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Full text of "Beaver Valley labor news [microform]"

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WORK 

SLEEP 

RELAXATION 

HOURS ■^■HBBHBIB 
A SEASONABLE DEMAND 



OffWal Orgu ^tetml Ukir Uataa 



BFJi VER 



LABOR 



VOLUME 1. NO. 50. 



I AM THOROUGHLY IN ACCORD 



viith the movement to 
horn's a da.v at liard. c 
day's wttik. '■■■ * This 
nnt churaftcM-. Tlie cigrlil 



CENTRAL LABOR UNION 
IN REGULAR SESSION 



.aunction Park Selected as Place 

to Hold Annual Labor Day 

Celebration. 



OFFICERS INSTALLED; 

REPORTS RECEIVED 



A rcRular meeting of the Central 
Labor Union was held on Monday 
evening, in the rooms of the orjfani- 
zation, in Eaj^le's Hall, New Brighton, 
m considerable amount of business be- 
ing transacted and the recently elect- 
ed offirers installed. 

Chiirman Kross of the committee 
appointed to select a place for the 
holdinK of the annual I.abor Day cele- 
bration, reported on the matter and, 
upon vote of those present, Junction 
Park was chosen, and the celebration 
will accordingly be held at this popu- 
lar resort. A lenpthy discussion took 
place before the place was finally se- 
lected, as other resorts were also un- 
der cojisideration. 

Reports of the Auditors and Trus- 
tees were received and ordered filed, 
and communications from the Phila- 
delphia Typographical Union, which 
organization re<|uested that the Sec- 
retary advise them relative to ineetinp 
dates of the Central IJody, as well as 
the time and place of meeting, and 
from the Liberty L.eaguc, were read 
and will be attended to by Secretary 
Kross. 

J. D. McKenna filed a supplemental 

report in relation to the Pennsylvania 

hatte Federation Convention at Bea- 

i^nr Falls, it bein? shovi'n that vith a 

.number of donations received, the 

committee came out about even. 

Ludwig: Weissbart, of Pittsburgh, 
organizer of the Bakers' Unioij, was 
■Mated as a fraternal delegate and 
made a brief and convincing address. 

The following officers, elected to 
••erve during the ensuinf^ term, were 
installed: 

President, L. A. McDanel; vice 
president, J. D. McKcnna; secretary, 
R. F. Kross; treasurer, \V. H. Byers; 
largeant at arms, H. Thum; trustee, 
H. Grimshaw; executive committee, 
Charles Huff, W. H. Byers, J. D. :Mc- 
Kenna, Ralph Douf?las. W. H. MofTett. 

All delegates present reported a 
most satisfactor}' state of affairs in- 
sofar as work was concerned, with the 
one exception of a decided scarcity of 
labor. It is apparently impossible for 
manufacturers to secure additional 
help. 



CARPENTERS' LOCAL 
1333 HOLDS MEETING 



Takes in Several New Members and 

Transacts Routine Business. 

Strike Settled. 



At a meeting of Carpenters' Local 
>Io. 1033, held at Monaca Tuesday 
eveningr, three new members were ini- 
tiated; O. D. Buffington, who has been 
an apprentice, and H. D. Hunter, of 
Beaver, and Harry B. Buckwalter, of 
Woodlawn. Geor^ Rodon, of Local 
828, East Liverpool, was taken in on 
a clearance card. The resignation of 
S. S. Bowser as recording secretary, 
was received and accepted, C. W. Reed 
beins elected to the vacancy. J. A. 
Krqnk Dvas elected a delegate to the 
Benieral Convention, to be held in Fort 
Worth, Txas, in September. O. F. 
Gaolt was elected alternate. 

The strike at the plant of the Col- 
ons Manofacturing Company was set- 
tled Tuesday, a compromise havfaig 
been effected between the men and 
the company, the former returning to 
work. 



EIG0URA6IN6 REPORTS 



Menfibers of the Hone Nail Work- 
en' Local met in regular session on 
Monday erening, in Elagle's Hall, New 
Brighton. Then was a good attend- 
ance present and many nwtters of 
rotttbe character were disposed of. 
A report of trade conditions was very 
«ieonraging, adi members reporting 
busJBisi as exceptionally good. The 
only eompUdnt receiinBd «t this meet- 
ing was that a d«>sr*^h of lubbr exist- 
ed, which, it seemii Is a general oon- 
4itiai at the piMmt tinw. 



UNION MEN INyiTEO 



All union men in Beaver valley arc 
extended a cordial invitation to at- 
tend the cel^monies incidental to the 
laying of the cornerstone of the new 
Baptist Church, at Rochester, which 
will be held on Sunday afternoon, July 
2:5rd, at three o'clock. H. C. Gleiss, 
secretary of the Pittsburgh Haptist 
Association, wiU be the principal 
speaker, and an interesting^ program 
has been arranged. 



UBOR DAY PROGRAM 
AT JUNCTION PARK 



Central Labor I'nion .SeleclH I.«cation 

and Committee Will I'repare 

Program. 



.Monday, .September 4lh, will be a 
prcat day for Union Labor in Heaver 
Valley. Labor Day will be cclobrate«l 
by the mcinbors of unions throughout 
the valley gathering at Junction Park, 
and the conmiittee on arranpements, 
consisting of li. F. Kross, J. I). Mc- 
Kenna, O. Molter, Charles Huff and 
\V. H. Byers, is busily engajjed in 
preparing a program vshich will meet 
with the approval of the many per- 
sons who are sure to attend. 

Manager Shetteriy has lieen exceed- 
ingly aocommodatinir nl«*.tiT« to 14:: 
tractions for the big day, and stands 
ready to do everything in his poiver 
to make the day a big success. He is 
at present negotiating with several 
carnival companies of the better class, 
and will have one of them for the day. 

As- soon as the coiiiinittee on ar- 
rangements concludes its work on the 
program, it will be published in full 
in The Labor News. 



ORGANIZER IN VULLEY 



M. H. Nolan, vice president of the 
Bricklayers and Masons' International 
Union of America, is in the valley, 
and in company with Business Agent 
S. S. Bowser, is making an effort to 
unionize the work on the plant of the 
Asbestos Protected Metal Co., at Am- 
birdge, which company is employing 
non-union carpenters in the erection 
of a large plant addition. An effort 
will also be made to unionize the 
workers employed by Wallace & Car- 
ley in construction work at Woodlawn, 
non-union labor being used exclusive- 
ly by them in their work locally, at 
the present time. Several other non- 
union jobs in the valley will be looked 
over and the probabilities are that 
several of them will '*conie clean" be- 
fore very long. 



PRAISES VALLEY INDUSTRY 



William O'Lander, of Chicago, head 
stockman for the M. Bom Tailoring 
Company, was a guest Wednesday of 
Manager C. C. Shetteriy, of Junction 
Park. Mr. O'Lander stated to a La- 
bor News representative that he was 
greatly impressed by the evidence of 
industrial activity shown throughout 
the towns in the valley and declared 
that although his work took him over 
many states, that he never saw busi- 
ness so good as it was in the valley. 
Incidentally, he took occasion to pay 
<^ (^Bpliment to the Traction Com- 
pafffr^or their up-to-date service, and 
to Manager Shetteriy for his able 
handling of Junction Park. 




UKA'-KH FA., rRIDAlf JDIT 




mUBS II SESSION 



A ngnlir Matting <rf Intematianal 
MoMert' Vmim No. 219, wu held on 
If enday •fmfaic in Rochester, an ia- 
tareating nartna resulting. George 
KUngelharfar wm reported off tiie 
liek lilt and kNuinesa in both ihopa 
was i t | Kit »<l good. Harry Aadaraon 
was ptaead «a the diaability liat, anf- 
fariag ftma a walded foot. 

The oollocik for the soeoeaa of tiie 
P itUfcui gh atiike waa reported to^be 
hrlfffater, wbik the membership of Lo- 
eal 46 are patting -op a grand fight 
for the ei|^t-hour day, with exosllent 
proapects of being succeaafol. 



BEAVER FALLS MAN 
FmiN6LY HONORED 



Adam Kiaja, 



ited 



Velenui Otoaawerker 

«f No. S8, Pre- 
With Watch. 



RcNih-iiig Ei^ecutivc Ifeair br<)M J*mirk^ ^ikHtiHAlt «Mara* 
Union, Wa£ -a Former Rochester Boy. 

"Am I My Brother's Keeper?" 



( lly (le«)i|;»' A. Howe) 



j**.^>. 



NOVEL BASEBALL GAME 



The Rochester baseball team will 
meet the famoils ladies' team on Sat- 
urday afternoon at 3 o'clock on the 
Rochester grounds. This game will 
prove a novelty to local fans, and will 
also be interesting from the stand- 
point of skillful playing, as the female 
team is a ftrst-clasa one, and has a 
record of numerous victories gained 
over regular teams. 



The Olive Stove Worin. Rochester; 
' tions Maaoay, f<4Iow- 

Ing ^^^BMks' vaestion, sUI employ- 
ea n^^^^Hor work. 




This (lucstj-on is iiiiswered by ti'<" 
action of l,o(l(;r No. ■:I''< of llir llm- 
th«'rhoc)(i of lliiilroad Tminnie-n. 

Frcpcloin 1 .(kIlcc N'u. .'12' s of the 
MrothcrhoiKl of Hailiojid Trninnicn 
probably iUk'S luore for its niciulnr.K 
{!i;in any other orpriiiiization in tho 
L'nitod Stato-s. A IJelicf Coniinittpc" 
is nutintained. il consists of th«' I'rcsi- 
(Icnt, Nice I'rosidont aiul Tr«asuicr. 
When a brollier is ill .injured or ovrr- 
taken by mi.s fortune, the lieliof Com- 
iiiitlee immediately culls u|»on him 
and a.sccrtairi.s his wants jind oxtcnds 
the nrct's.sary relief until \.iv' rext 
rneolinK of the I-o(Ik-«, when Lhcir ac- 
tion i.s ropailcil witii their rcroin- 
iiiendations for furt licr tiiiaiicial a.s- 
.sistancc, and n(»vf>r in the history of 
t!io Lodjrc have th«~'y criticised the 
action or rofuscil tho icc-oniniciidalions 
of tho llflief CoMiinitleo. The L«)<|jr«< 
has. no stipulat«'fl amount a~; rrHicf, 
tltny trivo just what is ncedr-d, \tc il 
lar^i or small. I recall one member 
\\ bo loccivrvl .S4O0 in just four ^•epk.'^. 
.Many wlio were paid ;»t the rate of 
sixty dollars per week for a [period of 
two or niorf uooks oiich. Xlierr is 
absolutely no limit to their benevo- 
lence. 

The Lodpc look.s after visitinjf 
mcml>ers of other LcdR-es of t,hp bro- 
therhood. When a visiting member 
conies to Freedom to look for a posi- 
tion, he is taken care of at ttic hotel, 
and hi.s expenses paid by the Lodire. 
The fraternal spirit cannot be cx- 
ce.led. 



LOCAL BRANCH NO. S5 
STREETC/tRMENNEET 



The expon.sos of the l.odjre for a 
m rith are about $?.'>, whith inclu<lo of- 
liors' .sahiries, hall rent, postage and 
.stjitionery. To pay this the Lodge 
ivt'.ives from its member.'^, .V)c two 
int'iiths out of three, and the third 
in«'Hth, 2f»c. Its financial .standinir is 
>ro"d, having J500 on a savinirs d«'- 
pcsit at the First .National Hank. 
I' riedom, $500 on savings deposit at 
th« First National Hank, Koche.fter, 
and does it.s checking account through 
th : Peoples National Hank, Kochestf r. 

When one who has kept a closo 
witch on the many thinjcs done in the 
years past, and then hxiks at the i^ocxi 
fiTiiincial standing of the Lodjre, Im 
kiKi.vs that it is gcMxl management 
and nothing else. The offirrr^ of 
Ix)ii:c No. ^2^., each and every onf^ of 
th<i, is the best that could po.ssibly 
be selected. When you point Ui a 
godl officer of a fraternal order or 
lalnr organization, don't for^rel to 
co.'iiniend the members wliosr judge - 
ineiA put him there. There an? iiuiny 
goo! men to fill ofTires, but, unless 
thei'* are a number of other good men 
in iiie organization who car recognize 
the ability of the best, and elect them, 
«tho job is wanting. Therefore, we, 
tJK members of .123, recognize the 
ability of our officers, and' feel that 
orr officers appreciate the true Kup- 
port that is our constant endeavor to 
g.»«e them. That is the real secret 
t^at haa made it possible for .'^23 to 
do what it has done, and still be in 
good financial condition. 



MOIACA BATHIN6 BEACH 



p 

The regular meet inif of Eetaver Val- 
ley Hranch, of Local 86, Street and 
Electric Railway employes, xk&s held 
in Hank Hall, !^e\v lirighton, on Wed- 
nesday evening. TTic early meeting 
was held a 7:30 and the late meeting 
at 1:.30 Thursday morning. 

The early meetinK wajfi presided 
over by President V. H. Brigga, the 
attendance being fair, but there wau 
ample room for many more. Routine 
business was disposed of and adjourn- 
ment taken on account of the heat. 

Before the meetinir was called to 
order President Brijgs vrm taken to 
task for being 15 minutes late, biit he 
explained nnatten by Btatingr that he 
was at home lookins for a collar btxt- 
( Continued on Pa^pa Four). 



CaUed f or the PnrpoM if TkUiir 
Action on Miduurfe of 

Two 



CASE NOW IN HAMDS OF 
GRIEVANCE COBIBflTTBE 



r 



Adam Kxmua, of Beaver Falla, irtt- 
eran plaia vorker and momhar ct 
Local Union No. 38, Amerieaii Flint 
GUaa Workera* Union, waa hcnond 
during tha raeant annual comraatiflB 
of slaM iPiriHn* held at TMth. OOrf 
Wh^m^mM. on bdudf of - *~ 
«Jak ;atM»Mnlt • trold v^^tch 

the presentation speech being made 
by President Thomas W. Rowe. Mr. 
Kraus for 24 years has been employed 
in the Co-oper:itive Glass Company's 
plant at Heaver Falls, coming here 
from Pittsburifh. 

The fact that Mr. Kraus is 72 years 
of age and wu.s the oldest delegate at 
tho Tiffin convention, was the cause 
of his being so signally honored. He 
is also a veteran of the Civil War, 
having been a member of (-ompany A, 
10r>th Pennsylvania Infantry. His war 
record shows that he took part in the 
famous buttles of Hull Run and (Jet- 
tysbur^, and that he enlisted upon 
two difTerent occasions. The rtrst time 
he felt the call of his country was 
when he was under age, and upon the 
refusal of his parents to allow him 
to enlist, he proceeded to run away, 
succeede<l in Kitting into the com- 
pany. After a brief service his par- 
ents discovered his whereabouts and 
he was discl)arKed and taken home. A 
few years later, after reaching the 
proper aj(f* limit he again enli.<ite<l and 
.served with conspicuous gallantry. He 
is a member of the Heaver Kails (I. 
A. U. Post, and despite his years, is 
on the job at the ^rlass works every 
day. 



It has haen generally undenrtood 
among railroad employes that the 
member of any labor organisation 
who took an active part in trying to 
better thair working eondltions waa 
anre to meat with diacrimmation at 
the handa of the officials in charge. 

It ia understood that the maating 
of Lodge No. 828, held on Tueadajr 
evening, waa called specially for tfaa 
purpoae of taUng action on the dia- 
charge of two of ita active membera, 
and the rank injustice meted out to 
two ottier men, who were diaeiplined 
to the extent of 30 daya for the same 
alleged offenae. 

From all iiidicationa the officiala 
who handed down thia decision have 
paved the way for a great victory ia 
the eight hour and time and one-hadf 
daomnd of the four Brotheriiooda, be- 
ennae men who have aUyed with the 
eompany in the event of a atrika, will 
now aoreljr atrika without any ques- 
tion, after aeaing the tr e a tment «^ 
oahmd by fhaaa nmh whoae raeo^ I 
have never baan qnaationed. I 

GanMal (laiirmMi C. B. CarltoAf 

of the Brotherhood «f RailiMd TnUf 

man for theFamylvaaia Unaa 

Waat . of Ftttabnii^ waa ynaaat at 

•lid tM «f lOnaii iMU 

. _ . - ^ MJt^w^ttf 
>{« nr Y *'!^*-|iS' *?*••> ' 

would comply with the law ef the or< 
ganization, that the Brotherhood in 
genera] would support theee four 
brothers to the limit, which statement 
was received with great applause. The 
case is now in the hands of the griev- 
ance committee, and it is the inten- 
tion of the nwmbership to see that it 
goes the limit. 




EX-PRES. T. W. ROWE 
PAID K HIGH TRIBUTE 



-T. 



TOWNSEND STRIKERS 
ISSUE A STATEMENT 



.Ssy That Their I'nion Has Committee 

to Deal With Company and 

Adviseti Members. 



That the Monaca Aquatic Club 
bathing meach, at Monaca. is a greskl 
attraction to hundreds of bathers, ag 
well as apeetators, will be discovered 
by anybody who cares to pay a visit 
to the haach between the hours of 
6:30 and 9 o'clock any evening. The 
obvfiver will find the end of the 
bif brid|e lined with spectators and 
■ee llnaiAeda of bathers disportinif 
thoasselvfS m the water below. The 
Aijiaitic Club has erected a new bath 
ho'«fia, vi^ieh, while not large, ii 
aia^y Buftaient to care for the bath- 
en}* life ffunada are on the job, ready 
forv'ork ahould the occasion demand; 
F. M. Haya ia ^ officer on the 
SrodlidB and aaes that no profane laa- 
ar' vulgarity ia permitted, and 
Clib eomnittea, ¥f. W. 
Qaoiie Lay aad Olitaa Kaa- 



the 
Fol 
choi 






President Thomas W. Rowe, execu- 
tive head of the American Flint Glass 
Workers' Union, and a former Itoch- 
ester Doy, was paid a high tribute at 
the fortieth annual convention of the 
A. F. G. ^V. U., held at Tiffin, Ohio, 
the week of July 3rd. George Dough- 
erty, general superintendent of the 
United States Glass Co.'s plant, at 
Tiffm, 0.. delivered the compliment- 
ary remarks relative to Mr. Rowe's 
character, and stated that he was 
much impressed by the general fair- 
ness of the policy of the organization. 

Replying to the remarks, Mr. Rowe 
stated that his first commission as a 
Flint delegate was from Tiffin to the 
Raltinnore convention in 1890, and 
that the convention was in the nature 
of a home-coming to him. Regarding 
the announcement if his retirement as 
president of the Flints, Mr. Rowe 
stated that his decision waa final, and 
that he would, under no circumstan- 
ces, be a candidate for the office. "It 
is not a queation of a higher salary 
with me," laid Mr. Rowe, "and no in- 
ducement along that line will cause 
me to alter my deciaion to retire.'* 



Andy Keyaer and Frank Manyon, 
of Beaver Falla, membera of Local 
Union No. 88 ,A. F. G. W. U., return- 
ed Sunday from a trip to Tiffhi, Ohio, 
where ^hay attended the big conven- 
tion of glaia workara in that city. 



At a regular meeting of the mem- 
bers of Federal Union No. 14!>!»4, A. 
F. of L., held at the head(|uarter8 ot 
tho orjcanizution in the Kramer Hlock, 
.Now. Hrighton, on Thursday, July 
I'ith, it wa.*! decided, in view of the 
fact that the Townsend Company are 
alleged to bo sending our letters to 
memlK-rs of the union rc<|uesting 
them to rotum to work, to make a 
statcmont «)n liehalf of the organiza- 
tion, as follows: 

"Wo, tho meml)ers of Local 14094, 
A. F. of 1... wish to advise all mem- 
bers of tho Local to the effect that 
their Local has a Committee to trans- 
act business on l>ehalf of the members 
and that if the Townsend Company 
desires to meet members of the Local 
to clear up, what the Company terms 
is a 'misunderstanding,' that said 
Company should meet with the Com- 
mittee in question and not endeavor 
to arrange matters with the individ- 
uals. 

"Insofar as a 'misunderstanding' is 
concerned, as the Company alleges,we 
do not know of any 'misunderstand- 
ing' on the part of members of our 
organization. Signed, 

A. D. THOMPSON, 
. T. A. BENNETT, 

R. H. FINCH< Committee. 
GEORGE SEIBOLD. Pros. 

The following officers have been in- 
stalled, and will serve during the en- 
suing term: 

President, George Seibold; vice 
president, William Carey; secretary- 
treasurer, Mark Ford; recording sec- 
retary, R. H. Finch; conductor, S. H. 
Barton; guard, J. D. Javena. 

On Thursday evening, July 27th, at< 
eight o'clock, there will he a meeting 
of the local in the Kramer Black, New 
Brighton, which all members are ear- 
nestly rH|iieBted to attend, as there la 
a big aurprise in store for membera, 
according to officiala of the LocaL 



In order to remodel ona of tha fnr- 
naoaa, tha plant of the Go-Oparathra 
Flint GHaaa Company, at Baaver Falla, 
will eloaa down on tha S9th of 3vlj 
for a pfiriod of thiea wfak%, 



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BlATfll VALLEY LABOR NEWS 



OME TAX FRAUDS 
DEPLETE U. S. TREASURY 



Over $300,000,000 of Country's 

Revenues Stolen Last Year 

Through Fraud. 



FORMER DIRECTOR U. S. 
COMMISSION EXPOSES IT 



The following article, relative to in- 
come tax frauds and evasions, written 
by Basil M. Manley,' former dire«tor 
of the United States Commission on 
Industrial Relations, should prove of 
interest to the members of every 
Union in the Beaver Valley, and it is 
to be hoped that the suRKestions made 
by Mr. Manley in regard to the Un- 
ions adopting resolutions on the same, 
and writing to United States Sena- 
tors in this district, urging them to 
support an amendment to the income 
tax law, providing for complete pub- 
licity of the income taxc returns, will 
be carried out: 

Three hundred million dollars of 
your country's revenues were stolen 
last year through income tax frauds 
and evasions, involving thousands of 
wealthy citizens and thousands of the 
most profitable American corpora- 
tions. 

The published evidence shows in one 
case alone— that of L. V. Harkness, 
one of the Standard Oil magnates- 
evasions involvi'np in taxes and penal- 
ties more than one million dollars. 
The evidence shows that the Rocke- 
feller foundation is a device created 
by John D. Rockefeller to escape tax- 
ation on more than Ave million dol- 
lars of his unnual income. 

You have a direct interest in stop- 
ping these frauds, not only as a mat- 
ter of justice in the equal enforcement 
of the laws, but also because if these 
millions are not collected from the tax 

ieves. the people — you — will have to 

additional taxes at the rate of 

dollars for every American 

ly! ' 

of these uncontrQverted facts, 
were uncovered in an investi- 
'iHlkm made by me for the Newspaper 
IfallUiiltii Aisociation, have been be- 
for more than two 
tha Treasury 



All 



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loo 



hasl 



iiing and directing the holding of m 
public election in said Borough of M(y- 
naca, for the purpose of obtaining 
the assent of the electors of said bor- 
ough to the increase of the indebted- 
ness thereof as a/oresaid, and fixing 
the time and place for and providing 
for the holding 0/ said election. 

Be it enacted and ordained by 
the Town Council of the Borough of 
Monaca. and it is hereby enacted and 
ordained by authority of the same: 

Section 1. That the said Tow» 
Council hereby declare and signify 
their desire that the indebtedness of 
the said Borough of Monaca be in- 
creased in the sum of Forty-oa« 
Thousand Dollars ($41,000), in the 
manner provided for by the Act of 
Assembly of the Commonwealth of 
Pennsylvania, entitled, "An Act to 
regulate the manner of increasing: the 
indebtedness of municipalities, to pro- 
vide for the redemption of the same, 
and to impose penalties for the illegal 
increase thereof," approved April 20, 
1874, and the several supplements 
and amendments thereto^ and all 
other laws of the Commonwealth of 
Pennsylvania relating thereto, for the 
following purposes, vii.: *. 

For water works improvements. Six 
Thousand Dollars ($6,000). 

For street improvements, Eight 
Thousand Dollars ($8,000). 

For park improvements, Five 
Thousand Dollars ($5,000). 

For electric light and power eqi^ip- 
ment, Ten Thousand Dollars ($10,- 
000). 

For storm sewers. Twelve Thou- 
sand Dollars ($12,000). 

For re-funding overdue bonds. Sev- 
en Thousand Dollars ($7,000). 

For a floating indebtedness. Four 
Thousand Dollars ($4,000). 

Section 2. That for the purpose of 
obtaining the assent of the electors of 
said borough to said increase of in- 
debtedness thereof, a public election 
shall be held in said borough in pur- 
suance of the Act of Assembly afore- 
said, and the several amendments 
and supplements thereto. 

Section 3. Said election shall be 
held by the board of election office ts 
of the several wards of said borough, 
at the places of holding the municii»al 
elections therein, on Tuesday, the fif- 
teenth day of August, 1916. between 
the hours of 7 o'clock A. M., and 7 
o'clock P. M., under the same regula- 
tions provided by law for the holding 
of municipal elections. 



oif ths taxable pxoftatf fai Mid bor- 
ough, which is ^IjUtJUtM, of the 
siuount of the eirteting ilebt, which is 
$69,040.00, consieting of a bonded 
l«bt in the sum of $66,000.00, and a 
AoaUng debt in the sum of $4,000.00, 
and the amount and poreentage of the 
proposed incresae of indebt«dne^8, 
which is Forty-one Tlioaaaad Dollars 
(^IfiOO), incresae, and 248% pluis ^f 
the assessed valaation. 

Section 6. The Socfetarjr of t'>e 
Towm Council and all other municipal 
officers are authorised and directeii 10 
do all other acts and things wlu-h 
may be necessary for the lawful hold- 
ing of said election as provided by 
law. 

Ordained and enacted into an urii- 
nance this fifth day of July, A. L>- 
L916. 

D. J. MITCHELl 
Attest: Presidoit of Coutuil. 

£. B. STEINER, Secretary. 

Approved this tenth day of Ju y, 
A. D. 1916. 

JAMES C. IRONS 

Burpt-8. 

The amount of the last preceding 
assessed valuation of the ' taxuiile 
property in said Boroiigh, the aniuunt 
of the exiating debt, tad the anu)uiit 
and percentage of the propoie<l in- 
crease of the indebtedness of said 
Borough are as set forth in said or- 
dinance. 

E. B. STEIN EK, 
Secretary of Couiuil. 
jlyl4-21-28-aug4 



Ordinance No. 182 



) 



evasions are 'enormous and cannot be 
prevented under existing conditions. 
But up to the present time Congress 
has taken no steps to end these frauds 
because there has been no concerted 
demand on the part of the public. 

The only way that these enormous 
frauds can be stopped is by publish- 
ing the income tax returns, for which 
the law now provides complete se- 
crecy. When th<* returns are publish- 
ed the tax thieves can be identified 
and punished. The rich tax thieves 
are fighting tg keep the returns se- 
cret. They fear publicity more than 
they fear courts or jails. 

The income tax is now beinp amend- 
ed by the Senate. In order that it 
may be amended right, 1 ask every 
reader of this paper to do two things: 

First: Write a letter to one or both 
of the U. S. Senators who represent 
your state, urging them to support 
an amendment of the income tax law, 
providing for complete publicity of the 
income tax returns. Do this now. 

Second: At the next meeting of 
your union, secure the passage of the 
following resolution: 

"Whereas, it has been proved that 
the U. S. Treasury is being defmud- 
ed of millions of dollars through in- 
come tax frauds and evasions There- 
fore; bt it 

"Resolved, that our Senators and 
Representatives in Congress be urged 
to support an amendment of the in- 
come tax law, providing for complete 
publicity of the income tax returns, 
so that the tax thieves may be expos- 
ed and the frauds stopped. And bo 
it further 

"Resolved, that the Secretary send 
a copy of this resolution to each Sen- 
ator and the Representative from this 
district." 



at the places of holding the municipal 
elections therein, on Tuesday, the fif- 
teenth day of August, 1916, between 
the hours of 7 o'clock A. M., and 7 
o'clock I*. M., under the same regula- 
tions provided by law for the holding 
uf municipal elections. 

Section 4. The (|uestion of increas- 
ing the indebtedneiis of said borough 
in said amount und for said purposes, 
shall be submitted to said electors at 
said election, in the manner provided 
by law, for the purpose of ascertain- 
ing the assent of said electors to, or 
dissent of said electors from said in- 
crease of indebtedness. 

That the (|uestion of increasing the 
indebtedness of the Borough of Mo- 
naca shall be printed upon the ballots 
by the proper authorities in brief 
form und followed by the words "Yes" 
or "No," as provided in the Act of As- 
sembly in such case made and pro- 
vided, und that the (juestions be so 
stated as to afford the electors an op- 
portunity to vote separately upon the 
increase of indebtedness for each pur- 
pose as above stated. The questions 
shall be stated as follows: 

1 . Shull the Horough indebt- 
edness be increased for the YES 
purpose of water works 
improvements in the sum NO 
of Six Thousand Dollars 
($6,000)? 

2. Shall the Borough indebt- 
edness be increased for the YES 
puprose of street improve- 
ments in the sum of Eight NO 
Thousand Dollars ($8,000) ? 

.'?. Shall the Horough indebt- 
edness be increased for the YES 
purpose of park improve- 
ments in the sum of Five NO 
Thousand l)ollars( $5,000) ? 

4. Shall the Horough indebt- 
edness be increased for the 
purpose of purchasing elec- 
tric iitrht ant! power equip- 
ment in the sum of Ten 
Thousand I)ollars( $ 10,000 ) ? 
Shall the Horough indebt- 
edness be^:ncroa.''cd for the 
purpose of constructing 
storm scwor.s in the sum 
of Twelve Thousand Dol- 
lars ($12, 000) ? 
Shall the bonded indebt- 
edness of tlio Horough be 
iiicrraseil for the purpose 
of refun(lin^r overdue bonds 
in the sum of .Seven Thou- 
saml Dollars ($7,000)? 
Shall the bondetl indebt- 
edness of the Horough be 
increased for funding the 
floating indebtedness in 
the sum of Four Thousand 
Dollars ($4,O0C)? 
Section 5. There being no news 

papers published in said Horough of 



6. 



An Ordinance signifying the int* n- 
tion and desire on the part of u\e 
Tov^ni Council of the Borooffh of Mo- 
naca, to increase the bonded indebt- 
edness of said borough in the sum of 
Forty-one Thousand Dollars ($n,- 
OOO), for the purpose of water works 
improvements, street improvementf:, 
park improvements, purehasi^of el<c- 
tric light and power equipment, stoi m 
sewers, re-funding overdue bonds of 
said Borough of Monaca, and fundnvg 
the floating indebtedness, and auth'r- 
izing and directing the holding u!° a 
public election in said Borough of Mo- 
naca, for the purpose of obtain hr 
the assent of the electors of said l><>r- 
ough to the increase of the indebted- 
ness thereof as aforesaid, and tlxnif!: 
the time and place for and provi(i;iii>: 
for the holding of said election. 

Be it enacted and ordained hy 
the Town Council of the Boroufrh of 
Monaca, and it is hereby enacted atid 
ordained by authority of the sami : 

Section 1. That the said Toun 
Council hereby declare and signify 
their desire that the indditedness of^ Monaca, the Secretary of the Town 



the said Borough of 
creMued in the sum 



YES 



NO 



YES 



NO 



YES 



NO 



YES 



NO 




ing the indebtedness of said borouf^h 
in said amount and for said purposes, 
shall be submitted to said electors at 
said election, in the manner provided 
by law, for the purpose of ascertain- 
ing the assent of said electors to, or 
dissent of said electors from said in- 
crease of indebtedness. 

That the question of increasing the 
indebtedness of the Rorough of Mo- 



Assembly of the Commc 
Pennsylvania, entitled. 



Council is hereby directed to give no- 
tice of the holding of said election 
jng at least thjrty days, by week- 
nveSfSSnencsmThF^BtTy 
and the Beaver Valley Labor News, 
two newspapers having a general cir- 



naca shall be printed upon the ballots , Pennsylvania relating thereto, for th( 

by the proper authorities in brief! following purposes, viz.: 

form and followed by the words "Yes" For water works improvements, Six 

or "No," as provided in the Act of A.s i Thousand Dollars ($6,000). 

sembly in such case made and pro- ' For street improvements. Eight 

vided, and that the questions be so j Thousand Dollars (|8,000). 



regulate the manner of increasing the culation in said borough, and by at 
indebtedness of municipalities, to pro- last twenty (20) printed hand bills 
vide for the redemption of the same, posted in the most public places in 
and to impose penalties for the illegal -said Horough of Monaca, which said 
increase thereof," approved April 20, notices shall contain the purposes for 
1874, and the several supplements which the indebtedness is to be in- 
and amendments thereto, and all creased, a statement of the amount of 
other laws of the Commonwealth of the last precedinrr assessed valuation 

of the taxable property in said bor- 
ough, which is $1,595,622.00, of the 



NOTICE 



To the Electors of the Borough of 
Monaca: 
Notice is hereby given that a spec- 
ial election will be held on Tuesday, 
the fifteenth day of August, 1916, be- 
tween the hours of 7 o'clock, A. M., 
and 7 o'clock, P. M., at the places 
of holding the municipal elections in 
the several wards of said Borough of 
Ifonaca, by the boards of ctTection of- 
ficers of said borough, forkhe purpose 
and in accordance with the provisions 
fully set forth in Ute follj^wing ordi- 
nance: J 

ORDINANCE NOL 182 

An Ordinanee signifying the inten- 

tioa and dssirs on the part of the 

Town Ceundl of the Borough of Mo- 

Baea, to ineraaae the bonded indebt- 

•tefcM of laid bttrooi^ in the sam-of 

nofftjr-flne punaibA Dollars (|41r 

<NN|), for tM postpooa of water wovks 

'flppvdfWMmS^ Kipet irapfOvenienta, 

njpvR aUKfftfMtntKiMt |WiH'1nia^flf dso- 

tB6 Bphl flVjB yowiv e^qiuiiiBeiit, stenB 

JiMeaiMMMa ■■^b.JnsHaJU^s«a -Mmm^t^mmm^ *- * - ^^ 

— ypw g . jv^wBonig vfwuiM poimB oc 
iiMBtNii^ tf MwMca, tad tmOm 



YES 



NO 



stated as to afford the electors an c»p- 
portunity ^to vote separately upon the 
increase of indebtedness for each pur- 
pose as above stated. The (luestionR 
shall be stated as follows: 

1. .Shall the Borough indebt- 

edness be increased for the YES 
purpose of water works 
improvements in the sum NO 
of Six Thousand Dollars 
($6,000)? 

2. Shall the Borough indebt- 
etlness be increased for the YES 
purpose of street improve- 
ments in the sum of Eight 
Thousand Dollars( $8,000) ? 

3. Shall the Borough indebt- 
edness be increased for the 
purpose of park improve- 
ments in the sum of Five 
Thousand Dollar8( $5,000) ? 

4 . Shall the Borough indebt- 
edness be increased for the 
purpose of purchasing elec- 
tric light and power equip- NO 
ment in the sum of Ten 
Thousand Dollars($10,000)? 

5. Shall the Borough indebt- 
edness be increased for the YES 
purpose of constructing 
storm sewers in the sum NO 
of Twelve Thousand Dol- 
lars ($12,000)? 

6. Shall the bonded indebt- 
edness of the Borough be Y ES 
increased for the purpose 
of refunding overdue bonds IJO 
in the sum of Seven Thou- 
sand Dollars ($7,000)? 

7. Shall the bonded indebt- 
edness of the Borough be YES 
increased for funding the 
floating indebtedness in HO 
the sum of Four Thousand 
Dollars ($4,000)? 

Section 6. There being no ne-wg- 
papers published in said Borough of 
Monaca, the Secretary of the Tow-n 
Council is hereby directed to give no- 
tice . of the holding of said election 
during at least thirty, days, by wcMk- 
ly advertisements in the Daily Tinesi 
md th^v Beaver Valley Labor Newa, 
two newspapers having a general cir- 
culation in said borough, and bjr at 
last twenty (20) printed hand bills 
pooled la the moot pnbUc pUuMB in 
nid Boroogh of Monaca, wnidi 
Botiei* dhatl eontela tiie piu pooM fo# 
whidi the indebtodneao ia to be hk- 
emnad* a atatamowt of the amomatsrf 
Ur 1m* pimtdiag aaMiiiJ taloKt^n 



For park improvements, Fivi 
Thousand Dollars ($5,000). 

For electric light and power equip- 
ment. Ten Thousand Dollars ($10,- 
OOO). 

For storm sewers. Twelve Thou- 
sand Dollars ($12,000). 

For re-funding overdue bonda. Sev- 
en Thousand Dollars ($7,000). 



amount of the existing debt, which i.s 
$69,040.00, consisting of a bonded 
debt in the sum of $65,000.00, and a 
floating debt in the sum of $4,000.00, 
and the amount and percentage of the 
propo8e<l increase of indebtedness, 
which is Forty-one Thousand Dollars 
($41,000), increase, and 2.63';^ plus of 
the asse.'ssed valuation. 

Section 6. The Secretary of the 
Town Council and all other municipal 
officers are authorized and directed to 
do all other acts and things which 



For a floating indebtedness. Four •"">' ^' necessary for the lawful hold- 
Thonsand Dollars ($4,000) '"K "^ ^'"^ election as provided by 



Section 2. That for the purpose of 



law. 



obtaining the assent of the electors of Onlained and enacted into an ordi- 

said borough to said increase of in- ' nance this fifth day of July, A. D. 
NO J (iebtedness thereof, a public election ' 1916. 

shall be held in said borough in pur-' "• J- MIIXTHKLL, 

suance of the Act of Assembly afore- i Attest: President of Council. 

said, and the several amendments! K H. STKINKR, Secretary. 

and supplements thereto. ! Approved this tenth day of July, 

j Section 3. Said election shall be A. D. 191G. 

held by the board of election officers i JAMES C. IRONS, 

I of the several wards of said borough, I jly 14-21 -28 Burgess. 

YES I m^mm^^m^^.^^m.^^miLh.— ^M-^i-i^-^*^-^— «" 

f Leon Schniizer |; 

M i 

$10 and $15 Clothes Shop g 

I 

Clearance Sale | 
Now Going On | 



Assisting Business Growth 



Commercial patrons of moderate requirements as well 
as those with larger interests tind here a conf^enial financial 
atmosphere. 

Our hi{j:hly efficient organization, possessed of excellent 
facilities and adequate connections, is constantly at the ser- 
vice of our patrons. 

Our continual effort to further the interests of all pa- 
trons is not confined to the narrow limits of accepted bank- 
ing service but includes every advice and assistance consis- 
tent with our modern, constructive banking policy. 



Beaver Trust Company 

BEAVER, PENNSYLVANIA. 
CAPITAL AND SURPLUS $390,000.00. 



i 



^ 





Two Suites of Offices 
Elegant Locnition 



,»., 



New Brighton, Pa. 




♦ ff tiiit mnn i»»*»»<iiii» n ii nMnm i mnnn » 



I Mum LigDting studios \ 

CHAS. Z. FOGEL, Prop. 

; Electrical Contractors and Makers of ; 
Fine Lighting Fixtures 



^ £eU vihdikr 221-J. 
> 205 BRIGHTON AVE., ROCHESTER, PA. 

^ ♦ Mnnn i in iii n iiii***<»ii mm **t»tti* nnn i>< 



L. P. HARN STANSBURY 

Watchmskcr, Jeweler, Optician 

and EnsTSTer. 

Bell Phone 1274-W 

582 Third St., - - Bearer 



♦ iiiii n iiiiiii mnnn * f 

W. R. ANDERSON 

Meat Market 

All Kindf of Fraah and Smoked 

Meats. 

; Frecdon, Penna. ; 

' •i m iii iiii n i4»*iiiiii ' 



SAVOY HOTEL AMD 
RESTAURANT 

WorkinKinen's Hotd. 

Open Day and Night. 

506 Serenth Are., Beaver Falla 




*<iiii m ii n i i m iiii i m 

Penna. Ave. Pharmacy 

Ira C. Hoffman, P. D., Prop. 

Penna. Art ft ISth St. 

MONACA, - PENNA. 

•The RezaU Store." 

••ii m i f ii mn tiiii mi 



RAINCOAT SALE 

i For Ladies, Men and Boys. Also • 
I Rain Capes at very low prioaa. \ 
CHAa STEIN. 
IISI Penna. Are.. Msnacs, Pa. \ 

^ ♦♦♦<i n iiiiiii n iiiiii>»' 



1916 WALL PAPERS • 

: : at - 

:; KENAH BROS. \[ 

;: Third Ave., New Brightoo \l 



>»♦»#>♦♦»•>»#•♦»•»♦••»•♦♦• 



y, We Insure Every Thing < 

Under the Son — 

Consult Us. 



MOULDS & DONCASTER, 
Rochester, Penna. 



"We Hold Thee Safe." 



:: JOHN W. HARTZEL 

i » Plambtaif, Gas FIttfaif , Tta ni 
i> Slate Roofing. 

*\ Hot Air Faraaces. 

i> P. O. Bldff. . . Rochester 






«. I 



*►, 



LEON SCHNITZER 



< \ Gas, Steam and Hot Water \ \ 
o Fitting. \\ 

;; Estimates Promptly Giren. \\ 

Both Phones. 
Third St., BEAVER. PA. 



For Good OiBdy and lee 
Go to the 

Olympia ConfectionaT 
Masonic Bldg., Now Bright 



( 



I Ouinn T. Walton |i: 

PLUMBER 



♦♦♦»•»»#»♦»»»»»»»♦♦»#»#»♦( 



DR. F. R. HOLT. DENTIST 

Wilson Bldg., Rochester. 

Office Hours: 9 to 12 a. m.; 1 
to 5 p. m. Open evenings. 
Bell 612.R. B. C. 7004. 




•••• • •♦♦♦ti mmnm i i i 



For Tonr Noxt Suit Soe 

ALEX MUDRIK 
Merchant Tailor 

78 New Yorib At*., Roehaster ! 



»titi nnn i m ii<i nnm 



PIANOS and VICTROLAS 

New Records received on tha < » 
28th of each month at 

Rochester Music Stone 

> Brighton Are., ROCHESTER. 



i m i nM iiii n i M iii nn t tiiii«ii mn »i n t nnn i 



WBf. E. McKEAN 

' Plumbing, Gss, Steam mad ' > 
Hot Water Hea«ii«. 

7th St. sad 7 th A ts. * 

I Both Pronss. BEAVER FALUS \ \ 



• iiti m i fn i mm ii mi 



:l 



/--sar-i 



..•r 



/ 



A 



A-^ 



W9''w?!!v'Y'W^-^'' 



,9 ■ 



H.<;:'' 



( 




BEAVER VALLBT )L4BM HBWB 



II 



MERKLE-WILEY BROOM 
COMPANY IS ONFAIR 



The Me^kIe-\^^iley Broom Company, 
of Parik, III., huvv Juined the runkii of 
union hating cunccms und are dis- 
charging their employes for belong- 
ing to the Broom and Whiisk Makers 
Union. 

This firm, who manufacture the 
"Blue jay" brand of brooms, have al- 
ways paid the very loMcst wages, and 
when the men joined the union imme- 
diately started to discharge "them. 

W. R. Boyer, General Secretary- 
Treasurer of the Broom and Whisk 
Makers' Union, staites that this coro- 
pany is paying: most of its employes 
the miserable sum of $10 a week, less 
than half of what the Broom Makers 
receive in union factories. 

It will be well for every unionist to 
remember this brand of brooms and 
not allow one of them in his home. 



The railroads says: They cannot ex- 
pand, which can be taken to mean that 
the employes must put up the money 
for expansion just as they must make 
-"' i on unproductive improvements. 



BEAVER VALLEY EA6LE 
LODGES TO PICNIC 



Wednesday, August 2nd, will be a 
big day for the Kagles of Beaver Val- 
ley, that being the date upon which 
lodges, representing seven towns, will 
combine und enjoy the dajt with a big 
picnic at Junction Turk. Numerous 
jitlractions will be provided for the 
entertainment of the crowd, which is 
sure to attend; a ball game, field 
sports, basket picnic, dancing, etc., 

will provide enough amusement to (ill 
the day profitably and satisfactorily. 
A complete program will be publish- 
ed next week, the committee on ur- 
Mingements being engaged in making 
out the same. 



$58,000.00 RECOMMENDED 

FOR BEAVER FALLS OFFICE 



An item in the Public Buildings bill 
now before the House at Washington, 
appropriates $58,000 for the enlarge- 
ment and rebuilding of the Federal 
Building in Beaver Falls. 



in 



3E 



3G 



]E 



FIRST ANNUAL AND UNION 

PICNIC 



a 



—OF— 



E16LES 



IN BEAVER VALLEY AT 




WEDNESDAY 

AUGUST 




■^HMPii 



y^ 



THINGS THAT NBVBR HAPPEN 



y^^ 




*-? 



NOTICE 



Borough of 



7-Lodge$ of the feathered Tribe- 7 li 

WILL BE COMBINED IN THIS 

Odc Grand Day of Sports and Contests 

Which Are Open and FREE to All 

FREE GATE ADMISSION TO THE PABK 
DANCING-AfternoBn and Night-Union Mosic 
Big Basket Dinner in the Grove at Five Bells [ 

Base Ball Games! Roller Skatlmi! Circiiog 
Swing! Roller Coaster! Fan House! 



DREAMLAND THEATRE I 

ColiBima Stocfc Company Playino 

CONTESTS AND PRIZES TO BE AJJN||JNCED LATEK 



Sti 



!W 



Nwqr SbA tmrntge Bugaas 

After hoiwf> rfaimning it tke 
tmie to buy furniture. Wc 
M^t wowmt wonderful veluet 
at our store in furniture for 
home. Many of tlie sett and 
piecat have been reduced. 

And your house should be 
cbreseed up too, for Spring. 

New furniture makes the 
whole house look new. Visit 
the store now, at the best of 
these bargains irill not ramain here long. 




Hoosier Kitchen 



)ts Sare Miles of Steps 



«/. r. AMpERSOM 

THIRD STREET, - -^ - BEAVER, PENN^. 



t 




COM E — Everybody Invited and Wekome— C M E 



By order of Committee on Ground Arrangements. 

WM. A. HANSHEW, 
DAVID WHITEHOUSE. 
HOMER KOUNTZ. 




1 1 IIIIT8 H II 1 PIK" 

C. C. SHETTERLY, Lessee and Mgr. jjj 



]E 



3E 



Jt 



To the Electors of the 
Midland: 
Noti.^ is hereby Riven that a spe- 
cial election will be held on Tuesday, 
July 25th, A. D. 1916, between the 
hours of 7 o'clock A. M. and 7 o'clock 
P. M., at the place of holding the mu- 
nicipal elections in said Borougrh of 
Midland, by the Board of Election of- 
ficers of said Borough, for the pur- 
pose, and in accordance with the pro- 
visions fully set forth in the follow- 
ing ordinance: 

ORDINANCE NO. 107. 

An Ordinance sifrnifying the inten- 
tion and desire on the part of the 
Town Council of the Borough of Mid- 
land to increase the bonded indebted- 
ness of said lioroug'h in the sum of 
seventeen thousand dollars, for the 
purpose of paying the Borough's por- 
tion of the cost- of grading, curbing 
and paving Midland Avenue, in said 
Borouf^ of Midland, from First 
Street, the present terminus of the 
pavement thereon, vresb^'ardly a dis- 
tance of approximately one tiioussnd 
five hundred feet, and for paying the 
ocst of constructing: an extension to 
the present sanitary sewer on Mid- 
land Avenue from the present termi- 
nus of the same, xyestwardly a dis- 
tance of approximately live hundred 
feet, and the construction of a sani- 
tary sewer on Railroad Lane from 
Third Street to Fourth Street, and the 
construction of a storm sewer along 
Fourth Street from Railroad Lane to 
a point beyond Ohio Avenue, and for 
paying the Borough's portion of the 
cost of gradinpT, curbing and paving 
such other public streets or parts 
thereof as may be required by the 
Borough authorities to be graded, 
curbed and paved, and for paying the 
cost of constructing such other sew- 
ers, sanitary or surface, as may be 
required by the Borough authorities 
to be constructed, under prescribed 
legal proceedinifs, and authorizing 
and directing the holding of a public 
election in said Borough of Midland, 
for the purpose of obtaining the as- 
sent of the electors of said Borough 
to the increase of the indebtedness 
thereof as aforesaid, and fixing the 
time and place for and providing for 
the holding of said election. 

Be it enacted and ordained by the 
Town Council of the Borough of Mid- 
land, and it is hereby enacted and or- 
dained by authority of the same: 

Section 1. That said Town Council, 
after due investigation and consider- 
ation, deenn it necessary and proper 
for the welfare of the Borough and 
its inhabitants, and hereby declare 
and signify their desire that the in- 
debtedness of sa J Borough of Mid- 
land be increased in the sum of seven- 
teen thousand dollars, in the manner 
provided for by the Act of Assembly 
)f the Commonwealth of Fennsylva- 
,nia, entitled, "An Act to regulate the 
manner of increasing the indebtedness 
of municipalities, to provide for the 
redemption of the same, and to im- 
pose penalties for the illegal increase 
thereof," approved April 20th, 1874, 
and the several amendments and sup- 
plements thereto, and all other laws 
of the Commonwealth of Pennsylva- 
nia relating thereto, for the following 
purposes, viz: For paying the Bor- 
ough's portion of the cost of grading, 
curi>ing and paving Midland avenue, 
in said Borough of Midland, from 
First Street, the present terminus of 
the pavement thereon, wettwardly a 
distance of approximately one thon- 
sand f)ve hundred feet, and for pay- 
ing the cost of constructing an exten- 
sion to the present sanitary sewer on 
Midland Avenue from the pi^sent 
termimu of the same, westwardly a 
distance of approximately five hun- 
dred feet, and the construction of a 
sanitary ^vve^ on Railroad Lanib from 
Third Street to Fourth Street, and the 
construction of a storm sewer alooff 



Fourth ''ireet from Railroad Lane to 
a ppint beyond Ohio Avenue, and for 
pasrfng the Borougfa's portion of the 
cost of grading, curbing and paving 
such other public streets or parts 
thereof as may be required by the 
BonMigh authorities to be graded, 
curbed and paved, and for paying the 
cost of constructing such other sew- 
ers, sanitary or surface, as may be 
required by the Borough authorities 
to be constructed* under pretscribed 
legal proceedings. 

Section 2. That for the purpose of 
obtaining the assent of the electors 
of said Borough to said increase of 
indebtedness thereof, a public election 
shall be held in said borough in pur- 
suance of the Act of Assembly ^fore- 
said and the several amendments and 
supplements thereto. 

Section 3. Said election shall be 
held by the board of election officers 
of said Borough at the place of hold- 
ing the municipal elections therein, on 
Tuesday, the twenty-fifth day of 
July, A. D. 1916, between the hours 
of 7 o'clock a. m. and 7 o'clock p. m., 
sw^^ t?:-^ siire regulations 
pr^hdded by law for the holding of 
municipal elections. 

Section 4. The question of increas- 
ing the indebtedness of said Borough 
in said amount and for said purpose 
shall be submitted to said electors at 
said election in the manner provided 
by law, for the purpose of ascertain- 
ing the assent of said electors to, or 
dissent of said electors from said in- 
crease of indebtedness. 

Section 5. There being no news- 
papers published in said Borougrh of 
Midland, the Secretary of the Town 
('ouncil is hereby directed to give no- 
tice of the holding of said election 
(luring at least thirty days, by weekly 
Labor News, and the Beaver Arfrus, 
advertisements in The Beaver Valley 
two newspapers having a general cir- 
culation in said Borough, and by at 
least twenty printed handbills posted 
in the most public places in said Bor- 
ough of Midland, which said notices 
shall contain the purpose for which 
the indebtedness is to be increased, a 
statement of the amount of the last 
preceding assessed valuation of the 
taxable property in said Borough, 
which is $2,632,158.00, of the amount 
of the existing debt, which is a bonded 
debt of 1167,000.00, and of the amount 
und percentage of the proposed in- 
crease pt indebtedness, which is .65 
per centum of the assessed valuation. 

Section 6. The Secretary of the 
Town Council and all other municipal 
officers are authorized and directed to 
do all other acts and things which 
may be necessary for the lawful hold- 
ing of said election as provided by 
law. 

Ordained and enacted into an Ordi- 
nance this 19th day of June, A. D. 
1916. 

J. J. OTfEIL, 
Attest: President of Council. 

M. C. DONOHOE, 

Secretary of Council. 

Approved this 20th day of June, A 
D. 1916. 

HOMER L. LITZENBERG, 

Burgess. 

The amount of the last preceding 
assessed valuation of the taxable 
property in said Borough, the amount 
of the existing debt, and the amount 
and peiroentage of the proposed in- 
crease of the indebtedness of said 
Borough are as set forth in said ordi- 
nance. M. C. DQNOHOE, 

Secretary of Council. 
June28-80-Jly7-14<£l. 



SBIALL SUCCESS MAY LOOK INSIGNIFICANT TO 

THE UNSUCCESSFUL, BUT NOT TO THE MAN WHO 

IS A SUCCESS. 

EVERY SUCCESSFUL MAN HAS BEEN A SMALL 

SUCCESS AT SOBIE TIBIE. 

IT IS ALMOST IMPOSSIBLE TO EVEN START WTTH- 

OUT A BANK ACCOUNT. 

/ 

FIRST NATIONAL BANK 

BOCHS8TES, PKNNA 





THOMPSON'S 

THE STORE FOR MEN AND BOYS 

35% OF^F SALE 

On Nen's, Boys' and Children's Suits 
Hats and Dress Pants \ 



Special Dress Shiit Sale, CQ^ 

All Vaai Cnlnm UJC 



All Fast Colors 

$10.00 Suits, now $6.50 I $20.00 Suits, now. 

$15.00 Suits, now $9.75 ] $25.00 Suits, now. 

$18.00 Suits, now. . .$11.70 ! $30.00 Suits, now, 



$13.00 

.$16.2S 

$19.50 



ki. 




Thompsoiv 




' ^AVER FALLS, PA. 



/ 



^■iVii^ippfi^ii^ ^-•%#k M^i^ii^iiwii^f iwii^iiwii^i_|H 



4 



FREEDOM 



FREEDOM 



GERHEIM'S 

Semi-Annual Sale 

Beginaing Wed., July 5, to Tues., Aug. I 




All SuiU Sold by Uf Pressed and 
Altered Free of Charge 



FREEDOM 



FREEDOM 



» 
» 



<",> 



;t 



LIBEL IN DIVORCE 



; Oortnlligkt Jk CtapPlr Oi^ ! 



itif 



AtSb, B«ivsr 



• »»»»###»»#»>•>»»•<• » <>• 



SuhMflSs for the Lsbor Newi. 



In the Court of Common Pleaa of 
the County of Beaver, Pennsylvania, 
No. 6, June Term, 1916. 

Philip Stefan vs. HenrietU Stefan./ 
To Henrietta Stefan, Reapondent 
above naihed: 

The subpoena and alias subpoena in 
the above stated libel in divorce from 
the bonds of matrimony having been 
returned N. E. I., you are hereby 
notified and required to be and appeau" 
in the above named Court on the 
second Monday of August next, A. D. 
1916, then^jpd there to answer said 
petition or iTbel. 

JAMES P. BRYAN, 
Sheriff. 

Sheriff's Office, Junl^, 1916. 

Reed k Reed, Attorneys. 



#< mnm i n i m ii n ^>» 

HECKMAN BROS. 

! GsMfsl HMr4wss% Paist, GkMi, ; 



\ PmuL 



AvSi, 

mnnnM iiiii mm 




And Upwards, oa hso s s h old Koodi^ 
and oClMr psrssssi lu s y s itf. If 
fon used mtmtf, ds aoC hssitsti ts 
borrow f rooa vm, far s«r sIm of f»* 
paymsBt, our qoidc sad sffldMl 
system ctf makiac losas, esaasl W 

Infonnstloti ditstAdlj gfiv<n* 
Writs* call, or 



ttlllBIIM lOM 0. 



Car, (ill Mill An. * TmUlk 9L 
BMAtWm WJOAM, PA. 

Bdi piMBs Mil lb a piMBs am 

Op«i8A.lLtsfF.K. 
itadsy sad 8ata*qr UMfl TM. 




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lVEB VAIXET LABOR NEWS 

PahUakad BMh Friday by the 
BEAVER VALLEY LABOR NEWS COMPANY 
N<T Third St aad College Ave. - - Beaver, Penn*a. 

Eatertd U Moond-clmM matter October H, 1915, at the post office 
at Bmwn, fmaaybnaim, under the act of March 8, 1879. 



'rre«>k>bi 



Has Served Them Well. 
It's fine for a man to live so that when he dies people will 
eulogize him. Praises tend to cornlort his lelatives. aiui some- 
times serve as a sort of eye opener to them, too, as to a rumiliei- of 
admirable characteristics in the deai departed which they had 
totally failed to notice. 

But it i3 infinitely finei- lor a man to have such nice things 
t=aid of him while he is still alive. And like all the fiij/LT things of 
life, it is more raiely done. 

This is why one cannot help envying "Tommy" Howe. 
The announcement that Mr. liowe had irrevocably made up 
his mind not to be a c^didate for le-olection to the presidency 
of the A. F. G. W. U. first cau.sed a sort of stunned consternation. 
Then came an outburst of protest, and a |)erfect Mood of splendid 
tributes to Mr. Uowe as a man and as an official. 

Here, for instance, is in pan what \'ice President Jos. M. Gil- 
looly has to say of his departure. "No one, who has ever been 
honored with the position of piesident of this organization, was 
ever held in such high esteem by hi.s fellow workers as was "Tom- 
my" Rowe, as he wa.s familiarly called. ' * Pos.sessed of a 
pleasing personality, he made many friends. He believed in truth 
and honesty. He desi)ise(l deceit and hypocrisy and was ever 
ready to defend and insist that justice be rendered wheie justice 
was due. * * He was an able official and fearless in carrying out 
the duties of his olflce. He i)hiyed no favorites. * * His path 
has not been strewn with loses. but he overcame the thorns. With 
the departure of rresick-nt [Jowe the American Flint Class Work- 
ers' Union loses the .>^ervices of its most distinguished member, 
and one whose executive ability has been recognized far beyond 
the confines of our organization." 

That is what one man says. But the l)est of it is, every one 
declares it is the truth, and that the praise is wholly deserved. 

Measured in admiring friends, "Tommy" Howe is one of the 
world's rich men. 

o 

Public Opinion Swings to Trainmen. 
The publicity campaign of misrepresentation cairied on by 
the railroad managers, in which they grossly misrepresented the 
eight-hour movement, so-called of the railroad men, ha:«^fiuled of 
its pui-pose insomuch as the sentiment of the public has swung 
very decidedly toward the men's side of the controveisy. 

The line of propaganda sent out by the managers, tending 
to represent th^ demands of the men as a ridiculously exorbitant 
demand for a flat eight-hour day has failed. The Railroad Com- 
panies, have been played to a finish at their own game of publicity 
by an organize^^nd energetic propaganda campaign C4uxii# on 
J)xJi...niJ«iflB^^Pw]PtheiJtaods,_^ 




:<» 



The public is beginning to realize that it is not any upheaval 
which will disorganize their methods of operation, shorten their 
divisions tind generally di.sarrange their line of operation that 
the railroads fear. What they do fear is that the enormous, slow 
and dangerous tonnage trains of the present day will l)e cut down 
to leasonable limits. , 

When applied to road service the eight-hour movement simply 
means this and nothing ehse; that the men shall Ik? paid on a 12' .j 
miles an hour basis instead of a 10 miles an hour basis, as at pres- 
ent. This means that the Railroad Companies must move their 
freight trains at an average speed of 12' o miles an hour, or 2') 
per cent faster than at present, or pay overtime. In order to make 
it doubly sure that they do maintain this .speed, the. men have 
asked for a differential in pay on overtime, a concession granted 
to almost all skilled ciafts and hitherto denied to them. 

In all common .sen.se it will Iw seen that this is not piinuirily 
a move for more money, but for shorter time on the road, and 
while it is true that the men will gain not in money, but in better 
living conditions, the greatest gainei- will l>e the shipper, whom 
the Railroad Companies have endeavored to mislead into opposing 
this movement. 



Here is the Sale of Waists we 
promised you 

Semi-Annual 

WAIST SALE 



Greater Waist values than ever 
before. $.3.00 and $4.00 Crepe 
de Chine Waints, on sale at ... . 

^ J^tSiorsJ are white, flesh, peach, 
maize, ajpple and rose. 




$198 



COME EARLY WHILE THE PICKING IS GOOD 



/ / 




Cor B0WMih At^u4 11th St. BPEAVEll FALLS, PA. 




VALLEY LABOR NEWS 



STREET mm Mm 

(ContiniMd Prom I^a One) 



ton. However, Mr. Briggi' attent < 
wan called to the fact that he 
wearinf a iport Airt in whkh ti .'- 
was no place for said collar button ' 
the face of this damaffinc eVirie"* 
"came acroM" and admitted that 
had been negligent in regaitl to /-^ 
ting there on time. 

The shark stories from the Aihu " 
coast have nothing on the street i . 
way men of Beaver Valley, us ' 
have been engaged in catching sli.i. • 
for a number of years; althoujfli ' 
the man-eating variety, but novt r • 
less (juite bothersome. Motormen • 
conductors can catch a shark uli t 
any day. All that js required ,i »■ 
fail to reach the Junction five min • .-^ 
before his run leaves the bam. II 
ure to report on time means you * 
caught a shark that will occup\ u 
all day to land; should you fail t 
port on Saturday or Sunday, thoi; u 
will have caught a "whale of a .si ..: " 
that will take you three days t«. ; ■;- 
pose of. As a matter of fact 
r)loyes of the Beaver Valley Tm n 
Co. have been catching sharks r< -o 
many years, that they never thitiK •( 
mentioning the fact. In the opei u 
the men use several kinds of bai' ; e 
most successful sort being to tun c 
alarm clock off, turn over and : o 
.sleep. When you awaken you h;.' a 
shark on your line that will take i 
one to three days to get off the 1 -c 

Motorman James Boak cau^l ' '<^ 
shark lust week with the class ot i I 
above mentioned, and he sweai- t 
will never fail to land the shark. 



$5.00 Trousers Free! 




Absolutely Free 
With All Orders 

^^^■^— ■^^■— '■ IM M ^— ^^1 III III 11 I ■III ^^^^^^^^^,^^^M— — ^^^^» 

FOR A CUSTOM-MADE, HAND- 
TAILORED SUIT-FOR A 
LIMITED TIME ONLY 

Look For the Label 

• THIS IS AN EXCEPTIONAL OPPORTLN- 
I ITY TO SECIRE AN EXTRA PAIR OF 



TROL SERS FREE, WHICH MEANS THE LIFE OF TWO 
SLITS FOR THE PRICE OF ONE. WE HAVE HUN- 
DREDS OF PATTERNS FOR YOU TO SELECT FROM, 
NOBBY STRIPES, PLAIN COLORS AND FANCY MIX- 
TIRES. POSITIVELY NO ADVANCE OVER Ol'R RE(;. 
ILAR PRICES AND AN A.SSORTMENT OF STYLES 
THAT CANNOT BE FOl ND ELSEWHERE. ^ 



Howard Hluttner, of Rochesti-r, i 
employe of the Olive Stove Woi. . 
spent his vacation at Atlantic Ci' . 



The International Labor Pre.ss f 

America held its yearly convention n 

(Cincinnati, .May i» and 10, and dUscu - 

t'd ways and means of increasinK - 

influence. Trade unions should n - 

ize that they have a press of tli' r 

own and ;rivc it their active supp '. 



SUITS HAND-TAILORED TO SATISFY 

YOUR INDIVIDUALITY 

$15.00, $17.50, $20.00 AND UPWARDS 

FIT. FABRIC AND SATISFACTION (;i ARANTEED 



On January 1, liUT), only T.' ■") 
members of the International A- 
tiation of Machinists were work : ,' 
the eijfht-hour day; on January 
1!»16, no less than 60,000 machiiii > 
rtere working eijfht hours. Anoth- r 
instance of the value of orfpanizatii!!. 



IN ION 
y\ A I) E 



SEND IN THE NEWS. 

• 

* Send in the news. 




■ N 



should have a pn.7* 
ent. 

You want the nesvt of your 
union to appear in your paper. 

Get busy and see that some- 
body is especially ap|><)inted to 
take care of this matter. 

See th.-it it reaches the Labor 
News oiricc as early in the 
week as possible. 

News should be in this office 
by Thursday noon, of each week 
if it is to jfo in that week's 
issue. 



1211 
SK\ K.VTII 
A YEN IF 




Cailofs 



\'iOlv>S 



^CLSTO.M CL; I CLOriir;s 



UNION 
M A D E 



CHAS. D. FISCHER, Mana^^ei 



BEAVER 

FALLS, 

PA. 



<}• 



TRADE MORAL— The quality •! 
wnat you have to sell is >uMMn 
to some p>Qpiii au ot me timt 



and all of the people some el 
the time, out aovertise regu- 
larly with us ano youli reach 
all ot the i>eo,.te ah oi me iime. 

CHARTKR NOTICE 



.Sub.scribo for The Labor News. 



Notice is licrcby triven that an ap- 
plication will he made to tho (lovor- 
••rnor of I'enns\ Ivania on .Monday, 
Au^riist JSth. liMC). at in o'clock A. 
.M., by Harry (Irims'.iaw, J. 1). .Mc- 
Kenna, J. C. Fiirlo\ , .1. C. Heanor and 
F. M. Havs. under the Act of As.seni- 



bly entitled, "An Act to provide for 
the incorporation and regulation of 
certain corporationg," approved April 
29i] i^ l81A, and y^e supplements there- 
to, for the charter of an intended cor- 
poration to be called the Beaver Val- 
ley Labor News Company, the char- 
acter and object of which is tran.sact- 
injr a printinj; and publishinp busi- 
ness, and for these jiurposes to have, 
possess, and enjoy all the ri^rhts. 
benefits, and privileges of said Act of 
.Asscmblv and the supplements there- 
to. ■ JOHN 15. .McCLL'UK. 
jlyl4-21-28-aug4 Solicitor. 

CHARTER NOTICE 



Notice is hereby given that an ap- 
plication will be made to the Clover- 
nor of IVnnsvIvania on Tuossdav, the 



8th day of August. 1916, by Wahl J. 
Snyder, John E. Snyder, George A. 
Bonzo, Robert L. Baker, under the 
Act of Assembly entitled, "An Act ta 
provide for the incorporation and reg- 
ulation of certain corporations," ap- 
proved April 29th, 1874, and the sup- 
plements thereto, for the charter of 
an intended corj'oration to be called 
".Snyder Bonzo Itaker Company," the 
character and object of which is stor- 
ing, repairing, caring for, hiring and 
dealing in automobiles, motor ve- 
hicles, accessories and supplies there- 
fore, and for these purpo.ses to have,. 
pos.se.ss and enjo\''alI the rights, bene- 
lits and privileges of said Act of As- 
sembly and supplements thereto. 

UKKD and REED, 

jlyl4-21-28-aug4 Solicitors. 




SPECIAL ATTRACTION 

Majestic Theatre ^^^ 

Tuesday and Wednesday, July 25-26 



\ 



Afternoon: 1 to 3, 3 to 5. Evening: 7 to 9, 9 to 11 
EDWIN MILTON ROYLE'S 



"The Unwritten Law" 




Fitfa the Gifted Emotional Actress Beatrice Michekna 

In Seven Parts. Direct From an Extended Run at the Pitt Theatre, Pittsburgh 

A Spn Piece Orchestra, Afternoon and Evening 

PRICES^ Wlaio Floor, 25c. Balcony, 15c. 



X 



r'* j 




'iiittiifff&iai^r''teAiftav-;1i-il>-- 'rf- ■r"'\r",]a it- :. ^<f... 



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♦ i mmm i n i f ♦< m i>>i Mf >««t<i MiM tiiti n i f « 



BEAVEH VALLEY LABOR MKWB 



Jfjl^aiestic ^heatre 




ROCHESTER, PA. 



Program for Next Week 



MONDAY, JULY 24th 

Ilolfe Photoplays Inc.. piesents the lamoirs star Lionel 
Banymoie in "DORIAN'S DIVORCE," presontiiijr live acts 
of intense and Ki'ippinR interest. 

TUESDAY and WEDNESDAY. JILY 2:>-2e. 

California Motion Picture Corjwration oilers the jrilted 
emotional star Beatrix Micholena. in a startlinjr photo dra- 
matization of "THE UNWUHTEN LAW," a pictme which 
critics have given the hijjhest praise. 

THURSDAY and FRn)AY. JULY 2^-28 

William Fox presents the incomparable Theda Bara in 
'THE SERPENT," an exciting story of a Russian i)ea.sant 
n'lvl. There are many tense and excitiny: scenes in this pic- 
ture that hold the audience in suspense. 

SATURDAY, JULY 29. 

Jesse L. Lasky presents the charminjr g:>and opeia 
star, (leraldine Farrar, in a photo-dramatization of the 
story of a Spanish peasant Ki»'l— "Maria Rosa." The best of 
the three productions of this artist. 

• ••i m ti m i M iiiiii n i nmn i»«»*i*»»<i n iii m ii 



"Durian'h Divorcf" 

"Uoiian'.i DuoiiT," a .Mftio wun- 
(lerplay in live KiipixiiK uils, will ln' 
I shov.ri ul the .Majestic Theali%', on 
.Monday, July 24lh. Lioru-l liair> 
more, one of the most (ini.slieci acinic 
on either the staj^e or Kcreen, uml 
(Inice \alenline, the charming and 
iriften (Iranialu- arlisl, are starred in 
lhi.s jtroduclion, which was jjrodure'i 
fi:r the Metro proK'ram by the Koltc 
l'iioto|)lay.s, Inc. 



COLONIAL THEATRE 

ROCHESTER, PA. 

SHOWING THE WORLDS GREATEST PHOTOPLAYS. 
THE TRIANGLE SERVICE. 



MONDAY and TrES^A^ , JULY 21-25 

Trianjrle-Kay Bee presents Fiank Keenan and Knid 
Markey in "THE IMIAXTOM." in live reels. 

WEDNESDAY, JULY 2fi 

World Ulni Coiporaiton presents Kilty (lordoii in 
"HER MATERNAL RIC.HT." a j,nippinu r,-ieel puxluction. 

THURSDAY, JULY 27 

Equitable Film Coii)oration presents Charles Cherry 
in "PASSERS BY." a sen.sation 5-reel photoplay. 

FRIDAY and SATl RDAY. JULY 28-29 
Trianjjie Fine Arts presents De Wolf Hopper in 
"CASEY AT THE BAT," a screaming 5-reel photoplay. 



• "The I nwrillen Law" 

"The UnwnUeri Law" v. Iiich comes 
lo the .Maje.ilic on Tuesday and Wed 
ne.s<ia.\ , July li.'> and li(>, is a .sevi-n- 
|)arl phoUMJiania adajileij from Fid- 
win .Milton Itoyle's stu^c .success. The 
story is uhiilesome and hi)^, and de- 
velops Ihroufjch hrcalhh'.ss suspense to 
one of the most Ihrilliii); climaxes 
ever allaitiod in motion [)i«-ture art. 
An advance hynopsis of it here is in- 
advisahh- and would detract ("roni 
one's lat«'r pleasure in set-in^ it, since 
much of the inter«'>t of tin- dcveloii- 
nieiii of the plot on the s^croen lianas 
on a ihn-ad of mystery and s;urpri.se 
thai is spun out, with clever pr*Uic- 
\i\K touches, to the \rr\ end o( llic 
stor\ . 

If it were neccssury to pick oni' out 
slandin^r feature from the many e|c 
nn'nls (utf^'realness th;il this produc- 
tion embodies, it would unhe^italln^'l\ 
he the emotional power of Ilcatii/. 
Mieheiena's ilctinjj. Her in>pers(jn;i 
tion of Kate Wilson is her iri"''at<-,-t 
achievement since forsakinjr opera for 
the screen. Kvery critic who has re- 
viewe<i the film has declare<l her work 
a marvel in both power and linish. 



JUDGtlon Park! 

Most Beautiful Picnic 



"The .Serpent" 

A .score of iihotoplay actors and 
se\erai sp<-clalor.^ wci-e injinvd during' 
the makinj;: of the William 1- o\ piioio- 
diama "The .Serpent," in .Now .Jerse>. 
The play deals with Russian life and 
includes several battle scenes. 

In order to maki' the en^^'au'c-iiK-nls 
between the Kussiun.'- and (ioni.aiis a.-- 
ii'.-distic as po.s.^d)le, I)irector K. .\. 
Walsh employed two n,i!itur\ fxpcrt.- 
to supeivi.se the maneuvers. A larire 
plot of j^riiund u;ts mined and tin 
mines were to be exploded just after 
a detachment of rrti^eatin;^' .•-oldier^ 
had pas.sed over them. 

llecause of a mistakiMi si^'iial l!ie 
man op<'ralinj,' the electrical connec- 
tion.- opened the switch too soon. In 
the premature explosion which fol- 
lowed actors, jruns. sword.- and muni- 
tion wagons were hurled several feet 
into the air. Theda IJara. star of "The 
.Serpent," who was watchiiii: tlie bat- 
tle scenes, fainted. Ambulances from 
Fort I.,ee und surroumling |»U*ces— re- 
moved thirteen actors und super- 
numeraries, whose injuries ranRcd 
from lacerations to broken bones. This 
thrilling attraction will Ix' shown at 
the Majestic Thursdav and I-'ritiav. 
Julv 27-28. 



-^■x 



Grounds in the Valley 

SUNDAY SCHOOLS. LOIXJES, FRATERNAL ORDERS 

AND PRIVATE PICNIC PARTIES ARE TENDERED 

FREE ISE OF THE GROUNDS. 



o- 



-o 



DANCING 



EVERY WEDNESDAY AND SATURDAY 
EVENINCS. 



o- 



-o 



Finest Dancinil Pavilioiv 

In this part of the State, outside of Pittsburgh, ^'a^ious 
Small Concessions for Amusement of Patrons 

"YOU ARE ALWAYS WELCOME AT THE PARK" 

Reached from all ^'alley Points by way of 
BEAVER VALLEY TRACTION COMPANY LINES 



Write or Phone Me /or Open Dates 

0. C. SHETTERLY 

LESSEE and MANAfiER 
TELEPHONES: 
Beaver County, 116.'J and .'>12:i 
^-Bell, Rochester, :J2(): New Brighton, l.'iOO 



".Maria Rosa" 

(leraldine l-'arrar, the noted errand 
i opera prima donna and motion picture 
star of tlie Jesse 1,. l.asky Feature 
I'la\ ("omtTany, will appear at the .Ma- 
je>lir .Saturday, July 2:», in ".Maria 
K<Ji;i." said b\' those v. hu have seen 
it, to be the best of the three photo- 
plays she made for the l.asky t\)m- 
pany. the others bein^ ^"Carmen" an<l 
"Temptation." Wallace h'eid appear.- 
in the leadinjr ma.sculine rob'. 

'i'hese are facts of exceptional in- 
l<'rest in connection with .ML^ss Farrar 
in ".Maria Kosa," at it was durinir the 
making- of tins pnolopiav ■ that siie 
nu't and fell in love with >lr. l,ou- 
Telle).ren, whom she recently mar- 
ried. Three y««ars a^o when .Mr. J.ou- 
Telle^ren came to the United State- 
to niake his debut on the Airerican 
st:i>;e :is an Fn;:lish speaking actor, 
he chose as his lirst play, ".Maria 
Uosa." Pnviouslv the younu actoi- I 
had appeared foi- tv.o sea.-ons in .Am- ' 
erican lours .-is leadinir man \\ ith I 
.Mme. .Sarali llernhardl. 



«-^# 



NVHAT IS A 



BARGAIN ? 

THE DICTIONARY SAYS A BARC^AIN IS AN ADVANTAGEGIS PI K( HASE, AND 
WE OFFER THESE FOR YOUR CONSIDERATION. 



$5.00 and $7.00 Dres.ses, white and striped vaile and linens tf|0 CQ 

$8.00 and $10.00 Dresses, taffetas, voiles und crepe de chine 0C AA 

$2.50 Tub Skirts, linens, Kuhardines, and piques Q'\r 

$4.00 and $5.00 Tub Skirts, Silverblooms, Kolfines^ . ^1 AO 

$10.00 Sport Suits, Palm lieach Cloth and Silverblooms 0C AA 

$l.t.00 Cloth Suit.s, your choice $S 00 

$25.00 Cloth Suits, your choice ^J C A 

$4.00 Blouses, tub silks and Keor^ette crepe tf»1 QO 

$2.50 Blouses, orj^andie.s batiste and voiles . Q^r 

$1.50 Warner's Rust Proof Corsets QCi* 

$1.50 House Dresses, lawn and Kint^hani, now QC- 

Choice of any Coat in stock ^*% Qr 



s'- * 





The Store for Women 



1117 Seventh Ave., 
BE.WER FALL.S, PA. 



LEVY BROS 



S^aT'hird Ave., 
XKW llltl(;ilTO.\. I'.\. 



3E 



]|=] Lz=lL=J [; 



3t 



3E 



will Ik* "Passers By," in which the 
not" I dramatic star. Charles Cherry. 
will make his appearance. This pic- 
tun is adapted from the novel and 
pla.. of the same title. 

'He story of "Passers By" is both 
whii'Ksical in its humor and absorbing 
in its heart interest. The biv: situa- 
tion.- prow out of the hero's pro|M'n- 
sity for invitinR waifs of the street 
inte his bachelor (|uartcrs and enter- 
iaining-them with food and conversa- 
tions. 'T*. 'R a,-.«ovel picture. 



"CaHey at the Bat." 

"Casey at the Bat" the Trianple-I)e 
wolf Hopper comedy at the Colonial 
Friday and Saturday, July 2S-21>, tells 
in picture form the story of the fam- 
ous ba.seball poem, which appeare<i 
more than a (juarter of a century ajro. 

The poem does not reveal what un- 
touanl circumstances it was that 
i;ni.sod Casey to fall <lown s(» griev- 
ously ;il the crucial moment. This 
ni.\ster.\ the picture promi.ses lo cli'ar 
up during its showing. 



.Sub.scribe for The Labor News. 



"THE UNWRITTEM LAW" 
AT MAJESTIC THEATRE 



In its plot "The Criwritten Law" 
makes an ap|K>al not found in "Salomy 
Jane." with all the hitter's pictures- 
(|ue beauty. It takes hold of funda- 
mental truths an<i reveals Ihcm in 
their topical relations, oarh episoile 
linkinp itf:elf with the prcciMiinif and 
succeeding scene.s as matched pears 
are hliunjf on a strinjr. The purely 
nimantic charm and the scenic reve- 
lations of "Mipnon" j^ive place in this 
later exploit to the narration of a 
story of tlie pre.sent, with a .sipnifi- 
cance a.s timely as a nfws item. While 
"The Unwritten Law" is a<iapted to 
tlu' times throuph tlu' medium of a 
powerfully mond Irs.-son. it nev«'r 
pic.iehes, as ".Salvation .Nc'll" is .some- 
times inclined to <lo. \Vli;itever of 
|)rec«'|)t may Ih* contained in "The I'n- 
w nlten Law," it is ?H'Ver vociferous 
nor intrusive, hut it liccoinos an in- 
tegral part of the Ktur>'. But what 



will make a nior<' n<>t;ihle appeal to 
the picture-loving' world than any of 
these attributes ju.^t named, is the 
terrdic :;|K'e(l of the story, its multi- 
tu(l' of enprossinp .scenes, and the 
diversity of the a<lvenlures which be- 
fall its principal characters. It would 
almost seem as thouph its author and 
ils producers hati piven themselves 
the task of exhibiting in "The Un- 
written I>aw" every kind of thrillinp 
episoile which hjia been found most ( 
competent en the screen to brinp the 
shock of .surpri.se, the pasp of aston- 
ishment, the tear of sympathy or the 
cry of nliirni. ^ 




i«at 



.ALKil IPIVV < ONTB ACT LET 




A contract for the erection of a 
?lt;,0(M> audiloiiuin and warehou.«5e, 
ha.s l>e<'n let to I J. A. (Iroah, H-JT W . 
.North avi-nu"', I'ittshurirh, by the .Mu- 
.ual Union IJre.vinp Company, of Ali- 
quippa. Paul Irwin. Uenshaw Bldp., 
I'ittshurxh, is the architect. 



Y 



.Sub.scribc for The Labor News. 



I At the Colonial 



1 



]E 



]□□□□£ 






*J 



FOR SALE! 

House of Six rooms, well built, with furnace, city 
and cistern water.. Ivot .'t.'i\120. Located at 505 Dela- 
ware avenue, Rochester. $600 down, balance as rent. 

For further information see 

H. J. BECK 



"The Phantom' 
"The Phantom," the nev. Triaiit'lf 
feature m which Krank Ki-eiian star> 
with Knid .'darkey, is t.> Ix- shown at 
the Colonial Tii<'atry, i^londay an<l 
Tuesday, July '24--'>. L is de.-crib-d 
as «me of the hr-st detective stories 
written since the famous '•Palfh's" 
.series. The "Phantom" is the .-ohri- 
(luet o*" I-'arrell, the most elusive 
";:entiem.'in thit-f" knn\' ii. <)[>«'r:it imr 
in conjunction with his valeC Crabhe, 
a rascal of much inferior cleverness, 
he has escaped rleteetion for years. In- 
spector Plaisdell of the Centr.al ()f- 
lice. calls to notify Karrell that it 
mipht be well for him to move oti to 
another eit\-. I-'arreM readily promises 
to le.'ive town, and the merry cha.^^e 
he leads the oH'icers rounds out a 
storv of absorhin;,' interest. 



505 Delaware Avenue, 



D D DO 



ROCHESTER, PA. 
II = 



"Her Maleriiil Kiirht" 

Kitty (iordon, in private life Lad\ 
H. H. Beresford, will be .seen at the 
Cf)loni:d Theatre, \\'ednesda\ ..July L'fi, 
when the World Liliii jinxluct ion. 
"Her .Maternal Ripht." will be the 
feature on the .screen. In this picture 
Kitty (iordon wears three pou ris that 
are the latest innovations of the niod- 
iste'.s art, but although her p«)\\ns are 
wonderful, her performance, from an 
artistic and dramatic standpoint, even 
excels her mapnilicent clothes. 



"PaHHerH By' 

The feature on the propranri of the 
Colonial Theatre, Thursday, July 27, 

\ 




■■i. -.- 5f 



Ohoice of a lot of Suits 
which we are nind^ ^ (^qi^ 
xno«t of whidh are worth 
115. SiEHB 34, 36, 36, 37, 
3a 

f llllll H II I H I|||||» 

Union Suits, 50c 

■# 11 1 1 1 1 1 11 1 1 1 11 1 1 I n »# 

J%3it received Uus lot of 
Union Suits whch we 
picked up at a special 
price— you c«t the bene- 
fit. 

♦eii nmnm ii m 

Hose^ 10c a Pair 

This is a]«o « specisL 
• •■ nmmn iii m i n 

Ewin^^ Bros. 

ROCHESTBlt 






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■■*■.'■■ '■ ; f 



BBAVER VALLEY LABOR NEWS 



■f . 1 '^ 



F** 



Steam 
Railroad 



nave been increased TWICE 

during tlie past flVE 

years in this 

locality 

Compare our FIVE cent fare 
to the |)ass(3ii«;er rate charejed on 
parallel steam lines. 

With but hourly service Inter- 
urban Car line fan^s throughout 
the County are from two to four 
times those charged on our lines. 

We are doini; everything in 

' our power to properly serve the 

-1 — 

traveliuiz; public, at a cost to us 
of from '20 per cent, to 100 per 
cent, more than ever before, yet 
your fares have not been in- 
creased uj) to this time. 



Could you, would you, under 
ilke conditions, follow a 
method of this kind in the 
nanagement of your own 
business affairs? 



Our Cars 
areOperated 



Upon a Ten-Minute Sche- 
dule in Beaver Falls, 
New Brighton, Roches- 
ter, Bridgewater and 
Beaver. Elsewhere in 
the Beaver Valley a 
Twenty-Minute Service 
is Maintained. 

Although the majority of tkoiu 
have received from 10 to 20 per 
cent, iacrcaso in Til YAW wages 
during the past year alone, pas- 
sengers still })ay but a live cent 
fare from \'an])ort to Conway, a 
distance of 8.7 miles, oi* the same 
i^te {f ^ m -i J uftctiofl l\ark to Jlo-. 
rado, a distance of (> miles, or 
any other fare section, and less 
than half faie has been chars^ed 
throu.^h th(^ holders of baboi* 
Tickets, and a correspondingly 
low rate to purchasers of School 
Tickets. Cut I'ate tickets have 
been sold, good on all lines at 
any time. 

Now, with the increased wages 
paid our employes, the i-apid ad- 
vance in the cost of mateiials, 
and tlie greater expenditure nec- 
essary for maintenance, it would 
be folly to attempt to continue 
operation under the old rate 
longer. 



AXiL we ask is a fair con- 
sideration of our plans 
and a SGtUARE 
DEAL for the 

future. 



After 

Spending 

Months 



In consideration of the street car 
situation, because of the in- 
creased wages paid onr employes 
under the new wage schedule, 
and the great advance in the 
cost of materials and mainte- 
nance', the Management of this 
Comj)any is forced to take steps 
to make an adjustment to meet 
the ditliculty. 

It is intended by the Beaver 
ValUy Traction Company and 
the Pittebui«:h it Beaver Street 
Railway Company to make a 
change in its Passenger Tariff in 
regard to CUT KATES and 
SPECIAL TICKETS, and dis- 
continiu^ the sale of LABOR 
and SCHOOL TICKETS. 

While the sale of CUT RATE 
Tickets in Books of 100 Tickets 
for S4.r)0 will be discontinued, 
this Company will continue to 
sell tickets in strips at a reduced 
rat(\ 

Pa ti-ons, particularly those who 
hav(' been purchasea's of the 
booksabove mentioned, are kind- 
ly asked to fully consider the 
steps which made this action an 
absolute necessity. The plan of 
increasing the regular fare, or 
doing away with the transfer 
privilege at certain points, was 
given up, with the decision to 
take such action as would effect 
the lesser number of people. 



.< 



ji-^ 



Beaver Valley Traction Company 

w ADVERTISBMENTS SIMILAR TO THIS HAVE APPEARED IN THE DAILY PRESS DURING THE PAST TWO WEEKS. 



r 



'fJk^H'- 



'1(1*' ;'..,•*' .',l,si*':4':«. 



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•-■? •■ • ."-if" ' 



)7' i> 



BEAVER VALLEY 



NBWS 



What Can You 



/ 



1/:.' 



' '■ y ' 



r a Nickel? 



How Much Work Wonlil 

YOllDofo?TNitkcl? 



4 Little ^ Becomes a 
BIG 5g. Only One Place 



What Can You Buy 


What Can You Buy 


What Can You Buy 


foraNICKCL? 

ONE SMALL BAG OF PEANUTS 
A PACKAGE OF CHEWLNG iiVM 
A SPOOL OF THREAD 
A PINT OF MILK 

A CAKE OF SOAP OR 

OTHER MINOR ARTICLES REPRESENT THE EXTIRE 
PURCHASING POWER OF THE SUM OF FIVE CENTS. 
YOU CANNOT EVEN BUY A WIND INFLATED TOY 
BALLOON FOR A NICKEL. 

THINK OF THE LIMITATIONS OF THIS SMALL FRAC- 
TION OF A DOLLAR IN THE BUSINESS WORLD OF 
TODAY. 


. for a NICKtL? 

A FIVE CENT PUKCIIASE AMOUNTS TO— 

A 1I\ E CENT CAR FARE AMOUNTS TO A 6 
OR S MILK CAR HIDE ON THIS SYSTEM. 

Your nickel will not tjike vou far on a steai^ road. 

Your nickel will not };o far in making purchases, but 
think how far you are enabled to travel over OUR lines for 
a sinj^le fare. For this small sum our entire system is at 
your disposal for the full fare section. You are treated with 
as much courtesy in the expenditure of « f»v«xfnt piece on 
our lines, as in making: a hundred dollar purchase in a de- 
partment store. 

Do you ever stop to think how powerful your nickel be- 
comes when you step on board a street car? 


for a NICKEL? 

This small amount is lost si}>:ht of in financial circles. 
You would not work lonjj for FIVE CENTS. Yet for this 
sum our entir% car svstem works for you. You are taken 
many miles through towns, villages and country, after pay- 
in}; your fare on one of our cars, and deposited at your 
destination. Our crews see to it that you are cared for, trans- 
ferred at the proper branch and given every possible con- 
venience. Your safety is guarded with modern appliances, 
day and night. 

SERVICE AND SAFETY IS THE WATCHWORD 
ALL FOR A NICKEL. 



I 

1!»05 1910 1«»1<) 

RATE PER HOUR RATE PER HOUR RATE PER HOUR 

First Six Moiitlis • 1()C. 20c. 2(5c. 

Second Six Months 18c. 20c. 28c. 

Second Year 20c. 22c. :U)c. 

Third Year ^28c. :52c. 

Fourth "^'ear ^oc. 

Fifth Year and Over :J4c. 

Uur j)reseiit wa<i:e scak' lepreseiits an avera;j;e increase over 1905 of iiOSy per 
cent./and over 1!>]() of ^VJ.iW^ ptM* cent. 

The materials which we use h\ve increased for this period from 20 to 100 per 
cent Our rates for trans|)ortati()n have not \\\) to this time boon increased. 



Think This Matter Over. Be fAIR in Your Consideration 



■"t 



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Beaver Valley 



Company 



V 



ADVERTISEMENTS SIMILAR TO THIS HAVE APPEARED IN THE BAILY PRESS DURINO THE PAST TWO WEEKS. 






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BBAtm VALLEY LABOR NEWS 



'■•w. 




miDLAIND 



BURGLARS ARE ACTIVE 



A 



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T>A^a 



ALWAYS 
F R O N T 
LAC ED 



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J-. 







Yoii Will Simply Love It 

IT is sure to incite yoyr admiration. 
The MoHart has received more praise 
than any corset we ever carried.. 

Style. G)nifort and Quality— the three 
corset requisites— are gloriously emcx>died 
in the Modart. No other corset we know 
offers as much for the money. 

You cannot fully comprehend the quality 
3f the MoJarl without seeing and com- 
paring it/ [^o this please 

You wilt appreciate our recommendation. 



d 



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5 



The home of 'Mr. Nur|>h\ 
lor of the Midland Dairy, ' 
Lane, was en tere<L Monday " 
ier ihv family had retirijtl^ 
which .\lr. Al'Urj>l».v haci irj h ~ 
whi-n he went to bed wu.-- 
\\]\vn ho .arose in the mom i 
iii^ cl.so was misiiinK And tli' 
;s how the marauders sue 
;rrttint: intft the houiic, m 
won' all locked and tlie \vii:i 
t<'i\e<l. It is the iiiipressi": 
ban<l of Kyi>«'«>s, which if 
near .Midland, i.s reH|»on«il) • 
rohlM-ry, u.s several house- 
land have been entereti aiv 
«m1 niently. I. M. Rced.O 
lo.st a valuable trold watrl. 
thieves entering his Knmc. 
mined effort is being rimde 1 
licial* to run dow-n the par', 
of committing .these deprci! j 



.MIDL.VND Cm'RCHilS 












r •-. 




[iroprie- 
i:;iilroad 
K'ht, af- 
•id .$8.00 

l»o<'ket.'< 
'iiibsinvr 
:. Noth- 
luy.stcry 
v<lr<l in 
(' door.- 
• iw.-i fa.^i- 

that Ui 
(•iirupin^' 
for tho 
in Tov- 1 
•an. sack- j 
1 .stn-i'l, 









BERSOAAN'S 

Discount Sale! 

Men's and Boys' Suits and Hats 






IS NOW ON IN FULL GLORY 




«■ ■-«,<. 



\ 



lf)|{ SAT 



.?.: 



iiv 



E. B. DEWHIBST 

812 Third Avenue 

IVew Brighton, - Penn'a. 



First Methodist Epigcopii' 
Kice's Hair, Rev. George i 
pastor. Sunday Schoi^l, 9:1' 
•'Paul at Corinth," Act- 
MominR sermon, 11, 8ubje( • 
DetM-rifitiori of Christ;^' Ep\' 
(rue. 7:lfi, topic: "Hov Can ' 
BTue .Nk^ke Gur Town "Better 
injr sermon, 8, subject: "On' 
Christian Privilejafes." 

Pre.sentation Itoinan Cati; 
street. Rev. P. F". Quinn, pa>: 
Day .Mu.s.se8, 7:30; Sunday 
and !>; IJenediction, 7:30 p^ 
Day Mas.s, 6 and 8; Bapu- 
.Sunday School at 2:1'6. 

Pre.^byterian Church, Pfiu 
•ivenue, Kev. Kellar, pastor. 
School at 10; preochinK at s 



church, 

Bay ha, 

.subject: 

18:1-22. 

"John'.s 

'til 1-ea- 

lur hca- 

Kv«'n- 

of Ihf 

;C, Ohio 
r. Wei'k 
Ma.'J.s. t! 
.: He!} 
s at -J; 

>" Ivan in 
Sum la. \ 
' ni. 



Birthday Party 



A number of the frion«!s T -Mi'-- 
Frauu-e.s KlizalM>th Tucker. <• •■l)r:itiM 
her sixteenth birthday anni\ ^ary ;r 
her home. Ohio .street, Midi.. '. M'-'i 
ive.MJay evening:, from 8:.'5() t II. Ti." 
color .<chcme was pink and u i o < r. !<• 
ixi|>er and lanterns; pink :!: i whiti 
ro.sos, with ferns, decorate I i ■ pon 1 
and tables. The favors \ ■ • pinl. 
carnations and ferns, tied v " i wluti 
riblM)n. The (^uest list iiir i .mI tli' 
.blisses Lucile Mond»y, Marr;i^ct and 
Kleanor McCteehap, Yc|^ Gairl)le, I.il- 



ELITE THE.VTRE. .MIDLAND. 



".\ Butterfly on the Wheel" 
PcKKV Admaston and her husbund 
ai^ wealthy and should l>e happy, but 
Admaston nejflect.s bis Iwautiful 
younf; wife for |the cares of business. 
The social season throws Pe>rK"v much 
in the society of CoIlintrwiKxl. Ad- 
maston surprises t'nllinjrw<H>d and 
Pef^fry in a compromising situation in 
a room at a country inn. He .sues for 
divorce and there is every assurance 
that he will win his case. On the 
nijfht before the case is to ro to the 
jury Lady Atwill confesses that her 
secret love for Adnniston tempte*! her 
to urjre Collinjrwootl on to compromise 
PcKfry. and that it was she who ar- 
ranfced their mcetirp at the inn. This 
famous play will W .seen at the Filite 
Theatre, .Midland, Satunlay, July 22. 



".Sold for Marriajje" 

Let thi.s po on record: for once an 
author in fully satixfied with hi.s play 
after it has been prwiuced. The refer- 
ence i.s to William F,. Kwinp, author 
of "Sold for Marriage," which the 
Trianple-Fine Arts Studio presents 
Avith Lillian Ciish us the star, and 



which conirs to the Elite Theatre or 
Monday, July 24. 



"(;oId and the Voman" 

One of the biKjfest scenes in the 
WMllium Fox pro«lucti()ti, "(told and 
the Wofnar,'' starrinK Theda Hara, 
which appears at the Klite Theatre, 
on Tuesday, July 2r)th, is that ir 
wbjch an entire Indian camp is blown 
up. In the plot of "Gold and the 
Woman." 1 )U8jkara, chief of an Indiar 
tribe, is robbed of a land jrrant 
through the trickery of 1 JouRald Chan- 
dos, an early KnKlisb^cltler. Fifty- 
six Indians were u.sed in Ibe making 
of the picture. All but three' \wnt 
through the explosion .scene uninjured. 



millionaire stock manipulat i- to win 
the love of the beautiful .vife of o 

wertni^ferrwutiif eiwfef ^>^- ■i-ir-ei. <^ 

power and wealth by the "easy mo- 
ney" route. 



"The Gay LokI Waring" 

Those whose love .sensations with 
their moving picture entertaii meni 
will have their fill in the Blueli rd In 
be exhibited at the Elite theatre, on 
Thursday, July 27, under the t Ue of 
"The Gay Lord Waririr". J. Warren 
Kerrigan plays the role of a -pond- 
thrift scion of English nobility, whe 
goes through a series of wild .idven- 
tures in his ceaseless efforts to ob 
tain money to gratify his penchant 
for high living. 



"The .SteppinK .SI one" - 

Frank Koenan and Mary Uolnnd arc 
featured in thi.s attraction, which i.s 
booked at the Elite foT Wednesday, 
July 26. The play is bajed on an ori- 
ginal story from the pen of Cfltlard- 
ner Sullivan, of the Inc* staff. It is 
said to Ih* uni(|ue in that the plot, 
which concorn.s the "eternal triangle," 
is so skillfully handled that the inter- 
est always is at a hi)fli pitch. The 
story is phased upon the efforts of a 



"What Love Can Ao" 

The story of "What Love Can Do. " 
the Red Feather production which 
comes to the Elite- Theatre oi> Friday, 
July '28th, contains .some of. the bes: 
examples of strike and labor disturb 
ance scenes yet thrown on the .•screen. 
The story is built about a new.spaper 
woman who is working for a ii1an who 
owns a great newspaper property. He 
also owns large holdinf^s in an old 
producing region, and Lit Mag ill, tl.c 
woman, is placed in an anomalnu.s po 
sition, being deeply in love with tliis 
man, while entirely out of Bynipathy 
with his methods of extracting tin- 
last ounce of effort for the least mo 
ney from his employes. 




SI LVERM AN' 

126 Brighton Avenue, Rochester, Fa. 



Special For This Week 

$25.00 and $35.00 
Suits Reduced to 

BIG REDUCTION ON ALL 

Drestes and Skirts 




We Hwe a iMJerfM IJM rf Bilii^ Ais, (aps «i Sii^ 

AlSig ABSortment of Noyelties In MIDDIES 



. t-.: _»:_ _ 





Tomorrow we Expect Another Record Breaker in Our 
Men's and Boys' Clothing Department 













Special Added Attractions 

IN OUR MEN'S DEPARTMENT FOR TOMORROW 

Choice of any Man's Sttilor Straw in the house, that sold from 
SI. 15 to $2.00, for tomorrow, at 

Choice of anv Man's Sailor Straw that sold from ?2.50 to $3,50, 
fov tomorrow, at . . . .''. 

All .sizes, 6»/8 to 7»8. All Clean Brand New Hats 




74c 
$1.15 









LADIES' BATHING SUITS 

Received twenty-five dozen LadiesMJathinjj Suits for tomorr«w's selling.. All 
si/.os, styles and prices moderate. 

Also a full line of Biithinj; Suits for Men and Ik>ys, are found here. 








SPECIAL CLEARANCE PRICES ON ALL LADIES READY-TO-WEAR ^VIER- 
( HANDISE. TO APPRECIATE VALL ES THEY ARE TO BE SEEN. 
SPECIAL CLE.ARANCE PRICES THR0r(;H0rT EVERY DEPARTMENT. 







^ STORE OPENS TOMORROW AT S A. M. AND CLOSES .AT 11 P. M. 
Dtirinu: This Hot S^soti. We Encouratfe Earl^ Morning Shopping When Possible. 





\ 



EVERYTHIN(; READY TO WEAR 





BERKMAN'C 
lOl 4-1 6 Seventh Ave., Beaver Falls ^^ 

















;i;ur Du Chono, Irene Dublin imd Mrs. 
). .1. Conner, and Miss Loretta Qumn 
of .Siniths Ferry. 

Aliss" Tucker received many Ixjautr- 
ful frift.s. She was also presented 
vith a purse containing $16 in gold. 
Mis* Tucker's sister. .Mi.ss I.olla 
TiKkfr. of Hamlet, North Carolina, 
l»i«^s<'nto(l luT with a beautiful oil 
l»;iiiilmu. A very enjoyable cvcninjc 
.VMS Spent in vranios and music. 



Midland Personals 



— - f 

l\ . L. (Juthrio, of Uoaver avenue, 
\v;is a rittshurirh visitor Monday. 

lUim, to Mr. and Mrs. Kurlo .Mel 
lidiiriip, of Pennsylvania avenue, la 
ixcck. :i son. 

I,. K. Hess was a Iteaver visitor 
.M«inil:i.v. 

Tatiifk .1. .Murphy and William 
("Ixirke have returned from a two 
vv«N'kM' visit with their parents at 
Sriunton^. 

.Mi.ss .Mary O'Donnell. of Scrantor, 
vviis vi.sitinjT her brother, .lark O'Don- 
nell mill family, (if Ohio avenue. 

Mrs: Williani .^charf was a Pitts- 
l>iii'irh, visitor Friday. 

'}i'l\->. Pp.'irson an<l family, have re- 
in itHNi from a visit witli .M r.><. Pcar- 
>(«!'.•; (laujrhters. in Cleveland. O. 

Luther Zurley was an Fast l.ivcr- 
|i(B<i! visitor recently. 

.Ilrs. Charles Shae returned to her 
!ii»ine in I.cetonia. O.. after spondin^r 
tlir week rnd in .Midland. 

\. \\ . Walsh -of .*>cranton. spent a 
f^<^^v weeks with his friend, Jo.scph 
Punch. 

,)Ir.s. Hou.se, of Midland avenue, 
\v:is an P'.ast Liverpool visitor last 
wpek. 

Mrs. Itarbara Miller and sons 
tieorpe and John, have retumpd from 
a risit with friends in Pittsburgh. 

Mr. and .Mrs. .'^idney Horley, of 
Oliio street, were visiting with friends 
in ritt.sburjrh last week. 

\V. VV. Filson motored Monday to 
rittsburRh. 

Misses Warpucrite and Anna Mc- 
Crp'jithe were visitinf? in East Liver- 
pool Tuesday. 

•Mrs. Desmond, of Ohio street, was 
visiting Sunday with friends and rel- 
atives in Canton, Ohio. 

Frank Dinsmorc and A. Walsh, of 
Pennsylvania avenue, were East Liv- 
erpool vf*itors Saturday. 

Wm. Johnson, of Ambridffe, waa 
visitinjr friends here Sunday. 

Miss Mary and Mrs. Jack O'Don- 
nell, of Ohio avenue, were visiting in 
Fast Liverpool Monday. 

Kdwnrd Louis of Pennsylvania ave- 
nue, who hSs been on the sick list, is 
now able to be about. 

Mn. Aliee Stewart, of Coraopolis, 
vas the gxieii of Mrs. Mace, of Ohio 
avrenue, Sunday. 

Miss Fern Nolan has returned to 
her home in Steubenville, Ohio, after 
a veek's visit with friends here. 

Mrs. Robert Hill and son, Charles, 
of Scottdale, are the fniests of Mr. 
and Mrs. Gilson, Seventh street. 



"BUILT UP TO A STANDARD, NOT DOWN TO PRICE»* 




Midland, Pa. 



HOME OF THE FAMOUS PIPE ORGAN AND 
HIGH CLASS PHOTOPLAYS. 



We control the franchise for Trianf^le Picture Plays, 
William Fox Features, Blue Bird Photoplays, Red Feather 
Photoplays and World-Brady Made Pictures, enablins; us to 
present to our ever increasing: patrons a program par 
excellence. 



SATl'RDAY, JULY 22nd. 

World F'ilm Corporation presents Holbrook Rlinn M'ith 
\'ivian Martin in "A BUTTERFLY ON THE WHEEL," a 
heautH'ul society chama in five parts. 



MONDAY, JULY 24th. 

Triangle Film Coiporation presents Lillian Gish and an 
all star cast in "SOLD FOR MARRIAGE," also a two-part 
Keystone comedy entitled "THE OTHER MAN." 

TUESDAY, JULY S.'Sth. 

Fox Film Coi-poration presents the incomparable Theda 
Bara in "GOLD AND THE WOMAN." Mutual Film Cor- 
poration piesents Helen Holmes in Chapter IS, "THE GIRL 
AND THE GAME." 



WEDNESDAY, JULY 26th 

Trianjrle Film Coi-poration presents America's greatest 
actor. Frank Keenan, with Mary Boland in "THE STEP- 
PING STONE," in five jrripping parts. Universal Special 
Features presents Francis Ford with Grace Cuii»rd in the 
adventures of "PEG O' THE RING." The grreatest fihn 
show on eaith. Don't miss it. 



lyTjU 



THURSDAY, JULY 27 

Bluebird Photoplays presents J. Warren Kerrigan, fa- 
vorite of a million devotees of photoplays in "THE GAY 
LORD WARING," in five thrilling acts. 

FRIDAY, JULY 28th. 

Red Feather Photoplays present a ronntantic and emo- 
tional drama "WHAT LOVE CAN DO." featuring Ad«le 
Farrington, C. N. Hammond and Mina Cunard. 



WE WANT SUBSCRIBERS^BETTER GET ON THE LlgTt 



s.». 



i'JS^ 



i''-.M,«i* 



SM.to*' 



* UHIVLHSir» 0' 

> 



-m mufff 



vi K^ 



'»># 



8 



HOURS 



W O i K 

SLEEP 

RELAXATION 



A REASONABLE DEMAND 



C€ieial Orgaa •! €«ntnU Labor UbImi 
and Buildint Trades CoonciL 




BEAVBR VALLEY 



Oimatf, . CMifoDad, Edited aad Pab* 
UalMd by Orfamiaad Ukm-. 



LAB O<?NEWS 



8 



HOURS 



WORK 

SLEEP 

RELAXATION 



A REASONABLE DEMAND 



VOLUME 1. NO. 30. 



BEAVKR. PA.. 



£ 



AY. JULY 2», 1916. 



ONE DOLLAR THE YEAR 



TU r ftirki lilUn nn TUF IAI nni/ "• ^*^- -'*^"^ milwy Un«8 or th« country, should lertive ample coni|>eijsuti<^n far Rood, faithful work and ouRht not to 

I n r M r N Wlf I I I II I I H r ¥■ 1 1 K li '**" « etmn ed to devote such a number of hours to the- work a8 would impair their efficiencv or in anv wav impair their 

I IILb Iflkll ¥■ IIW ■#%# I Ilk llWIlll plivsi' il fitneHtt or the efficiency of the service t« Ik given t« the public by railway companies."— HON. il. W. 

^^^^^^^ ^====^=^==s^=^=== ('LAI{i\K. (Governor of Iowa. The eiK:ht-hour day is the standard for American workers. Everyone should co-oporate 



EIGHT- HOUR WORK QAY 
SUCCESS ON MANY LINES 



Trainmen Refute Magnate's As- 
sertion by Citing Hours of 
Eighteen Roads. 



ALL OPERATING UNDER 
EIGHT-HOUR SCHEDULE 



The Ken«ral strike vote of the 
four ifTeat brotherhoods of railroad 
workers w'ill soon be completed and 
the 600 chairmen of general adjust- 
ment committees of all railroads :irt 
the United States will ro to New York 
for the count. The officers of the 
brotherhoods will jco also and per- 
haps may participate in ii confereree 
with the National Conference Coim- 
mittee of the railroads of the Unit- 
ed Slates, that may avert the gen«r- 
al strike. 

In the meantime, the railroad 
inaKnutea and the workers are cm- 
Kuped in a ^^iRuntic publicitj- battle 
in their cfTorts to win the public t^ 
their side. The majrnatcs have ome 
of the moat costly publicity bureauB 
ever orifunized by HIk Business tu 
warp the minds of the people of the 
nation. F'roni the headquarters -of 
the Nationiti Conference Committee, 
in the (Inind Central Teniiira] 
HuildinR. big advertisenicrita ii:re 
placed in all the larpe capiUlist 
newspapei-s of the country. Theae 
advertisements. filled with false 
statements and warped, garbled 
sUtements, the railroad majcnatiea 
hope will arouse the custometB "of 
the railroads against the four bro- 
therhoods. 

Trainnen Busy Too. 

But the Brotherhood of Locomo- 
tive EnRineeers Order of Ilaihvuy 
Conductors, Brotherhood of Fire- 
men and Enfinomen and Brother hocod 
of Hailw.iy Tniinmen are not UHlopp 
at the swiUh. They have a Publi- 
city Bureau in Cleveland that is teaclh- 
inRinp the public soniethinp about the 
hardship* they endure. They ha'vc 
issued tliousun<ls of leaflets, ciicli 
bearing a short story about the rail- 
road worlcers' sufferings without the 
<»iKht-hoijr day that is now deniandepd 
by the organized men. 

One leaflet is hojided "Lonir Hours 
Cause Death" and carries at tho^ top 
a reproduction of a United Pre;.sH 
dispatch about Roy Wa.xhbum, 'M, 
an eiitriiieer on the liallimore iind 
Ohio llailroiui who shot :md killed 
him.self 31 av ''l, when niont;illy um- 
balanced bccau.so of overwork. l>ii r- 
ing .May hi.s reprular tinie nini nvcr- 
(Contirued on Page Four.) 



BIG COXTR.\CT LET 



Wallace & Carley, of Sharon, have 
been awarded a contract for the 
erection of fifty houses, to be locate<J 
at 'W'oocllawn, by the Jones & Lau{(h- 
lin yteel Co. This contracting Jinn 
employs non-union labor. 



PAINTERS HOLD MEETING 



The reg'ular meetinf? of Painters' 
Local No. ."».■{() was held on Wednes- 
day evening, at the rooms in the Kra- 
in|r building. New Urighton. One new 
member, Samuel yertzel, was re- 
cei'ved into the organisation and rou- 
tine business occupied the attention of 
those present durinj^ the short time 
which the meeting \%°a8 in session, the 
heat being so excessive that the boys 
were anxious to get away. 



BUILDING TRADES 
COUNCIL IN SESSION 



CoiiMiderable UuHiness Tran>«ac((>d and 

New DeiegaleM Were .Seated. 

Help Scarce. 



A RELIABLE FIRM 



The atlTition of readrr.s of Tlir 
Labor No\v-.s is called Id the ;iflverti.-i<o- 
inont in imotlior part dI toilay'.s issue, 
of .lolin A. I Sutler & Son. of U(>chnst(rr 
and lleiivrr Falls. Tlie di-xcimnt .^^iilc 
advei-ti.'^i'il is a semi-annual one, lliip 
particular .sort of sale Iwinj; iiuiujiiu- 
ratod by the senior member of the 
firm many lears ago, and it ha.s be- 
come an institution in the valley's 
mercantile life. Mr. Butler has been 
in b' jiness in the Beaver valley for 
the past .12 years, and the firm name 
has become a 8>'nonym for honestty 
and fair dealin«:. The discounts ad- 
vertised are bonafide, the values are 
absolutely honest, and the occasion of 
the present sale promises to be as 
successful, or more so, than any pre- 
vious sale put on by the house. 



COMPLAIIIT REGISTERED 



A meetintt of the Carpenters* Dia- 
trict Coancil 'was held in the Kramer 
l)lock. New Brighton, «n Tuesdaj^ 
evening. A general complaint was 
made on all vrork being done by the 
R. D. HunteT Co., general contractor!. 
of Beaver, and Businen Agent Bow- 
ser waf inatrocted to enforce the 
rulei of the organisation relatiTe to 
the employment of non-onion lab«r. 

The queatioti of the propoaition t}»t 
the Bearer Valley Traction Compamjr 
was to do away with laboring maai's 
tieketf at reduced rates waa taken op 
«ad diseoaMd at length. 



Subteriba for The 'Labor M 



At the regular meeting of the 
UuildirK Trades Council, held Thurs- 
day evening in the rooms in the Kra- 
mer Block, New Brighton, J. A. Kronk, 
of Moracn, member of Local 1033, U. 
B. of C. & J. of A., was elected and 
installed as secretary to serve during 
the ensuing term. Several new dele- 
gates were .seated, among them be- 
\nz three from the Hasterers' Local. 
The report submitted by Musiness 
A.irent S. S. liowser was accepted and 
a number of matters were turned 
o\f»r to him upon which he will act. 

The matter of the case of J. V. 
Crichton. .Midland plumber, \\. as taken 
up and the Business A^ront Mas in- 
Klructed to .see Mr. Creighton Ani\ to 
straighten things out. 

CleoTKe Bascevskes. of ^^'(><Kllawn, 
contractinK carp<^atpr, who has been 
working non-unior carpt-nt^rs. lias 
siirned the wage scale and will here- 
after employ union men on all his 
work. There hu.s been cori.^iicli'rahU' 
t: i' ^ in this particular ca.se in thr 
. 'd the fact t hut the nialt»'r i.'; 
now iiclji"!t<'<' , a j.'i"e:it source i>f sat- 
i.sfiictio: o union men throughout the 
val ley. 

That mechanics were exceedingrly 
scarce in all lines, wa.s the, general 
r»'|><irt hrou^lit to tlic Minptiiitr by tin- 
(l«'lc>^;atfs, and while the "S. (), S." call 
is out lA hours a day for mon in all 
crafts in the buildinjc line, thcr-e arc 
few rosponses. ^ 




ITEMS OF INTEREST 
TO BUILDING CRAFTS 



r^Ump are now in progre.s.«; for the 
erection of a throe-.slory brick apart- 
mciit building to contain two store- 
rooms and four apartmenta, and to 
cost .? 10,000, to be located in Am- 
bridge. Owner, (.eorgc McKalaJcpo- 
polos; architect, Ii. H. Hill, Ambridge. 

The contract f«r the erection of a 
two-story apartment building, costing 
$6,000, to be located on Valley road, 
Ambridge, has been let by the pros- 
pective owners, Efthimieg ^ Gam- 
bessos, of Pittsburgh, to Swasey Mil- 
ler, of Leetsdale. 

J. P. Slezak, of Ambridge, has been 
avarded the general contract for 
15,090 residence, tvo- story and base- 
ment, to be located on Maplewood 
avenue, Ambridge, and o>iited by J. 
Calhoun, of Ambridge. R. H. Hill, of 
Ambridge, is the architect. 

The general contract for the erec- 
tion of a $2,500 a4ldition to be used 
as a bowling alley by the Monaca 
Tumrerein, hat been let to Greorge^H. 
Liai, Monaca. 

J. J. Randolph, Emiworth contrac- 
tor, haa been awarded the general 
contract for the erection of a f5,0OO 
two-at«ry brick residence owned by R. 
E. Kradle, of Pittiburch. and to be 
located in Emsworth. The plunbinir 
contract was let to John: Randolph, of 
Enaiworli. 



A. F. OF L WILL SUPPORT 
R.R. MEN IF STRIKE COMES 



AT JINCTION PARK. 



The annual picnic of Duff's College 
is being held today at Junction Park, 
a dance t>eing enjoyed in the evening. 
On Saturday the United Presbyterian 
churches of the valley will hold forth 
at the Park, a fine program having 
been arranged. 



President Gompers Says It 
Only Just That Men Win 
Eifrht-Hour Fijfht. 



STATEMENT ISSUED BY 

THE BROTHERHOODS 



SPECIAL MEETING GALLED 



9WWWWW??9WS?<?W^^ 



-^^-. .. 



Committee Arranging For 

"Get- Together,' Meeting 



The L.ihor News is in receipt of 
the folldwin;; interesting letter from 
A. V. Craig, treasurer of McKecs 
Itorks Lcxljrc No. -Jl, Brothrrhoo*! of 
RalK^ay Trainmen: 

.McKees Kocks. Pa., .luly 2:'., 'Ki. 
Kditor Labor News. 

Dear Sir: — 

The "(let Togi'tlxr" Cutiiniittee, 
which held so many successful tn'-ft- 
ings in Pittsburgh. Pa., during the 
last year, h;is not trivc n iifi th«» work 
that w.is started, but on account of 
the iiol wealliei- ill it v, «• b.avo been 
hafini;. il!<l not Ix-lievc th:it it would 
Iw policy 1(1 JH'ld any mei-lini,' at th's 
time. 

August l."itli ti;e C()iiH!iill\'c will 
in"*'t at 111'' ."^lonoiiiraliehi Hjuwe. in 
I'it'isbnrgh. ti»;irTanro to lio'd another 
'(•"'oliii^r. \ jimri li.i.-» been adopted t'> 
cirry these meetings (m witlioul any 
i'.N|)ense to the lo<it,'<s. To r^iake it ;i 
sue .•»; only re(|U'i"r> tluit ;t member 
fi-om cacii Icxlge l:J<c tjoM of it, ami 



to those that will attend t^n Auiruat 
1."), the prop()siti«)n will lir «■: ptiim-d 
to them by I{n)ther K. W. Bo« . who 
originated the idea. 

Much goofi was done by holding 
the.se m»'etin^,'s, anii then- is :nnieli 
more that can be «lone in eontinu lag 
to hold incrtings of this nature. I'Lin.s 
can i>e siij^gested and earrii'd ou.t for 
•iny purpos*' that will Iwnefit thcinicin- 
bers of ,'ill the organizations th;u1 af- 
tili.ate with us, not alon<' relaBiwc to 
securing lu'ttir workinir conditions. 
Iiut in other matters that are of tk-rcat 
interest tu us. Anything thiit uill 
l*c''p to lirtti-r living condition.s uill 
!)ei). lit us as mucli as woi'king fundi- 
tions. 

•Many nirnibers are im|uirinr uhen 
the mcct-rj? is to be held. .\ d,Ltr» will 
be set on August j.'jlh, and all ■\\\\] be 
notiiiod \r hon ;nid wTi<n-e wc will liohl 
it. Cood speakers uill be sec lire* 1. 
The coniriiitti-e will iirol)al)ly tiilc^' up 
(Continued on P;igo Four),. 




There will he a called meeting of 
Local Union No. 103:J, United Bro- 
therhood of Carpenters and Joiners 
of America, in Hank Hall, Monaca, on 
Monday evening, July 2l8t, for the 
purpose of electing a delegate to at- 
tend the Cienerul Convention of the 
United Itrotherhood of Carpenters and 
Joiners of America to be held in Tex- 
as. A full attendance of members is 
desired. 



C.£. FAULKNER, PRES. 
McKEES ROCKS LODGE 



Brief .Sketch and Likenesa of Popular 

Order Railroad Trainmen Official 

Is I'reMented Today. 



■■.-!. 



Plant of the H. C. Fry Glites Co., North Rochester 

Most Commendable Action, 



"'I'll say that's the sort of firm to 
■%-ork for," was the remark made on 
Thursday by one of the factory de- 
partment employes of the H. C. Fry 
Glass Company, North Rochester, to 
the Labor News reportef, said< remark 
beini? inspired by the fact that the 
speaker, tofirether with the vast num- 
ber of other employes, had received a 
check on WedneiJay for the rofular 
two weeks' pay, despite the fact that 
the factory employes in both i)lants 
had been idle for the jpast two^ jxe e ta | other 
on account of a shut-down. '" Every 



employe in Uie twcr departments of 
both plants, Xht Eteayer Valle^r -Glaas 
Company and the H. C. Fry Glaas 
Company, receirad a check in full for 



the two weeks they were idle. The 
employes in all other departments 
were given one week's extra pay in 
addition to their regular waf^s fo;r the 
one week that they had worked. 

That the 500 employes of tliete 
plants thoroughly appreciate thiia act 
on the part of the manairennenl jvea 
without saying. It is indeed a riost 
commendable action and one which 
not only Will lead to better nintkr- 
standihg between employer and em- 
<3»toye, but sets an example which 
plants in the valley woulid do 
well to emulate. There would b«! less 
friction between capital and labar if 
the average employers would Im aa 
fair with their men aa are tiic two 
plants m«itioBed# 



The Labor News presents today a 
likeness of C. E. Faulkner, President 
of McKees Rocks Lodge Mo. 821, Bro- 
therhood of Railway Trainmen. 

President Faulkner, or "Dad," as he 
is b«?st known, is one of the most like- 
able men that you would can' to 
nu?et. He is now .serving his second 
term as president of this Lodge. He 
was bom in Kllerslie. ,Md., about 'M 
years ajro, coming to Penii.sylvania !,"• 
years ago, and locating in .McKer.s 
Koeks. Ht' was ••mployed on the P. & 
L. K. railroad for over 1.'! years ami 
has been eni|)loy»'d at th(" Schoen Steel 
Wheel Co. for nearly two vears. I!e- 
ing one of the younger iiu-nil>ers of 
the liKinf'. he lias always been progres- 
.-iv«' in his poluies. an<l hu.i ev«'r Iwen 
an .iggres.-iive titrhter for what is 
riLdil. His expcrn'Mce alonj^ (his line 
ha> Im'cii varied, serving on the (Jriev- 
aiicc ( 'oiiimitter and .-ilwiivs n-ady for 
anything that demandecl someone to 
take hriUl of it. 

His .scr\iees as President of the 
Lo<lg«- lias l)e»Ti the best that the or- 
!'.ini7..iti(»n could liaVe rxporte*!, and 
\.\hile he is not a "speiltT." the niem- 
hers have confidence in him anfl the 
ri'sulflias been that the Iwst of onlf-r 
li.i> pri'vailetl sine*' he lirst took the 
idi.-iir. Tin- memln-r who would he- 
'•omc unruly is firmly refii;n<liMl that 
the hiw-.N :iJHl riiirs of the order mu.sl 
he obi'Vt'd. Tlif lodge liii.s been in 
.-(iiric t itrht pl.icos >inre lie a.ssunird 
the presi<lene\ . oti .iceourt of so iiiurh 
>icktiess :iniong the meniljors, but he 
'las n«ver faltered or lost liojie, just 
kc[it plutrging away, holding the nu-m- 
bers to tlie Laws, ,ind never yet has 
Iris opinion or .'idvii-c been ignored, for 
the men realize that he is fair and 
liom-st, \\-isliing only to fie;il justice to 
■ill. That he has been ;ind is yet a 
rn'dit t<i the Lodge an<l OnW-r, no one 
can denv. It is such aw be that ha.s 
helfied to make our Order what it is 
today, and it is the hope of all that 
he will continue to be a pillar in the 
Order in the future, as he has in the 
past. ' 



BI6 REDUCTION SALE 



Jackson's big clothing and gents' 
furni.shitig goods store of ^ew Hrigh- 
ton, is enjoying one of thd biggest 
price reduction sales in its history, the 
same starting on Thursday of this 
we(?k. Substantial reductions have 
been made in all departments and a 
perusal of their big ad. in another 
part of today's Labor News will prove 
profitable to our readera. The stock 
i« complete and the opportunity of- 
fered tO|^aecure seasonable goods at a 
big reduction in price should appeal 
to the buying public. 



Edward Johnston, a conductor in 
the Conway yards, who waa recently 
injured by being caught between two 
cars when making a. coupling, ii on 
the road to recorery^ and will aoon 
be out. 



The following news item relative to 
the present fight which the four bro- 
therhoods of railway men are making 
in their effort to secure an eight-hour 
workday and time and one-half for 
overtime, is taken from the Cleveland 
Iveader of Wednesday » July 26th. 

Coincident with the issuance of thia 
8taten}ent one came from Samuel 
Gompers, president of the American 
Federation of Labor, that if the eight- 
hour day issue results in a strike, such 
a move will have the backing of thQ 
American Federation of Labor. Gom<. 
pers said it was only just tliat rail- 
road men receive the eight hour day 
because railroad earnings warrant.it: 

The transportation brotherhoods 
"come back" at the railroad officials 
in a statement issued here yesterday 
in answer to the assertion of the 
railroads that railroad men, who aro 
demanding an eight-hour day now 
are among the best paid men in any 
industry. 

"Train crews are paia L ss than 
any other organited trade," the state- 
ment saya. "The fi^nirea given out by 
the railroads are deceptive in that 
they do not show that the employes 
must work twelve to twenty hours a 
day in order to earn the sums >,'iven 
out by the mil roads in their state- 
ments published this inoniing. 

"The pn-vailing wages for l<M-onio- 
tive enginei-rs is .IH^- cents an hour, 
brakemen 'JO.T cents, when-as brick- 
layers and plasterers are paid 7.") cents 
an hour, an«l are working an eight- 
hour day. Surely the hazardous na- 
ture of their work c-ntitlet railroad 
men to at least an e«|ual wagr with 
other trades^ 

"The last annual refjort of the in- 
terstate commerce coinmiKKion shows 
that .a trainman is kiled on an average 
every four hours and forty minutes 
and a man erippled every three and a 
half minutes. And this does not tell 
the entire story, because, if a man 
does not die from his injuries within 
twent\-foiir hours, he lis not reported 
to (hr commission a.s having been 
kille«l, anfl unless the injury dis.ables 
him within ttirce days, he is not cnunt- 

• d ;is injure<L 

•'Of eviTv one hundred men who 
start as lirei^ien, only 17 ever bec(»me 
••iigineers. and of every one hundred 
who become engineers, only six l)e- 
eomc p;is.>ionger enirineers. Tlie avcr- 
:i;.'e length of .service is elevm :'.nd a 
half years. 

"Tram service em|doyes arc picked 
men in every sense. The physical ex- 
amination re(|uip'd of them is more 
severe th;m that retfyired for enlist- 
ment in tlu> army or navy, ;uid physi- 
cal examinations are rejieated every 
two f)r three ye.-irs. 

"Altiiough t)u> United States gov- 

• •rnm/'nt prohibits continuous employ- 
ment of a train employe more than 
sixteen hours, it i.s worthy of note 
that in 1!»L'') 78,940 violations were re- 
ported by the railroads themselves." 



"ARPENTERS, 246. MEET 



A regular meeting of Local No. 246, 
Carpenters and Joiners, was held in 
the Martsolf Hall, New Brighton, on , 
Tuesday evening. Two new membem ' 
were received into the order, W. H. 
Fake, of Harrisburg, by transfer; aad 
Henry Balser, of Beaver Falls. Chaa. 
Casner, of Beaver Falls, was reported 
still on the sick list, and an order waa 
issued granting him two weeks' ride 
benefits. No report on the eonditiop 
of Frank Conrad waa presentad. 

The treasurer's report waa read and 
Aownd a deficit, cauaed by the Bum- 
bar of sick benefits pakl recently. A 
motion waa made to ask the .Centnl 
Labor Union to take some aetloa tcI« 
ative to diacontionanee of labor tkh» 
eta apd reduced fftrea to woriDara, hf 
the Beaver Valley Traction Compaaj. 

The next maetiar wiU ba haU « 
Wedneadaj avaaiaff, Aagaat 9tfa, % 
full attandanca balag * * -- 



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RKAVtit VaLLIY LABOi NKWB 



STATEMENT ISSUED BY 
FOUR BROTHERHOODS! 



Ezplains Why Proposition to 
Arbitrate Requires Act of 
Congress. % 

INTERSTATE COMMERCE 

ACT NOT APPLICABLE 



Cleveland, Ohio, July 27. 1916— The 
following 8t4tement was issued today 
by the Transportation Brotherhoods: 
The proposition of the railroads to re- 
fer the demands of the railway bro- 
therhoods oi^n eight-hour day to the 
Interstate Co;nmerce Comnussion is 
nothing but a proposition to (rain 
time for the railroads and to waste 
time fpr the men. The Interstiite 
Commerce Commission is not at pres- 
ent, equipped to undertake this 
task. In order to undertake it the In- 
terstate Commerce Commission Act 
would have to be radically amended 
by Congress. Such an amendment 
would re<|uire at least a month for paK- 
■age, and upon its passaf^o several 
months would be reijuired before thl^ 
Commission could actually bepin the 
work thus im|MMSbtl ui»on it. 

Whatever may be the de.sinil)ility 
of empowering the Interstate Cuiii- 
merce Commission to handle wan*' dis- 
putes, this is not the time to do it. 
The Commifl.sion is <»verbur<lenotl witli 
duties. A bill lia.s been pendinj: hv- 
fore Congress, urirontly a<lvooate(l by 
the railroads theiiisc!ve.s, callintr for 
an increase in the nuMnborship of tin- 
•<!-oniii;iS8ion. in order to cnubU* it t«» 
handle cnseB already on its docket. 

A resolution now pendinjr in the 
House, after having boon passed by 
the Senate, callinjr for an invo-sti^"- 
tion by .1 joint committee of C'onjrre.'^.s 
into the need for railroad legislation, 
particularly into the need for legisla- 
tion affecting tlie Interstate Com- 
merce Commission. This resolution 
was introduced at the re«iucst of lh<» 
railroads and for the expi^ss purpose 
of heading off any railroad legisla- 
tion till a comprehennive survey of 
the entire situation should have been 
made. Representatives of the rail- 
roads have urged this resolution for 
these reasons. 

Yet now the railroads, forgetting 
these arguments, and frightened at 
the prospect of being forced to yield 
to the brotherhoods, are demanding 
hasty and ill-considered legislation, 
the fin^ effect of which would b^ to 
irive fhem ^D .advantage in their dis- 
pute with their employes. 

The Commission only has authority 
over rates, etc., on interstate traffic 
and has no control over matters that 
are wholly within a state. 

If authority is conferred on the In- 
terstate Commerce C'ommi.ssion by 
Congress, to li.\ or e.\ercis<- any con- 
trol over wage.K, it would only apply 
to employes who.se runs are from one 
state to another. 

Inasmuch as the bulk of trainmen, 
work wholly within a state, it would 
result in the worst tjiuddie pos.'^ible. 
A few employes havinir their waires 
fixed by the U. .S. and the rest of them 
standing just where tivy are now . 

The claim made by the mil roads 
that as the Interstate ('omm»Tre ("oiii- 
mi.ssion has auth«)rity over freijrht 
rates, it should also liavi' authority 
over rates of pay, is a ilcvcr and 
seemingly plausible arv'ument, I'lit i l 
fonvard to .secure public sym|>.ilhy. 

The Interstate (Diiiiiiercc ('ommis- 
sion has always taken ioirn,>'..mr«' of 
w-apes or labor costs in |»assing upon 
freight rates. One of tlie leadimr ar- 
guments of the railroads in making 
application for autli(»rit\ lo adv.ince 
their fn'i.uirt rale.>; has been tb.at out- 
lays for rinphjyes have increase<i ai.I 
as a conse«|uonce that they should Im" 
permitted to charire tnore for their 
serviies. 

Klaburale st.itistical exhibits have 
in all ;reneral rate cases been present- 
ed by th«' railr >a(is to the Corntnission 
which s«'t forth in great detail hyw 
many morn ilollars are paid out iii 
wages and salaries now as compared 
with former years. .\s a coosetiuence, 
the Interstate Coinmerce Commission 
has always pas.-^ed on the (|ue.«t<ion of 
the relation of wages to freight and 
passenger rates, and to total operat- 
ing costs. 



izing and directing the holding of a 
public election in said Borough of Mo- 
naca. for'^e purpose of obtaining 
the assent of the electors of said bor- 
ough to the increaso of the in4ebted- 
ness thereof as aforesaid, and fixing 
the time and place for and providing 
for the holding of said election. 

Be it enacted and ordained by 
the Town Council of the Borough of 
Monacu, and it is hereby enacted and 
ordained by authority of the «ame: 

Section 1. That the said Town 
Council hereby declare and pignify 
their desire that the indebtedness of 
the*8aid borough of Monaca be in- 
creased in the sum of Fdrty-one 
Thousand Dollars ($41,000), in the 
manner provided for by the Act of 
Assembly of the Commonwealth of 
iPennsyivania, entitled, "An Act to 
regulate the manner of increasing the 
indebtedness of municipalities, to pro- 
vide for the redemption of the same, 
and to impose penalties for the illegal 
increase thereof," approved April 20, 
1874, and the several supplement 
and ametdments thereto, and all 
other laws of the Commonwealth of 
IVnnsylvania relating thereto, for the 
follrm-in^' purposes, viz.: 

Far water works improvements. Six 
Tlwusand Dollars (?6,000). , 

For street improvements. Eight 
Thousand Dollars ($8,000). 

For park improvements. Five 
Thousand Dollars ($.'.,000). 

For tHectric light and power e(iuip- 
ment. Ten Thousand Dollars ($10,- 
000). 

For storm sewers, Twcjive Thou- 
sand l)ollai< ($12,000). '^ 

For rr-funding overdue bonds. Sev- 
en Thousand Dollars ($7,000). 

For a floating indebtedness, Four 
Thousand Dollars ,($4,000). 

Section 2. That ^r the purpose of 
obtaining the fwtsent of the electors of 
said borough to said increase of in- 
debtedness thereof, a public election 
shall be. held in said borough in pur- 
suance of the Act of Assembly afore- 
said, and the several amendments 
and supplements thereto. 

Section li. Said election shall be 
held by the board of election officers 
of the several wards of said borough, 
at the places of holding the municipal 
elections therein, on Tuesday, the fif- 
teenth day of August, 1916, between 
the hours of 7 o'clock A. M., and 7 
o'clock P. Ml, imder the samejregula-. 
tions provided by law for the holding 
of municipal electioiis. 

Section 4. The question of increas- 
ing the indebtedness of said borough 
in said amount and for said purposes, 
shall 4>e submitted to said electors at 
^aitl election, in the manner provided 
by law, for the purpo.se of ascertain- 
ing the as.sent of said electors to, or 
di.ssent of .said electors from said in- \ 
crease of indebtedness. 

That the question of increasing the 
indebtedness of the Ilorough of .Mo- 
naca shall be printed upon the ballots 
by th(> proper authorities in brief 
form anti followed by the words "Yes" 
or "No," as provided in the Art of As- 
sembly in such case nia<le .tiul pro- 



of the taxable property in ndd bor- 
ough, which if fl,696,e22.00, «f th* 
amount of the exirting debt, wUch ia 
$69,040.00, consiatinff of • bonded 
debt in the eum of $66,000.00, and % 
floating debt in the sum of $4,000.00, 
and the amount and percentage of the 
proposed increase of indebtedness, 
which if Forty-one Thousand Dollars 
($41/)00), increase, and 2.68% plus of 
the asf^seed valuation. 

Section 6. Jhe Sf^r^tlfary of the 
Town Counieil and all other municipal 
officers are authorized and directed to 
do all other acts and things which 
may be necessary for the lawful hold-< 
ing of said election as provided by 
law. 

Ordained and enacted into an ordi- 
nance this fifth day of July, A. D. 
1916. 

D. J. MITCHELL, 
Attest: President of Council. 

E. B. STEINER, Secretary. 

Approve this tenth day of July, 
A. D. 1916. 

JAMES C. IRONS, 
Burgess. 



The amount of the last ptecadhMf shall be stated as follows 



assessed valtMtion of the taxsbltf 1 
property in said Borough, the amomit 
of the existing debt, and the amount 
and percentage of the proposed in- 
crease of the indebtedness of said 
Borough are as set forth in said or- 
dinance. 

E. B. STEINER, 
Secretary of Council. 
jlyl4-21-28-aug4 



at tha places of holding the municipal 
elections therein, on Tuesday, the fif- 
teenth day of August, 1916, between 
the hours of 7 o'clock A. M., and 7 
o'clock P. M., under the same regula- 
tionf provided by law for the holding 
of mtmicipal elections. 

Section 4. The question of increas- 
ing the indebtedness of said borough 
in said amount and for said purposes, 
shall be subnrutted to said electors at 
said election, in the manner provided 
b\ law, for the purpose of ascertain- 
ing' the assent of said electors to. Or 
dissent of said electors from said in- 
«r*ia9e of indebtedness. 

That the question of increasing the 
indebtedness of the Borough of Mo- 
naca shall be printed upon the ballots 
by the proper authorities in brief 
f.'rm and followed by the words "Yes" 
I'l "No," as provided in the Act of As- 
t^tmbly in Such case made and pro- 
vided, and that the questions be so 
stated as to afford the electors an op- 
portunity to vote separately upon the 
increase of indebtedness for each pur- 
I>ose as above stated. The questions 



Oi'dinanee No. 182 



An Ordinance signifyihg the inten- 
tion and desire on the part of the 
Town Council of the Borough of Mo- 
naca, to increase the bonded indebt- 
edness of said borough in the sum of i^ 
Forty-one Thousand Dollars ($41,- 
fff()), for the purpose of water works 
improvements, street improvements, 
parl« improvements, purchase of elec- 
tric light and power equipment, stoiin 
sewers, re-funding overdue bonds of 
said Borough of Monaca, and funding 
the floating indebtedness, and author- 
izing and directing the holding of a 
public election in said Borough of Mo- 
naca, for the purpose of obtaining 
the assent of the electors of said bor- 
ough to the increase of the indebted- 
ness thereof as aforesaid, and fixing 
the time and place for and providing 
for the holding of said election. 

He it enacted and ordained by 
the Town Council of the Borough of 
Monaca, and it is hereby enacted and 
ordained by authority of the same: 

Section 1. That the said Town 
Council hereby declare and signify 
their desire that the indebtedness of 
the said Borough of Monaca be in- 
creased in the sum of Forty-one 
Thousand Dollars ($41,000), in the 
manner provided for ^y the Act of 
Assembly of the Coiamonwealth of 
Pennsylvania, entitled, "An Act to 
regulate the manner of increasing the 
indebtedness of municipalities, to pro- 
vide for the redemption of the same, 
and to impose |>enalticfi for the illegal 
increa.se thereof," approved Apjil 20, 
1871, and the several supplements 



YES 
NO 

YES 

NO 

YES 
NO 

YES 

NO 



Shall the Borough indebt- 
edness be increased for the 
-"purpose of water works 
improvements in the sum 
of Six Thousand Dollars 
($6,000) ? 
'1. Shall the Borough indebt- 
edness be increased for the 
puprose of street improve- 
ments in the sum of Eight 
Thou.san<l I)ollars($8,000) ? 
Shall th<i Borough indebt- 
edness bo increased for the 
purpose of park improve- 
ments hi the sum of Five 
Thou-sand Dollars($5,000) ? 
1. Shall the 15orough' indebt- 
edness be increased for the 
purpo.se of purchasing elec- 
tric light and power equip- 
ment in the sum of Ten 
Thousand l)ollars($10,(M)0) ? 
Shall the Borough indebt- 
edness be increased for the 
purpose of constructing 
storm sewers in the sum 
, of Twelve Thou.sand Dol- 
lars ($12,000)? 
t>. Shall the bonded indebt- 
edness of the Borough be 
increased for the purpose 
of refunding overdue bonds 
in the sum of Seven Thou- 
sand Dollars ($7,000) ? 
7. Shall the bonded indebt- 
edness of the Borough bo 
increased for funding the 
floating indebtedness in, 
the sum of Four Thousand 
Dollars ($4,000)? , 

.Section 5. There being no news' 
lepers published in said Borough of 
Monaca, the Secretary of the Town 
< uuncil is hereby directed to give no- 
tice of the holding of said election 
llnring at 'least thirty days, by week- 
ly advertisements in the Daily Times 
and the Beaver Viilley Labor News, 
two. newspapers havin;* a general cirr 
culation in said borough, and by at 
last twenty (20) printed hand bills 
poste<l in the most public places in 
said Borough of Monaca, which said 
notices shall contjiin the purj^osos for 
which the indebtedness is to be in- 
creased, a statement of the amount of 
ist prpce<lintr assessed valuation 



YES 
NO 

YK.S 
NO 

YES 



Assisting Bnsinsss Growtli 



Commercial patrons of moderate requirements as well 
as those with larger interests find here a congenial financial 
atmosphere. 

Our highly efficient organization, possessed of excellent 
facilities and adequate connections, is constantly at the ser- 
vice of our patrons. 

Our continual effort to further the interests of all pa- 
trons is not confined to the narrow limits of accepted bank- 
ing service but includes every advice and assistance consis- 
tent with our modem, constructive banking policy. 



Beaver Trust Coinpany 

BEAVER, PENNSYLVANIA. 
CAPITAL AND SURPLUS $390,000.00. 



vi<i(vl, an«l that the ijUt'stions be so 



Yi:.^ 



NO 



YK.^ 



Yi:.^ 



NO 



NOTICE 



To 



of 



the Electors of the Borough 
Monaca : 
Notice is hereby given that a 8i>ec- 
ial election .wjll be held on Tuesday, 
^ the fifteentli day of August, 1916, be- 
tween the hours of 7 o'clock, A. 'M.; 
and i o'clock, P. M., at the places 
of holding the municipal elections in 
the several wards of said Borough of 
llonaca, by the boards of election of- 
■ ficers of said borough, for the purpose 
. and in accordance with the provisions 
,;°'ftdly pet forth in the following ordif^ 

ORDINANCE NO. 182 

An Ordinance signifying the inten- 

. tloB and desire on the part of the 

; Town Cooneil of the Borough of Mo- 

to faiereaae the bonded indebt- 

of Mid boroogh in the smn of 

Twty-m» llioiiMnd DoUara (|41r 

000), for the purpoae of water Vorks 



J B UHWf S iiiti i ta, allMl inprovenMnts, 
V lisk inqpiwauMBta, pvrehaM of olee- 
.vte Hl^t and power OQidpinoBt, otonn 
le^nuMliBg ovexdno boBda of 
(dUimattL, and fimdbf 
and mti ifli^ 




YK.^ 



NO 



YKS 



statrd a.s to alVtird the ciector.s an 0|> 
portuiiity to vole .<opaiat(;ly upon th' 
iiuicase oT imU-bteilni-ss for each pur 
l>(>si' as above stated. The <iue.stion: 
shall be stat«<l as fitllnw.s: 

.Shall the liorou^'li indebt- 
edness be increased for the 
purpose of water woiks 
iiii|irovenients in the sum 
of ,<ix 'riiousand I'olfeirs 

2. .'^llail the Uorough ind«'bt- 
edness be increa.>*ed for tho 
puriH»sr of street im|)rovc- 
ir.i'iits in the sum of KiL'lit 
Thousand l>olhirs(.'i;S.()0()) 7 
:;. .Sliall till' Mon)Uirh iiidrbt- 
edness be incroasi d fm' tln' 
purpose of p.irk iniprove- 
nients in the sum of Five 
'riious.-uid l)oliars(S:. noo) ■.' 
-I. .Shall the U*m)UiLrli iiwlcbt- 
• dness be iin'rra.'<il for tlic 
purpose of piuvliasinir elec- 
tric iiirht and |)o\ver etjuip- 
iiient in the .sum of Ten 
TFiousand nollars( SIO.OOO) *: 
T). Shall the Morougli indebt- 
ednesis be increas«'d for the 
purpose of con^'tructing 
Storm se\ver.«? in the sum 
of Twelve Thousand Dol- 
lars (.>?12.1M)())? 
(5. Shall the bonded indebt- 
edness of the Borough be 
increasoil for the puri>OR<* 
of refunding overdue bonds 
■ in the sum of Seven Thou- 
siind Dollars ($7,000)? 
7. Shall the bonde<l indebt- 
ednes.s of the Borough be 
increased for funding the 
floating indebtedness in 
th^sum of Four Thousand 
Doflars (-$4,000)? 
Section 5. There being no news- 
papers published in said Borough of 
Monaca, the Secretary of the Town 
Council is hereby directed to give no- 
tice of the holding of sai4 election 
dtiring at least thirty days, by week- 
ly advertisements^ the Daily Times 
and the Beaver Valley Labor News, 
two newspapers having a general cir- 
culation in said borough, and by at 
last twenty (20) print«l hand bills 
posted in the most puUic places in 
said Boroiigh of Monaca, which said 
noClcsa shall contain the purpigses for 
wUdk tho iBdebtedDOOs is to be in- 
enaasd, a skataman^ of the amount of 
tbt last inriwdim aMSMsd valuatioB 



and anuMKliuents thereto, an 1 a 

other laws of the (.'oniiiionweallh of i the 

Pennsylvania relating thereto, for the | of the taxable property in said bor- 

followinu' purpo.ses. viz.: dugh, which is .^l, .")'.),"> ,0)2 J. 00, of tin- 

For uater works improvements, Six nmoimt of the existing debt, which is 
Thousand Dollars (.^(^OOO). j $6!».<t4().00, consisting of a bonded 

For .str.-et improvenient.s, Eijjht j debt iWhe sum of .Sn.'i.OOO.OO. and a 
Thou.-.ind Dollars ($S,(M)()). j no;itint>fiebt in the sum of $4,0()0.(M). 

For park improvements, Five'^n^' t''*" amount and percenta^'o of the 
Ti\ousand Dollars (.■?r..OOO). j pro|)i)sed increase of iijilcbti'dness. 





Two Suites of Offices 
Elegant Location 




New Brighton, Pa. 



I 



'•«i m i#»tllll> H ltlll H I Hr t MH 4»«»« M *#4 »M II I II 

\ Rochester Llghtiiig studios \ 

CHAS. Z. FOGEL, Prop. 

; Electrical Contractors and Makers of ; \ 
Fine Lighting Fixtures 



Bell phone 221-J. 
; 205 BRIGHTON AVE., ROCHESTER, PA. ; - 

' i m ii m i« mf <*<i»» f «t ff » * < m «ii n iiiiii n i»! 



♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦o»oo»»»»»»»»»»e» 



L. P. HARN STANSBURY 

'< > Watchmaker, Jeweler, Optician 
and Engraver. 
Bell Phone 1274-W 
582 Third St^ • • Beaver 



< leclric livrht and p«)\vor etpiip 
T- II Tliou.sand Dollars ($10, 

"wilvo Thou 



For 
ment, 
00(»).- 

For storm sew^ers, 
sand Dollars (."^IL'.OOO). 

For ro-funditiK' ovonlue bonds, Sev- 
•Mi TlKuisand Dollars (ST.OOO). 

I'm- a float inix ind<'l>t(Mlness, Four 
Tli()u>:in<l Dollars (.<4.(M)0). 

."^fciioii L'. That t"or the purpo.so of 
obt.-iininvr ti;e assent of tho clectorsof 
sai(U liorouirli to s.aid inerr;ise of in- 
N() liflitfiinfss thereof, a public (dection 
shall he held in said b«irou^'h in pur-l 
su;mro i.^^ the Act of Asseiubly afore- 1 
said, and the several .•iinondnientsl 
jand supplements thereto. 

.">^<Ttion :;. .•^ai(^ election shall be 

' hehl by the board of «'lection officers 

of the .several wards of said borough. 



.1 which is I-'orty-one Thousand Dollars 

l)lus of 



j ($41,000)^ increase, and -IX^V \ 

'the assossed valuation. 

' Section (>. The ."^ecrctarv 



of the 



1 I 



Town Council :in(l all other municipa 
officers are authorized and directed to 
do all other acts and things which 
may be" ni'cessary for the lawful iiold- 
ing of .said eU'ction :i-« provi.leil b> 
law. 

If. 

Ordained and cnacti-d iTili^ an ordi- 
nance this liflhday of .hil\ . \. D. 
lit Hi. 

D. .1. .MITCHKI.I.. 
Attest: rrt'sicU'tU of Council. 

v.. I!. .^ri;i\"KK. secretary. 
Aporov.-d this tenth day of .luly, 
A. D. I'.'K;. , 

JA.MK.-^ C. IRONS. 
jlyll-Jl-L'S IJurgess. 



♦ m iiiiii iiiiiii II II i i »*f 
W. R. ANDERSON 

Meat Market 

I All Kinds of Frmh and Smoked \ 

Meats. 

Freedom, - - Penna. 



♦♦•♦#>»o»»»a##»<»eo»»ao»a ^ 

SAVOY HOTEL AND ' ' 

RESTAURANT \\ 

Workingnnen's HoteL \\ 

Open Day and Night. 
506 Seventh Ave.. Beaver Falls 



■♦♦♦ I ♦ H » 'l H t t** I I I I I H l 'l'< 



♦ ♦♦' U llt^ ^ ' H ** ** "!' ! '!-**' ! ' ** -*" 

RAINCOAT SALE 
For Ladies, Men and Boys. Also 
Rain Capes at very low prices. 

CHAS. STEIN, 
1133 Penna. Ave, Monaca, Pa. ! 




