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Full text of "600 days' service; a history of the 361st infantry regiment of the United States Army"









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600 DAYS' 
SERVICE 



A HISTORY OF THE 
361st INFANTRY REGIMENT 

of 
THE UNITED STATES ARMY 




"ALWAYS HW READY" 
(Insignia and Motto of 91st Division) 



"THE 361st LEADS— OTHERS FOLLOW" 
(Motto of 361st Infantry) 



"Powder River!" 
"Let 'er buck!" 



-p* 10 - 



HEADQUARTERS FIFTH ARMY CORPS 

American Expeditionary Forces 

France, 3 October, 1918. 

From : Commanding General, V Army Corps, 
To: Commanding General, 91st Division. 

Subject: Relief of 91st Division. 

Under orders from First Army, the 91st Division will be relieved from 
the front line to-night and placed in Corps Reserve. 

The Corps Commander wishes you to understand that this relief results 
solely from a realization by higher command that your Division has done 
its full share in the recent success, and is entitled to a rest for reorganization. 
This especially as during the past three days it has incurred heavy casualties 
when circumstances would not permit either advance or withdrawal. 

At a time when the divisions on its flanks were faltering and 
even falling back, the Ninety-First pushed ahead and steadfastly 
clung to every yard gained. 

In its initial performance, your Division has established itself firmly on 
the list of the Commander-in-Chief's reliable fighting units. Please extend 
to your officers and men my appreciation of their splendid behavior and my 
hearty congratulations on the brilliant record they have made. 

Geo. H. Cameron, 
Major General, Commanding. 



'Ride 'em cowboy! Hook 'em cow! 
Wild West Division! Wow! ! !" 




74 Ra 



*> t 




Colonel William D. Davis, D. S. M., D. S. C. 

Commanding Officer of 361st Infantry Regiment from date of its 

organization, September 4, 1917, until killed in action 

November 1, 1918 



To its 

honored molder and leader 

Colonel William D. Davis 

the regiment 

naturally and gratefully dedicates 

this story of its life. 

He lived and died for his men. 

Killed in action, he had already by his training 
of officers and men, by his leadership, by his 
thoughtfulness, and by his fearless example 
made soldiers of civilians and made possible 
their achievements in war. 

March 11, 1869— November 1, 1918 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 

AND INDEX TO ORDERS 



Foreword 6 

Roster of Officers, September 30, 1917, and list of additional officers assigned 

to regiment before July 6, 1918 8 

Chapter I. — Camp Lewis, September 4, 1917- June 21, 1918 12 

The Start 12 

From Civilians to Soldiers 15 

Chapter II.— "Over There," June 22-September 2, 1918 23 

The Trip 23 

The Training 29 

Chapter III. — "The General Situation" 31 

Chapter IV.— The St. Mihiel Drive, September 3-13, 1918 36 

G. O. 238, G. H. Q. A. E. F. 26 Dec. 1918 39 

Chapter V. — To the Argonne, September 14-25, 1918 41 

F. O. 1, 361st Infantry, 25 Sept. 1918 46 

Table of Organization of Command Groups 53 

Roster of Officers, September 26, 1918 58 

Chapter VI. — First Phase of Meuse-Argonne Offensive, September 26- 

October 6, 1918 61 

F. O. 8, 181st Brigade, 28 September, 1918 73 

F. O. 46 (V Army Corps), 28 September, 1918 78 

F. O. 10, "Match" (181st Brigade), 29 September, 1918 78 

G. O. 24, 91st Div. 1918 (publishing letter from C. G. Fifth U. S. Army 

Corps, 3 October, 1918) 90 

Roster of Officers, October 7, 1918 94 

Chapter VII. — Second Phase of Meuse-Argonne Offensive, October 7-12, 

1918 97 

F. O. — , "Mamma" (361st Infantry), 9 October, 1918 100 

Letter from Chief of Staff, 1st Division, 12 October, 1918 117 

Extract from Operations Report of Brig. Gen. McDonald, 181st Brig 118 

G. O. 17, First U. S. Army Corps, 11 Nov. 1918 118 

G. O. 201, G. H. Q. A. E. F. 10 Nov. 1918 119 

Memorandum 181st Brig. 25 Oct. 1918 120 

G. O. 232, G. H. Q. A. E. F. 19 Dec. 1918 121 

Resolution by Council of City of Tacoma, Wash., 8 Nov. 1918 122 

Chapter VIII.— To the Belgian Front, October 12-27, 1918 124 

G. O. 30, 91st Div. 22 Oct. 1918 131 

G. O. 28, 361st Infantry, 27 Oct. 1918 (Memorial Order) 135 

Roster of Officers, October 31, 1918 137 

4 



Page 

Chapter IX. — The Capture op Audenarde, First Phase op Ypres-Lys 

(Scheldt) Offensive, October 28-November 4, 1918. 141 

F. O. — , "Regatta" (361st Infantry), 31 October 1918 144 

G. O. 11, 181st Brig. 2 Nov. 1918 (Announcing Death of Colonel Davis) 151 

Translation of German offer of extra leaves of absences as rewards for capture 

of prisoners from 91st Div 154 

G. O. 38, 91st Div. 1918 (publishing S. 0. of 7th French Army Corps, 4 Nov. 

1918) 158 

Chapter X. — Second Phase of Lys-Scheldt Offensive, November 4-11, 1918. 160 

Message announcing Armistice 164 

G. O. 49, 91st Div. 1918 (publishing letter from C. G. 30th French Army 

Corps, 24 Nov. 1918) 165 

G. O. 59, 91st Div. 1918 (publishing G. O. 31 of VI. French Army, 11 Dec. 

1918) : 166 

G. O. 16, 91st Div. 1919 (publishing letter from General Pershing, 20 Feb. 

1919) 167 

Chapter XI. — Touring Belgium, November 12-December 31, 1918 169 

Translation of French Communique, 11 Nov. 1918 169 

T. B. 21, 91st Div. 1918 (publishing G. O. 652, French Army in Belgium, 

11 Nov. 1918) 169 

G. O. 204, G. H. Q. A. E. F. 1918 (publishing communication from Marshal 

Foch, 12 Nov. 1918) 170 

G. O. 206, G. H. Q. A. E. F. 15 Nov. 1918 (publishing communication from 

Secretary of War) 171 

G. O. 211, G. H. Q. A. E. F. 20 Nov. 1918 (announcing policy as to return to 

America) 172 

Roster of Officers, February 8, 1919 187 

Chapter XII. — From Belgium to Camp Lewis, December 30, 1918-April 30, 

1919 190 

G. O. 7, 91st Div. 1919 (authorizing distinctive name, insignia and motto for 
Division) 193 

Appendix I. — Travel Summary 203 

Appendix II. — Battle Summary 204 

Appendix III. — Decorations and Individual Citations 205 

Appendix IV. — Summary of Casualties 239 

Appendix V. — Roll of Men who Died on the Field of Honor 240 

Appendix VI. — General Pershing's Farewell Order 245 

Embarkation Roster (St. Nazaire) 246-276 



LIST OF MAPS AND ILLUSTRATIONS 

Colonel William D. Davis 3 

"The Tour of Duty."— Maps showing route of 361st Infantry, June 22, 1918- 
April 30, 1919 22 

Operations of 361st Infantry, Meuse-Argonne Offensive 40 

Major Oscar F. Miller 57 

Operations of 361st Infantry, First Phase Lys-Scheldt Offensive 140 

Colonel Avery D. Cummings 153 

5 



FOREWORD 

This history is published by the members of the 361st Infantry Regiment 
for their own pleasure and information. The funds for its publication and 
for its free distribution to each surviving member of the regiment and to 
the nearest relative of each deceased member of the regiment have been 
contributed by the several units of the organization. The labor of prepara- 
tion and compilation has been enthusiastically contributed by each unit of 
the regiment and also by many of its individual members. 

In preparing the records of operations each unit was first called upon 
to submit a memorandum of its own activities. With the help of the original 
orders, operations-files and the fresh recollection of the several officers 
who from time to time formed the editorial board these reports were woven 
into a complete story and such discrepancies as existed were either recon- 
ciled or were reinvestigated until a reliable conclusion was obtained. While 
possibly it is true that in some of the details inaccuracies may still appear 
in this text, it is believed that what at first may seem inaccuracies to those 
who base their conclusions upon hearsay will upon investigation of the eye 
witnesses be found well substantiated. 

An attempt has been made (1) to supply accurate copies of all com- 
mendatory or other orders which might be of particular interest to members 
of the regiment, (2) to furnish an authoritative unexaggerated record of 
the training, movements and operations of the regiment, and (3) to publish 
reliable statistics particularly as to the regiment's casualties and as to the 
decorations or citations received by its members. 

The somewhat unusual capitalization of the proper names of towns, 
camps, etc., is a partial survival of the rule of the Field Service Regulations 
which requires this practice as to all geographical names used in field 
orders. This feature has been permitted to survive in this book not merely 
for old acquaintance sake but with the thought that such capitalization will 
make it easier for the reader to find quickly a reference to any special event 
by looking for the name of the place concerned. The accents properly 
belonging in French names have been printed in the text but omitted in all 
quotations from orders, etc., unless they appeared in the document quoted. 

The story of the operations is told from the point of view of the regi- 
mental headquarters, with the purpose of showing the parts played by all 
units of the regiment. Often there is also shown the part which the 
activities of the regiment played in the operations of the larger units. 
Whenever available, official statements of the appreciation felt for the 
services of the regiment or of any of its members have been quoted in full 
and where the facts have been fully known a further statement of appre- 
ciation has in some instances here been expressed in such fitting terms as 
the Editor has had at his command. 

A sincere regret is felt that because of lack of space and of personal 
unfamiliarity with the circumstances, it has been impracticable to include 



more incidents showing the individual exploits of the enlisted men, but it 
has been felt that this feature may in a great measure be supplied by the 
Company Histories which many of the companies most commendably have 
undertaken to publish. 

To Colonel A. D. Cummings in particular is due the gratitude of the 
regiment for any value that this publication may prove to have. It was 
at his personal suggestion that the task was first undertaken in December, 
1918, while the regiment was still in Belgium. His continued interest and 
ready assistance both as to the nature of the book and the plans for financ- 
ing its publication have been a constant inspiration and a very practical aid 
in bringing about its completion and final appearance. 

The Editorial Board which undertook this compilation in co-operation 
with the Editor, who was then Regimental Operations Officer, has changed in 
membership from time to time as many of its original members became 
separated from the regiment, but those whose efforts have most constantly 
been put forth are: Captains Jacob Kanzler, James C. Fortune, Richard C. 
M. Page, Curtiss R. Gilbert, John E. Bailey and Donald G. Abel, and 
Lieutenants Frederick T. Fairchild, Jesse T. Wilkins, Fred L. Brace, Charles 
H. Hudelson, John H. Moeur, Lewin W. Martinez, James A. Quinby, 
Wallace M. MacKay, Southall R. Pfund, Edward A. Valentine, Uil Lane 
and Reginald H. Linforth. 

For the Editor, the work inevitably has taken on the character of a 
memorial for his friends and associates, officers and men, whose sacri- 
fices of service and life are here recorded. For them this memorial has 
seemed to him all too inadequate, but as offering to him the privilege of 
expressing something of his appreciation of them and at the same time 
rendering to his fellow members of the regiment a service tending to per- 
petuate the name and number of this distinguished unit the opportunity 
of preparing this volume has been warmly welcomed. 

Harold H. Burton 
Cuyahoga Building, 
Cleveland, Ohio, 
28 June, 1919. 



ROSTER OF OFFICERS, 361st INFANTRY 
September 30, 1917 — based upon first monthly return of the regiment 

Regimental Headquarters 

Colonel William D. Davis 

Lieut. Colonel Lucius C. Bennett 

Captain Clarence F. Smith, Adjutant 

1st Lieut. Frank E. Winter, M. R. C, Surgeon 

, Chaplain 

1st Battalion 
Major John J. Mudgett 

Captain Earl H. Plummer, attached as Bayonet Instructor 
1st Lieut. Gustave B. Appelman, Adjutant (also Regi- 
mental Police Officer) 



Company "A" 

Captain George W. Farwell 

1st Lieut. Harold H. Burton 

2nd Lieut. Gerrit V. W. Wood 

2nd Lieut. Ellis Bates 

2nd Lieut. Wallace H. Blomquist, at- 
tached 

2nd Lieut. Merriam J. Howells, at- 
tached 

Company "B" 

Captain Wallace T. Downing 
1st Lieut. Eugene H. Blanche 
2nd Lieut. Gilpin S. Sessions 
2nd Lieut. James E. Peebles 
2nd Lieut. Southall R. Pfund, at- 
tached but on S. D. with Sup. Co. 
2nd Lieut. Ralph H. Walker, at- 
tached 
2nd Lieut. Donald G. Abel, attached 



Company "C" 

Captain Lee Arnold 
1st Lieut. Campbell Burke 
2nd Lieut. Charles H. Hudelson 
2nd Lieut. Ben B. Taylor 
2nd Lieut. Robert C. Howard, at- 
tached 
2nd Lieut. Ernest K. Murray, at- 
tached 

Company "D" 

Captain Max L. McCollough 
1st Lieut. Roscoe V. F. Brightbill 
2nd Lieut. Errol W. Proctor 
2nd Lieut. Thomas G. Ware 
2nd Lieut. James M. Tongate, at- 
tached 
2nd Lieut. Oliver Voderberg, at- 
tached 



2nd Battalion 
Major Oscar F. Miller 

1st Lieut. Carmi L. Williams, Adjutant (also attached to 
and commanding Supply Co.) 



Company "E" 

Captain Roy C. Ward 
1st Lieut. Henry P. Hoffman 
2nd Lieut. Royal A. Coffey 
2nd Lieut. John A. Long 
2nd Lieut. Jack Sweat, attached 
2nd Lieut. Charles T. Wright, at- 
tached 
2nd Lieut. Jack H. Cosper, attached 



Company "F" 
Captain Harry E. Williams 
1st Lieut. Curtiss R. Gilbert 
2nd Lieut. Everett E. Hunt 
2nd Lieut. Wallace M. MacKay 
2nd Lieut. Richard C. M. Page, at- 
tached 



2nd Battalion — Continued 



Company "G" 
Captain Jacob Kanzler 
1st Lieut. Frederick T. Fairchild 
2nd Lieut. Walter F. Davis 
2nd Lieut. Lester M. Ellis 
2nd Lieut. Everett J. Gray, attached 
2nd Lieut. Uil Lane, attached 



Company "H" 

Captain Albert H. Conner 

1st Lieut. Ira G. Towson 

2nd Lieut. Cherrill R. Betterton 

2nd Lieut. John H. Moeur 

2nd Lieut. George V. J. Ramsdell, 

attached 
2nd Lieut. Ryder Patten, attached 



3rd Battalion 

Major Robert C. Howard 

1st Lieut. Charles H. Moore, Adjutant (also Regimental 

Exchange Officer) 
1st Lieut. Russell W. Millar, attached as Bayonet Instructor 



Company "/" 

Captain Francis X. A. Eble 
1st Lieut. Elmer J. Armstrong 
2nd Lieut. Robert S. Batman 
2nd Lieut. James A. Quinby 
2nd Lieut. Thomas A. Cannell, at- 
tached 
2nd Lieut. Loron D. Sparks, attached 

Company "K" 

Captain Walter L. Tooze 
1st Lieut. Wilburn C. Hutcheson 
2nd Lieut. Harry J. Craig 
2nd Lieut. James D. McKay 
2nd Lieut. Ralph W. Rogers, attached 
2nd Lieut. Ernest E. Russell, at- 
tached 



Headquarters Company 
Captain Clarence F. Smith, Adjutant 
Captain Frank Heath, attached 
1st Lieut. Charlie A. Valverde 
1st Lieut. Earle G. McMillen 
2nd Lieut. Charles H. Andrus 
2nd Lieut. Ray R. Vincent 
2nd Lieut. Ernest L. Damkroger 
2nd Lieut. Edward L. Kellas, at- 
tached, but on S. D. with Supply 
Company 



Company "L" 

Captain William J. Potter 

1st Lieut. James C. Fortune 

2nd Lieut. Ronald E. Everly 

2nd Lieut. Alva J. Coats 

2nd Lieut. Edward A. Valentine, at- 
tached 

2nd Lieut. Reginald H. Linforth, at- 
tached 

Company "M" 

Captain Roy E. Naftzger 

1st Lieut. Frederick F. Lamping 

2nd Lieut. Paul D. Smith 

2nd Lieut. Fred L. Brace 

2nd Lieut. Robert A. Woodyard, at- 
tached 

2nd Lieut. Knapp Orton, attached 



Machine Gun Company 
Captain Fred B. Angus 
1st Lieut. Fred E. Privett 
1st Lieut. George E. Kelsch 
2nd Lieut. Lewin W. Martinez 
2nd Lieut. Harold C. Hubbell 
2nd Lieut. Frederick W. Gollum 

Supply Company 
Captain Leon E. Savage, R. U. S. O. 
1st Lieut. Carmi L. Williams, at- 
tached and commanding company 
in addition to his duties as Bat- 
talion Adjutant of 2nd Battalion 
1st Lieut. William T. King 



ROSTER— Continued 

Assigned to regiment, but serving as instructors at Officers' Training 
Camp at Presidio of San Francisco, and not assigned or attached to any 
organization within the regiment. 

Captain Friend S. Dickinson Captain Ora Goodpaster 

Captain Howard D. Hughes Captain Clarence J. Minick, 

Attached to regiment, but absent attending school at Fort Sill, and not 
attached to any organization within the regiment. 

2nd Lieut. Merle T. Jenkins 



Medical Detachment 

1st Lieut. Frank E. Winter, M. R. C, Regimental Surgeon 

1st Lieut. Joseph A. Beebe, M. R. C. 

1st Lieut. Paul F. Brown, M. R. C. 

1st Lieut. Alexander C. Crank, M. R. C. 

1st Lieut. John L. Burnside, D. R. C. 



Officers Not Appearing on Monthly Return for September, 1917, but 

Assigned to 361st Infantry Between September 30, 

1917 and July 6, 1918 

1st Lieut. (Chaplain) Eugene V. Bronson. Assigned and joined 17 October, 
1917. 

1st Lieut. James R. McLaughlin. Assigned 24 November, 1917, joined 29 
November, 1917, assigned to Company "I" 30 November, 1917. 

1st Lieut. Jesse T. Wilkins. Assigned and joined 15 January, 1918, assigned 
to Company "H" 15 January, 1918. 

1st Lieut. Gregg M. Evans. Assigned 15 January, 1918, joined and at- 
tached to Headquarters Company 19 January, 1918. 

1st Lieut. Dale J. Woods. Assigned 15 January, 1918, joined and attached 
to Company "A" 19 January, 1918, transferred to 40th Division 
12 February, 1918. 

1st Lieut. Roscoe M. Wright. Assigned 15 January, 1918, joined and at- 
tached to Machine Gun Company 19 January, 1918, assigned to 
Company "D" 5 March, 1918, transferred to 166th Depot Brigade 
11 June, 1918. 

1st Lieut. Francois Trouchet. Attached 15 January, 1918, joined and at- 
tached to Supply Company (S. D. with R. U. S. O.) 19 January, 
1918, assigned to regiment and Supply Company 1 1 March, 1918. 

1st Lieut. Albert J. Haas. Attached 15 January, 1918, joined and attached 
to Headquarters Company (S. D. as Asst. Adjt.) 19 January, 
1918, assigned to regiment 11 March, 1918, assigned to Com- 
pany "L" 12 June, 1918. 

10 



1st Lieut. John E. Bailey. Attached 15 January, 1918, joined and attached 
to Company "A" 19 January, 1918, assigned to regiment and 
Company "K" 11 March, 1918. 

1st Lieut. William J. Edick. Attached 15 January, 1918, joined and at- 
tached to Company "E" 19 January, 1918, assigned to regiment 
and Company "M" 11 March, 1918. 

1st Lieut. Drew W. Standrod. Attached 15 January, 1918, joined and at- 
tached to Company "E" 19 January, 1918, assigned to regiment 
and to Company "E" 11 March, 1918, transferred to Virginia 
Polytechnic Institute 26 May, 1918. 

Captain Frank P. Doherty. Attached 15 January, 1918, joined and at- 
tached to Company "E" 19 January, 1918, assigned to regiment 
and as Personnel Officer 2 May, 1918, assigned to Machine Gun 
Company 22 May, 1918. 

Captain Marshall S. Scudder. Attached 15 January, 1918, joined and 
attached to Company "K" 19 January, 1918, assigned to regi- 
ment 14 May, 1918, assigned to Company "I" 15 May, 1918. 

2nd Lieut. Frank R. Johnston. Attached 15 January, 1918, joined and at- 
tached to Company "K" 19 January, 1918, transferred to 166th 
Depot Brigade 17 May, 1918, assigned to regiment and to Com- 
pany "E" 15 June, 1918. 

2nd Lieut. Raymond A. Wilson. Assigned and joined 21 June, 1918, as- 
signed to Company "F" (S. D. at Regimental Headquarters) 21 
June, 1918. 

1st Lieut. David A. Bissett. Assigned and joined 3 July, 1918, assigned to 
Company "D" 4 July, 1918. 



Officers Not Appearing on Monthly Return for September, 1917, But 

Who Joined Medical Detachment Between September 30, 

1917 and July 6, 1918 

1st Lieut. Ernest C. McKibben, M. R. C. Joined 4 November, 1917. 
1st Lieut. Nathan G. Hale, M. R. C. Joined 4 November, 1917. 
1st Lieut. Roy M. Cox, M. R. C. Joined 4 November 1917; left 28 Febru- 
ary, 1918. 
1st Lieut. Charles H. Smith, M. R. C. Joined 28 November, 1917. 
1st Lieut. Fred B. Coleman, M. R. C. Joined 18 December, 1917. 
1st Lieut. Leland C. Mcintosh, M. R. C. Joined 15 January, 1918. 
1st Lieut. Ferdinand G. Dratz, D. R. C. Joined 21 January, 1918. 
1st Lieut. Mayo Reiss, D. R. C. Joined 24 May, 1918. 



11 



CHAPTER I 

CAMP LEWIS 

September 4, 1917— June 21, 1918 

THE START 

The United States went to war with the German Empire April 6th., 1917. 
The "Wild West," consisting of Montana, Wyoming, Idaho, Washington, 
Oregon, California, Nevada, Utah, and Alaska, was classified as the 16th 
Draft Area. It was to furnish as soon as possible a National Army Infantry 
Division. Its training camp was to be at CAMP LEWIS, located about 17 
miles south of TACOMA, Washington, and named for Captain Meriwether 
Lewis, commander of the famous Lewis and Clark expedition made to the 
Northwest in 1803. As the National Army Infantry Divisions were num- 
bered from 76 up, in the numerical order of their draft areas, this division 
became the 91st. In August, 1917, Major General Henry A. Greene, N. A., 
long known to the army in many capacities and particularly as the efficient, 
respected and loved commander of the 10th U. S. Infantry Regiment, 
assumed command of the division. 

The camp was laid out to fit the demands of the infantry division as 
then authorized. Within the first few months the tables of organization of 
the United States Army underwent rapid expansion and revision to which 
the 91st Division as rapidly conformed. While the units originally con- 
templated may have differed in detail, the following units soon grew up 
together at CAMP LEWIS, as the pride of the Far West: 361st, 362nd, 363rd, 
364th Infantry Regiments; 346th, 347th, 348th Machine Gun Battalions; 
346th, 347th, 348th Regiments of Field Artillery; 316th Trench Mortar 
Battery; 316th Regiment of Engineers; 316th Field Signal Battalion; 316th 
Train Headquarters and Military Police; 316th Ammunition Train; 316th 
Supply Train; 316th Engineer Train; 316th Sanitary Train, including 361st, 
362nd, 363rd and 364th Ambulance Companies and Field Hospitals; 181st 
Infantry Brigade, including 361st and 362nd Infantry Regiments, and 347th 
Machine Gun Battalion; 182nd Infantry Brigade, including 363rd and 364th 
Infantry Regiments, and 348th Machine Gun Battalion; 166th Field Artillery 
Brigade, including 346th, 347th, 348th Regiments of Field Artillery and 316th 
Trench Mortar Battery. 

The authorized strength of the division thus organized, became sub- 
stantially 28,000 officers and men. 

In addition to this combat division, the camp included other organiza- 
tions, notably the 166th Depot Brigade, the Remount Station, the Base 
Hospital, and last but none the less a fact, the unmilitarized adjunct and 
recreation center known as "GREENE PARK," all under the command or 
supervision of Major General Henry A. Greene. 

12 



Most of the original assignment of officers reached the camp late in 
August, while it was still in the hands of the Construction Quartermaster. 
The two-storied, frame barracks, at least for the infantry regiments, were 
well under way. Most of them were up but still lacked windows. The 
officers' quarters were being located; sewer systems and shower baths were 
in little more than the "blue-print" stage; the General was quartered in a 
tent; the roads were dusty trails, but in everything the well-conceived plan 
of the camp was evident. 

In general, the buildings were arranged six deep in two long rows 
separated by a drill plain about 400 yards wide. These rows ran approxi- 
mately East and West and parallel to each other for nearly a mile, then each 
turned away at an angle of about forty-five degrees and swung out around 
the low wooded hills. A little more than 60 miles away, opposite the 
eastern end of this ever widening drill plain, rose the majestic snow-capped 
summit of Mount Rainier. 

The camp was on two railroads; an excellent macadam highway con- 
nected it with TACOMA; and the camp area of approximately 70,000 acres 
was ample for every purpose, even for an artillery range and maneuver 
field. The many spruce and fir trees of the Northwest, later to become 
intimately associated v/ith the division in the divisional insignia, lent a 
quiet dignity to the camp. On each clear morning, day or evening, the 
snow-crowned peak of Mount Rainier, pink or white in the changing lights, 
stood as a beautiful and inspiring symbol of America's combined strength 
and idealism. 

On September 6th, 1917, G. O. 9, 91st Infantry Division, dated Sep- 
tember 4, 1917, officially assigned to the 361st Infantry Regiment: Colonel 
William D. Davis, N. A., Lieutenant Colonel Lucius C. Bennett, N. A., Major 
John J. Mudgett, N. A., most of the officers from the 3rd and 4th Companies 
of the 16th Provisional Training Regiment who had been ordered to report 
to Camp Lewis from the Training Camp at the Presidio of San Francisco, 
California, and several officers who had received their commissions upon 
completion of training courses held for non-commissioned officers of the 
Regular Army. 

A few days before this the officers had met their Colonel and Lieutenant 
Colonel, and moved into the quarters assigned to the regiment. These 
quarters were the nearest to the camp entrance, a fitting place for the 
regiment, whose watchword, at the suggestion of the Colonel himself, came 
to be: "The 361st Leads — Others Follow." 

The regiment had already begun its career on September 5th, when the 
first contingent of men called to the colors under the Selective Service Act 
reached CAMP LEWIS. They came from SEATTLE in automobiles gaily 
decorated, were preceded by a band and brought with them their city 
officials. They were reported to the Adjutant of the 361st Infantry, Captain 
Clarence F. Smith, and assigned to Company "H." On September 12th 
a few non-commissioned officers from the Regular Army joined and were 
assigned to the several companies in groups of three to five to each. At 
first each company had four or five more 2nd Lieutenants attached to it 
than show on the monthly return of September 30th, and a squad was 

13 



correctly defined as "a few men completely surrounded by officers." No 
time was lost in giving individual instruction to the picked first 5 per cent 
of drafted men so that these in turn might assist with the next 40 per cent 
who were to join on the 19th and 20th of September. Many of the first 5 
per cent had already attended non-commissioned officers' schools in their 
home towns. Nearly all of them later became non-commissioned officers, 
and many of them officers. 

The willingness of the newcomers was evident and inspiring. By the 
end of the month the rifle companies numbered from 140 to 170, Head- 
quarters Company 157, Machine Gun Company 87, and Supply Company 
93. The assignments were made to regiments and even to companies with 
a view to keeping together the men from substantially the same localities. 
Thus the 361st Infantry at first was filled largely with men from Washington, 
Idaho and Oregon. 

The Initial Muster Rolls show the following distribution of the National 
Army men (except in Company "C"), and it was on the basis of this showing 
that after the war the State of Washington became entitled to the Regimental 
Colors: 





Wash- 






Cali- 


Mon- 




Wyo- 




Company 


ington 


Idaho 


Oregon 


fornia 


tana 


Utah 


ming 


Total 


"A" 


226 


8 












234 


"B" 


175 


48 












223 


*"C" 


















"D" 


158 


34 


15 


18 


2 






227 


"E" 


166 


59 


5 


1 


1 


1 




233 


« F » 


125 


97 


7 








1 


230 


"G" 


151 


2 


73 


6 


1 






233 


"H" 


224 


3 


3 


4 








234 


«<¥>> 


192 


1 


1 


9 




1 




204 


"K" 


152 


70 


13 


1 


1 






237 


"L" 


131 


79 


28 










238 


"M" 


206 


20 


10 










236 


Hq. 


259 


2 


6 


1 








268 


M.G. 


132 


30 




15 








177 


Sup. 


94 




23 










117 



Total 2391 453 184 55 5 2 1 3091 

*Company "C's" copy of Muster Roll lost in action, other copies not avail- 
able. 

The 362nd Infantry also was filled with men from the Northwest, and 
the 363rd and 364th Infantry Regiments, principally with Californians. 
Necessary transfers, reassignments and replacements gradually altered this. 
In Belgium, Colonel Davis later welcomed to the regiment men from the 
Central States, and at last after the armistice, the regiment included on its 
rolls men from practically every state in the Union. All were welcomed, 
and they promptly took up the spirit and traditions of the unit. 

In these early times "Powder River," destined to be the war cry of the 
division, made its first bid for fame. One day, as the "old men," of a 

14 



month, a week or even a day's experience, called to the "recruits" : "Where 
're you from?" — a Montana detachment replied in a manner that was never 
forgotten: "Powder River — Let 'er Buck!" From CAMP LEWIS this answer 
was carried with the early replacements to the American Expeditionary 
Forces — and there it grew to the full story taught as follows at the 1st 
Corps School at GONDRECOURT: "What is the longest river in the world?" 
— "Powder River — it's a mile wide and an inch deep and it flows uphill all 
the way to Texas — Let 'er Buck!" 

FROM CIVILIANS TO SOLDIERS 

Everything was to be learned. The officers had a head start of the 
men, and the advanced training of the officers, through regimental, divisional 
and army schools and through individual study of modern warfare, kept 
pace with the elementary training and later the advanced training of the 
men. Colonel Davis set the standard at the limit and saw to it personally 
that everything was done to reach it. Underlying all was the effort to 
obtain the prime essential — discipline. Colonel Davis acted directly upon 
the officers and through them on the men. The results justified every effort 
and every sacrifice made. The pride of the regiment and the key to its 
success was its discipline. 

First there was drill without uniforms, then gradually the several parts 
arrived and the men, of average size at least, wore the woolen O. D. 
Company "B" succeeded in getting every man into uniform for the first regi- 
mental parade and, through the later well known enterprise of Captain 
L. E. Savage, the regiment was the first in the division to be completely 
uniformed. One long conspicuous ununiformed figure was the tall bearded 
woodsman on the right flank of Company "A," Private Damitz, a sincere 
conscientious objector, who in accordance with his belief had never cut or 
shaved the locks and beard that nature gave him, and who quietly refused 
to wear the uniform of military service. He was later transferred to 
render selected service elsewhere. Barrels of the discarded civilian cloth- 
ing were shipped out for friends of later days — the "Needy Belgians." Soon 
came the Krag-Jorgensen rifles, later the Enfields (U. S. rifles, Model of 
1917), and later still the web equipment. 

Instruction began with the "Position of the Soldier," then traveled 
straight through the I. D. R. Schools of the Soldier, Squad, Company, Bat- 
talion and Regiment. Physical drill as taught by Captain Plummer rapidly 
weeded out the disabled cases and hardened the weaker men. "Raise 
extended leg waist high" — as a goose step march was a favorite. "P. H. 
and C. of F." and "R. of A. D." were given constant attention; "Out goes 
the water and in comes the air" was demonstrated most ably to Company 
"L," by Lieut. Valentine. Military discipline and courtesy, insignia of 
United States Army, Articles of War, visual signalling, care of rifle and 
equipment, preliminary tests and training for range practice, bayonet exer- 
cises, hand grenade lectures and practice, and trench warfare were included. 
Finally came automatic weapons and gas defense. 

As the winter and rain came on the two target ranges were completed. 
One had 200 targets and ranges of 100, 200 and 300 yards, the other 40 
targets and ranges of from 100 to 1000 yards. Each man was put through 

15 



the regulation firing courses up to and including 300 yards, with and with- 
out bayonet. A selected number shot at 500 and 600 yards. All again shot 
at night, the targets being exposed for a few moments by search-light glare 
to the simultaneous fire of a platoon or company. 

A complete system of divisional trenches was dug and the regimental 
sector was occupied for one night by the 1st Battalion. Dugouts were 
sunk, six to a regiment, and each with two entrances. The work on these 
was competitive, and in spite of constant trouble with water and cave-ins 
this regiment completed its six before any other regiment completed one. 
Captain Marshall S. Scudder, Lieutenants Richard C. M. Page, John A. 
Long, Edward A. Valentine and Ernest L. Damkroger directed this work 
and received the personal commendations of Colonel Davis and Major 
General Greene. 

The Intelligence Sections built their own "No Man's Land," and received 
special courses in scouting, patrolling, observing and sniping. With one 
exception, the original Intelligence Officers were those who later led their 
sections into the Argonne attack. They were Lieutenant H. C. Hubbell 
(R. I. O.), Captain (then Lieutenant) H. H. Burton, who was succeeded by 
Captain (then Lieutenant) R. C. M. Page (1st Battalion), Lieutenant C. R. 
Betterton (2nd Battalion), and Lieutenant J. R. McLaughlin (3rd Battalion). 

The gun racks came, were chained and locked, and inspected each night 
between midnight and reveille. The spotless dining room tables, floors and 
walls (also the ceiling in Company "L"), the bread boxes, meat racks and 
other kitchen decorations were constantly scrubbed, inspected and judged. 
The fly traps were made, distributed, and noticed by all except the flies. 
The windows of the sleeping quarters were forced wide open "top and 
bottom," the ventilation was officially inspected by each Officer of the Day 
between midnight and reveille, and like the gun racks, was officially reported 
upon by him. 

Various things were summarily discontinued as appreciation of the 
military fitness of things grew apace. Among these went the use of the 
term "Mule skinners" (by Captain C. L. Williams) in military corre- 
spondence, the use of green ink (by Lieutenant Bates) in the guard book, 
the standing on piles of stones (by Lieutenant Blomquist) to observe the 
ceremony of the Presentation of the Colors, the detailing of men as Com- 
manding Officer's Orderly who could not speak English, and the use of 
the regimental telephone for personal telephone calls. 

As the months moved by, the division was nearly stripped of dough- 
boys except for the non-commissioned officers. The men thus separated 
were sent, some to the "Spruce Division," to earn safer but higher wages, 
some to specialist organizations, and many as replacements to the divisions 
nearer the front. Again the division was refilled with new men. The 
training was renewed with more "Personal Hygiene and Care of the Feet," 
and more "Resuscitation of the Apparently Drowned." As springtime 
beckoned, a change in training was made so as to include less of trench 
warfare and more of open warfare. Tactical walks, frequent company, 
battalion, regimental maneuvers and one divisional maneuver were held. 
The "Reds" were regularly driven to cover at STEILACOOM and ROY. 

16 



A typical springtime training schedule with its well known hieroglyphs 
is the following: 

"Headquarters 361st Infantry, 

Camp Lewis, American Lake, Wash., 

May 4th, 1918. 



Schedule of Drill 


AND 


Instruction for Week Ending 


May 


nth 


1918 




A. M. 






P. M. 






7:00 


7:30 


8:00 


8:30 


9:00 


9:30 1 10 :00| 10:30 


1:00 


2:00 


2:30 


3:00 


3:30 


4:00 




to 


to 


to 


to 


to 


to J to J to 


to 


to 


to 


to 


to 


to 




7:30 


8:00 


8:30 


9:00 


9:30 


10:00 10:30 11:00 


2:00 


2:30 


3:00 


3:30 


4:00 


4:30 


May 6th. 












1 1 






1 






1st Bn. 




O-P-E-N W-A-R-F-A-R-E 


FAW 


By 


By S 


PD 


Games 


2nd Bn. 


SS 


Pl.Dl PD | AE | I | By | By | By 




Gallery Practice and Tests 


3rd Bn. 




Gallery Practice and Tests 


I 


By 


By S 


PD Games 


Recruits 


ss 


SS | PD | AE | SA | SA |P1.D| S 


SS 


TD 


MDC 1 Pl.D 


PD |Games 


May 7th. 












1st Bn. 












2nd Bn. 




R-E-G-I-M-E-N-T-A-L F-I-E-L-D E-X-E-R-C-I-S-E 




3rd Bn. 












Recruits 












May 8th. 




Gallery Practice and Tests 














1st Bn. 




1 1 1 1 1 1 


I 


By 


By 


WW 


PD 


Games 


2nd Bn. 




O-P-E-N W-A-R-F-A-R-E 


I 


By 


By 


WW 


PD 


Games 


3rd Bn. 


SS 


P1D 


PD 


AE 


I 


By 


By 


By 


FAW 


I 


I 


WW 


PD 


Games 


Recruits 


ss 


ss 


PD 


AE 


SA 


SA 


Pl.D 


AW 


SS 


AG 


MIGD 


Pl.D 


PD 


Games 


May 9th. 






























1st Bn. 


ss 


Pl.D 


PD 


AE 


I 


By 


By 


By 


SA 


I 


I 


MDC 


PD 


Games 


2nd Bn. 




O-P-E-N W-A-R-F-A-R-E 


FAW 


By 


By 


MDC 


PD 


Games 


3rd Bn. 




O-P-E-N W-A-R-F-A-R-E 


I 


By 


By 


MDC 


PD 


Games 


Recruits 


ss 


ss 


PD 


AE 


SA 


SA 


Pl.D 


OP 


SS 


By 


By 


MDC 


PD 


Games 


May 10th. 






























1st Bn. 




O-P-E-N W-A-R-F-A-R-E 


I 


By 


By 


S 


PD 


Games 


2nd Bn. 


ss 


P1.D| PD | AE | I | By | By | By 


I 


TD 


B 


s 


PD 


Games 


3rd Bn. 




O-P-E-N W-A-R-F-A-R-E 


I 


By 


By 


S 


PD 


Games 


Recruits 


ss 


SS | PD | AE | SA | SA |P1.D| S 




Galle 


ry Practice anc 


I Tests 


May 11th. 


















1st Bn. 




I-N-S-P-E-C-T-I-O-N 














2nd Bn. 














3rd Bn. 














Hq. Co. 














MG. Co. 














Sup. Co. 











































F. A. W. — Practical demonstrations in First Aid by Medical Officers. 

cruits to attend with their respective Battalions. 
SS and Pl.D given Recruits will include extended order. 
Night Firing will probably be taken up Tuesday night by 1st Battalion. 



Re- 



17 



Regimental Schools 
Officers N. C. O.'s 

Grenade 1 :00 to 2 :45 p.m. Bayonet 1 :00 to 2 :45 p.m. 

Bayonet 2 :45 to 4 :30 p.m. Auto Rifle 1 :00 to 2 :45 p.m. 

Boxing 1 :30 to 2 :30 p.m. Grenade 2 :45 to 4 :30 p.m. 

(Boxing Tuesday and Friday) Boxing (Monday and 

Thursday) 1 :30 to 2:30 p.m. 

Miscellaneous Schools 

Buglers and Signalers — Regimental Regtl. Signalers — Division School 

School each drill day afternoon Daily. 

and Wednesday morning. Drummers and Buglers — Monday 

Parades — When ordered. Immedi- forenoon. 

ately after P. M. drill period. Equitation School — 1 :00 to 2:00 p.m. 

Officers' School by Battalion— 7 :00 to 8:00 a.m. 

Regimental Bayonet Course will be used by Battalion scheduled for bayonet 
work mornings. 

Target practice by Battalions as ordered. Preparation for target practice 
under "S. A." and target practice will be in accordance with changes 
S. A. F. M. as published by Div. Headquarters, Mar. 19, 1918. 

By Order of Colonel Davis: 
C. F. Smith 
als. Capt. & Adjt. 361st Inf." 

The hieroglyphs are thus translated: FAW — First Aid to Wounded; By — 
Bayonet Exercises; S — Semaphore Signalling; PD — Physical Drill; SS — 
School of Soldier and Squad; PI. D — Platoon Drill; AE — Athletic Exercises; 
I — Infantry Movements, by Company, Open or Close Order; S. A. — Practice 
and tests in use of Small Arms; TD — Target Designation; MDC — Military 
Discipline and Courtesy; WW — Wigwag Signalling; AW — Articles of War; 
AG — Advance Guards; MIGD — Manual of Interior Guard Duty; OP — Out- 
posts; B — Bombing. 

The Battalion Commanders had come to be — 1st Battalion: Major George 
W. Farwell (promoted to fill the vacancy caused by the transfer of Major 
Robert C. Howard to the Cavalry) ; 2nd Battalion: Major Oscar F. Miller; 
3rd Battalion: Major John J. Mudgett. It was now, under the guidance of 
Major Mudgett as a master of open warfare that the "Shock" Battalion 
of the Argonne learned the elements of open warfare. 

Aside from the regular training came the daily Interior Guard Duty, 
which was as much a personal care of the Colonel as was the Regimental 
Band. It served as an unexcelled individual disciplinary exercise from the 
day when a sentinel turned out the guard "for the Commanding Officer" 
as the Colonel passed by on his way to lunch, and after lunch surprised him 
on his return with a loud call of "Turn 'em out again, here he comes back," 
until the days when the Guard Orders of about 30 closely typewritten pages 
became a study of their own. Band Leader (then Corporal) C. C. Burger's 

18 



Regimental Band, which so many times since, whether on land or at sea, 
and whether in the United States, France or Belgium, has raised to its 
highest pitch the morale of the regiment is credited with being the first 
band in the division to make the hillsides and barracks ring to a martial 
air. From the first to the last it played Colonel Davis' favorite: "There's 
a Long, Long Trail," named by him as the "Regimental March." 

The first regimental field meet and later the first push ball contest 
in the division was held by the 361st Infantry. Throughout the winter 
came company smokers, monthly regimental smokers, company din- 
ners, the "Quarantine Picnic" of "Fighting F" now immortalized in that 
company's published history, and the Company "H" vaudeville show at the 
Liberty Theater. The frequent field days culminated in the Divisional 
Field meet where the 361st Infantry won the championship of the division. 
The constantly recurring boxing bouts, official and unofficial, finally brought 
to the regiment the amateur and professional company and regimental box- 
ing championships of the division. None of the regiment's boxers were 
ever beaten in their respective classes. The individual representatives 
were: Private Manuel M. Robertson, Company "G"; Private "Danny" 
O'Brien, Company "E"; Corporal (then private) "Dick" Wells, Company 
"A"; Corporal (then private) Sorn E. Pedersen, Company "A"; Private 
"Tim" Ferdon, Company "A", and Lieutenant (then corporal) "Butch" 
Simonich, Company "A." Sergeant "Tom" Woodhouse, Company "A," who 
previously and many times later, successfully represented the regiment, 
and who had trained many of its boxers, was unable to compete because 
at that time he was recovering from an operation. 

From the regiment, the divisional football team included Lieutenants 
Craig and Damkroger. The divisional basket ball team included Lieutenant 
Craig. The divisional soccer team included Lieutenants Kellas and Quinby, 
Sergeant Dobie, Company "H", and Private Cording, Supply Company. The 
divisional baseball team included 1st Sergeant Ten Million, Company "H." 
Under general direction of Lieutenant Damkroger, the regimental football 
team captained by Sergeant Skadan, Company "K", basket ball team cap- 
tained by Sergeant Glover, Company "F", soccer team captained by Ser- 
geant Dobie, Company "H", and the baseball team captained by Color 
Sergeant Belmont, Headquarters Company, did their part creditably and 
passed into history. The inter-company baseball series was moving briskly, 
each team with its distinctive company uniform, when the orders to move 
to France closed the schedule and started the uniforms on their long 
journey to an A. E. F., S. O. S. salvage pile. 

Another series of sidelights was presented to the officers in the "Officers' 
Show" by members of Officers' Quarters "65". It was here that Captain 
F. X. A. Eble and an able assistant put on a striking representation of 
Shylock, and here also Captain (then Lieutenant) Fortune and Lieutenants 
Valentine and Linforth most successfully conducted an officers' call, Cap- 
tain Fortune serving as Colonel "Benzine" (made up to represent Colonel 
Davis) , Lieutenant Valentine as a well known Lieutenant Colonel, and Lieu- 
tenant Linforth as Adjutant. It was here also that the "High, High White Col- 
lars" song made its debut. The white collar had a story of its own, for 

19 



the 361st Infantry was the first and also the only regiment in the division 
to prescribe a white collar for officers after Retreat. It was but part of 
the military training of the regiment, and it later became a cherished 
mark of distinction, the memory of which was preserved to posterity in 
Lieutenant Linforth's following parody of the well known army song of 
"High, High Up She Rises" (the tune perhaps being better known to civilians 
as that of "One Little, Two Little, Three Little Injuns") : 

HIGH, HIGH, HIGH WHITE COLLARS 

Our C. O. has always awed us, 
Had us buffaloed with orders, 
But the one that most has bored us 
Is to wear white collars. 

Chorus 
High, high, high white collars, 
High, high, high white collars, 
High, high, high white collars, 
Is to wear white collars. 

You can bet your bottom dollar 
That the Colonel he will holler 
If you haven't on your collar 
Stiff with starch and clean. 

Chorus 
High, high, etc., etc., 
Stiff with starch and clean. 

There is one thing you can bank on, 
You'll explain with indorsement hereon 
If you haven't your high white collar on 
At the evening mess. 

Chorus 
High, high, etc., etc., 
At the evening mess. 

The rain does fall and always get 
Our leggings soiled and shoes all wet, 
We look like tramps and hoboes yet 
We have our collars on. 

Chorus 
High, high, etc., etc., 
We have our collars on. 

Just to show that we were learning 
When the night to day was turning, 
And the whole damn place was burning 
We put our collars on. 

20 



Chorus 
High, high, etc., etc., 
We put our collars on. 

It's hard to see the reason for 
This order, but in time of war 
An order you cannot ignore, 
So we'll keep our collars on. 

Chorus 
High, high, etc., etc., 
So we'll keep our collars on. 

After this Officers' Call (censored to be sure by Lieutenant Colonel, 
then Major, Mudgett), Captain Fortune was in serious doubt as to his 
future military career until at inspection the next day as he stood at 
attention behind Major Mudgett, Colonel Davis carefully looked him up 
and down and passed on with the quiet remark, "Good morning, Colonel 
Fortune." 

Several company dances, a regimental officers' dance, and public enter- 
tainments in TACOMA followed each other in quick succession. 

The troops paraded at TACOMA and SEATTLE, the Tacoma Commercial 
Club and Chamber of Commerce presented to the regiment a set of 
regimental colors, the officers and men subscribed for bonds, and made allot- 
ments for home support and for insurance. The home people and the men 
in the service were working together and to but one end. 

In the spring of 1918 Brigadier General J. B. McDonald, N. A., whose 
erect figure and snow white hair and mustache were to become so well 
known to the regiment at the front, succeeded Brigadier General Henry D. 
Styer as Commander of the 181st Brigade. He already wore a wound 
chevron for a wound received in the Indian Wars. He came to the brigade 
from a position as Inspector General of the Western Department, and had 
chosen the "Wild West" Division from among seven that were open to him. 

The salute was taught and retaught, speeded up and taught again. 
Thorough discipline grew with practice of close order drill, self-confidence 
and fighting efficiency grew through practice with infantry weapons and 
through the maneuvers of simulated warfare. Officers and soldiers were 
thus made and trained together. 



21 




THE TOUR OF DUTY 
June 22, 1918— April 30, 1919 

22 



CHAPTER II 

"OVER THERE" 

June 22-September 2, 1918 

THE TRIP 

Instructions for embarkation for France were received, equipment issued 
and rechecked, baggage and freight packed and marked. An advance party 
was detailed to precede the regiment for various duties. The members of 
this party and their duties were as follows: 

For debarking and entraining duties in France — Colonel (then Lieu- 
tenant Colonel) Lucius C. Bennett. 

For debarking and entraining duties in England — Captain (then 1st 
Lieutenant) Elmer J. Armstrong. 

To attend Field Officers' School in France — Lieutenant Colonel (then 
Major) John J. Mudgett, Major Oscar F. Miller. 

To attend School for Company, Platoon and Section Commanders in 
France — Captain Jacob Kanzler, Captain (then 1st Lieutenant) Campbell 
Burke, Captain (then 1st Lieutenant) Harold H. Burton, Captain (then 1st 
Lieutenant) Curtiss R. Gilbert, 1st Lieutenant (then 2nd Lieutenant) 
Southall R. Pfund, 1st Lieutenant (then 2nd Lieutenant) Robert A. Wood- 
yard, 1st Sergeant Jesse L. Bedwell, Company "L", Sergeant Archie A. 
Adams, Company "A", Sergeant John H. Olsen, Company "E". 

To attend Trench Mortar and 37mm. School in France — 1st Lieutenant 
(then 2nd Lieutenant) Ernest K. Murray, Sergeant Paul E. Pearson, Head- 
quarters Company, Sergeant Linne W. Rose, Headquarters Company, Ser- 
geant Horace D. Brooks, Headquarters Company, 2nd Lieutenant (then 
Sergeant) Austin Duggan, Headquarters Company. 

To attend Signal School in France — 1st Lieutenant (then 2nd Lieutenant) 
Ray R. Vincent, Sergeant Ralph Ethier, Headquarters Company, Sergeant 
Basil M. Berto, Headquarters Company. 

To attend Machine Gun School in France — 1st Lieutenant Lewin W. 
Martinez, 1st Lieutenant (then 2nd Lieutenant) George V. J. Ramsdell, 
Sergeant John F. Barnes, Machine Gun Company, Sergeant Richard Nelson, 
Machine Gun Company, Sergeant Hurdis G. Oakley, Machine Gun Com- 
pany. 

This detachment left CAMP LEWIS June 19th; sailed from NEW YORK 
on the S. S. "Cretic" (of Britain's fleet) June 28th; landed at LIVERPOOL 
July 10th. From there left via SOUTHAMPTON for LE HAVRE, France, 
on July 11th and with the exception of Lieutenant Colonel Bennett and 
Lieutenant Armstrong, went directly to GONDRECOURT (MEUSE), France, 

23 



there to attend the 1st Corps School on July 22nd. The Field Officers from 
there proceeded at once to LANGRES (HAUTE MARNE). By the first of 
September all had completed their duties and all except Lieutenant Colonel 
Bennett and Major Mudgett had rejoined the regiment in its new training 
area. Lieutenant Colonel Bennett had been detailed as Division Quarter- 
master. Major Mudgett had been promoted to a Lieutenant Colonel and 
assigned to the 364th Infantry. 

Major General Greene started from CAMP LEWIS with this detach- 
ment, only to leave it, en route, as a Brigadier General, relieved of the 
command of the division. He had won the confidence, respect and admira- 
tion of the officers of the regiment and as the original commander of the 
division, there was a distinctly sentimental attachment to him. Brigadier 
General Frederick V. Foltz assumed command of the division and joined 
the advance detachment in NEW YORK in time to sail with it. 

The regiment started to move June 22nd. It was loaded in eight trains, 
leaving at intervals of about two hours. On train No. 1 were Regimental 
Headquarters and Headquarters Company, Colonel W. D. Davis command- 
ing; on train No. 2, Machine Gun and Supply Companies, Captain L. E. 
Savage, commanding; on train No. 3, Companies "A" and "B", Major G. W. 
Farwell, commanding; on train No. 4, Companies "C" and "D," Major (then 
Captain) O. Goodpaster, commanding; on train No. 5, Companies "E" and 
"F," Major (then Captain) R. C. Ward, commanding; on train No. 6, 
Companies "G" and "H," Captain A. H. Conner, commanding; on train 
No. 7, Companies "I" and "K," Captain C. J. Minick, commanding; and on 
train No. 8, Companies "L" and "M", Major (then Captain) W. J. Potter, 
commanding. 

Each train was fitted with two kitchen cars. The men traveled in tourist 
cars, the officers in standard Pullmans. Food was served to the men from 
the kitchen cars by bringing it through the tourist cars in large containers 
from which the men filled their mess kits. As one company historian 
has put it, "It was unique in that the chow came to the line instead of 
the common practice of moving the line to the chow." 

The trains crossed the continent without mishap, except that train No. 
3 was partially derailed in Montana, causing no personal injuries but caus- 
ing sufficient delay to let trains 4, 5 and 6 slip by. 

Stops of an hour were usually made at least once a day for physical 
exercise consisting of setting-up drill or marching. Officers and men of 
trains 1 and 2 stopped at Buffalo long enough to include a march to Niagara 
Falls. Trains 5 and 6 enjoyed an hour of bathing in Lake Detroit, Minne- 
sota, and train No. 8 bathed in a Minnesota river that was paved with 
clam shells. Most of the trains paused at the Chicago Stock Yards. 

It has been reported that a private in Company "H," a tailor by trade, 
dropped off at Chicago because he did not like the fit of his uniform, went 
to his brother's shop, made himself a new uniform and rejoined the regi- 
ment before it sailed. 

The ice cream, cigarettes, chocolate, cakes, postal cards and most of all 
the whole hearted cheer and wave that came to the boys in city after city 
left with them a lasting impression of the support and spirit at home. The 

24 



"Wild West Division" had the privilege of gathering up and carrying with 
it the accumulated spirit of the American people from coast to coast. In 
particular, SANDPOINT, Idaho, MISSOULA, HELENA, BILLINGS and 
MILES CITY, Montana, ABERDEEN, South Dakota, MINNEAPOLIS, 
Minnesota, CHICAGO, Illinois, ELKHART and SOUTH BEND, Indiana, 
ROCHESTER, SYRACUSE and CORNWALL-ON-THE-HUDSON, won safe 
places in the hearts and memories of the 361st Infantry. 

The regiment detrained close to CAMP MERR1TT, New Jersey, and 
marched to the camp. Here the clothing and equipment that had served 
at CAMP LEWIS was put to a new test, that of Major Cassatt, a test of 
indestructibility instead of one of presentability. Everything that could 
not withstand the quick wrench of the Major's hands went to the salvage 
pile. Every coat from which he could tear a pocket flap, every pair of 
breeches that he could rip, every first aid pouch that he could wrench from 
its hooks was "not good enough for France." Night and day the re-equip- 
ping went on. Although hard upon the nerves and endurance of the supply 
officers, the system was sound enough. The easiest way to keep up the 
supply of clothing and equipment abroad obviously was to send a quality 
of goods that would wear the longest and to send this on the men. Like most 
general rules it had its exceptions. One such exception was the case of 
Sergeant Major John D. O'Brien, Headquarters Company, weight 230 
pounds, whom no regulation clothes would fit. After several months of 
effort, he had obtained his O. D. breeches made to order at CAMP LEWIS 
and when his extra pair now fell apart in the tension test he lost that pair 
and failed to receive a wearable pair in return. He traveled one pair short 
until the Argonne and Belgian campaigns finally changed his size to regu- 
lation pattern. Steel helmets, spiral puttees and field shoes were in general 
the principal additions or changes in uniform. 

"Major Farwell's March Over the Palisades" on the night of July 4/5 
and early on the following morning, covered about seven miles of rolling 
country (that rolled mostly up) and brought the regiment to the well-named 
"Alpine Landing" on the Hudson. Loaded with practically a double regu- 
lation pack, coming almost directly from five days of train travel, walking 
usually in new field shoes "fit for France" but not yet fitted for feet, the 
march was a battle for every man. Yet everyone took his ferry on time 
and was sent to the Hoboken Pier. 

At the pier the American Red Cross workers again secured their hold 
on the hearts of the men. The Red Cross, this time, served hot coffee 
and a lunch. 

The S. S. "Karoa" (of Britain's fleet) received Regimental Headquarters, 
the 1st Battalion and Headquarters, Machine Gun and Supply Companies. 
Colonel Davis was in command of the troops on board. The S. S. "Scotian" 
(also of Britain's Fleet) received the 2nd and 3rd Battalions, with Major 
Farwell commanding the 3rd Battalion and the detachment. In addition this 
boat received the 181st Infantry Brigade Headquarters, two U. S. Base Hos- 
pital Units and about 200 members of the Canadian Flying Corps Cadets. All 
came under the command of Major W. E. Finzer, Brigade Adjutant. The 
"Scotian," by dint of consistent service from its unlimited supply of that 
delicacy soon earned its new name of "The Good Ship Marmalade." 

25 



The mail censor's hand clamped down. The "Have arrived safely over- 
seas" cards were signed by practically everyone and dropped in a mailsack. 
The theory was to leave the sack behind so that the government might mail 
the cards immediately upon receipt of cabled advice of the ship's safe 
passage. Not so, however, on the "Marmalade." She took the cards to 
Europe with her and having safely landed released them for transporta- 
tion home. 

At daylight, July 6th, the ships left the pier. At about 1 1 :00 o'clock 
they sailed from the Lower Bay as part of the 91st Division convoy of 
sixteen ships. The ships were painted with weird cubist camouflage, evi- 
dently intended not so much to conceal the ship as to mislead the hostile 
observer as to the ship's outline, size or course. 

An aviator circled above the convoy, a dirigible balloon followed its 
course and several submarine chasers steamed along side. One by one 
these guards dropped back as the high seas were reached. A single cruiser, 
however, remained with the convoy throughout the trip until relieved by the 
British escort. One incident of a mail censor's encouragement of correspond- 
ence demands attention. On about the third day out, Lieutenant Royal A. 
Coffey of Company "E" earnestly inquired of the ship's mail censor (the 
Adjutant of the 3rd Battalion) as to just when and how the accumulating 
letters were to be mailed. Not wishing to disappoint the Lieutenant the censor 
replied that he expected that very likely a hydroplane would arrive at 2:00 
o'clock the next afternoon to pick up the mail and carry it back. This news 
was officially communicated to Lieutenant Coffey's platoon and it spread at 
once throughout the "Scotian." Immediately it yielded a crop of five thous- 
and letters that occupied the thoughtful censor and several able assistants 
from the Medical Detachment throughout the remainder of their voyage. 

Life preservers were put on to stay. Boat drills, physical drills and 
guard duty were performed and the scene kept constantly set for the 
German. No trouble ever came from the Boche and the only submarine 
alarm was caused when a British submarine suddenly bobbed to the surface 
in British waters. 

The ships were policed in American style, and after the cooking for the 
men on the "Scotian" had been turned over to the American cooks things 
became more homelike. 

A light is thrown upon the "Marmalade's" original rating with the 
enlisted men by the following inquiry addressed by an enlisted passenger 
across the high seas to the passengers on the "Empress of Russia" as the 
latter swung one day within hailing distance. In a moment of quiet fol- 
lowing a salvo of "Powder Rivers," some one called from the deck of the 
"Marmalade" — "Hey, fellows, can you smell our boat over there?" The 
answer was lost as the "Empress" sheered away. 

Portholes were closed tight at night and no smoking was allowed on 
deck after dark. "No lights" was so strictly enforced that Lieutenant 
C. T. Wright's luminous wrist watch one night gave away his tactical posi- 
tion as he embraced his opportunity to learn from a nurse corps representa- 
tive something of other arms of the service than Infantry. 

The observers of the Intelligence sections were used day after day to 

26 



watch for intruding periscopes and floating mines. Nothing foreign was 
seen until on the morning of July 17th there appeared the British Naval 
escort that had joined the convoy during the night and soon land was 
sighted on the horizon. The eleven-day trip had been timed to permit 
the slowest boat to keep up and had been steered so as to mystify the 
German submarines. 

On nearing the coast of Ireland the convoy split — five ships went further 
south, while the others, including the "Karoa" and "Marmalade" steamed 
up the Firth of Clyde to GLASGOW, Scotland. The beautiful timbered slopes 
of "Bonny" Scotland won immediate admiration. Green fields and mead- 
ows, tiny villages and larger towns, church spires and castle towers met the 
gaze. The scene proclaimed the country of an ancient and happy people 
with a contented home life in the midst of wealth and beauty. Welcome 
was waved from the shores, the submarine net was closed behind the 
convoy, life preservers were removed, the Regimental Band burst forth and 
Scotland was treated to the "Regimental March." As the boats came close 
in, the busy ship yards told their tale of Britain's efforts and of her part in 
the war as Mistress of the Seas. It was holiday week and GLASGOW 
was in holiday dress. 

Early on July 18th the troops disembarked. Each man was handed a 
neatly engraved greeting from the King and then, led by the Regimental Band 
and some Scottish Pipers, the troops were marched a short distance to the 
railroad. The men entrained in British compartment cars and the trains moved 
south. The troops were plainly welcome and the beautiful rolling fields 
and neatly hedged roads taught them something of the dearness of this 
island to the Scotchman and Englishman. The country was worth fighting 
for and this glimpse of homelife brought the thought to mind that if this 
homeland were lost the fight would some day "carry on" into the homes of 
America. As the larger cities of England were reached, the war work 
showed plainly on every side. In particular, a deep impression was made 
by the many women working both in and out of the great factories. These 
women were not dabbling, they were dressed in brown denim factory 
uniforms and were doing the work of men. 

SOUTHAMPTON was reached, the regiment detrained and a long 
march made to a British "rest camp" where there was much mud but little 
rest and food. The American soldier's ration began to be seen in its true 
light as its absence became more marked. The troops had arrived late in 
the night of July 18/19. On the afternoon of July 19th they marched to 
the SOUTHAMPTON dock, boarded the small channel boats and filled them 
in much the manner that sardines fill a can. The rapid and rough channel 
passage to LE HAVRE (SEINE INFERIEURE) was safely accomplished. 

On July 20th the regiment first trod French soil and sized up its first 
Boche. The Boche prisoners were at work under guard of French sentinels 
with long bayonets that left no doubt as to who was in control. The 
prisoners conformed to advertised specifications and the regiment was 
strengthened in its belief as to who would be the best man when the fight 
came. 

Colonel Davis immediately started for the new training area by a sep- 
arate route. As Lieutenant Colonel Bennett was on debarkation duty, and 

27 



Major Mudgett and Major Miller at school, Major Farwell took command 
of the regiment and handled it with the ease of a veteran. In this capacity 
he received a bouquet of flowers in token of the welcome extended by King 
Albert of Belgium, whose seat of government was temporarily in LE HAVRE. 
The troops toiled up a winding road carrying their large packs to another 
misnamed "rest camp." Tents were assigned. A hot day and a wet night 
passed by. On July 21st a detachment from Company "D" commanded by 
Lieutenant Bissett, participated in a ceremony held in honor of the Allies. 
On the same day the regiment was put through the vapor bath "which 
proved to be at least a novelty." In the afternoon the regiment entrained 
in its first French "side-door Pullmans" — diminutive and battered box 
cars, marked "HOMMES 40, CHEVAUX 8." This widely advertised car 
capacity bore evidence of having been figured for young and slender French 
"Hommes," each standing upright with hands at his sides and without pack 
or rifle. Some of the trains were made up of Italian cars and this gave 
great strength to a rumor of service on the Italian front. Each train was 
drawn by a little engine equipped with what seemed a toy whistle. The 
officers were treated to war-worn coaches. Nowhere on the trains was 
there a suggestion of toilet facilities. 

The regiment was moved by three trains. On train No. 1, Regimental 
Headquarters, Headquarters Company, Machine Gun Company, Supply 
Company, Companies "A," "B" and "C," all commanded by Major Farwell; 
on train No. 2, Company "D" and the 2nd Battalion, all commanded by 
Captain R. C. Ward, and on train No. 3, the 3rd Battalion, commanded by 
Captain C. J. Minick. 

21-23 July, LE HAVRE (SEINE INFERIEURE) to CHAUFFORT 
(HAUTE MARNE), Southeasterly, by train, 550 kilometers (345 miles). 

The train bumped across sunny and attractive French farm lands, along 
picturesque diminutive rivers, or close to still more picturesque hamlets 
and cities that apparently had looked much the same since long before 
the American Revolution. The regiment made the trip safely except for 
a small detachment from Company "I" which missed the train as it pulled 
out of a way-station. 

In substantially 48 hours the new divisional training area was reached. 
The 1st and 3rd trains detrained at MEUSE in daylight and marched at 
once to their respective towns: Regimental Heaquarters, Headquarters 
Company, Supply Company and Company "A" to CHAUFFORT, Company 
"B" to FRECOURT, Company "C" to EPINANT, the 3rd Battalion to 
SARREY and the Machine Gun Company to IS-EN-BASSIGNY, all in 
the Department of HAUTE MARNE. The 2nd Battalion and Company "D" 
detrained at night in ANDILLY on July 23rd and marched the following day 
to their respective billets: 2nd Battalion to IS-EN-BASSIGNY, Company 
"D" to EPINANT. Division Headquarters were at MONTIGNY-LE-ROI. 
Captain Savage served an eleven-day term as Assistant Division Quarter- 
master in charge of railhead issues pending the arrival and adjustment of 
the Division Staff. 

Excepting for the move of the Machine Gun Company to the Machine 
Gun center at THIVET on August 5th, these assignments remained effective 
until the regiment was ordered to the front. 

28 



THE TRAINING 

The MONTIGNY-LE-ROI area was one of the large compact American 
group-areas straight south of ST. MIHIEL and VERDUN. Close to 
MONTIGNY is the source of the MEUSE RIVER and here "Powder River" 
was held in check six weeks to gather up such force that once its current 
started it could never be stopped until the war was won. 

This area was said to be in the "Desert of France" for the soil was not 
as fertile there as elsewhere in the Republic, yet the kindly spirit and warm 
welcome of the peasant people made the place a second home for the 
regiment. Not only were these the first billets of the 361st Infantry 
but the 361st Infantry was the first organization to be billeted there. Here 
an education, not only in the French language, but also the French customs, 
progressed rapidly. The streets however were soon cleaned according to 
American style and the community wash house became a bathing as well 
as a clothes-washing establishment. 

On Colonel Davis' return to the regiment shortly after its arrival in 
the area, Major Farwell for a brief time commanded the 1st Battalion, 
then again was placed temporarily in command of the 3rd Battalion. Major 
Mudgett received his promotion to a Lieutenant Colonelcy while attending 
the Field Officers' School and was assigned to the 364th Infantry, and there- 
fore never actually commanded the 3rd Battalion in France. On Major 
Miller's return from the Field Officers' School, Major Farwell went to the 
school and Major Miller was assigned to the command of the 3rd Battalion, 
which command he held until fatally wounded in action. Captain R. C. 
Ward continuously commanded the 2nd Battalion and Captain W. T. Down- 
ing commanded the 1st Battalion until Major Farwell's return late in 
August. On his return from school Major Farwell resumed command of 
the 1st Battalion and held it until fatally wounded in action. 

The military work took on a new aspect. Orders to join the front line 
or move into a trench sector were constantly expected. The attack forma- 
tions suggested in the familiar red pamphlet "Offensive Combat of Small 
Units" were taught; the Chauchat was taken into camp and mastered as 
the regiment's automatic rifle; bayonet work, gas defense, rifle practice, 
visual signalling — all were pushed to the limit. The men were kept at 
their training all day, taking with them but a sandwich for lunch. Saluting 
was strongly emphasized and included the exchange of salutes even between 
automobile riders and pedestrians. Furthermore, to overcome a tendency to 
keep the eyes too low, it included a temporary adoption of the so-called 
"canteen" or "beer bottle" salute, in the execution of which it was required 
to hold the head up at the same angle as when drinking from a canteen or 
beer bottle. Most of all, the liaison training which the division had not under- 
taken in the States was pushed with a will. At IS-EN-BASSIGNY, Lieutenant 
Wilkins was detailed as "Airplane Officer," and men on post instructed in a 
new warning call: "Enemy aircraft, Post No. 2." Near CHAUFFORT, 
Lieutenant Hubbell's intelligence section won some souvenirs and a reward 

29 



in the form of a case of wine by discovering and guarding a French air- 
plane that had been forced to land far from its base. Lieutenant Valentine 
assumed his duties as Regimental Liaison Officer and was never to be 
relieved of them until the Armistice was signed and the regiment moved 
out of Belgium. 

Many maneuvers were tried out with platoon, company, battalion, 
regimental, brigade and divisional command groups, and finally with 
the full personnel of these units. The maneuvers included one night 
problem by the entire division. A simulated relief of the division on the 
line was carried through by the command groups of the entire division, and 
particularly by those of the 361st Infantry, in a manner that brought the 
warmest praise from Major General Omar L. Bundy commanding the VI 
Army Corps, of which the division was then a part. Next was to have come 
the same maneuver with the full personnel of the division. This was under 
way and the troops were already in position when the order came to move 
to the actual front. During these maneuvers Colonel Davis' code name 
was "Gedap," and a message with that signature reached Lieutenant Blom- 
quist (then representing at least a regiment of artillery) before the arrival 
of the code and before the receipt by him of any suggestion that a code was to 
be used. At a loss to interpret the word, the Lieutenant finally concluded 
it to be an order for his imaginary artillery to move out at a gallop. 

Late in August, Major General William H. Johnston assumed com- 
mand of the division and Brigadier General Foltz resumed command of 
the 182nd Brigade. 

In spite of this constant military activity the regiment nevertheless 
held a Field Day at IS-EN-BASSIGNY (including the race for a tame 
greased pig), organized a vaudeville entertainment under the direction 
of the Battalion Adjutant of the 3rd Battalion and with truck headlights to 
supply the illumination, presented it in SARREY, IS-EN-BASSIGNY and 
CHAUFFORT. As the term of training drew to a close a memorable 
officers' dinner was held at NOGENT-EN-BASSIGNY on August 23rd, 
with Brigadier General J. B. McDonald and Lieutenant Colonel John J. 
Mudgett as guests of honor. The dinner was arranged by Captain Jacob 
Kanzler in accordance with his previously proved efficiency as Regimental 
Mess Officer and organizer of the Regimental Dinner held at CAMP LEWIS 
in honor of the Foreign Officers. This dinner was the last social gather- 
ing before going into action. 



CHAPTER III 

"THE GENERAL SITUATION" 

(Based on General J. J. Pershing's published report to the Secretary of 
War and on notes taken from lecture by Colonel George C. Marshall, Jr., 
G. S., G. H. Q., A. E. F., to officers of the 91st Division at NOGENT-LE- 
ROTROU (EURE-ET-LOIR), France, March 4th, 1919). 

The first military commission from Great Britain to reach the United 
States after its entry into the war urged that America send to Europe 
merely replacements to join the Allied armies as individuals or as small 
units, the particular need being for infantrymen and machine gunners. The 
French similarly conveyed the impression that nothing larger than regi- 
ments should be sent and that naturally these should be brigaded with the 
larger units of the Allies. The United States considered the acceptance 
of these plans unbecoming a nation of her size and strength. 

In June, 1917, General John J. Pershing with a small staff came to 
France to make plans for America's part on the battle front. The north- 
western section of the Western Front already was held by the Belgians and 
the British with their service of supply completely filling the ports and the 
narrow strip of country in their rear. France held the balance of the 
Western Front with her lines of communication filling the area north of 
PARIS. There remained but two sections, (1) the eastern end of the line 
in the VOSGES mountains where an advance was extremely difficult and 
the result of an advance was of comparatively small value, and (2) the 
line near VERDUN, including the ST. MIHIEL salient. Both of these 
sections of the line, although more distant from the coast than the others, 
nevertheless could be reached by the Americans from available base ports at 
BREST, BORDEAUX, ST. NAZAIRE and MARSEILLE, yet each of these 
lines of communication (to say nothing of the trans-Atlantic step) was longer 
than those then in use for the British or French main operations. 

Time was vital. For periods of about five days each, General Pershing 
visited the British and French High Commands. The plans for an imme- 
diate organization of corps and army troops were pushed to detailed com- 
pletion during two weeks, in a manner that ordinarily would have taken 
two years. The plans were sent to the United States and the War Depart- 
ment developed the new units accordingly. Throughout July and August 
the plans for the training and concentration of troops were made; the plan 
for the service of supply was made; troops began to arrive and by Sep- 
tember 15th, 1917, a decision was reached and a document sent home show- 
ing the agreement that in the fall of 1918 the first major operation of the 
American forces was to be directed against the ST. MIHIEL salient and 
another larger operation was to be carried out in the following Spring. 
The plan was laid on a scale larger than ever before attempted by an 
American military force. The complex and important organization of 
200,000 or more specialized corps and army troops (in addition to the 

31 



infantry divisions included in each corps and army), the multitude of 
technical organizations and the enormous tonnage of supplies required for 
the service of supply were carefully provided for. The plan demanded 
transportation overseas of a certain proportion of service of supply and 
specialty troops to each infantry division. In the meantime the first 
American combat units to arrive were placed in the lines with the Allies, 
there to assist in the fighting while learning at first hand of the problems 
of modern warfare. Railroads and telegraph lines were built with the 
future attack in view. 

In March, 1918, Germany, with fresh units suddenly released from the 
Russian front and become available as a great maneuver group, began 
her series of offensives intended to end the war. Marshal Foch, largely 
at the instance of General Pershing and President Wilson, was placed in 
chief command of the Allies. The great attack of March 21st broke 
through and cut the regular lines of communication between the British 
and French. A crisis was at hand. General Pershing at once put aside 
the ambitious plans for the American army's actions and offered to Marshal 
Foch all of America's troops for use as he might decide. At the latter's re- 
quest the American 1st Division was hastened across France to the danger 
zone and America's other units were at once sent where they could best 
serve to release needed units. On the 26th of April, 1918, the 1st Division 
had gone into the line on the PICARDY front. Tactics had become those of 
open warfare and on the 28th of May this division attacked the com- 
manding German position in its front, captured CANTIGNY and held it 
steadfastly against counter attacks and artillery fire. Although local, this 
brilliant action had an electrical effect for it demonstrated the American 
fighting qualities under extreme battle conditions and also that the enemy's 
troops were not invincible. 

The Germans in April had also attacked the British, retaking the 
MESSINES RIDGE and MT. KEMMEL which had been previously won 
from them at great cost, and here the enemy threatened the vital coal 
fields of France. Late in May the Germans attacked again, hit the lightly 
held line along the CHEMIN DES DAMES as a complete surprise and broke 
through toward CHATEAU THIERRY, drove further than apparently they 
had anticipated and cut the main allied line of communication running East 
and West. Again every available American soldier was placed at Marshal 
Foch's disposal and immediately the 2nd and 3rd Divisions were sent into 
the hottest parts of the line where they materially assisted in checking the 
Germans on the MARNE and in BELLEAU WOODS. 

Then followed a pause and the tide began to turn. The French received 
advance information of the proposed July German attack. This attack 
was to be east of RHEIMS, northeast of PARIS, and when the French 
finally learned the exact moment of the impending attack, they themselves 
launched a counter-attack thirty minutes ahead of the Germans and after 
inflicting heavy losses on the enemy, completely blocked their enterprise. 
On the 18th of July an allied attack, with the 1st and 2nd American Divisions, 
sharing the place of honor with selected French Divisions, drove into the 
enemy's MARNE salient from the west toward SOISSONS. The attack 
succeeded and the battle spread until by the end of July the 3rd, 4th, 26th, 

32 



28th, 32nd and 42nd American Divisions also had shared in the reduction of 
practically the entire MARNE salient. 

The war was moving fast and General Pershing received orders to launch 
the ST. MIHIEL attack along the lines originally planned. On the 10th 
of August the American "First Army" was organized under his personal 
command and on the 30th of August a portion of the front was placed 
under his command. The concentration of troops, artillery, transport, 
aircraft, tanks, ambulances and the location of hospitals were pushed on 
and arrangements made for supplying this new army at the front directly 
through the American service of supply. America was preparing to make 
good its claim to ability to handle an army of its own. Absolute success 
was vital to America as a world power and the point to be attacked was near 
the vital spot of Germany's entire western front. The German front was 
served by two main lines of communication — each running East and West; 
one to the British front through Belgium and one to the Central front, 
passing by METZ and SEDAN about 65 kilometers north of VERDUN. 
Germany's great BRIEY coal fields and steel works also lay near 
METZ, and the original plan was to push the attack through to the outer 
defences of that city. Orders were prepared with the greatest care. The 
plans were made for the rapid movement, mostly at night, of about 600,000 
troops, many of them compelled to move across rather than along the usual 
allied lines of communication. The French gave generous assistance with 
corps and army artillery and both French and British air forces were 
added to the American, but all under the command of the American Com- 
mander-in-Chief. On the 2nd of September the orders were sent out and 
the movement was under way. On about the 3rd of September Marshal 
Foch ordered that the drive be limited solely to cutting off the salient and 
that the troops be released to participate on the 26th of September in a 
more important drive on the MEUSE-ARGONNE front. The American plans 
were quickly revised to conform; the orders were changed to show the 
newly limited objective and the attacking division commanders were told 
in advance not only where and how to attack, but where and how to with- 
draw after a specified three or four days of advance. The ST. MIHIEL 
salient was then lightly held, but if the defending troops were re- 
enforced the situation was such that it could be made a stronghold that 
could be taken only at great cost. While secrecy was vital, the American 
soldiers had already guessed their mission and as they moved into con- 
centration every soldier seemed to have caught the famous names of SEDAN 
or METZ. As they marched or rode across country filled with enthusiasm 
for this attack, the news spread until it was published in the German papers. 
To save the plan if possible and to divert the enemy, the American General 
Headquarters rushed a corps commander and a large staff equipped with 
many automobiles (that their move might be as obvious as possible) to 
the extreme eastern end of the front there to prepare plans for an attack 
in that direction. The corps commander was not told of the falsity of 
the mission and he with his staff worked hard and well on an elaborate 
plan of attack. A representative from General Headquarters who knew 
the purpose of the move, easily managed to have a copy of the plans stolen 
from him by the ever present German spies at the large hotels. Germany 
at once dispatched five or six divisions to the area thus "threatened." 

33 



Further to distract Boche attention, all the American visitors and students 
who sought to visit the front were sent to another sector on the north-east 
front to satisfy their curiosity and stick their heads over the top. Here 
also aircraft activity was concentrated, until this French rest sector became 
active enough not only to irritate the Allied resting units but also to hold 
opposite them German divisions that were being sent past that point. 

The concentration of American infantry near ST. MIHIEL progressed 
steadily, but the great artillery concentration to come from the west was 
partially delayed by demands upon it elsewhere. The infantry accordingly 
were equipped with wire cutters and with explosives to destroy the famous 
seas of German wire if the artillery failed to do it. Zero hour came; the 
artillery was there in considerable force, but a long artillery preparation 
was not possible because of the danger that such a warning would cause 
the Germans either to concentrate or else to so completely withdraw as to 
rob the American attack of the signal success that was necessary to estab- 
lish beyond doubt the ability of America to carry out an effective attack 
on a large scale. With a brief artillery preparation that was put down just 
in time to hold up and cut off the Germans who were starting to withdraw, 
the Americans went over the top. The artillery had not destroyed the wire 
and to the later amazement of the French Allies, the infantry, on discover- 
ing the wire to be comparatively low and very dense, neither bothered 
to blow it up with bombs or even to cut it with wire cutters — they simply 
walked over it or through it. The attack was pushed on until the salient 
was flattened, the enemy garrison was captured or destroyed, the reputation 
of the American Army was established and the divisions scheduled to do 
so, pulled themselves out of the line and started at once for the ARGONNE 
front. 

Originally it had been planned to make the next major operation in the 
spring of 1919, but instead, it was done on September 26th, 1918. The 
plan was to strike through the difficult ARGONNE area. To Germany, this 
position was vital. Here the three Hindenburg first lines of defense 
covered a total depth of but about 15 kilometers in protection of their only 
line of communication to the west. These same lines of defense further 
west, bulged far to the front, covering a depth in some places of as much 
as 66 kilometers. To turn the flank of any one of these great lines by 
breaking through it on the American front, accompanied by the pressure 
of the 4th French Army on the Americans' left, practically meant the loss 
to Germany of that line along the entire Western European front. The 
American pressure was to come upon the German lines near their hinge. 
The push probably would be more difficult at this point but every kilometer 
gained at the hinge would bring with it a gain of about four in front of 
PARIS. 

Heretofore the plan of British and French attacks on this front generally 
had been attacks with limited objectives. Advances were made for com- 
paratively short distances against the strongest defences, then would follow 
a delay during which both sides would reorganize and prepare for the next 
engagement. In the ARGONNE the drive was to be different; the attack was 
to be continuous; the divisions were to be sent in to break through and 
then keep on. Divisions for this purpose were to be put in the front line 
and held there day after day, pushing and fighting to the limit of human 

34 



endurance with no rest either for themselves or for the Germans. When 
the Hindenburg defences were thus broken the troops were still to push 
on and on without limit. The divisions in reserve were to be put in as the 
front line divisions were worn out and the new ones in turn were to be 
held in until the old ones were refilled and returned as quickly as possible. 
The Germans were to be forced to keep up with the speed and endurance 
of America or to lose the war. 

The German General Staff was fully aware of the consequences of an 
Allied success on the MEUSE-ARGONNE front. The American attacks 
nevertheless broke through and the troops kept on while the Germans hurried 
up their reserves in disordered haste. There came no rest and no reorganiza- 
tion period for the Germans with the result that their disorganized units paid 
the full penalty of disorganization. The vital spot had been hit; the German 
divisions used at this point mounted quickly from fourteen to twenty-five, 
then to thirty-one and finally to forty. The enemy divisions came at the 
cost of weakening the reserves along the entire front, but they came into 
the line too disorganized to stem the tide. 

On the 29th of September and 1st of October, the British, accompanied 
by the 27th and 30th American Divisions, broke through in FLANDERS and 
continued their advance. On the 2nd to 9th of October the 2nd and 36th 
American Divisions joined in the allied attack in the center of the front near 
RHEIMS. In the middle of October the 37th and 91st Divisions were trans- 
ferred to the Belgian Front and joined in the attack of October 31st. Thus 
it proved that not only had one American Army been rapidly created and put 
in operation, but early in October a second American Army had been created 
and used in the attack, while at the same time American Divisions were 
dispatched to help in the "shock" on three other sections of the front. 

The Americans had never yet been stopped and when the Armistice was 
signed they were about to start a drive eastward from the ARGONNE and 
directed against METZ. All this was done with roads so poor and com- 
munication so difficult that the airplane carrier service was often the most 
successful means of liaison between the front and General Headquarters. 

The ruthless methods of Germany had been turned against her and 
she had fallen before the American Armies, organized as such scarcely three 
months before and operating for the first time as a unit of the Allied 
Armies of the World. The credit goes to many, but in particular it is felt 
that it should go to the Commander-in-Chief, to the Artillerymen and to the 
individual American Doughboy, all admirably supported by the service of 
supply. 



35 



CHAPTER IV 

THE ST. MIHIEL DRIVE 

SEPTEMBER 3-13, 1918 

3-4 September. From CHAUFFORT (HAUTE MARNE) to ORBIGNY- 
AU-VAL, to CHALINDREY (HAUTE MARNE), South, marching, 26 kilom- 
eters. On Tuesday, September 3rd, the regiment assembled en route to 
CHALINDREY. There were no squad rolls. In addition to his rifle, bayonet 
and steel helmet, each man packed his own entire equipment including 
100 rounds of ammunition, a full haversack, a pack that included his 
blanket, slicker, socks, reserve rations, toilet kit, and in some cases his 
blue denims. On this pack were also an extra pair of shoes and an over- 
coat. The start was made in the late morning or early afternoon according 
to the location of the units. The regiment pitched shelter-tent camp for the 
night on a steep hill-side near ORBTGNY-AU-VAL and got away to an 
early start on September 4th. It reached CHALINDREY before noon and 
pitched camp along the furroughs of part of a plowed field that later ac- 
commodated the entire brigade. The remainder of the division moved to 
other entraining points. 

Almost on the eve of departure from CHAUFFORT, Captain Kanzler 
had been assigned as Personnel Officer (later known as Personnel Adju- 
tant) and began his efficient and many-sided career in that capacity which 
later kept the reputation of the regiment's "paper-work" in the leading 
position in the division and constantly served the needs of the officers 
and men who became casualties as well as of those who remained on duty. 

Here Captain R. C. Ward became a Major and here Lieutenant H. H. 
Burton was detailed as Acting Operations Officer to fill this position which 
but recently had been added to the tables of organization and never before 
filled in the regiment. 

The Battalion Adjutants were sent ahead to the unknown new area, 
and the receipt of copies of "Standing Trench Orders for the American E. F." 
created the expectation of an immediate trip to the trenches. 

After one day of tactical walks in a pouring rain along muddy roads 
and water soaked fields the entrainment by the "cotillion" method began 
on Friday afternoon, September 6th. Major Farwell commanded the 1st 
train (1st Battalion), Major Ward the 2nd train (2nd Battalion), Captain 
Savage the 3rd train (Regimental Headquarters, Headquarters Company, 
Machine Gun Company and Supply Company), and Major Miller the 4th 
train (3rd Battalion). Colonel Davis traveled in the regimental "Dodge." 
The Machine Gun Company installed for the first time its flatcar anti- 
aircraft batteries. 

6-7 September. From CHALINDREY (HAUTE MARNE) to 
DEMANGE-AUX-EAUX (MEUSE), North, by train, 124 kilometers. The 
1st train arrived at DEMANGE-AUX-EAUX long before daylight, Saturday 

36 



morning. Companies "A" and "B" became a permanent unloading detail 
and the remainder of the regiment came in at about three hour intervals. 
The advance detachment of Battalion Adjutants came in last. The regi- 
ment was not yet fully equipped and rumor now spoke of three weeks of 
training. The regiment was 10 kilometers north of the 1st Corps School 
at GONDRECOURT and well within the enemy airplane bombing and 
observation area. Many allied airplanes were seen. Orders were issued 
to keep out of the open and in daylight keep off the streets. 

