. Pkt., 75c. 

Malacoides Lilac. Tr. Pkt., 50c. 

Malacoides Mixed. Tr. Pkt., 50c. 

SALPIGLOSSIS, White and Gold, Rose 
and Gold, Scarlet and Gold, Purple and 
Gold, Gloxinia Flowered Mixed, 'A oz., 
25c; oz., $1.50. 



Seasonable Plant Stock 



For other items see Classified lists. 



BEGONIAS, 21/i-IN. POTS 
Grown from Leaf Cuttings 



Doz. 100 1000 

Mrs. J. A. Peterson $5.00 $35.00 $300.00 

MeUor 5.00 40.00 300.00 

Cincinnati 5.00 40.00 300.00 

Lorraine 3.00 15.00 140.00 

Tumford Hall (White). 4.00 30.00 

Konkurent 5.00 35.00 300.00 

.500 plants or more at thousand rate. 

Less than 1(X) plants at dozen rate. 
For Other Begonias See Classified. 

CYCLAMEN PLANTS GROWN FROM 

L. A W. and other best strains of Amer- 
ican-grown seed in the following colors: 

American Beauty White with carmine 



Dark Christmas Red 
Bright Red 
Rose Dark Eye 
Rose Marienthal, 
pink 



eye 
Salmon Glory of 

WaiuNbek 
Pure W'liite 



<. 



Per 100 

2^-in pots $15.00 

3-in pots 18.C0 

3 in. pots, selected 22.00 

3}-j-in. pots, selected 35.00 

4-in. pots, ready June 1 40.0(1 

4-in. pots, extra select, rc.idy June 1. 50.00 
Add 5 per cent for packing. If Salmon 
alone is ordered, add 10 per cent to the 
above prices. 



CYCLAMEN SEEDLINGS, Strong, Trans- 
planted, 5 to 8 leaves, $8.50 per 100, $75.00 
jier 1000. In best varieties; best strain. 

PRIMULA OBCONICA. From Arends' 
Ronsdorfer strain. Ready June 15, 2%- 
inch pots, $7.00 per 100, $60.00 per 1000. 



Kermesina, red 
Apple Blossom 
Rosea 
Compacta 
Salmon 



White 

Blue 

Lavender 

and all colors mixed 



PRIMULA CHINENSIS. 2%-w. pots, $7.00 
per 100, $60.80 per 1000. 

Defiance, Christmas red; Rosea, bright 
pink; La Duchesse, flesh color, white 
center; Rlood Red, dark velvety color; 
Pure White; Blue; Sahnon and rnixcil 
colors. 

POINSETTIAS, 2%-in. puts, $10.00 per 100. 
$90.00 per 1000. 

We will have Oak Leaf type and Cali- 
fornia type ready later. Ask for prices. 



MUM CUTTINGS 

and POT PLANTS 

Clean Stock — No Midge 

MAJOR BONNAFFON. Rooted 
Cuttings, $3.00 per 100. 
$25.00 per 1000;214-in.,$5.00 
per 100, $45.00 per 1000. 

BEST STANDARD VARIETIES. 

Rooted Cuttings, $3..S0 per 100, $30.00 
per 1000; 2K-in., $5.00 per 100, $45.00 
per 1000. 

CHADWICKS: White, Yellow, Pink 

anil Bronze. Rooted Cuttings, $5.00 

per 100, $45.00 per 1000; 2!4-in., $7.00 
per 100, $65.00 per 1000. 

TURNERS: Yellow, White ami Pink, 

$5.00 per UlO, $45.00 per 1000; 2!4-in., 
$7.00 per 100, $65.00 per 1000. 

POMPONS, Single and Anemones. 

Rooted (."uttings, $.v.SO per 100, $30.00 
per 1000. 

.Ask for a complete list or see previous 

issues. 



ROMAN J. IRWIN 

43 West 18th St. NEW YORK CITY 



■i . 



The Florists^ Review 



Junk 1. I!i2ii 




WEDDING and GRA 

For the many and varied 

ample provision for all 

VALLEY — A quarter of million Valley for the 
June Bride. 

OR CHIDS — Fancy Cattleya Gigas and Cattleya 
Mossiae. 

JUNE ROSE CROPS-Large and Constant 
—include the cut from 30,000 Russell Plants. 

CRUSADER — The summer red rose best by 
test. Fine daily cuts from young stock. 

SUNBURST — A dependable source of sup- 
ply for yellow roses. 

PREMIER, COLUMBIA, BUTTERFLY, DOUBLE 
WHITE OPHELIA, DOUBLE WHITE KILLARNEY, 
PHANTOM, AARON WARD, CECILE BRUNNER. 

POEHLMANN BRO 

THE LARGEST GROWERS OF 

66 to 74 EAST 

TELEPHONE RANDOLPH 0035 



t:,:- \: ■:'>','-^'^-..;*V'^^\'^y:'%\;r^,f^\ 



«i(M,j}T.'; v- 




events of June, we have made 
"Flowers of the Hour." 

Summer Novelty Flowers 



*■ 



As the season 


advances* our list 


of summer novelty fL 


Dwers continues 


to grow. 






We 


now 


offer 


CORNFLOWERS 




LARKSPUR 


CANDYTUFT 




PYRETHRUM 


DAISIES 




GLADIOLI 


FEVERFEW 




PEONIES 



iTHERS Company 

I FLOWERS IN THE WORLD 

RANDOLPH ST. 

CHICAGO 




l»r^-^...>.^..^.v..-:^.. 



6 






The Florists' Review 



'■K, v:. , V 



JONB 1. 1922 



POPULAR PRICES FOR HIGH-GRADE 



In lots of 300 or more of one grade, our selection, as follows: 

ROSES, good short ... per 100, $4.00 to $ 5.00 
ROSES, choice medium lengths, per 100, 8.00 to 10.00 

NEW FANCY FERNS, very fine . per 1000, 3.00 

PRICE LIST: 



PREMIER 



Fancy long 



Per 100 
$12.00 



Choice medium $6.00 to 

Good short 3.00 to 

COLUMBIA 

Fancy long 

Choice medium 

Good short $4.00 to 



8.00 
5.00 



$12.00 
8.00 
6.00 



OPHELIA, BUTTERFLY AND 
WHITE KILLARNEY Per 100 

Fancy long $12.00 

Choice medium $6.00 to 8.00 

Good short 3.00 to 4.00 

CRUSADER AND SUNBURST 

Long $16.00 to $20.00 

Medium 10.00 to 12.00 

Short 5.00 to 8.00 



RUSSELL Per 100 



Fancy long $16.00 

Medium 12.00 

Good short 8.00 

Short $5,00 to 6.00 



When ordering please state what grade wanted. 

ASPARAGUS — extra fancy light green, guaranteed fresh at spe- j 

cial price, 35 cents per bunch or three bunches for a dollar. 
BRONZE GALAX— extra large leaves, $2.00 per thousand. 

FANCY FERNS— best New England ferns at $4.00 to $4.50 per 
thousand. 

All aeasonablc flowers we will buy for our customers at market prices. 

A Trial Order Solicited 

In buying direct of the grower you are assured of fresh 
stock at all times, and the most even run of quality possible. 

Bassett & Washburn 



Greesboascs: 
WESTMONT. ILL 



CHICAGO, ILL. 



Office and Store: 178 N. Wabash Aveaae 
Long Distance Phone, Central 1457 



JUNS 1, 1822 



The Florists^ Review 





Order June Wedding 

lies Now 




CO. 



Our Wedding accessories department 
is replete with every requisite 



Ribbons 

No. 2 Plcot Edge Oauze, 

With very fine lustre satin stripe, in 

White, Pink and Nile. 

Per bolt, 50 yards $ 2.25 

Per 10 bolts 21.00 

No. 2 Metallic Oauze. 
White and Pink. 

Per bolt, 50 yards $ 1,50 

Per 10 bolts 14.00 

No. 2 Messallne Gauze. 

White and Pink. 

Per bolt, 50 yards $ 1.50 

Per 10 bolts 14.00 

6-Incli Metalline. 

Plain, Special $0.16 yard 

Fancy Edge, Special 20 yard 

6-Incli Crepe Metalline, No. 1650. 

With No. 2 Picot Edge Gauze, 8 
inches over all. Pink and White, 35c 
per yard. 



Baskets 

White Enameled Princess Baskets 
for Flower Girls. 



No. 2 $0.60 each 

No. 3 70 each 

No. 4 80 each 

No. 5 90 each 



$ 



7.00 dozen 

8.00 dozen 

9.00 dozen 

10.00 dozen 



All good sizes, but No. 4 being the 
most popular. 

Imported Natural Flower-Oirl Baskets. 

Three to a nest in the two popular 
sizes. 

No. 9615 $1.00 a nest 

No. 9616 1.25 a nest 

Bridal Batons $2.50 each 

Princess Brides — Maids' Staffs 4.00 each 
Shepherds' Crooks 2.50 each 

Made Up Showers 
Of No. 2 Messaline Gauze. 



14-inch $1.00 each 

30-inch 1.25 each 



$11.00 dozen 
13.50 dozen 



Price* on Aisle Posts, Kneeling Rests, Wedding Gates, etc., 

"^sent on request. 

POEHLNANR BROTHERS COMPANY 



Complete Service for Florists 



Long Distance Phone 
Randolph 003S 



66 to 74 
East Randolph Street 



CHICAGO 

See our SPECIAL PRICES on SHEEP MANURE and MOSS b Classified Columns 



^ 




'MMmA^'^M K.i./'w..-- 



■w^.pw 



10 



The Florists^ Review 



June 1. 192'J 



Note and Remember 

TRIMBLE'S 

LOW PRICES 

On AH the Flowers You Need 

For June Weddings and Commencements 

It Will Pay You to Order Direct of the Grower 

JUNE PRICE LIST 



MRS. CHAS. RUSSELL AND PREMIER 

Per 100 
Extra Specials, 34 to 48-in .$20.00 to $25.00 

Specials, 28 to 32-in 15.00 to 18.00 

Select, 18 to 24-in 10.00 to 12.00 

Medium, 16-in 6.00 to 8.00 

Short, 8 to 12-in 4.00 to 5.00 

COLUMBIA 

Specials, 20 to 28-in 15.00 to 

Select. 16 to 20-in 10.00 to 

Medium, 16-in 6.00 to 

.Short, 8 to 12-in 4.00 to 



RICHMOND AND MILADY, red 

Specials. 20 to 28-in 12.00 to 

Select. 16 to 20-in 8.00 to 

Medium, 16-in 6.00 to 

Short, 8 to 12-in 4.00 to 



18.00 

12.00 

8.00 

5.00 

15.00 

10.00 

8.00 

5.00 



OPHELIA, KILLARNEY, WHITE KIL- 
LARNEY Per 100 

Specials, 20 to 28-in $12.00 to $15.00 

Select, 18 to 20-in 8.00 to 10.00 

Medium, 16-in 6.00 to 8.00 

Short, 8 to 12-in 4.00 to 5.00 

Cecile Brunner 2.00 to 3.O0 

Roses, our selection 4.00 

Carnations, assorted 2.00 to 4.00 

Easter Lilies, ])er hud and 

hloom 15.00 to 18.00 

Calendulas 2.00 to 4.00 

Sweet Alyssum .50 

Sweet Peas l.OOto 1.50 

Daisies 1.00 

Calla Lilies 10.00 to 15.00 



PEONIES, assorted colors, $4.00, $5.00 and $6.00 per 100 



GREENS 



Ferns 

I\'r UXX). 



.$3.00 to $4.00 



Asparagus, Sprengeri or Plumosus 

Per hunch .$0.50 t(. $0.75 



We never close — open days, nights and Sundays 

W. E. TRIMBLE GREENHOUSE CO. 

Wholesale Florists PRINCETON, ILL. 



Phone 2416 



, • 'w-^.-. • '^•■^.-.-■T ', ■? ..,- ■ ■■ '. , TTl - 



Ji;nk 1. 15)22 



The Florists^ Review ii 



The Denver Wholesale Florists' Co, 

DENVER, COLO. 

The largest and by far the best equipped and most 
centrally located wholesale house in this locality. 



Current Price List 

you will need lots of Roses and Valley for school com- 
mencements and June brides. We are in full crop with 
both items. And now when it is getting warmer in the 
east, our wonderful cool climate will give you flowers 
that will hold up and ship much better from Colorado. 
Carnations are also in good supply and, as you know, 
at this time of year can only be had from this locality 
in A-No. 1 quality. 

ROSES 

FRANCIS SCOTT KEY, per 100 $10.00 to $25.00 

RUSSELL, per 100 6.00 to 16.00 

COLUMBIA, per lOOi 6.00 to 16.00 

PREMIER, per 100 6.00 to 16.00 

BUTTERFLY, per 100 6.00 to 16.00 

OPHELIA, per 100 6.00 to 16.C0 

DUNLOP, per 100 6.00 to 16.00 

DOUBLE WHITE KILLARNEY, per 100 6.00 to 16.C0 

SHORT FUNERAL ROSES, per 100 4.00 to 6.00 

CARNATIONS, per 100 6.0O 

PEONIES. Home Grown, per 100 10.00 to 15.00 

GLADIOLI, Very Fine, per 100 20.00 ' , 

VALLEY, per 100 , 8.00 

ORCHIDS, per dozen 12 00 

CALLA LILIES, per 100 16.00 

EASTER LILIES, per 100 20.00 

DRIED STATICE, per bunch l.CO 

PLUMOSUS, per bunch. .75 

ADIANTUM, per bunch .50 

HUCKLEBERRY SPRAYS, per bunch 1.00 

OREGON FERN LEAVES, per lUOO 6.00 

IMMORTELLES, per bunch .85 

CYCAS LEAVES, all sizes. 

Supplies and Wire Work of All Kinds 

Prices subject to change without notice 

Wrwf^h T7»*e Prwrr^ ^^ Dcnvef Wholesale Florists' Co. 

I VY UrC/l i ills rUg€ 1433.35 Californi. Street DENVER, COLO. 



, ■^■: 



12 



The Florists' Review 



JnNi 1. 1822 




To the Manufacturer, Jobber, Florist and 
Supply House only, no retail. 

Don't Be 

Caught Short 

Without our patented eardbeaid Wreath Fenni 

Experience has shown us that most of 
our trade has paid too much for their 
Wreath Forma because they held back 
their orders until shipment had to be 
made by express. This increased the cast 
of the merchandise from 25 to 35 per 
cent. Besides, our customers lost busi- 
ness because they did not have the goods 
on hand — their customers would not wait 
when delivery could not be made at once. 
The profit on such specialties comes 
.through having the goods on hand when 
wanted. It does not pay to approach the 
Christmas holidays with little goods on 
hand. 

Thmrcf or* %»• mggcst to yoa that you 
plae* you* otdmr» now tor fall reqaire* 
mcnts In Christmas Wreath Forms. 

Send for our line of samples of cardboard 
Wreath Forms as illustrated in this ad- 
vertisement. Do it now. Prices and 
samples will be sent gratis on request. 
We make the following sizes: 

Wreath Forms-^, 6. 8, 10. 12 and K-inch. 
Star Forms-^. 6, 7, 9 and 12-inch. 
Heart Forms— 6, 6 and 7-inch. 
Cross Forms— 14z21-inch and ISzSO-inch. 

Write us today about yotu* requirements. 

A. SiNGMAN & Co. 

Manofactnrers of Cardboard Novelties 
124 ts 128 N. 7tk Street, PHILADELPHIA, PA. 




MUMS TO BENCH 

We will have our usual lot of fine young plants in 2-inch pots, ready early 
in June. Order these now and let us ship them to you when you have your beds 
ready to plant. Send for list of varieties. Many of our custo tners give us the 
number of plants they need to fill their beds and have us make up a selection of 
varieties to cover the season, in white, yellow and pink, in all good commercial 
varieties. We also have a fine selection of Pompon varieties. 

$5.00 per 100, $40.00 per 1000 



Plant a good batch of THANKSGIVING PINK for your Thanks- 
giving Day trade. It will pay you handsomely all through the last 
half of November and early December if you grow it cool. We have 
a big stock $5.00 per 100, $40.00 per 1000. 



How about young Poinsettia plants? We will have them. 

BAUR & STEINKAMP 



3800 ROOKWOOD AVENUE 



INDIANAPOLIS, IND. 



JCNB 1. 1922 



The Florists^ Review 




Cyclamen Glory of Wandsbek, 5-inch Pots, Grown far Seed. 

For Particular Florists and Gardeners 

Cyclamen Giganteum Seed 

For over twelve years we have given specieil attention to the betterment of Cyclamen and we feel 
confident that no better strain cein be had anywhere at any price. Ask the Florists who grow Peterson's 
strain of Cyclamen. 

Standard Varieties 



Glory of Wandsbek, lovely shades of light and 

dark salmon. 
Daybreak, delicate shades of light pink, to salmon. 
Brilliant Red, very large and fine. 
Christmas Cheer, blood red. 
Pure White, very large and fine. 



White, Pink Eye, very large and fine. 

Magnifica, dark rosy pink, very fine. 

Rose of Marienthal, light pink, very fine. 

Rosea Superba, deep shell pink. 

Lavendar, dark and light shades. . 

Victoria, white tipped with pink, fringed edge. 






Price of above varieties, $12.00 per 1000 seeds, NET. 

Novelties 

Pnde of Cincinnati, a lovely shade of salmon, semi-double flowers, very large eind free flow^ering. 
Price, $18.00 per 1000 seeds. 

Orchid-Flowering Types 

Fairy-Queen, very large and magnificently frilled flowers, pure white with pink eye. Price, $15.00 
per 1000 seeds. 

Rokoko Improved, large frilled flowers in light and dark shades of pink. Price, $15.00 per 1000 
seeds. 

Our Latest Novelty 

Ida Emilie, a very large beautifully fringed pure white, orchid type. Price, $5.00 per 100 NET. 

J. A. Peterson & Sons, Westwood, Cincinnati, O. 



--'■•^'"'••"- •■ "•"'- 






14 



The Rorists' Review 



June 1, 1!»2-J 



CRAIG SPECIALTIES 



SPRING DELIVERY 
1922 



Never before have we offered to our customers such a complete liae of stock and of such high quality, iucludiug both Floweriag and 
Foliage Plants. W^e are booking heavily on Spriog orders and suggest to our many customers to either call at Norwood and make 
their selections, or mail order at once so that reservations can be made, \o avoiu disappointment. Prosperity is here and you should 
pro act your best interests for bigger and better sales with Craig Quality Stock. 

• We cordially invite you to our new home at Norwood Station, Delaware County, Pa., easily reached by the Pennsylvania 
R. R. to Norwood Station, and Baltimore & Ohio R. R. to Holmes Station, or by trolley. 



CROTONS 

The Croton, with Ita highly colored foUajre, 
la indispensable during fall and winter. We 
have the largest and most complete collec- 
tion of Crotons In the world, carrying at the 
present time for aprlng aalea over 60,000, all 
of the very highest quality and brilliantly 
colored. Immediate delivery. 

4-lneh poU, strong plants, $12 per dosen. 
$76 per 100. ^ _._ 

6-fnch pota, atronc planta, $1S and $1$ per 
dozen. 
• «-lnoh pota, atrung planta, $24 and $80 per 

8-inch pota. atroag planta, $4, $5 and $6 

lO^inch pota, atrong planta, $7.50 and $10 
each. 

12 and 14-lnoh pota. apeelmen planta, $15, 
•20 and $26 each. 

CROTONS (NARROW UCAF TYPB) 
DelicatUaima. Golden Thread and Flor- 

These varieties are indiapensable (or table 
decoration and we predict a great future for 
them, as nothing aurpasaea tnem for uae In 
artistic arrangement. 

2</i-inch pota, $S5 per 100, 

4-incta poU. $12 per dozen. $75 per 100. 

6-inch pota. $18 per dozen. 

6-inoh pots, $24 and $30 per doaen. 

CROTON PUNCTATA 

One of the most satisfactory and flneat 
varieties for b^ket work and centers of 
ferneries. , „_. 

2H-hich pota. $20 per 100. $176 per 1,000. 

8-(neh pota. $S6 per 100. 

4-ineh pota, $60 per 100. 

Every retail store and grower should fea- 
ture Crotons this spring. We know our stock 
will please you and your customer. 

CROTON LEATES AND SPRATS 

Cut Croton Leaves and Spcaya have been 
supplied by us In the past few years to soma 
of the leading florists, who have featured 
them in mantel, table and funeral worlt. 
Cut Crotons will last In a cool place from 
three to four weeks. We can supply them 
every day In the year. 

Very hlyhly colored apraya at 50c eaeh; 
cut leaTea, $6 per 100. ^ ^. 

When you have orders for funeral or table 
work "out of the ordinary," order Craig's 
Cut Crotona. 

DRACAENAS 

There la no other variety of foliage plant 
so attractive as the highly colored Dracaena. 
The small and medium alzea can be uaed to 
great advantage in making up the popular 
spring baskets, while the large apeclmena 
have always been In great demand for deoo- 
ratlve purposes. We are now growing moips 
Dracaenas, in greater variety, than any Urm 

in the country. 

DRACAKNA OODSEFFIANA 

areen and white leaf, very hardy, line fer 
baskets. 

214-inch pota, $20 per 100. 

S-fneh pota. $S6 per 100. 

4-inch pots, $60 per 100. 

FANCY DRACAENAS 

We are ofTerlng a collection of the nerf 
and rare Dracaenaa. Very handsome for 
home decoration or for fancy combination 
baskets. 

4-inch pota, $9 per doaen. 

6-lneh pota, $15 per dosen. 

8-lneh pots. $18 and $24 per doaen. 

7 and ft-lneh pota. $8.50, $4 and $5 eaeh. 

DRACAENA MASSANOKANA 

The variety with the golden atripe down 
the center of the leaf. The beat of all Dra- 
caenas for the house. We have an excep- 
tionally large stock, well colored and ef tha 
very highest quality. 

4-tneb pots, heavy, $12 per dosen, $100 per 

too. 

6-lneh pota, $2 and $tMt each. 
8-inch pota, heavy, $4 and $5 eaeh. 
10-inch pota, heavy, $7J(0 eaeh. 



DRACAENA 

green leaf. 



FRAORANS 



Plain _ 

4-lneh pota, $• per deeen. 
•-Inch pota, $1$ and $24 per da 
$-Ineh pota, $5 and $• eaeh. 
10-lneh tnba. $7.50 each. 



DRACAENA LORD WOLSELET 

One uf the very best varieties for Baatei 
and Christmas, being bright red in color. Ad 
excelleiu Christmas variety. 

2-lnch puts, «20 per lOU. 

8-lncli pots, $35 per 100. 

4-inch pots, $60 per 100. 

6-ineh pots, $16 per dozen. 

6-inch pots, $18 and $24 per dosen. 

7-lnch pots, $3 and $3.60 each. 

DRACAENA KELLERIANA 

One of the finest foliage plants for com- 
bination baskets or boxes. Improved Ood- 
sefflana. 

2^-lnch pots, $20 per 100. 

S-uieh pots. $35 per 100. 

4-lnch pots. $60 per 100. 

8-inch pots, $5 and $6 eaeh, made np, very 
handsome. 

DRACAENA TERlflNALIS 

Bxceptlonally well colored. 

2%-inoh pota, $20 per 100. 

8-inoh pota, $36 per 100. 

4-lneh pota, $66 per 100. 

5-lnch pota, $15 per dosen. 

6-incb pota, $18 and $24 per dosen. 

We would suggest ordering the abovs 
earlr. as the demand is always great. 
DRACAENA DE SMETIANA 

A atrong, vigorous grower, with bold, 
dark green foliage, which becomea beauti- 
fully suffused and variegated. 

4-Uieh pota, njM per dosen, $60 per 100. 

5-ineh pote, $1 eaeh. 

6-lneh pota, $2 eaeh. 

7-lneh pote. $$.50. $4 and $5 eaeh. 
DRACAENA WARNEOKO (NEW) 

Sliver and green leaf. Very durable. 

6-ineh pota, $80 per dosen. 

7-lneh pota, $4 and $5 each. 

DRACAENA LINDEND 

Same type aa Massangeana, but with the 
golden atrlpea on the outer edgea of the leaf. 

4-ineh pota, $12 per dosen, $100 per 100. 

6-lneh pota, $2 and $2.50 eaeh. 

8-lneh pota, $5 eaeh. 

10-ineh tnba. $7.50 each. 

DRACAENA IX>NOn 

Improved aport of Dracaena Warneokll. 
One of the very best novelties in follava 
planta Introduced for veara. Dark green 
outer edge with pure white atripe in center 
of leaf. Stock limited. 

4-lneh pota, $5 eaeh; 5-ineh pota, $10 eaeh. 
DRACAENA TRICOLOR 

One of the flneat introductiona In recent 
yeara, coloring of green, white and pink. 

2%-Inch pota, Joly delivery, $60 per 100. 

4-inch pota, $18 per dosen. 

6-lneh pota, $8.50 eaeh. 



PALMS 



ARECA LVTESCEN8 

Perfect planta with rich, dark green fol- 
iage. Our stock la grown cool and hard. It 
la In splendid condition and will surely give 
satisfaction. Large slses are very scarce this 
year. We have the largest stock in all sizes 
In the country. 

7-lnch pots. $6 and $6 each, made np. 

8-lneh pota, $7.60 and $10 eaeh, made np. 

10-lneh tuba. $12.50 each, made np, BHi te 
6 feet tall. 

PHOENIX ROERELENH 

Very acarce. Fine for growing on. 

2-lneh pota. 8 to 4 leaf. $35 per 100. 

NEPHROLEPIS 

NEPHROLEPIS NORWOOD 

The most beautiful form of Nephrolepis to 
date, graceful, compact and symmetrical, a 
vigorous and healthy grower. All growers 
are invited to Inspect It at our Norwood 
greenhouses. Strong planta. Orders filled 
strictly in rotation. 

2^-Ineh pota, $8 per dosen, $12 per 100, 
$106per 1,000. 
NEPHROLEPIS BOSTONIENSIS (DWARF) 

Thia is a dwarf form of the old Boston 
fern, same character, form and graceful 
habit. 

4-Inch pota, $85 per 1(W. 

6-lneh pota, $12 per dosen, 

^Ineh pota, $24, $80 and $36 per dosen. 

11-lneh tuba, $6 and $7.50 eaeh. 
NEPHROLEPIS ELEGANTISSDIA 
COMPACTA 

A dwarf, compact form of Nephrolepis 
■legantlsslma, each plant making an ideal 
shape. 

2Vk-lnch pota, $10 per 100, $90 per 1.000. 

4-lneh pota, $5 per dosen, $40 per l<iO. 

•-Inch pots, $12 per dosen. 



NEPHROLEPIS TEDDT JUNIOR 

A grand dwarf Fern. Fine, young plants. 
4-inch pots, $36 per 100. 
6-lnch pots, heavy, $12 and $16 per dozen. 
8-lnch pots, $24 and $80 per dozen. 
11-lnoh tnbs, $6 and $7.60 each. 

NEPHROLEPIS HARRISH OR ROOSEVELT 

2^-ineh pots, $10 per 100, $90 per 1.000. 

4-inch pots, $86 per 100. 

11-inch tubs. $7.60 and $10 each. 

NEPHROLEPIS VERONA 

Makes a good plant In all sizes. Much 
finer frond than any crested sort outside of 
N. Smlthil. The fronds are carried on a 
heavy, wiry stem. We consider it one of the 
best of the newer Introductiona. 

4-lnoh pota, $36 per 100. 

6-lneh pota, $12 per dozen. $90 per 100. 

NEPHROLEPIS SCOTTII 
4-lneh pota, $86 per 100. 
6-lneh pots, $12 per dozen. 

PELARGONIUM EASTEK (iREETING 

One of the best flowering plants. 
6-lnch pots, $0 per doz. 

OTAHEITE ORANGES 

Stock that is free of all disease. Strong 
planta. 

2^-lnoh pota. $15 per 100, $129 per 1.000. 
4-lnch pots. In flower, $76 per 100. 

PANDANUS VEITCHO 

Well colored plants. 
6-lnch pota, $18 and $24 per dosen. 
7-lneh pota, $4 each. 
8-lneh pota, $6 and $6 each. 
10-lneh pota, apeelmens, $10 eaeh. 

FICUS REPENS 

Fine for small boxes. 
2)4-lnch pota, $20 per 100. 

ENGLISH IVIES 

We have a large stock of the small leaf 
variety. 

2V^-lnch pots, 2 and 8 runners to pot, $10 
per 100, $90 per 1,000. 

4-lnch pots, $20 per 100. 

CYCLAMEN 

We are growing 100,000 plants this year 
and our atock was never in finer condition at 
this time of the year. Grown from the very 
best German strain of seed obtainable. Sug- 
gest placing orders early to Insure prompt 
delivery. 

2Vi-lneh pota. equal to 8-lneh atoek, $1$ 
per 100, $100 per 1,000. 

4-lneh pota, heavy plants, July let deliv- 
ery, $60 per 100, $460 per 1,0<M>. 

POINSETTIAS 

Bright red variety. 

We are now booking ordera for young 
stock, June delivery and later. 

2!4-lneh pota, $12 per 100, $100 per 1,000. 

ASPIDISTRA— GREEN 

June Delivery 
Strong planta. 
6 and 7-ineh pota, $2.50, $8 and $8.50 eaeh. 

SPRING STOCK 

GERANIUMS 

RIcard, Poltevlne, Nntt, Alice Lemon, 
Bnchner, 4-lnch pota, $20 per 1(M, $1$0 per 
1,000. 

6-inch pots, Poltevlne and RIeard, $50 
per 100. 

SALVIA 

America and Zurich, 4-lnch pota, $15 per 
100. 

SWEET AI.TSSUM 

2V^-inch pota, $6 per 100. 

LANTANA 
Golden Yellow, 4-lneh pots, $20 per 100. 

BEGONIA LUMINOSA 

4-inch pots, $18 per 100. 

BEGONIA PRIMA DONNA 

4-lneh pote, $18 per 100. 



IMPORTANT NOTICE 

We are pleased to announoe that ewlnc 
to the recent drop in the priee ef lumber. 
It enables na to give our enstomer* the 
benefit by reducing the priee en peeking 
aa follows: 

Full slse easea $L50 eaeh 

Three-quarter slse eaaea IJt5 eaeh 

Small size eaaea JI6 

Half size boxea 1.66 



ROBERT CRAIG COMPANY, Nonvood Station, DELAWARE CO., PA. 



■ -I s-'iT-'''.- . -.' 



' '?'/■;■*•" >'^ 






June 1, 1922 



The Florists' Review 



15 



CHRYSANTHEMUMS 

BUY CLEAN. HEALTHY PLANTS FROM THE LARGEST STOCK IN THE WEST 

Rooted Cuttings, $3.00 per 100, $25.00 per 1,000, except the varieties marked (*), which are priced 

$5.00 per 100, $45.00 per 1.000. 
Established Plants, 214-inch. $5.00 per 100, $45.00 per 1,000, except those marked (*). which are 

$7.50 per 100, $70.00 per 1.000. 

White: Smith's Advance. Karly Frost, Oconto, White Chieftain*, Chadwick*, White Jones. 

Yellow: Golden Glow, Sunray*, Golden Queen, Sunbeam*, Richmond, Bonnaffon, Golden Chad- 
wick*, Yellow Jones. 

Pink: Pacific Supreme, Unaka, Rose Perfection*, Chieftain*, Dr. Enguehard, Patty, Seidewitz, 
Helen Frick. 

Pompons: Chicago White, Elva, Lula, Acto, Mrs. Buckingham, Kenneth, Mariana, Romaine War- 
ren, Volunteer, Langaulet, Mrs. Frank Beu, Western Beauty, Golden Wedding, Christmas Gold. 

Our varieties are the result of a lifetime of selection and elimination. You will hardly find a better bread-win- 
ning list. They are listed in their blooming order, from extreme early to late. 

We very strongly recommend buying plants from pots to ship in hot weather. 



JUNE CLEARANCE 



LOOK OVER THESE BARGAINS 

Achyranthes, red, Zy^-'m., 4c. 

Asparagus Plumcsus, 2y^-\u.. 3c; 3-in., 8c; 4-in.. 15c. 

Asparagus Sprengeri, 2li-\u.. 4c; 3-'m.. 7c. 

Begonia Albo-Picta, Zy-iu.. 4c; 3-in.. 6c. 

Canna The President, 3-in., lOc; Humberts, 8c; other 
varieties, 7c. ~^ 

Coleus, rooted cuttings, \c;-^i^-\u., 3c. 

Cupheas, in bloom, 2j4-iii-. 23/c. 

Daisy Mrs. Sander, and Marguerite. 2^ -in., in bloom. 5c. 

Dracaena Indivisa, 3-in., 10c; 4-in., 25c. 

Dusty Miller, 2y^-'m., 3c. 

Ficus Elastica, first-class, 4-iii. and 5-in., 60c and 75c. 

Fuchsias, 10 varieties, strong stock, 2y^-\\\., 4c. 

German Ivy, rooted cuttings, Ic; Zy^-'m., 3c; 3-in., 6c. 

Geraniums, Nutt, Grant. Buchner, Oberle, 2j4-in., 4c; 
Ricard, Poitcvine, Viaud, Zy^-m., 5c; Nutt, Grant, 3-in., 



-STOCK UP FOR JUNE SALES 

7c; Ricard. roitevinc, Viaud. 3-in., 8c; 4-in., bloom- 
ing. \2y>c. 

Heliotropes, rooted cuttings, Ic; 2y^-\n., 3c; 4-in., 10c. 

English Ivy, 2]4-\n.. 5c. 

Impatiens Sultani, strong plants, 2j4-in., 5c. 

Lantanas, best bedders, 2y^-'n\., 5c. 

Mesembryanthemums, 2j4-in., in bloom, 2j/.c. 

Petimias, double fringed, bud and bloom, 2^-in., 5c. 

Petunias, Single. Dreer's Fringed, Rosy Morn, Diener's, 
4c; Diener's alone, 5c. 

Salvias, 2-in.. 3c; 4-in., large, 10c. 

Smilax, strong, three times pinched back, 2j/2-in., 4c. 
Snapdragons, bud and bloom, large, 2j^-in., 4c. 
Tradescantia Wandering Jew, rooted cuttings, 75c per 
100; 2^-in., 2j/^c; red variegated, 2j4-in., 3c. 

Vincas, 20,000 of them, 214-in., 4c; 3-in., 8c; 3-in. select, 
10c; 4-in., 15c. 



ROSES TO FORCE 



2J4 inch— — ■ 

100 1000 

Milady $15.00 $120.00 

Columbia 12.50 120.00 

American Legion 22.50 200.00 

White Killarney 10.00 90.00 



3-inch 

100 1000 



BEST BEDDING ROSES 



100 

Radiance $ 8.00 

Helen Gould 8.00 

President Taft 8.00 

Etoile de Lyon 8.00 

Etoile de France 8.00 

Wm. R. Smith 8.00 

Clothilde Soupert 8.00 

White Cochet 8.00 

Pink Cochet 8.00 

Kaiserin 8.00 

Red Radiance 



-2^4 inch- 



1000 
$ 75.00 
75.00 
75.00 
75.00 
75.00 
75.00 
75.00 
75.00 
75.00 
75.00 



■ 3-inch- 

100 
$12.00 

12.00 



1000 
$110.00 
110.00 



12.00 
12.00 



12.00 



110.00 
110.00 

ii6!66 



12.00 120.00 



Green Sheet Moss, large sheets, delivery on day order arrives, $1.90 per sack; 5 sacks, $9.00; 10 sacks, $17.50. 
Sphagnum Moss, large burlapped bales, $1.15 per bale; 10 bales, $10.00; 25 bales, $23.75. Apply for low carload 



Packing Ph 



on the dollar. If in Clay Pots 10c on the dollar. 



'^i^'' 



GDLLETT & SOI 



Plant 
Specialists 



Lincoln, Illinois 



i'. --■, •'.■■1' ' "IvTJ'Vi^ '.'.■'■ t, ■I'iCT'T'' .'•.• 



-,^^■■V-■ •„;;(,•. 



".'v '. ^'»'; ■•■ •>■ 



^' -j;, .' i 



it 



The Florists^ Review 



June 1. 1922 




Freight Rates Reduced 

Effective July First 

This welcome news will materially aid the restoration of 

Booming Business, which all Business 

Leaders confidently predict. 

FOR FALL SEASON 
The New "Keystone Quality'' Line 

of "Made-in-America" Products WILL EXCEL 

ANY WE HAVE EVER SHOWN. 

It will be augmented by 

Imported Novelties 

now being rushed in by our Mr. B. Eschner, who is 
combing Europe for novelties for the florists' trade. 

M. RICE CO. 



Florists* Supplies That Excel 



1220-22-24 Sprins: Garden St. 



PHILADELPHIA, PA. 



M. 

^RICEi 

.CO. 




'^^flm^' 



w 



BRIDAL 



The new FRINGED BRIDAL SCARF WITH PICOT EDGES has made quite 
a hit. If desired, a sample dozen will be sent subject to your approval 

BRIDAL SHOWER RIBBONS 

Manufacturing, as we do, floral fabrics on a ^arge scale enables us to give the maximum value in price and Quality. 
OUR SHOWEIR RIBBONS are justly famous with the florists throughout the 
country. Made with plain gauze center with satin edges, also with picot edges and in various 
gradeslof satin weaves. We offer an assortment satisfying to the most fastidious. 

At Your Service 

WERTHEIMER BROTHERS 

THE NATIONAL mORAL RIBBON HOUSt 



MILLS 
PATERSON, N. J. - BATH, PA. 



'M %«?•;.' 



Office and Salesrooms: 17-25 East 24th Street, NEW YORK 



:THi^ 



'mmm 



FLOWERS FOR 

JUNE BRIDES 

For generations June has ieen popularly dedicated to the bride. As 
m all dedications, there is a symbol: Flowers! For those wha specialize 
in that symbol, a wedding may mean, besides the cadent chimes from the 
corner church, the allegro tinkling of the cash register. 





UNE, avers the 
pragmatical c o m - 
pounder of cyclo- 
pedic truths, is the 
sixth month of the 
year, consisting of 
thirty days, during 
which the sun en- 
ters the sign of 
Cancer. A defini- 
tion as colorless as it is concise! 
June is far beyond the capacity 
of a few words. This is a month 
that exceeds the mind and in- 
vades the heart. There were 
more than words in the genius 
of the man who wrote "The 
Vision of Sir Launfal" and in 
that of the author of "Knee 
Deep in June." During these 
thirty all-too-brief days there is 
poetry in the spirits of all, both 
young and old. There is senti- 
ment, exultation, sweet joy and 
long walks under moonlit skies. 

Here Come the Flowers. 

The sign of Cancer, indeed! 
This, above all, is the month 
when the bride, pretty in blushes, 
enters the sign of all future 
happiness. It is a month of 
brides, for brides and devoted to 
brides, with the floral world pro- 
viding the atmosphere. And 
therein lies the factor that 
makes June an exceptional 
month for the florists' business. 

Three parties are inevitable at 
a wedding — the bride, the groom 
and flowers. Besides the blooms 
that belong to the bride and her 
retinue, there are other flowers. 
Some are in corsages; some are worn in 
more natural form; perhaps the tables 
will be decorated with them; perhaps 
the entire residence and the altar at the 
church will be decked with them. But 
flowers there are bound to be. How 
many? In what manner! Attractive! 
Worthy of commendation! The florists' 
activity and ability are the answer, and 
whether or not a particular wedding is 
to be a big success is largely dependent 
on this trade. Flowers are a wanted 
"quantity." The trade has only to de- 
velop that "want." 

At any wedding, of course, the bride- 
to-be is the center of attraction as well 
as the center of general activities. All 
the features of the wedding, one might 
Bay, radiate from her, and it is a wise 
florist who aims to get the prospective 
bride interested first of all. If the bride 
can be convinced that the most beautiful 




Here's to the Bride — June's Fairest Flower 1 

corsage is the only one for her, then she 
will convince the groom-to-be to that 
effect. It will follow, then, that the 
bridesmaids must be proportionately 
lovely, and the whole range of activities 
will be measured up to the standard set 
by the bride. It is often just as potent 
to convince the groom, but, as a matter 
of fact, he usually does as the inclina- 
tion of his future wife decides. 

Acciuaintance Acquires. 

The main objective in getting June 
bride business seems, then, to be con- 
tained in the injunction, "Get the bride- 
to-be interested." It should always be 
borne in mind in this connection that 
everyone who is about to take part in or 
attend a wedding is a prospective flower 
buyer. 

This offers another instance where it 
pays a florist by square dealing and 



courteous friendliness to develop 
an acquaintance with customers 
that will let him "behind the 
scenes" once in a while. In this 
way he is often advised before 
the newspapers have the news 
as to when a wedding is to be 
enacted. Many times genial con- 
versation has disclosed pointers 
that have led to large profits. 

A courteous letter to the pros- 
pective bride or groom or even 
a telephone call made to the 
bride's parents or other mem- 
bers of the family, inviting 
them to visit the store and see 
the new creations, is a quick 
way to this kind of business. 
When once the "wedding job" 
is obtained, it should be carried 
out with a rigid regard for ex- 
cellency, because there is no bet- 
ter or worse advertisement than 
the quality of one's own work. 
That is direct advertising. Every 
bridesmaid at that wedding is a 
prospective bride and, so, a pros- 
pective customer of the florist. 

Tempus Fugit! 

Time flies! And the styles 
change rapidly. It follows, log- 
ically, that if the florist wishes 
to remain popular with Hymen, 
he would better keep the pace. 
For instance, since 1920, styles, 
customs, decorations — many 
features have changed. Obvi- 
ously, it would be decidedly 
unwise to handle a wedding now 
a la 1920. Herein reading the 
society news pays! 

Knowing how to do the work, 
the florist has to go out and get the 
business. The method of personal con- 
tact, a splendid one, has already been 
touched upon. However, in practically 
all cases the newspaper offers the broad- 
est field for appeal. And for these June 
bride advertisements there is a great 
chance for composing good copy; that 
is, writing the words for the advertise- 
ment in attractive style. For instance, 
take the well written advertisement of 
George Hart, illustrated on the next 
page. This is pulling copy. Imagine, in 
its place, a blank statement, such as 
"George Hart has good flowers for all 
occasions," and the contrast in effect 
is at once noted. Put yourself in the 
public's place and then start writing. 
Description that is magnetic; style that 
catches the eye; well arranged para- 
graphs — all these and more can be in- 
troduced to make the advertisement 



"S'lr. 



18 



The Florists' Review 



Junk 1. l'J'2-- 



worth while. Often it is found profitable 
to run the photofiiraph of a real bride 
in tlie advertisement. Remember that, 
in any case, you arc j)aying for that 
space, so it is well worth the time and 
eifort to have the copy right and to the 
point. 

Convincing the Eye. 

still anothoi- <;""<' niedium for adver- 
tising is the wedding booklet or some- 
thing on that order. An attractively 
jtrinted and well written booklet sent to 
all the customers on your mailing list 
at the opening of June, and to any likely 
prospects, will prove valuable, if it con- 
tains facts concerning the ])ossibility of 
getting satisfaction at your store. De- 
scrij)tions of wedding decorations, a 
statement of the latest customs, illus- 
trations of weddings for which the flo- 
rist has furnished the flowers — all these 



are business-getters. Perhaps the cus- 
tomer has been married thirty years and 
is not herself interested, but the chances 
are that she has young friends to whom 
she will be only too pleased to show the 
literature. 

As intimated before, tlie most endur- 
ing advertisement is the quality of the 
work done. The display window offers 
unlimited jjossibilities for showing the 
kind of work one does. Here can be 
shown wax figures of brides and grooms, 
with ail the corsages, decorations, etc., 
that are needed. Show the interior of a 
room at a residence, the altar of a 
church, or just the bride herself. The 
window catches the eye of many ])assers 
and will cause comment. 

When an order has been especially 
well carried out, it is wise to get in 
touch with a representative of the local 




''Say It With 
Flowers 



97 



to 

The Bride 
The Graduate 
The Friend 

Roses, Orchids, Lilies of the Valley 
and all the other beautiful blossoms 
in season at this time of the year 
breathe of loving friendship that is 
as charming as their fragrance. 

So why not declare yourself to 
some one near and dear to you by 
presenting some oi the charming 
blossoms we are now offering? 

If for a bride, we can make up a most attractive bouquet to your order. 
For the graduate, nothing would be more appropriate than a dozen 
or so of American Beauties. If fbr a frienH. you have the cho.ce of 
innumerable blosao.ms, all reasonably priced. Order by phone, Z 1 1 54. 
Wc will deliver. 

Geo. Hart 



Telephone 21154 



1434 Third Street 



Santa Monica, California 




paper. If there is something out of the 
ordinary, the papers are always glad to 
get the news, and it eventually means 
free advertising for the shop. It is June 
for florists! "Here comes the bride! " 



ULA LEE, THE BBIDE. 

The exquisite illustration of a June 
bride on the preceding page shows 
Miss Lila Lee, the motion picture ac- 
tress, in one of her most delightful 
poses. Thi^ is an ideal at which flo- 
rists might aim when fabricating a 
bride's bouquet. The bouquet is the 
central point of the picture. If the 
flowers were suddenly removed from 
Miss Lee's arms, the effect would be 
at once noticed and there would be 
less charm to the picture as a whole. 
The photograph is printed through the 
courtesy of the Paramount Pictures 
Corporation. 



SIEBBECHT'S BBIDAIi BOUQUET. 

Simplicity is inevitably characteristic 
of the great, applying to inanimate 
as well as animate objects. In line 
with this logic is the fact that perhaps 
the greatest danger in executing any 
bit of artifice lies in overdoing it. 
Excess balks success. This applies to 
the making of brides' bouquets, as well 
as to the other forms of artifice. There 
may be too many flowers, too much rib- 
bon or an excess of green, or the bou- 
quet may be generally bulky and when 
the bride appears she may give the im- 
pression of bearing up under a heavy 
weight; the bouquet will become the 
cynosure of all eyes, and the bride will 
be second in attraction, whereas she 
should be the chief attraction and the 
flowers should be only a delightful 
means of improving the attraction. 

The bride's bouquet on page 19 was 
wisely designed with an eye to sim- 
plicity. It is excellently made up, as 
can be seen, and, as a matter of fact, its 
excellency won for it the first prize 
at the Pasadena, Cal., flower show, 
April 20 to 22. Henry A. Siebrecht, 
of Siebrecht 's House of Flowers, Pasa- 
dena, is responsible for the artistry. 
In the composition of this delightful 
piece are lilies of the valley, under 
which hangs a shower of phalsenopsis, 
the whole being neatly tied with dainty 
lovers' knots. This bouquet was most 
accurately described at the time of the 
show as "airy, girlish, light and not a 
burden for small white hands." 



Here Is an Effective Florist's Advertisement for June. 



FOB BBIDE AlfD BBIDESMAIDS. 

When it comes to designing and mak- 
ing up bouquets for weddings, the Du- 
luth Floral Co., of Duluth, Minn., is 
if the expression is permissible, 
"there." As evidence, is offered the 
illustration of a bride and her brides- 
maids, which is shown on page 20. The 
liou(|uets were designed by J. E. Staple- 
ton, of the Duluth Floral Co. Here is 
a photograph that the bride will look 
upon with intense pleasure on her 
golden anniversary. Like all other 
things of beauty, it will be "a joy 
forever. ' ' 

The occasion of this work was the 
Abbot wedding, which was one of the 
great social events at Duluth. The 
bouquet carried by the bride was en- 
tirely of valley, while those of the 
bridesmaids were made of Columbia 
roses and pink cornflowers. This is an 



I 



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• . -'".^ -•■•^P' . > '^v'^'- .("^, -.'»'■ ■(■ 



June 1, 19'22 



The Florists' Review 



19 



example of wluit tlic florist can do to 
iiiako a wi'ddiiifj; a cliariiiiiig event. 

CANNERS' ADVERTISING. 

All insight into tlic advcrtisiny of llic 
]\'ational ('anners' .Association and its 
financing is to hr li;id in a report of the 
recent meeting of tiie executive com 
mittee in Cliicago. 

The refinancing coniiiiitlie reported 
that tliere are o]ieii accounts still due 
tlie inspection and advertising cam- 
paign fund to the extent of !iil8r>,9(5().l2L'. 
Xoti's have also been given in respect 
of such accounts in the sum of $')'2,- 
874.()(). Of these notes $'27,1!)7.8() have 
already been discounted, and the jiro- 
ceeds ri'ceived th(>refrom have been a|)- 
])lied on the payment of the original 
$20(1,000 borrowed from banks to 
finance the advertising campaign. The 
application of the jtroceeds of these 
notes, together with credits of various 
amounts collected on account of the 
fund, leave, according to the commit- 
tee's statement, a balance of $4.5,176.42 
still due. 

Assuming as contingent liability the 
full amount of the notes already dis- 
counted because of the possible failure 
to have them paid at maturity, there 
is left a maximum liability on account 
of the advertising fund of $72,374.22. 
Wliile the aggregate underwriting of 
the inspection and advertising program 
of the association was several times 
that amount, it seemed evident to the 
finance committee that in order to 
maintain the equity of the situation be- 
tween those who are delinquent sub- 
scribers and those who are underwrit- 
ers, a call for the payment of the full 
amounts due on the various underwrit- 
ing agreements should be made at once. 
Accordingly, the suggested action was 
ajiproved by the board of directors. It 
is obvious, from the state of the ins])ec- 
tion and advertising fund, that the 
final underwriting liability incident to 
it will be extremely small and it is 
l»resumed the call will produce no 
alarm. 

WISCONSIN FLORISTS TO MEET. 

The summer meeting of the Wiscon- 
sin State Florists' Association will be 
held at Oshkosh, July 2'), President 
Rentschler has ajipointed the following 
committee in charge of arrangements: 
James E. Taylor, chairman; William 
Buchholz, Ward B. Davis, Carl Fugle- 
berg, J. V. Xelson and R. E. Pamplin. 



NEW YORKERS' BIG TRIP. 



I 



J6,ti. 



To S. A. F. Convention. 

This year the New York Florists' 
Club plans to attend the S. A. F. con- 
vention in a 12-day tour, to include, 
among other features, four days on the 
'treat Lakes. The entire expense of the 
trip will be covered by $220. There will 
be a special Lackawanna train fur- 
nished to the New York Florists' Club, 
which will leave Hoboken August 13, 
as shown in the table below. The mem 
bers will have an opportunity to see the 
famous Delaware water gap, climb the 
Poconos, visit Chicago, and, after the 
convention and Kansas City, those in 
the party will visit St. Paul and Min- 
neapolis, take the Great Lakes trip 
mentioned above and enjov a side trip 
to Niagara. 

At Chicago a sight-seeing trip will be 



B/i'mIiIjJ-i 



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Valley, Orchids and Lovers' Knots Make a Matchless Bride's Bouquet. 



provided throughout the city and lunch- 
eon will be served on the train. 

At Kansas City breakfast will be 
served on the train. There will be ho 
tel accommodations in the city, the 
American plan being provided, begin- 
ning with lunch, August lo, and ending 
with lunch August 18. 



At St. Paul dinner will be served on 
the train, and breakfast and lunch wiU 
be taken at the hotel.* A sight-seeing 
trip will be enjoyed in and about St. 
Paul and St. Louis. 



The Itinerary. 
The transportation committee 



con- 



• h M. 1. I'.l-'-' 



Thz Florists^ Review 



19 



i>x;inilil(' "' \vli;il lin' lldiisi r;jri iln In 
III-, I;,. ;, w.'.Mili;^ :i i'li;ii-inii'^ i'\ciil . 



CANNERS" ADVERTISING. 

All iii>iul'' i"' " ' ''" ■"Ivri t i-i:i;4 (il t In- 
\ ;it ii,|l,-l! ( ';i Ulirl- ; ' A >mi«- i,-| t i (HI ;il|i| It- 
liii:i iirinu i> to '•'•' h..i\ in .-i rci ml dl' the 
iTcciil inci'l iii;-; 111 'I''' ' xi'i-iil i \ <■ rciiii 
liiillrc ill ('lli'-.-i.U". 

'I'll,. I rli II. I 111'! II'-; cMlil mi I ' I !■ lr|ilM'tri| 
) ||,.|) t lirr.- II ri' i>\"'ti .'i toiiiiI , still .liii- 
t|i,i jns|ii''-t inn .■111'! .-hIv nt isinL; i-;iiii 

j,,-liM|| t'lllnl ; 1 tile rNtc lit 1 1 f > 1 S."i .llhl'i.L':.' . 
\iit,.s li;.\c .il-ii liii'ii ';i\rii in ri'-.|ii'ct 
ol' siicli ;iii-iiiint - in t lir siiui dt' ^'>'2. 

<<7l.(;ii. ():' ilivs.' iiiitr- ."r-T. I nr.sii ]t:\\,- 

;li|-,.,-|,l \ I'l-i 11 ili.M-nmi! cil. Illhl till- |rl-(i 
.■(•rii- i-,rr:\ii' t lnTct' 1(1111 li:i\i' liccii .-il' 
|,lii'(| (III tin.' [i;iyiii('lit (if the (iri;;iii;il 
•tL'Oii, 0(1(1 iKimnvi'il troiii Imiiks tn 
lirKiiu'c till' iiilvt'i-tisiii^ c-iniiini^^n. TIn' 
;i]ililicat icill (if tln' I'loccciN ol' tlioc 
notes, td^ctlu'i' witli crcilits of \;iriini> 

; lints colii'ct cil on nccoiiiit of the 

fund, U'liNc, .■((•(■(iriliiiji' to tlic coinniit 
tec's st.'il cniciil , n li;il;i iicc of $ l."i,l 7ti. t"_' 
still due. 

Assiiiiiiiij:: ;is cunt iii;:i'nt li:iliility llic 
lull iiiuouiit oi' tlic notes iilrc'idy (lis- 
coiiiileil liecause of tlic possilde failure 
t( have tlu'iii paid at in;iturity, there 
i-- left a inaxiiiiuni lialiility on accdiint 
ol' the ad\ crtisiu^ fiiml of $72,;i7 l.l'l.'. 
While the ai;;:;i'ej;ate uiiderwrit iii;i of 
the insjieet ion and advert isiii;^ jiroj^rani 
111' the .-issociation was several limes 
that amount, it seemed e\ idciit to the 
liliaiiee coniiuittec that in oidcc to 
iiiaiutaiu th(> e(iuity of the sitiialion be 
tweeli tlldse who are deliM(|lieii1 suh 
si-riliers and those who ;ire uiiderwrit 
els. a call for the ]iayiiieiit of the full 
ainoiints due ou the various uiiderwrit 
in^ a^reeineut s should lie uinde at oiiee. 
Accordiuyly, the stiii^csted action wa- 
a|ii)io\('ii l>y the board of directors. It 
is ol)\ioiis, from the state of the ins|icc 
tioii and .advertisinj; fuml, that tin 
tinal iinderwritiufi- liability incident to 
it will be (>xtreinely small and it i- 
|iresumed the call will jiroducc no 
al.'irm. 



WISCONSIN FLORISTS TO MEET. 

The --ummer meeting; of the Wiscon 
sin Sl;ite I'loiists' .Xssociation will be 
held at Oshkosh, .Inly L'.". President 
Hents(dtler has ai>]ioiiited Ihc following: 
committee in cliai;^i' of arraujicinents : 
.lames K. Tavlor. cliairm;in: William 
Huchhol/. Ward H. Havis, (".irl Ku^le 
ber^. .1. \'. Nelson and H. V.. I'.impliii. 



NEW YORKERS' BIG TRIP. 



To S. A. F. Convention. 

This year the New \i>\k florists' 
•'lull |d;ins to .-ittend the S. A. 1'. con 
\'ention in a iL'-day tour, 1o imdiide. 
■ inioii;; othei- features, four days on tlu 
'ireat, Lakes. The entire expense of the 
trip will be covered liy .$220. There will 
be a special Laekawauna train fur 
iiislied to the New York Florists' Club, 
whicli will leave Hoboken August b'., 
as shown in the table below. The niem 
lieis will have an opjiortiinity to see the 

t;iinous Delaware w.'iter ii'.i]'. climb the |iid\ ided t li roii;;hoiit the city ;iiid liiiicli 
I'oconos, \ jsjt ('hic:ii;o. .'ind, .-ifter the eon will be seivcd on the train. 
convention .-ind K;uisas Pity, those in .\t Kaiis.a-, City bre.-ikfast will be 

the ))arty will visit St. l';iul and .Min ser\c(| on the tr.'iin There will lie ho 

neapolis, take the (ire;it Ti.-ikes trip tcl acconii l;itioiis in the city, the 

mentioned above and enjoy a side trip .\mericaii plan beiii}; jirovided, liej^in 
to Xi.it;ara. niny with lunch, .\ui,nist 1"), and eiidine 

.\t ('liic;iy;o a siylit-seeing 1ri[i will be with lunch .Viiyiist 1 H. 




.\t .^t. I'aiil dinner will lie Ner\'eil ou 
the lr;iiii, .-111.1 bleak t':ist ,-iiid lunch will 
be taken .-it the hotel. .\ siyh t ■S(>ein Ji 
Iriji will be enjoyed in ,-iihl about St. 
Taiil .ind St. l.oiiis. 

The Itinerary. 

The transportation committee ('on- 



20 



The Florists^ Review 



JUNB 1. 1922 



sists of Paul A. Eigo, chairman; A. L. 
Miller and Clifford Lowther. An itin- 
erary of the trip has been issued by 
the club, showing illustrations of points 
of interest on the way and at Kansas 
City. Following is the complete itin- 
erary: 

SUNDAY, AUGUST 13, 192li. 

By Lackawanna. 

L«ave New York 2 p.m. 

I^eave Hoboken 2:20 p. m. 

Leave Newark 2:;i2 p. m. 

Dinner on train. 

MONDAY, AUGUST 14, 1922. 

By New York, Cliicago & St. Louis U. R. 
Leave Bnftalo 2:20 p. ra. 

I.«ave Cleveland 7:50 a. m. 

Arrive Chicago 4:50 p. m. 

MONDAY, AUGUST 14, 1922. 
By Atchison. Topeka & Santa F6 Railroad. 
Leave Cliicago 8 p. m. 

TUESDAY, AUGUST 15, 1922. 

Arrive Kansas City 8:45 p. m. 

FRIDAY, AUGUST 18, 1922. 
By Chicago, Rock Island & Pacific R. R. 

Leave Kansas City 2:30 p. m. 

Arrive St. Paul 7:30 a. m. 

SATURDAY, AUGUST 19, 1922. 

By Northern Pacific R. R. 

Leave St. I'aul 2 p.m. 

Arrive Dulntli 0:45 p. m. 

Dinner at Hotel Spalding. 

GREAT LAKES TRIP. 

Aug. 19, Lv. Duluth 8:30 p. m. 

Aug. 20, Ar. Houghton •. 9:30 a.m. 

Aug. 20, Lv. Houghton 10:30 a.m. 

Aug. 21, Ar. Sault Ste. Marie *. 4 a.m. 

Aug. 21, Lv. Sault Ste. Marie 6 a.m. 

Aug. 21, Ar. Mackinac Island Up. m. 

Aug. 21, Lv. Mackinac Island 2 n. m. 

Aug. 22, Ar. Detroit 11:30 am. 

Aug. 22, Lv. Detroit 12:30 noon 

Aug. 22, Ar. Cleveland 9 p.m. 

Aug. 22, Lv. Cleveland 10 p. m. 

Aug. 23, Ar. Buffalo 10:30 a. m. 

Aug. 23, Lv. Niagara Falls 6 p.m. 

Aug. 23, Ar. Buffalo 7 p.m. 

Aug. 23, Lv. Buffalo 8 p. m. 

Aug. 24, Ar. Hoboken 6:42 a.m. 

Breakfast in restaurant, Lackawanna terminal. 



HOLLANDERS' CONGBESS. 

The Netherlands Horticultural and 
Botanic Society (Nederlandsche Maat- 
Bchappy voor Tuinbouw en Plantkunde) 
has decided to hold an international 
horticultural congress at Amsterdam on 
the occasion of its fiftieth anniversary, 
September 27, 1923. Papers will be 



read on various subjects of scientific 
research, practical breeding, horticul- 
tural education and landscape architec- 
ture. Trips are planned to the most 
important centers of horticulture in 
Holland. On the same days the Am- 
sterdam section of the society intends 
to organize a great horticultural exhi- 
bition. Further information will be 
given later. This announcement is is- 
sued for the organizing committee by 
G. F. Van Tets, president, and Dr. M. J. 
Sirks, secretary, Bergweg 55, Wagenin- 
gen, Holland. 



OPIUM POPPY. 



Opium poppy, which has been culti- 
vated in Egypt from an early date, 
is grown for the narcotic alkaloid opium 
which it contains. The locality most 
favorable to its growth is Kena prov- 
ince, seventy-five per cent of which is 
under opium poppy. 

Prior to 1914, considerable opium was 
imported, mostly from Smyrna, but its 
quality is inferior to the Egyptian va- 
riety. With the outbreak of the war 
importations ceased and the demand for 
Egyptian opium increased. In 1918, 
however, the government issued a decree 
prohibiting its cultivation in order to 
increase the area under cereals. This 
caused the price of opium to advance 
tremendously. It is said to have reached 
$90 per pound in the province of Kena 
during the summer of 1920. 

Harvesting of opium takes place about 
the middle of March, Fresh opium is 
sold to merchants at the rate of fourteen 
Egyptian ounces to the rottle (rottle 
equals twelve English ounces). The 
merchants shape it into round disks, 
each weighing from two to three drams. 
These disks are brushed with the white 
of an egg to present a better appearance. 
Dry, pure opium is black-red, resembling 
cooked coffee. On breaking it shows a 
soft, compact fracture. It is often adul- 
terated with lentil flour or mixed with 
"mor higasi," a gum from Hedjaz. 



Cooked and ground helbeh or coffee and 
the epidermis of the pericarp are other 
adulterations used, but these adultera- 
tions can be detected. Pure opium 
burns without leaving a residue and 
contains not less than ten per cent of 
morphine — sometimes as much as twelve 
per cent. Oil extracted from the seed 
(fifty to sixty per cent) is used in paint- 
ing^. 

The Egyptian government controls the 
cultivation of opium, since it was being 
sold for native consumption in consider- 
able quantities and with bad effect. It 
is possible that the crop will be greatly 
limited during the present year. 



FUCHSIA LEAVES FALLING. 

What is the matter with the fuchsia 
leaves which we have sentf The plants 
were doing finely and all of a sudden the 
leaves appeared as though they were 
burned. The plants were in 2%-inch 
pots and we repotted them in 4-inch pots 
about two weeks ago, using a 4-inch pot- 
ful of bone meal to a bushel of soil. 

F. & F.— Wis. 



It is quite probable that there is 
some escaping gas from city mains leak- 
ing into the greenhouse. I understand 
from one of your notes that this main 
runs close to your greenhouse and I am 
aware of several cases where gas has 
caused great damage to greenhouse 
plants. Usually, however, the damage is 
most noticeable in winter, when green- 
houses are ventilated the least. With a 
little top ventilation left on your green- 
houses, damage from whatever source 
should be eliminated. Other plants than 
fuchsias should show injury if growing 
in the same house. What varieties are 
you growing other than fuchsias, and 
how are they affected f If fuchsias only 
show damage, I should be inclined to 
think that most probably the compost 
in which the fuchsias were potted was 
too strong. C. W. 



















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This June Bride Carried a Bouquet of Valley, While Her Bridesmaids Bore Roses. 



JONH 1, 1922 



The Florists^ Review 



21 



iyipiyipipiJPPiJM?PPi?'?qq3tJPii?9iipiJiip^^ 



IRIS SOCIETY MEETS 



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AMERICAN IRIS SOCIETY. 



Holds Meeting and Exhibition. 

The third annual meeting of the 
American Iris Society, in connection 
with an interesting exhibition, was 
held at the New York Botanical Gar- 
den, Bronx park, New York, Saturday, 
May 27. 

A luncheon, at which were forty or 
more members, was served in the Man- 
sion, and, at the conclusion of the re- 
past, the business session commenced. 

Message from President Wister. 

Secretary E. S. Sturtevant, of Welles- 
ley Farms, Mass., read a message from 
President John C. Wister, who is in 
France, in which Mr. Wister said that 
he hoped the work of the past year 
would be thoroughly discussed, and that 
members would make suggestions as to 
the work of the coming year. There 
had been considerable satisfaction ex- 
pressed at the work of the society, he 
wrote, as he had noted when visiting 
recently various sections of the coun- 
try as far west as Colorado, which gave 
much pleasure, as there could be no 
feeling that the society was run by a 
small group. He felt that the mem- 
bers should be proud of the society's 
publication, and expressed the hope 
that in time more and larger bulletins 
could be published. It was merely a 
matter of finances, he stated. With the 
growth of the organization the clerical 
work increased, and it became impera- 
tive that the secretary be paid a proper 
salary for his work. An appeal for 
contributions sent out last winter had 
resulted in a fund amounting to $358, 
from about fifty persons, from which a 
new bulletin would be published, to 
consist largely of official descriptions 
of varieties. He referred to the sym- 
posium recently published, which dealt 
with varieties, and gave it as his belief 
that another and more general sym- 
posium should be produced five or ten 
years hence. He believed the test gar- 
den established at the New York Bo- 
tanical Garden would prove of great 
value during this and succeeding years. 
He hoped that discussion would be had 
looking to the best means for discour- 
aging iris breeders from naming and in- 
troducing varieties which have not been 
passed upon by the society and pro- 
nounced worthy. He said an endeavor 
would be made at the international con- 
ference on irises, to be held in Paris 
early in the month, to secure interna- 
tional artion in regard to nomenclature, 
registration, classification and descrip- 
tion. 

Secretary's Report. 

The report presented by Secretary 
R. S. Sturtevant was as follows: 

"With the opportunities offered by 
our monthly page in the Flower Grower, 
a detailed report of work for the year 
seems unnecessary and I have occasion 
elsewhere to report on special subjects. 
_ The international conference on 
irises, at Paris, has largely influenced 
our work for the year, and today, as we 
meet here, our president, John C. Wis- 
ter, is in discussion with other iris 



authorities in Paris at the opening of 
the conference. We have been accom- 
plishing a pioneer work in standardiz- 
ing and distributing information con- 
cerning irises; we have established no- 
menclature and methods of registration, 
judging and description; it remains to 
be seen to what extent our work will 
gain international acceptance. With 
Mr. Wister and Lee E. Bonnewitz to 
represent our interests, we can hope for 
success, and already from Mr. Wister 's 
letters I can promise you notes of in- 
terest for our next bulletin. He has 
found the pumila hybrids and inter- 
mediates in fine condition, but far, far 
too many in number and not sufficiently 
distinct one from another. I am look- 
ing forward to his later reports, as I 
understand that Lent A. Williamson's 
and some of Miss Sturtevant 's seed- 
lings, as well as B. F. Farr's, are to be 
exhibited at London in competition 



EVERY now and then a 
well pleased reader speaks 
the word which is the means 
of bringing a new advertiser to 



P 






Such friendly assistance is thoroughly 
appreciated. 

Give us the name of anyone from 
whom you are buying, not an adver- 
tiser. We especially wish to interest 
those selling articles of florists' use 
not at present advertised. 

FLORISTS* PUBLISHING CO. 
500-60 Caxton BIdg. Chicago 



with European introductions for the 
first time. 

"The number of our members is 
promising; fifty per cent had renewed 
their subscriptions before January 15 
and over eighty per cent are now with 
us, together with at least 100 new 
friends, and I expect that we shall 
easily increase our membership beyond 
our record of 650 for 1921. It is, how- 
ever, the real interest of our members, 
expressed by voluntary contributions of 
close to $1,200 in the Inst twelve 
months, that is most impressive. 
Through this generosity we have pub- 
lished the cheek list, have arranged to 
add greatly to the number of varieties 
represented in the test garden at Bronx 
park, and can plan to publish a bulle- 
tin this coming summer. 

Year's Work. 

"Since our meeting last year as 
guests of the Columbus Iris Society, 
we have published, in addition to the 
monthly notes in the Flower Grower, 
a bulletin on Sir Michael Foster and 
his work, a check list of varieties, a 



1921 membership list, and, lastly, the 
symposium, probably our most valuable 
contribution to the literature of the 
iris. I cannot too greatly emphasize 
the splendid work of Mr. Connell in 
compiling the votes of the symposium 
jury; I wish that he were with us to 
receive personal thanks from each of 
you. Of minor importance as publica- 
tions are the new edition of the data 
cards for descriptions and a pamphlet 
on exhibition policy and management, 
accompanied by a full outfit of exhibi- 
tion supplies that are obtainable at a 
nominal cost. 

' ' Last year we assisted in some seven 
or eight exhibitions. This year I have 
already had reports of success in Nash- 
ville, Louisville, Kansas City, Eich- 
mond and Cincinnati, and await word 
from Canada and the northern states. 
Our policy has proved successful and 
I should not be surprised to find that we 
were cooperating in twenty-five exhibits 
in a not far distant year. These form 
our chief means of publicity and de- 
velop great enthusiasm. At the last 
meeting Chicago bid for our 1923 an- 
nual meeting, and just before I left 
home I received the heartiest of invi- 
tations for us to meet in Cincinnati, 
with the added inducement of seeing a 
batch of seedlings far finer than the 
famed Dominion. Mrs. Samuel Taft is 
an ardent iris lady and could give us a 
royal welcome. Personally, I am glad 
that I do not have to decide between 
these rival claims. 

"In closing, I wish to urge everyone 
of you to send me notes for publica- 
tion. They have been few this last year 
and I fear that I have been delinquent, 
perhaps, in my acknowledgments of 
your letters, but the pressure of the rou- 
tine work has become heavy and your 
letters are the only things that make 
the job worth while." 

The fee for life membership was, 
by vote, increased from $25 to $50. 

Proposals and Discussion. 

There was some discussion as to the 
advisability of continuing the selection 
of the Flower Grower, published at Cal- 
cium, N. Y., as the official organ of the 
society, on the present payment basis. 

Miss Grace Sturtevant made a plea 
for the better establishment of iris 
nomenclature. 

Resolutions of thanks were passed to 
the Horticultural Society of New York, 
to the New York Botanical Garden, to 
Dr. N. L. Rritton and to Mrs. George F. 
Nash for their hearty assistance in con- 
nection with the meeting and exhibi- 
tion. 

After adjournment all journeyed to 
the test garden, which is located oppo- 
site the Fordham hospital and near the 
old 1917 convention garden of the S. A. 
F. This garden was not established to 
try out now varieties, as many suppose 
but to gather together a collection ol 
general varieties for nomenclature pur- 
poses, and the result already is won- 
derful. There are more than a thou- 
sand varieties planted, covering mainly 
the gormanica and pallida sections, with 
a few of llio pumila and sibirica va- 
rieties. Fully .100 varieties were in 



•2 



The Florists^ Review 



Ji .\B 1, 1922 



flower at tlic tiiiio of tlic visit; many 
had pasm'd, and otlicr.s were yet to 
hlooiii. Xotelxioks were kept busy until 
a sliower din|ierse(l all but tlie most 
ardent iris enthusiasts. 

Those Winning. 

Tlie exhibition was held in the mu- 
seum buibliny, and, under the circum- 
stances, was hifjhly credital>le. 

The exhibition date had been 
chanjred from .June li to May 27, and, 
even witli this advaueement, many 
varieties Jiad ])assed, and a considera- 
ble number of the exhibits stood up but 
jiooriy, and c(diections were cut down. 
The showiiij; made by commercial ex- 
hibitors was not larjie, but indeed com- 
mendable. The John Scheejters Co., 
New ^'ork, iiad a splendid exhibit on 
the bro.'id landiu}; of a stairway, but it 
was for exhibition only and not for 
competition. In the exhibit was the 
new variety, Asia, which everybody 
wanted to see. In the exhibit also were 
several stalks of eremurus. 

John Lewis ("hilds, Inc., Flowerfield, 
X. Y., won the society's silver medal 
for the most coni]ir(diensivi' dis])lay, 
an<l also the piize for a s]iecial dis[)lay 
to cover 100 s(juare feet. 

R. H. Farr, Wyoniissinj;, I'a., took 
first for a \ariety with blended tones; 
first for a lollect'oii of fifty distinct va- 
rietii's, an<l seconds for collections of 



twelve and six, John licwis Childs, Inc., 
takintj; the firsts. 

The (iarden (Mub of .\'ew Kochelle 
was the winner in the class for a dis- 
play of at least ten varieties to cover 
fifteen square feet, with or without 
other hardy flowers and foliajje. 

Among the exhibits was noticed the 
variety Ambassador, V'ilniorin 's, Paris, 
192(1, introduction; the varieties Asia 
and Prospero, introduced l>y Wallace, 
of England, and the new variety. 
Mother of I'earl, by K. S. Stuitevant, of 
Wellesley Farms, Mass. 

Election of Officers. 

Flection of otticers resulte(l in the 
reelection of all otticeholders, as fol- 
lows: President, John (". Wister, Phila- 
iltdphia; vice-]iresiiient , William A. L'e- 
terson, Chicago; secretaiy, \i. S. Stur- 
tevant, Wellesley Farms, Mass.; treas- 
urer, Frank H. Presby, Montdair, N^. J.; 
directors, to serve thi'ce years, James 
Boyd, llaverford. Pa., ami Uertrand 11. 
I'"'arr, Wyomissing, I'a.; regional vice- 
presidents, eastern district, 1. S. Hen- 
drickson, Flowerfield, N. Y.; central dis- 
trict, Mrs. Samuel II. Taft, Cincinnati; 
northwestern district, T. A. Kenning, 
Minneapolis, Minn.; southern district, 
C. P. Connell, Nashville, Tenn.; Pacific 
district, Sydney B. Mitchtdl, Berkeley, 
Cal., and Canadian district, W. E. Saun- 
ders, London, Out. J. II. P. 




S2S2S2S2SHS2SE525252S25H525H5H5HSH5H52S2SSHSE5H52S2S2S2525H52S252S2SHS2S2525ESHSffiHSPS2S2S2S?^ 

QUARANTINE 37 



CHANGES IN QUARANTINE. 

It will ])robably be July 1 before flu 
federal horticultural board announces 
any changes in regulations ',) of (piar- 
antine ;^7, as .-i result of the conference 
held May l.'. ami Ki. The si)ecial ad 
visory committee ajipointed by Secre- 
tary- Wallace to attend the conference 
and mak<' a report on the ch.anges pro- 
posed has not yet submitted its recom- 
mendations, nor have the various com- 
mittees |)ut their suggestions Ix'fori' the 
<lepartment formally. 

Oflici.ils of the board hold out no 
jiromises of .'iny great change in the 
regulations. They adhere to their 
former attitude that no cli;ince must be 
given for the introduction of new pests 
and diseases and that America must 
make provision to su]i])ly all horticul- 
tural needs from within herself, rather 
than from Enrojie. 

This last w;is sliongly im]iressed upon 
the horticultural delegates from Eng- 
land, Holland and Belgium who at- 
tended the conference and later had a 
dicussion with Chairman M.ai'latt and 
other officials of the board, during 
which they took up the international 
question. Intimations that retaliatory 
orders might be issued by foreign coun- 
tries made 710 ini]iression upon the 
board, which ])ointed out th.at the 
I'nited States makes no m:iterial ]dant 
ex])ortat ions, but, on the <-oiitrary, has 
always been a big importer. There will 
be no change in the regulations so as to 
l)ermit the free iinjiortation of plant 
jirodiicts, the f'lrei'.'iiers were told, the 
original ])laiit (piar.'int ine act making 
such an as'reement impossible, even 
if the board were i)iclined to favor it. 

.\n\' (-h.-MiLies in;icl;' in regulations 'A 



will be slight, it is indicated at the 
Dejiartment of Agriculture, and caleu- 
lateil more to define (d(>arly what is and 
what is not jiermissilde Jnatter than to 
relax the restrictions. The bulk list 
will be clarified somewhat, it is under- 
stood, and other minor changes will be 
made for the purpose of making impor- 
tations of permissible stock easier than 
they have beeii in the past. T. N. S. 



SOCIETY OF AMERICAN FLORISTS. 



Vaughan's Quarantine Resolution. 

.1. C. \'angli;in, n.ational councilor for 
till' S. A. F. in the Chamber of Com- 
merce of the Uniteil States, presented 
the following resolution to the cham 
ber May L'H, with this message: ''On 
behalf of the Society of American Flo- 
rists, a trade organization having ten 
votes in the Chamber of (*oninierce, I 
(Miclose a statement and ])ro)iosed reso- 
lution for action by your body. I ho|)e 
for an early accejitance of the same.'' 

.r. ('. Viiiit'liiin. cciiiiii'iliif ri'ipn'Sfiniiii.' thi' Sm- 
ricty iif .\ini'iii'iiii Kliirists. wishes In liiU In the 
roiiiicirs ^itii'iitioii .1 iiKist siTiniis iiiiMivaliim in 
liiiri';Mirr:ilic <oiitriil iif I'liiiiiiiTrc iiiiiliT wiiicli, 
in Ilir Kuisc of :i (|n:inintini-, :in iilisoliitt" |>ri)lii- 
liitiiin lias been ost.ililislii'il au.iinsi iniixirts iif 
liiMltliy plants and hnlhs cxii'iit ,1 icrlain fen 
s|]i'rilii'il varii'tics .'ind rxi-cpr in sncli rasrs as 
s|M'cial iifi-niils ina.v lie L'r.iatrd fur iiniinrta licin 
nf tlic i'\rlnd('(l niatciial at tin' pli'asiiri' of tlic 
federal lii>rticnUnral Imard. 

'I'liis order, knnwii as iinaraiitine .ST. put in 
elTeet .Iiiiie 1, llllil. lias deslriiyed an extensive 
iDinnierce wliicli lia<l been in I'xislenee fur 100 
years and it is nnw prnpnseil tn exteml it fnrtlier 
liy an arbitrary exeiiiiive aetinn witlimit \v^\s- 
lative eeiisidei-.i tien nr an iip|i irlmiity fnr the iii- 
lei'ests affected til be In-ard beftire an iiii|>artinl 
tr'.lHiinil. 

'I'ImmikIi defended .'is a nieis'ire In prevent the 
inipiirliitiun (if insei-ts and diseases, this (piaran- 
tiiie reverses the iiiethiiil id' all iilher ipiai'an 
lines and instead nf specif viiii; insei'ts and dis 
eases nr plants snbicct In ihciii wh'cli ;i'-e barred 
frni imp rt. it prnhitiiis all inip irta tiniis even 
I f plants fr-ec fruni disease and i)i^ei Is cxii pi ilic 



f<'\v siiecificd (dasses which lire allnwcd. Power 
is retained by the federal liurticiiltiiral liuard to 
issue siie<ial perniits to tiriim or individuals to 
import materials otherwise excluded. This setH 
ii|> a syKtem of speihil favors tn lie ({ranted or 
withheld at the whim of a bniean otlicial for 
reaHons good or bad, honest or dishoncHt. witli- 
out imbllo record or the pretense of jndiidal liear- 
iiiK. This places coucerus engaged in the busi- 
n<'ss of imiiorting horticultural mtiterial at the 
mercy of the federal horticultural board and 
destroys the principle of equality before the law. 
The commercial effect of this alleged (luarantine. 
which is really a wall erected against all im- 
ports, whether healthy or diseased, has been to 
afford certain special producing interests pro- 
tection far ill excess of any conceivable tariff 
protection, insomuch that in discussions of tlii- 
qiiarantine and in its defense by the chairman 
of the federal horticultural board It is now coii- 
si<lered, not as ii protection against disease, but 
as a protection against foreign conii>etition, thus 
presenting the spectacle of a federal liorticul 
tnral board usurping the functions of a tariff 
board. 

Though as yet applied only to plants and 
bulbs, the reasoning which is behind quarantine 
:!7, if allowed to prevail and to be extended, 
would Justify the exclusion of fruits and other 
fiMid products, indeed of all materials of vege- 
table or animal origin which an executive lioard 
might profess to believe harbored insect life or 
disease germs and de(dde to shut out of this 
iniiiitry except when impnrted under special per- 
mits issued liy themselves. In view of the iiu- 
pnrlance of tliis novel and radical application of 
the (piarantine to conimerce in general and the 
il.inger of its indelinite extension by doctrinaires 
should its present use be contirmed and ainpli- 
lied, I move the adoption of the following res- 
iilul i4ui : 

Itesolved: That the directors of the taiited 
Slates Chamber of Coninierce bo and they are 
hereby reiniested to investigate the legalit.\ o( 
iinarantine ;17 as established b.v the federal linr- 
ticiiltur.il Iwiard, the f.nrness nf its eiiforcement 
and the possibility of the application of its 
principle for restraint of commerce in gener.il 
and tliat if such investigatinn indicates cause. ;i 
cnngressinual investigalicm of the federal Imr 
ticultiiral iHiard and lis ai-tion in promiilgatiiii; 
and enforcing (piarantine 'Al shall be reipiesti u 
in the name «( the luited States Chaniber nf 
t'ninmerce, 

John Young, Sec 'y. 



PAY FOR PARTNERS. 

For some reason or other, few eni- 
[iloyi'es in the greenhouse business ae- 
ipiire enough in the way of ctisli ca])ital 
to embark in business for themselves 
without outside itssistance. So it is 
freipiently the case that a partnership 
is formed between a man experienced 
in greenhouse work but with little or 
no cajiital and a jierson iinac((u;iintcd 
with the flower business whose contri- 
liiition to the firm is enough money to 
make a start. In jiartnerships of this 
type the (luestion fre(|uently arises how 
the profits are to be divided so that 
eaidi of those interested will have an 
eipiitable share. Xo hard and fast rule 
can be laid down governing such cases, 
but a few suggestions as to ways which 
have been successful in actual practice 
may assist those who find this question 
.1 puzzling one. 

To take first an extreme case, let us 
siip|iose that a grower with no money 
forms a jiartiiership with a man who iii- 
\ests severjil thousand dollars, but 
knows nothing about flowers and takes 
no active jiart in the business. The 
grower wishes to be more than an em- 
ployee or manager for the person wlio 
furnishes the capital; he wishes to be 
on a basis so that he will liavc a real 
investment in the concern's business 
and will be entitleil to a certain share 
of the profits. First of all, the grower 
is entitled to jiay for his services, in 
]iroiiortion to the resiionsibility which 
devolves upon the manager of the en- 
terprise. After such salary is jiaid, the 
grower may feel that he is entitleil to a 
share of the, remaining jirofits, but the 
proportion of his share and that of 
ins inactive jiartner may be ;i loatter 
of considerable argumiMit. One wav to 
establish a basis that will not be ques- 
tioned is for the grower to ]i;iy into the 
business out of his s.alary. in install- 
luelifs. a siiiii equal fo fhiit si;]ipl'.i'(l \iv 



"7!,''^• — 



■ "fi'if^^ 



VWJ^.'f' yw^,U ■/ .r-T V', 



June 1, 1922 



The Florists^ Review 



23 



his piiitiicr. The result uf tliis would 
be that eacli would have aa e(|ual in 
vestiiu'ut. ill tho business and would 
share alike in the profits without (pies 
tion on either side. 

Where one partner eontriluites his 
experience as a grower and the other 
manages the business end of tlie eiiter- 
j)rise and furnishes the ea[iital, the di- 
vision of the profits is not so easily 
arrived at. One way of adjustment 
would be for the grower to draw a sal- 
ary eommensurate with his exjierience 
and responsibility, while the ]>artner 
would also draw a salary which would 
be fair payment for the type of work 
he does. The profits after the salaries 
of both are paid might be divided on 
any agreed basis. In this case, also, 
the grower might plan to pay into the 
firm a sum of money ecpial to that 
invested by his partner at the outset, 
so that they would thereby beeome 
e(|ual i)artners. Of course, if either 
member of the firm is satisfied to draw 
a minor shiire of the profits, he may 
arrange to make his investment ])r()|i(ir 
tionately smaller. 

If both jiartners contribute (a|iital 
at tlie beginning of the enterj)rise, and 
their experience in the trade is widel\' 
disproportionate, the solution a'jaiii 
would seem to lie in ])aying a salar\ 
in jiroportion to the services and rx|ie 
rience of each and in dividing the 
jtrofits remaining in accordance with 
the capital invested. 

In case the partner witlioul <-a|iil.il 
wishes to pay in enough to |Mit him on 
an e(|ual footing with the man who has 
the money, the latter might ask, not 
witliout fairness, that the former give 
to the firm promissory notes, which 
would ])ay the current rate of iiit(>rest. 
Tliis arrangement sliould satisfy one 
who wislied to keep the books on a 
ical and mathematical basis. 



loii 



MAKING SPACE COUNT. 

Among carnation men the name ol 
W. D. Howard has meaning, both be 
cause he recently completed a term as 
president of the American Carnation 
Society and because he is one of the 
foremost of a number of skilled grow- 
ers of carnations in New England. Kis 
greonhoiises, at Miiford, Masii are pri- 
marily devoted to t'lia one fl (\i'r, but, 
believing in making < very foe of s))ace 
•■iiunt, Mr. Howard grows some sweet 
peas on the posts and runs a line of 
boxes down the side walls and along the 
supjiorts, in which lie can grow enough 
stock to pay the wages of a heliicr. A 
look at the illustration on this ])age, 
which shows the interior of one of Mr. 
Howard's carnation liouses, reveals how 
well he utilizes every foot of space. 

-\side from these "plants that fill odd 
sjiaces, the whole range at Milford is 
devoted to carnations except one house, 
where they do not do well, which is 
given over to Godfrey callas. Mrs. 
C. W. Ward is a favorite variety. 
Matchless comes next in favor. White 
Delight, Pink Delight and Cottage Maid 
are grown in considerable numbers, 
wiiile Benora, the only variegnt(Ml va 
riety grown, has a house to itself. A 
small lot of Morning Glow is grown and 
a few benches of L.addie. Main Sun- 
shine, Bernice and lOureka ilo well, and 
some Belle Wasliburn are still giown. 
All plants are grown in raised })enches. 

The view in Mr. Howard's largest 
house, which is fi.lxIWO feet and con 
tains ten benches four aii<l one half feet 




Big Carnation House of W. D. Howard, at Milford, Mass. 



wide, holding 27,000 plants, is a line 
sight, as may well be imagined after a 
gl.ance at the illustration. Altliough 
Mr. Howard did not begin his career as 
a grower until his health gave out as a 
Miacliinist when he was about :50, lie 
now has a most thorough knowledge of 
carnation culture and his son Kay, his 
\alued assistant, absorbs his fatlier 's 
ureenhouse ieai'iiing. 



GROWING DELPHINIUMS. 

Will you kincjly ad\ise me how to 
i:row delpliiniunis .' 

S. .\l. r. i: S.— Mich. 

Vou d> not state whether you wish 
to grow the dcd))hiniums from seed, 
from cuttings or by means of root di 
vision, but all of these methods are 
e(|ually simple. They will do well ii; 
garden soil, but better results will In 
obtained if a deep, rich, sandy loam 
which is exposed to the sun is used. 

The annuals are raised from the seed, 
while the perennials are generali>' 
grown from cuttinys or by means of 
root division. The seeds should lie 
]>lanted in the gi-eenhouse in 'March or 
earlier. Sufficient growing s|iace must 
be given the young seedlings by trans 
]ilantiiig them as fast as they grow. 
Set outdoors in dune. If the seeds are 
planted in late sjtring or early sunimei', 
careful watering must be done during 
the dry weather. These plants will 
flower the next summer. To grow them 
from cuttings, take a few cuttings from 
the jilants e;irly in the s|iriiig, or use 
cuttings from the jdants ;if1er the 
Mower stems ha\i' been |-emn\('(l. These 
cuttings will root easily in a frame 
which is shaded, and no bottom heat 
will be re<|uired. .\n occasional s]irin 
l<ling will be necessary during the hot 
weather. After the cuttings .-iri' rooted. 



they are treateil in the same manin'r as 
the see<llings spoken of ;iliove. 

The roots of the ])erennials are .ofti'ii 
left unprotected in the garden (iuriiig 
the winter. It is best, however, to 
co\er the bed with a dressing of barn- 
yard manure when the ground begins 
to freeze. This will not only protect 
the underground buds, but will also en- 
rich the soil. It will be better also to 
sjiade fill' manure into tho ground in 
tile sjiriiig ratlier than remove it en- 
tii'ejy. as the delphinium can easily use 
a great deal of fertility, and bi'tter 
flowers will result. 



TEXAS-GROWN FREESIAS. 

Will you gi\'e us information as to 
how Texas-grown freesias llower.' Are 
the\- as good as California-grown stock? 

J. S. S.— O. 



I ha\e nexcr handled Texas-grown 
freesias, but I see no reason whatever 
why they should not be just as good as 
those grown in California. If you can 
secure long, thin bulbs, they will ])lease 
glowers better than the round, heavy 
ones usually (if['er«>d. I have never been 
able to ]nir(diase as satisfactory freesia 
liulbs grown outdoors as are grown un 
der glass. If only the tojis of the spikes 
are cut, without tli(> foliage, and the 
plants are allowecl to ripen off naturally, 
freesias, no matter whetluM- grown in 
]i(its. ]iai's, flats or beiiclies. jiroduce 
bulbs of the highest (luality for grow- 
ing. I'erha])s some reader can tell us 
about Texas-grown freesias. Why not 
send a few to good i;rowers in your 
\icinity to try nut for forcing? C. W. 



Frost, O. — John S. Le;i(di, who for- 
iiierlv owned the range of flu! Hartford 
City' Floral Co., Hartford City, Ind., 
and wlio is now farming, will enter the 
tra(b' with outdoor flowers. 



•r^^.-*-' 



?. v^-jt; 



24 



The Florists^ Review 



Junk 1. 1922 



^mm 



COMMERCIAL GEBAXrUMS. 

"Will you please give me a list of the 
best commercial varieties of geraniums 
to grow? H. D. H. — O. 



Good commercial varieties for you to 
handle are: Salmon, Beaute Poitevine; 
red, Alphonse Ricard, S. A. Nutt, Gen- 
eral Grant and Maryland; white, 
Comtesse d'Harcourt; pink, Jean 
Oberle, Berthe de Presilly. Other fine 
sorts are Helen Michell, Mme. Buch- 
ner, Jean Viaud, Mrs. Lawrence and 
Marquis de Montmort. Far the great- 
est call is for scarlets and probably it 
would be well to grow from two-thirds 
to three-fourths of this shade. Salmon 
and pink come next, and white last. 
Save good stock for yourself, plant it 
out not too thickly and do not take cut- 
tings until late. October gives firmer 
cuttings than September and a far 
larger proportion will root. Watch The 
Review from time to time and you will 
find seasonable notes on geraniums and 
other bedding plants. C. W. 

BLIND WOOD ON GERANIUMS. 

This spring I found it necessary to 
throw out about half of my geranium 
plants, which seemed to be growing 
blind shoots. The shoots came out dou- 
ble and the leaves would often be de- 
formed. The plants were vigorous, but 
would throw few blooms. Would this be 
caused by taking cuttings too closely, 
or are some varieties inclined to do this 
under any treatment? What would 
you advise putting on the benches on 
which to stand potted geraniums, in or- 
der to prevent them from drying out so 
rapidly? This year I had them stand- 
ing on benches which contained six 
inches of soil. Some of the plants 
were partly submerged in the soil and 
I found that if they w^re not moved 
quite frequently they rooted down in 
the soil and then began to make a soft, 
rank growth. 

What would be the best proportions to 
use in making a compost for the potted 
geraniums, and should bone meal be 
used in the compost at any time? I have 
one house with solid beds. Would this 
give satisfactory results if potted ge- 
raniums were set on this at their final 
sliift? II. D. H.— O. 



I should say that careless selection of 
cuttings had been responsible for your 
plants thro.wing so much blind wood. 
Some growcM use coal ashes beneath 
their pots successfully. Others find 
ashes harmful. Coarse sand is alwavs 
safe. It is not a good plan to allow 
stock to remain long in one place and 
root through. This causes rank growth 
and such wood is too soft to flower well. 
Short, stocky wood which is firm will 
produce flowers. Frequent spacing of 
bedding geraniums, with picking over 
for decayed leaves and flowers, is neces- 
sary to get A-1 stock. Grow cool and 



,;.. * nat? 



well ventilated; 45 to 50 degrees at 
night in winter is ample. Give them 
plenty of sunshine, and do not play the 
hose over your plants. A little bone 
meal added to the potting soil will be 
found beneficial. Any manure used 
should be old and of such a consistency 
that it will readily crumble in the 
hands. There is nothing you can stand 
on the benches to prevent geraniums 
from drying out so rapidly, but at this 
season if you chance to have some cold- 
frame sashes, you can advantageously 
plunge at least part of your stock in 
them in ordinary loam; the plants will 
then dry out much less and will take 
on an excellent color. Of course, sashes 
should be kept over them for a few days 
as a shelter from rain storms. Solid beds 
should prove all right to set your plants 
on after their final shift, provided you 
space them apart and thus prevent too 
much rooting through. C. W. 

CABBYXNG ROSES OVER. 

How should roses be handled that 
are to be carried over for a second 



year? What treatment should they re- 
ceive? A. H. K. — Kan. 

After Memorial day, or at least after 
June weddings, roses to be carried over 
should be gradually rested, by being 
kept drier at the root. The plants should 
be judiciously pruned before being 
started up, at which time some of the 
old surface soil can be removed and a 
top-dressing of fresh loam given, or 
the old soil can be retained and a 
mulch of old cow manure spread over 
the beds. This is better than fresh 
cow manure, which will come in useful 
as growth progresses later in the sea- 
son. C. W. 

POINSETTIA CUTTINGS. 

When should poinsettia cuttings be 
taken and under what conditions should 
they be rooted? A. H. K. — Kan. 

Poinsettia cuttings can be taken ad- 
vantageously from May 1 to August 1. 
The latter date is for dwarf plants to 
be used in making up pans. Short- 
jointed cuttings rubbed off with a heel 
are the best. Dip the ends of the cut- 
tings in powdered charcoal as soon as 
they are taken off, to stop bleeding. 
The cuttings will root well in a mixture 
of fine charcoal and sand in a regular 
propagating bench or in coarse sand, or 
they can be put singly in small pots 
of fine charcoal, coarse sand or even 
fine coal ashes. The last medium 
I have found excellent. Careful water- 
ing, avoidance of sunshine and drafts, 
and a warm house make for success in 
rooting poinsettias. C. W. 




WILTING CARNATIONS. 

We are having some trouble with our 
Belle Washburn blooms and do not 
know how to remedy the situation. We 
have been cutting blooms all season 
and these have been excellent until 
about two weeks ago. Since then we 
have cared for the plants in the same 
manner and tlie blooms remain fine as 
long as they are on the plants, but as 
soon as they are cut and placed in wa- 
ter, they go to sleep, and in a large num- 
ber of cases turn black around the edges. 
Twenty-four hours after cutting it is 
not uncommon for us to throw away 
the whole cut. What can we do about 
this trouble? R. G.— N. M. 



take up water properly and this may 
help. Do not place them in the icebox. 
A cool cellar is the best place, provid- 
ed there is proper ventilation. If the 
blooms keep well on the plants, there is 
nothing wrong with the watering. This 
is proved by the way your other va- 
rieties are keeping. A. F. J. B. 



CARNATIONS OUTDOORS. 

Is it advisable to plant carnations 
immediately in the benches where they 
are to bloom, without first putting them 
out in the fields and then bringing them 
in sometime during midsummer? Will 
they be as sturdy if bedded in June, or 
should they be field-grown? 

A. H. K.— Kan. 



We have not grown Belle Washburn 
for several years, but never had any 
such experience with it when we did 
grow it. This variety has never been 
famous for long keeping and is usually 
one of the first to suffer in the exhibi- 
tions. It is probably not a good warm 
weather variety. 

Try placing the stems deep in water 
for an hour after they are cut from the 
plants. After they have been in the 
water for an hour, cut the stems again 
and replace the flowers in water to the 
usual depth. They evidently do not 



In your state I should prefer to plant 
the carnations outdoors and house about 
the end of July. Some growers keep 
their plants indoors all summer, but 
the number of these does not seem to 
increase. Indoor culture should not be 
attempted unless you have large, roomy, 
well-ventilated houses. I should cer- 
tainly plant outdoors for two months at 
least and, if you have facilities to wa- 
ter them outdoors and keep the soil well 
cultivated, your stock should do well 
and not bo much troubled with red 
spider. C. W. 






June 1, 1922 



The Florists^ Review 



25 




exhibition by designated members of 
the executive committee in the morn- 
ing; luncheon at Skaneateles lake; an 
afternoon meeting in Mrs. Hitchcock's 
rose garden, and an evening session 
with speakers in the exhibition hall. 

Plans were made to announce all pil- 
grimages to the different rose gardens 
associated with the American Eose So- 
ciety, notice of these to be announced 
in the trade papers. 

J. Horace McFarland, upon his re- 
quest, was released as chairman of the 
membership committee and Joseph J. 
Lane, now associated with House and 
Garden, was appointed chairman to fill 
the vacancy. 



AMEBICAN BOSS SOCIETY. 



Ezecutive Oommlttee Meets. 

At the executive committee meeting 
of the American Eose Society, at the 
Cosmos Club, Washington, D. C, May 
15, the following members were pres- 
ent: Eobert Pyle, president; F. L. 
Atkins, S. S. Pennock, J. Horace Mc- 
Farland and H. Mills. Invited guests 
were E. 6. Hill, of Eichmond, Ind.; Dr. 
W. A. Taylor, F. L. Mulford and Dr. 
L. C. Corbett, of the Department of 
Agriculture; Eichardson Wright and 
J. J. Lane, of House and Garden, and 
E. A. White, Cornell University. 

Because of the absence of the secre- 
tary, who is in Europe, E. A. White 
was appointed secretary pro tern. 

President Pyle reported a member- 
ship of 2,487. The first business trans- 
acted was in regard to the distribution 
of the Mary Wallace rose. President 
Pyle reported that his firm had propa- 
gated about 1,700 plants 'for the De- 
partment of Agriculture and Professor 
Corbett reported the department had 
propagated about 700. 

It was pointed out that since the 
American Eose Society has now become 
incorporated, it will be proper to enter 
into a definite contract with the De- 
partment of Agriculture and it was de- 
cided to plant out the stock of the 
Mary Wallace rose thus far propagated, 
so that the dormant plants in 2-year 
size might be distributed to the firms 
who will have made application by De- 
cember 1, 1922. Because the stock is 
sure to be irregular in size, it was de- 
cided that all should be brought to- 
gether under charge of the Department 
of Agriculture for equitable distribu- 
tion at the proper time. 

Plans were made to have the rose 
photographed at its best and to have 
material prepared so all information and 
illustrations may be embodied in the 
circular to be issued to all the firms 
distributing the rose for use by them in 
advertising it, each firm to pay for the 
number of circulars used. 

Other Activities Proposed. 

It was further voted that the request 
be addressed to the Department of 
Agriculture that the American Rose So- 
ciety be allowed to cooperate in the 
introduction of other Van Fleet novel- 
ties, including the rugosa hybrid, E. 
rugosa crossod with R. polyaiitlia, and 
the cross hetwoon R. Wichuraiana and 
Duchess of Wellington. It is hoped 
that it may be possible to introduce 
several varieties at one time. 



Due to the small attendance of mem- 
bers at the meeting at Indianapolis, at 
which time the annual meeting had 
been postponed, plans were made for 
the annual meeting to be held in rose 
season. Invitations were received from 
Bobbink & Atkins, of Eutjierford, N. J.; 
Mrs. Aaron Ward, Eoslyn, N. Y., and 
the Syracuse Eose Society, the latter 
being supplemented by Prof. E. A. 
White, who stated that the rose test 
gardens, at Cornell, would be on ex- 
hibition during June 23 and 24, at the 
time of the farmers' field days. 

It was felt that Dr. Mills, president 
of the Syracuse Eose Society, was enti- 
tled to special recognition Jjy reason of 
his work in establishing local rose so- 
cieties throughout central New York 
state; therefore, the invitation from 
the Syracuse Eose Society to hold the 
annual meeting under its charge was 
accepted, the precise date to be an- 
nounced later, probably June 20, 21 or 
22. Dr. Mills indicated that the plans 
for the meeting included judging of 



BLIGHT ON BOSES. 

We have mailed you some Kaiserin 
Augusta Victoria roses. These plants 
are affected with a disease which is 
unknown to us and we should like to 
have you advise us what the disease is 
and how to combat it. 

J. J. F. Co.— Va. 



The Kaiserin foliage sent was af- 
fected with blight, to which this rose is 
subject. Not having had any expe- 
rience with the disease, I am unable to 
give the cause of it; neither am I able 
to give a remedy for it. It is my opin- 
ion, however, that the disease is caused 
by allowing the plants to remain wet 
for too long a time. Under these cir- 
cumstances the soil becomes soggy and 
root action is retarded, and generally 
ceases entirely. If the soil has become 
soggy, running it a little on the dry 
side, followed by a heavy watering to 
open up the soil, will help to overcome 
the trouble. W. J. K. 




Elwood, Ind. — Lee Goins has entered 
the trade, growing plants of all kinds. 
Mr. Goins has been a grower for many 
years and is well versed in this busi- 
ness. 

Kansas City, Kan.— L. C. Fields used 
a full page in the Kansas City Kansan 
May 25 to advertise Memorial day flow- 
ers, quoting prices on staple items of cut 
stock and also on plants and wreaths 
for the holiday. The extensive adver- 
tising of this firm is rapidly increasing 
its business. 

Beacon, N. Y. — The Home Garden 
Brigade, enrolled by Benjamin Ham- 
mond among the school children here, 
attains greater proportions each year. 
This is the fourteenth year of the bri- 
gade. Last year 135 children won prizes 
for making their homes attractive by 
gardening. This year an exhibition may 
be held of the children's products. 

Ossining, N. Y.— The greenhouse 
property on River street, lately owned 
by Arleigh C. Hendry, was sold Tues- 
day, May 16, in foreclosure proccodinsjs 
by S. L. Huntington as referee. The 
sale was made at the office of Mr. Hunt- 
ington and the purchase price w.ts 
$9,000. The purchaser was Antonio An- 
gellilo, who held a mortgage on the 
place. 



Fort Worth, Tex. — A fire which orig- 
inated in the rear of the building oc- 
cupied by the Drumm Seed & Floral 
Co. threatened the firm 's quarters with 
destruction May 10. The damage to 
the building occupied by the seed com- 
pany amounted to $5,000, while the 
amount of stock lost equals $15,000. 

Burlington, la. — A cloudburst and re- 
sulting floo<ls May 26 caused thousands 
of dollars' damage in Burlington. The 
partial destruction of the Ashborne Gold- 
fish & Supply Co. building, on Agency 
street, caused a $15,000 loss. Hundreds 
of goldfish were swept from tanks and 
carried away. Many of them became 
stranded in pools as the water receded 
and boys and girls spent hours capturing 
tlie finny pets. 

Norristown, Pa. — Four men narrowly 
escaped being buried beneath a con- 
crete floor in the greenhouses of Wil- 
liam Yeager when a loaded coal de- 
livery truck, in being backed up to the 
building, struck one of the iron posts 
on which the girders supporting the 
floor rested. The post gave way at tha 
contact with the truck and the entire 
floor, about sixty square feet, buckled, 
the center dropping down in the shape 
of a huge basin. It is estimated that 
the loss in building and flowers will 
amount to several thousand dollars. 



■,.^<- ,- . . "v, -w^-.-s— • .-- -_':r, 



26 



The Florists' Review 



Jl NK 1, 1!»22 



OBITUARY 



Charles W. Phillips. 

Chillies W. rjiillips, votcraii florist 
of VVallii Walla, Wash., died May 18 at 
:i local hospital, following a brief ill iioss. 

Mr. Phillips was born at Raleiii, Ore., 
May 27, 185,^, and four vears later 
moved to the Walla Walla valley, where 
iiis kindly disjiositioii made many 
friends for him throiijihont his lifetime. 
Always a keen lover of ]p|;iiits and llow- 
ers, he naturally turned to the Imsiiiess 
of growing them. Besides lieing a llo 
rist,_ lie was a decorator of exceptional 
ability. Ho is survived l)y his wife, Mrs. 
Xellie S. Phillips, and nine cliildn-ii. 

Mrs. May Bonuot. 

Mrs. May Bonnot, of Xew York city, 
died May 20, at the St. Francis hospital 
from an operation following an attack 
of pneumonia. Mrs. Bonnot was the 
wife of the well known New York and 
Brooklyn florist, Leon Bonnot, who was 
formerly in business in New York and 
in Jersey City, N. J., operating under 
tlie name of Bonnot Bros. He was also 
engaged in the trade in Hoboken and 
I'lemington, N. J. 

C. C. Thomas. 

All his friends, in the cast and west, 
will regret to hear of the death of C. V. 
Thomas, of Los Angeles. Mr. Thomas 
went to Los Angeles about three vears 
ago from Indianai)olis, Ind., and joined 
the staff of Lichtenherg "s, Fr.-iiik Lidi 
tenberg having formerly worked with 
him for Bertermann Bros. (\,., of Indian 
apolis. Although Mr. Thomas had been 
sick for a week or more, he had appar 
ently improved and May 22 talked of 
going back to the store' the next day. 
.V high blood pressure, followed bv a 
hemorrhage of the lungs, brought him 
down suddenly and he died from heart 
f.-iljiire the following niylit. 

.Mr. Thomas, during liis st;iy in Los 
.Vngeles, made many friends in the busi 
Mess, owing to his iinf.iiling court esv 
:iii<l jidod nature, .-iiid lie will be greatlv 
missed. He h;id coiisi.jer.-ilile trouble 
with his healtli and Mrs, Thomas had 
.ilso been ill a gre;it de;il during the last 
\oar. .Mr. Thomas was .ilMiiit .').") years 
of .-luie ;ind leaves only .i wife, no cliil 



dren. 



H. R. K. 



John F. Hargrave. 



.)(din V. Hargrave, pid])iietor of II;ir 
grave's Seed Store, Oalveston, Tex., 
and grand knight of Galveston Council 
Xo. 787. Knights of Columbus, an ac 
ti\i' worker in civic .ind fraternal cir 
eles. died Mav 10. at his residence. 1207 
K avenue. Mr. Hargr.-ive was .-i native 
G.-ilvestonian, h;iviiig been born tlieri 
.lanuary 28, 1S7!t. He was 43 ye.-ns old. 

-Mr. Hartrrave was well known 
throughout the state as an eiithnsiiistic 
.■ind capable worker in all Kniylits of 
• 'olumbus and Catholic activities. He 
w.'is a jnember of the Travelers' Protec 
five Associiition and of the Graml Fr.i 
ternity. He was also a member of the 
fourth degree ass(>mbly, Knights of Co 
lumbus, .-itid president of Sacreil lle.irt 
Parish. 

He is survived by his wife. Mis. 
Alia Hargr;ive; two daughters, .\nii;i 
:ind Ada \'. Hargrave: his mother, .Mrs. 



K. P. Hargrave; four brothers, Thomas 
and Kiidiard Hargrave, of Dallas, Tex., 
Morris, of New York city, Frank, of 
Texas <!ity, Tex., jiiid one sister, Airs. 
Kose X'oight. 

Professor William Parsons. 

William I'arsous, prominent horticul- 
turist and musical director, of Paincs- 
ville, O., died May 25, from injuries 
sustained when he fell from a tree 
which he was trimming in Cit.v jiark. 
He was .■)() years of age, ;ind grew flow- 
ers and jilants for the retail trade and 
especially for Lake lOrie College. He 
was also superintendent of parks. 

Mr. P.arsons came to Painesville six- 
teen years ;igo from New Castle, Pa., 
and was a member of the Methodist 
Kpiscop.-il chiirtdi, a thirty second de- 
gree Mason and a .Shriner. Kor eleven 
vears the dece;(se(l was the <lirector of 
the Kiiclid band at Kucliil, ()., also the 
director of the Painesville (Citizens ' 
band and oi'iginator of the Kxcelsior 
Militarv band. Mr. Parsons is survived 
by his widow, two daughters, Mrs. Mer- 
rill Hodges, of West Wjtshington street, 
and Miss Lilli;iii Parsons; .-ilso a son, 
Otto Parsons. W. J. M. 

Lorenz P. Geiger. 

Members of the trade 5n Chicago wen- 
shocked to learn of the untimely death 
of Lorenz P. (ieiger, who, though only 
.■>2 years old, had become well known 
through his long connection with Prank 
Oechslin, having acted as his book 
keeper for several years and having 
been in his employ since bovhood. Mr. 
(ieiger died at !) a. m.. May 30, at Bal- 
mora, N. M. He had been in New 
.Mexico about a month, having gone be- 
cause of lung trouble. (-'omplications 
ensued, resulting in his death. Mrs. GiMger 
and her sister were in New Mexico with 
Mr. Geiger. 

Mr. Geiger is survived by his wife, 
his mother, two sisters and two broth- 
ers, Hermap Geiger and Paul Geiger, the 
latter being foreman of Frank Oechs 
lin 's Forest Park range. The body is 
ln'ing brought home- for burial, ,iihl 



luneral services will be held Saturday, 
.) line .'!, at 2 ji. in., at the cliai>el of Kanipji 
\ Son, ;n8 North Central avenue, in 
-Austin. 

Patrick Welch. 

The florists' trade of this country 
lost one of its outstanding figures the 
morning of May 25, when Patrick 
Welch, of Boston, Mass., passed away. 

As president of Welch Bros. Co., one 
of the oldest and largest wholesale 
houses in the east, and as an ex-presi- 
dent of the Society of American Flo- 
rists, Mr. Welch had a host of warm 
friends who will miss him. At his 
death he was 64 years of age. 

Patrick Welch was born in Ireland 
in 1858, and at the age of 23 years 
came to Massachusetts with his par- 
ents, who made their residence at Dor- 
chester. Immediatel.v thereafter he en- 
tered the florists' profession, taking 
employment jit the conservatories of 
William Wales, at Dorchester. In 1873 
Mr. Welch was cmi)loyed by Holbrook 
& Tompkins, who had bought the busi- 
ness of Mr. Wales. This firm opened 
what was, |-erlia]is, the first store in 
lioston for the ])urjiose of selling cut 
dowers, and it t)ecaine a part of Mr. 
Welch's duty to deliver the cut to the 
city e.ach day. 

In the same year Mr. Welch went out 
on the road to sell a iiiachine for fumi- 
gating, whi(di had been invented by 
one Willi.-im Wheeler. Mr. Welch 
|)r()ved ;i good salesman, for at almost 
the first trial he succeeded in selling 
K. M. W()()<1. proprietor of the Waban 
Conservatories, Natick, Mass., four of 
the machines. Mr. Wood, struck with 
the selling ability of Air. Welch, of- 
fered him a jiositioii, "if he ^o de- 
sired.'' .\s a consequence, in 1876 
Mr. Weleli becani(> Boston salesman 
for the W:il);iii Conservatories, later 
going to Philadelphia, where he sold 
to the full satisf .action of his employers. 

Ill 1S77 .Mr. Welch started the busi- 
ness of selling flowers on commission. 
.\iid it is said that from that date may 




Charles 'W. Phillips. 



1 



.Ii:.\K 1. 1922 



The Florists^ Review 



27 



l)c (lilted tlie pioneer work of the whole- 
sale florist in the eastern United States. 
At that time the only other wliolesale 
house was that of James Hart, New 
York. 

After a period of three years, during 
which Mr. Welch did not have a regular 
place of business, but carried his stock 
from place to place, he leased a store 
in a basement at Tremont and West 
street, Boston. This was in 1879, dur- 
ing which year Edward Welch joined 
liis brother and formed the firm of 
Welch Bros. Later on another brother, 
David, joined the firm. Thv^ enterprisi- 
grew rapidly and soon moved to larger 
((Uitrters, at 165 Tremont street; ten 
years later still another move was 
made, to Beacon street, thence to l'> 
Province street, and Iti 1906 to 220 
Devonshire street. In 1912 the firm 
was incorporated as Welch Bros. Co., 
with a capitalization of $75,000. 

March 29, 1915, it was announced 
that Patrick Welch had opened a new 
commission house, at 262 Devonshire 
street. This was under his personal 
management, although he still retained 
his interest in Welch Bros. Co. In 191 (i 
a reorganization of Welch Bros. Co. 
was effected, following the resignation 
(>*■ David Welch and Edward J. Welcli 
who had opened commission house's f)l' 
their own. At that time Patrick Welcli 
still retaiiied his office as jiresidenf ami 
tr('asnr(>r. Henry Haas was elecfeil 
manager and Frank J. Kcvuolds assist 
.lilt manager. In 1917 Patrick Welch's 
firm was united with Wi'lch Bros. Co. 
The staffs of both jilacos were retaiiieil. 
and a larger busint'ss was iiuiuediatcly 
linilt. Patrick Welch was at the head 
i)f the concern so formed and retained 
liis jiosition until his death. 

Among his business interests outside 
of Welch Bros. Co., Patrick Welch was 
tre.-isurer of the Montreal Floral L'^x 
ch.ange and secretary and treasurer of 
the Albany Cut Flower Exchange. 

.\t all times Mr. Welch was active 
in matters pertaining to trade organ 
i/.ation. He was esi)ecially prominent 
in the S. A. F., of which he was elected 
|iresident in 1914, .after having served 
.•I term as vice-president and filled other 
important posts. He was a member ami 
I'x-president of the Florists' and Oar 
deners' Club of Boston, ,i member of 
the Massachusetts Horticultural Seci 
ety, a member of the American Carn;i 
tion Society, a member of the executive 
board of the American T?ose Society, a 
member of the American Sweet I'.'m 
Society and an ox-president of the ITor 
ticultural Club of Boston. 

He was also a member of the New 
Vork Florists' Club, Youwz Men's 
•".-ttholic Association, Irish < 'liaritable 
Saciety, Knights of Columbus, Boston 
i.ndtre of F:iks and other organi/.;itioiis. 
Mr. Welch had a summer home at Old 
Orchard Beach, Me., where he w:is one 
i)t the lM>st known figures and where he 
fre(|uently entert.ained his m;iny friends 
III the <rade. Tie was one of tlie last of 
what \v;is fain ili;irly called "the old 
sruard," .a bnrly of men who did much 
to keep P.oston in the van of .\nieric;ni 
horticulture. Rome of the former mem- 
bers of this well ki'own contingent were 
^V. .1. Stew;irt, .Io<eph Taill.v, W. S. 
Kwall. P'Urick Norton. M. H. Norton, 
^^illialM Kolvnson. .lames Conlev, .Toliii 
^^he|iherd. Fre.l Harris, C. M. .Vtkinson 
nnd David Allen. 

Mr. W(>leh v.as mnried in 1891 and 
w.is the father of -ix children, three 
^iniv an,] three daughters. 




Patrick Welch. 



Funeral ser\ices were held May 27, 
with high mass at St. Peter !s church, 
Meeting House liill. A large number of 
business men, including many in the 
trade, attended; among them were ex- 
.M.-iyor Fitzgerald, F;irk Commissioner J. 
I! She.a, .1. Mitchell (Jalviu, Thomas 
Hfdaiid, Frank Edgar, K. Allan I'eirce, 
(iustave Thommen and others. There 
were large delegations from the Klks and 
other fr.-iternal and floricultural bodies. 
Thei-e w.as a magnificent disj)lay of 
(lowers, including several ])ieces from 
|irominent memlieis of the S. A. I'. 
Interment wjis in Old Calv.ary cemetery. 

A])preci:ifion of Mr. Welch's value to 
the tr.ade was estimated in ;i statement 
by Henry Penn, as follows: 

" I'atrick Welch was a man of rare 
ability. When called upon for opinions 
and facts, he was ever ready to give un 
biased views and had an unusual way of 
reasoning out the proper <diannel to pin- 
sue, lie w.as ii tower of strength in l)y 
gone days upon (|uestions of natural im 
jiortance to the Society of American 
Florists and the older generation would 
• ilways look upon Pat Welch's .advice 
with great favor. 

"Me was ;i credit to the craft .-ind 
will he missed ;is the vears roll on." 



finally assembled anil checked in alpha- 
betical se(|uence bv onlv one person. 

Dr. F. V. Coville," TTnited States 
botanist, is the one man in the scope of 
this final work best fitted to thus handle 
it, and he is using all of his time that 
it is jiossible to (livert from his official 
duties toward that end. It was not 
realized how arduous, diflficult and slow 
this work would be. All are exceedingly 
anxious for an early completion of it, 
but it is entirely im]>ossible to expedite 
it beyond the limit of the jiroduction of 
one able part ici]iant. The tyjiesetting 
is jirogressing (dose upon the completion 
of the co|)V. 

This statement is issued in behalf of 
the many persons who have subscribed 
for and .are anxious to receive this cata- 
logue. .\s the work proceeds, its quality 
;ind importance increase in est im.ation, 
ami we sincerely trust those who have 
subscribed will re.ali/.e that the sub- 
committee is doing it.s very best for 
early comjiletion, tlie ilelays being those 
impossible to forecast. 

Frederick Law Olm.sted, 
Chairman of Subconimi'tee. 



THE OFFICIAL CATALOGUE. 

While Jill of the heavy investigative 
.and pridiinin;iry work in the preparation 
of the nmnnscript for the Official C.ata 
logue of St.audardi/.ed Plant Names has 
been completed for sever.al months, it 
has l)een found th;it, in order to secure 
the recpiired accuracy .and easy icference 
imality, the lists of common and sci(>n 
lilic names .and the sjx'cial lists must be 



Pawtucket, R, I, — Henry .1. l.'Heu- 
reux ex])ects to enter the trade in the 
near future, lie will begin the erection 
of a greenhouse about July 1. 

Spartanburg, S. C. F. L. (Jentry has 
bought the interest of Fred W. Sass in 
Fred's Flowei' CJarden and is now sole 
ownei'. .Mr. .Sass will continue foi' the 
[)resent' in the emjiloy of j'red 's Flower 
< harden .and the intention of Mr. (ientry 
is to develop a large business, the exjie- 
rience of the last eighteen months en- 
coiir.aging him to Ixdiexc there is plenty 
of op|iort unity. 



26 



The Florists' Review 



.li \i: I, I'.fj 



OBITUARY 



Climlos W. Plullips. 

'Uinl,- \\. I'lii||ip~. \.i.m:,ii lldi-!^; 
"I W;iil:, W.-ill.-i. \\:iv|i.. ,|ir.| M:,v Iv ■,• 

■ I ^'"-n I iM.s|.il;il. I'lillnw iiii; :i Inii'l' iili,,-... 

^' ' ■ riiilli|'- w .1 V Ik.i n ,ii s.'i I,. Ml. ( )i ,.., 
M; •. L'7. Is.".:., riihl r..iir \ , .-i i - l;it.T 
>i"'^ ' 'I to llir \\:il|;i W;i|l,-| v ;i|i,.\ . u I,,.,,, 

'li" kirnilx c|l-,|,,,-.|| i 1.1,1,. ni,-iii\ 

• III ii'l> I'll! Iiiiii I h I (iip^||.,.|i lijx lil.tiiiii. 
\ l\\ ;iy^ .-1 I; I -I II lnvci •,{ |,l-i iii> ;iii.| ilnw 
'I -. Ih' ii,-i! m-:i 1 1 V I iii'iM il ! I. I h, 1 .i!- m,,---- 
"T l;|"\\ iiiu I hi'iii. l!,~i.|, - l.,iii- ,1 tic 
i"i~' . ill- \\ ;is ;i .|i',i)i:i 1 .11 .il .■\.-.'|.| iiiii;i I 
.iliilil\'. lie i-^ '^m \ i\ I'.Mu ii 1-. w i r,., \l r, 
^■'■!l,.' >. I'liillip-. .-Ml. I niih I'liiMn'M. 

I Mrs. May Bomiot. 

M I - M.I \ Kmii iiiit , I.I \,\\ Vnik ,-\\ V . 
'lii'i M.-i\ L'M. .-11 11,, ■ SI. i'r.inris lM.^|.il;ii 
tii'iii .•111 iipii-.-it inn I iilLwin:^ .-m .iil^irk 
"I I'lii iiriKin i;i. \l r^. linn unt w .-i v (I,,. 

\\ll' "I till' Wi'II kllliWIl \c\\ ^(l|k .■Mill 
l'.|..iikl\n tl(ill>.t, I, run 111. nil..!, wliii \\;i- 

I III iiiirly' 111 liiisiii,.,^ ill \,.i\ ^■|M■k .-iiiil 
ill .Iii-i y ( 'it \ , \. .1,. ,.|„i:ii ji,^ nil, In 
'111' ii.'iriir 111 r.i.iiniit |-!iii^. |||. u:i-- ;iKii 
'■iiu:il:iiI ill tile li.-i.l. in iliiliiikrii nil. I 
I'ii iiii nyti'ii, .\ . .1 , 

C. C. Thomas. 

Ml lii- II irmlv, ill t II. r;,-| ninl w i-t . 
\\ ill rcyi-rt 111 lir.nr m i I,,- .ii..itli ,i| ( '. C, 
Tliiiln.ns. I.I |.o> .\n;;ili... M , . ■nn.in.i- 

"1 III 111 i.lis .Xll-rl,- .iLiillt t hl.r \ ,MI~ 

■lii" I'r-oiii I iiili;iii;i|.iili-. I n.|.. .i n,| J., in... I 
till- -;I;iH' of Lirlii.nli. 1 l: '-, I r.iiik l.ii-Ii 
ti lllii-i;,' li;i\ iiiu rorinrilx \\..ik,.,i \\ it |, 
him 1(11 lirrli 11I..I1I1I 1; I ,,x ( ■,,. ,,| I n.li.i n 
■ij'i'ii^. Alllnm-li Mi . ■ni,,n;.ix h,-..! I,,.,,, 

-""^< l"i' •■' "II i< or !,■. li, lin.l .•i|i|,;ii 

■■||''.\ iih|iiiivi-.| ..III.! .\|,;n ■_■:.' 'nlk..,! ,,| 
L.;iiiii;.; I.;irk In | li,. ^i ,.| , i h. n.xt ,1;, \ 
A liiuli liliiii.l |in-.~iii , , ' ,.{\,,v , .1 l.\ ,-, 
lliliini rli;ii;i i,f tlir liMi;;>. Innii.^lil hin 
•ii'>\ II -.lilil.nl\ ;iii.| !,.■ ,|i.. I ir,„i, l,,.;iii 
i.-i' III. Mil lM||l.^\ill^ iii..^|it. 

Ml ■riiiiiii.-is. i|niiii_; l;iv .,tn\ in l,ii~ 
\ n':'li -, mn.l.' iii;iii v li i. n.U i 'i 1 li. Inisi 
111'--. .i\', ill'..; 1.1 lii- iiiil'.. ilin- c.iii t, -\ 
■iii'i :^ •"■I ii.'il 111 I'. .-Ill II. 'A ill I., LTi-' .'iI 1^ 
i"i"i 'I. II'' li;iil I'lin-i.!.! nlil. t loni.!,. 
'.^ilii ill- *'.':iltli .'111.1 Ml-, 'ninin:,- ji.i.i 
.''1-1. '.. 1 n III :, -I'. '.'It .l.'.'.i .|iirin- llir |;i-1 
\ I'.'i • . \l I . 'riiiMi,.'!- w I- .'.l.i.ni .'..", \ , ,11 - 

"t ■' !■ : II. I li'.'i v.- iiiil\ ,1 'A it.'. Iii! 

.h. 1. II l; l; 

Jolui F. Hiiryrave. 

•loll I, I ". II ;il';;r.|\ , , |il o;.; i.M ,ir ,.t || .-, i 

'_;i;.\. '- Sinl Slon. I . .i i \ . -t on . Tia.. 
■111.! -i.'iiol kniulit ol' ' i.'ih . -Ion I'onii.il 
No 7^7. Krii'.;lit- nl i ol n n. I.n-. .in ;i, 
' 1 \ . w or k. 1 in <i\ i,- .i n.| i i .n , in.i I .i i 
.'I' -. ilii .i M.'i\' 111. .il 111- il -i.|.-n.'. . lL'ii7 

1'^ ' \ I'lllll . .\l 1 . Il.'ll'^l .-IX ,. w ;i^ ;. II.., t i\ , 

I i,'i ! \ I -I oni'i II. Ii:i \ 1 ni^ L, ,•!, Inn n I |i,.| , 

■ l.'Min.'iiy L'^. I ^7'.i. Ili u n- I.; \ ,:ii - ,,|,| 

M I'. Il.'ll :.M'.'I\ 1' \.\ n- \\ . II \s lOlW I; 

t II i'i.i:'_:liiiiil III,. -I;il.- :i- .-,11 .III II n-i.-i-l i. 
■111.: .'.'1 |..'ililr w oi'l;iT in nil |\ n i- 1,1 , ,,i 
' 'oliiinli'i- .-iiiil < '.'itlKili,- .'M't i\ It i.^. Ij, 
'•\ n- ;i In. mil. r of | h,. 'I'l iix i In- ■ Trot . • 
ti\. A --oiint ion .'iinj ot Ihr (ii.-iml I'l,-, 

I I I n it \ . Ho u :i- .-il-o ,'i inriiil.. 1 .,1 i |i, 
toiilll; ij. ^ri I' .'i--.(iiili!\ . K'lijolit- ,,i ( ., 
'unilii.-. niol [H-.-i'li-nt of S;hi,,| ||,,ii 
1'.'.: i-n. 

Ill :- >iii'\ i \ I'll ii\ hi- wit.. Ml-. 

\'l.'i 1 1 ni '.jr.': \ !• ; U\ o .l.'iii^^hl .i-. Vnii.'. 

" A.!;. \ . Ilnr-r.'i\.-, hi- inotli,!. \| , -. 



11'. I'. Ilni^i'nxi ; foiii In ol Iht^. 'riioiiin- 
III. I h'li lo'ii.l ll.'iimn\ 1 , 111 n.'ill.'r-, 'I'.'N.. 
M 111 li-. ot \ . w VoiK i-il \ , l''i'.'iii k , ot 
Ti'\.i- I it \ . Tis., ;ini| oio- -i-toi. Mr- 

l.'o-. Wii^lit. 

Piotossor WiJliaiu Parsons. 

Willi.'im r.'ii'-oii-,, |iioiiiiiinil lioiliriil 
lini-t .'in. I 111 ii-ii'.'il ilii'rr'oi, ol' IViiiii'- 
\illi'. <).. ilir.l \!;iy I'.-i, triiin i li.j II lio - 
■'ii-I ,'iin.-i| \\ Ion III' t I'l I I I oni .'i I roi' 
\\liiili 111' w.'i- I I'iin mi 111; ill <'ily |inrk. 
Ilo w.'i- "ill yi ,ii'- (it ,'il;i'. nliil l;ii'\\ liow 
I'l'- n lol j.l.'i III - I'or I ho I'll .'li I I I'.'I. i.' ,'i ml 

.-|ii'i'i.'lll\ fo, l.nki- I'J'ii' t'ollr-i'. Hi 

\\ n- .'1 l-o -iijii li lit iiiil.'iil of |inrl\-. 
Ml. I'.'ii-ini- .'.'iin.' Ill I '.'I i no-\ i I 11' -i\ 

1 .'.'II \i'.'l I- .'I l;o f I'lllll \ r\'> I '.'I -I lo. I'.'I., 

'I lot W.'I- ,'i ini'inlii'i' ot I ho .M ot hoili-t 
I '.|ii-.'ii|i.'i I I'll nrrh. :i I h i il \ -oriiml ih 
;.;i'i'o .M.'i-on ninl .'i Shi inn. I'or ilixni 
\i':ii'- llii. ilii'i'.'i-o.i W.'I- ill.' ilirirlin ol 
I ho I'jicli.l I, .-in. I .'Il i'jii'ii.i. ( )., .'li-o III,- 

.1 i I I'l'l or lit' t ho I ';i illo-\ i 111 I'll i/ill- ' 

li.'iml .'iiiii ori^iiint or of ih. I !\'.-.'l-iiii 
Milil.'ii'N I..110I. .Mr. I':ii'-iiii- 1- -iii'\l\o.| 
li\ hi- willow, two .l:i ii;;lit ol'-. .Mr-. Mil' 
I ill liiiil:;i'-, 111 Wo-t W.'i-liinutoii -troit. 
.'iihI .Mi-- LiHi.'iii I'.'.i'-on-: :;l-ii :, -on 
Dill. Ifii-on-. W. .1. M. 

Ijorenz P. Gciger. 

.Molliliil- of till ll;i.||. in <'lilc.'r^i. W.I.' 
-horkoil to lo.ii n of I h.' nnl iliirlv .|o;il k 
of I 111 111/ I '. ( ii'ii^.o . n Imi. I iioii ; k oiih 
.iL' .\r;il'> o|.|. Ii.'iil liri'oiin Will known 
lliioiioh Ili- liiii;^ I'oiiiu i-t ion with I'rniik 
t ),Tli,-lin, li:i\iiio mlo.l .'I- hi- Imok 
ki'i'|ii'i for -i\ii.-il yrnr- .iml h;i\ii|o 
li.'i'ii in hi- i'iii|iloy -iiii-o limliooil. Mi. 

I O'ion- ,|i..|| ;|t 1.1 ;,. Ill . Miiy Ml, ; 1 f I'.nl 

moi'.-i. \. .M . He lin.i Ill-Ill in .New 
.Mi\ii'ii .'ilioiit .1 monlli, h.'uini; i;onr In 
..'iii.-i' of liiiio liiiuliji. ( iim|ilirat ion- 
.n-ili'il, n-iiltino in hi- ilcnili. .Mr-, (o.j^, i 
.'iiiil Inr -i-tii' Wi'i'r ill .Vow Moxi.o wilk 
Ml. <o io,.,-. 

.Mr. tirioii- ]y Mir\'i\'cil liy lii< wit'i. 
ill- iiiolhiT, two sisters ami two liiolk 
or-, lli'i'iii.'iii Oci^'er ami I'aiil t i my^cij tin 
l.'iti.'i l.i'iii:^ fdi'oiiin n of T'laiik Ooik- 
iiii'- l'oio-l I'.ai'k i'aii^;r. Tlir IkhIn i- 
l..'iiiL: ki..ii'_;lit liiiiiio for liiiri.'n. ..-n. 



'■ illioi; i -rl'\ il-,.-. u ill lio hoi. I S,'lllll.ni.\ . 
•I '■'■'" ■'. :ii - |i. III., .il ' Ih' .'Ili;.,-! ■>[ K.imiij. 

Son. .'.Is Xoi'ii, (■.nlrn! .iM'inio, in 
\ii-l in. 

Patrick Welch. 

I ho lliiri-l-' li';ii|o of till- lonnti'v 

hi-t I of ii^ out -t .imliii^ lioiiri'^ tho 

riiiiii; of .M.'iv L'.'i, wlii'ii I'.'itrirl^ 

^^I'h'h, III I'.ii-ton, M.i--,., |i;i--ri| .'IWIIV. 

•N.-' I'l'i-iililit of Wrlch Kill-. ( 'o., one 
I'l the olilost nil. I l.'ii'oo-l w li(plr^.-i Io 
hoii-o- ill I |i(. o;i-i, :im| ,-1- :iii o\ |irc-i 
'h'lil I'T till- Siicioiy of Aiiiirii'.in I'lii 
list-. .Mr. Wi-lili h.-iil ,-1 ho-t of w;iriii 
I'li'ii'l- N\ho will iiii-^ liini. \l hi- 
'li'.'it li hi' w .'I- li I yo.'ii's of joo. 

I'.'itiirk Wrhh W.'I- lioin in Iiol.'iinl 
in l^.'iS. .■iinl .-it III,. ,.|o,. lit' j;; y(.ni'> 
'■■■imo to .M:i--.'i(lin-ot I- with hi- p.'ii' 
lilt -^, w ho in.'oli. I hoir n -iili-mo .'il |)iii 
'ho-t or. ! iniiio.li;itol\ I hiir.i f I or ho <.|i 
'''lo'l till' lloi'i-l-' |.iiiti--iiiii, l.ikiii;: 
i'in|iliiy mini .it tin. roii-. r \ .'il or io- i.f 
\Villi;ii,i W.'ilo-, .-It |)orrlii--toi'. In |s7:; 
.Mr. Wolrh W.I- nii|.lo\..l l.\ liolliiddk 
iV 'I'limiik in-, who h.ml Imn^ht tlio lui-i 
Ill's- 111 .Ml. W.ilo-. Till- tiiiii ojiolloil 
" h;il w ;i-. 1 ol li;i|i-. t II,- tir-l sloro in 

1 -o-l on for t 111 |illr|io-,- ol -ollill;.; i-lil 
lli'VM'i-. .iml It liiT.'iiiio ,1 |inrt of .Mr. 
Wi li'li - lint \ I 1 ilolix ,1 t hi' .-III 111 I ho 

"il V 1 .'irll .ln\ . 

Ill t Io -.'inn- \ o.'i I .M I . W ilrh w nil mil 
"II tho I o:ii| 111 -ill n no'iiliiiii for fniiii 
U.'it iiio. w liii'h h.'ol lici II iii\ oiitoil In 
Olio Willi.'iiii Wlo-i-loi. Mr. Woli'ii 
|'ro\ I'll .1 uiio'l -.'ili'-iii.'iii. tor al almost 
tho lii-l IiinI lo' siii'i-oo.li'il ill sclliiio 
K. M. Woo. I. |.ii.|irii'toi of llio \V:il..'iii 
I 'oii-i i\ nl 111 il -, Nnlii'k, .M.'is-.. four of 
till- imo'li iiii's. .Mr. WmoiI. -triii-k with 
till' s, Hill- .iliililv 111 Mr. U'oh'h. Il' 
f'l'i'il li im .1 |iiisil ion. • • i t' he .o .|i- 
-ii'oil. ' .\- ,1 i-onsoi|iini,.,.. ill lS7ti 
.Ml. W.lili liii-.'inio iioslmi s;i lo-iii.-i II 
lor till' W.'ili.'in < 'onsi-r\ nt Olios, Intor 
i;oiii^ to I 'Il i l;olol |ilii.'i. wliiio ho -ohl 
1 11 1 lo' I 111! -nl i-I .'ii-l ion ot hi- nn |i|,i\ or-. 

In 1^77 .Ml. Will h -t.-irl.il I hi- Imsi 
no-- of -I'lliir.^ Iliiwi-i- oil ioinmi--i(i|i. 
\ ml It i- -ni'l t h.'it from t li.it .Into mnv 




Ch,itlf. W. Fllillips. 



.h m; I. II'-'- 



The Florists^ Review 



27 



|,r .|:it(i| 1 III- inollliT W CMI-. nl | |]( S\ |]iili> 

,;,!,. il,,ii~t ill I 111' i',-i^tiiii riiit.'.l St.'iti-. 

\ 1 t li.'.l I ilrli 1 lie oil l\ (i1 li, I \\ ||nlr-,;ilr 

I s,. \\:is tii:it 111 .l.-iiiic> ll;irt, \i-\\ 

\ .ik. 

Afti i- ;. |rrriticl di' thri'i- vinrs, during 
wliicli Mr. W'i'lrli dill lint li;i\r ;i rcmil.-ir 
|,l,-Mi' (iC liii^iih'--s, Init carried liis stoidi 
li'iiin [ilacr tc )iiaiT, lir lca.st>(l a stiii'c 
in ,■; lia-^rinriit af 'rri'inoiit and Wcsl 
-iirrf, I'.d.stiiii. 'J'liis \\as ill ls7'.i. dm- 
in-' wliirli year Ivlward H'rlili jcdiicil 
lii^ liidllicr and I'oriiird the linn ol 
\\ .'i( ii liros. I,ati r (in ancitlur Krot lirr. 
I>a\id. jdiiird tlir lii'iii, 'l'li.( m '. .Tiiii-' 
_;r,'\\ lajiidly and xitiil iiiii\fi) tn larger 
(|nait(is, at Iti'i Trcmoiit ■-trnd; ten 
\rars later still another innvr \\a- 
made, t(i I'.eacoil street, tlniin' in 1 ;, 
l'rn\iiice street, and in I'.i'ni In I'ji: 
Hivnnsliire .street. In liM'J tin liin. 
wa- incoriMirated as \Vididi lim-. (H,. 
w iili a i-apitalization of $7r),()(i(i. 

\lar.di L".t. 1!»1.'. it was an n;ni n.-,,] 
liial I'.-ilriidi Welidl Iiad n|i.nii| a inw 
rninniissinn liolise, at L'til' I )i'\ nii^li i i . 
-iini-t. 'I'liis was under lii- |ier>niial 
Ilia iiaL;i'niriiI , ;ill lioilyli lie still riKailiril 
liiv iiiti-rcst ill W'ehdi I*.ro>. Cn. In MHii 
a 1 1 nryani/.;it ion nl W'niidi I'.in-. ('n. 
wa- ntl'Mded, t'nlinwin;^ llii ii - i :^ Ma I in ii 
n' l>a\lil Welidi ;ind Kd/;;i.| .1. vV,.],-!. 
wlin had n|M'iied cnlii in i-^inn linii^r- nl 
iln'ii nwn. .\t that linn- I'aliiilx W'elili 
>:ill irtained his ot'lii-n a~ |.i ■■-iilmi I ami 
! I I a- un-r. Henry liaa'- \\a^ ihrlii! 
ihaiia;;ni and l''rank .1. ki \ iinhK a^-i^' 
ant inan;i-ir. In I'.H 7 I'al rirlv W.li I, '- 
iiiii, was iindel with W'nI.li Urn-. < 'n. 
Tin st.-it'N nl hnt h |ila'-i- a i .■ : .lailU'il. 
ainl a laruer lill^illrss u.iv i m in rd i,i f rl \ 
Imilt, I'titrirk Wrhdi ua- at I In' hn.ad 
111 t |i.. cniimin sn I'nrnird :iiii| rntainnd 
li i- I n^it iiii; iini il liis de.at h. 

Ainnn^ ills hiisiness iiifi ii-t- niilsidi 

nl Wrlrll I'.rns. Co.. I'atrirk Wrlrll wa- 

tina>in.r nf the .Mniilnal I'lmal I'.x 
idiaiii;.- and sccii't ary and 1 1 n.i-iiiii nl 
ikn Alliaiiy Cut I'Inwnr llxidiann.. 

\' all times Mv. \\'rlidi \\a> ;irli\i 
il! niattiis ]iertainiii;i to ti.adi niuan 
i/alinn. lie was fv|iiTia II v iimni i in iit 
ill llm S. A. I'., nf whi. h lir was cK it.d 
i'rnvi,i,.,il ill I'.U I. attri having ~cr\ ad 
a I. rill a-. \ ire |iri-ii|nnt ■■iiid lillr.l nllni 
ini|.nrtaiil posts. ji,. w;i- .-, ineinlMi am! 
'A |ir. sill, Mil nl' t hn I'lniisi- ' .a in I ( lar 
drini>" (''liil, ,,|- i'.ip^tnli. ,1 imimiiImi nf 
'hi M a-.v.a(dins,>t1s llniti.lllllir.il S,p,i 
'' ^ . 1 ini'inlii'i- of the Aimrii-.-ia r.irn.i 
linii Sniictx-, a nirnilier nl tin i\.(iiti\. 

'■naid nf till' Atneriran I.'n-i Snrirt\, .1 
nnaiilni nf the .\ in rr i i-.i n >>\ .1 l'i-:i 
Snricty and ;m (>\- ini'sidcnt m i|,, lim- 
liiuitural Chih of F.n-tnn. 

Ill w;is ;i|s(l ;i imiiil.rl ..| 'In \ , w 

^'n^K i'ini-ists' Cliil,, \,ri,,-: M.ii'- 
' 'atiiidir Assi, ialinii. Ii i-h < liai it.iM. 
>i"lnt\. Kni^hl- ,,\ I ',,1111111. 11 -. l;n-l,ili 
''"'"' nt \\\\i< :iild nth, I nr^.alii/.il inn-. 

^' I ■ Wilidi h.i.l .a -III ■!■ Ii,,im- .at ( )lii 

"r.i,:,i,| T.,.;i,di. M,... ulnr,' In' w .a - 

"' 'hi' l.,--t kiinwn li'Mii,'- .iml wlnia In 
' ii iimiitiv entnrl.aim-.l lii^ iii.ain I i i.inl- 
'" ''' ■ a i.. 'I,, wa- ..m- n<: t|,,. i,-i-l n- 
'^li'' "1- fan iliarlv ,-.ai!r.| --tli.' nhl 

'"■•'I •'• ' ' a I i,|\- ,,1 II \., Im, ,lid mil, h 

'" I' '1. I'.n-t (Ml ill t In- \ :i II nt A mm i,-:i ii 

'i'"' !• il'tei,-. Sniiir nl I In- 1 . . r i iiirm 

'"'" "' 'i:i- WiU I I'nwii .-.ni; iii:^,ail \\,Ma 
^^ •'• ^'i w.ai'. .In., |.ll T.iill.^ . \V. S, 
l.^':-!'. !'-"rirk Nn,I,,... \| II ,\nltnli, 

Wiit'-in l,'..l.-||-,ili. J: - ' nilliv. .Inhll 

^'"■11" Id I'r.'d ll.arii-. i '. .\l. .\tkin-nn 
aid l).a\ i.l .\|!,.,i. 

\! 1 . \\. I.di w;i- .,.■.. li,. I i,, jsnj ^111. 1 
"•'^ ' ill fat hn nf - i\ . liiLh . ii, llir, . 
"'■ii~ 11. 1 ;lii,i' i|aii'.|it i-r-. 




Patrick Welch. 



kiiini'.i! -,-r\ irr- \\,-i,' In LI .\la\ L.'7. 
with lii;;li iii.iv- .at St, I'd, a'- rliundi. 
.\|i',l in- llnii-i' hill. .\ l,ai-y,' nnnilii'r nl 
l.|i-in,'--- null. iiirliiiliiiL; ni.in\ in tin 
li.a,l,-, .a 1 1 .anli'd ; .aiiinii^ tlnan \v. in .v 
M.-is.ii I 'it /i;nia |.|. r.-nk < 'nin in i--iniiir .1 . 
1'. s|i,-;,. .1. \\ Il .dirll ( .al\ 111, Thnma- 
h'nl.aml. I'l.ank I'Mn.-n. |;. \||;ii, I'ldn-,'. 
I .N-t.a \ . 'riiniiim. II .a ml nt Inn -. 'I'lii'i , 
'Ml,' l.ai^,' di li^.al inn- fi,,ni tin i:ik- ami 
"tli,i fi.itninal .ami llni i,-ii It ii r,a I i.,..|ii-, 
I'ln I I- w as ;i iman II ilic^nt .1 i-|.|;i \ nl 
lln\\ ■■: ., I mdii.l i II- -.x ,-i a I |.|,'.-, - Il mil 
|.l i.lllillill' III, III li. I - nf t h. ^. \. I ' 
I lit I I an III w a- in ( )|i| < . a I \ ,a i \ ,-, iml . i \ 

\|'|'i ,-.i.at i,.|i 1. 1 .M 1 . \\ ,1, h ■- \ .aiii, I,. 
'In li.adi- w.a- ,-t i iii.a I , d in :i -I ;il ,aiiriil 
In 1 1 III r\ I 'iiin. .1- fnllnw -: 

■'I'aliiidK W'.hdi w.a- :i in.an nt r.aia 
a I'll it \ . Win 11 ,-:i I I,'. I II |.iiM I ,1V n|.l n inll- 
.aml f.irl-. In- \\:i- , \ , |- i,':i,ly In i;i\i iin 
l'ia-,'il \i,'U,- and li.nl an nnn-il.al w,a\ nl 
ii-a-niiiiiL; niil III,' |.rii|i, I rh.anml I,, |iiii 

-111 . I l. U.is :i ln\\, 1- ,,| -I 1,11-1 h III l,\ 

unm .|,a \ - n|inn ,|m-t i,in- nl mil ma I i n 
|nrl:ini-i In Ih, .'-M,ii,'1\ ,,| .\ imii.-.i n 
I'Ini i-t - .ami 1 h. nhl.r n,n,r.al inn wniihl 

ll\\a\ - Innk ll|.nli l';it W.l.dl '- . 1 . 1 \ i.-. 
n it h LI .'.at t .1 \ (II . 

''Ill W.I- -1 i-i III il In till I r.a II .1 ml 
'A ill !"■ iiii--,-il .a- I I,.- \-,-,-ii-- I ,ill ,,iK ' ' 



THE OFFICIAL CATALOGUE 

\\'liili .all i.t I I,,. I,, :, V ^ ;i,\ ,..t ;_.,•,• u , 
a ml |.i rl ini ; ii.a i \ w ,,i k i n I Im |.| i|i.a r.a I ina 
I'f I II.' nil llll-rl l|.t fnl I Im' ( )|li,'l,al ( :il,'l 

In-m- nf St.audaidi/i'd I'lant Naan- h.a- 

hcell r |,|,-; ( ,| I ,,!' -,\ ,i;i j llli.nt 11-. It 

h.a- liri'ii fniiml t hat , in m dm t -. -n,-ni , 
ill,' i'i'i|ii i I'l'.l a,('ii I .■lev ;in.| ca-x i.-fm cii,-. 
iili.ahly. till' li-l- nl , ,1111111(111 ;ilnl -cimi 
' iii.' mi nil'- a ml i hi -|iiTi:i 1 li -t - inii-l 1.. 



tin:ill\ ,'i--cinl.l,'.| ami .dn'rkid in al|di.'i 
lii'tii.il -.■i|ii,'m',' l.\' niil\ nil,' |.,'r-i)n. 

I'r. I'. V. < nx ill,', rniti'd Strifes 
1 .1.1 ;i II i-t . i- till' nil.' man in the s,ai|ie nf 

I hi- lin.'ll \\..| k hi'-t li't.'.l In I lill- hail. lie 

it. .ami 111- i- ii-in- ,'ill i.f hi- time that 
It i- |.n--il,|, II, ,|i\ ,-i t I'l nni hi- nllicial 
dm 1.'- U>\\ .ard I h.-il mid. 1 1 w.a- n il 

i",ali/i'i| hnw aid i-. .|illi.-iilt .ami -lew 

till- uni'k \\,.ii|i| I,,'. \ll .ai, , \,',-,'i|in-l\ 
.■I II v inn- I'm .-I II ,',a li \ . ..in|.|. I inn nl' it . 
Im; il i- laitinly im j.n-- 1 1.1.- In ex j.i-.l it ,' 

It III \ nlld t he limit nl til. |,l ,..|l|i't inll ii\' 
nil.' ,ild.' |,,art i,i|,,a 111. Tin' t \ [,,■-, ■! t i n - 
i- |,| (m I I--I II- rill-.' Il|...ll till rnlll|il,t inn 

I.f 1 h,' I i.|.\ . 

'I'lii- -l.a I I'lmiil i- i--iini| III lii'li.alf nl 
till iiiaiiN |.,i-nii- \\ Im li.a\,' -ii l.-mi l,,'.| 
f.ii .ainl ,ai.' anxinii- In i'i'.-ci\,- tin- i-.at.-i 

InUn,'. \- tin- Wnik |.|'n,',',' I-. it- ,|ll.alit\ 

.■1 ml im|.n! I:i n.-. imi .-.a-,' in . -; iniat inn. 
a II I v\ ,' -iinna el \ I i ii-l I hn-.' w hn li;i \ r 
-iili-ci ili.'d will i..ali/c Ih.al the -nl. 
.■nllllll i 1 1 .-. i- ,|,.in^ it- \.-|\ l..'>1 I'l.l 
.',a I 1\ . ninph't Inn, t In .!-la \ - I,, i n- i In.-, 
lmiin--i 111- to fnici-.a-t . 

|-'re(|,'i'i,ds I .a w ( »lni-l ,'.|. 
< 'hairm.an ,i| Snlima nit... 

Pawtucket, R. I. Il,iii\ .1 l.llmi 

ri'iix ,'\|.,',-t- In .11'. I t h,' ' I .nl. in Ih, 
m.ar flit inc. II,' will Im-in t h- m m-t i,,ii 
n I a - mmi hnn-, ;, l,,,iit .1 ii h I . 

Spartaiihiirg. S. C. I'. I.. i.miti\ h,,- 

• ..iil^ht th,' iiit.i',-t .it I'l.. I \\ . S:i-- ill 
I'li'd'- l"!nu,i (laid, 11 .-iinl I- m.w -nl- 

n" 111 I . \\ 1 . S;|-- will .'.,||t nil,, fi,| III, 

|il'c-nlit ill till- ,lii|.li.\ nf I'l,',!'- I''|.i\\.'i 
•iaidi'ii ;iinl III- inti'iitinii •:] \\ , il.ailiv 
i- t'. .|i'\.'l',|. ,a l,ai'_;.' Ini-im--. llm .'ni.,-- 

I'm:,!' nl the i.'l-l li^lili-mi innllth- I'll 

.'nil r.a -i II - him In l,,di.'\,' linn,' i- |.lmii\ 

nl . ,|.|inll II II i I \ 



28 



The Florists^ Review 



JcNB 1. 1922 




II 



Established 1897, 
by a. li. Grant. 

Published every Thursday by 
The Fix)rist3* Pubhshino Co., 

S00-S60 Oaxton BuUdlnrr, 

808 South Dcuirborn St., Ohica«o. 

Tel., Wabash 8195. 

Befflstered cable address, 

Florvlew, Chicago. 

Entered as second class matter 
Dec. 3, 1897, at the poet-oflace at Ohi- 
cago. 111., under the Act of March 
8. 1879. 

Subscription price, (2.00 a year. 
To Canada, $3.00; to Europe, $4.00. 

Advertlslngr rates quoted on 
request. Only strictly trade ad> 
vertlains accepted. 



i 



Eesults bring advertising. 
The Eeview brings results. 

No longer docs the florists' season end 
with Memorial day. Those who make a 
special effort to do so keep right on 
selling flowers through the summer. 

Most members of the trade today pay 

their bills promptly. Some fail to meet 

due dates because they cannot, but the 

, largest, number do so merely through 

neglect. 

Many more persons would buy plants 
for window boxes if they were properly 
urged. This is a department of our busi- 
ness that has not been developed as it 
should be. 

Many renders have responded to the 
Editor's request for clippings of their 
Mothers' day advertisements. Thank you. 
Send the Memorial day advertisements 
along, please. 

Now that freight rates are ordered 
down, is it too much to expect that ex- 
press rates also will be reduced? This 
seems to be a place where the Society of 
American Florists might well take the 
initiative. 

High prices are not so ruinous in this 
line of business as poor quality. Fresh 
flowers that last a fair length of time 
usually convince a customer that they are 
worth a good figure, but flowers that droop 
ere they are in the vase at home produce 
dissatisfaction at the cheapest price. 

Advances in coal prices lately are laid 
at the door of speculators, who would take 
advantage of the consumers' anxiety over 
the present strike to reap exorbitant 
profits. But so recently was the public 
badly bitten by these gentlemen that coal 
dealers and consumers alike are taking 
steps to prevent their activities. 

After a lapse of five years, during 
which experiment was made of a society 
journal, the proceedings of the convention 
of the Society of American Florists again 
appear in volume form. The book con- 
taining the doings at Washington last 
August is slimmer than its predecessors, 
containing only 176 pages. Its compact- 
ness is due to inclusion only of the actual 
proceedings of this convention, in addi- 
tion to a membership list, and to typo- 
graphical style. A neat volume has been 
provided members by Secretary John 
Young. Many will be glad to liave the 
list of members for reference once more. 



Don't be satisfied to regard flowers as 
so much merchandise to be sold. Know 
enough about them to arouse your custom- 
ers ' enthusiasm. 

Reports indicate that employment is 
on the rise and the resumption of divi- 
dends is beginning — two good straws in 
the business wind, for florists. 