NO 



\ Leon Schnitzer \ 

» 
> 



>##♦♦♦»»♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦»♦♦♦»»♦♦♦♦ 

W We Insure Every Thing ;; 

Under the Sun — 

Consult Us. 



« 
A 
A 

A 
A 

A 



$10 and $15 Clothes Shop 

Clearance Sale 
New Going On 



U 



LEON SCHNITZER ' 

* ...a 

137 Brighton Av^, .^ Rochester, ^^. 



'«t 



MOULDS & DONCASTER, 
Rochester, Penna. 



'We Hold Thee Safe. 



n 



♦< • 1 1 1 1 n 1 1 1 1 11 < n 11 11 1 m 

Penna. Ave. Pharmacy 

Ira C. HoflFman, P. D., Prop. 

Penna. Ave & 13th St. 

MONACA, - PENNA. 

"The Rezall Store." 

♦♦Ill n il iii mmn i nn ^ y 

♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ea»e<<#aa»»e0<, ^^ 

1916 WALL PAPERS - 
at 
KENAH BROS. 

Third Ave., New Bris:hton \\ 

»♦♦♦»>»♦» ♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦a 

^ JOHN W. HARTZEL <► 

Plunibinff, Gas Fittfais, Tfai and o 

Slate Roofinir. \\ 

^ ^ Hot Air Furnaces. < v 

i> P. O. BldK. - - Rochester ; ^ 



'I, 
I.. 



eee f >♦»»#< ttttt»aaa»»0»»» 



For Good Gandy and Ice 
Go to the 

Olympia ConfectioneiT 

Maaonk Bldf., New Brigkttn 



^♦♦♦4 



ai<#ttt » ###>» MMM l i* > >•> 1 



: Quinn T. Walton i; 

PLUMBER 

Gas, Steam and Hot Water \l 
Fitting. 



Estimates Promptly Ghren. 



Both Phones. 
I : Third St., BEAVER, PA. ] \ 



■ •••i mnn i f it um iii 

Tm Taw Nest dalt See 



ALEX MUDRDS 
Merchant Tailor 



78 New Talk Ava., 

mumummmmm i 



DR. F. R. HOLT, DENTIST ; 
Wilson Bldf., Rochester. 

Office Hours: 9 to 12 a. m.; 1 \ 
to 5 p. m. O^im evenings. 
Bell 612.R. B. C. 7004 



»♦♦#♦»< 



j <<iiiiii M i nnmmnt » 



PIANOS and VICTROLAS \ \ 

New Records received on the o 

28th of each naj^th at * ^ 

Rochester Music Ston * *■ 

Brif htaa Ave„ ROCHBSTIB. \ t 



• i M tt MH ttii n ii mn »( 



i m ii nnmnmnnn > 

WBf. B. MeKBAN 

• Flamhiiif, etm, StMun and *■ 

Tlh St airf Tik Ava. 
; Beth ProMa. HUTSB VALLS \ I 



l iii mummm i 



iii!;t.Hi., ,j*K&... 



■■■¥ 



BEATS TALLBT ttfWmWB 



1 









( 



K 



r 



Closing Out Sale 



A 
A 
A 



MSd-Summer Hats \ 

Regular $6.75, $7.50, $8.95 Value* Only «* 
» 

Schwartz* Millinery I 





^ 166 Brighton Avenue • ROCHESTER. PA. || 




IIUNillllllllllHIii^ 



iit'l 



Beautiful Bust und Slioulders 

■re irauibie if you will wear a •I'ieatificaUy 
constructed Uien Jolie Urouiere.^ 

The IraKtcinfT weight of an unconAned b«»t 
•o alrctclics the aupportinK muscles that 
the contour of the figure is spoiled. 



B^t 



BRX^i-etmf 




HELP COMMITTEE ON 
INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS 



Money Needed to Carry on Work 
Help Those Who Are Help- 
ing: the Workers. 



ORGANIZED LABOR HAS 

APPROVED ITS WORK 



•BBIOHT FUTTFKE FOB 
TIOLmBT WHO PLATS HEBE 



Bot the hn>t hack whrre it bctonc*. prercnt the 
hill bimt fnini luivina the appcaranre nf flalv 
binriM. rliniiimte the dancer of clrasKinvniuiM-li-i 
anil ronltiie the flf»h nf the nhouhlt-r trivjng u 
graceful line to tlic entire upper budy . 

They arc the dainticxt and mo«t •ervlrrahlc itar- 
mentR iniigrinabU — rnme in all niatrriaU and 
style*: CroM Uark, ll<»k Fmnt, Surplice. Dnnd- 
eau. etc. Bnnrd with "WhIkIiii." tlie ruxtlc** 
Iwiiing^pcmiittint wanhing witluiut rtmoval. 
Have your dealer »how you Bien Jolie Bnuwierr*, 
if not Htnckeit, we will gladly acod him. prepaid, 
Mmples to show you. 

BKNJAMIN & JOHNKS 

SI Warren Street Newark. N. J 



luiuiiuiiiiiiiiiiiiiHiiyiiiiiuiiiiiiiiiil 



■■■■■: 



■ 
■ 



^^Onyx** im Hosiery 



Yo» Get GOOD Value at ANY Price— Silk; X-i»le or Cotton 

25c to $5.M per pair 

J Emery 'Beers Company, imc 

■ WHOLESALE 153191 EAST»4ih ST. NEW YORK 




A SKIN LIKE VELVET 

smooth, clear, free of wrinkles. 

Use the exquisitely 
fragrant cream of the 
beauty flower of India 
and he rompliroented 
on your complexion. ■ « ■ ^^-^ a ^^ a 

l-^^i^t"^ ELCAYA 



cr£me 



Advertise In the Labor News 



Business Directory 

Beaver Merchants Who Are Friends of Organized 
Labor and Deserve Your Patronage. 



F. H. MAYO 



THE REXALL 3TORE 



otli Phonos. 



Bkavku Pa 



6. W. WALTON HDW. CO. 

Siu-ri-»wir5 til 

Beaver Hardware Co. 

Dealers in M:ir<lw.ir«>. Smv.-. Home Furnishinfis. 

iind hiirin liiiplfinfiils. 
HOTII PHONES. DKAVKK. PA 

F.C.DANDO 

GROCER 

lU'ii iLV.L'-u. li. V. ♦i.V);) 
Third Street, - Mkavkk. I'a. 

•'The House of Quality" 

N. STOLOWITZ 

TAILOR 

BEAVEK AND WOODLAWN 

J. C. KIMPLE 

GROCERIES 

B. C.fil29; Hell 1072 
643TniBDST., Bkavkr, Pa. 



All Wool Suits 

( !M(iN Mauk) 



$15 



.00 



FRICK^S 

'The Store That's Difjercrxt' 



T;"he followinK is " cop.'^ "^ ^ letter 

beinK sent out by the L'liilod .States 

Coruniittee on Industrial Relations to 

all local and central bodies: 

To All Local Unit»ns of Kvcry Craft 

and CallinK in the Lniti-d .States— 

(Jreetinji: 

The C'oiiimik«'«' on Indu.slnal Uola- 

tions is williMK an<l v\xv.vr to continue 

its ser\ice with labor. Or^rani/.ed labor 

has approvt'ii it ami it ha.s proved it- 

.si'lf to Ik- nt'tfs.sary. Hut it cannot k« 

on without money. The workers have 

been liberal in their support up to this 

! liiiii', but the\ inu.sl continue if the 

! committee i.s to be a continuin^r l)ody. 

i Kxcept for a .small stair the comiuil- 

j lee's .serficcs are freely contributed. 

I The only motive of/its inember.N is to 

serve tlie cause of imliistnal justice. 

; Thi-s cominillee was organized hy 

Irank V. Walsh, the head of the 

Inited States ("ommi.<:siotv on Indus- 

■ trial Uelations, who directs it now and 

■will continue to do so. Its business is 

t(j carry on tiie work which he and the 

labor men of the committion did as a 

iiiiblic body. Labor can krcp it irniiiK 

'.if it \vill. , - - '-^,. 

.\ s'.atcmeir. of some ni tin liibi^.j 

accoiiiplished by the coimiiiltef i> '^'U' 

rlosod herewith. The huiinTous otlirr 

iliily atlivit'es of the coMunitlec cau- 

' not oven be indicated in a hrief letter. 

'Ilie coinmi.tlee pl.wi- vi'.r<>niii.- con- 

tituiaiice of lis work. In aildition to 

lis pc.v lettiTs am! I'eports riwnislni! 

to .-ill tlie labnr press of the count r\ 

iiid to all olhci- news ajrencies, lln 

• xiiinittee will have I lie service.- '■! 
.Is ci^-iini'an. .Mr. Walsh, in tlu" m.ik 
MIL' of fiTijUiiit spe(>chcs cdveriim al: 

• •(■•. ioii.v of the coumr;. . .Such s<t\ 

1 " .- will he c(intri!>iit( d without char;'" 
'" any sort. 
In order to d'l thes<' thini's the com 
ti ittee must have the financial sup 
nrt <if such orj'.uii/ations as yours. 
!'h.c committee repeats that it has no 
■iitrrest in this except mutual interest 
..ith you \t\ .son"inn lahor and luivanc- 
inp the cause of economic and politi- 
cal liberty. If you believe that the 
committee is (MMforminir a service that 
is useful and nece.-s.-'.ry. \<)ur s'^upport 
is .<;olicit(>d. If you have already con- 
tributed to thi' coininittee you will 
jiaidoii our sending' this additional .ap- 
peal, althou^rli your additional u'cner- 
osit\'. if th.at is ])ossible, will be irreat- 
ly appreciiiled. 

The treasurer of this committee is 
Mr. .lohii n. Li-mion. who for mon- 
than a (|U;irler of a centui\- has been 
.ind still is the tre;isiirer of the .Amer- 
ican Feiieration of Labor. I'h-ase iiuike 
.\our checks or m<)ne\' oi tiers pa>ablr 
to him .-md .'oldress your letti'rs to 
s:;l! .Southern liuiidiiir. W'.ashiiiirton, 
I). C. 

We are faithfullv vours. 
Cn.M.MlTTKK n\ rxiU'STRLAL 
UKL.'VTIO.NS. 
Frank I'. Walsh. Chairman, 
.lohn 11. Lennon. 
.lames O'Connell, 
Austin 1'.. (larretson. 
.lohn P. White. 
.\jriies .Nestor. 
Frederic ('. Howe, 
ClKirles I). William.s. 
.hilin Fit7.p:itiick, 
Helen .Marot. 
.Amos I'inchot. 
Hante i'.rirton. 




^eraalile Quartet to Be Heard 

Fourth Day of the Chaataa<|na 




TJONALI) McBKATIl. theyouny Alls- 
trallan violinist, who -vill he henrd 
here on the seventh day of the <''bnu- 
tauqua, may be classed ns one uf Iby 
™M< H^^iiP^ affd iKipuljir yX ^^ !r<»uiiBcr 
gehooloffii«tronient«llst8. He lia| 
only H'Cfntl^- completeil hi« Uilrd sea- 
mTi k3 'cTiTef ns»iHtiii>:Jirtist^\y)t|t JoLH 



WOLVERINE MALE QUARTET. 

TIIK Wolvrrino Male Qtiiirtet which will W liennl lieri' on th«' fotirtb day 
of the Clinutflliqua is pn.l.ahly one of tbo most veniiitlle orjrnnlzaliona 
(III thi" Chiuitiiuipm iilalfioiii. All four of these yoijnt; men liiivc innd» 
nnisle a serious stndv, ami two of the iiumlK?r have won nlynal «ue- 
ceRB ns tenehers. Kxery niemher --f tin- eonipauy l» a eapahle liistnimentallHtv 
nn«l two arc «'Xe«'lkMit pluiiisis. I'.iieh has \\ volee of remar\t«hln *|i)allty uwd 
power. iiikI each in jiIs»i an ini|>ei-sonat"r of distinet ability and ctiiishh-rahle 
profess Ion ji I ex|K'rieine. The n-^uU <>f such a eoinbluntlon of taleut. as would 
untunilly W mupimis«'<1, Is an ork'aiii/.sitiou of real worth »i»d ^»UcIlou^cnnl ver- 
satility. ' 

Tli(> M-U'ctioii.H of the WolxerlneH have plenty of iiuislcal worth and are 



I Jlii.' 



rt'uderiMl >vitli tlie vliii and dasli of xv\\ blmMled yonnj; men who delight in jrtv- 
llH; un ciiterinlnirienl tiuiT restify enlerlniiis. Tlieli* jCro«nun Includes. In addi- 
il.^ii »,. tiKi viu-iil iiiiil iiistnniientiil iiunil»ers • :' - he ' •■ l^nd 



11(1 J3^T? rtie$ favorite Mtli McCof. 
inaJkiiH.ITpHPej^ en«fT^hvr J. -- — 
¥r\ii KrelHler. wTJ^ i!» lf|^'j;^r»lly re- 
;;anle<l as the prentt'St JI* '.iTu"vT<ilinl«t. 
lias taken a keen iiitwresf ^li Mr .Mo- 
Meat li l.ec.inse l(.e rei-o>;ni/«'s lii.. Go- 
iiMual t.ilems of the younj: .Viisiijiiinn. 
.Mr. Kriesler lia«* I'een eomhinu him 
durinu the past .\ e:n- and pie.jiits for 
.Mel'.eatli. who is l.jirely In his i wen- 
ties, a \«'ry hri;:lit future 



tlon h. the Nociil and instrinnental nunihers^ .rttu..,B'~. ililll-l-rvl^ll^v,, 




MEMBEB OF BOSTON 
SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 
TO BE HEARD HERE 




Creator of English Role of ''Madame 
Butterfly'' to Be Heard at Ciiautauqua 



J. H. MARTSOLF 

DRUGGIST 

Bell 1398; B. C. 6644 
636 Third St., Bbaveb, Pa. 



L A. Mitchell 

Meat Market 

^ Frwh and Smoked Moats and Poultry 
in Seaoon. 



Both Phonos. 



BEAVER. PA. 



Rowse's Drug Store 



KAII KOAI) SIIOI'MKN 

WIN 'rm:iK strikj<: 



Beaver, Pa. 



BEAVER CAFE 

ROLLIN PA RRO TT, Prop. , 

First Class Restaurant, Soda 
Fountain and Confectionery. 

GRO-CO STORE CO. 

Succe««or« to Grovr Bro«. 

Fancy (iroceries and Notions . 

Wholesale and Retail I 

Hell Phones 9'«)-9*iL Bkavbr, Pa, , 



I 111 |:ni. . .111!; _'T. .Alx.ut 1 ,0on r-.,, 
;i'n\'i • oi' ! '!(■ L'li il'n. Roi'lii -Id' A" 
I'ltt -Inirir ra i.-;i; i:ii r>M..- /ki\ ■ ■. (■n 

I tllV(^e ii.-i\:-' -tril .. jiii.j .w-rcureii i .'i 

II r ('lit V.M.'e ilir-ieases, the <'i(.'ht 
lour day ami i'e<-oi'nit ion oi" "heii- un 

•oji, winch 's .-iffili.-iti'd to the Amer- 
<an I'eikr.it ion of L.ahor. 

I'hcse workers dismvered that 
v\hen tlicy tied lip ihe sliops ;ind yani- 
ih.it th(> manat'eiiienl .abandoned its 
policy nf sjmpl\ acknowledirintr re- 
ceipt of their dem.ands. 



iiii u 

♦lit.' 



ARTHUR FIEDLER. 

A iM'iii'u rii:i)ij:i:. i-ianist win, 

Mnie. I •oia I>e l'lilllip|pe, who ;ii( 
[K'Jir- here on the sevi-ntli <lii\ of tin 
Cliaiitaurina. wjis horn in ItosiMn .-mil 
is the son of KmiMitiel I"iedler.' Ilrst vi.. 
lliilsl of file r.ostoii Syiiiphoii.x i tri-|ie-> 
tra. "f whom he rereived his e.irlv nni 
si<n| edtieiition. I.;ifer he studied jii 
llerliii and has done extensive con, ori 
work as soloist and in eiisemhle :il| 
oxer <;erni:i!iy, Sweden .iml I'enmark 
Mr. i'iedicr wns ji siie<ial |>ro(e:;e oi 
i'liiHt'SK ileirkel \'-n I 'ounorxuKirk. 
I'llieeSH ItatilMis and the <ouiifess of 
\\ arienslelw'n ninl lias |ila.\e<l ,i ;;re;ii 
de:il with find for the (MTiiiaii iioliilKv 
I Miring' the pres«»jit wiir lie played in 
ninny military hospitals for the wound 
ed s«d(heni. but Inter left <;erinany to 
bo<-onic a meinlier uf the Moeton 8yui 
phony Orchestra. 




MME. DORA DE PHILLIPPE. 

ANiiTIIIII! miled prinia duiin;i h.i.s entered < liaiiiau'jiia work' 'l"hi>. tltne 
it Is .Mine l»iiia i\<- rhilliiipo. . n-jiior ,.f the title role <>f .M.i<lame ISnt- 
lerlly in I'.iiL'li-h. and im h.'tler trilmie ■ould he paid to the liiul) 
* (lu.ility « 'f t lie < 'iiauL-iiiipia pio-iam than i his niinoiineeineiit 
.Muic. lie riiillipi'c h.-i- I.eeii heard In ".MMdanie Itutlerlly" iiioi-.. fhnn :{no 
times :iMd is one ol" the finiiiiost opera -<iir.;er> in this country In addition to 
".Madame Hii ttcrtly ."" she ;il<o rre.ili-d ^iu- leadiii- rolo in "The Secret of Su- 
zanne" in <'aiiada. She will I .e lieanl in a ;:nind ion. -erf reiil.al on the seventh 
niirlit «>f the < li i \ii,Mi'|ua, .n-.-oiiipnnled I'V two e-pLally famous artist-^. 1 lonald 
.Ml r.eatli, .\ifJlr;iliaii violiiil-t, n ho for three years ^y.\< ii<"< onip.niied .Fojui .Me- 
Corniinl;, \v..ild l.inioii-^ leiii«r. on his tours, and Arlhur i'letller. iilanlst and 
llw«Uil>or of the l'.o-t"ii S\ iii|ili.p|iy «M-.ln-iia. 



(1iinitiiiH|ii:i, l)('avei', July 21»-Aiii:-. 4 



MILLS IVIORK DKADLY 

THAN ACTIAL WAR 



W. E. FLORENCE 

Registered Plumber 

B. C. Phone 6341 

Corporation St., Beavkr, Pa. 



J. T. GREMER 

Bakery and Confectionerj; 

Home Made Bread a Specialty 
576 Thikd St.. BaaynB. Pa. 



Harrisliuru, I'a.. -Inly 27. — Com- 
missioner of Labor Jackson .says that 
if every man of the rojfular army 
alone the Mexican border, receives a 
Avound in battle, the aKj?rej?ate num- 
ber of wounded would not equal the 
roster of those w-ounded in the mills 
of Pennsylvania during the first 152 
days of this year. 

it is shown that fiurinjr the period 
from January 1 to June 1, 1916, 964 
workers were killed and 100,287 in- 
jured, and on an average 191 workers 
were killed every month of the year, 
and an averaire of 20,248 were in- 
jured each month. 



Subscribe for The Labor News. 




Native town patriotitm 
is the mother of nocne success. 

Good things to sell, proper 
IwUitAy ia this paper aad 
8lkk'4oiliveBess m Duyws ii 
diis vicinity — buyers mean 
mon^. mon^ bnngs evesy- 
thng to your door, sen 



«Oa»rfiakt.iMkhr 



T5 



n.> 



Stabacribe for The Labor Newa. 



"UNWEPT, UNHONORED 
AND UNSTLNOr 

That's the phrase used by John Kendrlck 
Banga. humorist, to describe the "tri- 
umphal" return of the defeated candi- 
date -a Ad It's only a fair sample of the 
delightfiil wit that runs through 9Ut his 
lecture. "More Salubrities." to be deliv- 
ered on - .^ 

The Seventh Afternoon of the 

Chautauqua 

MR. BANOa HAS BEEN IN TURN MAN^QINQ EDITOR OF LIFE. 
EpITOR OF HARPER'S WEEKLY AND OF THB MITROFOLITAN 
MAGAZINE AND 18 ONE OF THE FOIIIIUOaT HUMOROUt WRIT- 
ERS AND LECTURERS OF THE PRESENT DAY. 







'^jf 


>. 

► - 


1 


f^ 


^ 


I^O^^- 


'\ 




^ ' N':, 





§mf r»m 0mn Bmr • *—*»^ tief^t y 'mmm #w«r Lm»m ' 

no ir /fowt 






s 










>••■■ 



..'•- 



-«» w^ 



mnm^imi^-^ 




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:..*#- 



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■^1 I l i y tf , 




:j 



BBAVOt TALLBY LABOR NEWS 



BEAVEB VALLEY LABOR NEWS 

Pttblldi«d Eack Friday by tlie 
BEAVER VALLEY LABOR NEWS COMPANY 
Near TUrd St. and Colfege Ave. • - Beaver, Penn'a, 

En^Brad as Mcond-clau matter October 8, 1915, at the post office 
•t Baayer, Puuuiylvania, under the act of March 3, 1879. 



EIGJI'IHOIR DAY BENEFITS ALL. 

"The men who work eJH^ hours a day have a puiiwse. What 
aim has the twelve-hour workei? To work — that is all. He 
work, eats and sleeps, and h«us no other thought or i)urpose; he 
has not the time, fio does not jro to theatres, nor even u movie; 
he has not the time. Ho does not ivad; he needs his .spare time 
to recuperate for his ne.xt tweive-houi- stretch. He has no know- 
ledsre even of how his children fan'. The man, however, who 
works eight hours has the time. 01 course, it may l)e true that 
some men abu.so this leisure time, hut what does that prove? 
I^prd Macauley once said that *the remedy for the abuse of newly 
ucciuiretl freedom was moie freedom and this will, if followed, also 
corivct the apparent al)U.se of the shorter work day. I miKht say, 
and with truth, that the shorter workday spells temperance, for it 
IK the long hour man that requires stimulants and eventually be- 
comes intemperate, and he cannot We hiamed for doing thi.s." 

President (Jompeis then went up into the statistics Of the Ci- 
{farmakors' union to prove that the shoiter workday had increased 
the averagi' life of the nienihers fifteen years. ^ 

In speaking of the eight-hour day and what it did for the 
eniployei-. I'lvsident (lompers stated that he had visited one of 
the largest industi iai i)laiits in this country, and one that was not 
fav()ial)le to unions, and the rejiresentative told him that when 
they I'educed the li()ui> of their workers from ten to nine, there 
was a JO iHM- cent imrea.se of pioduct. and the pi'oduct was in- 
crea-sed ('»(> poi cent wlieii the men were redwcerl to eight hours, 
thus pro\ ing that the (■ight-h()ur< day w;ls profitable to the em- 
ployer, the eini)ioye an<i the country. — From speech at Young.s- 
towTi. Ohio. 

o 



EI61IT-II0IIR WORK DAY 



(Continued from Pag« Od* 



rjeiuU'edjH' s, Ijio best way to make an impression on an iii- 
, dividual or a lai;',e l,»()(iy of persons is to iinpiess on their minds 
th'j t'iict th;il ycA\ i;:"c prcphieci to rupoi iiiom in i.aitip nt any tirn<> 
or place. 'I'his cannot lie areomplished liy any idle ta'lk or show. 
but, you mii.;t be able t/» make good what you say; ne\er foiget 
that the employeis are watchin;.'; us. know our every niovenient 
and aic ;tuare if we ixvc tiyiiig to spring a l>!utf on, tlieni; builil 
youi" local I'nions on a soi'd l»asis, and alKnc all. set- liial your 
treasury has enough monry at al! tinie- to pruiect vuur needs. 

o 

Mr. Xon-l'nionist. do vou e\ei tliin!; seriousl.N' (jI .\'oi:! m- 
du>t!!a! conditions, your wages and the houis you have to toil? 
If you Juive. you can conu' to no othoi- <lccisioii thaa to join the 
C'al't oi- trade unit>n of your class; join now a.nd siand sli(>ul(ler 
to >iiou!dei- with your' feliow-ci-aftsmoJi in their (ight fo;- fail' 
living wages aiul reasonai)!e hours of work. You need us! and 
we need you. ' 



^Brotherhoods Complete 'Balloting 



Now York, .luly -Jli.— The lir-ic al- 
lowi'd for tiu> vdU" of tlie biotluTlinods 
of .railroad cnKincHTs, lirrmcn, con- 
durtors and tniinnicii in tho fa.'^t on 
tlvf i|iicslion of calling: a .striki- for 
KhorU-r liours :ind Id-ttcM- pay oxpircd 
tmla:.. The olTu-ial count of the voir 
will Ix'jrin AuKU.sl 1. and will contiaai- 
until AuKU.st .'>. DIViccrs of ihv four 
brot!\orhoo(l.s will assonibli- heir dur- 
ing ill' n'M'.ainini;- day.^ :>t thi* wcfk. 

l!all('l.s in bij; humlU'.s arrivi-d ttxi.iy 
at li'-otliirhood i'.tadiiuartcr.s \\v\v. 
Hrotlii rhodd otVii-ials pictlictcd that 
tho voto of all tlu' (.rj^anization.-; 
would hr ovorwholniiiiLrly in favor nl' 
aulhon/.iiiv: their ronfiTfiwc roinmit- 
tcc to call a .«t!iki' if th«> railroa<l 
ronipanit's rofuscd to unirU an ritrlii- 
hoiir tlay and linu- and a iialf for 
ovtrtii'io. 



ii 



REfiOtKR" BALL GAME 



What will untlouhtcdly l>o tlir mo!* 
lanrcly attnulrd and cxcitinir I'idl 
cranio |)!ay<'d in ll.f v:illoy thi.< sca.^on 
will i)c tlir one Saturday aft^rno«)n 
hotNM'tn Ko«!uMt'4- and l.cavcr Kalis. 
at the lUx'hcstcr park. IJoth ti-ains 
ar(» pnnu'd for tho occa.sion and con- 
hid»?-ahlo money h.i.s a!ro;uiy h«»rn 
j>o.>-ttsl. Tho iraiiu' i.s one of a series 
to iletorniine tho ehainpionship of tho 
county, and will Im- hard-foujrht. 



SENATOR F. P. WALSH 
FAVORS 8 HOUR DAY 



Sayfi Demand fur It Im Not Subject 

Tor .\rl)jtra(ion Itvcaum^ It (h In- 

eontoftlably RiKht. 



The followinjr oxtnict from a speech 
made recentljj- by U. S. Senator Frank 
P. Walsh, Chairman of the Committee 
on Industrial Helations, shows what 
this distinf^ished f^entleman thinks 
of the eight-hour work day: 

"I hold that the eight -hour day is 
so incontestably right that the demand 
for it ii not a subject for arbitration. 
It ihottld be taken as a matter of in- 
alienable right through the etkmomic 
power of the workers. Not only should 
Bo man be compalled to work more 
titan «i^t hours a dajr, but no man 
■hoidd be permitted to work more 
than eight houra a day, except with 
jbm eonaent of his fellow woricera and 
vadnr eonditiona which they impoae 
1^ tii^ eollaetlTt barfaininc powar 
to Mt that tha ooe man data not in- 



vadr* and loiperil the ri^rlit- of \\\> 
follows. 1 li|>ld furtiier that lli.- ri.yht 
of the workers to lollectivc harpain- 
inti and the riirlit of every wurker to 
be pitileeted liy his fellow workor- 
from arbitrar.\ (lischar>re aie al.'-.i the 
inalic'n;d»le I'iuhts of modern imiu.str.v 
and the.v aii^o are not subjects of ar- 
lulration." 



PIANIST TO BE HEARD 
AT THE CHAUTAUdUA 
IS ALSO A COMPOSER 



m 




time made forty-iive working da.tt at 
the throttle, , -^ 

"Railroad otficials would Wli this 
man an 'aristocrat of th^ iabor 
world' and cite the fact that V) re- 
ceived good pay, but they ^ ould 
neglect to mention the Iohk ' ^^^^ 
he worked to enable him to • rn a 
fair wuge," declares the TrdR).' xta- 
tion Brotherhoods' Publicity 1: reuu. 

"Train crews are now con .elled 
to work from twelve to ' enty 
hours continuously and they ai' aak- 
inx that their workday be made iuu-t- 
er und their working conditi* s hv • 
bettered. They receive a lee.- wa^re 
per hour than most anw other ' ade." | 
Waf«« Per Hour Low. j 

The bureau declares that th only 
intellit^ent basis '^on which to scuss | 
watces is to show how much : man { 
receives per hour for his woi k. It 
shows the prevailing wages r> eived 
per hour by freight crews a com- 
pared to other trades, as fono\\ > : [ 

Locuniotive engineers -18 '^-e I 

Mricklayers, plasterers, etc T.')t: 

Locomotive Firemen ."Uc 

Car|>en^er8, painters, etc...... 70c 

Freitrht conductors 4('c 

I.aborerH "n tunnels, wells, ettv r>7'si' 

Kreijf ht hrakenicli . . li(>.7c ! 

KxcavatinK laborers lUc 

"In order to get even a fair livinpr 
wjyjp, train employes mU8t work 
\'l to 20 hours every day in the \<ar," 
the bureau tleolares. 

Thi^ railroad nia^rnates make i ler- 
rilic howl in the capitalist pres- .iboul 
•iie «'nonn()us co.st of the S-hoir tlay 
demanded by tho men, yet ni.i ^<^ no 
MionlJon of the fact that thq • i>rht- 
iiour <lay lm.< been established ■'.. the 
:;i,'htinu- laiion men in wester; and 
southwestern territory. The nt 'oads 
n we.stern territory with the \ff\\\.- 
lour day aro: 

El I'aso k Soutluvf^stem; (lal. st^m, 
ilarrishuiT ^ ^■':m Antonio; T.x: & 
New Orleans; .^^(^rl.•■an's Louis r;; & 
Texas Kailioat! and ."^teamshic ('*.■>.; 
Louisiana \\'e.stern; Ih)u.ston & -xas 
'Jentr;d: Houston, Kast & Wcs' !"ex- 
i.s; Houston & .^lireveport. 

The railroads' in S()uthca.ste, ler- 
ritory witii the eJKlitdiour ila.\ ■: 

Atlanta. llir!nin.t.diani Jc A iti' 
ll.-iilroat!; Atlantic Coast Lin^ .ail- 
\ay; Central of C;corj«-ia Ka: ad; 
''hafh'ston & \Ve.«;lern Carolina .ii!- 
itoad; Florida & Kast Coast Uai ly; 
(leoryia Railroad; Louisville & .\ >n- 
ville Hailroa'!; Xasiiville. Chatt:n ir.i 
& St. Louis Railway; Norfolk .-^ th- 
.■>rii Ilailroad; Seaboiil Air Line .il- 
vjiy. 

These road-, with one or l\\ ex- 
I'r'jition.-, .are solvent and payint iivi- 
dends des|)ite the fart that the ouds 
'.re .-iaturatcij witli wa^er poured .in l>y 
the .stock Mian'pulators ^1*** Wall 
Street. Tlie ei},d.l-Iiour ron :.s in .soutli- 
•aslern territo:y :\rc hi per cent ef 
ihe linos in that part of the country. 
Ti'e westeni mads witi' th.c eij^ht- 
.oiir day ar«' i i:;y '.', per rent. 

l!ul there \v'!l be !'H) per ce:-l 

.eitrla-hour day before tie year is up. 

■'•cordinir to the prcdic'-Qji of the 

(tfii'Ts i>f the four hrot!u>rhoo<i. . 

Till' men have been jobl;ed in- n;;'.ny 

'hilrallon jirociedinfrs aivl have 

'sl in conciliati(Mi and rediation, 
o this time they are \i>>-vj in t!:i 
•ijrbt to win. 

■'Kij^in-hour^day or irener.al strike," 
is I'-iC idtiiuatuni lu-intr ivvenared !>> 
•lie 4(V».()()(I fuen in the foi:i' brolli. r- 
iioods. 

While the vote prou-ressr ^ the om- 
iiloyers will make every effort to 
i"-(\«k the strike that may dcvcloi). 
The rennsvlv.mia. Delaware. Lacka- 
vanna i*;.- VV-slern and Krie ;ir(l inan.\ 
other roa'ls a>v seekin^r to niohilizi 
'')'• U(iori::miv.rd workers a'.';iin.''t the 
i)roilier!i<)o(i men. The D. I.. & W . 
opei.l.\ appeals to unoriranize.! men to 
siirn a list as potential sti ikebroiik- 
"rs. The.\ arc pnunised the jobs that 
they will take in theevent of a strike. 






if 
Iti'ti 



% CHARLES HARDING. 

(^HAUIJIS HAHDING. secompenlst 
with Dunbar's Soiree Singers, la 
not onlj a pianist of note, bi|t is also 
a gifted comiKioer. The variad and 
artistic program of the Soiree Singers 
to bo given on the opening day of the 
Cliautauqaa will include stiv^rah pleas- 
ing osmbers by tills talented musician, 
as well as rocal selections, headings, 
sketchea and impersdnationa by ottier 
BMmbera of thla able company. 



»»♦♦»♦»»»•»»»»♦»»♦»#♦»♦♦♦♦ 



^ Do yon believe in rec- 
oil Iprodty? If go, pat- \ \ 
roniie the merohanta o 

\ and flnni that bid for o 
3roiir patronage throni^ < ; 

\ the Labor Hews. 



"GET -TOGETHER" MEETING 



(Continued from First Paire) 



some other <|uestions that ai-c con- 
fwntint: tho lalxrin^ man today, and 
have speakt-rs to discu.ss those qucs- 

lion.s. There are nmny things that 
ean be made better for the man who 
labors for :i livint;, and we hope that 
these problmis will bo taken up by 
the lodges and a remedy 8ou};ht for 
them; at least that is the hope of 
many of us. It is the aim of all union 
men to help each other, and we, as 
union men, must do our share. What 
(juestion will be given consideration 
is not known at^this time. Tbpre are 
niany of them — better compensation 
hiws. sanitary conditions, bette-r hous- 
ing conditions, and better school laws 
are ntK»dcd. - • 

If all the lodges of the Railroad Or- 
ders will come and help, many of 
the.se laws that are needed badly can 
bo secured, but it will take work, not 
of one man or one order, but df all. 
Kvery one must give his support in 
the -way of money and personal as- 
sistance; if something has to be done 
and you are requested to do it, digr in. 
That is the only way it can be done. 

AH membera iue requected fo no- 
tice the change of maattng place. As 
there it a strike on at the Colonial 
Annex Hotel we had to secure other 
quarters in which to hold ^or meet- 
ings Let all get into this game and 
render wiiat aaaistance we caa» so 
that we will be able to hold aa naay 
and aai large meetings this coning 
t \B«t only for our manban. 




'^^tm.i^mjmm^m w^^frmssB^^mm^^mu ^ ^ 



Men 



Here's the Sale You've 
Been Waiting For ^ ^ 

It's Butler's Semi-Annual Discount Sale 

Great^stValue-Giving Event in Beaver County 

65c Buys $1.00 Worth 

Of Nen's, Young Men's, Boys' and Children's Suits, Hats 
and Caps. Also Trunks, Traveling Bags and Suit Cases 




Men's and Young Men's Suits 

All rc;;ulai- .^lO.IMI Summer Suit.s.^ 6..")0 
All ri'«ii!ar .^12.50 Summer Suit.s. 8.1:{ 
All icjfiilai- .Sl.">.00 Summer Suit.s. t).7.'> 
All rejrulai- .S2<).(M> Summer Suits. l.'UM) 
All itriiiar .S*J2..')(l Summer Suits. 1 1.6:1 
All rojiiilar .s^o.oo Summer Suit.s. 1«.2.') 



Boys' and Children's Suits 

All regular i? 2.50 Summei- Suits. .$1.6.*? 

All reiruUir ,$ 3.00 Summer Suits. . 1.9.'> 

All reifuUir .$ H.oo Summer SuiLs. . ;J.2.> 

All regiiliir S 8.00 Summer Suits. . .'>.20 

All rejfuUu- -SIO.OO Summer Suits. . 6.:»0 

All reiruUir .*i:i2.r)0 Summer Suits. . S.i;{ 



80c Buys $1.00 Worth 

Of All Furnishings, Shirts, Neckwear, Hosiery, Underwear, Belts, 

Gloves, Suspenders, Umbrellas, Etc. 



Afl Oui lliuli (irailo SilK and Oiitiiiu Shirl.s 
at SOc ilu; s SJ^nO M(nth. 



.SiininuM- I'liderwear in Two-piea'. Atlil^lir 
;ind Combination Suits, .MI Sizes. 



.S if I K 1 S 

.")(k- SliMl^. now 10. 

SI. 00 Sl;,rt.>. now MOc 

>".l.."0 Shirts, now . . . .SI. 21) 

S2..«'«» si'i-ts. i'o\.-. . . .s:.(i(' 

;':2.'>i) Si.ii-t-:. lu.v^ . . , ..*^2.(^'» 



I \!)::invi':.vn 

•")tic I lulorwcar. iioav. .. Kic 

Sl.'io rnfiorwear, at. ..SOc 

Sl.."'> Underwear, at. ..'^l.lMl 

.'^L'.dO Ur.dei-wear, at. ..siJiO 

."^.•"l.'*) riulerweai-. at. ..S2. 1-) 



m:('k\vi:.vi( 

^■"ir N'eckv.ear, now.. . . 2>')c 
TiOc Xeckwear. now.. .. Kk- 
.'^l.'iO .Veckweai-, iio\v..<S(>c 
.'^l.'O XecI:\voi'r. now . .<;i.2() 
Ncv, est \Vn.<h Ties in»lu(lvd 



V,;'eh Our V/iadows — K\ery!liin- Reduced F^xet>|)( .\.ir()\. Colias and Ovi-i alls. 

John A. Butler & Son 



BEAVER FALLS 



Largest Clothiers 



ROCHESTER 



fi^ {^(iBfe^^i^^^^^ ^'^rl^^^-^ ^^^^s«€g{^iBfeg^ 





CHAirn:n notice 

XotHi- !^ luii-ln- j: veil tiiat an ap- 
r.Iicaiion \vi:i bf i...i(K> to the tiovor- 
' i-Mor of r<"im.-;.v!vaiiiii ;ji; .'.iomlay, 
Au;,'u.s<. '3V:\\, ]:h>, ,a lo oV!tK-k A. 
•M., b.v H-rry (Iiir.i.si-nvv-, J. I). .Mc- 
K. ;i!i;i. .1. C. r -Icy. .1, (', lioi.ncr and 
1 . -M. ll.i^.-,, liiider tlit' .\ct of .\sscni- 
lll.^ cntillcci, •An Ai-l la , provide for 
tin> incorjioration anci/ rtfrulation of 
(•(Mlain rorinM-ation.s.'^ approvfd April 
L.':h1i.1871, and tin- .Mijijilt iiiciit.s tlioro- 
l'>. for ihc i-liarter of an inti'iukcLcor- 
! oniti'.m to he cailH the Ik-r'.wr \al- 
iry l,i!)or Xcw.s ("oinpany, tho cluir- 
aclor and obioct of uliich is trantact- 
iiiK a prialiiifr and publish inir bu.si- 
tK'.s.s, and for tiu'so |azi|)ose.s to liavc, 
po.^-.sc's.-;. anri enjoy ail tho rights, 
honnit.'s, and^ iirivilcfjes of said Art of 
.\:-.-cnd)Iy iwA \\\o .supplnmi-a.- tliopp- 

t'>- .JOHN i;. Mcri.riir:, 

j!yl l-JI--J^-;iuvrl ijolicitor. 



; CMPR-ICC. OF THE. rsrtCU '.vTA» t>i = 

t ' " -^/ lUUiA^lVV POX FR_OOv-»c:Tiotv» 

.Majestic Theatre, Thursday iihd Friday. August 3-4. 



but for all lahorinc: mm. It can bo 
done if all will assi.st. 

F'ratomallv. 

A.V. CKALG. 



Subscribe for Tlie Labor News. 



THE "WEMAKiT" STORE 



ch.\kti:r notice 

\i>l\f i.s licicby uiven tli.it an ap- 
r.!:>;ition will bo made to the CJovor- 
Mor of iN'nn.syivania on Tuosdriv. the 
Slh day of Au;ru.<t. KMG, by v/ahl J. 
••^nydi'i-. .I()!-.n K. ^)n^•dcr, Ck-oruc A. 
Koiizo. Pvoborl {.. llakc r, un.lrr tho 
.•\ct of A.sscjnbly ontitlod, '"An Act to 
l.rovido for tho inc-orporalion and reg- 
ulation of certain corporauoii.s," ap- 
proved .April 2yth, 1871, and the sup- 
i)Ipi)iont.'< thereto, for the charter of 
an intondo*!. corporation to be called 
".Snydor itonzo Ilakor Company," the 
rliaractor am! ol)jecl of which is stor- 
intr. ropairinjr, carinir for, hirinc: and 
df'alinfr in automohiloti, motor ve- 
il iclos, acco.«.sori(\s and supplies there- 
fore, and for thesr purposes to have, 
posfics.*; and enjoy all the rijfht.s. bene- 
tits and privilesres of .said Act of As- 

j .senibly and supplemrnts thereto. 

I UKED and RKED. 

|jlyI4--Jl-28-aujr4 Solicitors. 




♦♦»»»»»»»#»»»»#»»»»»»»»4»» 



^IT If the union men of 
jj Beaver Valley were 
as faithfnl to the 
Labor News as the Labor 
\ \ News is to their came, we J \ 

o would be forced to «nhur|r« \\ 
the paper. Do yon lae 
the point? 



>¥^^ 



[WAICHES,DIAM0ND5.| 

^GOLD-SnVERVAREj 
.LARGEST VWllBIY^ 

^'' AND POPULAR, 
PRICCL 



Subscribe for The Labor Newi. 



;: Printing 

9 

i: Yes, we do the bet- 
It ter kind tliat leaves i 
I [you satisfied, happy i 
iland determined tii j 
come again. 

ee» » ee » eeeie n i»iiei> M i 






-»^.'... -*..-v 



:.1.V 



I \ 



-*» — iu 



.■.Vift'itjv.; 



!4»' 



.i(i(^iiL:,fe=''''"'i«<--%;JM!.*.« 



^r.-'iT*^ 



-■.B«,t»a«j.iHl:w,'i>Si_;^;.,;: 



"■iW 



<?> 



^ 



BEAVER VALLEY lABOR IfBWS 



i M <i«i nnn i nnn i m » mnmm ii»<»»« f M m < h » 



I jjfjaiestic ^heatre 



ROCHESTER, PA. 



Program for Next We«k 



MONDAY, JULY :U— Metro Pictures presents Harold 
lx)ck\voo(l and May Allison in "TIIK MASKKD ltll>KU;" a 
thrilling story of South Carolina moonshiners. 

Tl^ESDAY, Ar(a'ST 1— Jesse L. Lasky pivsonts Ses- 
sile Hayakawa in "ALIKN SOILS," a stoiy of htpan, in 
which this great Japanese actor is seen at his best. 

WEDNESDAY, ArCH'ST 2— L^sanay presents the 
great emotional actress. Wanda Howard, in "THAT J^OIiT." 
an intensely dramatic stoiy of the "double standard, " which 
is a subject of great interest to thinking i)e()ple. 

THURSDAY and FRIDAY, AUCUST :J-4-'^Vinianl 
FOx presents Harry Hilliard and June Cai)rice in ''CiVriwICK 
OF THE MOUNTAINS." a refreshing stoiy of the out-of- 
doors, replete with dramatic interest. 

SATURDAY, Al'Gl'ST 5— Daniel Frohman ofTcMs cap- 
tivating Hazel Dawn in a dramatic romance of the moun- 
tains, "THE FEUD GIRL." 

ill ii* M iii m i»»»*«t imn» < * <* * ** f M ill n ail 44 411 1 




"I In- Mu,.kf<l Uiili-r" . 
"Tin- .M;i.-ki r Uidcr," a iiensationul 
live-jiiJi iMil lo-t^uiiiily pruductioii. 
^.itll ILiJoltl l.ofkwixjil uiiil May J^i- 
fson li';»(liiiir, V. ill be ll;t> uUructlon at 
till- .Majf.>ii«' iiiciilrc, .Moiiduy, July 'H. 

, 'llii.s woiulrniliiy is biiiafull of Uurills, 
(■.-<|H-(-i;tlly III till' lii(^ Mfia'ci Mtuged in, 
clic iiMnitilaiii.s i»r .North Ci^rolina. 
liifir .ire many fxritiriK momenta in 
iiiirt |»arl 1)1' thi- rtiorv , which deals 
uiili ihf moDii.iiiiiiiT.s oi Uiut section. 
Tlu- otitliiwj) -tif lirouj.'-lil to justice 
Jl^uu^^ll ll»«- ilannj,' exploits of "The 

, .'\lu^.k(Ml Uidcr." j.layeil by Mr. 

j l.(K-kw«KHi, will) po.M'.s US li mountain 
pai.scn until Uf Kalhrr.s lu.s evidence 

' auuiii.si llu-ni. l.c lure lliey are cor- 
Jiik-d the ti«:!»tin;r par.son i.s obligeij 
111 <li.->i)l:iy lii.-^ |ir<>\.r.s.>; in mie of the 

' lll(>.-^l reiiinikiilili" eneuuiiUTb ever 

I .-^iiiiwh u|'t»ii liie .St ret'ii. 

I I'l.e eentral ib.;i>aeter.s in the ftghl 

1 ale .Ml. l.tK'kwodti and Lester Cunco. 
wilt) plays tilt- villain in the role «)i 
•'S'liii'i Aveiier," tlu- U-ader of the 

' iii('^.n>niiicr.s. .Mi.«;s .M! ■.•^dii i.s seen in 

j till- (Icliulit I'ul role di' a l>euutiful 

I iiiounlaiii jriri, ul.«im tin- tiKlitiriK pur- 

• ^on wins !n ihv end. 



r 



• f ■■>•> ttll t »»— »♦ # §!»»»> 



1 



J At the Colonial . 



COLONIAL THEATRE 

ROCHESTER, PA. 

SHOWINC; THE WORLD'S (IREATFST niOTOPLAVS. 
THE TRIANGLE SERVICE. 



.MO.ND-Vi and TUESDAY , .Jl L^ ;:i-Al ( .. 1 
Trian;,'k' Film Uorpoi-alioii piesents the cclc'l)r;i!*:'!l iictoi 
(_'lKu-!es Ili-.y, ill -Tlil-: DKSKKTi:!:." a tlirilliu- .-.lory <.l 
western frontier life. 



Su.s.sue 11a 
ose actor, will be 
'I'uc'sdxiy, Aii>;u.<t 



\lien Smils" 

akatva, the* ntited Juputi 
.seen at the Mujetitie 



1st, in the Jesse 1. 



l,;i.--1iy piixiuv-l ii'ii of ",\lieii .Sauls," :i 
Ihi-iTliie^ Jilmt e(!;-:iiii.' urillen cspee- 



:i!i l)y llei-ier Turnhul!, th.- 



It. 



iali\ tor 
.lutiuir t)l "'\\,K ( 

MI'lVHI'. |)ro i.li ti'il. 

I n ".\l cii .'M ii:i ■■ t ',-.[ 
..: a v.c..i. I ;,' r . :,■.• I 
'ij.s aiui '. . :•■<■'■ .! til . 
• i.ii'aacse ;';rl W w *:i> 
iixlhed w' "li ii I I lid . ' 
iioiii lie i.- supply 111:- . 
1 U'a<lin:' .AuM'ri»--i'i ■ 

1 low iMsliiMu; ifu 
■.;ir! fa"s i!!t<» ■'•• ( 



i.s a I'uJii 

f 



.\i 



: iirtlly IjMur-L; 



I.. a ts seen 
,'■ ll.:e CUJ- 

!•: :•. younjr 
!n* was Iw- 

■' ilr ec. and for 

■■.!! ed'ii .ition at 

Ikio! •lor pirls. 

> « uiu' Jajiune.M' 

I '■■> ~ of a nio- 

.:ii liow she i.s 

•i ,(:;il tiic cast 

"•\i r iiu.'Ot, i.- 

1 .1 Ml 111 her v\ 

■■<-!''-.S. 



-m* Utwerlvr" 

Cl.uney itay iu tiie star of '*The De- 
•erter," 'Irianule feulure which will be 
seen at the Colonial theatre, Muntluy 
and Tue«(iuy, July Ml -August 1. 

iliC «tory ileuis with .stirring events 
ut tt fniiilier uiniy |K>.st in IKti'J. Kay 
has the role of Lieutenant I'arker, who 
huH lost liih heart to Uarbara Taylor, 
daughter of the coloM-l in eliarK'eof the 
post, llul Uarburu's allretions have 
beet! won by Caplani lui.ier, and 
when the haii(l.;oiiie yoiiri« lu-uUnaiit 
Uhke her fitr in r hand, .sin- lla.^ lu say 
nu. 

l>:n-bura <iei'. |ir«iniiiie the {iifieun.'D- 
iute I'arker ti;a' ..heWil! ^'ive liim liie 
lirht waltii ut U»e aji|troarhiriK llullow- 
•'*en hall. Itul when tin- tinu- conies, 
the liisl wall/ tind.s hi i uhirliMj,' about 
the floor with lier intended. 'I'lie vtiuiiK 
lieutenant hao a nasty t(Mn|>er, and it 
.eeonies inflamed forthwith with an- 
Kvr an<l jeahmj*y. He leaves liie hall 
«ri a laK^e und Koca to ,a dive on tin- 
outskirts of th»' post, wlu-ie he trie.s 
l<i drown his .sorrows in bud whi.skey 
and worse com pan y. 

The j^aniblcr.s at the resort try to 
clieat hi 111 at i-;ird.s. and a lij;hl starts. 
The jilaee is full of Koldiers, who 
tome to aid the younj: oirivei . and 
I treneral iiiih'e follows, \vhicli»li<'- 
roiiifs so violent that a (lela<'lim"iit is 
.■■eiit from tlie po.sl. Turner Icavf.-, tlir 
ball to romnuiiid them, and ie .rnay.ci: 
;o find Tai-ker in the niiddU- ol th. 
.:iixu|). Hi.-s i-»d)uke inllames th" hoy 
. lill fuitlier, :«nil lie strikes liis mi- 
l>orior olfie«M'. His jiric^t follows. 

I'acin;; e*»iirt martial he escapes 
aid flee;; into liie desirt; he is found 
hy settlers; later they ai*e attacked by 
Indians and ho, in reeoinpj-nse fvr 
their kindiips.s, e.sra|i. -. r -lurns to tin- 
.'on and hrin;,'si sufco|* t() them, finally 
i vini: from wcniiwii' receive*!. 



COLONIAL THEATRE! 

BEAVER FALLS, PA. 
PHOTOPLAYS EXCLUSIVELY 



rroi::rain For JSe.vt Week 



MONDAY, Jl'LY .H—W illiari 
tliur A.shley and Frances Nel.son i;' 
an<i .MvsU'iy. "WHAT HAPPENLJ' 

Tn:SI>AY, AlCaST l— lie*' 

sent.-; Kin;- IJafeyfot and Irene Hun. 
XOWHKl:!-:.- 

WKD.NKSDAY. AlfilST 2- 



A 



!>ra(ly presents Ar- 
■ '(t. y ol" love, romance 
vT 22." 

■atlu'i Piiotoplay.s pre- 
m "i ilK MAN FllOM 



ctiire.s presents 




UiuoW l.ockwood and May Alli.son in "THE CO.MlvBAC'K," 
avitai drama, bi'iminin^ with thril!.«^ and romance, poitray- 
fn;v the le^refieration of a .society idle: in the north woods. 

THIKSDAY, Ar(;rST ;J— K.ssi.PMv iiie.sents Henrv B. 
W a liial and Kdna Mayo in "THE .MISLKADLNG LADY," a 
roii'^h hewn love story that roaches the heart. 

FRIDAY, Al'CaST 1— Hliiol.ird Photoplay.'^ presents 
dainty Klla Hall and Uoljert U'onard in "THE CRIPPLED 
HANI);" a sinprisinifly l)eautiltil photoplay. Also Helen 
H.ilnies in the i;Uh chapter of "THi: (HRl. and the (;AME." 

S.VriRDAY ,Ar(;. .-)— Charlie Chaplin in his latest 
sucToss "THE VACAJJOND:" al.so Tom .^l(K>re and Anna 
Xill.son in "A LOST iVAUADlSF,'^ and Helen (Jib.son in 
"THE SI MK ED SWITCH." 
, If 



WED.NK.iDW . .VrcrST 2. 

World }"'ihn C'oipcii'ation i)!t\ cuts lioiioi'l \\';.r\viel\ 
•.SIDDE.N KJCHES." A plav dcaliii^ x.ilii a loi tunc. 



Niirt 



in- 



THl K.^DAV. AK.l .<i' :;. 
E(|iiital)l(-' Kilin Corjioralioii pros en Is Briici' I\lcil;'.c» and 
< lerda Hoimcs in '•Till: CHAIN LWISI I5LF,." .\ phoUipla 
tliat is toemin^ witii heart inloroist. 

i'RII>A\ andSATlKD.W, .\.l(.l.<I I :, 

Triaii'r'ic l-"i:ni CoinoiatioTi i)rcsi}nts Doiiv.ias Fi'siii)aiik. 
ill "FLlirnXC W I'i'il FATE," a fi\V-part photod i ,in la. 






I 



."" 


!'• of ur 


".\ 


. win l> 




inestLr 


. 


a.sed b 


f 


rosrra;: 




. its ai' 


.' 1 ' 


tcrribli 


. I'l! 


A oinun . 


I'l , 


lid fair: 


;•! 


at he: 


<• :i 


.. • lit law; 



".Siicidcfi Itidu-s" 
How lie hiiil the !!i!ll;oiis, spent tiicj^ti 
re('!;!es.<Iy, luireie.l i«'rrih!.\ , sappoii 
ed .1 Kioaclway siren, estranged hini- 
~elf from his \,\iie. sIm- from him, :uid 
liou , V. I;en .((irv^. .inlty on the very 
.•er;re ef th*- biiiilx, '.'.leir liltie dauarii- 
''•r. was 



Ills to ;. 
liich.C!.." 
vVeiinesi!: 
l.t».sin;; 

1iil(l h;i- 
;nd he ' 
.■<l iill : 
vvhil.-. • 
:'eel>ie t i, 
soleiniv. 
:iapj>il'.' >. 



iak«'ii -ick. liriiiKiitir hdlh par- 
. .r bcdsiiii', 1 '.id«| in ".Siiddei; 

at Hm- ( 'oiK'i;-'! Tin-.iti-e, on 
!:.y, AuKi:-t -. 
; Ir-e fi.i'i '.111'' . !'.M .-.jvin.'JT th* 

1 ' 5^!it Kiil.eit lit hi;; .stnrte.v. 
'•Ml ;:\s tl'.at i- has rei^ain 

... )'_• ',ly m.ikf ■> Iji'e v.nrll: 

ir lIll' luil V.i.i'f'f III s t!;iMl 

ll^.p '•ouji'" I iiderix ami 
n IMe n Iv. 'vliiijr of theii 




\[ "ii\' C')hinia! T'"'.<re. Ho;r«ei I- alls, 'I'hursd;i\ , .\\\ 



Ol 



< .jr.iuil. 

The ■v'!iii,iii [(.-iii!; .six- |>;ii(i n (iay 
hurirntc acroiiy, in nights v,' fever 
torture. Thronjrli suflerini,' j^pI '.'.' 



;Uone.l, hut ti;r .<;eurlet .sc;ir rLT.iained 
to .se:*.!' l:ei- .•■•oul as r.o branding iron 
ever biivn^ »!. 



Junction ParKl 

Most Beaut i ful Picnic 
Grounds in the Valle y 

SFNDAV SCHOOLS. LOlXiE.^, Fli.vTEKN AF ()KI>i:US 
.\M) PRIVATE PUNIC PARHES ARE TKN !)1 JHKI) 
FREE FSE OF THi: (.ROFNDS. ' , 
o o 

DANCING 

EVERY WEDNESDAY A.M) SATFRI) \V 
EVENIN(;S. 



'•C;i 

Ti.e !\ 
'••Jill I.' 



i;nTe 

• ' i.i-'. 



III. 



'( 



■ the 
-Ma- 

AuK- 



( .1, ..' lii'i. 
i\ < ; •.• !i ii i.cr 

.l.<: li' .- !!■' .- li« I 

I CM';ir;.C \ f'.l'. . 1 

-(■•;iii:otl-,i r is ; 
ni.ikt .- litV I li- 
.•UPS ;;\\;i ir«<i i 



ti.e M()lllltaiu^" 

.^i:;, "Ciiiirice I) 
'. r<ii:.i.s to t!i<' 
::. ...:■• Friday. 
ii" \u\: wv .slory: 
. :i .^ 111 "iMe iiiaiden, 
:■ ';' r. ;; , .iiunt..iiieLMV 
t " ii;ir: v I'im il.iker. 
'. . fi'i' ill •w.mair.'-. A 
..iloijs i,r ( aprid and 
i-.ihi'' :"")r iii-r. Caprice 
'.iinie. 



"T\ cC"!,i.:.i l:j\i.^ibU'*' 

'.iiiic'i; \ ';;(! .v.orlli, a nortii uoodti- 
.ivii:. f.e!i Iii.'- ieidlnjr-^ :-nd leaves for 

with 



.-•lation h<* 
I.s in Uiv 



ew York. At tlip 

:\nnv 1 >:ilt<Ji! iuid )a 

•:cr. The ! Jjiltons ar.<! Sir 'I'ov.nr sail 

•n .1 cruiso !i ivl \Va«!sA:rtli jroos on 

!i( :inir> .stci.'iU'r. At :i'i (»[>i)nrl urie 

iiiu Iw tctis .•Vnii'" <if his love, :md she 

■ ^11.' hini slie l;a.; ac.-'C'pU «l 'I'l.;.' li«'. In 

:is Mirviish Vx.iis .i)r*h i.s oh.--( ;. d by 

r m : .,, • MO I, ,. „„ ;, -Ii.scrl 



s sf • 11 h..' 'Iliu!>- 
aithUhS, .leiepts 



Kllll 



. \. .Ki. iliiiii.inv! 
S.S, ,inf|Ms> Uaiy'iey. 
Alfry \v;:iit.s lo «'>ii:mit suicide when 
lie learns v.Lul iius" hicf lie haa done; 
'uit •. 'i en I.e trie; to con-mit suieidc 
liy iimahii^ Hc«j i.i:. (lUUilci-in-thc- 
.-;lot meter lanT* out. He enters the 



.saloon to RCt cl;^ii!„..' for ;. (jh.iitcr, 
T'.nd th.T' rueeti; 
'■ .IS it U(< V*. 'til 
MMiif ri'i jK't '.' ' 

;• :>(.-• |>-i( I. l<) iii.^ li< 

of t'.'- .-lor. Is 



i.ie-I'.uck" :it the 
Ic^iver Fulls, on 



will pre.sonl "Ti.r 
Colonial Theatre 
»\'ednesd;i.y, Au^r. _". 

"The Connc-UaJv," is a .■^trons: story 
of how :t <iis.sipated younp man, just 



out of college, sees the error of his 

way, and k<^s to the nortli^rn .Maine 

\vood.s, v.'hcre lie becomes a real man 

.A.uioriaiic .Iixi. He and redeoni.s hini.^elf. There is an 

in:- to si'.oot hii^i at ' intere.stinc: and deli^ditful story run- 

,!;. t;^nl. and Ihen'nin;,' tlirouKli the feature, and a 



|...; 



■ III.-. The latter j wealtli of heautMiil jrliotography. 
iu.-l a.■^ interest- ! 



,1' 



1. .1 ( ' "H'trinni:. 



-o 



Finest Dancing Pavilioix 

In Ihi.s part of the State, out.-iide of Pittsburgh. Viiiioas 
Small Conces.sions for .Amusement of Pation^s 

'*VOU ARE .\LWAYS WELCOME AT TIIK I'AKK" 

Reached from all ^'a^ey Points by way of 
BE AVER VALLEY TRACTION COMPANY MINES 



Write or Phone Me for Open Dates 

C. C. SHETTERLY 

LESSEE and IVIANA(;ER 

TELEPHONES: 

Beaver County. 1163 and 5123 

Ikll, Rochester. «2(): New Brighton. 1500 



( )ii t'.e r«i:iii .he iiicf t; :\ (ray auto- 

, iiii«l);i«- p:i!\ . ;;;i.(ii,:: W'-ci'i is .lack 

! IviMioiid. (Jlariy :'. Ijiihini), k'-'kI- 

-on o: a viiu";il>li' ;ir;i.-.L who Kves 

■II :t r i ';<j'rie«''.-~ In »iu' •. 

.Jaei- Ki^e.- the e i r' .a handle .ind 
.i.-ks l.< r l<i ijcl!\-c!' i; t(i his n;r.i,id- 
^ lather .. itl. a nu-.-^.-a.:"'. .Mr. Mdr.' 'iid^ 
: iciis ( :ipru-r a fairy .stury v. liie h ojicns 
; !ier lyis to [\\(' h.-aulie.s <i(" the il'i un- 
I i.'iitis around i^-r own lioiiie ;inii in- 
<li!'(s l-.er t:' return t«i lier fail n^'-s 
• house. 

I .lack u'oc.'- to his vrandfat :• 'r't; 

nioiait.ain hoji"' for a liiintin;r trip. 

; Tini, llu- coar.se i.ioiinL.-i'ur'cr, r r. ifu- 

i v(ir< to force liis !ilt<'nt ion.'; upon Ca- 

: price, aid'-d ami ali<'ttfd hy hor .'^icp- 

riiother. I'.-ircnlal pies.sure is lirmiirht 

^1 he.ir iiH'T <';•.!> rice i.s ahout 1' he 

; f()ix'''il in'o ;i eiarriajre with Tim. In 

; the nwantlnic .she liii.« iiTt .1. . k. w ■ nm 

'< she c'lirsidf'iK ;i "fairy prince." The 

I ri^-lit of llie wi'ddinTf an-ives and C.'a- 

pri«ii ar.'iir runs av.ay froui ho.no. 

I diirk foil AS, overt.akeK her and they 

ev(iitu!i1!y marry. IJut Caprirc, unne- 

euFtouied t«i tho \v;ivs of sorietv, cali.s- 

es Jack jrre.it ('»nl)!irra.»';snieiit luul he 

rc.'-uiiies tl'.e fast life he led heTore 

nieetin^- her. He ;;r.'ulually KOf-sto 

ruin. C.-iprice le;ivr.s him ."in.I nlnrns 

to !ier old.h(iin<' in th<' nieiintnins. .I.ick 

atr;iin ivnounc^'S his life of dissipation, 

turns oyer a new loaC^ rejoins his 

younr wife in the ni(»unt:iins and i.s 

intrrvltieed to his son and lieir. 



'le 'Icri ol pr: III '. !Vi' U, «• on a '{'.serl t*~ ••*•• 

.slii>^ 1, and hr il.-luit.'S he, H<i' the\ ! 1 n i • i n .. ,- r-ll- 

,.a .: iho i,.i.„.!, I,,,,. »i , .v... L. „i;. Colonial, Eecu'er Falls 



"1 



..nicly 1<»! 
at tho (■ 



loni:i! 



Cha. 
Theatr. 



Iii\ inei 
'I'hurs- 



"KliitiiiK Wiih I ate" 

The nvr*'.-'. 'int • ' ; ■• >,•.■ ry «■ 

■ I'lirtint-' l\'ilh Kate," \\n "irianpie n' 

l:;i.so u hich its to h shcr.'. n jit tlu 

■';!'>nju?, I"riili-y and .'■;iti:ri!;iy. .'ur- 

;s( 4-."). s'.iiui.s it !!'-■ tl.<* live.t Iidu- 

•iiiK Fairii;-«nk? pietu'i- thus i'.ir. In 

his picture laiihanks |»!ays Auk: 

A ii.sv.c 'ii:. ;; \o.;n;: '.■{ ..; ,•.•!() i.- 

- liot-t 0!i funi!-. He fiill.v in h>ve with 



• 


.'« 11. • llapp.nt 1 at 11" 


In: . 


-(..■ .\. !s(<ii a':'! .' i u;ur .X-shli y 


1..0 of 


thi' 11)11 'n;r . ' unjr sl.-irs of 


• !i- 'loi 


. .vi ;>• I •> : u. • :• i in the ri\e- 


I'.irl Ur 


iliiri' |M^»*oplav (oniintf to, |ie 


t'o|nl)i;i 


Tl;- f , lleaver Kail.-., .Mon- 


■I". . w 


••■n ■' V ' a^ Hiip'.ent d at li"J" 


.• :'! >••• 


' . .!' ! • li');:. l: was r.ro- 


.! 1 •! 1 


tl 1 i M>i man .•\ie.iis«'nienl 


< '. : ;»;i! 


uikI'I" i';'' cin-etion «)! 


< li-or;.c 


Ir. iii;r. an«l tarries :i .story of 


i.ri. .i..il 


iiit<r< >* ia.u illation .and is as 



"Tho Mi.xloadiii^ Lady" 

lirnr.. II. Walthall lu llie roi<' of 
Jui'k Crai;:en, the iiioli rn e:ive-iiiaiii 
in the live-.ict jihot.ip'ay. "TI.e .Mis- 
leading l.ad>," will he i^reti at the Co- 
lonial, Heaver l-alls, Thur.-day .\ujr. '\. 

.The part cf «'rait'eTi is a 
• rtii . \^ tl:e p';'y drvrloos. Ije 
slowly from i! '■' . on»fnLioik.il man, 
yor: thouj^htful. slightly n:oody and 
eMreiiifly di." ru.-lful -of women, into 
a poli.shed brul-. \\ .U',;.! is the poet 
of tlu- .screen, :.iV'! '• poilrayer of 
piielic emotions. 



•IMficult 
ehanpps 



I: 



il;i<lvs Rln«r.'-I 



y.x- 



. .!< ;i I', coin'^s tc "I |>|>Mi; :> 

II I ■ " ! ^°"' 

i nioi;.'_ \vH' 
. ' '.■■> lire '.I :i 

I 



Id a DOi 



3E 



3Q 



FOR SALE! 

House of six rooms, well built, with furnace^ city 
and cistern water.. Lot 33x120. Located at 505 Dela- 
ware avenue, Rochester. $600 down, balance as reat. 

For further information see 

H. J. BBCK 

505 Dehware Avenue, ROCHESTER, PA. 

~ II 



i 



D D D a 



m 



"The I-eiid Cirl" 

II,i-el I>:i\vn, "The Tink Lady" of 
the- .screen will l»e seen at the Majestic 
The.-itre on .Saturday, .Aujr. •'», in that 
Icadin'r rele;i.«e on the I'aran;ount 
rro;rrani. "Thr Fouil (lirl." In the 
role of a resolute, rourufreous maid, 
who.se .stout hourt is too proud to al- 
low her to l»ond oven before the im- 
jiorious will of hei- father, Miss Dawn 
wins the .sympathy of her audienc(> a« 
even she has never done before. 

She is the dau^Ktcr of a rug^d 
mountuinefr^lhc head of the Haddon 
,clan, and she has been reared with one 
thoufrht uppcrmofit in her mind — ^the 
hatred of the liaasett clan, with whom 
her people have fought for many 
years over the possession of thm 
Mountain, which lies between thefti. 
This fierce antipathy for the Basastts 
is the only eril thought that aver 
crossed Nell's mind. She ia mtuimlly 



of a 'sunny disposilioii, a tyjinai ciiild 
uT'iiic niountiiins, who loves :ill n.ature 

-oxcei>t the ISap.setts. 

A.<i'lc fr«jiii tli( exeeiitionally eiever 
ind appeieirlK work wliitdi .Miss l>av.n 
'ioo.*>_in thi.< thriln'nn' story, tie pn>- 

■■.iclMin !i:i.-; iii;«n\ poitits «)f e.\c»|/t:«in- 

i int<:ro\. In < : !i r to pet just the 

I'.rlil ; t ii'(..'<|)l- < e I"' 
l»:u'.ii, Dirf^'.'tf ;• 

nd a coil i-ii:; ■ i.i' 1 
" v,i!f!es'. II..),;: vain di.slrict of that 

':it*» whrro they spent .si.\ weeks in 
'. I;tnd th:it lias never hr-fop-^ been 
plmto^raplu'd on the s(^reen. 
pr(i|»osinjr, ho falls down, and wliile 

, a. -ti. •!!•:: the rde with ;i I'fiend, he 



nd. 'I'l 

lir.i'- 



»n;;n.il. The entire 
. .■-t:ir.- ar.d ti" l^.er- 
■ : ;i;i.u( i! n ma!; njr 
I in every way. 



ai lliHi;.'.^ 
.^acrilic. 



. pti'.r.'il' 
airhiii'in 



.line..-, elenient- 
I, idi alized love, 
the liii;i:e.-t tyi>e. 



"The frippled Hand" 
In th" he;iuiifi;l IJhuhird photo|)lay, 
'n:e C'rip|.!ed H uul," lo-tA- shown at 
t'lf I'idonial '.\".. .'iv . '.. :ver Falls, oq 



*,i Tf , - «,. ' . 



..•(•• 



e f'.le, .Mi.ss 
rc<l( r>el; Thom.'a.:; 
nlayer.-s svcnt to 



'" '■.;»u i'rti:.i Nov, Ihtv." 

.^l.;'l l-':-<'i.i \'i..\ liere," an oi' 
..r "{-vA^rA'" I'awC de.:il 

inn<)<( '.' 
..f -A 



! lie .'•i, 
■''nai st'ii" 
• I','; an 

»::. i "led « 
(ie;r!ee, and 
;•€•'_'! 'lie ral«'.s 

o'i«'' y. It I lie. sec ii 

ton;:. I TVe-i'.re, I'^ave." 
1st. with f-ivorite Kintr 
!'"i(lin;r roI«'. 



ia;i who iias heon 
er in the .m-eonii 



tl: 



• iiiann"r in whivl 
nself in the eyes 



lu 

5f 

at the Co- 

ra'ls. .\ 11 crust 

I'nrcot in the 



AujLTU.st 4, IN>h' 

I han'l.soine pmt 
I dre;'.ii'.er ard in 
I lieauties of Ian' ; 
' th'» :i'>r ! <1 an-l 
! real life and 

Kincr.slriy !;• rr.Iict r 
• (Iladys K<»ekwn|| is the 
j and liitre are bcoreS w 
I ith>yo«l in nre.'scntinc; this hrilliant 

hliMid el' p(M li; ;.! i'iealisni and jrrip- 
' (linn nieHohania. 



..' V.Vi 
.e!!:i.;r \ 
; AW ill 
eN. it'"-; 

Kfippinp: 

.1., .. 



!-.| plavs the 

!i;ill "is the 

' story the 

•.larded with 

incidents of 

setjuences. 

'he cripple; 

.advent uress. 

people em- 



Harold 



"Th«' Come-Hack" 
L.ickw <K)d and .Mav 



11 .son 



The 




"The \a«abi....:" 
no'cti ('!;ai'.(' r'!,;iph'n appear? 
in Uiis, tho latest of hi.c; T>i:iny playsi 
Chaplin is sn well known that space 
v.il! i:ot 1).- \.x\-A'\\ •. - . .. ■ much about 
"The XaKahond," more than that it 
raiik.s in humorous .situations with 
his previous efforts. :ind is a "scream" 
from .start lo hnish. Additional filmr 
will Ih' shown on tlip date of the 
Chaplin comedy . Auirust .'ith. Tom 
.Moore and Anna Nillson appearing 
in "A l.o.st raradisc." a beautiful 
heart interest production; and Helen 
(iibson, the popular conietlienne, wfll^ 
appear in a thrillinK- photoplay en-"' 
titled "The Spiked SwitcK." 



At tlie GoloBial Thcttii BodMftor, Thimday, Aog; 8. 



V 



SEND IX THE NEWS. 



Send in the news. 

Every union in the valley 
should have a press correspond- 
ent. ^ 
* y-u want the n^-s of your 
union to appear iiNyour paper. 

Get busy and see that jmhim- 
body is eipecially appointicL^ 
take care of this matter. 7 

See that it reaches the LUior 
News office as early in the 
week as posaible. 

News should be ia this offtot 
by 'niMay BOfMi, of aach waak 
if H ia to ko in that waak^B iM«a • 



* • 

a 

a- 
I 







-U 



V-' 



i 



■^ 



--^-.. 



tisatfe 




f % 




Chautauqua, Beaver, July 29-Aug. 4 




Germany, Russia, 
Eitilaffid, kefaiid— 

ALL HAVE PRAIMD THK BHIL- 
LIAMT TALIMT OF LEON 
WILTMAN. DIHECTOR OF THE 
FAMOUS TtCHAIKOWSKY 
STRING QUARTET TO BE 
HEARD HERE ON 

The Second Day of fhe 

CHAUTAUQUA 

Kr. Weltman wu born in Rnitia and was at one time uaociated 
with Tiol^aikowiky, the jrr«at maiter. Hii quartet ii a company of 
brilliant artista, ud their program will be a real treat to cTery 
music loTer in this community. 

SingU admUjionj r« »A# ClnMUHtu^ua mttrueti^nj mtill total mmrm than ^T. 
but you oan huy a ^auon tUUft fr«m your Local Commllfo for only #3. 

OO / T flO Wl 




LIKE A TRIP 
THROUGH CHINA 

8TTCH IS THE LECTTTRE ON THE LITE, 
CUSTOMS AND MANNERS OT THE OLD- 
EST OF ALL EMPIRES TO BE DELIV- 
ERED IN COSTUME BY DR. FREDERIC 
POOLE. CHINESE AUTHORITY, ON 

THE S£COND AFTERNOON OF THE 

CHAUTAUQUA 

AND ON THE SECOND NIGHT DR. POOLE WILL PRESENT IN 
COSTUME THE FIRST ACT OF THAT FANTASTIC CHINESE PLAY. 
-THE YELLOW JACKET.- DR. POOLE iS THE ONLY PERSON 
EVER AUTHORIZED BY THE AUTHORS TO GIVE THIS F*LAY IN 
ITS DRAMATIC RECITAL FORM. AND HE PRESENTS IT WITH 
SPECIAL PERMISSION OF MR. AND MRS. COBURN, OWNERS OF 
ALL DRAMATIC RIGHTS. VISIT CHINA WITH DR. POOLE! 

Slngtt admij^lofu to th9 Clmutauqua attract.'onj tv/i/ total otorg than f7, 
hmt yom eon buy a stolon ttclimt from your Locol Comtmitto* _for only ^2. 

"DO IT f40W I 




BRILLIANT AND 
DELIGHTFUL GENS 

from sacred mnsic, aang^ by na- 
tionally famous choristers in vest- 
ments, followed by equally de- 
lightful selectiom from classical 
and operatit compositions — snch 
is the artistic program to be giyes 
by the Westminster Choir on 

The Third Day of the 

CHAUTAUQUA 

FOR THE LAST PART OF THE NIGHT PROGRAM THE WESTMIN- 
STERS WILL PRESENT IN BRILLIANT COSTUMES PORTIONS OF 
THE TUNEFUL AND POPULAR OPERA, "THE CHIMES OF NOR- 
MANDY." THE APPEARANCE OF THE WESTMINSTER CHOIR 
WILL LONG BE REMEMBERED IN THIS COMMUNITY. DON'T 
FAIL TO HEAR IT. 

Sinf.lc adtnijjionj to tho CAautout/ua attractions tuill total mor* than ■^7. 
hut you can buy a Jtason rieKjil _from your Local Cemrttlfttc for only ■^3. 

DO / r ft OW I 



"The Little 
Giant"— 

IS THE FITTINO TITLE APPLIED TO 
JAUES HOFFMAN BATTEN, WHO WILL 
DELIVER HIS FAMOUS LECTURE, "THE 
PATHFINDEB OF DEMOCRACY," CM 

The Third Afternoon of the 

CHAUTAUQUA 

MR. BATTEN RANKS AS ONE OF THE COUNTRY'S FOREMOST 
•PEAKERS—KEBN IN INTELLECT, BRILLIANT IN ELOQUENCE 
AND MABTER ARTIST IN DICTION. HI8 LECTURE WILL BE 
•ABED ON THE LIFE OF ABRAHAM LINCOLN, WHO, HE BAYS, 
'1NADB AMERICAN DEMOCRACY A FACT." 




/ « 




BiAvni jidiMt uMm news 



3m 



Humoroas Autihw and Lecturer 
To Be Heard at the Chautauqua 



Sh^ih 



Us^ions to Ihm Chf mfmmirmm mttrmmHmms tmltt tmtml «Mf« thmtt JTf, 
M hmr m sttbs mm Hmtgtfrmm ymr- LmomI C otmtmtt t mmjmf^ — ^ ^3. 

»o ir nowi 



JOHN KENDRICK BANGS. 

ON'K of the most |»iM'«'lnr Ip<*t«irer8 of ilu* pri»Heiit <\a.v iis well as i\ noted 
Iniiiioruus \vrlt«T iiiiil editor Ir .1 -Iim KMulrl. k HanyH. who will i»o 
lu'.'inl luMi* nil ilu' si'Vfiith aftenioi.: »t tin* riuiutntitni.'i. \\v luis Intii 
ill turn e«Utor of l.ltorntnre. IIju;m! < Wt-fkiy iiml tlu' .M»'tn>i.«>llt.iii 
Mami/.liH' aiitl was at one tlim- luiiiintfin;: t .liior of LIfo. Ills liuiuorous writ 
InuH liu-liuli' inoi«< tliaii llft.v v.>lunu'-< of pr- > .mil vi-rsr. 

-Mon' Sainlifltios." the tltU- oT Mr. llin _-' U'-tiiro at the ni.in«nii<|«ia. N :i 
conlliuuilloii ..f his iii.tuliU- ptutforiii effoi i S:ilul)ritle«M Ilavo .Met," wliLh l> 
a livflv ninvhi:: talk alx'Ut nion- or Ichm i uik'us iiicti niiil woiiumi iiiof li.v tlu- 
I h-turiT ill Ilu- • '>iir-.»' i-f Ills cjiictT "M"!' Saliilnliifs" is :i- <lfli'_'lit fully liii 
I nionuis as his f..riiu'i iii;i-icrpl»' i- ami intr •'!'i« »'s lu-w cluirartiTs niiil new lii< i 
I drills. 



Noted Mexican Leader to Be Here 
Fourth Day of itit Chautauqua 



EMETERIO DE LA GARZA. 

Emi:ti:i:io i>i-: i..\ (;.M{Z.\. w1i.. win sp.Mk -mi -wiiats \vii)HL' with 
Mr\i.i>" on the fniirtli iifteriioni, of ilu' ( liaiitauiiua. is lilms.-lf one of 
.Mr\i<-,.'s U'a.Uim <iti7.('iis nml lias lia<l a vitfll '"ait in tiif rc.Ma i>oliil .-il 
alTiilrs of liiat n«i'Ulilif. I'or twelve years In- was a nieiiihor of the 
riijiiuber .if IhM.utic"" nial was imiiie fn! with tlie ^o\ criiiiu-nls ..f IMm7.. I )e la 

r.ana. Ma«len. nnil lliierl.-i s.i Imiu as tliey stoo,! r..-.- iiali<>nal < slilut i-uial 

prliK iple-. When tliey dcpartetl from tlie««> he piderri'il pollij.-al fri-e«loin in 
the riiile«i Slates jo the haiuperiMl diploniatie p->r.i> ..iTercil to him. Coiise 
• lueiilly he is in a position today to tell llie truth al-ont Mexio and to su:;ues| 
n truly prn- ti«al inetliod for pai-lfyini: tlu- tiirhulei.i and aiiarehlsii.- repiihllr 

mid ft»r s.iivljii; oiiie ami for nil tlic ■•.Mexican prohleiu " 

« 



m 



Rookery of Million Penguios— the Most Comic 
Of All Birds — to Be Seen at the Chaotaaqaa 




t i mmmm ii nn i nnumm ii n iiii minmm 



iOAMioimuif 
i^'PMiiiB VsPir 



i^MdMidiillSEm. % ^Glovtsiad 



TBI SMOm HOim 

81 TeBSBse^ 




H 



•BUB to a rookwir of pwfuliM, tiie eMiie Arctic blrda which, beceoM of 
their qoMr weddMiic. art s^i t| kt jUm orlgliietoi» of the CharHt 
Chapltai walk. The peDS«la ti mm htnaorotw than tho monkey, and 
motion pletomi porfinqrliiE the nttei of this lanfhaMe Urd wUl 1m 
shown at the Chavtenqna. Mr.Doailaa mm i i . who took the iikttirso, found 
and photographed a leokefT ef a million fnnliii In his bold daah to tbo 
heart of the Antaretle. QHrnpasi <g many etiwg lnteteetln« forme e< anhnal UiW 
hi the potatf r s fl eBe ee— o< then asffer haMe semi hy man-will be hMlnded 
la the famona Ma 



Chautauqua, Beaver, July 29-Aug. 4 





'Yms^Stih, Boss! 
Yaas— Suh T 



Iff you like rmai negro 
tol4 in real Southern dialod — 
hear Mrs. Josephine Chilion, mono- 
drmmist on 

THE FOURTH DAY OF THE 



CHAUTAUQUA 

lira. Chilton'i home is in the south, which ezplaiaa why her im- 
personations are so true to life. Her profram will include selected 
readings from Thomas Nelson Ptge, James Lane Allen and the pop- 
ular "Uncle Semns" stories. 

Shtgit a4mijjionj to tho Chmmtmm^mm mtlrmoH^nj toAl tot^l tm^ro thotn fl, 
hut yom cmn hmy m jomson tlcUft fr—m ymmr Looal Cmtmmlttoo for *miy ^2. 

"DO IT MO Wl 



^ 




What's Wrong 
With Mexico? 

A MEXICAN HDCSEIF AND ONE WHO 
HAS BEEH A CLOSE FBfEHD AND AD- 
VISEE TO DIAZ, MADEBO, HTTERTA 
AND OTHEE PROMINENT LEADERS. 
WILL ANSWER THIS VITAL UTTES- 
TION ON 

The Fourth Evening of the 

CHAUTAUQUA 

He it Hon. Em«t«rio d« la Garxa. who for twelve years was a mambar of 
tha Mexican Chamber of Deputies and has had a prominent part in the 
political life of his native land. Hear the thrilling story of Mexico and 
its government that Senor dc la Garza has to tell and his solution of the 
priablam of her present anarchy. 

S/nglo admUs/onj to the Chautaawua attractions ^ill total moro than fl. 
hut you can huy a season ticKft from your Local Cou»mittec for 'itiljr i^X 

DO I T /i OWI 





A Veritable 
Flood— 

of melody and harmony is the 
progrram to be g^ven by the New 
York City Concert Band, ander 
the leadership of Oiovanni Hot- 
tcga on 

The Fifth Day of the 

CHAUTAUQUA 

FRESH FROM THE EAST, WHERE IT CREATED SUCH A WIDE- 
SPREAD SENSATION. THIS TALENTED ORGANIZATION WILL 
RENDER THE SAME STIRRING PIECES THAT WERE THE DE- 
LIGHT OF ALL NEW YORK. IF YOU LIKE REAL BAND MUSIC 
HEAR THE NEW YORK CITY CONCERT BAND. 

Single adtnijjions to thi Chautauqua mttroctlons ^Itl total moro than ^7, 
btt yof can buy a scajon ticKtt from your Local Cammfttco for only ^2* 

-DO IT JH O Wl 



*J 



^^'''\ ,-?^t^.% .-^^^^^r- 



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In Arcadia— the Phantomland — 

ALL IS HARMONY AND MELODY, AND ALL WILL BE HARMONY 
AND MELODY HERE WHEN THESE SIX YOUNG LADIES, WHO 
CALL THEMSBbVES ARCADIANS, RENDER THEIR ARTISTIC 
PROGRAM ON 

THE SIXTH DAY OF THE 

CHAUTAUQUA 

The ovraot tenea ef the pipe, violin and tympanum will mingle with the 
weird harmeniaa from the alto, mezxo and treble and preduee an 
efVeet that ia truly delightful. Few eempaniee peoeeea the enap, erigi- 
nality and real entertaining ability ef the Areadiana. 



Stuglm mUmigslmtu «• 
>■« hm)r m 



CiiMeOae^eie .mttrmoHons tmW tmtml 
floUft fwmm ymmr LmomI CmtmmHmm 
90 IT MOWl 



tMmm^T, 



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Advertise in tlie Labor News 
And Watfli for Results 



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"^Wj^'T^i K 



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BEAVER VALLEY LASilB MBWB 



y. 



Chautauqua, IJcaver, July 2j9^^Aiig. 4 



Tlie Real ""Madame 
Botterfly^IsComms! 

Tai, Son S» VhlUippe bmeU, 
eraator of tke loadiaf x«le ia 
*lfadame Butterij" la Xif Uih 
ftifil pq^ma. doaaa of the Chioago 
Grand C^pera Contpaiij, will be 
hoard bofo on 

The Seventh Day off the 

CHAUTAUQUA 

If* th« grMt««t tnusioal avvnt in th« history vf this Chautauqua. And 
with Hmr oem« Oofiald Melaath, ehi«f aaaiatinB artist with tha world fa- 
mous taniM>, John MeCormaok, and Arthur Piadlor, pianiat, mombar of 
tha Boaton Symphony Orchaa^ra. Don't fail to hoar thia tria of maalor 
'muaioianti 

Singh •4mlni0^0 u «*• CAAMtaa^fo* m*trmmH0m^ tmitf mtmi mt^n tk^m ^7, 
*«r « ^VM^on HvAft yp^m ymmr Lmmml Cmmmitlu yor mmly ^2, 

90 IT no Wl 




It 



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^ 



FIRST ANNUAL AND UNION 




—OF— 



EAGLES 

IN BEAVER VALLEY AT 

Junciion rarK 

WEDNESDAY 

AUGUST 




7-Lodgcs of the feathered Iribe-7 

WILL BE COMBINED IN THIS 

One Grand Day of Sports and Contests 

Which Are Open and FREE to All 

FREE GATE ADMISSION TO THE PARK 
DANCING-Afterooon aod Nigiil-Union Music 
Big Basket Dinoef In the Grove at Five Bells 

Base Ball Oames! Roller Skating! Circling 
Swing! Roller Coaster! Fun House! 

DREAMLAND THEATRE ! 

Colimlila %\wk Company Playing 

CONTESTS AND PRIZES TO BE ANNOUNCED LATER 



C O M E— Bvtrybody Invited and Welcome — COME BS 



By order of Committee on Ground Artangemeiits. 

• WM. A. HANSHEW. 

DAVID WHITEHOUSE, 
, HOMER KOUNTZ. 



RAILWAY CO. ENDEAVORS 
TO SECURE PLEDGES 



Pennsylvania Ounpany Asks Its O-nfr 



Men to Siim AKreement to 
Work If Strike Conies. 



AGREEMENT IS SIMPLY 

ANTISTRIKE BALLOT 



jSU viouvm TO 

KAT OV nOOMS SAT 
OF TIE OHAUTAUair A 



All valley employes of the PennByl- 
vania lines received and were asked 
to 8i^ the following appeal, issued 
by F. J. Kron, superintendent of the 
Pennsylvania Lines west of Pitts- 
burfrh, the same bein^; u pledKc that 
in case of a strike that the sif^ner will 
volunteer his services to assist the 
copipuny. It will be noted that the 
men are not asked to fill any particu- 
ulr position, but ufcree to accept such 
position as the officials may desi)?- 
nate in case of a strike: 

To All Employes: 

I 

As noted in tho Oencral MjtmiKor'si 
statement of June liO, 1 ;>!<», reproson-, 
tJitivcs of tix" train sorviro (»rKiiniza-j 
tions are now taking a strike vot*- on, 
the Pennslvania Lines West «if Pitts- 
burgh. If tin- vot«> is in favor of a' 
strike, it will place in tlir> liaixls of the 
Chief Kxecntivcs and Ceneral Chair- 
men of the four, orirani/.atir'ns tin- au- 
thority to ajruin n-fusc .irlHtralion and 
to call out on strike all iiuii in tin- 
train and enjrine service. 

The laws of the cuntry retjuiro 
that the railroads must rorttinue to 
of)erate in the interests of the puhlie, 
and. as the orjranization.s have already 
.rvfu.s(?<.t \i) arbitrate and may aKuin 
r«'fuso if the vcite is in favor of r. 
strike, the iiKinatreiiient rails the at- 
tention of all faitl-.ful «'ni|iloycs to the 
fact that the neces.sity may arise to 
mei't Buch an emergency. 

If this strike occurs our Company 
will rf(|uire enjjinenien, firemen, con- 
ductor.-, road ami yanl hrakcincn and 
others. 

If you feel and l>clievo with the man- 
a>:emcnt that the traffic of the coun- 
try must move ref^ardless of any wajre 
controversy and arc willing; to volun- 
teer your services to assist the Com- 
pany in perforniinR it.«! duty to the 
public and to the stockholders, will 
you please fill out and sign the blank 
attached below and send it to your 
immediate superior officer. 

F. J. KRON, 
July 12, 1916. Superintendent. 

Thft foil owing letter, sif^ned by the 
(rcneral Chairmen of the Brother- 
hoods of the Pennsylvania Lines west 
of Pittsburgh, has been received by 
the four local Brotherhoods, and con- 
vincingly explains ju.st what the rail- 
roads are endeavoring to do relative 

: to .securinir signers to the above nien- 

; ti<)ne(l agreenient : 

Pittsburgh, Pa., July 17, 1910. 

To All Local Chainnen, llivisions an<l 

I L.Hlges. P.. of L. K., I'., of L. V. and 

1 K., O. H. C. ^nd i;. of P. T.. Penn- 

I 4;ylvania Lines We.st of I'itt.'iburgh, 

; .^irs and llrotlH-r.-;: We arc advi.^ed 

' t!ial the .^uperintciKJpnt.s of .some- of 

Lt'.K^ DivL-^ions of the Pi-nn.slv.'inia Lines 

IWr.^t .-iro railing tluMr train .service 

(•iii|)lo>(s Into their ofTicvs ami re- 

^lUe.<tin^r them to si^'n. what we wuuld 

t-rni. ;m anli-.^trike h.-illot. \Vc are 

further advi.sed th;it in .'^ome instances 

I'lprtivn who refu.se to >;itrn are Weinjj- 

tiireatened with disini.s.sal. and that 

• irious other cooreivo inethod.s arr Im-- 

im.r resort(Mi to. Thi.s i.-^ nothini: iiuire 

or le.s.s than an (Ml'ort to make ".<eal)s" 




•AMUEL OIAMONDE. 
gA.lrf^L DIA&IONDE. vloUulst with 
tbe TiKhalkotrsky String Quartet, 
la m. mmiclnu uf merit and a soloist of 
unusMl ability. With every other 
member of this brilliant comimny. be 
is fulljr ca|»flble of rendering ezcelieni 
Bup|)ort tu Leon Weltmun. leader, who 
in director of one uf the large cnuser\'a 
torloB at music Just out of Boston nnd 
is widely known us an orchetitrn cou 
ductor Loth in this nnd other countries 
Tbe Ts<-liaiku\V9ky String Quartet will 
be heard liere uu the second day of tbe 
Cbante ii<iua 

out of ue» before our strike ballots 
have even been counted. 

The law s of our organixation.s pro- 
ide the means for securing a- strike 
vot€, and our methtxis have b«?en rec- 
ognized by the Committee of Man- 
agers representing the Kuilrouds. 

IJefore wc commenced voting the 
employes, the General Manager put 
out u lott«r retjuesting each em|)loye 
to vote. From the recent action of 
ilie Company, which calls forth this 
circular letter, it is apparent that the 
otficers arc convinced that the strike 
vote has carried, but that they are 
far from satisfied with the apparent 
verdict, and that they are determined 
not only to discredit yourselves, but 
to discredit the position which will be 
taken Tor you by your representtitives 
when they meet in New York in Aug- 
ust. 

We vould advise that all members 
and others whom we represent re- 
fmiif fioni' sifniing anything convey- 
ing: ttn impression of sentiment other 
than our own Icpal strike ballot. 

In conclusion, we desire to empha- 
size that the letter of July 112, llUtJ, 
which is l>cing put out by the Com- 
pany, addressed "To All Kmploes," is 
i\n anti-strike ballot, and is In'ing 
placed before you, ostensibly for the 
purpose of getting you to n-main 
lo\al to the company, while in reality, 
it is f«r the purpo^je uettin^r you to 
declare yourself a ".scab." 

I-ratcrnallv vours, 
1). I). .MILLKU. 
CliHin)):in, 1!. of L. V. and K. 
C. I{. CAKLTON, 
Chumnan, M. of K. T. 
11. K. KAliNS, 
Chairman, 15. of L. K. 
OLIVKIi IHW IN, 
Chairinun, O. li. C. 



Chautauqua, Beaver, July 29- Aug. 4 




Lnu^ 



Long aii4 Loud! 

Irtiybcdy laafhi — old tad 
yomif — at the cleTer lOBfi uul 
rMdiagi and the dtlightful eomio 
■hetohea and impenonatioBS that 
feature the program to be fivea 
bj Dunbar's Soiree Siagen on 

OFEimiO OAT 07 



CHAUTAUQUA 

VOCAL SOLOa, DUCTS. QUARTCTt FROM CLAMiCAL. OPCRATIC 
AND POPULAR CGIMPOaiTIONa. WITH A NOVEL "OLD P0LK9 
CONCCR-r GIVEN IN COLONIAL COtTUME— THBEE ARE ONLY 
A FEW OF THE INTEREETINQ SELECTIONS OF THE EOIREB 
•INQERS. HEARTHEMI 



hml ym •••• hmy • .mmm lUiUfifrmm ywmr LmiU C mmmHtm^/^ mmir ^i. 

•DO IT /t O W I 



/ 



THOMPSON'S 

THE STORE FOR MEN AND BOYS 

35% OFF SALE 

On Men's, Boys' and Children's Suits 
Hats and Dress Pants 



Special Dress Shiit Sale, CO-, 
All Fast Colors "•>*- 

$10.00 Suit.<. now $6.50 .S20.00 Suit.s, now. . ..Sl.'J.OO 

$15.00 Suits, now $9.75 Pr^.OO Suits, now. . . 5416.25 

$18.00 Suits, now . . .$11.70 ^30.00 Suits, now. . ..S19.50 



John P. Thompson 



1024 Seventh Avenue, 



BEAVER FALLS, PA. 



SMALL SUCCESS MAY LOOK INSIGNIFICANT TO 

THE UNSUCCESSFUL, BUT iJOT TO THE MAN WHO 

IS A SUCCESS. 

EVERY SUCCESSFUL MAN HAS BEEN A SMALL 

SUCCESS AT SOME TIME. 

IT IS ALMOST IMPOSSIBLE TO EVEN START WITH- 

OUT A BANK ACCOUNT. 

FIRST NATIONAL BANK 

ROCHESTER, PENNA. 



■AWiiSidRiiSWriSiriRiAiiRrAii^iifiiAriSfAriSiribH 



Central Light & Supply Co. 

Bell 288-R. 
Gas aad Electric Flztnree, Man- 
tles, Bamera, Glassware, etc 
1017 Seventh Are., BetTer Falls 

♦♦♦♦•♦•♦♦♦♦♦00»0»»»»»0»»»< 



iS FREEDOM 

»2 



FREEDOM 



THlwoS TiiilXi i-:i:v ER HAPPEN 




1 It lUII!]! Utt 11 1 PIH 

C C SttfTTERLY, Lmms and Mc». 



3E 



3E 



]E 








GERHEIM'S 

Semi-Annual Sale 

Beginning Wed., July 5, to Tues., 4ug. I 

All Suits Sold by Us Pressed and 
Aletred Free of Charge >. 



FREEDOM 



FREEDOM 



Si 



w»»»»s^»*»ff'»'if^*»*»'Sf3f»tfim 



^ 



LIHKL IN DIVORC E 



In the Court of Conit;.;n IMoas of 
the ("ounty of IJcaver. I'ehn.sylvunia, 
\o. <;, June Term, i:»l(i. • 

I'hilip Stefan vs. Henrictt.i Stefan. 
T» Henrirtta Stvfan, Itespondent 
above n:i|ncd: 

The Kubpoontv and alia.s Kubpopna in 
the above stated libel in divorce from 
the bonds of matrimony hayinif been 
returned N. K. I., you are hereby 
notified and required to bo and appear 
in the above named ('ourt on the 
second Monday of Avfcust next, A. D. 
1910, then and there to answer said 
petition, or libel. 

JAMES P. BRYAN, 
Snenif. 

Sheriff's Office, June 7, 1916. 

Reed & Reed, Attorneys. 







V 




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"'■CX''^''^'*^' 



I 



IMHH Iil HH I H ti Ul I f 

HBCDfAN BROS. 

PiyntfCHsMb ( 



• m iit nnnnumm t 



And Upworda, on household ffooda, 
and other personal praperty. If 
you need money, do not hesitate t» 
borrow f ironi xm, tot onr plan of f»> 
payment, ciur qniek and affldint 
s)rstem of making^ loans, cannot ba 
axeelled. 

^ormatim diaaiftdly ajhm. 

Write. caU, «r -•^ 



nil sun lii-fli. 



Af^ ft T^mHHi It 
FAIM PA. 

sai & a PIMM am 

aA.K.IotP.llr 
•nd ■ ■M i M UHfl f PJH. 



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BEAVER VALLEY LABOR NEWS 



MIDLAND 



Items of Interest From the Fastest 
Growing Town in the Valley. 

Written by Margaret Hesi. 



Bell Phone 181 'J. 




SUNDAY SCHOOL PICNIC 



COMMii iEI) TO JAIL 



Tr.e .M(>thudi8t Kpiscopal and PrcB- 
bylriian Sunday kcIiik>Is of Midl.-ind, 
are holding u union piinic loduy at 
K«k1\ Springs r.ar(|. Spt-cial cars con- 
vex ni iIh' picnickers it) tin* j^rounds, 
wlitTc ball (^UMics, tUK ol' war, races 
and a jfciicral j^ood tiiiic i.s bcin^f «'n- 
joy(Ml. 



WILL RFm RN TO JAPAN 



?.ir.s. Hofsoiiu'r. wilii her liusband 
and faiiiil>, will Uavc in liie fall for 
.lapan, on ndssionary \C»»rk. Tlio 
Hofsonu'rs .si)ont the winter and 
»<prin»f in Midhmd, and are visiting 
in l'hilad«'lphia and .Mt. (Iretna be- 
fore theii- 1 el urn to Japan. 



1 r.mk Covii.!;. ajred •!- year. , v.as 
coMi:: i.l •! l<i ihe Heavir coui\;y juil 
.M«>ii(iay, Off technical charK*'-- <'l" ^u'"- 
ely (»f the peace. Information was 
mude hly his brother, Mike C'ovick, 
of Ni). 1, Toner's i:i)u. County au- 
lliorilies will ask Jud^re llaldwin to 
;i[)pi)int a nu-dical commission to in- 
i|uiir into the mer.tal condition of the 
defendant. 



STEEL EMPLOYES' DANCE 



Then' will Ik* a dance Monday pvo- 
ninK, July ■"11, at K«K-k Springs Park, 
held by the eniploye.s of Pittsbur^rh 
Crucible .Steel ("onipany, of this place. 
Dancing from t» to IJ. 



ANNIVERSARY DANCE 

The First Anniversary I'ulilic Dance 
will 1m* j;iven by the younjr men of 
Midland on Saturday ovenin^'. July 2!', 
at t)ie danciiii; hall in the .Municipal 
buildinjr. commencing' at Ti^O p. m. 
The music will Im" furnishe<i by a .'^ix 
piece orchestra. All are heartily in- 
vited. 



LAWN FKTE. 



There was a lawn fete )jiven Wed- 
nesday and Thursday eveninjjs on the 
lawn, corner of Ohit) avenue and 
Ki^rhlh street, for the henelit of tiie 
Presentation Itoman Catholic Church. 
The lawn was nifely decorated an<l 
tJie fete was l.-iru'ely attended. 



MIILAM) CHTRCHHS 



Midland Personals 



.Mrs. .Mcl't'rnan v.as an Kast Liver- 
pool visitor this week. 

•Mrs. H. C. Po.sey and son Henry, 
and dau^liter Ahhie, of Heaver ave- 
nue, and Miss .Nell Crawfonl, left 



COLONIAL THEATRE 
AT BEAVER FALLS 



New .Smith Pipe Oriran JumI Intitalled 
and Increased SeatinK Capa- 
city Added. 



A new advertiser in The I>abor 
News Ihi.s week is Samuel (toodman, 
proprietor of tiie Colonial Theatre, 
I leaver Falls. Mr. Cioodman has re- 
cently added numerous improvement.s 
to this popular amusement hpad(|uar- 
ler.-, placing one of the latest Smith 
pipe or):ans in the pit, adding a num 
h 



First Methodist Kpi.Topal church, 
Rice's Hall, Kev. (leorjre L. Hayha, 
pastor. Sunday School, WiAiu subject: 
"The Word of the Cross."— I Cor 1:18 
to II Chap. 2; 11, preachinjj, subject: 
*'The Work of the Messenjr^r of the 
Cross;" 7:15 Kpworth League, lesson, 
*'It is Kasier to be a Forcipn Volun- 
teer Than a Home Stand-By," 8 p. m. 
prenchinKt Hr. J. K. Wripht, of Kea- 
ver, a former pa«tor, will be present 
to administer the Holy Communion 
and preach. All members and friends 
are invited to all thesp services. 
Prayer meeting: Wedne.sday evening' 
at 8 o'clock. 

Presentation Uoman Catholic. Ohio 
street. Rev. P. F. Quinn, pa.stor. Week 
Day Masses, 7 :•''(); Sunday Mass, 6 
and I); Benediction, 7:;J0 p. m.; Holy 
Day Mass, G and 8; Haptisms at 2,' 
Sunday School at 2:15. 



)ran in »|uestion is one of the finest 
manufactured, having the human 
voice i)eda! and pnMluces most beau- 
tiful and harmonious music. It will 
pnivc a popular act|uisition to the 

theatre. A jrl»n<**' i»t the pro^rram of- 
fered by Mr Cocximan for the con- 
sideration of his patrons next week, 
will convince the reader that the house 
only presents the best attractions ob- 
tainable. 



Wednesday for the East. Mr.-. I'osey 
and Son will stop at Philu<l* phia. 
where they will visit Mrs. i''>.sey'h 
daufrhter. Miss Abbie Posey, ; isical 
instructor' in Midland school and 
Miss Cravviford, a (irrade teach< ^^iH 
make a short visit to Phila<i '[)hia, 
.New York, Hoston and other > isu>rn 
points, where they will spen' iheir 
vacation until the opening; c the 
openinjf of the school term. 

Mrs. Charles Leaports is \ -ilinjr 
relatives in Wellsvillc, Ohio. 

.M. K. Hess was transacting i)usi- 
noss in Pittsburj^h Monday. 

Mr. and Mrs. Arkin and two l.tu^h- 
ters, have been visiting friei.'ls in 
Keaver Falls this week. 

M. B. King, of Pittsburgh. si>ent 
the week visiting friends in toNsn. 

Mrs. L. Harrigan and daugl^ers at- 
tended the Freedom picnic at Hock 
Springs Park Tuesday. 

Unclaimed mail in the .Midland 
postoflfice for July 24. is as follows: 
Franke Srovic, Provence Giu.seppe, 
Bade Gorvirick, Teas Asolvicic (2), 
John Daido, Andrew Litwin, William 
Stafford, John J. Haniey, William 
Brown, Mrs. Joseph Hughes, .Miss 
Lena Navey. 

Kmest Wranshaw, of Pennsylvania 
avenue, is on the sick list. 

Miss Barbara Mattes, assistant 
postmistress, and Mrs. Edward Movie 
of Pennsylvania avenue, have leium- 
ed from a two weeks' vacation at At- 
lantic City. 

H. H. Stewart, of Park Place, is 
on the sick list. 

Mrs. Ready and Mrs. Gallagher, of 
Lectonia: Ohio, were the gwwts last 
week of Mr. and Mrs. Lawrence Har- 
rijfun, of Beaver avenue. 

.Mrs. George Smythe, of Wellsville, 
Ohio, was the guest of friends here 
ifon Weilnesday. 

Ilev. Dr .T. K. Wright, of Beav 



, ..... , , 1 .1 J Kev. i>r .'. K. Wright, or weaver, a 

,er of additional seats and other^v..se/ ^^,^,^^^,^ ^^^^^^ ^^^ ^^^ Methodist I-pis- 

mj'rovinu thmjrs in general. The or^ (.„p.j| church, will preach the ev. nins 



A. F. 6. W. U., 38, TO MEET 

There will \yo a meeting of the 
American Flint Gla.ss Workers' Union 
No. .'>8, in the Oatman building. Sev- 
enth avenue, Beaver Falls, on Satur- 
day afternoon at 2 o'cl(x*k. All mem- 
l>ers are requested to l)e present. 



sermon at the church Sunday, and 
will also administer the Holy Coni- 
munion. 

.Mi.ss Kthel Hart and Miss .Mary 
O'Donnell were East Liverpool vis- 
itors Saturday. 

Louis Miller, of Pennsylvania ave- 
nue, s|ient Saturday and Sunday with 
friends in Wellsville. O. 

Jack Wilton of Pennsylvania ave- 
nue, was the guest of friends in 
CWester, W. Va., Tuesday. 

Mrs. Roy W. Gauffer . /of ^»«<in»yl- 
vania avenue, was an East Liverpool 
visitor Wednesday. 

William Johnson, of Ambridge, 
spent Sunday with friends here. 

Walter E. Howe, of Pennsylvania 
avenue, was visitin^^ his home in Bea- 
ver Falls, Satunlay and Sunday. 

Joseph Punche spent Saturday with 
friends in East Liverpool, O. 

Mrs. Robert Hill has returned to 
her home in Scottdale, Pa., after a 
week's visit with local friends. 



R. R. STAIKE VOTE IS 
FINALLY COMPLETED 

The Four RrotherhoodN Finish Taking 

o! .Strike >ote on Wt^dnettday, 

July 261 h. 



St. Louis, July 2G~Tho strike v.ae 
of tiie four tram service hrother!.;.. ds 
fvnipleted tonij^'ht at iiiidri!},');'., re- 
sulted overwhelmingly in favor df a 
strike, if necessary. 

Coincidental a»lvices from all sec- 
tions of the country justify the fore- 
cast that from between 'Mi and *.)8 per 
cent of the brotherhoods' membership 
has voted in favor of a nation-wide 
strike, atfectiiiK practically every rail- 
road in tlie Cnited Slates and appro.x- 
imately •150,(K)(» employes. 

In the St. Louis district the i>er- 
centage will probably e.xoHul this es- 
timate. On reliable authority it is 
estimated that 'Fri.sco employes have 
been practically unanimous in the 
casting of the strike ballot. Ninety- 
nine per cent of the men are said to 
have voted for the "walkout." 

The vote on the Missouri, Kan.sas 
& Te.vas is said to have fallen a lit- 
tle short of that on the 'Frisco, the 
percentage in favor of a strike being 
e.stimated at I»8. The strike percent- 
age on the .Missouri Pacific was esti- 
mated tonight at appro.ximately 97. 

The ballots cast in the St. Louis 
district will be taken to New York 
unopened. They will be delivered to 
the brotherhood hea(h|uarters. It is 
ex|>ected that tabulation will be com- 
mnced within the next few days. 

It is planned to have the counting 
finished August 6, and a monster 
mass meeting of the four brother- 
hoods has been called for the Am- 
sterdam Of)eni House in New York 
that night. The n*sult of the vote 
will then be announced. 

It is reported on good authority 
that the strike vote taken in Conway 
Yards and vicinity was almost unani- 
mous, and that practically 100 per 
cent of the members voted in favor 
of the walkout, if such a course is 
found to be necesary. 




At the Colonial, Xun. 3. 







20% Off 








ON ALL 






LoW Cut Shoes 











ALBERT S. DEAN 

Next to Postoffice 
Third St., - Beaver, Pa. 














r? 
















BIG 



SPECIAL SALE 



1,. 



NOW ON AT 



The Stoie for Women 

LEVY BROS. 



1117 Seventh Ave., 
BEAVER FALLS, l»A. 



828 Third Ave., 
NEW BRIGHTON, PA. 



SALE TIME IS HERE AT 



N 



SALE STARTED THURSDAY, JULY 27th 

WE ARE NOW OFFERIN(; OIR ENTIRE STOCK .VT 

"7SC. BUYS $I.OO NA/ORTH 

This discount on every article in our store is unusual when you stop to consider the high co.st of all merchandise, hut we cair> nothing over from one .sea.son to the other, and that 
is the rea.son for such a discount on all Koods. Just look over the following: reductions and see what this sale means. 



TRUNKS AND BAGS 



-*> 



$22..'>0 Steamer Wardrobe Trunks, now $16.88 

$15.00 Fibre Trunk $11.25 

$12.50 Fibre Trunk $ 9.38 

$10.00 Fibr< trunk $ 7.50 

$ 8.00 Fibre Trunk $ 6.00 

$ 6.50 Fibre Trunk $ 4.88 

$ 5.00 Fibre Trunk $ 3.75 

$ 3.50 Bag or Suit Case $ 2.63 



$15.00 Black Walrus Bag $11.25 

$13.50 Blacic Walrus Baff $10.13 

$10.00 Black Walrus Bag $ 7.50 

$ 8.00 Black Walrus Bag $ 6.00 

$ 6.50 Black Walrus Bag $ 4.88 

$ 5.50 Black Walrus Bag $ 4.13 

$ 5.00 Black Wahrus Bag $ 3.75 

$ 3.00~Bag or Suit Case. $ 2.25 



DO NOT FAIL TO ATTEND THIS SALE 
ALL HATS WILL GO AT THE SAME RATE OF DISCOUNT 

75c. ON THE $1.00 



Sale started Thursday Morningl 



SHIRTS 

$3.50 Silk Shirts $2.63 

$3.00 Silk Shirts - $2.25 

$2.50 Shirts, SUk Cloth '. . . .$1.88 

$2.00 Shirts $1.51 

$1.75 Shirts $132 

$1.50 Shirts r: $1J3 

$1.25 Shirts 94c 

$1.00 Shirts 75c 



ALL OF OUR MERCHANDISE, INCLUDING STRAW HATS, BAGS, MEN*S AND 
BO YSV TROUSERS, BOYS' ROMPERS, WAISTS, CAPS, HOUSE COATS. SOX, BATH 
ROBES. NIGHT SHIRTS, PAJAMAS, NECKTIES, UNDERWEAR, AND EVERY- 
THING ELSE, EXCEPT COLLARS AND CUFFS— WILL GO. 



NOW DONT FORGET THE TIME AND PLACE, SQ YOU CAN TAKE ADVANTAGE 
OF THIS SALE AND LAY IN A SUPPLY AT A VERY LOW COST TO YOU. 



JACKSON'S 908-910 Third Ave, New Brighton 



A - :■ 



'^*#^\W:Jf' 



■ ii V 





SEP 1 ■»*^ 



^ 



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■#" .».': 



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A IIASOH AHJI Hm^OI 



SSBS 



ircttiUifBi. ifOtt. 




BBAVBB. P4» 



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AUGUST 4, mc 



ONI IX^LLABTHI TSAB. 



.1: 



f WdULD YOU UKE TQ WORK 9 HOURS A^MY AS A BRAKEMAN FOR $12.96 A WEEK] 



JSS^ 



BALLOT INDICATES THAT 
R. R. MEN WILL STRIKE 



Jtarly Volt M«v CMMtod Skmm 

WalMt Is Appuwilsr 

iMfitebfe. 

AFFBCrS 225 RAILBOADS; 
FINAL C OUNT BY AUG. 7 

N«w York, Ai4Wk 2^Wlim MOr 

•«00 €f tiM 400,000 baUota cMfc by 

logBi bM ri of f onr Infotheiliooda ^hut 

•ratotiiiff OB tho qnooUoB of eaSUag 

a fWMisl stoiko on S26 roMlo had boon 

at noon today, it waa an- 

that **% piopondofant nom- 

of tha mon are in f aTor of a 

Tho balloto eoimtod today an mafai- 
ly TOtoa of tho BMton and Soathem 
aMBiban of tho "Bit Fonr^ nihmy 
teothorhoodi. Tho Woatora and Sonth- 
-f^^gt ow i dhnii'inoB will anivo in a f ow 
daya with tho balloto from thoir re- 
apoetiiro eonnumitieo. It ia oxpoelod 
that tho lowoat nnmber of votoa caat 
la fkfor of tho atriko will oome from 
-Om Baatom OMmbori of flio laUway 
vaioBB. Howofvor, no mattor what tho 
anmbor of Totoa caot acainat tho 
atriko by tho Eaotem man, thore ii 
j^fpetieally no doubt that the major- 
ity of them favor tho atriko, it was 



BASEBALL GAME. 

Tho newly orfaniied baooball team 
of WollsTlllo, played its first game 
of tho seaaon with Midland, Saturday, 
Midland wianint by a score of 4-1. 
AUison, pitohfaiff for Midland, was ef- 
fective at all stagea of the game, and 
Ganrey pitched good baU for Wells- 
Tille. The game was witnessed by 
a large crowd, 'many being present 
from Wellsville. 



GOV. WILUS BACKS 
EIGHT-HOUR DAY 



Teila l,OtO TmfaiaMB at 

Ohio, That They Are Kntitiod 
To Shorter H« 



Vote 

Thus far the la rge s t number of 
irotes in favor of the strike have been 
«a8t by members from tte South. One 
aoathemor v^o is in touch vdth the 
predicted today the 
iftmot hid seetioB would ran ap- 





ji-v 



'ton, 04 per east. 

An official of the Southoastem Aa- 
aociatlon of Trainmen, who is in close 
touch with the situation, declared to- 
day that 09^ per cent of the mem- 
bers of the four orders of railway 
workera of the south favor the strike. 

It had been expeeted that the count- 
ing of the vole would be complete by 
August 7, but at the rate the count 
is being madiB, ¥t ought to be eom- 
. looted bef <ne that, unleea there should 
be some unexpected delay. 

Expect UnaaisMM Vote. 

A committee of 50 men continued 

tiie ooonting of the strike vote. 

'Hmothy Shea, who is in charge of the 

■counting, aaid he believed the vote 

would be almost unanimous to quit 

woik if the raflway <rfrieiala persisted 

in their refusal to grand the demands 

•of the men for an eight-hour day and 

^time and a half for overtime. 

The co unter s expect to finish today 

the counting of the vote in the East- 

•«m territory. They will then take up 

the Western vote. #hen the final re- 

;ault is known a mass msetiag will be 

held to explain the controversy to the 

<'000 chairmen of the adjustment^^eom- 

mitteea of the four brotheihoods of 

Milway workMfs, who have brou^t 

the ballots hen to- be counted. 

A meeting ct the national confer- 
-eneo committee of the railwajrs will 
be held here next Tneeday to make 
another attempt to settle the dilfer- 
•epees between the railrolMls and the 
flien. 

Presidsnt Watchfaig DevetopsMOta 

Officials of the federal government 
lBffln4^ PiealdsBl Wllaon, aie close- 
ly watching deve l opments in the eon- 
troveiay between 225 railways and 
thair 400,000 employes, and are pre- 
jpariag to olfer every ipMiosiUe aid in 
<ilecttng an agrsement and evading 
« JMba^" ' 

The SMidontforwaidsd to the La- 
bor 0ipaitaient an mppmi he had re- 
fhUB I&' CShamber of^Gom- 
«f the United Btatoa, thm^ 
A. Wheeler, ehaifiaan of we 
ahanilbii'ii eomnittee on laoioada, de- 
<datii^C a ataiks |a inevitable, "milses 
.'MMMa evMHtf '"^BaaMBea ok 'sHeweBtioii 
■ra spaamy anvsonsoB, and ugng 
■aMter. Aatfiw BeoMtary otf l4i- 

UdOi lb ilhMlloB, bat bad ittt da- 

hjr 



Bellofontaine, O^Dodaring that 
the tendency of the present age is 
eight hours for woric, eight hours for 
recreation and ei|^t hours for rest. 
Governor Frank B. Willis dearly and 
vigorously expressed himself in sym- 
pathy with the movement of the rail- 
road men to secure eight-hour worii 
days and time and a half for over- 
time, in an address before more than 
a thouaand people in Rutan Park. The 
noeeting waa arranged by the train 
aerviee brotherhoods. IjocbI minis- 
pad sevnal bntheis^ 
'toete. ''-^ ■ ^' '^■'■'A *i 

lb iSd vety'^ afr,*^ said GovMnor 
Willis, "is the sentiment demanding 
recognition of men as men. It is not 
possible for the men in any branch 
of the railroad service to do his best 
work and give the public the eervioe 
to which it is entitled, if he has to 
work from twelve to sixteen hours 
per day. The public has an interest 
4n this great problem. As one of the 
public, I don't care to travel ^on a 
train where the operatives work six- 
teen hours. 

"Bii^t hours' work, eight hours' 
recreation, eight hours' rest are nat- 
ural divisions of the twenty-four. I 
think that these boys are entitled to 
such division. I am here because I 
want to express as clearly and vig- 
orously as I may my sympathy wiUi 
and interest in tUs gredt move- 
ment.'' 



POUCE OFFICERS 
WIU CELEBRATE 



The third mid-summer outing of the 
Beaver Valley Police Officers' Protec- 
tive and .^Beneficial Association will 
take place at Junction Park, Wed- 
nesday, Aug. 9, afternoon and even- 
ing. A fine program ot sports has 
been arranged and the automobile 
upon which numbers have been sold 
for several weeks past, will be raffled 
off at 5 o'clock. At the Dreamland 
theatre, the Columbia Stock Com- 
pany, on this oceasioB, will present 
"Officer 090." , * f* 



m. 



*¥*■: 



'iM 



Aecordinf te tiM Ciiilpt nte of wages reoeivMl 
by train seryice enplqrt^MlIb FtUMgrtvaaia Umm 
west of Pittsburgli, niphfsd ia Om throiigii f reiff ht 
sonriee, cngiiiMra, esMMIra, Brencn and bnkenen 
would rocehrc tlic fiilliiwMll aaMMUits for oac week's 
work, provided the ■ijM'iifnrkod eight hours a iay, 
six days a week, as da iilddayon, carpeatera, hod 
carriers, phurtcrers, prliiifB, or aay other craft: 

Engineers . $23.52 

Firemen - _-f* ^ 15.8^ 

Conductors. $ -^ 1^20 

Brakemen ^ 12,96 

SATE OF WA0BS PBft HOUS 

Eangineer ••• g^^ 49 cents 

Firemen . ^ .^ 88 cents 

Brakemen «]r. 27 cents 

Conductor :; 40 cents 

la the state«MBts Bihiti?e to wages paid this 
dass of employca* seat aft 1^ the Peaasylraaia Co^, 
the weekly wage is based an eaeaasive hoars of work. 
The qoestioB is — ^why alpoid tnia servioe men work 
fron six Is eight hours IWigrr each day than do men 
ia other liraacliea of iadvtry Is earn a Hying wage? 
Certaioly their work is wmn hanu'doas. 

THESE ARE THE HIGHEST PAID SKILLED 

WOEKBBS IN THE WOKLD, ACCORDING 

TO PENNSYLVAMU CO/S REPORT 

I il ' iii I 




TOWNSEND STRIKERS 
MEET CO. PRESIDENT 



BAKEK REUNION 



The Baker family and connections 
of Beairer and adjoining countiee will 
hold their annual reunion at the 
Woodlawn Country Club grounds, at 
New Sheffield, Pa., on Thursday, Aug- 
ust 17th, 1916. Music and other forms 
of entertainment will be funished. 
ConVeyanoes ean be had from Wood- 
lawn from all local trains. 



SIX ORDERS EAGLES 
HOLD LARGE PICNIC 



Junction Park Scene of Joyful Doince 

On Wedneeday— Big Crowd 

Was Preeent. 



With hie Ug tee on the ligfat ftot 
taMnjr auMhed as tto lasSIt of btlM 
aaariit b s wath a heavy pieee «f smW 
at Om ylaat of the PHtihanh Qnd 
Me ileil Oi., hi mtead, 1 

aged 4<, of laai UfeapeM 
^ te the But LhMlEfeei 




RAILROAD SHOPMEN WIN. 

Do Bois, Pa.— About 1,000 em}>loyes 
of the Buffalo, Rochester A Pitts- 
burgh railway car diope have won a 
three days' strike, and aecnred 16 per 
cent wage incrsasea, the dight^our 
day and rseog n tt to n of their union. 
They are affiliated to the American 
Federation of Labor< 

These wotkers diaeoversd that when 
they tied up the shape and yards that 
the management abandoned ita pelky 
of afanifly admowledgfaig receipt of 
tiieir demand!. 



Members of the Fraternal Order of 
Eagles throughout the valley were 
congratulating thenuwives Thursday 
morning over the fact that their first 
annual and union picnic, held at 
Junction Park on Wedneeday after- 
noon and evening, was an unqualified, 
success. There was a attendance of 
over 2,000, and the time was spent in 
dancing, roller skating and other park 
amusements, watching the athletic 
sports, taking in the big show at the 
Dreamland theatre in the evening, and 
enjoying a basket dinner in the spa- 
cious grove at five o'clock. 

Six valley lodges, Freedom, No. 
1429; Aliquippa, Na. 1708; Rochester, 
No. 1226; New Brighton, Na. 1342; 
Bniver Falls, No. 749, and Monaca, 
No. 1412, were represented at the 
picnic, each lodge appointing a com- 
mittee of ten members, the sixty men 
acting as a general conunittee in 
charge of the program for the day. 
The committee in charge of the occa- 
sion consisted of William A. Hanshew, 
David Whitehoose and Homer Kountz 
and to thise gentlemen, together with 
Manager Charlea Shetterly of Junc- 
tion Park, is due, in a great meaAire, 
the -fact that the day waa a huge 
success. 

It will not be out of place, right 
heie, to mention the fact that the 
manner in which Manager Charlea C. 
Shetterly handled the pnblieity end of 
this particular picnic, hisd a great deal 
to do with the great 8u<;pess which 
was attained. Since takiftg hold of 
Junction Park, Manager Shetterly has 
displayed rare aptitude la haadlinK 
the multitudinous details connected 
with the aucoessf ul hawdHng of the 
park, tiw result being that the park 
is rapidly becoming paore popular. 

The danee In the eveahig was at- 
tended by one of tha faufeft erowds 
of the seaaon, there bM^ SW eoo- 
piles on the floor. The spacious 
pavilion was beontiAdljr decorated, 
Mnsie was fnmidied by Elglam's 
eiehiatnM Ths ptiae walta eonteott 
hdd at 10 o'eloflc, pfoived to be an 
lalersitlng feature sad .teoo^' oat a 
large mu^er of coi^ee» all of whom 
leeie grasoftd daaeer^ vie priaes be- 
ing won by Simon Shdhr of Ifonaaa, 
aad Mio. Mowe, of RoeheMtr, who 
woa ftnt hoaoit; aad by W. M. Ibe^ 
havAt aad Xri. BantaHa Knok, of 
'liaiilMii'%'-'lhi' iiyMgi 'i|bB|U||f '^ 

■■■ 'a i \^. ^li - *e "-' X..li. ML m ^ 
\viBBBaaa oa nga wwrnrj* 



MONACA LOCAL 1033 
CARPENTERS MEET 



Decided Not to .Send Delegate 
Fort Worth, TexM, National 
Convention. 



to 



NICKU-PUTE AND 
N, Y. C. MEN WIN 



Telegraphers on Tdo Roads, East and 
Went of Buffalo, Gahi Wage 



Fail To RaiMii Afraanaat tmt 

Fedaral Uaiaa Striiw 

CoBtiaiMa. 



Monaca Local No. 1Q83, Carpenters 
and Joiners held two meetings the 
first of the present week. On Mon- 
day evening a specially called meeting 
was h^d for the purpose of select- 
ing a delegate to attend the national 
convention at Fort Worth, Texas, but 
after a thorough . diacuasion of the 
proposition it waa decided not to be 
represented at the convention this 
year, consequently a motion to not 
participate was passed. 

The regular meeting was held on 
Tuesday evening. Clearance cards 
were deposited by John W. Miles, L. 
U. 893, Wellsburg, W. Va.; William 
0. Dible, L. U. 1136, Donora, Pa.; 
William Clemensen, L. U. 405, Wells- 
viUe, Ohio; James F. Hamilton, L. U. 
32B, East Liverpool, Ohio; F. Donald 
Silverthom. L. U. 435, Chester, W. 
Va.; J. P. Silverthom, L. U. 436, Ches- 
ter, W. Va.; W. J. Woodruff, L. U. 
828, East Liverpool, Ohio, and John 
Simpson of Rochester, was initiated. 

Sick benefits to the amount of $20, 
were ordered in the cases of P. J. 
Beck and James McCauley. The com- 
mittee on by-laws tendered a report, 
which was passed on first reading. 



Just as the conunittee of fifty, rep- 
r e ae ntin g the four tranaportation 
brotherhoods, began counting the re- 
cent strike vote of their 400»000 mem- 
bers in New York Monday, can«B the 
announcement that telegraphers on 
the New York Central and Nickel 
Plate railroada had won their ftg^t 
for increased pey. 

The telegraphers' award was made 
by Chairman Harry Dougherty, of the 
arbitration board. It grants doid>le 
pay oa Sundays and seven days' va- 
cation eadh ymr to. mm who woik 
nine or nune hoars daily, and who 
,^flre^ beoa twa ya<ai:|a.Jha-'<aaaiiaa.' 
Ten days' vacation Is gnated theee 
who have been three years with the 
road. The request of the telegraphers 
that they be relieved of the care of 
crossing gates, switch lamps and gas- 
oline and steam pumps was denied by 
the board. T 

William J. Fripp, member ^f the 
board representing the railroad, filed 
an opinion dissenting from the grant 
of overpay for Sunday work on the 
New York Central Lines west of Buf- 
falo, and on the Nickel Plate. He 
said it meant that the two roads 
would be paying much more than 
their competitors. 

The men asked for an increase of 
15 per cent on lines west and 19 per 
cent on lines east of Buifalo, but F. 
J. Manion, vice president of the Or- 
der of Railroad Telegraphers, who 
was one of the arbiters, expressed 
satisfaction with the award 



VALLEY UNIONS LAX IN 
SUPPO RT OF 8TSIKKR8 

A spsdal ealleST meeting of Fedsml 
Union No. 149M, which orpmisation 
lo eompsaed of former employee of tha 
Toimaend Company, at Fallotoa, now 
out oa strike, was held in the roome 
of the union in the Kramer Block, 
New Brighton, on Saturday erenhngi 
joly 2Ml The meeUng was called 
for the porpOM of allowing B. X^- 
Townoend, of the Townaettd Company, 
who had previonaly reqnested that he 
be permitted to appear before tkm 
union to eq[»lain the eompany's atti- 
tude in the present nnantisfaetory 
condition of affairs. 

The meeting was called to order by 
Presklent SeiboM, a diseuasion tak- 
ing plaee prior to the admission of 
Mr. Townsond, rehitive to Just what 
sprt of a pr(H»oBition the union would 
make, provkled the former was in the 
mood to offer terms of settlement It 
was decided to aak for a straight ten 
per cent increese in wages, the recog- 
nition of the union, and a demand 
that the Townsond Company remove 
some of the employes who are at 
present working in the plant. 

Mr. Townaend was then admitted 
to the room and upon being g tanlo d 
the privilege of the floor, stated that 
he rsnlly did not know what the tron- 
Ma was aboofc, aa he smifuisd tiie 



TRAIN CREW'S JOB 
EXTRA HAZARDOUS 



DEATH OF GEORGE BIRD 



George K Bird, of Rochester, a 
freight conductor on the Pennsylva- 
nia Lines, died at his home early 
Thursday morning, death being due to 
heart trouble and Bright's disaese. 
The deceased was 34 years of age, and 
waa a member of the Order of Rail- 
way Conductors, and of the First M. 
E. ehureh of Rochestnr. A widow, 
thine children, several brothers and 
slaters and Uie parents of the de- 
eeased survive. The liberal services 
will be hoM from the Firtt M. E. 
di^rdl at Rodiester, Sstarday after- 
noen at ^t80 o'clock. Rev. S. C. Wolf 
officiating. Interment wflt be in Ir» 
vfai's cemetery. 



Who pays for the depreciation in 
human life, the result of railway oper- 
ation ? 

When a car or locomotive is smash- 
ed up, a fund has been provided for 
its renewal, but when in the ^ same 
wreck, an enfrineer, fireman, con- 
ductor or brakeman has been crushed 
out of all semblance to his former self 
the other employes of these classes 
whose time has not yet come, dig 
down into their pockets and pay for 
this human railroad wreckage. 

The common law doctrine of "as- 
sumed risk" has been fbreed on rail- 
road employes as a part ot their com- 
pensatfon. To use a Western expres- 
sion, they have been educated to ex- 
pect "to die with their boota on." 
, In no other industry is the occu- 
pational hasard so great as in the 
nwking up and transportation of rail- 
way trains. The railroad 
however, reflects po recog^itii 
this haaard in the wages of its 
ployes. • 

The records of the Brotheriiood jof 
Locomotive Firemen and 
show tiiat it has paid out tf its sdem 
ben for deatlw and diaabilitMir tte 
sum of 118,109467.76. Mors than 
VOH of all deatha and disabilities of 
members of thla ozganlsatlon are 



ID NEWS READERS 



A peruoal of Ihe advertiafaig m1- 
omns of The Labor News today wUl 
pRPve profitable to onr renders. 8ev- 
eial stores are advertistaig 
foaii at ireatly radaeed priess 
aa#MV* la mdoabtadly- ssewral 

§Jh/^ mmim mi Mh it la a 




efthaHiilbiiiiuialf 
Raibaad TkalaaMn dnriof Jiii|aar al 
(Coaliiaad oa 




te aiiartihi ^Ihafc Jria 

eonv«ny is otlll cenaMarsd to he un- 
fair. The speaker further sUted that 
he did not believe in the organisation 
of workingmen, as it was doubtful if 
organization was of any benefit to 
the men. He believed, so he said% 
that if both sides would woric togeth- 
er, something would be gained. The 
company has, according to Mr. Town- 
send, furnished a large club room, 
called the Townsend Employes' Cmb, 
of which everyremploye was a mem- 
ber, and that the Club had the Union 
beat in every way, insofar as protec- 
tion to its members was concerned. 
The club has a lunch room, a bath and 
other conveniences too numerous to 
mention, according to Mr. Townsend, 
who did not state what the dues were 
to club members, but stated that he 
would like to see the members get to- 
gether, call the srike off, come back 
to work and become members of the 
Townaend Employes' Club. 

llie proposition was then gone into 
from the side of the Union, but owhig 
to the fact that that Mr. Townsend 
would not listen to the proposals made 
by the speakers, a secret vote was 
taken by the members to determine 
whether or not the proposition made 
by Mr. Townsend would be accepted. 
The proposition was rejected. 

Mr. Townsend stated, before leav- 
ing the meeting, that he was very 
sorry that the members would not ac- 
cept his proposition to return to work, 
and the meeting was adjourned to 
Thursday, August 10. 
' At the conclusion of the meeting 
several members of the Federal Un- 
ion called the attention of the Labor 
News representative to the lack of 
support which other unions through- 
out the valley are giving the. Town- 
send strikers in their preeent flf^t. 
As an example, it was stated that the 
carpenters, employed at the Townaend 
works, who came out when the naam- 
bers of the Federal Labor UaioB 
struck, had returned te wwfc; Uiat 
bricklayers and electricians are worik- 
ing at the plant and that some ef 
the machinists who left the plant at 
the time the first strike-breakns vratf 
put to work at the plant, and iHm 
claim to be union men, have r a tui ao il 
to work. The members furtiiev<afalad 
that hi their opfaiion thla waa all 
wrong, oeveral of them aaying ttHH 
they were union men and alwafi had' 
been, hot that they fslt,that tiw otaRi 
which membem of 'oIlMr aaieaaia iM 
valley waie HHnlf ia ttia §6ifiA 
da a gieat dial ef daiaagi ta 
of vatonlaai tiu«i«ho«IJta^)| 



eaossd by railtoad acddsala. 

During the year 1915, the memhet!^ _ _ ^^ ^ ^ 
of the Brotherhood of Lbeoasothre Ba- » Wy, aa wail oi hi gaaoial. 1^ i 
glheers were compelled to eenlribote andaptakaaiiaMd tobatlMliai 
tha gnat smn of |2,2704!7tJt-te the «ar haw wmnj 4t the naOat IH 
wklowa and oiphans of ita "■t'l'ltiw aovnil ttMir nMaibwa to naik ii 
who^wers kUlad daring that «aa liar Kwaaend phurt, tiwl Ow iMMIliii 
and on aeeooat af injvriea jbM »dli> barlMMh laaHbita aia ioh^iNplPH 



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STATE INVESTIGATING 
^ ^JOMPENSATION ACT 



•Will Determine Whether Pay- 
ments Are Being Made to 
Every Injured Worker. 



EMPLOYERS ARE MOSTLY 
COMPLYING WITH LAW 



Harrisburg, Pa., Aug. 3.— A state- 
wide investigation to ascertain wheth- 
^r compensation paymenU are being 
made to every injured worker, en- 
titled to receive such payments, under 
the Workmen's Compensatioji Act, is 
being conducted under direction of 
Commissioner John Price Jackson, of 
the Dapartment of Labor and Indus- 

Although hundreds of individual 
cases have been found where injured 
workers should be receiving c*>n)P«n- 
sation, the investigation has disclosed 
that, with few exceptions, employers 
are endeavoring to comply with the 
provisions of the Compensation Act. 
In most instances, lack of knowledge 
of the provisions of the law has been 
responsible for delayed payments. 

Delays in reporting accidents, to the 
Department of I^bor and ludustry, 
have been discovered and letters have 
been sent from the Labor Department, 
to every eniploycr, large or .small, 
known to have held up an accident 
report. In this circular letter, the 
Act of Assembly of June 19, 1913, »b 
cited which provides that unless acci- 
dent reports are made, the eniployer 
is liable to a penalty of ?100, follow- 
ing prosecution. 

Paul N. Furman, Chief of the Bur- 
eau of Statistics and Information of 
the Labor Department, has compared 
Yeports of accidents, with the records 
of agreements for compensation, lilea 
in the Compensation Bureau, to de- 
termine where compensation is not 
being paid to employes who have fus- 
tained injuries and suffered disability 
for a greater period than two weeks. 
This comparison has disclosed where 
an employer or insurance company is 
not making the payments required 
by law. 

In every case, where it appears that 
compensation payments should be 
made. Commissioner Jackson has di- 
nscted Lew R. Palmer. Chief of the 
Bureau of Inspection, to send an in- 
spector to the home of the injured 
employe to learn whether the worker 
U entitled to compensation -»-'*»•— 



PENNSYLVANU TO HAVE 
A MODERN EXPOSITION 



Biggest and Best Fair Is PranfiMd 

For Erie Thb Fall— Elabomte 

Building Equipment. 



NOTICE 



To 



%■ ,.3- 



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whether 
the 



Northwestern Pennsylvania, West- 
«Tn Pennsylvania, Western New 
York and Eastern O^io are showing 
u very livefy interest in the first Erie 
Exposition which is scheduled to be 
held during the week of September 
18-23. The expositioo, is to be of a 
scope sufficient to cTassify it with the 
bigger state fairs of the country and 
it is conservatively estimated that the 
daily attendance «vith anything like 
favorable weather will probably ap- 
proximate from 25,000 to 40,000 per- 
sons. 

The Erie Exposition is sponsored 
by the Erie Board of Commerce. It 
it capitalized at $100,000 and its stock 
wa.s disposed of by popular subscrip- 
tion, thus making it a public institu- 
tion organized with no thought of 
private or personal gain, but only to 
fill a long felt want in this vicinity. 
Its primary purpose will be to en- 
courage the breeding of stock, to fur- 
nish an agricultural display of educa- 
tional value to the farmer and a hor- 
ticultural exhibition of helpful inter- 
est to the fruit grower. A further 
purpose will be the encouragement of 
better cooking, better baking, better 
needlework, etc., etc., on the part of 
the housewife. 

Though the first spade of earth was 
turned on the exposition site only two 
months ago, the big exposition is 
rapidly taking form. The main, ex- 
position building, a tremendous great 
structure, is rapidly nearing comple- 
tion. Work on a half dozen smaller 
buildings is also being rushed along. 
A number of live stock buildings are 
now complete. The race track, a 
model half-milo course which it is 
believe is destined to become the 
fastest course of its kind in the 
countrj'. will be entirely completed 
within a week or ten days. A fine big 
grand stand, capable of comfortably 
seating three thousand persons, is 
under way and a half dozen speed 
bars are rapidly nearing completion. 

This hundred thousand dollar expo- 
sition i» going to house a million 
dollars worth of exhibits. The finest 



•. ■ t*. k: . 



„ # * ♦h cattle, 'horses, sheep, swine and 

L ..:._. ., \ ^ It weci ving it and> if ^5*>2.u..^ chickens raised in this country and 

'UUl'fHJMMUll(!& fti tneMSMf ffl<$^ifnt-^^:a)i* unae^standrnV tnai 
can be utilized for practical pui'poses during the whole year. 

It is, therefore, urged that every central body in the country 
plan for a distinctively labor celebration on the coming Labor 
Day. There ought to !>€ a paiade that will direct the attention 
of the whole town to the cause of Labor, which is the cause of 
humanity, and in addition a general gathering of the workers of 
the community to listen to labor addresses. 

The labor movement has made tremendous progress during 
the past year. On this coming Labor Day we ought to make 
known the story of that progress to the whole nation, and plan 
for greater constructive work during the next year. There are 
no limitations to the work of the labor movement, no limitations 
to its power to bring betterment into the lives of the workera of 
this country or to establish mutually helpful relations with the 
workers of all other countries. 

The labor movement of the United States has reason to be 
proud of its achievements, and to be gratified at the work that has 
been done for humanity and civilization during the past yeai-. Let 
us express this progress in an adequate way on September 4. — 
Samuel Gompei-s, in American Federationist. 



Every unionist and non-unionist in the Beaver Valley should 
familiai'ize himself or hei-self with the principles of the fight of 
the rai}rOad brotherhoods. There is so much misrepresentation 
and hypocrisy being circulated that one should go to the fount 
of knowledge and leam the true facts, such as are enumerated 
in the panel on the first page of this issue. These are incontesti- 
ble facts, gleaned from the workers' pay envelopes. 




the Eleeton «tf IIm Boiough of 
Mftnxta? 
Notke ie hereby giTaa. that a spec- 
ial election will be held on Tuesday, 
the fifteenth day of Auguat, 1910, be- 
tween the houn of 7 o'clock, A. M., 
and 7 o'clock, P. IL, at the places 
of holding the municipal elaeiious in 
the aeveral wards of aaid Borough of 
Monaea, by the boarda of election of- 
ficers of aaid borough, for the puriwse 
and in accordance witti the provisions 
fully set forth in |he followhag ordi- 
nance: 

ORDINANCE NO. 182 
An, Ordinance aignifying the inten- 
tion and deaire on the part o\ tne 
Town Ck>uncil of the Borongfa of Mo- 
naca, to increase the bonded in tebt- 
edness of said borough in the buu\ of 
Forty-one Thousand Dollani ($41,- 
000), for the purpose of water vorks 
improvements, street improrei onts, 
park improvementa, purehaae of elec- 
tric light and power equipment, . torm 
sewers, re-funding overdue bom is of 
said Borough of Monaca, and funding 
the floating indebtedneas, and author- 
ising and directing the holding of a 
public election in said Borough of Mo- 
naca, for the purpoae of obtaining 
the assent of the electors of aaid bor- 
ough to the increase of the indebted- 
ness thereof aa aforesaid, and tixing 
the time and place for and providing 
for the holding of said election. 

Be it enacted and ordained by 
the Town Council of the Borou^Mi of 
Monaca, and it is hereby enacted and 
ordained by authority of the same: 

Section 1. That the aaid Town 
Council hereby declare and siirnify 
their desire that the indebtedness of 
the said Borough of Monaca !>•' in- 
creased in the sum of Fort \ -one 
Thousand Dollars ($41,000), in the 
manner provided for by the Act of 
Assembly of the Commonwealtli of 
Pennsylvania, entitled, "An Art to 
regulate the manner of increasinir the 
indebtedness of municipalities, t>> pro- 
vide for the redemption of the same, 
and to impose penalties for the illegal 
increase thereof," approved AjjuI 20, 
1874, and the several supph mcnts 
and amendments thereto, aid all 
other laws of the Commonweaih of 
rennsylvai]|ia relating thereto, i-r the 
following purposes, viz.: 

For water works improvemeiits, Six 
Thousand Dollars ($6,000). 

For street improvements, 
Thousand Dollars ($8,000). 

For park improvements, 
Thousand Dollars ($5,000). 

For electric light and power 
ment. Ten Thousand Dollars 
000). 

For storm sewers. Twelve 
sand Dollars ($12,000). 

For re-funding overdue bonds, Sev- 
en Thousand Dollars ($7,000). 

For a floating indebtedneas. Four 
Thnnvand DAllam f$4.00CI\. 
Following is the list of prize win 
ners in the athletic events: 

25-yard dash, for married ladies 
only; first prize, pocket book, Mrs. 
Frances Lloyd, Ambridge; second 
prize, pair scissors, Mrs. William 
Kralcie, leading lady with the Colum- 
bia Stock Co., at the Dreamland The- 
atre, Junction Park. 

50-yard dash for fat men over 200 
pounds, Eagles only; first prize, stiff 
straw hat, Henry Drumm, Rochester; 
second prize, box cigars, H. H. Hom- 
berger, Beaver Falls. 

Ball Throwing contest, for ladies 
only; first prize, bottle perfume, Mrs. 
William Heitman, Aliquippa; second 
prize, bathing cap, Mrs. Thornton, of 
Rochester. 

50-yard dash, girls under 12 years; 



MUd fliaetion, in the maann- invTidad 
by law, for the pnipoM of aacextaiB' 
iag the aaaent of aaid t l ec t o r a to, or 
diiMwit of aafal eleetora from aaid in- 
crtiac 0^ indribtednsaa. 

That the qoeakien of iaeraaaiac tlM 
indebtedneaa of the Boroui^ of Mo- 
naca ihall be printed ufm Hm ballota 
by the proper authonitiea in briel 
form uid-foilowed by tha weada ^aa" 
or^"No," a* provided in tlie Aet of Aa- 
aembly in such case made aa^ pvo- 
^dad, and that the qaaationa^ be ao 
atated as to alFord the eleetora an op- 
portunity to vote aeparately upon the 
increase of indebtedneai for each pur- 
poie aa above stated. The questii 
ahall be atated aa follows: 



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*.'^,%*?,-^ -fe* V .--v :^^- : >^r^ 



cTtJtekv 

. <** ■ Jr.' 



Eight 

Five 

cfiuip- 
($10,- 



Thou- 




1. Shall the Boroulrh faidabt- 
edneaa Iw increaaed for the YES 
purpoae of water works 
improvements in the aum NO 
of Six Thousand Dollars 
($6,000) ? 

2. Shall the Borough indebt- 
edneaa be increaaed for the YES 
purpose of street improve- 
ments in the sum of Eight NO 
Thouaand Dollsr8(|8,00O) ? 

S. Shall the Borough indebt- 
edneaa be increaaed for the YES 
purpoae of park improve- 
ments in the nun of Five NO 
Thouaand Dollara($5,000) ? 

4. Shall the Borough indebt- 
edneaa be increaaed for the YES 
purpose of purchasing elec- 
tric light and power equip- NO 
ment in the sum of Ten 
Thouaand Dollara($10,000) ? 

5. Shall the Borough indebt- 
edness be increased for the YES 
purpose of constructing 
storm sewers in the sum NO 
of Twelve Thousand Dol- 
lars ($12,000)? 

6. Shall the bonded indebt- 
edness of the Borough be YES 
increased for the purpose 
of refunding overdue bonds NO 
in the sum of Seven Thou- 
sand Dollars ($7,000) ? 

7. Shall the bonded indebt- 
edness of the Borough be YES 
increased for funding the 
floating indebtedness in ^O 
the sum of Four Thousand 
Dollars ($4,000)? 

Section 5. There being no news- 
papers published in said Borough of 
Monaca, the Secretary of the Town 
Council is hereby directed to give no- 
tice of the holding of said election 
during at least thirty days, by week- 
ly advertisements in the Daily Tiniea 
and the Beaver Valley Labor News, 
two newspapers having a general cir- 
culation in said borough, and by at 
last twenty (20) printed hand bills 
posted in the most public places in 
said Borough of Monaca, which said 
notices shall contain the purposes for 
which the indebtedness is to be in- 
creased, a statement of the annount of 
the last preceding assessed valuation 
of the taxable property in said bor- 
ough, which ia $1^95,622.00, of the 



I (losing Out Sal| 

i Mid-Summer Hats 

4 Rcgulw 16.78, $7.50! $8.9S VaJoM Onbr 

t $1.45 " 

M . — 

V Store doaed in ten days, aa we go East to do oar Fall baying. 

I Schwartz* Millinery i^ 

|S 166 Brigbloii Atmiim - ROCHESTER, PA. || 




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■VIS .• 



Assisting Business Growtli 



Commercial patrons of moderate requirements as well 
as those viith larger interests find here a congenial flnanria] 
atmoiq>here. 

Our highly efficient organization, possessed of excellent 
facilities and adequate connections, is constantly at the ser- 
vice of our patrons. 

Our continual effort to further the interests of all pa- 
trons is not confined to the narrow limits of accepted bank- 
ing service but includes every advice and assistance consis- 
tent with our modem, constructive baiddng policy. 



Beaver Trust Company 

BEAVER, PENNSYLVANIA. 
CAPITAL AND SURPLUS $390,000.00. 



I 



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T. 





Two Suites of Offices 
Elegant 

Eknm 



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lyssot 



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first prize, 2 lb. Reymer's Chocolates, 
Edith French, New Brighton; second 
prize, 1 rb. box Reymer's Chocolates, 
Johunna Cronin, Monaca. 

One mile bicycle race, open to all 
amateurs; first prize, gold cuiT links, 
John Corless, Rochester; second prize, 
shirt and tie, Norman Daugherty, of 
Monaca. 

Five-mile motorcycle race, open to 
all; first prize, %5 Meerschaum pipe, 
B. J. Burnett, Vanport; second prize, 
razor, William Glad, New Brighton. 

One-half mile foot race, open to all; 
first prize, razor. Inland Schachern, 



MoT)&ca; second prize, dress shirt, 
Harry Uiksch, Monaca. 

lOO-yard dash, free for all; first 
prize, straw hat, Lee Matheney, Bea- 
ver Falls; second prize, box cigrars, 
Neman Dillin(?er, Monaca. 

25- yard sack race, boys under 15 
years; first prize, two pair pigeons, 
Paul M. McKenna, Beaver. 

50- yard dash, girls over 12 years; 
first prize, ladies' umbrella, Cora Gra- 
ham, New Brighton; second prize, pair 
silk stocking's. Janie Meyers, Monaca. 

One-half mile foot race, for Eagles 
only; first prize, smoking stand, Chris. 



Deidrich, Beaver Falls; second prize» 
box cigars, Franic Clearwater, Roch^ 
ester. 

Standing broad jump, free for all; 
first prize, sack flour, Frank Clear- 
water, Rochester; second prize, box 
cigars, Norman Dillinger, Monaca. 

Standing hop,8tep and jump, free 
for all; first prize, Cd Shotsinger, Mo- 
naca; second prize, Frank Clearwater,. 
Rochester. 