One order issued here over Major Farwell's name as Regimental Com- 
mander before the arrival of Colonel Davis, gave rise to more than passing 
comment, not only by its subject matter which was of considerable personal 
interest to the command, but also by a humorous ambiguity which seemed 
readily to suggest itself whenever the order was read aloud, as to whether 
it was intended to credit the Major with having previously ordered the 
infestation which he now desired to be made a subject of inspection and 
observation : 

"All billets will be thoroughly inspected because they are infested with 
lice — By order of Major Farwell, by Curtiss R. Gilbert, Acting Adjutant." 

It was at DEMANGE also that the Supply Company found the stock of 
brooms that it was later to hear from under fire. 

Lieutenant Hubbell's Regimental Intelligence Section installed an anti- 
aircraft observation post with a telescope on a nearby hill and sent in by 
telephone to Regimental Headquarters reports of their observations. 

A neighboring stream and canal provided necessary cold water bathing 
facilities. 

Sunday was spent in preparation of billets for an indefinite stay. In 
quiet moments the gun fire on the front could be heard. 

On Monday, September 9th, a battalion maneuver was held by each 
battalion operating in a different area as an attacking unit and moving by 
compass course diagonally across hills and valleys or through masses of 
woods. This practice was soon to prove its value in the MEUSE-ARGONNE 
drive and to bear testimony to the foresight of the regimental commander. 

10-11 September. From DEMANGE - AUX - EAUX (MEUSE) to 
NAIVES-EN-BLOIS (MEUSE), Northeast, night marching, 14 kilometers. 
Secrecy of troop movements was enjoined and the first night march toward 
the front was made on the night of 10/11 September. In the rain and mist 
considerable difficulty was experienced in clearing the town. The 1st 
Battalion crossed the canal by another bridge than that intended in the 
orders, and consequently was much delayed upon encountering a water- 
filled ditch. The 2nd Battalion which was attempting to follow the first, 
finally reversed its columns and by making a complete circuit of DEMANGE 
got under way across the correct bridge. The destination was NAIVES- 
EN-BLOIS, via REFFROY and BOVeE. It was reached long before dawn, 
by all except the Supply Company and its mired vehicles. The regiment, 
(excepting Regimental Headquarters, the Supply Company and the several 
kitchens) took an extra kilometer and bivouacked in the BOIS LTNGLURE 
On this march the guns on the front were plainly heard and the flares, for 
the first time, could be clearly seen. 

37 



11 September. From NAIVES-EN-BLOIS (MEUSE) to VACON 
(MEUSE), East, marching, 4 kilometers. The regiment returned to 
NAIVES-EN-BLOIS for a hot meal, then moved up the road three 
kilometers in broad daylight to a new hiding place in the BOIS DE VOIRUT 
(one kilometer northwest of VACON) while Regimental Headquarters 
moved on into VACON. 

The units had now received code names under the "Maroon" Code 
for use in all communications. The 91st Division became "Maroon," the 
181st Brigade "Match," the 361st Infantry "Mamma," its 1st Battalion 
"Mate," its 2nd Battalion "Maul," its 3rd Battalion "Medal," the 362nd 
Infantry "Melon," the 347th Machine Gun Battalion "Method." Each Com- 
manding Officer became "No. 1," each Operations Officer "No. 7," each 
Adjutant "No. 12," etc. Thereafter a message from "Mamma 1" meant a 
message from Colonel Davis. The Supply Company assumed the name of 
"Mud." 

It rained almost constantly and the woods gave the troops practically 
no protection from the water. 

12-13 September. In vicinity of VACON. 91st Division in Army 
Reserve during beginning of ST. MIHIEL drive. After four hours' artillery 
preparation the front line in the ST. MIHIEL drive (then about 15 kilom- 
eters north of VACON) jumped off at five o'clock on the morning of 
September 12th, assisted by a limited number of tanks. The 1st, 4th and 
5th American Army Corps were engaged including the 1st, 2nd, 4th, 5th, 
26th, 42nd, 82nd, 89th and 90th Divisions. The 78th and 3rd Divisions 
were in Corps Reserve. The 35th and 91st Divisions were Army Reserves 
and the 80th and 83rd were available. French troops also co-operated in 
the advance on the western side of the salient. 

At zero hour, Colonel Davis and the Operations Officer, personally re- 
ported the exact position of the regiment to the 91st Division Headquarters, 
which was then at SORCY-SUR-MEUSE (making it on this occasion about 
5 kilometers nearer the front than was the 361st Infantry). Brigade Head- 
quarters were at LANEUVILLE-AU-RUPT, nearly as far advanced as the 
Division Headquarters. Favorable reports of the drive into the salient 
from the east were early received and published in the first Regimental 
Communique. The success of the drive became apparent and on Septem- 
ber 13th the regiment was ordered to eat an early supper and "embuss" at 
17:30 o'clock, to move to "a new area." 

While the regiment receives credit for participation in this drive and 
while it underwent physical hardships in connection with it, it did not here 
actually come under fire. In fact until the regiment passed through the 
town of VOID to take the "busses" for its new area, it never came inside 
the "precautionary zone" of gas defense. Even this slight entry into 
the "gas zone," however, made one marked change in the regiment. The 
regulations for the "alert zone" of gas defense, then but a few kilometers 
north, prescribed that "every man will be clean shaven, except that a 
mustache may be worn." In anticipation of a movement forward, Lieutenant 
Brace, in charge of the Supply Company Trains, removed the goatee that 
had long been familiar in the regiment and which had contributed to his fame 
at the Officers' Training School. The change was so marked that Colonel 

38 



Davis, on seeing him at work in VACON inquired the name of the officer who 
seemed so busily engaged with the Supply Company's Trains. 

The long line of trucks had been waiting all day for the move. The 
troops marched some two or three kilometers, passed through VOID, as- 
sembled near the embussing point and at dusk climbed aboard for the only 
movement by trucks that the regiment was destined to make in Europe. 

Here Captain W. T. Downing of Company "B" regretfully left the 
regiment to fill a detail as instructor at an Officers' Training School at 
LANGRES. 

The following general order of commendation bears testimony to the 
participation of the 91st Division in the St. Mihiel offensive, and to the 
importance of that engagement in the history of American Arms: 

"G. H. Q. 
AMERICAN EXPEDITIONARY FORCES, 

France, Dec. 26, 1918. 
GENERAL ORDERS) 
No. 238 ) 

It is with soldierly pride that I record in General Orders a tribute to the 
taking of the St. Mihiel salient by the First Army. 

On September 12, 1918, you delivered the first concerted offensive 
operation of the American Expeditionary Forces upon difficult terrain 
against this redoutable position, immovably held for four years, which 
crumpled before your ably executed advance. Within twenty-four hours 
of the commencement of the attack, the salient had ceased to exist, and 
you were threatening Metz. 

Your divisions which had never been tried in the exacting conditions of 
major offensive operations, worthily emulated those of more arduous experi- 
ence and earned their right to participate in the more difficult task to come. 
Your staff and auxiliary services, which labored so untiringly and so 
enthusiastically, deserve equal commendation, and we are indebted to the 
willing co-operation of veteran French divisions and of auxiliary units 
which the Allied commands put at our disposal. 

Not only did you straighten a dangerous salient, capture 16,000 prison- 
ers and 443 guns, and liberate 240 square miles of French territory, but 
you demonstrated the fitness for battle of a unified American army. 

We appreciate the loyal training and effort of the First Army. In the 
name of our country, I offer our hearty and unmeasured thanks to these 
splendid Americans of the 1st, 2nd, 4th, 5th, 26th, 42nd, 82nd, 89th and 90th 
Divisions, which were engaged, and of the 3rd, 35th, 78th, 80th and 91st 
Divisions, which were in reserve. 

This order will be read to all organizations at the first assembly forma- 
tion after its receipt. 

John J. Pershing, 

OFFICIAL: General, Commander in Chief." 

Robert C. Davis 
Adjutant General. 

39 



CHAPTER V 

TO THE ARGONNE 

September 14-25, 1918 

13-14 September. VOID (MEUSE) to MARATS - LA - GRANDE 
(MEUSE) Northwesterly, night movement on trucks, 62 kilometers, march- 
ing, 7 kilometers. The regiment was transported on trucks at night via 
BAR-LE-DUC to the great lines of communication in rear of VERDUN. 
The trucks rumbled along rapidly without headlights but at the crossroads 
they were guided by illuminated numerals marking the route. Leaving the 
trucks at dawn, the troops marched into their towns. Here the Colonel 
and Staff had preceded them and the attached French officers, Captain 
Jean Champion and Lieutenant Robert Guibert (old friends of the training 
days both in CAMP LEWIS and in Europe, now attached to the regiment for 
duty as members of the French Mission) had spent the night in arranging 
for billets. Regimental Headquarters, Headquarters Company, Supply 
Company, 3rd Battalion and Companies "E" and "F" were billeted in 
MARATS-LA-GRANDE, Companies "G" and "H," with 2nd Battalion 
Headquarters, a kilometer away, in MARATS-LA-PETITE, 1st Battalion 
and Machine Gun Company, three kilometers away in ERIZE-LA-GRANDE. 

Again secrecy of movement was ordered and all large bodies of troops 
were kept out of the sight of the now frequent airplanes. The 14th, 15th 
(Sunday) and 16th of September were spent in resting and in bringing up 
equipment from the rear area. On the evening of the 15th, simple compass 
problems were practiced after dark. Also during this stop about thirty new 
animals were added to the train. 

16-17 September. MARATS-LA-GRANDE (MEUSE) to NUBeCOURT 
(MEUSE), North, night marching, 15 kilometers. Regimental Headquarters, 
Headquarters Company, 2nd Battalion and 3rd Battalion in NUBeCOURT; 
1st Battalion, Machine Gun and Supply Companies in BULAINVILLE 
500 meters south of NUBeCOURT. The day was spent under cover. 

17-18 September. NUBeCOURT (MEUSE) to BOIS LE COMTE, near 
BRABANT-EN-ARGONNE (MEUSE), North, night marching, 18 kilom- 
eters. The route lay through IPPeCOURT, JULVeCOURT, VILLE-SUR- 
COUSANCES and JUBeCOURT. At NUBeCOURT there were ample 
marks of shell fire or bombing, but in JUBeCOURT there were not only 
marks of greater destruction but the place was thoroughly deserted except 
for one or two ancient natives. A dump was established for the Supply 
Company at JUBeCOURT and Colonel Davis, who had previously personally 
reconnoitered the BOIS LE COMTE and seen its lack of shelter, made 
every effort to obtain permission to billet at least some of the troops in 
JUBeCOURT under cover of the few remaining roofs. The orders, how- 
ever, remained unchanged and the regiment found its way through mud, 

41 



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mist and rain into the designated woods. The men there rolled up in their 
shelter tents and slept. 

This woods was but ten kilometers (about six miles) from the German 
lines and concealment became imperative. In the morning, kitchens were 
spotted along a ravine in the woods and brush was cut for fuel. The cut- 
ting of trees, which would change the aspect of the woods from above 
was prohibited. The 3rd Battalion had camped at some little distance 
from the remainder of the regiment but in the morning moved close to the 
1st Battalion. On this long night march the combined intelligence sections 
had scouted out the route and posted themselves as guides. 

Along the route had been met some of the large caliber French artillery, 
creaking steadily to the front through the darkness along the rough and 
muddy roads or trails and always accompanied by the constant and strange 
jargon of the drivers. Astride of the long swaying gun barrels, perched 
sometimes singly, sometimes in groups of twos or threes, rode sleeping 
gunners rocked as in a storm at sea but apparently never awakening. To 
the surprise of the passing infantry one of these gunners greeted them in 
English and added to the doubtful cheerfulness of the troops going into 
their first action by calling out "Hello, boys, glad to see you, three weeks 
from today you'll be two weeks dead." Many of the guns thus pushed 
ahead at night were hidden for the day in the BOIS-LE-COMTE, which had 
long been used as a rear assembly point. 

18 September. BOIS-LE-COMTE (MEUSE) to PAROIS (MEUSE). 
North, marching, 4 kilometers. In the late afternoon of the 18th the regi- 
ment moved into PAROIS just as other troops of the brigade moved on to 
the BOIS DE PAROIS in the southern edge of the FOReT DE HESSE. 
PAROIS was a completely deserted and badly battered town, yet cover was 
found there for all. The Personnel Office and Supply Dumps were estab- 
lished there for a several days' stop. The 1st Battalion P. C. ("Poste-de- 
commandement": commanding-officer's post) was inside the church, behind 
its ruined altar. The night was spent in quiet but the next day the need 
for keeping under cover from airplane observation was emphasized when 
three of the enemy's shells opened great holes in the soft earth on the edge 
of the town. 

At PAROIS the Supply Company learned its first lessons in camouflag- 
ing vehicles so that they would appear like leafy groves, and here the 
regiment received its first rolling kitchens — four in number. 

The so-called "Silent Approach of the Great American Army" was under 
way and the future front line divisions were being crowded ahead as far as 
the roads and concealment from the enemy would permit. Colonel Davis, 
Captain Smith and the Operations Officer went ahead and selected the next 
camping ground in the woods. 

19 September. PAROIS (MEUSE) to FONTAINE - AU - CHfiNE 
FERME ("Oak Spring Farm") in FOReT DE HESSE (MEUSE). North, 
marching, 4 kilometers. On the afternoon of September 19th the troops, 
none too well satisfied with their success at concealment in PAROIS, were 
glad to move forward into the FOReT DE HESSE and to settle in shelter 
tents under the cover of the trees, now 3|/2 kilometers (a little over two 

42 



miles) from the German lines. Of the farm house nothing remained but 
four walls and a small stone hut that served one night as the Colonel's 
quarters. In and around this locality, ran old systems of French third line 
trenches with scattered strips of wire, a narrow gauge railroad track and 
here and there a few old dugouts. Regimental Headquarters was estab- 
lished in a great round hole with picturesque dugouts excavated out of 
the sides. Here it would have been practically impossible to find it were 
it not for the "Mamma P. C." guide posts placed along the trails. The 
Battalion and Company P. C.'s were in shelter tents. A few hundred 
meters to the east was the Brigade P. C. in an elaborate French Regimental 
Command Post known as "P. C. CARRIeRE" (Quarry Headquarters) on 
a wooded knoll and equipped with nearly all the conveniences of home, 
including electric lights. A little more than two kilometers to the west 
was the Divisional P. C. in a still more elaborate system of dugouts on a 
hill known as "Cote 290" (meaning a point having an elevation of 290 
meters), near BERTRAMe FERME. Here it was that General Pershing 
later paid a personal visit to Major General Johnston on the eve of the 
attack and expressed his confidence in the troops in words that were 
distributed throughout the lines before or soon after the jump-off. 

The kitchens reduced their smoke as much as possible by day and did 
no cooking in the dark. Men were kept under cover and practically the 
only shell fire heard was the whistle of enemy shells that passed over in 
the general direction of PAROIS, or the blast of the allied artillery as 
it took up position and from time to time sent a shell into the German 
positions to check its range. These little salvos were called by some the 
"Reveille and Retreat" of trench warfare. 

On the morning of the 19th of September, Company "D" had been 
detached from the regiment for fatigue duty at AUBReVILLE, but later 
rejoined the regiment in the FOReT-DE-HESSE before the attack was 
begun. ■ 

20-25 September. FONTAINE-AU-CHeNE FERME (co-ordinates 9264, 
Verdun-A, 1/20,000 Map) to the "Jump-Off" on the VARENNES-EN- 
ARGONNE (MEUSE)— AVOCOURT (MEUSE) Road, North, marching, 
3|/2 kilometers. On September 20th General McDonald assumed command 
of the sector of the front assigned to the 181st Brigade, including command 
over the small French company holding the front line trenches and also 
including temporarily the Center of Resistance "Hermont" immediately east 
of the Brigade Sector. 

Instructions had been received that "under no circumstances must any 
officer or soldier allow himself to be captured. It is better that a man 
sacrifice his life than to allow himself to fall into the hands of the enemy 
at this particular time," and no member of the division is known to have 
been captured prior to the "jump-off." 

The old French trench systems were reconnoitered, lanes of advance 
were cut and plans were made and published for resistance of a German 
attack. In these plans the 361st Infantry was designated as the unit to 
launch a counter-attack in the event of a hostile attack on the Brigade Sector. 

A battalion of the 362nd Infantry took up a position near the French 

43 



second line of trenches. On September 22nd orders were received that 
the defensive positions be not taken up until further orders. On Sep- 
tember 23rd, the 3rd Battalion of the regiment moved into position on the 
left of the 362nd Infantry advance battalion, near the RENDEZ-VOUS DE 
CHASSE (9380). 

Gradually the road traffic, particularly along the main road near Division 
Headquarters increased in volume and at night the sound of arriving artil- 
lery seemed to ring in the hills. Soon came the first false alarm of gas. 
It was long after dark and German shells were dropping here and there in 
the woods, when suddenly someone sounded the alarm. Theoretically 
trained to the gas discipline of trench warfare, the alarm was taken up by 
the waiting gas sentries and all along the hills the claxons, gongs and empty 
shell cases were sounded while the warning cry of "Gas!" went up hill 
and down dale. The U. S. Fifth Army Corps Summary of Intelligence 
covering the night of 23/24 September reported: "Three gas alarms were 
sounded at 23h. 53, Oh. 15 and 3h. 40 due to few gas shells falling in 
divisional area. The gas discipline of the men was reported excellent 
and there were no casualties." 

Although the hostile airplanes dropped bombs here and there, the Ger- 
mans apparently drew no special lesson from the loud alarm. It may be 
that the full sound never reached the Germans, for while the noise seemed 
loud to the Americans who were mostly on the reverse and heavily wooded 
slopes, yet those officers who, in French overcoats and helmets visited the 
front lines in those days, well remember the deep silence that hung over 
No-Man's Land on the forward wooded slopes three kilometers to the front. 
A German raid was attempted in the 35th Division Sector adjoining the 91st 
Division on the left, but none in the "Wild West" Sector. The Intelligence 
Summaries however, reported that the enemy appeared to be hurriedly 
reinforcing his artillery. 

While the regiment waited here, many of its officers and non-commis- 
sioned officers reported back to duty from the First Corps Training School. 

Telephones had been installed but their use was prohibited for fear of 
enemy listening-in sets. Buzzer communication was in operation between 
the brigade and regiment and, through the regiment, with the forward 
battalion. The liaison personnel was fully organized and by direction of 
Division Headquarters a test message was started back from the front line 
to establish the rate of transmission to Division Headquarters. Unfortu- 
nately the test character of this message was not marked on it, and when 
the Adjutant of the forward battalion received from Captain Potter of 
Company "L" a message directed to "Maroon 1" (the Commanding Gen- 
eral of the Division) stating that airplanes had been seen overhead and 
some old maps had been found in a dugout, he considered it frivolous and, 
with the approval of Major Miller, threw it away. All night the Brigade 
kept inquiring of Regimental Headquarters for the progress of the test 
message and not until General McDonald visited Major Miller's P. C. the 
next morning, did the story come out in full. 

Captain (then Lieutenant) Page, was put in charge of large details of 
men to corduroy with light timber the only North and South road in the 

44 



Regimental Sector, as the wet weather and constant use had already ren- 
dered this road knee deep in mud and made it impassible for vehicles. 

In view of later general investigations, the following paragraph of a 
memorandum of September 23rd, from Colonel Davis is of interest: "1. 
Preparatory to a probable offensive by this regiment, special precautions 
must be taken reference the following: (a) instruct automatic riflemen to 
never throw away their Chauchat rifles even if they jam or become tem- 
porarily useless. This may happen frequently and if men throw them away 
as they have done in other campaigns, the later resumption of the offensive 
would be greatly handicapped. They must be brought up. Carriers and 
others not in automatic rifle teams, if automatic rifle goes out of com- 
mission, will of course be expected to help out in rifle fire." In this same 
memorandum the importance of ammunition supply and adequate liaison 
was emphasized. The Regimental Adjutant and the Captain of Head- 
quarters Company were especially charged with overseeing, supplementing 
and perfecting the liaison system which was placed directly in charge of the 
Regimental Liaison Officer, Lieutenant Edward A. Valentine. 

Heavy "two-handed" wire cutters were distributed to the Pioneer Platoon 
of the Headquarters Company and in smaller proportions to the infantry 
elements. They were for use in clearing lanes through French as well as 
Boche barbed wire. 

On September 24th, the 3rd Batallion pushed slightly forward and the 
remainder of the regiment moved up immediately behind it, bivouacking in 
the woods or settling into old dugouts. The Regimental P. C. took over 
the old 3rd Battalion P. C. near RENDEZ-VOUS DE CHASSE. 

While it is not known whether the request did more than confirm Colonel 
Davis' previous decision, it is known that a few days before the attack 
Major Miller had earnestly requested that, as Senior Major of the Regi- 
ment (and as having a Captain present and in command of each company 
in his battalion) he be given the honor of taking his battalion "over-the-top" 
as the front line battalion in the regiment's first attack. 

The detailed plans and orders for the attack began to arrive. Among 
them came the order (Par. 17, Order No. 12, 91st Div. 23 Sep. 18) which 
later was strictly observed and keenly felt: "The troops will go into action 
carrying only their ammunition, reserve rations and water. They should 
not expect to receive any supplies, except ammunition, other than those 
carried on the person, for possibly 48 hours after the commencement of 
the action." No blankets, no overcoats, no raincoats, no extra weight to 
hold back the attack and consequently little to keep out the cold and rain. 

91st Division, Field Order No. 7, 24th September, 1918, 11:00 o'clock, 
with its annex, No. 1 (consisting of the plan of liaison with its six ap- 
pendices) ; 91st Division, Orders Nos. 12 and 13 (Administrative Orders); 
181st Brigade, Field Order No. 6, 24th September, 1918, 22:00 o'clock; and 
361st Infantry, Field Order No. 1, 25th September, 1918, 7:00 o'clock, 
included the principal burden of orders for the Infantry. The Regimental 

45 



Order was the one to reach the Company Commanders and was as follows: 

"361st Inf., 
25 Sep., '18. 7:00 o'clock. 
FIELD ORDERS: 
NO. 1. 

VERDUN A ) 

DUN sur MEUSE ) 

MAPS: FORET d' ARGONNE ) 1:20,000 

BUZANCY ) 

MONTFAUCON ) 
VOUZIERS ) 1:50,000 

1. (a) The enemy holds the line from the MEUSE to the AISNE with 
about five (5) divisions. 

(b) The First American Army will advance on the front from the 
MEUSE (exclusive) to LA HAZAREE (exclusive) in the direction of 
BUZANCY-STONNE and force the enemy from the line of the AISNE. 

(c) The Fifth Corps will attack in the front between MALANCOURT 
(inclusive) and VAUQUOIS (exclusive). 

(d) The 91st Division will attack on the front between VAUQUOIS 
(exclusive) and POINT 9704 in the direction of BUZANCY. 

(e) The 181st Brigade will attack on the front between POINT 8205 
and POINT 9704. 

(f) The 182nd Brigade is on this regiment's left. The 362nd In- 
fantry is on this regiment's right. The 35th Division (First Corps) is on 
the 91st Division's left. The 37th Division (Fifth Corps) is on the 91st 
Division's right. 

2. This regiment attacks at "H" hour on "D" day on the front between 
POINT 8205-POINT 9303. 

Zone of Action, 361 st Infantry: 

Western boundary : (Western boundary of Brigade) 8201-8205-8240- 

COTE 242 (7553) (exclusive)— ECLISFONTAINE 
(exclusive)— LANDRES et ST. GEORGES (inclu- 
sive). 

Eastern boundary: 9300-9303-BOY DE LAWARTHA— 9222-BOY DE 
NEUMANN (this boyau is the apparent continuation 
of BOY DE LAWARTHA passing through 9227)- 
9036-8648 on RAU de CHAMBRONNE at northwest 
point BOIS de VERY— EPINONVILLE (center) - 
5416 (on road and 500 meters southwest of GES- 
NES)-LA MUSARDE Fe. 

Line of Departure (Jumping-off Line) 

From 8201 along southwest side of road running southeast to 8997, thence 
east 300 meters to eastern limit regimental sector at 9297. 

Direction of Attack: 
Within zone above indicated. General compass bearing to CHEPPY- 
MONTFAUCON road north nine degrees (9°) EAST (MAGNETIC) 

46 



thence to the American Army objective general compass bearing NORTH 
seventeen degrees (17°) WEST (MAGNETIC). 

Objectives: 

Corps objective: Northeast-southwest line passing just northwest of 
EPINONVILLE. 

American Army objective: Northeast-southwest line along southwest 
edge BOIS de GESNES. 

Combined Army first phase line: Northeast-southwest line through 
COTE de CHATILLON. 

Combined Army objective: Northeast-southwest line including COTE 
253; 1500 meters northwest of LANDRES et ST. GEORGES. 

Points at Which the Front Line Will Be Reported: 

The arrival of the front line elements at the following lines will be 
reported to these headquarters: 

1. Hostile front line (8205-8707-9210). 

2. North side of BEAUSSOGNE RAU (8220-9225) . 

3. North side of RAVIN de LAI FUON. Intermediate hostile posi- 
tion 8334-9035. 

4. RAU de CHAMBRONNE (8243-8648). 

5. Northern edge BOIS CHEHEMIN (7656-8457). 

6. Corps objective: Northeast-southwest line passing immediately 
northwest of EPINONVILLE. 

Upon the arrival at lines Nos. 3 (intermediate hostile position) and 6 
(Corps objective) lines will be marked for the Infantry Aeroplane, in manner 
prescribed in instructions already issued. 

3. (a) Initial disposition for attack: The regiment will be organized 
in depth as follows, and disposed according to directions of Battalion Com- 
manders : 

(1) In front line: 

(a) 3rd Battalion 

(b) Company "B", 347th M. G. Bn. 

(c) 2-37mm. guns with adequate operating and carrying 
personnel from Headquarters Company. 

(2) Supporting line: 

(a) 1st Bn. (less 2 platoons for Combat Liaison Group). 

(b) l-37mm. gun with adequate operating and carrying 
personnel from Headquarters Company. 

(c) One-half of the Sappers and Bombers platoon of 
Headquarters Company, will report to the Regimental 
Liaison Officer for duty under his direction. The re- 
mainder of the Sappers and Bombers platoon will be 
under the command of the commander of the 37mm. 
gun platoon of that company. 

47 



(3) 2nd Battalion is assigned to Brigade Reserve. 

(b) All elements will be in position by "H" hour minus 1 hour. 
The distance between the front line and the supporting battalion will be 
600 meters. This distance will be gained while marching. The front line 
battalion will move forward promptly at "H" hour. 

(c) Additional units attached to Regiment. 

(a) One battery, 122nd Field Artillery. 

(b) One platoon, 316th Engineers. 

(c) (Attached to Brigade and operating with support waves) 
3rd Platoon, Co. B, 1st Gas Regiment. 

(d) The Regiment, reinforced by one battery, 122nd Field Artillery 
will attack straight to the front and take in succession the following objec- 
tives : 

(1) BOIS CHEPPY. 

(2) BOIS de VERY. 

(3) BOIS CHEHEMIN. 

(4) VERY-MONTFAUCON RIDGE. 

(5) EPINONVILLE. 

Upon reaching the northern edge of BOIS CHEHEMIN the 
attack will be pushed with the utmost vigor and under no circumstances will 
it be halted until EPINONVILLE is captured. 

The Regiment will render support to the 182nd Brigade on 
the left and to the 362nd Infantry on the right. 

Rate of advance of Regiment as far as the VERY-MONTFAU- 
CON Ridge will be controlled by the artillery barrage. Artillery tables show- 
ing rate of advance of the barrage and its halting points will be issued later. 

After reaching the Corps objective, the advance will continue 
to the American Army objective without waiting for the advance of the 
divisions on the right and left. This advance will be pushed with the 
greatest vigor. The American Army objective will be reached on the after- 
noon of "D" day. 

(e) The one battery (less one gun) of the 122nd Field Artillery 
assigned to this Regiment will support the advance. The artillery com- 
mander will reconnoiter and select positions for his guns in close support of 
the Regiment and move forward to successive positions in order to furnish 
continuous artillery support. He will maintain close liaison with the Regi- 
ment and will direct his fire in support at the call of the Regimental Com- 
mander. One gun of the battery will accompany the front line battalion of 
the Regiment and will direct its fire at the call of the battalion commander. 

(f) The Regimental M. G. Co. and Co. A, 347th M. G. Bn., will 
be under the command of the Battalion Commander, 347th M. G. Bn., so 
as to operate as a support closely following the advance of the front line 
of the Regiment. 

(g) The Battalion Commander, 1st Bn., will detail one company 
to mop up the woods passed through by the front line battalion in order that 
the progress of the attack may not be interrupted by this work. This Com 
pany will perform its mission quickly and follow its battalion closely. 

48 



(h) The Commander of the 1st Battalion will furnish the follow- 
ing Combat Liaison Detachments: 

( 1 ) To the 362nd Infantry One Platoon 

(2) To the 182nd Brigade One Platoon 

These platoons will perform their missions under the direction 
of their platoon commanders. These platoon commanders will be under the 
direct orders of the Brigade Commander. 

These platoons will be adequately provided by the Battalion 
Commander with large two-handled cutters. 

(i) The 3rd Platoon, Co. B, 1st Gas Regiment, is attached to the 
Brigade and has for its mission the placing of smoke and gas barrages to 
assist the advance of the Infantry. This platoon will function normally 
with the 2nd (support) wave. 

(j) The platoon from the 316th Engineers will accompany the 
front line battalion to assist its advance by cutting wire and removing other 
obstacles. Immediately after it crosses the hostile first line it will return to 
assist the advance of the artillery and will report to the Artillery Com- 
mander. It will thereafter accompany the artillery facilitating its advance 
by the construction of roads, etc. 

(k) The 2nd Battalion of this regiment will operate as the Brigade 
Reserve under the direct orders of the Brigade Commander. 

4. Axis of Liaison will be the Axis of Advance. 

5. Regimental Surgeon will make arrangements for evacuation of 
wounded along axis of march. 

Administrative Order will be issued later. 

6. Brigade P. C. will close at present location at "H" hour and reopen 
at French Company Commander post at road and northern edge of LUTZEN- 
POINT 9188 at the same hour. 

Regimental P. C. will close at the present location at ZERO minus 
1 hour and open at observation post at POINT 8794 at the same hour. 

Davis, 



HHB/H 




Col., 361st Inf. 
Cmdg. 


Cop 


lies by messenger to: 




1. 


C. G. 91stDiv. 


29. 


R. I. 0. 


2. 


C. G. 181st Brig. 


30. 


R. G. 0. 


3. 


C. G. 182nd Brig. 


31. 


Lieut. Quinby. 


4. 


C. 0. 362nd Inf. 


32. 


Lieut. Vincent 


5. 


C. 0. 347th M. G. Bn. 


33. 


Lieut. Valentine. 


6. 


C. 0. Platoon, 316th Engrs. 


34. 


C. 0. 37mm Gun Platoon. 


7. 


C. 0. Btry., 122nd F. A. 


35. 


Regt. Surgeon. 


8. 


C. 0. Platoon, Co. B, 1st 


36. 


War Diary. 




Gas Regiment. 


37. 


File. 


9-24. 


Co. Comdrs. 


38-40. 


Bn. Intelligence Officer. 


24-27. 


Bn. Comdrs. 


41-45. 


Extra." 


28. 


Op. 0. 







49 



"Mamma P. C, A. P. O. 776, 

25 Sept. '18. 
Memorandum : 

In the absence of a more detailed barrage table, the following summary 
of artillery action is quoted from Field Order No. 7, 91st Division, 24 Sept. 
'18. 'Artillery preparation will begin at an hour to be designated later. 
The rolling barrage on the line of the 182nd Brigade will be regulated on 
the basis of 100 meters in four minutes: that of the 181st Brigade 100 meters 
in five minutes, until it has moved to the northern edge of BOIS-DE-VERY 
when it will advance at the rate of 100 meters in four minutes. Halts will 
occur in the advance of the barrage as follows: 

On the hostile front line trenches 25 minutes 

On the hostile intermediate position 10 minutes 

On the hostile second position 20 minutes 

The barrage will finally terminate one kilometer beyond the line con- 
necting the center of VERY and the center of MONTFAUCON. In the 
woods infantry will follow the rolling barrage at 400 meters; in the open 
at 200 meters.' 

The hostile second position is that of the enemy trenches one and one- 
half kilometers south of EPINONVILLE. It is these trenches that are to 
be taken by continuous advance from BOIS-CHEHEMIN. 

By order of Colonel Davis: 
HHB-v H. H. Burton, 

To all Bn. & Co. Cmdrs. 1st Lieut. Asst. Adjt., 
Op. O. Mamma." 

A barrage map was later exhibited to the Battalion Commanders, show- 
ing the schedule time at which each point within the barrage was to be 
reached and this was copied on the map used by the 3rd Battalion. Bat- 
talion and Company Commanders and specialty officers were supplied with 
contoured maps representing the surface of the ground on a scale of 1 to 
20,000 or of 1 to 10,000. 

The following data as to the Divisional Artillery (drawn from Operations 
Order No. 12, Hq. Div. Art. 91st Div. 25 Sept. '18) will serve to indicate 
to the infantryman something of the activity of the artillery support. 

The divisional artillery was commanded by Brigadier General H. D. 
Todd, Jr., of the 58th Field Artillery Brigade and included the 58th Field 
Artillery Brigade, 158th Field Artillery Brigade (less 323rd and 324th F. A.), 
one battalion 65th Regiment Coast Artillery Corps and one battery of French 
artillery, making a little more than 100 guns, without counting 40 or more 
heavy trench mortars. This artillery was entirely separate from and in 
addition to the army and army corps artillery units which were used by 
the army and corps commanders in support of the division and which 
directed their tremendous fire against the strongest enemy positions. The 
caliber of the divisional artillery was as follows: 

50 



75mm — 122nd F. A. Regt. (58th F. A. Brig.) accompanying 

181st Inf. Brig 6 Batteries 

75mm— 124th F. A. Regt. (58th F. A. Brig.) 6 Batteries 

75mm— 322nd F. A. Regt. (158th F. A. Brig.) 6 Batteries 

18 Batteries 

155mm— C. S.— 123rd F. A. Regt 6 Batteries 

155mm— C. Model 1912— 36th Battery, 8th R. A. P. (French) . . 1 Battery 



7 Batteries 
9.2 in.— One Battalion 65 Regt. C. A. C 2 Batteries 



Grand Total 27 Batteries 

Average Rate of Fire Per Gun for Artillery Preparation : 
At Beginning After First Half Hour 

75mm— 1 round per 3 minutes. 1 round per minute. 

155 C. S. and ) 1 round per ,,__ „ c . 

Mod. 1912 \ 4 minutes. < { 55mm Q S -> : l round P er 3 minutes - 

9.2 — 1 round per 4 minutes. 1 round per 4 minutes. 

Rate of Barrage Per Gun: 

75mm — H to H plus 30 minutes 3 rounds per minute 

H plus 30 to H plus 115 2 rounds per minute 

H plus 1 15 to H plus 185 3 rounds per minute 

After H plus 185 2 rounds per 3 minutes 

155mm — H to H plus 30 minutes 2 rounds per 3 minutes 

H plus 30 to H plus 200 1 round per 3 minutes 

H plus 200 to H plus 300 2 rounds per 3 minutes 

(After one hour's firing one gun will rest for ten minutes and three other 
guns will increase their speed to maintain the same intensity of fire.) 

9.2—1 round per 4 minutes. 

In accordance with sub-paragraphs (g) and (h) of paragraph 3 of the 
Regimental Field Order, the following details were made: Company "A," 
under Captain Hughes, to mop up the woods after the 3rd Battalion; Second 
Platoon of Company "D," under Sergeant Graebener as Combat Liaison 
detachment between 361st and 362nd Infantry, and Fourth Platoon of Com- 
pany "D," under Sergeant Hamblet, as Combat Liaison detachment between 
181st and 182nd Brigades. 

The 3rd Battalion, commanded by Major Miller, was disposed as follows: 
Front line: Company "L," under Captain (later Major) Potter, on the right; 
Company "M" under Captain (later Major) Naftzger, on the left; Support: 
Company "I" under Captain Scudder, on the right; Company "K," under 
Captain Burke, on the left. Those companies of the 1st Battalion, com- 
manded by Major Farwell and not assigned special missions were disposed 
as follows: Front line, Company "C," under Captain (later Major) Good- 
paster, on the right; Company "B," under Lieutenant (later Captain) Appel- 
man, on the left. Support: Company "D" (less 2 platoons), under Captain 
(later Major) Dickinson, on the right. 

51 



Lieutenant J. D. McKay with one platoon of Company "K," Lieutenant 
Bissett with two platoons of Company "I," and Lieutenant (later Captain) 
Batman with another platoon of Company "I" occupied the front line 
trenches. Lieutenant Batman was north of LA BUANTHE RUISSEAU 
(BUANTHE CREEK). This little stream here flowed in a deep valley pass- 
ing northwesterly out of the French lines just to the left of Lieutenant Bat- 
man. From there for two kilometers the stream marked the center of No- 
Man's Land before entering the German lines near BAULNY, and after join- 
ing the AIRE River, finally emptied into the AISNE River north of the 
FOReT d'ARGONNE on the left flank of the American Sector. 

The remainder of the 3rd and 1st Battalions assembled along the roads 
or trails near to where the road skirted the forward slope of the hill and by 
4:30 on the morning of September 26th had taken up their designated 
positions. 

The order assigning the 2nd Battalion to the Brigade Reserve was 
changed so as to assign it to the Division Reserve. It moved back about 3 
kilometers to the vicinity of Division Headquarters where it joined the 
346th Machine Gun Battalion and an infantry battalion from the 182nd 
Brigade. These three units, commanded by Lieutenant Colonel F. C. Endi- 
cott, constituted the Division Reserve. 

Company "B," 347th Machine Gun Battalion, joined the 3rd Battalion. 
The Regimental Machine Gun Company and Company "A", 347th Machine 
Gun Battalion, took their places as units of the Machine Gun Battalion, 
with a mission "to support closely the advance of the front line battalions." 

Headquarters Company was completely separated into platoons or smaller 
units on much the same basis as continued throughout the action. The 
Staff Section (including the Intelligence Section, under Lieutenant H. C. 
Hubbell) and the Orderly Section of the Headquarters Platoon were prin- 
cipally with Regimental Headquarters. The Personnel force, the Mess 
Sergeant and four cooks were directed to remain at the RENDEZ-VOUS DE 
CHASSE. The Battalion Sergeant Majors were with their battalions. The 
bandsmen were ordered to accompany the Medical Detachment as emergency 
litter bearers — and there proved to be an almost continuous emergency for 
them. The Signal Platoon, under Lieutenant R. R. Vincent was divided into 
four sections — one with each battalion and one with Regimental Headquarters. 
A detachment of twenty men from Company "C" of 316th Field Signal Bat- 
talion was assigned the duty of maintaining the wires between Regimental 
and Brigade Headquarters. The Sappers and Bombers (Trench Mortar) 
Platoon, under Lieutenant E. H. McMillen and Lieutenant E. K. Murray, 
having no trench mortars, was divided so that half went to Regimental 
Headquarters as additional runners and half went to the One Pounder Platoon 
as ammunition carriers, while both the Lieutenants joined Regimental Head- 
quarters. The One Pounder Platoon, under Lieutenant C. A. Valverde, 
was divided into three sections — two guns and sections with the 3rd Bat- 
talion and one with the First Battalion. The Pioneer Platoon, under Lieu- 
tenant John A. Long, was attached to the 3rd Battalion. Captain Heath 
joined Regimental Headquarters and later assisted particularly with the 
maintenance of the ammunition supply. 

52 



The Regimental Surgeon, Major John J. Sellwood, was with Regimental 
Headquarters and the Medical Detachment was divided into three units; 
one with each battalion. Dr. Fred B. Coleman, Dr. Mayo Reiss and 17 
Medical Corps men started with the 3rd Battalion and were joined on 
September 27th by Dr. L. C. Mcintosh, who had been on detached service 
with the Sanitary Train. Drs. E. C. McKibben, N. G. Hale and J. L. Burn- 
side with 15 Medical Corps men and Mr. Christian and Mr. Davis of the 
Y. M. C. A., were with the 1st Battalion. Captain P. F. Brown, Dr. C. H. 
Smith and Dr. Alfred Schilt with 17 Medical Corps men were assigned to 
the 2nd Battalion. The Y. M. C. A. men on September 25th brought up a 
welcome supply of cookies and chewing gum. 

The Supply Company was organized as follows: Captain L. E. Savage, 
to remain "as Liaison Agent at the Regulating Station at the RENDEZ- 
VOUS DE CHASSE" and "facilitate the moves of trains in conjunction with 
the Regulating Officer" (Administrative Memorandum 181st Brigade, 25 
Sept. '18) ; Lieutenant F. L. Brace, assisted by Lieutenant E. L Kellas, to 
command the Field Trains and Lieutenant J. A. Quinby to command the 
Combat Train. 

Units varied somewhat in strength, but in general, platoons consisted of 
approximately 45 men, Company Headquarters of 20 (rifle companies, there- 
fore of 200), Battalion Headquarters of 100 (battalions with attached units 
of the regiment, such as machine gun and one-pounder units consisted of 
1000), Regimental Headquarters of 150. The last consolidated Morning 
Report, before the attack shows the total present, including Ordnance and 
Medical Detachments, but not including men or units temporarily attached 
for tactical purposes, as 97 officers and 3216 men. 

The several headquarters or "command groups" varied slightly in differ- 
ent organizations, but the typical platoon, rifle company, battalion and 
regimental groups, substantially as called for by the Divisional Plan of 
Liaison, were as follows: 

Platoon Commander's Group (in addition to Platoon Commander) 
2 Privates — Runners 

Company Commander's Group (in addition to Company Commander) 

Command Group 
1 1st Lieutenant 
1 1st Sergeant 

1st Group 3rd Group 

Observers and Signallers: Runners to Battalion Hqrs. and to 
2 Buglers Flanks: 

4 Pvts. 1st CI. Signallers 4 Pvts. or Pvts. 1st CI. 

4th Group 
2nd Group Signal Corps Liaison: 

Runners to Platoons: 1 Lineman 

4 Pvts. or Pvts. 1st CI. 1 Pvt. 1st CI. or Pvt. Operator 

Total, 1 Officer, 17 Men. 

53 



Battalion Commander's Group (in addition to Battalion Commander) 

Command Group 

1 1st Lieutenant — Adjutant 

1 Lieutenant — Scout, Intelligence Officer 

1 Lieutenant — Liaison Officer 

1 Lieutenant — Gas Officer 

1 Battalion Sergeant Major 

1st Group 1 Sgt. asst. to Chief of Det. 

Orderlies and Pioneers: J £or P . Switchboard operator 

_ , _. , , 1 Corp. in charge of Linemen 

1 Corp Mounted Orderly , c fa ch of Operators 

1 Pvt. Mounted Orderly g Rvts 0f Pvts , st Q Lineme n and 

1 Corp. Pioneer Operators. 

8 Pvts. or Pvts. 1st CI. Pioneers K 

1 Sergeant ) Telephone 

2nd Group 2 Corporals ) detail from 

Runners to Companies and Flanks: 10 Pvts. or Pvts. ) Headquarters 

4 Pvts. or Pvts. 1st CI. lst Cl > Company. 

i , r 1 Corp. Signaller 

Jrd Uroup 4 Pvts or Pvts lst q signallers 



To Regimental Hqrs. & Flanks: 



5th Group 



12 Pvts. or Pvts. lst Cl., Scouts 



3 Pvts. Bicyclists 

4 Pvts. or Pvts. lst Cl. Intelligence Section 
(Additional runners as required to 1 Sgt., Scout 

maintain chain of runners to Regtl. 2 Corps., Scouts 
Hqrs.) 

4th Group l S § t or Cor P-' 0bserver 

p 10 Pvts. or Pvts. lst Cl., Observers 

Signal Corps Liaison: 2 Sgts. or Corps., Chief Snipers 
1 Sgt. lst Cl. Chief of Det. 

Total: 4 Officers, 82 men (additional runners as needed) 

Regimental Commander's Group (in addition to Regimental Commander and 
Lieutenant Colonel, if any) 

1 Captain, Regimental Adjutant 

1 Captain, Operations Officer 

1 Captain, Headquarters Company 

1 lst Lieutenant, Regl. Intelligence Officer 

1 1st Lieutenant, Sappers & Bombers Platoon 

1 lst Lieutenant, One-Pounder Platoon 

1 Lieutenant, Regtl. Signal Officer 

1 2nd Lieutenant, Pioneer Platoon 

1 Lieutenant, Regtl. Liaison Officer 

1 Lieutenant, Regtl. Gas Officer 

1 Lieutenant from Outpost Co., Signal Battalion 

1 Medical Officer, Regt. Surgeon 

1 Artillery Officer, Artillery Liaison 

54 



1 Regimental Sergeant Major 

2 Color Sergeants 

2 Corporals, Stenographers 



1st Group 
Chauffeurs, Orderlies and Pioneers: 

1 Chauffeur 

8 Pvts. or Pvts. 1st CI. Mounted 

Orderlies 
3 Pvts., Bicyclists 

2 Sergeants, Pioneers 
1 Corporal, Pioneer 

24 Pvts. or Pvts. 1st CI., Pioneers 



4th Group 
Signal Corps Liaison: 
1 Sgt. 1st CI., Chief of Detail 

Assistants, 

3 Sergeants 

4 Corporals 
18 Pvts. or Pvts. 

1st CI. 



Cable lay- 
ing detail, 
Linemen, 
Operators, 
Drivers 



1 Sergeant 
1 Corporal 
8 Pvts. or Pvts. 
1st CI. 



Signalmen 

and 

Pigeoneers 



2nd Group 
Runners to Battalions & Flanks: 
11 Pvts. or Pvts. 1st CI., Bicyclists 
Additional Runners as required 

3rd Group 

Liaison with Brigade and Artillery: 

2 Pvts. or Pvts. 1st CI., Motorcyclists 

Approximately 45 to 60 N. C. O.'s 
and Pvts. or Pvts. 1st CI. as Run- 
ners for Chain of Liaison 

1 or more N. C. O.'s from Support- 
ing Artillery 

Total- 13 Officers, 148 men (and additional runners as needed) 



5th Group 
Intelligence Section: 
3 Sergeants 
6 Pvts. 1st CI. 



"D" day was set for September 26th; "H" hour for 5:30 a. m. 

Late on the afternoon of September 25th, in the midst of the prepara- 
tion for the attack, Colonel Davis was compelled to reply "by endorsement 
hereon at once" to a demand relating to the DEMANGE-AUX-EAUX brooms. 
Having accounted for the brooms he again turned his attention to the war 
and sent to the companies the following memorandum expressing his con- 
fidence in his regiment: 



Memorandum 



"Headquarters Mamma, 
25 September, 1918. 



The Commanding General regrets his inability to personally talk to the 
officers of this command reference the great work to be undertaken to- 
morrow. He desires in this connection to express his thanks to the officers 
and enlisted men for the excellent manner in which they have performed 
the strenuous work involved in the march to this point and to congratulate 
the command on the manner in which they have complied with his orders 
reference concealment on the march and in camp. He has seen nothing 
like it in any of the other divisions. In everything else this division 



55 



exhibits excellent military characteristics away beyond what he has seen 
in others. 

He has no doubt as to the outcome tomorrow and as to the excellent way 
in which the Division will conduct itself. He does not believe that the 
Boche has much else left than gas and machine guns and he feels that we 
will know how to take care of all situations that may arise. 

He wants it understood, however, that this is a drive and that every 
officer and enlisted man must do his utmost to get forward on scheduled time. 
The task set for it is a hard one but a necessary one, and every personal 
sacrifice necessary must be made to gain the end desired. No excuses will 
be accepted. 

The Regimental Commander desires to add that he also has full con- 
fidence in his troops. We have now arrived at what we have been striving 
for for the last year. We have overcome all hardships heretofore presented 
but what confronts us now is an extreme test: we can excel in this test as 
we have heretofore excelled in everything presented. He has no misgiv- 
ings as to the outcome. We shall succeed, I freely stake my life on this. 
The Army objective must be reached on scheduled time even though it be 
fourteen (14) kilometers away. 

WDD/H. Wm. D. Davis, 

Copies to: Colonel, 361st Infantry, 

1- 3 Bn. Cmdrs. Commanding." 

4-18 Co. Cmdrs. 

19 Regt. Surgeon 

20 File 

21 Op. O. 



56 



ROSTER OF OFFICERS, 361st INFANTRY 

September 26, 1918— at "Jump-Off," 1st Phase of MEUSE-ARGONNE 

Offensive 

Regimental Headquarters 

Colonel William D. Davis 

Lieutenant Colonel 

Major John J. Sellwood, Regimental Surgeon 

Captain Clarence F. Smith, Regimental Adjutant 

Captain Jacob Kanzler, Personnel Adjutant 

1st Lieut. Harold H. Burton, Acting Operations Officer 

and Assistant Adjutant 
1st Lieut. Eugene V. Bronson, Regimental Chaplain 
1st Lieut. Charles H. Moore, Jr. (Co. "K") attached as 

Regtl. Gas Officer 
2nd Lieut. Edward A. Valentine (Co. "L") attached as 

Regtl. Liaison Officer 
Captain Jean Champion, of French Army, attached as 

member of French Commission 
1st Lieut. Robert Guibert, of French Army, attached as 

member of French Commission. 

1st Battalion 

Major George W. Farwell 

1st Lieut. Donald G. Abel, Adjutant 

1st Lieut. Richard C. M. Page (Co. "C"), attached as 

Intelligence Officer 
2nd Lieut. Errol W. Proctor (Co. "D"), attached as 

Liaison Officer 

Company "A" Company "C" 

Captain Howard D. Hughes Captain Ora Goodpaster 

1st Lieut. Ellis Bates i st Lieut. Charles H. Hudelson 

1st Lieut Wallace H. Blomquist, , st Lieut Gerrft y w Wood 

also Bn. Gas Officer 

1st Lieut lst L,eut 

2nd Lieut. Ben B. Taylor 2nd Lieut - Robert C. Howard 

(2nd Lieut. Merriam J. Howells, D. 2nd Lieut 

S. at Gas School) 

Company "B" Company "D" 

(Captain Wallace T. Downing, D. S. Captain Friend S. Dickinson 

as Instructor at Army Candidate i st Lieut. Roscoe V. F. Brightbill 
School) lst Lieut Louis B j ansen 



lst Lieut. 



lst Lieut. Gustave B. Appelman 
lst Lieut. Gilpin S. Sessions 

lst Lieut 2nd Lieut. Thomas G. Ware 

2nd Lieut. Southall R. Pfund 2nd Lieut 

2nd Lieut 



58 




Major Oscar F. Miller 

Commanding Officer Third Battalion, 361st Infantry 

Mortally wounded in action on "Miller Hill," September 28, 1918 

Posthumously Awarded Congressional Medal of Honor 



2nd Battalion 
Major Roy C. Ward 
1st Lieut. Curtiss R. Gilbert, Adjutant 
1st Lieut. Jesse T. Wilkins (Co. "H"), attached as Liaison 

Officer 
1st Lieut. Cherrill R. Betterton (Co. "E"), attached as 

Intelligence Officer 
2nd Lieut. Oliver Voderberg (Co. "G"), attached as Gas 

Officer 



Company "£"' 

Captain 

1st Lieut. Elmer J. Armstrong 
1st Lieut. Henry P. Hoffman 
1st Lieut. Royal A. Coffey 
(2nd Lieut. Ernest L. Damkroger, D. 

S. in charge Div. Warehouse at 

MEUSE) 
2nd Lieut. Frank R. Johnston 

Company "F" 
Captain Carmi L. Williams 
1st Lieut. Everett E. Hunt 
1st Lieut. Wallace M. MacKay 

1st Lieut 

2nd Lieut. Jack Sweat 



Company "G" 
Captain Clarence J. Minick 
1st Lieut. Frederick T. Fairchild 
1st Lieut. Walter F. Davis 

1st Lieut 

2nd Lieut. Uil Lane 

2nd Lieut 

Company "H" 
Captain Albert H. Conner 
1st Lieut. Ira G. Towson 
1st Lieut. John H. Moeur 

1st Lieut 

2nd Lieut. Charles T. Wright 
(2nd Lieut. Harry J. Craig, S. 
as Liaison Officer 181st Brig.) 



D. 



2nd Lieut. 

3rd Battalion 
Major Oscar F. Miller 
1st Lieut. James C. Fortune, Adjutant 
1st Lieut. James R. McLaughlin (Co. "I"), attached as 

Intelligence Officer 
2nd Lieut. Everett J. Gray (Co. "I"), attached as Gas 

Officer 
2nd Lieut. Knapp Orton (Co. "M"), attached as Liaison 

Company "L" 
Captain William J. Potter 



Officer 
Company "I" 
Captain Marshall S. Scudder 
1st Lieut. Robert S. Batman 
1st Lieut. David A. Bissett 

1st Lieut 

2nd Lieut. Robert A. Woodyard 
2nd Lieut 

Company "K" 
Captain Campbell Burke 
1st Lieut. John E. Bailey 
1st Lieut. James D. McKay 

1st Lieut 

2nd Lieut. James M. Tongate 
2nd Lieut 



1st Lieut. Albert J. Haas 

(1st Lieut. Gregg M. Evans, D. S., 

attending school at Langres) 
1st Lieut. Ronald E. Everly 
2nd Lieut. Alva J. Coats 

2nd Lieut 

Company "M" 
Captain Roy E. Naftzger 
1st Lieut. Frederick F. Lamping 
1st Lieut. Francois Trouchet 
(1st Lieut. William J. Edick, D. S. 

at school) 
1st Lieut. Lester M. Ellis 
2nd Lieut. Paul D. Smith 
2nd Lieut 



59 



Headquarters Company 

Captain Frank Heath 

1st Lieut. Charlie A. Valverde (One- 
Pounder Platoon) 

1st Lieut. Earle G. McMillen (Sap- 
pers and Bombers Platoon) 

1st Lieut. Harold C. Hubbell (Intel- 
ligence Officer) 

2nd Lieut. Ray R. Vincent (Signal 
Officer) 

2nd Lieut. Ernest K. Murray (Sap- 
pers and Bombers Platoon) 

2nd Lieut. John A. Long (Pioneer 
Platoon) 

Machine Gun Company 

Captain Frank P. Doherty 
1st Lieut. George E. Kelsch 
1st Lieut. Lewin W. Martinez 
2nd Lieut. George V. J. Ramsdell 
2nd Lieut. Reginald H. Linforth 
2nd Lieut 

Supply Company 

Captain Leon E. Savage 
1st Lieut. Fred L. Brace 



Supply Company — Continued 

1st Lieut. James A. Quinby 
1st Lieut. Edward L. Kellas (at- 
tached) 

2nd Lieut 

2nd Lieut 

Medical Detachment 

Major John J. Sellwood, M. R. C, 

Regimental Surgeon 
Captain Paul F. Brown, M. R. C. 
1st Lieut. Fred B. Coleman, M. R. C. 
1st Lieut. Leland C. Mcintosh, 

M. R. C. 
1st Lieut. John L. Burnside, D. R. C. 
1st Lieut. Ernest C. McKibben, M. 

R. C. 
1st Lieut. Nathan G. Hale, M. R. C. 
1st Lieut. Charles H. Smith, M.R.C. 
1st Lieut. Mayo Reiss, D. R. C. 
1st Lieut. Alfred Schilt, D. R. C. 

Chaplains 
1st Lieut. Eugene V. Bronson 
1st Lieut. John W. Beard 
1st Lieut. Alphonse L. Weber 



60 



CHAPTER VI 

FIRST PHASE OF MEUSE-ARGONNE OFFENSIVE 

September 26-October 6, 1918 

26 September. The "Jump-Off" on VARENNES (MEUSE)— A VO- 
COURT (MEUSE) Road to EPINONVILLE (MEUSE), North, attacking, 
8 kilometers. 

On the 24th of September and the night of the 25/26 September, Lieu- 
tenant Long, commanding the Pioneer Platoon of Headquarters Company, 
assisted by Lieutenant McLaughlin, Battalion Intelligence Officer of the 3rd 
Battalion, with men detailed from each company of the battalion, located 
old lanes or prepared new ones through the French System of wire. While 
doing this, late on September 25th, they went by mistake in front of the 
182nd Brigade and were shot at by the brigade sentinels. No one was hit 
at that time, but a little later, the regiment suffered its first casualty in 
action when a member of the 3rd Battalion Intelligence Section was fatally 
shot while on patrol. 

Soon after dark on the 25th of September, Colonel Davis and the 
Operations Officer made a last trip to Brigade Headquarters and returned 
with final instructions and the complete barrage map. 

At 23:30 o'clock, September 25th, the artillery preparation began. The 
great strength of artillery massed for the supreme effort was made known 
to the enemy with a crash that astonished our own troops. Many an innocent 
looking bush unexpectedly "exploded." Guns of every size were every- 
where. Colonel Davis expressed surprise and admiration at finding behind 
us more guns than he "ever knew there were in the world before." The 
91st Division was substantially in the center of the 30 kilometer (about 20 
mile) front of the American Army, so that the flashes and roar of artillery 
fire and shell explosions extended as far as eye or ear could reach on each 
flank as well as to the rear. The following description of this artillery fire 
contributed by Arthur Ruhl to Colliers' Weekly of January 11, 1919, conveys 
an impression of its effect: 

"Batteries, massed in the dripping haze, were banging away all about us 
— 'seventy-fives' that suddenly whacked the air with dry, sharp reports, now 
singly, now tumbling viciously over each other; 'heavies' that seemed to 
split earth and sky when they unexpectedly crashed from the near-by dark- 
ness; or, farther off, flung down the countryside a long thunderous resonance 
across the harp of the woods. * * * The whole sky flickered from 
horizon to horizon as if in the flares from hundreds of blast furnaces. And 
over our heads, now with quick, pert, almost frivolous whistles; now with 
long-drawn, lazy moans; and now with a rushing sound of a departing 
express train, the shells began racing over into the enemy's lines. Near-by 
batteries, firing salvos, slapped the ears with sharp, physical concussions. 

61 



There would be instants of pause sometimes, and then scores of detonations 
crowding over each other in a curious sort of localized thunder that re- 
minded one of torrents of great balls rolling downstairs." 

The night was cold, misty and very dark. The troops had moved to 
their positions near the trails or roads ready to pass forward to the "jump- 
off" line. The artillery preparation at once brought forth many signal 
rockets from the German lines, and a few scattered shells came south in 
reply. The allied artillery was evidently covering the most dangerous enemy 
artillery positions and as the shell fire swept overhead practically un- 
answered, this demonstration of the strength of the artillery support, added 
further confidence to the infantry. 

The Second Battalion had moved to its position in the Division Reserve. 
Colonel Davis and Regimental Headquarters were in position in a small 
concrete French Observation Post (at about 8794) so located in the front 
line trenches as to cover a large part of the Regimental Sector. By 4:30 
A. M., September 26th, the 3rd and 1st Battalions had moved out of the 
trenches and had passed in single or double file along the trails and pre- 
pared lanes to their final positions on the "jump-off" line. This line lay 
on the northern slope of the FOReT DE HESSE and therefore in front of 
the French trench system except on the extreme right where the French 
trenches reached across to the hill north of the BUANTHE. As the dis- 
tances between our units were to be gained while advancing, the companies 
were held within easy reach of each other and the 1st Battalion was 
placed close behind the 3rd. A heavy mist, increased by the smoke screen 
layed by our artillery, baffled both the enemy's and our own vision for any 
distance greater than 50 feet. 

As the troops were moving into position a mine or a large caliber shell 
exploded unexpectedly between the two battalions, knocking many of the 
men of Companies "C" and "M" to the ground with its concussion and 
opening a shell hole of 30 to 40 feet in diameter. All were interested 
and considerably impressed but none were injured. 

The hands of the synchronized watches moved slowly to the Zero hour, 
and suddenly the crash of artillery burst into a roar, the air was crowded 
with shells and an enormous and beautiful burst of thermite over the 
enemy trenches announced the time for the advance of the doughboy. 
Helmeted in steel, armed with rifles with bayonets fixed, each man with 220 
rounds of rifle ammunition, each company with an ample supply of Chauchat 
automatic rifles, a few men with rifle or hand grenades, an extraordinary 
collection of pyrotechnics, several pigeons, and a light load of reserve rations, 
the 3rd and 1st Battalions of the 361st Infantry, accompanied by the auxiliary 
units before mentioned, stepped out to their first attack. Scarcely anyone 
had slept but all were eager to "go" — they had trained a year and come to 
France for this big game hunt and the Wild West Division was in its element. 
The message which Lieutenant Fortune for two hours had held ready for 
transmittal to Regimental Headquarters was released at just 5 :30 with the 
news that the front line battalion was on its way. "Powder River" was 
loosed. 

Arthur Ruhl, in the article quoted above, again gives a glimpse of the 
scene in the following description: "The blackness had thinned a little by this 

62 



time — zero hour was approaching — but the whole semi-circle of the sky still 
flamed and the flashes and whistles and roars and moans filled all the waning 
night with a horrible beauty. * * * The broken thunder which had been 
pounding our ears for hours suddenly swelled into one continuous, clamor- 
ous note. The organ of the guns had, with the dawn, thrown out all its 
stops and was shaking sky and earth with its rushing diapason. From the 
heavies, shells that could smash a house to smithereens, came racing after 
each other like so many Roman candles. The seventy-fives began their 
"drumfire" — drumfire, literally, whole batteries flinging out their salvos in 
one slightly rippled Br-r-r-um! Though one could see nothing, of course, 
but the constant flaming and flashing, one could feel, as it were, those 
countless parabolas, crisscrossing, weaving their appalling canopy over our 
heads. Faster and faster they came, as if conscious of their mission, and 
racing in a sort of desperate fury to interpose their barrier before those 
helpless little humans over there, waiting the word to advance. A pale 
amethystine radiance began to suffuse the mists, and one became aware, 
far off above the horizon, as of something less seen than remembered, of 
the cold calm twinkle of morning stars." 

The 3rd Battalion led the way. Company "L" was on the right, Com- 
pany "M" on the left in the front line, Company "I" on the right, Com- 
pany "K" on the left in support. Battalion Headquarters was in the center. 
Each Company moved with two platoons in its front line and two in support. 
Company Command Groups were in the center of their companies. The 
heavy mist and thick clouds of white smoke completely hid the enemy 
trenches. The troops had been warned of the harmless quality of the smoke 
and they moved forward slowly to follow the rolling barrage that was to clear 
the way ahead of them, starting at the front line trenches then moving 
through the woods at the rate of 100 meters in each 5 minutes as the gunners 
on schedule time increased the range by 200 meter jumps. About three- 
fourths of a mile an hour, less than 25 yards a minute — between 2 and 3 full 
seconds for every step — it was intended to be slow enough to let the infantry- 
men scramble through the woods about 400 meters behind it, passing through 
all remaining resistance as they came. Every effort was made to keep up 
to this apparently simple schedule but the woods were thicker, the resist- 
ance greater and the direction harder to follow on the ground than on the 
artillery map. When, after a 2y 2 kilometer advance, the first elements of 
the infantry broke through the far side of the BOIS DE CHEPPY and 
at about 10:30 had been reorganized for further advance — they were already 
nearly 3 hours behind the barrage and all Germans who had obtained 
sufficient cover during the passing of the barrage were now free to man 
their concealed machine guns subject only to infantry attack. 

The troops came up the short, steep slope of the first German position 
ready for the trial of steel — but the artillery had done its work thoroughly. 
The whole hill top and side and for two hundred meters beyond was turned 
bottom-up; great holes from five to fifteen feet deep, and from ten to 
thirty or more feet wide were everywhere — there was not even a path left — 
the trenches and concrete blockhouses or "pill-boxes" were torn out of the 
ground, burst open and wrenched apart, so that these ruins little more than 
indicated here and there the trace of the old trench. Here and there the 
thermite was still burning in the ground or on tree stumps. The surprise 

63 



was welcome — the Germans were gone — the attack was a success in its 
first phase. The only living thing in the old front line was a fox terrier 
that gave a glad welcome to 1st Sergeant McKennie as he passed on with 
the Company "M" command group. 

The 1st Battalion followed the 3rd at 600 meters. 

The paths and trails in the woods ran at an angle of nearly forty-five 
degrees to the direction of advance so that compass marching became 
essential in holding the regiment even near to its sector. German snipers 
and machine gunners had held to their positions in the middle of the woods 
and now and again covered with their fire the paths of advance. It was 
necessary to break trails through the brush, to scramble through wire, and 
to overcome any remaining resistance. First, German equipment was found 
scattered about on the paths — then came the sniper and machine gun 
resistance. The 3rd Battalion was under orders to push on, leaving the 
thorough mopping up to Company "A" of the 1st Battalion. The 3rd Bat- 
talion Command Group pushed rapidly along, Major Miller and Lieutenant 
Fortune breaking trails, Lieutenant McLaughlin directing the course by 
compass, and Lieutenant Orton maintaining direct command of the enlisted 
men who were formed in line of combat groups. The bicyclists, with good 
judgment abandoned their impedimenta in the first tangled mass of broken 
concrete, barbed wire and shell-dug trenches. The panels, rockets, flares, 
pigeons, telephone instrument, wire, signal flags and projectors came through 
the first dash with but few losses. 

The companies necessarily lost immediate contact with each other. The 
Battalion Group, however, identified familiar platoons here and there and 
in the center of the sector met men of the 362nd Infantry who had drifted 
northwest with the trend of the woods trails. The 362nd Infantry was 
closing in from the right while the 361st Infantry in turn was moving 
further to the left. Several German machine gun nests offered brief 
resistance as the advance pushed vigorously on, but on every hand, small 
groups gave themselves up as prisoners with little or no resistance. Bat- 
talion Headquarters, shortly after 9:00 o'clock came out of the BOIS DE 
CHEPPY at point 8334 in the left half of the Regimental Sector and near 
where the VeRY-AVOCOURT road enters the woods from the North. The 
Headquarters, for the moment, was out of contact with its battalion. 

Sergeant J. O. Yuill, of the Intelligence Section, moved about 50 meters 
ahead of the battalion and from there saw a German officer and two men 
come out of a dugout near the side of the road and start to set up a machine 
gun to fire on the command group. He at once shot the officer and the 
two other Germans ran to their dugout. The officer, though wounded, 
reached for his pistol, whereupon the Sergeant fired again, killed the 
officer and went on into the dugout where he found and shot one of the 
two men who had at first escaped. 

From here a pigeon was released with a location message directed to 
Regimental Headquarters. The message is reported to have been delivered 
to Division Headquarters in about 20 minutes and from there immediately 
relayed by wire to Regimental Headquarters. 

The Regimental Sector was a little less than a kilometer in width and 
both Companies "L" and "M" drifted out of it to the west before reach- 

64 



ing the northern edge of the woods. Company "L" extended one-half a 
kilometer west of the western limit of the Sector, while part of Company 
"M" was on the left of "L" and part on the right. Each company had over- 
come machine gun nests and captured prisoners on the way. Of this 
feature Company "M" has filed the following brief report: "Some of the 
paths were enfiladed by snipers and machine guns and we now suffered our 
first casualties. Sergeant Oster was mortally wounded and died in the hospital 
from the wounds. Private Beach was killed instantly and Sergeant Heine- 
man severely wounded. We also captured prisoners here and could have 
taken many more, but our orders were to push ahead and leave the mopping 
up to another company. 1st Sergeant McKennie, with Corporal Henley 
and Privates Hanley, Droper and Rose captured one officer and 14 men. 
Corporal Lewis took 8 men of a machine gun crew singlehanded. Sergeant 
Rees, with a squad, took several. Corporal Amyes, with his squad took 
two, Private 1st Class Gale shot two who tried to escape and captured 
two. Private McGuire, singlehanded, captured three." 

Lieutenant Trouchet led the detachment of Company "M" that came out 
at LA NEUVE GRANGE FERME and for nearly an hour was under ma- 
chine gun fire at that point. Company headquarters and the 1st and 3rd 
platoons of Company "K" held strictly to their sector and came out at 8334 
near Battalion Headquarters. Here they were detailed to mop up the 
western edge of the BOIS DE VERY on the right. This resulted in 75 
or 80 more German prisoners. The 2nd and 4th platoons had been delayed 
while making the capture of several machine gun nests and later joined 
the 1st Battalion for the remainder of the day. Company "I" reported in 
and by 1 1 :00 o'clock the battalion was reformed and pushing ahead in its 
regular sector. 

The 1st Battalion had been held within the sector and substantially 
intact, advancing with Company "C" as the guiding unit. It cleared the 
woods before noon, was reformed and pushed ahead in co-operation with 
the 3rd Battalion. In mopping up the BOIS DE VERY, Lieutenant Ses- 
sions and Sergeant Anderson, each without the knowledge of the other, 
gallantly entered separate entrances of the same dugout, simultaneously 
threw their grenades and successfully mopped up the interior, all without 
injury to each other. At another point, some 50 Germans came out and 
surrendered to the 3rd Battalion Headquarters, the German officer in charge 
having tremendous difficulty with his dignity while holding his hands above 
his head and running at a trot regulated from the rear by a doughboy's 
bayonet. 

The enemy's first and intermediate defensive positions had now been 
cleared. 

The 3rd Battalion, having eaten its first reserve ration lunch, resumed 
the attack. During the cleaning up of the nearby western tip of the BOIS 
CHeHeMIN, Company "I" claims to have captured 5 machine guns and 
three 77mm guns. In the next gulch, Sergeant Yuill, of Company "M," 
(with the Battalion Intelligence Section), added to his previous record 
another exploit, the description of which is here quoted from the citation 
that later accompanied the award to him of a Distinguished Service Cross 
for his work that day: "Accompanied by one man, Sergeant Yuill went 

65 



forward to a German trench and bombed it, killing a German officer and 
two soldiers and held the trench until reinforced by a party of four. Fearing 
that the Germans in the trench would escape, he led these men five hundred 
meters through sniper and machine gun fire, cut off their means of escape 
and captured twenty-seven prisoners." Many other individual and con- 
certed attacks were necessary to clear the enemy's second prepared position. 
This position consisted not only of scattered machine guns but of a double 
or triple line of trenches with a double system of thick low wire entangle- 
ments. The trench system, however, had been placed to resist an attack 
from the southwest and it so happened that as the regiment advanced from 
the southeast, it was able to enfilade a long double section of wire and 
trenches so that once the machine gun nests had been cleared away, the 
advance was pushed rapidly through the trench system and across the gulch 
to the crest of Hill 252 and to the orchards immediately south of the 
German camp in the hamlet of EPINONVILLE. 

Colonel Davis and Regimental Headquarters left their observation post 
shortly after the troops, followed them through the BOIS DE CHEPPY, and 
rejoined them before noon near 8334 on the VeRY-AVOCOURT Road. 
Here Colonel Davis directed the reorganization and continuation of the 
attack and incidentally set straight several companies of the 37th Division 
that had drifted a little more than a kilometer to the west through the 181st 
Brigade Sector. In the early afternoon, Brigadier General McDonald and 
Major General Johnston came to this point. The Regimental and Brigade 
Headquarters were soon temporarily located at point 8653 where the 
CHEPPY-MONTFAUCON Road entered BOIS CHeHeMIN from the west. 
This spot, officially referred to as "Dead Horse Corner," was well marked 
by a German 77mm gun, several machine gun nests and a dead horse. 

One of several evidences that a haze surrounded the general knowledge 
of local geography on this first day of rapid advance was the notable 
explanation given by Lieutenant Martinez to his Machine Gun Platoon: 
"There is VERDUN," as he proudly pointed to MONTFAUCON. 

The Regimental Machine Gun Company had been attached to the 347th 
Machine Gun Battalion, but at Captain Doherty's earnest request and in 
answer to a call from Colonel Davis, Major Hansen of the Machine Gun 
Battalion, let the Captain and Lieutenant Kelsch separate one platoon from 
that battalion and with it seek to join the front line battalion. In anticipa- 
tion of difficult ground, Captain Doherty had already cut up his cart harness 
and improvised apparejos on which his mules were carrying the company 
equipment, but this platoon now jumped the BUANTHE CREEK and packed 
its guns by hand so as to avoid waiting for the completion of the bridges 
required for the animals. The 3rd Battalion had at least a two-hour start 
and in spite of the Doherty enthusiasm it took until noon to get the 
guns, tripods and ammunition through the three kilometers of brush and 
into the field of fire. By the middle of the afternoon the Doherty guns 
were in position on Hill 258, south of EPINONVILLE and engaging in 
reciprocal target practice with enemy machine guns and snipers. 

Late in the afternoon, the 3rd and 1st Battalions were on the crest of 
EPINONVILLE HILL and extended not only across the Regimental Sector 
but several hundred meters west into the 182nd Brigade Sector. Thus on 

66 



the first day the 181st Brigade had reached the "Corps Objective," although 
it was not until the morning of the third day that EPINONVILLE was com- 
pletely and permanently brought within the American lines. 

Here an officer of the 363rd Infantry is said to have brought word to 
Captain Doherty, intimating that the Captain's machine gun crews were 
in the line of fire of the machine gun company of that regiment. To this, 
Captain Doherty is said to have replied, that if the 363rd Infantry wished 
to make use of his position by moving up to it and taking over his direct 
line of fire upon the enemy, he would be glad to move away. It then 
developed that Captain Doherty was permitted to occupy his position until 
dusk when the line of resistance was changed for the night. 

It was on this day that Lieutenant Louis B. Jansen, of Company "D," 
who was later killed in action on October 3rd, performed the act which, 
with his exceptionally efficient service, won him the Distinguished Service 
Cross with the following citation: 

"For extraordinary heroism in action near EPINONVILLE, France, 
September 26, 1918. When the advance of his battalion was held up by 
an enemy machine gun nest, Lieutenant Jansen, accompanied by a soldier, 
crossed the enemy wire, took the position, killed one of the enemy, and 
captured four prisoners and two machine guns." (W. D. G. O. 20, Sec. VI, 
Jan. 30, 1919.) 

The losses for the day were obviously less than those of the enemy if 
the many German prisoners be included, but all front line units had suffered, 
and among the casualties were two officers, 2nd Lieutenant B. B. Taylor, 
of Company "A," wounded in the leg while observing and sniping in a 
tree top, and 2nd Lieutenant P. D. Smith, of Company "M," killed by a 
sniper's bullet while advancing near the crest of EPINONVILLE HILL. 

At nightfall both battalions maintained outposts on EPINONVILLE 
HILL and started to bivouack in the hollow at its foot along BARONVAUX 
CREEK (a place that later was all too well known as "Death Valley," "Death 
Hollow," or "Deadman's Gulch"). After dark the main bodies of both 
battalions were moved back into the German second position trenches 
(shown on the French maps as the CROCODILE and CAIMAN trenches) as 
these were better suited for resistance of a counter-attack. 

The nearest thing to an enemy attack that occurred that night happened 
when Lieutenant Fortune personally established liaison with the 1st Bat- 
talion and on the way back with Major Farwell suddenly discovered him- 
self a few yards from a long column of troops filing by in absolute silence. 
The fact that the troops wore overcoats marked them as not belonging to 
the regiment and their absolute silence indicated both hostile intent and 
un-American habits. Major Farwell at once returned and ordered his 
companies into readiness to resist an attack, then rejoined Lieutenant 
Fortune while the column was still filing by. Suddenly a man stumbled, 
fell, swore in good American style and the secret was disclosed — it was a 
unit of the 347th Machine Gun Battalion, wearing raincoats, and going 
into position for the night. 

The Regimental P. C. moved up twice that night and finally was located 
in the open on the steep southern slope of Hill 258, at about 7769. The 

67 



wounded were grouped together nearby in the open, but received such care, 
in the cold and drizzling rain, as was possible in the absence of ambulance 
facilities. The Operations and Intelligence Officers were sent out to the 
unknown location of the 1st Battalion with a verbal message of a barrage 
and early hour of attack. The wrong route was taken. Lieutenant Hubbel, 
the Intelligence Officer, finally returned and by starting again the message 
was delivered in time to be effective. 

The 2nd Battalion after joining the Divisional Reserve on the evening 
of September 25th, spent the remainder of that night in trenches of the 
old French second line of defense. These trenches were on the north 
side of Hill 296, known on the 1 :20,000 scale maps as the northern "COTE 
290," about one kilometer northeast of Division Headquarters which were 
located at the southern "COTE 290." The Reserve command post was in 
a comfortable set of rooms in a frame building located on the steep southern 
slope and formerly used by the French for a similar purpose. Here, in 
the midst of the allied artillery, this battalion had the best opportunity of 
any in the regiment to see and feel the intensity of the artillery preparation. 
These troops remained in position at dawn, and at six o'clock received a 
highly valued ration of hot coffee. At about nine o'clock the Reserve moved 
rapidly forward under orders to prepare to fill a gap between the brigades. 
The battalion, on reaching the No-Man's Land of yesterday, hurried across 
it and on through the BOIS DE CHEPPY. Company "H," (less two platoons, 
that had been detailed to a Machine Gun Battalion), followed substantially 
the AVOCOURT-VeRY road while the others cut through to LA NEUVE 
GRANGE FERME. The reported gap between the brigades already had 
been closed without the assistance of the Reserve and late in the afternoon 
the battalion was reassembled, and marched northward along the AVO- 
COURT-VeRY road to VERY. On entering VeRY, shell fire reached the 
battalion but the only injury received was a slight wound to one man. The 
battalion halted for the night on a hillside road northeast of VeRY. Here 
the men slept in the cold, drizzling rain with the hillside for protection 
against artillery but with practically no protection against the weather. 
One man spent a comfortable night snuggled warmly to a horse that had 
been killed that day. 

27 September— Environs of EPINONVILLE (MEUSE) and ECLIS- 
FONTAINE (MEUSE), North, attacking, 1 kilometer. 

At dawn, the 1st Battalion, Company "C" on the right, Company "A" 
on the left in the front line, Company "D" on the right, Company "B" on 
the left in support, passed through the outpost line of the 3rd Battalion 
and followed a barrage into the orchards and huts of EPINONVILLE. Com- 
pany "D" was still supplying the combat liaison detachments on each flank. 
The battalion met heavy machine gun fire from the flanks and from well- 
hidden sniper posts and machine guns in the orchards and hedges. Com- 
pany "B" had already been sent to outflank the machine guns that were 
firing on the battalion from the left flank when orders came to fall back 
while artillery shelled the enemy position. This order failed to reach one 
platoon of Company "B" promptly and the platoon was saved from isolation 
and consequent probable destruction under hostile machine gun fire only by 
a careful withdrawal while under the protection of Sergeant (then Corporal) 

68 



O'Keefe's Chauchat automatic rifle. For his courage and effective fire on 
this occasion the Corporal later received the Distinguished Service Cross. 

The artillery next took its turn and the attack then was repeated with 
artillery support. Apparently the barrage fell short for salvos of support- 
ing shells began hitting in the midst of the American troops that were already 
close to the objective. The enemy immediately opened up with heavy 
machine gun fire and as soon as the orders could be issued to accomplish it, 
the artillery fire and attack were stopped, and the troops drawn back. 

At about 9:00 A. M. the Second Battalion, then in Division Reserve 
located immediately northeast of VeRY, had received orders to report to 
its Brigade Commander. This was done by moving up the plank road 
along DEATH VALLEY, and General McDonald at once put the battalion 
in a gap that was occurring between the brigades. Thus the 2nd Battalion 
found itself in the front line on the left of the 1st Battalion of this regiment. 

A third attack was now ordered. The plan was for the 2nd Battalion to 
envelop EPINONVILLE from the left. Early in the afternoon it accord- 
ingly advanced with Companies "F" and "E" respectively, the right and 
left front line companies, Company "G" supporting "F," and "H" sup- 
porting "E." Apparently there arose a misunderstanding as to which town 
was EPINONVILLE, and the battalion pushed steadily on to the northwest 
until it reached the German position at ECLISFONTAINE about a kilometer 
to the front and two or three hundred meters to the left of the Regimental 
Sector. This action served to relieve the pressure from the left, but failed 
to accomplish the purpose of securing EPINONVILLE. 

The 1st Battalion pushed through the orchards and again occupied the 
huts of the town and this time substantially cleared out the enemy. The 
3rd Battalion remained in support, Company "K" on the right, Company 
"I" on the left in the front line, Company "M" on the right, Company 
"L" on the left in the second line. Company "I" went to the active 
support of Company "B" of the 347th Machine Gun Battalion on the left 
of the line. Owing to the earlier experience there was considerable un- 
easiness as to the source of shells that hit among the troops, but this time 
the attack pushed ahead successfully. 

The One-Pounders and machine guns had done excellent and continuous 
service all day, and the machine gunners, in one instance, succeeded in 
blowing up by direct fire an enemy ammunition dump hidden in a build- 
ing. 

On this day, Company "A" lost another officer, Lieutenant Blomquist, 
wounded in the knee by shrapnel. Company "C" lost Captain Goodpaster, 
wounded in the leg, and Company "I" lost Captain Scudder, wounded in the 
arm. Dr. Burnside was evacuated to a hospital with a high fever, and 
Dr. Reiss received a slight wound which, however, did not put him out of 
rxtion. At dusk the troops were ordered to consolidate their position. The 
1st and 2nd Battalions were sent back to the general position of the 
night before and the 3rd Battalion took over the front line on the crest 
of EPINONVILLE HILL, about one kilometer ahead of the line of re- 
sistance on September 26th. The day had been continuously cold and a 
drizzling rain had been falling much of the time. The diet was entirely 

69 



"bully beef" and hard tack. The chlorinated water had run out and pend- 
ing the arrival of the water carts, men were permitted to fill their canteens 
from the nearby running stream. German overcoats, gloves and blankets 
were being gradually added to individual equipment. Nearly all remaining 
carrier pigeons were here released with messages to Division Headquarters. 
The men had received many new experiences that day — many "close-ups" 
with enemy machine guns and with well hidden snipers, much fighting 
around hedges and stone huts, many high explosive and shrapnel shells 
landing in their midst, often in salvos of three and four at a time, and enemy 
airplanes swooping to 200 feet above our lines and sprinkling the men 
with machine gun bullets while at the same time evidently sending target 
locations to the enemy artillery. One enemy airplane had been seen to 
destroy in rapid succession three American observation balloons, which 
burst into flames while the observer sought safety with his parachute. 
Many men had seen in the distance on their own right flank a large body 
of American troops advance as in a panorama and then under enemy artillery 
fire, turn and move to the rear. Within the regiment the problem was 
growing more familiar. It was always simply a question of what the orders 
were and then the doing of them, and the orders were all very similar attack 
orders with slight shifting of the several units. All were becoming more 
used to the snap and crack of passing rifle or machine gun bullets, and were 
becoming better able to judge the danger zone of bursting shells. 

That day Brigadier General McDonald was frequently up with the regi- 
ment and the regiment with admiration watched the conduct under fire of 
their veteran General and Colonel. Colonel Davis, always as close as 
possible to the line, wore his regulation overcoat conspicuously marked 
on each sleeve with the five large loops of black soutache. Always stand- 
ing erect regardless of the heaviest machine gun, rifle or shell fire, always 
cool and acting just as he had in the quietest maneuvers, he was an inspira- 
tion to the men of his command, practically none of whom had ever before 
been under fire. His quiet, cheerful demeanor and undoubting confidence 
bred in his men a similar demeanor and a similar confidence not only in 
him but in themselves. 

The EPINONVILLE Ridge swung from EPINONVILLE southwest to 
VERY and behind its steep slope ran the "plank road" — a land mark and a 
great convenience by day and night. This road of heavy planks evidently 
had been constructed by the German Army for use instead of the dirt road 
that skirted the sky line. It ran close to the foot of the steep southern 
slope of the ridge and now in turn afforded protection from German fire 
and observation. As the road entered the Regimental Sector from the 
west, it turned north toward EPINONVILLE and there stopped. At this 
turn was DEATH VALLEY. Here first was located the Regimental Com- 
mand Post; then when this post moved further up the hill, here in the 
open and less than 500 meters from the firing line, was the Brigade P. C. ; 
here also was the open air dressing station and the collecting post for 
the wounded — and here later came the enemy shells. 

That night, as the 2nd Battalion withdrew from its position on the 
VARENNES - EN - ARGONNE, — CHARPENTRY, — DUN-SUR-MEUSE, 
highway (about one kilometer ahead of the main line of resistance), Com- 

70 



pany "F" came upon Captain Brown of the Medical Detachment, alone and 
attempting to care for the wounded who would now be left between the 
hostile lines. Lieutenants Gilbert, Moeur and Betterton, a detachment from 
Company "H," and Lieutenant W. M. MacKay with a platoon from Company 
"F," were left to assist Captain Brown. Company "H" supplied a chain 
of guides, and by passing from guide to guide, these details finally brought 
in every wounded man. Captain Brown later received the D. S. C. for his 
services on this night. 

The 362nd Infantry on the right had similarly fought back and forth 
and now held the town of IVOIRY, just to the right of the Divisional 
Sector. 

While the main body of the regiment was again withdrawn to the 
trenches south of DEATH VALLEY, the EPINONVILLE crest was thor- 
oughly outposted, particularly with detachments from Company "K" on 
the right and Company "H" on the left. Regimental Headquarters re- 
mained on EPINONVILLE HILL and late that night occurred an incident 
which Colonel Davis was later fond of relating. A series of fox holes had 
been dug near the telephone for the Colonel and his Staff, and the Colonel 
was sleeping in one close to the operator. Suddenly a shell struck close 
by, and just as suddenly a load landed on the Colonel with a thud, com- 
pletely covering him. He thought he had been covered with the flying 
earth, and started to push himself out when the load itself began to move 
and the telephone operator struggled off him with the remark, "It's sure 
a good thing to have a stand in with some one." 