May surely was a record month for the 
trade, but unless all signs fail the summer 
now close at hand will put to a test the 
endurance powers of many in the business. 
It will be in line to collect outstanding 
accounts and to clean up outstanding 
liabilities. The florist who owes nothing 
is safe under any conditions. 

June 1 finds more than the usual quan- 
tity of bedding stock still unplanted. It is 
due, principally, to weather conditions. 
Much of the stock was not ready earlier, 
wet and cold retarded bedding out and 
experienced labor has been short of the 
needs of the last ten days. Probably the 
bedding season, scarcely begun in many 
places, will last later than usual this year. 

FREIGHT REDUCTION. 

Eeductions of about ten per cent in 
freight rates, effective July 1, were 
called for in a decision of the interstate 
commerce commission last week. With 
the exception of farm products, prac- 
tically all classes of traffic are affected 
by the ruling. 

A total reduction of $225,000,000 in 
the operating revenues of the railroads 
will be caused by the ruling, according 
to railroad executives. Supplementing 
the reductions which have been put into 
effect since August, 1920, it is figured 
that an aggregate reduction of $400,- 
000,000 in the operating receipts of the 
railroads will have been caused. 

Florists will be able to save a few 
dollars on coal by this ruling. Other 
^ctual benefits are slight, though much 
is expected in the way of encourage- 
ment to manufacturer^, and producers, 
resulting in general business stimula- 
tion, which the trade hopes to share in. 

THE COAL MARKET. 

The coal market in the last week has 
been markedly affected by two things, 
the reduction in freight rates and the 
increased output of the mines, though 
the strike still keeps production at 
about half of normal. 

A leading coal trade journal stated 
May 27: "General market conditions 
in the coal industry received a decided 
setback May 24, when it was announced 
at Washington that the commerce com- 
mission had ordered a reduction in 
freight rates. Up until that announce- 
ment was made the demand for coal in 
practically all sections had continued on 
about the same level as the last few 
weeks. That is, buyers from practically 
all of the railroads, steel mills, utilities 
and larger industrial concerns were to 
be found in practically all fields where 
production was still in force. These ap- 
parently were anxious to obtain coal, 
regardless of prices, and this attitude 
on their part, as in weeks past, forced 
prices still higher than they had been 
at any time since the strike was called 
on April 1. When the rate reduction 
was announced, however, an immediate 
reaction set in and the demand became 
almost entirely absent. This had the 
effect of softening prices to a consider- 
able extent. Owing to the great demand 
that prevailed up until May 24, every 
fffort was made by producing mines +o 



increase their output, with the result 
that greater outputs were noted in al- 
most every field still working." 

Last week, the eighth of the coal 
strike, opened with a decided increase 
in production, according to the weekly 
report of the geological survey. The re- 
turns so far received indicate an out- 
put of soft coal close to 5,000,000 tons. 

Final reports for the seventh week 
of the strike. May 15 to 20, showed an 
output of 4,472,000 tons of bituminous 
coal. Anthracite production remains 
close to zero. 



RECOVERY PERMANENT. 

After watching the signs that make 
up the business barometer seesaw for 
many months, the commercial reporting 
agencies find the change for the better 
now taking on a certain and enduring 
aspect. Last week Dun's review of the 
general business situation said: 

"With stronger underlying condi- 
tions the current business recovery re- 
flects more positive characteristics of 
permanency. Progress is still impeded 
by labor troubles in certain important 
industries, but response to constructive 
factors is more clearly evident in the 
improved sentiment and revival of buy- 
ing and the reversal of the price move- 
ment has become more decisive. De- 
clines in various markets, continuing 
for many months, have been succeeded 
by an advancing tendency and demand 
in different instances is being stimu- 
lated by the prospect of higher quota- 
tions to follow. 

"Except in retail channels, where 
price concessions have not infrequently 
been necessary to maintain distribution, 
most sellers are now more favorably sit- 
uated, with orders more numerous and 
in some cases extending farther into 
the future. While purchasing to cover 
closely defined requirements remains 
the prevailing policy, commitments in 
anticipation of forward needs are un- 
mistakably increasing, and some lead- 
ing producers, in contrast to their re- 
cent position, are now well engaged 
ahead. Such phases as these not un- 
naturally find reflections in statistical 
barometers which measure the rise and 
fall of business. 

"With commodity prices at about the 
same general level, bank clearings this 
week are considerably in excess of last 
year's; commercial failures, although 
still above the average, have lately di- 
minished in number, and car loadings 
disclose gains in railroad traffic, which 
may become more marked under the 
stimulus of the freight rate reductions 
just announced." i 

PLENTY OF DEMAND. 

Once in a while someone reports lack 
of demand for his stock this season, 
but the preponderance of evidence is 
that the demand this year has been 
as strong, in proportion to the supply, 
as it ever was in any other season. Most 
of the reports are like this: 

We are sold out for tlie prespnt. thanks to The 
Review. — Schlund Flor.il Co., CiiinberlaiK], Md., 
Mny 20, 1921. 

We thouRht we h.irt yon stuck this se.Tson, but 
you nre too much for us nK'aiii tliis your. You 
have brought us all the dracipna onlcrs we can 
fill.— Frost & Spence, Greenville, 0., May 19, 
1922. 

I have had the lii'^t of results from ada in 
The Review ami I tliank you for it. — Fred W. 
Baumgras. Lansing, Mich.. May 20, 1922. 

If you hear a man complain of the 
cost of advertising, you can be pretty 
certain he spends a good bit of money 
elsewhere than in The Review. 



-n^r^fl- ,-,■-- 



JUNB 1, 1922 



The Florists^ Review 



29 



NEW YORK. 



The Maxket. 

The market last week was well sup- 
plied with flowers of all kinds. The 
supply was subject to a demand not 
sufficient to consume it; consequently 
the heyday of the street man again oc- 
curred, numbers of peddlers being in 
evidence on the business streets. An 
avalanche of peonies from southern 
points upset the market balance and 
sent prices of several staples down a 
point or two. The peony arrivals were 
moved at any prices obtainable for 
them, from $2 to $5 per hundred, and 
much stock in a condition to warrant 
it was tucked away in cold storage for 
Memorial day. Peonies from Pennsyl- 
vania are pouring in and are better in 
quality than the southern stock. Lo- 
cally grown peonies, liybrids, are com- 
ing in also, so there is a clash which 
makes the survival of the fittest rather 
hard on the survivors. It was expected 
in this neighborhood that peonies would 
be late, but they are really ahead of 
time, the only late ones being of the 
ofiicinalis type, flowers from which are 
coming in with the better kinds and 
bring practically nothing. 

Eoses have taken on their summer 
condition, both as regards quality and 
quantity, and prices quoted last week 
are barely maintained, as concessions 
are frequent to effect clearances. Amer- 
ican Beauty continues to arrive in fair 
quantity and to move within the price 
range of $15 to $40 per hundred. In 
hybrid teas the price range is about 
$1.50 to $10 per hundred, the grading 
not exceeding the fancy. The best 
blooms of Premier bring a trifle more, 
as do those of Hadley and Crusader. 
Scott Key comes in the Beauty range. 

Carnations show little signs of fall- 
ing off, and fluctuate in value almost 
daily. The quality has been affected by 
somewhat warmer weather, and evident 
inattention on the part of some grow- 
ers. Not all arrivals are taken through 
legitimate channels, the street men car- 
rying off much of the held-over stock. 
The price range is $2 to $4 per hundred 
for the best grades. 

Cattleyas are not in abundant supply, 
but their movement is slow at $35 to 
$100. Stray shipments of spray orchids 
arrive, but not in sufficient quantity to 
establish particular prices. Gardenias 
are not overplentiful, but more than 
enough for the demand at prices not 
exceeding $2 per dozen. 

The supply of white lilies has short- 
ened considerably, and prices last 
quoted are pretty well maintained un- 
der present market conditions. Lilies 
of the valley are in oversupply and sales 
drag materially. 

Sweet peas continue in great abund- 
ance,^ moving slowly. Snapdragon is 
also in heavy supply, with a sluggish 
movement. A little northern-grown 
lilac arrives, but has now to meet heavy 
shipments of the wild spiraea. Other 
flowers of a miscellaneous character 
available are white and yellow daisies, 
Spanish and German irises, mignonette, 
cornflowers, Centaurea imperialis, lu- 
pines, pyrethrum, feverfew, gladioli, 
delphiniums, pansies, schizanthus, pop- 
pies, calendulas, myosotis, ranunculi, 
stocks and columbines. 

T'jj^^T- Various Notes. 

The white earnaticm appears to have 
been selected as an emblem fot unother 



organization of national renown. At a 
funeral in Eutherford, N. J., some 
twenty-five members of the Ku Klux 
Klan appeared in full regalia and each 
threw a white carnation into the grave. 

It was arranged by the Horticultural 
Society of New York to hold an exhibi- 
tion of peonies, orchids, roses, shrubs 
and herbaceous plants in connection 
with the exhibition of the American Iris 
Society, May 27, in the Museum build- 
ing. New York Botanical Garden, but 
since no entries were received, the show 
was abandoned. 

W. E. Marshall & Co., 166 West 
Twenty-third street, last week had an 
excellent display of cut iris blooms on 
view at their store. Previously they 
had staged a fine exhibition of lilac. 

Eobert S. Eennison, of We.stbury, is 
laying out and planting the extension 
grounds of the new million-dollar high 
school at Hempstead. 

Major P. J. O'Keefe, of Boston, was 
in the city May 23, returning from Syra- 
cuse, where he had been to deliver an 
address on publicity before the vege- 
table growers and florists. 

I. S. Hendrickson, manager of the 
Flowerfield establishment of John Lewis 
Childs, Inc., staged several groups of 
iris last Friday at the exhibition of the 
American Iris Society. 

The many friends of Patrick "Welch, 
of Boston, were grieved to learn of his 
death Thursday, May 25, after a long 
illness. The deceased was always a wel- 
come visitor to the New York flower 
markets. 

The number of those sending in their 
names to the chairman of the New York 
Florists' Club's transportation commit- 
tee as anxious to take the de-luxe trip 
to the Kansas City convention is now 
over thirty. The committee has issued 
a splendid booklet descriptive of the 
trip out and return by way of the Great 
Lakes, the cost of which, including 
everything, is $220 for the round"trlp. 

Prof. A. C. Beal, of Cornell Univer- 
sity, was a visitor last week. 

J. H. P. 



CHICAGO. 



The Market. 



Perhaps in an effort to square himself 
for what he did to us at Mothers' day, 
the weather-man has been kind to the 
Chicago market for Memorial day. 
Outside of having provided an unusual 
quantity of blooms in private gardens, 
weather conditions were ideal in this 
territory this Memorial day. Cool, 
bright days for a week preceding the 
big flower day produced large quanti- 
ties of stock and made the quality all 
that could be expected at this time of 
year. It is the general opinion that 
the Chicago market never has sold 
more flowers for Memorial day than it 
did this year and that the average 
quality of the greenhouse stock never 
has been better. Whereas Mothers' day 
brought complaints without parallel in 
the recent history of this market, it is 
figured that the Memorial day stock 
will give general satisfaction. 

The volume of business for Memorial 
day has been enormous, but the de- 
mand was spread over almost a week 
and at no time was the market more 
than momentarily short of any item. 
It was a condition which led to a big 
volume, but low prices. It was evident 
that the observance of Memorial day 
would begin on Sunday, because ship- 



ping orders called for large quantities 
of stock to go out Thursday. There 
was a steady increase in the volume of 
shipments until Sunday, which was one 
of the biggest days this market ever 
has known. The exjiress company gave 
delivery and pick-up service all day, 
up to 5 p. ni., at which time all but a 
few scattering shipments were ready. 
Earely has the express company taken 
off this market a larger quantity of 
stock than was boxed and ready for 
the last trucks to the stations on Sun- 
day. As a matter of fact the quantity 
exceeded the expectations of the ex- 
press company and it was necessary 
to make extra overtime trips to get the 
mountains of boxes hauled away. Even 
after this big day's shipping, many 
of the iceboxes were full, though most 
of it was the kind of stock not in re- 
quest for the shipping trade. 

Probably the peony played the part 
of first importance in the Memorial 
day business. Cool weather retarded 
the local crop, so that the supply was 
not so large as it has been in some 
other years. Because of the conditions 
under which southern peonies were cut 
and shipped, there was considerable dif- 
ference in the quality of the stock from 
various sources. Nearly everyone was 
afraid of festiva maxima because it has 
been behaving badly this season. The 
stock cut early and put in storage dur- 
ing the heat wave has come out in poor 
shape; nearly every bunch was a 
"shaker." On the other hand, some 
festiva maxima cut farther north un- 
der cooler weather conditions has held 
up beautifully. The trouble has been 
that no one could tell from the looks 
of it how any lot of this variety would 
behave. It was noted, too, that the 
buyers wanted pink peonies instead of 
white. Practically all the good peonies 
were out of storage May 28, except 
small quantities reserved for city cus- 
tomers. The quantity remaining was 
of the kind that delights the man who 
takes his stand in a wagon at the ceme- 
tery gate. There was an abundance of 
peonies for him this year. The average 
price of the peonies handled up to Dec- 
oration day this year has been lower 
than was expected. While any price 
was a good price for a considerable 
part of the cut, the abundance of the 
low grade stock served to depress the 
price of the better grades. Also, from 
some sections cancellations came be- 
cause their local peonies had made the 
date. 

Carnations occupied second place. 
Having suffered severe losses on car- 
nations at Mothers' day, there was less 
than the usual disposition to hold them 
back for Memorial day. Also, the 
weather, which was highly unfavorable 
to the keeping quality of carnations at 
Mothers' day, was ideal at Memorial 
day. No doubt the disappointment 
many retailers experienced on orders of 
carnations at Mothers' day had some- 
thing to do with the cutting down of 
orders for Memorial day. At any rate 
the orders were not so large as many 
shippers had expected them to be. 
There were enough carnations to go 
around, and some to spare, with the 
result that average prices will be low. 

There are varying reports as to roses. 
Some houses say their rose orders took 
everything good, even that it was nec- 
essary to cut some of the orders for the 
better grades of stock. On the other 
hand, some houses say their orders ran 

(Continued on page 84.) 






% 



\ 



/ 



;.('bu.^ 



'' ^b 



30 



The Florists^ Review 



June 1, lua- 






FLOWERS For { 

And School 



Amlings has the stock you need 



^iiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiuiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii(iii'!iiiiiiiii{iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii:iK,- 



CURRENT 



We believe we have the largest 
and finest supply of Roses to be 
found anywhere in America. Send 
us today's order and judge for 
yourself. 



PEONIES 

We handle quality stock. Use it 
now and you will please your 
customers, not lose them. Send 
your next order to Amling. 



I PREMIER and RUSSELL 

I Per 100 

I Special $25.00 

I Medium $15 00 to 20.00 

I Select lOOOto 12.00 

I Short 4.00 to 6.00 

I COLUMBIA 

I Special $18.00 to $20.00 

I Medium .'^ 12 00 to 5.00 

I Select 8.1^ to 10.00 

I Short 4.00 10 6.00 

I MILADY and CRUSADER 

1 Special $25.00 

I Medium $15.00 to 20.00 

I Select 10.00 to 12.00 

I Short 4.00 to 6.00 

I BUTTERFLY and GOLDEN RULE 

I Special $20.00 

I Medium $15.00 to 18.00 

I Select 10.00 to 12.00 

I Short 4.00 10 600 

I OPHELIA and MONTROSE 

I Special $18.00 

I Medium $12.00 to 15.00 

I Select 8.00 to 10.00 

I Short 4.00 to ().0<^» 

I SUNBURST 

I DOUBLE WHITE KILLARNEY 

1 Special $18.00 to $20.00 

I Medium 12,oo te 15.00 

I Select 8.00 to 10.00 

I Short 4.00 to 6.00 

I Rxtra Sp^oial Rones billed accordingly. 

5 

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E. C. AMLING CO. 



store Open from 7:30 A. M. 
to 5 P. M., daylitfht saving time. 



The Largest, Best Equipped and Most Centrally 
Located Wholesale Cut Flower House In Chicago 






JUNB 1, 1922 



The Florists^ Review 



31 



Wedding Work 

Closings 

a large supply of finest quality 



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PRICE LIST 

CORSAGE ROSES 

Cecile Brunner 



Per 100 

$3.00 



CARNATIONS 

Large and Fancy, assorted $3.00 to $4.00 

Laddie 600 

[Remember there is a great deal of difference 
in the quality of different Krovrers' carnations. 
These are all good.] 



SWEET PEAS 



Butterfly . 



$1.00 to $2.00 



I 



PEONIES 

Select $4.00 to $ 5.00 

Extra Fancy b.OO to 8.0J 



VALLEY 

Always "headquarters," we have 
a special crop for June. The 
bride prefers Valley. Let her have 
it; you can get it here. 



to 
to 
to 
to 
to 
to 



MISCELLANEOUS 

Valley per 100, 

Easter Lilies per 100, $15.00 

Snapdragons perdoz., l.uu 

Daisies per 100, 1.(0 

Calendula per loo, 3.00 

Mignonette per 100, 4.00 

Pansies per doz . bunches, 1 .00 

Gladioli per Kd, 10.00 to 

Statice, Russian per bunch, 

Statice, other per bunch, 

GREEN GOODS 

Ferns, new per 1000, 

Plumosus per uuncn, $0.50 to 

Sprengeri per bunch, .60 to 

Adiantum per 100. 1.60 to 

Smllax per doz. strings, 3.00 ts 

Galax per 1000, 

Coontie Leaves per 100, 

Leucothoe per 100. 



$6.00 

18.00 

2.00 

3.00 

4.00 

6.00 

1.60 

12.00 

1.60 

.50 



.$3.00 
.?b 
.76 
2.00 
4.00 
2.00 
3.00 
1.00 



I 



Many growers are out of Peas as 
the result of hot weather in May, 
but you can get good Peas by or- 
dering of Amling's. 



Prices Subject to Market Changes § 

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169-175 N. Wabash Ave 

CHICAGO, ILL 



Long Distance Telephony 

Central 1977 

1975 






32 



ESE 



The Florists^ Review 



June 1. 1022 






GEO. C. WEILAND, President 
FRED SCHRAMM, Vice-President 
RUDOLPH ELLSWORTH, Secretary 
CHARLES McCAULEY, Treasurer 



PAUL R. KLINGSPORN, 
Manager 



Our Customers Want— and Get— the Best There Is 




WHOLESALE GD9VEPS ^'/ CUT fL9WEDS''-^ PLANTS V] 




182 N. Wabash Ave., 



L. D. Pkone Priyate Exchange 



Central 0282 



CHICAGO, ILL. 







Peonies 

Gladioli 

Carnations 

Sweet Peas 



1^ 



The rose is probably the most dependable flower for shipping 
in warm weather and we have arranged for a large supply of 
specially grown roses for summer cutting. Crops now ready. 

These are the flowers which make the most show for the 

money. We have fine stock in quantity. Can fill all 

^^^^^^^^■^^ orders up to the end of June. All colors. Big value. 

^^1^ JJ^^IJ A large supply of the best varieties and popular colors. 
^J*^^i"ii Indoor grown. Show your trade this fine stock now, 
"""^^"■^^^^■^ ahead of the man who waits for the outdoor crop before 
he begins to handle Gladioli. 



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■■fiT'''r'S'~^^"^ / j-lT ■ ■••"— ^^Ti^ '^• 



J0N« 1. 1922 



The Florists^ Review 




THE HOUSE THAT SATISFIES 




182 N.Wabash Avenue 



Chicago 



CURRENT PRICE LIST 

Chicago's Finest Roses 



Premier 



Columbia 



Milady 
Crusader 



Special. 
Long ... 
Mediam 
Short. . . 



Per 100 

.$20.00 to $!>.").( K I 

, 15.00 to 18.(K) 

, 10.00 to 12.00 

().(H> to 8.00 



Special $1k:(X) to $20.(X) 

Long 12.00 to Ir).(H) 

Medium 8.00 to lO.OO 

Short o.OO to <).00 

Special $20.0() to $2r).(Ki 

Long 15.00 to 18.00 

Medium.. 10.(X) to 12.(X) 

Short <).00 to 8.fX) 

Special 120.00 to $25.00 

Long 15.(xt to IH.(X) 

Medium 10.00 to 12.00 

Short fi.OO to 8.00 



Butterfly 
Sunburst 



White 



Angehis 



Special. 
Long ... 
Medium. 
Short... 



Per 100 

$18 (H) 

$12.00 to 15.(K) 

. 8.(H) to 10.00 

. 5.(H) to «.(KI 



Special $18.(Hi 

Long $12.IK) to 15(H) 

Medium 8.00 to 10.00 

Short 5.00 to 6.(^» 

Special $18.(K) 

Loog $12.(N) to 15.(KI 

Medium 8.(H) to l().0(i 

Short 5,()() to ().(Ki 



Special . 
Long ... 
Medium. 
Short... 



$18.0(1 
.$12.0(» to 15.00 
. 8.(» to 10.(H> 
. 5.0(> to ().(K) 



Extra Special Rosea Billed Accordingly. 



CARNATIONS 



Best stock . . .^ $2.00 to $4.00 per 100 

Our selection $30.00 per 1000 



Miscellaneous Flowers 



Camatloiu, Laddie per 100. $6.(K) to $8.00 

Sweet Peas per 100. 1.00 to 2.00 

Larkspur per bunch, 1.00 to 2.00 

Orchids, Cattleyas each. 1.5() 

Lupines, fancy i)er bunch, .75 to 1.00 

Gladioli I)er 1(H). (1.(X) to 12.()() 



Valley 

Daisies 

Giganteom Lilies 

Calla Lilies , 

Snapdragons 

Calendulas, Orange King. 



.per Km, 
.per 1(K), 
.per 1(K), 
.per do7... 
■ per doz. . 
.,l>er KM). 



$ 1.0<» 

15.(K) 

1.50 

1.00 

;{.(X) 



$ fi.CK) 
2.(K> 

20.00 
2.0(1 
2.0(1 
4.(K) 



PEONIES 



Best stock $4.00 to $6.00 per 100 

Our selection $40.00 per 1000 



Ferns. 
Ferns, 



Plnmosus 

Sprengeri , 

Coontie Leaves. 
Smilax, strings . . 



Decorative Greens 

$6.00 per 

new 4.00 per 

. 50c buuch Adlantum , 

,35c to 50c bunch Galax 

Leucothoe 

Boxwood 



1000 
1000 



$3.00 per 100 
4.00 per doz. 



.$ 



1.50 i)er IfKi 

2.00 per KKKi 

10.00 per KKHt 

.$12.50 per 50-lb. bag 



Prices subject to change %vltliout Notice. 



"Service to swear BY, not AT" 



■a ™! 



m 



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rrz-.k'fFs-i- 



34 



The Florists^ Review 



June 1. 1922 



L. D. Pbona: Central 3120 or L. D. Phone: Doarborn S14S 



Use BUDLONG'S Flowers 

For Your June Wedding Work and School Closings 



BUSSBLL 



COLUMBIA 



PKEMIER 



BOLADY 



HEARST 



OPHELIA 



Select Roses 

Do you want a good White Rose? If so, order our 
Double White Killamey, the only good white on the Chicago market 

SUNBURST BUTTERFLY DUNLOP MONTROSE NESBIT 



A Large Supply of 

CARNATIONS, Quality Stock, IN LARGE SUPPLY 

Gladioli, Calendulas, Callas, Easter Lilies, Stocks, Pansies, 
Lupines and all other Seasonable Cut Flowers 

A Nice Lot of Cornflower and Gyps 

USE OUR VALLEY FOR YOUR WEDDING WORK 

ONCE TRIED YOU WILL NOT BE SATISFIED WITH ANY OTHER 



Bsxwood, Ferns, Adiantum, Plumosus, Sprengeri, Mexican Iyj, Coontie Leaves 



II yn wait fud itNk ud |Md treatRent, biy %l Cluci|i*i niit ip-ti-dite ui kft-licatel Wktknle Cit FIiwci Hiim 

J. a. BUDLONG CO. 



QUALITY 

SPEAKS 

LOUDER 

THAN 

PRICES 



WHOLESALE CUT FLOWERS AND GREENS 

Roses, Valley and Carnations our Specialties 
184-186 North Wabash Ave. 

CHICAGO 



Wl ARK CLOSSD ALL DAY SUNDAY 



PRICES 

AS 

LOW 

AS 

OTHERS 



We are in constant touch with market conditions and when a decline takes place you can rely upon orders sent us receiving such benefit 



lightly on roses and that they had some 
left every night during the week. 

With the abundance of the three 
leaders, peonies, carnations and roses, 
the miscellaneous stock fared rather 
poorly for Memorial day. While the 
high class stores try to show a variety 
of flowers, the merchants who handle 



quantities for an occasion like Memorial 
day prefer to deal with the smallest 
possible number of varieties. They 
never take the miscellaneous stock when 
they can get a suflScient quantity of the 
big staple items. The result was that 
sweet peas, valley, Easter lilies, callas, 
snapdragons, daisies, calendulas, mig- 



nonette, gladioli, feverfew, candytuft, 
etc., needed pushing to get into the 
business and these items sold only at 
low prices. 

The total sales made a handsome fig- 
ure, because the business was distrib- 
uted over such an unusual number of 
days. While Sunday was the big ship- 



"ij^|n;^.MNiJ!^Pl" ' .Li'^>i^uiU!',^f'^W;Pf!|!!P9*pi^^ 



iTS^B" 



• '\",.ft ™f'"*' . ' ■**";, 



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Jdnb 1, 1922 



The Florists' Review 



35 



KENNICOn BROS. CO. 

Peonies » In AD Colors 
Roses " Quality Stock Only 
Carnations » By Specialists 



QUALITY 




« SERVICE 



I 






Length of 

Stem 
in inches 

8 to 10 
12 to 15 
18 to 20 
24 to 28 
30 to 36 
36 to 42 



Short S. 

Good Short G. S. 

Medium M. 

Good Medium G. M. 

Long L. 

Fancy F, 



Sunburst 

Ophelia 

Dunlop 



■Price per 100- 
White 
Columbia 
Butterfly 



$ 4.00 $ 4.00, 

6.00 $ 6.00 @ 8.00 

8.00;.... 10.00. 

10.00 12.00 @ 15.00. 

$12.00 @ 15.00 18.00 @ 20.00, 

20.00 25.00. 



Peonies per 1000, $50 00 

Peonies per 100, $ 6.00 @ 8.00 

Carnations, fancy per 100, 3.00 @ 4.00 

Sweet Peas, fancy per 100, 1.50 @ 2.00 

Daisies per 100, 2.00 @ 3.00 

Easter Lilies per 100, 12.00 @ 15.00 

Calla Lilies per 100, 12.00 @ 15.00 

Valley per 100, 6.00 

Calendulas per bunch, .35 @ .50 

Stocks per bunch, .35 @ .50 

Larkspur per bunch, .75 @ 1 .00 



Russell 

Premier 

Crusader 



Feverfew per bunch, 

Candytuft per bunch, 

Misrnonette per dozen, 

Snapdrasfons per dozen, 

Smilax per dozen, 

Plumosus per 100, 

Sprensferi per 100, 

Adiantum per 100, 

Leucothoe per 100, 

Ferns per 1000, 

Galax per 1000, 



$10.00 @ 
15.00 @ 
20.00 @ 



$0.35 @ 

.35 @ 

.75 @ 

1.00 @ 

2.50 @ 
3.00 @ 



$ 6.0O 
8 0O 
12.00 
18.00 
25.00 
30.00 



$0.50 
.50 
1.00 
1.50 
4.00 
4.00 
4.00 
1.50 
1.00 
5.00 
2.00 



Long Distance Phone: Central 0466 174 N. Wabash Ave., CHICAGO 



V ■..•>? '^^;'' 



36 



The Florists^ Review 



JuNB 1. 1922 . ' 




LD. PHONES {SrJ^=T,Jl 




WHOLESALE CUT FLOWERS 



30 E. Randolph St., 



■f 



CHICAGO 



..«*" ■<> 



ROSES 

CARNATIONS 



PEONIES 



VALLEY 



PEAS 



and all Flowers in season at Chicago Market Prices 



\)infr (lay. there was a considerable 
ainouut of sliipjiiii}; May 2!> and the lo- 
cal buyers eanie into the market in 
force tiiat day. The city stores liad not 
placed many order.s in advanc^e, count- 
ing that the market would, be abun- 
dantly supplied. Had tliey been seek- 
intj (juality yjoods their calculations 
would have been astray, but Memorial 
day calls for (juantity rather than ipial- 
ity. The regular city tr;ule was fixed 
up in good shape May 29. It was pos- 
sible to meet any buyer's ideas regard- 
ing reasonable prices. Heavy as the 
business was, the market was not clean 
on the evening of May 29 and on the 
morning of Memorial d.ay the hucksters 
hail their inning. The flowers they 
bought would not hav(> been s.atisfac- 
tory in any first-class flower store, but 
it represented a considerable (pi.-intity 
of stock. These buyers practically 
cleaned the market, but they made their 
own prices. 

Tlie Course of Expansion. 

That the retail trade in flowers in 
Chicago is increasing steadily and rather 
rapidlj' no one doubts, but ask almost 
any established retailer and he will tell 
you his sales fluctuate little from year 
to year. How, then, is the increase 
made? The answer is found in the 
large number of new stores that have 
been 0])ened, not in the downtown cen- 
ter, but in outlying business sections. 
During and .pist after the war this 
growth was arrested and the estab- 
lished stores profited greatly thereby, 
but in the last two years the number of 
new stores opened has exceeded any- 
thing in the previous history of the 
tr.nde. Check up on almost any of the 



PEONIES FOR JUNE WEDDINGS 
AND SCHOOL CLOSINGS 

FINE PEONIES.... $4.00, $5.00 and $6.00 per 100 
SPECIAL FANCY PEONIES $8.00 per 100 

We offer High Gntde Locally Grown Peonies — the result of years of concen- 
trated effort for a auoerior grade. Ready tc ship in any color or quantity. 



Roses 

Carnations 

Miscellaneous 

CUT FLOWERS 
and GREENS 



Tonn 




30 East Randolph St., CHICAGO 



L. D. Phone: Central 6284 



newer outlying theater neighborhoods 
and one or two new flower stores will 
bo found close by. At the same time 
that this outlet for flowers has broad- 
ened so markedly, there has been no 
important new store opened in the loop. 
Indeed, the disposition is to leave the 
loop, where rents are too high to per- I 



CUT FLOWERS 

PEONIES, Pink, White and Red, 
$4.00 per 100. Cash or C. 0. D. 

CHAS. F. UECKE 

NEW LONDON, WIS. 



.'■'T- "■ '^ - 



r-^-'i 



w -^ r ■ ., -^- 



JUNB 1, 1922 



The Florists' Review 



37 







GOULD'S 





$4.00 and $6.00 
per 1 OO 

USE PEONIES 

For Weddings and Commencements 

Fine, fresh, fragrant flowers— nothing else makes so 
good a show for the money. 

For quick action, wire or phone to 

A. L. RANDALL CO. 

Exclusive sales agents for Gould*s Select Peonies 
ISO N. Wabash Avenue CHICAGO, ILL. 

Grown by GOULD COMPANY, Onar^a, 111. 
Five Peony Farms 

MitMtippi Tennenee Southern Illinoia Northern Illinoit Wiaconain 



Best Quality PEONIES AH Colors 

A Choice and Abundant Supply of 



Columbia 
RusmU 
Sunburst 
Brunner 
White Killamey 
Crusader 
Mrs. Ward 



Premier 
MUady 
Ophelia 
Butterfly 
Orchids 



Calendulas Daisies 

Carnations Easter Lilies 

Stocks Snapdragons 

Svreet Peas Mignonette 
Valley Pansies 

Larkspur Boxwood 

Peonies Calla Lilies Galax 



Ferns 
Adiantuna 
Plumosus 

Smilaz 
Coontie Leaves 
Mexican Ivy 

Sprengeri 



MYRTLE, exclusive with us, 35c per bunch 

We Always Fill Shipping Orders at Low^est Chicago Meurket Prices 



F rne ^ C ompany 



30 E. Randolph St. 



WHCIUSALI FLORISTS 

LD.PlMMRMiMHi6578 



CHICAGO 



, .^ ^- 



'^kv ■>'*'. "V-Ti;, ''-.'' , "f , J!?i * 



38 



The Florists^ Review 



Jdnk 1. 1922 





RANDALL 



WILL HAVE 



A Very Large Supply 



OF ALL KINDS OF 



Flowers for June 

Push the selling — you can depend on 
Randall for all the flowers you need 

See opposite page for Current Prices 



A. L. Randall Company 

180 N. Wabash Avenue CHICAGO 




CUT FLOWERS AND FLORISTS' SUPPLIES 



ORDER FROM 



St. Louis Wholesale Cut Flower Co. 

1406-1408 Pine Street St. Louis, Missouri 



mit much profit. The small neif^hbor- 
bood stores figure seven to ten per cent 
of their sales for rent. They do, most 
of them, from $10,000 to $2.1,000 per 
year gross business, with a few doing 
$30,000 to $50,000, rarely more, and the 
small capital required to start such a 
place makes it seem probable that new 
stores of this kind will be opened as 



rapidly as there is business to support 
them. An interesting point is that 
where such a store is opened by a man 
of experience in the trade, as an em- 
ployee, success almost always follows, 
whereas such an undertaking by some- 
one outside the trade, who expects to 
hire expert help he needs, rarely proves 
permanent. Numerous druggists, con- 



fectioners, tobacconists, etc., have found 
this is a field of no value to those not 
able and willing to work at it. 

Freight and Coal. 

Chicago growers are pleased with the 
announcement of a reduction in freight 
rates. The freight on smokeless coals 
from the Pocahontas and New River 



,,■( .T'lil.. iry- ■ : : -. 



*,>■ 



JcNB 1. 1822 



The Florists^ Review 





GOOD ROSES 

A v^y large supply, all varieties — cuts are at their best 

Good stock $ 6.00 to $15.00 per 100 

Extra fancy special long Premier 20.00 to 25.00 per 100 

CARNATIONS 

Good stock at $2.00, $3.00 and $4.00 per 100 

PEONIES 

Fine home-grown stock. 
Select stock $4.00 and $6.00 per 100 




DAISIES 

White and yellow, $1.00 to $2.00 per 100 

LARKSPUR 

All colors, 35c to 75c bunch. 



VALLEY 

6.00 per 100 



CANDYTUFT 

35c to 50c bunch. 

EASTER LILIES 

$15.00 to $20.00 per 100 

GLADIOLI 

$6.00 to $10.00 per 100 
Fine Greenhouse grown, $12.00 to $15.00 ver 100 



FERNS 



New stock $4.00 per 1000 

Old stock 5.00 per lOOO 

Don 't mitt tales — wire or phone to ut 
for anything you need 



A. L. Randall Company 

180 N. Wabash Ave. CHICAGO 








FOR YOUR WEDDING WORK 



Roses, Carnations, Peonies, Sweet Peas, Lilies, Valley and 
other Flowers for buyers whose trade demands the best. 



JOSEPH FOERSTER CO. 

Wholesale Dealers in Cut Flowers 

160 North Wabash Ave. Ask the man who 

CHICAGO Buys from us 



40 



The Florists^ Review 



Jhn* 1. 1922 



You Will Gain by Sending all Orders to 



ZECH & MANN 

Wholesale Cut Flowers 



30 East Randolph Street 



CHICAGO, ILLINOIS 



We offer you plenty of 

Cut Flow^ers 



in all varieties 



At Market Prices 

If there still is a train that will reach you in time, phone us 
your order and we will rush your order off. Call Central 3283 

Specially Strong on Roses, Carnations, Peonies, 

Valley, Daisies, Greens 



OUR FLOWERS ARE SECOND TO NONE 



'.^CIC 



DOC 



DOC 



one 



DOC 



oac 



one 



one 



one 



one 



one 



fields considerably exceeds the cost of 
the coal and the reduction of ten per 
cent in freight will make quite a mate- 
rial saving for many of the local grow- 
ers. Tlie ])resent freight rate from the 
West Virginia fields to Chicago is $3.58 
per ton. After July 1 there will be a 
saving of 3').S cents. The present 
freight rate from the southern Illinois 
fields is $2.17 per ton. After July 1 
there will be a reduction of 21.7 cents. 
The freight rate from Sullivan county, 
Indiana, at present is $1.88 per ton. 
From the western Kentucky fields it is 
$2.40 per ton and from the eastern Ken- 
tucky district it is $3.43 per ton. 

The coal trade is beginning to urge 
the purchase and immediate delivery of 
fuel for next autumn, basing the rec- 
ommendation on the improbability of 
an early settlement of the miners' 



strike. Not many ' florists, however, 
take these, recommendations seriously, 
lielieving they are prompted by the 
considerable stocks now in dealers' 
hands and by the present extremely 
slow movement. Most florists have 
enough coal on hand to carry them 
some distance into the nutunin. 

The Fair Price List. 

The city's high cost of living "ex- 
pert," whose chief occupation seems to 
be to depress the business of small re- 
tail stores, issued a "fair price list" 
of flowers for Memorial day, hjs first 
undertaking along this line having been 
for Mothers' day. He gave the retail 
florists a little better chance this time 
than he did before. The price list pub- 
lished in the daily papers was as fol- 
lows: 



Mi'iiilxTs of tlio Allied Klurists' Association 
liavi' aerci'd to tho followint; price acliediilea foi- 
ytay 2St and 30, Mr. Pool<» said: IVonies, $1 to 
Ji; a dozpn, dopcndiriK on size; carnations, 75 
cents to $1.50 a dozen: sweet peas, 50 cents to 
7.") cents for a Inincli of twenty five lilooms: 
daisies, 40 cents to M cents j dozen; rosi's. $1.50 
to $i; a dozen; lilies of <}>•■ v;illey. *1 to $l!75 
a dozen. 

Fair prices for rx't'ed i>lanis are ^jiven ;is fol- 
lows: {;eraniiims. 15 to 2."> •ents for .l-inch to 
I inch plants: licRonias, 1.". to 20 cents for plants 
of I lie same size: French hyilranKeas, 50 cents to 
.*J, (lependinc on the size of plants and blooms. 

Various Notes. 

There is one order in town for Sat- 
urday, June 3, calling for 30,000 carna- 
tions. 

The A. L. Eandall Co. has completed 
the purchase of a 7-acre tract along" 
the St. Paul tracks about a mile north 
of the well known Lyon & Healy fac- 
tory and a half-mile north of the new 






JdMI 1. 19--' 



The Florists^ Review 



41 



■-It 



Fancy Bridal Bouquet Holders 




The use of a Fancy Bridal Holder adds 
100% to the beauty of a shower bouquet and 
also adds to the Florist's profit. Made in 
white and pinlc; special shades made to 
order. 

Fancy Covered Holders with Bows 

Style No. 6-1. — Size, 6% inches inside 
measure. Price each $1.25 

Style No. 8-1.— Size, 8 inches inside 
measure. Price each 2.50 

MiDiatnre Holder*, Fancy Styles with Lace 

Our Miniature Holders are a money-mak- 
ing novelty for Florists. Made in White, 
Pinlc, Blue, Orchid, Violet, Ward, Nile and 
Ophelia Chiffons with white laces, bows to 
match chiffon colors. 

No. 2-1. — Size, 4% inches. Price each.. $0.05 
No. 3-L — Size, 5M; inches. Price each.. .85 

Lace and Chiffon Edge Holders 
Style No. 4-1. — Size, 6»i inches. Price 

each $1 .0« 

Style No. 7 — Size, 8 inches. Price each. 1..75 

Plain Bouquet Holders 

No. 6-C — Plain, size. 8 inches. Price 
each $1.00 

Fancy Bridal Muff with Streamers 

Price each, $8.00 




Corsage Shields 

Blodwin .Shields, Satin Pad. all colors. 

Per dozen $2.50 



Tonn 




cS!^ 30E.R«ii<l»lphSt., Chicago 

factory of Kroeschcll Bros. Co. No 
plans have been made for the imnie- 
fliate use of the i)roperty, but some day 
there will be a model factory and wari>- 
house there. Edward Galavan, sales 
manager, returned to his desk last 
week after a sojourn at St. Bernard's 
hospital. F. M. Johnson, A. M. Ander- 
son and J. W. McConnell, who have 
been at New York and other points east, 
returned last week. 

The city building permit for the pub- 
lic garage, to be built at S.'^Ol to 3319 
North Halsted street by the George 
Wittbold Co., gives its dimensions as 
109x212 and places the cost of the struc- 
ture at $40,000. George S. Kingsley, 




FLOWERS FOR THE BRIDE AND 
THE SWEET GIRL GRADUATE 

Use Pyfer'a Flowers for Profit and Satisfaction 

CURRENT PRICE LIST 
ROSES 

Columbia, Premier, Russell per loo 

Select, LoDg $15.00 to $20.00 

Choite. Medium 10.00 to 12.00 

Good, Short 6.00 to 8.00 

Ophelia, Sonbust, Maryland, Double White Killamey and Hoosier Beauty 

Select, Long $12.00 to $15.00 

Choice, Medium 8.00 to 10.00 

Good, Short 4.00 to 6.00 

PEONIES 

Fresh Stock — not out of Storage Per ino 

Long, Fancy $6.00 

Choice, Medium $4,00 to 5.00 

CARNATIONS 

Fresh Fancy Stock $2.00 to $4.00 

YELLOW DAISIES, Choice per 100. $1.00 to $3.00 

STOCKS, Choice, Double doz., .75 to 1.00 

GLADIOLI doz.. 1.00 to 2.00 

EASTER and CALLA LILIES doz., 1.50 to 2.00 

FEVERFEW per bunch. .50 

CANDYTUFT per bunch, .50 

ADIANTUM perlOO. 1.50 

ASPARAGUS and SPRENGERI per bunch , .25 to .50 

FERNS i)er 1000. 6.00 

GALAX per 1000. 2.00 

SUBJECT TO MARKET CHANGES 



Arr.^ yfei*' & Cpitipa n: 




Our Motto: "Nothinil too much trouble to please a Customer. 
PhoneajCentraj 3373 jg^ J| WaBash AvC, CMcagO, III. 



^- -t- 



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-..-.-^.,-^^^^^y »«• 



42 



The Rorists^ Review 



Jdnb 1. 1922 



GuUett's Flowers 

LOW SUMMER PRICES 



PREMIER 

COLUMBIA 

MILADY 

BUTTERFLY 

OPHELIA 



ROSES 

Per 100 

Select $15.00 to $18.00 

Firsts 12.00 to 15.00 

Seconds 10.00 to 12.00 

Thirds 8.00 to 10.00 



WHITE KILLARNEY / Short 5.00 to 6.00 

Roses, our selection, good, short stem, $3.00 to $4.00 per 100 



CARNATIONS 

Per 100 

Select $3.00 to $4.00 

Good 2.00 to 3 00 

Split, all colors 1.50 



MISCELLANEOUS STOCK 

Per 100 

PEONIES $4.00, $5.00and$ 6.00 

SWEET PEAS 75 to 1.50 

EASTER LILIES 15.00 

GLADIOLI 12.50 

CALLAS 10.00 to 12.00 

CALENDULAS 2.00 to 3.00 

DECORATIVE GREENS 

FERNS per 1000, $4.50 

ASPARAGUS PLUMOSUS, long per 100, 4.00 

ASPARAGUS PLUMOSUS, Med., per 100, $2.00 to 3.00 

ASPARAGUS SPRENGERI per ICO, 3.00 

ASPARAGUS SPRENGERI, select 4.00 

SMILAX per dozen, 3.00 



Open 7 a. m.fto 6 p. m., standard time. 



GULLETT & SONS, Uncoln, Illinois 



It Pays to Order Cut Flowers Direct of the Grower 



STUPPY SUPPLY COMPANY 



Ten-Twenty Oak Street 



{^r^n KANSAS CITY, NO. 



Supplies, Cut Flowers and Greens 

QUALITY AND SERVICE 



the architect, 109 North Dearborn 
street, is reported by the Economist as 
ready to award contracts. The cost, the 
Economist reports, will be $90,000. 

W. J. Smyth and Mrs. Smyth motored 
to Lake Marie Mav 27, returning May 
29. 

E. C. Amling and Mrs. Amling are 
here from Los Angeles for a short visit. 

Miss Harper, who for several years 
was a member of the office staff of Bas- 
sett & Washburn and who before that 
was with E. H. Hunt, has taken charge 
of the books of O. A. & L. A. Tonner. 
Miss Harper has been out of the mar- 
ket for several months as the result of 
a fall which fractured her right arm. 

M. H. Mann enjoys holidays to the 
utmost, as then he leaves his regular 
duties and puts on a packer's apron in 



best in the world ' 
John C.Meyer Thread Co 

Lowell, Mass. 



Meyer Green SSkaline 

will go twice as far as any common, ordi- 
nary thread. 

You have 2 ounces of thread on each 
spool, 16 ounces to the pound. 

Send for samples and quotations to 

JOHN C. MEYER THREAD CO. 

LOWELL, MAS&„ U. S. A. 

Dept. ZYZ. 



the store of Zech & Mann. The Me- 
morial day rush gave him three perfect 
days. 

Dr. A. J. Knapp was here from Evans- 
ville to watch the peonies turn into 
Decoration day dollars. 

Eric Johnson was .S4 years of age 



on Memorial day. He was born in Chi- 
cago, May 30, 1888. 

An early morning fire, May 27, did 
$20,000 damage in the building in 
which C. H. Bookedis recently opened 
his Boulevard Flower Shop. The dam- 
age was confined to the- upper floors of 



vj^yr-'Sr ;•■' t, .•; • r^r»T"^'^"*prw»j;ji''t|',^»'y;-^f-' ■■•" 



JUNB 1, 1922 



The Florists' Review 



43 



B^ Phone, Harrison 4310 



Home Phone, Harrison 6487 



Kansas City Wholesale Cut Flower Co. 

1 1 08-1 110 Grand Avenue, Kansas City, Mo. 



PRICE LIST 



PEONIES, Best grade $8.00 per 100 

Next best grade 6.00 per 100 

Culls 4.00 per 100 

CORNFLOWERS, Blue, Purple, 

Pink, Lavender 1 .00 per 100 

LARKSPUR, Pink, White, Laven- 
der. Spikes 24 to 30 inches. . 1.00 per doz. 



GLADIOLI, fancy stock 15c each 

G YPSOPHIL A, White 50c per bunch 

SWEET WILLIAM 50c per bunch of 25 

ROSES, Premier and Russell 8c to 20c 

Columbia and Butterfly 6c to 20c 

Milady and White 6c to 20c 

CARNATIONS 3c to 5c 



Everything in Green Goods 
and Florists' Supplies 

L. R. BOHANNON, Always at Your Service 



Mention The Rerlew when yon wrlf. 



T. J. NOLL FLORAL CO. 

1117-19 McGee Street 



Phone HanUon 8235 



Kansas City, Mo. 

CUT FLOWERS 

FLORISTS' SUPPLIES 

ARTIFICIAL FLOWERS 



FLOWERS "at their best'' 




From Grower Direct 



■|^ from urower i/ireci ^^p 

-KISCII Cot 



w^!i!!t» rwmm «iiowers 



CHICAGO 



irKJTv «,^ 



, ^'J^Y^ ' ■* 



44 



The Florists^ Review 



JUNI 1. 1922 



the building and the flower shop was 
not injured. 

A. L. Vaughan was born at Bastrop, 
La., June 1, 1864. 

S. R. McKee, of the American Green- 
house Mfg. Co., has returned from 
Pittsburgh with an order from the 
Pittsburgh Cut Flower Co. for three 
^ipe-frame houses, 21x167, and an- 
other from W. H. Devlin for a steel- 
frame house, 39x217. These houses are 
all of the Agmco 1922 model. 

Superintendent Andrew Benson is 
kept busy these days supervising the 
replanting at the Premier Rose Gar- 
dens. About 50,000 plants arc being 
replaced. 

; News of the sudden death of Lorenz 
P. Geiger reached Chicago the day after 
J^Icmorial day. Fuller report appears in 
the obituary column of this issue. 

John Poehlmann thinks "Poppy 
day," May 29, when every taggerette 
pinned a cloth poppy on every tag- 
geree, was a help to the sale of flow- 
ers. He believes the mental reaction 
to sight of the artificial in flowers is 
thought of the natural. 

They A. B. C. sold out of red poppies 
for May 29 — the taggers took them all. 

With appropriate ceremonies the old 
established wholesale house of Wietor 
Bros, closed its doors for the last time 
May 31, N. J. Wietor and Henry Wietor 
retiring from the business with a eom- 
pfetence. C. A. Alles and Charles Dress- 
ier, who have been with the firm many 
years, June 1 joined the staff of Peter 
Reinberg, Inc., where the roses will be 
sold from the greenhouses to be oper- 
ated by Henry Wietor 's sons and son- 
in-law. The carnation range was taken 
oyer by John Eschette and he will ship 
to Joseph Foerster Co. 



PHILADELPHIA. 



, The Market. 

'Tlii'ie were a million flowers. Tliat 
covered the Memorial day situation up 
to Saturday evening, May 27. There 
\\^as l)usiness, hut the supply was too 
heavy. Tlie week opened badly; peonies 
c'anic in heavily; the weather was 
warm; flowers were plentiful, and busi- 
ness was light. Business improved as 
the week progressed, but the supply was 
enormous, and there was no cateliing up 
with it. The peony might become de- 
njoralizod. Prices were cut and things 
generally were at sixes and sevens. 

'The strike up-state — from the coal 
rr'giojis usually come he;ivy orders for 
Memorial day — added to tli(> fact that 
the uji-state florists lind their own 
peonies, did not imjirove mutters. There 
was a vast difference in the quality of 
the ])eonies — some were easily worth the 
top (piotations of this week's list; 
otliers could only be offered at the low- 
est figure, with an a])ology. Carnations 
sold jirctty W(>11. what there were of 
them, but roses languished. Perhaps we 
shall end better than we expect, but 
Saturday the Memorial day business 
looked like a disappointment. 

An Unfortunate Situation. 

The feder.'il authorities have lately 
shown a decided disposition to recog- 
nize commercial flower culture as a na- 
tional industry of some importance. 
This hns been shown through the De- 
partment of Agriculture in various 
ways. The department's entomologists 
have been and still are endeavoring to 
;iid rose growers in destroying the 



PEONIES 

For the early part of June we will have a big sup- 
ply of very fine Peonies. 

White, light and dark pink and red, carefully 
selected stock, the best varieties for cut flower 
purposes. 

IN ROSES 

we particularly recommend to you the better grades 
in RUSSELL, COLUMBIA, HADLEY, PREMIER 
and DOUBLE WHITE KILLARNEY. So late in 
the season we have never been able to offer you 
Roses of such fine quality. When you want good 
Roses you are sure to find them here. 

For June weddings we have arranged for a 

Large Supply of VALLEY 

You cannot buy a better grade of Valley than 
what we can furnish. 

NEW DAGGER FERNS 



The new local Ferns are ready, 
fine, clean and extra long. 



They are very 



Plenty of Fine Orchids 

THE LEO NIESSEN CO. 

Wholes€de Floruts 

Branches: 120I-3-5 Rac* St. 

WASHINGTON PHILADEILPItIA 



BERGER BROTHERS 

Peonies, Sweet Peas 

ROSES, CARNATIONS 

Easter Lilies all the year around 

1609 Sansom Street PHILADELPHIA 



EDWARD REID 



PEONIES 
SWEET PEAS 
CARNATIONS 
PREMIER 



SNAPDRAGONS 

CALLA LILIES 
YELLOW DAISIES 
COLUMBIA BUTTERFLY 



AND ALL THE LEADING ROSES 

Whmn Thty'rm Rmd't Thmy'rm Right 

1619-21 Ranstead St., PHILADELPHIA, PA. 



1 



^v*:-'Pii«T?».*:r.r f'9fW»«wK7^^r~.-^ 



JUNB 1. 1»22 



The Florists^ Review 



45 



RAMBLER SPRAYS 





PINK, WHITE AND RED 

Long, Medium and Short, in the better varieties, 

$5.00 to $20.00 per lOO 



Delphinium— The new and improved hybrids, both 
light and dark blue, $6.00, $8.00, $10.00 per 100. 

ETerytluBg in Cat Flowers, Plants, Greens, Ribbons and Supplies. Send for Price List. 
Busnrzss KOTTSS: 7 a. m. to S p. m. 

S. S. PENNOCK COMPANY 

'""'^i^^fsoF PHILADELPHIA 

NEW YORK PHILADELPHIA BALTIMORE WASHINGTON 

117 W. 28tb Street 1608-1620 Ludlow Street Franklin and St. Paul Sts. 1216 H. St. , N. W. 



GLADIOLI, 

DELPHINIUM BELLADONNA 

and AU Seasonable Cut Flowers 

WM. J. BAKER 

WkatoMl* nmrlat 
12 Seatk MoU StrMt, PUUdaiphia, Pa. 

SPECIAL FLORISTS' AIR BRUSH 

for paintinc and shading wickerw&re, artificial 
flowers. grassoB, showcards. etc.; positively 
the most useful all-around device of this kind 
for the florist. Complete outfit, $6.60. 
Cash with order. Satisfaction guaranteed. 
Send for illustrated price list. 

KENDIG, THE FLORIST 
Hmwbee of thm F. T. D. OSWEGO, N. Y. 

THE HOUSE OF MERIT 

FLORISTS' SUPPLIES 

JOS. G. NEIDINGER CO. 

1309-11 N. Second Street \ 

PHILADELPHIA, PA. 

strawberry beetle. "Whether this gov- 
ernment work does or does not amount 
to anything will depend largely on our- 
selves. If we meet them halfway and 
help them as brothers working for tho 
common cause, good will result, but 
if we antagonize them, as some of us 
have unfortunately done, they will soon 
get discouraged, and a powerful ally 
will be lost. 

Butterfly Versus Ophelia. 
When the new rose, Madame Butter- 
riy, came out, the experts were unani- 
mous in their opinion that it would sup- 
plant Ophelia. Butterfly was more pro- 
ductive and it was a l)etter color. As 
a result everybody planted Butterfly 
and the fate of OJphelia was regarded 
as sealed. This spring reaction has 
.set in. One of our leading growers 
finds the returns from Ophelia decid- 
•Hlly better than from Butterfly—pro- 
duction larger, price the same. Since 
Kaster, Butterfly has been selling at low 



PEONIES 

FANCY PEAS ^ GLADIOLI 

CARNATIONS ROSES 

and all Novelties 



Philadelphia Cut Flow^er Company 

GEORGE AEUGLB 
Proprietor 



Wholesale Florist 



PHONES: 
Keystone. Race 1112-1118 1517 StllSOm St., Pluladelpkit, Tv 





Carnations 

AND ALL OTHER FLOWERS 

Send us your next telesfram, please 

The Philadelphia Wholesale Florisb' Exchange 

1615 Ranstead Street, PHILADELPHIA 



Our Motto 

'*Ttao OoMoB Bole' 



Roses 
CamatioBS 

Gladioli 
Snapdragons 
Rublir Rm» 


CHARLES E. MEEHAN 

4 South Mole Street 
PHILADELPHIA, PA. 


ASPARAGUS 

Striaf t sad 
Baches 

Adiantnin 
And Greens 



jirices. Well grown ()])lielia is still a 
fnctor in the I'hiladelpliia cut flower 
market. 

The Attitude of Big Business. 

It is a pleasure to note that our Icail- 



iug business houses are adopting a 
broiid policy with regard to the labor 
situation of today. They say in effect 
to their employees, "We know that we 
ran fill your places for less money than 
we are paying you. We are doing this 



-' .'77 V'' *» '" /""~''''»~7 '"■ ' >-■■*■■*:•,, ".*,' 



46 



The Florists^ Review 



JuN> 1. 1022 




Gold Letter prfces SmBshed 

These prices on gold letters are Postpaid 

to you no matter whether you are located 

in Maine or California, Oreiron or Florida. (8V"^ak Hi * 

Compartment Boxes 25c each or free with 

orders of 5,000 letters. 

These letters are our regular first ^^^ 

No.iGoU quality stock. The kind that will pwisoo.$3.oo „ ,5^*..«« 

P« i.eos, $3.50 stick, STICK and STICK, and won't P«riooo.$3.oo 

Per 5.000 15.00 *^». J ^*« 

Per 10.000 28.00 como orr. 

SCRIPT Father Sister Grandpa Asleep Rest Darling Mamma At Best Niece Uncle 

■ P'l'i'P^g Mother Husband GrandJna Baby Gar Dear Comrade Cousin Daughter Papa 

IrfEi I 1 CiKo Brother Wife Friend Sleeping My Too Soon Nephew Peace Aunt Soon 

Per lOO, $3.00; per 1000,$22.50 

B. L and J. T. COKELY, 201 N. 7th Ave., SCRANTON, PA. 

Ethiblhhfd 25 ycait MumfKtarcts and Importer! of FIsclste' SappUat 





when an employee has left, but we will 
keep you and keep your pay where it is 
in consideration of your having stood 
by us throughout the war. We ask in 
return that you do your best." 

Various Notes. 

J. Hampton Moore, mayor of Phila- 
delphia, will, barring accident, address 
the Florists' Club at the Hotel Adel- 
phia, Tuesday evening, June 6. 

Mrs. J. H. Glaus sailed for Europe on 
the Resolute from New York Tuesday, 
May 30. Mrs. Claus leaves her business 
in charge of her son, Henry Claus. 

Edward Towill has been advertising 
in the local papers American Legion 
bench plants at $1.50 each, with the 
choice of an Ophelia or a Columbia as 
an extra. 

.Tohn Wilson is now manager for the 
Diamond street establishment of J. J. 
Habermehl 's Sons. 

J. G. Neidinger sailed on the steamer 
Orduna Saturday, May 27, for a busi- 
ness trip to Europe. 

A sign, "Roses for Sale," at the en- 
trance to a private garden was an un- 
usual sight in West Philadelphia last 
week. 

J. .T. Fallon, of Lynchburg, Va., was 
in town May 27. Mr. Fallon, as is gen- 
erally known now, ha.s two places, his 
own and the .T. L. O'Quinn place, at 
Raleigh, N. C, 125 miles south of 
Lynchburg. Mr. Fallon is one of those 
who have proved that the south cnn pro- 
duce to its own satisfaction. 

The St. Leonards Farm Co. will grow 
carnations in its large house next sea- 
son. The firm expects to build another 
house the same size as the first one, 
72x600, next fall. The plan is to plant 
both houses with roses in 1923. 

Charles E. Meehan has samples of ex- 
ceedingly well grown gernniums in 
bloom on display nt his eommission 
house. Phil. 

BOSTON. 



The Market. 

The full story of Memorial day, 1922, 
cannot be told in this issue, but up to 
May 2P it looked as though the volume 
of business might equal that of former 




The Most Appropriate 
Basket for Bridesmaids 

No. 822/1— Width. 9 ins.: Overall. 16 ins.: Natural, 

$3.90: Stained. $5.00: Two-tone, $5.65: Liner, $1.00. 
No. 82Z/2— Width, 10 ins.: OTerall, 18 ins.: Natural. 

$4.20: Stained. $6.00: Two-tone. $6.35; Liner. $1.20. 
No. 822/3— AVidth. 11 ins-: Overall, 22 ins.: Natural, 

$4.80: Stained, $6. 60: Two-tone. $7.80: Liner, $1.20. 
No. 822/4- W^idth, 12 ins.: Overall. 26 ins.: Natural. 

$5.40: Stained. $7.20: Two-tone. $8.40: Liner, $1.20: 
No. 822/5- ■Width, 13 ins.: Overall. 28 ins.: Natural. 

$6.60: Stained. $8.40: Two-tone. $10.20: Liner, $1.80. 
Ne. 822/7— Width, IS ins.: Overall, 32 Ins.: Natural, 

$7.80: Stained, $10.20: Two-tone, $12.50: Liner, $1.80. 
These are all per dozen prices. 
AVhy not eet a stock in now? You will need them. 
■Write. for cataloKue. i 

edlein Basket Company 

713-717 MILWAUKEE AVE. 
CHICAGO, ILL. 

RAEDLEIN aKrayi at yoar Mrnce. 



The Philadelphia Growers' Cut Flower Market 

A LARGE STOCK OF FINE FLOWERS 

PEONIES 

CHOICE SWEET PEAS A fine crop of hi^h grade 

All Colors PREMIER ROSES 

Extra Fine VALLEY. A heavy crop of ROSES in all the finest sort*. 

TO THE BUYER: We ask a trial order. We can and will please you. 

TO THE GROWER: Join us now. Send your own flowers to your own Commission house. 

Beth Phoect 

K.Sn//.'?.82 No. 7 South Mole Street, PhUadelphia ^'"JSS.SeV"*- 



><'ar.s ill iijitiirji] flowors and far surpass 
it in tho ;irtitic'i;il " croations. " There 
was little ju'tivity in cut flower circles 
until May 27, ;»nil on that day there was 
a lack of siia]) to the Imying. A veri- 
table avalanciie of flowers arrived, of 
flood, had and indifferent quality. A 
j;reat deal would have heen better 
thrown away in advance^ and was evi- 



dently pickled and on its last legs. 
I'ricos were lower on the average 
than for several years. Good values 
ruled for the best stock, but, as usual, 
much inferior material realized little. 

There was a fine crop of roses. Short 
and medium-steinmed were in big de- 
mand at from $(> to $10 per hundred. 
Some fancies made more, and in the 



^ T ^-^ f ;'Y *^ *-. ' '■"■*'^ '! '.'^ ' ^»-^'W * >\ ' ;/|?*i!'.i.' ' ^/« ''y S'if 'T.; iyT^ sy~r-. > 



JuNii 1, 1922 



The Florists^ Review 



47 



4 



The Florists' Supply House of America 



Commencements and Weddings 

Assortment of Commencement Baskets, $25.00 

Chiffons, Ribbons, Wedding Gates, 
Aisle Posts, Kneeling Stools, 

Old-Fashioned Bouquet Holders 

A New One, Gold Old-Fashioned Bouquet Holder, $2.50 each 

Clay Heads and Pigs, jast arrived. 15c, 25c, 35c, with seed. A good seller for the summer. 
Don't forsret, we are also in New York at 146 W. 18th Street. Phone Chelsea 3739 

H. Bayersdorf er & Co. 

MANUFACTURERS OF METALLIC DESIGNS OF ALL DESCRIPTIONS 

1129-1133 Arch Street, PHILADELPHIA, PA. 

BRANCH, 146 W. 18th St., NEW YORK CITY. One block west of the flower market. 

Telephone Chelsea 3739 



i 



I 



•t 



case of Hadley, Crusader and Francis 
Scott Key $25 was realized. 

A good many American Beauties came 
in and sold from $25 to $50 per hundred, 
more going for the former than the lat- 
ter price. White roses, as usual, were 
the slowest sellers. Carnations made 
$6 to $8 for the best stock, but much 
inferior material went at from $2 to $4. 
Laddie made $10 to $12. More miser- 
able carnations appeared than for years. 
Sweet peas came in veritable shoals, 
$2.50 to $3 being the top-notch prices, 
and yellow daisies averaged about the 
same. Gladioli of the best grades sold 
for $2 to $2.50 per dozen. Callas and 
lilies made only slight advances. 

Good colored ten weeks' stocks sold 
well, but a lot of singles were hard to 
move. Candytuft went a little slowly. 
Much colored candytuft came in, but 
little of it came to the wholesale mar- 
kets. Those who got it on time made 
jrood money. Double feverfew sold 
fairly well and Gypsophila elcgaus went 
remarkably well. No Dutch bulbous 
stock appeared, except some belated 
Darwin and cottage tulips. Lilac was 
mostly on the wane, but some good 
deutzia, outdoor valley, German iris 
and other outdoor flowers were seen. For 
asparagus there was a good demand. No 
local peonies were in season, but some 
were received from Philadelphia and 
vicinity. 

The demand for orchids was not great. 
A. good supply of Cattleya Mossiai ap- 
peared. For these no great advances 
were made. There were other seasonable 
firchids. Outdoor valley proved better 
than the forced article, although selling 
lower. 

The demand for plants was excellent. 



^!lI!IIIIl!!I!!tTTT T ITTTTTT!! !!II!lMM 






i Wood-fiber Jardinieres 

Strongly made and waterproofed. Handsomely decorated with 
clastic designs in striking colors. All sizes for standard flower 
pots. May be used for cut flowers. A profitable seller for every 
florist. Send for illustrated folder and prices. 



MONO SERVICE CO., NEWARK, N. J. 



►H 




[jTlMT T T T T T T T T I T T T ! ! ! 1 1 1 I t T T t T T I ! I I T T f ^ 



Geraniums were splendid sellers and for 
those a sliortage already exists. 

Most of the retailors filled their win- 
dows and a large part of their stores 
with the usual extensive line of artifi- 
cial wreaths. Tens of thousands of 
these metal and wax tokens were han- 
dled in department stores, meat mar- 
kets, hardware stores, grocery stores, on 
street stands and by undertakers. Great 
numbers were being hawked around 



near tlie big cemeteries at low prices, 
and a greater number than ever were 
unsold. 

The most overdone fresh flowers this 
year were snapdragons. God'l flowers 
sold well, but a groat proportion looked 
jaded. Many had twisted stems, and 
flowers fell in showers when a bunch 
was handled. The flowers were left too 
long on the plants and such stock proved 
almost unsalable. 



r ■" •■/: ;• 



48 



The Florists'^ Review 



Junk 1. 1922 



While it is generally stated that 
Memorial day broke all previous records, 
it is not easy to compare this year with 
previous years. There was undoubtedly 
more artificial material sold than ever, 
and probably as many fresh flowers, but 
I have seen more animation and snap 
to some i)reviou8 years' business. How- 
ever, about everyone seems satisfied. 

Flower Show at Chestnut Hill. 

The flower show staged by the Chest- 
nut Hill Garden Society and effectively 
arranged in two large tents on the 
beautiful grounds of E. B. Dane, May 
24 to May 26, was the most charming 
flower show of its kind ever held here 
in May. Groups of flowering plants, 
covering 400 square feet each, were a 
feature in one tent. First prize and a 
gold medal were awarded to Peter Ar- 
nott, gardener for Mrs. E. S. Webster, 
with an artistically arranged group 
which included many beautiful godetias, 
clarkias, pelargoniums, campanulas, 
pimeleas, hydrangeas and calceolarias. 
An excellent second was William C. 
Eust, gardener for Mrs. C. G. Weld. 
Splendid gladioli, godetias, calceolarias, 
lilies and other plants were in this 
group, as also in the third prize group 
from L. C. Seagrove, gardener to Mrs. 
R. M. Saltonstall, and Donald McKenzie, 
gardener for Mrs. E. B. Dane. 

For the best group of orchids Donald 
McKenzie won with a superb lot of 
odontoglossums, odontiodas, cattleyas, 
renantheras, masdevallias, oncidiums, 
brassocattleyas and other varieties. 
Peter Arnott, who was second, showed 
some choice varieties. Splendid stand- 
ard fuchsias and calceolarias were 
shown by J. Clancy, gardener for Mrs. 
Andrew Adie, while Arthur T. Bradlee 
had an excellent group of flowering 
plants. L. C. Seagrove had a splendid 
lot of Marshall strawberries loaded with 
luscious-looking berries. There was a 
keen contest for table centerpieces from 
ladies, and fine displays of native plants 
and vegetables. Thomas Roland judged 
the groups of plants. The attendance 
was large on all three days, the tents 
being crowded most of the time. 

Various Notes. 

An excellent half-page illustrated 
Memorial day advertisement appeared 
in the rotogravure section of the Boston 
Herald May 28. Participating firms 
were the Fottler, Fiske, Rawson Co., S. J. 
Goddard, Houghton-Gorney Co., Zinn 
the Florist, Beacon Florist, Belmont 
Flower Shop, H. M. Robinson & Co., 
Janiten & Kunan, Anderson Conservato- 
ries, Axel Magnuson, Galgay the Florist, 
W. C. Bowditch, J. K. Alexander, S. 
Irving Moody, William Sim, Littlefield 
& Wyman and H. R. Comley. An illus- 
tration showed the work of each adver- 
tiser. A fine, readable story appeared 
in the news section of the same paper, 
giving Boston's history and position as 
a floral and horticultural center. 

The executive committee of the Gar- 
deners' and Florists' Club met May 26 
and completed arrangements for the 
ladies' night at Horticultural hall, June 
20. The finest entertainment in the 
club's history will be given on this occa- 
sion. July 20 has been selected as the 
diate for the annual picnic at Cunning- 
ham park, East Milton. 

Andrew Christensen, at Stoneham, has 
sold Tiis greenhouse establishment, 
dwelling house, etc., to Joel Whittemore, 
who will continue to make carnations 
his leading specialty. Mr. Whittemore 




Meavywelsrht and Rieul Stock. 
Molstore Proof. 
Hinge ' reased. 
Uasjr Foldincr. 

Why Buy Boxes That Are Not So Good, When for Lesc Money You Can 
Have Boxes That Are Better? Send for Samples and Be Convinced. 

Milt Gray and Mist Green Boxes 

Pleaslngr shades of gray and grreen, white 
lined, hinge creased, heavy stock and stiff. 

For Violets and Corsases. 

Price per 100 
Size 2-ln. Covers 

9x6x6 $2.60 

11x8x7 8.60 

12x6xS 8.00 

13x9x6 4.00 

15x6xS 3.60 



Manila Boxes 

Hinge creased, heavy board, suitable for 

parcel post and shipping in full telescope. 

FOB CUT FLOWEBS. ETC. 

Price per 100 

. 81m Lid FullTsL 

18x6x3 $2.10 $2.60 

20x 4x3 2.10 2.60 

21x 6x3% 2.60 8.00 

24x 6x3V^ 3.00 8.60 

28x 6x3V^ 3.60 4.60 

21x 8x6 3.30 4.80 

80x 6x3V^ 4.00 4.60 

24x 8x6 4.60 6.46 

28x 8x6 6.26 7.26 

28x 8x6 5.76 8.26 

80x 8x6 6.10 8.60 

80x 8x6 6.26 8.76 

30x10x6 7.60 9.60 

86x 8x6 7.20 9.00 

86x 8x6 7.70 8.90 

30x12x6 8.0a 12.00 

80x12x8 9.4ff 12.26 

36x12x6 11.26 14.00 

36x12x8 11.60 14.20 

86x14x6 11.75 14.70 

86x14x8 18.25 16.60 

42x 8x6 8.10 18.00 

FOR BOUQUETS 

19x 9x8 6.00 8.60 

Manila Boxes for Wreaths and Designs 

Heavyweight stock, strong and service- 
able, binge creased, easy folding. 
Price per 100 
Size Shallow Lid Full 

16xl.6x 6 $ 6.80 $ 9.60 

16xl6x 7 7.60 11.60 

18xl8x 6 8.26 12.00 

18xl8x 8 9.26 12.60 

20x20x 6 8.90 14.00 

20x20x 8 1 1.26 16.00 

20x20x10 12.00 18.00 

22x22x 8 18.00 17.76 

24x24x10 16.26 22.60 



For Cut Flowers, Etc. 

I3x 6x8 2 -in. cover 2.76 

20x 4x8 2 -In. cover 2.76 

21x 6x8% 2 -In. cover 2.96 

24x 6x8% 2 -in. cover 8.96 

28x 6x3% 2 -In. cover 4.60 

28x 6x4 2 -in. cover 6.1.0 

21x 8x5 2 -In. cover 4.90 

80x 6x8% 2 -In. cover 4.76 

24x 8x6 2 -tn. cover 6.00 

28x 8x6 2%-in. cover 7.00 

30x 8x6 2%-in. cover 8.76 

80x10x6 2%-in. cover 9.60 

86x 8x6 2%-in. cover 9.26 

80x12x7 2%-ln. cover 12.60 

36x12x7 2%-in. cover 18.60 

36x14x7 2%-in. cover 14.00 

For Bonqnets 

19x 9x8 2%-in. cover 9.00 

SPECIAL DISCOUNT— On quantities of 

2,000 or more— 6%. 
PRINTING — $2.60 per 1,000 or less for 

ordinary card copy; $3.60 per 1,000 or 

less for color bionze. 

EMBOSSING — $4.60 per 1,000 or less in 
addition to printing charge, embossing 
plates to be furnished by customer or 
charged for at cost when we supply 
them. 

ALL PRICES 



ARE NET 



Do not be misled by bothersome discoants. 

BOSTON BOX COMPANY, Inc. 

Dept. E, S9 Clinton St. BOSTON 48, MASS. 

MANUFACTURERS OF FOLDING PAPER BOXES 



Mention The Review when you write. 




"Knot Wood" Product 

Pots ~ Vases - Baskets 



"Knot Wood" Pots make a splendid 
appearance when used as Veranda 
Pots and for Ferns. 

Try one of our sample shipments 
of assorted ware in Log Brown and 
Green. 

$10.00. $i8.««. $20.*« 

They will make money for you dur- 
ing bedding season. 




Price List and lUustraUd Leaflet on the Press. Sent only by request from 

R. G. BOCK, Florist, r:!r£.Haiiiilton, O. 



Mention The Review when y»n write. 



BASKET LINERS in STOCK 

for immediate delivery. Write for prices 

and sizes. Oive quantity needed. 

Special Liners made to order. 

GRAND SHEET METAL WORKS 
2423-28 W. 14th St., CHICAGO, ILL. 

Largest ManafactDrer* of Buliat Linen in America 



AQUARIUMS 

IVHOLESALE 

GEO. H. WILTSHIRE 

Maaafacturer 

2968 N. Oikley Ave. CBICAGO, UL 



w 



JUNK 1, 1922 



The Florists^ Review 



49 





/Ccr&A-<^ ^dnnyJt ^A^^^Jl^^ xsuS-i^ >f^ Jk^ ^^^^ 



^ _ _ .AiXa-^^lsl^ 




Jia^CSK/. 



/mxroJiJ 



SPECIAL DISCOUNTS: 



Less than 280, assorted. 
280 and over, assortad. 



..28% 
..30% 



800 and ovar, assortad . 
lOOO and nvar, asaortad 



.25 and 10% 

38% 



Prices ff. o. b. Marion, Ind.; 3^ extra discount if casii witli order. 

f rialiag black ar caiarW bk, $3.50 par tkaauad aztra ar Ian iautity. 



Not GriT **S" Grade 

Undley standard-weight, 
well moUture - proofed, 
green tinted Inalde, apeclal 
reinforced, easy folding, 
hinge crease. 

For Out Flowers, etc. 



Blse 
16x4x8 ... 
Ms4x8 ... 
18x5x3 ... 
tlx6x8 ... 
S4x6xSV4 . 
Sta6xS>/4 . 

sexs^xivft 

>1x7xIh . 
Mx8x« ... 
»x8x4 ... 
84x8x6 ... 
88x8x6 ... 
86x8x6 ... 
4Sx8x6 ... 



Shallow 

Ud 
Per 100 
.9 S.60 
. 4.80 
. 8.06 
. 4.80 
. 6.00 
. 6.10 
. 8.66 
. 6.80 
. 8.00 
. 8.76 
. 8.40 
. 0.60 
. 18,16 



Fall 
Tele- 
scope 



I 4.80 
4.60 
6.80 
6.80 
8.80 

i»',76 
10.80 
10.85 
18.80 
16.85 
10.40 



Hilt Gray ''AA" 

PosltWelr the highest 
quality, stillest, best 
flower box obtainable. Is 
moisture-proofed, green 
tinted Inside, easy folding, 
hinge crease. We recom- 
mend full telescope AA 
Ifist Oray for shipping. 

Shallow Full 

Ud Tele- 

Sise Per 100 scope 

18x6x8 « 4.86 % 4.80 

SU6x8 4.70 6.86 

S4x6x8>4 ... 6.66 6.60 

SOx6x8Vi ••• <M *10 

SOxSHxl^ . 8.80 10.10 
Slx7x8H ... 6.60 

84x8x4 8.86 10.00 

84x8x6 8.66 11.80 

88x8x4 0.00 11.10 

88x8x5 8.80 18.60 

86x8x6 16.80 

48x8x5 18,86 

For other sties see Regu- 
lar SUndard "8" Grade. 




Nist Gray Conage 

High - grade, moisture- 
proofed, green tinted in- 
side, special reinforced, 
easy folding, hinge crease. 



Ud Per 100 
2-inch... 8 8.76 
2-lnch... 4.60 
2-inch... 6.60 
2-inch... 7.60 
2-lncb... 10.60 



Nist Gray OUtng Betigi 

Heavy weight, well 
moisture-proofed. All full 
telescope. Special hinge 
creased. 

Size Per 100 

80x10x6 815.40 

36x10x5 18.60 

86x10x6 tl.40 

48x10x6 88.76 

48x10x6 87.60 

30x18x6 10.86 

36x18x6 86.80 

80x12x7 88.60 

36x18x8 81.65 

36x14x6 86.75 

80x14x8 88.70 

86x14x8 88.60 

40x14x8 86.40 

48x17x8 48.70 



Nist Gray Sfiare Beiip 

Heavy weight, well 
moisture-proofed. All full 
telescope. Special hinge 
creased. 

Size Per 100 

14x14x8 817.60 

16x16x8 81.70 

18x18x7 81.90 

80x80x6 81.80 

80x80x8 88.70 

80x20x10 86.00 

24x84x8 84.70 

84x84x10 46.80 

88x88x8 45.80 

38x88x8 64.80 



Greei Boxes 

A Beautiful Appropriate 
Color 
Made from high-grade, 
medium weight, moisture- 
proofed stock. Special 
binge creased. 

Shallow Full 
Ud Tele- 
Size Per 100 scope 

7x4x4 8 8.90 

16z7x6yt ... 6.70 

18x6x3 4.10 9 4.86 

21x6x3 4,54 4.76 

84x6xSVi 6.85 

80x6x8>4 ... 6.60 7.80 

86x6Vix3Vi 9.86 

84x8x4 7.76 9.80 

88x8x5 9.90 12.80 

86x8x6 18.00 16.00 

80x10x6 14.90 

Narble Greei Boxes 

Made from same high 
grade stock as our regular 
green and in same sizes. 
Special hinge creased. 

Shallow Full 
Ud Tele- 

Slse Per 100 scope 

7x4x4 8 8.00 

15x7x6Vi ••■ 6.85 

18x5x8 4.86 8 4.50 

81x6x8 4.65 4.90 

84x6x8V> 6.40 

80x5x3'/; ... 6.70 7.40 

36x6Hx8Vi 9.60 

84x8x4 7.95 9,46 

88x8x6 10.16 18.10 

36x8x6 18.80 16.40 

30x10x6 15.80 

Naiila Boxes 

Made of high - grade, 
water-proofed, Manila lined 
stock. Absolutely the best 
medium priced box on the 
market. Special hinge 
creased. 

Sice Ud Per 100 

18x6x8 2-lnch... 8 8.75 

81x5x8 2-lnch... 8.95 

84x6xSVi 2-inch... 4.76 
80x6x814 2-inch... 6.80 
81x7x31^ 2-lnch... 5.95 
84x8x4 2-lnch... 7.70 

88x8x5 2-lnch... 9.10 

86x8x5 2^-lncb. 11.70 

86x8x6 B-lnch... 14.75 



White Enameled 

"AA" Grade 

For Cut Flowers 
The most beautiful box 
made. The hardest, stiff- 
est, and best water-proofed 
genuine Enameled Olay 
Coated stock obtainable 
and Tery tough and dur- 
able. Is specially flnlshed 
to prevent soiling. Prints 
beautifully. Special water- 
proofed lining inside. 



Size 


Ud 


PerlOO 


18x 5x3 


2-lnch. 


..$ 6.10 


80x 5x3 


2-lnch. 


.. 6.60 


81x 6x3 


2-lncb. 


.. 6.86 


84x 5x8)4 


2-lncb. 


.. 8.45 


80x 5x8U 


2-lnch. 


.. 9.90 


i?f» 


2-lncb. 


.. 18.40 


2-lnch. 


.. 9.40 


84x 8x4 


2-lnch. 


.. 18,80 


84x 8x5 


2-lnch. 


.. 18.70 


88x 8x6 


2-lnch. 


.. 16.00 


sex 8x5 


6-inch. 


.. 80.80 


80x10x5 


6-lnch. 


.. 80.60 


86x10x6 


6-inch . 


.. 88.60 



White Eianeled Corsage 

"AA" Grade 

Same high quality; stiff, 
extra tough board as used 
in White Enamel. "AA" 
cut flower. Special hinge 
creased. 

Size Ud Per 100 

7z 4x4 2-incli...$ 4.10 

Sx 5x6 2-inch... 5.26 

lOx 6x5yi 2-incb... 6.30 

12x 8x5>/2 2-incb... 8.20 

14x10x8 2-inch... 15.50 

White Plated Bexes 

Patent white plated 
stock. A beautiful box, 
but not as nice as onr 
White Enameled. Special 
hinge creased. 

Shallow Fall 
Ud Tele- 
Size Per 100 scope 

18x5x8 8 4.75 • 6.00 

81x5x8 6.00 5.60 

84x6x8>4 ... 6.00 6.90 
30x6x8V4 ... 7.80 8.M 
36x6x8V4 ■■ 9.90 11.00 

84x8x4 9.50 

28x8x5 11.60 18.60 

86x8x5 14.90 17.00 



BARGAINS 

Odd lots and dlKontlnued, high-grade bargain mill 
ends. SPEOIAI^— Extra Discount of 10 Per Cent. 

7x 4x4 2-lnch Ud Violet color % g.M 

7x 4x4 2-lncb lid Oreen color f |fo 

15x 7x6V4 2-lnch lid Qreen color ' a 70 

14x10x8 2-inch lid Violet color \ |.7t 



ECONOMY CARTONS 

One-Pieoa Style 

Made of mist gray light-weight stock. Just the box 
for small local delivery packages. Far superlai to 
wrapping paper and almost as cheap. Try then. 



Slae 


PerlOO 


80x4>/4z8 


...98.40 


84x4>4xS 


... 8.66 


84x6 x8^ 


... 8.15 


80x5 xS^ 


.... 8.60 




Undley Florist Box Co. 

Qaality Box Makers MARION, IND. 



Oaur faupacton liava sortad oat from our rcgolar stock 

Writa UM U intaiastad 



good oa c onda 



cmr iAxxs aokncib8 

New York — Phone Aiademy 266S — Geo. U. Hoopla. 
Chicago — Phone Frmklln 6460 — A. V. Z. Jennlnra. 
St. Ix)ul»— Phone Olve 1840 — H. P. Seigneur. 
Ix>ui8Tille — Phone 2569 — J. Raymond Clark, 
Detroit — Phone Cadllac 4178 — A. A. Pordon 
BnflTalo — Phone Seieca. 8380-^. Anthony. 
Richmond, Va. — Phone Boulevard 878 — J. B. Scott 
•lackgonTille, Fla.— Phone 6966 — Southern Brokorave 
Cleveland — 816 NAlonal Bldg. — Phono Cherrv 2066 ' 
— P. B. Toun;. 



50 



The Florists^ Review 



Jdnb 1, 1922 



has had a. good commercial training and 
should make good in his new undertak- 
ing. Mr. Christensen has the frame- 
work completed for two King Construc- 
tion Co. houses, each 40x200, to be de- 
voted to carnations, and has a large 
servi'ce building well under way. He, 
wiH later erect additional houses at his 
new location in Reading. He is also 
going heavily into nursery stock of 
all kinds. His new enterprise is called 
the Reading Nurseries & Greenhouse Co. 

Edward Winkler, of Wakefield, has 
completed grading ground for a new 
Hitchings house, 40x194, for carnations. 
He has purchased a plot of several acres 
of excellent land adjoining his green- 
houses and plans to erect a dwelling on 
it quite soon. His greenhouses are all 
well stocked with carnations, snap- 
dragons, candytuft and Gypsophila 
elegans. Of the last named he has a 
line lot, grown in shallow flats. Seed- 
ling raising continues to interest Mr. 
Winkler as much as ever and he has 
some promising varieties. The popular 
Morning Glow is one of the varieties 
raised here. 

There were over 75,000 visitors to the 
Arnold Arboretum to view the lilac dis- 
play this season. The display of Azalea 
Kaempferi at present is remarkably fine 
and the rhododendrons are blooming 
profusely. The mountain laurels are 
also commencing to show color. Pro- 
fessor Sargent is interesting; Mayor 
Curley in a project for a fine rose garden 
at the arboretum. The estimated cost 
of this will be $300,000 and it will be 
the finest of its kind in America. It is 
hoped to get some money from the Park- 
man and George R. White funds for this 
project. 

The Be^^on Florist reports an enor- 
mous business in artificial wreaths and 
other Memorial day designs. John Eise- 
mann sees no sentiment in these designs, 
but a large class of people want them 
and are pleased with them. He, there- 
fore, merely assists in satisfying this 
demand. No doubt other florists feel 
the same way about this artificial mate- 
rial, though it is cutting into the natural 
flower business more heavily each year. 

While no locally grown peonies have 
yet appeared on the markets, singles are 
due this week and a week hence some 
doubles should be available. Plants are 
promising and there should be a splen- 
did exhibition of these at Horticultural 
hall June 17 and 18. The annual con- 
vention and show of the American 
Sweet Pea Society comes June 24 and 
25, in conjunction with the rose, straw- 
berry, late peony and sweet pea show 
of the Massachusetts Horticultural 
Society. 

Anthony Watercr, of Philadelphia, 
was among our callers last week and did 
a good business in bulbs, as usual. He 
reports business as rapidly getting back 
to a normal basis. 

Memorial day business in fresh flow- 
ers did not take on any si.ap tliis year 
until May 29. Then buyinjr hnd some 
power. Weather conditions this year 
were extremely favorable. "Hay 26 a 
temperature of 84 degrees was recorded, 
but May 27 it fell to a niaxim«m of 5:i 
degrees, and light frosts occirred at 
night on low lands north of Boston. 
May 28 and 29 were clear, wit'i com- 
fortable temperatures, as near icrfect 
as possible. 

The death of Patrick Welch, reiorted 
elsewhere, removes one of Boston 'i most 
notable figures in the commercirj flo- 
rists ' field. " P. W. " and " P. Wilch ' ' 



FLORISTS' BOXES 5^c 



BISCO U NT 
/N wkaa mmtj b 
^ with tk« ardcr. 



The AuU Bros. Co., Dayton, O. 

ESTABLISHED 1890 
Mad. of hMivy, high-grmde material and first-clai. workmaiuliip. 
strive for duplicate orders and get them. Write for samples. 



We 



Mist Gray MUt Gray 

or Manila or Manila 

Shallow Full 

Coyer Telescope 

Price Price 

SI/ES Per 100 Per 100 

3 z20x4 $ 2.50 

3 xlSzS 2.60 

3^x24x5 $3.25 4.20 

3Hx30x5 4.25 5.00 

5 x24x8 5.80 6.80 

5 x28x8 6.50 8.20 

5 x36x6 7.70 10.90 

5 x38x8 9.25 11.30 



Mist Gray Mist Gray 

or Manila or Manila 

Shallow Full 

Cover Telescope 

Price Price 

SIZES per 100 per 100 

5x30x10 $10.10 $11.50 

6x28x12 10.80 12.60 

Sx35ielO 11.40 13.00 

6x36x12 14.40 16.50 

8x20x20 15.20 19.00 

8x24x24 22.50 25.60 

7x42x12 25.70 

8x48x14 31.50 



Gray Corsage and Violet 

With Shallow Fluted Edgt Lid 

5^x9x 6 $3.40 I 6x9x13 $4.60 

« x7xl4 4.30 I 7x9x 9 4.60 

ONE PIECE BOX, heavy weight, mist gray, 3x4^x24 $2.50 

Printing in black ink, $2.00 per 1000, or lesi quantity; printing ia colored ink, $3.00 per 
1000 or lesa quantity, in assorted sizes. All f. o. b. Dayton, Ohio. 

No order printed less than 50 of large sizes or 100 of small sizes. 
WE DO NOT SHIP ANY GOODS C. O. D. 



■*^«!- 



dust What WbniGn 
HavG Boon LooKin^For 






All women admit they like flowers, but the worry, 
trouble and mess together with poor, scraggly plants 
and few blooms as the result have discouraged them in 
ever trying. Show these women that it is now easy 
to keej) hanging baskets and flower boxes full of 
healthy, beautiful plants with 

CHIEF 

Sub-Irrigating FLOWER BOXES 

Tho right amount of air and water reaches 
the roots through the special sub-irrigating con- 
struction. Chief Boxes and Uaskets sell on siglit. 
Made of metal, furnished in several difterent fin- 
ishes and sizes, attractive, low priced and witli 
good dealer margin. Write for our dealer prop- 
osition. 

Slirauger & Jolmson, 810 Walnut St., Atlantic, Iowa 




The Ove Gnatt Co., he 

FloritU' SupplieB 

Prepared Foliage 

Artificial Mowers 

Decorative Noveltiee 

LA PORTE, IND. 



Baskets and Florists' Sapplies 

Loot Dittasce Telepboac, Dearbora 3381 

ALLAN HUMASON CO. 

448-5§ North Wells Street, CHICAGO, ILL 



SPECIAL 

No. 88 Linen Cards, Size IJ^xS^i 
$1.00 per 1000 

THE JOHN HENRY CO. 

LANSING, MICH. 




Ever Ready 
Flower Pot 
Cover 



No worry, no hurry, 

DO cutting, no folding, 

no fussing, no ribbon to tie. Drop the 
pot in the cover. That's all there is to 
it. You'll find it so easy; just try. 
Write for sample and NEW REDUCED 
PRICE LIST today. Send 10c postage. 

The Ever Ready Flower Pot Ctver Ce. 

146 Hughes Avenue, BUFFALO, N.Y. 



Lotos Mfg. Co. 

1734 N. Haliteil St, CHICAGO, ILLINOIS 

ARTIFICIAL FLOWERS C.cfrp\7on 

AMk for our Dollar Sample Aaeortment. 
FLORISTS' SUPPLIES, ETC. 



JCNB 1, 1922 



The Florists^ Review 



51 



I 



-^^ 






■,v.;>/h'^i(/ 



'o'-Hv 



v\^^;l 



'H^'^': 



Fancy and Dagger Ferns 

A No. 1 QUALITY 

$3,00 per 1000 

llllllllllilllillllllllllllllllllllllilllllllllllllllllV 

Henry M. Robinson & Co., Inc. 

2 Winthrop Square :: 32 Otis St. 

BOSTON, MASS. 




Wm. J. Boas & Co. 

1427 Vine Street^ 

Philadelphia, Pa. 



Writ* for 
Prices. 



Mention The Review when you write. 



Save Freight on 
Your Boxes 

If you are located west of the Missis- 
sippi river, be sure and write for prices 



He 



Profits 
Moat 




St Joseph Paper Box Company 

St. Joseph, Missouri 



Uentl<Mr> The Reriew when too write. 



Clii^ax Mfg. Co. 

Florists' 
High Grade Boxes 

CASTORLAND, N. Y. 



Uention The Eerlew when yog write. 



H. & D. DESIGN BOXES 

Are made of light, stront; Corrugated Fiber- 
board and can be furoUbed with K. D. lock- 
corner covert, sale and convenient. 
Write for full particulars. 

THE HINDE & DAUCH PAPER CO. 

SANDCSKT. OHIO 




^ 




Refrigerator 

Elegance 

Means greater sales 
and larger profits. It 
will pay you to display 
your cut flowers in a 
B r e c h t specially - built 
refrigerator. 

May we tell you why the 
better appointed shops 
are Brecht equipped? 

A postcard brings our cata- 
logue. Address Oept. N. 



Mentlen The Review when yoo write. 



NOTICE TO FLORISTS 

We wish to inform you that our supply of 
Ferns is gone until the new crop is grown. This 
will be about June 10th. 

We wish to thank you all for the kind support 
you have given us in our business. We will 
announce in this space when the new crop is 
ready for delivery. Trusting to have your busi- 
ness again the coming season, we are, 

Sincerely yours, 

ROBERT GROVES, Inc., Adams, Mass. 



52 



The Florists^ Review 



JoNB 1. 1922 



FANCY FERNS 



FliMSt stock in tlM eonntry 






$4.50 per 1000 



$4.50 par 1000 



''l^*;!'\'r^' 



m\mi'^ 



U,:^^ 



8id4Mt to Ckmm» WHhMit N«tle«. 

WiM Sadlaz, 60-lb. case $ 7.80 

GrcMi Lcac«tli«e, 100.... «1JM>; 1000 10.00 

Ma^olla Leaves, green and bronze, per oarton IJtO 

10 oartons 14.00 

Galas Leaves, green, 9er case if 10,000...'. IS.OO 

GREEN SHEET MOSS, rery fine for basket work, trimming 

pots, etc., per bag 2.00 

Sphagnum Mess, per bale 1.50 

FULL SUPPLY CUT FLOWERS AT ALL TDIES. 






MCHIGAN CUT FLOWER EXCHANGE, 'tils Randolph St,Detroit,NiclL 



Huckleberry, $7.50 per case 

THE E. F. WINTERSON CO., iS!;.^^,^tS/^iL^;!^^>^s Chicago, 111. 



wore titles uHiially fjivoii liiin. He was 
a man of kiM>n forrsiglit and a general 
favorite. His passinj^ leaves a blank 
not easv to till. W. N. C. 



RUST ON HYDRANGEAS. 

My otaksa hydrangeas that should 
have bloomed this sprint? are so affected 
by red spider or rust that they are of 
no account for this year's bloom. Will 
they make j^ood i)lants for next year if 
they are cut back and placed outdoors, 
letting tlieni make a new growth, or 
would it be l)etter to throw them away 
and get new stock entirely? 1 liave a 
supply of new cuttings already started, 
but I am afraid they may also be af- 
fected in the same way. I fumigated 
several times in the early spring with 
hydrocyanic acid gas. but it did not 
seem to helji thi-in. T. 11. S.- -Pa. 



Cut your plants down (piite low and 
plant outdoors in good soil, preferably 
where the plants can be watered occa- 
sionally in dry weather. Dig the plants 
up and ]iot tliem before the weather 
gets too cold. The plants should make 
vigorous growth if properly cared for. 
Plant out your cuttings in the same 
way. If you carry the plants over sum- 
mer in |iots, the best plan is to jdunge 
them to their brims in a coblframe 
where they are within easy reach of tht; 
hose. These hydrangeas are not usually 
attacked by red spider or rust, and it 
may be that your ])l!ints liave been sun- 
scalded. In a clear house wlun s])rayed 
overhead, the sun is a])t to burn som<> 
of the foliage and hydrocyanic acid 
gas, unless given in light doses, would 
be liable to intensify rather than alle- 
viate the trouble. C. W. 



New Bern, N. C. — Two greenhouses 
."ire being erected at the establishment 
of the Now Rem Greenhouses. One 
of the new houses is .TOxlOO feet and the 
other is 120x80 feet. The new firm han- 
dles all kinds of cut flowers and pot 
jilants. 



FERNS 



FERNS 



Fancy Ferns - - - $2.50 per 1000 
Summer Fancy Ferns 1.75 per lOOO 
Dagger Ferns - - - 2.00 per lOOO 

HUCKLEBERRY FOLIAGE 
$2.50 per case 

PROMPT SHIPMENT 



E. A. Beaven, 



Evergreen, Ala. 



MfntloB The E«t1«w whe. y.n writ*. 







CHAS. S. I. RE & CO. 

Wholesale Dealers In 

Southern Decorative Evergreens 

EVERGREEN, ALA. 


Fancy Ferns 

Let us have your inauiries 
for next season. 

TEAHAN FERN CO. 

69« RIVER ST.. TROY. N. Y. 


Mention The Rerlew wben 70U writ*. 


Mention The Rerlew wben ron write 






Laurel, Hemlock and Spruce 
Branches, 5c per lb. 

PRINCESS PINE 

Cleaned and bunched 10c per lb. 

HAMILTON BROS. 

Millincton, Franklin Co., Mass. 


Sphagnum Moss 

n.F.AN >: DRY 

CAR LOTS OR LESS 

A. J. AMUNDSON CO.. 
CITY POINT, WIS. 


Hentton The Rerlew when 7011 4wrlte. 


Mention The Rerlew when yon writ*. 




L. B. Brague & Son 

Wholesale Dealers la 

CUT FERNS 

MOSS, EVERGREENS 

"•^gg-**"* HINSDALE, MASS. 


Dagger Ferns-Wild Smilax 

Huckleberry Filii^e 

W. W. THOMPSON 

MONROEVILLE ALA. 



Junk 1. 192:: 



The Rorists^ Review 



53 



Ferns 



Galax 



Moss 



HUCKLEBERRY BRANCHES, per 50-lb. case, $6.00 



Asparagus Plumosus Sprays per bunch, 35c-50c 

Smilax per dozen strings, $3.00 

Adiahtum per 100, 1.50 



NEW SOUTHERN FERNS 

Per KKKi $2.5(» 

GREEN LEUCOTHOE 

Per U)U $0.7') 

Per 1000 (5.00 

BRONZE AND GREEN GALAX LEAVES 

Per KXK), Sl.-W: case of 10,000, $12..")0 



CHIFFON-All Colors 

4-in., yd., Sc; 6-in., yd., 7c 



SPHAGNUM MOSS 

Select Quality, large size bale $1.75 

T) bale lots, or more, at 1.60 

10 bale lots, or more, at 1.50 

GREEN SHEET MOSS 

Per bundle $ 1.50 

Per 10 bundles H.W 



Write for price list on Wire Designs 

Brown, Green and Purple Magnolia Leaves $1.50 per carton; 10 cartons, $13.50 

Red Magnolia, rich, bright color per carton, 1.75 

Everything in Florists' Supplies 
Write for price list 



THE LARGEST SHIPPER 
AND HANDLER OF 



CUT FLOWERS 



IN THE 

CINCINNATI MARKET 



C. E. CRITCHELt, 



Wholesale Commission Florist, 
15 East Third Street, 



Cincinnati, Oiiio 



Mention The ReTlew when you write. 



Ferns, Wild Smilax, Leucothoe, Galax 



New Southern Fern* $2.50 per 1000 

Green Galax $1.50 per 1000; $12.50 per 10,000 

Sphagnum Moss $1.50 per bale; $13.00 per 10 bales 

Green Sheet Moss $1.35 per bale; $12.50 per 10 bales 

Brown, Green and Porple Magnolia, $1.50 per carton; 10 cartons, $13.50 
Red Masrnolia $1.75 per carton 

All Kinds of Wirework and Decorations Carried in Stock 



CHIFFON 

4-inch 5c 

6-inch 7c 



THE WILLIA 

329 Main Street 



MURPHY COMPANY 



WHOLESALE COMMISSION FLORISTS 
Phonca Main 980-981 



CINCINNATI, OHIO 
Largest SiMppers of home-Grown Cut flowers in tlie Gndnnati Market 







BOXWOOD ■ LAUREL ■ NOSS 

Laarel Brancbes, irix* ft. case. 18 26 case. 

Uiiurcl Stems, larvP ban .. tlM 

Graca Sheet Moaa $l.&0 bag. 


Asparagus Plumosus Sprays 

Mahonia Leaves Fancy Ferns 

SKND FOR PRICE LIST OF DESIGNS AND SUPPLIES 

E. G GILLETT, wholesale commission riorist, Cincinnati, O. 


W. Z. PURNELL, SNOW HILL, MD. 


Natural Green Sheet Moss 

Per lO-lb. ba«, $1.75 

Dyed Green Sheet Moss 

Per 10-lb. bag, fa.50 

KNUD NIELSEN, ETergreen, Ala. 


HEMLOCK SPRAYS 

are the most appropriate Greens now for all 
kinds of Floral decorations. Ferns are scarce 
and sky-high in price. 

We Quote Hemlock Sprays for promot ship- 
ment at 9S.OO tier 1000; 2500 or^or» at $4.00 
peraOOO. TERMS: GASH, PLBASE. 

Northern Fern Co., Schofield, Wis. 


NEW CROP OF 

Fancy and Dagger Ferns 

Grean and Bronze Galax Leaves, Laurel 
and all kinds of Eversreens in season. 

Write for Prices. 

CHRISTY S. PULOS 
1«8 New St. NEWARK, N. J. 



54 



The Florists^ Review 



JuMii 1. 1922 




LOS ANGELES. 



The Maxket. 

During the week preceding Memorial 
day, business kept up fairly well, with 
plenty of stock of all kinds. By ship- 
ping time it was expected that there 
would be an abundance of gladioli and 
other flowers suitable for long-distance 
work and probably plenty of left-overs 
for local use. Memorial day, as a rule, 
does not call for high-priced stock, but 
rather for quantities of showy material 
that will stand the heat so late in the 
season. 

Eose growers are in with a fine cut. 
Some peonies are in and are attractive, 
although there is some complaint as to 
their lasting quality. The herbaceous 
peony has never become popular here, 
although the Moutan varieties thrive 
well. For the first time this season yel- 
low and Shasta daisies have sold freely. 

Vaxious Notes. 

"Turn again, Whittington, lord mayor 

of . " No, we mean Armacost, 

lord mayor of Sawtelle. Good luck to 
the modern Dick Whittington and may 
his shadow never grow less! The Old 
Soldier city never had a better execu- 
tive head. 

The L. A. Evergreen Co. is bringing 
in fine herbaceous peonies from the 
north. They came in well before the 
Memorial day demand and were handled 
at the American Florists' Exchange. 

Some years ago A. W. Pooley, of 
Pomona, raised a fine red gladiolus, 
which he named Virginia. This is now 
beginning to appear on the market here 
from several growers and it is a remark- 
ably distinct and beautiful thing. It 
was mentioned some years ago in The 
Review, when Mr. Pooley was working 
up stock of it, and the good things 
prophesied of it then seems about to iie 
realized. It is a clean-cut, bold flower; 
the flowers are set well on the spike and 
arc of a beautiful, clear color. 

The Broadway Florist continues to be 
one of the heaviest buyers on the local 
market and the store is always a busy 
place. Outside of the regular box trade 
and decorations, the amount of funeral 
work turned out here is remarkable. 

Gorini Bros, are bringing in some of 
the best Halley gladioli of the season. 
This firm is noted for its special strain 
of Shasta daisies, which are arriving in 
the usual fine shape. The strain is noted 
for its fine texture and long-keeping 
qualities; consequently, most of the 
stock is taken by the wholesalers for 
shipping. 

E. Schaeffor, at 2905 South Figueroa 
street, has a fine stock of all classes of 
bedding and similar plants. lie reports 
good business. 

J. B. Pilkington, of Portland, Ore., 
was in the city last week on fine of his 
periodical visits. 

C. E. Falls, of the C. E. Falls Service 
Co., Chicago, was in the city last week. 
The firm is opening a local branch in 
Los Angeles. Mr. Falls was being 
piloted iabout l)y Arthur Howard, of 



Howard & Smith, and A. H. Soules, dis- 
trict manager. Mr. Falls expressed him- 
self as delighted with all he had seen. 

Communications from J. Dieterich 
show that he is enjoying himself in the 
east, en route to Europe. In the mean- 
time Emil Brinkmeyer, his son-in-law, 
is running the business, at "Wall street, 
and the nursery, at Wintersburg, and it 
keeps him busy. 

Among the newer buyers on the mar- 
ket here is Walter B. Parker, proprietor 
of Parker's Flower Shop, of Pomona. 
This business was recently started at 
164 West Pearl street, and Mrs. Parker 
is also interested and active in the busi- 
ness. 

Albert Goldenson has signed a lease 
for a new store at Sixth and Spring 
streets, one of the busiest corners in Los 
Angeles. He will keep the store farther 
out on Sixth street for a time, until he 
gets established in the new location, 
where he will eventually concentrate all 



his energies. Such a location should al- 
most insure success and, of course, the 
long-established name of Wolf skill's & 
Morris Goldenson insures a steady and 
good trade, in addition to new cus- 
tomers. 

The death of C. C. Thomas, of the 
staff of Lichtenberg's, is reported on 
the obituary pages of this issue. 

All the wholesalers bought heavily 
for Memorial day and, although at the 
hour of writing they have not started 
to ship, everything is in readiness for 
a big holiday and orders are coming in 
rapidly. H. R. R. 



SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



The Market. 

Stock was plentiful last week and the 
universal hope was that it would re- 
main so over Memorial day. There 
were plenty of roses and satisfactory 



STATICE, the Everlasling Flower 

We have the finest quality of Statice this year that 
California has ever produced. It will ship anywhere. 

Carnations and all field and garden flowers are plenti- 
ful and cheap. Our Shasta Daisies have never been 
better. 

L. A. FLORAL CO. 

The House of Quality and Service 

236 East 4th Street, LOS ANGELES, CAUF. 

Phone, Pico 518 



GLADIOLI, ROSES 

SPRING FLOWERS 

SELECTED FOR LONG DISTANCE SHIPPING 

ALSO THE BEST 

Callasy Carnations, Peas, 
Orchids and Valley 

COMING TO THIS MARKET 
Our packing methods insure good results and our prices are right 

on all classes of stock. 

S. MURATA & CO. 

380-386 S. Los Angeles St., LOS ANGELES, CAL. 

OldMt and Most ExpsrUniead Shipper* in California 

WE NEVER MISS 



JUNB 1, 1»22 



The Florists^ Review 



55 



A BIG 

BASKET BUSINESS 

That is just what we have been having. We put 
in a small stock of Baskets to sell at wholesale 
about five years ago. From the very start we 
selected our line by finding out exactly what 
your customers liked. Our business grew right 
from the start, and our basket business has 
grown bigger every year. Your basket busi- 
ness must be bigger, too, or you couldn't buy 
our baskets. We believe that you can make it 
still bigger. We now carry a very full and 
complete line, every size, every shape and 
every color. Not only Flower Baskets, but 
Bird Cages, Lamps and Writing Desks. If you 
show them you will sell them. 

Of course we have 

ROSES CARNATIONS ORCHIDS 

LILY OF THE VALLEY 

and every seasonable flower to fill these bas- 
kets with. 

It is always time well spent to visit and; go 
over the stock of — 

THE BIGGEST, BEST AND BUSIEST STORE IN THE WEST 



321 East 4th Street LOS ANGELES, CALIF. 

WE CLOSE SUNDAYS 



, ■ .■' ■ «^ '.. 7" '.fT^*»i.^r *^y ^.?^■*^;Jw•'';■' '-y -■—•;«' ■■.,^'w<7 > -"^^.^'s-v- >:■-<•,■■■-. 'Br-;--; • - .^vT^fflK^i^'*^*;^^^^!^. 



56 



The Rorists^ Review 



Jdnb 1. 1022 



Russell Bench Plants 

2S,000 

Choice, Grafted, One- Year Stock. 
Can be well rested and shipped subject to order. 



Premier Rose Gardens, 



Maywood, 111. 



CALIFORNIA FLORAL CO. 

ALL SEASONABLE CUT FLOWERS AND GREENS 



217 Winston Street 



THE BEST IN THE WEST LOS ANGELES, CAL. 



crops seem to be coming along. The 
carnation crop was not large last week, 
and some doubt seemed to exist as to 
whether there would be a sufficient 
quantity of carnations in the market to 
take care of the Memorial day trade. 
There were still some irises from late 
planting and a good many fine peonies 
are in evidence, thougli this year's crop 
is not so large as was expected. Mar- 
guerites began to arrive. Their lateness 
was due to the unusual amount of frost 
experienced last winter, which froze the 
plants and curtailed the supply. Large 
quantities of fine sweet peas are seen 
in the market, as well as g\'psophilas, 
gillyflowers, pansies, delphiniums, mari- 
golds, poppies, mignonette, cornflowers, 
sweet Williams, and a liost of other sum- 
mer flowers. Large crops of strawflow- 
ers are now being cut, some for drying 
purposes and some for immediate sale. 
Oladioli are not yet in their full season 
and baby gladioli are almost at a 
premium. There is plenty of valley and 
gardenias are no longer scarce. 

Various Notes. 

San Francisco and Oakland are pre- 
]iaring to "Say It with Flowers" to the 
visiting Shriners June 12 to lo. In Oak- 
land, work on the great Shriner emblem 
of flowers in the city hall plaza is pro- 
gressing rapidly under the direction of 
Howard Gikkey. city landscape en- 
gineer. Fifty thousand flowering plants 
are being set out. Outside the Ferry 
building, San Francisco, the Shriner em- 
blem in flowers is being jilanted under 
the supervision of Donald McLaren, of 
the MacRorie-McLaren Co. David Lich- 
tenstein, the Terminal Florist, is urging 
the bo.'trd of liarbor commissioners to 
retain this conspicuous s])ot as a per- 
manent flower garden. The oil service 
stations in the lity and on the high- 
ways are having gardens planted with 
Shriner emblems in flowers, to welcome 
the delegates, and Park Superintendent 
McLaren is liaving floral emblems put 
in Oolden Gate park. 

J. A. Axell, Frank Thatcher, of Feli- 
cano, Kossi & Co., and Charles Brown, 
of Brown & Kennedy, headed an ex- 
pedition to attend the "'49" celebra- 
tion in Sacramento. Thev were much 



15 Acres of Strong Calilomia Field-Grown 

Poinsettia Stock Plants 

Two Red varieties: The True Red, with large, bright red flowers and wide petals, 
and the Early Flo%vering variety, famous for holding its foliage and easy to raise. Has 
narrow flower petals and the flowers are not as large or bright as the True Red variety. 

Strong one-year-old plants, ^-in. to l9<-in. caliper. S16.00, S18.00. S26.00 and $80.00 per 100. 

Plants shipped by second-class express or freight to any part of the United States. 

PAUL ECKEy 1226 Hayworth Ave., Los Angeles, Cal. 

Largest Grower of Poinsettia Stock Plants. 



- LOS ROBLES CO. 

FLOWER BUI B , *- . . SftN TACRUZ- 
> SPECIALISTS! ^^COllFORMd 



ERIC JAMES 

Wholesale Grower of 

Palms, Ferns and Flowering 
Plants in Season 

8635 Foothill Blvd., OAKLAND, CALIF. 



ADIANTUM 

And all classes of Greens 

WE SUPPLY ONLY THE BEST 
Send for prices od 2-inch Maidenhair. 

TASSANO BROS. 

Artesia Nurseries ARTESTA. CAL 

iiitercsti'il in tho i)oki> bonnets, hoop 
skirts .'ind j);int!il('ttes worn by all the 
belles of the rapitiil city .and the 
■whiskers jind -vvestern outfits of the 
men. Mr. Thateher went as an old-time 
dude and Mr. Axell ^'ot local celor from 
a week 's f^rowtli of beard. They called 
on Mark H. Kbel, who showed them 
all the "'4!t" sights. Peter Matraia 
and his wife also attended the cele])ra- 
tion. 

Members of the E. W. McLellan Co. 
believed that Memorial day would 
be a big event, ,iudging from advance 
orders. G. W. McLellan said: "Peo- 



BOSTON 
FERNS 

6-in., heavy $0.75 each 

7-in., heavy 1.25 each 

H. Hayashi & Co. 

231 1 73rd Ave. OAKLAND, CAL. 



Phon* Merrltt 691 

NASART BASKET WORKS, Inc. 

Hiffh- Grade Flower Baskets 

2001 E. Fourtaonth St. 
OAKLAND, CAL. 



])le have been booking their Memorial 
day orders early this year. We are 
looking forward to a large local trade." 
S])eaking of this year's peony crop, 
J. A. Axell said: "I have taken up 
the question of the peony crop with va- 
rious growers, and they state that 
peonies can be grown at less expense in 
the east than here. In the first place, 
in the east they can grow peonies on 
land that does not cost one-tenth as 
much as land in the west. In the east, 
the ground freezes in the fall and the 
peonies do not require any attention 
because they are frozen for at least six 



June 1, 1922 



The Florists^ Review 



57 



BUY AMLING'S CUT FLOWERS, 
FLORISTS' SUPPLIES AND GREENS 

We are headquarters for the best in the Los 
Angeles market. When you want quality stock, 
real service and good packing — 

WIRE OR PHONE 

E. C. AMUNG CO., 447 WaU St., Los Angeles, Cal. 

Tk* Largest, B*«t EqnippW aad Most Centrally Laeatad Wkolasala Hoaaa ia Las Aagalas. 



FRASER & SON, Wholesale California Flower Seed Growers 

WRITE NOW FOR OUR 1922 WHOLESALE BULLETIN 



FRASER & SON, 



Pasadena, Csdif omia 



OWN- 
ROOT 

1922-1923 

List Ready Jnly 1st 

ALL FIELD GROWN 

Howard Rose Co. 

HEMET, CAL. 




Mpntinn Tho R<»Tlew when yon write. 

months. Here the fiehls liave to be 
taken care of all winter and weeded. 
The east has natural rains, but the west- 
ern growers have to irrigate, and where 
this is done the peonies burn on certain 
days. You cannot beat natural condi- 
tions." 

C. Kooynian is the proud father of an 
8%-pound baby girl. She is the first 
child in the family, and Mr. and Mrs. 
Kooyman are receiving many congratu- 
lations. 

Mr. and Mrs. Darbee and tlieir son, 
Andrew, arc planning to sail for ¥ai- 
rope in June. 

F. C. Jaeger & Son. both of whom are 
Shriners, have started a hook for regis- 
tration and are inviting all florist 
Shriners to register. "We are planning 
to have lists of the local addresses of 
visiting delegates, so as to make deliv- 
eries and to relay messages when these 
come," said F. C. Jaeger, Jr. 

The United Flower & Supjdy Co. re- 
ports that it expects to be able to fill 
all its Memorial day orders, of which it 
has booked a large number. I. Inoue, 
of this firm, speaking of the trade in 
artificial flowers, said: "The trade in 
artificial flowers from Japan has been 



''California" Plant Tub 



(REDWOOD) 




Tlip "("aliforniii" I'l.uu Tnii i.-< a special 
])roiluit for Flori.sts and Niirsirynien. Kx- 
pirt workmansliip, artistic linos, liarmo- 
iiiiiiis color anil .substantial nuality. Made 
from selected Xo. 1 Redwood, bound with 
electrically welded \\ir>' hoops. .N'o better 
tub made. 

NET WHOLES.VLE PRICE LIST 
Size K.icli Uoz. 100 

8-inch $0.8.'. $!».tMi *»>7.00 

Kl-inch 1.10 11. oO 84.00 

12-inch l.tiO I'i.nO 121.00 

14-inch I'.^r. ■_'.". (HI 187.00 

Ki-inch L' tio Jit.Od 212.00 

18-inch H.-.T. :;.^.l)0 2«0.00 

20-inch 3.S.-, 42.00 322.00 

22-inih ri.2."> r,- Am 441.00 

24- nch 7.2.') 78.00 .-|<».-..00 

30-inch 10 7". 120.00 010.00 

F. 6. T.. Factory, T.os .Vnceles. 
Prici s Sub.icct to I'haniT'- V\'!lliout Notice. 

Roy F.Wilcox & Co.. NontebeUo. Cal. 

Manui acf orers 
Wholesale Florist- in 1 Nurserymen 



Mention T>« RcTlew when yoo wrlt». 



PRONOUNCING DICTIONARY 

A list of PLANT NAMES and the Botanical Terms most frequently met with 
in Articles on trade topics, with the CORREQ PRONUNCIATION of each. 

"The Pronouncing Dictionary is just what I have wanted." 
"The Pronouncing Dictionary fills along-felt want." 

"The Pronouncing Dictionary alone was much more value than th« sub- 
scription price of The Review." 



A Booklet iust the size to fit a desk plgreonhole and be 
always available. Sent postpaid on receipt of 25c. 

Cazton Biilldlne. 
508 South Dearborn Street, 



FLORISTS* PUBLISHING CO. 



CHICAGO 







Dahlias - Gladioli - Cannas 

SELECTED DAHLIA SEED 

ARCHER'S GARDENS 

Les AngdM CooDtr 400 No. If anngo ATraa* 

ALHAMBRA. CAL. 


MEXICAN IVY 

Fresh from the Northern Woods 
HUMBOLDT EVERGREEN CO. 

FORTUNA, CALIFORNIA 



58 



The Florists^ Review 



Jdnb 1. 1922 







MATS 

For wrapping plant pots. 
Write for samples and prices. 

BAMBOO CANE STAKES 

Green, 3-ft. . .$4.50 per 1000 
Green, 4-ft. . . 6.50 per 1000 
Natural, 6-ft. . 7.50 per 1000 

PLANT TUBS 

Each 50c 


Now Ready for Shipment 

Dried Strawflowers 

OF ALL VARIETIES 

ENOMOTO & CO., Inc. 

WhohtcJ* Crown and Shippers 

35 Saint Anne Street SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 







Mention The Review when you write. 



greatly reduced by competition with 
artificial flowers from Germany and 
other European countries. ' ' Mr. Inoue 
added that the cut flower business is 
good at present. 

Domoto Bros, had some nice Shasta 
daisies and marguerites, which, they 
said, would be ready for cutting for Me- 
morial day, as well as roses, peonies, etc. 

The Growers' Floral Co. is cutting a 
fine stock of statice, helichrysum and 
other strawflowers, including the coral- 
like flowers known popularly as "Eus- 
sian cattail." 

S. Enomoto, of Enomoto & Co., has re- 
turned from a visit to Santa Cruz, where 
things are growing satisfactorily. Some 
of the Japanese growers in Santa Cruz 
have good supplies of freesia bulbs, Mr. 
Enomoto stated. He has made arrange- 
ments to handle a considerable quantity 
of these bulbs. These are for July de- 
livery. 

In places where San Francisco florists 
congregate, one is apt to see and hear 
the admonition: "Don't forget the 
florists' picnic, Fairfax park, June 25." 

Frank Thatcher represented Pelicano, 
Rossi & Co. at the '"49" celebration 
in Sacramento. Frank D. Pelicano says 
that he knows, from old-timers he has 
met, that Mr. Thatcher was quite in 
keeping, neatly shaven and wearing fine 
raiment. "The city boys dressed well 
in the days of '49." 

Podesta & Baldocchi have had num- 
bers of Shriners in their store already. 
They belong to the Honolulu delegation, 
which is here. Manuel Russell, of this 
firm, is going away for a two months' 
outing on the Russian river. 

Joseph's have a number of orders for 
Shriner affairs, including a big banquet 
at the Palace. They also have consid- 
erable work in connection with affairs 
for the delegates to the national real 
estate convention. The Civic Audi- 
torium is being transformed into a red- 
wood forest for this convention, with 
the floor carpeted with pine needles and 
wild flowers. 

The Misses Hannon's store is busy 
with bon voyage baskets. 

The Charles C. Navlct Co. has the 
largest and most extensively assorted 
stock of dahlias that it lias had for some 
years. The stock includes a fine line of 
pompon dahlias. 

Darboe's designed some clever 
wreaths in strawflowers for Memorial 
day. The firm reported heavy advance 
orders for local decorations for that 
day, as well as a rush of shipping orders. 
Leon Habet, of the Suzanne Floral 



FLOWER SEEDS 

Selected Strains. Highest Germination. 

The Best Varieties for Commercial Growers. 
ANTIRRHINUM (Snapdragon) 

Tr. Pkt. U Ob. 

Nelrose, rich coral pink $0.75 . .$4.00 

Harmony, rich terra cotta 

orange (new) 1.00 

Peace, lovely rose pink (new).. .75 2.00 
Silver Pink, best producer for 

cut 75 4.00 

Silver Queen, pure silvery lilac 

(new) 1.00 ... 

Torchlight, vivid orange with 

yellow center 75 3.00 

Giant Flowering 
Colors: Bronze, dark red, pink, 
scarlet orange, orange, yel- 
low, red and terra cotta 25 1.00 

ANEMONE "The Caen." 

Best French mixed. Pkg. H Oz. 1 Os. 

Single $0.50 $1.00 $3.00 

RANUNCULUS. French mixed. % 0«. 10s. 

Semi-double $0.60 $2.00 

STRAWFLOWERS. All varieties and 

colors. 
Postage prepaid. C^sh, less S% discount. 

ADRIAN J. SCHOORL 

255 California St., San Francisco, Cal. 



"TheLawsifHybridiziiig" 

Discovered by Richard Dlener 

A dlscover.v of tremendous Importance to 
everyone Interested In plant-breedlnK and plant 
life. Any form and sl/.e of flowers, fruits and 
(fralns can be obtained by application of these 
laws In the (lulckest possible way. They are the 
first workable laws ever discovered In plant and 
anlmal-breedlm;. Inchided is an explanation of 
What Plant Life Is; Animal Life in Relation to 
Plant Life; What Plant Sports Are, and other 
valuable Information. A i>amphlet of sixteen 
paKes, elegantly printed aiul Illustrated. 

Price, fS.OO 

RICHARD DIENER 

KENTFIELD, CAL. 



DAHLIA SEED 

Saved from ear anrlvsled prize-takinR collection, hybrid- 
ised bjr hand and lare to give aplendid reaalts. Ninety 
per cent will come deable. 

50 seeds $130 500 seeds $1«.00 

100 seeds.... 2^0 1000 seeds.... 17.80 

SUPERIOR DAHLIA GARDENS 

49tk and Fif eroa Sts., LOS ANGELES, CALIF. 



Aquilesia Caernlea, 2 1-4 In., $3.50 per 100. 
Aquileeia Clirysantlia. 3-ln. pots, $5.00 per 

100; also Loner Spurred Hybrids, same 

price. 
Cam panulaPersicifolia, blue or white, 3-ln,, 

$5.00 per 100. 
Pentstemon Hybridnm Grandiflornm, 

In 5 separate colors, 2 1-4 In. pots, $4.00 per 1000. 
Caab Please. 
FRED 8R0HE CO.. R. F. R. 4, Rii 367. SaiU Riti.Csl. 



For June Weddings 
and School Closings 

We Offer 
An Excellent Supply of 




CARNATIONS 

LILIES 

Miscellaneons Flowers 

SPRENGERI, PLUMOSUS 

FERNS 

Write for price list. 

HiUer Floral Co. 



FARMINGTON 



UTAH 



Richard Diener Cimpany 



INC. 



Originators and Growers 
of the Largest and Fbest 
Gladioli and Petunias 

Caialogum en Request 

KENTFIELD 

Marin County CALIFORNIA 



IF YOU WANT TO SELL ANYTHING 

USED ON THE PACIFIC COAST 

IF YOU \VANT TO BUY ANYTHING 

PRODUCED ON THE PACIFIC COAST 

'•Try Clarke" 

W. B. CLARKE 

Herticaltaral Breker, SAN JOSE, CALIF. 



Co., won praise for his decorations in 
the big hall of St. Mary's College, Oak- 



land, at the annual meeting of the 
alumni of that institution. Over the 



Jdnb 1, 1922 



The Florists^ Review 



59 



United Flower & Supply Co.^ inc. 

Wholesale Growers and Shippers 



448 Bush Street 



San Francisco, Calif. 



MUM 



CUTTINGS B. E. HAMMOND CO. 

— — ^-^^— — — — — — — — — — " SmattWa Wholnale FlmrUt 

GET OUR PRICES 1008 POST ST., SEATTLE 



CYCLAMEN 

Peterson's and Fischer's Strains, separate 
colors. 

2-inch pots $ 8.00 per 100 

3-inch pots 15.00 per 100 

OPHELIA ROSES 

For Bench Planting. 

2M-inch $ 8.00 per 100 

3 -inch 12.00 per 100 

Clarke Bros. 

287 Morrismi St. Portland, Ore. 




Patented March 5, 1911 



THE SECURE 
HOSE WASHER 

This washer sttcks. Tin- 
wire holds It iiithecoup- 
HiiR. You ciin't lose it. 
Ask your dealer or job- 
ber for It or send to Uft 
for prices. 

The Secure Hom WuberCo. 

P. 0. B«x 356 

OAKUND, CALIF. 



speakers' table hung a bell of roses, 
made of wreaths, diminishing in size 
from forty-eight inches. Within this 
hung a bell which the president used in- 
stead of a gavel. The panels of the 
great hall had cornucopias of roses and 
the sacred image was decorated in white 
flowers. 

W. L. Harding, formerly with Podesta 
& Baldocchi, is now chief decorator for 
Gill, the San Pablo avenue florist, Oak- 
land. M. M. 

PORTLAND, ORE. 

Business last week was fair with the 
trade here. There was an abundance 
of sweet peas, snapdragons, carnations 
and the like. German irises are shown 

Few peonies of the earlier varieties 
are arriving. The season being back- 
ward, few outdoor flowers are to be had. 
The prospects just preceding Memorial 
dav were for a good business. 

The Oregon Florists' Club held its 
regular business meeting at the Pythian 
building May 23, in the early evening. 



Roses! Roses!! 

Carefully Grown and Graded Cut Blooms 
Butterfly, Columbia and Hoosier Beauty 

PRICES: 

Fancy $10.00 per 100 

Lonsr 8.00 per 100 

Medium 6.00 per 100 

Shorts 3.00 per 100 

BEALL GREENHOUSE CO. 

VASHON, WASH. 



PHONE 
Pacific Long Distance 



Mention The Review when you write. 



Cyclamen Seedlings, traasplanted, salmon and red colors, 4 to I leaves, $6.00 per 
100; $50.00 per 1000. 

Otahelte Oranges, 2K-in i 600 per 100. 

Adlantum Cuneatum, 4-in 20.00 per 100. 

Asparagus Plumosus, 2K-iQ.. $6-00 per 100; 3-in., $8.00 per 100; 4-iD., 15.00 per 100. 
Begonia Cincinnati, 2H-in.. READY JUNE 25.00 per 100. 

Holden Floral Co., 1180 Nilwaukie St., Portland, Ore. 







ASTER SEED 

Send for list or see ad in The Review of 
Feb. 2nd, Feb. 16th or Mar. 2Bd. 

7%e Home of Aatera 

HERBERT & FI.FI.SHAUER 

McMinnville, Oregon 


BEDDING STOCK 

2-inch pots and rooted onttinss. 

Peters & Sons 

HILLYARD, WASH. 

(We fhip from Spokane) 


Mention The Review when you write. 


MeotloD The Review when yoa write. 






After the business meeting, the retailers 
gave a hard-time dance for the enter- 
tainment of the growers, which was a 
grand success, and enjoyed by all. 


Rahn & Herbert Co. 

CLACKAMAS, OREGON 


There was an unusually large attend- 
ance, and there were many funny make- 
ups. Refreshments were served during 
the evening. 


Wholetmle Growen of 

Pot Plants and Cut Flowers 




Mr. Maroni, of Salem, Ore., was a 
trade visitor in this city a few days ago. 

R. L. Scott, of Tillamook, Ore., was^a 
visitor last week. * 

Mr. and Mrs. A. J. Steele left the 


earlier part of last week on an exten- 
sive business trip through the cast and 
middle west. 

Rain prevented the outing on the oc- 



^•iV .• '•'^'.yf7';.i -i :/\7.. 



60 



The Florists^ Review 



JtjNK 1. 1U2-2 



DAGGER FERNS i^oo 



SEATTLE FERN & MOSS CO., l'^J=Krwls;i. 



E. W. McLELLAN COMPANY 

Growers and Wholesale Florists 
451 BUSH STREET, SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA 






casion of annual blossom day, and many 
in the trade were disappointed. V. H. 



SEATTLE, WASH. 



The Market. 

General trade activities last week 
were slow on most lines, and it was con- 
ceded by all florists that only a good 
sale on bedding stock and a brisk de- 
mand for funeral work saved the day. 

Funeral work was heavy last week, 
and there has been an unusually heavy 
demand for the larger pieces. There 
has been an increase in small decora- 
tions and the booking on early June 
weddings insures a good run of work. 

Stock is plentiful in all lines. The 
first deliveries of anenomes, local irises 
and peonies were made last week. Iris 
is of especially fine quality and the 
same can be said for the gladioli which 
arc being cut. 

The latter part of last week was 
marked by unusually warm weather, 
with the result that roses were forced 
•ahead, and the cut showed a material 
increase. ('arnations showed better 
color, and tlic supply of tulips and nar- 
cissi is still ahead of trade demands. 
Orchids continue scarce, witli lilac in 
plentiful supply. Forget-me-nots are 
about the only item in popular demand 
on which it is hard to supply the neces- 
sarj' stock. 

Various Notes. 

Walter (iarbett, who succeeds the 
late Martin Reukauf as the Pacific 
coast representative of 11. Rayersdorfer 
& Co., IMiiladelphia, has been calling 
on the local trade during tlie last week. 
He reports business conditions aver- 
age in most communities visited. 

Koses of exceptional color and length 
of stem were among last week 's offer- 
ings at the City Flower Shop, and these 
have proved good sellers. A number 
of good-sized orders for fraternal fu- 
neral pieces have been filled. 

The Woodlawn Flower Slio]) has been 
using its smaller windows on the Union 
street side for an effective display of 
some new pottery lines, and these have 
met with good success. Blues and va- 
riegated patterns of this same color 
have been most popular. The larger 
window has been given over to the 
summer flowers in baskets and other 
combinations. One luncheon decoration 
handled last week called for the ar- 
rangement of a yacht several feet in 
height, of yellow tulips and lavender 
sweet peas, combined with yellow rib- 
bon, sailing on a sea of maidenhair 
ferns. 

The B. E. Hammond Co. is to move 
June l.") to larger quarters, at 1510 
Western avenue, where better arrange- 



PORTLAND 
jj^^^y rieli(nwii. ThiWiFld'iBeit. 
PERENNIALS Moiuitaiii View Floral Co., Portland, Oregon. 



The BMt to th« ChaapMt. 
Aak for Pries Ltot.^ 



Primula Obconica 

My well' known strain 

2)^-iach pots $ 6.00 per 100 

4 -inch pots 20.00 per 100 

Primula Obconica Seed, mixed ar separata 
vuieties. 

76c per package af 1000 seeds. 
Send for price list of Ferns. Kentias, etc. 

H. PLATH 

"The Ferneries" 

**;2Si1,«. San Francisco, Calif . 



Califwiiii rrivet, 2 ti 3 ft. $ 6.01 per IM 
CsUfiriia Privet, 8 te 4 ft, 8.00 per 100 
Bwtoa hj, Zjtu, 2 ft, IS.OO per 100 

Cash with order, please, 

PACIFIC NURSERIES, 

Colma, San Mateo County, Calif onto 



Woodland Park Floral Co. 



SUMNER 



WASHINGTON 



Wholasal* Growars of 

Pot Plants and Cut Flowers 



Yonr inquiries for anything yon may neei 
WILL BE APPRECIATED 

H. L OLSSON CO., he. 

Growen ef Qnality Plaits for the Trade 



Box 494. 



SPOKANE. WASH. 



nicnts for the liiiinUinn of the wliolc- 
SctIo trade are jiossildc. This is tlio 
location formerly occii]iif(l l)y the Hod 
Shield Creamery, and tlu' cold storage 
rooms there will be converted into an 
icebox, wliile street display windows 
are increased to :> store fronts. The 
new location is handier to a majority 
of the retailers, and to everything else 
except the railwiiy express yards. 

A continued dem.and for bedding 
stock has been reported bv the Art 
Floral Co. 

A. R. M.'itthiesen was the first locil 




Our 

Winter 

Orchid. 

Flowerii^ 

Sweet 
Peas 



are now growD by over 8000 commercial florista. 
They have no equal Send far Hat 

Anton C. Zvolanek & Sans, ^"Skr" 



Bedding Stock 

FRED G. EHLE 

WHOLESALE GBOWEB 

224-236 Sanborn Ave., San Jose, Calif. 

W^rit* for 1922 Price List 



1800 Otaheite Oranges 

FINK STOCK REAKV FOK MNCH POTS. 

$6.00 per 100 
FRED M. YOUNG 

41 East 52d St., PORTLAND, ORE 



SEE OUR LARGE AD ON 

Seasonable Plants and Snppties 

in tba March 30 laaua at Tha RaTiaw. 

Wilton-Crout-Gehr Co. 

Wbolatala Ploriata 
Bmat 62nd and Ankanir Sta. Portland, f>ra. 



FREESIAS 



rNckd a WittdJa 



Box eo8 
Montoballo, Oal. 



grower to bring in i)eonies this season, 
and he is alsa delivering ^ome fine 
purple iris. i 

Luke Farris, -with W. .T. Mathewson, 
of Port Angeles, was a trade visitor 
last week, as was Anna V. Amundsun, 
of the Annavee Flower Shop, of Yak- 
iin.'i. Wash. 

Kosai.'i Bros, report '. n increased cut 



•J 



^ 

J 



•♦ji.*'^Tr' ' '.^'^vsr..- •.">;•:; "•-_^'r^«^7. 



""Ta 



June 1. 1»2- 



Thc Florists^ Review 



61 



i 



£. y. Steele, Mgr. 



ORIGINATORS OF 



Since 1893 




Mastodon Pansies 

1922 PRICES: 

Mastodon Miracle Mixed — Our initial offering of a super 
mixture containing all the finest types of all our strains, and 
including ruffled flowers and many of our new sunburst 
pansies, smoky rims, henna shades, with fine long stems; 
in fact, an up-to-the-minute strain that will delight the pansy 
fan who is looking for something BETTER in the pansy 
world. Fine for forcing. (O. K. outside.) 

Price: i^ oz., $0.85; yi oz., $1.50; y^ oz., $2.75; X' oz., 
$5.25; 1 oz., $10.00; 2 oz., $19.00. 

Steele's Greenhouse Special Mixed — (O. K. outside). 
A wonderful market strain and a fine forcer. 

Price: i^ oz., $0.65; Y^ oz., $1.00; 34 oz., $1.75; ^ oz., 
$3.25; 1 oz., $6.00; 3 oz., $16.00; 4 oz., $21.00. 

Steele's Mastodon Private Stock Mixed. 

(Unequaled for the price.) 
Price: ^ oz., $0.65; }i oz-. $0.75; Y^ oz., $1.50; i/ oz., 
MASTODON PANSIES $2.75 ; 1 OZ., $5.00; 3 oz., $13.50; 4 oz., $17.50. 

Mile. Irene — New. A henna red. h wonderful Pansy. A fine forcer. Price: -^ oz., $1.00; Y& 
oz., $1.75; Ya oz., $3.25; Y2 oz., $6.25. 

Steele's Mile. Isabelle — Our novelty. A ruffled bronze, a few are yellow. 

Mastodon Striata — Our novelty. Of great size and striped in true sunburst fashion. 

Steele's Improved Vulcano — New. A rich, velvety Burgundy red. Very large. Long stems. 

The price of each of three varieties named above is the same as Miracle Mixed. 

Introducing Steele's Improved Orchidea — A mixture of unique sorts, ranging in color from creamy 
white to shell pink, and of the most delicate orchid shades. A beautiful variety. Price : 400 seeds, 50c ; 
^ oz., $1.00. 

Meteor. A wine-red — a profuse bloomer. 

Black Mastodon. Huge in size. 

Madame Steele, Elk's Purple. Extra fine. 
Very large. 

Prince Henry. The largest dark blue in exist- 
ence. 

Mastodon Beaconsfield. Purple, upper petals 
tinged with lavender. Extra large. 

Mastodon Adonis. Light blue, baby blue and 
lavender shades. Our most popular blue. 

The price of each of the twelve varieties named above is : ^ oz., $0.65 ; 3^ oz., $0.75 ; 34 oz., $1.50; 
Y2 oz.. $2.75 : 1 oz., $5.00 ; 3 oz., $14.50 ; 4 oz., $19.00. 

STEELE'S PANSY GARDENS, '^S^Ik^^'^' 



Panama-Pacific Yellow. Those wonderful Ex- 
position Pansies. 

Parisian Yellow. A pure yellow of marvelous 
size. 

Bronze Mastodon. The most popular strain we 
have. 

White Mastodon. Dark center, the largest 
pansies we have ever seen. 

Grand Duke Michel. The premier large, all 
white pansy. 

Madame Perret. Rose and red shades. 



iif nearly \u\ offt'rintjs from the grecn- 
lioiiscs, ,is :, result of the better fjrow- 
in^r weatlii.r. (ircliids beinfj about the 
one exception to this list. Transient 
business has tieen holdinj; ny well. 
lliere has been a yoofl increase in so 
cial and store decorations, ("ontintied 
eommont on tlie (|uality of Premier 
roses beinj. lian(iled at* this time is 
heard from trade visitors of other 
cities. 

Mor;;an \ Flower Sli0)i is slKtwing 
some finely colored sweet peas of its 
own growing. These meet with a ready 
^<ale. Funeral business has been good. 

Business for the nurseries and stores 
handling: plants is assured in the deci- 



sion of the American Legion committee 
to have a box on every downtown lamp 
post during the coming convention of 
dis.-ibled veterans. Harry A. Crouch, 
vice-president of the Rc-ittle Florists' 
Association, is chairman of one of the 
subcommittees to raise the necessary 
iinds for this convention and refiorts 
ready response from all of tlo^ tlorists 
Mii]iroached. 

W. R. Wilson, of tlie Hellingham Flo- 
ral Exchange, Hellingham, Wash., was 
a visitor last week, as was V,. M. Mat- 
son, of Bremerton. 

Alex Swanson, retired Minneai)olis 
florist, who has been residing .'it I'asa- 
ilena, has purchased a good-sized tract 



of land near the Highlands, on the 
County Club road, and will move his 
family here. It is likely that he will 
take up the growing of some few va- 
rieties of flowers as a personal hobby. 

Meiby's F'lower Shop h;»s been show- 
ing some fine yellow tulips and these 
li:iv(> made an efFe<'tive window dis- 
play. 

William Desmond was host S.afurday. 
May 2(1, at a jK)ker jiarty for a number 
of florists, among those attending be- 
ing .Tosejdi Stuber, Oustave Bjorkmai, 
C:nl M(dby. H. K. Hammond, Ralph 
Richardson, .T. O. Hankins and W. 
Wallmark, of Kverett. On the same 
(f'ontlniiPrt on PRire KKI. t 



62 



The Florists^ Review 



JuNB 1. 1922 




Wanted and For Sale Department 

^^Advertisemetnts under this bead, set without 
display, 18 cents per line. In sending remittance 
count six words to the line. 

Display advertisements in this department Sa/N> 
net, for one inch space. 

When answers are to be sent in our care, add It cents 
for forwarding, 

CASH WITH ORDER from those who do not 
do other advertUlntf. 




SITUATION WANTED— By grower; single; 25 
years' experience. Address No. 338, care 
Florists' ReTJew, Cliicago. 

SITUATION WANTED— Grower of pot plants, 
carnations, mums, etc.; middle age; life ex- 
perience; married, one cliild. Address No. 853, 
care Florists' Kevlew, Chicago. 

SITUATION WANTED— By young lady; good 
designer, with 8 years' experience; want to 
make change as soon as possible. Address No. 
860, care Florists' Review, Chicago. 

SITUATION WANTED— Single man; 36^ 10 
years' experience In general greenhouse worlj 
in middle west and west; Job must be steady. 
W. S. Arp. Kennebec Hotel, Long Bench, Cal. 

SITUATION WANTED — As gardener on private 
estate; 18 years' experience growing fruit 
and flowers under glass and outside; married, 
age 34; please state particulars. Address 
Gardener, Box 474. Ravinia. 111. 

SITUATION WANTED— As gardener on a pri- 
vate place; 18 years' experience growing 
fruits and flowers under glass and outside, and 
landscapeworli ; to take full charge; please state 
particulars and wages in first letter; married; no 
children; age, 40 years; nationality, Hollander; 
19 years In this country. B. T. De Wilde, 
M ontvale Farm, R. 7. Spokane. Wash. 

HELP WANTED — Rose grower Immediately; 
near Philadelphia. Address No. 47, care 
Florists' Review, Chicago. 

HELP WANTED — Competent grower of mums, 
carnations, peas, etc.; $25.00 per week to 
start; steady position. Frank Garland, Des 
Plaines, 111. 

HELP WANTED — At once; good, reliable young 
greenhouse man; one with knowledge of 
roses; $25.00 per week. Address No. 220, care 
Flori sts' Review, Chicago. 

HELP WANTED — At once, a good foreman in 
my greenhouse establishment; same to live 
by greenhouse; German man preferred. Address 

No. 3 42, care Florists' Review, Chicago. 

ELP WANTED— Will pay $28.00 week for 

man to grow roses and help on balance of 

place in central Pennsylvania; send references. 

Address No. 817, care Florists' Review. Chicago. 

HELP WANTED — A good, ail-around young 
grower at once; good references and ex- 
perience required; 10,000 ft. of glass; wages 
$30.00 per week. Salmon the Florist, Kalispell, 
Mont. 

HELP WANTED — First-class grower of roses, 
carnations, peas and potted plants for retail 
place of 35,000 ft.; single man preferred; good 
wages; place open at once. Ellis Floral Co., 
Bloomi ngton, Ind. ^ 

HELP WANTED — Good reliable grower of gen- 
eral line of pot plants and cut flowers, also 
spring bedding stock for retail trade; will 
furnish house with water and fuel; state ex- 
perience and wages wanted. Cotton Floral Co., 
P ortsmouth, Ya. 

HELP WANTED — An experienced grower of 
roses, carnations and potted plants; must 
be able to manage and get results; good position 
for right man; state experience, for wliom you 
have worked and salary wanted. Address No. 
340, care Florists' Review, Chicag o. 

HELP WANTED — Working foreman to grow 
carnations, mums and general line of bedding 
plants; prefer German; must be able to get 
good results; have 40.000 feet of glass; am ten 
miles from Pittsburgh; state in first letter the 
wages you would come for, with good board and 
room; a'lso your telegraph address; if your reply 
is satlsfactorv, will telegraph for you. Address 
■l ohn L. Wyland. Allison Park, Pa. 

HELP WANTED — Foreman for pot plants in 
northern Ohio; do a wholesale shipping 
trade with small and large unfinished plants 
and want a man who Is able to produce such 
stock economically and in quantity; give full 
experience, wliere you worked before and how 
long in each pl.Tce; state wages wanted; we 
are willing to pay and want the goods; can 
offer a good future. Address No. 252, care Flo- 
rists' Review, Chicago. 

WANTED— To buy or rent with option of buy- 
ing, small greenhouse in west or middle 
west: give full particulars. Box 33, Clarinda, la. 

WANTED — To buy greenhouses to dismantle: 
please state particulars and price in first 
letter. I. Suesserman, 104 Ridgewood Ave., 

Newark. N. J. 

ANTED— To rent about 30,000 to 40,000 
sq. ft. of glass, with an option of buying; 
near Chicago. Address No, 325, care Florists' 
Review, Chicago. 



WANTED — To buy old greenhouses to be torn 
down. Address M. Welngarten, 286 Fifth 
Ave., New York. 

ANTED— To rent 3,000 to 6,000 ft. glass, 

lease two years, privilege buying. G. Florist; 

Gen. Del., Detroit, Mich. 

FOR SALE— No. 46 Kroeschell water tube 
boiler; heat 25,000 sq. ft. glass; In use five 
years; reason, enlarging plant. Neal Floral Co., 
Walton, N. Y. 

FOR SALE— A retail flower shop; will sell at 
sacrifice on account of owner leaving city; a 
real bargain for cash. Address No. 843, care 
Florists ' Review, Chicago. 

FOR SALE— Concrete bench legs 16 ins. high; 
shipment to be made from our Joliet plant, 
Jollet, 111.; write for particulars and prices. 
Davis-Joliet Co., Davenport, la. 

OR SALE — Beeman tractor, complete, $250,00; 

used very little; also a 2 H, P. Alamo gas 
engine, $25,00; both In first-class condition. 
Rlebs Bros., North Milwaukee. Wis. 

FOR SALE — 5,000 ft. of glass with or without 
8-room, modern dwelling in a live Kansas 
town; terms, cash; write for further particulars. 
Address No. 819, care Florists' Review, Chicago. 

FOR SALE — Or rent; In good location, 10,000 
ft. of glass In good condition; with additional 
lots; ready to occupy by July Ist; for further 
information write Raebel & Son, 217 Tusc. W., 
Canton, Ohio. 

FOR SALE — Quantity of greenhouse materials, 
such as good second-band pipes, glass, sash- 
bars, apparatus, boilers, etc.; also complete 
greenhouse. I. Suesserman, 104 Ridgewood Ave., 
Newark, N. J. 

FOR SALE — Greenhouses and downtown store, 
separate or together; about 20,000 sq. ft. of 
glass, well stocked; in southwest Missouri; good 
reason for selling; terms. Address No. 346, 
care Florists' Review, Chicago, III. 



I SITUATION WANTED | 

= As working foreman; grower of g 

§ roses, carnations, and goneral line of g 

g stock; a competent, good, all-around = 

^ man with life experience, in all = 

= branches; nationality, English; an g 

= American. g 

B Address No. 354, care Florists' Re- = 

g view, 508 S. Dearborn St,, Chicago. = 
=rilllliiiiilllillllilllllllllllllllllillllllllilllllllllllllllliiilliiilllliiiiiiiliiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiilllllllllllllllr, 
^niiiiiiliiiiilii!iiiiiil!lliilliiiiii!iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii|i||iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiillllilllllllllllllllllllllinillllllllllllMi 

I SITUATION WANTED | 

= Single man, past 50, life-time i 

g gardener and florist; capable of taking 1 

1 charge of commercial or private estate; § 

= place within 100 miles of Chicago. = 

I H. WM. HELLMANN, | 

I Box 298, South Bend, Ind. | 
^iiiiiii>iiiiiiiiiiiiiuii;iiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiuiiiiiiiiiiiii::uiiiiii!iiiiiiiiiiiiiuiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii?- 
^iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii;^ 

j SITUATION WANTED | 

1 As working foreman; life experience; = 

1 satisfaction guaranteed; nothing but g 

g flrst-class place considered; best of ret- 1 

1 erences can be furnished. = 

1 L. A. Johnson, 1 

i 928 Carter Ave,, Wichita. Kan. | 



^iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiuiiuiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii^ 

I SITUATION WANTED | 

g By A-1 grower, where good work is ap- = 

= preilatt'd ; 25 yiais' experience; thoroughly com- = 

= intent in the culture of all species of pot plants g 

g here and abroad; caii bring tlio best results g 

g on roses, carnations, mums, sweet peas, Easter g 

= and Christmas stock; capable to take full = 

= charfre; wholesale or retail trade; middle age, g 

g married; please state particulars in first letter, g 

g w. stobdp:. i 

g 30!) CralRle Ave., Richmond, Va. g 

;;iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii!iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii!iiiiii;; 



i SITUATION WANTED g 

g A greenhouse foreman and manager of im- g 

g doubted honesty and full of pep and execu- g 

s tlve ability desires to make a change In the g 

H near future; many years' experience; 40 years = 

= of age and can handle help to l)est advantage g 

H and get results; full charge wanted and prefer g 

= a long term contract, as I hate moving; please g 

g state full particulars as to location; wages paid, g 

= etc, In first letter. Address No. 337, care Flo- g 

1 rlsU' Reirlew, 508 S. Dearborn St., Chicago. 111. g 

T^liiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimmiuiiiuiiiiiiiiiiiiiNiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiuiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii? 



FOR SALE— Small greenhouse, residence, 2 lota 
and store. Address No. 820, care Florists' 
Review, Chicago. 

FOR SALE — Two pipe-frame greenhouses. King 
construction, to be removed; 50x21 and 47x18 
ft., with hot water heating plant, two boilers; 
built new four years ago and in fine condition; 
must sell; write for price. O. A. Voris, Milton, 
Pa. 

li OR SALE — Tanks; about 50 extra fine tanks 
V practically new; from 119 gallons to 664 gal- 
Ions; price, $15.00 to $45.00; these tanks are 
excellent for water service and liquid manure 
supply. Metropolitan Material Co., 1299 Flush- 
ing Ave., Brooklyn, N. Y. 

FOR SALE — Or rent; on account of our land- 
scape and nursery work needing so much of 
our time, we will sell or lease our 5 greenhouses; 
15,000 ft. of glass, well stocked with a general 
line; centrally located In the best 30,000 city, 
with 50 factories and a community of 65,000 good 
flower buyers; 6 outside lots, one stocked with 
hardy flowers to cut summer blooms; 6-room, 
modern residence; you will flnd this a proposi- 
tion that will stand investigation. J. E. Leslie 
& Son, 2816 S o. Boots St., Marion, Ind. 