Excellent order characterized the 
gathering throughout the day, and the- 
first annual and union picnic vras vot> 
ed a huge success by all. 



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HARTLEY & CO.'S 



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SPECIAL SALE 



:... 






Of All Low Shoes and Men's Oxfords , 

$2.25, $3.25, $4.25 

These are Tallies and prices you will not get 
a^ain for many moons — not at least until Russia 
gets thmugrh irith her present contract and ships 
the Unitjed States of America some leather. Pay 
you to buy now for next year. 

Women's, Misses* and Children's Low Shoes, of many 
variety and prices, cut to clean them out by August 10th. 
Prices of Women's Wear, 11.25, $2.45, $2.95, $3.93. 
Come this week while sizes are good. 

Remember the price of erery Low Cut Shoe in the house 
is cut to sell them. 

Another big lot of B^THIMG SLIPPERS oune in yes- 
terday. Another 1»inidi on the way— ^Oc per Riir. 



H. P. J^ARTLEYSe CO. 




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BEAVER VALLEY LABOR NEWS 






RANGHING 



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Cattle and Horse Ranching In 

Western Canada — Steers 
j Brought 10 CentI a Pound 
on the Seattle Market 



That big money is made by the large 
cattle rancher In Western Caaada, and 
alao by the amall farmer as well, ts 
abown by the undlsputable facta pre- 
sented fruiii time tu tiaie. A rancher, 
near OI«>lchen. Albvrtu, who com- 
menced In a small way nine years 
ago. recently disposed of 1,248 cattle 
at a total of $101,804.50, and this was 
only hl8 surplus atock fur the present 
s«>uson. 
; A Itecciuber shipment of 217 head of 
I runch steeru brought the owner an av- 
erage of over $80 {mc hfiid. They wore 
taken straight from thw range without 
any gmlii feeding and wnre In excellent 
condition to tte sold for the Cbrlst- 
maa trnde. Another ahlpuieDt of 100 
head, averaging $70 each, was made 
to Seattle. The J;vighe8t price paid on 
the Seattle market was for an Alber- 
tan steer, which weighed 1.700 lbs., 
and brought the fancy prlc« of 10c 
per lb., or flTO. 

Six carloads of live stock from 
ranches 05 miles from I'lncher. Al- 
berta, shipped to Spokane, excited 
keen comiietltion Hiere on account of 
their exceptionul (]iiulity. The price 
realized was $10,028. Anierlc-aii deal- 
ers 8«y they uiuat look to ('anada for 
beef supplies. 

A livestock firm, which has shlppj-o 
over 2.000 head of beef entile lo tlie 
Aineriran farmer since the raldtlle of 
N«vember, rei>orts ii splendid recei>- 
tlon of Alberta stock Ui the UnU<*d 
States. 

A carload of choice Alberta nteers 
were M»ld early In .lanuary for ship- 
ment to the Rrltlsh Oolunibln coast 
at .t(5.70 per 1(»() lbs. and, later on, a lot 
from Carstairs brought SC.ltO — the 
highest price paid Rinre the spring of 
inir>. Shipments from Calgiiry iive- 
Hti»ck yards during 1915 were : Horses, 
8.075; cattle. 30,577; hogs. 144.515; 
sheep, 12.410. A coiimc In ucrictiiture 
and livestock demonatrntion whicli 
has been coDdorted by the Provincial 
I)ept. of Agriculture here was well at- 
tended, showing the taitereet taken by 
city residents In ngrloultnml progress. 

John Toong. of Sidney, Man., gives 
hiR experiences in sheep-ralHlng as fol- 
lows, as quoted In a local pnper : 

"I bought a buncfc of fifty ewes, 
r >which cost IB* $202,50. With this 
ll\tle flock I deuionstrated Just what 
can t)e dooe in the afaeep business. 
This fail I sold fifty fat lambs ut $6.50 
per head, $825, and 18 af the beat ewe 
lambs, which I kept, I value at $S.OU 
per head. $144. The wool itold at an av- 
'Htige of $2 07 pe" h»».<« *iw "W Th|« 





Homelbuiii 
THelpsT 



PUN YOUR HOUSE V\»SELY 

Your Own Intereats and the Interests 

cf the City Alike Demand Cart 

• n Building- 



iniiuiufiiiiwiinifiiiiifiiiiininininini 



Happy Union of Voile and Organdie. 



|L 



Trjinsjiaront orpiindle, rlnlmlly cm- 
/>roi«lfn'<l. and striped nr fVmvcr s|.rin- 
kled vdilt's lire «'vi«lrntlv iiiih!«- l<»r i»in' 
anoilHT. Al(le<l by hfiiisliichiiic, »1«- 
si^'iu'rs have J«iined them nn<1 ri<» (»ne 
woul<l fvcr w|t»h to put til em iisnnil<«#. 
The rjfiult <if this happy unifii is 
numerous, whiiusicnl. jnxi ultuKeiher 
adonihle little aflermwni iin<i imrly 
fnM-ks with n)u<-li enprinainK clinrin. 
^hio of thoin makes its aiip«'iirnnre. and 
every femiiiliM- h«'h«»l(i«'r runs striil^:!)! 
B-sht>piiing to iii-quirt.' wjrU a froc-k for 
h«rs«'ir. 

I •••signers vie with nno iirHMli»>r In 
uinking alltirlng iiifirlels. iin<i luivr 
nbowM how niiicli ran Im* drtae with 
thefe simple inaleriaK. <tii«> of the 
prertlest in made of while vnilehnvlnc 
f ' *«- ♦- - «' - '- •• - ' ' Ii 



sfiitlfTi'd over It. 'I'iie skirt is nuifleof 
three wid. liaiuK <■( voili- itet togethei 
wiTii IhukIv «if triiiispiir«'tl organelle 
\vi''iiii flainty eriit>i(ii<l«T«><1 edge. The 
eirsliroiflcred iilgf "vcrlnps the voile, 
iukI tlic fihiiii <ff;:e in tinlslud with 
Il!lr^l^^ vsil lacf. A band n( the ein- 
hrni(1«T('«l r.rgaTKlio tiiii.she*. the hulloia 
of I lie vkirt. 



Junction Park! 

Most Beautiful Picnic 
Grounds in the Valley 

SUNDAY SCHOOLS, LODGES, FRATERNAL ORDERS 

AND PRIVATE PICNIC PARTIES ARE TENDERED 

FREE USE OF THE GROUNDS. 



DANCING 

EVERY WEDNESDAY AND SATURDAY 
EVENINGS. 



Finest D^ncin^ Pavilioa 

In this part of the State, outside of Pittsburgh. Various 
Small Concessions for Amusement of Patrons 

"YOU ARE ALWAYS WELCOME AT THE PARK" 

Reached from all Valley Points by way of 
BEAVER VALLEY TRACTION COMPANY LINES 



Write or Phone Me for Open Dates 

C. 0. SHETTERLY 

LESSEE and MANAGER 

TELEPHONES: 

Beayer County, 1163 and 5123 

Bell, Rochester, 320; New Brig:htoo, 1500 



Tnln Crew's Job Hizinins 



(Continued from First Faflre) 

1916, paid out from their maaflrcr 
Mumingi, on account of menben 
IdUfld and diHd>led in Mrvice, the sum 
of |2,42i;568.17. 

Mfmbera of the Order of Railway 
CondQcton put up |1,76M17.49 for 
tiie veliaf of their human wreckafe 
in 1915. 

Tha astim haiardoui nature of the 
flniploy«40ii a freight train, mUna 
abavnTaqr eomparimi of wac«i n- 
eoitad, wMh ndhw darks, aeetion 
lupMi SM oUmp aHiployaSi 



^^■■: 



■\, 



Considering the fact that train em- 
ployes are the most skilled xHf all the 
railroad wafre earners and mat. they 
must pay out such enormoaa lami ai 
above '^ account of "human vrreck- 
age," they are entitled to a work day 
strfTiciently ahort to enable them to 
perfornri their axduoua datiet with a 
reated body and brain. 

Freight train crews should at least 
reeeiTS ai mudi as la paid in other 
trades, so that they could better af- 
ford to mast, tha losses oeeaaionsd by 
daathi and taijuriss of their memben. 

It is oirtaia that a rsdaetkm hi the 
honn of hd»ta> with proper net and 
rseuperatiaB will bsttsr fovtifjr the 
hmnaa mind sad body a|afaiit tsd* 



Tin- li:il>y ▼iiis-t is ruT with sliorl 
l^illlel!Il .sicev**. Thefp are lont'thfiicf] 
by luxfT- 'if <irj:an<lie exu-ndiiic to the 
wri-i. 'Diii. i^ piiilHTO*! iiilo a cnrr of 
ili«» ('!)■.! n'i<l«'rt(l ort'iindip flnish(Hl witft 
VII I line. Till' IxKlice Ib iniiflp ovrr a 
net f«»iin<hitl«>n and flmsh<'<l witli a 
(j<'«>ji fdlliir rif tht' •>iiihrol<l('r«Hl ort'im- 
<ilr. The Rirtllc is of iiivrndrr velvet 



Oni' fmim dftfa ovorl<Mil<tij in t\\. 
lug lh«' valiif oi II Ik. lis.' i- ilu- niis- 
tnlvfs in Jiiiij;iiiciit iliiii oiicii iK'cur in 

pl.ililljlli; Illlll Id. .-itili;; It. 

"Viui li.iv.' (.iicii |j«'iir«l ilic nMniirk, 

"nii.ri- sl;ili(ls il !<r»,(KK» lidUNf I'll u 

$;<,<»<K» fttr.fi.*' 

Moniiiiii: tiijif wlillA the house jMiinf- 
e<l out .-osi ,s"'.(MMi 1,1 |»iiil(i. iIh, oiiirr 
htntses oil iJk' slrccl uvera^rc only 
$3.iHH). 

Smli iiiisi.i Kfs in iuilKmi'iii in Iniilil- 
in;; \v (Illlll lic ]»■» ri«'i|iii-iii if two 
Wfiis wiTc Ivi'pi ill iuiikI liy iiioi\' jm'o- 
ple wlit'ii iMii Idiii;.'. 

Ileal e«ir;it«' iiHu have ftMliil that, 
OH II »:«ii»*ral rule, n r:ilio of nl.oiit three 
to ('III' slioiiiil cvisi ln'twicii Jlic vaiiirt 
of a .siii):le laiiiilv <i\\-eilin^ ami the 
valiu* of the liiiid il oecupirs. 

.\lsfi, hiiiist-s slieiilil ln" iM)i<l(> to liar- 
in"iii7.e Willi (iilier .Ituil.iiniis ia th« 
bli" U. Ki.ii tliisi' tu.i facts lu mind 
wIm n hii.viiiv. 

^ J hell— iJiU' houses iirt» 8oinelimes 
biitlt near iiniic>»^iral)h' siirroiiitdiii^s, 
MJi II as iifiisy l;i«-l(iri.-s. ll\«Ty -laldes 
tfii'i the like- whicli ale suro to lessen 
till value of tlu' house. 

I iider iiiislakes in idaiuiin;: i .niies 
1h( "t'realv" lioti>e. hiiilt to sun sonie 
Iiviu's jiersoiiai wjiim. Su.h a house 
iu;i\ l»e N.ry eostly siiid yci no| at al' 
Kihdilr. 

'I ti«* cost I if unusual .w uiululy nr- 
nati- livtuics iukI ilecu aiimis is ;:eii- 
eiallj <ii?;re^':ir(ie<l in lixiaj; the vulue 
of a fiulidiii^r. 

Tbe»(e iliin::s must all he .'.uisidere.l 
in (l\ilij,' the value of a lanise- ia enii- 
lie<ii.»n Willi ilie fosi to replnre, de- 
preiiatiini and ol>soh>sc»»ncp. If any. 




^^THot Weather 

Veal LoJ. io serve cold: Cooked Gm«d Beef, aelect 
and appetizing. Chicken Loaf. Ham Loaf and Veal Loaf, 
detcatcly seasoned. Vienna Sausage, Genuine Deviled 
Han and Wafer Sliced Dried Beef for Muidwiches and 
dsinty kmcheoos. 



V7<^i 





Libbr, M^«U a liU^, Chicago 




60-E: 3. 



'ii \.. 



'4 




POSITION 



Members of Parker Famdy Have 

Proved -Themselves Capable in 

Places of Responsibdity. 



In the Confusion. 

"Ther.^ vva^ e.>iisi(lerahle .(int'iisioik 
in the cafe last i.i;:lit wiii'ii the li«lit» 
went out. I>idnt I see you at a tahlfT* 

"Ves. I WHS ih<'re." 

"Siiiiie fellows ;;(.t l;isses in lll» 

darkiiesv." 

"I KOt a <ln'elc for >-ix <lo!lars. .<<»in«»- 
K.nly vwlt. h.<i cliecUs oil ine. My own 
was for two." 



ITCHING, BURNING SCALPS 

Crusted With Dandruff Yield Readily 
to Cuticura. Trial Free. 



Foreinosf am.ui;: the "red hloods" 
are lie- I'ariiers- father and son. 
They collie .i| a line ^li' distiliK>lislied 
alieeslors. ol the Selieea iril.e of llie 
Ir.MHiois sto. k. Fredt-rielc K. I'lirlxer. 
tin- lail\er. i> ii nephew of lien. i;ii 
l'ari»»'r, <;raiirs inlliiary se.ieinry and 
till- eo-w .iiU. r .»f Lewis II. .\1oi;-'hii. Ill- 
's a man <d' tine presein-e mid altnln- 

iii.Mits. A i-.-^id.'iu <d' Wliil.' l'!:'.ins. j 

X. v.. lie has I.eeii a paieiii la>tor lor I riiiiiiiiM Soap to < leiinse the sealli of 
il.-an ;:.ivei ii!!i.ni and -.>eial rei:oiau | dandnin' erustiufc's and sealinjrs. and 
in his .■omniiinity. Mr I'lirlo-r |iold-> ^ < 'm i'ura < Miiiiiient to so<ith.> and heal 
llu' respoii^ilil.' posiil.-h .'I' Slat iNiK-iaii il'liiiii-'s an<l irrita!i(»iis. Noiliin;; l.et- 
in Uie d.paniii.iu ol r.veiiii.- ol" Hi.- i I«'r. surer ..r in. 're eeononihal ttitin 
.N'evv V.u-li (.'.•iiirai railroiul, Imv in- ; lln'se super rr.ainy .•niolUeiiis {..r hiiir 
• har;;.' .>f all otIi«*e,N. in.ludiu;; nior.' i """I s.nip iroiiLl.- (»f yoiin:: or old. 
Ihnii a ihousaiMFaueais, l.eiue.u i'lii-j i Free saiiipio eaeh hy mail with r...olt. 



WORK ON BUSINESS BASIS 



City Parks Aasociation of Philadel- 
phia, Might Well Be Copied In 
Other Communities. 



rit-t./iti T'l" S.rH,^. l;|^» l<; ..f f-ly 

ne), who was a foundling: adopted by 
a character part of the stary, the Rev. 
Joseph L.orimore, taken by Stephen 
Grattan. In the part of Samuel Sum- 
mers is found the talented Enf^lish 
actor, Fuller Mellish. 



"Sweet Kitty Bellaira" 

A b>eautiful and exciting romance of 
the days of the powdered wig and 
courtly gallants, is "Sweet Kitty Bel- 
lairs," which will be the attraction at 
the Majestic on Saturday, Aufr. 12th, 
under the direction of the Jesse L. 
lAsky Company, with beautiful Mae 
Murray in the title role. ' Miss Mur- 
ray will be remembered as the beau- 
tiful heroine in the picturizatiqii of 
the famous story of Colonial davs ir 
Virgrinia, "To Have and to Hold."' 



dents of a personal nature and men 
in freight train service are now de- 
termined to have u shorter work day 
and to have their workini; conditions 
approxiinate as far as possible, that 
v'hich obtains in other trades. 

Railroad officials claiin that if the 
demands of the train crews are grant- 
ed, it will mean an enormous increase 
in wages paid and that the cost of 
any increase will fall upon the pub- 
lic. 

If the officials really believe this, 
why their strenuous opposition? Does 
the historj- of railroading; show any 
instance of any great anxtit^ty on the 
part of the railroads to prr.tcct the 
public ? 

The officials also make statements 

that the cost \vi I conic out of the 

pockets of the stockholders and in the 

next breath they claim that the cost 

J will fall upon the farmer and shipper. 

The employes claim that the truth 
« r the matter is, that there will be 
little or no increase in cost by grant- 
ing an ei>j:ht-hour day and in proof of 
this claim, they cite the fact that 
sworn statements of the railroads iti 
the recent Federal arbitration case in 
Chicago, show that 78% of through 
and irregular freijrht trains now make 
the basic division of 100 miles in less 
than ciffht hours, which would leave 
only 22Yr of trains whose speed would 
have to he accelerated in order to 
avoid the payment of overtime. 



Able to Pay. 

Tbey were rich, and tha dansbter 
uraa taklDK lessons on eejaaaa and so- 
cial small talk. 

**A penny for your thoasbts," iIm 
archly remarked to an abttractad Tki- 
Itor itiA tbea felt, from th* k>ok of hor- 
ror tbat orenqnraad bar parmf ■ faem, 
•bt nniat Jiare been guilty of • ttJmm 



**WI|y didn't TOO ofTor him ■ wr- 
««lpir fmt ibt motlMf^ erltklifli 
tnm tbm ik/ttafB dqw rtan . "WtTwrn 
|Dt money, uad jw mint aoi 1w afraid 
t» m Mks know tt: 



flabMribt for IIm LiW N«wi. 



Tlie City I 'arks ussiwiiition has for 
a f.'Oil many vt'jirs mtw performed tt 
most useful fuiKMidii for l'hilail«'l|>hia. 
It lias niaiiii2;eil In eonibiite and roii- 
ertiinito the efforts of a larue niiiulM'f 
of ( ivic orpiiiixiiliens u|Min a eertaiii 
definite line of endeavor. This was 
orij;iiially. ai-; its name indleuirs, tho 
cn.Mitinn of a eoiiiprelienslve jiarlv sys- 
tem, — the etilitrgeiiiont of exi.^tinf; 

lonial Theatre, liochester, Friday and 
Saturday, Aug. 11-12. 

There is only one grade in the 
school which contains children of all 
ages and sizes. Her life is made inis- 
er.iblc by spying gossipers. One 
evening she goes alone to the brook to 
have a good cry. There she is found 
by Howard, a young playwright. He 
becomes a regular visitor to the little 
school, and the gos.si|)er.s say unkind 
things about the girl. They go or a 
drive together, the horse runs away 
■\\u\ they are thrown out. It takes 
them until morning to find they way 



(•a;.'.> jukI .\'e\v Vorlc. 

The son, Ariluir *'. I'arlxer. a hril- 
iiatit yoiin;; areheolo;:isi, sinee liis ap- 
poiiiHiteiit 1.. ilif .\ev\ York ."-iinle mu- 
selllii. luis uiaeiieully eniileii a new 
iir«'he<)lot'le:il mu.vuni. lie in u writer 
of uoie, eilitor general of the .^nierieaii 
ItKJian Mauaziiie. a nieiiilMT ef ttie 
Atiieiiear. IIilii*..il.>j:ieui niid So<iolo;:i- 
eal s.»eielie.K, tlie UtU", niednlisr of 
<'liie:iK<i iirii\er>ity f.ir Imliiin res«;ireli 
and one of tlie ten .Viiieri.iin ai. ie-olii- 
trisis ap|iiiinte<l to tlo- I'lin-Aimiimn 
Seleutilic coiiuress. <'lirlslian Herald. 



One Man's Wisdom. 

(Irowells lliis iiuiniiiiK I onlered 

the ieeiiiaii t.> <liscontinue his \ isit.s. 

Kdil the hiilelier to seiitl us ii supply of 

Kjill pork, lef; word with the halier to 

Church and Val Paul to Palm Canyon, 
a disttince of 130 miles, on the border 
of the Mojave Desert. 

In all, the company tniveled 280 
miles in a day to film seven 
scenes. Palm Canyon is thickly stud- 
ded with wonderful trees and the leg- 
end is that the seed-i^ were originally 
carried there in the migraticm of birds. 



A(llll■<■'^s pnst'-nrd. ('uli.iira. Pepi. 
llostmi. Sold evervw Ikt.'. .\«iv. 



Had Nothing on Vouse. 

W'il' II. Vniise. (•roofniiil. r .<ii a 
Miineie Newspaper. \*iis liail.-.l by h 
friend ii.s Youse wii.s lnin\inc hIoiik 
tilt' street the otIi'T diiN . it beiii;; oun 
.if llie diiys that tin stafe Siilidnj) 
s.luud <-.MiveiiIioii Mas !n session iliere. 

"Iley. ^.ill ! I.o<.i< i.» these tliee liM«H 
lin falxim: in the lieu-.' to iiav.' lniiveU," 
.sli<>ul«'. I the friend. 

"Yej-. tliey're all ri;:lil." •^aid Yeuse, 
as he stiirted on. "Init I tot te v' home 
III :i hurry- -wf're poitijr to liave mix 
Siiiiilay seluiol de!»'^'ates for liiiiiier."— 
liidianH|>olls News. 



"The Snow Bird.** 

Mabel Taliaferro will be .seen in the 
stellar role of "The Snowbird," which 
will be »cen at the Colonial Theatre, 
Wednesday. "The Snowbird" is one 



Imoortant to Motnaro 

"The Cilded Spider" 

Love and jealousy, hatred and ven- 
geance, e.xeitement and sensations and 
an altogether clever n)oving picture 
entertainment is promised in "The 
Gilded Spider." at the Colonial thea- 
tre on Friday, with beautiful Louise 
Lovely the star. The fountains of 
sensational i.sm have been drawn upon 
for new methtnls to ijuicken the in- 
terest; stirring scenes follow in <|uick 
succession; there is a thrill atiH a 
throb in every movement, an<l all 
through the play is intensely inter- 
esting. 




X 



3E 



3I=IE 



]I 



ALL SUfflMER GOODS 



1 



(" 



MUST OO 



Our policy will not permit us to carry over a sinf^le piece of summer furniture or a 
siiiRle article of summer merchandise.. Accordingly we are RoinK to cut the price to rock 
bottom while there is still plenty of time for you to enjoy your purchase this suuimer. 
Read the followinK price reductions on timely summer goods. 

ALL PORCH FURNITURE ONE-HALF OFF 

Every piece of Porch Furniture in our stock has been marked 
at just one- half the orif^inal low prices. 

Regrular $3.75 Porch Rockers $1.8^ 

PvCKular $4.00 Porch Rockers $2.00 

rvojriilar $4.50 Porch Rockers $2.25 



Regular .$2.50 Porch Rockers $1.25 

Regular $3.00 Porch Rockers $1.50 

Regular .$3.50 Porch Rockers $1.75 



One-Fourth Off Oar Entire Line of Refrigerators 



Porch Shades Reduced 

Regular $2. .5(1, 4- foot shades, at. . . .$1.65 

Regular $3.50, 6- foot shades, at $2.65 

Regular $4.50, 8-foot shades, at $3.65 

Regular $6.50, lO-foc^ shades, at. . . .$4.7& 



Porch Swings Specially Priced 

We still have a few porch swings which 
will be closed out at the following reduc- 
tions: 

Regular $3, 31/2 ^d 4-foot Swings, at $1.98 
Rcgulai' $4, 4-foot Swings, at $2^5 



*•■• 

*" 



Come early as the quantity of eadi of the above named artidcs is limited. 



PAFF FURNITURE-CARPET CO. 






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1800-2 deycntli ATtnue, 



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BBAVKR FALIiSI, PA. 



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BEAVER VAIXEY LABOR NBWg 



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EI^Ki LIFE !«/% 

JOHN YfBm 

^OeorgeVHobait 




John Henry On Tipping 



S' 



i\Y: «iid you ever makt up yoar 
riiuiil iiDi to do auj more tlp- 
l-iiiK? Ami Luve you uuti( til how 
quickly you It lorced to takt- lln' iiiuk*;- 
up oir/ 

lu a \\\k Town nowadays tipijiug 
Is UH nite»8ary uh u triillu coji. Unly 
by the aiid of one or both can you 
make any progrtss or jci'i aiiy>vlieri'. 

Ami tli«' bultlfc cry in <'aili cahe 1b 
"Hundb up!"' 

It'a Ko In thiH country todiiy thai ti«- 
fore a IliuuKhlful man cushion-iaruiub 
through tin- in<Try-Ko-roiiiid ilDorH of a 
Swell hotel lu^ hua to Itavt- his iiockcl- 
book oil th*; bidewulk 11 he i1o«'hu'1 
want to loso It. 

On th« othrr side, across the nig 
Pond. If a h(it« I enniloyt'c doen you a 
Mttle f<«vijr and you slip hini tupptiice 
ba'|)c>nny or u iifcuiiH? hi' will bniile 
back ut you and L>u i^uch obliged lor 
fivf niiniiii-8. 

But in thi8 country if you lip any- 
body with a couple of pennies tbe 
chanct'it art' you 11 wako up in th*- 
neurcfli hotipitul and llnd a kind-heart- 
ed but not very pictorial iiiirtjc lean- 
ing over vou and whi»i)i'riuK Ke.-p 
balUini. now, k'ep cool and eailuiii' 
The doetor savH you will f < "V<;r 
everyihinf,' extfpi yt)ar wateli il he 
can liufl a i*inall piece of the in'-tlulla 
obloHKala u liich wan removed from the 
northensterii part of your btaii whtn 
tbe bell hoy soaked you with th«> Ice- 
pitcher' " 

It takcH a brave man to save hU 
money tht'Ro days. 

Hep Hardy Ih one of those recklfHB 
tip-t08BerH. He thinks that all Kilver 
money should have a smooth surface, 
tbereby making it easier to Blip a ccin 
to a waiter. 

He is what the laurajeans would 
call a pepper box of prodigality. 

Hep hands out backsheesh like an 
absentonitided farmer sowing grain. 

Hep's trail through a Hig Town 
looks as thouKh the cashier of a five 
and ten cent store was walking to tbe 
bank and bad a bole in tbe canvas 
bas. 

When Hep starts out to pound a 
public road with bis rowdy-cart all the 
waiters In every hash-foundry within 
■ound of his siren fall flat on their 
faces and yell. "Hallelujah! pay-day 

•^»'wr«.«4 E ita H: ■ 

Peacbea and I dined with Hep at 
the SaJnt Astorvllt Hotel night before 
last. Hep likes to dine there because 
tbe waiters are Prencb and when be 
tries to Bay "(Jood evening!" in their 
native tongue he Insults tbem ho bit- 
terly he haK to sprinkle the room with 
tip-money In order to square himself. 

Hep loves to squeeze into a French 
cafe, fsrab a French menu card, and in 
a confidential tone give an order like 
this to the French waiter: "Avec le 
beaucoup pomme de terre. Donnez 
mot de I'eau chaude; Je vaia me raser. 
■Avec get a move on you!" 
' lb a French hour and a half the 
Prencb waiter hurries back with a 
culinary meloclxBimi wherein each 
■wallow is a thrill and sver>' new 



bill be has memorized the name of 
every street in Puns. 

So when Hep I .vhauHtH his nine or- 
dinary words he begintt to Uhe up the 
Btnelh II. rushes, regardlet.8 of speed 
liniilb. all over the eity of I'aris. Out 
to VauKirard. over tc/ the llatigiiolleB. 
to (luhy. by rues and side streets 
to till < astern Houlevard lleauniar- 
chafs ajid Si. iu-nis. iht n across lots to 
the wohtern Houlevard des Italiens. 
then into the lii«h and off through the 
I "lace de la Concord*', around corners 
QU one wheel into the Champs Elyseea 
and on and on with the mutUer off — 
it's lnitn< nse. 

Hov»ever. as I waa saying some time 
ago. r«>aclu a and 1 dined with Hep and 
he handed uh u few lessons In the gen- 
tle pastime of tipping, he Hure)y did. 

From the very moment we entered 
the aristocratic btanery he began the 
giving of alms. 

The' attendant at the revolving 
doors imprisoned a nice old lady in 
cell No. .'! and kept her there, cut off 
from coinmuiiication with the world, 
while he waited for Hep to dig in his 
jeans for the cuntoniary (luarter. 

A hallboy. paging a missing hus- 
band, stopped short as he saw our 
party approaeliing, arrantjed his face 
in imitation of a Spanish mackerel, 
saluted Hep and received ten cents for 
his trnuble. 

>^ Halt ling Hill, the house defective, 
loomed bulklly In our pathway and 
without warning suddenly stooped 
down to pick up a pin Hep did a 
hoodaii over the tame Cop's feet and 
when they both came smilingly to tbe 
surface Ituttllng Bill clutched a f^fty 
cent piece in his Westphalia and the 
procession moved on. 
' Then from some dark recess or 
niche in the wall something in brass 
buttons and with a whisk broom In 
Its band darted out like a pickerel 
and pointed the whisk broom at Hep. 
Tbe latter pointed a quarter at the 
something in brass buttons, where- 
upon the brass buttons and the whisk 
broom and the quarter darted away 
again, thereby bringing to a conclu- 
sion the incident of the pickerel. 

As we approached the coat room 
the girl In charge was seen to dote 
her eyes in prayer. She didn't open 



One of Eftendl Bay^ 11«at«uuit^ 
made up to look like Ivan tha Ttr.i 
ble, tode up to our ubto to Inquii* :r 
a waiter bad taken our order. H^'ii 
told him no, but Ivan couldn't belie \' 
It. Ivan waa firm in bis diaball^ uu 
til Hep gave him money, th^ ha ar h 
the light and went Joyoualy away from 
there. 

jPreaeptly a waiter arrlTed who in 
•ome .other incarnation muat have 
been a pirate on tbe Spaaiah Main 

He had a chin which was dlvic-d 
against itself, and a forehead wb ch 
was retreating hurriedly on the fou ii 
■peed. 

One look at Captain Kidd and I 
knew that Hep's deaire^to die p( : 
but popular would be realixed. 

All the time tbe Captain was taki : 
our order he was sizing us up a ! 
hoping in Portuguese that Hep'i c 
sight wasn't good so be could aho.: 
change him. 

Finally the deadly Rover of the Si 
decided to give us our food flr«t n: J 
ma&e us walk the plank afterwan . 
Then he bore away, sou' by sou'eii t. 
for tl^ kitchen where he dropped : 
chor and sharpened bis board i:;^ 
irons. 

In the meantime, while we await' d 
the return of the Pirate KIm. o^*" 
friend Hep was busy tipping. 

B:very time he took a cigarette from 
bis case four eager waiters would 
dash forward with Ughted match i-s 



BEST IN NECKWEAR 



LATKST ACCESSORIES UP0|4 
WHICH COSTUME DEPENDS. 




Collar and Paee for Which It le Chosen 
Must Ee Harmonious for Perfect 
Effect^Twe Dainty Neck- 
wear Suggestions. 

Skill in selecting accessories is often 
the major nsset of a woman who ranks 
as the best-dresiied Individual in her 
own «et. 

Qloves, shoes, hat nnd neck dressing 
j must be thought out carefully and the 
I questiou of furs is one that comes up 
j for considerutioii. The summer fur 
I vogue is Htrou)(er tliuu it was a year 
ago, wlien it first received general 
Americuu recognithtn. 

Last year natural unlnml scarfs pret- 
ty \vell d<uuiuated the summer fur 
sliowiug; but this sea.sun innumerable 
smart novelties are diMpluyed. Stole 
scarfs lined with thin sutin or chilTun, 
little three-cornered wraps of tlat fur, 
collarettes and all Horts of clever lit- 
tle capes are shown. 

In regard to suniuier neckwear, It 
must i>e noted that many periods con- 
tribute, and a collar taken from tbe 
era of Ueury II, Byrou, Oliver Crom- 
well or Victoria may bo equally smart, 
provided the collar and the face for 
which it is chosen as u framing blend 
harmoniou»<ly. Cape and lichu effects 
are extremely good und sailor, cavalier 
unti Htou shapes ure also favored. 
Some tailored Ci)llHrs of pique or linen 
have organdie cape collar, cjin>e8 of 
net, batiste, etc., ur** thought highly of 
nnd ure worn with frocks ot silk, voile 
and other sheer suiiiiiier fabrics. Crouj- 



CHARMING EVENING GOWN 



When ths Btil-Boy Soaked You Over 
the Bean With an lee PItchor. 

and Hep, desiring to show no partial 
Ity, would slip a coin to each of the 
Mexican guerrillas. 

One shark of a waiter swam 
around in the offing and every time 
Hep's serviette dropped from hla knees 
to the floor tbe shark would retrieve 
It and as he came to the surfaco with 
tbe serviette in bis teeth Hep wo. Id 



plained to her that if she spent the fully. ^ " 



money he gave her for a new hat she 
wouldn't have to give it to the in- 
come-tax gatherers. AVhereupon she 
was glad and showed her gum chew- 
ing instruments. Then she glanced 
at the inside of my hat to see if It 
was expensive und sighed deeply as 
we passed on. 

At tbe door of the soup room we 
were met by EfTendi I'ey, the head 
waiter. 

Hep whispered something to Ef- 
fendi hut the Rev wasn't listening. 
He was looking at Heps hand which 
he knew must contain money. It al- 
ways did. Hep gave Effendl a flash 
at a Treasury note. Uith the swift- 
ness of thought tbe money changed 



well collars or organdie daintily em- 
broidered are youthful and smart. 

Fichu collars show best when made 
of some very aoft. thin fabric, anch as 
georgette crepe, crepe de chine, mona- 
eellne de sole or chiffon, and collars 
suggesting the Henry II period are 
made of thin material and are boDe<} 
to keep tbem erect and In shape. 

The question of collars and many 
other accessories of dtess is limited 








Hep Would Pat HU Htadand rteward Him Cheerfully. 



•/■. 



'tA 



w. 



W. 



ii 



covrae a climax, and Hep. believing 
K is all due to his knowledge of the 
French language, swelU up with pride 
and beglne to toss money into the air. 
Hep doesn't know It, but while he's 
■plUint that Schenectady French all 
over the tablecloth the waiter ii get- 
tlAf a stone' bmlae on bla palate from 
lK>ldtnE back hie Parisian laughter. 
B^ would wrinkle bis fsap with 
tf he heard me, but I've been 
it when he has blurted out aoma 
«f hii ftenek kUoms with the oiallted 
— ee«t>.f|K tfe a aoream. I nottfy ynHil 
"On «i|ii jpMaMnmblo occaa\on ho or- 
lb ekopa aa^ • bakeA polgte 
Tkt irslter bowed, aaM. 
jr sad brossht htm • 
t | ht» U i M e Mopasdtka 



that !•«'» rrtMk Is 





handsi wh<reupon Effendl Bey began 
to hum, "In. my harem — my dinky 
little harem!" and turned us over to 
Murad Pasha, one of his lieutenants. 

.Murad Pasha led us to a table and 
stood there — counting the spoons — 
until Hep could Dnd another pocket 
oontalnlng money. 

Then Murad Pasha, Clutching his 
^hare of the plunder, with many bows 
aad obeisances, faded out of our lives 
a^d Giovanni 'HanA^nndfetsl, tbe om- 
nibus, besan to splash water into our 
Slaaeea. 

Hep sot rid of aioTannl by etakinc 
him to enousb money to enable hie 
little brother Angelo to fet through 
college, and thereafter tor a period of 
ten or flft«en nlnutee Hep waa por 
altted to breathe quIoUy. throegb bla 
aad hia poeketboek enjoyed a 



fully 

It was one continuous orgte of tip- 
ping until finally we left the Prunes 
Palace with Captain Kidd gloating 
over the pieces of eight which Hep 
bad given him and singing to himself, 
"Oh. ho — a bottle of rum on a dead 
man's chest'" 

Hep Insisted upon taking us home 
In a taxi vo that he could tip the 
starter and the chauffeur. 

■U'e stopped In the drug store at 
our home corner to mall some letters 
and even there Hep found a weigblif^ 
machine and tipped the scales. 

There are ginks like Hep in every 
nig Town, going through the night 
like a cyclone through the sub-treas- 
ury, scattering pocket money right 
and left like so much chaff simply be- 
cause they want to be looked upon 
as High Class Sports. 1r 

And it's hard to follow their act. 
It's n>ugh sledding for the Sensible 
I.Ad8 who are willing to pay for aerv- 
ices rendered but balk at the myriad 
of outstretched paws which line the 
Pathways of Enjoyment 

I was talking to Miff Pnttenon 
about it. Miff invented a machine for 
removing sunburn from pickies and 
made a fortune. 

He has It yet. all etce'pt two eenta 
he paid for a postage stamp which 
stuck to his pocketbook some nine 
years ago. Rut he has the pocketbook 
and he ptlll can look at the stamp and 
consider It an asset. 

Miff is such a stingy loosener he 
looks at you with ohe eye so aa not 
to waste the other. 

The boys call him "Putty" because 
he's the next thing to a pain. 

If you ask him what time U Is he 
takes off four minutes as his commla- 
slon for telling you. 

"Tipping!" said Miff; "what Co you 
meiTi tipping?" 

"To give a bit of coin to a waiter 
or those who do you a service," I 
explained. 

"Oh!" paid Miff: "I've henrd about 
It. but T don't do It. t doh t know 
any waiter well enough to give hlra 
mimey to take home to his wife. She 
might meet me affen^ards and thank 
me for It and my wife might hoar 
abotit it— that's risky work." 

"Ihif you caiit get good aerrlbe in 
the restaurants or hotels unless yon 
do a bit of tipping. How do. you man- 
age it?" I inquired. 

"Easy." Miff answered: "I never go 
to the same hotel twice. I begia.at 
the head of the list and go to tlMm 
all. By the time I get around to Ibo 
first one again all the old waHara 
have grown rl^ and haTt BOne batik 
to Bulgaria. m^Vm mfa— that's any 
ayatem." 

Maybe Hep la right, aad maybe Miff 
Il right. For ny part I beUaiva la 
BM>doratloB, betwixt aad boehaaa. 
Wbat do iron tfeljRk? 




Dainty Accessories That May Be Made 
■t Home. 

only hy the inclination of the Individ- 
ual to 8ei brain nnil lingers to work on 
the developn>eut of novelties, for nc- 
tiuil cost enters In a very small degree 
Into the matter. Odd>» nnd ends of 
lace or other leftover dress trimming 
or fabrics may with excellent results 
be presSetl Into service. 

Two suggestions are offered In tbe 
sketch shown herewith. The upper pic- 
ture gives a collar and cuff set, em- 
ploying black satin and white organdie, 
with small white pearl buttons as the 
finishing touch, nnd the lower sketch 
shows a simple round collar of rose- 
colored georgette crepe, caught with a 
bow of French blue velvet rlbl>on. 

The question of veils is also an Im- 
portant one when selecting the sum- 
mer accessories of dress. Many net 
and lace veils as well as tbe more 
serviceable chiffon ones, are fashion- 
able, uud there is a considerable color 
range to chtMise from. The wise wom- 
an win try tbe effect of the different 
colors on her own complexion before 
chooalng. 



Digestive c 
Troubles 

cauiehfadache, biliousness. 
oonstq»tkni» impure blood 
and ofitbr unpleasant symp* 
toms. If tfa^ troubles are 
neglected diey weaken the 
body and open the way for 
8eriousillness.Manychronic 
diseases may be traced back 
to indigestion that could 
have been immediately 

relieved by 

Beecham's Pills. This well- 
known home remedy has 
pxx)ven itself dependable, safe 
and speedy during sixty years* 
use. The fame of having a 
larger sale than any other med- 
icine in the world proves the 
dependable, remedial value of 

UPIUS 

«f Aav M«««fa« fa iIm Warl^ 
la Umm. Mc tic 



raEPARBOMCSS AOENTtt. 1 NKKU YOl' 

'>.'ti lo grocera. druCHlata. cliriir »laniis. iioo! 
ro('in«. rrstaurnnti. di^partm<-ni ■torii. • v«t>> 
■•tubllahtii.'ni wh>i< a mull Imainvai la iiii- 
ri'd on KvtT>' man. wnmun inn iiml ^.r' 
ihould buy onr. I'oaltlvrl)- the flrat .ipi' iiruiic* 
• n th"" niurki'i Srrxl '.'5 oiuta lor ».4iiii>;< .mit, 
partU-ulara Do n<i( ■••ntl staiDi'' )>•' ""t 
anawcr iiiilcaa ^ nti rn>-an bualiuaa. P. O 
RO\ ;il, RKAniNCi. PA. 



PAR AAI F lOO FINE FARMS lb 
■ *^I1 9MkB aaatorn Ohio 



rrvr Hat. w. «r. lub riaa awmcy. 



Wri*» for 

CalaaM.aa, «>fei» 



SHE HAD THE BARGAIN BUG- 



Mrs. Winniger Knew Just Exactly 

Where and How to Get What 

Father Wanted. 

Mrs. (lanpway WlnnipT, the luir- 
piln fiend, who had married (J. Wiiiiii 
jrer becniuse it was such a rca.M»Miihlft 
way uf cettlni; n big huuHe In the* 
city, an.swered n rinj; ut her eU-i'trlc 
doorbell. Installed only lant week at a 
special bargain rate. 

"Why. father."* exclnlme*! Mrs. Win- 
niger. "When did you leave I>oo|)s- 
burjr?" 

"I took the 11 :0t) to town." n-pllert 
Con.stable Wings of I><M»i».sliurK. "1 
l»een 'lecte<l .sheriff, und the .Mornlns 
Biixz wants my i»ixture. I want a 
**w«'ll plxture took by the Kwellest phi»- 
tycraidier In taown. Sompiii' that wuat 
make me look natural." 

"<). father. I tell .vou !" <Tle«l hi a 
daiijchter. "Oo around to any one of 
the Beezer-Wlgglv» grocery Hlnr«'-< nuti 
hiiy three pounds of tea. and they'll 



BHght Silver and.Tuil*. 
What InTtbe worki did f ashiondo be- 1 *<''^'^ A'n Hn h'fiA^tu uirve" >uft*fA>ftire 



vX' :^':^;- ^. ■ ^- ^ 1L.;^<^- .^' -^.-r 



A very dainty and charming evening 
gown ia this one of white tulle, ita 
aimplicity add* a tone ot richneaa 
and "quality" to It which ornamenta- 
tion would fail to do. The skirt falls 
in simple lines in the front but is 
draped Juat a trifle in the back. The 
waist is extremely decollete with a 
semi-blouse effect. 



fore Horaeone thoiiirbt of silver ribbon 
and tl.s8ue for fruHllfCbt wear 7 An en* 
cbantlne dunce frock Just eomplete<1 la 
made of white tulle nnd silver rihhons 
— nothing elKe. if one excepts a sim- 
ple foundation slip of silver tis.sue 
which plenniH delicately throujrh the 
floating skirt of tulle. There are In 
fact three skirts of tulle, nuil on the 
second one Is a wide silver rlhhon, set 
at the knee. The jclrdU» Is of similar 
gilver rihbon run across the chlfr«m 
unMerlKMllces, below the draF>ery of 
tulle. At the front of the skirt, 
nhout eijrht Inches below the wnlstllne, 
is set a tab of sliver ribhon fastened 
to the tulle with rosettes of narrower 
silver ribbon, and from the plrdle de- 
I>end 'our tabs of ribhon likewise 
trimmed with silvery msettes. 



taken, free!" 

"But don't I tell you I want llic 
swellest — " 

"Well, Abe Smith f^s open<«l up n 
little photfiKniph stU(llo/~}Mi(l Mii* week 
he's Kivinc pictures away for imthlnt; 
pnivlding you buy the frame fnuii him 
The frame only cost.s $18.40, upd just 
lhli:k— " 

"Hut, consarn it, datter — " 

"1 know, father. I know 'vln-n- 
there's a perfectly elepnnf second-hand 
I»ortrult in oils, all (iidshed. for only 
.'tM.iM. I can get the man to i>«int In 
a hald HjMt and paint out the side 
whiskers nnd It will look just Hkf 
you." 

And Poustablc Wlntrs cliisp«»«l n hnnd 
to hl.s dlzzv brow. — Detroit l-Yt-c Pr^ss. 



To Press a Plaited Skirt. 
When pressing a plnlted skirt, after 
yon have laid tbe skirt on the ironing 
board fold the plaits evenly and pin 
them to the IronlnR blanket at the bot- 
tom. Hold tbe walsthand finiily with 
the left hand, nnd Iron from the liot- 
toiii toward the top. Hold tbe plait 
tlk'htly IIS you Iron it 



— Get rid of dandruff — 

it makes the scalp itch and the hair fall out. J?f 
wise al)out yonr hair, cultivate it, like the women in 
Paris do. They regularly use 

ED. PINAUirS EAU DE QIME 

the wonderful French Hair Tonic. Try it for your- 
self. Note its exquisite q uality and fragrance. Aristo- 
cratic men and women the world over use and endorse 
this famous preparation. It keeps the scalp clean and 
white and preserves the youthful brilliancy of the hair. 

Bu J' a 50c bottle from your dealer— or send 10c to our Ameri- 
Ciin Offices for a testinfir bottle . Above all thinffs don't neglect 

your hair. 

PARFUMERIE ED. PDiAUD. Dept H ED. PIHAUD BUg.. Mew Ttik 



Pa's Opinion. 

"Pa." asked little Snminy Twohble, 
"what Is a misnomer?" 

"ily son." answered .Mr. Twoltble, 
whose Idea of haxlnj; a k«m»<1 time \s 
to ta)cp n nnp 'd "" •'"''.^' 'hiilr close 
to an electric fan. "I Bhould say thft 
average ideasure resort is a tnlsno- 
mer." 



.•'i':'i^' 



For Greaee Spots. 
Balls made of fuller's earth and 
Tinegar are good to keep on hand for 
removing grease spots from clothing 
and houaebold material. Make • 
etiff paate of the fuller's earth and 
vinegar. Roll It Into balls, and dry 
them. When a spot is to be removed 
dampen It and grate one of tbe balle 
over It. Leave this until it la dry, 
brush off the powder, and wash the 
mark with tepid water. 



"Neata' of Fish. 
Two nests of the African lung flsh 
described by Sir F. J. Jackson, were 
In a patch of coarse grass and were 
of circular form, ahoot three feet 
across and 18 inchea deep. A sinffular 
outer ring, five Inches wide and an 
inch above ' water^letel, seemed to 
bave been bnilt up with mud brought 
up in tbe Ashes' months, and beattn 
down with their flat, slim tails. 



1- ■■- 



InsureYourleeth 



/iV 'r 



41 



• . ..- . 



Boob, towevcr. aiiotlier oo«|MBf 
wU Ids anMta ter 
pltifU. . J . 



It Ii eailtr^ to crlUelie the litt 
tMat JigMrlir tluui lo io the mt^SHttt'- 
tkte^lBdtttcMntly. ^ - 



^Bettorjhc 
l-j dcntitnre vou 
is6iarc usino now 



«;,i.^u; r 



V A U D O U ■ S 



Mrs. B. Scoree Twice. 

Mrs. Blunderby (to caller)— WhOe 
passing your house yesterday I saw 
the hospiul sTalanche drive up and 
stoiLtmly a few doors away. 

Caller— The avalanche? (Reeovert 
herself.) Oh. yea; a poor man very 

in. 

Mrs. Blnnderhy— Dear mm\ Kotb* 

Ing contiguous, I hope. 'V--'^^, . 



Worth While Quotation. 
"The mark of the maa of tbe^worid 
Is iUwence of pretenslOB. He does boI 
nak« a speech, ke takes a low tael- 
oepi tone, arotds all hrac. proa l ewi 
not at all. ptrfavaw amk. He «»11« 
kta taptaqmeot W it* tswlliit num m, 
w$^ m ttfne mm- evfl ttaiipf iMr 



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THE BEST PLACE TO EAX AFTER ALL 




^■f 



May's Restaurant 



•«^' 

.',i- 



■'■':? 




Evenrthing New. UnezcdU Service 
, OUR MOTTOt 

''Hone CooUig aid Pronpt Service" 



UkoIi Hotel Bidg. - Rochester, Pa. \ 

HARRY. MAY, Proprietor 



•A 



SMALL SUCCESS MAY LOOK INSIGNIFICANT TO 
THE UNSUCCESSFUL. BUT NOT TO THE MAN WHO 
IS A SUCCESS. 

EVERY SUCCESSFUL MAN HAS BEEN A SMALL 
SUCCESS AT SOME TIME. 

IT IS ALMOST IMPOSSIBLE TO EVEN START WITH- 
OUT A BANK ACCOUNT. 

FIRST NATIONAL BANK 

BOCHBSTEB, PENMA. 



TIE "WEMAKIT" STORt 









BEAI/Eh rJ<MLS.PA. 

rVflOCHEaDlAMONDS.] 
^GOLD-SnyERWAREJ 

.u^Esr >wRiEn/ 

^ AND POPUIAR, 
PRICES, 



Mn ii nnn iii m ti n t f 






X' 



HBCKMAN BROS. 



; Pmuw. At«^ - • 
mm i nm i m iti n i n 





And Upword&f on houaehold coodi, 
and other p«rMMUtl property. If 
you need money, ^o not hesitate to 
borrow from nt, for onr plaa <^ re- 
payment, oar quick and efficient 
•yatem of malcing loans, cannot be 
excelled. 

Information cheerfully ffi^en. 

"Write, call, or phone as. 

m\ m\ m co. 



BUg. 
Cor. Serenth Ave. * Twelfth St. 

BEAVaS FALLS, PA. 
Ben PImm 244; B. C FImm 1791 

Open 8 A. M. to 6 P. M. 
Monday and Satorday Until 9 PJL 




NEWS 



' .. .f l> . " 






Subscribe for The Labor News. 



i mmnn i m iii n i nnn ii nm iii m ii m iiiiii f 



ADAM KORNMAN . > THE SMOKE HOUSE 

Cor Spedal Braada — Kon- Andrew P. Konusaa, Praa. 

man's BeaTer Valley Special; , > Retail dealer in Tobacco, Can- \ \ 

> Kwnman's Best Stogie; Kom- • > dies. Postal Carda, Pipea, Can- • > 

maa's Gold Medal Extra. ' ', Tas Glores and Postage Stampa. ' ! 

* Hotel Uaeola BMg., BodMater. . . 9» New York Ato.. BedMster. . > 



ti nnmnmnm i n i m i m i nfmm t m i nnm 



RAILWAY EMPLOYEES DO 
NOT ASK WAGE INCREASE 



Ask for Adoption of Plan Which 
Will Decrease Income of 
Many Employes. ^ 

DO NOT WANT TO WORK 

FROM 12 TO 18 HOURS 



The railway manaKers are flooding 
the country with publicity rcf^arding 
the "increase in wages" that is being 
demanded by the members of the 
four railway brotherhoods who are 
engaged in actual bundling of trains. 
It seems the railroad managers can- 
not make an honest presentation of 
this issue any more than they can of 
the rate question, the (|Ucstion of 
their valuation, or their inside financ- 
ing. 

The railway employes are not ask- 
ing for an advance of wages. In 
fact they are asking for the adoption- 
of a plan that will decrease the in- 
come of many of them. They are 
asking for an eight-hour day, instead 
of being compelled to stay out on the 
road from 12 to 16 hours. 

Their argument in fuvor of this 
change is reasonable. They say that 
passenger trainmen and fust freight 
trainmen would not be niatoriidly af- 
fected by such a rule, us few of them 
are now on the road nioro ihjm eight 
hours. The men who would l>e af- 
fected are the trainmen who handle 
"dead" freight train.s. Tlu-se men 
are on the road usually the limit per- 
mitted by the federal laws — IG hours 
— and often longer than that before 
they gret back to their homes. Their 
expenses on the road must come out 
of their own wages. 

The greatest evil, however, is the 
physical and mental effect upon men 
working that length of time. It needs 
no argument to prove that after eight 
or 10 hours' continuous strain, one's 
physical and mental activities get 
sluggish. It is during these periods, 
say trainmen, that wrecks most fre- 
quently occur; and then the railroad 
managements hlame it pn lo the 
"carelessness" of the railroad em- 
ployes. 

Even the traveler in the Pullman 
gets tired after a 10-mile ride during 
the day. But the man in the engine 
cab must keep fresh; he must keep 
his mental activities keen for he must 
see every signal, keep in mind every 
order, and when he enters a railroad 
yard must know just what every one 
of all the way from 50 to 300 switch, 
signal and block lights mean, and if 
they are as they should be to guaran- 
tee him a clear track. Yet eye fatigue 
is one of the first symptoms and re- 
sults of long hours of work, and men- 
tal dullness comes a close second. 
"Safety first" for the traveling public 
demands that men on railroads be not 
overworked. 

There is yet another side — one 
which affects the commercial side of 
railroading. Why are some freight 
trains handled with such speed that 
men who handle them are not on their 
runs over eight hours, while other 
freight trains hauled with the same 



elass of motive power and over the 
some right-of-way, are 14 to 20 hours 
clearing one division? Why is a 
carload of fruit from 6Q to 72 hours 
coming from New Orleans to Sioux 
City, while a carload of other freight 
is three to four weeks? 

Trainmen say the railroads so over- 
load "dead" freight trains that thev 
cannot make their time. This is dom 
in order to increase the railroad's 
profit. This is why the trainmen who 
handle these trains must "lay out" on 
sidings and at way stations, and be 
on their run 14 to 16 hours. 

Trainmen also offer the hint to the 
shipper that if the eight hour law 
goes into effect, it will solve the 
freight car famine to a great extent. 
Railroads will then speed up their 
freight schedule, in order to avoid 
overtime wages, and freight cars will 
be rushed to their destination and un- 
loaded instead of ding-donging along 
on the road for weekii. — Sious City, 
Iowa, Tribune. 



A MODEL RESTAURANT 



The attention of readers of The La- 
bor News is called to tne advertise- 
ment of the May Restaurant, located 
in the Lincoln Hotel building, Roches- 
ter, which appears in another part of 
toduy's issue. This restanrant was 
opened up on June 27, by Harry May, 
who formerly conducted the May res- 
taurant on New York avenue. The 
new restaurant is by fare the most 
modem in the Beaver Valley. The 
cooking is excellent and the service 
beyond criticism. 

Harry May, the proprietor, was u 
member of the American Flint Glass 
Workers' Union for 18 years, having 
held his card steadily ull of that time. 
During that time he worked for the 
Rochester Tumbler Co., the H, C. Fr>' 
Gla.<is Co., the Syndicate Glass Co., of 
Morgantown, W. Va., and the Cora- 
opolis Consolidated Lamp Co. 

Owing to the fact that it is almost 
impossible to get help in the restau- 
rant, Mr. May has been compelled to 
curtail the amount of home cooking 
done, but within a short time he ex- 
pects to have all cooking on the home 
order and to have the best service 
obtainable. 



«••••«•• 



«••••••••• 



SEND IN THE NEWS. 



SP€€IAL! 




Ladles ' 

Bathing 

Slippers 



BarnetVs 



Penu'a Ave., 



MONACA. 









^'k 



!D D D'Di 



si: 



FOR SALE! 

House of six rooms, well built, with furnace . city 
and cistern water.. Lot 33x120. Located afl 505 Dela- 
ware avenue, Rochester. $600 down, balance as rent. 

For further information see 

H. J. BECK 

505 Delaware Avenue, • ROCHESTER, PA. 



DO DO 



' Seii^d in the mwi. 

Ever>' union in the valley 
should have a press correspond- 
ent. 

Y< want the news of your 
uniote j, '> appear in your paper. 

G^ %'sy and sec that some- 

* body^ Especially appointed to 

* take care of this matter. 

* See that it reaches the Labor 

* News office as early in the 

* week as possible. 

* News should be in this office 

* by Thursday noon, of each week 
' if it is to go in that week's issue * 



* 
* 



CHARTER NOTICE 



Notice is hereby given that an* ap- 
plication will be made to the Gover- 
emor of Pennsylvania on Monday, 
August 28th, 1916, at 10 o'clock A. 
M., by Harry Grimshaw, J. D. Mc- 
Kenna, J. C. Figley, J. C. Beaner and 
F. M. Hays, under the Act of Assem- 
bly entitled, "An Act to provide for 
the incorporation and regulation of 
certain corporations," approved April 
29th|1874, and the s upfl eroe nto ^t h ere- 



to> for the charter of an intended cor- 
poration to be called the Beaver Val- 
ley Labor News Company, the char- 
acter and object of which is transact- 
ing a printing and publishing busi- 
ness, and for these purposes to have, 
possess, and enjoy all the rights, 
benefits, and privileges of said Act of 
Assembly and the supplements there- 
to. JOHN B. McCLURE, 
jlyl4-21-28-aug4 Solicitor. 

Hund your paper to your neighbor 
when you are through with it. 



CHARTER NOTICE 



Notice is hereby given that an ap- 
plication will be made to the (Jover- 
nor of Pennsylvania on Tuesday, the 
8th day of August, 1916, by Wahl J. 
Snyder, John E. Snyder, George A. 
Honzo, Robert L. Baker, under the 
Act of Assembly entitled, "An Act to 
provide for the incorporation and reg- 
ulation of certain corporations," ap- 
proved April 29th, 1874, 4nd the sup- 

an intended corponll^i to be called 
"Snyder Bonso Baker^bmpany," the 
character and object of which is stor- 
ing, repairing, caring for, hiring and 
dealing in automobiles, motor ve- 
hicles, accessories and supplies there- 
fore, and for these purposes to have, 
possess and enjoy all the rights, bene- 
fits and privileges of said Act of As- 
sembly und supplements thereto. 

HEED and REED, 
jlyl4-21-28Miug4 Solicitors. 



Subscribe for The Labor News. 



TIME IS K 



ZMZ 



AT 



'' >i 




W 




SALE STARTED THURSDAY, JULY 27th 

WE ARE NOW OFFERING QUE ENTIRE STOCK AT / J^^^ ^F 

. BUYS $1.00 \A/ORTH 

This discount on crerjr article in our store is onasoal when you stop to consider the high cast of all merchandise, but we carry nothing over from one season to the other, and tliat 
is ihe reason for such a discount on all goods. Just look over the following reductions and see what this sale means. 



TRUNKS AND BAGS 



$22.50 Steamer Wardrobe Trunks, now $16.88 

$15.00 Fibre Trunk .$11.25 

$12^0, Fibre Trunk $9.38 

$10.00 Fibre Trunk $ 7.50 

$ 8.00 Fibre Trunk $ 6.00 

$ 6.50 Fibre Trunk $ 4.88 

$5.00 Fibre Trunk $ 3.75 

$ 8JM) Bag or Sntt Cue $2.63 



$15.00 Bhick Walrus Bag * $11.25 

$13.50 Black Walrus Bag. $10.13 

$10.00 Black Walrus Bag $ 7.50 

$ 8.00 Black Walrus Bag. . $ 6.00 

$ 6.50 Black Walrus Bag $ 4.88 

$ 5.50 Black Wains Bag. $ 4.13 

$ 5.00 Black Walrus Bag $ 3.75 

$ 3.00 Bag or Suit Case .$ 2^5 



SHIRTS 

$3.50 SUk Shirts , $2.63 

$3,0d Silk Shirts $2J25 

riso Shirts, Silk Cloth $1.88 

$2.00 Shirts $1.51 

$1.75 Shirts $1^2 

$1.50 Shirts $1.13 

$L25 Shirts 94^ 

$1jOO Shifts ' 75e 



DO NOT FAIL TO ATTEND THIS SALE 
ALL HATS WILL GO AT THE SAME RATE OF DISCOUNT 

^ 7Sc. ON THE ^1.00 



Sale Started Thursday Morning! 



ALL OF OUR MERCHANDISE, INCLUDING STRAW HATS, BAGS, HEN'S AND 
BOYS* TROUSERS, BOYS' ROMPERS, WAISTS, CAPS, HOUSE COATS, SOX, BATH 
ROBES, NIGHT SHIRTS, PAJAMAS, NECKTIES, UNDERWEAR, AND EVEEY- 
THING ELSE, EXCEPT COLLARS AND CUFFS— WILL GO. 



NOW DOl»l'T FORGET THE TIME AND PLACE, SO YOU CAN TAKE ADTANTAGB 
OF THIS SALE AND LAY IN A SUPPLY AT A VERY LOW c6gT TO YOU. 



908-910 TWrd Ave^ New Brtehtop 



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MIDLAND 



Items of Interest From the Ftstest 
Growing Town in the Yalley. 

Written by Margaret Hess. 



B«1I Phone 181-J 



AUSTRIAN HELD ON 
SHOOTING CHARGE 



Upon inf;urmatJon filed by Frunk 
Nickovich, an Austrian of Midland. 
Brozuro Zeno, another foreiKnpr. ^^■"'' 
placed under arrest by Congtablf 
David Hayvice, Monday eveninK- Zenu 
is beinK lield in the town jail |K'ndinK 
a heal inK before Justice McNeill, on u 
charge of shooting with intent to kill. 

According to officials, Nickovich 
was lidinjr a bicycle down Midland 
avenue, about live o'clock, Monday 
evening, when Zeno opened fire ui»on 
him with u revolver, firinjj two shots. 
The bicycle rider fell from his wheel 
and Zeno thinking he had shot the 
man turned and fled. Several by- 
standers who witnesse*! the affair, 
gave chase, and with the aid of the 
Midland officers, caugh^ the gun 
toter several blocks a-. ay. He had 
thrown the gun away, but in his 
clothing was found a large dagger. 

No direct motive for the act can 
be ascertained by the officials. 



WM. DEWEY KILLED 



While unloading ice from a refrig- 
erator car in the railroad freight 
yards at Midland, William Dewey, 
SLged 42 years, a laborer in the employ 
of the Pittsburgh Crucible Steel Co. 
was fatally injured about 11 o'clock, 
Saturday morning, when he fell be- 
neath the wheels of a C. & P. freight 
train. The ynfortunate victim was 
picked up and rushed to the East Liv- 
erpool hospital, but he died before 
they reached the State line. Dewey, 
it is claimed, was standing on the 
ground outside the refrigerator car, 
and failed to notice the approach of 
the freight train. He stepped directly 
in the path of the passing locomotive, 
his head being crushed, one arm sev- 
ered and his right leg fractured. 

The deceased moved to Midland 
about one year ago. He is survived 
by a blind widow and several chil- 
dren. Funeral services were held at 
his home, Fourth street, Monday, and 
interment was in Beaver cemej^ery. 

WAG« IMGWHAaBd ORDBBBD 



WIRE .v::n make gain.s. 



C" .nton, io — Striking electrical 
workers ha-c secured a union ahop 
agreement with one of the largest 
electrical concerns offer improved 
working conditions but insist on the, 
non-union shop. This the electrical 
workers decline — they refuse to be a 
[)aily to their own destruction. 



BAKER REl'MON 



The Baker family and connections 
of Bcuer and adjoining counties will 
Imld their annual reunion at the 
Woodlawn Country Club grounds, at 
New Sheffield, Pa., on Thursday, Aug- 
ust 17th, 1916. Music and other forms 
of entertainment will be furnished. 
Conveyances can be had from Wood- 
lawn from all local trains. 



OPEN TaMORROW EVENING UNTIL IIKX) P. M. 



* .*■ 



MEETS WITH ACCIDENT 



Charles Matthews, employed at the 
Pittsburgh Crucible Steel works at 
Midland, met with a serious accident 
-.vhile at his work about 11:30 Monday 
morning, which resulted in his being 
crushed between a heavy steel weight 
and a concrete wall. His chest and 
ribs were crushed and he was hurried 
to the East Liverpool hospital for 
treatment. 



Midland Personals 



Wilkes-Barre, Pa. — The anthracite 
conciliation board has ordered a 3 per 
cent wage increase for mine laborers 
at Georgetown and has also ruled that 
they should work eight instead of lU 
hours a day. 

the 



The board awards 
Lackawanna d: Western 



Delaware, 
"ompany's 
electricians a 7 per cent wage in- 
crease. The company had offered a^ .1 
per cent increase. 



Mrs. Spencer returned to her honw 
on Beaver avenue last week, after a 
very enjoyable vacation spent at At- 
lantic City. 

Mrs. C. E. Shay, of Ohio street, 
spent Sunday at her former home in 
Leetonia, Ohio. 

Mr. and Mrs. Miller are moving 



from their home on Pennsylvania ave- 
nue, to Canton, Ohio. Mr. Miller was 
an employe of the Pittsburgh Cruci- 
ble Steel Company at this place, but 
resigned to accept a similar position 
in Canton. 

The property of William Morgan, 
Beaver avenue, has been sold to John 
Yetso. 

A Jargf crowd was in attendance at 
the dance given Saturday evening in 
the hall of the Municipal building, A 
large number of out-of-town people 
attended., 

M. E. Hess was transacting busi- 
ness in Woodlawn Sunday. 

Mrs. L. Harrigan and daughter 
were the guests Sunday\of Mr. and 
Mrs. Gallagher, of Leetonia, O. 

Mrs. Neville, of Industry, was a 
Midland visitor this week. 

Francis, sdn of Mr. and Mrs. Frank 
W. Gamble, of Midland avenue, who 
was taken last week to the Wedt Penn 
hospital, Pittsburgh, underwent a 
ierious operation for appendicitis, and 
is now improving. 

F. D. F.gan and family of Beaver 
ivenue, left Thursday for Euclid 
Beach, where they will spend their 
vacation. 

On account of the extremely warm 
.veather the Midland Fancy Work 
Club will not meet until September. 

Mrs. Barbara Miller and danffhter 
Miss Anna, af Pennsylvania avenu^ 
spent Sunday with friends in Am- 
bridge. 

Quite a number of young people 
journeyed to Rock Springs Park on 
Monday evening to attend the dance, 
but were greatly disappointed be- 
cause the lightning during the itorm 
burned out the lighting system and 
^he place was in darkness. The dance 
was postponed until Tuesday night. 

Mr. and Mrs. W. C. Kane and fam- 
ily, of North Braddock, formerly of 



Men! Your Attention 

Come to Our Men's Clothing Dept. Tomorrow 

Prepare to Pnithase One of Onr High Grade Suits on Sale at 
35^%) Less Than Their PrevJons Low Prices 



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Plenty of warm weather ahead. Plenty of time to 
get the benefit out of a good summer suit. Don't 
overlook this opportunity. 

Suits for real hot weather, suits for eariy fall 
w^eai^ suits for year round weat. Suits for every 
occasion — business and pleasure. Suits to fit the 
young man, the conservative man. Suits for the 
stout man, suits for the slim man, suits for the short 
stubby man. In fact a splendid variety of clothing 
for every build of man. Plenty of "pinch backs" for 
the young fellows. 

SEE WHAT 85% SAVINGS ON YOUR SUIT 
MEANS TO YOUR VACATION TRIP. 

A 12.00 Suit, now | 7.80 

A $15.00 Suit, now $ 9.75 

A $18.00 Suit, now $11.70 

A $20.00 Suit, now IIS.00 

A $22.50 Suit, now $14.65 

A $25.00 Suit, now $1(L25 

A $28.00 Suit, now $18.20 

A $30.00 Suit, now $19.50 

ALTERATIONS FREE, WHENEVER REQUIRED 
SPEHAL NOTICE: We have ftirther increased 
oar service in onr Clothing Department by creating 
an alteration department, which will be under oar 
own personal supervision. 



We are sole reprcMntativea of the finest tcady for service Clothing made in America. Sndi 
waO known standard awkes as Kappenheimer, "Sampcck," Schlosa, etc. Every garment guaranteed. 
HEADQUARTERS FOR UNION MADE MERCHANDISE for Men. Women and Children 



CONTINUING OUR SALE 
Ladies' and Misses' mid-summer Ready-to- 
Wear Garments. Prices alone will convince their 
worth, (Berkman's — second floor) 



MOTHERS— REMEMBER 

Now is the time to buy your boy his school 
sui^ You save 35% on all "Sampeck" Suits 
(Berkman's — first floor) 



EVERYTHING READY-TO-WEAR 



ERKMAN'S 

1014-15 7tb At«^ BmamtFtSU,?^^^^. 



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this place, were riritin;r fi'icnds here 
this week. 

Mrs. M. E. Hess, of Midland ave- 
nue, left Friday rxmminig for Chicago, 
111., whare she will visit her sister. 

Mrs. Starcke, of Beaver Falls, nuule 
a businesa trip to Midland Tueaday. 











CLEAN-UP SALE! 



starting in early to clean up our sununer stock to make room for Fall ma- 
terials. The prices are put down to make thfcm aelL Every article is actmlly 
woiih the value we state in this ad. Come and look them over and if you 
find they are not what we say, tell us^ we will make it worth your while. 







$2.50 and $3.98 Wash Dresses $1.50 

That is a price that saves you severaydolars of your 
money. Girls' &iilor Dresses are indudA aad they are 
made of flowered crepes, linens and 
voiles. They are for sale now ai: 



$1.50 



TUB-SKIRTS 




$1.50 and $2.00 value. Of White 

Linen, Awning Striped Patterns, in, 

blue and pink, black and white and 

checka. Ideal skirts for outins and. 

street wear. They come in all lengths and are priced at 

89c 



White Dress Special 

One di^May rack with about 75 to 
100 very fine white embroidered 
voika„ striped voiles, dainty white 
neta« figured rice doth and beautiful 
flowered patterns in linens. Dresses 
that sold from $9.9o to $13.00, start- 
ing Satvday morning, you can make 
your ehsice^ while they last, for 

$4.50 



TUB-SKIRTS 

This offers you a choiee of the best grade Tub Skirts. 
Each one is worth from $2iM) to $3.00 more than the 

price asked. It includes all our best 
grades, in all sizes, at the low price of 



HODCARRIERS 

International Union No. 214. Meets 
first and third Tuesday of each month 
in Kramer Bldg, New Brighton. Pres- 
ident, Wm. Wright; Secretary, Chas. 
Siras. 



P- 







Sizes six to fourteen years; regular 
$1.50. quality, for 



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The Store For 

LEVY BROS 



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19c Flowered Crepe and Linai, a yard 10c 

50c Bungalow Aprons, t^f 39c 



Find the Man 

Bvery nuu andwomaa JsaazloBt 
U buy MMne artMe — necesiitj or 
tezury — everyday ef hit or her life. 

Single handed it would take yo« 
months to seek oat those interested 
la Tonr line of bo iia ese. 

An advertiMmeBt in tfaii p*per 
does the work iastaataneonsly. 

It corrals the purchaser — brtegs 
him to yonr storo— makes him buy 
thiafs yon advertised. 



(OavmsM, IMl kr w. a. o.> 



Hand your paper to your neighbor 
when you are through with it. 



TRADE MORAL— If we were al 
mind-rejdert we would have 
no trouble in ieambia ^^vtiat 
merohant't goods are beet 
About one bi every 1,000 of 
us IS addioted to mental tele- 
pathy. To reaoh the other 
999 of ut, Mr. Merohant mutt 
ailvertlee. Persistent atfver- 
tlslng bi this paper wH make 
those 999 buy. The telepath- 
ist win buy anyhow. 

TRADE MORAL— The dlfferenoe 
between business and suooets 
Is advertising. Inqub*e about 
our rates. 



THOMPSON'S 

THE SreRE FOR MEN AND BOTS 



35% OFF SALE 

On Men's, Boys' and Children's Snits 
Hats and Ih*ess Pants 



Special Dress Shirt Sale, C9^ 
aS F^t Cotors O^C 



f 10.00 Suitvnow. 
il6.00SaH7now. 
$18.00 Suits, BOW. 




.00 Suits, now..,tl8.C 
26.00 Suits, now. . .|16J 
~0.00 Suits, now. . .$19 J 



John Ps ThompsoA 

" BliLTIB f AlXa PA. 



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UNIVtFSrTY or HIlMOffi LIPt?AnY 
SEP 1 1916 




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WORK 
SLEEP 
RELAXATION 
HOURS ■■■■IHHBB 
A REASONABLE DEMAND 



OffkUl Orfui Af Cmtral Ubw Uaka 
awl Baildtaiff Trad« GmmO. 




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^•••fclB # UdMd b7 OrgBBia^ Labor. 



LABOR NEWS 



8 



HOURS 



WORK 

SLEEP 

RELAXATION 



A REASONABLE DEMAND 



VOLUME 2. NUMBER L 



BEAVER, PA. FRIDAY, AUGUST 11, 1916. 



ONE DOLLAR THE YEAR. 



[ REPRESENTATIVE OF THE LABOR NEWS DENIED ADMISSION TO CONWAY YARDS 

^ 




P. R. R. OFFICIALS GIVE 
LABOR NEWS BIG BOOST 



General Yardmaster Dngan Refuses to Allow 

Distribution of the Labor News in 

Conway Yards, Saturday. 

It is generally conceded that the actions of the local '^Art" 
tifficials at Conway Yards gave the Beaver Valley Labor News the 
irreatest boost of the season last Saturday, when Acting Yard- 
master John Dugan, evicted George A* Howe from the yard, be- 
cause he was distributing copies of The Labor News anions: the 
employes of the Pennsylvania Railroad Company. 

On Saturday afternoon, Au^st 5th, 
Mr. Howe, with two hundred copies 
of The Labor News, arrived at Con- 
way Yards with the intention of dis- 
tributing the papers and getting new 
aubscribers. He was met by acting 
General Yardmaster John Dugan, 
who said: "George, we can't stand 
for your brin)fing those papers in th^ 
yard." "Why, w^at is the objection?" 
asked Mr. Howe. "Because it is a 
labor paper," answered Mr. Dugan; 
whereupon Mr. Howe said: "Well, if 
that is the case, I won't go any fur- 
ther," and retired from the yard. 

We are satisfied that Mr, Dugan 
was only acting under instructions, 
and, therefore, hold no malice against 
him. Really, we hold no malice to- 
wards anybody, for the action of the 
"Art" official who gave out the in- 
structions to stop The Labor News 
from coming into the yard did more 

JW 



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Rqnain Loyal to Your Oi^anization 



■^ 



BUILDING TRADES 
COUNCIL CONVENES 



Considerable Routine Business Trans- 
acted and Favorable Reports From 
Delegates Are Received. 



loe of t <loabt that The Labor 
News it a workin^man's paper, and, 
therefore, deaerves his support. 

Some people cannot see, or else 
they have an ambition to do some- 
thing that the world knows they have 
not the ability to accomplish. Just 
imagine a man who rose to the posi- 
tion of an "Art'* official of a railroad, 
thinking that he could stop his em- 
ployes from reading a particular pa- 
per. His ignorance was the cause of 
us adding 20 new subscribers to the 
list of the fast-growing Labor News, 
and the chances look pood for ten 
times that amount by next pay day. 

Here is the secret. After being 
evicted Howe brought the papers back 
to Rochester to await the evening re- 
lief train, where the new subscribers 
were enrolled for a year's subscription, 
and each pledged himself to get as 
many more subscribers as possible, 
after hearing that the company had 
objected to the paper being brought 
into the yard. It there « mind so 
dense that it cannot see' that each and 
every paper that i^-as objected to 
went right to the sbot where it was 
intended to go, excehtj^with a greater 
force? 

Joseph Nannah, the local news deal- 
er of Freedom, goes through the yard 
each day in the week with other pa- 
pers, and there never was any objec- 
tions to him, and he has been doing it 
for years, and what is the answer? 
The answer is that The Labor News 
is looking after the workers' interest 
and that is the objection the Company 
has to your reading it. Now it is up 
to the Brotherhoods to do their part 
in assisting the paper, and the best 
. way on earth to help it is, if you are 
not already a subscriber, subscribe at 
once. If you are a subscriber, assist 
in ^tting others, it only costs one 
dollar a year and it worth every cent 
of that amount. 

The Labor News is your paper. 
Why not give it the support that it is 
justly entitled to for what it has done 
and what is left to be done? Don't 
forget that there will be some import- 
ant legislative matters at this coming 
aession, and the best way to prepare 
for such things is to build -up a strong 
press. 

The subscription list to The Labor 
News isigrowing rapidly, and it is our 
intention to put the list close to 2000 
by Labor Day. We can do it with a 
little assistance from you. Will you 
give it? 



A meeting of the Building Trades 
Council was held on Thursday even- 
ing in the rooms of the organization 
in the Kramer Block, New Brighton. 
The attendance was good and a num- 
ber of matters were taken up. Condi- 
tions in Xmbridge, Woodlawn and 
Midland were discussed ut length and 
the work of Wallace & Carley, Sharon 
contractors, (m the Woodlawn School 

foB, aafl^' action was ordered Ibaken 
through the International bodies. 

Delegates to the Council brought 
encouraging reports of the condition 
of business in their respective crafts, 
all trades reported to be booming. 

A new by-laws committee, consist- 
ing of A. T. Jones, W. H. Dithridge 
and Elmer Shipman, was appointen, 
the former committee being dis- 
charged for failure to act. 

An audit of the books was re<iuest- 
ed by Financial Secretary Dithridge, 
the trustees being ordered to make 
the same. 



CENTRAL LABOR UNION 
MET MONDAY NIGHT 

iranHact Routine Busin^sK and LiHten 

to \\ portH of Delegates as to 

General Conditions. 



A regular meeting of the Central 
Labor Union was held on Monday 
evening in the Ragles' Hall, New 
Brighton. There was a large attend- 
ance and various matters were dis- 
cussed. The matter of the complaint 
of the members of Federal Union No. 
14994, composed 6i\ former employes 
of the Townscnd Conipany, who stated 
at their last meeting that their Union 
was not receiving the support to which 
it was entitle<l from the other Unions 
in the valley, in their fight to secure 
an advance in wages at the plant, was 
taken up and discussed at length. 

Mark Ford, secretary of the Fed- 
eral Union, was seated as a delegate, 
and the committee on a program for 
Labor Day arranged to get together 
on Thursday evening and fix up de- 
tails connected with the celebration at 
Junction Park, September 4th. 



CONWAY YARDMASTERS MEET 



ENGAGES NEW TAILOR. 



'S,: '^^'« 



Charles H. Harten, of Buffalo, N. 
*Y., one of the best tailors in the coun- 
try, has accepted a position with the 
Xay Tailors, at Beaver Falls. Chas. 
D. Fiaeher, manager of this enterpris- 
iBf tailoring house, is a persistent 
follower of the policy that "The Best 
tip None too Good for Onr Patrons," 
the tmgagement of Mr. Hartaa. 



The yardmasters of Conway held a 
secret session this morning in the local 
yard office, which was brought to an 
abrupt close when a freight train was 
wrecked on No. 2 track just east of 
the Junction Park. While the nature 
of the meeting was not learned, it is 
generally understood that there was 
nothing of any great importance trans, 
piring, as meetings of this kind have 
been held for a number of years, and 
no improvements have been made. 



NEW BILLET MILL 



Within the next sixty days the new 
28-inch billet mill at the plant of the 
^Pittsburgh Crucible Steel Company, 
at llidland, will be in operation. Work 
on the construction of the new de- 
partment is being rushed as ^pidly 
as possible. The entire plant is now 
being operated to capacity. 



The action of the Switchmen's Union of North America 
in accepting arbitration the day before the crisis of the four 
If rent Railroad Brotherho^ ' vas reached, forced the "Bik 
Four" to follow another li of procedure. 

In accepting mediativn, the "Bip Four" in no way 
weakened its chances for an eight hour day. In mediating 
their differences, it only «;oes to ihow the jfood intentions of 
the Brotherhoods to try to reach a settlement without 
putting: the public to any inconvenience. 

ThiouRh mediation, the eight hour day and time and 
one- half for overtime may be g^ranted, but in the event that 
a settlement cannot be reached, then the "Big Four" is still 
in a position to strike. This njay be the way to let the 
managers' commission down easy, because Garretson, Stone, 
Carter and Lee have the very stamp of determination on 
their forehead which spells success, and The Labor News is 
satisfied that they mean business. 

Remain loyal to your organization. Refrain from pa.ss- 
ing judgment until it is time to ct>ndM>n. Remember, it is 
your company's hands you are playiag into when you cast 
one word of condemnation against your officers. 

The Labor News has been writh you all through your 
fight, because we know your demands are just and reason- 
able: it is our intention to remain loyal to the finish, 
and we know it is your duty to do the same. When the 
smoke dears away, the EKiHT HOUR DAY WITH TIMK 
.\M> ONEH.ALF FOR OV ERTIWE will stand out to all 
railroiid men, cJear and clean. 

If you are a company man, knock while the knockin^'s 
jrood. If you are a Brotherhood wan, boost, and your loy- 
alty will be greatly appreciated. Don't forj^et that every 
dog can growl. . Grin and bear with us for a few days, and 
if there is just cause for co^pli|iiit when a settlement is 

-'''^'^^"'^i^ESj j fejHIlW I iSi3Tl tfiii (imilfciiiUlito 'ki — 

Letter." 



DETAILS OF LABOR 
DAY CELEBRATION 



Committee Met Thurwday Evening and 
IMans for Big Celebration Are 
Now I'nder Way 
> I 

The committee on detail^ of the bij? 
Labor Day celebration to be held at 
Junction Park, September 4th, is rap- 
idly perfectinff plan.s for what the 
members anticipate will be the bijf- 
post celebnition ever held in the Hea- 
ver Valley by any organization. The 
committee, consi-sting of Messrs. R. F. 
Kross, McKenna, .Molter, Hyers and 
Huff, met at the former's home in 
Heaver Falls Thursday evening an<i 
outlined a program of events for the 
entertainment of those who are cer- 
tain to attend in case the weather i.s 
propitious. This pro^jram, which ap- 
pears below, will be added to in tlie 
near future. Scores of business tirnis 
throughout the valley hxive sij^niliod 
thoir willin^rncss to donate prizes to 
be awarded the victors in the various 
contests, a full list of the j>rizes arnl 
names of the donors appcarinj^ in a 
later issue of The ' ' bor News. There 
will l)c band music all day; .Manager 
Shetterly has arranged for some fea- 
ture attractions n the line of now 
.shows; (jood speakers will be heard 
alMl the day promisof; to be unusually 
enjoyable from every standpoint. 

The amusement program, with sov- 
ral additions to be made later, is OB 
follows: 

100-yanl da.sh for men, open to all. 

100-yard dash, open to boys be- 
tween the afi^es of 12 an<l 16 years. 

100-yard dash, open to girls be- 
tween the ag;es of 12 and 16 years. 

Watermelon eating contest. 

One-half mile race, ope g,^ all. 

50- yard dash, open to women. 

.'J-legged race for men, open to all. 

Ladies' baseball throwing contest. 

Shoestring race, for boys. 

Ladies' Nail Driving contest. 



HAVE SIGNED UP 
WITH CARPENTERS 



Li>t of Contractors >Vho Have .Signed 

Ajireement With Urotherhood 

of Carpenters. 



The followinfj is a list of the con- 
tracting roiiif)anies and contractors in 
the Heaver \'alley who have si^rne(l 
up with the Brotherhood of ("arpen- 
tors and Joiners, thus guaranteeing 
that they will work under union con- 
ditions and pay the union scaln of 
w;ij.res. The emplr)yers will recog- 
ni/*' the rules of the HrotherluxMl: 

( Ook-Anderson Co., Ik-aver; K. 1). 
Mu'iter, Beaver; TalUm k Farr, Hea- 
ver: Geo. .ShafTer, I'.caver; Hineinaii 
&. I alhoun, Heaver; C. W. Hrucc, Con- 
w.i ; W. F. Hartoo, Free<lom; J. S. 
Mitchell & .Sons, .Monaca; C (iarmen 
& ^ox\., U. 15. McDanel Co.. O. \l. .Mc- 
Xutl, Harry .Shaffer, Hri^^hley Hi 
Dim, W. h! Schlotter, .Marlsolf i5ros. 
<■()., New Hrighton ; Morklem Bros.. 
Kdintz liro.';., .Sh.-'.n'^ Urns.. Ti'.-ipole & 
H;i-'f>y, .McDonald is: Har'man, of Uo- 
chcster; Fhink (Iai-\'in, \V. C. Kens- 
ley. J no. F. (larvin, Ch:is I'fcifer, 
Jiio. Kcefor, L. C. Kirker & ."^t'li, Jas- 
Jiick.son, Klmer Snyder, I'.eaver Falls; 
A. H. fender, .Midland: .Millor & Coch- 
ran. Woodlawn; \S . H. Mumford, ]{ea- 
ver Fulls. 

( 'ontractor.s — \\. (^. Peters, Harton 
& Hurton. W . K., H«Kan.son Co., H. ('. 
Hiinton, P. C. Coleman, Joseph W. 
W<-ir, A. .]. Huppertz, Feliks Kniasin- 
*'ki , A, H. Crow, W'ni. J. WeiskofT, J. 
K. Tate & Co.. p.-r K. .M. Kidenour; 
Don D. Munfonl. H. H. Morgan, Mike 
?rt yaclc, Ley Construction Co., John 
iM. Hughps & Sons, Goo. M. Cross, 
.Tdtii C. Douds, Jacob Rape, Daniel 
C'orninis, John L. Palmer, Walker M. 
Mills. Wm. F. Uarprer. (leo. J. Harbi- 
son. John & Jai^ies Senior, Ott & Kay- 
bu< Ic, F. C. Kcmey. Park & Gilmour, 
P'inney & Dctrick, (Jeo. H. Lias. 



TROUBLE AT MONACA 



The men working in the melting 
shop at t^e Colonial Steel Co, Colons, 
tft« having trouble. It is Raid these 
men are worked from 12 to 14 hours 
a day, at ver>' low wag^es, and when 
they asked for an increa^^ in pay and 
were refused, they walked out. The 
diflTerence has not been settled. 



Twenty-five per cent, discount off 
alt Suits and Hats at Ewing Bros., 
Rochester, Pa. — adv. 



ftLlECOATS ENJOY DAY. 



V 



The third mid-summer outing of the 
Beaver Valley Police Officers' Pro- 
tective Association, which took place 
at Junction Park Wednesday after- 
noon and evening, was a most enjoy- 
able affair, and was well attended. 
Large crowds attended the perfort%- 
ance of "Officer 999," put on at the 
Dreamland Theatre by the Columbia 
Stock Company, the show jfiving com- 
plete satisfaction. The dance in the 
evpninff was an unasusdly pisasant oc- 
^sion, beinff largely atte^cKed. 



RAILROAD MEN ACCEPT 
U. S. MEDIATION OFFER 



dklk(;ate to convkntio.s 

AT FORT WORTH, TEXAS 



.\. K. Christ, of Duss avenue, Ani- 
hridge, will U-ave early in Septend)er 
for Fort Worth, Te.xas. to attend the 
.N'ational Convention of the United 
HrotheHuwd of Carpenters and J;)in- 
ers of America. He ^r()eK as a r<?^)re- 
sentative of Ambndge Focal NTo. 17;!2, 
and expects to bo jjone about six 
weeks. He will make the trip with 
other delegates from the east in a 
special car. They will go by way of 
Denver, Col., and will do some sight- 
seeing along the route. 



Hujfe Strike of 400,000 Employes 

Covering 22.") Railroads Is 

Temporarily Averted. 



MEDIATORS ARE NOW 

HEARINC; THE CASE 



FEDERAL UNION NO. 
I4994JN SESSION 

Decides lo Hold Out Intil Victory 
Is Won in Tonwsvnd Com- 
pany .Strike. 



The question of the settlement ofc 
the Town.send strike was tak«-n up .a 
a re^rular meetinjr of Federal Union- ■ 
.Mo. 14!»!>4, held Thursday oveninK m 
the rooms of the organization in the 
Kramer block. New Mrighton. Some 
of the members present advocated the 
proposition that as a number of men 



those who would not return until the 
strike was settled to return to work. 
A majority of the members, however, 
vetoed this idea, stating that they 
v.ore ready to ^o back lo the plant at 
such a tiir.e as the Town.send Com- 
|)any would make an olfer which they 
con.sMlen-d just anrl n-asonahlf. When 
that time coiiics, if it does conic. Ihr 
majority are ready to iruarante<- Mr. 
Townscnd a (juick .settlement of the 
matter. L'j) to the pres«'nl time, it 
was .slated, the company had not of- 
fered anythinjj in a<ldition to the first 
offer made, which, the .strikers claim. 
IS not acccfitable. 

ilusiness Af.Tent S. .S. Ilow.ser, of the 
Muil(linj,r Tniiies Council, was pn-.sent 
and ^ravc the men some [tixkI advice 
alonjf the lines of u hat to do and how 
to do it in the affair, teilinjc the men 
ho would not advise scttlinjf the strike 
until such a time as the Town.send 
'"ompan> made an offer uhicli niivrht 
prove aecejitablc. Offircr-s of the l"c<l- 
eral Union stated to Tlie Labor News 
reprc.sentative that they desired to 
tliank .Mr. Howser for his kindness in 
;i|)pearini: before the men and for the 
mnnl a«lvice offereii, iind als<t to ex- 
press to the unions ircnenilly through- 
out the v.illcy their aii|)reciatii)n of 
the :iid they li;ivc trridercd the Ked- 
eral Labor I'nion in their ti(;ht to 
VTiiin a victory in the present strike. 
The oiriecrs further .statod that the 
ineM;bi rs firoposcd to stick until they 
have won. 




ELECTRICAL WORKERS 
IN REGUUR SESSION 

Receive Two New Application.H and 

Tranuact ConHiderahle Routine 

Business. 



The FJcctrical Workers met in reg- 
ular session Monday cA-enintr. in their 
headquarters. Kramer liiiildini,', .New 
Hrijrhton, a larju^e attenflanre l)einjr 
present. A pleasing' rhanictoristic of 
the electricians is that they always 
.seeni to b«- able to ^et a pood turnout 
at their metintrs. Two new applica- 
tions for membership were filed, F. 
W. Taylor and Mr. Parrish. 

The local received a communication 
from Wheeling Uocal No. 141, to the 
effect that James Neville, a former 
member of this local had deposited his 
carfl there and was woj^kinic in that 
district. 

A report was circulated to the ef- 
fect that the recent hot spell had cot- 
ten thf "jroat" of J. N. Donaldson, of 
Rochester, a local member. We did 
not know that Nels iiiffered from the 
heat, but 'you nerer can tell. 



Subscribe for Hie Labor News. 



The threatened strike of the 400,000 
railwa\ employes of the United States 
has been seemingly averted, tempor- 
^irily at least, when the railroad bro- 
th(>rhoo(is ucce|)tefl a proffer of the 
l"nited States board of mediation and 
conciliation to mediate their differ- 
ences with the railroads. 

If the board fails to adjust the 
controversy between the railroads and 
their employes, IVesident Wilson wfll 
b*' asked to use his |)ersonal influence 
to avert a general strike. 

This statement was made today by 
a representative of the railroad man- 
aK'ers who have been neKrotiatiri" with 
the men .since June 1, for a 
.settleinent\ 

The appeal to the presiden 
be the last resort and would 
only to save the nation frf 
trade paralysis that would rf 
strike of the majrnitude gla'. 
the railroad men. 

.Mediators .Start '' 

Late Wednesday nij^jit -r^orts of the 
fHeral mediators to , -mK the con- 
tenrlm^' factions together were well 
under way. Six hours after the rail- 
road managers had served notice on 
the men that they would not with- 

the managers Wencn5||ced in secret 
session. 

What was discussed ■> the confer- 
ence could not be divulKe<l by any of 
those attending it, under mediation 
rules, hut it was understood that the 
railroad r.-pn-.-^entaiivcs outlined their 
position in fi-ll and indicated how far 
the were willinj; to lto in meeting the 
• Icinands f.f the men. J 

The railroad inanaj^ers. iji present- 
inir their ca.se lo the mediators, were 
as.si.sted by tluee experts on rale.<< and 
wa^res, J. W. HipK'in.s. former secre- 
tary of tlie Association of Western 
Uailroads; C. (;. Walber, .secretary of 
the bureau of information of the east- 
ern r.ailways. and Cliarles i*. \eill, 
manairer of the bureau of information 
of the .southe.istem railways. Thurs- 
ilay it was ;innounce<l by C. W. I). 
Uanvrer, a member of the boartl. the 
mediators would hear the railroad em- 
rilo.ves' si<i<> of the ca.se. Then the 
hoard will hold alternate conferences 
with llip opposintr forces, .Mr. Hanper 
said. 

When a !)asi.s for an understanding: 
has been reached the railroads and 
men will he sep.irately asked if they 
desire to jiLice their ca.se in the hands 
of the hoard for final adjuflication. 
If the .Miswcr is in the afTirmative, the 
conten<linu forces will have to abide 
by the decision of the board. 

(Continued on Pajje Four). 



NEW ME.MIJER ADDED 

TO PAI.NTERS' LOCAL 

I.ocjil .\'o. ."..U). Painters, Decorators 
.md Pafierhan^rers met Wednesday 
cvenin;: in rejfular .session at the Kra- 
mer buihlinff. New I'.ri^rhton. C on- 
siflend)le routine bu.sines.s was trans- 
acted an<l one new meml)er, Lloyd Wil- 
son, of llridjfewater, was added to the 
membership. 

Hn)thcr IJert Koah. a member of 
the local, who has been spendinsr the 
summer in the west, returned homo 
Wednesday evening, and the boys are 
unanimous in expressinp the opinion 
that Hert certV-'ly docs look well. 



CONTEMPLATE LOCATING. 



•Mr. and Mrs. J. S. Bowser, of Jas*. 
per, Alabama, are sruests of the for-' 
mer's father, Husiness A^rent S. S. 
Bowser and family, of Rochester. J. 
S. Howser is a member of St. Louis 
Local 578, U. B. of C. and J. of A., 
and is contemplatini^ locating perma- 
nently in the valley. 



» ^REWARD OFFERED 



A reward pf $100 will be offered by 
the local orsrani cations of the Wood- 
men of the World and the Brotherhood 
o{ Railroad Trainmen, for the reeor* 
ery of the body of D. F. Breeden, who 
was drowned in the Ohio rirer lut 
Friday eveniaff at the MonaM MSI* 
inff beach. 






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BBAYntTALLry 



[MIDLAND 



F 



Items of Interest From the Fattest 
Growing Town in the ViiUe7. 

Written by Margaret Hess. Bell Phone 181-J 



AUSTRIAN HELD ON 
SHOOTING CHARGE 



WIRE !*•; 



MAKE GAINS. 



Upon infjurmation filed by Frank 
Nickovich, an 'Austrian o/ Midland. 
Brozuro Zeno, a1iothei*'ftrrei«;ner, was 
placed under arrest by Constable 
David Hayvico, Monday eveninK- /-«"(> 
is beinK beld in the town jail iK^ndin^' 
a heal in^ b«fore Justice McN'cfll, on a 
charge of shooting with intent to kill. 

According to officials, Nickovich 
was liding a bicycle down Midland 
avenue, about live o'clock, Monday 
evening, when Zeno opened tire upon 
him with a revolver, firinj; two shots. 
The bicycle rider feHI from his wheel 
and Zeno thinking he had shot the 
man tunied and fled. Several by- 
standers who witnes»e<i the affair, 
gave chase, and with the aid of the 
Midland officers, caugh^ the gun 
toter several blocks a-. ay. He had 
thrown the gun away, but in his 
clothing was found a large dagger. 

No direct motive for the act can 
be ascertained by the officials. 



WM. DEWEY KILLED 



While unloading ice from a refrig- 
erator car in the railroad freight 
jrards at Midland, William Dewey, 
ag«d 42 years, a laborer in the employ 
of the Pittsburgh Crucible Steel Co. 
was fatally injured about 11 o'clock, 
Saturday morning, when he fell be- 
neath the wheels of a C. & P. freight 
train. The unfortunate victim was 
picked up and rushed to the East Liv- 
erpool hospital, but he died before 
they reached the State line. Dewey, 
it is claimed, was standing on the 
ground outside the refrigerator car, 
and failed to notice the approach of 
the freight train. He stepped directly 
in the path of the passing locomotive, 
his head being crushed, one arm sev- 
ered and Ms right leg fractured. 

The deceased moved to Midland 
about one year ago. He is survived 
by a blind widow and several chil- 
dren. Funeral seri'ices were held at 
his home, Fourth street, Monday, and 
interment was in Beaver cemetery. 



WACnriNCKBASSS ORDKBEB 



Wilkes-Barre, Pa.— The anthracite 
conciliation board has ordered a H per 
cent wage increase for mine laborers 
at GeorgetowT) and has also ruled that 
they should work eight instead of 10 
hours a day. 

The board awards the Delaware, 
Lackawanna 6i Western Company's 
electricians a 7 per cent wage in- 
crease. The company had offeretl a, ?> 
per cent increase. 



C .nton, O io — Striking elerirlcal 
wo:i<er.s ha'c secured a union .shop 
agreement >y<th one of the largest 
electrical concerns offer improved 
working conditions but insist on the^ 
non-union shop. This the electrical 
workers decline — they refuse to be a 
party to their own destruction. 

BAKER REINIOX 



The Maker family and connections 
of lieuer and adjoining counties will 
hold their annual reunion at the 
Woodlaxvn Country Club grounds, at 
New Sheffield, Pa., on Thursday, Aug- 
ust ITth, 1916. Music and other forms 
of entertainment will be furnished. 
Conveyances can be had from Wood- 
lawn from all local trains. 



MEETS WITH ACCIDENT 



Charles Matthews, employed at the 
Pittsburgh Crucible Steel works at 
.Vlidland, met with > a serious accident 
while nt his work about 11:30 Monday 
morning, which resulted in his being 
crushed between a heavy steel weight 
and a concrete wall. His chest and 
ribs were crushed and he was hurried 
to the East Liverpool hospital for 
treatment. 



Midlind Personals 



Mrs. Spencer returned to her honv 
on Beaver avenue last week, after a 
very enjoyable vacation spent at At- 
lantic City. 

Mr«. C. E. Shay, of Ohio street, 
spent Sunday at her former home in 
I.«etonia, Ohio. 

Mr. and Mrs. Miller are moving 



from their honne on Pennsylvania av-c- 
nue, to Canton, Ohio. Bf r. Miller vsis 
an employe of the Pittsburgh Cntci- 
ble Steel Company at this place, b^t: 
resigned to accept a simiUi- positicjn 
in Canton. 

The property of William Uorgan, 
Beaver avenue, has been sold to Jokiio 
Yetso. 

A large crowd was in attendanoc iit 
the dance given Saturday eveaiag in 
the hall of the Municipal bvilding, M. 
large number of' out-of-town people 
attended. ■^' 

M. E. Hess was transacting bui^i- 
ncss in Woodlawn Sunday. 

Mrs. L. Harrigan and daughter 
were the guests Sunday of Mr. B.ral 
Mrs. Gallagher, of Leetonia, O. 

Mrs.' Neville, of Industry, was a 
Midland visitor this week. 

Frai^cis, s4n of Mr. and Mrs. Fra.iiO< 
W. Gamble, of Midland avenue, \klio 
was taken last week to the Wewt Pen n 
hospital, Pittsburgh, underwent u 
serious operation for appendicitis, an d 
is now improving. 

F. D. F.gan and family of Bes'ver 

ivenue, left Thursday for Eucliid 

Beach, where they will ipend th»r 
vacation. 

On account of the extremely warm 
weather the Midland Fancy V-ork 
Club will not meet until September.. 

Mrs. Barbara Miller and danchter 
Miss Anna, sf Pennsylvania avenu^ 
spent Sunday with friends in Ann- 
bridge. 

Quite a number of young people 
journeyed to Rock Sprinjri Psrk on 
Monday evening to attend the daiiM, 
but were greatly disappointed Iw- 
cause the lightning dunnfr the ■torm 
burned out the lighting system and 
-the place was in darkness. The darce 
was postponed until Tuesday nifht. 

Mr. and Mrs. W. C. Kane and fain- 
ily, of North Braddock, fornfierly «f 



v«/ 



OPEN TO-MORROW EVENING UNTIL IIKX) P. M. 



Meii! Your Attention 

Come to Our Men's Clothing Dept. Tomorrow 

Prepare to Purchase One of Dor High Grade Suits «n Sale at 
35^%) ^'Wa Thau "flieir Previcus Low Prices 




v^. 






N 



r . 



Plenty of warm weather ahead. Plenty of tine to 
get the benefit out of a saod sunmer suit. Dont 
overlook this opportunity. 

Suits for real hot weatlier, suits for eariy fall 
weai^ suits for year round wejir. Suits for every 
occasion — business and pleasvre. Suits to At tlie 
young man, the conservati've msm. Suits for the 
stout man, suits for the sliim raian, suits for the short 
stubby man. In fact a splendid vmriety of clothing 
for ever/ build of man. Plenty of "pinch backs'* for 
the young fellows. 

SEE WHAT 15% SAVINGS- ON YOUR SUIT 
MEANS T€ YOUR Y^CATION TRIP. 

A 12.00 Suit, noir. .. $ 7.80 

A $15.00 Suit. noir. .. $ 9.75 

A $18.00 Suit, noir. .. $11.70 

A $20.00 Suit, noir. .. 113.00 

A $22.50 Suit. now. .. , $14.65 

A $25.00 Suit, nmw, .. $16.25 

A $28.00 Suit. now. .. $18.20 

A $30.00 Suit. now. .. , $19J0 

ALTERATIONS FREE, WHENEVER REQUIRED 
SPEOAL NOTICE: We h^ve farther increased 
osr serriee in our Clothinr De-partnent by creating 
an al^n-ation department, wliich will be under onr 
own personal sapervision. 



We are sole representatives of the inest ready for service Clothing aiailc in America. Such 
well known standard makes as Kappeniaimer, "Sampcck," Scbloss, etc. Evcrr Ba-TRient gnsrantecd. 
HEADQUARTERS FOR UNION MADE MERCHANDISE for Men, Wcnneit and Children 



CONTINUING OUR SALE 

Ladies' and Misses' mid-summer Beady-to- 
Wear Garments. Prices alone will convince their 
worth. (Berkmar's — second floor> 



MOTHERS— KBMEMBER 

Now is the time to \»\xy your boy his school 
sui^ You save 35% on all "Sampeck" Suits 
(Berkman's — first fioor) 



ColonisI Theatre. Beaver Falls, Thurwlay, August 10th. 



EVERYTHING READY-TO-WEAR 

ERKMAN 

1014-15 7tli Av^ B«»erFalh, Pa. 






/ 



this place, were viri'iin* friends here 
this vredc 

Mrs. M, E. Hess, of Midland ave- 
nue, left. Friday itmminjr for Chicago, 
111., where she will visit her sister. 

Mrs. Starcke, of Beaver Falls, made 
a business trip to BGdland Tuesday. 























AU G U S 









CLEAN-UP SALE! 



Startin);: in early to clean up our Buminer stock to make room forFkll ma- 
terials. The prices are put dowa to make them aelL Every article ii actoally 
worth the value we state in this ad. Come and look Uien over aad if you 
find they are not what we say, tell u% we will make it worth your while. 












$2.50 and $3.98 Wasb Dresses $1.50 

That is a price that saves you several dolars of your 
money. Girls* Sailor Dresses are induded and they are 
made of flowered crepes, linens and 
voiles. They are for sale now aC 



$1.50 





TUB-SURTS 

(1.50 and $2.00 value. Of White 

Linen, Awning Striped Patterns, in 

Une and pink, Mack and white and 

checks. Ideal skirts for oatins and. 
street wear. They come in all lengths 

89c 



White Dress Special 

One die^by rack with about 75 to 
100 very ftnc white embroidered 
voiles^ striped voiles, dainty white 
neta« figured rice doth and beautiful 
flowered patterns in linens. Dresses 
that sold from $9.95 to $15.00, start- 
ing; Saturday morning, you can make 
yeur, dioieek while they last, for 



TUB-SKIRTS 

This offers you a choiec ft! the best grade Tub Skirts. 
Each one is w<Mth froir il3JS^ to $3.00 more than the 

price asiked. It includes all our best 
grades, in all sizes, at the low price of 



$4.50 




$1.98 









. flUMien's Wash Dresses 

Sin* rix to fourteen years; regular 
U.50, ^wHtjr. for 






79c 



19c Flowered Crepe and Llawi, a yard :r. 10c 

50c Bungalow Apnam, f#.. 39c 




X 



■>^ 



The Store^or W 




NEW BBIGHTON/ PA. 




LEVY BROS 



<*. 



HODCARRIERS 

International Union No. 214. Bleets 
first and third Tuesday of each month 
in Kramer Bldg, New Brighton. Prea- 
ident, Wm. Wright; Secretary, Clias. 
Siraa. 



ir 



Find the Man 

iTcry maa andwomaa isaaxioM 
fei bay aome aitlcto — nMoattf or 
tazcry — everyday of hii or her Ufa. 

Slagle haadad it wonJd takt y«« 
BOBtha <» seek ont tkfla« interwttd 
la rovr line of bnalaeok 

Aji advertlsemeat ia tUs paper 
dooftie work iaataataaMiuly. 

It corrals the parcbaser — bringi 
him to yoar ttoro— makos hiai bay 
tidnp yoa advertioed. 



(Oapnicki. laa kr w. a. v.i 



Hand your paper to your neighbor 
when you are through with it. 

TRADE MORAL— If wt wert al 
mlfld-readert we would havt 
no trouble ta leamino what 
mcrtihant't goodt are beat 
Abofit ona In evary 1,000 of 
u( It addiotad to mantal tela- 
patliy. To raaoh the other 
99^ of ut, Mr. Merohant muat 
ad^ortlte. Peraittent aiver- 
tiaina ki this paper wl maka 
tlioaa 999 buy. The telepatli- 
irt v^il buy anyhow. 

TRAOE MORAL— The dlffarenea 
bctwean butlneu and tuooeaa 
la aiJvMrtieing. Inqub^ about 
oirralaa. 



THOMPSON'S » 

THE STORE FX>R MEI( AND BOTS 



35% OFF SALE 

On Men's, Boys' and Clildren's Suits 
Hats and Dress Pants 



fj 



Soedal Dress Shirt SaW, fio^ 
AJI Fast Cttiors ..vOC 



|10.00 Suita^nov. . . .Se.50 1 129.00 Suits, now. . .813.M 
|15.00 Suit? now. . . .i$.75 p5.00 Suits, now. . .iia.S 
$18.00 Sdits, now. . .111,70 $80.00 Suits, now. . .$19.50 



John P. Thompsbn 



ittd 



FAMJ^PA. 






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s^ 5 1 . ^ D o uwvtFsrTY Of mnm upffAnv 



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SEP 1 ms 






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8 



WORK 
SLEEP 
RELAXATION 
HOURS mttKB^^BB^m 
A REASONABLE DEMAND 



Offlckl OrvM •! CMtml Ukw DkIm 
ui4 Bidldimf Tr«4« CMndL 






LABOR NEWS 



8 



HOl'RS 



WORK 

SLEEP 
RELAXATION 



A REASON .ABLE DEMAND 



VOLUME 2. NUMBER 1. 



BEAVER, PA. FRIDAY, AUGUST 11, 1916 



ONE DOLLAR THE YEAR. 



REPRESENTATIVE OF THE LABOR NEWS DENIED ADMISSION TO CONWAY YARDS 




P. R. R. OFFICIALS GIVE 
LABOR NEWS BIG BOOST 



<ieneral Yardmaster Dugan Refuses to Allow 

Distribution of the Labor News in 

Conway Yards, Saturday. 

It is generally conceded that the actions of the local ''Art" 
-officials at Conway Yards i^ave the Beaver Valley Labor News t)»e 
jrreatest boost of the season last Saturday, when Acting Yard- 
master John Dugran, evicted George A. Hot^e from the yard, be- 
cause he was diHtributing copies of The Labor News among tite 
emi^yes of the Pennsylvania Railroad Company. 

On Saturdaj- afternoon, Auprust Sth,*" 
Mr. Howe, with two hundred copies 
of The Labor News, arrived at Con- 
way Yards with the intention of dis- 
tributing the papers and getting new 
aubscribers. He was met by acting 
<jeneral Yardmaster John Dugan, 
who said: "George, we can't stand 
for your bringing those papers in the 
yard." "Why, what is the objection?" 
asked Mr. Howe. "Because it is a 
labor paper," answered Mr. Dugan; 
whereupon Mr. Howe said: "Well, if 
that is the case, I won't go any fur 
ther," and retired from the yari. 

We are satisfied that Mr Dugan 
was only acting under instructions, 
and, therefore, hold no malice against 
him. Really, we hold no malice to- 
wards anybody, for the action of the 
*'Art" official who gave out the in- 
structions to stop "The Labor Ne\\-8 
from coming: into the yard did more 



BUILDING TRADES 
COUNCIL CONVENES 



r 



Considerabile Eloutine Businetts Tran«- 

acled ard Fa\orable Reports From 

Delegates Are Received. 



Boe of I doabt that The Labor 
News ii a workingman's paper, and, 
therefore, deserves his support. 

Some people cannot see, or else 
they have an ambition to do some- 
thing that the w -rid knows they have 
not the ability to accomplish. Just 
imagine a man who rose to the posi- 
tion of an "Art** official of a railroad, 
thinking that he could stop his em- 
ployes from reading a particular pa- 
per. His ignorance was the cause of 
ua adding 20 new subscribers to the 
list of the fast-growing Labor News, 
and the chances look good for ten 
times that amount by next pay day. 

Here is the secret. After being 
evicted Howe brought the papers back 
to Rochester to await the evening re- 
lief train, where the new subscribers 
were enrolled for a year's subscription, 
and each pledged himself to get as 
many more subscribers as possible, 
after hearing that the company had 
objected to the paper being brought 
into the yard. It there a uiind so 
dense that it cannot see that each and 
ever>' paper that was objected to 
went right to the spot where it was 
intended to go, except, with u greater 
force? 

Joseph Nannah, the local news deal- 
er of Freedom, goes through the yard 
each day in the week with other pa- 
pers, and there never was any objec- 
tions to him, and ho has boon doing it 
for years, and what i.s the an.swor? 
The answer is that The Labor News 
is looking after the workers' interest 
and that is the objection the Company 
has to your reading it. Nov it is up 
to the Brotherhoods to do their part 
in assisting the paper, and the best 
way on earth to help it is, if you are 
not already a subscriber, subscribe at 
once. If you are a subscriber, assist 
in getting others, it only costs one 
dollar a year and it worth every cent 
of that amount. 

The Labor News is your paper. 
Why not give it the support that it is 
justly entitled to for what it has done 
and what is left to be done? Don't 
forget that there will be some import- 
ant legislative matters at this coming 
session, and the best way to prepare 
for such things is to build tip a strong 
press. 

The subscription list to The Labor 
News is<srro^'ing rapidly, and it is our 
intention to put the list close to 20O0 
by Labor Day. We can do it with a 
little assistance from you. Will you 
girt it? 



A meeting of the Building Trades 
Council was. held on Thunsduy even- 
ing in the room.* of the organization 
in the Kramer Ulock, New BrighLor. 
The attendjince A*as good and a num- 
ber of mutters were taken up. Condi- 
tions in Ambridge, Woodlawn and 
Midland \,crt discussed at length and 
the work of Wallace A Carley, Shar»n 
contractors, on the Woodlawn School 

on, m<d~~acti9ii was ordered taken 
through th« International bodies. 

Delegate 8 to the Council brought 
! encouraging reports of the condition 
! of business in their respective crafts, 
! all trades xeported to be booming. 

A new by-laws committee, ccnsiirt- 
I ing of A. T. Jones, W. H. Dithriclgc 
I and Klriier Shipman, was appoint*, 
: the fornner committee being dis- 
charged fcr fuilure to act. 
; An audit of the books was re<|uest- 
i ed by Financial .Secretary DithridR-e, 
[the trustees being ordered to make 
I the same. 



Remain Loyal to Ymir Oi^anization 



^^ 



The action of the Switchmen's Union of North America 
inaicceptinK arbitration the day before the crisi.s of the four 
«reat Riiilroad Urotherho'- ' vas reached, forced the "BiK 
F«iir" to follow another li of procedure. 

In acceptinj? mediation, the "Bip Four" in no way 
weakened its chance.s for an eight hour day. In mediatinK 
their differences, it only jfoes to show the K:ood intentions of 
the Brotherhoods to try to reach a settlement without 
piittinK the public to any inconvenience. 

ThrouRh mediation, the eig^it hour day and time and 
one- half for overtime may be granted, but in the event that 
a ftcttlement cannot be reached, then the "Big Four" is still 
in a position to strike. This may be the way to let the 
miinauers' commission down eaisy, because (larretson, intone. 
Carter and Lee have the very stamp of determination on 
their forehead which spells success, and The Labor News is 
.suLisfied that they mean business. 

Remain loyal to your organiaation. Refrain from pa.ss- 
inz judfcment until it is time to cond^n. Remember, it is 
ynur company's hands you are playiag into when you cast 
ore word of condemnation stgainst your officers. 

The Labor News has been with you all through your 
fi«ht, because we know your demands are just and reason- 
able ; it is our intention to remain loyal to the finish, 
and we know it is your duty to do the same. When the 
fintoke clears away, the EKiHT HOUR DAY WITH TIMK 
AND ONE-HALF FOR OVERTIME will stand out to all 
railrosid men, clear and clean. 

If you are a company miui, knock while the knockinu's 
Kood. if you are a Brotherhood man, boost, and your loy- 
alty wiU tUc greatly appreciated. Don't forget that every 
c^og caPirrowL. Grin and bear with as for a few days, and 
if tli&^e is just cause for co^pfaiint when a settlement is 
rf>«£ttcd. again T^jAhflnffiiac^BUe V yjth wm. SL^em- 



RAILROAD MEN ACCEPT 
U. S. MEDIATION OFFER 



iJh;Lf:(;\rE to co.nvkntion 

.\T KOKT WOKrn. TKXAS 



.\. K. (ihriHt, of Duss avenue, Ani- 
bridgi', will leave early in Septenil»er 
f«ir Fort Worth, T»'xuk, to attend thr 
.\:it!orii»l ((Hiventijm of the United 
lirotherli<K)d of Carpenters and Join- 
er.s of America. He ^ova a.s a reprc- 
.sinlativc of Aitibridgi- Local No. 17."J2, 
and ex:|K'ct.s to be tfone about mx 
wcck.s. He will make the trip with 
olhor dolcgate.s from the east in a 
.■special (ur. They will go by sva\ of 
hcnver. C'ol., anrl will do some Kij^lit- 
.sceinjc iiNing tlir route. 



Huge Strike of 4()(),()0(J Employ^ 

Covering 2i.l Railroads Is 

Temporarily Averted. 



FEDERAL UNION NO. 
I4994JN SESSION 

Decides lu Hold Out ( nlil Victory 
In Won in Tunwttend Com- 
pany .Strike. 



MEDIATOR.^ ARE NOW 

HEARI.NC; T^E CASE 



CENTAAL LABOR UNION 
MET MONDAY NIGHT 

i ranHsct Routine BuHin^H and Listen 

to I! portK «f DeleKstex ss to 

General Conditions. 



,9t 



DETAILS OF LABOR 
DAY CELEBRATION 



I A rcR-ular moetinR of the Central 
j Labor Union ^^•as held on .Mondar 
'eveninf?' in the F^aples' Hall, New 
Bri(»hto«. There was a larp^e attend- 
ance and various matters were dis- 
; cu8se<l. The niattrr of the complni nt 
;of the iiieiiil)er.s of Federal Union ICo. 
14I>94, coimposecl of former emploj-cs 
i of the Tpvnsencl Company, who stated 
I at their Iii-st mc-etinK- that their Union 
I was not rc-ceivinjr the support to which 
jit was entitled from the other L'nior.^ 
I in the ■valiley, in their fijfht to .secure? 
an advar»ce in v\apes at the plant, was 
taken up and discuR.scd at IdnKth. 
Mark Ford, secretary of the FH- 
eral Union, was seated as a deleg-ate, 
and the committee on a prog-ram for 
Labor Daj' arranjyed to get tojrcther 
on Thursday cveninjr and fix up de- 
tails connected -w-ith the celebration at 
Junction Park, September 4th. 



CONWAY YAilDM.\.STER.S MEJ^T 



ENGAGES NEW TAILOR 






CharlM H. Harten, o{ Buffalo, N. 
^^firone df the beit tailors in the coun- 
try, Km accepted a position vrith the 
Kay Tailors, at Beaver Falls. Cha«. 
D. Fischer, nuuuigrer of this enterpris- 
iaf tftilorfng house, Is a persistent 
folldwer of the policy that "The Best 
«is None too Good for Onr PBtrons,"* 
the engagement of Mr. Harten. 



The yard masters of Conway held a 
secret session thi.s mominjf in the local 
yard ofTvcG^ •which was broujfht to an 
abrupt close when a freight train vas 
wrecke<i on No. 2 track just east of 
the JunctioTi Park. While the nature 
of the meeting was not learned, H' is 
generally understood that there u-as 
nothing of any great importance trans, 
piring, as meeting's of this kind have 
been held for a number of years, and 
no imprDvcmerts have been made. 



NEW BILLET MILL 



Withir the n«xt sixty days the new 
2g-inch billet mill at the plant of the 
yPittsbupgh Crucible Steel Company, 
at Midland, will be in operation. Work 
on the construction of the new de- 
partment is being rushed as rapidly 
as possible. The entire plant is now 
being operated to capacity. 



■■a. f f 



Committee .Mel Thurnday E\ening and 

rianw for Big Celebration Are 

Now Inder Way 

The corniiiittee on details of the big 
l.iibor l>a\ celebration to be held at 
Junction Park, September 4th, i.s rap- 
idly |>erfecting plan.s for what the 
r)«mbers anticipate will be the big- 
gest cclebrition ever hold in the liea- 
■\'er V'lilk'V by any orj^anization. The 
committee, con.si.st ing of .Mr.ssr.s. K. F. 
3C ross, McK.enna, .Molter, [{vers and 
H utT. met at the former's home in 
Heaver Falls Thur.sday evening and 
«iul lined a program of events for the 
cnlcrtainment of tho.se who are cer- 
tiiin to uttenci in ca.so the weather i.s 
jiro pitiou.s. Thi.s pro^nun, which ap- 
pca.r.s below, will be added to in tlie 
Tinitr fuluro. Scoro.s of business linns 
throurhout ihe valley have signilied 
their v.vi llintrness to donate prize.s to 
le a".varcl(»fl the victors in the^various 
coivle.st.s. ii full list of the nrize.^ and 
names «f the donors appcarin^r in a 
la.tcr is. sue of The Labor News. There 
will l)b Ijund music all day; .Manager 
•Slietterly has arranired for some fea- 
ture attrurtioBs n the line of now 
.show.s; Kood speakers will be heard 
ard the day promisee to be unusually 
«njo>'ablc from every .stanrlpoint. 

The amu.sement program, with sev- 
ral additions to be made later, is as 
follows: 

1 OOyarcl dash for men, open to all. 

lOO-yarrl dash, open to boys be- 
tween the aijes of 12 and 16 years. 

1 OOyard dash, open to girls be- 
tv\eer the a^es of J 2 and 16 years. 

Watermelon eating contest. 

Ori(irhalf mile race, open to all. 

iO-yard dash, open to women. 

.'-legg-ed race for men, open to all. 

Ladies' baseball throwing cont.est. 

Shoestring race, for boys. 

Ladies' .Mail Driving contest. 



HAVE SIGNED UP 
WITH CARPENTERS 



Li-'l of Cunlraclorh Who Have .Signed 

.•Xgreemcnl With Hrolherhood 

of Carpentvrs. 



The following is a list of thre con- 
tracting^ ronij)anie.s and contrartor.s in 
the Heaver \'alley who have si^rned 
up with the Brotherhoo<i of Carpen- 
tors and Joiners, thus guaranteeing 
that they will w(jrk under union con- 
ditions and pay the union scale of 
w.-ifes. The employers will rerog- 
ni7.c the rules of the limtherlioofl: 

(<>ok-Amierson Co., Heaver; \i. I). 
.Hui'.tcr, Bcjiver; Tallon & Farr, Hea- 
ver; Geo. Shaffer, IJiaver; Hin»irian 
& < alhoun. Heaver; C. li. Hruce, Con- 
w.i ; W. F. Hartoe, Freedom; J. .S. 
Mi'chell & SoTi^, .Monaru; C. 'Jarm^n 
& .-on, li. IJ. .McDanej Co.. O. K. Mc- 
.Nutt, Harr>- .ShafTer, Heii^hU-y &: 
|).:m, VV. H. .Schlotter, .Mart.Mjjf Hro.s. 
Co.. New iJrigtilon; .Mecklem Hro.s.. 
Kountz HroH., .Sh.-'.n'^' Hros.. 'rcrifiolc & 
Hripey, .McHonaM iV Har^man, of Ro- 
chester; Frank Cat-\in, \\ . C. Kens- 
\fy. Jno. F. (Jarvin. Ch;is IT'ifer, 
.Ino. Keefer, L. C. Kirker & ."^on, .las- 
.Jack-son, KImer .Snyd«'r, Heaver Falls; 
.\. H. I'endrr, .Midland: .MilUr & Coch- 
ran, Woodlawn; VS. H. .Mjmford. Hea- 
ver Falls. 

'ontrartnrs — H. C. Peters. Harton 
& Harton, \\ . H., Hocan.son Co.. H. C. 
Hunton, V. C. Coleman, Joseph \V. 
W>'ir, A. .1. Huppertz, Felik.s Kniasin- 
fk . A. n. Crow. Wm. .1. WeiskofT, J. 
H. Tate & Co., per K. M. Kidenour; 
Don D. Munfonl. H. H. .Morgan, .Mike 
IVtyack, Ley T'onst ruction Co., .John 
.M. Hughes & Son.<;, (Jeo. .M. (Jros.". 
Tom C. Douds, .Jacob Rape, Daniel 
Coi'imis, .Inhn H. Palmer, Walker M. 
.Mills, Wm. F. Harger, fk?o. J. Harbi- 
son. John & .'ames .Senior, Ott & Hay- 
hu' Ic, F. C. Kemey, Park & (Jilmour, 
Finney & Detrick, (Joo. H. Lias. 



TROUBLE AT MONACA 



Tbe men working in the melting 
iliop at the Colonial Steel Co, Colona, 
fte hBring trouble. It is said these 
men a.re vorked from 12 to 14 hours 
& day, at ver^ low^ wages, and w^hen 
they A«ke<i for an increasil in pay and 
».-ere -refused, they vvalked out. The 
difTerence has not been settled. 



Tvyemty-fire per cent, discount off 
alt Sait:i and Hats at Ewing Bros., 
R<Kheat«r, Pa. — adv. 



The «|Liestion of the settlement ofr 
the Town.iend strike was taken up at 
a regular ineeting of Federal Union 
.NJo. 14!*!)4. held Thursday evening in 
the room a of the organization in the 
Kramer Ijlork. .\ew Brighton. Some 
of the members present advocated the 
proposition that as a number of men 



those w'hc would not return until the 
strike was settled to return to work. 
A majority of the members, however, 

vcto<'cl this idea, stating that they 
were ready to go back to llw i)lant at 
siieh a t irj.f a.s the T(»uii.sen(l Corn- 
pans' .s ouUi make an olfcr which llu'v 
(■•jnsideri-d just ari'l rca.sonahle. \\'h«'n 
that tiiiif" coiiK-s, if It (io<-s roiric, thr 
majority ari- rca<l\ to t^uarantcf ,\Ir. 
Tou ii.M-inl a ()Uirk .settlement of the 
matter. L'f) to the [)re.sent time, it 
vva.s .'^talc'l, the coiiiftany had not of- 
fered anything in addition to the first 
olTfT made, which, the JstnKer.s clami. 
IS not aci'4.'!>t;il>l»'. 

iiu.siness Agent S. S. llow.ser, of the 
HuildinK Tni-ies Council, ua.s pre.scnt 
and giLV th<' men some good advice 
along the line.s of what to do and how 
to do it in the alTair, telling the m^n 
he w(»ul(i not ativise sflLling the strike 
until such a time as the Town.send 
f^ 'oin|»aii>' in.-idf .in olfer which might 
pnivc lAcrf'ptablf. Offirers of the F'ed- 
• Tal Cri<in .st;it<'d to Thf Labor News 
reprfscn tative tli:tt they desired to 
thank .Mr. Dowser for his kirifln<'ss in 
appearirijr before lli*^ hkti and for the 
Koo<| advirc offered, and also to exr 
jire.ss to tLe unions generally through- 
nut the v:illey their apjin-ciation of 
the ai'i they h.-ivc tendired tlu- Fed- 
enil L;ilj(>r L'nion in their tight to 
gain a victory in the jire.sent strike. 
The offirr-r-. further stated th.at the 
nien.birs fimpo.sed to stick until ihey 
have u-on. 



BLIECOATS ENJOY DAY. 



The thinl mid-summer outing of the 
Beaver Valley Police Officers* Pro- 
tective Association, which took place 
at Junction Park Wednesday after- 
noon and evening, was a most enjoy- 
able affair, and was well attended. 
I>arge crowds attended the perform- 
ance of "Officer 999," put on at the 
Dreamland Theatre by the Columbia 
Stock Company, the show (|[iving com- 
plete satisfaction. The dahce in the 
evening wiss an anusualiy pleasant oc- 
casion, being largely attended. 



ELECTRICAL WORKERS 
IN REGUUR SESSION 

lUreivr Two New Applications and 

TranMV . Con.siderabli- Routine 

liusine!-s. 



The Klpctric:il Workers met in reg- 
ular .se.ssion .Monday evening, in their 
hea<l<|iiart*>rs, Kramer huildmg, .New 
Hright<jn, a large attendance l)eing 
pre.*;ent, A pleasing characteristic of 
the electricians is that they always 
.seern to l>e able to get a good turnout 
at their nieting.s. Two new applica- 
tions for membership were filed, F. 
W. Taylor and Mr. Parrish. 

The local received a communication 
^rom Wheeling Local .\o. 141, to the 
effect that James Neville, a former 
member of this local had deposited his 
card there and was working in that 
district. 

A rpport was circulated to the ef- 
fect that the recent hot spell nhd got- 
ten thr "goat" of J. N. Donaldson, of 
Rochester, a local member, ^We did 
not knov that Nels suffered from the 
heat, but you never can t«ll. 



SubscTibe for The Labor >fewa 



The threatened strike of the 400,000 
railway employeKof the United States 
has Iwen seeminjr I) averterl, tempor- 
arily at lea.<t, whr-a the railroad bro- 
thrrhocxis acc«-pte<l a proffer of the 
Inited States Imm rd of mediation and 
'onciliation to mediate their differ- 
enres with the railroads. 

If the board fails to adjust the 
controversy betv^-(.«.rl the- railroads and 
their employeK, J're.sident Wilson wfll 
U- asked to use hm jM-rsona.! influence 
to avert a geii«Tjil strike. 

This statement wa« made today by 
a representative of the rail n>ad man- 
agers who have liccn negotiating with 
the men since June 1, for a [R-acefuI 
.settlement. 

The appeal to the president would 
Ik" the hiKt resort ard wrwild l>e taken 
only to save the nation from the 
trade j)aralysis that would follow a 
strike of. the iii;t|f ni tuile i^ltfnned by 
the railroad men. 

.MediatufM .Start *'' 
Late Wedriesduy nighr ^ffirts of the 
foileral mediators to h..n|- the con- 
tending fuction.s together were well 
unrier way. .Six liours after the rail- 
road managers hud ser\-ed notice on 
j*l® '".*." }^^^ **'^J' would not with- 

the managers ^^nJfclSieted in secret 
session. 

^ What was di»ciilli.^d at the confer- 
ence could not Ih' divulged hy any of 
tho.se .ittending it, under iiiediution 
rules, hut It Aa.s understood! that the 
railroad r.-pre.^ienl.-iiivefi cjutlineil their 
po.-.it!nn in f-ll ;»n.| iridicalrd how far 
the were willing to i^'o in niot-tmg the 
demands of the nu -n. ^ 

The railroad nirtnagers, ij, present- 
ing their ca.se Id the medintrjrs. wore 
as.si.sted l)\ three e.^ ports on riile.s and 
wages, j. VV. HiffK-ins. forrier secre- 
tary of the As. SI .(I at ion of We-stern 
Itiilroad.s; C. <;. V\alh.-r, .secretary of 
the bureau of inforui.ilion of the e.-i.st- 
ern railw.iys, anrl Charles P. Neill, 
m.inager of tlie hurt'iiu of information 
of the .southeaster-n raihva.ws. Thurs- 
day it was anriounred by (i. \V. D. 
Manger, a mcinhcr »{ the kiard. the 
mediators would hear the railroad em- 
ploye.s' side of the ca.se. Then the 
ho.-ird will hold a lt*Tnate ronfercnres 
with the oppotiinjr forces, .Vlr. Hanger 
sairl. 

\S'li'>n a !)asi.s for an understanding 
has been reached the rMl roads and 
men will he se(>aiiitely asked if they 
desire to pl;ice tlifirrase m the hand's 
of the hoard Tor final adjudication. 
If the an.'-wer is in the afTiriiL-it ive. the 
contending forcr^s will have to abide 
by the de«i.sion of the board.. 

(Continued c»n Page Four). 

\K\V MK.MIJhrK \I)I>Kr) 

TO PMVTKRS' LOCAL 

Local No. :,:](}, Tamters, I>ecorator8 
.md Paperhangr-is met U'edne.sday 
evening in regular .session at the Kra- 
mer building, .\>\s- Drigbton. Con- 
siderable routine busine.ss wzih trans-, 
acted :ind one neu- nieinher, Lloyd Wil- 
son, of Uridgpwiiter, was added to the 
membership. 

Brother Dert Koah, a member of 
the local, who ha.s been sf>ending the 
.summer in the we.st, retume<| home 
Wednesday evening, and the boys are 
unanimous in expresfiing the opinicm 
that Hert certainly docs look well. 



( ONTE.MPL.V TK LOCATING. 



.Mr. and Mrs. J. .S. Rowser, of Jas« 
per, Alabaqia, anr guests of the for- 
mer's father, IJiisincss Agent S. S. 
Howser an'l family, of Rochester. J. 
.S. Howser is a rrember of St. Louis 
Local .57ft. U. n. of C. and J. of A., 
and is contemplating locating pernia' 
nently in the valkjjf. 



REWARD OFFERED 



A reward of $\ OO will be offersd by 
Che local organizations of the Wood- 
men of the World and the Bix)therhood 
of Railroad Trainmen, for the reeort 
ery of the body of I). F. Bff«cden, wIm 
was drowned in the^Ohio ri^er lait 
Friday erening at tlie Momaoa htA* 
ioff beach. 



-.i.; 



f^^(r\^-.^s.. 



». ^_ . 1.... ..^ 



t' \'^'.-- " •■, '■■■'7 .'^'*' "■ ", 



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I •.r^'^.^f^^T^y V'v*'; >**v . - ^T^l^ 



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/*».'•«. - '■ '* ^ •W. « ^^"^ i «*»-r^ 









BBAVEE TALLEY LABOB NBWB 



■■'i- 



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m- 



NOTICE 



To the Electors of the Borough of 
Monaca: 
Notice is hereby given that a »pec- 
ial electioD will be held on Tuesday, 
the fifteenth day of August, 1916, be- 
tween the hours of 7 o'clock. A- M., 
and 7 o'clock, P. M., at the places 
of holding the municipal elections in 
the several wards of said Borough /)f 
Monaca, by the boards ol election of- 
ficers of said borough, for the purpose 
and in accordance with the provisions 
fully set forth in the following ordi- 
nance: 

ORDINANCE NO. 182 

An Ordinance signifying the intep- 
tion and desire on the part of the 
Town Council of the Horough of Mo- 
naca, to increase the bonded indebt- 
edness of said borough in the sum of 
Forty-one Thousand Dollars ($41,- 
000), for the purpose of water works 
improvements, street improvements, 
park improvements, purchase of elec- 
tric light and power eciuipment, stonn 
sewers, re-funding overdue bonds of 
said Borough of Monaca, and funding 
the floating indebtedness, and author- 
izin^!: and directinjj the holding of a 
puh(.lic flection in said Horougli of Mo- 
naca, for the pur|)oso of obtaining 
the assent of tlie electors of said bor- 
ough to tlic increase of the indebted- 
ness thereof as aforesaid, and fixing 
the time and ])lace for and providing 
for the holdinj,' of said election. | 

Uc it enacted and ordained by 
the; Town Council of the ltor<)Uj,'li of 
Monaca, and it is liereby enacted and 
(irdaiiiod by autliority of the sanu-: 

Sectiftn 1. That tlie said Town 
Cmmcil liereby declare and si^rnify 
their (i(\sire that the indebtedness of 
the wild IJoniufrh of Monaca lir in- 
erea-srd in tlu- sum of Forty-one 
Thousand Dollars ( s;.11.0()()) . in the 
iiianinT provided lor by the Act of 
A-ssciubly of the Coiiimonweallh of 
rennsylvania. entitled, "An Act to 
rf^'uhite the luanncr of inereasinK the 
indelitetlness of inunlci|ialili(:-s, to pro- 
vide for the redemption of the same, 
anil to impose penalties for the illej^al 
increase thereof," a|)proved April liO, 
1874, and the several supplements 
and anientiiucnts thereto. \\w\ all 
other laws of the ('ommoiiwealtii of 
Pennsylvania relating then^to, for the 
, followiiiK purposes, viz.: 

For water works improvements, Si.\ 
Thousand Dollars (.'?G,000). 

For street improvements. 
Thousand Dollars (?8,(X)()). 



said election, in the manner provided 
by law, for the purpose of ascertain- j^i 
ing the assent ol said electors to, or 
dissent of said electors from said in- 
crease of indebtedness. 

That the question of increasing the 
indebtedness of the Borough of Mo- 
naca shall be printed upon the ballots 
by the proper authorities in brief 
form and followed by the words "Yes" 
or "No," as provided in the Act of A»- 
sembly in such case made and pro- 
vided, and that the questions be bo 
stated as to afford the electors an op- 
portunity to vote separately upon the 
increase of indebtedness for each pur- 
pose as above stated. The questions 
shall be stated as follows: 
1 . Shall the Borough indebt- 
edness be inereased for the 
purpose of water works 
inijiiovements in the sum 
of Six Thousand Dollars 
($6,()00) 7 
:. Shall the Borough indebt- 
edness be increased for the 
I)urpose of street improve- 
nierts in the sum of Eight 
Thousand Dollars(|8,0O0) ? 
;. .Shall the Borough indebt- 
e<lncss be increased for the 
purpose of park improve- 
ments in the sum of Five 
Thousand Dollars ($5,0DO) 7 
1. Sli.nll the Borough indebt- 
edness be increased for the 
I)urp(».se of purchasing elec- 
tric li^'hl and power equi«p- 
' iiiont in the sum of Ten 
Th(>u.santl Dollars($10,000) ? 
>. Shall tlie Borough indebt- 
edness be increased for the 
purpose of construclinp 
storm sewers in tlu- sum 
of Twelve Thousand Dol- 
lars (?rj.0OO)? 
;. .^iiall the bonded indebt- 
cdnc.'^s of the Doroutch be 
iiicroa.sed for the purpo.se 
of refunding overdue homl.s 
in the sum of Seven Tliou- 
s.md Dollars ($7,000) " 
7. .Shall the bon<i('(l indebt- 
edness of the Borough bo 
increased for funding the 
floatinjr indehtcilix'ss in 
the sum of Four Tli(>u.sand 
I)<illars ($-1,000)7 
.'Section .'). There beinr nt) news- 
liapcr.s published in said lioroujrli <if 
.Mciu.-iea. the Secretary of tlio Town 
CoiiTicii is hereby tlirectod to jrive no- 
tice of the holdmjr of said election 
(luritiu at least thirty days, by week- 
Fight ly advertisements in the Daily Times 
land the Beaver Valley Labor News. 



MMMM 



wmmmmmmmmm 



B. R. MO. 321 

Items Concerning Affairs of the 

McKeea BocM LacsI Tkat 

Will Interest Yon. 



MAiMOTH EXHIBIT IS 
: PROMISED AT ERIE 



YES 



NO 



YES 



IJO 



YES 



NO 



YES 



NO 



yp:s 



NO 



YES 



NO 



YFS 



NO 



Ed. Reed, clerk in the general yard 
office, left last week on his vacation. 
He will proceed to bask in the sun- 
shine alone the Great Lakes. 

David Irwin, a popular employe of 
the shops, left Monday on his vaca- 
tion. He will be absent two weeks or 
more. We "know" Dave will have a 
good time. 

Conductor James Farrell, who 1 as 
been confined to the South Side hos- 
pital suffering from rheumatism, is 
able to leave that institution, but is 
still confined to his home. 

The t*. &. L. E. is having trouble 
getting enough men in all depart- 
ments. Probably u little more money 
and a few improved conditions would 
help some? It would not be surpris- 
ing to see the clerks organize here be- 
fore Jong. 

Conductors P. W. Duffy and C. V. 
Cooney, who have been in the South 
Side Hospital, suffering from crushed 
feet, are improving. Duffy has so far 
recovered to l)c removed to his home, 
and C(»oney cxi)ectK tu be able to leave 
the in.5titution shortly. 

.Members of the 1 5. of \\. T. are 
foniiinj: a social club here, for the 
purp»)se of liolding djmces during tlie 
comirf,' .season. This club's dou^rs 
will be separate from the lodge '.s af- 
fairs of this kind, being handled by 
memlKTs of the lodge only. 

Bnitbrrs. don't forget the ttig ;;et- 
loKcther me<'ting at the Mononguhela 
Mouse, rittslwr'k'h. Augu.sl 15th. We 



want to see you there. Lets pet i^c- j^ j^^ ^,,^|.|. ,,.jn„py ^f y\^^ heavens 



>iuainted at this tinu'. After you liavc 
(liKe.sted the news in this paper, hard 
it to your neitrhbor and solicit hi.', pi - 
and--sub.scrii)tion. 



Tremendous interest is being taken 
in all this great section of Fennayiva- 
nia and throughout Eastern Ohio %nd 
Western New York in the forthcom- 
ing Erie Ejcposition to be held dur- 
ing the Veek of Sept. 18-23. Erie is 
reached by the New York Central 
Lines, the Nickel Plate, Bessemer, 
Ene & Pittsburgh and the Philadel- 
phia & Eric bran^ Qi the Pennsylva- 
nia Lines , to say nothing of its being 
the radia-ting' point for a number of 
important trolley feeders, and in-as- 
much as all have promised especially 
reduced fares for Exposition Week, a 
most welcome invasion of thousands 
of visitors is looked for. 

Space is being taken up with a 
rapidity fur exceeding even the most 
sanguine expectations. The exposi- 
tion grounds include eighty-five acres 
but already it is apparent that every 
foot is eoing: to be utilized by exhi- 
bits in permanent exposition buildings 
or under canvass, by race track, 
grand stand, speed bams, stock pens, 
shows a.nd concessions of all kinds. It 
now seems certain that there will be 
overflo\v exhibits in all classes, this 
being particularly true of the argicul- 
tural, horticultural and stock raising. 
There is also to be a most amazing 
display of agricultural implements, la- 
bor-savin k machinery for farm and 
Ihonie, ^as engines, automobiles, etc. 
I The Kric Hxposiiton is to 'be a 
jnijrht as well as a day show. Evcry- 
thinji: \-\ill be o|K'n and in full bloom in 
the even-ngs just as in ddytinie i^esides 
which there will bo a wonderful fire- 
works (li.splay costing $1,000 a night, 
depictLiik' "The War of the Nations," 
and nk«:kit (lij^ht.s by DelJoyd Thomp- 
son, the fainouij aviator, who.se 
mudiijir' will he illuminated a^rainst 

All 




Commercial patrons of inodera|^ reqairementfl as weD 
as thaee with larger interests find here a congenial flifcanrial 

atmoqihere. 

Our highly efficient organization, possessed of excellent 
facilities and adequate connections, is constantly at the ser* 
vice of our patrons. 

Oar continual effort to further the interests of aJi pa- 
trons is not confined to the narrow limits of accepted hank- 
ing service but includes every advice and assistance consis- 
tent with our modem, constructive banking policy. 



Beaver Trust Company 

BEAVER, PENNSYLVANIA. 
CAPITAL AND SURPLUS $390,000.00. 



» ... 
r -r 



For park improvements, 
Thou.saml Dollars (.$r).0()0). 

For electric light and power ecjuip- 
ment. Ten Thou.sand Dollars ($10,- 
000) . 

For storm sewers, Twelve Thou- 
sand Dollars ($12,000). 

For re-funding overdue bonds, Sev- 

Section 2. That for the purpose of 
obtaining the assent of the electors of 
said borough lo said increase of in- 
debtedness thereof, a public election 
shall be held in said borough in pur- 
suance of the Act of A.«^senibly afore- 
said, and the severaj amendments 
and supplements thereto. 

Section .l. Said election shall be 
held by the board of election officers 
of the sovenil wards of .said borough, 
at the places of holdinjr the municipal 



sliow.s mid conces.sions will ahso be in 
full (iperrntion and the brilliant illum- 
inatitin of the ^lound.s will prol)ahl\ 
Irnd z\\\ even ^rreater glamour to the 





Two Suhes of Offices 
Elegant Location 




New Brighton, Pa. 



Five I two newspapers havinjr a jrcnPTiil cir- 
culation in .said boroujrh. and by at 
last Hwenty (20) printed- Iviind bills 
posted in the most public places in 
said IJorough of Monaca, which said 
notices shall contain the purposes for 
which the indebtedness is to be in- 
c«B Kuii, >»p6«Sarag,'\t of th<^ anovnt nf 
d!^ the ^taacable rit rjl bii ^i h i rh jJ B IWT- 
ough, which is $1,595,622.00, of the 
amount of the existing debt, which is 
$69,040.00, consisting of a bonded 
debt in the sum of $65,000.00, and a 
floating debt in the sum of $4,000.00, 
rintl the amount and percentapre of the 
propo.se<l increase of indebtedness, 
which is Forty-one Thou.sand I)ollars 
(Ml. 000), increase, and 2.63 ':r plus of 
the assessed valuation. 

Section 6. The .Secretary of the 
Town Council and all other municipal 
olTicers are authorized and directed to 



rusal 

Jcwepli 11. 
Lodjrc \\l\. 15. of i;. T., <lied at the 
Ohio Valley Hospital, Wednesday, 
.A.ugust 2nd. from the efTecls of injur- 
ies received some time a^'o. It \vas 
suppo.si'd that he had recovered and 
he had retumed to work; but live 
weeks ago he was ;icuin taken ill, his 
death resullinjr. brother Lockiiai-t 

was well liked amonK hi-"' fellow work- |j^p ^Ye^'k of Sept 
men, and they in turn extend their 
heartfelt symi)athio« to the widow 
and children in their bereavement. 

The members of the Brotherhoods 
in this town are incensed at the ac- Notice is hereby given that an ap- 
tion of one of the local papers for re-|PhcatLon will be made to the Gover- 
f using to pnfeLinh an article which was emor of Pennsylvania on Monday, 

flB^lBSSHo print 1n&>^vl^.'tii^H7'bf-«^ 



I.oekhart. :i member of 'night tliun the day show.- 

Kric is goitig to extend an official 
as wtdl ;l.s civic welcome to all visitors 
during Kxijosition \\'eek and the I'.x- 
postica Officials and P.oartl -of Com- 
merc*', .sponsor for the big show, will 
provide every possible convenience, 
comfort and pleasure. Turn your 
steps Kric; Kxposition-ward during 
18-2.J.— ailv. 



CHARTER NOTICE 



elections therein, on Tuesday, the fif-jdo all other acts and thirg.s which 
teenth day of August. lOlfi. between 
the hours of 7 o'clock A. M., and 7 
o'clock r. M.. under the same regula- 
tions provided by law for the holding 
of municipal election.s. 

6e«tion 4. The question of increas- 
ing: the indebtedness of said borough 



HODCARRIERS 

International Union No. 214. Meets 
first nnd third Tuesday of each month 
in Kramer Rldg. New Hrij^hton. Pres- 
ident, Wni. Wright; Secretary, Chas. t tk 
Siras. ' *" 



Central U^ht & Siipplj Co. 

Bell 288-R. 

Gas and Electric Fixtorea, Maa- 

tlea, Bomers, Glassware, etc 

1017 SeTcnth Ave., Beaver Falls 



I' 

may be necessary for the lawful hold- 
ing of said election as provided by 
law. 

Ordained and enacted into an ordi- 
nance thi.s fifth dav of July, A. D. 
1016. 

D. J. MITCHKLL, 
Attest: President of Council. 

K. B. STB:1NKR, Secretary. 
Approved this tenth day of Julv, 
A. D. 191C. 

JAMES C. IKONS, 

Burgess. 

e amount of the last preceding 
j assessed valuation of the taxable 
j property in said Borough, the amount 
of the existing debt, and the amount 
•antl percentage of the proposed in- 
i crease of the indebtedncs.s of said 
1 Borough are as set forth in said or- 
' dinancc. 

I E. B. STFINKU, 

' Secretary of Council. 

ijlyU-21-2R-aug4 



railroad company. Already sevexal 
items that would have benefited Che 
paper financially have been taken else- 
where, and several have stopped their 
.subscriptions, while still others de- 
clare that when their present sub- 
scription runs out it will stay out. If 
the railroad company's .good will is 
de.sirvil more than that of tiie people 
of the town, it is time for those peo- 
ple to let the paper alone. Help those 
that help us. 



Thanks, Brother Railroaders, for the 
hunch of subscriptions received this 
week. May we look for more? — Mgr. 



Kenna, J. C. Figley, J. C. Bfeaner and 
F. Bl. Hays, under the Act of Assem- 
bly entitled, "An Act to provide for 
the incorporation and regulation of 
cert;ii.n corporations," approved April 
2;Hh,1874, and the supplements there- 
to, for the charter of an intended cor- 
poral ion to be called the Beaver Val- 
ley Labor News Company, the char- 
Jicter and object of whicli is transuct- 
injf a printing and publishing busi- 
nes-s, iind /or'^these purposes to have, 
possess, and enjoy all the rights, 
bcraefiLs, and privileges of said Act of 
Assembly and the supplements there- i 
to. JOHN B. WcCLURE, 

jlyl4-21-^8-aug4 Solicitor. 



SMALL SUCCESS MAY LOOK INSIGNIFICANT TO 
THE UNSUCCESSFUL. BUT NOT TO THE MAN WHO 
IS A SUCCESS. 

EVERY SUCCESSFUL MAN HAS BEEN A SMALL 
SUCCESS AT SOME TIME. 

IT IS ALMOST IMPOSSIBLE TO EVEN START WITH- 
OUT A BANK ACCOUNT. 

riRST NATIONAL BANK 

ROCHESTERp PENNA. 



»»#»»<»»»»»#»»»»»»#»»»»»»a 



L. P. HARN STANSBURY 

Wstehiftaker, Jewder, Optician 

and Engraver. 

Bell Phone 1274-W 

582 Third St., ■ - B«aTCT 




THOMPSON'S 

THE STORE FOR MEN AND BOYS 



35% OFF SALE 

On Men's, Boys' and Children's Suits 
Hats and Dress Pants 



Special Dress Shirt Sale, 
All Fast Colors 



63c 



flO.OO Suits, now. . . .|6.50 I S20.00 Suits, now. 
U6.00 Suits, now. . . .$9.75 |26.00 Suits, now. 
U8.00 Suits, now. . .$11.70 $80.00 Suits, now. 



KI3.00 
16^5 
19.50 



[*■ 



John P. Thompson 



laM otwflQi Atmmm^ 



BEAVn FALU9. PA. 



mON CITY 

DRY CLEANING CO. 

We Have Just Opened Up a Fii-st Class 

Dry Cleaning, Pressing 

ANDDTEING 



Establishment, where we are prepared to attend 

to all classes of Ladles" nnd (tentlemeii*s 

work. Special attention {;iven to 

the proper handling of 

Evening Gowns, Etc. 

EXPERTS ONLY ARE EMPLOYED. ALL 

WORK CALLED FOR AND DELIVERED. 

AUTO SERVICE 

GIVE US A TRIAL AND WE WILL CONVINCE 
YOU OF OUR SUPERIORITY. 



Iron City Dry Gliding Co. 