Repeated efforts both on the first and second days had failed to bring 
ambulances up over the single, narrow, rough and crowded road that served 
as the division's axis of liaison. As a consequence the "litter cases" had 
been collected at an advance dressing station near the plank road and 
incidentally also near to Brigade Headquarters and as close as possible to 
the base of the protecting steep southern slope of EPINONVILLE HILL. 
The constantly increasing group soon had attracted the attention of the 
enemy planes and the German artillery searched the valley repeatedly. 
Captain Goodpaster, who had been brought in in a blanket, lay here in a 
fox hole and his two attendants dug other holes for themselves one on 
each side of him. As the Captain lay in his shelter below the surface of 
the ground, and his attendants, one on each side of him, sat talking on the 
edge of their holes with only their feet below the surface, an unannounced 
shell burst almost directly over the group, killing both attendants but en- 
tirely missing the Captain. Again and again shells passed over and be- 
yond the station — but late that night one fell in — it killed a dental corps 
assistant who was serving water to a sergeant and it also killed the sergeant 
and six other wounded men, while it doubly wounded more. So the night 
wore on with intermittent shell-fire, until early the next morning before 
the Brigade Headquarters had moved, another fatal shell fell in — squarely 
on the brigade message center. It killed three members of the telephone 
service and severely wounded an officer and the Brigade Sergeant-Major. 
Only by the same rare chance that plays about each shell-burst it missed 
several other officers who were in the very midst of it. On that same fatal 
morning another shell brought death to several of the wounded who had 

71 



survived the night wrapped in captured German blankets and overcoats. 
This was DEATH VALLEY. 

In the meantime the supply trains were struggling into action through 
the crowds of moving or firing artillery. About noon of September 26th, 
Captain Savage received orders to dispatch the field trains. The regi- 
ment's combat train under Lieutenant Quinby finally jockeyed into the 
lead in the division race, and having explored the impassability of any 
direct route north, started via AVOCOURT. Just north of AVOCOURT 
the combat train was split by the Military Police to loosen a traffic jam — 
and the leading section followed Captain Sellers of the 108th Ammunition 
Train to a night rendezvous near BOIS CHeHeMIN, and the next morn- 
ing to an advance ammunition dump at a point just north of VeRY. In the 
meantime the second section, under Lieutenant Quinby, worked forward 
independently and meeting no information as to the night rendezvous — 
pushed on and galloped into VeRY through artillery fire and over a barricade 
of German corpses that blocked the road. Hearing that the regiment held 
EPINONVILLE, Lieutenant Quinby later pushed by the 2nd Battalion on the 
VeRY hill only to encounter enemy observation and fire which suggested the 
need of reconnaissance. Reconnaissance (by Sergeant Smith) developed the 
information that the enemy still held EPINONVILLE and that further prog- 
ress would soon present the enemy with a combat train. Connection was now 
made with the 3rd Battalion south of EPINONVILLE and the ammunition 
was dumped nearby under directions from Major Miller. The train returned 
safely and again at a gallop. 

Lieutenant Brace's field train had a different type of experience. 
Ordered south to get supplies at AUBReVILLE, it spent the night of Sep- 
tember 25/26 tumbling off or climbing onto the road as it passed under 
or near the muzzles of the allied artillery. This artillery was crowded along 
the roadside and firing over it. As the battery salvos burst unannounced out 
of the pitch darkness, first the passing drivers then the mules and vehicles 
would be lifted and pitched by the blasts bodily into the ditch only to 
scramble back as rapidly as possible and move on to the next battery. 
About one o'clock in the morning the lighter artillery began to limber up 
and push northward along the same (and only) road. A sample of this 
phase is repeated in Lieutenant Brace's language: "It was hard enough 
to keep the road in the dark without getting pushed off it every few feet. 
We were nearly out of the BOIS DE HESSE and had had a chance to 
get settled a little, sufficiently at least so we could hear each other speak 
if we hollered as loud as possible, when a French command was heard 
and 'Boom' we were again eating fire. Seven rounds were fired and our 
disorganization was complete. Many of the horses were down and the 
drivers had been down several times. A Frenchman came running over 
to us and found a large number of us under a truck; we would all have 
been under it only it wasn't large enough. The Frenchman informed us 
that we must hurry, for they were going to fire. We left at once, for the 
simple reason that if v/hat we had just met was not firing, we did not care 
to stay for a demonstration. We arrived at AUBReVILLE about 4:00 A. M. 
and were entertained for some time with the German hate, but suffered 
no losses. The division trains were parked near a large hill. We had a 

72 



fine view from there and apparently so did Heinie have a corresponding 
view of us." 

The Supply trains remained at AUBReVILLE until 4:30 P. M. (Sep- 
tember 26th), then started their night movement, this time to the front. 
"Ten miles of solid traffic, roads shot up, horses all in and the night was 
wonderfully dark." The trains were halted until daylight about four kilo- 
meters north of AVOCOURT, then they moved up to the cross-roads about 
one kilometer southeast of VeRY, and the remainder of the day was spent 
touring here and there under direction of the Military Police. 

28 September— EPINONVILLE (MEUSE) to BOIS COMMUNAL DE 
CIERGES (MEUSE), North, attacking, 2 kilometers. 

At 6:12 A. M., General McDonald penciled and delivered to Colonel 
Davis the following order: 

"181 Brig 
F - O- 8 28 Spt 18—612 AM 

The Brigade will attack in column of Regts at 7 oclock in the following 
order: 

361st Inf 
362d Inf 

The regiments will be formed with two battalions in line, the 3d battalion 
in support. 

The 362d Inf will form the brigade reserve and will detail one Co of Inf 
to act as combat liaison between this brigade and the 74th Brigade. One 
M.G. Co. 347 M G Bn will be attached to this combat liaison co. 

2 Cos. 347 MG Bn will be attached to 361st Inf— The remaining Co 
with the Co. attached to the support Bn. 361st Inf— under command of 
the M.G. Bn commander will support the advance. 

One piece, 122d F. A. will accompany each of the leading battalions of 
the 361st Inf, — and the remainder under the arty commander will take up 
successive positions in continuous and close support of the infantry ad- 
vance. The arty commander will maintain close liaison with the leading 
Reg't. & with Brig. Hq. and answer calls for fire direct from the infantry 
Commander. The Artillery Commander's P. C. will be at P. C. 181 Brigade. 

Co B 316th Engineers & 1 Platoon Co B 346 M G Bn will form the 
Brigade reserve. 

The P. C. 181 Brigade remains at point 7080 — 

J B McDonald, 
Brig Gen — Commanding." 

The two days' supply of reserve rations was practically exhausted, and just 
in time for delivery before the attack, a new supply was made available near 
the end of the plank road in DEATH VALLEY. Ration details hurriedly 
gathered and distributed these as the troops moved out. 

For the third consecutive day the regiment moved to the attack. The 
3d Battalion which had been in support the day before, now moved to the 

73 



front, and the 2d Battalion moved to attack toward ECLISFONTAINE over 
the ground it had taken the day before. The 1st Battalion followed the 
Third in support. Units of the 347th Machine Gun Battalion joined the 
assaulting battalions, while the Regimental Machine Gun Company accom- 
panied the 1st Battalion. The regiment took over the entire Brigade Sector 
and the 362nd Infantry was formed close in rear as Brigade Reserve. 

A barrage preceded the advance and when the infantry arrived, the 
Germans had substantially withdrawn from EPINONVILLE and ECLIS- 
FONTAINE, so that the remaining resistance was rapidly overcome with 
brief fights around scattered machine guns and snipers. Early in the 
afternoon, however, the 3rd Battalion worked well over to the left of the 
sector, at LES EPINETTES BOIS, consequently the 1st Battalion was 
again put into the front line, moving to the front on the right of the 
Third, and the Second Battalion was drawn into support. 

The Third Battalion was advancing with Company "M" on the right, 
Company "I" on the left in the front line, Company "K" on the right, Com- 
pany "L" on the left in support. The Second Battalion used its formation 
of the previous day, Company "F" on the right, Company "E" on the left 
in the front line, Company "G" on the right, Company "H" on the left in 
support. The First Battalion was working in a new formation, Company "B" 
on the right, Company "D" on the left in the front line, Company "A" 
on the right, Company "C" on the left in support. 

Regimental Headquarters followed closely, the first location being in an 
orchard immediately north of EPINONVILLE, and finally in a shack close 
to the shelter later officially known as the "Long Dugout" of the brigade 
(east of ECLISFONTAINE, at about 6691). Throughout the afternoon 
the attack had been meeting machine gun fire and artillery fire, and as it 
became possible to locate the enemy positions, Colonel Davis struggled to 
bring the accompanying artillery close up and into action. Finally, however, 
when two guns arrived close to ECLISFONTAINE, they went into position 
so obviously in the open that they drew fire both on themselves and the 
neighboring troops before their own fire could be of much effect. 

As the infantry reached LES EPINETTES BOIS and the BOIS DE 
CIERGES, the day's battle really began. The First Battalion, taking over 
the right flank, passed across rapidly to the BOIS DE CIERGES — meeting 
heavy machine gun fire from the right and left. Companies "C," "D," 
and "B," pushed on through the thick woods while Company "A" became 
temporarily separated, but later rejoined the battalion and brought with it 
an additional supply of ammunition. The woods had long been used as a 
comfortable German rest camp and had been prepared for defense. The 
paths were thickly camouflaged, and well covered by German sniper fire, 
wire was stretched between trees, and as the northern edge was reached, 
the woods, which were full of huts, dugouts and even clubhouses came 
under fire of German machine gun nests. It was nearing dusk and the 
companies took up positions preparatory to holding the northern edge of 
the woods. Company "C" was on the right, then came Company "D," and 
Company "B" was on the left. 

In the meantime the Third Battalion had reached the northern edge of 
LES EPINETTES. From there, its line of advance lay across bullet swept 

74 



fields. The objective was far ahead and the standing orders were to drive 
the Germans back at every opportunity. From positions in the hills in front 
the Germans were sweeping the woods themselves with short range machine 
gun fire while their artillery readily poured in shells from the heights be- 
yond. Casualties were occurring rapidly among officers as well as men. 

Captain Potter of Company "L" had just been hit by a machine gun 
bullet and Captain Naftzger of Company "M," slender as he was, had been 
hit by a machine gun bullet even while he lay prone on the ground. 

Lieutenant J. D. McKay, with his platoon of Company "K," here out- 
flanked a pair of machine gun nests which were located in the immediate 
front of the battalion and by its rifle fire this platoon killed every member 
of the hostile gun crews. 

Major Miller now formed his battalion to renew the attack — Company 
"M" on the right, Company "I" on the left in front, Company "L" support- 
ing the left flank and Company "K" (which had just returned from clear- 
ing the west edge of the BOIS COMMUNAL DE CIERGES) supporting the 
right flank. Lieutenant Sessions and a sergeant from Company "B" also 
wandered up just in time to attach themselves to Company "K." The 
Pioneer Platoon of Headquarters Company was still with the 3rd Battalion 
and the 3rd Platoon of the Regimental Machine Gun Company, under Lieu- 
tenant Ramsdell, as well as units of the 347th Machine Gun Battalion, were 
acting in cooperation. 

Major Miller had collapsed once that day from sheer exhaustion, but 
feeling the demand for action, he now placed his battalion command group 
(including in it the courageous and energetic French Interpreter, Adjutant 
Emile Hauger, armed with a rifle) between the front line companies. The 
Major thus led his battalion in person. As the troops came out of the woods 
they met a concentration of the machine gun and artillery fire that had been 
playing back and forth. There yet remained nearly a kilometer (over 1000 
yards) to go in order to clear the field, but Major Miller, in the front line 1 
never paused. He waved his men ahead, someone called "Powder River," and 
the war cry was echoed up and down the line. Firing from the hip as they 
went, they swept over the first ridge close to the BOIS DE CIERGES. 
The First Battalion heard and saw them come, and in spite of the previous 
plan and order for that battalion merely to hold the woods, over the top 
went Companies "B," "D" and "C," extending the attack of the right flank 
of the 3rd Battalion. The line swept down into a deep gulch, then up a 
steep hill — 300 or 400 yards long. Major Miller, wounded both in the leg 
and arm, was still in the front line but forced to hobble as he led the attack. 
"POWDER RIVER! POWDER RIVER!"— nothing could stop the charge 
now. The German machine guns let loose once more, the battalion crossed 
a shallow dip, swept up to the crest of "Miller Hill"; and there Major 
Miller, hit in the stomach with a fatal bullet, fell to the ground, but only to 
wave his battalion on with "Never mind me, take the ridge." The Germans 
ran in all directions — they left their guns and trenches, for the 3rd Battalion 
was seeing red and it chased out every German in sight, even the hostile 
fire from a distance was slackened, and the hill was taken. The BOIS DE 
CIERGES was secure, the wide semi-circle of "100 HOUR HILL" stretch- 
ing across the entire Brigade Sector had been won, never to be lost. The 

75 



Germans had been shown that if once this regiment started its attack, 
Germany had nothing which could stop it. Night was falling — the battalion 
line lay nearly two kilometers ahead of Regimental Headquarters. The 
Major was fatally wounded. Captain Campbell Burke, the junior but 
only remaining Captain of the battalion was with Company "K" clearing 
out snipers from the right flank, and had no news of the Major's serious 
condition. Lieutenant Fortune, Battalion Adjutant, accordingly assumed tem- 
porary command on the front line. All through the attack the Signal Platoon 
section, led by Sergeant Ethier had unreeled its telephone wire and on the 
ridge close by the line, the Battalion Headquarters was in perfect con- 
nection with Regimental Headquarters. While the wounded were being 
gathered in and the rain came on with the darkness, Lieutenant Fortune tele- 
phoned the situation to Colonel Davis. The Lieutenant recommended hold- 
ing the position, far ahead as it was. The Colonel at first favored with- 
drawal, then feeling the cost of the advance, the importance of the situation 
and his own lack of familiarily with the terrain, he authorized Lieutenant 
Fortune to select his own defensive position and if satisfied that it could 
be held to organize the line where he was. The outermost ridge was 
abandoned, but the defensive line was established well north of BOIS DE 
C1ERGES. The First Battalion dug in along the northern edge of the 
woods. Major Miller was carried out as rapidly as possible through mud 
and rain and by nine o'clock that night had been placed in an ambulance 
of the first group to reach the line. His wounds were too severe to give him 
a chance, and a short time later the regiment had lost in him its senior 
Battalion Commander and its own second in command. 

Major Farwell put into position the companies of the 1st Battalion, then 
reported in person to Colonel Davis to state the situation. Major Ward, of 
the 2nd Battalion, was also called to headquarters and instructed to take 
his battalion to reinforce the 3rd Battalion. It was then about six o'clock 
in the evening, and in the slippery mud and drizzling rain, the Second 
Battalion turned out for further duty. Lieutenant Betterton, as Battalion 
Intelligence Officer, selected the route. Slowly, through the mud, in single 
file, in pitch darkness, each man holding to the man in front of him, the 
battalion started its movement of nearly two kilometers to the Third Bat- 
talion by way of EXMORIEUX FERME. Halting to avoid detection while 
German flares lighted the landscape, or halting to insure connections along 
the line or to cut a way through wire, it took several hours to make the 
trip and it v/as long after midnight before the "fresh" battalion was settling 
itself in cold water and mud holes in close support of the Third Battalion. 
All the while, German machine gun bullets were still sweeping across the 
hill top whenever the German schedule called for a little long distance 
harassing. 

In the meantime, Colonel Davis and the Operations Officer went with 
Major Farwell to examine into the situation in the BOIS DE CIERGES, and 
to return again at about 2 A. M. in time to receive Lieutenant Fortune as 
he came in to report upon the Third Battalion. The day's work was done, 
the units were knit together, a little more than two kilometers of new 
territory and a good position across the entire brigade front had been won. 

The ambulance service had now come up. By noon DEATH VALLEY 
had been cleared of its cases, and before dawn of September 29th, the 75 

76 



to 100 cases that had already come back from "Miller Hill" to the new 
dressing station near EPINONVILLE had all been cared for and sent to 
the rear. 

Many an act of individual courage, bravery, self-sacrifice and efficiency, 
went unnoticed or unrewarded by official mention in this dash of September 
28th, and many another passed likewise in the days that followed, for what 
in ordinary times was far beyond the call of duty became so common among 
these men as to be recognized as but the part of a worthy member of the 
regiment. However, whenever the modest reports of these acts officially 
reached the Regimental Commander, a recommendation for an award re- 
ceived his instant and hearty support. Thus to Major Miller's family has 
come the award that brings to the regiment the most highly prized of 
America's military decorations, the Congressional Medal of Honor. It 
was conferred: 

"For conspicuous gallantry and intrepedity, above and beyond the call 
of duty, in action with the enemy, near Gesnes, France, 28th September, 
1918. 

"After two days of intense physical and mental strain, during which 
Major Miller had led his battalion in the front line of the advance, through 
the Forest of Argonne, the enemy was met in a prepared position south 
of Gesnes. Though almost exhausted, he energetically re-organized his bat- 
talion and ordered an attack. Upon reaching open ground, the advancing 
line began to waver in the face of machine gun fire from the front and 
flanks and direct artillery fire. Personally leading his command group 
forward between his front line companies, Major Miller inspired his men 
by his personal courage and they again pressed on toward the hostile posi- 
tion. As this officer led the renewed attack he was shot in the right leg, 
but he nevertheless staggered forward at the head of his command. Soon 
afterwards he was again shot in the right arm, but he continued the charge, 
personally cheering his troops on through the heavy machine gun fire. Just 
before the objective was reached he received a wound in the abdomen 
which forced him to the ground, but he continued to urge his men on, telling 
them to push on to the next ridge and leave him where he lay. 

"He died from his wounds a few days later." (W. D. G. O. 16, Sec. Ill, 
Jan. 22, 1919.) 

Heroism personified, a devoted and able commander of troops he thus 
died for his country and in the service of humanity. 

So also in this action were earned several of the Distinguished Service 
Crosses of the regiment. Among these, may be particularly mentioned those 
of Sergeant Ethier, for his service with the telephone, and of Privates 
Wight and Wallace Smith, both of Company "I" for their work that night in 
bringing in and caring for the wounded on the field in spite of their own 
danger and great exhaustion. 

Sergeant John Rees, of Company "M," who was later killed in the second 
phase of the MEUSE-ARGONNE drive, was awarded the Distinguished 
Service Cross in recognition of his fearless and able leadership of his 
platoon while making this advance and capturing one of the opposing 
machine gun nests. 

77 



29 September (Sunday). BOIS COMMUNAL DE CIERGES 
(MEUSE) through GESNES, North, attacking, 2 kilometers, and back to 
"100 HOUR HILL," South, withdrawing at night, \]/ 2 kilometers (net gain 
Yl kilometer). 

Shortly before midnight September 28/29, the following message started 
from the Fifth Army Corps Headquarters: 

"Message 
From Lakewood 3 at Lakewood 28 Sept 23 oclock. 

To Maroon 1. 
Field Order 46. 

1. The attack will commence tomorrow, September 29, not later than 
7 o'clock. 

2. Divisions will advance independently of each other, pushing the 
attack with the utmost vigor and regardless of cost. 

By Command of Major General Cameron: 

W. B. Burt, 
Copies to: Chief of Staff. 

(Distribution down to 
Regts and Separate Bns.)" 

Apparently based upon this and a brief attack order from the division, 
the following brigade order was issued by General McDonald: 

"MATCH 

29 Sept i8, 
3:15 o'clock. 
F. O. 10. 

1. The attack will be resumed at 7 o'clock today. Artillery fire of 
preparation will take place between 6:15 and 7:15 o'clock. Fire of the 6 
inch Howitzer regiment will be directed on GESNES. Fire of the two 
regiments of 75mm will sweep through the woods W and N. W. of GESNES 
to a depth of 1 kilometer. 

2. This brigade will attack in column of Regiments. 362nd Infantry 
in front with 2 battalions in the front line and one in support. A combat 
liaison detachment of one company 361 Inf. and 1 company 347th MG Bn 
attached will connect our right flank with the left flank 74th Brigade. 

3. (a) The C. O. 362nd Inf. will detail 1 platoon as a combat liaison 
detachment to connect our left flank with the right flank 182nd Brigade. 

(b) The C. O. 347th MG Bn will detail one Co. to the front line Bns 
of the 362nd Inf. The remaining Cos of the 347th MG Bn will be under 
the direct command of the C. O. 347th MG. Bn, advancing in close support 
of the Infantry attack. 

(c) The 361 Inf will form the Brigade Reserve. They will be formed 
with 2 Bns in the line and one in support and follow the leading regiment 
at approximately 600 meters. 

78 



(d) Two 75mm guns will be attached to the leading (362) regiment, and 
will be at the disposal of the regimental commander. After the fire of 
preparation has ceased, the C. O. 122nd F. A. will take post at P. C. this 
brigade and will dispose his batteries in successive positions for close and 
continuous support of the infantry advance. The C. O. of the leading regi- 
ment of infantry will call direct on the Artillery Commander for support. 

4. P. C. of this brigade at 6691 (large shelter in orchard) until H hour. 
Thereafter with the reserve at such places as may be announced. 

J. B. McDonald, WHC. 

Brig. Gen., Comdg." 

The Second Battalion considerably scattered but within reach of its Bat- 
talion Commander was already in position. The Operations Officer was sent 
to locate the exact positions of the 1st Battalion, and Company "K" in the 
tangles of the BOIS DE CIERGES. These were found under control and in 
huts or fox holes in the northern and western edges of the woods. Major 
Farwell, too weak and ill to stand, was attending to his duties, propped up in 
a chair in a small hut. Captain Burke, of Company "K," as commander of 
the Third Battalion was getting in touch with Companies "I," "L" and 
"M." These three companies were soon drawn back from the line and 
assembled in the woods in readiness to support the new advance. 

The 362nd Infantry was gradually moving up, and between 5:30 and 
7 :00, the attack orders were reaching their front line companies and also 
the 2nd Battalion of 361st Infantry, which still was the "fresh" battalion of 
this regiment. In the midst of the tangled woods and muddy trails that 
had never before been seen in daylight, it was practically impossible 
promptly to organize the regiment for an early decisive movement as con- 
templated by the Corps Commander. 

However, the 362nd Infantry, coming up from the rear to take over 
the front line, started ahead at zero hour west of the BOIS DE CIERGES. 
It at once met such a storm of machine gun and artillery fire that it 
abandoned the attack for the time being. At about 10 o'clock the attack 
was renewed but with a similar result. 

Artillery fire was then carefully concentrated on the known German 
centers of resistance and machine gun fire was poured into LA GRANGE 
AUX BOIS FERME which was located on a neighboring knoll in the 37th 
Division Sector on the right and from which an enfilade fire had been 
directed on the advancing troops. 

Following this preparation, the brigade was again ordered to attack, this 
time in the middle of the afternoon, and to proceed "at all costs." As neither 
of the morning attempts had carried the front line far enough forward to call 
for a movement of this regiment in support, the delays had given time 
for a reserve ration breakfast, for an establishment of complete liaison, and 
for the men to snatch bits of needed rest in welcome warm sunlight. 

Regimental Headquarters was established on a knoll in the BOIS DE 
CIERGES near its northwest corner, telephone communication was opened 
with Brigade Headquarters, and with the Second Battalion. The message 

79 



for the Division to attack independently and regardless of cost was com- 
municated to each battalion. It was evident that the higher command felt 
the need of a supreme effort and the knowledge of this was enough. 

Snipers' bullets were still abroad, and Company "L" was detailed to make 
a final clearing of the woods. Under brigade orders Company "K" was 
detailed as a straggler guard to make sure that no man drifted to the 
rear, and that previous stragglers were guided to the front line. In pur- 
suance of this order, Lieutenant Tongate took one platoon of Company 
"K" to follow the 362nd Infantry in the attack and Lieutenant Bailey took 
the remainder of the company to establish a line at the rear of the brigade. 

As the afternoon zero hour approached, Colonel Davis was directed to 
insure the protection of the right flank of the division in addition to supply- 
ing a company as the right flank combat liaison detachment. Company 
"H" received the combat liaison assignment, the remainder of the Second 
Battalion was directed to support the 362nd Infantry in its drive north, 
while the First Battalion, supported by the Third (less Company "K"), 
was directed to insure the flank protection. As the attack developed with- 
out support on the right of the division, the regiment accordingly, for the 
fourth consecutive day, attacked the enemy as a part of the front line. 

At zero hour the 362nd Infantry moved out. The enemy, as though 
accurately aware of the movement met the advance with the heaviest 
artillery and machine gun barrage yet delivered. But as the brigade had 
its orders for the supreme effort, the 362nd Infantry moved straight through 
the hail of steel "regardless of cost," and with that regiment went Com- 
panies "E," "F" and "G," and a platoon of Company "K" of the 361st 
Infantry. Colonel Davis went to the First Battalion on the right flank. 
Just as the enemy's artillery barrage surrounded the Regimental Headquarters 
there came back the telephone message from the 362nd Infantry that its 
right flank was being cut to pieces and needed the 361st Infantry support 
battalion on that flank. The telephone lines stayed open just long enough 
to get this message through and the Second Battalion was ordered to make 
the change. 

GESNES lay two kilometers ahead in a valley beyond two hills. The 
advance never stopped until it reached there. With steel, smoke and dirt 
flying on every side the brigade moved through it. The Second Battalion, 
advancing in line of combat groups, never lost its formation, and while 
officers and men were killed or wounded on every side, each man who 
was unhit moved ahead, marvelling that the shells could miss so many. 
The 362nd pushed on to GESNES, and swung its main force to the west 
of the town as the Brigade Sector curved off in that direction. The Second 
Battalion (less Company "H") pushed ahead and now held to the right 
half of the sector. Company "G" was on the right, Company "F" on the 
left in the front line, and Company "E" in support. 

Captain Williams, commanding Company "F," and Lieutenant Armstrong, 
commanding Company "E," were put out of action during the heavy shell 
fire and Lieutenant Fairchild, second in command of Company "G" was 
so disabled by a wound that although he made a gallant effort to do so, 
he was unable to hobble fast enough to keep up with the line. Company "F" 

80 



and a part of Company "E" kept on with the 362nd to the heights west of 
GESNES. Two platoons of Company "G" and small detachments from 
"F" and "E," all under Lieutenant Lane, went straight through GESNES 
to the patch of woods on the hill to its north, while Captain Minick with 
the remainder of Company "G," a few combat groups of Company "F" 
under Lieutenant Hunt, and most of Company "E" under Lieutenant Hoff- 
man, moved ahead in such regular formation to the heights east of GESNES 
that Colonel A. D. Cummings (then a Lieutenant-Colonel, serving with 
Brigade Headquarters and advancing as Liaison Agent) remarked at the 
perfection of the discipline. There also joined Captain Minick a detach- 
ment of the Pioneer Platoon of the 362d Infantry Headquarters Company. 

On the hill north of GESNES, Lieutenant Lane met Major Finley of 
the 362d Infantry with a small group from Battalion Headquarters. The 
Major, however, soon moved from here, leaving Lieutenant Lane holding 
the position. Here also Lieutenant Johnston, with a squad from Company 
"E" later joined the "Farthest North" detachment. 

As late afternoon and dusk approached, the Germans fled. Suddenly 
there was almost complete silence — the Germans had abandoned their 
machine guns and artillery alike. American patrols went on and were 
seen bringing back prisoners from the direction of Hill 255 which ten 
days later the 3rd Battalion of this regiment (then as part of the 1st Division) 
was to attack at great cost. Although intermittent bursts of machine gun fire 
still reached Lieutenant Lane's position from the general direction of the 
crest of Hill 255, the heights commanding GESNES had been won, and the 
brigade, on its fourth day, had reached the "American Army Objective." The 
enemy's resistance had been broken down, and they very evidently had fled to 
their "third prepared position." This had been accomplished "regardless of 
cost," and had it been possible for the units on the right and left to have 
done the same, much of the great later cost — paid in the Second Phase of 
the Argonne Offensive — would have been saved in this sector. 

Senior officers had been lost on every hand, but Lieutenant Colonel 
Cummings was still unhurt, and in the manner related in the citation that 
later accompanied the award to him of the Distinguished Service Cross, he 
met the needs of the situation. It was also in recognition of his service on 
this and the preceding days of the advance that he soon received his pro- 
motion to the grade of Colonel. The citation just referred to is as follows: 

"For extraordinary heroism in action near Gesnes, France, September 
29, 1918. During the attack on Gesnes, he, then a lieutenant colonel, in 
addition to performing his regular duties as brigade adjutant, 181st Brigade, 
went forward with the front line of attack directing the organization and 
outposting the front line after Gesnes and the army objective beyond it 
had been captured. All the senior officers of the assaulting regiment hav- 
ing been killed or wounded in the attack on Gesnes, he unhesitatingly 
organized the scattered elements of the regiment, and pushed the attack 
home to final success." (W. D. G. O. 139, Sec. I, Dec. 24, 1918.) 

His work on the line accomplished, he then returned to Brigade Head- 
quarters with the report that so far as this brigade was concerned it could 
hold the American Army Objective. 

81 



In the meantime, however, the right flank had demanded attention. 
Company "H" strove to extend its liaison across the ever widening field 
between the stationary units on the right and the attacking units on the 
left. Finally Major Farwell wheeled his battalion out of the woods under 
another hostile hail of steel and lead, and moved over to cover the division's 
right flank. Company "C" was on the right, Company "A" on the left in 
the front line, Company "D" on the right, Company "B" on the left in 
support, and the Regimental Machine Gun Company was on the right at 
the hinge. The enemy held a nest of trenches at 6212, and commanded 
the long hill stretching from LA GRANGE AUX BOIS FERME at the 
northeast corner of the BOIS DE CIERGES northwest to GESNES. The 
same discipline characterized this advance as had the other — the 
same result followed — the hill was won and the flank was held, but this 
also was "regardless of cost." This movement was executed at about four 
in the afternoon, and while the losses to the regiment were not so great 
as those of the direct attack, they numbered among them Major Farwell. 
While lying on the ground with his adjutant and his command group he 
was hit by shrapnel or high explosive fragments. Wounded in the arm, 
hand, leg and back, he was carried to the dressing station. Hurried into 
the first ambulance and personally accompanied by Captain Brown of the 
Medical Corps, the regiment's second in command was again taken from 
the field. This valued battalion commander, a man of West Point training, 
fearless, honored, respected and loved by his command and throughout the 
regiment, died the next morning a few moments after the ambulance, 
struggling to the rear over a crowded and shell harassed road, had borne 
him to the dressing station at VERY. As in Major Miller, the regiment had 
lost another of its great soldiers. The later award to Major Farwell of the 
Distinguished Service Cross bore with it the following citation: 

"For extraordinary heroism in action near Gesnes, France, September 
28-29, 1918. He displayed exceptional personal bravery in leading his com- 
mand to the capture of enemy positions near Gesnes, France, September 
28-29, 1918. In each of these actions his troops were subjected to heavy 
artillery bombardment and machine gun fire, but due to his coolness and 
the inspiration of his personal leadership and bravery his battalion in each 
instance captured and held the positions attacked." (W. D. G. O. 20, Sec. 
V, Jan. 30, 1919.) 

Then came the orders to withdraw. The price of victory had already 
been paid, but the danger of greater loss in the exposed position was felt by 
the higher command to demand the withdrawal of the brigade from 
GESNES. It was but the fortune of war and with sad but obedient spirits 
the troops finally accomplished the withdrawal. Companies "C" and "A," 
however, dug in and remained on their hill, with Companies "D" and "B" 
and the Machine Guns for support. Captain Howard D. Hughes, of 
Company "A," now became the Battalion Commander of the 1st Battalion. 
To hold this position now required the holding of about three hundred 
meters of the neighboring sector on the right and later it required about 
five hundred meters of that sector. Company "H" dug in on the Division 
Sector line, now on the left of the First Battalion. The Third Battalion held 

82 



the ground to the rear and left of the First, about 300 meters in front of the 
BOIS DE CIERGES. This general position was on "100 HOUR HILL." 

The message to withdraw reached the 362nd Infantry, but failed to reach 
the Second Battalion of the 361st Infantry (less Company "H"). As the 
362nd gradually withdrew from the left flank, the detachments of the 361st 
Infantry on that flank fell back with them. Captain Minick and Lieutenant 
Lane, on the right flank and in the center, sent out patrols to gain connection 
on their right and left, only to learn bit by bit that they were each alone. The 
Second Battalion Headquarters had now joined Lieutenant Lane, but Major 
Ward and Lieutenant Betterton had set out for Regimental Headquarters to 
get instructions. Reaching there late in the night, the withdrawal orders were 
explained, and Lieutenant Betterton, 2nd Battalion Intelligence Officer, Lieu- 
tenant Hubbell, Regimental Intelligence Officer and Lieutenant Page, 1st 
Battalion Intelligence Officer, set out to carry the orders. For four days and 
nights the Intelligence Officers had been performing their difficult and 
exhausting duties, as scouts, guides and liaison agents, and Lieutenant Bet- 
terton had not only repeatedly reconnoitered in advance of his troops and 
guided them in their night marches, but that very day he had gone through 
the inferno to GESNES and already had once practically fainted from exhaus- 
tion. Lieutenant Betterton's assignment was to reach Lieutenant Lane's 
detachment, from which he had come earlier in the night. Apparently with- 
out a thought of anything except his duty and without a suggestion of his 
condition he now set out to carry the message to the front line and to guide 
back the troops he had left beyond GESNES. He met Lieutenant MacKay, 
about midway to GESNES, with the troops from the left flank, obtained 
Corporal Cudd of Company "F" as a volunteer and pushed on to GESNES, 
but never again to be heard from. Before reaching any of the detachment 
in GESNES he and the Corporal suddenly met a hostile patrol and were 
fired upon. The Lieutenant called to the Corporal, "Run for your life, 
they've got me." The Corporal escaped, but not knowing Lieutenant Lane's 
location was unable to carry any message there. In the meantime, Lieuten- 
ant Lane had outposted his position, and with him still remained the 2nd 
Battalion Headquarters group. 

It was near midnight and as no orders arrived at GESNES, Lieutenant 
Gilbert, as Battalion Adjutant, with two men of the Intelligence Section, set 
out to gain information. Struggling slowly back in the mud and rain, he 
at length reached Regimental Headquarters. On the way he met Captain 
Minick, moving South with his detachment, which after its failures to find 
any neighboring troops was already withdrawing. This detachment now 
halted until it should learn the result of Lieutenant Gilbert's mission. At 
headquarters, Captain Smith, the Regimental Adjutant, and Lieutenant Bur- 
ton as Operations Officer turned out to assist Lieutenant Gilbert. The Opera- 
tions Officer went with Captain Burke to arrange a disposition of the left flank 
of the Third Battalion to cover the front. Captain Smith, with Lieutenant 
Gilbert, went to Captain Minick's detachment, which was now directed to 
move on to the BOIS DE CIERGES, and then Lieutenant Gilbert, with dawn 
rapidly approaching, hurried on to GESNES. Under cover of the morning 
mist this last detachment of the 2nd Battalion withdrew safely, just receiving 
a light burst of long range machine gun fire as the column was about to 

83 



reach the American line of outguards. One man of this platoon was 
captured by the Germans — one of the only two prisoners who ever were 
captured from the regiment. 

The men of Companies "E" and "F" and a few from Company "G" 
that had assembled under Lieutenant MacKay, were now placed behind the 
crest of the extreme left of "100 Hour Hill" and the line of defense across 
the Brigade Sector was complete. The position extended not only across 
the Brigade Sector, but about 300 meters beyond that sector to the right. 
The entire line was manned by the 361st Infantry with supporting machine 
guns, while behind this line the troops of the 362nd Infantry and the other 
GESNES detachments (except those of Lieutenant MacKay which remained 
temporarily on the left of the line) , were afforded a badly needed opportunity 
to rest and reorganize in the vicinity of LES EPINETTES BOIS. 

Early on the morning of September 29th, Captain Bird, M. R. C, of the 
347th Machine Gun Battalion, and Lieutenant Smith, M. R. C, of the 
361st Infantry, opened a new dressing station in a large German barracks 
near EPINONVILLE. Wounded men were treated here steadily during 
the day, and toward night when word was received of the large losses in 
the GESNES attack, the band, all available litter men and the Y. M. C. A. 
men were pressed into active service with the medical detachment. A 
detachment of infantry from the 3rd Battalion was also added to the force. 
When the litters ran short, many men were carried on improvised litters 
made from poles and captured blankets. The main dressing station was 
completely filled. Lieutenant Smith with three men, and Private Eckert 
working independently, opened two stations in the BOIS DE CIERGES. 
Lieutenant Smith's station was unique in that it was a German 
split-log bungalow, marked with the skull of a horse nailed to the gable. 
Medical aid was given under intermittent shell fire with practically no 
lighting facilities, and the service involved long litter carries from the field 
to the station and thence to the ambulances, usually a total distance of 
more than a kilometer. This was but a sample of the faithful and able 
work of the Medical Detachment and the band. On the same day Lieutenant 
Burnside returned to the detachment from the hospital. 

In addition to officers before mentioned as killed, wounded or missing, 
there were now to be numbered the following wounded Lieutenants: Coffey, 
of Company "E," Moeur and Wright of Company "H," Bissett of Company 
"I," Gray (of Company "I"), 3rd Battalion Gas Officer, Haas of Company 
"L," and Orton (of Company "M") 3rd Battalion Liaison Officer. Colonel 
Davis, wounded in the finger, was on duty as usual; Lieutenant Batman of 
Company "I," and Lieutenant Coats of Company "L" were slightly wounded, 
but were on duty, and Lieutenant McLaughlin (of Company "I"), 3rd Bat- 
talion Intelligence Officer, was gassed, but refused to allow himself to be 
sent to the hospital. Lieutenant Lamping of Company "M," under orders 
from higher authority, left on detached service to attend Staff School 
at LANGRES. 

Lieutenant Brace had by now moved the regimental ration dump from 
BOIS MUGUET (6843) to "KELLEY'S CUT," which was a sunken road 
immediately west of EPINONVILLE, named for Lieutenant Kellas of the 
Supply Company. From here "reserve" (now in fact "regular") rations of 
corned beef and hard tack were issued on the night of September 28th, and 

84 



the animals were immediately sent back for eight rolling kitchens, this 
being all that could be hauled. Lieutenant Kellas brought up the kitchens 
by the main road, swung them into the BOIS DE CIERGES and opened 
them for business on the north edge of the woods as near as possible to 
the line. The effort was highly appreciated and for the first time in four 
days many men that night had a taste of cooked food. The kitchens, how- 
ever, immediately drew the enemy artillery fire, and by this shell fire the 
Machine Gun Company kitchen, while seeking a new location, was over- 
turned and thoroughly riddled by shell fragments. The Supply Company 
saved no kitchen for itself, and in these days Cooks Toy and Chong fed 
the "mule-skinners" with food that tasted as good as ever but was cooked 
on a strip of sheet iron bolstered up over a fire built between rocks. 

30 September-3 October— 100 HOUR HILL, extending from BOIS DE 
BAULNY to LA GRANGE AUX BOIS FERME, 300 meters north of BOIS 
COMMUNAL DE CIERGES (MEUSE), outpost duty under fire, and to 
BOIS CHeHeMIN (MEUSE), Southeast, night marching, 5 kilometers. 

Brigade Field Order No. 11, of September 30th, announced that "the 
attack of the V Corps will not be continued today. The present line of 
the 91st Division will be held and every effort will be made for a resump- 
tion of the offensive on the following day." But the offensive was never 
resumed here by this division. For "one hundred hours" — four days and 
four hours (with slight variations of time for the different companies), the 
regiment outposted the same line. For a time this line was nearly 2 
kilometers wide and once for a brief period every company in the regiment 
and many machine guns were forced to be on the line of outposts. While the 
362nd Infantry was being reorganized and held in Brigade Reserve, and the 
divisions on the right and left were being relieved, the front line company 
locations were gradually shifted about as LA GRANGE AUX BOIS 
FERME was taken over by neighboring troops, or as Companies "C" and "A" 
were withdrawn from their isolated positions ahead of the line, and finally 
as the First Battalion was moved in from the right and brought entirely 
within the brigade's original sector. The Second Battalion, when reorgan- 
ized, was moved into the BOIS DE CIERGES in support. Captain Doherty's 
machine guns carefully camouflaged and manned by crews that were changed 
only at night, continued throughout to be a main reliance against attack on 
the right flank. A platoon of Company "F" succeeded Company "K" as 
provost guard. It was here also that Lieutenant Brightbill of Company 
"D" was assigned to the command of Company "A" which was particularly 
short of officers. 

The men all had dug single or double shallow holes into the reverse 
slope of the hill, and while the outguards watched from the crest, the rest 
lay in safety from everything except the comparatively rare direct hits from 
artillery fire. The enemy, however, taking advantage of the lull, were 
evidently reorganizing their positions on the hills beyond and were con- 
stantly directing harassing machine gun and artillery fire on any suspicious 
assembly point, and particularly wherever a curl of smoke indicated a 
kitchen fire. The men now gathered up blankets, straw, tar paper, boards 
and doors to cover their holes from the weather. Some men had at first 
been evacuated with feet frozen during the cold and wet nights, but this 
danger had passed with the advent of the covered fox hole. Sometimes it 

85 



would be practically quiet across the entire regimental front except for an 
officer, runner, or detail moving about with messages or on errands. A 
direct hit sometimes brought quick death to a man or a pair of men, long 
before even those nearest knew of the fatality. Colonel Davis, as usual, 
made occasional trips walking along the front line, unmindful alike of 
artillery, machine gun and rifle fire. 

On September 30th, Lieutenant Fortune stepped out of his hole in the 
3rd Battalion group, only to find on his return Lieutenant "Johnnie" Long, of 
the Pioneer Platoon of Headquarters Company, comfortably cuddled in it. 
After a brief argument, Lieutenant Fortune moved into another hole a few 
feet away. A few moments later a direct hit instantly killed Lieutenant 
Long where he lay dozing peacefully, and also killed an enlisted man who 
was leaning over the hole about to speak to him. In Lieutenant Long the 
regiment lost one of its most dependable, cheerful and popular members. 

On October 1st, Major Ward was evacuated to a hospital for exhaustion, 
thus leaving the regiment with no field officers save its Colonel. Captain 
Smith, the Regimental Adjutant and the ranking Captain present, was now 
second in command of the regiment and was assigned to the command of 
the 2nd Battalion. Scarcely an hour later, as he was familiarizing himself 
with his new command and communicating to it his own great enthusiasm, 
he was almost instantly killed by a shell splinter in the heart. This oc- 
curred as he was returning from a visit to the line and when, with his 
Adjutant and Liaison Officer, he lay on the ground trying to dodge a salvo of 
high explosive shells. For the fourth time the regiment lost its second in 
command and a Battalion Commander. Captain Frank Heath, of Head- 
quarters Company, was now assigned to command the battalion. The 
regiment continued without a Regimental Adjutant, Lieutenant Burton, as 
Operations Officer and Assistant Adjutant, taking over the then comparatively 
light duties of that office in action. 

On October 1st, Lieutenant J. D. McKay of Company "K" succeeded to 
the duties of 3rd Battalion Intelligence Officer, because Lieutenant McLaugh- 
lin had been so badly gassed as to be unable to continue actively on duty. On 
the same day Lieutenant Page, Intelligence Officer of the 1st Battalion, 
was wounded in the arm and his work was taken over by Lieutenant Howard 
of Company "C." On October 3rd, Lieutenant McKay was severely wounded 
by shell fire, and on the same day Lieutenant Jansen, a valued officer of Com- 
pany "D," with 10 years experience as a regular army non-commissioned 
officer, and who already had earned the award of a Distinguished Service 
Cross, was killed. 

The chief asset of the regiment in these days was cheerfulness, a spirit 
emanating from Colonel Davis himself, who refused to tolerate any other 
attitude. Feeling keenly each loss to the regiment, and realizing thoroughly 
the nervous strain and continued exposure to which his men were being 
subjected, he did everything in his power to make their condition clear to 
the higher authorities while at the same time he used every possible effort 
to care for the military situation, to bring up rations, water, ammunition and 
equipment, and even to bring up some of the RENDEZ-VOUS DE CHASSE 
squad rolls that had been left a kilometer and a half behind the jump-off, at 
a point now a total of over thirteen kilometers to the rear. 

86 



Regimental Headquarters was established in a shallow dug-out in the 
northern part of the BOIS DE CIERGES, just under ground, and under a 
thin corrugated iron and earth covered roof, which made it practicable to keep 
candle lights burning continuously without exposure to observation. This dug- 
out had been discovered by the 2nd Battalion Headquarters on September 
30th, and requisitioned for the regiment. In it were four shelves and a long 
table that served as bunks-de-luxe for at least six persons, including the 
Colonel. Here on the evening of October 2nd was held an Officers' Call 
for the battalion officers that will long be remembered as typical of the 
Colonel's spirit. The meeting was called principally for recreation and as 
the Colonel passed around a box of cigars, he joined the newly made 
Battalion Commanders and their Adjutants in an hour of cheer under shell 
fire. One bit of his philosophy, expressed on another occasion, has been 
cherished — "It's a great war — if you die, die cheerfully, it isn't every one 
that has a chance to die gloriously." It was here that the Battalion Com- 
manders, expressing the confidence of the regiment in the Colonel, urged 
upon him greater care for his personal safety, and he sufficiently acceded 
to their request to take with him thereafter on his personal tours, a body 
guard of at least one man. 

On the firing line the same spirit lived in practically every fox hole. 
As one "Whizz-Bang" crashed into the hillside and a fuse head hummed 
across the field and hit beside a machine gunner's fox hole, he poked 
up his head, reached out, picked up the fuse head, examined its serial num- 
ber, seriously pulled out his identification tags, examined his own number, 
compared the two, then cheerfully remarked to his "bunkie," — "Not mine 
but damn near the same." 

Cooked food was now coming to the front. The kitchens, always a 
target, were nevertheless kept at the north edge of the woods. By platoons or 
smaller groups the men came back to a hot meal of stew or rice and coffee, 
and stayed by to draw "seconds." At meal times Company "H" was regu- 
larly met by the artillery fire of a watchful German battery and on October 
1st, at one of these meals, its Company Commander, Captain Conner, was 
hit in the elbow by a shell fragment, which forced him to go to the rear for 
hospital treatment. Once in a while a delicacy appeared on the front line. 
One day in the heat of shell fire Private Ohneck, the orderly of Lieutenant 
Fortune, crawled to the Lieutenant's fox hole, drew from his shirt a mess 
kit, opened it and, upon disclosing a fried chicken, hurried to apologize for 
the somewhat torn condition of the fowl, because at two hundred yards 
rifle fire, he had failed to hit the wandering German chicken in the head. 

On about October 2nd the Italian Pigeoneer, Lorenzo Curti, of Com- 
pany "L," saluted Lieutenant Valentine and said, "Lieutenant, Sir, the last 
leetle peege is seek; can no fly home" (and confidentially) "let's kill heem 
and eat heem." The Lieutenant, however, gave the pigeon its chance, and 
upon obtaining its release it made good progress toward home. 

Corporal Ward of Company "L" had a scheme of his own to avoid 
standing in the mess line. At meal time he would wait until the unfailing 
German shell fire searched for the kitchens and scattered the crowd, then 
he would remark, "Well, I guess I'll get something to eat," and would wander 
over to the kitchen and help himself to a complete menu. 

87 



The citation of Cook Regnvald Johnson of Company "B," accompany- 
ing the award to him of the Distinguished Service Cross, tells the story of 
his service and that of his companions at the kitchen of that company: 

"For extraordinary heroism in action, near GESNES, France, September 
29th to October 1, 1918. Under heavy shell fire and badly wounded, he 
constantly assisted for three days in cooking for an entire battalion in the 
front line." (W. D. G. O. 139, Sec. I, Dec. 24th, 1918.) 

The kitchen of Company "K," shot full of holes, still remained on the 
front line and functioned as far as its condition would permit. 

Wagoner Windell, of the Supply Company, one night missed the BOIS 
DE CIERGES entrance trail, and with his water cart passed too far towards 
LA GRANGE AUX BOIS FERME along the road to DUN-SUR-MEUSE. 
He was seen by a German "watchful waiter," and was showered with lead 
and steel. Shot through the sole of his shoe, and his water tank cut six 
inches behind the driver's seat, he hurried back only to report that "If I 
had stayed a little longer, I couldn't have pulled my old sieve home." 

The supply, ammunition and equipment service to the front line won 
much deserved credit. This service was under the general control of Captain 
Savage. It was further directed night and day by Lieutenant Quinby in 
charge of the Combat Train, Lieutenant Brace and Regimental Supply 
Sergeant Zimmer, in charge of the Supply Train from the Division Dump to 
EPINONVILLE, and then by Lieutenant Kellas with Regimental Supply 
Sergeant Morriss and Supply Sergeants Beattie and Swanson, in charge of 
supplies from EPINONVILLE to the kitchens. This work was accomplished 
with an inadequate number of inadequate animals that in several instances 
fell to the ground in their harness, or under the saddle, asleep or dead from 
exhaustion. Colonel Davis more than once remarked of these officers and 
men. "They're wonders, I don't see how they do it." 

On the night of October 2/3, Lieutenant Quinby and his combat train 
were located near EPINONVILLE, just across the road from the brigade 
dump of small arms ammunition. Three German shells hit the boxes of 
ammunition, which immediately began to blaze. The sentinel woke Lieu- 
tenant Quinby, who at once tried to put out the fire with blankets and 
earth. By this time the rifle ammunition was beginning to sputter and 
explode and Wagoners Harris and Parks responded to the lieutenant's 
call for volunteers. These three saved not only the ammunition dump, 
but the lives of those nearby, by personally carrying each flaming and 
sputtering box to an embankment and spilling the ammunition over the edge. 

The dumps and kitchens were moved from place to place, but they never 
completely dodged the shell fire. On a last tour of inspection on the night 
of October 3/4 in the midst of the German barrage, a shell killed Regimental 
Supply Sergeant Morriss and wounded Lieutenant Kellas. 

Many Chauchat automatic rifles had been disabled, many automatic 
riflemen killed or wounded, and a special service was instituted to collect 
abandoned Chauchats, refit them for service and resupply the front line. 

During this interim of four days on the line, a few new replacements were 
received and added to the ranks. 



The medical detachment operated as a regimental unit, and by using 
relays of two or more doctors on duty at a time, furnished continuous service. 
The band and other litter bearers worked steadily, so that the system for 
evacuating the wounded was never severely clogged. Just prior to the final 
enemy barrages on the night of October 3/4 the dressing stations were 
cleared, so that when the barrages took their heavy toll from the men of this 
regiment and of the relieving troops, every possible medical service was given 
before the detachment withdrew on the following morning. Mr. Christian 
and Mr. Davis of the Y. M. C. A. worked with the detachment as litter 
bearers from the main station to the ambulances, and on several occasions 
worked to and from the advance station in the woods. Mr. Christian, by 
October 1st had also obtained a sufficient supply of chocolate so that for 
the last three days there was available at the main station, for every wounded 
man who could take it, a drink of hot chocolate. On October 3rd, the 
Y. M. C. A. furnished a limited supply of tobacco and cigarettes that was 
evenly divided among the companies on the line. 

On the afternoon of October 3rd, came the order that the troops would 
be relieved at midnight by the 32nd Division. The message was sent to 
the several commanders, but the order was not issued to the troops, lest 
any movement or preparation by daylight should attract the attention of 
the enemy. At dusk, whether because of knowledge of the impending 
relief, or as part of a barrage intended to check an advance, or merely on 
general principles, the evidently reorganized German artillery put down on 
the whole line and on the BOIS DE CIERGES in particular a barrage of 
heavy and light artillery. This lasted about half an hour and included salvo 
after salvo of shells at such a rate that approximately 200 shells landed each 
minute within the hearing of each locality on the line. Colonel Davis 
was out at the time, but toward the end of the barrage, returned through 
it to the Regimental Headquarters, accompanied only by a body guard of 
one or two and all were unhurt. The shells were of all kinds, great and 
small, gas and high explosive. Trees and branches were broken down 
everywhere, and the Colonel admitted with relief that he didn't know 
v/hether he was going to get back or not. Already before his arrival, there 
had come others. One man and then another had come to the head- 
quarters with eyes distended, gasping for breath, and unable to stand — and 
had reported in a terror-stricken voice: "All is lost — the Germans are 
attacking out there, the troops are coming back — all is lost." But no troops 
had yet come back, and these men bore no written or oral message from 
their commanders. Their overstrained nerves had broken and Chaplain 
Beard gradually quieted them while the headquarters awaited more authori- 
tative news from the front. The telephone lines had been repeatedly cut 
by the shells, and although the signal platoon detail was out in the shell 
fire working, patrolling and repairing the wires as faithfully and fearlessly 
as always, they could not keep the lines intact. Finally came a regular 
runner from the First Battalion. He saluted and calmly handed in his mes- 
sage which stated that the battalion was preparing for a German counter- 
attack, that the front was well prepared with rifles and automatics, that patrols 
were out in front of the lines, and that the Germans had not yet advanced. 
It was learned later that on this occasion Company "B" had built up a firing 
line that included 21 automatic rifles as well as the rifles of the individual 

89 



riflemen. The barrage finally stopped, but after an interval of perhaps 
fifteen minutes, it came on again, this time for about twenty minutes, but 
still with no infantry attack behind it. 

By nine o'clock at night the relief movement was under way, and it 
progressed on the following plan: The Third Battalion took over the entire 
front, preparatory to turning it over to the troops of the 64th Infantry 
Brigade (32nd Division), that were to be guided up by Lieutenant Fortune. 
The Second Battalion withdrew, followed by the First, and finally by the 
Third. Except for the deaths caused by one shell that wiped out a full 
squad of Company "C," the losses of this regiment during the relief were 
slight. 

The troops withdrew for five kilometers straight across country to the 
BOIS CHeHeMIN, thus leaving the roads upon for the 32nd Division. 
The Second and First Battalions were in their new position before dawn, 
the Third arrived by eight o'clock in the morning. Regimental Head- 
quarters was again at Dead Horse Corner (8653). 

4-6 October, BOIS CHeHeMIN (MEUSE)— Resting. 

On the morning of the 4th most of the troops slept. At noon, the 
crowded regimental bivouac was reorganized, and the companies were as- 
signed to more definite and orderly locations. A large ration dump of 
the 32nd Division was directly at the side of the camp, and several precious 
delicacies, such as jam, were captured before a sufficient guard was sent 
to assist the ration detail in protecting its treasures. Captain Savage now 
actively rushed up new supplies. The kitchens, except for four shattered 
souvenirs left in the BOIS DE CIERGES, were brought in and placed near 
their companies, the packs and rolls (other than those now forever lost in 
the BOIS DE CIERGES) were brought up. Later an ample supply of 
new blankets was issued. The men began to stretch their legs, to enjoy 
the peace of a day substantially out of range, and to shave their beards 
of ten days' growth. The fact that on October 4th a few shells reached these 
woods and caused a casualty in a neighboring artillery unit did not disturb 
the welcome peacefulness of being out of the line. 

On October 5th, the morning was again devoted to rest. An Officers' 
Call and reunion was held at eleven o'clock. Every line company except 
"D," "G" and the Machine Gun Company was now commanded by a 
Lieutenant. Companies, platoons and squads were reorganized, rifles 
and pistols cleaned and oiled, and with the welcome shelter of many of the 
"pup" tents, the regiment already began to look far better than on the 
day before. At company formations the following General Order was 
read to the troops: 

"(280— FOR OFFICIAL CIRCULATION ONLY) HQ. 9 1ST DIV. 

A. E. F. October 4, 1918. 
GENERAL ORDERS: 

No. 24. 

I. The following letter which has just been received from the Com- 
manding General 5th Corps, is published for the information of all con- 
cerned. It is a source of great gratification to the Division Commander that 

90 



the Division in its initial fight acquitted itself in such a credible manner as 
to bring forth this letter from the Corps Commander: 

HEADQUARTERS FIFTH ARMY CORPS 

American Expeditionary Forces 

France, 3d October, 1918. 

From : Commanding General, V Army Corps, 
To: Commanding General, 91st Division. 

Subject: Relief of 91st Division. 

Under orders from First Army, the 91st Division will be relieved from 
the front line tonight and placed in Corps Reserve. 

The Corps Commander wishes you to understand that this relief results 
solely from a realization by higher command that your Division has done its 
full share in the recent success, and is entitled to a rest for reorganization. 
This especially as during the past three days it has incurred heavy casualties 
when circumstances would not permit either advance or withdrawal. 

At a time when the divisions on its flanks were faltering and even 
falling back, the Ninety-First pushed ahead and steadfastly clung to every 
yard gained. 

In its initial performance, your Division has established itself firmly 
on the list of the Commander in Chief's reliable fighting units. Please 
extend to your officers and men my appreciation of their splendid behavior 
and my hearty congratulations on the brilliant record they have made. 

Geo. H. Cameron, 
Major General, Commanding. 



WHJ 

20:15-20:28 

BY COMMAND OF MAJOR GENERAL JOHNSTON: 

OFFICIAL: 

D. J. Coman H. J. Brees, 

Major, A. G. Colonel, General Staff, 
Acting Adjutant Chief of Staff." 

GENERAL DISTRIBUTION. 

Here Lieutenant Hunt, a graduate of the Fort Sill, Oklahoma, Bayonet 
Course, was met by an order sending him at once back to the United 
States as a bayonet instructor, and here an order that had been issued, but 
not received, before the jump-off, brought promotions to captaincies for 
Lieutenant Armstrong of Company "E," already wounded, and for Lieu- 
tenant Burton, the Acting Operations Officer. 

Soon the activities of former days were again under way. Captain 
Kanzler located his personnel force in a neat deep dugout and the type- 
writers were busy at the records. The troops were paid. The Y. M. C. A. 

91 



brought up cigarettes, chocolate and writing paper. A batch of personal 
mail was conjured up by Chaplain Beard and many officers and men snatched 
the opportunity to write home of their safety. 

Chaplain Bronson, who had succeeded Lieutenant Brace as Burial Officer, 
was still busy on the line, assisted by a burial detail from the Pioneer 
Platoon. Lieutenant McLaughlin was placed in charge of a detail to count 
and check up captured materiel. Other officers were detailed to locate 
areas for grenade and automatic rifle practice. Warning orders were re- 
ceived on the 6th, indicating a new move, but no movement was made 
until the morning of October 7th. 

The regiment had been in action a little more than eight days — every 
day in the front line — four days attacking, four days holding the line. 
Including the capture of GESNES, the regiment had covered a depth of 
well over 13 kilometers (about 8|4 miles) of enemy territory, and the 
brigade had turned over to the 32nd Division an 11 Vi kilometer advance 
of over one kilometer in width. With the 362nd Infantry and 347th Ma- 
chine Gun Battalion, the regiment had captured sections of the BOIS DE 
CHEPPY, BOIS DE VeRY, and BOIS CHeHeMIN, the settlement of 
EPINONVILLE, LES EPINETTES BOIS, BOIS COMMUNAL DE 
CIERGES, and the town of GESNES; the last town, however, had been 
relinquished under orders issued because of failure of flank support for 
the division. Also, with the co-operation of the 182nd Brigade the regi- 
ment should be credited with the capture of the hamlet of ECLISFONTAINE. 
The regiment had passed the CORPS OBJECTIVE, and had reached, but 
had withdrawn from, because of failure of flank support, the AMERICAN 
ARMY OBJECTIVE. It had captured its section of the hostile first posi- 
tion, hostile intermediate position (HAGEN STELLUNG), hostile second 
position (VOLKER STELLUNG— the CAIMAN and CROCODILE 
TRENCHES) and in the GESNES attack had forced the enemy back to 
his third prepared position. During this period 1 1 German officers and 
2,360 men had passed through the 91st Division prisoners' cage. In addition 
to citations and awards of decorations listed in the appendices to this volume, 
the following recommendations for promotion for gallantry and efficiency in 
this action were made by Colonel Davis on the field and the notice of the 
granting of these promotions, without the usual certificates and physical 
examinations of routine promotions, was received at Regimental Head- 
quarters on October 16th: 

To be Majors: 

Captain William J. Potter, of Company "L" (wounded). 
Captain Ora Goodpaster, of Company "C" (wounded). 
Captain Roy E. Naftzger, of Company "M" (wounded). 
Captain Frank P. Doherty, of Machine Gun Company. 

To be Captains: 

1st Lieutenant James C. Fortune, Adjutant of 3rd Battalion. 

1st Lieutenant Richard C. M. Page, Intelligence Officer of 1st Battalion 
(wounded). 

92 



This regiment's losses had been as follows: 

FIRST PHASE "MEUSE-ARGONNE" OFFENSIVE 
September 26-October 4 (inclusive), 1918 



Compauies and 
Detachments 


Killed 


OFFICERS 

Wounded 


Field and Staff 


3 


1 


"A" 




2 


"B" 






"C" 




2 


"D" 


1 




"E" 




2 


«p» 




1 


"G" 




2 


"H" 




3 


"I" 




5 


"K" 




1 


"L" 




3 


"M" 


1 


2 


Hq. 


1 




M. G. 






Sup. 




1 


Med. Det. 




1 



ENLISTED MEN 
Missing Killed Wounded Prisoners 



Totals 

4 
55 
75 
74 
57 
74 
47 
71 
63 
72 
76 
59 
82 
54 
28 
6 
9 

Total 6 26 1 208 664 1 906 



14 


39 


21 


54 


27 


45 


10 


46 


18 


53 


11 


35 


15 


53 


9 


51 


19 


48 


12 


63 


13 


43 


19 


60 


10 


43 


4 


24 


3 


2 


3 


5 



93 



ROSTER OF OFFICERS, 361 ST INFANTRY 

October 7, 1918— at Return to Front, 2nd Phase of MEUSE-ARGONNE 

Offensive. 

Regimental Headquarters 

Colonel William D. Davis 

Lieutenant Colonel 

Major John J. Sellwood, Regimental Surgeon 

Captain , Regimental Adjutant 

Captain Jacob Kanzler, Personnel Adjutant 

Captain Harold H. Burton, Operations Officer and Assist- 
ant Regimental Adjutant 

1st Lieut. Eugene V. Bronson, Regimental Chaplain 

2nd Lieut. Edward A. Valentine (Co. "L"), attached as 
Regimental Liaison Officer 

2nd Lieut. Oliver Voderberg (Co. "G"), attached as 
Regimental Gas Officer 

Captain Jean Champion, of French Army, attached as 
member of French Commission 

1st Lieut. Robert Guibert, of French Army, attached as 
member of French Commission 

1st Battalion 

Captain Howard D. Hughes (Co. "A"), Commanding 

1st Lieut. Donald G. Abel, Adjutant 

1st Lieut. Charles H. Moore, Jr. (Co. "K"), attached as 

Gas Officer 
2nd Lieut. Robert C. Howard (Co. "C"), attached as 

Intelligence Officer 
2nd Lieut. Errol W. Proctor (Co. "D"), attached as 

Liaison Officer. 



Company "A" 

Captain 

1st Lieut. Roscoe V. F. Brightbill 
1st Lieut. Ellis Bates 

1st Lieut 

(2nd Lieut. Merriam J. Howells, S. 

D. as Liaison Officer, 181st Brig. 

Hq.) 
2nd Lieut 

Company "B" 
(Captain Wallace T. Downing, D. S. 

as Instructor at Army Candidate 

School) 
1st Lieut. Gustave B. Appelman 
1st Lieut. Gilpin S. Sessions 

1st Lieut 

2nd Lieut. Southall R. Pfund 
2nd Lieut 



Company "C" 

Captain 

1st Lieut. Charles H. Hudelson 
1st Lieut. Gerrit V. W. Wood 

1st Lieut 

2nd Lieut 

2nd Lieut 



Company "D" 
Captain Friend S. Dickinson 



1st Lieut 

1st Lieut 

1st Lieut 

2nd Lieut. Thomas G. Ware 
2nd Lieut 



94 



2nd Battalion 



Captain Frank Heath (Hq. Co.), Commanding 
1st Lieut. Curtiss R. Gilbert, Adjutant 
1st Lieut. Jesse T. Wilkins (Co. "H"), attached as Liaison 
and Gas Officer 



Company "E" 

Captain 

1st Lieut. Henry P. Hoffman 

1st Lieut 

1st Lieut 

(2nd Lieut. Ernest L. Damkroger. D. 

S. in charge of Div. Warehouse 

at Meuse) 
2nd Lieut. Frank R. Johnston 

Company "F" 

Captain 

1st Lieut. Wallace M. MacKay 

1st Lieut 

1st Lieut 

2nd Lieut. Jack Sweat 

2nd Lieut 



Company "G" 
Captain Clarence J. Minick 
1st Lieut. Lester M. Ellis 

1st Lieut 

1st Lieut 

2nd Lieut. Uil Lane 

2nd Lieut 



Company "H" 

Captain 

1st Lieut. Ira G. Towson 

1st Lieut 

1st Lieut 

2nd Lieut. Harry J. Craig 
2nd Lieut 



3rd Battalion 

Captain Campbell Burke (Co. "K"), Commanding 
1st Lieut. James C. Fortune, Adjutant 
1st Lieut. James R. McLaughlin (Co. "I"), attached as 
Bn. Intelligence, Liaison and Gas Officer 



Company "/" 

Captain 

1st Lieut. Robert S. Batman 

1st Lieut 

1st Lieut 

2nd Lieut. Robert A. Woodyard 
2nd Lieut 



Company "K" 

Captain 

1st Lieut. John E. Bailey 

1st Lieut 

1st Lieut 

2nd Lieut. James M. Tongate 
2nd Lieut 



Company "L" 

Captain 

(1st Lieut. Gregg M. Evans, D. S. 

School at Langres) 
1st Lieut. Ronald E. Everly 

1st Lieut 

2nd Lieut. Alva J. Coats 
2nd Lieut 

Company "M" 

Captain 

(1st Lieut. Frederick F. Lamping, D. 

S. at School at Langres) 
1st Lieut. Francois Trouchet 
1st Lieut. William J. Edick 

2nd Lieut 

2nd Lieut 



95 



Headquarters Company 

Captain 

1st Lieut. Charlie A. Valverde (One 
Pounder Platoon) 

1st Lieut. Earle G. McMillen (Sap- 
pers and Bombers Platoons) 

1st Lieut. Harold C. Hubbell (Intel- 
ligence Officer) 

2nd Lieut. Ray R. Vincent (Signal 
Officer) 

2nd Lieut. Ernest K. Murray (Sap- 
pers and Bombers Platoon) 

Machine Gun Company 
Captain Frank P. Doherty 
1st Lieut. George E. Kelsch 
1st Lieut. Lewin W. Martinez 
2nd Lieut. George V. J. Ramsdell 
2nd Lieut. Reginald H. Linforth 
2nd Lieut 

Chaplains 
1st Lieut. Eugene V. Bronson 
1st Lieut. John W. Beard 
1st Lieut. Alphonse L. Weber 



Supply Company 
Captain Leon E. Savage 
1st Lieut. Fred L. Brace 
1st Lieut. James A. Quinby 

2nd Lieut 

2nd Lieut , 

2nd Lieut 



Medical Detachment 

Major John J. Sellwood, M. R. C, 

Reg. Surgeon 
Captain Paul F. Brown, M. R. C. 
1st Lieut. Fred B. Coleman, M. R. C. 
1st Lieut. Leland C. Mcintosh, M. 

R. C. 
1st Lieut. John L. Burnside, D. R. C. 
1st Lieut. Ernest C. McKibben, M. 

R. C. 
1st Lieut. Mayo Reiss, D. R. C. 
1st Lieut. Clyde Ruff, M. R. C. 



96 



CHAPTER VII 

SECOND PHASE OF MEUSE-ARGONNE OFFENSIVE 

October 7-12, 1918 

7-8 October. BOIS CHeHeMIN (MEUSE) to BOIS DE CHEPPY 
(MEUSE), Southwest, marching, 3 kilometers and to vicinity of GESNES 
(MEUSE), North, night marching, 15 kilometers. 

Although the regiment did not know it until later, the 181st Brigade, by 
special telephonic orders of the Fifth Corps, 5:15 P. M., October 6th, was 
detached from the 91st Division, and the Brigade Commander was directed 
to report to the Chief of Staff of the First Corps, for further orders. Pur- 
suant to orders of the First Corps, the brigade moved on the morning of 
October 7th to the northern edge of the BOIS DE CHEPPY. The regi- 
ment, still in ignorance of the orders separating it from the 91st Division 
which (less the 181st Brigade) was moving south to a rest area, took a 
three kilometer hike to the southwest. It crossed the AVOCOURT-VeRY 
Road, and pitched a regulation shelter tent camp in the fields just north of 
the BOIS DE CHEPPY, near point 7224, fondly believing that it too was en 
route to a rest area and somewhat mystified by this short march out of its 
original sector. 

The field trains, hampered by the one-way road system traveled around 
in a great circle nearly all day and reached the camp just in time to provide 
the materials for a hot afternoon meal. The Personnel Office moved to the 
new location and here it remained throughout the second phase of the 
battle. At least once during the coming engagement the enemy airplanes 
bombed this place but no loss was suffered in men or records. 

Further change of command during the day placed the brigade again 
under the Fifth Corps, and at 3:00 o'clock that afternoon, General Mc- 
Donald, in accordance with a corps order, issued his Field Order No. 12, 
announcing that the troops of the brigade had been temporarily detached 
and assigned as follows: To the 32nd Division: 361st Infantry and 347th 
Machine Gun Battalion; to the 1st Division: 362nd Infantry. The troops 
assigned to the 32nd Division were directed to proceed at 4:00 P. M., (later 
changed to 5:00 P. M.), under command of Colonel Davis, to the BOIS DE 
BAULNY and to the area immediately south of that woods ready for prompt 
movement to the front. The 362nd Infantry was to move to a position in 
LES BOULEAUX BOIS, just west of ECLISFONTAINE, there to join the 
1st Division's Reserve. 

In some cases even without finishing the newly arrived meal, the troops 
moved off at dusk. A cold, drizzling rain fell constantly, and the regiment (in 
order of battalions: 3rd, 1st, 2nd, followed by the Machine Gun Battalion) 
moved slowly in column of twos along the traffic jammed roads through 
VERY and EPINONVILLE to ECLISFONTAINE. There at about mid- 
night the column halted for instructions and for guides from the 64th 

97 



Brigade of the 32nd Division, for the regiment was now to relieve troops 
that had relieved it four days before. It developed that the 32nd Division 
had advanced about two kilometers from the BOIS DE CIERGES and was 
holding not only GESNES, but also a wide sector extending some three or 
four kilometers to the East. The German resistance, however, was strong 
on the west of Hill 255, near GESNES, and here the 361st Infantry was 
to move in. The 64th Brigade was now to become the 32nd Division 
Reserve, advancing behind the 63rd Brigade, which was to remain in the 
front line East of Hill 255. 

The guides having arrived, the troops moved on about another kilometer 
to where the Regimental P. C. took over the headquarters of one of the 
units being relieved. This P. C. was located at 5097 (then identified as 
5197), in a German hut about 500 meters west of EXMORIEUX FERME. 
Here guides to the front line companies were obtained, and the troops moved 
2Yi kilometers further north over slippery muddy trails to the northern 
edge of the BOIS DU CHeNE SEC. This woods was little more than a 
patch of scrub-oak bushes, often scarcely six feet high. The 1st Battalion 
outposted the northern edge of the woods, while the 3rd Battalion went 
into position on its right on the hills west of GESNES, and the 2nd Battalion 
was placed in support of the 1st, partly on the north side, and partly on the 
south side of a little clearing between the BOIS DU CHeNE SEC and the 
BOIS DE LA MORINE, about two hundred meters behind the front line. 
Company "F" was on the right, "G" in the center, "E" on the left, and 
"H" in support. The Machine Gun Company was about 800 meters south- 
west of GESNES. Hostile machine gun and shell fire intermittently har- 
assed the countryside and searched the valleys to the rear. 

Lieutenant Voderberg had relieved Lieutenant Moore as Regimental 
Gas and Mess Officer, and with Lieutenant McMillen, he now took over 
active supervision of the food supply from the kitchens forward. Lieutenant 
Craig had been relieved as Brigade Liaison Officer upon arrival of Lieu- 
tenant Howells, who thereafter held that detail continuously, and Lieutenant 
Craig now assisted Lieutenant Vincent in the operation of the signal and 
telephone system. Throughout this phase of the ARGONNE drive both 
the mess and signal departments earned special credit. The kitchens were 
not sent further to the front than EXMORIEUX FERME, and while thus 
enabled to work in comparative safety, they daily sent up two hot meals to 
the line. This necessitated hard work on the part of carrying details, 
particularly as the front line pushed further and further ahead. Neverthe- 
less, with only occasional delays or failures to function, the system brought 
cooked food to the line at least once a day, and often twice a day. The tele- 
phone and buzzer service, finally working across a distance of about four 
kilometers between Regimental Headquarters and the front line battalions, 
functioned admirably. Both the signal platoon and the signal corps men 
performed their duties with exceptional endurance, rendering continuous 
service night and day, and with commendable courage repairing the wires 
frequently cut by shell fire. 

8 October. On line BOIS DU CHeNE SEC and GESNES— Outpost duty 
under fire. 

On October 8th the First Division (with the 362nd Infantry attached) 

98 



also passed to the control and direction of the Fifth Corps. The entire 
181st Brigade was then reunited and placed under the command of Brigadier 
General McDonald who had temporarily been without a command and had 
reported to the commanding general of the corps for further orders. Thus 
reunited the brigade was attached by corps order to the 1st Division. No 
movement of position was made by the regiment that day. 

9 October. BOIS DU CHeNE SEC and GESNES (MEUSE) to HILLS 
255 and 269, attacking, one-half kilometer. 

Regimental Headquarters was temporarily flooded with the orders from 
the 32nd Division, 1st Division and 181st Brigade as an attempt was made 
to adapt the unit to the new situation and to the procedure and administra- 
tion of its new higher commanders. As the situation developed, it ap- 
peared that the Fifth Corps would resume the attack at 8:30 A. M., October 
9th. The Third Division was placed on the extreme right. The 32nd 
Division, next on the left, was to attack on both sides of ROMAGNE-SOUS- 
MONTFAUCON and as far west as Hill 255. The 181st Brigade as part of 
the 1st Division was to hold a line between Hills 255 and 269, and the 1st 
Division itself, with five regiments in the front line (from right to left: 
1st Engineers, 26th Infantry, 28th Infantry, 18th Infantry and 16th Infantry) 
was to attack on a line extending west of Hill 269. The 42nd (Rainbow) 
Division (less the 67th Field Artillery Brigade which was temporarily with 
the 32nd Division) was to remain in Corps Reserve. The Corps was also 
to have the assistance of Corps and Army Artillery and the usual auxiliary 
units. The 181st Brigade Field Order No. 13, issued at 7 P. M., October 
8th, continued the 361st Infantry in the front line with the 347th Machine 
Gun Battalion in support. The 362nd Infantry remained with the Division 
Reserve. 

The intent of higher authority appeared to be that the brigade should 
"hold without advancing" the line between Hills 255 and 269, and it was 
evident that information must have been relied upon that these hills had 
been captured, and that the relief of the 64th Brigade had left the 181st 
Brigade in possession of them. Quite the contrary was the fact. The line 
turned over to the 181st Brigade lay fully 500 meters south of these hills, 
and both hills, particularly No. 255, were strongly held with prepared posi- 
tions and ample machine guns, while the approaches to them were covered 
by artillery fire that in many places was point blank. 

When this situation was fully reported to the Division Commander, he 
directed the brigade to advance at "H" hour (8:30 A. M.), October 9th, 
and to seize and hold the line between the hills. The Battalion Com- 
manders were accordingly summoned to Regimental Headquarters, and the 
plan of attack verbally arranged — The 1st Battalion was to move around 
to its left and advance upon Hill 269 from the South. The 3rd Battalion, 
reinforced by Company "F," was to attack Hill 255, while Company "I" 
with a platoon of the Machine Gun Company was to act as combat liaison 
detachment between this brigade and the 32nd Division. The further details 
are stated in the following field order which was issued the next morning 
in confirmation of the verbal instructions: 

99 



"Mamma P. C, 
France, 
FIELD ORDERS: 9 October, 1918. 

No. 

i VERDUN — A ) 

MAPS: ] FORET d'ARGONNE } 1 : 20,000. 
( DUN sur MEUSE ) 

1. The 1st Division as part of the 5th Army Corps will attack on "D" 
day at "H" hour. 

2. (a) The 181st Brigade is attached to the 1st Division for the attack, 
and will hold its present position on the right of the 1st Division. 

(b) The 361st Infantry holds a position on the front line on the right of 
the 1st Division. 64th Brigade (32nd Division) is on the right of the 361st 
Infantry. 64th Brigade is in reserve, but 1st Battalion of the 127th Infantry 
of that Brigade will follow the 125th Infantry in the attack, and in case the 
125th Infantry advances beyond the 361st Infantry this Battalion will main- 
tain liaison between the Divisions. The 2nd Brigade (1st Division) will 
be on the 361st Infantry's left. 1st Battalion, 1st Engineers is attached to 
the 2nd Brigade, and will be the element of that Brigade on the left of the 
361st Infantry. 

3. (a) This regiment will seize and hold the position from HILL 255 
inclusive, westward to HILL 269 inclusive, maintaining liaison with the 
elements on the right and left. The attack for this purpose will begin 
without further orders, at "H" hour. 

(b) The regiment will attack with two battalions in line, 3rd on the 
right, 1st on the left. The 2nd Battalion (less Co. "F") will be in regi- 
mental reserve in the northern edge of the BOIS du CHENE SEC, ready to 
counter attack and drive out the enemy from any part of the position which 
he might penetrate. The RAU du GOUFFRE (near its source) will be 
the dividing line between the 1st and 3rd Battalions. Each Battalion (less 
detachments stated below) will have two companies in support, 100 meters 
to 300 meters in the rear of the front line. The support line must be 
selected for its field of fire and general advantages for defense. All 
elements will fight on the spot. Elements will hold themselves in readi- 
ness to push the attack to the new objective. 

(c) During the night D — 1/D Company I with a platoon from M. G. Co. 
will establish and maintain liaison with the 32nd Division on the right, and 
report to these headquarters will be made when liaison with the 32nd 
Division is established after receipt of this order. Company F will re- 
inforce the 3rd Battalion, and report to Battalion Commander in ample time 
to take proper position before "H" hour. 

(d) One platoon of Company A, this regiment, and one section of 
machine guns, (3 guns) from Co. D. 347th M. G. Bn. will establish and 
maintain liaison with 1st Battalion, 1st Engineers on Hill 269, night of 
D— 1/D. 

(e) Companies from 347th M. G. Bn. now attached to battalions of 
this regiment will remain with these battalions until position is organized 

100 



for defense. These guns will be under command of the Infantry Battalion 
Commander, and in assuming defensive position, will be echeloned in depth 
in checker-board fashion so as to cover the whole sector. 

(f) One one-pounder will be with each front line battalion. 

4. (a) 58th Artillery Brigade will support the 361st Infantry. 

(b) Company B, 1st Gas Regiment, will co-operate with the regiment 
by directing heavy explosives against Hill 255 at "H" hour, for a duration 
of not more than five minutes. 

(c) Front line panels will be promptly displayed on call from Infantry 
planes. 

5. Regimental Surgeon will establish and maintain a First Aid station 
with each battalion, with three litters and twelve litter-bearers. He will 
also maintain an Infirmary with Medical Officers present who will promptly 
care for and evacuate the wounded as the advance proceeds. 

6. Regimental P. C. will be at 5197 at the beginning of action. 
HHB — mov Davis, 
Copies to: Colonel, 
Each Bn. Cmdr. Commanding." 
Regtl. Surgeon. 

347th M. G. Bn. 
181st Brigade. 
Op. O. 
War Diary 
File. 
3 Extra. 

Captain Hughes moved the First Battalion from its position along the 
BOIS du CHeNE SEC under cover of the heavy morning fog, down a 
gully, across an open area and to the base of Hill 269, a movement of about 
400 meters to the rear and 500 meters to the left. With the battalion 
formed for the attack, Company "C" was on the right, "A" on the left in 
the front line, "D" on the right, "B" on the left in support, and the battalion 
was co-operating with the 1st Engineers on the left. The attack was made 
successfully and without meeting severe resistance, but only after somewhat 
severe losses from shell fire at the jump-off. Apparently a large force of 
German Infantry was at one time collected to launch a counter attack, but 
being assembled squarely within the range of an indirect machine gun bar- 
rage of the 1st Division and of indirect machine gun fire from the 181st 
Brigade, as well as confronted with heavy infantry rifle fire, the German 
troops were cut to pieces, and were so demoralized that no counter attack 
developed. Hill 269 was captured and the crest fully occupied by eleven 
o'clock that morning. Many prisoners had been taken by the battalion and 
turned over to the Engineer Regiment on the left for delivery to the 1st 
Division prisoners' cage. 

The Second Battalion moved to the position vacated by the First Bat- 
talion in the BOIS du CHeNE SEC. Company "G" on the right, "E" 
on the left, "H" in support. 

As the attack developed it became clear that the 3rd Battalion had 
encountered a strongpoint offering determined resistance. Not only were 

101 



there entrenched and concealed German positions, but back of the crest 
was situated a strong cement blockhouse. The attack formation of the 
Battalion was Company "M" on the right, "L" on the left in the front line, 
"K" on the right, "F" on the left in support. Company "I" and Lieutenant 
Linforth's Machine Gun Platoon as combat liaison detachment, all under 
command of Captain Doherty of the Machine Gun Company, went to the 
right flank. The advance, however, was more than an ordinary movement 
to the front, for it was necessary to encircle the hill as far as available 
cover would permit. A glimpse of the story of the unflinching attack of 
Captain Burke's battalion appears in the following series of messages pre- 
served by the 3rd Battalion Headquarters. "Match" is 181st Brigade; 
"Mamma" is 361st Infantry; "Mate" the First Battalion; "Maul" the Second 
Battalion; "Medal" the Third Battalion; "Method" the 347th Machine 
Gun Battalion; "Melon" the 362nd Infantry; "Mamma-1" the Command- 
ing Officer of the Regiment; "Mamma-7" the Operations Officer; "Mamma- 
20" the Gas Officer; "Mamma L. O." the Liaison Officer. 
"From Medal At 5218 Date 9-10-18 Hour 6:38 

To Mamma No. 1 By Buzzer 

F Co. has reported to Medal. Bn. Officers are reconnoitering around 
to front. Medal" 

"From Medal At P. C. 5218 Date 9-10-18 Hour 7:44 

To Mamma No. 2 By Buzzer 

3rd Bn. is now in position. Right 5318, left 4916. Co. I Liaison 125 Inf. 
One pounder on hill to south. Gas and Flame in position firing O minus 
20 sec. will jump off at O. Burke" 

"From Mamma 1 At P. C. Date 9 Oct. 18 Hour 8:00 (Rec. 8:57) 
To Medal No. 2 By Runner 

Report situation, including location of your Bn. every half hour. Also 
obtain and transmit to these hqrs. every half hour similar report from 1st Bn. 

Mamma 1" 

"From Medal At 5022 Date9-10-18 Hour 9:00 

To IstBn. No. 3 By Runner 

We are ordered to report location of your Bn. every half hour. Keep us 
advised so we can report. Medal" 

The runner taking the above was a casualty and the message failed to 
get through. 

"From Medal Date 9-10-18 Hour 9:03 

To Mamma No. 4 By Runner 

Center our front line 5022. Enemy shelling on our left. Contact in 
fog difficult. Sent to 1st Bn. for report. 

Ack. No. 2 Medal" 

(The letters "Ack. No. 2" meant that Mamma's message No. 2 was 
acknowledged.) 

No message coming from 1st Battalion as to their position, the following 
was sent to the left support company of the 3rd Battalion. 
"From Medal Date 9-10-18 Hour 9:41 

To F Co. No. 5 By Runner 

Send contact patrol to locate 1st Bn. Get their disposition and report it 
to this P. C. immediately. Medal" 

102 



"From Medal Date 9-10-18 Hour 9:42 

To Mamma No. 6 By Runner and Buzzer 

Our front line-center 4822, delayed by machine guns filtering men for- 
ward. No contact from 1st Bn. Sending patrol left flank support Co. to 
locate 1st Bn. and get their disposition. Medal" 

"From Mamma 1 Date 9 Oct. '18 Hour 9:42 (Rec. 10:14) 

To Medal No. 4 By Runner 

Send in promptly half hourly messages showing situation. If nothing to 
report or nothing unusual, so state, negative information is important. Did 
gas regiment detachment fire explosives on Hill 255 at O hour? Mamma" 

"From Medal Date 9-10-18 Hour 10:31 

To Mamma No. 7 By Runner 

The center of our front line located at 4724. Gas regiment were ready 
to fire at O could not observe results on account of fog. Our line 250 m 
crest of the ridge S of W Hill 255 Medal" 

"From Medal Date 9-10-18 Hour 10:45 

To Mamma No. 8 By Runner 

Our line 250 meters crest of ridge Hill 255. We are moving to take 
hill and mop up woods. Appear to be only few machine guns, our casualties 
not heavy. Sending back German Officer taken at S edge woods Hill 255. 

Medal" 

At this point a message came in requesting recommendation of a man to 
be sent to West Point. It was sent to each company to sign and return. 
Final report was sent back later in the day. The runner bearing the message 
was killed when he started back, but the message was picked up and 
brought in and the recommendations duly submitted. 

"From Medal Date 9-10-18, Hour 1 1 :03 

To Mamma No. 9 By Buzzer 

Front line-woods south Hill 255. Medal" 

"From Mamma At P. C. Date 9 Oct. '18 Hour 10:30 (Rec. 11:16) 

To C. O. 3rd Bn. No. 6 By Runner 

Our present barrage now covers area beginning 500 meters north Hill 
255 and Hill 269. Will continue until 1 :00 P. M. If you want artillery 
knock out Hill 255, take safe position and request. Mamma" 

At 1 1 :23 a duplicate of Mamma's Message No. 4, already delivered by 
runner at 10:14 was received by buzzer. 