FOR SALE— Brand new glass, B. double thick, 
16x24, 16x18; unselected double thick, 16x20, 
16x18, 14x20, 12x16, 10x12. at special low prices. 
Second hand pipe, 1-inch to 6-incb, threaded 
and coupled, price upon application. BOILERS 
— We have several sectional and round boilers 
at specially reduced prices. Used bars, 2c per 
foot. New Pipe Tools — Malleable Hinged Vises; 
No. 1, capacity, 2%-ln., $3,00; No. 2, capacity 
3% -In., $4.50. Stocks and Dies, Armstrong pat- 
tern; No. 2R, threads % to 1-in,, $6,60; No. 
3R, threads l^, to 2-in,, $9.90. Toledo Stocks 
and Dies; No. 1, threads 1 to 2-in.. $12,00. 
Pipe Wrenches; 18 in., grips 2-ln., $2.00; 24-ln,, 
grips 2Mi-ln,, $2,90, Pipe Cutters, Saunders* 
Patterns: No. 1, cuts % to 1-ln., $1.66; No. 2, 
cuts 1 to 2-in., $2,48. Metropolitan Material Co., 
1299-1323 Flushing Ave., Brooklyn, N. Y. 

|iiiuiiiiiii!iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiuuiiniiiiiiiuiinmiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiig 

I SITUATION WANTED | 

I A-l salesman, buyer and man- 1 

I ager; 17 years' experience in two of | 

g the most exclusive siiops in New | 

I York as salesman and manager; 1 

i able to turn out high-class, artistic i 

I work; open at once for position in | 

= any city west or north of New York; g 

1 must be permanent with high-class i 

i concern or young responsible firm | 

1 intending to enlarge its business; | 

1 has also knowledge of perennial and g 

I landscape work; state salary. i 

1 Address No. 349, care Florists' Re- | 

i view, 508 S. Dearborn St., Chicago, | 

I 111. I 
^iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii:iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii>iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii»iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii 
gii;iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiit!iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiij 

I SITUATION WANTED | 

g By Scanilinavian as foreman and grower; g 

g thoroughly capable of growing roses, carna- g 

g tions, mums, pot plants, etc. ; life experience = 

= In the business; married; age, 39; only a = 

g permanent place considered; particulars In full s 

g when answering. = 

g Address No. 347. care Florists' Review, 508 = 

g S. Dearborn St,. Chicago. Ill, = 

iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiitiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiuiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii 

^lllllllllillllllllillillllllllllllilllllllllllllllllllllNllllllllillllllllllllllllllllllillillllllllllllllllllllllllHIIIIIIIji 

I SITUATION WANTED | 

i Up-to-date grower of wide experience; any g 

g part of U, S. or Kurope ; take full charge of g 

g greenhouse for commercial purpose and private g 

H landscape gardens; excellent references; single, = 

g German: give particulars In first letter, g 

i Address No. 352, care Florists' Review, 50S 1 
g S, Dearborn St., Chicago, 111, 1 

iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiuiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiil 
giiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiNiiiiiiiiiiiiiuiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiini^ 

I SITUATION WANTED | 

g Storeman, florist, expert on sales, capable of a 

g handling best class of trade and making up g 

g hlgh-cla.ss work; good advertiser; also have had = 

g broad experience as general grower; capable to g 

g manage any plant; young, married; services g 

g now available ; state full particulars and salary, g 

1 F,ARLE FOUTNEY, i 

g 500 North Main St., Rushville, Ind. i 
-TllllllllllllllllilllllllllllliUllllllUllllllllllllllllllllUlllllllllllllllllllllllllllllUllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllUll 



JCNB 1, 1922 



The Florists^ Review 



63 



1 



1 i 






•t 



•if 

■'t 



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I HELP WANTED | 

I Immediately, assistant general | 

= erower; state salary with board and i 

I lodging In first letter; give refer- | 

i ences. = 

i R AND S FLOWER STORE, § 

I Missoula, Mont. m 

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'iiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiniiiiiiniiiiniiiin"""""""'"""''"'''''"'""'''''"'''''"'''''''''"^ 

I HELP WANTED | 

= Greenhouse builders wanted : exi)erlenced men = 

- on m-eenhouse construction; carpenters, painters, = 

= Klazlers steam fitters; only flrst-class. top- = 

1 notch men of good character will be considered: § 

1 good wages; write fully or call. = 

1 AMERICAN ORKENHOUSE MFQ. CO., = 

= Room 904 Masonic Temple, g 

1 159 North State St.. Chicago, 111. | 

^IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIINIIIIIIIIIIIIIIINIIVIIIIIIII"!!"!""""""!""!!"^ 

liiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiHn"ii>>i"i"iii""ii'"i'i''"i^^ 

I HELP WANTED | 

I First-class perennial propagator | 

I and grower; give experience and | 

I wages expected. | 

I PFUND NURSERY CO., | 

I Elmhurst, 111. | 

illlllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllUIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIINIIIIIIlil 

yjiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii mill iiiiiiiiiiiiii I iig 

I HELP WANTED | 

Rose grower; flrst-class man to i 

handle 20,000 roses in a new place; lo- | 

i cation northwest; give full particulars | 

= In answer. 1 

i Address No. 816, care Florists' Re- | 

1 view, 608 S. Dearborn St., Chicago, 111. | 
iiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii"iiiiiiiiiiiiiii"iiii>>"<iii>"i" 

^IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIINIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIKIIIIIIKIIII'llli 

I HELP WANTED | 

H Working foreman; prefer married man with = 

H western experience; one who has had charge = 

= of 35.000 feet of glass or more, growing for = 

= retail trade: we have the trade and need the s 

= stock: send references ; salary wanted, etc, g 

= first letter. = 

1 BOISE PliORAIi CO.. s 

H Boise, Idaho. g 

iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiMiiimiMiiiiiiiiii^ 
^iiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiuiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiuiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii^ 

I HELP WANTED | 

i will pay $80.00 per month and room | 

g for good all-around grower, single; must g 

g understand some design and landscape g 

= work and be capable of taking charge. = 

g Address = 

I STOWE TAVERN GREENHOUSES, | 

I Cuyahoga Falls, Ohio. g 

^iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiuiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiir= 
piiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiuuiiiiiiitiiiiiu^ 

I HELP WANTED | 

g All-around store man; must be good = 

= salesman and maker-up; give salary = 

1 expected, references and full particu- g 

I lars in first letter. g 

I Address No. 356, care Florists' Re- 1 

g view, .-)08 S. Dearborn St.. Chicago. 1 
riiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiuiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiHiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii';; 

glllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllUIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIilllg 

I HELP WANTED I 

g By wholesale floral establishment, g 

= flrst-class bulb forcer, also familiar g 

= with cut flowers; married man pre- = 

g f erred; must be capable of taking full g 

= charge; give details and references In g 

g first letter. g 

i CRONEMETER GREENHOUSES, i 

g Deposit, New York. g 



gniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiuiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii iniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiuiiiiii| 

s HELP WANTED i 

= Good reliable man to take charge of small g 

g retail greenhouse in middle west: wide ex- = 

= periencB not necessary but must be willing to g 

3 work to business Interest and do design work g 

g when called upon; permanent position; reference = 

g as to character and reliability required; this g 

= Is an opportunity for the right man; state = 

= salary expected In first letter. = 

g Address No. 334, care Florists' Review, 508 S. = 

g Dearborn St., Chicago, III. g 

^iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiinri 

giiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii,i,,ii,ii,ii,,,,i,,,,,,,,iiiiii,,,,iiiiiiiiiiii{iiiiiiii^^ 

1 ,,, , HELP WANTED i 

s Working foreman to grow all necessary stock g 

^ o ?/>a'^®'"^'*'^ ■ married man who can handle g 

s [>. 500 square feet of greenhouse gla-ss and 150 g 

g liothcd sash, with land of 12 acres and is will- = 

g ing to board 2 men; good future for man with g 

= "^"^y as I will retire in three years; no one g 

g wno cannot produce results need apply. = 

i GOTTLIEB .TIRKOVSKY, g 

= irti, J S^P'- J'"ree Sons Cemetery, = 

g J3tn and Desplalnes Ave.. Forest Park. III. g 

"••luiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii^^ 



gi iiiuiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiKiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiin^ |iiiiiiiiuiiiiiiiiiiiiiuiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiuiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiuiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiuiiiiiuiiiiiiiiiiiiiii^ 

I HELP WANTED | 

I High class salesman, well ac- | 

I quainted with the wholesale floral, | 

I seed and nursery trade and allied | 

I industries; must have character and | 

I reputation above reproach; refer- | 

I ences; excellent for full time or | 

I sideline. Apply | 

I FLORISTS' CREDIT ASSOCI- I 

I ATION, INC., I 

I 1225 N. Ashland Ave., Chicago, 111. | 

iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiuiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiil 
|iiuiiiuiiiiuiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiitiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiui» 

I HELP WANTED § 

i A first-class wholesale and re- g 

I tall establishment with 150,000 | 

I SQuare feet of glass desires the m 

I service of a good grower as fore- i 

I man; applicant must have exper- | 

I ience with bedding, Christmas and | 

I Easter plants In addition to roses g 

I and carnations and must be able to | 

1 handle help in an efficient manner; | 

i this is an exceptional opportunity I 

g with a future; we li;i\e an ain' - g 

I ment with all conveniences to ofter i 

I as a home. References are required. = 

I Address No. 314, care Florists' 1 

I Review, 508 S. Dearborn St., Chi- | 

I cago. 111. § 

fiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiaiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiHiiii iiiiiiiiiiuiiiiniiiiiiiiuiiiiiiiiiiNiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiui^ 

i:.iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiuiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiHiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiuiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii;^ 



I HELP WANTED | 

= We need a man who Is first of all, i 

1 a salesman of proved ability with a = 

g Kood record of past experience; he is g 

g tactful, persistent, and adaptable, and 1 

1 has good appearance; knowledge of g 

5 plant material and landscape work g 

1 will greatly help; he will have absolute g 

1 charge of territory In and around Chi- = 

g cago; an ample drawing account will g 

= be given, but his real income will be g 

g proportionate to sales and, therefore, = 

g practically without limit; we hope to i 

g secure one of the best retail nursery g 

g salesmen in the country; if you feel g 

g you measure up. Write giving some g 

a particulars, preparatory to a personal g 

g , I ' » ■ w . g 

1 Address No. 348, care Florists' Re- 1 

I view, 508 S. Dearborn St., Chicago, III. g 

^1 iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii 

^llllllllllllllllllllillllllllllllllllllllllllllllillllllllllillillllllilllllllilllllllliiiUlliliilillllillllHIilllllllllllllJ 

I HELP WANTED | 

i Experienced pot plant grower; one | 

1 who can manage 40,000 feet of glass; | 

i greenhouses and grounds are in first- | 

I class condition; party engaged must | 

I be willing to show results by first of | 

I the year and if both parties are sat- | 

i isfied we are willing to give entire g 

1 charge of range and sell a limited 1 

I amount of stock in company. | 

1 Address No. 341, care Florists' Re- | 

I view, 508 S. Dearborn St., Chicago. | 
iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiuiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii 

^IIIIIIIIIIIIUIIllllllllllllllllilillllilllllllllllllllllllllllllNIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII>lll>IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIINIIII!= 

I HELP WANTED | 

= Good grower of pot plants for retail i 

i store; must be capable of producing re- | 

1 suits; state wages and experience In g 

g first letter. g 

I HUSCROFT'S FLOWER SHOP, | 

g Steubenvllle, Ohio. | 

iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiNiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiir 
giiiiiiiiiiiuiiiiiiuiiiuiuuiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiuiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii;^ 

I HELP WANTED | 

I By a large florists' supply house, | 

g salesman who knows about the line g 

i and trade in New York; state salary, = 

I experience and references. | 

I Address 1129 Arch Street. i 

g Philadelphia, Pa. g 



WANTED 



i To buy or lease, greenhouse estab- 1 

I lishment in good, live town; middle 1 

I west preferred; send particulars to g 

I C. C. WAKELING, | 

I 1301 North Court St., Ottumwa, la. | 

illllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllUIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIUIIIIIIIUIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIUIIIIIIIIIIII^ 

:iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiuuiiiiiiiuuiiiiiiii:i 



WANTED 



r;illllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllinillllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll!l 

giiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiuiiiiiiiiuiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiuiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii^ 

I HELP WANTED | 

g Experienced grower of cut flowers 1 

g and plants; must be good on roses and g 

= capable of taking full charge when g 

g necessary; 25,000 sq. ft. of glass; give g 

g experience and wages wanted. g 

I BEAVER AVENUE GREENHOUSES. | 
g 3422 Beaver Ave., Des Moines, la. = 

fiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii^ 

|ll!IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIUIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIg 

I HELP WANTED | 

I Live agent wanted to sell bulbs on | 

g commission basis. Excellent side g 

I line for capable man visiting florists, g 

1 Address No. 509, care Florists' g 

g Review, 608 S. Dearborn St., Chi- g 

g cago. 111. I 

iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiintiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii^ 
;:iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiuiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiuiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiuiiiiiiiiiiii:£ 



g To lease, by successful grower with g 

g 26 years' experience In flowers, plants g 

g and vegetables, a greenhouse business, g 

g or will run same on commission basis; g 

g state full particulars in first letter. g 

g Address No. 355, care Florists' Re- g 

g view, 508 S. Dearborn St., Chicago. g 

fiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiuiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiS 

^IllllllllillllllllllllllUIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIUIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIUIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIItllllllllllllllllllg 

I FOR SALE I 

1 A florist's retail business in a i 
g good location in business part of g 
g Buffalo; must be sold at a reason- g 
g able price on account of sickness. = 
I LINCOLN FLORIST, | 

g 896 Broadway, Buffalo, New York g 
^iiiiiiiiuiiliililliiiliiillllillliilliillllllllllillllllllllllllilillillllilllillillllllliuilllillillllillllllllllllllllllin; 
^iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii^ 

I FOR SALE I 

g 'Or rent, two greenhouses, lot g 

g 35x392; good location in central g 

g Pennsylvania; well stocked; good g 

g reason for selling. g 

1 Address No. 318, care Florists' g 
g Review, 508 S. Dearborn St., Chi- g 
g cago. g 

=iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiitwiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii 
1!^ b:.iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiuiii<iiiiiiii;iiiiiiiiiiiiiii^ 



HELP WANTED 

Working foreman for 40,000 ft. of 
glass; carnations, mums, cyclamens and 
general line of pot plants; must be 
able to produce first-class stock; ref- 
erences required. 

RYAN & CULVER, 
Youngstown, O. 



FOR SALE 



g Oreenhouse establishment, six houses 25x85 g 
g and one house 12x85. with all necessary land s 
g and equipnient; ideal location; town of 2.000. s 
= 40 miles west to nearest mmpctitlon. none to M 
g the east nearer than 200 miles; big rich field; g 
= fine chance for exiierienced florist with some = 
= cash. g 

g J. T. ROBERT.SON. g 

g Sunnyside, VVa,shlni!ton. g 

-.iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiiiniuiiiinniiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiin 
giiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiig giiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiuuiiiimiuiHiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii^ 



HELP WANTED 

g Flrst-class grower of roses, cama- g 

g tions, mums and bedding stock; ex- g 

g perience on lettuce and tomatoes de- g 

= slrable but not essential; good wages g 

g and comfortable house to good man. g 

I Address No. 307. care Florists' Re- g 

g view, ."508 S. Dearborn St., Chicago. g 

iiiiiuiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiuuniiiuiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiuiiiiuiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiJ^ 



I FOR SALE I 

g Two used hot water heating boilers; 1 

g 5,000 sq. ft. of heating surface each; 1 

g In first-class condition. g 

1 SUPERIOR MACHINE & BOILER 1 

I WORKS. i 

I 840-8.10 W. Superior St., Chicago, 111. 1 
r.iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiuiiiiiiiutiiiiiiiuiiiiuiiiuiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiuiiiiiiiiiuiiiuuiiiiiiujiiiiiiiiiiuiiii'il 

[TURN THE PAGE.] 






*• ■ --^ - 



64 



The Florists' Review 



JUNI 1, 1922 




OT-R NEW STORE AND GREENHOUSES AT 600 HARLEM AVENUE, OAK PARK, ILL., A RESIDENTIAL SUBURB 

OF CHICAGO 



FOR SALE 



i A place in one of the finest suburbs of Chicago that can safely be called one of the best establishments in the | 

i country doing a retail and wholesale florists' business; a sound, successful business that has thrived for forty years, 1 

i serving a high-class retail trade and doing wholesale business with Chicago's leading florists; everything new and | 

= in best of condition, the entire place having been rebuilt recently and new equipment installed; there are eight new i 

I and modern Moninger iron-frame greenhouses covering 30,000 square feet, equipped with a new heating plant and i 

I devoted to a general line of pot plants; the spacious store at the greenhouses is equipped along modern lines with g 

I new fixtures and is connected to the greenhouses by a large, well arranged service building; at the rear of the range s 

i is a fine 10-room residence and a heated garage big enough for six cars; there are three motor trucks and all other 1 

1 necessary equipment; in addition there are tliirteen 50-foot city lots next to the store and greenhouses; another store = 

= is operated on Lake Street, the main business street of the suburb; not far from several very large cemeteries; there i 

I are steam railroads, Chicago elevated railroads and trolley lines and many other things that make for an ideal loca- 1 

= tion; the amount of business that can be done is limited only by production, for there is a ready market for all that | 

i could be produced in a place two or three times as large g 

I Offering for sale a florists' business of as high standing as this one is not a common occurrence, and it presents = 

i a rare opportunity to a person who has enough capital and knows the florists' business. This is a big proposition = 

s and replies are wanted only from persons who command a goiul amount of capital, and such persons will be supplied 1 

1 with full p:irticulars on request. A. H. SCHNEIDER, 1 

I 600 Harlem Ave., Oak Park, 111. i 

iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiin iiiiiimiiiiiiiiiijiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiNiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii^ 

:'iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiimiiiMiiiniiiiniiiiniiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii!iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii; .:iii!iiiiiiiiii:uiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii^ ^iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiuiiiiim^^ 

I I FOR SALE i I 



I FOR SALE I 

I Well established retail business 1 

I in fine locality in Chicago, doing a | 

I flourishing business; will pay for | 

I itself the first year; full details will | 

I be furnished on request; will be | 

I sold at a very attractive price. | 

I Address No. 268, care Florists' | 

I Review, 508 S. Dearborn St., Chi- | 

I cago. 111. I 

^lUllllllllllllllllllllllllllltltillllllllilllllllllllllllllllilllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll 

^iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiuiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii|g 

I FOR SALE I 

= A flourishing greenhouae business; 25,- g 

1 000 feet glass: In Canada; modem con- g 

1 structlon; well filled with plants: In- = 

g vest in Canada now while the Canadian = 

g dollar Is still below par; It is coming g 

3 up each day. g 

1 Address No. 56, care Florists' Review, = 

g 508 .S. Dearborn St., Chicago, III. | 

!riiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiHiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiin 
^iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiininiiiiiiiiiinnniiiiniiiniiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiitiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiii^ 

I FOR SALE I 

g Three small greenhouses to be dismantled: 1 

1 also benches that are In the houses and a = 

§ small boiler; can be seen at 3725 So. Michigan g 

i boulevard. Chicago; apply at g 

g MAUKICE L. ROTHSCHILD' S, = 

i gtb floor. State Street and Jackion Boulevard, g 

I Chicago. 111. g 
iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiuiiiiiniiiiiiiiinniiiiiuiiiHiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiitiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii'i; 

m iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiii]niiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii!iiii| 

I FOR 8ALB g 

1 Five houses, centrally located In a city of = 

= 20.000 in western New York; one 21x110. one = 

I 22x128, one 17x126, two 12x60; three of the = 

i houses Lord & Burnham arch bar construction; g 

= all in good repair: stocked to sky line with = 

1 spring bedding plants: also 3,000 stock geran- = 

1 luras In ground benches; May and June gale« 3 

i will pay over hi of purchase price; choice of = 

= 2 dwellings: Immediate possession. . _ = 

g P. H. LLEWELLYN, Administrator, Clean. N. T. g 
iiiiiiiiiiiiiniiimnumiiininnnniniiminiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiitmiiiiitiiiimmiiiiiiitiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii?. 



i Florist's establishment estab- I 

I lished 25 years, doing a fine busi- | 

I ness; about 35,000 feet of glass, | 

I well stocked; 5 acres of land, a | 

I dwelling and two lots at the green- | 

I houses; downtown office with one | 

I greenhouse attached; also dwelling | 

I at downtown office; coal mined i 



I FOR SALE 

I Glass, bars, pipe, ven- | 
I tilating machinery, etc., | 
I from 11 greenhouses; av- | 
I erage size, 27x100 ft; 1 

one-half mile from place; 150 miles | | prefer tO SCll Standing. I 
west of Chicago; owner would like | | ^^.^^ j^^ detailed infOF- I 



I to retire. | 

I Address No. 313, care Florists' | 
I Review, 508 S. Dearborn St., Chi- | 
I cago. 111. I 

Tiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiii^ 
giiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiitiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiig 

I FOR SALE I 

= ()!• Will trade; on account of wife's health = 
g an; I'oniiiellei! to KO U> an altitude of 2500 ft. = 
s or more: I offer 2 mo4lem steel-frame green- = 
1 houses, 8,000 ft. of glass, full of stock; steam = 
= heat, city water: new l-rooni l)ungalow, 6 acres = 
= rich land: town of 10,000 population, no com- = 
= petition: a money-maker, at a real bargain. = 
i MOULTKIK FLOIIAI. CO.. = 

g Moultrie, fia. g 

n.iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiic 
giiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiig 



FOR SALE 



= (^ne of the Ijest little paying businesses in the g 

= west in one of the prettiest towns; well estab- g 

= lished: 11,000 square feet of glass with dwell- = 

= injx: first rate condition; selling on account of = 

g high altitude: $3,000,00 deposit required; write i 

= tor further particulars. g 

1 Address No. 351. care Florists' Review, 508 = 
= H. Dearliorn St., Chicago, lU. g 

Willllllllllllilllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllfr; 
ijiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiitiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiuiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniu: 



FOR SALE 



Good second-hand pipe, all sizes, for g 
water and steam purposes; also pipe g 
for culverts, grape arbors, fence and = 
corner posts; cheaper than wood and g 
lasts longer: send us your Inquiries and = 
let us quote our prices. = 

MAX ZIEGLER & BROS., g 

Muncle. Ind. = 



I mation of material. | 

I The Geo. Wittbold Co. | 

I 745 Buckingham Place i 

I CHICAGO I 

I NoTK- Houses mentioned above are lo- I 

g cated at Aldine and Halsted Sts., Chicago, I 

I and are to he renioveci to make room for 1 

I an apartment building. Business will be I 

= carried on as usual from 74.') Buckingham = 

I Place. I 

iiiiiiiMiiMiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiinniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiinmiiiJ 
giiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiii 

I FOR SALE 

i Tip-to-date grreenhouse establish- 

I ment, consisting of four King 

I greenhouses each 35x150 ft., one 

g propagating house 8x150 ft., stuc- 

1 coed paclcing room and office 17x35 

I ft., shed 17x70 ft., 8-rooni dwelling 

I and about 2% acres land, all In 

I elegant condition; price $20,000, a 

I big bargain for a quick buyer; sltu- 

I a ted 8 miles from Lancaster, Pa., a 

1 wonderful chance for two active 

i young men. 

1 Address No. 357, care Florists' 

I Review, 508 S. Dearborn St., Chl- 

= cago. 



^ II niiiiin iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimi iiiiiiiiiii I iiiiiiii; ^iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiii iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiuiiiiiiiHiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiHiuiiiiiiuiiiiuiB 



June 1. 1922 



The Florists^ Review 



65 




fikgia nlL-Deliverv 



Department' 



THE florists whose cards appear in 
the Pink Part of The Florists' 
Review are prepared to fill orders from other 
f lorists, for local delivery, on the usual basis. 
See index by towns on the f oUowingr pagre. 
If your city is not represented, there is a 
specially good opportunity for you. 





OUR customers give you 
an order — and you send 
your order to us — 



What happens? We fill it so well 

that your customer soon hears of it and says. 



"You have a darn good man in New 
York"- 

and tells it not only to you, but 
to his friends. 

RESULT: 

You get more orders to send — 
and we get more orders to fill ! 




Ci'vidztd WorU 

,7^ FlFT^i AYE- 

•AT 60t« 5T • 

■new yoRK- 

•Tf»on« ptJ^ZA 72-f I - 



Get Your Share of Telegraph Orders 

start Your ad next week by mailing this blank today 



FLORISTS' PUBLISHING CO., 

508 South Dearborn St., CHICAGO 



19. 



You may insert a Telegraph Delivery card occupying: ] y f inch in each issue of the 

Strike out size NOT wanted. 

Florists' Review for a period of one year from date, and thereafter until forbid by either 

party, for which 

monthly. 



" #-- — — — — -— — — — — ^ 

.agree to pay at the rate of ] goVc i "®* ^^^ week, bills payable 



strike out same ar above. 



. jAr*>4.«\ *.v 



\ • 



66 



The Florists^ Review 



JUNB 1. 1922 




Jhe florist* whose cards appear on the pages carrying this head, are prepared to fill orders 
""^^ from other florists for local delivery on the usual basis. 




For SAN FRANCISCO 

the Bay Cities and all Central California 

iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii^ 

PELICANO, ROSSI & CO. 

Members F. T. D. 123-125 Keamy street 

OFFER UNEXCELLED FACILITIES FOR HANDLING YOUR ORDERS 



Index by Towns of Florists Represented in the Pink Fart 



city Paie City Pa«e 

AKRON, 0. BLUEFIELD. W. Va. 

Heepe Co 91 Flower Shop 82 

airInv r Fallon. Florist 82 

t^Pt^'iTr^'-C... 80 BOSTON. Ma... ^^ 

ALBANY. N. Y. GaMn. Inc., T. F. 72 

Danker '* Hougbton-Goroey . . 72 

Uloeckner. Wm. . . 74 O'Brien 72 

^h\erSS":....9o w^"Brii;-:::::::?l 

Woodian-". FL 8hp. 90 BOZEMAN. Mont. 

Langohr, M 93 

Kmi'FioJIa Co.... 87 BRIDGEPORT. Cnn, 



91 



Horan & Son . 
Keck & Son. J. 



73 



AMHERST. 0. 

Henes, L. J "•■ BRISTOL, R. I 

AMSTERDAM. Holland Kinder & Bro.. S.. 

Thlm. C *^ BROCKTON, Ma... 

ANN ARBOR. Mich. Belmont Fl. Shop.. 72 
RluMalze Bl. Shop. 84 BROOKLINE. Mas*. 

Tir-rnu wi« Palmer. F. E 72 

^'I.m'I™ Ofnhsel".. 82 BROOKLYN, N. Y. 
Sv"^^?d"e SJI^SLs 82 .ah^^ Hugo^H^... 74 

ASHEVILLE, N. C. welr. Inc., Jas 74 

Brownhurst ..^-•- » BROWNWOOD, Tex. 

Brownwood Fl. Co. 79 



Middlcmount Gar. 

ASHTABULA. 0. 

Ashtabula Fl. Co. 

ATCHISON. Kan. 

Atchison S. & Fl. 
(jtoves Floral Co. 



91 



BRUSSELS. Belgium. 



ATLANTA. Ga. 



Froute. M.. 69 

BUCYRUS. 0. 

90 I'osie Shoppe 91 

90 

WW. w. ... .. ^^ 

7fl 



BUFFALO, N. Y, 

Anderson, S. A. . 

f,',''Fl!,'rri' Co"' . 81 Colonial Fl. Shop 
Joy F'oral «.o..... " Felton's Fir. Shop. 76 

l^'Xr 80 Grever. Wm. H.... 76 

StalUiKs »g Kramer the Florist. 76 

Weinstock »" , .^. . ,7»ii,v. .. 76 



Lchde & Galley... 



ATLANTIC CITY. N.J. Palmer & Son 

Atlantic City V. Sh. 74 .^andiford, Chas... 7(! 

Crane & Hill 74 .srott the Florist... 78 

Kdwards Klo. Hall. 74 sicvcrs. W. H 76 

BURLINGTON. Vt. 
88 GoTe the Florist... 73 

BURLINGAME. Cal. 
g3 Peterson & Hayw'd. 94 

CAIRO, III. 

gg Cade the Florist... 80 

86 CAMBRIDGE, Mais. 

Ilcrker's Conserr. . . 72 

„„ Robbing Bros 7\i 

92 liyan. H. A 72 

CANTON. 0. 
79 Raebel & Son 91 



ATTICA. Ind. 

.\ttlca Floral Co. . 

AUGUSTA. Ky. 
Thomas, Victor U. 

AURORA, III. 

Aurora Crnhse. . . . 
Smely, Jos. M 

AUSTIN, Minn. 
Kinsman, A. N 

AUSTIN, Tex. 

Austin Fl. Co 

Hillyer's 79 CARBONDALE, III. 



BALTIMORE, Md. 

Fea-st & Sons 

(Irabani, nol)t. L.. 
Ilalliilay, Wm. J.. 
Johnston, Mary.... 



Plater. E. W 86 

R4 CASPER, Wyo. 

8] Ca.sper Flo. Co.... 93 

^ CEDAR FALLS, la. 

Bancroft & .Son 71 



81 



BASIN. Wyo. 

Koiiwell. Robin 

BATON ROUGE. La. 



.. CEDAR RAPIDS, la. 

■>■' Kemblc Flo. Co 71 

CENTRALIA. III. 



llosoland Florist... 80 jt„,g j y/ • ' j,^ 

BATTLECREEK. Mich. Wcljstcr Gnihses... 85 



2* CHARLES CITY. la. 

*" Riverside Fl. Shop. 71 



iJrcoiismith. F..., 
Coggan, S. W 

BERKELEY Cal. CHARLESTON. S. C. 

Berkeley Florist... 91 Art Floral Co.... 81 

BIDDEFORD. Mo. Carolina Floral Str. 81 

Strouls 72 CHARLESTON. W.Va. 

BILLINGS. Mont. Capital City Fl. Co. 82 

Billings Fl Co 9S Cli'ton Cut Fl. Co. 82 

Hopper's Grnbse... 93 Winter Floral Co.. 82 

BIRMINGHAM. Ala. CHARLOTTE. N. C. 

Blossom Slii.p fn Fiowcr Shop 81 

Harris Co 80 Sclioltz. In.- '^1 

Parker's Fl. Store. SO CHARLOTTESVILLE. 

BLOOMINGTON, Ind. Va. 

Klli-^ KN'iiil Co. .. .>>^ T.iiiikford. W. A . . S" 



City Page 

CHATTANOOGA.T.nn. 

Haeger FL Co.... 81 
Joy Floral Co 81 

CHICAGO, in. 

Bohannon Co 87 

Bnina. H. N 87 

Central FL Co 84 

Clody'8 86 

Congress Fir. Shop. 87 

FUher A Bro 87 

Jackson Fl. Shop.. 86 

Jensen Bros 8f 

Johnson & Jensen.. 87 

Lange. A 87 

Lange & Son 87 

Mangel 87 

Mlchal. John A 86 

Mulr 87 

O'Leary, Florist 87 

Samuelson. C. A... 87 

Smyth, W. J 87 

Swanson the Florist 87 
Wlenhoeber Co.. E. 87 
Wlttbold Co.. Geo. 87 
Wlttbold & Son. H. 
86-87 

CHICKASHA. Okla. 

Chickasha Gmhses. 86 
CHILLICOTHE. Mo. 
Isherwood Gmhses. 77 
CHILLICOTHE. 0. 

Brehmer Gmhse. . . 91 

CINCINNATI. 0. 

Baer, Julius 73 

Sheppard, H. W... 88 
CLARKSBURG. W.Va. 

Dudley & Sons 82 

Hayman Gmh.so.Co. 82 
Weber & Sons Co.. 82 
CLARKSDALE. Mits. 
Payne's Fl. Shop. . 85 
CLEVELAND. 0. 

(iassor Co 91 

Graham & Son... 91 
Mcgrhelsen Fl. Sh. 91 

Temlilett. W. n 91 

Westman & Getz. . 91 
CLIFTON FORGE, Va. 
Alleghany Fl. Co.. 83 
COLDWATER. Mich. 

Van Aken Bros 84 

Vogt's Gmhses 84 

COLO. SPRINGS.Colo. 
Cramp. Frank F . . . 92 
1'ike.s Peak Flo. Co. 92 

COLUMBIA. Mo. 

Columbia Fl. Co. . . 77 
COLUMBUS. Ohio. 
Franklin Pk. Fl.Co. 90 
Mission Fl. Shoppe. 90 
Neil Flower Shop . . 90 
Wilson Floral Co.. 90 

COUN'L BLUFFS, la. 

Gardiner Floral Co. 71 

Shaw, Fred R 71 

Wilcox & Sons 71 

COVINGTON, Ky. 

Ruttle. Robt. D.. . 83 

DALLAS. Tex. 

Flagg Floral Co. .. 79 
Lang Floral Co 79 

DAVENPORT, la. 

Bills Floral Co 71 

Forber, G. F 71 

DAYTON. 0. 

Abhv Ave. Gnihscs. 91 

Rodgers. J. W 91 

Zollilz F1. I'ro<i... 91 
DECATUR. III. 

D.iut Itios S.*i 

DE KALB. III. 

De Kail) Fl Sliop. . v", 

.Inlllisilll. .1. T, >.". 



City Page 

DENISON. Tex. 

Majors the Florist. 79 

DENVER. Colo. 

Bright Spot Grnhses 92 

Central Fl. Co 92 

Columbine Fl. Shop 92 
MaufT Floral Co... 92 
Park Floral Co.... 92 

DES MOINES, la. 

Guthrie-Lorenz Co. 71 
Klrkwood Fl. Co... 71 

DETROIT. MIeh. 

Breitmeyer's Sous.. 84 

Central Flo. Co 84 

Scrlbner FL Co 84 

DEVILS LAKE, N. D. 

Valker's FL Co.... 85 

DIXON. IIL 

DLxon Floral Co. . . 85 

DODGE CITY, Kan. 

Dodge City Flo. Co. 90 

DOUGLAS, Ariz. 

Gatllff FL Shop... 70 

DOVER, N. J. 

Sunnysido Grnhses. 74 

DUBUQUE, la. 

Uarketfa FL Nurs. 71 

Muntz, S. K 71 

DULUTH. Minn. 
Duluth Floral Co.. 92 

DURHAM. N. C. 

Durham Fl. Co 81 

Fallon Co., J. J... 81 
Piedmont Fl. Shop. 81 
E. PITTSBURGH, Pa. 
Frederick Fl. Shop. 78 
EDMONTON, Alberta 
Ramsay. Ltd.. W.. 89 
EL DORADO. Ari(. 
Leach Fl. Shop 89 

ELGIN. IIL 

Souster, Geo 86 

ELKHART, Ind. 

Van Aken Bros 84 

ELMIRA. N. Y. 

Sheely Bros 74 

EL PASO, Tex. 

Potter Flo. Co 79 

ELYRIA, 0. 

Hecook Fl. Co.... 91 

ENID, Okla. 

Knid Floral Co SG 

ERIE, Pa. 

Laver, J. V 79 

EUGENE, Ore. 

University Florist.. 93 

EUREKA SPGS.. Ark. 

Poor. C. 1 89 

EVANSTON. III. 

Wetland, .Tcihn 87 

Wlttbold .t Son.. 86-87 
EVANSVILLE, Ind. 
Mednagel Julius.. 88 

EXCELSIOR SPS..MO. 

Excelsior Gmhses.. 77 

FAIRFIELD, la. 

Montgomery Gnhscs. 71 

FAIRMONT. W. Va. 

Weber & Sons Co.. 82 

FALL RIVER. Mais. 

Warburton 72 

FARGO. N. D. 

Shotwell Fl. Co S.'i 

Smedley Fl. Co <i 

FAYETTEVILLE. N.C. 

Fallon <"ii., .1. .1 . ^i 



Page 



83 



90 



83 



City 

FLINT. MIeh. 

Hasselbring Flo 84 

FORT COLLINS, Colo. 
Espelln Flo. Co... 92 
FORT SMITH, Ark. 

Lee, Arthur G 89 

Quality Fl. Store.. 89 
Rye. George 89 

FORT WAYNE, Ind. 

Vesey'B 88 

FORT WORTH, Tex. 
Baker Bros 79 

FRANKFORT, Ky. 

Power Fl. Shop. . . 

FREEPORT, IIL 

Bauscher Bros 

Freeport Flo. Co. . 

FREMONT, 0. 

Horn FL Co 

FULTON. Ky. 

Rucker's FL Shop. 

GALESBURG. IM. 

Drary, H. F 85 

Plllsbury. I. L 85 

GOLDSBORO, N. C. 

Goldsboro Flo. Co. . 81 
GOSHEN. Ind. 
Colonial Flo. Shop. 83 
GRAND FORKS. N.D. 

Grand Forks Fl 85 

McElroy's Fl. Shop. 85 
GRAND ISLAND. Neb. 
WiUiamfl. Ed 88 

GRAND RAPIDS, 

Mich. 
Allersma, H. W. ... 84 
Smith Flo. Co.. H. 84 
GRANVILLE. 0. 
Duerr, Chas. A... 
GREEN BAY, Wii. 
Meier-Schroedor ... 82 

GREENSBORO, N. C. 

Van Lindley Co 81 

GREENVILLE, Mils. 
Idle Hour Flo. Co. 85 

GREENVILLE, N. C. 

Greenville Fl. Co.. 81 
GREENVILLE. Tex. 

Adklsson. Wise 79 

GRINNELL. la. 

Dittmer 71 

HAGERSTOWN. Md. 

Bester & Sons 84 

HAMILTON. Ont. 

Connon Co 89 

HANNIBAL. Mo. 

League 77 

HARTFORD. Conn. 
Brodrib, J. Albert. 73 

Coombs, John 73 

Lane. Geo. F 73 

Welch's FL Shop.. 73 

HATTIESBURG, Miss. 

Stemme & Sons.... 85 

HELENA. Arte. 

Ball Floral Co. 

HELENA. Mont. 
State Nurs. Co. 
HIAWATHA. Kan. 
Margrave. Sasan ... 90 
HIGHLAND. PK.. III. 
IllKhl'd Pk. Grhses. 87 
HILLSBORO. Tex 
WiKid Floral Co. . 
HILLSDALE. Mich. 

Stoll. (>. A SI 

HOBOKEN. N. J. 
Cnilirli \- Sons. ... 71 



91 



89 



93 



79 



City Page 

HOLLYWOOD. Cal. 
Hollywood Fl. Shop 94 
HONOLULU, H. I. 

Straus 69 

HORNELL, N. Y. 

James & Son 75 

Wettlln Floral Co.. 74 

HOT SPRINGS. Ark. 
Flower Shop 89 

HOUSTON. Tex. 

Kerr. B. C. 79 

HUNTINGTON. W.Va. 

Archer's Flo. Shop. 82 
McClure-Coffman . . 82 

INDIANAPOLIS. Ind. 

Bertermann Bros... 88 
Wiegand's Sons Co. 88 
IRONTON. 0. 
Reliance Seed Co.. 91 

JACKSON. MIeh. 

Blessing, J. B 84 

Fumlval & Son 84 

JACKSON. Ml... 
Capitol Floral Co.. 85 
JACKSON. Tenn. 
Jackson Cut Flo... 81 
JACKSONVILLE, Fla. 
Mills the Florist... 71 

JAMESTOWN, N. Y. 

Lakeview Rose Gar. 75 

JOLIET. III. 

Joliet Floral Co. . . . 85 
JOPLIN. Mo. 

American FL Shop. 77 

KALAMAZOO. Mich. 
Van Bochove & Bro. 84 
KANKAKEE. III. 

Faber. Geo 86 

Shafer Fl. Co 86 

KANSAS CITY. Kan. 
Moseley. Mrs. T. A. 76 

KANSAS CITY. Mo. 

Akln's Floral Co. . . 76 

Alpha Fir. Co 78 

Austin. J 76 

Barnes. W. J 76 

Chandler's Firs 7H 

iftiehlebach Kl. Sli. 76 

Murray, J. E 76 

Murray. Samuel 70 

Newell, A 76 

O'Connell Fl. Shop. 76 
Rock Flower Co... 76 
KENOSHA. Wis. 

Obertln, P. N 82 

KNOXVILLE. Tenn. 
Crouch, Chas. W... 81 

KOKOMO, Ind. 

Coles' Fir. Shop. . . 88 
LA CROSSE. Wii. 
La Crosse Flo. Co. . 82 
Salzer's Floral Gdn. 82 
LAKELAND. Fla. 
Westmoreland Gdns 71 

LANCASTER. Pa. 
Barr & Co.. B. F.. 79 

LANSING. Mich. 
Blssinger, J. A.,.. 84 
LEAVENWORTH.Kan. 

Leavenworth Fl. Co. 90 
LEBANON, Pa. 

Vavrous Sons 79 

LEWISTOWN. Pa. 

Miller, J. S 78 

LEXINGTON. Ky. 
Honaker the Flori.xt. S3 

Keller Co., J. A S3 

LIMA. 0. 

Zollitz. KgKert N. . , On 



City Page 

LINCOLN. Neb. 

Chapin Bros 88 

Eicho Floral Co 88 

Frey. C. H 88 

Frey * Frey 88 

LITTLE ROCK, Ark. 

Tipton * Hurst 89 

LIVERPOOL, England. 

Bees, Ltd 69 

Dingleys, Ltd 69 

LOGANSPORT, Ind. 

Pershing. E. H 88 

LONDON, Ont. Can. 

Gammage & Sons.. S9 

LONG BEACH. Cal. 

Art Florist 94 

Lowe's Fir. Shop. . 91 

Patrick FL Co 94 

LORAIN, 0. 

Carek. F. G 90 

Hecock Floral Co. . 91 

LOS ANGELES. Cal. 

Athletic Club Flo. . 94 
Bateman, Inc., H. . 94 

Broadway Flo 94 

Dartlng's Fl. Shop. 94 
Hall & Co.. Geo. J. 94 
Howard & Smith.. 94 
Redondo ¥\. Co... 94 

Saake, O. C 91 

Wright's Flo. Shop. 67 
LOUISIANA, Mo. 
Selbert, L. M 77 

LOUISVILLE, Ky. 

Fuchs, Henry 83 

Marret & Miller... 83 

Reimers & Son Co. . 83 

Schulz Co., Jacob.. 83 
LOWELL. Mas.. 

Mor.se & Reals 72 

LYNCHBURG, Va. 

Fallon Co.. J. J. . . 83 
McCarron, Miss. ... 83 
LYNN, Ma... 

Gibbs Bros 72 

MACON. Ga. 
Idle Hour Nurs. .. 80 
MADISON, Wis. 
Reiitschler Fl. Co. . 82 
MALOEN, Mats. 
Walsh & Son. J. . . 72 
MANCHESTER, Eng. 

Dingleys. Ltd 69 

MANCHESTER. N. H. 

Stache. H. C T.i 

MANHATTAN, Kan. 

Martina, The 90 

MANITOWOC, Wis. 
Sradson See<l Co. . . 82 
MANKATO. Minn. 
Mankato Flo. Co. .. 92 

NeUsen, Neil 92 

Wlndmlller Co 92 

MARIETTA, 0. 

Dudley ft Son 82 

Klfer. N 91 

MARION. Ind. 
Marlon Floral Co.. SS 
MARION, 0. 

Blake's 90 

McALESTER. Okla. 

Weaver, Wm 86 

MEDINA. N. Y. 

White Bros 74 

MELROSE. Mass. 
Casey Florist Co. 
MEMPHIS. Tenn 
Flower Shop. The 
Iillcwild Gmhses. 
Johnson Gmhses... 81 
MERIDIAN, Mis.. 
Carltol Fl. Co.... 85 



72 



81 
81 



J UNI 1. 1922 



The Rorists^ Review 



67 




_The l l ortoU whose cards appear on the pages carrying this head, are prepared to fill o rders 
****~ from other florists for local delivery on the usual basis. "^ 




Index by Towns of Florists Represented in the Pink Part 



city PM« 

MEXIA, T«XM 

Mexla Fl. Co 79 

MILWAUKEE. Wis, 



Baumgarten 



82 



Currie & Co., A... M 

Fox'B. Inc »J 

(Jlmbel's »* 

LubUner \% 

I'erstoin. Harry.... 82 
Semler-Leldiger Co. 82 

Welke Co.. E 82 

MINNEAPOLIS, Minn. 

Adams J;; 

Andrews, Florist... 92 

Mazey J, 

Swanson's, Inc. ... vi 

MINOT. N. D. 

Vallter's Floral Co. 85 
MISSOULA. Mont. 
<5arden City Fl. Co. 93 
MITCHELL. S. D. 

Dethiefs, \Vm 85 

Guniey Gfrnliso. Co. 85 

MOBILE. Ala. 

troodbrad Fl. Co.. 80 

Minge Floral Co... 80 

Uavler & Sons 80 

MOLINE, ilL 

Knees & Sons 87 

MONROVIA. CaL 
Brunger. C. A 94 

MONTCLAIR. N. J. 

Maspmann, Florist. 74 

MONTGOMERY. Ala. 

Kosemont Gardens. . 80 
MONTREAL. Can. 
Hall & Robinson... 89 

Ix?y & McAllan 89 

McKenna. Ltd 89 

MT. PLEASANT.MIch. 
Caple. Walter W... 84 
NASHVILLE. Tenn. 

(!eny Bros 81 

Joy Floral Co 81 

NEWARK. N. J. 

i'hillips l!ro3 74 

NEWARK. 0. 

Duerr, Chas. A 91 

Kent Bros 91 

Perry's Fl. Shoppe. 91 
NEW HAMPTON, la. 

Deal, S. L 71 

NEW KENSINGTON. 
Pa. 

GeorKe Bros 79 

McRac-Jenkinson . . 79 
NEW ORLEANS. La. 
Avenue Floral Co. . 80 

Kble. Chas 80 

Flower Shop 80 

.Mctairie Ridge Nur. 80 

Keyes & Co 80 

.Schpinukj^ Max 80 

Virgin. U. .T 80 

NEW YORK CITY 

Hostiin KlorL%t 75 

Huiiyard. A. T 75 

Burns, H. H 75 

Clarice's Sons 75 

Dards 75 



City Pa«e 

NEW YORK (Cont.) 

Fordham Florist... 75 
Galvln. Inc.. T. F.. 72 

Kottmlller. A 75 

Afalandre Bros 75 

Park Florist 75 

Ramm's Fir. Shop. 75 

Schlliig. Max 65 

Stumpp, O. E M.. 69 
NILES, Mich. 
Hansen N. & P. Co. 84 

RedUne Co 84 

NORFOLK. Neb. 

Norfolk Flo. Co 88 

NORFOLK. Va. 

George, Inc 83 

NORTON. Kan. 

Norton Gmhse 90 

OAKLAND. Cal. 

Clarke Bros »o 

Hogan & Erers.... flS 

Navlet Co •di 

Thorsted Fl. Co... 93 
OAKLAND. Md. 
Weber & Sons Co.. 82 
OAK PARK. III. 
Avenue B"lr. Shop. . 86 

Madison St. Fl 86 

Schneider, A. H.... 86 

OGDEN. Utah 

Artistic Fl. Co 95 

Dumke Fl. Co 95 

OKLAHOMA CITY, 

Okla. 
FurrovT & Co 86 

OKMULGEE, Okla. 

Marshall. O. W.... 86 
OLEAN, N. Y. . 

Herron, Dana R.. 71 
Oppenhelm, Manuel. 74 

OMAHA. Neb. 

Bath, John H 88 

Flatlron Fir. Shop. 8S 

Hess & Swoboda... 8S 

I,armon, Lee L.... 8H 

Rogers, Louis M . . . 88 

ORLANDO. Fla. 

Violet Dell Florist. 71 

OTTAWA. Can. 

Scrim's Florist 89 

OTTAWA. III. 

Lohr'a Gmhses.... 86 

OTTUMWA, la. 

Kraiiz, C 71 

OWENSBORO. Ky. 
Nanz Floral Co. ... 83 
OWOSSO. Mich. 
Owosso Floral Co . . 81 
PADUCAH. Ky. 

Schmaus Bros S3 

Van Aart. John S3 

PARKERSBURG. 
W. Va 

Dudley & Sons 82 

PASADENA. Cal. 
Eldred Fir. Shop.. 91 

Orchid Florist 91 

Siebrecht, Jr.. H.A. 94 
Whitforils 94 



City Page 

PASSAIC. N. J. 

Sceery. Edward 74 

PASS CHRISTIAN, 

Mist. 
Adams & Sons.... 85 

PATER80N. N. J. 

Sceery. Edward 71 

PEKIN. III. 

Kuhl, Geo. A 85 

PEORIA. III. 

Kuhl, Geo. A 85 

Loveridgo. Chas 87 

PETERSBURG. Va. 

Stiles, Mrs. Robt. B. 83 

PHILADELPHIA. Pa. 

Berger's Sons. Wm. 78 

Callahan, M. J 78 

Colonial Fir. Shop. 78 
Fox, Chas. Henry.. 78 

Grakelow's 78 

Habermehl's Sons. . 78 

Hastings, F. R 78 

Hill's Fir. Shop... 78 

Knieger Co 78 

Ridenour. V. 1 78 

PHOENIX, Ariz. 

Donofrio Fl. Co 70 

PINE BLUFF. Ark. 

Davis Flo. Co 89 

PITTSBURGH. Pa. 
Alpha Floral Co... 78 

Harris Bros 78 

Hill & Co.. D 78 

Ludwig Co.. E. C. 78 
Moorby, Chas. W. . 78 
Randolph & Mc- 

Clements 78 

Smith & Co.. A. W. 7S 
Williams. Mrs. E.A. 78 

POMONA. Cal. 

Pomona Fl. Co 94 

Pooley's Fir. Shop. 94 

PONTIAC. in. 

Miller & Son 85 

PORT ARTHUR. Ont. 
WlUson, Herbert II. 89 
PORT HURON. Mich. 
Asman 84 

PORTLAND. Me. 

Flower Shop 72 

PORTLAND, Ore. 

Clarke Bros 93 

Martin & Forbes.. 93 

PORTSMOUTH. 0. 
Oakcs. Orrin B 91 

PORTSMOUTH. Va. 

Cotton Fl. Co 83 

PRESCOTT, ArU. 
Acker's Fir. Shop.. 70 
PRINCETON, III. 
Trimble (inihse. Co. 85 
PROVIDENCE, R. I. 

Johnston Bros 73 

John.ston & Co., T.J. 73 
PUEBLO. Colo. 
Alpha Floral Co. . . 92 
Pueblo Flo. Co 92 



City Page 

QUEBEC. Can. 

McKenna. Ltd 89 

QUINCY. IN. 

Gentemen. H. A 85 

Heckenkamp 85 

RACINE. Wis. 

Obertln. P. N 82 

RALEIGH. N. C. 

Fallon. J. J 81 

McCarron Flo 81 

RED BANK. N. J. 
Kennedy & Spns... 74 
REGINA, Sask., Can. 

Reglna Flo. Co 89 

RICHMOND. Ind. 

Gause. G. R 88 

Lemon & Co., F. H. 88 
RICHMOND. Va. 

Hammond Co 83 

Mosmlller. Florist. . 83 
ROANOKE. Va. 

Fallon. Florist 83 

ROCHESTER. Minn. 
Rochester Grhs. Co. 92 

ROCHESTER. N. Y. 

Keller Sons. J. B.. 75 
Wilson. H. E 75 

ROCK FALLS. III. 

Swartley & Sons... 85 
ROCKFORD. III. 

Peterson & Sens, S. 87 
Rockford Flo. Co... 87 

ROME. Ga. 

B'lower Shop 80 

ST. JOSEPH. Mo. 

Stuppy Floral Co.. 77 

ST. LOUIS. Mo. 

Bentzcn Flo. Co... 77 

Grimm & Gorly 77 

Hell, Paul T 77 

Mullanphy 77 

Oppermann, Jr., A. 77 

Ostertag Bros 77 

Sanders Nur 77 

Schaeffer, J. E 77 

Waldbart Flo. Co.. 77 

Walther & Sons 77 

Weber. Fred C 77 

Weber, F. H 77 

Wltek. Joseph 77 

ST. PAUL, Minn. 

Fulbruge's 92 

Holm & Olson 92 

SAGINAW. Mich. 

Gootz Sons, J. B. .. 84 
SALEM, Mass. 

Salem Fir. Shop. . 72 
SALEM. Ore. 

Salem Gnhses 93 

SALINA. Kan. 

Leighton Flo. Co. . 90 
SALT LAKE CITY. Ut. 

Lambounie, Ernest. 95 

Miller Floral Co. . . 95 
SAN ANTONIO. Tex. 

Green, Edward 79 

SAN DIEGO. CaL 

Boyle & Daniaud,. 95 



City Page 

SAN FRANCISCO.CaL 

Art Floral Co 95 

Brown & Kennedy. 94 

Darbee's 95 

Jaeger & Son 95 

Joseph, B. M 95 

Navlet Co 95 

Podesta-Baldocehi. . 95 

Pellcano, Rossi 66 

Shellgraln & Ritter. 95 

Stein, A. 95 

Suzanne Fl. Co 95 

SAN JOSE. CaL 

Navlet Co 95 

SANTA ANA, Cal. 

Morris 95 

SANTA, BARB'A. Cal. 
Gleave's Flo. Shop. 95 
SASKATOON. Sask. 
Victoria Nursery. . . 89 
SAVANNAH. Ga. 
Oelschlg & Sons... 80 

Wolf. John 80 

SAY RE. Pa. 

Sayre Fl. Co 79 

SCHENECTADY, N.Y. 
Roscndale Fl. Shp. 75 
SCRANTON, Pa. 

Beagle 79 

Besancon & Co. . . . 79 

Clark. O. B 79 

Schulthels 78 

SEATTLE. Wash. 

City Flo. Shop 93 

Hollywood Gardens. 93 
Pinehurst Fl. Shop. 93 

Rosala Bros 93 

SEDALIA. Mo. 

Archias Fir. Co 77 

State Fair Fl. Co. . 77 
SHEFFIELD. Eng. 
Artlndale & Son... 69 
SHERIDAN. Wyo. 
Sheridan (Jr'hse Co. 93 
SHERMAN, Tex. 

Hannah & Son 79 

SHREVEPORT. La. 

Buch, D. E 80 

SIOUX CITY. la. 

Art Fl. Shop 71 

Bennison Co., J. O. 71 
Rocklin & Lehman. 71 
SOUTH BEND. Ind. 

Beyer & Weber 88 

Williams. Florist.. 88 
SPARTANBURG. S.C. 
i^ed's Fir. Garden. 81 

Moss, Cha.s. A 81 

SPENCER, la. 
Woodcock Fl. Co.. 71 
SPOKANE. Wash. 

Burt. A. J 93 

City Floral Co 93 

SPRINGFIELD. IlL 
Brlnkerhoir Gnhites. 85 

Brown, A. C 85 

Hembreiker & Cole. 85 
SPRINGFIELD. Mo. 
Springfield Seed Co. 77 
SPRINGFIELD, 0. 
Van .Wefr Fl. Shop. 90 



City Page 

STAUNTON. Va. 

Fallon. John 83 

STERLING. IlL 

Swartley & Sons... 85 
STREATOR. \\\. 
Thornton's Fir. Shop 85 
STURGIS. Mich. 

Vogt's Grnhses..,. 84 

SUMMIT, N. J. 

May, Harry 74 

SUPERIOR. Wli. 

Superior FL Co... 82 
SYRACUSE. N. Y. 

Day Co.. W. E 74 

Johnston's 74 

TACOMA. Wash. 

California Florist.. 93 

TARENTUM. Pa. 

Tarentum Fl. Co. . 73 

TERRE HAUTE. Ind. 
Cowan Bros. & Co. 88 
Ilelnl & Sons 88 

TEXARKANA. Tex. 

Majestic Fl. Co 79 

THREE RIVERS.Mich. 

City Floral Co 84 

TITUSVILLE. Pa. 
Murdock. Wm. A. . 79 
TOLEDO. 0. 

Avery 99 

Metz Bros. '90 

Patten, Helen F. . . 90 

Suder. A. A 90 

TOPEKA. Kan. 

Hayes, James 90 

Lord's Flo. Room.. 90 
TORONTO. Ont. 
Dunlop, John U... 89 

Hlggins. J. J 89 

TRENTON. N. J. 

Rlbsam, Florist 74 

TRINIDAD. Colo. 

Park Floral Co 92 

Trinidad IL Store. 92 
TROY. N. Y. 
Menand. II. Louis. 74 
TRURO. N. S., Can. 
Suckling *c Chase.. 89 
TUCSON. Ari7. 
Burns' Flo. Shop. . 70 
Langers Floral Co.. JO 
TULSA. Okla. 
Boston's Flo. Store. 86 
TUPELO. Miss. 
Tupelo Floral Co... 85 
UNIONTOWN. Pa. 

Alpha Florist 78 

Stenson & McGrail. 79 
UPPER SANDUSKY. 
Ohio 

Constien, B. E 91 

UTICA, N. Y. 

Baker & Son 75 

Utica Floral Co 75 

VALPARAISO. Ind. 
Itcinhart & Adams. 88 
VANCOUVER. B. C. 
Brown Bros. & Co. 89 



City Page 

VICKSBURG. Mlu. 

Capitol Fl. Co 85 

VICTORIA. B. C. 

Brown's Nurseries. . 8D 
Woodward. A. J... 89 
WACO, Tex. 

Wolfe the FloiLst.. 79 

WALLA WALLA. 
Wash. 

Young & Lester 93 

WARREN, 0. 

Adgate & Son <jO 

WARREN. Pa. 

Crescent Fl. Gar. . . 70 
Wood's Fl. Sliop.. 79 

WASHINGTON. D. C. 

Biackistone, Z. D. . 70 
Gudo Bros. Co. ... 70 
Louise Flower Sh.. 70 

WATERTOWN. .Wh. 

Steube Fl. Co 82 

WEBB CITY, Mo. 

Melnhart. J. E 77 

WHEATON. III. 
Mau, Otto F 88 

WHEELING. W. Va. 

Selbert. F. C 82 

WICHITA, Kan. 
Gulp & Co.. W-. H. 90. 
WILKINSBURG, Pa. 

Turner, Wm. M 79 

WILKES-BARRE, Pa. 
Marvin. Ira G. . . . 78 
WILLIAMSPORT. Pa. 

Derr's Fl. Shop 79 

Evenden Bros 79 

Evenden's Sons 70 

WILMETTE. III. 

Wciland. John 87 

WILSON. N. C. 
Starr. Flprist..,.,. 81 
WINDSOR. Ont. 
Gammage & Sons,. 89 

King" Florist 89 

WINSTON-SALEM. 
N. C. 

Morgenroth. W... 81 
WORCESTER. Mass. 
Kandaii's FL Shop. 72 
XENIA. 0. 
Engle Florist Co. . . 91 
YAKIMA. Wash. 
Annavee Fl. Shop.. 93 
State Floral Co. ... 93 
YANKTON. 8. D. 
Gurney (inihse. Co. 85 
YONKERS. N. Y. 

Broderlck. B. T 74 

YOUNGSTOWN, 0. 
Central Fir. Shop.. 91 

Ryan & Culver 91 

Schmidt & Meine.. 91 

Walther. H. C 9U 

YPSILANTI. Mich. 

Davis & Kishlcr 84 

ZANESVILLE. 0. 
Humphrey, C. L. . . 90 



LOS ANGELES 



CALIFORNIA 



Member 
F. T. D. 




«< 



The Leading Florist** 

HAVE YOU SEEN THE NEW WRIGHT FERN 71 



WRIGHTS FLOWER SHOP 

224 W 4th St., Los Angeles 



68 



The Florists^ Review 



Junk 1, 192'J 




THE RETAIL STORE 

A PAGE OF HINTS AND HELPS 
FOR THE RETAIL FLORIST 




FLOWERS FOR THE LIVING. 

Funeral flowers are purchased for a 
person only once. For few persons are 
obsequies performed twice. But flowers 
may be bought for one living any num- 
ber of times. To make flowers the req- 
uisite of the living rather than the 
dead is, therefore, to increase our busi- 
ness manifold. 

Carrying out that idea, M. H. Lock- 
year, of Evansville, Ind., has devised 
ouvclope stuffers to embody a message to 
customers. Here is one of them: 

Don't 8cnd lue flowers when I lie oold «n<l llfi-- 
lene, 

As If it were a duty. 
When I've no voice to tliank you for your gift 

Nor eye to look upon their l)eauty. 
Hut give them to me now, before 'tis night. 

While I CRn smell their fragrance, 

Touch their petals, hold tliem in my hand. 
And look upon their colors bright. 
Not when I've passed away, 
lint send my flowers today. 

As an antiphone to the preceding 

verse, Mr. Lockyear has the following 

also : 

It is not Htrange, but plain to see, 
(lOd made the flowers, for you and uie; 
I will not wait till you are dead, 
rtnt send these flowers today iusteail. 



WINDOWS CAN INCREASE SALES. 

"I've noticed one characteristic about 
most successful florists that to my mind 
has Ji deal to do with their success," 
said ;i keen observe': the other day. 
"Every man of them hiis a mania for 
borrowing ideas tliat will increase sales. 
For instance, I believe it is impossible 
tor it florist to walk down State street 
in Chicago, Fiftli avenue in New York 
or Chestnut street in Philadelphia with- 
out borrowing at least one sales-making 
policy from the big dojijirtincnt storo^i. 
This is tlie sales \ahie of attractive 
window displays. Few merchants today 
deny tlif iinixirtaiice of attractive win- 
dows, wlicther they sell boots and shoes, 
refrigerators or flowers. 

"However, it is my observation that 
florists, as a class, have not developed 
tlieir windows as highly as have mer- 
chants in other lines. One thing that 
has held florists' window displays be- 
hind is the cost of fixtures that are 
usuall>' necessary to ])roduce striking 
effects. Sucli fixtllr(^s, wlien at all elab- 
orate, increase the overhead of the store 
prohil)itively. " 

For this reason a recently introduced 
line of metal flower ])Oxes, procurable 
in half a dozen different finishes and 
sizes, has found favor with a number 
of florists wlio have keen eyes for at- 
tracting the passer-by and enticing him 
or her into the store. These boxes — as 
well as similarly made hanging baskets 
and jicdestals — are not only inex])ensive 
for store decorations, but also are sold 
at a ]>rofit to customers. Some florists 
re]tort tliat women who previously re- 
fused to grow flowers in the house were 
s(dd first on the box and then on the 
flowers to fill it. The manufacturer of 
these metal boxes claims to have over- 
come .'ill drainage and irrigating difficul- 



ties heretofore experienced with metal 
flower boxes. 

The boxes can be set off their stands, 
which are collapsible. They fit in well 
with a variety of attractive window 
displays and can be removed to the 
sales floor to good advantage after serv- 
ing in the window. This has helped to 
overcome the window fixture cost, as the 
boxes are carried as merchandise and not 
as overhead. 

There is undoubtedly a growing incli- 
nation among florists to devote more 
thought and time to their windows. 
Such care as is given this important side 
of the store is generally quickly ap- 
parent in the increased sales which re- 
sult. 

INSURING YOUR OWN SUCCESS. 

In time with the current interest in 
the finer points of business manage- 
ment, covering, among other features, 
the problem of cash and credits, Joseph 



The E<Utor U pleased when 
a Reader presents his ideas 
on any subject treated in 




As experience is the I>e8t 
teacher, »o do we learn 
fastest by an exchange of 
experiences. Many valuable 
points are brought out by 
discussion. 

Good penmanship, spelling and 
Krammar, though desirable, are not 
necessary. Write as you would talk 
when doing your best. 

WE SHALL BE GLAD 
TO HEAR FROM YOU 



Harris. s])eaking for Joseph Harris & 
IJro., of Shamokin, I'a., makes the fol- 
lowing opportune statement and sugges- 
tion regarding the successful operation 
of a florist's business: "For making 
money in the florists' business, first of 
all watch your credits. Show me a flo- 
rist whose accounts on the ledger are 
gilt-edged and you have a successful 
florist. This man will pay his fellow 
man. A man who does a business of 
,$l."),flOO a year cash is a better business 
man than the one who does $30,000 and 
has $1. 1,000 on the books, of which he is 
not sure. Joseph Harris & Bro. pride 
themselves on their system of cash and 
credits. We have been in business twen- 
ty-five years and have not lost $250. 
This, we think, is a real record. 

"We do not believe in overbuying. 
We would rather be short at times on 
supplies and stock than overbought. 
This holds good in building green- 



houses. There are florists who are build- 
ing poor. We do not buy anything that 
we cannot pay for. If we desire to 
buy and cannot pay, we go to the bank 
and borrow in order to }iay our bills. 
Some will say that they have no credit 
at the bank. Then work and make 
credit! Do not buy pleasure when you 
cannot afford it. I have failed to see 
the board of directors of any bank of 
our acquaintance who would not extend 
credit to an honest, hard-working man; 
nor have we met a man of this type who 
is not a success." 

Joseph Harris & Bro. own, besides 
tlieir concrete-reinforced store, 15,000 
feet of glass at the greenhouse estab 
lishment at Springfield, Pa. The entire 
range is equipped with concrete benches, 
which were installed in 1900. Since 
that time the firm estimates it has 
saved 125,280 feet of lumber, which 
would otherwise have been used for 
bench construction. It might be said 
here that the firm is a pioneer in the 
construction of concrete greeahouse 
benches. 

And the company does business. Last 
Easter 16,000 bulbs and plants were 
handled at retail. Better than 660 de- 
liveries were made in three days, using 
a Stanley steamer truck, one Ford truck 
and a horse and wagon. The company 
is located in a hilly country, which calls 
for thought on the delivery question. 
But the firm has thought this out, just 
as well as it has thought out its window- 
decorating, an example of which was 
shown in the May 11 issue of The Re 
view. 



KNAPP VS. SAYRE, PA. 

The equity proceedings of J. B. 
Knapp, Sayre, Pa., .-igainst the borough 
of Sayre, which were to have been ar- 
gued before Judge Maxwell at Towan- 
da, Pa., May 16, were continued by 
agreement of the attorneys until a later 
date. It was understood that the coun- 
ty .iudge would hear both sides of the 
question at that time and determine 
whether he would continue the prelim- 
inary injunction or discontinue it.' A 
preliminary restraining order was issued 
May 12 by Judge Maxwell, enjoining 
the borough or any of the police officers 
from interfering with .7. B. Knapp in 
Ihn display of merchandise in front of 
his Packer avenue flower shop. This 
aciion came after the borough police 
had taken a quantity of flowers .ind 
plants from in front of the florist's 
store. Mr. Knapp was also jdaced un- 
der the charge of maintaining a com- 
nron nuisance and was held for appear- 
ance in the countv court. 



FORT SMITH'S NEW FLORIST. 

A retail and wholesale florists' depart- 
ment has been opened to the public of 
Fort Smith, Ark., at the store of the 
Arthur G. Lee Seed Co., 211 Garrison 
avenue. 

The new department will be in charge 



JUNB 1, 1822 



The Florists^ Review 



69 



M 




The florirta whose cards appear on the pages carryfnK this head, are prepared to fin or ders 
"" from other florists for local delivery on the usual basis. "~ " 




FOREIGN SECTION 



ENGLAND 



Yoa can 

"Shy It wiA 

Flowers" to 

anyone in 

theBritith 

Isles through 

Bees' 

Flower 

Service 



Hsmbcn 
F. T. D. 




BOLD STREET, 



Steamers 

arriving at or 

leaving any 

port can be 

served at a 

few hours* 

notice 



Hembers 
F. T. D. 



LIVERPOOL 



CABLB US YOUR ORDERS FOR 

ENGLAND 

With Bfteen important shops in sood centers, we are 
the largest florists in Eniiland and better equipped 
than anyone else to carry out cable orders. 

DINGLEYS. Ltd. 

Head OOee: Cambridgre St., MANCHESTER 

LIVFRPOOL Branch, 2 Parker St. 



SHEFFIELD, ENGLAND 
WILUAM ARTINDALE & SON 

FLORISTS SEEDSMEN NURSERYMEN 

BRUSSELS, BELGIUM 

MrD<-\I TTC" The Leadine FLORIST 
. r r\V->*J 1 i:^ 20 Rue des Colonies 
Prompt service anywhere in Belgriuni, Holland, Germany 

Amsterdam, Holland 

C. THIM, Florist V. Baerlestraat 56 

HONOLULU, H. I. 

"f'^T STRAUS FLOWERS 

of B. A. Adams, formerly of Fayotte- 
\ ille, Ark., one of a trio of brothers who 
have made a .success of the florists' busi- 
ness in Kayetteville. Mr. Adams lias 
had a wide experience in the making of 
•■(trsage bou(]uets, funeral designs and 
all sorts of interior and exterior floral 
decoration work. 

The front of the retail store has been 
i-oiiverted into a flower siiop, and in the 
basement arrangements liave been made 
for caring for the wholesale trade. Here 
long worktables and a large built-in re- 
frigerator have been installed to facili- 
tate the handling of flowers. 

Potted plants of all kinds, ferns, cut 
tliiwers, including roses, carnations and 
various flowers in their season, will bo 
featured in this new department. 



ST. LOUIS. 



^M The loc.'il wholesale cut flower market 

^M was in an excellent condition all last 

^B week, as far as the supply went, but the 

^M demand from the retailers was not 

^M there to consume the greatly increased 

^B daily consignments. The retailers s,ay 

^M that the week was rather quiet in all 

^m lines, though Memorial day. school com- 




mifms>m^^mmmmmi 




How a KnoxviUe Jeweler 
Says to Say It 

If you doubted for a minute that "Say It with 

Flowers" has gone over big, all over the country, 

you have but to travel a bit and see its evidence 

everywhere. 

Everybody seems to be imitating it by trying to say 

something with something or other. 

Was in Knoxville, Tennessee, in February, and 
walking along the street came to the leading jew- 
eler's window. 

In the center was a beautiful collection of gems in 
rings and other adornments. 

On either side of them was a beautiful silver vase, 
each holding some choice roses. 

A daintily lettered little sign said: "First say it with 
flowers, then keep it said with gems." 

When 1 came back to New York, I promptly passed 

along the idea to a Fifth Avenue jeweler. 

Just naturally he bought his roses of me, and has 

kept on buying ever since. 

Which may or may not be an idea for you. 



New York*9 Favor' te Flower Shop 




Phone Plaza 8190 Fifth Avetiue at S8th Street 



nienienients and .June weddings should 
keep the trade busy to June 15, the end 
of the social season. Throughout last 
week prices came down considerably on 
all cut stock and in all grades. For 
Memorial day there was a large cut of 
peonies of extra good quality and large 
shipments of cape jasmines from Texas. 
Roses in all varieties have been more 



than the trade can consume, while «>x- 
tra fancies alone hold up in price, ('ar 
n:itions show the effects of the hot 
weather and the blooms are becoming 
sni.iller. I'rices have been cut down 
low, in order to clean up the d.-iily shi])- 
ments. Sweet peas are scarte in the 
fiuicy grades, but short-stem med stock 
is arriving in great quantiti.- i^rladiolus 



70 



The FI<Mists' Review 



June 1, 1922 






JThe flori«t« whose cards appear on the pages carrying this head, are prepared to fill orders 
■ "~ from other florists for local delivery on the usual basis. 




Flowers and Giving 

"Consider the lilies of 
the field." How bounti- 
fully they bloom, how 
freely and fully they give 
of their loveliness and 
sweetness. 

Brother Florists, we 
give to you our kindly 
thoughts and best wishes. 
Let us make this Spring- 
time very beautiful. "He 
that soweth bountifully, 
shall reap also bounti- 
fully." 




|»OURTBeNTH • H aTRBr»#i 
• WA/*HIA.OTOM • 



spikes are not in oversupply and 
seem to clean up nicely every day. 
Valley and lilies are in demand. There 
is a great supply of outdoor stock, 
which is used for window displays. 
Cornflowers are selling well, as well 
as delphiniums. The supply of greens 
has been large, and the fancy ferns, 
asparagus and smilax clean up almost 

^3'^y- Various Notes. 

The St. Louis Flower Growers' Pub- 
licity Association's executive board 
Avill hold an important meeting June 6, 
in publicity headquarters, at 2:30 p. m. 
As the big flower days for this season 
are at an end, the board will at this 
meeting take up the advisability of 
summer advertising. The board con- 
sists of L. Jules Bourdc't, chairman; 
J. F. Ammann, Louis A. Hocrr, W. J. 
Pilcher, Joseph Deutschmann, A. S. 
Cerny, F. A. Windier, H. G. Berning, 
W. A. Kowc, treasurer; J. J. Beneke, 
secretary, and W. A. Ferrcc, advertis- 
ing manager. All are requested to at- 
tend this meeting. 

The big meeting of the St. Louis 
Florists' Club will take place Thursday, 
June 8, at 2 p. m., at W. J. Pilcher''8 
place, in Kirkwood, Mo., wlien the mem- 
bers will celebrate the club's thirty- 
sixth anniversary. Luther Armstrong, 
the only living charter member and the 
club's first secretary, promises to be 
present for a talk on the early history 
of the club. Autoinobilcs will be in 
waiting in the wholesale district to con- 
vey the members to the meeting place 
and will leave promptly at 1 p. m. The 
trustees have outlined a program of un- 
usual interest to all members. O. C. 
May, state vice-president of the S. A. F., 
also will have something of interest. 
Cigars and refreshments will be served. 

The members of the trade extend 



<iuj (Wjiwuh^ow€ri 



Members 

of the 

F.T. D. 



Members 

of the 

F. T. D. 




Gin>E BROS.Ca 

FLORISTS 
1214 P ST.N.V«& 

WASHlNlSTOM.bil^ 



WASHINGTON, D. C. 

Louise Flower Shop 

Connecticut Ave. at N St, N. W. 

Ml88 Lonlse W. Daugherty. • • Proprletresa 

Phones— Franklin 3579. 3841, 3842 

Member Florists' Telegraph Dellyery 



TUCSON, ARIZ. 

BURNS' FLOWER SHOP 



7 East 
Congress Street 



their symjmthy to Edward Steitz and 
Julius E. SchacfTer, in the loss of Mrs. 
.Tulia A. Steitz, the mother of Mr. 
Schaeffer, and mother-in-law of Mr. 
Steitz. Mrs. Steitz died May 21, after 
a lingering illness, at the age of 80 
years. The funeral was from the family 
residence May 25. Many beautiful floral 
emblems were sent by members of the 
trade. 

Arthur Jensen, son of L. P. Jensen, 
lias resigned his position with Grimm & 
(iorly and has announced that he will 
open a florists ' establishment at 5856 
Delmar avenue. The place will bear the 
name of Jensen Florist, Inc., and will 
be open for business this week. 

.Joseph Deutsclimann, secretary of tlie 



TUCSON 



AU SOUTHERN 
ARIZONA, 
NEW MEXICO and SONORA, MEXICO. 

Langers Seed & Floral Co., 

Tucson, Arizona 



Formerly 
Taeson Seed & Floral Co. 



Phoenix. ARIZONA 

Donofrio Floral Co. 

CHAS. E. MORTON. M«r. 

Wire your orders to us for delivery in 
Arizona and New Mexico. 



.7 



DOUGLAS,AREONA 

GATLIFF FLOWER SHOP 

AND NEWS AGENCY 

Flowers for all parts of Arizona 

Narajo Rugs and Mexican Zarapes (Uanketi) 



PRESCOTT, ARIZ. ! 

gg.'S" ACKER'S FLOWER SHOP 



30N» 1, 1922 



The Florists' Review 



71 





^^%e^florists whose cards appear on the patfes carrying this head, are prepared to fill o rder* 
"* "~ from other florist* for local deUvery on the usual basis. "" 



Kirkwood Floral Co. 
DES MOINES 



F. T. D. 



Your orders vnll receive Mr. Ray Holt's Personal Attention 

IOWA 

STORE AND GREENHOUSES 



DAVENPORT 

IOWA 

BILLS FLORAL CO. 

M. A. TIERNET. Owner Member F. T. B. 



Council Bluffs, la. 

FEED B. SHAW 
Flower Shop 

Member F. T. D. and Kiwanis Flerist 



OTTUMWA, IOWA 



PHONE 182 




SIOUX CITY, 
IOWA 



Sapplies western Iowa, 
Boathern Minnesota, all of 
Sooth Dakota and north' 
eastern Nebraska. 

J. C. RENNISON CO 



SIOUX CITY, IOWA 

"IP^-S"' ROCKLIN & LEHMAN 



Council Bluffs, Iowa 

GARDINER FLORAL CO. 
Cieadlng R etail Florist 645 W. BROADWAY 

rAllvrlllLU, lA,. please our trade 

Montgom ery Greenhouses 

DUBUQUE, IOWA 

S F MTINT7 Leading Florist 

J. E m mUlNl^ Best of service at all time s 

DES MOINES, lA. 

GUTHRIE-LORENZ CO. 
Cerlar F;illQ U BANCROFT'S 

UCUai 1 dllb, Id. Beautiful Flowers 

JemberT F t"d JoSCpH BailCroft & Soil 

CEDAR RAPIDS, lA 

KEMBLE FLORAL CO., Inc. 

M ember Florists' Telegraph Delivery. 

NEW HAMPTON. I A. 

S. L. DEAL 

Wholesal. and R.tail FlorUt. 

SPENCER, IOWA 

WOODCOCK FLORAL CO. 
-Wholesale and Retail Florists. Member F. T. D 



Council Bluffs Ia J- ^ • ^'^^^^ ^ ^^^ 

V/vyUiiV/iJLj ULtKJi 1 k^9 xrr. 750,000 feet of glass 

Orders shipped to aay part of Iowa or Nebraska on a moment's notice. 

Daily Delivery to Omaha. 
MEMBERS FLORISTS' TELEGRAPH DELIVERY ASSOCIATION 



C/ y^FWR^NUR^RX Dubuque, Iowa 



Eastern Iowa 
Western WiSo 
N.W.Illinois 



QUAUn 

PLUS 

SERYICL 



DAVENPORT, IOWA 

EASTERN IOWA AND WESTERN ILLINOIS 

GEO. F. FORBER, 3 1 3 Brady Street 

Will at all times serys yoa beat. Another asset of oar own at your service — 

Member Florists' Telegraph Delivery Association. ORIGINALITT. 



St. Louis County Growers' Association, 
says the association will endeavor to 
hold a meeting June 7, at the Eleven 
Mile House, at 8 p. m., if enough re- 
spond to the call. The nomination and 
election of ofiBcers will take place. Mar- 
tin Ude is president of the association. 

Grimm & Gorly, Mullanphy Florists 
and the Ayres-Tubbesing Co., leading 
downtown florists, had attractive Me- 
morial day window displays. 

Sunday, May 21, the last day of the 
flower show at the Missouri Botanical 
Garden, attracted an attendance of 
28,000, which filled the big display 
house to capacity all day long. All 
prize-winning cut flowers were sent to 
the various hospitals by the officers of 
the Garden Club of St. Louis. 

Paul Hranicka w^ill be the rose grower 
for the St. Louis Rose Co., which is 
building a range of glass at Larinioro 
station. The range will bo devoted en- 
tirely to the growing of roses. The 
Lord & Burnham Co. has the contract. 
Louis A. Hocrr, the majority stock- 
holder, is the president of the company. 

Several large conventions last week 
brought visitors to the city from all 
parts and taxed the capacity of the 
liotels. These brought considerable 
business to the florists for banquet deco- 
rations, and cut flowers to the rooms 
daily. 

The local gladiolus growers say that 
gladioli will not be so plentiful this sea- 
son as expected, since about thirty per 
cent are coining blind. Among the 
largest growers here are W. A. Rowe 
Co., Thil Goebel, .Tr., C. E. DeWever, 
O. C. May, Kalisch Bros. Co., the 
Deutschmann Bros, and A. Ia Kopp. 

The Melbourne Floral Co., in the new 
Melbourne hotel, at Grand and Lindell, 
has the furnishing of the flower and 



SIOUX CITY, IA. 

ART FLOWER SHOP 

512 FIFTH STREET 

Everything in Cat Flowers, Plants, 

Funeral Designs, Etc. 

Member F. T. D. 



A Card This Size 

Costs only $1.25 pep Week 
on Yearly Order 

It would koop your name and your specialty 
befoie the whole tiadc. 

A hair-incb card costs only 62*30 per week on 
yearly order. 



MILLS THE FLORIST, Inc. 

36 West Forsyth Street 

Jacksonville, Fla. 

We reach all 
FLORIDA AND SOUTH GEORGIA POINTS 



ORLANDO, FLA. 

Violet Dell Florist 

LAKELAND. FLORIDA 

Service in all directions 
WESTMOREUND FLORAL GARDENS 

CHARLES CITY, IOWA 

RIVERSIDE FLOWER SHOP 

GRINNELL,IOWA 

%"§N°E« Dittmer the Florist 



72 



The Florists^ Review 



Jnm 1. 1922 






The florists whose cards appear on the pages carrying this head, are prepared to fill orders^ 
'"*- from other florists for local delivery on the usual basis. 



BOSTON 

1 Park Street and 
549 Boylston Street 



74th Year 




INCORPORATED 



NEW YORK 

561 Fifth Avenue 
at 46th Street 



CHARLES P. BOYLE, President 




Worcester's 

Shop 

of 

Quality and 

Service 



Randall's Flower Shop 

22 PEARL STREET 

WORCESTER, MASS. 

Member F. T. D. 




Member 

P. T. Dn 



FALL RIVER 

MASS. 

33 N. Main Street 

Orders Exeeutad for 

Boatheutem Haas., Newport 

and Rhode Island Points 



Brookline, Mass. 

220 Washington Street 

F. E. PALMER, Inc. 

Established 1886 
Members Florists' Telegraph Delivery Ass'n. 



Cambridge, Mass. 

Largest Retail Conservatories near the heart 
of Boston. Deliveries in all suburbs. 

HAROLD A. RYAN. Inc. 

Opposite Mount Auburn Cemeter> 



i 



BIDDEFORD, ME 

NEAR PORTLAND 




F. T. D. 



CARNATIONS 



PORTLAND, ME. 

THE FLOWER SHOP 
M. E. McGunigle Cor. Oak and Free Sta. 

CAMBRIDGE, MASS. 

ROBBINS BROS. cm Massachusetts Avenue 
Near all Colleges Members F. T. D. 

MELROSE. MASS. 

The Casey Florist Gj. 93 Maple Street 

Nearest Dealer to New Ensland Sanitarium 

gROCKTON, MASS. 

Belmont Rower Shop ^f':'*''d.'' 



"\Vhere flowers degenerate man cannot live." 

— Napoleon. 




1 24 Tremont Street 

BOSTON, MASS. 



P. S. — This doesn't mean postscript. It means Penn Service. 



Morse & Beals, LOWELL, MASS. 

Home of Qyality Flowers 

Members RorisU' Telegraph Delivery Association 8 MERRIMACK SQUARE 



Boston, Massachusetts 

44 TEMPLE PLACE 
The Centrally Located Florist Shop 
Yours for Reciprocity We cover all points in New Ensland 

Members Florists' Telegraph Delivery 




BOSTON 

O'Brien 

67 BEACON ST., AT CHARLES 



Member F. T. D. 



BOSTON- BECKER'S 

Send us your telegrams. Prompt service IN 
and KOUNDABOUX BOSTON. Our con- 
servatories are In Cambridge, only 8 minutes 
from the heart of Boston. 

BECKER'S CONSERVATORIES 

CAMBRIDGE. MASS. 
Uembers Floristi' Telegraph Delivery 



IBOSTON 
MASS 



^T^g 



HOU6HT0NA GORNEY 




UNDER THE PARK St 



plant decorations for the oppning of 
the roof garden of the hotel, which will 
run into several hundred dollars. 

George II. Angerinueller, Edward 
Pieper, \V. H. Kruse and A. Hoffmann, 
.Jr., all did jury duty daily last week. 
They say it was a good time to serve, as 
it was a dull week, and they are through 
for a year before another call. 

Business at the various seed houses 
has stacked up considerably and is Hear- 
ing the end of their busy days. A. H. 
Hummert, of the St. Louis Seed Co.; 
Clifford rorneli, of the Cornell Seed 
Co., and the American Seed Co., say this 
was one of their best seasons. All will 
attend the meeting of the American 
Seed Trade Association, at Detroit, this 
month. 



CARBONE, Boylston Street. 

BOSTON 

Member Florists' Telegraph Delivery Ass'n. 



ERVICE 

ALEM FLOWER SHOP 

ATISFACTION 




Essex .^ 

County ^ 4 North Street 



ALEM, MASS. 



MALDEN, MASS. 

J. WALSH & SON 
Members Florists' Telegraph Delivery Aasociation 

T «T««-r« ATnoo MEMBERS 

Lynn, Mass. p. t. d. 

GIBBS BROS., 231-23.3 Union St. 



JUNB 1, 1022 



The Florists^ Review 




The florist s whose cafds appear on the pages canrylntf this head, are prepared to fill ordera 
""■ "— from other florists for local deUvery on the usual basis. ~~ ' 




QUALITY plus SERVICE! 

I Want Your F. T. D. Business 



m 



CINCINNATI 



To mention Flowers is to think of 



Member of y\ 

F. T. D. / \ 



\V^ooJ^(b^^ 



138-140 EAST FOURTH STREET 



Ten-Minute Service to Covington, Newport, Bellevue and Dayton, Ky. 



Hartford, Conn. 

Since 1887 




PLEASE Address as above 

A. W. WELCH, Manager 



Hartiord, G>nn. 




ISO Asylum Street 



Memba 
F.T.D 



HARTFORD. CONN. 



Greenhouses: 
Benton Sc . 



Stores: 
741 Main St 
364 Asylum St 



mht F. T. D. 
Orders solicited (or all parts oi G>nnecticut 



BURLINGTON. VT. 




_ MrmUr F T. D. 

Ordsn for Versiont and Northers New York tUsa M 
Toor enUre satisfactioB at risht prices. 



BRIDGEPORr) 

CONNECTICUT • 
Certainly! 

John Reck & Son 



F. T. D. Member 



MANCHESTER, N. H. 

H. C. ST ACHE ' " 



L. D. Phone 
1261 -R 



Hartford, Conn. 

J. ALBERT BRODRIB 
Store, 639 Main Street 

DeliverieB to New Britain, Meriden. Middletown. 

UuebOTtcr, Roekville, ParminKton, Willimantie 
Member Plorista' Telegraph Delivery Asaociation 



BRISTOL, R. I. f 

SAMUEL KINDER & BRO. 



EST. 
89S 



Henry Berning said May 29 that it 
looked as though this Memorial day was 
going to 1)8 a record-breaker. He based 
his opinion on the advance shipping or- 
ders to date, which were double those 
of last year. 

W. A. Rowe, president of the Missouri 
State Florists' Association, reports that 
the annual meeting of the association 
will not be held this summer, as ex- 
pected, but will be held in St. Louis 
next November, the week of the fall 
flower show and the meeting and ex- 
hibition of the Chrysanthemum Society 
of America. 

The west end retail florists' establish- 
ments of Paul T. Heil, Sanders Florist, 



BRIDGEPORT, CONN. 

James Horan & Son 

943 MAIN STREET 

Largest Growers in this District 

Members Fu)RI8ts' Tkleorapu Delivery 



Providence, Rhode Island 
Johnston Brothers 

LEADING FLORKTS 
38 DORRANCE STREET 

Members Florists' Telegraph Delivery Assn. 



PROVIDENCE, R.I. 

AND ALL NEW ENGLAND POINTS 

T. J. Johnston & Co- '" ^'^^Si^cw 



74 



The Florists^ Review 



JUNIC 1. ItfUU 




The florUts whose cards appear on the pages carryfaitf this head, are prepared to fill orders 
""■"" from other florists for local delivery on the usual basis. 




Red Bank, N. J. 

W. W. KENNEDY & SONS 

FLORISTS 

We are in a position to deliver in the following 
towns and cities in New Jersey: Red Bank, Fair Ha- 
ven, Rumson, Sea Brisbt, Highlands, Locust, Atlan- 
I tic Higrhlanda, Fort Honmoutb, New Monmouth, Bel- 
ford, Leonardo, Hiddletown, Keyport, Keansburg, 
Holmdel, Freehold, Matawan, Little Silver, Shrews- 
bury, E^tontown, Long Branch, Monmouth Beach, 
Elberon, Allenburst, Deal, Asbury Park, Ocean 
Grove, Bradley Beach, Sprinsr Lake, Sea Girt, Hanas- 
qoan. Point Pleasant and Lakewood. 

Day Phone, 686; Nigbt Phone, 689 and 1066. 

MEMBERS 
F.TD. 



41 Broad Street 



Abundantly Prepared 
AT All Times 



i 

I 'l\NK/ Nurseries: Mediterranean 
^^^ and South Carolina Aves. 

Member Florists' Telecp-aph Deliverr Assn. 



Edwards Floral 
Hall Company 

1716 Pacific Avenue 
Atlantic City, Newjersey 



ATLANTIC CITY.N.J. 

CRANE & HILL, Inc. 

Fonnerly Egg Harbor Flower Shop 

1311 Pacific Ave. Members F. T. D. 



ATLANTIC CITY, N.J. 

Atlantic City Flower Shop 

1519 Pacific Avenue 

Alwaya • Ug stock on hand of all kinda of flowan 
and idanta. Peraonal attentkm. ^. T. D. tUatttt 



J 



PATERSON \T^,^, T^^^^„ 

PASSAIC iNew Jersey 

EDWARD SCEERY 

Member Florists' Telecraph Delivery Ass'n. 



All Middle State and Seasliore 

NEW JERSEY POINTS 

and Northeastern Pennsylvania towns 
are best reached from 

TRENTON 

MARTIN C. RIBSAH, Florist 
Member F. T. D. Broad and Front Sta. 



Summit HARRY 0. MAY 

t^Ulilllill) PROPRIETOR 

New Jersey The Rose Shop 



MONTCLAIR, N. J. 

MASSMANN 

Member Florista' Telegraph Delivery 



HOBOKEN, N. J. 

J. GRUUCH & SONS 
Members F. T. D. 616 Washington Street 



DOVER, NEW JERSEY 

148 East Blackwell Street Phone 470 

SUNNYSIDE GREENHOUSES 

We deliver to the following towns: Wharton, Kenvil, 
Saecaaanna, Lake Hopatcong, Stanhope, Netcong, 
Roekaway, Denville, Mt. Hope, Ht. Tabor, Chester. 

ESTABUSHED TWENTY-TWO YEARS 
Member F. T. D. Have oar own glaat 



NEWARK, N. J. 

PHILIPS BROS. 

938 BROAD STREET 

Members P. T. D. 



YONKERS, N. Y. 

&M^^. R. T. BRODERICK 



MEMBER 
F. T. D. 



Joseph Witck, Julius Schaeffcr, F. H. 
Weber and Fred C. Weber, leaders in 
that section, say this has been an ex- 
ceptionally busy season all through. All 
have good-sized June wedding orders 
booked to the end of the season, June 15. 
J. J. B. 

NEWARK, N. J. 



The Market. 

Peonies are now beginning to come 
into the market, and poppies have made 
their appearance. Carnations are quite 
plentiful. The early Memorial day 
sales were satisfactory to most florists. 
Potted geraniums were sold in large 
numbers, the retail price for single 
plants being from 20 cents to 25 cents. 
When sold by the dozen these brought 
from $2.25 to $2.50. Foliage plants 
were in great demand and there was a 
fair sale of such plants as phlox, moun- 
tain daisies and other small plants suit- 
able for transplanting. Some pansy 
plants were sold, though the season for 
these has nearly passed. Ivy and myr- 
tle had a considerable sale also. 

Various Notes. 

Henry A. Strobell, whose store is at 
931 Broad street, is recovering at his 
home, at 112 Park place, Irvington, 
from two operations which ho under- 
went last week for the removal of ab- 
scesses. 

Fred P. Wolfinger, Broad street, re- 
ports much funeral work for last week 
and states that there was also consid- 
erable wedding work. R. B. M. 



BALTIMOBE, MD. 



The Market. 

Last week the supply of stock on the 
market exceeded the demand. Peonies 
were plentiful and a great many have 
reached the streets. These were selling 
at 25 cents per dozen, which is a big 
price, considering the supply on hand. 
Gladioli were plentiful and the quality 
of the stock was excellent. A few good 
carnations reached the market, but 
most of them were poor. Roses were 
good. Delphiniums were plentiful and 
the quality of the stock was fine. 

The market outlook for Memorial day 



BROOKLYN, N. Y. 

JAMES WEIR, Inc. 

324 Fulton St., cor. Pierrepont 

Telegraph orders receive our usual good care 
and prompt attention. Pbones, 270 271 Main 



Trepel & Bershad ^'^""I^Je"^''^ 

Bedford and Gates Avenues 

Livingston St., comer Bond Street 

Florist Dept. care of Frederick Loeser & Co. 

BROOKLYN, N. Y. 

Doing Business a Quart^ of a Century. 



WETTLIN FLORAL CO. 

HORNELL, N. Y. 

For qaick service to Avoca, Addison, Andovor, Ark- 
port, Almond, Anitelica, Bath, Coming, Cuba, Canis- 
teo, Castile, CansarKa. Cohocton, Friendship, Wells- 
ville, Wayland, Warsaw, Uansville, Alfred (Alfred 
University), Nunda and other Western N. Y. towns. 




Albany, N. T. 



SYRACUSE, N. Y. 

JOHNSTON'S 

SYRACUSE'S FINEST FLOWER SHOP 

IMMEDIATE MESSENGER SERVICE 
Sjrracuse and Vicinity 

WASHINGTON and WARREN STREETS 



For SYRACUSE, N. Y. 

W. L DayCo.,^°°'^TTy°^'^ 

A I RAMV W V THE CAPITAL DISTRICT 
/\LD/\ll I , n. A. and all Eaatam New York 

WM. GLOECKNER 

WE GUARANTEE ABSOLUTB SATISFAOTION 
Member of Florlrta' Telegmph Dellyery. 



MEDINA, N.Y., White Bros. 



Member! 
K. T. D. 



Oidan (or Waatern New York 
handled with pnNnptaaaa. 



TROY, N. Y. "pT?" 

33 Fourth St. H. LOUIS MENAND 



HUGO H. J AHN, brookltn. N.r 

Tel. 19a Bedford. W!ndeU*erto8ta«Mlilpa.TIieBtan, 
•arwhan wttUn 10 milM ot New Tork. Artfatie work 
P e n o ae l a tt e ot toB. Special eare at >ila>f>iih ocdMS. 



ELMIRA, NEW YORK 



SHEELY BROS. 



fludson and Walnut 



CLEAN, N. Y. 

DANA R. HERRON 



MEMBER 
F. T. D 



^^OLEAN, N. Y. 

Tdeffraph Delivery Manuel Oppenhdm 



JuNio 1. 1«22 



The Florists^ Review 



75 





I .; 




The fl orirts whose cards appear on the patfes carrying this head, are prepared to fill o rders 
*"" from other florists for local delivery on the usual basis. "~ 





WE CARRY THE HIGHEST GRADE OF CUT FLOWERS 

SEND US YOUR NEW YORK ORDERS 

ADJACENT TO THEATRICAL AND HOTEL DISTRICTS 




DARDS 

341 Madison Ave. 
Opp. Hotel Biltmore 

New York 



Fifty Years* Exacting 
Fulfillment 



ESTABUSHED 1875 



C. F. BAKER & SON 

UTICA, N. Y. 

We Cover Central New York 



Hombon 
F. T. D. 



uncA, N. Y. 

Utica Floral G>. 

Largest and most modem floral establish- 
ment in Central New York. Send as your 
orders for Utica and vicinity. 



ROCHESTER, N. Y. 



68CJiAlN.ST 



We reach 

all 

Western 

N.Y. 

Points 



JAMESTOWN, N. Y. 

LAKEVIEW 
ROSE GARDENS 

Capable Retail Service 
TuavpAMT f Fredonia, N. T, 

BERVICB < Lakewood, N. T. 
-TO" ( Ca»ad«g», N. Y. 
Oth«r Prindpal Waatvn N. T. tewna. 

Rochester, N.Y/-"-^S^sfs'"^'- 

25 CLINTON AVENUE. N. 
Members Florists' Telegraph Delivery 



y00.000ft.ofgU88 

|roeton.N.Y. | INS 

f"<tolph, N. T f SEl 
"«niM Point. N. T J -' 



BUNYARD 



413 MadisoD 
Avenue 



NEW YORK CITY 



Member F. T. D. 



SUMMKR SEASON, Bellevue Ave. 
NEVVPOKT, K. 1. 



David Clcirke's Sons 

2139-2141 BROADWAY 

Tel. 1652. 1553 Columbus 

NEW YORK CITY 

Out-of-town orders for delivery in New Yoif* 
carefully and promptly filled at reasonable rat«c 

NEW YORK CITY 

THE PARK FLORIST 

S. H. CALAMARAS 116 East 34tb atieet 

AT YOUR SERVICE 

FLORIST FOR 25 YEARS 



is favorable, writing a few days before 
the holiday. There will be a good sup- 
ply of peonies, but only a limited sup- 
ply of daisies and cornflowers. 

Various Notes. 

Joseph Merritt reports that he has 
sold out completely his stock of pot 
roses. His Radiance, both red and pink, 
were exceptionally good. His other va- 
rieties were also fine. 

Robert Kift was in town calling on 
old friends in the trade last week. 

A representative of Wertheimer 
Bros., New York, and a representative 
of the Mono Service Co., Newark, N. J., 
called on the trade last week. 

R. W. J. 

KANSAS CITY, MO. 



The Market. 

At this writing, a few days before Me- 
morial day, iceboxes are loaded with 
stock. Peonies are abundant; every 
grower has a large crop. Many of the 
florists have enough to supply their own 
trade and some to spare. Home gardens 
are still blooming. Peonies are much 
more in evidence than they have ever 
been at the time they are most needed. 
Those that were in cold storage came 
out in perfect condition. A considerable 
number were held in the iceboxes in wa- 
ter for several days. The supply Friday 
and Saturday, May 26 and 27, was large 
enough to meet a normal holiday trade. 
They are all of good quality. The aver- 
age price is 6 cents. Department stores 
advertised peonies in quantity, for 
Saturd.ay, May 27, at 60 cents 
and 7.5 cents per dozen. It is 
believed they will have sales at the 
same prices Monday, May 29. Carna- 
tions are almost as plentiful as peonies. 
They are far more plentiful than they 
were for Mothers' day. Growers 




. . . FLORIST . . . 

426 Madison Ave. — and 49th Street 

Also Vanderbilt and MPIY/ WCWiXH 
Ritz-Carlton Hotels INHW I Wl\ffc 

Telephone Hurray Hill 783 

Highest award at the International Flower Show. 

April 11, Grand Central Palace. 

i^eeation Central. Perw>nal Attantleii, 



RAMM'S "^""^^^ 



SHOP 



In the \T 
Heart of IN eW 



Y^-U 412 Madison 



Prompt and Elffieient Serriee 



Avenue 

Hember F. T. D. 



NEW YORK 



Sent to n. H. DuKMb Hadil^ A«. 
will receive prompt and earefol attention. 
LONG ISLAND JEBSBY CITY 

BBOOKLYN NEWARK 



THE BOSTON FLORIST 

Personal s<?l<H'tion. Satisfaction irnaranteed. 

Ill the heart of New York City. 

('1«««> U) Theaters and SteaniHblp-i 

F.8tablighed 1902 

BSE. 34th Si., NEW YORK 



The Rosendale Flower Shop 
126 Jay Street 

Schenectady, N. Y. 

No order too large for us to fill, none 

too small for consideration. 

Member F. T. D. 



BRONX,NewYorkCity 

FORDHAM FLORIST 

421 E. FORDHAM ROAD 



HORNELL, New York 

C G. JAMES & SON 

i>rompt Deliveries to Elmira, Cornlnerand'WellsTille 



76 



The Florists^ Review 



JUNB 1. 1»22 




The flori«to whose cards appear on the patfes canryinK this head, are prepared to fill orders 
™ "^~ from other florists for local delivery on the usual basis. 





iii 



^Miiiiiiiiiiiijiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii' 

uffalo 

NEW YORK 

F.T.D. MEMBERS 



>9M'>9j^mimim'.m'M>'-'<*^. 



Scott the Florist 

Main and Balcom Streets 

Qiarles Sandiford 

2692 Main Street 

Felton's Flower Shop | 

1368 Main Street 

W. H. Sievers 

330 Genesee Street 

S. A. Anderson 

440 Main Street 

Colonial Flower Shop | 

230 Delaware Avenue 

Wm. H. Grevei 

77 and 79 Allen Street 

Kramer the Florist | 

1291 Jefferson Street 

Lehde & Galley 

2 1 65 Seneca Street 

W. J. Palmer & Son | 

304 Main Street 

II' ■ : ■■■■' iimiWIIIIIHIHIHIIHIIIIIIIIIIIIIHIIIIIlnillllllltlllllllllllllllimilllllllll,; 



Send your F. T. D. orders for 
Mo., Kan., and Okla. to Alpha 

THEY WILL BE 
WELL TAKEN CARE OF 

tSmA 

KANSAS CITY, MO. 



KANSAS 



KANSAS 
CITY . . . 

MRS.T.A.MOSELEY 

"Service Above Self 724 Minnesota Ave. 
MEMBER F. T. D. 



KANSAS CITY, MO. 

Akin's Floral G). 1 203 Baltimore 
KANSAS CITY, MO. 

O'CONNELL FLOWER SHOP 

FOB SERVICE 
N. W. COR. INDEPENDENCE AVE. AND OAK. 

brought in big cuts the morning of May 
27 and said they had more ready to be 
cut for the afternoon if needed. They 
are even of better quality than they 
were earlier in the month. Instead of the 
.small, soft flowers familiar at this sea- 
son, the l)looms are large, firm and clean. 
Shipments have been heavy all week. 
Orders were placed early. Saturday was 
an extremely busy day. Orders for 
wreaths have been in excess of those of 
other years. Supplies and artificial 
goods have moved well. 

Various Notes. 

S. liryson Ayres has opened a retail 
flower store at 1120 Walnut street, in 
the building formerly occupied by the 
People's Trust Co. He is negotiating 
for a lease on the jiroperty and will re- 
main permanently. Since opening the 
store, May 20, business has been good. 
AH the stock handled is grown on his 
farm near Independence, Mo. 

William Wade, secretary of the Mis- 
souri State Florists' Association, says 
that the association will hold its an- 
nual meeting with the St. Louis flower 
show and chrysanthemum exhibition, 
November 7 to 12. One day will be 
known as Missouri state day. 

Frank X. Stuppy has returned to his 
home in St. Joseph, Mo., from the Peter 
I?ent Brigham hosj>ital, Boston, Mass. 
He is feeling much better and has been 
at his store several times. 

Many handsome bouquets and baskets 
were made up by various florists last 
week for the principals in the annual 
week of grand opera. All but one or 
two of the stars are local artists and 
have many friends here. 

The chart of convention hall has been 
returned by John Young, secretary of 
the S. A. F., together with the informa- 



KANSAS 

criY 



F.T.D. 



MISSOURI 



Joseph Austin 

3111 Troost Ave. 

W. J. Barnes 

38th and Euclid 

Chandler's 
Flowers 

4700 Ward Parkway 

Muehlebach 
Flower Shop 

1208 Baltimore 

Samuel Murray 

1017 Grand Ave. . 

J. E. Munray 
and Co. 

217 East lOth St 

A. Newell 

11th and McGee 

William L Rock 
Flower Co. 

1 1 06 Grand Ave. 

Alpha Floral Co. 

1 105 Walnut St. 



'T^»--,-'r'.r - 



JUND 1, 1922 



The Florists^ Review 




The llortoto whose canU appear on the pages carrying this head, are prepared to fiO or Jers 
from other florists £jr local delivery on the osoal basis. 




ST. LOUIS, MO. 

GRIMM & GORLY 
Leading Downtown Florins 

Members Florists' Telegraph Delivery 



ST. LOUIS, MO. 

J. M. WALTHER & SONS 

FIX)RISTS 3645 Iowa Avenue 

tttabUahad 1900 

We eatar to tiiosa who require the best. 

Prieee reaaonablo. Uemhen F. T. D. 



Member 
F. T. D. 



For Flowers Worth While 
And Service with a Smile, 
Wire your orders to 

PAUL T. HEIL 

556 Skinker, ST. LOUIS. MO. 



SEDALIA, MO. 

and all orders for center of state given 
personal attention. Members F. T. D. 

ARCHIAS FLORAL CO. 



SEDALIA, MISSOURI 

Q , . "Too will not stammer 
^tatP r? • ^ if yo u say it with onr 

^^"^^^ r air Flnral "lo"" 

Florists' * lUiai I ^ 



STUPPY RORAL CO 

Orders Executed 
Missouri, Iowa, Kansas and Nebraska 

St. Joseph, Mo. 

Hembers Fkvista* TslesraDh Deliver? 



UtOPPERMANN CT I A! TTQ 

serve you in 1 . JLv/UliJ 

KINGSHIGHWAY. AT SHAW 



Excelsior Springs, Mo. 

EXCEUSIOB GREENHOUSES 



Springfield Seed Co. 

6PRIB0FIELD. MO. 
nx)RAL oapjkanuBtn open day and nigbt 

Maahe» fflartAif T.legreph Delivery AaMcietion 



Hannibal, Mo., ThTF^ 

Cut Flewsrs. Decorative and Bedding PUals 
FLORAL WORK A SPFC^ KVf^ 



Louisiana, Mo. L M. SEIBERT 

Motor Delivery, 



Pike Co., Uo. 
Pike Co.. lU. 



COLUMBIA, MO. 

COLUMBIA FLORAL CO. 
Halfway between St. Louis and Kansas City 



RED 



4326 Olive St. 



F. T. D. 




ST. LOUIS 



ST. LOUIS, MO. 

For prompt delivery send your order to 

Julius E. Schaeffer, Florist 
Boyle at Maiyland Member F. T. D. 



ST. LOUIS, MO. 

r^ord^rtS OSTERTAG BROS. 

Tbe Largest Retail Sopply House in the West, 

JEFFERSON AND WASHINGTON AVES. 

Members F. T. D. 



tioii that almost all of the areii.a floor 
space has been sold to exhibitors for the 
S. A. F. convention, to be held here in 
Aiigust. 

Wiley Pendleton, of Rock's Flower 
(Jardens, has been (juite ill for several 
days. He hopes to be back at work 
within a week. 

Frank Robinson, convention director 
of the Chamber of Commerce, was se- 
riously injured in a motor collision in 
St. Louis, Mo., several days ago. He is 
in a hospital there, suffering from a 
shattered kneecap and numerous bruises 
and cuts about the body. It will be ini- 
l)0ssihle to remove him to his home for 
several weeks. J. E. K. 



WORCESTER, MASS. 

Speaking a few days before Memorial 
(lay, florists of this section state that 
business looks promising for the holi- 
day. The demand for cut flowers 
already exceeds former years. One rea- 
son for this is the safe and sane con- 
duct of business on Mothers' day. In 
many places in this eastern part of the 
country many people got .Tngry at Moth- 
ers ' day on account of the high prices 
charged and the press is still discussing 
the subject. Littlefield's have had to 
limit the amount of purchases to each 
customer at the greenhouses. Outdoor 
flowers are in the market in small quan- 
tities. Lilacs will be gone before Me- 
morial day, while, on the other hand, 
many other shrubs and perennials lag 
behind. The season has been favorable 
for germination of seed in the open and 
vegetation in general looks good. 

E. A. 

TERRE HAUTE, IND. 

With Easter and Mothers' day over, 
the efforts of the J. W. Davis Co. are 
being directed toward moving the large 
stock of ferns now on hand, which in- 
cludes in all about 60,000 plants of dif- 
ferent varieties and sizes. A force of 
about ten men is kept constantly i)ack- 
ing and shipping and the end of the sea- 
son is still far off. Prepar.-ttions are al- 



■SEND YOUR ORDER TO" 

SANDERO 
623 Claia Avenue ^^^^ 

T. LOUI»^ 



. MEMBER F.T.D.. 



ST. LOUIS, MO. 



Hemlxr 

Floriste' 

Telesraph 

Delivery 

Asaociation 



4732 McPherson Avenue 



ST. LOUIS, MO. 

Wire your orders to 

MULLANPHY FLORISTS, Inc. 

N. W. Cor. 8th and St. Charles Streets 

Both Long Distance Phones 

Member Florists' Telegraph Delivery Ass's. 



ST. LOUIS Sf"' 

George WaJdbart Floral Co. 

Member* P. T. D. 
Efflcieot Service-Hoet Centrmlly Loemted 

c.re^„'i?^x'^,ed 5 1 6 N. Grand Ave. 



ST. LOUIS, MO. 
BENTZEN 

FLORAL COMPANY 

3118 North Grand Avenue 
FACILITIES SECOND TO NONE 



ST. LOUIS, MO. 

FLOWERS DELIVERED IN CITY OR STATE 
ON SHORT NOTICE 

F. H. WEBER 

Taylor Avenue and Olive Street 

Both Long Distance Phoaea 
Hcmber iiloriats' TeJesrsph DeHver, Aaaoetatlcp 

CHILLICOTHE, MO- 

ISHERWOOD GREENHOUSES 

WE STRIVE TO PLEASE 

l^^l* IVA^ AMERICAN 
JOplin, Mo. FLORAL SHOP 

J.V MEINHART, Prop.. 21S W. 4th St. 

WEBB CITY, MO. 

). E. Meinhart, 416 S. Pennsylvania Ave. 



78 



The Florists^ Review 



JUNI 1. 1022 







The flortoto whose cards appear on the pages carrying this head, are prepared to fill orders 
■' — from other florists for local delivery on the usual basis. 




PITTSBURGH ^td a. W. Smith Co. 



AND VICINITY = 



Service 



Flower Stores 



Keenan Building, PITTSBURGH, PA. 



PITTSBURGH, PA. 




6022 

PENN 

AVE. 



DesigiM 
and DecoratiofM 



THTNTC' Everything in Flowers 

GRAKELOWS 



Member Florists' Telegrapfa 
Delivery Aasoclatton 



Broad Street at Cumberland, PHILADELPHIA, PA 



PITTSBURGH, PA. 

DAVE HILL & CO. 

Fifth Ave. and Wood St. 

OPEN SUNDAY QUICK SERVICE 



Pittsburgh, Pa. 

MRS. E. A. WILLIAMS 



621 PENN AVENUE 



Member F. T. D. 



PITTSBURGH 




E. C LUDWIG 
FLORAL CO. 

7 1 E. Diamond Street 

Members F. .T. D. 



Germantown, Chestnut Hill, 
Suburbs and Philadelphia 

Orders Kt-celvc Careful and Prompt Attention 

CHAS. W. MOORBY, The Rorist 

5420 Germantown Ave. PHILADELPHIA 



PHILADELPHIA 

Colonial Florist Company 

WE ARE SO CENTRALLY SITUATED TO 
FILL ALL TELEGRAPH ORDERS PROMPTLY 

N. L G>r. 13th and Market Sb., Subway Station 



PHILADELPHIA 

OUR BETTER SERVICE 
MAKES BETTER CUSTOMERS 

HILL'S FLOWER SHOP 

4348 Frankford Avenue 



Pittsburgh, Pa. 

RANDOLPH & McCLEMENTS 

FLORAL EXPERTS 

5936 PENN AVENUE 

Members of the Florists' Telegraph Delivery 



PHILADELPHIA 

VICTOR I. RIDENOUR 

(Florist of the Better Kind) 
Ridge Ave. and Dauphin St 



HARRIS BROS. 

510 Market St. 



ivfgB 



\3^ 



BEST 
SERVICE 



EAST PITTSBURGH, PA. 



FREDERICK 
FLOWER SHOP 



Braddock and all Turtle 
Creek Valley PoinU 



es tab- 
in town 



THE ALPHA FLORIST I^^^lirl 

Special attention to all orders, large or small 

p.R.R.station. UNIONTOWN. PA. 

LEWISTOWN. PA. 

^%S^t?SS^p1a'nts joe s. miller 

All Kinds of Funeral Work 

TARENTUM, PA. 



ready being made by the firm for the 
late fall and Christmas holidays. There 
are about 7o,000 cyclamen plants, great 
blocks of pandanus, crotons, begonias, 
poinscttias, rubber plants and cherries 
to be seen here. Many out-of-town flo- 
rists visit this range. 



OMAHA, NEB. 



The Market. 



As this is written, the stage is being 
set for another holiday, and yet the re- 
tailer is just a little nervous as to the 
outcome. Everyone is afraid to take a 
big chance, as the whole situation lies 
in the liands of the weather man, and 
he has got to act within the next few 
hours. It seems unlikely that there 
will be any surplus of outside stock, 
as the weather is cool. Rain has been 
the predominating feature, followed by 
cool, dark weatlier, which is against a 
-j.Aii-i-v AMI-. cn-D\/i/-r II TADCNrriiik* forty per cent crop of peonies for Me- 

<t'l'/.I?;,ct':llltfh^I'^e^ II ^^ftS^^CO ' -orial day. The peoniL are streaked 



PHILADELPHIA 

Germantown and Chestnut Hill 

Orders carefully filled in first-class styls 
and on time. 

WILLIAM BERGERS SONS 

6622 Qermantown Ave.. Philadelphia, Pa. 



) 



ORDERS FOB ]' 

PHILADELPHIA! 

AND SUBURBS CAREFULLY FILLED 
We are in close toaeli with all the labarba by 
railroad service and can make quick delivery. 

CHARLES F. KRUEGER CO. 

Reading Terminal Flower Shop, Philadelphia 



Germantown and Chestnut Hill 

OR HP" R <s Carefully executed with 
V-TVLycrVJ taste and promptness. 

FRANK R. HASTINGS 

8 West Chelten Ave.. GERMANTOWN 

PHILADELPHIA. PA. 



ORDERS FOR 



PHILADELPHIA 

Carefully and Promptly Executed 
with Good Flowers and Good Taste by 

Ml rolloko« 8924 Market St., 
. J. l^clilanan, Philadelphia 



PHILADELPHIA 

Charles Henry Fox 

I will never send you an order less than 16.00. 
Member F. T. D. 



J. J. Habermehl's Sons 

The finest floral arrangements, flowers and 
plants furnished on telegraphic orders. 

&d Philadelphia H 



Broad and 

nut 
Streets 



SCHULTHEIS, Florist 

817 Charch Street 612 Linden Street 

DUNMORE. PA. SCRANTGN.PA 

Members of the Florists' Telegraph Delivery Ass'n. 

Wilkes-Barre, Pa. 

^.TT IraG. Marvin. il°cT^^^^ 



JUNB 1, 1»22 



The Florists^ Review 



79 






^^e_fl ori«t« whose cards appear on the patfes carrying this head, are prepared to fill o rders 
^ from other florists for local deUvery on the usual basis. "~ 




SAN ANTONIO, TEXAS 

AVENUE C AT 8TH STREET 

LARGEST RETAIL FLOWER SHOP IN THE SOUTHWEST 

TELEGRAPH ORDERS A SPECIALTY 




MEMBER 
F. T. D. 



UNIONTOWN, PA. 

STENSON & McGRAIL, TSiSs!'- 

11 Morsantown Street 

FRESH HOME-GROWN CUT FLOWERS 

AND PLANTS at all times 



Williamsport, Pa. 

W. J. EVENDEN'S SONS 

THE LEADING FLORISTS 

Members Telegraph Delivery Association 



J. V. LAYER 

ERIE, PA. 

Write, Phoneor WueS^J^v^^.T^ 



SAYRE, PA. FLORAL CO. 

We handle a full line. Prompt deliveries to Waverly, N. 
Y.; Athens, Towanda, Pa., and other Burrounding towns 

LEBANON, PA. i^ 

J. F. VAVROUS SONS 

Orders for •'entral Peiina. handled with promptneea 

NEW KENSINGTON, PA. 

GEORGE BROS. & CO. 

813 FIFTH AVENUE 

TITUSVILLE, PA. 

WM. A. MURDOCH g?.^yg 

New Kensington, Pa 

'•IcRAE-JENKINSON CO 

■! ijab er glorlgta' Telegraph Dellve ; 
aeirbemFloriBts' Telegraph Delivery Assoclatloc 

EVENDEN BROS. 

.Aijiest Growers in W/'Il- ». U 

antral Fennay lyanis WlluamSpOrt, ra 

WILLIAMSPORT, PA 

DERR'S FLOWER SHOP P. A. Derr, Prop 

Established lo years Guaranteed Servic*. 

WARREN, PA. 

Croe/./>ni. 171 1 r* J SHERM OFFEELB, 

rescent ri oral barden, proprietor 

WARREN. PA 

Wood's Flower Shop 



MEMBfiS^: 
F. T. E'_ 



LANCASTER, PA. 

J-_F. BARR & CO., Leading Florists 



AUSTIN. TEXAS 

AUSTIN FLORAL CO., Inc. 

Flowerland, 722 Congress Ave. 

9000 feet glass, 7 acr^s of flowers 

AUSTIN'S LARGEST PLACE 



SCRANTON, PA. 

A. L. BESANCON & CO. 

Florists and Decorators 

Adams Ave. and Spruce St. E?fe*bldg 

BOTH PHONES 
You can depend on us. Order your flowers on any 
occasion for delivery in Scranton and vicinity 



SCRANTON, PA. 

wire your f D f"! ARK" 124 Waehlngton 
orders to vl. I\. V^l^rVIvI^, Avenue i 

Est. 42 years. Everything in Flowers and Seeds. ' 
Seven railroads give quick connections to all parts in 
eastern Pennsylvania, southern New York, western 
New Jersey. Telephone connections everywhere; 
through delivery ears, no disappointments ' 



SCRANTON, PA. 

BEAGLE, The Florist 

923 Capouse Avenue 

WILKINSBURG. PA 

WM. M. TURNER, Flonst 
809 PENN AVENUE 

DENISON, ™^'V^^A?'^°^ 

"i-Tr'n. Majors, The Florist 

here this year, and yet this is a fine 
season for the early varieties. In fact, 
this is the first year that i)eonios have 
looked so well in years, and then alonpf 
comes tlie dark, cool weather and spoils 
the Memorial day situation. 

At the week-end one can buy peonies 
all the way from 50 to 75 cents per 
dozen. One retailer has contracted for 
2,000 choice peonies at 4 cents each. 

There are some nice carnations to be 
had. The carnation crop is not heavy, 
and there will be a great many more 
roses than carnations to offer tJie pub- 
lic. There are unlimited numbers of 
Rhasta daisies and marguerites for the 
holiday. Koses demand all the way 
from $3 per hundred for short to $20 
for the longer grades. About the best 
roses on the market here at present are 
Eussell and Premier. There are a few 
Beauties coming in, but they are noth- 
ing to brag about. Unlimited numbers 
of calendulas are arriving daily. Some 
excellent snapdragons are in. The mar- 
ket is pretty well loaded with gladioli, 
but they are a good asset. Pendleton 
and America never were better. Sweet 
peas are scarce, as so many of the grow- 
ers are throwing out their stock. Callas 
are plentiful. Easter lilies are a little 




nOWTON.T!XAS. 



Austin, Texas 
HILLYER'S 



MEMBER F. T. D. 



FOR WEST AND CENTRAL TEXAS 
AND THE OIL FIELDS 

^•'T'w'rite Brownwood Floral Co. 

BROWNWOOD, TEXAS 

We are prepared to fill your orders 

Members F. T. D. 



FLAGG FLORAL COMPANY 

Special attention to all Cut Flowers, Plants, Florali 

orders, large or small Designs and Casket Sprays 

Stores and Greenhouses, r\ A I T AC TTV A O 

326 West 10th Street. UALLAj, 1 EaAj 

HILLSBORCTEX. 

"" f!"t''. d Wood Seed & noral Cg 

SHERMAN, TEXAS 

H. 0. HANNAH & SON 

Service up-to-date. Northern Texaa-Sonthem Oklaboaiii. 

WACO \Lno' Texas 

Member F. T. D. WOLFE THE FLORIS*; 



MEXIA, TEXAS 

Mpxia Flnral Cn c/o PALACE DRUG STORE 
exia riOrai K.0. Members F. T. D. 



DALLAS {^T-ssl} TEXAS 

Lang Floral & Nursery Q, 



365,000 
Ft. of CllasB 



TEXARKANA, ^1: 

MAJESTIC FLORAL COMPANY 

El Paso, Texas floral co. 

Members Florists' Telepraph Delivery 



North and East Texas 

WISE ADKISSON, GREENVILLE. TEXAS 
9 Railroad OutleU Member F. T. D. 



FT. WORTH, TEXAS \ 

O-l,^^ n 1 l^„ Members Florists' 

tSaker r lOral ^^O. TelcKraph Delivery 



80 



The Florists^ Review 



JUMB 1, 1922 






The ll qrtoU whose cards appear on the pages carrying this head, are prepared to fill orders 
*"'^~ fran other florists for local deUvery on the usual basis. ■ — 





SEND 
YOUR ORDERS 

FOR 

Dixie Land 

TO 

IDLE HOUR 
NURSERIES 

MACON. GA. 

100,000 sq. (t. of Glass. 



Savannah, Ga. 
JOHN WOLF 

The Largest Grower 
of Cut Flowers in the South 



SAVANNAH 



njomsTa 



and for all South Georgia 

•mBiRt rLoitwn- TtLaoitPH diuvery ASsoaATWK 




MOBILE, ALA. 

^M^"bgr"#.l!^* Goodbrad noral Co. 

Mobile, Alabama 

Tt^. The Minge Floral Co. 

BIRMINGHAM, ALA 

PARKER^S FLOWER STORL 

ATLANTA, GA. 

Lawrence Floral Co. gSa;.S^r"G:g?i;^ 

ROME, GEORGIA 

Tie Flower Shop, Puryear & Co., 338 Broad St 

No ehartrea for dclivariea to Shorter College. 

ALBANY, GA. 

lACK SMITH GREENHOUSE CO.. Florift 

BATON ROUGE, LA. 

THE ROSELAND FLORIST 

MEMBER F. T. D. 



ATLANIA.GA. 





FLOWER, 
SHOP 

41 Feachtree Street 



BIRMINGHAM, ALA. 

Harris Seed & Floral Co. 

2018 Fir A Avenue 



MONTGOMERY, ALA. 

Alabama's Leading Florists 

Rosemont Gaurdens 

Member GorrestMndence 

F. T. D. Solicited 



New Orleans, La. ^'ord« to 

The Flower Shop 

108 Baronne Street 
HENRY SCHEUERMANN, Prop. 



NEW ORLEANS 

U. J. VIRGIN 

914 CANAL STREET 

Member Florists' Telegraph Delivery 



scarco. Among the novelties there are 
oo1uinl)ines, stocks and campanulas. 

About the only thing in the line of 
blooming house plants are gloxinias and 
tuberous-rooted begonias. T. E. E. 



ROCHESTEE, N. Y. 



The Market. 

Last week brought a large number of 
funerals, weddings and graduations, 
which kept the retail florists busy. 
Stock was plentiful and a fair supply of 
outdoor stock arrived daily. The Me- 
morial day demand for bedding stock 
was large. Koses played the big part 
in the cut flower market. Stock con- 
tinues to be of excellent quality and 
the prices are moderate. Carnations are 
getting toward the end of their season 
and the quality is not up to its former 
standard. Sweet jieas are also slowing 
up, but their ((uality is good. Mig- 
nonette, daisies, lupines, snapdragons, 
calendulas, gypso])hilas, irises and a 



ATLANTA, GA. 

Wire Your Orders 

To 




MEMBER 
F. T. D. 



BIRMINGHAM. ALA. 

WIRE YOUR ORDERS TO 

THE BLOSSOM SHOP 

^^^^^^^^" ■^^^^^^^™^— ■•M^^^^^^^i™. «HM>aa^^^^i^_^ 

"AN UP-TO-DATE FLORIST" 
Molton Hotel Bldg. 5 1 5 No. 20th Street 



NEW ORLEANS 



MEMBER 
OF THE 
F. T. D. 




We Cater 
_ to the 

or/r/ ^' T"'^ 

2600 ST. CHARLES AVENUE 




New Orleans, La. ^st?^^^" 

Flowers of Superior Quality 

Frcink J. Reyes & Co. 

Prompt Delnroy 



525 CANAL STREET 




EiOUISLANA - TEXAS - ABEANSAS 
SHREVEPORT. LA. 



NEW ORLEANS, LA. 
CHAS. EBLE 

OLDEST FLORIST SOUTH 
121 BARONNE STREET 

Member Florists' Telegraph Deliverr. 



JUNB 1, 1922 



The Rorists' Review 



81 




The florists whose cards appear on the patfes carrying this head, are prepared to fill or ders 
*'"' ~ from other florists for local delivery on the osual basis. "" ■ 




WINSTON-SALEM,N.C 



AT YOUR SERVICE 



Member F. T. D. 




HINSHAW 



BUILDING 



Asheville, N. C 

MIDDLEMOUNT GARDENS 

MEMBER F. T. D. 




Charlotte, N. C. ^^d 



Scholtz, 



VICINITY 

THE FLORIST 
INC. 



Member Florists' Telegraph Delivery Ass'n. 



CHARLOTTE, N. C. 

AND VICINITY 

THE FLOWER SHOP 

203 N. TRYON STREET 
Member F. T D. 



»» 



"All Over North Carolina 
PIEDMONT FLOWER SHOP, Inc. 

"Everything in Flowers" 
Mrs. N. W. G>bb, Prop. Durham, N. C. 



Fayetteville, N. C. 

J. J. FALLON CO. 



LEADING 
FLORISTS 



DURHAM, N. C. 

|. J. FALLON CO. ^^JFeL^^. ^^^r^ 

DURHAM, N. C, 

Durham Floral Co. ?^r^r 

WILSON, N. C 

*R^D. STARR. The Rorist 



RALEIGH. N. C. 

_McCarron Floral Co., Hs^Jt"ltreet 



RALEIGH, N. C. 

I. J. FALLON CO. ^^A^Xr^^^L'" 



GREENSBORO 

IN THE CENTER OP 

North Carolina 
Van Lindley Co., 1 1 3 S. Elm St. 



GOLDSBORO, N. C 

Ga*« City to Eastern North Cartdina 

GOLDSBORO FLORAL CO. 

Modem Greenliouses — ^Retail Store 

20 years' experience 



CHARLESTON, S. C. 

Carolina Floral Store 

King and George Sts. 



Oreenhouses, 
Saxon, S. C. 



Member 
F. T. D. 



Charleston, S. C. 

Art Floral Co. 

219 King Street, near Market 



SPARTANBURG 

AND ALL SOUTH CAROLINA 
CHARLES A. MOSS 

Member Florists' Telegraph Delivery Ass'n 



SPARTANBURG, S. C. 

We will give you service 
FRED'S FLOWER GARDEN 

JACKSON, TENN. 

JACKSON CUT FLOWER CO. 

Fresh ISotJlowers S. C. BRENDBL, Manager 

GREENVILLE, N. C. 

GREENVILLE FLORAL CO. 

Gateway to Kastern North Carolina. 
Flowers for all oeeasions. Phone 143-443 W. 

fair supply of outdoor tulips are seen 
daily. Shipments of peonies have 
reached this market, hut this stock is 
only averaf^e. Ijocal peonies will be on 
the market in about two weeks. 

Various Notes. 

Doctor K. M. Mills, president of the 
Syracuse Rose Society, was the speaker 
at the meeting and dinner of the 
Rochester Rose Society, May 26. Dr. 
Mills, a veteran rose cultiirist. chose 



THREE 
STORES 



Nashville, 

Chattanooga 
and Atlanta 



Member 
Florists* 
Telegraph 
Delivery 




Two Stores 



Members 
F. T. D. 



CVj 



,lia^ 



tvoo 



e 



\e^ 



THE 
Haeger Floral Co. 



Central Market House 700 Market St. 



.1 



Geny Bros. ''fSxs 

Members Florists' Telegraph Delivery 
212 Fifth Avenue North. 

NASHVILLE, TENN. 



■ WE NEVER SLEEP- 



Idlewild IV^ L* T 

Greenhouses IVleiTipniS, 1 €1111. 

89 South Main Street 

"Up-to-the-minute" Service and Execution 
Member Florists' Telegraph Delivery 



Send all MEMPHIS Orders to 

THE FLOWER SHOP 

61 Union Aventie 
MEMPHIS. TENhESSEE 



Memphis, Tenn. 

JOHNSON'S GREENHOUSES 
161 MADISON AVE. 

Established isas 

Memlter Florists' Telegrapk Deltverr Ass'n 



Knoxville, Tenn. 

CROUCH. Horist 

Member Floristw' Telegraph IJelivcrv 

LAKGKST AMOUNT OFOLASS DKVOTKU TCt 
CUT FLOWKRS IN THK SOUTH 




The Rorists' Review 



.JCNK 1, lft22 





The fl ortota whose cards appear on the pages carrying this head, are prepared to fill o rders 
""' """ from other florlsto for local deUvery on the usual basis. 




MILWAUKEE 



Member F. T. D. 



760-762 Third Street 



MILWAUKEE, WIS. 

HARRY PERSTEIN 

"SOME FLORIST" 
471 TWELFTH STREET 



Milwaukee, Wis. 

A. CURRIE & CO^ 

130.132 Wisconsin Street 

Member Florists' Telegraph Delivery Ass'n. 



La Crosse,xWis. 

La Crosse Flor£|J^Co. 

Oldest F. T. D. Member 
We STOW all oar flowers GuaraDtMd service 



5 



La Crosse, Wis. 

Send your order for flowers foi' delivery in 
this city and vicinilar to 

SALZER'S FLORAL GARDENS 

QUALITY AND SERVICE ASSURED 



SUPERIOR, WIS. 

Superior Floral Company 

1410 Tower Ave. 

FLORISTS 

TELEGRAPH ORDERS SOLICITED. 



RACINE AND KENOSHA 

Operating largre greeDhoaia t . IN. UDtiKiUl 

Id both these Wisconsin cities Member F. T. D. 

MANITOWOC. WIS. 
THE M. G. MADSON SEED C0„, 

North 8th and Commercial Streets. 

Watertown, Wis. 

104 Main St. STURBE FLORAL CO 

Appleton, Wis. "^'i^Jis^ 

Junction Greenhouses 



Orders for Northern 
and Central Wisconsin 



GREEN BAY, WIS. 

M^;^, Q^k...^«Jo^ Cr. flrriers for Cut Flowers and 
eierOCnrOeder LO. DesiRns delivered anywhert 
in Wiaconain and Northern Michlsan at rlprht prices. 

MADISON, WIS. 

RENTSCHLER aORALCO. rf^n' 



LOOK AT YOUR MAP 

With excellent facilities at 

CHARLESTON, W. VA. 

we can give prompt delivery in many surrounding towns. 

WINTER FLORAL CO. 



MILWAUKEE 

F. T. D, 

SEMLER-LEIDIGER CO. 

419 Milwaukee Street 



MILWAUKEE 

EXCLUSIVE FLORAL 
ARRANGEMENTS 

BAUMGARTEN, Inc. 

Member F. T. D. 93 WISCONSIN ST. 



MILWAUKEE, WIS. 



FOX'S 



•■COirORATED 

4S7-89-41 MILWAUKEE STREET 
iCember Floriata' Telegraph DellTery AM*n. 



MILWAUKEE 

1-3-5 GRAND AVENUE 

GIMBELS 

A. H. MacDonald, Mgr. 
Member Florists' Telegraph Delivery Association 



APPLETON, WIS. 

Growers Established 40 Years 

Riverside Greenhouses 



for liis topic, "Rosariaiis and Eose Gar- 
dens of the Old World and the New." 
Ho wjis introduced by Superintendent 
of Parks John Dunbar, who is president 
of the Rochester Kose Society, and told 
of the suggestion made at the Washing- 
ton meeting of the American Eose So- 
ciety that Eoehestcr send a delegation 
of its rose growers to the June meeting, 
which the Jiational society is going to 
liold in Syracuse in conjunction with 
the Syracuse society. The decorations 
at the Osborn House, and at the open 
meeting, which followed at the Y. M. 
C. A., were baskets of Columbia and 
Premier roses, donated by E. E. Purr- 
sell, of Irondequoit, and of the new 
Mrs. Harding rose, which was donated 



WEST VIRGINIA 
WESTERN MARYLAND 

The H. Weber & Sons Co. 

Fairmont, W. Va. Clarksburg, W. Va. Oakland, Md. 

Commissions Promptly Executed 

QUALITY EXCELLENCE ABILITY 

Members Florists' Telegraph Delivery Association, 



J. W. Dudley Sons Co. 

PARKERSBURG, W. VA. 
CLARKSBURG, W. VA. 
MARIETTA, OHIO 

Orders Carefully Executed 



CURKSBURG, W. VA 

Order your flowers on any occastoii. 
for delivery in this section from th» 
leading Florists in the State. 

HAYMAN GREENHOUSE CO 

CLARKSBURG. W. VA. 

Bluefield, West Virginia 

THE FLOWER SHOP 

Saecessor to Alexander Cat Flower & Plant C«^ 
Member F. T. D. 

CHARLESTON, W. VA. 

Capital City Horal Co.. ^""^H^^x^^ander-s 

FOR ALL SOUTHERN WEST VIRGIN IA 

"^Tl CHARLESTON, W.Va 

arcKlven prompt and careful attention bj the 

Charleston Cut Flower and Plant Cc 



BLUEFIELD, W. VA. 

FALLON, Florid 



HUNTINGTON. W.VA. 

ARCHER'S FLOWER SHOP 
Everything in Flowers. Member F. T. L, 

Huntington, W. Va. ^'^^l 

McClure-Coffman "T^f "ggifey sons Cc 

WHEELINCW.Va. 

Also for Bellaire and V n QCIDtTRT 
Martins Ferry ^ • ^' »Ji-'lDILir\. 1 

MILWAUKEE 

LUBLINER. Florist ^p.^B 

MEMBER F. T. D. GRAND AVE. 



'■ \. :■ ■ V 



JuNi 1. 1822 



The Rorists^ Review 



83 




JTbe florUto whose caids appear on the pages carrying this head, are prepared to fill or ders 
*"■ "— from other florists for local delivery on the usual basis. "~ " 




Lexington, Ky. 

JOHN A. KELLER CO. 

INCORPORATED 

Main Street, Opposite Phoenix Hotel 

Service (or all 

Central and Eastern Kentucky 

Member Florists' Telegraph Delivery Assodation 



RICHMOND, VIRGINIA 




115 E. Main St 

Member Florutu JTeiegrkpH Delivery ABSociation 



Richmond, Va. 

The Hammond Company, Inc. 

LEADING FLORISTS 
109 EAST BROAD STREET 



ROANOKE, VA. 

FALLON. Hori^ 

Member Florists' Telegraph' Delivery Ass'b 



CLIFTON FORGE, VA. 

ALLEGHANY FLORAL CO. 

Charlottesville, Va. 

W. A. Lankford's, Florist "f'^r'g.'of ^.^ 

Portsmouth, Va, 

Cotton The Florist, 333 High St 

PETERSBURG, VA 

MRS. ROBT. B. STILES, Florid 

Phone 910 1202 W. Washington St 

LYNCHBURG, Va. 

J.J. FALLON CO. ^^^eSI^^.T^ 

LYNCHBURG, Va. 

MISS McCARRON TSr^Bll y 

""" STAUNTON, VA. 

JZg^ir^ JOHN FALLON [ 

NORFOLK, V VIRGINIA 

GEORGE, Inc. 

Member FlorlBtB' Telegraph Delivery AssociaUoc 



In jVLjIN 1 UUa. Y where pre^ige counts for much, 
let your cu^omers be represented by a concern whose pro- 
gressiveness is combined with the dignity of forty- six years 
of di^nguished service. 




> FOURTH I 
Members F. T. D. Association 



LEXINGTON, KY. 

HONAKER,The Florist 

Largest Cut Flower Grower in the State 

160 West Main Street 

Member Florists' TelesraDh Delivery Ass'n 



Covington, Ky. 



Member 
F T li 



ROBERT D. RUTTLE 
THE MAPISONT AVENHR FLORIS'^ 



by Hart & Vick, Inc. The talk of Dr. 
Mills at the meeting was illustrated by 
colored slides. Colored photographs of 
famous Eochester Gardens were also 
shown by Charles Zoller. 

Sunday, May 28, was observed at 
Highland park as azalea day. The 
line weather and warm rains had 
brought out the blooms so that the 
azaleas were about at their best. In 
addition to the blossoming shrubs, the 
Japanese peonies and a number of other 
flowering shrubs and plants have 
donned their summer beauty and are 
doing their best to make the park a 
gem of splendor. II. J. II. 



BOAST OF BADGER TRADE. 



Part of Milwaukee's Tajne. 

In the monthly magazine called 
"Wisconsin Horticulture, which the V/is- 
consin State Horticultural Society is- 
sues, is a florists' department, the fea- 
ture of which in the May issue is an 
illustrated article regarding C. C. Poll- 
worth, of Milwaukee, and his extensive 
range of greenhouses at West Allis. As 
a director of the Society of American 
Florists, Mr. Pollworth is widely known 
officially, as he has long been person- 
ally. So some of the article will be 
interesting to readers of The Keview. 

"Ten to one, few people thought 
Clem Pollworth would become one of 
the largest wholesalers and growers in 
the northwest twenty-five years ago, 
when ho started in a humble way, sell- 
ing flowers in a little store near his 
present location," says the article. "But 
Clem knew folks and ho- was indus- 
trious and absolutely dependable. He 
still is — and in any flurry among the 
Milwaukee florists, his is the cool head 
that again brings harmony and tides 
over the trouble, whatever it may be. 
Though by no means an old man, he has 
a trusted line of advice which he shares 



LOUISVILLE, KY. 

E. G. REIMERS & SON CO., 
800 Baxter Avenue. 



Esteblished 1880 



Incorporated 1912 



.Louisville, Ky. 

HENRY FUCHS 
670 SOUTH FOURTH STREET 

Member F. T. D. 



Louisville, Ky. 

MARKET & MILLER 

Est. 1878. Members F. T. D. 

814-822 Cherokee Road 



PADUCAH, KY. 

SCHMAUS BROS. 

icio.ooo feet of Glass Produces Our Supply 

F. T. D. Member 

4 2 8 BROADWAY 



Fulton, Kentucky 

Prompt^and Efficient ChoicC FloWCrS 
Wire or Phone your orders to 

RTirK'FR'^ FLOWER SHOP 
l\UV^IVL.l\ .J 452 LAKE STREET 



I FRANKFORT, KENTUCKY 
I THE POWER FLOWER SHOP 



Owensboro, Ky 

NANZ FLORAL CC. 



'iSHembera 
L? T D. 



AUGUSTA, KY. 



Victor H. Thomas 



Deliveries to Georgetown 
and Ripley, Ohio 



Paducah, Ky. il^^ 

JOHN VAN AART 
Oreenhouses and Retail Store Member F.T. D. 



84 



The Florists^ Review 



Juki 1, 1922 





The flortoto whose carda appear on the page* carrying this head, are prepared to AH orders 
""■ from other florists for local deUvcry on the usual basis. 




MICHIGAN 

ORDKRS WILL BE CAREFULLY CARED 
FOR BY 

HENRY SMITH 

FLORAL CO. 



INOOKPORATSO 



GRAND RAPIDS 

WHOLESALE AND RETAIL FLORIST 

Member F. T. D. 

200,000 FEET OF GLASS DEVOTED TO 

FLOWERS AND PLANTS 



CHICAGO 



DETROIT 



Central Floral Co. 

"FLOWEBS THAT LAST LONGER" 

35-37 Broadway, Detroit, Mich. 
132 N. State St., Chicago, ni. 

CENTRALLY LOCATED 

OPEN EVENINGS AND SUNDAYS 

Members F. T. D. 



DETROIT 

J. BREITMEYER'S SONS 

1314 BROADWAY 

"Always a pleasure to keep an eye, personally, 
OD any order for a brother florist." 

Philip Breltmeyer 



DETROIT 

SCRIBNER FLORAL CO., 

2740 EAST FORT STREET. 

Always at your service. 



VAN AKEN BROS. & SONS 

LEADING FLORISTS 

COLDWATER. MICH. 

ELKHART. IN 

COVER MICHIGAN and INDIANA POi: 
Ord«ra promptly and caref oily taken cars of 
" • FT. D. 



STURGIS, 
Mich. 

•ember V.T.» 





Coldwatef 
^„ Mich. 

So. Mich point 



THREE RIVERS. MICR 
City Floral Co., Reed & Wallace 



J. B. GOETZ SONS 

SAGINAW, MICH 

OR AIT CITY IN MICHIGAN 



PORT HURON, MICH. 

ASMAN, LEADING FLORIST 
Prompt Delivery 



Ann Arbor, Mich. 
BluMaize Blossom Shop 



Member 
F. T. D. 



MEMBER P. T. O. 

622 Aisquith Street 
Downto^vn 



GRAHAM 



BALTIMORE 

MARYLAND 

GREENHOUSES WAVERLY 



Established 40 Years 

854 W. North Ave. 
Uptown 



BALTIMORE Samuel Feast & Sons 

AND ALL MARYLAND 



MEMBERS F. T. D. :: :: ESTABLISHED 1882 
Charles and Pleasant Streets 




JACKSON, MICH. 

1101-1105 W. Ganson St. 

A. W. FURNIVAL & SON 

Your orders will receive our prompt and 
careful attention, upon short notice. 



JACKSON, MICH. 

J. B. BLESSING 



Tha oldest and only F. T. D 
•tore in the heart of the city 



Grand Rapids, Mich. '^. 

Cut Flowers, Floral De- 14 W AT T FR^MA 
signs and Potted Plants * *• »» • rttil.i.a\kJiyirt 

with ;ill liis brother florists for the good 
ot' tlic huHincss. 

Range at West Allis. 

' ' Two di't'iules ago he began the build- 
ing of his own greenhouses, out in the 
wilds of West Allis, where now a thriv- 
ing settlement grows, with stores, a 
cemetery, :i mausoleum, n 'everything. 
Anil his greenhouses are not a bit be- 
hind the inarch of progress. They have 
steadily grown until lie now has thirty- 
two 2.j0-foot houses. He expects to 
make it an even three dozen this com- 
ing suiauier.-^ 

"Tl/e establishment is easily reached 
ly tl/' West Allis car line, at the Fair- 
vuH/ Mausoleum stop, and visitors are 
always welcome, although there is no 
retail business done either at the green- 
houses or the store downtown. The 
downtown establishment is on the 
northeast corner of the city hall square, 
on Market and Oneida streets, and is 
realh' almost overcrowded, with the 
enormous supply business, which sup- 
jilies florists in nearly every state in 
the Union. There is carried an immense 
stock of florists' su]>plies — fancy bas- 
kets, containers and the hundred and 
one things a retail florist uses. Last 
month orders were shi])ped to Pennsyl- 
vania, New York state, Texas and Ber- 
muda and two to the Hawaiian islands. 
Some of tlic su])])ly business is due to 
the traveling representatives, who call 
on trade and sell these lines clear to the 



Baltimore, Maryland 

WILLIAM J. HALUDAY 



llambar F. T. D. 



321 Charles St.. North 



HAGERSTOWN, MD. 

HENRY A. BESTER & SONS 
Members Florists' Telesraph Deliverr Ass'n. 

MARY JOHNSTON, Florist 

Nee Paterson ... 

221-223 W. Madison Street Ralhrnnrc Mfl 
Member Florists' Tel. Delivery DaiUIIKMC, lUU. 

OWOSSO, MICH. 

OWOSSO FLORAL CO. 
C. Marcus Anderson, Prop. Member F. T. D. 

MT. PLEASANT, MICH. 
I.rg Walter W. Caple 

Battle Creek, Michigan 

S. W. COGGAN, Florist, 25 E. Main St 
Member of Florists' Telectraph Delivery 



HILLSDALE, MICH. 

Soathem r\ K CTni I '■ '. D. 
Michigan Pointe W. A. JlULL. i 



Member 



Kalamazoo, Michigan 

G. VAN BOCHOVB & BRO. 
F. T. D. Orders Satisfactorily Pilled. 



YPSILANTI. MICH. 

I A VIS &. KISHLBR. 
At your service. 102 Miettigan Ave. 



LANSING, MICHIGAN 

I. A. BISSINGER fT^ 

"INCE 1894. LANSING'S LEADING n,OKIST 



V. T. O. 



NILES, MICHIGAN 

Serrka to BUCHANAN and BKBRIBN BCBniGS, lOOB. 
Larsest Floral EatabUabment ia Nttaa. 

HANSEN NURSERT A FLORAL CO. 

NILES, MICHIGAN 

Also service to Buchanan, Micfa. 

THE REDUNE CO. ""^kg.'B"" 

BAHLE CREEK, MICH. 

FRANCIS GREENSMITH 
GreenhoHVpo: North Union and Emmf'; Street? 



Ju«* 1,.1»22 



The Florists^ Review 




The florists whose cards appear on the pages carrying this head, are prepared to fill o rders 
*""*" from other florists for local delivery on the usual basis. "" ' 




DECATUR, 

ILLINOIS 

DAUT BROS. 



p. T. D. 



120 £i. Prairie St. 



JOUET FLORAL CO. 

507 ^fc^ JOUET, Hi. 

AQ pobts in WiQ G>unty and Vicinity 



CENTRALIA, ILL. 

JW POQQ We serve the followinc 
, W. I^WOO Illinois towns, direct 
train service: Mt. Vernon, Wayne City. Fair- 
field. Sesser, Christopher. Herrin, Ashley, Car- 
bondale. Nashville, Oakdale. Coultervllle. 
Sparta, Salem. Odin. Sandoval, Carlyle, Patoka, 
Kinmundy. Farina. 

F. T. D. Member. 



QUINCY, ILL. 

H. A. GENTEMAN 

Member Florists' Telegraph Delivery Associstion 

For Kortheastera Missouri and 
Central-western Illinois. 



Oliinrv III HECKENKAMP, Jf.T.'B! 

KfUinX^yy 111, Quincy's Leading Florist 
Western Illinois, Northeastern Missouri and 
Southeastern Iowa. 40.000 feet of glass. 

CENTRALIA s^o^Urn ILL. 

The Webster Greenhouses 

Memb er Florists' Telegraph Delivery 

GALESBURG, ILL. 

1. L. PILLSBURY-For Central 111. 
Member F lorists' Telegraph Delivery Associatioa 

GALESBURG, ILL. 

H. F. DRURY 



HemberF. T. D. 
All orders Oiled well 



DE KALB, ILL. 



Northern Illinois 
Southern Wisconsin 

J. L JOHNSON 

Yoor order win receive onr prompt and careful attentioD 

DIXON, ILL., and NORTHERN ILL 

We ««a and wlU be tx . «-n i /-» 

'^S^f¥w Dixon Floral Co, 

BRINKERHOFF GREENHOUSES 

SPRINGFIELD and CENTRAL ILLINOIS 

Mmbw riorists' Talaeraph Deliveir Aiaodatlea 
^ Beat and Prompt Bervise Alwari 

SPRINGFIELD, ILL. 

Hembreiker & Cole, S?2ffi'u "^ 

U embers Florists' Telegraph Delivery Aaaoclatlon 



SPRINGFIELD, ILL. 



217 South 
Fifth Street 



Good Service 

Backed by Large 

Greenhouses 



MEMBER F. T. D. ^^ 



FREEPORT, ILL. 

Bauscher Bros. Floral Market 

Established 1868. Incorporated 1920. 

We are the largest growers in the northwest. 
1,000,000 square feet of glass. All orders receive 



sqoa 
ireful 



careful attention and prompt delivery, 



id 1 



FREEPORT. ILLINOIS 

THB FREEPORT FLORAL COMPANY 

Staffen & Ballaa, Inc. 

The house of nnality and servlee. 



PRINCETON, ILL. 



W. E. TRIMBLE 
GREENHOUSE CO. 



For Central and 

Northern Illinois. 

Members F. T. D 



PEKIN- 



-PEORIA 



All Orders Receive Personal Attention 

GEO. A. KUHL. PEKIN, ILUNOIS 

Ql-^^^#-^^ 111 THORNTON'S 

kjtreator, lu. flower shop 

^■^JoRisT Quality is Our Hobby 

STERUNG and ROCK FALLS, III. 

and YICINITY. ^f»a satisfaction is our aim. 
J. A. SWARTLEY & SONS. STERUNG. ILL 

MISSISSIPPI "fTT 

J. B. Adams & Sons Pass Christian 

DEKALB, ILLINOIS 

and Vicinity dekalb flower shop 

Pacific coast. The out-of-town whole- 
sale cut flower and plant business ex- 
tends throughout the northwest. This 
jtast year several carloads of 
and Frencli bulbs, mostly T';i])er 
narcissi, were distributed. 

Able Grower. 

" Karly in the game Mr. I'oUworth as- 
sociated with liim a good English 
grower, William Kennedy, Sr., who ha.3 
kept things going economically and en- 
ergetically at the range. And now that 
William, Sr., has passed middle age 
there is a Bill, .Jr., as he is affection- 
ately known at the range, who, they 
say, has more j)cp than his dad ever 
had. Anyhow, a little thing like an 
order for 100,000 carnation cuttings 
doesn't make Bill bat an eyelid. They 
do stunts like that frequently out at 
the range. I've forgotten how many 
minutes it takes to walk from one cor- 
ner of their carnation house to the 
other, but it isn't in yelling distance. 

"Roses are another big stand-by at 
the range, such proven varieties as Kil- 
larney. White Killarney, Mrs. Hearst, 



Dutch 
White 



Stores in three cities enable us 
to deliver flowers anywhere in 

MISSISSIPPI 

CAPITOL FLORAL CO. 

JACKSON, VICKSBURG and MERIDIAN 



30 years in business. 



Member F. T. D. 



Yankton and Mitchell, S. D. 

We grow Roses, Carnations and all seasonable, 
flowers. Floral emblems that are right. Give 
us your northwest orders. 160- page catalogue. 

Gumey Greenhouse Company 



Mitchell, S. D. 



WM. DETHLEFS 
Leading 
Florist 
Choice flowers and prompt service _ ^ 
731 SOUTH MONTANA ST Member F. T. 

Fargo, North Dakota 

SMEDLBY FLORAL CO.. Inc. 
We ship to all points in tl>e Nortliwest 




Established over a quarter of a century 



Devils Lake, N.D. Minot,N.D 

VALKER'S FLORAL CO. 

Uuvest GreenlMNises in the btata 



GRAND FORKS, N.D. ^!W 

§ g %fSSL GRAND FORKS FLORAL CO. 

Ortw toTNorth Dakota and Northern Mlnneeott 

GRAND FORKS, N. D. 

McELROrS FLOWER SHOP 

Order* for North D( kota and Northern Hlnneeota 



CLARKSDALE, MISS. 

PAYNE'S aOWER SHOP 



TUPELO, MISS 

?tTo^-|^^<S TUPELO aORAL CO 

MISSISSIPPI 



STEMME <jk SONS 



HATTIESBURG 



GREENVILLE, MISS. 

IDLE HOUR FLORAL CO. 



L. A. WAAS. Manager 



Main St Extended 



PONTIAC, ILUNOIS ^'^^ 

"i?S5r°iii!L^'^ W. J. MILLER & SON 



srsl 

)nJ 




The Florists^ Review 



Junk 1. 192i 






The fl qrUte whose cards appear on the pages carryhig this head, are prepared to fill or ders 
"■ from other florists for local delivery on the vsaal basis. " 




CHICAGO wiLLiAM j: SMYTH 



Member Florins* Telegraph Delivery Association 



3 1 1 to 3 1 09 Michigan Ave. 



CHICAGO 

75 E. ADAMS ST. 




Branch Store 

Evanston, III. 



Oklahoma City 



OKLAHOMA 



Furrow & Company 

MwnhBr FlorUts' Teiesraph Dellvatr. 

205 W. MAIN STREET 



ENID, OKLA. 

The Hub of the Middle Southwest 

10 Railroads for Quick delivery 

ENID FLORAL CO., Leading Florists 

Authorized Member F. T. D. for Enid 



McALESTER 

OKLAHOMA 

WM. WEAVER 

MEMBER F. T. D. 



TULSA, OKLAHOMA 

Boston's Flower Store. 0. 0. Bostoa 

McmlMr Flortrts' Telegraph DeliTery. 



OKMULGEE. OKLA. 



GEO. W. MARSHALL 
210 W. Uain St. 



MEMBER 
r. T. D. 



CHICKASHA, OKLA. 

Chklusha Greenhouses ,, , „ _ „ 

D. M. JOHNSTON. Mftr. Member F. T. D. 



CARBONDALE, ILL. 



E. W. PLATER 



Southern Illinois 



CAIRO, ILL. VICINITY 

^iS*^ Cade The Florist 



CHICAGO 

iuick deliveries anywhere on the South 
side or in the City's Southern Suburbs. 



STORE AND CONSERVATORIES 

7045 STONY ISLAND AVE. ^f 




Flowers 

for all 

Occasions 




Tel. 

Lake View 

1121 



39 1 2 North Clark St. CHICAGO 



Just west of 
CHICAGO. 



WHEATON, ILL., 

OTTO F. MAU 

KANKAKEE, ILL. 

Schafer Floral Company 
KANKAKEE, ILL. 

GEORGE FABER. Leading Retail Florist 
Member F. T. D. 162 S. Washington Ave. 

Ophelia, Hoosier Beauty, Premier, Co- 
lumbia, Butterfly and Mrs. Russell be- 
ing grown. 

"In the mum season you'd think they 
were growing them all for the flower 
show. The fellows at the range are not 
'stick-in-the-muds,' cither. They are 
always originating something that other 
growers want. Their Mrs. C. 0. Poll- 
worth proved a fine yellow show type of 
mum. Their new hybrids of pompons 
are eagerly sought by Milwaukee grow- 
ers. 

"Pollworth's bulbous stock is carried 
and grown in great profusion. Likely 
they are not excelled in the northwest 
in this respect. The jonquils, daffodils 
and narcissi are in many varieties, with 
an eye to new introductions. Some of 
their King Alfred and Gloire do Sessen- 
heim daffodil bulbs cost 20 cents 
apiece, and more, in Holland, but you 
should see the huge trumpets! 

Plants Up to Pace. 

"Most of this article has dealt with 
the cut flowers so far, but don't forget 
that there is a large section of potted 
plants, too, ably presided over by Wil- 
liam Hogie. What he doesu 't know about 
shaving production costs isn't worth 
knowing anyhow, and you'd really 
think he was holding an exhibit, when 
you see how neat his stock always looks. 
To name the kinds of pot stock he 
grows would take up too much of this 
magazine, because tliat is a seasonable 
affair, and he nlw.nys keeps pace with 



CHICAGO 

JTor gtiality, service and supreme efficiency 

F. T. D. orders will be delivered by special 

meBsenger aa Boon as received. 

JACKSON FLORAL SHOP 

Established 1912 Member F. T. D. 74S E. 63rd St. 



CHICAGO 




OR 1ST 



Phone Graedand 1E2I 8SS6 Uneohi Avenoe 



OTTAWA, ILL. 

LOHR'S GREENHOUSES 

Fancy Cut Flowers and Bloomins 
Plants. 

Oood R. R. Service. Orders filled promptl;. 



OAK PARK,' ILL 

Madison Street Florists 

OAK PARK'S LEADING FLORISTS 

813 to 821 Madison St 
Oak Park, Austin, River Forest and Maywood 



SEND YOUR 

OKDEBSTO 



OAK PARK 

and all western suburbs of Chioago 

A. H. SCHNEIDER 

Member 1048 Lake Street 

F. T. D. OAK PARK. ILL. 



Oak Park, III. iw^hop 

Flowers and Plants. Oood Quality Prices 

Phone 849. 811 Lake Street Reasonable 

AURORA GREENHOUSE CO, 

AURORA, ILL. 