HARRY L. GILMORE, Maiui«er. 
B. C. Phone, Rochester 5262. Bell 546sJ 

105 BRIGHTON AVE., - ROCHESTER, PA. 



• >ii nn i m iiiii n i M i4» 

W. R. ANDERSON 

Meat Market ^ 

I All Kiads of Frean aad Smoked \ 
Meats. 

i Freedom, ... Peana. \ 



: : SAVOY HOTEL AND < ► 
- RESTAURANT : : 

Woridnffnen's HoteL 1^ 

Open Day and Nl^fct. « ^ 

S06 Serenth Are, Bmitct FaOa \X 



♦» » % »♦ 



; •■! ii nn i»» 

Penna. Ave. Pharmacy 

Ira C. Hoffman, P. D., Prop. 

Penna. Atc ft ISth St 

MONIACA. . PENNA 

The Resaa Stem." 



RAINCOAT SALE 

< • For Ladies, Men and Boya. Alao « 

^ Rain Capes at very lo w pTicM. \ 

CHAS. STEIN, 

IISS Panna. Are., Moasca, Pa. 



<tiiii nn i m iiii m » n » 



♦»♦#♦»»♦»»♦>»»♦♦♦♦♦#<♦»#»» 



We Insure Every Thing 

Under the Sun — 

Consult Us. 



MOULDS & DONCASTBR, 
Rochester, PeniuL 



<We Hold Thee Saie.** 



•»»»»♦♦♦♦♦♦»♦»»»♦»»»»♦»»♦» 



; ♦♦ ><tti»»»» 

1916 WALL PAPERS 

; ' si : 

KENAH BROS. ; 

; Third Ave., New Brighton ; 

^♦♦» »» » 



♦••<iitt M #t<#»»## 



;: JOHN W. HARTZBL '^ 
\ \ Plnmbinf . Gas Pittint, TIa nl o 



<» P. 0. Bldr 



Shte iUjoffcng. 
Hot Air Furnace 



Rocheatcr \\ 




I QuinnT. Walton il 

PLUMBER 



\ \ Gas, Steam and Hot Water { \ 
Fitting. 

Estimates Promptly Given. 

Both Phones. 
: Third St, BEAVER, PA. 



FW Tow N«it Salt Bee 



ALEX MUDRIK 
McrdtentTdlor 



4t 71 Now Y«ik Avs., 

ii ummm i mnMH i i 



For Good QkxtAr «ad loo 
Go t0 the 
Olympia OnifectiDneiy 
Mawnic Bldg., Vwm Bfeiill 



; DR. F. R. HOLT, DENTIST ' 

Wilaon Bids, Rockeotor. 

I Office Hours: 9 to 12 a. m.; 1 I 
• to 5 p. m. Opem. rvenin^a. 
Bell 612-R. B. C. 7004. 



■I 



vs.. 



iiiiiii mnK i nm i UM f 

PIANOS anJ YICTROLAS 

New Bocordf FoodTMl on Am i 
28th of os^h aonth ftt 

Rochcsttr Ml 
Brii^loa Avo« 

III m ill ii H i M i umm i 



mmnnnnnm i m t 



WM.B. McKRAN 
' PtamUns, Claa, Stom 
* Hoi Water Htaliiq 

7tl| M. lad Tfk Am 
Z Both PNMa. sum fALUl ; 



M i m ii m i in i n 



4^i-f,..; 



f~^ 



,«» k. V 




: \3t 



L'«'«'' 









V •■ 






^^^SoT^^Wf? • 'fi*r- r "^f^t^ti . y^*' ^-' ■ 



■=>,-•'' *;.•;;-«;.•■'»• 



BEAV£R VALLBY LABOR NEWS 



-j^' 
.»«, 



> • 



,-V 











•: -I 






»%: 



^: 



"Magnet Bill." 
Uv 4liM*Nii't UM»k like a very linpurlunt 
part of tt big uutumobilv orguDiKutloa 
tills HtuoiM*!!. Kiti'zzled luuu, but the 
presideut uf u greut niutur cur cotD- 
paD> imyu that "Mugiiet Bill" aaveii lili 
•alary a duceD tluiea over every dajr 
he Workn. Ilulu or ahlne, aummer or 
ulater, "Uagaet Bill" may be seen 
walking aluwly about the automoblla 
plant, hla eyes on the sround. "Hag- 
«et Bill" gets his alckaame from tb* 
tact that his tools consist solely of one 
tin bucket and a big steel magnet, 
•trapped to the end of a shovel han- 
dle. It Is hla duty to save automobile 
""BVea by removing from the roadway 
•vary oall and bit of metal that might 
cause a puncture. Thousands of cars 
art ran over the roadway to tiM teac- 
lof place and it Is flgared that with- 
ont tha precaution taken hy "Magnet 
Mil" the coat for cut and punctured 
tlxw would be $20,000 every year- 
Popular Science Monthly and World's 
Idvance. 



RED, ROUGH, SORE HANDS 

May Be Soothed and Healed by \)— 
•f Cutioura. Trial Fra«. 



EI^G LIFE wiA 
JOHN HENW 




John Henry On Vanify 



Nothing BO soothing and healing for 
rad. rough and initatad hands as Cutl- 
eura Soap and Cuticura Ointment. 
Soak hands on retiring In hot Cutictira 
loapauds. Dry, and gently anoint hands 
with Cuticura Ointment. ▲ one-Dlght 
treatment works wonders. 

Pree sample each by mail with Book. 
Lddress postcard, Cuticura. I>ept. L. 
ftOBton. Bold everywhere. — A.dT. 



An Unproductive Visitor. 

"Suy. youiiK f«*llt'r," siild Hntncho 
ftob, "lia%i' yi)U Kot a kuii nti you?" 

"No, sir," repllt'd the man with the 
brand-new cowboy unifortu. "I wus 
told that It WHS hotter to bo unurmecl. 
M as to avokl any liiipros.slon that 1 
aras seeking ii quurrei." 

"Well, that's u big disappointment. 
( need*;d a brand-new gua an' thought 
foa'd be bringln' uIohk ut least a pair 
of 'em. Don't you let unytlilug Hike 
tills occur aguln." 



Perhaps the best way to kill false- 
lood Is to let It lie. 



Going It Too Hard 

We are Inclined notv-aduya to "go 
It too hard ;" to overwork, worry, 
eat and drink too much, and to 
neglect our rest and sleep. This 
nils the blood with uric acid. The 
kidneys weaken and then It's a siege 
of backache, dissy, nervous spells, 
rtieumatlc pains and distrMSlng 
urinary disorders. Don't wait for 
worse troubles. Strengthad tha 
kldnays. Use Doaa's Kldnay PPc 

A West ^rginla Gam 

T. ▼. Blmpson. Br., 
Ml W. 4th StT \Ves. 
ton. "W. Va.. aays: "1 
oouldn't pass th« kid- 
n«r seoretions irtth- 
out pain and the flow 
was canty. I had •«• 
v«r« attacks of back- 
acha and often had to 
plac* my hands on 
any bipa to aaae th« 
Mitji, whan I cot up 
from a chair. I doc- 
t r • d. but nothinc 
nalped ma until I 
uaed Doan'a Kidney 
Pills. They curad tha 
pains If my back and alnca then my 
ktdnaya hava been la aood ahape." 

Oet DmmS at AiV Stor^ SOc • B«B 




DOAN'S V.1V.' 

UKM CO.. BUFFALO. N. T. 



SAY! havo you aver noticed that the 
bug called Canity can cook up 
more trouble for human beluga 
than any germ tbat«ever built its ueat 
Ln a brain cell? 

It's a subtle little disease, this fever 
we call Vanity. No man ever knows 
he has It but fa« cam always recognlie 
the symptoms In his neighbor. 

Sometimes it lareaks out In diamond 
lings on the lingers; sometimes it 
takes the form of ragtime clothing ac- 
companied by rainbow neckties, and 
Bomet lutes it drlres a man into pulltlca 
who should remain at his peat as the 
chautTeur of a garbaRe wagun. 

And then o^aia (here are occasions 
when It never kIiuwb in a man until 
after lie is dead and hla will r<>adH, 
"1 give and LeQUratii the auni of thirty 
thouaund dollarifc for the purpost's of 
scattertDg my asiK^s from th» highest 
peak of (lie Hiiiiiiiaya inountuiiiH." 

Hep Hardy has It lor k«^f'i)8 Around 
at the club the utbor night I saw blm 
drink sfv«'ii Siotcti lilglibails bfcause 
aonifbody swell(<J him all up by tellinK 
him he never a howed tho offfctd of 
liquor. 

'Mien he had to lean BKainst the 
buildings all tbe way home. 

Even friend wife iaa't proof against 
the Vanity microbe. 

Not long ago 8oni(» fresh friend told 
her that she v as getting stout and 
Peaches promptly fell for every obea- 
ily cure known to modern science. 

During her calmer moments I'eaches 
has the general appearance of a Fletch- 
erizlng canary hlrd, but when some 
amiable Idiot t«l<l her that day by day 
she was gro^la^ to look moro and 
more like a public building she ut- 
tered a few shrill screams and started 
after that obesity proposition with a 
tomahawk. 

1 tried to flag ber and talk her out 
of it, but she wared nie hack and said 
she wasn't golDg through this world 
chaperoning a double chin. 

So Peaches ataKed In to put the 
sabots to the fa-tty tissues, and for a 
week our erstwblle peaceful home be- 
came two reels In the Movies entitled 
"A Rough Night at Sea." 

Whea I residisd home oe tba eve 
of j^ks^Battle of Sabonpolnt I found 
Peachat stroll laf around the campus 
made up to look like a lady scarecrow. 
Her face was concealed behind a mus- 
lin mask, there was a feverish glitter 
In her eyes an d in both hands she 
clutched a b«ok which proclaimed 
Itself "The Roa«l to Beauty; or. How 
to Get Thin Vlthout Calling In the 
Coroner." 

As 1 breezed through the turnstile 
with a cheery "<'>opd eventide. I..a8- 
sle!" she turnpd her acetylene lamps 
on me and burned tne to a standstill. 

Then Aie threw both herself and the 
book on our uwarly -Persian rug and 
began to roll around the room. Seek- 



nii Bim tiAimr iewin MAciiit 

MOT SOLI HNOEI ANT ITNER RAMI 

Write for fr«« booklet "Points tobeconsldrrnj kefere 
purchasing a Srm I nf Machine." Learn the fa^tt. 

fHENEWHOME SEWING MACHINE CO.,0RANGE,M«S3. 

Kill All Flies! 'r.!:r.*' 

I MTwlMre.Datav riy KIM«r ■ttrs«ta Md kflkaO 
Neat, claaa. ociMaMoUl, caa*«i>l«it, aad < ' 




r. o»«i— 



^Daiay Ply Killer 

kf » i >» m . >r M »tt. U.ee. 

>«UUH.0 80MKRa, 1660«KaiaA«e. Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Don't Foi^et— 

that when constipation, buiousnefls or 
indigestion is neglected, it may cause 
a serious illness. Act upon the first 
symptom — keep your digeistive orgaas 
in good order by the timely use of 

BCGCH^n^ 
PILIS 



loc 




Mvery Womaii Wants 



ANTISEPTIC POWDER 



FOR PERSONAL 
iawatarfsr 




by ufaia E. 
Mad. Csb for t«a 
for 




In 



■ OH 9ALE aaaMni oaie. Wrii« fni 
itM Ual. w. w. MCB rasa assacr 



PATENTS f rlKssS^^- 



f*-^ 



GALLSTONES 



,A'-'^' 



W. M. U.. PITTMURQH. NO. tS-lllt. 



river and going bard when a strap 
broke, whereupoa Feachea went over- 
board with a splash that upset naoot 
of the furnitura In tbo room and 
knocked her manlcura set down be- 
hind the bureau. 

One of the oars went up In the air 
and landed on the bridge of my noae, 
becauao my faca hapijened to be in 
the way when the uar came down. 

When loving hands finally untangled 
Peaches from tike cbaln drive of a 
rocking chair, she found that, with the 
help of the ruwlti^ riuichlue. she had 
loal nearly two iiou uUs - luoally off the 
end t)f h»*r t;lbow. 

A day or two lutcr Mrs Fiiziiistaatz, 
who tips tlie heuiUMt 24;i.lluiJped in like 
an uiiiiabit! soal aiitJ u>kj i'lacht'K that 
her systtni of |i!i\sii«l imturi! was all 
wruuK Onrt! inorti 1 hollooli'd it for 
the shoppiuK district and returned 
with one of tliobt' rul)b('r contrUaiU'CS 
V, liich you t-arflully riiaitn lo iho wall, 
and tht'ii luko hold of tbe tiuiiiJies and 
try to pull it ufl UKiiiii. 

IJrJKhl and early tlic iiot ^'lnd iiiorn< 
Ing I'l-achcH Krablx'ii tlui handlfa and 
was ^^cltiiij; away from licr fat little 
self at tlio rate of an nuncf an hour 
when one of tlic» rubtt-r airiUKs sud- 
denly (juit the job and i b«>ii Honietliing 
kicked I'eaclics just vhero a £ood 
sinijor getH her coltjrutu ra 

When l*t>ach«-s f«'ll wounded on the 
fU'ld of battle slu' dpcidcd hurriedly 
that Bunit'thinK niusl fikll with ht»r so 
she selected our new tallcing machine, 
and there was Burh a crush that our 
new cook thought tbo end of tht* world 
had arrived and 8titi ran screaming in 
the direction of 1'a.lf'rson. N. J. 

I had to pour a iiltch«r of Ice water 
over Peaches' facial expression before 
she came to, and theu sbe found that 
all she had lost t>y lb« new prucess 
was her breath and \'IA worth of rec- 
ords. 

She was sittinit on a Caruso, with 
her left foot embedded in a Tctrazzlnl 
while fragments of^ \ictor Herbert 
medley nestled coyly in her hair. 

Mrs. Gadfrey dropped In next day 
about lunch time and told Peaches 
that the only real way to reduce ths 
fleeh is to take a lone walk; ao Peaches 
picked out a Ions walk and took It. 

After she was gone ibout six hours, 
and It was Retting dark she called me 
up on the long distance and broke the 
news to me that sbe bad walked some 
fifteen miles, and that Bh« had been 
terribly extravagant aad had used up 
all the walk that vas Iti ber. and would 
I please be so kind aj to send a taxi 
and not leave her to perish In a 
■strange, land amcug the savage tribes 
in the Bronx. ^ 

When Peaches reached' home that 
nif;ht she found that all the flesh eh>- 
had lost was her pocket book contain 
iufj ten dollars, and I waa set back ten 
dollars for cab hire, makiiig a total re- 




"What's tl 6 Idea?" I Gasped. 



Ing new worUg to conquer, she rolled 
out Into the dining room, bumped into 
the sideboard, and exit, rolling into 
ball with glass'crash. 

"What's tho Idea?" I gasped, when 
friend wife rolled back into my life 
again and droyped anchor in a Morr.? 
chair. 

"Reducing,' she answered in the 
still, small voice of a .Marathon run- 
ner at the end of the ninety-fourth 
mile. Then she rushed out and 
weighed herself and canio back with 
the glad tidings that she'd lost six 
and one-quarter ounces. 

"Eat one of our new cook's break- 
fast rolU and get it back permanent- 
ly," I suggested], and Peaches didn't 
speak to me for t^-enty minutes. 

The next morning Aunt Ix)ui8a MIf- 
fendale. who »-c'gha 278 In her war 
paint, ftoated In and told Peaches that 
she had picked out the wTong kind of 
exercise, and presently 1 was chased 
off dowQtown for a rowing machine, a 
set of Indian <Iub8 and sixty cents 
worth of dumbbells. 

That evenlcif Pearhes Jumped mer- 
rily aboard tlie rowing machine and 
bore away to the northeast, with a 
strong ebb tide on the |K>rt bow. 

8h«.was alxsQC four miles up the 



"Don't more!" snapped Peaches; 
"doni move! ' 

For another half hour 1 strulk-d with 
Dante through bis favoriic boiler 
room. I felt sumethiug dtiurp aud pe- 
eullar on my back. It Has one uf my 
shoulder blades iteepiug out to see 
what the matter waa The tempera- 
ture had started to display itself In 
four Agures when I gasped. "What is 
.this thing that's over ua — a plumber's 
blow-pipe?" 

"Shush!" whispered Peaches, "It's 
an electric blanket — we're reduclngl** 

Shrieking the battlecry of Freedom 
I pushed the volcano off the bed and 
Jumped to my feet. 

Peaches also jumped to her feet and 
with one of them stepped on an ohm 
or something. whereu[>on she let a 
blood-curdling yell out of her that 
could be heard in Winnipeg. 

Then she put her other foot down 
and landed on a volt or an ampere or 
something equally exciting and b^ 
came short -<<lrcuited. 

She waa the best little short-clrcttlt 
that ever fussed a fuse. 

For two minutes that room looked 
like a thunderstorm with Peaches 
playing all the elements. 

When I fiiiully got the current 
turned off and all fhc live wires out of 
her hair Peaches collapsed ou the sofa. 



Flisrs. 

"I>o y-iu ever laiio a tlyer tu the 
market? 

"No," replied tin- luuiiiiioiis Bpecu- 
lator. "NniliiuK •lolug vslih airhUipa, 
Cm fur suliHiarlues." 



In thtt United States 2.0O().(lOO chll- 
Jren, It^a t^ tift«en yi-arS Df ui;e. ure 
employed In gainful occupallun.->. 



Becauae a man growls at IiIh wife It 
a no Hlgn that sh<- is aft^uld of iiim. 



I'ncle Pennywiss ftaysi 

The auto IjlzueHM luuvt be S grand 
one, with ev«>rybuddy saving up to 
huy u machine. — LuuisviUu Courler- 
Jourual. 



Although there are 1,(K10 miles of 
rHtlway llncM In Uruguay, there la only 
ouu tunnel in I he country. 



Soinetitnes it is eaxy. and aometimes 
It is iiupossllile to raise money on a 
Itond of Hyinpathy. 



Don't PoisQn Baby. 

rORTT TEARS AGO almost ersry mother thought her child mwi* h«f« 
PAREGORIC or Isndannm to maks it sleep. TlMse drugs will prodooa 
sleep, and a FEW DROPS TOO MANY wlU produoa the ^LBEP 
(-ROM WHICH THERE IS NO WAKING. Many are the childrsn who 
have been killed or whose health has bsea raiasd (or life by parsgorio, laads^ 
Qum and morphine, each of which is a narootio product of opium. DrucjSlsIs 
are prohibited from sellina either of the narootios named to childrsn at au, or 
(o anybody without labelling them " poison." The definition of " narootio* 
is : "ii mtdiaknn wMek rtlievea pain and produeM sisep. but vOiieK in poimm- 
ou» domt produee$ aiupor, eoma, eonvuuionM and diath." The taste and 
«mell of medicines oootaining opium are disaulsed, and sold under the name s 
of •' Drops," •• Cordiala." " Soothing Syrups, etc. You should not permit any 
(uediciue to be given to your chiUren without you or your physioian know 
of what it is composed. CASTORIA DOEH NOT 
CONTAIN NARCOTICS, if it bears the signature 
of Chaa. II. Fletcher. 
CkBuise Castoria always bean the slgastsre of ^ 





WANTED 30,000 MEN 

For Harvest Work Western Canada 

Immense crops; wages $3.00 per clay and t)oard. Cheap 
'ailway rates from boundary points. Employment bureaus 
it VVinnii)eg, Regina, North Portal, Saskatoon, Fort Frances, 
Kingsgate, B. C, Coutts and Calgary, Alberta. 

Mo Co^nsGrlptlon — 
Abmoiuteiy Mo MlUimry Intorferenoe 

For all particulars apply to 

i.S.Crawlsrd.SOl e.test9tcSl..SyrscaM.N.Y.:r.A.BarrlMa.2ION.3rtfSl..ilarrtibsrf,Pa. 

Canadian GoTcremcnt Ascnt* 



Somstimea It Takea the Form of Rag* 
Time Clothing. 



WAN GOT A BATH OF EGGS' HEAD HUNTERS GETTING BUSY 



screaming! "Take it away! Take it! ^*" Crates of Hen Fruit Bury Phila- Natives of Solomon Island Take Ad- 



away! Now I know what a hard life 
the third rail must lead!" 

I think the electric blanket has 
cured friend wife. 

At any rale all the exercising do» 
funnys have been presented to thu Jan- 
itor's children, and I'eucheg has prom- 
lBe<l to be kind to a duuble chin If Nap 
tur«' slips her one. ^ 

Old King Solomon had toi right idea 
'vtacn he said to his typewriter, nfaa* 
Ity, vanity, all Is vanity !" 

If a surgeon could remove our Van- 
ity as easily as he removes an appen- 
dix there'd be a lot more money In the 
savings bank. 

What do you think? 



dclphian. When Car Hits 
Wagon. 



vantage of War to Gather 
Tropics. 



("ov.T.MJ fr..iii li.-;i.l tl. f'K.t \Oili iiro- At lir^t ^Ik'Iu tfi.-re floes not seem 
K.ii >'iiiis. iiiKl ill II «lti7.e(l condltl-'ii. An- I "^ •>•• a v^ry cIosm connection l>»tweeii 
:lioiiy <';i|.,,|u. iliiiiN six yciirs ol'l of ; 'he war in Kurop.- mid head hunting 
.N>1 I't'iu'c .xtri'ft. \Mi.>< <iirritMl inio ili.- 



MclliiMlist li<»s|iiiiil lii>it uinht. After 
111' I'K'^s Find l»<>«-n M-raju'd from his 
•lothlutf (itid hody it was disrovered 

OR|»oio WHS MufTerlnK from lacerations 

niid contui'lnnii of the Itudy. 



HOW ONE MAN GOT HIS START 



Couldn't Go in for a Literary Career, 
. So Went Into Hardware 
Business. 



Ill the Solomon tsiiiiulW Neverth<-les!i, 
the one arist's from the other. 

I'revloiis to the out>)r«-ak of the 

war. acconllnu to a Vancouver World's 

.Sydney (!t. S. W.) correKiMiudeut, Brlt- 

l.'h, and occasionally Oerman war- 

rii|Mdo wM.s riding In a wagon along **hii)« patrolleil the Islands and on- 

MoyjitiHii>.iin: avenue, and was hurled j denvoreil to keep down cannibalism 

l..ii.'iith a wrock of ten rnitfs of egg.s j ""•»•••« 'he iwitivo.H, who are largely of 

.vh.-n th.' v.diiclc wa.s stru«k hy a trol- I ''"I'll"" «"" Malaysian Kt«»ok. Ilow- 

• ■V ciir, .loliii I>o\\in'y. nil t-m; and 

|."Oil!ry d<Ml<'r of I'lusti-r, driver of 

llrlli.sli warshl|>s — nnd the happy bead 
hunter liiis liffii fret- to follow his -)WB 

de\i")ii-i courses. 
In oiif raid 



j evi-r, tin' rtMniirt'iiK'tits for the trans- 
I port of troop^ Ifd to the recall of the 



ill.' \s.ii.'"ii, f:iilid t" >■•<• the appniindi 
• >\' iIm' <iir iiiid drovi' iirroHs the tracks 
llriM-tly in its piilli.- -I'lillaiJi'ipliia 
U.-. nrd. 



"I Rot my start in life* said a 
wealt*.y retired hardware dealer, "in 
a Bln|{ular manner 

"You nij*:hl net think it, I having 
passed tho major portion of my life in 
Belling nails, pajlocks. stoves and 
shovejs, but in ray early youth my 
great ambit loii wa.s to l><> a wnier, an 
author 1 had r.o doubt whatever 
that that was what 1 w:i3 cut. out 
for, and certainly I worked at It good 
and hard, but none of 'he |)ul)liHher3 
to whom I sent my thinKs soi-iiK-d to 
agree with me. Ah fast as 1 gent 
the tiling-^ in lo tli<:ii tiny wuiild send 
them back. 

"l!ut that didti'T worry mo. I knew 
that soonc-r or later they Nvould < I'tne 
lo like what 1 urot" ;iiul ;<ii> it W'liat 
liOl my goat was the expi n ■ I u ;n a 
very ready writer and I,' wrote long 
plece'v The .stumps 1 l;'d ;.> u-. to 
send these pu-cei; c)<u Mnd ^••l ihem 
back co?t nio a lot t)( nmnoV 

"\\'hcn ! rt'al./.i-d lio\». :..ii< li I was 
paying out tor stanijis 1 said to my- 
self: 'Humpf! I'll aavii up ilsal money 
for flvo yoarn atul lln-n I'll i;u to writ- 
ing again.' And for ihe next five yeara 
I did put asldf? regularlv the amiiunt 
that 1 would otherwise i.a 

BtarnpK and you would be surprisctj^nii nn-^A.-r 

iii:iw. mil'' 



Homogenized Ice Cream. 

■W'e ;ile llldelited I'> Ilie lii.iird of 

lien Ml of the <'iiy oi .N.-w VorW for 

'lie in! ii-iiiiitioii tliiil lioiii)i;;<>ni7.)'d ice 

r»iiiii may lawiiill;, be .sold in tlint 

■it> nii'l for III" fiiriber liiforiiiatioii 

'ha* hol;lc>krelHZ. i| l<-e iTi-llIll uitiy be 
iilJlde III p,.\\der.M| sUlm milk 
.-:iier. .\iii'iiik: ileiNe tliiiiir!* In 

•iMIIle-. id' wliiill • I line-, .ire iiUllIllittei 

I'-.' eteiiiii ranks nirlit hI'Mii; with lll> 
•I'', and tuiurlst nr; - .•>!. I.oiiis Ke 
..iii.lt.- 



made by n mountain 
trible upon a small village near the 
coii.st no les.s than '_'<> bends w»«re se- 
iur»'d. No piiiilslinieiii fidlowe<l b^ 
eanse the wlnie.s were niinble to or- 
ganize 111 time. \h n coii.stMjuence 
the raids are growing more dangerous, 
and nlth.iiigti as yet, no Kiiropeans 
have been aitaeked. planters have cou- 

and i •'itaiitly to ke.|» .m ibeir guard. 

the' . 

Til' K:i»saii'> dam. In Alberta, Ciia- 
jida. one III' the ;.'rejiie.st irrigation 
Willi, s III III'- Wiilld lias been com- 
ber. d 



Bebevc. 

r.elbve \\itb ail \-i'ir li.sirt tliat you 



w ; II i|i> 'A ha' 
.Ni'ver fur ail 

o!' I III-. I ■: ' • 

1 1 ■..•1 I, ., 1 -i' ;■ 



\ ' 1 1 1 ■.■..• r 
ins'air 

r ii!;i I 
1 ■'•. IJi' 



IrJend tbi>ii,jiii- or p.. n 
> .. ;l a re le li. mI t't a-'i.i'' 

; ; 1 1 I ■ i _■ 1 c ' e • 1 1 1 , ■ ■ ■- . all 
III.mmI^— e\ •■:■. llull.; \^ li. 

-i:.'_'">' I;i;iiire <»r ui;'-, 



• ! 11.11 le t" on. 

'arlmr a doubt 
:' '. 'lur ii.iiel If 
rtaiii iiiil^' the 
Is of »!ie tbiiii: 
..•. Kej..,-: all 
'\'.-' 'UniVnig 

'tl '-volliil e\.e;i 

il.p,:,.->v — .Su.-- 



I Says the Old Philosopher. 

"We iMii't all be rap'ns. coloneN nn' 
I ;:'';'riils, my son." sjild the old phllo.-'o- 
; plier. "Providence has .so llxed it that 

-Mii:..li.' ly miiMi lea I an' somehtwly 
I till;-' i.il ..w. The bllll"[i j.ioks t;oo«| to 
' 11--. but we ;e . I.iscr to i!ie thuialer up 
, ;li"re, ;i;i' if \r e eaii't stand steady on 

iiiir !•■.•' if's riiiglitv apt to shako US 

, 'loWU." — .V'.laliM (''ohstllUtion. 



duction of four pnunds — English 
money. 

A few days later while I icas down 
town .Nfrs, CarrutliorB dropped in, also 
at lunch time, and carefully explalne<l 
to friend wife that ihe cMily •^■ay to j 
beat biick an attack of avoirdupois Is I 
to take electric baths. 

An hour later I'eachos gnlherpd up 
the family platn atid c^ichanged it for 
an electric blanket, wblcb she had sent 
home Inimcdiately. 

It waa cold that nipht bo I wasn't 
at all surpriHed to hpo what I suppoBed 
was a .Mackinaw, coat Bpread over the 
bed. 

1 figured on rrarhing Dreamland by 
the fa«t express b\it, bpavons! how 
warm It began to Ret. 

"Tho Janitof la Hura annoying the 
radiators with a lot of steam tonight, " 
I said, feverishly, but all 1 got was a 
sharp "Shush: " from the other half of 
the sketch. 

A half hour [>asMed and one hy one 
my features trickled away from my 
face. The temperature Jumped up to 
211 in the dark. 

"For the frleodifclp of Mike." I plead- 
ed, "can't we throw this aabestoa quilt 
on the floor and eoina^at of the flsry 
furnace?" • 



if 1 should t«dl >ou hn-.v niurh It 
aincun<ed to. Hut at thi> end of that 
time I did not again take up wrltl.Tg. 

"Just at tlmt lime the .senior part- 
ner of the hardware store in our town 
died and his heirsj drew out all his 
interest in the lirni. There was a 
chance for a man with a little cap- 
ital to get into a good bii.''lnesH. I had 
the capital, by accumulatod stamp 
money, and 1 boiiglii that Interest in 
the hardware store. 

"From that time on 1, wa? always 
too busy to write, but my ureal suc- 
cess in the hardware buslne.s8 you 
can clearly trace to my original ambl- 
bltion for autliurship. 



Good Example. 

\\\r\' I'ii'In '.'.as Lull .11.; i i th-' cow 

JDl. jilid leT p.illi: ally e\' ited ^mII 

foiiiiil l.iT iln're. ".Ma\v. y>iu'ie i I >em- 

ve spent for,^i.i lat. niri f vmi?" Ii • a-U-'I. .'sbe ni..de 

bti' 111" pei->i>te.l : ".-^ay. 

y.iii a -ii.i.l IiiTMocrat?" 

-i.'l. eiilpbiiiieally : "I 



riaiilly ^le 
hain't n'llbi 
1 iiu'. You 

ui.:- 



I'm n w .»iiiaii bi.lkin' a 
I) In the house and shut 



The Devil'a Own. 
The Inns ( r ('oiiri OflicerH' Training 
corps ts proud of its traditional name, 
the DevlI'H Own. a rifle .which links 
It with the patriots of the four inna. 
who formed a volunteer corps in tho 
time of the .Napoleonic whth. It. was 
(leorge 111 who beKtowed the title on 
the corps. He was reviewing bands of 
rolunteerB and as one parili ulHrly 
smart body of men pawned beliro 
him. asked who they were. "Law- 
yers," was the reply. "The Devils 
Own. the Devil's Own" snid the oi 1 
king, who had a habit of repcjiting h.^ 
phrases. And the lawyers, who ;i o' n 
sense of humor, adopted the titb- .it. 
glee.— London Chronicle. 



Real Lberty. 
Liberty, real liberty, consists no' In 
In w les^ro'ss. but in servitude to la"'. 
Tlijii is Its essential condition. .Mil- 
ton lias put If into mnji'stic words; 
"Where ciitii[ilaltits are freely heard, 
deeply considered nnd sj)eedily re- 
formed, flien is the uttiKixt lioubil of 
<ivil liberty attaineil ihut wise men 
look for. " 



I ;• 

Ii;et| 



Wasted Labor. 
t!e IM:,.i. who was wattlibit: the 
\M>rk;:i_' n pile-driver in ttie lot 
Mj. ;...-:•.•. said l-> le-r mother, "I'm .so 
siirry for tlmse p.ior men. mnninia t 
ibey've been tryltiL- and trying to lift 
out that great weight, nnd every time 
I bey L'et it almost to the top !♦ falls 
ri.;bl back agniii." — Hosloii Transcript. 



Prevalent Complaint. 
All Hje wiiild's a stjii,'!' aiid one of 
the most pathetic of all the pathetic 
feji hires of everyday life iS the way* 
me<||ocre performers so often contrive 
to get Into the Icadinu roles for a 
time. — Ohio State Journul. 



Generous. 
"ANIO". >Vlille, I'm aslmmed of yon. 
You Khoiild linve shflred your apple 
with your little cousla." "Well. I let 
him chew my chewing gum while I was 
eating the apple." 



Equity. ) 

r.riMsli cnnrts ,,f equity nro those of 
'be lord ebaiicellor. the viee-i h'incellor 
anil master of the rolls, 'heir oflbe be- 
ing to correct the operation of the lit- 
eral texf^ot* file law, supplying Us de- 
feets by the reasonable constructioit 
not adiui.shlble In il court of law. 



Useful. 
"Do yon take cordwood In payment 
of siibseripilons?" n^ked the culler. 
'Yes, " replied the eilltor of the coun- 
try piip«'r. "provided it Is In conveni- 
ent lengths to Uirow at bill collec- 
tors." 



ti 



» 



Perfect Philosophy. 
And ns for me. '.et what will come, 
I <an receive no damage from It, tin- 
les.s I think It a CHluinlty ; and tt Is In 
my power to think !t none, 'rf I so da- 
clde. — Marcus Aurelliis. 



Wdrld Hss Little Influsnas. 
In the course of time the wor!d fets 
llred of hearing one man*or one wonan 
telling It what It should do sbont OUfi 
and that — Toledo Blades . .- 



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BBAVBR VAIXBY LABOR NEWS 



BEAVER VALLEY LABOR NEWS 

Pubiiahed E«cl?^ Friday by the 
BEAVEK VALLEY LABOR NEWS COMPANY 

Near Third St. and College Ave. - - Beaver, Penn'a. 

., c 

Entered as second-class matter October 8, 1916, at the post office 
at Beaver, I^nnsylyania, under the act of &larch 3, 1879. 

JOSEPH C. BEANER. .\ Preaident 

J. D. McKENNA Vice President 

Hell ITione lOl'J-J. Houver County Phone 6365. 

REX L. C HA.MBERS (JEN. MGR.-EIHTOR 

F. L. ANDKRSON TREASURER 

C. L. (JILBERT AI)VERTISI.N(; & CIRCILATION MCJR. 



EIGHT REEL FEATURE 
COMING TO MAJESTIC 



With til is issue, The LaWor News starts on the second year 
ol" its e.xistonce. 'i'he first luimboi was issued Friday. Auj^ust 
loth, 11)15. The anouiiceiiuMit niado in that issue, setting foith 
the hopes and aims of the pulthshers. contained this statement; 

"I->e;iinnin^ on ;>. modest scale, we expect soon to l>e 
al)le to ini|)i()ve the i)apei- in many respects and to i)i<)- 
(hice a j)ul)lication that not only every union man, hut the 
j)roressiona! and husiness man. as well, will he j^lad to 
have on his readin;:^ tahle. We shall at all times uphold 
i))c staiifhird and liij^lu-st ideals of tlu 
)e])re.sent." 



' j-reat cause wt* 



That The Lahoi Ni'w> i)ul»lis}ieis ha\( mad*» ^jood theii ex- 
l)ectations is a tact wliich our usiders will sul)stantiate. The jro- 
in^ has not ln-en easy, the road has lu'en iou.irh at times, hut the 
j)rincipal i)oinl is that the pa|)or has made j;ood. not only I'rom a 
stand]M)int ol' ln'in^ a (irsl-class lahor paper, l)ut iVom an advei'tr*is- 
in;^ and siihscription .-.landjxiint as well. 

j'oi' moiitiis alter tlu- papt'i stai'ted. Iiut littlv advntisinji' 
was secured, and rnij^hty lew suhsci'iptionii wcri' it-cordcd. The 
l>uhhshers took tin- \iewpoint that the way to ^et suhscrihers was 
to vret local p.cws ol' interr>t !or them to read, and thai, the \' ay to 
;;et a(h'ertisin>: \\ as to >i,'cuiv a sul>stantial miml)ei' oi suhscrji)- 
tions. .As a result ol loMovv iii;^ out this polic.\'. The i.alior News, 
to(Uiy. lias a laiji'e and ,iir(n\in.u circulation and, a ^laiue at the 
advertisinj,^ pa^^'es I'ach week reveals the lacl that it is Ininji loy- 
all.\' supjiorted l»y the business nun of the \alley. 

Credit for what niea.^ure of success 'i'lu' Lahoi .News ha.- en- 
joyed is (\\.\v. not only to tlu' men who are j^ettiii^'' oat the i)aper. 
hut to the memhers of the various unions tlirou^rhout the valley. 
who have woiked and aie woiking: to help in every way possible 
to jussi.st the manairement of the pai)er to .secure suhscripiions 
.Mnd iuivertisinji. Hundreds of suhscriptions have come into the 
office in the past few months through the hands of union men, 
who !t>elieved that The Labor News was doing a good work and 
vras worthy 6f their support. 

The motto of The Labor News i.s "A Square Deal for Every- 
body." This i)olicy has been faithfidly adhered tt) — the employer 
receiving credit wiiere credit was due, just as cheerfully as would 
an employe or body of employes. 

The Labor News today stands hisrher in the estinration of its 
many readers, of the business man, of the employer of lal)or, and 
(.fClthe press peneially, than at any previous time in its existence. 
To increa.se this appreciation of the woi*k of The Labor News i.s 
the aim of the manajioment of the paper, and that the cominjr year 
will show even ^reatei* improvement in eveiy depaitment tiian has 
the past year, is the promise of the men who are enjrajred in 
issuing it. 



SUBSCRIBE FOR 

THE LABOR NEWS 



ii 



25S 



Discount Off All 



SUITS and HATS 



•^4 



EWING BROS. 



Rochester, Pa. 



'% 




m 



1 



■y. • 



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Manager CIoUibcTK, of the Majes- 
tic Theatre, Rochester, annuunicti u 
fcatuix' attraction for the dat<-s of 
Tueuday and Wcdnewla.v, Au|fu.-i 21)- 
.'iO. at which tiim- i>e will offer the 
N'itaKraph Uluo Ribbon featun- in 
»'i>cht reeltj, "(iinl's Country and the 
WoMuin," a wondtrful drama o! the 
jrroat northwtst. The scenes vvcre 
ph(»loKr,jit>he<l in the drep snows of llic 
Crt'al Rear Valley in tlir San Rer- 
nartiino Mountains of .Southern ( ali- 
fornia. 

William Duncan. flcorK* Holt and 
Nell Shi|)inan are the ^)rincipab who 
enact the drama of a >jirl whose moth- 
er is overcome by a villian and (.Tives 
birth to a child in the absence of her 
hu.sband. The daughter comes to the 
front to assume rei?ponsibility for the 
niothrrhocMl. To presei-ve her own 
honor the trirl, just befoiv her fathor'.s 
return. write.s him that she is Koinu: 
to the .N'orth vsimhIs to meet her "hus- 
band." The ruse works well, for a 
vdunK' nian driftin^r down stream on a 
I'omeward jounwy from the wilds, 
beaches his canoe near the girl's 'or- 
t'sl slu'lter; and falls in love with her. 

.She prevails upon him to po.sc as 
Imt husl)and. and they >ro back homo 
t(i^:ethcr to protect the ;;ood name of 
llic mother. A marriaj^e ceremoii\- is 
IK-rformed. bul they live apart until 
iii\ally tli«- bal>.\ dies and the villian. 
who all the v.iule is trvin;,' to k'ct 
pos.session of tin- irirl, is devoured \i} 
a pack of sledire dojrs. and after a 
sensational battle in which the arcl:- 
(•<)iis|)irator and h>s fellow outlaws in 
••|)(vii's .\est are van<|uish"(l an.l the 
i^'irl, who has been maile captive, is 
Creed by her svveethearl. Thereafter, 
in the trlow of the burninir roiid('zvou.< 
the hero takes the y:''.r\ to iiis he.irt as 
wile in fact, as well as name. 



HERE IS YOUR DHANCE 



MORi; Sli5S( RIMKUS. 



At the ineetin;' o'" ti.e ("entral l.a- 
ijor I'liiou Monday irv,!it, .Aiu'iist 
Kr.ikenbery came m.-lunj,' in, a t'-:''o 
, it^'. Jkul j-uslied u\i to Tiie !.. i>'-v 
W'\', .- Vepi-esentatiNc with a rii'cv iist 
of new ones. He also stated tli'ie 
\v(>re more to follow, a.-; soon a> i^e 
vacation was over. Tl'.anks, Au>.'u>t. 
I'.cep tl;.' trood worlc up. 




Our Semi- Annual 

Clearance Sale 



which 18 now on, offers you 
an opportunity to buy that 

Suit TaOored-to-Your Measure 

At iM^reat saving. We must make room for our 
Ne wFall and Winter Woolens, some of which are 
already in stock. 

We offer you unrestricted choice of any ^oods 
in the house at the folU)\vin}>: prices: 



All Our $20.00 Suits Now Tailored for 
All Our $22.50 Suits Now Tailored for 
All "Our $25.00 Suits Now Tailored for 
All Our $27.50 Suits Now Tailored for 
All Our $30.00 Suits Now Tailored for 



$13.75 
$16.75 
$19.75 
$21.75 
$23.75 



Li:r riiK(;()()i) work (iobs 



Mark Ford, of the Federal 1. d>or 
Union, has expressed hii; conviiuon 
that he can secure us about a dozen 
new ones amonR the fellovwKjL^^l? 
now boardinfir with. Prospcj'ts look 
^ood — go to it, Mark! 



MKKTING OF V.XLLEY B.MJHER.S 



An open meetinj,' of Local 'J8<), .1. H. 
I. L'., has been called for 6 ::'.') .Mon- 
day oveninir, April 14th. the same to 
beheld at K. of C. K. Hall, 827 Thin! 
.ivenue. .New Rri^jhton. The meeting 
IS c;i1I(nI for the purpose of offectinK' 
an adjustment of prices to be charp^cd. 



CENTRAL LABOR UNION 
OFFICERS 



L. A. McDANEL President 

R. F. KROSS Secretary 

W. T. BYERS Treasurer 



.MR. IMON .M.VN— The.se «:o(kI.s ,are, for VOl. Tailored by .skilled IN ION Tailors. 
Y«)u can pa;, iiumo iiioncy for your clothes el.sewhere. I)ut you cannot buy better clothes 
at any piict-, than we make. 

LKT YOIH NEXT .SITT MK A K\. T' -LORK. SI IT— 'IT IJI:aR.S THK LABEL" 



IN ION 
M A n K 



1211 
SLVENTH 
AVENIE 




Caifofs 



VlOU'v Oh CISTO.^I ( tl CLOllll 



CHAS. I). FISCHER, iMana^er 



UNION 
MADE 



BEAVER 

FALLS, 

PA. 



R.R. MEN ACCEPT MEDIATION 



(Continued from First Page) 



'I'lic United States hoard of media- 
tion and conciliation has helil its first 
(•(inference with the rcpre.'^entatives 
of the four r.ailro.ul brotiierhoods of 
employes in an elTort t.) piTvent, 
tlirou^rh mediation, a country-wide 
strike to enforce their demands. 

.Nothinfr was olTicially disclosed as 
tl) the succes.; the media'.ers riut, but 
it was learned on ^tockI authority that 
ihe brotherhoods had shown no dispo- 
sition to modify their deinands. 

"The status is unchantred," was the 
only comment which A. H. (larretson, 
head of the conductors, was willing to 
make after the conference. 

"We have onlv scratched the sur- 



face," said G. W. W. Hanger, one oi 
mediation board. "The situation may 
be cleared up within 24 hours and 
then negotiations may continue 'for 
a week." 

The mediato/s arran^e<l for a sec- 
ond conference Avith the railroad nmn- 
air< IS and will meet the brotherhoods' 
repn ncntatives ajjain today. 

The )iiediators Jiad their first con- 
ference with the national conference 
cimm'ttee of niilway manuffcrs Wed- 
nesday. Wm. 1,. Chambers, one of the 
mediators, said afterward that the 
r.iilroad inana^rers told the mediation 
board how t'ar they would ^o in an at- 
tempt to avoid a strike, and that the 
mana^rei s made their side of the arjfu- 
inent plain. 

The mediators, announced that ifb 
statement would be forthcoming from 
them until they either have succeeded 
or failed. 

«■ 



It is.^inderstood that the labor lead- 
ers pin their hopes of settling the 
dispute upon mediation rather than 
arbitration, now that the managers 
have failed to agree with them. They 
are opposed to arbitration. 

W. S. Carter, president of the Bro- 
therhooij of Railway Kngineers and 
Firemen, said: 

"Arbitration is a ^'ambling „'ame. 
even when the dice are not loaded. 
Railway employes have lost faith in 
the justice of arlrit ration board i. They 
believe arbitration is as fickle as 
chance. If there is arbitration of this 
eight -hour demand and every effort 
is made to appoint neutrals entirely 
free from prejudice, it is but tossing 
pennies to deci^de the (juestion. Why 
has none suggested that the matter be 
settled by 'pulling straws' and relieve 
everybody of the bother." 



SPECIAL SALE 



Still on and Prices Lower Than Ever Before. This is the Final Cut in Prices 




^^^ '^m^ ' ^ ^'^wimi^ ^MimM. 



HARTLEY & CO.'S 







Over 300 paiis of Women's Low Shoes., jrreat 
variety in styles and kinds of leather; ■■■%.') I) A 
these are on .sale at, per pair «4»4nVW 

No question but these are barj^ains. 

All our $4.50 arid $500 Pumps, Colonials in grey, 
black, champagne and white, at - ^O A A 

pel' pair <P«#«vv 

JUST TWO PRICES— $2.00 and $3.00 




ANOTHER CUT IN MEN'S OXFORDS 

, 26 pairs at $2 25 Another lot at $2 95 

$3.95 




Your choice of the $5.00 and $5.50 Oxfords; 
they must l)e sbid — at . . j 



.Here is a good bunch of Women's White Canvas But- 
ton Shoes — to close out, they ai*e mai'ked J| CA 
down to, a pair ^l»«lv 

Other equally good bargains in Boys* and Misses' 
Pumps and Oxfords. Come and carry them away. 

BATHING SLIPPERS, 50c to $1.50 



^ 





H. P. HARTL EY & CO.^^ 



u. v.:.-.^u~r/7j 




;.»i<v,,„. ■_,-■' 



..-.-^ 






$>^ 



J' 




s ' % 



BEAVER VALLBt LABOR NEWS 






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• • M i nnfUf ti m ii mnnn ^ f i n ii^ f i m i H '** 



1 I 



ROCHESTER, PA. 



Program for Next Week 



MONDAY, AUd. 14— Metro Pictures present the 
younfi:est star in motion pictures, Violet Dana, in a new won- 
\ deiplay, "THE FLOWER OF NO MAN'S LAND." 

TUESDAY, AUG. 15— Daniel Frohnian presents Poffir-v 
: Hyland in "SAINTS AND SINNERS," a pictuii/.ation of 
I H. A. Jones' celebrated drama. 

WEDNESDAY, AUti. 16— Daniel Frohman preseiit.s 
•THE INNOCENT LIE," a stirring drama of adventiaie, 
with Valentine Grant in the leading role. 

THURSDAY AND HIIDAY, AUGUST 17 18— William. 

Fox presents Ceorfje Walsh and Anna Luther in "THK 
I BE^ST," a vivid story of a bad man's reformation, depict- 
ing stirring scenes in the great North woods. 

SATURDAY, AU(;. 19— Jesse L. Lasky pre.stfiits 
Blanche Sweet in "THE THOUSAND DOLLAR HUS- 
BAND," an interesting drama by James Young. 



iiiiiii m iii i itit i i mm ii M ii 



I * 



COLONIAL THEATRE 

ROCHESTER, PA. 

SHOWING THE WORLD'S GREATEST PHOTOPLAYS. 
THE TRL\NGLE SERVICE. 



MONDAY and 11 ESDA V, AUCi. 1 1-1 :> 

Triangle Film Coipoiation presenl.^^ William S. Jliiil 
in "THF CAPTIVE COD." a photodrama of uiisurpiissect 
excellence, I'eaturinj;" well kuoun .star. 

WEI)NESI)*\Y, AUG. IH. 

U'orUI I-'ilni Coiporation pii'st-nts the captivating voiinji 
actros.s Mollie Kinji". in "FATi:'S LOOMI-'JLAXC," a story nf 
the eccentricities of late. 

THURSDAY. Al G. 17. 

E(|uital)lo Film Coijjoration presents Julia Dqhw in 
"THE RANSOM." a .stiong photoplay with an exceptionally 
stirring climax. 

FRIDAY and SATURDAY, AUG. 18-19 

Triangle Film Coi-poration presents Bessie Ixtve and 
De Wolf Hopper in "STRANDED." These intemationally 
famous ai'tists make a splendid team. \ 



At the Majestic 



J 



1 rr:, 



"Tlu I'lowtr «J No >!an'h Land" 

Vialo l»aiiu, liic >(.uii;.ri'.vt nf .screen 
slurb, will iiiakt' iu-i dt'bul at the Ma- 
jestic, .Monday, Au^rust 14th. in "The 
F'li)\vrr of .\'> Man's Land," a five- 
part .Met ro-C'oluinlnu wotidfrplay. 

The story is an i-xceptiunally 
iilronK onf>, and dt-als with the tiny 
(iiiuKhtiT of u iiutxT, who is nii.sed 
by a faithful old Imiiaii, after her 
father is luurdcn-d and rubbed by 
a Mexican hulf-bned. ."s|u- trrowB 
up into it beautiful flower of the 
..plans, w h«jn an opera siu^'i-r, wlio 
ineet.s with an accident near her 
home, comes into her liff. They 
an.' inarrioci, but lie proves un- 
worthy t)f her jun\ failliloss, and 
evenluully she r^turt\s to" the hind 
when' she has fi)UP<l that honor 
and truth are not only found in 
book.s. 



Colonial, Beaver Falls 



»•>»•• •^ »♦♦•-•♦- 



J 



"Saints and Sinners*' 

.Mkss I'cir'try HylaiKl. Ilin beautiful 
and talt>ntt'd little Kru'lii^h actn*ss, 
whose recent arrival in America to 
appear t'\clu.Kivi'l\- on the .scieen un- 
der tlu' niitiuiKcnient of the F:iinous 
Playei-s Film t'o., has created con- 
siderable news[);iper comment, makes 
I'.er debut to the American jiublic in a 
tluillinjr pi( turi/.alion of IT nry Ar- 
thur Jones" noted (lrainati<' succe.-;s, 
"Sainls an<l ."-'inners." This current 
release on the i'araiTKUiiit Trotri-am 
will b<> .shown .it the .Majestic, Tues- 
day, Au!:i..>t 1 it 1:. 



"Tie Innocoiil l.ii" 

"Th" IniuK lit l.ie," iiy l.nuis Zeli- 
ner. wa.s l;iken on the inctui-esnue is- 
land ol !Ii'inuid;i, by the i'amous 
I'l'iyeiS Co. The e\t<'rie|- scenes ■'111' 
uiiTjrpasMiiul s Ixaiitiiul and with the 
spacu»u< inteiioi ^(•tIln;^~, make an 
ehdiorale bacK'^' i'ouikI foi' this a[)peal- 
ini,'' diaiiia. v.iiich ai_>pears .at tln' .Ma- 
j.-slic. M'cdii- .-il:i\ , Au'/ust Iti. 

Mis- V'.'ilcM' .ne 'iraiii. \ In. lia.s won 
'list iml ion m s.'Viiai j»re\ luiis photo- 
ili-.i:iias . ,i[. pears a.s Nora ()'i!r:e.i, a 
p< oi- Irish las.-, wiio ha.- iiiriui' ei able 
1 ri.'ahics. 



"llie \Veakne^h of Man" 
The ;jreuler love ol man i:> [hv 
theme of this new Hwlhrook IJlinn 
\V'.,;-|d Filni feavure, wlucli will b«' 
uliow n al ( oloniul Theatre, llcavcr 
Falls, Montiay, Au;rust 14. Althou>,'h 
nut N\holly ;t happv ending motion pic- 
ture, it \t luvcniu'lesri a vi-ry ^cr.p|JinK 
and moral play. "The V\eakne.'<« of 
Man," as it is called, ntiiiids out as a 
distinct Uiinn aclin-viiiHiit m compar- 
ison to other hlms. It i.b in live partw. 



"The Wa.. oi J he NVorid" 

'1 lie next Ueo l-'eather feature u hich 
coine.s to the ( <'l.iiiia!, Itoaver Falls, 
'i'uesday, Au^:. l.>. is entitled "The 
Way of the W Orld," in five reels. The 
Ktory is hy LlyJe I'ltch. "The Way 
of the World" xnis produced by Mr. 
l.loyd ('arleton;-^ind the cast be rhe.se 
include:; llobart llosworth, Dorothy 
I)a\enpiirt, Kniory Johii.slon, (Iretch- 
en i.edered. Jack Cuni.s. ('. N'onium 
Haniiliond. Adele l;'arr:n^^toll ami Her- 
bert IJarrinjrton. 



".\ .Million a .Minute" 

"A .Million a .Minute," the sensa- 
t 1 ua! livi' part .Metro wondcrpluy, 
?i ildi'iiiK l-'raiieis X. I<ush;p..iii :iii<i 
l!e\ir'\' l{a>ne, will he siu)\\ n at tin- 
I'ol.uiial. heaver I'.ills, \\ e"hM'sil;.i> . 

.Mr. iJushmaii and .Miss !la;.ne are 
.-,ia Ktunde'l b> a ^lro^^: cast in 1 liis 
|irodu(tion, which includes 1 lohert 
< 'aiMiiiita:.-. Ib'len l)inihar, W.ili.iin 
!'.aiie\. .111(1 otbecs of note. 



GOLOINIAL THEATRE! 

REAVKH FALLS, PA. 

Prniirani For .Next Week 



MONDW, \H,. 14— W. A. iJrady and World Film Con>oration 

pre.senls Holbrook Mlinn, Kleanor \S oodi .11 and Alma Hanlon in "The 
Weakness of .Man," in live acts. A'so Mi.;r>s and Svuhl as I'okes and 
Jabe in -Mel,., Help, Help." 

Tl i:sH W AK; I.">— |{e<l Feather I'hotoplays pre.sents Hoburt 
Hoswortli and Dorthy I)avenpoi-t in "The V, a.\ (if the World," showing- 
the s!;a::is ol" societ>. A -Metro-Drew coined;, and The .Seli^r Triblme. 

MKDNFSDAY, AFC Ifi— .Metro I'k .ares pre.sents Francis X. 
i!usliiii;in and l!everl>- l!a\ne in "A .Million a Minute," Ahso a Ham 
and hud comedy "The (ireat Detective." 

Till U.SDA^. .\F(; 17 -W. A. i!ra(l\ iiul \V orld Film Corporation 
pn siiit Alice Hrad.\ in "Tangled Fates," an unusual photodramatic 
mle. Also a \"itaj?rapii comedy, "I.osin^r Wei^'ht." 

rKin.W. A I (J. IH— I{lu<'l)ird I'holopla; s presents Florence l.aw- 
reiK e m "Flusive Isabel," in si.\ acts. Al.so Helen Halme.s in "Drtv- 
inK the Last ."spike." 

S\l"l KD.W. .\l(; 19— Tom .Moore and Anna .Villsnn in "The 
<io;id ol' Jealousy." Also Francis X. Dushiiian an<l Irene Warlield in 
"The voice in the Wilderness. Helen (lilson in ".A liac«' Tb.rouK'li 
the A:r." 



v 



At the Colonial 



1 ■! , 
e' 



Ma- 



Juootlon Parkl 

Most Beautiful Picnic 
Grounds in the Valley 

SUNDAY SCHOOLS, LODGES, FRATERNAL ORDERS 

AND PRIVATE PICNIC PARTIES ARE TENDERED 

FREE USE OF THE GROUNDS. 

o o 

DANCING 

EVERY WEDNESDAY AND SATURDAY 
EVENINGS. 



-o 



Finest Dancing Pavilioi\ 

In this part of the State, outside of Pittsbur^li. A'lirious 
Small Concessions for Amusement of Patrons 

"YOU ARE ALWAYS WELCOME AT THE PARK" 

Reached from all Valley Points by way of 
BEAVER VALLEY TRACTION COMPANY LINES 



Write or Phone Me for Open Dates 

C. C. SHETTERLY 

LESSEE and MANAGER 

TELEPHONES: 

Beaver County, 1163 and 5123 

Bell, Rochester, 320; New Brighton, l.')00 



-The iJea.-,!" 
liii., M I 'til e.ist" rn mri \'. as taken 
prisoiiti- b;. a rou;^li man from the 
west, vas nur.sed by him h.ick to 
health aii'l hajipincss, and then ro- 
leaso<i t(» iio back to her parents, 
is told in William Fo.\'s latc/t screen 
play, "The Beast," which coines to 
the Majestic, Thursday and Friday, 
AuRu&t 17-iy. Anna Luther nnd 
Georjre Walsh are the stars in this 
new picture, 



"Th* Thousand Dollar Husband" 

The artfui device.s of the fake for- 
tune tellers and palmists are cleverly 
• '.vpo.sc'fl in the Jesse L. i.asky produi 
tion (if "The Tliou.s.md Dollar ilu.- 
band," in which Dlanche Sweet, the 
distin^'uishod photodramatic favor' v, 
will L»<' seen at. the "vlajestic on .^.it- 
urday, .\ufrust lIHh. As the .Swe<l:-h 
maid of all work in a colletje bo.'ird- 
inij house, she suddenly becomes 
Healthy and is cntanKietl in the t<)il.> 
of a t)an<l of palnii.sts w ho altemfit in 
bleed her of la-r newly ,ic<|uired fn; - 
tun* . Hov, she purchases a liusban<l 
t«) Kavc him from ruin, and how l.c 
frees lier from the snares of ti. 
crooks troes to make up ;i story jrrip- 
pin>r in its situations and unusual ii: 
its tlicnies. 



AdA-crtisc in the Labor News. 



^ru^iM r?^ 




'^Onyx" ^ Hosiery 

To» G«t GOOD Valve at ANY Prlc«-Silk( Li»le or Ci»tton 

2Sc to $i.M per pur , 

Emery "Been Company, btx 

WMOLKSALK lU-Mt gASTB4tk ST. MKWTOIUC 



m 
u 
u 

u 

i 

■ 

■ 

u 



Advertise in the Labor News 




IJoiDg busincM vitlt' 
out •dTcrtiung ia tUi 
paper ia like trjriag ta 
uolock jrour bars doof 
with yoar wife "i hatpin 

You'»« jot the Mffoaj 
key. 

Adver^OBgiitiie kny 
to the horn of plect/. 

We wiM to putjrou 
at tlte biQ ead ol dw 
kora. 

Our ad rale* fit 
your pune. 

Our pubEcity bring! 
the money t« your (ioor. 



"Tanu'led fates 

Tl.e L;re;;; sa. r ':ee ;i .s 
■ (> II, ol e' t i:er sister''-' 

ev. u thouj^li il na.. eiiise !icr tn be 
lian .h.efl rrom tl'.r Ihmi.i' and hearth 
' 'k '. i,.lii-i' • • lii'jeh h> I'llie, :il\'. a_\s 
..lak' : .111 .pieresl .II'.' I;lm diaiiKi. l!ut 
^r. ;iie h..iiid ) o!' .Xhcr hiaii^. •.'. i.o 
I' lys I !.e I'liii' III 'he s;icr;li('n;- -.is- 
le;-, li.i: |i.i>tora' ■iraiiia i.- n'er. I '^aii 

:; tiiel e ; , ■ ,(>: e j'l . \ . ll i. at oiii <' a 
r.),.M' I ;■.' ,i/'i:Stie ;i"d lii'aiM.i' <' ill- 
' • I pri't;.' ii : id" a ih.i 'Mii rol-' (r,:iMii 
r .'!> .■:!.' •.'r.-K'.liiM;. |i«prlia>''l la all 

.!^ nio"|i' l!.- el li;: pill iie.^.., .iihI .'<i|- 

'•.e,;. 'Ihi,. p:;-U;r.' \\ !' !>•■ : Im ri at 
• ■■ ( '..] ei.al, i:.-.tv.'i I ih' , 'I !i-ir.-<la\, 
.■■'..il^'U.U ITt*'. 



.Melhe K;nu. Hie attr:,. ';\'' ^.nv-.\e 
st.ir ef t'i. Wo'-l.i I'lhii ( 'dip"" .iti"i!, 
','iil he se<ii .It tln' ('lonial '1 '.(:;■ re, 
.l< r maltes i:,,,''-.- t, i'. \\ > In. ■ i:i\ . .-Vima.'', LMh, 
'"••'1 n-.me I,,.,, •■l'..<, '. il.K.i.i.iaiu'," ^' iH be the 

e.llule ~i,(),' 11. The .-li>I\ 1.- both iu- 

erestiiu' ai.'i p:i'''<ti' . • (Iimil'i'. an 




' I'lllive i-.ll)»l" I 

Floreiici L.i ■. fence letnrii- to tlie 
.-rrccn in "Klasive I~ihel." the |>lue- 
hird ]Miot<.|)l:\ to be e\!;ibit«(l at the ,- 

i.,'«/lonial, reaver I'';iIIs, Kriday, Aur. Cii^ineer, rece ves larvr<' contr:uts for 
i".»t!i. This v.ill be an cxtreniol}- sen- ' railroad building' in the v.e.st. His 
iational protluclion, filled with excite- wife, Mildred, fond of society, hesi- 
irciil ami tlinlls. The story dLscloaes ^ tutes to j;o with hitn, and remains at 

■■ home, h<' froin^ alone. One day while 

alone, dreaniitijr of the folks ho left 
in th(^ r>;ist, Little Zell, bom and bred 




♦ I 11 the wilderness, afijiears before hiiki. 
' ' '■ ' never h<'f<iri- seen the won- 
iii'dtin iiiaeliitiery .■nil with 
■.rr i^^randl ailier arc daiht vi.-ilors tt> 
' ,.(• e. oik. • ■ 

()ii" ii.iN Kile letiirii ii.r heme, tliii 
.'.■■> ' lean '".1 do 'Ail and injure.l hiiii- 
- I.'. ..u>l (I.e.. .. f.'A <!.i\.- !.i'.e;t, (ieortre 
:ii;d his ( V'-w hiir\ Mi'.' him. 

.After th<' death of her ^M'andfather, 
/ell .-nuuht the company of (leorj;'' 
r.'.re and moi"'. iiiit'l the latter could 
leirdi.. r.'-tr:i:n 1;^ pas---M>.i.'. : • h.\-i. for 
her, V. I ii-ii was i^mwiiuj with day.s 
\l uii !r:a'ie .\| , 'hired '.-^ ab-;ence such .a 
.•.tv.iMi upon h'ni. .Months later, 

.-'IMII'.'e ihini^s :!<■ I ,;pp..nin;,' Ml th<' 
L'.ti' 1 :.'.aiii ;.u' and .ilso .11 l!i«* 

hi'.iil'.l f'll h 'le lII llie Cl!>. /.ell, tllf 

IiM'"- nir.!':, r <>'' th'' liiMs. ^s now a 
(■••al iitlle 1: miirr and < leoi^*' 's betid- 

iIU' o\eI '11 r iK.iklll'..; ;il tileh IH'V:- 

hiia b.ilM ..:lii tiue Uive and happi 
lie- . Ill (he CI'. .Mildred has ni<"'t 
.M:irL';in, a (hrtalious societN man. who 
.. pn .v.-.m^ her ti hrin^' divorci' pro- 
■ ediu'-'s a-rainst (ieorjre. 

'i"lie\ both leave t«) K'atlaT evident- 
ivainst him, but after leavinir tTi" l>- 
pot ill th«' little villaKf prepnr.itory to 
takiiit: a hint: journe>- in a coach to 
lh!^pla<(- where (ieor;^e was directinjf 
his crew, the coach overturne<l, kill- 
ing both occupantji and llie driver, 
leaving CleortfP free to marry the [itUe 
mother of the hills and pive a name 
to their babe. 



FLOREMCe LAWRefNCE 



an inlricue ;iniont,' foreiirn diplomats 
tn vioi.i'e the neutr:ilit\ e'" the l.'nited 
.States. IkU in their prin-. lhe\ f.ailed 
to reckon with ju.st one Yankife — 
ar d lie ix.its them a'l at their own 
^^ame. 



.Subscrilje for The Labor N«n\ .■-•. 




( oinniul 'riu.itrc, \\ edni>(Ia> . .\u«ust 16(h. 



(Oaprrlctu. laOB. by w. a. O.. 



l^' 



fu0 

Find the Man 

Brery man andiroouui iiAnxloaft 
la tray aome article — nufliwUj or 
lazory — eTory day of hia or her Ufa. 

fiinfle handed it would tako yo« 
OMtttht Co aeek oat thoae interoatad 
ta ronr line of bvaiaeaa. 

la adrertiaaiiieat ia thJa paper 
Ao«a the work iaaftiataaeoaaly. 

It corrala the porchaMr — hrtefi 
hha te year atore makaa hiia taiy 
tklafB yea a dufti wd. 



Mmrw.a.uj 



3E 



31; 



3(=IE]D[=]C 



3E 



3E 



SALE OF BRASS BEDS 

Owin;; to the inpid advanct' in prices all I5ra.s.s (IikkI.s h;ivc advanced Hfly por cent 
in Ihc la.sf .-^.jx n^ontlts. i)iit wc aic able to offvv you bed.s at fhe old pri\cs. subject to a 
liljt'ial CD* in pi ices. Come in and sec om line. 



Read These Prices 

llejriiiar .S2H.50 Hra.s.s Bed. at .«22..")() 

Iiok'ii!ai- >'M)m l'>ras.'^ P.cd, at S2;{..')0 

Kckailni- ^?.2S->0 Hra.^s n<}(], at .S2 1.7.') 

Kcjriilar s:'..->.00 liias.s Hod, at 827.:)0 

lir^ailai- >"M M) H\ii<^ I5od. at. .* $2*l:)(I 

KcRtilar S;-l().(»0 liia.-.^ lied, at S.'n.-'iO 

KoRiiiar $42.50 Bra.^.'; Bed, at $;{:i.7.') 

Regular $r>().0() Bra.s.>i Bed, at .S:i9.:)0 



Extra Special 



A special Bias.s Bed, 2 inch continuou.*^ 
post, 10 1-inch fillers, in any fini.sh, fidly 
jfuaraiiteed. Thi.s l>€d is ^17 CA 

woith $25.00. Special at ** * ••'" 



Mattress Special 

.An all felt "jO-poiuid roll edg-c niiittress. 
CK an and .-anitary. not a .stufFed d^Q CC 
cotton. Chuice of ticks *^U*%tO 

S«'e oil! other Mattresses at $3..")0. 
ii.l.OO, .S6.00 S7.r,f) to .S25.00. 

We are atrent.s for the famous 

Way Sagless Spring 

Cliiaianteed for 25 years never to sagr or 
break. Will last a lifetime. dJO CA 

For wood or brass l>eds at vO»vlf 

Oth^r Springs from $2.50 up. 



PAFF FURNITURE-CARPET GO. 



Be 



1300-02 Seventh Avenue, 

w 



]E 



]I=iaD(=E 



BEAVER FALLS, PA. 
■ ' 







.-*'» ■ 



^t*: 



»'*♦**». 



^'>>k^'- 



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>--.-•• ^ -» 1^., 
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ipiiP^^^lpv^i|Pip|. ^ M m ^ '••Jifin, 



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H*r « ^j«»''^W--'-w-- ' 




BEAVER VALLEY LABOR NEWS 






*■■ 




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■' ■?, 



'1. 



M 



WESItBH CANItDII 



Co-Operative Creameries Show 

Tremendous Increase in 

Butter Production. 

The IMlry Ooiumlsslooer. at flnt ao- 
aual (XiUTeutlou of Sajikutcbewua 
Dairy mi'u'H aaaociatloo, reviewed pro- 
Cresu of 1U15 which showii a great ia- 
creaae la the butter productlua of the 
ro-operallTe creamerlea aiuouotlag to 
1,9U<J.<NA) IbH. He also Huld the im- 
proveuieul la guullty la shown by the 
preferf'iK-e accorded Sazikutchewan 
Matter tii outMlde marketa. Bhlptuenta 
•ut of the proTluce for the year to- 
taled 52 carloads. 

According to bulletin Just lasutMl by 
the Maiiltuba department of agricul- 
ture, the dairy Itiduntry had a very 
■ucci'ssful year In M>ir>. There was an 
lnci.:is.' of over l.lHX).t)<» lbs. of crtMiili- 
ery liutttT producotl, h« a^ilnst the 
previou-; ><'ar. alxtut L'tVO.^XK) lb-*. In- 
crca.s<- In dairy bullcr and over 'jr».(X>0 i 
0)8. Increase Id the cheese output. The 
lncr<>nsi' of the total value of mH'i nn<l ' 
UJJlk produ.:ls was over !>l-7.iK)<), Tli« J 
pr<9du< tlori of dairy butter for .Maul- ' 
loba il'irln;,' the year was 4.1"0. \V\ il)«\ 
und If broiii;lit an averaije prlre of 2^» 
per lt» : of creaiiuTV butter r>,S.W,Gt57 
lbs. \\ iTt' i)ro(lU''ed \\bl''li corniuiiniied 
ir.)c piT 111. on tbe averaj;e; iliei>se jiro- 
duftjuii was T'-'H.T'J.") lbs. wlii.h s.il 1 at 
Hu av<'i:w;>' prji-e of I.'m-— ihe total 

value nf Illise (lir.'C prodll.-ts 1^ KtV(^n 

as 5-.7t'><>.')".»S, In addition to win h tlio 
inl!^ iircidu.-.-d l.s valued at $'. •'_'.■.(;.".:( 
■ nd I 111' iTenra at $1.'>"<,*<'_'7. tbe av(-rii;:tt 
pri<-'' i>f iln> milk b.'Ini; re.k-ined aC 
2.1 <• p<T II.. and of sweet <T.'ani at P.'Jc 
per lb butter fat. In ronne(t|.):i wltb 
(he dairy Itidusiry It Is interesiirii; t' 
(lotf that almost tlii* most linpor'ant i 
fiMlder 'Top now Is corn. i>f wbl'di tlm 
I9ir> production ain.>uut.Ml to 11>I.1.'{1 
lon.M. Tbe biKKcxt cultivatecl fodder 
rrop l.s ttiMotby wbieh for last season ' 
produced ll>.'?,;i'»7 tons and the next 
most popular crop was bronie trasi \ 
ivlth -irLSlo ton.s; of alfalfa and clover ; 
ther.' were produced some 3S.»HX) ton* 
The number of cattle In tb(» province 
I« jr'veti as C'U.OO."), which H tin In- 
rrea.so of*13U.lKX) over the previous 
yenr. 

The fact that the Re<l Deer. Alberto, 
rheese factory Ih handliu); four times 
%» much milk thl.i season as In<tt win- 
ter sbowH the growing Improvemeut in 
the dairy Industry. On Feb. 14, It was 
announced the factory hod Ju.st 
ahlpped two tons of clieese for Caljfarj 
market. 

t'ardHton. Alberta, creamery In 1913 
paid Itn patrons a rate of 27>4c i>er 
tb. for butter fat and had a profit re- 
cnalulng over all expenses of fS.584. 
The creamery during Maaon dlstrlb- 
«rted anHmK fannert $01,11 T and uiana- 
Clac^ured 206,000 lbs. butter and 13.000 
tbfl. cheese. Average price reallrttl fpr 
butter was 28Vi cents. ^ 

Tt)e development of the dairy Indus- 
try of Northern Alberta Is well Indl 
cated by the growth of a prominent 
dairy buHlueMs here, which In 1915 pro- 
duced 2,525.000 lbs. butter, an Increase 
•f 400.000 lbs. over the previous year. 
This product has found a market in nil 
partM of (^anaila and this year will pq- 
ter the export trade. Adv.>rll.sempnL 



VOTE FOR STRIKE 
HEMLI 




Four Railroad Brotherhoods Ail 

Over Country Declare for 

a Walkout. 



GOVERNMENT IS VVORRIED 



Interruption of Railway Traffic for 
Even One Day Would Demoral- 
ize Bualaeai — Federal Media- 
tion Board to Await Oo- 
velopmenta. 



URGES $840 MINIMUM WA(ik 



The •strike vote" of the four trulia 
service tirotberhooiL* re«ultt}il ov«r- 
wbelmlntjly In favor of u atrtke. 

Colnt-ldenlal advli-e.s froiu all H«e- 
tlon.s of the country justify tlu' fore- 
cast that from b«-u\ ••en INi uml SI'S per 
tent <tr' llie brolherliocii' nicniLfrsliiti 
v<»ic<l ui fn\or oi a nlltion■v^lJ»• sirlk*' 
MlIe<■IiIl^; prurtlfully every riillroati lu 



New Yorfc-^lty Buraau of Standardi 
J Recommenda Thia for Ail 
Miinicipal Emplo/aaa. 

r~ ■ 

The New York citjr bureau of aiaud 
urclu recouiiueuda m mlolmum wa^f 
standard of $840 par year for all luu 
aid pal empluy«>«s. Thla is 97*^ a 
uuntik, or $10 and a fractlou a «e«k. 
rtke bureau says that any city em- 
l>lOya« whu haa a wife and at least 
ttiroa childr«u to aupport caonot ke*^ii 
b«Mly aad aoul together unless he re- 
ceives weg«s totaiilns this amount 
The biggest items are 20 per cent for 
hauling. 1380 for food and $104 for 
clothing. 

George L. Tirrell, director of the bu- 
reau, which Is ono of the working 
bodlee of the board of eatlmate. make* 
tills unuuuiAcenieut to the parent body 
und explitlna how he arrived at hla tlg- 
ure. During an Investigation covering 
a year, In the courtie uf which he wui 
uBMWtu^ by the bureau uf municipal 
reHi'urch, Tirrell .saya he cuusulte<l tbe 
work of expertJj here and In IsJuroiR' 
and olttnlnt^d family budKL'tsi prepari'<l 
by eiiiployccs of the city. 

A<'cor(lln|( to a report by the bur«:iu 
of Ijibnr .sintl.stics, tbe iiv»*ra^;e rnt • of 
vvntff.s piilil 111 tbe prltnipal trade- In 



Hi.- ( iiiie<l .Stut.-s :iMil I'.iipni.viiiiuti'ly ' •*" "f 'be lejidliiK .XuL^rkan cities was 



-l."jy,<^K» (•nipluye«».s. 

in ibe .Si. l.ouls (U."<trkt ili 
■ iiiiii^;*' will prohiiM; .•xccimI tl>l 
mute. (Hi r.iliible aulborltv It I 
milled iliiit I'risi'i) (•iiij)li>.M»'.>< 

!ir«-ri pr;iet|rull\ UIlJlUlUlollS 



pcr- 

, .'.Stl- 
. .•Htl- 

liiiv e 
111 llie 



.Niiu'ly- 



FOR SEASIDE WEAR 



PARISIAN DltlQN THAT 18 BEAU- 
TIFUL IN EFFICT. 



or Ivory WhIU Jersey Cloth, With 

Kmbroldsrias of Soft White Silic 

—Coat Will ■• a Favorite for 

the Winter. 



Uy ak«tch shows one of lledfem'i 
Dflw models for seaside wear, wrltea 
Idalla dtt VilUers. Paris correspond- 
act of the Uostua Globe, lu this casa 
a beautiful ijuallty uf Ivury white Je^ 
8«y cloth was uaed aad the embrold- 
eriea ware worked eatlreiy in soft 
white aiika. Th« smart coat, which 
molded the flinn***. ^a* flulshed off with 
a larice white linen collar and cuffs to 
match. 

Thia was a really exquisite suit. la 
tliti best of taatu, In uccurdaoce with 
the traditions of thu MbIhou Kedfera 
ami very- new lu outline. These shaped 
coats will be much worn all through 
tbe winter. They are tight, without 
btdiiK too lijcbt. und the bnsque Is j;iv- 
en a di.rjtinct Hare at the hem. lled- 



Revenge. 
"I've been callltii; ibl.s number fof 
Ave minutes," said tbe Irate .sub.sorlb 
«r. 

•"Wbiit iiiiinber?" 

"I'm »;o Irritated I'm jiltnost tempted 
not to satisfy your femlnltie <-urloslty." 



THE FINEST KIDNEY REMEDY! 
IN THE COUNTRY > 

I hare l>e^n handling I)r Kilrufr'tl 
Swamp Hfx'it for two yrart and ovrr «ndj 
my cuKtomcr* are alwityi« utiatied with I 
tbe rtritulta nbtainrtl from it« u»e. I know 
of a ca»« of Liver trouble where Swamp- 
Root proved very benelicial. I Iv^lievj ' 
it i« one of tlifl t.nest kidney remeJiet la 
ibe country. 

Very trulv voure, 

H.I{. BROWN, 

Drugei**. 
Pinna«;lo, N C. 

"Kovember l?th. 1915. 
frave What Swamp-Root Will Do For Yoi 

8en>l ten cente to I>r. Kilmer h. Co., 
Bingbamton, N. Y., for a eaniple tizfl bot- 
tle. It will convince anyone You will 
aiao receive a booklet of valuable infer 
Bstion, telling alout the kidnrr* and blad- 
der, ' \Vbrn wntina. I>e lure and ntentioB 
thia pai»er. Ueralar fifty-cent and one- 
dollar eize iKjttlet lor tala at all dru| 
atorea.— Adv. 



The Situation. 

"Fhibdub married a «oclpfy butter 

fly." ".' 

"I xiippo.se ho l.s wining and dlnlnf 

afl the time now." 

"WbinhiK and dining. He doesn't 

lilie going our." 



Nothing Relievea Tender, Aching Feel 
like a hot foot buth with Johnson's Foot 
Soap. Coiupoaed of Borax, Ilran and 
Iod.ine. At Druggiats or sent postpaid 
fdr 25c by Thoa. 0111 Soap Co.. 711 
Kent Ave., Brooklyn. N. Y. Adr. 



■ n-^ilii^ of the .strike ballot. 
HUM' [MT «'ellt of tbe luell iir< 
biive \uifd for ilu- "walk mit." 

Tile vote on iln' Missouri, KtiiiMis A 
'I'lMis i.s said to liave fallen ii little 
hliori ol ilial ou tbe I'riM-o, the piT- 
r.'iiiii>:e ill lavor of a sirlk<- beiiiK e.tLi- 
iiiuted lit '.IS. The strike |)cC(»'i»tii)-;i' 
Mil ilu- .Missouri I'aclllc was i-stluiali»d 
111 aiipin.xiiiiutely i>7. 

.Neiilier liroili.-ibooil nor railway of- 
llclui.s uoubl disciivs tbe mutter f«Jr 
|piililii-iitlon. Lenders uf tin* i'm|)b>yi'i»s, 
liowevrr. iiiedicted thut lilt' luluilnti* m 
iif 111.' vote to he made lu New \\)vV 
w.»uld sliow that from !>«3 ti» l»S |>vr 
cetil of tbe iiu'U bad votfd for llu' 
strike. Hallways ottlciuls ndiiiittvd 
tliat tlieir b<->i iiii'oriiiiitioii iiidi«'iit«'d 
thai tbe in'reenin^e would !>«_• "MOliie- 
\\ber«! In tbe iiliietlos." 

Worry is be.'.iiiiinK manifest In gov- 
ernment circles (»v»'r the p»(.sslt)llktj' 
of st-rious railwiiy illltlcultk'S lu Llm 
ut'ar future. 

Wu.sluiiK'ton lia.s lunn iiiaiii' uwiare 
that tbe interruption of ruiivviiy trulUc 
for a sini^le day would totally deiiis»r- 
allze for the ttmi> bt'ltiK' all liuMlD»*eii 
In the country and iiilglic be of gruvw 
euibHrniKKtuent to the guwrnnietit 

luublUty to move troop traini in 
caae of grave emergeucy Is vuly one 
of 'i*!ie iwsslble results. The vcoooailc 
paralysis to all lines of bualness Is 
autfldent to cnune iilufui, wltliout con- 
juring an additional Mexlcuu wur 
bojcy. ^gj- 

The Rovernnient l.s nwuro^ the dan- 
gers ahead, but Is uiiMble tu do a ny- 
tiiluK about It. 

Tbe ultltiiatum of the brotlierlioods 
will be jireseiited to the eniideyi'rs. If 
It is denied, the sltunlloii n'iu'hi'?< a 
point where tbe >{i>veriiriii'iit run for 
tbe lirsi time luuke its Icciil iipiik'nr- 
unco. 

Tbe board of mediation and rdiicll- 
liition created tlire," yeurs iign. Muiy 
proffer Its servieos 'Ma any <*nse win-re 
an interrui>iion of trallU- l.s linnilnt'Ut 
nnd fniUKbt with serious detriuH'ii t lo 
ibe publle iiitere<t." 

After the liiii>!isse has hecii reiidicd 
procedure reiiiilrt's that f hfl l)onri|v\uii 
until eiieli side li;\s im <»])|>ortuiilt> to 
request tbe boards iis-^l.tt aiici- ii s a 
mediator. If ii> such request loiiies 
tbe boanl is mil luiri/.ed to jirofTi'r Its 
servic.'s. Tin- firs! •^t.-j) is \\ lib nii-din- 
tioti and i-'Mii'ilia iIdu. If this fulls tlu' 
♦ •luployers and finiiloyecs ;ire :i ski-d to 
submit tlieir dllT'-ri'iices tn iirbi tin tion. 

.\ III. 'lit fiiiiiliio bM- irrt^iii.T St. Isolds 
WHS ibreateiuvl wIhmi eiiyiloyi'es (if |b«' 
blK luiekiiin plants in Mast St. I ,<illl.s 
wettt out on strike. II.e|>r«'<eiUiitlve!S 
ef the sirik.'r>; maintained tluit -l.;U»0 
workmen si^jned as inenihers of « new- 
ly <>ri;nnl7.ed miloii at ttie iinvtiiiic iitnl 
that all i-midoyt'es will >i!rike. la elud- 
ing butebers, meat cutters, lli'l JXT."*. 

women, nnd foreitrn iiihorers. a aless 
tilt' union 1< ree. .u"ii7.»'(l. Tbf uiilnn al- 
so asks for an ■"elijht In mr diiy." 

Ollii'lal iiotlre was receiVt'd nt 
Sharon. I'li.. of a further iidvaa<'e In 
tbt' wav;es of toniiak'e no'ii eniiiloyed 
by the America h Sheet niul Tin I'lute 
company. Tlo* company iidvsiiiced 
wages In February ami imaln In Jlay, 
Tbe latest Increase will aiiiouiit to 
nbont S per cent, niakltix n tntjil In- 
crease for tbe year ll* imt cent. 

For the first tltue luen to work on 



bl»;ber on .May I, llU.'i. tlian lu the 
previous year. The following; Increa.snj 
In weekly rates of pay between M.iy 
I'.MI. and May HU,'.. are luiled : r.ak.rs, 
1 |n-r oi-iit ; l»e»-r bottlers. .'? per cent; 
(Mrpeiitei.-, 1 per <'ent ; bodcarrlers. 1 
l>er <i'nt : inside u ireiiieii, 1 p»'r cent ; 
said I u I P'o'i'li'Ts mill jriislltters, 1 per cent; 
sliiti' nnd tile ii'oftr.s, 4 per cent; 
Ktcanitltters, 'J per cent; palnt<T8 
(Imrdwoixi fiiil.xluTs). -I per cent; eli<- 
tnitypers, (bfitterv men and builders), 
.'I |n'r ffiii ; elec-tmrypers (Hulsbers ni:d 
inoblers), '1 per cent ; compositors 
(book mill Job). 1 per cent. In rati*8 
of waKcH per hour, as dlHtlngulabed 
frijiii rates jiur we«'k, 47 trades showed 
iin increuMe, 41 no chiiiige. und for 
iietu' wns the rnte lower. 

All iMTMons enKaK«*«J In bazardouii 
eiuployuient by tbe state, any county, 
town, or v-lllage. In NVw York, must bt 
lnHure<l by it under tbe amended work 
men's compensation law In the suuif 
manner a-s private employers are now 
Cduipelled to do. In un oiilnlon by 
Kcbert K. Woodbury, attorney general. 
It Is held that by Chapter OTJ, laws of 
lilKI, tbe coinpen.sntbui law ih so 
bruaden«><l an to make it cover the em 
ployees eimnifed in dauKcrous occupa 
tloiis. Heretofore the policy puraued 
by tbe state and Ita various inuxdd- 
palltles (lid not cull for such Inanr 
mice. Tills polit-y was grounded on 
the belief thut since the state and \^> 
niunlclpulitlee were not engaged in 
bunlneaa for pecuniary gain, their em- 
ployees did uot coooe wlthlu iii«r>pfjj^ 
vlaloua of the compensation law. 

The Brotherhood of I'alnteni, Deco- 
rators nnd Pai>erhanger8 of America 
uas ord(>re<l, ns h rexult of a unanimous 
ileelslon of the Justices of the appel- 
late division of tbe New York supreme 
court, to reln.state Meyer Solomon, dia 
chnrKi'il from t!ie liK-al union four 
yenrs ajfo, und to pay \\m $875 dam- 
ii>:«'s. 

An ofllclal statement shows thai 
since the comineneenuMit of the yeai 
over "(• trade nioveiuents In connectloD 
with the .Vinalcamated Society of <'ar- 
jienliTs and .lolner.s have been settle*! 
In tl^t^'Hrlllsb isles. .Vdvnnces ninmn] 
freiii one-half p^-miy to twopence pel 
hour. 

It Is the deltrrninntlon of tbe olfieert 
of tbe .ViiU'rifiin I'ederntion »)f bahoi 
to streajctbcn the labor niovt-ment by, 
v\bere\er pixslUie. briuKltij; about ar 
atnal^'iiiiinllon of two or more Interna 
llen.'il utiioii'' wliosi" interests are close- 
ly allied. 

Kvniisville (bid.) C'eiitral Laboi 
union has aiipolnied a eoiiiinlttee tc 
Investk'.'ite elaiins that children im<let 
jaire are eiiiidoyi'd lu that city and llial 
certain stores refuse to [lermlt tbeli 
I \v oiiinn cl«'rUs to sit d">w n w ben nol 
husy. as the law provide^.. 

I'.nrtiMob'rs" iiniioi of San Francisco 
In coiiJutictiiMi with the C'alifornii' 
Trade liilon I .ibert.v lencne. Is con 
dnctlni; an imtrt-ssive eanipalgii uK'alnsI 
the proposfd constitutional nmend 
inents to vote California "dry" at tht 
electlou lu Noveiubor. 

.•\ stMte wide cauipnimi for the estnb 
lisbnu'iit of siii'»'ty cniiiinlttees in ab 
tl/e industries and In every Inbor orga 
nlzntieii of tbe stjitels betnt conductisl 
by tbe industrial board of tbe depart 
tnenr'V»f labor aitd Industry of I'enn 
sylvaiiia. 

.\ peace parade on Labor day. with 
all tbe wane earners and their frlend.- 
in Snii Francisco uniting In a lulKbty 
deinonstrntlon iicalnst prepare<luess 
militarism and war, Is suKjjested. 

The ('(»oks' union of Snu Frnnclsco 
by ptipulnr vote, has Redded to Join 




the new prison at .Toliet, 111., nrf IndnKl with tba Walters' union in a demiiDG 






F^og Catchera Bifty. 
It soema that tbe borne s|(b> of thf 
frog-catchIng Industry Is liNikint; up 
l»eoanse there are disadvantngex tt 
people hunting for frogn on partn ot 
Fi*nn«4' that are battlefields. A hand 
fai of men, whoQe fathero wore in th< 
buHln4>Rs before them, work froR crotch 
lllS4n ICppiag forest with Seven DIalf 
MS l(aMi>. nnd It Ii one of thu moat tilgh 
Ijr spaclaiis^ industries In London 
Wldi frog catchlog. snail catchlux t> 
iilllfld; the frogs go to some reatau 
tMilS'Mid to the anatomlcAl laborato 
rt«a of the hospitals, and the snails an 
ditafly bought as claaneni of subarbai 
dMBMUc a^aarlama. The snail that b 
.la 8alw oouM* from th« vine 
«C VraiMC^— Lottdoa Ohrodlcls. 



'kA -. ^-. 



selected from the rank und rtb> of th*" 
Inmates. The stipply of '"liotior" men 
Is cxbatist«Hl nnd KM) uddl tloniil work- 
ers are needed for liarveslinn of the 
crop on the "honor farm" iiml ll»ec(»n- 
stnictluK of the new iirlsoii. 

Thirty women emiiUiyed hy the la- 
linKbin (Knubind) l>orf)U|Cb council 
hav** usked that thfy. lll<i> tlk? uieu, 
shall have a wnr boniix. 

On September 3-10 at Mlnti(*«i)ollii, ' 
Minn., the Internntional AllUnce of 
Bill Jj'osiers nnd Killers of A^iiit^rlca 
will wnvene. 

Nine women are now t>elng cuaployed 
aa engine drivers and drcineii hf the 
Loiiflon (Fnglnnd) Ilydruullc coiupany. 

Stirling (Scotland) towu couiaril has 
approv«Mi of a scheme for the e^r«?tioo 
of minen' cottages at Canibusk^uueth. 

Of 200,000 govemmeot drll •m- 
ployees it Is claimed that leas tban 20O 
receive fl.OOO a year. 

Vancouver, B. C. Is rapladoB young 
nen In Ita streot-cleanlnf dapmrtoMnt 
by oldc£jDac% 



for aa elKbl hour day. The cooks ar« 
now \v-orkin>; ten hours per day. 

tmieials of the Hoi»t an.l Shoe Work 
ors' jliiteniHtional union report thut U»« 
slipper trade of the United States uiK 
Canada Is noV thoroughly orgnnlxed 

Industrinl accidents In Fennsylvanls 
during tbe first six iimnths of this yeiii 
resulted In the kllllhg of 1).'>4 worken 
and in the Injuring of m),2ST others. 

Sir \V1 Ilium James Thomas. th< 
Welsh colliery owner, has given fSUO. 
000 townnl the «'Stabllshnient of i 
Welsh school of medicine. 

Plans to build worklugmen's c«t 
tagea, to be rented and S4)ld withou: 
pi-oflt. were Indorsed by the Kunsat 
City board of welfare. 

Lancashire (Elnglan^ji) cotton opera 
ton almost aolldiy voted in favor of i 
strike if an advance of 10 per cent Id 
wages Is not granted. 

A very large proportion of tbe won 
en at work In this country contrlbah 
a substantUl part o< their •aralnfi tc 
(anilljr •ttPQ<^_^ 



Redfern Cost and Skirt of Ivory White 
Jersey CloV^, Embroidered With 
White Sillta. 

fern Is lua Icing coats of this order io 
fine serge and in pale-hued linens, and 
always with tbe greatest success. 

Redfern, like all our other really 
good tailors. Is makiog a number of 
plaited ikirts — accordion plaits, box 
plaits, kl>te<l plaita. Indeed, the plait 
ed skirt I* now an established favor- 
ite. It will certainly play a leading 
role III the world kit dress all through 
the winter, 

The rniigiennes are asking for 
vIjI^i' cosimnes, and white costuiues 
only. Very brilliant colors are being 
shown by nil tl»t> leading dressmakers 
;ind tnliors, but these are for tbe for- 
elLMi niiirkets. The really exclusive 
I'arl.slennes wear only black, navy bl'Ue, 
nhilc or >rray. 

-And tills Is onsily tin<lerstfH>d. 

I r;iiire is in niourninif for ber brave 

-MMs. Someone Is iiiissinj; In aim jst 

I N cry home. How then can one ex- 

■ ct the I'lirisicnnes to appear In g'ay 

olors? 

Hut even for the foroiiin mnrkots nn 

i.iiH-use nuiiiber of white costumes 

-". l>"liiK made this year. .-VnioiiK 

.••>-i- white Jersey cioth.'^^bile linen 

.Md ivory white crepe de ehino take 

1 lie load. 

l.ar;,'!' black tnfTetn lints .-iro taking 
ih" I'lisition which was ludd by Mack 
v.h'-t iii<-tiiro bats last autumn. Tnf- 
r'citi bats |o<-»k -ipeeliilly well wben 
*' ini with :i i>eiit litieii costmne — and 
• t I'' certainly true that taffeta is more 



foltabltt tluiu velvet for the but dajs 
uf Auguat. Uut this latter fact has 
nothiug tu do with the popularity of 
tbe taffeta hst. 

Women of fashion have long ago 
thrust aside the Idea of wearing sum- 
nier thioga lu summer aud winter 
things in winter. Mever I think were 
expensive furs more in oTldence than 
at tUii moment — at midsummer. BSr- 
naine. lahle. chinchilla and skunk— all 
thsta fun are now worn in tbe guise 
of long straight ties, or cape collars of 
conalderikble slse. White fox is anoth- 
er faTorlte aummer fur. 



CROCHET RUGS ARE PRETTY 



Just tlie Amount of Material That Is 
Rsqulrad to Make a SO by 40- 
Inch Oval. 

Tbe pretty oval braided Japanese 
rugs seen everywhere now suggrtted 
to an lagenious girl tbe Idea of using 
up the odda and ends of rags In tbe 
bouse and crocheting them together 
luatead of braiding them. While it 
may not api»eul to one us a summer 
fancy work, still It's a good time to get 
ouu's Htrlps together in bulls and plan 
for loaK winter evedlngs. 

Tij luuke u ruK 30 by 40 Inches oval 
retjiilres .'14 yards o^nuiterlal 3G Inches 
wide. It Is much prettier to choose 
two (llfTerent cidors, while and another 
soiitl color or 17 yards t>f white and 
tbe rest dlvlde<| anioiiK' two or three 
barriionlziiiK sbades. It must, how- 
ever, always be remembered that In 
ruK dcslKUinn, like lioiupiet maklni: or 
<|iiilt iiutchiru;. ciTtain rules are Infal- 
lible. There must be a distinct touch 
'>f ilark, black or very dark tiluo or 
brown. Yellow and ureen set olT all 
other colors ami the iirettlest ru^'s are 
divided equally between white and au- 
olluT cohu- or group of colors. 

To make a white and blue-striped 
ruK. for exaniple. tear IT-yani strips 
of white cbeesecbitb and blue calico 
into oite-luch widths. 

H.'jjln wltb a chain eight Inches 
louK. crocheted with a heavy wooden 
cnx'het netHlle costing 10 cents or 
one iif limber which costs lo cent.s. 
Turn und put In eight stitches nt tbe 
eiiikv. Itepeat at tbe other end after 
crocheting bfft'k tbe eight Inches of 
chain. Add eight stitches nt the ends 
with every <»ther row nnd this will 
form tbe oval. When the first plec^ 
of 17 yards of white Is consumed, b€^- 
gln with the blue strip nnd alternate 
the two colors until all the strips are 
llalshe<|. This produces a graduated 
stripe rug. 

A clrl who has three brothers nnd 
a ifreot many brothers' friend.s has 
niadu a rug of neckties, cut Into Inch 
strips and sewn together In hanuonlz- 
Ing combinatious. This rug Is very 
beautiful and. being of silk, is quite 
valuable. The really loveliest and 
moat durable ones of all ai« made of 
woolen materials, but if one buys out- 
right for them It makes it more expen- 
sive and it takes a good while to ac- 
cumulate Just the right colors here 
aud tliere. 



HosnNrsiniDv 
jyswirfi 

Stoppdl M«Ml T«rribbS>f« 

fmi« byGfllliiif Her Lydia 

ETPiiiklMUB's V«c«te. 




Daaina, Tttsa. — "Aflar wcf MttUT 
gfarl was bom two 7 oMs afo I bcgaa sof- 
fariaf with fa 




Inmbw aad eo«ld 
ksidlf do mtf 



Cutaway coats are coining In to a 
lludteil extent. 

RIVIERA MODEL 



Straw forms the foundation of this 
fascinating cbapeau, which is bor- 
dered with satin ribbon and a wreath 
of flowers, with a bunch at one side. 



— Get rid of dandruff — 

it makes the scalp itch and tbe hair fall out. Be 
wise about your hair, cultivate it, like the women in 
Paris do. They regularly use 

ED. UNAUirS E\U DE QUININE 

the -vronderful French Hair Tonic. Try it for your- 
self. Note its exquisite quality and fragrance. Aristo- 
cratic men and women the vrorld over use and endorse 
this famous preparation. It keeps the scalp clean and 
white and preserves the youthful brilliancy of the hair. 

Buy a 50c bottle froin your dealftT — or send 10c to our Ameri- 
can Offices for a testing: bottle . Above all things don't negrlect 
V your hair. 

PARFIHEUE ED. PnUUD, DepL M ED.I1l(ADDBUg^llewTHk 



nsure 



YourTeeth 



i 






K Better than the 
\^\ de n t i r r i c c j/o ii 
^^^ are using now . 



' ' "» ^ '< A^ . 



IVAUDOU'S 

P( rn - u:(' Tool I- i' ifJo 



bat Jwtkaptdgacw 
fffaiC «a OBtU last 

IBUMrwiMlIgOt 

wharo I eo«kl Bot d* 
By wofk. • I w«ttld 
IImt* a dilll araiy 
daj and liot flaahaa 
and diaiT spoils aad 
imj baaa woold •!• 
moat baiit.91 got where 1 was afanoat 
a walking akaktOB and life was s boidaa 
to ma natU oi«a day my hosband'a ■t«p> 
sister told toy hnsband if he did not do 
something for me I would not last kmg 
and told him to get yoor medicina. So he 
got LydisR. Pinkhf^'s Vegetable Com- 
poond for me, and after taking the flrat 
three dosea I began to improve. I eoo- 
tinned its ise, and I have nerer had any 
female troxible aince. I feel that I owe 
my life to you and your remedies. They 
did for ma what doctors could not do 
and I will always praise it wherever I 
go."— lira. G. O. LowKRY, 419 W.Moo- 
tere^ Strtot, Denison, Tezaa. 

If yoa are suffering from any form of 
female ilia, get a bottle of Lydia E. 
Pinkham'a Vegetable Compound, and 
commence the treatment without delay. 

MAKE BIG GUNS ABSOLETE 




Western Inventor Oeviaea an Aerial 

Torpedo That Givea Promiae 

of Effectivenesa. 

What may ev»?utuull.v prove t/> be a 
hiKhl.v o(ri>ctlre wnr iiiii)U>rn«'nt, and, U 
s«), pi>HSll)l.v r«»iuler pres^Tit heavy ap 
UlU'ry obMnlfte for long ruDKe opera* 
tlouK, IS a sflf-controUtHl uiTial tor- 
;>e«li> tlNit hus lately beeu developed lu 
Colorado. It Is de.«»crlhtMl In the Au- 
gust autiibcr of I'ltpular Mechanics 
.MiiKozliu'. In a genera I way, the lo- 
strutiietit nttfinpts to accoiiiplLsh over 
land what the l'iilt«Ml States navy'a 
new wireleas torpedo does at sea. Ita 
l)rli)clple and metho4l of oiieratlon. of 
<'ours«^, are entirely different. As Is 
to be luferre<l. It conMlats of a amall 
aircraft — uiuoh like an ordinary bi- 
plane — r-iirrylng a large, hlgh-exploslve 
torpedo which it is designed to drop 
at any predetermined spot within a 
certain radius. Tbe projectile, which 
Is sbout twelve feet In length, forms 
tbe bod; of tlie machine and is divided 
Into two compartments. The propel- 
ler Is mounted at the front end of It. 
^vhlle the abaft extends through the 
entire torpedo to the rear rompart- 
niedt where an IS-horsepower mot^r 
Is housed. The ai»eed and course of 
the niodiine are regulute<l hy inean^of 
u gyroHc»jplc mechanism, wklle a tim- 
ing device of nome sort releases the 
eiii;ine containing niix.slle at the prop- 
er iu.slunt for It to strike Iti target. 



Imitation Pearla. 

Clevr Iniitaiion peris have been 
made by (llliiig thin glnn.s bulbs with a 
•iohitlmi of lis!) «c)ili> niicn". Another 
aitflm.l Is t«» coat the inside of the 
glass hulbs with n 10 per cent gelatin 
•ioliificn wliiih Is allowetl to lieomne 
only partially dry before a small 
uiii'Xint of sodium [tbosphntc Is addeil, 
t*i<'ii .111- (Iryln:r process Is continued 
slowly. The Imltation.s look nitich like 
;;enulne pearls, but they can be dete<"t- 
•■i| liy iioiiii;; the placi? \\heri> the bulbn 
have bei'ii scalial. 



{'i>rti) Uico has Jnst had the most 
I)r»riiMi)le tourist scnson it has ever 
• •vpcrii'!t>'»n|. 

It Is lii)j)e<l that the nations of the 
western betjilspbere have not been clv- 
ill7.tMl to the point of using poison gas 
nnd Ii(|iiid lire. 



.Mnn thinks he Is clever nnd dl.scem- 
Ing. nevertheless It Is necessury to la- 
\w\ fr*>sh paint, ao he won't mistake It 
for Ice creatu or strawberry short- 
cake. 



^iSTien you read the antnmobile sta- 
tistlcr you wonder where the price 
of horses In the United States would 
have tumbled to If It hadn't been for 
tbe war. 



A health expert sounds a warning 
Hgnlnst swallowing chewing gum. Al 
a nation we have been warned agalnat 
everything by now. • 



The plan of making pence on the 
hft.sis of the war map Is further ob- 
structe<l hy tbe dally ablfUng of ths 
war map. 



Inform your wife that you have A 
headache and she will look oflTendad, 
as thiiugh you had taken something 
that belonged to ber. 



I An encouraging fact about most 

I child prodigies la that they outgrow.-^ 

J their Incipient brilliance and tettla 

down to average mentality. 



How are "knocking" and "kicking" 
related. Is a question worth consider- 
ing- We should say. offhand, that 
knocking Is futile, while kicking very 
often Isn't- / 



l.lj 




Day by day the ramlflratlons of tba 
war extend Its dlatraoaes. Now It la 
causing t scarcity of tennla balla. Is 
nothing ever to b« done to atop thli 
sort of thing? 



'Jfii/^. 



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■^ Ul fc TI >t l 



i .. 5 v ft' 



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BBAYKR VALLEY LABOR NSW8 



If' 

m 



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W^'- 






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• ■ 






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ODU C T 1 O N V 

At the Majestic, Thuraday and Friday, AuRust 17th and 18th. 



ent tcrminua of the paTing, wwfc- 
waitUy • dittance of approadmataly 
one thouaand five bundled feet, and 
two-thirda of the coata thereof bourne 
by the owner* of property abutting 
thereon, in accordance with the feet 
front rule. 

And whereaa, an Act of the General 
Aaaembly qi the Commonwealth of 
Pennaylvania, approved May 14th, 
1915, called the General Borough Act, 
giyea all Boroughs in thia Common- 
wealth the power, without petition of 
property ownera, to f^rude, pave, curb, 
macadamize ami other^'ifte impirove 
public fltreeta or parta thereof, and 
collect two-thirds of the custti and ex- 
penses of the same from the owners 
of real estate bounding or abutting 
thereon, by an e(|ual usscssinent on 
the feet front. 

Therefore, be it ordained and en- 
acted by the Town Council of the Bor- 
ough of Midland, and it is hereby en- 
acted and ordained by authority of 
the same. 

Section 1. That Midland Avenue, 
in the Borough of Midland, from First 
Street, the present terminus of the 
paving thereon, westwardly a distance 
of approximately one. ihousiind live 
hundred feet, be graded, curbed and 
paved from curb lo curb with hard 
burned vitrified paving brick, accord- 
ing to the plans and specittcationt> to 
be prepared by the Borough Kngineer. 

Section 2. That the grade of said 
Street shall be brought to the present 
estublishe<l grade thereof, and 



COLUMBIA STOCK CO. 
PROVES POPULAR 



As the park season draws io a 
close and the crowds nw >r<'tting let- 
ter, the real worth of the members 
of the Columbia Stock Comii.iny, 
which has been holding forth at Junc- 
tion park this .se:ison. becomes iiu>r(> 
evident, and that paik patrons ;irc 
appreciative of the i xcelUtice of liu' 
artists is evidenced by the increasing 
crowds which arc attending tin- per- 
formances. The oi<l favorite, "Tom- 
pest and Sunshine." is beir>g present- 
ed the lust three da;.s of llu' pifsent 
week, the part of "Tempest" bcin^ 
taken by the versatile Stella May, 
while the role of "Sunshine" is most 
efficiently haudled by Anna I)avih. 
The balance of the cast is first-class 
and very satisfactory performance is 
given. 



A NEW CONCERN. 



Htfifry C. Gilmore of Pittsburgh, has 
opened a branch office for the Iron 
City Drj- Cleaning Co., of Pittsburgh, 
Bt 106 Briifhton avenue, Rochester. 
^Ite advertisement of the new concern 
'^appears in another part of this isaue 
of The Labor News, and we would ask 
such of our readers as are in ne«d of 
first -class cleaning, pressing and dye- 
ing to patronize them. 



FAVORS WOMAN SUFFRAGE. 

Rome time ago a consideration 
of our «»roiiomlc •■ondltloiis and 
tcMidendes, of the i>o.sition of 
\v I'liifn In giiiiiful <MTni)atlon8, 
of tlic nature and course ot the 
(IcMniind. led me to thu couclu- 
slnn tfiiit the graiitlntj of suf- 
fra;;e f'> women Is Inevitable. 
< >pp<r<itl'>ii luay delay, but iu 
my Juil;:iijLMit cniiu<»t defeat this 
ini>v«iaent. If wonu'ii arc to 
luivc the vote, as I iKilieve they 
arc. it 8(>i>ui8 to me entirely 
clear that in the Interest of the 
['iilflk' life of this country the 
contest should l>e ended prompt- 
ly. I favor tlie vote for women. 
— From Mr. Iliiplies' S|K»ech of 
AceeptiUKV. 



OKDINANCK NO. lOS 



.\n Ortlinaiice providing: for and 
re(|uiring the grading, curbing and 
p.'ivintr of .Midlami Avenue fron^ F'irst 
Str«*ct, the t'jrniinus of the present 
paving thereon, westwardly a distance 
of appro.vimatcly one thousand five 
hundred feet, and assessing a portion 
of the costs of the same on the own- 
ers of real estate abutting thereon. 

Whereas, the Town Council of the 
Borousrh of Midland deem it neces- 
sary and proper for the welfare of the 
Borough and its inhabitants, that 
Midland Avenue be graded, curbed 
and paved from P'irst Street, the pres- 



rritidSiriRiriRiiSW A AriSi AriKiribrib AiSiM 



Si 

» 

2 Lincoln Hotel BIdg. - Rochester, Pa. s, 

J HARRY MA.Y, Proprietor & 



"THE BEST PLACE TO EAT, AFTER ALL" 

May'8 Restaurant 

Everything New. Unexcelled Service 
OUR ivfOTTOs 

''Home Cooking and Prompt Service" 



THE "WCMAKIT" STORE 



Mk. 



CS"r 1902 

fWA!CHES.DlAW0ND5.' 

•SilverWareJ 

STWRlElYj 

AND POPULAR. 
PRICES, 



"V 






> j |ii n i n inin n ii« n ii# r 

HECKMAN BROS. • 
'> d i w l Hardware, Paint, GUmm, • 
* H«w«fanilahinsi, Etc 

Bolii Phonea. * 

Are, Moatca < 



i i mm iiiiniiiii n t nn 




fif I io 



And Upwords, on houaehold gooda, 
and other personal ppoperty. " If 
you need money, do not heaitate to 
borrow from as, for our plan of M- 
pa3rment, our quick and efficient 
lystem of making loans, cannot be 
excelled. 

Information cheerfully g^iTen. 

Write, call, or phone us. 




Second Floor Bcnaon BIdg. 
Cor. Seventh Ato. tt Twdfth St 

BEAVER FALLS, PA. 
Bell Phone 244; R C Phone S7M 

Open 8 A. M. to 6 P. M. 
Mofhlay fmd Saturday Until 9 PJI. 



antli Btract t« Fourteenth Street, and 
opwhig Fourteenth Stmt from Mid- 
Uad 4^eiiue to the State «oad. 

Be it onlained and enacted by the 
Town CiHiDcil of the Borough of Mid- 
land, and it ia hereby enacted and 
ordaitMd by authority of the aanie. 

Section 1. That the south side of 
Mid)«*id Arenue. being the part there- 
of between the aouth track of the Ohio 
River Fwuenger Railway Company, 
and tlie aouth line of the Avenue, be 
opened up, graded and htted for travel 
from Eleventh Street, the present 
termiaius of the paving, to Fourteenth 
Street. 

Section 2. That Fourteenth Street 
be opened up, graded and fitted for 
travel, from Midland Avenue, to the 
State Kuad. 

Ordained and enacted this ITth day 
of July, A. L. I'JIG. 

J. J. O'.N'KILL, 
Attest: rre.sident of Council. 

M. C. DONOHOK, 

Secretary of Council. 

Approved this 4th dav of August, 
A. D- 1"J16. 

HOMEU L. LITZK.NHKIU;, 
uugll-18. Uurffess. 

ORDINANCE NO. Ill 



An Ordinance authurizinjr and di- 
recting' an increase of the imh-bted- 
ness of the Uoroujjh of Midland in 
the sum of .Seventeen Thousand ^>ol- 
j^p liars (!f 17,000.00) fur the purpo.se (.1 



curb shall bo set and pavement laid i l'»»y"-»^', *''^' HoroUKh's |Kirtion of thr 
in accordance therewith | ^'""l. »' «'-adin>r. curbing, and pavuiK 

.Section .•!. That two-third., of the ! 'J '^, *"" Avenue, 'n saul i;..n.uKh of 
cost.s and expeii.s.-.s of th- K'ra.l.uK. i •^^"^'•""* •""'"•'/ 1'"^^ ^^'"-'"'^^ ^'T ^"''''^ 
curl.iMK an.l paving' of sai.l part of K'"^ <^*'-'"'""« "^ f.»^« pavement thereon, 
.Muihind Avrnue shall bo c..llecte«l^^*^«^':'""'">' '' distance of approM- 



I 

from the owrier.s uf tc;il cstalc b> an 

e<|Ual a.s><-.-siiierU im llio foel fidnt, 

hounding "i" abutting,' thereon; that i.s, 

onf'-ttiiril on llio owner of real estate 

on either side of tlir stnci. aaonlinj; 

to the feet frontajje of .said real es- 

slate so boundin^r or abuttini; thereon, 

said asses.sinent to be osli mated b\ 

the Horoujrli Kngineer in char^re of 

the work. 

houndui),' or ahutlinj,' tliinm. .said a.s- 

sessmenl to he estiiiiale<i li> the l>or- 

na;rh I'inKmeor in charge ol' the work. 

.Section 4. That the lioioujfh Kn).'i- 

iK-er is hereby autliori/.cti and direc- 

led to niake the nci-es.-ary plans and 

specifications, and tsiiinate^ for saiii 

irradinfT. curhin^ and pavinjr; and the 

two-tliirds of the costs thereof to be 

a.sscssed at:ain.>-t tin- real <>iat<' , 

1 1 1 ..• ■ I M II 1 i <^'* suit ace 

boundin;r or abuttinjr on said .Muiland ,, , 

Avenue, shall \>o estimatotl ami col- 
l<'c-te<i under and acconlinK to the pro- 
visions of the .said Act of Assembly 
appnn-ed .May l-Uh, l\)U^, entitled: 
"Providing a .system of jrovernnient 
for borouKhsi. and revisinjr, amcnd- 
\nK. and consolidatinj; the law relating 
to boroujjhs." Known as the General 
ISorough Act, and all the residue of 
said costa ahall be paid by the Bor- 
ough. 

Section 6. All property owners on 
<;aid Midland Avenue shall make the 
needed .sewer, water and y^aa taps 
and run the same to the curb before 
the pavinjf is laid under this ortli- 
nance. 

OHained and enacted this ITth day 
of Julv, A. I). iyi6. 

J. J. O'.NKII.L, 
Attest: President of Council. 

.M. C. DON OH OK, 

.Secretary of Council. 

Approved this 4th day of August, 
A. I). I'.tie. 

HOMER L. LlTZENl'.EHc;, 
auK'11-18. Hurjress. 



mat(»ly (iiic thousand live liundr.il 
feet, uni[ for pa\ in^' the cost of con- 
.struct, i»K iiH e'vtensioM to the prc.sciU 
sanitiirv sewei* on .Midland Avcmie, 
from the jircsent terminus of the 
same, wcstuanlly a distance of ap- 
proxiiiiateI\ live hundrod -Icol, and the 
constructuui of. a sanilai\' .sewer on 



Railrniid I,;inr f'lom Third Street to 
Fourth Street, and the construction 
of u storm sewer alonK Ko'.Ji'th .Street 
:"n»in liailroad I.anc to a point be- 
yoml Ohio .•Vvcmir, aiul for payinj; 
the 15or«u>^li'.s |)((i-ti()ii of tlu- cost of 
«rra(liiu-r. ciirbintr, an«i p;iviiur such 
other public .streots, or parts tlien'of, 
as may be r»'(nrij-ed by the llorou^li 
authorities to he i:i-adeii, ciiibi'<l, ami 
liavoil, and for pay in^; iho co.st of con- 
structing,' such other sewers, sanitary 
as may be re(iuir«'<l by llir 
oroiiL' !i aulhorilii's to be const riicted, 
under prcsoibeil Icj-al procer.linus. 
and I'l-ovidiiiLT for the issue and sale 
of coupon bonds to that 
the levy of an annual tax for the pay- 
ment of same. 

Whcrca.s, the corporate authorities 
of the Horouph of Midland, by Ordi- 
nance No. 107, |)assed by the Town 
Council the l!>th day of June, 1916, 
anth fcpproved by the Burgess the 20th 
day af Juno, VJW, and duly recorded 
in Ordinance Hook of said nooruKh, 
sirnificd their desiit? to incre.'usc the 
indebledne.ss of said Morou^h in the 
sum of .Seventeen Thousand Dollars 
($lT,00().no), for the purpose of pay- 
ing: tlio lloroufrh's [lortion of the cost 
of frrxiUnt:;, curbing', and paving .Mid- 
laiid Avenue in said Horoujrh of .Mid- 
l.uul, from First Strvet, the present 
terminus of tiie pavement thereon, 
we.-^twardly a di.stance of aj)proxi- 
niately one thousand five hundred 
feet, and for paying' tlu* cost of con- 



there ehall be iaeued eeventeen coupon 
bcndi of the aaid Boroui^h numbered 
from one to eeventeen, dated August 
1, 1916, each in the sum of one thou- 
aand dollar*, payable to bearer, or if 
registered to the reKiatered holder 
thereof, bearing interest at the rate 
of Ave per centum per annum, i)ayable 
semi-annually on the first days of 
'February and AuguHt in each and 
every year, with both principal and 
interest payable in lawful money of 
the United States of America, and 
free f^m any and all tuxes that may 
b« levied thereon in the hands of any 
|>«rson under any present or future 
law or laws of the Commonwealth of 
Pennaylvania. 

Section 2. That the form of said 
bonds and coupons sbuU be ub follows: 

B O .\ D 

UNITED STATK.s yF A.MFRICA 

COM.MON\VKAl/ni OF 

PK.NNSYl.VA.MA 

UOKOUtai OF MIld.A.M) 

No , Series 1. §1,000.00 

Know all men by these presents. 
That the liorough of Midland, a muni- 
cipal ct>rporation of the County of 
Beaver and the Commonwealth of 
rejjmsylvaniu, is indebted to the 
bearer, or if refjistered, to the reg- 
isteitMl holder hereof, in the sum of 
One Thousand Dollars in lawful mo- 
ni-y of the L'nited States of Ainericu, 
wliich sum the said Borough of .Mid- 
land proiui.ses to pay to the holder 
hereof, or if registered, to the reg- 
isti'ixd holdet' hereof, at the .Midland 
Savings imd Trust Company, Midlanil, 
I'ennsylvauia, on the lirst day of .Aug- 
ust, lit , with interest IIichmhi at 
the rate of five per centum pei' aie 
nuni, payabli' semi-annually un the 
I i>l tiays of l-"ebruai-y and .-Vurii t, in 
each ;iiui ev< ry year from the date 
lierevl. upon tiie surrender and dcdiv- 
erj'*^*^! tlu- annexed couiJon.-" ;i.. the;, 
severally niature and become payable, 
\<."itl'.out deduction !'<>r any ;a.\e> wliuh 
may hr levie<l ln'reun, pursuant to any 
present or future l;»\^s of the Com- 
muiiweallh of I'emisy !\ama. all of 
V. hich taxes the Mmough of Midland 
hereby assumes and arrccs to pay; 
and for tlie true and raitliful pay- 
ment (if the piMicipal ol this luiiid. 
and the .->< mi-aniui;' I inslal'ments ol' 
nt;'re;;t hereon, and the taxes as 
af«ifes!ii<l, the I'aith, hon<ir. cieilit and 
property of the liorouirli of .Midland 
;;re heieby filedfed. 

This bond lua; be reiristereil, as to 
the principal, in ilie owner'.- name on 
the l)ool..-i tif th<' s:iid Morou^rh of 
.Midland, said registry also bein^' not* 
ed un till' bond, .al'ler >\lii(h no trans- 



be valid iinhs.- made bv the 



structing an extension to the present' 

-Midlan 



.sanitary .sewer on 
from the pre.sent terminus 
.sanie, westwardly a distance 
proximately live hundred feet, and the 
construction of 
An Ordinance providing for the con- , Kailroai 



ORDINANCE NO. 109 



unouiU and ' re^d.-tered o\\ nc'. mul similarly noteti 
on the bond, but the .same may be di.s- 
(d';iri;ed from ieg;str\' by being 
transl'erreil tn bearer, after whicdi, 
transfirability by delivery shall be re- 
.•^tored, but may again from time to 
time, be registered or transferred to 
l)earer as before; Buch registrations, 
however, shall not affect the negotia- 
bility of the coupon.s by mere delivery. 
This bond is one of a series of sov- 
enloon (IT) eou[)on bonds, each in the 
sum of One Thousand Dollars ($1,- 
OOO.OO) numbered from one to seven- 
teen inclu,';iv<'. and all of like date, 
tenor and elfect. an<l i.s issued for the 
imr[ii).se of pix^viding :i fund for pay- 
wn: the Hoi'ough's [tortiori <.f the cost 
of grading, curbinij. and pavini: Mid- 
land Avenue, in s:ii«l I'.orougli of Mid- 
land from First .Street, the i)resent 
terminus of the [laveinent thereon, 
w('St\^ardly ;i distante of a|)[)roxi- 
•"^''''""" I iiiately one thou.-arid i\\T hundred 
of the f,.,.f .,„(} f(|,- Moving the cost of con- 
Ol !'P- j siructing an extension to the present 
sanitarv seuor on .Midland Avenue, 



struction of the following sewers in 
the Borough of Midland, viz.: 

A .Sanitary .Sewer beginning on 



n of a .sanitary .sewer on from the pre.sent terminus of the 
,ane from Third Street to !,.„„,,_ u.-slwardiy a di.stance of ap- 



Foiirtii Street, and the con.struction of 
a .storm sewer along Fourth .Street 
fnmi Riilroad Fan*- to a point l)eyon(i 



.Midland Avenue at a point one thou- I Oh lo Avenue. ;in<l for paying the Bor 
sand feet west of First .Street, the ou^rh'.s |>orlion of the cost of gra.dinir. 
terminus of the |)re.sent sewer, and e\- , curbing, and pavint,' such other public 
tending thence we.itv.arflly along said streets, or parts thereof, as m.iy be 
.Miflland Avenue, a distiince of approxi- rei juired by the Borough authorities 



proxiinatrdy five hundred feet, and the 
construction of :i .sanitary sower on 
Railroad Lane from Third .Street to 
l-'ourth .'>trect. and the construction of 
a storm sewer .alonir Fourth .Street 
from Railroad I.an(> to ;i ()oint l)e\ond ' 
Ohio Avenue, .md for paying the I!oi- 
, , , , ' 1 , , ouL'h's |)oi-Lion of the cost of grading, 

mately hve hundred feet; a .sanitary , to be gra.le<l. curlH>r|. and paved, ami eiirhing, .and paving such other public 



sewer on Railroad Lane, from Thini for i>ayintr the cost of constructing 
.Street to P'ourth .Street, and a storm 
sewer along P'ourth .Street from R.iil- 



roarl Fane to a f)oint l>eyond Ohio 
Avenue. 

He it onlained anfi en.icted by the 
Town Council of the Rorough of Mid- 
land, and it is hereby enacted and or- 
dained l>y .authority of the same. 

.Section 1. That the present sani- 
tary .sesver on Midland Avenue be ex- 
tended from its present termimus, a 
point one thou ind feet westwardly 



siK h other .sewers, sanitary or sur- 
fjif-e, a.s may be reciuired by the Ror- 
ougli authorities to be constructed, 
un<ler prescribed leg.il proceedings, 
an<l iiuthorized ;ii,(| directed the hold- 
int: of a [luhlie election on Tuesday, 
Il;«- IMh (lay of .July. A. 1). 1!»h;, for 
tlu purpose of obtaining the assent 
of tho electors of the said Rorough to 
.said increase of Ihe^ indebtedness. 

An -I, wh.ereas. properly and timely 
ntfticf hiiving been iriven, .said elcc- 



from First Strof-t. to a point approxi- \ tion was conducted ;ind liehl in every 
mately on^ thous.ind five hundred foet respect as re(|uirr'(l by law, and duly 



Subscribe for The Labor News. 



i mnn i mn itti mnn ii mnm i mn tit nnn ii» 

t ADAM KORNMAN { THE SMOEB HOUSB 

Ov Sfodal Bnads — lam- Andrew P. Koraaaii, Ptm. 

-V ; ; ■Man's BwT«r VaUey Speeisl; . . Retail dMl«r ia Tobaeeo, 6am- ! 

< I Ksmiiupili Best Stogie; Kan- < > diss. Postal Osrds, Pipsi, Om- ' 

; Mail GoMMsdal Ebttrs. I tm Gl<ms aad Ptostag* Stamps. ; 

{ I Bslrf Llatrfli BMf at BsomsAv. M Nsst Tstvi^Taii BaAsslsv. i 



ii nm i m ii mn ti^ititi nm i mM i mmn iiit u i 



westwardly from First .Street, the cx- 
ten.<;ion being a distance of approxi- 
mately five hundred feet. 

.*^ection 2. That there be laid anrl 
constructed a sanitary sewer on R;»il- 
road Fane from Third Street to 
^^)U^th Street. 

.Section "i. That there be laid and 
constructed a storm sewer along 
Fourth .Street from Railroad F.me to 
a point beyond Ohio Avenue. 

Section 4. Said .sewers shall be 
constructed and laid at the cost of 
the Borough, accortling to plans and 
specifications to be drawm by the Hor- 
oujrh Engineer. 

Ordained and enacted this 17th day 
of Julv, X. D. 1916. 

J. J. O'NEILL, 
Attest: President of Council. 

M. C. r^ONOHOE, 

Secretary of Council. 

Approved this 4th day of August, 
A. D. 1916. 

HOMER L. LITZENBERG, 
augll-18. Burtress. 



ORDIN^I^CE NO. 110 

Ab Ordinance opening the south 
side of Midland Avenue from Elev- 



(crtilied returns thereof together witli 
a cortifiod copy of .said ordin.ance and 
prnpor proofs of said election .and ad- 
vcrti.s<iiient.« were made and filed as 
re<|uirod by law to the C'lerk of the 
rriiirt of (,>uarter .Sessions of fieavor 
(.)unty, as will fully a|)iK-ai' by refor- 
"ncf to the prweedintT's in .said Court 
;it N'o. pj, .June Temi, 1!M6. 

And, whereas, by the resurns of 
.<<aid election it appears that a major- 
ity of the electors vote<| in favor of 
.said increa.s*' of indebtedness; 

And, whereas, the Clerk of said 
('<iurt made a record of the snme and 
fiimiflhed a certifiecl copy thereof un- 
dor 8€al, showing the result of said 
election, to the corporate authorities 
of said Borough, and the same has 
been placed of record on the minutes 
thereof as required by law. 

Nov, therefore, be it ordained and 
enacted by the Town Council of the 
Borougrh of Midland, and it is hereby 
ordained and enacted by authority of 
the same: 

Section 1. That the indebtedness of 
the Borough of Midland be and is 
hereby incretsed in the stun of SeT- 
enteen Thousand Dollars ($17,000.00) 
and that to secure said indebtedness 



streets, or parts thei-edf, as m.ay be 
ref|ui red by the n<irou;jh ;iuthorities 
to he graded, eurlxd, .and paved, and 
fur [laying the cost of eynstructing 
.;ucli other se.vrrs, s.anitary or surface, 
as iiia\ be rc'iuiri'l by the Rorough 
;iutlioril ies to be constructed, under 
pre.^rribed li ual proceedings, .and pur 
.suaiit to .III ordinance of the Rorough 
nf .Mifiland, duly ordained and enacted 
into a law in Council assembled, tlu' 
nintoenth day of June, IfUO, e\;im- 
iiK'd aiui approved the twr'ntielh flay 
of June, ]',»1(!, by the Rurg«'ss; iind 
pursuant to the as.sent of the electors 
of .s:iid Reroujrh. duly riven .at :i f)ub- 
lir election hfld '>n the 'J.')'!! day of 
.July, IfMO, accordinjr to l.iw; ;ind pm-- 
suant to the authorit- r 'inferred by ati 
A<' of the Ciener.'il As.send)Iy of the 
Commonwealth of Renniylvania. ap- 
proved the 'JOth »l;i\- '.T April, 1871. 
I'. L. fi.".. entftled, "An Act to reflate 
the manner of increa.sing the indebt- 
erlnesK of municipalities, to provide 
for the redemjition of lli*^ same, -.umI 
to impo.se penalties for the illegal in- 
crease thereof," the amendments 
therrto ftnd the supplements thereto. 

It is hereby certified that all thing," 
ro()uircd to be done, precedent to or 
in the issuing of this bond, have hap- 
p«»nf»<l and been done and performed, 
as required by law, and that the total 
indebtedness of the said Rorough of 
Midland, including this issue of bonds, 
is not in excess of any statutory or 
constitutional limit of indebtedness, 
and that the annual tax has been lev- 
ied suflTicient for the liquidation of all 
interest, assessments and taxes here- 
in agrreed upon to be paid, and the 
payment of the principal at matiir 
i 



ty in accordance with this bond, and 
the Acts of Assembly in such cases 
made and prorided. ^^ 



In testimony whereofr we, the 
President and Secretary of Council, 
and Burgess of the Borough of Mid- 
land. County of Beaver, and Conomon- 
wealth at Pennsylvania, being duly 
authoriaed to execute this obligation 
on its behalf do hereunto set oar 
hands and cause the corporate seal of 
the Borough to be hereunto sdfixcd 
this first day of August, A. D. L916. 
(Corporate Seal) 

ROHOUCH OF MIDLAND, 
Attest: President of Council. 

Secretary of Council. 



Burgess. 
FOKAl OF INTEREST COUPON 

On the first day of , A. 

D , the Council of the Bor- 
ough of Midland, in the County of 
Reaver iiid Commonwealth of I'enn- 
Bylvania, will pay to the bearer on 
surrender of thi.^j coupon at the Mid- 
land Savinjfo and Trust Company, 
.^Lidlan<i, T'ennsylvania, the sum of 
Twenty-hvc Dollars ($2fj.OO), being 
si.x iiionlhs' interest then due oq its 
bond iasue of August 1, 1916, Series 
I, NumlK-red 

Secretary. 
.Section .'!. The proper officers of 
the borough of Midland, to-wit: The 
I'ri'iiident and ."Secretary of the Town 
Council and the Ifurgess, are hereby 
authorized and rcciuired to duly exe- 
cute each and all of said bonds, and 
lo make delivery thereof, the same 
to be executed by atfixing thereto the 
corporate seal of the Rorough of Mid- 
land, and by the signatun- of the 
I'll Muient ami .Secretary of tl:«' Town 
Council an<l the Rurges.s, and the sev- 
eral eoU|»on.s attacla-d to said bonds 
sIk'.II bear the facsimile s '.mature of 
tlio .Sfcrtftai'y engi^aved tiiereon, 

.Section 1. The said several bonds 
shall be iiuule payable according to 
the following schedule, to-wit: 

Rond No. 1, .-vKOOO.OO. sluill be due 
ar.tl payable August 1, r.»_'(). 

Rond .No. li, .Sl.(Mt(l.(KK shall be due 
and pay;ible August 1, ItcJii. 

Rond -No, :;, .sl,(iOU.tK). shall be due 
aiui payable August 1, r.»24. 

Rood .No. 1. .>l,»»'Mi.O(i, Miai! U- du.- 
and payable August 1, 1926. 

i;on<l No. .'>, .$1,()()().(>0. shall be due 
and p;i\al)le .August 1, I'.'L'T. 

Rood .No, ti, .<l.UUO.tK), shall be due 
and payable ,\ugust 1, I'.'IS. 

Rond Nik 7. .'<l,o()( ).()'), -hall be due 
and p.iyable August 1, Rf-i't 

llond No. .s, S;i,()'t(».()n, ^iiall he due 
ai- ! [);iy;ible Aui:u<t 1, l'.*'.!). 

Rond No. :». .'Jll.UttO.OO, shall be duo 
and payable August 1. l!»:;i. 

Hond .No. 1(1. $l,(t()().oO, shall be duo 
and p:iy able August 1, \'X'>'2. 

Rond .No. 11, .S!,(MIO.O(), shall be due 
and pavahle August 1, VJ'-V.l. 

Ronds .\o^. 1-J and i:!. .$1,000.00 
each, shall Ik? duo and, payable Aug- 
ust 1, 1934. 

Bonds \os. 14 and 10, $1,000.00 
each, shall be due and payable Aug- 
ist 1, lu.ir.. 

Hcrnds Nos. H) and IT. $1,000,00 
each, sliall be due ;ind i):iyablo Aug- 
u.st 1, lif.'.C. 

Section i). There is hereby levied 
an<l a.sws.soii u|)on the taxable prop- 
eiyl of the Rorou^;h of .Midland ;in an- 
nual tax of Si\t«'en Hundred and Fif- 
teen Rollark (^Hilo.OO), to coiiunence 
in the year I'.MT, being the i-r.st year 
after the said increase of in(b-bedno.ss, 
and continue for a perimi of twenty 
years, which uaid annual suni of 
.s.xteen Hundred :ind Fifteen Hollars 
(.$1015.00) is sufficient for and shall 
Ik' set apart for and applicable only 
to the payment of th ■ interest. t:ix 
and princij)al of saifl bonds, as they 
respect -vely become due within the 
said [wriod of twenty years. 

.Section C. The proceeds arising 
from the sale of said bc-nds are here- 
Iiy api)ropriated to paying the Bor- 
ou^'li'^ portion of the cost of jrrading, 
curbing, and I'aving mitlland .\vcnuc 
io .-aid l!oI'.ui:!i of Midland, from 
First .Street, the fin.sent terminus of 
the i)aveinent thereon, westwardly a 
distance of approximately one thou- 
«;in<l livi' hundrHl feel, and for pay- 
in;: the cost of constructing an exten- 
.<ion to th" pre.sent s.initary sewer on 
.Midland Avenue, fmi;. the present 
; niiinu.i of the same, vestwardly a 
di.stance of approximately liv hun- 
rjjofl feet, and tlir construction of a 
s.initary s«'v.er on I'.ailro.ad 1 ,ane from 
Third .Street to Fomlh Street, and the 
con.'^triiction of a .«:(erm sewer along 
Fourth .Streot from R.iiiroacI I.ano to 
a point beyond Ohio .\vpnuev.an(l for 
|)aying the Rorough'- portion of the 
cost of ;rr:uling, curb ng, and i>.tving 
such other public streets, or parts 
thereof, as may be re<iuircd by the 
Rorough authorities to bo graded, 
curbed, ami paved, rmd for paying the 
cost of constructing such other sew- 
ers, sanitary or surface, as may be re- 
(|uired by the Rorough authorities to- 
be con.«tructe<l, under "re.«:cribpd Icpral 
proceed inps. 

.Sort ion 7. The proper officers of 
the Borough, to-wit: The President 
and .Secretary of the Town Council, 
and the Burgess, are hereby author- 
ized and required to make, swear to 
and flic in the office of the Clerk of. 
the Court of Quarter Sessions in and 
for the County of Beaver, 9 financist 
statement as required by the Act of 
Assembly approved April 20, A. D. 
1874, and the supplements and ameiid- 
mants thereto. 

enacted this 7th da/ 
1916. 
J. J. O'NEILL, 
Attest : President of CotmeiL . 

M. C. DONOHOE, 

Secretary of CounciL 

Approved this 8th day of Angiut^ 
A. D. 1916. 

HOMER L. LITZENBERO,.-* 
aagll>18. 



mants thereto. 

/Ordnined and < 
01 / J gust, A. D. 



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BEAYEB VALLEY LABOK NEWS 



^ 




MIDLAND 



Items of Interest From the Futest 
Growing Town in the Valley. 

Written by Margaret Hew. lie" Phone I3i-J 



Midland Personals 



Work is under way on the construc- 
tion of the new sewer from Kleventh 
Xu T'owirteeiilh street. 
^'Yhc Midland KiHe Club held an out- 
inK Sunday in Tine tlrovc. 

On AujfUftl lOlli the <;<hm1 Koads 
As^sociation put in operation the road 
>-;craj)er, |»uile(l by a traction en^'ine. 
on \hr road between tiie borough an<l 
iiniiJK- Ferry. K. K. Htter an<l Morris 
Lioherir.an have charge of the w<!rk, 
and already have the road in better 
condition than it ims been for years. 

Work ha.s been started on lifty addi- 
tional hou.se.s in the town, wliile fully 
100 houses have just Ix'en coin|)leted. 
ArraiiuM'inents have not yet been com- 
pleted for the olficial deilication of the 
Carnejrie Library building, whidi ulia 
built some time avro. The Midland 
School Board are rontemplatin^c usinjr 
a room of the ne>v librar\ buikliiiK 
for the hiph school. 

Tenth street is boinj? opened up 
south of Midland avenue, and a new 
road will be built to the depot, |)ast 
the I'ittsburjfh Iron and Steel foun- 
dry's property. The Pittsburgh Cru- 
cible Stool Company h.ave pertnitted 
the use of the roa<l through their 
property for years, which road will 
be discontinued. 

H. H. Stewart, chief auditor at the 
Pittsbur^^h Crucible Steel works, left 
this week on his vacation. W. N. No- 
lan, 6f PittsburKh, wil! take his place 
while away. 

Aliss V'eni Ciamble is visiting with 
relatives in I'ittsburjfh. 

H. L. (lUthrie, a l«K'al drutrjrist, has 
purcha.sed a new Studebaker car. 

Edmund McCleehan left for Lan- 
casfr. Pa., for a short visit. 

Lawrence K. Harrijjan, of Heaver 
avenue, left We'ine.<day for Ix^etonia. 
Ohio. 

Thomas Bell, proprietor of the Mid- 
lam) re.<itatKlant, has purchased an 
Overland automobile. 

Airs. \V.'. Iter \N . Lo*ver returntvj 
this week after a very enjoyable va- 
f:;'>!en .t^pont in Montival. Canada. 

Mrs. (ieorffe Y. Tike, of Nib's. 0., 
formerly of Midland, will arrive here 
Saturday, whore she will visit for u 
few weeks with friends. 

Mrs. Mabel Wilson will leave this 
.vreek for her home in Chicsfco. after 
.■spending the summer with her par- 
ents, Mr. and Mrs. Spencer, of Mi«l- 
land avenue. 

The Misses Mollie an<I Helen Win- 
kle of Bl'flV^r avenue, have left for 
Syracuse, N. Y., where they will 
spend their vacation. 

M. K. Hess and K. K. P'ttor wrrr 
Pittsburgh visitors Monday. 

Air. and Mrs. K. K. Kite/ and T. 
11 Heed, of Heaver avonue, motored 
to Pittsburjrh Sunday. 

JZobert Smith was an Kast Liver- 
pool visitor this week. 

-Mrs. P'ajjer, of Freedom, was the 
jruest of Mr. and Mrs. L. K. Harripan 
and family, of Heaver avenue, Sundav. 

Rev. C. F. Swift, I). D.. of Heaver 
Falls, will deliver an address at the' 
Presbyterian Church, Sunday ev-i^nin^r 
s»t 8 o'clock. 

Mrs. William Mrojjan and dauph- 
ler, Elizabeth, of lleaver avenue, are 
Tisitin;; relatives in Johnstown, Pa. 

lir. R. S. Hen.sel and wife, of near 
Pittsburgh, formerly of Midland, wore 
the pucsts over Sunday of .Mr. and 
Mrs. W. K. Hart, of Hoaver avenue. 

Miss Stella McCombs, of Rice ave- 
nue, loft Tuesday /or Lorraine, O., 



ALLEGED VETERINARIAN 
ARRESTED-"BEATS IT" 



H. Slevenwin .XrreMled for FailinK 
lo Register Wilh tht- Slate 
lioard. 



CRUCIBLE STEEL GQ. TO 
HAVE MODERN HOSPITAL 



BlillDINQ CRAfTS 



A number of contracts for work on 
new buildings in this vicinity have 
been let within the past few days, the 
following being of special interest: 



r 



2 DAYS OF 




Will lie Erected on GroundH of Plant. 

.Made NeceHsary by Number 

of .Accidents. 



Residence; $6,000; 2-8tory and base- 
ment, Patterson Heights, Beaver 
Falls; architects, Boyd & Stewart, 
Century Building, Pittsburg; owner, 
K. R. Boots, care John Manvllle Com- 
pany, Beaver Falls; general contract 
let to Gorman & Sons, New Brighton. 



Residence remodeling) $12,500.00; 
48.'{6 Kllsworth avenue; private plans; 
owner, W. S. Stimmel, 4836 Ellsworth 
avenue; general contract let to H. 
Feltyberger, 57:54 Bartlett Street, 



On Monday, Aujrust 7th, an officer 
of the Slat*' Hoard of Veterinary Ex- 
aminers came to Midland for the pur- 
pose of investi^catin); the illejfal prac- 
tice of veterinary doctors. Shortly 
aflerv.ard a warrant was .sworn out 
b«fon' .luslico of the Peace Charles 
.McNeill against H. A. Stevenson, 
rill- warrant was placed in the hands 
of tdn.slable V.. E. Fitter, who immedi- 
ately placed .Mr. Stevenson under ar 
re:it. 

When Con.stable Ktter placed Stev- 
enson undi-r arn»st, the supposed veter." 
inarian a.sked Mr. Ktter to allow him 
to put away the horse that he was 
cleaning at the time. The recjuest 
was tcnmted. and when Mr. Etter, af- 
ter wailin>r several minutes, went in- 
to the stable to see what wa.s keepinjr 
him .so lonjr, discovered that he had 
"beat it." He was last seen headed 
for the State line. 

Stevenson came to Midland about 
one and one-half years ajro and went 
to work as a barber for Mike Conkle, 
in the meantime letting himself be 
known as a votej-inarian. After about 
si.\ Mumths with Conkle, he rented a 
house in Midland avenue and hung 
out his shinKlf"- He had built up (|uito 
a practice among the farmers and 
stock broodrrs of the community; he 
pos.sesse<l the ability, but apparently 
had failed to register with the State 
Hoanl. 



where she will .spend a couple of 
weeks with her sister, Mrs. (J rover C. 
Hannah an*i family. 

Jo.seph i^ovines, of Heaver avenue, 
left la.st week for a trip to Detroit, 
.Michijran. 

Mrs. Lind.say and daughter, of 
WoiHlbiwn. are the guests of Mr. and 
Mrs. Lindsay, of Beaver avenue. 

John Colmcry, of Midland avenue, 
made a business trip to Braddock on 
Monday. 

Jack Wilter, of Pennsylvania ave- 
nue, w;is the guest of East IwverjMJol 
friends Sunday. 

.Miss Kathr>n Stare. \vl o has l)een 
makini: her home with Mr. and Mrs. 
Roy M. Coulfir. I'enn.sylvanna ave- 
nue, has relurinil from a month's vi.s- 
it \\ ith her jiarents in Harrishurjr. 

Mrs. .lohn L. ("olincry antl daugh- 
ter, of Pittsburgh, were .MiiUantl vis- 
itors .Monday. 

Mr. and Mrs. Cliarle.s E. .Shae of 
Ohio street, have been called to Low - 
ellville, O., on account of the severe 
illness of .Mrs. Shae's mother. 

The .Miiises Ethel and Thelma 
.•Vlice. of dreensburg, are spending a 
few weeks with Mr. and Mrs. Wil- 
liam lialph, of Ohio avenue. 

Walter E. Howe spent Saturday and 
Sunday with friends in Monaca. 

Mr. and Mrs. drover Hannah and 
children, of Lorniino, O., formerly of 
Midland, are visiting Mrs. Hannah's 
parents, Mr. and Mrs. All)ert Mc- 
Combs and family, of Heaver avenue. 

Mr. and Mrs. Needs and son. of 
Rice avenue, have left for a trip to 
.Atlantic Citv. 



Hecause of the number of accident.'^; 
in the plant of the Pittsburgh Cruci- 
ble Steel Company plant, plans have 
been preparetl for the construction of 
a new hospital building on the 
grounds. A temporary structure i'.as 
l>een in use for some time, but the 
propo.sed new hospital will be e«|uip- 
ped with all surgical appliances and 
a truiiurfl surgeon will be on duty. 
I'epiiKfs seriouKly injure<l in the mill 
•ifetaken either to the City Hospital 
at East Liverpool, or the Rochester 
(lenoral Hospital at Rochester, but 
because of the length of time required 
to make the trip to these institutions, 
more complete aid will be rendered 
at the plant. 



MIDLAND CHIRCHES 



First Presbyterian, Rev. Kellar, 
pastor. Sunday School at 10 a. m.; 
preaching at 8, union service. Pniy- 
ermeeting at 8 o'clock every Weil- 
ne.sday evening. 

Presentation Roman Catholic, Rev. 
P. F. Quinn, rector. Week day masses 
ta 7 :;•(); Sundi%' masses, 6 and 'J; 
Holy Day niasse.s. 6 and 8; benediction 
7:.';0 p. m.; flaptisms at 2; Sunday 
School at 2:15. 

First Methodist Episcopal, George 
L .Bayha, pastor. ;':45, Sunday 
School, lesson: "The Grace of Giv- 
ing," 11 Cor. iUh chapter; 11, morning 
sermon by 0. C. Delaney, subject: "If 
Go<i P.e God, Serve Him." 7 15, Ep- 
worth League, subject: "Jacob's Vic- 
tory," (Jen. 32:24-^0; 8, union meeting 
in the Presbyterian church. Dr. Swift. 
Supt. I^iit.sburgh District Anti-Saloon 
League will address this meetini,'. 
Pn'.yer meeting Wednesday eveninr 
at 8 o'clock. 



Church; 1 story and basement, 46x 
80, Si.xth and Melrose avenue, Am- 
bridge; architect, Thos. Hannah, Kee- 
nan building, Pittsburgh, owner, Ru- 
thinion Greek Catholic Church of St. 
Peter and St. Paul, Ambridge; g^eral 
contract let to J. N. Dushane & Son, 
Carnegie, I'a.; $2,000, including heat- 
ing, plumbing and lighting. 



Commercial Garage; $10,000.00; one 
story and basement; 45x100, Am- 
bridge; architect M. S. Wickersham, 
Vundergrift building, Pittsburgh ; 
owner, Lincoln Auto Repair Co., W. 
J. Haines, general manager. Merchant 
and Bryden streets, Ambridge; gen- 
eral contract let to Pittsburgh Engi- 
neering Construction Co., Vanderj^rift 
building, Pittsburgh. 



i 

« 



Apartment Building (8 aparments) 
$25,000; I', story and basement. Wood- 
lawn; architects, Boyd & Stewart, 
Century building, Pittsburgh; owner, 
A. C. Osbom, cashier Woodlawn Trust 
Company; general contract let to John 
W. Cochrane, Woodlawn. 



DOLLAR BARGAINS 

Saturday and Monday Will be 

I Days at oiir New 

Brighton Store 

The large poster left at your home tells you of 
a few items on which we offer you savings from 25e 
to many dollars. There are hundreds more in our 
stoi'e and we invite you to come in and see this great 
"SALE OF SAVINGS" 



•»'*" 



LEVY BROS 



"The^nse of Qnality" 






a 



PATIENT CONVALESCENT. 



Mrs. Frank W. (Jamble, of Midland 
avenue. Midland, was in Pittsburgh 
Wednesday to see her son, Ftsncje, 
n-bo was operated on in the West Penn 
Hospital two weeks ago for appendi- 
citis. The patient is getting along 
nicelv. ^ 



6. W. WALTON HDW. GO. 

,Surcr»»ors to 

Beaver Hardware 'Qo. 

(>calrr» in llsnlwnr*- Si'ivrt. Hoiisr l\rnl<ihinUi. 

■ml Farm linpleinent*. 
BOTH PHONES BEAVER PA 

F.C.DANDO 
GROCER 

liell 12.VJH. \\. C. 6.y>3 
Third Street, - Heaveu. I'a. 



The contract has been let for the 
new heating system and the new 
plumbing system for the Beaver Val- 
ley (leneral hospital. New Brig'hton, 
The contract for the plumbing wa« 
awarded to Frederick Webster, of 
New Brighton, and the heating con- 
tract was let to Chandleys, Beaver 
Falls. It is understood that work will 
be started at once. 



J. W. Cochran. Woodlawn contrac- 
tor, has been awanled the contract 
for the ei"ection of a 6-rooni flat for 
A. C. Osborne, casliier of the Wood- 
lawn Trust Co.; cost $1300, to be com- 



BEAVER CAFE 

ROLUN PARROTT, Prop. 

First Class Restaurant, ^mU 
Fountain and Confectionery. 



GRO-CO STORE CO. 

Succptaon to U^uve ilru*. 

Fancj' Groceries and Notions 

Wholrsale and Retail 

Hell Phones »^'<0-$)Sl. Bka«|sr, Pa. 



^ 



W. E. FLORENCE 

Registered Plumber 

\\. C. Phone 0.141 
Corporation St., - Hbavbr, Pa. 



l3f •' The House of Quality" 

N. STOLOWITZ 

TAILOR 

BEAVku AM) WOODLAWN 
Subscribe for The Labor News. 




'^''^im^'^^^m^.'r^^'^^^^'Z'^^:^^^ 



THE BIG DISCOUNT SALE 

Is Growing Bigger Every Day 






65c. BUYS 

$1.00 WORTH 

Hen's, Young Men's 

Boys' and Children's 

Clothing, Hats andCaps 

Trunks, Bags and 

Suit Cases 



80c. BUYS 

$1.00 WORTH 

Nen's, Young Hen's 
Boys' and Children's Furnish- 
ings, Shirts, Neckweai; 
Hosiery, Underwear 
Gloves, Belts, Etc. 



J. T 

Bakeip and'Confebtioneri; 

Home Made Bread a Specialty 
636 Third St.. Hravrr, Pa. 



All Wool Suits 

(Union Made) 

.00 



$15 



PRICK'S 

"77?^ Store Thafs DifferenC 



Row^'s Drug Store 



Beaver, Pa. 



^ 



John A. Butler & Son 



UtTER FAUS 






Largest Clothiers 




J. H. MARTSOLF 

DRUGGIST 

' Hell 1398; H. C. 6644 i^ 



638 Third St., 



Bbavkr, Pa. 



L. A. Mitchell 

Meat Market 

Freth and Smoked Meats and Poultry 
in Season. 

Both Phones. BEAVER. PA. 



J. C. KIMPLE 



B. C. 6129; 'Bell 1072 
64STniBDST., Bbatbr, Pa. 



Subscribe for The liabor N^ewa. 