"From Medal Date 9-10-18 Hour 1 1 :55 

To Mamma No. 10 By Runner 

Request artillery on Hill 255 (5026). My dispositions are as shown on 
attached sketch, am digging in Medal" 

"From Medal Date 9-10-18 Hour 12:24 

To Mamma No. 1 1 By Runner 

Am still occupying position indicated on sketch attached to Message No. 
10. Will hold this position until further orders. Medal" 

103 



"From Medal Date 9-10-18 Hour 13:20 

To Mamma No. 12 By Runner 

Your verbal message "Dig in where you are and hold" received 13:00. 
We are complying, disposition unchanged. If Reg. P. C. moves forward, 
send forward our runners. Medal" 

"FromMedal Date 9-10-18 Hour 13:50 

To C. O. Co. M. No. 13 By Runner 

Lieut. Edick will take command of L Co. at once. Medal." 

(This was because Company "L" had successively lost three Company 
Commanders by wounds and was again without an officer.) 

"From Mamma 1 Date 9 Oct. 18 Hour 13:00 (Rec. 13:50) 

To Medal No. 13 By Runner 

Reply your message 1 1 :55 Artillery will fire on Hill 255 as requested 
from 1 :00 to 1 :30. Mamma 1" 

This message reached the Battalion 20 minutes after the Artillery fire 
ceased. 

"From Medal Date 9-10-18 Hour 14:07 

To Mamma No. 14 By Runner 

Please confirm your verbal message "Dig in and hold" in writing. Are 
we to understand we are to await orders to move forward? Have never 
had any contact with 1st Bn. G Co. slightly in rear our left flank. Contact 
with 125 Inf. on line with and right Co. I. Medal" 

"From Medal Date 9-10-18 Hour 14:20 

To Co. I. No. 15 By Runner 

You understand your company is to keep combat liaison between 125 
Inf. on your right and the 361 on your left. Dig in and hold line southern 
edge woods where you now are. Work out small patrols to your front to 
get information location of enemy machine gun nests, their strength, above 
all keep contact between right and left, notifying this P. C. of any move 
of the 125, also their location. Try and find out if the enemy have any 
Infantry or trench system in woods to your front. Medal" 

(Answer on bottom of above message) : 

"Have contact with 125 on right. They are about 100 yds from my rt. 
flank. They have dug in about 100 yds back from woods. Will send out 
patrols at once as directed and dig in. Woodyard" 

"From Mamma 1 Date 9 Oct. 18 Hour 14:23 (Rec. 15:17) 

To Medal No. 15 By Runner 

Move forward to original objectives as soon as this can be done under 
limitation of Division order that we avoid all casualties other than from 
artillery fire. If not able to advance under these conditions notify us at 
once what artillery assistance needed. Mamma 1" 

"From Mamma 1 At P. C. 5197 Date 9 Oct. '18 Hour 14:40 (Rec. 15:35) 
To Medal No. 16 By Runner 

Supplementing message 14:23 No. 15, Mate is on line extending from 
Hill 269 East. 2nd Bn. Melon has gone forward to connect with Mate's 

104 



right in extension of this line further east. You are to extend the line to 
Hill 255 as soon as practicable without substantial losses. Call for artillery 
assistance if necessary. Rush. Mamma P. C." 

"From Medal Date 9-10-18 Hour 15:50 

To Mamma No. 16 By Runner 

Medal moving forward to attack Hill 255. I K and M in woods south 
Hill 255. L & F remain in support in small wood on road 400 met S. W. 
255. Medal" 

"From Medal Date 9-10-18 Hour 15:55 

To C. O. 125 Inf. No. 17 By Runner 

This Bn. is resuming attack to take Hill 255. Our right rests on your 
left flank Co. Eastern edge of woods South Hill 255. We look for your 
support on our right flank. Burke, Cmdg." 

"From Mamma At P. C. 5197 Date 9 Oct. 18 Hour 15:00 (Rec. 16:00) 
To Medal No. 19 By Runner 

Send in sketch your disposition for defense at once also report of 
casualties for today. Mamma 1" 

"From Mamma 20 Date 9 Oct. 18 Hour 16:00 (Rec. 16:14) 

To Medal By Runner 

Notify each Co. in your Bn. to send gas N. C. O. and one private soon 
as possible to draw their required number of masks and sag paste. Can- 
nisters are also available. Voderberg, Reg. Gas. Off." 

"From Mamma 7 Date 9 Oct. 18 Hour 15:35 (Rec. 16:40) 

To Medal No. 22 By Runner 

Immediately upon organizing your position send to these hqrs. sketch 
showing disposition of your companies. This is important for immediate 
report to Division. Mamma 7" 

"From Medal Date 9-10-18 17:05 

To Mamma No. 18 By Runner 

Our front line within 100 yds crest 255. Will submit sketch immediately 
crest is taken and cos start digging in. Medal" 

Just before No. 18 was written the Battalion P. C. had moved up to 
the northern edge of a small woods at 4825. Captain Burke having ordered 
Company "L" to attack, stepped over to his Adjutant and quietly remarked, 
"I don't care if I get killed now, I've just shot two Huns, so I'm ahead of 
the game anyway. I am going over to the left and get "L" Company 
started firing." A few moments later, as a hail of German machine gun 
bullets was cutting off leaves and twigs about a foot above the Adjutant's 
head while he lay writing in a shell hole, a runner who had gone with 
Captain Burke came back through the brush to report that Captain Burke 
had been hit. The Adjutant sent off "No. 18" and went about fifty feet 
to where he found the Captain severely wounded. The runner at once 
stepped into the hole that the Adjutant had left and before Lieutenant 
Fortune had gone five yards the runner was shot as he lay in the shelter. 

105 



From then on the firing became heavier; the Germans had evidently 
survived the artillery fire and on seeing the Americans advance they sent 
up a star shell and immediately there came a withering barrage from Hill 
255 and also from Hill 288. The range was perfect and they swept the 
entire slope. At that time Lieutenant Fortune found himself in command 
of the battalion. Captain Burke was to be carried back. Company "L" 
was again without a commanding officer, the enemy fire was increasing 
in intensity, men were becoming casualties in all directions, the position 
must be consolidated, messages were coming in from Regimental Head- 
quarters, a sketch of the position must be made, messages must be pre- 
pared and sent to the companies, to Regimental Headquarters and the flanks 
— all this in addition to directing the attack and preserving the morale of 
the troops, and Lieutenant Fortune had at last found a sufficient answer to 
the question that used to bother him when in the United States: "What, 
if any, might be the duties of a Battalion Adjutant in action?" 

It was at about this interesting moment that Pigeoneer Lorenzo Curti, 
of Company "L," his pigeons all gone, came to the Lieutenant through a 
shower of machine gun bullets, saluted and said: "Lieutenant, Sir, my 
mother in Italy, I no seen her fifteen year, can I get furlough go see my 
mother?" The Lieutenant's reply was a warning that if he didn't get 
down out of sight he would probably meet his great-grandmother in a few 
minutes. 

Thirty minutes later message No. 19 was sent out. 

"From Medal Date 9-10-18 Hour 17:40 

To Mamma No. 19 By Runner 

I Co. is on Hill 255 flank exposed. 125 Inf. did not advance. M Co. is 
on Co. I's left. K Co. is on the same ridge. L Co. is on the left of Co. K 
badly disorganized. F Co. is on the left without contact. Called upon 
Co. G to support our center. Capt. Burke wounded. Short of officers. 
Cannot submit sketch yet as I have not reconnoitered our position. Heavy 
machine gun firing in front Co. L. Support very necessary. Medal" 

"From Mamma P. C. Date 9 Oct 18 Hour 16:45 (Rec. 18:30) 

1st Div. well satisfied with accomplishment Mamma today. It is re- 
ported that there was discovered in BOIS DE MONCY North of Hill 269 
a force of nine German companies of 109 Infantry especially designated as 
a counter attacking force. Three of these companies have been driven 
off and many prisoners taken. While it is not anticipated that great 
danger exists from this source, all precautions against surprise and counter 
attack will be taken promptly. Mamma" 

"From Mamma 7 At P. C. 5197 Date 9 Oct 18 Hour 17:40 (Rec. 18:30) 
To Medal No. 27 By Runner 

Send immediately statement or sketch showing location your troops and 
Bn. P. C. this for transmittal to Brigade and Div. thru these Hqrs. 

Mamma 7" 

"From Co. K 361 At Clearing in Woods (Rec. 18:30) 

To Medal 

Need reinforcement. K Co. in lead. Many wounded. Machine gun 
nests all over hill. Bailey" 

106 



"From Medal Date 9-10-18 Hour 18:30 

To Lieuts. Bailey, Woodyard, Trouchet. No. 20 By Runner 

Get in touch with each other on flanks, organize best position. German 
Infantry reported in vicinity, do not expect counter attack but be prepared 
keep scouts well out to front of your positions. If counter attack be sure 
that rifles and auto rifles in use get together and organize. Send reports 
here as to disposition by runners who can locate your P. C. again. Must 
know how much Hill 255 held by us. Get 125 Inf. support on right. Re- 
port as to casualties and effectives. Medal" 

(All this time heavy machine gun fire was continuing.) 

"From Mamma 1 Date 9 Oct 18 Hour 18:30 

To Medal By Buzzer 

Report situation at once. Mamma 1" 

Date 9-10-18 Hour 16:14 (Rec. 18:40) 
"From C. O., Co. L. Waiting for advance of M Co. at N edge of woods. 
To Medal By Runner 

Am unable to see the advance of M Co. on my right. No one on my 
left. Edick" 

Something of the intensity of the fire can be judged from the fact that 
the above message had been successively carried by several runners who 
had become casualties and it took nearly two hours and a half for it to 
travel but little more than 50 yards. 

"From Maul At P. C. Date 9-10-18 Hour 18:10 (Rec. 18:45) 

To Medal No. 8 By Runner 

Desire sketch of your position by return runner, also your plan in case of 
counter attack. We are covering center between 1st and 2nd Bn. with 
M. G. fire and rifle fire. 2 German machine guns, located 044825 Very Map, 
are sweeping our position. 1 pounder could put these out easily, we have 
none. Sketch of our position on back. Maul 1" 

"From Medal Date 9-10-18 Hour 19:25 

To Mamma No. 21 By Runner 

Co. K in break of woods 5025. Co. M to left, Co. I to right rear all 
disorganized. I have ordered them to dig in, get in touch with each other 
and send scouts to front. Co. K was bombed by grenades from stone house 
near top of Hill 255, have not been able to go forward to look over ground 
held by I K M and Cos. have not sent me any definite information. All 
the above was gathered from runners. Bn. has lost heavily in officers, only 
ones available are Co. F, Lt. MacKay, Co. M, Lt. Trouchet, Co. L, Lt. Sweat, 
Co. K, Lt. Bailey, Co. I, Lt. Woodyard, Bn. Lt. Fortune and Lt. McLaughlin, 
Co. F reports 65 effective, Co. L 30. No reports from K-I-M. They 
should have about 40 men effective each. We can hold ridge in front of 
F and L Cos. tonight. If I K M meet with any resistance they will have to 
be reinforced to hold. The 125 Inf. did not advance on our right, leaving 
gap between them and Co. I. Fortune" 

107 



"From Medal Date 9-10-18 Hour 19:35 

To 2nd Bn. 361 No. 22 By Runner 

I K & M Cos. in woods S Hill 255 on general line along opening 5025. 
They are digging in although badly disorganized. Co. F & L are dug in 
along patch of woods 4824. 125 Inf. did not go forward, leaving our flank 
exposed. We have no contact with 1st Bn. and are in bad position to hold 
Hill unless reinforced. We look to you to cover our withdrawal in case 
of counter attack that we cannot hold. Germans in woods Hill 255 have 
been throwing hand grenades at us. Medal" 

"From Medal 3rd Bn. 361 Inf. Date 9-10-18 Hour 20:00 

To 125 Inf. No. 23 By Runner 

Our Bn. now occupy woods S of Hill 255 to a point about 5025 about 150 
meters S of crest. Our right flank Co. reports no contact with you. We 
are badly disorganized from the attack. Request you endeavor to connect 
with our right. Will you send back 2 runners so that I can keep contact 
with you tonight? Fortune, Cmdg. Bn." 

"From Medal, 3rd Bn. 361 At P. C. 4824 Date 9-10-18 Hour 22:05 
To C. O. 1st Bn. 127 Inf. No. 24 By Runner 

Your sgt. has been on my right flank to locate Co. C 127 Inf. Cannot 
find the left 125 or C Co. 127. I understand you are combat liaison. Our 
right flank is on 5125. We heard that the 125 had advanced beyond us, can 
you confirm it? Fortune" 

While the above four messages were being written it was getting quite 
dark, and German Infantry was seen moving around on top of Hill 255. 

"From Mamma 1 At P. C. 5197 Date 9 Oct. 18 Hour 19:45 (Rec. 22:15) 
To Medal No. 32 By Runner 

Your No. 19 received. 125 Inf. did advance far beyond Hill 255. 1st 
Bn. 127 Inf. which was Liaison Bn. was sent forward in support. We under- 
stand your right flank not in danger but you should protect it with machine 
guns attached to Co. I. Maul has been directed to send G Co. your support. 
2nd Bn. Melon is on your left and should get in contact with you shortly. 
You can reach them also through Maul. Organize your position in depth 
and notify these hqrs. of disposition. Mamma 1" 

Lieutenant Bailey of Company "K" had sent two runners to Battalion 
Headquarters, but both were wounded before getting across the draw be- 
tween their woods and the Battalion P. C. The Lieutenant then recon- 
noitered his position and that of Companies "I" and "M" and went to the 
Battalion Headquarters himself. With the information brought by Lieu- 
tenant Bailey and after giving directions for Lieutenant Linforth to cover 
the right flank with his machine guns and indicating the position to be 
taken by the expected reinforcements from the 2nd Battalion, Lieutenant 
Fortune as Commander of the 3rd Battalion set out with a 2nd Battalion 
runner for 2nd Battalion Headquarters to report the situation by telephone 
to Colonel Davis. This trip was made necessary because the 3rd Battalion 
telephone lines had been badly cut early in the evening and were not yet 
in operating condition. 

108 



It was after midnight by the time that the report had been made and 
Colonel Davis then ordered the 3rd Battalion to withdraw from its position 
near the crest of Hill 255 to the southern edge of the woods so that artillery 
fire could be concentrated on the block house and on the trench system 
near the top of the hill. Lieutenant Fortune arrived back at his battalion 
at about 3:00 A. M. and at once ordered "I," "K" and "M" Companies to 
withdraw to the lower edge of the woods. At 4:05 A. M., about as the last 
company was settling into position, the following message was delivered by 
a runner. 

"From Mamma At P. C. 5197 Date 10 Oct., '18. Hour 2:00 (Rec. 4:05) 
To Medal No. 1 By Runner 

Do not withdraw from Hill 255. Artillery not available against it. You 
will attack and mop up the hill at daybreak, expect to obtain some assist- 
ance for you from one company and one-pounder 127 Inf. on right. One 
company 362nd and platoon machine guns 347 M. G. Battalion will assist 
later. General Infantry attack to be made 7:00 A. M. Mamma 1 " 

10 October— HILLS 255 and 269 to HILL 288, attacking, \y 2 kilometers. 

The probable reason for the denial by higher command of further artillery 
concentration was the fact that a concentration of artillery fire on the 255 
stronghold might unduly endanger neighboring advancing troops and later 
developments supported the decision. In any event, further artillery sup- 
port was not to be had, and with its own depleted forces, the battalion was 
now to do the thing it had failed to accomplish with its fuller, fresher com- 
mand of the day before. At Regimental Headquarters the Operations Officer 
(who had but just loaded into an ambulance, Captain Burke, fatally 
wounded) was making every effort to gain additional support for the heroic 
battalion of Miller Hill which had now for the second time lost its Battalion 
Commander, had lost all of its original Company Commanders, and had 
received what read like its own death warrant. The story is told in the 
following messages: 

"From Mamma At P. C. 5197 Date 10 Oct 18 Hour 2:30 

To Medal No. 5 By Runner 

Am notifying Mate to hold his one-pounder in readiness for your call 
during your attack on Hill 255. He will also supply runner to keep up 
liaison between you and his gun. Mamma" 



"Headquarters Mamma P. C. 
American E. F., A. P. O. 776 
10 October, 1918. 
Memorandum : 

1. The attack will be resumed October 10 at H Hour. 

2. This regiment, reinforced by 2nd Bn. 362nd Inf., and being accom- 
panied by two companies from 362nd Inf. and one company from 347th 
M. G. Bn., will attack in the triangle, Hill 255, Hill 269, LA TUILERIE 
Farm. 32nd Division on the right, 1st Div. on the left. Warning Message 
attached. Field Order follows. The regiment will advance at "H" hour 

109 



with 1st Bn. this regiment and 2nd Bn. 362nd Inf. in front line, and in order 
named, from left to right. These Bns. will be followed respectively by the 
2nd and 3rd Bns. this regiment, F and G Cos returning to the 2nd Bn. 
for this advance after capture of Hill 255 (Note: This should have read 
"F" and "H" Cos. because the 2nd Battalion had elected to send three 
platoons of its support company, Company "H," instead of its front line 
company, Company "G" as the unit to reinforce the 3rd Battalion. Regi- 
mental Headquarters at this time did not know of the substitution.) 

3. The 3rd Bn. will operate as a combat unit, whose first objective will 
be Hill 255; the 2nd Bn. 362nd Inf. being authorized to push by this hill 
in its advance, if this is practicable. After taking Hill 255, the 3rd Bn. 
will continue its advance within the sector, and assist the 2nd Bn. in mop- 
ping up. 

4. One 1 -pounder will accompany 1st Bn. and one the 3rd Bn. After 
the capture of Hill 255, the 3rd Bn.'s gun will be subject to the call of the 
C. O. 2nd Bn. 362nd Inf. 362nd Inf. will supply one company to act as 
combat liaison detachment on each advancing flank of the front line of this 
regiment. Each company will be assisted by a detachment of machine 
guns from the 347th M. G. Bn. The company on the right will primarily 
report to and assist the C. O. 3rd Bn. 361st Inf. in capturing Hill 255. These 
companies and detachments will report to Regimental P. C. 361st Infantry 
at 5:30 Oct. 10, for guides to conduct them to the Bn. Commanders with 
whom they will move forward at H hour. 

5. Probably impracticable for any artillery support to be given against 
the enemy on the immediate front, including Hill 255. 

6. Medical attendants will be provided on basis prescribed for October 
9, arrangements being made by Regimental Surgeon to co-ordinate the work 
with that of the 362nd Infantry Regimental Surgeon. 

7. Every effort will be made to deliver to troops requiring the same, 
sufficient reserve or other rations before H hour, to provide for at least 
one meal, thereafter regular delivery of rations will be made and supply 
of reserve rations brought up to the required amount as rapidly as possible. 
The first distribution of rations will be handled from dump near the present 
Regimental P. C, the others from new dump to be established in GESNES. 
Distribution will be under Lieut. Voderberg. Arrangements will be made 
to co-ordinate as far as possible the ration delivery of the 361st and 
362nd Regiments. 

8. Regimental P. C. will be at 5197 at commencement of action, and 
will move to GESNES later in the day. 

By order of Colonel Davis: 

Harold H. Burton 
Captain and Asst. Adjt., 
HHB-mov Mamma." 

"From Mamma At P. C. 5197 Date 10 Oct 18 Hour 5:30 

To Medal No. 8 By Runner 

Capt. McCaustland, Co. A. Method is moving up with four machine 
guns to form part of right combat liaison detachment, also Capt. Robinson 
with Co. A Melon is doing same. Have arranged for 1 -pounder from 1st 

no 





"I 
K 
L 
M 


"From Medal 
To Mamma 





Bn. 127 Inf. to assist your attack from right flank. Get in touch with him 
at once. His gun is to be ready to open fire at 6:30 on blockhouse but 
it is necessary that you control his action. Make the attack with view to 
conserving men and as far as possible to keep all elements constantly in 
hand. Advise us of your progress. Mamma 7" 

On the back of this message Lieutenant Fortune put the following pencil 
note being an estimate of effectives: 

32 men) F 65 men) 

35 men) H 85 men) 150 

35 men) 142 Com. L. 362 70 men) 70" 
40 men) 

At P. C. 4823 Date 10-10-18 Hour 6:57 

No. 1 By Runner 

Withdrew from Hill 255 last night before receiving your order. Sketch 
herewith shows our disposition at H hour. Medal " 

"From Mamma 10 Oct. 18 6:45 (Rec. 6:58) 

To Medal By Buzzer 

Field order will not be issued act on orders already sent. Mamma 7" 

At zero hour patrols pushed out from the 3rd Battalion front line com- 
panies to feel out the enemy, and Lieutenant McLaughlin with what re- 
mained of the Battalion Intelligence Section was ordered to reconnoiter 
the hill. 

"From Medal At P. C. 4823 Date 10-10-18 Hour 7:30 

To Mamma No. 2 By Buzzer 

Patrols report Hill 255 unoccupied, we are moving to the top. Medal" 

"From Medal At P. C. 4823 Date 10-10-18 Hour 8:08 

To Mamma No. 3 By Runner 

25 wounded lying along edge of woods 4823 by my old P. C. A few men 
been here since 10:00 9-10-18 the rest brought in last night. Endeavor to 
get stretchers to evacuate same. Medal" 

"To Sgt. Major. (Rec. 8:25) 

Rush casualties report, show effective strength. Lt. Valentine" 

"From Mamma L. O. At P. C. 5197 Date 10 Oct 18 (Rec. 8:40) 

To Medal Buzzer 

This P. C. moves to GESNES, establish a line of runners to that town 
and I will return your present line as soon as we pull out of here. Wire 
communication will also be established to that point. Mamma L. O." 

"From Medal Date 10-10-18 Hour 8:15 

To Mamma No. 4 Runner 

Reached Hill 255 8:00 A. M. No resistance. Germans having evacuated 
during night. In touch with Co. A 362nd Inf. and M. G. det. of right 
combat liaison. They are in touch with 127th on their right. No contact 
on left. Have returned H & F Cos to 2nd Bn. No sign 2nd Bn. 362nd 
Inf. on our front. Sending forward patrols to gain contact and am push- 
ing forward in the following order right to left, front line M & K support 

ill 



I & L, our Cos. consist of about 35 effectives each. We will form in groups 
for mopping up and endeavor to maintain contact. Medal" 

"From Medal Date 10-10-18 Hour 9:15 

To 2nd Bn. 361 No. 5 Runner 

We are attacking as per memo Mamma 10-10-18. Have taken Hill 255 
we are supposed to push forward to LA TUILER1E FARM supporting the 
362nd with you on our left in support of the 1st Bn. Have you contact with 
the 1st Bn.? When you move up on our left notify me so we can go for- 
ward together. The 127th has pushed past us on the right. Medal" 

The attack of October 10th, into the BOIS DE MONCY and BOIS DE 
GESNES proceeded regularly and with comparatively slight losses. Having 
taken Hill 255, the 3rd Battalion moved into position as a support battalion, 
and Companies "F" and "H" were returned to the 2nd Battalion. During the 
advance there was at first some difficulty in establishing complete liaison and 
in getting all units in their proper relative positions. The formation was, how- 
ever, completed as originally planned. In the front line were the 2nd Battalion 
of the 362nd Infantry on the right and the 1st Battalion of the 361st Infantry 
on the left (Companies "C" and "D" respectively on right and left in front 
and Companies "B" and "A" respectively on right and left in support). 
One company of the 362nd Infantry with supporting machine guns served 
as Combat Liaison detachment on each flank. The 3rd Battalion as right 
support battalion had Companies "M" and "K" respectively as right and 
left front line companies, "I" and "L" respectively as right and left support 
companies. The 2nd Battalion, as left support battalion placed companies 
"G" and "E" as right and left front line companies, "H" and "F" as right 
and left support companies. The Machine Gun Company followed the 
3rd Battalion and assisted in covering the right flank during a failure of 
liaison with the 32nd Division. 

The plan to move the main Regimental P. C. to GESNES was abandoned 
and in its stead a system was adopted whereby an "Advance P. C." was 
temporarily established near the front line of the regiment and the "Old 
P. C." was held intact on the axis of liaison and axis of advance pending 
the relief of the brigade which was expected to occur as soon as its advance 
had sufficiently narrowed its front in its triangular sector so that the 1st 
and 32nd Divisions would close the gap between them. 

Shortly before noon General McDonald was advised by telephone from 
the 1st Division Headquarters that the 1st and 32nd Divisions had met at 
LA TUILERIE FERME, then about 2 kilometers ahead of his line. This 
left apparently a simple task for the 181st Brigade to advance to the apex 
of its triangular sector, and to be pinched out. Orders to attack imme- 
diately and push through to the farm were accordingly received by Colonel 
Davis. 

Reports from our own front, however, made it clear that the enemy was 
still in great force and in a strongly entrenched position on the ridges 
nearly a kilometer south of LA TUILERIE FERME. At that point the 
enemy's third prepared position ran in a south-easterly direction across the 
sector, forming a crescent that curved around the brigade's right flank along 
LA C6TE DAME MARIE, and including Hills 288, 287 and 286. In a sunken 

112 



road on the southern slope of Hill 288, and extending directly across the 
sector, the enemy had placed not only cleverly concealed machine guns but 
several light minnenwerfers and some light field pieces prepared to fire point 
blank at an attacking force. In some instances the guns were reported to be at 
the mouths of tunnels dug through the earthen wall on the south side of the 
sunken road and out to the southern slope of the hill. Patrols crawled 
directly up to these defences and one scout from Company "D," who under- 
stood German, overheard a German officer going up and down his lines in- 
structing the gunners not to fire until the Americans were half way up the 
slope, and then to wipe them out. An attempt was made to outflank Hill 288 
by moving the 2nd Battalion of the 362nd Infantry around it to the west, while 
at the same time Lieutenant Fortune's battalion was to be sent around it 
from the east. It soon developed, however, that Hill 288 was part of a 
continuous trench system, and it was found inadvisable to attempt com- 
pletion of the maneuver. 

Lieutenant Hubbell had located an advance P. C. for the regiment east of 
Hill 269 in the BOIS DE MONCY and Colonel Davis came up to investigate 
personally the situation on the front line. Finally word was received that 
the report from the 1st Division was incorrect, and the orders for the attack 
were cancelled. The 3rd Battalion was recalled from its flanking movement 
just as its front line was again about to come under the guns of the enemy. 

Leaving a line of outguards, the troops were withdrawn for the night to 
a defensive position 400 meters south of the German line. Intermittent 
machine gun and shell fire was kept up by the enemy, but in spite of 
frequent scattered casualties, the losses on that day were small in this 
regiment in comparison with its previous engagements. 

11 October— BOIS DE GESNES (MEUSE), in Brigade Reserve, and to 
EXMORIEUX FERME, South, night marching, 4 kilometers. 

On the night of October 10/11 the brigade passed from the control and 
command of the 1st Division to that of the 32nd Division, and a renewal 
of the attack was ordered for 7 o'clock, October 11th. For this attack the 
362nd Infantry was ordered to take over the front line, by a passage of 
lines at "H" hour, and then to attack with one battalion in line and two 
battalions (less the 2 companies on combat liaison service) in support. The 
361st Infantry was to follow the 362nd Infantry at 800 meters, as a Brigade 
Reserve, with its 3rd and 1st Battalions on the right and left in front, and 
its 2nd Battalion in support. This was changed so as to add Companies 
"F" and "H" of this regiment to the support of the 362nd Infantry. For 
the first time since the jump-off in the MEUSE-ARGONNE offensive 
on September 26th the regiment found itself taking part in an engage- 
ment but with none of its own units in the front line. It proved to be 
a day of rest for the regiment. The organized defences of Hill 288 proved 
too great an obstacle for the combined efforts of the front lines of the 
brigade and of the divisions on its flanks. A concentration of heavy artillery 
was directed against the enemy for 50 minutes in the early afternoon, but 
no material progress was gained as only a few shells of small caliber had 
hit the narrow wall that constituted the actual position. 

At 6 o'clock that evening, the following message was sent out and about 

113 



an hour later was received with joy on the line, which was then over three 
kilometers north of the "Old Mamma P. C." near EXMORIEUX FERME. 

"From Mamma Date 11 Oct 18 Hour 18:00 

To Mate, Maul, Medal, M. G. Co. By Runner 

Withdraw your Bn. early tonight to bivouac between old Regimental 
P. C. and ECLISFONTAINE, reporting arrival thereat. No relieving troops 
substituted. Hot meal at bivouac tonight. Mamma" 

The 181st Brigade was to be relieved by the 64th Brigade of the 32nd 
Division, but as this regiment was serving as an independent reserve 
element it was to move back prior to the completion of the relief. A hot 
midnight meal in ample portions was served at the kitchens at EXMORIEUX 
FERME as the tired troops came in. The companies then moved to a field 
a few hundred yards away and enjoyed a peaceful sleep in the open, prior 
to an early move in the morning. 

The only officer of the regiment who had been killed or fatally wounded 
in this phase of the offensive was Captain Campbell Burke, of Company 
"K," then commanding the 3rd Battalion. Colonel Davis' last message to 
him as he was being carried to the rear was that he was his next choice for 
promotion to a Majority, and this, though he had been a Captain scarcely 
a month and was the junior Captain in the regiment at the time it went 
over the top on September 26th. This young officer of 28 years of age who 
had seen nearly 9 years of service as an enlisted man in the Regular Army, 
came to the regiment in 1917 as a First Lieutenant and during its formative 
period had commanded Company "C" and made of it one of the regiment's 
most thoroughly military units. He was unmistakably and inevitably a 
soldier. It is difficult, if not impossible to think of him as anything except 
a soldier or even out of uniform. He was absolutely dependable, in that 
nothing, however great the temptation, could move him from the strictest 
performance of duty. Correct in dress, and conspicuously neat in appear- 
ance, clear and direct in thought and action, a natural disciplinarian and 
leader of soldiers, clean in thought and deed, tireless, equipped with nerves 
of steel, and cherishing a simple philosophy, he made a cool and most 
reliable leader in action. He was thoroughly informed as to his military 
duties and responsibilities, and blessed with a sense of humor and a 
control of language that made him a welcome companion in any group 
of officers and a master of any situation with his men. He frequently 
remarked with quaint pride that on his military record his home appeared 
as the "U. S. Army," his religion — "None," his nearest relative — "None," 
his emergency address — "The Adjutant General of the Army, Washington, 
D. C," and his $10,000 insurance policy ran in favor of The Adjutant 
General of the Army. 

To Captain Campbell Burke, one hundred per cent soldier and officer, 
was posthumously awarded the Distinguished Service Cross with the follow- 
ing brief citation: 

"For extraordinary heroism in action near GESNES, France, October 
9, 1918. The battalion which Captain Burke commanded was ordered to 
attack a position on Hill 255 under terriffic machine gun and artillery fire. 
His coolness and personal example contributed largely to the success of 

114 



the battalion and enabled it to capture substantially the entire objective. 
He was severely wounded in this engagement." (W. D. G. O. 20, Sec. VII, 
Jan. 30, 1919.) 

Company "L" went into this engagement with two officers, Lieutenants 
Everly and Coats. Lieutenant Everly was wounded and was succeeded as 
company commander by Lieutenant Coats. Lieutenant Coats was wounded 
and the company was passed to Lieutenant Tongate, then of Company "K." 
He was wounded and the company passed to First Sergeant Howard and 
from him to Lieutenant Edick, then of Company "M." From Lieutenant 
Edick it passed to Lieutenant Sweat then of Company "F," and he held this 
command for some time, even after the regiment was withdrawn from the 
line. All of the above changes, except the first, took place on October 9th. 
Also in this phase of the offensive were wounded: Captain Doherty of the 
Machine Gun Company, and the following Lieutenants: Wood of Company 
"C," Ware of Company "D," Proctor (of Company "D"), 1st Battalion 
Liaison Officer, Ellis of Company "G," and Batman of Company "I." Lieu- 
tenant Bates of Company "A" and Lieutenant Lane of Company "G" both 
were extremely ill during this engagement but refused to allow themselves 
to be evacuated. Companies "D" and "G" were the only ones to come out 
of the line still under the command of a Captain. 

The system of detailing men from the line as regular litter bearers and 
of sending them forward with their respective battalions as they moved into 
the attack, greatly improved the promptness of service for the wounded in 
spite of the long carries that finally became necessary to bring the wounded 
to the main regimental station at EXMORIEUX FERME. The ambulance 
service was good and as the ambulances could drive directly up to the farm, 
evacuation was prompt. 

On October 8th, during the engagement the following new officers 
joined the regiment, and were distributed as here indicated: 2nd Lieutenant 
T. W. Burnett, assigned to Company "A," 2nd Lieutenant Charles Stout, 
attached to Company "L," and 2nd Lieutenant H. A. Brocopp, attached to 
Company "I" but detailed on Special Duty as a Liaison Officer serving 
with 181st Brigade. 

The Supply Train and kitchens had followed the troops to ECLISFON- 
TAINE on the rainy night of October 7/8, but had found the place receiving 
too much shell fire to justify attracting more of it with the smoke of a 
"kitchen park." The trains and the nine kitchens were then moved to 
EPINONVILLE, where two meals a day were regularly prepared. These 
meals were placed in large metal containers which, in some instances at 
least, had a double metal lining so as to preserve the heat. These con- 
tainers, known as the "marmite cans," were hauled in the ration carts about 
two kilometers to EXMORIEUX FERME and there delivered to the ration 
details that had been sent from the several companies to carry the food by 
hand across the remaining two or three kilometers to the line. 

The work of these carrying parties was not only most fatiguing, but 
also dangerous as they were forced to cross open areas and in several 
instances the men were hit and the cans they carried were so badly riddled 
and torn as to become useless. 

115 



After the attack of October 9th, Lieutenant Brace, in charge of the 
rations, brought the kitchens to EXMORIEUX FERME, where the meals 
for October 10th and 1 1th were delivered direct to the carrying parties. 

Whatever may have been the other disadvantages of the rapid changes 
of the regiment from one division to another and back again, they were 
largely counterbalanced by the fact that it gave Captain Savage a practical 
opportunity to draw as his needs required, either from the dumps of the 
1st or the 32nd Division. Both of these divisions were well supplied with 
food and equipment and their officers always offered the readiest co-operation 
in assisting in the supply of this regiment. 

After the advance Regimental P. C. had been established in the BOIS DE 
MONCY and Lieutenant Quinby had brought reserve rations to the dumps 
between it and the old P. C, he decided to return by the GESNES-CIERGES 
road. This road was smoother but not safer. As the train swung out of 
GESNES it passed a German War garden filled with fresh cabbages. The 
sight brought the train to a halt and "Shorty" Marino started for a par- 
ticularly luscious head of cabbage well within the fence. Just then a 
German battery dropped a ranging shot in the outskirts of the village. 
Marino sprinted back to the fence and waited. No more shots followed, 
and his eye wandered longingly to the cabbage. The magnetism of the 
vegetable prevailed and he again drew near it. Just as he layed his hands 
on his prize — the next shot fell and fell closer than the first. Marino 
dropped the cabbage and hesitated. Again he grabbed, and again a shell 
burst nearer than the last. He dropped the cabbage and turned away, 
but again his palate and appetite coaxed him back and again he grabbed 
his evening meal. A fourth shell burst closer than the third. It was time 
for final action, and just as the next sociable Boche "seventy-seven" tore 
away a piece of the fence — Marino tore away his cabbage, ran for his ration 
cart, and the entire train went on its way the happier. 

When the troops took up formation on the morning of October 12th they 
actually looked better than they had when they came out of the line in BOIS 
DE CIERGES a week before. This last engagement, in spite of the deter- 
mined resistance on Hills 255 and 269, had been more easy to bear than the 
first, for the men were now equipped with their blankets and overcoats, and 
in spite of the weakened condition of many of them from continued diarrhoea 
due to constant exposure and nervous strain, the comparatively regular and 
better meals had done much to uphold both their strength and spirits. 

The regiment this time had been in action a little more than four days — 
three days in the line (one day on outpost duty, two days attacking), and one 
day in reserve. During the 9th and 10th, the two days on which the regi- 
ment was attacking, it had been serving as part of the 1st Division, and 
on the other days, as part of the 32nd Division. It had captured the im- 
portant and heavily defended German strongholds on Hills 255 and 269 
and, with the 362nd Infantry, had pushed the American line into the BOIS 
DE MONCY and BOIS DE GESNES, and almost to the parapet of the hostile 
entrenched positions on Hill 288 and along LA C6TE DAME MARIE. These 
last positions were so located and prepared that their ultimate capture would 
require either tremendous and extraordinarily accurate artillery concentration 
or a flanking movement extending well beyond the sector of the brigade. In 

116 



two days the regiment had taken two strongholds, and with two com- 
panies of the 362nd Infantry, had moved forward the American line a total 
of 2 kilometers over a sector narrowing from practically 2 kilometers to 1 
kilometer in width. 

The regiment's losses are shown below. These with the losses suf- 
fered in the first phase of the MEUSE-ARGONNE drive, make the totals 
shown in the last column on the right: 

SECOND PHASE "MEUSE-ARGONNE" OFFENSIVE 
October 7-12 (inclusive), 1918 

Totals 

Companies and OFFICERS r- — ENLISTED MEN ^ for Both 

Detachments Killed Wounded Killed Wounded Missing- Prisoners Totals Phases 

Field & Staff 

"A" 

"B" 

"C" 

"D" 

"E" 
« F » 

"G" 
"H" 
"I" 

"K" 1 

"L" 

"M" 

Hq. 

M. G. 

Sup. 

Med. Det. 

Total 1 9 84 255 1 1 

On October 12th, the Chief of Staff of the 1st Division sent to Brig- 
adier General McDonald, commanding the 181st Brigade, the following 
letter : 

"Headquarters First Division, 
American E. F., France, 
October 12, 1918. 

FROM: Chief of Staff, 1st Division, 

To: Commanding General, 181st Brigade. 

SUBJECT: Appreciation of Services. 

1. The Commanding General, 1st Division, wishes me to express to 
you and to the officers and men of your command his appreciation and the 
appreciation of this division for the services rendered by the 181st Infantry 
Brigade while attached to the 1st Division, during the operations between 
the Argonne and the Meuse, October, 1918. 

2. This division as a whole fully appreciated the difficulties of the 
position of your Brigade. Fatigued by a week's combat and forced by the 
necessity of the situation to reenter the battle under the staff and with 

117 





7 


24 




5 


19 


1 


4 


15 


2 


8 


36 




3 


1 




6 


17 


1 


1 


8 




3 


13 


1 


10 


25 


1 


5 


21 


2 


18 


37 




6 


18 




1 


14 


1 


7 


5 
2 






4 


31 


86 


24 


99 


20 


94 


46 


103 


4 


78 


23 


70 


10 


81 


16 


79 


36 


108 


29 


105 


58 


117 


24 


106 


15 


69 


13 


41 


2 


8 





9 


351 


1257 



the artillery support of another division, the willingness and energy with 
which you executed the missions assigned you, are worthy of the best 
traditions of the service. J. N. Greely, 

Chief of Staff." 

On October 17th, General McDonald, in submitting to the Commanding 
General, Fifth Army Corps, his Operations Report for October 7th- 12th, 
included the following paragraph: 

"7. I desire to emphasize that during all of the above detached service 
of the brigade my troops were operating under the most adverse conditions, 
weather, enemy activity, and the weakening effects of diarrhoea, all com- 
bining to try their spirit to the utmost. At no time was there the slightest 
indication of faltering or weakening on the part of officers or men, and I 
feel that the organization commanders and their men are deserving of the 
highest commendation for the steadfast way in which they performed every 
task demanded of them." 

In connection with these statements and particularly in connection with 
the letter from the Chief of Staff of the 1st Division, the following two 
general orders as published to the regiment, are recognized to include 
within their scope, the 181st Brigade: "181st Brigade, 

November 18, 1919. 
Memorandum : 

The following is published for the information of all the command: 

HEADQUARTERS FIRST ARMY CORPS 
GENERAL ORDERS: November 11, 1918. 

No. 17. 

1. During this pause in the operations of these headquarters, the Corps 
Commander desires that the units which have contributed to the constant 
success of the 1st U. S. Corps be informed of his full appreciation of the 
service each has rendered to the common end. 

2. This appreciation must be extended to every element of the Corps 
and Divisional units for it goes without saying that the work of each man, 
no matter what his station, has contributed powerfully to the accomplish- 
ment of the common aim — the defeat of the enemy. 

3. It is the desire of the Corps Commander that his sincerest thanks, 
best wishes and assurances of his appreciation reach every member of the 
units which have contributed to the steady and unfailing success of the 
Corps. 

By Command of Major General Diskman: 

Malin Craig, 
OFFICIAL: Chief of Staff. 

W. A. Haverfield, 
Lieut. Col. A. G. D. 
Adjutant. 

By Command of Brigadier General McDonald: 

Wm. H. Curtiss, 
Major, U. S. A., 
Brigade Adjutant." 



118 



"G. H. Q. 

AMERICAN EXPEDITIONARY FORCES 

France, Nov. 10, 1918. 
GENERAL ORDERS ) 
No. 201 ) 

1. The Commander in Chief desires to make of record in the General 
Orders of the American Expeditionary Forces his extreme satisfaction with 
the conduct of the officers and soldiers of the First Division in its advance 
west of the Meuse between October 4th and 1 1th, 1918. During this period 
the division gained a distance of seven kilometers over a country which 
presented not only remarkable facilities for enemy defense but also great 
difficulties of terrain for the operation of our troops. 

2. The division met with resistance from elements of eight hostile 
divisions, most of which were first class troops and some of which were 
completely rested. The enemy chose to defend its position to the death, 
and the fighting was always of the most desperate kind. Throughout the 
operations the officers and men of the division displayed the highest type of 
courage, fortitude and self-sacrificing devotion to duty. In addition to many 
enemy killed, the division captured one thousand four hundred and seven 
of the enemy, thirteen 77mm. field guns, ten trench mortars and numerous 
machine guns and stores. 

3. The success of the division in driving a deep advance into the 
enemy's territory enabled an assault to be made on the left by the neigh- 
boring division against the northeastern portion of the Forest of Argonne, 
and enabled the First Division to advance to the right and outflank the 
enemy's position in front of the division on that flank. 

4. The Commander in Chief has noted in this division a special pride 
of service and a high state or morale, never broken by hardship nor battle. 

5. This order will be read to all organizations at the first assembly 
formation after its receipt. (14790-A-306.) 

BY COMMAND OF GENERAL PERSHING: 

James W. McAndrew, 
OFFICIAL: Chief of Staff." 

Robert C. Davis, 
Adjutant General. 

With this engagement, there ended the participation of this regiment in 
the MEUSE-ARGONNE Offensive. It had participated in it for more than 
16 days. Eleven of these days were spent in the firing line, one of them 
in active support of the line, and four in reserve. During the eleven days 
on the firing line the regiment had spent six of them in attacking the 
enemy, with the result that it had in that time penetrated the enemy's lines 
for a total depth of more than 15 kilometers. 

To Colonel Davis and to the character of the men in the ranks should 
go the primary credit for the exceptionally good record that the regiment 
had made. Colonel Davis, first of all, deserves the honor of the achieve- 
ment — for it was his teaching, his personal standard of discipline and of 

119 



military training, and finally his personal example under fire that had 
enabled the men and officers to make of themselves the efficient soldiers 
they had proved to be. 

In recognition of his distinguished and courageous service in this engage- 
ment there was later awarded to the Colonel the Distinguished Service Cross 
with the following citation (word of which reached him before he was 
killed in Belgium on November 1st) : 

"For extraordinary heroism in action near Gesnes, France, September 
26 to October 12, 1918. He displayed distinguished gallantry in leading 
and directing his front line in the four days' advance on Gesnes, and in 
the four following days holding the front line under heavy shell fire. During 
this period his regiment was suffering heavy casualties, but he remained 
constantly with the front line, encouraging his men by his presence to 
hold out under this most dangerous and trying condition of warfare. Twice 
wounded, he remained in command of the regiment throughout the entire 
action until it was finally relieved on October 12th. (W. D. G. O. 139 
Sec. I, December 24, 1918.)" 

The wounds referred to in this citation were slight wounds in the fingers, 
one of which had evidently shattered the tip of the bone and caused the 
Colonel frequent pain. He never let his wounds interfere with the usual 
performance of his duties and these wounds bear testimony, better than can 
any words, to the nearness to the firing line that the Colonel felt it his 
duty to go. In addition to this award of the D. S. C. he was also post- 
humously awarded the Distinguished Service Medal. This was in recognition 
of his service as a whole and the citation is quoted later in the text and also 
is set forth in the appendix. Furthermore, by an order, also quoted in the 
appendix to this book, the War Department in July, 1919, named one of the 
new army posts near GATUN, Panama Canal Department, "Fort William 
D. Davis," in his honor. 

The following further commendatory statements relating to this phase 
of the activities of the 181st Brigade and 91st Division were published 
later: 

"Headquarters 361st Infantry, 
American E. F., A. P. O. 776, 
October 25, 1918. 
Memorandum : 

The following memorandum from 181st Infantry Brigade Headquarters 
is published for the information and guidance of all concerned: 

181st Brigade, 
October 25, 1918. 
Memorandum: 

To the Officers and Men of the 181st Brigade: 

1. The Brigade Commander wishes to convey to all the Officers and men 
of this Brigade his high admiration for their gallant conduct and for the 
indomitable will which carried them successfully through the eight days of 
battle, 26th September to 3rd October, inclusive. 

120 



2. This period was followed by five days more of just such thoroughly 
soldierly conduct in battle while the Brigade was attached successively to 
the 1st and 32nd Divisions, 8th to 12th October, inclusive. The strongest 
of the enemy positions on the front of these two Divisions were assaulted 
and captured by the 181st Brigade, namely Hills 269 and 255 northwest of 
Gesnes. The 361st Infantry and the 347th Machine Gun Battalion bore 
the brunt of the fighting in these actions. 

3. On the 29th of September the assault on Gesnes, resulting in its 
capture, was carried out by the 362nd Infantry, ably assisted by the 361st 
Infantry, and the 347th Machine Gun Battalion, both of which lost heavily 
in officers and men, their losses almost equaling those of the assaulting 
battalion. 

4. The conduct of the brigade as a whole has won the highest com- 
mendation of the division, the Corps and the Army Commanders, and has 
won for itself an enviable name as a fighting unit. The Brigade Com- 
mander desires to thank each and every soldier — officer and man — for the 
part borne by him in this campaign and urges each individual to bend all 
his energies toward maintaining the excellent record of the brigade. 

J. B. McDonald 
Brigadier General, U. S. A., 
Commanding. 



Bv order of Colonel Davis: 



Marshall S. Scudder 

Captain and Acting Adjutant, 

361st Infantry." 



"G. H. Q. 
AMERICAN EXPEDITIONARY FORCES, 

France, Dec. 19. 1918. 
GENERAL ORDERS ) 
No. 232 ) 

It is with a sense of gratitude for its splendid accomplishment which will 
live through all history, that I record in General Orders a tribute to the 
victory of the First Army in the Meuse-Argonne battle. 

Tested and strengthened by the reduction of the St. Mihiel salient, for 
more than six weeks you battered against the pivot of the enemy line on the 
western front. It was a position of imposing natural strength, stretching on 
both sides of the Meuse River from the bitterly contested hills of Verdun 
to the almost impenetrable forest of the Argonne; a position, moreover, 
fortified by four years labor designed to render it impregnable; a position 
you broke utterly, and thereby hastened the collapse of the enemy's mil- 
itary power. 

Soldiers of all the divisions engaged under the First, Third and Fifth 
Corps— the 1st, 2nd, 3rd, 4th, 5th, 7th, 26th, 28th, 29th, 32nd, 33rd, 35th, 
37th, 42nd, 77th, 79th, 80th, S2nd, 89th, 90th and 91st— you will be long 

121 



remembered for the stubborn persistence of your progress, your storming of 
obstinately defended machine gun nests, your penetration, yard by yard, 
of woods and ravines, your heroic resistance in the face of counter attacks 
supported by powerful artillery fire. For more than a month, from the 
initial attack of September 26th, you fought your way slowly through the 
Argonne, through the woods and over hills west of the Meuse; you slowly 
enlarged your hold on the Cotes de Meuse to the east; and then, on the 
first of November, your attack forced the enemy into flight. Pressing his 
retreat, you cleared the entire left bank of the Meuse south of Sedan, and 
then stormed the heights on the right bank and drove him into the plain 
beyond. 

Your achievement, v/hich is scarcely to be equalled in American history, 
must remain a source of proud satisfaction to the troops who participated 
in the last campaign of the war. The American people will remember it as 
the realization of the hitherto potential strength of the American contribu- 
tion toward the cause to which they had sworn allegiance. There can be 
no greater reward for a soldier or for a soldier's memory. 

This order will be read to all organizations at the first assembly forma- 
tion after its receipt. 

John J. Pershing, 

General, Commander in Chief, 
American Expeditionary Forces." 
OFFICIAL: 

Robert C. Davis, 
Adjutant General. 

The following is a record of the interest in and appreciation of the 
efforts of the Division, as it was being felt in the Division's home area: 

"(270— FOR OFFICIAL CIRCULATION ONLY) HQ. 9 1ST DIV. 

A. E. F., Dec. 18, '18. 
MEMORANDUM: 

The following resolution by the Council of the City of Tacoma, Wash- 
ington, U. S. A., is published for the information of this command: 

'WHEREAS, recent news from France tells of the splendid showing 
made by the 91st Division in action, carrying on in the face of the fiercest 
opposition and winning for itself the remarkable commendation of the 
Major General Commanding, expressed in these words: 

'At a time when the divisions on its flanks were faltering and even falling 
back, the 91st pushed ahead and steadfastly clung to every yard gained 
In its initial performance your division has established itself firmly on the 
list of the Commander-in-Chief's reliable fighting units. Please extend to 
your officers and men my appreciation of their splendid behavior and my 
hearty congratulations on the brilliant record they have made,' and 

WHEREAS, this information recalls vividly to our minds the fact that 
the 91st Division was the first division trained at our own Camp Lewis, 
and refreshes the recollection of the association of this division with the 

122 



people of this community — an association which attached it to us by ties 
which cannot be broken; and 

WHEREAS, we recall with pleasure that the foundations of the strong 
and earnest character of this division were well and truly laid under the 
devoted care of Major General Greene and the officers associated with 
him; and 

WHEREAS, we remember well the diligence with which their training 
was carried on during the whole time of their stay at Camp Lewis and we 
have not forgotten the good name which the division left with us when it 
was ordered away for duty overseas, and it is certainly no matter of surprise 
to us that the 91st Division has acquitted itself so nobly and so bravely; 
NOW, THEREFORE, 

BE IT RESOLVED BY THE COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF TACOMA: 

That the Council place on its permanent records its sense of pride in the 
91st Division, its grateful recollection of its association with this City, and 
its high appreciation of the well merited honor which has come to it. 

Adopted on roll call Nov. 8, 1918. Yeas, 5; Davisson, Harrison, Pettit, 
Shoemaker, Riddell. Nays, 0. 

C. M. Riddell, Mayor.' 

ATTEST: 

Blanche Funk Miller, City Clerk. 



HCJ 

10:20—10:34. BY COMMAND OF MAJOR GENERAL JOHNSTON 

Henry C. Jewett, 
Colonel, Engineers, 
OFFICIAL: Chief of Staff." 

D. J. Coman 
Major, A. G., 

Acting Adjutant. 



123 



CHAPTER VIII 

TO THE BELGIAN FRONT 

October 12-27, 1918 

12 October— EXMORIEUX FERME, near ECLISFONTAINE (MEUSE) 
to VERRIeRES-EN-HESSE FERMES, in FOReT DE HESSE, near 
DOMBASLE-EN-ARGONNE (MEUSE), Southeast, marching, 18|/ 2 kilo- 
meters. 

Exactly on schedule time the head of the 3rd Battalion, under command 
of Lieutenant Fortune, cleared ECLISFONTAINE, leading the brigade on 
the first of the series of marches that were to try its endurance to the very 
limit. This regiment led the column, followed by the 347th M. G. Battalion 
and 362nd Infantry. Within the regiment the order of march was 3rd 
Battalion, commanded by Lieutenant James C. Fortune; 2nd Battalion, Head- 
quarters Company and Regimental Headquarters Group, commanded by 
Captain Frank Heath ; 1st Battalion and Machine Gun Company, commanded 
by Captain Howard D. Hughes; Supply Company and trains, commanded by 
Captain Leon E. Savage. 

Overcoats were placed in squad rolls, bandoleers of rifle ammunition 
were left on a dump at ECLISFONTAINE. In addition to his usual arms 
and equipment each man carried a shelter half, blanket, raincoat, his reserve 
rations, a belt full of ammunition, and a lunch. Of the theoretical allowance 
of almost 400 animals to each war strength regiment in America, or the 
300 for each regiment in the A. E. F., this regiment now had only 64, but 
was assisted by an allowance of 8 trucks. The regiment was far short of 
the vehicles that would require the 300 animals but even as it stood the 
veteran 64 were unable to move out all of the few precious vehicles the 
regiment had. 

The original destination for the day's march was DOMBASLE-EN- 
ARGONNE, but after reconnoitering the route in his car the Colonel de- 
cided to halt the troops at dusk near the springs of the VERRIeRES-EN 
HESSE farms which had been the headquarters of the Fifth Army Corps 
at the time of the regiment's attack of October 9th on Hills 255 and 269. 
The 347th Machine Gun Battalion, assisted by its machine gun carts, pushed 
on that night over the remaining four kilometers and bivouacked on a hill- 
side one kilometer west of DOMBASLE-EN-ARGONNE. 

As this regiment's bivouac was being made under the trees of the 
FOReT-DE-HESSE, a heavy rain began to fall, but a hot supper was served, 
and many men were able to find dry shelter in abandoned French dugouts. 
As the Commander of the 3rd Battalion had been delayed in leaving the 
line on the night before, this was the first time he had slept since 10 P. M. 
on October 8th, four days and four nights, 96 hours ago, and his ruddy 
color, but not his smile, was beginning to fade. 

124 



13 October (Sunday)— VERRIeRES-EN-HESSE FERMES to bivouac 
near DOMBASLE-EN-ARGONNE, South, marching, 4 kilometers. 

After a short march, a regulation shelter tent camp was pitched in 
a light rain on the southern slope of the open hill one kilometer west of 
DOMBASLE-EN-ARGONNE. Regimental and Brigade Headquarters were 
in DOMBASLE. During the day the remainder of the RENDEZ-VOUS DE 
CHASSE rolls were conjured up by Captain Savage. The Y. M. C. A. later 
opened a well stocked canteen and was assisted in its operation by Lieu- 
tenants Moore and Howells. 

Railroad trains running into DOMBASLE were regarded with friendly 
interest as a sign of an approaching return to civilization and possibly of a 
movement by rail instead of by foot. Brigade Headquarters in the meantime 
was making every effort, even at the 1st Army Headquarters, to obtain trucks 
to move the brigade on its way to the rear but all was to no avail. 

The brigade was scheduled to proceed by marching about 50 kilometers 
further to billets in the neighborhood of SERMAIZE-LES-BAINS 
(MARNE), about 17 kilometers west of BAR-LE-DUC (MEUSE), and 10 
kilometers west of MUSSEY (MEUSE). This was to be the NETTAN- 
GOURT (MEUSE) rest area. The 182nd Brigade was already in the area 
between SERMAIZE and BAR-LE-DUC, and Division Headquarters was 
atCONTRISSON (MEUSE). 

14 October— Bivouac near DOMBASLE-EN-ARGONNE (MEUSE) to 
IPPeCOURT (MEUSE), South, marching, 15 kilometers. 

The brigade moved out at 7 A. M. The 347th M. G. Battalion led, 
followed by the 362nd and 361st Regiments. Within this regiment the order 
of march was: 1st Battalion and M. G. Co., 2nd Battalion, Headquarters 
Company and Regimental Headquarters, 3rd Battalion and Supply Company. 
Formation: column of twos on the right of the road. 

Many officers and men were leaning on heavy canes as they plodded up 
the long hills, and the columns were delayed in inevitable tangles with other 
units that were moving to the front or rear along cross roads. During this and 
the following marches and the wet nightly bivouacs, many of the most hardy 
nearly gave way. Lieutenant Hudelson who had ably commanded Company 
"C" through practically the entire time of both battle phases, was now three 
times tagged by the doctors for evacuation, but nevertheless he kept on and 
finally came in at the head of his company. 

The route to IPPeCOURT lay through JUBeCOURT, VILLE-SUR- 
COUSANCES, and JULVeCOURT, all of them towns through which the 
regiment had passed on the night of September 17/18 on its way North 
from NUBeCOURT to BOIS LE COMTE, near BRABANT-EN-ARGONNE. 

The town of IPPeCOURT was already filled with French and American 
troops, so that except for those who were quartered in the barracks assigned 
to the 362nd Infantry, and in a barracks used for the several Battalion 
Headquarters and Regimental Headquarters, the men here slept in the open. 

Brigade and Regimental Orders were here issued for each officer and 
man to shave before leaving IPPeCOURT, and thereafter to shave daily. 
With the sole exception of the few men who had bathed in the CHAMB- 

125 



RONNE creek south of the BOIS CHeHeMIN during the brief rest be- 
tween the trips to the line, no one had bathed or had a chance to bathe 
for more than a month. Accordingly, there was here afforded to many of 
the men a brief bath on a hurried schedule. Warning was also published that 
men evacuated to hospitals as a result of wounds, illness or falling out 
on the march might become permanently separated from the regiment and 
every officer and man was urged to stay with the column as long as possible. 
If actually unable to keep up, he was urged to follow and rejoin his organiza- 
tion at the earliest opportunity. 

Here General McDonald was confined to his bed by illness, and Colonel 
Davis assumed command of the brigade. He held this responsibility until 
after the troops were entrained for Belgium. 

Captain Scudder and Lieutenant Bissett, both of Company "I," rejoined 
the regiment at IPPeCOURT although both had been wounded and evac- 
uated to the hospital, respectively, but 17 and 16 days before. Lieutenant 
Bissett took the active command of Company "I" while Captain Scudder 
assumed command of the 3rd Battalion. Lieutenant Fortune resumed his 
duties as Battalion Adjutant. 

15 October— IPPeCOURT (MEUSE) to the FERMES DE LAMER- 
MONT, near VAUBECOURT (MEUSE), South, marching, 21 kilometers. 

The march to the NETTANCOURT rest area had been abandoned, the 
new final destination was not yet known, but evidently it was further east 
than the first. Order of march: 347th M. G. Battalion, 361st and 362nd 
Infantry Regiments. Within the regiment: 2nd Battalion, Headquarters 
Company and Regimental Headquarters, 3rd Battalion, 1st Battalion and 
Machine Gun Company, Supply Company. 

The first 7 kilometers took the regiment through FLEURY-SUR-AIRE 
and to NUBeCOURT where Regimental Headquarters, Headquarters Com- 
pany, the 2nd and 3rd Battalions had spent the 17th of September. After 
NUBeCOURT the line of march passed about 10 kilometers to the west of 
MARATS-LA-GRANDE, and was in territory new to this regiment. 

The brigade found itself passing through small towns already fully 
billeted with troops. The intended stopping place at VAUBECOURT did not 
offer even a satisfactory bivouac ground. The brigade accordingly marched 
four additional kilometers to the LAMERMONT farms. Here the buildings 
were practically all in use as part of a Prisoner of War Camp, but through 
the personal courtesy of the French Military Commander, all available 
buildings were turned over to the brigade, and permission given to occupy 
some privately owned woods. Enough covered space was thus afforded for 
the field officers, and for those men who were not supplied with shelter 
halves. The remainder bivouacked in the nearby woods in a pouring rain. 

16 October— FERMES-DE-LAMERMONT to MUSSEY (MEUSE), 
South, marching, 15 kilometers. 

Just as the troops were about to march to CHARDOGNE, orders were 
received that the 91st Division would entrain for a new area and that the 
361st Infantry would commence entraining from MUSSEY at 15 o'clock, 

126 



(3:00 P. M.) October 17th. The remainder of the brigade would entrain at 
REVIGNY, beginning late on the night of the 17th. 

Order of March: 347th M. G. Battalion, 362nd and 361st Infantry Regi- 
ments. Within the regiment the usual rotation of battalions put the 3rd 
Battalion in the lead, the 1st Battalion and Machine Gun Company next, 
and the 2nd Battalion, Headquarters Company and Regimental Headquar- 
ters third. The 75 kilometer (47 mile) march was ended at MUSSEY, 
but it was there necessary to wait during the afternoon for troops of the 
182nd Brigade to entrain and thus clear the billets. Once the other troops 
were out, the first units in the column of march moved into their billets, 
and with the exception of the Second Battalion, practically all the regiment 
was that night under cover (and out of the almost ever-falling rain) for 
the first time since leaving PAROIS, nearly a month before. 

Colonel Davis, as Brigade Commander, was ordered to take charge of 
the entrainment on Quay "A" in REVIGNY. Captain Savage being ill, 
Captain Kanzler was directed to drop the personnel work and v/as put in 
command of the regiment. He was the only captain ever to command 
the regiment and he held this command until October 20th, when the regi- 
ment had begun its march into the interior of Belgium and had been rejoined 
by Colonel Davis. 

17-19 October. MUSSEY (MEUSE, FRANCE) to ST. JEAN and 
WIELTJE, near YPRES (BELGIUM), Northwest, by rail, approximately 
600 kilometers (375 miles). 

By the constant personal efforts of Captain Kanzler, transportation was 
obtained for many delayed items of badly needed clothing and equipment. 
Up to the very moment of entrainment, clothing and equipment was issued 
to the men who needed it and finally some unissued articles were carried 
on the trains to be issued at the other end of the trip. Among the articles 
received were the first of the disappointing British boots, which proved to 
be heavy and oddly shaped shoes that rarely fitted an American foot and 
long were the bane of the entire division. A few men found time for a 
cherished bath. 

Before entrainment the regiment received a few new officers. It also 
welcomed back a number of its own men who had been wounded in the 
MEUSE-ARGONNE drive and many of those who had been sent ahead on 
the recent marches in such transportation as had been available for the men 
then unable to proceed on foot. The regiment likewise received an additional 
supply of animals — many of them "skinny and crippled" but all able to 
stand and start. Accordingly when the regiment left France its approxi- 
mate strength was 65 officers out of a prescribed strength of 114, 1900 
men out of a prescribed strength of about 3800, and 200 animals out of the 
Expeditionary Force allowance of about 300. Among the officers to rejoin 
the regiment here was Captain Carmi L. Williams, who resumed command 
of Company "F." 

The regiment moved on four trains, the first left at 3 :00 P. M. October 
17th, the others at 3-hour intervals until midnight the same day. All had 
arrived in Belgium by noon of the 19th. 

127 



1st Train, carrying the 1st Battalion, Captain H. D. Hughes command- 
ing, detrained at ST. JEAN, BELGIUM, 2 kilometers northeast of YPRES. 

2nd Train, carrying the 2nd Battalion, Captain Frank Heath command- 
ing, detrained at WIELTJE, BELGIUM, one kilometer northeast of ST. 
JEAN. 

3rd Train, carrying 3rd Battalion, Captain M. S. Scudder commanding, 
detrained at ST. JEAN, BELGIUM. 

4th Train, carrying Regimental Headquarters and Headquarters, Supply 
and Machine Gun Companies (less detachments of 2 machine guns, 1 
officer and 24 men on 3rd train as anti-aircraft protection), Captain Jacob 
Kanzler commanding, detrained at WIELTJE. 

On October 16th an order had been received promoting to Majors, Cap- 
tains Goodpaster, Potter, Naftzger and Doherty and to Captains, Lieutenants 
Fortune and Page. All of these officers except Captain Fortune had been 
wounded and were still absent from the regiment. The promotions, how- 
ever, had been made for gallantry in action, and therefore the physical condi- 
tion of the recipients was not in question and all these promotions remained 
effective. Later all of these officers except Major Potter, who was sent to the 
United States for convalescence from his serious wounds returned to duty 
with the regiment. To Major Potter there was later awarded the Distin- 
guished Service Cross, with the citation quoted in the appendix to this his- 
tory. Captain Fortune was at once assigned to the command of Company 
"L," exchanging, as he put it, "an Adjutant's mount for a mountain of 
paper work." 

Colonel Davis, accompanied by Captain Fortune, Captain Champion 
(of the French Commission) and a chauffeur, drove to Belgium in the 
Colonel's car. A slight incident occurred on this trip, which indicated the 
constant thought that the Colonel was giving to the affairs of the regiment, 
but which has also raised the question as to which of the officers concerned 
was first called to the mind of the Colonel at the sight of the Gargoyle 
of Notre Dame. As the Colonel and Captain Fortune drove through Paris 
they got out of the car for a brief stroll and on the way stopped by the 
Notre Dame Cathedral. Here the Colonel looked up and earnestly studied 
one of the great Gargoyles on the building. Then without a change of 
expression or position thoughtfully remarked: "I wonder which is senior, 
Brace or Quinby." 

For most of the men the train trip itself was a luxury in that it at least 
was not marching, and although traveling in the usual box cars, the com- 
bined circumstances that the regiment was greatly depleted and that a 
French troop train has always the same number of cars regardless of its 
load, resulted in the men getting more train space than they ever had had 
before or were to have again in France. 

One serious loss occurred on the train trip. At a way-station one of the 
Supply Company's small but valued Chinese cooks ventured too far from 
the train. As the train started out without him, his mate, the other Chinese 
cook, jumped off to keep him company. There was no intent to desert, 
it was merely an unfortunate incident for them but more particularly for 
Captain Savage and his company. Once arrived at the destination a search- 
ing party was sent to find the cooks, and in a few days the party brought 

128 



them back. It had found Cooks Dong Chong and Ah Tong busily cooking 
for the first detachment they had met, and which happened to be part of 
the Canadian forces. Chong's simple explanation was "Train goes like 
hellee, no could catch." 

At the detraining point in Belgium all was gray desolation. It was 
within the famous "No-Man's Land" of Flanders and of fiction. A little 
more than two weeks before, the British and French, with the Second 
U. S. Army Corps, consisting of the 27th and 30th Divisions, had made 
their final attack on the Hindenburg line and had burst through it. The 
battle line was already some 30 kilometers distant, only a rare spent shell 
was landing within this area, and there were no German planes overhead. 
All was comparatively quiet, and the scene was the same as far as eye 
could reach. Totally different from the hilly, wooded country of the 
Argonne, this country was flat, broken only by gradual folds and distant 
low ridges. The land was scarcely above sea level, and only a few inches 
above water level. Such recognizable defences as existed were built above 
the surface. Dug-outs were really "dug-ups" and consisted usually of low 
mounds of earth supported by the semi-circular British hut-roofs of corru- 
gated iron. In these huts, each approximately twenty feet long, and fifteen 
feet wide at the base, with a roof curving to a height of a little more than six 
feet in the center — the several P. Cs. and many of the men were located. 
Here also was the home of the "cooties" and of the trench rats of world- 
wide fame. The size and activity of both types of these hungry inhabi- 
tants, as well as the character of the great waste of No-Man's Land, lived 
up to the wildest story that had reached the United States. Here the 
troops for the first time lived in the quarters of previous armies, and here 
for the first time the "cooties" attached themselves to the regiment, never 
to be finally driven off until the determined "cootie" campaign at BEL- 
LeME, France, six months later. Rats as large as cats and as bold as 
wolves, scampered in and about the huts and across the fields and roads. 

The great waste was pocketed with shell holes, crowded rim to rim like 
the pocks of smallpox — all with water in them and many of the older ones 
with gray, withered marsh grass already growing on their sides. 

The troops moved into bivouac close by the road in order not to be lost, 
and no search in the distance, however diligent, revealed any one locality 
that was greatly preferable to another. 

Lieutenant Murray of Headquarters Company, who, being without 
mortars for his Sappers and Bombers Platoon, had served throughout the 
Argonne as a trusted bearer of the Colonel's most important messages, or 
had been repeatedly dispatched under fire to perform dangerous or important 
missions, was now selected from the Regimental Headquarters at WIELTJE, 
to locate in this waste, the battalions at ST. JEAN. He returned late in 
the night the sole and valued possessor of the knowledge of the exact 
location of both parts of the regiment. 

Regimental Headquarters was established in an abandoned open-front 
iron-top hut. A sign was placed on the road, and a wire strung on stakes 
to guide runners and officers to the P. C. through the dark. 

The 37th and 91st Divisions had thus been sent to add their strength 
to the French Army of Belgium in the Group of Armies of Flanders, under 
the command of the King of Belgium. Attached to the 91st Division as 

129 



its artillery, was now the 53rd Field Artillery Brigade, originally of the 
28th (Keystone) Division, and organized from former units of the Pennsyl- 
vania National Guard. This artillery was destined to render the fullest 
co-operation and most efficient support to its new infantry associates. 

Late on the night of October 19/20 Lieutenant Colonel Coleman arrived 
from Division Headquarters to establish connection with the several units 
and to deliver the march orders for the following day. At about midnight 
Captain Kanzler and the Operations Officer met him by chance as his car 
came through the rain along the muddy road at WIELTJE. Captain Kanzler 
received the march orders, and as a result of the day's investigations, was 
able to direct the Lieutenant Colonel to such units as were in the vicinity, 
including, oddly enough, the 182nd Brigade Headquarters, v/hich was 
snuggled in the mud near the roadside. It was now that the sleepless Lieu- 
tenant Murray received his usual detail and, mounted on one of Lieutenant 
Brace's new and listless but still four-legged animals, set out at a v/alk to 
carry the messages to the units at ST. JEAN. Realizing that he would scarcely 
reach his destination by dawn, he consistently halted every passerby enroute 
until at last he intercepted a motorcycle courier from the 181st Brigade 
Headquarters and by delivering the messages to the courier the necessary 
liaison was thus completed in proper season, and the next day's movement 
was made possible of execution at the hour ordered. 

The ration supply for the American units, now far separated from their 
base, was not yet running smoothly, but the luck and good judgment of 
Captain Heath in command of the 2nd Battalion enabled his companies to 
buy out a stranded British Commissary that was well stocked with oatmeal 
and farina. As a result, his battalion enjoyed several excellent hot meals 
of highly prized cooked cereal. 

20 October (Sunday)— ST. JEAN and WIELTJE, BELGIUM, to DE 
RUITER, BELGIUM, via VERLORENHOEK, FREZENBERG, ZONNE- 
BEKE, PASSCHENDAELE, and COLLIEMOLENHOEK, Northeast, march- 
ing, 18 kilometers. 

The above names, astounding as they were to the Americans, all ap- 
peared on the maps, which showed each of them as the name of a town or 
settlement. The day's march, however, was to be across the strip which for 
many months had been No-Man's Land, and the PASSCHENDAELE on this 
route was the famous PASSCHENDAELE ridge that had long been featured 
as a battle center of Flanders. Ruined and deserted as was the nearby city 
of YPRES, that city still had sufficient ruins to mark it as a city. Not so with 
the towns in No-Man's Land. Never a house, a hut, or even a ruined wall 
showed above the waste. The muddy road followed its prescribed course on 
the map, but the rows of trees shown on its sides were gone, the towns were 
gone, even the fields themselves were gone, it was all one great gray bog and 
waste. British road "Tommies," evidently unfitted for more active service 
by reason of old age or other disabilities, but still wearing brass but- 
tons as bright as any on parade were working on the rough roads. Large 
well lettered black and white signs posted here and there in the waste land 
or on a heap of brick dust marked the former town locations. At PAS- 
SCHENDAELE, bricks for road repair were being excavated from a heap of 
red dust that marked the location of the village church. Shell holes, shat- 
tered cement "pill boxes," abandoned armored "tanks," field pieces, am- 

130 



munition, equipment of every type, here and there a dead animal, graves 
of soldiers, pools of stagnating water, and lines of tangled barbed wire 
extended in every direction to the silent horizon. The waste of war, the 
ruination of civilization, was visualized. 

This march through the "dead lands" covered but 18 kilometers, but it 
was popularly known as a 30 kilometer hike for its dreariness made it seem 
that long. As the Supply Company brought up the trains, although it 
found the roads rough and muddy, yet here in the rear of the British Army 
the excellent traffic and road discipline was a great help to progress. 

Lieutenant Murray and the Battalion Adjutants had gone ahead to 
reconnoiter locations for the night, and that afternoon when the regiment 
had passed the waste area and again come to green fields and battered 
buildings, it established itself at DE RUITER. All troops except those of 
the Second Battalion were "billeted" in ruins of varying degrees of demoli- 
tion, and later much of the Second Battalion found similar shelter. 

21-27 October. DE RUITER, BELGIUM, resting and preparing for 
action. 

The 181st Brigade Headquarters was located in DE RUITER, the 347th 
Machine Gun Battalion in its outskirts, and the 362nd Infantry at MOST, 
less than 2 kilometers away. Division Headquarters was at OOSTNIEUW- 
KERKE, 2J/2 kilometers away. The Division was in the Army Reserve, and 
this was its rest area. 

The Flemish names and the Flemish language, which combined some- 
thing of the Dutch, German and French tongues, proved a mystery to the 
new troops, but here and there in the regiment came to light a man who 
knew that very dialect, and it was found also that most of the natives who 
gradually drifted into or through the deserted settlement, could understand 
the Americanized French that was offered by the regular company inter- 
preters. At first there were absolutely no civilians in DE RUITER, but 
before the regiment left there a week later, there was already puttering 
about in each ruin, some one man or even a little group of refugees begin- 
ning to patch up the holes in the roofs and preparing to occupy the ruins as 
"homes." 

At nearly every cross road, and in niches in nearly all of the best 
preserved buildings, were battered crucifixes or images of the Virgin Mary, 
all bearing silent testimony to the simple devout religion of the peasants 
that four years ago had tilled in peace these fertile fields of Flanders. 

The following general order expressive of the attitude of the Division 
Commander and of his troops in Belgium was here read to the several 
organizations : 

"(280— FOR OFFICIAL CIRCULATION ONLY) HQ. 9 1ST DIV. 

A. E. F. Oct. 22, 1918. 
GENERAL ORDERS: 
No. 30. 

I. 1. Officers and men of the 91st Division and of the 53rd Field Artillery 
Brigade, attached thereto, are advised that notwithstanding their creditable 

131 



participation in previous offensive action against the enemy, they have 
only begun to fight. 

The division commander realizes that for some weeks past officers and 
men have incurred unusual fatigue and exposure through changes of station 
and marches during inclement weather. But such conditions are only what 
must be anticipated during active field service in time of war. They meet 
full compensation in the realization of duty discharged and the hope for 
early defeat of the enemy. 

2. No officer or man will voice the sentiment that his organization has 
borne its share of the burden or has been subjected to unusual demands. 
Any such sentiment is unworthy a good soldier. 

3. This division, with the 53rd Field Artillery Brigade attached, has 
been selected for the honorable task of assisting the armies of the Allies 
in driving from this stricken country the forces which invaded it in violation 
of the rules of civilized warfare. Participation in such an enterprise should 
inspire all officers and men to contribute, during the coming operations, 
every particle of energy of which they are capable towards compliance with 
all orders and instructions received from proper authority. At the same 
time officers and men of the Allied forces will be treated with all possible 
courtesy and respect, and the people of this country will be shown the 
consideration due them. 

4. This order will be read to each organization of the division, and the 
53rd Field Artillery Brigade, at the first formation thereof after its receipt. 

William H. Johnston, 
Major General, U. S. A. 

11:25-11:35 Commanding." 

\VHJ/d 

GENERAL DISTRIBUTION. 

Large numbers of German grenades were discovered near Regimental 
Headquarters. In most instances these had been abandoned while still 
in their original cases, and had not been finally fitted up for use. Captain 
Jean Champion, of the French Commission, and still attached to the regi- 
ment, had been a Grenade Instructor while at Camp Lewis, and he here 
rendered valuable service in preparing the grenades for use in Lieutenant 
Pfund's and Lieutenant Sweat's grenade school, which was soon in opera- 
tion. Here also Lieutenant Robert Guibert, of the French Commission, 
also attached to the regiment, and formerly an Automatic Rifle instructor 
at Camp Lewis, co-operated with Lieutenant Curtiss R. Gilbert in the conduct 
of a Chauchat Automatic Rifle School. The targets for this latter practice 
were appropriately located along the side of a knoll that housed a concrete 
German strongpoint. 

While at MUSSEY Captain M. S. Scudder, of Company "I" had been 
temporarily detailed as Regimental Adjutant, and instructed to report for 
duty upon arrival in the new area. He accordingly took up his new duties 
in DE RUITER. 

Captain Fortune thus was left the senior officer present with the 3rd Bat- 
talion and for the third time became its commander. A little later, when the 

132 



newly promoted Major Goodpaster returned to the regiment, a month after 
his wounds had been received, he was on October 29th placed in command 
of the 2nd Battalion, and Captain Heath was assigned to the command 
of Company "F," to replace Captain Williams, who had been unable to 
continue on active duty. Lieutenant Craig was assigned to Headquarters 
Company and took over the duties of Regimental Signal Officer, succeeding 
Lieutenant Vincent, who had been assigned to Company "H." 

At DE RUITER Major Sellwood, the Regimental Surgeon, worn out by 
his faithful and exhausting service in the MEUSE-ARGONNE drive was 
compelled to go to the hospital. He was succeeded by Captain Paul F. 
Brown, at that time the senior Medical Officer with the regiment and who 
had often before satisfactorily served as Regimental Surgeon in Camp 
Lewis and in France during periods when neither Major Winter nor Major 
Sellwood had been assigned to the Regimental Detachment. Chaplain 
Weber had given out physically, and Chaplain Bronson, who had now re- 
turned from a conscientious and careful completion of his duties as Burial 
Officer in the MEUSE-ARGONNE sector, was transferred to another unit 
of the division, so that Chaplain Beard became the only Chaplain with the 
regiment and also became the Burial Officer. A number of Second Lieu- 
tenants here joined the regiment and were assigned or attached as is 
shown later on the roster of officers at the "jump-off" of October 31st. 
Lieutenant "Happy Jack" O'Brien, however, served a brief two days with 
Company "K" before finding his final and appropriate berth with the wits 
of the Supply Company. 

Colonel A. D. Cummings, who had been promoted for gallantry in 
action on the same order with Major Goodpaster and Captain Fortune, 
brought to the division about 1000 replacements from the 84th Division. 
Some 300 of these were at once assigned to this regiment. These men, 
mostly from Ohio or the neighboring central states, had been separated 
from their division shortly after arrival in France, and after a brief trial 
of the hard life of "casuals," welcomed a permanent assignment to the 
regiment where they were correspondingly welcomed by the "veterans" of 
the ARGONNE. The new men readily assimilated themselves and from 
the first became a valued and integral part of their units. 

It was understood that Colonel Davis had been recommended for a well- 
deserved promotion to the grade of Brigadier General, and in view of his con- 
sequently expected separation from the regiment, Colonel Cummings was 
attached for duty with it and was placed in charge of its training, reorganiza- 
tion and re-equipping. Given this opportunity to familiarize himself with the 
organization, its members and its methods, already in a large measure 
previously known to him as Division Inspector and Brigade Adjutant, he 
made use of it in a manner that prepared him for the discharge of ' the 
responsibility soon to be thrust upon him in the midst of action. 

These days of rest and reorganization were seized upon to file recom- 
mendations for deserved awards or promotions, to write letters of sympathy 
and appreciation to the relatives of those who had been killed, to refit 
the regiment with needed equipment, to re-establish the company organ- 
izations on the basis of their effective strength of approximately !50 men 
each, to take up close order drill, to develop in the light of newly acquired 

133 



experience the practical use of rifle (V. B.) grenades and hand grenades, of 
Chauchat automatic rifles, of the Enfield and Springfield rifles themselves, 
of bayonets and of machine guns. The band was reassembled, its instru- 
ments brought up, and brief joint practice undertaken with the band of the 
362nd Infantry. The Personnel Office was established close by and it 
gradually began to come to the surface above the mass of rapidly accumu- 
lating record work incident to the recent actions and consequent changes in 
personnel. Also before the regiment left DE RUITER it dispatched to the 
Officers' Training Camps in France its quota of highly recommended en- 
listed men, many of whom there earned commissions which they received 
shortly before returning to the United States. 

It became important to familiarize the officers and men with the tactical 
demands of the now comparatively open and rolling terrain. The fields, 
hedges and nearby ridges abounded with the freshly abandoned German 
machine gun positions, and everyone thus had an excellent opportunity 
to examine closely the heavily cemented or cunningly hidden hedge posi- 
tions used by the enemy. Also a tactical problem was prepared, and, with 
the several battalions taking turns in the front line, brigade attacks were 
simulated against hostile positions while members of the Intelligence 
Service by waving warning flags or members of the Machine Gun Company 
by firing warning machine gun bursts into the ground indicated the positions 
that actually had been or were likely to be taken by the enemy. 

In carrying out these maneuvers the veterans of the ARGONNE showed 
ready skill in taking advantage of the comparatively limited cover and the 
new men learned from their example. A new type of formation was 
developed, designed to decrease losses, and to avoid the maintenance of an 
easily enfiladed straight line of skirmishers. The troops were taught to 
advance to the attack against scattered machine guns with a screen of 
scouts ahead and themselves adopting a formation in rough line of combat 
groups. The groups, or so-called "gangs", were each in column and, ac- 
cording to the terrain, were separated by intervals of from 10 to 20 or 
even more meters. The individual members of the group, singly or in 
pairs, would follow their group leaders to the front or flank, by rushing 
one by one or two by two from cover to cover that usually consisted only of 
shell holes or of folds in the ground. Each man or pair remained 5 to 15 
meters behind the preceding one. The net result was an irregular but easily 
controlled, mobile and well covered line of skirmishers, advancing 
"echeloned in depth." 

On October 24th, the divisional area was extended to include a district 
south of ROULERS which was a comparatively large town, 2'/2 kilometers 
northeast of DE RUITER. On the following day, certain of the other units 
of the division moved forward to that area and on October 26th Division 
Headquarters was opened in a chateau at RUMBEKE, 3 kilometers to the 
east of DE RUITER. This was one of the many chateaux later encountered 
in Belgium by apparently all of the various headquarters other than those 
of this regiment. 

On Sunday, October 27th, in accordance with a thought originating with 
Colonel Davis for this regiment, a joint memorial service was held by 
the brigade in a field near DE RUITER. The service was to be in memory 

134 



of those who had given their lives in the MEUSE-ARGONNE drive, and 
Colonel Davis wished at the same time to express a welcome to the newly 
joined members of the regiment. The entire brigade was assembled around 
a little platform. The joint bands rendered appropriate selections, Chap- 
lain Beard delivered a brief, but stirring, thoughtful and eloquent address 
expressing the underlying spirit of the American Army in the Great War, 
and then in honor of the men whose bodies had been buried "on the 
sunny slopes or beneath the shades of the forests of France," three volleys 
were fired by a platoon of infantry and "taps" was sounded as if over 
their graves. 

After the dismissal of the brigade, the 361st Infantry remained on the 
field, and Colonel Davis read the General Order which he had penned the 
night before. In the following words he immortalized the regiment and 
welcomed to it its new members: 

"Headquarters, 361st Infantry, 
American E. F., A. P. O. 776, 
27th October, 1918. 
GENERAL ORDERS: 
No. XXVIII. 

1. The 361st Infantry has received its baptism of blood and fire and has 
fully justified all predictions as to what its conduct would be. It has most 
creditably upheld all traditions that go toward establishing a worthy reputa- 
tion in any military service. Never once has it faltered. In all tasks 
assigned to it the regiment has excelled. Never once has it been ordered 
to advance but what it has gained ground. The regiment still leads. High 
among the names of the illustrious regiments in all the war must be written 
the name of the 361st Infantry. It is with unbounded pride that the Regi- 
mental Commander congratulates you one and all, and extends to you, to 
our wounded, and sick as well, and to those who have passed away, his 
thanks for the splendid achievements of this glorious organization. 

2. We are assembled today though not to extoll our successes, but 
rather in bereavement of our losses. We have paid a high price for our 
successes. We must today bring back to our presence the memories of 
our friends and comrades who have fallen in this cause, who have been 
sacrificed that an inhuman foe might be vanquished and the world made 
safe for our families and to posterity. They are gone, but what can be 
sweeter than to be laid away in the consciousness that one has given his 
very all in a work and in a cause that admits of there being no better, none 
more righteous in all eternity. We honor our dead, yet the more they 
honor us. 

3. We bring back today the memories of our Miller, Farwell, C. F. 
Smith, Long, Paul D. Smith, Morriss, McCarthy, Dillon, and of the others 
of our illustrious dead. We see them again as they were while among us, 
upright, stalwart and brave, struggling to do their duties whatever they 
were, leading always, encouraging and protecting others, and advancing 
fearlessly to their deaths. We are lonely without them and we grieve 
deeply that they must have been sacrificed. They will always serve as 
examples to us in many, many ways. 

135 



4. But at this time and forever, our hearts must go out to their families, 
to their mothers, to their fathers, to their wives, to their children, and to 
their sweethearts and friends. These are the sufferers now. Their sacri- 
fices are the more painful in that they are continuing always. We must 
ever remember their sad bereavements and stand ready to assist. 

5. Because of the sacrifice to our cause which the regiment has had to 
make, the government has sent to us officers and men to replace those who 
have gone. We welcome you to our regiment with all our hearts and souls. 
We ask you to forget any previous regimental affiliations and to be as 
organically a part of the regiment as we are ourselves. Our cause is your 
cause. We are all of the same blood. Let your sorrows be our sorrows, 
and the joy of one be the joys of the other. We must fight side by side, 
suffer side by side, and rejoice side by side. We must do this as one 
complete homogeneous whole. We welcome you into the 361st Infantry. 
We are proud of the regiment as we are proud of you now a part of it. 
It must be forevermore your pride and love. We are glad that you are 
here to join in our bereavement and we feel that the souls of these glorious 
ones who have departed, as strongly welcome you to our own today as we 
do ourselves. 

Wm. D. Davis, 
Colonel, 361st Infantry, 
WDD-mov. Commanding." 