Our Service is the Beat. 

Aurora, 111., and Vicinity 

JOS. M. SMELY *'«oNEs 



ELGIN, ILL. 

GEORGE SOUSTER 



MEMBER 
F. T. D. 



168 DU PAGE 
STREET 



mr^wrin^py.r 



jvnn 1. 15*22 



The Florists^ Review 



87 






The flori«t« whose card* appear on the pages carrying this head, are prepared to fill or ders 
""^~ from other florists for local delivery on the usual basis. — ' 




CHICAGO— 77-79 Ea^ Madison St. 

A. LANGE, Florist Phone central 3777 




THE UNEXCELLED FACILITIES OF THE 

E.WIENHOEBER CO. 



22 E. ELM ST., 



CHICAGO 



Are available to the trade In flUtnK all orders. 

mCMBKB F. T. D, 



CHICAGO 



THREE 
STORES 




PALMER HOUSE 

DRAKE HOTEL BLACKSTONE HOTEL 

HembM^ F. T. D. 




l924L7l5tSl. 



Chicago 

Mvcfictott^ to 
My put 01 wt titf 



CHICAGO 

O'LEARY— Florist 

369 East 47th Street 
Member F. T. D. 



Send Your CHICAGO Orders to 

H. N. BRUNS 

Best EaoipDed Retsil Store on the 
West Side 

3040 W. Madison St.. CHICAGO. ILL. 



ROCKFORD. ILL., and Vicinity 

ROCKPORD FLORAL CO. 
f. ^ ^ 108 West State Street „,^„„ 
tTomptdeliveriea to ROCKFORD COLLEGK 

ROCKFORD, ILL., and Vicinity 

SWAN PETERSON & SON f^. 

Comer E. S tate and Lonswood Streets 
I^I-iL/l\lA, ILL. Member P. T. d! 

-^heWo^„se« chas. loveridgf 



CHICAGO 



2132-2134 
Michigan Avenue 

Member F. T. D. 




Orders 
^ . > CarefulK 
txecuted 



AND ALL THE NORTH SHORE 
SUBURBS OF CHICAGO 
HENRY WITTBOLD & SON, 75 E^st Adams Street. Chicago. Branch Store. Evanston. IlL 



EVANSTON, ILL., 



EVANSTON, ILL. WILMETTE, ILL. 

1614 Sherman Ave. JOHN WETLAND ^'^^ Wilmette Ave. 

TWO STORES CaterinK to the best trade in Chicago's Rich North Shore Suburbs MEMBER F. T. D. 



CHICAGO 



BOH 
FLOR^ 



ANNO 



N 



FLORAL COMPANY 
Member F. T. D. 75 L Monroe St. 



GEORGE 

FISHER & BRO. 

183 N. WABASH AVE. 

CHICAGO 




We cater 
to those 

who 
require 

the best. 

Price* 
rckaonable 



ICAGO 

eSTABLISHEtk 
1865 

4647 GRAND BLVD. 

ESTABLISHED 1894 

R. C. LANGE & SON 

No. Whipple St. CHICAGO, ILL. 



the fickle public taste — yes, and antici- 
pates it. Although he is solid with the 
usual hardy foliage plants, ferns, ge- 
raniums, begonias, sansevierias, coleus, 
crotons and such, he is always growing 
novelties in improved Primula obconica, 
cyclamens, calceolarias, cinerarias, aza- 
leas, genistas, Japanese lilies, ice-plants, 
Cleveland cherries and such plants. He 
is generally to be found around the or- 
chid house, seeing that the hundreds of 
plants of Cattleya Schroedcraj and 
Cypripedium insigne arc properly cared 
for. And let me ask you if one orchid 
plant that produces twenty-four blooms 
at $2 per, at one time, is properly cared 
for? If we could grow a dozen of these 



MEMBER F. T. D. 



FLOIUST 



GEO. WITTBOLD CO. 

Eatablished 186T 

a'£ifei:iS.CHICAGO 

NO BRANCH STORES 



CHICAGO 
SWANSON, The Rorist 

GREENHOUSES: 8TOEE: 

7302 N. Western Ave. G97S N. Clark St. 

Well located to handle North Shore orders. 
MvnlMr r. T. D. 



CHICAGO, ILL. 

CONGRESS FLOWER SHOP 

T. C. FOGARTY. M«i, 
520 S. Micbigaa Ave. Congress Hotel 



KRUG FLORAL CO. 



ALTON, 

(LLINOIS 



Srancli Store 
Granite City. ILL. 



MOLINE, ILL. Mote. 

'%',?,';"■• WM. H. KNEES & SONS 

Highland Park, 111. 

HIGHLAND PARK GREENHOUSES 



Ksiablished 1894. 



Members F. T D 



88 



The Florists^ Review 



JuNi 1. 1922 




-The florists whose cards appear on the pages carrying this head, are prepared to fill ofdera 
*"" '"~ from other florists for local delivery on the usual basis. — ■ 




LINCOLN, NEB. 

1338 Street 

FREY & FREY 

WHOLESALE AND RETAIL 

120,000 square feet of glass at your 
service 

Trad J Discount 

Members of the Florists' Telegraph Delivery 



C. H. FREY 

WHOLESALE AND RETAIL FLORIST 

1133 O Street. - LINCOLN. NEB. 

MEMBER F. T. D. 

WDl Fill Orders for the West on Short Notice 

TRADE DISCOUNTS FIRST-CLASS STOCK 



LINCOLN, NEB. 

EICHE FLORAL CO. 
1333 O STREET 

1 38,000 h. of glaM 36,000 roses to cut from 



NORFOLK, NEB. 

Norfolk Floral Co. ^."^.^g 

For all Northern Nebraska. Southeastern 
South Dakota and Northwestern Iowa. 



Flowers for AD 
Occasions, from 
Cradle to Grave 



Lincoln, Neb. 

CHAPIN BROS.. Retail Florists 

OMAHA, NEB. J^T.t 

JOHN H. BATH. The Careful Florist 

1804 FARNAH STREET 



OMAHA, NEBRASKA 
Le6 L. Larmon wu u^ouglaS's^t. 



Hess & Swoboda, Florists 

Telephones ISOl and L 158% 

1415 Farnam Street OMAHA, NEB. 

OMAHA, NEB. s-n- 

Louis M. Rogers, 319 So. 1 6th St. 

OMAHA^NEB?™^ 

:i7» ST. UABYS AVENUE 

FOR OMAHA AND VICINITY 

&1t^L NEBRASKAn^sf^ 

ED. WILLIAMS. Grand Island 
Ck>mDetent Florist Railroad Center 

Colonial Flower Shop ^'Ic^J- 

»1t^r^^ GOSHEN, IND. 



FT. WAYNE, IND. 

W. J. & M. S. Vesey 

2602 THOMPSON AVE. 

1 50,000 feet of glass devoted to fine 
Roses, Orchids and Carnations 

Prompt and Careful Service 

MEMBER F. T. D. 



BEYER & WEBER, Florists 

226 N. Michigan Street 

SOUTH BEND, INDIANA 

Daily Deliveries to Notre Dame University and St. 

Mary's Academy. Also close connections with 

Niles, Berrien Springes, St. Joseph, Mich., 

New Carlisle, Michigan City, La Porte, 

Elkhart, Goshen, Warsaw, Ind. 



SOUTH BEND, IND. iifcgSanst. 

WILUAMS THE FLORIST 

South Bend's Leading Florist 

Daily deliveriei to St. Mary's Academy and Notn 
Dame University. Orders filled for Noitham 
Indians and Southern Michigan. 



VALPARAISO. INDIANA 

AND SURROUNDING TERRITORY 

REINHART & ADAMS 

FLORISTS MEMBERS F. T. D. 

for a year, wo would consider retiring. 

"We have hinted before that Clem 
Pollworth is well thought of at home. 
He is a leading light, indeed, in the Mil- 
waukee Florists' Club, which comprises 
eighty florists in Milwaukee, some forty- 
two of whom are growers. Of course, 
with such an establishment he cannot 
liegin to grciw all he can sell, so he han- 
dles quantities of their stock as ii 
wholesaler. 

"Mr. Pollworth is also a member of 
the board of directors of the Society 
of American Florists, and as we write 
this is down in Indian.'ipolis, Ind., ar- 
ranging for the national show. He cx- 
l»ects to make quite a display .nt this 
show, especially in carnations. And we 
hope and expect th.at he'll show the 
world that hooch isn't the only thing 
that makes Milwaukee famous!'' 



MOTT-LY MUSINGS. 

(iathcring up the morning cut of a 
house of Delphinium Helladonna, now 
in second crop, Victor (iroshens, Ros- 
lyn. Pa., commented >i])on the value 
of these as a catch crop. Something 
happened to the rose, Mrs. Charles Rus- 
sell; so, without dallying to bring the 
rose hack, Mr. Oroshens threw it out. 
"We cannot .afFord to wait in these 
strenuous times," observed our hus- 
tling confrere. Plants sell freely at 
the r» and ID-cent stores; ;i prompt 
source of revenue. 

• . • • 

Adolph Farenwald, Roslyii, Pa., is 
cutting fine crops of the Russell rose. 
This rose has held up with the best of 
them throughout the entire season. 

• • . • 

Edward Towill, Roslyn, Pa., probably 
will plant the two houses now under 



Member F. T. D. Phone: Canal { ^ j 

H. W. SHEPPARD 

FORMERLY HILL FLORAL CO. 

FLOWERS OF QUAUTY 

Arranged in a Richly Artistic Manner 

Service Unexcelled 
Your Patronage Solicited 

532-534 Race Street 

CINCINNATI, OHIO 



Indianapolis, Ind 

241 MASSACHUSETTS AVBNDB • 

Bertermann Bros Co. 

LEADING FLORISTS 
Members Florists' Telegraph Delivery Asia. 

Establiahad SSSS 

A. WIEGAND'S SONS CO. 

1610 to 1620 North IlUnoia Street 

INDIANAPOLIS. IND. 

Indiana's oldest, largest and most complete 

retail eatabUatament. 

Member FlorlstB' Telegrapb DeUveir AsMclatlon. 

TERRE HAUTE, IND 

129 SOUTH SEVENTH STREET 
JOHN G. HEINL & SON 

TERRE HAUTE, IND. 

COWAN BROS. & CO., norists 

Established 1894 Twenty-first and Spruce Sts. 

KOKOM 0, IND 

COLES' FLOWER SHOP 

MBMBKB P. T. P. 

RICHMOND, INDIANA 

FBED H. LEMON & CO. 
Florists and Decorators Send ns your orders 

RICHMOND, INDIANA 

AND VICINITY 

Member F. T. D. G. R. GAUSE 

LOGANSPORT, IND 

PERSHING-norist STerl^D 

BLOOMINGTON, IND. 

ELUS FLORAL CO. 

Members F. T. D. 



M* _ T J MARION 
anon, ina. floral co. 

Member Florists' Telegraph Delivery Ass'n. 



E*|1 f I and Soatbem Indians 

vansville, Ind. w^^i^'s^c^, 

JUUUS NIEDNAGEL 



100,000 Feet Glasa 
Modem Equipment 



ATTICA, IND. 

; Attica Floral G>. 



And all Surround 
ing Cities 



JUNB 1, 1922 



The Florists^ Review 



89 







^^g_<i orirt« whose cards appear on the pages carrying this head, are prepared to fill o rders 
"*" from other florists for local delivery on the usual basis. *" " 




MONTREAL 

CANADA 

LEY & McALLAN 

658 ST. CATHERINES STREET, WEST 
MEMBER F. T. D. 




Largest 
Retailers 
in 
Canada 



Cor.8t.Catherine and Gur Sts- 

Montreal 



9 St. John St., QUEBEC, CAN 
Member Florists' Tel. Delivery 



Edmonton, Alberta 

WALTER RAMSAY, Ltd. 

Member F. T. D. 
We have the largest greenhouses in the district 



London, Ont., Can. 

J. GAMMAGE & SONS. Ltd. 

"The House of Flowers" 
All Orders Carefully Executed 

Members Florista' Teiegrapb Delivery Ass'n. 



VANCOUVER, B.C. 

BROWN BROS. & CO., Ltd. 

48 HASTINGS STREET. E. 

^^ BRITISH COLUMBIA ordek 

Members Florists' Telegraph Delivery Assn, 



Winnipeg, Man., Can. 

THE "KING" FLORIST 
270 Hargrave St. 



Member 
P. T. D. 



SCRIMPS, FLORIST 

OTTAWA, CANADA 



TRURO, f^o^fgS^A 

ITS. SUCKUNG & CHASE Ltd. 

Montreal, Que., fo*B.VsoS 

825 St. Catherine St., W. 



UEHBEIB 
F. T.D. 



PORT ARTHUR, ONT. 

HERBERT H. WILLSON 
Member F. T. D. 257 Arthur Street 

Saskatoon, Sask., Can. 

Victoria Nursery Z'^^'J^'^l^' 

REGINA, SASK., CANADA 

spSIS^NA FLORIST CO. Ltd. 

'''JSWAL ATTENTION TO F. T. D. ORDER" 



FORT SMITH, ARK. 

ARTHUR G. LEE 
"THE FLORIST' 

Member Florists' Telegraph Delivery 



VICTORIA, B. C. 

Brown's Victoria Nurseries, Ltd. 

618 VIEW STREET 

Victoria's Leading Florist 



VICTORIA, British Columbia 

Last Port of Call for All Oriental Liners 
Established 1S92 WOODWARD, Floriato 



ronstruction with the rose, American 
Legion, as it is doing so well here. 

* • * • 

William Wunder, Pittvillo, Pa., com- 
ineiiting upon the early arrival of the 
Memorial day number of The Review, 
said, "It is good to have it around — 
host kind of publicity. Although really 
a trade magazine, it need not be kept 
out of the sight of the customer, so to 
speak." The gradual encroachments of 
the city will soon absorb this busy es- 
tablishment and swell the coffers of our 
confrerp, who, it is hoped, will decide 
to "carry on," oven if it must T)o else- 
where. 

* • * • 

William Koehler, Frankford, Pa., ob- 
served that the call for variety in bed- 
ding plants is encouraging. While gera- 
niums will, doubtless, Jilw.ays lead, 
large quantities of small plants, such 
as alyssums, calendulas and the like, 
grown in frames, find a ready sale. A 
choice batch of gloxinias, with yiorfect 
foliage, showed careful cultivation. 
« • • • 

Martin C. Ribsam, Trenton, X. J., 
lias enjoyed a large run of funeral work, 
with some large orders for Memorial 
day. Gladioli are welcome for spray 
.'iiid basket work; their season is almost 
]iorpetual. The seed soMSon is holdinc 

out well. 

* • • « 

Carluian Kibsani, Trenton, \. .!.. w:is 
busy with Memorial day busiuess. 
I'lnntings, both of bedding plants and 
slirultbory, continue to incroaso. 

* . • . 

.Joseph M. Goellor is proprietor of 
the Goellor Flower .Slio[), a new ven- 
ture in one of the best residential sec- 
tions of Trenton. N. .T. A fine, new 
store, of colonial design, with show 
house attached and garage in the rear, 
is ke])t well tilled with the best stock 
obtainable. Success must attend the ef- 
forts of a iiienibor of the old firm of 
(liM'lI(^r Bros, in the capital city. 
. • • • 

The P:. W. Riley Co., Trenton. X. .1., 
is paying especial attention to its land- 
scape department. The rapid increase 
in sul)urban residences affords big op- 
])ortunities along this lino. 

* • • . 

The William H. Moon Co., Morris- 
ville. Pa., reports a good planting sea- 



Toronto, Canada 

J. J. HIGGINS, Ltd. 

273 Yonge Street and 1450 Queen Street 
Member F. T. D. 



CANADA'S FLORIST 

8-10 W. 

Adelaide 

Street 

Toronto 

Uember Floriata' Telegraph Delivetr Association 




HAMILTON 

OhJTARIO CANADA 

JOHN CONNON CO., Ltd. 

F. T. D. FLORISTS 



Windsor, Ontario, Canada 

AND THE BORDER CITIES 

J. GAMMAGE & SONS, LTD. 

Members F. T. D. 



TIPTON & HURST 

FLORISTS 

Litde Rock, Arkansas 

Capital and Central Shipping Point for Arkansas 
Members F. T. D. 



Qyality Flower Store 

Large Greenhouses of our own; centrally located 

We guarantee satisfaction in service, 
quality of flowers, and price 

FORT SMITH, ARKANSAS 



HOT SPRINGS, ARK. 

The Flower Shop 



tea Centrt) 
^Tenna 



Nearest Florist in 
State 150 mUes 



Helena, Ark. 

BALL FLORAL COMPANY 

PINE BLUFF, ARK. 

QAVIS FLORAL CO '^'J^mbbr 

GEORGE RYE, Some Florist 
THE PLAZA c^ o -i-L A 1 

F.T.D. rt. omith, Ark. 

EL DORADO, ARK. 

ALL OCCASIONS LEACH FloWCr Shop 

Eureka Springs, Arkansas 



Northwestern 



^^"'^'^ Arkansas C. I. POOR, Florist 



The Rorists' Review 



JUNB 1, 1922 




The fl orUte whose cards appear on the patfes carrying this head, are prepared to fill o rders 
"" "" from other florists for local delivery on the usual basis. " 




MEMBER F. T. D. 



YOUNGSTOWN, 0. 



HARRY C WALTHER 

29 WEST WOOD STREET 
WELL EQUIPPED TO HANDLE YOUR ORDERS 



EGGERT N. ZETLITZ 

THE LEADING FLORIST 
209 We^ Market Street 

LIMA, OHIO 

Member of Florists' Telecraph Delivery 



MARION, OHIO 

6 railroada with good connections to all parts of state 

A GOOD SELECTION OP FLOWERS 

ON BAUD AT AIX TIIC1I8. 

BLAKE'S. HOW. Center 



Leavenworth, Kan. 

606 Delaware St Leavenworth Floral G>. 




Leading Florist 
825 KANSAS AVENUE 

TOPEKA, KANSAS 

Member F. T. D. 



MRS. LORD'S FLOWER ROOM 

1 12 W. 8th Ave., TOPEKA. KAN 

Member Florists' Telegraph Delivery. 

MANHAHAN, KAN, 

if 1 THE MARTINS 

Mombor ». T. D. T. S. MARTIN. Prot 

XT/^rj'T'/^X T Midway between the East 

l\l Jr< I IJ1\ and West. Prompt deliveries 

* "'■^^*** "^^^ ''f made to the State Sanitorium 

fyT A XT and local liospitals. 

rwAlM. NORTON GREENHOUSE 
WICHITA. KANSAS ^"^-^d^o JiS^T" 

W. H. GULP & COMPANY 

Quality Flowers Members 

Personal ServioS' F. T, Dc i 

Atchison, Kan. Fiowerst^e 

Leading Florists 
EsUbliahed 1874. 



424 Commercial St 

MEMBKB F, T. D. 



Atchison, Kan. floral co. 



EstabliBbcd 1865. 



Member of F. T, D. 



SALINA, KANSAS 

LEIGHTON FLOI^L CO. 

Members Florists* TelesrraDh Delivery Ass'b 



HIAWATHA, KAN. 

SUSAN MARGRAVE. Florist 



DODGE CITY, KANSAS 

DODGE CITY FLORAL CO. 



Zanesville, 0. 

C. L. HUMPHREY 

Has the best facilities for filling your orders. 
Membo: Florists' Telegraph Delivery 



Sayjt with 

Fl< 



lowers by 
Telegram 



COLUMBUS, OHIO 

s. Hilh St Mission Flower Shoppe 
Columbus, Ohio F^S!f^'n 

THE FRANKLIN PARK FLORAL CO. 
Cut Flowers for Central Ohio 



COLUMBUS. OHIO 

Neil Flower Shop 



ilowers 
•or all 

wcaaiOTJi 



Membe: 
F. T. E> 
Ass'n. 



son. The great wealth of conifers and 
flowering shrubs of the firm have been 
heavily drawn upon. Shade trees also 
are in big demand. 

* • • • 

Peter A. Peterson, Asbury Park, N. 
J., is having a grand rush in planting 
for Memorial day. He also is furnish- 
ing the best hotels here with decorative 

stock. 

* • * • 

M. H. Kruschka, Asbury Park, N. J., 
has his hands full filling contracts for 
summer residents. Mrs. Kruschka has 
charge of the store, which is exceed- 
ingly attractive. 

* • • • 

D. B. Edwards, Edwards Floral Hall, 
Atlantic City, N. J., predicts this sea- 
son to 1)6 one of the best on record. 
Pot roses and hydrangeas are making 
.1 fine showing for Memorial day, while 
crotons and dracanas are freely used 
for decorating purposes by the leading 
hotels. Speaking of dracsenas and the 
splendid stock grown by the Eobert 
Craig Co., Norwood Station, Pa., their 
novelty for 1923, Dracaena tricolor, will 
create a sensation. The combination 
of pink, white and green is highly ef- 
fective. 

* • • • 

William Bryan, Elberon, N. J., and 
•Tohn Bennett, Hillside Greenhouses, At- 
lantic Highlands, N. J., are well pleased 
with the season's prospects, as also are 
members of the long established Wil- 
liam G. Ei.sole establishment, at West 
End, N. .T., where a choice assortment 
of stock may always be scon. 

* • • • 

Memorial day created the usual de- 
mand for cut flowers and blooming 
plants among Albany, N. Y., florists, 
regardless of the sale of paper poppies 
on the streets, which ran into the tens 
of thousands. Mabel Harding, of 
Banker's, arranging some lovely floral 
baskets for special orders, remarked that 



WE LEAD 

Whether for funeral, party or 
home, your order will be artisti- 
cally prepared and delivered by 
that Zip-Zip Service for which 
our beautiful store is famous in 

Columbus, O. 

The Wilson Seed & Floral Co. 

Members of F. T. D. 



TOLEDO. OHIO 

Stock, Workmanship and Service first-class. 
Send us some orders and we will ledprocate. 

HELEN F. PATTEN 

907 Madison Ave. Member F. T. D. 



SUDER'S 

TheToleclo,Ohio, Floriils 

A. A. SUDEK, Proprietor 

2941-3003 CHERRY STREET 



Toledo, Ohio „^S?.?^T^?: 

METZ& BAi'EMAN 22 1 Superior Street 

TOLEDO, OHIO 

-AVERY, FLORIST- 
2601 ColliPgwood Ave. Member F. T. D. 

VAN METER FLOWER SHOP 
L"d*y.Sg SPRINGFIELD,OHIO 

BEST FLOWERS FOR EVERY OCCASION 

WARREN, OHIO 



THE F. T. D 
FLORISTS 

WE GROW 



ADGATE & SON 

OUR FLOWERS 



FREMONT, OHIO 

912 CROGHAN ST. Hr^m Plrkral Cr^ 
Member F. T. D. nom T loral V.^0. 



ALLIANCE, O. 



MEMBER 
F. T. D. 



Woodman's Flower Shoppe 

WE DELIVER IN SEBRING. 



ALLIANCE, O. 

522 S. Freedom Atc. H. T. MILLER 



Member 
F. T. D. 



LORAIN, OHIO ?.T.'S' 

^^"^ F.G.CAREK, Leading Fl<^ 

Our Motto: "Anywhere: Any Time." 



JUNB 1, 1922 



The Florists^ Review 



91 






JThe florists whose cards appear on the pages carrying this head, are prepared to fill o rders 
"""■■^^ from other florists for local delivery on the usual basis. — ——— 




NO ORDER TOO LARGE 



NO ORDER TOO SMALL 



yniT 1-1 T TT^T A XTTV Member F. T. D. 

1006 EUCLID AVENUE 
WE ARE THE LARGEST GROWERS OF CUT FLOWERS IN OHIO 



CLEVELAND, O. 

S923 EUCLID AVENUE 

WESTMAN & GETZ 

FLOWERS and SERVICE 
Members Florists' Telegraph Delivery 



CLEVELAND, OHIO 

Wm. H. Temblett 

FLOWERS 
Member F. T. D. 10313 Euclid Avenue 



CLEVELAND, OHIO 

A. GRAHAM & SON 

5523 EUOJD AVENUE 
Members Florists' Telegraph Delivery Ass'n 



CLEVELAND, 0. 

Megchelsen Flower Shop 

Quality ROSES 

Art 



ialil7 
ft 
Serrics 



1976 E. 105th Sl 



Chillicothe, Ohio 

Brehmer Greenhouse '^'^ '■ ^Tp'^i^elor 

BUCYRUS, OHIO 

Haitie Eddstein The Posie Shoppe 

Melle Bnnkman on thb square 

Upper Sandusky, Ohio 

B. E. CONSTIEN, 



Elyria, Ohio 



AT YOUR 
SgRVICE 

LORAIN 
OHIO 



THE L. C. HECOCK FLORAL CO. 

Member Florirtg' Telegraph Delivery AMoei»M«>- 



MARIETTA, OHIO 

Have onr own M V\CV\i Member 
Greenhouses, ^- MUeJ\ p. T. D. 



ASHTABULA, 0. 

^ ASHTABULA FLORAL CO. 

gniest E. T ong. Mgr. T.S7 MAIN STREET 

AMHERST, OHIO 

SANDSTONE CENTER OF WORLD 
LOUIS J. HENES. Leading Florist 



AKRON, OHIO 

THE HEEPE CO. 

EXCLUSIVE FLORIST 



CANTON, OHIO 

c«5te'fcd.. RAESa & SON 

some charming brides were to change 
their names in June and the prices 
of some of the bouquets were given 
in a whisper. F. H. Kelliher, of Bank- 
er's, secretary of the Albany Florists' 
Club, mentioned that the next meeting 
will be held in the Y. M. C. A. rooms 
in June, when special business will be 
taken up. Fred A. Danker commented 
upon the damage done to conifers last 
winter. He said that large numbers of 
them have the appearance of having 
been blasted, while many show signs of 
having been either partially or totally 
killed. These conditions were noted 
through Long Island and elsewhere. 
E. T. Brown, of the Cottage Gardens 
Co., stated that, while it was true that 
the average temperature had been 
higher throughout the winter, the total 
mortality was greater than when the 
winters had been more severe. 
« • • • 

Charles E. Lenker, Freeport, N. Y., 
follows the custom of many growers in 
planting carnations indoors, claiming 
that better control is possible and that 
checks in replanting arc avoided. A 
fine crop for Memorial day, together 
with a batch of Geranium Bea\ite 
roitovine, swelled the treasury. W. M. 

WASHINGTON, D. C. 



The Market. 

The glut of flowers in the Washington 
market continued last week and the 
wholesalers and growers found it im- 
possible to move even a part of the 
stock that came in. Fortunately, Me- 
morial day helped to use up quantities 
of certain of the flowers. All through 
the week the retailers placed orders for 
peonies, which they placed in cold stor- 
age. On quantity sales the price was 
made at approximately $40 per thou- 
sand, but in small quantities good 
peonies brought $6 to $10 per hundred. 
The local growers have produced some 
good flowers of this variety this year. 

Literally speaking, the outdoor flow- 
ers came into the market in cartloads 
and naturally much of this class of 
stock found its way to the refuse heaps. 
Included in this class of flowers were 



DAYTON, OHIO 




AND VICINITY 



J 



DAYTON. OHIO 

ABBY AVE. GREENHOUSES 

E. E. Schaefer, Prop. 

Wholesale and Retail 

Largest Greenhouses in West Dajrton 



Youngstown, Ohio vkiSy 

SCHMIDT & MEINE 

TWO STORES 

Greenhouses: 3121 Market Street 
Send all Telegrams to Store. 20 W. Federal St. 



DAYTON, OHIO 

J. W. RODGERS 
Member F.T. D.. Elks' Bldg.. 8d and JefFerson Sto 

PORTSMOUTH. OHIO 

0. B. OAKES 
South Central Ohio 0pp. Post Office 



XENIA, OHIO 



Engle Floral Company 



NEWARK AND GRANVIILl 

OHIO 
CHAS. A. DUERR 

Mffntwr FloriatB' Teleerraph Deh«w} 

Kent Brothers ^r^ 

^rmtl"^!«.°^ Newark, Ohio, 



NEWARK, OHIO 

Perry's Flower Shoppe, Cor. 2nd and Qiurch St«. 



Youngstown, 0. ^^ Itre"? 



Hazel 



)lember 
F. T. D. 



RYAN & CULVER 



YOUNGSTOWN, OHIO 



Ci_ 1 CI CL _ GUS CARAVASIOS, Mgr 

entral r lower iMiGp 107 market street 

I 1. (\L' REUANCE SEED CO. 

Ironton, Unio tri-state florists 

MEMBERS F. T. D. 

Southern Ohio Kentucky West Virginia 



92 



The Florists^ Review 



JUNH I. 1921: 





JThe fl ortots whose cards appear on the pages carrying this head, are prepared to fill orders 
"" from other florists lor local delivery on the usual basis. — — — 




DENVER, COLORADO 



MEMBER FLORISTS' TELEGIV\PH 
DELIVERY ASSOCIATION 



PARK FLORAL COMPANY 



DENVER 

The Mauff Floral Co., 



andaU COLORADO 
and WYOBAING 



1225 Logan Street 
Member F. T. D. 



DENVER, COLO., and WYO. 

CENTRAL FLORAL CO. 

936 Fifteenth St. 



MEMBER OF 
F. T. D. 



Open Sundays 
and Evenings. 



A Card This Size 

Costs only $1.85 per Week 
on Yearly Order 

It would keep your name and your specialty 
before the whole trade. 

A half Inch card costs only 62Hic per week on 
yearly order. 



Colorado Springs,Colo. 

ORDERS CAREFULLY EXECUTED 

PIKES PEAK FLORAL CO. 

Wholesale and Retail 
Member noriats' Telegraph Delivery. 



Colorado Springs, Coloc 

F..,^L. V r*.,,,^^ WholMale and Eeti* 
rank r. v.^runip, pionst 

Member Florists' Telejfraph Delivery Ass'n. 



lAnvPY* Bright Spot Greenhouses 
CIl VCl Cor. 5th Ave. & Josephine St 
DOWNING & KASH. Proprietors 



D 



DENVER, COLORADO 

COLUMBINE FLOWER SHOP 



IDA E. DU PONT 



607 15th Street 



THE PUEBLO FLORAL CO. 



?aeblo Member F. T. D. 



623 North Main Stre«i> 



Colorado, New Mexico and Western Kansas 

PUEBLO, COLORADO 

ALPHA FLORAL CO. 

PROMPT DELIVERY FINE STOCK 

FORT COLLINS, COLO. 

ESPELIN FLORAL COMPANY 
Member Florists' Telesraph Delivery AssV 



Greanhowr 



Trinidad, Colo. ^m^tlS. 

THE PARK FLORAL CX). 

Members F. T. D. 



TRINIDAD, COLO. 

Jt> D A D IT" 170 Trinidad Floral Stora 

. I\. lj/iLVl\.£il\ Masonic Baildins 




iztj^rist* IVlinneapolis 

Minnesota 



ANDREWS FLORIST 

HOTEL ANDREWS 

Minneapolis, Minn. 

All orders executed with utmost care. 
Member F. T. D. 



Minneapolis, Minn. 
ADAMS 

^^ FLORIST 
ELEVEN SOUTH EIGHTH STREET 



Mankato Floral Co. 

428 South Front St. 



Mankato, Minn. 

Mankato'8 Leatilng Florist. Twenty-four hour serv- 
ice, including Sundays. Centrally located. 

cut ramlikn- roses, gaillardias, cornflow- 
ors and sweet ■williams. Easter lilies 
are moving slowly, on account of the 
large supply of peonies. Eoses were 
more in demand last week than they 
have been for some time, although 
prices continue to be low from the grow- 
ers ' standpoint. Some fine Eussell and 
Columbia were offered at reasonable 
figures and were well taken. 

A large number of local schools and 
seminaries arc now holding their an- 
nual commencement exercises. These are 
])roductive of a large amount of extra 
iiusiness for the retail establishments 
anil, of course, are reflected in tlie day's 
sales by the growers and the whole- 
salers. Oude Bros. Co. last week fur- 
nished 12.1 shower bouquets made of 
lavender and white sweet peas for the 
National l^ark Seminary and, in addi- 
tion to that large order, furnished many 
corsages which the girls wore following 
graduation. The corsage boufjuets were 
all of fine stock. 

Carnations are still in glut and are 
hard to move on account of the small 
size of the flowers. The price hovers 
.-irriund $.3 and $4 per hundred. Orchids 
and valley are much in demand and the 
supply is only sufficient to take care of 
the orders. Orchids are rather scarce at 
this time and are bringing from $9 to 
$^2 per dozen. Valley sells at $6 to $8 
per iiundred. The commencement exer- 
cises make the sale of these two flowers 
good. There is a huge quantity of sweet 
peas on the market at the present time 
and the quality is good, considering the 
lateness of the season, but there is t»o 



ST. PAUL, MINN. 

THE LARGEST STORE IN AMERICA 

MEMBER F. T. D. ASS'N 

The finest and largest stock west of Chicaso 

Awake night and day looking for orders 

HOLM & OLSON, Inc., w.'sihs' 






rORMUIiY LUMAV COS RORI 




> 



SAINT PAUL 
MINNCSOTA 



Incorporated 

912 Nicol>et Avenue, offers the trade its 
unexcelled facilities for filling orders in 

MINNEAPOLIS 



Mankato, Minn. 

THE WINDMILLER CO. 

Eowers to all points on short notice. 

Member Florists' Telegraph Delivery 



MANKATO, MINN. 

NEIL NEILSEN, Inc. 

Member F. T. D. EXCELLENT SERVICE 

Southern Minnesota. Northern Iowa, 
South Dakota 



ROCHESTER, MINN. 

Rochester Greenhouse Co. 

EMIL RIEPLE, Prop. 

Ro<.'he#ter's only store having its own 

greenhouses. 

Member F. T. D. 



DULUTH FLORAL CO. 

reaTtfe\in,l?ATS Duluth, Minn. 
Northwest. Daily deliveries to SUPERIOR.WIS. 



100,000 FEET 
OF GLASS. 



AUSTIN. MINN. 

A. N. KINSMAN, Inc., 



jUNIi 1, 1922 



The Florists^ Review 



93 





The florUt* whoae cards appear on the pages carrying this head, are prepared to fill orders 
*^^ from other florists for local delivery on the usual basis. 




^FATTI F Hollywood Gardens 

1^ *^ A ^ A A LJ! MLji SEATTLE'S LEADING FLORIST 



Member Florists' Telegraph Delivery Ass'n. 



SEATTLE'S LEADING FLORIST 

1622 Second Avenue 



PORTLAND, ORE. 






,jg^^' 



EsfmUisAed ZOYear^ 

OAKLAND, CAL. 



SEATTLE, WASH. 

Pinehurst Floral Shop 

325 Pine Street 
IMMEDIATE ATTENTION TO ALL ORDERS 



SEATTLE 

CITY FLOWER SHOP 

601 Third Avenue 

Nearest Shop to Docks and Depots 



YOUNG & LESTER 

WallaWalla,Wash. 

Eetablished 1903 

50.000 SQUARE FEET OF GLASS 

MEMBERS F. T. D. 



A Card This Size 

<'<»stK only $1.35 per AVeok 
on Yearly Order 

It would kci'p your name and your «pi'fiiilty 
'"■loie tliH whole tiado. 

A lialf inch raid costs only 62V2C per wt-ik on 
yeaily ordor. 



Yakima, Washington 

STATE FLORAL CO. 

We Grow Our Own Flowers 

Telegraph Orders Blled Promptly and Carefully 
Members F. T. D. Association 



YAKIMA. WASHINGTON 
AxNAVEE Flower Shop, '&"V 

QUALITY FLOWERS Artistic Arransemani 

Me mbers Florista' Telegraph Delivery 

EUGENE University Horisl 

ORF All South and Southwestern 

v-TxlL,, Oregon points quickly reached 



SEATTLE 

1001-1003 Third Avenue 



Finest Floral Studio 
in the Northwest 



'^V^ p. To B. 



PORTLAND M 



MEMBERS OF THE 
F. T. D. 



OREGON 

354 Washington Street 






Retailers 

and Growers 



SPOKANE, WASH. 

ALBERT BURTS 

Palace of Flowers 

907 West Sprague Avenue 

Eatablished 25 years. Send us your order. 



SPOKANE, WASH. 



N 3 Lincoln St 



Cin FLORAL ^'^ 



\J^, 



Salem, Oregon ci:* 



Jem Greenhouses 

F. Breithaupt, Prop. 
IBth AND GARDEN STREETS 
All orde g rer«ive care'ul and pr mpt attention 



(loiiiand and tlie jirice riuiges from $7. .ID 
to $10 j)or thousand, although it' a buyer 
comes along and wants to get a lai-ge 
quantity he can easily do so at $") jier 
thousand. Some fine delphinium is com- 
ing into the market just now :nul is sell- 
ing at about $1 per bunch. 

Various Notes. 

(icorge C. Sliaffcr was seen on the 
boardwalk at Atlantic City last week. 
>ir. Shaffer went to that popular smn 
mer resort to attend tlic convention of 
Masonic clubs. 

Daylight saving in Washington has 
jiroved a failure. Large business houses 
of tlie city, and the department stores 
in particular, have returned to standard 
time. Practically all of them gave the 
local plan of daylight saving a trial for 
one week, but found that for them it 
did not work. The local flower stores 
suffered in common with other specialty 
sho])s. The people diil^ not come out 
early in tlu^ morning fviid at 5 ]). in., the 
closing hour under ttc daylight saving 
plan, the stores were crowded. 

T. N. S. 

Ironton, 0.— The "gold star" moth- 
ers received a beautiful tribute on 
Mothers' day from the Reliance Seed 
Co. Each of the twenty-seven mothers, 
whose names were furnished by the Red 
Cross, received a neatly arranged box 
of cut flowers from this firm. 



California Florist 

TACOMA, WASH. 

Orders for Cut Flowers and Designs delivered 
anywhere in the United States and Canada. 



FOR MONTANA 

STATE NURSERY & SEED CO. 

HELENA. MONT. 

200.000 SQUARE FEET OP GLASS 

At Your Service. Telegraph Orders Solicited. 



CASPER, WYOMING 

CASPER FLORAL CO* 

' We deliver to all of 

Central and Northern Wyoming 
Western Nebraska and South Dakota. 

Members F. T. D. 



BASIN, WYO. 



CUT FLOWERS 



Robin 

BonweU 

BLOOMING PLANTS 



SHERIDAN, WYO. 

SHERIDAN GREENHOUSE CO. . 
Plants and Flow*^ 

BILLINGS, MONTANA 

HOPPER'S GREENHOUSE & NURSERY 
Ornamental Shraba and Bedding Plantt 
Cut Flowers and Desisna. 



BILLINGS, 
MONTANA 

EASTERN MONTANA 
Quality and Serriea 



Billings Floral Co. 

The Leading Florist 

■ - - NORTHERN WYOMING 
2816 1st Avenue N. 



^erJ'for Eastcm and Southern Montana 
to M. LANGOHR, F. T. D. Roria 

BOZEMAN. MONTANA. 

MISSOULA, MONT. 

GARDEN CITY FLORAL CO. 

Largest Growers in Western Montana 




The Florists^ Review 



JUNB 1. 1922 



The llortou whose cards appear on the pages canryliig this head, are prepared to fill or der* 
""■~ from other florists for local delivery on the usual basis. 




S; 



AND VICINITY 



F 



Where F. T. D. Members will 

get the Greatest Satisfaction 



an r ranClSCO Brown & Kennedy 



Member Florists' Telegraph Delivery Association 



3091 Sixteenth Street 



LOS ANGELES, CAL 

REDONDO FLORAL CO. 

218 West Seventh Street 

Members of Florists' Telegraph Delivery 

A. KNOPF A. F. BORDEN 



Los Angeles, CeJif. 

O. C SAAKE. Florist 

WE SOLICIT TELEGRAPH ORDERS 

REGULAR TRADE DISCOUNT 

216 WEST FOURTH STREET 
Member F. T. D. 



Darling's Shop 

"FLOWERS FOR HER" 

J08 West Sixth street, LOS ANGELES. CAL. 

Out flowers or good design work by best artists 
»iid designers delivered anywheie in the west 
911 receipt of mall or telegraph orders. 

Members Floriata' Teletn^ph Delivery Association. 



LOS ANGELES, CAL. 

HOWARD & SMITH 

NINTH AND OLIVE STREETS 

You can depend on us for all orders for 
delivery in this section. 



LOS ANGELES, CAL. 

ATHLETIC CLUB FLORIST 

Formerly California Cut Flower Co. 
433 West 7th Street 

Takes care of telephone and telegraph orders 
over the whole of Southern Oallfornla. 

Usual trade discount. 



LOS ANGELES 

HERBERT BATEMAN. Inc. 
FLORAL ART 

647 South Grand Avenue 



LONG BEACH, CAL. 




RoTAWAfI o''^J3'*A«^ ^>-^ Member 

Ficm^ HOUSE 5£ FLOWERS F. T. D. 



Long Beach, Cal 

ART FLORIST " 



Member 
F. T. D, 



126 Pint 
Ave 



LONG BEACH, CAL. 

Lowe's Flower Shop, ''•*•' ^'""'"dliing Florist 

Member Florlets' Telegraph Dell"''— 



PASADENA, CAL. 

SIEBRECHT'S HOUSE OF FLOWERS 

We are open each Sunday from 6:30 to 1 1 A. M. to attend to Telegraph orders only. 

Our Service is the Best in Pasadena. 

Prompt delivtriea by our two special delivery automobHea. 

HFWDV A QIFRDCrUT T» district representative state of California 
ncaNix I /\. omoiMLV^n i , jr., for florists* telegraph delivery association. 



LOS ANGELES 

SEND YOUR ORDERS TO 

Broadway Florist 



Member F. T. D. 



414 SO. BROADWAY 



Los Angeles, Calif. 

GEO. J. HALL & CO. 

E. J. REYNOLDS, Manager Retail Dept. 

Mail Box 365, Arcade. Wire, Los Angeles. 

Prompt service at Reasonable prices. 



POMONA, CALIF. 

POMONA FLORAL CO. 

283 North Gary Street 

Auto deliverieB daily to Claremont Inn, Mission Inn 

at Riverside and all surrounding towns. 

GOOD WORK AT REASONABLE PRICES. 



POMONA, CALIFORNIA 
POOLEY'S FLOWER SHOP 

Member Florists' Telegraph Delivery 

STEAMER SAILINGS. 

The following sailing list, displayed 
in a conspicuous place in the window or 
store, or used in advertising matter 
with the information that you have fa- 
cilities for filling bon voyage orders on 
short notice, will help you to develop 
steamer trade: 



Stonmer^ From — 

Haycru Nev? York 

Cciitrn. Stnte.New Y'ork 

Montrnlm Montreal 

lyone Star St.. New York 

I'aris New Y'ork 

Canada Montreal 

N. Amst'dam.New York 

Celtic New York 

Zoelnnd New York 

Cnmeronla. . . .New York 

Vand vck New Y'ork 

Olympic New York 

UoussUlon New York 

Maoretanla. . .New York 

Hanover New York 

Minnedosa Montreal 

St. Panl New York 

Samaria New York 

Srotlan Montreal 

Panhandle St. New York 
StaTaDK'ford..Ncw York 



To— Sails 

Hamburg June 1 

Ixinilon June 1 

Liverpool June 2 

Bremen .Tune 3 

Havre June •^ 

Ijverpool June 3 

Rotterdam June 3 

Liverpool June 3 

Antwerp June 3 

OlasRow June 3 

HambuTK June 3 

Sou'mpton ....June 3 

Havre June 6 

Sou'mpton ....Juno 6 

Bremen June 7 

Antwerp .Tune 7 

HamburR June 7 

IJverpool June 7 

GlasKow June 7 

London June 8 

Chrlstianln ...June 9 



Monrovia, Cal. 
C A. BRUNGER 



You can depend on us 
for all orders for de- 
livery in this section. 



239 Grand Avenue 



BERKELEY FLORIST 

(Oldest EsUblished Flower Store in Berkeley) 

23 1 5 Telegraph Ave., Berkeley, Cal. 

R. T. MacDOUGALL. Prop. 
ROTARIAN FLORIST 



BURUNGAME, CAL. 

AND VICINITY 

PETERSON & HAYWOOD 

Wholesalers and Retailers of Flowers and Plants 

Growers of Orchids in all varieties. 

Members F. T. D. 



Hollywood Flower Shop 

HOLLYWOOD, CAL. 
artistic work. member f. t. d. 

Telegraph Orders Delivered to 
LOS ANGELES OCEAN PARK 

SANTA MONICA VBNICB 



PASADENA, CAL. 

342 East Colorado Street 



Member 

of 
f . T. D. 




FLORIST 



PASADENA, CALIF. 

WHITFORD'S. HorUu 

j Member F.T.D. 

343 East Colorado Street 
^ We are the Largest Growers In this city, 



PASADENA. CAL 

ELDRED FLOWER SHOP 

Member Floritti' Teiegnkph D«Uv«ry 



r7f?;,^|^^;c:-^A' ,'. 



yUNB 1, 1922 



The Florists^ Review 



95 






.The flortets whose cards appear on the pages carrying this head, are prepared to fill or ders 
"" -— from other florists for local delivery on the usual basis. 




SAN FRANCISCO F. C. JAEGER & SON, Florins 

AMH ViriMTTV —MASTER FLORISTS— 

AINU VlUlNll I MEMBERS F. T. D. Ml PowcU Street, SAN FRANCISCO, CAUF. 



S 



F 



an rrancisco 

OAKLAND. BERKELEY and Vicinity 



CHAS. C. NAVLET CO. 



THREE STORES:- 



423 and 427 Market Street SAN FRANCISCO. CAUF. 

917 Washington Street OAKLAND. CAUF. 

20 and 22 East San Fernando Street. . . .SAN JOSE. CAUF. 



San Francisco, California 

ALBERT O. STEIN 
Flower Shop 

1160 SUTTER STREET 



San Francisco, Gilifomia 

SHELLGRAIN & RITTER 
148 KEARNY STREET 

Prompt attention given to all 
telegraphic orders 



San Francisco 

DARBEE'S 

1036 Hyde Street 

LARGEST STOCK OF CHOICEST FLOWERS 
Memben Floriita' Telegraph Delivery 



SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

ART FLORAL CO. 

255 Powell Street 
Best attention given your orders 
Members Florists' Telegraph Delivery 



SAN FRANCISCO 

JOSEPH'S 

Member F. T. D. 

233-35 Grant Ave. 
Ste mer and train packages our specialty. 



SAN FRANCISCO 

Podesta & Baldoccki 
224-226 Grant Avenue 
Prompt and careful atteotlon to orderi from 
'9atK>f.town florista. 

Member F. T. D. 



Santa Barbara, Cal. 

912 STATE STREET 

GLEAVE'S FLOWER SHOP 

ARTHUR GLEAVE, Prop. 
Choicest Cut Flowers and Floral DeelgnB 
on short notice. 
Both Phones 1(113 



OGDEN 

UTAH 



DATTDHAn PCMTTD FOR intermountain shipping 

IxAlLIxUAU LEilNlI!<I\ Ogden's Largest and I'^nest Store 
ONLY GROWERS UNDER GLASS WITH DOWNTOWN STORE. 

'LOWERS DUMKE 

RESH Member F.T.D. FLORAL 

ROM THE GREENHOUSES. CO.. Inc. 



OJ 

Fl 
J 



9ATT T AKT riTV SWp whole of UTAH, central part 
Dl\Ltl Lit\L\Li Vxll 1 of NEVADA and IDAHO 

MILLER FLORAL CO., 10 East Broadway 



260,000 SQ. ft. of modern glass. 



MEMBER P. T. D. 
Unexcelled facilities. Prompt and courteous service always. 



SANTA ANA, CAUF. 

Personal attention given your orders 

MORRIS, the Rorist 

Member F.T.D. 630 N. MAIN STREET 



SAN DIEGO, CAL. 

BOYLE & DARNAUD 

F. T. D. Florists. We grow our own flowers. 
Telegraph orders carefully executed. 

Usual discount. 

Members Florists' Telegrraph Delivery. 



Steamer — From — 

Oroppsn New York 

(;. Wasli'gton.Ncw York 

Rrpina Montreal 

lirottn'>rliolm..N<'w York 
Sonndlnavlan . .Montreal 
I,n f ii ye t to . . . . Ne w York 

Nooidnm New York 

JUltir New Y'ork 

Algcrin New Y'ork 

Homeric New York 

Albania Montreal 

K roon 1 .1 nd .... New York 
Knip, of France. .Quebec 

Aquitania New York 

La Touraine. .New York 

Itoliancp New York 

Carniania New YorE 

Ilansa New York 

Haverford Boston 

Montrose Montreal 

Andania Montreal 

Rotterdam New York 

Krnnre New York 

Majestic New York 

Tjipland New York 

Oironla New York 

Cedric New York 

Hudson New York 

Mecantlc Montreal 

Tnnisian Montreal 

Old N. State.. New York 
Kochambeau ..New York 
Herengaria ...New York 

.Melita Montreal 

Yorck New York 

Mongolia New York 

Scythia New York 

Montreal Montreal 



To — Sails 

Hamburg June 9 

lirenicn Mine 10 

T^iverpool June 10 

Christiania . . .June 10 

Antwerp June 10 

Havre June 10 

Rottordntii . . . .June 10 

Liverpool Jiuie 10 

(Ilasgow June 10 

Sou'nipton ....June 10 

Liverpool .lune 10 

Antwerp June 10 

Sou'nipton . . . .Juno 1.'! 
Sou'nipton . . . .June l;{ 

Havre June 13 

Hamburg June 1.3 

Liverpo(d June 14 

Hamburg June 15 

Liverpool June 15 

Liverpool June 10 

London June 17 

Rotterdam June 17 

Havre June 17 

.''ou'nipton . . . .June 17 

Antwerp .lune 17 

Hamburg June 17 

Liverpool June 17 

lirenieu .Tune 17 

Liverpool June 17 

(Ilasgow June 17 

rx)ndon June 17 

Havre June 20 

Sou'mpton June 20 

Antwerp June 21 

Bremen June 21 

Hamburg June 21 

Liverpool June 21 

Naples June 22 



Salt Lake City, Utah 

ERNEST LAMBOURNE, Florist 

MEMBER F. T. D. 

67 South Main Street 



Oakland, Calif. 

AND THE BAY CITIES 

Thorsted Floral Co., 1438 Broadway 

Member Florists' Telefrraph Delivery Association 



OAKLAND, CAL. 

HOGAN & EVERS 
1439 Broadway 

THE BEST SERVICE 



A Card This Size 

Costs only $1.86 per Week 
on Yearly Order 

It would keep your naino and your specialty 
before the whole trade. 

A half-inch card costs only 62'ac per week on 
yearly order. 



SAN FRANCISCO 



252 
Mason Street 



Suzanne Roral Company 



ARTISTIC FLORAL CO 

"^A^n^e*^" OGDEN, UTAH 



Floral Work 
The Beat 



L. B. Wegtholder, Mgr. 



Geo. T. O'Keefe, Aest. 



96 The Florists^ Review 



JUNB 1, 192-.' 



READY NOW 

We Can Ship on Receipt of Order 

The Review is able to announce that it NOW is in position 
to make immediate shipment of 

BAILEY'S STANDARD 

Cyclopedia of Horticulture 

at a new low price. The last printing was sold out at $48.00 
the set of 6 volumes — a very reasonable price considering 
war-time costs of printing. Now a new printing has been 
made and the publishers authorize The Review to give its 
readers the benefit of the saving made in present competitive 
conditions in the book-making trades in the East. This means 
a new price of $40.00 per set for the Cyclopedia— a saving 
of $8.00 per set. 

Send Your Orders Now — Delivery by First Express, Prepaid 

REMEMBER— BAILEY'S Standard Cyclopedia of 
Horticulture is in 6 large volumes, over 3,000 pages. It 
is authority in all matters of plant names and spellings. Besides 
the purely botanical matter one would expect to find in such 
a work, there are many hundreds of cultural articles, chapters 
on insects, diseases, remedies, etc.— a veritable horticultural 
library, all carefully and completely indexed. 



f^; 



508 S. Dearborn Street VJ'if'rS^C'^^ , CHICAGO, ILLINOIS 



^i^B¥ 



Florists' Publishing Co., 
508 So. Dearborn St., 
Chicago, 111. 

Enclosed is my check for $40.00, for which please send me, express prepaid, a set of 
Bailey's Standard Cyclopedia op Horticulture, new printing. 



Name- 



Street No. 



City \ State- 
To get ibformation about the monthly payment 
plan, put a mark hereQ and mail the coupon. 



"^■^"T,":* ^ 



June 1, 1022 



The Florists^ Review 



97 



JOHN KRUCHTEN 



HENRY KRUCHTEN 



JOHN KRUCHTEN CO. 



^NOT INCORPORATED) 



Wholesale Florists ^o ^ast Randoip*. stre^^^ CHICAGO, ILL. 



L. D. Phone, Central 8016-8017-8018 



Wholesale Cut Flower Prices. 

Chicago, May 31, 1922. 
Per 100 

c luiiiiiift $ 4.o<) m $ao.oo 

Ml- UilssoU 4.U0 C(«! 2."i.0<) 

i'niiii.T 4.00 U 25.00 

Miladv 4.00 m 2r..00 

(■ , iwador 4.00 m 2.-..()0 

Hill IciH.v 4.00 fii 20.00 

Moiitnise 4.00 (ii 18.00 

Smilmrst 4.00 fuj 18.00 

()|,li,.lia 4.00 ^0 18,00 

Ih.iil.le White Killarney 4.00 S«! 18. 00 

Neshit 3.00 

(Viili' Brimner 2.00® :{.00 

Valley «.00 

Cii [nations 2.00® li.Od 

Carnatioiis, Mrs. Ward 4.00 

('.irnatioiiB, Ijiddie 0.00® 8.00 

(iladioli 6.00 fij 10.00 

Cladioli, indoor 10.00® 15.00 

.><\v((t Peas 50 ® 2.00 

(alfiidulas 3.00® 4.00 

Easter Lilies, doz $1.50@$2.50 

Callas, doz 1.50® 2.00 

Snapdragons, doz 75® 2.00 

I,\iliim>a, doz 75® 1.00 

lattleyas, each 1.00® 1.50 

Feverfew, bunch . . . .35® .50 
('!iiid.\ tuft, bunch ... .35® .50 

St. rx)uis. May 30, 1922. 
Per doz. 

Iteautv, Specials $ 5.00 ® $ fi.OO 

lUauty, Extra 3.00 ® 4.00 

Per 100 

I'remier $ 6.00 ® $20.00 

Columliia 0.00 ® 15.00 

While Killarney 6.00® 12.00 

Killarney (i.OO ® 10.00 

Ward 0.00® 8.00 

Milady and Ophelia 5.00® 15.00 

Russell 6.00 & 20.00 

Butterfly 8.00 ® 15.00 

Carnations 2.00® 3.(K) 

Kaster Lilies 0.00 ® 8.00 

Snapilragous 4.(K) r<(! 0.(10 

Daisies 1.00® 2.00 

Valley 4.00 ® 6.00 

Sweet Peas 50 ® 1.00 

Tulips 3.00 ® 4.00 

Peonies 4.00 (d 5.00 

(Iladioli 8.00 ((() 10.00 

I'ape .Jasmines 1.00® 2.00 

Orchids, per doz. .$18.00@$24.00 

Milwaukee, May 30, 1922. 
Per 100 

Premier $10.00 ® $.30.00 

C.lnniliia 8.00® 25.00 

I'.iilteillv 8.00 ® 20.00 

White killarney 10.00® 18.00 

Ophelia 8.00® 20.(10 

Mrs. Ward 0.00® 12.00 

• aruatious, fancy stock 0.00® 8.00 

Vallev '. 4.00 ® 0.00 

fMh'iirtnlas 4.00 ® 6.00 

Sweet Peas 1.00® 3.00 

Koi-'ct-ine nots 1.50® 2.00 

• attleyas 150.00 ® 200.00 

Ilaisies 1.50® 4.00 

"Mllas, per doz $2.00®$2.50 

Su ipdrajjons, per doz. .75® 1..50 

CiMdioli, per doz 1..50® 2.00 

Ijirkspur, per doz 1.50® 2.00 



Philadelphia, May 30, 1922. 
Per 100 

'•'■■(Illy, lontr $40.0(» Oi 

"'issell, Ilailley. Ions 20.00® 

"isseii, Iladley, short 0.00® 

I'leinier, Columliia, loUB 10.00® 

I'reinier. Columhia, short 4.00 ® 

D'Uhle White Killarnev 4.00® 

I'ltterfly, Ophelia, long 10.00® 

I'.iiderfly. Ophelia, short 4.00 ® 

'■'li-'rim 4.(K) ® 

'-'•■ler Lilies 15.00 ® 

' (irnations. Laddie 

''inialions, select 4.00® 

'':(rtiations, ordinary 2.00® 

"'■iphinlum 12.50 ® 

';'"lioli 10.00 ® 

''conies, select 8.00 ® 

■'conies, ordinary 5.00® 

' aitleyas lOO.(X) ® 

'.•'"•18 10.00 ® 

Mveet Peas ,-,0 ® 

^•lapdragons, ordinary 4.00 ® 

'iniflowers 75 @ 

"^'^ 4.00 ® 



$75.00 

25.(10 

10.00 

15.00 

8.00 

10.00 

12.00 

0.00 

12.00 

20.00 

8.00 

6.00 

3.00 

25.00 

12..50 

10.00 

6.00 

125.00 

15.00 

1.00 

8.00 

1.00 

0.00 



Henry Kusik & Company 

The oldest and most reliable 
wholesale house 

Largest Shippers of Fresh Cut 
Flowers at Kansas City 

Florist Supplies 

Manufacturers of Wire Designs 
1018 McGee Street 

KANSAS CITY, MO. 



THB 

SECURITY STAPLE 

The simplest and best 
device on the market for 
securely fastening cut 
flowers, sprays and de- 
signs. 

$1.75 per box of SCO 

For sale by your supply 
house or sent direct by 

rRANKJ.YEnER,rieritt 
226 Main St., GREENFIELD, MASS. 




OMf 



REFRIGERATORS for all purposes 

Send for Catalogue 

McCray Ref rif erator Co.. 2288 LakeSt. , KeBdallriUe, Ind. I 



PERC Y JO NES 

WHOUSAlf coMMiasioN FLORISTS 

30 East Randolph Street, 
CHICAGO 



Mention The RcTlew when yon writ>. 

GEO. REINBERG 

S±"5 Cut Flowers 

.Milady, Columbia, Sunburst, OpheUa, White 
Killarney and RusseU 

30 E. Randolph St., CHICAGO, ILL. 

FLORISTS' SUPPLY HOUSE 

Hartje & Elder, Props. 
FLORISTS' SUPPUES 

Wholesale Commission Florists 

229 N. Delaware Street 
Indianapolis, Ind. 

♦♦:••:•♦>♦•:••>•:•♦:•♦:••:«:••:••:••:••>♦:••:":••:• •:•♦>.:«:"> 
Z GLOEKLER FLOWER I 
t REFRIGERATORS | 

,X, Send at once for catalogue F, illustrating *t* 
••• and describing flower homes. ,J« 

:^ BERNARD GLOEKLER CO.. rittsbiirgh,ra. | 




Write for Catalogue 

BUCHBINDER BROS. 

11 S. La Salle St., CHICAGO 



Mention The Review when yon write. 



ECOME A 





Dignified, Exclusive 
Profession not overrun 
.-'with competitors. 
Crowded with opportun- 
ity for money-making and 
big fees. $5,000 to $10,000 in- 
comes attained by experts. Easy 
to master under our correspondence methods. 
Diploma awarded. We assist students and grad- 
uates In getting started and developing their 
businesses. Established 1916. Write for Infor- 
mation; It win open your eyes. Do It today. 
Amcricaa Landacapc School. 18 K. Newark. New York 



miRONOUNCING 
LH DICTIONARY 



A list of PLANT NAMES and the Botanical 
Terms most frequently met with in articles 
on trade topics, with the correct pronun- 
ciation of each. 

Sent postpaid on receipt of 25c 

FLORISTS* PUBLISHING CO. 
608 So. Dearborn St., Chicago 



GET OUR ESTIMATES ON 

REFRIGERATORS 

AND STORE FIXTURES 

A. L. RANDALL CO. 

ISO N. Waba«h Ave., CHICAGO, ILL. 



Mention The Review when yon write. 



HARRISON 1848-1849-1850 

REFRIGERATORS 

and Complete Fixtures 

Union Insulating & Conttinction Co. 

Specialized Coutmction in Refrif enting Imlaitriei 
GREAT NORTHERN BUILDING. CHICAGO 



b;y-. 



98 



The Florists^ Review 



June 1. 102-J 



Holton & Hunkel Co. 

47 1 Mil^vatikee Street Milwaukee, Wis. 



Growers and Shippers of 

CUT FLOWERS 

GREENS and 

PLANTS 



Wholesale Cut Flower Prices. 

Pittsburgh, May 31, 1922. 

Per 100 

Benutk'S $12.00 @ $75.00 

Hiissell, lonu 20.00 

Uussoll, tihort 8.00® 15.00 

(Columbia, I'reniier, loiiir 15.00 @ 20.00 

(•olumbia, Piemipr, sluirt 8.00® 10.00 

Ophelia, Ions 15.00 

Ophelia, short 8.00® 10.00 

Double White Killariiev G.OO ® 15.00 

Uichmond 0.00 ® 15.00 

Crusader 10.00 ® 25.00 

rarnulions 4.00 ® 8.00 

Kaster I..ilie.>< 15.00 @ 20.00 

Valle.v G.OO ® 8.00 

Orchids 60.00 @ 100.00 

(Jladioli <i.00 ® 20.00 

Iris 3.00® 8.00 

Yellow Daisies 3.00 

Calendulas, bunch $0.25 

Callus, doz 2. CIO 

l<o>l.iu. .M;iy IIO, 1922. 

Per 100 

Proniicr $ 2,00 ® $12.00 

ColMnibiu 2.00 Oii 12. (K) 

IMltrriiu 2.00 ® 10.00 

Double White Killarney 2.00 @ 8.00 

Francis Scott Key, Kadlance... 3.00 @ 16.00 

Mme. Butterfly 2.00® 10.00 

Milady, Mock 2.00® 8.00 

KillariLcv i.Oitdi' S.OO 

Willi.- Killiirtic\ l.(Hl r.i SOU 

Killarney Krilliant 2.00 @ 8.00 

Mrs. Aaron Ward 2.00® 12.00 

liiidley M.lHt f<U IC.Od 

t)plii'liii 1.00 r<() S.Od 

Oattleyas 50.00 ® 76.00 

Sweet Peas 50 @ 2.00 

Gardeiii.-is 10.00 ® 25.00 

i:;istcr lA\ifs tJ.OO Oi S.OO 

(■;iniiitioiiv i;.(IO (,i 4.«HI 

Sii:ip(lnit,"Hi> 4. (HI (ii (i.Od 

Ciillas «.(H) (II S.OO 

Maif-'iicrilcs ."lO (jij 2.(10 

(Gladioli, hirt'c Him-, iloz $1 ..">0 

Gypsophila. buncli 50 

Itiiir.il.p, .\Ia,v ;!(l, 1!»L'2. 
Per 100 

Coluniliiu $ 6.00 ® $25.00 

Premier G.OO ® 15.00 

Double White Kiil.iiiu'V HMO (d 12.00 

MiliKiy (i.OO @ 18.00 

Crusader 6.00 ® 15.00 

Maryland 3.00® 10.00 

Kussell 0.00® 10.00 

Ophelia 4.00® 12.00 

Sunburst 5.00 ® 12.0(1 

Cccile Hriiiiner 3.00® 4.00 

("alias 10.00® 20.00 

Hubruin I>ilies 6.00 ® 10.00 

SuapdriiKoiis 4.00 ® 12.00 

Calcndul.is 4.00 ® (!.(10 

Minniiuelte 3.(X) ® 5.00 

Easter I,ilies 15.00 ® 20.00 

Carnations 3.00® 5.00 

Sweet Peas 1 .00 ® 2.00 

Daisies 1.00 ® 2.00 

(;ladi(.li 10.00 ® 12.00 

Brockton, Mass. — 1'. \V. .lohiison will 
enter tlie tnide in the near future. Mr. 
Johnson has jmrcli.nsed two acres of 
land ;nid lias also liej^iin work on the 
ereetion of a ii;r(>ciiliouse. 



SAVE MONEY ON SUPPLIES 

II UV IKOM 

Florists' Co-operative 
Supply House 

363 W. Superior St. CHICAGO, ILL. 

Iliive yi)ii our iiitcst ratalocd*''.' 



Mention The Kevlew when yon write. 



C.A.KUEHN 



WHOLt.S\t f 



Florist 



FLORISTS' SUPPLIES 



I 



1312 PINE ST. ST. LOUIS, MO. 



J 



GUST. RUSCH & CO. 

Wholesale Cut Flowers and Supplies 

Headquarters of the Cudahy Roses 
and Other Seasonable Novelties 

p. O. BOX 676 

444.446 Milwaukee St. MILWAUKEE, WIS. 



Mention I'he ReTlew wbea you WTlt« 



c 


ut Flowers Greens 


Supplies 




Everything a Florist Needs 






CINCINNATI CUT FLOWER EXCHANGE b 


Wholesale Commission Florists 14 E. Third St., Cincinnati, Ohio J 



P^%^^H^^ for FRESH, ARTIFICIAL and DRIED HA 
U Y r ^fc FLOWERS, Mosses, Ferns, Roping, hllP 

m^ m Hhi^^ Baskets, etc., all shades, in packages at... ^^^ 
Special Prices in quantities, or in 1 to S-lb. tins. PREPAID 

AUO lUNUFACTURING CO., 101 Betlaniii Street, NEW YORK CITY 






A. W. GUMZ 

WHOLESALE FLORAL CO. 

Cut flowers a Specialty 

1314 Pine St., St. Louis, Mo. 

Both lonK distance Telephones 


Three Good Colors 


We now have a Blue and Deep Pink dye that 
are fit companiona to our famous Yellow. The 
blue is as blue by artificial ll^ht as by day. Peas, 
Ko8C8, Carnations, Tulipa, Paper Whites, Free- 
Hlas, LarkHpurH, SlinHta DalHieg, and almost any 
flowers take these dyes freely. 

Six pkgs^-'-^'^C^^i.orted $5.00 

1 pkg $1.00 

Western customers may order from the Colo- 
rado Seed Co., of Denver. 

McClenahan Greenhouses 

40th and Phillips St*., Oklahoma City, Okla. 


Wm C. Smith Wholesale Flortl C& 

WHOLESALE 

FLORISTS 

1316 Pine Street ST. LOUIS 

(Both L. D. rtmes) 
Snpptir « and E^erytliiBc in Srawo Alway« on Htmi 




Cut Flowers 

OUR SPECIALTY 

H. G. BERNING 

1402-4 Pine St., St. Louis, Mo. 


"SmiUng Service" 

WINDI .FR 

Wholesale Floral Co. 

1310 Pine St. ST. LOUIS, MO. 


GOLDFISH THE BREEDER 

107 Acres of Ponds this Season 

Write for Big, New Oatalogne 

Globes, Aquariums, Aqnarinm Sapplies, Etc 
PUTNAM'S FISHERIES 

8 DiTisiMi. Offic*. M2 Wathnctoa St., Baliak. N.T. 


RICE BROTHERS 

Wholesale Florists and Supplies 

MINNEAPOLIS, MINN. 

SEND LIST FOR QUOTATIONS 


Ashborne Goldfish & Supply Co. 

BURLINGTON, IOWA 

GOLDFISH and CANARIES 

Fish Globes, Aniiariunis, Fish Food. Anu.ir- 
iuniOrnanients, Hint CaKPSiind Bird Supplies 


The Regan Printing House 

Large Runs of 

CATALOG! JFS 

Our Specialty— Get Our Figures 
531 S37 Plymouth PI., CHICAGO 



June 1, 1922 



The Florists' Review 



99 



FRANK H. TRAENDLY 



CHARLES SCHENCK 



Traendly & Schenck 

Wholesale Florists and Cut Flower Exchange 

436 6th Avenue, between 26th and 27th Streets, NEW YORK 



Phones 797, 798 and 799 Farragut 



CONSIGNMENTS SOLICITED 



N. Y. Florists' Supply Co., Inc. 

103 West 28th Street, NEW YORK CITY 

Wholesale and Retail Dealers in all kinds of 

EVERGREENS ^^s% FLORISTS' SUPPUES 

Telephones 2144-2145-2146 Farragut 



1922— EstabUshed-1887 

J. K. Allen, New York 

Commission DeMer in Cut Flowers 

At the main entrance of the Great Wholesale Pn.A« PavnafiAn* 
Flower Market, 43 West 18th St., solicits *VOSeS, VamanonS, 
Vallpv (Irrhiflc ^^^^ facilities for handling. Highest prices. 
» aiicjr, \/ruuu9. auick returns, prompt payments. 

Telephone, Watkins 0167 and 305S 



$1.25 



Seventh Edition 



$1.25 



Album of Designs 



$1.25 



Better Than Ever 



$1.25 



Something Needed By 
Every Florist 

APRONS 

LARGE SIZE 

Aproni made af Black Rubber, medium 
weight. 
Let U8 send you one for a trial. 

Price, $2.00 each. 

Avel«l Gettliig Wet. 

Pittsburgh Cut Flower Co. 

116 Sereatk Street, PITTSBURGH, PA. 



Mention Thp Rpview when yon write. 



Burlington Willow Ware Shops 

Makers of 

Worth Whfle Will-0-Wue 

Baskets for particular Florists 
BURLINGTON, IOWA 



PATRICIAN CANDLES 

-AND 

CANDLESTICKS 

WILLIAM T. USINGER 
Century Bidg., Pittsburgh, Pa. 



CHARLES N.COTTER CO., Inc. 

WHOLESALE DEALERS 

Floricultural and Agricultural 

Products and Supplies 

JAMESTOWN, NEW YORK 



J. E. KOPPELMAN 

Wholmtal* and Commission 

FLORIST 

26 Custom House Street 
PROVIDENCE, R. L 



WESTERN FLORISTS 

can depend on getting prompt service 
on rush orders from 

COLORADO SEED CO. 

FLORISTS' SUPPLY DEPT. 
1S18 Champa St- DENVER. COLO. 



A HALf-JNCn ADVERTISEMENT 

here will keep your name and specialty 
before the whole trade, at a cost of 
only 62'flc per week on a yearly order. 



CHAS. FUTTERMAN 

Wholesale Florist 

1 10 W. 28th St. NEW YORK 

Phone: WatUna 4675 

Consignments Solicited 

RETURNS DAILY CHECKS WEEKTT 

NO CONNECTION WITH ANT OTHEB FIBM 



Mention The HeTJew when you write. 

Wholesale Cut Flower Prices. 

New York, May i;9, 1921.'. 

Per 100 
I?eniity, Specials $15.00 gj $40.00 



Beauty, Fancy 10.00 

Beauty, Extra 8.00 ® 

Beauty, No. 1 5.00 @ 

Beauty, No. 2 3.00 © 

inidicv (.(HI (,i 

Uu8sell 6.00 @ 

Fnmcis Scott Key 10.00 ftj 

rrcinicr L'.OO ^ 

.Xiiicriciin LcKiou -.0(1 (ir 

i'vinr.i Ddiinii L'.(MI Ov 



Wliilc Killaiiic 
Mis. .\aniTi Wanl.. 

Ophcliii 

('nliiitit)ia 

Simliiirst 

(Ii-iliiils Cattli'VMs 
I-ilics (if the Vallev. 

Lilies 

(aniations 



2.00 (■«' 

2.00 (<li 

2.IKI <(, 

l.."i() (II 

l.."iO (II 

.•{."..(Ml (II 

.."ill (il 

10.(HI (,i 

2.00 (it) 



15.00 

10.00 

8.00 

5.00 

2(1. (Ml 

20.00 

40.00 

15.00 

1(1.(1(1 

.S.IMl 

S.(M1 

«.(l(l 

S.(MI 

S.IMl 

S.IKI 

lIMI.dO 

1.00 

12.(M) 

4.00 



.\iiiiTican 

Coliiinliia, 

('iiliiinlii.'i, 

I'reinicr, 

I'reinier, 

Ophelia. 

Opiielia, 

r.iitterllv, 



t levilaiid, May ".1. 1!I22. 

Per 100 

Heaiilv $ S.IHI r,( >;l.-,(l.(M) 

short 4.00 (ii 15.00 

Iduk 25.0(1 

short 4.00 @ 15.00 

Ions 25.00 

short 4.00 @ 12.00 

louK 25.00 

<hort 4.00 (ii 1 2.(M( 

Itiilterdy, lonK 15.00 (Jil 25.0(1 

Siiulmrst 4.00 67) 15.n(» 

.Xinerican IjeKion 8.00(3 15.00 

White Kill.iriiev 4.00 (ji! 15.00 

Wai-d 3.00 di 8.0(1 

I'ilirrini ,S.00 (fi) 15.00 

While Ophelia 8.00 (ii! 25.00 

Cecile Brniiner 2.00 (ill 4.00 

C.i Ilia I ions .i 2.(M> ro s.(MI 

Valley .3.00 fti) 6.0(1 

('Mlciiiliilas ;i.(io di' l.(Mi 

Sui-it I'eas 75 61 l.(MI 

I'aisics 2.00 (it 3. (Ml 

.^iiapdi-.-ii-'ons 4.m Cii' 10. (Ml 

.MiL'jiniiette 3.(M> ftr 4. (Ml 

I'i'oiiies (i.(M) (,i S.OO 

i;asl|.i- Lilies, doz .*l..">0r(i$2.0O 

Cilla-^. iloz I.."i(iC(( 2. (Ml 

I.iipiijcs, hiini'li 5(if(( I.IIO 



It Pays U Buy Direct frim the Grewer 

I Cut Flowers 

THE ELITCH GARDENS CO. 

Wholesale Floritti, DENVER, COLORADO 



>fentlnn The Review when you write. 



FRED C. MEYER 

Wholesale Grower and Shipper 

of Cut Flowers 

1720 ROSEMARY STREET, 

DENVER, COLORADO 



Don't Forget It 

Confidence is a firm's best asset 
and it certainly applies to our business 
in a very large degree. 

We can say, however, without fear 
of contradiction, that no one has ever 
felt that their confidence was mis- 
placed when they consigned their 
flowers to us. Consign that next 
shipment to us and acquaint your- 
self with our service. 

Special opportunity for a couple of 
good Rose Growers who are looking 
for best returns. Our present demand 
is greater than our supply. 

United Cut Flower Co., Inc. 

1 1 1 WEST 28Ui STREET. NEW YORK CITY 

Mention The Review when you writ.. 



M. C. FORD 

Wholesale Florist 

American Beauties and Carnations 

31 to 43 W. 18th St, NEW YORK CITT 

Teleplione 3870 Watkins 



I. GOLDSTEIN 

Wholesale Florist 

n to 43 W. 18th St., NEW YORK CITT 

Telephone Chelsea 6925 

iffi tke exact center of the Wholesale Cut Floweg 

lection. Prompt and careful attention to your interestSr 

CONSIGNMENTS SOUCITED 



Florists' Supplies, Baskets, 
Willow Ware and Sundries 

Toara for Stnicm 

S. HANFLING CO. 

131-133 W. 28th St., NEW YORK 



UNITED STATES 
CUT FLOWER CO. 

Wholesale Growers 
ELMIRA, NEW YORK 



ORCHIDS, GARDENIAS, £tc. 

PAUL MECONI,WkebMleFl.ri>t. NEWYOKJL 

UI«94oiiM N« 3W ^T^ S3C VLmL Sq. %1 W JMt St 



100 



The Florists^ Review 



June 1. 1922 



WE HAVE THEM! YOU WANT THEM! 

Extra fine lot of LONG DAGGER FERNS, $2.00 per 1000. None better. 



Bronze and Green 

GALAX, $1.25 per 1000 

strictly Fresh and No. 1 Southern 

SMI LAX, $8.00 50-lb. cases 



Try one case and yon will use more. 




Laarel Featoonine. Fresh stock supplied 
on short notice; use It for your weddingrs and 
other similar decorations; nothing better. 

Sphaxrnam Moaa, $5.00 per largre bale. 

Oroand Pine, 12c per lb. 

Branch Laarel, large bundles, SOc. 

Hemlock, large bundles, $1.00. 



Post Office and 

L. D. Phone Address: 



MILLINGTON, MASS. 



Telegraph Address: 

NEW SALEM, MASS. 



SEATTLE NOTES. 

(Concluik'd from paKe til.) 

evening F. A. Allen was also host to 
a large party at his home and a num- 
ber of florists were included among 
those present. 

Felix Kosaia has been moving large 
quantities of tulips through special 
window displays, lie reports continued 
good results in the sale of potted ge- 
raniums and other seasonable offerings. 

Kecent visitors included Mr. King, 
manager of the Butte Floral Co., of 
Butte, Mont., and G. Gagnon, of the 
Gagnon Sweet Shop, at Aberdeen, 
Wash., the first of the northwestern 
candy stores to take up the handling of 
flowers. 

McCoy's has had several large fu- 
neral commissions of late. 

The Pinehurst Floral Shop advises 
that the better weather has drawn more 
shoppers downtown and heljicd smaller 
transient sales to ;i notable degree, with 
stock plentiful. Funeral work has been 
ahead of the average. 

The Capitol Hill Floral Co. has been 
moving all the early peonies it could 
secure, and has practically cleaned up 
the supply of several of the local grow- 
ers. 

Kenney's developed an attractive 
window background for showing its 
flowers through the use of llowering 
dogwood, the bright blooms standing 
out to advantage against this green and 
white background. 

Irving Harris, of the Bon Marche 
Flower Shop, has been enjoying the 
best business since ojiening his shop 
during the last two or three weeks, and 
has been moving considerable summer 
stock. 

The Orpheum Floral Co. continues to 
feature its combination boxes of flower- 
ing plants in colorful combinations, 
with good results. Tulips have been in 
heavy snpjdy and special efforts have 
been made to keep this stock moving. 

II. M. 

Bemidji, Minn. — .V bad five recently 
destroyed the stock of bedding plant.? 
of A. E. Webster. Mr. Webster is 
the proprietor of the Bemidji Green- 
hous(> and Florist. 

Coming, N. Y. — Spiros Condos, who 
conducted the flower shop at 8 West 
Market street for several years, has sold 
his interest in the shop to James Massa- 
don and Harry Maragus, of Hornell, 
N. Y. The new owners took possession 
of the shop May 11 and expect to con- 
duct it here in connection with their 
Hornell shop. Mr. Condos has no defi- 
nite plans for the future. 



HART BRAND— Wire Hanging Baskets 

The most practical and best made Hanging Baskets oa the market. Order new for future 
delivery and save any possible delay. We will ship promptly when needed. 



PLAIN TOP 

10-inch $2.60 per doz., $18.00 per 100 

12-inch S.OOperdoz., 20.00 per 100 

14-inch 4.00 per doz., 25.0« per 100 

16-inch S.OOperdoz., 37.50 per 100 

18-inch 6.75 per doz., 60.00 per 100 



GEORGE B. HART, 

47-55 Stone Street, ROCHESTER, N. Y 



SCROLL OR ROLL TOP 

10-inch S3.26 per doz., $21.00 per 100 

12-inch 8.75 per doz., 25.00 per 100 

14-inch 4.75 per doz., 83.00 per 100 

16-inch 6.00 per doz., 40.00 per lOO 

18-inch 7.50 per doz., 66.00 per 100 

Nanufacturer, Dealer and Importer 
FLORISTS' SUPPLIES 



Mention The Review when you write. 







NEW CROP FERNS 

DAGGER FERNS, 

$2.00 per 1000. 

FANCY FERNS, 

$2.50 per 1000. 

SUMMER FANCY FERNS, 

$1.75 per 1000. 
HUCKLEBERRY FOLIAGE, 

$2.50 per case. 
Prompt Shipment 

Caldwell the Woodsman Co. 

Evergreen, Ala. 


HANGING 
BASKETS 

Enameled Green 
Extra well made. 

8-inch $1 .65 uer doz. 


lO-inch 1.90 per doz. 

12-iiich 2.25 oer doz. 


14-inch 2.75 Der doz. 


16-inch 3.75 per doz. 


Mention The Review when you write. 


18-mcD 5.00 per doz. 

GREEN MOSS 

Fancy sheet. 3-bu. sack, well filled. 
XXX Quality, 

$1.50 PER SACK 
10 SACKS @ $1.36 

Pittsburgh Cut FUwer Cf. 

116-118 Seventk St., PITTSBURGH, PA. 




PREPARED BRONZE GALAX 

MagBolia, Short Oak for Wreaths 

Other items. Catalogue. 

W. M. WOODRUFF'S SON & CO. 

LOWGAP, N. C. 


Mention The Review when you write. 


l"'ri « . KIRCHEN & GIFFORD 


Hariiard, Mich. *^»»».vii»-ii ut Ult A MiXKf 


Mention The Review when you write. 


Oak and MANUFACTURERS 




cJcMLelye! ^atUFal 

plin't'd R»cas Prcservcd Filiages 

Tinted Rnscn* 

Lycopodin. 222 W. Nadisin St., CHICAGO 


Florists' Stationery 

PricM qooted ar* far WhiU ■uunannlU Boad, 
prlDted In black ar vraen Ink omij. 

1000 Letterhead!. tS.OO 1000 Blllheadi. tS.OO 

loot EDTalopei. 4.00 lOOOLabeb. 8.2t 

Write for lamplai 

NiUer Priat Ship, ''^^' Piuladelpkia, Pa. 


Prepared Magnolia Leaves 

In Cases or Cartons 
THE RUMRI.F.Y CO. 

Evergreen, Ala. 


Mention The Rerlew when yon writ*. 




PENCILS AT WHOLESALE 

Best Graphite, Gilt Tip, Rubber Eraser Lead Pencils 
at 13.26 a gross. Imprinting, one to three lines, in 
lots of TWO GROSS and over, $1.60 per gross extra. 
16c brings you samples worth double the money. 

The Osborne Co. 

Lock Drawer D., Camden, New York 




LTCOPODIUM, chemically prepared, everlasting. 
CartonsoflOlbs.,$2.60;carlonsof25lt)S.,$5.7S; 
50 or 100 lb. cases. 22c per lb. Prompt shipment. 


JOHN PERMAX, Catawba. Wis. 


Mention Tba Beriew when yon write. 



•Tt^TTT \**>^s-' "'^y '■%.'' 1*^"^ ~,"?^ "' 



JoNB 1, 1922 



The Florists^ Review 



101 




WIRE HANGING BASKETS 

NOT THE CHEAPEST BUT THE BEST 
Th« W«ll Mad* Kind Painted, Bound with QalvanizMl WIra 

6 at dozan rata, 80 at 100 rata 

Per doz. Per 100 

8-iiich $2.00 $15.00 

lO-inoh 2.26 18.00 

12-mch 2.50 20.00 

14-inch 3.25 25.00 

16-illch 5.00 36.00 

18-inch 6.00 45.00 

Prices on larger size Hanging Baslcets quoted on application. « 
Write for Price List of Wire Floral Designs. 

nmriTN QUI7I7T' 1i>l#^QQ long grpitn sheets 
VsIvILILi^ orilLIL I W1KJS90 for hanging baskets 

Per bundle, 9 1 .8(^ per 1 bundlea, 9 1 4.00 

CI? #^onrr^i-iiri i whoie.aie 
• Ed» V^lVl 1 ^ ^nF^l ^1 .J Commission Florist 

15 E. Third Street, CINCINNATI, OHIO 




The Best Wire Basket 

AND WHY 

Made of Galvanized wire and crimped. 
Closer meshed to hold moss better and 
less of it. Sturdy and strong. 

Measure inside ring Each Doz. 

«-in $0.25 $2.50 

in-in 30 3.00 

12-in 35 4.00 

11-in 40 4.50 

I'i-in 50 5.75 

Fresh LoH Mom 10-lb. carton. $2.00 

Dyed Log Mom, 5-lb. bag, $3.00: 

10-lb. bag, 4.50 
Sphagnum Moaa 5 bales for 6.25 

C. C. PoUworth Co. 

Milwaukee, Wis. 



pp 



« 



RUBBER STAM P 

JTAVTNO been asked by several Florists for a 

rubber stamp of the trade's sloRan, we have 

had gome made same as cut shown above. Will 

send you one on receipt of 40c In postage stamps. 

FLORISTS' PUBLISHING CO. 

S08 S. Dearborn St., CHICAGO, ILL. 




Wire Hanging Baskets 

Our baskets are made strong and substantial, well painted, 
have strong vtrirc hangers and are guaranteed to be the 
best on the market. Will outlast many other makes. 
Size (Measure across top) Per doz. 

8 inches %IS^ 

10 inches 2.50 

12 inches 3.00 

14 inches 375 

J6 inches ;.;;'.; s;oo 

18 mches 5.50 

GREEN SHEET MOSS 

For Lininc Hanfinc Basketa. Etc. 

Per Urge size bale « SI 

5-baIe lots, per bale ",\ \j^ 

••Green Dyed" Sheet Moss 

Per large lize bag mq, 

S-bag lots, per bag \\\\ sjjo 

Geo. H. Angermueller Co. 

Wholesale Florists. 1324 Pine St., ST. LOUIS, MO. 

Get Our List of Other Supplies— It's Free. 

Mention The Review when you write. 



Heavy Hanging 


Baskets 


Green Enameled Extra Heavy 
Hand Made Hangers 


Per Doz. Per 100 
8-inch $1.75 $12.75 


10-inch 2.00 15.00 

12-inch 2.25 16.75 

14-inch 2.75 21.00 


16-inch 3.75 27.50 


18-inch 5.00 S7.50 


LOG MOSS, $1.50 XL. 

Our Pamoas "Blue Rldtfe" Quality 


The IMcCallum Co. 


PnTSBURGH, PA. 




Cokely's 
Baskets 

No. 1— Plaia Style 



'Size Doz. 
10-in. $2.50 
12-in. 3.00 
14-in. 4.00 
16-in. 6.00 



100 

$18.00 

20.00 

25.00 

37.50 



No. 2— Bordered Stylo 



Size Doz. 
10-in. $3.25 
12-in. 3.75 
14-in. 4.75 
16-in. 6.00 



100 

$21.00 

24.00 

33.00 

40.00 



Sheet Moss 
Per bag $3.M 



B. E. & J. T. COKELY 
SCRANTON, PA. 



< Tvr»-*'' ,>, -■, 






102 



The Florists^ Review 



June 1. 1922 



Seed Trade News 



AMERICAN SEED TRADE ASSOCIATION. 

rrpsidpiit. Xj. Ij. Olds, Madison, Wis.: 8e<'rp- 
tary-trfHsuror, C. E. Keiiilrl, Clcvolnnd, 0. 

A Setterberg i.s in eharj^e of sales 
and advcrtisiiifj for J. Oliver Johnson, 
Chicago. 

The death of John F. Harprave, pro- 
prietor of Hargrave's Seed Store, Gal- 
veston, Tex., is reported on the obituary 
page of this issue. 

The contract to erect an addition to 
the seed warehouses of F. H. Woodruff 
& Sons, Milford, Conn., has been let to 
Willard Bros., contractors, Milford. 

The Indiana Canners' Association will 
have its next meeting in Evansville in No- 
vember. This is the first time that Indian- 
apolis has not been used for a meeting 
place. 

A MCST interesting program has been 
arranged for the annual convention of the 
American Seed Trade Association and a 
large gathering is expected at Chicago 
June 21 to 23. 

The Association of Official Seed An- 
alysts will meet in Chicago Juno 21 to 2.3. 
The present officers are : President, F. W. 
Taylor, Durham, N. H. ; vice-president, 
A. K. Peitersen, Fort Collins, Colo. ; 
secretarv-treasurer, A. Ij. Stone, Madison, 
Wis. 

The Wholesale Grass Seed Dealers' As- 
sociation will moot in Chicago June 19 
and 20. The officers are: President, Wil- 
liam G. Scarlett, Baltimore; vice-presi- 
dent, J. Charles McCullough, Cincinnati; 
secretary-treasurer, Clarence R. Jones, 
Baltimore. 

Ten acres of peas for seed to be sup- 
plied to a Portland firm this year are 
being grown by J. W. Chase & Sons, 
Pruneville, Ore. The first five acres, which 
were planted February 6, are now ready 
to bloom. In case this year's crop ])roves 
a success, there will be a nmch heavier 
planting for the coming season. 

The Soutliern Seedsmen 's Association 
was in session at Now Orleans the first 
half of this week. Addresses were pr(>- 
sented by Harry D. Wilson, commissionci- 
of agriculture; James L. Burgess, of the 
North Carolina department of agriculture : 
H. J. Hastings, ox-president of the A. S. 
T. A.. Atlanta. Ga.. and Fred T. Meyer, 
New Orleans. 

Seedsmen of St. Louis, Mo., report that 
this has boon one of the best seasons ever 
ox|i(>riencod. So reporting are A. H. Huin- 
nicit, of the St. T.ouis Seed Co.; Clifford 
Coriieli, of the Cornell Seed Co., and the 
American Seed Co. All these companies 
will be roprosonted at the convention of 
the American Seed Trade Association, at 
Detroit, this month. 



FRENCH BULBS. 

Tt npjK'.nrs that there are to bo com- 
plic.'itions in the French bulb situation 
again this se.'ison. T.;ist week certain 
exporters at Ollioules cabled prices ;ind 
obtained some .acceptances. A few 
days later they reported they were un- 
able to place the business at the figures 
named. Now comes the report that the 
crop of Paper Whites has been sharply 
reduced by dry weather and may not 
exceed fifty to sixty per cent of last 
year's short crop; that most of the 
growers have declared they will not 



C C MORSE & CO. 
WHOLESALE SEED GROWERS 

SAX FRANCISCO, CALIFOKNIA 



CAKROT-CELERY-ENDIVE-LEEK-LETTUCE-ONION-BADISH-PAR8NIP-PAR8LET-SAL8IFT 
SWEET PEAS-ALL VARIETIES PEAS-KENTUCKY WONDER BEANS 



Braslan 



Growen lor th* Wtaoleaale Trade Only. Onion, Lettac«, OuTOt, 
Pannlp, Fanlay, Oelerr, Endive. Saldfy and Mixed Sweet Feaa. 



Seed Growers 



SAN JOSB» CALIFORNIA 



Company 



g;;^ LEONARD SEED CO. o^ 

ni WHOLESALE GROWERS C . 

"^^^^^ 226-230 WEST KINZIE STREET, CHICAGO ^^^^ 



Wholesale Seed Grower 

Pepper, Eggplant Tomato. Okra. Asparagus, 
Rhubarb, Celery, Spinach, Beet Onion, Beans, 
Cabbage, Cauliflower, Sweet Com, Vfaic Seeds. 

Correspondence Solicited 
GEORGE R. PEDRICK & SON 

PEDRICKTOWN, N. J. 

rHE KINBERLIN SEED CO. 

a:S'^^^ San Jose, Cal. 

GROWERS OF 
ONION, LETTUCE, RADISH, ETC- 

CoP'espondence Solicited 

THE 

J. C. Robinson Seed Co. 

WATERLOO, NEB. 

ROCKY FORD, COLO. 

Contnw:t growers of Cucumber, Cantaloupe, 
Watermelon, Sauash and Pumpkin Seed, Sugar, 
Flint and Field Seed Com. 

The C. Herbert Coy Seed Co. 

VALLEY, g?SSf NEB. 

Wholesale Growers of High-grade Seeds 

Cocumber, MuskmeloD, Squash and Pump' 
kin: Sweet. Flint and Dent Seed Coin 



Return Envelopes 

Catalogue Envelopes 

Seed Packets 

Brown Bag Filling Machine Co. 

Fitehbarg, Maaa., U. S. A. 



Bur 4ll TOur seeds at the aouroe 
Gabr. DIPPE,A. CQaedliBbarg, Germur 

Flower and Teacatablc Seedi. 
72 years old, now the largest seed growing organiza- 
tion in Europe. Why? 

Allow six weeks after ordering to receive fresh seeds 
by dependable direct mail from Quedlinburg. 

Hsadqouten U. S. and Canada 

DETROIT INTERNATIONAL, SALES CO. 

Pre* Preaa Bnlldlns, Detroit. Mleta. 

Catalogue with descripflens. DoUar prices. 



Waldo Rohnert 

GILROY, CAL. 
Wholesale Seed Grower 

Specialtiea: Beet, Carrot, Endive, Lettuce. 

Onion and Radiih. 

Comapondenoe Solicited. 



JAMES VICK'S SONS 

GROWERS OF 
FLOWER and VEGETABLE SEEDS 

Oet the benefit of oar 73 years' experience 
AO Seasonable Varieties 

Our Stocks Are Very Complete 

Rochester, N. T. The Flower City 

TOMATO SEED 

Grown for the 
Wholesale Seed Trade 

HAVEN SEED CO. 

SANTA ANA, CALIFORNIA 



The J. Bolgiano Seed Co. 

Garden, Field and Flower Seeds 
Poultry Supplies 

Founded 1818 Incorporated 1921 

BALTIMORE, MD. 



BECKERT'S 

SEEDS, BULBS 
SUPPLIES :: 
Quality and Service 

Beckert'e Seed Store, Pittsburgh, Pa. 



ST. LOUIS SEED CO. 

The Home of "Pire ud Sore" Seeds 

411-413 WASHINGTON AVENUE 

ST. LOUIS, MO. 



T-' .-- ■•!?•'•'■ ■ *■ 



'■••'>,: r7.Ti,j5M.r-^...,- 



June 1, 1922 



The Florists^ Review 



103 



Not Price Yo the Seed Trade: 

Please note we now have an American office 
and Warehouse, which place us in a position to 
serve you better and more quickly than before 

WRITE FOR OUR PRICES ON 

Flower Seeds, Bamboo Stakes, Tree Seeds 
T. SAKATA & CO. 

Suite 901-902, 20 E. Jackson Blvd., CHICAGO, ILL. 
Dili CaLUdlltl/ "International in Scope— Individual in Service" 




We are Headquarters for the 

BEST OF EVERYTHING 
in 

Peas, Beans, Corn and Vegetable Seeds 



OUd to auoto for pment delivsry or on 
growing coato»ct (or future delivery 



Jerome B. Rice Seed Co., Cambridgre, N. Y. 



Mentloa The Berlew wfcen yoa write. 




Write for illustrated 
catalogue to 



Try WATKINS & SIMPSON, Ltd. 

for HARDY PERENNIAL 
and CHOICE FLORISTS' 

FLOWER SEEDS 

27-29 Dniry Lane, LONDON, England 



BuRPEES Seeds Grow 



W. Atlee Burpee Coi 

Seed Growers JPhifadeiphia 



The Everett B. Clark Seed Co., Milford, Conn. 

Branch Houses in Wisconsin, Colorado, Montana, Idaho and Washington. 

Beans, Peas. Sweet Corn, Onion, Beet, Turnip, Tomato, Spinach. 



SEEDS 




30.32 BarcUy Street. NEW YORK CITT 



Tomato Seed and 

Seed Sweet Potatoes 

Pleased to quote yoa pricei on qvantltlee end 
rarleUee wanted for preeent or fatnre dellrery. 

H.AUSTIN Felton, Del. 



\ An Experience of Hall a Ceatary 

i IN PBODUCIMQ HIOH^GBADB 

GARDEN SEEDS 



at jrooT dlapoMl. Contract nowm for th. 

feb6llg tfadirf a f oU Ito .. MaU na yoor Uat • 
r both SPOT and rOTUBE raqalnaMnts. 

'SX: S. b. WmMI & S«u X"" 



TOMATO SEED 

Pepper, Eggplant, Squash, Pumpkin, 
Cucumber, Cantaloupe and Watermelon 
Seed and Field Corn, on contract. 

EDGAR F. HURFF 

Correspondence Scrlicited. Swedesboro, N. J. 



The L. D. Waller Seed 
Company 

WHOLESALE GROWERS 

Select Stock of Flower Seeds 
Sweet Pea and Nasturtium in variety 

Guadalupe, California 



A New Florists' Aster 

EARLY AMERICAN BEAUTY 

Blooms with the Royals 
SEND FOR FLORISTS' CATALOGUE 

HART & VICK 

55 Ston* St., ROCHESTER. N. Y. 



NcHutchison 

& CO. Offers 
Immediate Shipment 



Lily Bulbs ^° ^'^ 

J "»"■»'»«» case case 

Otganteum, 7 to 9 in 300 $50.00 

Repacked and regrraded. 

Valley Pips 

Per 1000 

Berlin, selected forcing pips ?28.50 

2,500 pips per case, case lots only. 

Bamboo Stakes 

Bale Bale 
Japanese, Natural ....6 ft. 2000 $21,00 
Japanese, Dyed Green. .IVj It. 20O0 5.50 
Japanese, Dyed Green. .2 ft. 2000 8.00 
JapaneHe, Dyed Green.. 2'/^ ft. 200(» 10.00 
Japanewe, Dyed Green. .3 ft. 2000 12.00 
Japanese, Dyed Green.. 3'/j ft. 2000 14.00 
JaiHinese, Dyed Green. .4 ft. 2000 10. .50 
Ex warehouse CHICAGO. Prices quoted 
ex warehouse New York and San Fran- 
cisco on request. 

Raffia 

„ Per lb. 

Red Star Branil, 25 lbs. up $0.13 

Ked Star Brand, 50 lbs. up 11 14 

Ked Star Brand, 100 lbs. up 10 

Ked Star Brand, bale (225 Ib.s. ) . . . .08>4 
Also dyed in 20 colors and shades. 

Knclose lemlttance if you have not 
established credit with us. 



Later Shipment 

.\dvance prices are ready now on the 

following items. Write for Iheni: 

T. B. BEGONIA and GLOXINIA bulbs, 
all sizes and colors, tine fur sprinK pot 
plants. 

ROSKS, XXX forcing grade. Baby type, 
H. P.'s and H. T.'s in best varieties. 

CYCL.\MEN SKKDS. Tnp-notih German 
(Binneweis) strain. AuKust delivery 

CHINESF: sacred lilies, 120 biilb.s 
per mat. August deliverv. 

1)1 T(H Bll,BS. Hyacinths. Tulips, Nar- 
ciKsi, etc.. XXX forcing graile only. 

DRACAENA CANES, best eimime'nial 
varieties. Fall shipment. 

I'.VL.M .SEEDS, Kentia Itelmurenna and 
Korsferiana, P. O. H. San Francisco or 
New York. Cocos Weildeliann and 
.Vrwa Lufeseens. 

FERNS IN FLATS, all commercial varie- 
ties, .luly-.\UKU.st sliipnient. 

FICt'S EL.XSTICA, rooted mossed cut- 
tings (fall shipment). 

DOMESTIC BCLBS, Freesia Purity, Cal- 
lus, Iris Tingitana and Spanish. 

Fall Shipment 

.\dvance orders being booked for the 
following items — the prices, when made, 
lieiiit; sul).iect to buyer's acceptance. 
FRENCH Bl'LBS, Paper Whites. White 

H.imans, Lilium Candidum, Solell d'Or, 

etc. 
LILY BL'LBS. Furmosiim, (iii^antenm, 

.Vuratum, Rnbnini, Magiiitlcuni, Album, 

etc. 
.MANF;TTI STOCKS, EngliNh for Kreen- 

lioiiMe grafting. 
V.XLLEY TIPS, Berlin or Hamburg types. 

l','--e busirifss stationery. We sell only 
111 the trade. All quotations are P. O. B. 
.New York unless stated otherwise. 

NcHUTCHISON & CO. 



95 Chamber* St., 



NEW YORK 



104 



The Florists^ Review 



Jdnb 1. 1022 



sell until the bulbs have been lifted 
and that the talk among them now is 
of a price of 200 to 220 francs for the 
thirteen centimeter size. 



SEED TRADE PBOBIiEMS. 



Stockier Seeks Solutions. 

In his address as president of the 
Southern Seedsmen's Association, at the 
convention at New Orleans this week, 
Joseph Steckler touched on some of the 
leading problems of seedsmen at the 
present time. Eegarding them he said: 

"I dare say there is not one of us in 
this room who has not at some time or 
other (and particularly within the last 
few years) been called upon to face 
financial difficulties, poor collections, 
heavy obligations and all the attending 
difficulties of financing a business. 
What have our losses been in worthless 
checks, uncollectible accounts, long- 
standing accounts, collection fees, 
bookkeeping entries repeated and re- 
peated, stamps and stationery? Each 
one in itself not large, but in the ag- 
gregate an astounding figure. 

"Cannot some plan be evolved by 
which the sad experience of one may 
be the safeguard of the other? Is it 




Joseph Steckler« 

(President Soiitlicrii Sfcclsiiicn's Association.) 

possible that all or many must fall er? 
the others be warned? I would suggest 
that discussion be had on this subject 
and that, if found desirable, a commit- 
tee be appointed to study the matter 
and determine upon some plan to be 
followed. 

"At one of our former conventions 
an effort was made to bring about some 
plnn by which the surplus stock of one 
might be the means of aiding another 
short on that particular stock — a relief 
to both; a loss prevented on ohe side, a 
satisfied customer on the other. I 
earnestly believe that more attention 
should be given to this question than 
has been given it in the past and that if 
the idea be developed to its fullest, we 
shall be greatly surprised at the re- 
sults, not to say extremely benefited. 

Advertising. 

"During the conduct of the war, our 
business was given a boost, the like of 
which no other business has ever re- 
ceived. On all sides, from north to 
south, from east to west, the cries went 
up, 'Plant more seeds,' 'Home gardens,' 
'Eaise your own vegetables and help 
feed yourself.' All over the country, 
we were advertised, broadcasted, pro- 
claimed as the center of all gravitation; 
the proverbial end of the rainbow from 
which flowed the boundless stream of 
wealth. What have we done to retain 
the advantages gained by all of this? 
What have we done to sustain ourselves 



MICHELL'S FLOWER SEEDS 

<^iHWi^£S«<'»fi3§^^Si^s#>i^<4i^sa» CINERARIAS nkt. pkt. 

^.,...y.,i2Z4a«i,i«*ss>..../,4i«,i2as^ Gr«Baiflor«Prii«.Dw«rf.f0.60 $1.00 

GraBiiif Ion Prixe, Medina 

_^__^_^__^,^^^_^^_^_.,,^____^ Tall 60 1.00 

WtKHSBK&K^KBKKS^SSS^. primula Chlnensis 

Htr. Tr. 

^^^"■^^■^^■^■^^^^■^'^^"'^^^^"^' Alba MuBifica 10.60 f 1.00 

ChuwickRed 60 1.00 

Docbcu 60 1.00 

HolboraBloe 60 1.00 

KermesiBa SplendcDS 60 1.00 

__,^^___,,,^_,j__,^_^_^_,^^^_^__^^_^ RmtMoih 60 1.00 

'^^^^Ksam^mtmamKom^^a^^^m^^K^^^^ PriieMixed 60 i.oo 

PRIMULA Obconica 
Gigantea Tr. pkt. 

Lilacina, Lilac $0.50 

Kermeuna, Crimson 50 

Rowa, Pink 50 

Alba, White 50 

Hjrbrida, Mixed 50 

I, PRIMULA Obconica 

.'i'^ ST-. . ^^^^^^^^■L.mAK^I^^^ Glgantea, Monster 

j#r=-iB-^- -Ts.^^^^M^^^^Ba^H|^^^^^^af Tr. pkt. 

Apple BlotHHD, Pink $1.00 

KerBctina, Crimson 1.00 

PlaibU, Deep Rose 1.00 

R«»ea,Pink 1.00 

Mixed Colon 1.00 

Also all other Seasonable Seeds and Supplies. 
Wholesale Price List Free. 

MICHELL'S SEED HOUSE >£^tVI. Phila., Ta. 

^ Mention Ths BeTlew wliea yon writ*. __^ 




VAN ZONNEVELD BROS. & PHILIPPO 

ESTABLISHBD 1879 

SASSENHEIM, - - - HOLLAND 

GENTLEMEN:— 

We beg to inform you that our BRANCH 
OFFICE HAS REMOVED from 18 Broadway 
to 29 BROADWAY, NEW YORK, N. Y. 

Ask for our very reasonable prices on 
DUTCH, FRENCH and JAPANESE bulbs. 
Be sure to get the most for your money. 

AGE AND REPUTATION ARE TWO 
FACTORS WORTH CONSIDERATION 



Darwin Tulip Specialists 

Let us haTO your list; we will trive you the right rarieties to cataloRue at the 
right price. We are growers of the finest and largest collection in the world. 
Also originators of some extremely fine Darwin and Breeder Tulips. Large 
growers of Hyacinths, Early Tulips, Crocuses and Narcissi. Originators af 
the finest and earliest Gladiolus Primulious. L ' II ^ ^. ST^.- i . 

J. J. Griillemans & Sons, '"^m''^^^:K" New York, N. Y. 



Hogewoning & Sons, Inc. 

WHOLESALE 

Bulb Growers and Importers 

299 Broadway, New York City 



DUTCH AND FRENCH BULBS 



C. J. Speelman & Sons 

SASSENHEIM. HOLLMO 



Lagarde & Speebu 
omouiES. vu, nuwGE 



New York Office: 470 GREENWICH ST. 

Pacific Coast Rep., W. B. Clarke, 

Box 643, San Jose, OaUf . 




KENILWORTH 



GIANT PANSY SEED 

K«ilw*ra Miztar*. 1000 aeedt. 

86c; ifl oz. Mc; H. oz. SUflB; 

1 oz.. S6.00. 
All cabn, separate or mixed, 
ieeda, 8«c: any 4 pkts. 11.00' 
)i oz., MM; I oz.. $6.00 




The General Bulb Co. 

Established 1883 

Vofirelenzanfir, Holland 

BRANCH OFFICE: 
25 Beaver St., New York City 

1922 Catalogue now ready; copy upon reauest 



JUNB 1, 1922 



The Florists^ Review 



105 




Aug. Lagarde 



LIVE WIRE 

Again-Buy Your 
French Bulbs-Now 

FROM 

Lagarde & Vandervoort 

OLLIOULES, FRANCE 

Permanent American Address: 
P. O. Hamilton Gransre Station 
Box 38 NEW YORK CITY 

Our repreaentativm will be ctitting on you 




J. A. Vandervoort 




SNAPDRAGON 

Begin to sow aecd for spring bloonu and 

for early spring sales of plants. Use th* 

best seed and be sure of results. 

SEED of our famous Silver Pink. Sl.OO pefokl.; 

» for $2.60: 7 for $6.00. 

SEED of Hybrid Pink and of our new Golden 

P'nk Queen, same price 

SEED of Keystone. Nelrose. Qarnet.Whi'e. Tel- 

Igw, Scarlet. Light Pink, Buxton and Fancy 

Bized, 86c per pkt.: 8 for tl.OO. 

Free cultural directions. All orders cash. 

6.S.RAWSBURG. SOMERSWORTH. N.H. 

upon the high pedestal to whii-h wc 
^vcio raised? The national garden 
''iireau, I believe it safe to say, has to 
til!' satisfaction of all carried the Inir- 
;l''ii it undertook, but we can do our 
iii'lividual share and thereby supple- 
iiiriit and support the work which the 
''liicau is doing. I believe we should 
'iiidertake to educate, and inculcate in 
'III' minds of our ])eo])le the real sig- 
nificance of plant life, plant cultivation, 
^■('{jetable and flower. No one will deny 
tlie conduciveness of beautiful flowers 
•''/'I fine shrubbery to good health, clean 
l''o and fine morals. Yet our cities are 
li'Crally covered with thousands upon 
tliousands of homes in which the slight- 
'st vestige of a growing flower ]ilant 
'■' nnot be found. Our children arc born 
J" d grow to manhood and womanhood 
" >d have, if anything, only the most 
Ji'^ager knowledge of plant life. Ask 
■iny child you meet if it has ever plant- 
•"•l a seed of any kind, <ir has ever seen 
I'tatoes grow. What a field, then, for 



VALLEY 

FOR MEMORIAL DAY 

AND SPRING WEDDINGS 

Choice Cold Storage Valley Pips 

1000 $30.00 

500 16 00 

250 8.00 

H. N. BRUNS 

3032-42 W. Madison St. CHICAGO, ILL. 



Prices Now Ready for RELIABLE HOLLAND BULBS 

COMMUNICATE WITH 

TEGELAAR BROS^ Inc. 

1133 BROADWAY, NEW YORK, N. Y. 

Extensive Nurseries at LISSE, HOLLAND. 






The UHitd Bulb Growers, lie 

Sassenheim, Holland 
New Tsrk Offks, 15 WiffisMs Sirsst 

Wholesale Grawers of 

HYACINTHS, 

TULIPS, 

DARWIN TULIPS 

GOLDEN SPUR 

BIC. VICTORIA 

VON SION 
and other Bnlbs 

Cable Address: United Balb, SsMenheiik 


ASPARAGUS CoAilr 
PLUMOSUS uccUS 

New crop from frostless location — 
just picked, vigorous and clean. 
5000 seeds, $10.00; 1 lb., $18.00 

Asparagus Sprengeri Seeds 

5000 seeds, $5.00; 1 lb., $7.50 

M. KAI, R. F. D.No.6,Box380 

LOS ANGELES, CAL. 


Drevon-Tegelaar & Co. 

Wholesale French Bulb Growers 

1133 Broadway, New York 
(Comer 86tb Street) 

Nivseries at OUioales, Var, France 


PIONEER GROWERS R| fl RGL 
AND EXPORTERS of DU L D9 

N. Veldhuyzen van Zanten & Sons 

LISSE, HOLLAND 

Established 1870- StlU goliiB strong 
Cable AJdrcM - VELDZANTEN, LISSE, HOLLAND. 


real and true educational advertising! 
Think it over. 


"Transportation is a big word and a 
big subject. I will not undertake to dia- 






'. t >"v v; ^R. ■ ' f " . .'■y^v-: >i"™> "•? 



106 



V 

The Florists^ Review 



June 1. 1022 



euss this subject, but will touch upon it 
briefly in order to stress its vital im- 
portance to our business. While it is 
the fact tliat the consumer, and not the 
shipper, bears the transportation 
charges, we seldom hear of anyone ex- 
cept the shipper attacking a freight 
rate as too high, unduly prejudicial, or 
otherwise unlawful. The reason is not 
u mystery. The consumer does not pay 
the freight charges as such. They are 
hidden from his view in the retail 
prices, just as are the indirect taxes and 
duties levied upon articles of commerce. 
On the other hand, the freight rate is 
in clear view of the shipper. He pays 
the freight charges in the first instance, 
and even though he passes them along 
later in the price of his goods, he still 
is interested in their measure, since such 
charges constitute an expense that en- 
larges the ultimate selling price. And 
the enlargement of the ultimate selling 
price spells the lessening of the number 
of sales and of the sizes of the sales. 
Certainly, this is a matter which calls 
for our best thought and most serious 
attention. 

Overhead. 

"Overhead is, I believe, one subject 
which cannot })e discussed too fre- 
quently. It is a matter of most vital 
importance in the life of any business, 
and jiarticularly ours, and I fear that 
a good many of us do not give it the 
Jittcjition it deserves. We all know that 
nearly every commodity in our line Is 
being sold today at or below pre-war 
prices, while nearly all the exyiensos 
of handling, selling and turning over 
our goods are at or not nuieh below war 
figures. With such being the fact, I 
believe it behooves us all the more to 
consider carefully the matter of price- 
making. A few cents added to or sub- 
tracted from the sale price will be no 
added or lessened burden to the pur- 
chaser, yet these same few cents multi- 
plied by the volume of purchasers will 
spell success or failure to the seedsman. 

"It is needless and perhaps painful 
to dwell upon the conditions which h;ive 
existed generally in the ininiedi:ite past, 
but while the course has been stormy 
and strewn with dangers and i^itfalls, 
I believe that the clouds of difficulty 
and disaster are beginning to vanish 
and that the sun of prosperity will soon 
cast its rays upon us in full beauty and 
radiance, and so, having tasted the bit- 
ter, we may be better able to appreciate 
the sweet." 



CALIFORNIA SEED OUTLOOK. 

Under date of May 24, John Bodger 
& Sons Co., IjOS Angeles, Cal., report 
on seed crops as follows: 

"Referring to the prospects for Cali- 
fornia seed crops, we would state that 
John TJodger, Sr., advised us last sum- 
mer that the drought in Europe would 
have a bad effect upon the jierennial 
cro[)s and we made a special effort to 
increase our jilanting of such perennials 
as we could grow successfully in Cali- 
fornia. For instance, we have increased 
our jdanting of varieties of delphiniums, 
dahlias, anchusas, carnations, single 
(tvpsojiliila paniculata, hollyhocks in 
varieties, scabiosa and wallflowers. 

"Prospects today are good, although 
%ve are heavily booked on a large num- 
ber of the above varieties and expect 
to be sobl out long before the harvest is 
over. 

"There seems to be a considerable de- 
maud for all kinds of flower and vege- 




LIVE WIRE 

J. A. Vandervoort & Co. 

Wholesale Bulb Growers 
NOORDWYK, . HOLLAND 

Also Nurseries at Sassenhelm 



Abaolately the lantct gnrowen in Holland of 

Bic. Victoria, Gilden Spur asd Von Sion 

Also large growers of 

HYACINTHS, TULIPS, ETC. 



Permanent American Addrenm: 

P. O. Hamilton Grange Station 
Box 38, New York City 



TAMDEBVOOBT 



Our representatives will l>e 
calling on you. 



Bulbs - HOLLAND — Bulbs 

R. A. Van Der Schoot 

Whole»aIm Bulb Grower 

Hillegom, Holland 

Many thinsfs contribute to the superiority of R. A. Van 
der School's products. They will contribute to your success 

^^ « I Address all correspondence care of V^ « « 

DUlbS •'• ^- HAMPTON, JR., CO. DUIDS 



17 Battery PUce 



NEW YORK 



C. KEUR & SONS, HILLEGOM, HOLLAND 

5625 Mosholu Ave^ NEW YORK CITY 

Telephone, Kingsbrldge, 3078-W 
Have now on exhibition at their New York address, 
an extensive assortment of 

Breeder, Darwin, Rembrandt, Old Dutch and Nay-flowenng Tulips 

Also Single, Double and Poetaz Narcissi 
Free inspection is extended to anybody interested 



^s^ . «N B A." 

E^^^flj- The above is the trade-mark of the 
j^^^^Ql Narcissi Bulbgrowers' Association of Carqueiranne, Var, rranca 

/ajB^^^^y Do not fail to specify N. B. A. brand when ordering 

(^W Paper White Narcissus 

IgWS^^Bi of your American dealer next season. You will avoid disappointment 
\MJjmr?wtM- and be sure to receive stock giving best results. Wholesale only. 






All Florists who seek a source of dependable and reli- 
able ForcloK Bulb* please communicate with 

CRESCENT BULB COMPANY 

Wholesale Bulb Growers 
Americta Addreu: H 1 LLEC O IM , 
84 Brotd St.. New York HOLLAND 
Quality U our motto. 


telosia Chrysanthefiora 

NOW 18 THE TIME TO SOW 

The most talkedof flower of the day; per JC An 
trace packet of more than 2000 seeds <P«.wv 

S. BRYSON AYRES. Independence, No. 

"Over lOO Acres in Flow^ers" 

Mention The Rerlew whea yo« write. 






AI.KF.MADE & SON 

Wholenle Bdb Growers 

Send us roar list of wants for aootatloos 

Noordwyk, Holland 


Chas. Schwake & Co., inc. 

LILY OP THE VALLEY 

Japaaese Ulies, French lad Datch Bulbs 
90-92 West Bretdway NEW YORK 



JUNB 1, 1922 



The Florists^ Review 



107 



,>^-H 



^*» ^ 






For Prices, Quality 
and Service 



TRADE WITH 



Hracinths Scored and Scooped. 



SEGERS BROS., Ltd. 

Bulb Growers 
and Exporters 

1165 Broadway, NEW YORK CITY LISSE, HOLLAND 




'WeaUoimke 
|a Specialty of 

tSecd Oulog Covm. 
Hangen, Box UbcU, 
Nurwrymeo'i PUtcs, 
X'lwa Gnu vmI Bird 
Seed Caitena ami S««<1 
Cartons of every des- 
Wiption. Va atwaya 
carry a laifc aiock of 
all items for immtdiatc 
shipmeni, and ^ve 
prompt attention to 
orders for individaal 
requirCBlCRtl, 



Wrfto tar lhN« mi • 
STECHER LITHOGRAPHIC COMPANY 

KOCHCSTUt. N. V. 



HELLKRS 

M I C t 

PHOOF 

SEEP 

^ CASES. 


Seid for CMafopie. 

HEUER & CO. 

Montpefier. Ohio 



table seeds at this time, and we are 

oversold iiractically on all vegetable 

si't'ds and on many flower seeds. There 

Seems to be an unusual demand for 

Ki'.'indiflora mixed sweet peas, owing to 

•'III apparent overproduction during the 

p'lst year. All the growers reduced their 

^"■reage and it was doubtful whether 

there w^ould be enough seed to go around 

it delivery time. We have a liberal 

-' reage planted, but our second plant- 

!ig was late, and it will depend upon 

' iiniatic conditions as to whether we 

'-liall raise a large crop. The early- 

'iowering sweet peas are now coming 

iito full bloom and, notwithstanding 

lie cold spring and the two severe frosts 

n April, they are making a good show- 

iig and there will be a fair crop har- 

■ ested and probably enough to go 

iround, although we are selling closely 

■11 some of these varieties. On late- 

!owering Spencers in named varieties 

lie prospects arc good and there will 

"0 ample to take care of all our busi- 

'ipss, but we think there will be no 

■ireat surplus of mixed Spencer this 

•ear. The green aphis has made its ap- 

I'Parance quite noticeably, but we have 

^een successful iu fighting it by spray- 



BULBS 



BULBS 



For Hollauid grovm Bulbs of every 
description, CMk prices from 

Bader & Co., aia c^'n Sassenheim, HoUana 

LarjB^e s^rowers of Hyacinths, Tulips and Narcissi 

PLEASE COMMUNICATE WITH 

Bader & Co., care of R. F. Laag, 82 Broad Street, New York City 




soPttaoR eotes 
ONS 




61VESEYST.. N.Y.CITY 

OWoules, 
ff'fance. 



Holland. 



GLADIOLI 



FOR FORCING OR 
OUTSIDE PLANTING 



UNITED BULB CO., Mt. Clemens, Mich. 

LEADING GROWERS OF GLADIOLI 



When you think of GLADIOLI 

think of P. VOS & SON 

WE HAVE THEM— HEALTHY AND TRUE. TRY US. 



The Home of 
Fine Gladioli 



P. VOS & SON 
P. O. Box 555. GRAND RAPIDS, MICH. 









Gladiolus Bulbs 

Quality Stock Moderate Prices 

Glad to quote on your reuuirenients 

ALFRED OESTERLING, Gladiolot Grower 

Star Route. BUTLER. PA. 




GLADIOLI 

U you are looking for Oladiolus bulbs of 
Al auality see my ad under the Classified 
column of this issue. 

JELLE ROOS 

ti^Zl^SX Box A, CONCORD, MASS. 


ing, and we hope to get through with- 
out any serious damage. 

"We have perfect stands of asters 
and zinnias and on all kinds of annual 




DANISH SEF.n IMPORT 

Import of aU kinds of Seeds direct from seed 
jrowera In Denmark. Please send for price list. 
CHR. MOSB.IERG. 21C 7tk St N.. Miueapolu. Mioi. 


flower seeds. Prospects, generally 
speaking, are of the finest." 


Always Mention The Florists' Review 

When Writing to Advertisers. 



108 



The Florists^ Review 



June 1. 1922 




Peterson Nursery, Chicago, has am- 
bitious advertising plans, and to insure 
their successful execution, they have been 
placed in the hands of Frank B. White, 
Chicago, whose agricultural advertisers' 
service is well known in the trade. The 
Peterson peonies and irises will be adver- 
tised in magazines and by direct mail, a 
catalogue in colors being in preparation. 

John Watson, who terminated his 
service as executive secretary of the Amer- 
ican Association of Nurserymen just 
about twelve months ago, is now secretary 
of the Du Bois Press, Rochester, N. Y., 
printing department. The high-quality 
color work of the Du Bois Press and Mr. 
Watson's thorough knowledge of nursery- 
men's advertising will form a combina- 
tion of much value to members of the 
trade. 

CALIFORNIA NURSERYMEN. 

The dates for the twelfth annual con- 
vention of the California Association of 
Nurserymen, to be held in Sacramento, 
Cal., have been named as from June 1 
to 3, 1922. A splendid program has 
been prepared. Every effort has been 
made to make this the most worthwhile 
gathering that has ever been held by 
the horticultural workers of the state of 
California. The official hotel for this con- 
vention will be the Travelers' hotel. 
The social side of the gathering will 
be well cared for, and there will be 
provision made for the entertainment of 
the ladies while the convention is in 
session. The program as worked out so 
far is as follows: 



THURSDAY, JUNE 1, »:.10 A. 
MpptinB in tlip Travelers' hotel. 
Reports of (ifflccra. 
Reports of committees. 
Nominations of offlccrs. 



M. 



M. 



THURSDAY, JUNE 1, 1:30 1> 

In the nssembly cliambor at the state capitol: 
Joint conference l)etwpen the California Associa- 
tion of Horticultural Cominissioncrs and the 
Californin Association of Nurserymen. 

FRIDAY, JUNE 2, 9:30 A. M. 
Meeting at Del I'aso Country Club. 
Reading of papers. 

"The ITlorist and the Association." 

"I'rot>lcins of tlio Seedsman." 

"Functions of tlic Agricultural Ij<>gislntive 

Coinniitlee." 
"Crcilits and Credit I'riiuiides. " 
"Federal I'lant Quarantine No. 37." 
"Soils and Soil Conditions." 
"Caliper (irading for Fruit Trees." 
"Sulitroiiical F'riiits." 
"Uu<l Sidection." 
"I^andscaping and Its Relation to the Nurs- 

er.v Husiuess." 
"Root Stocks." 

"Production of Hnlbs in California." 
"I^itPst Developments in the I'roduction of 
I'lants Formerly Imi]orted." 

SATURDAY, JUNE 3, !»::W A. M. 
Meeting at Del I'aso Country Club. 
Election of othcers. 
Reports of coiiiiiiitlees. 
Miscellaneous business. 
Announcement of election results. 
Ad,jouriimenr. 

The present officers of the association 
are as follows: President, J. W. Barni- 
cott, Newcastle; vice-presidents, Donald 
McLaren, San Francisco; M. R. Jackson, 
Fresno, Cal.; George F. Otto, San Diego, 
Cal.; ,Iohn C. Bodger, Los Angeles; 
Harold A. Hyde, Watsonville, Cal.; sec- 
retary-treasurer, Henry W. Kruckeberg, 



Los Angeles. The present standing com- 
mittees are as follows: 

Executive: (Roy F. Wilcox, chairman, Monte- 
bello; Max J. Crow, Gilroy; Huns Plath, San 
Francisco; B. W. Horton; Fred H. Howard, Los 
Angeles. 

Legislation: J. E. Bergtholdt, chairman, New- 
castle; D. MacRorle, San Francisco; E. B. Wash- 
burn, Pasadena. 

Transportation: J. D. Meriwether, chairman, 
Ontario; Donald McLaren, San Francisco; Fred 
H. Howard. 

Insects and diseases: George H, Hecke, chair- 
man, Sacramento; Tliomas Maxwell, Napa; Fred 
Hills, Los Angeles. 

Nomenclature: Ernest Rraunton, chairman, Los 
Angeles; M. 11. Jackson; Almon Wheeler, San 
Jose. 

Native vegetation: Theodore Payne, chair- 
man. Los Angeles; John J. Morley, San Diego; 
Donald Mcl.iaren. 

Trade exhibitions: Roy F. Wilcox, chairman: 
E. B. Washburn, B. H. Rust, South Pasadena; 
D. W. Coolidge, Pasadena; Max J. Crow; Robert 
J. Balrd, Van Nuyi. 

Plants and flowers: John C. Bodger. chair- 
man; George F. Otto; John Wallace, Oakland. 

Landscape gardens: Walter L. Annacost, 
chairman, I»s Angeles; Paul J. Howard, Los 
Angeles; John Gill. Berkeley. 

Arboriculture: George C. Roeding, chairman. 
Niles; John J. Reeves, Los Angeles; George 
Williams, Newcastle. 

Citrus-tropical fruits: J. S. Armstrong, chair- 
man, Ontario; R. M. Teague, San Dimas; L. E. 
Ingoldsby, Exeter. 

Deciduous fruits: W. T. Kirkman, Jr., chair- 
man, Fresno; B. F. Fowler, Newcastle; L. H. 
Elmer, San Jose. 

Program: W. B. Clarke, chairman, San Jose; 
H. A. Hyde, Watsonville; J. E. Bergtholdt. 



Publicity: A. L. Wisker, chairman, Grass 
Valley; H. Plath, George F. Otto. 

Exhibition gardens: Donald McLaren, chair 
man; W. B. Clarke; E. James, Oakland. 

Viticulture: T. B. Mabee, chairman, Fresno; 
James Mills, Jr., Hamilton; Max J. Crow. 



NURSERYMEN TO CONVENE. 



At Detroit, June 28 to 30. 

The American Association of Nursery- 
men will convene at Detroit, Mich., June 
28 to 30. The "Baby Rambler" program 
committee, consisting of William F. Fie- 
mer, Jr., Princeton, N. J., chairman; 
Horton Bowden, Geneva, N. Y., Paul V. 
Fortmiller, Newark, N. Y., William H. 
Masten, Newark, N. Y., and Albert F. 
Meehan, Dresher, Pa., has issued the 
program for the forty-seventh annual 
convention of that association. 

The committee has given the matter 
of selecting a program considerable time, 
and, judging from the result, the meet- 
ing should be well worth the attending. 
In formulating the program the Baby 
Rambler committee has consulted with 
the executive committee and a number 
of large firms throughout the country 



SPECIAL 



Per 1000 

$350.00 

250.00 

SSO.OO 
45.00 
SO.OO 

$180.00 
70.00 



BERBERIS THUNBERGII Per 100 

2 to 3 ft $36.00 

12 to 18 ins 26.00 

CALIFORNIA PRIVET 

2 to 3 ft $7.00 

18 to 24 ins 5.00 

12 to 18 ins 4.00 

AMOOR RIVER PRIVET (Hardy) 

3 to 4 ft $20.00 

12 to 18 ins 8.00 

SPIRAEA VANHOUTTEI 

3 to 4 ft $20.00 

2to3ft 16.00 

18to24ins 10.00 

12 to 18 ins 7.00 

Send for our BULLETIN NO. 8, just off the press and offering 
an excellent assortment of general nuisery stock. 

BV^Use printed stationery. Private trade not solicittd. 

JACKSON & PERKINS COMPANY 

NEWARK, NEW YORK 



Nursery Stock for Florists' Trade 

Field-Grown Roses Our Specialty 

FOR FORCING 

Magna Charta, American Beauty, Baby Rambler, Ulrich Brunner, 
Paul Neyron, Gen'l Jacqueminot, M. P. Wilder, Tausendschoen, 
Crimaon Rambl*r, Dorotky Perkinc, Clg. American Beauty, 
Ezcelsa, Orleans, Anny Mailer. 

ALL GROWN AT GENEVA, NEW YORK 

W. & T. SMITH COMPANY, Geneva, New York 



w.. rs ''J ; ' ■ 



JUNB 1, 1922 



The Florists' Review 



109 



Roses Budded on Contract 

ALL STANDARD AND NEW VARIETIES 



Select your own varieties — and 
have us grow them for you in the 
open field out here in the Santa Clara 
Valley, where the soil and climatic 
conditions are ideal. 

That's the way to get hardy, vigor- 
ous, strongly ; rooted plants at low 
cost. 

We grow for some of the largest 
rose dealers in the United States, 
and have shipped roses into every 
sectiqn. 



We do not confine ourselves, how- 
ever, to large orders only — but are 
glad to take care of small orders as 
well. 

Our roses are thoroughly matured 
and hardened by October 1, and we 
ship from then until March. 

Let us do your rose growing, while 
you devote your time and effort to 
developing your sales. 

Send us your budding list for 
quotation. 



One of the Largest Growers of Roses in the West 

ELMER BROS. NURSERY 

72 South Market Street SAN JOSE, CALIFORNIA 



SATISFACTION 





TREES 

SHRUBS 

PERENNIALS 

GREENHOUSE PLANTS 

Whatever you buy of u«, its 
satisfaction wc sell 



[jTuUuy t^cKrr Ca 

I ^ At TU Sifi of 1ii> T— 

I Bm 24 Rutk.rf>r4 N.J. 




ugissRssa 



Magnolia Grandif lora 

EverRreen variety, hardy in cold sections if 
planted to northern exposure. 2 to 8 ft., 
160.00: 8 to 4 ft., $75.00; 4 to 6 ft., $125.00 per 100. 
Other sizes iiuoted on reauest. 

ABELIA GRANDIFLORA 

1 to 2 ft., $25.00: 2 to 3 ft., $36.00 per 100. 

Valdeiian Nurseries. Bostic. N. C. 

and the program can be called a synop- 
sis of all the resulting suggestions. 

The program, as can l)e seen upon 
ri ading, is full of numbers of education- 
al and social value. For instance, tlie 
aidresses by the Hon. Secretary Wal- 
lace, of the Department of Agriculture, 
slould be well worth the hearing, as 
w ^11 as that by Gifford Pincliot, nominee 
t( r the governorship of Pennsylvania. 
It should be added here that, although 
11 6 Baby Rambler committee has been 
tiying hard all along, with the coopera- 
ti )n of the executive committee, to get 
Mr. Pinchot and Mr. Wallace, their ap- 
1" arance is not definitely assured. But 



Waller Nurseries Co., 

INC. 

Ask for Catalogue 
HOLLAND MICHIGAN 

MeutloD Thr KeTlew when you write. 

BOXWOODS 

Choice American grown Pyramid-:, Balls 
and Standards. Good color, well formed 
spe imens that will please your customers. 
This stock is supplied ballrd and burlapped, 
carefully packed. 

BOXWOOD Each 

Ball Shaped, 14x14 inches, B&B $3.50 

Ball Shaped, 16x16 inches, B&B 4.2=> 

Ball Shiippd, 18x18 inches, B&B 5.50 

Pyramid Shaped, 2>« feet, B&B 4.50 

Pyramid Shaped 3 feet, B&B 6.50 

Standards— Stem, 14-inch; Crown, 16- 

incb.B&B 6.50 

BAB signifies balled and burlapped. 

TheD.HillNanerTCo.,liic., f^^ Dundee, Ul. 

ETergreen SpeeialiBta— Largest Growers in America 



Thank You 

for the business you gave 
us this spring and we ex- 
tend you an invitation to 
call at the Nursery this 
summer and see our 
growing stock. 

Onarga Nursery Company 

CULTRA BROS^ Manag*n 
ONARGA, - ILLINOIS 



even so, there are plenty of other ad- 
dresses which would be worth coming 
the miles to hear — J. Edward Moon, M. 
E. Cashman, Orlando Harrison, Thomas 
B. Meehan, Richard Wyman, W. G. Mc- 
Cay, P. F. O 'Keefe, Paul C. Lindley, J. 



Hardy Perennials 

Send for our Spring 1922 Wholesale Price 
List of strong field-grown hardy perennials. 

WILLIAM TOOLE & SON 

HARDY PLANT & PANSY FARM 
BARABOO, WIS. 



The Wayside Gardens Co. 

GROWERS OF HARDY PLANTS 

Sbrabs, Bulbs and Scads 

MENTOR, OHIO 



F. Ammann, and many others of equal 
importance. Then, too, there is to be 



fT*' -T'^vv- ^-y 



■;''^ 



\^jr':' ■■■^■=^T^■^y',^^^.'v' 



110 



The Horists^ Review 



June 1. 1922 



a rousing "get-together" banquet, a 
visit to Henry Ford's establishment, and 
other pleasurable attractions. 

The Program. 

The program, as contemplated, is as 
follows: 

WEDNESDAY. JUNE 28, 10 A. M. 

rail to order by I'resldent CuRhman. 

Invocation, by W. II. Wyman, Nortli Abington, 
Mass. 

Address of welcome. 

Kcsponse, by .1. Edward Moon, Morrisville. Pa. 

I'resident's address, by M. U. t'asliman, Owa- 
tonna, Minn. 

Secretary's and traffic manager's reports, by 
Cliarles Sizemore, Lonisiana, Mo. 

Transportation committee's report, by Cliarles 
Sizemore, Louisiana, Mo. 

Keport of program committee, bv William 
Flemer, Jr., chairman, Princeton, N. J. 

Arrangement committee for convention and 
exhibits, by Charles Ilgenfritz, cliairman, Mon- 
nie, Mich. 

Appointment of awditin!; and resolution com- 
mittees. 

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 28, 2 P. M. 
Reports of committees: 

Executive, by M. R. Cashman, chairman, 
Owatonna, Minn. 

Finance, by M. R. Casliuiau. chairman, 
Owatonna, Minn. 

Legislative and tarilt, by Orlando Harrison, 
chairman, Iterlin, Md. 

Arbitration, by W. C. Heed, chairman, Vin- 
cenncs, Ind. 

Vigilance, by Paul C. Lindley, chairman, 
Pomona, N. C 

Nomenclature, by Harlan P. Kelsey, chair- 
man, Salem, Mass. 

Relations with landscape architecls. by 
Thomas B. Meehan, chairman, Dresher, 
Pa. 

Course in nurhery training in agricultural 
colleges, by A. E. Nelson, cliairman, 
Chicago, 111. 

Standard trade practices, by Harlan P. Kel- 
sey, chairman, Salem, Mass. 

Deciduous and tropical fruits nomenclature, 
by R. A. Simpson, chairman, Vineennes, 
Ind. 

Committee on' distribution, by W. G. Mc- 
Kay, chairman, Madison. Wis. 

Obituary. 
Adjournment. 

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 28, 7 P. M. 
■'<iet-togellicr" banquet — J. Edward Moon, 
toastmaster, Morrisville, Pa.; arranged bv the 
"K.iinbling liaby Ramblers," Paul V. Fortmiller, 
Newark, N. Y., in charge. 

THURSDAY, JUNE 20, 10 A. M. 

"The Average Stand of Nursery Stock," by 
A. F. Ijiike, Shenandoah, la. 

"The Establishment and Progress of the Nurs- 
ery Training Course at the M.issachuselts Col- 
lego of Agriculture, Amherst," by Richiird M. 
Wyman, Framingham, Mass. 

Report of market development and publicity 
committee, by F. F. Rockwell, chairman. Bridge 
ton. N. J. 

"Slate, Sectional and National Associations," 
by Paul V. Lindley. Pomona, N. C. 

"Advertising," by JIa.|or P. F. O'Keefe, Boston, 
ilass., introduced by P. L. Atkins, Rutherford, 

"Organizing Sectional Florists' Associations 
and Their Relation to Their National Publicitv 
Campaign," by J. Fred Ammann. introduced by 
P. V. Fortmiller, Newark. N. Y. 

"Publicity," by Kx mayor Hreitmeyer, Indian 
(Continued on page 112.) 



Seasonable Stock 

Boston Ferns, 5-in., 35c aach. 
Scottii and Teddy Jr., 3H-in., 18c each. 
Impatiens Sultani, orange red, deep 

pink, 2H-in., $4,00 per 100; 3H-in., 

$8.00 per 100. 

Parlor Ivy, 23^-in., $3.00 per 100. 

Petunia Rosy Morn, bushy, in bloom, 
3-in., $4.00 per 100. 

Dreer's Mammoth Fancy Verbena, 

mixed, bud and bloom, 3-in., $4.00 per 
100. 

Alyssum Little Gem, 2K-«n., $3.00 per 
100. 

Cabbage Plants, Copenhagen Market, 
$2.50 per 1000. 

CASH PLEASE. 

GEO. B. MORRELL 

TORRESDALE, PA. 



Seasonable Stock 

READY NOW 

PETUNIAS, Single, Giant Ruffled and Rosy Mom, 2-inch, $5.00 per 100, 
$40.00 per 1000. 

HELIOTROPE, Jersey Beauty and Florence Nightingale, good purples, 
2J4-inch, $5.00 per 100, $45.00 per 1000. 

ASPARAGUS SPRENGERI, 2H-inch, $5.00 per 100, $45.00 per 1000. 

ASPARAGUS PLUMOSUS, 2J4-inch, $5.00 per 100, $45.00 per 1000. 

BEGONIAS, Gracilis Luminosa, Prima Donna, Erfordii, Superba and 
Mignon, 2^-inch, $5.00 per 100, $45.00 per 1000; Metallica, Argenteo- 
Guttata, Sandersonii and Albo-Picta, 2^-inch, $8.00 per 100. 

BUDDLEIA ASIATICA, 2j4-inch, $5.00 per 100. 

COLEUS, standard varieties, 2j4-inch, $4.00 per 100, $35.00 per 1000. 
Brilliancy, 214-inch, $7.00 per 100. 

FUCHSIAS, Black Prince, Avalanche, Mrs. E. G. Hill, Spedosa, 2^-inch. 
$5.00 per 100: 3-inch. $10.00 per 100: 4-inch, $20.00 per 100. 

FERNS, Boston and Teddy Jr., 2J4-inch, $6.50 per 100, $60.00 per 1000. 

PLUMBAGO, Capensis and Capensis Alba, 3-inch, $15.00 per 100; 4-inch, 
$25.00 per 100. 

SNAPDRAGONS, giant flowered, separate colors, 2-inch, $5.00 per 100, 
$45.00 per 1000. 

SANTOLINA INtANA, grand for carpet bedding, 2-inch, $5.00 per 100, 
$45.00 per 1000. 

THE STORRS & HARRISON CO. 

PAINESVILLE, OHIO 



Winter -Flowering Roses 

We offer the following strong plants, own-root stock, out of 2% -in. pots, 
ready for Immediate delivery: Mme. Butterfly, Coluxabia and Mlfrnon. 

The following varieties, own-root stock, extra strong plants, out of 3%- 
In. pots: Francis Scott Key, Crusader, Mme. Butterfly, Columbia, Premier and 
Mlffnon. 

PRICES ON APPLICAl ION. 

FERNS 

We wish to call particular attention to our fine stock of Ferns which we 
are offering at this time: 
ZTephrolepls Victoria (The Victory Pern). A beautiful, new, crested form of 

Teddy, Jr., nice plants, 3% -In. pots, 2Bc to 35c each; 6-ln., 75c to $1.00 each; 

7-in., $1.50 each. 
Nephrolepis Blegrantiisima, large specimens, 10-ln., $4.00 to $5.00 each. 
Nephrolepia Blegrantisslma Compacta, 3V^-in., 35c to 50c each; large specimens, 

8-ln., $2.00 each; 10-ln., $4.00 to $5.00 each. 
Nepbrolepis Muscosa, 3^-in., 35c to 50c each; 5-in., 75c each; 6-ln, $1.00 each. 
Hephrolepls Swarf Boaton, 6-in., 75c each; 8-in., $2.00 each. 

M ISCELL ANEOUS 

Entrlish Ivy, Strong plants, 3%-ln. pots with shoots 18 to 24 Inches, $25.00 per 
hundred. 

Vincaa, Strong plants, 3>i^-in. pots., $16.00 per 100; extra strong plants, 3^- 

in. pots, $25.00 per 100. 
Dracaena Zndivisa, Strong plants, 5-in. pots, 75c each. 

Packing added extra at cost. 



F.R.riERSON, 



Telephone 
Tarrytown 48 



TARRYTOWN,N.Y. 



. 



STAR BRAND ROSES 

"American Pillar" and nearly every 
other good hardy climber. 

Send for our list. 



n. pONARD ft 
"• I* JONES CO 
Robmt Pyla, Pm. 



s 



imST GROVE. 

Tf PENNA.,U.S.A. 

Ant.Wint»«r,V.-P. 



ROSE SPECIALISTS 

Badded fleld-irrown Teas, Perpetnals, 
OUmbera (own root) and Standard*. 

SEND LIST WANTED 

NEW BRUNSWICK NURSERIES 

NEW BRUNSMTICK, N. J. 



rr :^■■''f•.f'~'^'^^~ ■^':r/:^.--i^ y^ 



JuNB 1. 1922 



The Florists' Review 



111 



No Shortage of 
Palms With Us 

XEimA FOBSTEIEUAXTA OOICBX- 
JTATIOirS: 

n-lnch $1.50 

i;-inch 3.00 

-Uooden tubs, $5.00, $7.60, $10.00, 
$12.00, $14.00, $18.00, $30.00 and $25.00 

All In first-class condition 

AHECA XUTESCEirS COlfltBIHA- 
TZON8: 

S-inch $10.00 

FANDAXraS: 

0-ineh $3.00 

CIBOTTUMS: 

10-inch tubs $10.00 

BUBBEHS : 

'.-inch 50o and 75c 

tl-inch $1.00 

FEKNS — All kinds, pot-grown: 

5-inch $0.50 

t;-inch 75 

7-lnch 1X)0 

S-inch 1.50 

FBBNS, 2 Mi-inch: 

Macawii $0.10 

Hoston 08 

Piersonil 08 

Whitmanii 08 

Klegantissima 08 

.Scottii 08 

Teddy, Jr .08 

Strong plants, not like what is 
usually sent out by others. 

ASPAKAOTTS Fl^TTDCOSUS: 

2^4 -inch 5o 

:'. -inch 15o 

ASPARAOUS SPKENOEBI: 

2 14 -inch 5o 

'.i -ineh 15c 

DBACAEITA MASSANG-B ANA : 

r)-uich $1.25 

6-inch 1.50 

JOHN BADER CO. 

Ml. Troy, N. S., PITTSBURGH, PA. 



Mention The Rerlew when jou write. 



Standard 
and Novelty 

Write for prices and descriDtion. 
THE JOSEPH H. HILL CO., RichmoBd, Ind. 



Roses 



Mention The BeTlew when yon writ*. 



Chrysanthemums and Roses 

OUR SPECIALTY 

Write ui about anything you want 
in this line. 

vIlAu* IL TUTTl vU*) NKw jbbsbt 



Mention The ReTJew when you writ*. 



PEONIES 

8«Bd far enr Special Prlca List ■kowiai 

beat lorta, with each color in the 

order of bloominc. 

PETERSON NURSERY 

S« N. La Sana Straat, CHICAGO, ILL. 



Mention The Review when you write. 



ROSES 



1000 

5000 American Legion $200.00 

10,000 Columbia 110.00 

10,000 Butterfly 130.00 

70OO Premier 130.00 

5000 Double White KiUarney 125.00 



2;4^-inch Own Root 

1000 

5000 OpheUa $120.00 

2000 Hadley 140.09 

1000 Pilgrim 135.00 

1000 Pilgrim, 3-in 180.00 

2000 Golden Ophelia 150.00 



5000 American Beauty, $150JN> per 1000 

Packing extra at cost 

2%-inch Grafted 



1000 

1000 American Legion $2.W.0O 

1000 Premier 240.00 

8000 Butterfly 225.00 



1000 

5000 Double White KiUarney $225.00 

2500 Angelus $300.00 



Packing extra at cost 



CHRYSANTHEMUMS 



WHITE VARIETIES 
White Surprise, $15.00 per 100 
Early Fro»t October Queen 

Polly Rose White Chieftain 

_ Chas. Rager 

Oonto White Seidewitz 

October Frost Mistletoe 

Cuttings $.?..S0 per 100, $30.00 per 1000 

ZVi-in. pots $5.00 per 100, $45.00 per 1000 

Wm. Turner Victory 

Chadwick Improved Hamburg's Late 
December Beauty White 

Cuttings $5.n0 per 100, $45.00 per 1000 

2V4-in. pots $7.00 per lOf), $60.00 per 1000 

Betsy Ross $4.00 per 1(X), $35.00 per 1000 

BRONZE VARIETIES 

Glenview, Barbara Davis, Indian Summer 

Cuttings $3. .50 per 100, $30.00 per 1000 

2>/i-in. pots $5.00 per KlO, $40.(XI per 1000 

RED VARIETIES 
Harvard. $.1..S0 per lai, $.W.OO per 1000. 

YELLOW VARIETIES 
Golden Glow Yellow Polly Rose 



Yellov^ Frost 

Marigold 

Maj. Bonnaffon 



Chrysolora 
Richmond 
Golden Mistletoe 



Tints of Gold 



Cuttings $3..S0 

2V4-in. pots $5.00 

Golden Glory, $1(1.00 
Yellow Turner 
Sun Glow 

Cuttings $5.00 

2y4-in. pots $6.50 

Golden Chadwick 

Cuttings $5.00 

2V4-in. pots $6.50 



per 100, $.30.00 per lOfX) 

per 100, $45.00 t)er 1000 

per ion, $90.00 per 1000 
Sunray 
Whittier 

per HMI, $40.00 per lOfT, 

per 100, $55.00 per 100') 
Sunbeam 

per 10(), $45.00 per 10(10 

per 100, $60.00 per IIKX) 



PINK VARIETIES 
Thanksgiving Pink, $12.00 per lOO, $100.01 

per 1000. 
Glory Pacific Unaka 

Chieftain Pacific Si:preme 

Seidewitz McNiece 

Early Rose 

Cuttings $.^.,50 per 100. $,W.OO per IfKT) 

214-in. pots $5.00 per 100. $45.00 per KXHl 

Pink Turner Pink Chadwick 

Rose Perfection 

Cuttings $5.1)0 ,.er inO, $45.00 per 1000 

2H-in. pots $7.00 per la), $60.00 per 1000 



Early Flowering 

CHRYSANTHEMUMS 

For Outside Growing 
Evelyn Etoile d'Or 

Alice Howell Jack Bannister 

Bronze Source d'Or L'Argentuillais 
Cranfordia Normandie 

Cranford's White Perle Chattillonaise 
Rooted Cuttings, $3.50 per 100, $30.00 per 1000 

For Pot Culture ^\^^^i^ 

All Vsu-ieties 

Rooted Cuttings, $5.00 per 100, $45.00 per 1000 

ADDITIONAL VARIETIES 

Suitable for Pot Culture 

Barbara Davis. Reddish-bronze. Nov. 5. 

Eugene Langaulet. Deep golden yellow 

Anemone, holding until Thanksgiving. 
Frank Wilcox. Pompon, golden bronze. 

Nov. •». 
Polly Rose. I'ure white. Oct. 10. 
Yellow Polly Rose. Clear yellow. Oct. 10. 
Glory of the Pacific. Pink. Oct. 10 
$3.50 per 100, $30.00 per 100. 

POMPONS 

Baby, Becky McLean, Christmas Gold, 
Cometa, Diana, Donedd Doris, Excelsior, 
Frank Wilcox, Golden Climax, Golden 
West, Hilda Canning, Firebird, Julie La- 
gravere, Lillian Doty, Maid of Kent, Ma- 
riana. Niza, Romaine Warren, Skibo, 
Uvalda, Western Beauty, White Lillian 
Doty. 

Rooted Cuttings, $3. .SO per 100,$.«).00 per 1000 
Pot Plants $1 .50 per 100 extra 

SINGLE POMPONS 



Bronze Bucking- 
ham 
Gloriana 
Kathleen May 
Lily Neville 



Margaret Waite 
Mrs. E. D. Godfrey 
Miss Isobelle 
Mrs. W. E. Bucking- 
ham 



ANEMONE TYPE 

Sunshine Deep yellow. The best Thanks- 
^iviiiR variety ill this tvpe. Rooted Cut- 
tinRS. $4.00 per 11)0, $35.()0 per 10(H>. 

Volunteer Eugene Langaulet 

Pink Lady Blanche 

Izola 

Rooted Cuttings, $3. .SO per 100,$.W.OO per IOO1I 

2y4-in. pots $6.00 per 100, $50.00 per 1000 



Bo$ton Office: 15 Cedar St., Watertown P. O. 
L. U. LluulTy 505 Bulletin Building Phlla., PE. 



ROSES, Own Root 
Quality Stock 

At Price* You Know Are Right 

AMERICAN ROSE & PLANT CO. 

SPRINGFIELD. OHIO 



Bobbink & Atkins 

NURSERYBIBN 
FLORISTS and PLANTERS 

RUTHERFORD, NEW JERSEY 



112 



The Florists' Review 



June 1. 1022 



Miscellaneous Plants 



Per 100 

3-inch Dracaena Indivisa $10.00 

3-inch Vinca Variesrata 7.00 

4-inch Vinca Varie^^ata 10 00 

3-inch Salvia 5 00 

3-inch Verbenas, mixed 6.00 

3-inch Petunias, double, mixed 6.00 

3-inch Agreratum 6.00 



Per 100 

2>^-inch Vinca Rosea $ 5.00 

3^ -inch Geraniums 12.50 

4 -inch Geraniums 15.00 

3>^-inch Asparagus Plumosus 10.00 

3 >^ -inch Asparagfus Sprengferi 10 00 

3 -ioch Coleus Brilliancy 6.00 

3 -inch Coleus Golden Bedder 6.00 



BOSTON FERNS 

Fine, Clean, Bushy Stock 



4- inch each, $0.25 

5-inch each, .40 



6-inch each, $0.75 

7-inch each, 1.15 



8-inch each, $1.50 

Exceptionally fine, 10-inch, at $2 00 each. 

Orders shipped date of arrival, packed carefully and as light as consistent with safe transit. 

DAVIS FLORAL COMPANY 

Fern Specialists DAVENPORT, IOWA 



apolls, Ind., Introduced by Ilobert Pyle, West 
(jrove, Pa. 

Discussion of publicity for 1922 2.'5. 

Adjournment. 

TUURSDAY, JUNE 29, 2 P. M. 

Report of state vice-presidents. 

Election of officers ami next place of meeting. 

Report of special advisor.v committee to co.- 
operate with United States Department of Agri- 
culture, in connection with tlie department's 
work in developing American supplies of r.iw ma- 
terials, by J. H. Skinner, chairman, Topeka, 
Kan. 

"Progress in Propagating American Fruit 
Seedlings by Ilnreau of I'lant Industry, " by 
I'rof, L. B. Scott, Department of Agriculture, 
introduced by William Pitkin, Roolu'stcr, N. Y. 

"The Development of tlie Horticultural and 
Pcjmulogical Work of the United States Depart- 
ment of Agriculture," by Dr. h. 0. Corbett. 
Department of Agriculture, introduced by Thomas 
li. Median. Dreslier, Pa. 

Report of special oommitlec to assist F. P. 
Detwiler, United States Department of Agricul- 
ture, in compilation and republication of an edi- 
tion of quarantine regulations, by A. 11. Uill, 
chairman. Dundee. 111. 

"B'ederal Control Restrictions: Their Applica- 
tion and Effect, Present .'ind Future," bv Dr. 
C. L. Marlatt or R. Kent lieattie, United 
States Deiiartment of Agriculture. 

Adjournment. 

FRIDAY, JUNE 30, 10 A. M, 

"Standardization in tlie Nursery Business," by 
E. S. Welch, Shenandoah. la. 

"The Immediate Future of the Nursery Busi- 
ness," by Henry Cliase, I'hase. Ala. 

"The United States Department of Agricul- 
ture," by Hon. Henry t'. Wallace, secretary, 
introduced by J. W. Hill, lies MoiiU'S, I,i. 

Unfinished business. 

Questinn box. 

Parting thoughts: "Ood Be with You Till We 
Meet Again." All sing. 

Adjournment. 