FIRST ANNUAL 

MOTORCYCLE 






- * 



Junction Park 

AUGUST 

SATURDAY 



ti-i 



Races Start at 2:00 P. N. 

Under Auspices of (he 

llarley-Davidson Motorcycle Club 

OF ROCHESTER, PA. 

White Bros., Promoters 

-*+, 

6-BIG EVENTS-6 



Events. Motors 

1st — 5-inile Professional Race; three prizes; 30-50 cu. in. 
2nd — o-mile Amateur Race; three prizes; 30-50 cu in. 
3rd — 10- mile Profesional Race; three prizes; 30-50 cu. in. 
4th — 2-mile Bicycle Race; two priies; Open to AIL 
5th — 5-mile Sidecar Race; three prizes; Open to AIL 
6th — 15-mile Professional Race, three prizes; 30-50 cu. in. 



All races to be run under the rules of the Federatiop 
of American Motorcyclers. 



The following: Speed Kiwgs will ride in thtse CTents: 

L. KBYS L. CHRIST R. BACON H. D. IMMEL 

A. G. SCHMIDT E. ^cCALL G. BLACK 

Also other well knowp riders. 



This Will be the Greatest Speed 

Event Ever Held in 

Beaver County 



ftdnisslon to Park, - 256, 






'%. T.!t;„'i;r' *i , 



■' ^■■■A -.::'' , .i-». 



;.*. 



; i 



"l-t 









• . * - » ■ . . 






3E 



"'f ;'^ -i >« 






•f"*K^»^-«''*^ 



UNJVtRSir> Of* ILLINOIS Li8R<\f'V 




^^ ^f""^ 



•^u* 



5 - ^ ^■^:- 




i 



■■*■ 



> 



"^ '-^iri}; 



u : ("• 









8 



ud BiiiUtaf TraiM CmbkO. 



BKAVKR VALLEY 



WORK 

SLEEP 

RELAXATION 

HOURS l^^l^S^^HI^ 
A REASONABLE DEMAND 




llalMd by Org»Bia«4 Ubw. 



LABOMNEWS 



8 



HOURS 



WORK 

SLEEP 

RELAXATION 



A REASONABLE DEMAND 



VOLUME 2. NUMBER 2. 



BEAVER, PA.. FRroAfJ AUGUST 18. 1916 



=Ef: 



ONE DOLLAR THE Y^AR. 



E^ 



QUESTION or R. R. STRIKE STILL UNSETTLED 



POSSIBILITY MEN WILL 
ACCEPT WILSON'S PLAN 



Both Men and Managers to Cast 

Vote on Propositions 

Today. 



J JTRENUOUS EFFORTS ARE 
f I MADE TO AVERT STRIKE 

r . 

Washingfton, Aug. 18^*1^ »* rumor- 
ed here on what is said to be good 
authority, that a majority of the 640 
chairmen, representing the "Big 
Four" brotherhoods, are in favor of 
accepting the plan of strike settle- 
ment proposed to them by President 
Wilson, in the east room of the White 
House Thursday afternoon. The chair- 
men met Thursday evening in the 
Bijou Theatre and discussed the ques- 
tion informally, finally adjourning un- 
til 9 o'clock this (Friday) morning, 
at which time a vote will be taken. At 
lust night's meeting it is understood 
only a minority of extremists held out 
for preservation of the original "all 
or nothing" position. 

The railroad managers admit that 
they will concede the principle of an 
eight hour day. 

The big tight is to come over the 
overtime (juestion, but the general 
feelinfe tonight is that this will be 
ultimately settled according to the 
President's plan and that there will 
be no strike. 
m ^ W lil ff ^y My>rit»t^^y stated lact 
''^fll^nSctiur program stibniftted to 
the labor leaders by the President, 
provided: 

That both sides shall accept the 
eight-hour day on the present basis 
of pay. . 

That the collateral question shall be 
submitted to a commission to be au- 
thorized by Congress. 

At the White House it was slated 
that until the union loaders had voted 
on the suggestion and the railway 
executives had pa.ssed upon it, the 
White House could not discuss the 
existir>g situation. 

While the union .leaders were in 
session last night, the railway presi- 
dents called to Washington by Presi- 
dent Wilson, were arriving by every 
train. They will meet the President 
this afternoon. The President will 
then have the decision of the 
therhoods. 

Daniel Willard, president of 

Baltimore & Ohio, when asked 

night if the executives would sustain 
the committee of managers, replied 
that he assumed'they would. He added 
that they had reached no decision 
however, on questions that n.ight 
come before them. ^ 

The executives went into conference 
with the managers immediately after 
their arrival in Washington. It was 
intimated that a statenient may be 
issuefi later outlining the position of 
the railroads. 

To Summon Financierw. 

It was stated tonight by a person 
close to the White Hou.se, that if the 
unions agree to this plan and the rail- 
road presidents finally hold out, Pres- 
ident Wilson wilt call representatives 
of the railroad stockholder.'? and big 
banking interests to Washington and 
deal directly with them. 

The temper of the railroad man- 
agers last night was clearly indicated 
by one of the iViost prominent of 
them. He said: 

So far as the eight-hour principle 
is concerned there is little opposition 
to it. The chief problem arises in the 
details described as collateral ques- 
tions. Without these details being 
simultaneously put on a payment 
basis the railway managers, while 
agreeing in principle, could continue 
to oppose the eight-hour day plan un- 
til^ it was accomplished by such bind- 
ing agreements as would be reason- 
ably fair to all." 

In other words, the railway man- 
agers are not also willing to concede 
the time and a half for overtime, de- 
manded by the men as an arbitrary 
measure. There was no indication 
last night as to how they regard the 
proposal to submit the overtine 
question to Federal committee invflT 
tigation, but belief prevails that they 
will concede this point also before per- 
mitting a strike to be called. 

I BrotherlNMHl to Accept. 

' Thety is little doubt at the White 
House thkt the brotherhood will eves- 
toally acc«p|^ the President's plan. It 
was jisamed tonight from a source in 
«IoM touch with the White House end 



rf'^ 



r 



bro- 

the 

last 



of the situation that the President is 
confident of his 'ability to bring the 
railroads into line if the men accept 
his proposals. 

He realizes that traffic managers 
are intensely opposed to his scheme 
for settlinf? the time and a half con- 
troversy, but he has faith that the 
threat to call the banking interests in 
to the area will force the presidents 
to agree to his proposals.' 

As indicating? the President's feel- 
ing, it was learned last night that he 
demanded to know of the railroad 
managers if their agreements with 
him would be binding. They evident- 
ly sent him word that their agree- 
ments would be binding. 

There is a well-defined feeling 
among those close to the President, 
that^ his conferences with the rail- 
road '^t^r^sidents will result in a defi- 
nite seMement of the dispute. 

The brotherhood chaimnen marched 
four abreast to the White House yes- 
terday and were received by the Pres- 
ident in the east room at 2:50 p. m. 
Previously they had met at the Bijou 
Theatre and selected Spokesmen. 

The President plunged immediately 
into his program to avert a strike and 
urged the unions to accept a means to 
that end. He declared that the atti- 
tude of the first committee of the bro- 
thcrhood.s was nothing less than "in- 
cipient anarchy." *He was glad, he 
said, to find this committee more con* 
dilatory. 

The spokesmen for the men insist- 
ed that the workmen did not wish to 
strike and vould only tolerate a walk- 
out as a final and extreme means. On 
the other hand, the spokesman said, 
the rxiilway employes did not propose 
at any cost to forego the fruit.s of 
victory previously obtained by or- 
ganized labor. 

Men Make ConcettHionH 

It is understood the men authorized 
the President to tell the presidents of 
the railroads that the cmpioyr.s had 
made real concessions and ask them to 
repudiate the stand of their managers 
and agr^ to the eight-hour working 
day as 'a basis of settlement in the 
present negotiations. 



Will President Wiboi be Saccessiiil? 



^ 



Can Pj-esident Wilson effect a satisfactory settlement 
in the demands 'of the four greft railroad biotlieihoods lor 
a shorter workday, with time and one-half foi oveitime? 

The Labor News is of the flpinion that he can. We be- 
lieve that the officers of the "Bif Four" think that he can 
make a settlement, and they are driving him every oppor- 
tunity to do so. He has expivsaed himself as in favor of 
the eight-hour principle, believing that a majority of the 
people of the United States w«re of the same opinion. 

It is admirable to note tile loyal manner in which the 
membership of the four i*aHroiMl brotherhoods have con- 
ducted them.selves since the eighVhour demand was drawn 
up almost a year ago. They^ hav« not only held their place, 
but have gone along assisting wh<R% possible, strengthening 
their organizations by securing fvery man eligible to join 
the organization that representf his particular line of 
service. 

At the last regular meeting of the Trainmen's Lodge at 
Freedom, action was taken to show their lepresentativc 
(one of the 640 mentioned in the 'daily papers) that they 
stand behind their vote. The following telegram was .sent: 

"C. R. Cailton, General Chairman, 
Pennsylvania Lines West, 

Broadway Central Hotel, New Yoik, N. V. 
"Freedom Lodge met and jq)jiroved your actions in the 
eight- hour situation. * 

"We aie ready to give up our jobs to get it. 
"We bitterly oppose ai'bitration. 

3ign«d by the Secretary." 

This is proof conclusive tha^ cold feet don't l>egin at 
home. 

The Labor News thinkr th . VH honest effort is being 
made by the officers of the brotherhoods io accomplish the 
eight-hour demand with time and one-half for overtime 
u without resorting to a strike. « 



TRACTION EMPLOYES TO 
HOLD PICNIC-FIELD DAY 



L.\D1ES OF THE M AC( ABEES 
HOLD THKIR AN.M AL PICNIC 



NEWSPAPER MEN ARE 
INVITED TO OUTING 



CARPENTERS LOCAL 
1033 IN SESSION 



Hold InlercKling Meetinji at Monaca 

On Wetkiesday Evening — New 

Members Taken In. 



Western Pennsylvania .Scribes lo be 

(iiieh>ts of I'ittKburgh Railways 

Co. at .1 unction Park. 



.Monibors of the Labor Npw.s staff 
jiro in receipt of the following invita- 
tion to attend the annual prcs.s outing 
at Junction Park on Sunday next, the 
ocr.'ision h>einK ono of the annual af- 
fairs i)ut on h\ the I'ittsburgh Uail- 
uay.s Ciunpany: 

Pittsburgh Railways Company 
Pittsljurprh, Pa.. August l.'>. lOlG. 

Dear Sir: — The Annual Outing at 
Junction Park, New Hrighton will bo 
held next Saturday, Augu.st 20. The 
com and chicken will then bo ripe. 
In order to add interest to the trip I 
have char-tcrcd a special car on the 
Harmony trolley route, going via Ell- 
wood City to Beaver Falls. This spec- 
ial will leave Liberty Avenue and 
Sixth Street, Pittsburgh, at 11:45 a. 
m., sharp. It will stop only at Fort 
WayTie Station, North Side. Please 
be on hand promptly as the trip to 
Junction Park will take three hours. 
We will have sandwiches on the car 
for those who are hungry. 

Please let us know by return mail 
on the enclosed past card whether you 
cap joins us. I would like to know 
the number for whoiji I must provide. 
"Thanking you in advance for your 
courtesy, and with best wishes, I am, 
Yours very truly, 

J. E. McKIRDY. 



HOD CARRIERS GAIN. 



The newly organized Hod CarrierB' 
Union, of Pitt8flel<j, Mass., won a 
short strike for union recognition, a 
$.3.00 minimum, and an eight-hour 
work day. 



Subicribe for The 'LaUbox Newa. 



Many matters of importance were 
taken up at a regular mooting of liO- 
cal Union No. 10.",:5, U. 15. of C. &. 
J. of A., held in the Bank Hall, Mo- 
naca, on Wednesday evening. Two 
members were taken into the organi- 
zation on cloar:ince card.s. Jhoy are 
J. .S. I'owsor. from Local No. .'i78, St. 
l.oui.<5, Mo., and Harvey H. Shiveley, 
from Local No. 287, Harrishurg. Four 
ramlidatrs wore also received on ini- 
tiation, as follows: O. ('. .McNutt, 

Daniel Lambert, An.son .McDonald, 
Huirii H. Clianihf-rs. 

Sick benefits wore drawn for thr 
following ainoimls: Janios McC^aily, 
•SI 0.00; A. J. Froobprn. §20.00. 

(looipc ( ornoll. of Mcavcr, was 
clofl«>d vice prosidont. 

The by-lav s conmiittoe was pres- 
ent and the now by-law 
second reading. 

A .'>,u'ci:il nuoting will bo called for 
the e\cnin^' of Tue.sday, Augu.st 20, 
for the third and final reading of the 
bv-laws. 



LABOR DAY DETAILS 
BEING PERFECTED 



passed on ,. vents, an. 
the «'V(Mal 



MANAGER SHKTTKRLY 

GIVES A.N EXPLANATION 



Manager C. C. Shetterly, of Junc- 
tion Park, desires to make a state- 
ment relative to an occurrence at the 
dancing hall on Wednesday evening, 
at which time the Ladies of the Mac- 
acbees were holding forth. Manager 
Shetterly having loa.sed the pavilion 
had no control over the admission 
charged. A number of his regular 
lady patrons were charged admission, 
which is not the practice on occasio&B 
when the fSavilion is not leased, and 
Mr. , Shetterly desires to inform his 
regular patrons that he was helpless 
in the matter, as the hall was leas^. 



Indications Point to .Successful Cele- 
bration at .function Park on 
.•^eplcmber Itli. 

The committee on arrangements for 
the big Labor Day celebration at 
./unction Park- is hard at work per- 
lecting d'taii.^ for lh«' air.iir ;m.I ac- 
'-ording to nu-mbers of the .same the 
celebration this ye.ir promises to sur- 
iuifis any previous occasion of tlio kind 
• ver held in the valley. Manager 
Shetterly of the |)arl<, is airangint; for 
.1 big free .' ix'cial attraction and with 
•!>e program of (ield events, wliirli is 
i>oing enlariri'd daily, the \r.ii\i\ inu.'^ic 
■ind (lancin;;, to .say nothing of the 
numerous «*oncr.'<sions and the big pir- 
i:ic, promisr- to m.ikc the dax' one Ihtuc 
o be rciii'jinhercd by the union work- 
■rs of the \^vail(y ;ind t!;':r many 
"riends who will attend. 

Mcrrliant.'; in Ihr valley iiave boon, 

. s has alw;iys been the ra.se, exroed- 

ilgly libr-nil in the matter of (loii;it- 

ng pri/.ts for t!ie m;iny ;ithlet.ic 

the indications ;ire that 

events will be well filled 

..ith entrants. Tlie romf)lete pro^rrani 

'f the day's doinirs will be published 

in The Labor News. 



The Ladies of the Maccabees in the 
Heaver Valley held a union picnic at 
Junction Park Wednesday afternoon 
and evt;nin^:, there iR'ing a large at- 
tendance. A fancy drill was held dur- 
ing the afternoon, and 2r> new mcm- 
biTS were initiate<l, the Heaver Falls 
dej^reo team putting on tho work. The 
dance in the eveninjr was a pleasant 
affair. 



Tuesday, August 28th. is Date, 

and Junction Park Is the 

Place 



PinSBURGH MEETING 
MOST SUCCESSFUL 



MANY INTERESTING 

EVENTS ARE PLANNED 



"(Jet- Together" Affair of R. R. Hroth- 

erhuiids Productive of .Much Good. 

Was Well At tended 



The "Get-Together" meeting of the 
four railway brotherhoods, of J.he 
i'ittsburgh district, held at the Mon- 
on;,'ahela Hou.se, Pittsburgh, on Tues- 
day evening, August 10th, was large- 
ly attended and resulted in much good 
from several standpoints. Matters of 
inlertsl to niemlKMs were di.scussed 
and the meeting was a most success- 
ful OTiO. 

Another meeting is being planned 
for Tue&day, September I2tb, upon 
which occasion matters of importance 
to the men will be taken up, and a 
full attendance of delegates i» rv- 
quested. 

Arnong those pro.s<'nt at Tuos- 
tlay'.s meeting ueie (Jeorjre .St«wart, 
:;2:», 1!. of L. 1. & !•:.; J. O. Kum- 
hvrKvr, 842. P.. of M. T.; C. P. Wil.son. 
2r.». l;. of I,. V. \-i:.-. 1{. W. Dees, .^2, 
«). K. T.; T. H. .\l(\;in.ier, .^2, (). U. 
'].; A. \'. Craij:. :;i;i, I!, of U. T.; J. 
L. Freeman, 2:;.'.. 11. of I.. F. &• K.; J. 
.S. ijrindle, 2.;."i, H. of L. F. & K.; 
<)iarles Brown, ri.l, (). K. C.. .uul rep- 
resentatives of the I'.caver \ alley La- 
bor .New.s. 



"SAFETY FIRST" IS 
SLOGAN B. Y. T. CO. 



.\cciden1?. on (he System .\re Being 

(ireatl> Kediiced h\ Persistent 

( ampaiun. 



W. Jl. Iloyce, of the 
action Co., is tlie n-- 



HEAVER 
NOW 



VALLKY ( C)N( KRNS 
HI VINt; FALL GOODS 



BIDS RECEIVED 



Beaver School Board again received 
bids 'tuesday niffht for the Erection 
of the proposed new school building. 
The bids were tabulated and the con- 
tract awarded at a nMetfnff to b* held 
this evening. 



<«; 



Miss v.. n. Dew hirst, Now Hrigh- 
ton milliner, is in New York this week 
purchasing her fall stock and inci- 
dentally taking in the pleasures at 
Atlantic City. 

Maurice Levy, of Levy Mros., New 
lirighton and Heaver Fall.s merchants, 
is in Now York on a purchasing trip, 
and will devote several rlays to laying 
in a stock of fall goods. 

Miss Rebecca Schwartz, Rochester 
milliner, will leave for New York the 
first of the week, on Jier fall fturchas- 
ing trip. She will b^ absent several 
'dreeks. 

CONTRACT LET. 



.'^upcrint'^n'lenl 
ilea VI r Valles Tr 

> ipitrit of nui!ierouii pleasant 'criti 
ci.siiis of his "Safety I'irst" cam- 
jiaign, \shicli has i)e«'n i?i existence on 
the lines uT the company for several 
years, liacli ear carries cards an- 
Mi>uncinvr tlio desirability of coo])ar- 
aling w til the comijany in its cam- 
paign to lossen the number of acci- 
dents, some of .<ai(l e.iius bein^r of an 
e.\cocdingl\ oritrinal character. For 
instance, one reafls: "It may be safe 
for your wife to go to the eountrv , hut 
it IS not 'safe for her to get off the 
ear backwards.". Other cards are 
oi.ually original. If car riderx would 
only follow the advice given by the 
cards, the danirer of accidents will be 
reduced to a miniinum, and it is up to 
the car patrons to cooperate With Mr. 
IJoycc in the >;ood work. 



The fourth annual outing of the 
employes of the Heaver Valley Trac- 
tion Company will be held at Junc- 
tion Park on Tuesday, August 29th, 
the same taking the form of a field 
meet and picnic. An elaborate pro- 
gram has be^n airanged and there 
will be dancing in the evening. The 
big noise of the day will be the ball 
game between teams representing the 
conductors and motormen, and the 
.shop and power house men. The 
meml>ers of both teams are indulging 
in .secret practice and the contest bids 
fair to be vastly exciting and enter- 
taining. O. R. Ward is the manager 
of the conductors' and motornien'a 
team, while C. Marshall in honored 
with the managership of the shop 
and fMjwer house representatives. The 
f9llowing officers, to be in charge of 
the day's festivities, have been elo, c- 
o<i: President. J. I). McKcnna; vice 
president, T. H. Whit?; secret ar\. A. 
Wob.Stcr; treasurer, C. Marshall. The 
dance will be under the suj>crvision 
of William Broumbcck and A. Price. 
D. MeOedo has bmn appoin' ' ' cap- 
tain of the conductor's and motormeft'i 
relay team, and Mr. Walker will head 
the shop and power house sprinters. 
H. K. Pfeiffer will h*- field marshal. 
\\\ unusu.illy nice list of pr'zcs will 
Ix' offered for the events,, whi(,h lirt; 
as follow .s: 

Ono n-.l'io rare, nlay nice, ■240-yard 
dash, 120-yanl dash, hi^h jump 
i>:-oa(l jun)>. ball llirowin^-. blue rock 
shoot, bas<'h.iil i::itne. 

The traction etuployes extend ;i cor- 
ili.il invilatfron to everyb(Ml\ in the 
valley to be j. resent upon this occa- 
sion, guarantoeintr them a jrood time, 
h.iiicing will be eiijoved from 8 IQ 
12 o'clock in the evening, jxentlemen 
!>eing .admitted for the sum of fifty 
c-ents, ladies free. ^ 



VALLEY MERCHANTS 
ARE IMPOSED UPON 



Oulsidi- ."Solicitors for Various Labor 

Papers Viclinii/e Local 

Dealers. 



The County Commissioners have let 
the contract for the erection of a sew- 
age disposal plant at the ne\# county 
home to Patton & Rossa, Aliquippa, 
for 12,130. 



Subicril>e for The Labor News. 



■■i>^:v 



Mi-rrliants and manufacturing con- 
cerns in the l!ea\er N'alley h.ave been 
the victims of <ine of the ino.-jt hra/.en 
.in«l fraudulent methods ever con- 
ceived t<» rob business men. For 
weeks past tliey have been hounded 
Ity advertising solicitors, claiming to 
be vepreseiit.alivi.s of organied labor 
-oad joj au!sivio.\pi: joj ;iu!5(si: puu 
irrams, etc. A few day.s' ago a solici- 
tor, carrying credentials froi R. J. 
MctJrath, President of the Iron City 
Trades Council, called on Cashier 
Robert ('am|)bell, oT the Monaca Na- 
tional IJank, and after stating that he 
wanted an a<lvertiscmont for the La- 
bor D.'iy official souvenir booklet for 
the Labor Day celebration of the Iron 
C'ity Tnides Council at Pittsburgh, in- 
forme<l Mr. Campbell that the Heaver 
Valley unions were to hold no cele- 
bration this year, and that no special 
Labor Day edition would l)e i.ssued by 
The Labor News. Fortunately, Mr. 
Campbell knew differently and the so- 
licitor, after begging "for at least 
%i>," went on his way. Needless to 
.say, ho did not get the money. 

Jo.seph Campbell, .cashier of the 
People's National Bank at Rochester, 
had the same experience, and Charles 
D. Fischer, manager of <^e Kay Tail- 
.Many matters of importance were oring Company, at Beaver Falls, wa» 
disfto.sed of and routine business) "stung" for an advertisinff contract on 



DISTRICT COUNCIL 
CARPENTERS MEET 



A regular meeting of the Carpen- 
ters' District Council of Heaver Val- 
ley v.as held .Monday evening at the 
rooms in of the organization in the 
Kramer building. New Hrichton. 



of the council tnmsacted. 

Business Agpnt 1?. S. Bowser re- 
ported on several different jobs and 
there was considerable discussion of 
ways and means lo cope with dilTer- 
ent matters pertaining to the craft 
in the valley. 

The Council has placed Fred Mar- 
quart, of Rochester, on the unfair list, 
as he is said to be eqiploying non- 
union labor on- hit work. 



Wjednesday from another Pittsbar^ 
concern, who represented themeelvef 
through the solicitor, to be conneeted 
with local unions. 

B. Mulheim & Son, of Bridgewater, 
had a like experience, the imof|tii« 
talking solicitor getting away with |i 
of Iheir money. 

Other cases ere on recofd where 
BeaTer Valley merchants have 
(Cbntfaiiied oB Fife Fi«9. 



-*'• 



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JIT- -W". "^■ 






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BBAVB TittXST LABOB NKWB 



FIRST ANNUAL 

MOTORCYCLE 



Junction Park 

AUGUST 

SATURDAY 



Races Start at 2:00 P. N. 

rndor Auspices of the 

Harley- Davidson Motorcycle Club 



OF UOCIIKSTER, FA. 



White Bros., Promoters 

6-BIG EVENTS-6 



t 



' • «. 



Events. Motors 

1st — IS-mile Professional Race; three prizes; 30-50 cu. in. 
2nd — 5-mile Amateur Race; three prizes; 30-50 cu in. 
)^(d — lO-mile Profesional Race; three prizes; 30-50 cu. in. 
4th — 2-mile Bicycle Race; two prizes; Open to All. 
5th — 5-mile Sidecar Race; three prizes; Open to All. 
6th — 15-mile Professional Race, three prizes; 30-50 cu. in. 



All races to be run under the rules of the Federation 
of American Motorcyclers. 



The following Speed Kings will ride in these events: 

L.KEYS L. CHRIST R. BACON H. D. IMMEL 

A. G. SCHMIDT E. McCALL G. BLACK 

Also other well known riders. 



This Will be the Greatest Speed 

Event Ever Held in 

Beaver County 



Admission to ParK. - 256. 

You are Akways Welcomo at^tlio Park 

C. C. ShWtERLY, Lessee and Manager 






Wi. 



THOMPSON'S 

THE ST9RE FOR MEN AND BOYS 

i • • ■ ^ 

35% OFF SALE 

On Hen's, Boys' and Children's Salts 
Hats and Dress Pants 



4 



Special Dress Shirt Sale, eo^ 
Ah Fast Cdoni. . ^OC 



• • • • • 



SIO.OO Suits, now 16^0 

|16.00 Suit*, now 19.75 

$18.00 Suits, now. . .$11.70 



20.00 Suits, now. . .f 13.00 

>.00 Suits, now. . .|16.25 

)0.00 Suits, now. . .$19.50 



John P. 'thompson 



' 1 

^ 



BKATBII FALLS. PA. 

mmmmimmmmmmm 



rWflGS'rHktHE;VEKUAPnN 








1-/ 



^c«*w uS^ 



*c»Jt « 



SAYS STRIKERS 

ARE JUSTIFIED 



Wilkeg-Itariv. Ta. — State Comniis- 
sioricr of Labor and Industry Johxi 
Pricrt- Jackson, has nMterated his for- 
mer statement that motormen and 
conductors of this city were justified in 

issuing that an arbitration award be 
reopened, and which resulted in the 
present strike, whicli has been waged 
for sevenil months. 

Tlie strikers originally demanded 
wage increases, and the matter was 
referred to an arbitration board. Mr. 
Jackson served as chairman. The 
board's award was based on a sliding 
scale. The employee' representative 
protested against this decision, which 
ignored the purpose for which the 
board was created. Later Mr. Jack- 
son accepted this viewpoint and Tc- 
versed his decision, which the com- 
pany refused tg accept. 



MUNITIONS WORKERS WIN. 



Scranton, Pa. — After a week's strike 
800 puddlers, carpenters and laborers 
employed at the Scranton Bolt and 
Nut Works, have increased wages. 
Puddlers' rates are raised $1 a ton; 
laborers, 50 cents a ton, and carpenters 
10 per cent over their old scale. The 
company is making war munitions. 



Subscribe for The Labor News. 



SEND IN THE NEWS. 



Send in the news. 

Every union in the valley 
should have a press correspond- 
ent. 

You want the news of your 
union to ap|)ear in your pa|)er. 

(Jet busy and see that some- 
body is especially appointed to 
take care of this r utter. 

See that it reaches the Labor 
News office as early in the 
week as possible. 

News should be in this office 
by Thursday noon, of each week 
if it is to go in that week's issue 



CHARTER NOTICE 



Notice is herebj^given that an ap- 
plication will be made to the Gover- 
emor of Pennsylvania on Monday, 
August 28th, 1916, at 10 o'clock A. 
M., by Harry Grimshaw, J. D. Mc- 
Kenna, J. C. Figley, J. C. Beaner and 
F. M. Hays, under the Act of Assem- 
bly entitled, "An Act to provide for 
the incorporation and regulation of 
certain corporations," approved April 
29th,1874, and the supplements there- 
to, for the charter of an intended cor- 
poration to be called the Beaver Val- 
ley Labor News Company, the char- 
acter and object of which is transact- 
ing a. printing and publishing busi- 
ness, and for these purposes to have, 
possess, and enjoy all the rights, 
benefits, and privileges of said Act of 
Assembly and the supplements there- 
to. JOHN B. McCLURE, 
jIyl4-21-28-aug4 Solicitor. 




IRON CITY 

DRY CLEANING CO. 

We Have ^ust Opened Up a First Class 

Dry Cleaning, Pressing 

AMD DYEING 



Establishment, where we are prepared to attend 

to all classes of Ladies* and Gentlemen's 

"work. Special attention given to 

the proper handling of 

Evening Gowns, Etc. 
i 

EXPERTS ONLY ARE EMPLOYED. ALL 

WORK CALLED FOR AND DELIVERED. 

AUTO SERVICE 

GIVE US A TRIAL AND WE WILL CONVINCE 
YOU OP OUR SUPERIORITY. 



Iron City Dry Cleaning Co. 

HARRY L. dLMORE, Manager. 
B. C. Phone, RodMster 5262. BeU 546-J 

i05 BRIGHTON AVB^ - ROCHESTER, PA. 





Assisting Business Growt 



Commercial patrons of moderate requiroawBta as weO 
aa those with larger interests find here a congenial «i»!^im»<^i 
atmosphere. 

Our highly efficient organisation, possessed of excellent 
facilities and adequate connections, is constantly at the ser- 
▼ice of our patrons. 

Our continual effort to further the interests of all pa- 
trons is not confined to the narrow limits of accepted bank- 
ing service hut includes every adrice and assistance consis- 
tent with our modem, constructive hanking policy. 



Beaver Trust Company 

BEAVER, PENNSYLVANIA. 
CAPITAL AND SURPLUS $890,000.00. 





Two Suites of Offices 
Elegant Location 



i 



Npw Brighton, Pa. 




SMALL SUCCESS MAY LOOK INSIGNIFICANT TO 
THE UNSUCCESSFUL, BUT NOT TO THE MAN WHO 
IS A SUCCESS. 

EVERY SUCCESSFUL MAN HAS BEEN A SMALL 
SUCCESS AT SOME TIME. 

IT IS ALMOST IMPOSSIBLE TO EVEN START WITH- 
OUT A BANK ACCOUNT. 

FIRST NATIONAL BANK 

SOCHESIVB, PENNA. 



L. P. HARN STAN9BURY 

* Watchamkcr, J«irder, Optidui 
•ad BBfrsTcr. 
BeU Phone 1274-W 
(82 TUrd St, - - 



»»»»»e»»»»»etee<e»o»»»e»ee 



mm i nm iti nMnn itt 

W. R. ANDERSON 

; All Kinds mt Trmk and Smolud \ 
MmU. 



t tii n iti mmmm iii * 

RAINCOAT SALB 
For LmUm, Men and Boys. AIm 
Rain Capos at mj lo w pricaa. 

CHA8. STEIN, 
lltS Paana. At*., MsMca, Pa. 



SAVOT HOTEL AND 
RESTAURANT ^ 

Woridngmen's HstiL 

Open Day and Niffht 

SeS Soreath Atc. BaaTor FaDa 



»e»##i<»#e»>#>e<o###<is f »» 
' n i m iiii m ^ nnm i n a 



Penna. Are. Phannacy 

Ira C. Hoffman, P. D., Prop. 
Pouia. At« a ISth St. 
1I0NAC^ PENNA. *<^ 

'The Rezan SCora." ^ 



f ♦#ee»e»»ee#ee»e»e»»»»ee' 

We Insure Erery Thing <; 
Under the Sun — 
Consult Us. 



MOULDS & DONCASTER, 
Rochester, Penna. 



'^e Hold Thee Safe. 



ft 



1916 WALL PAPERS 

St 

. KENAH BROa 

; Third Ave., New Brighton 



••e»e»»»»e»e»»<»»»e»»»»e»e 



JOHN W. HARTZEL 

Ptnnbing, Qmm FlttiBg, Tia aai 

Slate Rooffaif. 

Hot Air Fnmaeea. 

P. O. Bide. • • Rochester 

••♦»»e»#»»»»»ete»»<< f ete i 



M »»e»»#»e»e»e<»e»e>»»ee»e 



eee>eeee»eeeee»e»e»e»»eee» 



Quinn T. Walton 

PLUMBER 

Gas, Steam and*^t Water 
Fitting. 

Estimates Promptly Giren. 

Both Phones. 

Third 8L, BEAVER, PA. 

< eeeet>»e»eee»>»t»ee»e»»e< 



nmm s msnnn i umi 



fW Tav Nert 8«it See 



ALEXMUDRIK 
Morchaat €Ulor 



Tt New Tefk Am^ 

• n il mumn i mn mi 



Tm Good Ciiidy and lee 
Ga to the 

Oljrmpia Confectionsty 
Maaonk Bldg., Nair 



»»»»e»o»»ee»teis»t ff ee< 

DR F. R. HOLT, DENTIST \ 
Wilson BMff., KedMster. 

Office Hours: 9 to 12 a. m.; 1 ] 
to 6 p. m. Open evenings. 
Bell 612-R. B. C. 7004. 



ee»»»ee»e»»#et»e»»eeet»e»e 



.nmn i fumn ii um i 

PIANOS and VICTROLAS 

New Records reeeiTed on the 
28th of each arionth at 



Inaie Stoce 

ROCHSSnOL 



■••i mnmnm iii n i nt 



t u iii n i i i m i nmum * 



WM. B.lleKKAN 

• PlunUng, Ctau, Steaai and 
* HoTWatar flesttng. * 

7th 81. lad f Ik Avau 
I Both Piiais. WmAJWtL WALLS \ 



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BEAVBR VHSXBY LABOR NEWS 



HAG LIFE with 
JOHN HEAK^ 

^QeoraeVHdbart 




John Henry On Getting Grip 



SAY! did you erer pat on tho goc- 
glM and go jor riding with an at- 
tack o( th« grip? 
. It hM all othttr fonna of anraaemant 
huahad to a lullaby— tako It trom 
Uaole Hank. 

Aaa Bad B07 tta« grip haa sTair 
other dla«aa« alapped to a aobblng 
atandaUU. 

It's doUara to prvtsali that the grip 
germ i» the bralnlaat little bug that 
was ever chated by a doctor. 

1 was alttlng quietly at home read- 
ing Maeterlinck on Auction Bridge 
when auddenly I began to aneexe like 
a Ruaalan regiment anawerlng Toll 
call. 

Friend wife waa deep In the mya- 
teries of Ibaen'a lateat achievement, 
"Tbe Riae and Pall of the Hobble 
€klrt." but she politely acknowledged 
my flrat aneexe with the cuatomary 
"Qeaundhelt!" 

Then aha trailed along, bravely with 
her reapoaae for ten or fifteen min- 
utes, but It was no uae — I had more 
aneezes in my syatem than there are 
"Oesundheltr!" in the entire German 
nation, including: principalities, iioa- 
aeaalons acrosa the sea, and the Mu- 
aical Union. 

"John." she ventured after a time, 
"you are getting a cold!" 

"I'm not (retting It." I aniffed; "I 
have it now." 

What a mean, contemptible little 
creature a Krip germ must t>e. Ab- 
aolutely without any of the finer In- 
atincta it aneaka Into people'a ays- 
tema disguised aa an ordinary cold. 
It isn't on the level like appendlcitla 
or inflammatory rheumatiam, both ot 
which are brave and fearleaa and will 
walk right up to you and kick you on 
the ahins, big as you are. 

Nobody ever knows Just what make- 
up the Krip germs will put on to break 
Into the human system, but once they 
net a foothold in the epiglottis notb- 
iuK can remove them except inward 
apoiications of dynamite. 

Thp Rrip germ hates the idea of 
race Buiride. 

I (liscovored ahortly after I had 
sneezed myself Into a condition of 
pale blue profanity that a newly-mar- 
ried couple of grip genne had taken 
a notion to bttlld a neat aomewhara on 
the outakirta of my aolar plezua. and 
two houra later they had abont t33 



"Right again." I whlapered. 

"Do the Jolnta fael aore and pinched 
like a poolroom?" he aald. 

"Right!" 

"Does your tongue (eel rare and 
high priced like a porierhouae ateak 
at a summer reaort?" 

"Exactly ! " 

"Do you feel a apaamodio fluttering 
In the concertina r* 

"Yea!" 

"Have you a sort of nervous heaita- 
tlon in your hunger and does every- 
thing you eat taste like an imposalble 
aandwlch made by a ghostly baker 
from dlaappearlng bread and phantom 
ham?" 

• Keno!" 

"I^flibs your nerve renter tlnkle- 
tlnkW like a breukfaHt bell lu a kitch- 
enlesB boarding house?" 

"Right again!" 

"Have you a foellni? that the Rerms 
have attacked your Adam's a|)ple and 
that th«'re won't -be any core?" 

"Yes!" 

'When you look at tho wall paper 
does your brain do a sort of loop-the- 
loop an(f cause you to meid 100 aces 
or double pinochle?" 

"Yea. and 80 kings, too!" 

"Do you feel a slight palpitation of 
the membrape of the Colorado madura 
and is there a confused murmur in 
your brain like the sound of a hard- 
working gaa meter?" 

"You've got me sized good and plen- 
ty. Doc!" 

"Do you have inaomnia. nightmare, 
loss of appetite, chills and fever and 
concealed respiration in the Carolina 
perfecto?" 

"That's the Idea. Doc?" 

"When you lie on your right side do 
you have an impulse to turn over on 
your left aide, and when you turn 
over on your left side do you feel an 
impulse to Jump out of bod and throw 
stonoa at a i>ollcpman?" 

"There Isn't anything you can men- 
tion. Doc. that I haven't got " 

"Ah!" said the doctor; '"then that 
settles it." 

"Tell me the truth." I groaned. 
"What Is It — bubonic plague?" 

"You have aomethlng worse — you 
have the grip," Doctor Lelaer whis- 
pered gentry. "You aee I tried hard 
to mention aome symptom which you 
didn't have, but you had them and 




My Friends and Rslativea Began to Drop In. 



children attending the public school 
of my medusa oblongata; and every 
time school would let out for recess 
I would go up In tbe air and hit the 
ceiling with my Lima. 

Before daylight came all these grip 
children had graduated from school 
and after tearing down tbe school- 
house the whole bunch had married 
and had large families tft their own. 
and all hands were out paddling their 
canoes on my alimentary canal. 

By nine o'clock that morning there 
must hav# been eighty-five million grip 
germs a,rmed with self-loading revolv- 
era all trying to shoot their Initials 
over the walla of my interior depart- 
ment 

It was fierce! 

When Doctor Leiaer arrived on the 
acene I waa carrying enovch con- 
cealed weapona to atart* something In 
Mexico. 

The good old pill pusher threw hla 
aawa behind the aofa, pot hla dip net 
on the mantleplece, and took a (all 
out of my pulae. 

"Ah!" he said, after he had noted 
that my tongue looked like a curry- 
comb. 

"The same to yon. Doc." I aaid. 

"Ah!" he said, looking hard at the 
wall 

"Say. Doc!" I whlapered: "there'ano 
uae to cut off my leg, becauae the 
germa will hide In my elbow." 

"Do you feel ahooting pains in the 
cerebellnm near the apex of the cos- 
in'o|)olitan?' inquired the doctor. 

"Surest thing you know," I said. 

"Have yoa a batxing in the ears, and 
a cnnfnaed aoand like distant laugh- 
ter In the panatella?" be aaked. 

"It a a cinch, Doc." I said. 

"Do VeiTleel a roaring in the comi>> 
copia with a ticklns kenaatlon In tho 
diaphragm?" ha aakad. 



r 



'iJ-'^y~"^ .. 



;Ji-t;;«**t- 



the grip is the only disease In the 
world wblch makes a specialty of hav- 
ing every symptom known to medical 
Jurisprudence." 

Then the doctor got busy with the 
pencil gag and left me enough pre- 
scriptions to keep the druggist in 
pocket money throughout the winter. 

Then my friends and relatives be- 
gan to drop in and annoy me with 
suggestions. 

"Pop" .Barclay sat by my bedside 
and after I bad barked for him two 
or three times he decided I had In- 
flammation of the lungs and was In- 
sistent that I tie a rubber hanj around 
my chest and rub myself with gaso- 
line. 

I told Pop I had no desire to be- 
come a human automobile, ao he got 
mad and went home. But before he 
got mad he drank six bottles of |>eer 
and be(ore he went home he Invited 
himself back to dinner. 

Then Hep Hardy dropped in and ten 
minutes later he bad me making aigus 
for an undertaker. 

Hep comea to the bedside of the af- 
flicted In the aame restful manner that 
a buzxsaw associates with a log of 
pine. 

He insisted upon taking my pulse 
and listening to my heart beats, but 
when he attempted to turn my eye- 
lids iMick to see If I had a touch of 
the glanders every germ In my body 
rose in rebellion and together we 
chased Hep out of tbe room. 

The next calamity was Teddy Pear- 
son, who had an apartment on the 
floor above us. Teddy had spent the 
previous night at a Tango party and 
ever since daylight he had been beat- 
ing home to wlnd^l^rd. Hla cargo had 
ahlft^ and the seaway was rough. 
Silll^ad In the black and white scen- 
ery ^Ith the silk bean cover loma- 



'•ji -../fcU 



•lamed laa for "Chiggera." 
If a bath in hot water, or in water 
containing salt or strong aoap, la ta- 
kao within a few bouM after expoe- 
Ofe in ahruhl)ery and weeds infested 
with "chlggerH." or "red buga." no 111 
eflacta will be experienced. After a 
long expoaure^ however, u bath hat 
practically no effect, and direct reme- 
are necessary. 

^^ After irritation has set In. and small 

appeal, he arose and said:" 'lW5l.*** '^^ appear, the applicatluo of a 



what muaaed. he groped a 
darkened room and solemnly 
handa with me. 

Then be aat in a chair by the 
aide and began to slog soft lul 
to a bold-over. 

Preaently he reached out hie 
and made all the geaturea that go 
the act of hitting a hell to aumanM 
waiter. 

Receiving no answer to his 



with l«ai 



a heluva club— rottenest aervlct 1i 
this club— a'limit, that'a what It ^tl 
a'Umlt!" Then he hiccoughed Vi$> 
weary way out of the room aai I 
haven't aeen him since. 

An hour later Uncle Louis MUBm* 
dale had looked me over and coniellli> 
ed I bad galloping sMthma. ooa> 
presaed tonailitis, chlllblainoos enN# 
and incipient measles. He Inglsiad 
that I take three grains of qulnlsai 
two grains of asperine, rub the bMk 
of my neck with benzine, soak mj 
anklea in kerosene, then a llttla 



^•oderately tttronK aolutlon of ammo- 
nia to th<> iifrtM'ted parts is recommend- 
ed by the d<>paruuent of agriculture's 
entomologists. A supersaturated ao- 
lutlon of bicarbonate of soda, or conn 
moa cooking soda or saleratus. will af* 
ford relief. Lit>«M-ti.l applications should 
be made until the Irrltutiori aubsldea. 
If the MufferinK is severe u dilute tinc- 
ture of iodine or eolludton should be 
lightly applieti. 




"Ahr He Said. 

phenacetlne, and a hot whisky toddy 
every half hour before meals. 

If I found it bard to Uke tbe toddy 
he volunteered to run in every half 
hour and help me. 

Then his wife. Aunt Jessica, blew 
in with a deduction she rallecj catnip 
tea. She brought it ail the way from 
tho Hronx in a thermns bottle so I 
had to drink it or lose a perfectly re- 
spectable old aunt. 

It tasted like a linoleum cocktall-> 
weouwl 

I>nrinK the rest of the day every 
frli-nd and relative I have In the world 
ru«hejtl in. RUgKested a sure cure and 
thon rushed out again. 

Peaches tried them all ou me and 
I felt like the Inside of a medicine 
chest. 

To make matters worse, I drank 
some dogberry cordial and it chaaed 
the catnip tea all over my concourae. 

Then Peaches, being a student of 
natural history, insisted that I take 
some hoarhound, I suppose tp bite the 
dogberry, but it didn't. 

Blood will tell, so the hoarhound 
Joined forces with the dogberry and 
chased tbe catnip up my family tree. 

Suffering antiseptics! everybody 
with a different remedy, from anake 
poison to soothing syrup — but it cured 
the Krip. - 

Now all I have to do la to cure tna 
medicine. 



'That Stamped Return Envelope. 

"Among tbe many lettera I receive 
from charitable enterprises asking me 
to contribute," said a man who givea 
occasionally. "I get now and then one 
that contains a return addressed en- 
vflope with a stamp on it. 

"This must be an expensive way of 
sending out circulars, but I am lo* 
dined to think it pays. At any rata 
I know how It impre^sses one. 

"I should not feel warranted in 
using that stamp for my own personal 
purposes, and of course It would be 
wasteful to throw It away; and then It 
seems to mc a businesslike method of 
proceeding, thus to make it very easy 
for the person addressed yto reply. 
Further, I rather admire the sporting 
npirlt of an institution that la willing 
to risk a two-cent stamp on the chance 
of getting something more in return. 

"So when I get one of those ap- 
peals containing an addressed and 
stamped return envelope I usually put 
into it and forward a small contribu- 
tion." 



Brass Band Cures Catalepey. 

An extraordinary instance of the 
curative power of music Is recorded in 
newspapers recently arrived (roa 
Italy. In a Naples hospital lay a cei^ 
tain FYancesco Measina who had ar^ 
rived from New York In a condHlon o( 
coma. He had been aaleep (or aevea 
months and nothing the doctors could 
do would arouse him. 

The Countesa Cell, visiting the boa> 
pltal, suggested that a brsMs band be 
engaged to play expreealy (or the 
sleeper. The doctors laughed at lier, 
but she got tho band, brought it to the 
hospital, stationed It under the wla* 
dow of the ward in which Meaaina waa 
sleeping and made It play Ita loudest 
and liveliest pieces. After an hour of 
drumming and trumpeting, Measina 
suddenlf aat up, wide awake. He waa 
cured and was at gnce dlacharged. 
This Is the third time he has had sucki, 
a cataleptic attack, the flrat having 
been precipitated by hla sweetheart 
Jilting him. 



Co-OperatloR. 

Oibbs— So you went after the Job? 
I thought you believed that the office 
ahould seek the man. 

DIbbs— I do: but thla ia a flat Job, 
and I thought It might get windad he-' 
fore It reached mf. — Boston Tran* 
script 



•!{ .... 



Take the Ache Out of Foot-Ache. 

Bathe your feet in hot water, ualng 
Johnson's Foot Soap. Compoaed of 
Borax. Iodine and Bran. At drugglats 
or sent postpaid for 25c by Thos. Oill 
Soap Co., 711 Kent Ave.. Brooklyn. N.Y. 
Adv. 



« 



Buy materials tiiat last 

Certain-teed 




isw Roofing 




irerM** 



■MMMSia SMMto JaanMiH^AMMMi 



Juft in Style. 

"Yon have a ramplalnt to nuke, ma- 
dam?" aaked the milkman. 

"Yea, I have." said the lady df the' 
house at the door. "The milk you 
have left for three mornings is blue — 
absolutely blue." 

"Well, my dear madam, you must 
know thnt blue is the aeusun's most 
fasblonul>le color. Now, if it were 
purple or pink you might complain, 
hot uothlnt; can be more fanhlonabie 
than blue just now, madtim. I assure 
you I"— -Yonkers 8tatesuian. 



The Itemal Feminine. 

"Did you go and tell the lady 
turer that the club waa waiting 
her to begin her talk 00 the hindraaoo 
of the Intellectual development €# 
women l)y the tritliug frlvolltlea af 
lifer 

"Yesm." 

"Well, what was nhe going to keep 
us waiting all this time?" 

"Please, ma'am, she was powdcfia^ 
tier nose." 



Went Pretty Far Back. 

Tliere !.•> not it liir^f »-<>lleotlon of 
nnecdotes uhout Charle.s K. Hutches. 
One of tlicrn (liile». Ynxrli to tlo' tiiiic 
when he wns pivcrnor of New York 

and Ulis tiiakill;; oi|.> ol iil>> ":il>p<-iil.s to 
the IMMiplc." It in«li^•itt^•^ liijit ht' is 

apt Ht n-piirtee. 

Le\vi.«< .StMy\fsjint ('iiiinl-r liad lifon 
saying' in one of tils diiv<>« ilmt Mr. j 
HuKlie.>< was a "inodtTii Oliver Crom- 
well :" Mr. IIukIk'^ \vA'< speaklm; in an j 
upntiite <ity on flw followlni: day wlieu I 
a man in tiit- crowd shouted: "Ilow 
about < M:\ .-r froiiiwidl?" 

"Tliiii r*'ndnd.>< me." the pov.Tiior j 
benined. "of tlie man who was a$k<-d 
by the waiter what kind of .xouj» he 
would have. 

"*\Vliai kind have vdu'^ the «liner 
replie<i. 

"'Oxtnil.' said the waiter. 

•**Isut tliat Kolii^ pri'tty far hack 
for soup?" " 



A Perfect Fit. 

flarn — I^^ ahe Katlslleil with lier di- 
vorce suit? 

Ilelle — Yrx; she wouldn't have It al- 
tered for tin- worlil. 



The Exception. 

•Snpliedrh' — Tliat girl can't take n 
.)ok.'. 

lluhdiih— <ant? Why, I thought 
she was entriiRed to you. 



Night Work. 

Bacon— It l.s Huld'thnt experimeati 
with forelng veKetulile growth bfj 
electric IlKlit.s huve r>e<>n quite succaa* 
ful. 

KRlwrt— .'Should flilnk that woul4 
Htnrt thH ( hli'keiis ^oini; around wal^ 
lug in tlii'lr sleep. , 



Fine Credit. 
"Is his credit Kood?" 
"It nnixt Ix-. I uiiderstsmd he owi 
money to everyho«ly." 



& 



SI 



BANISH PIMPLES QUICKLY 



Eaaily and Cheaply by Using Cutlcura 
8oap and Ointment. Trial Free. 



Smear the pimples lightly with Cutl- 
cura Ointment on end of finger and 
allow it to remain on five minutes. 
Then bathe with hot water and Cuti- 
cura Soap and continue some minutes. 
This treatment is heat upon rising and 
retiring, t^^t is effective at any time. 

FYee saciple each by mail with Book. 
Address postcard, Cuticura. DepL L. 
Boston. Sold everywhere. — Adv. 



The Wheat Yii 

Tells the Story 

of Westim Canada's Rapid Prt|reta 



A^H 



!•> 



The Too-Good. 

Uev. .1. 11. Jowett, pastor of the 
Fifth Avenue I*re8l)yterlan chorch, 
once said nt n dinner: 

"Deliver me from th-* too-good, 
from the straiKlit-laced. tiom the bi|{- 
ored. 

"The too-Rood lt<^ome liard, narrow 
imd cruel. 1 know a too i;ood .Siuiday 
>ohool superintendent wlio said one 
Sunday in tlie cour.se of ids usual ad- 
dress : 

"Our ntlerxiance is very, very good 
today. In fact, we are all here liut Ut- 
ile Catlierlne Simmons. .All hVre hut 
little r'utherint'! What ohstaclo has 
kept our lltlli' Irlcnd a\va^-? Let lis 
Ijope that she l.'j. not well." " — Washing- 
ton Star. 



The Retort Courteous. 

Mrs. I'jtpisli — 1 can as-iiiic yoii tli'Tf 
is a great deal liungln;; on my family 
tree. 

Miss Pert — Some ancestors, for In 
stance? 



Money Is everything to the poor 
chap who hasn't n cent. 



The heavy chmm in WesterrfCanada have caused 
new records to be made in the handling of graioa 
by railroads. For, while the movement ottheae 
heavy shipmenta has been wonderfully rapid, the 
resources of the different roads, despite enlarged 
equipmenta and increaaed fadlitiea, have been 
strained as never before, and previooa fecorda 
have thus been broken in all directiona. 
The largest Canadian wheat ahipmenta through New York ever known 
are reported for the period up to October 15th, apwarda el leer aad • 
qaaHer milliea baahela helag expoHed ia leea fhaa aix weeka, 
and this was but the overflow of shipments to Montreal, through which 
point shipmenta were much larger than to New York. 
Yields as high aa 60 bushels of wheat per acre are reported from aD 
parts of the country; while yields of 45 bushels per acre are common. 

Thousands of American farmera have taken part in this wonderftd pro* 
duction. Land price* arc tflll low and free Itomeataad lands ara eaaily ■ec urt d 
in good lucatuics. runvenicnt to churches, echoola. Barketa. railwars. etc 
Thar* la ■• war tax oa laaa aad ao ceaacrlytlaa. 

Wnte for illutt rated pamphlet, reduced railroad rates and other 
iniormation to Suttcnotetulcnt imnusratioo. Ottawa. 

Caoada. or ^' 

I. i. CrawleW. S«1 t. gMMaa St.. 

SyracMM, New Terh; T. A. Ha ri l i aa. 
lie NerlhtteSlrMt. karrUbarg. Pa. 

Canadian Qoveminent Agenu 



Just a Trifle. 
Here is a ridi< iilou^i little Rift which 
may cum.- in handy for slipping into I •J»"n^e » hor»e Wheexe, 



TliCI, SWOI 



-^ 



an envelope with a cheery letter f<»r u 
yotiin;ster. an invalid friend or .some- 
one who Inst naturally appreciates a 
^<Kvl laiij;l*:''~~h\ls a small hookinark 
Munl**''tvlih a liiiYf<iiicli colored satin 
rthhon and on each >ud is uttaclied a 
small tloll r)f wool. It lilajLJ** hinck 
wool or white w<K)l. and It Is tied in 
tassel style, with ccdored cotton for 
t'\>-<. none and month. The whole 
"doll" Is not an Incli Ion;;. Try oue 
of these bookmarkers with n Itit of 
rll>i)on and soin.' left-over end»rol(lery 
silk or cotton. 




Fell Some. 

Ilodd — How are yon gefilns along 
In tho Aviation school? 

ffreeiie — .N'ot very well 

"Tfead of the class yet?" 

"No. I was up near the lii'ad yes- 
ferdajv hut 1 fell. iin<l went lo the 
foot." 



Roar, have Thick Wind 
or Choke-dowa, can be 

reduced with 



^BSORBINE 



also other Bunches or Swellingt. Not 
no hair gone, and horac kept at work. 
Bomical — only a few drops required ataas^ 
plication, f 2 per bottle delivered. IhIIIIII 
ABSORBINE. JR., die antiseptic hnimftt lei 
manltind. reduces Cysu, Wens, Pfeislli 1 
SiWollcn Veins and Ulcers. |l and lia bottled 
dealers or delivered. Book "Evidence" frsa 
W . F. VOUMS. P. D . F .. ail TssMla tU SertaafeM. Maaa 



Of U O f C Women as well 
▼» *»^-' ^^^ men ara made 
able bx kidnay 
bladder trouble. 
3 LA. ME •*'"^» recommend 



TO 



K I I m e r ' a 




Root tha araat kidner remedy. At drag* 
Slats In flrty-canr-sand dollar alsaa. Tag 
may receive a aampie alxe bottle bjr Peai 
eel ro*t. also pamphlet telllnf at>out t^ 
Addresa I>r. Kilmer a Co.. Blnghamte* 
N. r.. and enclose ten ceois. also meatlai 
this paper. 




Children Cry For 




What Is CASTORIA 

OMtarte Is ft bannleM Ml i rtlUite for (JmIov Ollf' 
yorio. Drop* and Soo«]iliiff Synmu It la plaagai 
contains ncttber Oplnm« Morplibie nor ouisr Vi 
■nbstance. lU nfe Is Its g n a m n t ae. It flssUufS Wscbm 
atnd allays FereriahnaMe For more ttina tUrty j9mnm 
baa^een In constnnt turn tor the relief of Constv^ttsfte 
FliitifcMicy, frind CoUo, all Teethliw Tiodbtes luid 
DlarrEftft. It feffolates tbe Btomacih itaid B 
asalndlstes thm Food* fflwlnr healthy and natoaal 
Ztaa Childna's ~ ~ ^ 



!■ 



GENUINE CASTORIA ALWAYS 

Bean the Signature of 




boff 9ty0hffm» 



h Use For Over 3t Teais 

TiM Kind You H«v« ANmots Boii#ll 




>r-;>r..* 



i< fy,: .v.-«X'.«f»,;;. V «. 



.;*i;U,- 




>* • • ' 



"IP ■ tv- 



::*.-¥ r-^ . 



'(••T* 










-%■■>■. 



,^t^'- 



V 



ljlJ-\-) 



TAIXBT LABO» Wnrs 



BEAVEE VALLEY LABOR NEWS 

PvhlUhed BmIi Friday by Um 
BEAYER VALLEY LABOR NEWS COMPANY 
Near TluH St and CoUege Ave. • • Beaver, Penn'a. 



iCiitand M second-cIaM matter October 8, 1915, at the post office 
at Baarer, FennaylTania. under the act of March 3, 1879. 

lOSEPB C. BEANER Prealdeat 

J. D. McKENNA Vice President 

■ » 



B<;I1 rhone 101 9- J. 



Beaver County Phone 636ii. 



REX L CH A-'MBERS GKN. MGR.-EI)ITOR 

F. I. ANDER.SON TREASl RER 

C. L GILBERT ADVERTISING & CIRCULATION MGR, 



I 



<m 




BE> 



THK LABOR MARKET 

Some one who attoiulod the meeting of the Steel Founders' 
Society recently, and who Hl'terwaids expiessed his views foi- 
piil)iication. was much exeicised over the conditions which exist 
in the steel tnule. He was particulaiiy concerned because, iis he 
put it. tlio "Wottoni had (h»»i)i)e(l out of the hibor market." The 
.smile iiiij^lit have been more. ii|)|)i<>i)riate had he said that the roof 
had ^^one oil the labor market. We do not know to what - level 
najres niiiy \ot advance, but it seems certain that they are nearor 
the top than they are to the bottom. That is .somethinjr which 
worries some people w i y much. \"ct who amonjj those who wc 
woriTins' renionihci- a period ot prositerity which was not ac- 
conipanied by a laisc in wajresV 

A liiise in wa^es in a jiciiod of active business means tliiit 
labor is shariii^^ iu the ad\aiita«;es cf that activity. Were it i)os- 
sible so to cidrr human ad'airs liial all the l)eiiefits of a jieriod of 
trade iictivity went to cjipital instead of beiny dixided with labor. 
no surei- road to disaster could l>e found. The last thin^ that any 
:-ane man would wi.sh wouhj bo a condition which would make the 
rich i-ichcr and the poo'- pooi cr. What is ri-ally to l»e desired is 
the },fradual improvement of all the people. 

Wealth in tlie sense in which that woid is i)oi)ularly used will 
always he the exception. J*i<>sperily is not a tiling similarly re- 
stricted; it may well extend to all who are willing to work Idi a 
shaiu of it, and today it does exteiid to piactically all such. In 
othei- words, labor is in deman<I, and wa^jes are high. The lonjjer 
that condition lasts the l)etter. 



rfc 



VALLEY NER6IIANTS 

ARE IMPOSED UPON 



(Continued from Pnrat Page) 



victimized for various amounts by the 
same cltuis of solicitors. 

As a maUcr^^f fact, the souvenir 
pi-jsrram, ftts^ which McGrath stands 
us tiponsor, is not for the benefit of 
th«' Iron City Trades Council any more 
thuin the Council has sold the right to 
thi' schemers connected with the pro- 
gram, to use tlie Council's name in 
thoir solicitutions uf advertisements. 
Most of the revenue goes to a man 
named Abemuthy, a professional pro- 
Kruni promoter, and the solicitors who 
are as80ci:itetl with him. 

While the puhlisliers of The Labor 
News appreciate the fact that such 
inisreprcsentulions Ki^i^tly injure the 
work of Solicitors sent out on a lej^i- 
tiinutc cumpui^n ta secure advertising 
for the Labor Day edition of their 
paper, the fad that leaver Valley 
mepchiints and manufacturera are 
robbed iii this cold-blooded manner, 
iiHiro tliun offsets the pecuniary loss 
the pui>cr may suffer. The Labor 
News makes this sup^restion to mer- 
chants and inanufjicturers in this val- 
ley, who have been or may be ap- 
[)r<mched hy these out-of-town solici- 
t)rs who ri'prci-ctit theniseivcs to be 
lonrioi-tfd with ileavcr Valley unions 
— the next tiMi«» one of these men ap- 
proaclirs you, ask him to show his 
credentiuLs properly .signed by the 
.sfcretaiy of tho Central Labor Union 
•)i' the ISeavor V;illoy. If he can do 
tills, thin the man approached is cer- 
tain that If ho jrocE into the thing that 
lie viil at least have tiio satisfaction' 
r>r ktu)\vintr that hi.s nionoy Ih for the 
i-enolit of the union men of the valhey 
and tliat lie is likely to pet some re- 
tiTH i>n his inve.slinent. 

The business men in this valley 
have lonK bocn in poseil upon by this 
ilass of advoilislnu men, and, if it is 
their desire to assist the union men 
A ho live and work in the valley ami 
lo realize, in cii.so tlic-y are merchants, 
some return on their investments, 
they will do well to insist upon the 
proper credent ialt5 from solicitors. 



i|»»»»nt»»»»:nimuim»»»»»»»»t»»»t»» >i »imwimm 

I Another Lot of Men's & Young Men's Suits I 



4 N » Former values $13 to $18 



' ARBITRATION A GAME OF CHANCE 

Can you call to mind a single instance in which workers at 
and trade have secured the ei^dit-hour day throujfh arhiti'ation? 

The mine workers were forced to inconvenience the public 
for many mont4is by a Ki't'at strike l)efore they .secured the ei^ht- 
hour day. Of course, now the public is g:lad that they were incon- 
venienced, for it was their sacrifice that thus helped to make this 
a better country to live in. 

The printers, bricklayers. caJT)entcrs. and all the rest of 
them secHredan eijfht-hour day through lonjf and repeated strikes, 
but who of you now regrets your inconvenience? All mothers of 
lil)ei-ty and human rights have suffered labor pains. 

If the raih-oa(^ may judge of the future by experiences of the 
past, they perhaps feel safe in submitting the present eight-hour 
question to an ai'bitration boaid. The railroads have already se- 
cured the cooperation of all Chambers of Commerce and other 
employei*s' as.Hociations in their propo.sal that railway employes 
l)e now forced to submit their eight hour proposition to arbitration, 

la the last Western arbitration locomotive hostlers, who have 
always Iveen re(iuired to work 12 hours every day in the yeai', 
asked for a ten-hour day and the arbitration board decided that 
they should continue to work 12 hours. But, in faiiTiess to the 
boai'd, it should be said that it was not believed by anyone that 
hostlers could support their families in decency on 25 cent.s per 
hour unless they did work 12 hours per day. 

After having refused to reduce the 12-hour day to a 10-hour 
day, it would be radical to expect another ai'bitration boaid to 
reduce these same hostlers to an eight-hour day. What courts 
are ever radical ? 

Aside from this, railway employes have lost faith in the 
justice of arbitration boai'ds. They believe arbitration justice 
is a£ fickle as chance. 



The railroad threatened strike, which would tie up the trans- 
portation system of the whole country, is still in an acute stage, 
and before the President who declares, as the mouthpiece of the 
country, there must not be any strtke. No agi*eement has been 
reached, but that the strike will not occur seems sure. 



iiimaiMiMBiii^^ 



Mecklem Hro.s.. tlie Rochester con- 1 
tractors, have tlie tontruct for as- 1 
semblInK Monaca's new portable! 
lichool house, the only one in this sec-j 
tion of the country. The building was 
purchased from the Mershon 4 Mor- 
ley Co., of Saffinav.-, Mich., a a eOBtC 
of $1404. The only additional cost 
u'ill be for putting it together and 
fumi.shings. 

The buildinu is double constructed, 
P.KTO feet, and 10 feet high. The ex- 
terior is of California red wood, and 
the interior, inrluding the floor in of 
aVellow , pine. The building will con- 
tain tw'o r6o*n8, with a capacity for 
acconiinodating from 80 to 85 pupilsf 
tirades •'{ ahd G, formerly in the high 
school building, will occupy il. 



TO SELL AT 



$8.50 $10.00 SIZilO 



<►.► 



Former values $18 to $20 



Former value« $20 lo $25 J^» 



For FRIDAY, SATURDAY and MONDAY ONLY 

We have added an immense number of our highest grade suits to the few suits that 
were left from our Special Sale of last week. Many of this s«ason*8 newest styles and 
most attractive patterns are shown at these prices. You ^ill find a wide range of choice 
in any size, regular, slim or stout. 



::: OthcF ExUa Specidls for These Three Days Only | 

\h* tf^O Tift ^"^ ^"^ "^ ^^^ hundred Boys Suits in sizes ranging fi-om ^ A ^f% 4^\ 

ih* ?K ■ ill t^n to 5*«^'^"teen years. Values up to three times the price ^4 ill <»^' 

iSi T^"^^ asked. FTIIDAY, SATURDAY and M0N1>AV only ipUiWW <n. 

I One Lot Boys' Waists at 50c. One Lot Boys' Wash Suits 50c. |: 

y<> All sizes. Former price $1.00. Ages .'} to 6 years. Former Prices ^^^ 

\\{i 7r)c to $i.5p. ^::: 



1^1 Odds and Ends Throughout the Storo at 1-2 Price and Less— Look for Tbom <^ 

THE ni(; DISCOUNT SALE ENDS SATURDAY EVEMNCi, AUGUST 26th— BUT ONK 
WEEK REMAINS. Everything in our two big stores, except Arrow Brand Col- 
lars and Overalls. 



FIL.M M ASTERIMECE TO BE 

SHOWN AT THE .MAJESTIC 



"(iod's Country and the Woman," is 
a speciul Vitu^raph Blue Ribbon fea* 
turc that is bound to take its pUuce 
umonfc the Kreulest motion pictuxi^ 
yet produced, and will be ahown . Jit 
the Majestic, Rochester, Tiiesday and 
Wednesday, August 29-30. Shows 
each day at 1 und '3 and 7 and 9. 

William Duncan, George Holt and 
Nell Shipman are the principles who 
enact the drama of a (cirl whose moth- 
er is overpowered by a villian and 
f^ivcs birth to a child in the absence 
of her husband. The daughter as- 
surnes the responsibility for the mo- 
therhood. To preserve her own honor, 
the girl, just before her father returns 
writes him that she is going to the 
North woods to meet her "husband." 
The ruse works well, for a young man 
drifting down stream on a homeward 
journey from the wilds, beaches his 
canoe near the girl's forest shelter; 
and falls in love with. her. 

She prevails upon him to poae as 
her husband, and they go back home 
together to protect the good' name of 
the mother. A marriage cerymony is 
performed but thoy live separate, un- 
til finally the baby dies, the father be- 
comes acquainted with facts, and the 
hero takes the girl to his heart as his 
wife in fact as well as in name. 




SCAFFOLD COLL. \rSES AND 

TWO MEN ARE INJURED 



One Lot Men's Soft Hdts $1.00 

Former values $2.00 to $3.00. 



Ajjes .'} to 6 years. Former Prices 
7r)C to $i.5p. 

One Lot Elastic Crotch Union Suits 50c 
These are regular 7.')C L^nion Suits. 



BUILDING CRAriSjl 65c. Boys $1.00 Worth 



Of all our highest ^i-ade Suits, Hats, Caps 
Trunks, Bat^s and Suit Cases. 



Mc. Buys $1.00 Worth |: 



J. A. Butler (t Son. 



is; BEAVER FALLS 



Largest Clothiers 



ROCHESTER ^ 



♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦-♦♦^^^^^^^^^^^^^♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦^^^^♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦^♦♦♦^♦^♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦^ 



PRICE OF HAIRCUTS 
RECEIVES RIG BOOST 



Boas Barbers Jump the Price From 

25c to 35c To Take Effect 

September 1st. 



"Rip Van Winkle" will be the mid- 
dle name of many a resident of Bea- 
ver Valley after September first. And 
all on account of the fact that the 
prices for hair cuts have been shot 
upward. The boosting process was 
put on at a meeting of the Boss Bar- 
bers of the valley, at New Brighton, 



on Monday night, the result of the 
meeting being that the cost of hair 
cutting has jumped ten pents. 

The regular haircut, which cost 25 
cents heretofore, will be boosted after 
September 1st to 35 cents. Hair-cut- 
ting on Saturday will cost 40 centa. 
Pompadour haircuts will cost 40 cents. 

Beard trimming, which has hereto- 
fore been 10 cents and up, will, after 
the first of September, be 15 cents and 
up. 

At the meeting of Local No. 280, 
Journeymen Barbers' International 
Union, in New Brighton, Mbnday 
night, August 21, the new schedule of 
prices will come up for endorsement. 
The price for a shave, 15 cents, will 
remain the same. 

Shorter hours were proposed, but 
this was voted down. 



WIDOWS' APPRAI.SEMENT 



Of the properties to be retained by 
widows and childreii of decedents out 
of the followinj: estates, to-wit: 
George S. Texter, personal... .|30().0O 
Thomas L. Miresinger, per- 
sonal 1300.00 

Notice is hereby given that the 
above appraisements will be confirm- 
ed absolutely by the Orphans' Court 
of Beaver County, on the 14th of 
Septemtxr, A. D. 1916, unless cause 
be shown to the contrary. 

WILL H. HAMILTON, 
Clerk of the Orphans' Ceurt. 



Subscribe for The Labor Newa 



♦ ♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦^♦♦^♦^♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦^♦♦■♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦4«^ 



A. L. Mennrel, of New Sewickley 
township, a former Freedom batcher, 
and A. J. Croft, carpenter, of Pittlk 
burprh. were seriously injured Tues- 
day, shortly before noon, while es* 
gaKe<i^in razing a slaughter hotiae be> 
onging to the former and located. Ml 
Dutchman's run, a short distance from 
the Freedom borough line. Both OMP 
were working on a scaffold, 12 fevk 
in height, the same breakinf and 
cipitating the men to the 
Menni sustained a sprained kdl 
wris^hree teeth knocked oat, a bad 
cut under the chin, and several miMT 
bniiaes. Croft was seriooely in^tftd 
in the anuUl of his back and euff ered 
a bad sprmin of the right aidde. The 
injoriea are not Uumi^t t» be «f ft 
permanent character. 



12^ 



Hand your pftper to yw 
when y«a are tliroo^ wltli H. 



W 






If you expect to send your ix>y or girl to a 
BUSINESS COLLEGE write for 

< 

The Handy Folder 

Ht Answers Your Inquiries to the Point 



Beaver, Pa. 



Beaver Falls, Pit. 



• \ 



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BBAW VALLST tilUKMK NEWS 



• •it mn i m i nnmmmM ii nnm i Hif i #nn tiii 



jjijaiestic ^heatre 



ROCHESTER, PA. 



Program for Next Week 



MONDAY, AUG. 21— Popular Plavs and Players pre- 
sents Mme. Petrova in "THE ETERNAL QUESTION," a 
Metro Wondeiplay of supreme power in five acts. 

TUESDAY, AUG. 22:^esse L. Lasky presents the 
versatile and charming Fannie Ward in "A GUTTKK MAG- 
DALENE," a thi-obbing stoiy with a theme poitraying a 
woman's triumph and redemption. 

WEDNESDAY, AUG 23— Albert E. Smith and J. Stu- 
ai*t Blackton present the Vitagrraph Blue Ribbon Feature 
"THE DARING OF DIANA," in five parts. , 



f^l 



(URSDAY and FRIDAY. AUG. 2425— William Pox 
presents Theda Bara in "UNDER TWO FLAGS." a master- 
ly picturization of Ouida's internationally famous di*ama. 

SATURDAY. AUG. 26— Daniel Frohman presents Mr. 
Frank Losee in "THE EVIL THEREOF," a powerful mili- 
tary drama by. Channing Pollock and Rennold Wolf. 



»♦••••!<••< II 1 1 i« M »»>*»t n ii mm iii m <«tii»4 HM 



At the Majestic 



»9«V** »««««••• • 



1 



GOLOINIAL THEATRE! 

BEAVER FALLS, PA. 

Prou'rani For Next Wcvk 



.M()\DAV, Alt;. I'J — \\tu. A. Ilnidy-Worii] Mini Corporation 
prcsentti Curlyle UlackwoII jrnd Muriol Osiriclic in "Sally in Our Al- 
ley;" alsi> Ilurns and Stiihl as I'oki'j^ and Jabs in "Whal'll Vou Have?" 

TrKSDAY. \\V.. 22— World Film C'or,)oratioii jn-cxc-nls Kinclie 
I'olini in "Tlie LiUie Churcii Around the Corner," a heaulifu! produc- 
tion in five acts; also a Metro-Drew comedy and "The Seli^ Tiibuni.*." 

WKDNKSDAY. Al'ti. 2:J— Metro J'icturcs j.resents Kdniund 
Ilreese in "The S|)ell of the Yukon," a powerful live-act drama of the 
Alaskan Ko\i\ iicids; also h Ham and IJud comedy "Ham's Whirl- 
wind Finish.". 

THl'RSDAY. Al'G. 24— Wni. A. IJrady-World Film Corporation 
presents Clara Kimball Youn^r in "The Feast of Life;" also a N'ita- 
graph come<ly "When It liains It Fours." 

FRIDAY', Al'G. 25 — Bluebird Photoplays present.s J. Warren 
Kerrit^ar in "A Son of the Immortals;" also a Heine and Louie comedy. 

SATURDAY, AUG. 26— Tom Moore and Anna Nillson in "The 
Irony of Justice;" also Helen Gibson in "The Mysterious Cipher," a 
thrillingr railroad drama, and "The Fable of the Fearsome Feud Be- 
tween the First Families." 



"The KUHtial Quvtitiun." 
Mme. Petrova is called upon in '*The 
Kt«mul (.Question" not only to w&ar 
;iome of the elaborate and beautiful 
coututneh huch as ulwuyti udom her, 
but also to appear in the picturesque 
t^arb of an kalian i^irl with a hand- 
orgun. This will be u Hurprise for 
those who have always seen Mme. 
Petrova's classic beauty against the 
background of silkti and jewels. 

The play, wluch will be seen at the 
Majestic, .Monday, Auj;. Jl, teems 
with excitini; incidenib, in uliich a 
race between un ocean liner and an 
aeroplane figures . in a UirillinK de- 
noument. The scenes vary from the 
humble home of the or^an-j^rinder to 
u ducal palace, with liianca (.Mine. 
I'etrova) necessary to all thf action. 

"Jk Gutter MaRdaiene." 

The Salvation Army of Los Anjjeles 
is richer by many hundreiLs of dollars 
from tlie taking ul the Je.sse L. Las- 
ky protiuction of "A Ctulicr .Magda- 
lene," which will be seen at the .Ma- 
jestic Tuesday, Aug. 2:i, wiiii Fannie 
vVard in the title role. 

In tills picture Mis.s Ward i.s seen 
as a private in this army of .salvation. 
W'lien the (Jominander of llu' iuial 
l>arracks was approached for pcriiius- 
sion to use the menibens of hi,s band 
and the interior of the bairaek ; or 
motion pictuie purposes, the request 
met wilii a refusal, but uiitn lie 
leurned thai tl'.e siory dealt u itii tli'j 
silent woi k of this army «.m Ik tim -, he 
readily coiisentetl. AiI'T :..-- iig \...> 
barracks for .scveriil <ia.\.^, the l.a.sky 
Conipany sent ■Jiem .i >ubsusm,ial 
eiuck as a toKen of njii;; lialiun. It 
is a Paramount Prv>;rraiii release. 



"The Daring of Diana." 

Trapjied in a eciuir— lig! ling le-r 
way Lhrougii a very heli- maUliing 
lier cleverness and loyally against ti;t 
I iin.strujiulou.s e^JIlnill^; oi the poliii- 
j tal "ring," Li.iiKi iVar.^on, a y<)'.;ng 
I reporter on the New York Daily Ar- 
1 gus, n5ak<'S a .sciis:itional e.-eaite, 

i . ' 

I "scoop.i" the story and bi'imcs liie 
I band of coii>iiiraloi s and their iciiuers 
I to earth. 

Packed full of throb ant! tl.iill, 

jammed witli courage, devotion and 

sacritice, "Tiie Daring of Di.ma," 

I \ehich will be seen at the Majestic, 

I Wcdnes<lay, Aug. 2o, has a |iulse- 

Mjuickening ajipeal. 

Though she livetl through every 
torture and fought clean and hard, 
her loyalty to the paper and its youns 
chief made it a work of> love. 



; ii t »iMiiii>M»»iitii»{»»»»»»}»»»:»»n»t»ni»»»mwum ; 

: I Here are Some of the lowest Prices | 
Ik Ever Quoted oo Good Furniture 

' * • ' w%w^w^wtrnmtm^m.w^ While prices un nearly e\ery piece of furniture and < *** 



REDUCTIONS 

RANGE 

FROM 

1 20 Per Ct. 

TO 

1 40PerCt. 





/ 



Most Beautiful Picnic 
Grounds in the Valley 

SUNDAY SCHOOLS, LODGES, FRATERNAL ORDERS 

AND PRIVATE PICNIC PARTIES ARE TENDERED 

FREE USE OF THE GROUNDS. 



DANCING 



EVERY WEDNESDAY AND SATURDAY 
EVENINGS. 



Finest Dancing Pavilioa 

In this part of the State, outside of Pittsburgh. Various 
Small Concessions for Amusement of Patrons 

-YOU ARE ALWAYS WELCOME AT THE PARK" 

Reached from all Valley Points by way of 

BEAVER VALLEX TRACTION CC^P|^Y LINES 

Write or Phone Me for Open Dates 

C. C. SHETTERLY 

LESSEE and MANAGER 

TELEPHONES: 

Beaver County, 1163 and 5123 

Bell, Rochester, 32Q; New Brighton, 150O 







9€ 



Onyx" 



inmraaaNBanMBBBBBumBiB 

Hosier 




TJ 



Tow Gat GOOD Vflla« at ANY Prlc^-Silk, Liil* ©r CoMoa 

38cto$I.MptrpMr 

immammmimmmmmmammmmmMmmmmMmmMmMUMmmmmwam 



Advertise in tlie Lalior News 



"Under Two FlajCH." 

"Under Two Flags," which William 
Fox has made into a film triumph with 
Theda IJani in the loading role, is a 
story of French army life in Algeria, 

The story concerns Hertie Cecil, heir 
of the English Viscount I{oyalieu,who 
has shouldered the conse<|uenceB of his 
UrothQT's crime, and gon<j to Algeria, 
in the. French canfp whe^c he ertlists 
unler'an assAmed name, is a' girl, Cig- 
ui^der an assumed name, is a girl,Cig- 

Cigarette falls jn love with Bertie. 
Chateiiuroye, the colonel, hates Bertie, 
and sends him on u mission where he 
is almost certain to meet death. Cig- 
arette heading a relief troop, aids him 
and receives the Cross of the Legrion 
of Honor. Lady Venetia comes to the 
camp and recognizes iiertie and begs 
him to return, but he refuses and she 
falls sobbing on a couch. Chateauroye 
rhearehs 55op.T — rrht . fltesbsHaceier 
hears her and rushes into the tent. He 
insults Bertie, who beats him up. In 
the court-martial, Bertie is condemned 
to die. Cigarette, on the strength of 
her Legion of Honor Cross, gets a re- 
prieve from the marshal. She rushes 
in just as the firing sfjuar fires, and 
receives the bullets intended for her 
lover. Hertie realizing that the poor 
girl is dying, rushes forwanl and 
holds her head in his lap. Her eyes 
close. Without a struggle, and with 
the name of her native land on her 
lips, she died in tiie arms of the man 
she loved. 



"The Kvil Thereof." 

The relentless pursuit of the al- 
mighty dolla. has at last been pic- 
turized in true and hold colors by the 
Famou.s Tlaycrs Co. "The Kvil There- 
of," which ha.s tliis great human hun- 
ger for gold as its central theme. 

Owing to the importance of the in- 
cidents involved in the interpretation 
of this gripping .story, written for the 
screen by the noted dramatir authors, 
Channing Pollock and liennold Wolf, 
the Famous IMaycrs have selected a 
cast of well known players, including 
Frank Lasee. 

This great production, which is so 
striking in its fidelity to life that itn 
realism will startle, will be seen at 
the Majestic, Saturday, August 27. 



Subscribe for The Labor News. 



$ 




FoimdatioiM 
for Fortunes 

""^r — 




ADVKMTISM IT. 
Mm&LMU ••II It it f—. 



While priceM un nearly e\ery piece of furniture and 
all kindH of rug)* a*e steadily advancing, we have de- 
cided tu make a draittic cut in prices of many lines ii. 
order that we nuy effect a quick clmrance an<! 
make riM>m fur our Fall nierchandiMe which iti rap- 
idl> coming in. For this August Furniture Sale we 
ha\e reduced th«' prict*K on the merchandiHe adNcr- 
tised from 20 to 10 per cent. These priceK krv giMMl 
during the rcniaindt-r of this month only. After 
September Isl. the orixinal prices will prevail. Then 
reason it out fur yuurMcIf — isn't it bcHt tu buy now 
and nave this 20 (o 40 per cent. You know the kind 
of furniture we handle — the best thatV made. You 
know the guaraiHee we nell it under — e\ery piece 
must s«-r%e l«t your entire HatiMfactiun. You know 
llu- Tair pidicv for fair dealing — then: 



READ EVERY i^: 

ITEM IN i::: 

THIS AD. I 

AND CONE I 

TOMORROW ^ 



I).VVKM»ORTS RKDlCKl). 

AN IM.MKNSK STOtK TO .SFl.IXT FROM 

$.1.">.0O I)a-.enfH)rls. now $2(i..".0 

$10.00 I)a>en|M>rls. iu.« y.V1.7t() 

$4.~».00 l)a\eni)4*r(s, iu>w $3ii..">() 

$50.00 Davenports, nuv, $:W..-0 



f.'t.'t.OO I)a\fni>orls, now 



$ i;j..-.o 



One (ii-nuiiM- Leather I)a\en5MM', worth 

iiS.">.(M>, special at STili.?.') 



SrKC'IAL PKKKSON HI (i.-^. 

.V partial list of thf n>an> uood \aliie> ««• olTtr. 
Uemeniher — all muni ium* patterns. 

Wo«»I Fihi-r lUuvs at $S..".0. i^\2.'Ai and .'«;it...'.<t 

Hea\y .AII-VxKd I act- Seamless Tapestrv 

Kugs, «KI_'. al ^I.l.OO, $i:.:)() and .<?20.00 

Hea\v SvainlesH Hugs, size **\12, 

at $20.00, .<2."..00 and ^.'.L'.riO 

Axminsfer Hng> at . . $20.t)0. .<2:>.0(). S:{2.:>0 and .•>:;> 
Congoleuni Kiiks, si/.t- {Kll.', s|Hri.iI ;'f S7..')') 

FXTKA SPECIAL 

One Three -I'iiHT .Ml-I.eather Lihrar\ Suite, 

worth $IO0.0(). at .'!;is..-|» 

DRESSER SPECIALS 

$12.50 Oak Dresser, now $ 9.50 

$16.50 Oak DreHser, now $1 1.75 

$18.50 Oak DreHser, now $13.50 

$22.00 Oak Dreiser, now $Mi.:.0 

$25.00 Oak I)re>*her. now $1 8..'»0 



s.vi.f: or dimnc; tables. 

SI.L.'iO Di.iiii.: I ables. now $ 9.75 

$Hi..'.0 l)it»i "v Tables, now $12.75 

$I7.."j') Diiin;; TahleK. now SI.'t.T.'i 

S20.()(> Difii.i,: lahle.s. now $15.75 

^■1-2M) Mii.m?' r;.bles. now $17.75 

S2'>.(tt» Dining r.il lis now K19.75 

S:U).0(» DifiM.g Tahlfs. now .?2."i.75 

.S;i5.0iJ l)i 'iii<; 'i':. !,!»•,',, now $27.75 

I'ini .!' ('.i'ii-- ti) male'' at ^^Ii(■cilll prieer . 



ni'A) Roo.M sriTi'.s .vr \ uu, s.vm.nc; 

Kuril .^nile c«>nsisls of a Heel. Drr.ssrr 
and t'liiflfonier 

Ont' ( ircassian Walnut Siiit«». rtp.tilar 

priot- SI 2"). 00. now $87.50 

(•i',' (, ,11. ..ssi;i:i W.diiut Suite, regular 

tirii-f $17.'».()0. MOW ."<.s;.50 

One M;if-o)raii> Suilf, regidar price 

.<I2."..00. MOW SH.l.OO 

Ont Latin Walnut Suite, regular 

|)rici- .<!).'.. 0(1. now S'i.'i.Ol) 

( J.ii '. >iiarlfrrd Oak Suiti', regular iirice 

$.").">. OO, now $37.50 



(01(11 SIM'X'LM.S 

Kixular .SIS.OO Couoi.es, now 

!: uid.r $2(1.00 touches, now 

It<'md;ir S22.50 (luu-hes, now 

|{<'Kidar .<2.'i.00 Couches, now 



. ..$11.7:. 

. ..$i:..7:. 

. ;.$17.7.-. 
. ..SI!>.7.-. 



2()c Off Iho DoMur on All Libraiy Tables 

$12.50 Library Tables, now $10.00 

$1.'..00 Library Tables, now $12.00 

$20.00 Library Tables, now $15.00 

.'>2.'..00 Library Tables, now . $20.00 

S30.00 Library FabK-.s, now $2 LOO 

$;i.'..00 Lilirar> Fables, now $28.00 



Ol'R REASON AHLF 
KXTKNDKI) FAYMKNT 
PhAN 

Don't miss the .savings 
of this sale becau.se you 
find it inconvenient to pay 
all 'cash. One-third down, 
one-third in 3(1 days and 
one-thinl in 60 days will 
do. 



PAFF 

rurnituue-Carper Co. 

1300-1302 Seventh Ave. 
BEAVER FALLS 



IMY SOW — 

WL >\ILL 
DKLIVKR LATKR 

If you are not ready to 
have the fumHure .select- 
ed in this sale delivered 
right now, wo will .store it 
w iliiout charge and mxikc 
delivery any time you say. " 



il DikttifAr Tallc t 



Ggloniil, Beaver Falls 



»•><>»•••><>• • ■>■■>■ ■■ 



»•>•••* 



"Sally in Our Alley" 
Muriel Ostriche, one of the truly 
youn^st stars in film<loni, will be the 
attraction al the Colonial, Heaver 
Falls, Monday, Aug. 21, when she 
vi!l be featured in a World photo- 
play, "Sally in Our Alley," with Car- 
lyie Blackwell, the Prince of Popu- 
i.inty. This is a play in which both 
^tar8 have excr'llrnt opportunities to 
show theiiv;>n)pttlo, and, needle.ss to 
state, rtlfy take overy advantage of- 
fcn-d them to .show why they are at 
the top of the ladder of motion pic- 
ture favorites. Uoth their work and 
the play itself will be a matter of 
rrrrat admiration. 



"The Little ( hurch Around the 
Comer." 

World Film Corporation presents 
the five-part photoplay "The Little 
Church Around the Comer," at the 
'""lonial, Beaver FuIIp, Tuesday, Aug. 
2:'.. in which Kmelie I'olini ni;ikes her 
first appearance in motion pirture.*!. 

The Btory of "The Little Church 
Around the Comer" i.s intensely dra- 
matic and touching. A girl marries a 
nan who is a morjihiorfianiac. Her 
rejected lover takes advantage of the 
fart to ruin the husband; persecute 
the yrife; and cndcRvor to obtain po- 
KeF<tioirbC»~the child who is heiress to 
sonifit money. Husband and wife are 
shut tip ttfan asyljim; but they escape. 
The htisband is cured of the morphine 
habit; the couple arc reunited, and 
they mider their thanks at "The Lit- 
tle Church Around the Comer," where 
they w«re married. The villian is de- 
feated ftnd the ^hild and her money 
are MT»d. 



In 'The .Spell of the Yukon," Mr. 
Hreese h.'is ;i nuinlH-r of hijjhly dra- 
matic incident.s, wltleh wcr«* cxree<l- 
ingly (langerou.-; to life and limb, that 
is, they might bo for someone else, 
hut he believes in prepare<lncsB, at 
lea.st in ifgard to [)icturr taking. He 
plan.-; out carli .srn.dlest detail of his 
a|»paicntly hair'.s-hreadtii escapes, 
until lie has it all worked out to a nic- 
ety-, with the niiniiuum pos.sibility of 
mi.scliisncc. Tl'.en. foarle.'-.s ami har/ty, 
lie tolLs the c:inieninian to "grind 
awav." 



"The least o. Life" 

In :inf)Wf'r to the n.any in<|uincK 
which havf heen nveived from the 
pr.lrons of the C'olonial theatre, the 
manavrerneir announce.s that it has 
arrari),'e(! f<,r tiie showing of a Clara 
Kjniball Young picture in Thurstlay, 
Aug. 24, when "Tlio Feast of Life," 
with Paul Cap(!lani and Dori* Ken- 



yon, will bo seen with Miss Young in 
the World Film feature. 



"A .Son "of the ImmortalH " 

Tlu- attraction for the Colonial on 
Friday. Aug. lJ5th. is .1. Warren Ker- 
rigan i:i "A ."^on of the iinniortals." a 
iJluebird fihotoplay of sensational 
henl, replelo with thrills and excite- 
ment. Thi' plot convey.- the action 
(if a Yankee .suddenly elevated to rule 
ovt r a kingdom, and the manner in 
which he hrpuks down conventions 
.in<J cast's traditions to '.lie wind stirs 
w]) th*^ politit;an.< and I'\-ids to many 
sensational episodes. The final out- 
'( me is a triumph for the American 
.-pirit, an<] tiic King gets away with 
liis prohieiiih in a manner to stir the 
enlhusias|ii of American audiences. 
Kerrigan hua never L:.c'n entrusted 
witl: a role in moving pictures that is 
'. .veil suited to his da.shing style of 
>rocedure. 



>S* 



"Of Spdl of the Yakon" 

Ekfammd Breeae is said to have the 
best pi9l of his long and interesting 
esrstd ia "Tlie Spall of the Yukon," 
tlM new lhr»-«et Metro prodoetian, 
wMdi will bs mm at tlM Colonial, 
FUlSr Wsdastdsr, Aag. 28. 




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BBAVBt VALLEY LABOR NEWS 



t 







MID-SEASON DRESS 



OCIIQN 8UITAM.I fOM tUMNIR 
OR EARLY FALL. ^^ 



PowlbllHy of leenemy In 
tur« of Monty Now in Vtow #f tiM 
AdvantatMiM Situation tlio 
Marfcot AfTordo. li 

BarfalDs to ■ommor fabriea tr« ao 
pleatlful Juit DOW that many womon 
do mot cuuslder It extrtTnganeo to add 
a new fruck or two t<^her aaiotiior 
dr«Bs«s. eveu though inero doairc. not 
a u««d, liiifpire« the purchaao. 'ftie 



GownB of Transparent Organdie 



UrKHflllll-.S tlltlt look IIS 11' tiK'.V W.T>' 

woven iiti tilt? ItMliis itt Ihi' I'aiiH"- luiv>? 
xrnslo/ijilly iiiipciircfl iiiuimy \.\u- sIiot 
wliltc t;i)\viiH for nil<lsiiiiiiu«T. TIichi- 
tulirlcs art' us K>iti/.y as tli<' whu's i>f a 
lru);oiitly and aliout as i-rlsp. liiit lli)>y 
•upport lln»' «'iiilirnj<ltM) ui^'l luive ln-fu 
uiiult- Jn ••«l>;iii>;s uiid llouiicinu'-i "f >iti- 

Cljlltlt (I (IllllllllU'SS. 

Kvcnlim iiDit ii! iiTiicxni frni-K'* l>!i\»' 
t>(M-ii iikmIi' of trniispiiniit (>r_';iinll<'M. 
iiftrii ill roiiiliiiiiittoii uttli voiif or ii''t. 
They an* to be worn ovt»r slips of i.if- 
firljl for the best efr«>ctH. Tlic tiiuT 
liugvrU' luces are uso<l with them uttd. 
fur tho handAotnext frocks. |irln(*i>ss, 
ronaiMsaiiri' nnd otluT hiiti(!iiiiiile vu- 
rtetteti are UN<>d. 4>rpin(lic imiki's the 
prettioMt plaltlafCH alHu atid iiiany nar- 
ruw-pliilttMl rutllt'M h«>lp out In ilio »'Ui- 
tH*lli-<liii;<'Mi of airy frockd. 



ll i>i (lirllcult to r«'pru<luoe such un- 
'4ul)staulliil II till K»uzy tuat«>rtulii la a 
pifturt'. iilthouch tli.'y make a lovely 
liin^^Touiiil for tlae fuibroldoriea. 
Krom the illuslrHtlofi only a faint lin- 
pr«'s-.ioii (Mil 1)0 kjiif Ii^timI of tlu' huiid- 
s.MUi' frot'k of «'inlir<>i«l.'n'd orKuadle 
iiii'l liu-e \vlij(-h shown hucU clever 
iKliipiiitioii (ii <tyh- to fiitti^lo. It la 
rii.Milc with ii lull. LMtli.'red Hklrt huvlug 
ii witio piUi>i of l;i(>' let in nt each 
<\fh\ Th>' front iiiid back are beuvlly 
liaii'l »'inliroi(K're(l. 

Till- l>oilIi-e {a simple, opening In a 
V ut the frout uud back uf the ueck. A 
Atnnll collar, covered with plaltiugs. 
uiukes a beautiful finish. A drapery of 
hice at each Hide forms caps over the 
top of the sleeveH, and the embroidered 
pattern on the skirt Is repeated In 
siuuller size on the bodice and girdl^ 
The frock Iti In oue |)iocc. 




Summer Frock of Plain and Printed 
I Voile. 

I home dressmaker never had greater 
j eiicuura^'einent to try out her own 
' lileas iu Htyle d«'si>;n than during the 
; pronent seuson. becuiise such lodalte 
' riirlety obtains in cut and color or 
' fiihric ctiniblnutiou that It U dllBcult 
for liiiyone with tli«> slightest knack 



at aowlog or with arU^c Ideaa to 
JO Tory far wrong. 

Printed and plain whlto toUo are 
auffootod aa aultable for tho Uttlo 
frock ahown In the sketch, although 
iilaln and dotted handkerchief linen, 
chocked gingham and plain color 
ehambray. etc., might be used aa tf- 
focUvoly. 

The double tunic la auggeotlve of a 
atylo Hue that la to be given conaidor- 
•bio prominence In the flrtt ahowlng 
of fall frocks. Advance bulletins and 
advance models carry out an Illusion 
of brevity In length and breadth of 
Bklrts. while they are In reality 4ongor 
and narrower than those generally fa- 
vored at present, and the long tunic 
alda very materially In this Illusion, 
the underskirt belnfc reasonably clooe 
reefed and modestly lung, while the 
upper skirt or tunic Is given a decided 
flare. The hosiery display of the past 
season or two will not be looked on 
with favor In the fall, as practically 
all frocks brush lower than the slioe 
topo. 

The little fnxk in the sketch Is, how- 
over, distinctly u nuiuuier model, and 
excellent for tub fabrics. Tlie back 
of the bodice has a deep round yoke, 
coining below the slmulders. of white 
voile, and the bark of the skirt Is ex- 
actly like the front, paneled In white 
and printed voile. The dress fastens 
In the center front. 

To make this Kown. three yards of 
plain fabric 3tt inches wide nud seven 
and a half yards of figured material 
the same width will be re<iuired. The 
bottom Hklrt measures four yards 
wide. A bright ribbon Is used for the 
girdle. 

The generous use of ribbon as a 
trlinmluK or tlnlshlug touch on- sum- 
mer frocks Is H notable feature, and It 
strengthens the quaint and plctur-* 
esqu« tendency of the season's ap- 
parel. 

Ribbons will be used rather freely 
on the next season's evening frocks. 
t'olore«l silk or bead embroideries are 
favorite trimming touches for modish 
utility gown of serge or gaberdine. 
The tendency to favor a lower waist 
line is more and inore emphasized as 
the early full models see the litfht of 
day. — Wu.shlnjcton Star. 



WANTED 30,000 MEI 

For Harvist Work Western Canada 

I 

Immense crops; wages $3.00 per day and board. Cheap 

railway rates from boundary points. Employment bureaui 

at Winnipeg, Regina, North Portal, Saskatoon, Fort Franoea» 

KIngsgate, B. C, Coutts and Calgary, Alberta. 



Mkmmluimly Ho miHimry Imtmtrfmi 

For all particulara apply to 



I Si.. SyracaaitW. f .; r.A.1 



i»#iwn.Sra9i<tBaninv|»Pg» 



Oilcloth Revers. 
BInrk rubber niliicoats nre being 
trimnifd wiili collars and ciifTs and 
front fncinj; of blue uud white tile 
pattern oilcloth. 



BUTTONS USED IN MANY WAYS 




Pronounced Feature of tho B^jWOW'a 

Styles la a Thing That Haa to 

Be Rocognizod. 

Buttons are not at all left in the 
lurch biH'ause of the amount uf hand- 
>vork U8«'d. In fact, they serve to ac- 
centuate the 8i»eclal feature of the 
waist, coat or suit they adorn. But- 
tons increasv the Importance of pock- 
etH. belt and caiM>s iind give themselves 
a chance to ussunle extraordinary 
^sbnpes and slzi>8. 

• Bemuse of the vogrue for dark ooltp 
with white hats, shoes or gaiters, white 
ivury buttous are allowed. Sotnetlnies 
tlii'y are rluged with black or a taah- 
loDsble color, Miiuetlmes they have a 
(leurl center, but nil of them are Ught 
in weight, and that accounts for at 
lt>a8t part of their i>opulurlty. They 
ere also made on dark tajpteta dresses. 

Those used on coats €nd sulta are 
more conservative, muahrooiu and 
fiiiucer shapes being the most |iopular. 
Itnlls, Hguar«>s and cubes, are also em- 
ployed, as well as iicorns. Fearl but- 
tons jpome in ull sizes and shapes, from 
the lariie ball buttons, appropriate for 
novelty suits, and the flat styles for 
separate skirts, to the tiny ones for 
!itiirtwal.sts. Heavy colored materials 
luake use of ribbed buttons. 

rhecktHi suits may be thanked for 
Che ululn and che<ked button, aa well 



as the black and white effects In com- 
binations with white rims. Among the 
new colors shown Is a French gray but- 
ton to match the shade now so popular 
In dresses. A ring of black Is often 
used to enhance Its beauty. 



CHARMING PICTURE HAT 




To Embellish the Plain Waist 



tV" 



Here are pictured two collars and 
a collar with Testae, which aro recent 
additions to the already RrcatVarray 
of neckwear. The collars are made 
of transparent organdie and the collar 
and veotee of sheer orgaodle trimmed 
with Venetian lace Insertion. Collars 
and vesteea at this kind are liberally 
used In finishing plain waists and 
alooaoo In all sorts of naaterlala to 
give them tho summery touch and the 
becomtngncaa of white about the face. 
There Is little difference In the two 
collars. Both are large enough to be 
classsd among sm^ capes and both 
are made of plaln^mtnsparent organ- 
die. Thia matarlal lends Itself per- 
fectly to narrow plaltloss. nud each 
oCttioae cape collars la covered wUh 
rows of plal tings aet close together. 
la the collsr at a the left they are 
stltdied to the fouodatlon cape and 
and It Is 'Keceoaiiry Ho 
down. In t|ie other collar 
the pisltlngs are hemstitched to the 
plsl0 eape. 
llis small Tostee Is frilled on to 
jnrtte at the fr^nt and slips 
of ths bodice, leaving 
to fHirorer the ahonl- 
4ms |S#,%Mk. Those manafactnrod 
mmimm^ •*• v^a made and ««ciir- 
■rtll ip Iwill ••• w Inop^Mlvs that 
i|1g in ^tmnk wkfio to attonpt thsm 
•ivgartl^alsfly vtiCii 



Joy of the tourist It Is no burden t» 
lake quantities of fresh and crisis 
looking neckwear on a Journey. 

Many other sheer fabrics are nasd 
for similar collars, but no other Is 
quite so crisp looking as organdie, 
and It seems to soil less easily than 
the softer fabrics. 



Couch Arrswgomo nt . 
The following way of making np m 
couch when used as a bod will proiF« 
aaUsfactory. provided the coach Is of 
that typ* which haa aldea that can 
be lot down like the awlnglng ends 
or sides of a kitchen table. Uako up 
the bed to the morning ths aamo aa 
ordinarily, bat when tho ahoets and 
blankets are in place Instead df tnck- 
Ing thoin In at the tldoa. fold the 
blanket and ttien tho ahesta smootli- 
ly from the sides toward tho center. 
TlNia the beddothoa will occupy only 
tho top of the couch, leavtng tho ald«s 
free. Drop the «|deo. spread a cover 
over tho whole couch aid a neat rs> 
suit win appear. Have for tho plllowa, 
day covers like the condi cov«r, 
which can be easily aUiipod off at 
night ' : 



It is Made of Yellow Crepon, Pat- 
terned With Fruit in Bright Qreen 
and Dull Purple, and Lined With 
Black Velvet Clustera of Apples 
Appear as Trimming, and a Bright 
Qreen RHtbon Is Loosely Tied Un- 
der the Chla. 



* Get rid of dandruff — 

it makes the scalp itdi and the hair fall out B0 
wiS0 about yoiir imr^ cultivate it, like the women in 
Paris do. They legtuarly use ^ * 

ED. nrUDVS EAU DE (piNE 

the wonderful Prendi Hair Tonic. Try it for your- 
self. Note its ezquinte Quality and fragrance. Aristo- 
cratic men and women uw world over use and endorse 
this famous preparstioik It keeps thescalp clean and 
white and preserves the youthful brilliancy of thehair. 

Bujra 50c botde from yvorflealer — oraendlOctooarAnierl- 
can Offices for a teatiiiflolfle. Above all things don't neglect 

your hair. 



■sure 



Yourleeth 



Ptala OIUmso hfscolota sfO' 
Vtipiptlag '00 hats, armaisd 
tto kfit can h^ carried hf 



at 

ml 

MM 



,.3n me 
entifricc you 
. <' usirW now. 



fVAUDOU'S 



The Household Remedy 



f9r the ailments from which almost eveiyone sometimes 
suffers— sick headachet constipation, custurbed sleep, 
ddy compleidou, laantude, bac k ac h e, depmskm and | 
er results of a disordered digestive syston— is I 



mu 
other 



ftEE(HAl6FlLlS 

They have achieved the distinction of being the most 
widely used medicine in the world, because millions of 
people have found them dependable, speedy and sure in 
their action on stomach, liver, kidneys and bowels. 

Compounded from vegetable products. Beecham'a PiUs are free from 
harmful minerals and dangerous drugs. They do not promote the 
l^ysictng habit— do not irrtUte the bowela Should betaken by every 
member of the family at the first sign of illness— so mild and effective 
that they are good for the aged, and for the ills of childhood, are 

Safe for Children 



DirMtlMU of SpMkd VahM to W 
Sold by dnigffisto 



I wiIb Evety 
labevas, lOc, 



SLAVERY !N EARLY DAYS 



African Slave Trade Wat Once Op«n> 

ly Tolerated by the British 

Government. 

Slnvcry pxIsKmI lit nearly nil of - tl tw-i 
r.rinlish colonleH from un t.-arly m>»"^ 
riod until shortly tu-fore or soon /af- 
ter the lU'volutloniiry wur, iind th« 
African hUiv«! truile was ojHMily tol- 
••niteil l>y the Itrittsii K<»v»'niuu'Mt. In 
1750 there were 'Jirj.(XJ<) African 
.slaves la the colonies, scattered from 
New Kn}:lai»J to (Sj^orftia. It was not 
prohibited In Massachusetts until 
1780. nor In Vermont until 1777. The 
United States census of 1810 showed 
310 slaves In Connecticut. 10.831 In 
New Jersey. 15,017 in New York. 7»5 
In^rennsylvanla. and H>S In Rho<le 
Island. Slavery wan gradually nb- 
Olished In the northern mutes, but 
!n 1820 there were ntlU 97 slaves lii 
Connecticut, 7,557 In New Jersey. 
10,US8 In New York, 211 In Penusyl- 
vafiia, and 48 In Rhode Island. The 
Tensus of 1850 showe<l the disapear- 
ence of slavery In all thj* northern 
states except New Jersey, which .still 
bad a surviving reuinnut of 236. 



THE NI6HE5T QUALITY 

SPAGHETTI 

Jo ^flr lw€l^ Book fftt 

SKINNER MPG.COL OMAHA.UJA 

lASGOt HAOWKM nCWnr Nl AMSSCA 



The Test. 

Mrs. OniiKg .iwltli u reputation) — 
Doctor, I feur hiy hiishund's mind Is 
affected. Is there any «ure test? 

Doctor — Tell hliii that you'll never 
Ki>eak to him apilii. If ho laughs he's 
.sune. — B«>ston TrauHcrlpt. 



WANTED DISTRICT NANAOCKS 

fur oar oaw «»-t<»-tet« «ooSlttonlfM 
▲OClUaHT snl NATURAL DBA'raji 
^llrlw. Mora ■roMeUooior OM 
BoBtli Um« evarWrnf* oSMad. 

— rmsncuGsi laser 




START MAjnnrAi 
wstMS. fealr to«fei.M 

GoM m. K«tuy oollni: 



▲MB rsMU&sf 00., iu^TmSSt, I 




W. N. U., PITTSBURQH, NO. 34~191t. 



NINE SOLDIERS CAPTURE 113 



Marks on the Wall. 

BUI— This i)a|M«r nny« t'olunabus. O., 
Hchool children the «)ther day kllle<l 
0.738 flies. 

Jill— Well, they must luive got some 
marks to their cr^-dit that day. 



A thorn In the lle«h !«« more troable- 
«»ome than two on the bush. 



"I Intend to marry for love," said 
the girl with the dreamy eyes. "You 
are wise, my dear," replied her dear- 
est friend. "Men with monej aro 
often so hard to please." 



Dailx Thouflht. 

He does nothing who seeks to coin 

sole a desponding uiau with words; a 

friend la one who aids with deeds at a 

critical time whea deeds aro called 

for. — Plautus. 

*■ 
I 

Sonalbis Procoduro. 
Don't try to gain all your know! 
edge from rough experience. Ask a 
few questions If you are In doubt 
about tho proper way to do a thing. 



ThIa Trios Ono'a Patlenee. 

Is a woman eligible to a card In the 

Garment Workers' union Just because 

she goes through her husband's panu 

at night?— ;L G. 



Aheoiutoly. 

*Toor Madge ! Her marriage was an 

absolute failure." "How so?" "Why. 

she hasn't been sble to collect a cent 

of alimony since she got her divorca." 



Frenchmen Trick the Defendere of a 

German Field Fort on 

the Somme. 

One of the most striking episodes 
of the gr€»at Somme offensive was tho 
recent taking of the Aeld fort at Bl- 
iiclieH nud Its garrison of 113 men 
l»y it French soldiers. 
. All ntteiiiptn to storm the position 
had been checked by murderous ma- 
chine-gun rtrc until a French officer 
(llseovered a vulnerable point. 8e- 
UTtlng u s»*ct)nd lieutenant, two sef- 
ieant.s. a cur]>ornl and four men, Jio 
led them on hands and knees through 
the long grass to the spot where he 
knew there was a breach In the de- 
fenses. Then three of the French of- 
tieers uhruptly leaped Into the work, 
shouting lu stentorian tones. "For- 
ward with the bn.vonet:" and throw- 
ing bombH which exploded In tho 
dugout. 

The Germans, believing a large , 
force was with the Frenchmen, had 
no time to get their weapons and sur- 
rendered. But now the three Fr«ich 
captors began to feel nervous, as 
they saw no reason why* the Qeraisas 
should not fall upon them and ex- 
terminate them. They were ssved 
by the six comrades, who came rush- 
ing In Just at this moment. Agaim. 
fooled, the entire Oermsn ganrlsoa 
was marched to the French rear» 
escorted by the nine "poUus." who had 
not lost a 



WoilL What Waa ItT 
Speaking of fatue, what was Molly 
Pitcher's husband's name? — Boston 
Transcript i- 



Friendship mhd Knmity. 
He will nerer have true friends who 
Is afraid of maklnc enemloa. — Haalltt. 



in 



• OfrtlmloUo Thouokt 
Wheft you obsr^ jmu*' ■■perlon jras 
laatmct your laferlora. 



The Stoker In Battle. 
In the modem battleship, as Is well 
known, the stoker, like the oarsman (tf 
hnoient Roman galley, has his 
all below deck. The sesflght 
above him. and he can rarely If sror 
see a battle. One of the stortes eoB- 
Docted with the battk of Jatland U- 
lustrates the stolid character of ths 
British 8t6kers. A chance was glvoa 
two of these during the fl^t.to OMSO 
from below. They were on the War* 
spite, which was heavily engaged. One 
of them wss telling a domestle story 
to the other as they went up to tho 
4eck. At the hottest moment of tho 
flgl^ their grimy heads appeared at the 
top or the hatch round which, spttnters 
of shell were crashing. Above Uie 
hellish din the Imfiasslve voice of the 
story-telling stoker was heard, as cahn 
as though at a "pub" over a nog cC 
ale. sn.vlng. "1 always thought *o offt 
to 'ave married 'er." 

\ , \.^ . ^ ^ 

Auctioneers are men who cry h^ 
cnu«e they have to make an honest Ht« 
Ing. 



If a nian*n htutneis runs dowa tiM 
•hsrlff.opBMS slo^ and winds It m> 



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BBAYBt VALLBT 



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mmamn 

IS lEIOND COMPARE 



A hmdnd thoaaand dollar site 
Ihooafatf a million dollan' woriit of 
vsxhibiu of on* kind and anothor, lire 
■took ahoira and eonoeaaiona, that ia 
4o be tlM materialiaation of the next 
. 1W« waeka aa embodied in the Erie 
Expoaition. It aeema a huge, a poai- 
..tiirely atupendoua taak, but the aite 
' Itaelf ia not more than three weeka 
diatant from abaoliitb completion and 
the work of placing all of the exhi- 
bita, aetting up all of the ihowa, con- 
eeaaiona, etc, will be really but a mat- 
ter of daya, rather than of weeka. -' 
When the gates of the Exposition 
are thrown open qn Sept. 18, it will 
be upon the greateat exhibition of 
ita kind in Pennsylvania, and one of 
the very greatest in the country. Only 
auch mammoth exhibitions aa the 
New York SUte Fhir at Syracuse, 
the niinoia State Fair at Springfield, 
and the Minnesota State Fair at St. 
Paul, will be able to vie with it. 
Every department of the exhibition is 
going to be filled to overflowing and. 
the live stock show to be held in con- 
nection will be especially extensive. 
Whole herds of cattle have already 
been entered though the lists will not 
be closed for five weeks to come and 
from every section ' of the country, 
from all of the greatest stock raising 
' sections, have conic inquiries which 
■fiay aafely be accepted as the fore- 
runner of entries. 

The Erie Exposition has already 
established itself as the sensation of 
the show world. There are to be a 
score of bip free circus acts which 
will be staged on the grounds with- 
out cost to the visitor save the ad- 
mission at the gate. There will also 
be DeLIoyd Thompson, the world 
famous aviator, for day and night 
flights, and each night there will be 
the expenditure of $1,000 worth of 
fireworks in a sublime pyrotechnicul 
demonstration of "The War of the 
Nations." Any one of these featureH 
is alone worth the price of admission 
and the big showmen of the countrj- 
have been quick to realize the won- 
derful drawing; power of such a ga- 
laxy of mammoth attractions and they 
are striving to bring their own big 
drawing cards here. 

Not one single foot of the entire 
eighty-five acres occupied by the Ex- 
position is goini; to remain unoccu- 
pied when the gates are thrown open 
on Sept. 18, and special low rates on 
rail an4 trolley assure crowds. 



± 



CHAS. M. SCHWAB 
EULOGIES LABOR 



At a dinner held raoently in hia hon- 
or hi Philadelphia, Chaa. M. Schwab, 
of the Bethlehem Steel Company, ia 
quoted aa paying the following eidogy 
to labor: 

"There ia nothing that really fig- 
ures but labor. Materiala — analyse 
material. You will find that mater- 
ial meana nothing but labor. Freight 
and auppliea? Analyse them. They 
mean nothing baaically, but labor — 
just Bo much labor. 

"In other words, from the first 
magic touch to the last, which turns 
everything to gold, it is all labor. 

"It is labor which produces every- 
thing, all the riches, all the splendor, 
all the wealth. 

"Nothing has any value imtil turned 
over by the hand of labor. 

"Everything is begun by the iiand 
of labor, and is finished by the hand 
of labor. 

"Labor has produced all the wealth 
of the world." 



HODCARRIERS 

International Union No. 214. Meets 
first and third Tuesday of each month 
in Kramer BIdg, New Brighton. Pres- 
ident, Wm. Wright; Secretary, Chas. 
Siras. 







Central Ught A Sopplf Co. 

Bell 288-R. 

Gas and Electric FIztarea, llaB> 

ties, Bnmera, Glaaaware, etc 

1017 Seventh Ave^ Beaver Falla 



ORDINANCE NO. 108 



An Ordinance providinj^ for an<i 
rcMiuirin^: the ^rradinjr, curbin;r and 
paving of Midland Avenue from First 
Street, the terminus of the present 
pavinjT thereon, westwardly a distance 
of approximately one thousand five 
hundred feet, and assessing a portion 
of the co.sts of the same on the own- 
ers of real estate abutting thereo*. 

Whereas, the Town Council of Vtje 
Horoujrh of Midland deem it noci 
siiry and proper for the welfare of <l{e 
Uorougli and its inhabitants, thii 
Midland Avenue be graded, curbed 
and paved from First Street, the pres- 



ent terminaa of the pa^^ng, 
wardly a dialattee, of appraxiiaataljr 
oae thooaaad ilTa hnadnd feet, aad 
two^thirda of the coata thereof boume 
by the owner^ of property abutthiig 
thereon, in adbrdanoe with the feet 
front rule. 

And whersaa, an Act. of the General 
Aaaembly of the Commonwealth of 
Pennaylvaaia, approved May 14th, 
1916, caUed the General Borough Act, 
givea all Boroughs in thia Conunoo- 
wealth the power, without petition of 
property owners, to grade, pave, euzb, 
macadamize and otherwiae improw 
public Btreeta or parts thereof, and 
collect two-thirds of the costs and ex- 
penses of the same from the owners 
of real estate bounding or abutting 
thereon, by an equal assessment on 
the feet ifl^nt. 

Therefore, be it ordained and en- 
acted by the Town Council of the Bor- 
ough of Midland, and it is hereby en- 
acted and ordained by authority of 
the same. 

Section 1. That Midland Avenue, 
in the Borough of Midland, from First 
Street, the present terminus of the 
paving thereon, westwardly a distance 
of approximately one thousand five 
hundred feet, be graded, curbed and 
paved from curb to curb with hard 
burned vitrified paving brick, accord- 
ing to the plans and specihcations to 
be prepared by the Borough Engineer. 

Section 2. That the grade of said 
Street shall be brought to the present 
established grade thereof, and the 
curb shall bo set and pavement laid 
in accordance therewith 

Section .'J. That two-thirds of the 
costs and expen.ses of tin- Kniding, 



to Fourteenth Street, and 
, FMurtoenth Street from Mid- 
A^wiiie to the SUte road. 
JH'lt oidaiiiod and enacted by the 
Tmm Coandl of the Borough of Mid- 
uid it is liereby enacted and 
by authority of the same. 
I 1. That the south side of 
MUlMd Avenue, being the part there- 
of batween the iouth track of the Ohio 
Riwt PMaenger Railway Company, 
•aSve Moth line of the Avenue, be 



opaaH op. graded and fitted for travel 

fnni Eleventh Street, the present 

of the paving, to Fourteenth 



Sittion 2. That Fourteenth Street 
bt apaned up, graded and fitted for 
tiwial, from Midland Avenue, to the 
State Road. 

Oldained and enacted this ITth day 
of ^uly, A. D. lUlO. 

J. J. O'NEILL, 
Attaat: President of Council. 

M. C. DONOHOE, 

Secretary of Council. 
Approved this 4th dav of August, 
A. D. 1916. 

HOMER L. LITZKNBEUG, 
angll-18. Burgess. 



ORDINANCE NO. Ill 



An Ordinance authorizing and di- 
recting an increase of the indcbted- 
neaa of the Borough of Midland in 
the sum of Seventeen Thousand Dol- 
lars (117,000.00) for the purpose of 
paying the Borough's portion ol the 
cost of grading, curbing, and paving 
Midland Avenue, in said Itoruugh of 



Midland, frojn I'irst Stn-et. the pres 
curbing" and 'i .a V in,: of said part"" of , ent terminus of the pavement theivon. 
Midland Av. iiue shall ♦>«• - colUct-d ' *'«"*V'**™'>' ", li'"^""^"^' "^ approxi- 
fro.n the oAmrs of u aI estate bv an I "^^^'^ »"*= thousand five hun.lred 
assessn.ent on the f.-(.l fiont, I f««^' '^"^ ^"'" f'^'>'"^' ^^e cost of con- 



e(|ual 

boun<iing or abuttin';: tiiereon; tliat is, 



structing an extension tit the |»re.seiit 

Midland 



one-third on the owner of real estate : f"'*"^y «^'^^-^'" "» Mnil«'"d Avenue. 

from the present terminus of the 



on either side of the street, acconiing 

to the feet frontage of said real es- 

state so boundirlg or abutting \hcreon, 

.said as.sessiiient to be estimated by ,, ., , , 

the Horoujrh Kngineor in vharge of ^"''"[r^,!'"""' "■"'!' ! ''"''' ^^'^'•e^'^to 

I'ounn Street, ami tiie construction 



same, Weitwardly a distance of a|,- 
proximutely live hundriHi feel, and Die 
construction of a sauitarv sewer on 



of a storm sewer alon^r iouilii .Street 



the work. 

bountlin^"- or al)ulting thrroTi. said as , .. i ■ , ■ 

sessment to be estimate-! l,v the Hor- '^'^"J S-''"°a '"""' ^", '» »'"'"^ '»*- 
..UKh KnK'ineer .n cha.r.< of the work. ; >'°^^„,^:.*:.,^.^^'l";;,' .""^', f:^** »'^'>"'^: 

SeejiioM 4. That the Uo rough Hngi- 
nt«r is hereby Jiutliurized and direc- 



MACHINISTS' STRIKE ENDS. 



Allentown, Pa., machinista employ- 
ed by the International Motor com- 
pany have aettled their strike, which 
waa canaed by the discharge of six 
active members of this union. The 
aettlement involves the establishment 
of the eight-hour day in the near fu- 
ture. 



TRADE MORAL— The viallty d 
wMat you have to mU « lUMVini 
to tOfflo pfcopio all ot tht tkw 
and aH of the people some ol 
tiie time, but advertise regu- 
tally with us and you'll reaoh 
all oi tbe peopte all di tne tuna. 



"THE BEST PLACE TO EAT, AFTER ALL' 



ii 

Si 

s> 



r 

S Lincoln Hotel BIdg. - Rochester, Pa. |i 

l| i4ARRY MAY, f roprietor |l 



May's Restaurant 

ETerjrthing New. Unexcelled Service 
OUR MOTTO* 

"Home Cooking and Prompt Service" 



» 



THE "WEMAKIT" STORE 



• ! > 



-^^L , .^^ 



BC/l/Eh riMIS.PA. 

f\tfaCHES,DlAMONDS.] 

tGou^-SnyERVARci 

LARGEST AWRIETY/ 

AND POPUIAR, 
PRICES, 



Minmn iiii mnnm 

H8CKMAN BROS. 
Ckaaral Harivank Pafart, Oltm, 



Ave., 

Hmnummmm i m 





And Upwords, on household gooda, 
and other personal property. If 
you need money, do not heaitate te 
borrow from ua, for our plas of re- 
payment, our quick and efficient 
system of making loana, cannot be 
excelled. 

Information cheerfully given. 

Write, call, or pheae us. 



mvEiiiioiiiuiiiiieo. 



BUg. 
Car. Seventh Ave. A Twelfth St 

BEAVER FALLS^ PA. 
Ben PhoM 244; B. C PhoM ITN 

Open 8 A. M. to 6 P. M. 
Monday and Saturday UatO f PJL 



Subacribe for The Labor News. 



ii HHHHnnnn it nnnM i m i n t M i num ti m it 



ADAM KOKNMAN < > THE SMOUB HOUSE 

Aminw P. 

VaOajr Spaelal; i • Retail daatar la Tobaeea, 

i BtMk; 1MB- ; : dka, Polal €iidi, P^ 

•k Gild llaaal ftSa. W wmiQimmmadyotr— ^ 

'• • » M Kav Tflril Ava* 



*|#i— — ♦»—— ♦f»»»ii mmM i n i nnn ii mn iiiiiiti 



lo<l to make llu> nccc-isary piimi; and 

siH>rilicatiun.s, and^^o.stiiuates for said 

;;ra(iiii>;. curbint: ami paving; and the i , r ■ 

r .11 r 41 , tu J. r * \ paved, and for jiajinu' tlic co.st (. con 

two-thinls of the costs thi-reof to be . .. i ., 

structmfi^ such olli«r seuiij;, panilary 

or surface, as niaj bo riMiuiicd by lh» 



the BorouKh'.s portion of tlie cost ol 
grading, curbing, and j)avinjr bucli 
other public slm-tw, or pait.s tlicrcof, 
us may be rccjuind by ilu- iloiouKii 
authorities to be Kn«de<l, curiKd. and 



assessed against the real estate 
bounding or abuttin(r on said Midland 
Avenue, shall be esliinated and col- 
lected under and according' to the pro- 
visions of tiie said Act of Assembly 
approved May Nth, 1915, entitled: 
"ProvidinK a system of government 
for borou^lis, and revising, amend- 
ing, and consolidating the law relating 
to boroughs." Known as the General 
Borough Act, and all the residue of 
said costs shall he paid by the Bor- 
ough. 

Section 5. All property owners on 
said Midland Avenue shall make the 
needed sewer, water and gas taps 
and run the sxime to the curb before 
the paving is laid under this ordi- 
nance. 

Ordained and enacted this 17th day 
of Julv, A. D. 1910. 

J. J. O'NEILL, 
Attest: President of Council. 

M. C. DONOHOE, 

Secretary of Council. 



Approved this 4th day of August, f^^, and for paying the cost of 



A. D. 1916 

HOMER L. LITZENBERG, 
augll-18. Burgess. 



ORDINANCE NO. 109 



An Ordinance providing for the con- 
struction of the following sewers in 
the Borough of Midland, viz.: 

A Sanitary Sewer beginning on 
^Midland Avenue at a point one thou- 
sand feet west of First Street, the 
terminus of the present sewer, and ex- 
tending thence westwardly along sai(f 
Mi^and Avenue, a distance of approxi- 
maiely five hundred feet; a sanitary 
sewer on Railroad Lane, from Third 
Street to Fourth Street, and a, storm 
sewer along Fourth Street from Rail- 
road Lane to a point beyond Ohio j ougli authorities to b< 
Avenue. 

Bo it ordained and enacted by the | and authorized and dinrted the 1m>M- 
Town Council of the Borough of Mid- ling of a public election on Twssday, 
land, and it is hereby enacted and or-; the :M>th day of July, A. I). 191fi, for 
dained by authority of the same. \ the purpose of obtainhig tlir as.scnl 

Section 1. That the present sani- ; of the electors of tlie said Borcnigh to 
tary .sewer on Midland Avenue be ex- { said increase of the in(lebtffine.«'H. 
ten<led from it:; pre.sent terminus, a I And, whereas, properly and limely 
point one thousand feet westwardly | notice having been given, .said el»»c- 
from F'irst Street, to a point approxi- i tion was conducted and held in every 
mately one thousand five hundred feet ' respect aa required by law, ano duly 
westwanlly from First Street, the ex- i certified returns thereof together with 



Borough authorities to be constructed, 
under prescribed le^al proceedings. 
and providing for the issue and sale 
of coupon bonds to that amount and 
the levy of an annual tux for the pay^ 
ment of same. 

Whereas, the corporate authorities 
of the Borough of Midland, by Ordi- 
nance. No. 107, passed by the Town 
Council the 19lh day of Jime, 1916, 
and approved by the Burgess the 20th 
day of June, 1916, and duly recorded 
in Ordinance Book of said Boorugh, 
sigrnified their desire to increase the 
indebtedness of said Borough in the 
sum of Seventeen Thousand Dollars 
($17,000.00), for the purpose of pay- 
ing the Borough's portion of the cost 
of grading, curbing, and paving Mid- 
land Avenue in said Borough of Mid- 
land, from First Street, the present 
terminus of the puvcmenl thereon, 
westwardly a distance of approxi- 
mately one thousand five hundred 

con- 
structing an extension to the present 
sanitary sewer on Midland Avenue 
from the present terminus of the 
same, westwardly a distance of ap- 
proximately five hundred feet, and the 
construction of a sanitary sewer on 
Railroad l.ane from Third Street to 
Fourth Street, and the construction of 
a storm sewer along Fourth Street 
from Railroad Lane to a point beyond 
Ohio Avenoe, and for paying the Bor- 
ough's portion of the cost of gnuling, 
curbing, and paving such other public 
streets, or parts thereof, as may be 
required by the Borough authorities 
to be graded, curbed, and paved, and 
for F)aying the cost of constructing 
such other sewers, sanitary or sur- 
face, as may be required by the Bor- 

constructod, 
under prescribed legal prcn-eedings, 



tension being n distance of approxi- 
mately five hundre<l feet. 

Section 2. That there be laid and 
constructed .a sanitary sewer on Rail- 
road Lane from Third Street to 
Fourth Street. 

.Section 3. That there be laid and 
constructed a storm sewer along 
Fourth" Strtet from Railroad Lane to 
a point beyond Ohio Avenue. 

Section 4. Said sewers shall be 
constructed and laid at Ihe cost of 
the Borough, according to plans and 
specifications to be drawn by the Bor- 
ough Ehigineer. 

Ordained and enacted this 17th day 
of July, A. D. 1916. * 

J. J. O'NEILL, 
Attest: Prealdent of Conncit 

M. C. DONOHOE, 

Secretary of Council. 

Approved this 4th day of Autoet, 
A. D. 1916. 

HOMER L. LITZENBERG, 
aagll-18. Bargeaa. 



ORDINANCE NO. 110 

An Ordiaaaee opeaing the aooth 
of Midlaad Atanue from Eler- 



■|> 



'■■'*! 
■ If" 

'■i ... 



■;^r , 



it'^ 



I ■, 



i V' 



a certified copy of said orrlinance and 
proper proofs of said election and ad- 
vertisements were ma<le an<l filetl as 
re<iuired by law to the Clerk of the 
Court of Qnarier Sessions of Beaver 
County, aa will fully appear b> refer- 
ence to the procreflings in said Court 
at No. 12, June Term. 1916, 

And, whereas, bypthe re.sum8 of 
said election it appears that a major- 
ity of the electors voted in favor of 
said incraaae of indebtedness; 

And, Wifcuiaas, the Clerk of said 
Court mada a record of the same and 
fumish^d • eartified copy thereof un- 
der seal, showing the result of said 
electton,'«|tft llw corporate authorities 
of saidwmm^, and the same has 
been pi^fad of record on the minutes 
thereof tt xaqaired by law. 

Now, MiiNfore, be it ordained and 
enacted kf tiie Town Council of the 
Boroofh m Midland, and it is hereby 
ordaiaed aad caaeted by authority of 
the aama: 

Seetion 1. That the indebtedness of 
^ Bonn^ of Midland be and is 
hereby iMMiaad ia the anm of- Ser- 
omaaa IMaad DoUaft (117.000.00) 
aad tiwt «aktteare aald faidebtedneaa 






.-**. 



'^.S 



there shall be iaauod aeventeen coopea 
bonda ni th» said Borough aumbeiad. 
from oaa to seventeen, dated Aoguat 
1, 1916» each in the sum of oae thou- 
sand doUara, payable to bearer, or if 
rkgiatarad to the regiatared holder 
theraofi bearing interest at the ijate 
of flve per eentum per annum, payable 
aemi-annually on tbe first days of 
February and August in each and 
every year, with both principal and 
interest payable in lawful money of 
the United States of America, and 
free from any and all taxes that may 
be levied thereon in tlic hands of any 
person under any preiient ur future 
law or laws of the Commonwealth of 
Pennaylvania. 

Section 2. That the form of aaid 
bonds and coui>ons shall be as follows: 

BOND 

UNITED STATES OF AWEitlCA 

COMMONWEALTH OF 

PENNSYLVANIA 

BOROUGH OF MIDLAND 

No Series I. $1,000.00 

Know all men by these presents. 
That the Borough of Midland, a muni- 
cipal corporation of the County of 
Beaver and the Common wealth of 
Pennsylvania, is indebted to the 
bearer, or if registered, to tlie reg- 
itilered holder hereof, in the sum of 
One Thousand Dollars in lawful nio- 
nty of the United States "^f America, 
uliich sum the said lioruugh uf .Mid- 
land promises to pay to the holder 
iiereof, or if registered, to tlie n'g- 
istered holder hereof, at the Midland 
.Savings and Trust Comjiany, .Midland, 
IVnnsylvania, on the first day of Aug- 
ust, 19 , with interest thereon at 
the rale of five per centum per an-' 
nutn, payable seini-annuaily on the 
first days ol February and Augii. t, in 
f.icli and everv vear from tin da'.e 
hereof, upon the surrend«'r and <lrllv- 
iry of the annexed coupons a.>~ they 
.'ii'Vt'rally mature and hecomi' |):iyable, 
uilhmil dedui-lion for ;in> t;i\e;, which 
may Iw levied hereon, iiursuant to any 
pre.SLiit or future laws of the Coii.- 
laoiiwealth of I'enn.'^ylvania, all of 
which taxes tlic IIuiuultIi <>r .Midland 
hereby assumes and agrees to pay; 
.1:1 ! for liie tri;<- and faitliful pa\ - 
ment (ii° the principal ^ this boml. 
and tile stMiii-aiinu;il iiist.illments of 
interest hereon, and the Jaxes as 
aforesaid, the faith, heiuir,, credit and 
i>n>pi'ity of the l;orou^rh of Midland 
are hereby pled^:*'.!. 

This bond iiia> he re-^isterod, as to 
the principal, in the owner'.s name op 
the books of th«' said Uorouirh "t" 
Midland, said registry al.so hoing iiut- 
I'd «»n the bond, after uliich no trans- 
fer shall l>e valid unl<N.< mmie b\ the 
regi.->t» red owner, and similarly noted 
on the bond, but the .same may Im- dis- 
charged from registry by lu iiig 
tran.sfen*e<| t^) bearer, "«ifter which, 
transferability by delivery shall be re- 
stored, but may again from time to 
time, Im* registered or transferred to 
l>earer as before; such registrations, 
however, shall not affect the negotia- 
bility of the coupons by mere delivery. 

This Ixmd is one of a series of sev- 
enteen (17) coupon bonds, each in the 
sum of One Thjiiu.sand Dollars ($1,- 
000.00) numbered from one to seven- 
teen inclusive, and all of like date, 
tenor and effect, and is issued for the 
purpose of providing a fund for pay- 
ing the Borough's portion of the c<»st 
of gniding, curbing, and paving Mid- 
land Avenue, in .said Borough of Mid- 
land from First Street, the present 
terminus of the pavement thereon, 
westwardly a distance of approxi- 
inat«'Iy one thou.san<i Jive hundred 
fee', .-ind for paying the cost of con- 
structing an extension to the present 
sanitary sewer <m Midland Avenue, 
from the present terminus of the 
.Hjime, westwardly a distance of ap- 
proximately five hundred feet, and the 
construction of a sanitary sewer on 
RjfH^oa<l Lane from Third Street to 
Folirth .Street, and the construction of 
:i storm .sewer .'dong Fourth Street 
from Uailn)a<l I.ane to a point l)eyon<l 
Ohio Avenue, and for paying the Bor- 
ough's portion of th«' co.st of grading, 
curbing, and paving such other public 
streets, or p;irts thereof,* air ma.\ be 
ri"iuire<l by the Borough authorities 
to be grade«|, curbed, and paved, and 
for paying th<> cost of eonstructing 
such oilier .'Jewors, sanitary or surfave, 
as m.iy be r<><|uired by the llorougn 
authorities to be constructed, under 
(irescrilK'fl leiral f)roeeedings, .-jnd pur- 
suant to an ordinance of the Borough 
of .Midlan<l, duly onlained and enacte<i 
into a law in Council .is.<?embled. the 
ninte«'nth d.ay of June, IHlfi, exam- 
ined and appn)ved the tw<'ntieth day 
of .June, lllin, by the Burgess; ;ind 
pursuant to the assent of the electors 
of said Borough, duly tr-ven at a pub- 
lic election h«'id on th< J.'ity Hay of 
July, lOlfi, according to lav, ; and pur- 
suant to the authority i onfcrred by an 
Act of the Genend As.-eriibly of the 
Commonwealth of Pene. v Ivania, ap- 
proved the 20th dav ni' April, 1874, 
P. L. 65, entitled, "An Act to regulate 
thf manner of increasing the indebt- 
edness of municipalities, to provide 
for the redemption of the same, and 
to impose penalties for the illegal in- 
crease thereof," the amendments 
thereto and the supplements thereto. 

It is hereby certified that all things 
required to be done, precedent to or 
in the issuing of this bond, have hap- 
pened and been done and performed, 
as required by law, and that the total 
indebtedness of the said Borough of 
Midland, including this issue of bonds, 
is not in excess of any statutory or 
constitutional limit of indebtedness, 
and that the annual tax has been lev- 
ied sufficient for the liquidation , of all 
intereat, asseasmenta and taxes here- 
in agreed upon to be t>aid, and the 
payment of the principal at matnr- 
ity in accordance with thia bond, and 
ihe Acts of Aaaembty in Mdi 
made and providad. 



#^ 



■^m 



In taatimoay 
Praaidaat aad Saeralary of 
aad Bttijgaaa of. the Bonni^ of 
land, Couaty of Beaver, aad 
wealth of Pennaylvaaia, bdag 
authoriaad to axeevte thia iiMltatka 
on ita behalf do hereunto aai aar 
haads aad cauae the corporate aaal if 
the Borough to be hereunto affiaaft 
thia first day of August, A. D. 1018. 
(Corporate Seal) 

BOROUGH OF MIDLANDL 



Attest: 



President of CoundK. 



Secretary of CoundL. 



FORM OF INTEREST COUPON 

On the first day of , JL- 

D , the Council of the Bor- 
ough of Midland, in the County of 
iieaver and Commonwealth of Pena- 
sylvaniu, will pay to the bearen oik 
surrender uf this coupon at the Mid- 
land Savings and Trust CompaB>v 
Midland, Pennsylvania, the sum of 
Twenty-iive Dollars ($25.00), being 
six months' interest then due on ita 
bond issue of August 1, 1916, Setia» 
I, Numbered 



dux 
due 



due 



\h- dutf- 



Secretary:- 

Section .'j. The proper officers of 
the Borough of Midland, to-wit: The 
President and Secretary of the Town 
Council and the Burgess, are hereby 
authorized and re(|uired to duly exe- 
cute each and all of said bunds, and. 
lu make delivery thereof, the suitm. 
lo lie executed by affixing thereto the 
( orporate 5feal of the Bdrough of Mid- 
land, and by the ..signature of the 
President and .Secretary of th" Town. 
Council and the Burgess, and tlie sev- 
ei;il coupons a'.laclud to said butids 
shall bear the facsinnle signa'.ure of 
lli<' Secvetary engniv d ti neu. 

.Section 4. The suitl several bunds 
<*+nWI be made pa\able according' to 
liie ftiliowing schedule, to-wit: 

Bond No. J, ."fl.OUU.OO, .shall b. 
and payable August 1, I'J'JO. 

l>ond No. -J, .SI, 000.00, shall Im 
and pa\al)le August 1, I'JliJ. 

Bond No. ;:, .«; 1,000.00, shall b. due 
.md payable August 1. I'.'il. 

Kuiid No. 1. ."> 1. 000.0(1. .shail Im 
and payable August 1, 1D26. 

Dond No. :., SI, 00(1.00. .dial 
and |>a;, able Augu.--t 1, l!t_'T. 

Bond No. (i, $1,000.00, shall be due: 
and payable August I, 10LI8. 

lloiid No. 7, .•sl.OOu.OO, .-^haM be du€ 
and pay.'ibje August 1, l!t2'.» 

llond No. S. .si.oOO.oo, .-hall l«e due 
.uid |ta\abl! Augu-^t 1, l'''!). 

llond No. ;», ."i;i,0O0.OO, shall b- dur. 
and pay:ihle August 1, l'j:;i. 

Bond .No. 10, .$1,000.00, shall be du«- 
and payable August 1. 1I>.I2. 

Bond No. 11, $1,00(J.OO. sh.ill Ih- due 
and payable August 1, VXV'j. 

Bond's No«. 12 and 13, $1,000.00 
each, shall be due and payable Aug- 
ust 1, 1034. 

Bonds Nos. 14 and li., |1 ,000.00' 
each, shall be due and payable Aug- 
ust 1, id:{5. 

Bonds No.s. 10 and IT, $l,(K)O.0Oi 
each, shall be due and payable Aug- 
ust 1, l'J36. 

.Section o. There is hereby levicdf 
and as.sesKe<l upon the taxable prop- 
eryt of the Borough of .Midland an ;in- 
nual tax of Sixteen Hundred and Fif- 
teen Dollars ($lGir).00), to comn»cnoe- 
in the year IIMT, being the first year 
after the said increase of indcbedncss, 
and continue for a period of twenty 
years, which said annual sum of 
.Sixteen Hundred and Fifteen Doffarc 
($lGir).00) is sufficient for and shall' 
be set apart for and applicable only 
to the payment of the interest, Ulk 
and principal of said bonds, as they 
respectively become due within the 
.said period of twenty years. 

.Section 6. The proceeds „unEtng' 
from the .sale of said bonds an- here- 
by appropriated to paying the Bor- 
ough's portion of the cost of gradin£. 
curbing, and paving midland AvenoK 
n said Horough of .Midland, froas; 
First .Street, the present terminus, of 
the pavement there«)n, " * stwardly » 
di.'^t.'tnce of approximately one thou- 
sand five hundred feet, and for- pM.> - 
ing the cost of constructing an exten- 
sion to the pre.sent .<^ani*."ry sewer «IB 
Midland Avenue, from the pre.seni- 
'erminus of the same, westwardly ar 
distance of approximately five hua- 
drcd fe<'t, an(l the construction of a? 
sanitary si wer «>n Biilroa<l Lane from: 
Thinl Stn-et to Fourth Street, and the; 
construction of a stori 1 sewer uioaip' 
l-'ourth Street from PnMroad Iaioc cc> 
:i point beyond Ohio Avenue, and foir 
paying the Borough's j.ortion of tia»» 
cost of gniding, curbiirr. and paving 
such other public .streets, or jmatK- 
thereof , as may be re<|uirpd by the? 
Borough authorities to bo graded^ 
■urbed, and paved, and Tor poyin^. tha' 
'ost of constructing such other 
ers. sanitary or surface, as may be 
ittJinnl by the Borough authorities to 
be constructed, under prescribed legaL 
proceedings. 

Sj'ction 7. The proper officers o^ 
the Borough, to-wit: The Presideat 
and .Secretary of the Town Connd^ 
and the Burgess, are hereby anth«^ 
ized and required to make, .swear t» 
and file in the office of the Clezl: eC' 
the Court of Quarter Sessions m aa# 
for the County of Beaver, a fi 
statement as required by tiie Act 
Assembly approved April 2(y, JL. 
1874, and the anpplementa aad 
m^ts thereto. 

Oraained and enacted tiiia 7lk 

of August, A. D. 1916. 

J. J. O'NEILi;, 
Atteat: PreaJ^eat of 

M. C. DONOHOE, 

Secretary of CooaciL 

Approved thia 8th day of 

A- D. 191«. ■ 

HOMER L. UTZENBEML* 

angii-is. . ■ V^uam 



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BBATB TlLLBT ULBM NBWB 




How Akoona R. R. EmployK A(e Treated 

Altoona railroad employes have be^n very faithful to 
the railioad company. Have they l>een accorded the proper 
treatment? And have they leceived the pi'oper share due 
t}»enk?i> 

For yeais back the Railroal Tompany has inaugurated 
i;uspensions in this cily. throv..ii;. thousands of their eni- 
plcyes out of work and t-6 shift for Iheiw.^el'es as l>est thoy 
couid. When, however, the liailroad Company was threat- 
(.'v.cd with a stiike elsewhere, tliey immediately found work 
in the local shops very plentiful so that everyone had work 
(!av and night; l>ut when the same employes wanted to or- 
uani/.e to bettei' their own conditions they were threatened 
iim\ held at bay with the stron}>: arm and the power of the 
club which the Railroad Company is able to wield. Thou- 
sands of the faithful men who stood by the Railroad Com- 
pany when they needed them and were sent to places of 
danger (which orders were willingly ol)eyed) were then at 
the leiLst suspicion againstHhem that they tried to organize, 
thrown out of positions. A list of all names of those who 
dared attend any meetings was kept at headciuarters and 
many a good citizen of Altoona had to leave his home and 
l)irthplace and seek a livelihood tunongst strangers and most 
of these we hear only the very best reports from. 

Today the Railioad Company is asking the.sc same 
men in the shops to stand by them and against their fellow- 
workmen. At the .same time the majority of these men arc 
not able to make their full week's wages due them, notwith- 
standing the fact that all the big cities have enjoyed the 
greatest prospeiity ever known and Altoona is made to 
suffer foi- the Railroad Company. If the men go on a strike, 
as they intend to. and stick to their demands and principles, 
the United States government would of necessity be com- 
I)elled to tiike over the railroad — and then Altoona would 
enjoy seeing the .shops working on an eight-hour basis and 
every man would get his just share due him. 

The Altoona shops would be running full time the same 
ius the navy yards, govenmient piinling offices, po.stoffice 
department and all other governrnent enteiprises. There 
would be no suspensions, blacklists and coercion. The gov- 
ernment would take the general manageis and superintend- 
('!its and instead of paying them big .salaries on account of 
Lheir unusual e.\ecutive abilities (which they now use to 
juggle the affairs so as to pleii.><e the public) would pay them 
just as well or l)etter for the l)etteimont of the service. 



OLIVER ANQ PENROSE 
VOTE FOR CHILD UBOR 

Both .Senaton Vote Airainst Child La- 
bor Bill— Coostituepts Arv 
Thoroughly Duigiuitod. 



(.f 



!lie ervice. 



Wo have 17.:V.)7 individual accounts on our books, peo- 
ple living l.otv.een Cie.^son and Huntingdon, and most of 
*hcm are in the employ of the Railroad Company, and it is 
iiom the complaints we hear that we have formed our con- 
clusions, and it is for this rea.son that we hope the men in 
the .shops will stand by their fcHow workingmen that they 
may get their rights, and that Altoona should enjoy the 
piosperity. same as the other cities, v.hcre the big i-ail- 
roi'/l contrjitts arc sent to.— Altoona TriI>uno. .An;:. I-"). 



Waaliington, D. C— The senate haa 
patiwid the bill to prevent interstate 
conMncrce in products of child labor. 
The vote wjib 52 to 12. The measure, 
alri-udy paijit>ed by the houae, was 
brought to a vote in the MluiU upon 
liie iniiihtince of President Wilson, 
after the Democratic senate caucus 
once b.ad decided to defer its con- 
sideration uhtil next December. 

Senators who voted against the bill 
were: Bankhead, Alabama; Brayan 
and Fletcher, Florida; Hardwick and 
.Siiulh. (leorKia; Overman and Sim- 
nion.s, North Carolina; Smith and Till- 
man, South Carolina; Williams, Miss- 
i.ssippi; (Democrats) and Oliyer and 
i'ciiro.se, Pennsylvania, (Republicans). 

The bill, as passed, would pro. ...>... 
interstate commerce in the product of 
any mine or (|uarry in which children 
uutlor 16 \-ears of age have been em- 
ployed, or in the product of any mill, 
ranncry, workshop, factory or manu- 
facturing establisiiment in which chil- 
dren under 14 have been employed 
riM)rc than ei^ht hours a day, more 
tii:in six days a week, before 6 o'clock 
in the morning, or later than 7 o'clock 
in the evcninK- 

It would take effect one year after 
enactment. 

Of the 46 votes cast against the 
bill in the house, .38 were cast by Con- 
trressnien representing "dry" states. 
The «i;scussion on the bUlI revealed 
that irore than 60<).0(X) child workers 
brt'veen the ajres of 10 and IS years 
arf employed in states that have en- 
dorsed Prohibition. While the profes- 
sional Prohibitionist is extending the 
hand of "friendship" to labor. Prohi- 
bition states are harboring the Child 
Labor trafTic; n traffic that ruins not 
only the boy, but the little ffirl as 
well, and jeopardizes the only thin^ 
that stands between the worker and 
starvation — his job. 



^fJ&SXHG Xl>ij^ i(»»»<»»f»<»»»»»»»»»»"»»» «»» 

j||.<^ D4wUiM...A.I<S' ■■ SiXrr BAYS SAME AS CASH ^ ; 




TRADE MORAL--The qualtty ti; 
wnai you nave to sell is xnown ! 
to tome people aU oi tM timti 
and all of the people somt at 
the time, but advertise regu-: 
lany with us and you'll reaoh; 
•U 01 the people all oi tne tuiMi 



F. H. MAYO 



THE REXALL STORE 



6. W. WALTON HOW. GO. 

SucccMora to 

Beaver Hardware Co. 

Dtmlen in Hardw«rr. Stove*. House FumlshinSt. 

and FatTO Implementt. 
ROTH PHONES. BEAVEX. PA. 



F. C. DANDO 




I WOiW EXPERT 9! 

Emm 
Fonsiwm 



MRS. CHRISTINE FREDERICK SAYS 
IT WILL AID CONSUMERS. 

w 



n. 



Bell 1252-R. B. C. 6.-)53 
Third Street. Hbavkk, Pa. 



"The House of Qualitv" 

N. STOLOWITZ 

• TAILOR 

HEA VKU AM> WOOPLAWN 



BEAVER CAFE 

ROLUN PARROTT, Prop. 

First .ClaM Restaurant, Soda 
Fountain and Confectionery. 



INSURES STANDARD QUALITY 




Consumers in Small Towns and Rural 
Communities Are Victims of Dis- 
crimination by Big -Store Methods. 
Which Encourage Subetitution of 
Unidentified Goods at High Figures. 



GRO-CO STORE CO. 

Pancj' (irocerie.s and Notion.s 

Whulpkalc Biid Rptail 

Hell INione.s!>S<j-'jHl. Ukavkr. Pa. 




snmr BAYS same as cash 

ARTSOLF X 



SUMMER GLEAN UP 

I All Imported and Domestics 
• Sun Parlor and Porch 
Furniture 

This Imported Furniture is Ideal for Home Use 



\ E \ '.r*!' 



$10.00 imported 
Rocker* 



$6.67 



$10.00 imported 
Chairs 



$6.67 



12.00 imported 
Rockers 



$8.00 



$12.00 imported 
Tables 



$8.00 



$13.50 imported 
Rockers 



$9.00 



$13.50 imported 
Chairs 



$9.00 



$20 imported 
Settee 



$13.34 



$2.75 domestic 
Chairs ... 


.$1^ 


$3.00 domestic 
Chairs 


$2.00 


$3.35 domestic 
Chairs 


$2.23 


$3.75 domestic 
Chairs 


$2.50 


$4.00 domestic 
Chairs 


$2.67 


$.'i.00 domestic 
Chairs 


$3.33 



$5.75 domestic 
Stands 



$3.83 iSi 



1 Sat. 



Genuine Haviland 1 7Pi0c^s 
China 7-ln. Plate | 7 v*i-.-» 
Tea Cup & Saucer I si Ji 'tk 
rioral Decoration U #l.Ull 



SPECIAL 

49c 



\V> SPECIAL 



♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ 



I 



•(lod's Countv and the Woman" at tlu- Majt-Mtic. .Vii«ust 28tl> and 2«>lh. 