136 



ROSTER OF OFFICERS, 36 1ST INFANTRY 

October 31, 1918— at "Jump-Off," 1st Phase of "LYS-SCHELDT" Offensive 

Regimental Headquarters 

Colonel William D. Davis 

Colonel Avery D. Cummings (attached) 

Lieut. Colonel 

Captain Marshall S. Scudder (Co. "I"), Acting Regi- 
mental Adjutant 

Captain Jacob Kanzler, Personnel Adjutant 

Captain Harold H. Burton, Operations Officer 

Captain Paul F. Brown, M. R. C, Regimental Surgeon 

1st Lieut. John W. Beard, Regimental Chaplain 

2nd Lieut. Edward A. Valentine (Co. "L"), attached as 
Regimental Liaison Officer 

2nd Lieut. Oliver Voderberg (Co. "G"), attached as Regi- 
mental Gas Officer 

Captain Jean Champion, of French Army, attached as 
member of French Commission 



1st Battalion 

Captain Howard D. Hughes (Co. "A"), Commanding 
1st Lieut. Donald G. Abel, Adjutant 

2nd Lieut. Frank W. Coppinger (Co. "B"), attached as 
Intelligence Officer. 

Company "A" Company "C" 

Captain CaDtain 

1st Lieut. Ellis Bates p ¥ . "'" ' * * * '*" *'* ** V 

1st Lieut 1st Lieut. Charles H. Hudelson 

1st Lieut 1st Lieut 

(2nd Lieut. Merriam J. Howells, S. 1st Lieut 

D. as Liaison Officer, 181st Brig. 2nd Lieut. John C. Hayes (attached) 

„ I ? < J c ! rs -) „., „ _ 2nd Lieut. Francis L. Meade 

2nd Lieut. Milo B. Seay 



Company "D" 



Company "B" 
(Captain Wallace T. Downing, S. D. 

as Instructor at Army Candidates Captain 

School). 1st Lieut. Charles H. Moore, Jr. 

1 st Lieut. Gustave B. Appelman 1st Lieut 
1st Lieut. Gilpin S. Sessions T . 

1st Lieut. Southall R. Pfund lst Lieut 

2nd Lieut. Augustus C. Carver (at- 2nd Lieut. Joseph E. O'Connor (at- 
tached) tached) 

2nd Lieut 2nd Lieut. Sam W. Robertson 

137 



2nd Battalion 



Major Ora Goodpaster 
1st Lieut. Curtiss R. Gilbert, Adjutant 
2nd Lieut. Ray R. Vincent (Co. "H"), attached as Liaison 
Officer 

2nd Lieut. Uil Lane (Co. "G"), attached as Intelli- 
gence Officer 



Company "E" 

Captain 

1st Lieut. Henry P. Hoffman 
1st Lieut. Ely F. Echolds (attached, 
S. D. as Liaison Officer) 

1st Lieut 

2nd Lieut. Frank R. Johnston 
2nd Lieut. John A. Flagg 

Company "F" 

Captain Frank Heath 

1st Lieut. Wallace M. MacKay 

1st Lieut 

1st Lieut 

(2nd Lieut. Ernest L. Damkroger, D. 
S. in charge of Div. Warehouse 
at Meuse, France) 

2nd Lieut. Jack Sweat 

2nd Lieut. Theodore W. Burnett (at- 
tached) 



Company "G" 

Captain Clarence J. Minick 
1st Lieut. Edmond T. Duvall 
tached) 

1st Lieut 

1st Lieut 

2nd Lieut 

2nd Lieut 

Company "H" 

Captain 

1st Lieut. Ira G. Towson 
1st Lieut. Jesse T. Wilkins 

1st Lieut 

2nd Lieut. Reginald T. Mitchell 
2nd Lieut 



(at- 



3rd Battalion 

Captain Friend S. Dickinson (Co. "D"), Commanding 
1st Lieut. James R. McLaughlin (Co. "I"), Acting Adjutant 
2nd Lieut. Arthur Cody (Co. "M"), attached as Intelli- 
gence Officer 

2nd Lieut. Charles Stout (Co. "L"), attached as Liaison 
Officer 



Company "I" 

Captain 

1st Lieut. David A. Bissett 

1st Lieut 

1st Lieut 

2nd Lieut. Robert A. Woodyard 
2nd Lieut 



Company "K" 

Captain 

1st Lieut. John E. Bailey 

1st Lieut. William Dean (attached) 

1st Lieut 

2nd Lieut. John H. Hastings 
2nd Lieut 



138 



3rd Battalion — Continued 



Company "L" 

Captain James C. Fortune 

(1st Lieut. Gregg M. Evans, D. S. at 
School at Langres) 

1st Lieut 

1st Lieut 

2nd Lieut. Richard Franklin (at- 
tached) 

2nd Lieut. Harold J. Jones (assigned 
to regiment, attached to co.) 



Company "M" 

Captain 

(1st Lieut. Frederick F. Lamping, D. 

S. at School at Langres) 
1st Lieut. Francois Trouchet 

1st Lieut 

2nd Lieut. Thomas E. Dunn 
2nd Lieut. Lorenzo S. Foote (at- 
tached) 



Headquarters Company 

Captain 

1st Lieut. Earle G. McMillen (Sap- 
pers and Bombers Platoon) 

1st Lieut. Harold C. Hubbell (In- 
telligence Officer) 

1st Lieut. Ernest K. Murray (One- 
Pounder Platoon) 

2nd Lieut. Harry J. Craig (Signal 
Officer) 

2nd Lieut 



Machine Gun Company 

Captain 

1st Lieut. George E. Kelsch 
1st Lieut. Lewin W. Martinez 
2nd Lieut. Reginald H. Linforth 

2nd Lieut 

2nd Lieut 

Supply Company 
Captain Leon E. Savage 
1 st Lieut. Fred L. Brace 
1st Lieut. James A. Quinby 
1st Lieut. William P. Gillogly 

tached) 
2nd Lieut. Jack O'Brien 
2nd Lieut. Albert R. Bartell 



(at- 



Medical Detachment 

Captain Paul F. Brown, M. R. C, Regimental Surgeon 

1st Lieut. Fred B. Coleman, M. R. C. 

1st Lieut. Leland C. Mcintosh, M. R. C. 

1st Lieut. John L. Burnside, D. R. C. 

1st Lieut. Ernest C. McKibben, M. R. C. 

1st Lieut. Charles H. Smith, M. R. C. 

1st Lieut. Mayo Reiss, D. R. C. 

1st Lieut. George H. Griffin, M. R. C. 

1st Lieut. Clyde Ruff, M. R. C. 



139 



CHAPTER IX 

THE CAPTURE OF AUDENARDE 

October 28-November 4, 1918— First Phase of the Ypres-Lys- (Scheldt) 
Offensive. 

28 October— DE RUITER to KRIEKHOEK via RUMBEKE, OUCKEN, 
BOSCHMOLENS, LENDELEDE and DOORNHOEK, East, marching, 19|/ 2 
kilometers. 

The division was attached to the 7th French Army Corps and was mov- 
ing to the front. Division Headquarters moved to CHaTEAU-ISEGHEM, 
Brigade Headquarters to DOORNHOEK, 347th M. G. Battalion to DOORN- 
HOEK, 362nd Infantry to LENDELEDE, 361st Infantry to KRIEKHOEK 
and vicinity. 

The scene was again different. This land was too far to the east to 
have suffered from the shell fire on the YPRES front, it had substantially 
recovered from the damages of the early days of the war and the recent 
German retreat had been too rapid to draw heavy fire. The buildings rarely 
showed signs of demolition, the fields contained few shell holes, and every- 
where the land was in cultivation. By far the prevailing crop was that 
of turnips, large, white, sweet, juicy turnips, fully ripe. These turnip fields 
became so frequent, and raw turnips became such a popular side dish for 
lunch that the entire Belgian drive became well known in the division 
as the "Turnip Drive." Every little group of farms had a name on the map 
and often the smaller the place the longer and more unpronounceable was 
the name. The Germans had carefully painted these names on the 
buildings and street corners in large black and white letters which were 
often one or two feet high and easily readable except on the blackest night, 
yet their very frequency, peculiarity, similarity and sometimes their 
identity with each other, so mystified most of the Americans that it became 
impossible for the doughboy (not to mention the M. P.'s) to give reliable 
directions. Added to this difficulty was another of following even 
correct directions along the crooked course of the narrow cobblestoned 
highways and byways, particularly at night in the absence of all guiding 
lights. The hiding of lights, including the hiding of even the motor vehicle 
headlights, was essential, for although the excellent Allied air service cleared 
the heavens in daylight, the enemy each night sent out squadrons of 
whirring, busy, bombing airplanes which dropped their great bombs on 
everything that suggested a likely target. The rules requiring darkness, 
already well taught to the civilians by the Germans, were so strictly ob- 
served that at night scarcely a glimmer shone through the heavily shuttered 
cottage or city windows, and troops or vehicles on the road would un- 
expectedly be confronted by sharp corners or would find themselves face 
to face with dark French camions lumbering toward them at practically 
full speed. 

141 



INFANTRY 

t Offensive 
4, 1918 



worry 
if how 
r, was 
elgian 
plane. 

at the 
■mown 
vever, 
e bat- 
of not 
an 10 

lowed 
fed in 
.alion, 
ieath, 
s had 

rain- 
anner 
main- 
curity 
s and 
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The 
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Gun 
iead- 
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rops, 

oon" 
alion 
"Re- 



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^ 



October 28-1 
Offensive. 

28 October- 
BOSCHMOLEI* 
kilometers. 

The division 
ing to the front 
Brigade Headqu 
HOEK, 362nd 1 
and vicinity. 

The scene v 
have suffered f 
recovered from 
German retreat 
showed signs of 
where the land 
of turnips, large 
became so freqi 
lunch that the 
as the "Turnip I 
and often the si 
the name. Th 
buildings and si 
often one or tw( 
yet their very 
identity with ea< 
impossible for t 
directions. Ad< 
correct directioi 
highways and b 
lights. The hid 
headlights, was < 
the heavens in 
whirring, busy, 
everything that 
already well tat 
served that at n: 
cottage or city 
expectedly be c< 
to face with da 
full speed. 



These unseen enemy bombers gave some of the men far more worry 
than did even heavy daylight shellfire, and the story has been told of how 
the Company Headquarters of Company "L," including its commander, was 
driven to cover one night by the loud purr and rattle of a hidden Belgian 
kitten which had been mistaken for the purr of a German bombing plane. 

Protected by the Allies' control of the air and by the fact that the 
Americans would readily be mistaken for the British who were already known 
to be in this sector, all troop movements were conducted by day. However, 
so as to avoid traffic congestion, precautions were taken to separate bat- 
talions by 300 meters, to divide motor transport trains into convoys of not 
more than 8 vehicles, and wagon trains into convoys of not more than 10 
vehicles, with distances of at least 50 meters between convoys. 

The brigade moved out with the 347th M. G. Battalion ahead, followed 
by the 361st and 362nd Infantry Regiments. The 361st Infantry moved in 
three columns: 1st Battalion commanded by Captain Hughes, 2nd Battalion, 
Headquarters and Machine Gun Companies, commanded by Captain Heath, 
and 3rd Battalion, commanded by Captain Fortune. New regulations had 
been made whereby each man now wore his overcoat and carried his rain- 
coat, one blanket, and certain specified small articles in a prescribed manner 
in or on his pack. Squad rolls were made up containing the remain- 
ing blankets, clothing and equipment. Packs were inspected for security 
and appearance before each march. The rolling kitchens, water carts and 
ration carts were divided into battalion trains, each of which followed its 
own battalion and later was accompanied by a Battalion Mess Officer. The 
remainder of the trains followed the regiment. Lieutenant Bartell was 
placed in charge of the motor trucks, which served to bring up supplies and 
miscellaneous equipment from the rear. 

The 1st Battalion was billeted in and about OTTECA, one kilometer 
northeast of KRIEKHOEK, the 2nd Battalion at MUIJZEL, two kilometers 
southeast of KRIEKHOEK, the 3rd Battalion, Headquarters, Machine Gun 
and Supply Companies were at or near KRIEKHOEK. Regimental Head- 
quarters were placed with Headquarters Company in an immaculately clean 
convent and school building. The children, who rarely seemed scarce in 
Belgium, were here present in swarms. 

At this point Mr. J. L. Pender, of the Knights of Columbus, better known 
as "KC" or "Casey," appeared in the midst of the Supply Company and 
from then on till the day of demobilization in Camp Lewis, six months later, 
he was the constant friend, companion and aid of men and officers alike. 
He moved with the troops, shared their hardships, repeatedly brought up 
welcome gifts of tobacco, candy, food or reading matter, and without show 
or pretentiousness quickly spread these stores throughout the regiment. 

29 October — KRIEKHOEK and vicinity, waiting in corps reserve. 

The day was spent quietly and preparations were begun for another 
extended stay. The fields, however, were so crowded with cultivated crops, 
that it was almost impossible to find assembly grounds for the troops. 

The "Maroon" and "Mamma" code was now superceded by the "Racoon" 
code. The 91st Division became "Racoon," 346th Machine Gun Battalion 
"Rascal," 181st Infantry Brigade "Regard," 361st Infantry Regiment "Re- 

142 



gatta," (its 1st Battalion "Regent," its 2nd Battalion "Register," its 3rd 
Battalion "Regulator"), 362nd Infantry Regiment "Relay," 347th Machine 
Gun Battalion "Renegade," 182nd Infantry Brigade "Republic," 363rd In- 
fantry Regiment "Reptile," 364th Infantry Regiment "Retort," 348th Machine 
Gun Battalion "Revenge," 53rd Field Artillery Brigade "Radiant," 107th 
Field Artillery Regiment, "Redeem," etc. The 361st Infantry Regimental 
Commander was "Regatta 1," its Operations Officer "Regatta 6," and its 
Regimental Adjutant "Regatta 8." 

The names given to the battalions by this code clung to them for months 
and for convenience were still being used by the telephone operators in 
BELLeME, France, 4 months later. 

30 October— KRIEKHOEK to EVANGELIEBOOM, via HULSTE, 
OYGHEM, STRAATE, DESSELGHEM, SPRIETE and DRIESELA, South- 
west, marching, 15 kilometers. 

The Personnel Office, Company Clerks and Band were moved to 
ISEGHEM. 

On short notice the tentative training schedule for October 30th was 
abandoned, and the brigade marched forward to join the attack of October 
31st. The 347th Machine Gun Battalion led the column, followed by the 
361st and 362nd Infantry Regiments. Within the 361st Infantry the troops 
moved in three columns, 2nd Battalion commanded by Major Goodpaster. 3rd 
Battalion commanded by Captain Dickinson (newly assigned as its com- 
mander), the 1st Battalion with Headquarters and Machine Gun Companies, 
commanded by Captain Hughes. 

The LYS River, near DESSELGHEM, was the first obstacle. The Ger- 
mans had destroyed the permanent bridges, and crossings were made on 
small pontoon bridges. A mixture of French and American troops and 
trains caused traffic congestion, and the 361st Infantry Supply Company 
succeeded in keeping contact with the regiment only by cutting across the 
river on an unauthorized but temporarily open bridge. The troops were held 
in STRAATE pending the rejoining of units separated or delayed at the 
crossings, and also to await definite information as to their final position. 
A temporary Regimental P. C. was selected by Sergeant Major O'Brien and 
established by Captain Scudder in the front room of a Belgian dwelling on 
the principal highway. Dusk coming on, the rolling kitchens, now accom- 
panying their respective battalions, served supper in the street. 

The march was later resumed and that night the regiment was moved 
into position as Brigade Reserve in front of EVANGELIEBOOM. 

The 7th French Army Corps, was to attack the following morning with 
the 41st French Infantry Division on the right (next to a British division 
of an adjoining corps), the 91st U. S. Infantry Division in the center, and 
the 128th French Infantry Division on the left (next to the 37th U. S. 
Infantry Division of an adjoining corps). The 128th French Infantry 
Division, after passing the second objective, along the CRUYSHAUTEM 
— (later more popularly known to the Americans as "CHRYSANTHEMUM" 
or "CHRYS" for short)— WORTEGEM road, was to allow itself to be 
pinched out, but to keep enough troops on the line to fill any gap that 
might remain or occur between the two American Divisions. The 181st 

143 



brigade was to be in the front line on the south side of the Divisional 
Sector. The jump-off was about 500 meters west of the WAEREGHEM- 
ANSEGHEM Road. Brigade Headquarters were at EVANGELIEBOOM, 
Division Headquarters at DESSELGHEM. 

31 October— Vicinity of EVANGELIEBOOM— in Brigade Reserve, 
while 362nd Infantry attacked with net gain of approximately 1 kilometer. 

The Brigade Field Order was not issued until 20:30, October 30th, and 
after verbal instructions had been given to the several battalions, the fol- 
lowing Regimental Field Order was issued after midnight to confirm the 
previous instructions: 

"Headquarters Regatta, 
31 October, 1918. 
Field Orders: 
No. 

I. 1. (a) The 91st Division as part of the 7th French Army Corps, 
will attack at H hour (notice of H hour has already been given by orderly to 
Battalion Commanders. No further notice will be given), 31 October, on 
front between WAEREGHEM (inclusive) and STEENBRUGGE (exclu- 
sive). The 181st Brigade will attack on the right of this sector, limitations 
stated below. 

(b) On left of 91st Division, 128th French Division, on left of 
181st Brigade, 182nd Brigade. On right of brigade, 41st French Division. 

2. (a) The brigade will attack in column of regiments, 362nd 
infantry in front line, 361st Infantry in Brigade reserve. 

(b) Zone of Action: 181st Brigade: 

Northern boundary— Southern edge of SPITAALS BOS- 
SCHEN— STUIVENBERGHE (inclusive), WAALEM 
Farm (inclusive), HULSTHOEK Farm (inclusive), 
AUDENARDE (inclusive). 

Southern boundary— STEENBRUGGE (exclusive), JAM- 
MELSHOEK (inclusive), WORTEGEM (inclusive), 
PETEGEMSTRAAT (exclusive), PETEGEM (exclusive). 

3. (a) Initial Disposition for the Attack. The 362nd Inf. will have 
two battalions in the front line and one in support. The 361st Inf. will have 
its three battalions echeloned in depth and in the following order, 2nd 
Battalion with Company A, 347th M. G. Bn. attached and one 37mm gun 
will form along the west edge of KLEIN-HARLEBEKE Woods. 3rd Bat- 
talion with Company B 347th M. G. Bn. attached and one 37mm gun, 
formed approximately 500 meters northwest of 2nd Battalion. 1st Bat- 
talion with Machine Gun Co. attached, formed approximately 500 meters 
northwest of 3rd Battalion. Each Battalion will be organized in depth 
so as to cover an area of at least 300 meters. In the advance, the leading 
Battalion will follow the support battalion of the 362nd Inf. at 1000 meters. 
37mm guns will follow their respective Battalions as promptly as practic- 
able, and will be attached for rations to Companies I and G in the 3rd 
and 2nd Battalions respectively. Men will eat breakfast and carry lunches 
issued by Headquarters Co. 

144 



(b) The attack will be preceded by five minutes of concentrated 
heavy artillery preparation, and beginning at zero hour will be accompanied 
by rolling barrage moving at the rate of 100 meters in four minutes as far as 
the line 200 meters beyond first objective. On arrival at the 1st objective 
leading troops will halt until H hour plus three hours and thirty minutes, 
and then resume attack. On arrival at second objective, leading troops 
will halt until H plus seven hours. Rolling barrage will not accompany 
troops from 1st to 2nd objective. 

(c) 347th M. G. Bn. less 2 companies, will take position of close 
liaison with 361st Infantry, as part of Brigade reserve, and will advance with 
that reserve. 

(d) 362nd Inf. will insure combat liaison with 41st French 
Division, which will assign similar combat liaison groups, above groups to be 
in position before H hour 200 meters in rear of front line, and on the bound- 
ary between the 181st Brigade and 41st Division. Combined detachments 
will be commanded by senior captain. 

4. (a) Each company will detail four men as litter bearers in accord- 
ance with previous instructions. These men to be furnished with litters 
by Regimental Surgeon at earliest opportunity. They will carry litters 
particularly between their respective companies and the Battalion 1st Aid 
Station. 

(b) Company kitchens will accompany the battalions during the 
time this regiment remains in support. Each battalion will, however, appoint 
a Battalion Ration Officer, and each company will at once designate one 
N. C. O. and 7 privates as rations detail, so that ration carrying details are 
available for efficient operation when troops are sent into the front lines 
or other conditions require it. The ration detail is vital to the success of 
the attack. No man not fully capable of the work should be selected for it. 

5. Ammunition will be brought as far forward as practicable, and issue 
be made as rapidly as possible to all riflemen of sufficient ammunition to give 
them 160 rounds. This is to be increased to 200 rounds in case need develops. 

6. Especial warning is given against German snipers and machine 
gunners throughout this area, particularly all farm houses in the regi- 
ment's sector, which should be carefully examined and mopped up, includ- 
ing cellars. Many losses have been experienced due to failure to do this. 

7. Regimental P. C. will remain at present location approximately 100 
meters east of EVANGELIEBOOM, until further notice. 

Wm. D. Davis 
Colonel, Regatta, 
HHB-mov Commanding." 

The general plan of maneuver which appeared in the Division Order, 
and was incorporated into the Brigade Order by cross reference, was ex- 
plained verbally to the Battalion Commanders and in brief was for the 
attacking infantry brigades to push rapidly by the SPITAALS BOSSCHEN 
(a hill and woods) both on its north and south sides, join forces at the first 
objective 500 meters beyond the hill and then, while other assigned troops 
mopped up the SPITAALS BOSSCHEN, push on together to the CRUYS- 

145 



HAUTEM-WORTEGEM Road which formed the second objective about 
2Vi kilometers further east. From there the brigade attack was to be 
pushed to the ESCAUT (better known as the SCHELDT) River including 
the capture of the City of AUDENARDE on the western bank of the river. 

The supporting artillery had already crowded up to deliver the morning 
barrage. As a result the Supply Company found practically every barn in 
use as an arsenal and early the next morning it had another opportunity, 
similar to that in the ARGONNE, to test the nerves of the animals as they 
passed under the noses of the guns firing the barrage. 

General McDonald's Operations Report shows that strong machine gun 
resistance was met from the southern edge of the SPITAALS BOSSCHEN 
and from heights in the neighboring sector to the right. During the early 
hours of the attack this resistance was dealt with by the accompanying 
artillery and machine guns supporting the attack, thus enabling the 362nd 
Infantry to reach its first objective, about 3 kilometers ahead, by noon. 
This line, however, could not be held, because the SPITAALS BOSSCHEN 
had not been mopped up and because the 41st French Division was not 
able to advance on the right abreast of the line named. Accordingly the 
362nd Infantry was obliged to withdraw and in spite of that regiment's 
heavy losses, their line of resistance at the end of the day was back ap- 
proximately to the WAEREGHEM-ANSEGHEM Road, which ran between 
500 and 1000 meters ahead of the jump-off. 

The 361st Infantry's starting position was immediately in rear of the 
support battalion of the 362nd Infantry; accordingly it was necessary for 
this regiment to remain where it was until the 362nd Infantry had gained 
the prescribed distance of 1000 meters. The progress of the day's fighting as 
above outlined resulted in moving the leading battalions of the 361st Infantry 
only a few hundred meters forward. During the day the Regimental 
Headquarters moved across the fields about a kilometer to KLEIN-HARLE- 
BEKE, where Captain Scudder had selected a roomy, neat, low farmhouse 
which on the following night was also to serve as an assembly point for the 
Battalion Commanders and Adjutants. Thus for the second time the brigade 
had spent a day in the front line of an engagement but without any troops 
of this regiment on the firing line. Practically no hostile fire reached the 
regiment, and the men spent their time resting in the fields in much the 
same manner as though assigned to the reserve in a practice maneuver. Hot 
meals were served with all the regularity and ease that could be desired 
and even tobacco reached the men. This extra day gave the regiment 
an excellent opportunity not only to co-ordinate its system of ration supply 
and first aid service but to check up and remedy personal shortages of 
battle equipment. 

1 November— KLEIN-HARLEBEKE to AUDENARDE, East, pursuing 
the enemy, 12^2 kilometers (ll'/i of these were ahead of the firing line 
as already established by the 362nd Infantry). 

At 6:35 P. M. October 31st, a message was sent to the several units 
of the regiment ordering them to prepare to relieve the 362nd Infantry 
before 5 :00 A. M. the following morning. Tentative dispositions were made 
and reconnaissances ordered. The Battalion Commanders and Adjutants, 

146 



the commanders of the auxiliary units (including the machine gun and 
37mm gun units), the liaison officers from the artillery and the usual officers 
of the Regimental Staff were assembled in the Colonel's room where the 
plans were orally outlined for the next day, subject to final confirmation. At 
23:45, October 31st, the Division Field Order was issued, and at 2:30, 
November 1st, the Brigade Field Order was issued. Later these reached the 
regiment. Some changes in the regiment's proposed method of advance 
were required by the detailed provisions of these orders and the Battalion 
Commanders were again reassembled so as to make possible a full under- 
standing of the somewhat complicated maneuver. 

The orders were read and explained and the maneuver arranged as 
follows: Units when first moving out were to retain substantially their 
existing relative positions, except that Lieutenant Hudelson with Company 
"C" and Lieutenant Linforth with a platoon from the Regimental Machine 
Gun Company, were to form the American portion of the mixed combat 
liaison detachment between the 91st Division and the 41st (French) Divi- 
sion on the right. The battalions in their present order of 2nd, 3rd and 
1st, were to advance through the SPITAALS BOSSCHEN, passing by the 
left flank of the 362nd Infantry, and through the units of the 182nd Brigade 
which had now occupied the woods. The troops were scheduled to arrive 
at the eastern edge of the woods and there deploy at "H" hour. The 2nd 
Battalion (with Company "A" 347th M. G. Bn. and one 37mm gun) was to 
place itself on the right in the front line, and the 3rd Battalion (with Com- 
pany "B" 347th M. G. Bn. and one 37mm gun) on the left in the front line, 
while the 1st Battalion (less Company "C") and the Regimental Machine 
Gun Company (less one platoon) were to be in support. "H" hour was 
set for 6:30 and at that time a brief rolling barrage was scheduled to move 
ahead of the troops from a line 300 meters ahead of the jump-off line. 
The specified jump-off line was then three kilometers ahead of the leading 
battalion, and that battalion was then about one kilometer ahead of the 
Regimental Headquarters. The orders were at once communicated to the 
company and platoon commanders, but hurry as they might, it was prac- 
tically 6:30 when the regiment actually moved out. The Second Battalion, 
however, had passed the prescribed jump-off line and thus relieved the front 
line by about 7 :30. All that morning this battalion swept ahead at top speed 
and the Third Battalion only with the greatest difficulty finally succeeded in 
catching it and arrived abreast of it on its left before the conclusion of 
the advance. The arrangement of the rifle companies within the battalions 
was the same as on the day previous. In the 2nd Battalion "E" was on the 
right, "G" on the left in front, "F" on the right, "H" on the left in support; 
in the 3rd Battalion "K" on the right, "L" on the left in front, "M" on the 
right, "I" on the left in support, and in the 1st Battalion "B" was on the right, 
"A" on the left in front, and "D" on the right in support. 

The enemy had evidently started a withdrawal to the heights beyond the 
SCHELDT, and the German rear elements had a head start of several hours 
on our troops with the result that the Americans, for the first five kilom- 
eters, met no machine gun resistance and only light shell and sniper 
fire. The inhabitants had been told by the Germans that the advancing 
troops were British — and as the Belgians rushed to the doors and yards 
of their cottages, their joy was redoubled on learning that the troops were 

147 



American, and that America, with 2,000,000 troops was actually on the 
European firing line. The people eagerly offered to the advancing troops 
coffee, milk and even bread spread with some form of butter substitute. 
Complete liaison was early established on the flanks but owing to the rate 
of advance it was a great strain on the signal platoon to keep its wires within 
even a reasonable distance of the front line. Guiding on the WORTEGEM 
church spire, the Second Battalion, widely deployed, continued rapidly ahead. 
In the little town of WORTEGEM, old men and women lined the road 
smiling a deep thankfulness and with tears in their eyes reached out to 
shake the hands of the soldiers or gladly threw their arms about them 
in welcome. Sandwiches, apples, and home made cigars were thrust on 
the victors, while occasional German shells were still contributed by the 
enemy. By noon the front line had reached a long ridge, extending from 
V-7888 to V-4575 along the crest of the western slope of the SCHELDT 
valley, a position clearly landmarked on the right flank by a pair of large 
four-winged windmills on the sky-line. From here the valley lay wide open 
across to the commanding German position on the steep east bank of the 
river shown on the maps as FORT KEZEL. Northward through the valley 
ran the SCHELDT River, which had been permitted to flood all the low- 
lands that it could reach. Opposite the 41st French Division and our 2nd 
Battalion, in the right half of the Brigade Sector, the river now ran over 
a submerged marshland varying from one to two kilometers in width. 
Within the left half of the Brigade Sector and about one kilometer ahead 
of the 3rd Battalion, lay the City of AUDENARDE. 

Soon the patrols of the 3rd Battalion entered this ancient city — whose 
history, as a fording place of the SCHELDT River dates from the days of 
Julius Caesar. The city itself had several ancient sieges to its credit and 
its neighboring hillsides had been the scene of many mediaeval combats. 
In addition to the minor campaigns, history (at least as published by the 91st 
Division Intelligence Service) records that in 1383 the King of France 
had rescued the starving city from the besieging forces of England by 
defeating the armies of the enemy at WESTROOSBEKE, a few kilometers 
west of DE RUITER. Later during the war for the throne of Spain, the 
allied English and Austrian forces had defeated the French in 1708 on the 
plains between EYNE and OYCKE, a little northwest of AUDENARDE, 
where on November 1st, 1918, the 182nd Brigade was now moving forward. 
The city had passed from hand to hand until 1831, when Belgium in its 
revolt from the Netherlands, carried AUDENARDE with it. Since October 
13, 1914, the city had been in the hands of the Germans who made it the 
administrative seat of one of the military districts into which this portion 
of Belgium had been organized. 

At the outbreak of the war AUDENARDE was a quiet city of 7000 
inhabitants, busy principally with its cotton mills, brush manufacturies, 
breweries and cloth or lace making establishments. In its midst stood 
the tower of the Church of Saint Walburga. A part of this church had 
been built in 1050, the tower in 1524. Among other ancient treasures 
there stood in the central square, the Town Hall, an imposing five storied 
structure of stone, erected in the late Gothic style of 1525 and known as 
one of the gems of Belgium's architecture. It was crowded with pointed 
windows and sculptured embellishments and was surmounted by a richly 

148 



sculptured delicate spire. However, before the present phase of history 
was to be closed the great tower of Saint Walburga was to be badly bat- 
tered by enemy shell fire, the cathedral itself all but demolished and at 
least one great shell hole smashed through the eastern front of the cherished 
Town Hall. 

The Second Battalion moving forward in connection with the French 
pushed rapidly to the river bank, and the Third Battalion advanced to the 
slopes of BEVERE. The troops were again under concentrated fire, for 
the Germans opened up on the advancing lines both with long range 
machine gun fire and direct artillery fire. The men were so widely de- 
ployed that, except for Company "C" which received an exceptional hail 
of machine gun fire and a concentration of shells, the losses were com- 
paratively slight. The entire regiment was still thinking of warfare in the 
terms it had learned in the ARGONNE, and in comparison with the 
struggle on that front the troops here felt that they had scarcely reached the 
front line or really begun to fight. 

At least one patrol from the Second Battalion also entered AUDENARDE 
that day and evidence of its activity may be found in the following citation 
accompanying the award of a Distinguished Service Cross to Sergeant 
Richard M. Kirk of Company "H" (and in the similar citations published 
in Appendix III to this volume, accompanying the award of a D. S. C. to 
Corporal John W. Cramer, also of Company "H," and accompanying the 
additional award to each of these men of a French Croix-de-Guerre with a 
corps citation entitling each to wear a gilt star with the decoration) : 

"Richard M. Kirk, Sergeant, Company 'H,' 361st Infantry. For extra- 
ordinary heroism in action at Audenarde, Belgium, November 1, 1918. He 
was a member of a patrol sent out to reconnoiter the town of Audenarde. 
This patrol discovered several enemy machine gun sniper posts, located in 
buildings, which were enfilading the streets of the town. Taking another 
soldier with him and dodging from building to building, he entered one 
of these houses and captured two machine gunners." (W. D. G. O. 21, Sec. I, 
Feb. 1, 1919.) 

Throughout the morning the telephones had been worked faithfully 
forward with the result that the lines at one time extended fully twelve 
kilometers to the rear, and messages had to be repeated through several 
relays, to Lieutenant Valentine at the original Regimental Headquarters at 
KLEIN-HARLEBEKE and thence to the original Brigade Headquarters at 
EVANGELIEBOOM. In the meantime Colonel Davis and General McDonald 
had themselves come forward seeking the leading battalions and waiting 
for a long enough pause in the advance to establish advanced headquarters. 
It was early afternoon and the last bit of telephone wire had extended the 
line to a telephone instrument placed in an open turnip field, 500 meters 
east of WORTEGEM. Leaving the Operations Officer at the telephone 
while the Adjutant sought a place for the Regimental Headquarters, Colonel 
Davis took Colonel Cummings, Captain Champion and Lieutenant Hubbell 
further forward in his black, closed Dodge car to examine the disposition 
of the front line. It was a clear and sunny afternoon and the car moved 
swiftly ahead to MOOREGEM (V-6081). There it stopped in front of a 
small cottage near to the headquarters group of the 1st Battalion. The car's 
movement had been such that it very likely had been seen by some careful 

149 



watcher in a hostile artillery observation post across the valley. The 
officers stepped out, the car was moved to the rear of the building and 
Colonel Cummings with Captain Champion had just stepped around the 
house when Captain Hughes, commanding the First Battalion (and ac- 
companied by a runner from Battalion Headquarters) stepped up to speak 
to Colonel Davis. Immediately three shells crashed across from the opposite 
valley. All hit near the house and one fatal shell hit the hard surfaced 
road close to the little group of three. Instantly the three were killed. 

Accustomed as was the regiment to the sudden loss of its field officers, 
yet as this news spread over the battle field, there was a sudden hush 
among those who heard it. This time not only Captain Hughes, a tried 
Battalion Commander, but Colonel Davis, the leader, the molder, and 
practically the father of the regiment was gone. Although known per- 
sonally by but few of the enlisted men, the Colonel was well known by 
sight to each of them. He was implicitly trusted by them, he had taught 
them and had taught their officers by precept and by personal example the 
standards of America's unbeaten army. His personal knowledge of each 
officer, his personal acquaintance with all the details of the regiment, his 
constant care for the welfare of his men, his well-known standard of disci- 
pline, his demonstrated ability in battle as well as in routine administra- 
tion, had won him the unquestioned confidence of all the officers. But 
most of all, to the comparatively few who had lived in close personal 
relationship with the Colonel, came the clear realization that the regiment 
had lost a great hearted friend as well as a military leader. Already in 
his fiftieth year, with over 30 years of military experience, Colonel Davis 
was a veteran of several previous engagements and his military leadership 
had been invaluable, but in addition there lived in his heart a thorough 
interest in the life of every soldier. Wearied, but never exhausted, already 
slightly wounded, already slightly affected by the gas in the ARGONNE, 
he many times had sunk into snatches of deep slumber on whatever rough 
cot or ground served as his bed, and yet in the midst of the night he would 
quietly make to those about him fresh suggestions providing for the better 
care, equipment or comfort of his men, or he would step to a rough table 
to write in his ever ready loose leafed folio, a personal letter, either to his 
family or to the bereaved family of some member of his regiment. His 
rare and valued letters of commendation, his hearty response to any letter 
from an officer who had been transferred from his regiment but had re- 
membered to send back news, his freely given and unreserved letters of 
recommendation for any worthy officer who was about to leave the regiment, 
his staunch and jealous championship of the rights and privileges of his 
regiment (cost what this might to him personally), are cherished by all to 
whom these features of his character were disclosed. Modest, thoroughly 
dependable, he was an officer most worthy of the uniform he wore, and for 
whom no more fitting memorial of his spirit can be expressed than that 
which he had himself spoken five days before in honor of the fallen heroes 
of the ARGONNE. 

In General McDonald's official report of this engagement he has stated: 

"A most serious loss sustained by the brigade in the 4 days action was 

the loss of Colonel W. D. Davis, commanding the 361st Inf., who was killed 

150 



by a high explosive shell near MOOREGEM on the afternoon of Nov. 1st, 
while reconnoitering and disposing his front line. As a fearless leader and 
efficient organizer and as an officer and gentleman, he fulfilled the best 
traditions of our service. As was his example in life, so will be his memory 
now — a guide and inspiring influence to the officers and men of his regi- 
ment and of the brigade." 

On the following day General McDonald caused his General Order 
No. 11 to be published throughout the brigade announcing the death in 
action of Colonel Davis. 

"181st Brigade 
2 Nov. 1918. 
GENERAL ORDERS 
No. 11. 

The Brigade Commander announces the death of Colonel William D. 
Davis, commanding the 361st Infantry, by shell fire on November 1st, 1918, 
while adjusting the front line of battle. 

No greater loss could have befallen the brigade and the service loses 
in Colonel Davis one of its best and most valuable officers. His example as 
a leader and an organizer was invaluable to his regiment and to the whole 
brigade. 

The Brigade Commander feels a great personal loss in the death of 
Colonel Davis and extends to his bereaved family and friends his deepest 
sympathy and that of the whole brigade. 

J. B. McDonald, 

Brigadier General, U. S. A. 

Commanding." 

With Colonel Davis had fallen two others, an officer and an enlisted 
man. Again the officer was a Battalion Commander, Captain Howard D. 
Hughes. He was a well known and able attorney of Seattle, Washington, 
who had, with prompt patriotism dropped his professional practice within a 
few days after the declaration of war to offer his services by attending the 
First Training Camp at the PRESIDIO of SAN FRANCISCO. Already middle 
aged and mature, he won at that camp a Captain's commission, although he 
had never before taken part in serious military training and furthermore, he 
was among the few Reserve Corps Officers selected to remain at the camp as 
instructors in the Second Officers' Training School. Subsequently he re- 
ceived a similar detail as instructor at the Third Officers' Training Camp, 
this time at CAMP LEWIS. Throughout this period he had been assigned 
to the 361st Infantry but had not joined it. Upon permanently joining it 
he was given command of Company "A," which command he held until 
he succeeded to the command of the 1st Battalion, when Major Farwell 
had been wounded. He commanded this battalion in the front line during 
the remainder of the first phase of the MEUSE-ARGONNE offensive and 
again in the front line during the first three days of the second phase of 
that offensive when his battalion won distinction by its successful maneuver 
that brought it safely to the base of Hill 269, and finally by its successful 
attack upon the hill in co-operation with the 1st Engineers. For these 

151 



services as Battalion Commander he was later cited in Division Orders. He 
was a devoted, thoroughly disinterested and intelligent officer whose sudden 
loss was keenly felt. So it was that Company "A", originally selected as 
a Seattle Company, lost in action both of its original commanders, Captain 
(later Major) Farwell, of Seattle, and his successor, Captain (later Battalion 
Commander) Hughes, also of Seattle. 

Colonel Davis had built the regiment so well, that when his successor, 
Colonel Avery D. Cummings, with no final word of instruction from him, 
was thus suddenly called upon to command the regiment, which had been 
deprived of its leader and for the sixth time had been deprived of a 
battalion commander, no unit suffered a moment of disorganization or 
confusion. 

On the following day the simple military burial services in the nearby 
church yard of V/ORTEGEM were attended by the Brigade Commander, 
representatives of the several units of the brigade, and those few officers 
of this regiment who could be spared from the staff and line. "Taps" was 
sounded as enemy shells burst nearby and as a battery of American artillery 
a few feet away was moving up the road to take its position nearer the front. 

Immediately upon the death of Colonel Davis, Colonel Cummings as- 
sumed command of the regiment, and placed Lieutenant Appelman in 
temporary command of the 1st Battalion. The establishment of liaison on 
the front line was completed and after getting fully in touch with the dis- 
positions of the units, Colonel Cummings reported to Brigade Headquar- 
ters with full information as to the tactical situation and with the con- 
firmation of the death of Colonel Davis. He was immediately officially 
assigned to the command of the regiment, and his Regimental Headquarters 
were established in the farm buildings at CAUBORRE (V-4586). The 
regimental staff remained unchanged. 

Brigade Headquarters were established at WORTEGEM, Division Head- 
quarters at STUIVENBERGHE (Chateau). 

By about 2:00 P. M. an "L" Company patrol of five or six men led by 
Sergeant J. Schwartz, had crossed the western canal of the river and 
patrolled to the center of AUDENARDE. On the same afternoon other 
patrols from the 2nd and 3rd Battalions worked their way into the city and 
reported it safe and unoccupied except for carefully placed hostile outposts, 
machine guns and artillery covering the eastern half of the city and its 
eastern exits. The river passed through and around the city, following a so- 
called main natural channel on the extreme east. A main canal, with 
demolished locks, passed through the center of the city (thus creating an 
"island" in the eastern third of the city), and two lesser canals cut through 
the city still nearer to the west. All bridges had been destroyed or rendered 
unuseable before the Germans left the city. The city itself was as yet not 
badly damaged by artillery fire, and most of the enemy fire was being 
directed against the suburb of BEVERE rather than AUDENARDE. 

The people of the city were ecstatic in their welcome, the houses were 
thrown open, the soldiers urged to come inside and to be treated to wine, 
food, milk or whatever delicacy the establishment could boast. A detail 
to patrol into AUDENARDE was then regarded as a privilege rather than 

152 



a hardship. Nevertheless the ever-present sniper was abroad, and all 
patrolling required caution. 

That night the regular patrols were ordered back from the city to the 
established line of observation along the slopes west of the city, while only 
certain designated patrols from each Intelligence Section and a detachment 
from Company "F" of the 316th Engineers were sent to AUDENARDE to 
discover and report upon available bridge material. The city was full of 
bridge material and the next morning the Engineers began the construction 
of temporary bridges over the nearest (westernmost) canal. 

2 and 3 November (Saturday and Sunday) — Occupation of AUDEN- 
ARDE. 

Patrols were again sent into the city on the 2nd of November and early 
in the afternoon of that day two platoons of Company "I" were sent in to 
outpost the town as a covering party for the Engineers. The remainder 
of the company was sent in at about dusk and that night nine posts were 
established, thoroughly protecting the eastern entrances, and preventing 
the passage even of civilians who might try to pass between the hostile 
lines. Before dawn the posts were reinforced by machine guns from Com- 
pany "B" 347th Machine Gun Battalion. 

On this day of comparative quiet, there came to the troops through the 
Intelligence Service of the Division, the following notice, which was 
accepted as praise at the hands of the enemy, and which indicated that 
from the very first of the attack the German high command was fully 
aware of the identity of the Americans: 

"HEADQUARTERS 9 1ST DIVISION No. 50 

Summary of Intelligence 
November 2, 1918 



Translation of a German document taken from a wounded officer by 
the 107th Field Artillery : 

"H. Q. 30th October, 1918. 

1. Early tomorrow we must be ready to meet hostile attack. It is there- 
fore ordered that from six o'clock on, companies will be alerted for action. 

2. Munitions may be got at the K. T. K. (distributing point) at any time. 
Empty, light machine gun feed boxes must be exchanged for poor (prob- 
ably misprint for "full") ones. 

3. Opposite our sector lies the 91st American Division. For each 
prisoner brought in the division will give 18 days extra leave. 

(Signed) Von Below. 



Thomas A. Driscoll 

Major, Infantry, 

A. C. of S.- G— 2 

per K." 

154 




Colonel Avery D. Cummings 

Commanding Officer of 361st Infantry Regiment from November 1, 1918, 

until its demobilization April 30, 1919. 



In addition to the code names for units, the mystery of war was now 
further deepened by the following code words for places. These were pre- 
scribed for telephone communications — possibly to make the war seem more 
homelike: 

AUDENARDE became LAKEWOOD WORTEGEM became OAKLAWN 

MOOREGEM became CLOVER OYCKE became HIGHLAND 

EYNE became CLIFF ISEGHEM became ROSEDALE 

HEURNE became VOLUNTEER ESCAUT River became DEFIANCE 

No official relief was ever provided from the names of VOLKAARTS- 
BEKE, HEMELRIJK, KASTEELWIJK, KLEIN-KORTIJL or other of the 
smaller settlements near the front line. 

No attack was scheduled for November 2nd and the higher command 
ordered the regiment back from the river to a line of observation extending 
northeast along the windmill ridge. Captain Heath was placed in com- 
mand of the 1st Battalion and ordered to place it under the best available 
cover about 700 meters in rear of the line of observation and to the east 
or northeast of the CAUBORRE farm buildings. 

The rolling kitchens were assembled near CAUBORRE, and with fixed 
regularity the troops received their two hot meals daily. Even during the 
rapid advance on November 1st, the Battalion Mess Officers (then called 
"Ration Officers") and their ration details had rendered conspicuously valu- 
able service, not only by having succeeded in some cases in carrying the 
meals close behind the lines for the entire 10 or 12 kilometers of the pursuit 
and delivering them at the halt, but by directing the regimental supply trains 
to the proper assembly points. 

The supporting artillery was particularly successful in keeping down 
the enemy artillery and machine gun fire from the heights east and south- 
east of AUDENARDE and the Allies' control of the air continued complete 
during daylight. 

During the night of November 2/3, orders were received covering the 
proposed crossing of the SCHELDT by the 182nd Brigade early the next 
morning about three kilometers below AUDENARDE, in the vicinity of 
EYNE. That brigade was then to move south to attack the heights of 
FORT KEZEL from the north. The 181st Brigade was to hold its present 
line until the completion of the above maneuver, and was then to make a 
strong demonstration by using all available means of fire against FORT 
KEZEL. 

With a view to the performance of this plan, the Operations Officer 
was sent to open an advance Regimental Headquarters, in AUDENARDE. 
Most of the Third Battalion of the 361st Infantry, with Company "B" of 
the 347th M. G. Battalion, and an attached platoon of Engineers under 
Lieutenant Van Leer, were moved into the city. Observation posts and 
patrols were kept constantly on the lookout for the appearance of the 
troops from the north. For a few hours, pending procurement of suffi- 
cient wire to reach this additional 5 kilometers to the advance Regi- 
mental P. C, the regiment had the novel experience of sending messages 
from its front line to its P. C. (at CAUBORRE) over a wire of the Advance 
Information Center of the Division which at dawn had established a station 

155 



at the AUDENARDE Town Hall. As no troops appeared from the north, 
a volunteer patrol under Sergeant (then Corporal) Wright of Company "I" 
was sent down the river with instructions to cross it at the first opportunity 
and gain actual contact with whatever American troops could be found. 
The patrol finally went the entire three kilometers to EYNE, there met the 
37th Division, and after the patrol leader had crossed on a log what he 
took to be the river (but may have been a canal), and had seen that no 
troops had made the crossing even at that point, he returned to AUDEN- 
ARDE with the above report. The contemplated maneuver to the north 
was never carried out owing to delay in obtaining permission from the 
division in whose sector the movement would take place and to the conse- 
quent impracticability of making the desired river crossing by constructing 
bridges in broad daylight. 

In the meantime, General McDonald, Colonel Cummings and the Field 
Artillery Commander had arranged everything for such a concentration of 
fire on the centers of resistance around FORT KEZEL, that it was a keen 
disappointment not to have the opportunity to give the enemy the medicine. 

Throughout the day there had been constant sniping and counter-sniping 
along the eastern edge of the city, during which the Germans had been 
forced off the island and east of the river. Several German snipers were 
killed or captured. Also several persons, including two women, suspected of 
having means of communicating with or of aiding the enemy were arrested 
and turned over to the local Belgian authorities. 

Next came a surprise, for the orders arrived stating that the 41st French 
Division would hold the Corps Front, and accordingly would take over the 
positions in AUDENARDE. At least a battalion of infantry of the 37th 
U. S. Division had effected a crossing near HEURNE, about 5 kilometers 
north of AUDENARDE, yet both that division and the 91st were withdrawn 
at the same time pending a later general attack. It has been stated that the 
withdrawal was made because other corps further north were not yet ready 
to pass the line of the SCHELDT. In any event the policy saved many 
American lives. 

Still judging by the policy used in the American drive in the ARGONNE, 
the troops were unable at first to realize that they were to have a rest at 
the end of but four days in the line (only three of which had been spent 
by them in the front line) and during which most of the units had suffered 
comparatively few casualties and had both rested and fed well. 

Throughout this engagement the instructions from the higher com- 
mand after November 1st had been to hold the troops back and to avoid all 
unnecessary risk of casualties. Also a rumor (how well founded may be 
judged by later events) reached the regiment to the effect that the German 
troops had been ordered to hold the east bank of the SCHELDT until 
November 10th and then to withdraw to the east. 

The troops toward the right flank of the regiment had observed with 
great interest the French method of advance on November 1st. While our 
troops, being unopposed by machine gun positions and subject only to 
artillery fire or long range machine gun fire, were advancing rapidly with 
lines and men widely deployed and largely regardless of cover while mov- 
ing, the French were advancing by independent squads. Their units, evi- 

156 



dently extending more deeply to the rear than the corresponding American 
units, filtered forward in squad columns, scurrying from cover to cover 
and stopping at the several farm houses for cover, rest and refreshment. 
They reached their objective in this instance as soon as did the Americans 
and they somehow seemed able to keep up very good liaison between these 
apparently independent squads. Doubtless these were Frenchmen who had 
lived through many battles and the war was no diversion to them, they 
fought as a matter of daily living and with a plain intent to fight if possible 
without losses. Accordingly no Frenchman took an unnecessary risk and 
none underwent avoidable hardships. What the comparative rate and 
success of advance would have been had the two units actually met with 
resistance holding on until forced out, remains only to conjecture. Very 
likely both armies would have reached the same result, the Americans 
perhaps more rapidly and possibly with greater losses, the French perhaps 
more slowly, but (unless the enemy gained sufficient time to make a counter- 
attack or to organize fixed defensive positions that would have prolonged 
the engagement), very likely with less losses. 

The first phase of the "Turnip Drive" was over. Among its officers the 
regiment had lost in action its Regimental Commander, and the commander 
of the First Battalion. Lieutenant Hayes of Company "C" had been 
mortally wounded, and the following Lieutenants had received wounds of 
varying degrees of severity: Meade of Company "C," Burnett of Company 
"F," Wilkins and Mitchell of Company "H," Vincent (of Company "H"), 
2nd Battalion Liaison Officer, Franklin of Company "L," Trouchet of Com- 
pany "M," and Quinby of the Supply Company. Captain Minick of Com- 
pany "G" and Lieutenant Towson of Company "H" each were reported 
slightly wounded but both were able to remain on duty. Lieutenant Trouchet 
had been wounded on October 31st, but had then been placed in charge 
of the 3rd Battalion Rations, where he acquitted himself with credit before 
being compelled to go to the hospital. 

Lieutenant Lane, 2nd Battalion Intelligence Officer, on November 4th, 
was compelled to go to a hospital on account of a bad wrench to one knee. 
Lieutenant Echolds succeeded him as Intelligence Officer. Lieutenant 
Brightbill had been left behind in STRAATE where he had been taken ill 
on October 28th, but he rejoined the regiment on November 6th. Through- 
out this engagement Adjutant Hauger of the French Commission had 
rendered valuable services as a Liaison Agent with the French troops on 
the right. Chaplain Beard, in charge of the burial parties remained behind 
under heavy shell fire after relief of the regiment until all burials were 
complete. In recognition of his exceptional services on this occasion he 
was later awarded the French Croix-de-Guerre with a Divisional Citation. 

The regiment had been in action a little more than four days (one day 
in reserve, and three days in the front line — one of these days attacking, 
or rather pursuing the enemy, and the other two in outposting the line). 
The regiment had captured AUDENARDE, and in its advance of November 
1st is also credited with the capture of WORTEGEM, MOOREGEM and 
BEVERE, as well as more than 15 of the small, but heavily named, groups 
of farm buildings. It had advanced 11 Vi kilometers in the attacking line, 
and had turned over to the relieving troops not only AUDENARDE but a 
strip of recovered territory nearly three kilometers wide. The regiment, 

157 



as a front line unit, since September 26th, had, itself, permanently driven 
back the enemy's lines for a total depth of 25 kilometers (over 15J/2 miles), 
across an area varying from 1 to 3 kilometers in width. Its total losses are 
stated below. The totals in the last column on the right show the grand 
total for the French as well as the Belgian campaign. The entire table of 
losses is recapitulated in Appendix IV. 

FIRST PHASE "LYS-SCHELDT" OFFENSIVE 
October 31 st-November 4th (inclusive), 1918. 



















Totals 


Companies and 




Officers 




Enlisted Men 




All 


Detachments 


Killed 


Wounded 


Killed 


Wounded 


Totals 


Actions 


Field and Staff 


1 












1 


5 


"A" 


1 








1 


2 


4 


90 


"B" 










1 


3 


4 


103 


"C" 


1 






1 


9 


26 


37 


131 


"D" 










2 


4 


6 


109 


"E" 










1 


8 


9 


87 


"P" 








1 


4 


8 


13 


83 


"G" 








1 




9 


10 


91 


"H" 








4 


1 


9 


14 


93 


"I" 










5 


14 


19 


128 


"K" 










5 


7 


12 


117 


"L" 








1 


3 


12 


16 


132 


"M" 








1 


2 


15 


18 


124 


Hq. 










1 


1 


2 


71 


M. G. 










2 


10 


12 


53 


Sup. 








1 


1 


1 


3 


11 


Med. Det. 












1 


1 


10 



Totals 



10 



38 



130 



181 



1438 



Shortly after the arrival of the troops in the rest area, there was pub- 
lished to them the following commendation from the Commander of the 
Seventh French Army Corps: 

" (300— FOR OFFICIAL CIRCULATION ONLY) HQ. 9 1ST DIV. 

A. E. F. Nov. 7, 1918. 
GENERAL ORDERS: 
No. 38. 

1. The following expression of appreciation by the Commanding Gen- 
eral, Seventh Army Corps (French) of the services of troops of this com- 
mand during the advance to the Scheldt River, is published for the informa- 
tion of all concerned: 

'7th French Corps. 
Staff. 



SPECIAL ORDER 



Transported from the Argonne to Flanders, the 91st American Division 
has again been thrown into the battle, a few hours after its arrival. 



158 



Under the energetic influence of its Commander, Major General John- 
ston, the 91st American Division reached all its objectives on the 31st 
October, and 1st November, with remarkable dash and energy. 

In spite of the determined resistance of the enemy, in spite of artillery 
and machine gun fire which opposed them, the troops of the 91st American 
Division captured Spitaals Bosschen by a clever flanking movement, reached 
the Scheldt, and penetrated into the town of Audenarde., from now onwards 
delivered from the yoke of the invader. 

The General Officer commanding the 7th French Corps heartily con- 
gratulates General Johnston, and the officers and men of his division, on 
the excellent results obtained. 

When, in a few days time, the battle for the passage of the Scheldt 
takes place, the 91st American Division will be called upon to furnish a 
further effort. 

The brilliant way in which this division has just fought is a sure guar- 
antee that it will gather fresh laurels during the next operations. 

Hdqs. 4th November, 1918. 
Commanding General, 7th Corps. 
(Signed) Massenet.' 

2. The Division Commander adds his appreciation of the efforts of 
officers and men of his command to comply with orders received. He warns 
them, however, that such efforts must continue until the last armed enemy 
of the United States has surrendered. 

3. He especially thanks officers and men of the 53rd Field Artillery 
Brigade for the assistance rendered during this offensive. Infantry units 
have never been supported more skillfully, nor with more willing and 
intelligent co-operation, than were those of the 91st Division by the 53rd 
Field Artillery Brigade and organizations of the French Artillery attached 
thereto. 

4. This order will be read to all organizations on the earliest appro- 
priate occasion. 

By Command of Major General Johnston: 
WHJ- 
9:50—10:10 

OFFICIAL: Henry C. Jewett, 

D. J. Coman Colonel, Engineers, 

Major, A. G. Chief of Staff." 
Acting Adjutant. 



159 



CHAPTER X 

SECOND PHASE OF LYS-SCHELDT OFFENSIVE 

November 4-11, 1918 

4-7 November— AUDENARDE to EVANGELIEBOOM, via MOORE- 
GEM, WORTEGEM and WAEREGHEM, West, marching, 19 kilometers, 
and in vicinity of EVANGELIEBOOM, resting. 

During the night and in the early morning of November 4th, the regiment 
moved back to the vicinity of EVANGELIEBOOM, where a hot meal was 
served upon arrival of the troops. The battalions were billeted in nearby 
farms and Regimental Headquarters were opened in a little empty store 
partly shattered by shell fire. Although the walls were still standing, the 
roofs of most of the buildings in EVANGELIEBOOM had been shattered 
by direct hits or by the shock of nearby explosions. The refugee families 
were already refilling the homes, but the billeting problem was solved by 
the use of the spacious rambling barns of the farms. Brigade Headquarters 
moved to OYGHEM, Division Headquarters to OOSTROOSEBEKE. 

The band rejoined the regiment and treated it to concerts. Also, much 
to the delight of the natives, the band included a newly learned rendering 
of the Belgian National Air. 

Captain Scudder was regularly appointed Regimental Adjutant and 
Captain Savage, as Regimental Unit Supply Officer, was now permanently 
attached for duty with the Regimental Staff, the Supply Company being 
directly commanded by Lieutenant Brace. 

The complete bathing of the regiment was accomplished by the use 
of the many empty large caliber shell cases which served as basins or pails. 
Needed personal equipment was brought up, and had it not been for rainy 
weather, each battalion would have put on a parade by way of a diversion. 

8 November— EVANGELIEBOOM to FRANCQUAART, via WAERE- 
GHEM, DE BIEST, LINDENHOEK and JOENSHOEK, East, marching, 15 
kilometers. 

Warning of an impending move reached the regiment on the 7th. Ac- 
cordingly a detailed regimental warning order was issued, accompanied 
by a detailed order covering permanent instructions for troop movements, 
and on this basis the regiment was put in readiness to move. 

Division Field Order No. 26, issued at about midnight of November 7th, 
announced that the division would be placed at the disposal of the Com- 
manding General, 30th Army Corps (French), on the following day and 
prescribed the preliminary movements for relieving French units on the 
8th and 9th. By this order the head of the 361st Infantry column was to 
reach DE BIEST at 5 P. M., November 9th. In reliance on this, prepara- 
tion was now made for another day at EVANGELIEBOOM. Suddenly a 
message issued from Brigade Headquarters at 1 1 :30 A. M., November 8th, 

160 



announced that the brigade had been required to clear its present area by 
6 :00 P. M. on that day. Orders were at once sent to the troops and by virtue 
of the previous preparation the regiment was in column and moving to the 
front at 1 :30 P. M. The final tactical disposition had also been covered in the 
first warning order and the movement was completed on that basis. The 
order of march within the regiment was 3rd Battalion (with one 37mm gun), 
commanded by Captain Dickinson, 2nd Battalion (with one 37mm gun), 
commanded by Major Goodpaster, and 1st Battalion with the Machine Gun 
and Headquarters Companies, commanded by Captain Heath. The 347th 
Machine Gun Battalion followed this regiment. The 362nd Infantry moved 
independently. 

With the same order of battalions the regiment moved into its pre- 
liminary position as a part of the division in reserve. The Third Battalion 
was in the front line of the division and was located in the vicinity 
of the KNOCK-FRANCQUAART Ridge. The other battalions were each 
about 500 meters in rear of the preceding one. Regimental Headquarters 
was opened at a farm near FRANCQUAART. About five hundred meters 
still further east was the Regimental Headquarters of the 128th (French) 
Infantry, the troops of which then occupied AUDENARDE. 

9 November— Vicinity of KNOCK, FRANCQUAART, KLEIHOEK, and 
WAALEM, in reserve. 

During the day of the 9th a generous supply of tobacco and of other 
Y. M. C. A. and K. of C. stores was issued to the men and the battalions 
made slight changes to improve the positions which they had taken in the 
mud and darkness of the previous night. 

During the preceding night the Field Train had had a memorable 
struggle with the roads and the directions, but on the 9th it had ample 
opportunity to resettle itself in KNOCK. Lieutenant Kellas was again on 
duty with the Supply Company, having rejoined on November 4, after 
but one month's absence on account of his wound received in the BOIS 
DE CIERGES. 

A careful plan for effecting a crossing of the SCHELDT River had been 
made and Division Field Order No. 28 was fully prepared. It provided for 
what might have proved to be another most serious front line engagement 
for this regiment had the enemy chosen to have forced the issue. The 
plan was for the 30th Corps to attack between HEURNE and AUDENARDE. 
The 91st Division was to have the right of this sector, from EYNE to 
AUDENARDE (both inclusive), and was to attack with the 41st (French) 
Division on its right and the 132nd (French) Division on its left. Both 
brigades were to be in line. The 181st Brigade was to have the right of 
the Division Sector. The Brigade Sector was again to cover the entire city 
of AUDENARDE, beginning at a railroad fork one kilometer north of the 
city. In AUDENARDE lay the feasible bridging and crossing points and 
by Division Order the brigade was placed in column of regiments with the 
361st Infantry specified as the front line regiment, and directed to attack 
with two battalions in line. The 362nd Infantry (less one battalion in 
corps reserve) was to follow the 361st Infantry across the river. Each 
front line battalion was to send an advance guard across the river 3'/2 
hours before zero hour with the mission of taking and holding a specified 

161 



line on the east side of the river and from there two hours later, cover 
the front line battalions, while they crossed the river and reformed prepara- 
tory to the attack. This new line was to be the "jump-off" line at zero 
hour. The artillery was to prepare for and support the attack on FORT 
KEZEL by concentration of fire, commencing 3|/2 hours before zero. At 
that time also a rolling barrage would precede the advance guard during 
its move to its covering position. Two minutes before zero hour, another 
rolling barrage was to start and move forward to the first objective (beyond 
FORT KEZEL), ahead of the attacking 361st Infantry. This regiment's 
attack was to encircle FORT KEZEL from the north, while at 30 minutes 
after zero hour the 362nd Infantry (less one battalion) was to launch a 
secondary attack, carrying the heights of FORT KEZEL by frontal attack. 

This with other incidental and accompanying features, was to be the 
realization of the attack on those heights which had occupied the thoughts 
of the front line commanders so seriously when encountering them on the 
first trip to AUDENARDE. The enemy was still in his strong position, and 
there loomed ahead for the 181st Brigade a task fit to test the metal of the 
best troops in the world. 

News had already arrived as to the pending armistice negotiations and 
the artillery fire on the front did not seem as heavy as usual. However, 
during the absence of the division from AUDENARDE, there had occurred 
a steady hostile fire into the city, including a bombardment by gas shells 
that brought death to the unprotected civilians, men, women and children, 
far more readily than to the French soldiers fully equipped with their gas 
masks. 

On November 9th the headquarters of the 128th (French) Infantry 
moved into AUDENARDE, and Colonel Cummings with a few officers 
visited those headquarters to learn what information they had and what 
preparation they were making for a relief that night. The Colonel found 
the headquarters crowded into one of the great bomb-proof cellars long 
ago made by the civilians or Germans, and as yet the French had no knowl- 
edge of an impending relief. 

That afternoon, General Johnston, personally visited the Regimental 
Headquarters of the 361st Infantry and there pencilled a message providing 
for the accomplishment of the expected relief. He intimated, however, 
that a change in the further plans seemed to be impending, and he stated 
that the plans for the attack (as above outlined) were to be withheld at 
Division Headquarters until further orders. 

At 5:40 P. M. the 364th Infantry, on this regiment's left, sent a 
message that was delivered at 6:35 P. M., stating that the 364th was to 
remain where it was and probably it would not be on the left of the 361st 
Infantry that night. 

At 9:00 P. M., Division Field Order No. 29 was issued, cancelling No. 
28, and announcing that information had been received that the enemy 
was in retreat east of the SCHELDT River, that the 12th (French) Division 
was now on the left, and the 41st (French) Division on the right of the 
91st Division. The 182nd Brigade, supported by a regiment of light (75mm) 
artillery would take up the pursuit of the enemy at 6:30 A. M., November 
10th, 1918. The 181st Brigade was to remain on the west side of the 

162 



river, but to assist the Engineers in preparation of the bridges necessary 
for the crossing. 

Acting on advance messages, the 3rd Battalion had already been sent 
into the city and was furnishing both the covering parties and necessary 
fatigue parties to prepare the foot bridges under direction of the Engineers. 
The Second Battalion moved to BEVERE, ready to render assistance if 
needed, and the 1st Battalion with the Machine Gun Company, moved up 
to the former position of the 3rd Battalion. 

The enemy had gone — and the French were in pursuit. There was no 
firing on the bridge workers. It was learned later that Lieutenant Kellas 
had been required to bring up 100 life preservers, presumably for the 
bridge workers, or possibly for the 361st Infantry advance guard that was 
to have made the first crossing under fire according to the first plan, but 
none of these life preservers were used or needed. The regiment suffered 
no casualties from any cause during this second phase of the Belgian 
Offensive. 

At dawn on November 10th, the 182nd Brigade pushed across the com- 
pleted foot bridges, relieved the pursuing French, and took up the pursuit 
of the enemy. 

The entire Belgian offensive, between August 19th and November 11th, 
is technically known as the YPRES-LYS Offensive, but as this regiment's 
contact with the enemy did not begin until it had crossed the LYS River, 
a more accurate official title for the two "Turnip Drives" is the YPRES- 
LYS-SCHELDT Offensive as previously used in this text, and frequently 
used in official statements. 

10 November (Sunday) — to AUDENARDE, Southeast, marching, 5 
kilometers and in AUDENARDE on guard duty. 

On the 10th, the regiment continued its duty of guarding the several 
entrances and exits of the city, preventing the passage of civilians either 
in or out. 

Regimental Headquarters were opened in AUDENARDE in the same 
building that had been used by it for its advance P. C. on November 3rd. 
This was the former headquarters of the German Civil Administration, and 
evidently before that it had been a handsomely finished private residence. 
The elegant tapestried drawing room with a stately plate glass mirror 
and rich furnishings that had served as the temporary Headquarters Office 
before, was now a rubbish heap of plaster, broken glass, and torn or 
broken furnishings, for during the absence of the regiment a shell had 
struck squarely on the front of the building and torn a hole directly into 
this room. All about the city were heaps of fallen bricks, stone, masonry 
or glass and great tangles of torn wires lined the streets, showing the 
effect of the past six days of shelling. 

Brigade Headquarters which had been established at NOKERE moved 
to AUDENARDE at 10:00 A. M., and at 3:00 P. M. Division Headquarters 
also moved there from the Southern Chateau NOKERE. 

Substantially all the troops of the regiment were moved into the city and 
billeted in the empty buildings, many being temporarily placed in the con- 
vent near the Church of St. Walburga. 

163 



In accordance with an amendment in the tables of organization pro- 
viding for a Captain on the Regimental Staff as Intelligence Officer, Captain 
R. C. M. Page, who returned to the regiment on November 9th (and had 
commanded Company "F" for two days) was assigned as Regimental In- 
telligence Officer to succeed Lieutenant Hubbell, who was now attached to 
Headquarters Company for other duty. 

1 1 November— In AUDENARDE, in support. 

The Division Field Order for the 11th stated that the enemy was con- 
tinuing his retreat east of the river, that contact with the enemy would be 
maintained and the attack resumed at 10:00 A. M. The 182nd Brigade was 
to continue the attack, the 181st Brigade was to remain in support, west 
of the river. 

At 7:30 A. M. the Corps Commander sent to the 91st Division, a message 
in French, of which the following is a translation: 

"TELEPHONE MESSAGE 

Headquarters PENET (this was the code word for the 30th Army Corps, 
and also the name of its Commanding General), to 91 D. I. U. S. 

7 h. 30—11 November, 1918. 

Marshall Foch to The Commander-in-Chief. 

1. Hostilities are stopped on the entire front, beginning November 
11th, at 11 o'clock (French time). 

2. The Allied troops are not to pass, until further orders, the line 
reached at that hour. Report the exact location of the line. 

3. All communication with the enemy is forbidden, until receipt of 
instructions sent to the Army Commanders. 

(Signed) Foch. 

Transmitted for execution. 

Report the line reached. The Infantry units will be reassembled by 
battalions at the hour above stated. A regular line of outposts will be 
established along the entire front of the Army Corps. 

The Generals commanding the Infantry Divisions will issue the strictest 
orders to the effect that all officers and platoon leaders will make abso- 
lutely sure the prevention of communication with the enemy." 

Universal relief and congratulations expressed in cheers that passed 
from group to group was the manifestation brought forth by the news of 
victory. The civilians and the French joined in a relieved shout of "Fini 
la guerre" but in this shell-torn spot there was no wild celebration. The 
spirit was more one of thankfulness. For the Americans, the war was over 
and many already turned their thoughts homeward and to the days when 
they would again be peaceable civilians. All realized, however, that there 
might yet be much further need for military service before final peace, 
and the fact that the present Divisional Sector extended straight to BRUS- 
SELS, caused a realization that the advance might be pushed at least to 
that city if not into Germany. 

164 



Once again the division received the commendation of its Corps Com- 
mander and on November 26th this was published to the division in the 
following form: 

"(300— FOR OFFICIAL CIRCULATION ONLY) HQ. 9 1ST DIV. 

A. E. F., Nov. 26, 1918. 

GENERAL ORDERS: 

No. 49: 

1. The following letter from the Commanding General, 30th Army 
Corps (French), is published for the information of officers and men of this 
division, and of the 53rd Field Artillery Brigade, attached thereto: 

'30th Army Corps H. Q., Nov. 24, 1918. 

General Staff From: The General of Division Penet, commanding 

the 30th Army Corps. 

3rd Bureau To: The Commanding General of the 91st Infantry 

Division, U. S. 

No. 377/3 

The General commanding the 30th Army Corps does not want to part 
with the 9 1st Inf. Div. without expressing to its Chief, its Officers, its 
splendid units all his appreciation of the fine military qualities they have 
shown during the length of their attachment to the Corps. 

By abandoning the line of the Escaut, the enemy did not allow the 
putting in execution of the plan of attack which was so cleverly promoted. 
The intelligent operation preparations by all the General Staffs, the efforts 
made by the officers and the troops in order to have all necessary materials 
at their disposal when and where needed, the strict discipline which presided 
over all preliminary movements and which were a certain presage of suc- 
cess, are nevertheless deserving of the greatest praise. 

The Commanding General of the 30th Army Corps takes great pleasure 
in sending this letter as a proof of his appreciation to the General Com- 
manding the 91st Division, and thanks him for his intelligent and faithful 
co-operation. (Signed) H. Penet.' 

2. This is the third Corps Commander under whom this division has 
served, who has considerately expressed appreciation of the services of its 
officers and men during the past two months. Hostilities have ceased, but 
the efforts of all officers and men to improve their ability to fight, must 
never cease. They must be always ready for any call to active service, 

3. This order will be read to each organization on the first appropriate 
occasion after its receipt. 

By Command of Major General Johnston: 
WHJ 
10:25 —10:40 

Henry C. Jewett, 
OFFICIAL: Colonel, Engineers, 

D. J. Coman, Chief of Staff." 

Major, A. G. 

Acting Adjutant. 

165 



Later there came to the division two further commendations, these 
from the Army Headquarters themselves. The first came in the form of a 
General Order published by General Degoutte, then Commanding General 
of the VI French Army, and who had served as the Chief of Staff of the 
Group of Armies of Flanders during the LYS-SCHELDT offensive, and 
the other came in the form of a letter from General Pershing of the Amer- 
ican Army, who not only was the Commander-in-Chief of the American 
Expeditionary Forces, but had in person held the command of the First 
U. S. Army at the time that the 91st Division was serving as a part of that 
Army in the MEUSE-ARGONNE offensive. 

These were as follows: 
"(270)— FOR OFFICIAL CIRCULATION ONLY) HQ. 9 1ST DIV. 

A. E. F., December 17, 1918. 
GENERAL ORDERS: 
NO. 59. 

I. 1. During the recent campaign in Belgium, the 91st Division with 
the 53rd Artillery Brigade attached, fought with the French Army of 
Belgium in the Group of Armies of Flanders, under the command of the 
King of Belgium. Major General Degoutte, then Chief of Staff and 
actual commander of the Group of Armies of Flanders, now commanding 
the 6th French Army, has honored this Division by citation in General 
Orders from Headquarters 6th French Army, a translation of which order 
appears below: 

'VI French Army. H. Q., 1 1th December, 1918 

GENERAL ORDER NO. 31 

In addressing the Divisions of the United States of America who covered 
themselves with glory in the CHATEAU-THIERRY offensive, I said that 
orders given by a commander were always complied with, whatever might 
be the difficulties encountered or the sacrifices made. 

I have found in the 37th and 91st Divisions the same spirit of duty 
and discipline freely given which makes valiant soldiers and victorious 
armies. 

The enemy intended to hold "to the death" the heighth between the 
LYS and the SCHELDT. The American troops of these Divisions, acting 
with the French Divisions of the Group of Armies of Flanders, forced him 
back on October 31, 1918, and after hard fighting, threw him over the 
SCHELDT. 

Then, in a maneuver of unheard of audacity, the American units crossed 
the flooded SCHELDT under the fire of the enemy and maintained them- 
selves on the opposite bank, notwithstanding counter attacks. 

Glory to such troops and to their commanders. They have valiantly 
contributed to the liberation of a portion of Belgium territory and to the 
decisive victory. 

Their great nation may be proud of them. 

The General Commanding the Army. 

(Signed) Degoutte.' 

166 



2. Officers and men of this Division should earnestly strive so to main- 
tain their training and discipline that in any future operation they may 
merit equal praise from any future commander. 

3. This order will be read to each organization of the Division on the 
first appropriate occasion after its receipt. 

WHJ BY COMMAND OF MAJOR GENERAL JOHNSTON: 

20:00—20:26 

OFFICIAL Henry C. Jewett, 

D. J. Coman Colonel, Engineers, 

Major, A. G. Chief of Staff." 

Acting Adjutant. 
AHG 

"(230— FOR OFFICIAL CIRCULATION ONLY) HQ. 9 1ST DIV. 

A. E. F., February 24, 1919. 

GENERAL ORDERS: 
No. 16 

I. 1. The following letter from the Commander-in-Chief, American 
Expeditionary Forces, generously commending this Division for its par- 
ticipation in the campaigns which led to the Armistice, is published for the 
information of all officers and men of the Division: 

'American Expeditionary Forces, 
Office of the Commander-in-Chief, 
France, February 20, 1919. 
Maj. Gen. Wm. H. Johnston, 
Commanding 91st Division, 
A. E. F. 

My dear General Johnston : 

It gives me great pleasure to extend to you and the officers and men of 
the 91st Division my compliments upon their splendid record in France. 

Arriving on July 12th, the Division was thrown into the active fighting 
in the Meuse-Argonne offensive without previous training in the line. From 
September 26th to October 3rd it was actively engaged in this offensive, 
making an advance of 13 kilometers against strong opposition, capturing 
the towns of Very, Gesnes, and Epinonville. When the Division was with- 
drawn on October 3rd, the 181st Brigade remained in the battle line until 
October 12th, its units operating with the 32nd and 1st Divisions. In the 
middle of October the Division was attached to the 7th French Army Corps 
of the 6th French Army in Flanders. Between October 31st and November 
2nd, the Division made an advance of 1 1 kilometers, capturing the town 
of Audenarde. Crossing the Scheldt River on November 10th and 11th, 
the Division was in pursuit of the enemy when the armistice ended hos- 
tilities. 

167 



It was gratifying to see your troops in such good physical shape, but 
still more so to know that the moral tone of all ranks is so high, which it is 
hoped will continue even after their return to civil life. 

Sincerely yours, 

(Signed) John J. Pershing.' 

2. This letter is a fitting climax to the various commendatory letters 
and orders received from American and French commanders under whom 
the Division has served, as it comes from the officer who organized and 
ably commanded the greatest army that has ever fought for the United 
States. 

3. This order will be read to each organization of the Division on 
the first appropriate occasion after its receipt. 

WHJ 

14:00—14:30 BY COMMAND OF MAJOR GENERAL JOHNSTON: 
OFFICIAL 

D. J. Coman Henry C. Jewett, 

Lieut. Colonel, A. G. Colonel, General Staff, 

Adjutant. Chief of Staff." 

GENERAL DISTRIBUTION. 
AHG/ 



168 



CHAPTER XI 

TOURING BELGIUM 

November 12-December 31, 1918 

12-17 November (17 November, Sunday) — in AUDENARDE, guard 
duty, police duty and training. 

The matter-of-fact spirit in which the French veteran army received the 
news of the long awaited and hard earned victory is indicated by the French 
Official Communique of November 11th, quoted below as published on 
November 12th in the 91st Division's Summary of Intelligence, and is 
further evidenced by General Order No. 652 of the French Army in Belgium, 
which order is also quoted below as translated and incorporated in the 91st 
Division's Training Bulletin No. 21 : 

"FRENCH OFFICIAL COMMUNIQUE, Nov. 11 (11:45 P. M.) 

In the fifty-second month of a war without precedent in history, the 
French Army with the help of its Allies has achieved the final defeat of the 
enemy. Our troops, animated by the purest spirit of sacrifice, and giving for 
four years of uninterrupted fighting, a most sublime example of endurance 
and heroism, have finished the task which their country laid upon them. 
Whether resisting with indomitable courage the onslaughts of the enemy, 
or whether attacking themselves, they have broken and expelled from 
France the powerful German Army, and forced them to beg for peace. All 
the conditions demanded by us for a cessation of hostilities, were accepted 
by the enemy, and the armistice went into effect today at eleven o'clock." 

"(230— FOR OFFICIAL CIRCULATION ONLY) HQ. 91st DIV. 

A. E. F., Nov. 12, 1918. 

TRAINING BULLETIN: 
No. 21. 

The provisions of the following orders will be strictly observed by this 
command: ****** 

EXTRACT 

French Army in Belgium. Army H. Q. Nov. 11, 1918. 

General Staff 
1st Bureau 
No. 5929/1 

URGENT. GENERAL ORDER NO. 652 

It is possible that the announcement of the armistice will give rise to 
manifestations of joy, which might impair the good conduct of our troops 
if special preventative measures were not taken. 

169 



In order to prevent all difficulties, the officers must not only show, as 
always, the good example, by observing the most correct attitude, but they 
will carefully watch out for any disorder which may start up and have it 
immediately stopped; they will issue orders accordingly to the non-commis- 
sioned officers. 

The police posts will be reinforced and, if need be, increased in number. 
Rounds will be made in the cantonments. In other localities occupied at the 
same time by French and Allied troops, the men on police duty will be mixed 
and will include a detachment of each nationality. 

It is absolutely prohibited in the entire zone of the army to tolerate the 
firing of arms, as well as the blowing of bugle calls executed in isolated 
cases. (Outside of the line of duty). Above all, the officers will not forget 
that under the present circumstances, which are of such intense interest to 
the men in their affections, or their hopes, it is their duty now more than 
ever to be near their troops, with their whole heart, as well as in person. 

General de BOISSOUDY. 



17:30-18:15 

BY COMMAND OF MAJOR GENERAL JOHNSTON: 

Henry C. Jewett, 

Colonel, Engineers, 

Chief of Staff." 

Soon after these orders there came the personal messages of Marshal 
Foch, Secretary of War Baker and General Pershing published to the Expedi- 
tionary Forces respectively in General Orders 204, 206 and 211 G. H. Q. 
A. E. F. 1918. They are quoted below: 

"G. H. Q. 

AMERICAN EXPEDITIONARY FORCES, 

GENERAL ORDERS FRANCE, November 13, 1918. 

No. 204. 

The following communication from the Commander in Chief of the 
Allied Armies is published to the command: 

G. Q. G. A., le 12 Novembre, 1918. 

OFFICIERS, SOUS-OFFICIERS, SOLDATS DES 
ARMeES ALLIeES: 

Apres avoir resolument arrete l'ennemi vous l'avez, pendant des mois, avec 
une foi et une energie inlassables, attaque sans repit. 

Vous avez gagne la plus grande bataille de l'Histoire et sauve la cause la 
plus sacree: la Liberte du Monde. 

Soyez fiers! 

D'une gloire immortelle vous avez pare vos drapeaux. 

170 



La Posterite vous garde sa reconnaissance. 

Le Marechal de France, 
Commandant en Chef les Armees Alliees: 

F. Foch. 

BY COMMAND OF GENERAL PERSHING: 

James W. McAndrew, 
OFFICIAL: Chief of Staff." 

Robert C. Davis, 
Adjutant General. 

A free translation of Marshal Foch's above message is as follows: 

Officers, Non-commissioned Officers, Soldiers of the Allied Armies: After 
having resolutely stopped the enemy, you have, during these several months, 
with unflagging devotion and energy attacked the enemy without respite. 
You have won the greatest battle of History and saved the most sacred cause; 
The Liberty of the World. You may well be proud ! You have decked your 
colors with an immortal glory. Posterity preserves its recognition for you. 

Marshal of France, 
Commander-in-Chief of the Allied Armies: 
F. Foch. 

"G. H. Q. 
AMERICAN EXPEDITIONARY FORCES, 

GENERAL ORDERS FRANCE, Nov. 15, 1918. 

No. 206. 

The following cabled communication from the Secretary of War is pub- 
lished to the command: 

'The signing of the armistice and the cessation of hostilities brings to 
an end a great and heroic military adventure in which the Army under your 
command has played a part distinguished by gallantry and success. It gives 
me pleasure to express to you the confidence and appreciation of the War 
Department and to those who have labored with you to make this result 
possible this appreciation of their zeal, courage and strength, both of purpose 
and achievement. The entire country is filled with pride in your fine 
leadership and in the soldierly qualities shown by your Army. Now that a 
respite has come in the solemn task to which the Army devoted itself, the 
War Department will do all in its power to expedite the early return of the 
Expeditionary Forces to the United States in order that the country may 
welcome its soldiers home, and in order that these soldiers may be restored 
to the opportunities of civil life as speedily as the military situation will 
permit. I extend to you as Commanding General of the American Expedi- 

171 



tionary Forces my hearty congratulations and this expression of high esteem, 
and I beg you to make known to the officers and men of your command the 
fact that their conduct as soldiers and as men has stirred the pride of their 
fellow countrymen, and that their military success has contributed to the 
great victory for the forces of civilization and humanity. 

(Signed) Newton D. Baker, 
Secretary of War.' 

BY COMMAND OF GENERAL PERSHING: 

James W. McAndrew, 
OFFICIAL: Chief of Staff." 

Robert C. Davis, 
Adjutant General. 



"G. H. Q. 
AMERICAN EXPEDITIONARY FORCES, 

GENERAL ORDERS FRANCE, Nov. 20, 1918. 

No. 211. 

TO THE OFFICERS AND SOLDIERS OF THE AMERICAN EXPEDI- 
TIONARY FORCES: 

The mission intrusted to us by our country has not been ended by the 
armistice that is now in operation; and the same devotion to duty and 
sincere effort to attain efficiency which have marked your participation in 
the actual conflict are still demanded of you. 

It is the desire of our Government to return us to our homes at the 
earliest possible moment, and every effort will be made to accomplish that 
purpose. It will be as difficult, however, to effect our return to America as 
it was to bring us to Europe; and any lack of enthusiasm in the tasks still 
to be accomplished will surely serve to postpone the hour of our departure 
for the United States. 

I trust that each of you will continue to maintain the high standard of 
efficiency and conduct that has characterized your service in the past; and 
I expect every officer and soldier to undertake, with the same fine spirit 
they have always exhibited, the duties yet to be performed before the mission 
of these forces is successfully completed. 

John J. Pershing, 
OFFICIAL: General, U. S. Army." 

Robert C. Davis, 
Adjutant General. 

On November 12th the entire 361st Infantry was ordered into AUDEN- 
ARDE and billeted in the immediate vicinity of that city's ruined cathedral 
and somewhat less ruined convent. Regimental Headquarters remained at 

172 



22 Hoogstraat, which had been the headquarters of the German civil admin- 
istration. The 181st Brigade and the 91st Division Headquarters were also 
fully established in the city and the 316th Engineers made their presence 
known by the act of one of their members in flying the American flag from 
the pinnacle of the battered but lofty cathedral tower. In this city, for the 
first time since going into action, the American national and regimental 
colors, both of which had been forbidden on the firing line, were unfurled and 
permitted to add to the foreign scene their welcome symbolism and in- 
spiration. 

The Belgians readily and gladly gave to the Americans complete freedom 
of the city, but with this honor and privilege of occupying a city of the size 
of AUDENARDE came a corresponding responsibility. While the French 
and Belgian soldiers or civil authorities looked after the conduct of their 
respective nationalities, the work of constructing temporary bridges for road 
traffic and the Augean task of clearing and cleaning the rubbish from the 
blocked and cluttered streets fell to the Americans. 

Pending the arrival of the Divisional Military Police, the 361st Infantry 
here organized its own military police or provost guard. Picked men from 
the several companies were detailed on this duty and placed in the charge 
of Lieutenant G. S. Sessions. Throughout the remainder of its overseas 
service this guard was to be a material factor in the efficiency and discipline 
of the regiment. Although the immediate occasion for its establishment was 
as above stated, this unit was also intended as a preliminary step in the 
development of a permanent organization planned by Colonel Cummings 
to meet the requirements of the possible occupation of hostile territory. 
With this larger plan in view particular care was taken in the selection of 
the members of the unit. Lieutenant Sessions at once began the gathering 
of information and the instruction of these men so that each might be of 
material assistance in organizing a similar military police service in his 
own company if it were later detailed on detached service in hostile 
territory. 