FRIDAY, JUNE .SO, 3 P. M. 
Trip through the flivver factory, in charge of 
arrangements committee, C. A. Ilgenfritz, chair- 
man. 

Other Meetings. 
Besides the convention proper, other 
meetings have been scheduled: There 
will be a Baby Rambler business ses- 
sion Tuesday, June 27, at 11 a. m., in the 
committee room; the state vice-presi- 
dents will meet Wednesday, June 28, 



FERNS 



BoHton, 2i2-ln. $6.00; 4-In., $20.(K) and $'2.->.(Kl: 

,')-lri., $4<).(KI and SLVl.tX); fi-lii., $(iO.(K) ami $75.(K) 

per 100; «7-iii., Sl.tXI each. * 

Whttiiiaiiii, 4-111., $-J,-).Oii and *:i.j.00; 5-iii., Jott.OtI 

an<l $liO.(KI per KIO. 
RoOKevcIt, .i-lii., »S(I.OO; (i-ln., $7.i.lK). 
I'teris for 1-eriieiieK. '-'-in., Sti.OO |)er KKI. 
I'lniiiOHUS. 2'i.-lii., S4.U(); ;i-in., ifX.tMl; 4- 

S-i->.00 per KMI. 
SprwiiKerl. 2'-j-in., ^.mi; 

SilS.IKi per 100. 
Pliiiiiofiiis Send I i n es at $1 

per KKM), readv July 1. 
Si>renir«rl SeudHiiKS, SI. no i>ci- liKI or ^.M 

per KXIO. 
Pnlms, Kcntiii, 4 In., ."illc eacli. 

See our ad May IHIIi Issue lor Heddiiig .stock. 

Aikl .l per cent for packlni.'. You can save this 
by sending CASH WITH OKDKlt. 

Subject to change wltlioiit notice. 

GEO. A. KUHL, Whalisale Grower, Pekin, III. 



-In., 

:i-in., .tH.IKl; 4-ln., 
;.") per 1110 or ?1I).(I0 



ASCHMANN BROS. 

WHOLESALE GROWERS OF 

Pot Plants 

Second and Bristol Stt., Philadelphia, Pa. 



Ferns, Pandanus Veitchii, 
Cyclamen, Dracaenas 

ure our Quantity stocks. Write us about 
any plants you need. 

MACAW BROS. 
Delaware County, NORWOOD. PA. 



ORCHIDS 

We grow and sell Orchids only. Can ftir- 
nlsh you with anything In this line. 

If you intend invegtlDg In Orchida, do so now 
while prices are low. 

Special lists on application. 

LAGER & HURRELL, Snimnit, New Jersey 



BEGONIAS 

Pride of Newcastle, 

4- inch, 20c each 
Mrs. M. A. Patten, 

4-inch, 20c each 

Corallina de Lucerne, 

4-inch, 20c each 
Heavy bushy plants in bloom just 
rifjht for immediate sale or for 
shifting along to larger sizes. 

Rex, 4 -inch, 25c each 
Rex, 234 -inch, 10c each 

Asparag'us Plumosus, 

Fine, heavy plants, 4-inch, 12c 
each. 

Asparagrus Spreng-eri, 
Coleus in variety, Pailor 
Ivy, Moon Vines, Sal- 
vias, Sultanas, Lan- 
tanas. Wandering Jew, 
all from 2 and 2/4-inch pots, 
$3.00 per 100. 

BOSTON FERNS 

A nice lot of 5% and 6-inch 
pots, 60c each.. 

All of the above stock of my 
usual excellent (luslity. 

EXPERTLY PACKED, FREE OF CHARGE 

G. R. NOBLE, Paducah, Ky. 



JoNii 1. 1»22 



The Florists^ Review 



113 



PRIMULAS 



As Cut Flowers 




By using our December-sown stock, you can have the Primula 
obconica commence blooming in September, and in full bloom by 
November, which the lat-r sown stock will not do, as they are 
not old enough. A half dozen more flowers per plant , used as 
cut flowers, just adds that much more profit and still leaves a 
salable plant and they are a cut flower that lasts. 

Thig.illustratioD shows a plant ia a basket 

Get your plants now from December-sown stock, grow them 
on in pots or, better, plant them out; the results will surprise 
you, they will average just double as much. 

TfjeSivQin that^ods 

has proven its quality; there are none better. Prompt shipment 
now from 2-inch pots, $7.50 per 100 in any quantity and any 
color of the grandiflora or gigantea. 

Later sown stjck, ready the middle of June, of the same 
strain, $6.00 per 100; $55.00 per 1000. 



READY LATE IN JUNE 



100 



Priinula|chinen«is, from 2-inch pots $5.00 

Primula malacoides, old type and pink 5.00 

Primula malacoides Schilleri, best for cut.. 6.00 
Primula malacoides Townsendii 6.00 



1000 

$47.50 
47.50 
55.00 
55.00 



PRIMULA OBCONICA IN BASKET WORK 

Hydrangeas, French and Otaksa, fall delivery, from pots. 
4-inch, 2Sc; 6-mch, 40c; 6-inch, 60c; 7-inch, 75c. 



Begonia Gracilis Luminosa, Mignon, Prima Donna and 
Pink Profusion, the best varieties, which anyone can 
grow well and bloom in winter. July andAugust delivery, 
from 3-inch pots, $10.00 per 100; $90.00 per 1000. 

Not a kick this season, just praise; they must have bloomed well. 



SEED! 



Calceolaria Hybrida Grandiflora, prize strains of SELF COLOES and TIGERED, y^ trade packet, 60c: 

trade packet, $1.00. 
Cineraria Hybrida Grandiflora, Europe's best from a German specialist, in the following colors: 

Alba, white; Atrocoerulea, deep blue; Azurea, sky blue; Incamata, blush; Kermesina, carmine; 

Mataidor, scarlet; Rosea, bright pink; Sanguinea, blood red; Giant Dark Red with White; 

Giant Dark Blue with White; Dwart Gold Medal Mixed; Medium Gold Medal Mixed; 

Dwarf Large Stella Mixed; Stellata Mixed, tall, small flowers; Dwarf Stellata; Double Gold 

Medal Mixed; PRICE, each color, H trade packet, 60c; trade packet, $1.00. 



J. L SCHILLER, 



929 Prouty 
Avenue 



Toledo, Ohio 



CROTONS 

From ai^-lnek to Sp«eiin«B8 
2X-iii. Doti, 92B.OO per 100. 

PHOENIX RECLINATA 

2K-iii.. extra lurse. 98.00 per 100. 

HUGH N. NATHESON 

418 S. W. Sccrad Arenae 
MIAMI j: FLORIDA 


A-1 

2V8- 


Stock You Will Need 

100 1000 
n. German Strain Cvclamen. 6 to in Ipavp-s Jtv^.nn Jiin.m 


2^- 
2%. 
Vi- 

2 - 

3 - 

4 - 
4 - 
4 - 

3 - 

4 - 


T1 R^ii Prkffn««ftnc 


KSi^ 4.1 nn 


in. Vinca Varieitata ' 6.00 55.00 


n Jerusalem CnerrieA 6.00 /Wi.OO 


n. German Strain White Stecka, 8f)7r double 4.00 35.00 

in. EnSltsh Ivy 8.00 75.00 


n. Ciiatelalne Beifonia 25.00 220 00 


n. S. A. Nutt Geranium, '2 to 4 branches 15.00 140.00 

n. Feverfew, double 15.00 140.00 


n. Cobaea Scandena 10.00 90.00 


n. Cobaea Scandena 15.00 140 00 


Kirchh( 


Immediate shipment. Cash with order. 

off's Conservatory, 4711-4713 Milwaukee Ave., Chicago 


Joseph Heacock Company 

Wyncote, Pa. 

Palms and Cibotiums 

See Cleeaified edTertleemente 


CHAS. D. BALL 

GROWER OF 

PALMS. ETC. 

Holmesbiirg, Philadelphia, Pa. 


My Specialty 

POIltD PLANTS 

TO THE TRADE ONLY 

A. L MILLER, Jamaica, N. Y. 



112 



The Florists^ Review 



Junk 1. Iit22 



Miscellaneous Plants 



3-inch Dracaena Indivisa 


I'ci- IKl 

$10 00 


3-inch Vinca Variegata 

4-inch Vinca Variegata 

3-inch Salvia 


... 7.00 

... 10 OO 

5 00 


3-inch Verbenas, mixed 

3-inch Petunias, double, mixed. . 
3-inch Ageratum 


... (l.Co 

... ().00 
... (5.00 



Per II HI 

2 '^-inch Vinca Rosea $ 5.00 

3 >^ -inch Geraniums 12.50 

4 -inch Geraniums 15.00 

3 ' j-inch Asparagus Plumosus 10. OO 

3'i;-inch Asparagus Sprengeri 10 00 

3 -inch Coleus Brilliancy 6.00 

3 -inch Coleus Golden Bedder 6.00 



BOSTON FERNS 

Fine, Clean, Bushy Stock 



4-ineh each, $0.25 

5-ine'h each, .40 



()-inch each, $0.75 

7-inch each, 1 . 15 



8-ineh each, $1.50 

p]xceptionally finr, lo-inch, at $2 00 each. 

Orders shipped date of arrival, i)acked cai-efiilly and as li<,'-ht as consistent with safe transit. 

DAVIS FLORAL COMPANY 

Fern Specialists DAVENPORT, IOWA 











iili'ilis, liiil , iiitnidiii'i-il In i;..lii'it r\ li. Wr-t 


F F R N S — . 


BEGONIAS 

Pride of Newcastle, 

4-inch, l20c each 
Mrs. M. A. Patten, 

4-inch, 20c eacli 

Corallina de Lucerne, 

4 inch, LiOc each 
Heavy liu^liy iilaiiis iii bluom Just 
nt-'til tor iiiiiiiediate salt; or for 
>liiltitiK aldPg to lars^er sizes. 

Rex, 4 -inch, 25c each 
Rex, 2 '4-inch, 10c each 

Asparagus Plumosus, 

Fine, heavy plants, 4-incli, 12c 
each. 

Asparagus Sprengeri, 
Coleus in variety, Pailor 
Ivy, Moon Vines, Sal- 
vias, Sultanas, Lan- 
tanas. Wandering Jew, 
all from 2 and 2X-inch pots, 
.t3.(i0 per lOn. 

BOSTON FERNS 

A nice lt>t of ")% and G-inch 
pots, 60c each.. 

All of tlie Hllo^o stock of my 

usual e.vcellciit nuility. 

EXPERTLY PACKED. FREE OF CHARGE 

G. R. NOBLE, Paducah, Ky. 


(iiuVf, Til. 

Discussion i.f pulrliiil \ l.'i I'.iL'L' 1^:; 
A(lJ(iuriiiiU-rit. 

'JiiiKsn.w, jim; jh. u iv .\i 

liopnrt I.f sl:ili' vice iiri'-idi'Mis. 

KIrctioii <if citlicers ;inil iirxt iiLuc ..f iiii'i ! iiii; 

Itcpm-t of spcciiil iiilvi^niv ii.niiiiii i.'i. i.. (i. 
cpiriiti' witli I'nitcil .Stalc'S llrji.Til iii.iii .if Akti- 
i-iiitui'4', in (-..niKM't i..ii vvilli iIh- .l.-piirtnicnt s 
\v..ik ill (l>.vi.l..piiii,' Aimriraii siippli.'s "f I'.iu' iiiii 
tci'ials, by J. H. SliuiiMT, .'lui inu.iii, Lipcli;!. 
K.'iit. 

•'I'ri.;:r('ss in 1*r..p;iL':i tin:; Ani.-ti.Mn Krnit 
S..-.iliiiKs I..V l'.nr.;iii I.f l'l:inl 1ih1ii-ih." In 
rr..f. I,, H, S.-..1I. Il..p;irtiiic.nt i.f .Xlti.iiIi iii-.\ 
inir..iiii.-..l l.y \\iin.iMi I'iiliiii. Ki..li,.-I.i . .\ . V 

••■||i(. Drvcli.pniint I.f llir 1 liirlii iilliiral ami 
l'i.ni..|..:.'ii Ml \Vi.rl< I.f Ilii' 1 iiiiiil Stall's lli'pari 
mini I.f .\:;rii-iillnii.." l.y lir. I,. C, (■..ili..ii 
Ki-p.-i itmi'iit lif .\i;riiiilluii-. int rinlin . i[ l.v 'lliLni:.- 
II, .Mii-lian. Uri'shir. I'.i. 

i;i-p..rl I.f ^pi'.ial ii.iiiriiil I.-.' li. a>— i-l V 1' 

lll'I will'V, riiilni Stall's lli.p.-ll Ilni'IlI lif .\:;lir.li 




Hosloil. L''-j ill. $l..llll; l-iii., jjli.iiii all.l SJ... iKi; 
• I ill.. slii.iHi anil s.'iii.iHl; ri-lM.. sui.iHi ainl ?i7.'..iiii 
piT liHi; s7-iii.. SI. on i-arli. • 

W liiliiiiiiiii. Iiii., s_..-,.iiii an.l s;;.-,.iiii; ,-i.iii., s.mmki 
aii.l s.ji.iiii prr liHi. 

■iiMiK.'x cir. .".111.. *.'Ji.iiii; 1. in.. s7,-..iiii. 

I'lf ris till- hcriUM if-. .'-111., s.i.m. pi-i- jiKi. 

I'Iniiiosn-. .'J*'* 111., si, III; :: 111., ss.dii; lin.. 

SJ.'.. IKI |.rl lull. 

Spr^-innTi. 'J'-.'-in.. sl.iiii: :; m.. ss.ini; 4iii., 

SI.'. i«i piT mil. 
rill til- x-cdiiiiu- .it SI. J', p. 1- IKIiir sill. an 

1 i.a pNiii, 1 , :,,i \ .1 a 1 1 I , 
».|ii<-ii:;i-rl ><•«■ (III iiy », sPaa p, i jiHi i.i ,s.-.,'.ii 

prr Kimi. 
I'liltlls, Ivciit i;i. 1 ill.. .V aili. 

■~.|i i.iii ,ii| \la\ Islh is-iii- l..r I'.rilililiL' ^P.i !■ . 

.\ilil .'i prr ri 111 li.l parkillL'. ^ i .11 iMIl ~a \ r llii- 

l.> ~rliililiL' 1 \--ll W Mil 1 ii;i>i,i;, 

^ill.H.I p. rl.aiiL-.i \\ llii.iiil li.il i.-i 

GEO. A. KUHL, Wholesale Grower Pekin, III. 






tii.n I.f quaraiitim- i .-i;!!!,. 1 i..ri~. I.\ A 11. ll.i: 
cliairin.ari, Iturnlii', III. 

■■Ki'il.-ial (■..niri.l Kisi iiiii,,i,< ■ •|li,.ii- A|.pli. ,. 
linn ami i;n'iii. I'n-ihi ami riituii-." In In-, 
r, I,, M.ail.aU 1.1 1;. K.lil Ilea 1 1 ii... liiit..' 
Stat.-^ lii-p.niniiTil i.f .\;: in nil iii... 

Ailj'.iii iiniini 

i'i;iii.\\\ .11 m: :!ii. m \ m 

"Si.-iiiil.ir.li/.i ti.in in 11.'- .Niip^.rv r..i--in.<-i," !■ 

1' S \\ rli ll ^l.i-ll 1 riili. 1 h Pi 




ASCHMANN BROS. 

WHOLESALE GROWEKS OF 

Pot Plants 

Second and Bristol Sts. , Philadelphia, Pa. 


"'111.- Ininiiilia ll' l''.iiiir.. ..f thr Niii-ii\- I'.ii-: 


.. - - - 


iii'ss." In IjiMirv I'lia^.-, Ilia-.-. ,\la. 

"Till. Inihil Slali-N jP. pal iMi.nl I.f .\:;rin ; 
liiri'." l.y 11. ill ll.iir\ ( Wall.iii'. ^.i.-lar 
inii...liiii ll li> .1 W ll'ill. li.i^ .Miiiii.s, 1.,. 

Inlinisli.i.l liiiviiir-s. 

(^i.-li.iii l...\ 

I'ai-lin!.' Iliniii;ljl<: "('....l r.i. wiih Viiii lill W. 
M. .t A:-',iiii •■ All siliL-. 

.\.l.i..urniiii lit 

ii;iii,\ \ . .iiNi: .".ll, :•, iv m 

■| rip tlir.in:;li llii. Ili\\rr f.iili.in, i>i .l.ari:.. ..; 


Ferns, Pandanus Veitchii, 
Cyclamen, Dracaenas 

»re our Quantity stocks. Write us about 
any plants you need. 

MACAW BROS. 

Delaware County, NORWOOD, PA. 


a rra ll ji ii..hl> . .^ainii iii i-, (' A, I lu'i'iif i it/, iliaii 

Ilia h 

Other Meetings. 

Besiili'S tlip cMiiN eiitimi [irniier, dllipr 
niPffiii^s liavo licpii scIkmIuIciI: Tlicic 
\\\U lip ;i liiili.v J^piiililiT )nisiiic«s .=os- 
sion Tiips,l,-iy, .Iniic L'7, :it 11 n. m., in tin- 
ffiinniittcc nidiii ; Ihc st.'itc vicrprosi- 
ilciits will inert Wriliirsilay, June ~^, 


ORCHIDS 

Wo crow ami sell Orchids only, ('an fur- 
iiiHh yon witli anytlilni.' in this line. 

If ynii intrnil invcstint; in Orchids, do so now 
wliili- piii-i-'i ;iri' li.w. 

Spi'cial liutHon iipiilication. 

LAGER & HURRELL, Summit, New Jersey | 



jijSK 1, 1022 



The Florists^ Review 



113 



PRIMULAS 



As Cut Flowers 

15y usinti our December-sowa stock, you can have the I'riiiiula 
olicouii-a eomiiieiice liioDiiiiuK iu Sci'leinber, aad in lull hlooiii liy 
NovenilxT, wliicli the lat-r sown slock will nut do, as they are 
not old euuuBh. A half dozen more flowers per plant, useil as 
cut flowers, just adds that much more i>rotit and still leaves a 
salable plant and they are a cut tlower that lasts. 

This illustration shows a plant in a basket 

Get your plants now from Derember-sowa slock, grow them 
on in pots or, better, plant them out: the results will surprise 
you, they will average just double as much. 

7/wStrmn thut^ads 

has proven its (lualily; there are none better, f'rompt shipment 
now from "J-iuch pjts, ST.")*) per U)() in any (|uanli1y and any 
color of the grandiilora or gigautea. 




color of the grandiilora or „.,,„„. v,«,. 

Later sown stjck, ready the middle of June, of the same 
strain, $<i.(tO per 100; $5o.(«) per KHX. 



READY LATE IN JUNE 



llH) 



Priniulagchinen«is, from L'-inch |)ots $5.00 

Primula malacoides, old type and pink 5.00 

Primula malacoides Schilleri, best for cut.. 6.00 
Primula malacoides Townsendii 6.00 



S47.50 
47.50 
55.00 
55.00 



PRIMULA OBCOMCA IN BASKET WORK 

Hydrangeas, French and Otaksa, fall delivery, from pots. 
4-inch, 25c; 5-iuch, 40c; t)-inch, 60c; 7-inch, 75c. 



Begonia Gracilis Luminosa, Mignon, Prima Donna and 
Pink Profusion, the best varieties, which anyone ran 
grow well and bloom in winter. .luly andAugusl delivery, 
from :;-iuch pots, $10.00 per 1(HI; $90.00 per Ktdo, 

Not a kick this season, just praise; they must have bloomed well. 



SEED! 



Calceolaria Hybrida Grandiflora, prize strains of SELF COLOliS and TlGKRP:i), Yz trade packet, 60c; 
trade i)acket, $1.00. 

Cineraria Hybrida Grandiflora, Europe's best from a German specialist, in the folbiwing colors; 
Alba, white: Atrocoerulea, deep blue; Azurea, sky blue; Incarnata, blush: Kermesina, carmine: 
Matador, scarlet; Rosea, bright i>ink; Sanguinea, blood red; Giant Dark Red with White; 
Giant Dark Blue \%ith White; Dwarf Gold Medal Mixed; Medium Gold Medal Mixed; 
Dwarf Large Stella Mixed; Stellata Mixed, tall, small flowers: Dwarf Stellata; Double Gold 
Medal Mixed; PRICE, each color, ' . trade packet. 60c; trade packet, $1.00. 



J. L. SCHILLER, 



929 Prouty 
Av enue 



Toledo, Ohio 



CROTONS 

From 2^-inch to Spacimant 

2H-in, potB, $25.00 per 100. 

PHOENIX RECLINATA 

2H-in., extra large, $8.00 per 100. 

HUGH N. NATHESON 

418 S. W. Sectnd A venae 
MIAMI FLORIDA 



Joseph Heacock Company 

Wyncote, Pa. 

Palms and Cibotiums 

See Classified advertisementt 



A-1 Stock You Will Need 



.-III. 

;-in. 
;-in. 
.•-ill. 

•ill. 

-ill. 

-in. 

-in. 

-in. 

-in. 

-in. 



Ill In li':i\o- 



German Strain Cyclamen, 

Beu Pompons 

Vinca Variefjata 

Jerusalem Cherries 

German Strain White Stacks, > "^r iIcuiIjI. 

English Ivy 

Chatelaine Begonia 

S. A. Nutt Geranium, J to I bi-;incii'',s 

Feverfew, iI(jiiIi1i' 

Cobaea Scandens 

Cobaea Scandens 



. r..O(i 

. I'p.rKi 

. 4.fKI 

. S.(KI 

. ■.'.").IK1 

. I'l.iiii 

. In.(K) 

. 1.0.1 K.I 



inrio 
Jiin.m 

•1,5.0(1 

OO.fKI 

,'!.').(I0 

75.1111 

2'Jii.iiO 

11(1.(10 

110.00 

!I0.(M1 

llO.fXJ 



Iiiiiiii'diiiti' >hi)iiiii'nt. (';i-^li wilh iinlfC. 

Kirchhoff's Conservatory, 47 11-4713 Milwaukee Ave., Chicago 



CHAS. D. BALL 

GROWER OF 

PALMS, ETC. 

Holmesburg, Philadeiphici. Pa 



My Specialty 

POTTED PLANTS 

TO THE TRADE OxVLY 

A. L. MILLER, Jamaica, N. Y. 



114 



The Florists' Review 



JUNB 1, 1922 



at 5 p. m., in the committee room; the 
American Nurserymen 's Protective As- 
sociation will assemble Thursday, Juno 
29, at 7 p. m., in convention hall; the 
Franco-American Syndicate will meet 
the same day at 7:30 p. m., in the com- 
mittee room; the Wholesale Fruit Tree 
Growers ' Association will meet Wednes- 
day, June 28, at 8 p. ni., in convention 
hall, and the Retail Nurserymen's As- 
sociation will meet Thursday, June 29, 
at 8: 30 p. m., in the committee room. 



TORONTO, ONT. 



There has been a f^ood demand for 
flowers during the last week. The col- 
lege convocations call for a great many 
bouquets, as do also tlie hospitals. The 
closing exercises have started and will 
continue at different hospitals and col- 
leges for the next two weeks. The fol- 
lowing extract from one of the local 
papers regarding one of the college con- 
vocations illustrates the demand for 
flowers there is from this source: 
"Banks of flowers, surmounted by fresh 
young faces, contrasted with the somber 
academic garb." It is customary at 
graduation for friends to remember the 
fortunate young ladies with flowers. 

The demand for design work has been 
heavy. May 23, preceding the holiday 
May 24, is listed as Empire day in the 
schools, and the monuments all over the 
cities were draped with designs of all 
kinds by the children of the schools. 
On the afternoon of May 23 there was 
a parade by the cadets and girl guides, 
the other pupils forming an interested 
crowd of spectators. This year the de- 
signs were many and beautiful and 
ranged from small sprays and pretty 
baskets to large and imposing wreaths 
and other designs. 

Miller Bros, are progressing with 
their greenhouses and the benches are 
in the first of the ten houses. Planting 
will start immediately. 

Dealers in l)edding plants are having 
a big season this year. There is a grow- 
ing interest in flowers and the people of 
Toronto as well as throughout the prov- 
ince are being e<lucated to decorate 
their property with flowering shrubs, 
plants of all kinds and small trees. The 
people are getting the habit of having 
flowers on the table, and when there are 
none in the garden it isn't far to the 
nearest florist, who benefits by the in- 
creasing love of flowers. J. J. II. 



FERNS 

POT-GROWN STOCK 

Per 100 Per 1000 

Boston $6.00 $56.00 

Roosevelt 6.00 66.00 

Whitmanll 6.00 56.00 

Teddy Jr 6.00 55.00 

Verona 6.00 66.00 

MacawU 6.00 65.00 

Transplanted Bench-grown Stock $5.00 
less per 1000 than the Pot-grown. 

Fern Runners, 

$15.00 per 1000 

HENRY H. BARROWS 

Fern Specialist 
264 High Street, Wkitman, Mass. 



Godfrey Aschmaim's Spring Stock 

We are offering this year a fine and large stock of Spring Foliage 
and Bedding Plants, all in good condition and at reasonable prices. 



Ferns, ScottU and Teddy Jr., 6% -Inch 

pots, 60 cts. each. , 

Palms, Kentia Forsterlana and Belmore- 

ana. fine stock, 4-lnch, 60 eta; S-lnch, 

$1.25. 

Blrd's-Nest Ferns, heavy 5 ^ -inch, $1.00 

each. 
Dracaena FraKrans, heavy 6-lnch, 76 cts. 

each. 
Rubber Plants, heavy 4-lnch, 60 cts. 
Asparagms Plumosas, heavy 4-lnch, $17.00 

per 100. 
Dracaena Indlvisa, heavy stock and very 

scarce, 5-lnch, 50 cts.; 6-lnch, 76 cts. 

and $1.00 each. 
Tradescantias. 2% -Inch, $6.00 per 100. 
Hardy Enfflish Ivy, 2 plants In a 2Vi-lnch 

pot, $6.00 per 100; 3-lnch, $12.00 per 

100; 4-lnch, staked up, $25.00 per 100. 
Oeraninms. We have a flne stock of 

healthy plants of A. Rlcard and B. 

Poltevlne, 4-lnch, $18.00 per 1,00; S. A. 

Nutt and Mme. Buchner, white. 4-lnch, 

$17.00 per 100. 
Besronlas, flne, heavy stock In bloom of 

Lumlnosa, Prima Donna and Vernon, 

4-lnch. $17.00 per 100; 3-lnch, $10.00 

per 100. 
Scarlet Sace, America and Bonflre, 4-lnch, 

$15.00 per 100; 3-lnch. $7.00 per 100. 
Cannas, King: Humbert, Yellow King 

Humbert and The President, strong 4- 

Inch, $17.00 per 100, 
Heliotropes, heavy plants, dark blue, 4- 

Inch, $15.00 per 100. 
Aceratam, new dwarf variety. 4-lnch, 

»15.00 per 100: 2%-lnch, $6.00. 
Vlnca Yariesata, 4-lnch, $20.00 per 100. 
Lantanas. best varieties, 4-lnch, $15.00 

per 100. 



Hydrangeas, all the best French and 
Otaksa varieties, full of buds, for 
spring planting, 6-lnch, 76 cts.; 7-lnch, 
$1.00 each. 

Coleus. These are very scarce but we 
have a flne and large stock of them; 
VerschafTeltli, Golden Bedder and 
Queen Victoria, 2%-lnch, $5.00 per 100; 
Brilliancy and other fancy varieties, 
2% -Inch, $6.00 per 100; 4-lnch. $17.00 
per 100. 

Calendula Prince of Orange, 3-lnch, $8.00 
per 100; 4-lnch, $15.00. 

We also have a flne stock of 2^ -Inch 
plants at $5.00 per 100, such as Pe- 
tunias, Rosy Morn and Inimitable; 
Sweet Alrssom Little Gem; Verbeiiaa, 
4 best colors; Liobelia Emperor Wil- 
liam; Dusty Millers; Dwarf Frencli 
Marigolds; Pbloz. best colors mixed. 



Ipomoea Noctlflora, Godfrey Asch- 

mann's well known pure white, 
fragrant Moon Vines bearing flow- 
era as large as a saucer, 2^ -Inch, 
$6.00 per 100; 4-lnch, staked up, 
$18.00 per 100. 



Jerusalem Cherries. In the following 
varieties: Cleveland, Holly Berry and 
Orange Queen, 2% -Inch, $5.00 per 100. 

Snapdragons. We have a flne and large 
stock of strong plants which will be 
ready about May 20, pinched back In 
the following varieties: Keystone, Nel- 
rose. Silver Pink. Giant Yellow and 
Giant White, 2^4 -Inch, $6.00 per 100; 
$55.00 per 1000. 

Tomatoes, strong 2% -Inch John Baer, 
Earllana and Stone, $3.00 per 100. 



Our Terms are cash with order. No plants are shipped C. O. D. Add 6% for pack- 
ing. All plants shipped at purchaser's risk. All plants will be shipped out of pots 
unless otherwise Instructed. 

GtDFREY ASCIINANN,ioiow.ii>t»i.st.. rhiladelphia, Pa. 



Mention The Review when yon write. 



OUR SPECIALTY— Ferns of Finest Ouality 

Boston \ Boston v 

Roosevelt I 2Ji-inch Booseyelt J „ . „. 

Whitmanii Vper 100 $6.50 Whitmanii >tu,rinn «iKno 

Teddy. Jr. (per 1000 60.00 Teddy. Jr. ^Per 100 $15.00 

Whitmanii Comp./ Whitmanii Comp,/ 

100 1000 

Asparagus Plumosus, 2)i-inch $ 5.00 $50.00 

Asparagus Sprengeri, 2H-inch 5.00 60.00 

Asparagus Plumosus, 3-inch 12,00 

Asparagus Sprengeri, 3-inch 12.00 

Asparagus Sprengeri, 4-inch 20.00 

We are booking orders for Immediate and'future delivery. Quality stock guaranteed. Cash with order. 

THE SPRINGFIELD FLORAL & FERN CO., SPRINGFIELD, OHIO 



Carnation Thomas C. Joy 

strong, from 2-inch pots 

$12.00 per 100, $100.00 per 1000 
250 at 1000 rate 

JOY FLORAL CO., Nashville, Tenn. 



CABBAGE PLANTS if^S 

See Classified Ads. WM. P. YEAGLE, Bristol, Pa. 



JuNB 1, 1922 



The Florists^ Review 



115 



SPRING STOCK 

Ready by the Thousands 

Per Per 

Size of Pot. „ _ ^^ ^«*'® 

21/1 -In. Arenitama, Frazerl 
or IlKbt w^dark blue $ 8.00 I 27.60 

91,^.111. AlternantheraB, red 

'^nd yellow 2.76 26.00 

^V^-ln. ABpa««n«, Plumo- 
•ua or Spreogerl 6.25 60.00 

S-ln Cannas, 100,000 red 

and yellow Humbert 7.60 70.00 

CMinas, Mwk Alfred Co- 

MTd, Firebird 10.60 100.00 

sU-ln. CentaureM, Dusty 
Miller «.00 27.60 

2^-in. Chrymnthemama, 28 

varieties 4.76 46.00 

ty^-in. Coleas. red or yellow 8.26 80.00 
60,000 Dracaena Indlrlaa, 
4, 6, 8-ln. pots, $20.00, 
$40.00, $76.00 per 100. 

TU-ln. Fnchslas, 12 good 
varieties 8.26 80.00 

4-lii. Fuchsias, 12 good va- 
rieties 12.60 .... 

n4-iii. OeranliUBS, all stand- 
ard varieties 6.26 60.00 

4-iii. Geraniums, fine plants 12.50 120.00 

tVi-in. Heliotropes, llfht or 

dark blue 4.60 40.00 

4-ln. Heliotropes, fine plants 12.60 .... 

2V4-ln. Marguerites, white or 

yellow 6.00 45.00 

4H-tai- Marguerites, stocky 

plants 12.00 

2V&-ln. Stocks, Princess 

AUcs or Beauty of Nice.. 8.60 80.00 

2%-in. Verbenas, fancy as- 
sorted 8.26 80.00 

S^-ln. Tradescantias, Wan- 

derlnr Jew 3.76 85.00 

V/A-ya. Vinoa Varlesata 6.00 45.00 

8%-ln. Vlnca Yartecato 13.00 126.00 

Also abundance of other stock. 
Send for List. 

VEGETABLE PLANTS IN ABUNDANCE 

Per Per 

100 1000 
Cabbare plants, standard 

varieties $0.76 $6.00 

Tomato plants, standard 

varieties 90 7.60 

Lettuce plants, 4 varieties. .60 4.00 

For special prices, correspondsnce so- 
licited. 

ALONZO J. BRYAN 

WHOLESALE FLORIST 

WASHINGTON, NEW JERSEY 



Surprise (n«. issig) 
And Laddie 

We are now booking orders for our new 
Pmk Carnation, Surprise, for 1923. 
Also Laddie, for December, 1922, and 
later delivery. 

Description and price list 
nailed on request 

F. Dorner & Sons Co. 

Lafayette, Indiana 



Chrysanthemums 

FOR EVERY NEED 

ELMER D. SMITH & CO. 

Chrysanthemum Specialists 
MiKlAN, MICH. 

xne Birthplace of Modern Chrysanthemums 



Chrysanthemums 

OF FINEST QUALITY 

OUR SPECIALTY 

_ ^•^«' Classlflod ad in this issue. 

T. G. OWEN & SON, Cilambus, Miss. 

WHOLESALE FLORISTS 



NATALIE 

A new medium pink seedling carnation 
that will take the place of Ward 

NATALIE was awarded tlie Silver Medal in New York 
Won First Prize and was awarded a Report of Merit in Boston 

* Place your order at once to Insure early delivery 

i ROOTED CUTTINGS 

$12.00 per 100; $100.00 per 1000; $450.00 per 5000 

250 at 1000 rata 

Deliveries beginning December, 1922, and filled in the order received. 

JOY FLORAL CO. 

Nashville, Tennessee 



BETTY JANE 

Awarded the Silver Medal at the National Flower 
Show at Indianapolig, Indiana, 

Our new Ward pink seedling has a beautiful 
formed flower on long, stifE stems; of an even 
shade of Ward pink. It is a good grower in 
the field and under glass and a free and con- 
tinuous bloomer, good keeper and shipper. 

Awarded the Special S. A. F. & O. H. Silver Medal 

by the American Carnation Society at Hartford, 

Connecticut, January, 1922. 

Place your order now for early delivery next 
winter. $12.50 per 100; $110.00 per 1000. 

Orden will 6« HUed in rotation aa received 

A. JABLONSKY, Carnation Specialist, 

CUVETTE, CLAYTON P. O, MISSOURI 




/: 



BIDDEFORD, MAINE 

CARNATION PLANTS 

ROSALIND, rooted cuUinKS $120.00 per lOOO 

IMPROVED WARD, rooted cuttings lOO.M per 1000 

December. 1922 delivery. 

MAINE SUNSHINE, rooted cuttiDKS 120.00 per 1000 

WHITE DELIGHT, rooted cuttings 100.00 per 1000 

April, 1922 delivery. 



I 



''■fi:A. ,:^'^>;^^-r y 



116 



The Florists' Review 



June 1, 1922 



Greenhouse Heating 



Subscribers are invited to write the 
editor of this department with regard to 
any details of greenhouse heating that are 
not understood. When information is de- 
sired regarding the capacity of boilers, or 
the amount of radiation required for a 
greenhouse, the needed temperatures 
should be stated in the inquiry, as well 
as the amount of glass in the side walls, 
and the dimensions and general arrange- 
ment of the greenhouses. It is often help- 
ful, also, to have a sketch showing the 
location of the houses. 



FOB HIOH-FBESSUBE STEAM. 

We are completing a greenhouse, 20x 
350 feet, with solid benches for carna- 
tions. The heating system will consist 
of a high-pressure steam boiler, cen- 
trally located. What size of flow and re- 
turn pipes and how many -will be needed! 
The minimum temperature to be main- 
tained will be 60 degrees in a climate 
similar to that of Chicago and vicinity. 

B. F. L. — Can. 



For a house 20x350 feet it would be 
advisable to use one 3-inch main flow 
pipe. From the description, it is under- 
stood that the boiler will be located op- 
posite the middle of the house. The 
main flow pipe should be divided at 
that point and a 2%-inch flow pipe car- 
ried in each direction to the ends of the 
house, where they should be connected 
with the coils. The coils should be 
located on the sides of the walls. If 
more convenient, two 2-inch flows may 
be substituted for each of the 2%-inch 
flows. These may be carried either on 
the side wall plates or on the purlin 
posts. The pipes for the coils should 
be 114-inch, and the number will de- 
pend upon the amount of glass in the 
walls and the construction of the house. 
A well built house without glass in the 
walls will require three pipes in each 
coil, but for two and one half or three 
feet of glass in each end wall an addi- 
tional return pipe will be required on 
each wall. If the end of the house is 
much exposed it will be advisable to 
start the coils on the end of the house 
five or six feet from each corner. E. 



HEATING TWO HOUSES, 

We have erected two connecting 
greenhouses IS^^xlOO feet and will use 
a Lord & Burnham soft coal boiler with 
a fire box 24x38 inches. We are getting 
3,000 feet of 2-inch, 400 feet of 3-inch 
and 5-inch pipe for flows and returns. 
What is the proper way to arrange these 
pipes in order to secure the best re- 
sults! T. B. G.— Pa. 

The sketch shows that each of the 
houses has one side wall exposed, con- 
taining thirty inches of glass and thirty 
inches of concrete. The temperature de- 
sired is 55 to 60 degrees. Each house 
has two side benches, with a solid bed 
in the center. 

From the size of pipe ordered, it is 
inferred that the idea is to use 3-inch 
flows and 2-inch returns, which will be 
all right. 

For each house it will be advisable to 
use two 3-inch flow pipes, placing them 
on the side wall plates and giving them 
a slight downward slope. At the farther 
end of the houses connect each flow pipe 
with a coil of five 2-inch returns on the 



KROESCHELL STEAN UNITS 

Of Superior Features 



^'o Tubas 
To Claan, 

No 
Masonry 
Raquirad 




For Steam 

Plants 

Less Than 

100 

Horse Power 



Kroeschell Water Tube Steam Boiler 



KROESCHELL High Pressure Unit 



100 to 350 HORSE POWER 




Our BABY Steam Boiler 



For 
Small 
Steam 
Plants 




Oravity 
Vapor or 
Vacuum 
Systems 



KROESCHELL Tubelesa Steam Boiler 

Enginaering Advice and Quotations cheerfully 
submitted— Let us know your requirements 

KROESCHELL BROS. CO. 

444 W. Erio Street CHICAGO, ILL. 



I 



JONB 1. 1922 



The Florists^ Review 



117 




MONEY-SAVING 
SUNDRIES 

OUR PRICES ARE 
ALWAYS BELOW THE MARKET 

GULF CYPRESS 

Greenhouse Materials 

Pecky Cypress Bench Lumber 

GLASS 




HOTBED SASH 

AU Kinds and Sizes 

At lower than tte prevailing mar- 
ket prices. 

PECKY CYPRESS 

Tn random ividths Rn<l lengths. 

Carload lots shipped from mill, frelgrht 
paid New York rate. 

$28.00 per thousand sq. ft. 



• 



NON-KINK 

WOVEN HOSE 

Remnants, 12 ft. and up, coupled, ISo per 
ft. This nose is dieap at twice the price. 



Hose Valve 

Size, ^-incb 

tSfig* All brass except the hand wheel. 
^w\* Has a removable leather disk, 
which is.*easily replaced to keep watertight. 
Stuffing box prevents leaks at stem. 



MetrapolitaB 
PaUnted 





BOILERS 

Will do more work than any 
other boiler of the same size; 
made in all sizes to heat every 
■ize itreenhouse. 

PIPE 
VALVES FITTINGS 



1299-1323 Flushins Av«^ Brooklyn, N. Y. 



PIPE and FLUES 

A LL SIZES of second-haDd pipe, with 
new threads and couplings, in ran- 
dom lengths or cut lengths. Also 
make a specialty of handling boiler 
flues for retubing boilers or for green- 
house piping. All flues are triouned 
and thoroughly cleaned by machine. 

,«« JOHN GROH 

1885 Clyboani Ave, CHICAGO, ILL. 



■PIPE- 



Wrought Iron of sonnd second-hand aualitj 
Wh new threads and couplings. 16- ft. lengths 
"?,"P- Also Pine cut to sketch. We guarantee 
entire satisfaction or return money. 

ALSO NEW PIPE AND FITTINGS 

Pf aff & Kendall pglig. Newark, N. J. 

PIPE — Second-Hand 

AUnzea FitHnga and BoUer Tube* 



Pipe cut 
to sketch 



We guarantee entire satisfac- 
tion or money refunded 



PWelphia Second-Hand Pipe Supply Co. 

1003 N. 7tli Street. PHILADELPHIA. PA. 

A HALF-INCH ADVERTISCWCNT 

h!f5^i"Jfeep your name and specialty 
OBiS coi?® ^^ole trade, at a cost of 
only 63i«c per week on a yearly order. 



Endurance - Resistance - Economy - Design 

Four Practical Reasons for Lining Your Boilers With 



:sTEa 



liidj 



vvl 



It lasts from two to three times as lotiE'as ordinary fire brick. 

It resists heat up to 3500 doKrees F. 

Very economical to install and it saves money on repairs and replacements. 

"STEEL MIXTURE" Blocks are 
largre. tongued-and-grooved and when 
fitted together form a long-lived, 
smooth, clinker-proof surface. 

Made for all styles and sizes of 
boilers. Boiler Door Arches, Fire Box 
Blocks, Back Arches and Blow-Off Pipe 
Protectors, Furnace Arches, Fire 
Cement. Can be shipped promptly 
from stock. „ 

Send for new catalogue and Book 
of Dimensions." 



McLEOD & 
HENRY CO. 

TROY, N. Y. 

NEW YORK BOSTON DETROIT 




Mention The Beylew when joa writa. 



IMICO 

Hot Water Boilers 

Made by 

Dlinois Malleable Iron Co. 

1801-1825 Diversey Boulorard 

CHICAGO 

Are noted for COAL ECONOMY and 
good results generally 

SEND FOR CATALOGUE 

Uention The Review when you write. 




Mpiehaad 




Points the 
Way to 
Economy of Fuel 



IB 



EGIN NOW to find out about the "Morehead" System. Send right away 
for the "Morehead" book for florists. In it you will And an easily understood 
discussion of the boiler and condensation Question from the practlGal 
standpoint of the grower of flowers. Write for this help TODAY. 



MOREHEAD MFG. CO. 



Dept. "M" 299 



DETROIT, MICH. 



Mention The Review when you write. 







YOU SHOI Jf .D KNOW 

More about 

FUher Steam SpedalUes 

Write for our interesting catalogue 

THE FISHER GOVERNOR CO. 

- MARSHALLTOWN, IOWA. 

Agencies In all principal cltlea. 


Union Grate 

A Rocking Grate that Saves Coal 

Write for catalogue and prices 

MARTIN GRATE CO., "'^cMSS'^ 






ESTABLISHED 1867 

S. WILKS MFG. COMPANY 

Manufacturers of 

WILKS HOT WATER BOILERS 

FOR GREENHOUSE HEATING 
3517-3539 SUeUs Are., CHICAGO, ILL 


Cokal Hand Stokers 
SAVE COAL 

Ask us to send our combustion engineer 

COKAL STOKER CORPORATION 

335 E. Ohio St. CHICAGO, ILU 
Pbon* Soperlor 7701 



"rf. ^•■•-^i-j-^-'"; ,,.^*--- n,rr'-'"\-'.A " •:•• 'T ■■.' 7. ,/*»'■ 



■ . '■ , ~ ".' * .-j^^*",'" ,'^Mw' ""•'^iif': *V9y^%^U^ 



118 



The Florists'' Review 



June 1, 1922 



outside walls and four rotunis ou the 
inside walls. 

This will only require about 1,800 feet 
of 2-inch jiipew, an(l {i;oo(l results can be 
obtained with ],t)00 linear feet. If 55 
degrees will suffice, when the tempera- 
ture is 10 below zero, the number of re- 
turn pipes in each house can be reduced 
to seven, which would require only 1,400 
feet of 2-inch pipe. 

The boiler is amply large to heat the 
two houses. R. 



INDIANAPOLIS, IND. 



The Market. 

Flowers for Memorial day were plen- 
tiful. Feverfew, candytuft, daisies, 
delphinium, sweet williams, gaillardias, 
pyrethrums, some peonies and irises 
composed the garden stock offered. Out- 
door roses have been good this year, 
but the majority are gone. Peonies, too, 
have been exceptionally lovely, but the 
local crop is practically gone. 

Eoses, carnations, lilies, snapdragons, 
stocks and calendulas were the finer 
flowers offered for the holiday. Prices 
increased little. Indications pointed to 
a heavy demand, and it appeared that 
all available stock would be utilized. 

Bedding stock has been in such un- 
usual demand that orders can hardly bo 
filled. No blooming geraniums are to be 
had at present; all stock showing color 
is sold immedi-ately. 

The landscape architects have been 
busy making many homes attractive. 
The city is overdoing itself in beautify- 
ing. It is now showing the effects of 
the national flower show. 

Various Notes. 

The Lowry Nursery Co. has just re- 
ceived a large landscape order from 
the Ball brothers, at Muncie, Ind., to 
landscape the new college campus. 

Len Elder has just returned from Chi- 
cago, where he spent a few days. 

Temperley's have been cutting some 
exceptionally good delphinium. 

Otto Eieman is going to the hospital 
to undergo an operation. His wife re- 
cently fractured her spine in a fall. 

(C'DMchKleil oil piiKi' I'ilJ.) 



Boiler Flues 

Cleaned by Special Process 

Cut to order for retubing 
Random lengths for piping 

Guaranteed Rebuilt Boilers 

STEAM and WATER 
Prompt Delivery 

C. B. ISETT & SON 

BOILER WORKS 
1701-7 Winnebago Ave., CHICAGO 




To Stop that 

pipe leak per- 
manently — 
cheaply — use 
Emergency 
Pipe Clamps. 

M. B. Skinner Co. 

SS8-S62 WuhiBftM 
Bool., CUcago. 



USE LESS FUEL 

You can do it, while at the same time producing more power, if your boiler 
settings— arches, side and bridge walls, and baffles—are made of 





FURNACE LINING 



There is no chance for air or gas leaks 
through a PLIBRICO setting, therefore less 
fuel is needed to obtain the objective desired 
— the production of steam. 

Not only does PLIBRICO permit the pro- 
duction of more steam at less cost, but it 
forms boiler settings that last from two to 
four times as long as laid-up fire brick, and 



PUBRICO » d*- 
lireredaDlr ia ileel 
coaUiBcts oi dis- 
tiactiTcappeanaca 
ai (howa at the 
richt 

Warehouse 
stocks in all 
principal cit- 
ies. 



that are impervious to heat up to 3100" i*'. 

A complete PLIBRICO setting is a paying 
investment. 

Our booklet D68, on "Modern Furnace 
Building," gives full information. Ask for 
it, and ask also to have our nearest repre- 
sentative call. 

Our service is free. 




MPDtlon The Rerlew when you write. 




Multiplies Man Power 

7:Re BILENS POWER HOE 

and Lawn Mower Tractor 

is a motorized wheel hoe. The patented 
arched axle works astride plants four- 
teen to twenty Inches high. The tool 
control permits close cultivation in 
twelve inch rows and wider (the pic- 
ture shows cultivation of asters planted 
thirty inches apart). A differential 
drive enables the operator to turn 
about face at the ends of rows. The 
BOLENS is practical in small as well 
as large fields. 

All attachments for seeding, aulti- 
vating or lawn mowing have snap 
bitches and can be changed instantly 
without the use of a wrench. 

The BOLEN8 multiplies your man 
power when you are most crowded 
with work. It pays for Itself In a 
short time. 

Write for further particulars. 
GILSON MFG. CO., 121 Park St., 

PORT WASHINGTON. WIS. 



Mention Tha Bavlew when yoa write. 



PECKY CYPRESS 

WE ARE SPECIALISTS 

We were practically the first to sell to this trade, and guarantee perfect satis- 
faction and rock-bottom prices. Get the value of our lond experience. 
PECKY CYPRESS, because of its durability, is the only wood now being 
used for greenhouse benches. Will ship in any Quantity, carload or less. 

Dnp Siding, Ship Lap, FlNiug, White Cedar Pisti, ETerything in Luhei 

WRITE FOR PRICES 

ADAM SCHILLO LHHBER CO., ""'^ti^'^'^ 

L. D. Phones Llneoln 410 and 411 



It Lets the Florist Sleep 

You don't have to sit up and watch a 

GIBLIN GREENHOUSE BOILER 

GIBLIN 6l CO. UTiCA, N.Y. 



Let OS tell you what one 
win cost delivered at 
your Railroad Station. 



WRITE NOW 



JONB 1. 1922 



The Florists^ Review 



119 



Retail Florists— Attention! 



Ererr R*Uil FI*rUt U atked, timet withoat UBbcr, for loaethiaf to keep hooM pknU keeltliT and make them (row. 

The Public Wants It — We Have It - Here It Is 

ZENKE'S 

**NEW PLANT UFE" 



A Lidtild Plant Food. Tonic aad PcrtlliMr. OdoricM, Bcononlcal, 

In Chicago alone over 3()() Retail Florists are selling it and sending repeat orders every month. 

SPECIAL INTRODUCTORY OFFER— Cut coupon below and order today 

EXCELL LABORATORIES, 453S Raveniwood Ave., CHICAGO, ILL. 

Knoltssd please find cheek for $U).0(), for which kindly ship at once, the following: 

5 Doa. NEW PLANT LIFE, Kfrfnt aisc, & «2.00 910.00 

1 Doa. NEW PLANT LIFE, K-pint alao FKBB 

Also a good suppb' of leaflets, without charge. Retailing at 25c per can, brings $18.00, or $8.00 net profit. 




Name.. 
Street. 



City aad SUte. 



>^-pmtcn 
Retaflt bi . . 



25c 



Mention The Rerlew when you write. 




i/^ 



THE RECOGNIZED ITMDARD INSECTICIDE 

A spray remedy for green, black, 
white fly, thrips and soft scale, 

FUNGINE 

For mildew, rust and other blights 
affecting flowers, fruits and vegetables. 

VERMINE 

For eelworms. angleworms and other 
worms working in the soil. 
Quart, $1.00 GaUon, $3.00 

Sold by Dealers 

Aphine Mfg. Co., """i'r"' 



Uentlon The ReTiew when you write. 



Gets-There Insecticide Soap 

RECOMMENDED BY 

Leading Florists and Nurserymen to 
free you from 

Red Spider, Aphis, White Fly, 
Mealy Bug, Mildew 

And Numerous Other Pests 

They claim that it reaches a GREATER 
NUMBER OF PESTS than any other Insec- 
ticide that they have used. 
It will be sent to you for trial if you send 

$1.00 for a liberal sired can. 
Your Money refunded U it does not do 

the work 
Geti-There Soap Co., Coaskokocken, Pomis. 



WOson's 0. K. Plant Spray 

Kills Plant Insects, Scale and Mildew 

BbU. $90, % bbls. $50, 10 gals. $20; 5 gals. $10 

Used by Leading Rose Growers, Plantsmen and 

Gardeners 



SPRINGFIELD, 



NEW JERSEY 



Mpnrlon Thr R*t1»w wh«o yon writ* 



Mention The Review when you write. 



TOBACCO PRODUCTS 

Pulverized Tobacco Povi-der 

Fliip as flour 100 lbs., $4.00 

Fiiinii;atlnijr Tobacco Diist 

Strong and fri-sh ... 100 lbs., 3.00 
Fine Tobncco Dost 

Cloan, uniform 100 lbs., 2.00 

tut Tobacco Steins 

Clean, fresh. In bags, 500 lbs., ,5.00 

Special prices in ton and carload lata 

F. & I. Tobacco Prsdncts Co. 

Saecesaora to 
Lancaater Tobacco Producta Co. 
300^10 Plum St., LANCASTER, PA. 




SAVE YOUR PLANTS from injury by the 

APHIS, WHITE FLY, LEAF ROLLER AND TYER 

and a number of other Insect pests with the use of the 



MORE 
FLOWERS 



N 



EVER-FAILING INSECTICIDE- 

oN-poisoNous Insectonos 



MORE 
PROFITS 



Which, as a spray, destroys both Insects and their EGGS. 
'A great success," "Gives perfect satisfaction," so say leading Borists. 



Irice i$ 2. 00 per can 



-( 



ostpaidS 14.00 per case 

8 cans to the case. M case yt case rate. 
1 can sufficient to make 32 gals, of solution 
for Bpr&ring. 



An additional number of 
SALESMEN WANTED 

who may carry these goods as a 
side line. 

WM. BRANSON, Prop., Insectonos Laboratory, BLOOMINGTON, ILL. 



Mention Th» ReTlew when yon write. 






WentloB The Beriew wUen yon writ*- 



GREENHOUSE BUILDING 
GLAZING AND HEATING 

HENRY G. MILLER 

p. O. Box 181, Irvington Sta. 
Phone IR 1761 INDIANAPOLIS, IND. 




RED RINa BRAND 

NIKOTEEIN 

FOR SPRAYING 

Aphis Punk 

FOR FClflOATING 

NICOTINE MFG. CO. 

St. Louis. Mo.. U.S. A. 



120 



The Florists' Review 



JuNB 1, 1922 



Lee EickenbacL has made a heavy 
planting of gladioli this year and has 
a good number of fine varieties. 

Clarence Thomas, previously of In- 
dianapolis and more recently of Los An- 
geles, Gal., passed away last week in the 
latter city. The local tradesmen and 
the members of the Indiana State Flo- 
rists' Association mourn the loss of 
their former member. Funeral services 
will be held in Indianapolis upon ar- 
rival of the body. E, E. T. 



A new and attractive flower shop has 
been opened at 3010 Washington boule- 
vard. The new store is operated under 
the name of the Washington Flower 
Shop. William Horn, Jr., is its man- 
ager. Mr. Horn specialized in landscape 
gardening at Purdue University. 



CROWN-GALL, OR PLANT CANCER. 

The most interesting bacterial disease 
of plants is generally conceded to be 
that known as crown-gall, or plant can- 
cer. It is induced by a tumor-producing 
organism, Pseudomonas tumefaciens. 
The attention of medical men has been 
directed to this plant disease particu- 
larly through some striking analogies 
to human cancer as revealed more es- 
pecially through the elaborate investi- 
gations of Dr. Erwin F. Smith, of the 
bureau of plant industry, Washington, 
D. C, says the April bulletin of the 
Missouri Botanical Garden. Dr. Smith 
lias demonstrated that from the primary 
tumors produced by the bacteria, 
there originate certain infection 
strands, and these are pictured as grow- 
ing through the tissues of the host, in- 
ducing secondary tumor formation at 
greater or less distances from the pri- 
mary infection. It is also believed that 
in a case where the primary infection is 
that of a stem and the invading strand 
enters a leaf, stem tissue will be pro- 
duced in this secondary area. The causal 
bacterium is able to infect a great va- 
riety of host plants and frequently pro- 
duces on apples, grapes, raspberries and 
a variety of other cultivated plants cer- 
tain characteristic swellings, usually at 
the base of the stem on the so-called 
crown; hence the name, crown-gall. The 
inoculations on Paris daisy, geranium 
and tobacco will show, however, as is 
now well known, that aerial tumors are 
readily produced. 




Ready-Set 
Concrete Benches 

are easy and economical to build. 
You can build them yourself. 

Ready-Set Improved Steel Molds 
are so simple to operate that any 
laborer can equal the wrork of an 
expert. 

Ask for information on molds. 
We also contract to erect benches 
complete. 

Mead-Suydam Co. 

342.346 Sixtk Ave. NEWARK, N. J. 



FIRST COST THE LAST COST 



GLASS 

for 

GREENHOUSES 

Get Our Prices 
JOSEPH ELIAS & CO., he 

LONG ISLAND CITY, N. Y. 



Greenhouse Glass 

BENJAMIN H. SHOEMAKER, Inc. 

DISTRIBUTORS 

LIBBEY-OWENS' flat drawn Sheet Glass, 
AMERICAN WINDOW GLASS CO.'S ma- 
chine made Glass, and other leading brands 
produced by high-grade factories. 

QUOTATIONS GLADLY FURNISHED ON ANY QUANTITY 

205-211 N. Fourth St PHILADELPHIA, PA. 



LOW PRICES 

PROMPT SHIPMENTS 



GREENHOUSE GLASS 

QOOD QUAUTY UNIFORM STANDARD THICKNESS WELL FLATTENED 

Our Service and Prices Will Save You Time and IMoney 
We Solicit Florists' Inquiries 

THE THROOP-MARTIN CO., COLUMBUS. OHIO 



GREENHOUSE GLASS 



In all sizes, uniform in thickness, prompt shipments 

Ohio Plate & Window Glass Co., ^s^l'su Toledo, Ohio 



SOMETHING NEW IN 

Greenhouse Glass 

"FLAT CRYSTAL GLASS" 

Even thickness. The cost to you is no more. 
Why not have the best? Get our prices. 

CADILLAC GLASS COMPANY 
2556-2586 Hart Ave DETROIT, MICH. 



GLASS CLOTH 

A transparent waterproof fabric aa efficient 
as glass for hotbeds coldframes, etc., per so- 
yd.. 35c; 25 yds at 32c; SO yds at 31c, 100 yds. 
at 29c. Lei us flRure on your larger orders. For 
parcel post add So per yd. to above prices. 
Try It oat now aad be coavlaced. 

Turner Bros., Bladen, Neb. 



JUNB 1, 1922 



The Florists^ Review 



121 



OUR PATENT LEAK-PROOF GUTTER 

has proven to be superior to any other gutter in the 
market and we substantiate this assertion with the 
testimonies of many growers. Let us send you an 
estimate on your next houses. All our material, same 
as the gutter, is strictly best grade in its line. 

Fat. Oct. 80. 1917. 

ICKES-BRAUN MILL CO. 

2330 Wabansia Avenue, Near Weitem ud North Are*. CHICAGO, ILL. 

Greenhouse Material, Greenhouse Hardware, Permanite, Paint, etc 




IfcatlOD Tbc R*Tlnw whpn yon writ* 



GREENHOUSE BUILDERS 




We boUd all kinds of Oreenhoosea. Get onr 
eaUaute on roar next hoose. 

Weeber & Race 

im MaaM St. N. B.. WNIIEAPOLIS. Mlim. 



Mention Tbe Review when you write. 



Irtor't PatrlMt^ 
Glazing Points 

For Greenhou— 

Drive easy and tme, beeaaae 
both bevels are on tbe same 
■ide. Can't twist and break 
tlie ulass in driving. Galvan- 
ized and will not rust. No 
rights or lefts. 
The Peerless Glazing Point { 
is patented. No others likq 
It. Order from year deal^ 
er or direct from us. 
Write for samples 
and price. 

■IintTA.BUIBj 
U« Oksataat StraslA 

- yHIHtlyfcffti 



GREENHOUSE 

GLASS 



ALL SIZES 



BIST BRANDS 



Sharp, Partridge & Co. 

2263 Lumber Street 
CHICAGO 



We Await Your Commomds 
THE 

Foley Greenhouse Nfg. Co. 

3248 W. Thirty-firtt St, CHICAGO, ILL 



Greenhouse Glass 



WE ARE THE NOILI'S LUGEST PROIICEIS 

Ask the dealer for prices, or write us direct if the dealer doesn't 
handle our product. We guarantee uniform Grading, Flattening 
Annealinsr and Careful Packing. 

''GET ACQUAINTED" WITH ODR SPECIALTIES 

29-34-39-ounce Glass 

AMERICAN WINDOW GLASS CO. 

General Offices: Farmers* Bank Building, PITTSBBIGH, PiL 



Mention The Review whan yan write. 



BEST QUALITY 



EXTRA HEAVY 



PROMPT SHIPMENT 



Greenhouse Glass 

SINGLE AND DOUBLE STRENGTH 

ABSOLUTELY THE BEST ON THE MARKET 

Write U» for Price* 

BAUR WINDOW GLASS CO., Eaton, Indiana 



Mention Tbe Review wben yon write. 



Florists' Hail Association 

Did you ever stop to reflect that insurance is a guaran- 
tee of value, and that now is the time to be sure that your 
glass is protected? 

IT IS WORTHLESS WHEN BROKEN BY HAIL. 

Banks loan money when your glass is insured in the Flo- 
rists' Hail Association. 

For particulars write JOHN G. ESLER, Saddle River, N. J. 



122 



The Florists' Review 



JuMie 1. 1922 



EYERTITE 

GLAZING CEMENT 



Applied with an 

"OH BOY" 

Automatic Gun 



Evertite Glazing Cement applied with the new "Oh Boy" Gun makes 
au ideal combination. This gun, which is the last word in glazing guns, 
allows Evertite Glazing Cement to flow in a uniform consistency all the 
time. Note the ease with which this gun can be handled. Think of 
what you have used and draw your own conclusions. 

Write for circulars and prices. 

THE EXCELLO MANUFACTURING CO. 

CLEVELAND, OHIO 



Patented 
S. A. KOST, Inventor 




CINCINNATI, O. 



The Market. 

Business last week in tliis market was 
(uuc.h the same as the week previous. 
Stock is plentiful and the demand is 
small save for roses, for which there is 
1 strong call. The f^eueral run of busi- 
ness seems to be slow, and were it not 
for our old friend, funeral work, we 
tnijjht tliink it tlic middle of summer. 

Koses are now in good condition and 
move well, considering the time of the 
year. Carnations are in little demand, 
but find a fair market at that; they 
bring $3 to $4 per hundred. Lilies, both 
• ialla and Easter, sliow the effects of the 
summer sun and arrive in an inferior 
condition. Outdoor flowers, such as 
^asta daisies, peonies, cornflowers and 
sweet peas, are now arriving in l.irge 
numbers ;ind move readily. 

Various Notes. 

Districts 42 and 45, which include 
southern Ohio and Indiana, of tlie Flo- 
rists' Tclegrai)h Delivery Association 
will hold a joint conference here June 
12 at the Hotel Gibson. Many impor- 
tant matters concerning future effi- 
ciency arc slated to be talked over, and 
all F. T. D. members, especially those 
of districts 42 and 4.'), are earnestly re- 
quested to be present. II. W. Sheppard, 
vice-president for southern Ohio, re- 
ports that everything has been arranged 
for a large gathering. 

(1 E. Critchell's condition is about 
the same as at last writincr, but he has 
hojies of being back on the job soon. 
Sales have been quite brisk at this es- 
t-ablishment lately, in chiffons and 
ijreen goods especially. 

.Tulius Baer reports a good week in 
i^eneral sales of flowers. 

The William Murphy Co. is receiving 
some good outdoor sweet peas, the first 
of the season, from ('. A. Murpliv, of 
Price Hill. 

H. W. Sheppard 's shop has been 
steadily on the jump liitely, tiiking care 
')f wedding orders and funeral work. 

The Cincinnati Cut Flower Exchange 
IS receiving good America gladioli from 
Charles Wind ram, of Cold Spring, Ky. 

Peter Weiland's peonies are among 
the best to be had at this market at 
[iresent. Thev are grown at Newcastle, 
Ind. 

William Gear was seen on the market 
')uite frequently last week, a good sign 
that upper Vine street is busy. 

K. G. Gillett is getting regular ship- 




g',1^7E^^"M^lK£^ FLORISTS' POTS 

The YORK. Pa., PLANT has for more than one whole generation 
shown the way in making the beat RED POTS that can be produced. 
STRONG. POROUS, UNIFORM, abaolutely the best and cost no more. 

THE PROGRESSIVE CLAY COMPANY 

Execotlve Offlce: Ninth Floor, Harbridse Balldlnv, NEW YORK CITX 
Braneb Ottloe: Bulletin Bids., FhlladelpUa, Pa. 

Mention The BeTlew whea ywi write. 



THE ELVERSON POT 

It is a dollars and cents saving proposition — plus satis- 
faction — to use the pot that proves its merit in the test 
of actual service. Write for free samples of that pot. 

W. H. Elverson Pottery Co., New Brisfhton, Pa. 

Mention The BeTlew when yon write. 





VAHIFR RFAT RFA PHTC are recocnized every- 

lUUllJ^ft »!tML RLil rmj WHERE FOR QUALITY. 

Your orders always receive prompt and careful attention. Made 
of high-grade material by skilled workmen in a modem plant. 

Write for prlcer-and samples. 
KAHLER POTTERY CO. - LOUISVILLE, NEB. 



WHY WAIT 

TO ORDER YOUR 

Flower Pots? 

Have them when you need them. 
It's like money in the bank. 

ORDER TODAY DO NOT DELAY 

GET THE BEST, FROM 

Missouri Pottery & Supply Go. 

4219 Iowa Av*., ST. LOUIS, MO. 




THE HARRIS 
READYTO-USE 

/J ^WV JW ^o(^^if> 

"4 ^m:^j^^ PLANT BAND 

Sanplcs opmreqaeit 
THE A. W. HARRIS MFG. CO., 
lOl E. PINE ST., SLEEP Y EYE, MINN. 

WIRED TOOTHPICKS 

Manufactursd by 

W. J. COWEE, »SfV™ 

10,000, $2.50 50,000, $11.00 
Sample Free For Sale by Dealers 



^T loUIS 




ORDER NOW 

St Lottis 
Standard Red Pots 



AU Regular Sizee 



They are the best. All orders 

receive prompt attention. 

Prices on application. 

ST. LOUIS POTTERY & MFG. CO. 

5240 Nortlinip Ave. ST. LOUIS. MO. 



BIRD'S 



NepohseT 

' WATERPROOF PAPER ^ 

FLOWER POTS 

livWMTI YOUR OIALIR POR SAMPUS AND PMCIS ai 



BUYYOUR OWN RAIN! 
IRRIGATION SYSTEMS 

OUT OF DOOR AND GREENHOUSE 

FACTORY BUILT— ANY SIZE 

ROCK RIVER IRRIGATION COMPANT 
FACTORY AND MAIN OITia: ROCKFOID. ILL 



JUNB 1, 1922 



The Florists^ Review 



123 




^sbes£Rilf 




Make your greenhouse weather-tight with 
Asbestfut, the elastic cement that never gets 
hard, cracks or peels in cold weather or runs in 
hot weather. 

$1.00 per gallon 



12M-1323 FhiUw Atmi*. BROOKLYN. NEW YORK 



SOS RIchftale Ave., S171 Fluahingr Ave.. 
CambrldKe, Mass. Dtaspeth, L. I., N. T. 



ESTAB. 17S5 



B 



INCORP. 1904 



World's Oldest and Largest Mannfactnrers of 

FLOWER POTS 

A. H. HEWS & CO., Inc. 
CAMBRIDGE, MASS. 




COMPETITION PROVES OUR QUALITY 



"MOSS AZTEC" 
Ware 

Axalea Pots 
Hantfintf Baskets 
Lawn Vases 
Bird Baths, Etc 



RED POTS 

Best Materials— Skilled Labor— Uniformlj 
Burned — Carefully Packed. 

THE ZANE POTTERY CO., g?Att^hi?o .*ife4^Y^5: So. Zancsville, OWt 

Mention The Review when you write. 

IONIA POTS ARE STRONG 

Always burned to the same degree of hardness. Our kUns are equipped with hMt- 
measuring pyrometers and other up-to-the-minute improvements. Every detail of man- 
ufacture, from the clay bank to the strong crates in which Ionia pots are carried U 
you, marks an advancement over old-time methods. Let us have your order now. 
WE WnX SHIP WHEN YOU ARE READY. 

■sssi^p^.u:',.'^.'?* iiNM ponEM eo, ioiia. mich 

Mention The Review when yon write. 



GEORGE KELLER POTTERY CO. 

Successors to 
GEO. KELLER & SON 

Manufacturers ot 

RED POTS 

Before buying write for price* 
2614-2622 Heradon Street 

Near Wrightwood Avenue 

CHICAGO. ILL, 

Mention The Review when you write. 

Extra Quality Pots 

Florists who want superior quality KKD POTS, 
place tlii'ir orders with us. Wire or telephone 
your rush orders at our expense. 

Missouri Pottery 

Kansas City, Mo. Kansas City, Mo. 

Established 37 Year.* 




LOUISVILLE POTTERY CO. 

ine. 

Loui8Yille,Ky. 

Manofaeturen since 1876 ef 

Red Florists' Pots 
Azalea and Bulb Pans 
ASK ANY SOUTHERN GROWER 




Uentiuu The Review when yon write. 




The Pfaltzgraff 
Pottery Co. 

Florins' Pots 

YORK, PA. 



124 



The Florists' Review 



JuNB 1, 1922 



menta of mahonia foliage from Oregon 
and reports his sales of it are many 
since the passing of leueothoe. 

James O'Malley has joined the force 
of Dodge owners. 

The Avondalo Floral Co. reports an 
unusually large bedding season and also 
good business in funeral work. 

Joseph Grimm, buyer for E. D. Rut- 
tie, of Covington, Ky., has been much 
in the market lately. 

C. J. Jones, of the Walnut Hills Floral 
Bazaar, reports a good week in the sale 
of hanging baskets and bedding stock. 

The week's visitors were Maurice 
Cohen, of Cohen & Hiller, New York; 
T. J. Ilerdegen, of Aurora, Ind.; George 
T. Appel, of Schloss Bros., New York, 
and "Walter Gray, of Hamilton, O. 

G. H. K. 



FORT WAYNE, IND. 

Market conditions have been good. 
Mothers' day business was a record- 
breaker. The volume of business far 
exceeded that of other years. While 
stock was plentiful, there still was not 
enough to supply the demand. Every- 
one cleaned up well. For a few days 
following Mothers' day business seemed 
rather slack, but picked up later. Eoses, 
carnations, snapdragons and sweet peas 
are in good supply and tlie quality is 
fine. The local peony crop was in just 
right for Memorial day. Saturday, May 
27, the market was flooded with peonies, 
irises and pyrethrums. 

The Blossom Floral Co. reports busi- 
ness about normal, following the big 
rush for Mothers' day. This firm an- 
ticipated a large amount of trade for 
Memorial day. It was said that Mr. 
Blossom would take advantage of the 
excursion Sunday, May 28, to visit some 
of the Chicago florists. 

W. J. & M. S. Vcsey are cutting a fine 
lot of Cattleya MossisB and C. gigas. 

The force of the Flick Floral Co. has 
beon busy with the plant trade. The 
call for plants and baskets has been ex- 
ceptionally large this year. S. N. 



BLACK BULL 



•(•i*ruM» 




BUILD STRONG' 
PURE ASPHALTUM 

Greenhouse Cement 



ACID 

HEAT 

WEATHER 



PROOF 



Barrels, 50-60 gallons $1.20 per gal. 

■•2 Barrels, m -10 Kallons 1.25 per gal. 

Kegs, 20 gallons 1.30 per gal. 

Palls, 5-10 gallons 1.35 per gal. 

P.O. B.CHICAGO, ILL. 
10% discount, Cash with order. 
Re-'. Terms— 2%, 10 days. Net, ;io days. 

BUY DIRECT FROM MANUFAaURER 

ROBERT M. LUCAS CO. 

1950 W. 31st Street, 
CHICAGO, ILL. 



Paiw WHEN^buAVANT It 




Loyd Bunch of Fredonia, Kansas, finds Cannas 
a profitable crop when Skinner System Watered. 



Making Money 
With Cannas 



Cannas behave pretty much the same 
whether grown in Tennessee or Vermont, 
because a canna is a canna. 
But Floyd Bralliar, of Madison, Tenn., 
in an article in the Review, tells below 
how they act when given plenty of water: 

"Cannas thrive best where they can se- 
cure a large supply of water. In fact, 
they will grow in the edges of swamps 
and rejoice in the opiwrtunity. I placed 
a few plants, of the 
high-priced novelties, 
where we could irri- 
gate them thorouglily 
with a Skinner over- 
head sprinkling sys- 
tem and watered them 
every aay'and on hot 
days sprinkled the fol- 
iage thoroughly about 
noon besides. We got 
an average '. ol fifty 



7 


T Y 


P 


E 


s 


Wv make 7 type.*; 


for 7 


different | 


If Ifs 

It. If 

whatc 


prlcf yi)ii 
it's cjualll.v 
rcr the piic 


vaiit, 
. we 


we h 

llHVl 


!1VC 

it 


7 


PRICES 



good eyes for each plant set, to pay us 
for our trouble. These results are given, 
not because they are of great practical 
value to the commercial grower, but just 
to show what water willi do if you'U 
only let It do it." 

Cannas are over 85% water when grown 
right. If they don't get that 85"/. you 
don't get the cannas you ought to get. 
And what it willfdo for cannas it will 
do for carnations, 
asters, gladioli and 
dahlias. 

A 1(X) - foot portable 
section'! 1 line costs 
complete only $:i9.75. 
Waters 5000 square 
feet without moving. 

Write us about it or 
any length line you 
may need. 



The Skinner Irri^aHon Co. 



223 Water Street 
TROY, OHIO 



286 Fifth Avenue 
NEW YORK 





t*Wi 



Wire Tie" 



Will tie any plant to a 
wira or Hyacinth 
Btaka. Yonr Chrya- 
anthemuma will goon 
need tying to a stake. 
Why not land for 
aamplea? Prom your 
dealer or direct, 
92.00 per 1000 
WM. F. BUSCHARDT. 
6 E. Woodland Ave. ArlinKton, Md. 



If 7*u have not seen aur wonderful 

JIM'S ELASTIC 

write u* today for free sample 

The Quality Braids Cimpiny 

2S Spruce St., New Yorlc, N. Y. 




BEFOSI 



Nd loss ?i yoK 
mend your split 
carnations with 

SUPERIOR 

CARNATION 

STAPLES 

88c per 1000; 3000 
fofl.OO, postpaid. 



Wa.Sciilitter&Sn 



12 Pyaekea Sl 
SpriasficUt Man. 




AITKB 




SPLIT CARNATIONS 

Easily Mended with 
Pillsboiys CarnatiM St<>9les 
"Best device on ths 
, market."— Joseph Traudt. 
Could not get along with- 
out them."— S. W. Pike. 
ino. SSc; 30Mhr SLOB. ptttpaM 

I. L Pillsiwry. Galesburf . Ill 



Jdnb 1, 1022 



The Florists' Review 



125 




fA^CALLUM 




Remember! 




^HBN YOU THINK OF GLAZING THINK OF 




THE NAME"McCALLUM"GUARANTEES ITS QUALITY 



PUTTIUM in Black or Gray will make your 
glazing a pleasure. You have the satisfaction 
of knowing that you are using high class material 
and, doing first class work. 

Black Puttlum is based on Pure Mexican Asphalt 
combined with Gilsonite and high grade Canadian 
Asbestos Fiber. Pure material and scientific mix- 
ing in just the right proportions give you a glaz- 
ing cement with a permanent elasticity. It will 
not melt or freeze in the extremes of weather. 
It is easily applied and easily removed. 

Gray Puttlum is the ideal glazing cement for 
bedding glass. It is a specially treated combina- 
tion of tough non-volatile oils, heat resisting 
gums, and high grade imported pigments. To this 
is added the binding base of short fiber Canadian 
Asbestos, giving you a product unexcelled for all 
kinds of glazing work and particularly for bed- 
ding. 



The House of McCallum stands back of Put- 
tlum — a house that you have dealt With for years 
and that has always stood for character products 
and fair dealings. Send for our descriptive folder. 



Investigate 

Mail the 

Coupon 

Now 



7*e McCallum Company, Ji^HuSgh^'^ 




' The 

McCallum Co., 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 



Please s/pnd me your descriptive 
folder on "PUTTIUM." 



"TAe House that Service Built" 
Mail Order Headquarters for Florists' Supplies 



Name. 



Address. 




rSERVICEl 






CALLAHAN GREENHOUSES 



ECONOMY 

is abvaya found 
in Ccdlahan Quality 

Prices are now down. Let us fig- 
ure with you on Greenhouses and 
Ventilating Equipment. Every- 
thing for the Greenhouse Complete. 

T. J. Callahan Co. 

970 S. Perry Street DAYTON, OHIO 

Cleveland Representative: 261t Prospect Ave. 
Uention The Rerlew when yon write. 



HUMUS 

D. V. Brand 
''Makes Everythingr Grow" 

Put up in apecially prepared water and dust 
pioof bags, containing 2% cu. feet or about 
100 pounds. Shipped anywhere from our 
Btorehouse at Streetsbotougb, Ohio. $1.00 
per baitf , f . o. b. Write for prices on car lots. 

THE CLEVELAND SOIL CO. 
1353 Park Row, Lakewood, Ohio 



Mention The ReTlew when you write. 



R. S. MCMURRAY 

Wholesale Grower of Plants 

BELLEFONTAINE, OHIO 



Mention The ReTlew when jon write. 



I 



[GREENHOUSES 



I I I I I I I I I 



You can build now at big savings 




o 



UR PRICES are down to rock bottom. We offer 
helpful assistance to those who want to build. 

Put Your Greenhouso Problem* Up to Us. 



Wt go anywhere in the United States to submit plans ttnd prices. 

MctropohtanMatcrialC& 



1299-1323 FLUSHING AVE. 



BROOKLYN, N. Y. 



I I I I I i I I ITT 



% 



1 



CANE STICKS, Extra Strong 

Per lOO Per SOD Per lOO* 

5 to 7 ft. long - • $1.25 $5.50 $10.00 

Get our complete list of ether items— it's free 

GEO. H. ANGERMUELLER CO., Wholesale Florists, *"* Txf LVJiirMo 



126 



The Florists' Review 



JuNB 1. 1922 



^ Classifie 



ACALYPHAS 



Acalypha Triumphans, 2Mi-ln., $5.00 per 100. 
Oak Grove Greenhouse, Tuskegee, Ala. 



ACHYRANTHES 



ACHYRANTHES, RED; 2^4-IN.. 4 CENTS. 
GUIJJSTT & SONS, LINCOLN, ILL. 



ADIANTUMS 



Adiantuiii Cuneatum, strong plants, 2%-ln., 
$12.50 per 100; 4-in., $30.00 per 100; S-tn., $50.00 
piT 100; strong, large clumps of Croweanum, 
$50.00 per 100. Can be subdivided. 

Adiactum California variety, strong 6-in., 
$76.00 per 100. Special price while they last. 

Adlantum Hybridum, strong clumps suitable 
for 8-ln. pots, $50.00 per 100. 5 per cent 
for packing. 
S. S. Skidolsky & Col, 53 I'nrk I'huc, New York. 

Adiiintuni O'Hrienii, ciisy (.'rower, li-iii. pots, 
irtc; 4-in., I'Oc; 5-iii., 50c; (i-in., T.'io. Adlantum 
Farleyciisi- (Jlnriipsiiiti, 4-iii., 35('; .l-iu., 50c. All 
full and |ioi 'lo'iud. Cash with drdir, H. (". 
Doesrhor, L(ilS (icul'lly Ave, Now O.-U-ans, I^a. 

Adlantum Cuneatum, 2V4-ln. at $12.50, flne 
plants; Hybridum, 4-in. at $25.00. 

Henry Smith floral Co., Grand HapMs, Mich. 

AQERATUMS 



BARGAIN COUNTER PRICES. 
Stella Gurney, Blue Star, rooted cuttings, 80e 
per UK); 2V4-in., $3.00 per 100. 

GIJLLETT & SONS, LINCOLN, ILL. 

Ageratum Blue Star, rooted cuttings, $1.00 per 
100; 214-in., $3.00 per 100. Cash or c. 0. d. 
W. E. Trimble Greenhouse Co., Princeton, 111. 

Ageratum Blue Perfection, 2%-ln. at $4.00 per 
100. Henry Smith Floral Co., Grand Rapids, 
Mich. 

Ageratum True Dwarf Blue, always in bloom 
when you want it, rooted cuttings, $1.00 per 100. 
J. A. Keeney Co., Monongahela, Pa. 

Ageratum Blue Star, large-blooming and choice 
stock, 214-in. iKjts, $4.50 per 100. 
Freeport Floral Co.. Freepo rt, III. 

Ageratums, extra flne stock, 2i^-in. pots, $5.00. 
Cash. Packing free. 
La Crosse Floral Co., La Cro sse, Wis. 

Ageratum Stella Gurney, blue; 2i^-in., $3.00 
per 100. 

Oak Grove Greenhouse, Tuskegee, Ala. 

Ageratum Little Blue Star, 2%-ln., $4.00 per 
100, $35.00 per 1000. 

The Storrs & Harrison Co.. Painesv llle. O. 

Ageratuins, blue and white; rooted cuttings. 
$1.00 per 100. Wm. J. Beck, New Castle, Pa. 

Ageratum Imperial, seedlings. 40c per 100, 
$3.50 per 1000. L. J. Rowe, TitusvUle, Pa. 

ALTERNANTHERAS 



ALTERNANTHBRAS, STRONG, BUSHY, 
A No. 1 stock. 
We have only a few left and are offering 
them at the following price: 

1000 Aurea Nana, yellow; 

300 Rosea Nana, red; 

500 Brilliantisslmn, red; 

$3.50 per 100. $30.00 per 1000. 

Cash with order. 

The above prices include packing. 

R. 8. McMURRAY, BELLEFOXTAINE. 0. 

ALTERNANTHBRAS, RED. ~~ 

August stock, fine, strong plants 

from 2V4-in., readv for 3-in. 

$4.00 per 100, $37.50 per 1000. 

Cash. Prompt shipment. 

H. W. BUCKBEE, 

Forest City Greenhouses. Rorkford. 111. 

PINK AND YELLOW VARIETIES. 
Alternnntheras, strong 2-ln., $4.00 per 100, 
$37.50 per 1000. Brilliautlssinia, 2-ln., $5.00 per 
100, $45.00 per 1000. Spoolal prices in lots of 
600O and more: write for them. 

AVINFIELD S. KIRCHER. 
Cyclamen Specialist, Defiance, O. 

Alternnntheras: Twice ns good at Just a trifle 
higher price than rooted cuttings; dwarf red and 
yellow, bench-grown, equal to 214-ln. pot plants, 
$2.00 per 100, $15.00 per 1000. A few Bril- 
liantlsslma at same price. 
F. W . Fletcher, Orla ndo. Fla. 

-Mtprnanllieras. Aure.i Nana. Tricolor and 
Paniiiycliioides Major, stronc 2V4 in., $:i.')0 jier 
100. Five per cent for jincking. 
C. H. Frey Floral Co., Lincoln, Noli. 

Alternantheras. red and yellow; strong 2-ln. 
$4.00 per 100, $.3.->.00 per lOOO; Brilliantissima, 
$5.00 per 100, $45.00 per 1000. 

Kemble-Snilth Co., Inc., Boone, la. 

Alternantheras. red and yellow; 22,000 big, 
bushy 2'4-in., $3.00 per 100. 

Burden Floral Co., Bowling Green, Ky. 




Department % 



Rates for adTertitinf in this department 
18 cents a line net per insertion 
Minimum advertisement, 2 lines 



Alternantheras, rooted cuttings fall struck from 
soil, Brilliantissima, $15.00 per 1000; pink and 
yellow, $10.00 per 1000. These are good plants. 
Cash, please. E. B. Randolph, Delavan, III. 

Alternantheras, red and yellow, $1.25 per 100, 
$10.00 per 1000. Strong fall cuttings. Write for 
prices on 10,000 or more. 

Kingman Floral Co., Kingman, Kan. 

Alternanthera Brilliantissima, extra heavy, 
fall struck from soil, *15.00 per 1000. Small 
leaved, red and yellow, same quality, $10.00 
per 1000. N. 0. Caswell, Delavan. 111. 

.\lternanthera Uriliinlissima, well colored, 
bushy 2'/j-in.. .$8..''iO lier 100. .|.sr,.0() i.er 1000. 
Cash, .loseoli H.iucroft & Son. Cedar Falls, la. 

Alternanthera Brilliantissima, from soil ready 
to set out; well branched, 2-in. pots, $12.00 per 
1000, prepaid. C. Hunifeld, Clay Center, Kan. 

ALTERNANTHERAS, 2 KINDS, 2^-IN., Se"; 

BRILLIANTISSIMA, 5c. 

QULLETT & SONS. LINCOLN, ILL. 

Alternantheras, red and yellow; 2-in., $3.00 
per 100. 

Bird Forrest. Florist. Waxahachie. Tex. 

Alternanthera Brilliantissima, red and yellow; 
2-ln. stock. $4.00 per 100, $35.00 per 1000. Cash 
with order. Aurora Greenhouse Co., Aurora, III. 

ALTERNANTHERAS, RED AND YELXOW. 

Good, strong plants, 214-ip., $4.00 per 100. 
THE REESER PLANT CO.. SPRINGFIELD. 0. 

Alternantheras, Rosea, P. Major and Yellow 
rooted cuttings, $8.00 per 1000. Cash. 
Byer Bros., Cha mber«bur», Pa. 

Alternantheras, red and yellow. 2-in., 3c; Bril- 
liantissima, 4c. 

John Nelson Co., Oshkosh, Wis. 

Alternantheras, red and yellow; good stock 
from 2%-ln. pots, $4.00 per 100, $35.00 per 1000. 
E. B. Morgan Floral Co., Paxton, 111. 

Alternantheras, Aurea Nana, Paronychioides 
Major, 60c per doz., $3.50 per 100, $30.00 per 
1000. The Schmidt & Botley Co.. Sprlngfleld. O 

Alternnntheras, red and yellow: L'-in., 3c each. 
Cash. Hill City Greenhouse. Forest City, In. 

Alternantheras, 2i4ln., $4.00 per lOO, $37.00 
per 1000. Lewis G. Pleiss, New Albany, In d. 

ALYSSUM ~ 

DOUBLB OIANT SWEET ALYSSUM 
Strong 2-in., $4.00 per 100, $35.00 per 1000. 
WINFIELD S. KIRCHER. 
Cyclamen Specialist, Deflance, O 

Sweet Alyssum. double. 2-in., $4.00 per 100- 
single, $3.50 per 100. Cash. 

Myers-Watson Floral Co.. St. .Tosenh. Mo. 

Alyssum Little Gem seedlings, 4(Jc per 100. 
$3.60 per 1000; 2Vi-in., 2%c. 

L. .1. Rowe. TItusville. P» 

Sweet Alyssum, single or double, 2^4 -in. plants, 
$4.00 per 100; seedlings, single, dwarf, 75c per 
100. Henry Smith Floral Co., Grand Rapids, Mich. 

Alyssum Double Giant, strong 2V4-in., 4c 
J. 0. Steinhauser, Pittsburg, Kan. 

Alyssum Little (Jem, heavv 2'4-in., $4 50 per 
100. Robert W. Yeo, North Bergen, N. J. 

Alyssum, double white, 60c per doz., $4 00 per 
100. The Schmidt & Botley Co., Springfield, 0. 

ALBUM OF DESIGNS. $1.25 postpaid Flo- 
rists' Publlshla* Co.. Cblcaco. 



AMARYLLIS 

Amaryllidaceae, Crinum Powelli, $20.00 per 100, 
.'50c each. One of the best of Amaryllis family; 
blooms many times. 

C. E. Houdyshel, La Verne, Cal. 

Amaryllis Equestrls, growing plants from B-ln. 
pots, 40c each; 4-in., $3.00 per doz.; young bulbs 
from 2^-in. pots, $8.00 per 100; Johnsonii, 6-in., 
60c; 4-ln., 88c each. N. O. Caswell, Delavan, 111. 

AMPELOPSIS 

.VMPELOI'SIS VEITCIUI, SURPLUS. 

Three-year XX, 3 lo 4 ft., very strong, $3.00 
per doz., by mail. 

2-vear XX, 2 to 3 ft., heavy, $2..'50 per doz., 
by mail, $8.00 per KK), $00.00 per 1000. 

2 year, strong, 18 to 24 inches, $2.00 per doz.. 
by mail, ."SS.OO per 100, $40.00 per 1000; all in 
good <<in(litlo>i. Large stock transplanted for 
next season. 

CHARL ES liLA(;K, HIGHTSTOWN.^J^ 

Ampelopsis Engoluninnii and Qninquefolla, im- 
proved types, 1-iu. iH)t-«rown, $]'!.00 per 100. 
All extra si:-i.i.:. C.is'i -.vitii order. H, C. 
Doesclier, 2048 iiout;iiy .\ve., Ne'v Orleans, La. 

ANCHUSAS 

Anohusa Italica Uropmorc, strong, field-grown 
plants, $1.00, doz.; $6.00, 100. 

Harry J. Squires, Good Ground, N. Y. 

ANTHEMiS 

Anthemis, or Chamomile, strong, field-grown 
plants, $1.00 doz.; $6.00, 100. 

Harry J. S(iulres, Good Ground, N. Y. 

ANTHERICUMS 
Anthericums, variegated 2-in., $6.00 per 100. 
Geor ge Bros. A Co., New Kensington. Pa. 

ANTIQONONS 

Antigonon Ijcptopus (Rosa de Montana), 
Queen's Wreath, 2-year-old, 3-in. pots, 15c; 4-iu.. 
20c. All extra strong roots. Cash with order. 
U. C. Doescher, 2048 Gentilly Ave.. New Or- 
leans. La. 

AQUATICS 

Water Hyacinths, best selected stock, $3.50 
per 100, $30.00 per 1000. With each order we 
send information about our offer of 100 free 
plants. Pomona Nurseries, Dade City, Fla. 

Water Hyacinths, $2.50 per 100. 
Dade City Nurseries, Dade City, Fla. 

AOUILEQIAS 

Aqullegla, Columbine, yellow, white and blue, 
80c per dos., $4.00 per 100. 

The Schmidt A Botley Co., Sprlngfleld. O. 

ARTILLERY PLANTS 

Artillery plants, Novelty, rooted cuttings. 
$2.00; 2V4-in., $6.00; 3-in., $8.00 per 100. Cash 
or c. o. d. 
W. E. Trimble Greenhouse Co., Princeton, III. 

Pllea Serpyllifolla, Artillery plant. 85c per 
doz., $6.00 per 100. 

The Schmidt ft Botley Co.. Sprlngfleld, 0. 

ASPARAQUS 

ASPARAGUS. 
Asparagus Plumosus Nanus — New Crop. 

1,000 seeds | 2.2S 

10.000 seeds 20.00 

100,000 seeds 190.00 

Asparagus Sprengerl — New Crop. 

1.000 seeds $ 1.80 

10,000 seeds 14.00 

F. RYNVELD A SONS, 
61 Vesey St., New York, N. Y. 

ASPARAGUS. 

Asparagus Plumosus, 2-in $ 3.60 per 100 

Asparagus Plumosus, 2i4-ln 6.00 per 100 

Asparagus Plumosus, 3-in 8.00 per 100 

Asparagus Plumosus, 4-in 15.00 per 100 

Good, strong plants. Cash with order. 
E. R. POUND, 
Cedar and Indiana Sts., Newark, 0. 

ASPARAGl'S. PLUMOSUS, SPRBNOBRI. 
Sprengerl: Good length and bushy. Just right 
for baskets, porch boxes, etc.. 1%-ln., $3.00 per 
100, $25.00 per 1000: 4-in., $10.00 per 100. 
Plumosus. 4-in., $10.00 per 100. 

THE GOOD & REESE CO.. 
Department A, Springfield, 0. 

ASPARAGUS, PLUMOSUS AND SPRENGERL 
Plumosus seedlings, $9.50 per 1000.$ 1.00 per 100 

Plumosus, 4-in 12.00 per 100 

Plumosus, 3-in 7.00 per 100 

Sprengerl, 3-ln 6.00 per 100 

Cash with order, please. 
KRING BROS., FAIRBURY. ILL. 

15,000 ASPARAGUS SPRENGERL 
Seedlings from soli, 8 months old, $15.00 per 1000. 

PRAIRIE FLORAL CO., 
P. 0. Box 344, Lyons, 111. 



Junk 1, 1922 



The Florists^ Review 



127 



Asparagus, Sprengeri and Plumosus seedUngs, 
$1.25 per 100. $10.00 per 1000. 

Sprengeri and Plumosus, fine 2'4-ln., $5.50 per 
100, $50.00 per 1000; 3-ln., $10.00 per 100. 

See our nd on the cover page for Plumosus 
;iiid Sprengeri seed. 
S. S. Skldelsky & Co., 53 Park Place, New York. 

ASPAUAGUS. ' 

Per 100 Per 1000 

Sprengeri, 2 in. strong plants $3.00 $27.50 

Sprengeri seedlings, from flats 1.00 8.00 

Cash. Prompt shipment. 

H. W. BUCKBEB, 

For est City Greenhouses, Rockford, 111. 

SEASONABLE STOCK READY NOW. 
Asparagus Sprengeri, 2^-in., $5.00 per 100, 
$45.00 per 1000. 

Asparagus Plumosus, 2^-ln., $5.00 per 100, 
$45.00 per 1000. 

THE STORRS & HARRISON CO.. 
Palnesville, 0. 

ASl'AU.XOI'S PLUMOSUS NANUS 
TRUE TO N.\MB. 
These are rdot-boiind, liusliv plants. Wo have 
(100, 3-ln., ifS.OO per KXt; the lot for $40,00. Cash. 
If you want thciii order quick. 

II. M. PASKINS & CO., HASIL, O. 

PLUMOSUS AND SPKKNGKKI. 
Plumosus and Sprengeri, 2M-in., oxtni strong. 
$(>.00 per 100, $.50.00 per 1000: 3-lii., $12.00 per 
100; seedlings, $1.50 per 100, $12.50 per 1000. 

ROMAN J. IRWIN. 
m West 18tb St., New York, N. Y. 

ASPARAGUS SPRENGERI, 

Good, strong plants, ready to sliift, 

out of 2U-ln. pots, $4.00 per 100. 

Cash with order. 

No charge for packing. 

R. S. M cMURRAY, BELLEFO NTAINE. 0. 

ASPARAGUS SPRENOBRL 

With healthy growth. 

3-in., $7.00 per 100. 

4-ln., $12.00 per 100. 

BAUSCHER BROS., 

20 S. Chicago Ave., Freeport, 111. 

b.\rgaYn counter plumosus, sprengeri. 

Plumosus, 2',{.-in., 5c; extra select, 3ln., 8c; 
strong 4-in.. 15c; Sprengeri, Mtrong 2',4-in.. 4c; 
3 In., 7c; very strong 4-in.. 15o. None finer. 
GULLETT & SONS. LINCOLN, ILL. 

Asparagus Sprengeri: We have several thou- 
sand seedlings as strong as 2-in., .$7.00 per 
1000: also a few Plumosus, strong 2%-in., $2.00 
per 100. Cash with order. 

Ozark Pansy Gardens, West Plains, Mo. 

FIELD-GROWN FOR BEDDING. 
Asparagus: 100,000 Plumosus, 10,000 Spren- 
geri, 2%- to 3%-ln., $25.00 per 1000 f. o. b. ; 
$4.00 per 100, prepaid. Cash. 
J. D. HUME, ENCANTO. CAL. 

ALL EXTRA HEAVY. 

Asparagus Sprengeri, 3-ln $6.00 per 100 

Packing at cost. 

WALTER ARMACOST & CO., 

321 East 4th St.. Los Angeles, Cal. 

Asparagus Sprengeri seedlings, bushv, strong 
plants. $1.00 per 100, postpaid, $8.00 per 1000. 
Chas. Whitton, York St. and Grav Ave., Utica, 
N. Y, 

Asparagus Sprengeri. 3-in. as good as 4-ln., 
$8,00 per 100: Asparagus Plumosus Nanus. 3-ln.. 
should be In 4-ln., $10.00 per 100. 
West Hill Greenhouses, Fredo nln, N. Y. 

Asparagus Sprengeri, 214-ln., $4.00 per 100; 
Asparagus Plumosus, 3-in., $10.00 per 100. Cash 
or c. o. d. 
W. H. Trimble Greenhouse Co.. Princeton, 111. 

ASPARAGUS SPRENGERI. 

Good strong 3-in $8,00 per 100 

WESTWOOn FIX)WER & PLANT CO,, 
Lynam St. near Hoover Ave., Dayton, 0. 

ASPARAGUS SPRENGERI, 

2Vi-ln. plants $5,00 per 100 

3-in. plants 7. .TO per 100 

HEMBREIKER BROS., LINCOLN. ILL. 

ASPARAGUS SPRENGERI. 

Strong 2H-in., $6.00 per 100. $50.00 per 1000; 

WINFIBLD S. KIRCHER, 

Cy clam en Specialist, Defiance. O. 

Asparagus Sprengeri. transplanted second time, 
will average for 2»^-ln., 3-ln. and 4-in., $4.00 
per 100, $35.00 per 1000. 
J. S. Jones, Sablna, 0. 

Asparagus, Plumosus and Sprengeri, 2%-in. 
at $5.00 per 100; 3-ln. at $10.00; 4-in. at $15.00; 
Sprengeri seedlings, $1.00 per 100, $8.00 per 1000. 

Henry Smith Floral Co.. Grand Rapids. Mich. 

GOOD, STRONG PLANTS. CASH. 
Asparagus Sprengeri, 4-in., $12.00 per 100; 
Asparagus Plumosus, 3-in., $7.00 per 100. 
GEO. SIONCUR, WOODSTOCK, ILL. 

ASPARAGUS SI'KENtlEKI.^STRONCr Hr'siIY. 
3-in,. $6, (to pir KHC 4-in.. $11.0(> per 100. 
HENLEY BROS,, TERRE ilAl'TE, IND. 

ASPARAGUS I'LUMOSl'S, 

214-in.. $.-).r)0: ri-in,, $7,.'iO per 100. 

CHARLES SHERWOOn, WATERLOO, lA. 

Asparagus Sprengeri, very cliolce. strong plants, 
2'4-in., $5. no per 100, 
Freeport Flonil Co,, Freeport, HI. 

SPRENGERI AND PLUMOSUS. 

3 '/4-in., 10c each. 

DAVIS FLORAL CO.. DAVENPORT, lA. 

Asparagus Sprengeri, strong 2%-ln. pinnta. 
$5.00 per 100. Marlon Enochs, Blcknell, Ind. 



per 



Asparagus Sprengeri, 3-in., 7c; Asparagus Plu- 
mosus, 3-in., 8c each. 

Chas. Roberts, New Madison, O. 

Asparagus Sprengeri, strong, well-rooted, 21^- 
in., $5.00 per 100; 4 in., 12^c. Geo. Kennedy, 
1920 Jennings Ave., Fort Worth, Tex. 

Asparagus, Plumosus and Sprengeri, 3-in., 8c; 
Sprengeri, 4-in., 12c each. Packing free. Cash, 
please. Goshen Floral Co.. Goshen, Ind. 

Asparagus Sprengeri, seedlings, $7.00 per 1000. 
2V4-ln., $4.00 per 100; 3-in., $8.00 per 100. 

F. C. Freeman & Sons, Portland, Ind. 

Asparagus Plumosus, strong seedlings, $1.25 
r 100, $10.00 per 1000. Cash with order. 

Henry Ebelink, Holland, Mich. 

Aspnragus Sprengeri, 3-in., 7c; Plumosus, 
2U-ln., 5c. Cash. 

Hnmmersehmidt & Clark, Medina, O. 

Asparagus Plumosus. very strong, extra fine 
plants, very best 3-ln., 10c; 4-ln., 15e. Cash. 
BrinkerhoflF Greenhouses, Springfield, 111. 

Asparagus Sprengeri. extra strong 2-in., 4c; 
3-in., TAc to 10c each. Cash. 

O. E. Ber thold, Nebraska City , Neb. 

Asparagus Sprengeri, 3-in., $8,00 per 100; 4-ln., 
$15.00 per 100. Good strong stock. Cash. The 
North Madison Floral Co., North Madison, Ind. 

ASPARAGUS SPRENGERI SEEDLINGS. 
$1.00 per 100, $8.00 per 1000. 
H. P. SMITH. BOX 721, PIQUA, 0. 

Asparagus Plumosus. 3-ln.. $10.00 per 100. 
Cash with order. 

France & Vandegrift, Monroe, Mich. 

Asparagus, Plumosus. strong 3-ln. ready for 
4 in., $8.00 per 100. Sprengeri, 3-ln., $7.00 per 
100. The East Lawn Gardens, Urbana, 0. 

Asparagus, Plumosus and Sprengeri, 3-in., 
$8.00 per 100. 

Oak Grove Greenhouse, Tuskegee. Ala. 

Asparagus Sprengeri, extra heavy S^-ln., 
$12.00 per 100; 2%-in., $4.00 per 100. Cash. 

Daut Bros., Decatur. 111. 

Asparagus, Sprengeri, 2^-ln., very good, $3.60 
per 100; Plumosus. 2>4-ln., very fine, $6.00 per 
100. Theo. D. Kuehler, R. 6, Bvansvllle. Ind. 

Asparagus Sprengeri and Plumosos, strong 
3-in., $8.00 per 100. 
E. B. Morgan Floral Co., Paxton, 111. 

Asparagus Sprengeri, strong S-tn., $7.00 per 
100; 2-in., $3.60 per 100. Gash. 

Jacobs Bros., Peoria, III. 

Aspnragus Sprengeri, extra strong 2%-in., 5o. 
C. Hunifeld. (Hay Center, Kan. 

Asparagus Plumosus. 4-ln., 14c each. 

W. B. Shumwny Floral Co.. Tiffin, O. 

Asparagus Sprengeri, 3-in., $6.00 per 100. 

Edgar Easterday, Nokomis, 111. 

Asparagus Sprengeri, good, strong 4-in., 15c 
each. Grant Newport & Son, Cedar Rapids, la. 

Asparagus Sprengeri, strong 2V4-in., 6c each. 
Odor Greenhouses, lola, Kan. 

Asparagus Plumosus, strong 2% -In. plants, 
$4.00 per 100. 8. A. Plnkstone, UtIca, N. Y. 

~ ASPIDISTRAS 

.\spidistras, 5-in. and in. riot", plain green. 
12c per leaf: 10 to 15 leaves, fine, healthy stock. 
Cash. Freeport Floral Co., Freeport, III. 

Aspidistras, green, 6-ln. pots, 12 to 15 leaves, 
$1.50. Cash. 

Calvert Floral Co., I.flke Forest, III. 



ASTERS 

Asters, plants grown in sterilized soil trans- 
planted from seeillines, read.v for hencliing or the 
Held. List of varieties ineln(l<> earl.v, uild-season 
anil late: 

Queen of Market, earliest of all white, pink, 
lavender. 

Carlson's and Invincilile. next early, l)e;irin(.' 
reiiiiy formed Hiiwers. white, pink, lavender. 

Lavender Gem, very early and best In ex 
istence, lavender. 

I'ink En<li.intr(ss. tloHcrs very double of large 
size, m.'ikinc it a craml .\stir. 

Peerless, large llnweis mi lunt' sleiiis. pink ami 
while. 

Daybreak, excellent for euttins. ll<iwcrs large 
and double, shell pink and salmon. 

Purity, simil.ir to Daybreak, pure white color. 

Hall's White, originator's seeds, the sensation 
of Chicaco market in 1921. very full and well 
fentered. ideal fur long distance shipping. 

Cregd's Giant, best late in existence, large 
flowers borne on good stems, wliite, pink and 
l.ivender. 

$1,00 per lOO, $8,00 per 1000. 

H. J, Potonikin. Muncie. Ind, 

PANSY PARK ASTER PLANTS, ' 

Daybreak, I'lirilv and White ('oniel, large, 
stocky iilanis, ti and 7-in,. $2, (HI per 100: Viek's 
Ciiniet, Crego's and K'lte liraniliiiig. all colors. 
':><• per 1(H>, .$(>.00 i»T 1000: Hall's Wliite and 
iitliers later, also Verbenas, 

PANSY PARK FLOHAL C .\ KDIvNS. 
Dwiglit, Mass, 

~ ASTERS, VICK'S VARIETIES. 

Transplanted, assorted stoik plants, late and 
early, all colors. $2,00 per 100 Cash with order. 

N. K. WELTER, 
70S Wesley Ave,. Evanstnn, Til. 

.\sters, Roval and Crego's separate colors, 
transplanted, $1.00 per 100. 

Odor Greenhouses, lola, Kan. 



Anters, Henderson's Invincible, n splendid 
Asier for cutting.', 5 colors, strong plants read.v 
for the field, .'^.'i.OO per 1000. Cash. 

lirill Celery Gardens, Kalamazoo, Mich. 

Asters, Queen of tiie Market »nd Semple's 
Branching, good, strong plants from outside 
beds and heavy, $7.50 per lOOO. Cash with order. 
Harry White, Florist, North Manchester, Ind. 

Asters, Queen of the Market, Semple's Branch- 
ing, Invincible,, strong plants, at 50c per 100, 
$3.50 per 1000, 6000 for $15.00. 

J. 0. Schmidt, Bristol, Pa. 

AsTer plants. Queen of the Market, pink, wiiilt 
and lavender, Or.c per 100, $5.00 per 1000. 

W m. P. Yeagle, Hriatol, I'ii 

Asters, Semple's and giant Comet, 40c per 
100, $3.50 per 1000. L. J. Rowe, Titusviiie, Pa. 

BEDDINQ PLANTS 

Agenttums, Sweet Alyssum, Coleus Trailing 
Queen, English Ivy, Parlor Ivy, Ijobelias, Petu- 
nias, Rosy Morn and Dreer's Fringed; Salvias, 
Snapdragons, Verbenas, Tradescantias, Vlnca 
Variegata, Geraniums, Rose, Sallerol. S. A. Nutt. 
Mme. Bnchner and Appleblossom, 2>4-in., $4.00 
per 100, $35.00 per 1000. 

Otto P. Krueger, Toledo, O. 

BEGONIAS 

BEGONIAS. 
2*4 in. iKjts, except where noted. 

Per 100 Per lOOC 
NEW BEGONIA HETTY FARR.$12.00 $100.00 

Chatelaine 7.00 65.00 

Mrs. Patten 8.00 75.00 

Pride of Newcastle 800 75.00 

Luminosa, Prima Donna and Erforiiii, 2'4-in. 
pots, $6.00 per 100, $50.00 i)er 1000. 

For other Begonias, Melior, Cincinnati, etc 
see display nd |iage 5. 

ROMAN J. IRWIN, 
43 W. 18th St., New York. N. Y 

BEGONIAS. BIG 2%-lNCH. 

Argenteo-Guttata $ 6.00 per 100 

President Carnot 8,00 per 100 

De Lesseps 8.00 per 100 

Picta Rosea 8.00 per 100 

Albo-Picta 8.00 per 100 

Sandersonii 8.00 per 100 

Cornlllna de Lucerne 10.00 per lOO 

Chatelaine 5.00 per 100 

Luminosa 5.00 per 100 

Pride of Newcastle 6.00 per 100 

BURDELL FI>3RAL CO., 
Bowling Green, Ky. 

BEGONIAS NOW READY FOR DELIVERY. 

Glolre de I»rraine $16.00 per lOO 

Turnford Hall 25.00 per 100 

Glory of Cincinnati 2!5.00 per 100 

Melior 30.00 per lOO 

Peerless, new 35.00 per lOO 

Mrs. M. A. Patten lO.OO per 100 

Strong, healthy plants from 2-ln. pots, ready 
for a shift. 

Cash with order, please. 

Cultural directions free to all customers. 
J. A. PETERSON & SONS, 
West wood, Cincinnati, 

Rex Begonias, our well-known fine assort- 
ment including Mme, Gacbe and Speculata, 2-in., 
$15.00 per 100. 

Begonias, assorted, blooming varieties, $6.00 
per 100; Coralllna de Lucerne, 2%-ln., $10.00 
per 100; 3-ln., $16.00 per 100. Otto Hacker. 
Thurstonll, Argenteo-Guttata and Lucerne, 2-in., 
$8.00 per 100. Sandersonii, Marguerite and Mac- 
Betbii, rooted cuttings, $3.00 per 100; 2-1d., 
$6.00 per 100, N. 0. Caswell. DeUvan, III. 

BEGONIAS READY FOR SHIPMENT. 

2«4-ln. Each Per 10 Per 100 Per 100<> 

Lorraine $0.50 $2..'>0 $15.00 $140.W. 

Turnford Hall 50 2..')0 20.00 

Mrs. J. A. Peterson .50 3,50 30,00 270.0« 

Melior 50 3.50 30.00 270.00 

Cincinnati 50 3.50 30.00 '270.00 

Concurrent 60 3.50 30,00 270,0(i 

JULIUS ROEHRS CO.. RUTHERFORD. N. J. 

Begonias. Chatelaine, 2%-ln., $7.00 per 100. 
$65,00 per 1000; Mrs. Patten and Pride of New. 
castle, our new red sport of Chatelaine. 2V4-in,, 
$8.00 per 100, $75.00 per 1000. Rex Begonias ir 
assortment, strong 2V4-ln., $12.50 per 100. 

See ad on cover page for Melior and Clncln 
natl, 
S. S. Skidelsky & Co., 53 Park Place, New York 

BEGONIAS. 

Melior, 2^^-in $35.00 per 100, $300.00 per lOO* 

Cincinnati, 2 1^ -In. 30.00 per 100, 250.00 per 100<i 
250 at 1000 rate. 
Melior can be shipped immediately. They ar«^ 
extra fine and can be shifted into 3-in. pots. 
WILLIAM F. KASTINO CO., 

568_Wa8hington^t.^ BnjTalo, N. Y 

SEASONABLE STOCK READY NOW. 
Begonias, Gracilis Lumlnosn, Prima Donna, 
Erfordll. Superbn and Mignon, 2*410.. $5.0< 
per 100; $45.00 per 1000. 

Metailica. Argenteo-Guttata. Sandersonii and 
Albo-Plctn, 2V4-in., $8.00 per 100. 

THE STORRS & HARRISON CO.. 

Palnesville, O. 

BE€IONIAS. 

Mrs. Patten, 2-lh,, $ 4.00 per l«p 

Metailica, rooted cuttings 2. .50 per KM 

MetaRica, 2% in 7.00 per loc 

Metailica, 4-in 20.00 per in< 

Cash, but no packing ch.Trges. 
THE IMLAY CO., ZANESVILLE, 0. 
Begonia Chatelaine, 2%-in. pots, ready for 
shift, $0.00 per 100. 

Henderson Floral Co., Pana, 11! 



128 



The Florists^ Review 



JuNB 1. 1922 



BEQONIAS— Continued 



BEGONIA PRIMA DONNA. 
Exceptional stock. 

3-lnch $16.00 per 100 

4%-lnch 80.00 per 100 

AMERICAN BULB CO.. 
172 No. Wabash Ave. , Chicago, 111. 

BEGONIAS, GOOD STOCK. 
Albo-Plctu, 214-in., 4c; 3in., 6c; Chateliiine, 
2%-in., 6c. Mrs. M. A. I'utten, 2%-ln., 6c. 
Lumlnosa, 214-ln., 6c; 3-in., 8c. 

GULLETT & SONS, LINCOLN. ILL,. 

COUALLINA DE LUCERNE. 
Begonias, 2V^-in., $10.00 per 100. Can ship at 
once. 

WBSTWOOD FLOWER & PLANT CO.. 
Lynam St. near Hoover Ave., Dayton, 0. 

Begonias, Erfordil and Vernon, fine, bushy, 
rooted cuttings, $2.00 per 100; 2Vi-ln., $6.00 per 
100; Erfordil, fine, bushy 3-in., $10.00 per 100, 
4-in., $15.00 per 100. Cash or c. o. d. 
W. B. Trimble Greenhouse Co., Princeton, 111. 

Begonias, Chatelaine, 214-ln., $7.00 per 100, 
$65.00 per 1000; Mrs. Patten and Pride of New- 
castle, 2%-ln., $8.00 per 100, $76.00 per 1000. 
A. J. Schmutz, 23 Arnold Place, North Adams, 
Mass. 

Begonias, Luminosa, Prima Donna and Rosea, 
strong transplanted plants ready for 2V^-in. pots, 
$2.50 per 100, 800 for $6.75, 600 for $10.00, 
prepaid. Cash. 
Brill Celery Gardens, Kalamazoo, Mich. 

Begonia Pride of Newcastle, good, strong 
stock, from originator, 2%-in., $8.00 per 100, 
$75.00 per 1000. Wm. J. Beck, 15 S. Jefferson 
St., New Castle, Pa. 



BEGONIAS, CHATELAINE, LUMINOSA. 

strong 3-in., $10.00 per 100. 

WINFIELD S. KIRCHBR, 

Cyclamen Specialist, Deflance, 0. 

Begonia Corallina de Lucerne, strong, healthy 
2-ln., ready for 8-ln., $8.00 per 100; 8-ln., $16.00 
per 100. Cash. 

Meyerg-Watson Floral Co., St. Joseph, Mo. 

Begonias, strong rooted cuttings of Chate- 
laine, $2.60 per 100, $20.00 per 1000; Mrs. Patten, 
$3.60 per 100, $30.00 per 1000. Ready now. 
8. A. Plnkstone, Utl ca. N. T. 

Begonias, best flowering and foliage Tarleties, 
2Vi-ln. at $6.00 per 100; 4-in. at $25.00; large 
plants, 60c each. 

Henry Smit h Floral Co., Grand Rapids. Mich. 

BEGONIAS. 

Sep display ad in this Issue. 

G. It. NOBLE, PADUCAH, KY. 

Hcgonin rrim.i Donna, full of blooms, 2U-in., 
.$.'). 00 per 100, 300 for $12,00, (Mias. Whitton. 
York St, and Gray Ave., Ulioa, N, Y, 

Begonias, Argenteo-Guttata Rubra, De Lessepa, 
Thurstonli and Marguerite, 3-ln., $12.00 per 100. 
Oak Grove Greenhouse. Tuskegee, Ala. 

Begonias, Luminosa and Vernon, 2-in., 4c; 
very strong seedlings, $2.00 per 100, 

II. Meyer, Little Rock, Ark. 

Begonias, Luminosa and Prima Donna, strong 
plants, 4-ln., 15c each; 2-ln,. 5c each. Gash. 
Carl Erlckson, Princeton, 111. 

Begonia Chatelaine. 2-in,, 3<^c; Mrs. Patten, 
2-in., 4c; Pride of New Castle, 2-in., 6c. 
Loyd O. Bunch, Fredonia. Kan. 

Begonias, Gracilis and Chatelaine seedlings, 
60c per 100, $4.50 per 1000, prepaid. 
L. J. Rowe. Tit usville, Pa. 

Begonia Pride of Newcastle, strong plants out 
of 21^-ln. pots, $8.00 per 100. Cash with order. 
Chas. E. Smith & Son, York, Pa. 

Begunia Rex, flne varieties; strong plants from 
2-in. pots, 10c each. Cash with order. 

George M, Emmans, Newton, N. J. 

Rex Begonia, ,'{-in. ready for 4-in., 2.')e each, 
rash, please. V. K. Selkregg, North East, Pa, 

Itecciiiia Luminosa, strong 3-ln., .$(i,()il iier 100, 
<'asli. .T.ieolis liros., I'eoria, 111. 

Hegonia Lueerne, 4 in,, $1,").00 i>er 100 , John 
Ileidenreicli. 7L'r> Iowa St,, Indianapolis, Ind, 

Begonia Luminosa, from 4-ln. pots, 25c each. 
Nixon H. Gano. Martinsville, Ind, 

Begonia Luminosa from seed, 2'/4-ln,, 5c. Cash. 
Ilanunersclimidt & Clark. Medina, O. 

liegonia Cliatelaine, L'H-ln,, .^.la.OO per 1000. 
Cash, .T, ('. Uennison Co.. Slonx City. la. 

Begonia Pride of Newcastle, 214-ln,, $8,00 per 
100. Charles Sherwood, Waterloo, la. 



BERRIED PLANTS 



TWO NEW niFUtlilES, 

Improved (Ji.int CievidaiKi, lellow and Im- 
proved Gi.iiit Orange ()iieeii, L'l.i-in. pots, $0.50 
]>er 100, .<!,">(). 00 per 1000 

Tiird's E.ve Peppers, 2in. jiols, $0.00 per 100, 
$50,00 per 1000. 

ROMAN ,T, IRWIN. 

43 W, 18th St., New York, N. Y, 

(•LKVP:I,A.\I) CHEKIUES 

(irown fnim seleeted strain. 

Good, strong, liiisliy plants, 

2V4-in., $4 00 per 100, 

Casli witli order. 

The alinve prices iiuliule careful parking 

R, S, MeMI'RRAY, liELLEFONTAINE, O. 

Cleveland Cherry, large berried, per pkt,, 60c; 
seedlings, 75c per 100. 
Otto P. Krueger, 427 East Broadway, Toledo, 0. 



JERUSALEM CHERRIES. 

Strong 21,4 -in. plants of Cleveland, Hollyberry 

and Orange Queen, $5,00 per 100. 

Cash with order. Add 5^ per cent for packing. 

GODFREY ASCHMANN, 

1010 W. Ontario St., Philadelphia, Pa. 

CLEVELAND CHERRIES, STRONG 2-IN. 

Ready for field or 4-in. pots, $4.00 per 100, 

$30,00 per 1000. 

WINFIELD S, KIRCHBR, 

Cyclamen Specialist, Defiance, 0, 

JERUSALEM CHERRIES, CLEVELAND TYPE. 

Transplanted, strong, ready to line out 

or pot in 3-in., $4.00 per 100, 

parcel post free. Cash, 

THE IMLAY CO,, ZANESVILLE, 0. 

Hollyberry Cherry, the Improved Dwarf Cleye- 
land Cherry, strong 2-in. stock, $5.00 per 100, 
$46.00 per 1000. Cash with order. Job. I. 
Bcbaeffer, Mad Rlrer Oardeni, R. B. No. 8, 
Dayton^ 0^ 

Cleveland Cherries, 250 good, stocky plants, 
2 in,, $3.00 per 100. Cash, please. 

Dixon Flor al Co,, Dixon, 111. 

Hollyberry Cherry plants, ready to bloom, 
from 2-in. pots, $4,00 per 100, 

Page's Greenhouses, Staunt on, 111. 

Hollyberry Cherries, the best of the Cleve- 
land type. 2»4-ln., $5,00 per 100. 

Abby Avenue Greenhouses, Dayton, O. 

Cleveland Cherry seedlings, $1,00 per 100. 
L. G. Brown, 35th St. and Kensington Ave., 
Kansas City, Mo. 

Cherries, Cleveland and Orange, flne stock 
seedlings, 75c per 100, $6.00 per 1000. Cash. 
Byer Bros., Chambersburg, Pa. 

Cleveland Cherry seedlings, 76c per 100; 2^-in. 
•t $4.00 per 100; strong 4-in. at $25.00. 

Henry Smith Floral Co., Grand Rapids, Mich. 

BOUOAINVILLgAS 

Itougainvillea Sanderlana, 4-ln., 25c; 5-in., 
40e; ;!-year-oId, globe shape, 6-in,, $1.00; 7-ln,, 
.$1,25; 8-in,, $1,50, height 2 to 3 feet and spread 
at top 18 to 24 ins. All well shaped. Cash with 
order. II, C, Doescher, 2048 Gentilly Ave,, New 
Orleans, I.,a, 

BOUGAINVILLBA GLABRA SANDBRIANa7 

2%-in., $10.00 per 100; 

8-in.. $20.00 per 100. 

THE STORKS ft HARBISON 00., 

PalneiTllle, O. 

BOUVARPIAS ~ 

BOUVARDIAS. 

Single, pink, white and red. 

Per 100 Per 100(1 

SI rong 2'4 -in $9,00 $80,00 

There are never sufficient Bouvardias, 

Order early, 

C, U, LIGGIT, 

-,()r, Bulletin BIdg,. Philadelphia, Pa, 

BOUVARDIA HUMBOLDTII, 

Strong 214 -In. plants, $6,00 per 100, 

No packing charge, Casli, 

M. A. REIMERS, 

800 Baxter Ave., I.,oui8ville, Ky. 

Bouvanlias, separate colors, strong 2i/i-in. 
plants. $8.00 per 100. 
S, S, Skidelsky & Co., 53 Park Place, New York, 

Bouvardias, strong pot plants, 214-ln., mixed, 
pink, white and red, $8.00 per 100. 
Henry Smith Floral Co.. Grand Rapids, Mich . 

ioxwooD ~ 

HILL'S BOXWOODS. 

Choice American grown pyramids, balls and 

standards, good color; well formed specimens 

that will please your customers. Tree furnished 

tialled and burlapped, carefully packed, 

BOXWOOD. 

Balled and burlapped. 

Bach 

Ball shaped. 14x14 Inches $8.60 

Ball shaped, 16x16 inches 4.26 

Ball shaped. 18x18 inches 6^50 

Ball shaped, 24x24 inches 6.60 

Pyramid shaped, 2% feet 4.50 

Pyramid shaped, 8 feet 6]bo 

Standards, stem 14 inches; crown 16 inches 6 50 

THE D. HILL NURSERY CO., INC., 
Box 403. Dundee, 111. 

BOXWOOD. 
Just as good as we used to get, only acclim- 
atized. Pyramids, 2H «. high, $3.60 each; 
Pyramids. 3 ft. high, $4.75 each. 

OULDEMOND & CO., SPRINGFIELD, 0. 
English Boxwood, rooted cuttings, $2 50 per 
100, $20.00 per lOOO. Cash with order T»9 
Angeles Geranium Co., Sawtelle P. 0,, Los 
Angeles. Cal. 

Boxwood Suffruticosa. for lining out, 6 to 
6 Ins, and 7 to 8 ins. Write for prices 
Robert H. Bender, Bo xl y, Chestnut Hill. Pa. 

nZTT BUDDLEIAS 

BUDDLEIA VARIABILIS MAGNIFICA 
Rank grower, hardy, beautiful Lilac; 

blooms all suminer. 

2V4-ln., $3. ,50 per 100. $.35.00 per 1000. 

ASIATICA, WHITE, 

To grow on for winter blooming; 

a great money maker, 

2%-ln,. $3.50 per 100, $S5.00 per 1000 

Cash with order. Free packing 

C. L. HUMPHREY, 

Zanesvllle, O. 

Buddlelas, white, pink and lilac, 2^4 -in $6 66 
per 100. Eli Cross, Grand Rapids', Mich. 



Buddlela Aslatica, or White Butterfly Bush, 
2H-ln., $6.00 per 100; 8-ln., $1.60 per dos., 
$10.00 per 100. 

Oak Orove Greenhotue, Tuskegee, Ala. 

BuddleU Aslatica, 2%-ln., $6.00 per 100. 
The Storrs & Harrison Co.. PafneaTllle. O. 

BULBS 

MANY GROWBBS MADB MONBT 
On our prepared Hyacinths for Christmas 
blooming. The preparation of these bulbs for 
early forcing Is the work of ■pedaliiti. and we 
are leaders in this line. Now booking the new 
crop for early summer delivery. Send for com- 
plete list of all fall bulbs. Remember we are 
growers. 

F. BTNVBLD & SONS. 
61 Vesey St.. New York. N. Y. 

Purity Freesla and White Calla bulbs at 
growers' prices. Crop seriously injured by re- 
cent cold weather. Order now for June, July, 
August delivery. State your requirements, and 
we will quote prices by return mall. 
Lilydale Bulb Co., Santa Cruz, Cal. 

Stammes & Co., Wholesale Bulb Growers and 
Exporters, Hillegom, Holland. We sell at grow- 
ers' prices. Ask for special quotations and cata- 
logue or mail your list of wants care B. F. 
Lang, 82-84 Broad St., New York City. 

Bulbs of ail descriptions; Lily of the Valley. 
Write for prices. The trade will be visited by 
us in due time, as usual, for 1922 spring and 
fall orders. C. Keur & Sons, Hillegom, Holland, 
or address 5625 Moshoiu Ave., New York. 

Bulbs of all descriptions, high grade Japan 
Lilies. Please mail list of wants to Papendrecht 
Bros., Sassenhelm. Holland. 

Lillum Oiganteum. bulbs, 7 to Ins., 800 to a 
case, $60.00. 
^ Bol ton & Hnnkel Co.. Milwaukee, Wis. 

CACTI 

Cacti, my choice, 26 vara., $4.00; 60 Tars.. 

$10.00; succulents, 26 Tars., $2.00; 60 Tars., 

$6.00. Cash with order. A. O. Oreiner. 4202 

W. Natural Bridge ATe.. St. Louis. Mo 

CALADIUMS 

FANCY-LEAVED CALADIUMS, 
5000 bulbs in 10 named varieties, flnest stock 

in America. 

Medium sized bulbs $20.00 per lOO 

Monster bulbs 25.00 per 100 

All bulbs extra large and strong; order quick, 

as they will not last long; sold out of small size. 

Cash with orders. 

H. C. DOESCHER, 

2048 Gentilly Ave., New Orleans, La. 

CALENDULAS 

Calendulas, all varieties mixed, in bud and 
bloom, $1.60 per 100, $10,00 per 1000, 

Mrs. Sam Hlnes, Mocksvllle, N. C. 

Calendula Orange King, seedlings, 40c per 100, 
$3,50 per 1000, prepaid, 

L. J. Rowe, Titusville, Pa. 

Calendula Orange King ready to bloom, 2%-ln., 
.$4,00 per 100, $,'55.00 per 1000. Alonzo J. Bryau, 
Wholesale Florist. Washington. N, J. 

Calendula Orange King, fine plants, 2^-in., 
$4,00 per 100. 

Henry Smith Floral Co., Grand Rapids, Mich, 

CALLAS 

YELLOW OAT.T.AH. 

Spotted foliage, golden-yellow flowers; 

Well cured Calla Elliottlana. 

WHITE CALLAS. 

Spotted foliage. Ivory-white flower; 

the well known Macula ta. 

LOS ROBLBS CO.. SANTA CBUZ, CAL. 

WHITE GODFREY CALLA CLUMPS. 
Open field-grown. 6 to 10 shoots each; very 
flne and strong, $20.00 per 100. F. o. b. here. 
Cash with order. 

S. HENDRY, CITY POINT. FLA. 

Godfrey Calla. 2i^-in,, $4,50 per 100, $40.00 
per 1000, Geo. F, Deutschmann, R, No. 5, AVeb- 
ster Groves, Mo, 

CAMELLIAS 

CAMELLIAS. 

Assorted Camellias, 
I'ropafrateil fiuiii choice named varieties: in 
2'..-in. puts. Iimiiediatc shipment 

Each Per 10 Per 100 

fi to 8-incli .$0.r,0 $4,,jO $10,00 

THE I) HILL NIUSERY CO., 
Poy 408, Dundee, III, 

CANNAS 

CANNAS, SELECT 2 AND 8 BYE ROOTS. 
True to name, clean stock. 

Per 100 Per 1000 

Austria $2.60 $20.00 

Alemannla 8.00 25.00 

Wintzer's Colossal 8.60 26.00 

California 3.00 25.00 

Yellow King Humbert 4,00 86.00 

Howell 2,60 20.00 

Chas. Henderson 2.60 20,00 

Indiana '. 3.00 26.00 

Richard Wallace 2.50 20,00 

Wyoming 3,00 26.00 

NORTH STAR NURSERY, 
H. B. Schroeder. Mgr., Onarga, 111. 

Cannas, well started, Wyoming, $3.00 per 
100; J. D. Eisele, Indiana, Austria, Alemannia 
and Pennsylvania. $2.60 per 100. 

Oak Grove Greenhouse, Tuskegee, Ala. 



T* '')r 



JUNI 1, 1922 



The Florists'" Review 



129 



CANNAS. 

Potted plants from 3-in. pots. 

Per 100 Per 1000 

American Beauty $50.00 

Apricot 50.00 

Heacon 8.60 $ 75.00 

Buttercup 25.00 

Candelabra 60.00 

California v '^•^ 65.00 

Distinction 50.00 

Druid Hill 12.50 

Ggandale 7.50 

Firebird 8.60 75.00 

Flag of Truce 15.00 ■ 

George Washington 7.50 

Gaiety 8.50 75.00 

Gladiator 7.50 65.00 

Gladioflora 8.50 75.00 

Golden Gate 8.60 76.00 

Hiawatha 7.50 

Indiana 7.50 66.00 

Jane Addams 8.50 

King Humbert 8.60 75.00 

Meteor (Wintzer's) 9.50 85.00 

Moliawk 100.00 

Morning Glow 8.50 75.00 

Mrs. Alfred F. Conard 15.00 125.00 

New York 8.50 

Nokomis 9.50 85.00 

Olympic 12.60 115.00 

Tlie President 10.50 100.00 

Princeton 12.50 115.00 

Kichard Wallace 8.50 75.00 

Snow Queen 35.00 

Statue of Liberty 25.00 

Wabash 10.00 

Wintzer's Colossal 10.00 85.00 

Prices are net, f. o. b. West Grove. Pa. 
Itoxing at cost. Orders for 25 or more at 100 
rates; for 250 or more 1000 rates. 

THE CONARD & JONES CO.. 

Kobert Pyle, Pres., Antoine Wintzer, Vice-pres., 
West Grove, Pa. 



CANNAS. 8-IN. POT PLANTS. 
BBADT NOW. 
The following, |S.60 per 100, $46.00 per 1000: 
Alphonse Bouvier, Gladiator, J. D. Blsele, Jean 
Tissot, Florence Vaughan, Louisiana, Maroi, 
Mme. Crozy, Rubin, Pres. Myers, Queen Char- 
lotte, Richard Wallace, TJncIe Sam, Sout. d' An- 
toine Crozy. • 

Per 100 Per 1000 

King Humbert $10.00 

The President 9.00 $80.00 

City of I'ortland 14.00 120.00 

.Mrs. A. Conard 12.00 100.00 

Crimson Bedder 7.00 65.00 

Yellow King Humbert 10.00 

ROMAN J. IRWIN. 
48 W. 18th St.. New York, N. Y. 

CLEARANCE SALE. 

CANNAS. 

King Humbert, 3-ln., 7c each. 

THE FOLLOWING CANNAS, 2Mi-IN. POTS, 



William Bates. 
Orange Bedder, 
Panama, 
Alcmannia, 
King Humbert. 



5c each: 
Meteor. 

Richard Wallace, 
Duke of Marlborough, 
I'ncle Sam. 
The President. 



THE GOOD & REESE CO., 
Department A, Springfield, 0. 

f CANNAS, CANNAS, CAN.NAS. 

King Humbert, ;{-in $ 8.00 per 100 

Yellow King Humbert, 3 in 8.00 per 100 

Florence Vaughan, 3-ln 7.00 per 100 

Mme. Crozy, 3in 7.00 per 100 

Charles Henderson, 3-in 7.00 per 100 

Richard Wallace, 3-in 7.00 per 100 

Tlie President. 3in 10.00 per 100 

Wintzer's Colossal, 3-in 10.00 per 100 

GULLETT & SONS, LINCOLN, ILL. 

CANNAS. 

Cannas, strong 3-inch $0.00 per 100 

Yellow Humbert 0.00 per 100 

Nokomis 6.00 per 100 

Austria C.OO per 100 

Alcmannia 6.0O per 100 

California 6.00 per 100 

And a few other sorts 6.00 per 100 

Five per cent for pnckini;. 
C. H. FREY FLORAL CO.. LIN C OLN. NEB. 

FOR CASH. 
4 inch started plants. Per 100 

1000 King Humbert $7.00 

liiOO Wjiiming 7.00 

2000 Austria 6.00 

PARK FIX)RAL CO., TRENTON, N. J. 

CANNA KING HT'MBERT. 

14 to l(i ins. liigh, healthy plants. 

$15.00 per 100. (;nah with order. 

N. K. WELTER, 

708 Wejley Ave.. Evanston. 111. 

Canniis. Chns. Henderson, Florence Vaughan 
and Burbank, fine, strong plants from soil ready 
to plant out, $5.00 per 100; strong roots of 
same, $2.50 per 100. 
S. W. Pike. St. Charles, 111. 

Cnnna King Humbert, fine stock for immediate 
efTect, from 4-in. pots, $12.00 per 100; 3^-in., 
pots, $7.00 per 100. 

Harold W. McGregor, Springfield, 0. 



Cannas, King Humbert, Yellow King Humbert, 
Austria. Queen Charlotte and Pennsylvania, 
strong 3-in. pot plants, $8.00 per 100. 
W. W. Dederick, Warsaw, Ind. 

Canna The President, strong plants from soil, 
$6.00 per 100. A. B. Campbell, The Canna Man, 
Cochranville, Pa. 

Cannas, King Humbert, 3-in. pot plants, $7.00 
per 100; The President, $10.00 per 100. 

Storrs & Harrison Co., Painesville. O. 

Canna Pennsylvania, 2000 strong 4-in. plants, 
$8.00 per 100. Cash. 

Huscroft's Flower Shop, Steubenville, O. 

CANNA MLLE. BERAT. ~ 
Fine dormant roots, $16.00 per 1000. 
LOYD C . BUN C H, FRE DONIA, KAN. 

Canna Yellow Humbert, strong 3-in. stock. 
$10.00 per 100; other good sorts. $8.00 per 100. 
No King Humbert. Harry Heinl, West Toledo. O. 

Advertisers have learned from experience that 

THE REVIEW 
PAYS BEST. 

Canna King Humbert, 3-in. ready to plant out, 
$7.00 per 100. Cash with order. 

Henry Ebelink, Holland, Mich. 

Cannas, Alemannia and Pennsylvania, strong 
2 to 8-eye roots, $2.00 per 100, $16.00 per 1000. 
Kingman Floral Co., Kingman, Kan. 

CARNATIONS 

CARNATION PLANTS, NICE, CLEAN. 

HEALTHY STOCK FROM 2-INCH POTS. 

Mrs. 0. W. Ward. .$ 6.00 per 100, $50.00 per 1060 

Rosalia 7.00 per 100, 60.00 per lOOO 

Happy Day 10.00 per 100, 90.00 per 1000 

Harvester 10.00 per 100, 90.00 per 1000 

Please make money orders payable at Clayton 

Postofflce. 

A. JABLONSKY, 

Olivette, Clayton P. C, Mo. 

ROOTED CUTTINGS 

Ready now. 

Clean, healthy, vigorous, well rooted. 

Mr«. C. W. Ward. .$4.00 per 100, $30.00 per 1000 

Matchless 3.00 per 100, 25.00 per 1000 

White Enchantress 3.00 per 100, 26.00 per 1000 

Aviator 3.00 per 100. 25.00 per 1000 

Gash with order, please. 

CHARLES N. MILLER & BRO., 

Morton Orove, 111. 

CARNATIONS, 2V4-IN. POTS. 
Enchantress, Matchless, Ward, White Wonder, 
White Enchantress and Beacon, $8.00 per 100, 
$70.00 per 1000. 

ROMAN J. IRWIN, 
43 W. 18th St., New York. N. Y. 

Carnations, extra fine from the soil, 700 
Nebraska, $4.00; 2900 Rose-pink Enchantress. 
$3.50; LIOO Light-pink Enchantress. $3.50; 700 
White Enchantress, $3.50; 900 Matchless, $3.50 
per 100. 

J. S. Wilson Floral Co., Des Moines, la. 

CARNATIONS, 2%-IN. POT PLANTS. 
Propagated for my own planting; 1500 each, 
Alice, Matchless and Ward; 400 White Enchan- 
tress, $60.00 per 1000. Each plant has been 
topped and is branching heavily. 

CHA8. A. MOSS. SPARTANBURG. S. O. 

Carnations, White and Pink Enchantress and 
Matchless, 5000 very strong plants in 2-in. pots, 
$5.00 per 100. Will make price on the lot. 

Lahr's Flower Siiop, lAi Fayette, Ind. 

WHITE CARNATION THOMAS 0. JOY. 
Strong 2-ln. plants, $12.00 per 100, $100.00 per 
1000. 

JOY FLORAL CO., NA S HTILLB. TBNN. 

Carnations: 2000 Pink and White Enchantress, 
mixed; from soil, first check takes them all. 

Abilene Floral Co., Abilene, Kan. 

'^^^1^ CENTAUREAS __ 

CENTAURBA OYMNOCARPA, DUSTY 

MILLER. 

Strong plants, ready to shift. 

out of 2V4-ln. pots, $4.00 per 100. 

Cash with order. 

No charge for packing. 

R. 3. McMURRAY, BELLEFONTAINB, 0. 

CENTAUREAS, DUSTY MILLER. 
Seed plants, strong and well rooted ready for 
2^-ln. pots, $1.25 per 100, $10.00 per 1000, $45.00 
per 5000, prepaid. See Vegetable ad. 

H. J. POTOMKIN, MUNCIE, IND. 

Centaureas, Montana and mixed, strong, flelil- 
grown plants, $1.00 per doz.; $6,00 per KM). 
Harry J. Squires, Good Grouml, N. Y. 

Centaurea Gvmnocarpa, seedlings, 50c per 
100, $4.50 per 1000; 2'4 In.. 3V.C. 

L. J. Rowe, Titusville. Pa. 

Centaurea Dusty Miller, strong stock ready 
to plant out, $1.75 per 100, prepaid. 
S. W. Pike, St. Charles. 111. 

Centaureas, double blue and double pink; fleld- 
grown plants, 60c per 100, $5.00 per 1000. 
Mrs. Sam Hines, Mocksville. N. C. 

Centaurea Gymnocarpa, or Dusty Miller, 2-ln., 
$3.00 per 100. Cash. 
Byer Bros .. C hambersburg, Pa. 

DUSTY MILLER, 2%-iN;r$3.n0 PER 100. 
GITLLETT & SONS, L I NCOLN, ILL. 

CHRYSANT H EMUMS 

SEE PAGE 6 

FOR ALL CHRYSANTHEMUMS. 

ROMAN J. IRWIN, 

43 W. 18th St., New York, N. Y. 



CHRYSANTHEMUMS. 

LARGB SUPPLY. QUALITY GUARAn'tBBD. 

DELIVERY FREE. 



A 1 stock of the best commercial varieties. 
No drawn up hard cuttings. No midge. Circu- 
lar "How We Keep Our Plants Clean of Midge" 
for the asking. Descriptive price-list on request. 



OUR GUARANTEE. 
We deliver Mum rooted cuttings parcel post 
free of charge up to the 6tb zone, or 1400 miles 
from Geneva, and guarantee safe delivery. Stock 
not satisfactory when received may be returned 
at once and money refunded, or slight dlfficultiet 
win be adjusted and you keep the stock. Out- 
side this territory stock travels at buyer's risk 
and expense. 



20 per cent oft on all varieties marked * until 
surplus Is sold. 



$3.00 per 100, $25.00 per 1000. 

•Unaka, 

•Tiger, 

Pacific Supreme, 

•Oconto, 

•Early Frost, 

Harvard, 

White Patty, 

Pink Patty, 

Pink Seidewitz, 

J. Nonin, 

•Mistletoe. 



$3.60 per 100, $30.00 per 1000. 

Golden Queen, 

Chieftain, 

White Chieftain, 

Roman Gold, 
Dr. Enguehard, 
White Seidewitz, 

Chrysolora, 
Charles Rager, 
Josephine Foley, 

Marigold, 

Golden Mistletoe, 

•Yanoma. 



$4.60 per 100, $40.00 per 1000. 
White Turner. 
Yellow Turner, 

Betsy Ross, 
Lady Hopetoun, 
Pink Chadwick. 



POMPONS AND SINGLES. 

$3.00 per 100, $25.00 per 1000. 

•Clorinda, bronze; 

Diana, white; 

Golden Mensa. 

White Menaa, 

Godfrey, pink; 

Fairy Queen, pink; 

•Christmas Gold. 



We have a number of varieties in soil topped 
and branching. Just right for planting. For a 
time will make these at an advance of only 
20 per cent to the above regular prices for 
rooted cuttings. 



GENEVA FLORAL CO., GENEVA. N. Y. 

CHRYSANTHEMUMS. 

Start your fall business with the big money- 
makers. This stock guaranteed free from midge 
and exceptionall.r fine. 

Give us a sample order and get lined up with 
as fine stock as you ever put in a bench. All 
2-ln. pots with lots of roots. 

The following at $4.00 per 100: 
.^Smith's Advance, Whittier, 

Yellow Advance, Buckbee, 

Oconto, Lynnwood Hall, 

Pacific Supreme, Harvard. 

Chrysolora. Lena li.Tiim, 

White Chieftain. Yellow Ragor, 

Richmond, Seidewitz. 

Rooted cuttings of the above varieties, $3.00 
per 100, $25.00 per 1000. 

The following 2-in. pots, $5.00 per 100: 
Sun Glow, Betsy Ross, Victorj'. 

HERE IS A SPECIAL: 

Odessa, the great big yellow; the dazzler of 
the mid-season varieties, roofed cuttings, $2 25 
per 100, $20.00 per 1000; 2-in., $3.00 per 100. 
$25.00 per 1000. Guaranteed to give satisfac- 
tion or your money back. 

Remember! All stock free from midge; free 
packing; every plant sent out to give perfect sat- 
isfaction. Cash with order. 

0. L. HUMPHREY, ZANESVILLE. 0. 

Chrysanthemum White Chadwick, 500 2V4-in. 
and 3-in., $6.00 per 100. 

Neil Neilsen, Inc., Mankato, Minn. 



130 



The Florists' Review 



J 



JuNB 1. 1922 



CHRYSANTHeMUMb-Oontinueu 



X.AUtJK Fr,0\VKUIN« 

KiMitod CiiltiilKH. 

WHITK: Smith's A<lviince, Wliltp Chloftain. 
UetBy KiisH, Virtor.v, Cliailwick linprovod, Wliite 
Seidpwit/,, MiKllctoe. 

YE1jU)W: (Joldfii Qufoii, Tiger, MidnlBlH 
Hun, Uoldnn Chadwick, Miijor ISminaffun, Sun- 
beam, (!()ldt?n MlHlleloi'. 

I'INK; TInaka, Cliii'ftain. Rose Perfection, 
hidwin Soidpwitz. $4.00 per 100, $35.00 per 1000, 
•xoept Olmdwiok Improved and Golden Chad- 
wiok, $.'■..50 per 100, $50.00 per 1000. 

I'OMl'ONS. 
WHITK: Uvalda, Ijiriirite, Nordi. 
YEI,IX)W: Zora, Klondike. Quinoln. 
PINK: Kdina, Fairy Queen. Western Heautv. 
miONZP]: Iva, (31orinda, Frank Wilcox. 

BABY I'OMPONS 

For i>ot plantfi or cuttings. 

Baby Doll, Buena, Button Hose, Little Tot. 

Mary IMckford, White Midget, Mareuerite Clark, 

Hilda CanninK, Billie Burke, Vivian Martin. 

(.Ihristmas Gold. 

ANEMONES. 

Godfrey's I'erfection, Golden I<ida Thomas, 
Izola, 8unHhine. 

Above iMjniiKins and anemones, $4.00 per 100, 
^S.-i.OO per 1000. 

EXHIBITION VAIlIBflES. 

Artlsta. Corp. Piper, Daily Mail, Elbcron, Lady 
Hopetonn, Lenox, Christy Mathewson, Mrs. J. 
Leslie Davis (Pink Turner). Mrs. O. H. Kahn, 
Meudon, Nakota, Nerissa, Odessa, Louisa Pock- 
ett, Pockett's Crimson, Reginald ValUs, Ro- 
sanda. Sergeant Young, Titanic, Vermont, Wells' 
Oate Pink, William Turner and Yellow Turner. 

$5.00 per 100. $45.00 per lOOO, except Mrs. 
Davis and Itosanda, which are $10.00 i>er 100. 
JtJO.OO per 1000. 

Those desiring plants from 2%-in. pots of any 
variety offe-ed, add $1.00 per 100, $10.00 per 
1000. These prices are for June and July 
delivery. Clean stock; best quality. Let us 
book your order to be delivered when desired. 

Not less than 25 of a variety at 100 rate and 
250 at 1000 rate. Many other varieties in stock. 
Send list of wants. 

ELMER D. SMITH & CO., 
Adrian, Mich. 



OUB SPBOIAIiTT— OHBTSANTHmnna 

or riNBST QUALITT. 

BOOTBD OUTTINGS BBAOT NOW. 

PINK. 

Per 100 Per 1000 

■dwlD Beldewlta $2.B0 $20.00 

Helen Frick 2.D0 20.00 

Dr. BBKnehard 2.B0 20.00 

Mra. Patty 3.S0 90.00 

WHITE. 

Chadwick 8.B0 80.00 

Helen Vrlck 2.60 20.00 

OhlefUIn 2.60 20.00 

Obaa. Baser 2.60 20.00 

riorence Pullman 2.60 20.00 

White Mlitletoe 3.60 90.00 

Tanoma 2.60 20.00 

TBUiOW. 

Ohryaotoia 2.60 90.00 

Golden Qaeen 2.60 20.00 

Golden MlaUetoe 8.60 80.09 

POMPONS. 

DUna S.B0 ».0« 

Qolden Wedding 2.60 9a00 

Satlafactlon guaranteed. 

T. O. OWBN & BON. 
Wholesale riorlsta, Oolomboa, Mlaa. 

ROOTED CHRYSANTHEMUM CUTTINGS. 
YELLOW— Gold Glow, Robt. Halllday, Mert- 
sold, Chrysolora, Bonnaffon. 

WHITE — Oconto, White Chieftain, Chaa. 
Rager. 
PINK— Pink Chieftain, Dr. Enguehard. 
BRONZE— Tints of Gold. 

POMPONS— ROOTED CUTTINGS. 
YELLOW— The Baby, Golden Wedding, Lu- 
cille Knoble, Krut, Golden Climax, Zenobla. 
WHITE — Mariana, White Doty, Mary. 
PINK— Mimico. Lillian Doty. 
BRONZE— Miramar, Mrs. Beu. Hilda Canning, 
Becky McLean. 

SINGLES— ROOTED CUTTINGS. 
WHITE— Late Garza. 
PINK— Mrs. Godfrey. 

BRONZE— Mra. Whitehom, Mrs. Stewart. 

All the above $2.50 per 100. 

Golden Chadwick, $4.00 per 100. 

Cash with order. 

GEORGE O. WEILAND. 

602 DavU St., Branston, HI. 

bhrysantbemuma, Oconto, Unaka, Golden Glow. 
Patty and Buckingham, $2.00 per 100. Cam. 
Oarl S. lilndey. 1207 S. 17th St., New Caitle, Ind. 



CHRYSANTHEMUM ROOTED CUTTINGS. 

We offer immediate delivery on the following 
Hat of varieties, which includes varieties most 
in demand: 

WHITE— Smith's Advance, Polly Rose, Chas. 
Uager. White Chieftain. Betsy Ross, Mistletoe, 
White Seidewitz, Early Frost. 

YELLOW— Yellow Advance, Golden Queen, 
("hrysolora, Sun Glow, Marigold, Major Bonnaf- 
fon, Mrs. Morgan, Yellow Mistletoe, Whittier. 

PINK— Unaka, Pink Polly Hose, Pacific Su- 
preme, Pink Chlertain, Dr. Enguehard, Mrs. B. A. 
Seidewitz. Maud Dean, Nerissa. 

RED- Harvard, dark crimson, the best red yet 
introduced, double from any bud. 

All of the above rooted cuttings at $3.60 per 
100, $30.00 per 1000. 

POMPONS. 

WHITE— Niza, Mariana, Diana. 

YKLIiOW— Quinoln Improved. Zenobia, Golden 
Climax, Peter Pan, Baby, Klondike, Golden 
Wedding. Christmas Gold. 

PINK— Minta, Fairy Queen, Lillian Doty, 
Nella. Western Beauty. 

BRONZE- Ivn, Hilda Canning. Mrs. Frank 
Beu. 

WINE COLOR Aiinalielle, sport of Godfrey. 

SINGLES — Mens.i, Single Salmon. Simplicity, 
Felicity, Mrs. K, 1). Godfrey, Mrs. Buckingham, 
Bronze Buckingham. 

ANEMONES BlaiKlie, ElizalK-th, Emma, Graf 
Von Orioln. Sunshine. 

All the nhove iHinipons, singles and anemones, 
rooted cuttings, at $:i..''.(l per 100, $.S0.00 per 1000. 

Add 5 per cent to cover cost of packing. 

AMERICAN BULB CO.. 

172 N. 'Walmsh Ave.. Chicago. 111. 

~ CHRYSANTHEMIMS. 

Buy clean, healthy plants from the largest 
stock in the West. 

Rooted cuttings. $3.00 per 100, $25.00 per 
loot), except the varieties marked * which are 
l)riced $5.00 per 100. $45. (K» per 1000. 

Established plants 'jy, in., $.j.00 j.er 100. $45.00 
\wx 1000, except those marked • which are 
$7.50 per IfM), $7().iiO per 1000. 

WhWe: Smith's Advance, Early Frost, Oconto, 
Chieftain,* ('hadwick.* Wliite Jones. 

Yellow: Golden (Jlow. Sunray,* Golden Queen, 
Siml)enm.* Richmond, Bonnaffon, Golden Chad- 
wick,* Yellow Jones. 

Pink: Pacific Supreme. Unaka. Rose Per- 
fection.* Chieftain.* Dr. Enguehard. Patty, 
Seidewitz, Helen Frlck. 

Pompons: Chicago White, Elva, Lula. Acto, 
Mrs. Buckingham, Kenneth, Mariana, Romaine 
Warren, Volunteer, Langaiilet. Mrs. Frank Beu, 
Western Beauty, Golden Wedding, Christmas 
Gold. 

Our varieties are the result of a lifetime of 
selection and elimination. Y'ou will hardly find 
a better bread-winning list. They are listed In 
their blooming order from extreme early to late. 

We very strongly recommend buying plants 
from pots to ship in hot weather. 

gullett 4 sons, lincoln^ill. 

chrysanthemums; 

Healthy stock; no midge. 

Rooted cuttings 2%-ln. 

100 

C. 0. Pollworth $2.00 

Charles Rager 2.00 

Yellow Rager 2.00 

Negoya 2.00 

Golden Mistletoe 2.0O 

Seidewitz 2.00 

Sunbeam 3.00 

W. H. Chadwick 8.00 

Chadwick Supreme . . 3.00 

POMPONS. 

Idolf 2.00 18.00 3.00 26.00 

Niza 200 18.00 3.00 2B.00 

Zora 2.00 18.00 3.00 26.00 

Lillian Doty 2.00 18.00 8.00 26 00 

Diana 2.00 18.00 8.00 25.00 

Eugene Langaulet . . . 2.00 18.00 3.00 25.00 

Volunteer 2.00 18.00 8.00 25.00 

Hilda Canning 2.00 18.00 8.00 28 00 

Christmas Gold 2.00 18.00 S.OO 26.00 

Beu 2.00 18.00 8.00 25.00 

Donald 2.00 18.00 8.00 26.00 

Marie 2.00 18.00 8.00 25.00 

WM. P. KRUEGER, 
Box 102 Sta. A, Toledo . 0. 

CHBTSANTHBMUMS, WELL ROOTBB 

CUTTINGS, 

$8.60 per 100, $80.00 per 1000. 

WHITB. 

R. 0. Berthier, 

Smith't Advance, 

White Chadwick, 

iTory, 

Wllltam Turner, 

Clementine Touaet, 

Charles Rager, 

YELLOW. 

Polyphine, 

Bonnaffon. 

Yellow Jonei, 

Golden Glow, 

Chrysolora, 

PINK. 
Chieftain, 
Maud Dean, 
POMPONS. 
Ninta, King Henry, Helen Newberry, Diana 
Martha, Mensa, Clorinda, 
also French Caprice all colon mixed 
STATE FLORAL CO., YAKIMA, WASH. 
Chrysanthemums and pompons, rooted cuttings 
at special low prices owing to large supply- 
Christmas Gold, Smith's late White, Garza' 
Climax, Beu, Buckingham and Bonnaffon *2 M 
per 100, $20.00 per 1000. ' * 

R. Scheffler, Wheaton, III. 



1000 


100 


1000 


$18.00 


$3.60 


$80.00 


18.00 


8.60 


80.00 


18.00 


3.60 


80.00 


18.00 


3.60 


80.00 


18.00 


8.60 


30.00 


18.00 


3.60 


80.00 




5.00 


46.00 




6.00 


45.00 




6.00 


46.00 



CHRYSANTHEMUM CUTTINGS. 