■riSiAiSWiiSiriRiAriSiriRiAriSii^AiAriRii^iSbP 



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« 
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SaturtTay-iWonday 






I SPECIALS!! 



sirs, (')irlstlae Freilerlck. hou8chut<l 
eili<ii>ii)-y cxiMTt and couKUltiiis hoUHc- 
tiold editor (if the Ludieii' UomeJou."- 
niil. tlie .N't'w Yurie Evening Sun, Sue- 
ccs.viful I'liriiilnf*. nud various otlicr 
pulilimtioii.x. nn-cntiy iippctired before 
the Inter.statc and i''oreign Coinaierci' 
Coiiii:iitte« of tlie House of i lU'pre- 
8<>ntntives in Waidiiugton In .aupporl 
of the SttpJi«'n.x-A.sJiur8t bill. ThI. 
monsiiro. ucrordlng to Its tlt^e. Is dt"- 
Ktirned '"To protect the public against 
dlNhouost advtTtisin;; and faLse pr«.>- 
teii.seH in iiierchnndising." 

The bUI vill leKallKe standard, nni- 
fonii prici's niMl jirevent price cuttiiiK 
of triKle iiiiirked pNtd.s by big city 
stores for the purixwe of giving the 
fal.«<' iiiiiire<:.«iion that nil tlielr other 
jirticles MH' pniportionntely l«»w. 
I'rlce ruttiuK is merely bait to lure 
cuHfoiners so that articles of Inferior 
merit may be Kul>stltute<l at hlK'.), 
prices. 

"I appear l>efnre the commit tp" 
purely in tlie Interest of the con- 
sumer," vnid Mrs. Frederick, "nnef^l 
do not rare nixjut the rij^hts or wronjrs 



98c ^ 



«Ne\v Fall Middy Blouses, U>ng Sleeves. 
j^ Stripe, Belted Models 

^ Children's Fall Dresses, New 

JR Models 

Ladies' Waists, New Frills and %^Z %k 



98c I 



■B Trinuningfs . 

'41 ^i^Taffeta Skirts, Blue, Black and 

^ Ladies' Wash Skirts, Your ^ 

V Choice . 

^ Ladies' Summer Suits, (valued up 

2 to. $35.00) 

t A . Ladies' Coat Suits 



$6.95 I 
98c I 

$4.95 
$3.95 




W. E. FUORENCE 

Registered Plumber 

II. c Phniie KMI 

Corporation St., - Heavek, Pa. 



J. T. 

Baker]} and Confectionery 

Home Made Bread a Specialty 
53C TiiiuD St.. Hkaver. Pa. 



All Wool Suits 

( Union Madr) 



$15 



.00 




^t Colonial Theatre, Beaver Falls, Friday, Augrust 25. 



♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ 



• •■••• 




THE STORE FOR WOMEN I 

bSI LevyBros. ^ | 



MRS. CHRimNl puboiiiick. 

^ te-C; 

of retailer or nuumttctnnr tteept u 
they affect ttM cooMnilll 'There la 
grcAt need that tte wninrtl eonraroer. 
who apenda moat of tha funtly Incone 
for artlclea oaed la IMm 'Iwii. ahould 
be able to bnj with tie l«ul extniTa- 
gance. the leaat InMBdaiicy and the 
leaat waste. I brieve tkat a vnl- 
fom price on an MmtttM arOde la 
<mk of the chief oiaaaa W ^»Mcli thla 



PRICK'S 

" The Store That's Differenf 



Rowse's DruK Store 

Beaver, Pa. 



<►<► 

i><* 






Olive Stove Works 

ROCHESTER- - PENN'A. 



g<r-x»^ .„ 






J. H. MARTSOLF 

DRUGGIST 

Hell 1398; n. C. 6644 
fi38 Third St., - Bbavrh, Pa. 



Advertiai ia tht Lik« 



L A. Mitchell 

Meat Markjct ' ' 

Fresh and Smoked Meats and Poultry 

V i4n Season. 
Both Phones. dEAVES. PA. 



J. 0. 



leiui: 



LE 



B. C. 6129; Bell 1072 
643THmD8T., BsAYBa, Pa. 



Subscribe for The Labor News. 



r^ 



X 















BUILDERS OF GOOD STOVE? 
FOR SALE BY ALL LEADING DEALEllS 



»«»»»»m»n»»n»nmnn»»»»»»Hu 4 



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Cf^:^46&:i 





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V' ' > ■' • ■'■■ 




^ 4 



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tf% WORK , 

g^ S L E BP 
%# RELAXATION 

HOURS aan^^^^^s 

A RE7IS0NABLE DEMAND 



Official Org u of C«iti«l Ubw UbIm 
Md 3BildiBg TradM CfnacU. 



".i.-^' ' «i 



BE A VER 



Owned. CoBlroncd. Edited and Pab- 
iislMd by OrgaaiMd Ubor. 



LABOR 



EWS 



8 



HO IRS 



WORK 

SLEEP 

RELAXATION 



A REASONABLE DEMAND 



VOLUME 2. NUMBpi 3. 



BEAVER, PA., FRIDAY, 



25, 1916 



ONE DOLLAR THE YEAR. 



LABOR DAY CELEBRATION 
PLANS ARE COMPLETED 



n • 



'Splendid Program ArranRed for 

Centi-al Body's Celebi-ation 

at Junction Park. 



BIG FREE ATTRACTIONS 
AND FIN E SPO RT EVENTS 

Final plans for the biggest Labor 
Day celebration in the history of the 
Beaver Valley are practically complet- 
ed by the committee in charge.Messrs. 
R, F. Kross, J. D. McKenna. O. J. 
Molter, W. T. liifers and Chas. Huff, 
and if the weather man behaves there 
will be a bijr crowd of "Wnion men and 
their families and frienqs at Junction 
Park on Monday, Sept. 4th. "There 
will be all sorts of fun for both the 
old and the younp. Superintendent 
\V. H. Boyce, of the Beaver Valley 
Tnictioii Covupany. has kindly donat- 
ed a j)iK to tlif committee, said pijr. 
a;iiT beinjj libcnilly annointcd wi'-h 
numerous coats of prcase. will be let 
looic in the bi;r enclosure inside the 
. track, and wii! go to the person who 
proves to bo the best runner an«i pos- 
ses-ses tin- ability to hold onto a 
jrr'a.s»>d porkrr after he prahs him. 
Ov'inp to the .recent advance in the 
price of pork, it is needless to say 
that several hundred men and boys 
v.ill LUKuMi in the pursuit, incidentally 
furnishi* a loi of fun for the on- 
looki'rs. • 

Manager ("has. Sht-ttirly lias se- 
cured a big free attraction jn the per- 
son of Captain L. D. Blondell. cham- 
pion swimmer of the v.orld. who will 
give an interesting exhibition of his 
wonderful skill in the water, and in 
the evening tlicre will be a big water 
ival. featured by the blowing up 
- - ^ MiHag ■hip. "wn 






W fitku/t, tiill be excited over 
tKe scramlrie of 5,000 marbles, which 
will talte place on the race track. The 
marbles will be thrown into the cen- 
' ter of the crowd and the scramble will 
start. Included in the 5,000 marbles 
will be 600 glass "aggies," which will 
tend to make competition all the more 
keen. 

Complete programs, which are 
ofhcial and are the only ones to be 
distributed, will be included in the 
Labor Day edition of the Labor News, 
which will be distributed to all in at- 
tendance at the celebration. The fal- 
lowing is a partial list of the sport 
events, the prizes to be announced in 
The I^bor News of next neck: 

100-yard dash for men, open ot all. 

10(^-yard dasiT for boys, between the 
ages of 12 and 16 years. ^\ 

100-yard dash for girls, between the 
ages of 12 and 16 years. 

Watermelon eating contest. 

One-half mile race, open to all. 

.^0-yard dash, ofien to women. 

Three-legged race for men. open to 
nil. 

I,adio>' basrhail throwing content., 
% Sh(K.«;trin;; rnco.'for bo.\>. 

Ladies* nail driving contrpl. 



SOUND REASONING OF 

NOTED TRADE I^IONIST 



Editor Frey, of the International 
Molders' Journal offers thi.s guide to 
trade unionists when they are called 
upon to sympathite with or accept 
new plans of action or new legisla- 
tion: 

"What we are organized to do for 
ourselves we can do much better than 
any one else can do for us, and any 
proposition which would limit or in- 
terfere with this right of ours to art 
for ourselves, is to the cxtont it inter- \ 
feres with these rights ;i menace 
.something which we should oppose. 

"We are not free to work out our I 
own probioms as wage earners if any! 
other power, authority, or method of| 
action is to cxc-rt an inierfeniiK in- 
fluence in any of the- activities which ! 
\v<- ha'c ;i : icliT to enirapr in :is free 
men." 



MEETING OF CENTRAL 
LABOR UNIDN MONDAY 



General Agent of Danbury Hatters 

Appeals for .^id-r-Labur Day 

Committee* Appointed 



TliACTION EMPLOYES 
WILL HAVE^'BIG DAY" 



[;. V. r. lt<>y> l<* Hold liltl; Annual 
! OiitiiiK at .1 unci ion I 'ark on 

Tui'sday. Au;;. 2\Hh. 



From Present indicai'M s the l.ftli 
■iT.nunl dutint' cf the cm!.!f..P:> of the 
IV-.ivor Valley Traolioi. C'ompiyiy. 
•.vhich ib to b<- !u '(i at Ji:nriioh I'ark 
on Tue-sduy. Auirusi 2!>th, wili prove 
uu- most succtssful since' the inception 
of tlies*e iifTairs. An elaborate and 
entertaining proj^ram has l)een ar- 
ranged and there will be something 
doinfe all day. Manager Charles Shet- 
leriy, of the Faric, has generously do- 



whldi he handles, direct 
to the iJoys, and if the wether is pro- 
pitious the "boys" should receive a 
gc^dly addition to their treasury. The 
big ball game between teams ffbm 
the motormen and conductors and 
shop and power house men, will be 
something to remember. The teams 
will be expected to pull off some spec- 
tacular stuff at the pi'.rk on this par- 
ticular (lay. The program for the 
sport events include.s races of all kinds 
for ;it>ung and old. target shooting, 
blue rcx-k shooting, base runnintr, abll 
throwing for distance, broad jump and 
hi^rh jump, shee string race, endinjr 
with a tug of war. 

Thei-e will be a basket picnic from 
12 to 1 o'clock, and in the evening at 
G p. m., a basket supper. 

I>ancin{r will be an enjoyable fea- 
ture r ->m 8 to ll:oO p. m. 

or.'.c rs of the outing are: J. D. 
McKenna. piisident; T. 11. White, 
vice pre. lent; H. K. Pfeiffer, Held 
marshal; C. S. Duddleston, clerk of 
cour.'^r : O. R. Ward, assistant clerk of 
course; T. IJ. White, timekeeper; W. 
.M. I.oifan. timekeeper; J. R. \t:irshall. 
iti.fster of ceremonii's; A. N'.'eh.'^'er, j 
secrctar\-; ('. .MarslMl'. t:-e.!sui« r. 



A meeting of the Central Labor 
l^ion was held on .Monday evening at 
the headtjuarters of the organization 
m New Brighton. There was a good 
attendance, all delegates reporting 
jLTood business cunditions; all mem- 
lM>r.« l>einp employed. Tlie committee 
in the Labor Day celebration details 
reported favorable progress, and the 
i'ollowinj: additional committeemen, to 
serve at .lunciioii I'ark on the <lay of 
the celebration, were ap|>ointetH 

l).tnce liali, H. (Irimsiuiv, ; carou.ssel, 
K. Itouglass; 1 »r<air.ian(l Theatre, 
.Maik Fonl; roller skating rink, C. .M. 
Ree-i. 

.Sfcrelary Kress reported that no 
answer had been received from Typo- 
trnphical I nion No. 7, relative to the 
st.tiuliaK of I). J. IJerry. 

Thomas W. MeNnliy, general agent 
o*" the United Hatt. ;s of Ni'rtii .\mer- 
ica. was pn-sent iiiul s|)«>kt' of the re- 
cent vi^rdict against his oiganization, 
\". he.cin lli«' l»:i!ibu'-y H:itters were 
mulcted for ih. .mi:; of .■?_'.')J,i>(lO by 
order of th- I'. .S. .'Supreme Court. 
Th< San Fran;isfo < "onvcntioii voted 
♦o ..l!nv, all ir.f inbeii of (irfrani/ed 
'..hor to iIcMitr <i!io hour's wages to 
assist :n payinj; the sum mentioned. 
Mr .>UN;iI!y >t:it.d tiuit tlie unions 
h;i<! bcon I Ix nil ;il tlie first CJ'.II, but 
"iiiii; ti.at ii;id rot been making' very 
eni iragin;: ^eturn^;• and asked that 
'1.1 brother hatters be gi\'en consider- 
;i'. on ;:nil support. If ti^c Panbury 
bre:'iyen are copipellctl to st.ind the 
payment of ti'.e < luarti-r-inillion dollar 
•( rdiet, it means 'hat all of them will 
lot ihe-r hon;<> ;'.iul lifetime savings, 
I'.n 1 it is up to fellow -craftsmen to 
donate at Ici^t one hour's wages and 
h |i lift the oppre.ssive load. 



IGS WILL 
EXCITEMENT 



M« 



laces to h*- Held at Junc- 
Ml Saturday, Aug. 26. 
Furnish ThrillH. 



est 



*«*J 



Kas 
h; 




ALLAN L. BENSON TO 

"From chair factory to 
tial candidate," might well be the titla 
of a story of Allan L. Benson's life, 
who is the Socialist party condidate 
for President of the Unjted States, 
and who will speak nt (irand Opera 
Hou.se. Roclicstcr, P'riday, Sept Ist, 
at 8: 1. J p. m. 

•Mr. Renson is beat known as the 
most popular propairanda writer the 
movement lias pro<iuccd. He was born 
at Plainwcll, Mich., Nov. 6, 1871, the 
-on of a facli)r\ ^.-•.iker. Mother 
died when he was three years old. He 
went to live with liis pnindfather on 
a farm. Attended district school in 
winter and at the a>re of 14 worked 



nndoubtedly be the jrreat- 
int ever pulU-d oif in the 
ly, is carded to take place 
Park on Satunlay after- 
26, starting at 2::>U. at 
^a large number of speedy 
will contt'st for hiera- 
tjVffered by the H:iriey-I)u- 
cycle Club. While Rroth- 
er, being the i»romoters. 
Brested in spee«l contosts 
fact that inotopcyclist.s 
thrills u.) li.e ■ minute 
Br class of racf.-.. ;i!id as a 
■peed kimr.>; notaitiy I.. 
ist, H. Haeon, <;. Hlack. 
bI, a. (;. .^cl.inidt and K. 
entered, it does not re- 
stretch of imagination 
out an aftenioon of thrill- 
BrtatinK spurt. The fol- 
of events and pri/e.s is 
^^•••unir.ce that the several 
be bitterly contested: 
le profehsii>n;il i-ace, tiii»M- 

amateur r:"e. tiM-ee 

lile prof( .-.-ion;il race. 
prizes. 

i)e bicyc'*' niic. , rst : "d 
S8, pa'r tin s. 
Je s:d<jar lace. twi- ;>r.-/>^. 

\\\e profe.'isional ••.■m-. 
^^rizes. 



PRES. WILSON'S OFFER; 
WHAT RAILROADS WANT 



fla(;ra\t viol.\tions 
of child labor laws 



".M«)st appalling. indee<l, is the ut- 
ter disre^ranl for the laws n-latinj? to 
ihild labor. rompulsor> (-(lucation and 
the .'>4-hour law. for women," asserts 
(Jfortre H. Hamilton, of Columbus. O., 
chief inspector of w«)rkshi»ps ifmi fac- 
tories, in his annual repoit. He says 
that in three months it was found ne- 
(•»'.^sary to institute 11;') proseeut.ons" 
for violatitms of tiM'sc law^. Seventv- 
tv.o |M'r rent of the I.ne,-; in the cast's 
proserutfd were suspended or remit- 
ted. The report refers rather sli^'ht- 
in^ly to uplift and other voluntary 
S()rielies which are "m«>st annit;. inj: to 
ti.t d''partment." 



SPECIAL AHRACTION 
BOOKED LABOR DAY 



miVER" HAS 
OWN TROUBLES 



FEDERAUABOR UNION 
MET THURSDAY NIGHT 



J B. R. T., NO. 321 i 



Fedei-al Union No. 14f«01 mer in 
reg:ular .«;es-pion Thursday evcninj^' in 
tlieir rooms, Kramer Ruildintr, Ne'.vH 
Prijrhton. There v.as a good turn- 
out of members and ronsiderable rou- 
tine business disposed of. ^ 

'federal union wishes to extent the 
tn;.nks of its membership to the mer- 
chj nts and business men of the val- 
ley for the support they are giving 
them in their fight to w in recognition 
•f the Townsend Company, Fallston. 
The officers claim that if the Town- 
send Company will meet their com- 
mittee and offer any reasonable plan 
of settlement, a conclusion of the 
trouble con be speedily arrived at.' But 
under present conditions they cannot 
and ^^ill not return to work at the 
plant. 



YARN WORKERS HAVE 

WAGES INCR EASED 

Yam workers in the Kansingrton 
mill district, Philadelphia, have rais- 
ed wages alter • 10 weeks' strike 
which ioTolirsd 10 mills. These work- 
en are affiliated to the Uhited Tex- 
tile Workers' Union. 



The fellow who is lucky at lore is 
the one who can write a loire letter 
that doesa^ nnean sajrthisf . 



Items (onccrninp Affairs of the » 

McKces Rocks Local That f 

Will Interest Y"ou. J 

» «««»««« «".— "»-"««»««««««iiiiini>niBffnflffii"^* 

Klmer Wolstoncroft left last week 
for a vacation at Atlantic City and 
other eastern points, stoppinjr at Ni- 
agara Falls on his way home. 

Assistant General Yardmaster Fred 
Thiel started on his "acation .Sunday. 
He will be gone about two weeks. As- 
sistant General Yardmaster E. Cheny, 
of the nifht..shift, is filling his place. 

Many members of the Masonic fra- 
ternity are planning to go to Eliza- 
bet htown to witness the laying of the 
cornerstone of the Allegheny County 
Memorial Cottage. Special train over 
the Pennsylvania Lines both ways, 
will furnish the members transporta- 
tion at reduced fares. 




The borough School Board will hbld 
a mass meeting Friday to ask for s 
hond issue to help furnish the 
playgrround end to secure new ones. 
They claim they are short of money 
and caraiot furnish school room nor 
teachers enotigh. This should aot be 
permitted. Give them Uw money to 
get room and pay n m teachers, and 
also bay plajrgrounds for the kiddies, 
so that Uiey may enjoy themselves. 
But — ^wateh sad see that the money 
is qMBt properly sad wisely. 



by the nmnth on a farm for neighbor. 
Left home to support vhimself at the 
age of 15. \Vorked in ' chair factory 
a year and a half, bepinning at $.3.50 
a week. Worked in paper mill a year, 
(lot the only year's high schooling he 
ever had by quitting paper mill and 
taking a job as janitor in high school 
at Otsego, Mich. After many weeks 
of failure to land, he secured a po- 
sition at newspaper work. For 20 
years he followed that vocation. He 
was a magazine writer for 10 years. 
Author of many interestftig articles 
on Socialistic subjects. 



FISH -FRY 



The Loyal Order of Moose, Na 575, 
of Freedom, are making preparatieas 
for one of their delicious aiMi appe- 
tizing fish fries, which will be heM 
in the lodge rooms at that place, on 
the Evening of Saturday, September 
23rd. 



h'ven the braggart has his good 
points. The people who are ahhtys 
talkbig aboat themselves cant be 
talldiig about us. 



,y ccnt« a day" Olivers 
e ugain. In an edi- 
on or Force," they 
p i^'^ors, Sid 
Hit^lofMrs %^]lsf the same as they 
vrtin when that infamous statement 
was- issiaid . that "HOc a da\ was 
enough for any working man." He 
now asks, "If a railroad strike is 
averted at the cost of arbitration, 
have we advanced or retro^rraded ?" 
In this qnestion he misrepresents th«' 
position of President Wil.son, (whfcli 
•is not ."-urprising) for President Wil- 
son's plan is arbitnttion on a plan 
which gives the worker soniethin^: of 
a chance in case of a deal like that 
handed the Enginemen :ind Firemen 
in the last arbitration decision. He 
sa.vs it was expected that the Presi- 
dent voold impress upon the poinds 
of both, "parties the necessity of arbi- 
trating their difT'^nmce-?. I'resid'-nt 
Wilion has shown that he knows 
somclh'ng of the railr<>;i(l inan.itrers' 
gsine, .ind is not, (at lea.st up to the 
pr^'sent time) poinj^ to as.«ist in li.-uul- 
in^ the workers another lemon. 

Yes, it was e.\p(Hie.l thai h( would 
inpree upon them that they should 
arbitrBie, but it was expected that 
the nilroad chi'-fs would do all the 
arbitrating and not tin* workor.*^^. What 
ai; .iw'"!!! crime the IMv.«ifleni ^onuiiit 
ted V. ;ien he becmie a conver-t t.o the 
w rkei s' cause; he ha.- tiikcn th.' .-'efi 
f«ii th'- eight hour <l:i.- . Ixiicvnir ti);i! 
til' w rking man has .i i .rht to . nji.. 
lifi ^ well as the uiaK-natis 

1 l:t eight-hour d.iv U!;dt»ul»l« di;. ii.is 
th( 3;in«tion of s.K-iet . iti it- f.ivf)r 
:5a .» .-^ ri*esidciil Wilsi.n. OIjm i ;i.-.k.>, 
is I' not aiso true t;ial the .iU(i;,Mi.en*. 
of . 1 iety also r:\v<-r< haviu;.' a <iu;!r 
re!, like the pre.-;cnt one. jriven to an 
ins; J|"'ial tribun.il, rind .-ibide by the 
stwf-rB for a perifxl of \(ai-.s. Now, Mr. 
Nin vV Cents a day, di<l not the llro- 
therhoods submit their case to an im- 
partjal tribunal; two of them in fact. 
First, to the Board of .Mediation, and 
then to the President. Who could b*- 
a more impartial judge than the Pres- 
ident and who has more right to ex- 
pect his views to be respected. Did 
not the employes re6|)ect those views 
and make concessions as he re(|uested 7 
They did! But what did the the man- 
agers do? Nothing! 

Mi^be.lir. Oliver can tell why the 
rsilroa4|p insist upon arbitration. It 
is bffnijit their case is so weak they 
know 11^ only hope is — what? Well 
the eB^oyeeo know from experience. 
Theni to so such a thing as an impar- 
tial t^>i|MBal, and if you study it out 
yoa #itt Had the truth of this state- 
ment jftv yourself. Furthermore, did 
•mployes submit their case to 
through the press of the 
Did Oliver's paper print 
it given them by the em- 
Tbey did not! 

flM railroads proven to the 

the eight-hour day would 

i to the men ? No ; 

prove it. The subsi- 

on Psge Four.) 



(', .plain I.. ]'. iJloedci!. thf ( ieun- , 
picn ocean swimmei". v.ii! knov n ;;iiii ■ 
r«i .^'niy.ed a.s the jrr**:!' -t .uiraetion 
III the liiited ."^tnte: . will l)< ll'c fiit , 
attiaction fo!' tin- < •iilrai i-aiior^ 
Inion'^ picnie ;irul eeUhralion 't>i. La- j 
l>or1i;iy at Jinution P.-irk. Cipt. Plon- i 
ileil will pre.sent a vei> iii>\i 1 j-ro^-^ram ; 
a.t ni^rht on the nver. w In ic .i ;rood j 
\ uu can be had from th*- l)anks o' the, 
|iark l»; all. The laplain wil! lecture^ 
on swiinininjr aiul life saving'. Hi- wilT 
perfor.-ii nuinerous feats in tl-.<' wati i. 
I'.uild r.ifls, rook hi.-- suppi r. (al. 
druiv' .ind smoke under water. Hi.- I 
.siwi-laeular linisli i.< saiil t-i l»e tlw 
jrrealc.<H of v.ater < \hil»it ion.' . Ilf 
will pn-sent the loriMMJoinj; of tin- 
Wm. r. Krye in miiratun- form, u ith 
a dynamite bomb al.so a scene of a 
ship on fire at sea, with marine tire- 
woiin. llie niedel of Uie F^^ytr will 
be constructed at Pittsburgh for the 
iiij.' day. and will arrive on Sv\ii. '1. 
Manager .Shetterly will have the pret- 
ty model mounted on a special IVa\ 
ear and e.diibiled over thi' line.s of tiie 
IJc.ivei- \a!le\ Traction ( iii.i|(aii> on 
that oVftiinir. It will be aeeonipaiiK d 
b\ an additional car beurin^ a band 
of Miu.-^iiians. In eii.s*- of 4*ain on tlie 
nurht of the date, and considoriiiK tin- 
exprn.-'*' to .-ecure llii.-i v.imderful at- 
traction, (apt. IJIondell will i-emain 
over and kwv his pertoniiance on Die 
linst clear day, at the park. 

This is the most educational. <lurinp, 
and exciting exhibition tliat lias ever 
iM-en held :tt the park, iiul .Manairer 
.^hetterly states tliat Iw appn-eiates 
the courtesy, res!>e«t and patrona^re 
the jM'ople of this vallc \ have sliov. i. 
him sincf In- lea.sed .Junction Park, 
md e.-pc<iaiiy the l,:il«ir rnioii.-«. The 
valley pa|)ers, reporters and all the 
i'iiiplo\es of the Tracti()n ( o, .sayinvr 
nothm^r of till many favor.-.. arnl ari> 
c' kindn»'.^< snuuii hiin b\ ."^upl. \V . H. 
llosee and ln> stalf of office help' and 
the police force have shown him. 

.•X.'^ a p; Iti.'! recompen.se foi- these 
k iiflne.^s<> .Mr. ."^hetterly lia.-^^ -ccured 
'••I. ^nj'liriii! perfidii.mc" 
hiiioii-^ {!>•< <if charge. an( 
'II ' I II ; I.' • aJf! > of 1 ;i-,;\i : 
' ■ . iiaik I 1 • : I *a \ . ."^lot"! 



Obiection.s to Points Involved 

Results in Postponement of 

Final Decision. 

(iR.WT KI(;HTNOrR DAY: 
imOTHEKHOOD HOPES HICiH 

Foliowinir are tin- .-ali. nt points 
points that have In-i-n brouuht out so 
I far in \\\v railroad el)ntrov^•r^.\ : 
, The Railroad I'reNJdenth Promi.sv 

I 1 — The (!at eijrht-hour .la\ with 
pro-rata pay feu- (.\«Ttiiii<-. The agree- 
ment t»» l)f a siKMU'd cntract for one 
y«yir bejlwcen the iaiiroad> and the 
four br(,)ther!HH>(|< vi presented. 

2— Tl'.e eight-hour day becosne ef- 
fective imme«l!ately. datiny: preferably 
datiiiL" fr«iii: (»ctMlMi- i 

The F*re.-.ideiit !'ronii.-.e> 
'i'he President proini.s(.> a> an in- 
demnity a;rainsi unuue iiws from the 
« iMue.ssii.n of ihf ( ivrht-hour d.'i>-: 

1 -i",. u'o his influeme. p< r-onai 
a:ul ofVicia', to (»bta n fi)r tlie radroads 
m ini rea.-f of livijr'.rt rates. 

■J -1'liat the j)rineiple of arbitration 

Aould bt maint'iinvd anti con- erved ; 

ii:.t tli< dcni.in i of t! e I r';>tiierhoo<ls 

i>: I !i!f and !'. lujl' for ( vertiiin and 

■ . ( <•! ;:n;.'i"-.t di'nian<is <■♦■ t'.e :ail- 

; ro:i''s a;!(ctinu ^ perial way-e .schedules 

' I'uld ill ari»itr.ited. 

I ■ -The (nacrinent of a coinpul-ory 

; in\< .~t i'T.'it ion la., .similar, in L'eneral 

j uullio.. t»> tiie <':madian industrial 

li.-pi!t< > act. Th:.< lejrislat :i>'i t'> b*- 

oliiaiiied before .Ian. 1. !!••'. 7. 

-1 — Tlie cniarueiiunt of the inter- 
<la'<- ei'ii.nu-icc cnininis^ion 'i'iM'I .-cv- 
er> to nine nioinKeis. an imrease which 
would l»<- cn.sidered hijrhl;. favorable 
;<» the I'ailroads. 



WALLACE & CARLEY 
fUf ON MMA W 



Meaver t'ounty PuildniK Trades 
('ouneii iiK t Thursday eveninir in leg- 
ular session at tlxii- I, a!!, Kramer 
I'.uildint', .New I!riylitciii. I'a. .A nuin- 
hor of niatt«rs pi-itainiiif to rou- 
tinr busne*-- of ilif ('ouncil v.as taken 
up and dispo.scd of. 

The unfair attitude ot' \\;ii!ace & 
Cariey. of W'oodhiui;. x.hich has been 
tb« <-ause of consiiierable com'r.ent in 
labor circh's of the valby. was tiien 
taken up and the fiC**: p!ac(d oTi the 
unfair liit \>\ tl.c < I'uru i!. 



of hiv 

ullj tM- 



MAKE.S ST\TK.MK.\T 

The lollowinu lettei- is .-ielf-explana- 
t')r\. and i.- oublish<'d with tin- ( on- 
>ent i)f all iiartie^ interesied: 

New HriplUon. Pa.. XuK. J-. U'Ki. 
.Vli Wn;. T. P.yers. 

.\'\\ lliiiriit«in. P'Mina. 
|)e;ir Sir: — \ f«'\\ days ago 1 was 
aske«l l>v one of the crew «tf a car of 
ihe P.eavej \ aii<\ Traction Company 
'f the .\( \vs had any t(implainl to 
iiiiK«' reu'ar'iinr tin \vU_\ \hy a.otor- 
men and i onduclors of the 'inc trans- 
i'n\i"!(>|i'-s. Tlierr v.as 
no riouiit, U-r \\\r ipn's- 




pt. 



Iini?i<ir.ii<!\ after' till- '• .1 !«:lioti 
tiie rlancm^r Ipavilion, a inch .' 'In 
',. I •/«,?■' ..iM-; !.i:r.-l III rl'C v:.l!r;. . I<i- 
uet, , r will; ilir roller nnk, circlini; 
<ivin;r farou.sall, roller (oaster ami 
fun hou.se, will all be tl.ro,\ii ojien, 
and operated, with many other at- 
tractions, for the enteiiainiin nt. of 
tne old as well as the youn^. 

The labor unions of the valley, as 
w« 11 as Mr. .Shetterly, especially invite 
tlie public to make .Junction Park tiieir 
head<iuarters for this day and evening. 



port ou' ' ••'•I 
^i)i:u ri'a^t'M 
• .'III .1), 
n, .. i!. ... • .r 

' lull \' .1 - 1. • 

-Vii.- iha! '!'• .\<-v, .- tia- 

.. iiatiA er t o make. I '. i 

t It eii.p. I '. ( . o! t M< I 



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I 






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t!; 



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ryi e<i;>'piaMlt 

M'\-. rai ><■ irs 

II t 'I'll conip." ny 



OHIO UNIONISTS TO 

MEET OCTOHER NINTH 



Officers of the Ohio State Federa- 
tion of Labor have issued a call for 
the Thirty-third annual convention, to 
be held at Toledo, beginning October 
9th. 

Ohio unionists have been resisting 
the attempts of private liability in- 
surance ^companies to weaken the 
state compensation law that they may 
write insurance. As this question di- 
rectly affects every wage earner in 
the state, Secretarj-Treasurer Don- 
nelly says it will be one of the princi- 
pal deliberations of the convention. . 



PI^ITMBERS RAISE ^GES 

Plumbers' Union No. 123, Philadel- 
phia, has raised wages 50 cents for 
an eight-hour day. Double time will 
be paid fpr overtime. The rate is now 
f4.60 a day. 



I b;;vc k'nd;\ taketi cari- of our envcl- 
I o|ie.s coining from ail .>iections of the 
I e('Unt\ to oui olfice at Kievcnth stn-el 
; and ThinI avinufe, .New Urij^-hton. 
Sometimes as many a> ten iar^'e en- 
velope.'- aie <leliven'd to our mail l>o.\ 
on the comer, in a single day, ami it 
IS seldom, very seldom, tliat there is 
ari.\ (bday in our roceivinj: them. The 
ni» n are aUvay.« coui-teous. have a 
pleasant word, and have never to my 
knowdedjre ^.'rumbled over the addi- 
tional duty of recoivinjr and deliver- 
injf the letters. It has often occurred 
to the News that without the permis- 
sirm of" Supt. W. H. Boyce. to have 
our c<ipf»o transpo|^ed. and without 
the invaluable services of the crewg, 
we would be in a sorry plight for the 
prompt receipt of our valley copy. It 
it with pleasure that the News goes 
on record ir this letter as being with- 
out cause for a "kick," but that on tlie 
contrary fiels under obligation to the 
employes of the traction company, 
as well as Supt. Boyce. Our entire 
experience with the traction company 
employes has be^n marked with cour> 
t^y on their part which the News, we 
assuitf you, appreciates to the fullest 
extent. 

Hoping that our rslatioas will con- 
tinue cordial in the future as ia th* 
past, we are, 

Very truly yours, 
' F. S. READER A SON, 
Editors Beaver Valley Nerin, 







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PSAVBS ly^^Xr LABOR NBW8 



BNG LIFE iraKfi 

sJOHN HENRY 

^GeoKjeYHoibait 




Johnllenry Has a Musical 



SAY! DID you ever stray away tmm \ 
buqte uf an evenlDg aad gu to uue 
of thoHe parlor rloU? 

Friend wife callud it a niuslcaie, but 
to rot' it loulied more llku a aunsiuu uf 
the Alexicau cungresa lu • UoUer fac 
tory. 

They pulled it off at Mrn Luellu 
FrDthinKhaniH, over on the Drive, 

I llku Luellu and 1 like her huMtiand. 
Jack FrotbuiKham. so it'a uu aucr»t 
conclave of the Anvil Aaaociutioa 
when I whisiwr them witte that the 
next time they give a muatcal evoulux 
my addresa la l<\>re8t Aveoue, curuer 
of Foliage Street. In the wood*. 

The Froth InKhams are Dice people 
and old friends and they h«va more 
money than some folks have hay, but 
that doesn't give them a licenu to 
•poll one of my perfectly booiI eve- 
nings by sprinkling a lot of canned 
music and fricasseed recllations all 
over It. 

The Frothlnghams have a skeleton 
In their closet. Us name Is Uncle 
Heck and he weighs 237 — not bad fur 
a skeleton. TncU^ Heck Is a Joo Mor- 
gan. His sole ambition In life Is to 
become politely pickled and fall asleep 
drap«>d over a gold chair In the draw- 
ing room when there's blgb-claiis com- 
pany present. 

For that irasun the Frothlnghams 
on state o<-rusliinti put the skids under 
TTncle Heck uiul run him off stage till 
after the tlnal curtain. 

On some occasions Uncle Heck 
breaks tlinniKh the bars and da«heB 
Into the scene of rotlnement i^ith 
merry quip and Jest to the cobfuslon 
of his relativi-H aiitl the- ili-coucealed 
amusement of their quests. 

This was one uf those occasioDS. 

EJarly in the evening Jack took 
T^ncle Heck to hlH room. Hat hini In 
front of a quart of vintuRe i#nd left the 
old seezer there to slosh around in the 
surf until sleep claimed him for its 
own. 

But before the wine was gone Cncle 
Heck put on the gloves with Mor- 
pheus, got the decision, marclied down 
•talrs and Into the drawing room. 



flowers we were all Invited to listen to 
a auprano solo by Miss Imogene Glass- 
face. 

\Vlien Imogene sings she makes 
fac es at herself. When she needs a 
high note she goes after it like a hen 
•Iter a ladybug. Imoffen* sang "Sleep. 
Sweetly Sleep.' and then kept us 
awake with her voice. 

Then we bad Kufus Kellar Smith, 
the parlor prestidigitator. Rufus was 
a bad boy. 

He cooked an omelet In a silk hat 
and when he handed the bat back to 
Hep Hardy two poached eggs fell out 
and cuddled up in Hep's hair. 

liufuB apologised and said he'd do 
the trick over again If someone would 
lend him a hat, but nothing doing. We 
all preferred our eggs boiled. 

Then we had Clarlbel Montrose In 
select recitations. She was all the 
money. 

Clarlbel grabbed "The Wreck of the 
Hesperus" between her pearly teeth 
and nhook it to death. Then she got 
a half-Nelson on Foe's "Raven" and 
put it out of business. 

Next she tried an imitation of the 
balcony scene from "Romeo and 
Juliet." If Juliet talked like that dame 
did 110 wonder she took poison. 

Then Clarlbel let down her back hair 
and started in to pive us a road scene 
— and It was. Everybody In the room 
got mad. 

When peace was finally restored. 
Mrs. Prothlngham Informed us that 
the rest of the •"paid" talent had disap- 
pointed her and she'd have to depend 
on the volunteers. Then she whispered 
to Miss Gladlola HunRcrschnttz. where- 
upon that young lady glK^led her way 
over to the piano and began to knock 
its teeth out. 

The way Gladlola went after one of 
Heethoven's sonatas and slapped Its 
ear?) was pitiful. 

Gladlola learned to Injure a piano at 
a conserratorv- of music. She can take 
a Hungarian rhapsody and turn it into 
a goulash In about 32 bars. , 

At the finish of the sonata we all 
applauded Gladlola Just as loudly as 




Then Claribel Let Down Her Hair and Proceeded to Give Us a Mad Scene 

— and It Was. 



where he Immediately Insisted upon 
being the life of the party. 

Uncle Heck moved and seconded 
that he sing the swan song from "L>o- 
hengrln." but his idea of a swan was 
so much like a turkey gobbler that 
loving friends slipped him the xnocca- 
slns and elbowed him out of the room. 

Then he went out in the butler's 
pantry hoping to do an Omar Khayyam 
with the grape, but not flndlxif any he 
began to recite, "Down In ths Lehigh 
Valley me and my people grew; I was 
a blacksmith, Cap'n ; yea. and « good 
one. too! Let me sit down a minats, 
a stone's got Into my ahoe— " 

Bttt it wasn't a stone, and It didn't 
get Into his shoe. It was a potato 
salad and it got into his face wtisn the 
Irlak cook tknm It at him for Interfsr- 
log wltb her work. 

'I'm dlsooarBged." mamarsd Uncle 
Reek, and presently h« was alMplnv 
with magnificent noiass on tlis eofa 
latheUbimry. 

There ware present at the battle In 
tha drawing room Uncle Petsr Grant 
and Annt Martha; )pep Hardy and hie 
dtamond ahlrt studs; Baneh J«8enon 
and hla wife, Alice; Bud Hawlcy aad 
Ua aeoond wife; PhU Meiton and his 
third wife; Dave Maaon ajnd his «t»> 
tlonanr wlte; Btvb Wllsoa aud Us 
wifSk Jeaalak who la Peachse* sister, 
and a fsw others who naked to hare 
tbalr MUSM omitted. 

Hm mdd rerela were tmagnrated 
by the Plpfla hrothov, who nttempt- 
•d to drag aome groedqr nnaie oat of 
■vttaM that dldnt want to itreap^ 
The Plppla hroChen part tlidr heir In 
tlM mMiis aai aHmys do th# nsreh 
ftpm "The Bthes la Tovtand" «a tbeli 
maadfdtaM M yn eseora. 
It Tlsler Il w^s rt ever entehm then 
• (Mipls of shine chord- 
■mqr to Ihs hid. 

brollMrn took a 
oC into g vant of 



we could. In the hope that she would 
faint with surprise and stop playing, 
but no such luck. 

She tied a couple of chords together 
and swung that piano like a pair of 
Indian clubs. 

First she did "My Old Kentucky 
Home." with variations, until every- 
body who had a home began to weep 
for fear it might get to be like her 
Kentucky home. 

The variatlona were where she made 
a mlatake and atruck the right note. 

Then Gladlola moved up to the 
squeaky end of the piano and gave an 
Imitation of a Swias music box. 

It soonded to me like a Iwlaa 



Presently Oladlola ran out of nw 
material aad aubslded. while we all 
applauded her with our fingers crossed. 
and two vsry thonghtfid ladles began 
to tnlk taat to Oladlola so aa to take 
her mfai^ off the planoL 

This exettsment was followsd' by 
anothsr cstnotrophe named Minnehaha 
Joass. who picked up a conplo of so- 
a crae c hsd thtm at 



that It wtu never hn «Mt i» 
fltty-cent ublad'hols 
Almost before the 



m 






;t:BACK TO VICTORIA 



lpM«lMr 
■iJ.*Ths 



time to recover 

nle. was coaxed to sing TosGili 

By!" 

I'm very fond of 
I'm afraid if Mr. Toell evsr 
sing his "Oood-by" he would 
same to you, and hera'a your kBi 

Before Jennie marrted 
West I remember she hW a vsry frrtty 
messo-concertlna voice, but shs%fl)«i9n 
so long away helping Stub W^tatB to 
make Milwaukee famous th^t pt>v< 
adays her top notes sound -Kke s 
cuckoo clock after It's hsm W nil 
night 1 

I suppose It's wrong for lbs M pidl 
this about our own flesb nad, Miosd, 
but when a married woman wtth sis 
fine children, one of tbem aft TalSi 
walks sideways up to a piano and bs- 
gins to squeak, "Oood-by. savBisrl 
Oood-by, summer!" Just aa If riM wsrc 
calling the dachshund In to dliasr. I 
think it's time she decllnsd ttM.Boinl- 
nation. 

Then Bud Hawley. aftsr tcnlkf H 
all out that, there waa no oluuMS d( his 
getting arrested, sat down OB ttf 
piano atool and mads n tsw 



UOLINKM OF PAST ■KOOMIt 
•lAUTY OF PRISINT. 



lOaaehi^ is one of thosa f oarless 
nlBtsn who rocallae without a safety 
walTS. She alwaya keeps her eyes 
d ose d , no she cant tell Juat when her 
nadlesee geta up aad leaves the room. 

Ths next treat waa a mixed duet on 
the flute and trombone between Clar- 
eneo Smith and Lancelot D18enberger. 
with a violin obllgato on the side by 
Bsct6r Tompkins. 

Nevsr hstoro have I seen muale ao 
ronshly handled. 

It looked like a walk-over for Clar 
enen. h«t In the fifth round he blew a 
cott^ of gr een notss and Lancelot got 
ths dedalsn. 

Than, tor n eoasolatlon prlta. Hec- 
tor lad oat to the middle of ths room, 
he nssnaslnstsd Masenfol's 
lusftkasa- so thorooghly 

titf^'^.-v' . « '. 




He Immediately insisted 

the Life of the Party. 

marks, which In their orlglaal state 
form the basis of a Scotch baltau! 
called. "Loch Lonaond." 

Bud's system of speaking ths Oat 
llsh language is to say with hto volet 
as much of a word as he can rtmsm 
her and then finish the rost sC It trttb 
his hands. 

Imagine what Bud would dn to a 
aong with aa oatmeal fonndatlan like 
"Loch Lomond." n 

When Bud barked out fha %mliM^. 
bara. which say "By yon honals hash 
and by yon bonnle bras." svsrybSdy 
within hearing would have cried with 
Joy If the piano had fallen over oa 
him and flattened his equator. 

And when he reached the plot of the 
piece, where it says. "Tou take tli< 
high road and I'll take the low road." 
Uncle I'eter ^look a driuk, PhU Merton 
took the »>aine, Stub took an oath and 
I took a walk 

And. all the while Bud's wife sat 
there.' with the glad and winning amile 
of a swordTish on her face, Ilstenl:ig 
witli u heart full of pride while ter 
criiueladen husband chased that h'lp 
less Foni? ^H over the parlor, and flral- 
ly lert It unconscious under the aofa. 

At that point Hep Hardy got up aad 
volunteered to tell some funny stories 
and this f;nve us all a good excuae to 
I'Ut on our overshoes and say "Good 
night ' to our hostess without offend- 
ing anybody. 

Hep Hardy and his funny stories are 
always used to close the show. 

John," tiaid Peaches after we got 
home; "I want to give a muslcaL Blay 
I?" 

"Certainly. ^Id girl," I answsrsd. 
"We'll give one in the nearest moving- 
picture thiater. If we don't like the 
show all we have to do is to cloee our 
eyes and thank our lucky stara tbsre'a 
nothing to listen to." 

"Oh! aren't you hstefttl! 
pouted. 

Maybe I am. at that 



Art ef PaHa Is Making Kvtn Worsted 

llnsss Fit for Qe«wnt «f Silver 

Lace Parrot Peases 

aa Nevslty. 

A yonng girl, dressed la a frilled 
musUn wltb a blue sash, walking along 
Bellevue avenue at Kewport one day 
last aummer, created a aefumtloa by 
carrying a email bird of brilliant plu- 
mage In f fragile gilt cage swung by 
a Hng from her little finger. 

The city by the ttfa, la which sim- 
plicity Is exploited with the aaiue kiud 
of artificiality as It M-as by hlnrle An- 
toinette at the Petit Trianon, caoie very 
near being actually simple for lack of 
Incentive to be otherwise. 

Therefore, when ILrs. Herman Oel- 
rlchs, wltb the artistic aid of Mrs. 
Coode Nast and Fraak CrownlDshleld. 
held a fashion show at ber house in 
the luune of a war charity, she was 
thrice blest both by the residents of 
Newport aiyl the outsiders. And then 
a joiug girl, of undoubted charm and 
prontlge, satmtered slong th« avenue to 
ths Casino and tbe Uilltop Inn. 
dangling a bird In a cage from her 
finger, she wag greeted as one who 
had aaved a aeasoo from that in- 
nocQoos desuetude which Newport 
loathss. 

The Idea waa greeted with ripples 
ot npplaose fer Its audacious novelty. 
Tet, It was a revival from Victorian 

The girl with her bird did not have 
her novelty to herself very long. All 
winter, we have been beseeched to buy 
exquisite Chinese bird cages wltb bril- 
liantly plumnged birds sested In them, 
to be bung in any room ef the house, 
whether a cottage or a piAace. 

Tiny birds that gllMtened like 
beetles then came into fashion Instead 
of the canary, wbicli reaemAed a new- 
bom chicken. 

The milliners seized upoa this sym- 
bol of Vlctorianlsm, tlie gaudy parrot, 
and pointed and embroidered It on 
such a quality of hats that the price 
quickly sank td* 98 cenUk 

The parrot has passed as a novelty 
and a fashionable pastime Id millinery, 

GOOD MOP MADE AT HOME. 



bnt snothsr bit of Vlctorianlsm Is 
creeping ov«r tlie land. 

It Is the worsted rose. Prance, flbk- 
ing nt the ptat for her clothes 1b> 
splratloo. Instead of the present and 
future, has ilfte4l another bit of fancy 
work out »f early Vlctoriaolsm and 
ttung It Into the current of the roust 
daring modem fishloos. We already 
have tulle and aatin gowns caught up 
with bulbous roses, made of soft, fine 
wool, la enchantlag culora. 

Serge suits are caught at the waist- 
line and aeck with small roees In 
green, scarlet, yellow and black. In- 
formal llnea suits, In the natural tone 
of the linen thread, huit^ black and 
greeo worsted roses somewhere on the 




T 



iM MM fUAxnumm hamiii 

BST tilt iSMI Aif ITiil SAM* 



miEMINNKSEWIIIB 






Amt» MSTMCT MANA6£ftS 

iwMk ljM2r»MnMto« 0tM«S 



. nsAi^tu 

ronibtnuil' r 
UULLAH, i<r 



-'^•-■••Tii.nr^^'^"""" 



riMfor i«iriu« 



CAn-Oaa carbon rvinovvr, ■asoiliir auvi-r 
lh« only on* that aula rvpval •aUs: htiii pMi> 
•ample by maU. kOc. H«l»anifn wiiniKl 
CAn-4jaa CO^ t4S *th Av*.. nuabwrch. fi^ 

PATtHXs isf»MLR&sSuSr(?M' ii^t 

Overheard in the Zoo. 
Eagle—How are things with your 
Owl — On the blink. 



Ssrvlesable and Nsceianry Implement 

Constructed from Odds and Ends 

Found Around Hotiss. 

A mop Is slmost Indlspenmble In 
those homes that hnvs poUahed floors 
jy llnelsnoM, snd one msds st homo 
•will ■h* fSund ' to smswer almost ss 
well ns those ezpeoalve onss that are 
to ho bought 

To make It, collect together odd- 
ments of cloth or Aannel. anything In 




A Home-Made Mop. 

fact from which rubbers or fltjor 
cloths arc made. 

Now cjt up the cloths such oa flnn- 
nel or fl.-innelette», e'tc. Into strips 
about S incheo In lenirth and 2^ Inches 
In width. 



it \Mlth Basket Trimmino. 

.surface where they catch the eye and 
do the iiioMt good. 

For some months, France has been 
wearing bats trimmed with large, 
\vorste<] roses and Alpine flowers done ' 
lu gre«u find white wool. 

On whatever luuterial she wishes to 
put these colored worsted threads, she 
can dc» so. tCven organdie serves as 
a suitable biickgrouud. 

The fashions that concern us most 
at the present moment, are the crewel 
rose and the sampler cross stitching. 
No mattet how fur a womun Is from 
Purls, she can use l>oth these meth- 
ods of trlEnniing with a lavish hand. 



Some or the strips can be a shorter 
length and should be In the center 
of the mop. Wben sufllcient strips 
have been cut (and this can easily be 
told by bunching them up until there 
Is a nice fat bundle), Oe them to- 
gethtr about tn Inch from the top 
with string. 

Thin most bs done very sse nrs ly by 
blndlns tlM ntrtng roond snd roand. 
Now n long ntlelT wiU be nesdsd. like 
a iMinboo ; If there is not one to hand, 
one cfui be bought cheaply. 

To fasten the mop to the handle, 
open it out like In the small diagram; 
run the stick through the ceoteV of 
it. This Is tnslly dune. ^ 

Now take one or two strips of the 
inrip and put over the end of the stick 
and rlriv« u null. through the strips 
and Into the stick. In thi.s way the 
iiMip 1:1 well secured and Is as tirm as 
a rock. 

To work, simply rub the mop along 
the floors, don't i)fn'l the back at all ; 
ft l8 surprising how th« tuop will not 
only tiike up the du.«<t. but polish 
file f1cMir*«; It niny he ii.sed with some 
liquid polish if llkerl. and can he 
\va.«'h*»d npnln nii'l ricnln by simply 
dipping It up iin«l 'lowii In soapy water 
and i>«tt tne It In tlit; ojcn xo dry. 

A siuillnr mop Is spk-ndld for walls, 
pIcturp-rMiis. etc.. hut should be made 
of white or lightly-colored niaterial, 
and, of course, used for noiotlier pur- 
pose than the trails. 

A trln 1 of one of these home-made 
mops will more Than convince the 
housewife ns to its u«e. and best of 
nil. It mo be made for nothing, which 
In tlteite times is a great consideration. 



You Bet Paw Knows. 

Little l.,eniuel — Suy. puw. \vh:if li 
the difference between u Htuu->iii) I 
and a polltlclun? 

Paw — A statesman, son. Ih ii jniii 
tlcian who has made hlH [die an I » 
politician Is a statesman who Is h(!II 
poor. 



Important to Moth4 

Einmlne carefully every bottle ot 
CASTGRIA. a oafs and sore remedy f oi 
Infants and children, and aee that tt. 

Bonra the 
81gnat«ra<rf 
In Una tor Over SO 
Children Cry for Fletchsr's Castoris 




Making a SUrt. 

Little Louis was a smart b«)y nnd 
.very anxious to forge ahead In ttie 
world. He got a Job In the local hunk. 
A Wealthy uncle met him In the sii->fei 
one morning and said : 

"Well, Ldnia, how are you gertluu 
on In bnslneaaT I s*pose thellrwt ihinu 
ws hnow yon .will be prssMent of tliv 
bsnkr 

"Yes, ancle,** replied the boy. "I'm 
draft clerk already." 

">^'hat!" exclaimed the an<le. 
"Draft clerk? Why, thatV very mh- 
prising, bnt very good." 

"Yes. uncle," replied the bov. "I 
open and shut the wlntlow*; a<'c«)r<HnL' 
tr order, and close the <l<M»r>« uln-n 
people lenve them open!' — Ydiitti- 
CVmpunlon. 



»h»- 

.nil 



Somewhat Different. 

The honeyiufKin liad slii':ip»Mi 
slunipx. "On our weddliit: -Imv," 
sold. *"I was un'ler the lin|ir»'.--;i>ii 
had filled my heart with Hiiiisli.i.c' 

"Well?" he queried, nftei ilit- iimn- 
ner of his kind. 

"Burl t1n«l." Bh#> contlnuf.l. "it v\u-. 
nothing but moonshine." 



Didnt Walt to Loam 

A gentleman, clad In a ping bnt sad 
an air of determination, together vlDl 
sundry ether garments not 
to enumerate, uprose on a dry 
box at the most promlnsnt 
the village* and, holding aloft a vlls sad 
wriggling serpent Invltsd, te ftdn- 
torlan tonea. all good psopis wttMh.lks 
soond of his voles to 
htm for profit snd 

"What d'ye s'pse la eomla' «cr !■• 
quired V a dtlian, addfasslB) 
Codgor. 

"D'know!- sasrisd ths 
Trobly he's soras lafsrssl 
seeker who la going to pnmSm, H vs 
elect him, to got rid of all ttt 
In theeotoity by sstlag 'em. 
I'm going home! O'day, 
City Star. 





Loot the rOlfNa 

Jones, who sppredstsa n 
like many othsrs. 
with any degree of snoesss. 
the first lima ths )oks 
being the most ms^lcsl sff 
"because he wesrt s 
his neck." aad detsrminsd tn 
on the first psrty of firlanit In 
he was Invited. Ths 
he e^edtrifled his victims irttliil 
olamation. "I say, rve n 
one!" He asked. "Why Is 
most moslcal of snlmslsr* 
tt np. "Beosn 
trtvnphantly, **hs vhsn tf 
rMadhtenvdlL** ^ 



Us nmMmmt^tm 

ictlma irtt|*«ft'#h 

rvenf«tf|f pir 

"Why Is n dtag4ll0 




— Get rid of dandruff — 

it makes tlie scalp itch aiid the liair fall out ^0 
wis0 about your hair, cultivate it, lilce the women in 
Paris do. They regularly use 

ED. riHAUirS EM DE QUDONE 

the wonderful French Hair Tonic Try it for yonx^ 
ie]f . Note its exquisite q uality and Ihigrance. Aristo- 
cratie men and women the world over tueand endorse 
this famous preparation. It keepa the acalp dean and 
white andpreaerves the youthful brilliancy of the hair. 

Bay a 50c bottto ffXMn your dealer* or smd 10c to our AjbotI* 
esnOAcst&xra testing botde. Abo(V«antfafai8*Aon'tiMg1eat 

your hgdf • 

B. nUOl, BifL I II 



"... ^ .. 



nsure lOurTecth 



f. Better than tno 
j dent I fi'icc vou 
^ arc usin^ now. 



fVA^UDOU "S 



W- 




Unbiased View. 

Hazel — YouDg de Swift Is mn-ei'li-nHi 
the lloD of the season. Huve y<>ii nx-i 
him? 

Alme« — Yes. and. Judging fn.m \t\-* 
manners, he Is more of a tlonkf.v rl>:in 
n lion. 



Cracking Down on Them. 
'Dar am mo' dan one pnsson wldln 
de sonnd o' mnh voice.** severely said 
^ood old Parson Bagster, In the course 
of n recent aermon. "dat wouldn't fol« 
ler de stral^it and narrow path turn 
dis cbnrch to dsir homes bnt would 
tag a minstrel hand to de end o* de 
ssrth r— Kansas City Star. 

9 

-7-:.- 

Drastie ■dueatlen. 
In the adiool of experience a man 
recelvea practlesl education from his 
sifters, aa advsncsd edncstlon from 
hU wife, and then la astonished to dls> 
eorer timt dssghter csn pnt him 
throogh a "Sniahlng eoorse^ thnt 
him fsallaf linv and dlHf;. 



Hisiisi In •*Calsmlty." 

Tbs cosi p e n mtiona of cslsmlty ars 

■Mds apparsnt aftsr long Intervala of 

Urns. Ths ssra years revssl the desp 

tsasdlsl faces that «idmtt« nU fact. 



«Dssp Myslsry nf Awm ri s m i Pdltlss. 
A yovng wunwn taking a dvU ssrr* 
ice ezamlaaflon went Into hystsrlcs 
whan tfM lesd on hsr pspar: "Who 
wore the first five vice prasldsntiT' 



MestOsI Svan 
"■A man dat's too good natored,** osld . 
tJncls Bbsn, "nearly always hns to Im- 
pose on somebody to mske np f or de 
wny hs gits Impossd on hlsaeU.**^ 



Wsrfcaw 

Whatever yen de dsn't wony nbont 

the work, bnt go sheet doing ths wash, 

•nd thns yonll ssod ds the woof. 






OLD PRESCRiPnOR 

FOR WEAK HONEYS 



A mcdieinsl preparation like Dr. Kil- 
mer's Swamp-Root, that has real curat ivt 
▼slue alouMt sells itself. Like an en(il«M 
ekaia system the remedy is recoiniDf!r'1e<l 
by tifoee mho haTsboea benehted to thuae 
who are in nsod of it. 

Dr. KilaMr's Swamp-Root is a phv«i- 
dan's preecriptioa. It has been tckioi' 
for years and has brought reaaltt to cuuui- 
loss niunbers who hare soffersd. 

The soeeeas of Dr. KIIsmt's 8warap-RiK>t 
is dus to the fact that it fufilli almost ev 
sry wish in oTsreoming kidney, liver hv*i 
bladder diasaass, correets vhnary truultli-* 
and aeotralisas ths arie acid which cau«.« 
rbeoamtism. 

Do Bot suffer. Qet a bottle of Pwnnii 
Root from any draggist now. Start tK.it 
■Mat today. 

Hoverer, if yo« wish first to trnt C.:» 
great preparation send ten ceo:t lu l>r 
Kilmer k Co., Bingbamton. N. Y . (o> « 
■ample bottle. AVhea writiDg Us Hur«i uu J 
ition this paper.— AdT. 



^ 



"V 



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'J«a^ 




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■a^ "jT^ , , 'iy 



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BBAVBR V 



^ 



> 



BASIS FOR PEACE 
NOT YET FOUND 



CONTINUOUS CONFERENCE PRO- 
, DUCES NO RESULTS 



WIU SEE PRESIDENT AGAIN 



A«e«ptanG« of Eight Hour Day tho 

lloal HItoh -In Prooo«dlng»— 

liMiatoneo Upon Arbitration 

Still Urgod by Capitaliata 



Washington. — ElKht prealdenta of 
Important railway systems who have 
boon deaignated to draft the rail- 
roads' reply to President Wilson's 
appeal that they accept his plan for 
arertlng a nation-wide strike, were 
in almost continuous session with* 
•at solving the problen}. 

Three of the commltteo. Hale 
Holden of the Burlington, R. &. 
Lovett of the Union Pacific, and 
Daniel Wlllard of the BalUmcre & 
Ohio discussed the situation with 
President Wilson. They werr-at the 
White House for ntore than an Dour, 
and on leaving declined ({k talk 
about their vinit. further fYian to aay 
they had asked for the ronference to 
''discuss the general Hltuutlon" and 
•zpected to see the President axaln. 
No Concrete Plan 

Although some of the 60 or more 
presidents are showInK a dlspoHi- 
tion to prolong the negotiations in 
,the hope that the HfTntlnienI of busi- 
ness men of the c«)untry will \w 
ahown to be opposed to tht- Ulea of 
an elKht-hour day, there wuh h gen- 
eral feeling that a deduitf answer 
to President Wilson's d'manrl can- 
not be rauch lonRcr postponed. The 
President 1» understood to have In- 
dicated that he desired his proposnlH 
to be fully debated by th" e.xecutlv»s 
but their conferenros among th<m- 
■elves have failed ho far to develop 
any concrete plan likely to win ap- 
proval. 

So far as the presidents would dis- 
cs the present situation, 'lit-y still 
ire Insistent upon arbitration of th'* 
eight-hour day and all other I.hsu'm 
with the employes. A., the confer- 
•nces continued there was less talk 
of action whl(h would lead to a 
Strike, but some of the exe^utiveH 
are expected to IlKht to the last 
lltch any plan which would force 
an eight-hour day upon the roads 
Without some form of arbitration. 



6BEEKS IN BATTLE 
WITH BULGARIANS 



Mumania Haa Moblllsad an Army af 
tOO^MX) li^dy to Strikt Teutona. 

L<ondon. — Eiventii in the Ualkuntf. 
rapidly following each other threai- 
en to drag twojnOre nations, Kumania 
and Greece. #nto the maelstrom of 
the European war. 

The crisis has admittedly b«*en 
reached In Duchareat. VYhile Greek 
troops, by engaging the BulgHriana in 
a bloody bfittle In Greek Macedonia. 
may lead the Athens government to 
enter the arena even against It-t own 
deaire. 

Startling Diaciosures. 

A startling new phase of the situa- 
tion reached the public* eye foe the 
Drat time with the ne4s that Rumania 
hsH completely mobillt^d her ^ruiy of 
60O.000 and that Russia has landed 
t'Voops at SalonikI, to co-operate with 
the British. French, Italian and Ser- 
bians. 

Both these developmfnts. now 
weeks old, have been r^ligfoUHly with- 
held from public knowledge by the 
entente censors. 



MEXICAN COMMISSION 




R NBWS 



Ittatas Burgeon Qeneral Calls 
Meeting at CapUal- 

n.— What o!tf( iaU ergard 

of the most Important niedl- 

ncet in th« country's his- 

will me4l- here to dlitcuMS means 




srW 



ACCEPTS APPOINTMENI^ 



Secretary Lanaing Announces NaiUM' 
^ Selected by the Prssidsnt 



Washington.— Secretary LanalSf :4 •"•^'"°« lutantile parulysU 



announced that the American 
bers of the joint comuilsslon to 
dertak.e settlement of dltferenoaa b^ 
Iwecn the United States and llasloft 
would be Franklin K. Lane, M»' 
retary of the Interior; Judge QeorS* 
(Iray of Wilmington. Del., and Dt. 
John R. Mott of New York City. ' 

All have accepted their appolaV 
menta. 

The MeilRan mem bers were uaBISi 
some time ago. and arrangements 
for their meeting will be made las^ 
mediately. Virtually the only qOOS' 
tion to be decided Is where the •*•!, 
Mions shall be held. The Mexicans 
are understood to prefer some 
on the New Jersey coast. 



I 



Open Seasons Named for Birds. 

Washington. — Uegulationa designat- 
ing open seasons for banting migra- 
tory birds under the new fedt-ral migra- 
tory bird law were proniulpaled by 
Secretary ilouston of the Agrirulturo 
!>epartni*>nt. They apply only In 
caHes wht?re e(|ual protection to the 
birds is not provi(le«l under state 
laws, the state reKulations Rovern- 
Intr wh'-re th<- open sca.sons they 
(lesiKnate end liiler or uarli<T than 
stipulated III the federal designa- 
tions. All Insectivorcdis liir<I; :ir<' 
j)rulect«'(i iiidilinltcly under the Sec- 
retary'.s order. 



I Ambassador Elkus Sails. 

I New York. — Abrani I. Elkus, recSBt 

I ly appointed snibaRsador to Turkey* 

• (tailed aboard the Danish steamshifi t ^y ^^pt 
I Oscar II. He will go to his post hf 

way of Berlin, Vienna and Sofia. AaB* 
I bassador ^IkuB gave out a statemmt 

in which be said he would do hit ntr 
I moat for the relief of the native pop* 

ulutioii of Turk<>y and to r*- estabUsb 

free mail communication Ijet 

that country and the United States. 



Big Corn Crop in Iowa. 

Des Moines, la — Iowa farin»'rs' <orn 
crop thi.s year will be worth $L',::J0.0Of 
moro tl^nn lajit, ."ay exp<'ri.< in an estj 
niate h;(s«-d on the I-"<d«'ral crop re- 
port This means at least .100.000 mo 
tor cars in lo.va next y<ar ugaiiist 
IT.'i.ii till.-; y«-ar. only one 'n ••v<Ty 
i:? p'T. on.s. Iowa, wi'ii ?,0'.l.>itiO.Ui><> 
buvhels of corn la.-^r year, has in pros 
;>»-(f .''.*>.';.000,00" busli<lK fills yi-ar. and 
'he selliiie price now is T.T fenta, as 
against 71 in 19i.'.. / 



Flour Rise Regular. 
Wnsliiijr'on. — Prflitmnaiy Inventl* 
gallon in <'Jii<ugo of the rtcent rise 
in \vli»at and Hour prii «• , und the 
fhieaK'iM'd ri.-»- in t>r»'ad prices bf 
Chairman Hurley of th-- K» derul trade 
« Miiiiiii.''si<m is imiltTsiood to have (lls> 
' !ii-^«(l no < vi(l<iii. oi ill»K'a! inanipu* 
latinns, und as ilie inii'icr .stands now, 
thf < oiiiMiission is n«it expected tO' 
lal<<' any a<tion. 



♦ 



^ fjOilFER ON PARALYSIS 



TROOPS WtLLSTAYON BORDER 



authorities fr(»in SM states. 
of the F«9deral Public Health 
and many leading sclentlsta 
lehange views on methodii of 
It and prevention, and will 
ilSfk out a morn deflnlte scheme of 
gg OUdlBStlnc their camiialgn against 
Am dlaease. UepreaentativeM of va 
0IMM rallroadH ulso will be proHent 
J^ OOBBUltatlon on the question of 
Shacking a further terrlturlul spread 

TROOPS HELD 




Wilt Net Co to Border Until Strike 

Situation Is Settled. 
^ Wasblngton. (Orders for the re 
ng mobilized iinitH of the Na 
I Guard to proc«-*'d to the bor 
have been Hus|>endfd by the war 
Itlnent. ' 
▲ telegram from Major (jeneral 
Jteniton made public liy ilie war de 
dlHc|r>Hed that fhe general 
VecoBimend«fl titu Hiihpcnsion oC> the 
Srders. His teUigrHin follows: 

"In view of the pohsTfelllty of a 
gSneral railroad Htrik)*. 1 d<-sire 
to call att«-ntion of tlie war de 
partment to diftliulties tliat will 
follow In Diaintaltiiiig food sup 
piles not only of troops in this 
departnit-nt hut of the civilian 
'population H>. well. Th*'se bor- 
der Ht:it<-s |>ru<luce but little 
fOodHlufr i-xrcpl (attic. 

"In view of fonmnni; 1 ri-cdin 
nend thai .Niiliiiiuil (wt.ird or^:) 
Ixationa wliicU are about to start 
for border st at ions l)i> n>t:ilii''d 
in their molioli/.at ion uniil siuli 
time as the (lucsiion of .i Kenerai 
gtnke shall liav); Im'*'ii detur- 
• ^,ailned." 



Guard Will Be Withdrawn Only 

When American Lives Are 

Safe, Says Baker. 

Washington The National Guard 
will be retained on the Meilcan bor 
der until It can be withdrawn with 
out again endangering American 
lives. Secretary Uaker so declared 
the admlnlstratlon'ti policy in an- 
swering a score of letters from 
mn^ny parts of the country complain 
Ing thst the state troops were being 
held in service after the emergeucy 
for which they were called out ap- 
parently had paased. 

Complainants Answered. 

In general. thi> complainants, whose 
names were withheld, alleged the 
bord«r servlcf wa8 entailing U>sb 
financially on mllliiamen and hard- 
ship on their fanillleH. The secre- 
tary replied lo all (hose scemiUK to 
merit Hticntlon. 

Hy lis jprcsence on lh«' border, he 
wrote tii^hte, tile guunl is "Winning 
bluodlesH vlctorii>M dally." He de- 
clared that Americans resident alung 
the international line were enjoying 
a peace and seiurlty they could not 
know without the milltury forces to 
protect Ihcni. 

Hardship Inevitable. 

The dwpartineirt uppreciHteR, Mr. 
Maker Nald In another letter, the 
fact that a call for military service 
upon the militia orKiiiii/.atloiiM must 
"Inevltahly prohem (•a>es of hard- 
ship." Ill" aillled 

"The einerg^Mtcy however, which 
recnijieil tills call for ih«' miHli;i was 
(III-' of a ^;ra\e ch:ir:i< fer. aPeclim; 
Ilie >at.'l\ and live- of I iti/.«'!is of 
the lH'leil State.- nu'll. WOIIK'II iilld 
ehildrell." 



FUN$TON FOR 
WITHDilAWAl 

BORDER COMMANDER DROPS A 
BOMB IN SITUATION 



ZAFFRA SEASON IS NEAR 



Administration Suppresses Report- 
Fearing it May Cmbarraaa the 
Mexican Commission — Black 
Jack's Army Is Helpless. 



•:• SILENT MOSQUITOES •:• 

DISCOVERED •:• 



I ,-- 



■'" Flood Relief Measurr Passed. 
«<i^ashlngton. 'I li-- Senal.- i»;m. ''rt 
■:• CLAIM SWAT CHAMPIONSHIP ♦; fguator f'hllton'R jomi resohiHon for 

•'.' ^ ' tmllef of the siifTei.T'^ from th' . loii-l 

•:• lIuntinKion. W V;i — Joel ^ ; Igrst In \V»'si \lrKltii:i. 'li'- resolu 
•:• \Var<l. ( UHiodntii oi the < jiy indn- ♦ ' tlpn, as paased. carrying an .ii.|i!i, 
<• r-ruior, cl.-»in)s to i>e ilie cham- ^ prlatlon of ?lori.r„»ii 'ji,,. Mow >• d"' 
V pion fly .< watt" I Sinrc .June 1 he ^ <^ned to pas.s a siniilar revolution in 
•:• ha> swati. (I LMtO.OOO tiles, lie has ^^ tM>duc-ed hy Ft<«pri-sentative Little 
•:• Imili a lnme trap wliirh he 'imp- 4> ' fS|V7 but ln» lufl^d \\>st Virj'iiiia 
•'.' lies every two weeks It holds ^ ^Oiong the stal»" In wiiit-h a;i appri/ 
•:• L'O pints Statisticians, figuring <► ffiation of $.'i40.o..o, oriKlnallv intend 



\V;i-l'.i!i(!l<ci >;. Kiiiilic \Var<li •;• 

-:• iiD'iMii i.- aroii. • d «iver ihe ^li^<•()V- •!• 

V I I \- III liolM'le-. mo ijillloCK TIli'V •;• 

•;■ <l(i IHil difli" 111 Otliel- Icspei'lH •!• 

•!• l:oir) Uie eoliirioM v.lljety. but ''.' 

•'.• lii'/./l' -Ml-- r<!i(iers their r}tt<i^\ •'.' 

-!• I :')ii iiinri- deaflty. •!• 

. .;. .;. ^. ^ .;. .\ .;• ^ •(• •!• •;• 



.«. .». .-. .«. .«. 



♦ ♦ 

♦ SOSSY TOURS BY AUTO ♦ 

4. •:. 

«!• Denver. Col. — Tourlstn on their ♦ 

♦ way to Colorado report that they ^• 

♦ met a party of New V<»rk tourist*' •:• | 

♦ on their way ho:;:*;. While visit- ♦ 

♦ ing in Colorado the wife of one •:• 

♦ of the party gave birth to tv-ln.**. •!• 
+ Milk for the new airivalH was •> 
+ secured from a fine "Jersey cow, •► 
+ and tlu-' mother wa."* afraid to <■- 
+ change the twins' diet when she + 
+ left. So father purcha.sed a cow ♦ 
+ and bought it a trj«iler in which •> 

♦ to ride. Bossy i!« on her way to •> 

♦ New York, furnishing the twins '> 
+ milk as she travels. •> 
4. ^ ^ ^ 4 ^ ^ 4. 4. ^ 4. ^« ^< ^* >> •> •!• H* •> 



Short on Second Lieutenants. 

AVasblnjTton. Applications for np 
pointment as si-iund lieutenant In 
:he army have flooded the officn of 
".he adjutant gene.'al since It became 
known that the service virtually Is 
without officers of that rank and 
mnst obtain them promptly from 
aril life. Nine hundred will take 
the examinations. 



every persoi. of JhiniiiiKton's 50.- ♦ 
0"0 p'lpolatlon as k<x>*\ a .^-waiter ♦ 
as Ward. sav Uiere would 4» 
have been l(*,Mn«i 000,000 files ♦ 
swatteji in H::".'ini,Mon at the <^ 
rale Ward lia-^ been doing It. •> 

♦ •:• + •:• •:• -i- •:• •:• -:• •!• <- •> .><..> + -><► 



Guardsmen Leaving Flood District 

Charle;-ton, W. Va. — Leavlne only H 
company on duty iu 'he flfxxl dlsiriei 
of Cabin ("reek, all 'he Jioop- of tl.- 
Second West Virginia infantry hav 
been called into rj^»l>iliza*ion camp. 

LATEST MARKETS 



I Plans fer Shadow Lawn. "" 

I Washington. — President Wilson 
I plann to spend practically all Hep 

t'-mher anH f)( tol>er at .Shadow Lawn. 

the summer While House, in New 

Jersey. 

I Removal of office furniture from 
the exeeuOve ofllces to the quarters 
engage/i ff)r cWrks at Asbury Park 
was hetcun. I'racfi'-ally the entire 
j ofRce force of the While House will 
go. 



'id for .Vorih and Si.iiih""C;iiolln.i iiri'l 
ilshama, is to tie e.x|)eiiii.'(i for in- 
f-glief of flood siilJerers uiid<-r Ih^ 
llrectlon of the Kc(r«;tarv of war. 

China Protests to Japnn 
Washington China h;'^ profe-Jted 
to Japan agfiinMt the Ketidinu <»f iitHic 
Itrippe io Cheng <^'haltung because 
of a clash between Chinese and Jap 
LHSse troopK. It I-* contended .vh.-n it •• 
l< nal Chinese riinpi-vaie onl'-red |,i.- 
c utions taken ar.tin-t an expeetfii 
r--id by nomadi' biiriflits, sotne of tb'> 
J paoeMe r»'Hid»'nts refns»»d to oUev 
1 .le magistrjit'- atternp'eil to enfor<'«» 
tl "s order, whi<h resulK-d In al.ovit 
1: deaths. 



Blamed for Big Tom Diiatter. 

Jersey City, N. J.— The coroner's 
Jury which has been Investigating 
the causes of the recent dlsaKter on 
Black Tom island, that remilted In 
several deaths and about $20,000,000 
property damage, brought in a ver- j 
diet censuring thfe Lehigh Valley 
railroad and the National Storage 
Company for failing to take adequ'-"e 
precautions in the transportation and 
storage of explosives. 

£ 

May Raise Bridges. 

Washington.— Chief of Army En- 
gineers W. M. Black _has concurred 
in the recommendations of Lieut. 
Col. Francis R. Shunk that the 
bridges over the Allegheny river at 
Pittsburgh be raised, and with the 
announcement came the information 
that Secretary of War Baker had 
set August 31 for hearing the re- 
port. 



Would Veto Literary Test. 
Washington. — President Wilhon let 
it bo known that he would vtjto 'he 
immigration bill If It came before 
him again with the literary test, and 
with that the Senate defeated the mo- , 
tion to take up the measure and re- 
turned to con.sideratlon of the revenue 
bill. 



Oaie Sweeps Porto Rico. 
San Juan. — A severe storm, with a 
wind velocity of more than 90 miles ; 
an hour lasted for three hours. Many . 
houses were unroofed. The street ; 
car service was stopped. Smsll ship- [ 
ping la the harbor was damaged. I 



V 

Pittsburgh. 

Cattle — Good to choice. tfl.aO'^ 
K'.'iO; medium to good, tH.Mfi fi.'.iir. 
tidy. SS.Tr.firt.OO; fair. i7 .(K>ftH.2'>: 
common to good fat bulls. l.'jOO'H 
7.25; common to good fat cows, fZJ/^ 
ft :.(>(*: heifers, $.■■>. OOfi <>.0O; fre:^h 
cows and springers. $25.00'^ go. 00, 
veals. ~^.'iOfi 13.00. 

Hogs— Prime heavy. ?11.20fi ]1.2r.; 
naedlum, $n3oijll.4"; heavy Yorl< 
ers, 110.3.'.'^ 10.40; jlj^ht Yorkers 

$11.2.'* fill.:.';; pigs. iri..'0'ji ]o.2.=i; 

roughs. $8.90i6 9..'iO; stags. il.OO'Q 

Sheep — Prime wethers. $7.80*5 8.00; 
good mixed, $T.2r>'rj 7.7-'. : fair mixed 
|6.0O'&7.O0; culls and 'ommon. 13.50 
©5.00; Iambs. $7. Of. 'fill 00. 

Rutter — Prints. 34'& 3414c; tubs 
8311 33 Vic. 

Eggs — Candled. 2(«f/30c; extra 
fanf'y. 30'rr31c. 

Wheat- September. $1 r,0. 

Com — September. RSV^c. 

Oats — September, 45>4c. 

Chicago. 

Cattle — Prime steers, f 10. 7.".© 31.25; 
butcher grades. $7.00'?/ n.oo; cows. 
f3..'>'^i'fi9.40. Calves— Culls to choice. 
19 00(^12.2?;. 

Sheep — Wether .•?. ?«? 4^"?/ «i or. ; owes. 
f8.2.'.'?/7..'ifi: lambs, 57 Oof, 10. S.*;. 

Hog." - Hulk, tio.oof/ n.oo; iiKht 

?H'.7'»f/n 3»«; mixed. ?I".40igtl 2'.; 
hf-avy, $10.15'?/ 11.20; roughs. $10.25'?/ 
10.40. 

Buffalo. 

Cattle— rPrlroe steers. Is^OOfJlOOO; 
butcher grades. $6.7.' '?i r*/>0; cows. 
$3.70^7.25. Calves — Culls to choice, 
$4.50 •© 13-00. 

Sheep and lambs — Choice lambs. 
17 GO'S 11.25; culls to fair, |5 .SO© 
9.25; yearlings, $5.50^9.50; sheep 
$3.0O®8.«)0. 

Hogs— Yorkers, 19.25 'g 1 0.OO ; pigs. 
$10.00^10.25; roughs, $9.75^10.25; 
mixed. 110.15^10.20; staffs. $7,009 
8.&0. 



Ambassador's Wife Coming. 



Car Strike Averted. 
SbM York A ihr'-anneil r'-n'-wa! 
'o' Nw York s s'ree! far striK'- u.i- 
1 8 -arted when the company and it- 



Copenha?'!! -The fotmt*'s.<< von employes jearhe.l im HL'reement 
n'-rnstorff, wife of the German sm- through the efforts f,f .Mayor .Mluh'i 
bas'^ador to Ui>- United States, arrived . l'ourte<-n workers, di.-mlssed af^-r 
here from (J.-rmany and sailed on * mvictlon of disord'-rlv ".nduot ir. 
tfoard the Fr' d';rk-k VIII, for the the recent trike. will li" r-insi;'feft 
I'nited States RepreHentatives,of tl.e tnd other differences will be HCtlled 
Ariierjf an and fl- rinan lega'ions were I'V arbitration. 

prssent at the |,..-r. Tlie Countes-ii - — 

von Herns.orff ha. been In Oermsny WITH HATIONAL LAWMAKERS 
since August. 1913. j 

Sayings arid Doings Among Our Sen 
•tors snd Congressmen. 



GULF STORM HITS TEXAS 

Cunrd Cimps Levc'* d and Men Take 

Tal<e Refuflc in Puliiic Buddings. 

S.ili AlMouio. 'I I \ .\ j'ov. iniin'lil 

ulieje.>%h I', l-'fjrt .'■^.iiii llousU.ii Hitid 

that irouMe at the lighting -i.ilion 

l! Hrowii' •. 111< l'iii;ht lejiV*- ih« cllv 

ri d.irkne:, , mkI i!i;i» the w.ii. r Hiip- 

fity in in dimj-er Th'- lljo <;i;iiwle 

wiiH ri'lriK tl.i- i(ie.;s;iKe K.iid. Jind 

."ver;i! v, ;j .(I'loii had bi-eii I'-jiorted. 

Ceiieral I'ariter. efunmundiiiK, or- 
iered teuTporary aiaiid«»ninenl of all 
ijiili'.irv eneHnipiiii-fiih 'Ihe w(M>den 
hiiildlngH of the lovcH camp were 
Idowu down, the llJlnoiH cariiii waa 
iind'-r wa'er. the bfj;'-' h of th<- 1111 
noil- puiird -iiflererj mf,it]y front ex 
;.o ure. inii'h equlpirient had been 
lost and ;il! ro;id > we;-. lr:i|> c-Kalib. 
Coast Retort Bears Brunt. 

Kl f'.i.^o Tex f'orpuH f hrlstl, 
Te\ , a Miv oJ abfjiil I!'" MOO popula- 
tion, a ii'j.ular re.-.ori on the 'I ex.is 
.<oas' would receive the l)runt of the 
'loplciK storm and hurrlcan*- ap 
proa'liing the Cniiefl States from the 
Weil Indi'-'- 

Milit:a Flees Waters. 

fnit<-'l Siate>, aoldl'-r-i ;,n'! Na- 
tional (iuardHinen from Illlnoi.H Iowa 
iri'l Vlrelnia w< r* forced Into the 



l?v to tak' 



reraxe in 



the eitv hall. 



<u\in houHO and warehounes. where 
ihev took 'w-o '<1avH' raMon<i. 



NAVY MEASURE PASSES 



Counterfeiting Scheme Nipped. 

New York —A conspiracy to mano* 

i fact ure and f ir^ulate $1,000,000 rtt 

counterfeit silver certificates and 

Cnlted State" treasury notes was 

fni.strated here Plight arrests were 

mad" after raids A < omplete eoun- 

, terfeitlng outfit wa« found. An illicit 



SENATK 
to take up 



I'orto Hi'tn 



Declined 
- i'lsensbip bill. 

Passed shipping bill, 'arrying $-~>0,' 
<'0O,O00. by party vo'c of iiS lo .1, and 
rejected amendment 10 altar:, iouiil- 



wine and liquor hi'-iiding plant also ^ration bill a.-* rid<T 

was unearthed. Approved conference report on 
■ — ■ PhiUppine bill with Clarke amend 

Mexico Revokes Rairoad Concession ment providing for lnd-(i<-r;den'e ii^ 

Mexico City. - The concesslor. '<*"*" '••" eliminated by vote of 37 

granted to the Amerif:an Holding & to Zl. 

' Improvement f.omi.anv for the con Adopted resolution ap;.ropria»ing 

, fitructlon of a railroad from Sailna JIOO.OOO for relief of flood huXferers 

' f.'ruz to Aeapulco was declared void *" West Virginia. 

on the gr -und of failure to fulflll HOUSE 

' htipuliition.4 iu the contract < Adopted conference report on Phil- 

I - )4pplne self-govenim'^nr bill. 

■ IWemorial to Typo President Ur«ed. Representative Hay reintrodu.'^ 

,. . ,^ »i v.,iij- »- army appropriation lill withrjj* -er . 

HaiTimore — An ofhce huildinsc as .. , , „ ^. . 

tkm revising artif-les of war, which 



Sh'pt t^ the Number of 15J Author- 
ized— Vote Wat 283 to* 51. 
Washin»?«on. f V;ngre«« virtually, 
'•finipl' ''-d the nationril defense pro-; 
gram bv finally approving the great! 
In'reas"., In naval eonsfnictlon and 
pernonri'-I written Into the n»iv,il Idll , 
.'ind urger.tly supported nv the adgdn- ! 
I«i»rat!on Mou«e ;.'•« wp^efj th'.- hull'tlns; 
program. •'» whl< h I'S ■'itif»ri-*if on 
the m«-aHure had refused to agre**. 



Wasbiugton. — (Jon Fuuhlon lo a 
'.elegram to the war department, and 
A'hich the a<lniinlMlratlon in mukiug 
•(Torta lo kei-p uecret. re< omineiulH 
'.be Imiuwllatu withdrawal, ul the 
Pershing ex|>editlonary force from 
Mexican territory. 

f|ate of Slcl^ness High. 

The / health of tho tn.opM alao 
weighed in On. FunHtunx declHlon 
He Ih underatood to be con.slderably 
worrie«l over the approach of the hot 
ii>aM(>n In .Mexico and the bunlMhipn 
Cu which the men will be subjected. 
With the physical strain tliey hiive 
undergone in the cain|iaigii. coiipled 
with the had clim.itic cotidlllon.i, tho 
oiithreuk of an epidemic it* leared. 
Aln udy the r.ite of Hi«-kncss. li l» 
.iiiif»-r.sioo(l IS consii!<'r;rl»ly *:j",her 
'ban .iiiio.i;; tli<' iroijp^* on the bonier 

War (l.-parimeiit olliiialt* wro 
Jumldouiidt d V. heu \liv l-'un.-loi' '«b»- 
grtiin w.i read It Is und r^^iood 
• oples were t|iiliklv iranHT'iit t < d n> 
ihe While 11.,'. *e and to tie tali; 
lepartui'i.l, wli.'M' Ilie I ■.iiimb-'ioii 
iiegolialloii.-4 with ("iin .1 ii/-;i :«re In 
i»n»Kr«-hr. (»r«|ers were lie mediately 
issued to ke. p the lll«' s::K" Ir' III be 
omlMk: puldic. .iihI (; -u lii.T t" 1 waH 
.idviscl it i'< iMiibi tood, n-.i to w,lro 
any fuiiher 1 <•. otmii'-udati'.nh of a 
Himilar rharurler. 

Anti-Commistion. 

Sbeiil'l <'ii'iaii/ I iliHiov.-r th-'* 'Jen 
Fiiiisioii w.i.^ ill ae. jrd v.lth lum on 
th.- ipi-^iioii oi Ih*- w'.thilrawal of 
'U>- .\iiicM. an troop- adminiKtralinii 
'idlcialH reallze'l 'h- lianl for tlio 
loltit eommirtsioi! rt work would ho 
:.ir»;ely s\-<pt away. On his iiisImi 
. IH e iJiat inHue w,n to l»<- llc^t !;• kcu 
•ip l.v the eomrnlK-'ione: s am! fnun 
ih'- Me.\l.aii po.nt of view, r w:m 

the (jlily iHSUe 'O be rllx ll;.s. d. 

Pershing Army Helpless. 
C.irnii.'u'H rmiil .on-oi' to the 
hroafleoini' of the pf.wer.-* of the « otu 
mission It in polnt'-l out. u'l- ijit*- 
ly eomliMoiial lij.on the taH'i,-. i:fi <tt 
the troop.-t (|U<"ition firs-t .Now with 
'he Aiiierif i!i 'ornni.Mlner bin^self 
reroinm-odini: •Aith«lruwal it ii. f/tar- 
ed .Mexir-o mij'li» dl^^r'-gard the corn- 
mlrtJion plan altogether. 

WILSON VETOES AR.'^Y QILL 

Chairman Hny Pr<rsentB N':w Meas- 
ure '* nus Feaiu'cs Objected 
to by President. 

Wa^hini'ton Tb'- itii-'.y iipj^.-oprla- 
•Ton bill wa.-. uiiexpe. i«-(lly v.fto-fl by 
j'reujdent WINon be.au^'- Ik; *ould 
no' a' 'ejjt certain provlMionn j:i th»» 
.-e vision of the articles of w.ir. f«)rced 
'.n»o the bill by the hou:-e < «iiili-ree« 
and eommonlv -aid In army - ircIeH 
to he In tiie Int- ruhi of .'•rt.i'n re- 
firefl oflicers '"at outH" with the 
irmv 

Chairman Hny ''f '•'' h'/r.' mili- 
tary rommiUee. at on< e inin liic*>d 
the bill with th*- '-ntir' re< t;' 11. re 
vising the arfleles of war t^t Icken 
01" ani th»- de'lariUon 'K:<t ;»«> re 
vivif.n Jit all would go througb with 
the Wll In thin eongr«-s«i 

fhairriian f:hamberlaln of »h cen 
ate m.l'.tarv eommit^ee ar^ii' un' «*d 
that th<- senate would re In-'-" the 
revl-iion approve'! by the f-»r< Mdent 
and the war f|ep ,rt.m';Ll. but !-'-icl(en 
out in the house. 



bv a vote of 



wi'h -seven 



of the memliers present no' voting. 



head'iuar-erii for the Internal jonal Ty- 
> pograp;..cal I'nion a^ Indianapolis 

wa- -ugge-'ed as a ni**n;orial to Wil- 
j llaiji li. l're-.eott.. a forn.er president 
' of the union, and affectiooataly 
; kno-.vn &» it*- fa' her. 



No Wrappers for Bread. 

N*^w Orleans -The Master Bakers' 

; Association of New Orleans appealed 

I to officials to allow them to violate 

the law which requires that bread 

must be wrapped in paper. Inability 

to secure paper is the reason as- 

sisned. 



Cut Farm Implement Duty. 
SI Bsso Tex. — Duties oa agricultur- 
al ImpteBMBts Imported Into Mexico 
troB the Unltod States have been re- 
doesd by CarrjMisa materiallf, while 
a rsduction has been made In freight 
rates for fanning nscblnenr on 
tks national railway lines. 



Holbrolis Dies of Auto Injury. 
. ^ftesola. N. T.— Alrab F. Holbroks. 
wen ka»wn plajrrrright died a few 
iKmrs aftof he hsd beea ^rowa 
tnm Mr^ rannlnc board of in 



♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦#♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ 

♦ ♦ 

♦ RISE IN PRICK OF BREAD ♦ 
t PREOICTCO ♦ 

4 Chicago. — Bakers tbrougbout 4 
4 the country sre preparing to sd- 4 ; 
4 vance the price of the &-cent 4 j 
4 loaf of bread to C cents, sccord- 4 | 
4 Ing to the hesd of one of Cbl- 4 
4 cago's largest baking 4»noems. 4' 
'4 The advance may cone within 4 
4 two weeks. Il^il^. 4 

4 Pennsylvani^Rfceni - say the 4 
4 weight of the Stf loaf has been 4 
4 cat from'lC to 12 onncas. 4 

444>4444444444«4< 



caused Pr»*siden''.'^ veto. 

Reprisals against UriM.'h blacklist 
urged by Uepresentatlve Bennett be- 
fore commerte 'ummlrtec. 

Concurred In .Senate building prr>- 
vision of naval hill 2^.3 to ."^1. and 
Hesate personnel provision by vive 
voca vote- Disagree.] to Senate 
aawadment for navy yard Improve 
■Vaats and sent bill back to con^ 
fsronoe. 

Adopted resolution Jnctudthg West 
Vlf)|taia hood aufferers fn distribu 
tlott of recent S^OO.OOO Southern re- 
llsC anrropriation. 



Shipping Bill Passed. 
\Va-*h;:igt'vr. The gov'-mrn'-nt ship 
ping bill pasi«ed th» "enate by a 
vote of ."?* to 21 ending one of tb*> 
most bitterly ^-ontesttd legln-I-itlve 
struggles of th'- Wil.son .'limlnistra- ' 
tion It wa« r"vlhed so as to min- 
imize 'h'- government op«-ration fett 
ure. It already ha- passe'l the fiouse. 

Post Office Clerl<s Protected In Johs. ' 
\V;*-hjngton - i'o.stmaBter (jener;.! 
Burleson i.ssued an order to "all post 
ma.sters and all po-^tal emfdoyetj" rfe- 
claring that any p''>8tal '»jnj>Iove^ , 
who have been called into The army 
will be r" employ*id at their old sal- 
aries Imrriedla'ely on their dlymlsHall 
from such nervico. 



Wil«on Accept* L'nc&lr't Birl- 
Washmr'on. !>. C — I'.-e«id«fj 
son formally a' ■ epi'-'l for the 
.States the blr'hpla'e of A^ 
Lincoln at Hf>d?ensville. Ky.. i 
Ired by a recent act of congre-i 
mal ceremonie" transferriLi 
property to the government v 
held at Hodx-'enHvUIe. Septen 
-.lith the PreHldenl as t.he 
speaker. 



- place 

Wll 

■njted 

-aham 

ithor 

For 

•he 

.11 b*: 

•er 4. 

chief 



Mingc. OhiO. Gets Big Porit. 

Wh<-' lir.c iV Va -It was o'^cially 

announ^:e«i her*- 'hat the F llman 

' ompany of Pullma'; 111. wotild 

.shorHy begin the ere«'rion, rf Kteel 

cars at Mingo O Two h-jndrei 

a-'jres were recently porchaw I ' The 
now Industry will give emj,'|.ynient 
to 5.0"" skilled workmen. 



Copper Find Valuable. 
The di.=5<overy of a great field of 
native » opper in the vicinity of 'op 
per .M!n'^ river in the neigh !>orhr>od 
r.f I'ri.T e .\iljert Island, will prove of 
great value to 'he business world 



Reported Jap-Psnama 
Washington.— Reports thst the Jap 



4 ♦ 4 4 + + + + + + •{• •!• + ♦ + + + + 4 

snese govemnent. through a Spanlal) ' ^ ^aTAL CHASE BY LIGHTNING 4- 

agent, has obtained a land eoaco s s to a : ^ ^ 

of W.<m seres on the Atlantic sea- j 4 Bvnasvllle -Just as he had e« + 



board of Panama are bthkg iaveatl* 
gated by the secret service nsents. 



Will Hener Lsfsyetto. 
Washington *-liany skies oC ths 
ronntry, sspectaify of the Bast and 
South, hsvf prepared fsr fsraal 
di^inonstrstlons ih celebratton of the 
linniversanr. Septembet f. of tli» Milk 
of the Marquis ds Lsfaystta. . 



4 ttecttl*lk«d a Are caused by one ^ 
4 koit of lightning, another otruck 4 
4 AnoCt Ivy. klllinc him' intrtantlv 4 
♦♦44444 + ++ + + +->-5-4+ + 4 



Jtoiadn. Teon. — SeTen rr.en were 
kttlti*lMBd two Injured when the boJ- 
«« it tha Harlan A Morris Wood 
plaat exploded, shattering 
half a oaile sway. 



Cost of Navy Subsistence Decresses. 
Washington - I>esplte the fart that 
the i^st of living* has gone up 
proximately 10 per c^nt since 
outbreak of the European war, the 
cost of •ubsl»ten<~e In the Stry has 
decreased, three-quarters of a cent 
per man. 



X. 



Explosion Kills Two Man. 
Ashland Wis.- Two men 
killed and the Trivelone plant of 
the ThiPont drnamlte work* in Barks- 
dale was dest^cy^ed as the result of 
SB explosion ta ths plaaL ^ 



Republics St Outs. 
Pan Salvador The troverr" -nt oi 
Salvador su-p<-ndel n-gotla'l.- with 
Xlcaragu.-! In regard to the .Ispute 
growing out of .\"if aragtia'" 'reaty 
with the l.nlted .States, and < 
to the Central AnTeri'ar. ( art of 
Justice f'osu Rica baa madt a sim- 
ilar appeal. 

•eligmsn. N. Y., •snMrr. DMa. 
Long Branch, N. J — Jatn*? Seiig 
man. a retired member of the ^rm of 
J. and W. Seligman A Co.. Nfw York 
bankers, died at bit^ samfB<^r 
here at the age of 12 years. He 
the oldest member of the NIew 
Stock Bxchangc ^ 



lo Meys to 
El Ps.a. Te« — *«rican rtporfji 
Janres iadlcatod thst no 
been Ukea by Oea. PrnnMatfu 
psdiMon looking tosnard a 



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S 



iEAVEE VALLEY LABOR NEWS 

Published Each Friday by' the 
BEWER VALLEY LABOK NEWS COMPANY 
Near Third St. and College Ave. • - Beaver, Penn'a. 

Entered a« second-class matter Octobir 8, 1916, at the po«t office 
at Beaver, Pennsylvania, under the act of March 3, 1879. 

lOSRPH C. BEANER Preaident 

J. D. McKENNA V>c* Preaident 

Hell Phone 1019-J. IUav«r County Phone 6365. 

REX L. (HAMBER.S .....GEN. MGR.-EDITOR 

F. L. AMIFR.SON TREASURER 

C. I:. (ilLBKRT vDVERTI.SI NT. & CIRCl LATION MGR. 



I 



<m 




\ 



TO THE RAILROAD WORKERS OF TH^ ) 
IMTEI) STATES y^ 

The Keavei X'alley Lal)Oi- News wishes to congratulate you 
on a \ ictoiy which i.s now ulnio.st complete. 

In waiving the demand lor time and one-half for overtime, in 
order to liiiny: a^oiit a pea^'ful .settlement, you have gained far 
irreater in tiie esteem and k^ood wi.she.s of the public in one day, 
than the time and one-half would e(iiial you in dollar.^i and cents 
for many year.s to come. The principle for which you stood, the 
eight hour day. has Iteen won. It is a peaceable victory never to 
1)6 forgotten. Your plan of action wa.s carefully laid, and success- 
fully cairii'<i out. No victory was ever won without some sacrifice. 
Yours wa.s the time and one-half foi- overtime, which was grace- 
fully yielded, to the credit of each and every one of you who 
pay your little mite to keep the wheels of unionism turning. It 
is too I. ad that theie aie still tho.se among you, who ai'e so 
.small, .so narrow and unpiincipled. as to accept that which you 
and youi- organizations have eaiiu'd for them, and yet are will- 
ing to set idly hy and permit y(»ii to pay the l)i!l: while they criti- 
cise your officers for not getting more. Still, if we were all per- 
fect, the hijrhest standard of manline.ss would never he reached. 
ljecau.se, we must ohsorvo the faults (if others in order to improve 
our own. 

While we l»elievL' the time and uiie-half for overtime is right 
and .just. .>still. in leaving the matter foi- arbitration, theie is a 
])o.ssil)ility of the men >ecuiing an advance rate of pay for longei- 
hours in the foim td' an overtime penalty of a certain stipulated 
extra amoimt per hour for all ovei- eight hoifT^s worked. 

While you did not get all you a>ked for and ought to have. 
iieveriheles.>; you have demonstrated that in unionism theie is 
strength. The four brotherhood organizations are stronger than 
the railroads, with all their capital. You have shown once more 
that the real king of the.se I'nitecl States is lal>or. Labor can 
do everything without capital. Capital can do nothing without 
•labor. 



S.MALL SUCCESS MAY LOOK INSIGNIFICANT TO 
THE I NSCCCESSFIL, BIT NOT TO THE MAN WHO 
IS A SUCCESS. 

KYKRY srCCESSFl L MAN HAS UEEN A SMALL 
SI CC'KSS AT SO.ME TIME. 

IT IS ALMOST IMPOSSIBLE TO EVEN START WITH- 
OUT K BANK ACCOUNT. 

FIRST NATIONAL BANK 

ROCHESTER, PENNA. 









IRON CUY 

DRY CLEANING CO. 

We Have Just Opened Up a First Class 

Dry Cleanliig, Pressing 

^I^ DYEING 

Establishment, where we are prepared to attend 

to all classes of Ladies* and Gentlemen's 

work. Special attention given to 

th^i^^proper handling of 

EWningGfiwns, Etc. 



EXPERTS ONLY ARE EMPLOYED. ALL 

WORK CAI^LED FOR AND DELIVERED. 

AUTO SERVICE 

GIVE US A TRIAL AND WE WILL CONVINCE 
YOU OF OUR SUPERIORITY. 

Iron City Dry CleaniQg Col 

HARRY L. GILMORE, Manager. 

^ C. PhW, Rochester 5262. Bell 546-J - 

ito BRIGHTON aVk, - ROl»Il^n»R, PA. 




POOR^'OLIVERTTRHilfiLES 



(Continued from First Fttfer 

(I! zed presb of the eoontxy j>riBt«d 
i litorial after editoriml for Aim. The 
II iiKnates had them pHnttd in book 
form and sent to every newafB|>t» in. 
the country; and what ha« bpen" tho 
rr .suit -the press and .|iabUc idlks 
hiive become disglisted, for tbt pub- 
li.- cunnbt forget those wmds «Bee 
uttered. "To hell with the iniblk," and 
•';i!l the traffic will bear," Wiy «•« 
then they can forget "90c a day." 

They liuy the public has been in- 
formed that this demand by tbb em- 
ployes cannot be granted witboat an 
increase in freight rates, hft, liUt it 
IK out! Increase in freight nte^: yet 
every day the papers axe tellitm of 
the wonderful earnings of thMs Mune 
railroads. Strange, is it not? The 
companies present figures to pTOve 
that they cannot pay for tho eight- 
hour day, it might decrsfflO dltjilMwls 
Never once do they mention »4vl|at S 
benefit the eight-hour day 'wooM be 
to their employes. They want good 
and faithful men, but never * wofd of 
comfort or cheer do they reeeive. Dol- 
lars against humanity, the rsilned 
stand. Humanity against dollars is 
President Wilson and the employes' 
.stand. Where do you stand, Oliver? 

It is not a fact that the Industrial 
Relations Committee, appointed by 
(\)n)j:ress, various State committees, 
learned physicians, professors, Gov- 
ernors of several states, and many 
public spirited citizens of the Uaited 
States, state and state empliatieally, 
that no man should labor more than 
eijrht hours in any 24? Then why 
should not President Wilson take tht 
.amo stand — the stand for huniaaity? 
President Wilson's stand is right and 
just. 

One Pittsburgh editor sue. Presi- 
dent Wilson has dealt a Mow to the 
principles of arbitration tliat wiD re- 
sult in reaching: every comer oj the 
country where or^ranized labor exists. 
He is ritrht; but what will the ll|sult 
i)e'.' l!. will be this: when .arbitration 
IS agreed to and a flecisioln handed 
down, it will be in good plain English, 
>o that no corporation lawyer can pick 
Maws in it by which the mansgers 
can rob the men of what they thought 
•hey hail L-'ained by the decision. This 
was (lone by the managers of the 
Kasteni Association after tlie award 
• >t' 11)10, and the workers have not 
f'orpotten. 

When all is said, the OUtote favor 
arbitration, for they can win, no mat- 
ter how bad the case may bs. Even 
a United States Senatorsliip can be 
secured by the means they 4Ma. 

Does not the United Stales Govern- 
ment have the eight hour day, «M is 
<t nc* dii^g good work fo r tff ig W 
eminent? 

The Olivers. Rabcocks, Garlands, 
Armstrongs, etc., are very solicitous 
:kl*out the \^ orkin^man at election 
time, but when it conies to the work- 
ers' turn, they cannot see an eisH^t- 
hour (lay, but demand arbitration. 
"\ hy IS this? 

A KAILROADFK. 



CHARTER NOTfCE 

N'ollce i.s l)('!'M»; n'ven tliat sn ftp- 
(liication will be made to the G'Ver- 
■i-n<ii' ot* Pennsylvania on Moiiday. 
Au-ii>; 2Sth. 1 !•]<■.. at 10 o'clock A. 
Ai., l>y Hairy (Irinishaw, J. D. Mc- 
Krtma. .1. c. rinley, J. C. Iknnej and 
1". .M. Hays. undrM- tlie Act of Afsem— 
i)iy entitled. "An Act to provide foi 
tl:e incorporation and regulation of 
•ert:iiii corpora' ioiis," approved Apri! 
"'i!i,lS7-l, and ti.e .sii])pienients there- 
to, for tlie charter of an intended cor- 
poration to he tailed the Beaver Val- 
ey LaUor News Company, the char- 
uter ai:d object of- which is transnct- 
iii;r a printinu and publishing busi- 
ness, ami lor tlicso purposes to iiave, 
pos.se?:s. and enjoy at', the ri^ts 
benefits, anil privilcpts of said Act of 
.Assembly and the supplements there- 
to. JOHN B. M<fCLURE, 
jlyi4-Jl-28-auff4 SoUdtor 



HERE IS YOUR CHANCE 




Our Semi- Annual 

Clearance Sale 



Will continue but 
a few days more 

At a great saving. We must make room for our 
New Fall and Winter Woolens, some of which are 
already in stock. 

We olfer you unrestricted choice of any goods 
in<4he house at the following prices: 



AH Our $20.00 Suits Now Tailored for 
All Our $22.50 Suits Now Tailored for 
All Oar $22.50 Suits Now Tailored for 
All Our $27.50 Suits Now Teilored for 
All Our $30.00 Suits Now Tailored for 



$13.76 
$16.75 
$19.75 
$21.75 
$23.75 



MR. UNION MAN— These Koods are for YOU. Tailored by skiUed UNION Tailors* 
You can pay more money for your clothes elsewhere, but you cannot buy better clothes 
at any price, than we make. 

LET VOIR NEXT SUIT BE A KAV-TAILOREI) SUIT— "IT BEARS THE LABEL" 



UNION 
>I A I) E 



1211 

SEVENTH 

AVENUE 




tTailofi 



! Olv' 



CI s'VOM C L I CI 



CHAS. D. FISCHER, Manager. 



UNION 
MADE 



BEAVER 

FALLS, 

PA. 



AUDITOR'S NOTICE. 



' ' In the matter of the distribution of 
the monies paid iittn Court by James 
P. Br>'an, Sheriff. 

In the Court of Common Pleas of 
Beaver County, Pa., No. 16'J .March 
Term, 1916. 

Now, June 1. V^Vy. on inotion of J. 
L. Holmes, \\%k\., tlie Court appoint 
Sam 15. Wilson, K.-t].. an Auditor, to 
make distribution of the said ninnifs 
paid into Court to and amonp thorje 
legally entitled tPToto. 

in' THK C GLUT. 

Notice is hereby given that the 
above named auditor will nu'ci for 
the purpose of his appointint nt in the 
Arbitration Kooin of the Couit House, 
Beaver, I'a., on Thursday. Sciitembor 
21, 1916. at 10 o'clock a. m., at which 
time and iilaco all partie.*; in interest 
may attenil. 

S.4.M I!. WIL.SO.V. 
auK2r)-sepll -H. .Auditor. 

WIDOW.S* AIM*RAI.SE>IKNT 



THE "WEMAKIT" STORE 



Cff tiic properties to be retained by 
widow .< and children of dflre.ifnts out 
of till- foUowinR estate;, to-wit: 
Georjro S. Te:ter, pergonal. . . .$."00.00 
Thoin:i«i L. .Mi nosing: >.'r, per- 
sonal •. ..$:]UO.OO 

Notice is hereby i^nven that the 
above appraisement.^ will be ronrirni- 
ed al).-oIuteIy h\- iho Orpluin.s' ("ourt 
of Meaver County, on the 14th of 
Sept.nibor. .\. I>. 1 ?>](>. unless cause 
Ih» .>-liown to tin; contrarv. 

WILL H. H'A.MII.'rO.\', 
Clerk of the Orphans' Court. 



S^x 



j-J v^ 




BE/*/Eh*iAUS.PA, 

fWAICHEStDlAMCamI 

^GOLD^*SnVERM\Ke 
LARGEST yARlETR^ « 

iTANDPOPUUiltJ^ 



PRICES, 



\ L. P. HARN 8T, 
* Watchmaksr, Jeifthr, 
•ad BNin^«< 

Boll phoM mA-nr 

BS2 nOi^ Bin • - 






•♦••• M tt ^t tf 







And Upwords, on household soods,^ 
and other p^nonal property. If 
you need money, do not hesitato to 
borrow from as, for our plad of i«- 
pajrment, our quick and efficient 
system of making loans, cannot be 
excelled. 

InfomatJop cheerfully giynn. 

Writ^ call, or phone ns. 





BUff. 

Oer. flevaath Ave. * Twetfth 81. 

BKAVBR FALLS, TA. 

Phsaa 144; & C Phoaa t7ff 

Open I A. M. to • P. H 

llaaday and Saturday Until 9 PJL 



; Gwlnl Uglit A 0iiilr (X : 

Bsn — 



f, ', tlML _ _ _ „ „ 



■■■' , ■-■r.^' 

V.;)^"^"^ ;■■..•-■■■: 



Assisting Business Growtli 



Commercial patrons of moderate requirements as well 
as those with larger interests find here a cq^genial financial 
atmosphere. 

Our highly efficient organization, possessed of excellent 
facilities and adequate connections, is constantly at the ser- 
vice of our patrons. 

Our continual effort to further the interests of all pa- 
trons is not confined to the narrow limits of accepted bank- 
ing sei-vice but includes every advice and assistance consis- 
tent with our modern, constructive banking policy. 



Beaver Trust Company 

BEAVER, PENNSYLVANIA. 
CAPITAL AND SURPLUS $390,000.00. 



■iSSirfRiriRiriSiiiSiriRiriRidStdSiiflWriSiriRii^iiSiriRiMi 



•THE BEST PLACE tO EAT, AFTER ALL 






« _ 

I May's Restaurant > 

Hi Eyerything New. Unexcelled Service fr 



< 



OUR MOTTOt 



"Home Cooking und Prompt Service" 



» 



I LincolD Hotel BIdg. • Rochester, Pa. ^ 

l| HARRY MAY, Proprietor || 






:->■ .,:.-^> 






Two* Suites of Offices 
Elegant Locatioa 



£ ••• r. 



'i 



New Brighton. Pa. 







"•v"'^ 

!#** 



r 






.•*•' •',»• 






;*... 



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J^ '*_;■.,, 







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BE AVER VALLBY ^Mil NEWS 



-■* ^ . 



♦♦ ♦iii n ii< umn »«»»»»t»i nnmn iii | i n *»« n * i ii 



JH^ai^stic ^heatre 



ROCHESTER, PA. 



Program for Next Week 



MONDAY, AUGUST 28 — Metro Pictures Corporation 
presents the gifted dramatic star, Lionel Barryjnore, and the 
magnetic young actress. Marguerite Skirvin, in **THE 
QUITTER,*' a Metro Wonderpiay in five acts. 

TUESDAY and WEDNESDAY, AUG. 29-30— Special 
Vitagraph Blue Ribbon feature **GOD*S COUNTRY AM) 
THE WOMAN,'* featuring William Duncan. George Hold 
and Nell Shipman. Matinees, 1 to 3 and 3 to 5. Evenings, 
7 to 9 and 9 to 11.. Orchestra afternoon and'evening. 

THURSDAY and FRIDAY, AUG 31-SEPT. 1— WilUam 
Fox presents William Farnum in ''THE END OF THE 
TRAIL,** a soul stirring drama of the rugged north which 
deals with life among the snows of the Hudson Bay district. 

SATURDAY, SEPT. 2— Daniel Frohman presents Mar- 
guerite Chirk in *«SILKS AND SATINS,*' a thrilling romance 
screened by the Famous Players Film Company. 

• ••• nm i# m <ii>#»<«»ti»i m i# mnn ii>ii mn ii i 



COLONIAL THEATRE! 



BEAVER FALLS, PA. 



Program Foi* Next Week 



-MONDAY, Al'G. 28— Win. A. Brady-World Film Corporation pro- 
sents (iail Kane, (Gladden James and June Klvid^o in "Payinj: the 
Price," a vivid tale of love in 5 acts; also Bums and Stuhl as I'okf's 
and Jabs in "Wait a Minute," a one act comedy. 

Tl'ESDAY, AUG. 29 — Equitable Pictures Corporation presents 
Jackie Saunders in a drama of charm "The Twin Triangle;" also .Mr. 
and Mrs. Sidney Drew in "It Never Got By," and "The Sclip Tribune." 

WEDNESDAY, .\rG. 30 — Metro Pictures Corponition presents 
.Marpueriet Snow and William Nij?h in "Notorious GaUaphor" or "His 
Great Triumph," in five acts; also a Ham and P.ud coine<ly "The Heart 
Menders," and Hanly and Rudf?e in "Spajrhelti," a Vim comedy. 

THl'RSDAY, Al'G. 31— VitaRraph Blue Ribbon features i)re.sonl.s 
Edith Storey and Antonio Moreno in "The Tarantula." an intense 
drama in six acts; also a Vitajrraph comedy, "The Man From Kpyr't." 

FRIDAY, SEPT. 1— Bluebird Photoplays presents Rupert Julion 
and Elsie Jane Wilson in "Naked Hearts," a charming heart interest 
play in five acts; also Francis X. Bualiman and Beverly Ba.\-nc in 
"A Man for A' That." 

SATURDAY, SEPT. 2— Mutual Film Corporation presents Char- 
He Chaplin in ''ONE A. M." PoBitively the funniest comedy Charlie 
evei'^niailc. Also Helen Gibson in "The Engineer's Honbr," and Neil 
Craig in "The War Bride of Plumville." 



At the Colonial, Beaver Falls, Friday. Sept. 1st. 

Advertise in the Labor News 



''God's Country and the Woman' 

Complete titory of thia gtlit j)hotoplay. 



s-* 




Junoiiofl Park! 

Most Beautiful Picnic 
Grounds in th e Valley 

SIMIAY SCHOOLS, LODGES, i .JATERNAL ORDERS 

AM) PRIVATE PICNIC PART/F^^ ARE TENDERED 

FREE rSE OF THE ROl'NDS. 



—■) 



DANCING 



levers in 'HSod's.OMintn'.' 




"God's Country and the Woman** 

Fur away, in the timborlands of the 
North, where the purity of woman is 
placed above all else, lived Josephine 
Adare, a kind, honest soul, whose face 
plainly bore an expression of deep 
sorrow and anxiety. Up to this — 
(lod's own country — came a man, Phil- 
lip Weyman, to spend a yoar in that 
r«'Cion. 

The man meets the woman and falls 
in love with her. He Ijefjs her to con- 
fide in him her R^reat sorrow, which 
he sees she ia constantly thinking of, 
but she tells him that she may not do 
so. Seeing that he is persistent, and 
really anxious to help her, she aska 
him if he would be wiilinK to follow 
her wherever she pocs. doinR' what- 
ever she asks of him, asking no ques- 
tions, and with the hope of no reward 
but her undying gratitude. Owing to 
ills great love for her, he connents, 
knowing that he will be working for 
a just cause. Through the long, bit- 
ter N'orthei-n winter, he travels with 
lier, knowing neither where he is go- 
ii.g no; what ho i.s going to do. To 
ait! her plan.- tl.cy are married, but 
It is a marriage in naime only. She 
then takes him to tiie home of her 
father, Joh.n .■Xdaic, a luggod woods- 
man, where she tells him to pose as 
the father of a baby which slie shows 
him. Tor u iuuinent his laith in her 
wavers when he sees the child, but 
his manhood comjuers and he deter- 
mines to stand by his promise. 
Through many lense situations Phil- 
lip remains true. 

Then on one eventfdl day, the in- 
fant dies. After the child's death, 
Phillip notices unusual activity about 
the camp, and suspects that Jose- 
phine's enemies arc near. Though he 
knows not who they are. he longs 
to fitrht them; but Jean Crois.set, Jose- 
pii:ne'.s huir-brcoi! protector, who had 
also been assisting her in her trouble, 
tells hini tiiat he ran clc. nothing but 
wait for onlers from her. He is 
temptfi to cast caution to the winds 
•and .>oa!vli foi Lliem iiim-seil; bu' his 
bolter jucigmont prevails and Ik* re- 
.Jizes that he must b<' satislied with 
inxioiy and inactivity. .iosephinc's 
•■(•rocious wolfhounds have grown to; 
love rhilip as tliey do their mistress. | 
The.se terrible beasts, though bom 
for I'giuing, have Imh !-.oarl,: '.n i:.. ',:• 
savage breasts, and, at a word from 
.lue whom they l»)vo, would tear an 
•'nciny to pieces. 

One clay, Josepiiino, who is known 
thniughout the noi^riiborhood for her 
kirici ic.«s and loyjl' ior childj*cM, is 
c;;Ilod lo ano: I.' rAv'liino to ^i-nc a sick 
vhi'id. J.oan /(>iio\\j^to protect her; 
rhiiiip trails iuir. with the dogy, 
and learns I'lui she ' has been kd- 
napped by Lang, wlio, Joan lellh him, 
wa.s responsible for all lier troubles. 
l*i'. iiip loiisi-^ ail the honest woods- 
men in the neighboriiood, who love 
Josephine for her kindness, and they 
set out to rescue her. I'liey also en- 
list th.e aid of a tribe of Indians in 

tin l|- <.-,\'i—-. 

After traveling for some time, the 



party traps the villaneous gang 
hi tWr lair, "Devil's Nrst." Here 
Lang and his men barricade the doers 
and windows and prepare for the a'^- 
taek. A terrible battle ensues, and 
LttBg'a followers, seeing they a»v be- 
ing beaten, try to escape. Im; t'nd 
thamielves hemmed in. In the mitist 
of tht battle, Jean is shot, and, know- 
ing he is about to die, calls Phillip tn 
hif fide. He tells him how. .-. \<ar 
bafove, Josephine's mother htul ji';U.ien 
into Lang's dutches while her hus- 
band was away, and of the hirtl-. oi 
Um dlild,which Josephine had claimed 
as her own, to shield her mother's 
hflOor. The story told, the faithful 
half-breed dies, with a part in" in- 
jmction to Phillip to kill Lang and 
distroy the incriminating papers in 
hia poaaession. In a lull in the iight- 
ing Lang tries to e.sacpe tiuougli a 
window with Josephint'. His action 
ia saen by Phillip wh«) rushes ovt-r 
to protect her. In the struggle which 
follows, Lang manages t« gain the 
uppar hand, and reaches for Ins knife 
to and Phillip's life. Seeing this 
dangor, Josephine relca.scs the dogs, 
witii a command to kill. As thougii 
the knew the sorrows of their mis- 
tre.'-s, the shaggy beasts lc:'.p upon 
the struggling form>, single out Lang, 
and greatly mangle his body, i'hillip 
toli> her that he knows all. 'and that 
ahe itaed no longer feiir for her niotli- 
et^y honor, as he has destroyed the 
pa]>en. She tells him that she has 
alvayi loved him, and Phillip looks 
forwird to a happy future — in (iod's 
.ccsatxy — with the woman of his 
choice. 



EVERY WEDNESDAY AM) SATURDAY 
EVENINGS. 



-o 



Finest Dancin|( Pavilion 

In this part of the State, outside of Pittsburgh. Various 
Small Concessions for Amusement of Patrons 

•YOr ARE ALWAYS W ELCOME AT THE PARK" 

Reached from all \ alley Points by way of 

BEA^ ER VALLEY TRACTION COMPANY LINES 



W lite or Phont yiv for Open Dates 

C. C. SHETTERLY 

LESSEE and iMANACiER 
TELEPHONES: 

Heaver County, 1163 and r)l2.J 
liell, Rochester. IVH); New HriK:hton, 1500 



-The (luitter" 

Th' story of "The t^Juitter" sets 
forth how the miners <>f Paradi.se 
dinted decide that someone mu.'?t 
rr.ari" ■ to relieve liie tnciinioiiy of thr 
camj . so they make Happy .lac!: (Lio- 
nel ParrjTiiore) tln^ victim, and make 
iiina dvertise for a \\;U\ v.iwi musI be 
I bl' nde. Amon^- the ninny answers 
'.ne >cautiful face glows like ;: ^tar 
.iniOJ g the ug";y ones — (il.id Mason, 
Aho.-^ • life is being burdnnf d l)y th«^ 

'bno ious atlt'otion.- of hor < inpIo>er, 

. m ning pronioier. 
Gild goes to l'ara<lise (liulch, but 

lappy Jack. ii,..king over to Ikt his 

line and all his i)c!onL'in;rs. leaves in 

HSt' . the beys having told hiin an 
I Id ' •.,'J has son; tiio p.i-ture. 

How "the t|Uitter" and the girl 

;eet 'n spite of :ill handicaps, hov i;;~ 
■ortnne, completely dof)li-t« <i. !S !<•- 

■.on', in suriirisiniL': fasii;oii by 'ilad. 

; toll in u story \>. i i-h vill be sh'.^.n 
it ti.' Majestic. Mon.iay. \u\i. J.-- 



woman ((Iladys .r»la<k\\ill ) v. Iio.-e lius- 
i and (Willard Loui.-^) Iia> .-seized her 
and carried her awa> to a lonely life 
'n tin- fore.^-t. She ' .ivi'.^ Ii ii.i tx-causc 
of his brutality and thinking him dead, 
•liarries I.e Cler( . 

Hut Pevil Cabot is not iU.ui. He 
arrives at the trading |>osl ju.-t after 
:i baby is born to Adrienne and Jules. 
He seizes .Adrienne and tho child and 
'•arri<'s them away. She lives with 
him in deadly fear. One day she 
strikes him with a ciiilcel and i:e falls 
to the floo)-, and as she <l:i.iiies ''rom 
the iiMUse meets Jules at the door. 
Jules takes her in his arms and car- 
ries her to his house, but she dies 
from the long trip, leaving the little 
L'ir! in Jules' care. The first husband 
meets justice at the. hands of ].n Cler<| 
when he accosts the (iaught«'r in a 
saloon. 



tlio -Navy, gave permi.ssion to the 
WOrld Film Corporation to tako 
.scenes on and from the torpe-io boat 
destroyer No. <!!>. the Wadsv.ort!'. and 
■'i'om this Imat two regulation si/w^r 
'oipediw's, each costing .S-l,."!*)!.'. were 
lire<i and e.\pleded. 

(Jail Kane piays the leadimr role, 
.•in<l she is a<linirabl> well supported 
by Oladden Janie.s, June Klvidf and 
Robert Cunimings. 



".Silk.- and Salin-'" 

i.itlN- .M.irguente «lark uili be .seen 
at ilie .Majestic Thiatre, .Saturday, 
Septt ipber "J, on thi- Taraniount Pro- 
gram. 

Ill tli;.- unii.^ual !oi).:nrf ^'is.■^ (lark 
i^ a modi-rn irirl who i.s to marry a 
vi riiiii' >oiini: (land;. :igam"-^t hei" 
A I.- Ins. Tiiroiitrii till- i;!!!-'!'*- nian<'u- 
v-nni: of a l.il>!«'. a dra\\>-r is dis- 

■lired, uliich liad hen'toforf born un- 
~' . n. IV I alini,' a diary vitli an ave- 
m > f e.srapi- from hoi- pn-dicament 
iii.Mi ilM-d in It b\ an aiu.ent ni.ttivo. 
'I : f [lioi i.s :i (•oiid)inat ion of ;in ohl 
!o\. .-'.orv with oru- of ntod»i-n 'i';r'ii. 



Colonial, Beaver Falls 



I 



"The Twin Triangle" 

.Miss Jackie Saunders, known as the 
Maude Adams of the screen, will be 
featured at tho Colonial Theatre, Bea- 
ver Falls. Tuesday, Aug. l»i», when 
"The TSvin Triangles," a photodrama. 
of universal appeal, will !>♦• shown. 

In this production Miss Saunders 
has a role just suited to her wonder- 
ful versatility, and tlu- production is 
one of the best to be shown at the 
Colonial. 



■'Noluriou.- (iallajiher" 
-Marguerito .Sno.v, the charming 
ami gifted .Metro Star, and William 
Nigh, the versatile ai i -r-director, will 
be .seen on the screen at the Cohmial 
'I'heatiV. Ill avi r Falls, on \Vedn« sday, 
.Auirusl .".<), in "Noloniiiis (;alias.''i« r." 
.>ni' of til'' most novel five i.-ii' (< .:■ 
lures ever jiroducrj foi* tin- .Nbtio 
piograir.. Tin- storv is i dis*. iiut 
novelty, ;md t i> treati<l in irast-rly 
inanniT under the dir •Uon o! .Mr. 
.\igh. 



"""* The End'of'tlTe Trail" 

William Farnum .nice n-oic br.ngs 
in'o play the niarvelou.s strength and 
power of his filfcrn-' in the newest of 
\\ in. Fox picture., of the great North- 
v.ost, 'The End of the <rrail," whidi 
.o.iifa to the Majestic Thur.sday and 
r I iday, Aug. .Tl-Sept. 1. Farnum acts- 
.ijles Le Cleni, a French Canadian. 
]a: Clerq has fallen in love with a 



■•I'ayiiii; 'h'- I'rire.'* 
••ra\ine the fVice," the World Film 
o.torp in .\ve reet*i..v"iU bo shown at 
»*T' <^'ol()n-a' Theatre. !5euv<r Falls, on 
Monda;.. .-V'..'.'. 'Js. In this pi'-'nr'^ tlM' 
U. .S. ifoverninent co-opor;i'ed witli 
the producing company in (irocuring 
the pro|>er at'ro.splif r-- :,, st;iire this 
■;tfry tdim'cally crnrect, and to th.'it 
<nd, Josephus Danield, .Secretary of 



I. 



"The Taranlula" 

Mtlifugl-. IMilii >r->rry. < ' •'.-■ 
iit- lapli pl.i er.<. )i;a<< alw;r s liad 
enviable ' -putatiop for p.-r- it '..♦y 
■ ! I her i»ro\ iiu>- thi- sta'' <.!it 
O'lr .'-.i! .icf ion o^ "The I. lan- 
'.v:!;.," at ti- '.(doiii.-il 'T'-.eatre, Bea- 
/r-r" Falls, T 'Ui.sd.-'.y, Ai'n "'l- 
' iier rlia' .■ ler n the {"i-t five reels 
of this Vit:igra|)h picture ;s t':at of u 
I lively, i.uo-free .Spani.Wi stnoiita — 
i full of life imd irreatly .-ittracted to a 
{ .' oung .AiiK ric.in. althoueh in opposi- 
jfion to her father's wishes. 
, H:'r ^ love 'o!" .'ill frf nds— for na- 
(Cfinlinufd on Eighth J'age) 



/ .>UJ'JrK*'*f '. ' 



MAJESTIC thiatre; ROCHESTER 



^w 



"if 



Tuesday and Wednesday, August 29 and 30 

ALBERT E. SMTTH and J. STUAKT BLACKTON Present 



• !• 



» Country ahd the Womao 

A Special Vitagraph Blue Ribbon Feature in EIGHT PARTS 



/*God'8 Counto' and The Woman/* by James Oliver 
Corwood, is a story of the Canadian Northwest, of the wo- 
man who love^ anttiof men who liVe wild and shoot tme. The 
feature of thii picture is the famous Siberian' dog teams. It 
is a picture of the big snows wondcrf uUy filmed, with an ex- 
celleBt cast headed by WilUam Duncan, George Holt and 
Nell Shipman, and directed by RoDin S. Sturgeon. \ 

< eiejieeeteei^it M #»»>tioe#»e<t<#>#»#» t^ <tttt »ff > 



Music for this lllcasion furnislied by Eistner's hf\m Orchestic 



■'■■■' ■>.%. 






■*!'. • * 



._iJkiaalMiHi 



MAnNEE (Tw amw) 1 to 3, 3 to 5. EVEWUHi (Two Show) 7 to 9, 9 <• 1! 

Admission: Main Floor 25c. BUcony 15c. 



•«• 






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BEAOTat V^^XKY LABOR NEWS 



immn Turs 

BOIIS l) 6IRLS 



Their Misdeeds Seldom Evidence 
of Wiolcedness. 



PLAYING HOOKY WONT HURT 



Parent Who Remtmb«rc How Things 

UMd to Feel Is One Who 

Knows How to Manag* 

His Bey. 






By SIDONIE M. QRUENBERQ. 

AT TilE club'^Jones wuh reudiug the 
paper to hliuHelf aud niukiiii; coui' 
ments to oil within beuriug. Suddeuly 
be sat up and put dowu the pajter. 
-Was tiiiit Walte's boy." he aslced, 
**that WU8 mixed up In that affuir 
down at the lalie?" No oue seemed to 
know. l)ldu't even linow tlicre hud 
been an afTuir. Iu tliat cuse Jones had 
to read to tliem. It was the story of 
a boy who lind pine over tlie ed;;e of 
a pier and was pulled out liy anutiier 
boy who tuipiicni-d to be passinK- Tlic 
buy wlio lia|ip<-iied to lie pUMMinK 
was youiiK Holt, nmi hi> hait|M-iied uIuuk 
at a time when lie wu.s sui>i»osed to 
be In Kcliool. 'I'lijit was the puint. Al- 
tlioucli im one tlenied tliai It was emi- 
nently proper for liiiii to jiiiiip Into tlie 
water aijd save the riix;,'e(l KtraiiKi-r, 
all were iij:ri'e<l that lie IkhI no Imsi- 
noss there, lie wa.s obviously playia;{ 
truant. 

'if a boy of mine <iiil that," Kaitl 
SaflTroii. 'Td jet liiiii take all tlu» 
menials iind liin- sjxt elics that weio 
coming to biiii. and after the eelelira- 
tion was nil o\4t 1 woii'.tl tat:e him 
Into the Wood .lifil and K've him tlu; 
worst liekin;: of his yonii;; life." 

That souiuled very heroic and very 
reuKonable. After all, its wielied to 
pluy truHnt. It was only a lucky 
Chanee that the boy eaiae nlonK in 
time to Have the otlier child— p«'rliaps 
this one had been a truant also. The 
chnuees \. <Te »'V«'n tlnit another tliae. 
he'd got run over by a tire «-nKine. The 
boy's place Is in the school, and he 
hud no business alonu the lake front. 
lie neiMled a lessou that would teach 
him his iilure. 

It mnile Saffron real nngry to think 
of a son of his <^iniiidttiti^ an outra;;e 
upon law aud morals. And the thlat^s 
he had iii mind to do w«'re — well, they 
were Just tlie ex|iressions of his ant'er. 
Th«>.v Were n<»t thou;:ht out policies of 
apply ill); for<-e \vl)j»re it would do the 
niOHt Rood. They were the in.stlnctive 
appeals to violence, and had just about 
as much moral vaiae a» Bob'» owu 
dereliction. 

And Prown, who had not been wiy- 
Inc unythlnu. could see that. And so 
he Jolni>d the conversation. He would 
not appaove of truancy. He knew it 
WRN a hnd (hint; and liable to lead to 
••orse tilings. iJut there's no use K»-*t- 



punishing chndren. Ha was fnat a« 
ImiAilslve as%be truant himself, with 
this difference. Whereas the buy had 
an uncomfortable feeliuK that he was 
doing Moiuething that was wrong — be- 
cause It was dlsuppruved — the man had i 
the aasuruucu that be was In th« 
right, for In the puuishment of chil" 
dren he was counteuanced by genera- 
tions of pareqta aud most of his con- 
temporaries. 

The trouble with Brown was that, 
whereas he had learned enough to 
Imow that the misdeeds of children 
are in must cases the outward exprsa- 
siouB of perfectly healthy instincts, 
and not evidences of "wickedness," 
and whereas he knew that .moat chil- 
dren win outgrow these misdeeds, he 
had no Idea that there was anything 
to be done abou( It except to permit 
the fates to finish the story. 

It Is well for all of us to know 
what Brown knew. But that Is not 
enough. Children will outgrow their 
childish Impulses, but what will take 
their place? One of the ways In 
which tlie grown-ups ac(]ulred that 
feeling of righteousness In the pres- 
ence of childish misdeeds was through 
the ImpreKslve Indignation of thMr 
parents on the occasions of their own 
childish errors. It may be wrong for 
Saffron to put so much stress upon 
the wicke(hiess of truancy, hut it is 
Juat as wning to erade the isMue and 



LABOfrS HOUDHS 
OF IINIES IIBO 

Workmen's Quilds of fiROland 
Had Unique Methods of ^ 
Celebratioii. 



Labor Day Paradea In Tlila 
Are Na Longar Popular WNklhs 
OrganlMd Workara— FIrtI 9m 
Hald in 





Asntambar That Boys Will Be Boys. 

ting excited over It. Didn't we all do 
the aame thing when we were young? 
Or at least we were all tempted to, 
and If Y ^'*^ ^^^ yield It was Just our 
good foftunc and not our 8U|>erior vir- 
tue. Besides, Its the sort of thing a 
child will do Just because he la a 
child. When he gets to be as old aa 
we are he won't be tempted to go down 
to the lake. Hemeiiiber that boys will 
be boys. Clvc him n chance to grow 
up and he'll be all right. 

This did not sound so heroic, hut It 
did seem reasonable. After all, a day 
out of HchcKtl breathing the fresh air 
and taking go4id exercl.se won't hurt 
any,bo.v. lie could make up his school 
work just as easily us though he hud 
been absent on account of sickni^sa, 
and this was better thnn slcknefis. 
Thousands of boys piny "hooky" and 
then grow up to be decent citlsens — 
■ome of them even become teachers or 
mlhlsters. Let him alone, and hell 
grow up all right 

Tovng Blank, whose children had 
not yet reached the age of truancy, 
waa Interested, but bewildered. He 
had expected to lay vp a supply of 
pcftctlcal wisdom to nm In poaslble 
emat g e n dea'ln the fntnre. But he did 
■ot And the conflicting counsel rery 
hciirfal. Brlldoera oiii^t to bo pun- 
IdMd, of eourao; othorwlao' then 
wovld bo no premium on doing the 
rlgkC fhlag. But |f a child doea what 
w«- eoi4^Ke "otV** Vlthout mallte, 
■hbvhl Urn otftl bo Im4o to auffei^— «o- 
podally iriMB Iw to very llkdy to out 
grow tiM 
MliT 



He Was Supposed Be in School. 

treat It like teething, ns something 
that will pass away was soiii«>thing 
else to <lo besides w'lii|ipiiig <hlldren; 
lirown nt-edtid to learn tiiul tlieru wus 
Hoiiieiliia^ to do. 

As we become more and more famil- 
iar with the developnieiit of tiie child's 
mind we reali7.t.> that many of the 
syrniitoins that are so iilarminK to oth- 
ers are In no way lndl»-alions of de- 
Itravily. Hut tliere is the danger thut 
in learning this we iiiny become In- 
(llfr«'ri>ut to all Hymptum.s. A child 
is to be watciied aiai understood; this 
will uvuld fi-et|ueiitly the resort to 
violence. ISut he iu to be understood 
and helped; tlUs will savu us fre- 
quently from the sin of omission. 

We niUKt know not merely enough 
to Improve on the methods of revenge 
and peniilty; we must know enough to 
evolve n positive proKrnni i»f construc- 
tive nssistance to the child at every 
IM)int at whi<'h his In.stlncts conflict 
with the re(|niremetits of the world to 
which he must adjust himself. 



Since 1882. when the Knlghti of I*' 
)ur resolved to hold their pgwOgi on 
Labor day, that holiday haa MiB k^pt 
)efore the public in varloua lacuUtlso, 
until now almost every stato baa fd- 
luwed the example of Coloraep by 
making the first Monday In Septem* 
t>er a legal holiday. The Idoft Of pB> 
rudlng on thut day has. hoWOTOr, loot 
po|>ularity with labor organliatloiis, is 
the holiday Is cel^nitod lo mafey 
forms of recreation by tbo oeveral 
(nllllon strong army of wago eamaro 
who live by the exercise of brain or 
bruwn. One duy each year la thereft*« 
set apart for workers of all Claaaes to 
relinqui.sh labor and pursue the enjiiy- 
nieiit of their Individual bent. WhOn 
there Is such a diversity of aport^ OV- 
ery man demands his choice as to 
whether he shall spend the day at 
fishing, baseball, motoring or become 
an exeurslonlst. 

Nothiii;: commends the good '<ld 
days as siioimly as the accountB of th«- 
fei:<ts and f>-stlvals of the old Bnglisli 
<-rafismca, who kept certain holidays 
In revelry or ceremonious pageant 
even btfore Anierii;;! wus discovenid. 
In the present century It Is alninat 
iiii|HissiliIe to imagine the Influence of 
some of th«*se old guilds of worknu>B. 
or to com|>rehend the occupations In 
whii'h they were engaged. No longer 
Is there any demand for homera, who 
engaged In making cups, spoons and 



WORK 



A Son^ of Triumph 



Somethipg to Regret. 

In a Wushlngton hotel lobby the oth- 
er night reference was made to the 
wonderful thoughts of the little folk, 
when this incident wus recalled by 
Cungressman J. Edward llussell of 
Ohio : 

One afternoon little Bessie sat In 
the kitchen watching her mother 
weave a hot Iron through the dainty 
frills of some white frocks. The day 
was warm, and mother looked some- 
what w«Miry. 

"Mnnimn," flnnlly renmrked the little 
girl In a sympnthetic voice, "Isn't It 
very hard work to iron?" 

"Yes, dear." answere<I mother, With 
A Roft sigh, "sometimes it is very 
hard." 

For a moment the little girl thought- 
fully communed with herself, nnd then 
her face became brightly Illuminated. 

"Oh, mamma !" she enthusiastically 
exclnlmed. "Wouldn't It have been 
great If you hnd mnrrie^l a Cbluumun?" 
— rhlladelphla Telegruph. 




to Nmm Ymik Emmii^ MmM. 



Work! 

Thank Qod for the might of it. 
Tba ardor, tha u^gs. the delight of it- 
Work that sprkigt from the heart's desira. 
Sotting tha4>rain and the soul on firs— 
Oh. what is so good as tha heat of it. 
And what is so glad as the boat of it, 
And what la to kind ss th« stem comman<L 
Cballangiag brain and heart and hand? 

WorkI 

Tliank Qod for the pride of it. 

For tba beautiful, conquering tide of it. 

SwMping the Ufa in its furious flood. 

TbriUng the arteries, cleansing the blood. 

Maalaring stupor and dull despair. 

Moving tha dreamer to do and dare. 

Oh. what is so good as the urge of ^t. 

And what is so glad as the surge of it. 

And what is so strong as the surnipons daep^ 

Rooting the torpid soul from alfip? 

WorkI '""> 

Thank Qod for the pace of it. 
For tba terribls. keen, swift race of it, 
Ftory steads in full control. 
Noateila aqaiver to grset the goal. 
Work, the power that drives bshind. 
Guiding the purposes, taming the mind* 
Holding the runaway wishes back. 
Reigning tha will to one atsady track. 
Speed in g the energies faster, faster. 
TrHmiphIng over disaster. 
Oh, what is so good as the pain of it. 
And what is so great as the gain of it? 
And what is so kind as ths cniel goad. 
Forcing us on through ths rugged road? 

WorkI 

Thank Qod for the swing of it. 

For the clamoring:, hammering, ring of it. 

Passion of labor daily huned 

On the mighty anvils of the world. 

Oh. what is so fierce as the flame of it? 

And what is so huge as the aim of it? 

Thundering on through di-arth and doubt 

Calling ths plan of the Maker out. 

Work, ths Titan ; Work, the friend. 

Shaking the earth to a glorious end. 

Drahung the swamps and blasting Ihs hills. 

Doing whatever the Spirit wills — 

Rending a continefit apart. 

To answer the dream of the Master hear^ 

Thank God for a world where none may 

shirk— 
Thank Qod for the splendor of work I 

LABOR DAY IS FOR ALL 



it 



Is Not Intended for Any Class, but 
for Americans En 
Masse. 



Cheap Japarteae Prints. 
If you cannot afford expensive pic- 
tures, do not therefore put up with 
ugly ones. There ore lovely prints that 
can he bought for n song, nnd If you 
do not wish to s|>end money on fram- 
ing them, by all means mount them on 
gray, brown or blnrk mate and tack 
tliem unframed on the wnll. .Tn|>anese 
prints cim be bonght. In a size a lit- 
tle bigger thnn postcards, for 10 cents 
each. There ore niuny loyeiy designs. 
<r>nc. In binck. grny-browns aud yellow. 
Is a rainy scene at night. A .Tnpnnese 
woman with a sorvnnt, hearing a Inn- 
tem. la silhouetted against a back- 
ground of lighted houses, moving rick- 
shas and other pedestrlnns. Every- 
body carries a flat Japaneae parasol, 
and long alantlng llnea of rain ctit 
across the whole print Others of these 
3(M!ent prints show water, scenes, gar- 
den scenes and Japanese children and 
bablea 4n charming nttltudea of play. 




F»eanufa Many U 
The peanut lg«a much more useful 
product than moat people think. Be- 
aides Its use In the roasted form, there 
are other Innumorabla ^^9M- 

The anta eontaln frdn 42 to 00 per 
«ant of a nearly colorleoa, bland, fixed 
olU roaembllng that of the oUto fnd 
laed for tin^ ^urpooeo. 

More than fl years ago there waa 

began In Tlrglnla the manufscture of 

that lead to aacb peanut flopr. of which a partlculariy 

\^ J IMU«t«blo Macott III ma«e. North Qaio- 

|Han Nna baa long ited* ^atry ofJMundod 

tbo palna to think | peannta. It Is also eaten for dcoaertr 

SWfcSr* IS ^ ^•^■^* ■ub^lt.ta for oaf. 



.?^- 



Entrance to Quildhall, London. 

window panes from the homo of 
cuttle; nor Is there but little demand 
for those whose huKlneas It waa tO 
disbwlge chimney s<H>t. Even the tin- 
ker who went from place to piaoo 
mending pots nod puns for houaewlTea, 
and who passinl them down to auc- 
cetHlIng generations, has disappeared. 
There Is no industry today. howeroT, 
except i>erhn|i8 that of building all^ 
ships, but was represented In 
crtide way In the labor of the 
men. and if h(m<'sty and quality 
work are considered, our hata 
be off to those men of old. 

That Labor' duy in Europe today ia 
the 1st day of May is probably the 
outcome of this duy having been 
bra ted by many of the old 
before the nffe of Invention. Among 
other merrymakera, the ehlmney 
sweeps s)UMit n frolicsome Mayday. 
nnd in some localities still keep up 
8<ime of their old customs. In fbnner 
times Ltindon's chHlk-faC(>d cblglnay 
swe<'|M carri<>4i shovels and hniah^P 
ns they panidinl the streeta dreaaed In 
cheap linery and decked with 
of gilt and colored papef. To 
no Mnydny was -complete wlthOBt 
May dance. 

The berihboned mllkmaldv 
danced on the aame day alao 
to have music at their jolllflcatlaa»lBi 
often marched behind 'a coiw lirtth fDt 
horns In procession. On ttat 4|F 
these rural workers borrowed, 
cups and tankards, which ttM|r 
around their mllk-palla, 
with ribbons and flowers, 
tractive paraphernalia h^^^ 
collecting colna from their 
before whom they daaeotf 

Partly to aecure a holiday 
ly to Increaae their fun 
fiodety of Cfertera tf ao 
1st of May with a 
try places the carterai wNh 
6ns and horaee gay With 
stopped at the nmiMroin 
and at horaea. At 
within were under oMl{ 
ribhoarto lialp la th« 



Men of labor eame to America in 
the Mayllower. A |irlat»'r and a car- 
penter signed the Decliiration of In- 
dependence. Ceorge Wushlngton, the 
whole world knows, wus a survey«»r ut 
one time In his life. Lincoln wus no 
more than a day laborer. Andre%\- 
Jobnson was a taiior. AWlllam How- 
ard Taft, after li>avlug college, was a 
newsi)ai>er reporter ut $0 a week. 
Roosevelt, it can be fairly said, was 
a cowboy once. 

A working man, by a strict deflnl- 
tlon. is "one who earns his living hy 
manual lalior" — titherwise. ut tusks 
employing his bauds. Farmers are 
working men aud clerkf* In stores and 
ofllces must be. under the meunlug of 
the dictionaries. 

AcVBally< of course, anyone who 
works Is a working mun. Labor day, 
consequently, is not for any class, but 
for Americans en muss. 

The foUowln^i^re but a few of the 
thousands of instancea where great 
men of today began their successful 
careers by working with their hands: 

Secretary Lane of President Wil- 
son's cabinet l(>nrned the printers' 



IB 









•-,.■ 






■ .^ ^ , 



u^^'M 



*-•■# 



The Late James Whitcomb Riley. 

trade In the oflice of a country week- 
ijr newspni»er. 

S«HTelary of Lubor Wllsoa began his 
career as a ci>:il dlggt-r. 

The first Job held by Secretary Mc- 
Adoo was that of a newsboy sidling 
Macon Morning Telegraph, ills next 
Job was that of n farm laborer. 

Secretary Kedfleld began his busi- 
ness career as a clerk in the peat of- 
fice at IMttstield. Mass. 

**I left 8ch<Mdv:When I was fifteen," 
the late James Wl^itcomb Rllcy said, 
in the drawling enunciation once ao fa- 
miliar to the lecture-going public. "I 
knew I had to provide for myself, but 
leouldn't settle on anything. At last 
I hit on painting and took lesaons — 
that's the way I now state It — In the 
graining of doora and the vamlahing 
'Hi mlscellaneoua woodwork." 

Another famoua Indiana man, 
Obarlea Warren Fairbanks, once 
worked aa a carpenter for il.2S a day. 
And Myron T. Herrick — T. for Timo- 
thy perhaps — the late ambaasador to 
i>nuic^, peddled dinner bells tq fanrn 
era. Some of the bells are ringing 
yet BIbert H. Gary, head of the 
HaitM'Statea Steel corporaUon. also 
a malM-nUIIIonalre. waa a clerk at $12 
,1i woek In a Chicago public ofll^. **I 
if was glad to get the pUce^" ho cim- 



'{;7<'4j.u. . M^tl,t^^. 




In Her Party Frock. 



The little ml»«. with tho pretty curls, 
looks w'«'ll in the Rlni|>lest of her 
Clotbes, but she iMndorable In her party 
fr<M'ks. She Is Kweetly c(»nMflouH of be- 
ing "all dressed ui>" iumI Is entirely sat- 
lstle<l with thiii;;s as they nre. This Is 
a state of iiiind inoHt cuiufortable for 
all eoncenie<l. 

The little party froelt pictured ahpve 
Is niude of such simple and Inexpensive 
materials that every .Kinall girl Is en- 
titled to have her liistliu-t for finery 
ndulged. It re<julres nothing more ex- 
trnvngant than ulbntro»<.s cloth In cream 
white, a little Venetian lace In an all- 
tvvr pattern und plain creum white net 
for the sleeves. The albatross is a 
light weight wool fabric In a crepelike 
weave which has the advantage of t>e- 
Ing washable. It conies In white and 
all colors. Venetian lace la familiar 
ts a pretty nnd sen'iccnhle sort which 
is Just ns washable as tho plain net of 
which the sleeves nre naule. 

In this dresH the skirt Is JolntMl to a 
nhiln short sleeveless waist. With its 
fullness disponed In n group of plaits 
at. each side the skirt hnngs In a panel 
tt the front and buck. The short iKMly 
Is sup|>orted by narrow straps over the 
ihoulder nnd fastens with small but- 
tons and button boles in the back. The 



sle«'ves are pithered Into three shirred 
sections over small cords and finished 
with a band of lace. The little slip- 
over Jacket of lace is gathered over a 
cord into a round neck und bound with . 
scallops ttt the back and front tlutt 
lengthen into points at the side. 

A wide sash of soft satin ribbon In 
one of the light tints Is finlshetl at one 
side with a big rosette bow with a sin- 
gle end. With a knowledge of the ma- 
terials used and the small amounts re- 
qulr«Hl for a little girl, it is easy to fig- 
ure the very modest cost of this pretty 
little party frock. 



Linoerie Bloui 
The colored blouse of <Mrgandie» ^ ' 
▼olle, georgette and wash satin haa J 
taken such a hold on the popular *. 
fancy that It Is quite dlfllcult to find a • 
really attractive plain white blouse, ex- , 
cepting those for sports wear. Palo 
pink, all tones of tan and yellow, soft 
blues and grays predominate. The 
costume blouse of pale cream lace or 
(ieorgette usually has an Interlining 
of the palest fish chiffon ; the blue 
waist is piped with pink or another 
harmonious contrast. It is indeed a 
season of color and one may indolgo 
to the heart's content 



'^' r-^ 



.•'t 



a: 




For the Little Kindergartner. 