The fighting having come to a sudden end, the Operations Officer was 
placed in charge of the regiment's military instruction and was given super- 
vision over the general life and accommodations of the troops as well as 
over the co-ordination of the regiment's various administrative departments. 
The new provost guard service was also placed under his supervision and 
Lieutenant Pfund was detailed as Assistant to the Operations Officer with a 
view particularly to compiling and publishing information as to the relations 
which properly should exist between a foreign army of occupation and the 
civilian population of the territory occupied. On paper a complete organ- 
ization was perfected in each company to facilitate the taking over of any 
of the duties of an occupying force. Regimental bulletins were published 
to supply such information as became available on this new phase of military 
life. In the development of this system of preparedness the regiment was 
again living up to the motto given it by Colonel Davis: "The 361st leads, 
others follow." Not only was this regimental military police unit the first 
of its kind in the division, but the first 361st Infantry Bulletin of Informa- 
tion on this subject was at once republished in full by Brigadier General 
McDonald as a suggestion to his brigade as to how a start could well be 

173 



made to meet this new responsibility which might be thrust upon victorious 
troops. 

From the day that Lieutenant Sessions with his characteristic enthusiasm 
took charge of the new provost guard, he made it an unqualified success, 
and until the breaking up of the regiment after its return to America, five 
months later, this unit constantly justified its somewhat unorthodox exist- 
ence. It not only co-operated with the Divisional Military Police in the 
first days of the occupation of AUDENARDE and during the long marches 
or brief rests in the subsequent tour of Belgium, but also during the longer 
"stop-offs" at CROMBEKE, Belgium and BELLeME, France. It maintained 
such an intelligent and active control over all disorderliness that it rendered 
unnecessary the use of large interior guards, and at the same time it well 
avoided a source of friction which arose in some other organizations through 
the attempted maintenance of order by military police units which were 
permanently on duty in given localities and were composed of men drawn 
from other units than the troops temporarily occupying the area. On the 
marches this regimental unit cleared the roads of traffic, assisted in the 
maintenance of road discipline within the regiment and supplied whatever 
need there was for straggler guards. In billeting areas, and even on ship- 
board, it performed fhe manifold diplomatic functions of a provost guard. 
Thus, in this regiment the black brassard bearing the red figures "361" and 
worn by picked veterans of the firing line became even better known as the 
identification of the "arm of the law" than the widely heralded "M. P." 

In December, Lieutenant Sessions was transferred to the Divisional Mil- 
itary Police in answer to a request for his services. Lieutenant J. T. Wilkins 
succeeded to his position in the regiment and maintained the excellent 
record of the regimental M. Ps. This unit, originated and developed under 
the direction of Colonel Cummings, was an innovation in the permanent 
organization of a regiment, but its value was such as to indicate its desir- 
ability as a part of any infantry regiment engaged in continuous campaign- 
ing. It was this feature, coupled with the natural orderliness and the high 
military standards of the individuals composing the regiment, that made pos- 
sible the maintenance of a strict yet easy discipline, and enabled the Colonel, 
during the remaining long weeks of waiting, to rely upon the proper conduct 
of his men without imposing heavy punishments or taking frequent formal 
disciplinary measures. 

On Wednesday, November 13th, for the first time since it left the 
MONTIGNY training area to go into action, the regiment assembled on a 
parade ground and passed in review. It was here reviewed by the Com- 
manding General of the 30th French Corps and by Major General Johnston 
on what had but recently served as a German parade ground. Never did 
the regiment make a more effective showing. The ranks were depleted 
and the woolen uniforms rough and unpressed, yet the steel helmets and 
rifles were thoroughly cleaned and oiled. The short platoons, many of them 
commanded by non-commissioned officers (including one platoon of Company 
"C," commanded by its recently promoted and highly respected Chinese 
sergeant — Sergeant Emow) swung by with the full step and irresistible self- 
confidence of proven and victorious veterans. They were members of a 
regiment which, at the cost of the lives of its Colonel, five Battalion Com- 

174 



manders, and a casualty list of substantially fifty per cent of its original 
strength, had never failed under light or heavy fire to gain ground when 
ordered to attack. These conquerors of the Prussians were distinctly of a 
type of soldier that any nation would be proud to claim as its own and they 
felt the honor and responsibility that was theirs thus to represent in Europe 
the United States of America. The brief ceremony on the former German 
parade ground was followed by a few remarks by General Johnston in which 
he warmly commended the regiment upon its record and the records of its 
Commanding Officers. 

In addition to his other duties, Lieutenant Sessions was placed in charge 
of the AUDENARDE fatigue details. These details often consisted of an 
entire battalion and were engaged in clearing the streets and public places. 
The large convent near the cathedral received daily attention, for not only 
was the place greatly cluttered with debris caused by shell fire aimed at the 
cathedral tower, but it was generally understood that through the agency of 
a persuasive, diplomatic and English speaking Sister, the convent's case was 
repeatedly and effectively presented both to General Johnston and General 
McDonald. 

On November 12th the regiment moved its headquarters, and, with the 
exception of the Supply Company, its entire personnel to the former 
German "Sturm Kaserne," or barracks, that before the war evidently had 
been a commodious, up-to-date Belgian prison. In the many tiers of cells 
the regiment was quartered with comparative comfort and later in welcome 
cleanliness. Lieutenant Evans here rejoined the regiment from the A. E. F. 
Staff School just in time to be appointed Regimental Police Officer, and to 
become the busiest man in the regiment, as he undertook not only to clear 
out and clean the prison, but also to put back into operation the water, sewer 
and lighting systems that had suffered severely from shell fire and neglect. 

In the meantime the Supply Company, in a sharp but bloodless engage- 
ment with a French Tank Train, successfully defended its billets in a group 
of farm buildings near BEVERE. The Supply Company's capture and hold- 
ing for ransom, of several of the French Tanks was the maneuver that 
brought victory. 

In these same days of peace and "rest," the regiment rapidly pushed 
ahead its efforts at supplying missing equipment, replacing unserviceable 
equipment and salvaging the now useless and cumbersome weapons of trench 
warfare. Regular schedules were begun for bathing the men and for rid- 
ding their clothing both of the aboriginal YPRES cooties and of their 
numerous descendants. Close order drill appeared in the daily routine. 
Rifle, pistol and chauchat target ranges, as well as a grenade course, were 
put into operation. 

The band gave a concert in the public square on November 14th. It 
likewise afforded frequent musical accompaniment to close order drill 
and it participated in the first formal guard mount to be held since leaving 
Camp Lewis. On one occasion a band concert was held at the convent near 
the cathedral. It soon drew forth from the bomb-proof cellars an 
eager and curious audience. It brought out the shrunken and wrinkled old 
men and women who had survived the gas and steel of war in the convent 
cellars under the care of the Sisters. Best of all was the response of one old 

175 



woman, a particularly bent and weazened octogenarian, who gleefully burst 
into capers and "shimmied" an original step to the time of American "jazz." 

On another occasion the civilian population, assisted by the regimental 
band, held a service of thanksgiving that was impressive in its emotional 
appeal and was attended in solemn reverence by representatives of the 
American and other allied armies in the vicinity. 

The Belgian refugees were beginning to flock back from the east as 
they were freed or abandoned by the retiring Germans. The refugee families 
were often represented by survivors of three or four generations, but they 
almost never included a man of military age. They were pushing westward 
through AUDENARDE toward the wasted and ruined farms of western 
Flanders. The belongings of one or more families were generally packed 
about ten feet high into an ancestral two-wheeled farm cart. On top of the 
load, tucked into the quilted bedding or clinging to an ancient chair, rode 
one or more of the grandparents, or even great grandparents, usually hold- 
ing a baby or two of the present generation. In the cart were carried the 
meager movables of the family, while underneath trotted the family dog. 
Rattling and jolting close behind there sometimes was a lighter and smaller 
cart carrying other scant remnants of household furnishings. The famous 
great Belgian horse was conspicuously absent. The loads were pulled by 
the combined efforts of the refugees, chiefly women and children, all of 
whom bore clear evidence of lives of hardship and privation. Thus the 
unfortunate, unoffending, industrious and indomitable people of Belgium 
were already beginning the reconstruction. 

On November 17th, Major General de Boissoudy, commanding the French 
Army of Belgium, and Major General Massenet, commanding the 7th French 
Corps, visited the 91st Division Headquarters in AUDENARDE. Later on 
the same afternoon King Albert of Belgium paid a like visit. 

18 November— AUDENARDE to HOOREBEKE-STE. MARIE and 
HOOREBEKE-ST. CORNEILLE, East, by marching, 8J/2 kilometers. 

After a week of this repose, the division was ordered to march to the 
east. This was the first of the "triumphal" marches — marches which also 
brought with them constant divisional, brigade or regimental inspections 
en route. Unnecessary equipment was left in storage at the "Sturm 
Kaserne" and early Monday morning, November 18th, the movement started. 
The march orders included the following innovations which indicated the 
great change in the military situation since the secret night marches of two 
weeks before: 

"Regimental bands will accompany the units. Bands will play appro- 
priate airs, flags will be unfurled, and troops will be marched at attention 
while passing through the more important villages and towns. 
* * * * * * 

"Brigade, regimental and separate unit commanders, and members of 
their staffs for whom horses are available, will be mounted and will march 
with their commands." 

176 



Yet it was provided that "troops will be billeted or bivouacked in as close 
proximity as practicable to their respective lines of march, with a view to 
again taking up the offensive on short notice, if necessary." 

The animals were given all possible opportunity to recuperate their 
strength and health. Not only were they allowed all available time for 
grazing, but no unnecessary loads (of baggage, packs or men) were per- 
mitted to be drawn by them. Nothing but neatly stacked "wood for the 
next meal," was allowed on the rolling kitchens, and the only men allowed 
on the carts were the drivers. 

Another order required the kitchens to be constantly steaming while en 
route. The purpose of this was to speed up the preparation of a hot meal 
following the completion of the march and in any event to lend to the column 
an appearance of warmth and of culinary activity that furnished to the 
ever-hungry doughboy a cheerful reminder that the cooks had not been left 
behind. 

The division had been placed at the disposal of the Commanding Gen- 
eral of the 7th (French) Army Corps. The 164th (French) Division, 91st 
(American) Division, and 41st (French) Division, in the order named from 
head to rear, had been ordered to proceed eastward toward NINOVE (22 
kilometers short of BRUSSELS). The 181st Brigade moved out of AUDEN- 
ARDE at 9:00 A. M., November 18th in the following order: 361st Infantry, 
347th Machine Gun Battalion, 362nd Infantry. The order within the regi- 
ment was 2nd Battalion (with regimental band at its head), 1st Battalion, 
3rd Battalion, a Provisional Battalion (commanded by Captain Heath and 
consisting of the Headquarters and Machine Gun Companies), then the field 
trains (including the battalion trains and medical carts) under the escort 
of the Supply Company. 

Except for a brief blockade at a narrow bridge shortly before marching 
time (when Lieutenant Kellas and his trains, while going into position, en- 
countered not merely a jam of French traffic but also Major General John- 
ston's personal car) all went smoothly. General Johnston inspected the 
organization as it neared the summit of the heights of FORT KEZEL. 

Regimental Headquarters, the 1st and 2nd Battalions and Headquarters 
Company were located at HOOREBEKE-STE. MARIE and the balance of 
the regiment was about one kilometer to the southeast (with Brigade Head- 
quarters) at HOOREBEKE-ST. CORNEILLE. Division Headquarters was 
five kilometers further east at a chateau two kilometers southeast of 
MICHELBEKE. 

While this new area was but slightly damaged by shell fire, it too had 
been thoroughly stripped of farm animals. 

19-20 November— in HOOREBEKE-ST. MARIE and HOOREBEKE- 
ST. CORNEILLE, training. 

In the heavy mist of these Belgian valleys, training was resumed, but 
this mist was so heavy that firing on the rifle-grenade course was abandoned 
because the grenade bursts could not be observed satisfactorily even at a 
distance of 200 meters. The schedule included close order drill (accom- 
panied by band music), formal guard mounts, instruction in the law of 

177 



military occupation, the care and use of equipment, sighting and aiming 
drills, loading and firing commands, rolling packs, setting up drills, bayonet 
exercises, inspections of gas masks, and specialty instruction for the specialty 
units. 

In particular there was here resumed the systematic instruction of the 
automatic rifle sergeants. This work had been taken up at AUDENARDE, 
when it was found that but few of the men who had received full theoretical 
and practical instruction in the automatic rifle remained available to carry 
on the instruction of new gunners. By careful individual instruction of the 
automatic rifle non-commissioned officers of each battalion, Lieutenants 
Gilbert, Moeur and Coffey gradually built up a new but thoroughly com- 
petent set of automatic rifle sergeants and corporals. One result of this 
effort was that the chauchat rifle, in spite of its disadvantages, was so thor- 
oughly understood and intelligently inspected in each company, that its 
care and use never caused in this regiment the troubles that were reported 
to have arisen in units where insufficient interest had been aroused in the 
rifle's mechanical features or where insufficient credit had been given to 
the men who, by mastering this weapon had prepared themselves, not only 
to use it to its best advantage, but also had prepared themselves to master 
promptly any new and better automatic weapon that might suddenly be sub- 
stituted for it. It was felt in this regiment that the great effectiveness of 
an automatic rifle in the hands of an intelligent, cool gunner, who used 
sound and practical judgment when firing, made that weapon a peculiarly 
suitable one for use by American infantry. For this reason it was made a 
special point to give to as large a number as possible full opportunity to 
understand and to learn the value of the weapon. 

21 November— HOOREBEKE area to ESSCHE-ST. LEVIN, East, by 
marching 18 kilometers. 

The order of march within the brigade was: 361st Infantry, 362nd In- 
fantry, (347 Machine Gun Battalion by separate route) ; within the regi- 
ment: 1st Battalion (preceded by band), 3rd Battalion plus Machine Gun 
Company, 2nd Battalion plus Headquarters Company, Field Train under 
escort of Supply Company. Battalion trains followed their respective bat- 
talions. Brigade Headquarters moved to SOTTEGEM. No change was 
made in Division Headquarters. The division passed to the command of 
the Commanding General of the 34th (French) Army Corps. 

This march, which took the regiment to the furthest point east that it 
reached in Belgium, was preceded by the following announcement: "It is 
anticipated that the regiment will make a short march to the northwest for 
a brief stay preparatory to returning to the American Expeditionary Forces." 
While this announcement was subject to various interpretations, it sounded 
more like "home" than anything received before, and from November 20th 
to early April the uppermost thought and the favorite subject of speculation 
was the date when the regiment would sight the Statue of Liberty. 

On this last march east a ready welcome was again extended to the 
regiment by the Belgians who were delighted to know that the troops they 
now saw were actually the mythical "Americans." Belgian flags were hung 
from many houses. One pair of signs made a particular impression. It 
consisted of an old sign of the Germans erected in 1914, pointing west, 

178 



and reading: "1914 — Uns Vaterland Muss Grosser Sein — nach Paris" 
(Our Fatherland must be greater, this way to Paris), topped by a new 
sign, pointing east, and reading: "1918— Uns Vaterland Caput— nach 
Berlin" (Our Fatherland "busted," this way to Berlin). 

22 November— In ESSCHE-ST. LIEVIN, waiting. 

On this date the King of Belgium re-entered his capital, BRUSSELS. 
Colonel Cummings, of the 361st Infantry, accompanied Brigadier General 
McDonald as a guest. Organizations from the 91st (American) Division, 
37th (American) Division, 5th (French) Infantry Division, and 164th 
(French) Infantry Division were represented at the ceremony. The 91st 
Division furnished a battery of artillery. In the meantime the regiment 
itself passed a quiet day at ESSCHE-ST. LIEVIN, 36 kilometers west of 
BRUSSELS. Training was resumed and the band gave a concert in the 
Public Square. No infantry unit of the 91st Division ever entered further 
into Belgium than did this regiment— but the 316th Engineer Regiment 
was moved to a new area immediately northeast of ESSCHE-ST. LIEVIN 
and thus earned the credit of an extra two kilometers to the east. Here 
the division passed to the command of the Commanding General of the 
30th (French) Army Corps. 

23 November— ESSCHE-ST. LIEVIN to BAEYGEM and KASTEEL 
area, Northwest, by marching, 21 kilometers. 

The division in a few hours passed back to the command of the Com- 
manding General of the 34th (French) Army Corps, and shortly before mid- 
night on the evening of November 22nd, warning was received of an im- 
pending move west. As the regiment was scattered over several kilometers 
of farm lands a warning message from Regimental Headquarters outlining 
the probable details for the move went out soon after midnight prescribing 
a tentative order of assembling of the regiment with the head of the column 
at Regimental Headquarters at eight in the morning. The field message at 
Division Headquarters was written that night at midnight and was not trans- 
mitted from Brigade Headquarters until shortly after five A. M. It then 
was carried about six kilometers to the regiment. Nevertheless the regi- 
ment moved out on schedule time. From this time on every effort was 
made to obtain advance notice of impending movements and by means of 
warning messages the regiment was able to get its approximately 2500 men 
fed and started, its billets policed, its trains hitched and in column in every 
instance on time throughout the many remaining movements. 

Order of march in the brigade was: 362nd Infantry, 361st Infantry, (347th 
M. G. Battalion had moved on November 22nd). Order of march in the 
regiment was: Band, Third Battalion with Machine Gun Company, Second 
Battalion, First Battalion with Headquarters Company, Supply Company. 
Brigade Headquarters moved to BEIRLEGEM, Division Headquarters moved 
to DICKELVENNE. 

24 November (Sunday)— BAEYGEM and KASTEEL area to DEYNZE, 
Northwest, by marching, 19 kilometers. 

The march was immediately resumed on November 24th and the regi- 
ment was billeted that night in the city of DEYNZE on the east bank of 
the LYS River. This city was comparable to AUDENARDE in size and as it 

179 



had suffered far less by shell fire, it furnished a treat to the troops in the 
form of its stores. Here for the first time since arriving in Europe the 
troops found themselves in a place which bore a semblance to an active 
trade center. The city was already partially occupied by French troops 
and only by a compressing and impressing process was the billeting party 
able to gain the necessary space. The Division Order had stated "other 
units at present located at DEYNZE will not be moved but will be com- 
pressed as far as practicable within the limits of the town." The regiment's 
early arrival, assisted by General McDonald's successful encounter with a 
French artillery unit on the march, was all that gave the Americans prece- 
dence over a body of French troops that would have practically filled the city. 
Order of march in the brigade was: 361st Infantry, 362nd Infantry, 
347th M. G. Battalion, and within the regiment: Band, 2nd Battalion with 
Headquarters Company, 1st Battalion, 3rd Battalion with Machine Gun 
Company, Supply Company. Brigade and Division Headquarters moved to 
DENTERGHEM. 

25 November — in DEYNZE, checking equipment and adjusting billets. 

26 November— DEYNZE to WONTERGEM, VAARINCKXHOEK and 
MARCKEGHEM, West, by marching, 17 kilometers to WONTERGEM, 11 
kilometers to VAARINCKXHOEK, 12 kilometers to MARCKEGHEM. 

All available advance information from Division Headquarters on the 
night of November 25th stated that no move would be made the following 
morning. Accordingly no advance preparations were made. Nevertheless 
at ten minutes of three on the morning of November 26th orders arrived 
for a movement west of the LYS. On schedule time, at eight o'clock, the 
regiment had had its breakfast, packed its equipment, policed its billets and 
had started across the river with its entire organization, rolling kitchens and 
supply trains all in their proper places. 

Owing to the absence of any forewarning, this movement was actually 
made on the shortest notice of any during the Belgian tour and its execution 
was made doubly difficult by the fact that the officers and men to be notified 
were billeted in scattered, strange quarters. Often these billets were in 
back rooms of securely shuttered buildings, which were hard enough to 
identify by daylight, to say nothing of a pitch dark Belgian night. The 
success was due to the hard learned lessons of "liaison at any cost" mas- 
tered by the troops and particularly by the runners during the fighting in 
the ARGONNE and in BELGIUM. 

The order of march was: 361st Infantry and 347th M. G. Battalion. The 
order within the regiment was: Band, 1st Battalion with Machine Gun Com- 
pany, 3rd Battalion, 2nd Battalion with Headquarters Company, Supply 
Company. Owing to the smallness of the towns in the new regimental 
area, the 1st Battalion and Machine Gun Company marched to billets in 
MARCKEGHEM (five kilometers southwest of WONTERGEM), the Third 
Battalion to billets in the large farms near VAARINCKXHOEK (about four 
kilometers south of WONTERGEM) and only Regimental Headquarters, 
the 2nd Battalion, and Headquarters and Supply Companies were accommo- 
dated in WONTERGEM. 

27 November-3 December — WONTERGEM area, training and equipping. 

180 



On the day of its arrival in this area, November 26th, there came 
to the regiment a list of well deserved promotions. Those of the newly 
promoted officers who were present were at once assigned as fol- 
lows: Major F. S. Dickinson to 3rd Battalion, Captain C. R. Gilbert to 
Company "F," Captain I. G. Towson to Company "H," Captain H. P. Hoff- 
man to Company "E," First Lieutenant O. Voderberg to Company "G," 
First Lieutenant M. J. Howells to Company "A," First Lieutenant F. H. 
Johnston to Company "E" (detailed as Acting Battalion Adjutant of Second 
Battalion) and First Lieutenant J. O'Brien to Supply Company. Of these, 
Captain Gilbert was soon re-assigned to Company "M" when Captain C. L. 
Williams returned to the regiment from the hospital and was allowed to 
resume command of Company "F." 

On the same A. E. F. order with the above promotions were the follow- 
ing promotions for officers then absent from the regiment: Captaincies for 
Lieutenants G. E. Kelsch and F. Trouchet, and First Lieutenancies for Sec- 
ond Lieutenants R. R. Vincent, R. A. Woodyard and A. Cody. The order 
granting these promotions was dated November 14, 1918, and came as a 
surprise to the entire organization for, although recommendations for these 
promotions had been submitted long before that date, yet there had been 
received an announcement that no further promotions would be granted after 
the date of the armistice, which had begun on November 11th. Many a 
promotion had been well earned on the battlefield that was not included in 
the list of November 14th, and in justice to the officers concerned the fol- 
lowing statement is set forth as the history of the promotions of its officers 
after the regiment went into action on September 26th. 

Colonel Davis took a particular and personal interest in providing for 
the award of deserved decorations and promotions to the members of his 
command and yet he exercised a most careful judgment in keeping high 
the standard of the action that would earn the award. During the first days 
of the MEUSE-ARGONNE offensive, he was asked for the names of 
officers whom he might wish to promote for their gallantry on the field. It 
was then quite impracticable to fill out prescribed forms or to provide 
physical examinations for the candidates for promotion, and in this instance 
none of these formalities were insisted upon. Colonel Davis at once 
verbally recommended for promotion to Majors: Captains W. J. Potter, 
O. Goodpaster, R. E. Naftzger and F. P. Doherty, and to Captains: Lieu- 
tenants J. C. Fortune and R. C. M. Page. All of these officers except Captain 
Doherty and Lieutenant Fortune were at that time wounded and in the 
hospital. The promotions, however, were granted to each of them on 
October 10th, and all except Major Potter later recovered from their 
wounds sufficiently to return to active service with the regiment. Major 
Potter, who had been wounded severely in the lungs, was sent back to the 
United States for further treatment. He also later received a Distinguished 
Service Cross in recognition of his services on the field. 

Intending again to accomplish the same result, Colonel Davis, at the 
conclusion of the second phase of the MEUSE-ARGONNE offensive, sent 
in written recommendations for the following promotions "on account of 
gallantry and efficiency shown in action during the American Army offensive 

181 



in the vicinity of the Argonne Woods, September 26th-October 12th, 1918." 
To Captaincies: Lieutenants R. V. F. Brightbill, G. B. Appelman, J. E. 
Bailey, R. S. Batman, R. E. Everly, C. H. Hudelson and D. G. Abel; to 
1st Lieutenancies: 2nd Lieutenants E. A. Valentine, G. V. J. Ramsdell, J. 
Sweat, H. J. Craig, U. Lane, E. W. Proctor, A. J. Coats and R. H. Linforth. 

This list was returned for compliance with the rules calling for a state- 
ment of specific vacancies in the regiment to be filled by the promoted 
officers and later was returned for physical examinations of the candidates. 
This necessitated the omission of candidates then in the hospitals and greatly 
delayed the entire list. Colonel Davis also filed the following recommenda- 
tions as early as October 23rd "for efficiency and bravery shown in action 
during the Argonne offensive near GESNES, France, September 26-October 
12, 1918," to Captaincies in the Medical Corps: 1st Lieutenants F. B. Cole- 
man, L. C. Mcintosh, E. C. McKibben and C. H. Smith, and "because of 
exceptionally meritorious service in action near GESNES, France, Sept. 26- 
October 12, 1918," to Chaplain, with rank of Captain: Chaplain (1st Lieu- 
tenant) J. W. Beard. 

On October 29th Colonel Davis filed a further list of names which was 
identical with the promotions included in the A. E. F. order of November 14, 

1918, except that it included the name of Captain H. D. Hughes as recom- 
mended for a Majority. This list was similarly returned but before it was 
re-forwarded on November 6th both Colonel Davis and Captain Hughes had 
been killed in action. In the meantime the first list had also found its way 
back to Belgium and it was refiled on November 7th. As refiled, it now 
omitted several of the officers originally on it because by this time they 
were, for various reasons, absent from the regiment. On November 8th 
was added the recommendation of a 1st Lieutenancy for 2nd Lieutenant 
T. E. Dunn. The list re-forwarded on November 7th proved to be too late, 
while that of November 6th arrived just within the time limit. The result 
was unfortunate in that it deprived the regiment of rewards which had been 
earned on the battlefield and were most highly prized in a regiment where 
promotions had always been made with impartiality and the greatest of care. 
The situation was immediately fully presented to the higher authorities both 
by Colonel Cummings and by Brigadier General McDonald. Finally nearly 
all of these promotions, together with certain additional recommendations 
of officers later returned from hospitals, or for whom vacancies had since 
occurred, were granted before the troops left Europe. Such delayed pro- 
motions, however, carried rank as of a later date than otherwise would have 
been the case. These promotions are mentioned later in their chronological 
place but it may be noted here that even this final revision, through one of 
the peculiar coincidences of the service, came after those officers who had 
indicated a preference to remain in the regular service had been transferred 
to the Army of Occupation in Germany. As a result of this coincidence 
the promotions to Captaincies of 1st Lieutenants Roscoe V. F. Brightbill, 
Gustave B. Appleman and Charles H. Hudelson, and of 2nd Lieutenant 
Alva J. Coats to a 1st Lieutenancy, did not reach them until the spring of 

1919, long after their separation from the regiment, and then with rank 
only from April 8, 1919. 

On November 27th the first Distinguished Service Crosses to be re- 
ceived in the division were awarded. Three of these came to the 361st 

182 



Infantry. They were awarded by Major General Johnston in the presence 
of the entire regiment assembled for the ceremony at VAARINCKXHOEK. 
The awards were to: Colonel Avery D. Cummings for his distinguished 
services in assisting on the firing line in the control of the attack on 
GESNES, September 29th, at which time he was serving on the staff of 
Brigadier General McDonald; Sergeant Daniel J. O'Keef, of Company "B," 
for his exceptional services while a corporal, in covering the withdrawal 
of his platoon on September 27th ; and Sergeant Howard M. Wight, of 
Company "I," for his courageous services while a private, in rescuing and 
caring for wounded men under fire near Miller Hill on September 28th. 

November 28th was Thanksgiving Day and the holiday was accompanied 
by the following characteristically brief but expressive memorandum from 
Colonel Cummings: "The Commanding Officer desires that each member of 
this command enjoy this holiday to the fullest extent. This, the National 
Holiday of Thanksgiving, comes at a most opportune moment, and it is 
improbable that in the history of our country have we had any greater 
cause to render Thanksgiving than on the present date, not only amongst 
men who have been relieved from the strain of actual battle, but amongst 
our relatives and friends who have so loyally supported us throughout 
the war." 

Care and cleaning of equipment and billets, military instruction, check- 
ing of property and additional issues of equipment were promptly resumed. 
On November 30th a special inspection of men and equipment was made 
by Battalion Commanders, and on the same day a special inspection of the 
animals, harness and vehicles (including rolling kitchens) was made by the 
Brigade Commander. On December 2nd a detailed and complete re-check 
of all property was made by officers of the regiment specially assigned to 
check up organizations other than their own. On Thanksgiving Day and 
on Sunday, December 1st, regular religious services were held. On November 
28th the Regimental Band gave a concert in DENTERGHEM. On December 
3rd a Drummers' School was established. 

Chaplain Cassidy joined the regiment on November 30th and was as- 
signed to the 1st Battalion. His genial personality, his resourcefulness and 
his devoted service to the regiment during the remainder of its service won 
him the ready support and gratitude of officers and men alike. 

4 December— WONTERGEM area to MEULEBEKE, West, by march- 
ing, 121/2 kilometers from WONTERGEM, 12 kilometers from VAAR- 
INCKXHOEK, 91/2 kilometers from MARCKEGHEM. 

For this march the scattered brigade (and also the regiment) assembled 
its column en route at the GINSTE crossroads, nearly half-way to MEULE- 
BEKE. As it passed GINSTE the brigade was inspected for the first time 
by the new Division Inspector, Lieutenant Colonel Bargar, and the report 
was highly complimentary to the brigade. The regiment received two 
special mentions — one that the "packs in the 361st Infantry were especially 
good," and the other a criticism of the tightness of the throat pieces on 
several horses. To this latter comment the Supply Company never ceased 
producing alibis. 

The order of march within the brigade was: 347th Machine Gun Bat- 
talion, 361st Infantry, 362nd Infantry; within the regiment it was: Com- 

183 



manding Officer and Staff, Band, 1st Battalion and Machine Gun Company, 
3rd Battalion, 2nd Battalion and Headquarters Company, then Supply Com- 
pany escorting Regimental Trains. Detachments of the newly organized 
Drum Corps headed the rear battalions. Division Headquarters remained 
at DENTERGHEM. Brigade Headquarters moved to a chateau west of 
MEULEBEKE. 

5-6 December, at MEULEBEKE, cleaning up and training. 

On the very day (and night) of the arrival in MEULEBEKE, sterilization 
of the gas masks of six companies was completed and nine companies passed 
through the bathing and delousing plant that had but recently been used 
by the German troops then controlling the town. Here, also, the Ameri- 
cans found unmistakable German sympathizers among the inhabitants. 

The sterilization, bathing and delousing process was completed in the 
next two days. Training was resumed. Practice Battalion Parades were 
executed. The Headquarters Company here received the award in an 
elimination contest held to select the squad standing the best field inspection 
and making up the best appearing packs in the regiment. 

On December 5th, Colonel Cummings, the two Color Sergeants, a color 
guard of four men and two squads of picked men, went to AIX-LA- 
CHAPELLE to be present at a ceremony of the allied armies. This left 
Major Goodpaster in command of the regiment. The absence of Major 
General Johnston and Brigadier General McDonald on the same trip left 
Brigadier General Caldwell in command of the division and Colonel Wool- 
nough of the 362nd Infantry in command of the 181st Brigade. Chaplain 
Beard on an independent tour got at least as far as GAND and was rumored 
to have reached BRUSSELS or even AIX-LA-CHAPELLE. 

7 December— MEULEBEKE to STADEN— via HET VELD, RYSSEL- 
EINDE, ARDOYE, BEVEREN (about 3 kilometers north of ROULERS), 
HOOGLEDE and SLEYBAEGE, West, by marching, 25|^ kilometers, i. e. 
16 miles. 

"No-Man's Land" in this area included such a wide border land of ruined 
country that it took a two days' march to cross it. The division started its 
move on December 6th and the 181st Brigade moved on the morning of 
December 7th. This march of 25 , /2 kilometers west carried the regiment 
past great graveyards (one of them with over 3000 German graves) and 
through many battered towns, each of which was more ruined than the last. 
At dusk the regiment halted in STADEN. This hamlet, on the very border of 
"No Man's Land," was so badly shattered as still to be uninhabited. Close by 
it was an American hospital unit, serving under canvas and including in its 
personnel several American women nurses — the first American women that 
most of the troops had seen in France. Wearied by this 16-mile hike under 
full equipment, and with the prospect of a repetition on the following day, 
the Band, nevertheless responded to a call for music and played for a few 
dances at the hospital. 

8 December (Sunday)— STADEN to CROMBEKE via HOUTHULST, 
JONKERSHOVE, MERCKEM, NOORDSCHOTE, RENINGHE, OOST- 
VLETEREN and WESTVLETEREN, West, by marching, 29 kilometers, 
i. e. 18 miles. 

184 



Throughout the entire movement westward the shoe supply had been 
short and at WONTERGEM there had come practically no relief except in 
form of the stiff and shapeless "English boot" that frequently did more 
damage to the American foot than did the most dilapidated American field 
shoe. The march to STADEN had broken through many pairs of shoes which 
had been barely holding together and this next 18-mile hike was the climax. 
On the march to STADEN the men who could not walk had been brought 
along as members of the baggage details, riding on the few trucks avail- 
able to carry squad rolls. On the march to CROMBEKE, the only thing 
that carried the majority of the men through on foot was sheer determina- 
tion and the obvious futility of attempting to stop in the "dead area." The 
welcome assistance of ambulances from the American hospital at STADEN 
made it possible to bring in all serious cases so that by nightfall every 
man was accounted for. 

All day long this march led through the wasted area — shell holes, 
military debris, blasted concrete works, piles of shells, wrecked wire and 
camouflage, then miles and miles of rough and torn, gray morass. It was 
a scene similar to that which the regiment had passed through about two 
months before when marching east across PASSCHENDAELE ridge, except 
that at PASSCHENDAELE this waste land had been comparatively high, 
dry and open, while here the wrecked trees and soggy bogs showed only a 
dreary, flooded, blasted wilderness. 

At OOSTVLETEREN civilization appeared again. At WESTVLET- 
EREN the 2nd Battalion stopped for its billets. Halfway from there to 
CROMBEKE, in the muddy sea of the former British "CHAUNY CAMP," 
stopped the 3rd Battalion with the Machine Gun and Supply Companies. 
Major Goodpaster pushed on to CROMBEKE with Regimental Headquarters, 
Headquarters Company and the 1st Battalion. Brigade Headquarters were 
established at WESTVLETEREN. Division Headquarters were at ROUS- 
BRUGGE. This was the longest day's march that the regiment ever took 
under full equipment. It came as the last 18 miles of the 88 miles 
that the regiment had covered in its 20-day tour of Belgium since leaving 
AUDENARDE on November 18th, and it completed a total of over 150 miles 
of Belgium that the regiment had walked or fought over since October 18th, 
not to mention about 115 miles of recent footwork in France. 

9-29 December — in and near CROMBEKE, smiling at adversity in 
Flanders. 

Three weeks, including Christmas, were spent in CROMBEKE and its 
vicinity. 

Beginning with the philosophy of Colonel Cummings, that "it is a great 
life if you don't weaken" down to the "mule-skinner's" unprintable disserta- 
tions on mud and mules, the regiment lived on cheerfully, industriously and 
hopefully. Marooned amidst the war wearied Belgians of Flanders, and 
far from the American supplies, the 361st Infantry (with an average of 60 
men per company unable to march or drill on account of their lack of 
shoes) undertook to entertain and educate itself. 

These three weeks of rain, that seemed like three months, included 
physical exercises, school of the soldier and squad (attempted only on the 

185 



driest spots in the roads or fields), bayonet work, guard duty, visual sig- 
naling, musketry, gas defense, first aid, thirty yard rifle range practice, 
live rifle grenade practice, 1000 inch machine gun practice, automatic rifle 
school, N. C. O., bugler and drummer schools, schools for physical in- 
structors, field inspections, talks on tactics, on rations, on the law of mil- 
itary occupation, and on the use of maps and compasses. There were also 
so-called "road maneuvers" involving the use of connecting files or of rear 
and advance guards, but in reality designed more especially to give the 
troops a chance to visit large towns or nearby battlefields. Life included a 
daily chronicle of ever increasing activity in the war on cooties, the dis- 
covery or manufacture of bathing facilities, the carting away of mud or 
the carting in of duck-boards. One "regimental formation" meant in 
fact an assembly at CHAUNY CAMP to witness an outdoor presentation of 
"The Turnip Field Follies of 1918," by the 3rd Battalion, accompanied 
by a competition in the manual of arms. Other variations in the routine 
included a system of two-day passes to DUNKIRK, a detail of twenty-six 
men to attend an entertainment given by the 30th French Army Corps at 
DUNKIRK, a detail of two men to participate in a theater opening at 
BRUSSELS, the award of approximately 150 Belgian Croix-de-Guerre to 
the division (including the award of 18 of these crosses to members of 
the regiment) an attempt at Christmas dinners, an occasional influx of 
mail and packages from home, a constant effort to keep reasonably warm 
and dry, and the never failing active speculation as to the day of emancipa- 
tion. 

Yet in spite of it all there actually was one advantage in the situation 
which was little realized at the time. This was that CROMBEKE proved 
to be too far from civilization to be reached by the influenza. The regi- 
ment throughout its career never had anything that even resembled an 
epidemic of the "flu." It has been well said that "of mud and Germans the 
regiment saw much and it overcame them, but of cities and germs it saw little 
and it was the better for it." 

On December 22nd, Lieutenant Wilkins succeeded Lieutenant Sessions in 
command of the Regimental Military Police. On December 25th Major R. E. 
Naftzger returned (or escaped), from the hospitals of France and was 
officially attached to the regiment as a supernumerary Field Officer. 

On December 26th the great news was officially received — the regiment 
would entrain on December 28th, 29th and 30th for the LE MANS area in 
France, with every prospect of moving from there to America and not to 
Germany. This news was all the more appreciated as it came in the imme- 
diate wake of a wild but disconcerting rumor that the 91st Division had 
been selected as a future cavalry division to be trained and used in con- 
nection with an army of occupation in Russia. 

Shoes or no shoes, day or night, every man was in line when his unit 
marched to ROUSBRUGGE STATION for entrainment, and in spite of 
every difficulty in the form of rain, mud and inadequate loading facilities, 
there never was a more cheerful atmosphere about any spot in Flanders 
than that which clung close to the rain-washed shacks and loading platforms 
of ROUSBRUGGE. The New Year inevitably held promise of better things, 
and wherever or however spent, "New Year's Eve" was one of happy an- 
ticipation. 

186 



ROSTER OF OFFICERS, 36 1ST INFANTRY 

February 8, 1919 — on Day before Transfer of Officers to Army of Occupation 
Regimental Headquarters 

Colonel Avery D. Cummings 
Lieut. Colonel Brett W. Eddy 
Captain Marshall S. Scudder, Regimental Adjutant 
Captain Leon E. Savage, (Supply Co.), attached as Regi- 
mental Unit Supply Officer. 
Captain Jacob Kanzler, Personnel Adjutant 
Captain Harold H. Burton, Operations Officer 
Captain Richard C. M. Page, Intelligence Officer 
Captain Paul F. Brown, M. C, Regimental Surgeon 
1st Lieut. Frederick T. Fairchild (Co. "E"), attached as 
Assistant Personnel Adjutant and as Embarkation 
Officer 
1st Lieut. South all R. Pfund (Co. "B"), attached as 
Assistant Operations Officer and as Regimental Gas 
and Mess Officer 
1st Lieut. John W. Beard, Regimental Chaplain 

1st Battalion 

Major Frank P. Doherty 

1st Lieut. Donald G. Abel, Adjutant 

1st Lieut. Roscoe V. F. Brightbill, Intelligence Officer 

1st Lieut. Francis H. Cassidy, Chaplain 

Company "A" Company "C" 

Captain George A. Jahant Captain Fred B. Angus 

1st Lieut. Ellis Bates lst Lieut. Charles H. Hudelson 

1st Lieut. Mernam J. Howells 1st Lieut. Ray R. Vincent 

lstLieut 1st Lieut 

2nd Lieut. Everett J. Gray 2 nd Lieut. Augustus C. Carver 

2nd Lieut. Milo B. Seay 2nd Lieut 

Company "B" 
(Captain Wallace T. Downing, S. D. r tf _„ 

as Instructor at Army Candidate company D 

School) Captain Claude D. Johns, Jr. 

lst Lieut. Gustave B. Appelman lst Lieut. Albert J. Haas 

lst Lieut lst Lieut. Oliver Voderberg 

lst Lieut lst Lieut 

2nd Lieut. Frank W. Coppinger 2nd Lieut. Sam W. Robertson 

2nd Lieut. Theodore W. Burnett 2nd Lieut 

2nd Battalion 

Major Roy E. Naftzger 

lst Lieut. Frank R. Johnston, Adjutant 

2nd Lieut. Knapp Orton, Intelligence Officer 

lstLieut. Edwin S. Priest, Chaplain 

187 



2nd Battalion — Continued 



Company "E" 
Captain Henry P. Hoffman 
1st Lieut. Royal A. Coffey 

1st Lieut 

1st Lieut 

2nd Lieut. Joseph E. O'Connor 
2nd Lieut. John A. Flagg 



Company "F" 
Captain Carmi L. Williams 
1st Lieut. Wallace M. MacKay 
1st Lieut. Ely F. Echolds 

1st Lieut 

2nd Lieut. Jack Sweat 
(2nd Lieut. Ernest L. Damkroger, D. 
S. with Division Athletic Officer) 



Company "G" 
Captain Clarence J. Minick 
(1st Lieut. Gregg M. Evans, S. D. 

as Regimental Police Officer and 

Town Major) 
1st Lieut. Edmond T. Duvall 
1st Lieut. Walter F. Davis 
2nd Lieut. Uil Lane 
2nd Lieut 

Company "H" 
Captain Ira G. Towson 
(1st Lieut. Jesse T. Wilkins, S. D. 

as Regimental A. P. M.) 
1st Lieut. John H. Moeur 

1st Lieut 

2nd Lieut. Charles T. Wright 
2nd Lieut. John G. McCorvey 



3rd Battalion 
Major Friend S. Dickinson 
1st Lieut. James R. McLaughlin, Adjutant 
2nd Lieut. Lorenzo S. Foote, Intelligence Officer 



Company "I" 
Captain Elmer J. Armstrong 
1st Lieut. Robert S. Batman 
1st Lieut. David A. Bissett 
1st Lieut. Robert A. Woodyard 
2nd Lieut. Charles Stout 
2nd Lieut 

Company "K" 
Captain Curtiss R. Gilbert 
1st Lieut. John E. Bailey 
1st Lieut. William Dean 

1st Lieut 

(2nd Lieut. Harold J. Jones, S. D. 
as Assistant Regimental A. P. M.) 
2nd Lieut 



Company "L" 

Captain James C. Fortune 
1st Lieut. Lester M. Ellis 

1st Lieut 

1st Lieut 

2nd Lieut. Edward A. Valentine 
2nd Lieut. Alva J. Coats 

Company "M" 

Captain Francois Trouchet 
1st Lieut. Charlie A. Valverde 
1st Lieut. Frederick F. Lamping 

1st Lieut 

2nd Lieut. Thomas E. Dunn 
2nd Lieut 



188 



3rd Battalion — Continued 



Headquarters Company 
Captain Frank Heath 
1st Lieut. Ernest K. Murray 

1st Lieut 

1st Lieut 

2nd Lieut. Robert C. Howard 
2nd Lieut. Harry J. Craig 
2nd Lieut. John H. Hastings (at- 
tached) 

Machine Gun Company 
Captain George E. Kelsch 
1st Lieut. Lewin W. Martinez 

1st Lieut 

2nd Lieut. George V. J. Ramsdell 
2nd Lieut. Reginald H. Linforth 
2nd Lieut 



Supply Company 

Captain 

1st Lieut. Fred L. Brace 

1st Lieut. James A. Quinby 

1st Lieut. Edward L. Kellas (of Co. 

"M," attached) 
1st Lieut. Jack O'Brien (of Co. "E," 

attached) 
2nd Lieut. Albert R. Bartell 

2nd Lieut 

2nd Lieut 

Medical Detachment 

Captain Paul F. Brown, M. C, Reg. 
Surgeon (also listed with Regi- 
mental Headquarters). 

Captain Ernest C. McKibben, M. C. 

1st Lieut. Leland C. Mcintosh, M. C. 

1st Lieut John L. Burnside, D. C. 

1st Lieut. Charles H. Smith, M. C. 

1st Lieut. Mayo Reiss, D. C. 

1st Lieut. George H. Griffin, M. C. 

1st Lieut. Clyde Ruff, M. C. 



189 



CHAPTER XII 

FROM BELGIUM TO CAMP LEWIS 

December 30, 1918-April 30, 1919 

28-31 December— CROMBEKE area, BELGIUM, to BELLeME (ORNE) 
aiea, FRANCE, Northwest, marching, 5 kilometers, Southwest, by rail, 
550 kilometers, and West, marching, 20 kilometers. 

31 December, 1918-20 March, 1919— Vicinity of BELLeME (ORNE), 
FRANCE, anxiously waiting. 

"Eighty days to see picturesque Normandy peasant life in BELLeME 
and its quiet suburbs with side trips to PARIS, NICE, ST. MALO and LES 
HAUTES PYRENEES." This was a tourist trip to NORMANDY on which 
the tourists were never hurried before they had had an opportunity to 
see all they wanted to see of the ancient towns, the beautiful rolling and 
historic countryside and the quaint dwellings of the peasants. 

The division (less the artillery brigade) was billeted over an area 
known as the LA FERTe BERNARD area, extending about 25 kilometers 
north and south and about 30 kilometers east and west. The division 
was assigned to the Second Army Corps the headquarters of which were at 
BONNeTABLE (SARTHE), but later the administrative organization was 
changed so that the division came directly under the control of the Le 
Mans American Embarkation Center with headquarters at LE MANS 
(SARTHE). 

BELLeME was in the extreme northwest corner of the divisional area, 
the 181st Brigade Headquarters were less than 3 kilometers northeast of 
BELLeME at CHATEAU LE TERTRE, while Division Headquarters were 
approximately 25 kilometers away, at LA FERTe BERNARD (SARTHE), in 
the southeast corner of the area. All supplies, except wood and straw, 
had to be transported to BELLeME by truck for about 20 kilometers 
from the several divisional dumps or depots. The location, however, was in 
many respects a pleasant surprise, for it had been tentatively announced 
in Belgium that the 361st Infantry was to occupy the NOGENT-LE- 
BERNARD area which, though adjoining LA FERTe BERNARD, consisted 
of such small and scattered settlements that to billet a regiment in it re- 
quired the spreading of the regiment over an area nearly 20 kilometers 
long and required the probable subdividing of companies. These plans 
had been changed so that Colonel Bennett (formerly Lieutenant Colonel 
of the 361st Infantry) with the 364th Infantry was assigned to the NOGENT- 
LE-BERNARD area and the 361st Infantry received at BELLeME the 
snuggest, cleanest and altogether most desirable regimental area in the 
territory. Major Goodpaster's battalion had been tentatively assigned to a 
district in the NOGENT-LE-BERNARD area which left the Major the un- 
precedented choice of billets in either of two chateaux. Well knowing the 
previous record of the regiment for never receiving a chateau-area he had 
wisely not trusted himself to count upon these luxuries. In BELLeME it 

190 



soon developed that the only chateau had been thoroughly destroyed and 
removed during the French Revolution. Ultimately, however, the Colonel 
secured a billet in the next best thing to a chateau — "LA GRANDE 
MAISON." 

BELLeME is situated on a hill with a beautiful view to the west down 
the valley of the MeME River and across the rolling rich hills that have 
made of Normandy such a desirable province and such a tempting field 
for battle. According to the historical information published by Captain 
Page and the Regimental Intelligence Section this particular hill had seen 
many battles for its possession and had passed through almost countless 
hands since the days when it was first included in the Roman conquests from 
the Gauls. Company "E's" headquarters were in a group of buildings 
on a knoll on the side of the larger hill, and on that knoll, as early as the 
tenth century, had been built the small fortified chateau of YVES DE CREIL. 
On that spot there still stand the plain old chapel and crypt much as they 
have for nearly a thousand years. Later, a large chateau-fort had been 
built upon the crest of the main hill, and this had been repeatedly besieged, 
captured and recaptured by contending nobles and even kings. Today 
nothing remains of the chateau and of its once beautiful chapel of St. Leonard 
except stretches of the ancient ramparts, such as a 20 or 30-foot but- 
tressed wall that rises above the PLACE DU CHATEAU behind the SALLE 
DES FeTES (better known perhaps as the Regimental Theater), scattered 
sections of the ancient mote the most notable of which has become the 
town watering place for animals, and finally the heavily turretted gate- 
way or "tunnel" which formerly served as one of three main entrances 
to the castle. 

Just outside of this gateway is now LA PLACE DE LA RePUBLIQUE. 
This is the market place, where every Thursday the farmers bring their 
produce and where the public gatherings are held in much the same manner 
as for generations past. Here the question of prices for the American 
consumer was repeatedly argued with a result almost always favorable to 
the French producer until after many diplomatic sessions Colonel Cum- 
mings and Lieutenant Pfund (then Acting Operations Officer) won from 
the Mayor a proclamation of peace in this price war which set the official 
approval upon certain comparatively reasonable rates on standard articles. 

The town was an unusually clean one with a commendable local pride 
but the population of the regiment was practically as large as that of the 
town itself and as the regiment was gradually filled up with replacements 
preparatory to its return to America, unit after unit was moved out into 
the quiet suburbs. The Machine Gun Company, always at ST. MARTIN 
DU DIEUX BELLeME, about one kilometer northwest of BELLeME, was 
joined on January 6th by Company "A" which moved into a several storied 
old mill and a neighboring large building between the two towns. Com- 
panies "C" and "D" were always located at LE GUe DE LA CHAINE, 3 
kilometers west of BELLeME, and finally Company "B" on March 6th 
moved to COLONARD, about 8 kilometers northeast of BELLeME. On 
the other side, Company "I" on January 1 1th moved about 4 kilometers south 
of BELLeME to APPENAI, and Company "M," late in February moved 
about 6 kilometers southeast to DAME MARIE. These towns and farms, 
then barely in operation, were all located in what had once been the powerful 

191 



county of PERCHE and many of them in days gone by had raised the 
famous great Percheron horses of Normandy. 

The new additions to the regiment in BELLeME included officers as 
well as men. First of all, the regiment was met by Lieutenant Colonel 
Brett W. Eddy, who thus became the first and only Lieutenant Colonel to 
serve with it in France. He had had long experience with the National 
Guard of Louisiana and by his unassuming manner and ready lending 
of friendly and helpful assistance or advice he soon won the friendship 
and high regard of the regiment. From the day of its arrival in BELLeME 
to the day of its demobilization in CAMP LEWIS Lieutenant Colonel Eddy 
was constantly on duty with it and his services, particularly in maintain- 
ing a friendly and yet self-respecting international relation with the billet 
owners of BELLeME and its vicinity, will long be recalled with gratitude 
by the several Town Majors and doubtless with corresponding respect by 
many of the imaginative freeholders of the cherished ancestral ruins which 
served as American billets. 

Every officer of the regiment who was still in France and able to do 
active duty rejoined it at BELLeME, so that (except for Major Good- 
paster who, on January 20th, in answer to his application to remain in the 
regular service, had been transferred to the Combat Officers' Depot at 
GONDRECOURT, there to await assignment, and except for Lieutenant 
McMillen, who had been transferred to G. H. Q.), the roster of February 8th, 
1919, reads like a reunion of the surviving officers. To fill the remaining 
vacancies and thus be enabled to return to America with the regiment, new 
officers who had indicated their preference for "full and immediate separa- 
tion from the service" (the "greyhounds," as Captain Scudder called them), 
were assigned to the regiment and rapidly were assimilated by it. 

Almost immediately after arrival in the new area, schools and military 
training were put into full effect to comply with the combat division train- 
ing program of the Expeditionary Forces. BELLeME was selected as the 
location for the Divisional Trench Mortar School, which under direction of 
Major Roy E. Naftzger and Lieutenant Ernest K. Murray of this regiment, 
at once proved itself a thorough success. Although the school's target 
practice was reported to have caused much concern to the worthy guardians 
of the church at ST. MARTIN DU VIEUX BELLeME by shaking ancient 
statuettes from their ancient pedestals, and although the Pioneer Platoon 
was compelled to devote much of its training schedule to repairing the 
road and conduit that shell fire had destroyed, no serious damages were 
caused. 

Similarly, early in January, the Intelligence Sections attended a Divi- 
sional School at LA FERTe BERNARD, and representatives of the Pioneer 
and Signal Platoons attended schools at NOGENT LE ROTROU (EURE 
ET LOIR). 

On January 18th, the "command groups" of the entire 181st Brigade 
turned out on a maneuver which repeated in a single day a tactical disposi- 
tion and advance similar to that experienced by this brigade during the second 
phase of the MEUSE-ARGONNE offensive. It was soon seen that the 
comparatively thickly settled area in which the division was now located 
was, from a practical standpoint, rendered a precarious maneuver ground 
by the failure of the native peasants to understand the necessity for this 

192 



cross country work and their inherent and highly cultivated sense of land 
values was most sensitive to the damage caused to their hedges and grass 
by each such trip over the soggy and slippery fields. Finally arrangements 
were made whereby it was found to be reconcilable with the proper prepara- 
tion for the return of the division to America that it should discontinue 
further practice of large scale maneuvers. 

By this time the green fir tree divisional insignia which had been 
authorized while in Belgium (by G. O. 57, 91st Div., 13 Dec. 1918) had 
been generally distributed. Also by the middle of January practically all 
members of the command, including all members of the original regiment 
from Camp Lewis, were wearing the gold service stripe for six months' 
service overseas. These service chevrons and the wound chevrons were care- 
fully checked up and were worn at the time of the Pershing Review of 
January 27th. There was also issued at about this time the following 
Divisional Order officially authorizing and interpreting the distinctive divis- 
ional name, insignia and motto: 

" (270— FOR OFFICIAL CIRCULATION ONLY) HQ. 9 1 ST DIV. 
GENERAL ORDERS: A. E. F., January 29, 1919. 

No. 7 

1. 1. The name "Wild West Division," by which this division has been 
known since the days of its organization at Camp Lewis, Washington, in 
1917, is officially recognized as the distinctive divisional name. 

2. The distinctive divisional design, a green fir tree, adopted as a 
personal badge, to be worn by each officer and man of the division (G. O. 
57, 91st Division, 1918), is emblematic not only of the foliage found in each 
state from which the personnel of this division was selected, but the ever- 
green and ever useful character of this foliage is emblematic also of the 
state of readiness and the degree of usefulness which has characterized, 
and should continue to be the aim of, each unit of the division. 

3. Since this division was ready to participate in the ST. MIHIEL 
Salient operation while standing in the reserve of the First American Army; 
since it was ready to attack in the front line of the Fifth Army Corps, from 
Foret de HESSE, when the Commander-in-Chief launched his attack against 
the enemy's line of communications between the MEUSE River and the 
ARGONNE Forest; since some of its units were already entraining for 
BELGIUM before others, marching from the firing line, had reached the 
railroad; since its units never hesitated to attack the most formidable of 
the enemy's defences in BELGIUM; and since its members are now ready, 
either to return to the UNITED STATES and resume the pursuits of peace, 
or to continue their service wherever ordered by the Commander-in-Chief, 
the phrase "Always Ready" is adopted as the divisional motto. 

WHJ 

9 :30— 9 :50 

BY COMMAND OF MAJOR GENERAL JOHNSTON: 
OFFICIAL: 

D. J. Coman, Henry C. Jewett, 

Major, A. G,. Colonel, General Staff, 

Adjutant. Chief of Staff." 

GENERAL DISTRIBUTION. 

193 



At first a "Model Battalion" consisting of picked veterans of the regi- 
ment's engagements was drilled in a new solid square formation to be used 
in passing in review before General Pershing. Finally it was arranged 
for the General to review the entire division at the time of presenting a 
number of American decorations to its members. Much to the pleasure of 
the inhabitants of BELLeME the review took place in a field only four 
kilometers south of the town. This field was easily reached on foot by the 
members of this regiment while the units from the furthest corner of the 
area were forced to leave there early in the morning by truck and did not 
return until late that night. General Pershing, at the review, personally 
walked around and among the troops of the entire division, speaking fre- 
quently to those who had been wounded and after the review addressed a 
few words to the officers, including his commendation of the division for 
its service in action. 

Among the many decorations awarded were both the Distinguished 
Service Medal and Cross for Major General William H. Johnston, com- 
manding the division, the Distinguished Service Cross for Brigadier Gen- 
eral J. B. McDonald, commanding the 181st Brigade, and fourteen Dis- 
tinguished Service Crosses for enlisted men in the 361st Infantry. Later, on 
March 17, at a ceremony conducted by the 2nd Battalion of this regiment 
at BELLeME, Major General E. M. Lewis presented a Distinguished Service 
Medal to Brigadier General McDonald. 

The Regimental Colors were decorated with four light blue Battle 
Ribbons (MEUSE-ARGONNE, September 26-October 4, 1918; MEUSE- 
ARGONNE, October 7-12, 1918; YPRES-LYS, October 31-November 4, 
1918, and YPRES-LYS, November 10-11, 1918) awarded by the General 
Headquarters of the A. E. F. as a temporary substitute for the silver bands 
later to be placed around the pike. 

On January 29th on the same field as that where the divisional review 
had been held, the A. E. F. Chemical (familiarly known as the "Comical") 
Warfare Service Demonstration Unit gave a demonstration participated 
in by two companies of the 2nd Battalion of this regiment under Major 
Naftzger, all under the general supervision of Lieutenant Colonel Eddy. It 
illustrated the use of the thermite shells and smoke screens in attacking 
machine gun nests and was attended by officers from the several units of 
the division as well as by the entire 361st Infantry. 

At about the same time as came the relaxation in the requirements for 
field maneuvers, greater freedom and opportunity was provided for enter- 
tainments and diversions. Not only was a liberal system of furloughs and 
leaves of absence instituted and applied to the regiment so that practically 
every officer and man who desired a vacation was given one — sometimes for 
three days (to PARIS) and more often for two weeks to regular leave 
areas or "Points in France other than PARIS." In BELLeME itself, under 
the supervision of Chaplain Beard, as Regimental Entertainment Officer, 
entertainments were put on at the Regimental Theater almost every evening. 
These entertainments were often furnished by talent from within the regi- 
ment, notably the 2nd Battalion Show, the Band and Drum Corps Minstrels, 
the Company "F" "Finish Fight" (won by "Powder River"), and the "Love- 
lace Minstrels." Sometimes the talent was from other units of the division 

194 



and now and again the Y. M. C. A. circuit would treat the regiment to 
a troupe from outside the division, or even to feminine entertainers who 
never failed to pack the "house" even for two entertainments on the same 
evening. In March an interesting performance was staged by a troupe 
from the Canadian Forestry Detachment that was working in the nearby 
FOReT DE BELLeME. Each battalion, and whenever possible each com- 
pany, soon had its own reading and writing room in addition to the some- 
what limited space available for the general Y. M. C. A. reading room. 
"KC" also operated a little gift shop of his own near Regimental Head- 
quarters from which he distributed candy, tobacco and reading matter, 
including a liberally managed circulating library of fiction. During this 
interim Sergeant Z. A. Olson of Company "F" found time to prepare and 
have published as the first of the histories of the units of the regiment a 
most readable and creditable little volume entitled "Following Fighting F." 

During hours of training, the term "Regimental Formation" grew to 
cover a multitude of forms of entertainment and competitions. An athletic 
meet held on January 24th was won by the First Battalion, a "Military Field 
Meet" held on February 21st, was won by the Second Battalion, and a 
Novelty Field Meet held on February 27th was won by the Third Battalion. 
Colonel Cummings always took a hearty personal interest in all these 
events, thus greatly adding to their success, and on one occasion by per- 
sonal participation in an officers' relay race he contributed materially to the 
winning of the event by the so-called "Combination Battalion" which in- 
cluded all members of the regiment not in the three regularly constituted 
battalions. As the snowfall was never heavy, soccer and even baseball found 
a place in the winter sports. 

The old favorite diversion of boxing was again indulged in with the 
result that the divisional team included among its members Sergeant Wood- 
house of Company "A", Sergeant Simonich of Company "A", Corporal 
Pedersen of Company "A", Private O'Brien of Company "E" and Private 
Robertson of Company "G." These included all of the 361st Infantry 
boxing representatives who had won divisional championships in Camp 
Lewis, except Corporal Wells and Private Ferdon, both of Company "A", 
both of whom had been wounded in action and had not returned to the 
regiment. Chaplain Beard trained the boxers and accompanied his "Sunday 
School Class," as he called it, on its trips with the divisional team. No 
one of these men was ever beaten and each inter-divisional contest in which 
they took part was won by this division. 

Finally came the Horse Show, started by order from the Headquarters 
of the A. E. F. The order was at first regarded as of doubtful application to 
this organization, for it had not been re-equipped with animals or vehicles 
since its withdrawal from the line. However, the regiment had a reputation 
to maintain in such inter-regimental contests, and under the energetic leader- 
ship of Major Naftzger every effort was made to assemble entries that at least 
would not be a discredit to the organization. At the preliminary Regimental 
Horse Show in BELLeME late in February, first place was won by the Com- 
bination Battalion and on March 1st, at the Divisional Horse Show at 
NOGENT-LE-ROTROU the regiment to its own surprise found itself not 
merely creditably represented but the winner. Colonel Cummings here again 

195 



personally contributed materially to the success of the undertaking not merely 
by his hearty support of the representatives but by personally winning an 
event — taking first place in the Officers' Jumpers contest. The horse show 
parade which followed the completion of the event, and closed this last inter- 
regimental Field Day was but a living representation of Colonel Davis' old 
motto: "The 361st Leads, Others Follow." 

During this period the military training tended more than before to 
close order drill for it was now becoming necessary to prepare again for 
participation in ceremonies. The schedule however included in addition 
to the usual school of the soldier, squad, platoon and company, instruction 
in the new close order formations and movements as prescribed in the 
Provisional Infantry Drill Regulations prepared for the A. E. F. and specially 
adapted to maximum strength rifle companies of 250 men. Also 100, 200 
and 300-yard rifle target practice was conducted on a nearby rifle range 
constructed by Lieutenant Howard and the Pioneer Platoon. Automatic 
rifle practice and machine gun practice were conducted as long as the 
supply of ammunition would permit. Signalling, tactics, rifle exercises, 
the "MacNab" system of preliminary rifle firing instruction, identification 
of the several distinctive American divisional insignia, and map reading were 
all included. The band and drum corps rendered regular service at formal 
guard mounts, which were held daily, and at all ceremonies or "Regimental 
Formations." A brigade band was developed by providing for frequent 
practice with the band of the 362nd Infantry. Chaplain Cassidy conducted 
a most successful elementary school particularly for men who could not read 
or write and several men through this course became able for the first time 
to write letters home. 

No epidemic of influenza or any other disease ever attacked the 
regiment while abroad and although deaths from any cause were infrequent 
in BELLeME, it became the sad duty of the regiment to render the funeral 
honors at the BELLeME cemetery for Sergeant Samuel Lezak, of Company 
"F," and later for Captain Lewis of Division Headquarters. Also a memorial 
service, including addresses by Brigadier General McDonald and Major 
Doherty, was held in honor of ex-President Roosevelt, whose death oc- 
curred in February. 

One of the most successful ventures that the Y. M. C. A. undertook was 
the sending of Miss Brady to the regiment. She was the first and only 
woman who had been on duty with the regiment, and she was instantly a 
success. Quiet, diplomatic, energetic, resourceful, thoroughly interested in 
her work and attractive in her personality, she had in about two days 
enrolled the assistance of officers and men and was managing the regi- 
ment's first hot chocolate establishment in a corner of the Regimental 
Theater. From the day of her arrival until the day and hour that the 
troop trains pulled out for ST. NAZAIRE she was constantly and materially 
assisting in the maintenance of the morale. Also not to be overlooked was 
the visit of the "Flying Legion" — a group of about twenty Y. M. C. A. girls 
who spent one day at BELLeME participating in an enlisted men's dance 
in the afternoon and in an officers' dance in the evening. 

On February 1st an order was issued from G. H. Q., A. E. F., which 
took its effect in the regiment on February 9th, transferring to the Army of 

196 



Occupation those officers who, in Belgium, had indicated their preference 
to remain in the regular service if opportunity should occur. Under this 
order the following officers were transferred to the 2nd Division: Captains 
Williams (Co. "F") and Scudder (Regimental Adjutant) ; First Lieutenants 
Brightbill (1st Bn. Int. Officer), Appelman (Co. "B"), Hudelson (Co. "C"), 
Bissett (Co. "I"), Bates (Co. "A"), Johnston (2nd Bn. Adjutant), and Voder- 
berg (Co. "D") ; and 2nd Lieutenants Coats (Co. "L") and Stout (Co. "I") ; 
to the 3rd Division: Captain Page (Regimental Intelligence Officer) ; and to 
the 4th Division: Captain Towson (Co. "H"). Lieutenant McMillen (Hq. 
Co.), mentioned in the same order, had already received orders to report to 
G. H. Q., A. E. F. At about this time and in response to a similar 
election made by him, Lieutenant Valverde (Co. "M") was transferred to 
the Military Police Corps. 

In honor of these departing officers a farewell dinner which was at- 
tended by the Brigade Commander and Staff as well as by the Colonel and 
all officers of the regiment was held at the HOTEL ST. LOUIS in BEL- 
LeME. Its success rivalled but scarcely outrivalled that of the dinner held 
at NOGENT-EN-BASSIGNY, nearly six months previously, when the regi- 
ment was about to go into its first action. 

To fill vacancies resulting from these transfers the following changes 
in the regiment were made effective on February 9th : Captain Burton be- 
came Regimental Adjutant, Lieutenant Pfund Acting Operations Officer, Lieu- 
tenant Orton Acting Regimental Intelligence Officer, Lieutenant Lane Regi- 
mental Gas and Mess Officer and Assistant Operations Officer, Lieutenant 
Abel Commanding Officer of Company "B", Lieutenant Carver ("of West 
Virginia") Acting Adjutant of 1st Battalion, and Lieutenant Linforth Acting 
Adjutant of 2nd Battalion. As the several officers of the 2nd and 3rd 
Divisions, who were replaced by those from this regiment, reported for duty 
the other vacancies were soon filled by them. The principal changes thus 
caused were the assignments of Captain Wade Goble (2nd Division) to 
command Company "H," and Captain Hunter P. Lovelace (3rd Division) as 
Regimental Intelligence Officer. 

Within a few days further changes resulted from the promotions granted 
with rank from February 21, 1919, to cover certain of the cases of deserved 
promotions which had been unexpectedly cut off by the order stopping 
all national army promotions after the armistice. Within the regiment this 
order brought Captaincies to First Lieutenants Bailey (Co. "K"), Abel 
(Co. "B"), and Batman (Co. "I") and First Lieutenancies to Second Lieu- 
tenants Dunn (Co. "M"), Lane (Co. "G"), Valentine (Co. "L"), Craig 
(Hq. Co.), Ramsdell (M. G. Co.), Orton (2nd Bn. Int. Officer), Linforth 
(M. G. Co.) and Howard (Hq. Co.). Similar orders brought a Majority 
to Captain Brown, M. C, a Captaincy to Lieutenant Smith, M. C. and a Cap- 
taincy to Lieutenant (Chaplain) Beard. Each of these promotions had been 
so well earned and long delayed that sincere gratification upon their receipt 
was heartily felt by the entire regiment. 

As a result of these promotions several material changes in assign- 
ments were announced on February 22nd, the principal ones being that 
Captain Gilbert was transferred from Company "K" to his original Com- 
pany "F," Captain Bailey was placed in command of Company "K," Captain 

197 



Abel was transferred to Company "D," Captain Batman was temporarily 
attached to Company "G," Lieutenant Orton was assigned to Company "M," 
Lieutenant Lane was assigned as 2nd Battalion Intelligence Officer (but 
continued his duties as Gas and Mess Officer and Assistant Operations 
Officer), and Lieutenant Linforth was assigned as Second Battalion Adjutant. 
The subsequent principal changes in the assignment and personnel of line 
officers before leaving BELLeME were: February 25: Captain Batman 
attached to Company "A." February 28: Captain Burton from Regimental 
Adjutant to Operations Officer (compiling history), Lieutenant Pfund from 
Acting to Assistant Operations Officer (but continuing to do the operating), 
Captain Jahant, Acting Regimental Adjutant, Captain Angus to Machine 
Gun Company and Captain Louis N. Fournier (2nd Division) to Company 
"C." March 1: Captain Batman assigned to Company "A." March 13: 
Captain Jahant assigned as Regimental Adjutant. March 14: Captain Jahant 
transferred to LE MANS Embarkation Center, Captain Burton assigned as 
Regimental Adjutant, Lieutenant Pfund as Acting Operations Officer. In 
the meantime almost at the last moment an additional thousand unequipped 
replacements were sent to the division, but for the sake of keeping clear 
the regimental records, which now were practically ready for embarka- 
tion, these men were held in a single detachment and officers were detailed 
from the several regiments to take charge of them. From this regiment there 
went on this duty Lieutenants Haas, Ellis and Coppinger. 

Also during the last months an opportunity had come allowing selected 
officers and men to attend, on detached service, certain of the European 
Universities. In answer to this call the Medical Detachment contributed 
Major Brown, Captain McKibben, Captain Smith (after a few days of service 
by Captain Smith as Regimental Surgeon following Major Brown's depart- 
ure) and Lieutenant Mcintosh. The Dental Surgeons were also soon sep- 
arated from the regiment. The popular and efficient Captain William G. 
Parker of the 346th Machine Gun Battalion was then transferred to the 
regiment as its Regimental Surgeon, and among other additional doctors 
there came back Captain (formerly Lieutenant) Fred B. Coleman. Shortly 
before the second detachment of the regiment sailed for the United States 
Major Brown rejoined it. 

From early in February until the day of departure the one controlling 
purpose of every program was the preparation for the regiment's return to 
the United States. Organization property not required for transporta- 
tion overseas was collected and as rapidly as possible turned in — additional 
personal equipment needed to comply with embarkation instructions was 
constantly checked and rechecked, and missing items sought after and 
issued, the elusive "cootie" was made the subject of a determined cam- 
paign until each company had its own delousing plant and each company in 
addition to the medical inspections held a daily inspection and reported the 
result at Officers' Call. The final victory came when Lieutenant Pfund's 
suggestion was incorporated in an operations memorandum and the "cootie" 
was outmaneuvered and wearied to death by the doughboy's practice of 
one day wearing his underclothes wrong side out and the next day right side 
out until the enemy had fled or been annihilated in action. 

Repeated inspections of men and equipment were made by everyone from 
squad leader to Division Inspector. A similar inspection of billets was made 

198 



by everyone from squad leader to Lieutenant Colonel Eddy, and finally a 
"tactical inspection" by "G-3" of the Division (Lieutenant Colonel Lynn) 
won for the men of the regiment a clearance and a record that equalled 
even that which Captain Kanzler was making for them on paper in the 
personnel office. The results of the tactical inspection (which included 
particularly the execution of close order movements according to the Pro- 
visional I. D. R. of the A. E. F.), are here in part recorded as indicative 
of the results attained: The two leading rifle companies in the division 
were Companies "D" and "I" of this regiment, with the records given 
below; of the four infantry supply companies in the division, the Supply 
Company of the 361st Infantry ranked first by a considerable margin; the 
two leading battalions in the division were the 1st and 3rd Battalions of 
this regiment with the records given below, and the record of the 2nd Bat- 
talion is also here published because, although it ranked in a tie for 13th 
place in the division, this result was largely due to the small percentage 
present and such percentage has been explained as an error due to a failure 
to allow for the unavoidable absence of members of the new and old guard; 
finally, of the four regiments, the 361st Infantry ranked first, as shown 



below: 

Organization 


Rating of Officers 
Appear- Perform- 
ance ance 


Per- 
Rating of Enlisted Men centage 
■ Appear- Perform- Present at 
ance ance Inspection 


Final 
Rating 


Co. "D", 361st Inf. 


100 93 


98 


95 


95 


96.2 


Co. "I", 361st Inf. 


100 95 


97 


95 


94 


96.2 


1st Bn., 361st Inf. 


97.5 91.5 


96.7 


91.5 


94 


94.2 


3rdBn., 361st Inf. 


100 92.2 


96.7 


90 


91.5 


94.1 


2nd Bn., 361st Inf. 


100 89.2 


93.7 


90.3 


79.7 


90.6 


361st Inf. 


99 91 


95 


89 


88 


92.4 


364th Inf. 


97.5 88.5 


91 


89.5 


90 


91.3 


363rd Inf. 


97.1 92.4 


91.5 


89.3 


87 


91.2 


362nd Inf. 


97.5 90 


93 


87 


86.5 


91 



While all of this was going on outside, the personnel office, under the 
conscientious direction of Captain Jacob Kanzler assisted by Lieutenant 
Frederick T. Fairchild, was crowding the capacity of all available type- 
writers with the reams of reports required to be completed so that once the 
regiment left the embarkation area, its records with the Expeditionary 
Forces would be satisfactorily closed and that thereafter as the regiment 
passed through the further stages of demobilization there would be the least 
possible delay due to discrepancies or to the need of further data. The 
task was gradually accomplished and Captain Kanzler's reward came with 
the opinion of the Embarkation Center Inspectors who said that they had 
never before seen a regiment's records in such excellent condition. 

20 March to 26 April, 1919— from BELLeME (ORNE) FRANCE, to 
CAMP LEWIS, WASHINGTON, U. S. A., via ST. NAZAIRE (LOIRE 
INFERIEURE), France, and HOBOKEN, N. J., U. S. A., East, by marching, 
20 kilometers, and West, by rail and ship, 7023 miles (1 1,237 kilometers). 

On March 20th the movement to the West at last began by marching East 
20 kilometers from BELLeME to NOGENT-LE-ROTROU and there entrain- 
ing for ST. NAZAIRE. The first units to leave were Regimental Headquarters, 
Headquarters Company, Machine Gun Company and the Second Battalion 

199 



(train commander, Colonel Cummings). The rest of the regiment followed, 
on two trains leaving NOGENT-LE-ROTROU a few hours apart. On the 
first of these trains were the 181st Brigade Headquarters, the Third Bat- 
talion and Companies "A" and "B" (train commander, Brigadier General 
McDonald) and on the second train were the First Battalion (less Com- 
panies "A" and "B"), Supply Company and 347th Machine Gun Bat- 
talion (train commander, Lieutenant Colonel Eddy). 

The troops arrived in ST. NAZAIRE the following day after a 275- 
kilometer (about 172-mile) trip. The train service already was growing 
better for a part of the cars were large American freight cars instead of the 
tiny French type and each train carried a kitchen car that made possible 
the service of hot meals prepared by a permanent train crew regularly 
assigned to that duty. 

At ST. NAZAIRE an excellently managed and roomy embarkation camp 
readily absorbed the regiment and after undergoing more physical and 
equipment inspections and a revision of some of the embarkation lists 
according to new instructions, the regiment was ready for shipboard. The 
admirable efficiency and ready co-operation shown by all in charge of 
operations at ST. NAZAIRE is worthy of the highest commendation. 

On March 25th the 181st Brigade Headquarters, 361st Infantry Head- 
quarters, Headquarters and Supply Companies boarded the Naval Transport 
"Orizaba" with a considerable number of troops from the 182nd Brigade 
and various convalescent and minor detachments. Brigadier General 
McDonald was commander of troops. The ship sailed that day and reached 
HOBOKEN, NEW JERSEY, on April 2nd, after an excellent trip. 

Just as the "Orizaba" was sailing there came the last assignment of new 
officers to the regiment. First came a list of appointments to Second Lieu- 
tenants' Commissions of those men who had graduated from the last 
Officers' Training Camp and from there had been returned to the regiment 
as officer candidates (or so-called "3rd Lieutenants") to await their com- 
missions. Following this came a Division Order assigning the new officers 
in most cases to their own regiments. These men had earned their recom- 
mendations to attend the camp by service under fire in the MEUSE- 
ARGONNE offensive and it was a proud day for the regiment when it could 
list them on its roster of officers. These were the regiment's first officers 
to come to it from its own ranks: 

Second Lieutenant Clyde C. Boyce, formerly Sergeant in Co. "E". 

Second Lieutenant Alexander Dobie, formerly Sergeant in Co. "H". 

Second Lieutenant Austin Duggan, formerly 1st Sergeant in Hq. Co. 
(commissioned shortly after his arrival in United States on "Orizaba"). 

Second Lieutenant Val F. Gerlits, formerly Sergeant in Co. "D". 

Second Lieutenant Thomas Greenlees, formerly Sergeant in Co. "G". 

Second Lieutenant Frank J. McDonald, formerly Sergeant in Co. "C". 

Second Lieutenant John Melcher, formerly Sergeant in Co. "E". 

Second Lieutenant William G. Monaghan, formerly Sergeant in Co. "K." 

Second Lieutenant Joseph A. Simonich, formerly Sergeant in Co. "A". 

There were also similarly assigned to this regiment Second Lieutenants 
Fidler, Harelson and Wallis, who had served as enlisted men with other 
units of the division. 

200 



During this brief stay at ST. NAZAIRE, the 2nd Battalion again par- 
ticipated in a ceremony accompanying the presentation by Major General 
Lewis of a few belated decorations. 

On April 3rd the last units of the regiment sailed from ST. NAZAIRE. 
The First Battalion (less Company "D"), accompanied by a number of 
officers from the other units sailed on the "Edward Luckenbach," the rest, 
under command of Lieutenant Colonel Eddy, sailed on the "Mexican." 

By April 15th the entire regiment of veterans had been brought back 
safely to the welcome shores of the Goddess of Liberty. Scarcely a man 
who was able to rise from his bed failed to gaze eagerly at the great 
statue at the harbor's entrance, for this statue symbolized to each man 
most nobly and perfectly the land and the ideals for which he had put 
forth his every effort and freely risked his life. To each returning soldier 
the spirit of Liberty appeared in person to hold out the light of Freedom 
and to welcome him to his well-earned reward — a home in a country of 
Freedom. 

The troops on the "Orizaba" and "Edward Luckenbach" were sent to 
CAMP MERRITT, N. J., those on the "Mexican" to CAMP MILLS, N. Y. 
Here the members of the regiment were rapidly separated into groups to be 
sent to the demobilization camps nearest to the respective points from which 
they had entered the service. The Regimental, Battalion and Company 
Headquarters, and the band were, however, preserved essentially intact and 
ordered to CAMP LEWIS, Washington, with such of the other troops as had 
been originally inducted into the service from Washington or Oregon. 

On April 20th, Colonel Cummings entrained with the second train of the 
Camp Lewis detachment leaving Camp Merritt. In his detachment were the 
21 officers and 436 men who together now made up the Regimental Staff, 
the First Battalion (less Company "D") and Headquarters and Supply Com- 
panies. On April 24th, Lieutenant Colonel Eddy, entrained with the Camp 
Lewis detachment from Camp Mills, consisting of 25 officers and 739 men, 
which included not only all that remained of the 361st Infantry, but also 
8 officers and about 150 men from other units. 

As the troops were hurried homeward the same glad welcome and ever 
helpful and cheerful Red Cross workers appeared again, much as on 
the trip East ten months before. But now there was no secrecy, and 
receptions were tendered at many points along the way, including MARION, 
Ohio, ST. PAUL, Minn., DICKINSON, N. D., BUTTE or HELENA, Mont, 
(according to the routings of the trains), and finally the great ovations 
and parades in SPOKANE, SEATTLE and TACOMA, Wash. 

Camp Lewis was reached by each train late in the evening and in each 
case the discharge machinery was put in motion the moment the men had 
detrained. Some were there discharged by noon of the following day 
and all (except a detachment from Company "H" and few necessary 
men at headquarters) were discharged within forty-eight hours after their 
arrival. The detachment from Company "H" consisted of one carload 
of men among whom it was reported that there had developed a case of 
''German measles" — this led to a 14-day quarantine by Camp authorities, 
which Regimental Headquarters was unable to foreshorten. 

201 



On April 26th Colonel Cummings had led his detachment in triumphal 
parade in TACOMA, and on the same night the regiment reported in at 
CAMP LEWIS for demobilization. On that day the 361st Infantry com- 
pleted a term of active service of just 600 days (September 4, 1917, to April 
26, 1919). On April 30th the remaining units were all in the camp where 
they had been originally formed, and that date is understood to mark the 
official demobilization of the unit, after 604 days' service. The tour of duty 
was done, the official National and Regimental colors were turned in for 
delivery to the State of Washington, and at patriotic exercises held in the 
City of Tacoma, Colonel Avery D. Cummings returned to the Tacoma Com- 
mercial Club and Chamber of Commerce the additional Regimental Colors, 
the safe return of which had been guaranteed to them a year before by 
Colonel William D. Davis. 



202 



APPENDIX I 

TRAVEL SUMMARY 

(All dates are inclusive) 

Total service of regiment (Sept. 4, 1917-April 30, 1919) 604 

Days in United States before going overseas (Sept. 4, 1917-July 5, 1918) 305 

Days on high seas or overseas (July 6, 1918-April 2, 1919) 271 

Days in United States after return from overseas (April 3-30, 1919) .. . 28 

Days in Scotland or England (July 17-19, 1918) 3 

Days in France (July 20-Oct. 19, 1918, and Dec. 31, 1918-Mar. 25, 
1919) 176 

Days in Belgium (Oct. 20-Dec. 30, 1918) 72 

Days out of U. S. before armistice (July 6-Nov. 11,1918) 129 

Days out of U. S. after armistice (Nov. 12, 1918-April 2, 1919) 142 

Miles Kilometers 
Railroad travel in United States (approximately 3200 miles 

each way) 6,400 10 : 240 

Sea travel (approximately 4318 miles going, 3645 miles 

returning) 7,963 12,741 

Railroad travel in Scotland or England 425 680 

Railroad travel in France (5 trips) 1 ,302.5 2,084 

Railroad travel in Belgium 15.5 25 

Motor truck travel in France 39 62 

Night marching in France (7 marches) 45.5 72.5 

Day marching in France (15 marches) 104 167 

Day marching in Belgium (16 marches) 148.5 238 

Advancing by attack, including attack on Gesnes, (7 

advances) 1 6.5 26.5 

Total movements of regiment 16,459.5 26,336 

Total movements on foot in Europe 314.5 504 



203 



APPENDIX II 

BATTLE SUMMARY 

(All dates are inclusive) 

Days 

Days in training in United States (Sept. 4, 1917-July 5, 1918) 304 

Days in training in France (July 23-Sept. 2, 1918) 42 

Days in service as Combat Division (Sept. 3-Nov. 1 1, 1918) 70 

Days en route during action (Sept. 3-11, 14-19, Oct. 12-27) . . 31 

Days in action (Sept.l2-13,Sept.20-Oct. 11, Oct. 28-Nov. 11) 39 

Days in front line (Sept. 26-Oct. 3, Oct. 8-10, Nov. 1-3) 14 

Days in Brigade Reserve (Sept. 20-25, Oct. 11, Oct. 31) 8 

Days in Division Reserve (Nov. 10-11) 2 

Days in Corps Reserve (Oct. 4-7, Oct. 28-30, Nov. 4-9) . 13 

Days in Army Reserve (Sept. 12-13) 2 

Depth of enemy territory permanently gained by regiment, 25 kilom- 
eters (151/2 miles). The division is credited with a total gain of 34 
kilometers. 

Major operations participated in by 361st Infantry: 

ST. MIHIEL OFFENSIVE (in Army Reserve), Sept. 12-13, 1918. 

MEUSE-ARGONNE DEFENSIVE, Sept. 20-25, 1918. 

MEUSE-ARGONNE OFFENSIVE, Sept. 26-Oct. 12, 1918. 

YPRES-LYS (-SCHELDT) OFFENSIVE, Oct. 31-Nov. 11, 1918. 



204 



APPENDIX III 
DECORATIONS AND INDIVIDUAL CITATIONS 

Summary of Individual Awards 

Designation of Name for Army Post 1 

U. S. Congressional Medal of Honor 1 

U. S. Distinguished Service Medal 1 

U. S. Distinguished Service Cross 34 

French Croix de Guerre 45 

Belgian Croix de Guerre 23 

U. S. Army Meritorious Service Citation Certificate, without Decoration 7 

Divisional Citation in General Orders (with Silver Star) 195 

Regimental Citation in General Orders, without Decoration 5 

Total 312 

DESIGNATION OF NAME FOR ARMY POST 

By direction of the President, the new post now being constructed near 
Gatun, Panama Canal Department, is named Fort William D. Davis ; in 
honor of the late Col. William D. Davis, 361st Infantry, who died in France, 
November 1, 1918. Colonel Davis was awarded the distinguished service 
cross "for extraordinary heroism in action near Gesnes, France, September 
26 to October 2, 1918." During the engagement he was twice wounded, 
but remained in command of his regiment throughout the entire action, 
until it was finally relieved. He was awarded the distinguished service medal 
posthumously for exceptionally meritorious and distinguished services. He 
served on the Canal Zone in the 5th Infantry during the period when the 
troops were engaged in the maneuvers and survey work which formed a 
practical basis for the defense project. (W. D. G. O. 91, Sec. IV, July 
19, 1919.) 

U. S. CONGRESSIONAL MEDAL OF HONOR 

Oscar F. Miller, Major, 361st Infantry. For conspicuous gallantry and 
intrepidity above and beyond the call of duty in action with the enemy near 
Gesnes, France, September 28th, 1918. After two days of intense physical 
and mental strain, during which Maj. Miller had led his battalion in the 
front line of the advance, through the forest of Argonne, the enemy was 
met in a prepared position south of Gesnes. Though almost exhausted, he 
energetically reorganized his battalion and ordered an attack. Upon reach- 
ing open ground, the advancing line began to waver in the face of machine 
gun fire from the front and flanks and direct artillery fire. Personally 
leading his command group forward between his front line companies, Maj. 
Miller inspired his men by his personal courage, and they again pressed on 
toward the hostile position. As this officer led the renewed attack he was 
shot in the right leg, but he nevertheless staggered forward at the head of 

205 



his command. Soon afterwards he was again shot in the right arm, but 
he continued the charge, personally cheering his troops on through the 
heavy machine gun fire. Just before the objective was reached he received 
a wound in the abdomen which forced him to the ground, but he continued 
to urge his men on, telling them to push on to the next ridge and leave him 
where he lay. He died from his wounds a few days later. (W. D. G. O. 
16, Sec. Ill, Jan. 22, 1919.) 