Smith's Advance, white; Smith's Advance, yel- 
low; Roserie, October Frost, Sunray, Rose Perfec- 
tion, Marigold, Sun Glow, TMtanlc, Pink and 
White Chieftain, Smith's Sublime, Unaka, Mid- 
night Sun, I/oyalty, Oconto, Chrysolora, Mrs. 
Foley, Sunbeam, White Turner, Richmond, 
Smith's Imperial, White and Golden Mistletoe, 
Mrs, C. W, Johnson, Pink and White Seidewitz, 
Charles Rager, Celebration, Major Bonnaffon, 
Mrs. Totty, Betsy Ross, Glenvlew, White and 
Golden Chadwick, $35.00 per 1000. 

December Beauty $45.00 per 1000 

Sunshine, Little Bronze, Early Pink Niza, Mrs. 
Buckingham, Mrs. Frank Beu, Golden West, Yel- 
low Anemone, Late Bronze, Red Pompons, Christ- 
mas Gold and White Pompon, $35.00 per 1000. 

ELI CROSS. 
160 Monroe Ave., Grand Rapids, Mich. 



CHRYSANTHEMUM CUTTINGS. 

They are going fast, we offer for immediate 

delivery the following : 

700 Golden Glow, 

300 Golden Queen, 

500 Chrysolora, 

1500 Oconto, 

150 Pink Chieftain, 

200 White Chieftain, 

500 Whittier, 

800 Charles Rager, 

500 White Frick. 

POMPONS READY NOW. 

800 Ban-ett's Early White, 

150 Yellow Mensa, 

500 White Mensa, 

200 Mariana, 

200 Golden Wedding, 

360 Godfrey, 

800 Diana, 

800 Golden Climax, 

$3.60 per 100, $30.00 per 1000. 

8TUPPY FLORAL CO., ST. JOSEPH, MO. 

OHBYSANTHBMUMS, MILE-HIGH QUALITY. 
Pompona and alnglei, 2%-in., $6.00 per 100. 
BABI.T VARIBTIBS: LATB YABIBTIBS: 
Zenobla, yellow doable; Hilda Canning, bronae 
Lillian Doty, pink double; 

double: Becky McLean, bronaa 

Diana, white double; • double; 
Charles Fohn, pink Wilcox, bronze double; 

single; Jules Lagrayere, red 

Fine Bronze, bronze double; 

single; Weatem Beauty, pink 

Barly bronae, bronze double; 

single; Donald, pink double; 

Acto, white double. Golden Wedding, yellow 
donble. 
Sunshine, late yellow, $8.00 per 100. 
Caprice rarietlea: Tellow, white, bronae, laT- 
ender and purple, 2U-ln., $7.00 per 100. 

PARK FLOBAL CO.. 

^^'_ ^f^^^ffZ' Denver, Oolo. 

CHRYSANTHEMUMS. 

BOOTBD CUTTINGS. 

Free from disease. 

Per Per 

100 1000 

16,000 Marigold $3.00 $25.00 

10,000 White Chieftain 8.00 26.00 

20,000 McNtece, reflexed, deep pink. 3.00 26.00 

80.000 Oconto, incurved, white 8.00 25.00 

60,000 Chieftain, incurved, pink 8.00 25.00 

10,000 Chrysolora. incurved, yellow. 8.00 25.00 
30,000 Golden Chadwick, incurved, 

yellow 4.00 35.00 

40,000 Harvard, reflexed, dark crim- 

Bon 8.00 26.00""^^ 

55,000 Charles Rager, Incurved, pure 

white 8.00 25.00 

ADOLPH FISCHER, FLORIST, BA8T0N, PA, 

CHRYSANTHEMUMS, BOOTBD CUTTINGS, 
PREPAID. 

Polly Rose, Unaka, Pacific Supreme, Oometo, 
Diana, Golden Climax, Golden Wedding Pom- 
pon, Mra. Buckingham, Blizabeth, 2Hc; Whit* 
and Tellow Touset, Josephine Foley, Smitk'a 
Ideal, Chryaolora, Amorita. Lavender Queea, 
Mariana, Mimico, Miramar, Wanda, Vaaco, Baby 
Marguerite, Lellah, Little Gem. Mra. Frank 
Beu, Uvalda, Western Beauty, Christmaa Gold, 
the best pompon; Zenobla, Godfrey's Perfection, 
Louis Uihleln, laola, 8c; May Foster, White and 
Pink Frick. C. O. Pollworth, Golden Gleam, 
Toklo, Harvard. White Thread, 8%c; Lynnwood 
Hall, Richmond, Lena Baam, Helen Lee, Dr. 
Enguehard, B. A, Seidewitz, 4c; Sun Ray, Whit- 
tier, Calumet, November Glow, Smith's Cameo, 
Silver King, 5c. Cash. 

THEO. D. KUEBLBR. R. 6, BVAN8VILLB, IND, 

CHRYSANTHEMUMS. 

Good, atrong rooted cuttings. 

Per 100 Per 1000 

Pink Turner $8.76 $86.00 

Golden Chadwick 8.75 86.00 

Pink Chadwick 8.75 86.00 

Wm. H. Chadwick 8.25 80.00 

October Queen 2.75 26.00 

Charlea Rager 2.75 26.00 

Chrysolora 2.76 26.00 

Tellow Bager 2.76 26.00 

Maior Bonnaffon 2.76 26.00 

Unaka 2.75 26.00 

Chieftain 2.76 26.00 

B. A. Seidevrlta 2.76 26.00 

Pink Frick 2.75 26.00 

Harvard, red 2.75 26.00 

250 assorted at 1000 rate. 
D. H. GBBBN, BOONSBOBO, MD. 



V 



JUNB 1, l'J22 



The Florists' Review 



131 



CHRYSANTHEMUM STOCK. 

Nice, fine plants out of 2i^-ln. pots. 

YELLOW. 

ililden Queen $4.00 per 100, $35.00 per 1000 

( iirysolora 4.00 per 100, 35.00 per 1000 

) valty 4.00 per 100, 35.00 per 1000 

I'lchmond 5.00 per 100, 40.00 per 1000 

WHITE. 

I I tsy Ross 5.00 per 100, 40.00 per 1000 

V illtam Turner .. B.OO per 100, 40.00 per 1000 

, onto 4.00 per 100, 35.00 per 1000 

Miitb's Ideal 4.00 per 100, 35.00 per 1000 

PINK. 

1 r,sette 4.00 per 100, 85.00 per lOOO 

1 jse Perfection... 4.00 per 100, 85.00 per 1000 

MILLER BROS.. 
-,,,58 N. Lincoln S t., ChlcaRO. 111. 

Cbrysanthemums: Order now, delivery as 
, anted. We have a complete list of the beat 
,arletie>, a few of whtcb are in white, October 
>.^ueen, Oconto, Chieftain, Ghas. Rager, Seldewitz; 
in yellow, Golden Glow, Golden Queen, Richmond, 
Yellow Rager, BonnafTon; in pink. Pink Chieftain, 
Maud Dean, Seldewitz. All of the above are 
-3.60 per 100, $30.00 per 1000. We alto have a 
line Hit of choice varletiei, such a* the Turners, 
\^'7lite, Yellow, Pink, (Mrs. J. Leslie Daris), 
White and Tellow Mistletoe, Sun Glow, Bom Per- 
fection, and aa always, the CHADWICKS, 
WHITE AND GOLDEN, the same unsurpassable 
<iuality as In previous years. These are $5.00 
per 100, $45.00 per 1000. Likewise a very full 
list of pompons, singles, etc. Write for copy. 
S. S. Skidelsky & Co., 63 Park Place, New York. 

CHRYSANTHEMUM CUTTINGS. 

Order now. don't lose out by ordering late as 
others did last year. 

White: Crystal Gem, Oconto, Charles Rager, 
Diana, Silver Wedding. 

Yellow: Chrysolora, Robert Halliday, Roman 
Gold, Richmond, Whlttler, Major BonnafTon. 

Pink: Unaka, Pacific Supreme, B. A. Selde- 
witz, Dr. Bnguehard. 

Red: Harvard, at least 12 other varieties, 
$3.00 per 100, $25.00 per 1000. 

White Mistletoe and Yellow Turner, Golden 
Wedding, Silver Wedding, White and Yellow 
Cbadwick, $4.60 per 100, $40.00 per 1000. 

Eight standard pompons, $26.00 per 1000. Add 
$1.00 per 100 for 2U-ln. 

.1. C. STEIXH AUSEK, PITTSB URG. KAX. 
CHRYSANTHEMUMS. 
PINK. YELLOW. 

Pacific Supreme, (loldon Queen, 

I'naka, ('hrysolora, 

Seldewitz, Itichmond, 

t'hieftain, Hobert Halliday, 

WHITE. 
("bieftain, Mistletof. 

Early Frost, Suidewitz, 

Early Snow, 

Rooted cuttinKS. $3.00 per 100, $25.00 per lltOO; 

2>4-ln., $4.00 per 100, $35.00 per 1000. 

L. H. DORNBUSCH, 

Hills & Dales Greenhouses, Duyton, O. 

CHRYSANTHEMUM PLANTS. 
Clean, fine stock; 500 Unaka, 400 early Light 
Bronze, very good; 550 Pacific Supreme, 176 
Oconto, 160 Chrysolora. KM .Smith's Idoal. 100 
Golden Glow, 125 Pink Chieftain, 100 White 
Chieftain, 25 Yellow Turner, 30 Golden Eaton. 
175 Cream Robinson, 75 White Turner. 125 Lynn- 
wood Hall, 50 White .Tones. 130 Yellow Cbad- 
wick, 100 Harvard, 120 White Chadwick, 300 
Seldewitz, 75 Enguehard, 125 Pink Frick; 1200 
collection of pompon and anemone-flowered 
plants; all of the best varieties, 2-in., $4,00 per 
100 any variety, or the entire lot at $3.50 per 
100. Cash, please. 

DIXON FLORAL CO., DIXO N. IL L. 

CHRYSANTHEMUMS^ 
WHITE. PINK. 

Knrly Frost, Chieftain, 

Oconto. Helen Frick. 

• bas. Rager, Dr. Enguehard, 

Wm. Turner. Patty. 

YELLOW. 
Yellow Turner, Robert Halliday. 
Uooted cuttings... $3. 50 per 100, $.10.00 per 1000 

-'4-ln 4.50 per 100, 40.00 per 1000 

3-ln 5.00 per 100, 45.00 per 1000 

This stock baa been kept moving for our own 
lilanting; have a surplus of the aliove varieties. 
STATE FAIR FLORAL CO., 
Sedalla, Mo. 

CHRYSAN'THEMUM PLANTS. 

Crystal Gem, 

Chrysolora, 

Oconto. 

Lynnwood Hall. 

Yellow Turner, 

Seldewitz, 

Patty, 

Golden Gate, 

Harvard. 

from 2^-in. pots, 

$4.00 per 100. 

A. CHLORAL CO., ARKANSAS CITY, KAN. 

CHRYSANTHEMUMS, FINE CLEAN STOCK. 
Rooted cuttings... $8.00 per 100, $26.00 per 1000 
2H-in. pots 6.00 per 100, 46.00 per 1000 

Golden Glow, Early Frost, Smith's Ideal, Com- 
oleu, Chrysolora, Pink and White Chief Uln, 
Richmond, Harvard, Dr. Enguehard, Charles Ea- 
ter and BonnafTon. 

POMPONS. 

Pink and White Doty, Climax, Mrs. Frank 
Ben, Hilda Canning, Diana, Margaret Waite, 
Mrs. B. D. Godfrey, Hlramar and Mariana. 

ROBINSON FLORAL CO., 
gj O Bast 40th St.. Portland, Ore. 

.Chrysanthemum Golden Chadwick, 2%-in., 
$8.00 per 100, $66.00 per 1000. 

Holton & Hunkel Co., Milwaukee. ^Is. 



CHRYSANTHEMUMS. 
Strong, clean, well-rooted cuttings. 
Unaka, Pink Chieftain, 

Oconto, White Chieftain, 

Chrysolora, Col. Appleton, 

Gloria, Enguehard, 

White Rager, Richmond, 

Yellow Rager, B. A. Seldewitz. 

Marigold, Harvard. 

$2.76 per 100, $25.00 per 1000. 

HENRY A. BESTER & SONS, 

Hagerstown, Md. 

"CH^RYSANTEfEMUMS, PINE, CLEAN STOCK. 
Ready for shipping. 

2%-ln $40.00 per 1000 

Golden Glow, Chrysolora, 

Wm. Turner, Charles Rager, 

Dr. Enguehard, Halliday, 

White BonnafFon, Pacific Supreme, 

Major BonnafTon, Unaka, 

Roman Gold, Early Snow, 

Smith's Advance. 
No charge for packing. Cosh with order. 
WM. H. FORD, MARSHALLTOWN. lA. 

CHRYSANTHEMUMS, 2-INCII. 
$4.00 per 100. 
Charles Rager. Oconto, White Chieftain, Yel- 
low Kager, Midnight Sun, Golden Gleam, Rich- 
mond, Calumet, Harvard, Enguehard. 

Pompons: Golden Climax, Klondike, Godfrey's 

Perfection, Golden Wedding, Lydia Thomas, 

Diana, Elva. Frank Wilcox, Bronze Beauty. 

William Turner, $4.50 per 100. 

KINYON BROTHERS, 

804 Duvall Ave.. South Bend, Ind. 

CHRYSANTHEMUMS. 

Golden Glow, Oconto, BonnafTon, Seldewitz, 
Enchantress, Rager. Pompons: Lillian Doty, 
White Doty, Wilcox, Qulnola, Mariana, Christ- 
mas Gold, Golden Climax, Godfrey, Buckingham, 
rooted cuttings, $3.00 per 100, $25.00 per 1000. 

Golden Chadwick, rooted cuttings, $6.00 per 
100, $45.00 per 1000. 

(>ood stock, absolutely free from midge. All 
orders acknowledged same day as received. 
__ W. E. SPAFFORD, BARKE R , N. Y. 

~ CHRYSANTHEMUMS. 

Charles Rager $4.00 per 100 

Oconto 4.00 per 100 

Chrysolora 4.00 per 100 

Marigold 4.00 per 100 

POMPONS. 

Diana 4.00 per 100 

Klondike 4.00 per 100 

Christmas Gold 4.00 per 100 

CASH. CARL ERICKSON. PRINCETON. ILL . 

STANDARD, 

POMPONS AND SINGLE. 

Earliest to the latest; 

a good range of colors 

and productive growers. 

Satisfaction guaranteed. 

Free of disease. 

Write what you need or would like. 

Information is yours for the asking. 

Let me send you list. 

W. C. EHMANN . CORFU, N. Y. 

Chrysanthemums, strong, healthy rooted cut- 
tings, October Frost, Chrysolora. Roman Gold, 
IVinnafTon, Seldewitz. White Frick, Pink Frick, 
Weils' Late Pink, White Chadwick and Mistle- 
toe. $.X00 per 100, $27.50 per 1000. 

Pompous, Godfrey, Ben, Diana, Yellow Smith's 
.Vdvance. $3.00 per 100. 

(.'aprice. vellow. purple, bronze, $4.50 per 100; 
li-in., $,').50 per 100. Cash, please. 
Heckenkamp, Quincy. 111. 

WE ARE HEADQUARTERS 

BONNAFFON CHRYSANTHEMUM STOCK. 

Stock plants have been grown during the win- 
ter in seven three-quarter-span solid-bench 
bouses. We have never seen a midge on any of 
our plants. 

Rooted cuttings, $3.00 per 100, $26.00 per 1000. 

2U-inch plants, $5.00 per 100, $46.00 i>er 1000. 

75,000 ready for shipment. 
EDW. J. TAYLOR, GREENS FARMS. CONN. 

CHRYSANTHEMUMS, 2-IN. STOCK. 
Good and clean; order now; deliver*' as needed; 
send for list of other varieties, $4.00 per 100, 
$35.00 per 1000. 

Harvard, Unaka. Oconto, Chrysolora, Buckbee, 
Dr. Enguehard, Seldewitz. I'onipons: Diitna, 
Mrs. Buckingham, Klondike, 

Rooted cuttings of above varieties, $3.00 per 100, 

$25.00 per 1000. 

H. C. BROWN. YELLOW SPRINGS. 0. 

CHADWICK CHRYSANTHBMCM. 

ROOTED CUTTINGS, 

IMMEDIATE AND LATER DBLIYBRY. 

GOLDEN CHADWICK AND 

CHADWICK IMPROTBD. WHITE; 8TB0NQ, 

WELL ROOTED CUTTINGS. 

FREB FROM MIDGE. 

$5.00 PER 100, $45.00 PER 1000. TBRMS: CASH. 

P. R. DBMUTH A SONS. 
CONNEHaVILLB. PA. 

Chrysanthemums, rooted cuttings; guaranteed 
clean, sturdy stock; Golden Glow, Golden Queen, 
Early Snow, Octol)er Queen, best early white; 
Pacific Supreme, McNlece. Roman Gold. Turner. 
Chas. Rager. Pink and White Frick. Seldewitz. 
Dr. Enguehard, Roy. Mistletoe. Single: Mar- 
garet Waite, White Mensa. Pompons: Christ- 
mas Gold. Golden Climax, $2.60 per 100. 

Tarentum Greenhouses, Tarentum. Pa. 

Cbrysanthemums. best standard Tarleties, la 
early, medium and late. Also ■ingle and pom- 
pons, rooted cuttings and pot plants. Write 
for varieties and prices. 

Henry Smith Floral Co., Grand Baplds. Mick. 



MAJOK BONNAFFON. 

WHITE BONNAFFON AND JEANNE NONIN. 

Rooted cuttings, $3.00 per lOO, $25.00 per 1000. 

This is cleau, healthy stock, full of vigor; 

my Mums year after year are the finest in the 

Chicago market. Supply limited; order today. 

ClIAULES PAULSEN. 
Cash, please. Arlington Heights. 111. 

ONE-HALF MILLION 
CHRYSANTHEMUM ROOTED CUTTINGS. 
Yellow BonnafTon, Seldewitz, pink; Baby Yel- 
low, Chieftain, $20.00 per 1000; 2H-ln., $25.00 
per lOOO; White Chadwick, $30.00 per 1000; 
2%-ln., $36.00. Cash only. 

MICHEL HILPERT, 
Sta. 0.. 313 Belair Rd., Baltimore. Md. 

CHRYSANTHEMUMS, FREB FROM DISEASE, 
Good, strong 2-in., $4.00 per 100, $35.00 per 1000: 
Unaka, Edwin Seldewitz, Marigold, Pink Chief- 
tain, Lena Baum, Halliday and White Frick; 
also many other varieties Including pompons. 
Send for complete list. Cash, please. 

SCHNEIDER. FLORIST, 
22 E. High St., Springfield. O. 

ROOTED CUTTINGS. 200 VARIETIES. 
Commercial. Show. Pompons, Singles, Hardies, 
Anemones. 

Toklo, yellow pompon, Pacific coast best seller. 
$3.50 per 100, $30.00 per 1000. Write for price 
list. 

BAOLB ROCK GARDENS. 
301 Batsuma St.. Eagle Rock. Cal. 

CHRYSANTHEMUMS. 2^-IN. 
In the following varieties: 
Alice Day. Josephine Foley, Tiger, Dr. En- 
guehard. Seldewitz. Mariana, Graystone. White 
Bonnaffon, Major BonnafTon, William Turner. 
Pink Turner, Yellow Frost, Golden Mensa, White 
Mensa and White Doty. 

A. N. KINSMAN. AUSTIN. MINN. 

Chrysanthemum plants from 2%-ln. pots. These 
are strong plants from frames and a cutting 
can be taken from nearly every one. Clean from 
all insects and midge. Unaka, Oconto and Pink 
Patty, $6.00 per 100, $45.00 per lOOO; Bonnaf- 
fon, Richmond and Chrysolora. $5.00 per 100; 
Golden Chadwick, $6,00 per 100. 
Silvieus Greenhouses, R. F. D. 4, Ashtabnla. O. 



Chrysanthemums, PoUworth, Golden Glow, 
Early Snow, Rager, Pacific Supreme, Autocrat. 
October Queen. Marigold, White and Yellow 
Chadwick. BonnafTon. Frick, Seldewitz, Engue- 
hard, Patty, Harvard and a good list of pom- 
lions, $22.50 per 1000, prepaid. 
C. Humfeld. Clay Center. Kan. 

Chrysanthemums, good, clean strong 2% -In. 
plants including Harvard, Seldewitz, Turner, 
Chadwlcks, Chieftain, BonnafTon. Frick and 
several other good varieties, assorted, $4.00 per 
100, $35.00 per 1000. You will be pleased with 
these plants. Packed free. Cash. Lawrence 
Flora l Co.. 1547 Mass St., Lawrence. Kan. 

Chrysanthemums. Pacific Supreme. Chrysolora, 
Oconto, Touset. White and Yellow Rager. Edwin 
Seidewits. Pompons: Nlza. Zora, Diana. Lil- 
lian Doty, Donald, Mary, Volunteer and Christ- 
mas Gold, rooted cuttings, $2.60 per 100, $22.00 
per 1000; 2H-ln., $4.00 per 100, $35.00 per 1000. 
Henry Krueger. 602 Clark St.. Toledo. 0. 

CHRYSANTHEMUM CUTTINGS: CLBAN STOCK 
Pink: Seldewitz, Dr. Enguehard, Unaka, Patty. 
Yellow: Oolden Glow, Yellow BonnafTon, 0. 0. 
PoUworth, Marigold. White: Smith's Advance. 
Oconto. Diana. Bed: Harvard, $3.00 per 100. 
$25.00 per 1000. Cash. 

Q. B. BBBTHOLD. NEBBA SKA CITY. NBB. 
Chrysanthemums. Yellow BonnafTon, Lillian 
Doty, Climax, Enguehard. Charles Rager. White 
and Pink Chieftain. Unaka and C. O. PoUworth. 
clean stock. 2i4-ln.. $3.00 per 100; rooted cut- 
tings above varieties, $2.50 per 100. Cash, 
please. B. A. Uewellyn, Olean. N. Y. 

' BXTBA~BABLY WHI'TB ~P0Up6s. 
Our well known variety, which will come Into 
bloom by September 1 If wanted that early; 
2-in. pot plants now ready, $6.00 per 100. 

BASSETT 8l WASHBURN. 
178 North Wabash Ave.. Chicago. Hi. 

Chrysanthemums. White Chieftain. Pink 
Chieftain. Seldewitz. Wm. Turner, Helen Prick, 
White Frick, Mistletoe, Yellow Mistletoe. Golden 
Wedding and Chrysolora, fine stock ready now; 
2 In., $3.50 per 100. 
Bird Forrest. Waxnbnchl e. Tex. 

Chryaanthemums. Oolden and White Chadwick, 
2-in. pot plants, $«.00 per 100. $50.00 per lOOO; 
rooted cuttings. $4.50 per 100. $40.00 per 1000. 
Clean, healfby stork. No midge. 

Scbarff Bros.. Vnn Wert. O. 

Chrysanthemums of the following kinds: 
Major BonnafTon. Oconto, Dr. Enguehard, White 
BonnafTon. rooted cuttings. $20.00 per 1000; 
24 -in. pot plants, $.30.00 per 1000. Cash, please. 
J. J. Clayton & Son, \Vea t Grove. Pa. 

Cbrysantbemnms, Smith's Advance, Early 
Snow, i:naka. Oolden Queen. Chrysolora, Kalb. 
Early Frost. Pink Seldewitz, Mariana and Oolden 
Wedding pompon, 2V4-in., $5..%0 per 100. $50.00 
per 1000. Charles Sherwood, Waterloo, la. 

CHRYSANTHEMUMS, ROOTED CUTTINGS. 

Seldewitz and Smith's Early Rose. $3.00 per 
100: Yellow and White Cbadwick, $45.00 per 
1000. Immediate deliverv. 

VOGT'S GREENHOUSES. STURGIS, MICH. 

BENCH MUMS, EXTRA GOOD PIjANTS. 
Clementine Tonaet, Robt. Hallidav. Lillian 
Doty, Godfrey's Perfection, Diana, 2^-ln., $4.00 
per 100. 
QUENTIN FI>ORAL CO.. ST. JOSEPH, MO. 



132 



The Florists' Review 



JUNB 1, 1922 



CHRYSANTHEMUMS-Continued 



Ohrysanthemums: Best collection of large- 
flowerlng Mums for pot culture; aUo collection 
of Caprice varieties In 2V&-in. pots, $8.00 per 
100, $75.00 per 1000; BOO at tbe 1000 rate. 
Frank Oech slln, 4911 W. Qulncy St., Chicago, 111. 

Chrysanthemums, Cbrysolora, C. 0. Pollworth, 
Oconto and Seldewitz; Pompons, Cbriatmas Oold, 
Beu and Oolden Climax, clean, strong rooted 
cuttings, $2.60 per 100; 2H-lii.. $4.00 per 100. 
Otto P. Krueger, 427 East Broadway, Toledo, 0. 

Chrysanthemums, Unaka, Oconto, Chryaolora, 
Pink and White Chieftain, Enguehard and Mistle- 
toe, rooted cuttings, $3.00 per 100, $27.00 per 
1000. Write for our weekly list. 
Abby Avenue Q reenhouses, Dayton, O. 

Chrysanthemums, rooted cuttings, good, clean 
stock; now ready: McNlece, Charles Rager, 
Patty, Marigold, Yellow Bonnaffon, Touset, 
White and Yellow Turner, $3.00 per 100, $26.00 
per 1000. Page's Qreenhouses, Staunton, 111. 

Chrysanthemums, Marigold, Patty, Whita 
Chieftain, Harvard, Bonnaffon, rooted cnttlnci, 
$20.00 per 1000. Also pompons, Illona, Diana, 
Clorlnda, Godfrey, Niza. 
0. A. Stoll, Hillsdale. Mich. 

Chrysanthemums, Oconto, 2-in., $3.50 per 100; 
pompon, Button Klondike, 2-in., $3.50 per 100; 
Mrs. I?eu, 2V4-in., $4.00 per 100. L. Linnemann, 
Jr., 1313 Ashland Ave., Ues Plaines, 111. 

Chrysanthemum Christmas Gold, pomPon, extra 
fine stock, special price; well rooted cuttings, 
$16.00 per 1000; strong 2V4-in., $25.00 per 1000. 
C. G. James & Sons, Homell, N. Y. 

Chrysanthemums, Polly Rose, Glory of Pacific, 
Pacific Supreme, ITnaka and Yellow Bonnaffon, 
sand-rooted, $22.50 per 1000. 

A. A. Laub, New Hamburg, N. Y. 

Chrysanthemums, rooted cuttings and plants 
from 2^ -in. pots our specialty. Ask for trade 
list of nearly 200 varieties. 
Stafford Conservatories, Stafford Springs, Conn. 

Chrysanthemums, Chrysolora, Richmond, Pink 
Chieftain, White Chieftain and Naomi, 2^-ln. 
pots, $4.00 per 100. 
Holton & Hunkel Co., Milwaukee, Wis. 

Chrysanthemums, Golden Glow, Nagoya, cut- 
tings, $2.00 per 100, postpaid. Cash. 
W. Q. Thomas & Sons, Sheffield, 111. 

Chrysanthemum Bonnaffon, rooted cuttings, 
choice stock, $3.00 per 100, $26.00 per 1000. 

0. B. Stevens, Shenandoah, la. 

Chrysanthemums, rooted cuttings. Send for 
list of leading market varieties. William 
Swayne, P. O. Box T, Kennett Square, Pa. 

Chrysanthprniims, White Mistletoe, 2-in., $3.60 
IHT 100. Andprsou Floral Co., Lebanon, Tenn. 

Chrysanthemum Mistletoe, cuttings, $3.00 per 
100. Haentze Floral Co., Fond du Lac, Wis. 



CLEMATIS 



Clematis Panlculata, 2-year, pot-grown, sure to 
live, 4-in., $15.00 per 100. 

Burden Floral Co., Bowling Green, Ky. 



CLERODENDRONS 



Clerodendron Balfouri, 3-in., $1.S0 per doz., 
$10.00 per lOO. 

Oak Grove Greenhouse, Tuskegee, Ala. 



COLEUS 



NEW HARDING COLEUS 

IS A SEEDLING FOUND BY US, 

SHOWN AT WASHINGTON, D. C, 

S. A. F. CONVENTION, 

Where an award of high merit was recommended 

by Judges A. L. Miller, J. A. Peterson and 

Joseph Kohout. 

Harding Coleus, most beautiful, bright red 

leaves with brown, green-yellow edging. Send 

fur sample leaves. 

Strong rooted cuttings, $10.00 per 100. 
Dcflauce, strong rooted cuttings, $2.00 per 100, 
$20.00 per 1000. 

LOUIS HAHN St SON, 

R. F. D. No. 4, Box 75, 

Millvale Branch, N. S., Pittsburgh, Pa. 



Coleus cuttings, 12 varieties. Including Golden 
Bedder and Vcrschnffeltll, also some of our new 
variety. Rainbow, a real acquisition In fancy 
leaved Coleus, $1.25 per 100, $10.00 per 1000. 
Rainbow alone, $2.00 per 100; also Brilliancy or 
Christmas Gem. 2',4-ln.. $5.00 per 100. All stock 
good, clean and healthy; absolutely free from In- 
sects and disease. We guarantee this stock. 
Cash. J. A. Famworth & Bon, Galion, O. 

COLEUS ROOTED CUTTINOS. 

I'cr 100 Per 1000 
Golden Redder, Verscliaffeltii 

nnd otliers SL.^O Jl.S.OO 

2' I in. pots -too a.'). 00 

liiilliaiic.v, 2>/4-in. pots 8.00 

ROMAN J. IRWIN. 
43 W. ISth St.. New York. N. Y. 

Coleus, 8 leadinc varieties, rooted cuttings, 
$1..')0 per 100. $10.00 per 1000; 2y4-in., $3.50 per 
100; Trailing Queen, rooted ciittlnRs. $2.00 per 
100; 2V4-ln., $4.00 per 100; 3in., $8.00 per 100. 
Cash or c. o. d. 
W. E. Trimble Greenhouse Co., Princeton. III. 

Coleus, Improved Mrs. Hunt, Defiance and 
Brilliancy, extra strong, clean S-in., 7c. 

Burton B. Crane, Kansas City, Kan. 



Coleus, Verscbaffeltll, Golden Bedder and 12 
other varieties, rooted cuttings, $1.2S per 100, 
prepaid, $10.00 per 1000 by express, not pre- 
paid; 2-ln., $8.00 per 100, $26.00 per 1000; BrU- 
liancy, rooted cuttings, $2.00 per 100; 2-ln., $4.00 
per 100. All of these in 2-in. have lieen cut 
back and will make good, bushy plants. Cash, 
please. H. B. Randolph, Delavan, 111. 

SEASONABLH STOCK. 
Coleus. standard varieties, 2i4-in., $4.00 per 
lOO, $35.00 per 1000; Brilliancy, 214-ln., $7.00 
per 100. 

THB STORKS & HARRISON CO., 
^ Painesyllle, 0. 

20 BEST"~BBDDING VARIETIES. 
Coleus, including such as Golden Bedder, 
Dunelra, Verschaffeltil, Mav Laverin and Fire- 
brand, good, strong 2%-in., $3.50 per 100, $30.00 
per 1000. 
THB REESER PLANT CO., SPRINGFIELD, O. 

5000 COLEUS GOLDEN BEDDER. 
Stock that will please you, 2-in. pots, $3.00 
per 100, $25.00 per 1000; fine selection in assorted 
colors, .$3.00 per 100. Cash. 

C. L. HUMPHREY, ZANESVILLE , 0. 

COLEUS, 10 BEST VARIETIES. 

Clean and strong, 2%-in., to close out, $3.50 per 

100. $30.00 per 1000; 3-in., $5.00 per 100; 4-in., 

$7.00 per 100. Brillinnev, 214-ln., $5.00 per 100. 

IlENLEY BROS., TERRE HAUTE, IND. 

COLEUS ROOTED CUTTINGS. 

10 best varieties, clean stock. 

$1.00 per 100. 

RICHARD A. IRVINE, 

Bay City, Mlcli. 

Coleus: We have a ver.v fine assortment, 
plenty of red and yellow, mixed, or will leave 
out any colors you say, from 2-ln. pots, $3.00 
per 100. E. Rawlings, Wholesale Grower, AUe- 
gany, N. Y. 

Coleus, Trailing, red, yellow and mixed, stand- 
ard varieties including Yellow Bedder and Ver- 
schaffeltil, very large, extra strong, clean and 
healthy, $3.60 per 100. Cash. 
Brinkerhoff Gree nhouses, Springfield, 111. 

Coleus, Christmas Gem, 2^-in., $6.00 per 100; 
Trailing Queen, red and yellow, bushy 2%-ln., 
$3.00 per 100; rooted cuttings, $1.26 per 100. 
Otto P. Krueger, 427 East Broadway, Toledo, 0. 

Colens, 8 best bedding varieties, well rooted 
2-in., $3.00 per 100, $25.00 per 1000; rooted cut- 
tings, $1.50 per 100, $12.00 per 1000. 
Chas. E. Smith & Son, York, Pa. 

Coleus, best standard varieties, rooted cuttings, 
$1.50 per 100, $12.00 per 1000; strong stock 
plants, branched, 2M!-ln. and 3-ln., $5.00 per 100. 

Henry Smith Floral Co., Grand Rapids, Mich. 

Colens, good, choice varieties, including Trail- 
ing Queen, 2i/j-ln., $3.00 per 100. Fine varieties 
for stock. 

Oak Grove Greenhouse, Tuskegee, Ala. 

Coleus, good, choice varieties, including Trail- 
ing Queen and Golden Redder, mixed rooted cut- 
tings, $1.25 per 100; 3-in., $6.00 per 100. 
. Montgomery Gard ens, S ac City, la. 

Coleus, strong 214 inV plants of the best va- 
rletles, $3.50 per 100, $.S0.OO per 1000 
S. S. Skidelslcy & Co., r>H Park Place, New York, 



IIIG COLLECTION, GOOD COLORS. 

Coleus, 15 kinds, 2",-in., $3.00 per 100 

GULLETT & SONS, LINCOLN, ILL. 



Coleus. rooted rnttings, $1.00 per 100 bv ex- 
press, $1.25 per 100 by mail. 
. Anderson Floral Co., I^ebanon, Tenn . 

Colens, 10 kinds, rooted cuttings. $1 25 oer 
100, $10.00 per 1000. Cash. ^ 
Byer B ros. , Chnmbe rshurg, Pa. 

Coleus, good, strong rooted cuttings. $10 00 
per 1000. Cash with order. 
White's Qreenhouses, North M anchester, Ind. 

Coleus. 10 varieties, standard and fancy mixed, 
2H-II1.. $3.00 per 100: rooted cuttings. $1.26 per 
100- B. G. Goltz, Bellevue, 0. 

Coleus, 10 named varieties, all clean stock, 
rooted cuttings $1.25 per 100; 2%-In.. $4.00 per 
100. Cash with order. H. A. Cook, Oberlin. O. 

Colens. mixed varieties, 214-in., 5c: 3-in.. 8c 
Cash, please. P. Hopman. .New Galilee. Pa. 

Colens, 12 varieties, Ir. prepaid: Hrillian.v, 
•» '" ■ 1-''- ( . Hnnifeld, CIny Cen ter, Kan." 

Large Leaf Coleus, seedlings, 50c per 100 S4 ,50 
perl()00;2y4-in.. 3 %c. L^. Jt^e, -Ti t usville Pa 

Coleus, in best assortment, heavv oi/.i- 
$3.00 per 100. S. W. Pike, St. Charles! Ill 



COREOPSIS 

Coreopsis Lancelata Grandifiora, 60c per doz.. 

The Sch mi dt ft B otley Co.. Springfield, 0. 
Coreopsis Ijinceolata, field-grown plants S5 00 
per 100. Highland Park NurseryT StMling,' 111 

COSMOS 



Cosmos "giant-flowering early." pink, white and 
oriinson $1.50 per 100. Mannetto Hill Nurseries 
\\ . C. Nnonnn, Prop.. H irksville. L. I., N. Y. 

CUPHEAS" 

rUPHE.AS IN HLOOM" 

2i',-in.. $2..')0 per 100 

GULLETT & SONS, LINCOLN, ILL. 



EXTRA STRONG PLANTS. 

Cupheas, 2^-in., $4.00 per 100. 

THB RBE8B R PLA NT CO., SPRINQFIBU), O. 

Oupheai, 2^ -In., $4.00 per 100. 
Charles Sherwood, Waterloo, la. 

'~~ CYCLAMEN 



CYCLAMEN SEEDLINGS. 

In offering our block of 300,000 
TRANSPLANTED CYCLAMEN SEEDLINGS 
to the trade, we 
can emphatically recommend them as 
a superior grade of plants. Inasmuch 
as we have specialized on CYCLAMEN 
for years, and are constantly improv- 
ing our strain and methods of growing. 

Through the use of a specially 

prepared compost, we have produced wonderful 

root action and a fine foliage, in 

fact we have never had a finer lot of 

seedlings of the very best known varieties. 

We established a new record with our 

CYCLAMEN plants last fall when we 

shipped them in full carload lots to 

the East. 

Remember — Our plants have no trace 

or sign of the mite or any other 
diseases CYCLAMEN are subject to. 



Orders booked in rotation, 
guaranteed. 



Satisfaction 



$5.50 per 100, $50.00 per 1000. 

CYCLAMEN PLANTS. 

SUPERIOR STOCK NOAV READY. 

2%-ln. plants. . .$12.00 per 100, $100.00 per 1000 

3-ln. plants 15.00 per 100. 125.00 per 1000 

4-in. plants 30.00 per 100, 275.00 per 1000 

Packing at cost, 250 at the 1000 rate. 

ZETLITZ FLORAL PRODUCTS CO., 
Cyclamen Specialists, Dayton, 0. 



$3*«>''Sirior'?is'h"'"'"^'' ^'■^^'i^^^^or^^. 

Byer Bros., Chambersburg, Pa. 



THE ORIGINAL ZEHLENDORF 
STRAIN OP CYCLAMEN. 
Raised by the leading German specialist, Mr. 
Jobs. DIabka, nt Zehlendorf. This marvelous 
strain is unanimously considered by growers, 
experts and by the German horticultural press 
as the most superb and leading German strain. 
It combines harmoniously all good, desirable 
and valuable qualities and gives entire satisfac- 
tion even to the most critical grower. Full 
cultural description (see Fl. Rev. June 30th, 
1921), and particulars given with each order, no 
failure possible. All seeds are hand-selected. 
Communications as safe as ever before. Prompt 
delivery by registered mail, postpaid. Offer per 
1000 seeds. 

1. Glowing red, bright Cherry red $12.00 

2. Glowing dark red. Christmas red 12 00 

3. Bright rose, carmine eye, Marlenthal.. 12.00 

4. Pure rose, extra flue 12.00 

5. White with carmine eye 12 00 

6. Pure white 12 00 

7. Lilac ■. i2'.0O 

8. Perle von Zehlendorf, dark salmon, 

„ „e^'™ 15.00 

a. Kosa von Zehlendorf, deep salmon 

rose, A-1 1,'5 00 

10. Glowing dark red with salmon shade.'! isioo 

11. Rococo, all colors, exc. bright rose 

and salmon shades, mixed 15 00 

12. Victoria, with fringed and color 

border 15 00 

13. Dlabka's Bonfire, Novelty, blinding sal- 

mon-scarlet color 20.00 

Crossed bankers dollar cheque payable at New 
York solicited with order, then no Informations 
are needed and prompt shipment can be made. 
Order now. 

ROBERT BLOSSFELD, 
94 Neue Koenigstrasse, Potsdam, Germany 

Snip exporting agent for Mr. DIabka. 
CYCLAMB.N SEED. 
New crop for July and later delivery. 
A No. 1 seed from the best German specialist 
One who grows for quality instead of quantity 
This is A No. 1, or largest size seed; not 
mixed sizes as it comes from the plant; there 
fore gives practically 100 per cent germination 
also gives quicker and stronger seedlings and 
plants. 

THB KIND I BUT TO GROW MYSELF. 
Dark blood red, bright red, bright rose (Ma 
rlenthal), $12.00 per 1000. Light and dark 
salmon and Snow Queen, at $15.00 per 1000. 

Let's have your order now for next season's re- 
quirements. 

WINFIBLD S. KIRCHER, 
Cyclamen Specialist. Defiance, O. 

PETERSON'S AND FISCHER'S ' 

celebrated strains of Cvclamen. 
Strong 3-in. stock ready for shift to 4-ln This 
stock is absolutely free from any disease and 
insects nnd of vigorous growth; can be shipped 
safely anywhere in paper pots; it will pay you 
to order early before the stock is picked over 
$20.00 per 100, $180.00 per 1000 
250 at 1000 rate. 
J. W. DAVIS CO., TERRE HAUTE, IND. 

Cvclamen. 8 of the most popular colors in 
about equal proportions; about 2000 plants two- 
thirds strong 2-ln., $4.00 per 100; $75.00 for the 
lot. They will please you. Cash with order. 
Ozark Pansy Gardens, West Plains, Mo 



JUNB 1, 1922 



The Rorists^ Review 



133 



CYCLAMEN GIGANTBUM SEEDS. 
For particulur florists and gardeners. 
For over twelve years we have given special 
attention to the betterment of Cyclamen and 
we feel confident that no better strain can be 
had anywhere at any price. Ask the florists wlio 
grow Peterson's strain of Cyclamen. 
STANDAKU VAUIETIES. 
Glory of Wundsbek, lovely shades of light aud 
dark salmon. 

Daybreak, delicate shades of light pink to 
salmon. 

Brilliant Bed, very large and fine. 
Christmas Cheer, blood red. 
Pure White, very large and fine. 
White with Pink Eye, very large and fine. 
Magnifica, dark rosy pink, very fine. 
Rose of Marientbal, light pink, very fine. 
Rosea Superba, deep shell pink. 
Lavendar, dark and light shades. 
Victoria, white tipped with pink, fringed edge. 
Price of above varieties. 
$12.00 per 1000 seeds, net. 
NOVELTIES. 
Pride of Cincinnati, a lovely shade of salmon, 
seml-doiible flowers, very large and free flower- 
ing. Price, $18.00 per 1000 seeds. 

ORCHID-PLOWEItING TYPES. 
Fairy-Queen, very large and magnificently 
frilled flowers, pure white with pink eye. Price, 
$15.00 per 1000 seeds. 

Rokoko Improved, large frilled flowers in light 
and dark shades of pink. Price, $15.00 per 1000 
seeds. 

OUR LATEST NOVELTY. 
Ida Emilie, a very large beautifully fringed 
pure white, orchid type. Price, $5.00 per 100, 
net. 

J. A. PETERSON & SONS, 
Westwood, Cincinnati, O. 



CYCLAMEN, TRANSPLANTED SEEDLINGS. 



Fairfield, la., May 8, 1922. 
O. L. Humphrey, Zanesville, 0. 
Dear Sir: 

The Cyclamen seedlings came today and they 
were sure fine. I want to express my apprecia- 
tion for that class of stock, as I never saw 
better plants shipped and they were packed fine, 
only sorry now that I didn't buy more, but 
will need some more later on and sure will 
place my order with you. Thanking you, 

E. H. Montgomery. 

We have 20,000 more 

just like Mr. Montgomery got; 

in the best commercial shades, 

consisting of white, white with pink eye. 

Rose of Marienthal, lavender, 

Cherry red, Christmas red, 

dark salmon, light salmon 

and Daybreak. 

Last year we shipped 25,000 plants 

and never had a complaint. 

This year, our stock 

being exceptionally flue, 

you may expect 

to get the best on the market, 

$5.50 per 100, $50,00 per lOOO. 

Cash. 

No charge for packing. 



C. L. HUMPHREY, ZANESVILLE. 0. 



CYCLAMEN GIGANTEUM PLANTS. 

QUALITY EXCEPTIONAL. 

Grown from Fischer's true strain and in the 
most desirable colors and shades. For im- 
mediate shipment. 

2Vj-inch pots $12.00 per 100 

3-inch pots 15.00 per 100 

25 plants at 100 rate. 
Please write for special prices on (piantity. 

AMERICAN BULB CO.. 
172 N. Waba sh Ave.^ Chicago, 1 11. 

CYCLAMEN PLANTS. 

Our Cyclamen are grown from the beat Ger- 
man seed obtainable; Rose von Zehlendorf. Pearl 
von Zehlendorf, Rose of Marienthal. Wonder of 
Wandsbek, Glowing Red and Blood Red: Strong 
2V4-ln., $12.00 per 100, $100.00 per 1000; strong 
3in., $17.50 per 100, $160.00 per 1000. 

If shipped in paper pots add $4.00 per 1000 on 
2»4-in., $7.00 per 1000 on 3-in, 

SCHMIDT & MEINE, 
3121 Market St., Young stown, 0. 

CYCLAMEN " 

Of the finest oonimercial .strain, 

in assorted colors, 

mostly britrlit shades, no wliitp; 

slnmg. hoalthv pl;ints, readv to shift. 

3 in,, $12.(10 per 100. 

C.'ish with orilcr. 

The above price includes circfnl p.TCking. 

R. 8. M cMI'RRAY. HKLLEFONTAIN B. O. 

CYCLAMEN, CYCLAMEN. 



WONDERFUL STOCK, CLEAN AND PERFECT. 
3 IN.. SELECT, $20.00 PER 100, $180.00 PER 
lOOO; STRONG 2y,-IN., READY FOR SHIFT, 
$12.00 PER 100. CHOICEST GERMAN STRAIN: 
LIGHT RED, DARK RED. LIGHT SALMON, 
DARK SALMON, ROSE AND RED EYE. IT 
PAYS TO BUY EARLY. 
Jim^LETT^A SONS, LINCOLN, ILL. 

Cyclamen, Ferd. Fischer's strains; good strong 
2\i-in. stock ready for 3-ln. pots. $10.00 per 100. 
Evenden Bros. Co., Williamsport, Pa. 



CYCLAMEN. 
Ferd. Fischer's itralns for immediate delivery 
In assorted colors. 

Strong, twice transplanted seedlings ready for 
S-in.. $7.00 per 100. 
Strong 8-in., $15.00 per 100. 
No charge for packing. Cash, please. 
CHAS. WARNOKB OBEBNHOUSB, 
9171 W. Fort St., Detroit, Mich. 

80.000 CYCLAMEN, 
In the following varieties: 
Wandsbek, Pink Pearl, Glowing Bed, Pure 
White, Rose of Marienthal, Perie von Zehlen- 
dorf, Rose von Zehlendorf, etc., fine busby plants 
in 8-in. pots, ready for delivery, all varietiei, 
$ie.00 per 100. 

WALTER ARMA008T & CO., 
821 Bast 4th St., Los Angeles, Oal. 

OTCLAMBN 8BEDLINQS. 
Orders booked now for early ihipment of 
extra strong, busby, transplanted Cyclamen seed- 
lings. These are A No. 1 stock; should be seen 
to be appreciated; from Peterson's and Fischer's 
celebrated strains. Best money can buy. Orders 
filled in rotation, $7.00 per 100, $60.00 per 1000; 
250 at 100 rate. 

J. W. DAVIS CO., TBRRB HAUTB, IND. 

CYCLAMEN CARMINE SALMONBUM 
Was the best Christmas seller. Now booking 
the new crop seed for August delivery at $15.00 
per 1000. Our Cyclamen won first honors at 
the big European shows. We sell many of the 
leading growers in the country. Send for com- 
plete list of many varieties. 

F. KYNVHLD & SONS, 
61 Tesey St., New York, N. Y. 

QUALITY CYCLAMEN. 
We offer now for immediate shipment, 76,000 
of the finest Cyclamen plants ever seen, out of 
2%-in. pots, $12.00 per 100, $100.00 per 1000. 
Best commercial colors. If salmon alone is 
ordered add 10 per cent to above prices. Shipped 
in paper pots. 

AURORA GRBBNHOUSB CO., 
Aurora, 111. 

SPECIAL CYCLAMEN OFFER. 
Choicest German strains, 3-in., $15.00 per 100, 
$125.00 ](pr 1000. Deduct 10 per cent for cash 
with order. AVe have too many and want room; 
excellent stock. 

POEHLMANN BROTHERS CO., 
• Morton Grove, 111. 

Cj'Clamen, separate colors or mixed, strong 
transplanted seedlings, $7.00 per 100. $60.00 per 
1000; 2Vj-in., $12.00 per 100, $100.00 per 1000; 
strong 3-in., $18.00 per 100. 250 or more at 
1000 rate. 
S. 8. Skidelsky & Co., 53 Park Place, New York. 

CYCLAMEN SEEDLINGS. 
Transplanted from host German seed; cool- 
grown; In salmon, red, pink and lilac colors, 
$0.25 per 100, $60.00 per 1000. 
Cash with order. 
VALENTA BROS., JENNINGS LODGE. ORE. 

Cyclamen, good, strong, healthy plants, 2^-in., 
$12.00 per lOO, $100.00 per 1000. 

Cyclamen seedlings, 2 to 4 leaves, $6.00 per 
100, $50.00 per 1000. 

J. F. Wilcox & Sons, Wholesale Dept., 1132 
B. Pierce St., Council Bluffs, la. 

Cyclamen Giganteum, mixed colors with plenty 
of salmon and red, strong 3-in. ready for 4in., 
$15.00 per 100. 
Chas. Whitton, York and Gray Ave., Utica, N. Y. 

CYCLAMEN. 

SEE DISPL,\Y PAGE 5. 

ROMAN J. IRWIN, 

43 W. 18th St., New York. N. Y. 

Cyclamen plants, very finest strain of salmon; 
best deep pink and red; no white or poor pink In 
this lot, 2V<i-in., $12.00 per 100, $100.00 per 1000. 
Cash. Dixon Floral Co., Dixon, 111. 

Cyclamen, as long as they last, good 2<4-in., 
$10.00 per 100. Hembreiker Bros., Lincoln, III. 

Cyclamen, twice transplanted, extra strong, 
7c. Cash. Hammerschmidt A Clark, Medina. O. 

DAHLIAS 

DAHLIAS TRUE TO NAME. 
Countess of Lonsdale, Cactus, pink. $15. 00 per 100 
Golden Gate, Cactus, yellow; lorge. 14.00 per 100 
Grand Duke Alexis, Show, white; 

large 12.00 per 100 

Perle de Lyon, Hybrid Cactus, 

white 10.00 per 100 

Eldorado. Decorative, yellow; large 9.00 per 100 

Dreer's White, white; large 12.00 per 100 

Clifford Bruton, Decorative, yellow. 7.00 per 100 
Princess Victoria, Show, yellow... 9.00 per 100 

A. D. Livonl, Show, pink 7.00 per lOO 

Wm. Agnew, Decorative, scarlet.. 7.00 per 100 

Bonny Blue. Show, blue 11.00 per 100 

Jack Rose, Decorative, crimson.... 5.00 per 100 
Gustave Doazon, Decorative, scarlet 8.00 per 100 
W. W. Rawson, Show, white; large 12.00 per 100 
Dellce, Decorative, pink; large.... 12.00 per 100 
Yellow Duke, Decorative, yellow.. 8.00 per 100 
Floradora, Cactus, wine crimson... 9.00 per 100 
Queen of Yellows. Show, yellow.. 8.00 per lOO 
Thompson, Decorative, crimson; 

large 10.00 per 100 

Chas. Ijanier, Show, orange; large.. 9.00 per 100 

25 of one variety at 100 rates. Cash, please. 
PERRY GARDENS. RAVENNA, O. 

Dahlias, 1200 varieties; ceiinlne florists' cut- 
flower sorts at $5.00 per 100 and upward. 
Indiana Dahlia Farm, New .Mhany. Ind. 

Dahlias, pink, lavender, white, yellow, red, 
copper; all Decorative, $5.00 per 100. 

A. 0. Sperry, Neodesha, Kan. 



DAHLIAS, DESIRABLE KINDS. 

For florists' use we recommend ttie following 
guaranteed, good cut flower sorta in our locality: 

Each Per doi. 
Lavender Queen, new. Decorative 

Peony, light lavender $0.SO $ B.OO 

Qroenekan, Decorative, extra Urge. 

dark wine color, long stems 60 6.00 

Vesuvius, Hybrid Cactus, dark red, 

long stem 28 2.60 

Dos. Per 100 
Vesnyiiu, Hybrid Cactus, dark red, 

long stem $2.50 $20.00 

H. J. Lovlnk, Peony, lilac and 

white, large flowers 2.50 20.00 

Diemant Tan Bystein, Peony, ligbt 

lavender 1.75 14.00 

Golden Gate, Colossal, Cactus, large 

yellow and bronze 2.00 17.00 

Yellow Le Colosse, Colossal Decora- 
tive, large yellow 2.00 17.00 

Flora, Hybrid Cactus, large white. 

Chrysanthemum shaped 2. SO 20.00 

Princess Juliana, Peony Decorative, 

white 1.60 10.00 

Le Grand Manltou, Decorative, violet 

purple aud white 1.60 10.00 

Caleb Powers, Massive Ball, day- 
break pink 1.60 10.00 

American Beauty, Decorative, cerise 

pink 1.60 10.00 

Alice Roosevelt, Decorative, white 

and lavender 1.60 10.00 

Manhatten Beauty, Novelty Ball, 

yellow, splashed red 1.00 8.09 

Progress, Decorative, lavender and 

carmine rose 1.25 10.00 

Bird of Passage, Fancy Ball, white, 

carmine shading 1.00 8.00 

Libelle, Cactus, lavender, very good 1.00 6.60 

Something special, all named varieties in dif- 
ferent types and colors in 100 lots: 

5 different colors $ 4.00 per 100 

10 different colors 6.00 per 100 

16 different colors 6.00 per 100 

20 different colors... 10.00 per 100 

Cash. 
BRBCKSVILLB DAHLIA FABM, 
Brecksvllle, O. 

DAHLIAS, FANCY CUT FLOWER VARIETIES. 

Field-grown divisions in the best condition. 

Mina Burgle, the best red Decorative, 7 Ins., 
$0.00 per 100. 

Baron de Grancy, the best white Peony, 7 
Ins., $11.00 per 100. 

Springfield, Cactus, Improved Lonsdale, 6 Ins., 
$15.00 per 100. 

Lucero, better than King of the Autumn, deep 
orange Decorative, 7 Ins., $50.00 per 100. 

Dellce, Decorative, the best pink grown, large, 
good stem, $11.00 per 100. 

Twelve of one kind at 100 rate. 

Milwaukee Black, Peony, dark, good bulb 
stock, $3.00 per 100. 

Pearl, lavender-pink. Peony, good bulb stock, 
$3.00 per 100. 

Send for catalogue listing 81 varieties with 
discount to the trade of 50 percent from regular 
list price. 

MISSOURI DAHLIA FARM, 
Wellston Route 29, St. Louis, Mo. 

DAHLIAS 
FOR CUT FLOWERS. 
Mrs. Chas. Seybuld, Prof. Miinsflold. 

Cuban Giant, Striped Banner, 

Rose Queen, Etcndard de L.von, 

Ilornsveldt, Arthur LoFavour, 

Le Grand Manitoii. Hcrph von llocnistede, 

Torriem, .Mary Piokford, 

.Millo A. Lumiori'. liadon Ivartina, 

Manhattan Beauty, Aiahclla, 

Queen Mary, Klsie liurgess. 

Red Jack Rose, Hampton Court, 

Pink Jack Rose. 

The alKive collection .SfiO 00 per lOOO. Not less 
than 50 of a kind at tlio 1000 rate. We have a 
larKe collection of e.vhibitiou varieties, in plants 
of a No. 1 stock. 

Senil in vour wants for prices. 

MANXETTO HILL NURSERIES, 

W. C. .Xoonan. Prop., Ilicksville, L. I., N. Y. 

DAHLIAS. 

White Century, Souvenir de 

Gustave Doazon, Edith, $2.60; 

Arabella, $2.00; Countess of 

Lonsdale, Stability, $3.50; 

America, $5.00 per doi. clumps. 

HARRY FRANKLIN BAKER, 
1118 W. I«ke St., Minneapolis, Hinn. 



DAHLIAS, STRONG DIVISIONS. 

Arabella, Show, $5.00; Copper, Peonv, $25.00; 
Coiir de I^ Paix, Peony, $18.00; H. j. L)vink, 
$10.00; Mrs. A. Rayer, Peonv, $12.00: Mrs. G 
Gordon. Peony. $12.00: Miss Minnie McCullough, 
Decorative. $6.00; Mina Burgle, Decorative, 
$11.00; Queen Mary, Decorative, $9.00; Svlvia, 
Decorative, $4..'iO: Wm. Reed Butler, Peony, a 
very fine long-stemmed white, $8,00. All priced 
per 100. 

RALPH BENJAMIN, CALVER TON, N. Y. 

CALIFORNIA GIANT CUT FLOWER 

VARIETIES. 

Special offer for this month only 

to Introduce our pot bulbs to the trade, 

12 named sorts, $3.50, postpaid. 

KEY ROUTE HEIGHTS NURSERY CO., 

Quality Service. 

3^2^Tx>ma_ Vletn Ave., Oakland. Cal. 

Dahlias: Get our list of^arlel^les sFlIl to be 
had, very flne stock and the price right. 
S. S. Skidelsky & Co., 53 Park Place, New York. 



134 



The Florists' Review 



Junk 1, 1922 



DAHLIAS— t^ontinuea 



DAHLIAS. DAHLIAS. 

Strong divisions of plump biillia: 

F. P. Jewel $4.00 per 100 

Lyndlmrst 3.50 per 100 

Mixed 3.50 per 100 

BRAZIL DAHLIA FARM, BRAZIL, IND. 



^__ DAISIES 

DAIBIB8I DAI8IBSI1 

Per 100 Per 1000 

Boston Yellow, 2H-ln. pots $7.00 $60.00 

Single White, 2K-ln. pots 6.00 60.00 

Single White, Mrs. Sander, rooted 

cuttings 8.00 2S.00 

ROMAN J. IRWIN, 
43_W. 18th St., New York, N. T. 

Boston Yellow Daisy, rooted cuttings, $8.00 
per 100. Mrs. Sander, rooted cuttings, $2.S0 per 
100. White Marguerite, rooted cuttings, $2.00; 
2%-iD, $3.00 per 100. Qiant White, rooted cut- 
tings, $3.00; 2^-in., $4.50 per 100. Cash. 

W. A. Ballou, Wheaton, III. 

Daisy Marguerite, extra fine stock, -white. 
2%-in. pots, $6.00; 8-in. pots, $8.00; yellow, 
2%-in. pots, $8.00; 8-ln. poU, $10.00. Packins 
free for cnsh. 

La Crosse Floral Co., La Orosae, Wis. 

MARGUERITES, YELLOW. 

Extra heavy 3-in $6.00 per 100 

Packing at cost. 

WALTER ARMACOST & CO. 

821 East 4th St., Los Angeles, Cat. 

Boston Yellow, strong 2%-in., $7.00 per 100; 
Giant White, 2V4-ln., $6.00 per 100. 6 per cent 
for packing. 
8. S. Skidelsky & Co., 53 Park Place, New York. 

Daisy Marguerite, white with yellow center, 
strong, rooted cuttings, $1.60 per 100, 2^-ln., 
$4.00 per 100. Cash or c. o. d. 
W. E. Trimble Greenhouse Co., Princeton. 111. 

DAISIES. SANDER AND PARIS. 

Full bloom, 2Vi-i".. 4o each. 
GULLETT & SONS. LINCOLN, ILL. 

Shasta Daisy Alaska, strong 2>,i-ln., $4.00 per 
100, $40.00 per 1000. Cash. 

C. L. Humphrey, ZancsvlUe, O. 

Shasta Daisy, strong, field-grown plants, $1.00, 
doz.; $6.00, 100. 
Harry J. Squires, Good Ground, N. Y. 

White Daisy, rooted cuttings, $1.60 per 100; 
2-in,, 8c; Mrs. Sander, rooted cuttings, $2.00 per 
100. Cash. Byer Bros., Chambersburg, Pa. 

Bellls Daisy Snowball, good, healthy stock, 
transplanted seedlings, $3.00 per 1000. 

Freeport Floral Co., Freeport, 111. 

Daisy Marguerite, beat single white, 2)4-li>., 
$6.00 per 100; 4-ln., $10.00. 
Henry Smith Floral Co., Grand Baplda, Mich. 

Shasta Daisy, 60e per dos., $4.60 par 100, 
$40.00 per 1000. 

The Schmidt A Botley Co., Springflald, O. 

Shasta Dalaiea, nice plants, outdoor grow*, 
$2.00 per 100. Qray Floral Oo.. Ohlckaaha. OkU. 

DELPHINIUMS 

DELPHINIUMS, BELLADONNA. LIGHT BLUE. 

Per 100 Per 1000 

2U-In. pots $t!.50 $55.00 

ROMAN J. IKWIN, 
43 W. 18th St., New York, N. Y. 

Delphinium Belladonna, 2-year-old, $12.00 per 
100, $100.00 per 1000; 2U-ln., $6.00 per 100, 
$60.00 per 1000. 
8. S. Skidelsky A Co., 53 Park Place, New York. 

25,000 DELPHINIUM BELLADONNA. 

2^-lB., $6.00 per 100, $S0.00 per 1000. 

WILUAM 8WAYNB, 

P. O. Box T, Kennett Bqnare, Pa. 

DIANTHUS ~ ~ 

Sweet William, mixed and separate colors, 
strong, field-grown plants. $1.00, doz.: $6.00, 
100. Harr?- J. Squires, Good Ground, N. Y. 

Sweet William, good strong plants, $2.00 per 
100. Gray Floral Co., Chickasha, Okla. 

DIGITALIS ~~" 



Digitalis. 90c per doz., $6.00 per 100. 

The Schmidt & Botley Co., Springfleld, O. 



DRACAENAS 



DRACAENA INDIVISA 

From 2V4-ln. pots, 6c; 

3 in., 12c: 

4-in,, 25c; 
5-ln. and 5\4-in., 50c. 

All good, heavy stock. 

WETTLIN FLORAL CO., 
Homell, N. Y. 



DRArAENA INDIVISA. 

214-ln. pots, $6.()0 per 100. $55.00 per 1000: 
3-in. pots, $12.00 per 100; SMsin. pots, $17.50 
per 100; 4 in. pots, $25.00 per 100; 5 In. pots, 
$.50.00 per 100; strong seedlings, $1.00 per 100, 
$8.00 per 1000. 

LARGER i'LANTS, ASK FOR PRICES. 

ROMAN J. IRWIN. 

43 W. 18th St., New York, N. Y. 



DRACAENAS. 

Extra heavy stock. 

BUY WHILE THEY LAST, 

Per 100 ft. Per 1000 ft. 

Termlnalls $11.00 $100.00 

Lord Wolseley 14.00 136.00 

Fragrans 25.00 

Please send cash with order. 

These prices are delivered In your town In 
strong, ventilated boxes. 

Reference: American Colonial Bank, San Juan, 
Porto Rico. 

. PORTO RICO PINEAPPLE CO., 
F. M. Pennock, Pres., San Juan, Porto Rico. 



DRACAENA INDIVISA. 

Extra fine plants at these prices 

while they last. 

Per 100 Per 1000 

8-in $ 6.00 $ 60.00 

4-in 15.00 140.00 

6-ln 40.00 

6-in 60.00 

BAUSCHER BROS., 
20 8. Chicago Ave., Freeport, HI. 

DRACAENAS, INDIVISA AND AUSTRALIS. 

A few hundred to clean up, strong 6-ln., 75c 
each, $60.00 per 100. 

IndiTisa, 3-in., $10.00; 2i^-in., $5.00 per 100. 

WINFIELD S. KIRCHBR, 

Cyclamen Speclnllst, Defiance, 0. 

DRAOABNA INDIVISA] ~ 

Strong 3-in. plants $ 8.00 per 100 

Strong 4-ln. plants 15.00 per 100 

Cash, please. 

THB ASHTABULA FLORAL CO., 

187 Main S t., AshUboIa. O. 

DRACAENAS. STRONG. NBBD SHIFTINO. 
4-in., 18 to 24 ins. high, 16 to 24 leaves, $17.60 
per 100; 4-in., 24 to 28 ins, high, 26 to 28 leaves, 
$26.00 per 100. 

Cash. No packing charge. 
THE IMLAY CO., ZAN BSVILLE, 0. 

Dracaena Indlvisa, transplanted seedllnga, 
$2.00 per 100; atrong 2^-ln., $4.00 per 100; 8-in., 
$10.00 per 100; 4-in., $20.00 per 100; 6-in., $60.00 
per 100. 
S^S. Skidelsky & Co.^ 53 Park Place, N ew York. 

Dracaena Indlvisa, strong, healthy stock need- 
ing shift, 2V4-in., $4.00 per 100; 3-inch, $8.00 
per 100; extra fine, 24 to 30 leaves; 22 to 80 
Ins. long, 41n., $20.00 per 100. 
Freeport Floral Co., Freeport, 111. 

Dracaena Indlvisa: Ready after June 16. good, 
thrifty plants for growing on, from 2-in. pots, 
$3.00 per 100, in any quantity. Order now. 
E. Rawllngs, Wholesale Grower, Allegany, N . T. 

Dracaena Indlvisa. fine, healthy plants ready to 
shift, 15 to 20 inches high, 14 to 18 leaves, 
4-in., $17.50 per 100. Cash. 
Brinkerhotf Greenhouses, Springfleld , 111. 

Dracaena Indivlsa, 4-ln., $26.00 per 100; S-ln., 
$6.00 per dos.. $46.00 per 100; extra strong, 
transplanted in September. Cash. 

B, Scheller. Warren. Pa, 

DRACAENA INDIVISA. ' 

3-ln., 10c.: 4-ln., 25c. 
GULLETT & SONS, LINCOUf, ILL . 

Dracdenii Indivisii, strong 2V4-in.. $4.00 per 
100. ('has. Wliitton. York St. & Criiv Ave 
fti.a. N. Y. 

Dracaena Indlvisa, 4-ln., 20c. "They're good." 
Shipped in paper pots. 

Prelsach Bros., Le Roy, N. T. 

Dracaena Indivlsa, 18 to 24 Ins. hlgir 4-ln . 
$18.00 per 100. Cash. 
Smith the Florist, St. J ohns, Mich. 

Dracaena Indlvisa, 4-in. as good as 5-in.. 30c 
each, $30.00 per 100. 
West Hill Greenhouses, Fred onla, N. Y. 

Dracaena Indivlsa, very strong, healthy plants 
$20.00 per 100. Cash with order. 
Schafcr Floral Co., Ka nkakee. 111. 

Dracaena Indivlsa, good, strong plants, 4-in 
$20.00 per 100. Cash with order. 
Trimble ft Oppeneer, L ancaster. 0. 

DRACAENA INDIVISA. ' 
Good, strong plants, 4-ln., $15.00 per 100 Cash 
C. L. ERICKSON. PRINCETON, I LL. 
Dracaena Indivlsa, 3%-ln. fine plants ISc 
strong 3%-in., 18c; 4-ln., 20c; strong 4-ln., 26e ' 
Prince's Flower Shop, Iowa City, la! 

Dracaenas, strong 3-ln. ready for 4-in.. $10 00 
per 100. Cash. 
^ Riverside Greenhouses, Appleton, Wis. 

Dracaena Indlvisa, fine seedlings, 75c per 100 
$6.00 per 1000. Cash. *^" ^""' 

Byer Bros., Chambersb urg, Pa. 

Dracaena Indlvisa, fine stock, 2V4-in., $5.00 
Henry Smith Floral Co., Grand Rap ids, Mich. 

Dracaena Indlvisa, strong plants, 3-in . 3%-in 
and 4-ln., 10c, 16c and 20c each. ^ 
J. 0. Steinhauser, Pittsburg, Kan. 

Dracaena Indivlsa, good, strong plants, ready 
to shift, 3-in., $10.00 per 100. Cash BR 
Pound, Cedar and Indiana Sts. , Newark,' o' 

Dracaenas, strong 3-ln., $8.00 per 100- 2-Jn 
$3.50 per 100. Cash. Jacobs Bros., Peoria? Ili! 



Dracaena Indlvisa, strong 4-in. pots, $20.00 
per 100. Cash with order. 
Attica Floral Co., Attica, Ind. 

Dracaena Indivlsa, strong 3-in., $10.00 per 100. 
W. M. Deyoe^A Co., 212 W. 6tb St., Oil Ci ty, Pa. 

Dracaenas, 5-in., 75c; 6-ln., $1.00 each. 

L. J. Ilenes, Amherst, 0. 



Dracaena Indivlsa, 3-in., 15c each. 
W. B. Shumwuy Floral Co., Tiflln, 0. 

Dracaena seedlings, 50c per 100, $4.50 per 
1000, prepaid. L. J. Rowe, TltusvlUe, Pa. 

ERICAS 



Heather Melanthera, choice stock out of 8-in. 
pots, ready for 6 and 6-ln., $86.00 per 100. 
A. L. Miller, Jamaica. N. Y. 

EUPHORBIAS 



Euphorbia, or Crown of Thorns, 3-in., 15c; 
4-in., 20c; 5-ln., 30c. Extra strong plants. Cash 
with order. H. C. Doescher, 2048 Gentiily Ave., 
New Orleans, La. ^ 

Bupborbia Splendens, or Crown of Thorns, 
8-ln., $1.60 per dos., $10.00 per 100. 
Oak Grove Greenhouse, Tuakegee, Ala. 

EVERGREENS 

Evergreen understocks for grafting conifers, 
complete assortment. Write for prices. 
The D. Hill Nursery Co., Box 403, Dundee, 111. 

in I FERNS 

FERNS MY SPECIALTY. 

Ferns for fern dishes: strong, bushy, 2>4-in. 
stock. In largest and best assortment, $6.00 per 
100, $50.00 per lOOO. 

Kentia Belmoreana, clean, thrifty 214-in. stock, 
right size for center plants, $2.00 per doz., $16.00 
per 100. 

Fern seedlings, excellent stock, ready for pot- 
ting, in assortment of 8 best fern dish varieties, 
$1.76 per 100, $15.00 per 1000. 

Alsophlla Australis (Australian Tree Fern). 
Splendid 3-ln. stock, $2.50 per doz.. $20.00 per 
100; 4-in., $6.00 per doz., $40.00 per 100. 

Cibotium Schiedel, the King of Ferns. Strong, 
thrifty 3-in., $8.00 per doz., $65.00 per 100; 4-in., 
$12.00 per doz., $95.00 per 100; 5-in., $24.00 per 
doz.; 6-in., $3.00; 7-in., $4.00. Special quotation 
on 100 lots. 

Adlantums, Cuneatum and Graclllimum, strong 
214-in. stock. $6.00 per 100, $50.00 per 1000. 

8-in., $2.40 per doz., $16.00 per 100. 4-ln., 
$3.60 per doz., $25.00 per 100. 

Polypodlum Mandalanum, well established 2%- 
in. stock, $1.50 per doz., $10.00 per 100. 

Asparagus Plumosus Nanus, strong seedlings, 
$1.25 per 100, $10.50 per 1000. 

Asparagus Sprengeri, strong seedlings, $1.00 
per 100, $9.00 per 1000, 

See Smilax seedling classified ad. 

Illustrated price list mailed upon request. 

J. F. ANDERSON, 

Fern Specialist, Short Hills, N. J. 

Table Ferns from flats, shipped in or out of 
flats, best varieties, $2.75 per flat, 10 flats or 
more at $2.50 per flat. 

Table Ferns for dishes, strong 2%-ln., $6.00 
per 100, $50.00 per 1000. 

Strong 214-ln. pot plants, Boston, Teddy Jr., 
Verona, Roosevelt, Dwarf Boston, $6.00 per 100, 
$65.00 per 1000; Scottii and Whitmanli, $6.60 per 
100, $00.00 per 1000. 

Bostons, extra fine C-in., 60c and 75c: 7-in., 76c 
and $1.00; 8-ln., $1.23 and $1.50. No charge 
for packing. 

Transplanted bench-grown stock of the above, 
except Scottll; better than pot plants: cheaper 
and lighter, $50.00 per lOOO: Macawll, 2%-ln. 
pot plants, $7.00 per 100, $65.00 per 1000. Trans- 
planted plants of the above, except Scottii, $5.00 
per 1000 less. 
S. S. Skidelsky & C o., 53 Pa rk Place, New York. 

BOSTON FBRNS. 

4-inch $0.26 each 

6-lnch 40 each 

6-inch 76 each 

7-inch 1.16 each 

8-lnch l.SO each 

10-inch 2.00 each 

We pack all orders on the tame day they are 
received. All will be packed to arrive in flrat- 
class condition. No charges for packing oat of 
clay pots; In clay pots, add 6 per cent. 

DAVIS FLORAL CO. 
Fern Specialists, Davenport. Iowa. 

FERNS. POT GROWN. ~ 

Strong, clean, healthy stock. 
We offer the following for June delivery: 

Boston, 4-in $0.28 

Boston, 5-in 00 

Boston, 6-in 1.00 

Boston, 7-ln 1.50 

Boston, 8-ln 2.00 

Whltmanii, 4-in 28 

Roosevelt, 4-in 20 

Roosevelt. 6-in 60 

Teddy Jr., 4-ln 26 

Macawll, 4-in 28 

Norwood, 4-ln 40 

This is superior stock and will make you money. 
J. W. DAVIS CO., TB RRB HAU TE. IND. 

^T-GBOWN BOSTON FBRNS! 

2%-ln $8.00 per 100 

6-ln $0.36 and $0.60 eack 

6-ln 70 and 1.00 each 

7-in. and 8-ln. at 1.00 and 1.00 each 

WISE ADKISSON. ORBBNVILLB. TBX. 



June 1, 1922 



The Florists^ Review 



135 



FERNS, KKADY NOW. 
Boston, Itoosevt'lt, Teddy Jr., Verona and 
Wliitniaiiii, 214-ln. pots, $6.50 per 100, S55.00 
jier 1000; Dwarf Boston, $8.00 per 100, $75.00 
per 1000; Elegantlssiniu, $8.00 per 100; New 
.Macawll, $7.00 per 100, $05.00 per 1000; Bird's 
Nest Ferns, 214-ln. pots, $25.00 per 100. 
LAHOE PERNS. 
Boston, Teddy Jr., 4-in. pots, $40.00 per 100. 

SEE FRONT COVER ADVERTISEMENT. 

ROMAN J. IRWIN, 
43 W. 18th St., New York, N. Y. 



POT-GROWN BOSTON FERNS. 

CLEAN, HEALTHY STOCK, 
4-IN.. 25c BACH. 

THE CELINA GREENHOUSE CO.. 
CELINA, 0. 



Hardy Ferns, wholesale price. Per 100 Per 10 

Evergreen and Marshfleld $ 8.00 fLOO 

Maidenhair and Wood Fern 9.00 1.00 

Goldleana and Ostrich Fern 10.00 1.20 

Glnnamomea and Interrupta 12.00 1.80 

And 11 other varieties. Illustrated descrlptlye 
Hat mailed free. 100 or more, your (election, 
billed at the 100 rate. I otFer for trial a collec- 
tion of 16 Goldleana, 15 Ostrich. 10 Cinnamomea, 
6 Maidenhair and 6 Evergreen for $5.00 cash. 
Packing free. 

Ludvlg Mosbaek, Femdale, Askov, Minn. 

FBBNi 

Bostons, ready for 4- in. pots $10.00 per 100 

Bostons, ready for 5-ln. pots 12.00 per 100 

Bostons, ready for 3-in. pots 8.00 per 100 

Assorted, ready for 4-ln. pots 10.00 per 100 

SprenReri, for 4-ln. pots 8.00 per 100 

Asparagus Plumosus, for 4-in. pots 8.00 per 100 

Cash with order. 

WALTER P. NEWELL, 

Wholesale Grower, Apopka, Fla. 

BOSTON FBBNS. 

2U-inch stock. Per 100 Per 1000 

Boston $5.B0 $B0.00 

Roosevelt B.50 BO.OO 

Wbitmanil B.60 BO.OO 

Teddy Jr 6.00 BS.OO 

Verona 0.00 BS.OO 

Macawll 6.00 BS.OO 

AMBRICAN BULB CO.. 
172 N. Wabaah Ave.. Ohlcaio. HI. 

rBRNB. FBRN8. 

8BB OUR DISPLAY AD THIS ISSDB. 
STOCK OF SPLBNDID VALUE. 

THB SPRINGFIELD FLORAL ft FERN 00.. 
SPRINGFIELD. O. 

FERNS OUR SPBCIAI/TT. ~ 

100,000 2H-ln. Ferns. 

Scottll, Teddy Jr., Roosevelt, Boston 

and Verona, $6.00 per 100, $6S.OO per 1000. 

20,000 Macawlt, $7.00 per 100. $6B.OO 

per 1000. Cash vHth order. 

BRDMAN & ULRIOH. 

Belair Road and Brdman's Hill, 

. Baltimore. Md. 

Perns, Boston. Sword, Smithil, Whltmanll. 
Superblsslma and AsparaRiis Sprengeri, out of 
2%-ln. pots, 6c; 4-in., 17Hc; 5in., 35c; 0-ln., 
50c; 7-in., 7!5c; 8-in., $1.00. AiiRtralian Tree 
Fern, 5-ln., 60c; 6 in., 80c; 7-in., $1.25. Above 
all full and pot-bonnrt stock. Casli with order. 
H. C. Doescher, 2048 Gentilly Ave., New Or- 
leans, La. 

FBRNST S AND 4-IN. 

Boston. 8-ln $1B.00 pw 100 

Teddy Jr.. 8-ln 16.00 per 100 

Roosevelt, 8-ln IB.OO per 100 

Roosevelt, 4-ln 2S.00 per 100 

Whltmanll, 4-ln 25.00 per 100 

Oasb please. Less 4 per cent dlsconat. 
B. 0. BLAKE. SPRINGFIELD. O. 

BOSTON FERNS. 
STRONG, BUSHY, CLEAN STOCK. 

8 In I .70 

7-in 90 

Packing charges free. 

DAVIS A STBINBR CO.. 

Morrison. 111. 

BOSTON FERNS. 

Strong runners, ready for immediate delivery. 

$10.00 per 1000, $88.00 per 10,000. 

8-in. pot Rise, $B.50 per 100; 

4-ln. pot slie, $7.00 per 100. 

20 per cent discount for cash. 

F. M. SOAR. LITTLE RIVER, FLA. 

FERNS. READY NOW. 

Koston, strong 2i/.-in $5.00 per 100 

Blegantissimn. bnshv 214-in 6.00 per 100 

ALABAMA FLORAL CO.. 
fi 25 McMil lan Ave., Birmingham, Ala. 

~~, STRONGnBOSTON FERNS? 

3H-ln 15c each 

"-in 60c and 76c each 

Mn $1.00 each 

JOY FLORAL CO., NASTTVILLE. TENN. 

Boston Ferns, well-grown stock, to make room, 
5-ln., eOc and 7Bc; 7-ln., 75c and $1.00; 8-ln.. 
$1.28 and $1.60. No charge for packing. 

A. 0. Oelschtg & Sons. Savanab. Ga. 



FERNS, 2%-IN. A-NO. 1 STOCK. 
Boston, Roosevelt, Teddy Jr., Whltmanll Com- 
pacta, Macawll, $6.50 per 100, $60.00 per 1000. 

WILLIAM V. KASTING CO.. 
668 Washington St. BiifTalo, N. Y. 

PERNS TO PLANT NOW. 
Boston, Roosevelt, Whitmanli, Verona. Teddy 
Jr. and Whltmanll Compaeta. 2%-ln.. $6.00 per 
100. $55.00 per 1000; Macawii, $8.00 per 100. 
GULLETT & SONS, LINCOLN, ILL. 

" BOSTON PERNS. 

Bin $0.50 

6-ln 75 

C. M, HAMILTON, 
204 E. 3rd St., Kewanee, 111. 

THE BEST WAY 

to get rid of your surplus stock 

is to use the 

REVIEW'S 

Olasslfled Advs. 

SEASONABLE STOCK READY NOW. 
Ferns. Boston and Teddy Jr., 2%-ln., $6.60 
per 100, $60.00 per 1000. 

THB STORRS & HARRISON CO.. 
Painesvllle. O. 

Ferns, Scottil and Teddy Jr., 4-ln., $20.00 per 
100; Scottll, Teddv Jr. nnd Roospvclt, C in., 
$60.00 per 100. Cash. ))le»sp. M. Hllpert, Sta. 
0, 313 Belair Road, Baltimore, Md. 

Boston Ferns, 4tn., 20c; 5-ln., 40c; 6-ln., 75c 
each. Cash. 

Hill City Greenhouses, Forest City, la. 

Perns, Boston and Roosevelt. A few hundred 
left of good 2V4-ln. stork, $5.00 per 100. 
Harold W. McGr e gor, Spring field, O. 

Perns. 800 Boston and 200 Whitmanli, 2^-ln., 
6c. Cash, please. 

MUford Greenhouse, Mllford, 111. 

Boston Ferns, strong 7-ln,, ready for shift, 
$1.00 each; 2%-ln., $6.00 per 100. 

Eldora Greenhouses, Eldora, la. 

Perns. Boston, Dwarf Sword, Wanamaker and 
Teddy Jr., 3-ln.. $10.00 per 100. 

Oak Grove Greenhouse, Tuskegee, Ala. 

Fern seedlings. $2.00 per 100; assorted 2-in., 
$6.00 per 100. Roscoe S. Baldwin. 460 Atlanta 
St., Pasadena, Cal. 

Ferns, Boston, Roosevelt and Dwarf Sword, 
4-ln., 18c each. 

Oak Grove Greenhouse, Tuskegee, Ala. 

Fern Whltmanll, 2%-ln^, $6.00 per lOoTlSSB.bo 
per 1000. 

Henry Krueger, 602 Clark St., Toledo, O. 

Ferns, Boston and Whltmanll, extra choice, 
bench-grown, $20.00 per 100. 

B. B. Morgan Floral Co., Paxton, 111. 

Boston FermJ, out of 2%-ln. pots, $6.00 per 100. 
Quick shipment. J. C. Blgelow & Son. 1542 
Sunset Ave., Ptlca. N. Y. 

Boston Ferns, pot-grown, 4-ln., ready for B-ln., 
26e each. Cash, please. 
Chas. C. Walker, 1227 Logan Ave.. Danville, 111. 

Table Ferns, leading varieties, strong 2%-ln., 
$6.00 per 100, $40.00 per 1000. 

E}venden Bros. Co., WlUiamsport, Pa. 

Fern Norwood, fine, stocky plants, 2^-in,, 
$6.00 ycT 100. C. B. Majors, Denlson, Tex. 

Table Ferns, best varieties, 2V4-ln., $5.00 per 
100. Henry Smith Floral Co., G r and Rapids, Mich. 

Boston Ferns, strong 6-ln., BOc. 
Calvert Floral Co., Lake Forest, 111. 

FEVEWFgW 

Feverfew Little Gem, the only good one, rooted 
cuttings, $1.50 per 100: 2-ln.. $3.00 per 100. 
Cash. Byer Bros., Chambersburg, Pa. 

Feverfew Little Gem, 2-ln., $4.00 per 100, 
$36.00 per 1000. F. Linnemann, Jr., 1313 Ash- 
land Ave., Des Plalnea, 111. 

FEVERFEW LITTLE GEM, 2V4-rN.. 4c. 
GULLETT ft SONS. LINCOLN, ILI.,. 

Feverfew Double Giant, strong stock, 2%-ln., 
$3.00 per 100. J. C. Schmidt, Bristol. Pa. 

FICUS 

Ficus Elastlca. 4-ln., 18 to 24 Ins. high 40c 

Flcus Elastlca, Bin., 24 to 86 ins. high 60c 

Flcua Elastlca, 6-ln., 36 to 48 Ins. high 70r 

Good foliage and well-grown. Cash with order. 
H. C. Doescher, 2048 Gentilly Ave., New Or 
leans. La. 

PirUS ELASTIC A. 

Fine stock, 4-ln.. 60c; 5-ln.. 75o. 

GULLETT & SONS. LINCOLN, TLL. 

Flcus Elastlca, Rubber plant, 15 Ins. high, 
4-in., 40c each, $4. BO per doz. Nice stock. 
Oak Grove Gre enhouse, Tuskegee. Ala. 

Rubbers. 4-in.. $40.00 per 100. ' 
Holton A Hunkel Co., Milwaukee. Wis. 

FOROET-ME.^NOTS 

Forget-me-nots, field-grown, $5.00 per 100. 
Cash, please. 

T.ieonard Cousins . Jr.. Concord Junction, Mass. 

Porget-me-nots, strong, bushy plants, ready to 
shift, 2H-ln., $4.00 per 100. 
Freeport Floral Co., Freeport. Dl. 

Forget-me-nots, strong, young plants, from 
coldframe, hardy outdoor-grown, $4.00 per 100. 
High land Park Nurser y, Sterling. 111. 

Forget-me-not Alpeatria Victoria, blue; strong 
field-grown plants In bnd, $8.00 per 100. Cash. 
Brill Celery Gardens, Kalamazoo, Hlch. 



FUCHSIAS 



Fuchsias: Gas fumigated and free from white 
fly. Dandy 2-ln. of the two great leaders, 
Black Prince and Trailing Queen, $4.00 per 100. 
Cash with order. C. L. Humphrey, ZanesvlUe. O. 

Fuchsias, strong rooted cuttings, best named 
varieties, single and double, labeled, $2.00 per 
100, prepaid. Black Prince separate. If wanted. 
S, W. Pike, St. Charles. 111. 

Fuchsias, Avalanche, Black I'rince, Mrs. E. G. 
mil and Speciosa, 2'/j-ln., $5.00 per 100; 3-ln., 
$10.00 per 100; 4-ln.. $20.00 per 100. 

The Storrs & Harrison Co., Painesvllle, O. 

TEN VARIETIES— BIG PLANTS. 

Fuchsias, 2^4-lu 4c each 

GULLEra' & SONS, LINCOLN, ILL. 

Fuchsias, fancy assorted rooted cuttings, $2.00 
per 100; 2%-in., $5.00. Cash or c. o. d. 
W. E. Trimble Greenhouse Co., Princet on. 111. 

Fuchsias, mostly double white, fine 2^-ln.. 
6c; 8-ln., 10c. 

Hamuierschmldt & Cla rk, Medina. O. 

Fuchsias, 3 best varieties, 2%-ln., $5.00 per 
100. Charles Sherwood, Waterloo, la. 

QENISTAS 

Genistas, rooted cuttings, $3.00 per 100; 2^- 
In., $6.00 per 100. Cash or c. o. d. 
W. E. Trimble Greenhouse Co., Princeto n, 111. 

QERANIUMS 



NEW GERANIUMS. 

Red Barney, brilliant red; 2V4-in. pots, 

$3.00 per doz., $10.00 per 100. 

Mrs. Geo. E. Buxton, double, rose-pink, 

2%-ln. pots, 

$15.00 per 100, $125.00 per 1000. 

GERANIUMS READY NOW. 

2V4-'n. pots. 

Per 100 Per 1000 

Poitevlne, Rlcard and Vlaud $7.00 $65.00 

S. A. Nutt, Buchner 6.00 50.00 

Helen Miehell 8.00 70.00 

B. G. Hill, Mrs. Ijuwrence 7.0O 65.00 

ROOTED CUTTINGS. 

S. A. Nutt $3.00 per 100, $25.00 per 1000 

Buchner 3.00 per 100, 25.00 per 1000 

Poitevine, Mrs. I.flw- 

rence 4.50 per 100, 40.00 per 1000 

ROMAN J. IRWIN, 
43 W. 18th St.. New York. N. Y. 

GBRANIUMS. CASH WITH ORDER. 
Charles Turner, Ivy. 2-ln... 4« each, $4.00 per 100 

Oastellane. 2-ln 4c each. 4.00 per 100 

Poitevine, 2-in Be each, B.OO per 100 

Uontmort, 2-ln 6c each, 6.00 per 100 

Rlcard. 2-in 6c each. 6.00 per 100 

Oberle, 2-in 4c each. 4.00 per 100 

Barney, 2-ln Be each, 6.00 per 100 

Buchner, 2-ln 4c each. 4.00 per 100 

THB FOLLOWING VARIETIES 

WANTED. 

200 Happy Thought. 

200 Miss Pollock, 

200 Silver-leaf S. A. Nutt, 

200 Bronze Bedder. 

F. H. REESE, 

406 N. Belmont Ave., Springfield, O. 

BARGAIN COUNTER PRICES. 

S. A. Nutt, Double Grant, Jean Oberle, Jean 

Vlaud, 2V4-in., 4c; Rlcard, Poitevine and Mme. 

Buchner, 214-ln., $5.00 per 100; Nutt and Grant. 

3-ln., 7c; Illcard, Poitevine and Jean Vlaud. 8c. 

ROOTED CUTTINGS. 

Per 100 Per 1000 

Poitevine $3.50 $30.00 

Rlcard 3.50 30.00 

S. A. Nutt 2.00 18.00 

Mme. Buchner 3.00 26.00 

.lean Vlaud 3.00 26.00 

Double Grant 2.00 18.00 

Jean Oberle 3.0O 27.50 

GULLETT & SONS. LINCOLN, ILL. 

75,000 ROOTED CUTTINGS. 

BEAUTE POITEVINE, ALPHONSE RICARD. 

TRUE STOCK, $25.00 PER THOUSAND. 

June cuttings are Just the tiling for growing 

on for stock or sale; place your order now and 

get stork that is right. Parked In light airy 

crates free. 

S. A. Nutt, rooted cuttings $20.00 per 1000 

S. A. Nutt, from 3-in. pots 8.00 per 100 

S. .\. Nutt, from 4in. pots 12.00 per 1000 

Poitevine, Rlcard, 3-ln 10.00 per 100 

Poitevine, stork plants, late June 8.00 iwr 100 

Cash wtih order. 
THE W. T. BUCKLEY CO., SPRINGFIELD, ILL. 



S. A. NUTT GERANIUMS. 

Extra strong, thrifty plants. 

."? in $ 7.00 per 100 

SH-in 10.00 per 100 

4in 14.00 per 100 

Cash with order. 

It, I,. TITTLE, PAW PAW, MICH. 



GERANIUMS. 

Per 100 Per 1000 

S. A. Nutt, rooted cuttings $ 2. ."SO $ 20.00 

Ricard, rooted cuttings 3.00 27.50 

Reante Poitevine. cuttings 3.00 27.50 

S. A. Nutt, 2 in 4.00 30.00 

Rlcard. 2-in 5.00 40.00 

Reante Poitevine. 2-ln 5.00 40.00 

S. A. Nutt, 3%-in., bud and 

bloom 12.00 100.00 

MT. OILEAD FLORAL CO.. MT. GILEAD, 0. 



136 



The Rorists^ Review 



June 1. 1922 



QEWANIUMS-Continued 

NEW ciEUANlUMS. 

By all means get buuiu of our new Mrs. 
George E. Buxton, the beautiful rose-piuk with 
enormous trusses, $1^.00 per 100, $125.00 per 
1000; not less than 50 plants on au order. Hed 
Barney, the name describes it, $3.00 per doz., 
$10.00 per 100. 

S. A. Nutt, strong 2yo-in. plants, $5.00 per 
100, $45.00 per 1000. I'oitevine. Kiourd and 
Lawrence, strong 2V4-iii. plants, $G.50 per 100, 
155.00 per 1000. 

S. S. SKIDELSKY & CO., 
B3 Park Place, Kew York, N. Y. 

GEKANIUMS. 
BOOTED CUTTINGS 

READY NOW. 
S. A. NUTT AND BUCHNER. 
$25.00 per 1000. 
RICARD VIAUD, 

OASTELLANB, ANNA BROWN, 

POITEVINB, SCARLET REDDER, 

$30.00 per 1000.' 

cash with order. 

fred w. r itcii y, lancaster, pa. 
"geraniums. 

Nutt $4.00 per 100, $30.00 per 1000 

Buchner 6.00 per 100, 40.00 per lOOO 

Viaud B.OO per 100, 40.00 per 1000 

Regalia B.OO per 100, 40.00 per 1000 

Rleard 6.00 per 100, 40.00 per 1000 

Poltevine 6.50 per 100, (50.00 per 1000 

Hooted cuttings of Nutt, ready, $18.00 per 1000. 

AU are extra strotig 2-in. stock, except last 
Item; as good aa 2V^-ln. and the express is much 
less. Packed right and free by experts. Cash, 
please. 
J. A. SWARTLEY & SONS. STERLING, ILL. 

THE NEW GERANIUM, 
MRS. RICHARD F. GLOEDE. 
Another lot of 20,000 2%-in. A-1 stock, mostly 
all in bloom, ready for 4-iu., $20.00 [K-r 100. 
Do not hesitate in placing your order for stock 
at this time. If you don't you will regret it 
later. 

We are also offering 

BEAUTE POITEVINB AND E. G. HII>L, 

A-1 stock, mostly all in bloom, 

$15.00, $25.00 and $35.00 per 100. 

GLOEDE CONSERVATORIES, EVANSTON, ILL. 

GERANIUMS 4-IN. IN BUD AND BLOOM. 

Helen Miehell $15.00 per 100 

Beaute Poltevine 15.00 per 100 

S. A. Nutt 15.00 per 100 

Thos. Meehan 15.00 per 100 

GERANIUMS, 214-IN. 

Helen Mlchell $0.00 per 100, $50.00 per 1000 

Beaute Poltevine 6.00 per 100, 50.00 perlOOO 

S. A. Nutt 4.00 per 100, 35.00 per lOOO 

The above are nil good, strong stock. 

Boxes and packing free. 

EVENDEN BROS. CO., WILLIAMSPORT, PA. 

THE NEW GERANIUM. 

Per doz. Per 100 

Mrs. Richard Gloede, 4-iii « 6.00 | 40.00 

Mrs. Richard Gloede, 2H-in... 3.00 20.00 

Mrs. Richard Gloede, 214-iD., 1180.00 per lOOO; 
S. A. Nutt, 4-in., $16.00 per 100, $135.00 per 
1000; Helen MicheU, 4-in., $15.00 per 100, $135.00 
per 1000; Poltevine, 4-iii., $16.00 per 100, $140.00 
per 1000. 

UNITED STATES CUT FLOWBB CO., 
Elm ira, N. Y. 

CALIFORNIA SUNSHINE 
GERANIUMS, ROOTED CUTTINGS. 
Rleard, Toiteviue, Hill, David and Fiat, $3.75 
per 100, $25.00 i)er 1000. 

Crarapel, Grant, S. A. Nutt. Jacquerie, Oberle, 
Pabun, Jean Violette, Liwrence, ilartman, Sal- 
leroi and Rose Gerauium, $2.50 per 100, $20.00 
per 1000. Cash witli order. 

LOS ANGELES GERANIUM CO., 
Sawtelle P. 0., I/is Ang elea, Cnl. 

GERANIUMS. HOOTED CLTTIN U S . 
liny now; make sure of getting wliat you want 
by buying at least part of .voiir stock riybt now. 
June and July are safe months to stock up, 
after that, the demand often exceeds the supply 
and disapi>ointmeiit is tlie result. 

Nutt and liuchner $20.00 per 1000 

Ricard and Toitevine 30.00 per 1000 

ALBERT M. IlEKU, 
R. F. D. N o . 8, I..nncaster, Pa. 

GERANIUMS. 
S. A. Nutt, Buchner, 
Viaud and Montmort, 
from 2-ln. pots, $3 50 per 100, 
$35.00 per 1000. 
Ricard and I'oitevine ready soon 
at the same price. 
ELMER RAWLIXGS, 
Wholesale Grower, Allegany, N. T. 

~ GERANIUMS, ROOTED CUTTINGS. 

IMMEDIATE DELIVERY. 
Grant, S. A. Nutt, Scarlet Redder, Buchner, 
Oberle. Jacquerie, Doyle, Salleroi and Ivies in 
double pink, red and lavender, $2..")0 per 100, 
$20.00 per 1000. Cash. We are booking now 
for all other commercial varieties, June de- 
livery. 

THERESEAN ^JjANT CO., GARDENA. CAL. 
GERANIUMS, 3% AND 4-IN., FOR liUDDINCi. 

S. A. Xiitt ?S. 00 and $10.00 iior 100 

Jean Viaud 8.00 and 10.00 per 100 

Good Mixture 8.00 jier lOO 

Not in bloom. Cash with order. 

GREENAVOOD AVENUE GREENHOUSES, 

Decatur, 111. 

Geranium Mme. Salleroi, strong 3-in.. $8.00 
per 100. Cash. 

Riverside Greenhouses, Appleton, Wis. 



GERANIUMS. 

Booted cuttings ready for shipment. 

S. A. Nutt, $26.00 per 1000. 

Ricard, Poltevine, Scarlet Redder and Anna 

Brown, $30.00 per 1000. 

Cash with order. 

PETER BROWN, LANCASTER. PA. 

GERANIUMS, STRONG, THRIFTY STOCK. 

S. A. Nutt, 2U-in $3.00 per 100 

S. A. Nutt, 3-in 6.00 per 100 

Jean Viaud, 3-in 6.50 per 100 

Castellane, 3-in «!.50 per 100 

PLAIN CITY GREENHOUSES, PLAIN CITY, 0. 

GERANIUMS, STRONG, WELL-BRANCHED. 

In bud and bloom, S. A. Nutt and Buchner, 
4-in., $15.00 per 100; Ricard, 4-in., $10.50 per 
100. 

WINFIELD S. KIRCHER. 
Cyclamen Specialist, Defiance, . 

ALBUM OF DESIGNS. 

Seventh Edition. 

Better than ever before. 

$1.25 per copy, postpaid. 

$12.00 per doz., postpaid. 

FloristH' Pub. Co., Caxton Bldg., Ohlcago. 

Geraniums, S. A. Nutt, Appleblossom, Mme. 
Buchner and Improved Poitevlne, strong rooted 
cuttings, $2.50 per 100; 2V4-ln. ready to shift, 
$4.00 per 100; Mme. Salleroi, rooted cuttings, 
$2.00 per 100. 
Otto P. Krueger, 427 Bast Broadway, Toledo, O. 

GERANIUM S. A. NUTT. ' 
Healthy stock plants, 4-in., $10.00 per 100, 
$150.00 per 1000. Cash with order. 

N. K. WELTER, 
708 Wesley Ave., Evanston, III. 

Geraniums, mixed, mostiv Ricard, strong 3-ln., 
$7.00 per 100; Ruby, Poitevlne and Ricard, 
strong 2-in., $4.50 per 100, $40.00 per 1000; Ivy 
(Jeranium Rycroft's Surprise, pink, 2-ln., $3.50 
per 100. Cash. Jacobs Bros., Peoria, III. 

Geraniums, fine, bushy plants, in bud and 
bloom, Poltevine and Hicard, 4 in., $10.00 per 
100; S. A. Nutt, $15.00 i>er 100; S. A. Nutt. 
3-in., $8.00 per 100; mixed, all good kinds, $7.50 
per 100. Calla Cut Flower Co., Calla, O . 

Geraniums. Poltevine, Ricard and Nutt, 4-in., 
$15,00 per 100; stocky plants, in bud and bloom, 
3 in. ready for 4-in. I'oitevine and Nutt, $8.00 
per 100. While they last. 
Chas. Whltton, York and Gray Ave., Utiea, N. Y. 

Geraniums, S. A. Nutt. Perkins, Viaud, Polte- 
vine and mixed. 4-ln., 15c; 3-in., 8c; most of 
them in bud and bloom. 2'/4-ln., 4c; Rose-scented 
and Ivy-leaved, 4c. Cash. 

G. E. Rer thold, Nebraska City, Neb. 

GERANIUM RICARD. 

Very good 4-in. Ricard after Decoration day. 
15c. The best you ever bought for bedding or 
planting out for cuttings. Cash. 

R. n. WORKMAN. LOUDONYILLE, O. 

GERANIUMS, EXTRA VALUE. ' 

S. A. Nutt, 2V4-ln $ 4.00 per 100 

S. A. Nutt, 3-in 7.00 per 100 

S. A. Nutt, 4-in 15.00 per 100 

CHARLES SHEJtWOOD, WATERLOO, lA. 

Geraniums. Snow Queen and I^a Favorite, rooted 
cuttings. $2.50 per 100; 2V2-ln., $5.00 per 100; 
3 in., $8.00 per 100; any variety, 4-in., $15.00 per 
100. Cash or c. o. d. 
W. JE.Trimble Greenhouse Co., Princeton. III. 

Geraniums, Nutt and Buchner, 4^in~^15y0O 
per 100; Ricard and Poitevlne, 4-ln., $16.00 per 
100. These are heavy plants full of bud and 
bloom. Packed In clay or paper pots. Cash. 
Tarentn m Greenhouses. T!irentun\, Pa. 

Geraniums, 500 strong 2V4-ln., want a shift 
at once, about one-half S. A. Nutt, balance 
Poltevine, Ricard, Presllly, Barney and White. 
$20.00 cash for the lot. 
Richard A. Irvine, Bay City, Mich. 

Geraniums, S. A. Nutt, CasteUane, Barney 
and Lemon, in good assortment spread on bench, 
4In., 12V4C, 15c and 20c; 3-ln.. 7c, 8c and 10c; 
according to size, 214-in. and 2Vj-ln., 4%c 
L. J. Rowe, Tttusvllle, Pa. 

Geraniums, strong, well branobcd. Poltevine 
P,-\n., .«S.OO per 100: S. A. Nutt, 3-in., $0.00 per 
lOO. (luaranfeod A No. 1 stock. 
Itrigliam Bros., Howling Green. 0. 

(■"■eraiiiMins. I'oitevine, Ricnrd and S. A. Nutt. 
strong 4-in. ready for 5-in., $17.00 per 100. Wcli 
siiread stock in bud and bloom. 
Chas. Whitton, York and Cray .\ve., Utlca, N. Y. 

Geranium S. A. Nutt. fine stock in bud and 
bloom, 5000 4-in.. $15.00 per 100. Packing free. 
Cash with order. 
Wm. IT. Ford. JIarshnlltown, la. 

Geraniums. Poitevlne. Ricard. H MicheTl 2'/.- 
in., .$0.00 per 100; Marvel. 2Vjin.. $5.00 per 100 

Good -liii., .<l,^i.00 per 100. Cash. 
North Madison Fl.inl Co._, North M.ndison, Ind. 

Coraniums, Ricard and Viaiid^out^f 2^A-\rr 
pots, .«fl.0O per 100. Buchner out of 2';.in pots 
$5.00 per 100. Cnsh with order. - • ■ 
Chas. E. Smith & Son, York, Pa. 

Geranium Salleroi, rooted rilttini.'sr 2c- ''U,.in 
pots ready for 3-in., ."c. Ed. IIcini,"l3o'tli' Sf' 
Mild Western Ave., Ilhie Island, 111. Phone Blue 
Island 577 M. 

Geraniums, S. A. Nutt. 4-ln., ^$20.00 per 100- 
Poitevine Ricard and Viaud, 4-ln., $25,00 per 
100. Cash with order. 
Newton Rose Conservatories, Newtonville, Mass. 

Geranium S. A. Nutt, 2Vj-in., $5.00 per 100- 
3 in., $6.50 per 100, ' ' 

Henderson Floral Co., Pana, 111. 



Geranlunas, S. A. Nutt, Ricard, FoiteTlne, 
Buchner and Presllly, good, clean 4-in, planti. 
in bud and bloom, $16.00 per 100. 
B. A. Plnkstone, Utlca, N. Y. 

Geraniums, red; in bud and bloom, itroni 
plants, 4-iu., $15.00 per 100, $126.00 per 1000 
No charge for packing. Cash with all orders. 
New London Greenhouse, New London, O. 

Geranium S. A. Nutt. extra strong, from 2%- 
in. pots, $3.50 per 100; 3yj-in. pots, $10.00 per 
1 00. Ca sh. A. Milne & Sons, Falrbury, 111. 

Geraniums, Nutt, Poitevine and Ricard, 2%- 
in., 8c; 3-in., 12c; 4-in., 15c. Cash, please. 

P. Hopman, New Galilee, Pa. 

Geranium Mme. Salleroi, good stock, ready to 
shift, 2-in., $5.00 per 100. Cash. 

Carl Erickson, Princeton, 111, 

Geraniums, Poitevine, Viaud, S. A. Nutt, 
Oberle and mixed, strong, bushy plants, 4-in., 
15c each. S. E. Muntz, Dubuque, la. 

Geranium S. A. Nutt, 1000 3-in., $5.00 per 100. 
Cash, please. 
Mllford G reenhouse, Milford, 111. 

Geranium S. A. Nutt, in bud and bloom, 4-in., 
$15.00 per 100; 2Vi-in., $4.00 per 100. 

Savanna Greenhouses, Savanna, 111. 

Geranium S. A. Nutt, Double White and Pink, 
in bud, SMi-iu., $10.00 per 100; 4-in., $12.00 per 
100. Samuel Whitton, Utica, N. Y. 

Geranium S, A. Nutt, 4-in., 18c each. Cash 
with order. 
H. W. Allersma, G rand Rapids, Mich. 

Geraniums, S. A. Nutt and Jean Viaud, 3 to 4 
branches, strong 4-in., $12.00 per 100. Cash. 
Huscroft's Flower Shop, Steubenville, 0. 

Rose Geranium, skeleton-leaved, 4-in., ready 
for shift, 18e each. 
W. B. Shumway Floral Co., Tiffin, 0. 

Geraniums, S. A. Nutt, $16.00 per 100; Single 
Red, $15.00 per 100. 

Nick Reding. (i731 Ridge Blvd., Chicago, 111. 
Geraniums in bud and bloom, Poiteviue and 
Jean Viaud, 3-in., 8c; S. A. Nutt, 3-in., 6c. 

The East Lawn Gardens, Urbana, O. 

Geraniums, 500 S. A. Nutt and 150 Oberle, 
4-ln., $15.00 per 100. 

Albert Loeffler & Son, Watertown, Wis. 

Geranium S. A. Nutt, A No. 1 stock, $15.00 
per 100. 

Anderson Greenhouse, Cannon F alls, Minn. 

Geranium S. A. Nutt, strong, bushy plants in 
bud and bloom, 4-in., $15.00 per 100. 

Storm Lake Floral Co.. Storm Lake, la. 

Geranium Mme. Salleroi, strong 2-in., $4.00 
per 100. Cash. No charge for packing. 

Fisher's Greenhouse, Vinton, la. 

Geraniums, a few hundred mixed Ricard and 
Nutt, 4c; to make room. Cash. 
H. Meyer, Little Rock. Ark. 

Geraniums, Ricard, MicheU and Poitevine, 
4-ln., $15.00 per 100. 

Bigler'B Greenhouses, Camden, N. J. 

Geraniums, S. A. Nutt or mlxe^, 4-lii., $16.00 
per 100, $160.00 per 1000. Cash. 

M. B. Busse, Como Station, St. Paul, Minn. 

Geraniums, mixed, mostly S. A. Nutt, 4-ln., 
$12.00 per 100. Anderson Floral Co., 616 John 
St., Anderson, Ind. 

Geranium 8. A. Nutt, excellent plants, 2-in., 
8c; 3-in., 6c; 4-ln., 15c. 

A. 0. Anderson, Columbus, Neb. 

Geranium S. A. Nutt, 2^-in., $46.00 per 1000. 
Emil Rleple, care Rochester Greenhouse Co., 
Ro chester, Minn. 

Geraniums, Poitevlne and Bicard, rooted cut- 
tings, $3.76 per 100, prepaid. Cash. Boyston & 
Fenton, R. A., Box 683, Bva nsvUle, Ind. 

Geranium S. A. Nutt, rooted cuttings, $1.25 
per 100. Casli. B. Scheller, Warren, Pa. 

Geranium S. A. Nutt in bud and bloom, 4-in., 
$15.00 per 100. Pana Greenhouses, Pana, III. 

Geranium S, A. Nutt, 2-in., $4.00 per 100, 
$35.00 per 1000. J. L. Johnson, De Kalb, HI. 

GLADIOLI 

GLADIOLUS BULBS. 
Fine, clean, healthy stock. 

1% to 2 In. lUtolW-ln. 
100 1000 100 1000 

America $.... $ $1.80 $16.00 

Halley 3.75 35.00 2.00 18.00 

Panama 4.00 35.00 

Pendleton B.OO 45.00 3.76 85.00 

PrimuUnus Hybrids.. 2.75 25.00 .... 

A. HENDERSON & CO., 
168 N. Wabash Ave.. Chicago. 111. 

SPECLVL OFFER, PLANTING STOCK. 
Exhibition Mixture of 3,000,000; $2.00 per 
1000, 10,000 for $17.50; pk. of bulblets, $3.00; 
bushel, $10.00. Halley and America, planting 
stock, $2.60 per 1000. Cash with order or satis- 
factory references. 

THOMAS COGGER, MELROSE, MASS. 

■ GLADIOLUS BULBLETS. 

Princeplne, 12 qts., $10.00; War, 4 qts., $10.00; 
Taconic, 2Vj qts., $2.00; Panama, 2 qts., $3.00; 
America, 10 (jts., $5.tK): good, mixed, 28 qts., 
$10.00. The whole lot, $25.00. 

Cash with order. 

EDGAR P. WALTZ. 

Eastbrook Farm, Tallmadge, 0. 



Junk 1, 1922 



The Florists^ Review 



137 



OliADIOLI TRUB TO NAME. 

10 per cent discount on list except America, 
Mrs. Francis King, Buron Hulot, Schwaben, 
War, Pendleton which are net. 

America, No. 1 $18.00 per 1000 

America, No. 2 15.00 per 1000 

Mri. Francis King, No. 1 21.00 per 1000 

Baron Hulot, No. 1 65.00 per 1000 

Baron Hulot, No. 2 65.00 per 1000 

Prince of Wales, No. 1 60.00 per 1000 

Prince of Wales, No. 2 60.00 per 1000 

Prince of Wales, No. 3 40.00 per 1000 

Bertrex, No. 1 80.00 per 1000 

Bertrex, No. 2 70.00 per 1000 

Wllbrink, No. 1 60.00 per 1000 

Pink Perfection, No. 2 48.00 per 1000 

Gretchen Zang, No. 2 40.00 per 1000 

Gretchen Zang, No. 3 36.00 per 1000 

Gretchen Zang, No. 4 32.00 per 1000 

Gretchen Zang, No. 6 27.00 per 1000 

Gretchen Zan«, No. 6 22.00 per 1000 

Halley, No. 1 26.00 per 1000 

Halley, No. 2 20.00 per 1000 

Schwaben, No. 1 40.00 per lOOO 

Niagara, No. 1 33.00 per lOOO 

Niagara, No. 2 29.00 per lOOO 

Niagara, No. 3 24.00 per lOOO 

Panama, No. 1 35.00 per 1000 

Panama, No. 2 30.00 per lOOO 

War, No. 2 40.00 per lOOO 

Peace, No. 1 35.00 per lOOO 

Peace. No. 2 30.00 per lOOO 

Mrs. Watt, No. 1 38.00 per 1000 

Mrs. Watt, No. 2 30.00 per 1000 

Flora, No. 1 26.00 per 100 

Crimson Glow, No. 1 28.00 per 100 

Empress «f India , No. 2 30.00 per 1000 

Goliath, No. 2 40.00 per 1000 

Herada, No. 1 70.00 per 1000 

Herada, No. 3 50.00 per 1000 

Louise, No. 1 38.00 per 100 

Lllywhlte, No. 1 100.00 per 1000 

Mary Fennell, No. 2 65.00 per 1000 

Sulphur King, No. 2 8.00 per 100 

Mrs. Dr. Norton, No. 1 38.00 per 100 

Mrs. Dr. Norton, No. 5 83.00 per 1000 

Mrs. Dr. Norton, No. 6 48.00 per 1000 

The Pearl, No. 1, new pink 4.'). 00 per 1000 

The Pearl, No. 2 35.00 per 1000 

Myrtle, No. 2 60.00 per lOOO 

Faust, No. 1, large red 4.00 per 100 

Exhibition Mixed, No. 1 22.00 per 1000 

Exhibition Mixed, No. 2 17.00 per 1000 

250 bulbs at 1000 rates; less lots, lec per 100 
higher. Good stock. Cash, please. 

PERgY GARDENS, RAVENNA, 0. 
LATE CUT FLOWERS PAY. 

This offer Is good only until June 10. Order 
now and be sure of getting what you want. 

1% to 
Per 1000. 1%-ln. 1%-In. up 

-^merica, lavender-pink $15.00 $18.00 

impress of India, maroon 32.00 40.00 

Bailey, salmon pink 30.00 

Mka. F. King, salmon red 24.00 

Niagara, delicate cream 32.00 

Panama, fine pale pink 28.00 35.00 

Prince of Wales, early salmon... 48.00 

Schwaben. best yellow 36.00 45.00 

All good mixed, 1 to l>4-ln., $12.00; IM to 

IH-ln., $15.00 per 1000. 

100 or 250 bulbs at 1000 rate. Cash or c. o. d. 

F. o. b. West Grove, Pa. 

BULBLETS PREPAID. 

r_, 1.000 5,000 10,000 

America $0.50 $ 2.00 $ 3.50 

Autumn Queen 1.00 4.00 7.00 

Empress of India 50 2.00 3.50 

Hallev 50 2.00 3.50 

Mrs. F. King 50 2.00 3.50 

Niagara 1.50 6.00 10.00 

Panama 50 2.00 3.50 

Prince of Wales 3.00 15.00 28.00 

Schwaben 1.00 4.00 7.00 

War 1.00 4.00 7.00 

Willy Wigman 7."> 3.00 5.00 

Yellow Hammer 1.50 6.00 10.00 

All good mixed 50 2.00 3.50 

Culturnl directions with each order. 

W. P. LONG, BOX F.. WEST GROVE, PA. 
Wholesale grower of Gladioli. 

~ SPECIAL OFFER OF GLADIOLI. 

Second and third sizes for late planting. These 
bulbs will all give good flowers, if planted for 
late blooms, which are often more profitable 
than those planted early. 
Approximately Per lOOO 

25,000 America, 1% to 1%-ln $15.00 

50,000 America, 1 to IH-in 10. OO 

60,000 America, % to 1-ln 7.50 

15,000 Peace, 1% to 1%-in 30.00 

20.000 Pence, 1 to H4-ln 25.00 

25,000 Peace, % to 1-in 20.00 

15,000 Schwaben, 1 to H4-ln 30.00 

15,000 Schwaben, % to 1-in 20.00 

10,000 Pendleton, 1 to H4-in 3.J.0O 

10,000 Priraulinus Hybrids, 1 to 1%-in 15.00 

20.000 Prlmulinus Hybrids, % to 1-in 10.00 

2,000 Pink Perfection, 1% to l^-in 45.00 

1,000 Yellow Hammer, IW to m-in 35.00 

N. LEON WI.NTZEK, 

G ladiolus Growe r, West Grove, ^Pn. 

CLOSING OT'T THE FOLLOWING vTiUETTeS: 

1000 Srhwabon, No. 2 .$20 00 per 1000 

1000 Schwaben. No. 3 15.00 per 1000 

l;;00 Rf■h^vallell, No. 5 10.00 por 10(¥) 

lOOO Pendleton, Va to tVi in 1.").00 por 1000 

1000 Gretclicn Zanjr, V. to l",-in. l.-).00 per 10(tO 
1000 Prince of Wales, '4 to I'/j-in. 15.00 por 1000 

1000 Immiiciilce, 'A to I'l-iii 1.").00 iicr 1000 

The first check for ttic lot will Kct liulblets 
of the al)oye varieties free, 

II. R. MACK, ROCKY R IVE R , 0. 

Gladiolus America, 2nd size. $14.00 per 1000; 
bulblets, 00c per qt., postpaid; pk., $3.00; bu., 
$10.00. J. L. Johnson, De Kalb. 111. 



GLADIOLI, ODD LOTS. LAST CALL. CASH. 

260 Schwaben, % to 1%-in. lot $5.00 

200 Prince of Wales, 1V4 to 2-ln 7.00 

6 Golden Measure, 1% to 2-ln 6.00 

100 Angola, (P-H) No. 3 4.00 

60 Myrtle, 1 to 1%-in 2.25 

60 Niagara, 1^ to 2-in 1.50 

40 Cliateau Thierry, 1% to 2-in 2.00 

100 Mary Fennel, % to lV4-iti 3.50 

3 Maine, 1 to 1%-ln 2.00 

60 Gretchen Zang, 1% to 2-in 2.00 

16 White Giant, No. 2 2.00 

21 Majestic, No. 2 2.50 

15 Nora, 1 to 1%-in 2.50 

100 Yellow Hammnr, % to IMi-in 2.00 

100 Mrs. Dr, Norton, No. 6 5.00 

23 Crimson Glow, 1 to 2-in 2.00 

11 Rev. Ewbiink, 1 to 2-in 2.00 

F. C. HORNBERGER, HAMBURG, N. Y. 

GLADIOLUS BULBLETS, POSTPAID. 

Fine, clean stock, free from dirt and absolutelT 
true to name. 

America, Augusta, Brenchleyensls, Crackerjack, 
Halley, Independence, Mrs. Francis King, Pan- 
ama, Princepine, Scarsdale and Wlntzer's Gen- 
eral Mixture, 60c per 1000, $2.00 per 6000 of a 
kind; $8.60 per 10,000 of a kind. 

Niagara, Peace, Schwaben, War, $1.00 per 
1000, $4.75 for 6000 of • kind; $9.00 for 10,000 
of a kind. 

N. LEON WINTZBR. 
Gladiolna Grower, West Qrore, Pa. 

AMERICA, CHEAP ONLY IN PRICE. 

25,000 1^-ln. and np $18.00 per 1000 

16,000 1% to 1%-ln 14.00 per 1000 

20,000 % to %-in 6.00 per 1000 

60,000 % to %-ln 8.00 per 1000 

FAIRY (MRS. JAMBS LANOASHIRB). 
Exquisite cream color shading to salmon-pink; 
two weeks earlier tlian America, IV^ to 2H-in., 
$25.00; 1V4 to 1%-ln., $20.00 per 1000. 260 of 
either kind at 1000 rate. 10 per cent for casta 
with order. 

B. E. STE WART. BROOKL YN. MICH. 

GLADIOLUS BULBS. 
Good, healthy and clean stock; true to name. 
AMERICA. 
1200 No. 2; 2760 No. 3; 9000 No, 4. 
MRS. FRANCIS KING. 
1235 No. 1; 375 No. 2; 1790 No. 3; 6700 No. 4. 
Mrs. Francis King bulblets, 28 qts.; mixed, 
14 qts. 

I have planted all my ground; no place to 
plant the rest. Net cash $160.00 takes the lot. 
Make an offer. Terms: F. o. b. here, c. o. d, 
C. S. BARTLETT. ALEDO. ILL. 

GLADIOLI. 
Fine plump bulbs for late planting. 

1000 3000 

Schwaben, IV- to 2-in ..$40.00 $00.00 

Schwaben. 1 to IVl-ln 20.00 ,50.00 

Peace, 1% to 2-in .SO.OO 80.00 

Peace, 1 to 1%-iu 20.00 .50.00 

America, 1 to 1%-in 10.00 25.00 

Less than 250, add 50c per 100 to above prices. 
W. E. KIRCHHOFF, JR., ALBI ON, N. Y . 

THE BEST FLORISTS' VARIETY ON THB 

MARKET. 

MISS HELEN FRANKLIN. 

% to 9i-in., $5.00 per 100, $40.00 per 1000; 

ander %-ln., $3.00 per 100, $25.00 per 1000; 

bulblets, $6.00 per 1000, $20.00 per qt. 

Cash with order or satisfactory references. 

THOMAS COGGER, MELROSE, MASS. 

GLADIOLUS BULBS. 

1% in np lU to IVj-in. 

America $18.00 $14.50 

Mrs. Francis King 22.00 19.00 

Peace .35.00 30.00 

The above is first-class stock. 

No charge for parkiiie. 

HANSEN NURSERY & FLORAL CO.. 

Niles, Mich. 

LAST CALL. GIADI0l7l~VERY FEW LEFT. 
White Olorv, 300 %■%, $0.00 per 100. 
White Glnrv. 1 qt. hulblpts, $1.".00. 
Yonell'a Favorite, % qt. bulblets (3000), 
$15.00. 

Alice Tiplady, 7.500 bulblets, $.30.00. 
10 per cent discount on amounts of $25,00 or 
over. Cash with order. 
, R. M. SANFORD. MADISON. N. J. 

SPECIALS, TO CLEAN UP. 

America, 1-in. to 1%-in $12.00 per 1000 

Mrs. Watt, IVl-ln 27.00 per 1000 

Peace. 1-in 20.00 per 1000 

Primulinus Hybrids, bulblets. $8.00 per bu. 

RALPH BENJAMIN. CALVERTON, N. Y. 

GLOXINIAS 

Gloxinia plants, will make nice blooming stock 
this summer; nice, thrifty 2-ln. ready to shift, 
$1.60 per doz., $10.00 per 100. 
N. O. Cas well, Delavan, 111. 

QREVILLEAS 

Grevlllea Robusfa, averacinn alwut 17 Ins. 
high; good, strong 4-in. ready for 5-in.. 20c. 
W. R. Shiimway F loral Co . , Tiffin. 0. 

Orevillea Robusta, good, strong 4-in. plants 
ready for 6-in., 20c. 
Wagner's Greenhouses. Tiffin. 0. 

~" qiUAVAS ~~ 

strawberry Giinva. out of 4-in. pots, 2 feet 
Iiich, 35c; n feet. .50c. Cash with order. II. C. 
Doescher. 2048 Gontillv Ave, New Orleans. I>t. 

QYPSOPMILAS 

G>-p8ophila Paniculata, strong, field-grown 
plants, $1.00 doz.: .«r>.00, 100. 

Harrj- J. Squires, Good Ground, N. Y. 



HARDY PLANTS 



HARDY PLANTS. 

OOMPLBTB OOLLBOTIONB 

AT BBASONABLB PRICBS 

OFFERED IN OUR 

NEW SPRING CATALOGUE. 

THB BEST AND MOST COMPLBTB 

IN THB COUNTRY. 

WRITB FOB A COPY. 

THB WAYSIDB GARDENS CO., 
MENTOR. 0. 



HARDY PLANTS. 

Per 100 

Dlcentra CucuIIarla $5.00 

Sanguinaria Canadensis 4.00 

Rudbeckia Laciniata 5.00 

Viola Pubescens 4.50 

Lupinus Perennls 5.00 

Tiarella Cardifolla 4.00 

FRED MUNN ETT, CHARLOTTE, VT. 

WELLER NURSERIES COMPANY. INC., 

Perennial specialists. 

Ask for catalogue. 

Holland, Mich. 



Hardy Ferns, Illustrated descriptive list 
maile d. Ludwlg Mosbaek, Ferndale, Askov. Minn. 

HE LI CHRYSUIWIS 

HELICHRYSUM, STRAWFLOWERS. 

Assorted colors. 2%-in. pots, $3.00 per 100, 

$25.00 per 1000. 

ST. LOUIS WHOLESALE CUT FLOWER CO.. 

1406-08 Pine St., St. Louis. Mo. 

Helichrysum, 6 colors; Ammobium, Rhodanthe, 
3 colors; Xeranthemura, 60c per 100. Cash with 
order. F. Meeder, Grand Rapids, Mich. 

HELIOTROPES 

HELIOTROPES, DARK BLUB, FRAGRANT. 

Strong 2%-ln. plants ready to shift, 

$4.00 per 100. 

Cash with order. 

No charge for packing. 

R. S. McMURRAY, BELLEFONTAINB, 0. 

SEASONABLE STOCK NOW READY. 
Heliotropes, Jersey Beauty and Florence Night- 
ingale, good purple, 2%-in., $6.00 per 100, $46.00 
per 1000. 

THB STORRS & HARRISON CO., 
PainesTlUe. O. 

HeliotropoH. Ccntoflcur. IjB Diise and I/irne. 
2Uin., $6,00 per 100, $60.00 per 1000. Good, 
dark blue; rooted cuttings, $2.00 per 100, $16.00 
per 1000. . „ . 

8. S. Skidelsky ft Co., 53 Park Place, New York. 

Heliotropes, large-flowering, fine stock for im- 
mediate delivery, need the room, 2%-ln., $30.00 
per 1000. Cash with order. 

Ru dolph Irsa, East Hampton, N. Y. 

Heliotropes, lavender; rooted cuttings, $1.60 
per 100; 2U-in., $4.00 per 100; 3-in., 8c each. 
Cash or c. o. d. 
W. B. Trimble Greenhouse Co., Princeton, 111. 

"~ HELIOTROPES. 

Nothing but Ccntefieur, the best variety, 2-ln., 
$6.00 per 100. 

C. L. HUMPHREY, ZANKSVILLE , 0. 

HELIOTROPES, VERY CHEAP. 

Rooted cuttings, $1.00 per 100; 2U-in., $3.00. 

GULLETT & SONS, LINCOLN, ILL. 

HELIOTROPES. 
Strong 4-in., well hmnched, $15.00 per 100. 
M. E. SOURDRY, GIRARD, KAN. 

Heliotropes, strong 3-in., 6%c. 

L. J. Rowe, Titnsville, Pa. 

Heliotropes in bloom. 4-in., $15.00 per 100. 
Anoka Floral Co., Anoka, Minn. 

Heliotropes, 2U-in., $3.00 per lOoi 3-in., 
$4.00 per 100. Freeport Floral Co., Freeport, 111. 

HIBISCUS 

Hibiscus, PeachWow, Snh-Violaceus and Rubra, 
.3 best doutile varieties; bushy, 24 to 30 ins. high, 
5-in. pots, fiOc. Cash with order. H. C. Doescher, 
2048 Gentilly Ave., New Orleans. I^n. 

Hibiscus. Oinnt Mallow Marvels, strong, field- 
grown plants, $1.00. doz.: $6.00, 100. 

Harry ,T, ,'!(iuires. Good Ground, N. Y. 

Hibiscus, Peachbiow, Rubra, Miniatus and 
Versicolor, 2%-in., $5.00 per 100. 
Oak Grove Greenhouse. Tnskegee, Al«. 

HYDRANOEAS 

FRENCH HYDRANGEAS. 

Strong 2-ln. Pot Plant Produced by a Specialist. 

This is a grand opportunity to secure the 
better varieties of tliis valuable plant to grow 
on. Early orders desirable. Superior packing. 
Prompt shipment. 

Per 100 Per lOOO 
Baby Bimhenet, early dwarf pink, 

very fine $ 8,00 $70,00 

Domotoi, sensational new doul)le 

pink 25.00 

Souv. de Mme. E. Chautard, early, 

vigorous, clear pink 7.00 65,00 

Etincelant, clear carmine 10.00 90.00 

AMERICAN BULB CO.. 
172 No. Wabssh Ave., Chicago. 111. 

Hydraneeas. strong 2i/i-in. best French varie- 
ties and Otaksn. $7.00 per 100. $05.00 per 1000. 
S. S. Skidelsky & Co., 53 Park Place, New York. 



138 



The Rorists^ Review 



JuNB 1. 1922 



HYDRANQEAS-Continued 



CLEARANCE SALE. 

Newer sorts Frcncli IlydranBeas, 4-ln., $15.00 
per 100. 

FINE PLANTS. 
175 Satlnette, ir.O Etincelant. 

270 Tropliee, 250 Uuby Ulmbenet, 

CLEARANCE SALE. 

New French Ilyilrangeas, fine plants, 4 in., 
$10.00 per 100. 



200 Avalanche, 
70 Lille MonlUere, 
110 Jm Lorraine, 

75 Mme. A. Nonin, 

76 Pres. Fallieres. 
40 Cen. de Vibraye, 



140 L'IslPtte. 
100 La France, - 
3,"i0 Mme. E. MonlUere, 
;iL'.") Soiiv. Mme. B. 
Chaiitard. 



CLEARANCE SALE. 

250 Hydra nj.'c.i Ot.iksa. the old slandhv, 4-ln., 
$10.00 per 100. 

THE GOOD & KEESE CO.. 
Department A. Sprinufleld, 0. 



FRENCH VARIETIES AND OTAKSA. 
2%-ln. pots. $7.50 per 100, $05.00 per 1000. 
Ready now and later. 
Otaksa, 3-ln. pots, $12.50; 4-ln. pots. $22.60 
per 100; 5-ln. pots, $45.00 per 100. 

Avalanche. Gen. de Vibraye, E. O. Hill, Mme. 
Moulllere, Bouquet Rose, Otaksa, Lille Mouillere, 
Mme. Chautard, Radiant, Mousseline and otbera. 
Ask for list. 

NEWER VARIETIES. 

Baby BImbenet $10.00 per lOO 

Satinette and Etincelant 12.00 per 100 

ROMAN J. IRWIN, 
43 W. 18th St. , New York, N. Y. 

ARP.ORESCENS GRANDIFLORA ALBA. 
Hydrangeas for lining out and growing on, 
2H-ln. pots, $5.00 per 100. .$45.00 per 1000. 
Not less than 6 of any variety of plants supplied 
in our wholesale department: under 25 of a va- 
riety are billed at doz. rate; 25 and over at 
100 rate. 

THE GOOD & REESE CO., 

The largest Rose growers in the World. 
D epartment A. Springfield, 0. 

HYDRANGEAS. 

Good French varieties, 

2H-ln., $0.60 per 100, $60.00 per 1000. 

4-in., $20.00 per 100. 

THE STORRS ft HARRISON CO., 
Palnesvllle, O. 

FLOWERING FRENCH HYDRANGEAS. 
Plants having from 3 to 10 blooms, 60c to 
$1.60 each, also few large $2.00 plants. 

Please state for what date plants are wanted. 
Cash with order. 
COLLE BROS, SUMMIT, N. J. 

10.000 HYDRANGEAS. 

French and Otaksa, 

2Vj-in. pots, $7.00 per 100, $65,00 per lOOO. 

BOITRDET FLORAL CO.. 

Magnolia and Tower Grove Aves,, St. I»u1b, Mo. 

Hydr.ingp.'is: In all shades of i)inks.an(l blncsr. 

from 4 ti) 10 blooms per plant, 15c per bloom: all 

extra line. Cash with order, H. C. Doeschcr 

2048 Gentilly Ave,. New Orleans. r.a. 

Hydrangea Otaksa, 4-in. In bloom, 40c and 45c: 
larger plants, 35c a bloom; budded only 25c a 
bud. Cash. 
Port Allegany Greenhouses. Por t Allegany, Pn. 

HYDRANGEAS, FRENCH AND OTAKSA 

Rooted cuttings, $3..'>0 per 100 

THE LINDSAY CO.. 

University Ave., Minneapolis. Minn . 

French Hydrangea, 2K'-ln., $6,50 per 100, 
George Bros, & Co,. New Kensington, Pa. 



Hydrangeas, mixed, 2>4-ln., 4Wjc; 4-in,, 17%c 
L. J. Rowe. Tltusvllle. Pa. 



IMPATIENS 

Impatlens Siiltanl. orange red, deep pink white 
and violet-rose; rooted cuttings, $1.60 per 100- 
2V4-ln,. $4,00 per 100, ^ "' 
Oak Qrove G reenhouse. Tuskegee, Ala. 

I M p ATI ens" sri/F.vNi 

Pink and fartiiinc, 2ii-iu. full bloom. 5p 
GITLLETT & SONS. UNCOLN, ILL. 



Impatlens Sulfanl, out of 2%-in. pots $6 00 
Pllo^o*^- '^"K^ shipment. J. C. BIgelow & Son, 
1642 Sunset Ave., Utlca, N. Y. 



IRISEii 



IRISES. 
Barrensis. Xcstor, Sans Sourl, Sibiricn Orient- 
alls, Caiiary-Binl. Lord (Jrey, .'i;4 00 pir 100 
Dorothc.i. KLivi'siin^i, ,\Iuir CluMfnu Koval 

r.',"^'^^"'''''"'- '^''" "^^■■'■t'T «'"tt. Florentinn. 
Lilac Queen. The P.ridr. .«.-. 00 per 100 

Perfection, Korbii, .$0 00 per 100. 

Eldorado, Pallida Dalnjatica. Ccrlrude $8 00 
per 100. ' ■ 

500 named kinds, L'O varieties, our selection 
$15.00. Cash. 

HAURY l-R.VNKLIN BAKER 
1118 W. I,jike St., Minneapolis, Min n. 

IRISES, STANDARD AND RARE SORTS 

Prices right. Send for list. 

W. J. ENGLE & SON, R. R. 8, DAYTON, O. 



Iris collections: 20 varieties, $3.00; 80 varie- 
ties. Including a $1.00 sort, $5.00; 40 varieties, 
including two $1.00 sorts and ten or more worth 
nOe to $1.00 each, for $7.50. All are labeled. 
Sent postpaid. 

C. E. Iloudyshel, La Verne, Cal. 

IVI BS 

ENGLISH IVY. 

Per 100 Per 1000 

2>A-in. pots $6.00 $60.00 

4-in. pots 25.00 

4-ln. pots, heavy plants, long 

vines 30.00 

PARLOR ivy. 

Per 100 Per 1000 

Rooted cuttings $1.75 $14.00 

2>,4-in. pots 6.00 46.00 

ROMAN J. IRWIN, 
43 West 18th St., New Yorlt. N. Y. 

HARDY ENGLISH IVY. 
Strong well-rooted cuttings, $2.00 per 100, 
$16.00 per 1000; 2^-in., $6.00 per 100, $60.00 
per 1000. 

S. S. SKIDELSKY & CO.. 
.53 Park Place, New York, N. Y. 

Special offer: Allegheny Vine, or Improved 
English Ivy, 2^S-in., $1.00 per doz., $7.00 per 
100. 

English Ivy, strong 2K-in., $4.00 per 100; 
3-in., $7.00 per 100. 

Oak Grove Greenhouse, Tuskegee, Ala. 