The little mlas who Is about to take 
her Initial atep on the endleaa road of 
knowledge muat be fitted out wltii 
plain nnd pretty frocks for school 
wear. Most of these are to be had 
reatlsr made. In reliable materials and 
at pricea so low that It Is hardly worth 
iriiUe to make them at home. But 
others In whidi simple handwork In 
ornamental stltchee Is used fm> a 
flnbii are comparatlTely high priced. 
Here la one made of plain "India 
Unoa." This by the way. Is an unsuit- 
able' name for- a beantlfnl cotton fab- 
He that needa ao false colon for 
amooth sailing. 

The plain full akirt la modeled at 
the tAp with nercerlsed crochet cot- 
ton and tbo edge of the frill about the 
aeek la finished with overctat switches 
Ml' clod» tofMier. This* editoa: la l» 
a artaa ■■iiiiliii with the 



Iaac do* 
.^-1- 



tST'^- 



i«f 






' "'S 'IB*'' 



and In |hl8 Instance delft blue la uaed 
on white. The top of the wide hem 
la outlined with diagonal atltches aet 
close together and the edges of the 
email banda about the sleeves ara 
done In the eame way as the collar. 

The greater niunber of dreaaes hir 
adiool wear are made of hearier cot- 
tone and llnena Iq colors. The fad 
fbr a roaerred uae of deooratlons mado 
with the slmpleet <rf embroidery or 
otint needlework etltchea. ebowa aO' 
sign of decreailng la p<qNdarity. TMa 
quickly mado and degant-looklns 
finish for the ereryday clothes of Ut> 
tie' glrie Is In keeping with the fa- 
miliar aerriceable materiala It la need 
on. It. Is noi fbo fln4 foir them.' Foi^ 
ttanate^e UttlsAfmlae whose home pe<K 
pie can decoraKi 'ber frocka la thir 
ppf. Vac^Niaelcinaly ahe-wlll: N ad» 
eatad to a fiaa "aaoaa of dothaa.' 



<.»'' ■■ 



z4 

• 



z •* 



^!'-^ 



f' . 






,.» ■ 



*.^^"" 



#. t 



%» :. <lf 



<'^ 



I 



•la 






n.^7 



jfiim , IJ| iiiynij 



.^: 




BEAVER VALLSt 



tWHY WOMEN 
fRITE LETTERS 

To Ljdia E. Pinklwni Mm& 
OHO Cob 



I*.-- 



Woman who an well ofUn ask "Ar* 
iho Uttan whieh tha Lydia E. Pinkham 
Madidna Co. ara continually pabliahing, 
SanalnaT" "Ara thay truthful!'* 
" Why do woman wriU lach lattan ? " 

In anawar w» saj that nerar hara wa 
fohUahad * flctitidoa lettar or name. 
ilarar, knowingly, hare wa published 
■an untmthfnl letter, or ona without tha 
full and written consent of tLa woma^ 
-who WTOta it 

TIm reason that thousands of women 
from all parts of the country write such 

Ctafol lattm to tha Lydia E. Pink- 
I Madidna Ca ia thatLydin E. Pink- 
Yarn's Vafatabla Compound lias brought 
kaalth and happiness Into their lires^ 
«aea bardaoed with pain and aoffaring. 
It haa raliafad woosan from aoma of 
tha wont fdcma of femala IUa» from dia- 
plaeamaBti. Inflammatioii, nloaratioab 
iriagnlaritlaa, nsrfonsnsai, waaknam, 
atomaeh t woblaa and fvoat tha bhMa. 




ALaborD^ 
Denouemm 



^ 



It la ImpoaaiUa far any 
la wall and who 
kaa narar snif arad 
to raaliaa bow tbaaa 
poor, aoffaring wo- 
aasB fad whan ra- 
ta health; 
kaaadeafarato 
balp otiiar woman 
iriM ara suffering as 
thay did. 



woaum wha 




.Copyrlslit. 1916. by the MrClure NVwipa.- 
pc-r S^-nilli-ute.) 

"Are you rt'ully going to give up 
your Jul). Kutlt'V* 

"Yes. John." 

"Have you told Seeley?" 

"Yes. iind he was real decent al)out 
it. Of couriie. he began all that MtufI 
about the growing buiiiness and uiy 
til)|><)rtuuity to grow' with the flriu, 
but I cutvhlin 8hort." 

"How ons«arth, Katie?" asked John, 
for Seeley ^s something of an ogre 
to hlH e^plo; 

here. Mr. Seeley. you 
situation enough to 
malce me slip into aeeiug it your way. 
I've got an old mother and fattier 
who need me, and I'm going home.' 
He said: 'Now, Katie, you're JuHt a 
bit honieHtck. Forget It You'll miss 
your salary before you've been home 
a week, and a village don't ofTor h 
(Cirl anything unless the butcher or the 
hlurkKMiith marries her.' " 

"W.'ll. Katie, that's ail so." Mi»n- 
tinn of the vllhifre ellKlbU'S niatle John 



"I said : 
can't soap 




Unfortunate. 
Howell — He's an unlucky fellow. 
Powell — Yes, he Is always Johuu) 
on the wrong spoL 



DONn LOSE ANOTHER HAIR 



Treat Your Scalp With Cuticura and 
Prevent Hair Falling. Trial Free. 



For dandruff. Itching, bumlng^calp 
the cause of dry. thin and falling hair, 
Cuticura Soap and Ointment are most 
affective. Touch apots of dandruff and 
Itching with Cuticura Ointment. Then 
ahampoo with Cuticura Soap and hot 
water. No treatment more auccessful 

Free sample each by mall with Book 
Addreaa postcard. Cuticura, Dept. L 
Boston. Sold everrwliera. — Adv. 



/.?^-- 



^■-^^<r:'*. 



Conversational PItfalla. 
First Girl— You remember Kitty 
Fowler, don't you? 
Second Girl— No. 

First Olrl — Oh. you most remember 
Kitty. She was the plalneat girl io 
BlaakTllle. Bat I forgot— that waa af- 
*-^ 4 tar you laft. 



■^ 



m 



Housework Is a Burden 

It's hard enough to keep house if 
In perfect health, but a woman who 
is weak, tired and suffering from an 
aching back has n heavy burden. 

Any woman in this condition has 
good cause to suspect kidney trou- 
ble, especially If the kidney action 
aeems disordered. 

Doan's Kidney Pills have cured 
thousands of sufTertng women. It's 
the l>e8t recommended special kid- 
ney remedy. , 

A PennaylTania Case 

Mrs. F. M. Rhap- 

cott. 33S5 Markp? 

^Street. PhJludel- 

fphia. Pa., ■ny^. 

"For Ave yeara I 

waa in asony from 

idlsordered kidneyn 

n d inflammation 

of the bladder. 

Thare waa a dull. 

throbbing pain in 

the small of my 

back and I waa 

nervous. Irritable 

and run down. 

Doan's K t d n • y 

me after •vanrthlng else 




DOAN'S 



KtDMBT 
PILLS 

CO, •UPPALO. N. T. 





Beanly Secret 



to OBre CHir ■Dut DnBuC eyc8 
9 sA « heri thy aiyemmoe, your 
diyitiflo nniit be good'^ytwr 
bowels and Hver kept aetiye 
andicfiilar. AMutnatuie-take 



:>'>*; 




\" 



PILLS 

la af iliartMMse laJhalNil 




W. N. U« ^trttUIIONk NO. ll-ttIC 



"YouMI Miss the LIfa Hera, Katie." 

bold to side with the unpopular StH'ley. 

"Yes, nolxMly knows thai l»«'tter than 
I do. Hut I'm making Just $11! a wtrk, 
:iti(i how much of that do .vou think I 
s:i\« aftiT iKi.viiix boani ami liiuiuiry 
:iii(l carfiirc iiiul buying what few 
tlollics I have?" 

"Not iiuich, I gups.<»." 

"In tlirtf y»'ars since I .started in 
h»'re at ."<H a wt-ck I'v*' iiiaiiayt'd lo 
I>iinh iiioii;; and save just mi < v«'ii $Tr>. 
That's .S'jr> a year, see? If I'd v.v\ sick 
that $7r» would ;j«i in a JilTy, and work- 
Inj: nine hours a ilay in a stuJTy of- 
fice and sittiiit; up uiuhtM to mend and 
sew ^id wash half her clothes don't 
help to keep any j;irl healthy. lie- 
Bides, my ninthor and father need ine 
there. They don't say anytliiuK. but 
I know they n«H»d me. and they l<M>kod 
so old and frail when I was home 
Christmas. I told Seeley some of all 
this, and he said : *I gue.ss you're 
about rlRht. Katie, but if y(»u want to 
come back, there'll be a place for you 
herft^ " 

Jidin stood helplessly with his hands 
In his trousers pockets and turiiea the. 
waste basket this way and thnt with 
his feet. Katie slipped a purpljp- car- 
bon paper between the white letter- 
head and yellow second sheet and 
nimbly twirled the trio around her 
typewriter roll. Then she paused and 
John spoke very softly: 

TonH miss ^« life here, Katie. 
Ton'll miss the ca; rides and the band 
concerts and the moviea." 

Tea. bnt not any more than they 
nlaa me now at home." Katie looked 
pretty aolemn, for aha was yonng and 
loved gayety and music and th#> 
moviea. John managed to find a scrap 
of paper on the floor and as he stooped 
to put it In the waata baaket, he whi»> 
pared : "WIU yon miaa me a UtUe bltr 

Tea, John, latfc" 

Looking up. she caught auch a 
pained look in 'J<rtin's eyea that she 
quickly stooped to blow the dust from 
her dlctsphone record. There were 
teara in her eyea aa abe adjusted the 
long rubber tubea to her ears and 
tamed on the electric current 
• •••••• 

Katie's first week at home waa de-' 
lightful, but when ahe bad cleaned 
and straightened up the whole hoone 
and planted her flowers she waa 
pretty tired and felt the need of aome 
diversion, but, alas I no music or 
movies or car rides were available In 
Plalnvllle. Sunday waa a loag, still, 
loneaome day, and she did not enjoy 



HMviugs. There was no income savt 
tliM few scattered dolUirs from bef 
father's fees as a Justice of the peaca 
and the buttur and egg money her 
luuther contributed. Nobody in ^Plaln- 
vllle hud t^e slightest wvvA of Katie's 
skilled services as a dlctaptioue opera* 
tor. 8be was resourceful, though/ 
uud iiit u|Min u plan whicb nette*! luir 
a small amount each week. She en- 
ptged Ivilt' the space In the l.ardware 
merchant s shiow window for Satur- 
,day afternoon. Then she bak«Kl soma 
l«mveH of bread, an angel food cuke 
uiid some little t))a cakes. Site made 
an appetlKlng salad. All these she 
displayed In the window on Saturday 
witit a card which said : "Let theae 
lielp to make your Sunday dinner 
easy."^ — ^-w., 

i'iainvllle people were consorvatlva. 
Tliey looked askance at all innova- 
tions, and HO the tirst liousewives wbo 
passed gazed curiously at tlu* display 
without a thought of purchasing. 
Young Mrs. Moore walked right in. 
though, as soon as she saw Katie's 
display and read the attractive little 
card. 

"No stale baker's stuff for ine when 
I can get this dandy bread.' Mrs. 
Moore laid aside two loaves of bread 
as she s|M»ke, and passed on to the 
salad. "No standing over the stove 
cooking vegetables and cake when 
these things drop right down like tha 
manna did to somebody In the Sunday 
school lesson. Larry Moore doesnt 
hurt himself at the bead of that sec- 
tion gang, and 1 shan't hiu-t myself 
cooking his victuals over a red hot 
stove." 

Two other housewives followed Mr*. 
Moore's lead, and Katie's slock waa 
s«xm disposed of. After h«'r second 
Saturday, she orraiiged with certain 
housewives to cull them up on Fridays 
t«t see what she could suii|ily for their 
Sunday diimers. and she boon built up 
a good little business. 

One Saturday she Kot a letter from 
Jolni teiliuK about the preparation! 
for a big Labor day celebration on 
Monday. She renienib<r<><l that last 
Labor day was the first time she had 
ever gone out with .lotm and It hurt 
her to ntitice that Instead K.\t his men- 
tioning It in bis letter, be wrote: "I'm 
expe<-tiiig to have the time of my lif« 
Motidny. Hope you'll have as good u 
time as I do." 

She had not been downtown for sev- 
eral days, but on ^loiiday she de«*ided 
she would take a holiday, ulthougil 
the village made no obst-rvance of 
l^ubor day. Site put on a fresh white 
dress, her tiower-trimme<l hat and 
white shoes and started out for a 
walk. .She met one of the village glrlf 
who was agog over the arrival of the 
new grocer from the city. 

*X)h, he's swell, I tell you ! And he 
Isn't married, either!" she ezdaimadi 
with sparkling eyes. 

Katie went to the post office and tba 
new atore window looked ao attractive 
she crossed over. She had a friendly 
feeling for this store because Its con- 
tents and Its keeper had come from 
tlie city she was longlug t9 see again, 
so she thought she would go in and 
insp4>rt It Inside. As she walked in 
she saw behind the couiii«»r somebody 
who Kurpri.se<i her so that she stood 
quite still, while her face becatiie at 




D6STII0Y BEAUTY OF GITY 






When You Follow 
The Trail ^,j 



Co 



Placards Have No Place in 
of Any Wtll-Ordtred 
Community. 



Politicly ambitions are becomlDg so 
an obatacli* to civic beauty that 
tka Mthetlc souls of many communi- 
tlai kave been on the verge of rebel- 
UoaSar aome time past. When a man 
obseased with a desire to 
in public life he announces bis 
Ylrtues by means of flaring 
escde and placards. These cards are 
•t every |>olnt where the hu- 
•Vlalon might he expe<-t«>d to dwell, 
pause to enjoy the grandeuf'' 
OC a ynral acene, he Is reminded from 
and rock that "Smith is the 
eholcePfor constable," or that 
''JOIM atanda for the sqimre deal.* 
TiM outrage la heightened by a seriea 
aChomaly Tisages abowing the aaplring 
ansa In various poses of vanity. 

Tandallsm is s strong term, but Is 
It too atrong for such practices? The 
worot part Is that it Is perennial. The ' 
boaatMNis crop sown st election time ' 
!■ permitted to remain the year 
atfOliBd. By the time the elements 
hava succeeded in destroying one crop, 
aaiotlisr has put in appearance. Cords 
naay be found in any grove — the cards 
oCmeo who hove been politically dead 
for jears. It may have h(>en provt>d 
at tiM polla that the erstwhile "pe«>- 
ple'a diolce" was not any one's clioice ; 
jet ba must be regaled with the plu- 
carda on every tree and eminence. 

Minneapolis, whoac liner Kcnslblll- 
tles liave been aroused, will have no 
mora of this. Hereafter, candidates 
Will have to proclaim their virtueti in 
■omo other manner. I>efacenient of 
■cenary by bnmely visages and trite 
^i>gpM Will be inhibited by law. At 
•n riaction now impending, most of the 
candMatea have ogreed to keep their 
placvda out of public scenic places. 
Ottiors are to be arrested. Tlie ex- 
ample aet by Mlnnonpolls Is a worthy 
one^— Portland Oregonian. 



ipped WIf h 



WHCHssrm 

Guns and Ammunition 

Made for all kinds of 
* shooting 



.so^: ' L Vx^■^-^ V '.\ ^j 



ASK FOR 



TT 



BRAND 



and 



Far Behind the Timea. 

Penelope — Marcella la years 
years behind the times. 

Perclvai — Wliat luukeH you think 
that? 

l'enelo|)e — .Tust now slip wnnte<l to 
know if iter h-it was on Ktraiglit. 



Vices are nniotig tlit> oldest tlilngH 
on record, yet history iliM'su't uieiiiion 
the loss of a single one. 



It Is easier for a mati t<» ho the iirchl- 
toct of his own fertnut* liiiui lu b«> 
the builder. 



The Beneficiary. 

"Professor Diggs has JuMt succeeded 
In deciphft'rinK uo ancient papyrus 
given up \\y htilf a dozen snvantH." 

"Well. \\\mX good will that do bo- 
manlty?" 

'iVrhnpw it won't benefit huiuanl^iy 
In getuTui. t.ut It will enable i'rofi' 
sor l>iirK)* to sign u few mure lectui 
contrncts." 



We believe that nny roan wim at- 
tempts In- mntcli his lo;;ir a^atust s 
wniniin'M tenrw is one kind of a padded 
cell cai«(llf|jit«». 



TROUBLES OF LARGE CITIES 




Ltnll Ownership In Europe Carries Re- 

apsnslbllltles That Are Unknown 

tn Thia Country, 

in Borope extensive land ownership 

•ftroQusBtly InvolTes municipalities In 
uophilltable disputes. A large town 
ownlOK a parcel of land In a nearby 
tovnahlp proposes to build a hospital 
on It. The project is not pleasing to 
thl^' township; its munrll prepares a 
^aftdlll■ plan for the district, and runs 
a akraat through the proposed hospital 
alia. Sarlia itself was, only a few 
yean a>gO, treated thus by a suburban 
neighbor. Electoral laws ar«' s<'\fro; 
dlaenfranchlBH*ment is sweeping in ef- 
fect. Under Vlie "three class" iiietliod 
of appoitioaing the voting' power, u 
taxpayer in the "hrrt class" may have 
thlrt> times ps r.iach votln;: [inwer ns 

! one in the seconfl. auo i^4K) tiiii<-^ a.s 
much as their "third, oinsy" n.-i^'libor. 
Agnia, municipal guvfriiiiKiits are 
boitlneas age^ncies with uiost liberal 
charters. They bulM barnuks — In the 
larger dtles the averaj:*- nuniber of 
persona housed In one s.''*ii(-iure nins 
from Frankfort's 20 to lierMn's 77— 
and theae structures are mutfrial of 
a purely speculative busnu'ss wI-Jcli 
cannot be regarded as a heiiiihfu! lu- 
fluence physically or {Mditinilly In tlra 

i city's life. Tliese diinus nod a hun- 
dred others of similar nature do cot 
condemn German municipnl goverfi- 
tnent any more than the peculiar ex- 
cellences of the sysl*m cotistituto a 

1 condemnation of the liritlsh system in 
which tbooe partlairar ex(*ellences are 
locking. But they do bring out the 
diflicultlaa of government and emphn- 
sise tha tmltleasness of cumpurison 
ot sjratema, — Exchange. 



WANTED 30,000 MEN 

For Harvest l¥ork Western Canada 

Immense crops; wages $3.00 per day and board. Cheap 
railway rates from boundary points. Employment bureaus 
at Winnipeg, Regina, North Portal, Saskatoon, Fort Frances, 
Kingsgate, B. C, Coutts and Calgary, Alberta. 

Ho CoiiMoripiion^ 
Mbmoiuimiy Mo Mffiitmry iniorforenco 

For all particulars apply to 

i.S.CraarfeN.S6l C.tcatsacSl.,Syricasc.N,Y.:r.A.airHs»e,2ION.3riSl..lirrlsbsrg,Pa. 

C«o»dian Covcmineat Atcnta 



Electric Wheel Chairt, 
Electric vvlieel cliulrx slinlliir to 
those employiHl at IIm' I'linaimi-riiritic 
InternalionnI exiKisltion InM yt'iir are 
being U8e<l successfully tn Eiiroite for 
the \vounde<l and cripplcMi fM)lillers. 
Invarialily the c»»iivnlesceiit men pre- 
fer to (lirect their own clinir rather 
than to have sonieoiie push tliein 
about. < >Me of flics*' rluiirs. \v lilcli In 
of .Swiss iiinUe :tii<l *•»■ a siiinll sum, 
is e(|uip|HM] with !i oil. ijiiailer Imrse 
power motnr suspemle*! Uetuci'ii tlio : 
stt'criii;: and rear wlie*-!. CiirniiT 1« 
sii|.i)iie<l from a lintleiy of l.'i IcmQ 
pl.Mte (.lis li<iiis<(j in three hfixcs lie-! 
tie;ilb ili«' >>"-iit. TIk- l>;itUTV i s of 7A> 
ami)ere lio^irs' eapaeiiy anil jtrnvideNJ 
sn(liri«-iii cneruy U>[- ;i i-*iii of f lilrty to ' 
forty inllfi. I-'ive forw.'ird ;i tul live 
reviTSi; s|ic»»(ls arc |iri'\ i'li'<l. 'I'ln* 
si eiTlriLr ati'l o|M'ralint' iin'(liaiii>in l.s of, 
llie very simplest. 



Getting What He Deserves. 

Nosilliij; iti H newspaper coiikt nett 
to the I'uiiuiiia-hnt ads %ve timl tills 
stray sunbenin of n li(>art throb; 

"The tirst fuee the baby sees In this 
world Im full of kludiie.ss. mid tlic last 
to bend over lilni when tie l«* old and 
<l.vim: In full of pltyln;: tiMidei-iies.s. It 
Is the fiM't'S he sees in liilwccii lliat 
ciinse hint fill lits triMiblr--." 

TliiH 1h 11 Ocar sweet lli.iimbt. Inn It 
strikes ii>: thiit tin- "in Ix'twi-eii " l:i'e« 
MKe looking' :il lilin .Mini very likely re- 
llecthit' h:icU ti > litrn Jnst mIh.iii what 
(iM-y •^ec. (^llite iiflcn It H H"! either 
k'ilidiwss «ir leiulrriu-' ^. fur. I;il;liiu It 
liy iiiid l!ir;rc. IhK i^ :i f.iirly j.i.si 
world. -( oilier' s. 



Refuted. 

"I've bi.ri tulil ili:n .-vi-ry cfiit r>nl>- 
\v;ilte iii;il:<'-^ j,'(..-s on .Mrs. Itulnvaile's 
luick." 

■■'riiat isn't so." 
• 'Till ;.'lad In bear It." 

"Mon't I see I mhvviilte siiiokin;; 
sfou'li's e\(i-y (|jiy that lu? Iiiiys liiiii- 
self?" 



Accurate Information. 
"Is wonijin really tin; weaker vcf»- 
sel ?" 

"Uiilv when sbo \n iininnmuMl," 



John? Is It raally 



like m7 store r' 

Tour store, 
joursr' 

"Yes, mlnA. I had aaved up a f«w 
hnndrjBd dollars In the eight years 
rv« been working and I got to think* 
Ing it wonld take all the best years of 
my life at that rate to aare a coopla 
of thoussnd. I'd worked thrte years 
In a grocery before I was shipping 
clerk for Seeley, and I know the bnol- 
neaa. For^ starting In a small way, 
btit ni grow W — John panaed and 
bmahed Imaginary dpst from the 
freshly ramlshed counter — "if y^ll 
help me, Katie. Don't you think yoa'd 
like to be the better half <tf a growing 
business manT** 
"Yes, If—" 
"If what, KaUer 
"If he lored me," blushing Tlolently. 

_.. — ,-. "Katie, dear, I lore you ao much 

the goesip which follnwet) the mom- there ain't words enough to tell yon." 
Ing senrlce a^ the church where her With her bead on his shottlder and his 



Qaaad Curiously at tha DIaplay. 

white aa her dress. It was John. Out 
from behind thc> counter he came and 
grabbed her hands. 

"Katie! Katie!" he exclaimed. *? 
didn't know bow good It waa going to 



be to see you once again. How do yoii]^^ ng onanantal ; that It hare cov 



psrenta always aat in ' a front pew. 
Aa sumnrer came and her flowers 
grew and bloahomed she felt better 
satlafled, but the amall outlay for ■ 
tew nafaanrj.rapalm and fumlaldngs 
had mada Quit* « koto la bar lattto 



afms about her, John managed to 
substitute actions for words th a man- 
ner 80 aatlsfactory tliat they asripil 
erer afterward that both of tliwli^ 
the time of their Ut«o on Oat .Mf 
tteolar Labor tfa(, ^ - ...^. 



ytlnitm tMrta Make for Oemfert. 

Oaa of the details of planning which 
should not b« overlooked is the matter 
of window aaata, of which there can 
hardly b« too many In a home. In 
erery bay window where posalbi^ a 
window aaat abonld be constructed, 
snd ao ooaatmeted aa to be useful aa 



New Oil-Extraction Procesi. 
A process invented t)y «a Itnllnn 
rhemi^t ffir eitractliic essentliil oils 
from ritniH fruits is nnld not to af- 
fect the chemlpai properties of the oils 
In any way, and it is prpdiciod that It 
fventtiaJly will revolutJoolze tlie In- 
dustry. 



era In aw tdp, neatly hinged and ao 
arrangad that tiMy may be easily open- 
ed to paradt iMtoff the spe^ under 
ftim aMt' for tbm atorage of thinga 
which It li'doiIrM to have handy and 
for whlcfe thora aaema -no other con- 
venient^ plaea. 

Arooad tha flrtplace there la noth- 
ing mora pttractlTa and comfortable 
looklaf ^IMh a nice built-in aeat, and 
cover. M tha apace beneath la very 
oaefia tg# atoring the kindling wood 
snd oooailoiially a few big sticks aa 
arall, wImb It la not conrenient to uaa 
a wood hOK or baaket bealde the llre- 
plaea. 



¥fMt t i r aa ta In Uruguay. 
Ctlao that ara worrying over narrow 
■treats ihd Mairalks may take a lea- 
ion fMM ^IM Meant acUon of Monte- 
video, m0iM *Bf Uruguay, which haa 
paasad am Wdlnaaca requiring that all 
balldlafiia,anetcd at leaat 82.8 feet 
froa tha ^tfiMlaiy line, except In the 
boalnaiB mtMei, where 13.t2 fMt 

ba allowed for 

and moat be en- 

ttsalr 





Always Pay for Diaobediatioe. 

Obedience is economy. Dlsot»e<]lence, 
extravairance. He who dlaotteys the 
laws of nature hss a doctor bill to pay. 
He who dlsobeya the laws of hit coun- 
try has a Iswyer'a bill to pay, «. 



^ Unele ifcan. 

''l>e man dat's sllnn aiayln' what he'd 
do If he was in somelKMly else's place." 
said V7ncle Eben. "mos' generally sin' 
doin' nuffln' much on his own accoonL" 



Making the World Better. 
That the world In growins b«tter 
means thitt the mlins thonshta are 
those seeking brighter, better things, 
higher levels of vision. — If ax. 



Chance for an Inventlofi, 
There are dolls which say "Bfamma" 
and "Papa." Why doetu't someooe in- 
vent a golf hall that will aay "H«rs I 
am?" — Indinnapolls Star. 



Real Eoenemy. 
Among other raearares of «cofMMny, 
It may^c a«td that cold feet NiTet a 
good deal of money from tlna to tima. 
•^Atchison Globe. 






Mr. I Haa Shartsat Mama. 
Mr. I, a Oaherman In EUwail, has ttM 
shortest name In the world. Ha wina 
over Oeneral O of Mexico by a valid 
technicality, aa headline wrltara can 
atteat. 



Extending Life of Olleleth. 
If a double layer of brown paper 
Is put nnder oilcloth on shelves oi 
tablea It will wear three times aa long 
»a If laid directly on the wood. 



Te Clean Matting. 
» Fofr tolled matUiig dissolve aoma <ns 
alic add In water and apply with a 
scrubbing brash. Waah afterwards 
with daaa water. . 



Curaa of K w owlsdgi. ' 
"Earache." wrote Barry la Ua 
physlolagy examination, "eoiteas tttm 
bit! of faformatlon gatttaff UmMo tta 



'' '■Vi 



y 



^ 






h'.*::1.-P ^. ...J^<k. '.. 



^ 






■. ♦jf, ^.' ?- '*■ -^ ■'■ »»i.. 



tl,£-u . 



■1-^ 






-1. ^J^ . li Ar^. ^'..m/ 



tSr 



e 



Time's Rfvc/iges. 
"The .Mill Imniicx uoiiMn i l.-i lu 

wear iiir im-w Iciiliin:; i-ovniiiH'.' ^.m. 

the e|lli'eii i»f liilislriil coiiicily. "'I In-, 

salil It \>,iis too risky." 

■■.And y 111! Iwi'l In ihniv. ftf if^rii^." 
■■(•r. in>. I'll w.-;ir if III tin -imw 

next >i':i-~«in. TIhmi thi'v'II p;iy nioiny 

to conie :iii<l si-e It." 



-II \ ITS, 



Indeed It Does. 

"T<-l('|. hones are ;;re;il lime 
an'ii't lln'v?" 

"'Well, tluil (Icpemls ujion wlio <:i!ls 
you up." 



Soiin> iiii-n never jro to r!iiir> h l>«»- 
cause wlnii 111.' lislilnjt i.**a't ^uoil ilie 
wi'ather Is hiid. 



According to Inquiries. 
"It's w.T()n(; of me to iui:o this food,** 
said tbe tra:iip. ns he reached out for 
the i>l«! In the window ; "bnt." he added, 
reflortlvel.v, "I've hnd repeated In- 
<iuirlt.*8 for It from the department of 
the Interior, and' I shall n^w deliver 
the goods," 



Hir, Meak Phllesophli 
"How strange It Is." mused aklmpy 
little Mr. Meek, "that If you take your 
wife to a restaurant nobody ^vei;.acclr. 
dentally carries her off by mistake for 
hia own.**— Kansaa City Star. 



•■•/^..vf 






~-,v •" 



vi'rK...i 



y:*^i 



j:-...?' 
i-.i<-.%' 






"!■■■"« ■ V- 



32 





<p 



By virtue of certain writs of Fieri 
Facias, Levari Facias, and Venditioni 
Exponas iuued out of the Court of 
Common Pleas of Beaver County, 
Pennsylvania, and t» me directed, 
there will be expd>ii to-aale at the 
Court House, Beaver, Pwinaylvania, 
by puUic vendue or outcry on 

aATLRDAY, SEPTEMBER 9. 1916 
. At 10 O'clock A. M. 
NO. 1. 

A! .:i>rht, title int..'rcst and claim' 
of il^fiiulant of. in :wid to all thut i 
cotlu'r. pierc c'' it.nd '.yinf: and bc'iiK 
situati- ill t!'o Horoug-h Q£_Ne\v Uri^l'- 
ton, C'^awr Counly, lVnn»vyh»4UiiH, ije- 
injr |»'.i!l of lot nuiiibei-cd Nine 
the tft'nerui plan of iMivid To\vn8e: 
bounUii and drscribetl ua follows, to 
wit; iVjrinintf at the nortl>east cor- 
ner of Thini avenue and Fifth strc t : 
theiKt by said strcol cy.-twardly tifty- 
nine 8-j'q (5!».S» fort to t!ie Inn-i o' 
i:dilii Brsiden; tl.ciice by land lasr 
aforesaid, nortliwardly at riRht 
aii;;!c> fn>. > r.i'lh .^Iret-t. liiirty-tliref 
(.".,; fff. to iaii.l of (vi.:'.''i«.-> Uolurt!^; 
ther.ci liV t! i' Ir.iil o ■ .-aid 
\\est..vai<ily and 

Kt.CV*. lorlV OHf 



Stiioiui street alley to lot numbered 
ihiriy-f.ve ("51 of said plan. 

' litin;^ the same premiaos which R. 
L. It. Heaves by de«l dated the t\t- 
UtP.;. day of April, A .1). 181>S> kucI 
,vtJided at Ueavcr in Deed Book Vol. 
117. pajrc 1. did »rrunl und convey un- 
to Susan M. Slianor. one of the purtien 
of tiu' first jvirl. 

L'i „ii \^\,i>:\'. I.* erected a ivu-fcior: 
frai;le dweliinj .ouae, contuiniiifr nme 
rooms, unU utuai oulbuildiiiK'^. 

»\ ied and l !;.n in execution as the 
pr i> ny ot \\ . A. Shanor and Susan 
V. :,,'.inor. hij .vife, at tlie si.:*, of 
.viu: . ri . l^.'.l.ii , administratur, for 
Jai' oi Ju»c-j|)i.' M. i'..aKin. _, 

M a !t Jfv i: S ivaney . Atto me ys. 

.NO. o. 

Aiso. ai! riifht, title, 'i«teii»t and 

■:.».<■. o:' (letcndunl of. in ^m^\ to all 

nat artain iot of land situate in the 

jjoiouifii of New Hriffhton, County of 

iieavor. and Slate o!" IVnnsylyania, 

! »ounilcd and described U6 follows, to- 



Setrinninsr on the ^vest side of Fifth 
4vViuie (formerly Second street) at a 
i-o^t distant ten (10) feet novthwaid- 
rom the north line of the thiity 
foot oxteiision of. Pearl street: 
thence by a line pupallel with said 
..orlii l.;:ir of the extension of Peari 
.livf., i-!u- i;undivd tliirt.v (I'M) lee*. 
KoIhtIs j it) oliicr i>art Oi" said lot; thence noith- 
paraliol with i-'iiti:' ..aiil y ;iii'l paraliel Willi Fouilli ave- 
N-H» (41. vS) feel tuinuc li!iy-one ('>!) feet to land nov. 
tlu tic: by. ihc .~:iin<' southward-: :>r iale oJ \\ iliiaiu VSallace; thence 
ly and p:'.r.i!Ie! with Triril avenue | .for.^ tui.i Wal'.ac propoi-ty t.utv. h.'«i- 
t!.iec- f(\\. u< a point; li.onvC by th»>;;y (.!'.<. ':.um ireti ihiriy ( Tl" > ;e( t lo 
same wpsi..vanlly und p:irailol wht). j l-"ifth avenue, (ial? Scii-nii .'.irtti;; 
Fifth otffi''.. (ipht.eii (1S> iVot, tc,-'i,n;» .-..ntiiv. anhy ' alou^r .-.i.i I'iMli 
Thij*d a\inuis li.t nc« !»y 'I'liird :ivtin,:< : iviiui' l.Il\-on? (.VI) fcfl, iiiuie or 
Southwardly th.irty (:I0» feet to lifthl ess, li» the place fof bepriiuiinij. .Said 
.sirevt, tlie |>!:icc of hejr'Miinc ■ ii .)i ;.b»'ve dr-ji. ribetf now abuli.-oii .- ilti 
whi:h is envttd a t\.o-t.liTy bricl. jV^r! .Street (now Fourle«-iith .slieet) 
buiid'ng ccntainir.jf two .store ro«>n>j; oy virtue cf tne d-'dication of May 







LABOR WCW8 



m 



I" 



en llie-lirnt floor ar.d bi\ 
rc,&i\\3 on tht- second fioor. 



dwidlinKi 2nd. 18?^, 
Ui) feet 



Seized and tak'Mi in cxe^'Uiiot. ;i.< the 



.M' 



proi>erty oi 
r.ifl o'" the 
Huiidine 

v.vi;. 



C"!ia:":o.s \>'. i'ox, at the 



r-c'ioii 



I Nt 



ew !iri>r.Uo» 



by J. F. Minoi' (•:" tlie tci. 
«lrip of iaii(i hi rrtoi'«ire in- 
•.•?>enini,' bctwel-n said j.ropor'.y ani! 
su.d I'eail Stivot or ihe purpo.-:* of 
idenJng saui ttr.el tr> tlu- vidti. ol 
iS- I.ouM As'sociat "on. j "'ty (40) ieet,-- which d'iiaijiir. was 

('i:t'il.; rtpi !;. Attorney.v* iu'ty' arvcpted by thf 'r"\.ii t'lr.ir.c-jl 

;,T' .\'J. 2. ,)f said lii>rou>r'.: m i!,c liay iimi ; car 

ALso, all ritrlit. tiiic intei-e.«t andi if;;r?sa!d. 
claim of liffendani (.f. in .-'.ri'! to al'l _ Ilcl;i^ the s:;!r.c premises which Wil- 
itiM ccriain ple.N-- <,r ,i.jari (.:' ianilj \im-\ l^cheniby n ux I>y l'»eir doetl 
situate in .Maiion 'i'own-^hip. lUaverj-'ittd the 20th day of }>.:\iv,\, A. F'. 
C»;ui(ty, Pa.. b(ii,:.i! i! ard dt-.-tiiiiedj ;til. and jti..rr'*(l at iJe.ivcr in Ikiu 
as lollovis: FU'e-inninK at the i^outh-i dtiok \ ol. 22i;. iiaye ll'l, liid txruni 
east corner, at Uw center of tiie Pub- •;Vd ■ro;i\e;- unto- Jui'.* s F. l»ia.itfo:i 
he Itoad io.oi. It;; f nmr F'Tiib '11 Ilrid^rc' i«.d K:ni.'. t I. Cl.n.s.-c:!. liuj-Vcmd unl 



.nd ?vrV. Road i9 
extending southwaMllir JRpMI'^ 
Hoad liUrty (^) fltl M MpiMbfwi 
MiH^ i.uitJred forty i}M^%Wm09M', 
ta-i... cattt^vardly by UM'fM|ill|f ^tl- 
; liui street and alonf 1|| dlikilafr 
line between lots ttmtmlMi MOm hun- 
dred forty (140) and oil kvidvMi 
'orty-one (141) in aaU pla», lit f«t<f 
o the dividing line b«t«NMa l«t#Mnn- 
twred one hundred ., fortf^ffM ^41) 
and one hundred Iwm^ ijwrii "flJtt) 
in said plan; thene^ BMlhwi^ihr by 
line parallel with Park Anad mM^iims 
the dividing line batwMB lets lioih- 
bercd one hundred forty-«ie (141) 
and one hundi^ twenty^itfisve (128) 
thjrty iM) feet to tot niim]Mr«d one 
iu!uii-ei fuiiN'-two (142) in Mid 'plan; 
lier.ce wc^itwardly by line iiamHsl 
.vit*: Thi:d street and ftlmMf the di- 
Yidini; line between Iota miniberad oiHl^ 
*iun !ivd forty-one (141) mA one Iran- 
■ ired forty-two (142) in said pluB, one 
!iun(lre(i ten (110) feet tojtiie point 
of beginning. Being 'the fUBM fMnni- 
sc.s cnnvep«^d by John F. Mniomy *t 
,ir to F^r.ink Hanoviteh by dtld dated 
.Septeni»)er -i, l')13. Recorded i#0«ed 
U«%!: Vol. 2n9, page 969. Htriiir 
•recttd thereon a two-story .brick 
apartn.cnt house contaittfi^ - four 
i]):irtnionts of four roomi and both 
each. 

So ze^i and t;'iken in execution. •■ the 

-^Tjjv't : of Frank Banovltch, at the 

■uit of Mui Realty Company, fer use 

.)f K, .'I. Ptandley. - \ . 

.M«i'on (• Hartford, Attomev'^ 

NO. 8. r- ' : 

AIm). all ri^iit. title, intei'eat and 

!;i;r'i of il-fondant of, in and %a dli 

'.■;os;e lr.t.s of 1 in<l situate in thl B«r- 

..'jtrh of N'ev CiuHlee, County of B«a- 

.1- ;.n«i Stale of Pennsylvan^ai and 

m I'-ic S'liirp ;-»lan of lots as sho^Ti in 

!'lot i;..ok \'pl. 1, page 131, is tije 

>''ice '•; U«^('M.I' r of Dcaver County, 

u'^ ^lats numbered one,, tvo. 



Seised and taken in execution as the 
pro|)erty of Milton J. Lawrence, at tlia 
•uii of Ronuiine A. Wilkinson; 

J. L. Holr.ies, Attorney. 



TEBMS OF JALE—Purchasera 
wi]l take notice that full amount of 
bid will be required in CASH at time 
of Bale. If these conditioivi are not 
complied with, the property will be 
r»-sold at 1:30 P. M. of the same day, 
at the riak of purchaser not comply- 
inc with terms of sale. 

JAMES P. BRYAN. 
&UKi6-25-8eptlv S-eiiff. 



BIG ERIE EXPOSITION 

COMPLETELV READY 



I,,.: 



Eri6 is preparing to do herself 
]j)roud durinp the forthiominjc Erie 
K\po£itlon, .veek of .<ept. '1& to 23. 
The «reat Fall. Siyie Show of the 
merchants has been ft Ned for Use same 
week and the show window- a of tne%iff 
mercantile establishments will be fair- 
lyravishing in their displaif of Dame 
Fashion's finest creations. In addition 
to this the stores are to be gaily deco- 
rated, the streets are to be made gay 
with flags and bunting and a genuine 
carnival spirit will prevail in its very 
best sense. ' 

Al! details of the lip siiow are rap- 
idly rounding into shape. The finish- 
ing touches will be put on the race^ 
track during the week jujit past and 
Erie 's now :n iiosscviion of the finest 
and fastest half mile course in the 
country. A j,ranvl stanii with a seat- 
ing ca;t.lcity c." .''..500 l,:is been erect- 
ed as .'"..ive ai-o a ^foo-i .siz«?d commun- 
ity of speed barns where the racing J 
paj.'s wi.! be stabUfi. The cattie ^nd ! 
horse b.:ildin>r and the .show pens for* 
siJitdler "o^'k are already in readiness! 
anJ the 'iry hist n:;il.- aiN* even now! 
l)Oin;': driven hon.e :n l':.<' riain e.\po- 
.'it'on build HfT. 

Till- bro.;d itiue bosr:.i of Lake- Erie 



ivay bo .ype-ii f:on-. 



the rxposition 



jfroanils ;;nii ilu ."■ jr."<.-;iMlinrs are ai 



to Now l:r 



Uo.k!; tl.i:i<o in al.-.ife, and the 



noriheri,. dinrliDi" to the centtn-f the , lied on tU.; 



(.onr.oqi'ert" .siiiir f"riek: i' rr.j 



.n d 



Wester'y <' irction by center cf the 
Con'»oi;»i« I • -SMV1,' ♦ nek a.; <le.«crilie<J 
in '•■ >\ iMnti Noilli l'itt.-;|»ii;i'h IN-alty 
Coin;)any to tlie present Kiantwr, Ui; 
lin<I c*^ K. A. (iovliKnK: th-^nee snulli 
1 .• i::iit!- . '■ !•:. A ' 



said Kii.ir.ii 1. t'.la.^-j-i n 

. . day of A. I 

': «!»..., ;u:d ijy rcuon tl.c-i-e.f th. 
-'luire tit;c to gaidsi pi'''>~*''''^^ vested 



;'rec. four, i \c. si::, sewn, ligrht, 
i.ine. ten, eleven, twelve,' thatecn, 
'■.)'jrto?n. ;:*»*»«;>. .j'xteen, fi,ihtecn, 
<iin?tte« t »tnt. . t *cnty-ono, ^vfenty- 

•x'Tt. twenfy-ri'KC. thirty, thirtjr-one, together of a inosc de i/iv.rul nature, 
••lii-ty-t'vo, thin: -three, tMrtVbfour. Two troiiey linos and t.o eieani 
•hi:iy-f.vc. t! ;ry-F x, thJrty-J|even, railroafjG riicht ;.: tii.; -.cry door rf the 
;luriy-c-ix:ht. th"rty-ni:je, forty-two, 'e-vposi* ion settle il! i:'an.spoiiation 
•.•"ty-nine. ?-xt>. .'ivty-one, ah:tjr-two.i problems. Two ^'reat paved main 
'i/ty-tWrce. si.vty-;..-n, sixty«l;v|-and i hii^iiway.s offer thi a'ltc^st easy ;.crc-ss 
;^..tj s'x in nui-I plan cY lots. jto Uie j.'rrur<l.<;. And fi-oi-,! of.st. '.vest 

Se':'.ed;'.n:l I nk'^r, :n execution IB the ju.. J iou.:. \...v-..i ..re ifaii.j? tc pour 
ii I'.n ■ of J. W . .Sharp, at liH suit into the city durinitr the week o: Sept. 

le--^!. to W'-" ihe wondtrful siglii.< of 
this :-!iair.mct;i exhibition and to par- 
ticipate in tht '.i^ou.sand ttnd one pai- 



it;elf in the said Jioinea K. Tilaistr, 
i.i of sun'ivo.. Iiip. 
erv lei y li'i'^' 



n 



(' It 



J- 



I pjir. kvi.ich i-> 



5l«.' 



i^uildlag I Ol •.•.;!!. liny: -.i 



pei\!.f.s to laM<: 

thence in an eri.stcrl>- direction by 

lands of Henry Ketterer and Heuttv 



i':;tiiuilc!'r.tr.s. ;;ii i 



■n ■ of J. W . .Sharp, at tin suit 
'>f VV. J. McC'.urr. 

!.-'r:er (V»pe. .\ttnrnev. 

N'o. 9. ■ : 

A'-^o. !.!].' .•;.''l.'. title,' interest; and! ties whic- 
c1:iini nf dcfondnnt of, in wul ID ali last. 



r.iark it f'-^m i.r.~; to 



■>! .. '.i' t(itei 
\. ';o.:n-in}r ISfi.TP v().:i;: a:-.l i.^u;: 
r Henry K't.rjvr; known aj; tiie (.'\\,.v lloai.e. 

.Voic"^ and tal.--M in e.\cciit!»n at ti. ' 

proTiorty of Ja .les V). (Ilassen and 



to place of bcKiniiing; containing 8:JjJa,.ie» E. oia::sen suK'iviiiff husband 
ac;t:.s more or less. E.xcepting and re- ; o'' Kintri i. <jl.ir,.se!i, detea.^d. de- 
sening all that certain piece or par-i r-ndant. and \< H. Martin. As.*\t,:r.r' 
ce! of land described us folloXvs: AJ,." .j.:..i«>. t'.. .i' .;s..-n. for i>#^nei.t «v' 
strip of land 40 feet wide, adjoining <-r •■' '.i>i <. t-.'.« !e:iart. at the .■Jiiit c; 
(•' und parallel on the southerly riwht of tJw iVople*.- IJuilii n^: i- Loan .\.ssocia- 
way of the Pittsburfrh. Harmony, Hut- tion. 

hi- und Ne.v Castle Railway, lie-in-; .•,! >rtin &• .*•'. .in>\. .\tt >rney.-i. 
nine on the ea.storly .side of Tublic SO. 6. 

P.uml and oMtemlintT westwanl'y there-! A]>o. ■.■.'.'r rivrht. till*, intere'^t ;mi'I 
fro:- a distance of .^00 feet. I .-laiiM nf ,lof<Midanl of. in and t.. all 

" Havms: erected thereon a four tl-.:.i n-rtain i.aiv«l or lot of himi siv- 
roor ed frame dvoUinjr hduse and us- i.au- m ti.r lioroutrh of ICorheitcr. 
ual nvitbuildings. 




Si;:. (1 and taken in execution ».s thr 
rro}.o:'. • ." W. A. Goehrinjr. .:it the 
suit c: c. ::. Glenn. 

V,'. ..\. >icConnel, Attofnev. 

NO. 3. 
A.ro. all right, title, intcre.st and 
cTa'!-. of defendant of, in and to all 
• that certai lot or land .-^Jt-Mto in tin* 
Hortuirh of ..'idiand, County of Hea- 
ver ami State of I'enn.xvlvr'niri. lM;n'.r 
lot niiinben-d Ti.rcf Hundred I'iftv 
<:•..')"> in^.Midliind Plan "A", .v;iiii:it'.- 
oi; t'le t^oulherly .side of licuver ave- 
nue, having' a frontage on said Hea- 
ver :p-inur of Forty ( 10) •Vet an! ev- 
. tendinir bick therefrom a (lii,i.nv-e of 
■ I'ne l-.uiuired twenty 'i-"'» '' 
^Xov] \,i'.i:(\ :tnd 
\. id;h tlir(..;j.'hoi)l 



pi-c^ervirik' in «.ven 
S'dfjetl to ihc i*e 



;<orv::l ion,'; and e::rcptiort.s contained in land rf .Mrs. Emma liur.-t 



to tfiK- 

prior convryaroe.s. H.ivinq: crectOfli aortlurn line of l^riphton 8t:eet; 

tticicon u two-stor> frame dwellJiiffj ihiE ace alonjr said Brighton street 

^hou.^e with atti<-. ^; \, - i \vesivurdi> .s-venly three (7".) feet 

.Ikinfr the .sju, c prcmi8r.s uhichito line of innd of C. C. Noss, the pince 

J William K.-H.ut. .Jr., et ux, by vheirjof befrinninji. - 

.^Miaed dated June 2G, 1P13. ami record- i Ard havinir errrted thereon'a fotiTr 



!4S 



tlv" 



ed i!i Df.d Hook 2:J8. pa^'o :^:>7 . i^:,;.- brick build hiic kno-.vn 
xrantfd and vouvcycd vnlo Artc.ur H. i ..T^fjo.^ic Theatre llui!d=ng. 
I'erder. ai by rrf. rr-nro to whi.h t'lr-j V.-'wr the .s.nM!f- pre'>i=::e.s conveyrd 
s.iPie will more fuMy and at lar,'e ai)-|'.o said .^ia ie:-tic Tb. .itre ^'oinpany' Uy 
P«''»'"- ' , |<!.-rd^.or Alfred C Hurst ot ux. In "deed 

Se. zed ai.d taken .n execution tts the .j.t/cl . I ulv :!0. I'jor.. und recorded in 
property or Arthur H. rend"'-. ;.t the \)^^(\ Hcok Vol. L'l-V pagr 216; also 
suit of the State Capital Saviny.s ami^lerfl of \V. Frank \^orkman bv de.-d 
Loan A8.sociation. ^ ! datrd October Gth. 1!KH?, and reeord- 

J. G. Marshall, Attome>}^ jod in Deed Hook Vol. lf)JKpage 46:]; 

^O- ^- ' al<5o deed of Fred Marquart datc<I 

Also, all right, title, interest and October 6th. 1906. and recorded in 



claim of defendant of, in and to all 
those two parcels or lots of land sit- 
aaie in the First Ward«of«the Borough 
of Beaver Falls, CountJ- of Beaver, 
and State of Pennsylvania, being lots 
.numbered thirty-five (35) and thirty- 
six i?.6) in Henry T. Reeves'^ plan of 
lots in said Borough, and together 
bounded and deicrbed as follows, U»- 
wlt: 

On the north by Vine alley; on the, 

-ooat by lot nombored thirty-fonr (84 ) 

tai same plan; on the sooth by Viae 

alley, aiid aa^ wort by Soe^ atreot 

aUey, and lot nnmbarad thirty-flvo 

iU), hatiBff forty (40) feet on Vtaie 

jitiaat aad axtandinff badi ^Mrafron 

'■''ti «9mI vIMi abovt aavanty-fhe (7$) 

JM*, iMM «r teas, to Vtao allay, aad 

mxtMti mh • thraa 

M, bavtef aa ftMt on Vtee 

■avfliiF a nask of ei^ikjr- 



ttiose two certain parcels ot lanA sit- 
uule i:i the First Ward of tho *Bor- 
oujri) of Ainbri<lge, Beaver ClBnty, 
Pen r.sy Ivan ia, being parts of loij|luro- 
be»-ed four hundred live (405)i hifAni->' 
I'Vidre Lund Company's plaBl,ae!blM« 
ly described as follows: v" 

r"''- r. •.-■,.. .-.'I. '.If at a point 
'•:•.* t.:i» side of ' Park Road It 
•nr? li.nc bot—ron lots nui ._^ 
hun-ire.J ::vc .'405) R.nd f Oar lxtt*4|ef^ 
ii\ (J'.»f?): iliencc eastwai^lj^ ak>n? 
said (iividin.' lin; 127.6 fleet tos toren- 
ty TiKiL alhy: thence stMitifvaKdly 
.;'iitiir said aley 20 feet to s'pest; 
thence on.nAvajdIy by line panllfel V'ith 
rhav'.e^r Klreet. I'J^J.oT feet to Pferic 
llo.ii!: the;::e northwardly aJoajf Park 
lir.r.il L'l'.'lo feet ;'• beginning". 

biLcd. Lcbiiiiiing at a point on 

the e:i.stcrn s de of Park Road ftt di- 

vuiir.;: line b'^twcen lots nuRilwxed 404 

I id 4(i."»: licence eastv.-ardly along oaic 

• iivithi.ir line lii.Ol feet; theinet north- 

.-.inl.y 7 feet to iihe southen line of 

;ir>~i above described, parcel; thoiice 

oy the last i.ientToned line 'waatwraid- 

]y C-'..r)T tVet to Park Road; thance 

.Mar-sball. one hundred fm.-1eon! southwimiiy .;ilong Park Read 7.1t» 

r."'- In ;i |)..i!it: t'lrr - ■ .st-j ''''»■•' to lu-j'inning.' Having oraeied 

thereon n t v. c -story brick dvdlinig ot 
<i:v rx-'i-is. t>-iih, cemented cdlsu" and 
slali- roof. 

.Sr>ized v.nd tulcen in execution u the 
;>ro|M-rty »' Lizzie M. rxewton, at the 
suit tif r.(il»«':i K. Newton. 

H' '. .^iornsoii. kcadi r & May, " 
.•\ltoriiev.s. 

NO. 10. 

Ai.so. uii r.^'iit. title, interest anci 
(duiai of d«. fendant of. in and to ali 
tout cci*taiti tract of land situate in 
vi# Tov.ny,hip of _ ilriglstoit nov. 
ilri(l«:cvvaU;r Borough. Cour&iy. c: 
!;i;.v..r. an;i :>tate of 1; ansyivania, bi - 
mg part oi" cut I»:.. n;.inbcj-ed 1!&3. lu 
il;e oti^irral p?rfn of out lota -in the 
{Jojxmgi; of He;;\ tr. Hounded as fol- 
'lOAK; Ue;ricii:ntr ui a- poinC pn j 
JiJprijifc L'ii« ,:ii coiaer of lands of T. 
Fov.ler; U'*-nce uoith by Spring^lane 
J-1 ;-:: t.ie».i-ee Most, 275 f eet %> Semei: 
*•( Fan.ir.'^ iune; thence by. Fannera 
laiu- riouth 8H de;:rees east, 101J5 f<et 
tea iioKt; iieuce south 24 1-8 ckfrces 
east. J&O feet to a post; tiMM by 
hind of Fowlcr,south 6K l^jkfrees 
west, 'jv feet to place of hegtealng» on 
which is erected a six toonM^ foame 
d\vellincr> 

Seized arid taken in exacfOi^ ^aa -the 
property of Lily Grace StMpir tt-the 
suit of Joseph L. HolvM^ «•#' ^ for 
U8e of \'eme C. McCoUoapk : ^ ; 

Joseph L. Holmes, A.tl(nllHV< 

NO. U. 

Also, all right, tiUa, ilfeMMt. aad 
claim of defendant of, ill aiil Ip all 

that certain parcel, piaoi # Hi^ of 

land situaU in the BoraHpii iNft- 

ver, formerly Towaaida tf^^Stpili^* 



<'oiint\ ol llri'vcr anil St.itc of I'onn- 
• Nvaviia. l-ounded :«.iid devrribet! a.« 
ToUowf. to- A it: 

llcfrinninf; on tlie iiorthem line o\' 
Brirliton .-rtroet :'n.l li.e (urnor of 
land Ol" I", f. No'j.'i; \ hence nv'rtlr.v :ird- 
Iv alonj.' land of mid ('. C. Nots and 
U. 11. 

!':;» 

.vaiijiyoaliin.;; laiui d' au.il K. H. M:it 
-1k:1I. .■•i..t;' tune .i'..! t \enty '.vc one 
iiuiulrcdt iv ii;;».J-"') 1't 1 1 to a poH'.t »»n 
'ie.c iif l;.!.ii of .J. .1. \VicIch;;n-«; 
t!:< lii-e .-I'.iltiv .'. rdly ;i 1 on jr lir.r 
of Ian I of.f. J. \Vichl-;;iin and J. !''.i.«<'V. 
fifty-lour ami one tiritb (."'i.!) iV»-i 
to a noint; thcnre north\ve.«t-.v.;i<i!y 
.■;e\en .md nir.elei n liiindro(l;ii.»; (7.1;)^ 
feet to a point; thence southwardly 
•4i'- handre<l (IfiO) feet alnnsr line of 



The cxl.ibitii.". of jivo stock i- tak- 
ing very delinitc fonv. and Overflow 
exhibits arc already fores liado.ved by 
the great number of in<|uiries re- 
ceived. The countr>'s best blooded 
and highest priced stock of all kinds 
will be .«h.pwn here and the exhibition 
of poultry v.ill prcbably prove to be 
the grevcest ever gathered together in 
tlie St;.le of i'cnnsylvania. And then 
just to iriv? the big «h.ow the proper 
TH-entieth Century touch, there is go- 
iaj; to be an exhibition of not less than 
IMi autos representins' the 1017 m«^- 
els of the big;rest ii.uuufactuic.ii. ^ 
Think well jover this and prepare tg| 
visit the Erie E.xposition week of Sep- ' 
tember 18--::. —adv. i 



At The Colonial 



ture- 



(Continued from Pajre Tivei ' 

life and all the ^rood th'ncr.^ in 
tiie world, is cleverly and convincing- j 
ly po^tra^x^d. t ' 



"Naked Hearts** 

".Vakid Hearts," a Hiucbiixl p'.-.cto- 1 
niay ndaptecl from Lord Tennyson's, 
beautiful pocn, "ilaud," will be the 1 
ittr.iction at the Co'onia! Theatre,' 
Heaver Falls, Friday, Sept. I. An nil | 
star cast including Zoc I lech. Houg- j 
las (lomird. Francclia Ilillinrton and 1 
Jack liolt arc "oi'iirri in- tiii.'^ fb.an»i i 
in;r heart interest . ,;.. wf i. c - • , 
■. ■•.'M-\- of true love. 



wnic.i v.'U be Fh.owi-, 
le.-.vcj Falls. Satui- 



(M> 



(») 



fMii 



la Vtet atlaf , aad 
iMtf (40) «i«l « 
fkan 



an<^ 
Deed Book Vol. 204. page lo5; also by 
deed of Fred Marquart, by deed dateil 
Julv nth .,1906, and recorded in Deed 
Book Vol. 211, page 2e«. 

Seized and taken in execution as the 
property of the Majestic Tbeatrr=Conn- 
pany, of Rochester, fa., a corporation, 
at the suit of Adam Kominan, for 
use of the People's Savings Bank of 
Pittsburgh, Pa., now for use of Bea- 
ver Trust Conipai&y. ' 

Moorhead it MarahaU; Attorneys. 

NO. 7. „ 

Also, all right, title, interest and 
claim df defendant of, in and to all 
that certain piece, paivol or lot of land 
aituate hi Ambridia, Beaver County, 
PmaayWaaia, being' lot anmbraed one 
hnndrad forty-one (141) hi plan of 
AmMdgt, reeordtd in Raeorder'a Of 
flee in the aforaeaki GouBty of Boa 
var ia Plan Book Vol 1, parea 210, 
ate, booadad and daaeribad as followi, 
to-wit: Bagioidaff at a poiat oa the 
aoalarly iMa afPlaik Raad la laid 
flM, alMir (fO) ftat iaallnraidly 
from thflatatMetioB of lUid stroet 



County of Beaver and Bll|p^l§|lpni- 



sylvania, boiag lot 

plan of loU eallad Omtimk. tha 

same heins raeordid fm' 

Office, BMKter, Pia„ la Hk 

l.page tt^iaidkl 

of 60 fact oa 

tendfaig back ihrnHmik 

140 feet to a twastir ~ 

ad oa the aofth hf, 

the east by lat 

plan, sad on fhr iMPl 

foot Uley, aad at #1 

Biuniwiad Itt, 

Is artelad a 

iag hovai. 



"One A. M." 

♦^""n.arlep Ch;i['iir. 'n hi.- hitofit eon-- 
• ' « >iie A. .^ 
(oio.i.;. 

J;t>, .'^opt. 2. ;i"esentF on the screen a i 
!ai:;i nun.bcv of ll.ir.;.;? that he duij 
;'"* le;irn a*. rnrrfsponr'.''n';e •^rhoc'. i 
It is ratiier a well kr.'),\n i.ict that i 
.>'. i-. (*!iapiin 's a your.?' i)C!-.>on of the | 
mo.st extreive sobriety, but "One A.; 
.M." leads one to believe that some! 
time in his life Mr. Chaplin "ha."! ob- i 
starved sctnieone who dnink. Hut we 
can lay aside, the question of where 
Chnplin got his dramatic material — 
the certainty is that he got it. It 
may be left to the judgmen of fasticfi- 
ous public whether or not Mr. Chaplin 
knows about those wierd fantasies 
that sleep in bottles and awake in 
glasses. The story dealt with Chap- 
lin's adventures in the home of a 
bachelor friend, whose hobby is col- 
le«tinfr stuffed animals, is itself excru- 
tiatingrly funny, but when combined 
with the art of the comedy star it 
becomes a continuous laugh. 

» ^ : ■ 



'• mmmm i n ii n ioii 

[4 > IW Tour Nan Ball Bm 




ALEXMUDRIK 
Mnrdynt Tdkr 



71 Jfow Talk Ava., 

iummm i mnum t i 



■t mm iii m i mum i 



fltaCDIAN BBO& 



it mmnm i m i mn ti 



FIRST ANNUAL 

MOTORCYCLE 



# 






Junction Park 

■ ■ - " . ^ 

SATURDAY All 

AUGUST 4U 

Races Start at 2:30 p. N. 

Under Auspices of the 

narley-Davidson Motorcycle Club 

OF ROCHESTER, PA. 

White Bros., Promoters 

6-BIG EVENTS-6 



Events. ..>.-.*- Motors 

1st — 5-niile Professional Race; three prizes; 30-30 W in. 
2nd — 5-mile Amateur Race; thi-ee prizes; 30-50 cu in. 
3rd — 10-mile Profesioiial Raee; three pr^^cs; 30-50 cu. ia. 
4th«-2-mile Bicycle Race; two prizei; Optn to AD. 
3th — 5-mile Sidecar Race; tlu-ee prizes; OptB to- AI. 
6th — 15-mile Professional JEUce, three prizes; 30-50 cu. in. 

AH races to be run under the rules of the Federation 
of American Motorcyclers. 

The following: Speed Kings will ride in these events: 

L. KEYS L. CHRIST R. BACON H. D. IMMEL 

A. G. SCHMIDT E. McCALL G. BLACK 

Also other well known riders. 



This Will be the Greatest Speed 
Event Ever Held in 
Beaver County |: 

fldmlsslontoPark, ■ 256, 

- ~ ^ - 7 * ' " ' " '■ III' ,1- ■ !■ I ■■■! 

^'oii ; IT AiwMvs \V<»l(()iM(' at lIu' P:u:k 

J. C. SH KTTERLY, Lessee and Manager 



/ 



J 



t 



I 



JHOMPSON'S 

THE STORE FOR MEN AND BOYS 

New is tlie Time te Orier Year 

Fall Suit. to Measure 

Or Sdect Year' 

READY-TaWEAR-SUIT 

New Gosdt Ready. New Fall 
Hate, SUiti, Nedtwear. CSwM 
ia oil Lert Iheai Over: . 



John P. Thompson 



ItM 



IP" 



wm 






\ , <o ■ ■ « ■ ^ ■■ 




> \.t6S 



.t^' 



x'^w 



*' ' 



w^-- 



\ 



r 



a'' *" 

4 



SPECIAL LABC^ PAY EDITION 

I ■ ) 






*x 



m^m^3T^ 





^ 



OFFICIAL LABOR PAPER 



ISSUED EVERY FRIDAY 



VOLl ME 2. M MBER 4. 



HKAVKK. PA.. FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 1. 1916 



ONE DOLLAR THE YEAR. 



Se 



CONGRESS MOVES TO 
HALT RAILROAD STRIKE 



Administration Bill (iives Men 
EiKht-Houi Day and Ten- 
Hour Pay. 



RAILROAD CHIEFS ARE 
OPPOSED TO PROPOSITION 



With Iho fompU'lion of the Ail- 
minislration's railway wajce bill on 
ThurMJay. and il.s approval h\ rresi- 
(lent Wilson «)n the om- hand and tlu- 
l>rothcrhoo<l prt'.sid«>nt.s on the other 
hand, hi'lirf that a Ktrikc will l>c 
uvert«'<l has jjrown stroiij-:*-!- in olTirial 

circles. 

A.s yi't no assurances to this ef- 
fect have heen t'iven by tlrt broth- 
erhotxl presidents. They wcr*' in con- 
ference with President Wilson Thur.s- 
(lay afterniM>n. Pri'sident Wilson call- 
ed their uttiMition to the present le^r- 
i.slation and argued that if it shall 
not have been actually cnactecl by 
Saturday nijfht it will have gone far 
cnoujrh to show that Congress stands 
ready to meet their denian«i.s, and 
urKcd as a patriotic duty that they 
rescind their strike order. After the 
conference it was announce*! at the 
White House that the representatives 
had "Kiven no a.ssuranco of any kind." 

I.ater, in a hearing before the Sen- 
ate Committee on Inter-State Com- 
merce, Mr. llarretson. president of the 



his strength In- threw out his arms, 
lowi-rcd bis j-yes to the crowd ;m<l in 
a low voice askcil "can I faic it?" 
and dropped into his chuir. 

.Not a person in the room mov«(I for 
several seconds. Mr. (.Jarrctson re- 
li«^ved the .situation by risiriK from his 
chair an«l leaving the chamber. 
Will KuKh Bill 

Representative Atiainson of tleor^ia 
made public the bill which has the 
Administration hafkinir, iininmiieinjr 
that the Democrats had dptcriiiiried to 
l)rin>r this before the Houst" by special 
rule this niorninir, and thiit ,it i,'- ex- 
pected it will b«' pa.s.sod by 4:."l<t this 
j'.fternoon. Mr. .\daiiist»n saitl he did 
not expe<-t any material opposition to 
the passage of the unasure. 

This bill pr:ietic;illy jrntnls evtry- 
thin^r the railway brotherlioixls have 
denianded. It makes eijrht hours a 
standard day'.s work for ni«*n enKJnr<'d 
in ojH'rations of trains, after Decem- 
ber 1, i;»H;, and |»rovities that they 
shall receive for this eij?ht hours' 
wyrk..no.t less than they are now re- 
ceiving for ten hours' work. 

It provid«'S a wane coiiiniission to 
investijrate the operations of the act 
during a perio«l of ni>t less than six 
(Continued on I'at^c P«i>r.) 



Order of Kwilway Conductors, said 
that enactment of un eiifht-hour day 
law by Congress would be acceptable 
to the men and. therefore, a ".satis- 
factory settlement." such as would 
make it pos.sible for the brotherhood 
heads to rescind tiie onler for a strike. 
Out of the nine-hours' arRument 
two facts stoml clearly in the estima- 
tion of all affected parties. Congress 
alone can prevent a .strike, and the 
public eventually will foot the bill 
for an eiirht-hour day with lU-hours' 
pay. which the trainmen demand. The 
railroad executives and the shippers 
insisted that the strike order at least 
should be postponed, and the four 
brotherhood chiefs declare<l w ith ecjual 
vehemence it couUI not Ik-. 

All sides apparently wore more or 
less satislietl with the hearinn. which 
had uiven them an opportunity t«) lay 
their cases*Wfore°the public. 

A dramatic .«cene. in which .Mr. (lar- 
retson was the central figure, broujrht 
the hearing to a climax last nijrht. 
shortly before the takinjr of testi- 
many cIoscmI. 

(iarretson Kxplaini* 
Throughout lh«' day nuMubers of the 
committee at different times had 
asked the four brotberhotwl h-^ads if 
they wen' powerless to stop a strike, 
save by ivportinjr a satisfactory set- 
tlement to their men. The i|uestion 
invariably was evaded, by sayinp that 
Mr. (larretson would explain the sit- 
uation Ijeforc the hearinR closed. 

For almost an hour .Mr. (Jarretson 
kept the crowd lauprhinjr with (4uaipt 
expressions and humorous stories. 
When he had only three minutes left 
in which to speak, his brother presi- 
dents urped him to an.s\ver the ciues- 
tion of power tft postiwne a strike. 
He suddenly became serious, .stood 
erect, grazed at the ceiling; for a mo- 
ment and then lie^an to speak. 

"We h«ve l>een ask<Ml," he said slow- 
ly, "if we huve the power to defer the 
strike. It has been called f»r next 
Monday. I have the power to defer 
that date in my oriranization, but in 
the other orjfanizations the situation 
is dfferent. The hends of the other 
brotherhoods cannot ^ call back the 
strike order. 

His Gethsentane 
"But here is w-here I stand. For 
years my men have trusted me. When 
I stood before the President the other 
nifrht and he asked me if this could 
be done, I found my Gethsemane. To 
the men who have made me the reci- 
pient of all these thinjfs, I owe my 
first obliRation. I can put it off, but 
if I did without i^aininR a satisfac- 
tory settlement, there \^-ould lini^r in 
the minds of the men who trusted me 
thouirhts of treachery. If T°>ut it off, 
across a fair i*et6rd of .30 years wbukl 
be written the word 'traitor.' " ^ 

For a moment the witness piused 
and seemed to peer far out over the 
heads of the crowd. Then tears came 
into his eyes and rolled down his 
cheeks. He started to speak but 
choked. Apparently iiiinmoning^sdl 



^ 



Hundreds of new Fall .Switinjfs and 
OSrercoatinRs from which you may .se- 
lect yours. Well tailored — there are 
none better, and in the inaide pocket 
you will also find The Labtd. You 
oupht to look for that. Tlie Kay 
Tailors, Heaver Falls- tliiifs the 
place. — ailv. 



LABOR NEWS' GROWTH 
MOST SATISFACTORY 



Paper is Making Rapid .SIrid«*M in (he 

Way of SecurinK .Vdditional 

New Businewt 






The management of Tlio l-;d»or 
Sews may well be parcbmoci if it takes 
particular pride in this, the Labor 
I>ay edition of I'.UC. While not as 
larire as .some of the special editions 
which have been issued by the daily 
papers in the valley, it nevertheless 
compares favorably froni a news and 
typographical stiin<lpoint iiml is well 
lille«l with advertisinjr fniin The most 
pr«)nunent husines.s and nmnufactur- 
ing concerns within its tr rritory. 

The LalM)r News is tcnliiy a better 
paper from every Ktun<l|ii»iiit than at 
any previous time sinc<^ it Vas start- 
ed, .something over on«^ yciirago. .Not 
only is the valley niercluint hecoining 
more convinced of its av: lilnhility Jis | 
a- first-class atlvertisinjr iieilium each i 
week and afTiniLs that r(»iiviction by' 
usinK liberal spar*- with regularity,! 
but the subscription li.st is growing] 
daily. Not a day pas.M's hut that 
several new subscribers are turn- 
ed in. .Menil>ers of the various lo- 
cals throujfhout the valley arc inter- 
eted in the success of The I .;il>or News, 
and accordinply work to «:et new 
subscribers. As a result, the list has 
thrown rapidly, and it now luis a lar^je 
circulation. 

The paper al.so sturtds w <'ll with the 
employer of labor. The ol<l idea that 
a labor paper, to rightly represent the 
workingmen, had \o fix^U the em- 
ployer on all occanions. h:is been dis- 
pelled by this paper, the citiployer be- 
ing KYven a 8(|uare <leal, :i.s well as 
the worker. 

As is invariably the ciise when a 
labor paper is run honestl\ in the in- 
terest of the wage earner. The Labor 
News has had to combat those op- 
posed to organized labor. Hut the 
management has kept its hands clean, 
and believes that it has eained the 
admiration of many of th** employers, 
who may not agree with the princi- 
ples of orgrfnizefl labor for which 
the paper naturally stands. 

It is the aim of the manairement of 
The Labor News to make the paper 
better as time passes; to make it of 
more value to the worker; to espouse 
his cause and to make it a power in 
the Heavei'Tallev. , 



To ipake good clothes rF*quires skill- 
ed tailors — the kind the Kay Tailqr.*, 
Beaver Falls, Fmploy. T.ook for the 
Label, — adv. 

'4 i , ■ 




R. F. KROSS 

.Secretary of the Central l^bor Ulllmi and Chairman of the 
lommittee on LalM»r Dajr Arrangements. 



••• 



Labor Day Program 



u^&ass_Si; 



Junction Park, Modday. Sept 4 
.Xn'KRNOON SPORTS AT 'l.'M) OCLOCK , 

lOOVARI) DASH. FOR MF.N 

Fir.-t Pii/.o $:',.()(> Hat 

I'oiiated liy .1. .\. iJutler A: .'^l)n, i;.:iver 1 iIIs-Kik-Ii. >t.-r. 

Swoiul I'ri/e Aiilo Clock 

I 'onatcd by Anders«m Klectric Co.. N- .\ liri^htoii 

Third Prize .si..-,() Shirt 

.( l><»nat«'d by Vincent .Sakr.iida. lie; .cr I" .-ills. 

Fourth Pri/o 1 lb. Box (Vntral L'ni'H Smokiny Toluicco 

Donated by A. C. ."^nmvden, IJL'L' .^-venth Vve., lU-aver I'allK. 

KMIVARI) DASH. FOR »OYS 

Fir.'^t Pii/A' . . ." Pail- Pant.s 

lionated \\\ .lohii I'. Tlioii!|)>()n, I'.eaver Falls. 

Second Piizt Fla.sh \A^\\i 

^ J)on;itif| l>. VNOlf Kb'ctrir Co.. Keaver J";ills. 

10O.\ ARD DASH FOK (;iRLS 

F'ir.st Piize ( ;ol(I Hai- Pin 

I)onatcd by I'hillips, the Jeweler, New Itri^hton. 
Scronrl Pii-'.c. 1 ( lallon Icr Croam 

I'lMiati'd li\ C;i;,ipl)<'ll l«T ( I' 11 Co.. |J«-;iver F:ill>. 

Third Prize .1 Dozen Po.st Caul Phoh».s 

Donated b\ Teichmaii ."-^t . iio, Hf.-iver l":ills. ' 

WATF:R .>1KL0.\ KAII.Nf; contkst 

Fir.'^t Prize .S2..'.(i Ca.sh 

Donated liv Cobini.'il Tbeatn-. .^. (l<" ..iinan. .M^rr.. Mi-aver Kails. 

Second Pi ize SI. DO Woith Ticket.s 

Donated bv (Irand TIk.i'c'. Ileaver lalls. 

HALF -Mn.E RA( K, OPE.N 

First Pri;:e .S^.DO Imlnella 

Donated by Kwin;; Dm .. .\'<'\\ nrightnn. 

Secoml Prize (loid Watch Pol) 

Donal'd bv llerkm:in'>. Heavt-r Falls. s- 

Third Prize " Dre.-.s Shirt 

Donated by ,Ic)hn A. .I.nk.^' ii. .\ew Hrighton. 

three-i.e(;(;fi)Race 

Fir.st Team Prize J .Two P>oxe.s Ci^far.s. 

Donat.il bv .1: 11. I.vtic, and .Model ' an'l/ Co.. D.-aver F.ilL-. 

Second Team r.ize,.' .^l.ODHVorth Tickets. Kach 

Donated b\ .A Ihafnhra TbeatP', .1. trub, .Mgr., Mejivi-r Falls. 

LADIES' HA LI THROW 

P^ir.st F^rize, . . Smoked Shoulder 

Df»nat< «| by ( "harU".; .'>teinl eld, Deaver Falls. 

Second Prize .' Fnilnella 

Dimaled Itv Parkinson & Miller, Weaver Falls. 
Third Piize ." ." . . 1 (Gallon Ice Cream 

Donated bv ("atnpbell Ice roain Co., Heaver Falls. 

SHOE STRINC; RACE V, 

Ffi-st Prize Pocket Knife 

Donated hy Harry Hohertsil Deaver Falls. 

Second Priz(» ."......" f^ook 

Donated bv Hummel k Hetzler. Meaver Falls. 

LADIES' NAIL DRFVLNti CONTE.ST 

Fir.st Prize. «k>.et Kmbroidery Sci.s.so^rs — 2 pair 

Donate<l by C. 1". Kramer Neu.s'vDepot. New Hrighton. 

Second Prize Suit Ca«c 

Donate<l by Walter .Miller, Heaver Falls. 

Third Prize Ten Re.scrved Seat Tickets 

Donated bv l.vceum Theatre. H. Hanauer. .Mgr.. Heaver Falls. ^ 

ILASE BALL (iAMK AT U):'M) A. M. "? ^ 

Ijo.x Cigars, donatefl bv W. W. Feils. .\e\v Hrighton. 

(;reasei> pk; contest 

Pig donated by \\' . H. Hoyce, Superintendent of Traction Coinpany. 

(irand Sciumble for ri.OOO Marbles in front of (Grandstand 

Free Exhibition hy (apt. K. I). Hlondell- WORLDS CH AMIMO.V 
.SWnniKK— W.\TKR C.ARMVAI — Near l»ark at 7:30 I'. .M. 

BAM) concert afternoon AND EVENIN(; 



BROTHERHOOITTRAINMEN 
SHOW THEIR GRATITUDE 



.\ I'niorv .M;i!i wimt.- iitiion luadr 
I'iothing. Tin- Ka\ T;nii>r> i:u.ii"aiitii' 
til satisfy you in <\fr\ j-i-.-imm! :ii \ouf 
I'.ill .Suit or 0\.r<(i;it . (io.xl clotlH' 
with the l.ahfl, at n-a^oriabli |irice.-<. 



-o 



BIG CELEBRATION AT 
ilUNCTION MONDAY 



Freedom Lodue VIW, II. of R. T. 

.•^ends (onuratulatorx J^A'tter 

and Check to News. 

E\ PR USS \ Vmi K(l \TI( )N 
OK WORK PAPER IS l)OIN<; 



hMititr. 



I" 



ari'i iiianav'ei.-, of rjcuspa- 
11- it! iliinir. come in for a 



The r«imiiiL' I.aiiur Day ci-hbration 
at .lutution Dark on .Moiida\ iio\'., 
|irMini^<'.< to Im- tlio iiio.-t not atili' 'o\ or 
lii'M by till' riiioii> ot ttif r.o.ivt!' \':il 
ley. and it' the \\ cat lie|-ni;iii will only 
do lii.s part, tliei-r will Ito tli«ni.>and.- of 
workers and their laiiiilio.-, at thr 
paik. ready tor a day's oiitini.'- and 
ea;;^'r li> w ;tne>> the Imo inotrraiii of 
sport.-- olfi'i'eil for tlinr .imiiMiiMiit . 
[Iji- jj^ograni in full appeai> on tlii.s 
paue. logctlicr with the names of till' 
donor.-- of till- \nix li>t <>!' prize.-- 'I'lie 
\>\\z ball uanie take.-- plaec in the 
Miorniiig; there will be b.'ind concerts 
holh afternoon and <vcnitiir. and Cap- 
tain inoiidcll. ehanipioii .-w iinnii'r of 
th«- world, will etitertain the crowd 
with his skillful a«|uatic feats in the 
afternoon, and a water carnival will 
he heUI in the evt-nini;, featured by 
the blowing U|» of the Anu-rican .sail- 
ing ship, "William 1'. Frye." 



DacriiEitiiooos hold 

MEETING THURSDAY 



'Men nnricially Notified lu .''Strike un 
Mondax Inlens (MherwiNe 
Advised. 



•«1 



mighty .--iuht inon- cundiitijiatioM tli.an 
pnii.sc. hut tlii-re .ii". fortii!iat<l\ , oc- 
»asions. when their h* art> ai<' warmed 
.inii ihrir audntion- L'iv<'n a lioost. 
i'iii' i'laiKiivnifn' o;' 'ri,.' l..ii)(ir News 
I.-, in i'<'i<i|)t of a litliM- tins Wffk, 
(■"•pi odiicfij liidow. u liu'h is cerla'niy 
most irr.'itlf) iiii^. a>idc from the mnrit- 
l.ir> (Kn.^idcration <-ont:im<'.| ti .said 
Ictt.r. D is <'Vidoi\t that iiieinlMr> of 

i.odt'. \. . .J.;. I'., of i:. r., thorouuh- 

l\ .ipp!i( la'' the fflurt- of The Labor 
.New .s inaii.iromrnt is ihu'KinL' to fur- 
ther tiie «. iu.se of lln- union nn'ii. and 
this .appreciation was iiot only ex- 
pr< ssi'd in wonls. luit i i iifck accoii- 
pai^ied the litter. 11:. it thf ntanaire- 
ii'<.fil of Tlif l.ahor .N.'ws feel.s grate- 

' 1 iml i, to the ii;--n)lM-rs of I'l-oo- 

'i' m l.odire \<i. :;l':; r.rotherhotxl of 
K.'iihv.'iv Traii'imn. ; Of - without -a> - 
iiiir. 'Iho let'er f(i''o\".s: 

. . liodi. sl»M-. I'a., Autju.-t li*) 1 It;. 
To the Officers ..f The Heavei \ alley 

Labor News, llftavcr, Pu. 
I>ear Sirs sin»i Hrot -.ers: ^ 

ApprnciutniK the ,^reiil kOo«' vour 
paper has he«»n to the iWllrond men of 
this community, Frr«H'i>m Dodge No. 
•"._':: of the IJrotli»rhc m| of Railway 
Tr.niijiicn. ;it its r•^:•u ir meetinir last 
"\< II 111 J.'. issue«| a .vai' iiit for twenty-. 
\\\>- (.rJ.").0(i) (jo! .ir.v |i.i\able to iho 
b.abor .News, it is b<r<uitli en«los<d, 
alonir with out thiiiik- and v»«ry Ik'.-«i 
wishes for .i pro-porou.- futuro ff»r 
you an i your j-ap* i. 

D V. as also •tecii'il that .\i' could be 



J...w,s Hah. Freodom. ^^as taM-,., ,i ,, as al.so .lecL!. ■ 1 t Hal .^ •■ couM t>e 
to Its capa.-ity yestrrday by inembors ,,j. ^,,,,^,. ,,^^^y^^^,., j,, ,,„. ,,..,. ,,, ,, 
of the Ord.r o( iaiway « '•"•l-'"'-". ;,,,... ^,^ .„ oporatio.i with the l.u.-in..ss 

I ; •■i>l liiii-liiH >. i iif If .'I il v« M V I'.'iinioon. I ..... . 



Drotlierliirt"! of l{ailw.i> Tr-iinmeii, 



ji \\\ii< idvertiso. .-irid assi,-t in iiiak- 

ThTs~we~ 



ri.i n w u" iiiveri ise, .-iiid 

' = '-"l'"-'' ' "'■ '•"•• ••".^•" '••"^' •'■-;. la^ vou! naper a .-^uece.s.s-. 

and till- lliot liot hood ot 1 ,(« omot ivi- .,j^,,.,,,,,j ,,, ,|,, 

Fnvm..'. :..d ia.ginomon. who had .n.-' . " _.^^,.,„^ -hank mi: v -m for vour pa.-t 
ojnb.ed n; joint un.on ...•...., on ■"«d I .^.,^j„ .,,„,,,„,,..„„,.,._,„,■, „.^,.„„j,,.,, 

.-lies and kind- 
am. 
I- raterri.ilU vour: 



i V, ori- otl'ii .ili 

' <i:iy. .Sop'. i;i 

•i.o moi-ii iiL' 



ssioii .mil 
ly notified, that, oti .\|on 
ber -Dh. .at <i o'ci.Hk in 
. unless tliey :iV otlier- 

w IS*' iiot'iiil by their l.ocai < li.iiiiii.iii. 

the sink, will take effect and all in.ii 

>•■•" ho iT-.ve'.Tcd hy tl'.e follow ing 

ruli's: 



L.tbor. md will best 
i;.--t Ml 'sonal ii'U.anl.- 



(;k<)i:«;|'; a. howi-:. 

I'ress .*<i-(rftar\;^ 



We hu> our Woolens diri'ct from 

tae iiiill.-. tliercbx i-limirml I'mr the 
iiiiddlem.in's (>rofit. These we "fash- 
ion into i-lntlles par e.vcellence. TheSi' 



i 1. N" "an ,11 road servieo in\iii\iir 

i in tin' "i.ki- nil! perfoini an\ ser 

I , , - ' .,' 

! vn-e ai;-!' 'lie hour set to strike, un i. . , ,, ,, .,., 

,, 111 II • . i , 'on into iinthes par e.vcellence. I hesi' 

'less be iia- .-ilready Im^'uii a trip .imli . i ■ i ■ , i r 

', . 1 ,.. .1 . I I,- ,i 1 clothes Im ar the l.ahel look for it in 

has aclua: \ left tin- ti-riiiiiial. It I He | i , ■ 

, "i r. .1 . II II 1 ba\ lailored cloihe.s. .mv. 

tram ha loft the tcriii'n.al lie w ill | 

eompleie 'III' trip and ihliver tin i-n- | 
and tr.ii.n at thr t-w' 



gin< 



run. orl I. \1HF.,^ fO CIN F .sl PrKK 

ti<'-u|) pom' if tied up umhr tli<' l:iw, | . 

afti'r wliiih he will pi'iforni im fur-. Tin- l.adn^' Aid .'^m loty 

until the clo.« of the .Mcfiodist |-!piscop;il chundi. of .Mid- 

• o.'id sfT , lani. will iri\< :i chicken supper on 

■ the ap- i Thursday evmnig, Sept. 11. at Kice's 

I Hall, .from fiv<' to nitu' o'clock. 

your letr.al rii'l t to slriko Those alf:»irs. which .are iriven by the 



I tlier s»rvii 
strike. .Men in other th:ifi 

i vice will jeave the service 

pointed ; 
.So fai 

there IS iio (lilfereric) 



of tin 



is concern' I. there is no dilfcrerice so<i<'t\ .it dillorent periods during the 

between .i Miail lr:un and fre.p'lit • ar. are looked forward to with 

train. Vou have identica ly, the s.-ime .rreat pleasure by many jietiple and 

ri^ht to refuse to pj-rform si'rvice on he indi<"atj,»)ns ;irr that the comin^r 

a mail tniin .'is y<*u have to refuse to -upper will be surcessful. i' not more 

(►erform service on ;i freiirht train. -i^ tliai^, on an\ previous occision. 

-A ) A 11- ft.,. in t\r\ utril/f. \t-tll l^fii.ti !IV1-*|'- ' ' . 



u. 



\ 



'i. ' Allmen on strike will keep awa;. 
from the (•'p'np;(ny's properly, exerp' 
.such men i.- are irsiuMi.itid ci'rt.ain 
duties to i»e perfi'rmeil l>\ authority 
of the orir.'iniz.i' 'Vis. 

.".. Kver> mail should underst.md 
that the hi'.- of the land must Im- 
i>lM'yed. A<t> of violence of an;, na- 
ture will not |te tolerated liy the jtr- 
^ranizations. 

4. Thr local n-presentativ' - will 
arranire for a hall f(H' meetinr pur- 
poses at all terminals, usin^r one of 
their own lodire rooms if .iv.-iilable. 
Immedia'ely after strike bei omes ef- 
fective ail men will asscmhle at th«- 
ball se'ureil for meeting [lurposes. 
When thus as.semhle<l an ^ork;an:7.ation 
will Ih' perfected hy the election of a 
rbairman. vice-chairman .ind .secre- 
tary. 

No p<'rson will be permitted to be 
present in the meeting: halls other 
than those wh«) are on strike, except 
I by permis.-.'<m of the asseiid)liiKC. 
(Continued on Pajre Two) 

Now, .N|r. I'nion Man, when* in Hea- 
ver Falls, stop in at the Kay Tailors 
and jret acquainted. The tnanaffement 
would be pleased to know you. — adv. 



» V 



<ourteou.- t reatinvnt. value for your 
money, a self-s.'iti.-^fied, well dressed 
feelinu, are the th ink's to be h.id at 
the Kay Tailors, Deaver Falls. We 
appreciate your piitronai:e. -;i(iv. 



A GOOD CHANGE TO HELP 



An exci'lleivt opporunitv for men in- 
terest in the .success of The Labor 
News to do the paper a irood turn is 
oiTered by means of the bin celebra- 
tion at Junction I'ark on Labor Day. 
There will be hundreds of union men 
on the jrround, many of whom are not 
sub.'f ribers to The Lat)or .News, and 
wh«»- would jrladly part with a dollar 
for a year's subscription, provided 
they were approached* If friends of 
the pap^r '.ill make it their business 
to solicit subscriptions on the day in 
ijuestion, devotinR a small part of 
their time durini; the day to the work, 
the rapidly jrrowinK list would receive 
a substantial boost. Think it over, 
telephone the Labor News office for 
a subscription blank book and then 
(JKT BUSY. 



% 



. rf^^ 



*., 



X- 






^•MWUC 



*«» 



1 ,., •' "' ■ 



M 4 



Page Two 



BEAVER VALLEY LABOR MEWS 



flipiitobT 1, If 1« 




j^f^JBi wrliBCMg i^ml 




BeaverTrust Company 



BEAVER, PA. 
Capital, $300,000 



This Bank Grows Because of Helpiiil Policies 

DEPOSITS AND TRUST FUNDS 

July 1, 1902 $ 242,187.19 

July 1. 1907 .\ $ 853,041.06 

July 1, 1912 $ 98.'S,771.2r> 

July 1. 1916 $1,416,542.06 

INTEREST PAID OX DEPOSITS & TRUST FUNDS 

July 1, 1902 to July 1, 1907— .'» years $ 29,301.62 

July 1, 19«7.to July 1, 1912—.'! yeiii-s 58,370.45 

July 1. 1912 to July 1, 1916—4 years 14.'i.l.")8.80 

Total, 14 years $2.'J2,H:J0.87 



OFFICERS 



U. S. Strou8s, 
C. M. Huffhes, 
A^new Hice, 
Fred G. Bruce, 
Chas. C. (iaiton, 
W. H. Harper. 



President 

- - - - > ice President 

Vice President 

Treasurer 

Asst. Treasurer 

Mfcr. of Insurance Department 



DIRECTORS 

U. S. Strou»> James Galey Afcnew Hioy 

J.'r. Leonard W. J. Mellon F. C;. Moorhead 

W. S. Moore J. R. Martin C. M. HuRhes 

llobert Ritchie J. W. Dougherty 



Report to Banking Commissioner June 30 

R K S U K C E S 

I^tanH and Securitit'H $1.0:i7.S7O..'it» 

LoanH and Socuniies. TruHt Ik-pl . . . .*»ai.8.'>."j.04 — $l..')ii9,72r».ftO 



Canh on hand and in ulhtr hanks. . . . nt2..'i*»1..1l 

CaHh on hand and 111 bank, Trust lum 1 1.Tr.O.lO— $ L'OT.ail.ll 



Real KHtate, I'umiturt', Fixtures and 

VauItM 

0%*erdraf t m 

Advances on Trust .\cn»iiiUM. . 



Total 



r>3,(>r»OI1 4 

429.7.3 

1.741.48 

$1,832,888.39 



LI A lULlTlES 



Capital .Slock $ .300.000.00 

SurpluM and I'ndividcd rrofils 114.067.48 

Reserved for I'neamed lnt<>re>«t. etc. 2.278.8r> $ 4U.346.33 

Depo«it»— BankinR Department . ..$ 8(i8.19.').44 

^ TniHt Department .',48.346.62— $M16,.=i42.06 



Total 



$1,832,888.39 




SAFETY DEPOSIT BOXES FOR RENT 



^ ^^fe ^^ag^^^^g^^ 



PROMINENT MEMBER 
OF LOCAL a42,B.R.T. 



The Labor News preaenti below a 
likeness of J. O. Rumberger, for four 
years president of Greater Pittibur^h 
Lodge No. 842. Brotherhood of Rail- 
way Trainmen, and a man who h«a 
always taken and still takes an im- 
portant part in railway brotherhood 
affairs. 

Mr. Rumbertrer was the first 
president of Lodge 842, and after 
HcrvinK four succcsaive yean, was 
elected treasurer, which office he held 
for one year, resiirninK on account of 
hpMinK the office of chairman of the 
Grievance Committee and LeRislative 
Representative. He is also an active 
ilnember of the United Railway Bro- 
therhood's ' Political Association of 
Allegheny county, and a niember of 
the Executive board of the "Get-To- 



»m»»»ini»»»»»»mmi i 




J. O. Rnmbercer 



> v%>-v w% wwvv^ 



'.v.v.w.;*iW^wmtt^» 



OUR NEW FALL 



FURNITURE-CARPETS 



ffether" oriranizution. The aim of thir 
orKanization is to extend the hand of 
brotherly love to all members of the 
kuil way Brotherhoods, and to impress 
upon those member's minds the fact 
thut "an injury to one is an injtiry 
to all." 

-itmther Kumberger has been a 
member of the B. of R. T. for sixteen 
years, and his advancement to the 
numerous hifrh offices which he has 
held has lieen caused by the fact that 

^ he has always b«»on on the job, ever 
ready to help a brother w^ho has been 
in hard lurk, ami because he has been 
honr.'^t . foarl;c;§8 and a faithful worker 
in thr cause of the B. of R. T. 

' "Mk Kummy," as Brother Kumber- 
Kvr is familiarly known by his friends, 
is :i MAN — coaUl more be said? 



The fedenil Workmen's Compensa- 
tion Art has been passed by both 
liouses of Conjrress and now only 
needs the President's O. K. to be- 
eonie a law. This much-deaired ]eg- , 
ifllation has been pendinpf*Tor ei^ht ^ 
years. The present law only pro- 
vides for those who are enffUfTMi at 
huzarrlous orrupations to all of the 
four hundroil thousand fetlcral em- 
ployi'.s. The bill provides that in raRO 
of (loath the widow slial! receive 'Ut 
\vr cent «)f the monthly puy and ten 
|)f*r c«nt additional for ea. !i depend- 
ent child under ••iphloon, .same to 
continue until death or nmarriajre. In 
tii.M- of injury. l»en«'tit.*: .sli;dl be at the 
rate of two-tliir'l.-^ the wau'es lost dur- 
irxK disability, with a iiiaxi:iiuni of 
S«><i.»>7 a month, and noi les.s than 
.S:i;i.:».'!. unU'.ss the emplovi-'s w.ijje is 
less than that amount, in. which case 
lie shall receive full |>ay. 




: j»n»»»«»t»»»>»»»» > »»«:{»»»»«jr 



COMPLIMENTS OF 



c/Hayi's ^staarant 



r 



ROCHESTER, PA. 



I take this method of expressinsr my apprecia- 
tion of the patronage accorded my rastaurant 
by the Utiion men of Rochester and vicinity. 
HARRY MAY, Proprietor. 



»»I»»»I»»I««»»»»»»»»»H»I»I»»» 



|H«m»»«»»H«»»»»»»»ii»»»m»» 

I OOMFUMENTS OF » 1 

HOTEL LINCOLN 

W. F. WORKMAN, Prap. - 

PENNSYLVANIA 21 



i i « i ii i iin»jHiniiiiii i iin { ni i »in»»»»m 



MHI 




^ 



And Upwards on household floods,- 
and other personal property. If 
you need money, do not hesitate to 
borrow from as, for our plaa of ro- 
imyment, our quick and efficient 
system of making loans, cannot be 
excelled, v^: 

Information chMrfnlly ^Tsn. . 
Write, call; or phone ns. 



JHVEI m 11 1 



0>r. SoT^h Am ft Twalflli 8C 

BEAVER FALLS. PA. 
Ben PiMM 244; & C PImm tTfl 

Open 8 A. M. to • P. M. 
If onday and Satoday UstU f PJL 



♦ 



'■'■■.'M*' 



Have arrived. Everything 
here to furnish your home 
complete. See our goods and 
get our prices. We can and 
will save you money. ^ ^ j* 



No War Prices Herc^as we Bought in 
Time to Save the Advance 



Paff Furniture-Carpet Co. 



i:U)0-i:J()2 Seventh Avenue 



III Beaver Falls, 



Pennsylvania \l\ 



: ::»8:i»i»:»»»»»»»»«t»»:«»»»»»»«««vt»»»»»«n»«H 



t;»»v»v,iit»»t «»t«» 



♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ 



■'\ 



tmitrntuuiiunumtt 



The Manager of The 

Colonial Theatre 



BEAVER FALLS 



"^T*. 



Takes advantairc of ithe opportunity afforded by this Special 
Labor Day Edition of The Labor Newa, to express his ap- 
preciation of the patronage accorded his house by the Union 
men and their families, and to assure them that he will en- 
deavor to merit a continuance of the high standard Which 
has been consistently maintained since he took diarge of 
the Cokmial Theatre. 

SAMUEL GOODMAN, Proprietor. 



■ / 



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ScpteMbtr 1, Iflf 



BEAVER VALLEY LABOR NEWS 



ll»iniiiiin»«»»»»»»»»n i »»»»ii ii »»» i n»i» iiii ii i « mm 



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THIS SPACE COMPLIMENTS OF 



Crockery City 



■IS- 



Brewery and 



Ice Company 



East Liverpool, Ohio 



\ 



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SERVICE PENSIONS 
NOT LIKED BY 



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The Southern Pacitic Railroad has 
warned employes that if they join the 
threatened strike for an eiRht-hour 
day, they will forfeit their pension 
riffhts, and Kditor Barry, of the Star, 

'That wuK to have been cfxpected. 
Every corporation thai introduces an 
'old uge pension' scheme does so with 
the reservation, clearly expressed 
that it may withdraw its proviuionB 
whenever it sees fit to do so. In other 
words, the employe never actiuiren a 
'vested rights' to be cared for in his 
old affe — it all depends upon his sub- 
servience and willinicness to submit to 
the rules laid down by his superiors 
for his Kuidance. 

"That is the difference between a 
real pension, such as the Typui^raph- 
ical Union, for instance, provides for 
its aged members, and the 'tin can' 
kind which has a nice strong: string 
tied to it and can be disconnected 
without consultinK the wishes of the 
supposed beneflciary. 

"One may work for twenty or 
twenty-five years with the temptinic 
bait of provision for his declining 
years danirlinK before his eyes, only 
to discover that on account of some 
infraction of rules or a desire to im- 
prove his condition by acting with his 
fellow employes, he is cut ofF^ from 
the promised benefits of lona and 
faithful service. I 

"No doubt tht service pension is a 
good thing in its way; but its real ob- 
ject is to enforce obcKlience and sub- 
servience by threat of its withdrawal. 
It is not a safe dependence for red- 
blooded Americans." 



MODERN METHODS PAY 



That the applicatioi of "safe and 
sane" methods in the banking business 
pays, is demonstrated l>y the success 
which has attended the efforts of the 
officers and directors of the Citizens 
National Hank of Monara to place 
this institution among th)> leading fi- 
nancial concerns of the Heaver Val- 
ley. Organized in 1901. th*> bank has 
enjoyed' a steady growth, until today, 
it boasts deposits of close to $280,000; 
resounce.s amounting to over $400,000, 
and surplus and profits of over $2fi,- 
•00. The officers are: John T. Taylor, 
president: John J. Allen, vice presi- 
dent; Mont D. Youtes, cashier; Waldo 
E. Mengel, assistant cashier. The 
Board of Dire<ior8 is composed of 
John T. Taylor, John J. Allen, J. Ilan- 
kin Martin. Louis Kleyle, A. L. Mc- 
Kibbin, Moht. D. Youtes and Alonzo 
S. Uatchelor. 



: |»»»»»»»»nn»mmmm»»»»» i i i i» 



is: 1109 Seventh Ave. 



KIRK & CLARK 






(NEW LOCATION) 



Beaver Fills is: 



Next Door to Engine House 



New Fall Goods 



\ M » Arriving Daily. Lowest Prices in the VaUe>' on ^ ^ | 

I Blankets, Comforts |l 
and Underwear 



WE CARRY A FULL LINE OF 

.. , . , ^ - .. ■ - • . '-' 

Rugs, Linoleums, Curtains, Wall 

Papers, Underwear, Dry 

Goods and Notions 

ALL AT LOWEST PRICES. 



t :s; 



<►<► 



XIRK & CURK 



,. "Whp Pap More?" 

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^v^-y>s^ ^^^^^^m ^,^^«^ 



WiUiam H. Benson 

BEAVER VALLEY'S LARGEST AND BEST STORE 



Dry Coods, Cloaks, Suits 



Millinery and Floor Ooveriogs 



DO NOT FAIL TO PAY AYISIT TO OUR NEW BARGAIN BASEMENT 



Ty 



There you will always find Staple Merchandise at a less price in the following: Bedding, 
Ginghams, Corsets, Wash Goods, Domestics, in fact a separate store in itself 



1125-27 Seventh Ave 



(v 



BEAVER FALLS, PA. 



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Page Four 



BEAVER VALLEY LABOR NEWS 



Sepetmber 1, 191< 



y" 



BEAVER VALLEY LABOR NEWS 

Publiahcd Each Friday by the 
BEAVER VALLEY LABOR NEWS COMPANY 

Near Third St. and College Ave. - • Beaver, Penn'a. 

■ ■ "t=^, — 

Entered as second-claM matter October 8, ltH5, at the poat office 

at Beaver, rennsylvania, under the act of Maicli iJ, 1879. 

lOSEPH C. HK ANER Prealdent 

J. D. McK KNsN A >'«ce Preaident 

Bell rhoru- lOIl'-J. liiaver County I'hone 6365. 

RKX L. C H AMIJKUS (JKN. .MCiU.-KniTOK 

E. L. ANDKKSON TREASl REK 

C L. (ilLHKIM. AI)VKR1ISIN(. & I IRt I LATION .MCR. 



CONGRESS MOVES TO 
HALT RAIROAD STRIKE 



(Continued from First Paxe) 



|:»«i»»»»»»ft»»»»»»»»n»»»»«»»»»ti»i»«»»n»n» 



THK PRK-EHINKNCE OF LABOR 

\iij;ir.N immortal epic hejfin.s with "Ann.s and the man, 1 
sin^." WiTc hi' writing to<lay his theme woiihl Ik?. I think, "Tool.s 
i.ml the man." for tools and the man is a phra.se expressinj? twen- 
tieth century i>io}:ivss into the untrie<l and unknown. Althoujfh 
iahoi- hjLs not tully come into its own, and is still weaiinjr chains, 
moie or less chafinji. it i^s yet worthy to lie the theme of the 
woild'.s epic. Alius aie destructive. lalK)r is creative. The man 
who makes two Ulades of jjra.ss jrrow where one ;rrew before, is 
the true lepie.sentative of modern civilization, lie who .scratches 
the eaith with a lH)e to make it smile a harvest is a greater bene- 
factor thiHi he who <iestroys and lays waste by arms what lalK)r 
has created. Let us on Labor Day magnify "tools and the man," 
not "arms and the man." 

W'orkinjr men are for peace. They l)elieve in the brother- 
hood of man — that all men are of one blood, and that war is only 
another name lor murder, except it l>e in .self defense. When 
workinjrmen everywhere lecojrnize that they are l)ound together 
l\v a strontrer bond than that which is called |)atrioiism, nations 
will be compelled to lay down their arms and war will l>e no more. 

Labor Day l)elon«:s ti> the workmen. It is the .soundin}r-l)oard 
of lal)or that mayrnifies its demands and sends its voice to the 
ends of the larth. There are two cUis.^ies into which .society is 
divided — the privilejred and the disinherited. The former has 
liad the upper hand for centuries. It has ruled by might, and in 
its own interests, and does so yet. Capitalism is dominant and 
gfreedy. In intei-piets "a fair tiay's work for a fair day's wage" 
to mean as much work for as little pay as the laborer can Xve 
forced to concetd. Workmen are compelled to strike to paiii 
their iu.st <len\ands. Instead of lalK>r l)einK -held in high honor, 
it is under restraint. Instead of lieing in demand, it has to l>eg 
lor a i'>b. The most .sacred thing on earth, it is >oId to th(» 
highest bidder in the market. 

, • Lal>or is creative: it can transform the wilderness into a 
garden; it can cover the earth with a network* of railroads and 
telegraph wires that destioy distance: can >en<l messages through 
the air thou.sands of miles apart: it can sail ships under the .sea. 
on the .sea and through the air; it can build cities, and villages, ajvl 
j)arks, and ei'ect monuments of ait: it can pro<luce food in abun- 
dance. And in short, it can do e\ri ytliing, and without lalxjr 
nothing can l)e done. 

There should be no idle men. Piones have no place- in soci- 
ety. He who will not work should starve. If labor were univer.sal, 
waste elinrinatifl, wfirs ended, nations in friendly relations the 
world would be pro.sperous. everyUxly have an abundance of the 
good things of life, and there would be more happiness to the 
.square inch than there is to an acre now. All this lal>or aims to 
achieve. It puts into concrete form the deepest longings of the 

.soul. 

_ 

THE PR0(;RESS of THE LABOR NEWS 

The first Monday in Septeml)er has been .set apart by the 
American F'ederation of Lalx)r as LalK>r Day. This yeai' the. 
day falls on Septeml>er 4. The pui*pose of the day is to direct) 
geneial thought toward the needs and aspirations of the workers ; 
and to afford the workers them.selves time and op|K»rtunity toj 
consider tho.se things which vitally concern them and their lalwr j 
organizations, through which they are trying to^ecui-e a living 
wage and reasonable hours of employment. 

The Central LalK)r Union of Beaver County will celebrate the 

day at Junction Park, where an elalwrate program will Ik? offered 

for the amusement of the big crowd which is sure to attend. 

The Central LalK)r Union, through the medium bf i|s plaper. 
The Labor News, desires to express it.< appreciation ^ the libei'- 

ality shown by the various adver^8er;,s in this I^lK)r Day is.sue. 

and to also thank the many business concerns which have made 

donations to the cau.se of lal)or. 

It is the desire of the management of The IjaXwv News to 
hat^e the business men and othei* employers of lalwr in this valley 
on friendly tenns with the various lal)or orjranizations, and the 
pf4>er assures the employer a square deal from every standpoint. 

The Labor News asks all members of the different locals, and 
friends of labor in general to patronize the different advertisei*8 
who hvft helped ^~m^e this Labor Day edition and the celebra- 
tion at Junction Park a success. <* 



nor more than nine months, appropri- 
ates $25 .(NK) fur the expense of this 
cuinniiHNion, which is to report ita 
fiiuiinKx to the |>n>«ident und ('ontfi^sa 
and allows the President to determine 
thf ijulury of the three- conimishioners. 

i'enahy I'roviiio. 

'fhi» iKMmlty '|)rovi»o Hcts forth that 
uiiy |M«r.son violutinK iiny part of the 
H<t shull be fruilty of misdemeanor 
un«l upon conviction shall be lined not 
U'.ss tlum .SI 00 and not more than 
SiOOO. or iinpris«»nment not to ex- 
reed oru' year, or both. 

Jn only One resfH-ct «loe8 the Adam- 
.son bill fall shoTl of the demands of 
the brotherhoods. It provides that 
overt im« shall be jmid at "a rate not 
less than a pro rata rate for the 
stanilurtl eijfht-hour work day," in- 
«tea<l of allowinjr a .*)() per cent in- 
t-rea.se for overtime. The brother- 
hood |iresi(lents have let it be known 
that the time and a half for overtime 
was their "trudinif demand." 

It wttsatrn'ed that the Senate would 
meet at 10 o'clock tomorrow momintr 
to beifin consideration of the bill. 
President Wilson will be in his office 
at the Capitol at the time. 

President Wilson told the leaders he 
was doinjr everything possible to have 
Congress legislate to meet the situa- 
tion, and that it was their duty as 
American citizens to postpone or can- 
cel the strike order pending its action. 
AHsails Railroad Heads 

Senator Keed assailed the railroad 
heads for "takinjf the action they 
knew would brinR on the strike when 
they had the assurances of President 
Wilson that they would be (riven in- 
creased rates, if the operatint; ex- 
penses under an eiffht-hour day war- 
ranted." ' 

"There are great financial powers in 
this country," Senator ileed charged, 
"that want the strike and want it at 
this time. There are a half-dozen men 
in New York City who can prevent the 
strike. The only thinj^ necessary for 
them to jjrant is the eight-hour day, 
and they fan do it without the loss of 
I dollar to themselves. Congress has 
the power to kt^ep the great lines of 
inter-state commerce open. If thip 
managements cannot do it, a legal 
power will." 



Howe's 



gfe Big Hardware Store 

FRBEDOM, PA. 



\ 



I Reduced Prices on Summer Goods | 

These reduction.s are biK and they 
are bona fide. See these goods 

TORCH .SWIN(JS— $4.75 ones, now $:j.r>() complete 

$2.50 ones, now $1.75 complete. 

ICE BOXES— $7.50 Sjnall Itoxes for. . . $4.75 

ICE CREAM FREEZERS— Best Make, 20 per cent. OFF 

VACLl'M CLEANERS— $10.00 New Type, special at $7.00 

SEWIN(i MACHINES— $35 "Standard" Machine for $25.00 

BICYCLES— Best regular $.35.00 "Bikes," at $24.50 

The Factory Cost. 



Culinary workers of San Francisco, 
who are on strike for the eight-hour 
da>. after being continuously charged 
with inciting to riot, while doing 
picket «luty. adopted a unique method 
by using donkeys to advertise the 
noii-uniun establishment.s. 





"■"••,. 1. 



►<► 



r" 



COUPON 

THIS COUPON AND 25 C^NTS will buy you one of 
our best regular 45c House Brooms. 



/ 



V 



ONLY ONE TO A CI STOMER— Void after September 10. 




J. F. Howe Hardware & Supply Co. 

"The Big Hardware Store" 

Freedom Pa. 



♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ 



:»»»»»iiu»»»»n»t 



; |«»»»i;»»»»»{ii»{ { »i»»»»i»»{» i »»»»»»»» { » ;i » i i {i »»»» { »» i i i iiM ii » m» 



TO THE 



4M» 



•r 



SUBSCRIBE FOR 

THE LABOR NEWS 



Workingmen of Beaver County 

.■'■■', 

Through the Columns of Your 
Weekly Labor Publication 



We wish to announce the preparedness of our Fall and Winter stocks of Wearing: Apparel 
for Men, Women and Children. W> call your earnest attention to the timely low prices 
of our merchandise for' this coming fall and winter season. Due to the daily advances in 
the markets, our competitors were obliged to pay sharp advances on their stocks for the 
present fall and winter feason ; but. due to our wonderful business insight, we foresaw 
conditions and prepared. We bought ten and twelve months ago— a year hence. Thus, 
while others have niised their prices, we, due to our wonderful buyinlNpowers, will sell 
our merchandise this fall for LESS, FOR Bl'YINCJ MOST. WE BUY FOR LESS, AND 
SELLIN(; MOST. WE SELL FOR LESS. 



1- 



j Eyerything to Wear (or the Workingman and His Family 1 



ii| VISIT OUR STORE AND BE CONVI NCED i| 

ft ERKMAN' S I 

\h\ . ■Hl^^ Everythinp: Ready-to- Wear for Men, Women and Children w^H^^ 



<>o 



f 



. 1 



J- 



September 1, 1916 



BEAVER VALLEY LABCR NE^S 



Page Five 



•^ m ittti ummmmnnmn ett nn ii n iii mm i 



I jfiaiestio ^heatre 



ROCHESTER, PA. 



Program for Next Week 



MONDAY, SEPT. I— Metro Pictures presents *'The 
River of Komiiflce," a ttifillinu adventure stor\, starring ' 
Hai-old I^ocliwood and May /Allison. - 

Tl ESDAY, SEPT. 5— Daniel F»: iiman presents "Des- ; 

tiny's Toy," a wonderful story of the sea, with Louise Hull" ', 

in the leading role. • 

WEDNESDAY, SEI»T. 6— Oliver Morosco presents ; 
charminK Edm\ («o(Klrich in "The Maikin); of Maddalena," a ; 
KrippinK story of life in Italy. < v 

THURSDAY and FRIDAY, SEPT. 7-8~Williani Fox j 
pre^ts Dorothy liernard and Glen White in "Sporting < 
Blood,** a }(allopinK drama of the race track. 

SATURDAY, SEI»T. 9— Jesse L. Liisky presents the ', 
inimitable Victor Moore in "The Clown." Critics claim this \ 
is positively Moore*s best work. 

♦•i m iii m i t i^e umf i m i' H tiiiiiii n i mn t^t n 



COLONIAL THEATRE! 



BEAVER FALLS, PA. 



■vj 



Pro^rani For >»e\t Week 



.MONDAY. SEPT. 4— Wm. A. Brady-World Film Corporation pre- 
HentM Alice Brady in."Miiiit IMticoattt." AIho Bum8 and Stuhl in 
"RuahinR BusineMi," a comedy in'tme act. 

TrESDAY, SEPT. !>— Red Feather PhotoplayH preHents Hobart 
Henify i" "Temptation and the Man;" aim) Mr. and MrM. .Sidney Drew 
in ^'Help." and "The .Selix Tribune." 

>\ EDNESDAV, SEPT. t>— Metro Picturen Corporation preaents 
Madame l*etrova in "The Worldly Woman:" alMO a Ham and Bud 
comedy, "Good Evening Judxe," and Plump and Runt in "Aunt Bill.** 

THIRSDAY. SEPT. 7— Vitairraph Blue Ribbon Features preMnt 
Anita Stewirt in **The DarinR of Diana;" alao VitaRraph cMnedy, 
"The Fur C<*t." ^^ 

FRIDAY. SEPT. »— Bluebird photoplayn preitenta Tyrone Power 
in "The Eye of God :" abo Joyce Fair in 'The Chimney Sweep." 

SATIRDAY. SEPT. »— Helen Gibmn in "To .Save the Road;** 
alno Harry Meyern and RoHemary Theby in "Hubby's Relativca," and 
John Lorenze and Anna Leixh in "Repentance." 




into the plot i.liiclf. In one wt-ne we 
find liaina rouinint; about the Ktreeta 
tryinR to find some m-wh for her! 
puper. 

Director Dn'w is noted for the 
n-ulisin which he in^^tilli) into his pic- 
tureK and his "DurinK of Diunu," iii 
no fxceptiun to liie rul«'. '!'h»'r«' is h 
thrill in every few ft'et without uny 
incl«Hiruniic inipre>>.siun«. ' 



#•• 



"The F.ye of <mk1" 

Al llu' t'olonial Th<utr«'. i»«MV«r 
lali.-. Friday, Sf\)\. Kth, lUurhinl pho- 
U>|ila\s pn's«Mil> '!"> uiiK- Power and 
l.i>ui.> Weber in "Tlir K\«' of (itxi." 

Mr. I'ower plas.s lli«' rule (»f a mur- 
<l>rrr. wuitiiiK 'n h'--^ »''ll ''♦'■ r<»«'t- 
f;i'N I'f hj.-i t'Nfrutinni'rJi, M .-^^ WfluT 
i> <1ic wouutri A 111) lia> .so ehvirly ap- 
pliril llie wih'.x tif fi-mininity to the 
.Ni. ,1-ptibk' htart ol the criiiiiiial that 
lie 11)11 fes.ses ami aw;iit.s hi.s iIimhii. 

l»iiiiii'illy tiut iif till- «ri|inar\ i.< thi."- 
lir.ii la and cntfrtaidiiuTit of iho most 
tt-nM-ly i^rippinu natuir i.- as.surrii In 
tliii.-'i- who hi'ok .SDincthiiivr uiIikhuhou I 
uiiii rxtraordinary m phoioplav itur. 



BROTHERHOODS HOLD 

MEETING THURSDAr 



(Continued Fi-om I'uk*- One) 



roi 



The .*^ecretar\ will arran;:«' a 
call (alphalH>U(-all\ ) with tarh 



I Colonial, Beaver Falls 



"MiaH PetticoatH" 

•*Mia« Petticoats," from the book 
by Dwiffht Tiltm. b.as lioen adapted 
to the screen by Hariey Knoles, and 
aupported by a company of cfnuinc 
playvns of merit. Alirr I*rady playH 



-'ivf'n an oppertunitv to see him play 
rive consecutive rc«'ls. "Temptation 
•lid the Man" is jilayed liy im'WJ star 
.Mst, which incluilcs. bisidcs the^tar. 
.Syfloll Dou-JinK. i>rt Mushy, Sydney 
Ilrucy, Joseph (Iranby an<l Clara Bey- 
er;, who ull ."^hov. theii- merit in this 
sterling photoplay. 



SMALL SUCCESS MAY LOOK INSIGNIFICANT TO 
THE I'NSITCCESSFUL, BUT NOT TO THE MAN WHO 
IS A SUCCESS. 

EVERY SUCCESSFUL -MAN HAS BEEN A SMALL 
SUCCESS AT SOME TIME. 

IT IS ALMOST IMPOSSIBLE TO EVEN START WITH- 
OUT A BANK ACCOUNT. 

FIRST NATIONAL BANK 

ROCHESTER, PENNA. 



"The 'luridly Woman" 

Mine. P«'trr»vn. lh<- pi f ted emotional 
a"tr('s-.. i-^ now M.irrinjr in "The 

i„ , r, .,, -. -.10 j Worldly Wmmuii." tin- Metro pro<luc- 

same time L'ivinK the characters .such' tian which u ill Ik. >.iri at the Coion- 



the leading i' 



i.lr 



,11 



iKinnpr alto- 



'irethcr pleasin^r :'.nd il;arin;r.«, iit tl 



a jfreat imiHTsonation as to iniikrcven 
her closest admirers raze ou in v\«n- 
dor. The many scenes i-enuirinjr u sra 
or mill .scene were filmed ir tlic rc- 
(|uisite locale, an oM fi.^hintr .sichtwjti- 
er, the C'has. \V. .Mi»r;ran, nf \i\v 
Bedford. .Mas.*;., ut< \m!I a.s the W'uin- 
autta .Mills lieinp iitilr/.<il '\n the prt)- 
<luction of this World |-ilni fi-aluro 
which will l»e shown at tli< • ( "oliuiial 
Theatre, jteaver Tall.-. mi Monday, 
September 4th. 



"Temptathnn and the >Ian"' 

Tiuiuiirh a very popul.-ir s; n«n |»1ay- 
er. Hobart Henley's Itrsl l>ii: fratuio 
is "Temptation and the ^lati." tho 
Red Feather fr-atun- to lie si. own at 
the Colonial Theatre, IJeavcr I-'alls. 
Tuesday, Sept. .*>, and his admirers arc 



•al Tl>e:itr< I leaver I'alls, on Wednes- 
day, S(|)t . '■'<. 

This i.»i «'iic of the .JtronKest features 
\ri' oliVi (I on this projrnim, and is 
riid to Infill- Ite.st vehiele ever provid- 
;'(! fiiv .Mi.ii', I'rtrova, whose wonderful 
]Ht\\r.-> ( r piuitoniiiif have made her 
fi.rcii >'4 anionu pti<>to|>lay artists! 
sine" ,<i)e f(»rKOok the .stiijje for the 
vcen. '.^hv i.'^ sMi roiinfled by a strong 
:u|iiio!i:ri;j cast. 



"The J)arinK ol Diana." 

"Tl.( I • ;i'iitr of Diaii.i," a \it:iuraph 
'llv.f llib'icii i'caturc of New York 
I'-- .:;,iaii«-; i ".li . will In- shown al the 
(*oloni:ilo 'r,j|4^atn*, lleavir Falls, Thurs- 
day, .*<c|)». 7- 

Tl.ril!.- :ir«^ i"''ny ;is .\nita .Stewart 
in the title I'oW-, recojves her difTer- 
ent as.MCrntnents which >rraduallv lead 



or^ranization i>n a separate .vhct-t. Koll 
will lie calle<l twice daily, morning and 
afternoon. The names of thf nmi 
mendn-rs will l»e kept .separate on 
the roll fr«»ni the naine.s oi tlm.sc wiio 
are mtMnbers t»f the organization. AH 
striker.*; will Ix* re«|uired to answer 
the roll call and alsn to Im- in the 
halls, where halls an- provulnl. dur- 
ing the day at all times, unless e\cus- 
e<i hy committee action or l»y ciuiir- 
man of the meetinp. 

The secretary will also keep a rcf- 
ord of the proceedinjrs from day to 
day. 

(>. In the conduct of every strik« 
there are numerous irresponsihli- per- 
sons, nt)t niemlH'rs of tin- orKan.Xii-| 
tions, who take occasion to entraire ini 
acts of vi«>lence .ind di.sorderly coii-i 
duct, and such aictions are usually ul-! 
trihuted to nn'inlKTs of the ori;aniz.a- 
tion. and ureat care should \f tak«-fi 
hy (Very nieinlwr of the l•r^Mnir.atil^r.^ 
to avoid as.sociutin^r with such jm r 
sons and such conduct should ho ilis-i 
courajred so as not to cast irpioaelij 
upon the cause. | 

7. .Some railroa<i i>lTici;il> may i-n- i 
deavor to coerce or misle.ui the n»en 
by tis.><ertinir that men at other points I 
have not <piit or that they have re- \ 
tume<l to work. Such infnrinat ion I 
bhould 1m» discounted and all strik- , 
crs should apply to their «)fricers and i 
^committecnirii for information, and In- ' 
jfovcrned acriutliiitfly, and no iinriilM>rj 
or non-union m:iii will return to work 
until the .-trikr' is otrieiully iie<-lareil 
off. and all will return to work at tlie| 
same time, \,ithc«iit prejudice ami w ith ] 
all former ri^rh^s. 

Kach elausi' was read .separaloly, 
and instruct ii)?i> jriven. Instructions 
w«re clear :iii>l ronri.se, and there is a 
small clianri' fur a misiindi'istand intr. 
At tho alterniHin mi-itinir. (',vttrir*' 
\K Ulack'.MHMJ. . . . II tary of the .loint 
rrotoctiv llicii.l of till- I!. i>r 1,. !•'. 
and V... for'tl.' I'ennsylv.tnia Lines 
West. \\ .•!> p). .lit aii'l ;;:ive an in- 
tenstinL' talk >ni the pnHi-.hiri- ot tin- 
<fran<l Oifici rs iii the liuht Imur, tiioo 
.and one-half ti'i- ov.Ttime inpveiMent. 
over which tin >trike is called. 

At the evi iiiiiir .session thiir Iih;i! 
im n dill t hi -poakinir and wno ir 
ceived with ^'Miit entliusiasni. Tliii.-«- 
present w«i« ;n .a cheerful fr.'iine of 
mind ami aiipnrntly were pleased that 
some (U'linit" action was soon to he 
taken in tin' matter. 




. .< 



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For 

''hard-to-fit" 

women 



Soiiu 



women a»o haul t(j 
fit in c«)rsel.><; some ju.st 
Uiiiik they aie. 

There are certain tyjie.c of lip- 
ures, however, ful! hu.-^t an«i 
small hips, small hust .md Iarjr>' 
hips, short stout ft'urr^ — that 
re(|uire spe«M.'iI di-siniinjf in 
corsit s. 

In .MnKAUT Fmn' l,;ic«d Cor- 
.>-rt.- tluT'' arr -•'■picial .-i/is ami 
nioili-l- for just siiiirtiirures. \VV 
can t'i\< :i!iy woman. '>f ^'.hat- 
I'ViT .-I/.- I'T .•^hap»^ till' k ni mi" 
St \ !<• ;m'l 111 she sliow'.l 



|KI\- 



J» J» J» .* 




ESTAbiUS.HED IQOO 



. — .^ 






Ill Mill 

""" Z- ' m 

J i';-r— 





-Uu. 



»" iiiiii :iu iiiiiiiiiuii 



■ ■ ■ ■ «^ I 

rSAilLJMAi 



HANK 

II I m 



I 'I ^ Mil ■■•• >ii 1 1 1 1 a iiaiaaaiH^flBMHrf I 

mr MnmAMj iiiti ii iaa ^^ 





The Bank of the People 

AN INCREASE IN DEPOSITS OF ALMOST lOO^c 
IN A LITTLE MORE THAN ONE YEAR'S TIME 

IS CONVINCINi; BMDEVCEOFTHE F.V<T TH.VT THE URST NATIO.NAI. HANK IS KKKP- 
IN(i WELL ABREAST OF CONDITIONS I> THIS RAPIDLY ADVANCLMi CO.MMIMTV. 

OUR RECORD FOU SAFE AND SATISI .\(TORY SKRVICE KXTEMJS OVKK A PEHIOD 
OF TEN YEARS, OrRLNCJ WHICH TIME 3I.\N Y HAVE BEEN ENABLED TO OBTAIN HO.VIES 
THROLGH THE FINANCIAL HELP .\NI) SOI ND ADVICE OFFER«;p BY THL^^ STRON(i IN- 
STITUTION. -^ ^* , ' 

YOU ARE CORDIALLY INVITED TO .WAKE A CLOSE INSPECTION OF 01 K METHODS 
AND AFFAIRS WITH A VIEW OF BECOMI.VC; ONE OF OLR DEPOSITOR.S. 

First National Bank of Midland 

United States Leposiiorg for Postal Savings Funds 
Member of Federal Reserve Bank 






L B. Dewhirst 



A/> Third Ace. 



New Brighton 



;«.. 



.MDITOir.S NOTICE. 






In the matter of the ilistrihution of 
till- monies paid into ''ouit hv James 
r. Hryan, .Slicrifr. 

In the Court of ('omiiinn I'leas of 
Iteavi r <'«)iinty. I'.a., No. MVl .March 
Term. i:»l(J. 

Now, .luno 1, i:Hti, on motion of J. 
, I.. Ili)iiin>s, Ksii., tliQ Court appoint 
'J|3' .S'am 1!. Wilson. Ksip, an Autlitor. to 
*!,>jm;il«' ilistrihution of the sai'l nuinies 
\f\;. ' paid into Court to anrl amontr those 
•!•' I le^rally ontillid thereto. 

BY THE COLTIT. 



rsJJ^-i 



"^ 



i 



Notire i.s hereby criven tluTt^ the 
abovo named jrufjitor will meet for 

' tho purpo.sc of hi.s appointment in the 
.Arbitration Hoom of the Court Kouae^ 
IJeavor. I'a.. on Thurf^day. .September 

I 21, lOir,. at l(»^)Vloek a. m.. al which 
tinir ami place all partieK in interest 
may attend. 

SA.M H. \Vl[,.SaM, 
auu'i'.'i-.sept 1 -K. Auditor.' 



»♦»♦»»♦< 



CAPITAL $ 50,000.00 

Sl'RPLrS AND INDIMDEI) PROFITS 22,000.00 

STOCKHOLDERS' LIABILITY .",0,000.00 



lltt ' I I ■ ■■! 




$122,000.00 



4 



ilQuinnT. Walton if 

PLUMBER if 



Always Affiliated With Midland's Prosperity 




; ; Gas, Steam and Hot Water ; t 
^ Fittiiiir. 



; I Estimates Promptly GfrcB. \ 

Both Phones. 
Third St., BEAViaiR, PA. < 



p; "•■■•'', 



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fcaifc-J.-^'i;,-;'-.: _ ,\':f 'm\i\od\'/&-jL&ivJiy-ik 



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Page Six 



BEAVER VALLEY LABOR NEWS 



1, 1919 



JiinGiioii rarKi! 

Most Beautiful Picnic 
Grounds in the Valley 

SUNDAY SCHOOLS, LODGES. FRATERNAL ORDERS 

AND PRIVATE PICNIC PARTIES ARE TENDERED 

FREE USE OF THE GROUNDS. 



>^ 



DANCING 



EVERY WEDNESDAY AND SATURDAY 
EVENINGS. 



Finest Dancing Pavilioa 

In this |>art of the Stat«, outside of PittHbur^h. Various 
Small ConoesBions for Amusement of Patrons 

**VOU ARE ALWAYS WELCOME AT THE PARK" 

Reached from all Valley Points by way of 
BEAVER VALLEY TRACTION COMPANY LINES 



Write or Phone Me for Open Dates 

C. C. SHETTERLY 

LESSEE and MANAGER 

TELEPHONES: 

Beaver County. 116.) and 5123 

Bell« Rochester. T20i New BriRrhton, 1500 



TIMELY UBOR BRIEFS 



Trades unionistji of all kinds are 
endeuvorinic to abolish private em- 
ployment bureaus in California. 



The niodenv system of trades union- 
ism came into existence in England 
about 1812. 



Barbers of Newark, N. J., are'con- 
ductinK u vijrorous canipaiirn of or- 
IcaniKation. 



The Machinists' strike in Philadel- 
phia, \H (craduaily coining to an end; 
thirty-tive shops have sifnied un 
aijrreeiiKMit for u cloMed shop and less 
thun fifteen hundred men remain un 
strike. 



Chief of Police McNamara, of Waro, 
Texa.s, Huh asked the mayor and city 
council to study the question of eiRht 
hours for policemen, claim inir that 
such a move would prevent worry, 
care und vexation, thereby causing the 
officers to K've better service. 



The convention of the International 
Typo(;raphical Union, last week, in- 
structed the executive board to lend 
its aid in a movemen: toward the erec- 
tion of a suitable memorial to Otto- 
mar Merjcenthaler, inventor of the 
linotype machine, and to study the 
question of erecting an office build- 
ing for the union, to be named in 
honor of the late William B. Prescott. 



i lii»«» i »»»: i i i »iiim»«»»w»wwViViVi'i»Vi»:ww 



II BOGGS & BRANDON CO. il 



Seven thousand female cigarmak- 
ers of Detroit, Mich., are on strike 
against low wages and obnoxious con- 
ditions. Among their complaints are, 
workintr over the legal limit of hours 
per day, insufficient time allowed to 
eat lunrh. f^ned for not making the 
re(|uired amount of cigars out of a 
given amount of stock, making one 
extra cigur with each hundred for 
nothing. This item alone nets the 
manufacturers over 10,000,000 cigars 
a year, without any cost for labor. 



ttt ii UAtftf 



ii mim « 



DRY GCX)DS 



COATS 



SUITS 



OPENING NEW FALL GOODS 



•*: 



New Fall Skirts, New FaJ! Sweaters 
New Fall Silks, New Fall Dress Goods 
New Fall Percales, New Fall Domets 
New Fall Blankets ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ jn^ 



BGGGS & BRANDON CO. 



:=: 1200-1202 Seventh Ave. 



Beaver Falls, Pa. : s 



'.»»}'.»'.»itn:'.»t»:n«:»»;»»»»»»»»»«i»m»»»»m :i 



United States Senator Bryan, of 
Florida, opposed the federal Child 
Labor Act and "Dixie," a paper print- 
ed in Jacksonville, sarcastically re- 
plies that States rights is a bugaboo, 
used only by near-statesmen when it 
serves their purpose. When hog 
cholera measures are considered they 



want the government to act as a 
whole. Do they consider the hog 
more important than the child, it 
aaks. 



City laborers of Milwaukee, Wis., 
will receive thirty cents per hour for 
eight hours, after September 1st. 



The Register of Mobile, Alabama, 
was one of the first southern papers 
to pass favorably upon the recent fed- 
eral Child Labor Act, clainnins that 
some states have ailed notoriously 
in giving children the necessary pro- 
tection, thereby inviting the needed 
federal legislatioii. 



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Where a Few of Our Students Are \Jorl^ig 



BEAVER. 



KAME. 

Baymond Comstock. 

David Bi. Woods 

Thomas Struthers. . 

Alma Martin 

Florence McGuirl . . . 

Rose Eberle 

Earle Evans 

Edwin Parrot 

Gladys Darling 

Hilda Reich 

Crace Buhot 

Raymond Dickey. . . . 

Newell Joyce 

Irwin Ellis 

Lewis Winter 

Hazel McElhaney... 

Elisabeth Hays> 

Hazel Love 

Harry Hannif^an. . . . 
Jphia Douthitt ...... 

Adrla McMillon 

Robert Jones 

lk>atrice Treverton.. 

iJelhel Hnwe 

J C. (foas 

Mae Taylor 

Mary Nail 

John Witherell 

Olive Fowler 

Aileen Swancy 

Olive Schaney 

Elizabeth Mattes 

Edith Cooper 

Roy KIsher 

John McCullough . . . 

Emma Grant 

Margaret Carlon . . . . 
William C. Malone.. 

Frank Gates 

Lois Gibson 

Ralph Hoge..... 

MmfuM Euiot 

.LOUaa Wynn^^. ... 
J. Henrr Forrest. . . . 

Mabel Stoutt 

T«r««i Kanadiat. . . 
KatherlM Waisa. ... 
JaaMs Johnston. . . . 
TiMnat 8tabl««r. ... 
Albtrt Mdahardt... 



ADDRESS. 

> Dvs V vr •••«•••*■ 

Ambridge 

Shippingport . . . 
, Monaca 

Midland 

, Woodlawn 

, Monaca 

, Beaver 

.Rochester 

W. Bridgewater. 

Woodlawn 

W, Bridgewati'r. 

Rochester 

Rochester 

W. BridgewatiT . 

Woodlawn 

Beaver 

Monaca 

Freedom 

South Heights. . . 

Beaver 

South Heights... 

W. Bridgewater . 

Freedom 

, Freedom 

Beaver 

Beaver 

Vanport , 

. Beaver , 

. Shinpingport . . , 

Rocnester 

Midland 

Ambridge , 

Rochester , 

, Vanport , 

, Rocnester 

, Rochester 

. W. Bridgewater 

. ROdlMMT •••••. 



• « • • I 



. . Shi]ipingport .. 

. . Monaca 

. , RochcMtsif * 

, ^ j^iwna^^ • .• .. ... 

. , Colona 

. . W. Bridgewater 



Aabrldff* 



I • . * . • • . 






Lao 

Kuth WhittstfaM. 
SUsaboth fltlmon 
Althea OMMman. 

Mas Biimillsr 

Marr Snllivan 

H. Alden Tsvlor... 

Lola Campbell 



Monaca 
Akron, O. 



> • • • 
' • • • 



• •••••• 



' • • • • 



• • • • • 



'•••••• 



• • • • • • 



Ambridge 
Beaver . . 
Monaca . . 
Aliottippa 
Rodieator 



• •■••• I 



WHERE WORKING. - 

Pennsylvania Railroad Co. • 

Fort Pitt Improvefhent Co. 

Tread well Con.ntruction Co. 

Metal Products Co. 

Pittsburgh Crurihle Steel Co. . 

C. C. ft E, P. Townsorul. 

Junes & Laufrhlin Stei>l Co. 

Vulcan C Crucible Steel Co. 

Bell Telephone Co. 

Beaver Trust Co. 

W. I). Craig, Attorney. 

First National Bank, Rochester. 

Pitt-sburgh Crucible Steel Co. 

v. & L. E. R. R. Co. 

Woodlawn Land Co. 

Kuffner ft Moore. 

Deitrick Class Co. 

A ntericnn Glass Specialty Co. 

Fro<'dom Casket Co. 

Jones ft I>iiughlin Steel Co. 

Heaver County Commissioners. 

Jonr.s & I.augnlin Steel Co. 

ntll Telephone Co. 

Bovard ft Anderson. 

Union Drawn Steel Co, 

Conk -Anderson Co. 

Mfxirhead & Marshall. Attorneys. 

Pennsylvania Railroad Co. 

Braver County Farm Bureau. 

Pittsburgh Crucible Steel Co. 

H. C. Fry Glass Co. 

Pittsburgh Crucible Steel Co. 

National Metal A Moulding Co. 

Treadwell Construction Co. 

Vulmn Crucible Steel Co. 

Pittsburgh Bridge St Iron Works. 

I. M. Porter. Midlsnd. 

Aliquippa A Southern Railroad. 

Vulcan Crucible Steel Co. 

The Daily Tiraea. 

Jones A Laughlin Steel Co. * 

The Daily Tiraea. 

Hamilton Glove Mfg. Co. 

American Express Co. 

H. C. Fry Glass Co. 

Opalita Tile Cs. 

American Glass Specialty Co. 

P. A L. E. R. R. 

Pittsburgh Crucible Stsel Co. 

National Metel A Monlding Cow 

W. P. PoUock. 

P. A ll E. Railipad. 

Akron Mill^ Co. % 

Phoenix Glaas Co. t? " 

B. Scott McFsfUhd. 

Opalite Tile Co. 

Dsnna ft Fricsno. 

Pennsylvania Railrosd Co. 

Itxkovitr. Co. 



GET A SALART-BASNING EDUCATION AT DUFF*8. 



BKAVERTALUL 



NAME. 

Harold Bruggenan . 

Lucille Zell.. 

Marion Smith 

Edna McNeea 

Edith Craham 

Mdrybelle Phillips.. 

Clarrticc Carnegie.. 

Medora White 

Mollic Marcus 

Alma McBrein 

Kathfcr:ne Fetter... 

Raymond Duncan . . . 

Ruth Wood 

Robecai Anderson. . . 

William Teichnan. . 

Mary flggenaberger. 

Harold Phillis 

Kather'ne Phillips. . . 

Mae Cooper 

Mary Kettmer 

Ed^^srtl Imbodcn .... 

Irene Weber 

Chester Douglas .... 

Mary Beere 

Ellen Moran 

Mabel Goettman . . jsi 

Helen McCUin 

Jennie Moore 

Esther Feinberg .... 

Robert Baggs 

Grace Kent 

John Boyer 

Rose Sanders 

George Conner 

Jerome Hsrtnett. . . . 

Evelyn Belles 

Helen Perrine 

Lucille Hiclcey 

Katherine Lenox .... 

Helen DeGrayr 

Howard Cook 

Flora Horn 

Enia Rohrkaste 

Louis Klein 

Flora Cleckner 

V Harrietts Hunter. . . . 
Ulose Ramelia 

Dallas Dillan.. 

Andrew Bsixer... 

Dorothy Young.. 

Sarah Bfanchard. 

Eulah Short 

JossfA Sanders.. 

Martin FUherty. 

Irene Balser. 

Dorothy Young.-... 

Emma GaiMr 

Margaret Schmeling 

Agnes Kraft 

Beatrice Flaherty 



• • • • 



• • • • 



•••••••• 



• • • • • 



ADDRESS. 
Beaver Falla... 
Beaver Falls. . . 
New Brighton. . 
New Brighton. . 
Beaver Falls. . . 
Besver Falls. «. 
Besver FaHs. . . 
Besver Falls... 
Besver Falls. . . 
New Brighton. . 
New Brighton. . 

Ambridge 

New Brighton.. 
Beaver Falls. . . 
Beaver Falls. . . 
Beaver Falls. . . 
New Brighton. . 
Beaver Falls. . . 

Zelienople 

Beaver Falls... 

Enon Vqlley 

New Brighton. . 
Beaver Falls. . . 
Beaver Falls... 

Wampum 

New Brij^hton.. 
New Galilee... 

Darlington 

Beaver Falls. . . 
Besver Falls... 
Beaver Falls... 
Beaver Falls. . . 
Beaver Falls. .. 

Wampum 

Beaver Falls. .. 
iJeaver Falls. .. 
Beaver Falls. .. 

Wampum 

Beaver Falls... 
New Brighton.. 
Beaver Falls... 
Beaver Falls... 
Beaver Falls... 
New Brighton.. 
New Brighton.. 
Bsavtr niUs... 
Bsavtr Falls... 
Beavsr Falls... 
Bsavtr Falls... 
Bsavsr Falls... 

Fallston 

Beaver Falls... 
Bsavtr Falls... 
Beaver Falls... 
Beaver Falls... 
New Brighton.. 
New Brighton.. 
Koppel ,,.,.... 
Beaver Falls... 
Beaver Falls... 



WHERE WORKING. 

.Jones A Laughlin. 
.Ideal Tool Co. 
.R. U. Dunn ft Co. 
.Lutton's Garage. 
.R. G. Dunn A Co. 
.Prudential Life Insurance Co. 
.P. ft L. E. Railroad. 
.Model Candy Co. 
.Orenstein Arthur Koppel Co.' 
.Pittsburgh Wail Paper Co. 
.Keystone Driller Co. 
.Pennsylvania Railroad Co. 
.Union Drawn Steel Co. 
.Standard Gauge Steel Co. 
.Jones A Laugnlin Steel Co. 
. Orenstein Arthur Koppel Co. 
.P. ft L. E. Railroad. 
.Pittsburgh Tool A Steel Wire Co. 
.Orenstein Arthur Kov>nel Co. 
.Sherwood Bros. Co. 
.Hawes ft Myler Works. 
.Freedom Oil Works Co. 
.Ingram Richardson Co. 
. Pittsburgh Tool A Steel Wire Co. 
.C:( scent Portland Cement Co. 
.Freedom Oil Works. 
.Orenstein Arthur Koppel Co. 
.PitUburgh Tool ft Steel Wire Co. 
.Union Drswn Steel Co. 
.Standard Gauge Steel Co. 
n„.v(»r Vnlley Produce Co. 
. Mayer China Co. 
.Orenstein .Arthur Koppel Co. 
.Jones A Laughlin Steel Co. 
.Pennsylvania Railroad Co. 
.Standard Gauge Steel Co. 
.Beaver County Treasurer. 
.R. G. Dunn A Co. 
.Orenstein Arthur Koppel Go» 
. Berkman's Clothing Co. 
.Federal Tia» A Trust Co. 
.Dufrs CollOge,. Beavsr FaHs, FH. 
. Standard Gauge Stael Co. 
.Ingram Richardson Co. 
. Beaver Coohty Light Go. 
.W. E. White. Justice of Vmim, \ 
.Orenstein Arthur Koppel Oib 
. Standard Scale A Snraly Ot^ 
. lAgran Richarjsoa Co. 
.Standard Gangs Blaal Co. 
. C. C. A E. P. TtowBMiid <h, ^ 
• W. n. Benaon. 
.Pittsburgh Ssamlaai Toha Oa^ 
.Boavfr Vallfy Traetloa 0». 
.Osenbaufii A Matheny. "^^^ •«. 
.Orenstein Arthur Koppal Ox '^ 
. Lsard Manuf aetortng Co. 
.PrudepUal jUfe Insuranea Co. ^ 
.Orenstein Arttinr Kopptl Co. 
. Beaver Fftlls Building A Loan 



> 

2 




WE ASSIST OUR STUDENTS TO GOOD-PATING POSlTIOlft. 



IhMsiid InsimiiM 8trMt% 
BB4VIR. PA. 



WRITE FOR THE HANDY FOLDER 



IT AN8WSR8 YOUR IHQUIRISB TO THE POIRT 

Both TelaplicmM. 



1004 MtifmxXh kwmkxm, 
BKAVIR PALL8. PA. 



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DipttiWr 1, 



BEAVERn'ALLEY LABOR NEWS 



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HUGH FERGUSON 

(COLLEGE.4IILL BOROUGH) 

CANDIDATE FOR 

State Senate 

DEMOCRATIC TICKET 



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Page Eight 



deave;r valley labor news 



Scp«tMb«: 1, If II 




?=»! 



J.LEVY 



We are Roin.. to show for Fitil the KfVHtest line of 
LADIES' READY-TO-WEAR 

Suits, Coats, Dresses 

And Skirts 

COME AM) SEE oht-lStNE 

J. LEVY 

920-922.924 Third Avenue. 
NEW BRIGHTON, PENNSYLVANIA 



ii^ *^ 



B^^E 





Two Suites of Offices 
Elegant Location 



B. V. T. EMPLOYES 
HOLD BIG OUTING 

H«vf <;ood Allendanci' end Drvct'llvnl 

Spurt I'loKram Wjii, mm,. 

liall ('■miv 



l\nMl session of the National Educa- 
tional Association convention, held in 
New York und urged them to join 
.l.e labor movement for the common 
piJtectitn and wclfure of all. 



irrsd'nt Jaiiifs H. Muurer, of the 
I.'o.'.:t.s.vlvania I'^dcrulion of Labor, 
.ill dc'iv* r !iJ(lrf:i:io.s in South Fork 
.i: i! Allooiiii, til Labor Duy. 



Thf fourth annual <>utinjr of lln' 
finployi's of the Ueaver Valh'v Trac- 
tion Company, held i-n I;. ;t Tur.'.- 
duy afternoon ami ev( mnn of this 
wi'ek. proved to l>e u most pleuKriir 
tilfair. There wa.s a h ^, :,tti ndamr, 
parlK-ulariy at ni»?ht. a,„| ^i„. vari- 
ous et)neessions and <1;\|)C(> I'.all were 
wi'll patronize*!. The .s,M»rti pn>- 
irram i?i the at lei noon Was oin ot llu- 
hist .-vrr pulled «)(r i»n u hkooccasion, 
le various entrants in tin- ivenls h<- 
int: elosely watched iind several .>l" 
the llnislie.s were more i|,an ordinar- 
ily exrilinu. The hail ^aiue l»el..e. n 
llie inottM'inen and «oiuluii,,|s ;:nd t' e 
lop and power hous,. |.i.n. was a 
•si ii-ain" as lonjr as ;• lafi..<l- Ir. e 
iiiiunjrs. At tl'.f <onLU|vi;„n oi' ll;e in- 
ning' in i|ueslion i;.e i,; piay. rs le- 
elinrd on the dianiuml ;ii„l ;«iiik tie 
M'st eure for a l'>-mni.u. |„:c! Tt-e 
work of the pilihers. i);i„ MtUcniia. 
lor the moterinen and conduc tor.s, und 
Harry Pfeiffer for the oppoi;il...n, v as 
easily the feature of the i;aiv.e. *'L« njf 
Dan," evidently inspired by th.e Rr^-at 
deeds IwinR done on the il amond hy 
•'Lonj? Dave" DRVcni)ort of the St. 
Louis Browns, twisty] him e'f into 
knots and propelled th.p |,jii v.itli j.reat 
force, if not with acc^rat \ . ii \ as a 
iflc)rious exhibition o*' l>,)xv lu pitch 
bull, or not to pitch it. JTriire- wa;; 
al.so in f-ne "form" an,| jt ;.s ii:mcred 
that a scout ior tlic piush. r.ch Pi- 
rates. wh«» was wut(.hi,.^r t] ,. g:uw, 
will take both v.v:n on ;'< :• a '.rv-o.t 
next sprinp. 



.*^'nel ran.itn'.N unons were organ- 
••- d :U C'on-ord. .\. H.. and HirminK- 
' .'.:.i, Alaijima, last w«'ek. 



; i»n»n»i i i ii n»iMn i »» i mn i »n»».m»g 

Smart Fall Styles In ;:: 

i ^ ' •—»»*——————•♦—»»<■»■»«■■■ ♦♦»»*»»»^»«^#»» ■»»»»»»»»•»■ ■■■■■■■><■ tmm i H i 



. :n.e t'-.e v.ar betran, ft-ijiule labor 
im reaseu ien fold in the Krupp iron 
Wi.rk.';, in l>s.sea, (lern-.any. 



7hc AnrM-:::i!-. Federation of Labor 
■ , :.t nio.; nt. i crd jctin^ a viKorouK 
caiapa^rn in the pack'nj; and iron in- 
•!• trrs, v-'lh t<.n.;'(Iirahle succesi* in 
t' !■ way e!" (.:-;:.ini:-.:il on and increased 
.v;<.;:es. 



li.vrnt luii.'-.hini,' of indictments 
•r" n '. r.on- than one hundred min- 
e: in Co'di i lo. i|i«ars the docket, 
wl'.li ti^e ex«ept:»n <f three cases. 



SUITS 



ORDIN VMi: NO. 1«3. 



TIMELY UBOR BRIEFS 



Iron moldcrs of Baltimore. Md.. 
have been jfrsinted im in<n-a.<e of li5 
lents a «luy. After Junuar> 1st. the 
wu|fe|k\vlll »>e four Uollais a day. 

Irish coal heaver^, on the channel 
;-oaI steamers, are o»j sf ' • rr an n- 
•rea.^e of twenty-rn> pt>,- . , pt in pa\. 

The Intemalion 'I '".-'- 'xyi n of 
HridKe and Stry('..;i:j] i „, Workers' 
•onvention will 'nvcr.r' .-t N'ew Or- 
e'.ns, Soptemb ;• 18th to L'Tth. 

The New York Uajxvays Company 
las reinstatocl a n. ,nber of ci ipioy- 
t»« who wen- dih i^K,d or '. 1: njj an 
netivi' part in t' e ^'.«.rlt .; ort .''tr'he 
.Miyor Mitcholi ar^v.^j,,] ;„ (^:•(^er to 
>rc vfl^iT^othrr 8ti';»;p. 



I'i'rs recently ad- 
*Vs attendinir the 




President 
dressed the 



PiovdinK for the vacation of a cer- 
tain alley in the llorou^h of Monaca. 