U. S. DISTINGUISHED SERVICE MEDAL 

William D. Davis, colonel, Infantry, United States Army. For excep- 
tionally meritorious and distinguished services. He served with marked 
success as commanding officer of the 361st Infantry, displaying military 
attainments of a high order. Inspiring his men by his faithful devotion to 
duty, he proved a potent factor in the achievements of the 91st Division. 
While ably directing his regiment in action during the early part of Novem- 
ber he was killed by an enemy shell. (W. D. G. O. 98, Sec. V, Aug. 2, 1919.) 

U. S. DISTINGUISHED SERVICE CROSS 

W. D. Davis, colonel, 361st Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in 
action near Gesnes, France, September 26 to October 2, 1918. He displayed 
distinguished gallantry in leading and directing his front line in the four 
days' advance on Gesnes, and in the four following days, holding the front 
line, under heavy shell fire. During this period his regiment was suffering 
heavy casualties, but he remained constantly with the front line, encourag- 
ing his men by his presence to hold out under this most dangerous and 
trying condition of warfare. Twice wounded, he remained in command 
of the regiment throughout the entire action until it was finally relieved on 
October 12th. (W. D. G. O. 139, Sec. I, Dec. 24, 1918.) 

Avery D. Cummings, colonel, 181st Infantry Brigade. For extraordinary 
heroism in action near Gesnes, France, September 29, 1918. During the 
attack on Gesnes, he, then a lieutenant colonel, in addition to performing 
his regular duties as brigade adjutant, 181st Brigade, went forward with the 
front line of attack, directing the organization and outposting of the front line 
after Gesnes and the army objective beyond it had been captured. All of the 
senior officers of the assaulting regiment having been killed or wounded 
in the attack on Gesnes he unhesitatingly organized the scattered elements 
of the regiment, and pushed the attack home to final success. (W. D. G. O. 
139, Sec. I, Dec. 24, 1918.) 

(As the above award was earned before Colonel Cummings joined the 
regiment it is not included in the summary and number of individual awards 
won by members of the regiment, but it is reprinted here because of its 
evident interest to the regiment as having been won by the Colonel who 
shortly thereafter became its commanding officer.) 

George W. Farwell, major, 361st Infantry. For extraordinary heroism 
in action near Gesnes, France, September 28-29, 1918. He displayed ex- 
ceptional personal bravery in leading his command to the capture of enemy 
positions near Gesnes, France, September 28-29, 1918. In each of these 

206 



actions his troops were subjected to heavy artillery bombardment and ma- 
chine gun fire, but due to his coolness and the inspiration of his personal 
leadership and bravery his battalion in each instance captured and held the 
positions attacked. (W. D. G. O. 20, Sec. V, Jan. 30, 1919.) 

William J. Potter, major, formerly commanding officer, Company L, 
361st Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action near Eclisfontaine, 
France, September 28, 1918. After being painfully wounded by a shell 
fragment during the night, Major Potter, then captain, refused to go to 
the rear, and organized his company for an attack and led it in the advance 
under heavy machine gun and artillery fire, freely exposing himself and 
cheering his men by his presence until he was a second time wounded thru 
the lungs, even then refusing to be evacuated until the company was organ- 
ized and properly turned over to his successor for another attack which was 
then impending. (Official copy, but reference to W. D. orders not available.) 

Major Paul F. Brown, Medical Detachment, 361st Infantry. For extra- 
ordinary heroism in action near Eclisfontaine, France, on the night of Sep- 
tember 26-27, 1918. Major Brown, then Captain, voluntarily advanced in 
front of our lines for the purpose of rescuing the wounded left in advance 
of the new lines by the retirement of a unit of the regiment. Due to his 
efforts fourteen wounded Americans were brought safely back to our lines. 
(Official copy, but reference to W. D. orders not available.) 

Campbell Burke, captain, 361st Infantry. For extraordinary heroism 
in action near Gesnes, France, October 9, 1918. The battalion which Capt. 
Burke commanded was ordered to attack a position on Hill 255 under 
terrific machine gun and artillery fire. His coolness and personal example 
contributed largely to the success of the battalion and enabled it to capture 
substantially the entire objective. He was severely wounded in this en- 
gagement. (W. D. G. O. 20, Sec. VII, Jan. 30, 1919.) 

Louis Jansen, first lieutenant, 361st Infantry. For extraordinary 
heroism in action near Epinonville, France, September 26, 1918. When the 
advance of his battalion was held up by an enemy machine gun nest, Lieut. 
Jansen, accompanied by a soldier, crossed the enemy wire, took the position, 
killed one of the enemy, and captured four prisoners and two machine 
guns. (W. D. G. O. 20, Sec. VI, Jan. 30, 1919.) 

Abraham Thorf, supply sergeant, Company B, 361st Infantry. For 
extraordinary heroism in action near Gesnes, France, September 28, 1918. 
Although badly wounded, he crawled 500 meters under heavy shell fire 
to deliver important papers to his company commander. (W. D. G. O. 21, 
Sec. I, Feb. 1, 1919.) 

Daniel J. O'Keefe, corporal, Company B, 361st Infantry. For extra- 
ordinary heroism in action near Epinonville, France, September 27, 1918. 
When half of his platoon were on a hillside under heavy machine gun and 
snipers fire, he effectively covered the withdrawal with his automatic rifle. 
(W. D. G. O. 15, Sec. IV, Jan. 21, 1919.) 

Regnvald Johnson, cook, Company B, 361st Infantry. For extraordinary 
heroism in action near Gesnes, France, September 29th to October 1, 1918. 
Under heavy shell fire and badly wounded, he constantly assisted for three 

207 



days in cooking for an entire battalion in the front line. (W. D. G O. 139, 
Sec. I, Dec. 24, 1918.) 

Ivan Y. Bailey, private, 1st Battalion Intelligence Section (Company B), 
361st Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action near Gesnes, France, 
October 10, 1918. While on a liaison patrol, Pvt. Bailey and Corpl. 
Carl G. Theobald attacked and captured a hostile machine gun nest and its 
entire crew. Pvt. Bailey then took the prisoners across No Man's Land to 
our lines under machine gun fire. (W. D. G. O. 37, Sec. VI, March 11, 
1919.) 

William N. Kouts, sergeant, Company D, 361st Infantry. For extra- 
ordinary heroism in action near Gesnes, France, September 26, 1918. 
Sergt. Kouts, together with two other soldiers, captured 3 enemy ma- 
chine guns and 26 prisoners. (W. D. G. O. 37, Sec. VII, March 11, 1919.) 

Arthur P. Zimmerman, sergeant, Company D, 361st Infantry. For 
extraordinary heroism in action near Gesnes, France, October 3, 1918. He 
voluntarily and unhesitatingly left shelter under heavy shell fire and, with- 
out thought of personal danger, rendered first aid and carried a wounded 
comrade to a place of safety. (W. D. G. O. 20, Sec. VII, Jan. 30, 1919.) 

Hjalmar Froman, corporal, Company D, 361st Infantry. For extra- 
ordinary heroism in action near Gesnes, France, October 3, 1918. He 
voluntarily and unhesitatingly left shelter under heavy shell fire and, with- 
out thought of personal danger, rendered first aid and carried a wounded 
comrade to a place of safety. (W. D. G. O. 20, Sec. VII, Jan. 30, 1919.) 

Jesse L. King, corporal, Company D, 361st Infantry. For extraordinary 
heroism in action near Gesnes, France, September 26, 1918. Corpl. King, 
together with two other soldiers captured 3 enemy machine guns and 26 
prisoners. (W. D. G. O. 20, Sec. VI, Jan. 30, 1919.) 

Leo L. Ross, corporal, Company D, 361st Infantry. For extraordinary 
heroism in action near Gesnes, France, September 26, 1918. When the 
advance of his battalion was held up by an enemy machine gun nest, 
Corpl. Ross, in company with an officer crossed the enemy wire, took the 
position and captured 4 prisoners and 2 machine guns. On the same day, 
accompanied by two other soldiers, he captured 3 machine guns and 26 
prisoners. (W. D. G. 0. 32, Sec. V, Mar. 1, 1919.) 

Carl G. Theobald, corporal, 1st Battalion Intelligence Section (Com- 
pany D), 361st Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action near Gesnes, 
France, October 10, 1918. While on a liaison patrol, Corpl. Theobald 
and Pvt. Ivan Y. Bailey attacked and captured a hostile machine gun nest 
and its entire crew. (W. D. G. O. 37, Sec. VI, Mar. 11, 1919.) 

Joseph A. Wallace, corporal, Company D, 361st Infantry. For extra- 
ordinary heroism in action near Gesnes, France, October 3, 1918. While 
his company was under heavy shell fire, he voluntarily, unhesitatingly and 
repeatedly left his shelter under heavy shell fire, without thought of per- 
sonal danger, rendered first aid and carried wounded comrades to a place 
of safety. (W. D. G. O. 20, Sec. VII, Jan. 30, 1919.) 

Henry N. Benoit, private 1st class, Company D, 361st Infantry. For 
extraordinary heroism near Gesnes, France, 26th September-4th October, 

208 



1918. During eight days of action while acting in the capacity of runner 
between his company and battalion headquarters, Pvt. Benoit was con- 
stantly subjected to a heavy shell fire, but performed his mission without 
thought of personal danger, carrying the many messages promptly and suc- 
cessfully. (Official copy, but reference to W. D. orders not available.) 

Victor A. Carley, private, Company D, 361st Infantry. For extraordinary 
heroism in action near Gesnes, France, October 3, 1918. He voluntarily 
and unhesitatingly left shelter under heavy shell fire and, without thought 
of personal danger, rendered first aid and carried a wounded comrade to 
a place of safety. (W. D. G. O. 20, Sec. VII, Jan. 30, 1919.) 

Joseph S. Leeb, private, Company D, 361st Infantry. For extraordinary 
heroism in action near Gesnes, France, October 3, 1918. He voluntarily 
and unhesitatingly left shelter under heavy shell fire, and without thought 
of personal danger, rendered first aid and carried a wounded comrade to a 
place of safety. (W. D. G. O. 20, Sec. VII, Jan. 30, 1919.) 

Gilbert Straabe, private, Company D, 361st Infantry. For extraordinary 
heroism in action near Gesnes, France, October 3, 1918. He voluntarily 
and unhesitatingly left shelter under heavy shell fire and without thought of 
personal danger, rendered first aid and carried a wounded comrade to a 
place of safety. (W. D. G. O. 20, Sec. VII, Jan. 30, 1919.) 

R. Roselli, private, Company F, 361st Infantry. For extraordinary hero- 
ism in action near Epinonville, France, 4th October, 1918. Accompanying 
a patrol on a reconnaissance, Pvt. Roselli penetrated enemy positions, the 
exploit being accomplished under heavy fire. Although wounded, Pvt. 
Roselli returned with valuable information regarding the positions of enemy 
machine gun nests, and snipers' posts. (Official copy, but reference to 
W. D. orders not available.) 

Richard M. Kirk, sergeant, Company H, 361st Infantry. For extra- 
ordinary heroism in action at Audenarde, Belgium, November 1, 1918. He 
was a member of a patrol sent out to reconnoiter the town of Audenarde. 
This patrol discovered several enemy machine gun sniper posts, located in 
buildings which were enfilading the streets of the town. Taking another 
soldier with him and dodging from building to building, he entered one 
of these houses and captured two machine gunners. (W. D. G. O. 21, Sec. 
I, Feb. 1, 1919.) 

Ernest R. Ball, corporal, Company H, 361st Infantry. For extraordinary 
heroism in action at Epinonville, France, 29th September, 1918. While 
his company was being harrassed by enemy snipers hidden in imitation 
tanks, Pvt. Ball, without aid went forward, and succeeded in killing one 
and capturing another. (Official copy, but reference to W. D. orders not 
available.) 

John W. Cramer, corporal, Company H, 361st Infantry. For extra- 
ordinary heroism in action at Audenarde, Belgium, November 1, 1918. He 
was a member of a patrol sent out to reconnoiter the town of Audenarde. 
This patrol discovered several enemy machine gun sniper posts, located in 
buildings, which were enfilading the streets of the town. With another 
soldier, he dodged from building to building and entering one of the houses 

209 



containing a machine gun, captured two machine gunners. (W. D. G. O. 21, 
Sec. I, Feb. 1, 1919.) 

Wallace Smith, private, Company I, 361st Infantry. For extraordinary 
heroism in action near Gesnes, France, September 28 to October 1, 1918. 
Although twice wounded, he stayed out in front under heavy machine gun 
and artillery fire, and helped to take back within our lines wounded com- 
rades, who otherwise would have fallen into the hands of the enemy. (W. 
D. G. O. 20, Sec. VII, Jan. 30, 1919.) 

Howard M. Wight, private, Company I, 361st Infantry. For extra- 
ordinary heroism in action near Gesnes, France, September 28, 1919. When 
his battalion withdrew after attacking a hostile position under heavy fire, 
Pvt. Wight, instead of falling back, organized a party and in the face of 
intense machine gun fire, rescued 15 wounded soldiers who would have 
otherwise have fallen into the hands of the enemy. He placed the wounded 
men in a gravel pit and remained the entire night, administering first aid, 
despite the fact that he himself was nearly exhausted after 3 days of fight- 
ing. (W. D. G. O. 15, Sec. VI, Jan. 21, 1919.) 

Nat R. Smith, sergeant, Company K, 361st Infantry. For extraordinary 
heroism in action near Gesnes, France, September 28, 1918. He success- 
fully led his patrol, in the face of heavy machine gun fire (being a point 
direct) in order to make better reconnaissance, and although severely 
wounded, continued to lead his patrol. (W. D. G. O. 20, Sec. VII, Jan. 30, 
1919.) 

John Rees, sergeant, Company M, 361st Infantry. For extraordinary 
heroism in action near Gesnes, France, September 29, 1918. He fearlessly 
led his platoon in the face of murderous fire in an attack on a machine gun 
nest, and by his personal example contributed largely to the success of the 
attack by his platoon. (W. D. G. O. 20, Sec. VII, Jan. 30, 1919.) 

Julius O. Yuill, sergeant, Company M, 361st Infantry. For extraordinary 
heroism in action near Epinonville, France, September 26, 1918. Accom- 
panied by one man, Sergt. Yuill went forward to a German trench and 
bombed it, killing a German officer and two soldiers and held the trench 
until reinforced by a party of four. Fearing that the Germans in the trench 
would escape, he led these men 500 meters through sniper and machine gun 
fire, cut off their means of escape, and captured 27 prisoners. On the 
same day he killed an officer who, with 2 men, was attempting to set up a 
machine gun to ambush the command group. He followed the two men 
into their dugout and killed one of them, and with the help of other mem- 
bers of the command thoroughly mopped up the place. (W. D. G. O. 32, 
Sec. VII, March 1, 1919.) 

Roy E. Watson, bugler, Company M, 361st Infantry. For extraordinary 
heroism in action near Gesnes, France, September 29 to October 3, 1918. 
Without any thought of personal danger, he repeatedly carried messages 
over ground swept by shell and machine gun fire, delivering his messages 
with utmost promptness. (W. D. G. O. 20, Sec. VII, Jan. 30, 1919.) 

Howard Craven, battalion sergeant-major, Headquarters Company, 361st 
Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action near Gesnes, France, Sep- 
tember 26, 1918. Although wounded, he remained on duty and during 

210 



the heaviest bombardment of the battalion command post, reorganized and 
kept under control the liaison section, which was essential to the success- 
ful operation of the battalion. He constantly exposed himself to danger 
and rendered service of great value. (\V. D. G. O. 20, Sec. VII, Jan. 30, 
1919.) 

Ralph Ethier, sergeant, Headquarters Company, 361st Infantry. For 
extraordinary heroism in action near Gesnes, France, September 26, 1918. 
He was in charge of the signal section attached to the attacking battalion; 
he displayed remarkable coolness and disregard for personal danger in bring- 
ing the battalion telephone line through heavy artillery and machine gun 
fire to the ridge which was being attacked and there established com- 
munication with regimental headquarters. (W. D. G. O. 13, Sec. VII, Jan. 
18, 1919.) (Note: This occurred on September 28th, not 26th.) 

Michael Carter, corporal, Headquarters Company, 361st Infantry. For 
extraordinary heroism in action near Gesnes, France, September 28, 1918. 
While attached to the signal section of the attacking battalion he repeatedly 
spliced telephone wires in the midst of heavy artillery and machine gun fire 
during the attack, displaying at all times exceptional coolness and personal 
bravery and aiding materially in maintaining communication between bat- 
talion and regimental command posts. (W. D. G. O. 15, Sec. VI, Jan. 21, 
1919.) 

FRENCH CROIX DE GUERRE 

(Unofficial translations of official French citations furnished to the editor by 

the Adjutant General of the Army, but the exact reference to the 

order containing the citation has not been available 

except where stated.) 

Francois Trouchet, 1st Lieutenant, 361st American Regiment of Infantry. 
Wounded during the advance from the Lys to the Escaut from October 
30 to November 4, 1918, he nevertheless continued for three days to assure 
the delivery of rations to his battalion under conditions particularly difficult 
and under heavy shell fire. (Extract from orders from Headquarters French 
Armies of the East, February 8, 1919 — With Bronze Star.) 

James R. McLaughlin, 1st lieutenant, 361st Infantry. For exceptional 
services under fire near Audenarde, Belgium, November 3d and 4th, 1918. 
During these engagements he performed highly valuable services as Batal- 
lion Adjutant under heavy artillery bombardment. (With Bronze Star.) 

Frank R. Johnston, 1st lieutenant, 361st Infantry. He distinguished 
himself in the engagement near Bevere, Belgium, on November 1st, 1918, 
by commanding his platoon with ability and success on the firing line in 
spite of the direct fire of the enemy's artillery and the enfilading fire of 
their machine guns. (With Bronze Star.) 

John W. Beard, 1st Lieutenant, Chaplain of 361st American Regiment 
of Infantry. An officer of highest merit and of remarkable courage. Charged 
with the burial of the dead on November 5, 1918, he accomplished his 
mission in spite of the danger threatening his men under a most heavy shell 
fire. (Divisional citation in Order No. 13.313 "D" of the General Head- 
quarters of the French Armies of the East, February 8, 1919 — With Silver 
Star.) 

211 



Daniel J. O'Keefe (2290557), corporal, Company "B," 361st Infantry. 
A soldier of admirable courage. When half of his platoon found itself on 
a hillside under heavy fire, he successfully covered the withdrawal of his 
detachment with his automatic rifle. (With Gilt Star.) 

Regnvald Johnson (2256921), cook, Company "B," 361st Infantry. A 
soldier of admirable courage. Under heavy fire and while severely wounded 
he steadfastly assisted for three days in operating the kitchens for a batal- 
lion in the front line. (With Gilt Star.) 

Ivan Bailey, private, 1st Battalion Intelligence Section (Company "B"), 
361st Infantry. He particularly distinguished himself in the course of the 
engagement near Gesnes, France, on October 10, 1918. When on a liaison 
patrol with Corpl. Carl G. Theobald he attacked and captured a hostile 
machine gun nest and brought his prisoners from No Man's Land to his 
own line under machine gun fire. (With Gilt Star.) 

Richard L. Smith, 1st sergeant, Company "C," 361st Infantry. For 
extraordinary heroism under fire near Wortegem, Belgium, on November 
2, 1918. During this action, at a time when a platoon commander had 
been mortally wounded, he reorganized the platoon and led it forward in 
spite of machine gun and artillery fire. (With Gilt Star.) 

Frank C. Emow, sergeant, Company "C," 361st Infantry. For excep- 
tional services under fire near Audenarde, Belgium, on November 2, 1918. 
During these engagements he showed much ability and bravery in reorganiz- 
ing a platoon and in leading its advance under a heavy machine gun fire 
and violent bombardment. (With Silver Star.) 

John A. Boyd, corporal, Company "C," 361st Infantry. He distinguished 
himself in the engagement near Wortegem (Belgium), on November 1, 
1918, where he showed great personal bravery in organizing and main- 
taining liaison with the neighboring elements in the front line in spite of a 
heavy machine gun fire and of direct artillery fire. (With Bronze Star.) 

William Kouts, sergeant, Company "D," 361st Infantry. For great 
courage displayed at Gesnes, France, on September 26, 1918. Sergt. Kouts 
accompanied by but two men captured 26 prisoners and 3 enemy machine 
guns. (With Gilt Star.) 

Hjalmar Froman, corporal, Company "D," 361st Infantry. A soldier of 
admirable courage. Under a heavy artillery fire he left his shelter volun- 
tarily and without hesitation and disregarding the danger gave first aid 
to a wounded man whom he carried to the shelter. (With Gilt Star.) 

Joseph A. Wallace (2257240), corporal, Company "D," 361st Infantry. A 
soldier of admirable courage. Seeing his company under a violent artillery 
fire he repeatedly and voluntarily left his shelter without hesitation, and 
gave first aid to wounded comrades whom he had carried to the shelter. 
(With Gilt Star.) 

Victor A. Carley, private, Company "D," 361st Infantry, 91st Division. 
A soldier of admirable courage. He left his shelter voluntarily and with- 
out hesitation under a violent artillery fire and forgetful of the danger he 
gave first aid to a wounded man and carried him to safety. (With Gilt Star.) 

Raymond J. Hague, 1st sergeant, Company "E," 361st Infantry. For 
exceptional bravery near Wortegem, Belgium, November 1, 1918. During 

212 



these engagements he showed great valor and much ability in organizing 
the position of a platoon under violent machine gun fire and an intense 
bombardment. (With Gilt Star.) 

Harmon T. Draney, private 1st class, Company "E," 361st Infantry (de- 
ceased). He performed most admirably the duties of a liaison agent during 
the course of the engagements of October 30 to November 4, 1918, between 
the Lys and the Escaut. He was killed in carrying out a mission entrusted 
to him. (With Bronze Star.) 

Everette H. Little, private 1st class, Company "F," 361st Infantry. For 
exceptional services under fire near Audenarde, Belgium, November 2, 
1918. During these engagements he performed his duties as a liaison agent 
with much courage and ability under violent machine gun and artillery fire. 
(With Bronze Star.) 

Thomas Stave, private 1st class, Company "F," 361st Infantry. He 
distinguished himself in the engagements near Wortegem and Audenarde, 
Belgium, between the 1st and 3rd of November, 1918, by discharging his 
duties as a runner with courage and success under a violent artillery and 
machine gun fire. (With Bronze Star.) 

Enos Subia, sergeant, Company "G," 361st Infantry. For exceptional 
bravery under fire near Wortegem, Belgium, October 31, 1918. During 
these engagements, although wounded, he continued in command of his 
platoon under a heavy barrage fire. (With Gilt Star.) 

Royal Oatfield, corporal, Company "G," 361st Infantry. For excep- 
tional services under fire near Audenarde, Belgium, November 1, 1918. 
During this action, although wounded, he remained at the head of his patrol, 
located a machine gun and furnished useful information to his company 
commander. (With Gilt Star.) 

Richard M. Kirk, sergeant, Company "H," 361st American Regiment 
of Infantry. Sergeant Kirk especially distinguished himself November 1, 
1918, as a leader of a patrol into Audenarde while it was still occupied 
by detachments of the enemy. He gained entrance into a house from 
which a machine gun held the street under its enfilading fire and he thus 
captured the gun crew. (Corps citation in Order 13.312 "D" of the 
General Headquarters of the French Armies of the East, February 7, 1919 — 
With Gilt Star.) 

Allen L. Passenger, sergeant, Company "H," 361st Infantry. For his 
brilliant display of bravery under fire November 1, 1918, near Wortegem, 
Belgium, when his platoon had been separated from the rest of his unit by 
violent machine gun fire. Sergt. Passenger with much ability and bravery, 
led his platoon through the barrage and thus aided the advance of his 
entire company. (With Palm.) 

Patrick J. Sparrow, sergeant, Company "H," 361st Infantry. For ex- 
ceptional services under fire near Audenarde, Belgium, November 1, 1918. 
During this action he showed great personal courage and excellent aptitude 
for command in leading his platoon through a violent barrage. (With 
Bronze Star.) 

John W. Cramer, corporal, Company "H," 361st American Regiment 
of Infantry. A corporal of great bravery. On November 1, 1918, he took 

213 



part in a patrol which encountered several machine gun emplacements 
where the guns held the streets of the City of Audenarde under their en- 
filading fire. Slipping from house to house, he succeeded in entering one 
of these machine gun positions and there capturing a machine gun and its 
crew. (Corps citation in Order No. 13.312 "D" of the General Headquarters 
of the French Armies of the East, February 7, 1919— With Gilt Star.) 

Thomas R. Burns, sergeant, Company "I," 361st Infantry. For excep- 
tional service under fire near Audenarde, Belgium, November 2, 1918. 
During these engagements he displayed much ability and bravery in per- 
forming his functions as a patrol leader under direct artillery fire. (With 
Bronze Star.) 

Marshall V. Gano, sergeant, Company "I," 361st Infantry. For excep- 
tional services under fire near Audenarde, Belgium, November 2, 1918. 
During these engagements he showed much courage and devotion in keep- 
ing his unit supplied with food under a violent bombardment. (With Bronze 
Star.) 

Floyd T. Williams, sergeant, Company "I," 361st Infantry. For excep- 
tional services under fire near Audenarde, Belgium, November 2, 1918. 
During this action he gave proof of great bravery and he showed great com- 
petency in keeping his company supplied with food while under a constant 
bombardment. (With Bronze Star.) 

Roy Wright, sergeant, Company "I," 361st Infantry. He distinguished 
himself in the engagement near Audenarde, Belgium, November 2, 1918, 
by organizing a close liaison service between his unit and the neighboring 
unit of the 37th Division under the most difficult and dangerous circum- 
stances. (With Bronze Star.) 

Berthel L. Nelson, corporal, Company "I," 361st Infantry. For excep- 
tional services near Audenarde, Belgium, November 4, 1918. During his 
engagement, he showed much courage and ability as a picked marksman 
operating against the enemy machine gunners and sharpshooters. (With 
Bronze Star.) 

Wallace Smith (2294204), private, Company "I," 361st Infantry. A 
soldier of admirable courage. Twice wounded himself, he remained in 
the first line under a violent fire and helped to bring back within our lines 
wounded men who would have fallen into the hands of the enemy. (With 
Gilt Star.) 

Howard M. Wight (2294304), private, Company "I," 361st Infantry. A 
soldier of admirable courage. When his battalion withdrew after having 
made an attack, Pvt. Wight instead of falling back, gathered together several 
men, and under a violent fire, saved 15 wounded men who would have fallen 
into the hands of the enemy. He placed the wounded men in a somewhat 
sheltered spot and remained the entire night administering first aid in spite 
of his exhaustion after three days of battle. (With Gilt Star.) 

Nat R. Smith (2258138), sergeant, Company "K," 361st Infantry. A 
non-commissioned officer of admirable courage. He successfully led his 
patrol beyond the fixed objective, in the face of a violent machine gun fire, 
in order better to reconnoiter the area; and, although severely wounded he 
remained in command of his patrol. (With Gilt Star.) 

214 



Owen B. Larken, private 1st class, Company "K," 361st Infantry. Near 
Wortegem, Belgium, from the 1st to 4th of November, 1918, he courage- 
ously and constantly for 12 hours performed the functions of a battalion 
liaison agent. (With Bronze Star.) 

James E. Poole, 1st sergeant, Company "L," 361st Infantry. For his 
brilliant display of bravery under fire, November 2, 1918, near Audenarde, 
Belgium. Although wounded he remained at his post and helped to direct 
his company through the city which was under violent bombardment. (With 
Gilt Star.) 

John F. Morton, mess sergeant, Company "L," 361st Infantry. He dis- 
tinguished himself near Audenarde, Belgium, November 2, 1918, by suc- 
ceeding in keeping his company supplied with warm food in spite of a 
violent bombardment. (With Bronze Star.) 

Oscar Wistrand, private, Company "L," 361st Infantry. For exceptional 
bravery under fire near Audenarde, Belgium, November 4, 1918. Acting 
as a scout he established an observation post on the bank of the Escaut and 
with his rifle temporarily silenced the fire of the enemy, thus permitting 
other men to take similar positions. (With Gilt Star.) 

Boss Burrell, corporal, Company "M," 361st Infantry. He distinguished 
himself in the engagement near Bevere, Belgium, in November, 1918, where 
he displayed great courage in taking 3 German prisoners in the village. 
(With Bronze Star.) 

John William Young, bugler, Company "M," 361st Infantry. For ex- 
ceptional services during the engagements around Audenarde, Belgium, of 
the 1st to 4th of November, 1918. During the attack and occupation of 
that city, he rendered excellent and most important services as a company 
runner, remaining 72 hours without sleep. (With Silver Star.) 

David W. Bryant, battalion sergeant major, Headquarters Company, 
361st Infantry. For exceptional services at Bevere, Belgium, on November 
1, 1918. The liaison officer having been wounded during the engagement, 
Sergt.-Maj. Bryant in addition to his own duties assumed the duties of the 
liaison officer and by his indefatigable energy kept the detachment up to the 
demands of its task throughout a period of 48 hours. (With Bronze Star.) 

Howard Craven, battalion sergeant-major (1st Bn.), Headquarters Com- 
pany, 361st Infantry. A non-commissioned officer of admirable courage. 
Although wounded, he remained at his post and during a bombardment of 
exceptional violence directed against the battalion P. C. he reorganized 
and kept in hand the liaison detachment which was indispensable to success. 
At all times he exposed himself to danger and rendered signal services. 
(With Gilt Star.) 

Ralph Ethier, sergeant, Headquarters Company, 361st Infantry, 91st 
Division. A non-commissioned officer of admirable courage. Having been 
placed in command of the liaison detachment attached to the attacking bat- 
talion, he displayed remarkable coolness and disregard of danger in pushing 
the battalion telephone line through an intense fire up to the ridge which 
was being attacked and in establishing liaison with the regimental head- 
quarters. (With Gilt Star.) 

215 



Michael Carter, corporal, Headquarters Company, 361st Infantry, 91st 
Division. A soldier of admirable courage. Having been attached to the 
liaison detachment of the attacking battalion he several times repaired the 
telephone lines under intense fire, constantly giving proof of exceptional 
coolness and courage and contributed toward the maintenance of com- 
munication between the regiment and battalion P. C's. (With Gilt Star.) 

James M. Herron, Private, Headquarters Company, 361st American Regi- 
ment of Infantry. Under heavy shell fire he assured the serviceability of 
the telephone lines during the advance from the Lys to the Escaut from 
October 30th to November 4th, 1918. (Regimental citation in Order No. 
13.314 "D" of the General Headquarters for the French Army of the East, 
February 8, 1919— With Bronze Star.) 

Harold Martin, private 1st class, Machine Gun Company, 361st Infantry. 
For exceptional services under fire near Audenarde, Belgium, from the 
1st to 4th of November, 1918. During these engagements he showed much 
ability and bravery as a liaison agent. (With Bronze Star.) 

Elmer E. Sharp, private 1st class, Machine Gun Company, 361st Infantry. 
For exceptional services under fire, near Audenarde, Belgium, November 
2, 1918. During these engagements he performed the functions of a liaison 
agent under a violent bombardment with much ability and courage. (With 
Bronze Star.) 

BELGIAN CROIX DE GUERRE 

The following awards of this decoration, all made on December 17, 
1918, are accompanied by identical individual citations in the following 
form: 

"For extraordinary heroism and gallantry in action during the advance 
from the LYS to beyond the SCHELDT River, in the vicinity of AUDEN- 
ARDE, Belgium, October 31 to November 3, 1918." 

Major Ora Goodpaster, Commanding 2nd Battalion. 

Major Friend S. Dickinson, Commanding 3rd Battalion. 

Captain Harold H. Burton, Regimental Operations Officer. 

Captain Fred B. Coleman, M. C, serving with 3rd Battalion. 

1st Lieutenant Charles H. Hudelson, commanding Company "C." 

1st Lieutenant David A. Bissett, commanding Company "I." 

Corporal William H. Annette, Company "C." 

Private 1st Class Fred A. L. Pearson, Company "C." 

Corporal Roy A. Thompson, Company "G." 

Private 1st Class Karl Snyder, Company "H." 

Sergeant George A. McDonald, Company "I." 

Sergeant John Schwartz, Company "L." 

Private 1st Class John G. Linse, Company "L." 

Sergeant Millard J. Easter, Company "M." 

Sergeant Roy W. Haysley, Company "M." 

Corporal Earl F. Hughes, Machine Gun Company. 

Corporal Edward F. Seaman, Headquarters Company. 

216 



The following additional awards of the Belgian Croix de Guerre are 
accompanied by special individual citations as quoted separately in each case: 

Sergeant Grafton C. Pearce, Company "E," 361st Infantry. For excep- 
tional bravery in action during the advance on AUDENARDE, Belgium, 
October 31 to November 4, 1918. Sergt. Pearce organized and personally 
led reconnoitering patrols into AUDENARDE while the town was being 
heavily shelled by the enemy and while enemy snipers were active, gaining 
much valuable information. 

Private 1st Class Earl A. Murray, Company "E," 361st Infantry. For 
bravery in action during the advance on AUDENARDE, Belgium, October 
31 to November 4, 1918. As a runner, he was frequently required to 
deliver messages through heavy enemy shell fire and was absolutely 
fearless in the performance of this duty. 

Private Jesse A. Newlun, Company "H," 361st Infantry. For con- 
spicuous bravery at AUDENARDE, Belgium, November 1, 1918. Pvt. 
Newlun, in charge of a patrol, entered AUDENARDE and gained valuable 
information as to location of spies. He located and captured a German 
sniper and his wife who was with him as a spy after two civilians who had 
volunteered to guide him had been killed. 

Private 1st Class Paul F. Rein, Company "M," 361st Infantry. For 
extraordinary heroism in action during the YPRES-LYS offensive, October 
31 to November 11, 1918. Pvt. Rein carried messages under very heavy 
shelling from his outpost to the Company Post of Command. This caused 
him to be under direct observation of the enemy and subjected him to 
sniper fire. 

Battalion Sergeant-Major David W. Bryant, Headquarters Company, 
361st Infantry. For exceptional coolness in action in moving the battalion 
command group forward during the advance on AUDENARDE, Belgium, 
November 1, 1918. In the absence of officers, who were working in the 
front line or had become casualties, Sergt-Maj. Bryant took charge of the 
Headquarters Group, led it through shell fire and with good judgment 
selected and established the new post of command. 

Private Mathew L. Eckert, Medical Detachment, 361st Infantry. For 
extraordinary heroism under terrific shell fire on the night of November 
3, 1918, at AUDENARDE, Belgium, where he established and maintained a 
first-aid station, unassisted. 

U. S. ARMY MERITORIOUS CITATION CERTIFICATES 
(Without Decorations) 

After demobilization of the regiment, General John J. Pershing, as 
Commander-in-Chief of the American Expeditionary Forces, issued United 
States Army Citation Certificates to the members of the regiment listed 
below. These citations were not published in general orders and were not 
accompanied by the award of any decorations but evidently were based upon 

217 



certain recommendations which had been submitted by Colonel Davis in 
October, 1918. 

Harold H. Burton, Captain, 361st Infantry. For exceptionally meritorious 
and conspicuous services during the Argonne Offensive. 

Fred L. Brace, 1st Lieutenant, 361st Infantry. For exceptionally meri- 
torious and conspicuous services near Eclisfontaine, France, September 26- 
October 4, 1918. 

Fred B. Coleman, 1st Lieutenant, 361st Infantry. For exceptionally 
meritorious and conspicuous services during the Meuse Argonne Offensive. 

Edward A. Valentine, 2nd Lieutenant, 361st Infantry. For exceptionally 
meritorious and conspicuous services during the Argonne Offensive. 

Ernest K. Murray, 2nd Lieutenant, 361st Infantry. For exceptionally 
meritorious and conspicuous services during the Argonne Offensive. 

Joseph T. Longfellow, Color Sergt. Hdqrs. Co., 361st Infantry. For ex- 
ceptionally meritorious and conspicuous services during the Argonne 
Offensive. 

Charles W. Hudson, Corpl., Hdqrs. Co., 361st Infantry. For exception- 
ally meritorious and conspicuous services during the Argonne Offensive. 

DIVISIONAL CITATIONS IN GENERAL ORDERS 

(With Silver Stars) 

The following men were cited in Division General Orders as quoted 
below, the wording of the general citation at the head of the list was in each 
case almost identical in form, the only changes being purely formal (such 
as to insert a list of the regiments, etc., which had representatives named in 
that particular General Order instead of referring to the men, as is done 
below, merely as members of the division.) The general citation here quoted 
is in the exact wording used in G. O. 6, Hq. 91st Div. 27 January, 1919: 

"The following officers and enlisted men of this division having been 
recommended by their superior officers for citation in orders announcing 
exceptional efficiency and fidelity in discharging their duties under fire, and 
such recommendations having been approved by the commanding officer of 
their respective organizations, their names are placed on the Honor Roll of 
the 91st Division as members thereof, whose example can well be imitated 
by officers and enlisted men of the division. Their real reward consists of 
a realization by them that they have conscientiously discharged the duties 
imposed upon them. Publication of this order is not intended as a reward 
for them but as a stimulus to other officers and men of the division to 
imitate their conduct: 

MEUSE-ARGONNE 

G. O. 35, Sec. I. Hq. 91st Div. A. E. F. October 30, 1918 

Roscoe V. F. Brightbill, 1st Lieutenant, Company "A," Oct. 9. Efficient 
leading of company under fire. 

G. B. Appelman, 1st Lieutenant, Company "B," Oct. 9. Efficiency and 
coolness in handling company under fire. 

218 



H. P. Hoffman, 1st Lieutenant, Company "E," Sept. 26-Oct. 4. Effi- 
ciency in handling company under fire. 

Frederick T. Fairchild, 1st Lieutenant, Company "G," Sept. 26-Oct. 12. 
Efficient and courageous performance of duty under fire. 

Walter F. Davis, 1st Lieutenant, Company "G," Sept. 26-Oct. 12. Effi- 
cient and courageous performance of duty under fire. 

Uil Lane, 2nd Lieutenant, Company "G," Sept. 26-Oct. 12. Efficient 
and courageous performance of duty under fire. 

B. M. Berto, Sergeant, Headquarters Company, Oct. 1-3. Repaired and 
maintained lines under fire. 

John Brackett, Sergeant, Headquarters Company, Oct. 1-3. Repaired and 
maintained lines under fire. 

C. V. Smith, Sergeant, Headquarters Company, Oct. 1-3. Repaired and 
maintained lines under fire. 

Ralph Ethier, Sergeant, Headquarters Company, Oct. 1-3. Repaired and 
maintained lines under fire. 

Michael Carter, Corporal, Headquarters Company, Oct. 1-3. Repaired 
and maintained lines under fire. 

Iver Syverstad, Corporal, Headquarters Company, Oct. 1-3. Repaired 
and maintained lines under fire. 

W. Everitt, Corporal, Headquarters Company, Oct. 1-3. Repaired and 
maintained lines under fire. 

J. E. Bryant, Corporal, Headquarters Company, Oct. 1-3. Repaired and 
maintained lines under fire. 

S. W. Christy, Corporal, Headquarters Company, Oct. 1-3. Repaired 
and maintained lines under fire. 

Frank Ward, Corporal, Headquarters Company, Sept. 26-Oct. 4. Re- 
paired and maintained lines under fire. 

James Erickson, Corporal, Headquarters Company, Sept. 26-Oct. 4. 
Repaired and maintained lines under fire. 

E. G. Woodworth, Private 1st Class, Headquarters Company, Oct. 1-3. 
Repaired and maintained lines under fire. 

K. R. Mueller, Private 1st Class, Headquarters Company, Oct. 1-3. 
Repaired and maintained lines under fire. 

O. Angoli, Jr., Private 1st Class, Headquarters Company, Oct. 1-3. Re- 
paired and maintained lines under fire. 

H. Eklund, Private 1st Class, Headquarters Company, Oct. 1-3. Re- 
paired and maintained lines under fire. 

F. Phillips, Private 1st Class, Headquarters Company, Oct. 1-3. Re- 
paired and maintained lines under fire. 

H. Pounds, Private 1st Class, Headquarters Company, Oct. 1-3. Re- 
paired and maintained lines under fire. 

219 



H. W. Moellering, Private 1st Class, Headquarters Company, Oct. 1-3. 
Repaired and maintained lines under fire. 

G. R. Pickens, Private, Headquarters Company, Oct. 1-3. Repaired 
and maintained lines under fire. 

W. A. Thomas, Private, Headquarters Company, Oct. 1-3. Repaired 
and maintained lines under fire. 

E. L. Morton, Private, Headquarters Company, Oct. 1-3. Repaired and 
maintained lines under fire. 

Lief Erickson, Private, Headquarters Company, Oct. 1-3. Repaired and 
maintained lines under fire. 

H. A. Adler, Private, Headquarters Company, Oct. 1-3. Repaired and 
maintained lines under fire. 

C. R. Caverley, Private, Headquarters Company, Oct. 1-3. Repaired 
and maintained lines under fire. 

E. J. Frasier, Private, Headquarters Company, Oct. 1-3. Repaired and 
maintained lines under fire. 

B. Casteel, Private, Headquarters Company, Oct. 1-3. Repaired and 
maintained lines under fire. 

E. H. Stone, Private, Headquarters Company, Oct. 1-3. Repaired and 
maintained lines under fire. 

G. W. Krause, Private, Headquarters Company, Oct. 1-3. Repaired and 
maintained lines under fire. 

A. Pugmire, Private, Headquarters Company, Oct. 1-3 . Repaired and 
maintained lines under fire. 

Isaac E. Locke, Private, Headquarters Company, Sept. 30-Oct. 3. Per- 
formed duty as member of Regimental Liaison Section under dangerous and 
trying conditions. 

LeRoy Templeton, Private, Headquarters Company, Sept. 26-Oct. 4. 
Efficient performance of duty as runner during heavy shell fire. 

Roy E. Bozarth, Private, Headquarters Company, Sept. 26-Oct. 4. Re- 
paired and maintained lines under fire. 

Harry Arthur, Private, Company "A," Sept. 30-Oct. 3. Performed duty 
as member of Regimental Liaison Section under dangerous and trying 
conditions. 

Ernest W. Strickler, Private, Company "A," Sept. 30-Oct. 3. Performed 
duty as member of Regimental Liaison Section under dangerous and trying 
conditions. 

N. B. Wilson, Private, Company "A," Sept. 26-Oct. 4. Efficient per- 
formance of duty as runner during heavy shell fire. 

Reginald A. Perks, Private, "Company "A," Sept. 26-Oct. 4. Efficient 
performance of duty as runner during heavy shell fire. 

Geo. F. Maguire, Private 1st Class, Company "B," Sept. 30-Oct. 3. 
Performed duty as member of Regimental Liaison Section under dangerous 
and trying conditions. 

220 



John Reinerts, Private 1st Class, Company "B," Sept. 26-Oct. 4. Effi- 
cient performance of duty as runner during heavy shell fire. 

Albert W. Prinzing, Private, Company "B," Sept. 30-Oct. 3. Performed 
duty as member of Regimental Liaison Section under dangerous and trying 
conditions. 

Frank S. Hart, Private, Company "B," Sept. 30-Oct. 3. Performed 
duty as member of Regimental Liaison Section under dangerous and trying 
conditions. 

Frank Gendrow, Private, Company "B," Sept. 26-Oct. 4. Efficient 
performance of duty as runner during heavy shell fire. 

Lloyd C. Rapp, Corporal, Company "C," Sept. 30-Oct. 3. Performed 
duty as member of Regimental Liaison Section under dangerous and trying 
conditions. 

Louis Offield, Private 1st Class, Company "C," Sept. 26-Oct. 4. Effi- 
cient performance of duty as runner during heavy shell fire. 

James H. Harris, Private, Company "C," Sept. 30-Oct. 3. Performed 
duty as member of Regimental Liaison Section under dangerous and trying 
conditions. 

Wilbur J. Riddell, Private 1st Class, Company "D," Sept. 26-Oct. 4. 
Efficient performance of duty as runner during heavy shell fire. 

Clarence P. Brownfield, Private, Company "D," Sept. 30-Oct. 3. Per- 
formed duty as member of Regimental Liaison Section under dangerous 
and trying conditions. 

Louis Stellmach, Private, Company "E," Sept. 30-Oct. 3. Performed 
duty as member of Regimental Liaison Section under dangerous and trying 
conditions. 

A. J. Sambrakes, Private, Company "E," Sept. 26-Oct. 4. Efficient 
performance of duties under shell fire. 

Thomas W. Peters, Private, Company "E," Sept. 26-Oct. 4. Marked 
bravery in efficient performance of duty as scout. 

Andrew P. Nyborg, Private, Company "E," Sept. 26-Oct. 4. Marked 
bravery in efficient performance of duty as scout. 

Thomas M. Strachan, 1st Sergeant, Company "F," Sept. 26-Oct. 4. Effi- 
cient and courageous performance of duty under fire. 

Nels E. Saari, Sergeant, Company "F," Sept. 26-Oct. 4. Efficient and 
courageous performance of duty under fire. 

Samuel A. Davis, Sergeant, Company "F," Sept. 26-Oct. 4. Efficient 
and courageous performance of duty under fire. 

William H. Butterworth, Sergeant, Company "F," Sept. 26-Oct. 4. Effi- 
cient and courageous performance of duty under fire. 

Neal D. Stoddard, Sergeant, Company "F," Sept. 26-Oct. 4. Efficient 
and courageous performance of duty under fire. 

Samuel Lezak, Sergeant, Company "F," Sept. 26-Oct. 4. Efficient and 
courageous performance of duty under fire. 

221 



Harry P. Stanton, Sergeant, Company "F," Sept. 26-Oct. 4. Efficient 
and courageous performance of duty under fire. 

Frank J. Hamelius, Corporal, Company "F," Sept. 26-Oct. 4. Efficient 
and courageous performance of duty under fire. 

John C. Cudd, Corporal, Company "F," Sept. 26-Oct. 4. Efficient and 
courageous performance of duty under fire. 

Cecil A. Mohr, Corporal, Company "F," Sept. 26-Oct. 4. Efficient and 
courageous performance of duty under fire. 

Thadeus A. Swartz, Corporal, Company "F," Sept. 26-Oct. 4. Efficient 
and courageous performance of duty under fire. 

Otto F. Boye, Corporal, Company "F," Sept. 26-Oct. 4. Efficient and 
courageous performance of duty under fire. 

Wm. Waterstradt, Private 1st Class, Company "F," Sept. 30-Oct. 3. Per- 
formed duty as member of Regimental Liaison Section under dangerous 
and trying conditions. 

William Galbreath, Private 1st Class, Company "F," Sept. 26-Oct. 4. 
Efficient and courageous performance of duty under fire. 

Robert Shields, Private 1st Class, Company "F," Sept. 26-Oct. 4. Effi- 
cient and courageous performance of duty under fire. 

Arthur N. Farnham, Private 1st Class, Company "F," Sept. 26-Oct. 4. 
Efficient and courageous performance of duty under fire. 

W. E. Stevens, Private, Company "F," Sept. 26-Oct. 4. Efficient and 
courageous performance of duty under fire. 

Clarence L. Jones, Private, Company "F," Sept. 26-Oct. 4. Efficient 
and courageous performance of duty under fire. 

Everett P. Ritchie, Private, Company "F," Sept. 26-Oct. 4. Efficient and 
courageous performance of duty under fire. 

Orlando B. Hardy, 1st Sergeant, Company "G," Sept. 26-Oct. 12. Effi- 
cient and courageous performance of duty under fire. 

Thomas Greenlees, Sergeant, Company "G," Sept. 26-Oct. 12. Efficient 
and courageous performance of duty under fire. 

William L. Jordan, Sergeant, Company "G," Sept. 26-Oct. 12. Efficient 
and courageous performance of duty under fire. 

Enos Subia, Sergeant, Company "G," Sept. 26-Oct. 12. Efficient and 
courageous performance of duty under fire. 

John B. Calmus, Sergeant, Company "G," Sept. 26-Oct. 12. Efficient 
and courageous performance of duty under fire. 

Roy A. Scott, Corporal, Company "G," Sept. 26-Oct. 12. Efficient and 
courageous performance of duty under fire. 

William A. Allan, Mechanic, Company "G," Sept. 26-Oct. 12. Efficient 
and courageous performance of duty under fire. 

Cecil H. Draper, Bugler, Company "G," Sept. 26-Oct. 12. Efficient and 
courageous performance of duty under fire. 

222 



Patrick M. Hennessy, Bugler, Company "G," Sept. 26-Oct. 12. Efficient 
and courageous performance of duty under fire. 

Edward Sagen, Private 1st Class, Company "G," Sept. 26-Oct. 12. Effi- 
cient and courageous performance of duty under fire. 

Oscar C. Martin, Private 1st Class, Company "G," Sept. 26-Oct. 12. Effi- 
cient and courageous performance of duty under fire. 

Raymond \V. Miller, Private, Company "G," Sept. 30-Oct. 3. Performed 
duty as member of Regimental Liaison Section under dangerous and trying 
conditions. 

R. A. Thompson, Private, Company "G," Sept. 26-Oct. 4. Efficient per- 
formance of duties under shell fire. 

Thomas K. Thomsen, Private, Company "G," Sept. 26-Oct. 12. Efficient 
and courageous performance of duty under fire. 

Raymond E. Coulter, Private, Company "G," Sept. 26-Oct. 12. Efficient 
and courageous performance of duty under fire. 

Rudolph W. Soule, Private, Company "G," Sept. 26-Oct. 12. Efficient 
and courageous performance of duty under fire. 

Pete Carnese, Private, Company "G," Sept. 26-Oct. 12. Efficient and 
courageous performance of duty under fire. 

Albert Erickson, Private, Company "G," Sept. 26-Oct. 12. Efficient and 
courageous performance of duty under fire. 

Lester L. Fletcher, Private, Company "G," Sept. 26-Oct. 12. Efficient 
and courageous performance of duty under fire. 

William B. Tipps, Private, Company "G," Sept. 26-Oct. 12. Efficient 
and courageous performance of duty under fire. 

Arthur Broughton, Private, Company "G," Sept. 26-Oct. 12. Efficient 
and courageous performance of duty under fire. 

Roy A. Thompson, Private, Company "G," Sept. 26-Oct. 12. Efficient 
and courageous performance of duty under fire. 

Eugene C. Tait, Private, Company "G," Sept. 26-Oct. 12. Efficient and 
courageous performance of duty under fire. 

Joseph H. Chrast, Private, Company "G," Sept. 26-Oct. 12. Efficient 
and courageous performance of duty under fire. 

Nick C. Cederson, Private, Company "G," Sept. 26-Oct. 12. Efficient 
and courageous performance of duty under fire. 

Byron A. Howard, Corporal, Company "H," Oct. 7-9. Efficient per- 
formance of duty under fire. 

Paul N. Cozad, Private 1st Class, Company "H," Oct. 3-4. Carried 
messages between front lines and Regimental P. C. during severe barrage. 

Edward F. Weselch, Private, Company "H," Sept. 30-Oct. 3. Performed 
duty as member of Regimental Liaison Section under dangerous and trying 
conditions. 

George S. Wardell, Private, Company "H," Oct. 7-9. Efficient per- 
formance of duty under fire. 

223 



Samuel J. Heskings, Private, Company "I," Sept. 30-Oct. 3. Performed 
duty as member of Regimental Liaison Section under dangerous and trying 
conditions. 

Ralph Crossman, Sergeant, Company "K," Sept. 26-Oct. 4. Faithful 
discharge of duties under heavy shell fire. 

Charles L. Simonson, Sergeant, Company "K," Sept. 26-Oct. 12. Ex- 
ceptionally courageous and efficient conduct in action. 

John A. Bartruff, Sergeant, Company "K," Sept. 26-Oct. 12. Excep- 
tionally courageous and efficient conduct in action. 

John V. Harrington, Sergeant, Company "K," Sept. 26-Oct. 12. Excep- 
tionally courageous and efficient conduct in action. 

William G. Monoghan, Sergeant, Company "K," Sept. 26-Oct. 12. Ex- 
ceptionally courageous and efficient conduct in action. 

Elbert R. Thurman, Sergeant, Company "K," Sept. 26-Oct. 12. Excep- 
tionally courageous and efficient conduct in action. 

David O. Anderson, Sergeant, Company "K," Sept. 26-Oct. 12. Ex- 
ceptionally courageous and efficient conduct in action. 

Carl B. Clear, Sergeant, Company "K," Sept. 26-Oct. 12. Exceptionally 
courageous and efficient conduct in action. 

Ivan W. Hoyt, Corporal, Company "K," Sept. 26-Oct. 12. Exceptionally 
courageous and efficient conduct in action. 

Mat L. Shadley, Corporal, Company "K," Sept. 26-Oct. 12. Excep- 
tionally courageous and efficient conduct in action. 

Marcus Guirado, Corporal, Company "K," Sept. 26-Oct. 12. Excep- 
tionally courageous and efficient conduct in action. 

Virgil Paxton, Private, Company "K," Sept. 30-Oct. 3. Performed duty 
as member of Regimental Liaison Section under dangerous and trying 
conditions. 

Ira Wills, Private, Company "K," Sept. 30-Oct. 3. Performed duty as 
member of Regimental Liaison Section under dangerous and trying con- 
ditions. 

Hugh Toughill, Private, Company "L," Sept. 30-Oct. 3. Performed duty 
as member of Regimental Liaison Section under dangerous and trying 
conditions. 

Ross Babcock, Private 1st Class, Company "L," Sept. 30-Oct. 3. Per- 
formed duty as member of Regimental Liaison Section under dangerous and 
trying conditions. 

Glenn A. Mertz, Private, Company "L," Sept. 30-Oct. 3. Performed 
duty as member of Regimental Liaison Section under dangerous and trying 
conditions. 

Oliver C. Phillips, Private, Company "L," Sept. 30-Oct. 3. Performed 
duty as member of Regimental Liaison Section under dangerous and trying 
conditions. 

224 



Payton W. Randall, Private, Company "M," Sept. 30-Oct. 3. Performed 
duty as member of Regimental Liaison Section under dangerous and trying 
conditions. 

Harry H. Kulukjien, Private, Company "M," Sept. 26-Oct. 4. Excep- 
tional courage and fidelity in action under fire. 

Rudolph Sommers, Private, Company "M," Sept. 26-Oct. 4. Exceptional 
courage and fidelity in action under fire. 

Otto J. Rohr, Private, Machine Gun Company, Sept. 26-Oct. 4. Efficient 
performance of duty as runner during heavy shell fire. 

G. O 39, Sec. I. Hq. 91st Div. A. E. F. November 12, 1918 

Friend S. Dickinson, Captain, Commanding 3rd Battalion, Nov. 2-3. 
Efficient and courageous handling of his Battalion under fire. 

David A. Bissett, 1st Lieutenant, Company "I," Nov. 1-2. Efficiency in 
handling company under fire. 

James W. Herren, Private, Headquarters Company, Nov. 3. Repaired 
and maintained lines under heavy fire. 

G. O. 45, Sec. I. Hq. 91st Div. A. E. F. November 21, 1918 

Howard D. Hughes, Captain, Company "A," Sept. 26-Oct. 12. Excep- 
tional performance of duty under fire. 

Curtiss R. Gilbert, 1st Lieutenant, Company "F," Sept. 30. Exceptional 
performance of duty under fire. 

Cherrill R. Betterton, 1st Lieutenant, Company "E," Sept. 29. Excep- 
tional performance of duty under fire. 

Uil Lane, 2nd Lieutenant, Company "G," Sept. 29. Exceptional per- 
formance of duty under fire. 

Charley A. Jones, Sergeant, Company "A," Sept. 26-Oct. 12. Efficient 
and courageous performance of duty under fire. 

Albert I. Ossinger, Sergeant, Company "A," Sept. 26-Oct. 4. Efficient 
and courageous performance of duty under fire. 

Charles Smith, Sergeant, Company "A," Oct. 9. Efficient and courage- 
ous performance of duty under fire. 

Theron M. Blakely, Private 1st Class, Company "C," Oct. 2. Efficient 
and courageous performance of duty under fire. 

Raymond R. Rice, Private, Company "C," Sept. 28. Efficient and cour- 
ageous performance of duty under fire. 

William H. East, 1st Sergeant, Company "E," Sept. 26. Efficient and 
courageous performance of duty under fire. 

Clyde C. Boyce, Sergeant, Company "E," Sept. 26. Efficient and cour- 
ageous performance of duty under fire. 

John Melcher, Sergeant, Company "E," Sept. 26. Efficient and cour- 
ageous performance of duty under fire. 

225 



Raymond J. Hague, Sergeant, Company "E," Sept. 26. Efficient and 
courageous performance of duty under fire. 

Peter F. Kerrigan, Corporal, Company "F," Sept. 28. Efficient and 
courageous performance of duty under fire. 

Jack W. Whitney, Private, Company "F," Sept. 28. Efficient and cour- 
ageous performance of duty under fire. 

Peter L. DeRosselli, Private, Company "F," Oct. 4. Efficient and cour- 
ageous performance of duty under fire. 

Earnest W. Ball, Corporal, Company "H," Sept. 29. Efficient and cour- 
courageous performance of duty under fire. 

Jose G. Garcia, Private, Company "H," Sept. 29. Efficient and courage- 
ous performance of duty under fire. 

G. O. 51, Sec. I. Hq. 91st Div. A. E. F. November 29, 1918 

Albert E. Ralstin, Corporal, Machine Gun Company, Sept. 26-Oct. 9. 
Efficient and courageous performance of duty as runner under fire. 

George M. Donovan, Private 1st Class, Machine Gun Company, Sept. 
26-Oct. 9. Efficient and courageous performance of duty as runner under 
fire. 

BELGIUM 
G. O. 52, Sec. II. Hq. 91st Div. A. E. F. November 30, 1918 

Richard L. Smith, Sergeant, Company "C," Oct. 31-Nov. 4. Efficient 
and courageous performance of duty while under heavy fire. 

John A. Boyd, Corporal, Company "C," Oct. 31-Nov. 4. Efficient and 
courageous performance of duty while under heavy fire. 

Joseph F. Desilet, Private 1st Class, Company "C," Oct. 31-Nov. 4. 
Efficient and courageous performance of duty while under heavy fire. 

Francis A. Hartman, Private 1st Class, Company "C," Oct. 31-Nov. 4. 
Efficient and courageous performance of duty while under heavy fire. 

Fred A. L. Pearson, Private 1st Class, Company "C," Oct. 31-Nov 4. 
Efficient and courageous performance of duty while under heavy fire. 

Thomas J. Fox, Sergeant, Company "C," Oct. 31-Nov. 4. Although 
wounded, displayed great coolness and remained at his post directing platoon 
under heavy fire. 

Bruce E. Arnold, Sergeant, Company "C," Oct. 31-Nov. 4. Although 
wounded, displayed great coolness and remained at his post directing platoon 
under heavy fire. 

Otto T. Tomany, Sergeant, Company "C," Oct. 31-Nov. 4. Efficient and 
courageous performance of duty under heavy fire. 

Frank C. Emow, Sergeant, Company "C," Oct. 31-Nov. 4. Efficient and 
courageous performance of duty under heavy fire. 

Milton R. McCafferty, Corporal, Company "C," Oct. 31-Nov. 4. Under 
heavy fire, succeeded in delivering rations to members of his company on 
the front line. 

226 



MEUSE-ARGONNE and BELGIUM 
G. O. 53, Sec. I. Hq. 91st Div. A. E. F. December 2, 1918 

Jean Champion, Captain Attached (French Army), Sept. 26-Nov. 11. 
Exceptionally meritorious and efficient services during the advance to and 
throughout the Argonne Offensive and the two attacks on AUDENARDE. 

Robert Guibert, 1st Lieutenant Attached (French Army), Sept. 26-Oct. 
1 1 . Exceptionally meritorious and efficient service during advance to and 
throughout the Argonne Offensive. 

Emile Auguste Hauger, Adjutant Attached (French Army), Sept. 26- 
Nov. 11. Exceptionally meritorious and efficient performance of duty. 

BELGIUM 

G. O. 55, Sec. I. Hq. 91st Div.. A. E. F. December 4, 1918 

Edmund T. Duvall, 1st Lieutenant, Company "G," Oct. 25-Nov. 4. Cour- 
ageous and efficient leadership under fire. 

Dayton Crandall, Sergeant, Company "G," Nov. 3. Courageous and 
efficient conduct under fire. 

Calvin F. Stouder, Sergeant, Company "G," Nov. 4. Courageous and 
efficient conduct under fire. 

Floyd J. Piper, Corporal, Company "G," Nov. 1. Highly courageous 
and efficient conduct under fire. 

Banner Zeek, Private 1st Class, Company "G," Nov. 4. Courageous and 
efficient performance of duty under fire. 

William C. Whitman, Private 1st Class, Company "G," Oct. 25-Nov. 4. 
Highly efficient and courageous performance of duty under fire. 

Richard L. Smith, Sergeant, Company "C," Nov. 1. Extraordinary hero- 
ism shown in action near AUDENARDE, BELGIUM. 

Thomas J. Fox, Sergeant, Company "C," Nov. 1. Extraordinary heroism 
shown in action near AUDENARDE, BELGIUM. 

Bruce E. Arnold, Sergeant, Company "C," Nov. 1. Extraordinary hero- 
ism shown in action near AUDENARDE, BELGIUM. 

John A. Boyd, Corporal, Company "C," Nov. 1. Extraordinary heroism 
shown in action near AUDENARDE, BELGIUM. 

Joseph F. Desilet, Private 1st Class, Company "C," Nov. 1. Extra- 
ordinary heroism shown in action near AUDENARDE, BELGIUM. 

Francis A. Hartman, Private 1st Class, Company "C," Nov. 1. Extra- 
ordinary heroism shown in action near AUDENARDE, BELGIUM. 

Fred A. L. Pearson, Private 1st Class, Company "C," Nov. 1. Extra- 
ordinary heroism shown in action near AUDENARDE, BELGIUM. 

Arthur N. Swanson, Sergeant, Supply Company, Oct. 31 -Nov. 2. Highly 
efficient performance of duty under fire. 

227 



Arthur L. Johnson, Corporal, Supply Company, Oct. 31. Efficient and 
courageous performance of duty under fire. 

Ernest M. Allen, Corporal, Supply Company, Oct. 31. Efficient and 
courageous performance of duty under fire. 

Axel R. Norgen, Corporal, Supply Company, Oct. 31. Efficient and 
courageous performance of duty under fire. 

Herbert Gilchrist, Wagoner, Supply Company, Oct. 31 -Nov. 2. Highly 
efficient performance of duty under fire. 

Frank A. Pierce, Wagoner, Supply Company, Oct. 31 -Nov. 2. Highly 
efficient performance of duty under fire. 

Harry E. Wood, Private 1st Class, Supply Company, Oct. 31 -Nov. 2. 
Highly efficient performance of duty under fire. 

Frederick W. Graden, Private, Supply Company, Nov. 2. Highly effi- 
cient performance of duty under fire. 

Joseph Tipton, Private, Supply Company, Nov. 2. Highly efficient per- 
formance of duty under fire. 

MEUSE-ARGONNE or BELGIUM 
G. O. 6, Sec. I. Hq. 91st Div. A. E. F. January 27, 1919 

George V. J. Ramsdell, 2nd Lieutenant, Company "L," Sept. 28. For 
exceptional leadership and courage, while under heavy machine gun and 
artillery fire. 

Harmon T. Draney, Private 1st Class, Company "E," October 31-Nov. 4. 
Exceptionally efficient and faithful performance of duty under fire. 

Henry N. Benoit, Private 1st Class, Company "D," Sept. 29. Courage- 
oue and meritorious performance of duty under fire. 

Herbert Sutton, Private, Company "D," Oct. 10. Courageous and merit- 
orious performance of duty under fire. 

Frank J. McDonald, Sergeant, Company "C," Oct. 10. Courageous and 
meritorious performance of duty under fire. 

Carl M. Naseth, Private, Company "B," Sept. 26-Oct. 4. Courageous 
and meritorious performance of duty under fire. 

Martin J. Anderson, Sergeant, Company "B," Sept. 26-Oct. 12. Courage- 
ous and meritorious performance of duty under fire. 

Paul Hill, Mess Sergeant, Company "B," Sept. 26-Oct. 4. Courageous 
and meritorious performance of duty under fire. 

Harry Jacobs, Cook, Company "B," Sept. 26-Oct. 2. Courageous and 
meritorious performance of duty under fire. 

Alexander Rose, Cook, Company "B," Sept. 26-Oct. 2. Courageous and 
meritorious performance of duty under fire. 

Charles R. Moulton, Regimental Sergeant Major, Hq. Company, Sept. 
26-Oct. 12. Exceptionally efficient and faithful performance of duty under 
fire. 

228 



G. O. 25. Hq. 91st Div. Camp Merritt, New Jersey, April 19, 1919. 

(Note: Shortly after the return of the 91st Division to America the 
Commanding General issued Par. I, G. O. 25, Hq. 91st Div. April 19, 1919, 
with the apparent intent of relisting all previous citations in such a manner 
as expressly to confirm the right of the individuals cited to wear a recently 
authorized small silver star on the ribbon of the victory medal or on the 
victory service ribbon for each citation "in orders issued from the head- 
quarters of a force commanded by a general officer for gallantry in action 
not justifying the award of a medal of honor, distinguished service cross or 
distinguished service medal." The citations in this order have not been 
counted as additional citations in the tabulation of awards, but so much of 
the order as relates to citations of members of the 361st Infantry for service 
with that regiment, is here reproduced in full so as to furnish this additional 
evidence of the right of the individuals cited to wear the citation star. 
The reproduction is also in a measure made necessary because there exists 
a noticeable number of variations between the spelling of the names of 
individuals as originally cited and as here cited, and also because, through 
some presumably inadvertant errors, there were omitted from the General 
Order of April 19, 1919, four of the citations of members of the 361st 
Infantry which had appeared in the earlier orders.) 

"HEADQUARTERS 9 1ST DIVISION 

GENERAL ORDERS: Camp Merritt, New Jersey 

No. 25. April 19, 1919. 

I. Pursuant to paragraph 4, General Order No. 48, War Department, 
April 9, 1919, the following officers and men of this division having been 
recommended by their unit commanders for gallantry in action, and placed 
on the Honor Roll of the 91st Division, are announced as entitled to wear 
a silver star for each citation shown below: 

36 1st Infantry 

Name Rank Organization Date Major Opr. 

Brightbill, R. V. F., 1st lieutenant, Company "A," Oct. 9-18. Meuse- 
Argonne. 

Appelman, G. B., 1st lieutenant, Company "B," Oct. 9-18. Meuse- 
Argonne. 

Hoffman, H. P., 1st lieutenant, Company "E," Sept. 26-Oct. 4-18. Meuse- 
Argonne. 

Fairchild, F. T., 1st lieutenant, Company "G," Sept. 26-Oct. 12-18. Meuse- 
Argonne. 

Davis, W. F., 1st lieutenant, Company "G," Sept. 26-Oct. 12-18. Meuse- 
Argonne. 

Lane, Uil, 2nd lieutenant, Company "G," Sept. 26-Oct. 12-18. Meuse- 
Argonne. 

229 



Berto, B. M., sergeant, Headquarters Company, Oct. 1-3-18. Meuse- 
Argonne. 

Brackett, J., sergeant, Headquarters Company, Oct. 1-3-18. Meuse- 
Argonne. 

Smith, C. V., sergeant, Headquarters Company, Oct. 1-3-18. Meuse- 
Argonne. 

Ethier, R., sergeant, Headquarters Company, Oct. 1-3-18. Meuse- 
Argonne. 

Carter, M., corporal, Headquarters Company, Oct. 1-3-18. Meuse- 
Argonne. 

Syverstad, I., corporal, Headquarters Company, Oct. 1-3-18. Meuse- 
Argonne. 

Everitt, W., corporal, Headquarters Company, Oct. 1-3-18. Meuse- 
Argonne. 

Bryant, J. E., corporal, Headquarters Company, Oct. 1-3-18. Meuse- 
Argonne. 

Christy, S. W., corporal, Headquarters Company, Oct. 1-3-18. Meuse- 
Argonne. 

Ward, F., corporal, Headquarters Company, Sept. 26-Oct. 4-18. Meuse- 
Argonne. 

Erickson, J., corporal, Headquarters Company, Sept. 26-Oct. 4-18. Meuse- 
Argonne. 

Woodworth, E. G., private 1st class, Headquarters Company, Oct. l-3rd- 
18. Meuse-Argonne. 

Mueller, K. R., private 1st class, Headquarters Company, Oct. 1 -3rd- 18. 
Meuse-Argonne. 

Anguili, O. Jr., private 1st class, Headquarters Company, Oct. 1 -3rd- 18. 
Meuse-Argonne. 

Eklund, H., private 1st class, Headquarters Company, Oct. 1 -3rd- 18. 
Meuse-Argonne. 

Phillips, F., private 1st class, Headquarters Company, Oct. l-3rd-18. 
Meuse-Argonne. 

Pounds, H., private 1st class, Headquarters Company, Oct. 1 -3rd- 18. 

Moellering, H. W., private 1st class, Headquarters Company, Oct. l-3rd- 
18. Meuse-Argonne. 

Pickens, G. R., private, Headquarters Company, Oct. 1 -3rd- 18. Meuse- 
Argonne. 

Thomas, W. A., private, Headquarters Company, Oct. 1 -3rd- 18. Meuse- 
Argonne. 

Morton, E. L., private, Headquarters Company, Oct. 1 -3rd- 18. Meuse- 
Argonne. 

230 



Erickson, L., private, Headquarters Company, Oct. 1 -3rd- 18. Meuse- 
Argonne. 

Adler, H. A., private, Headquarters Company, Oct. 1 -3rd- 18. Meuse- 
Argonne. 

Caverley, C. R., private, Headquarters Company, Oct. 1 -3rd- 18. Meuse- 
Argonne. 

Frasier, E. J., private, Headquarters Company, Oct. l-3rd-18. Meuse- 
Argonne. 

Casteel, B., private, Headquarters Company, Oct. 1 -3rd- 18. Meuse- 
Argonne. 

Stone, E. H., private, Headquarters Company, Oct. 1 -3rd- 18. Meuse- 
Argonne. 

Crause, G. W., private, Headquarters Company, Oct. 1 -3rd- 18. Meuse- 
Argonne. 

Pugmire, A., private, Headquarters Company, Oct. 1 -3rd- 18. Meuse- 
Argonne. 

Locke, I. E., private, Headquarters Company, Sept. 30-Oct. 3-18. Meuse- 
Argonne. 

Templeton, L. R., private, Headquarters Company, Sept. 26-Oct. 4-18. 
Meuse-Argonne. 

Bozarth, R. E., private, Headquarters Company, Sept. 26-Oct. 4-18. 
Meuse-Argonne. 

Stickler, E. W., private, Company "A," Sept. 30-Oct. 4-18. Meuse- 
Argonne. 

Wilson, M. B., private, Company "A," Sept. 26-Oct. 4-18. Meuse- 
Argonne. 

Perks, R. A., private, Company "A," Sept. 26-Oct. 4-18. Meuse-Argonne. 

Maguire, G. F., private 1st class, Company "B," Sept. 30-Oct. 3-18. 
Meuse-Argonne. 

Reinerts, J., private 1st class, Company "B," Sept. 26-Oct. 4-18. Meuse- 
Argonne. 

Prinzing, A. W., private, Company "B," Sept. 30-Oct. 3-18. Meuse- 
Argonne. 

Hart, F. S., private, Company "B," Sept. 30-Oct. 3-18. Meuse-Argonne. 
Gendrow, F., private, Company "B," Sept. 26-Oct. 4-18. Meuse-Argonne. 
Rapp, E. C, corporal, Company "C," Sept. 30-Oct. 3-18. Meuse-Argonne. 

Of field, L., private 1st class, Company "C," Sept. 26-Oct. 4-18. Meuse- 
Argonne. 

Harris, J. H., private, Company "C," Sept. 30-Oct. 3-18. Meuse- 
Argonne. 

Riddell, W. J., private 1st class, Company "D," Sept. 26-Oct. 4-18. 
Meuse-Argonne. 

231 



Brownfield, C. P., private, Company "D," Sept. 30-Oct. 3-18. Meuse- 
Argonne. 

Stellmach, L., private, Company "E," Sept. 30-Oct. 3-18. Meuse-Argonne. 

Sambrekes, A. J., private, Company "E," Sept. 26-Oct. 4-18. Meuse- 
Argonne. 

Peters, T. W., private, Company "E," Sept. 26-Oct. 4-18. Meuse-Argonne. 

Nyborg, A. P., private, Company "E," Sept. 26-Oct. 4-18. Meuse- 
Argonne. 

Strechan, T. N., 1st sergeant, Company "F," Sept. 26-Oct. 4-18. Meuse- 
Argonne. 

Saari, N. E., sergeant, Company "F," Sept. 26-Oct. 4-18. Meuse-Argonne. 

Davis, S. A., sergeant, Company "F," Sept. 26-Oct. 4-18. Meuse-Argonne. 

Botterworth, W. H., sergeant, Company "F," Sept. 26-Oct. 4-18. Meuse- 
Argonne. 

Stoddard, N. D., sergeant, Company "F," Sept. 26-Oct. 4-18. Meuse- 
Argonne. 

Lozak, S., sergeant, Company "F," Sept. 26-Oct. 4-18. Meuse-Argonne. 

Stanton, H. P., sergeant, Company "F," Sept. 26-Oct. 4-18. Meuse- 
Argonne. 

Hamelius, F. J., corporal, Company "F," Sept. 26-Oct. 4-18. Meuse- 
Argonne. 

Cudd, J. C, corporal, Company "F," Sept. 26-Oct. 4-18. Meuse-Argonne. 

Mohr, C. A., corporal, Company "F," Sept. 26-Oct. 4-18. Meuse-Argonne. 

Swartz, T. A., corporal, Company "F," Sept. 26-Oct. 4-18. Meuse- 
Argonne. 

Boye, O. F., corporal, Company "F," Sept. 26-Oct. 4-18. Meuse-Argonne. 

Waterstradt, W., private 1st class, Company "F," Sept. 30-Oct. 3-18. 
Meuse-Argonne. 

Galbreath, W., private 1st class, Company "F," Sept. 26-Oct. 4-18. Meuse- 
Argonne. 

Shields, R., private 1st class, Company "F," Sept. 26-Oct. 4-18. Meuse- 
Argonne. 

Farnham, A. N., private 1st class, Company "F," Sept. 26-Oct. 4-18. 
Meuse-Argonne. 

Stevens, W. E., private, Company "F," Sept. 26-Oct. 4-18. Meuse- 
Argonne. 

Jones, C. L., private, Company "F," Sept. 26-Oct. 4-18. Meuse-Argonne. 

Ritchie, E. P., private, Company "F," Sept. 26-Oct. 4-18. Meuse-Argonne. 

Hardie, O. B., 1st sergeant, Company "G," Sept. 26-Oct. 12-18. Meuse- 
Argonne. 

232 



Greenlees, T., sergeant, Company "G," Sept. 26-Oct. 12-18. Meuse- 
Argonne. 

Jordan, W. L., sergeant, Company "G," Sept. 26-Oct. 12-18. Meuse- 
Argonne. 

Subia, E., sergeant, Company "G," Sept. 26-Oct. 12-18. Meuse-Argonne. 

Calmus, J. B., sergeant, Company "G," Sept. 26-Oct. 12-18. Meuse- 
Argonne. 

Scott, R. A., corporal, Company "G," Sept. 26-Oct. 12-18. Meuse- 
Argonne. 

Allan, W. A., mechanic, Company "G," Sept. 26-Oct. 12-18. Meuse- 
Argonne. 

Draper, C. H., bugler, Company "G," Sept. 26-Oct. 12-18. Meuse- 
Argonne. 

Hennessy, P. M., bugler, Company "G," Sept. 26-Oct. 12-18. Meuse- 
Argonne. 

Sagen, E., private 1st class, Company "G," Sept. 26-Oct. 12-18. Meuse- 
Argonne. 

Martin, O. C, private 1st class, Company "G," Sept. 26-Oct. 12-18. 
Meuse-Argonne. 

Miller, R. W., private, Company "G," Sept. 30-Oct. 3-18. Meuse- 
Argonne. 

Thompson, R. A., private, Company "G," Sept. 26-Oct. 4-18. Meuse- 
Argonne. 

Thomsen, T. K., private, Company "G," Sept. 26-Oct. 12-18. Meuse- 
Argonne. 

Coulter, R. E., private, Company "G," Sept. 26-Oct. 12-18. Meuse- 
Argonne. 

Soule, R. W., private, Company "G," Sept. 26-Oct. 12-18. Meuse- 
Argonne. 

Carnese, P., private, Company "G," Sept. 26-Oct. 12-18. Meuse-Argonne. 

Erickson, A., private, Company "G," Sept. 26-Oct. 12-18. Meuse- 
Argonne. 

Fletcher, L. L., private, Company "G," Sept. 26-Oct. 12-18. Meuse- 
Argonne. 

Broughton, A., private, Company "G," Sept. 26-Oct. 12-18. Meuse- 
Argonne. 

Tait, E. C, private, Company "G," Sept. 26-Oct. 12-18. Meuse-Argonne. 

Chrase, J. H., private, Company "G," Sept. 26-Oct. 12-18. Meuse- 
Argonne. 

Cederson, N. C, private, Company "G," Sept. 26-Oct. 12-18. Meuse- 
Argonne. 

233 



Howard, B. A., corporal, Company "H," Oct. 7-9-18. Meuse-Argonne. 

Cozad, P. N., private 1st class, Company "H," Oct. 3-4-18. Meuse- 
Argonne. 

Weseloh, E. F., private, Company "H," Sept. 30-Oct. 3-18. Meuse- 
Argonne. 

Wardoll, G. S., private, Company "H," Oct. 7-9-18. Meuse-Argonne. 

Heskings, S. J., private, Company "I," Sept. 30-Oct. 3-18. Meuse- 
Argonne. 

Crossman, R., sergeant, Company "K," Sept. 26-Oct. 4-18. Meuse- 
Argonne. 

Simonson, C. L., sergeant, Company "K," Sept. 26-Oct. 12-18. Meuse- 
Argonne. 

Bartruff, J. A., sergeant, Company "K," Sept. 26-Oct. 12-18. Meuse- 
Argonne. 

Harrington, J. B., sergeant, Company "K," Sept. 26-Oct. 12-18. Meuse- 
Argonne. 

Monoghan, W. G., sergeant, Company "K," Sept. 26-Oct. 12-18. Meuse- 
Argonne. 

Thurman, E. R., sergeant, Company "K," Sept. 26-Oct. 12-18. Meuse- 
Argonne. 

Anderson, D. O., sergeant, Company "K," Sept. 26-Oct. 12-18. Meuse- 
Argonne. 

Clear, C. B., sergeant, Company "K," Sept. 26-Oct. 12-18. Meuse- 
Argonne. 

Hoyt, I. W., corporal, Company "K," Sept. 26-Oct. 12-18. Meuse- 
Argonne. 

Shadley, M. L., corporal, Company "K," Sept. 26-Oct. 12-18. Meuse- 
Argonne. 

Guirado, M., corporal, Company "K," Sept. 30-Oct. 12-18. Meuse- 
Argonne. 

Paxton, V., private, Company "K," Sept. 30-Oct. 3-18. Meuse-Argonne. 

Wills, Ira, private, Company "K," Sept. 30-Oct. 3-18. Meuse-Argonne. 

Toughill, H., private, Company "L," Sept. 30-Oct. 3-18. Meuse-Argonne. 

Babcock, Ross, private 1st class, Company "L," Sept. 30-Oct. 3-18. 
Meuse-Argonne. 

Mertz, G. A., private, Company "L," Sept. 30-Oct. 3-18. Meuse-Argonne. 

Philips, O. C, private, Company "L," Sept. 30-Oct. 3-18. Meuse- 
Argonne. 

Randall, P. W., private, Company "M," Sept. 30-Oct. 3-18. Meuse- 
Argonne. 

234 



Kulukjien, H. H., private, Company "M," Sept. 26-Oct. 4-18. Meuse- 
Argonne. 

Sommers, R., private, Company "M," Sept. 26-Oct. 4-18. Meuse- 
Argonne. 

Rohr, O. J., private, Machine Gun Company, Sept. 26-Oct. 4-18. Meuse- 
Argonne. 

Dickinson, F. S., captain, commanding 3rd Battalion, Nov. 2-3-18. Ypres- 
Lys. 

Bissett, D. A., 1st lieutenant, Company "I," Nov. 1-2-18. Ypres-Lys. 

Herren, J. W., private, Headquarters Company, Nov. 3-18. Ypres-Lys. 

Smith, R. L., sergeant, Company "C," Oct. 31-Nov. 4-18. Ypres-Lys. 

Boyd, J. A., corporal, Company "C," Oct. 31-Nov. 4-18. Ypres-Lys. 

Desilet, J. F., private 1st class, Company "C," Oct. 31-Nov. 4-18. Ypres- 
Lys. 

Hartman, F. A., private 1st class, Company "C," Oct. 31-Nov. 4-18. 
Ypres-Lys. 

Pearson, F. A., private 1st class, Company "C," Oct. 31-Nov. 4-18. 
Ypres-Lys. 

Fox, T. J., sergeant, Company "C," Oct. 31-Nov. 4-18. Ypres-Lys. 

Arnold, B. E., sergeant, Company "C," Oct. 31-Nov. 4-18. Ypres-Lys. 

Tomany, O. T., sergeant, Company "C," Oct. 31-Nov. 4-18. Ypres-Lys. 

Emow, F. C, sergeant, Company "C," Oct. 31-Nov. 4-18. Ypres-Lys. 

McCafferty, M. R., corporal, Company "C," Oct. 31-Nov. 4-18. Ypres- 
Lys. 

Ralstin, A. E., corporal, Machine Gun Company, Sept. 26-Oct. 9-18. 
Meuse-Argonne. 

Donovan, G. M., private 1st class, Machine Gun Company, Sept. 26-Oct. 
9-18. Meuse-Argonne. 

Hughes, H. D., captain, Company "A," Sept. 26-Oct. 12-18. Meuse- 
Argonne. 

Gilbert, C. R., 1st lieutenant, Company "F," Sept. 30-18. Meuse- 
Argonne. 

Betterton, C. R., 1st lieutenant, Company "E," Sept. 29-18. Meuse- 
Argonne. 

Jones, C. A., sergeant, Company "A," Sept. 26-18. Meuse-Argonne. 

Ossinger, A. I., sergeant, Company "A," Sept. 26-18. Meuse-Argonne. 

Smith, C, sergeant, Company "A," Oct. 9-18. Meuse-Argonne. 

Blakely, T. M., private 1st class, Company "C," Oct. 2-18. Meuse- 
Argonne. 

Rice, R. R., private, Company "C," Sept. 28-18. Meuse-Argonne. 

235 



East, W. A., 1st sergeant, Company "E," Sept. 26-18. Meuse-Argonne. 

Boyce, C. C, sergeant, Company "E," Sept. 26-18. Meuse-Argonne. 

Melcher, J., sergeant, Company "E," Sept. 26-18. Meuse-Argonne. 

Hague, R. J., sergeant, Company "E," Sept. 26-18. Meuse-Argonne. 

Kerrigan, T. F., corporal, Company "F," Sept. 28-18. Meuse-Argonne. 

Whitney, J. W., private, Company "F," Sept. 28-18. Meuse-Argonne. 

DeRosselli, P. E., private, Company "F," Oct. 4-18. Meuse-Argonne. 

Ball, E. W., corporal, Company "H," Sept. 29-18. Meuse-Argonne. 

Garcia, J. G., private, Company "H," Sept. 29-18. Meuse-Argonne. 

Duvall, E. P., 1st lieutenant, Company "G," Oct. 25-Nov. 4-18. Ypres- 
Lys. 

Grandall, D., sergeant, Company "G," Nov. 3-18. Ypres-Lys. 

Stouder, C. F., sergeant, Company "G," Nov. 4-18. Ypres-Lys. 

Piper, F. J., corporal, Company "G," Nov. 1-18. Ypres-Lys. 

Zeek, B., private 1st class, Company "G," Nov. 4-18. Ypres-Lys. 

Whitman, W. C, private 1st class, Company "G," Oct. 25-Nov. 4-18. 
Ypres-Lys. 

Smith, R. L., sergeant, Company "C," Nov. 1-18. Ypres-Lys. 

Fox, T. J., sergeant, Company "C," Nov. 1-18. Ypres-Lys. 

Arnold, B. E., sergeant, Company "C," Nov. 1-18. Ypres-Lys. 

Boyd, John A., corporal, Company "C," Nov. 1-18. Ypres-Lys. 

Desilet, J. F., private 1st class, Company "C," Nov. 1-18. Ypres-Lys. 

Hartman, F. A., private 1st class, Company "C," Nov. 1-18. Ypres-Lys. 

Pearson, F. A .L., private 1st class, Company "C," Nov. 1-18. Ypres-Lys. 

Swanson, A. N., sergeant, Supply Company, Oct. 31 -Nov. 2-18. Ypres- 
Lys. 

Johnson, A. L., corporal, Supply Company, Oct. 31-18. Ypres-Lys. 

Allen, E. M., corporal, Supply Company, Oct. 31-18. Ypres-Lys. 

Norgen, A. R., corporal, Supply Company, Oct. 31-18. Ypres-Lys. 

Gilchrist, H., wagoner, Supply Company, Oct. 31-18. Ypres-Lys. 

Pierce, F. A., wagoner, Supply Company, Oct. 31 -Nov. 2-18. Ypres-Lys. 

Wood, H. E., private 1st class, Supply Company, Oct. 31 -Nov. 2-18. 
Ypres-Lys. 

Granden, F. W., private, Supply Company, Nov. 2-18. Ypres-Lys. 

Tipton, J., private, Supply Company, Nov. 2-18. Ypres-Lys. 

Ramsdell, G. V. J., 2nd lieutenant, Company "L," Sept. 28-18. Meuse- 
Argonne. 

236 



Draney, H. P., private 1st class, Company "E," Oct. 31-Nov. 4-18. Ypres- 
Lys. 