Ivies, Hardy English, rooted cuttings, $2.00 
per 100; 2Vi-in., $5.00 per 100; German or Parlor 
Ivy, rooted cuttings, $1.50 per 100; 2U-in., $4.00 
per 100. Cash or c. o. d. 
W. E. Trimble Greenhouse Co., Princeton, 111. 

~~~~~ ENGLISH IVY. 

2-in. pot plants, $3.60 per 100, $30.00 per lUOO; 
heavy and strong 4-in., 2 ft., 3 to 6 branches, 
$20.00 per 100. Cash. No packing charge. 
THE IM LAY CO.^ ZANBSVILLB. 0. 

OERMAN IVY. 

Strong 2^-in. plants ready to shift, 

$4.00 per 100. Cash with order. 

No charge for packing. 

R. 8. McMURRAY, BELLEFONTAINB. O. 

ENGLISH AND GERMAN IVY. 

German Ivy. rooted cuttings, Ic; 2Vi-in., 3c; 

ii\n.. Oc.: English Ivv. 2U-ln., 5c. 

GULLET T & .SONS, LINCOL N, ILL. 

ALBUM OF DESIGNS. 

Seventh Edition. 

$1.25 per copy, postpaid. 

Florists' Pub. Co., Caiton BIdg., Chicago. 

English I^-}', 2-in. pots. .$3.50 per 100, $30.00 
per 1000. Cash. 
C. L. Hump hrey, Zanesville, O. 

German Ivy, 2', in., $4,00 per 100, 300 for 
$10,00, Chas, Whitton, York St, and Gray Ave., 
Utica, N. Y. • 

Parlor Ivy, rooted cuttings, $2.00; 2^-in., 
$4.00; extra strong 3-in., $6.00 per 100. 

W. B. Shumwny Floral Co.. Tiffin, O. 

OERMAN IVY, 
Good plants, 2V4-in., $4.00 per 100. Cash, please. 
H. S. BRANDT, YORK, PA. 

German Ivy, bushy 2%-in., $3.00 per 100, 
$25,00 per 1000. 

Wm. F. Krueger, Box 102, Sta. A, Toledo, 0. 

English Ivy, field-grown, long vines, from 3! 
3V, and 4-ln. pots, $20.00, $30.00 and $40.00 per 
100^^ Ha rry Hel nl. West Toledo, O. 

English Ivy, rooted cuttings, $2.00 per 100, 
$18.00 per 1000. Cash with order. Los Angeles 
Ger anium Co., Sawtelle P. 0., Los Angeles, Cal. 

German Ivy, rooted cuttings, $1.25 per~100; 
strong 2-in., $2.60 per 100. Otto P. Krueger, 
427 East Broadway. Toledo. 0. 

English Ivy, strong cuttings from soil, $3.00 
per 100, $26.00 per 1000. 
J. L. Johnson, De Kalb, III. 

Parlor Ivy, rooted cuttings, $2.00 per 100, 
prepaid, 2%-in., $4.00 per 100; good stock. 
Royston <t Fenton, Byansville, Ind. 

English ivy, strong rooted cuttingT from soil, 
12.00 per 100, postpaid. 
C has. Frost. Kenllworth. N. J. 

Parlor Ivy. good, clean stock, 2%-in., $3.60 
per 100, $30,00 per 1000. 
A lexand e r Shreve, B elvidere, N. J. 

German Ivy, nice plants. S-iiT.. (\c. Cash, 
Iib'nse, P, ITopman. New Galilee, Pa. 

English Ivy, fine 2%-ln., $6.00 per lOOT ' 

Tsooh BchnU. 8 31 Cherokee jd.. Loaisrllle. Ky 

German Ivy, very fine 2V4-ln.,^c^ 
Hammerschmldt Sc Clark. Medina. 0. 

English Ivy, 2%-in., $6.00; 4-in., $12.60 per 
100. Cash. Jos. M. Smely, Aurora, III. 

German Ivy, 2-In., $4.00 per 100, $38.00 per 
1000. Edward W, Schuster, Crookston, Minn. 

English Ivy, out of 3%-in. pots, $]6!00 per 100. 
J. 0. BIgelow A Son, Utlca, N. Y 

T^ZZ^ JASMINES 

JASMINES. FRAGRANT, 
Revolutum, Grandiflnnim, Primnllnns 75c per 

doz., $5.00 per 100. Maid of Orleans, $1.00 per 

doz,, $6,50 per 100, 

THE SCHMIDT * ROTLEY CO , 

Springfield , O, 

Cape Jasmine, 2ii-iii, pots. 8c: Grand Duke 

and Maid of Orleans, out of 3-in. pots. 15c: 4-in , 

20c; 5-in,. 25c. Cash with order, H. C. 

Doesc hcr. 2048 Gentilly Ave., New Orleans, 1*1. 
Jessamine, night-bloonilng. big. 2^4 -In., $5.00 

per 100. Burdell Floral Co., Bowling Green, Ky. 



LAIMTANAS 

WEEPING liANTANAS. 

Nice, large 2^ -in. stock, $5.00 per 100, 

$46.00 per 1000. 

ROSEMONT GARDENS, 

116 Dexter Ave., Montgomery, Ala. 

Weeping Lantanas, 2-ln., $8.00 per 100, $26.00 

ger 1000, 60O at 1000 rate; extra strong, very 
rancby, 2^-in., $6.00 per 100. Louis P. Faulk, 
R. F. D . No . 7, Box 9, Bel2evne,^a. 

LANTANAS, DWARF AND WBHPINQ. 

Best bedders, 214-1D'> 6c each. 

GULLETT & SONS, LINCOLN. ILL. 

Lantanas, five best named varieties, from 2%- 
in. pots, I6.0O per 100, $46.00 per 1000. 

The Geo. H. Mellen Co., Sprlngfleld, O. 

Iiantanaa, best yarieties, Strang 2%-ln. plants, 
$6.00 per 100; 4-in. at 20c; 6-in. at 60c. 
Henry Smith Floral Co., Grand Rapids, Mich. 

Lantanas, Jacob Schulz, Amile, Aurora, Bien- 
eourt and Weeping, 2^-in., $5.00 per 100. 
Oak Qrove Qreenhouse, Tuskegee, Ala, 

LEMONS 

American Wonder Lemon, 86c per doz., $6.00 
per 100, $66.00 per 1000; 4-in. pots, $8.60 per 
4os., $26.00 per 100. 

The Schmidt ft Botley Co.. Springfield. O. 

LILIUMS 

LILIU.M GIGANTEUM. 
In cold storage at Chicago, perfect condition. 

7 to 9 Ins., per case of 300 $60.00 per ease 

8 to 10 Ins., per case of 250 G5.00 per case 

F. UYNVELl) & SONS, 
61 Vesey St., New York, N. Y. 

LILY OF THE VALLEY 

LILY OF THE VALLEY, 
"Supreme" Quality German pips. 

250 for $10.00 

500 for 15.00 

1000 for 28.00 

Case of 2500; per 1000 26.00 

AMERICAN BULB CO., 
172 N. Wabash Ave., Chicago, 111. 

BRUNS' CELEBRATED VALLEY. 
Cold storage pips for you to force. 

1000 pips for $30.00 

500 pips for 16.00 

260 pips for 8.00 

H. N. BRUNS, 
3040 W. Madison St., Chicago, III. 

LOBELIAS^ 

DWARF LOBELIAS, BLUE. 

Good 2-ln., $3,00 per 100. 

WINFIELD S. KIRCHBR, 

Cyclamen Specialist, Defiance, O. 

Lobelia Kathleen Mallard, double, line plants, 
2V^-in., $8.00 per 100; fine sand rooted cut- 
tings, $1.60 per 100. 
Prince's Flower Shop, Iowa City, la. 

Lobelia Kathleen Mallard, dotible, blue; fine 
stock of rooted cuttings readv for 2Vi-ln. pots, 
$1.26 per 100, $10.00 per 1000. 
S. A. Pinkstone, Utica, N. Y. 

I»helias, trailing, full of blooms, 2V4-in,, $4,00 
per 1110, 300 for $10,00. Clias. Whitton, York St. 
and Gray Ave., ITtica. N. Y. 

Lobelia Kathleen Mallard, well-grown, bushy, 
erect, 3-in. readv for 4-in,, $5.00 per 100. 
E. A. Llewellyn, Glean, N . \'. 

I»belias, Speciosa and Crystal Palace, seed- 
lings, 40c per 100, $3,50 per 1000; Speciosa, 
2V41n., 2^^c; 3-ln., 6c. L. J. Rowe, Tltusvllle. Pa. 

Ijohella Double Mallard, in bud and bloom, 
very bushy, 2-in.. 3c; heavy 2Vi-in., 4c each. 
S. W. Pike, St. Charles. 111. 

Ix)bella Crystal Palace, 2V4-ln., fine, bushy 
plants coming into bloom, $4. .50 per 100, $40.00 
per 1000 . O. H. Edwards. La ke Forest, 111. 

liobelias. extra fine bushy plants, 2!4-ln. pots, 
$4. .50 per 100. Packing free. Cash. 
!,« Crosse Floral Co., La Crosse, Wis. 

liOlielias, fine, busily plants in bloom. $5.00 
per 100. Anoka Floral Co., Anoka, Minn. 

Ijobelia Kathleen Mallard, strong 2H-in., $3.00 
per 100. B. B. Morgan Floral Co., Paxto n, III. 

Lobelia Kathleen Mallard, double, 2-ln.. 8c. 
John Nelson Co., Oshkosh, W is. 

MADEIRA VINES I7ZZ 

Madeira vine roots, 2 to 3-tn., 2V>c; 1 to 
I'/j-in., 2c; planting stock, $1.00 per 100. 
S. W. Pike, St. Charles, 111. 

MARIGOLDS 

Marigolds, Legion of Honor and Lilliput, seed- 
lings, 40c per 100, .$3. .50 per lOOO: 2i4-in. In bud 
and bloom, 2140. L. J. Rowe, Tltusville, Pa. 

MESEMBRYANTHEMUMS 
MESBMBRYANTHEMUM, OR ICB PLANT. 
Large-flowering kind; beautiful shade of pink; 
strong plants, 214-ln., $4.00 per 100. 
Cash with order. 
No packing charge. 
R. 8. McMURRAY. BELLEFONTAINB, 0. 

Mesembrvantliemuras, large-flowering pink in 
bud, 3-in., 10c; 2-iu., 4c. Cash, please. 

P. Hopman, New Galilee, Pa. 

Mesembryanthemnms, 2Vj-ln., $4.00 per 100. 
Wm. F. Krueger, Box 102, Sta. A, Toledo, 0. 

Hesembryanthemoms, 2-in., $86.00 per 1000. 
F. H. Parker, Ft. Scott, Kas. 



Junk 1, 1922 



The Florists^ Review 



139 



PINK MESEMBRYANTHEMUMS. 

2i4-i'i- '1 bloom, 3c; rooted cuttlnKB, Ic. 

GULLETT & SONS, LINCOLN, ILL. 

Hesemhryunthemiims, flne plants in bloom. 
8-In., $5.50 per 100, $50.00 per 1000. 

Wm. Stoehe, Marion, Ind. 

MOONVINES 

IPOMOEA NOCTIFI^OKA OK GODFREY 

ASCHMANN'8 

Well-known, pure white Moonvines, 40 years 

on the market, 214-ln.. $6.00 per 100; 4-in., 

■taked, $18.00 per 100. 

Casli with order. Add 5 per cent for packing. 

GODFREY ASCHMANN, 

1010 W. Ontario St., Philadelphia, Pa. 

Moonvines, larRcst white, Festiva Maxima, 
$4.50 per 100, $40.00 per 1000. 

The Schmidt & I5otley Co., Springfield, O. 

WHITE MOONVINES. 

Good, Btronp plants, 2%-in., $5.00 per 100. 

THE KEESER PLANT CO., SPRINGFIEIJ), O. 

White Moonvines, from 2Vt-la. pots, $4.00 per 
100. The Geo. H. Mellen Co., Springfleld, 0. 

MYRTLE 

HARDY CREPE MYRTLE 
For coveriiiK craves, etc., nice clumps. $7.00 
per 100, $60.00 per 1000. 

ROMAN J. IRWIN. 

43 W. 18th St., New York . N. Y. 

Myrtle for cemetery use, 10 to 12 leads to ■ 
bunch, $2.50 per 100, $20.00 per 1000 bunches. 
Herman Scblacbter, St. Bernard, 0. 

Myrtle for graves, 2%-in., $6.00 per 100, 
$50.00 per 1000. Joseph Mlcbal, 5701 8. Kostner 
Ave., Chicago, 111. 

Myrtle, fleld-grown. strong clumps, $4.B0 per 
100, $40.00 per 1000. E. K. Mooney. Madeira. O. 

N I E R EM BERQI AS 

Nlerembergias, 2%-in. pots, $3.00 per 100. 
Ca sh, please. Cloute Bros., Fort Atkinson, Wis. 

NURSERY STOCK 

NURSERY STOCK. 

ONARGA NI'RSERY rOMl'ANY. 

Large wholesale growers of liigli'(|nnlit.v nius- 
ery stock f(ir Horists' Iriide. 

Shade trees, fruit trees, shrubs. Roses and 
perenniiils. Write for rat;il<igue or call at thi' 
nursery iind see our growing stock. 

ONARGA NURSERY COMPA.NY. 
Cultra Bros., Mgrs., Onarga, III. 

Write for wholesale price Hat of nursery stock. 
May wood Nursery Co., Maywood. 111. 

OLEANDERS 

Oleanders, Madonna Qrandlflora, Rose Queen, 
white and pink, $1.00 per doz.. $7.00 per 100, 
$65.00 per 1000. 

The Schmidt & Botley Co., Springfleld. 0. 

OLIVES 

Oleo Fragrans, or Sweet Olive, 5-in. pots. 2 ft. 
high. 90c; 6-in. pots, 3 ft. high. $1.25. All well 
branched. ("asii witli order. H. C. Doeschor, 
2048 Gentilly Ave., New Orleans, Iji. 

ORANQES 

Otahelte Orange, 85c per doz., $6.00 per 100. 
$55.00 per 1000; 4-in., $3.50 per doz.. $25.00 
per 100. 

The Schmidt A Botley Co.. Springfleld. 0. 

OXALIS 

Oxalis Ortlgiesii, golden star shaped flower; 
leaves. 3 lobed, dark olive green; 2%-ln.. 50c 
per doz., $3.50 per 100. 
Oak Grove Greenhouse. Tuskegee, Ala. 

P AL-M S 

PALMS, FINEST LOT IN AMERICA. 

Areea Lutescens, 0-ln. pots, 24 to 30 ins. 

high, 3 in a pot $ 2.00 

Areeii Lutescens. 6-in. pots, 30 to 30 ins. 

high, ;! in a pot 2.50 

Are<a Lutescens. 7-ln. pots, 30 to 48 ins. 

high, 3 in a pot 3.00 

Arpca Lutescens, 8-in. jiots, 48 to 60 Ins. 

high. 3 in a pot 4.00 

Kenlia Belmoreana, 4-in., 60c; 5-in., $1.00; 

0-in 1.50 

Latatiia Borlionii'ii, 3-ln., 25c; 4-ln., 40c; 

5-ln.. COc: 0-in 1.00 

Phoeni.x Reclinata, 6-in., $1.00 7-ln., 

$1.25; 8-in l..'')0 

Phoenix Canariensis, Washingtonia Ro- 

busta, 3-in., 2oc: 4-in., 40c: 5-ln.. 75c; 

0-in., .$1.00; 7-iii.. $1.50; 8-in 2.00 

Corns i'luniosa. 3-in., .'iSc: 4-iu., .')0c; 5-ln., 

7.5c; 7-in.. 6 to 7 ft., $2.00; 8-in., 8 ft. 

high 3.00 

Sabal Blackbumlana, hanliest Pnlni grown, 

2-ln., nc; 21/i-ln., 8c; 3-in., 20c; 4-ln., 

.^!>c: r,-in 50 

Cj-cas Revoluta, or Sago Palm, out of 4. 

5. 6. 7 and 8-in. pots. 2 to 20 leaves to a 

plant, per 100 leaves 10.00 

Ail of the above Palms are full and pot-bound. 
Casli with order. 

H. C. DOESCHER. 
2048 Gentilly Ave., New Orleans, La. 

Palms. Kentla Belmoreana and Forsterlana, 
strong 3-in. pots, $25.00 per 100. 
Louis Schmutz, 442 Clarkson St., Brooklyn, N. Y. 



KENTIA BELMOREANA, SINGLE. 

5-in. pot, 22 Inches high $ 1.25 each 

6-ln. pot. 24 Inches high 2.00 each 

0-in. pot, 28 inches high 2. .TO each 

7-in. tub, 34 Inches high 5.00 each 

KENTIA FORSTERIANA, COMBINATION. 

7-ln. tub, 34 inches high $ 5.00 each 

7-in. tub, ,36 Inches high 6.00 each 

9-in. tub, 40 inches high 8.00 each 

11-in. tub, 4% feet high 20.00 each 

11-ln. tub, 5 feet high 25.00 each 

11-ln. tub, 5% feet high 30.00 each 

Measurements from top of tub to top of Palm 
In natural position. 

JOSEPH HEACOCK CO., 
Growers, Wyncote, Pa. 

Palm Kentla, single, 6-ln., 48 to 60 inches 
high, $3.50; 7-In. and 8-ln., made up 4 to a 
pot, even height, 5 ft., $7.50. Cash. 

Calvert Floral Co., Lak e Forest, 111. 

PHOENIX BOBBELENII. 

Extra flne, from 4-ln. pots, $12.00 per doi. 

J. B. ADAMS A SON, PASS 0HRI8TIAN, MISS. 

PANDANUS 

PANDAND8 VBITOHII. 

Plants lifted from open for 

4-ln. pots $10.00 per 100 

6-ln. pots 16.00 per 100 

8-in. pots 25.00 per 100 

Suckers $5.00 and 7.00 per 100 

20 per cent discount for cash with order. 
J. J. SOAR. LITTLE RIVER. FLA. 

Pandaniis Veitcbii, nicely variegated plants. 
2%-in. pot size, $6.00 per 100; 3-ln. pot size, 
$8.00 per lOO; 4-ln. pot size, $10.00 per 100; 8-in. 
pot size, $15.00 per 100; 8-in. pot size, $25.00 
per 100; large specimen plants, 50c each; cut- 
tings, $5.00 and $7.00 per 100. 20 per cent dis 
count for cash with order. 
P. M. Soar . Little River. Fla. 

paImsies 

200,000 pansies, pall transi'lanteu. 

In bud and bloom. 
Superb strain raised from seed of my own sav- 
ing; the restilt of twentv-five years' selection. 
$1.75 per 100, $15.00 per 1000 
2.25 per 100, 20.00 per 1000 
3.00 per 100, 25.00 per 1000 
Immediate delivery. Express only. 
Cash, please. 
LEONARD COUSINS. JR., 
Concord Junction, Mass. 

PANSY PARK PANSY PLANT.S. 
Goodell's choicest, transpl.inted, $3.00 per 100; 
well rooted, strong pliuits, $4.00 iiiul .$,'). 00 per 
1000. Cash. 

PANSY PARK FIAJRAL GARDE.VS. 
Dwight, Mass. 

Pansy plants, over 6,000,000 plants of our well 
known strain, also Steele's well known strain; 
Done better; immediate delivery; strong plants, 
50c per 100; $4.00 per 1000, postage prepaid; 
$3.60 per 1000, $15.00 per 6000, by express. 

J. O. Schmidt, Brlstel, Pa. 

100,000 
PAN8T PLANTS. STEELE'S MASTODON. 

August and September transplanted; in bud 
and bloom; ready now, $1.60 per 100, $16.00 
per 1000. 
ifT>WABD W. SCHUSTER. CROOKSTON, MINN. 

Pansy plants: 50,000 Steele's Greenhouse 
Special, mixed colors, big, bushy and full of 
hloom, ready for Immediate sales, $2.00 per 100. 
$10.50 per 1000, by express. Cash. 
B. q. McKay. Atlanta, N. Y. 

Pansles, Steele's Greenhouse Special, July 
sown, September transplanted, strong stocky 
plants In bud and bloom, $8.00 per 1000. Cash. 
Joh n Irvine. B ay City, M ic h. 

Pansles, Vaughan's International, August sown, 
spring transplanted, $1,00 per 100. Cash. 

Mosl);iei( Nursery, .\skov, Minn. 

Pansles: 10.000 nice size and well rooted 
giants, $1.50 per 100. $12.00 per 1000. 
Ozark Plant Co., Girard, Kan. 

Pans.v Giant Exhibition, full of bud and bloom, 
$3.00 per 100. Cash. 
Taren tnm Greenhouses, Tarentum, Pa. 

Pansies, Steele's transplanted last fall, 2c. 
L. J. Rowe, Titusvllle. Pa. 

pela rqoniums 

rEI,.\ItGONil-.MS. KTItST QI'.M.ITY. 

Our plants are gunv.inteecl to be stroiiir. clean 
and free of white flv. We are sperinlists and 
the largest growers in America. Careful pack- 
itig. 

Knster Grcitiiig. Wiirtetnli(>rgia. Swnblnn Mniil. 
Lnev Becker and <;iirdeiiers .lov, 2-iii . .<:i0.0(i 
per 100. .«!in.0() tier lOflO. 

It M. HKNLEY. 
Pelnrgfmium Spe<iiilist. Hartfonl City^In^ 

PELARGONIT'M.^ BUY NOW^F'OR~STOrKT 
Easter Greeting, Lucy Becker, Wurteinbergia, 
Swablan Maiil. Lavender Queen, Gardener's Joy, 
(;ermiin (Jlory. Mrs. Ijival, Graf Zeiipelin. I'rince 
Bismarck. Goethe and Eastern Star, fine 2ii-in.. 
$10.00 per 100, SnO.OO per 1000: 3-in., .<14.00 per 
100, $1.'?0 00 per 1000: .1-in. blooming. lUc. 
GU LLETT & S()NS, LINCOL N, ILL. 

PELARGONIUMS. 
Easter Greeting. Lucy Becker, Swablan Maid, 
Wnrtembergla, four best Easter Gre^'fng varie- 
ties, 2V1-In. pots. $10.00 per 100. .HOO.OO per 1000. 

ROMAN J. IRWIN. 
48 W. 18th St.. Ne w York. N. Y. 

Pelargonium Easter Greeting, strong 2M-io., 
$8.00 per 100. $75.00 per 1000. 
Clarence A. Ustler, Fleming St., Springfleld, 0. 



NO CLEANER STOCK TO BE HAD. 
Easter Greeting, Wurtenibergia, Swaliian Maid, 
Gardener's Joy, (;raf Zeripelin. I'riiue Bismarck, 
Lucy Becker," Eastern Star, Wolfgang (Joethe, 
2-in,, .'<10.00 i>er 100, $!>(). 00 per 1000. 
S. S. SKIDELSKY & CO.. 
.5,'! I'ark Place, N ew York, N. Y. 

""l'elin-g(jniuni Easter Greeting, 'J'^-l".. $10.00 
per 100: mixed varieties. 3-in., $15.00 per 100; 
4 in., $20. (K» per 100. Cash or e. o. (1. 
W. E. Trimble Greenhouse Co., Princeton. 111. 

Pelargonium Easter Greeting, n.imed varieties, 
2Vj-ln., $7.00 per 100; mixed. $0.00 per 100. 
Casli with order. liOs Angeles Geranium Co., 
Sawtelle P. 0.. Tyis Angeles, Cal. 

Pelargoniums, Easter Greeting and Wurtem- 
bergia, strong stock in bud and bloom, 4-ln.. 
$18.00 per 100. Packing free. Cash. 

N. Gibson, Warsaw, Ind. 

Peiiirconium Gardener's Joy, 2V4-ln., 6c; 3-in., 
10c; 4-in., 15c. Clean, bushy stock. Packing 
free. Cash, please. 

Go shen Floral Co., Goshen, Ind. 

Peliu-K<inium Easter Greeting, flne, busliy 
Iilants, 4-in., .'SiO.OO per 100. 

Calla Cut Flower Co., Calla, 0, 

Pelargoniums. Easter Greeting and Lucy 
Becker, 2-ln.. $6.00 per 100. 

J. L. Johnson, De Kalh. 111. 

Pelargoniums, Wurtembergia and Mrs. Layal, 
fine strong plants. 2U-in., 5c. 

A. 0. Anderson. Columbus. Neb. 

Pelargonium Wurtembergia, in hud. 3-in.. 10c. 
C. Humfeld. Clay Center, Kan. 

Pelargonium Easter Greeting, strong 2%-ln., 
$10.00 per 100. Peters ft Sons. Hlllyard. Waah. 

PEO N I ES 

Peonies: Write for our new wholesale list. 
Franklin Nursery. Blchfleld Station, Minneapolis, 
Minn. 



PERiSTROPHES 



Peristrophe, beautiful green and yellow trailing 
vine, for vases and hanging baskets, 2%-ln., 
$5.00 per 100. 

Oak Grov e Greenhouse, Tuskegee, Ala. 

PETUNIAS 



PETITNIAS. 

Per 100 Per 1000 

2H-in. iKils. double and single, 

mixed $0.00 .$.i0.00 

Rosy Morn, 2','t-in. p<its 7.50 65.00 

ROMAN J. IRWIN, 
43 W. 18th St., New York, N. Y. 

80,000 PETUNIA PLANTS BEADY. 
Rosy Morn, Howard's Star, dark maroon; 
blotched and striped; transplanted from seed- 
lings and grown cool and stocky, as good as a 
2-ln. pot plant, ready for use, $1.60 per 100, 
$12.60 per 1000. See Vegetable ad. 

H. J. POTOMKTN. MUNCIB. IND. 

PETI'NIAS. SINGLE AND DOI'nLK, 
Single in blotmi. finest assortirient of Dreor's 
Fringed, Itosv Morn. Diener's and Ruffled. $4.00 
per 100: Diener's alone. .«5.0t). I)o\iblc in bud 
and bloom, $5.00 per 100. 

GTrr..LETT & SONS, LINCOLN. ILL. 

Petunias, Diener's Single Mixed and Diener's 
Pink Glorv, In bud and bloom, strong 2V4-ln., 
$4.00 per 100. Glory is beautiful and fringed, 
of Rosy Mom color. 

Gove The Florist, Burlington, Vt._ 

Petunias, ralifornla and Ruffled Giants, a 
wonderful strain of beautiful colors, plants as 
good as any 2yi-ln. stock vou ever bought. Get 
a trial lot, $1.50 per 100. $12.00 per 1000. 

S. A. Pinkstone, Utl ca, N. Y. 

SEASONABLE STOCK. 
Petunias, Single Ruffled Giant and Rosy Mom, 
2-tn., $6.00 per 100. $40.00 per 1000. 

THE STORRS Sc HARRISON CO., 
Palnesville. 0. 

Petunias, double, mixed. Also Balcony, Cali- 
fornia. Rosy Morn and otiiers, tine (piality, 2%- 
In. pots at '$."1.00 per 100; 4-ln., in bloom at 20c 
each. 

Henry Sm ith Flor al Co.. Gr and Rapids, Mich. 

Petuni.i Dreer"s Sinirli' Frinced, mixed colors, 
in bud and bloom. 2ii in.. $100 per 100. 300 for 
$10.00. Clms. Whitton, York St. and Gray Ave., 
I'tion. N. Y. 

Petunia Rosy Morn, a few thousand very flne 
plants, in btid and bloom, readv now, 2%-in. 
pots, $3.00 per 100. $2.'>.00 per 1000. Cash only. 
Restland Floral Co.. Mendota, 111. 

Double Petunias from seed, in bud and bloom, 
well branched good plants, 4-in., $18.00 per 10O. 

Single Fringed in bloom. 4-in., $10.00 per 100. 
Looffler tk Ben ke, Waterto wn, Wis. 

Petunia California Fringed, extra flne stock. 
2%-ln.. $5.00; rooted cuttings, $2.60. Cash. 
Packing free. 

La Crosse Floral Co., ta Crosse. Wis. 

Petunias. Rosy Mom, 2%-ln.. $4,00 per 100, 
$35.00 per 1000. Special Mixture. 2%-ln.. $4.00 
per 100. $35,00 per 1000. 

Llnesvllle Greenhouse Co., LInesvllle, Pa. 

Double retunias in bud ;ind bloom. 2-in.. 6c: 
3-in.. inc. Sinirle Petunia R.isy Morn. 3-in.. 8c. 
Cash, please. ]'. Ilopman. New (!;iillpp. Pa. 

Petunias. 3-ln., 7c each. 

Davis Floral Co.. Davenport. la. 

Petunia Rosy Morn, strong 2 In.. $4.00 per 100. 
P. L. Tornqulst. Benton Ilarlior. Mich. 



140 



The Florists^ Review 



JuNi 1. 1922 



PETUNIAS— Continued 



Petunias, mixed. Rosy Morn, California giants; 
seedlings, 40c per 100, $3.50 per 1000; 2in., 
3Mic; 3-ln., 7%c; 4-ln., 15e. 

L. J. Rowe, TltusTlUe, Pa. 

Double Petunias, strung rooted cuttings, $2.00 
per 100, $17.60 per 1000; 2^4-in., $5.00 per 100, 
$46.00 per 1000. 
S. 8. SkldeUky & Co.. 53 Park Place, New York. 

Petunlns, giants, Ros.v Morn, etc., in bud and 
bloom, strong plants, 3-in., 10c each. 

S. K. Muntz, Uubuque, la. 

Petunias, mostly Diener's strain; nice stocky 
3-In., $7.00 per 100. 

Jacobs Bros., Peoria, 111. 

Petunias, double-fringed, 10 varieties, $1.50 per 
100, also Howard's Star. 

Byer Bros., Chambersburg, Pa. 

Petunia Dreer's Single Fringed, $4.00 per 100; 
Double, $5.00 per 10(». 

Anoka Floral Co., Anoka, Minn. 

Petunias, Dreer's Superb Single Fringed and 
Rosy Mom, from 2-in. pots, $3.00 per 100. 
H. Rawlings, Wholesale Grower, Allegany, N. T. 

Petunias, double, 2V4-in., $5.00 per 100, $46.00 

Jer 1000. 
as. D. Hooper, 140 1 Roane St., Richmond, Va. 

Petunias, Dreer's Fringed and Rosy Morn, 
2^4-in., $4.00 per 100, $35.00 per 1000. 
Otto P. Krueger, Toledo. 0. 

Petunias, Diener's new flesb pink, a beauty, 
fine 2Vi-in., 6c; mixed, Sc. 
Hammerschmld t & Clark. Medina, 0. 

PHLOXES ' 



HARDY PERENNIAL PLANTS, 

Phloxes, 2%-ln., 

75c per doz., $5.00 per 100, $45.00 per 1000. 

Assorted varieties. 

THE SCHMIDT & BOTLEY CO., 

Springfield, O. 



PLUMBAGOS 



SEASONABLE STOCK READY NOW. 
PlnmbagoB, Capensis and Capensls Alba, 3-ln., 
$16.00 per 100; 4-in., $25.00 per 100. 

THE STORRS & HARRISON CO., 
Palnesville, O. 

Plumbago, 2-in., Cc each. 
Bird Forrest. Florist, Waxnhac hie. Tex. 

POINSETTIAS 

POINSF/PTIAS. 
TRT'E ("IIRISTMAS RED. 
Quality stock ready; shipped in paper pots; 
order now, have »liipi)ed when wanted, 214-in., 
$8.00 per 100, $75.00 per 1000. 

E. C. PRLNER. 
.10 E. Randolph St., Chlcaso. 111. 

Polnsettiiis, California stock plants shipped 
from California, tlie true red with the large 
flowers and the e.irlier and smaller flowered va- 
riety; fine plants at $15.00. $18.00, $25.00 and 
$.30.00 per 100. Also regular kind from nearby, 
very strong, $9.00 per 100. 
8. .S. Skldelsky & Co., 53 Park Pla ce. New York. 

CALIFORNIA FIELD-GROWN 

POINSBTTIA STOCK PLANTS. 

$18.00, $26.00 and $30.00 per 100. See display ad. 

PAUL BCKE, 
1226 Hay-worth Ave., Los Angeles, Cal. 



POINSETTIA STOCK PLANTS. 

See display advertisement page 5. 

ROMAN J. IRWIN. 

43 W. 18th St., New York, N. Y. 

Polnseftlas. true Christmas red; good 3-In. and 
3V4-ln. plants, $10.00 per 100. Packing free. 
Cash. Ljnvrence Floral Co., 15-47 Mass St., 
I^awrence. Kan. 

Poinsettia stock plants, true Christmas red, 
large stumps, 20 inches high, will make a lot 
of cuttings, $10.00 per 100. 
Wm. F. K ru e ger , 5 16 Potter St., Toledo, 0. 

Poinsettia stuck iil.mts, l.">r: 2 in. from hiird- 
■wood cuttincs, r>e: Jin. soft tip stock. 7c each. 
Bird Fo rre st. W.ixal iachio. Tex. 

Polnsettlaa, strong stock plants, $15.00 per 100. 
Rosemont Gardens, Dexter Ave., Montgomery, 

~~ POPPIES 

Oriental Popples out of thumb pots. $10.00 per 
100. Quick shipment. J. C. Bigelow A Son, 1642 
Sunset Ave.. Utlca. N . Y. 

PRIMULAS 
THE STRAIN THAT LEADS. 
Primula Obconica, December sown stock now 
ready from 2 In. pots. $7.,'i0 per 100, any quan- 
tity. Grandiflnra or Olgnntea, any color. This 
early stock will make extra large plants and be 
in full bi(X)m In Noveml)er. 

Iviter sown stock ready in June, $6.00 per 100. 
$55.00 per 1000. 

Chinensls and Mnlacnides ready In June S6 00 
per 100. $47.50 per 1000. 

J. L. SCHILLER, 

929 Pro uty A ve.. Toledo. 0. 

PRIMILA OBCONICA GIOANTEA. 
"Mile Hitrli Str.iin " Bim.Iv now jind later. 
This strain cannot be surpassed; flowers will 
average over the size of a dollar, 2V4-in.. $7 00 
per 100. 

PARK FIX)RAL CO.. 

1643 Br on dwa .v^ Denver. Colo. 

YELI/)W ENGUSn PRIMROSES^ " 

1-year seedlings $10.00 per 100 

CARL HAGENBURGER, MENTOR. 0. 



NOTICE! 



**A few lines in The ReTlew 
will polish yoar mail box." 

J. Dobbertin A Son, 
April 9. Rochester, N.T. 



To be sure of atten- 
tion for the issue dated 
Thursday, instruc- 
tions for 

Classified Ads 

must reach The 
Review on or before 
the preceding 

MONDAY 



PRIMULA OBCONICA. BEST STRAIN 

in assorted colors, 

mostly bright shades, no white; 

strong, healthy plants, ready to shift, 

2%-In., $4.00 per 100. 

Cash with order. 

The above price Includes careful packing. 

R. S. McMURRAY, BELLEFONTAINE. 0. 

PBIMUIiAS. 
Primnla Obconica. New crop seed. Hambur- 
ger Bose, finest Buropean Novelty Pink; 1000 
seeds, 76c; 6000 seeds, $3.00. Also Arend'a 
RoDsdorf strain In the leading varieties. Orig- 
inator's seed at lower prices. Send for list. 

r. RYNVKLD & SONS, 
61 Vesey St., New York. N. Y. 

Primulas: We have through careful selection 
developed the largest and most free-flowering 
Primula Obconica tliat we have ever seen. Of 
these we have a few thousand to spare, from 
2y4-ln. pots, $7 00 per 100. $65.00 per 1000. 
^C. G. James & Sons. Hornell, N. Y. 

Primula Obconica. Arend's Ronsdorfer, best 
strain; separate colors or mixed; Kermesina, 
Rosea and Appleblossom, fine, large, transplanted 
plants, ready for 2%-in., $3.00 per 100, postpaid, 
$25.00 per lOOO. Edward WTiitton, Utlca, N. Y. 

Primula Obconica. Arend's Ronsdorfer strain, 
mixed colors, 214 -in., $4.00 per 100, 300 for 
$10.00. Chinese Primrose, large transplanted, 
re.idy for 2'4-in., $2..">0 per 100. 
Clias. WhittoM, York and Gray Ave., Ufica. N. Y. 

PRIMULA OBCONICA. 
Giant-flowering from December sown seed, 
strong 3 In., $10.00 per 100. 

WINFIELD S. KIRCHER, 
Cyclamen Spoclniist. Defiance, 0. 

Primulas, Obconica, Gigantea, Kermesina and 
Rosea, plenty of red, flue strong, transplanted 
plants, as good as 2V4-In., $4.00 per 100, pre- 
paid. Cash. Immediate delivery. 

Brill Celery Gardens, Kalamazoo, Mich. 

Primula Obconica Gigiintea and Grandlflora, 
fine, large, transplanted plants grown from the 
best German seed, ready now, $3.00 per 100, 
$25.00 per 1000. Cash. 

S. A. Pinkstone. Utlca, N. Y. 

Primnla Obconica Gigjinten or Grandiflorn, 
separate colors or mixed. Kermesina, Rosea and 
Appleblos.som. 2M-ln., $6.00 per 100. $r>0.00 per 
idOO. Abtiy Avenue Greenhouses, Dayton, O. 

PKIMt'LAS. 

See display advertisement page 6. 

ROMAN J. IRWIN. 

43 W. 18th St.. New York, N. Y. 

Primula Obconica. mixed, fine 2V4-in. plants, 
$5.00 per 100. Cash with order. 

Geo. M. Wilson, South Lyon. Mich. 



PRIVET 



ALBUM OF DESIGNS. 

$1.25 per copy, postpaid. 

Florists' Pub. Co.. Caxton Bldg.. Chicago. 



Primula Miller's Giant Obconica, strong 8-ln., 
$6.00 per 100. Cash. 
J. W. Miller. Shiremanstown. Pa. 

Primula Obconica, extra fine strain, 2V4-In. 
plants, $0.00 per 100. 
Henry Smith Floral Co., Grand Rapids, Mjch. 

Primulas: See our cover ad for list and prices. 
S. S. Skldelsky & Co., 53 Park Place. New York. 



PRIVET AMOOR RIVER, SOUTH. 
24 Ins., $4.00 per 100, $35.00 per 1000. P o. b. 
for cash with order. Have several thousand in 
storage. 

VALDBSLAN N U RSERIES, BO STIO, N. O. 

California Privet, cut back once, 8 to 12 Ins., 
$2.00 per 100. $16.00 per 1000. Casb. 

Clement S. Levis, Alden, Delaware Co., Pa. 



ROSEMARY 



Rosemary, rooted cuttings, $3.00 per 100; 2-ln., 
$8.00 per 100; 8-ln., $10.00 per 100; 2-year stock, 
tf-in., $1.00 each. 

George Bros. & Co., New Kensington, Pa. 



ROSES 



HBADQUABTBBS FOB BOSBS. 
2%-in. 

Look oTer the list. It may contain sorts yon 
are "short on." Prices low, considering qual- 
ity. Onr guarantee of thirty years, "Satisfac- 
tion Guaranteed," still stands. 

BABY BOSBS. 
$7.00 per 100. ^- 
Anna Moller, Baby BamSier, 

Baby Bcho, Geo. BlgerX 

Bllen Poulsen, Orleans. \ 

Btolle Luisante (Baby Baby Dorothy, 

Herrlott). Catherine Zeimet, 

Ije Ponceau. La Marne, 

Mrs. Wm. H. Cntbush, Mile. F. Farre. 
Bal^ Doll (Tip Top). Oruss an Aachen, 
Edith Cavell, $8.00 per 106. 
HYBRID PBRPK-rUALS. 
$8.00 per 100. 
Anne de DieslMch, Oen. Jacqueminot, 

Conrad F. Meyer, Hugh Dickson. 

His Majesty, Paul Neyron, 

Magna Oharta. Captain Christy, 

Prince C. de Rohan. J. B. Clark, 
Boule de Nelge, George Dickson, 

Due de Bohan. Jubilee. 

Frau Karl Druschkl, $10.00 per 100. 
TBAS AND HYBRID TBAS. 
$6.00 per 100. 
Bridesmaid. Crimson Queen. 

Mile. F. Ernger, Catherine Mermet. 

Bnrbank. F. R. Patier, 

Mrs. Ben]. R. Cant, The Queen, 
Yvonne Vacherot. Lonis PhiUipe, 

Champion of the World. Wellesley, 
SouT. da P. Nottlng, 

$6.60 per 100. 
Countess of Gosford. Rhea Reld, 
Helen Gould. Florence Forrester, 

Helen Good, Marie Ouillot. 

Meteor. White M. Cochet, 

Clothilde Sonpert, Florence Pemberton, 

Hme. A. Chatenay, Papa Gontler, 

Safrano, Mamnn Cochet. 

Dnchesae de Btabant, Blumenschmldt, 
Marie Van Houtte, Oruss an TepHts, 

Lady HilUngdon, Miss Cynthia Forde, 

$7.00 per 100. 
Btoile Sfi France, President Taft. 

Mrs. George Shawyer. Edward Mawley, 
Eugene B. Marlltt. Laurent Carle, 

Mme. Paul Buler. Sunburst, 

Souv. du Pres. Camot, Mme. Lambard, 
Kaiserln A. Victoria. Duchess of Albany, 
Radiance, Hermosa, 

Hadley, White La France, 

Red Radiance, Francis Scott Key, 

Gen. MacArthur, Mme. J. Guillemot, 

$8.00 per 100. 
Antolne RlToire (Mrs. Winnie Davis, 

Taft), Mme. Segond Weber, 

Mrs. A. R. Waddell. Ophelia, 
My Maryland, Mme. 0. Testout. 

Arthur R. Goodwin Mrs. Chas. Bell. 
(Pemetlana). 

Klllamey. $7.50 per 100. 
Legion. $15.00 per 100. 
Frank W. Dunlop. $10.00 per 100. 
Charles K. Douglas, $26.00 per 100. 
Mme. Butterfly, $16.00 per 100. 
Crusader, $12.00 per 100. 
Col. Oswald Fitzgerald, $25.00 per 100. 
HARDY AND TENDER CLIMBBBS. 
$6.00 per 100. 
CI. American Beauty, Dorothy Perkins, 
CI. GruRS an Tepllts, Cloth of Gold, 
Red Dorothy Perkins White Dorothy Perkins, 
(Excelsa), Wm. Allen Richardson. 

Gardenia (Hardy Mare- Avlateur Blerlot. 
chal Nell). Crimson Rambler, 

Tausendschoen, Hiawatha. 

Pink Tausendschoen Lady Gay. 

(Roserle), Silver Moon. 

Vellchenblau (Blue 
Rambler), 

$6.60 per 100. 
American Pillar. CI. Mme. 0. Testout. 

CI. White M. Cochet. Bess I^ovett. 
Dr. W. Van Fleet. Paul's Carmine Pillar, 

CI. Kaiserln A. Vic- CI. Marie Ouillot. 
torla. CI. Papa Gontler, 

CI. Lady Ashtown, (31. Maman Cochet, 

Climbing Ophelia, $10.00 per 100. 
Paul's Scarlet Climber, $8.00 per 100. 
Not less than 6 of any variety of plants 
supplied in our wholesale department; under 28 
of a variety are billed at dozen rate, 2S and 
over at hundred rate. 

THE GOOD A REESE CO., 

The largest Rose growers In the World. 

Department A, Springfield, O. 

GOOD. STRONG 3 IN. PLANTS, OWN-ROOT. 

,300 White Killnrney 10c each 

100 Sunburst 12c each 

50 Cecile Brunner 12c each 

I. O, KEMBLE, MARSHALLTOWN, lA. 



JuNB 1, 1922 



The Florists^ Review 



141 



ROSBS. 
Oood 2-7ear-old, field-grown plants, now In 
S-in. and 6-in. pots, ready for immediate sbip- 

pAcei. 10 for $6.00; 25 for $12.60; 100 for $48.00. 

Clio, 

Dorothy Perkins. 

Duchess of Albany, 

Ecarlate, 

Edith Cavell, 

Bdward Mawley, 

Etolle de Trance, 

Eugene Furst, 

Excelsa, 

F. J. Orootendorst, 

Frau Karl Druschkl, 

Oen. Sup. A. Janssen, 

George Ahrendg, 

Hoosler Beauty, CU; 

Klllamey, 

Killarney Brilliant, 

La France, 
Laurent Carle, 
Los Angeles, 
Mme. Edouard Herriot, 

Mme. Jules Grolez, 

Mile. Cecile Brunner, 

Miiman Cochet, white; 

Mrs. W. Chrlstle-Mlller, 

Ophelia, 

Safrano, 

Souv. of Wootton, CU; 

Wellesley. 

THE CONARD & JONES CO., 

Robert Pyle, Pres., Antoine Wintzer, Vice-pres., 

West Grove, Pa. 

ROSB PLANTS. " 

Strong S-inch. Per 100 

Ophelia $16.00 

White Ophelia 18.00 

Columbia 18.00 

Crusader 16.00 

Hoosler Beauty 16.00 

Pilgrim 

Milady 16.00 

Bush Ceclle Brunner 16.00 

Lady Hlllingdon 16.00 

Kalserin Augusta Victoria 16.00 

Radiance 16.00 

Red Radiance 16.00 

Gen. MacArthur 15.00 

Premier 20.00 

Special — We have an nnusually fine stock of 
Milady, 10,000 plants propagated from flowering 
wood; strong S-in. stock; special price of $100.00 
per 1000; 6000 lots, $00.00 per 1000. 

Moderate charge for packing. 
WALTER ARMACOST A CO.. 

821 H. 4t h St.. Los Angeles. Oal. 

STRONG BEDDING ROSES, 214-IN. 
Kalsprin, Kadinnce, Ilelon Gould, President 
Taft, Etoile de Lyon, Etolle de France, W. R. 
Smith, Clothilde Soupert, White Cochet and Pink 
Cochet, 214-in. ready for 3-ln., $8.00 per 100. 

Radiance, Red Radiance, Pink Cochet. White 
Cochet, Etoile de Lyon, Etoile de France, Son- 
pert, strong 3-in., $1.50 per doz., $12.00 per 100. 
FOUniNO ROSES. 
CLEAN, VIGOROUS, WELL-GROWN. 

Own Root 
2Vi-lnch. 100 1000 

Milady $1.-).00 $120.00 

Cohimbla 10.00 fl.T.OO 

.\merlcan TipRion 22.50 200.00 

White Killiirney 9.00 80.00 

HKNCII ROSES. 
Ophelia bench phints, $8.00 per 100. Premier, 
$10.00 per 100. Carefully lifted, woll-rested. 
GULIJOT T & SONS, LINCO LN, ILL. 

ROSE.S, OWN-ROOT 

FANCY STOCK FROM 214-IN. POTS, 

at fnir prices. 

Mrs. Aaron Ward. Columbia. Russell, Kalserin, 

Wlilte Kill.Trney, My Maryland, Radiance, The 

Bride, Bridesmaid, Mncna Cliarta, Druschkl. 

Cllmblnc Lady Ashtown. Jubilee. Shower of 

Gold, Mile. C'ecilp Brunner. Mrs. Chas. Bell. 

Rhea Reid. Winnie Davis, Georce Elger, Mrs. 

A. R. Waddell, Climldng American Beauty, Paul 

Neyron, Red I>etter Day, Mme. Segond Weber, 

<'aptaln Christy. Mnrechal Nlel, Lady Ashtown, 

Gniss an Teplitz and a number of other fine 

furcing and beddinn varieties. 

Guaranteed QUALITY that proves a bargain 
fur the planter. 

AMERICAN ROSE & PLANT CO.. 

Producers of plants tliat grow and bloom, 

SprinRfleld. O^ 

OWN ROOT ROSE PLANTS. 

The following are ready for immediate delivery: 

4500 Columbia, 2V2-ln. pots, 10c; 
3.J00 Butterfly, 2V4-in. pots, 10c. 

BENCn PLANTS. 

l.^OO lliladv, 10c: 

l.-)0 Ward, 10c. 

STUPPY FLORAL CO., ST. JOSEPH. MO. 

ROSES, 2-YEAR-OLD BENCH PLANTS. 

Per 100 Per 1000 

Russell $10.00 $90.00 

•"oliimhia 0.00 50.00 

J^imliurst 0.00 .50.00 

White Killarney 6.00 50.00 

2%-IN., OWN-ROOT. 

Rnssell 12.00 100.00 

Columbia 8.00 70.00 

Sunburst 8.00 70.00 

Ophelia 7.00 65.00 

GEO. REINBERG. 
30 E. Randolph St.. Chicnpn, III. 



A. NO. 1 OWN-ROOT ROSE PLANTS. 

Per 100 Per 1000 

Columbia, 2i^-in $10.00 $80.00 

Columbia, 3-ln 12.00 100.00 

White Killarney, 3-ln 10.00 80.00 

BENCH PLANTS. 

White Killarney 10.00 80.00 

Columbia 12.00 100.00 

Cash, please. 

FOREST H. MEEK, NEWCASTLE, IND. 



STRONG ROSE PLANTS 
for immediate delivery. 

Hadlev, 3 in $15.00 per 100 

Columbia, 3-in 15.00 per 100 

Hadley, 2'/4-in 10.00 per 100 

Columbia, 2i/4-in 10.00 per 100 

Moderate charge for packing. 
Cash, please, for unestablished accounts. 

ROY F. WILCOX & CO., 
Montebello, Cal. 



ANGELUS! ANGELUS! ANGELUS! 

Orders are now being filled and we have on hand 

5000 grafted Angelus, 

and while they lawt we offer this stock at 

$42.50 per 100, $375.00 per 1000. 

Grafted Rose stock Is very scarce, so if you 

want these let us have your order at once. 

CHARLES H. TOTTY CO., 
Madison, N. J. 



ROSES UNDER GRADE 
FROM 214-IN. POTS. 
The entire unsold stock of one of the largest 
Rose growers In the World is at our disposal at 
slaughtered prices. 

There is approximately 200 varieties in the 
lot and these Roses must sell regardless of 
price. If you can use sliort undergrade plants, 
send us your list and mark "Undergrade." Price 
on this stock is no object. Samples free for 
postage to cover packing and delivers. 

THE AMERICAN ROSE & PLANT CO., 
Springfield, O. 

AMERICAN i7EGI0N. 

Cerise red; 2 silver medals, 5 first prizes; 
highest price for cut flowers at Christmas and 
Easter outside of American Beauty; very similar 
to American Beauty in color and shape. Free 
from mildew and black spot. 

American IjCglon, own-roots, $25.00 per 100, 
$200.00 per 1000. Pilgrim, own-root, $15.00 per 
100, $140.00 per 1000. 

American Beauty, bench plants, Mav delivery, 
15 cts. each, $15.00 per 100. Cash with order. 

MYERS & SAMTMAN, 
Chestnut Hill, Philadelphia, Pa. 

BENCH PLANTS. 

Ready now. 

Premier $ 8.00 per 100 

Columbia 8.00 per 100 

Mrs. Russell 10.00 per 100 

BASSETT & WASHBURN. 
178 N. Wabash Ave., Chicago, 111. 

ROSB PLANTS, OWN ROOT. 
Clean, healthy stock. Ready now. 

Per 100 Per 1000 

Columbia. 2%-ln $10.00 $90.00 

Ophelia, 2H-In 9.00 80.00 

J. J. L. Mock, 2%-in 9.00 80.00 

Shawyer, 2«4-In 9.00 80.00 

Richmond, 2%-ln 9.00 80.00 

Hoosler Beauty, 2%-In 9.0O 80.00 

Kalserin, 2H-in 9.00 80.00 

UNITED STATES CUT FLOWER CO., 
Elmlra^^N^ Y. 

ROSES, BENCH PLANTS 
for Immediate deliverv: 

Per 100 Per 1000 

Russell, 6000 2-vear-old $15.00 $125.00 

Columbia, 3000 l-year-oid 12.00 100.00 

Fine stock for replanting, better than young 
pot plants: these idants are clean and healthy, 
from the best Rose plant in this section. No 
packing charge. 

WINDLER AVIIOLESALE FLORAL CO., 
1310 Pine St., St. Louis. Mo. 

ROSES ON OWN-ROOTS. 
Strong plants from 2'4-in. pots. 

Mile. Cecile Brunner $0.00 per 100 

Ellen Poulsen 6.00 jier 100 

Orleans O.OO per 100 

George Elger 6.00 per 100 

White Baby Rambler 6.00 per ino 

Eclio 6.00 per 100 

Climbing American Beauty and Excelsa. $5 00 
per 100. Descriptive catalogue sent on request. 
THE GEO. H. MELLEN CO.. SPRINGFIELD^ J)^. 

COLUMBIA. OPHELIA. BUTTERFLY." 
Strong, clean plants. 

2V,-ln $10.00 per 100, $ SO. 00 per 1000 

3M.-In 14.00 per 100. 120 00 per 1000 

HENLEY BROS., TERRE HAUTE, IND. 



Roses: Write for our complete list of 2%-in. 
and 4-in. for growing on. Also can do some 
2^-ln., for greenhouse planting. 

For immediate delivery subject to being un- 
sold, strong Hoosler Beauty. Columbia, Premier, 
Richmond, Milady, White Killarney and Ward. 
$10.00 per 100, $100.00 per 1000; Russell, extra 
fine 2-year-old, good to be replanted in benches 
if desired, $14.00 per 100, $125.00 per 1000. 
S. S. Skidelsky & Co., 53 Park Place, New York. 

ROSB PLANTS. 

Price per 100. 2%-ln. 3-In. 

Mrs. Aaron Ward $6.00 $10.00 

Kalserin A. Victoria 8.00 12.00 

Columbia 8.00 12.00 

Ophelia 8.00 12.00 

Premier 8.00 12.00 

Butterfly 8.0O 12.00 

HEMBREIKER & COLE, 
Springfield, 111. 

BENCH ROSES 

of A No. 1 quality. 

FOR PROMPT SHIPMENT. 

Mrs. Charles Russell $14.00 per 100 

Columbia 14.00 per 100 

Milady 14.00 per 100 

White Killarney 14.00 per 100 

Premier 16.00 per 100 

AMERICAN BULB CO.. 
172 N. Wabash Ave., Chicago, 111. 

ROSE PLANTS. 
Grafted bench plants. Per 100 Per 1000 

Columbia $12.50 $100.00 

Ophelia 10.00 75.00 

Good, healthy stock, well rested, ready for 
shipment. Columbia, own-root, 2^4-In., $12.50 
per 100, $100.00 per 1000. 

Cash with order. 
AVEISS-MEYER CO., MAYWOOD, ILL. 

ROSES. 
Roses, for bencliing, strong 3-in. . .$15.00 per 100 

Columbia 15.00 l)er 100 

White Killarney 15.00 per 100 

Hoosier Beauty 15.00 i)er 100 

Ophelia 15.00 per 100 

Russell 20.00 per 100 

5 per cent for packing. 
C. H. FREY B^LORAL C O.. LI NCO LN, NEB. 

B. & W. QUALITY STOCK. 

WHITE KILLARNEY, 
2%-ln., $12.00 per 100, $100.00 per 1000. 

BASSETT & WASHBURN, 
178 N. Wabash Ave., Chicago, 111. 



ROSES. 

Monthly, for planting out, ready now. 

American Legion, 6-in. pots, 75c each. 

Mrs. Aaron Ward, Cornelia, Mrs. Prentiss, 
NlchoUs, Premier, Double White Killarney, Co- 
lumbia, Butterfly, Ophelia and others, 6-in. pots, 
$60.00 per 100. 

WM. K. HARRIS, 
68th and Springfield Ave., Philadelphia, Pa. 

ROSE PLANTS. ' 

Per 100 Per 1000 

W'hite Killarney, bench plants. .$12.50 $100.00 

Columbia 12.50 100.00 

Clean, healthy stock, well rested and ready 
for shipment. Cash witli order. 

BATAVIA GREENHOUSE CO.. 
Ratavla, 111. 

OWN-ROOT ROSE PLANTS. ~~~. 

To move quickly, as we need the bench space, 
we quote: 

Miladv $12. .-n per 100. $120.00 per 1000 

Columbia 10.00 per 100, 90.00 per 1000 

All extra fine stock. Milad.r and Columbia ready 

for 3-ln. pots. 

A. N. NIELSEN, INC., PANA, ILL. 

GRAFTED ROSES. 

From 2'i.-iuch pots. 

1000 Butterfly $20.00 per 100, $1.S0.00 per 1000 

1000 Milady 20.00 per 100. 180.00 per 1000 

A. H. BUDLONG, 

2449 Berwyn .\ve.. Chiciigo, 111. 

GHAFTKD KOSE ri.ANTS. ' 

Well Krciwn. strong 4-inili plants ready for 
bencliing. 

500 Yell.iw Ophelia S25.00 per 100 

COO Wliile Killarney 20.00 per 100 

I'lTTSr.URCII (TT FLOWER CO.. 
GHisonia P. O., Alleyheuy. Pa. 

OWN ROOT ROSES. EXTR.\. FINE STOCK. 

ColuiMliia. Ophelia, 2',i-iii $ (;..50 jier 100 

('"liiiiil'i.i. :'.-in 10..",0 JUT 100 

Wo will refund niiiupy if not entirely satisfied. 

'I'wd year olil bench-crown Roses, 

Ophelia. Cdluiiibia, $8.00 per 100. 

LA CROSSK I'LORAL CO., LA CROSSE, AVIS. 

Ro.ses, Crusader, Columbia. Oiihelia ami Kal- 
serin .Vtieiista Victoria. 2ii-in., $10.(M) and 
$12.00 per lOO. 

("rusadir. Slianver. Columbia and Opheli.i, 
.•! in., $12.00 and $15.00 per 100. Cash. No pack- 
ing charges. 
S tate Fair Floral Co.. Sedalia, Mo . 

ROSE PI^NTS. 

Columbia, 2>.j-in $ 00 per 100 

Columbia, 4-in 10.00 per 100 

Tills is good, lie.ilthy stock full size and well- 
rooted. 

ROCHESTER GREENHOI-SE CO.. 
Emil Rieplo, .Mgr., Rochester, Minn. 

Rose plants: 3000 Columbia, 2^^-in., $10.00 
per 100, $90.00 per 1000. 
William L. Rock Flower Co., Kansas City, Mo. 



142 



The Florists^ Review 



JoNB 1. 1922 



ROSES-Contlnued 


SALVIAS. SPLENDENS AND BONPIEB. 
Pine 2-ln $4 00 per 100, |37.50 per 1000 


CHRISTMAS CHBBBT SBBD. 
Grow your own Cherries! Cleveland, the best 
grown, large cberrles, eOc per packet of about 600 
seeds. Cash. 

0. Ii. BBB8B. SPRINQFIBU), 0. 


CHOICE, GRAKTED BENCH ROSE PLANTS. 

Per 100 Per 1000 

Uussell, 1-vear-old $25.00 $200.00 

Premier, 2" to 3-vear-olcl 16.00 125.00 


WINFIELD S. KIROHER. 
Cyclamen Specialist, Defiance, O. 

AMERICA, ZURICH, BONFIRE. 
2'4-in., $3.50; 4-in., $12.50 per 100. 
GULI.ETT & SONS, LINCOLN, ILL. 


PREMIEIl'nOSE GARDENS, INC., 
MiiywoiHl, 111. 


Asparagus: See our cover ad for Plumosus 
and Sprengeri seed. Write us for full list of 


OPHELIA. 

RENCH ROSE PLANTS. 

$7.00 per 100. 

Cash or reference. 

JOHN ASSA, 

5350 Rowmanville Ave., Chicago, III. 

BENCH ROSE PLANTS. 

COOO Premier, 2000 Butterfly, 2000 Columbia, 

2 and 3-year-old, unusually fine quality, 

$10.00 per 100, $90.00 per 1000. 

No charge for packing. 

THE ROLF ZETLITZ CO., LIMA, 0. 


.Salvia Bonfire. 2-in. and 2H-in-. $2.50 per 
100. $20.00 per 1000. Cash only. 

Restland Floral Co., Mendota, 111. 


other seed. 

S. S. Skidelsky & Co., -63 Park Place, New York. 

Running Velvet Beans make luxuriant porch 


Salvias, Splendena and Zurich, 3-in., $6.00 per 
100; Zurich. 2% -in., $3.60 per 100. 

Henry Krueger, 602 Clark St., Toledo, O. 


shading vine, purple bloom; selected seed, lb.. 
40c. postpaid. Rhodes Seed Co., Forsyth, Ga. 


SMIUAX 


Salvia Splendens, fine, clean stock, 2^-in., 
$3.60 per 100, $30.00 per 1000. 

Alexander Shreve, Belvidere, N. J. 

Salvia Bonfire, strong 2V4-in., $4.60 per 100. 
Carefully packed. 

Robert W. Yeo, North Bergen, N. J. 


SMILAX, 8TB0NG 8BBDLJNG8. 
Beady for potting. ...60c per 100, $4.00 per 1000 

J. r. ANDBBSON. 
rem Specialist, Short Hills, N. J. 

SMII..AX. VERY STRONG. 


OWN-ROOT ROSES. 


21/4-ln. pinched three times $4.00 per 100 


Good, itrong plants for immediate delivery. 


Salvias, fine topped back plants, ready for 
8-in. pots, 8V^c, prepaid. Cash, please. 
Liberty Gardens, 2030 Sunnyside, Burlington, la. 

Salvias, strong 2-in., 2e; 3-in., 5c. 

Sunny Mount Floral Co., Crestwood, Ky. 


GULLETT & SONS. LINCOLN, ILL. 


Rose Premier $18.00 per 100, $1S0.00 per 1000 

Mme. Butterfly 18.00 per 100, 150.00 per lOeO 

THE JOSEPH H. HILL CO., 
Wholesale Florists, Richmond Ind 


Smilax, 12,000 from soil ready for bed or 3-in. 
pots, $2.50 per 100, $20.00 per 1000. 

B. J. Passmore, Malvern, Pa. 


ROSES, OWN-ROOT, A-1 STOCK. 

200 Butterfly, 3 in $17. .'iO per 100 

500 Ophelia, 2^-in 12.50 per 100 


Smilax seedlings, ready for Immediate ahlp- 


Salvia plants. Bonfire, $1.50 per 100, $10.00 
per 1000. Wm. P. Yeagle, Bristol, Pa. 


ment, 60c per 100, $4.00 per 1000. 

Bdward W. Schuster, Orookston. Hlnn. 


(iOO Hadley, 2H-in 12.50 per 100 

W. J. KVENDEN'R SONS. WILLIAMSPORT, PA. 


Salvias, strong cuttings, Ic, prepaid. 

C. Humfeld, Clay Center, Kan. 


Smilax. line 2-ln., $4.00 per 100. Cash. 

Boyston A Fenton. BTansviUe, Ind. 


HOSES. 
3000 3in. Promior $25 00 per 100 


Salvia America, rooted cuttings, $1.00 per 100. 
OuB Obermeyer, Pnrkersburg, W. Va. 


Smilax plants. 2^-ln. at $4.00 per 100. 
Henry Smith Floral Co.. Grand Rapids. Mich. 






Cash or c. o. d. 


SANCHEZIAS 


Smilax seedlings. 60c per 100. $4.60 per lOOO. 
prepaid. L. J. Bowe. Tltusvllle. Pa. 


W. J. & M. S. VESEY, PORT WAYNE, IND. 


Sancbezias: A bigblj decorative plant; large, 
green leaves streaked with yellow resembling 
large Crotons, 2Vi-in., $1.00 per doc, $7.00 per 
100; 8%-in., $2.00 per doz., $16.00 per 100. 

Oak Orove Oreenhouae, Tuskegee, Ala. 


PREMIER, COLUMBIA AND OPHELIA 


SNAPDRAQONS 


Rosea, strong, healthy plants. 

3-ln $12.00 per 100, $100.00 per 1000 

2%-in 9.00 per 100. 75.00 per 1000 


20.000 GIANT 8NAPDBAG0N8. 
These seedlings are pinched back, branched 
and well established in pots; no rust;- same as 


A. RASMUSSEN, NEW ALBANY, IND. 


SANSEVIERIAS 


last year, $3.50 per 100, $30.00 per 1000. Giant, 




white, yellow, rose, garnet, pink. Send In your 

order now, as you will find we are headquarters. 

CLOVBB LEAF FLOBAIi CO., 

Springfield, 0. 


ROSES. 
1000 Hadley ready to bench, 4-in. pots, $15.00 
per 100, $125.00 per 1000. 

.100 Dunlop; 4-in. pots, $15.00 per 100. 


SANSEVIEUIA ZEYLANICA. 

Nii'i- 2in. pot plants $4.00 per 100 

Nice 3 in. pot plants 8.00 per 100 

Cash. No packing cliargo. 
THE IMI^VY CO.. ZANBSVILLE, 0. 

Sansevieria Zeylnnica. 3-in., 20c; 4-in., ,30c; 
.-> in., 50c. All extra strong. Cash with order. 
11. C. Doescher, 2048 Gentilly .\ve.. New Or- 
leans, I^a. 


CHAS. A. MOSS, SPARTANBURG. S. C. 


Snapdragons, 20,000 pinched back, branched. 


VOTING ROSE STOCK. EXTRA FINE. 
ROO Ophelia, 3-iii $10 00 per 100 


well established In pots, Half-Olant seedling 
Snapdragons in following kinds and colors: Bril- 


Cash with orders. 
J. C. RENNISON CO., SIOUX CITY. lA. 


liant Crimson, Golden Queen, Mont Blanc, De- 
fiance, Fire Brand, Rose Queen. Sure to please. 
Clover Leaf Floral Co., Springfleld, 0. 


GOOD, HEALTHY ROSE STOCK. 
Columbia. 2V2-ln $8 00 $75 00 


Sansevieria Zeylanica, 2%-ln. pots, $1.00 per 
doz., $7.00 per IOO; 8-ln. pots, $16.0* per 100. 
The Schmidt & Botley Co., Springfield, 0. 

Sansevieria Zeylanica, or Zebra Plant, 8-la., 
110.00 per 100. 

Oak Orove Greenhouse, Tuskegee, Ala. 


Snapdragons, mixed, pinks; Nelrose, Silver 
Pink, Golden Pink Queen, separate colors in 


T. J. ENRIGHT, FOSTORIA. 0. 


Golden Queen, Queen of North and Brilliant. 
also giant, mixed, strong 2%-in., $4.00 per 100. 
C. II. Frey Floral Co., Lincoln, Neb. 


Rose Columbia, very finest pot-grown 2%-ln. 
ready for shift, $70.00 per 100; 7%p each for 


SEASONABLE STOCK. 


Madlsonvillp, Ky. 


SANTOLINAS 


Snapdragons, giant flowered, separate colors. 
2-ln., $5.00 per 100, $46.00 per 1000. 

THE STORRS & HARRISON CO., 
Painesville. 0. 


WHITE OPHELIA. 

2Vj-ln., $12.00 per 100, $100.00 per 1000. 

Cash or satlsfacforv reference. 

W. F. DUNTEMAN, BENSENVILLE. ILL. 


SEASONABLE STOCK. 
Santollna Incana. grand for carpet bedding, 
2-ln., $6.00 per 100, $46.00 per 1000. 

THE STORRS &, HARRISON CO.. 
Painesville. 0. 


Snapdragons. Nelrose, Silver Pink, Vaughan's 
Special Mixture and Golden King, strong, 
healthy plants free from rust; seedlings ready 
for 8-ln. pots, $4.00 per 100. 

Freeport Floral Co., Freeport, 111. 


Roses. Milady. GOO 2'4-in. own-root, $10.00 per 
100: Ophelia bencli plants, I.IOO A No. 1 stock. 
ready June 1. $10.00 per 100, $00.00 per 1000. 
F. L. I.flInson, Florist, Council Bluffs. la. 


Santollnas. 2-ln.. $3.00 per 100, $27.60 per 
1000. Kingman Floral Co.. Kingman, Kan. 


SCHIZANTHUS 

Schizanthus. mixed varieties, 2U-incb at $6.00; 
4-lncb at $16.00 per 100. Good for either pota or 
cut bloom. 

Henry Smith Floral Co.. Grand Rapids. Hlch. 


Snapdragons, Silver Pink, Keystone, Nelrose 
and Dreer's pink, white, yellow, red, etc., strong, 
healthy plants, fine for summer bloom. 2^-ln. 
pots. $5.00 per 100. 


PREMIER AND OPHELIA ROSES. 

Bench-grown, 3-yparoId, $15.00 per 100 

ALFRED M. CAMPRELL, .STRAFFORD, PA. 


Rose plants, Hoosler Beauty. Oplielia. Mock, 
etc., 3-in., strong, own-root plants at $15.00 per 
100. Henry Smith Floral Co., Grand Rapids. Mich. 


Henry Smith Floral Co.. Grand Baplds. Mich. 


SEEDS 


Snapdragon Giants. Silver Pink, white, yellow, 
scarlet and ruby, 2V4-ln., $5.00 per 100, $46.00 


Surplus 2i/» and 4-ln., now and standard sorts. 
Lecdle Co., Expert Rose Growers, Springfield, O. 


ASPARAGUS PLUHOSDS NANUS 8BIBD8. 

New crop, live, vigorous seeds of true Nanus 
type. Will make quick growing, proflUble plants. 
Immediate delivery. Satisfaction guaranteed. 
1000 seeds 8 1.6* 


per 1000. 

W. E. Trimble Greenhouse Co., Princeton. 111. 


Roses: Write for our classified wholesale price 
list of The Schmidt & Botley Co.. Springfield, 0. 


SNAPDRAGONS, IN BLOOM. 

Pink, vellow and white, strong 2V4-in.. 4c. 

Gl'lLLBTT & SONS, LINCOLN, ILL. 


SALVIAS 


Per pound 12.60 

ASPARAGUS SPRRNGBRI SEEDS. 


Snapdragons, pinched back, free from rust, 
strong 2-in., $3.50 per 100. Cash. 

Fisher's Greenhouse, Vinton, la. 


SALVIAS, AMERICA AND ZURICH. 


Tiast call on a grand lot of 


2000 seeds 1 76 


Snapdragons, pink, white and yellow; 2>4-in., 




5000 seeds B.OO 


$4.00 per 100. Charles Sherwood, Waterloo, la. 


and all other insects 


Per pound 7 00 


STATICE 


lots of brandies 
AND A BIG RARGAIN. 


SBVIN-VINCBNT CO., 
612 Washington St., Saa Francisco. Oal. 

ASPARAGUS PLUMOSUS NANUS SEED. 
Now ready for immediate delivery. 

1000 seeds $1.26 

6000 seeds 8 00 


Latlfolia, reset seedlings, $2.60 per 100, pre- 
paid. P. Danley, Macomb, 111. 


.«:i.no iier 100, $30.00 per 1000. 
RiKilod cntliniis. $1 .''lO por 100 


STEVIAS 


prcimid. Cash witli order. 


STEVIAS. 




Lb 8 60 


Double and Single. 


r, L HI'MPnUEY. 
Zani'svillo, 0. 


ASPARAGUS SPRENOERI SEEDS. 


Per 100 Per 1000 
Rooted ciillinns $2.50 $20.00 




6000 seeds 4 00 


2 Vi -in 6.00 60.00 


SALVIA AMERICA. OR GLOBE OP FIRE 

strong plants topped, well branched and ready 
to shift. 2V4-in.. $4.00 per 100. 


Lb 6 00 


C. U. LIGGIT, 


MAISON SEED CO., 
3rd and Townsend Sts., San Francisco, Cal. 


.'iOS Bulletin BIdg., Philadelphia, Pa. 
STEVIA SERRATA. 


Cash with order. 

No pnckini: clinrge. 

H. 8. McMURRAY. BELLEFONTAINE. 


PRIMULA OBCONICA, 
QIGANTEA AND GRANDIFLORA. 
My well-known strain, with flowers 2 inches in 
diameter; named varieties or mixed, 75c per pkg. 
of 1000 seeds. 

H. PLATH, 
210 Lawrence Ave., San Francisco. Oal. 
Delphinium Belladonna, fresh seed, best type, 
$2.00 per oz. 

Dplphlnlum Gold Medal Hybrids, large, fine 
colors, $1.00 per oz. 

Wm. F. Krueger, 516 Potter St.. Toledo, 0. 


Strong, healthy, well-branched plants. 

214-ln., $4.00 per 100. 

Cash with order. 


SALVIA SPLENDENS. 

Transplanted, $1.25 per 100, postpaid, $10.00 

per 1000; sredlings, fiOc per 100, $5.00 por 1000. 

2iMn.. $3 !-.0 per 100. 

THE THUMB N^TRSERY, 

Jfarlette. Mich. 


The above prices include careful packing. 
R. S. McMURRAY, BELLEFONTAINE, 0. 

DOUBLE STEVIA. 

Strong 2-in. stock, $5.00 per 100; 

.3in., $8.00 per 100. 

WINFIELD S. KIUCHER. 


Salvias, America. Bonfire, Splendens, Zurich, 
!l';S?^ rooted cuttings, Jl.W per 100, $12.00 per 
lOOO' ""'^ 2U in., $5.00 por 100. $40.00 per 
S. S. Skidelsky & Co.. 53 Park Place, New York 


Cyclamen Specialist, Defiance. 0. 

Stevlas, Double Tall and Dwarf, strong rooted 
cuttings, $2.00 per 100. $17.50 per 1000. 

Tall 2»4-ln., $5.00 per 100, $45.00 per 1000. 
S. S. Skidelsky & Co., 53 Park Place, New York. 


NEW SEED 

DELPHINIUM BELLADONNA. 

Guaranteed pure seed, oz., $2.00; lb., $20.00. 

ONARGA NURSERY CO., 

Cultra Bros.. Mgrs.. Onarga, 111. 

Calendula Orange King. 60c per trade packet. 

Cleveland Cherries, select seeds, 60c per trade 

packet; leedlings, 60c per 100. 

Otto P. Krueger, Toledo, 0. 


Salvias. Bonfire, large tr.insplnnted plants 
•■eafly for 2VJ-in., $1.2.- per 100, jxistpaid; $10.00 

Chas. Wliitton, York and Gray Av... T'tica, N. Y, 


Stevlas, well branched plants, 2%-in., $5.00 
per 100, $45.00 per 1000. 

Otto P. Krueger. Toledo. 0. 

Stevlas. strong, healthy stock, 2H-ln., $8.60 
per 100, $30.00 per 1000. 

Henry Krueger, 602 Clark St., Toledo, 0. 


,«?ni^'.Jl?' 2H-ln., r,c. .Tohn G. Witt & Son, 
10423 Wallace St.. Chicago, III. 



'*' ■ . ■■■i 



Jdnb 1, 1922 



The Florists^ Review 



143 



Stevla, dwarf double, rooted cuttings, (1.60 
per 100; 2 in., $3.00 per 100. Cash. 

Byer Bros., Cliambersburg, Pa. 

Stevias, dwarf double, strong 2-ln., $2.75 per 
100; rooted cuttings, $1.20 per 100. 
Heckenkamp, Qnlncy, 111. 

8t«TUi, 2U-ii>. ready for 8-ln., $S.0O per 100; 
rooted cuttings, $1.60 per 1000. Anderson Floral 
Co., 616 John St., Anderson, Ind. 

Stevlas, stronu cuttings, l%c prepaid. 
C. Humfeld, Clay Center, Kan. 

Stevia Double White, 2%-in., 6c. Cash. 

Hammerschmidt & Clark, Medina, O. 

STOCKS 

Stocks, Beauty of Nice, Princess Alice, Queen 
Alexandra, best strain; fine, strong plants, 2)4* 
in., $3.00 per 100, $27.60 per 1000. 
J. 0. Schmidt, Bristol, Pa. 

STRAWBERRY PLANTS 

STBAWBEBHY PLANTS. 

Dunlap, Warfleld, Bzcelsior and Michell's Barly, 

at $8.50 per 1000; Aroma and Oandy, at $4.00 

per 1000; Progressive, $8.00 per 1000; also Apple, 

Peach and other nursery stock; prices right. 

THB ROEDBR NDRSBRIES, 

Osceola, Mo. 

SWAINSOWAS 

SWAINSONAS. 

Strong, clean 2^-in., $5.00 per 100. 

No packing charge. Cash. 

M. A. REIMERS, 

800 Baxter Ave., Louisville, Ky . 

SWAINSONA ALBA. 

2Vi-in., $5.00 per lOO; 3 in.. $8.00 

per 100; 4-ln., $16.00 per 100. 

ROSKMONT GARDENS, 

116 Dexter Ave., Montgomery, Ala. 

Swainsonas, strong 2% -in., 6c. 

F. L. Uiinson, Florist. Council Blnlfs, la. 

SWEET POTATOES 



NANCY HALL OR PORTO RICO PLANTS. 

Free from any known disease; prepaid; 600, 

$1.60; 1000, $2.25; 10,000, $2.00; 25,000, $1.75 

per 1000. Charges collect, $1.60 per 1000. Plants 

packed in damp moss. No order too large or 

too small. Largest plant grower in the state. 

J. A. CLIFTON, SEEDSMAN, 

Russellville, Ark. 

Sweet Potato plants. Yellow and Big Stem 
Jersey varieties, $2.25 per 1000, postpaid; $1.76 
per 1000, cliarges collect. 

Red Jersey nnd White and Yellow Yams, 
$2.50 per 1000, postpaid; $2.00 per 1000, charges 
collect. H. Austin, Felton, Del. 

Sweet Potato plants, ready now. Tellow 
Jersey and Red Bermuda, 60c per 100, $8.00 per 
1000. Cash, please. 
Mllford Greenhonse, Mllford, 111. 

Sweet Potatoes, 4,000,000 plants, $1.60 per 
1000. Varieties: Yellow Jersey, Big Leaf, 
Gold Skin, Up River and Red Nansemond. 
C. B. Brown, BridgeTille. Pel. 

Sweet Potato plants. Early Golden and Nancy 
Hall, $3.50 per 1000. 
A. 0. Sperry, Neodesha, Kan. 

~' THUNBERQIAS 

Thunbergias, strong, transplanted, bench-grown, 
$2.00 per 100. Cash. 
Harry M. Bu ckley, R. R. No. 6, Springfield, HI. 

Thunbergias for hanging baskets, 2U-ln., $4.00 
per 100. Burden Floral Co., Bowling Green. Ky. 

TRADESCANTIAS 

Tradesoantla Tricolor, variegated, green, white 
and red: rooted cuttings, $1.25 per 100; 214-in., 
$3.00 per 100. Tradescnntlas, green, rooted cut- 
tings, $1.25 per 100; 2V4-in., $3.00 per 100. Cash 
or c. o. d. 
W. E. Trimble Oreenhouse Co.. Princeton, III. 

TRADESCANTIAS. 
Three varieties, rooted cuttings, 80c l)er 100, 
2% in., $2.7.-) per 100. 

GIILLETT & SONS, LIXCOLX, ILL. 

Tradescantias, variegated, green and white; 
extra strong ready for shift, $3.50 per 100. 
W. B. Shumway Floral Co., Tiffla 0. 

Tradescantia Tricolor, also green and white; 
strong plants, 2-in., $3.00 per 100. Cash. 
Olson Floral Co., Elgin, 111. 

Tradescantia, or Wandering Jew. Zebrina, 
dark and striped foliage. 2^-in., $3.60 per 100. 
Oak Grove Greenhouse. Tnskegee, Ala. 

Tradesoantla, or Wandering Jew, Blcolor, BOo 
per doz., $4.00 per 100. 
Tho Schmidt A Botley Pp., Springfleld. O. 

Tradescantias. red: rooted cuttings, $1.26 per 
100: bushy 2-in., $3.00 per 100. 
Wm. F. Krneger, Toledo. O. 

Tradescantias. red; 2^ -In., $8.00 per 100. 
Charles Sherwood. Waterloo. la. 

Tradescantias. 3 kinds, rooted cottings, $1.00 
per ino. Wm. J. Beck. New Oastle. Pa. 

TUBEROSES 

TUBEROSES, SELECT BTILBS. 
MEXICAN EVERBIX)OMINO. 

ist size $2..'50 per 100. $20.00 per lOOO 

2nd size 2.00 per 100. 16.00 per 1000 

FURROW A CO., GUTHRIE. OKIxA. 

Advertisers bave learned from experience that 

THE REVIEW 

PAYS BEST. 



UMBRELLA PLANTS 



Umbrella plants, good stock out of 2-iu. pots, 
$3.50 per 100. Cash. 

C. L. Humphrey, Zanesville, O. 

Umbrella plants, good 8-ln., 8c. L. Q. Brown. 
86th St. and Kensington Ave., Kansas City. Mo. 

VEOETABLE PLANTS 

VEGETABLE PLANTS, NOW READY. 

Cabbage: Copenhagen Market and Charleston 
Wakefleld, 60c per 100, $3.60 per 1000. 

Tomatoes: New Earliana. Chalk's Early 
Jewel, Improved Stone and Ponderosa, 60c per 
100, $4.60 per 1000. 

Sweet Potato plants: Yellow Jersey. Nancy 
Hail and Bed Bermuda, 60c per 100, $4.00 per 
1000. 

Ruby King Pepper: New York Purple Egg 
Plant and Cauliflower, 75c per 100. 

Cool grown and ready for the field, f. o. b. 

Cash, please. 

JOHN SAMPSON. 

P. O. Box 823, Qreenvlew, III. 

PEACH ORCHARD IS IN CLAY COUNTY. 

Extrwpe northeast comer of Arkansas; a 6-hour 
run ogrTMissouri Pacific Railroad to St. Louis. 
Our plants are guaranteed disease free, well- 
rooted and ready for the field: 

CABBAGE: Jersey Wakefleld, Copenliagen 
Market, Ail Season, Danish Balihead, Premium 
Late- Flat Dutch, Redrock, 50c per 100, $3.00 
per 1000. 

TOMATO: Earliana, John Baer, Bonny Best, 
Chalk's Jewel, Matchless, New Stone, 50c per 
100, $3.76 per 1000. 

SWEET POTATO PLANTS: Nancy Hall, Yel- 
low Jersey, Cuban Yam, 40c per 100, $3.50 per 
1000; 10,000 plants for $30.00; supply unlimited. 

Guaranteed plants; orders shipped same day 
received; we are specialists in packing plants; 
give us a trial. 

LOCUST PLANT FARM, 
Peach Orchard. Ark. 

Cabbage, 5,000,000 plants, flcld-grown. Early 
Jersey Vvakeflelrt, Copenhagen Market, Enkhul- 
zen Glory, Allhead Early, Early Flat Dutch, 
Succession, Surehead and Danish Balihead, $1.75 
per 1000; 5000. $8.00; ."500. $1.00. Uerooted Cab- 
bage plants, $2.00 per 1000. 

Tomatoes, 2,000,000 i>lants, fleld grown, rpad.v 
now, John Baor, Norton and Stone. $2. .50 per 
1000: $11.00 i>pr mWi: transplanted Tomatoes, all 
varieties, $7.00 per 1000. 

Cauliflower plants; Early Snowball, $4.00 per 
1000. 

Pepper plants. Ruby King, Chinese Giant and 
I/ing UiMl Cayenne, transplanted. .¥7.50 per 1000. 

Send for free list of all vegetable plants. 

Paul F. Roohollo, Mnrristown. N. J. 

('al>liaK(' and Tomato i>lants, fielii-Krown. poili- 
gice seed; selected plants: CabbaKe. Danish 
Itallhoad, Enkliiilzen Glory, (^iipenhanen Market, 
Allhead Early, .Succession. SnreliPad. Flat Dntoli. 
Red Danish Stonehend, $l.Wi iw>r 1000; IjOO. $1.L'0; 
rcrootod plants, .«2.00 per 1000; uOO, $1.:!0; 300, 
$1.00. 

Tomato plants. Earli.nna, Chalk's Jewel, Great- 
er Baltimore. Success, Stone, ,*U..'pO jier 1000; 
nOO, if.\X<0: 5000, $11.50. Check, please. List 
free. No business dune on Snndav. 

F. W. Roohelle & Sons. Chester, N. J. 

(ELK It V PLANTSV^AS^ HLANCHING. 

Now grown by 90% of 

Kal,iin»z<ici fjrowers. 

Extra slronc. stocky plants, crown in our own 

fields from In'st seed; i>ackeil as our years of 

experience has shown 11s. and sliipped prdmptly. 

$3.00 per 100(», $i:{.7r. per .'ilMIO. .$2.%. lid per 

10,000. Cash. 

Special prices on larger lots. 
ItUII-L (KLERY (I.MIDENS. 
Kalamazoo. Midi. 




1000. 

Late Cabbage pl.iiits: ('openbacen, Itallhead. 
Flat Dutch. .\ll Season and Early Snninier, S-.oO 
per 1000. Cash with order. 

Geo. F. llarlnng. Sandusky, (). 

CABBAGE AND TOMATO PLANTS. 
Hardy, field-grown, ready for transplanting to 
the field; plants are grown from pedigreed seed 
stocks only. Varieties: Cabbage, Flat Dutch, 
Copenhagen Market, Danish Balihead. Tomatoes, 
Earliana, Bonny Best, Stone (Greater Baltimore 
strain), $1.50 per 1000. F. 0. b. Moorestown. 
Express shipments advised. Please mention this 
paper when ordering. 

STOKES SEED FARMS CO., 
Moorestown, N. J. 

SELECTED CELERY PLANTS. 
Easy-Blanching, now the most popular variety 
grown in Kalamazoo; "none better": strong plants 
ready for the field, $3.00 per 1000, $25.00 per 
10,000. Special prices on lots over 10,000. Cash. 
O. K. CELERY CO.. KALAMAZ OO . >nC H. 
Beet plants. 80c per 100, $2.25 per 1000. 
Swiss Chard plants, $2.00 per 1000. 

Wm. P. Yeagle, Bristol. Pa. 



JERSEY-GROWN VEGETABLE PLANTS. 
THB HOMB OF VEGETABLE PLANTS. 

Pepper plants $4.00 per 1000 

Cabbage plants, 17 varieties 1.60 per 1000 

Tomato plants 2.00 per 1000 

Cauliflower plants 4.00 per 1000 

Eggplants 6.00 per 1000 

Celery plants 2.00 per 1000 

Sweet Potato plants 2.50 per 1000 

WARREN SHINN, WOODBURY, N. J. 

MILLIONS, FINE FIELD-GROWN PLANTS. 

Cabbage and Tomato plants: 600, $1.25; 
1000. $2.25; 5000, $10.00, mailed prepaid; ex- 
pressed 6000, $7.60. 

Sweet Potatoes, 600. $1.75; 1000, $2.7S, poat- 
pald; expressed 10,000. $20.00. Cash. 

Plants well packed, shipped anywhere; satis- 
faction positively guaranteed. 
TIDEWATER PLANT CO., FRANKLIN. VA. 

Peppers, strong plants, 60c per 100, $3.00 per 
1000. 

Cauliflower, 60c per lOO, $3.50 per 1000. 

Cabbage plants, all varieties, fine plants, $1.25 
per 1000, $10.00 per 10,000. 

Onion and Beet plants, fine, strong plants. 
$1.00 per 1000. $8.50 per 10,000. 

Tomato plants, all varieties, 35c per 100, $2.00 
per 10 0. J. O. Schmidt , Bristo l. Pa. 

Peppers, strong plants, not transplanted. Bell 
or Bullnose, Ruby King, Sweet Mountain, 
Sweet Spanish, Chinese Giant, Long Red Cay- 
enne, 65c per 100, $5.00 per 1000, prepaid. 

Tomatoes. New Stone, Ponderosa, Earliana, 
Bonny Best, John Baer and others, strong trans- 
planted, 75c per 100, by mail; $6.00 per 1000, 
express. S. W. Pike, St. Charles, 111. 

VBOBT ABLE PLANTS. 
Cauliflower, strong transplanted plants, $8.00 
per 1000. 

Peppers, Neapolitan, Red Cayenne and Sweet 
Mountain, strong seedlings, $4.00 per 1000. 
No charge for packing. Cash with all orders. 
NEW LONDON GREENHOUSE, 
New London. O. 

Cabbage plants, field-grown, immediate ship- 
ment: Wakefleld, Copenhagen, Balihead and 
Flats. Tomato plants. Chalk's Jewel, Stone and 
Greater Baltimore. Peppers, Ruby King and 
Bullnose. Prices: 300, 90c; 500, $1.25; 1000, 
$2.26. postpaid. 10,000 expressed, $15.00. Sat- 
tafaction guaranteed. 
T. J. Cox. Frankl in. Va. 

Tomatoes, Stone, .\cnie. Earliana, .Tune Pink 
and MotJee Tree, plaiits. $2.00 per 1000. Sweet 
Potatoes, Nancv Il.ill, Porto Rico and Pumpkin 
Yam, idants, ,$2.00 per 1000. 

Peppers. Sweet Mountain. Prooopp's, Bell and 
Cayenne plants. $3.00 per lOOO. 

Bitsche Seed Ilouse, Chicknsha, Okla. 

Tomato plants; Earliana. Stone, Beefsteak 
and Ponderosa, strong plants, readv for the field, 

.$:<.oo per 1000. 

Cabliage plants: Jersey Wakefield. Surehead 
and liMte Flat Dutch, strong oiitduor-grown plants, 
$3.00 per 1000. I'.ickinc free. Cish with order. 
Mc.\dains & McConib. roliiintiiis Grove, O. 

raulifiower, llnissels .Sprouts, ("aliliaue, Beet, 
Onion. I<eek, Hiirse-rndisli. ,\spara;;us. Kale. 
Kohl It.ilii. .Manuel. Wurzel. Mint. I'.irsley. Kliu- 
barb. Saue. Sweet Potato ami Toinalo plants. 
Catalocne free. Wliolesale trade iirico list sent to 
dealers. Harry J. Sciiiiics. Good l^.ninnd. N. Y. 

Peppers: Ruby King. Chinese Giant, seed 
plants, strong and well-rooted, $3.00 per 1000, 
$26.00 per 10,000. 

Egg plants: Black Beauty, Mammoth Purple, 
seed plants, well-rooted. $3.00 per 1000. 60c per 
100. H. J. Potomkln. Muncle. Ind. 

TOMATO PLANTS. 
A bargain: 75.000 Redrock and Greater Bal- 
timore, $2.50 per 1000, fine plants; also Chalk's 
Jewel and Ponderosa, ready for retail or plant- 
ing. 
S. HUMFELD. MUNCIE. IXD. 

Cabbage plants: Jersey Wakefield and Copen- 
hagen Market, strong, transplanted. $4.50 per 
1000. 

Tomatoes: Bonn.v Best, Earliana and Ponder- 
osa, strong, transplanted, $4.50 per 1000. Cash, 
please. Mohler's Flower Shop, Ada, 0. 

Tomatoes, Early Avon, Dwarf, Champion, 
Vaughan's Improved Stone, fine plants ready 
for the field, $10.00 per lOOO, 3 times trans- 
planted, $7.50 per 1000. Quality Is our hobby. 
Thornton Floral Co.. Streator, 111. 

SELECTED CABBAGE PLANTS. 
Early Jersey Wakefleld, Copenhagen Market 
and All Head, $2.60 per 1000, $22.60 per 10,- 
000. Special prices on lots over 10.000. 

WM. P. YEAGLE. BRISTOL, PA. 

'rom.ito plants. Stone, 50c per 100, prepaid. 

CaWiaire i>lants. Copenhagen Market nnd Flat 
Dutch. .->0c per 100, prepaid. Cash, plensp. 
Liberty (hardens, 2030 Sunnyslde. Burlington. la. 

WHITB PLUMB CELERY 

Plnnts $3,00 per 1000 

OREENVIU.B FIX)RAL CO., 
Greenville , Mich. 

TOMATO PLANTS. 
Earliana, Bonny Best. John Bner and Stone. 
40c per 100. $3.00 per 1000. Selected plants. 
WM. P. YEAGLE, BRISTOL, PA . 

Celery plants, Easy-Blanching, ready for field, 
30c per 100. $2.00 per 1000. Cash with order. 
Peter Schrier & Co., 301 Wall St., Kalamazoo, 
Mich. 

Porto Rico Potato plants, healthy; grown in 
the open, 600, $1.76; 1000, $3.00, postpaid. 

Rhodes Seed Co., Forsyth. Oa. 



144 



The Florists^ Review 



JuNB 1, 1922 



VEGETABLE PLANTS— Continued 



HOLT'S MAMMOTH SAGE. 

75c per doz., $6.00 per 100. 

THE SCHMIDT & BOTLEY CO., 

Springfield, O. 

Celery plants, Easy-Blanching, White Plume 
and Golden Self-Blanching, 50c per 100. $3.50 
per 1000. Wm. P. Yeagle. Bristol, Pa. 

Nancy Hall plants, postpaid, anywhere, any 
amount, $1.36, express collect, $1.00 per 1000. 
W. V. Taylor, RussellviUe, Ark. 

Tomato plants: 1,000,000, New Stone, Bonny 
Best and Dwarf Stone, $1.50 per 1000. 
W. C. Whelchel, Danville, 111. 

Pepper Neapolitan, good, strong plants from 
seed bed, $3.00 per 1000. 
E. Bawlings, Wholesale Grower, Allegany, N. Y. 

Tomato and Pepper plants, standard varieties, 
grown in frames, ready for the field, $3.00 per 
1000. Odor Greenhouses, lola, Kan. 

Pepper Neapolitan, transplants, $1.10 per JOO, 
postpaid, $9.00 per 1000; seedlings, $2.50 per 
1000. The Thumb Nursery, Marlette. Mich. 

Sweet Potato and Cabbage plants, postpaid to 
you; 300. $1.00, 1000, $3.50. 

William Redcny. Route 6, Lancaster, Pa. 

Peppers, Ruby King, Ruby Giant and BuUnose, 
strong plants, 50c per 100, $4.00 per lOOO. 
Wm. P. Yeagle, Bristol, Pa. 

Egg plants, strong plants, 65c per 100, $5.00 
per 1000. Wm. P. Yeagle, Bristol. Pa. 

Pepper Chinese Giant, strung transplanted, 
$5.00 per 1000. M. B. Sourdry, Girard, Kan. 



Late Cabbage plants, 100,000 ready to ship, 
$2.00 per 1000. Ozark Plant Co., Girard, Kan. 

Oaullflower planti, CSc per 100, $4.S0 per 1000. 
Wm. P. Yeagle. Bristol, Pa. 

VERBENAS 

Verbenas, transplanted, rooted cuttings, $1.00 
and $1.25 per 100; 2%-ln., $3.50 and $4.00 per 
100. Cash or c. o. d. 
W. E. Trimble Greenhouse Co., Princeton, 111. 

Verbenas, Vaughan's Best Mixture and Mam- 
moth, mixed, strong, healthy plants, ready to 
bloom, 2%-ln., $4.00 per 100. 
Freeport Floral Co., Freeport, 111. 

Verbena Miimmotli, mixed colors, fine, large 
plants from flats, ready to pot, $5.00 per 1000. 
Samuel Whitton, Utica, N. Y. 

Verbenas, ViiuKhnn's best mixture in bloom; 
2% and 3-in. pots, $3.00 per 100. Cash only. 
Rest land Floral Co., Mendota, 111. 

Verbena Mammoth, separate colors, labeled, 
■trong plants ready to pot or plant out, $2.00 
per 100, prepaid. S. W . Pike, St. Charles, HI. 

Aloysla Citriodora, Lemon Verbena, 75c per 
doz., $5.00 per 100. 

The Schmidt & Botley Co., Springfield, 0. 

Verbena Giants: White, pink, blue, red, Luci- 
fer and mixed, fine 2-ln., $2.50 per 100, $20.00 
per 1000. Cash. Byer Bro s., Chambersburg. Pa. 

Verbenas, mixed, extra fine stock, 2%-ln. pot*. 
$8.00. Cash. Packing free. 
La Crosse Floral Co., La Crosse, Wli. 

Verbena seedlings, ."iOc per 100. $4.60 per 
1000, prepaid. I,. J. Rowe, Titusville, Pa. 

Verbenas, 4 colors; 2H-ln., $4.00 per iOO. 
Charles Sherwood. Waterloo, la. 

Verbenas, 8-ln.. 7c each. 
Davlg Floral Co., Davenport, la. 



VINCAS 



3 inch Vlncas, 
$19.00 and $12.00 per 100. 

WHITE BROS., 
Medina, N. Y. 



VINCA VARIEGATA. 

2V,-in., $4.00 per 100, $37..'i0 per 1000. 

3 in., 15 to 24 ins. long, $S.00 per 100. 

$75.00 per 1000; 4-in., $15.00 per 100; 

extra lioavy, strong 4in., 20c and 25c. 

GULLETT & SONS, LINCOLN, ILL. 
VINCAS, VARIEGATED. 

2'4-ln. pots, $50.00 per 1000 .«;'^f, (lO 

31/i-in. pots 15 00 

4-in. pots "2 50 

4-in. i)ots, bn«hy plants ....'...'..'. ^5 00 

ROMAN .1. lUWIN, ••• - • 

4S W. IStli S t., N,.w Y(.rk. N. Y. 

VINCAS, VARlEG.VfED. 

Extra strong, second year iilants 

8 to 10 long shoots, 

$15.00 per 100. 

Cash. Immpfliatp sliipmont. 

KNIGHTSTOWN GREENHOUSE. 

K nigh ts^wn , I nd . 

VINCAS, VARIEGATED^ 
Extra fine, strong plants In 4-in. pots 

$18.00 per 100. 
NEOSHO FLORAL CO., NEOSHO, MO. 



VINCA BOOTED CDTTIN08. 

ORBEN AND VARIEGATED, 

$2.00 per 100, $18.00 per 1000. 

VARIEGATED. 

2%-ln $4.00 per IOO, $35.00 per 1000 

8-ln 8.00 per 100, 70.00 per 1000 

THE ELITCH GARDENS CO., DENVER. COLO. 

VINCAS, VARIEGATED. 

For First Class Work. 

Extra strong, bushy plants, 

out of 4-ln. pots, $15.00 per 100. Cash, please. 

H. S. BRANDT, YORK. PA. 

Vlnca Varlegata, excellent bushy stock, the 
deep variegated white and light green kind, 
4-in. with vines up to 38 Ins. long, 20c each; 
4%-in. with vines up to 44 Ins. long, 25c each, 
Freeport Floral Co., Freeport, 111. 

VINCA VARIEGATA AND MAJOR, GREEN. 
Rooted cuttings... $ 2.00 per 100, $ 15.00 per 1000 

3-ln 10.00 per 100, 80.00 per 1000 

4-ln 20.00 per 100, 180.00 per 1000 

D. R. HERRON, OLEAN. N. Y. 

Vlncas. variegated, strong 2Vi-in., $5.00 per 
100, $45.00 per 1000; 3-in., $10.00 per 100; 4-in., 
$15.00 per 100. 
S. S. Skidelsky & Co., 53 Park Place, New York. 

Vlncas, variegated, rooted cuttings, $2.50 per 
100; 2%-ln., $5.00 per 100; 3-ln., $8.00 per 100; 
4-ln., i5c each. Cash or c. o. d. 
W. E. Trimble Greenhouse Co., Princeton, 111. 

' VINCAS, VARIEGATED. 

Extra strong 4-ln $15.00 per 100 

BAUSCHER BROS.. ||L 

20 8. Chicago Ave., Freep^P* 111. 

Vlncas, variegated, strong stock, 6 to 8 shoots, 
4-in., $18.00 per 100; good 3-in., $10.00 per 100. 
Packing free. 

Evenden Bros. Co., Wllliamsport, ^p. 

' VINCA VARIEGATA. 

2%-In. pots $4.50 per 100 

3-in. pots 8.00 per 100 

CHAS. E. SMITH & SON, YORK, PA. 

160,000 Vlnca Varlegata, 4-ln. pots, $16.00; 
8%-ln., $13.00; 8-ln., $10.00; 2^-ln., $6.00 per 
100. Will ship at once. Alonzo J. Bryan, Whole- 
sale Florist, Washington, N. J. 

Vlncas, variegated, fine 2^-ln, stock; this 
will make big 3-ln. stock for spring sales; $4.00 
per 100, $37.00 per 1000. 
8. A. Plnkstone, Utica. N. Y. 

Vlncas, variegated, fine stock, special for or- 
ders accompanied by cash, 3-in., $8.00 per 100. 
Joseph Bancroft & Son, Cedar Falls, la. 

Vincas, variegated, strong plants. 4000 3-In., 
$0.00 per 100. W. E. Robinson & Sons, 6024 
Emuia Ave, St. Louis, Mo. 

Vinca Varlegata, ex'tra strong 4-in., $13.50; 
liglit ones, $10.00 per 100. 

Plain City Greenhouses, Plain City, 0. 

Vlncas, variegated, strong 4-ln., $16.00 per 
100; 2^-ln., $6.00 per 100; 2-in., $4.00 per 100. 
The East Lawn Gardens, Urbana, 0. 

Vlnca Varlegata, extra strong plants from 
4-in. pots, $20.00 per 100. Cash. 

Kane Greenhouses, Kane. Pa. 

Vincas, variegated, long vines, 3-in., $10.00 per 
100, $90.00 per 1000. 

Wm. F. Krneger, Box 102, Sta. A, Toledo, O. 

Vlncas, varicsatod, strong rooted cuttings, 
$2.50 per 100, $20.00 per 1000. Cash with order. 
R. Virus, 5324 Leland Ave., Chicago, III. 

Vincas. heavy 3-ln. plants, $10.00 per 100. 
Packing free. Cash. I.,a\\Tenfe Floral Co., 1547 
Massachusetts St., Ijiwrence, Kan. 

Vlnca Varlegata, A No. 1 stock, 4-in., 15c 
each. Cash. 

Washington Greenliousps. Washington, Ind. 

Vincas, strong 2-ln., $3.75 per 100; 4 in., $12.50 
per 100. Cash onlv. 

Rpstland Floral Co., Mendota. 111. 

Vinoa Varlegata, heavy, out of 4-in. pots, 20c 
each; fair, 12yjC. Cash. Prompt shipment. 
Silvieus Greenhouses, R. F. D. 4, Ashtabula. 0. 

Vinca Varlegata, exceptionally strong and long, 
4-ln., $20.00 per 100. 

West Hill Greenhouses, Fredonia, N. Y. 

Vinca Varipgata, 3in., $10.00 per 100; 4-ln., 
$15.00 per 100. Cash, please. 
Chas. C. Walker. 1277 I/ican Ave., nanville. 111. 

Vinca Varipgata, good, strong 2-in., $3.50 per 
100. $35.00 per 1000. Cash with order. 
Harr.y White. Florist, North Manchester, Ind. 

Vinca Variegtttn, 3-ft. vines, big, full 4-ln., 
$12.00 per 100: 2V4-in., $4.00. 

Burden Floral Co., Bowling Green. Ky. 

Vlnca Varlegata. extra strong stock, 4-ln., 
$15.00 per 300, $145.00 per 1000. Cash. 
J. C. R cnnison Co., Sioux City, la. 

Vincas, variegated, 2-in. ready for 3-in., $4.00 
per 100. Cash with order. 

Marion Floral Co., Marion. Ind. 

Vinca Varlegata, strong plants, 4-in.. $25.00 
per 100. Cash with order. 

France & Vandegrift, Monroe. Mich. 

Vincas, 3%-in., $20.00 per 100; 4-in., $25.00 
per 10(1. 
Newton Rose Conservatories, Newtonvillp. Slass. 

Vincas. variocitpri. 3-in., 10c and 15c each. 
Anderson Greenhouse. Cannon Falls. Minn. 

Vincas, variegiitod. $15.00 per 100. 

Anoka Floral Co., Anoka, Minn. 



Tinea Variesata, 2H-in., $40.00 per 1000; 
rooted cuttings, $14.00 per 1000. Anderaoa 
Floral Co., B16 John St., Anderson, Ind. 

Tinea Minor, or grave Myrtle, nice plants, 
from 8 to 6 leadSi'SLCO per 100, $12.00 pei' 1000. 
Fred 8. DaTls. R. R. 1. Rossburg. O. 

Tinea Tarlegata, strong 2-in., ready for S-in., 
$4.00 per 100. Cash. 
Olson Floral Co., Elgin, HI. 

Tinea Tariegata, extra stronc 2^-in., $4.00 
per 100. Cash, please. 

The Sycamore Qrecnhonses, Sycamore, 111. 

Tinea Tariegata, fine plants, 4-ia. pots, $18.00 
per 100. Packing free. Cash. 

ta Crosse Floral Co., La Crosse, Wia. 

Tinea Tariegata, strong plants, 8-in,, 8^-ln., 
and 4-ln., 8c, 12c and IBc. 
J. C. Stelnhauser, Pittsburg, Kan. 

Vlnca Varlegata, 3Mi-ln., $10.00 per 100. Cash. 
Brill Celery Gardens, Kalamazoo, Mich. 

Vlncas, variegated, 3%-in., 10c each. Cash. 
Davis Floral Co., Davenport, la. 

Vinca Varlegata, extra strong 4-ln., 15c. Cash, 
please. P. Hopman, New Galilee, Pa. 

Vlncas, variegated, 2%-in., $4.00 per 100. 
Cash, please. F. E. Selkregg, North East, Pa. 

Vlncas, 3-ln., 9c; 4-ln., 15c; strong, ready for 
shift. W. B. Shumway Floral Co., Tlffln, O. 

Vinca Varlegata, 4-ln., $15.00 per 100. 
United States Cut Flower Co., Elmlra. N. Y. 

Tineas, strong 2Vi-ln. branched, $5.00 per 100. 
Cash. Daut Bros., Decatur, 111. 

Tinea Major, 2%-ln., $4.00 per 100; 3-ln., $6.00 
per 100. Oak Grove Greenhouse, Tuskegee, Ala. 

Tineas, variegated, strong S-ln., $7.00 per 100. 
Haase Bros., Pekln, 111. 

Tineas, good stock, 3-in., 8e; 4-in., 20e. Oasb. 
Kemble-Smlth Co., Inc., Boone, la. 

VIOLETS 

TIOLET MARIE LOUISE. 
Sand-rooted cuttings from the largest grower 
of Hudson River doubles, $20.00 per 1000. 

ETHAN A. COON, 
17 Piatt Ave., Rhinebeck. N. Y. 

Tiolets, Marie Louise, Princess of Wales and 
Swanley White, 2^-in. pots, $6.00 per 100, $50.00 
per 1000. 
Roman J. Irwin, 48 W. 18th St.. New York, N. Y. 

Tiolets, Governor Herriek and Princess of 
Wales, 2%-in. pots at $6.00 per 100. 
Henry Smith Floral Co., Grand Rapids, Mich. 

Sweet Tiolets, Governor Herriek and Princess 
of Wales, 86c per doz., $6.00 per 100. 
The Schmidt & Botley Co., Springfield, 0. 

Violet Governor Herriek, 2-in., $5.00 per 100, 
$45.00 per 1000. Otto P. Krueger, Toledo, 0. 

ZINNIAS 

Zinnias, good for cut flowers, crimson, scarlet 
and yellow; plants ready now, $1.50 i>er 100. 
Mannetto Hill Nurseries, W. C. Noonan, Prop., 
Ilicksville, L. I., N. Y. 

Zinnias, Dahlia-flowered, fine plants, $1.50 per 
100. Liberty Gardens, 2030 Sunnyside, Burling- 
ton, la. 

MISCELLANE OUS " 

Here is a long list of fine healthy plants that 
will make good money for you for your spring 
trade and they will come to you well packed, 
free of packing charges, quick, with extra plants 
in each order. 

Geraniums, about 18,000 8. A. Nutt, 2H-in<> 
6c; 8-in., 7c; 4-ln., 12c; rooted cuttings, l^c. 

Easter Greeting, 12,000 in bud and bloom, 2^- 
In., 7c; 3-ln., 10c; 4 In., 20c; 6-ln., 86c. 

Ivy Geraniums, assorted, 2^-1b., 6c; 8-ln., 8c. 

Parlor Ivies, cuttings, Ic; 2^-ln., 8c. 

Ice Plants, rooted cuttings, le; 2i^-ln., 8c. 

Mesembryanthemums, rooted cuttings, le; 2H- 
In., 8e. 

Dwarf Sweet Alyssum, seedlings, le. 

Geranium Mme. Salleroi, 2%-in., 8e. 

Carnation Enchantress, strong rooted cuttings, 
$12.60 per 1000. 

Irises, good vloIet-blue, 4c. 

Salvias, 25,000 big, strong transplanted, le. 

Asparagus Palmetto from the famous Ottawa- 
grown seed, 2-year-old, l%c. 

I need pink, white and red hardy Phlox, hardy 
Rose plants, or will trade 1600 either 2Vi-in., 
8-ln. or 4-ln. Nutt, for 1000 Poitevlne same siz€r 
or any other stock listed here. This offer mnly 
for immediate acceptance, or for cash with oroBrr' 
Wm. 8, Lohr, Ottawa, 111. 

BEGONIAS AND GLOXINIAS. 
2500 double Tuherous-rooted Begonias; latest 
new varieties as Fimbriata, Rosebud and Picta 
Marmorata, $15.00 per 100, $135.00 per 1000. 
All other double varieties. $10.00 per 100, $80.00 
per 1000; twice transplanted, ready for 3^4 and 
4-in. pots. 

Gloxinias, all of the best varieties, 

$8.00 per 100, $75.00 ppr 1000. 

LOWE'S OVERIXIOK GREENHOUSE CO.. 

Begonia and Gloxinia Specialists, 

Chagrin Fails, 0. 

^J^IISCELLANEOUS STOCK^ 

Salvias, 3-in. in bloom $ 7.00 

Carnation Enchantress, 2Mi-in 3.50 

Ivy Geraniums. 4-in 15.00 

Asparagus Plumosus, 3-in 8.00 

Geranium S. A. Nutt, 4-in 12.00 

A. C. FLORAL CO.. ARKANSAS CITY, KAN. 



June 1, 1922 



The Rorists^ Review 



145 



Qeranlumi, mixed, 4-ln., ISc; 3-ln., 8c; 2U-lii., 
4c: Kose-seented and Ivy-leaved, 4c. 

Salvia Splendens. 3 in., 8c; 2Vi-in., 4c. 

Cannas, Pennsylviinia, Henry George, Wyo- 
ming and David Harum, 3-in., 8c. 

Asparaguii Sprengeri, 3-in., 7V4c; 2^-ln., 4c. 

Impatiens Sultanl and Snapdragons, plnlc and 
white, 2%-in., 4c. 

Vlncas, green, 3-in., 7c; 2i4-in., 3c. 

Coleus, mixed and Tradescantias, 2^-in., 3c. 

Stevia, cuttings, l%c. 

Verbenas, wliite and blue; 2%-ln., 4c. 

Begonia Luminosa, large 0-in. plants, 60c; 
2^-in., ready in 10 days, 6c. Faclslng free. Cash. 
* Q. E. Berth ol d, Nebraslia City, Neb . 

READY FOR REPOTTING. 
Sweet Scented Geraniums, 200 strong 3-in., 
7c. Begonias, Mrs. Patten, Luminosa and Cbate- 
laine, In bloom, 200 strong 2Vi-in., 6c. Coral- 
lina de Lucerne, 50 3-in., 10c eacli. 

W. A. SCHREIER, ARGONIA. KAN. 

German Ivy, 2-in., $2.50 per 100. 

Verbenas, mixed, 2-in., $2.50 per 100. 

Ageratums, dwarf blue, 2-ln., $2.50 per 100. 
Holly Street Greenhouses, 14th and Holly, Nash- 
vllle, Tenn. 

Coleus, 6000 good and strong 2-in. to 2U-in. 

Alternantheras, 3000 2V4-in., red and yellow. 

Wandering Jew, 2000 2-in., red. 

Any of the above in strong plants, $20.00 
per 1000. Sch maus Bros., Paducah, Ky. 

TO EXCHANGE 

To Exchange — Aiternanthera Briillantisslma, 
$4.00 per 100, Aurea Nana, $3.00 per 100; Dusty 
Miller, $4.00 per 100. Tomatoes, Early Avon, 
Dwarf Champion and Improved Stone, big plants 
ready for the field, $10.00 per 1000, 3 times 
transplanted, $7.60 per 1000. Could use Gladioli, 
Ferns, Sprengeri, or what have you? Quality 
is our hobby. Thornton Floral Co., Streator, 111. 

To Exchange — Rooted Coleus, Achyranthes, 
Ageratum, best purple; Begonia, Tradescantia 
and Tomato seedlings ready to transplant Into 
flats, for Chrysanthemum rooted cuttings. What 
variety have you to offer? 

- J. A. Keeney Co., Monongahela City, Pa. 

To Bxckange — Or for sale. Chrysanthemums, 
Ura. Chas. Rager, Oconto, Marigold, 0. 0. Poll- 
worth, rooted cuttlags, 3c; 2-in., 4c. Rosy Mom 
and Dreer's Glaat Fringed Petunias, once trana- 
planted, ready for 2V^-in., $1.00 per 100, for 
Geraniums, a«y site. Geo. C onklin, Allegan, Mich. 

To Exchange — Or will sell Palm Phoenix Rec- 
linata; a genuine bargain; fine strong-growing, 
clean plants, 15 to 18 ins. high. In 4-ln. pots, 
$12.00 per 100 while tbey last. 

Ev erglade s N urser y Co., Fo r t Myers, Fla. 

To Exchange — Carnations, Chrysanthemnms, 
Vlnca Varlegata, Dracaenas, Feverfew, Roses, 
etc., for Gladioli, Dahlias, bulb stock. Pelargo- 
niums or nursery shruba. 
J. C. Stelnhauser. Pittsburg, Kan. 

To Exchange — Or will sell Poinsettias, strong 
plants, 2 to 3 shoots, 2%-in. pots, $70.00 per 
1000, for Carnations. Ready now. No packing 
charges. Be ll Floral Co., Temple, Tex . 

To Exchange — Nancy Hall plants, $1.00 per 
1000, for greeahouse plants. 
W. V. Taylor, RusspUvllle, Ark. 

To Exchange — Mesembryanthemums, fine plants 
in bloom, S-ia., $6.60 per 100, for anything I 
can use. Wm. Stoebe. Marion. Ind. 

WANTED 

Wanted — Gladioli, Cannas, etc., bulbs, Roses. 
Send price per 1000. 
B. W. Histed. P. O. Box 477, Palm Beach, Fla. 

ASPARAOUS SPRAYS 

SPRATS. 

Asparagus Plumosus and Sprengeri. 

Send for prices. 

THB PBNNOCK PLANTATION, 

Jupiter. Fla. 

Asparagus Plumosus cuta, $1.60 per 100; $4.00 
per crate, 800 cuts. Cash, please. 
W. P. Newell Co.. Apopka, Fla. 

CANE STAKES 

JAPANBSB BAMBOO 8TAKBS. 

Green Dyed. Per 100 Per 1000 

1 ft., 10,000 to a bale $0.B0 $1.50 

IH ft., 2,600 to a bale 70 S.SO 

2U ft., 2.600 to a bale 1.00 4.75 

SVi ft., 2,600toabale 1.2S 6.50 

4 ft., 2,600 to a bale 1.75 8.60 

Natural. Per 100 Per 1000 

6 to ft., 2,500 to a bale $2.00 $10.00 

8 ft.. 2000 to a bundle 2.25 11.60 

AMERICAN BULB CO., 
172 N. Wabash Ave., C hicago. lU. 

BAMBOO STAKES. 

To hale Per bale 

Japanose, natural, C ft 2000 $21.00 

Japanese, dyed green, 1% ft 2000 6.60 

Japenese, dyed green, 2 ft 2000 8.00 

Japanese, dyed green, 2% ft 2000 10.00 

Japenese, dyed green, .'l ft 2000 12.00 

Japanese, dyed green, S'/i ft 2000 14.00 

Japanese, dyed green, 4 ft 2000 16.60 

McHUTCniSON & CO., 

95 Chamhers St^ New York, N. T. 

JAPANBSB STAKES. 2000 TO A BALB. 

Natural, 6 feet $28.00 per bale 

Dyed green, 1% feet 7.00 per bale 

Dyed green. 2 feet 8.00 per bale 

Dyed green, 2% feet 0.00 per bale 

Dyed green, 8 feet 12.60 per bale 

Dyed green, 8% feet 14.00 per bale 

Dyed green. 4 feet 18.00 per bale 

S. S. 8KIDBLSKT ft CO.. 
63 Park Place, New York, N. T. 



CANB STAKES. 
Note these new low prices. 

Per 100 Per 1000 

1^-foot, green $0.45 $ 8.60 

2 -foot, green 66 4.50 

2^foot, green 65 6.26 

8 -foot, green 75 6.00 

3H-foot, green 80 7.00 

4 -foot, green 90 8.00 

6 -foot, natural 1.26 11.00 

6 -foot, natural 1.35 11.00 

A. HENDERSON ft CO., 
166 N. Wabash Ave., Chicago. 111. 

CARNATION STAPLES ~ 

Superior Carnation staples, best staples on the 
market, 36c per 1000, 8000 for $1.00, postpaid. 

MICHIGAN CUT FLOWER EXCHANGE, 
264 Randolph St., Detroit. Mich. 

PiUsbury's Carnation staples. 36c per 1000, 
8000 for $1.00. I. L. PUlsbnry, Galesburg, 111. 

FERTILIZERS ~ 

FERTILIZERS. 
A. B. C. Quality. 

100 600 1000 
lbs. lbs. lbs. Ton 
Wizard Brand Pulverized 

Sheep Manure $1.75 $ 8.00 $15.00 $28.00 

Wizard Brand Cattle 

Manure 1.76 8.0O 14.00 27.00 

Bone Meal, Rose- 
grower 3.40 15.00 28.00 54.00 

Bone Meal, Regular 

Grade .'5.00 13.50 25.00 45.00 

Blood and Bone 2.50 11.50 22.00 40.00 

Star Acid Phosphate, 

14 per cent 2.10 7.25 13.76 27.00 

Horn Shavings, sack, $5.00; 10 sacks, $4.75 per 

sack. 

AMERICAN BULB CO., 

172 N. Wabash Ave., Chicago, 111. 

SPECIAL PRICES ON SHEEP MANURE. 

Car lots of 15 tons or more $22.00 per ton 

5- ton lots 25.00 per ton 

1-ton lots 27.00 per ton 

%-ton lots 28.00 per ton 

%-ton lots 30.00 per ton 

100-lb. bags $1.75 each 

All f. o. b. Chicago. 

Guaranteed analysis, 2V4, 1%, 1. 

POEHLMANN BROTHERS COMPANY. 

66-72 East Randolph St., Chicago, 111. 

Iowa pulverized poultry manure, $2.00 per 100 
lbs. Write for sample. 
0. W. Callender, West Union, la. 

FLORISTS' FLATS ~ 

FLORISTS FLATS. 

8x12x24 $16.00 per 100, $165.00 per 1000 

8x14x24 17.00 per 100, 165.00 per 1000 

Inside measurements; made from pine; shipped 
knockdown In lots of not less than 100. Sample 
mailed for 26c. 

3. B. OOBTZ SONS, FLORISTS, 
Saginaw, Mlcb. 

FLORISTS' SUPPLIES ~ 

MAGNOLIA liBAVBS. 

Dux Superlora Brand. 

$1.60 per carton; 

10 cartons. $18.50. 

GULLBTT ft B0N8. LiNOOLN, ILL. 

QOLDFI8M ~ 

Goldfish, aquarium plants, castles, globe* and 
all luppllee. Send for wholesale catalogue. 

Aubumdale Oeldflsh Co., 
1440 Madlaon St., Tel. Haymarket 162, Ohleago. 

HORTICULTURAL BOOKS 

FOR STRAWBERRY OR0WBB8. 
Here are two books that every nurseryman 
and Strawberry grower in the United States 
should have for reference. 

"THB STRAWBERRY IN NORTH AMBBIOA." 
By 8. W. Fletcher. 
A practical guide to Strawberry growing and 
a sketch of the evolution of the Strawberry in 
North America. 

Illustrated, $1.76 postpaid. 
"STRAWBERRY GROWING." 
By S. W. Fletcher. 
The present commercial value of the Straw- 
berry clearly and comprehensively outlined. 
Worth many times its price to anyone who grows 
Strawberry plants for sale or who contemplates 
growing the Strawberry for market. 
Illustrated, $2.26 postpaid. 

For sale by 

THB FLORISTS' BBVIBW, 

508 8. Dearborn St., Chicago, 111. 

NBW PRINTING 

Ready now. 

CYOLOPBDIA 

Of American 

HOBTICULTUBB 

by 
Liberty H. Bailey. 
A monumental work in six large volnmes; over 
8000 pages. Contains more information than 
any hundred other books— a complete horticul- 
tural library. Hundreds of chapters of cultural 
matter by experts. 

Price reduced from 

$48.00 to $40.00, express paid. 

Purchase on monthly payments can be arranged 

if yon order through the 

FLORISTS' BBVIBW, 

608 8. Dearborn St.. Chicago, HI. 

ALBUM OF DESIGNS. 

Totl cannot afford to be without It. 

$1.25 per copy, postpaid. 

$12.00 per doz., postpaid. 

Florists' Pub. Co., CaxtoQ Bldg., Chicago. 



"The Practical Book of 

OUTDOOR ROSE GROWING" 

By Geo. O. Thomas, Jr. 

GARDEN EDITION— 16 Illustrations in colors, 
87 in black and white. Price $3.00, postpaid. 

DB LUXE EDITION— 100 of the world's finest 
Roses in their natural colors, and 46 additional 
illustrations; handsome binding. Price $7.50, 
postpaid. 

FLORISTS' RBVIBW, 
608 8. Dearborn St., Chicago. 111. 

"THB NURSERY MANUAL" 
By 
L. H. Bailey 
A complete guide to the multiplication of 
plants, giving an account of the methods com- 
monly employed in the propagation and crossing 
of plants. 

Price, $2.50. 

Send your order to 

THB FLORISTS' RBVIBW, 

608 8. Dearborn St., Chicago, 111. 

"LANDSCAPE GARDENING." 

By 0. 0. Simonds. 

A practical book by an experienced landscape 

artist, dealing with the handling and shaping 

of land, plant materials and arrangement, etc.. 

illustrated. Price $6.00. postpaid. 

For sale by 

THB FLORISTS' BBVIBW, 

608 S. Dearborn St.. Chicago, 111 . 

LEAF MOLD 

HIGH GRADE SORBBNBD LBAF MOLD. 

"Flaky Stuff;" successful growers use and 
recommend ours; $1.16 per 2 bu. sack; 5 or 
more at $1.00 per sack. 

JOHN B. ROY, CONWAY, MICH. 

PAPER POTS 

NEPONSET PAPER POTS. 
These are the new reduced f. o. b. Chicago 
prices; down to pre-war level. 
Size Crate Holds Per 1000 

2U-ln 1000 $ 4.00 

2%-ln 1000 4.76 

3 -in 1000 6.26 

3%-in leoo 8.25 

4 -in 600 10.60 

6 -in 600 16.00 

6 -in 500 21.00 

AMERICAN BULB CO., 
172 N. Wabash Ave., Chicago, HI. 

NEPONSET PAPER POTS. 

SAVE ON EXPRESS CHARGES. 

2^-in., $3.85 per 1000: 2%-in., $4.60 per 1000; 

3-ln., $6.10 per 1000; 3%-in., $8.00 per 1000; 

4-in., $9.95 per 1000; 6-in., $15.66 per 1000; 6-in., 

$20.85 per 1000. In hundred lots add 10 per cent. 

GULLETT ft SONS, LINCOLN, ILL. 

RAFFIA 
RED STAR BRAND RAFFIA. 

1 bale up (225 lbs.) S^clb. 

100 lbs. up 10 clb. 

50 lbs. up llHcIb. 

25 lbs. np 18 clb. 

Cash with order. 
Also three other dependable brand* In natonl 
and dyed in twenty colors. 

McHUTCHISON ft CO.. 
»5 Chambers St.. New York. N. T. 

SHEET MOSS 

GREEN SHEET MOSS. 
Extra fine quality, large sheets. 

Put in your stock now. 

Less than 10 bags $2.00 per bag 

10 bags 1.75 per bag 

26 bags 1.50 per bag 

AMERICAN BULB CO., 
172 N. Wabash Ave., Chicago, 111. 

GREEN SHEET MOSS. 
VERY BEST QUALITY, LARGE SHEETS. 

1-bag lot $2.00 per bag 

6-bag lots 1.75 per bag 

10-bag lots 1.60 per bag 

25-bag lots 1.50 per liag 

POEHLMANN BROTHERS COMPANY, 
66-72 E. Randolph St., Chicago, III. 

GREEN SHEET MOSS. ~ 

Strictly first-class Green Moss, $1.90 per sack- 

5 sacks. $9.25; 10 sacks, $17.50. 

SHIPPED DAY ORDER ARRIVES. 
GULLETT ft SONS, LINCOLN, ILL 



SPHAONUM MOSS 



SPHAGNUM MOSS. 
New stock, large burlap bales, clean and dry. 

Per bale, f . o. b. Chicago $1 25 

10-bale lots, f. o. b. Chicago I'oo 

25-bale lots, f. o. b. Chicago "90 

25-baIe lots, f . o. b. woods '. '85 

50-bale lots, f. o. b. woods '"' 'go 

100-bale lots, f . o. b. woods '.'..'. I75 

Order now. 

AMERICAN BULB CO., 

172 N. Wabash Av e., Chicago, 111. 

SPHAGNUM MOSS. ~~ 

J2 i" 52 ^"•PP«d *»'•». 14xl8x48-tn«....70e each 

10 to 60 wired bales, 14x16x24 In* 40c each 

_ „ _ Terms: Cash with order. 

F. M. HANCOCK, BOX 14, CITY POIN T, WIS. 

SPHAGNUM MOSS. ' 

I^rge burlapped bales, $1.20; 
10 bales. $10.00; 25 bales, $23.76. 
GULLETT A SONS. LINOOLnT ILL. 



High-grade Sphagnum Moss, dry and clean 
extra large bales. Booking carlots for next 
season's delivery. Write for prices 

F. K. Reshel, City Point, Wis. 






146 

SPHAQIMUM WOSS-Continued 

Sphagnum Moss: New crop; best grade for 
florists; dry and clean, ready for Immediate ship- 
ment. 

Burlap bales, 14x16x48 70c per bale 

Wired bales, 14x16x48 65c per bale 

Wired bales, 14x16x24 40c per bale 

3 per cent off for cash with order; prompt 
•erviee. Kooklng orders for summer deliTerlet 
at prices It win pay you to learn. 

Bert Hancock, Producer and Dealer, L. Box 7, 
City Point, Wis. 

SPHAGNUM MOSS. 
New, large burlap bales. 

Per bale, f. o. b. Chicago $1.25 

10-bale lots, f. o. b. Chicago 1.00 

25bale lots. f. o. b. Chicago 06 

26-bale lots, f. o. b. woods 85 

50-bale lots, f. o. b. woods 80 

100-bale lots, f. o. b. woods 75 

POEHLMANN BROTHERS COMPANY, 
66-72 Bast Randolph St., Chicago, 111. 

HIGH GRADE SPHAGNUM MOSS. 
From new crop, selected for florists' use. 10 
burlapped bales, 14x16x48 Ins., $7.00; 25 bales. 
$16.25. Immediate shipments. 3 per cent off for 
cash with order. 
FRANK HANCOCK. BOX 54. CITY POINT. WIS . 

HIOH-GRADB SPHAGNUM MOSS. 
Booking carlots, next season delivery. Write 

A. J. AMUNDSON CO., 
City Point. Wig. 

Sphagnam Hosa, 10 bbl. bale, $2.7S, 5 bclea, 
•10.00; 6 S-bbl. bales, |«.60: S 8-bbl. tele*. 
IS.OO. Burlap, 40c per kale. Cash. 

Joa. H. Paul, Box 1B6, ManahawMn, N. J. 

SPRUCE CONES 

Spruce Cones, nice stock, $9.00 per 1000. 
Pappa Bros., Watertown, N. Y. 

TOBACCO 

TOBACCO PRODUCTS. 
Baled stems, 200 lbs., $3.00; 400 lbs., $5.00; 
ton, $15.00. 

Tobacco dust, 100 lbs., $2.00; ton, $25.00. 
Tobacco powder for sprinkling, 100 Iba., $3.00. 
Tobacco dust for fumigating, 160 Iba., $4.00; 
400 lbs., $8.00; ton, $30.00. 

Special prices on stems and dust In carlota. 
VIGOR CO.. BOX 4, TOSTORIA. O. 

Uniform Brand Tobacco Products: Finely pow- 
dered dust, 100 lb. bag, $2.00; fresh cut itemi 
packed In bags, 600 Iba., $5.00; pulTerlsed pow- 
der, 100 lbs., $4.00; fumigating dust, 100 Iba.. 
$3.00. Write for samples, ton and carlot price*. 
F. A I. Tobacco Products Co., Box 282A, Lan- 
caster, t'a. 

Cigar Tobacco stems. $1.50 per 100 lbs. Special 
price on ton lota. Peter N. Jacobsen, Cigar Co., 
832 Harrison St.. DaTenport, la. 

WIRE \A/ORK 

FLORISTS' WIRE DESIGNS. 
100 wreaths, 10-ln., 12 In., 14-ln., $8.00. 
Special discount on all wire orders. Write 
us for a catalogue. 

PITTSnUKGH CUT FLOWER CO.. 

116-18 SEVENTH ST., 

PITTSBURGH. PA. 

WIRE WORK; ONCB TRIED. ALWAYS USBdI 

Write for reduced price list Just out, of sin- 
gle and double wreaths, easels, rings and flat 
crosses. 

S. S. SKIDELSKY Sc CO.. 
53 Park Place, New York, N. Y. 

FLORISTS' WIRE DESIGNS. 
GET OUR PRICES ON HANGING BASEBTS. 
FAI.LS CITY WIBB WORKS, . 
4B1 8. THIRD ST., LOUISYILLB. KY. 

WOOD LABELS 

Good grade wood labels, $1.00 per 1000. 
C hute ft B utler Co., Peru, Ind. 

Wood lat>els, for nurserymen and florists. 
^enjamln Chase C o.. Derry Village. N. H 

DREER'S 

Florist Specialties 

New Brand New Style 
"RIVERTON" HOSE 

_ _^^ Furnished in lengths 
f'T^fl^fl^l up to 500 feet without 
uymc'^^Sl \ Ufl s^^m or joint. 
M .CUMmmlV \ mm Tbe hose for the FLORIST 

'<-lnch per ft., 18c 

ReelofSOOft.per ft., 17o 

OonpllDf^s ftirnlshed free 

with lengths of 2.5 feet. 

HENRY A. DREER 

714-716 Chestnut St. 
Philadklphia, Pa. 
Mention The RwTlew wfcen too writ* 

YOU WILL GET 100% 

BETTER SHOWING 

BY EXHIBITINQ WITH 

Randall Displayers 

They are neat, durable, practical and economical. 

Rindall Displayers C«., Attlebiro, Mass. 



The FlofIsts^ Review 



June 1. 1922 







Sheep Manure 

is the safe^jf mo^ effedive 
and convenient fertilizer you 
b^^?\^\ can sell for Gardens, Lawns, Fruits 
and Flowers. Recommend and 
y sell it to every purchaser 

^^^ \ of seeds. It complies with the 

\J^^ \ laws of all States and is ab- 
solutely guaranteed. 











^^^ 




Packed in 25, 50 and lOO-lb. bags; 
also 2-lb., 3-lb. and 10-lb. packages 

Sold in any quantity at PRE-WAR 
PRICES. Get them today. 

J. OuvER Johnson 

1800-1810 Milwaukee Ave. 
CHICAGO, ILLINOIS 



Mention The Reriew when you write. 



Advance Materials Meet Every Requirement 

Operating Device, top or side. 

Truss Type Sash Arm, automatic stop. 

Shaft Hangers. 

Patent Split Pipe Couplings. 

Shelf Brackets, Pipe Carriers, single, double or 

multiple. 
Split Tees, plain, grooved or lug type. 
Split Crosses, Bench Fittings. 
Gutter Brackets, Column Brackets. 
Y Fittings, Pipe Straps, Expansion Joints, and 

many others. 

Our eight- page circular illustrates and describes 
this complete line of materials which have proven 
their superior advantages to thousands of florists and 
growers for twenty years. Best prices now in effect. 
Write us today. 

ADVANCE COMPANY 

RICHMOND, INDIANA 




Mention The Reriew when you write. 



J. W. DAVIS COMPANY 

Wholesale Growers of 
Christmas and Easter Plants 

TERRE HAUTE, IND. 



A. N. PIERSON 



INCORPORATED 



Growers of Plants, Cut Flowers 
Palms and Ferns 

CROMWELL, CONNECTICUT 



June 1, 1922 



The Florists^ Review 



147 



GREENHOUSE CONSTRUCTION MATERIALS 

AT REASONABLE PRICES 

Durable, Efficient, Light, Convenient, Inexpensive 

It will be to your interest to let us quote you on your requirements. No charge for estimates. 
OUR CATALOGUE WILL BE OF INTEREST TO EVERY GROWER. 

Louisiana Red Gulf Cypress or Washington Red Cedar 




CONSTRUCTION MATERIALS 



FITTINOS 
DEPT. "B.' 



HARDWARE 



HOTBED SASH 



A. DIETSCH CO- ><4o*h'^'u>av.. CHICAGO, ILL. 



Mention The Review when you write. 



■^ 



WIZflRb 



TRADt 



BRAND 



MARK 



Shredded Cattle Manure 

is selected quality manure taken from brick paved Stock Yard cattle pens — dried and sterilized by a high temperature direct 
heat process which kills weed seeds, fungus and disease germs. Packed in 100 lb. bags in coarse shredded form for mulch- 
ing or top-dressing. Largely used for mixing with bench and potting soil and liquid manuring. Unequaled for lawn and 
garden fertilizing. 

Insist on WIZARD BRAND through your supply house or write us direct. 

THE PULVERIZED MANURE CO., 33 Union Stock Yards, CHICAGO 



Mention The Rerlew when you write. 



HAKS TOVB OWN IRBI6ATOR WITH 

NARCH PATENT FLEXIBLE NOZZLE 



PATENTED 
JUNE 7, 1921 



SiMple Nanle wiik 
MI iastractiaai buM 
•a receipt el tea ceatt. 



Nirch Aatimatic Irrigator Co., Nukegon, Nich. 

WemmnDfeetnreseomplete line of IrrtsBtor equipment. 

Aik 01. 
Mention The Review when y«>o writa. 





We Know How 

A Greenhouse Must Be Bnilt Right 

You can use the best material in the 
world, if your house is not put up 
right it will not last. Erection of 
greenhouses is our business. Glazing, 
palming and bulbing. Rebuilding and 
glazing of old houses. 

We Can Save You Money 

MIKE WINANDY, Jr., S^.ira"^^"^'' 

Phone Sheldrake 3214 
6054 Ridge Ave.. CHICAGO. ILL. 



Meottnn The Berlew when you write 



No excuae for BAD CREDIT RISKS 
when a member of the 

FLORISTS' CREDIT ASSOCIATION 

NATIONAL SERVICE 

General Office: 

1225 N. Ashland Ave. CHICAGO 

Phone: Monroe 3987 




Nature's 

Best 

Plant Food 



Premier Brand 

Pulverized Poultry Manure 

For sale by your Dealer or 
Supply House 

Prices Quoted on Request 

Pulverized Poultry Manure Co. 

431 S. Dearborn St. CHICAGO, ILL. 



Mention The Rerlew when you write. 



Feed Your Plants Now 

Use PRENIER BRAND fOETRY MANURE 

The best feed for Mums, thoroughly heat dried and pulverized. 

Does not burn and will produce better flowers and more luxuriant 

foliage than is possible with any other fertilizer. Use as a top dressing 

at rate of 75 lbs. to 500 square feet of bench space. 

Shipped from either Kankakee, Illinois, or Buffalo, New York. 

$3.00 per 100 lbs., $13.75 per 500 Ibt., $25.00 per 1000 lbs., $48.00 per toa. 

A. HENDERSON & CO., 166 N. Wabash Ave., CHICAGO, ILL. 



GREENHOUSES 

Write for Catalogue or Estimate— State Type of Constmctlon You Want. 

1 W. 47tk St, New York City "^^t tOIlStrUCtlOII tO., HerrUo. BMf.. PhUeddiJiU. P.. 

307 N. IrriM Are.. Scruloa, Pa. NORTH TON AW AND A, N. Y. Boeni oi Tride BMf., Boetoa, Man. 



148 



The Florists^ Review 



Junk 1. 1022 



ms?mum^s?M 



?ss^'MUW?ss^*m 



r-ss^'mumssf, 



'^sfm!&(Simssfi 




Till- L;ist Full Iron Fra'iip llou-i' of Mr, lii(l;ito, 
iloMilcii I'lilir^'lj t(i vr.i^ iiij.' Swi'i'l Vena 

Jimmy Didato 
Is Still Going Strong 



Jimmy's friends have stopped shaking 
their heads. 

Years ago they decided he would kill him- 
self if he kept on working the way he was. 
But he kept right on, and kept right on 
making money, and kept right on building 
bigger and bigger houses. 
Jimmy is into everything — himself. 
He says, "I hat's how 1 get everything 
there is in everything." 

Me also says: "Some day. after I get my 
range built as I have planned to do, then 
I'll do .some sitting back and see to it that 
the other fellow works. " 
Of course. Jimmy thinks he will sit back. 
But he won t. 

Furthermore, when he gets the range com- 
pleted that he has planned for, he will go 
right on building just the same. 



His last house is one of our top-notch Full 
iron Framers, 66 feet wide and I 70 feet 
long, built especially for sweet peas. 
So satisfied has he been with everything 
we have built for him, that when his neigh- 
bor, Henry Schnitzpahn, thought of build- 
ing, Jimmy saw to it personally that he 
came to the right firm. 
As a result, we are just completing two 
houses, each 46 feet by 207 feet, for the 
neighbor. 

We'll soon show you photos of them, and 
tell you all about it. 



Steel is higher. 

And going higher. 

Good time to build. 

cheaper. 

Likely to cost more. 



Wont be any 



Philadelphia 
133 South li'th St. 



HiicKln^^mea^ 

HOME OFFICE AND FACTORY, ELIZABETH. N. J. 

New York, 101 Park Arenue 



Boston-9 
294 Washington St. 



w 



1 

m 






M 






i 
i 

m 






I? 



^4 






m 
(m 

w 



m 



m 



JUNB 1, 1022 



The Florists^ Review 



III 




AGMCO Huilt this Pipe Frame House for Herman Mamit.st'h. 
TenaBy, New Jersey 



Pittsburgh Cut Flower Co. 

Buys Three AGMCO Houses 

Three 21 x 167 ft. AGMCO Pipe Frame Houses; yes, that is the order. 

After many years of dealing with other greenhouse manufacturers, the 
Pittsburgh Cut Flower Company turns to AGMCO. 

When a well-known firm of this kind buys a greenhouse it is because 
they have been shown beyond all doubt. We want to show you how our 
1922 model will cut that overhead, and increase your profits. 

Write for AGMCO designs and an estimate, and see for yourself. Our 
service department is waiting to help you. 



American Greenhouse Mfg. Co. 

General Offices: Chicagfo. Factory: Pana, Illinois 
SALES OFFICES: 



NEW YORK 

43 W. 18lh St. 



CHICAGO 

Muoaic Temple 



KANSAS CITY 
N. Y. Life Btdg. 



PANA. ILL. 

Drawer 335 



SEATTLE, WASH. 

Smith Bld(. 



DENVER. COLO. 

1720 Roiemtry St. 



IV 



The Florists^ Review 



June 1. 1922 




llllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllilllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllilllllilllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll 




Paint 





What an endless 
source of worry and 
bother a poor paint 
job is! 

As a rule the big- 
gest expense in paint- 
ing work is the labor 
of applying. 

Then why buy a 
cheap, inferior paint 
only to have it peel off 
or discolor or wash off 
like chalk? You will 
have to admit THAT 
is poor economy. 

Moninger paint is made only of the highest grade materials, carefully 
and thoroughly mixed, after a formula worked out years ago by 
government chemists as being best suited for cypress wood and for 
greenhouse work generally. 

Better send in your order, so that you will have the paint handy 
when you need it. 

JOHN C. MONINGER COMPANY 

CHICAGO, ILLINOIS 



914 BLACKHAWK STREET 



iiiiimmiiimiiim EVERYTHING FOR THE GREENHOUSE iiiniimiiiniiiiiii 




Improved Challenge 



We Translate the Word 

SERVICE 

Into a Reality and Performance 

r^UR line of Improved Lifters, embracing the 
^^ well known Challenge, Little Giant, Rack 
and Pinion, New Style Side Machine and Mon- 
arch, are unequaled on the market. A machine 
suitable for every size house. 

We manufacture a complete line of Greenhouse 
fittings, which we supply at attractive prices. 

Catalogue and estimate furnished upon request. 

John A. Evans Co., Richmond, Ind. 

Corner North 15th and Penna. R. R. 



oS=> 





riOSE 



Price, $7.50 



^i^UHICai,TupR 




20 cants tiM cans' 

SUBSCRIPTIONS 

$Z«00 Ymlr 



*&7m^ 



A WEEKLY JOURNAL"" FLORISrS. SEEDSMEN «>»NIIRSERYMDI 

FIiORISTS' PUBLISHING CO., 5S0 Caxtoa Balldlns. 508 South Dearborn St., CHICAGO. 



VoL XUX. 



CHICAGO, JUNE 8, 1922. 



No. laso. 



Bench Grown Roses 

READY FOR IMMEDIATE SHIPMENT 

Per 100 Per 1000 

KILLARNEY $12.00 $100.00 

WHITE KILLARNEY 12.00 100.00 


ALTHOUGH LILY BULBS 
ARE OUR SPECIALTY 

FRENCH AND DUTCH BULBS OF EQUAL, BEST 
QUALITY ARE FOUND IN HORSESHOE BRAND 
WE MAY NOT BE THE CHEAPEST IN PRICE, 
BU" OUR STOCK IS THE BEST TO BE HAD. 

^^SSi^ WE SOLICIT YOUR ORDER. 

^i\ Ralph N- Ward & Company, Inc. 

>m^^4/ The Lily House 

S:l IZ'hZ: 25 Murray Street, NEW YORK 


BUTTERFl-Y 12.00 100.00 


OPHELIA 12.00 100.00 

PREMIER 15.00 140.00 

250 assorted at 1000 rate. 

Asparagus Plumosus Nanus Seed 

Greenhouse grown $4.00 per lOCO; 5000 for $18.00 

Outdoor grown 2. SO per UXX); 5000 for 10.00 

A. HENDERSON & CO., 166 N. Wabash Ave., Chicago 


Our Book on Bulbs 
Is Ready for 

You Now 

Send for It 

C C PoUworth Co. 

MILWAUKEE, WIS. 


TABLE FERN SEEDLINGS 

READY JUNE AND LATER 

$3.00 for one fl;it, 5 Hals at $2.7.") each, 10 flats at $2.50 each. 
In all the best varieties as follows: 

Pteris Wilsonii, Fteris Mayii, Pteris Serrulata, Pteris Wim- 
settii, Pteris Tremula, Pteris Argyraea, Aspidium Tsus- 
sinense. Cyrtomium Falcatuui. Crytomium Rcclifordiauum, 
Pteris Cretica Albo-Lineata. 

TABLE FERNS, 2Ji-in., POTS. BEST KINDS, .$7.00 per 
KXt. $()0.0U per lOuO. 

2 '4-INCH FERNS 

Boston, R(x)sevelt, eU.. SKK CI.AS IFIKI) COM'MXS. 

For AH Otbei Plant Stock See Classified or Page 5. 

ROMAN J. IRWIN, 43 W. 18th St., New York City 


25,000 Own -root 

COLtMBIA 

FOR EARLY JUNE 

1 All we have left in Rose plants. 

j LET US QUOTE YOU 

A. N. PIERSON, Inc., "'^SS'n^ 


Begonias, Melior and Cincinnati 

Strong, clean •1%-m. plants, $,S0.00 per 100. 

For immediate delivery, Begonia Chatelaine, $7.00 per 100, 
$65.00 per 1000; Mrs. Patten and Pride of Newcastle, $8.00 
per 100, $75.00 per 1000. 

Primulas, Obconica and Townsendii 

specially selected strain, none better, $6.o0 per 100. $t>0.00 
per lOOO. 

Jii-^t rcri'ivtMl iitiii^ii;illy liin- A^p. lMiitMo.iMs Sccii ;)t SLT."! per 1IHK(, $J^,(HI 
per :*\in\ #I.-.(KI pir IO.ikki. Write |nr |iri<-c iiii Inim-r i|u;inlitv. A^p. 
Spii'mrcri Seed, isl.iio pi'r 1(»KI. *'.i.i»l per lll.oiiil. Write for |)ii,-(. ,'m laretM' 
(IMHiilll.v. Write lor a cotiiplele and «orll'vvliile list of SKKDS, I'LANTS 
and liULliS 

S. S. Skidelsky & Co., new"v''5'r''i1:"c.tv 


■ The E. G. Hill Co. 

1 

Wholesale Florists 

Richmond, Indiana 


SPHAGNUM MOSS 

New Consignment of Moss 
Just Received 

Single bale lots, $1.25 per bale 

10 bales for $10.00 

25 bale lots at 90c per bale 

CAN MAKE PROMPT SHIPMENT— F. O. B. Chicago 

The W. W. BARNARD C0.,"i:15'.^r<ro^' 



*^ 



INDBK TO ADVERTISEMKNTS AND TABLK OF CONTENTS-PAGES TWO AND FOUR 



II 



The Florists^ Review 



Jink S. 1!)22 




No — You Are Wrong 



That is to say you are wrong if you think our 

No. 2 Construction is just th« same as the No. 1, 

only made lighter in widths up to 40 feet, for 

which it is used. 

Of course, it's plain that the wider the house the 

more staunch the framing must be. 

But the No. 2 has features absolutely differing 

from the other. 

The post detail at the eave, for instance. 

And the spacing between rafters and the number 

of lights of glass. 



Of course, both construc- 
tions are based on our orig- 
inal iron frame basis of 
wrought iron posts, and 
steel rafters and purlins. 
But you know that all 
iron frame houses, with 
the exception of the wrought 
post, have steel rafters and 
purlins. 



Recent Orders for Houses 



No. 1 Construction 

Theo. Hengstenberg, Hempstead, L. I 
41 ft. X 125 ft. 



It's not so much what you use, as how you use it. 

Not so much how much iron and sieel there is in 

the frame, as is it rightly placed? 

Is there more than necessary, or less than safety 

demands? 

To know what is right, we have the right to know. 

But it wasn't picked up in a year, or in five years. 

It's the result of years and years of experience. 

Half a century in fact. 

So far as we know, no greenhouse concern has 
been gathering experience 
as long as we have. 
It's a thing to bear in 
mind before you sign a 
contract, just because the 
price may on the Isurface 
look less. 




No. 2 Construction 

Snell & Bronner, Mohawk, N. Y. 
40 ft. X 150 ft. 



Those who buy solely on 
price, generally pay dearly 
for what they thought was 
buying cheaply. 



or4> &tWnham|o. 



Builders of Greenhouses and Conservatories 



IRVINGTON 
New York 



NEW YORK 
30 East 42nd St. 



PHILADELPHIA 
Land Title Bldg. 



CHICAGO 
Continental Bank Bldg. 



BOSTON- II 
Little Bldg. 



CLEVELAND 
407 Ulmer Bldg. 



TORONTO 
Harbor Commisaion Bldg. 



Elaatem Factorv 
Irvington. N. Y. 





. 1 




J 


mi 








p'*^, 




P 


^ 






^ 


g 


^m'^^^^mt^ 




^s 




^^t ^v 




WB 


fcvd 


Hk,«,Jhl.> Sij^T?^" 




HBIP 




ATLANTA 
Atlanta Trust Co. Bldg. 



Western Factory 
Des Plaines. 111. 



Canadian Factory 
St. Catharines. Ont. 





Our .-;.iiii Imn lloiHr In- ii Winiwht 
Iron Pr.st .anil tlu- galvaiiizrtl ati^le 
■ av<- plati' wiiri ivnif oar i-lasiis. But 
it. lias no iri)ii raIl»-rH. Tin' roof bars 
with tin" i>iirliiis jLft'l ('(tl"'m)-t hs^vi- t'» 
do all tliH suwwniiis. Tlial's wiiy so 
uiaiiy lolnnitis art* iifui'ssttry. 



Thp XiimbiT Two Full Iron Kiami' has in ailili- 
lioii to till' \Vtou;;)it Iron I'ost--: ^'ahiUil/i il aiiKlf 
i-avc nlatf aiiil root har i'las|ts; an iron rafter 
that, fxt.'uils t'loiu till.' iiosi to tlu' riilRc. It is 
fasti-n<',l to tlic iKist liv a double iron qussi't \AaU-. 
So stnui^' Is this t-onslitictinn that in some <»f the 
H'iiltlis, even iijcluilini,' the in I'mit one. it is 
not tieeess.iiy to use more iliati Iwu columns. 



The jKisl and rafter of the NnniIxT 
One Cortstiiietion tlitter fnmi me 
Number Two, only in the Kus.set jilale 
being lar^^'r. and of steel, to taiie 
rare cf the addi'd strain on thi wider 
houses, with tlieir neees,sily ol trtisa- 
ings. 




' 1 ' I 

V ■ 1 . 1. 



^- 



JUNK 8, 1922 



The Florists^ Review 



_^ . AMERICAN BULB CO. 

^'''^i^o'*' 172 N. Wabash Ave., CHICAGO. ILL. '^xr^^^^pO^ 





JAPANESE LILY BULBS 

MAGNIFICUM AND RUBRUM 

IVi- doz. r(.-r_'5 I'll- 30 I'crlOO Per case of 

ID tM li in. .$3.00 $6.00 $11.50 $21.00 $21.00 100 l'>ull)- 

GIGANTKUM 

I'cr i5 I'rr 50 I'.r lOd I'cr r.i^c of 

to Sin $4.00 $7.50 $14.00 $47.50 400 liulli- 

\\ «■ lm\<' liiiil a woinlcrliil siilc loniiMs iiiiiiiii;: in Irmii |>r>t<'l irall.\ 
♦■\er.v •.liitt- ill III!' I nioiil lor (liis (Irxiiahl.- IhiIIi si.i.k. rianl in 
IMils' (<'iiiii|>i(-li- I'lilliiral ilii<Tti<«ii> willi cacti order) aii.< time tlii» 
■ iKiiitli. Tliix «raii(l l.il.> is rcall.^ uuilli w liile for iiit tliiw cf s. 

Chrysanthemum Rooted Cuttings 

We offer Immediate delivery on tlic fdlouInK list of varieties, whlcli 

iiuludes varieties most in ileniand: 
AVIIITK— Smith's Advance. Pollv Ilo.se. Clia.s. HaKer, White Chieftain, 

Ditsv lin.-H .Misllet.ic, White Peiilewitz, Karly Frost. 
VKM.OW— Yellow Advance. Colden Queen, Clirysolora, Sun ("IIow. 

.Marifiohl, Major lionnaffon. Mrs. .Morgan, Yellow Mistletoe, 

Whit tier. „. ,„,,... .., 

riNK — I'naUa Pink Polly Ro-c, Pacific Supreme. Pink Chieftain, Dr. 

Knjcuehard. .Mr.s. K. A. Scidewitz. .Maud Dean. Nerlssa. 
UKIl— Harvard, dark crim.son, the best reil yet Introduced, double 

.\ir"»f''t"lu' above rooted cutliiisjs at $;5..")<» per 100, S:!0.|H) |ut 1000. 



Pompons 



WHITK— N'iza. Mariana, TMana. , , ^,. r. . t, 

VEI.LOW— guinola Improved, /.enobla. f.ol.len Climax. Peter Pan. 

Haby, Klondike. Ccdden Weddins,'. <hristinas C.old. 
PINK— Minta Fairv Queen. Lillian Doty, Nella, Western I.eauty. 
ItllON/K— Da. Hilda f'annini,'. .Mrs Frank Heu. 

WINK COI.OK— Anii.il.elle. sport of C.o.lfrey. „ ,. ., ,, „ ^ 

SINCJI.ES— -Mensa, Single Salmon. Simplicity. Fi licity, Mrs. E. D. 

Clodfrev. Mrs liuckinuham, Hronze Diickiri-'ham. 
ANE.MONKS— Blanche, Kllzabeth. Fiiima. C.raf \ on Orlola, Sunshine. 
All of the above pompons. **mi!le« niul nnemones, rooted iiittinns. 
M $3.50 per 100. $30.00 per 1000. AtlU u% to rover cost of paidviiiu. 



PANSY SEED 

AMERICAN BULB COMPANY 

"PRIVATE STOCK" MIXTURE 

I'Scaliziii).,' the iinportaiicf of the I'ansy to many Ki'owers 
lioth as cut flowers and for Ijeddinj^' plant sales, and tlie 
fact tliat FANCY PANSIES are Iialf sold when otfeicd 
to the pulihr, we ha\e roiuliincd a mixture whiidi we l)elieve- 
will crrate ;i sriisatioii hce.iiisv oi ilic manv new and odd 
shades it coiiiaiiis, maii\- oi wliieh have originated with 
various orouers who are in eh.ar.uc of large private estates 
throughout the coimtry, particnlarlv the so-called "Henna" 
types. In short, an e.xperieiirc of over thirt\- \ear^ holh as 
s'ee.lsman and .iirower, :> hark of our "PRIVATE STOCK" 
FANSY MIXTURE. 

Trade pkt $0.50 

Per Ys oz 1.25 

Per J 4 oz 2.00 

Per oz 7.00 

DELIVERY NOW. 

FREESIAS 

.\I;iy lie <'xpeeted soon. Jamiar\- fronts in California dimin- 
islu-d output to cxtetit that wi.' helieve it will he to your 
interest to arrau.ge NOW for \oiir jiossihlc needs. W^e 
stock ;ill of the good one- -'-PURITY, I'KKSlilXii, 
\'I()f.\ AM) K.\i\i!()W. Trice- for the asking. 

LILY OF THE VALLEY 

A. B. C. 

"SUPREME" QUALITY PIPS FOR JUNE WEDDINGS 

I'er 2.sn, $10.00 IVr .siM), $15.00 ]\y \iMH). $28.00 

i'rr cd-igin.il case of _'.sll(l, iier Kinii. $26.00 

Cyclamen Giganteum Plants 

QUALITY EXCEPTIONAL 

GROWN FROM FISCHER'S TRUE STRAIN AND IN 

THE MOST DESIRABLE COLORS AND SHADES. 

FOR IMMEDIATE SHIPMENT. 

Price per 10(1, .i-inch pot, 315.00. J.^ plants at 100 rate 

.\ nominal charge of not to c\ic< d 5% I'^r jiackin.g 

Please write fur special prices on quantity. 



Cyclamen Seed 

KriHii Ilic Wiirlil'-. I i>riiii<>-( <;ri>\\«'r. I ird I- i»<InT. 
of \\ ie-h:i(l('r. 

■\i> \iv CI .si< i.\i i:ks i.\ .\.\ii:i;ii-.\ : 

I'hi.^.' V lio ai'' III til'- 111 111 't I'm lll^,'ll ;-'i.i'l'> r.\ flaniiTi .Srtil. 
I w i...'i :ci ;ii|\is-- >i.H ili.il I liiiv.' p-'i fii'ti'il 111.- tini-st .striiin uf 

, \ ■I, :<. i-il I li.n.- .-\.-r iilt.-ril. iis fur tlio |i.T.>^t ti\i> yi':ir.s I 

|i.,\.- ,,. \.,|.., iii\ .iM- iiii'iii In iiiiiiiii\ iuK iii\- viirii'I ii-s. (.'.vrhiiiu'ii 
olT.-rcii li.v iiu- tills si MSMii .III- 111! tiiji; in 11. mil' ami si-l'-(-ti-il niily 
l,-,,;ii III. l.-.-ii .iiiil hi-aliln pluMls, uliieh in iiini Kivo vury unnd 
r.-siilis 

1 hai.-- I'aiil slfl'l .-I 1 I .1.1 lull tn |;,y S,|,|,,,„ .^,,,1 ];..,! slmiLs 
|i:i 11 inila ii.\ t'-T ill-' .^ ill '-I'ii a '1 Irail--. .M ,\ .si-i'il will Im nlti-rocl b'- 
ilin .\ 111- 1 i'-a 11 r.uili I 'n . u li'i all- iii\- sol" a.L;<'nts. ami noin' i.n 
Lj.inilin- iiiil'--s i-ur. Iias--a tlrnuKli 'li'- .\ Ml. ricaii llulli <'n. It 
IS with iili-asiire that I i ■ rniii-in ibl tn all llorisls whu an- K'rnw- 

> rs nl' liiuli class |i|.iiils tn tr\' niu my s I. I hold riM-oMiini-n- 

-latiniis I'rniu tlm l"-st KrnU.-ls ill tin- Wnrlil. 

^'nHl■S \ - I \ 1 1 111 \'. 

FKKP. 1-1.-<CH1-:U. 
I'KK K I I>T <»\ AI'IM.K ATIOV 



A. B. C. '^Perfected" Strains of Flower Seeds. Please write lor Price List 



'.'" 1, ->«■.?•■' 



o 



The Florists^ Review 



June 8. 1922 




A. 

Abby Ave. Ghse 91 

Acker's Fir. Store.. 70 

Adums Florist 02 

Aduins & Sons 80 

Adgato & Sou iM> 

Adkisson, Wise 70 

Advance Co 110 

Aklu's Floral Co.... 7(> 

Aljo MfB. Co 08 

Alkcmudo & Son 105 

Alleghany Fl. Co. . . 83 

Allen. J. K 99 

Allersma, H. AV 84 

Allnian Nurs 107 

Alpha Flo. Co.. 70-78-92 

Alpha Florist 78 

Am. Bulb Co 1 

Am. Floral Shop.... 77 
Am. Ghse. Mfs. Co. Ill 
Am. Landscape 

School 97 

Am. Rose & Plant.. 107 
Am. Window Glass. 119 

Amiinir Co 28-20-57 

Amundson Co 52 

Anderson, S. -V 76 

Andrews, Florist 92 

AnBermueller, G. H.123 
Annavee Fir. Shop. . 93 

Aphine Mfg. Co 124 

Archer's Gardens... 57 
Archer's Fir. Shop.. 82 
Arohias Floral Co.. 77 

Armacost & Co 65 

.^t Floral Co 81-95 

Art Florist 94 

Art Fir. Shop 71 

Artindale & Son 00 

Artistic FI. Co 95 

Aschmann Bros 100 

Asrhmann, G 112 

A8hl)orne Goldfish. . . 98 
Ashtabula Fl. Co... 01 

Asman 84 

Atchison Flo. Store. 90 
Athletic Club First. 94 
Atlantic City Shop. . 74 

Attica Fl. Co 88 

Anil Bros. Co 48 

Aurora Greenhouse. . 8<> 

Austin Fl. Co 79 

Austin, n 101 

Austin, J 70 

Avcmie Floral Co... 8»> 
Avenue Fir. Shop... 86 

Averv Florist 90 

Ayres, S. Bryson. . .laT 

B. 

Bader Co., John 100 

Bader & Co 105 

Baer, Julius 89 

Baker Fl. CoV 70 

Baker. W. J 45 

Baker * Son 75 

Ball, C. V Ill 

Ball Fl. Co 89 

Bancroft & Son 71 

Banuird Co I 

Barnes. W. .T 70 

Barr & Co.. B. F.79-11.S 

Barrows, II. II US 

Bassett & Washburn 3 
Bateman. Inc., II. . . 94 

Bath. John H 88 

Banmcarten 82 

Baur & Steinkamp. . 8 
Baur Window Glass. 119 

Bausclier Bros 8.5 

Baversdorfcr & Co.. 47 

Bonprle 79 

Benll Olise. Co -W 

Beaven, K. A 51 

Becker's Cons 73 

Beckert's Seeds ....100 

Bees. Ltd 69 

Belmont Fir. Shop.. 72 
IJentzen Floral Co. . 77 

BerRor Bros 44 

Bereor's Sons. Wm. 78 
Berkeley Florist ... 94 

Berninc, II. G 98 

Bort(>niiann Bros... 88 
Bosnnron & Co, .... 79 

I'.estrr & Sons 84 

I!etli;mls 51 

Ili'vrr & Weber 88 

T.iJlincs Flo, Co 93 

T'.ills Floral Co 71 

Bird & Son 120 

r.is^inirer. .T. .\ 84 

Blnckistone, Z. P. .. 70 

Bl.nke's 90 

Blessine, J. 1! 81 

Tiln«<ifel(I. I{ol>ort. ..lO.T 

lllo'jsom ."<liiip SO 

T.liiMnize B. Shop.. 84 

Bons & Co ."0 

Bobliink A- Atkins. .109 

Bork. R. G 42 

Bohnniion Fl. Co 87 

Bolcl.nno .<!eed Co. ..100 
Boiiwell Roliin .... 03 

Boston Florist 75 

Boston's Fir. Store.. SO 
Bovio <Sr Tiiirn.Tud. . . 05 
Br.nene * Son 50 



Braslan Co., N 100 

Brehnier Ghse 91 

Breitmeyer's Sons.. . 84 
Bright Spot Ghse. .. 92 
HrinkerhofT Ghses... 80 
Bi-oadway Florist... 94 

Bro<lerick. R. T 75 

Brodrib, J. A 73 

Brown, A. C 85 

Brown Bag Filling 

Machine Co 100 

Brown Bros. & Co.. 89 
Brf)wn's Nurseries.. 89 
Brown & Kennedy. . 94 

Brownhurst 81 

Brownwood Flo. Co. 79 

Brunger. C. A 94 

Bruns, H. N 87-105 

Bryan, A. J 108 

Buchbinder Bros.... 97 

Budlong, J. A .39 

Bunyard, A. T 70 

Burlington Willow 

Ware 99 

Burns, H. H 75 

Bums Fir. Shop 70 

Burpee Co 101 

Burt, Albert J 93 

Buschardt. Wm. F..111 

C. 

Cade the Florist 80 

Cadillac Glass Co. ..118 
Caldwell, Woodsman .50 
California Florist... 93 
California Fl. Co... .56 

Ciillalian, M. J 78 

Callahan Co.. T. J.. 146 
Capital City Fl. Co. 82 
Capitol Floral Co. . . 85 
Caple. Walter W... 84 
Cartmne. I'liilip L. . 72 

Carek. F. G 90 

Carolina Fir. Store. 81 
(^ase.v Florist Co.... 72 
Casper Floral Co... 93 
Central Fir. Co... 84 92 

Central Fl. Sliop 91 

Chandler Flo. Co. . . 76 

Chapin Bros 88 

Chapin Co., M. S...147 
t'harleston Cut Fl.. 82 
Chgo. Flower Grow- 
ers' Assn 30-31 

Chickasha Grnhses.. 86 
Cincinnati Cut Fir. . 98 

City Floral Co 84-93 

City Fir. Shop 93 

Clark, G. R 79 

<'lark Seed Co 101 

Clarke Bros 93 

Clarke, W. B 58 

Clarke's Sons 7.5 

Cleveland Soil Co. . .123 
Climax Mfg. Co. . . . .50 
Clody's Fir. Shop. . . 86 

Coggan. S. W 84 

Cok.il Stoker Corp.. 117 

Cokely's 46-51 

Coles' Fir. Shop 88 

Colonial Fir. Co 78 

Colonial Fir. Shop.. 76 
Colorado Seed Co... 99 
Columbia Fir. Co... 77 
Columbine Fir. Co.. 92 

Conard & .Tones 107 

Congress Fir. Shop. 81 

Connr>n Co 89 

Constien, B. E 01 

Coomlis 73 

Cotter Co.. C. N 99 

Cotton the Florist.. S3 
Cowan Bros. & Co.. SS 

Cowee. W. J -12 

Coy Seed Co 100 

Craig Co.. R 12 

Crane & Hill 74 

Crescent Bulb Co. . .103 
Crosient Giirden ... 79 

Critcliell. C. E ,5:; 

Crouch. Clias. W. . . SI 

Crowl Fern Co .50 

Criinip. Frank F 92 

Culp & Co 90 

Cnrrie & Co., .\. . . . 82 



Diinisl] Seed Imp... 103 

Banker 74 

Darbee's 9,-, 

TlMrlings Shop 94 

Dant Bros 85 

Bjviilson Fl. Co.... 88 

Diivis Co.. J. W 1(><( 

Davis Flo. Co S9 

DaviM & Kishler 84 

D.iv Co 74 

T)e:il. S. I, 71 

Be K.iIU Fir. Shop.. 85 
Denver Wliolesule. . . 11 
Dorr's Fir. Shop. ... 7i) 

Dethlpfs, Wm 85 

Detroit In'tl Co KM) 

Diener Co., R .f,s 

Dietsch Co., A 120 

Dingley''; «;<( 

Dittiiier tlie Florist. 71 



Dixon Floral Co 85 

Dodge City Fl. Co. . 90 

Donofrlo Flo. Co 70 

Dorner & Sons Co.. Ill 
Dreer. H. A.... 119-123 
Drevon-Tegelaar ...10.5 

Drury, H. F 85 

Dudley Sons Co 82 

Duerr, ('has. A 91 

Duluth Floral Co. .. 92 

Dumke Fl. Co 95 

Dunlop, John II 89 

Durham Floral Co.. 81 



Kbie, Chas 80 

Ecke, Paul .56 

Edwards Floral Hall 74 

Ehle, Fred G 60-61 

Eiche Floral Co 88 

Eldred Flower Shop 94 

Elias & Co 118 

Elitch Gardens 99 

Ellis Floral Co 88 

Elverson Potterj-. . . .120 

Eugle Floral Co 91 

Enid Floral Co 86 

Enomoto & Co ,58 

Erne & Co 35 

Espelin Flo. Co 92 

Evans Co., John A.. IV 

Evenden Bros 79 

Evenden's Sons .... '79 
Ever Ready Fl. Pot. 41 
Excell I>at>oratories. 47 

Kxcello Mfg. Co 112 

Excelsior Ghses 77 

T. 

Faber, Geo 86 

Fallon, Florist 82 83 

Fallon Co., J. J. . .81-83 

Fallon, John 83 

Feast, S., & Sons. . . 84 
Felton's Fir. Shop.. 7(> 

Fisher & Bro 87 

Fisher Governor Co. 117 

Flagg Flo. Co 79 

Flasch Chimnev Co. 116 
Flatiron Fir. Shop. . 88 
Florists' »;rdt. Assn. 147 
Florists' Co-Op. Sup. 98 
Florists' Sup. Hse.. 98 
Florists' Hail .\ssu.ll3 

Flower Shop 

72-80-81-82-89 

Foerster Co :!7 

Foley Mfg. Co 119 

Forber. G. F 71 

Ford. M. C 99 

Fordham Florist . . . ~o 
Fottler-Fiske-Raw- 

son 101 

Fox. Ch.is. Henry... 78 

Fox's, Inc 82 

Franklin Park Flo. . !l(l 

Eraser & .S<iu lii 

Kreileriek Fl. Shop. . 7,S 
Fred's Fir. Garden.. 8] 

Freeport Flo. Co 80 

Frey, C. U S,s 

Frey & Frey 8S 

Frost. Chas 10:! 

Froute, M li'i 

Fuchs, llenr>- S;! 

Fulbruge's Firs. ... 92 

Furnivnl & Son 84 

Furrow & Co H>> 

I'^itterman, Chas. . . 99 

G. 

Galvin. Thos. F 72 

<;aniinage & Sons. . . .H!i 
<;arden City Fir. Co. 93 

• Janliner Flo. Co. . . 71 

Garlanii Co 147 

Gasser Co 91 

C.atlitT Flo. Shop... 70 

Cause, G. R 88 

General Bull) Co. . . .105 
Genteninn, H. A. . . . 85 

Geny Bro.s 81 

(■eorge Bros. & Co.. 79 

<;eorge, Inc 8.3 

Gets-There Soap.... 123 

GiWis liros 72 

Giblin & Co 117 

Gillett, E. U .53 

Gilson :Mfg. Co 122 

Ginibel's 82 

Gleave's Fir. Shop.. 95 

• ;ioe(kner. Wm 74 

(iloekler Co.. B 97 

Gnatt Co.. Ove 46 

Goetz Sons 84 

Goldsboro Flo. Co. . . 81 

tJoliIstein, 1 90 

Goodbrad Floral ... 80 
Gove. Mrs. C. C. . . . 72 

Graham .84 

i;rnhani & Son 91 

Grakelow, C. II. . , . 78 
Gr. Forks Fl. Co. . . . 85 
fJrnnd Metal AVorks. 43 
Green the Florist... 79 

Greensmith. F 84 

tJreenville Fl. Co... 81 



Graver, Wm. H 76 

(irimm & Gorly 77 

Groh, John 116 

Grohe Co., B'red 58 

(Jroves Floral Co. ... 90 
Groves, Inc., Robt.. 52 

Grulich & Sons 74 

Grulleinans & Sons. 105 

Gude Bros. Co 70 

(Jullett & Sons 13-38 

(Jumz, A. W 98 

Giirney Ghse. Co... 85 
tJuthrie-Lorenz Co.. 71 

H. 

Hal)ormehrs Sons... 78 

Haeger Flo. Co 81 

Hall Tobacco Co 147 

Hall & Co., G. J 94 

Hall & Robinson 89 

Halliday, Wm U 

Hamilton Bros 52 

Hammond, Benj, . .124 

Hammond Co 83 

Hammond (^o., B. E. 5i» 

Ilanliing Co 99 

Hannah & Son 79 

Hansen N. & F. Co. 84 
Harkett's Flo. Nur. 71 

Harris Bros 78 

Harris Mfg. Co 120 

Harris Seed Co 80 

Hart, Geo. B 99 

Hart & Vick 101 

Hasselbring 84 

Hastings, JYank R. 78 

Haven Seed Co lOO 

Hayashi & Co 56 

Hayes, James 90 

Ilaymau Ghse. Co.. 82 
Heacock Co., Jos... Ill 

Heckenkamp 85 

Ilecock Floral Co... 91 

Heet>e Co 91 

Heil, I'. T 77 

Heinl & Son, J. G.. 88 

Heller & Co 105 

Henibrelker & Cole. 85 
Henderson & Co.... I 

Henes, Louis J 91 

Ilenrv Co., .1 47 

Herbert & Flei- 

sliauer ,59 

Herron, Dana R, . . . 74 

Hess & Swoboda 88 

Hews & Co 121 

Higgins, J. J 80 

Highland I'ark Ghs. 87 

Hill Nursery Co 106 

Hill & Co., Dave... 78 

Hill Co., E. G I 

Hill Co., J. H 109 

Hill's Fir. Sliop 78 

Hillyer's 79 

Hinde & Dauch 48 

Hitchings & Co 125 

Hogan & Evers 95 

Hogewoning & Sons. 105 

Holden FI. Co .59 

Hollywood Fir. Shop 94 
Ilidlywood Gardens. 9.'! 

Holm & Olson 92 

Holton & Hunkel. . . 08 
Ilonaker the Florist. 8.3 

Hopper's Ghse 93 

Iloran & Son 73 

Horn Fir. Co 90 

Houghton Gorney. . . 72 
Howard Rose Co. . . . 57 
Howard & Smith. . . 94 

Huber, AV. X 42 

Ilmnnson Co., ,\ . . . . 42 
ll.iinholdt Evercrn.. 57 
Humnhrev. C. T,. . . . 90 
HiirlT. E. F 101 

I. 

Tckes-P.rann 119 

T<lle Hour Floral Co. 85 
Mil' Hour Xurs. ... SO 

bllewild (Jhse 81 

Illinois Malleable. . .117 

Iiisectonos Lab 124 

Ionia Pottery Co.... 121 
Irwin. Roman J.... 1-5 
Isett & Son. C. B..n6 
Ishc'rwood Ghse. ... 77 



.Tablonsky. A 110 

.Tackson Cut Fir. Co. 81 
.Tackson I'lr. Shop.. 86 
Jarkson & Perkins.. 107 
Jaeger Machine Co.. 125 

Jaeger & Son 95 

Jalin. H. H 74 

.Tames, Eric ar, 

James & Son 74 

Jensen Bros 86 

.Tohnson, .1. L 85 

Johnson. .T. 122 

.Tohnson & Jensen... 87 

.Johnson's Ghses 81 

Johnston Bros 7.! 

Johnston & Co 73 

Johnston. Mary .... 84 
Jointless Fire Brick. 117 
Jolict Floral Co. . . . 85 



Jones, Percy 97 

Joseph, B. M 95 

Joy Floral Co. 81-110-111 
Junction Ghses 82 

K, 

Kahler Pottery Co. .120 

Kai, M 103 

Kan. City Cut Fl... 40 

Keller Co.. John 83 

Keller Sons, J. B.,. 75 
Keller Pottery Co.. 121 

Kelway & Son 104 

Kemble Fl. Co 71 

Kendig Florist 45 

Kenned.v & Sons.... 74 
Kennicott Bros. Co. 33 

Kent Bros 91 

Kerr, R. 79 

Keur & Sons 105 

Kiger, N 91 

Kimberlin Seed Co.. 100 
Kinder & Bro., S... 73 

King Cons. Co 148 

"King" Florist, The 89 

Kinsman, A. N 92 

Kirchhoff's Cons 109 

Kirkwood FI. Co 71 

Kirchen & Gifford. . 46 

Knees & Sons 87 

Koppelman, Jos. ... 99 

Kottmiller, A 75 

Kramer the Florist. 76 

Kranz. C 71 

Kroeschell Bros. ...114 
Kruchten Co., John. 97 
Krueger Co., C. F.. 78 

Krug Floral Co 87 

Kuehn. C. A 98 

Knhl. G. A 85 113 

Kusik & Co 97 

L. 
Tji Crosse Floral Co. 82 
Lagarde & Speelman.105 
Lagarde & Vander- 

voort 105 

Lakeview Rose Gdn. 75 

L. .\. Floral Co 54 

Liipibonrne, E 95 

Lane. Geo. F 73 

Tjing Floral Co 79 

I-ange & Son, R. C. . 87 

Ijinge, A 87 

I^angers Flo. Co.... 70 

Ijingohr, M 93 

I.iankford. W. A .83 

Ijirmon, L. L 88 

Layer, J. V 79 

Lawler, Geo 60 

I^awrence Flo. Co... 80 

Leach Fir. Shop 89 

I>eague the Florist.. 77 
Leavenworth Fl. Co. 90 

I.*e, Arthur G 89 

Ja'o & Co., C. S .52 

Lehde & Galley 76 

I*ighton Floral Co. 90 

I#mon & Co 88 

Leonard Seed Co 100 

I-ey & McAIInn 89 

Liggit, C. U 109 

Lindley Box 49 

Lipman Refrigerator 8 

I/)hr, Wm. S 86 

liOrd'B Fir. Room. . . 90 
Ijord & Burnham.II-llii 

Ix)s Rohles Co .56 

Ixitos Mfg. Co 42 

Ijouise Flower Shop. 70 
liouisville Pofy Co. 121 
Tioveridge, Chns. ... 87 
I/)we's Fir. Shop... 94 

Lnbliner 82 

Liulwig Co., E. C. . . 78 

M. 

McCallum Co. .43-51-125 

McCarron. Miss 83 

McCarron Flo. Co... 81 
McCIenahan Ghses.. 98 
AtcClure Coffman ... 82 
McCray Refrigera- 
tor o~ 

McEIroy, T. P 85 

McHutchlson & Co. .lOi 

McKenna. Ltd 89 

AfcT.K>lIan Co 61 

McI>eod & Henry... 116 

McMnrniy. R. S 112 

MelJae Jenkinson ... 79 

Macaw Bros 112 

Madison St. Fir 86 

Madson Seed Co 82 

Ma.iors the Florist. . 79 

Maiandre Bros 75 

Mangel. .Tohn 87 

Mankato Fl. Co 92 

March Irrigator Co. 121 
Afargrave, Susan ... 90 

M.irret & Miller 83 

Marshall. Geo. W... 86 

Martin Grate Co 117 

Martin & Forbes. . . 93 

Martins. The 90 

Marvin, Ira G 78 



Mas-Art Basket 50 

Massmann 74 

Matbeson, Hugh M.llO 

Mau, Otto F 86 

MaufF Floral Co 92 

May, Harry 74 

Mazey 92 

Mead-Suydam Co... 118 

Mears, Geo. F 50 

Meconi, Paul 99 

Meeban, CIuis. E... 45 
Megchelsen Fl. Shop 91 
Meier-Sehroeder Co.. 82 

Melnhart, J. E 77 

Menand. H. L '74 

Metairle Ridge Nur. 80 
Metropolitan Mate- 
rial Co 112-117-125 

Metz Bros !»0 

Mexia Flo. Co 79 

Meyer, F. C 99 

Meyer Thread Co... 36 

Miehal. John A 86 

Michell Co., H. F,.102 
Michigan Cut Fir... .5" 
Middlemount Gdns.. 81 

Miller, A. L lio 

Miller, H. G 125 

Miller, H. T 90 

Miller, J. S 78 

Miller Floral Co.. 59-95 
Miller Print Shop. . . 48 

Miller & Son 85 

Mills the Florist 71 

Minge Floral Co 80 

Mission Fir. Shoppe. 90 
Missouri Pottery ...121 
Mo. Pott'y Supply.. 121 

Moninger Co IV 

Jlono Service 43 

Montgomery Ghses. . 71 
.Moorby, Chas. W. . . 78 
Morehead Mfg. Co.. 110 

.Morgenroth, AV 81 

Morris, Florist 95 

Morse & Beals 72 

Morse & Co 100 

Moseley, Mrs. T. A. 76 
Mosmlller, Frank... 83 

Moss, Chas. A 81 

Aloimtain View Flo. 61 
Muehlebach FI. Shop 76 

Muir, John T 87 

MuIIanphy 77 

Muntz, S. E 71 

JIurata & Co 54 

Murdoch. W. A 79 

Murphy Co ,53 

Murray, Samuel. ... 76 
Murray & Co 76 

K. 

Nanz Floral Co 83 

Narcissi Assn 104 

Navlet Co 95 

Neidinger, J. G 45 

Neil Flower Shop... 90 
Neilsen, Inc., N. . . . 92 
New Brunswick Nur. 107 

Newell. A 70 

N. Y. Florists' Sup. 99 
Nicotine Mfg. Co.. 125 
Niednagel, Julius. . . 88 

Nielsen, Knud .53 

Niessen Co.. Leo. ... 44 

Noll Floral Co 40 

Norfolk Floral Co. . . 88 
Northern Fern Co.. ,53 
Norton Ghse 90 

0. 

Oakes, 0. B 91 

Obertin. P. N 82 

O'Brien. J. J 72 

O'Connell Fir. Shop 76 

Oelschig & .Son 80 

Oesterllng. Alfred.. 104 

Ohio Glass Co 118 

O'Lean- Florist 87 

Olsson Co.. H. L 60 

Onarga Nursery .... 100 
Oppenheim, Manuel. 74 
Oppermnnn, Anton.. 77 

Orchid, The 94 

Osborne Co 48 

Ostertag Bros 77 

Owen & Son Ill 

Owosso Floral Co . . . 84 

P. 

Pacific Nurseries... 01 
Talnier, Inc., F. E.. 72 

Palmer & Son 76 

Park Floral Co 92 

Park Florist 75 

Parker's Fir. Store. 80 

Patrick Fl. Co 94 

Patten. Helen F. . . . 90 
Payne's Fir. Shop.. 80 

Pedrick & Son 100 

Pelicano- Rossi 66 

Penn 72 

Pennock Co 45 

Perman, .Tohn 52 

Perry's Fir. Shoppe. 91 

Pershing, E. H 88 

Perstein. Harry ... 82 



[CONCLUDED ON PAGE 4.] 



Ju.NE 8, 1922 



The Florists^ Review 



Popular Prices 

For High-Grade Roses 

In lots of 300 or more of one grade, our selection, as follows: 

ROSES, good short .... per 100, $3.00 to $4.00 
ROSES, choice medium lengths .... per 100, 6.00 

NEW FANCY FERNS, very fine ... per 1000, 2.00 



PRICE LIST: 



PREMIER 



Fancy long 



Per 100 
$12.00 



Choice medium $6.00 to 

Good short 3.00 to 

COLUMBIA 

Fancy long 

Choice medium 

Good short $4.00 to 



8.00 
5.00 



$12.00 
8.00 
6.00 



OPHELIA, BUTTERFLY AND 
WHITE KILLARNEY Per 100 

Fancy long $12.00 

Choice medium $6.00 to 8.00 

Good short 3.00 to 4.00 

CRUSADER AND SUNBURST 

Long $16.00 to $20.00 

Medium 10.00 to 12.00 

Short 5.00 to 8.00 



RUSSELL Per 100 



Fancy long $16.00 

Medium 12.00 

Good short 8.00 

Short $5.00 to 6.00 

When ordering please state what grade wanted. 

ASPARAGUS — extra fancy light green, guaranteed fresh at spe- 
cial price, 35 cents per bunch or three bunches for a dollar. 
BRONZE GALAX — extra large leaves, $2.00 per thousand. 

All seasonable flowers we will buy for our customers at market prices. 

A Trial Order Solicited 

In buying direct of the grower you are assured of fresh 
stock at all times, and the most even run of quality possible. 

Bassett & Washburn 



GreeshoHScs : 
WESTMONT, ILL 



CHICAGO, ILL. 



Office and Store: 178 N. Wabash Avenue 
Long Distance Phone, Central 1457 



The Florists^ Review 



JuNB 8. 1922 



Peters & Sons 59 

Peterson Nui-Borv . . .108 
Peterson & Huywood 04 
Peterson & Son. S.. 87 

I'faft & Kendall 116 

I'faltzgraff Pottery. 121 
Phlla. Cut Flower. . 45 
Phlla. FlorlBtB' Ex.. 45 
Phlla. Gr'wrs' Mkt. 40 
Phlla. Pipe Supply. 116 

Philips Bros 74 

Piedmont Fir. Shop. 81 

Plerson, A. N 1-147 

I'lerson, V. H 108 

Pikes Peak Flo. Co. 92 
PlUsbury, I. Iv..85-tl.S 
Plnehurst Fir. Shop. OS 
Pine St. Nursery... 60 
Pittsburgh Cut Flo. 

50 09 

Plater, K. W 86 

Plath, n 01 

Podesta & Raldorohi 95 
Poehlinann Bros. . .6-7-9 

Pollworth Co 1-51 

Pomona Fl. Co 94 

Pooley's Fir. Shop. . 94 

Poor, C. 1 89 

Posle Shoppe 91 

Potter Floral Co 70 

Power Fl. Shop 83 

Preehtl & Woltella. fiO 
Premier Rose Gdns. 56 
Progressive Clay. . . .120 

Pueblo Flo. Co 02 

Pnlos, Christy S 5."5 

Pulverized Manure.. 122 
Pul. Pltrv. Manure. 122 

Turnpll. AV. Z 5.'1 