\/HKKKAS. a |>etition or request 
h:i.s been pi-et^i nted to this Council by 
the ov.nrn; of :dl the lands abutting 
updn a ceita'n alley lyinp: between 
Spruce Alley and Short Street and 
p.iiallel therewith, in the Borough of 
.'Irnata. and pion> particularly herein- 
after (R.;.r;bid. ::; iiinK for the vaca- 
tion ol same. .Saul alley never hav- 
in^r been open to public use. Now, 
ti.irefcre, 

Le it inattoil and ordaine<l by the 
To>»n Counc.l of the Borough of Mo- 
naca. ar.d it is i.ireby enacted and or- 
dained by awilority of the same. 

iiliSl": That that certain alley, | 
as laid out in the plan of Christian 
Erbeck. lyinjr between Spruce Alley 
and Short .Street and parallel there- 
•vith, the same being bounded on the 
north and south by land of the Mo- 
naca Tur Veix'in; on the east by Sev- 
enth Street, and on the west by land 
of Henry Mik.sch; having a width of 
Fifteen ( L"») feet and a length of One 
Hundretl Two und nine-tenths (102.9) 
feet, he vacate;!. 

.s.X'O^' ■'.:•.'>. f.e expense and 

-ost I .ypar n;. pus dng and pub- 
ijsh'- I. lis or,l ii.mt-e be paid by the 
s ! T.;c r.it.ui.a Turn Verein. The 
r.r.'.ount of f'c r.ume shall be certified 
io it b;- :1-.L' Secretary of the Town 
Counci. 

Enacted and ordained into an ordi- 
' m?ice this 2r..l day of August, A. D., 

U. J. MITCHELL, 
.\ tc::' : President of Council. 

L". U. STKINEK. 

.Sr^cretary of Council. 
Approved this 12th day of August, 
1!)16. 

JAMES C. IRONS, 
Burgess. 



FOR MEN AND YOUNG MEN 
Are New Ready for Your Inspection 

We are ready for Fall with our inimenHe line of 
Fall and Winter Clothing already on dispkiy. 1 

You will always find our lines the very latest in 
style and materials. Handsome suits for men and 
young men that are far ahead of anything you will 
see elsewhere. 



:ii 



Suits and Overcoats j i 

;| $10.00 to $25.00 | 



A NEW FALL HAT 

For Fall Weather 

No longer is the stniw a desirable piece of head- 
gear. The cool weather of the past day or two has 
forced its departure. The proper hat fr6m now on is 
one of our new stj'le soft or stiff hats in the 

CELEBRATED KROX, GUYER 
OR NALLORY HAKE 

We have a (^ape and size to fit every head and 
pocketbook. 

Soft Hats $1.50 to $3.00 
Derbies $2.00 to $3.50 

I j.a.buti!er&son t 

LARGEST CLOTHIERS 
BEAVER FALLS - - ROCHESTER 



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»:»»»»»»»»»»»»»»«»»»»»»»»» 




ANITA STEWART i ' ^ 
in ^'Thc Dsring ol Diana ^'^ 

At Cok>i)ial Theatre, Beaver Falls, Thursday. Sent. 7. 




New Brighton, Pa. 




IS; A. K. B.Wilson 



^' 




!■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■«»»■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■ , 4 »4 » 

■ 



•^Onyx*' « Hosiery 



yo« G«t GOOD Vahi« at ANY Prlc^-Slllf , Lisle or Conoh 

2Scto$8.Mpcrpur i 

E me ry»B€§mCompm%^ 

IM.M1 KAMT»4tk ST, 



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Advertise in the LaJHir News 



1^*11 Goods at the lx>west 
''(Muiible Price. 



Wilson Bros. < ^ : 



N>% D-ws Goods 

Ne% <v\\ ; 

^'% Domets 
N»\ Sweatem 
^'•> I'nderwear 
^•V Hosiery 
^*V Percales 
N>V Shirt Wi 
N«V Cvncts ^ 
Nev Neckwear 
Nev Blankets 
Ne^ Caaiforta 




WILSON BUILDING. 
; j ROCHBStER. PBNNA. 

fftttmttnnnmwwi 



CLOTHING. HATS AND \y, 



FIRNLSHINGS 



The noot attrcctive and fash- * ^ * 
ionablo goods are always shown < ** * 
at our stores. 



QIALITY AND PRICE 
MAKE ECONOMY HERE 



Two Stores 



Wllaaa Bide ROCHESTER < * > 
P. 0. BMg.. REAVER, PA i ^ ; 

»»»»i»»»n»»i»» 



IRON CITY 

DRY CLEANING CO. 

We Have Just Opened Up a First Class 

Dry Gleaning, Pressing 

AMD DYEING 

Establishment, where we are prepared to attend 

to all classes of Ladies* and Gentlemen's 

work. Special attention Kiven to 

the proper handling: of 

Evening Gowns, Etc. 



EXPERTS ONLY ARE EMPLOYED. ALL 

WORK CALLED FOR AND DELIVERED. 

AUTO SERVICE 

(aVE US A TRIAL AND WE WILL CONVINCE 
YOU OF OUR SUPERIORITY. 



Iron City Dry Cleaning Co. 

HARRY L. CilLMORE, Manager. 
B. C. Phone, Rochester 5262. Dell 546-J 

103 BRIGHTON AYE., • ROCHESTER, PA. 






LIKE VELVET 



of wrhilrlfn. 



PsoAo •sqalsitelr a 

fc y yT l^^ oflj? CREME 

•■a fee eoaipliaialoa 



Section No. Two 



Beaver Valley Labor News 



Labor Day Editton 



PHYSICIAN DECLARES 
8-HOUR DAY ESSENTIAL 



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"■>Vt» 






(By WuodH UutchinMin. M. D.) 

Shorter huurti nieun leiiti exhuuKtinf; 
and life tjhurteninK futitrue, more 
enertry left at the end of the day for 
ifitelliKont and whole recreation, in- 
stead of beinK ho stupid and sodden 
and exhausted that drink \vai> the 
only relief. 

It nieans longer hours of sleep and 
Ltetter cleanin)^ out of the blood of 
fati);ue poiHons, so that they don't 
pile up and hurn^ out a man's arteries 
an<l throw him on the scrap heap at 
forty- five. 

Hifrher wa^es mean better food and 
more of it, better housing, better cloth- 
inK, better opportunities for the chil- 
dren and increasing self-resjiect and 
inteliiKence. \^ 

Part of these health and/efficiency 
improvements have come intentionally 
and directly by improving conditions 
of work, and the ventilaiton and lif^ht- 
inu and dust-and-fume-purifyinjc of 
shops and workrooms. 

Such strides have already been 
made in this direction that I have no 
hesitation in saying that some of the 
l)est lighter, best ventilated, purest 
aired and most sanitary buildinf^s I 
have ever seen are certain >?lass, steel 
ami cement built model factories which 
I have inspected. 

I should like to see houses, particu- 
larly apartment and tenements, built 
on the .same plan. 

Partly by providinjr medical care 
and attendance for the workers, \to- 
jrinninj; very crudely and narrowly 
with iiioif sur^rical attention to acci- 
dents and injuries occurinjf (luriny^ 
work luturs, then sproadinjr to the 
ruriful piiysical examination of all 
employes, then to the health comli- 
tions uihUt which thry lived. t«» th«- 
health (»f their families, swirnniin^ 
"•'OS. iryrimasiuins. vrardens, play- 
jrrmuuls, model suburbs. ' 

Finally, back a);ain to the work- 
man himself, carefully tlttinf; him 
to the work which his physical and 
mental makeup best adapt him for. 
and littintr the work to him so as to 
promote his health, increase his 
workintr power and lenf^then his life. 



Hut fur the jrreatest and most sub- 
stimtial part of this incn-ase of 
health and diminution of di.sease has 
been due to t\w shortening,' of the 
hours of work and the raisinK of the 
wajfes. 

All over the world today wherever 
hours of work are lonK, wa^es are low 
and the labor cost of the product hi^h ! 

Wherever in the world hours are 
shoK, waives are hiffh and the labor 
cost of the product low. 

If you know the length of the 
workintc <lays you can predict in ad- 
vance the heiKht of the wajje and the 
labor cost of the product. 

As hundreds of disastrous experi- 
ments with Hindu, with Chinese, 
with nef^ro factory labor have .shown 
the cheafiest labor is the dearest in 
the lontc run, and the more hours a 
day beyond einrht men work, the less 
they earn for their emplo>'ers. 

The same holds true, with certain 
partial exceptions, between lon>; hours 
and short hours, hif^hly paid and poor- 
ly paid occupations in the same coun- 
try. 

This (reneration has seen the work- 
ing day Ro down from twelve hours 
to ten, to nine, to rijrht, with a con- 
stant and striking; increase in the 
amount of work done per day by 
each worker, an«l intelligent and far- 
sijrhte<l manufacturers* are already 
talking of a .seven-hour day to still 
further increase the efTicicncy of 
their force. 

I believe many uf us will live to 
see it down to six. 

With cheap labor the labor cost 
may amount to a hfth of the whole- 
! sale price of the pro<luct, with hijrh- 
j ly paid labor it nuiy fall to a tenth 
aiul even a twentieth, while from the 
point of view of the worker it is no 
iiure coincidence that the lonjicst 
lived and healthiest occupations are 
the hijrhe.st paid, and the sh«)rtest 
lived and unhealthiest the poorest 
paiil. from bankers at the top of the 
list to ser\'ant jrirls at the bottom. 

The one measure which would do 
most today to improve the public 
health and lower the doHtli rate 
would be a minimum wajje of three 



ABRAHAM LINCOLN ON 

THK RMiHTS OF LABOR 



(From a s|»eech at New Havrn, (,'onn.. 
Man-h G, IHJit). > 

I am k\ui\ a system of labor jirevuiU 
under which laborers can strike when 
they want to, when- they are not 
obliged to work under all circum- 
stances, and are not tic<| down and 
obliged to labor whetlier you pay 
them for it or not. I like the system 
which lets a man "«|uit" when he 
wants to, and 1 wish it iiii^'lit prevail 
everywhere. 

I do not iH'lieve in a law tt> prevent 
a man Kt'ttin^ rich; that would do 
more harm than Koo<i. So, wldlc we 
do not propose any war upon capital, 
we do wish to allow the humblest an 
equal chance to jret rich w illi every- 
body else. 

1 want every man to have a chance 
to b(>tter his condition; that is the 
true system. 

I am not ashamed to confe.ss that 
twenty-five years apo I was a hinul 
laborer. 



WHAT LABOR WANTS 

IS MORK, MORK. MORE 



What doo labor want? It wants 
the earth and the Cullness tlun-of. 
There is nothing too precious, tttr i » 
is nothing to«) harmful, too lofty, 
loo ennoblini;, unless it is within the 
scope and comprehension of laborV 
aspirations and wAnts. 

we want inoVe school hou.scs and 
less jails; more books and less ar- 
senals; m«ir«- learning and le.>«.-> vice; 
more constant work and less ci<Niie; 
more leisure anti N-ss trn'«-d; iiotK 
justice an«l less rev«-njre; in fact, j^on- 
of the o|)portunities to cultivate our 
^>otler natures, to make niaidio<Hl 
more n«»ble, wonutiduxxl more iK-auti 
ful and cliildluxMl more happy and 
bright. — Samuel (lompeis. 



HAS NO PART IN 
UNIONISM'S SPHERE 



Uy the time they arrive at a con- 
clusion some people, are too tired to 
valk buck. 



Just because your blood is impoyer- 
ished, dim't attribute it to the high 
cost of living;. 



HOOM THK LABKL. 

The full blooded union man 
is the one who (iemand> tin- un- 
ion lalw'l all the time. 

The Uliipn label needs i om- 
mittees to make "the menitM'rs 
buy union lalud ^ood> more 
than committees to a.-k mer- 
chants to carry Union label 
(foods. 

Complaint is sometiiiio i :ade 
that merchants make ,1 hlufT 
at carrying union label ^'doijs in 
stock. This is p«*rfectl\ natund 
.-IS lone ii^ the union laliel de- 
mand is cimlincfl to cimimittee 
demands. When the rank and 
lile of the memb«'rship of the 
unions call for union label roods 
them.^ielves. the merchant.- will 
als«> stop bluffinK- 



<llolars a day for every adult woiker 
and a maximum day for all cla.-ses 
«)f ei^ht hours. 



THE MONAGA NATIONAL 



One of Ihe Valley's VuunKer liankinK 

Intilituliuns .M^hiK FTni 

Record. 




E 



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••• 



>•• 



To;the Union Workers 



It is the desire of the man- 
agement of the Majestic 
Theatre to express his ap- 
preciation of the patronage 
of the Hosts of Labor in 
the valley. It will always 
be the aim of this playhouse 
to cater to the wants and 
amusement of ail those 
affiliated with labor's cause 



X 



MAJESTIC THEATRE 

H. GOLDBERG, Mgr. 



■iC 



"1 



One of the nmst popular an«l effi- 
cient bankinu institutions in the Hea- 
ver vAUiiiJis the .Monaca .S'ational 
Hank, of .Monaca. Although located 
in a town of medium size and having: 
the competiiton of another .National 
itank, the Monata .National, since the 
date of its or^sui nation in 1!KM, has 
steadily projrres.-i'd, ^iiinini; appre- 
ciably »'ach vear n the volume of 
business enj«)\ed ;.nd constantly ail- 
ilinir to its alreai|\ 'ar>;e list of .s:iti.>. 
lied patrons. With n the |)ast two 
years the deposits i;i this bank have 
increased nearly .<1'K),0(M). as luwe 
also the institutions '(-.sources. Sur- 
plus an«l prolits have nearly doui)le.i 
x\x\^\ the succe.--^ whi»l the hank \\\\> 
reconled is proof th.r fair dealiiur. 
courtesy and up-to-.iate bankimr 
inethod> a|tpeal to the iieople of to- 
day. .■\<i ordinir to patr«i:.,s of the .M" 
naca Nation:d. a ^'reat deal of the 
cre«Iit for the success wiich the in- 
stitution L- enjoyin^'' is lue to the 
uniform courtesy and abilry of IJnii- 
ert C. CaniplMll, ,lo.>.epli I- >cher and 
Kenneth ."^eii^el. casiiier. .-issi.- t.iiit 
cashii'r atnl teller. r<'spe«ti\e|y, who 
are "on 'ie j^li" during bankmu^ 
hours. 

The olTiters !•' the hank 
ident, (Jeorire I ,\\ ; vice 
James R. ( iorn ey and 
Carey: casiiier. Utdwrt ( 
Jissistant c.ishiei. Jo.seph I-i.^icber; tel- 
!«'r. Kenneth Seijjel. 



In repl\ to a <|Uery by a newspapi-r. 
"What is a satisfactory \\x\v,vV' 
American Federation of Labor .Secre- 
tary Frank .Morrison said: 

"A satisfactory wauc is something 
more tluui ai weapon to keep the wolf 
from the <l«)or; a compensation which 
a man can disburse hims4>lf, an<i 
make both ends meet without his 
rich «'m|>lo>er's .social settlement 
workers eomin^j to him and attepipt- 
i.nt; to teach him hi»w to keep IxmIv 
and soul loejrther im what he n'ceives. 
.StM'ial settlement work is all rijrht 
ill its place. Kut it has no more place 
in the life of the workin^man than 
in the life of any other man. Oruan- 
ixed labor .says ot the capitalist: 
'Keep your social workers. (Jive us 
an ei>rht-hour day and a satisfactory 
uajre and y«>ur s«K'iul workers will 
n«»t be necessary. 

" '(live us pro|>or wapes, and we 
will conduct our hunu's and our lives 
in such a way that we will not have 
to be instructed as t«) how much we 
shall s(')end for n-nt. foini. clothini:, 
d«»ctors. amu.sements. ma>r;izines,' and 
penny n«>wspa|M'rs.' 

".No man wants t«i lie du-taled to 
a.< to what he shall >pend lii> mone\ 



fla(;rant violations 
of child labor laws 

".Most appallintc, indeed, is the ut- 
ter ilisre^janl for the laws reiatinf; to 
child lab<»r, compulsory education and 
the .>4-hour law for women," asserts 
(JeorKe H. Hamilton, of Columbus, C, 
chief insitector of workshops and fac- " 
tories, in his annual report. He says 
that in three nwmths it was found ne- 
cessary to institute 11,'i prosecutions : 
U\r vi»)lations of these laws. Seventy- 
tw«i per cent of the lines in the cases 
l»ro.s«-cute(l were suspended or remit- 
ted. Tin- report r«'fers rather slijyht- 
in^ly to u|»lin and other voluntary 
scK-ieties which are "most annoying to 
the department." 



Itir, the t|UJintity and <|uality of what 
he shall hu\. or how he shall buy 
it; what he sliall read, or where he 
shall jfo." 



M.NCOLNS l>HILO.SOI>HV. 



Abraham Lincoln oifce .said: "1 do 
the very be.-t I kn<nv how — the very 
best I can: and I mean to keep duintr 
s«> until the end. It the end brin^rs 
me out al' iiirhl. what is .said atrainst 
me won't amount to anything. If the 
end brink's me out w ronir. ten angels 
swearini: that I was riirht would make 
no diirenrx I ." K wi.se philoso|dier 
was he. -( iarment. 






00 



<>o 



00 






are: Pn.-- 
president, 

.Martin W. 
CamplH'll; 



OHIO INIOMSTS TO 

MEET OCTOBER NINTH 






<►<► 



00 



Fioni New ^ ork (« Chicsmo 
From Cinvinnati to Detroit 



UINIOIN DRAWIN 



SERVIC 



^fy^ 1 



d QUALITY 



learhes <»ut (o seixe voiivwith tlu* prodticfs of the 
world's i.iijiesl hriuht\inishecl steel plant. 



Ik C 






(HFicers of the Ohio State Fe«loni- 
tioii of Labor have issued a call for 
the Thirty-thinl annual convention^ to 
he held at Toledo, hey'inninp' Octoln^r 

i'.tth. 

I Ohio unionists have l»een res i. sting 
the attempts of private liability in- 
surance companies to weaken the 
stale compensation law that they m;iy 
write insunince. As this.(|ue8tion di- 

I n-ctly affects every wage earner in 

I the state, Secretary-Trr'asunT Don- 
nelly s^ys it w ill l>e one of the pnncj- JJ 
|ial <ieliberations of the convent im.^\< >< ► 



I Union Drawn Steel Co. 



00 



IJesistence to wage reduction by 

union workers is the check upt>n still 

(urther encroachments upon the unor- 

' t'.inized. To s«'cure an adv.ince either 

, in wagj's or to prevent a reduction in 

i ours of labor by union w<irkers. is to 

1 liring corresiiondingly the>e .idv.in- 

I tages to the unorganized toiler.-. 



Om uaioluni.sc .•sima !<»• at .W'u York. IMiiUuieipliia. 
Cincinnati. Di'tioit an«l Clticajro, enaliUs \i.s to ship 
your oifh-r.^ on .short iiotiic. Un aiiytliiiijr in W^s- 
.M'MitM-, Oponhfarth. Nifkid, Chronjc ami V^ana- 
(liiiin SttM'l. Cohl Drawn Sliallin;!;. Klcvator (Ilide.s. 
Screw Slock. Koiinii.s. F''lats. Sniiari'.s and Iloxagron.s 



Main OfTice and Work.s, 



:;^t Beaver Falls, 



Pennsglvania jSE 



* * « * 



offices and Warehouses — New Vork, 4»»n-4<»<> \\:ydiington 
.'^t. PhiladelphTa. Ninth and Willow .Sts. Cincinnati, 
Spring <In»ve Av**. Chicagi». .'>7<l West A<i:ims ."st. Detroit, 
llt-j:; .St. Aubin Ave. l!ost«»n, '.••> .Milk .St. JJulfalo, While 
liuilding. m 



♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ ♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ 



k: 



♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦»♦»♦♦♦♦»♦♦»♦»♦ 









i><* 






00 

00 















y 







« 


To 


Organized Labor 




, I take thi*. 


mean.s or expre.s.^inu: hy appreciation 




foi' the putrona^e of Organized I.4ilM)r in the Heaver 




\alley. Offei 


inu you guaranteed kcnkIs, and efTicient 




.service, we 


are looking forward to a continued 




patronageA 


6 


'" 




Youm. 

FICEDERICK WEBSTER, 


1 


^ 


— New Brighton. 



«•• 









?f.. 






/• 



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f , 



V 



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4 



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■.-. -ti ^ 



Pagfe two 



BDAVER VALLEY LABOR NEWS 



Sepetmber h 1916 



%^^W&^^^^^^- ^l#2^'^'^i^^t^'^^'**^5^^ 




LABOyS : i f ^'^p'" ^/ 

"'■ • ^ SAMUEL 

Achievenients ® eOMPfeHS 
^ and Issues 



'<?5?^««?^S?^^ 



n»»n»»»»»»»»»»»»««»»»»»»»m 

< -; ; . •■-.■. 4 ►<► 

: :; : - - -t-^ ^"^■-. ■ - — '^-.--.^^..... ■ j ►j ; 

;;j; , ^ . : — \ « , Jm; 



!S> 



OPALITE 



White Glass 



Made at Monaca 

And Used for 

Counter Tops at the 

Junction Park Restaurant 

Largest Manufacturer of 

WHITE GLASS 




Standard of the World 



/<-. 



»»»«llii«H>if i »iii» i i»H»n > ;»H»» i » 



;^ 




4^ 



Hotel Hamilton 

S. a HAIOLTON, Pw »ri« to r 
PITT8BUIGH AND I.AKB BSB DEPOT 



\ Batn $iMP»liaD 



Honaca, Pa i 



t i nnm ti M i mn! i mM i MHM tititi>i m tti»titiit f 



Labor Day, l«,U(i, brings the work- 
ers of Aiiierka the rijrht to cheer and 
conlideiice in the trade* union niove- 
lueii. There have been tests and crises 
fhat liavc proved its fundamental 
principles; there have been opportuni- 
ties that, have tested its practical elTi- 
ciency. rhroujrh them ail the trade 
union niovcinent has made sure pr©- 
irros and t,'"ined in confident vision 
lor the future, 

Kvery natiohal and international, 
e\;er.v locai ^ union atf dinted to flic 
Tiiu'ricAn Federation of Labor, has 
maiie deliniteTn«|fr<yiS in' securing for 
its members jrreater advantages in 
those things which are fundamental 
of htlterment in ^11 rfclations oj" life.- 
In siiine organizatiolis the success has 
been phenomenal. 

'Inking the labor movement as a 
wholf, there hAs been greater progress 
in s«turing the eight-liou/ day or the 
shorter workday, than in any other 
siniiliir period of time. The meaning 
of these viitorivs can be in 
terpreted only in the light of full un- 
derstanding of the meaning of thp 
eight -hour day. The shorter workday 
is .something mf>re tharf an economic 
demand. It is a demand for opiwr- 
tunity for rest, recufjchition, and de- 
velopment; things which make life 
more than inechanical drudgery. 

Th workers whosi- working i>eriods 
are short, are es.sentially different 
from tho^e who are so worn by toil 
. that they havtf neither energy nojr 
miiul for other things of life. They 
■ liecoiue more , energetic, more re- 
sourceful workers with keener men- 
tality and greater producing power. 
It inevitably • f«>ll<Uvs that 'the short 
hour workers arc the best paid work- 
ers. With every, reduction in hours 
there is always a corresponding in- 
crease in \\;rges. Wherever demands 
for the shorter workday, and higher 
wages have been presented and urged 
by {trganlzed workers during the past 
' year, they have met with success. 
These economic gains have a potent 
1 relation to the social side of life. 
' Short«|[p|g the period of work 
lengthens the '.period for development 
; and for all of the other acti^'ities -that 
, belong to t-hc normal individual. In- 
creases in wages give the workers the 
means for taking advantage of the in- 
creased opportunitiejs of the .shorter 
workday. The workers of short hours 
and better wages become very difTcr- 
ent citizens from those who are so 
exhausted by the daily grind that 
they have neither the time nor the 
energy for thought nor aspiration. 
These gains mean better homes, bet- 
ter food, better clothing; time and op- 
portunity for the cultivation of the 
best and the highest that is possible 
in the life of man. 

FIconomic achievements are the 
basi^ upon which the workers can se- 
' cure social and political progress. The 
power which secures these achicve- 
mt^nts is the power that will secure 
justice for them in every other rela- 
tion. Shorter hours and Higher. wages 
Cive the opportunity and the means 
to live better, more purposeful lives. 

Power through economic organiza- 
tion means political power. There 
must be an economic basis in order to 
give political activity reason for ex- 
istence and a program. By organiz- 
ing its economic power to secure po- 
litical protection and by adhering 
strictly to a non-partisan political 
program, the American Federation of 
I^bor has won glorious legislative 
victories. 

The object of legislation which or- 
ganized labor has' sought to obtain, is 
to establish larger and bettei'<A<ppor- 
tunities for life and freedom. Or- 
ganized labor does not seek through 
leginotidn to d9 things for the work- 
era that they can not do for them- 
selves. It only seeks to Establish for 
i them opportunities. This principle ap- 
I plies to workers in private industry. 
I In the case^f workers in irovemroeiit- 
al em|ri«yment, where the gtivem- 
meni is the ^employer and conditions 
of employment can be fixed only by 
le^slation, Uien the orgafiized labor 
movement seeks to do something more 
than merely establish opportunity. It 
must secure legislation regulating 
conditions of employment. 

The record of the legislative 
achievements of the labor movement 
since 1906, when the non-partisan po- 
litical party was inaugurated, is one 
of splendid victories. The two most 
impoi:t*nt 4M« the Seamen's Act and 
the labor sections of th« Claytoo^nti- 
trust law. Hie greatest thing In bot|i 
of these acts is the advancement of 
human free d om. 

The problem of human f roedom was 
not'^endld by the work of Lineoln. 
There sUll rsmaiaed a elaas bound to 
involuatarjr servitnds, the ssamsn. 
The SeamsB's Act brings frssdom 
to these worhsrs. It maksi AnMrieaa 
soil sacrsd to freedom, a eountry upoa 
«Hiieh a bondman may not step with- 
out losing his legal fetters. Frsad 
and given ha epportunitjr to protect 
theniMlves, the Mamen are prfwif 
tiMir demaads for hii^Mf wagM sad 
better eoaditioBs. Seetion « «f the 
ClartefB Aathrust Aet eeataiM the 
moat advaaead eoneept of fkaaden. 



.»'• 



"Teh labor of a human being is not « 
commodity or article of conjinerce.'' 

According to old tmje philosophy, 
political economy^ and Jegal thought,; 
labor pc^ver was a commodity and* 
article of commerce 4n no way differ- \ 
ent from coal, potatoes, and iron. 
Under this- concept the most recent 
attempts have -been^ made to hold 
workers in oppressiqn and under the^ 
d(^iiinition of employers, but the pow- 
er to produce commodities is some-' 
thing different from the commodities 
thejuselves. It is personal, human, a j"^ 
part of life itsefiT^ Under the concept 
that labor was a commodity, and 
therefore property, employeraf have 
tried to repress efforts of workers for 
projfress and for larger- liberty, by - 
punishing these efforts under antir 
trust legislation and by attempting 
to restrain them through the ipjutvc- 
tive process. It was to proh?ct the 
worker's against titese abuses and to ' 
estabfish. recognition of the concept 
that the -workers and all of their at- 
tributes wcre*^ human, that, the Uibor 
sections of the Clayton Act were en- 
acted. In addition to -these big tichieve- 
ments, many other important human- 
itarian Taws have been l^nacted' by, 
Congress, increa.sing in number with 
every session of Congress since the | 
50th session. 

As Labor l>ay. llUfi. comes iti', ami 
one of the most critical political cam- 
paigns since the Civil War perioti, it 
is well to call attention to the big is-, 
sue of the campaign, which has u na- 
tional, as well as an international re- 
lation. The issue is the attitude of 
the political parties toward questions 
of humanity and human welfare. The ; 
party npw in power has in its legisla- ! 
tive achievenients placed . the highest 
(-Continued on Page Six.) - i 




■. ^mm^i^m 




^K^ 






American Plan 



^. 




JJe. 



* tt 



Rates $2.00 and Up, 



Hot and Cold Water in all Rooms 



Dining Room Noted for Its Well Cooked 
Meals and Service 




A GROWING INSTITUTIOli 



' I 



The Beaver Trust Company Shows i 
Splendid tiirowth^Prdgressive 
Yet Conservative Bank. 



On Lincoln Hi^way 



j» j» j» 



E. E. CHAFFEE, Prop. 



Beaver Trust Company wjxn organ- 
ized and commenced business on 'July 
1, 11)02, succeeding the, Beaver Na- 
tional Bank, which had been in busi- 
ness since July 1, 1896, the officers 
of the Tryst Company at that time 
bging the i|ame as the National Bank: 
J. K. Leonard, President; E. K. Hum, 
Vice President; C. M. Hughes, Secre- 
tary and Treasurer. 

The capital stpck of the Trust Com- 
pany was made $300,000.00 in order 
that it might be in position to fully 
care for the financial wants of the 
community. To thiff capital stock has 
been added more than $100,000.00 of 
.surplus and undivided profits from the 
earnings of .the company during the 
past fourteen years. 

I he company ' transacts a general 
banking and trust business, receiving 
deposits subject to check, paying in- 
to/est on time and savings deposits, 
and acting in all trust capacities.^giv- 
ing special attention to the Trust De- 
partment in which it has successfully 
rcted as trustee, executor, administra- 
tor and guardian for many estates and 
individuals, it having on its books at 
this time nearly three hundred ac- 
counts of this character, and has the 
satisfaction of never having received 
a criticism for its method of handling 
Trust Accounts. 

T^ the date of the transfer of the 
Beaver National Bank Ao Beaver 
Trust Company, the total deposits 
were less than $250,000.00. Now, in- 
cluding Trust Funds, this item 
amounted, as shown by its statement 
of June 30, 1916, to $1,416,642.06. 

Several years ago the company 
found iU quarters at 670 Third street, 
Beaver, now the home of The Daily 
Times, too small for the proper trans- 
action of its business, st which time 
the Beaver Trust Building, its present 
home, waa. erected and quarters fur- 
nished^ which give ample room and 
tiie best of aecommodttions for the 
transaetiflii of its business. Per- 
haps the^ most prominent feature of 
iU furnishings is its splendid steel 
vault, buil$ not only for ita own use, 
but for the beneiit of its patrons, in 
which are located the ssfe deposit 
boxes for th^ use of Its customers. 
These boxes- furnish absolute security 
from both Are and theft, and are be- 
coming more and more popular amoog 
the people of this community. 

As a whole, the Beavar Trust Com- 
pnhy has been proitreMiire ss well as 
conservative, and the steady growth 
of its business from year to yeer in- 
dicates the strong flnaaeial position 
which it holds in the eommuiiity. 

Its present olfieers and Clfcetors 
are: U. 8. Stronas, president; C. M. 
Hughes, vice prsaMant; Agnew Hies, 
▼ice president; Frsd G. Brace, treas- 
urer; Chas. C. Galtoa, asst. trsasurer; 
W. H. Harper, manager of lasursaee 
Department. Dirsetors— U. S. Strooss, 
laoMS Galey. ^Agnaw Hies. C. M. 
flofhos. J. R. Lseaard, W. J. Mellon. 
F. G. Morhead. W. S. Moore. J. R. 
Martin. Robert Ritchie. J. W. Dough- 
erty. 




Rochester 



Pennsylvania 




I T Pittsburgh - | 
I Coal Products Co. | 




f\ ' 



MANUFACTURERS OF 

CHEMICALS 




OFFICE AND WORKS 



is: MONACA, 



PENN'A i:: 



»iM»»»»»»» i »i»ni»»»» i »»n ii M i i»g 



On Street Car Uae 



Near Lake Brie aad Peaaa. Depot 



-i*» 



^otoL Jffonaoa 



Pa. 



Cor. WasUagtea Ava. * Niath StrseC, Mi 

. J. T. CASHBAUGH. Praprieler . 

ALL MODBRH !:^ BOTH PHONBS 

OONYBNIBNCBS BATB8 lUf 

$>$#»>tl f t#»#»#»t MMM »»#$ MMMM ## f tt » $$t$t$$li 



. I 



v 



IV"* 



\V . * 



. *« 



^ # 



:*r- 



';.•* 



September 1, 1916 



HKAX KK VALLEY L\IK>R NKWS 



Page Three 



♦♦^♦♦♦♦■♦♦^ ♦♦<♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ 



/ 



Olive Stove Works 



ROCHESTER* 



PENN'A. 




BUILDERS OF GOOD STOVES 
FOR SALE BY ALL LEADING DEALERS 




is; 






m»»»»»»»»»i:»:{t»»»»n»»»»»»m 



^♦♦♦♦♦♦^♦f ♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ 



^♦♦♦♦♦♦♦^'♦♦^♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦^ 



Meet Me at the 

PALACE OF SWEETS 

The Home of Fine Confections and Delicious Ice Cream. 

133 Brighton Avenue, 
B. C Phone 7403. ROCHESTER, PA. 



IS intemitiDK. m <'<lucation as in 
olluT plmses of I'lFort, to ua-uKionilly 
tukc a «ur\ey or w lial ha*. Iteen done 
in llu' recent pa«t, ami if possible, to 
project ourselves sulTu-ifnt !y into the 
fuluiv lo see what ih iir<>l)aWe or at 
least |>ussiblc in the yoars iniinediute- 
ly to come. 

Durint; the past , t«n yeairs the 
«chool rei»istn»tion in lUavt r County 
huK increased lifly ( JO) [mt cent, and 
this increase hu» h<'en aliimst entire- 
ly in the south half uf tlu- county; for 
the locution of this iiirr«'a.si' Wood- 
lawn hus been lar^fiy n-sponsible. To 
care for this incnase of the pupil 
population, almost one million ($1,- 
(>(K),UOO) dollars have lieen expended 
for building and eijuipinent. 

There are five hiiff.invl seventy-live 
(575) teachers in Heaver r«)unty; of 
which number four hundred (400) are 
in incorporated districti> and three 
hundred fifty (.'150) are liK-ated in the 
south half of the county. 

These figures indicate a rapid in- 
crease in the number of pupils in the 
county. This numerical projrress 
must always keep pace with material 
prosperity which, in Heaver county, 
has been marked during the past ten 
(10) years. 

With the increase of population 
and the atmosphere of advaticemcnt 
in all other lines of activity, the 
thinkintr individual naturally intiuires 
what has been the advance in educa- 
tion. To this nuestion the profession- 
al school man or woman answi-rs with 
something of embarrassment that the 
advance has not been all that could be 
hope<l, not the same advanc«' in school 
efficiency and .school improvement as 
has been manifested in all lines of 
manufacturing: and commercial activ 
ity. The cause for e«lucation in such 
districts us Heaver county iK-irtK tardy 
in making; the same advano-ment as 
does every phase of competitive busi- 
ness is two-fold; first, the natural ten- 
dency nf the mass of individuals is 
to advance when there is .some mater- 
ial or s|>ecial incentive promptins: the 
advance. In education this type of 
stiinulus is, in a lar»re way. lacking;. 
Men will buy expensive machinery to 
utilize a by-product of their factory, 
who would not employ an extra teach- 
er for their own children if the chil- 
dren could be cared for at ull in the 
old way without this extra teaching 
force, although these same men were 
aware that by an additional teacher a 
great saving of time and effort on the 





The Efficient School 




DdTsCoBegc is an Accredited School 



Sfie Emblem 
®ricieni School 




That means that it was honored by \)e\ng elected to 
niertil)ei'ship in the National Association of Accredited Com- 
mercial Schools. This org^anization is composed of the best 
business trainingr schools in America — schools that are 
known to have high educational standards and which have 
definitely pledsred themselves to maintain them and to Rive 
to their students the benefit of the most modem and pro- 
gressive methods of business and instruction at all times. 

All applicants for membership in this association are 

passed upon by a competent board of leading business 

ed uc^tors and ai*e elected or i-ejected purely on the basis of merit. The purpose of 
the organization is the elevation of business education and the mstntenance of such 
standai'ds as will enable the pi'ospective student to know where he may obtain the 
triiining that is demanded by the business public. 

The Accredited Schools conduct a univeisal employment bureau which gives the 
student the piivilege of calling upon any accredited school anywhere for assistance 
in securing a position. 

A gi*&Juate of an Accredited School will find his or her service in great demand 
l)e€ause graduation from such an institution will, in itself, Ije a passport to a good 
position in many instances. 

While Duff's College has the honor pf Ijeing the only Accredited Business Col- 
lege in Beaver Valley, we look foi-ward hopefully to the day when all commercial 
schools will have raised their courses of instruction to that high degree of efficiency 
. that is required to become a member of the National A.ssociation of Accredited Com- 
niercia! Schools. 

Superior advantages are enjoyed by those who attend an Ace edited Com- 
inercial College. 



1. 
2. 
3. 
4. 
5. 
6. 



Standard courses of study. 

Guai'anteed equipment. ^" 

Adequate teaching force. _ T 

Universal Employment Bureau. ' 

FrateiTial Fellowship that exists among all students throughout the country. 

Absolute honesty in all representations concerning this school and its ad- 



rantages. 

Write for 



The Handy Folder 

rr ANSWERS YOUR INQUIRIES TO THE POINT 





BEAVER FALLS 



BEAVER, PA. 





part ui the « liildiin v\ouUl be realized. 
In the one t a.oi' there is an inii!ie<liat*- 
n-turn in diviilfiulh while in tiie other 
lln" r«'turii, ;illniiu;rh iiiort' vulual)!«', is 
not ut Of HI totivcrtihle into the ••coin 
of the rtMliu." 

It is tilt natural tend»'iuy of manj 
IK'ople to ki\u\vinvcly short«ii their own 
lives by evil praetires. il tliey only 
may en jo.\ . in the present, a iV-w 
thin^js wliieli lon^r life uttuld eliini 
nuti'." JiiHiifdiute picasuie in tin- 
f«Miii of 111.. ta\«'S i.< of vitally inun- 
in>port:;iicc to many than tht- pli-a.-uri' 
and sati.-ifaction twenty years luiuc, 
which u ouUi Ik- lUliveinl from .>.r<inn 
iiioiX' cliiiiinii better euucate«l in tlieir 
own coiMiiiunity. wlu-tlier Uu-^i- iliil- 
(Iren Iw irum under llieir «>\\ ri n»«ii 
tree or nut; second, mH many people 
(•ulside of tile teaeliin^: prufi-.-sKin un- 
derstand that then" i.-, a real .»cienee 
in educ:itioi[ and, as a re.sult, do not 
estinuilc it proiK-rly. However trite 
Ihc statement may Ik-, it is true that 
there aie laws of the mind which nmst 
be accurately known by the tt-acher if 
the pupil is to receive an ade«|uate 
education. These laws an- as import- 
ant in education as are the (ihysical 
laws in medicine and the diajrnosis of 
disease. 'I'herc are parents who want 
their child to "teach a year or two" 
before takinj* up a profi-s.-iion ifr buil- 
nes.s; theie are school boards who w ill 
employ tliis iiidividual. and then- are 
coniniittees that will tolerate such 
ser\'ice. No one of these, whether il 
be parent, school board ineml»er, or 
citizen, would employ a physician who 
hud n<»t taken a definite professional 
iraininu and was well e(|uip|H><l in the 
diairno.sis of dis«'jise and adminisler- 
injr iiu'dicine, mud less an individual 
who hjul not studiid medicine at all.j 
but who wanted to practice ine<lieine ' 
on the people f(»r "a year or two," in 
order that he may l.ave a small in- 
coMu- until he di-cide.- what pr«»fes.>>i<.n 
he decides to follow Without any { 
professional trniniii;; anyone may j 
leach school who can pass an exami- \ 
nation in a few text bo.iks «lesi»,'naHHl i 
by tlu- .<tale jjovernimiit, few if any 
of .such hooks have anything; what-l 
ever to lio with the profession of; 
teaching'. 

Into the remedy of this there is, 
86me neee.ssity to intjuire. PeopU- in i 
Kener:il are not able to analyze the| 
success of some men and the failure 
of others. This analysis in compli-i 
cated b<'cause .^o many factors enter! 
into the case. However, a few jfen- 
eral features may be recojcnized. It 
is u complaint on the part of parents 
fre<|uently heaixl by school men, that 
because "of n poor teacher during? a 
certain year" their child or children 
never recovered educationally, became 
discourajced. and finally dropped out 
of school. Althouf^h many more 
teachers are educational failures than 
arc recotrni/ed by parents, yet the 
fad that some pt-ople outside of the 
profession are able to recofniize the 
failure when it is prominent, indi- 
cates that there is much inefficiency 
on the part of the teachinj? in our 
public schools and, as a result, much 
educational waste— a by-product that 
should be utilized in the case of 
crowded rooms or an inefficient teach- 
er, who may know much about hlstoYy 
and mathematics but little or noth- 
in^r about the profession of teachinic. 

In school statistics, the school rates 
are very hiifh that is able to brinic 
eijrhty (80) per cent of its pupils from 
the beifinninf? to the hijch school 
irrade. The high school that is able 
to graduate fifty (50) per cent of 
those who enter its first year is rat- 
i ed above the avenifrc. No owner of 
j any modem factory would allow 
twenty (20) per cent of his raw ma- 
terial to be lost in the process of man- 
ufacture if he could buy a machine 
I capable of utilizinfc this twenty (20) 
j per cent, and no factory board of 
I trustees could wanl off bankruptcy 
j for lonjf that permitted fifty (50) per 
cent of its raw material to be wasted. 
Although the factory and the school, 
are not, in every particular, analo- 
(Tous, yet the fact remains that mod- 
em communities will tolerate little 
pro);ress in education, so little that 
the schools of Ikiaver county look 
very much as they di«l twenty-live 
(2.'>) years uko, and aia; largely con- 
ducted in the same way and by the 
.-aine type of teachers, while marked 
progress is shown in medicine, farm- 
ing implements, telephones, factories, 
l)uildin»r material, and in every line of 
material and professional advance- 
ment, except that of the school. It is 
reserved for it to jjet on as best it can 
under the operation of old methods, 
and with supplies, ef|uipment, and 
teachers consistent with the lowest 
possible tax. 

The county superintendent may 
recommend and has often recommend- 
ed, and has done much more than is 
re<|uircd under his contract, for im- 
provement and advance, but unless 
such recommendations are followed 
little of value will result. 

That this is true is evidenced by 
the fact that the averaf^e teacher in 
Beaver county receives less salary per 
month than the waires paid to the 
common laborer. Professional equip- 
ment is impossible tvider such condi- 
tions. Without professional equip- 
ment «n the part of the teacher, lit- 
tle advance can be made. Hiirher sal- 
aries and better equipped taachen 
will mean proffresi, but these will 
come slowly so long as school boardi 
bicker and barfain, not for what ii 
best, but for the least possible whidi 
will allow ths schools to qperate. 



GERHEJM'Si 



Fall Goods Now on Display 



L.\TK.ST STVLKS I.\ 



j Clothin.i^ Hats, Caps, Shoes il 

► Jo 

Gents' Furnishings 

FALL SLITS M.VDE TO OKDKR IJV 

Kahn Tailoring Co., B. Stern & Son 
and Nark Amheim 



A FILL LLNE OF THE FAMOUS 



] : r l&l,^KafiDef O 



KK.\I)V-M.\DE SI ITS 



J. Walter Cerheim | 



\^l THIRD AVEM E, 



FREEIK)M, I 



♦♦»♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦»♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦»♦♦♦♦ 



♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦»♦»♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦»♦♦♦♦♦♦»♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ 






Ik'il i*hon«- 9«IJ 



It. ('. Phone II MA 



-Sfe 



Central ^^otoL 



j 



I'nder .New .^lanaKeme'nt 
HENRY SEI^P, Jr.. PROP. 



Steam Heat, Electric Liuht, HeHt of Service, Street 
Cars to all Riiilrwid Stations 



Ii; 



-o- 



•*/ 



Rates $L5() and Ip Per Day 



A GOOD PLACE TO EAT. TRY IS 



BEAVER FALLS, 



PENN'A. ; H J 



♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ 



♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦-♦♦♦♦♦♦♦-♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ 



I The Reliable Grocery | 

For eight years I have l)een servinjr the people pf Free- 
dom and vicinity to the l)est of my ability, always 
keeping in stock a first-cla.ss line of 

iS: Groceries, Canned Goods <§: 
jS: Smoked Meats, Etc, %te %» jS: 

<M> It has l>een my aim to provide my patrons with the \^> 

\ h\ .same grade of goods that aie to Ik? found in modem gro- \ ^ \ 
ct'iy .stores, and I feel that I have accomplished by aim. 

I desire to extend my thanks to customers for thoir 
jrenerous patronage and to assure pi'esent and future 
patrons that the high standard of my store will l)e main- 
tained. „ 

That I am friendly to organized Ial)or is a fact which 
is well known. 

C. L. KRIBBS I 



\ 



Third Avenue, - - - - ' FREEDOM, PA. 

irt»ii»««»»»»»H:»»»»»»»»»»»i» g 

Roche^er Carpet Co. 

CM. RICKEY, Prop. 

Carpets, Rogs^ Linoleiiiiui, Lace Curtains and Matting 

BothPhonm. ROCHESTER, PA. 



,-v-- —- 



.} 



.■■( 



•V 



:i 






:.•♦■■: V. 



r ■.-m-^ 



'S^, 



Page Four 



BEAVEB VALLEY LABOR NEWS 



Scpetmber 1, 1916 




ss^a^BMi ^l^ BIG SHMTItGE OF 



"Ju^ Watch Us Grow" 



OUR QUARTERS 25 YEARS AGO 



, ^1 




; i» { nin» ii unnn»>»i»»n»i»»»»»n»B 



UNSKILLED UBOR i=l 
IN THIS DISTRICT iii 



M 



Quality and Fair Dealing 
Tell the Story oe ^ ^ .le 





OUR PRESENT QUARTERS 



Key^one Bakery 



WEST BRIPGEWATER 



F. Walters & Sons, Inc. 

- .... . PENNSYLVANIA 











^^ 



OH Ptcs 





^^**^raStr' rS^/^fcf<^^'T ,ivyjV :" ,^^i^^^k^j^^'^\ ;', \'^'\. -y':- j^S; [^"SaCggf^XaJjlwlav r] j^aTS-^i^'iju- ifcCn) J)[U u t i>.'-a£ ?a£^ [ agE 



HARNETT'S 

Have alwiiys taken the side of Labor. A 'call will convince. 

■""■♦'■ 

Just arrivbd 

Complete Line Fall and Winter Suits 

For Men and YounK Men. These are to be Tound at our 

Department Store, - Monaca,Pa. 







AT OUR SHOTSTORES 

We Have Just Received a shipment of 

Shoes 



At the pretient time tiie lubur Kit- 1 
uutiun U u Kreutvr c>uuih> for worry 
to the industries in und uround Pittii- 
bur^li Ihan the subject of wur orders 
or the substitution of commercial 
products for munitions. 

Till,' shurtuKc a|)plies nm inly to un- 
skilled lubor und to coal iiiiiuT^, :iiul 
the .situation is uKKruvatcd by tbc in- 
drpt'iidence of coiimion lubor, wliich 
is viituully unorKiinizid, u* well na by 
in^ihlonce on the part of urKuniiifti 
labor for tl»e strictest obstrvance of 
all the minutiae of wuk^' iiKi'«^i'i>>('i>li^- 
C'ual Mine(r# Scarci-. 

In the Kiskiininetuh ami AlioKlii-ny 
valleys G,00() coal miners have been 
idl«' i»ecause of tlillVreru'ctj in liie in- 
terpivlution of retenliy nejfotiated 
contracts. 

In the ritthbur^h ilislritts IJ.UtX) 
inuir miners couki be u,s«>(l tiian are 
available. 

'Ihe Kustem Ohio tield iu .s!iort 
4,IKI0. urtd the tairmoat^^iiSL-KiL.) 
district nee<is lU.IMU). It iii estimated 
that at least lli.OOO common laborers 
could lind eniploynienl in Allegheny 
County. 

.Shorts Ki' of (.'omniuai Labor 

The shortut^e of conniioii labor in 

rittsburich is delaying projrresti on 

I the additions to old plants und the 

construction of new. I.itbur of this 

kind is not oiil\ more in(le|H>iident 

but it is les.s nomadic in its habits 

than formerly — t-eratiniy les.s nomudic 

than the immiKrunts who before the 

. war cunie annually in lurirc numbers 

I to the Kreut industrial centers in this 

! country. 

i It has been a common occurrence 
recently for laborers to apply for 
work in mills and furnaces located 
' within the Tittsburtrh city limits and 
to refuse to jfo a few miles up the 
Mononi^ahcla Valley, where the Steel 
; Corporation is building- its new by- 
; pHxluct coke ovens. Thi8 latter pro- 
j ject is one amonfc a number that is '. 
j Ix-int; seriously delayed by lack of ' 
I common labor. 
I To obtain relief an experiment is ' 

bein^r attempted with ne^rro labor 
I from the South, something that has 
I not been resorted to in many years. 
The difficulty in retaining help on a 
I new job is scarcely less than that of 
^assembling the men, the complaint 
i being common that contractors' fore;^ 
, men do not hesitate to "steal" men 
i from each other. 

The cause of the shortage is three- 
fold — first, the stoppaire of immigra- 
tion; second, the emgirution which oc- 
curred during the latter part of last 
year, and, third, the unprecedented ac- 
tivity in industrial circles. 

This activity has been increased by 
the policy of prosperous corporations 
in devoting a larger percentage of 
surplus earnings to new construction, 
with the view of diversifying output. 
.Munition .Makent .Sot Worrying 
Pittsburgh munition makers are 
much less concerned over the future , 
export trade than might be inferred i 
from recently published reports. | 

A fulse impression was created by : 
a statement uppeurinf; lust month that , 
the We.stinghouse Air Brake Com- 1 
pany, having completed its war order 
and no more being then in sight, was 
proceeding to dismantle the tempo- 
niry plant provided for that business. 
There has been no dismantling and 
iton'e is immediately contemplated. 
For one thing, there is the pi-ospect 
that the shortage of supplies discluscd 
by the iiiobiliz^ition of the National 
(iuard on the McNican border may 
bring contracts Ironi the United 
States (lovcmincnt. 

What is of greater con.se<iuence, ' 
hov.ever. is the fact that the most im-! 
portunt piece of machinery used in^ 
the manufacture of various kinds of 
army and navy supfilies is the lathe. 

With comparatively slight change 
and little cost, it is said, the.sc lavhes 
iiuiy be readjusted for the output of 
priMluet.s used in peaceful pursuits. 

The demand for lathes and similar 
machinery is in excess of the sup))ly. 
und there will be no dismantling of 
munitions plants of the throwing of 
machinery into the scrap heap while 
these conditions last. 



THE "WCM4IIT" STORE 



0PENIIN6 DISPLAY 



& 



OF 



OUR NEW 



Fall Footwear 



^ <M^ 




{ H I' .'■' ^ 



PRESENTING MANY NEW 
and BEAITIFI L CREATIONS 
IN TWO-TONED EFFECTS 



These New Styles are Not Only iS; 
for Ladies, But Misses' and 
the Children, too 



JOIN THE ADVANCE GUARD 
OF IPTO-DATE DRESSERS 



^- 




jJ 



I Albert S. Dean || 

iS; Next to Pqstoffice ;j; 

i=^ RRAVFP . PFNN'A iS: 



g BEAVER, 



PENN'A. is: 



♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ 



♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ 




Which Are To Be Found at Both Our Monaca and Rochester Stores. 

CALL AND SELECT A PAIR 



BARNETTS 



MONACA, PA. 




'MjiSC: ' 






^&nw^is^tfJS 
[^hlCHEalHAMONDa] 

^Gold^SdverWa 

.LMHSESrVARIETYi 

AMD POPULAR, 

PR1GCL 



SAVOY HOnL AMD | 

BK8TADEAMT . * 

WoridanMB't H0I1L 

OpMi tkjami Might 

IM 8e%iMh At^ Bmvot Fkllf 




nishing Goods ^ 



'J Rochester - - Monaco •:[ 

>»n»» i » i »»u»»»»»»»»i»»i i »»»» i 8 



nmniummn i n i m i i ii mm i n i n ii mm i m 



THE SMOKE HOUSE 
AndrvMr r« KonuBMit P'^P* 
Itotail daaltr in* Totmeeo, Can- 1 
dkM, Pwtal Ciuds, PipM, Cmh « 
^TBf GlolM and PostaiaC^spa. J 
vV Nj|n|r. Tani A^%§ BadMiCOT. ^ 



ADAM KORNMAN 
Oar Spadal Rraada — Kom- 
man's BaaTnr Valley Spaelal; 
Kommaa'i Batt Stogie; Kom- 
naa'i CMd Madal Extra. 
Hacal UMcah Elig., 



-..■•• ■ -^i 



BEAVER VALLEY LABOR NEWS 



\l\ ^'?WW?'??^^^'s?'??W5^ 



MORRISON 





--fiiSttif.^'^.Jfcv 



Page Five 



Pe n n sy Ivania 



OFFICERS 



C. M. Hughes, 
J. A. Doyle, 
A. C. Osburn, 
S. B. MiUer, • 
J. A. Matijflscic, 



Pi'esident 

• - Vice President 

Secretao'-Treasurer 

Assistant Secretaiy-Treasurer 

Manager Foreign Department 



Km 



^■ 



Capital, Surplus and 
Undivided Profits 

$170,000.00 




Consistent With Good Banking 

:f» i nii i nn»»»»»:»»»»»»» i i iii i ii »»8 



ti::tl- 

(lis- 

;.> re- 

I at- 

! Troi' 

l.iup- 




»» ii iiinn»»i»»»» ii »»»»»i^miiii i »»» 



COMPLIMENTS OF THE 




Re^aurant 




A. M. NOHE, Prop. 



\\ ROCHESTER, 



PENNSYLVANIA ; S > 



»»«»»m»»»nn»» i n»»n»»»»»H»^ - 



A history uT Iho Atr.< riiaii l'\«lora- 
tiori of l,;ib(,»r would rii nid \\u- ud- 
vaiKt't; aiiul liiilun.s, triuiii|iii> and de- 
fcajjif, drt'ums and «l..s.ip|H»iiitiiuiit8 o( 
the toilers of our imjiiiUi\ . 

No stulrnifMl of Muial pro;:re«« 
tlurinK; thi- past tliiit y-l.*.i' yens in 
fioniplclc without inoluiKnu lli<' Aincr- 
' icuii l-t'dfiatii'ii «•!" LuIm-i. thf itionccr 
j in every huinanitari;iii aclii''vniHnt. 
|- It was l-lic first in tlM- i'kM !< r free 
'textbooks, a sftrcl liallut ( Aij.-.lialian 
I system), direct leKi''lati«n., .- « x ('(lual- 
ity, a^ruinst iliil-i labor ami for ivcry 
otii«r , reform nou ^;l in rally ;m.tpted. 
It is the directinir fonr in tvery 
strujr^rle for hl-.ortrr lioiii.-. Ili^clu•^ 
wa]LTi-s, sanitary sliops and ho-n*-. pro- 
lection of life and limb, r(itnp.jii.<ition 
laws untl oiher K:ii''--*> *hal mak" for 
liner men and nobler vuimn. 

It voices the expr»'ssi4»ris. irr tnnjr=" 
inus and the ho|M-;- <>i llu- loib rs of 
our land, who :uf \\« Icctiir to its 
runks, without n-i;aril id .••x. « t»l«»r, 
civetl, race or sicill. 

Hen KesiHtfd lnju:u-tion.<. 

It refuses to ri'iojrnlzi ;;m.^ 
tution that would PKulatc maif 
posul ol his labor pa\v«r. and it i 

»te<l injunction ju<l^'('s in l:i' 
tempt to check free (.poci li am 
piess on the theory tlial labor i. 
ei-ty. This agitation has reiuii'.ed in 
llu- nolilication of Im'.1< ral ai; ' l>is- 
triit of'Coluiiibiii courts l)\ iKi (\>n- 
jfriss of the L'nH.d States (< layton 
law, .-i^netl by Tri .-itli rit Wix)".. Oo- 
tober 14, 11)14): 'That tl;< labor 
power of a Imiuan bein;; is imi :. com- 
iiKxlity or articU of loniLiercr." 

it ib tienuKiatic, both in spii.t am! 
deed. It enroura;rcs ind('p« ikIimk e, 
fosters e<iuc:;t;on and su.lii'ns every 
movement intended to e!|uip toilers 
f«ir a more ajftrressivc and patriotic 
•jitizenship, " - 

Firxt .Session in 1HH1. 

The lirst .sess-on «if ti.e b«Mly no\\ 
known as the American Federation of 
Labor was called to oidi-r in Turner 
Hall, Pittsburjrh. Ta., on Novembei 
Ij'i, 1881. There were present rep- 
resentatives of lU national trade 
unions, 75 local trade unions and 10 
city central unions, with an estimated 
membership of 2G2,0OO workers. 

At that time a demand was made 
for a law creating' u national bureau 
of labor statistics. Out of this agita- 
tion developed " the present Federal 
Department of Lubor. presided over 
by William H. Wilson, former secre- 
tary-treasurer of the United Mine 
Workers of America, and the first 
trade unionist to be a member of a 
President's Cabinet. 

Another demand provided for "the 
repeal and erasure from the statute 
books of all acts known as conspiracy 
laws, as applied to ortranizations of 
lubor in the regulation of wa^es and 
the number of hours which shall con- 
stitute a day's work." 

TradcH in Whole i^bor Klenient. 

While the convention was discuss- 
in»r the organization system recom- 
mended by it.s comniilt«'e. a colore<l 
I delegate a; ked: "If my own people 
'were included in the plan**" He was 
answered that "we recotrnize neither 
creed, color or nationality, but want 
to take into the f(»ij|s of this fed«»rH- 
tion the whole Udxir element of the 
country, no niatt<'r what caliinjr." 

This detflaration has Imcu iiKide a 
major principle by the American Fed- 
eration of Labor. 

Thi.s orjranizalion plan provide<l for 
national and internatiimal unions of 
workers in each xraft or calling. I<x*al 
union-i in crafts that wen- not sufTi- 
cienlly organized to form a national 
or international union, and city cen- 
tral bodies that unify eit\ and munici- 
pal trade union movements for mu- 
tual l)enefit. 

I^ter, provision was made for the 
e.stablishment of State federation*, 
who.se work is mainly in securinjr of 
reme<lial lejrislation. Central bodies 
and State federations are representa- 
tive bodies, eiectd by local unions, in 
in case of the .former, and by local 
unions and city central bodies for the 
latter. 

Federal Labor rnionci. 

Federal labor unions are chartered 
by the American Federation of I>abor. 
Those include workers who are not 
sufTiciently numerous to maintain a 
local trade union of their individual 
craft or calling. When a sufficient 
number of workers in any of these 
crafts is secured, they are chartere<l 
by the American Federation of l^bor 
as a localtrade union, or, if a natipnal 
or international union of that craft 
exists ,they are aasiinted to same. 

Ix)cal labor unions and Federal 
trade unions receive strike benefits of 
$4 a week for six days from the 
American Federation of I^Jibor. The 
Executive Council of the Afnerican 
Federation of Labor is empowered to 
authorise the payment of strike bene- 
fits for an additional period. 

Before 'itfike benefits are paid the 
union must notify the president of the 
American Federation of I^ibor, who 
shall endeavor to adjust the differ- 
ences. FailiriK in this, he shall ao.- 
quaint the Executive Council of tKe 
American Federation of Labor with 



all t!ie facts in the ca^e, and re«|ue.--t 
them to vole on the t|ue.stioii c 
whetlier a bliike is neeesary,, 

KcKulation of .SirikiH. 

If a strike i.>, authorized the intiM- 
ested union siiall be notifie(U lo call a 
iiieetiii;r within tweijl^-fffriTliours and 
take a .-triki' \i}{yr^ A three-foiirth.- 
vote of all .:i;eiiibers pre.«.rnt in iri^ii^ci 
standiii)^ is n»'c«'s«ary befoiv a leKai 
strike can be called. 

The Aiiieriean Fedeiatii'ii of l.alifr 
has no power lo «-all >tnkts, either 
tliroUK:|i Its officials or !»> eonveiit ion 
actitm. Thi> jiowei- i.- iii!iei<iit Wi Iht 
.ilVilialeii oiVMiii/alioii.-. 

A uniiiu*' feature < f the A. I". « f 1..^ 
'.:• .it' aii... p. !■ of an\ furin.^ of lorii> to 
1 lulic iliVt ir. ,■ it.-, convention ir.an- 
iatt s. Il puividts no penalties f»ir 
^^ ui l m w \u ii 'i^ f ru. ,,i ;h i l iTl ;i r ;i l i vn i:i...mL.. 
economic, pe! tical »if so( ial «|Uestions. 

't'liis Hoai;.;,, siranvre to tho.se wlio 
believ*' !ii i)iii«T,.. mandale.s and au- 
ihont.K. bi.t te.:i- ;.iovem<'nl is f«-uiide<i 
on Vir asp.iMtion.'- and nee< ss in .•> »»i 
.vorkInK ii.fn'and women and llu- b.-- 
lief tlial lii< lonjrinir for .social ju.-- 
tice, inluT'iit in all toiUw;;. is a inure 
powerful a|t|M-al than exhibition.'^ oi 
forte. 

Fraleriiily lis (ireateHt Triumph. 

This appeal U> man's best nature 
has developid a fraternity. .solidit\ 
;Mel v«)lunt;ir.. a.-tioii iliat has made 
jio.'riible every >.rain b\ the American 
Kcfleralion of Labor, j'.i.^l to my iiiin'' 
is its ^,'j-eat<'st trium|th. 

Durintr tiie earl\ hi tory of our 
movement. an<l up to «|iiite recent l\. 
at every ciihventi<»n ellorl wen- made 
to commit it to parti.san Politics and 
abandon il.f independent u.se of the 
liallot. The Detroit cenvention, in 
|8!H), was notable iM'cau.se of its re- 
fu.sal to seat the representatives of :>. 
.so-called "workinKmen's political 
party." 

In 1!)(m; t 
vised : 
. "The lirst concern of all should be 
the positive defeat of those who have 
been ho.stile or indifferent to th<' just 
demands of labor. X stinjfinK rebuke 
to them will not only benefit the toil- ■ 
ers, but the |>copU' of the entire coun- 
try. 
"Stand by Friends; Defeat Knetnies." 

"We will stand faithfully by our 
friends and elect them; oppose our ^ 
enemies and defeat them; whether 
they are candidates for President, j 
Congress or other offices, executive, 
lejrislative or judicial." 

Central bo<lies and local unions 
well* urired to elect c/immittoes to 
make effective the slouan, "Reward 
your friends and destroy your ene- 
mies." 

It may be asked: "W 
Im- .satisfied?" 

Let m^ answer by aski)virj/Why is 
this fiue/ry never applied to the pro- 
fessiondjljpian, the business man, the 
.scienti/tTthe artist or even he whoso 
sordid life is (levotj-il to the meri- pil- 
ing up of jrold ? 

Trade unionists reject th«' theory of 
.serf.lom that lalmr must Im- "s:itislied" 
whili- other elements in s<K'i«'ty are 
eiieouraccHl and .ipplaudetl for their 
(li.'ieontent with thinsrs that are. 

We refuse to Im .satisfied. Throujrii 
education and orir.inization we will re- 
move every b:inier that imfiedes our 
|)atli to the fullne.K.s of a bounteous 



Kxeeutive Council ad- 




♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ 




n will labor 



O^ ' f aa x *^ 



13: L. 



world. 



Retail 



Wholesiile 




' 91.') Seventh Avenue 

Ice Cream, Ices i I 
and Candies 



BRICK ICE CREAM 
A SPECIALTY 



^^e- 



♦♦♦♦♦»♦ • • »«••«•«*«•••«««• •»<■ »<»»♦•♦ 



l^otcl 



Columbia | 



Aliquippa, Penii'a. 

Takes advantuKc of thi.s opportunity to 
e\pres.s the appreciation or it.s proprietor 
for the patronage extended his hostlery 
by the Tnion men of the Heaver Vallev. 
MARTIN McNALLV. Prop. _ 



♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦»♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦»»♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦»♦♦♦♦♦♦»♦ 



:M^^M 



'^mm 



BEAVER FALLS. PA. 
Both Phones 



»#»#»»»»#»#»0»»»»»##»»#»» f 



WM. E. McKEAN 

> Plumbllic, 6m, Stcun tmd \ 
*' Hot Water Hoattag. * 

7th SI. sad 7th At*. 
Both PnmM. BEAVBS PALLS X 



j^otrl a>t- Clatr 

F.B CHENEY: Prop. 

RATES $2.00 AND UP 7 

■ ••• ■ '. ..-. ■ •■ ■■ -■' ■'■!.■ ' -;• • ■ • '\ >-■ . :,■--■■ ■'■" ' 
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* ' ' ' • ■ * . ■ ■*-■,' 

RREEDOM, - - PEIVIN^ A, 



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1 



P. H. Bl^UM 

The American Shoe Repair Man, loeattd at 101 New York ave- 
nue, Rocheater, will do your shoe repairinir with the beat katiier 
to be had. and at rcaaonabie pric^ iUc alao carrica i ataple Una 
of Men'a and Ladica' Shaeo of food qnaUty and at right prtow. 
Theae arv hia own ahoea, and beaiiiea theae he carrica the wMl 
known Wear- U- Wall Shoca for Men and Boya at |1,M to |t.M. 



; V *-%iflc'-"' It. 



'<•*' •mjt, 



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Pane Six 



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BEAVER VALLEY LABOR NEWS 



Sepetmber 1, 1916 



K»»» iiii i i ii i »»»miiiiii i iiiii»uiwww [QQi^nMIC VALUE OF THE 

I lARri AMnNnwnDKPi 



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4 »<^ 
4 »<» 



4 ^ ^ Henr>- M. Camp Joseph C. Campbell Charles A. Muse \ ^ 



From the Inside 



I'dinl oT \ iiw theif aii' many jrootl reasons why this 
liank >houUl have youi business. 

I'or iiistiiiice, thi- olficcrs and directors of our bank 
ail' well known l>u>in('ss tmd professional men — men 
von know and in whom voti have confidence. 



LABEL AMONG WORKERS 



(i)KI> 



J^^l Ca-Ordimitts the Forces of l^i- 
lM>r Into One Comprehen- 
sive FlfTort. 



LABOR'S ACHIEVEMENTS 



(Cuntinaed finm I'aj.'f Two.) 



i INSI'IUKS IMI Y OF I'lU^'OSK 



Stimu'atcs Kducaliun and KniphuMi/i*H 
Skill aiui Supt-rior WurkmaiiHhip. 
Dirifis l'urc!'UKinK I'owt'r of Work- 
ITS So as lo StrvuKthfti Thcni at* 
rrodui'tTH — StfliulH for liiKh IcifalH. 



TIlis moans they will ohey 
your interests in every way. 



the law and safeufuard 



OFFICERS 
AlT.rSTl S HELLER. President. 

ALFRED P. MARSHALL. Vice President 
JOSEPH C. CAMPBELL. Cashier 

EARL RADTKE. Assistant Cashier 

(;E0R(;E HAROLD FISCHER, Teller 
• ♦ • ♦ 
DIRECTORS 
Augustus Heller '^ Charles R. Eckert — — 
Alfred P. Marshall Charles P. Brobeck 



Tlu' workt-rs arc fast Ix'K'nninj: to 
untUrstaixl the ):roal suciul and eco- 
nomic value inherent in the Union 
Label. The increasing agitation and 
ivsultant demand for union label pro- 
ducts are cvi»lenc(s of the workers' 
irrowinK conception 'rf the jfreat .social 
md commercial values of the'r pur- 
{"^twisinjT power wl.en excrciwcd in a syt<- 
Itematic and orjran.zcd fasliion. The 
union label movement hus not been 
the i;rst attempt to organize the pur- 
.•has'.nK power of labor. Numerous 
attempts and many experiments have 
been made in this direction in the 
pasty ^ Cti-oper.itive movements, con- 
sumers' liapues an:i associated ef- 
forts v){ a like nature have been pri- 
marily in.-ipirid by the desire to so- 
.-ialize and conuncrcialixe the purcims- 
inj: power of the workers. 



iSi 



<^ 



« * * * 



11 The Peoples Natumal Bank | 



ROCHESTER, PA. 



•^^- 



> f«»»»»»;»»»:»»n i »»t»»»»»»»» m 



.;duat'(in upon human life and human ; 
aiributes l!ial I. a.-; tvcr bccii declaretl 
.111(1 enactetl by any political party in 
power. 

The (|uestion that concerns the 

..^rkers is how to hold t!u>ir present 

idvanlafres ar.d ho.v to secure from 

;)olitical parties slill K'<'ater opiM)r- 

unities for frecdnia. 'I'he ihinjf which 

s fuhdainenta! in Seilion «} of the 

layton Antitrust Ait, the labor of u 
. uman being is not a commodity or 
irticle of commerce. The representa- 
•.ives of the American Federation of 
Labor went to the political parties and 
.iskeil them to declare themselves up- { 
.)n this pr nciple, The answers that! 
lie i>olitical partu.*; K'ave afo iti their 
.ilatforms, where all may read. 

The Democratic Tarty openly and ^ 
favorably declareii and emphasii:e<i its ; 
position. The Ucpublicun Party took : 
no notice of Labor's reciuest that thej'^j 
declare themselves up»)n that which i 
ihe workers considend of greatest! 
mportame to tlieni.- 

The . international issue that now j 
comet closest to the labor movement ; 
is the policy of our government to- ! 
ward Aiexico. The ciiuse of humanity 
is in the balance in Mexico. The i)eo- 
ple theie are trying to work out their i 
own problems and to establish their 
own ideals of political, social and' 
economic justice. The labor move- 



Unfortunately whenever such asso 
.•iate<l activities reached any degree of ^ ,„e„Yin,M'iv\ico has developed; that is, 
success tlje |»ower and influence of | the most power and the most power. 

imi the nioit constructive product of 
.he revolution. Uepn'sentatives of 
.he labor mo>enient of .Mexico have 



♦♦ 



»»»»»»»»»:»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»» 



Moulds & Doncaster 

ROCHESTER, PA. 

; General Insurcince 



M 



WE HOLD THEE SAFE 



«« 



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■-■ >j<,.- .. 4-. 



mi 



•*v-:^' 



■:'<lf*'j 



.-.■. Ji;- 



; : We Insure Everything Under the Sun i ; ; 



H i mmin i inmni»m»»»m»in i »ii ii m 



hese instituticns many times were 
,»erverte<l into inslrununts ol oppri's- 
ion and suppress on of the workirt 
IS protlucer:i. Instead of c«)-operaling 
.vith the econoniic organizations of 
.he v. orki rs, very often ihe.se co-ojier- 
itive energies responded solely to a 
•spirit of commercialism and to the 
•uppression of a feeling and desire to 
socialize industrial pursuits. 

In it:> ultimate attainment the union 
.ubel movement comprehends com- 
plete huriiiony and unity of the hopes 
ind aspirations of the workers as pro- 
.lucers and as consumers. This move- 
ment responds to the possibility of 
iiniting and co-ordinating all the at- 
ributes of labor into one comprehen- 
iive efTort directed to democratize all 
ndustries and to ultimately establish 
a just, fair and rightful condition of 
life and work for all. 

For years trade unions have re- 
snonded in one form or another to 
this ideal of directing the purchasinR 
power of the workers as producers 
whenever representations for improv- 
ed working conditions were to be made 
lo employers. Usually these activi- 
ties were expressed in the form of a 
boycott or the fair list. < 

While these weapons have proven 
helpful, experience has shown disad- 
vantages. While the exhortations of 
trade unionists to their friends and 
sympathizers to purchase only union 
label goods and articles may not have 
proved so immediately responsive or 
as vital in its immediate effect upon 
my one particular linn or person as 
has the admonition not to purchase 
the goods of a particular firm being 
boycotted, it is true nevertheless, that 
the response to the former appeal has 
been by far more comprehensive and 
lasting in its beneficent result. The 
iH/ycott and the fair list are individual 
in character and the application spas- 
•Modic in nature, subject to ill feeling, 
strife and friction. 

On the other hand, the union label 
i.) by far more comprehensive in char- 
vt\.cx and is permanent in its nature, 
minus all elements of strife and fric- 
tion. It is not urged that trade unions 
should dispense with the weapons of 
the boycott and the fair list. It is 
'irged that the importance of the 
irade union' label activity cannot be 
overlooked. 

The union label unquestionably ex- 
lels in that it inspires unity and fed- 
eration, stimulates education, empha- 
sizes skill and superior workmanship, 
promotes trades and defines unscru- 
pulous competition, teaches the prim- 
al obligations of labor to a common 
cause, while steadily winning its way 
into the hearts of the masses in that 
it sympolizes human justice and hu- 
man freedom. It is for the attain- 
ment of these lofty ideals, these hu- 
mane accomplishments, that this em- 
blem ot trade, unionism has been 
adopted. Mindful of the latent and 
potential powers for* good inherent in 
the trade union movement, let all 
unite in this appeal and enlist in tnis 
noble cause for the uplift of the work- 
er. Let all join in this great march 
forward, onward and upward under 
this great banner of fraternity and 
brotherhood, the emblem of humanity 
and the symbol of the hopes and aspi- 
rations of the worker* for a better 
life and a greater and more humane 
civilization. — Shoe Workers' Journal. 



joined with representatives of the la- 
K»r movement of .\merica to insure to 
.he workers and the citizens of Mex- 
.co the rights of human beings, op- 
.•ortunities for freedom and for inde- 
,»endence. .Many of the problems of 
.he Mexican workers are problems of 
• the workers of the United States. 
Their welfare is our welfare. The 
M'undary line between the two coun- 
tries is only an artificial division that 
has little or no affect upon the course 
and the nature of industrial and com- 
mercial development. 

The problem of industrial welfare 
in the states of the southwest is 
largely a Mexican problem. With low 
standards of life and work prevailing 
upon th« 15,000,000 of Mexicans, there 
exists an obstacle to the establishment 
of higher standards within the United 
States. There are capitalists and ex- 
ploiting interests of the United States 
who, because they have property in 
.\lexico (often corruptly and dishon- 
estly obtained), desire to maintain 
governmental agencies by which they 
jun hold the people in subjection and 
leny to them the opportunity for pro- 
tecting themselves through the or- 
ganized labor movement, and other 
opportunities for growth and devel- 
(pinent. These selfish, exploiting in- 
terests are concentrating their politi- 
cal power in the present campaign to 
secure a different policy on the part 
of our government toward Mexico. 
Even under the guise of intervention, 
no matter how unnecessary and un- 
warranted, the advocates of that pol- j 
icy really aim at the conquest and an- 1 
nexation of Mexico. A few of the I 
most reckless, such as the Otis and { 
Hearst interests, come out brazenly i 
in the demand for intervention, inva- 
sion, conquest and annexation of Mex- 1 
ico. Of course, every effort must be I 
made to safeguard the lives and the | 
property of our people living along 
the border line, but who can honest- 
ly say that the Mexican marauders 
were the only offenders? The allied 
forces of greed and profit would deny 
the Mexican people the opportunity 
for their development; they would 
gladly embroil the United States in 
an unnecessar>' and unwarrantable 
war with Mexico. To them property, 
property rights, profits are held far 
more sacred than human life, interna- 
tional honor and human liberty. 

These are some of the issues that 
primarily concern the workers and all 
liberty-loving citizens of the United 
States; they are the issues upon which 
every wage-earner— every citizen — 
will make his own decision, not only 
in his every-day activity, but also at 
the polls on election day. 



^BUILDING UP A UNION 



The bttiMing np of a powerful trade- 
union is like the frowth of an ode— « 
•low proeeM, but produeinc straifUi 
whieh cwuiot be McurMl by mushroom 
growth. It is far better to build slow- 
ly but snrsly, than to buikl what may 
appsar to bs s substantial rtsfclsass 
npoB a fooadatioB sad fnunswork 
whldi camot whhstaad the storms. 



][ 



W ^^ &l 



1 



wxim 



Bell Phone 138 



B. G Phone 5138 



1^ 



m. 



LeRoy-Foster Co. 

COMPLETE 

House Furnishers 



> j» ji 



n 



Furniture, Rugs, Carpets 
Dishes, Stoves, Player 
Pianos, Victor and Edison 
Talking Machines and 
Records, Sheet Music 
and Musical Supplies 
Complete Line of Pianos 



j» j» j» 




Undertaking a Specialty 

LADY ASSISTANT 



82 Madison St. - Rochester, Pa. 

t^9ai Conway 'u Comtr and Bridt*wat«T Bridge 



][ 





Quinn T. Walton 

PLUMBER 

Gas, Steam and Hot Water 
Flttimc. 



Eatimatcs Promntly GItml 



Both 
Third SU BEAVER, PA. 



ii nn i nnmnnm iii» 

W. R. ANDBB80N 

M 
; AB KliidB of n<SBh 



i m i nm i nmn ii ni i i i 



»»»»i»» i »m»»i»i»»»»»»»»»»»» 



COMPLIMENTS OF 



James W. Doncaster 

ROCHESTER, PA. ; 



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■'■ ■■ -^«*iw.i:;,^.x.: 



^^^ 



September 1, 1916 



BEAVER \ ALLEY LABOR NEWS 



Page Seven 



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•'■■%■; 



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W. D. CRAIG 

CANDIDATE FOR /~ 

State SEfiATE 



REPUBLICAN TICKET 






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Page Eight 



BEAVER VALLEY LABOR NEWS 



Sepetmlwr 1, 191C 







CaEBRATION 

LABOR UNIONS 



1 Junction Park 11 



LABOR DAY 



I Monday, 



y 



OO 






oo 



WHY YOU SHOULD 
BE A UNION MAN 





UNDER AUSPICES OF 

I CENTRAL LABOR UNION | 



licTuusc it tendtf to raise vvukck- 

This iti |»roven by all sorts of evidence. 

iiocuuse it prevents a reduction in 

.vajrt''>; reductions never come to well 

<irKunixed labor. 

Iieraus(> it aids in irettintc .shorter 
hours. Ask the union men who are 
.vorkinjr eiifht houis; they can prove 
it. The^ can show a union card also. 
Ik>causi> it teaches co-operation. 
When IalK>rer.s co-operate they wilj 
oun the earth. 

IU>cause it curbs selfishnesn: the 
;rrab-all is toned clown by the fear of 
the opinions of his fellows. 

I'ecause it makes the job a better 
place to work. The bully foreman 
! can't bull the union card. 
' Hecau.se it helps the family; more 
money comforts, and a better oppor 
I tunity tu improve your social condi 
; lions. 

I Itecause it hel|)s the state. Unor- 

j ;;uniz?d and discontented labor is the 

parent of the mob. The trade unions 

. stand as a rock between the f^ovem- 

inent and anarchy. 

liecause it pays you sick benefits 
^vhen sick or disableil. 

liecause it pays death benefits of 
"llOO and upwards. 
Ile^'ause is stand for conciliation of 
I ill differences between ejnployer and 
4 M > ! v'lnployc. 

* *▼ ' Because a union man's can! is 
troateci with respect and considera 
tion by all union men, and the bearer 
of a card is never without friends, 
.mil can alwuys gvi assistimce if in 
nredv ciroumstances. 



H 



FUN FOR EVERYONE 



ii Catch the Greased Pig! i 



.^ii. 



WATCH THE KIDS 



!l Scramble for 5000 Marbles 






«• 



§ DANCING: Afternoon and Night | 






t 



A* 



^U 






l:: 



Free Attraction 



IS: 



SUCCESSfUL COHICCRN 






rhe Cm. H. Hamilton .Manufacturinc 

Company Points With Pride to | 
lis .\d\ancfmenl. ' 



' .101 N THK IMON. • 



The following is taken from 
an appeal to non-union men re- 
cently isf.uc«i by one of the 
l)jiidiii;; tra«le union.'^: "There 
'is a KocM livir.j; f< r rv* ryb(»dy 
••ii^:at;«*d in our Ira*!.', employ- 
vrs ami journ'yr.U'ii, hut we 
Mui.-it unite with our frllow 
workers t» <»l)t:iiri it.. Don't y«»u 
ihinl; you are doinj; yourself, 
\»>ur wife and children an in- 
ju.';l:«c liy .standing alone and 
workin^r for ::. miller wa^i't^ than 
;.();i (< uld otherwi.se obtain? 
I'on't \ <ii love your children? 
hon't you want tliem to have 
the iMvst you can possibly K<?t 
for tlium? If .so ilim't you know 
that ir is your duty to join the 



union 



«**««*«•* 



CAPT. L. D. BLONDELL 

World's Champion Swimmer 

WATER CARNIVAL! 

Blowing Up of the American^ 
Sailing Ship, WSTT. Frye 

r 

DREAflULAIND THEATRE 

Columbia Stock Company Playing 

SPECIAL STREET CAR SERVICE 

From all Parts of the Valley 

35 

:i F R E E G A T E! S 



LIST OF EVEHTS 

LADIES* NAIL DRIVING CONTEST. i^ 

100-YARD DASH FOR BOYS. BETWEEN 12 AND 
16 YEARS OF AGE. 

100- YARD DASH FOR GIRLS. BETWEEN 12 AND 
16 YEARS OF AGE. 

SHOESTRING RACE. FOR BQYS. . 

LADIES' BASEBALL THROWING CONTEST. 

100-YARD DASH FOR MEN, OPEN TO ALL. 

WATERMELON EATING CONTEST. ": 

ONE-HALF MILE RACE. OPEN TO ALL. 

50-YARD DASH. OPEN TO WOMEN. 

THRB^LEGGED RACE FOR MEN. OPEN TO ALL 



l\ ""Yti ire Always Welcome it the Parr i^| 

C C yHETTERLY, Lenw mad Mgr. ^\i\ 

n»»i»»»i»i»»»»»it»»ii»»H»Mn»t i 



.\ WHOLKSOMK PRAYKR. 

Teach ire that .sixty minutes make 
on*' hour, .sixteen ouncc-.s one pound 
and one hun<lre<i cents one dollar. 

Help inc to live so that I can lie 
do«n at ni^rht with a clear conscience 
without a jrun under n>y pillow, anil 
unhauntc>d hy the faces of those to 
vvh«»m I have brouirht pain. 

(I rant. I bescorh Thee, that I may 
i-ain my meal ticket on the K4|uare, 
ind in doinK thereof that I may not 
.stick the jfaflT where it doe.s not belong. 

Deafen me to the jingle of tainted 
money and the rustle of unholy skirt.s. 
iJiind nie to the fault.s of the other fel- 
o:\. but reveal to me mine own. 

(luide me so that each nijrht when I 
!«M»k across the dinner table at my 
wife .who ha.s liocn a blessing to me. 
I will have nothing; to conceal. 
. Keep me younj; enou);h to lauK'h 
with my chihiron and lose myself in 
their play. 4 

Anil when comes the smell of flow- 
ers, ami the tread of soft steps, and 
the c-rushinc of the hearse's wheels in 
the jrravel out in front of my place, 
make the ceremony short and the epi- 
taph simple: "Here Lies u Man." — 
Homer McKee. 



A FEW DONTS 



As a shining example of what Krit, 
.imbition and slickloilivcness will duj 
to build up a succeb^l'ul business, The ' 
Labor News callb attention in this ar- 
ticle to the plants of the <J. H. Ham- 
ilton ManutacturinK ^'0., located in 
Keaver and Heaver Fullh. Starting 
i;;jht years ago, in u little one-story 
I'rame buildinK. next tu The Labor 
>ew8 office, and/usinK but one roont 
of the bu.idtnx in (|ueaiion, (leorge H. 
Hamilton, of Heaver, o|>cncd up his 
little plant lor the purpose of manu- 
lactur.ni' canvas jrlov-s. He put two 
machines in the "|»;:ml." starting with 
two employes and increusint; the num- 
ber to !;ve during liie Jirst three 
months. In one year Mr. Hamilton 
had 12 employes in his little plant, 
disposing of his product to the local 
trade. In t..e summer of 11K)8 the 
;;rowing plant was removed to its 
own three story building on Buffalo 
street, Heaver, the utniji? covering 68,- 
000 square feet. Thirty-five employes 
are on the payroll and forty machines 
are used. In January of the present 
year Mr. Hamilton, compelled by the 
great numb(>r of orders receive<l and 
by the fact that help is exceedingly 
hard to get in Heaver, opened a 
branch factory at Iteaver Falls, where 
sixteen employes are working and 
eight machines are used. 

The excellence of the goods turned 
out— canvas, canton flannel, jersey 
and leather palm >,'lovos — has resulted 
in the plant bein^ rushed with orders 
from ail over tiie United States, there 
being at the pre ..cut time $50,000.00 
»\orih of oi'ticrs on liund which Mr. 
Hitmilton .say.s he doesn't believe willl 
ever be lillcd. 

The Hc-avcr plant has oi>erated 
.;lea«Lly lor t'i»- pa.st pJKht years,] 
shuttmg down but one summer in that ' 
icnprth of liiin'. Ilusints.s is constant- 1 
ly increasing'. l>ul the production in \ 
iiiore or less Karuiicappod by reason of | 
the diiTiculty i\|<tr enced in securing 
(u'!p. At tlu" prcst'iil time there i.s'" a 
j)r;>posit'on oil .font to move the He«- 
vor plant to llcavor Kails, where help 
i.s much more rasily obtained, and 
where it will be possible to increase 
th«' protiuction of the two plants to 
many times the pre.sent limit. 

As an example of business enter- 
pri.se, tne success made by Mr. Hani- 
■Iton,. \vi:o is Tri'asurer and (ienerul 
.Manairer of the company, is one of the 
most notable in the history of Beaver 
county, and younpr men, starting out 
to build up a busine.s.s, can do worse 
vhan to follow the rules laid down by 
.Mr. Hamilton for hi« own guidance, 
when he first started in — "Work hard; 
pay attention to the details and use 
the other party as you would like to 
be used." 



/ C{)r jHonaca 

I Jtattcnal Banfe 



» i i i ni tii imiHiiimnnm» tt 



♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ 



Monaco, Pa. 




Member of Federal Reserve Board 



»4it nnnn e m »>i n »ieti 



1. Don't condemn the labor move- 
ment because you know of "objec- 
tionable features." Kver>- human in- 
stitution has some imperfections. 

2. Don't forgot that oriranization 
increases wages and shortens the 
working day. makin? work steadier. 

•".. Don't shirk the moral obligation 
to (H all you can to uphold the dignity 
of your tRido— to elevate the stand- 
ard of living. 

4. Don't forjret that the vast ma- 
jority of your trade is organized. 
What is good for the majority is good 
for the minority. 

5. Don't be blind to your own in^ 
terests — unionism helps all working 
men and all society. 

6. Don't lot so-called "independ- 
ence" prevent, you from being unsel- 
fish and fraternal. We are all more pr 
less dependent on some one or some- 
thing. "No man stands alone." Get 
closer together. 

7. Dont retard our progress by re- 
maining a, weapon in the hands of the 
employer. 

8. Don't forget that our interests 
are identical. Improvement in your 
working conditions meant improve- 
ment for all our crafts. 

9. Dont say unions "can't accom- 
plish their purpose." Over 7.000,000 
of unioniita think difTerent. 

10— Dont think that having gotten 
along without the union for Ave or 
flfty-ftve yean that "it is uaeleas to 
you.** Organised labor Haa helped you 
and is helping now — through better 
conditions and inenated wagM. 



Penna. Ave. Pharmacy 

Ira C. HofTman, P. D., Prop. 

Penna. Ave A 13th St. 

MONACA, - PENNA. 

"The Rezall Store." 

■ • n it M iii n iiit m ti m i 



RAINCOAT SALE 

• For Ladiea, Men and Boy*. Alao « 
I Rain Capes at very low prices. ^ 

CHAS. STEIN, 
I 1133 Penna. Ave. Meiiaca, Pa. \ 

ii mn iii nm iiii m i H i 



»#♦••»»»»♦»•>••••»••#<>♦»♦ 



;; We Insure Every XStinc ; 
Under the Sun — 
Consult Us. 



MOULDS & DONCASTEK, 
Rochesterr Penna. 



*«We Hold Thee Safe." 



♦•»•♦»♦»#>♦#»#»♦»♦»»♦»#»•• 



Hpbody like* a quitter, but nuuiy a 
niMi who wants the earth has to tahs 
water. 



JOHN W. HARTZSL 

Plnmbfaig, Gas Fittfaig. Ttai aad 

Slate Roofing. 

Hot Air Furnaces. 

'> P. 0. Bids. - - Rochester \ 

♦»»»»»»»»» M #»e»ee»»»»»e»i 



♦♦#♦♦»##♦»»»♦#»»•<»•»»#»•• 



* • * • 



OFFICERS 



George Lay, 
James R. Gorntley, 
Martin W. Carey, 
Robert C. Campbell. 
Jos. Fischer, 
KennetK, Sei^el. 



President 

Vice President 

Vice President 

Cashier 

Assistant Cashier 

Teller 



iM\ 



DIRECTORS 

Geori^e Lay James R. Gormley 

Charles Houston Robert C. Campbell 

Henry J. Erkert Martin W. Carey 

Robert W. Darra8:h 

* * * ♦ 

OPEN A CHECK ACCOITNT WITH THIS 

BAIVK AND PAY YOUR BILLS BY 

CHECK, THEN YOU WILL HAVE 

RECEIPT AND A CORRECT 

~ ACCOUNT OF ALL BILLS 

THAT YOU PAY 

♦ * • • 

WE TRANSACT *=^A GENERAL BANKING 

BUSINE&S. COMMERCIAL AND SAV- 

.. INGS DEPARTMENTS. INTEREST 

PAID ON TIME DEPOSITS. 

WE SOLICIT YOUR 

BANKING BUSINESS 



ig; Bankiiii Hours, 9:00 A. N. to 3:00 P. M. i§| 

{ H ' Saturdays, 9 a. m. to 12 noon ' W> 

ii t { »»»«:»»»»»i:»»»»»»i»»»»mtt l: 



♦-♦♦♦♦♦ ^♦^♦♦^ 



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i: . «♦-*. iiii: Hotel ^(pchester iz: 

Oljrmpla Goaf ectlomry ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ 

#♦ » •♦•»♦♦♦♦••»♦ » »•»#»#•#♦» ; ^ \ >J* R» TRlAf BL>B» Pt*^p» < n | 

— — '-'-— "'— |2! - '' X ^^* 

♦•♦>»»#>• #i f < ;:; ' n^ Next Beat Place to "Home Sweet Home" \ ;E; 

: DR. F. R. HOLT. DENTIST ; 1 2 I ».^^,tt-i«*««« «^ « . < K I 

Wilson BMg., Rsehsstsr. w \''^\ K0CHESTE3{, > ^ ^ Pennsylvaiua . \ s \ 

\ Offiee Hoan: 9 to 12 a. m.; 1 \\ \^\ ' <n> 

' to 6 p. flu Open evening!. '•!►-> '• . . ■i." \^\ 

\ Bell 612-R. B. C. 7004. \\ Z\ ■:.',;:.-- m> 

; mmnm i ummnMu -iSr^ — *^ "'■■'■■ ag' ^S* 

3 : PIANOS airf YlCTROLAfT; \\\\ • '^ . ^ '■ ■•',..' -„..._ Jl 

\\ New Mcoids iseshfsd sb hM < ► < k f ■■..;.>■ •- ^ i- i> .i ■-; ^ .»..;,,■ .-.v^.-' -^ '.■,.• 4 ■■ . ■''■t^Kk 

IBth of saeh month at I t I n » ''flB 

:; BochMtdr MiMle 8tM» \\\V. ^ 5 

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Section No. Three 



Beaver Valley Labor News 



Labor Day Editton 



Noted Labor Leader On 

Panics and Their Causes 











... 


.- 


- 






• 


J 

> 





Discussion of Subject Reveals 

Much To Interest Union 

Workingmen 



The cause of unemployment, or in- 
dustriul panics, is u suhioct that con- 
cernH evjpryt-ody, yet few understand. 
Much is said to eniJKhten or to de-, 
ccive the public on the cuuses of pan- 
ics. Few, how ever, possess the knol^- 
led^e or the courage to tVll tlie truth. 
Previous to the Kuro|>ean war. the 
depression was world-wide; rent, in- 
terpst and profit were responsible for 
the distress. All other factors are but 
details of these three principal causes. 

Before the European war, every 
industrial centre in the United States 
had its increasing army of unemploy- 
ed, millions of able-bodied men and 
women were begging for an oppor- 
tunity to work. Even during the so- 
called prosperous times we have many 
who are denied the right to work. And 
why? I might answer this question 
as- it has been answewd a million 
times by the beneficiaries and the 
hired defenders of the system, who 
are responsible for it, and by doing 
so, be called a safe and sane labor 
leader. I shall, however, try to ex- 
plain, in this short space, a few of 
the real causes. First and primarily, 
is the criminal wcploitation of the 
workers. No matter how much wealth 
the toilers create, their share is, in- 
variably, as little as the competitive 
condition of the labor market will al- 
low. The workers, unless protected 
by powerful unions, sell their labor- 
power at a price fixed by the employ- 
ers, and the price of the commodity 
which they produce, and later by pur- 
chase, is also fixed by the employing 
class. And the difference in price, 
between that which the workers re- 
ceive OS wages and what the product 
sells at, is profit and this profit in 
the bone of contention among an 
ever-increasing horde of parasites. 
Wc hear much about a living wage 
for the workingman, but not a word 
about the living profit for the master. 
Suppose the profit would only be 
enough to keep the master alive and 
in working condition, and that the 
wives and children of the masters, like 



those of the workers, had to become 

bread-winners. This thought may 

sound harsh, even cruel, but the fact 

remains that this is what our masters 

mean when they speak of a living 

wage for the workers. And if the 
producers of all wealth are tu be con- 
tent with u living waK^, which unfor- 
tunately, millions are not getting, 
then what, in your opinion, do you 
really thing the non-producers arc 
entitled to? "But," say the profit- 
takers, "we arc surely entitled to a 
fair return for our money when we 
invest it." Fortunes, accumulated by 
rent, interest or profit, represent un- 
paid wages, special privilege and ex- 
tortion, and in either case represents 
wealth that rightfully belongs to 
those who created it, or to society as 
a whole. Every dollar, represented in 
industry, was earned by labor. Every 
cent, that is paid for the material and 
labor, came out of unpaid labor. 
The producers of wealtli created the 
surplus and the non-producers ovm it. 
The harder we work, the*porer we get, 
and the larger the army of the unem- 
ployed. Another factor that adds no 
small share to the unemployed prob- 
lem is the mania for cfTiciency and 
economy that has swept over the 
country during the past dozen years. 
Do not understand me as opposing 
efficiency and economy, because I be- 
lieve in both, if it benefits society as 
a whole,^or at least the greater ma- 
jority, who are the wealth producers. 
This efficiency would do under a sane 
and just system of production. Un- 
der our present system, however, ef- 
ficiency and economy means larger 
profits for the employer, and speeding 
up and working beyond the endurance 
point to the employe; cutting down 
the time and cost of production and 
turning many thousands over to join 
the army of unemployed. EflTiclency 
and economy, in production and trans- 
portation, has not reduced the price 
of u single commodity, but, by the 
very nature of capitalism, it must 
and does increase the price. 

An industrial establishment worth, 
let us say, one million dollars, em- 
ploying five thousand people, ami 
earning for its owners, ten per cent 
on their investment, employ effi- 




Beaver County Girls' Bread 
Baking Contest During Fair 



NumerouK PrizeK Have Been Se- 
cured and Will be Awarded 
the Mo8t Competent. 



^•i 



"^'VbJf'-Wi*. 



wtkkii^fri rox ffioeucTiOM ••j 

Majestic Theatre, Rochester, Thursday and Friday, ."^'pt. 7-8. 



ciency experts, day-work, wherever 
profitable, abolished, and piece-work, 
established. A bonus \» given the 
piece-workers and the speoding-up be- 
gins. Under the old system, it re- 
quired, say, ten hours' time to make 
ten purtK of a certain machine, and 
the worker received five dollars a day, 
or an average of fifty cents jht each 
piece made. Under the ofl'iciency 
piece-work system, the price per pi<?ce 
is fixed high enough in the beginning 
to lead the workers to believe tliat 
the change in system means to them 
increased wages. Thci^ace is set, 
and all work with the rapidity they 






»#>»♦# 






Secret Quick Direct 



fiutomatic 
Telephone 



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OF COURSE 






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Beam Onst^ Ahone (A 




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are capable of. in order to increase 
their earnings. A few weekK pass, 
when a roudjustment <if prices tak«'s 
place. Th<' workers, eager to cam as 
much as b<«forc the readjustment (n-- 
duction). work just a little hunlcr 
than Ix'forf; a minute saved here, a 
second llu-re. and the ol<| wage is 
nearly rrarhd. The old and incoiM|H'- 
tent drag lu'lplossly in the rear, and, 
in time, mntp readjustments of pricf.s 
take plan-, the highest skilled, witli 
all their K|»r«'d. cannot earn what thry 
formerly did. under the €)ld system, 
and the inrrea.<<>d pro<iurtion means 
that fewer <>mpi(>yes are nee<le<l. First 
it is the old and incompetent that are 
thrown on the human scnip heap. 
Tiie working force, gradually being 
reflucod, has the effect of making ser- 
vile slaves of those retained. The mil- 
lion dollar establishment, before nien- 
tion<'<l. has no longer need for five 
thousand employes. Under the eflfi- 
cionc y ystem. thoy can now turn out 
a.s iHUch with half the number of em- 
ply ih's and this means increased pro- 
fits for the owners. If the old invest- 
i>Mnt eame<l tm per cent, the new, 
oarns considerably more. For this ad- 
ded rr'venue, stock is issued, and this 
stock represents the unpaid earnings 
of the workers, that thoy. in return, 
must create more wealth to pay pro- 
fit on. Thus we see that the more 
energetic and thrifty the workers are 
under capitalism, the greater their 
burden. 

The Reading Railway Re|M)rts says 
that (26,000,0(K) were put in improve- 
ments and betterments after dividends 
-.von' paid. More stock was issufvl to 
cover the increased values. This 
stock will pay more dividends. So la- 
bor goes on piling up wealth, on top 
of wealth and each time additional 
.stock is issued, more interest must be 
earned by the concerns. This interest 
must come out of labor and the com- 
modities which the industry makes 
or the railway carries. Result: In- 
creased cost of commodities an<f\ in- 
creased army of innemployed. \ 

Inventions are also responsible for 
many jobless. I do not wish to be 
understood as being opposed to in-^ 
(Continued on Page Four) 



(By B. H. Dimit) 
(■reat interest is b(*ing displayed by 
the girls of Beaver rounty in the 
(Jirls' (Jreat Baking; Contest, which 
will be hoUl during the lU>uver Coun- 
ty Fair at Junction Turk. Already 
quite a number of girls have entere<i 
the contest and many more are e\- 
pf'ctH before the entry list closes on 
September 14. ut II a. m. 

This contest is open to all girls be- 
tween the ages of 10 and 18 years. 
Kach girl will be re(|uire<l to make 
and bake without 'issistunce. The 
loaves are to be oblong in shape, 
measuring alraut eight inches long 
by four inches wide. Kach loaf is to 
be accompanied by a written state- 
ment of the contestant giving infor- 
mation on her recipe, kind of yeast, 
dried, compressed, or home made; 
time left to rise, number of knead- 
ing* and the time re<|uired f«»r each; 
how long in the oven, date and time 
of baking, and number of hours for 
entire process. 

All loaves will be placed on exhibi- 
tion at the Farm Bureau lM»oth in the 
Horticultural Hall. Loaves will be 
received until 1» o'clock. .Soptomber 
14. and the judging will l>e rompleted 
that afternoon. If the l«luf can not 
l>e brought to the Fair it may be sent 
by parcels fiost to the Farm Bureau. 
Beaver, Pa. In this latter case, how- 
ever, all loaves Mwich reach Iteaver on 
.September i:f. m order to insure their 
Ijeing in place liefore the judging l)o- 
gins. 

The list of prizes includes the fol- 
lowing: V 

First prize, a J.^i Hht. donate«l by 
Allen & Moore, milliners, of lloaver; 
second prize, a fin«le.ss eooker; thirel 
prize, Boston School of C(»okinK'8 



cook book; fourth priie, a year's sub- 
scription to "American Cookery" mag- 
azine; fifth prize, a year's subscrip- 
tion to the "Indies Home Journal." 

In addition to these regular prizes 
each giri will be eligible to compete 
for the following special prizes, pro- 
viding, of course, that she complies 
with the conditions attached: 

One-fourth barrel of Gold Medal 
flour for the best loaf of bread bake<l 
from that flour; one-fourth barrel Oc- 
cident flour for the best loaf bakod 
from that flour, and one-eighth bar- 
r«'i for the second best loaf; three- 
fo^jrths barrel of Dodds & Garret 
flour for the best louf baked from 
I)o<kls.& (iarret flour, and one-fourth 
barrel for the second best; a US-tli. 
sack of Pillsbury flour for the best 
l«ff bake<l from that brand; one eight - 
otiart aluminum water kettle, value 
J^.'{.00. for the best loaf of any brand; 
one-half barrel of New Century flour 
for the best loaf of bread ba)ced from 
said flour, and one- fourth barrel for 
the second best; one-half barrel of 
Minnehaha flour for the best loaf of 
bread bake<l from that flour. 

To enter this contest merely send 
your name, age and address to the 
Farm Bureau, Beaver, Pa. A copy of 
the rules and conditioH^ governing 
the contest will be sent anfl space will 
be reserN'ed for your loaf in the ex- 
hibit. Do not delay but send in your 
name at onee. Shaw father that your 
bread will even surpass the bread that 
grandmother used to bake. 



IM)N.\TED BY Sl'PT. BOYCE 



The large two-column ac^vertise- 
mffxi on page eight of the second sec- 
tion of today's paper was donated to 
the Central Labor Union by Superin- 
tendent W. H. Boyce. of the Beavor 
Valley Traction Company, an act 
which is greatly appreciateil by the 
members of that organization and the 
union mion in general. * 



IS: ■ * 1^ 

♦♦ , THE MEN WHO WEAR « 

W.L. Douglass 

Union Made Shoes 

Know from actual experience that they uive more gen- 
uine satisfaction for the money than any other 
^ make. They are famous eveiywhere for their 
excellent style, perfect-littin^: and 
superior wearing qualities. 

p\M\ S4.0(), )54.50, §:).00 

We .specialize on Traction Men's Clothing and Shoes. 

Lowest prices on Motormen and Conductor's 

Suits, Overalls^ Caps, Vestletts 

and Changers 



BROWM'S 

IS: Opposite Pottoff ice N(»w Brighton, Pa. ll\ 

'iV> We (;ive S. & H. Green Trading Stamps. Zl 



♦♦^ 



♦ ♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦^♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦^♦♦^^^^#^^^^^*^-#>-#S^*^^^^#N^^^^^^#^N^^ 



♦♦ 



r\ 



THANK YOU 



r* 



For your past patronage. We will 
try to deserve your continued sup- 
port by ottering you Union-Made 
goods atpri cos that will appeal toyoi 



^ .• i: 



LEVY BROS. 



^ 



V v;-*r'- 



The Stm for Wonoi 

NEW BRIGHTON 



BEAVER FAUJ5. 




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• -••.«:*.•■ . ■ «. ■..- .♦■■ 



Page Two 



BEAVER VALLEY LABOR NEWS 



1 



^^pgg^^^^ ^m^^ ^^ i^^^^i^g 



1^ 



N.SILVERMAN 

Takes this opportunity of expressinu appreciution of the patroiuiKe ucforde<t our 

store, and solicits a continuance of the sjime.. As in the past, we shall 

put forth every etTort to please our customers 



Sepetmber 1, 1916 



ERIE EXPOSITION IS 
TO BE GRAND AFFAIR 



tt 



Will Eniertaiti ThrunKt Who Will 

Visit (.'ek'bralioii Week of 

S*'pli'inbt'r 18. 



OUR NEW FALL LINE OF 



Ladies', Misses' and Children's 

Cloaks, Suits 

DRESSES and SKIRTS 



Are anivinK: daily. We will haive a better and larger line this year than ever before 
and will be much better prepared to handle our fast ^rowinK tnide. 



Our Offerings Were Never More Complete 



N. Silvermaoi 




126 Brighton Avenue, (Second Floor) 



ROCHESTER, PENNA. 



C^ 



(Entrance through 5 and 10 cent store) 






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2 




m»»»i»»»»»»»»»»»tnm:»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»n>m»»i» 






All Kinds of Shoes 



rAiH. p. HARTLEY & ©O/S 

Fall Goods are in and prices run from Baby Moccasins at 25c, 
to Blethers* handsome Dress Shoes at $8.00. Good Shoes 
are^^shown all eIohk the line between these two prices. 

Strike an Average of $4.00 



And you hit us where we san show you a great variety of 
style and g:ood quality in both Men's and Women's wear. 
Dress Shoes, Street Shoes and Work Shoes— $4.00 popular 
price. We can supply you for the next six months. We 
have them now in our store and stock room, bought before 
the rise in prices or any talk of a strike. 



:: His is iVeparahess" and a Money Sayer to Our Tnule ii; 

;; SEE tes NOVELTIES IN OUR WINDOWS iil 

i STORE CLOSED ON LABOR DAY i *' 

H. P. Hartley & Co: 

ROCHESTER, PA. 

m»»««muti»»nnni i iii«n»Mitiiii»MiMnMiim»»»« m« 



Turn whero you will ihrouK'x'Ut 
Wi'stem ri'nnsylvatua, KasliMn Uhioi 
or Weslern Nt*\v York ami you will 
timi tliut oii«> of Ihf |iriiici|>al topics 
of converhution is furnished by the 
Krie Kxpotiition whirh is to Ix? held 
(luring the week of ScptenilK-r IS to 
2'{. A reully tivinendous iiite^^rest has 
been aroused in this one IWndn'd 
thousand ((bJlar exhibition plant with 
itii contemplated million dollars' 
worth of exhmjts and few there are 
rt>sidin(!: anywhih^* within a radius of ^ 
150 miles of Krie who ai-e not plan- 1 
ninfi: a trip to the hi^ show and look- 1 
intf fonvard to the occasion as one 
of the most delijfhtfui of their entire 
careers. 

Krie is one of the most charminK 
summer cities in the i«)untry. It is 
especially so tlurinjj September when 
a day spent on the shores of Lake 
Krie beconies a positive delit;ht. 
During Kxposition Week the city is 
to be in gala attire w ilii its downtown 
business section iray with flags and 
bunting and its .stores bedecked in 
t»ie carnival style. -\ carnival spirit 
is to prevail over all and a genuine, 
w-arm-heartetl welcome will Ije in 
waiting for the stranger within the 
city's gates. 

The Erie Exposition will be a night '. 
as well a6 a day .show. Its gates will 
be oi»en at 8 o'clock in the morning 
and from then «in until midnight there 
will be one grand, giddy whirl of fun 
and fesitvity. I'arades, band con- ' 
certs, horse races cjuh day, aeroplane 
flights, $1.(K)0 worth of liieworks to 
be explode<l each night, twenty big 
free circus acts, shows galore and 
concessions by the .score, a wonder- 
ful automobile exhibits of Sl.'iO.OOO 
worth of the latest and finest makes, 
a stupendous livestock show and a 
multitude of other attractions too 
numerous to mention, will All the 
visitor's time with a surfeit of pleas- 
ure and with much of educational 
value. 

Ever>'thing is in readiness for the 
I opening: of this mammoth exhibition 
which is now but a little more than 
two weeks off. Exposition buildings, 
horse and cattle and small stock 
IbuildinRS, race track, grandstand and 
: speed btams, all are in readiness for 
I the biirgest event of its kind which 
! has ever taken place in Western 
Pennsylvania, and one of the biggest 
of its kind ever staged anywhere in 
I this country. Erie will bid you a 
I very cordial and sincere welcome, 
I will open its homes and the doors to 
I its hearts to you and when once you 
; are within its gates will make very 
! certain that you have one of the 
biggest times of your lives forever- 
more to sing Erie's praises. 



»»m»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»» i »»» 



= Citizens 






<k i * 




Monaco, Pennsylvania 




i'\\ 



Capital, - $50,000.00 

Surplus and Undivided Profits 
$26,500.00 

United States Depository for Postal Savings. 
Member of Federal Reserve Bank. 



BW 



Addressing a class of newly nat- 
uralized foreigners at Pittsburgh re- 
cently, a newspaper dispatch reports 
a United States Circuit Court of Ap- 
peals judge as warning them to be 
careful about participation in stries, 
as little good come of them. 

The process of naturalization 
should not be made the opportunity 
for airing reactionary views on the 
labor question, and this judge, if he 
be reported correctly, far exceeded his 
province by making the statement 
above referred to. 



Contentment in old age is deserved 
by him alone who has not lost faith ; 
in what is good, his preserving 
strength of will and his desire for I 
active employment. — Turgeniff. 



m niii n iii n ii n ooi#i»» 



ForDtar Next Snit Sm 

ALEX MUDRIK 
/ Merehant T«ilor 

' 78 New York-Avs., RoehMter i 

4 H i H ii H i n ioiii H iii H 



OFFICERS 

JOHN^ TAYLOR, President 

JOHN J. ALLEN, Vice President 
MONT D. YOUTES, Cashier 

WALDO E. MENGEL, As8*t Cashier 



I 



DIRECTORS 

John T. Taylor John J. Allen 

J. Rankin Martin Louis Kleyle A. L. McKibbin 

Akmzo S. Batchelor Mont P. Youtes 




r 




The Bank That Desires 
YoiH^ Business 



DRESS UP! 



n 




The City's 
Dms-Up Headquarters 
For MEN . 



i»»n»»»»»»»n»»»»»»»»»ni»»»m 



»»»»»»i»»»»»»»»»»»i»»i»»»»Tm 

\ I J. H. HORN BY a SONS j : : 



Manufacturers and Dealers in 



\ I Union Made Flour, Feed, Grain, Etc. | : 

H I Between Fourth and Fiftli Avenues, 
; 3 and Seventh and EightH Sts., NEW BRIGHTON, PA. 

n»i»»uu»»i»n»m»»i>iT»»»»»«» 




The rashion I 



HazelrlffR & StlUey 



184 Brighton Ave. 
ROCHESTER, PENNA. 

" ' 7 ' " " 



» i »»»nii» i »»»niiin»» i »«»»»»»» i» 



$10 and $15 Ootks Shop 

THE KIND YOU PAY $20.00 AND $25.00 FOR 

L. SCHNITZER 

B. C. Phone 710S. 
Brighton Avenue, ROCHESTER, PA. 

»»n»»»»»»M»iim i »mi i »»»»»»»» i 






tfU¥lf i'tft'lU— ^' ^ 



♦,' 









September 1, 1916 



BEAVER VALLEY LABOR NEWS 



PaigtThrM 




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FIFTH ANNUAL EXHIBITION 



—OF THE 



Beaver County Agricultural Assn. 

• . ■ ■' ■'■.,» 

Junction Park 

Wednesday, Thursday, Friday, Saturday Sept, ] 3^ 14, 1 5, 1 6 

Oprii K?K-li Day Kroiii SAH) A. M. to lo.oo p. M. 



' Pony, Harness and Express 
Wagon To Be Given Away 

A Hpiendid and most beautiful pon^' about five years of 
nge, weiKhinK about 700 pounds, with harness and express 
wiiKon, will be given away at the Judges* StanfTby the Bea- 
ver County Agricultural Association to the holder of the 
coupon of the ticket purchased at any gate entnince to the 
fair ground or to the grand stand, having the number there- 
on corresponding to the ticket selected from all the tickets 
sold during: the fair uiitil 4 o'clock p. m., on the last day of 
the fair, Saturday, September 16 1916. The coupons will be 
numbered with the same number as the ticket to which it is 
attached. The purchaser will keep the coupon and hand the 
ticket to the gratekeeper. All tickets will be placed in a bag 
and shaken up well and a younK lady, blindfolded, shall take 
one ticket from the bag and the number thereof called out 
by the Judge of the Races. If the number is not responded 
to within ten minutes, another number will be di*Hiwn and 
railed, and so on until the ticket corresponding to the num- 
ber called^is ptesented, to whom the pony, harness and ex- 
press wagon will be given. This outfit will be given away on 
Saturday, September 16, 1916, at the Judges* Stand at 4::tO 
o'clock in the afternoon. 

Orand Parade 

All exhibitors of live stock a^ree to have the sjime 
groomed and in line upon the race track ready to start at 
the playinK of the band on Friday, September 15th, 1916. at 
one o'clock sharp, and will parade once around the tiack 
leaving at the place of entering;. f ' ■ 

Regarding Premiums 

The Board of Directors lesene the right to withhold 

any premium awarded under false representation or not in 

accordance with the rules and regulations and the Premium 

List. ■ 

Any premium awarded and not claimed before January 
1st, 1917, will be forfeited and deemed as donated to the 
Association. No deviation wil| be made from this rule, as 
the books for 1916 will be closed on that date. 



CQ 
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■ Prize Baby Contest 

The physicians of Beaver County will uive .S.'i(».00 as 
Special I'remiums to Beaver County Babies, the siime to be 
divided abong 12 prize winning babies. 

Salaried officers of the Beaver County Agricultural As- 
sociation will give $20.00 as Special Premiums to be divided 
among five prixe winning twin babies. ^ 

Please enter the bsibies for this contest before the first 
day of the fair, with M. J. Patterson, Secretary, lk>aver, 
1'a., giving the name in full and date of birth, also address. ' 



Boys* and Girls* Pig Feeding Contest 



( 



<*•••■ 



For boys and girls of Beaver County. Twenty Prizes. | 
First prize, free trip to Farmers' Week at State College — 
!ill expenses paid. 

Speedy Racing Events 

WEIWS'KSDAY, SEPTEMBER l.Uh, 1916 
County trot for horses without a record, owned in the 

county .*I0 djiys previous to the race .$100.00 j 

County pace for hoi-ses without a recoi'd. owned in the | 

county :J0 days previous to the race $100.00 

. 

^THIRSDAY. SEI»TE1VIBER 14th. 1916 

•3-year-old trot or pace $20(».00 i 

2:24 pace $:jt)0.00 

2:30 trot $;J00.00 

O ^^^^^'^r- 



)0 



FRIDAY, SEI*TE!VIBKR I'.th, 1916. 

2:19 pace $400 

2:1S Hot .: $100.00 

2 :ir> pace $400.00 

() 



SATIRDAY, SEI*TE.MBER 16th. 1»16 

2 I'M) pace $:100.00 

2:24 trot ....:. ^^. $300.00 

Free-for-all pace 7^^^ .... $400.00 

o 

Entries close- Friday, Septeml)er Kth, 1916, 10:00 p. m. 
Re"ords made on or after September 4th, 1916, no baiv 




SPLENDID EXHIBIT HORSES, CAHLE, SWINE, POUCTRY 



f*^ 



.-v^^ 



>• .^.i-„i,«j, ,.,^.: ;^. 



Display of Brain, Vegetables, Fruit, Etc., Will Never be Better 

Send Entry Blinks to II. J. Patterson, Stcretary, Bewer, Pa., at Least a Week Before the Fair 

: -■* — ■? .■■■■ ■ . ■ , ff- ■- .-.■■. • .■■....• ... ,^ . 



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Pagt Fo* 



BEAVER VALLEY LABOR NEWa 



Scpetmber 1» 1916 



»m»iiiiiin»»inin i M»»»«« » 



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^♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦^ 



»»m»»n»u»n»»» 







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IS THE TIME I 



TO HAVE YOUR 
HOUSE WIRED 
FOR THE USE OF 
ELECTRICITY 



NO HOME IS MODERN WITHOIIT FT! 



Klei'ti'ii' Illumination is the must economical. You use it 
only when you need it and you only pay for what you use. 

Klecti'ic Illumination is an assurance of sjifety from fire. 
There is always a risk in striking matches to MkM the ^as 
or oil lamp. Don't take any chances for the small amount 
of money involved. 

F^lectric Illumination is the most ehistic. You can locate 
it just where you want it, so that it cam be applied directly 
on the work in h:ind and where it will be eaisiest on the eyes. 
l>on*t ruin your eyes with faulty and antiquated methods 
of liuhtinK. 

Klecrticity is a tireless servant. You can use it at trill- 
ing cost to operate the washing: machine, vacuum cleiiner or 
electric iron. They sjiye weary steps and money iiesides. 

Elect I'J^liy is at your service every minute of the twenty- 
four hours and you only pay for the amount you actually use. 

Electric Illumination is the coolest, most efTicient, most 
comfortable, most econmic substitute for the sun that you 
can obtain. — 

If your house is not wired, phone Con4nict Department^ 
lieaver Falls No. .'l.'), and arrange for a fi'ee e'stimate of 
the cost. 



( 



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»»»#»#»>»•» « » f ♦»»##»»#»»»»» <»»»(»»»#»»»»»»#»#»»#»i|##>####» f 



Hi At the Najestic 

A ^ j »■■■■■ >———>■■■>>>»■■■> III! ■■■■♦^■■■■■■■■■■■■■•» 



''The River ot Ronance" 

Hurold Lock wood and May Alli- 
son will be Men on the screen at the 
Majestic on Monday, Sept. 4. In "The 
River of Romance," u live part Metro 
wonderplay, Mr. Lockwood is seen in 
the role of a wealthy young man who 
decides to make his own Way in the 
world. Not finding anything better 
to do he buys a broken-down motor 
boat, which he uses to ferry passen- 
gers among the islands of the St. 
Lawrence River. There he meets the 
girl and falls in love with her. The 
girl is struck by his manner, but on 
account of his station in life, refuses 
at tirst to consider him seriously, but 
ittle by little she loses her heart to 
him. 

j How he finally carries her away 
against her wishes in his boat and 
forces her into an elopement, when 

I she thinks he is a burglar, forms a 

; story of thrills. The boat sinks while 
they are running away, and the sup- 

I posed bo»tman saves the girl. 



i 



! 1»»»»»»«»»» I »»»»»I»»»»M I » I »« < 

iil :|- QUALITY l"- ':"| 

I Phoenix Glass Co. I 

<?![ MnKTAPA PA i3l 



'^Destiny's Toy" 

Joe Martin, a lone fisherman, had 
dreamed and dreamed that the sea 
had cast its riches at his feet, but his 

I vision never was realized until one 
day he waded out among the rocks 
to pull ashore a bundle and found — a 

I little girl. It was not the treasure 
of which he had dreamed, but as the 
days lengthel^ed into years, Martin 

' swore that old Father Neptune had 

' given him the greatest treasure he 

I possessed. 

It all happens in the Famous Play- 
ers production of "Destiny's Toy," in 
which Miss Louise Huff makes her 
first appearance as a permanent mem- 

' ber of this company. 

' This Paramount feature is booked 

' for the Majestic Theatre, Tuesday, 

i September 6th. 



i 4 I "The Making of Maddaiena." 

I Those Americans who are volun- 
tary exiles are usually the ones who 

! express their love of country with the 
most emphasis. This is cxen^lified 
in "The M.-.kinjr of Maddaiena," the 
Morosco-Paramount feature coming to 
the Majestic Wednesday, Sept. 6. 
Always fjay Kpirited, the atmos- 

■ phere of the student <|uartcr is sur- 
charged with electric thrill. Hunting 
is brought out with many cherished 

! copies of "Old Cilory" to make the 
studio an American shrine. All are 
happy with infectious joy when an 
unexi)ecte<l letter shutters the hopes 
and an.bitious of the leader of the 
revol.s. The reckless outcome ef his 
drunken folly extracts a bitter pen- 
alty that uives this powerful story 
a thrillinjr punch. 



MONACA, PA. 




MANUFACTURERS OF 



limMINATING 
GLASSWARE 



Of All Kinds 



»♦»♦♦»♦»»»»»•»»»»»»♦♦» 



ii QUALITY i; 

»»t»>{8t»»»»»»»:»»»»t»»»»»»hi ^ 



»»M i »»» i MnjnMniiiiMm» i i»»»i»i»»»m i u»nM»»»» «m 



f "S|M»rting Ulood" 

All the excitement of the race-track 
runs tlirou^rh William Fox's new plio- ' 
loplay of the turf. '•.Spoi-tin>r MIwkI." 
which conies to the Majestic Thurs- 1 
(la\ anil Friday. Sept. 7-8. ; 

Dorotliy rK.»rnanl and (lien White i 
ai-e the stars.- Miss l»ornard plays 
the part of .Mary liullanl. whose bro- j 
tluT i.-, ruined through tlie manipu- 1 
laliuns of l)avo Crurrihon, a notorious! 
f'urur*' on the turf. Mr. White plays j 
.Jim Kidille, who li:i.s ]tis .sisler'.s scoi-e ' 
lo stttle wiih (iani.M n. Riddle and 
.Mar; ('4iinhino io dofeal (iarrison, who 
Ivns fallen in love with .Mary, who 
tell;; him "If I'm wortli \\ inniiiLr, |>!av 
the i;ai:M.." 

Shi' iM'ts h.MS'lf .-lUMin-t .^'lO.OOO 
ihat Shooiin^r .Star. (Jarrison's horse 
will II. tt win. My cN-ver iiianij)\jlati«iii 
slu- ;;i iii.iirt's to rhan>r«' her horse, Buy, 
Melic, for (iarri.^«in'.s and runs Shoot- 
ing: St::r as her «)wn. She wins and 
in doin^ so. ruins (Jarrison and foreoh 
his retir.-ment fmm the turf. ^j 



♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ 



HARTZELBROS. 

• ■ ■ 

Complete House Furnishing 

Always Leads in Prices 



"The Clown" 

To he :i cirrus elow n was the boy- 
hoo«| ambition of Vii-tor .Moore, jlhp- 
ular l.asky comedian, and when a 
small l)oy rjm away from home and 
joined a circus. His circus career 
lasted three weeks, when his father 
finally locate<l him and. after a brief 
wo<Kl-shed conference, drove all desire 
for cinus life out of his head. But 
his ambition is realized now, and he 
will be seen in the Lasky production, 
"The Clown." This story of the saw- 
dust circle is said to be superior to 
even his immortal "Chimmie Fadden" 
; pictures. He is surrounded by a cast 
of unusual excellence. 



i^: EMPLOY ONLY UNION MEN 



The • attention of our readers is 
oalled to the advertisement which ap- 
pears in another column, from the 
Kay Tailors, of Beaver Falls. This 
concern has become one of the most 
consistqnt advertisers in The Labor 
News and is worthy of the patronage 
of union workers throughout the val- 
ley. The Beaver Falls store is one of 
several operated by the same organi- 
zation. The main factory is located 
in BuflTalo, N. Y., where several hun- 
dred men are employed, every one of 
whom is a Union man. Even since 
the incorporation of the Kay Tailors 
nothing but Union labor has been em- 
plo)red. Charles D. Fischer, nuuwcer 
cf the Beaver Falls store, is a man 
who thoroughly understands his busi- 
ness and who stands ready at any 
time to give his customers the bene- 
fit of his advice relative to styles and 
grades oT goods, and ot see that they 
get a square deal at his store. 




m. '*'^iv»v'v :>ii<yv^#^ 




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We Carry a Fall Line of 

Furniture^ Rugs, Linoleums 
\a» ue and Stoves ue j« 



V. 



^ 



Latest Patterns in Furmtiire at Lowest Prices 



HartzdBros. 



Opposite Fo8t Office, 

I ROCHESTER 



Third Avenue, 

FREEDOM 



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»»#>»<>>•♦♦»»»»»»♦•••»•»»»•»»»»•»»•»♦•»»»#»♦♦♦#»♦»»»• 



COMPUMENTS OF 



l^otel 9t)tUtfi( 



BEAVER FALLS, PA. 



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l^J 



Septraibm- 1» 1916 



:^ 



BEAVER VALLEY LABOR NEWS 









Pace Five 



V 




PANICS AND CAUSES 



(Continued fruin Page One) 






«»»mn»ii»mu 



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»♦»»» 



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J, 



JESSE W. HUNTER 

, ROCHESTER 

CANDIDATE FOR 

'.■ ' 

J" ,. ". 

■ ■ • ,»•■'■. 

Representative to General Assembly 

• Democratic Ticket ' 



»»n»nMM»n»i»m»ni»»»tt}tH»nn»»i»»»»in»»»»m »w 



ventionii and progrvum, but I do «ay 
that an invention that robs a man of 
his trud« and the right to work, to 
such a worker, an invention is a curse 
and not a blessinic- Lubor-cavinfr mv- 
chines are constantly being invented 
and installed, and just as constantly 
are skilled workvrK lusinR their jobs. 

No individual ur set of individuals 
should be allowed the private owner- 
ship of lubor-displucinjc machinery. 
The niutlern tools of production and 
distribution must biTome the pro|>erty 
of all the iieople, und be operated in 
the interest of all, and not as now — 
in the interest of the few, to the det- 
riment of the gri'at niajority — then ■ 
the invention will be a u^ssinK to all, 
and not 4is now — a cursf to many. , 

Child LabocHr-Hootitfer very import- 
ant factor. Modci^ invention.s ntake 
possible the employment of children 
where little or no skill is necessary, 
displacing not only the skilled, but 
unBkille<l men awl women. Thus, wc 
find children regiBlarly employed while 
millions of able-bodied men and wo- 
men are walking the streets. If the 
two million child-workers we now 
have in the United States, were put 
back to school and on the playgrounds 
where they belong, two million fath- 
ers, who walk the streets during panic 
times, would have jtbs. 

Men and women are not as cheap 
as children, therefore, such an ar- 
rangement would make unpardonable 
inroads on profits, and the change 
would, by many, be denounced us un- 
godly, unpatriotic and un-American. 
Ixjoking ut the subject from an- 
other angle, it in claimed by certain 
statisticians that labor receives as a 
wage about one-fifth of the wealth 
that it creates. Whether these fig- 
ures are any way nearly correct, I JJ 
do not know, nor do I believe that 
anyone can tell. But I do know that 
my cluKs fieat«*s all wealth, owns the 
remaining ninety per cent. True, we 
also rf'ct'ive above this enough to keep 
alive, but this i.>< also true of the non- 
producern. It is. therefore, evident 
that we are rxpNiited out of the lion's 
share of th«' uoalth w«' cn'ute, ami 
l)e:ng in the ovi-rwhelming niajority. 
we cannot buy bark enough of the 
thing.^ we niak*- \o keep us employed. 
\or can the non-|4ro(iucers who are in 
th<> minority d«» .so. I admit, howover, 
that in all a^/s tin* s(K"iaI dr«ino.s 
proved thom.sflv.s vor\ olficient eon- 
.sumers. T^^s*' well-fed an<l finely- 
griMiineil iiu'n an<l vvoim-n live in inag- 
nilicent .«plendoi. con.-unic the In-st 
tln-re i.^ on earth. an<l are cared for 
liv .st-nants as if they were invalids 
• >r infant.s. They no longer, like those 
wiiosc fortune.'^ they inherite<l. «'ven 
manage thrir own affairs. The col- 
leges and universitie.s train men and 
women to do thi.s wnrk for them I ilu-ir 
women do iml even profiagate; the\ 
prefer fondling no-account dog.^, to 
childn-n. .And these people havr the 
auflaeity to call tliem.»;<'lves the upper 
or bett< r i lass, while, in act. they an- 
nothing inoni than a useless, jdjc, 
parasitica! «la»<s. wiio hang like mill- 
stones aiound labor's neck. j 

The strange.st part of it .'iH is th:it 
llu" iriihist rl;il rna.sleis .seem l)hn(i to 
their own future economic v.elfai<'. |{\ 
cullinjr ijnwn the consiiinini' |»o\\«t of 
the \\oil<< IS. who are m the tri<at ma- 
jority of consumers, they aii' <lr>t row- 
ing the Mi.iiket for their pni'luct.'i. 
Those <iii;ir!ini!iti«-s <i.iij! up, liiisines> 
•^l:tirn;ite.-. ptojits ilv\ indie. divi<lenfls 
tea.s. ami liaiikruptr; fed low.-. Thi.> 
leave.; the ouninj; class without ;i 
soiiiif ol revenue, ani tlirou.'s ihein 
li.M'k into tlic workrir.' class. in<>>t of 
wliKiii .•nc iiirlTicient and helplr.-.'., 
ani! -utlei inor.- than t!ie worker.«s ul.o 
h:ive hel-n trainer! to shift t«» cli.uu' 
my «-oMili1ions. Tiiis eronomic law of 
CtoitalisMi. the owning clasK do not 
uiwii-rslaiid. And. in order to |M'i|M-t- 
uate this insane system, every n.'ition 
<i!) eartli ahsorhs considerable of «»ur 
labor enfrgy, ami lakes the strong- 
est out of the (iebl of [iroductioM. and 
makes them consumers and destroy- 
ers. While this may not caus*- un- 
eniployinent, it does cause povorty. 
j and con.sumes al>out fiu p«'r cont of 
' our fctleral revenues. It is .also one 
I of the many burdens which keeps 
j the workers poor when employed, and 
'leaves th<-m almost <lep<'ndent the day 
they join the army of uneniploy«'d. I 
regret that limes does not permit me 
to dwell upon this Kubject at greater 
, length and in more detail. As it is. 1 
I have hanlly touched a few spots. 
j I understand the purpose of your 
organization is to encourage progres- 
, sive legislation. It is not my dosiri' 
to discourage you in your efforts . 
< Much as I may admire your philan- 
thropic spirit, and hope you will ac- 
complish much for the good of man- 
kind in your efTorts, I fear your dis- 
appointments will be many. You will : 
find, or perhaps you have already ! 
learned, that no matter how you turn, I 
or what you may try to accomplish,' 
seemingly insurmountable barriers i 
confront you. You may Succeed in 
placing a 'legislative patch here or I 
there on the "ragged- garment of cap- '. 
italism, but patch as we may, the sys- 1 
tern of private ownership of the means | 
of life has not a single moral prop to j 
lean upon. It is inhuman, yes, race- 
restroyinff, and patching can no more 
change the nature of the system than 
can the leopard change hii spots. 
Therefore, the only remedy for the 
evils now confronting us is, change 
the system from preduction for profit, 
to production for use. Let our 'slo- 
gan be: "All able-bodied men and 
women who do not work shall not 
eat. All shall render such senriee to 
society that they are best fitted for. 




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OrR L.XRGE LINE OF 



Fall Millinery 



NOW ON DI.SPLAY 



Hals U) suii tveriiDodii 



Schwartz . Millinery 

1H« KKKJITON AVKNl K, 

!m| Rochester - - Pennsylvania 



ri 



Adequate 
Protection 



The most vfTiciont police syslom does n<»l \vholl> pro- 
tect. A billables in the home are wilhin reach of the lawless. 

Hut |M»sitive protection, not onl> from lunulars but 
from io.^s by lire is avaihible. 

For the lM>nent of rtsidents of this community the 
Ileaver Trust (^impany has provided a nia.ssive safe deposit 
vault of steel sind concrete — a vault where valuable papers 
and other articles may be phiced with absolute assurance 
as to their siifety. . ' - 

Call and inspect our facilities. 



Beaver Trust Company 

BE AVER. ^ PENNSYLVANIA. 
CAPITAL AND SURI^LUS $390,000.00. , 



All .shall work." And, if we product' 
more than wf arc able to i-on.sume, 
we will simply reduce the hours of 
labor. 

If we find that by everybody work- 
ing six hours a day, we an' producing 
too many of the goo<l things, we will 
cut the workday to four or to two 
hours if neces.-^ary. Then all will have 
time for recr*«ation, for mental and 
physical development — the beginning 
of a new eporh, the beginning of real 
civilization. The unemployed problem 
will have pa.s.Mvl into history. Kvery 
man will have a job, every woman a 
home, and every child an education. 
And this would be real civilization. 

(Address delivered by James H. 
Maurer before the Women's Clubs of 
Philadelphia.) 



»#♦♦»♦♦♦»♦♦♦»♦»»»»»»»♦»»»♦ 



President Samuel Gompers, of the 
American Federation of Labor, \S-ill 
deliver an address at Lewistown, Me., 
on Labor Day. 



i M ii mnm i nm iii m 

HBCKMAN BROS. ' 
i CmumI Hanlwai% PaiaC, CMMi^ < 



: P( 



kfn 



i mmnnumm i'iiiii 



GRAVIES I 

Studio 

WW 



WIDOWS' APPRAISE3IEXT 



Of the properties to be retained by 
widows and children of decedent* oat 
of the following estates, to-wit: 

George S. Texter, personal 1800.00 

Thomas L. Minesinger, per- 
sonal 4300.00 

Nvtice is hereby given that fhm 
above l|>praiMnieiits will be conflm- 
«d abBdately by the Orphana' Covit 
of Beaver County, on the 14th «f 
September, A D. 1916, milMi cavM 
be shown to the eontnuy. 

WILL H. HAMILTON, 
Clerk of tht Orphans' Gout 



.-.\ 



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Page Six 



BEAVER VALLEY LABOR NEWS 



Scpctmber 1, 1916 



♦♦♦ 



; »: i »{ ! {»»«»:»»»:»»»tu 



** «»{i:i ! »»» 



Union Label Suits 

IBade-to-IVlcasure ' 






oo 
oo 



Fall Samples are 



now rea 



dy r-tji^ 



prices range from 



$18 up as high as 



$40; a fine assort 



mentiLt $25.00 



Building Trades Council 

Is Thriving Organization 



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Ha^ 



Had 
Since 



Keinii,ll-k:ibl«> (iiowth 
Its OiKJini/atiun 
In IHL'i . 



MANY 



IN IONS 
NOW 



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I.omI I'tiioii 



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ool 

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oo 
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oo 
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Ewing Bros. II 

MEN'S WEAR ^ 



Rochester 
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Peiiii'a. 
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Remember This 

ICmtx l)0(l.\ (Jo(s;i (iimmI S(|ii:iie Ift'al ;i( 

Buser's Old Reliable Jewelry Store 
I KKhlDOM. I»ENN A. 
♦»#»»•<»»♦♦##♦»»»»»»♦♦♦ . ♦♦♦♦♦♦»♦♦»♦♦»♦»»♦♦»•#♦♦♦•♦♦»♦» 



fall of wm 

S. 1,1'ijfhty. a u.cnilM r til 

No. "Kri", ( arfii'tjlirs & 

.Iditicrs of Aiiurica, (<\ .Momu a, I'a.. 

aflti" si'Vi-ral aU< inpls, .-im-(('<-<Ii'<I rii 

Ct'llin^' lln- iin iuIkts of the .MiMiac I 

l.ittal iiitt rr.-lf.i ill ftn'iuiiin ii "it'.ti.i! 

<)ruanr/.ali«>ii of alt lln* liuiMiia'. iraH> 

lilt II, Uii;i\\n a> ihr liuil<iiiiir TratU's , 

(■|»iMi>'il. In- liciii^ appointiM^ a- chair ; 

III. Ill uf a niiiiiiiitt«'»' for ihul |>iiri><i.-<-. i 

. I 
'l'lii.< foiniiiitlrc visitnl thi' \arn>u>i 

l«u-al> of llu' liuililinK cran.-Mii'ii in' 
lli,> (listrifl and M'cunil tin- k' ii|.M'ra- 
luiii of Hrtis. .lohn Starr, Kliii»r Hoi j 
ricii aii<l CliarU'ji Sa>r»'r.s. nf tlu- I'aint- 
«•!■.-, l!rns. Miliiis, A. T. J'niu > iumI I 
riioiiias ISohtuM, of thr I'IuiiiIm iv; aini| 
r. A. havin. -of CarfM'iiti'rs l,i>«a! No. j 
■J4(». Nfw UriKliton. 

'l"lii.-> makint; liw ri'«|uir»(l huiuIht of 
tr.ni«'~ rc.|uiM'(l tu sfcure a «h;irt«'r, 
Urollur i.«Mtrlil\, ItoitiK :i I >isl i lit Or- 
vraiiiz r, Mcun-W a rliarti-r rmiii lli<' 
Ituiliiini: 'I'raWi's Pcpartinciil aiul in- 
.litul«il an Miiraiii/.ation known as the 
lliiiitlmir 'I'radrs t'ouiicii <>f N'<'\v 
r.riirli'""- I'a. ami vicinit\. Ilrollir;- 
!'. .\. I lavin was »'l<'«-tc<l |•^l•^.(|l•nt, 1 >. 
."^. 1.1 Lil^. . ; I ( n-t.ir; , ai'il TLtinia.^ 
iioiincf. t r< a.*»irrr. 

A fiiiiiinilli <• \'.a.- .ippoinli'd to vi.«it i 
thi" l!ri* kla\«i<' i.iM-al in lltK'lu-.slcr. • 
ami .sii!icit tlu-ir Mi|ip«i'l in llii.>^ niovo- 1 
ijirV.t. ar.«i to t'.\l« ml them an inviia-| 
tioii lo ;>rnil a coinmitU'i' I «i ', !u' ?.U'C't-j 
inir.'i that If-.iy ; nould unil«i>l;!,.(l llu- 1 
vvi>rkint;.< of ll<f ( itniicii. N('«m|1i'.-;s lo| 
say that our (■()iiiiii"*J,t'<' w. a.« ii-ccivi'd ' 
l»y thf r.rii klayi'?> :ii i Ir "n-ily i.ian- ; 
iiT ard a voiuiuiltoi fnu'^ tii'ir i»H-al 

ilh t lie irsult of 
j I ;.iii iti-.iii.. .i|)|iid\al and <'-*»|itra-! 
t'on uhifh, lo a \<'r\ iirviil I'Mdil, iia.- ; 
:iKido tl;i.-i •'•nmtil -rcond ii. nor.i- in i 
l\.i- Miiiifliiii.' rr;idf.- ht'parli Mcnt . * 
Ar iviiout till' .-aiiu- liiiif tlif i'la.«loi- 
i-.- aiuj l.itinr.- airiliat.MJ with tin 
('•Hincil, itnlcinir .»'i.v ()rKani;;;itions af- 
tiliatfd. 



''i'lados ("Dunril. Ihothn .1. C. Wvu- 
nrr, prrsiilinl "f tin* l!l<it ni-jil \\t*rk- 
fi-.s union, Immiik oih- >'( tlifir r«'|ir»'- 
si-ntativcs it; tin- coiiiit '!. ()»i aomunt 
of tl\«' inability ol Ih-tlcr !'. .\. Daviii 
to ;itl»>ii 1 tilt iiio«'tiiH>. the honor of 
tl'o prc-^idcin y ul tin- Council wa.s 
I «>iil'<Trr(l on llr.itlu r Milnrs. of tin- 
j I'liimlxMs. i.a'' r. Ihoth.cr .Mihu-.-J hav- 
a fl'T inucii "•l^ sci-urod i!ti|ilo\ mini in ()hi«,t and 
••aviiijf fur tiiat |ila<T. iSnitliiT J. C*. 
I'rancr wa^^ t'cjtid pitsidcnt of Ihr 
< 'ouncil. 



ARK 

AFFlI.LVrEI) 



l,n I"»'iirua!\ . 1!M"<. Hrotlur l.'-inhty 
I'oiiniil a U'ir.ikorni y «'riraiu/ation oT 
;'u' tlod Carriers, and on .Maitdi HJtIi, 
in.stitiitf'vi lla Ml ii!;<lttr * liarti-r No. 21-1 
and alfiiiahd tMiti with tlii- Council. 
inakin;r nin«- liuildin^' trades unions 
airiliutcd with tin- (iiuiiril. 

Durinir tia- moiuh of .May. 1;M4, 

I th(> Council drcidcd that tlioy should 

Lluivf a Iliisintss Ai'tiil in the lipid to 

I look after tin interests <d" the diffrr- 

cpt local."* alfiliated. l!roth«*r I-riKhty 

ua.s noiniiiati'l and eljTtrd to lill thai 

positiotv iinti! .Iiiiu' '"Mh, I'.Ua, At 

I th«' oxnirat'oii of his first term Uro- 

ithrr l.cijrlity \va> lo-c't'c^'d :iiid .servivl 

until .hiiic ."nth. !til»i. Vind. when hv 

declined a third t<riM, ISrother .S. S. 

llow.ser \v;i> elected ti> the po.sition of 

Hu.siness .\irent. ;iiid is now servinjr 

, in that ii(i.--it inn. 




o Coi Seventh Ave. tttid Uth St. BE.WER F.\LLS, PA. 



NEW FALL 



Women's and Children*s 

ICoats, Suits, Dresses 



Skirts and Waists 



You Always Save by Selecting 
Your Apparel Here 



i >h riiT ard a voiuiiiittei I 
T^l j visilfil our council. »vii 
♦♦ tl'.i'ir he.irt V a|)|iid\al 



ii Your Visit Will be Welcomed 



ylhirlni: tin- winter of li.tJ'.-N, IJro- 
iher heiu'lity securefl charter.- and or- 
ganized a local of l!lectrifal \V<>rkers, 
and- a local of Slieet Metal \V(»rk< rs, 
ami added tlu'iii to the Ihiild'nir 



♦»♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ 






me 



•»♦♦♦♦♦•♦» » »♦♦♦♦»♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ ♦» ♦»♦♦ 



one 



Oil Worlcs Company 



FREEDOM, - PENN'A. 



Oils, Gasolines, Greases 



For Motors and all Kinds of Machinery 



•s. .). Itok'ih^ I). S. I.i'iKhly. 

Mrother i.eiirhty as Hu^u'hs At;ent. 
j was al.so a leadiiiji spin*, in the or- 
. . j wanizalion of tlu- lloavcr Valley La- 
►Jl'lmr News, the first and only labor 
^v i |)aper puhlisiied in Ih-aver County. 
Th«' Labor Now.s, at the j^rcsent time, 
s fa.st (raining i" cirruliition and in 
•.trenjrth. which fact the l»usine.><.s nion 



o<» 



iU> 



••• 



PRODUCTS THAT ARE RIGHT 

■ ^.^p- 

Because they are made from 
Pennsylvania's Celebrated Crude 



••• 



,\ 



Forty Years as Manufacturers and Refiners iSI 



A GUARANTEE OF QUALITY 



>'• 



§ DISTRIBUTING STATIONS EVERyWiH 

lii»»iin»» i nt» i » i « i » i Ht»»ii»«»»»»nm»M»inn»tt mm 



Ih other I.eijrhty :dse havinjr .-'••rvetl 
lontinuously as secretary, .iml was re- 
elected to tiiat <^rin' ill .Inly , i'.'Mi. foi' 
oiu' \e;ir. Ilrotlir INniur having: 
I'.eld llie otfiie o) 'lV>'asur.r until hi- 
death, w lien l!i-<'iher W. li. I'it.liid • 
.\;;.'< elc'cjed to fill tlu»" unox p led ti r:M 
nd \va.; rc-electr (I for the year i:'l(>. 
.Jrotlicr A. T. Jones has serxnl .•!.< 
:ri*ctco Troia the bcfrinnintr of tho or- 
;canizati<m. 

In Maivh. i:»l.!. llrother 'l.iduhty 
\\t\:i eleili'd -ii (ieUj;ali to tl'.e I'lliii- 

• ; Ivaiii.a .S.late I'ounell of the iSuild- 
iin; Trades ('oiineil, Indd in Harri.->- 
l>',:r^r, r.a.. wlniv he was rdected vice 
;)rc.sidint of the State i'mincil and a 

loard .Mer.iher of this di.-tiict. Ihir- 

:)L' !:is incuiii))<':icy as Ihisiii-.-s An-nt 
:!!i:ti'er l.eijdHy has v.orhi'd untinnu- 
:y Jor th.i- In-llenu.-nt ol' the orjranizrd 
..orkei s of tir- cd'uijly. an-l in time of 
Li'oulile liet'.ten ('iiu>loyer and em- 
ploye h:i>. Itv iii- ''air dealinirs. in lu-ar- 
iy ovi-ry ca.-e. aiLint'ed a s'.ttlement 

ijuitalile :iiid just t n ali. and when 
ohjict .)n> V ere rai.-«'(i tn the ch.arltr 

• i" ti.i. (ouncil. it wa ; I'.roth.er l.eiirhly 
i.o a.- I;ed tlie . 1 >e|)ai;ii:eiil to is.>-iie a 

• harter covering the county, lie was ^ __ _^ |- 

•uiic rerused. out finally ,.-uccee<le<l in ** OCaVCr F allS 

;,'>'tl 11^; the dialler ehan^rd to read 

Ueaver Coiintv and vicinitv. The fol- , _ 

;••"""■■,■-"••-";!••■- ""•;•;■ ■!•■«;'•-- »»»»»»»»»»»»:{ ; «i»«: { : i ;»>i i n» »m 

kt*r: Ii. I.ov.. u. I". .»ic' lure, I. A. 

(lorinaii, J. C. ISeaniM', Charle.s' < yrus. ^^^^mm^^^^^^^^^^^^^IH^i^IIIII^^^II^^ZZ^Z^Z^ZZIZII^^^^IIZII^ 

iUn H. Ilarnes, ^ri^onia.s H. Uonnor 
I F. Cttono. li. .Shaffer. Frank Hamilton 
I A. T. .Ii 



Browm's 






Penn'a. 



♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦-♦♦♦♦♦♦♦^♦♦♦♦-♦♦•♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦••^ 



oo 
<»o 



oo 

Oo 

Oo 
oo 
<u> 
oo 
oo 
oo 
oo 



nd workers are iK^jjinnin^r to roalizo. 
The I.ahor News i.s owned ami con- 
.rolletl hy the unjon men of Heaver 

oanty. and i.<: the ofTirial orf^un of 
the UuiiditiK Trailes Council, a larjfP 
p.-irt of the stork Ik^ipp owiio«l hy tho 
HuildinK Trades Uniun.s. 

Tiip UuildinK Trades Council of 
1 leaver County i.s now composec^^ the 
followinir or>ranization.s: Carpienters' 
Di.-'trift Council, Hricklayors' Local 
.\o. 7, Pa.: IMasterer.«« Loral No. .5fi, 
Plumhor.s Lm-al No. ll.'>. Hodcarriers' 
Lo«al No. 214. Lathers' Local No. 26:1, 
.Sheet .Metal Workers' Local No. ."..'iT. 
I'aiitteis' Local No. .').'!(), Klectrical 
Workers' Local No. 712, and Ambridjje 
Carpenters' Local No. 17.".2. 

The iluilding Trades ( ouncil was 
lirst orjrani/ed in the small hall over 
tile Uestwick Hanlware .store, hut o\v- 
inu to its rapid jrrowtli and the lack 
of room in those (|uarters, secured 
lar«:er rooms ami at pVesent are «|uar- 
tei-ed in the Kramer Kuildinf?. New 
llriirhton. where they h.ave .two office 
roenis and a hnlpe hall. 



S| WILLI AM B. BROWN iSI 

DRY GOODS 

\ ^ I Once a customer, always a customer. We have the < *< * 

< M I most up-to-date line of Impoited and Domestic Dry Goods < ^ I 

< |< ; to be found anywhere at prices that are fai- l>€low others < m I 
{ ^ J for the same goods. We are now showing oiu- fall line of { ^ | 

^ Sweaters Flannelettes Blankets 
Underwear Dress Goods 



The silks for fall are in. When in leaver give us a call. 
Always a full line of fancy neckwear to l)e found here. 



William B. Brown 



BEAVER, 9A. 



•##♦♦♦♦•#••#»♦♦»»♦»♦»♦»♦<»♦»»♦»#»♦»»#><»<»#>»<»<»»♦ #» 
»»»♦♦»»♦»»•♦»♦♦♦•»•#»»»#♦»<♦•♦»♦»♦ ♦ ♦#»♦>#»♦»#♦»<»< > »♦ 




I 



TODAY 

We dream hrijrht drc.-iins of tomorrow; 

<Uir castles are huilt in the air; 
.And with hues suhliine. of the com- 
inj; time, 

We paint us a pictiwo fair. 
Put we never stop to consi<lcr 

That the Cjiure (lies aw.iy. '. 
.And th:it there i»i iiauirht into brinp 
hroujrht 

Cnless it i- wrought ti