Pyfer & Co., A. T. . 41 

a. 

•QuHlitT Brands Co.. 125 
<Juality Fir. Store. . 89 

B. 

llaebel & Son 91 

Uaedh'in Haskct (Jo. 4« 

"Rahn & Herbprt 00 

Hnmm's Fir. Shop. . 75 

Ramsay, Ltd 89 

Kamsburg, C. S 103 

Ranrtiill's Flo. Sliop 72 
Randall Co. .3.1-:m-:{7 97 
Randall Displayers.llT 
Randolph & Mc- 

(Mements 78 

Ravlcr & Sons 80 

Reck & Son 73 

Redline Co 84 

Redondo Flo. Co 04 

Regan Ptg. House. .123 

Regina Flo. C( 8!t 

Reld, Edward 41 




[CONCLUDED FROM PAOC 2.] 



Reimers & Son Co.. 8a 
Reinltart & Adams. 88 

Reinberg, (ieo 97 

Reinberg, 1' 34 

Reliance Seed Co... 91 

Rennison Co 71 

Rentschler Flo. Co.. 82 

Reyes & Co 80 

Ribsam, Martin C. 74 

Rice Bros 98 

Rice Co., M 14 

Rice Seed Co 101 

Ridenour, Victor 78 

Riverside Fl. Shop. 71 

Riverside Ghses 82 

Robblns Bros 72 

Robinson Seed Co. ..100 

Robinson & Co 51 

Rochester Ghses.... 92 

Rock Flower Co 78 

Rock ford Floral Co. 87 
Rocklin & Ijphman. 71 
Rock River Irig. Co.l20 

Kodgers, .T. W 91 

Roehrs Co 100 

Rogers. I»uis M 88 

Rohnert, Waldo 100 

Roos. Jelle 104 

Rosaia Bros 93 

Roseland Florist 80 

Rosemont Gardens.. 80 
Rosendule Fir. Shop 74 

Ross, .T. W 85 

Rucker'H Fir. Shop. 83 

Rumbley t'o 50 

Rusch & Co 98 

Rattle. Robert D... 83 

Ryan, H. A 72 

Ryan & Culver 91 

Rye, George Si) 

Rynveld & Sons 10.'> 

S. 

Saiike. O. C 94 

Snkata & Co 101 

Salem Glises 93 

Salzor's Flo. Gdns.. 82 

Samuelson. C. A. . . . 87 

Sanders Nursery.... 77 

Sandiford, Chas. ... 76 

Sayre Fir. Co 79 

•Sceerv. Eiiward .... 74 

.Sohaeffer, J. K 77 



Schafer Fl. Co 86 

Schelnuk, Max 80 

Schiller. ,1. I., Ill 

Schillo, Adam 123 

Schlatter & Sou 113 

Schliug Max 75 

Schmans Bros 83 

Schmidt & Melne. .. 91 

Schneider, A. H SO 

Scholtz, Florist 81 

Schoorl, Adrian J... 58 

Schulthels 78 

Schulz Co., J 83 

Schwake & Co 103 

Scott, Wm., Co 70 

Scribner Floral Co.. 84 

Scrim's 89 

Seattle F. & M. Co. 00 
.Secure Hose Washer 60 
Segers Bros., Ltd... 103 

Seibert. F. C 82 

Seibert, L. M 77 

Semler-Leidiger Co. 82 
Sharp, Partridge. .. .119 

Shaw, Fred R 71 

Sheely Bros 74 

Shellgrain & Ritter. 95 

Sheppard, H. W 89 

Sheridan Ghse. Co.. 93 
Shoemaker, B. H...118 

Shotwell Fir. Co S.'i 

Shrauger & Johnson. 51 
Siebrecht, Jr., H. A. 94 

Sievers, W. H 70 

Skidelsky & Co I 

Skinner Co.. M. R..117 
Skinner Irrigation. .113 

Smedley Flo. Co 85 

Smely, J. M 80 

Smith, B. L. S4 

Smith Co., A. W. .. 78 
Smith Co.. W. & T.lOO 
Smith Flo. Co., H.. 84 

Smith Ghse. Co 80 

Smith Wholesale 98 

Smith & Co Ill 

Smith & Young 98 

Smyth, W. J 65 

Souster, George .... 8fl 

Sou. Cyp. Aasn 123 

Speelman & Sons... 105 
Springfield Fl. Co... Ill 
Springfield Seed Co. 77 
St. Joseph Box ."iO 



St. Louis Pott'y Co. 120 
St. I.«uls Seed Co.. 100 
St. Jjouis Wholesale. 42 

Stache, H. C 73 

Stallings Fir. Shop. 80 
Starr the Florist... M 

State Fair F. Co 77 

State Floral Co 93 

State Nursery Co. . . 93 
Steele's Pansles.... 60 

Stein, A. 95 

Stemme & Sons.... 85 
Stenson & McGrall. 79 
Stiles. Mrs. R. B... 83 

StoU, 0. A 84 

Storrs & Harrison. .108 
Straus Flowers .... («9 

Stroh & Sons 121 

Stroufs, Inc. ...72-110 

Stuebe Fir. Co 82 

Stumpp, G. K. M... 09 
Stumpp & Walter.. 101 

Stuppy Flo. Co 77 

Stuppv Sup. Co 40 

Suekling & Chase... 89 

Suder, A. A 90 

Sunnyside Ghses.... 74 
Superior Dahlia 

Gardens 58 

Superior Fir. Co 82 

Suzanne Floral Co. . 95 

Swanson's, Inc 92 

Swanson the Florist 87 
Swartley & Sons. ... 85 



Tarentum Fir. Co... 78 

Tassano Bros .56 

Teahan Fern Co 52 

Tegelaar Bros 105 

Temblett, Wm. H.. 91 

'JTiim. C 09 

Thomas, Victor H. . 83 
Thompson, W. W... 51 
Thornton Fir. Shop. 85 

Thorsted Fl. Co 05 

Throop-Martin Co... 118 

Tipton & Hurst 89 

Toms, Lillian C 88 

Tonner 34-42 

Toole & Son 108 

Tottv Co.. C. H 109 

Traendly & Schenck. 90 
Trepel & Bershad . . 74 



Trimble Co 10-85 

Trinidad Fl. Store.. 92 
Tupelo Floral Co. . . 85 

Turner Bros 118 

Turner, Wm. H 79 

U. 

Uecke, Chas. F 38 

Union Construction. . 97 

United Bulb Co 104 

United Bulb Grs 103 

United Cut Fir. Co. 09 
United Flower & 

Supply 69 

U. S. Cut Fir. Co. . . 99 
University Florist. . 93 

Usinger, W. T 41 

Utica Floral Co 75 

V. 

Valdesian Nurs 107 

Valker's Floral Co.. 85 

Van Aart, John 83 

Van Aken Bros 84 

Van Bochove & Bro. 84 
Van Der Schoot. 

R. A 104 

Vandervoort & Co.. 103 

Van Llndley Co 81 

Van Meter Fl. Shop 90 
Van Zanten & Sons. 103 
Van Zonneveld Bros. 

& I'hilippo 102 

Vavrous Sons 79 

Vesey's 88 

Vick's Sons, J 100 

Victoria Nursery.... 89 
Violet Dell Florist.. 71 

Virgin, U. J 80 

Vogt's Greenhouse.. 84 
Vos & Son lot 

W. 

AValdbart Flo. Co... 77 

AValler Seed Co 101 

Walsh & Son 72 

AValther. H. C 00 

Walther & Sons 77 

Want Ads 02-63-64 

Warburton Co 72 

Ward & Co.. R. M. I 
AVatkins & Simpson. 101 
AVaysido Gdns 108 



Wax Bros 72 

Weaver, Wm 86 

Weber. F. 77 

Weber, Fred H 77 

Webster Ghses 85 

Weeber & Race 110 

Welland, John 87 

Weiland-Rlsch 38 

Welnstock'g 80 

Weir, Inc., James.. 74 
Welch's Fir. Shop.. 73 

Welke Co 82 

Weller Nurs. Co 106 

Werthelmer Bros ... 14 
Westman & Getz... 91 
Westmoreland Gdn.. 71 

Wettlin Flo. Co 74 

White Bros 74 

Whitford'B 04 

Wlegand's Sons 88 

Wienhoeber Co. ... 87 

Wilcox & Co 57 

Wilcox & Sons 71 

Wllks Mfg. Co 116 

Williams, Mrs. E. A. 78 

Williams. Ed 88 

Williams the Florist 88 
WlUson. Herbert H. 80 

Wilson, A 124 

Wilson, H. B 75 

Wilson Floral Co... 90 
Wilson-Crout-Gehr. . 60 

Wiltshire, G. H 47 

AVinandy, Jr., Mike. 125 
Windier AVholesale. 98 
Winter Floral Co... 82 

Winterson Co 52 

Witek, Joseph 77 

Wlttbold & Son.. 86-87 

AVlttbold, Geo 87 

AVolf, John 80 

Wolfe the Florist ... 79 
AVoodcock Fl. Co... 71 
AVoodland Park Co. . 61 
AVoodman's Fl. Shop 00 
Woodruff & Sons . . . 101 
Woodruff's Son .... 60 

AA'ood's Fl. Shop 70 

Woodward, A. J 89 

AVrlght's Fl. Shop.. 67 



T, 

Yeagle, W. P... 

Yetter. P. J 

Young, Fred M. . 
Young & Lester. 



Zane Pottery Co. 
Zeoh & Mann . . . . 

Zetlitz, E. N 

Zetlitz Flo. Pro. 
Zvolanek, A. C. . 



.113 
. 43 
. 61 

. 93 



.121 
. 32 
. 90 
. 91 
. 61 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 



Page 

Draca'ii.Ts and Their Differences 

(illus.) 15 

Kan.sas City Convention 16 

Xatioiial I'ublicity CampaiRn.... 17 

fiorly <'elel>ratos Uirthiiay IT 

F. 'I'. 1 >. Meinlier.'i at Atlanta.... 17 

Hail at Orcoley, Colo 18 

Newport. H. 1 18 

Mott-ly Miisinprs 18 

Custonicr.s at $1.50 Each 19 

— -Cost of AtU'ertisinK 19 

Prevent Panic 20 

— Fixes Fair Coal I'lices 20 

Ro.'^es at Arling;ton 21 

— • American Uose Society 21 

— If This Be Ue.se Majeste— 22 

Minneaiiolis and St. P.aul 23 

I^obelia Kriniis Gracilis (illus.)... 23 

Kansas City. Mo 23 

Washington, D. C 24 

Karly Mnms 24 

Mums and Cherries 24 

Columbus, 24 

Ooituary 24 

— Phili]) I'flastercr 24 

— William H. Hilton 24 



I'aere 

The Hardy Cardcn 2;') 

— Herbaceous Perennials 2r) 

}?ackfire 25 

— Hot Shots from Miss .Tarvis. . . 2.'i 

Ifelp Them Help Us 26 

Rose Society Meeting 26 

Peony Society MeptinR 26 

Why Not Build Anotlier House?.. 26 

Brief Answers 26 

r^ittsburKh, Pa 27 

New York 27 

Chicago 27 

Boston 42 

Philadelphia 44 

Pacific Coast Department 54 

— T.os Angeles, Cal T,i 

— ■ San Francisco, Cal 54 

■ — Oakland, Cal .■)8 

— • Seattle, Wash 59 

I'^or Cucumber Beetle 61 

Flowers for Graduates (illus.)... Q8 

An Ad on Wheels 68 

IntroducinK the Season 68 

Indianapolis Bank's Show 69 

Kowe's Rambles "6 

St. Louis 78 



Pa are 

Mid-AVesterners at Work 84 

Rochester, N. Y 86 

Newark, N. J 87 

Cincinnati, 88 

Worcester, Mass 89 

Milwaukee, Wis 90 

Cleveland, 9i 

Evansville, Ind 91 

Hardening Plants 92 

Steamer Sailings 94 

Seed Trade News lOo 

— Southern Seedsmen Meet (il- 
lus.) 100 

— Business Building- 102 

News of the Nursery Trade 106 

— Mildew on Ramblers 106 

— Nursery Stock at Queens 106 

— Poison Spray on Fruits 106 

Greenhouse Heating 114 

— Coal I'roduction Si)urred 114 

— -Coal or Oil? lie 

— Heating Additional House 116 

Providence, R. I us 

Toronto. Ont 122 

Indianapolis, Ind 124 



!F ' ^' 



June 8, 1922 



The Florists^ Review 



Choice Florists^ Flower Seeds 

/ aim to procure the best obtainable. Less 5% for cash with order. 



ANTIRRHINUM, Greenhouse Forcing va- 
rieties. Selected Seed. 

Pkt. 

Keystone $1.0C 

Ramsburg's and Buxton's Silver 

Pink 1.00 

Nelrose, Deep Pink and Qiant Yellow .50 

Phelps' White and Scarlet 50 

Garnet and Giant Bronze 50 

Fancy Mixed Colors 50 

Golden Pink Queen 1.00 

Hybrid Pink, Soft Orchid 1.00 

Orlando 1.00 

Philadelphia Pink 1.00 

ASPARAGUS, Plumosus Nanus, new crop 
seed. Northern Greenhouse Grown, $4.00 
per 1000 seeds, 5000 seeds $19.00; lath- 
nouse grown, $2.50 per thousand seeds, 
10,000 seeds $20.00. 
Sprengeri, 1000 seeds, $1.50. 

ASTERS. Best commercial varieties for 
cut flowers. See last week's issue. 



CARNATION, Hardy Dwarf Vienna 
Double, Mixed. Grenadin Dwarf Dou- 
ble, Bright Red, hardy, 14 oz., SOc; 
'A oz., 7Sc; ounce, $2.00. 



CALCEOLARIA, Hybrida Grandinora, 

extra chodce mixed, 1000 seeds, $1.00. 
Rugosa Nani^ Dwarf Mixed, 1000 
seeds, $1.00. 



CELOSIA, Compacta Chrysantheflora 

(Novelty), $5.00 per trade packet. 
Cultural directions on application. 



CINERARIAS, HYBRIDS, Giant Flow- 
ering, Half Dwarf, finest mixed, 1000 
seeds, $1.00. 

Hybrids, giant flowering, dwarf, fin- 
est mixed, 1000 seeds, $1.00. 
Giant Flowering Matador, crimson, 
500 seeds, 75c. 

Giant Flowering Rosea, ."iOO seeds, 7Sc. 
Giant Flowering Royal Blue, 500 
seeds, 7Sc. 

Stellata Hybrids, finest mixed, 1000 
seeds, $1.00. 




PANSY SEEDS 

Home grown. Best 



Giant Masterpiece 
Giant Red Shades 
Giant Beaconsfield 



money can buy. 
Giant Lavender 
Giant White 
Giant Yellow 



Giant Bronze Shades 

Mixtures: Giant Florist Mixture, Trade 
pkt., 75c; 'A oz., $1.50; J4 oz., $2.25; 
'A oz., $4.00; oz., $7.50. 

Steele's Mastodon Private Stock Mix- 
ture, yi oz., $1.50; 'A oz., $2.75; oz., 
$5.00. 

Steele's Greenhouse Special, Long- 
Stemmed Mixture, % oz., $1.75; )4 oz., 
$3.25; oz., $6.00. 

Irwin's Finest Exhibition Mixture. A 

mixture of the finest exhibition Pan- 
sies grown in this country, 'A oz-> 
$2.00; % oz.. $3.50; 'A oz., $6.50; oz., 
$12.00. 



CYCLAMEN SEED 

New crop ready July 1st 
Lehnig & Winnefeld Strain (American 

grown), $2.00 per 100, $15.00 per 1000. 
Peterson Strain (American grown), $1.50 

per lOO, $12.a) per HKJO. 
Giant English Strain, $1.50 per 100, $12.00 

per 1000. 
Best German Strain, $1.00 per 100, $9.00 per 

1000. 
All three strains at above prices in any of 
the following colors: 

Giant Brilliant Kcd 

Giant Dark Glowing Xmas Red 

Giant Pink with Rose Eye 

(jiant Rose of Marienthal 

Giant White with Pink Eye 

Giant Glory of Wandsbek, Salmon 

Giant Pure White 

Giant American Beauty 

Giant Lavender 

Giant Daybreak Pink 

Giant All Colors Mixed. 
Special prices on large quantities on appli- 
cation. For Cyclamen plants see below. 



DAISIES, white, pink, red, mixed. 
Giant Bellis Monstrosa. Tr. pkt., 
50c; 'A oz., $1.00; % oz., $1.50; ounce, 
$5.00. 



ANNUAL LUPINES, Hartwegii Rose, 
Hartwegii Dark Blue, Hartwegii Sky Blue, 
Hartwegii White, 'A oz., 25c; oz., 75c. 

PERENNIAL LUPINES, Polyphyllus 
Mixed, yi oz., 25c; oz., 75c. 



PALM SEEDS. Phoenix RoebdenU and 
Kentia Belmoreana, see front cover 
ad. 



PRIMULA OBCONICA G I G A N T E A 
ARENDS' Ronsdorf Strain in all colors. 
Packet, 400 seeds, 75c; 5 packets, $3.25; 
10 packets, $6.00; 25 packets, $10.00. 

PRIMULA OBCONICA GIANT HAM- 
BURG ROSE. Packet, 500 seeds, $1.C0. 
$3.00 per gran. 

For all other Primulas see previous issues. 



Seasonable Plant Stock 



For other items see Classified lists. 



BEGONIAS, 21/4-IN. POTS 
Grown from Leaf Cuttings 

100 



Doz. 100 1000 

Mrs. J. A. Peterson $5.00 $35.00 $300.00 

Melior 5.00 40.00 300.00 

CincinnaU 5.00 40.00 300.00 

Lorraine 3.00 15.00 140.00 

Tumford Hall (White). 4.00 20.00 

Konkurent 5.00 35.00 300.00 

5(X) plants or more at tliousand rate. 

Less than 100 plants at dozen rate. 
For Other Begonias See Classified. 

CYCLAMEN PLANTS GROWN by Lehnig 
& Winnefeld, HackensacU. New Jersey, 
from best selected strain of eyclamcn 
seeds. 
American Beauty WMte with carmine 
Dark Christmas Red^,^0'e 
Bright Red /Salmon Glory of 

Rose Dark Eye J Wandsbek 
Rose MarienthSir Pure White 
pink '^ Per 100 

2^-in. pots $12.00 

25/iin. pots 15.00 

3-in pots 18.00 

3-in. pots, selected 22.(X) 

3^in. pots, selected 35.00 

4-in. pots 40.a) 

4-in. pots, extra select 50.00 

Add 5 per cent for packing. If Salmon 
alone is ordered, add 10 per cent to the 
above prices. 



CYCLAMEN SEEDLINGS, Strong, Trans- 
planted, 5 to 8 leaves, $8.50 per 100, $75.00 
per 1000. In best varieties; best strain. 

PRIMULA OBCONICA. From Arends' 
Ronsdorfer strain. Ready June 15, 2'A- 
inch pots, $7.00 per 100, $60.00 per 1000. 



Kermesina, red 
Apple Blossom 
Rosea 
Compacta 
Salmon 



White 

Blue 

Lavender 

and all colors mixe<I 



PRIMULA CHINENSIS. 2'A-in. pots, $7.00 
per 100, $60.00 per 1000. 

Defiance, Christmas red; Rosea, briptht 
pink; La Duchesse, flesh color, white 
center; Blood Red, dark velvety color; 
Pure White; Blue; Salmon and mixed 
colors. 

POINSETTIAS, 2!4-in. pots, $10.00 per 100, 
$90.00 per 1000. 

We will have Oak Leaf type and Cali- 
fornia type ready later. Ask for prices. 



MUM CUniNGS 

and POT PLANTS 

Clean Stock — No Midge 

MAJOR BONNAFFON. Rooted 
Cuttings. $3.00 per 100, 
$25.00 per 1000;2l4-in.,$5.00 
per 100, $45.00 per 1000. 

BEST STANDARD VARIETIES. 

Rooted Cuttings, $3.50 per 100, $30.00 

per 1000; 2'4in.. $5.00 per 100, $45.00 
per 1000. 

CHADWICKS: White, Yellow, Pink 
and Bronze. Rooted Cuttings, $5.00 
per 100, $45.00 per 1000; 2'4-in., $7.00 
per 100, $65.00 per 1000. 

TURNERS: Yellow, White and Pink, 

$5.00 per 100. $45.00 per 1000; 254-in., 
$7.00 per 100, $65.00 per lOOO. 

POMPONS, Single .nnd Anemones. 
Rooted Cuttings, $,?.50 per 100, $30.00 
per 1000. 

Ask for a complete list or see previous 
issues. 



ROMAN J. IRWIN, t^l^%^%i¥r 



.,:'''., ViT' '■' V V**- ',1- • ■'- f^/?"*. '^ '>~ '-w. -t ■■ i*^ 



The Florists^ Review 



Jt'NE 8. 1922 




^y 




WEDD NG and 



For the many and varied 

ample provision for all 

VALLEY— A quarter of million Valley for the 
June Bride. 

ORCHIDS — Fancy Cattleya Gigas and Cattleya 
Mossiae. 

JUNE ROSE CROPS-Large and Constant 
— include the cut from 30,000 Russell Plants. 

CRUSADER — The summer red rose best by 
test. Fine daily cuts from young stock. 

SUNBURST — A dependable source of sup- 
ply for yellow roses. 

PREMIER, COLUMBIA, BUTTERFLY, DOUBLE 
WHITE OPHELIA, DOUBLE WHITE KILLARNEY, 
PHANTOM, AARON WARD, CECILE BRUNNER. 

POEHLMANN BRO 

THE LARGEST GROWERS OF 

66 to 74 EAST 

TELEPHONE RANDOLPH 0035 





events of June, we have made 
"Flowers of the Hour." 

Summer Novelty Flowers 

As the season advances, our list 
of summer novelty flowers continues 
to grow. 

We now offer 



CORNFLOWERS 
CANDYTUFT 
DAISIES 
FEVERFEW 



LARKSPUR 
PYRETHRUM 
GLADIOLI 
PEONIES 



THERS Company 



•LOWERS IN THE WORLD 



I 



^NDOLPH ST. 



CHICAGO 



8 



The Rorists' Review 



Junk 8. 1922 




"Br-r-r. These are 
colli farts. You can 
keep your exiiensive 
blossoms for weeks 
longer In Llpmanizcd 
colli air. No worry on 
Sundays and holidays. 
No ice to pack and 
muss to clean. A JAv- 
raan ends ice WUm. 
stops spoilage atul savos 
labor. Pay for itself? 
I'll say BO — and then 
some." 




No up-to-date florist can afford to waste several hun- 
dred dollars a year for ice, when at a mere fraction of 
this expense, a Lipman provides efficient, automatic re- 
frigeration. Its crisp-cold air keeps flowers fresh almost 
indefinitely — no spoilage losses. So many savings that 
a Lipman soon earns its small cost — even pays a 50% 
profit over the use of ice. 

A postcard request brings complete free information. 50 dis- 
tributing points in the U. S. On request a Lipman Engineer 
will investigate your refrigerating problems. His advice is 
free — no obligation. Write today. 



jjftft^fSlltff- 




FULL-AUTOMATIC REFRIGERATING MACHINES! 



UPNAN REFRIGERATOR CAR & NFG. CO., bSlSit^^. 



MUMS TO BENCH 

We will have our usual lot of fine young plants in 2-inch pots, ready early 
in June. Order these now and let us ship them to you when you have your beds 
ready to plant. Send for list of varieties. Many of our customers give us the 
number of plants they need to fill their beds and have us make up a selection of 
varieties to cover the season, in white, yellow and pink, in all good commercial 
varieties. We also have a fine selection of Pompon varieties. 

$5.00 per 100, $40.00 per 1000 

Plant a good batch of THANKSGIVING PINK for your Thanks- 
giving Day trade. It will pay you handsomely all through the last 
half of November and early December if you grow it cool. We have 
a big stock $5.00 per 100, $40.00 per 1000. 



How about young Poinsettia plants? We will have them. 

BALR & STEINKAMP 



3800 ROOKWOOD AVENUE 



INDIANAPOLIS, IND. 



fV'\ > .: .' ■,..■! 



June 8, 1922 



The Florists^ Review 



9 





Order June Wedding 
Supplies Now 

Our Wedding accessories department 
is replete with every requisite 



Ribbons 

VERY SPECIAL 

OUB NO. 666 BBIDAI. CHIFFON' 



White Valley Chiffon 
"^ Metallic Eibbon. 



edged 



8-inch 
with No. 

8-inch White Plain Chiffon edged with 
No. 2 Metallic Bibbon in Pink, Blue, 
Nile, or Lavender. 

Bolts of about 30 to 40 yards, regular 
price per yard, 25c; 
SPECIAL for this Month, per yard, 20c. 

No. 2 Plcot Edge Oaiize, 

With very fine lustre satin stripe, in 

White, Pink and Nile. 

Per bolt, 50 yards $ 2.25 

Per 10 bolts 21.00 

No. 2 Metallic Oauze. 

White and Pink. 

Per bolt, 50 yards $ 1.50 

Per 10 bolts 14.00 

No. 2 Messallne Gauze. 
White and Pink. 

Per bolt, 50 yards $ 1.50 

Per 10 bolts 14.00 



Baskets 

White Enameled Princess Baskets 
for Flower Girls. 



No. 2 $0.60 each 

No. 3 70 each 

No. 4 80 each 

No. 5 90 each 

All good sizes, but No. 
most popular. 



$ 7.00 dozen 

8.00 dozen 

9.00 dozen 

10.00 dozen 

4 being the 



Imported Natural Flower-Girl Basketa. 

Three to a nest in the two popular 
sizes. 

No. 9615 $1.00 a nest 

No. 9616 1.25 a nest 

Bridal Batons $2.50 each 

Princess Brides — Maids' Staffs 4.00 each 
Shepherds' Crooks 2.50 each 

Made TTp Showers 

Of No. 2 Messaline Gauze. 



14-inch $1.00 each 

30-inch 1.25 each 



$11.00 dozen 
13.50 dozen 



Prices on Aisle Posts, Kneeling Rests, Wedding Gates, etc., 

sent on request. 

POEENANN Brothers Cohpany 



Complete Service for Florists 



Long Distance Phone 
Randolph 0035 



ee to 74 
East Randolph Street 



CHICAGO 

See oar SPECIAL PRICES on SHEEP MANURE and MOSS in Classified Columns 



i 



J.,.. -:-, ,.- -^ ,. .. 



10 



The Florists^ Review 



June 8. 1922 



•T 



Note and Remember 

TRIMBLE'S 

LOW PRICES 

On All the Flowers You Need 

For June Weddings and Commencements 

It Will Pay You to Order Direct of the Grower 

CURRENT PRICE LIST 



MRS. CHAS. RUSSELL AND PREMIER 

Per 100 
Extra Specials, 34 to 48-in .$20.00 to $25.00 

Specials, 28 to 32-in 15.00 to 18.00 

Select, 18 to 24-in 10.00 to 12.00 

Medium, 16-in 6.00 to 8.00 

Short, 8 to 12-in 4.00 to 5.00 

COLUMBIA 

Specials, 20 to 28-in 15.00 to 

Select, 16 to 20-in 10.00 to 

Medium, 16-in 6.00 to 

Short, 8 to 12-in 4.00 to 



RICHMOND AND MILADY, red 

Special-s, 20 to 28-in 12.00 to 

Select, 16 to 20-in 8.00 to 

Medium, 16-in 6.00 to 

Short, 8 to 12-in 4.00 to 



18.00 

12.00 

8.00 

5.00 

15.00 

10.00 

8.00 

5.00 



OPHELIA, KILLARNEY, WHITE KIL- 
LARNEY Per 100 

Specials, 20 to 28-in $12.00 to $15.00 

Select, 18 to 20-in 8.00 to 10.00 

Medium, 16-in 6.00 to 8.00 

Short, 8 to 12-in 4.00 to 5.00 

Cecile Brunner 2.00 to 3.00 

Roses, our selection 4.00 

Carnations, assorted 2.00 to 4.00 

Easter Lilies, per bud and 

bloom 12.00 to 15.00 

Calendulas 2.00 to 4.00 

Sweet Alyssum .50 

Sweet Peas l.OOto 1.50 

Daisies 1.00 

Calla Lilies lO.OOto 15.00 



PEONIES, assorted colors, $5.00, $6.00 and $8.00 per 100 



Ferns 

Per 1000. 



GREENS 

Asparagus, Sprengeri or Plumosus 

Per bunch $0.50 to $0.75 



$3.00 to $4.00 

We never close — open days, nights and Sundays 

W. E. TRIMBLE GREENHOUSE CO. 



Phone 2416 



]Miole8ale Florists PRINCETON, ILL. 



^a;-. 



Junk 8, 1922 



The Florists' Review ii 



The Denver Wholesale Florists' Co. 

DENVER, COLO. 

The largest and by far the best equipped and most 
centrally located wholesale house in this locality. 



Current Price List 

You will need lots of Roses and Valley for school com- 
mencements and June brides. We are in full crop with 
both items. And now when it is getting warmer in the 
east, our wonderful cool climate will give you flowers 
that will hold up and ship much better from Colorado. 
Carnations are also in good supply and, as you know, 
at this time of year can only be had from this locality 
in A-No. 1 quality. 

ROSES 

FRANCIS SCOTT KEY, per 100 $10.00 to $25.00 

RUSSELL, per 100 6.00 to 16.00 

COLUMBIA, per 100 6.00 to 16.00 

PREMIER, per 100 6.00 to 16.00 

BUTTERFLY, per 100 6.00 to 16.00 

OPHELIA, per 100 6.00 to 16.00 

DUNLOP, per 100 6.00 to 16.00 

DOUBLE WHITE KILLARNEY, per 100 6.00 to 16.C0 

GOLDEN OPHELIA, per 100 6.00 to 8.00 

SHORT FUNERAL ROSES, per 100 4.00 to 6.00 

CARNATIONS, per 100 6.00 

PEONIES. Home Grown, per 100 10,00 to 15.00 

GLADIOLI, Very Fine, per 100 20.00 

VALLEY, per 100 , 8.00 

ORCHIDS, per dozen 12.00 

SWEET PEAS, per 100 2.00 

CALL A LILIES, per 100 16.00 

EASTER LILIES, per 100 20.00 

DRIED STATICE, per bunch 1.00 

PLUMOSUS, per bunch .75 

ADIANTUM, per bunch .50 

HUCKLEBERRY SPRAYS, per bunch 1.00 

OREGON FERN LEAVES, per 1000 6.00 

IMMORTELLES, per bunch .85 

CYCAS LEAVES, all sizes. 

Supplies and Wire Work of All Kinds 

Prices subject to change without notice 

U/ ^ A Tk • P ^® Denver Wholesale Florists' Co. 

rVatCil i ills rCLgB 1433.35 CdifornU street DENVER. COLO. 



12 



The Florists' Review 



JUNB 8. 1922 



CRAIG SPECIALTIES 



SPRING DELIVERY 
1922 



Never before have we offered to our customers such a complete line of stock and of such high quality, including both Flowering and 
Foliage Plants. We are booliing heavily on Spring orders and suggest to our many customers to either call at Norwood and make 
their selections, or mail order at once so that reservations can ht made, to avoid disappointment. Prosperity is here and you should 
pro ect your best interests for bigger and better sales with Craig Quality Stock, 

We cordially invite you to our new home at Norwood Station, Delaware County, Pa., easily reached by the Pennsylvania 
R. R. to Norwood Station, and Baltimore & Ohio R. R. to Holmes Station, or by trolley. 

NBPHBOLEPIS TBDDY JTJiaOK 

A grand dwarf Fern. Fine, young plants. 
4-Inch pota, $8S per 100. 
6-inoh potH, heaTy, 112 and 910 per doaen. 
S-lnoh pota, $24 and {80 per dosen. 
ll-lnoh tubs, $< and $7.50 each. 
BrEPBROLiEPIS HABBISU OK BOOBBVIBLT 
2%-lnch pets, 910 per 100. 900 per 1.000. 
4-Inch potB, 935 per 100. 
11-lncb tubs, 97.80 and 910 each. 

NKPHROIiBPIS TEBONA 

Makes a arood plant In all alsea Much 
finer frond than any crested sort outalde of 
N. Smlthll. The fronds are carried on a 
heavy, wiry stem. We consider It one of the 
best of the newer introductions. 

4-lneh pota, 935 per 100. 

C-lnoh pota, 9l2 per doien, 9B0 per 100. 

NBPHROLEPIS SCOTm 

4-faioh pots, 935 per 100. 
O-lneh pots, 9l2 per dosen. 

PEIiABGONIVM EASTER GREBTINO 

One of the beat flowerlnK plants. 
6-incb pots, 90 per doz. 

OTAHEITB ORANOBS 

Stock that 18 free of all disease. Stroai 
plants. 
214-Inch pota, 916 per 100. 912S per 1,000. 
4-lnoh pota. In flower, 975 per 100. 

PANDANVS TEITOHn 

Well colored plants. 
6-Inch pota, 918 and 984 per doaen. 
7-lnoh pota, 94 each. 
8-inoh pots, 96 and 90 each. 
10-lnch pots, apeeUnens, 910 each. 
FICCS REPENS 
Fine for amall boxes. 
2)4-lnch pota, 920 per 100. 

ENGUSH ITIES 

We have a large stock of the small leaf 
variety. 

2Vi-lnch pota, 2 and 8 nuinera to pot, 910 
■ f 



CROTONS 

The Croton, with its highly colored foliage, 
la indispensable during fall and winter, we 
have the largest and most complete collec- 
tion of Crotons in the world, carrying at the 
present time for spring sales over 60,000, all 
of the very highest quality and brilliantly 
colored. Immediate delivery. 

4-inoh pots, strong plants, 912 per dezem, 
976 per 100. 

6-lnch pota, strong plants, 915 and 918 per 
dosen. 

0-lneh pota, strong planta, 924 and 930 per 
doaen. 

8-lnch pots, strong plants, 94, 96 and 99 
eaeh. 

10-lneb pota, atrong planta, 97.60 and 910 
eaeh. 

12 and 14-lnch pota, apedmen planta, 916, 
920 and 926 each. 

CROTONS (NARBOW LEAF TYPE) 
DeUcatlaslma. Golden Thread and Flor- 
ence. 

These varieties are Indispensable for table 
decoration and we predict a great future for 
them, as nothing surpasses them for use In 
artistic arrangement. 

{■/t-lnch pots, 985 per 100. 

4-lnoh pots, 912 per dozen, 976 per 100. 

6-lnch pota, 9l8 per dozen. 

6-lnoh pota, 924 and 930 per dozen. 

CBOTON PUNCTATA 

One of the most satisfactory and finest 
varieties for basket work and centers of 
ferneries. 

7M(-lnoh pota, 920 per 100, 9175 per 1,000. 

S-lnoh pota, 935 per 100. 

4-lneh pota, 960 per 100. 

Bvery retail store and grower should fea- 
ture Crotons this spring. We know our atock 
win please you and your customer. 

CBOTON L.EATES AND 8PBAT8 

Cut Croton Leaves and Sprays have been 
supplied by us In the past few years to some 
of the leading florists, who have featured 
them in mantel, table and funeral work. 
Cut Crotons will last In a cool place from 
three to four weeks. We can supply them 
every day In the year. 

Very highly colored apraya at 6O0 eaeh) 
ent leavea, 96 per 100. 

When you have orders for funeral or table 
work "out of the ordinary," order Craig's 
Cut Crotons. 

DRACAENAS 

There is no other variety of foliage plant 
BO attractive as the highly colored Dracaena. 
The small and medium sizes can be used to 
great advantage in making up the popular 
spring baskets, while the large specimena 
have always been in great demand fer deco- 
rative purposes. We are now growing more 
Dracaenas, In greater variety, than any firm 
In the country. 

DRACAENA OODSEFFIANA 

Oreen and white leaf, very hardy, fine fer 
baskets. 

2%-lnch pots, 920 per 100. 

8-lneh pota, 9S6 per 100. 

4-lnch pots, 990 per 100. 

FANCY DRACAENAS 

We are ottering a collection of the nev 
and rare Dracaenas. Very handsome for 
home decoration or for fancy combination 
basketa 

4-inch pota, 90 per dozen. 

6-lnch pots, 915 per dozen. 

6-lnch pots, 918 and 924 per dozen. 

7 and 8-inch pots, 98.50, 94 and 96 eaeh. 

DRACAENA MAS8ANOEANA 

The variety with the golden stripe down 
the center of the leaf. The best of all Dra- 
caenas for the house. We have an excep- 
tionally large stock, well colored and «f the 
very highest quality. 

4-lnch pota, heavy, 912 per dozen. 9100 per 
100. 

<-lnch pots, 92 and 92.60 each. 

8-Inch pots, heavy, 94 and 96 each. 

lO-lnch pots, heavy, 97.60 eaeh. 

DRACAENA FRAGRAN8 

Plain green leaf. 

4-lnch pots, 90 per dozen. 

6-lnch pots, 9I8 and 924 per dozea. 

fi-inch pots, 96 and 96 each. 

10-ineh tubs. 97.60 each. 



DRACAENA LORD WOIiSEUET 

One of the very best varieties for Baater 
and Christmas, being bright red In oolor. An 
excellent Christmas variety. 

2-lneh pota, 920 per 100. 

8-lnoh pota, 936 per 100. 

4-lnch pota. 960 per 100. 

6-lncb pota, 816 per dozen. 

6-lnch pota, 918 and 924 per dosen. 

7-Inch pota, 98 and 93.60 each. 

DRACAENA KELUCBIANA 

One of the finest foliage plants for com- 
bination baskets or boxes. Improved Ood- 
aefflana. 

2^-lnch pota, 920 per 100. 

3-lnGh pota, 985 per 100. 

4-lnch pota, 960 per 100. 

8-Inch pota, 96 and $6 eaeh. made np. very 
handsome. 

DRACAENA TESMINAU8 

Exceptionally well colored. 

2>4-lnch pots, 920 per 100. 

3-inch pota, 936 per 100. 

4-lnch pots, 966 per 100. 

6-lnoh pots, 9l6 per dozen. 

6-lnch pots, 918 and 924 per dozea. 

We would suggest ordering the at>ov* 
eanlr, as the demand is always great. 
DRACAENA DE SMETIANA 

A atrong, vigorous grower, with bold, 
dark green foliage, which becomes beauti- 
fully suffused and variegated. 

4-lnch pots, 97.60 per dozen, 960 per 100. 

6-lnoh pota, 9l eaeh. 

6-lnch pots, 92 each. 

7-lnoh pota, 93.60, 94 and 96 eaeh. 
DRACAENA WARNECKH (NEW) 

BUver and green leaf. Very durable. 

6-lnoh pota, 930 per dozen. 

7-ineb pots, 94 and 96 each. 

DRACAENA UNDENn 

Same type as Massangeana, but with the 
golden stripes on the outer edges of the leaf. 

4-lnoh pota, 812 per dozen, 9100 per 100. 

6-lnoh pota, 92 and 92.60 eaeh. 

8-lnoh pota, 96 each. 

10-lnoh tnba. 97.60 eaeh. 

DRACAENA l,ONOn 

Improved aport of Draoaeaa WarneokU. 
One of the very best novelties in foliage 
planta introduced for yeara. Dark green 
outer edge with pure white atrlpe in center 
of leaf. Stock limited. 

4-lneh pota, 96 eaeh; 6-lnch pota, $10 eaah. 
DBACAENA TBICOLOB 

One of the finest Introductions in recent 
years, coloring of green, white and pink. 

2%-in('h pots, Joly delivery, 960 per 100. 

4-inch pots, 9l8 per doaen. 

6-lnoh pots, 93.60 eaeh. 



PALMS 



ABECA LVTESCKNS 

Perfect plants with rich, dark green fol- 
iage. Our stock is grown cool and hard. It 
is in splendid condition and will surely give 
satisfaction. Large sizes are very scarce this 
year. We have the largest atock in all aiiea 
In the country. 

7-lneh pots, 96 and 88 eaeh, made np. 

S-lneh pots, 97.60 and 910 eaeh, made vp. 

10-lnch tubs, 912.50 eaeh, made np, S^i ta 
fl feet tall. 

PHOENIX HOKBKLESU 

Very scarce. Fine for growing on. 

2-bioh pots, 8 to 4 leaf, 936 per 100. 

NEPHROLEPIS 

NEPHBOLEPIS NOBWOOD 

The most beautiful form of Nephrolepia to 
date, graceful, compact and symmetrical, a 
rigorous and healthy grower. All growers 
are invited to Inspect it at our Norwood 
greenhouses. Strong plants. Orders filled 
strictly in rotation. 

214-Inch pots, 98 per dozen, 912 per 100, 
(100 per 1,000. 
!n:PIIBOI.EPI8 B08TONIENSI8 (DWABF) 

This is a dwarf form of the eld Boston 
fern, same character, form and graceful 
habit. 

4-lnch pota. 936 per 100. 

6-inch pots, 912 per dozen. 

8-Inch pots, 924, 930 and 936 per dozen. 

11-inch tubs, 96 and 97.50 eaeh. 

NEPHBOLEPI8 ELEGANTIS8IMA 
COMPACTA 

A dwarf, compact form of Nephrolepls 
Blegantlsslma, each plant making an ideal 
shape. 

2^-lnch pota, 9IO per 100, 9*0 per 1,000. 

4-lnch pota, 96 per dozen, 940 per 100. 

6-lnch pots, 912 per dozen. 



per 100, 900 per 1,000. 
4-lnch pota, 920 per 100. 

CTCLAHBN 

We are growing 100,000 planta this 7**' 
and our stock was never In finer condition at 
this time of the year. Orown from the very 
best German strain of aeed obtainable. Sug- 
gest placing orders early to insure prompt 
delivery. 

2%-lnch pota, equal to S-lneh ■toek, 919 
per 100, 9160 per 1,000. 

4-lnch pota, heavy planta, July lat deUT- 
ery, 960 per 100, 9460 per 1,000. 

POIN8ETTIAS 

Bright red variety. 

We are now booking ordera for young 
atock, June delivery and later. 

2>4-lneh pota, 912 per 100, 9100 per 1,000. 

ASPIDISTBA— GBBEN 

June Delivery 
Strong planta. 
6 and 7-Inch pota, 92.60, 98 and 99.50 eaeh. 

SPRING STOCK 

GERANTCUS 

RIcard. Poltevlne, Nntt, Allca I,emon. 
Bnchner, 4-lnch pota, 920 per 100, 9190 per 
1,000. 

6-tneh pots, Poltevlne and Bleard, 9M 
per 100. 

SALTIA 

America and Zurich, 4-bH!h pota, 916 per 
100. 

SWEET ALTSSCM 

2H-lnch pota, 98 per 100. 

UiNTANA 
Golden Yellow, 4-lnoh pota, 920 per 100. 

BEGONIA LCMINOSA 
4-lnch pota, 918 per 100. 

BEGONIA PBIMA DONNA 
4-lnch pots, 9I8 per 100. 



IMPORTANT NOTICE 

We are pleased to annonnee that awtnc 
to the recent drop In the price of lumber. 
It enables us to give our enatomera tiM 
benefit by reducing the prlee on packing 
aa follows: 

Full size eaaea 91.90 aaah 

Three-quarter size eaaea 1.S6 eaefc 

Small size cases 60 eaeh 

Half size boxes 1.00 



ROBERT CRAIG COMPANY, Nonvood Station, DELAWARE CO., PA. 



June 8, 1922 



The Florists' Review 



13 



June Clearance 

LOOK OVER THESE BARGAINS 

All good stock — order now for June sales 



Achyranthes, red, 2M- 
Asparagus Plumosus, 



Per 100 

-in $ 4.00 

2^-in 5.00 

Asparagus Plumosus, 3-in 5.00 

Asparagus Plumosus, 4-in 15.00 

Asparagus Sprengeri, 2^4 -in 4.00 

Asparagus Sprengeri, 3-in 7.00 

Begonia Albo-Picta, 2j4-in 4.00 

Begonia Albo-Picta, 3-in 6.00 

Cannas — 

The President, 3-in 10.00 

King Humbert, 3-in 8.00 

Other varieties, 3-in 7.00 

Coleus, rooted cuttings 1.00 

Coleus, 2^-in 3.00 

Cupheas, in bloom, Zyi-'m 2.50 

Daisy Mrs. Sander, 2j4-in., in bloom 5.00 

Daisy Marguerite, 2^-in., in bloom 5.00 

Dracaena Indivisa, 3-in 10.00 

Dracaena Indivisa, 4-in 25.00 

Dusty Miller, 2i4-in 3.00 

Ficus Elastica, first-class, 4-in., each 60 

Ficus Elastica, first-class, S-in., each 75 

Fuchsias, 10 varieties, strong stock, 2Y^-'m 4.00 

German Ivy, rooted cuttings 1.00 

German Ivy, 2j4-in 3.00 

German Ivy, 3-in 6.00 

Geraniums, 4-inch, blooming 12.50 

S. A. Nutt, 2j4-in 4.00 

S. A. Nutt, 3-in 7.00 

Gen. Grant, 2%-in 4.00 

Gen. Grant, 3-in 7.00 



Geraniums — Continued Per 100 

Mme. Buchner, 2 J^-in $ 4.00 

Jean Oberle, 2K-in 4.00 

Mme. Ricard, 2j4-in 5.00 

Mme. Ricard, 3-in 8.00 

Beaute Poitevine, IVi-'m 5.00 

Beaute Poitevine, 3-in 8.00 

Jean Viaud, 2j4-in 5.00 

Jean Viaud, 3-in 8.00 

Heliotropes, rooted cuttings 1.00 

Heliotropes, 2^-in 3.00 

Heliotropes, 4-in 10.00 

English Ivy, 2i4-in 5.00 

Impatiens Sultani, strong plants, 2 1/4 -in 5.00 

Lantanas, best bedders, 2^-in 5.00 

Mesembryanthemums, 2j4-in., in bloom 2.50 

Petunias, double, fringed, bud and bloom, 2y^-m. . . 5.00 
Petunias, single, Dreer's Fringed, Rosy Morn, 

Diener's, mixed 4.00 

Petunias, Diener's alone 5.00 

Salvias, 2-in 3.00 

Salvias, 4-in., large 10.00 

Smilax, strong, three times pinched back, 2j^-in. . . 4.00 

Snapdragons, bud and bloom, large, 2^-in 4.00 

Tradescantia, Wandering Jew, rooted cuttings 75 

Tradescantia, 2i/4-in 2.50 

Tradescantia, variegated red, 2j4-in 3.00 

Vincas, 20,000 of them, 2K-in 4.00 

Vincas, 3-in 8.00 

Vincas, 3-in., select 10.00 

Vincas, 4-in 15.00 



Green Sheet Moss, large sheets, shipment same day order arrives, sack, $1.90; 5 sacks, $9.00; 10 sacks, $17.50. 

NOW FOR MUMS 

BUY THESE CLEAN. HEALTHY PLANTS FROM THE LARGEST STOCK IN THE WEST 

ROOTED CUTTINGS, $3.00 per 100, $25.00 per 1,000, except the varieties marked (*), which are priced $4.50 per 

100, $40.00 per 1,000. 
ESTABLISHED PLANTS, 2«4-inch, $5.00 per 100, $45.00 per 1,000, except those marked (*), which are $7.00 per 

100, $65.00 per 1,000. 



White: Smith's Advance, Early Frost, Oconto, White 
Chieftain*, Chadwick*, White Jones. 

Yellow: Golden Glow. Sunray*, Golden Queen, Sun- 
beam*, Richmond, Bonnaffon, Golden Chadwick*, 
Yellow Jones. 



Pink: Pacific Supreme, Unaka, Rose Perfection*, Chief- 
tain*, Dr. Enguehard, Patty, Seidewitz, Helen Prick. 

Pompons: Chicago White, Elva, Lula, Acto, Mrs. Buck- 
ingham, Kenneth, Mariana, Romaine Warren, Volun- 
teer, Langaulet, Mrs. Frank Beau, Western Beauty, 
Golden Wedding, Christmas Gold. 



Our varieties are the result of a lifetime of selection and elimination. You will hardly find a better bread-win- 
ning list. They are listed in their blooming order, from extreme early to late. 

We very strongly recommend buying plants from pots to ship in hot weather. 



BEST BEDDING ROSES 



— 2% inch — 

100 1000 

Radiance $8.00 $75.00 

Helen Gould 8.00 75.00 

President Taft 8.00 75.00 

Etoile de Lyon 8.00 75.00 

Etoile de France 8.00 75.00 

Wm. R Smith 8.00 75.00 

Clothilde Soupert 8.00 75.00 

White Cochet 8.00 75.00 

Pink Cochet 8.00 75.00 

Kaiserin 8.00 75.00 

Red Radiance 



3 inch 

100 1000 

$12.00 $110.00 
12.00 110.00 



12.00 
12.00 



110.00 
110.00 



12.00 110.00 



12.00 120.00 



ROSES TO BENCH 

2j4 inch 

100 1000 

Milady $15.00 $120.00 

Columbia 12.50 120.00 

American Legion 22.50 200.00 

White Killarney 10.00 90.00 



SPHAGNUM MOSS 

Large hurlapped bales, $1.15 per bale; 10 bales, $10.00; 
25 hales, $23.75. Apply for low carload rates. 



Packing Plants 5c on the dollar. If in Clay Pots 10c on the dollar. 



GULLETT & SONS, 



5,f«wL. Lincoln, Illinois 



JW*^wi^»r^'nj»Tr^TW^*wrFTTrr?T'^^ 



n^j=^y"^^^i^^^^yj'f-l7.-j^y^ - 



'f !^"/f: 



■TR^r. ■ "^ 



14 



The Florists' Review 



I 



.It.VE H. l'J2U' 





TRADEMARK 



APPEARS ON 



FLORISTS' SUPPLIES, 
BASKETS, WREATHS, ETC. 

every florist knows they are 

THE BEST MONEY CAN BUY 

Everything in Accessories for June Weddings, Commencements 

and Everyday Use. 

M. RICE CO. 

"Made in America"— Better than Ever 
1220-22-24 Spring Garden St. PHILADELPHIA, PA 




w 



FOR JUNE WEDDINGS 



SHOWER RIBBONS 
FANCY RIBBONS 
NOVELTY CHIFFONS 

Fabrics of rare ori^finality. Send us your orders 

WERTHEIMER BROTHERS 

THE NATIONAL FLORAL RIBBON HOUSC 



MILLS 
PATERSON. N. J. - BATH, PA. 

Office and Salesrooms: 17-25 East 24th Street, NEW YORK 



•- irt^ ♦'^ 









^i:;^w^ 



DRACAENAS AND 

THEIR DIFFERENCES 

Dracanas arc not only heautiful, hut exceedingly varied arid adaptable; 
there are many sorts for many situations, indoors and outdoors. Some are 
demurely graceful; others are brilliant in hue and are especially suitable 
for such festive occasions as Christmas, when bright colors are in vogue. 




KKllAJ'S it may l)e woU to 
state at the start, just to 
avoid beiiifr aeeused of in- 
accurac'v, that many of 
tlic i>lants known in the 
trade as dracaenas are not 
draca'nas at all, but are 
cordylines. Kven the two 
widely grown favorites 
whicli florists call Dra- 
caena indivisa and I), terminalis, with 
the numerous i)opular varieties of these 
two species — all of these are correctly 
labeled as cordylines, not dracsenas. 
But the two genera, draeaena and cordy- 
line, are so closely allied that the bo- 
tanical distinctions between them — 
<-hiefly with reference to the seed cells — 
are of little consequence to florists. 
Therefore, with apologies to the bo- 
tanists, tliis article will henceforward 
shun the name cordyline and use the 
word dracffina in its trade sense, as 
comprising both genera. 

Native Home and Natural Habit. 

The tendency of many dracaenas in 
their native tropical or subtropical en- 
vironment, especially as they advance 
in age, is to assume the form of a tall, 
bare stem, ten to thirty feet or more 
in height and crowned with 
n palm-like tuft of leaves. 
But good greenhouse cul- 
ture produces compact 
specimens, with foliage 
down to the base of the 
stem. It is for their fo- 
liage, of course, that dra- 
caenas are grown, not for 
their flowers. The flowers 
are inconspicuous, at best, 
and usually do not appear 
at all until the plants have 
attained a good size. But 
the leaves are so beautiful 
that there is no need of 
apology for the deficiency 
in flowers. 

Dracaena Draco, the drag- 
on tree of the Canary is- 
lands, is the giant of the 
gei|us. It yields a resin 
called dragon's blood; 
somebody seems to have 
known just what dragon's 
blood looks like. Hence the 
specific name, Draco, which 
is Latin for "dragon." 
Hence, also, the generic 
name, tlracapna, which is de- 
rived from a Cireek word 
meaning 
There i 

then, for the existence of the 
common name, dragon tree. 



With reference to the two groups of 
draca'nas mentioned in the first para- 
graph of this article — Dracaena indivisa 
.•md D. terminalis, with all the deriva- 
tives from these two extensively culti- 
vated species — a fact of real importance 
is that they do not reijuire so high a 
temperature as do some of the other 
dracaenas, especially those of tlie fra- 
grans type. 

Preferences in Temperature. 

The foregoing statement does not 
mean that indivisa and terminalis. could 
be grown successfully in the same tem- 
perature; not by any means. Indivisa, 
from New Zealand, is a cool-house sui)- 
ject. Terminalis, from the East Indies, 
requires a warm house, but not (juite the 
warmest house in the draca-na section. 
The numerous varieties in the termi- 
nalis group thrive in a minimum winter 
temperature of 55 to 60 degrees, while 
(ioldieana and the fragrans group, from 
tropical Africa, enjoy 10 degrees more 
heat. It is well to note in this connec- 
tion that D. fragrans also needs shade 
throughout the summer, while termi- 
nalis and its derivatives require ])rotec- 
tion from only the brightest sunshine. 

There is no wonder, then, that D. 



"she - dragon." 
double reason, 




Dracaena Massangeana, a Variegated Form of D. Fragrans 



terminalis is among the most popular 
species, since it is comfjaratively mod- 
erate in its requirements and comprises 
so many exquisitely handsome varieties. 
Terminalis itself, when young, is green 
or occasionally bronze, but it assumes 
rich shades of crimson or scarlet as it 
a])proaches maturity. The following- 
half-dozen kinds, though often regarded 
as distinct species, are really varieties 
of terminalis: Amabilis, one of the 
hardiest of the six, is broad-leaved and 
glossy green, later becoming spotted 
and suffused with j)ink and wliite; Bap- 
tistii has broad leaves, deej) green, 
striped with pink and yellow; Glad- 
stonei's leaves are broad and of a bril- 
liant crimson hue; Lord Wolseley is 
i)right red; metallica is dark purplish 
bronze; Yaungii is broad-leaved and 
bright green, streaked with deep red. 
These are just samples; there are many 
other excellent varieties, including some 
recently introduced ones which have 
not yet been fully tested. 

Peculiarities of D. Indivisa. 

But, as Jilready intimated, it is D. 
indivisa, with its varieties, that is the 
real lover of a cool atmosphere. This 
species will grow satisfactorily in win- 
ter in a night temperature 
of no degrees and will even 
tolerate a night tempera- 
ture of 40 to 4.J degrees, 
liesides being thus easily 
satisfied while under the 
grower's care, it is pecu- 
liarly tolerant of neglect 
and abuse as a finished 
]ilaiit. Owing to its ability 
to endure sunshine and 
<lrought, it is much used as 
an outdoor decorative plant, 
in cemetery vases, in win- 
dow l)oxes, on terraces and 
in other trying situations, 
where it not only lives, but 
even flourislies. D. indivisa 
is dark green. Among its 
varieties, atropurpurea has 
deep reddish brown fo- 
liage; aureo-striata is va- 
riegated with longitudinal 
yellow strijies; lineata has 
much broader leaves than 
those of the type and is 
stained with reddish pink; 
Veitchii is similar to the 
type, but is suffused with 
bright crimson at the base 
of the le;if. 

Besides its enjoyment of 
a cool atmosphere, D. indi- 
visa has another outstand- 
ing jH'culiarity. T^nlike most 



16 



The Florists^ Review 






June 8. 1922 



of the other draceenas, it can be easily 
and quickly grown from seeds. It is 
principally from seeds, therefore, that 
it is propagated. The seeds germinate 
most freely if sown in late winter or 
early spring, in flats of sandy soil, and 
placed in a house where a temperature 
of 60 to 65 degrees is maintained. Dur- 
ing the first year the seedlings usually 
are grown along in small pots under 
glass. The second spring they are 
planted out in the open, in light, rich 
soil, where by fall they develop into 
good plants for 4-inch to 6-inch pots. 
If sown sufficiently early in the spring, 
however, and grown along rapidly in 
pots, they may be prepared for 6-inch 
pots by the end of the following Sep- 
tember, and thus may be grown from 
seed to marketable size in one season. 
Among a few hundred indivisa seed- 
lings a considerable variation of char- 
acter may be observed. A few of the 
seedlings, perhaps, may have reddish 
bronze leaves and may be so choice as 
to be worthy of special care. If seed is 
not obtainable, D. indivisa may be 
propagated by means of canes, as are 
most of the other dracsenas. 

Propagating from Canes. 

This brings us to the propagation of 
dracsenas from canes — the ripened 
stems, from which all the leaves have 
been removed. Propagation by this 
method may be accomplished at any 
season when bottom heat is at com- 
mand. The undivided canes, in their 
entire length, may be laid in the propa- 
gating bed, but it is more customary to 
cut the canes into pieces from two to 
four inches long and lay these in the 
propagating material, which may be 
sand or fiber or extremely light soil. 
A mixture sometimes recommended for 
the purpose consists of equal parts of 
coarse sand and chopped sphagnum. In 
this material the pieces of stem are 
laid in a flat position and are covered 
about as slightly as .possible or are left 
just even with the surface of the bed. 
If kept constantly moist, over a bottom 
heat of 75 to 80 degrees, these pieces 
of mature wood soon send out a shoot 



at almost every eye. When the shoots 
are two or three inches long, they are 
cut off with a small heel and are placed 
again in the propagating bed, where 
they quickly form roots and are ready 
for small pots of light soil. Or, when 
severed from the fragment of stem, the 
shoots may be placed directly in small 
pots. 

The Young Plants. 

The little plants need a somewhat 
close atmosphere until established and 
are moved to larger pots when well 
rooted. The growth of young draceenas 
should not be checked by lack of 
prompt repotting. A suitable potting 
compost may be formed of three parts 
of good fibrous loam and one part of 
well decayed cow manure, with a small 
quantity of sharp sand and perhaps a 
sprinkling of bone dust. Leaf-mold is 
sometimes substituted for the manure. 
The pots should be well drained. 

In some instances, if no canes are ob- 
tainable and if the plants in stock are 
small, the plants may be topped and 
thus induced to produce numerous side 
shoots, which may be used for propa- 
gation. Some varieties, including the 
variegated forms of D. fragrans, are 
frequently propagated in this manner. 

Atmospheric Moisture. 

A moist atmosphere is essential in 
the growing of dracffinas. The atmos- 
pheric moisture serves two purposes — 
the control of pests and the promotion 
of the growth of the plants. Fortu- 
nately, in this case the conditions that 
are most pleasant and wholesome to the 
plants themselves are most disagree- 
able and deadly to the plants' worst 
enemies, thrips and red spider. It is 
well, therefore, in clear weather, to 
syringe the under side of the leaves 
thoroughly every day. On cloudy mid- 
winter days the syringing must be less 
liberal, or water may lodge in the axils 
of the leaves and prove injurious. On 
the other hand, in hot, dry midsummer 
weather, two daily syringings may be 
beneficial. 

It is just possible, however, to provide 
an excessively hot, moist, close atmos- 




phere and thus to induce a tender 
growth of the leaves. To avoid such a 
result, it is necessary to admit a little 
air on all warm, fine days, meantime 
being careful not to expose the plants 
to cold drafts. Another necessity, when 
such frequent syringing is practiced, is 
that the soil shall be sufficiently porous 
to permit the surplus water to pass 
through freely. 

The Heat-loving Varieties. 

In some of the preceding paragraphs, 
suggestions have already been offered 
in regard to the proper temperatures for 
dracsenas. As has been stated, D. in- 
divisa is a cool-house plant, thriving in 
an exceptionally low temperature, while 
a considerably warmer house suits the 
terminalis group. But many of the 
most popular, most gorgeously hand- 
some dracsenas, principally natives of 
tropical Africa, are at home in the 
warmest available house, with a night 
temperature of 65 to 70 degrees, accord- 
ing to the season and the stage of 
growth. Among the most familiarly 
known of these heat-lovers are these 
four species: D. Goldieana, with glossy 
green leaves, conspicuously barred and 
spotted with white or silvery gray; D. 
Uodseffiana, bright green, thickly spot- 
ted with white or creamy yellow; D. 
Sanderiana, with narrow, bright green 
leaves, striped and margined with 
white; D. fragrans, with broad, sub- 
stantial, glossy green foliage. 

Fragrans and Its Varieties. 

D. fragrans and two of its varieties, 
or variegated forms, Massangeana and 
Lindenii, are shown in the illustrations 
which accompany this article. Massan- 
geana is similar in habit to its parent, 
but its leaves have a broad, cream-col- 
ored or yellow stripe or band along the 
center. Lindenii resembles Massan- 
geana both in type and coloring, with 
this distinct difference, that the creamy 
white, yellow or gold of the Lindenii 
leaves is on each margin instead of in 
the center. On account of the heavy 
texture of their foliage, D. fragrans and 
its varieties are peculiarly well fitted 
to endure the dry atmosphere of resi- 
dences. D. Sanderiana and D. amabilis 
are also among the varieties that are 
well adapted for the private home and 
similar situations. 

Though a warm, moist atmosphere, 
with shade, is essential to the vigorous 
growth of many varieties of dracsenas, 
yet in the early autumn — or whenever 
the plants are to be put in a finished, 
liurdoned condition, fit for the market 
.'ind for their future trying environment 
— they must be gradually exposed to 
full sunshine, with a comparatively dry 
atmosphere. Sunshine is indispensable 
to the satisfactory development of the 
colors. 

KANSAS CITY CONVENTION. 



Dracaena Fragrans, Parent of Some Richly Variegated Forms. 



Trade Exhibition. 

The success of the trade exhibition is 
now practically assured. All the avail- 
able space in the oval is taken up, and 
reservations of space in the two arcades 
are being made at this time in number 
sufficient to indicate that the whole of 
the exhibition space in the big building 
will be taken up long in advance of the 
convention. In spite of the many an- 
nouncements made through the trade 
press and in other ways, prospective 
exhibitors are still making applications 



A- 



June 8, 1922 



The Florists^ Review 



17 



for space in the oval. It may be said 
now, every foot of space in the oval is 
taken up. Plenty of opportunity was 
given from the time of the distribution 
of the plans for early reservations in 
this section of the exhibition, and loca- 
tions were booked as the applications 
came in, each as nearly as possible to 
choice. If this oval had been three 
times as big, there would have been no 
difficulty in disposing of all the space; 
in fact, some of the groupings as orig- 
inally planned have been departed from, 
in order to maintain the policy always 
adopted in regard to sale of space in 
the trade exhibition — first come, first 
served. There can, under the circum- 
stances, be no reflection on the value of 
the spaces in the arcades, which are 
not at any disadvantage in comparison 
with the oval spaces. It will be a well 
arranged exhibition, and every exhibit 
will attract equal attention. Prospect- 
ive exhibitors are urged to make their 
applications for space without delay, 
so that, at least in the matter of choice, 
there may be still a little advantage, if 
it can be so considered. The exhibition 
will be a record-breaker, both in scope 
and attendance. 

The following exhibitors are in addi- 
tion to the list previously reported: 

rinehiirst Floral Co., Plpiisant Hill, Mo. 

Nebel Mfg. Co., Cleveland, 0. 

Robert Craig Co., Norwood Station, Pa. 

Orchard Paper Co., St. Ixmis, Mo. 

Joseph Heacock Co., Wyncote, Pa. 

Poehlmann Bros. Co., Chicago. 

George Wlttbold Co., Chicago. 

Jos. G. Neidinger Co., Philadelphia. 

W. M. Woodruff's Son & Co., Ixiwgup. N. C. 

Morehead Mfg. Co., Detroit, Mich. 

Convention Program. 

President Pennock and the secretary 
are now giving their attention to the 
preparation of the program for the big 
gathering. Prominent in the program 
will, of course, be a place for discussion 
of the national publicity campaign, and 
arrangements are being made for 
prominent speakers. The report of the 
national flower show committee and a 
discussion on it will also be featured. 
A meeting of the state vice-presidents 
will find a place, as also will a meeting 
of the Florists' Hail Association. Other 
features of special importance are also 
planned. President Pennock is particu- 
larly anxious to include discussions of 
many problems in these days of interest 
to florists and worthy of the attention 
of the society. He invites suggestions 
from members as to topics believed im- 
portant enough to be brought before the 
convention and assures those sending 
these suggestions that they will have 
most careful consideration. Such sug- 
gestions should be presented as early as 
possible to the secretary. 

Information as to hotel accommoda- 
tions and other matters tending to the 
comfort and convenience of visitors will 
shortly be forthcoming through the local 
committees. John Young, Sec'y. 



NATIONAL PUBLICITY CAMPAIGN. 

From the secretary's office this week 
is being mailed to all members of the 
society and subscribers to the campaign 
proofs of the series of advertisements 
to appear in the national niag.'izincs 
during June, July and August. These 
advertisements are in column form, and 
will appear in the Red Book for July; 
McLean's Magazine (Canada), June 15 
and August 15; Life, June 15, July 20 
and August 17; Collier's, June 3 and 
August 5; Outlook, July 19 and August 




Dracaena Lindenii, a Variety of Fragrans with Yellow-Margined Leaves. 



16; Vanity Fair, July; Atlantic Month- 
ly, July; World's Work, July; American 
Magazine, July; Literary Digest, June 
10 and August 12; Century, August; 
Scribner 's, July; House Beautiful, June; 
Sunset, July; Independent, June 10; 
Harper's Magazine, August, and Eeview 
of Reviews, August. It might be well 
for those interested to procure copies of 
these magazine numbers, so as to see 
how well the advertisements look and 
are placed. 

Since the publication of the three pre- 
vious advertisements our wonderful slo- 
gan, "Say It with Flowers," has been 
appreciably referred to, cartooned and 
exploited in a great number of publica- 
tions and in other ways, showing that 
our campaign loses through a temporary 
cessation of our publicity work. Dur- 
ing the period when scarcity of funds, 
mainly through neglect on the part of 
many of our subscribers to make good 
their pledges, made advertising expendi- 
tures impossible, our slogan seemed to 
vanish from sight, with all outside ref- 
erence to it lost. A resumption of our 
publicity has again brouglit it to the 
front, and we are enjojnng a tremendous 
amount of prestige, which costs the cam- 
paign nothing at all. Could better ar- 
gument be advanced as to the worth of 
our campaign to our industry? 

If our delinquent subscribers would 
make good their pledges, much more 
publicity could be provided, and it is 
sorely needed. Bills are now going out 
to all in arrears on their pledges, and 
immediate remittances are urged, so 
that the publicity committee mny be 
able to place advertising contracts for 
the fall season. As it is expected that 
there will be great pressure upon maga- 
zine advertising forms in the fall, con- 
tracts ought to be placed two or three 
months ahead, so that the bes^t maga- 
zines may be open for our use. A maga- 



zine cannot add to its pages after an 
edition is planned, and several large 
publications are already in press with 
numbers two months ahead of datings. 
John Young, Sec'y. 



GORLY CELEBRATES BIRTHDAY. 

Vincent J. Gorly, of Grimm & Gorly, 
St. Louis, Mo., celebrated his forty-fifth 
birthday June 3 with a reception at the 
Hotel Statler, at which 150 of his 
friends attended. The reception was 
featured by dancing, following a buffet 
luncheon. 

Congratulatory telegrams from va- 
rious parts of the country were read dur- 
ing the luncheon and displayed after- 
wards on a bulletin board in the lobby 
of the hotel. Signs in 500 street cars, 
each decorated with two flowers, read: 
"This is my birthday — I am not work- 
ing." All prominent Republican ofiice- 
holders were present, from Mayor Henry 
W. Kiel to Nat Goldstein. All enjoyed 
a most pleasant afternoon. J. J. B. 



r. T. D. MEMBERS AT ATLANTA. 

Thursday afternoon, June 1, a confer- 
ence of members of the F. T. D. in the 
southeastern states was held in the Pied- 
mont hotel, Atlanta, Ga., under the 
leadership of J. F. Ammann, of Ed- 
wardsville. 111. Irving Gresham, of At- 
lanta^ acted as secretary, and E. M. 
Eichling, of New Orleans, as chairman 
of the conference. 

Despite the prevailing rainy weather, 
there were thirty-one present, represent- 
ing eight states, including J. F. Am- 
mann, Edwardsville, 111.; L. Jack 
Spence, Chattanooga, Tenn.; Miss Edith 
Goetz, Chattanooga, Tenn.; Karl P. 
Baum, Knoxville, Tenn.; John J. Haury 
and H. H. Rinehart, Nashville, Tenn."; 
Winoham Lyon, Mobile, Ala.; T. H. Joy, 
Nashville, Tenn.; Jerry Ellis and F. M. 



r^r 



:h ■ ' '=.^»;-*i.,:7r^y<i^v^'jt*r>3S-^^ ^w'TT^ '• "*".'," ,*'^*'*^/^™J'y. t^-*^^^^ ;• vr'^S -f ■ 



18 



The Florists^ Review 



June 8. 1922 



Ellis, Griliiii, (ia.; Carl II. Oelschig, 
Savannah, Ga.; Mr. and Mrs. G. Leslie 
Whipp, Jacksonville, Fla.; Wallace Pat- 
terson, Montgomery, Ala.; E. M. Eich- 
ling. New Orleans, La.; Chas. A. Moss, 
Spartanburg, S. C; Robert Lockerbie 
and Miss Jean Lockerbie, Greenville, 
S. C; Otto Busack, Asheville, N. C; 
Hilnier \'. Swenson, Chicago; O. F. 
Shellnutt, Columbus, Ga.; J. T. Keheley, 
Newnan, Ga.. and Miss Carrie Chance, 
A. W. Cline, M. W. Stallings, Ellis G. 
Carswell, C. J. Harrison, L. D. Thom- 
son, Ralph Deans, F. V. Jacobs and 
Jacob Weinstock, Atlanta. 

From 8 to 11 in the evening the vis- 
itors were the guests of members of the 
newly organized Atlanta Florists', and 
Horticulturists' Club at the Daffodil, 
where a bounteous repast Avas served, 
seventy-nine partaking. 

At the conclusion of the dinner Mr. 
Ammann gave a splendid talk, picturing 
the florist of the past, with his great 
handicaps and discouragements, and the 
florist of the present day, with his fa- 
cilities and opportunities, and he gave a 
vision of the florist of the future, with 
cooperation and brotherly love as the 
watchword. Mr. Ammann startled his 
audience when he said that he is operat- 
ing his range at Edwardsville on an 8- 
hour shift and has been doing so for 
some time with great success. Follow- 
ing Mr. Amman's speech, short talks 
were made by many of the visiting flo- 
rists. 

Ralph Deans, secretary of the Atlanta 
Florists' and Horticulturists' Club, who 
had the entertainment in charge, was 
complimented on the way he handled 
the situation on such short notice. 

Tlie out-of-town visitors sjtont the fol- 
lowing day with the growers at their 
various establishments. 



HAIL AT GREEIiEY, COLO. 

A terrific h;iil storm ]iassed over (iree- 
ley, Colo., and neighboring towns May 
29. It w.'is by far the worst experienced 
by the florists there, lasting nearly an 
hour and totally wrecking the various 
greenhouse establishments, besides ruin- 
ing farm crops valued at half a million 
dollars. Many of the hailstones, it is 
asserted, measured three to four inches 
in diameter and struck with such force 
that even heavy plate glass shop win- 
dows were shattered. 

The loss of Hansen's Greenhouse is 
partly covered by insurance, but the 
Dunham Floral Co. carried none. The 
exact amount of the loss is hard to de- 
termine, but the various places no doubt 
were damaged to the extent of $20,000. 
While present crops are ruined, the 
young ])lants of mums and carnations 
came througli surprisingly well at Han- 
sen's Greenhouse and they will lie 
planted as fast as tlie wreckage is 
cleared away and new glass put in. 

In sjtite of the storm, Hansen's Green- 
house was able to fill all orders for Me- 
morial day, as Fred C. Meyer, of Den- 
ver, obligingly made the GO-mile run by 
automobile in response to a telephone 
call, when there were no trains run- 
ning- 

NEWPORT, R. I. 



ing May 31, at the greenhouses on the 
estate of Henry A. C. Taylor, and de- 
cided upon final plans and arrange- 
ments for the June exhibition, which 
will be principally devoted to roses, 
peonies, strawberries and potted plants. 
It was decided to hold the exhibition 
in the school rooms of the First Pres- 
byterian church, June 27 and 28, con- 
ducting it for two days this year, in- 
stead of one, as was the case last year. 
President Andrew L. Doorwood presided 
at the meeting. After the dates and 
])lace had been decided upon, consider- 
able time was spent in a general discus- 
sion of plans for the event. The show, 
it is expected, will be considerably 



larger than it lias been for several 
seasons. 

Various Notes. 

Robert Clifford, manager for Lei- 
ken's, arrived last week and began 
preparations for opening the firm's 
store on Bellevue avenue. Expecting 
the Newport season to be an early one 
this year, the firm is opening much 
sooner than usual. 

H. J. Hass, 61 Almy street, reports 
an unusually brisk demand for house 
and porch boxes this season. 

8niith reports a heavy run on cut 
flowers for homes, while funeral work 
has held up well. W. H. M. 




For June Exhibition. 

With a larger schedule of premiums 
and a broader field of classes in view, 
the executive committee of the New- 
port Horticultural Society held a meet- 



"The largest stock and the best sales 
ever experienced," observed Fred Gold- 
ring, Slingerlands, N. Y., referring to 
their Memorial day business, adding 
that gloom was cast upon thv establish- 
)nent by the death of Robert Oliver, who 
had charge of the fern growing of the 
firm for thirty years. He was held in 
high esteem by all who knew him. His 
death was caused by an accident. While 
riding his motorcycle he crashed into 
the rear end of a truck, which was run- 
ning at night without a tail light. 

• * • * 

Alfred Goldring, Cobleskill, N. Y., 
had a record-bre.'iking business Me- 
morial day, liniite(l ojiiy by the inabilitj^ 
to furnish more stock. 

* * • * 

The Hatcher Flower Shops, at Amster- 
dam, N. Y., and Schenectady, X. Y., 
eleaned out the large supply at the 
greenhouses at Hoffmans, X. Y., at Me- 
morial day. It has b(>en followed by 
wedding work, in which Asparagus 
Hatclieri is freely used. 

* * * • 

A. J. Hilton, Amsterdam, X. Y., is 
well pleased with the entire season's 
business. 

• * • * 

The Hotaling Flower Shop, Amster- 
dam, N. Y., had Avhat was termed a 
clean-up sale with satisfactory prices 
at Memorial day. 

* * * * 

"X'o kick coming," observed Joseph 
Tr.'iudt, Cana.ioharie, X'. Y., when 
quizzed regarding his Memorial day 
business. That day's business absorbed 
all of the fine stock usually grown here. 

* » * » 

Members of the Kosendale Flower 
Shop, Schenectady, X, Y., were of the 
opinion that the close proximity of 
Mothers' day to Memorial day affected 
the sale of cut flowers Memorial day, 
but the sale of plants came fully up to 
expectations. 

• • » » 

"Best ever," commented George 
Matthews, of the Mohawk Greenhouses, 
Schenectady, X. Y. "We had nothing 
salable left, and we are now engaged 
in planting our ferns, which are a 
leader with us," continued Mr. Mat- 
thews. 

• • * • 

Fj. V. B. Felthousen, Schonoctadv, N. 
Y., who has held a position at the local 
post ofiice for twenty-five years, took a 
vacation to help out at the greenhouses 



during the Memorial day rush. A fine 
lot of chrysanthemums. Sun Gold and 
Richmond, are going out here. Two 
promising sons are taking an active in- 
terest in this growing range. 

* * • • 

W. W. Hannell, Watervliet, N. Y., 
remarked upon the popularity of the 
hydrangea for Memorial day. He said 
that this popularity was presumably 
owing to the scarcity of geraniums, and 
that the plants were in tlie pink of con- 
dition. 

* * * • 

J. G. Barrett, a leading Trojan crafts- 
man, voiced the sentiment of the trade 
by saying that Memorial day found 
them sold out of blooming plants. They 
also h.'id a good sale on cut flowers. 
Contracts for planting out were fully 
up to the usual high mark. 

* • * • 

Samuel Hanson, L.'insingburg, N. Y., 
found his Memorial day cemetery busi- 
ness fully up to its jirevious high mark. 

* * * • 

Sambrook Bros., Troy, N. Y., did a 
big business in floral wreaths for Me- 
morial day. June weddings will keep 
all hands at this establishment busy for 
a while. 

* • • • 

Louis Menand, located near the rural 
cemetery, Troy, N. Y., expressed satis- 
faction with his Memorial day business, 
while John Murname, who is located di- 
rectly oi>po.site Mr. Menand, echoed the 

sentiments. 

* • • * 

The meeting of the Albany Florists' 
Club held June 1 was not largely at- 
tended, owing, doubtless, to the fact 
that the members were still engaged in 
recovering from the rush occasioned by 
the Memorial day business. This was 
the opinion of William C. Gloeckner, 
who added that between local and lonsr- 
distance orders, all previous records 
were surpassed. 

» • * • 

"Extremely busy," observed George 
Burgevin, of Valentin Burgevin's Sons. 
Kingston, X". Y., adding that anything 
well grown sold at Memorial day. 

* * * * 

Henry Hansen, Catskill, N. Y., was 
to the fore as usual with stock for Me- 
morial day, and the many out-of-town 
patrons who usually summer here were 
not disappointed in having their com- 
missions filled. Home customers were 
also well taken care of. W. M. 



I-T'pfl 



June S, 11>22 



The Florists^ Review 



19 



CUSTOMERS AT $1.50 EACH 






COST OF ADVERTISING. 



Told by Head of Pittsburgh House. 

Our business is built upon the funda- 
mental idea that advertising is buying 
customers at so much apiece, and keep- 
ing them long enough to make a profit 
from them. That was the definition 
used by the founder of our business. 
And this concern is based entirely on ad- 
vertising, if ever a concern was. 

Of course, we watch all the basic 
needs of sound business. But if we 
did not advertise in the way we do, all 
our pains would probably not have 
given us a business large enough to 
support an individual. As it is, I be- 
lieve I am telling an indisputable fact 
when I say that we now do a larger 
business in bulbs than any other retail 
concern in the world. And, in addition, 
we sell large quantities of nursery stock 
— trees and slirubs — growing plants, and 
seeds. 

Ours is entirely a mail-order business. 
We advertise for sales and inquiries, 
key the advertisements, keep careful 
records of the results; the whole busi- 
ness is geared to our advertising. And 
our advertising divides itself logically 
into two parts — the magazine advertise- 
ments, which start up the business con- 
tact between the customer and us, and 
the direct mail follow-up, upon which 
we most depend to close the inquiry 
into a profitable sale and to keep the 
customer reordering. Some customers 
are reminded of us by the magazine 
advertising, t)f course, and reorder be- 
cause of it. But in general our period- 
ical space brings us inquiries, and our 
direct mail work brings in the orders. 
If, in fact, we can make our first sales 
at the rate, for magazine space, of $1.50 
for each $1 of sales traceable to a maga- 
zine inquiry, we are well satisfied. 
Since from seventy-five to eighty per 
cent of our customers stay with us more 
than one year, and since we have over 
10,000 nanu's on our live list on plates 
of an obsolete addressing machine which 
we ceased using more tlian five years 
ago, you can see how this $1.50 figure 
is reasonable for us. Our sales average 
about $14 apiece. 

Large Space in Few Magazines. 

One ]>rinciple that wo have .iust re- 
cently decided applies to our business 
is that it brings us more profits to ad- 
vertise in larger sjiace in comparatively 
few ])ublications than in smaller space 
and less frequently in a larger num- 
l)cr. Tliis year we have increased our 
advertising ajipropriation seventy-fi\ c 
per cent; we have decreased the number 
of mediums from the sixteen we used 
last year to seven this year. It is simply 
a question of cost. The advertising 
dollar that brings us the largest volume 
of sales Ijrings us twice the iiuinber of 
sales when we double it. And in view 
of our ex])erience, we cannot afford to 
spend our appropriation in any except 
the most profitable places. 

Exactly the same principle apjilies in 
our mailings. We keep our lists in such 
a way that we can tell who is ordering 



and who is not. We have adopted 
rather arbitrary rules — they are based 
on a combination of experience and 
common sense — as to just how long we 
will send certain kinds of ''literature" 
to certain kinds of customers. And by 
holding closely to these rules, we keep 
down our selling expense; our idea is 
that it is more profitable to spend our 
money to bring in new, live customers 
than to spend our money bull-headedly 
to extract the last possible order from 
a list that has gone pretty thoroughly 
dead. 

Answering Seedsmen's Ads. 

Did you ever answer a seedsman's 
advertisement along late in the winter, 
when the urge to plant seems to spring 
up in almost everyone's breast? Of 
course you did; I don't believe there 
is a normal individual who has not, at 
some time or other, filled his name in on 



Seldom have the costs of 
doing a mail order business 
in horticultural products 
been so carefully and def- 
initely determined as they 
have been by Rhea F. Elliott, 
president of the Elliott Nur- 
sery Co., Pittsburgh, in an 
article entitled, ''Buying 
Customers for $1.50 Each/' 
recently published in Print- 
ers' Ink Monthly, by the 
courtesy of whose editor it 
it reprinted in part here. 
There is much of value in it 
to the heads of those firms 
who deal, either by mail or 
direct, with the public. 



tlie dotted line of the triangular coupon 
iind received within a week or so a 
large hook, l)eautifully garnished in 
beets iind Golden Bantam sweet corn, 
in dahlias and zinnias and ludlyhocks. 

But if you are not an inveterate 
jiardi'uor, perhaps after the first year 
or so your ardor cooled a little. Or 
l)erhaps you decided to move into town 
iind get rid of that daily round-trip in 
from Westcliester; or anyhow, one of 
the thousand and one tilings happened 
that made you no longer a live customer 
iij- prospect for garden seeds. Yet I am 
willing to wager that, year after year, 
you Imvo been receiving each spring — 
;ind i)orhaps again in the fall — a cata- 
logue which cost the advertiser any- 
where from 10 to 40 cents. And the 
chances are good that the catalogue 
goes into the waste basket. 

Xow, the scedsiuon know, no doubt, 



exactly what they are doing. If it did 
not ])ay them to keep on sending ex- 
l)ensive literature to every name on 
their lists, they would doubtless dis- 
continue tlie practice. But there is 
enough difference, I suppose, between 
the seed business and the bulb business 
so that we cannot afford to do this with 
our customers. As I have said, it pays 
us better to keep the new names flow- 
ing in. 

I do not want to give the impression 
that we chuck away, regardless, the 
names of people who do not buy for a 
season, names that cost us at least $1 
to get. But we have a well defined 
method of handling our lists. And it 
is, I believe, sufficiently different from 
the ordinary way of handling so that it 
may be worth describing here. 

Customers on Live List. 

When some one sends in an inquiry — 
which means, usually, writes for a 
catalogue — we send him what he re- 
quests and put him on our live list. 
We carry him on that list all that year 
and all of the next year, even though 
he does not buy. For example, if we 
receive an inquiry in June, 1920 (or in 
January, 1920, or November, 1920), we 
carry the inquirer's name during 1920 
and 1921. If, by January, 1922, he 
has not bought, off the live list he goes. 
That means that no longer does he re- 
ceive our big catalogues, which cost us 
anywhere from 10 cents to 30 cents 
apiece. 

Instead, however, of discarding him 
as worthless, we continue to solicit his 
business. But we do not use expensive 
30-cent catalogues; we use folders that 
cost us only one-half to one and one- 
half cents apiece. And these we do 
not regard as active mail solicitations; 
rather we consider them as the equiv- 
alent of a judicious use of oxygen to 
revive a moribund prospect. 

This folder has a double mission; if 
it performs either job, we count it sue 
cessful. What we prefer, of course, is 
that it will induce the customer to buy. 
So we devote most of the space to de- 
scribing the ])roduct and giving prices 
of a few good values. But then, also, 
we ])rint a coupon on the folder. This 
coupon requests a bulb catalogue. And 
if the customer either buys or asks for 
a catalogue, his i)late goes back into 
the live list for two more years. The 
sjiecial value of these revived names is, 
of course, that the inquirer is not likely 
to jiersist in inquiring year after year 
unless he is in the market and buying 
liulhs somewhere. As long as he is a 
buyer of bulbs, it ]»ays us to keep after 
him. 

Keeping Statistics. 

When office heli> became difficult to 
(d)taiii, we were forced to discontinue 
a great many activities that we had re- 
garded as indispensable. There was no 
other way to keep our office expense 
down to a reasonal)le figure. And when 
we came to this pruning off of a few 
dollars here and a few dollars there, we 
had to thiuk all the way down to the 
bottom of a great many office habits 



20 



The Florists^ Review 



June 8. 1922 



that we had inherited either from our 
predecessors or from outside influences. 

One of the things we found we could 
pare to the bone was the keeping of 
statistical matter of many sorts. And 
one of these was, we decided, keeping 
the statistics on inquiries from each 
advertisement and mailing piece. In- 
quiry figures are among the first things 
a space salesman talks about. We had 
always kept them. But we decided, 
when we investigated, that the only 
value of the inquiry figures was to show 
how many extra mailing pieces we had 
to send out that did not result in orders. 
Our method of relegating names to the 
dead list after two inactive years made 
this question relatively unimportant; 
in fact, we are willing to take a shot 
at selling almost anybody for a couple 
of years. For we can even sell bulbs 
to apartment dwellers in the fall, and 
do sell them; they grow small assort- 
ments of bulbs in water, or sand and 
water, for winter house flowers. 

Consequently, we discontinued the in- 
quiry statistics. We kept up scru- 
pulously, however, our figures on the 
cost, per publication, of selling each 
dollar's worth of product. For that has 
a direct bearing on our advertising and 
use of mediums, in accordance with our 
fundamental policy of considering ad- 
vertising as buying customers at so 
much apiece and keeping them long 
enough to make a profit from them. We 
have to know what they cost us, in order 
to ascertain whether we are making a 
profit from them. 

Now that competent office employees 
may be obtained readily, at a price that 
is not unreasonable, we are preparing 
once more to begin keeping statistics of 
our inquiries from each advertisement. 
But I shall keep an eye on the expense, 
and if it is not productive wc shall dis- 
continue the inquiry record. 

Handling Big Orders. 

I have said that wc are entirely a 
mail-order concern. That needs one qual- 
ification. For, occasionally, when an 
inquiry or a tip discloses a big order in 
the ofiinfj, wc may follow it up in jier- 
son. Wc follow up in person only lo- 
cally, however; the time and expense 
involved do not justify traveling any 
considerable distance. 

This is done through the firm of El- 
liott & Leonard, made up of myself and 
our vice-president; both of us are grad- 
uate landscape architects, and Elliott & 
Leonard operate in that field. Tlie 
ethical requirements of the profession 
do not, as in so many allied linos, allow 
for active solicitation of business. 
But within "ethical limits" prospects 
may be followed up. 

We should not, either of us, practice 
our profession if it were not a practical 
necessity as a time and expense-saver 
for the Elliott Nursery Co. But when 
someone is going to spend several thou- 
sands of dollars in beautifying a largo 
estate, he seldom wishes to do it in 
haphazard fashion. And if wc had no 
way of handling this landscape archi- 
tecture, we should ]irobably have to 
turn to as the Elliott Nursery Co. and 
give it as free service, which in many 
instances might be a waste of time. 

So now the nursery company turns 
over to the landscape architects nny in- 
quiries that involve layout work and 
the like. The firm of landscape archi- 
tects makes for its services a charge 
that covers simjily the time nnd expense 



it has incurred in handling the job; 
and the profit comes in the order that 
the nursery company gets. If, as is un- 
likely under the circumstances, the or- 
der goes elsewhere, at least we have 
not lost the time we have put into the 
job and the drafting expense. 

Catalogue Mailing. 

Our mailing of catalogues and circu- 
lars is carefully scheduled both by time 
and by quantity. We started this year 
off by mailing 6,000 copies of our seed 
catalogue January 3. (This mailing will 
doubtless increase from year to year; 
our seed business is a new enterprise.) 
February 1 we mailed 55,000 copies of 
our general nursery catalogue, and en- 
closed with it a seed folder that has 
another use, to another list at the same 
time; it is the oxygen treatment that 
we administer to the dead list at this 
time. 

May 1 we mailed 75,000 copies of our 
bulb catalogue — an expensive and 
elaborate job of color and special proc- 
ess printing. And along with this bulb 
catalogue we enclosed a special circular, 
which "doubles" as an oxygen treat- 
ment for the dead list — the second oxy- 
gen treatment of the year, and the last 
for those who do not respond and who 



have been on it for two years. Sep- 
tember 1 we shall mail 75,000 copies of 
our fall catalogue, which includes some 
bulbs as well as such plants, trees and 
shrubs as may with safety be planted 
in the fall. 

Order Forms Are Fool-i>roof. 

I have mentioned that we go over our 
routine on occasion to see what we can 
devise in the way of short cuts. One of 
the plans we use regularly might, I 
think, be of equal use to a great many 
mail-order advertisers who do business 
in a way not at all resembling ours. 
This is the use of a fool-proof order 
sheet, which we have devised carefully 
so that the customer simply cannot fill 
it in incorrectly. And to insure legi- 
bility, we request that the name and 
address be printed out. As it happens, 
a large percentage of these order sheets 
comes back typewritten! 

Our order sheet is punched at the side 
for binding. Almost all our orders 
come in on our regular order sheet. And 
if the order comes in any other form, 
we promptly copy it on an order sheet. 
For the order sheet, which seventy-five 
per cent of our customers fill out so 
carefully, is bound as our individual 
(Continued on pftsre 70.) 



L'-TJV-i'XT-TJ-i.rj-J.TtTJ'i-i.Tj^^^^ 




FIXES FAIR COAL PRICES. 



Hoover Attempts Regulation. 

Maximum prices on bituminous coal 
at the mine in three districts were fixed 
May 31 by Secretary of Commerce Her- 
bert C. Hoover. Prices set ranged from 
.'t;2.20 to $2.60 a ton for the Alabama 
district; $3.50 a ton for the smokeless 
coal districts of West Virginia, and 
$3.50 a ton for the Harlan and Hazard 
fields of Kentucky and southern Appa- 
lachian fields of TennesHoo and Ken- 
tucky. 

The prices apply only to spot coal, 
with the maximum for the Alabama dis- 
trict 25 cents a ton below the final Gar- 
field war-time scale and the maximums 
in the other districts somewhat above 
the Garfield scale. 

In explaining the action Secretary 
Hoover said: 

"It should be understood that the 
whole object of the administration's in- 
terest in coal prices is to protect the 
consumer bj' indicating the maximum 
price that would be fair for spot coal 
during the temporary period of the 
strike, and by doing so, to protect that 
great group of operators who do not 
wish to take advantage of the present 
situation. 

"Out of the 5,000,000 tons weekly 
]iroduction of bituminous coal, probably 
3,500,000 tons are under long-term con- 
tracts to consumers at prices stipu- 
lated in the contracts, and there can 
1)0 no alteration of these contract prices, 
which, as a rule, ru7i considerably below 
l)riees for spot coal, as they represent a 
steady business to the mines. The sug- 
gestion of a maximum fair price relates 
solely to spot coal. Many coal dealers 
enjoy longtime contracts at lower 
rates, and it would be only fair to the 
]iublic that, in the resale of this con- 



tract coal, these dealers should give 
the customer the full benefit of their 
lower prices, and I feel sure from my 
discussions with them that the majority 
will do so. 

Follow Garfield Scales. 

"The maximum price for spot coal is 
not the minimum price. It is only a 
general figure that will protect the pub- 
lic from such occasions as the last pinch, 
when spot coal in many places went to 
over $10 per ton. In arriving at the 
figure, the Garfield scales were taken 
as a basis, as these scales were the 
result of close investigations during the 
war, and allowances have been made 
for increased costs and a general aver- 
age of the situation taken that would 
protect the public and maintain pro- 
duction. The maximum price includes 
customary selling commissions, which 
were established separately in the Gar- 
field scale, and the operators are recom- 
mended to use the usual wholesale agen- 
cies, thus promoting direct movement 
to the consumer. 

"What Ave arc endeavoring to pre- 
vent is a panic in prices such as took 
place at the last coal pinch. Every con- 
sumer who is interested in knowing that 
he gets a square deal can easily check 
tlie freight rates, can compare them 
with the maximum price, can inquire 
from his dealer whether he is buying 
contract coal and at what rate, and 
can make proper allowances for retail 
distribution. If consumers are unwill- 
ing to take this degree of interest in 
negotiating for coal, it is a certainty 
that no one can help them. The govern- 
ment has no authority in the matter, 
for this is purely a moral question and 
one of cooperation. The consumers 
who are not treated fairly may appeal 
to this department in Washington and 
their case will be inquired into." 



JuNB 8, 1922 



The Florists^ Review 



21 



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ROSES AT ARLINGTON 



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AMEJtICAN ROSE SOCIETY. 



Members Visit Arlington. 

Bain marred the visit of the members 
of the American Eose Society on the 
occasion of their annual pilgrimage to 
the test rose gardens at Arlington 
Farms, Va., June 2. Most of the roses 
had long since passed their prime and 
the heavy rainfall shattered the blooms 
of those that had been worth looking at 
a few days before. 

Apparently insufficient notice of the 
meeting had been given, for the attend- 
ance of out-of-town members was ex- 
tremely small and rather discouraging. 
The local florists turned out in fair num- 
bers, however, swelling the party. Fol- 
lowing the inspection trip at Arlington, 
automobiles conveyed those attending 
to beautiful Twin Oaks, where the mem- 
bers were guests of Mrs. Charles G. Bell. 
Despite the rain and the wet, a tour was 
made of this wonderful estate under the 
guidance of George E. Anderson, its 
head gardener, who had some wonderful 
climbing roses to show. 

The Eeview correspondent had made 
a trip to the gardens a few days in ad- 
vance of the visitation, and was able 
to view the roses when they presented 
a more attractive appearance. The 
climbers were good and there were 
many teas that were well worthy of 
mention. 

The leaders among the climbers, un- 
disputed by those who viewed them, are 
Dr. W. Van Fleet, white, and Paul's 
Scarlet Climber. The latter can be seen 
looming up from all parts of the gar- 
dens and it has been much admired. 
The Van -Fleet rose is one that is be- 
yond description. More time was spent 
in looking at it than any of the other 
roses. 

There is considerable leaf-spot pres- 
ent in the gardens, and the fear has 
been expressed that if some of the more 
heavily infected plants are not removed 
from their present locations, it will be- 
come more prevalent. A great many 
rose chafers were noticed, and some of 
the roses had attracted spiders. 

Varieties Seen. 

American Pillar is one of the best 
looking climbers in the gardens at this 
time. The buds that cover it are just 
about to mature. It seems healthy and 
doing well. Empress of China was ques- 
tioned as to name. However, this 
climber is attractive. It is bushy in 
appearance and covered with small, 
white flowers and pink buds just about 
to mature. Debutante is another good- 
looking climber, fragrant, with large 
blooms, which are pink when just open- 
ing, bleaching to white, yet at no time 
unattractive. 

Andreas Hofer was full-flowered, but 
unattractive, as the flowers are not of 
good color and the foliage is not par- 
ticularly good. Queen of the Prairies 
also is of poor color and not particu- 
larly desirable when compared with 
some of the newer varieties. 

Many of the roses were long past their 
peak of beauty, yet giving evidences of 
having done well earlier in the season. 



Leuchtstern is apparently a heavy-flow- 
ering variety. Aglaia also showed evi- 
dences of being a free bloomer. Miss 
Helyett is another that had bloomed 
heavily, but this particular variety 
spreads out in its growth. It produces 
flowers of deep pink, shading to a pale, 
pink at the center. 

Ramblers. 

Both White Rambler and Climbing 
Baby Rambler were unattractive by 
reason of the fact that they are early 
bloomers and they had long since passed 
their seasons. Officials at the gardens, 
however, declared that they had done 
pretty well a few weeks ago. 

Tausendschoen is pretty nearly gone, 
but there are still plenty of large clus- 
ters of good-looking flowers, pink in 
color and shading to white. Of similar 
type is Shatemuc, although the flowers 
are not particularly good. It is doing 



The Eklitor is pleased when 
a Reader present* his ideas 
on any subject treated in 




SIS' 



As experience is the best 
teacher, so do we learn 
fastest by an exchange of 
experiences. Many valuable 
points are brought out by 
discussion. 

Good penmanship, spelline and 
grammar, though desirable, are not 
necessary. Write as you would talk 
when doing your best. 

WE SHALL BE GLAD 
TO HEAR FROM YOU 



well in the gardens and has luxuriant 
foliage. 

Favorable comment was given to Ru- 
bens, which has an appearance similar 
to the Scarlet Climber. It was heavy 
with flowers and the red-tinted foliage 
was attractive. 

Everblooming Crimson Rambler is 
A-1 as to general appearance, although 
the loaves were somewhat mildewed. It 
is growing nicely and was full of buds 
and blooms. Flower of Fairfield, which 
stood beside it, is also doing well. 

Vcilchenblau, as usual, came in for 
criticism. It is the only bine in the 
gardens and, strange to say, there were 
more plants of this variety than of 
most of the others. However, several 
of these are being removed. It is an 
odd-looking climber, showing u]i well 
from a distance, but hardly one that 
would make anyone enthusiastic over it. 

Gardenia and Source d "Or make at- 
tractive, yellow buds, the latter being 
the lighter in shade, slightly more dou- 
ble, although not quite so large. Loon- 
tine Gervais has large salmon flowers 
and attractive buds. It is fragrant and 
has good foliage. 



Milky "Way has been declared a good 
climber. It is a single white and has 
good foliage. It is doing well in the 
gardens. Silver Moon is another good 
one, having fine foliage. Both are free 
bloomers. Mme. Alfred Carriere, which 
also has white flowers, is attractive. 
However, it is not so free a blooming 
plant as some of the others that have 
been mentioned, compensating for the 
lack of ma.ss flowers by blooming all 
through the summer. 

Some Climbers. 

Climbing American Beauty is a little 
off color and is past its time, but still it 
is rather attractive and has good foliage 
and fragrant flowers. 

The general appearance of Oriole was 
marred by the hanging on of the dead 
blooms. The buds are deep yellow and 
are good. Klondike has cream-like buds 
and fairly large flowers, but the plant 
does not make much foliage. Ernest 
Grandpierre also has yellow buds, the 
flowers being white and growing in huge 
clusters, of which there were a great 
many. It is doing well. 

There are a great many attractive 
salmon-colored climbers in the gardens. 
Adelaide Moulle turns to white in the 
matured flowers. It is quite prolific and 
the flowers are double. The foliage is 
excellent and quite shiny. Electra is 
also double, with flowers fading to 
white, and the foliage is good. This is 
an attractive climber. 

Golden Rambler is not particularly 
hardy, but the flowers are attractive, 
fading to white at maturity. 

Lady Gay is showy and is doing well 
in the gardens. It has well formed flow- 
ers and is a free bloomer. Dorothy Per- 
kins is just coming into bloom and is 
exceedingly good, with excellent foliage. 

The Lovetts were fine this year. Mrs. 
Lovett is a showy plant, with deep pink 
blooms and good foliage. Bess Lovett 
is an excellent red — one of the best in 
the gardens; and Mary Lovett is a fine 
white, which has been doing excellently. 
Alida Lovett, a double pink, is not 
heavy in foliage, but is good just the 
same. 

Hiawatha is doing well and its flow- 
ers are rather attractive, carmine in 
color with a white center. The flowers 
of Wichuraiana do not show up well in 
the great mass of yellow and green 
foliage. Dundee Rambler is poor, be- 
cause the dead blooms hang on too long. 

Tigira will soon be a thing of great 
beauty, for it is covered with buds. The 
foliage is excellent. Baltimore Belle is 
another of the late bloomers, but is not 
hardy. Its flowers are blush-tinted. 
Graf Zeppelin has deep pink flowers. 
They fade white and remain on the 
]ilant too long, making it unattractive. 

Lady Godiva will soon be in full 
bloom, with attractive pink flowers. 
Flame, the name indicative of the flow- 
ers, is attractive. It has a large num- 
ber of clusters heavy with flowers and 
it will soon be in full bloom. Its foliage 
is excellent. Trier, a white, will bloom 
all summer, although the flowers are not 
large. 

Hugh Dixon is an excellent variety 
among the crimsons. It has large flow- 



22 



The Florists^ Review 



Jink S. 1922 



ers and good buds, but it is not much 
us to foliage. Dawson is not good, al- 
though free-blooming. Russell 's Cottage 
is not good, because the red flowers turn 
a sort of 2)urple and are ugly-looking. 
Anna Maria is also poor as to color. 

Climbing Orleans, a deep pink, is a 
free bloomer and has good foliage. Mrs. 
Flight, pink to white, is excellent and 
in its prime. Crimson Rambler is badly 
mildewed, but it has jdenty of leaves 
and is heavy with blooms. White 
Dorothy Perkins is just coming in. It 
is doing nicely, as it is a hardy plant. 

The dead blooms of Queen Alexandra, 
a pink, fail to drop promptly, and the 
same is true of Birdie Blye, which loses 
much of its attractiveness because of 
that condition. Climbing La France, 
like the bush rose, is good in the gar- 
dens. 

The rosarians were attracted to Long- 
wood, a vigorous grower, semi-double, 
with pink and white blossoms having 
yellow centers. Gruss an Teplitz is 
nearing the end of its season, but is at- 
tractive nevertheless. Another good red 
is Dazzling Red, and Coronation is 
worthy of mention. 

Many Teas Blasted. 

A number of the teas showed signs of 
blasting. Many of the varieties were 
quite badly hit by the weather and 
some few among the many in the gar- 
dens are not particularl}'^ adapted to 
this section of the country. Of course, 
generally speaking, it is' too late to 
judge many of the plants, while others 
were handicai)])ed by the beating rain, 
which destroyed so many flowers. 

The Killarneys are ali doing well in 
the gardens, proving to be free bloom- 
ers and not particularly given to leaf- 
spot. Ophelia, another" favorite in this 
section as a cut flower, is hardy and 
makes a good bush and has ainio.st per- 
fect buds. It is considered A-1 among 
the garden oiT'crings. Welleslev, which 
has found sale in the local wholesale 
flower market, is hardy and a free 
bloomer and makes an 'attractive pink 
flower, with foliage free from leaf-spot. 

My Maryland is new to the gardens, 
but the iilants look well. Kaiserin Au- 
gusta Victoria apparently does not 
make good foliage and the season for 
this variety has passed. White Oi)helia 
is a new addition to the gardens and 
nothing can be said of its performance 
this year. Lady Ilillingdon, a i)opular 
yellow rose locally, is doing well, and 
Irish Firoflame attracts considerable at- 
tention and praise. 

One of the leaders in the gardens is 
Red Radiance, which looked as if it 
might do extra well, for it was hoavv 
with blooms, well formed buds and 
abundant foliage. A new plant that 
attracts attention is Red ('olnnihia. 
from the Joseph 11. Hill Co., Richmond, 
Ind., which has a large flower of at- 
tractive shade, sliglitly larger than pink 
Columbia; hardy, but does not make 
much foliage. 

Some Favorites. 

Frau Karl Druschki is another favor- 
ite. It is doing well and its white 
flowers are large. This rose alwavs 
attracts favorable comment. 

No visit to the gardens is completed 
without an inspection of the rose Gen- 
eral Jacqueminot, but the alternate hot 
and wet weather blasted many of the 
buds. The plant is a hardy "one and 
does well over the winter. 

Royalty is represented liy liaiduess 



Rothschild, Duke of Edinburgh, Baron 
do Bonstetten and Earl of Dufferin. 
The first-named is afi^ected with leaf- 
s])ot and does not do particularly well, 
although its light ])ink flowers are good 
to look at. The Duke of Edinburgh is 
also badly spotted and its growth is 
not good. It does not seem to stand 
the winters well. Like its neighbors. 
Baron de Bonstetten is spotted and its 
flowers are not well formed. 

Countess of Gosford has fairly good- 
looking pink flowers, which are fra- 
grant, and the plant is fairly healthy. 
But Lady Ashtown is not particularly 
attractive, for it is slightly affected 
by leaf-spot and does not show up well 
as to the flower. Archduke Charles is a 
nev/comer to the gardens and nothing 
cm be predicted as to its possibilities. 

The Duchesse de Brabant spreads con- 
siderably, but the small, pink flower 
is rather attractive. Lady Ursula also 
makes a nice flower and is hard}'. 

Pilgrim a Recent Arrival. 

Pilgrim has just been set out. Her 
Majesty is not hardy and makes a 
large, but rather unattractive flower. 
Captain Christy is a good plant. Oak- 
mont is not showy, but it is full of 
flowers and buds. Frances E. Willard 
i^s .a free bloojn(»r ;ind not addicted to 
leaf-spot. Mrs. A. R. Waddell is a good 
variety, making perfect buds and flow- 
ers, ;uid is hardy. 

British Queen does not size up well, 
liady Alice Stanley is subject to leaf- 
s])ot, but is a frequent bloomer. Cham- 
])ion of the World is a good outdoor 
rose and is f(uite jiopular. It blooms 
early and is hardy. La Tosca is an old 
friend. Its light jiink flower is quite 
large, and while the plant is inclined to 
lie s])ready, it is hardy. La France 
is good as a garden rose. 

Mme. Caroline Testout has a light 
])iiik flower and nice bud. It is hardy 
in this climate. Mme. Butterfly does 
not make much of a show, but its small 
bud is good to look at. Mme. C'ochet is 
not good from the stand])oint of showi- 
ness. but it is fragrant. Gustav Gruncr- 
wald is a free bloomer and has an at- 
tractive pink flower, and good foliage 
not given to leaf-spot. 

Ulrich Brunner is good. Its flowers 
are fragrant and there are many of 
them. It is not affected by leaf-spot. 

Marshall P. Wilder is good; the flow- 
ers are fragrant .and the foliage attrac- 
tive. Jubilee is a good red rose, hardy, 
with well formeil foliage. 

Freiherr von Marschall stands the 
winters well and has fine foliage. It is a 
free-blooming rose ami at the present 
time is full of buds. White Maman 
Co(di('t has ]iasspd liy. ^Mrs. Wakefield 
Christie-Miller is too sjireading in its 
growth. Berthe Fontaine is also spread- 
ing and dot's not m;ike much growth. 

Pierre Xotting is an excellent cerise. 
It is fragrant and its hardiness com- 
mends it. It is a free bloomer and 
little given to leaf-spot. T. N. S. 



rose garden. Going from the north, I 
was surprised to find so many varieties 
in bloom at that time. It seemed to 
me that all were out except the ram- 
blers. 

But I was surprised at the smallness 
of the collection, and if it be not lese 
majeste to say it, I was surprised at 
the lack of care and cultivation in the 
test grounds. The farm — -or that part 
of it — had an appearance of neglect 
that was a distinct disappointment to 
find in a show place conducted by the 
government. Many varieties were grow- 
ing luxuriantly even in soil not ideal 
for roses, but neglect of the plants, 
absence of cultivation and the abun- 
dance of weeds made the garden a dis- 
tinct disappointment. Dreer's rose gar- 
den at Riverton, X. J., is better worth 
a visit both for its collection of va- 
rieties and for the intelligent care it 
has. Or Bobbink & Atkins' superb rose 
garden at Rutherford. X. J. A trip to 
either delights the heart of the rose 
lover. .lohn Watson. 



MINNEAPOLIS AND ST. PAUL. 



IF THIS BE LESE MAJESTE— 

Arlington. The n.'itional cemetery. 
Where the L'nknown Soldier was lately 
laid to rest with pomp and ceremony 
such as did not mark the return of the 
great Xapoleon. 

The home of Lee. Xext to Mount 
Vernon, the best known home in Amer- 
ica. The Mecca of thousands of pil- 
grims every year. 

I was there May 11 and visited the 



The Market. 

Tlie trade in general re])orts good 
business for the month just j)ast, al- 
though Mothers' day was liandica])ped 
by the poor condition of stock, caused 
by the exceedingly hot weather a few 
d.'iys before. 

Fine sales are reported for Memorial 
day. Even iris found a fair market. 
Home-grown peonies .appeared in con- 
siderable quantities; this seldom hap- 
])ens. The peony season is two weeks 
ahead of time this year. 

Outside j)lanting here is jiretty well 
done with. Frequent rains have made 
planting easier. 

Iris Show Attracts. 

The third annual iris show of the 
X'ortli western Peony and Iris Society 
was held in the showrooms of the W^ills- 
St. Claire Co., St. Paul, June 1 and 2. 
This was the largest and best show yet 
held. About 160 varieties were shown, 
and 800 vases were used to stage the 
exhibits. A large crowil of visitors 
passed through the rooms day ami night. 

Holm & Olson entereil only one class, 
but the firm made a tine display of 
baskets of iris. W. E. Fryer, of Man- 
torville, Minn., made a nice showjfug of 
seedling iris. His Katheriue Fryer was 
exceptionally good. A. C. Arny and 
the Rainbow Gardens sliowccl exception- 
ally fine iris. 

A. C. Arny took sixtci'ii first prizes. 
Holm & Olson being the only other ]iro- 
fessional to win first premium. Rain- 
bow Gardens and Riverview (iardens, of 
St. Paul, and the Forest Heights Gar- 
dens, of Minneapolis, were the only 
other commercial grower^ to win 
awards. 

Various Notes. 

The ^linneapolis Florists' Club liild 
its monthly meeting Tuesday, .lune (i. at 
the store of Rice Bros. Cooperative ad- 
vertising on ;i sul)scri]ition basis is 
showing good results, and the club in- 
tends to keep U]i this work. A. S. Rice 
and R. A. Latham haxc been successful 
in collecting funds. 

The flower show committees are busy 
continuing plans for the show to be held 
in Minneapolis X'ovember 11 to 16. 

Rice Bros, have a large crop of Ijilium 
longiflorum about ready frir market. 






'.•■«'■.• 



June 8, 1922 



The Florists^ Review 



23 




Half a Dozen Pots of Kamp & Spinti's New Double Trailing Lobelia. 



They are market-gardening approxi- 
mately sixteen acres of land. 

Hans Eosacker is busy remodeling 
and building new houses. 

Gibbs & Nelson and Peter Hermes are 
adding new houses to their ranges. 

Robert Stein is just recovering from 
an operation made necessary by an ul- 
cerated tooth. He reports a fine sjiring 
trade. 

Visitors last week were John Briggs 
and wife, of Moorhead, Minn.; I. Bay- 
ersdorfer, of Philadelphia; Julius Dill- 
off, of Wertheimer Bros., New York, 
and E. Snyder, of Poehlmann Bros. Co., 
Chicago. 

William A. Peterson, of the Peterson 
Nursery, came from Chicago to visit 
the iris show June 2. L. Roenfiold, of 
the Eoenfield Nursery, Des Moines, was 
also in town June 1 and 2 to see the iris 
show. 

June 33 and 14 the peony and garden 
flower show will be held in the Pence 
automobile showrooms, Minneapolis. In- 
dications are that this will be the big- 
gest ever. L. C. 

LOBELIA EBINUS GRACILIS. 

An excellent plant for lawn vases, 
baskets and similar uses is Lobelia 
Erinus gracilis. This plant is known 
as the half-trailing lobelia and is 
usually single, though sometimes dou- 
ble. It is among the commonest of edg- 
ing plants and is particularly well 
adapted for early season effects. When 
planted outdoors in the northern states 
it will bloom until frost comes if it 
has good soil, plenty of water and an 
occasional cutting back. In hot climates, 
however, the plant ceases to bloom in 
midsummer. The plant can be propa- 
gated from seed. Seeds sown in Janu- 
ary and February will give blooming 
plants by April or May of the same 
year. For flowers alone, rather than for 
edging, seeds may be sown later, l)ut for 
definite results in edgings, it is best 
to start the plants from cuttings. For 
cuttings, the best plants of a former 
crop are selected, lifted and placed in 
pots in the greenhouse in the fall and 
allowed to grow in this manner through 
the winter. Cuttings which are taken 
from these stock plants in January or 
February should give blooming i)lants 
by May of the same year. 

An improved strain of Lobelia gra- 
cilis, as it is commonly called, has been 
developed by the Kamp & Spinti Co.. 
North Milwaukee, Wis. Mr. Spinti 



speaks of the plant as follows: "It is 
a double trailing lobelia. We find it is 
a profuse bloomer and an improvement 
over any other trailing lobelia. It has 
been our experience to witness some of 
the plants bloom all summer and late 
into the fall, and they are especially 
suitable for warm weather. The plant 
is found to propagate easily and root 
action is obtainable almost any time 
during the winter months. We have 
been able to accumulate considerable 
stock, and will start propagating in Au- 
gust of this year. This will give us cut- 
tings in September. It is also our de- 
sire to have 2-inch and 2i/a-inch stock 
for October delivery and throughout the 
winter." 

KANSAS CITY, MO. 



The Market. 

Memorial day business was not un- 
usual. In nearly every shop it was 
ahead of last year. In a few it greatly 
exceeded all past years. Some of this 
increase was due to other business that 
would have come anyway. The favor- 
able spring brought a great supply of 
flowers. Home gardens supplied .a mass 
of flowers for cemeteries. Peonies 
seemed to be everywhere. The large 
and small fields came in at the right 
time and every grower had peonies to 
spare. The early varieties were held in 
iceboxes. Some of these held up well; 
others did not. There were enough 
freshly cut to supply what demand 
there was. Some of the stock was 
choice. Tills went well at the last. Car- 
nations were extremely plentiful and 
good. Tlie cool nisrhts have kept the 
stock to a rare quality for .Tune. Most 
of the roses are short, but they are not 
soft. Gladioli are plentiful. All gar- 
don flowers are good. There is the 
usual variety. The demand was good 
all last week. School cominenccnients 
and weddings are using a great many 
flowers. 

Various Notes. 

Tlorothy and Arthur Noll have r(^- 
turned from a year's stay with an aunt 
in Micliican. where they attended 
school. Tliev will spend the summer 
with their father, T. J. NoH. 

The June bride is featured by the 
Alpha Floral Co. in a beautifully deco- 
rated window. A wax figure, gowned in 
the latest fashion in wedding finery, 
with veil and wreath .■ind holding a bou- 



quet of vallej', stands in the window. 
This serves to introduce the floral part 
of a wedding. On a silken-covered chair 
is a bridesmaid's bouquet of pink roses. 
Silk, tulle and smilax are draped about 
the window, and several large baskets 
of flowers complete the picture. 

Fifty thousand artificial Flanders 
]ioppies were received by Frank P. 
Adams post, Veterans of Foreign Wars, 
for sale in Kansas City, Kan., for Me- 
morial day. These poppies were made 
by French peasant women, who will re- 
ceive half of the proceeds of the sale. 
The other half will go to disabled vet- 
erans in local hospitals. 

E. L. Clemens lias been busy all 
spring. Mothers' day and Memorial day 
cleaned up his plants. 

S. Bryson Ayres has bought sixty 
acres adjoining his farm on Blue Ridge 
road, near Independence. Mo. He will 
grow nursery stock and hardy flowers 
on the new ground. The spring business 
was the best of any season since the 
w.'ir. 

The week beginning ^fay 20 was one 
of the best in the year for J. E. Murray 
& Co. In addition to Memorial day 
work. Miss !Murray had the main work 
for the funeral of a prominent lumber- 
man, Mondav, May 29. 

Rock's Flower 'Ganlens hav.' .30,000 
2 year-old peony jdants. Ij.-iwrence L. 
Rock, president of the gardens, is get- 
ting up the fall catalogue. Spring busi- 
ness in the seed department was far bet- 
ter than was anticipated for the first 
year. 

Mr. and 'SUa. Cliarles Edgar, of Pitts- 
burgh, Pa., and I. M. Bav(>rsdorfer, of 
II. Bayersdorfer & Co., ' Philadelphia, 
wer<' recent visitors. 

Aviators took a prominent ])art in 
^^elllori.'ll day services here. Not only 
were there aerial exhibitions on the pro- 
gr.'im for the day, but formations of 
jtlanes drojiped flowers at the different 
cemeteries. Since the war few exhibi- 
tions of this kind h.ave been given, es- 
jiecially fis ;i part of Memorial day serv- 
ices. This was the first time in Kansas 
<'ity that avi.atnrs liave flown on this 
day. The first ii.'niil mcinorial service 
ever witnessed here took ]il;tce in Penn 
N'alley park. About (),00n jiersons gath- 
ered there to witness the ceremony and 
take part in the service. Two huge 
wreaths of flowers were cast into the 
l;ike, while a firing squad snapped a 
salute. The symbolic meaning of the 
ceremonv is that the flowers scattered 



24 



The Florists^ Review 



June 8. 1922 



on the water finally disintegrate and 
their fragrance is carried by the waves 
to the dead. The ceremony was con- 
ducted principally in honor of the forty 
sailors and marines of Kansas City who 
gave their lives in the war. During the 
entire service flowers were continually 
cast upon the water. Wreaths and 
flowers were furnished by the Gold Star 
League of Jackson County, the local 
chapter of American War Mothers and 
the auxiliary to the James Cummings 
post. 

The floral parade committee of "park 
and plan" week held a luncheon at the 
Hotel Muehlebach Friday, June 2. This 
parade will be the main feature of the 
"park and plan" week, June 12. The 
parade will be the afternoon of June 
16. Sixty-five women, representing the 
various wards of the city, were guests 
at the luncheon. They were given the 
outline of plans for the celebration. An 
executive committee of five women was 
chosen to select a queen and her at- 
tendants, who will have a conspicuous 
place in the parade. T. J. Noll, presi- 
dent of the Florists' Club; Glen K. 
Parker, secretary of the club, and Wil- 
liam L. Eock are members of the floral 
parade committee. Mr. Noll has called 
a special meeting of the Plorists' Club 
for June 8 to discuss plans for the 
parade. The Florists' Club has offered 
a prize of $100 for one class of entries. 
T. J. Noll left for Chicago June 4 to 
arrange for artificial decorations for 
some of the floats. 

A. Newell has a new work cabinet, 
the first of its kind to be seen here. It 
is of white enamel, covered with battle- 
ship linoleum. The drawers and trash 
bin are lined with galvanized tin. A 
drain along the top keeps the water 
from running down the sides. The cab- 
inet stands clear of the floor by several 
inches, making for comfort on the part 
of workers. J. M. McKcown, represent- 
ing the A. L. Randall Co., Chicago, sold 
the cabinet. He will have it to show 
visitors to the S. A. F. convention in 
August. 

Adolph Mohr is recovering slowly 
from his recent operation. He has 
nearly 10,000 cyclamens in 3-inch and 
4-inch pots and a large number of Cin- 
cinnati and Melior begonias for fall. 

William Foith has planted 8,000 as- 
ters for late blooming. He has bought 
a piece of land adjoining his range and 
will grow outdoor stock this summer. 
His carnations were fine for Memorial 
^^y- J. E. K. 

WASHINGTON, D. C. 



The Market. 

Cut roses were in good demand last 
week because of the large number of 
schools holding graduation exercises. 
However, the demand slackened off on 
Friday and Saturday found sales 
draggy. The prices on ordinary stock 
ranged from $4 to $25 per hundred, with 
as high as $30 for good Iladleys. Fu- 
neral work also was heavy and that 
made good the sale of the shorter 
gradps, and at times it was only possi- 
ble to get those grades, so heavy had 
been the call for roses for graduation 
and corsage bouquets demanding good 
stock. Some short-stemmed Hadleys 
were obtainable at as low as $8 per hun- 
dred. Columbia and Kussell were also 
popular. 

Peonies are the leading flowers and 
they predominate in all funeral work. 



The quality is good and the prices 
range from $4 to $6 per hundred. 
Gladioli are coming in more plentifully 
and good stock sells at about $4 per 
hundred. The price has been as high 
as $25, the drop being due to increased 
offerings in the market. 

Cattleyas are scarce and the supply 
is readily taken up at $12 per dozen. 
This represents a twenty-five per cent 
increase. The demand has been made 
heavy by the number of seminary and 
college commencements. There is a 
large quantity of good valley coming 
here from out-of-town points, which sup- 
plements the locally grown valley. The 
supply is usually well taken up at $6 
and $8 per hundred. 

Easter lilies are in heavy supply, but 
there is practically no demand for them 
even at $8 per hundred, on account of 
the peonies, which caused the price to 
drop from $12. This is only a temporary 
condition, however. The sale of carna- 
tions is similarly interfered with, but 
the flowers are small, showing that the 
summer season is here in earnest. They 
are being offered in quantities at $10 
per thousand, but even then there are 
few buyers. 

Various Notes. 

William F. Gude, head of Gude Bros. 
Co., accompanied by his daughter. Miss 
Amelia Gude, participated in the annual 
outing of Temple-Noyes lodge of 
Masons. The lodge had chartered the 
steamer Midland for a cruise down the 
Potomac to Richmond, the capital of 
the state of Virginia. Arriving at that 
place, they were welcomed by officials 
of the city and taken on an automobile 
tour of the city. 

Grace Bauer, daughter of the man- 
ager of the local store of the S. S. Pen- 
nock Co., has taken a turn for the better 
and is now on the road to recovery. She 
was one of about forty who were 
stricken with typhoid fever, presumably 
as the result of eating fform-infected 
food at a church supper. The little girl 
has had rather a hard time of it, but is 
said to be doing nicely. T. N. S. 



EARLY MUMS. 

What are the best early-flowering 
chrysanthemums to grow? 

S. G.— Mich. 



The earliest chrysanthemums to grow 
would be as follows; 

YHIXOW. 

P.olrtpn Olow. 
Cranfordla. 
Yellow Enrly Frost. 
Yellow AdTnncp. 

BRONZE. 
A. Bnrham. 
Hronze T'nnkn. 
Octr)I)pr Henld. 
Williiim n. Wnite. 

give entire satisfaction. 

C. H. Totty. 



PINK. 

Ilenri Vincent. 
T'nriflo Supreme. 
TInaka. 
Early Rose. 

WHITE. 
Smith's Advance. 
Early Frost. 
Poll.y Rose. 
Oconfo. 

This list will 



MXJMS AND CHERRIES 

Would you advise me to grow pompon 
chrysanthemums and Jerusalem cherries 
in pots in a shady greenhouse and shift 
them later into larger pots, or to sot 
them out in the open ground until fall 
and then take them up? Does cow 
manure water help the growth of these 
plants? C. D.— Mo. 



You will get the finest Jerusalem cher- 
ries if you plant them outdoors in full 
sunshine, dig them up and pot them in 
earlv fall, then shade and spray them 
until established. Pot-grown plants 
nip .Tlways much smaller. If, however, 



you prefer to grow them in that way, 
plunge the pots to their brims outdoors 
and be sure to have water convenient. 
The pompon chrysanthemums would 
give best returns if planted in the 
benches, but do not need shade except, 
possibly, when the flowers are opening, 
in order to prevent burning. C. W. 



C0LX7MBUS, O. 



Thousands of people thronged the 
Archeological museum at Ohio State 
University Saturday afternoon and eve- 
ning, May 27, to view the display at the 
fifth annual rose show of the Columbus 
Horticultural Society. It was pro- 
nounced the most successful show ever 
held by the society, with a greater num- 
ber of flowers on display than in any 
previous show and a larger number of 
exhibitors represented. The fine quality 
of the roses was particularly noticeable 
this year, as compared with the 1921 
show, when blooms were not up to 
standard, because of damage due to late 
frosts. The show was open all day Sun- 
day, May 28, from morning to night. 

McKellar's Flower Shop has a new 
Dodge truck, which proves a great help. 
This company now has two Dodge ma- 
chines for delivery purposes. James 
McKellar motored to Chillicothe, Mo., 
Memorial day. Mr. and Mrs. Thompson, 
of the same company, motored to 
Marion, O., the same day. 

Rudolph Zisch has withdrawn from 
the firm of Zisch & Dozer. J. Dozer is 
now running the place by himself. 

Memorial day business was good here, 
but so far no large weddings have been 
announced for June. J. W. T. 



OBITUARY 



Philip Fflasterer. 

Funeral services for Philip Pflasterer, 
prominent florist of Winchester, Ind., 
who died May 13, after a lingering ill- 
ness, were conducted at his late home, 
on East Washington street. May 16. 
Burial was made in Fountain Park 
cemetery. 

Mr. Pflasterer was born in Germany 
and came to the United States when a 
boy 10 years old. He was 81 at his 
death. Besides the widow he is sur- 
vived by one daughter, Mrs. Emma 
Pfifer, and two sons, William and Henry 
Pflasterer, all of Winchester, Ind. 

William H. Hilton. 

William H. Hilton, for many years in 
the retail florists' business on the south 
side in Chicago, died June 6 at his home, 
5319 Blackstone avenue in that city, 
from cancer of the stomach. Mr. Hil- 
ton, who was about 55 years of age, 
opened his first store on Fifty-third 
street in 1892. Later he operated two 
flower and candy stores on Sixty-third 
street, but after fourteen years at 1320 
East Sixty-third street he found it de- 
sirable to sell his lease there and cen- 
tralize his activities on East Fifty-third 
street near Jefferson avenue. This was 
in 1912. About two years ago he sold 
out and went to Florida to deal in land. 
Failing strength sent him back to Chi- 
cago about three weeks ago and he en- 
tered Mercy hospital for treatment. Mr. 
Hilton leaves a widow and a daughter. 
The funeral was held Thursday, June 8. 
Burial was at Forest Home. 



Junk 8, 1922 



The Florists^ Review 



25 




HEBBACEOUS FEBENNIALS. 



June, the Montli of Glory. 

June is the month of glory in the 
hardy flower garden. A wealtli of beau- 
tiful perennials are always in bloom 
at this season, such as delphiniums, 
aquilegias, lupinus, dictamnus, dian- 
thus, peonies, lieucheras, violas, cam- 
panulas, spiraeas, gypsophilas, linums, 
irises, potentillas, hemeroeallis, digi- 
talis, anchusas, armerias, coreopsis, 
geums, dicentras, Oenotheras, erigerons, 
pentstemons, polemoniums, stokesias 
and centaureas. 

There is opportunity for much greater 
culture of the class of plants known 
best as hardy border flowers. These 
can be started in coldframes, the more 
tender ones wintered in them, and the 
great majority grown in the open field 
all the time. In well drained land few 
will winter-kill, especially if a mulch 
of some kind is applied after the ground 
freezes. It is well to warn against 
heavy winter coverings; all that is 
needed is merely sufficient to cover the 
plants, to keep frost in and prevent 
the soil from heaving in later winter. 

Culture of Perennials. 

There could be no better time than 
the present for the average country 
florist to sow the more popular, showy 
and useful varieties of herbaceous per- 
ennials. A coldframe with some light 
soil, preferably one containing consid- 
erable leaf-mold, is the ideal place to 
start these seeds. It is best to sow in 
rows rather than broadcast. These rows 
need not be over six inches apart and 
the seeds must be covered lightly. With 
fine seeds a little dusting of fine sand 
is all that is needed. Make a nice, 
smooth surface, and water through a 
fine rose to prevent any danger of 
washing. Use some cheesecloth over the 
sashes or, better still, lath shades, un- 
til the seeds germinate; then the sashes 
can be removed. As soon as the seed- 
lings start to grow, scratch between the 
rows and pull out the weeds carefully. 
Some perennials will germinate within 
a week, others not for two or three 
months. 

Transplanting Seedlings. 

With the large proportion of peren- 
nial seedlings it is a much safer plan 
to transplant into frames when they are 
of sufficient size to handle and, if they 
are kept carefully watered, few will 
fail to grow. A little later, when the 
ground is in a suitable condition, these 
can be transplanted to the field with a 
minimum of loss. If taken from the 
seed rows and put directly outdoors, the 
chances are against many of the seed- 
linics growing unless we chance to get 
cool, cloudy and showery conditions to 
give them a good start. 

Delphiniums. 

Delphiniums always rank deservedly 
high among perennials. Their stately 



habit, glorious range of colors and com- 
parative ease of culture, to say nothing 
of their long flowering season, are all 
strong points in their favor. D. Bella- 
donna is unquestionably the king of the 
family. The prevailing color is sky 
blue, but a few will come of a darker 
shade. The flowers are more thinly 
scattered on the stalks than those of 
the formosum type and are more 
branched, giving them a much more 
airy and graceful appearance. Until a 
few years ago propagation of D. Bella- 
donna was by root division only. Seeds 
have been offered, however, which come 
true to type. There is no hardy peren- 
nial in the whole calendar so valuable 
to the florist for cutting as this beauti- 
ful larkspur. 

There are many other handsome del- 
phiniums, such as formosum, deep blue; 
formosum coelestinum, pale blue; Moer- 
heimii, pure white; King of Delphin- 
iums, gentian blue, and Queen Wil- 



helmina, soft blue. A splendid selec- 
tion may, however, be had by sowing 
a mixed packet of hybrid delphiniums. 
Many of the seedlings will be equal 
in quality to the best named hybrids. 
It is worthy of note that delphiniums 
are adaptable to gentle forcing and 
bring satisfactory market prices when 
flowered a few weeks in advance of the 
outdoor crop. A convenient way to 
handle these is to dig up field clumps 
in late fall, plant in boxes, leave out- 
doors until they have had one or two 
moderate freezings, keep them in cold- 
frames until the end of February and 
then place them in a temperature of 45 
degrees at night. 

Digitalis. 

There is no more stately border flower 
in June than the foxglove, or digitalis, 
and this is a reminder that no time must 
be lost in sowing seeds, if plants of 
blooming size for next year are wanted. 
Ivory's spotted and gloxiniaflora are 
the best varieties to sow. The seed is 
fine, germinates and grows rapidly and 
care should be taken to sow thinly. 
Protect from heavy rains while the seed- 
lings are small, in order to prevent 
damping off. The foxgloves are effect- 
ive in solid beds, but look specially well 
in masses in the herbaceous border and 
are at their best just in front of a belt 
of shrubbery. They enjoy partial shade, 
and in their wild state are found grow- 
ing in woodlands. 




HOT SHOTS FBOM MISS JABVIS. 

Able propagandist as she is, Miss 
Anna Jarvis was tardy in her rebuttal 
of florists' publicity for this Mothers' 
day, for not until May 27 did the letter 
quoted below appear in the Chicago 
Daily News. It was then tucked away 
on an inside page in a column of read- 
ers' views and aroused no interest save 
from florists who chanced to read it. 

Miss Jarvis is too extravagant in her 
statements to gain much attention from 
newspaper editors today. They can see 
too well that Mothers' day is larger 
than the association bearing its name, 
that the day now belongs to mothers 
everywhere and not to Miss Jarvis. 

Florists are willing to let her talk, 
for much publicity is gained for the 
day thereby. And publicity is public- 
ity, as the eminent public man knew 
who said, "I don't care what the news- 
papers say about me, so long as they 
say something." And if, as Miss Jar- 
vis says. Mothers' day business is on 
the slump, florists would like some other 
occasions to go on a similar slump, so 
that they might do business in the pro- 
portions they did May 14. "The hand- 
writing on the wall for the last three 
years," concerning which Miss Jarvis 
speaks, must have been in Latin, read- 
ing, "Veni, vidi, vici!" and not the 
Hebrew that she thought, "Mcne, mcne, 
tekel, upharsini " 

Here is Miss Jarvis 's letter to the 
Chicago Daily News: 

MOTHERS' DAY AND B'LORIST.S. 

In the Daily News of Mny 13, pace 3. there 
appears n "Mothers' day" article. One of the 
Btibheadingg of this article says: "No special 
flower needed." 

The white carnation is the only emblematic 



desiKH ever used for Mothers' day. This flower 
was chosen as the Mothers' day flower and 
emblem for many reasons and only after thought- 
ful consideration. 

Many attempts have been made by some trades- 
men to change the Mothers' day emblem for 
their trade advantage. It is felt such attempts 
should not have the support of the press or 
public, as in no way have these profiteers any 
right to name a Mothers' day emblem or any 
other feature of Mothers' day worlt. 

An especially designed button-badge has been 
adopted by Mothers' day leaders of the Mothers' 
Day International Association of Philadelphia for 
use on Mothers' day. This badge has the asso- 
ciation's name, that of its founder, and the 
white carnation on it. It is now the only thing 
worn on Mothers' day by its friends and none 
other should he used. 

The necessity for discussion as to scarcity of 
flowers, or use of "any flower," or the puerile 
slogan of florists of "a red flower for the living 
and a white flower for the dead," is past, if it 
ever existed. Flowers are dropped entirely for 
Mothers' day, and in the future their wearing 
has not nn.v significance as to this celebration. 
Wherever the official Mothers' day badge has 
been used it has been appreciated and liked. 
Further, commercialism has been cut out and 
flowers are normal in price, if not a drug on 
the market. 

Never in the history of their business did 
florists si>end so much money and do so much 
planning as they did to keep their grip on the 
Slothers' day just passed. For months in ad- 
vance of Mothers' day they held meetings here 
and there in different cities, hut Mothers' day 
business for them is on the slump. Tliey have 
seen the handwriting on the wall for the last 
three years. 

The poster got out In the name of the American 
Ix>gion and auxiliary, with their insignia on it, 
and liaving all of the appearance of an official 
affair issuing from the American Legion head- 
quarters, was the result of an agreement be- 
tween these organizations and the Chicago rep- 
resentative of the Society of American Florists. 

The poster was not a legion poster, but an 
advertisement, camouflaged through tlie legion's 
name. The poster was put in pai>ers as an ad- 
vertisement and paid for by florists. 

When any facts about Mothers' day are de- 
sired they may be had of the founder of Mothers' 
day. Miss Anna ,Tarvis, Philadelphia, or other 
Mothers' day leaders. 

The white carnation onl.v is the Mothers' day 
emblem. 

The Mothers' day official badge Is the only 
liadgc now worn by Mothers' day friends. 

Mothers' Day International Association, 

Philadelphia, Pa. 



.. V ' . , t.», . - „ F.' 



■'■-•<■,, A!^'"- ■■ ■• 



' 'rZ vcT."' ■ ~ '\ 



26 



The Florists' Review 



JrNB 8. 1»22 




n 



Eatabllsbed 1897. 
Jbya. L Grant. 

Pabliahed every Thursday by 
The Florists' Publishing Co., 

600-S60 Oazton Bulldlnfr, 

BOe Sontb Doarborn St., Ohlcagro. 

TeL, Wabash 8196. 

ReKlstered cable address, 

Floryiew, Otilcago. 

Entered as second class matter 
Dec. 3. 1897. at the poet-omce at Ohl- 
cago. 111., under the Act of March 
8. 1879. 

Subscription price, t2.00 a year. 
To Canada, $3.00; to Europe. 14.00. 

Advertising rates quoted on 
request. Only strictly trade ad- 
vertising accepted. 



(1 



RESULTS. 

"\Vc give them. You get them. 

We both liave them. 

The second iiistiillmont of your income 
tax is due next week, June 15. 

Have you .seen the S. A. F. publicity 
committee's advertisements in the current 
magazines? 

June brides of former years celebrate 
their wedding anniversaries this month. 
Therein lies a large jiotential demand for 
llowers. 

"The iiassage of the tariff bill is in 
sight," says a Washington dispatch, "be- 
ing only two months away." Congress 
will have to liurry to catch the autumn 
bulb shipments. 

The i-ost of growing flowers lias de- 
crea.sed less than manufacturing expense 
in most other lines. Any means of more 
economical i)roduction or any means of 
increasing ]ir()(luction without adding to 
expense will be welcomed in view of the 
jiublic's demand for lower prices. 

T)l(iE.sT.s of conditions in various trades 
contain iiiany indications of business ac- 
celeration. \ot much nuuiuMitum will be 
gathered before the liot weather, but 
autumn should bring .-i more favorable 
situation for the florists as a wiiole tiian 
they have had for eighteen months. 

Do you try to sell your customers seeds 
and ]plants for their liome grounds at this 
season .' There are two jirofits for you in 
such Inisincss; first, wlien the sale is 
made, .•iiul sccoml, when the customer, u.sed 
to flowers ;it honu' all sunnner, buys them 
from you to brighten tlie house in winter. 

Following the example, within tlie la.st 
year, of the American Gladiolus Society 
and the F. T. I)., the American Peony 
Society will cross the northern border to 
hold its animal ini'etiug this nuuitli. It will 
be held at London, (^nt., June ]fi ami 17. 
and jircparatious are being made for a 
spli'iidid ^lidw and yatheiing. 

Time.'< fa\(ir the ojiening of new retail 
stores: Vacant stores are sufliciently 
numerous so that coiu'essioiis in rent are 
niiiile; h(d|i is easily oljtained and at low 
wages, aii(l jiersons previously engaged in 
other occupations are now casting about 
for means to a livelihood. It is again 
jiossihle for persons of small (\ai)ital to 
embark in the rct;iil llower business — and 
uian\' ;n-e doiut.' .-o. 



We thought the war was over! But 
instead of Garfield's fuel administration 
we have Hoover 's fair prices — another 
change of party without change of policy. 

Have you noted how florists are pur- 
chasing land adjoining their greenhouses 
in order to grow outdoor flowers? They 
add variety to the offerings in summer, 
which is ceasing to be an unprofitable 
season for the trade. 

Already the Kansas City convention 
of the S. A. F., August 15 to 17, promises 
to be a record-breaker. Those who exhibit 
at such gatherings are anxious to show 
their wares to the trade west of the Mis- 
sissippi, who are planning to attend in 
large numbers. 

Times have changed; credit must be 
refused where payment no longer is 
jtrompt. The florist who permits his ac- 
counts receivable to run up faster than 
his sales increase is courting disaster. 
Success lies not in making sales, but in 
collecting for them. 

The increa.se of apartment house and 
hotel dwellers in the larger cities and 
the inclusion of areas where the wild 
flowers bloom in forest preserves and 
parks are two of the factors which are 
making the urban florists' summer busi- 
ness larger each year. 

Australia now prohibits, under quar- 
antine, certain plants and seeds, prin- 
cipally among them pear pips from this 
country, on account o