Benoit, H. N., private 1st class, Company "D," Sept. 29-18. Meuse- 
Argonne. 

Sutton, H., private, Company "D," Oct. 10-18. Meuse-Argonne. 

McDonald, F. J., sergeant, Company "C," Oct. 10-18. Meuse-Argonne. 

Naseph, C. M., private, Company "B," Sept. 26-Oct. 4-18. Meuse- 
Argonne. 

Anderson, M. J., sergeant, Company "B," Sept. 26-Oct. 12-18. Meuse- 
Argonne. 

Hill, P., mess sergeant, Company "B," Sept. 26-Oct. 4-18. Meuse- 
Argonne. 

Jacobs, H., cook, Company "B," Sept. 26-Oct. 2-18. Meuse-Argonne. 

Rose, A., cook, Company "B," Sept. 20-Oct. 2-18. Meuse-Argonne. 

Moulten, C. R., R. sergeant major, Headquarters Company, Sept. 26- 
Oct. 12-18. Meuse-Argonne. 



FRENCH ARMY ATTACHED 36 1ST INFANTRY 

Champion, Jean, captain, Sept. 26-Oct. 4-18. Meuse-Argonne. 
Guibert, R., 1st lieutenant, Sept. 26-Oct. 4-18. Meuse-Argonne. 
Hauger, E. A., adjutant, Sept. 26-Oct. 4-18. Meuse-Argonne. 
WHJ 

BY COMMAND OF MAJOR GENERAL JOHNSTON: 

OFFICIAL: HENRY C. JEWETT, 

D. J. COMAN Colonel, General Staff, 

(D. J. Coman) Chief of Staff. 

Lieut. Colonel, A. G. 

Adjutant. 

GENERAL DISTRIBUTION. 

REGIMENTAL CITATIONS WITHOUT AWARD OF MEDALS 

Headquarters 361st Infantry, 
American E. F., A. P. O. No. 776, 
11th January 1919. 

GENERAL ORDERS: 
11. 

1. The Commanding Officer desires to express his appreciation of the 
efficient but necessarily unspectacular performance of duties of the Per- 

237 



sonnel Office of the Regiment during active service. These duties have been 
performed in a manner which has contributed, not only to the high reputation 
of the Regiment, but has rendered every possible service to the friends and 
relatives of its wounded, missing and dead. In recognition of this service, 
the following enlisted men, recommended by the Personnel Adjutant, are 
cited in General Orders: 

Sergeant-Major Charles R. Moulton (2257639). 
Sergeant Edward F. Gerlach (2256471). 
Sergeant Rosario J. Niosi (2256355). 
Corporal Frank R. Potter (2258122). 
Courier Weston W. Walrath (2256441). 

BY ORDER OF COLONEL CUMMINGS: 

M. S. Scudder 

Capt. & Adjt. 361st Infantry 
mss-g 



238 





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239 



APPENDIX V 



Roll of Men Who Died on the Field of Honor 



Regimental Field and Staff 

Colonel William D. Davis 
Major Oscar F. Miller 
Major George W. Farwell 
Captain and Adjutant Clarence F. 
Smith 

Company "A" 

Captain Howard D. Hughes 
Private 1st Class Xavier Bennett 
Private Carmelo Bloisi 
Private Ross J. Bracken 
Private Leonard B Cherwinski 
Private 1st Class John V. Com- 
fort 
Corporal Joseph N. Hails 
Private Edward H. Hickey 
Private LeRoy K. Holmes 
Private Edward R. Irons 
Private Worthy Kinnear 
Private Lars L. Larsen 
Private Lawrence E. Larsen 
Private James V. Lynch 
Private Christian J. Lysberg 
Private John Marzinko 
Private Robert B. Nichols 
Private 1st Class Joseph Prono- 

vost 
Private Jacob Rau 
Private Orlin R. Rehbein 
Private Archie L. Smith 
Private Frank T. Stevens 
Private 1st Class Byron O. Street- 
er 

Company "B" 

Private Arthur E. Aldred 

Private 1st Class William F. Bare 

Private Jacob Barger 

Private 1st Class Bendik Bendik- 
sen 

Private 1st Class Fred Daniels 

Private 1st Class Chris M. Even- 
sen 



Bugler Robert E. Helm 
Private Carl J. Hendrickson 
Mess Sergeant Paul Hill 
Sergeant Ernest R. Krentz 
Private Elmer L. Kreuger 
Sergeant Herschel Lancaster 
Mechanic Daniel Larsen 
Private 1st Class Caeson Mc- 
Gregor 
Mechanic McKinley Moe 
Private George B. Morris 
Private Edward J. Morrison 
Sergeant Elmer E. Often 
Private Sidney A. Ostrom 
Private Fred V. Perrine 
Private 1st Class William R. Sands 
Private Frederick C. Schroder 
Private 1st Class John H. Timer- 
man 
Private 1st Class Hugo F. Wallner 
Private 1st Class Henry M. Walsh 
Private John J. Ward 
Private 1st Class Samuel O. 
Woodward 

Company "C" 
2nd Lieutenant John C. Hayes 
Private Ralph V. Baity 
Private John C. Bird 
Private 1st Class Albert L. Bon- 
ham 
Private Ambrose Boulden 
Private Anselm G. Brophy 
Private 1st Class Roy Buckland 
Private Howard E. Brown 
Private Horace C. Bussey 
Private Henry I. Dontanville 
Private Grover C. Eckley 
Private 1st Class Ernest J. Erick- 

son 
Private Fred Gale 
Sergeant John A. Gardner 
Private Roy L. Goodman 
Private William W. Griffith 
Sergeant Alex Henley 



Jk 



240 



Roll of Men Who Died on the Field of Honor 



. 



Company "C" — Cont. 

Private William Hess 

Private 1st Class Vernon L. How- 
ell 

Private Henry A. Jacobson 

Private Harry Johnson 

Private Raymond P. Johnson 

Private Edwin J. Kelley 

Sergeant Isaac N. Kemp 

Private 1st Class Gordon B. 
Knetchel 

Private Roy W. Kruse 

Private Edward F. Kunstle 

Private Isaac H. Langston 

Private Paul F. Ludke 

Private Domenic Mazzone 

Private John Mullder 

Corporal William Owens 

Corporal Glen H. Robinson 

Private Orville Ross 

Corporal William V. Saunders 

Private Edson R. Shreve 

Corporal Clarence A. Sylvester 

Private Lynn Taylor 

Private 1st Class Ralph Toomey 

Private Roy A. Whitney 

Private John E. Witbeck 

Company "D" 

1st Lieutenant Louis B. Jansen 
Private Benjamin N. Anderson 
Private Jesse E. Arbogast 
Private Delbert W. Cook 
Private 1st Class Frank L. Coziah 
Bugler Charles R. Curry 
Private Frank C. Danner 
Private Oswald Engelhardt 
Sergeant Don R. Grable 
Corporal George D. Hach 
Private William W. Hayes 
Private Maurice Hollzer 
Corporal Jesse L. King 
Corporal Alfred R. Kramer 
Private George H. Meyer 
Corporal Trifone Pietrantonio 



Private Simon Simonsen 
Private 1st Class Thomas Smyth 
Private 1st Class Lee W. Um- 

phenor 
Private George W. Watson 
Corporal Thomas O. Williams 

Company "E" 

Private Joe Arata 
Private Christof Brending 
Sergeant Don W. Clark 
Private 1st Class Herman T. 

Draney 
Corporal Guy O. Enman 
Private Ottavio Fiscalini 
Corporal John L. Hepworth 
Private Carol F. Jackson 
Private Gay L. Jones 
Private Victor Kangas 
Corporal Leo K. McCormick 
Private 1st Class John M. McMul- 

len 
Private Floyd Minch 
Private Frank R. Mitchell 
Private Clause E. Nygren 
Private William L. O'Neal 
Private Frank H. Rago 
Private Bert C. Smith 
Private Leland W. Tool 
Private Kyle G. Walker 
Private Charles V. Williams 
Private Robert C. Worthington 

Company "F" 

Private Demetries Asimakopoulos 
Private Michael Carlone 
Private Fred Closkey 
Sergeant Samuel A. Davis 
Private Hugh DeHart 
Private 1st Class Lee Flora 
Corporal Frank J. Hamelius 
Private Neil G. Hightower 
Private George Huebschwerlin 
Private William J. Jacoby 
Private Clarence L. Jones 
Private Milton I. Kanode 



241 



Roll of Men Who Died on the Field of Honor 



Company "F" — Cont. 

Private John P. Larrecq 
Corporal Frank W. Liebscher 
Private Andrew P. Litschi 
Private Jerome J. McNeill 
Corporal George I. Martin 
Sergeant Wilson T. Mumford 
Private Claude C. Perdue 
Private 1st Class Robert H. Rich- 
ards 
Private Ira R. Ringer 

Company "G" 

Private John Anderson 
Private John V. Cosgrave 
Corporal John 0. Fleckenstein 
Private Lester L. Fletcher 
Private John J. Ford 
Private 1st Class, Glezen F. Ham- 
lin 
Private Harry A. Hansen 
Sergeant Gill R. Jamison 
Corporal Marion F. Johns 
Private Peter L. Keyes 
Corporal Ferdinand M. Larsen 
Sergeant Omar S. Norguard 
Private 1st Class Charles J. Peri 
Private Thorvald Rowley 
Private David A. Thomas 
Private 1st Class Paul Washing- 
ton 

Company "H" 
Private John S. Boyce 
Private Nicholas Chichilicas 
Private Harrison J. Cleaver 
Private Alfred Dent 
Private Guy Eastman 
Private Howard Kahl 
Private George Kennell 
Private George Mack 
Private 1st Class Michele Mastro- 

monaco 
Private Swan L. Palmgren 
Private Domineco Perin 
Private Charles A. Seeley 
Private George L. Simpson 



Company "I" 

Private Drew C. Amos 
Corporal Elmer R. Anderson 
Private Jack Ayk 
Private Julius F. Bergendorff 
Private Julius Berndt 
Private Guiseppe Calleri 
Private Trifone Contacesso 
Mechanic Carl M. Carlson 
Private Harold E. Clarke 
Private 1st Class John Crocco 
Private John G. Cowan 
Private Robert W. Douglass 
Private 1st Class David A. Epler 
Private Bennie M. Frydenberg 
Private Miles P. Halfman 
Private Victor H. Home 
Sergeant Charles Huckaba 
Private Edward Jacobson 
Private Fred Jensen 
Private Niels Johansen 
Private William J. Lambert 
Corporal Carl A. Larson 
Sergeant George F. McCarthy 
Private John J. McGinty 
Private Samuel Mares 
Private John P. Martin 
Private Frank P. May 
Private Elvin O. Olson 
Corporal John H. Pierce 
Private George Salter 
Corporal John A. Schneider 
Private Harry Seamans 
Private Frank O. Thrapp 
Private Elmer E. Van Lew 

Company "K" 

Captain Campbell Burke 
Private Leo R. Barlett 
Private Loy H. Collier 
Supply Sergeant Harry A. Grono 
Private 1st Class Thomas Gossi 
Private 1st Class Cecil Hender- 
son 
Private 1st Class Martin O. Lien 
Private Bert W. Meigs 



242 



Roll of Men Who Died on the Field of Honor 



Company "K" — Cord. 

Private 1st Class Claude L. Metz 
Private Harry Miller 
Private 1st Class Lee E. Moore 
Cook Earl E. Morrison 
Private Amedeo Parenti 
Private William H. Ramey 
Sergeant Guy S. Rathbun 
1st Sergeant James T. Rivar 
Private George S. Simington 
Private 1st Class Albert H. Smith 
Sergeant Trigvi Soffoniason 
Private Angelo Tacagni 
Private Clyde Wells 
Corporal Sidney A. Wright 
Private Jesse A. Wright 

Company "L" 

Private Ferdinand Bet 
Private Manuel S. Christodoulon 
Private Ralph G. Creighton 
Corporal Lee Davis 
Private 1st Class John V. Folsom 
Private Charles L. Garrety 
Private Thomas J. Graham 
Private Arthur E. Harlow 
Private John A. Jacobson 
Corporal Clarence O. Johnson 
Private Henry J. Johnson 
Private Kris Kovich 
Private Lars P. Larsen 
Corporal Herman G. Lecornu 
Private 1st Class Joseph J. Mc-* 

Cadam 
Private Daniel F. Madden 
Private Gilbert Miller 
Private 1st Class Ermen W. Moses; 
Private Carl A. Nelson 
Cook Clement O'Conner 
Corporal Anton L. Olson 
Private Jesse L. Parks 
Corporal Alfred Richards 
Private Sigurd Ronning 
Private Victor E. Satterberg 
Private Mate Skifish 



Corporal Verne M. Smith 
Private 1st Class William Swenn 
Private Edgar T. Theobald 
Private Magnus Vestergaard 
Private William Walch 
Corporal Frank O. Wigle 
Private Gustav Wilson 
Corporal Grover D. Williams 

Company "M" 

2nd Lieutenant Paul D. Smith 
Private Sam Basone 
Private Walter T. Beach 
Sergeant Virgil R. Detrick 
Private 1st Class Edward A. 

Gaedecke 
Private Martin Hartles 
Private Delbert J. Holliday 
Private Leo P. Horan 
Private Bill Kallas 
Private William H. Krippner 
Corporal Clifford Lewis 
Private Robert S. McCutchen 
Private Daniel McCormick 
Private John Nelson 
Private Mathew L. Oliver 
Private Oscar T. Omundson 
Sergeant Otto H. Oster 
Private George M. Porter 
Sergeant John Rees 
Private Henry A. Rehbein 
Private Harry E. Requa 
Private Alfonso Riccuiti 
Private Herman Ringhand 
Private 1st Class Tom Shelse 
Private Ernest H. Stock 
Private Max A. Waltersdorf 
Private Ray Woodson 

Headquarters Company 
2nd Lieutenant John A. Long 
Private 1st Class Gerald M. 

Davison 
Private Jesse L. Jensen 
Private 1st Class Sam Johnson 
Private George W. Krause 



243 



Roll of Men Who Died on the Field of Honor 

Headquarters Company — Cont. 

Private Thomas J. Miller 
Private Maurice J. O'Connell 
Private 1st Class Gustave W. 

Peterson 
Corporal Kenna P. Plowman 
Private Angus Pugmire 
Sergeant John Roman 
Private Bert Stevens 
Private Barney Twerdale 

Machine Gun Company 

Corporal Otto E. Axelson 
Private Mason S. Bare 
Private John Christopher 
Private Wilfred E. Dumas 
Private Leonard A. Haws 
Private 1st Class Budd C. Larson 
Private Vernard J. Meyers 
Sergeant Wesley W. Miller 
Sergeant Richard Nelson 
Private Emil F. Neuman 
Private Battisti Pasini 
Private Niels Therkildsen 
Private John Zanoni 

Supply Company 

Wagoner Peter Gatto 
Regimental Supply Sergeant Ro- 
land Morriss 
Private 1st Class Peter Stearns 
Wagoner Bert Strickland 

Medical Detachment 
Private 1st Class John G. Cariello 
Private Leland C. Mead 
Private George I. Tselonis 



244 



ENLISTEt 



Rank 

Pvt. . . 

Pvt. . . 

Pvt. . . 

Pvt. . . 

Corp. . 

Pvt. . . 

Pvt. . . 

Pvt. . . 

Pvt. 

Pvt. 

Pvt. 

Pvt. 

Pvt. 

Pvt. 

Pvt. 

Pvt. 

Pvt. 

Pvt. 



Pvt. lcl....C 



Company 
...H 
...C 
...D 

..I 

..M 

..I 

..M 

..H 

..I 

..K 

..H 

..H 

..M 

..M 

..E 

..E 

..G 
.C 



Sgt 
Sgt 

Pvt. . . . 
Pvt. . .- 
Pxt. 

Pvt 

Pvt 

Pvt. lcl. 

Corp 

Pvt 

Pvt 

Pvt 

Pvt 

Pvt 

Pvt. lcl. 

Pvt 

Pvt 

Pvt 

Pvt 

Sgt 

Corp.... 

Pvt 

Pvt 

Wag 

Pvt 

Pvt 

Pvt 

Pvt 

Pvt 

Pvt. lcl. 

Pvt 

Pvt 

Mech F 

Pvt. lcl. . ..V 



D 

D 

M 
.K 
.K 
.K 
.1 
.C 

C 

.Hq. 
D 
L 
B 
M 
F 

Hq. 
L 
L 
H 
D 
M 
H 
M 

Sup. 
D 
D 
B 
I 
I 
F 
B 
A 



Pvt. 
Pvt. 
Pvt. 
Pvt. 

Pvt. 
Pvt. 
Pvt. 
Pvt. 
Pvt. 

1st Sgt E 

Pvt H 

Pvt H 

Pvt D 

Sgi M. G. 



Corp. 

Pvt 

Sgt 

Corp 

Sgt 

Pvt 

Pvt. lcl. . 

Corp 

Corp 

Pvt 

Pvt 

Corp 

Corp 

Pvt. lcl. . . 

Pvt 

3gt 

Pvt. lcl. 
Pvt. lcl. 

Pvt •. 

Corp 



V 

F 

M 

.E 

I) 

I) 

B 

..L 

..E 

..F 

..D 

..K 

..E 

..D 

..L 

..G 

,.L 

. K 

..B 

,.M 



' OFFICER 



NAMlfM p ANT 

Heeseit K 



Henrii B 
Hoey.^M 

HOLLM^E 

Hall, iC 

HANSEfrHq. 
HORGA1-A 

HowAR|Hq. 

HUMME|L 

Harrin-D 
Hatch, -A 
Howel-A 
Huefsq-A 
HamblJB 
HemphI-A 
Hill, AjC 
HaugeJH 
Ham, Q-L 
Hill, P 
Hende M 
Hale, d-A 
Hach d-H 



Ha 



LL, 



E 



Hansei -B 



Isaacs 



Jacobs: M. G. 
Jacobs; ■ I 
Jensen B 

Johans-I 

JOHANI>F 
JOHNSO-M. U. 



JOHNSO 

Jones, 

Jensen 
Jaco . 
Jensen 
Jesper 

JOHNSO 



Jacobsc-A 



Jarrat 

JOHNSO 

Juell 

JOHNSO 
JOURDA 

Jones, 

Jones, 

Jones, '. 

Jamisoi 

Johnso 

Jones, 

Juday, 

Jensen 

JuDIKII' 
jENKINi 

Jacksoi 

Kuss, C 

Kalles 

Kemp, ] 

King, I 

Kelly, 

Kulukj 

Knight 

Kravik 

Kadim, 

Kondo; 

Klein, 

Kawin, 

Keller 

Kimbrc 

Kollr 

Kooyui 

KOUTSA • 

Kerste 
Kriner . 
Keeley 
Kennei 
Keene 
Kimbal H 
Kirk, J. B 
KirkmaLC 
KliendJ.I 
Kneelai-D 
Krigge .1 
Knox, l.E 

KOLLIAS -D 

Koons, B 
Kozak, l.E 



K 



H 

. Hq. 
.A 
I 
E 
C 
E 
G 
E 
C 
E 
L 
D 
M 
Hq. 
G 
D 
D 
A 
A 
H 

M. G. 
B 
F 
F 
I 
I 
G 
L 
B 
M 
G 

M. G. 
F 



1 
D 

Hq 
K 



Name Rank 

Ro yse, Thomas L Pvt 

Ruble, Walton L Corp 

Rushmer, Earl M Corp 

Rota, Luigi Pvt 

Raif, William H Sup. Sgt. . 

Reno, Harvey D Pvt. lc 

Riznar, Albin Pvt 

Robnett, Roy Pvt 

Rose, Hubert B Pvt. lcl. . . 

Rose, Joe Pvt 

Rose, William P Pvt 

Rust, Theodore Pvt 

Radulo vich, Michael M Pvt. lcl 

Rey, Arthur E Corp. . . 



Rash, James A Pvt. 

Read, William A Pvt. 

Reese, James B Pvt. 

Reynolds, Frank S Pvt. 

Robertson, Manuel M Pvt. lcl, 

Riolo, Tony Pvt 

Ross, Leo L Sgt 

Rider, Charles G Pvt. 

Reeves, Alfred R Pvt. 

Rockwell, Reuben L Pvt. 

Rasmussen, Anchor C Pvt. 

Reidy, Francis M Pvt. 

Rumberger, Joseph H Pvt. 



Company 

...H 

...B 

M 

D 

A 

H 
..M. G. 
..H 
..Hq. 
..I 
..M 
..K 
..C 
..D 



...E 

...E 

...E 

...G 

...G 

...B 

...D 

...Hq. 

...B 

...H 

...K 

...M.G. 

...F 



(i. 



Ringer, Martin Pvt. lcl F 

Runte, Frederick Pvt I 

Rassmussen, Ernest Pvt A 

Riffle Harvey D Pvt. lcl F 

Rekstav, Hans A Pvt M. 

Rago, Tony Pvt E 

Richardson, Robert G Corp M. G. 

Rowden, Morrie A Pvt. lcl. . . .G 

Ronald, John Pvt M.G. 

Stoekes, Nick Pvt H 

Sullivan, Gerald Pvt B 

Sutton, James V Pvt H 

Syverstad, Iver Corp Hq. 

Schoeberl, William Pvt E 

Scott, James J Pvt G 

Scott, Roy Corp G 

Shenfield, Owen W Pvt. lcl G 

Smith, Wilbur E Pvt C 

Snider, Dan W Pvt G 

Snyder, Harry Pvt G 

Steelsmith, Samuel R Corp G 

Stephens, Robert V Pvt E 

Starsasli, Gusta ve G Pvt G 

Sullivan, William H Pvt E 

SCHWEIKERT, JOSEPH L Pvt G 

Sonnichsen, Hans D Pvt E 

Syres, William Pvt C 

Schaub, Harry J Corp D 

Suom y, John Mech D 

Sobule, William Pvt D 

Sutton, Herbert Pvt D 

Schultz, William R Sgt M 

Stevenson, William C Pvt. lcl. ... K 

Stangland, Andrew Pvt K 

Smith, Edward Pvt K 

Stout, William Sgt I 

See, Hong Pvt I 

Stringfellow, Marino Pvt Hq. 

Shawlay, Raymond Pvt E 

Salazar, Arthur Pvt G 

Sw anson, Albert J Pvt G 

SCHWARZROCK, OtTO L Pvt A 

Slavenburg, Johannes L Pvt A 

Shelton, Percy B Pvt A 

Strandrud, Halvor Pvt. lcl. . . .A 

Singleton, Albert G Corp B 

Struckmeier, Robert J Corp B 

Sullivan, Murt R Pvt B 

Sandberg, Theodore O Pvt H 

Smith, Percy L Pvt H 

Sutherland, Cecil W Pvt K 

Sams, Charles A Pvt M 

Snyder, Raymond B Sgt C 

St. Germaine, Alfred Pvt. lcl E 

Schmidt, Andrew Pvt F 

Schofield, Vao Pvt. lcl K 

Schroeder, William H Pvt M. G. 

Schultz, Fred C Pvt F 

Schumacher, George Pvt B 

Shadley, Matt L Corp K 



(b) 
(c) 



Name 
Batman, 
Doherty 
Minick, < 

Name 
Ables, J] 
Acheson 
Anderso 
Amyes, J 
Bulie, T 
Bathke, 
Bracket 
Bisset, A 
Birks, E 
Beckmey 
Boche, J 
Bryant, 
Cowan, ] 
Court, F 
Changnc 
Cobbs, J. 
Carter, 
Clark, L 
Cunning 
Cox, Adi 
Chipp, Lj 
Crawfof 
Cox, Sta 
Craven, 
Covey, I 
Cumming 
Cullen, 
Dahlen, 

DUANE, 

Draper, 
Dodd, H 

DONATO, 

Derr, Li 
Deamar/ 

Eklund, 



NAMES OF OFFICERS AND ENLISTED MEN WOUNDED IN ACTION 



5th December, 1918. 

' »KDER8 Bossi 

II. Pursuant to Paragraph 8. General Order No. 110. G. H. Q., A. E. F.. the b£I£ 

I., followina officers and enliBted men are hereby published, win. were hon- g"** 

rned the right to wear the Wound Chevron, while in Blani 

'. in. -iii\ i'ii li i ■ i Bloci 

(a) In the Meuae- Vrgonne offensive, France, (fruin September 261 li to October rwVi 

4th, 191 ! 

(b) In the Mousc-Argonne offensive, Frame, (from October Oth to October Bhow 

lL'lh. i'M . 01 BBOW 

(c) In the Lys-Scheld) offensive, Belgium, (from October 3lst to November bochj 

llth, 1918). Boss. 



William li 



B 



■ 



,tm, Ernest N. 



Bus, Bkkii H 

Boaana, Etivlmw 



Bhmmi, Khanb G. 



Rank Compan 

ifi, 



HH, I RI 



■ 



COt/TOH. l'l"-> 



JlMU \. Jmvb I* 



Jonmb, Thsodobi C 



I'vl I> I,AttSflN, GlllllHK 

Uwfa E Li iihi 



H<| U* 



' 



AtlTIS, RAI.PB H I'VI 

AUT.N. MAHI'M I*Vt 









!''! ''' 
























PltlMON, Kl»*l>BI 

■ 

Picsam Oct R. 



■ 






Rom. CiA«mt»E 
now, CwkwiA. 



APPENDIX VI 

GENERAL PERSHING'S FAREWELL ORDER 

G. H. Q. 

AMERICAN EXPEDITIONARY FORCES 

General Orders France, February 28, 1919. 

No. 38-A. 

My Fellow Soldiers: 

Now that your service with the American Expeditionary Forces is about 
to terminate, I can not let you go without a personal word. At the call to 
arms, the patriotic young manhood of America eagerly responded and became 
the formidable army whose decisive victories testify to its efficiency and its 
valor. With the support of the nation firmly united to defend the cause of 
liberty, our army has executed the will of the people with resolute purpose. 
Our democracy has been tested, and the forces of autocracy have been 
defeated. To the glory of the citizen-soldier, our troops have faithfully 
fulfilled their trust, and in a succession of brilliant offensives have over- 
come the menace to our civilization. 

As an individual, your part in the world war has been an important one 
in the sum total of our achievements. Whether keeping lonely vigil in the 
trenches, or gallantly storming the enemy's stronghold; whether enduring 
monotonous drudgery at the rear, or sustaining the fighting line at the front, 
each has bravely and efficiently played his part. By willing sacrifice of per- 
sonal rights; by cheerful endurance of hardship and privation; by vigor, 
strength and indomitable will, made effective by thorough organization and 
cordial co-operation, you inspired the war-worn Allies with new life and 
turned the tide of threatened defeat into overwhelming victory. 

With a consecrated devotion to duty and a will to conquer, you have 
loyally served your country. By your exemplary conduct a standard has 
been established and maintained never before attained by any army. With 
mind and body as clean and strong as the decisive blows you delivered 
against the foe, you are soon to return to the pursuits of peace. In leaving 
the scenes of your victories, may I ask that you carry home your high ideals 
and continue to live as you have served — an honor to the principles for 
which you have fought and to the fallen comrades you leave behind. 

It is with pride in our success that I extend to you my sincere thanks for 
your splendid service to the army and to the nation. 

Faithfully, 

JOHN J. PERSHING, 
Commander-in-Chief. 
Official: 

ROBERT C. DAVIS, 
Adjutant General. 

245 



NAMES OF OFFICERS AND ENLISTED MEN WOUNDED IN ACTION 



Nave 


R„. 


mono H 


Oorp 


Im'iuak, Cmptokd M 





.... I 



TuountoN, O 



I 



,1 1 












TatIaW, SAW 




rt 




Hemiamin J 








>i w 


r.i 




IM 1,1 


m». Jamb. 


IM I.I 


II A 








■ K. JlJLBB 


















ti.rp 








IM lil 






VoiXIN., l.AOOHE 




runitnA 




■ 


IM 


. 


IM 


i.hnr 


IM 


... 









II 


Wn.i 










i 


Wat* 








IM 




In 










m a 








l,M P 




n 


trail 




IM 








Wiii.i 




















IM 


h 


W'tu 
















Oorp 
















IM I.I 








, , , 








Wool 




















S«l 


n.i 






IM 








It .III 


i ,, , i 


IM 




IM 






iii, ...in. 














Pvl 1,1 




IM 












U .in 


nu.i.i>M 


IM 








Wini 




IM 




IM 








I'vl Id 






















rosx, Edwie 










» .11 




IM 




























IM 










IM 












IM 




W.I 1 




I'vl lei 




IM 
















































IM 








IM 








» LSI 


iRXBBW I'vl ll-l 
















II,, 




• V. HtRHI It 






IM 






,.. IttVMl.Sl. II 


















Oorp 
















Warn 




IM 


'. 








J..IIS It 










Hun 












Wish 




IM 










Mm.ii.mi K 


I'vt Id 














1 11 


IM Id 






•WORTH. TllOUAB W 












H. II.KHt J 






IM 1.1 


"I 




■.bwiuF 










Wiut 


„wh. Btfcrn w 


IM 


Thomas. Giuhob J 






n ,,, 


Amasa 





. Joseph E im 






Zahahi- , 



ZlMMKRMt.S. ClItK 
ZeIXER, CHBMT1 t> 
l.i i.i.i, MnttM K 






By Order „f Colonel A. I> CUMMINOS. 

.1 UJOB K t\/.l.l.lt. 

' apl iiinl I'l Ailj , 
361st Infantry. 



Headguarten 361at Infantry, 
P ()., 770, 
28th January, 1919. 

Sl'KI'IAI, OBDCBS 

No. ■_'■-' 

III. Pursuant in Paragraph 8, General Order" No. I in. i; II Q.,A E. !•'.. the 
the Following offieera and enlisted men are hi rebj published, (supplemen- 
tary in lint published in Paragraph II. Special Ordei No. 22 luartera, 
.".Hi December, 1018), who were honorably wounded and have earned the nulit to 
wear the Wound Chevron, while in action with the enemj either: — 

(a) In I In- Meuae-Argonne offei from September 26th to 

4th, l'J 

(b) In the Meuae-Argonne offensive, Prance, (I i Octobei i.ili in October 

12th, I I] 

(c) In tin- Vpres-Lys offensive, Belgium, (fn lotoberSlel in November I lth, 

1918) 

Rase COHPANT Name 



Hutu a. iiuiiM i E i ■!■' 



Rank 


COUP* 








II 




11 



Abler, Jimk o. 
Acheron, William 

Batukk, Edward 



Rkcemsvkh, THEODORE .... I'vt 

.i i 



II iv, COMPAM 



I'ikthk, IIiiiilktM IM 

lu.i, Uo !'>' 

Cl'NNINOHAM, HahEER IM 

COX. ADALBERT C IM 

CrIPE. LlA'll L. . 



Craves-. Hod lbs 



i v I'vi Id 



KniAii'i, Edward.. 

LUOIBA, s.sr,iM» 

LoCEE. ULVAI 

I. ARSES. PaKLBT R. 

I IMS II 

Ltlb, Arthi k R 
Locoes, John 



Name Rave CoifTA 

I.l TOE. Jl'UtS I'vt B 

Lawrence. William Pt 

LOTD II Pi 

M.amiveRN. UlCBAPXJ I'vl Id M 

Mvji is, BOH UU> It Cpl M 

M.CArrERTr. Miltos It Cpl C 

pi II, i 

IM !> 

Uabbubi, Oaipai IM I. 

, , s, , 1: I'vl 11 

Uolomt, Orao I IM Id K 

Mimosa, Bert I I'vt U 

MtsHi-. Jims I'vl ti 

UaBIOWIU, l.nis 1, I'vl 1,1 I) 

Miller. Joaai-h IM I 

M.ittner. Albert K IM I 

Nelson, Lewlb H Pi 

Nelson. Vsbnon W IM It 

N'iirthrop. Donald A I'm M 

Noroen, Axel R Cpl Sup 

On. Chawtobu E I 

Oatmeld. Rotal i |.l II 
M 

I'l.sEi. Ban , l 

Probert, Daniel O... PyI 

I'atne. John It Cpl II 

PooQBNEBS. Harrt I'm I 

Poole, Jamer E 1st 

Parmiall. J. •'. IB II., 

Itl-Ltl . J.IHS W IM i; 

It LBBU>1 M. Bit AS A U 

Reed, Arthi s I'vl H 



, t Nabb Ranx Company 

Ross, Lester I'vl I 

Rawbon. 1 .s»,s„ It 

lti.ii.i,i.-„s. John Ws« Sup. 

FUsmobsbk, Harold P IM Id ...O 

tUlHII. W,,,,,M I IM I' 

Slllt. HAM. 'I'll,. MIA H 9ft M 

SllRMtN, ElIM .III' M I''! M 

Sv.tNiuit.mi. Ms. i, ill: I "|.l II 

N.i.si.iii. truiAr IM II 

Smith, tluiitn I. IM I 

MOMMEH". RODOIPB I !pl M 

Smith, ' i tin s. , I'vl A 

S, ,1,,, I ...,- | .i ', 

Sparer. Ktii-H W IM II 

Stsrnweib, Victor O . I'vl I. 

Sarft. Saw C IM ' I 

Si ILIVAN. KaLI'H M IM B 

Sl'LANE. MlLUHl. I M.vl. \ 

Snowdbn, Tiisodorb C ... Op] H'l 

Stl M.iSAON. C'LAIIENlK , HUB H'l 

SlRTO, ANOELj Bit Q 

TURFIE. I'll tni.1- IM l0l....D 

Tl'RNEH. ItET E I'vt I 

TtlTTINO. Lorai I'vl M 

Turner. Rohert w IM C 

TnoHNocE. David B I'vl II 

Y..IIIS-, IaaDIIRE I'VI B 

Vine. Jacob ... IM I. 

Vincent, Albert It I'vl 1: 

W ,1111,, lis, 1 |M I, 

WaLDES. Il.siti II IM I, 

, 1 M 

Wmiiams, It II K I'vl 1,1 M 

By Order of Colonel \ D CI MMINQ8. 

JaCOa K AN7.I.KU, 

(apt, ami l'l. Adj., 
301st Infantry. 



Headguartara 361st Infantry, 
AiniTiiai, ffi. P., \ I'. O. 776, 
„ _ 8th Pebruan , 1918 

' iltREKS 

No. 30. 
' '' ,l '-" ■ •'• • OP i ,L't:.|.h s, i;,„,. n ,| Or,|,r» \„ no, (; II. Q , A It tllP 
wing Offieera land Enlisted Men are hereby published (sun 

tanr to list publuihed „, S ,„l Order. No. 220, 5tb December, ■ 

OrtlereNo. 22, 28th January, 1919, thess Headquart, , v w „ ,,' 

enemy jither-" "' " ' " ""' " '"""" ''"' V '""' "' '" ■'"'""" w " h *■ 

<S> In l J l hl • 1 ,) | , ^' s ' n • r u ^ ! '' M ' l, • ,,l^, • ,l »' V| ■, I 'iii, 1 itobei 

(b) I11 Mir Mi'iisi- AtKoiiiiftifffiiaivf. Fraiiei-, (ft„i„ 1 i,t, ,!„■,,;, |, toOotober 121 li, 

<l) 'lit^^yi'sr" 1 '" "' T '"" v ''' >M *"""' «'"'" Ootobar 81al to No 



N. 



It.s 



Coatb. Alva J bbkIU 

s 'Mr Rahe 

r,> 

HaMBBLARD, UutALD |M 



COHPANT 



Has 



Obat. Etebbtt j 

Name r . k . 

Pedebbeii, .Sorn ,., 



1 OS 



II. 



By Order of Colon. I \ D 11 MMINOS. 

Jj K AS/l.KIl, 

and I'l. Adj.. 
361»t Infantry. 



EMBARKATION ROSTER 

MEN AND OFFICERS— 361st INFANTRY 
AS OF MARCH 25, 1919— ST. NAZAIRE, FRANCE 

(SHOWING NAME, RANK. ORGANIZATION AND EMERGENCY ADDRESS) 



Abbott, Benjamin H., Pvt. 1 cl., Co. K, Grove City, Ohio 
Abbott, Ervin L., Wagoner, Sup. Co., Loon Lake, Wash- 
ington 
Abbott, Stanton, Cpl., Co. E, Winslow, Indiana 
Abel, Donald G., Captain, Co. D, 422 10th St., Hoquiam, 

Washington 
Abell, John A., Pvt., Co. G, Pulaski, Virginia 
Ables, Dan, Pvt., Co. C, R. R. No. 3, Carterville, Illinois 
Ables, Jesse O., Pvt., Co. H, Box 384, Neligh, Nebraska 
Abraham, John, Cpl., Co. M, Wilkeson, Washington 
Acheson, William R., Pvt., Co. H, Chewelah, Washington 
Adair, George D., Cpl., Co. G, 16 Murphy Bldg., Seattle, 

Washington 
Adams, David P., Wagoner, Sup. Co., 1320 7th Ave., Seattle, 

Washington 
Adams, Frank W., Cpl., Co. M, 2414 65th Ave., Oakland, 

California 
Adams, James F., Sgt., Co. E, Box 274, Waterville, Wash- 
ington 
Adams, Joseph E., Pvt., Med. Det., Land Titles Office, 

Edmonton, Canada 
Adams, Orville D., Sgt., Co. C, 712 Essex Ave., Aberdeen, 

Washington 
Adkins, Delbert O., Pvt., Co. C, R. F. D. No. 9, Honey 

Grove, Texas 
Adler, Henry A., Pvt. 1 cl., Hq. Co., R. R. No. 6, North 

Vernon, Indiana 
Aeils, Elsino, Pvt. 1 cl., Co. F, Dayton, Washington 
Ainlat, Thomas A., Pvt., Med. Det., Columbus, Montana 
Aitken, John H., Pvt., Co. H, R. R. No. 1, Coulterville, 

Illinois 
Albert, Charles X., Pvt., Co. H, Prairie de Rocher, 

Illinois 
Albert, Edward, Pvt., Co. A, 354 E. Kossuth St., Colum- 
bus, Ohio 
Albert, Richard, Cpl., Co. K, 1242 Michigan Ave., Cin- 
cinnati, Ohio 
Albright, Frank, Pvt. 1 cl., Co. D, Canastota, S. D. 
Aleith, Edwin L., Pvt. 1 cl., Co. H, Arlington, Washington 
Alfredson, Walfred, Wagoner, Sup. Co., 2712 Second Ave., 

Seattle, Washington 
Alkern, James J., Pvt., Co. L, 235 Cook St., Toledo, Ohio 
Allan, Charles S., Pvt., Med. Det., R. F. D. No. 1, Box 

198, Mt. Vernon, Washington 
Allan, William A., Mechanic, Co. G, 3451 Salisbury St. 

Oakland, California 
Allbritain, Charlie L., Pvt., Co. A, Cumberland, Ohio 
Allegre, Claude F., Cook, Sup. Co., Fromberg, Montana 
Alleman, Alfred P., Pvt., Co. H, 509 Fulton St., San 

Francisco, California 
Allen, Archie B., Pvt. 1 cl., Co. H, Blackshear, Georgia 
Allen, Daniel J., Pvt., Co. H, Khedrive, Saskatchewan, 

Canada 
Allen, Ernest M., Cpl., Sup. Co., 117 7th Ave. N., Seattle, 

Washington 
Allen, Frederick H., Pvt., Co. E, P. O. Box 348, Eureka, 

California 
Allen, Harris F., Pvt. 1 cl., Co. H, Crawford, Colorado 
Allen, Morton, Pvt., M. G. Co., Hueyeville, Kentucky 
Allen, Omar V., Pvt., Co. C, Box 38, Shawnee, Ohio 
Allison, Frank L., Pvt. 1 cl., Med. Det., Pinto, Montana 
Allison, Marion, Pvt., Co. M, R. No. 1, Blue Rock, Ohio 
Allison, Walter D., Sgt., Co. I, 2901 Washington St., 

Seattle, Washington 
Altwasser, Frederick G., Pvt., Co. C, Verwood, Sas- 
katchewan, Canada 
Amdal, Henry W., Wagoner, Hq. Co. ,6709 25th N. W., 

Seattle, Washington 
Ames, Chester R., Asst. Band Leader, Hq. Co., Sedro- 

Woolley, Washington 
Amyes, Joseph P., Cpl., Co. M, 1345 17th Ave., Seattle, 
Washington 



Anagnostakos, John H., Cook, Co. E, Bremerton, Wash- 
ington 

Anders, Morley H., Cpl., Co. C, Huntington, Oregon 

Anderson, Albert, Pvt., Co. G, 229^ 2nd Ave. N., Seattle, 
Washington 

Anderson, Axel E., Pvt., Co. A, Grass Flat, Pennsylvania 

Anderson, Clarence M., Sgt., Co. M, R. 2, Ferndale, 
Washington 

Anderson, Conrad O., Pvt., Co. K, 401 Pearl St., Boyne 
City, Michigan 

Anderson, Daniel, Pvt., Co. K, R. F. D. No. 2, Winlock, 
Washington 

Anderson, David O., Sup. Sgt., Co. K, 856 23rd St., San 
Diego, California 

Anderson, Earney S., Pvt., Med. Det., 412 East Republi- 
can St., Seattle, Washington 

Anderson, Edward, Pvt., Co. D, Silvana, Washington 

Anderson, George, Pvt. Hq. Co., 229;^ 2nd Ave., N., 
Seattle, Washington 

Anderson, George J., Sgt., M. G. Co., 838 French St., 
Santa Anna, California 

Anderson, George W., Pvt., Co. L, 1009 C St., Rockford, 
Illinois 

Anderson, Guy C, Cook, Co. K, Lacenter, Washington 

Anderson, Johan, Pvt., Co. A, Pando, Colorado 

Anderson, John, Pvt. 1 cl., Co. E, Jobs, Ohio 

Anderson, John A., Pvt., Co. C, Warren, Oregon 

Anderson, Knut R., Pvt. Hq. Co., Box 89, Olive Ave., 
Patterson, California 

Anderson, Lars P., Pvt., Co. I, Route 1, Hotland, South 
Dakota 

Anderson, Martin C, Pvt. Co. A, Lucca, North Dakota 

Anderson, Martin J., Sgt., Co. B, 3527 Bennett Ave., 
Seattle, Washington 

Anderson, Samuel, Pvt. 1 cl., Co. D, 539 S. 7 W., Salt Lake 
City, Utah 

Anderson, Samuel F., Pvt., Co. K, Custer, Washington 

Anderson, Sigfrid, Pvt., Co. I, 2919 Pacific St., Omaha, 
Nebraska 

Anderson, Thomas, Cook, Co. L, Box 52, Horte, Montana 

Andrews, John M., Cpl., Co. K, 1220 Adams Street, Minne- 
apolis, Minnesota 

Angle, William T., Pvt., Sup. Co., 401 Angle St., Musca- 
tine, Iowa 

Angoli, Oswald, Cpl., Hq. Co., 2746 Melrose St., Chicago, 
Illinois 

Angus, Fred B., Captain, M.G. Co., 1110 11th St., Sacra- 
mento, California 

Annette, William H., Cpl., Co. C, Glencoe, Ontario, 
Canada 

Anstine, Edward L., Mec, M.G. Co., Atherton, Montana. 

Antrim, Dewey W., Sgt., Med. Det., P.O. Box 47, Oak Hill, 
Illinois. 

Antmiler, Barney J., Pvt,, Co. G, 142^ First St., Port- 
land, Oregon. 

Aprilanti, Frank, Pvt., Co. I, Box 718, Roseville, California 

Argentin, Antonio S., Pvt., Co. K, 93 Clinton Place, East 
Rutherford, N. J. 

Argo, James S., Pvt., Co. K, R.F.D. No. 2, Wapella, Illinois 

Armstrong, Charles E., Pvt., Med. Det., Box 88, Elmira, 
Oregon 

Armstrong, Edwin W., Pvt. 1 cl., Co. K, Atchison, Kansas 

Armstrong, Elmer, Captain, Co. I, 310 Mason St., Normal, 
Illinois 

Armstrong, Harry, Sgt., Co. H, 200 N. Church St., St. 
Cathernies, Ontario, Canada 

Armstrong, John, Pvt., Co. C, Otterville, Missouri 

Armstrong, Joseph B., 2nd Lt., Co. L, Willets Point Road, 
Whitestone, Long Island, New York 

Armstrong, Joseph C, Cook, Hq. Co., 6817 Greenwood 
Ave., Seattle, Washington 



246 



Armstrong, Virgil L., Pvt., Hq. Co., 6817 Greenwood Ave., 

Seattle, Washington 
Arn, Andrew F., Pvt., Co. K, Arvilla, West Virginia 
Arney, John H., Pvt., Co. A, R. F. D. No. 1, North Vernon, 

Indiana 
Arnold, Earl W., Pvt., Sup. Co., 6521 Phinney Ave., 

Seattle, Washington 
Arnold, James P., Pvt., Co. F, Molson, Washington 
Arnold, Richard E., Sgt., Co. B, Spanish Fork, Utah 
Arnold, Robert P., 1st Sgt., Co. F, 912 Hill St., Escanaba, 

Michigan 
Arntson, Nathan M., Cpl., Co. I, 2101 South K St., 

Tacoma, Washington 
Arthur, Harry, Cook, Co. A, 935 East Park St., Butte, 

Montana 
Ashman, John, Pvt., Co. B, 1743 Angeline St., Seattle, 

Washington 
Assink, Harry, Pvt., Co. M, North Yakima, Washington 
Atkinson, James R., Musician 3 el., Hq. Co., 1122 36th 

Ave., Seattle, Washington 
Attlesey, Walter Elmer, Cpl., Co. H, 170 Washington 

Ave., Twin Falls, Idaho 
Atwood, Cyrus L., Sgt., M. G. Co., R. F. D. No. 2, Cor- 

vallis, Oregon 
Aubert, Virgil S., Pvt. 1 el., Co. A, 109 Virginia St., Bel- 

lingham, Washington 
Auerhamer, Herman M., Pvt. 1 el., Co. B, R. F. D. No. 1, 

Vassar, Michigan 
Augur, Ellsworth J., Pvt. 1 el., Co. H, 1529H 1st Ave., 

Seattle, Washington 
Aulicky, Charles J., Pvt., Co. L, 1822 S. Ashland Ave., 

Chicago, Illinois 
Aussibal, Eugene, Pvt., Co. E, 784 Broadway St., San 

Francisco, California 
Austin, Emil W., Pvt. 1 el., Hq. Co., 873 Grove St., San 

Francisco, California 
Austin, Harvey E., Pvt., M. G. Co., R. F. D. No. 1, Box 64, 

Blacksburg, Virginia 
Axtell, Samuel, Jr., Mechanic, M. G. Co., Tillamook, 

Oregon 
Axelson, Henry O., Sgt., Co. B, 4421 38th Ave. S., Seattle, 

Washington 
Aycock, Thomas B., Horseshoer, M. G. Co., R. F. D. No. 5, 

Concord, Tennessee 
Aylesworth, Guy A., Pvt. 1 el., Co. B, 1222 Cascade Ave., 

Chehalis, Washington 
Babcock, Ross, Pvt. 1 el., Co. L, Moore, Idaho 
Bachtel, Raymond H., Pvt., Co. D, 1744 S. 7th St., Colum- 
bus, Ohio 
Bachosso, Giovanni, Pvt., Co. K, Box 251, Sanger, Cali- 
fornia 
Badda, Charles E., Pvt., Sup. Co, 30 3rd St. S., Roslyn, 

Washington 
Baggenstos, Marcell, Pvt., Co. H, Box 114, Pe Ell, Wash- 
ington 
Bagger, Walter, Pvt. 1 el., M. G. Co., R. F. D. No. 4, Box 

327, Tacoma, Washington 
Bailey, Glenn R., Pvt., Co. H, Letart Falls, Ohio 
Bailey, Ivan Y., Pvt. 1 cl., Co. B, Fort Shaw, Montana 
Bailey, John E., Captain, Co. K, Box 217, Dixon, California 
Bailey, Roy W., Pvt. 1 cl., Co. M, R. F. D. No. 3, Ferndale, 

Washington 
Bailey, William T., Pvt., Co. H, R. F. D. No. 1, Box 31, 

Oblong, Illinois 
Baker, Dayre P., Pvt., Co. K, 434 Kossuth, Columbus, 

Ohio 
Baker, Floyd A., Pvt., Co. D, Madison, South Dakota 
Baker, Floyd E., Pvt., Co. H, R. F. D. No. 1, Benton, Ohio 
Baker, James M., Pvt., Hq. Co., Fullerton, California 
Baker, Ray F., Pvt. 1 cl., Co. E, 908 S. 18th St., Mattoon, 

Illinois 
Bardoni, Frank J., Pvt., Co. G, Benecia, Selano County, 

California 
Balatti, Severino, Pvt. 1 cl., Co. D, 1210 Grove St., Boise, 

Idaho 
Baldell, Gean, Pvt., Co. K, 213 Park St., Aberdeen, 

Washington 
Baldwin, Warren W., Pvt. Co. I, Deming, Washington 
Bale, Perry, Cpl., Hq. Co., 327 Brown St., Saginaw, 

Michigan 
Ball, Ernest W., Cpl., Co. H, Rigby, Idaho 
Ballich, Neckola M., Pvt., Co. C, Box 616, Auburn, 

Washington 
Barbini, Antonio, Pvt., Co. F, 1130 3rd St., Sacramento, 

California 
Bard, Thad R., Mess Sgt., Co. I, Sheridan, Wyoming 
Bardasis, John, Pvt. 1 cl., Co. B, Route A, Tulare, Cali- 
fornia 
Bareford, John I., Pvt., M. G. Co., Dunbrock, Virginia 



Barman, George E., Pvt., Hq. Co., 2091 Market St., San 

Francisco, California 
Barnard, Alvin M., Pvt., Co. C, Mayberry, Virginia 
Barnes, Henry, Pvt., Co. B, Rue, Arkansas 
Barnes, John F., Sgt., M. G. Co., 1815 E. 9th Ave., Spokane, 

Washington 
Barnes, Ward C, Wagoner Sup. Co, Route No. 3, Wood- 
burn, Oregon 
Barnett, Charles A., Pvt., Co. C, 114 Cody St., Evans- 

ville, Indiana 
Barnett, John G., Sgt., Co. M, Wasco, Oregon 
Barnhart, Clarence L., Pvt., Co. D, Tippecanoe City, 

Ohio 
Barrett, Henry A., Pvt., M. G. Co., 5 Summit St., Glou- 
cester, Massachusetts 
Barrett, John W., Pvt., Co. H, 1120 Tudor Ave., East St. 

Louis, Illinois 
Barrett, William C, Pvt., Hq. Co., 744 Euclid Ave., 

Toledo, Ohio 
Barretta, Alfred, Pvt., Co. G, 1005 E. Spruce St., Seattle, 

Washington 
Barrington, Joseph L., Cpl., Co. L, Dubuque, Iowa 
Barron, Guy L., Pvt., Co. I, 424 N. Chestnut St., Toppen- 

ish, Washington 
Barry, Thomas C, Cpl., Co. F, 2207 W. 65th St., Seattle, 

Washington 
Bartell, Albert R., 2nd Lt., Sup. Co., Wakefield, Kansas 
Barthou, Louis, Pvt., Co. F, Hopah, Utah 
Bartruff, John A., Sgt., Co. K, Ferndale, Washington 
Barton, Fred, Pvt., Co. C, Bingham, Utah 
Bartunek, Frank P., Pvt., Co. B, R. F. D. No. 1, Box 55, 

Delmont, South Dakota 
Bast, Clayton L., Pvt., Co. G, Ramona, South Dakota 
Bastes, Joseph M., Pvt., Co. L, 1745 Organ St., Cleveland, 

Ohio 
Bates, Barton A., Pvt., Co. F, 1300 Iowa St., Butte, Mon- 
tana 
Bates, Walter N., Cook, Co. M, Ellensburg, Washington 
Bathke, Edward G., Pvt. 1 cl. , Co. I, Martinsburg, Nebraska 
Batman, Robert S., Captain, San De Fuca, Washington 
Batson, Harman E., Pvt., Co. M, 2107 W. Strain St., Sulli- 
van, Illinois 
Battineschi, Anglo A., Pvt., Co. B, Ely, Nevada 
Battistello, Giuseppe, Pvt., Co. L, 648 W. Main St., Stock- 
ton, California 
Batto, Pasquale, Saddler, Sup. Co., Valbrevana, Pareto, 

Italy 
Bauders, Albert M., Pvt., Co. H, 1308 Napoleon St., 

Fremont, Ohio 
Baugh, Carroll C, Pvt., Co. K, R. F. D. No. 1, Rogers, 

Texas 
Baughman, George S., Pvt., Co. A, Willows, California 
Bauguess, George W., Cpl., Co. D, Sultan, Washington 
Baum, Ralph A., Pvt., Co. K, 1634 Beldin Ave., N. E., 

Canton, Ohio 
Baurer, Ernest J., Pvt. 1 cl., Co. K, R. F. D. No. 2, Sher- 
wood, Oregon 
Bayeoryos, Andrew N., Pvt., Med. Det., 2003 Hewett 

Ave., Everett, Washington 
Bayliss, Hugh A., Pvt., Co. B, Santo, Texas 
Baxter, Oliver L., Pvt. 1 cl., Med. Det., R. F. D. No. 1, 

Martinsville, Illinois 
Beach, Charles, Pvt., Co. D, Palmer, Nebraska 
Bean, Carl E., Pvt., Co. H, Winchester, Illinois 
Beard, John W., Captain, Chaplain, 903 Dubuque St., Sioux 

City, Iowa 
Beattie, Chauncey H., Reg. Sup. Sgt., Sup. Co., 1321 E. 

63rd St., Seattle Washington 
Beck, George J., Pvt. 1 cl., Med. Det., Minden, Nebraska 
Becker, Edward A., Cpl., Co. K, 22>2 N. Pennsylvania St., 

Indianapolis, Indiana 
Becker, Leo P., Pvt., Co. C, Johnston City, Illinois 
Beckler, Robert I., Pvt., Co. B, R. F. D. No. 3, Nelson- 

ville, Ohio 
Beckman, Vern A., Sgt., M. G. Co., Asotin, Washington 
Becraft, George K., Pvt., Hq. Co., 211 24th Ave. S., 

Seattle, Washington 
Beebe, Frank T., Pvt. 1 cl., Co. M, Woodland, Washington 
Beebe, Jesse M., Cpl., Co. C, 500 Palo Alto Ave., Palo Alto, 

California 
Beeks, Ernest, Sgt., Co. I, Arlington, Oregon 
Beeson, Harry G., Pvt., Co. C, R. R. No. 6, Casey, Illinois 
Behrens, Carl J., Pvt., Co. A, St. Paul, Minnesota , 

Beliek, Harry, Pvt., Hq. Co., Fernwood, Idaho *' i 

Bell, Ernest A., Pvt., Co. B, 1210 Carlisle Ave., Cambridge, 

Ohio 
Bell, James O., Pvt., Co. L, Kimbolton, Ohio 



247 



Bell, Melvin S., Pvt., Hq. Co., R. F. D. No. 1, Box 78, 

Mt. Vernon, Washington 
Bell, Milford F., Pvt. 1 cl., Co. M, Kirkland, Washington 
Bellett, Harry J., Pvt., Co. L, 1351 W. 95th St., N. W., 

Cleveland, Ohio 
Belth, Walter, Pvt., Co. I, West Frankfort, Illinois 
Bender, Harry A., Pvt., Co. H, 202 E. Lincoln Ave., Fergus 

Falls, Minnesota 
Bennett, Calvin, Pvt., Co. H, McLeansboro, Illinois 
Benoit, Henry N., Cpl., Co. D, Ekalaka, Montana 
Benson, Roscoe H., Pvt., Co. A, Montezuma, Ohio 
Benti, Matt, Pvt., Co. L, Boyes, Montana 
Benus, Walter E., Pvt., Co. G, 741 N. 32nd St., Kansas 

City, Kansas 
Berg, Ingwald W., Pvt., Hq. Co., P. O. Box 507, Seattle, 

Washington 
Bergh, Roy A., Cpl., Co. E, R. F. D., Box 31, Olympia, 

Washington 
Berling, George B., Pvt., Co. L, 1433 Republic St., Cin- 
cinnati, Ohio 
Berlinger, Frank, Cpl., Co. D, Melrose, Montana 
Bernal, Stephen J., Pvt., Co. M, 1428 N. 14th St., St. 

Louis, Missouri 
Berner, John S., Pvt. 1 cl., M. G. Co., Box 95, Mica, Wash- 
ington 
Bernhardt, Carl W., Cpl., Co. E, 4853 N. Winchester Ave., 

Chicago, Illinois 
Berntsen, Carl, Pvt., Hq. Co., Issaquah, Washington 
Berry, Morris C, Pvt. 1 cl., Co. M, 2642 E. 49th St., 

Portland, Oregon 
Berto, Basil M., Sgt., Hq. Co., 220 24th Ave., Seattle* 

Washington 
Beske, Frank O., Pvt., Co. H, 1026 N. Edison St., Stockton, 

California 
Best, Raymond, Mess Sgt., Co. D, Densmore, Kansas 
Betatto, Guiseppi, Pvt., Co. H, 601 7th Ave., Seattle, 

Washington 
Bettfreund, Adolph F., Pvt. 1 cl., Co. F, Valley, Wash- 
ington 
Betz, Harry P., Pvt., Co. K, R. F. D. No. 2, Ninerva, Ohio 
Bianco, Antonio, Pvt., Co. A, 18 E. Oak St., Pittston, 

Pennsylvania 
Biermann, Henry W., Wagoner, Sup. Co., Ritzville, Wash- 
ington 
Biggs, Thomas, Pvt., Hq. Co., Winter Quarters, Carbou 

County, Utah 
Bignami, George, Pvt., Co. H, 5442 Clermont Ave., Oak- 
land, California 
Bihn, John M., Pvt., Co. K, Bradner, Ohio 
Biles, Norman G, Cpl., Co. D, Enumclaw, Washington 
Binford, Joseph B., Pvt., Co. F, 1021 J Street, Fresno, 

California 
Bird, Cromwell, Pvt., Co. I, 905 S. Main St., Pocatello, 

Idaho 
Bird, Edward J., Cpl., Co. C, 1208 Dolores St., San Fran- 
cisco, California 
Bischoff, Albert M., Pvt. 1 cl., Co. E, 667 11th St., Oak- 
land, California 
Bise, Henry H., Mechanic, Co. M, Ehprata, Washington 
Bisnett, John P., Pvt., Co. H, R. F. D. No. 7, Parsons, 

Kansas 
Biss, George E., Pvt., Co. M, Petersburg, North Dakota 
Bissell, Charles H., Bugler, Co. H, 1806 E. 65th St., Seattle 

Washington 
Bissett, Arthur, Pvt., Co. F, 308 6th Ave., S., Leth- 

bridge, Canada 
Black, Clive A., Pvt., Co. G, Deseret, Utah 
Black, Enoch F., Cook, Co. M, Sumner, Washington 
Black, John W., Pvt., Sup. Co., 2610 Fifth Ave., Seattle, 

Washington 
Black, Louis T., Pvt., Co. H, Arcadia, South Carolina 
Black, Rolland M., Pvt., Co. G, Abraham, Utah 
Blackburn, Dewey E., Cpl., Hq. Co., Springfield, Idaho 
Blair, Charles S., Cook, Hq.Co., 13101st Ave. S., Fayette, 

Idaho 
Blair, Lewis, Pvt., Co. L, 1220 Academy Ave., Kalamazoo, 

Michigan 
Blake, Charles H., Cook, Co. M, Box 342, Washburn, 

Maine 
Blakely, Theron M., Pvt. 1 cl., Co. C, care of Mrs. L. 

V. Holmes, Mountain View, California 
Blankenburg, Harry, Pvt., Co. C, Clinton, Washington 
Blauvelt, William M., Pvt., Hq. Co., Milton, Washington 
Bleem, Leo L., Cpl., Co. I, Evansville, Illinois 
Block, Henry E., Pvt. 1 cl., Co. E, Route No. 2, Princeton, 

Indiana 
Block, William, Pvt. 1 cl., M. G. Co., Parkers Prairie, 
Minnesota 



Blondheim, Howard, Wagoner, Sup. Co., Leduc, Alberta, 

Canada 
Bluemke, Otto C, Cook, Co. L, Arlington, Washington 
Blunt, Ferdinand A., Pvt., Co. D, Kilbone, Illinois 
Boche, John J., Pvt., Co. I, Elvarano, California 
Boelens, Charles, Pvt., Co. C, 577 Shamrock St., Grand 

Rapids, Michigan 
Boers, Herman, Pvt., Co. K, 1744 E. 44th St., Cleveland, 

Ohio 
Boesel, Louis W., Wagoner Sup. Co., Warren, Oregon 
Boggess, Sylvester, Pvt., Co. K, Bayhorse, Montana 
Boggs, Scott, Pvt., M. G. Co., Cressmont, West Virginia 
Bolander, Arthur J., Pvt., Co. H, 1131 Payne Ave., 

St. Paul, Minnesota 
Boles, Willey P., Pvt., Co. C, 501 E. Blvd. St., Marion, 

Illinois 
Bolitho, Walter, Pvt., Co. C, General Delivery, Portlandi 

Oregon 
Bolkan, Alfred, Pvt., Co. G, Cooperstown, North Dakota 
Bomer, Philip C, Mess Sgt., M. G. Co., 2223 N. 45th St., 

Seattle, Washington 
Bond, Leland S., Sgt., Hq. Co., 1355 Cortez Ave., Bur- 

lingame, California 
Bonebrake, Chester A., Pvt. 1 cl., Co. G, R. F. D. No. 5, 

Box 80, Vancouver, Washington 
Bonk, Emil, Pvt., Co. I, Tarrifille, Connecticut. 
Bonner, Fred H., Pvt. 1 cl., Co. F, R. F. D. No. 4, Corsi- 

cana, Texas 
Bonner, John F., Pvt., Co. K, 337 N. Addison St., In- 
dianapolis, Indiana 
Bono, Ermenegildo, Pvt. 1 cl., Co. F, 107 First St., San 

Pafel, California 
Bonwell, Hesse L., Pvt. 1 cl., Co. D, Albany, Oregon 
Borresson, Emil, Pvt. 1 cl., Co. C, Norman, Washington 
Bosserman, William E., Pvt., Co. L, 527 W. Bryan St., 

Bryan, Ohio 
Bosetti, Luigi, Pvt. 1 cl., M. G. Co., Renton, Washington 
Bottger, Henry E., Pvt., Hq. Co., Edger, Montana 
Bottino, Antone P., Pvt., Co. L, 1508 § St., Sacramento 

California 
Bounds, Robert E., Pvt., Co. D, Calhoun City, Mississippi 
Bowen, Carvin B., Pvt., Co. B, R. F. D. No. 1, Flora, Illi- 
nois 
Bowen, Frank H., Cpl., Co. M, Montesano, Washington 
Bowen, William, Pvt., Co. C, 1521 W. 47th St., Los Angeles 

California 
Bowers, William P., Pvt., Co. M, R. F. D. No. 1, Higsby 

Ohio 
Boyce, Clyde C, Sgt., Co. E, Box 71, Levensworth, Wash- 
ington 
Boyd, John A., Cpl., Co. C, 1258 John St., Seattle, Washing 

ton 
Boye, Otto F., Sgt., Co. F, Osmond, Nebraska 
Boyer, Leonard, Pvt., M. G. Co., Stratford, Fulton Co. 

New York 
Boylan, Henry R., Pvt., Co. K, 236 Park Ave., East Mans 

field, Ohio 
Boyle, Dominic J., Pvt., Co. C, New Straitsville, Ohio 
Brace, Fred L., 1st Lt., Sup. Co., 362}^ Eugene St., Port- 
land, Oregon 
Brackett, Hohn R., Sgt., Hq. Co., 3242 Cook St., Denver 

Colorado 
Braden, John, Pvt., Co. L, 62 Post St., San Francisco 

California 
Bradshaw, Joseph A., Pvt. 1 cl., M. G. Co., Box 246, Port 

Angeles, Washington 
Bradshaw, Roy, Pvt. 1 cl., Co. K, Chilly, Idaho 
Bradshaw, Thomas E., Pvt., Co. L, Crooksville, Ohio 
Bragg, Clifford E., Cpl., Co. A, R. F. D. No. 1, Shepherd, 

Montana 
Braker, Arthur E., Pvt. 1 cl., Co. H, Fairfield, California 
Brammier, Martin H., Cpl., Co. L, Syracuse, Nebraska 
Brandon, George M., Pvt., Co. A, 303 S. Clark St., Pana, 

Illinois 
Brandon, Patrick L., Sgt., Co. A, 3221 20th Ave. S., Seattle, 

Washington 
Branner, Thomas D., Pvt., Co. H, LaGrange, Kentucky 
Brashear, Cannon, Pvt., Co. E, Viper, Kentucky 
Brassfield, Joe M., Cpl., Co. E, Puget St., Olympia, 

Washington 
Brassill, Martin J., Pvt., Co. C, Drockland, California 
Brawand, Walter J., Sgt., Co. K, R. F. D. No. 1, Co- 
lumbus, Indiana 
Breeden, Delbert K., Pvt., Co. C, Worley, Idaho 
Brekken, Thimor A., Pvt., Co. G, Pekin, North Dakota 
Brelje, Herman H., Sgt., Co. M, Box 55, Steeleville, 
Illinois 



248 



Bresio, Michael B., Pvt. 1 cl., Co. M, Bremerton, Wash- 
ington 
Brewer, Marshall, Pvt., Co. I, Modoc, Illinois 
Bridgham, Harry W., Pvt. 1 cl., Co. C, 2524 Grand Ave., 

Everett, Washington 
Briley, Calvin R., Cpl., Co. D, Joshua, Texas 
Brill, Lewis S., Pvt., Co. L, 1927 Kinney Ave., Cincinnati, 

Ohio 
Brill, Samuel S., Pvt., Co. M, 909 S. Union St., Indian- 
apolis, Indiana 
Brindley, Edmund R., Pvt., Co. F, 118 W. J. St., Ontario, 

California 
Brinkhaus, Clarence B., Pvt., Co. G, 2502 W. Sullivan St., 

St. Louis, Missouri 
Broback, Duncan G., Cpl., Co. H., 8037 Wallingford Ave., 

Seattle, Washington 
Brobeck, Walter L., Band Cpl., Hq. Co., Kenyon, Minne- 
sota 
Broderick, Joseph A., Cpl., Co. E, 1229 Walter St., San 

Francisco, California 
Brodick, William B., Pvt., Co. I, 1155 Inteville Ave., 

Bronx, New York City, New York 
Broerman, Fred Louis, Pvt. 1 cl., Co. A, 4017 Houston 

Ave., Norwood, Ohio 
Brook, Horace D., Pvt., Hq. Co., 6003 4th Ave., N. E., 

Seattle, Washington 
Brooks, Fred O., Pvt., Co. A, R. R. No. 7, Zanesville, Ohio 
Brooks, George E., Pvt. 1 cl., Co. F, R. F. D. No. 1, 

Sedro Woolley, Washington 
Brooks, Harlin D., Sgt., Co. I, Pearl, Missouri 
Brooks, James T., Pvt., M. G. Co., Vernal, Utah 
Brooks, Robert, Pvt., Co. K, R. F. D. No. 2, Shelburn, 

Indiana 
Brooks, Theodore, Pvt., Co. K, R. F. D. No. 9, Hunting- 
ton, Indiana 
Broome, Glen A., Pvt. 1 cl., Hq. Co., 116a Sycamore 

Drive, Los Angeles, California 
Broughton, Arthur, Pvt., Co. G, Monroe, Washington 
Browman, Eben E., Pvt., Co. E, Falun, Kansas. 
Brown, Arthur J., Pvt. 1 cl., Sup. Co., 2027 11th Ave. N., 

Seattle, Washington 
Brown, Axel P., Pvt. 1 cl., Co. B, 1083 Shotwell St., San 

Francisco, California 
Brown, Barton W., Pvt., Hq. Co., Olympia, Washington 
Brown, Charles, Pvt., Co. K, Cambrake, West Virginia 
Brown, Charles I., Pvt. 1 cl., Co. B, Wilder, Idaho 
Brown, Charlie, Pvt., Co. C, 824 Poplar St., Nelsonville, 

Ohio 
Brown, Chester A., Pvt. 1 cl., Co. C, Redmond, Oregon 
Brown, David O., Cpl., Co. I, Percy, Illinois 
Brown, Frank E., Pvt., Co. C, Ina, Illinois 
Brown, Glenn, Pvt., M. G. Co., Box 211, Lexington, Ne- 
braska 
Brown, Golden, Pvt. 1 cl., Hq. Co., Greenup, Illinois 
Brown, Hesse C, Pvt., Sup. Co., Lorenzo, Idaho 
Brown, Milo R., Pvt., Co. C, care of Fowler Sanitarium, 

Fowler, California 
Brown, Moses A., Pvt. 1 cl., Co. I, Centralia, Illinois 
Brown, Paul F., Major, Med. Det., 3722 Nicollet Ave., 

Minneapolis, Minnesota 
Brown, Ralph, Pvt., Co. I, 89 State St., Hammond, Indiana 
Brownfield, Clarence P., Pvt., Co. D, 1417 W. Monroe 

St., Chicago, Illinois 
Brownie, Frank G., Pvt. 1 cl., Co. L, Box 336, Taft, Cali- 
fornia 
Brownlee, Thomas L., Pvt. 1 cl., Co. F, Las Cruces, New 

Mexico 
Bruce, William F., Pvt. 1 cl., Co. E, Narris City, Illinois 
Bruckart, Perry C, Pvt., Co. I, Clair, Michigan 
Brucks, Edward B., Pvt., Co. E, Glasgow, Missouri 
Brudeen, John W., Pvt. 1 cl., Co. C, 115 E. 30th St., Kear- 
ney, Nebraska 
Brumfield, Clifford E., Pvt., Co. M, Lecta, Ohio 
Bruner, James A., Pvt., Co. I, Dahlgren, Illinois 
Brunning, Alfred H., Pvt., Co. B, R. F. D. No. 2, Pember- 

ville, Ohio 
Bruno, Francesco, Pvt. 1 cl., Co. A, 407 6th Ave., S., Seat- 
tle, Washington 
Bruns, Carl H., Pvt., Co. B, R. R. No. 1, Box 69, Pember- 

ville, Ohio 
Bryan, John, Pvt., Co. C, R. F. D. No. 1, Louisville, 

Illinois 
Bryan, Prentiss, Cpl., Co. C, Pittsburg, Illinois 
Bryant, Charles M., Pvt. 1 cl., Co. K, 715 N. 4th St., 

Yakima, Washington 
Bryant, David W., Bn. Sgt. Major., Hq. Co., Box 212, R. 7, 

Yakima, Washington 
Bryant, Joe E., Cpl., Hq. Co., 1424 7th Ave., Seattle, 
Washington 



Bryant, Robert J., Pvt., Co. I, Ewan, Washington 
Bucchianeri, Nicodemo, Pvt., Co. M, 111 Washington St., 

San Francisco, California 
Buchanan, Clyde C, Cpl., Co. D, Manti, Utah 
Buchanan, John, Pvt., Co. F, Quinton, Oklahoma 
Buck, Robert H., Pvt., Med. Det., 612 St. Paul Ave., Los 

Angeles, California 
Buck, Waldo W., Pvt., Co. A, R. F. D. No. 1, Guysville, 

Ohio 
Buckmaster, William C, Pvt., Co. E, Box 274, Ther- 

mopolis, Wyoming 
Buer, Emil A., Pvt. 1 cl., Co. B, Harding, South Dakota 
Bugneni.Petre, Pvt., Co. M, Box 127 Hobart Mills, Nevada 

County, California 
Buhler, Francis I., Cpl., Co. E, Gannett, Blain County, 

Idaho 
Bulger, Joseph P., Sgt., Co. H, 333 N. Charles St., Belle- 
ville, Illinois 
Buller, Frank W., Pvt., M. G. Co., 5314 Smart Ave., 

Kansas City, Missouri 
Bunty, Charles I., Pvt., Co. L, Linden Ave., Hanover, 

Pennsylvania 
Burch, Ora L., Pvt. 1 cl., Co. A, Mittleton, Colorado 
Burcham, Thomas G., Pvt., Co. A, Long Creek, Illinois 
Burford, Gustavus E., Sgt., Co. M, Hanford, Washington 
Burger, Charles, Band Leader, Hq. Co., Fort Winfield 

Scott, San Francisco, California 
Burke, Charles R., Sgt., Co. A, 3012 Altamont Ave., 

Spokane, Washington 
Burkhart, Archie N., Sgt., Co. I, 1620 13th Ave., Seattle, 

Washington 
Burmester, Paul, Pvt., Hq. Co., 422 Valencia St., San 

Francisco, California 
Burnett, Thfodore W., 2nd Lt., 319 W. Front St., Oil City, 

Pennsylvania 
Burnham, Hale A., Cpl., Co. B, New Port, Washington 
Burns, Harold M., Cpl., Co. M, R. F. D. No. 1, Gig Harbor, 

Washington 
Burns, Thomas R., Pvt., Co. I, 231 N. Garfield Ave., Poca- 

tello, Idaho 
Burrell, Boss, Cpl., Co. M, G. D. Nangua, Missouri 
Burris, Thomas F., Pvt., M. G. Co., 236 E. 64th St., Tacoma, 

Washington 
Burt, William B., Pvt., Co. F, 3189 17th St., San Francisco, 

California 
Burton, Harold H., Captain, Reg. Staff, Cuyahoga Bldg., 

Cleveland, Ohio 
Bush, John H., Cpl., M. G. Co., Tempe, Arizona 
Bush, Percy A., Pvt. 1 cl., Co. D, Issaquah, Washington 
Burwell, George K., Pvt. 1 cl., Co. D, Mountain Grove, 

Virginia 
Bush, Robert W., Sgt., Co. B, Malad City, Idaho 
Bush, Stuart C, Pvt., Co. K, Castle Rock, Washington 
Butler, Frank L., Pvt., Co. F, 23 Laconia Ave., Sagas, 

Massachusetts 
Butler, Norvin I., Sgt., Co. H, R. F. D. No. 2, W. 12 St., 

Ogden, Utah 
Butler, Peter S., Pvt. 1 cl., Co. L, Watsonville, California, 

R. F. D. No. 5 
Butterbaugh, Ira L., Pvt. Co. L, Butler, Ohio 
Butterfield, Shelby W., Pvt. 1 cl., Co. B, 843 W. 60th St., 

Seattle, Washington 
Butterworth, William H., Sgt., Co. F, Hazelton, Idaho 
Buzas, Spiros J., Pvt. 1 cl., Co. G, 514 Sacramento St., 

Vallejo, California 
Byer, John A., Pvt., Co. K, Kranzburg, South Dakota 
Byers, Jess S., Wagoner, Sup. Co., Onalaska, Washington 
Cabichis, George M., Pvt. 1 cl., Co. H, 629 Pike St., Seattle, 

Washington 
Cable, Jesse E., Pvt., 1 cl., Co. D, 1915 Post St., San Fran- 
cisco, California 
Caddy, Frank, Pvt., Hq. Co., 132 W. Agate, Butte, Montana 
Cagle, Lester J., Pvt., Sup. Co., Chelan, Washington 
Caldwell, James R., Pvt., Co. C, R. F. D. No. 1, New 

Castle, Virginia 
Calkins, James P., Sgt., Co. A, R. R. No. 1, Mt. Vernon, 

Washington 
Call, Earnest, Wagoner, Sup. Co., R. F. D. No. 3, Black- 
foot, Idaho 
Callant, John A., Cpl., Co. D, Spencer, South Dakota 
Calmus, John B., Sgt., Co. G, Mt. Angel, Oregon 
Cameron, Franklin C, Pvt., Co. C, Bluford, Illinois 
Campbell, Charles L., Sgt., Co. H, 1945 S. E. St., Tacoma, 

Washington 
Campbell, James M., Pvt. 1 cl., Co. E, Box 74, Glendive, 

Montana 
Campbell, Lewis B., Cpl., Co. H, R. R. "C" Box 136-A, 

Hanford, California 



249 



Campbell, Wilford, Pvt., 1 cl., Co. I, Route No. 1, Brough- 

ton, Illinois 
Campbell, Zack C, Pvt., Co. E, Lawn, West Virginia 
Cantrell, Theophilus, Pvt., Co. M, R. F. D. No. 1, 

Broughton, Illinois 
Capelli, John J., Pvt., Co. H, Felton, California 
Capps, Everett, Pvt. 1 cl., M. G. Co., R. F. D. No. 2, 

Cerulean, Kentucky 
Carbray, Irwin G., Pvt., Co. H, 1926 G. St., Eureka, 

California 
Carisoza, Frank P., Pvt. 1 cl., Co. H, Sawtille, California 
Carley, Victor A., Cpl., Co. D, 4200 Spring Grove Ave., 

Cincinnati, Ohio 
Carlson, Hans, Pvt., Co. I, Molde, Norway 
Carlson, Algot G., Pvt., Co. C, Porter, Indiana 
Carlson, Axel R., Pvt. 1 cl., Sup. Co., 6515 3rd Ave., N. W., 

Seattle, Washington 
Carlson, Claude, Horseshoer, Sup. Co., R. F. D. No. 3, 

Ferndale, Washington 
Carlson, John, Mechanic, Sup. Co., 211 Dexter Ave., 

Seattle, Washington 
Carmody, Frank C, Cpl., Co. E, 221 S. Water Ave., Idaho 

Falls, Idaho 
Carnese, Peter, Pvt. 1 cl., Co. G, 65 Circular Ave., Pitts- 
field, Massachusetts 
Carnival, Ernest, Pvt. 1 cl., Co. F, 1160 E. Grant St., 

Portland, Oregon 
Carpenter, Clarence C, Pvt., Co. C, Nodaway, Iowa 
Carpenter, Mike C, Pvt., Co. E, 11-13-15 Riverside Ave., 

Spokane, Washington 
Carpenter, Roy D., Cpl., Co. G, Platteville, Colorado 
Carr, James F., Cpl., Co. L, 1438 Goodale Ave., Toledo, 

Ohio 
Carrico, Martin J., Pvt., Co. M, R. F. D. No. 2, Bards- 
town, Kentucky 
Carroll, John F., Pvt., Co. C, New Eagle, Pennsylvania 
Carroll, Steven V., Cook, Sup. Co., Butte, Oregon 
Carroll, Walter W., Pvt., Co. L, Fremont St., Cincinnati, 

Ohio 
Cart, Elmer, Pvt., M. G. Co., Herald, West Virginia 
Carter, Evan E., Pvt., Co. B, Cannelton, Indiana 
Carter, Michael, Cpl., Hq. Co., 240 S. Griffin Ave., Los 

Angeles, California 
Cartwright, Charles B., Pvt., Co. C, 22 3rd St., Willough- 

by, Ohio 
Carvin, George, Pvt., 1 cl., Co. I, 6011 Centre Ave., East 

End, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 
Casebeer, Leigh C, Sgt., Co. E, Cashmere, Washington 
Casenave, Peter S., Cook, Hq. Co., 540 North California 

St., Stockton, California 
Casey, John R., Cpl., Co. C, Vealona, California 
Casille, Cominico, Pvt., Co. I, Con Di Furi, Reggio, 

Calabria, Italy 
Cass, Elmer H., Sgt., Co. D, Sultan, Washington 
Cassidy, Lafe, Band Sgt., Hq. Co., 203 Bellevue Ave., 

Bellevue Apts., Seattle, Washington 
Cast, Burton A., Sgt., Co. C, Omark, Washington 
Cabteel, Bert, Pvt., Hq. Co., 1158 7th St., Bremerton, 

Washington 
Castro, Albert E., Musician. 3 cl., Hq. Co., 478 19th St., 

Oakland, California 
Catten, William, Pvt., Co. C, R. F. D., Box 49^, 

Arthur Garfield, Utah 
Cauley, Joseph, Pvt., Med. Det., 1245 S. Seventh St., 

St. Louis, Missouri 
Cave, Charles R., Sgt., Co. E, Winslow, Washington 
Caverly, Carl R., Pvt., Hq. Co., Walville, Washington 
Caverly, Harold C, Cpl., Co. F, Chehalis, Washington 
Cavin, Hulbert M., Pvt., Hq. Co., Moxee City, Wash- 
ington 
Cederson, Nick C, Pvt., Co. G, Hannaford, North Dakota 
Centama, Matteo, Pvt., Co. L, 225 Government Place, 

Williamsport, Pennsylvania 
Cerrone, Patist, Pvt. 1 cl., Co. H, P. O. Box 257, Garfield, 

Utah 
Chaldy, Fred, Pvt. 1 cl., Co. I, Res Heights, South Dakota 
Chambers, William H., Pvt. 1 cl., Co. G, Mapes, North 

Dakota 
Chancy, Homer A., Pvt., Co. F, 501 E. Marion St., Marion, 

Illinois 
Chandler, Melvin, Sgt., Co. C, 800 Walnut St., Hiawatha, 

Changnon, Paul A., Pvt., Co. D, Idaho Falls, Idaho 
Chapman, Herschel F., 1st Sgt., Co. I, Stuttgard, Arkansas 
Chapman, John, Pvt., M. G. Co., Sleight, West Virginia 
Chapman, Wilber G., Pvt., Co. H, 3211 Carolina St., San 

Pedro, California 
Charles, Felix, Pvt. 1 cl., Co. C, 703 18th Ave. S., Seattle, 

Washington 



Charlson, Lewis M., Cpl., Co. D, Marysville, Washington 
Charlton, Victor E., Pvt., Co. E, Munson Station, Clear- 
field County, Pennsylvania 
Chash, Peter, Pvt., Co. G, Shereshaw, Russia 
Chatterton, Harry H., Wagoner, Sup. Co., Siletz, Oregon 
Checketts, Raymond S., Cpl., Co. L, Weston, Idaho 
Cheeseman, Frank R., Pvt. 1 cl., Co. E, Orbiston, Hocking 

Co., Ohio 
Chepeleas, Thomas S., Pvt., Co. H, Southern Pacific Sta- 
tion, S. Vallejo, California 
Cherry, William B., Cpl., Co. I, 440 East Center St., Poca- 

tello, Idaho 
Chezek, William J., Pvt. 1 cl., Co. B, R. F. D. No. 2, 

Box 61, Wincock, Washington 
Chicou, Emile, Pvt., Co. G, 972 Stanford Ave., Oakland, 

California 
Childs, Walter J., Cpl., Co. I, 922 14th St., Boone, Iowa 
Chipp, Lewis L., Pvt., Co. D, American Falls, Idaho 
Choate, Carl J., Pvt., Co. B, 306 N. Russell St., Marion, 

Illinois 
Chon, Dong, Cook, Sup. Co., 1346 Broadway, Tacoma, 

Washington 
Chrast, Joseph B., Pvt. 1 cl., Co. G, Neppel, Washington 
Chresst, Fred, Cook, Co. F, 651 N. John St., Pocatello, 

Idaho 
Christensen, Alfred, Pvt., M. G. Co., Enwood, Iowa 
Christensen, Joseph A., Pvt., Co. H, 1412 W. 57th St., 

Seattle, Washington 
Christensen, Lee, Sgt., Co. E, 6613 S. Lawrence St., 

Tacoma, Washington 
Christensen, Marion, Pvt. 1 cl., M. G. Co., R. F. D. No. 1, 

Lancaster, Washington 
Christman, Frank L., Pvt., M. G. Co., Terry, Montana 
Christopulos, Gust, Pvt., Co. E, Liberty Candy Kitchen, 

Hanford, California 
Christy, Samuel W., Cpl., Hq. Co., 415 N. Brand Blvd., 

Glendale, California 
Church, Cleveland A., Cpl., Co. I, Carters Creek, 

Tennessee 
Cioffi, Fiorayanti, Pvt., Co. G, 149 N. Maple St., Akron, 

Ohio 
Cipriani, Louis, Mess Sgt., Co. A, 40 Lincoln St., Meader- 

ville, Montana 
Clark, Charles R., Pvt. 1 cl., Co. D, Stone, Idaho 
Clark, Charles L., Pvt., Co. I, Auburn, Nebraska 
Clark, Frederick W., Pvt., Co. G, 209 3rd Avenue, Red 

Oak, Iowa 
Clark, Henry, Pvt.l cl., Co.M, 2350 55th Ave., Oakland, 

California 
Clark, James E., Pvt., Co. K, Visalia, California 
Clark, John G., Pvt., Co. I, Victoria, Illinois 
Clark, Leo, Pvt., Co. I, Rosevelt, Utah 
Clawson, Carl W., Cpl., Co. I, 5621 Adeline St., Oakland, 

California 
Clawson, George L., Cpl., Co. F, Durham, California 
Claywell, John F., Pvt., Co. L, 1328 So. 1st, Terre Haute, 

Indiana 
Clayton, Byron C, Pvt., Hq. Co., 336 W. 52nd Place, 

Los Angeles, California 
Clayton, Lee R., Sgt., Co. C, 219 S. Seminary St., Collins- 

ville, Illinois 
Clayton, Merlin A., Pvt. 1 cl., Co. L, Coalville, Utah 
Clements, Harry L., Mech., Co. C, Hayes, South Dakota 
Click, Robert L., Pvt., Co. I, R4, Sneedsville, Tennessee 
Click, William I., Pvt. 1 el., Co. I, Macedonia, Illinois 
Cline, Albert N., Mechanic, Co. B, 414 S. 9th St., Mar- 
shall, Illinois 
Cline, Gayle A., Pvt., Co. L, Mineral Ridge, Ohio 
Clodfelter, Fred R., Pvt., M. G. Co., R. F. D. No. 2, 

Comer, Georgia 
Clore, Wry V., Cook, Co. D, 1196 Chehalis Ave., Chehalis, 

Washington _ 

Cluff, Goldwin W., Pvt. 1 cl., Co. I, 258 N. 2nd St. E. t 

Provo, Utah 
Clutter, Vernon, Pvt., Co. M, 87 Pike St., Coal Grove, 

Ohio 
Coates, Newton, Pvt., Co. H, 1504 El Centro St., S. Pasa- 
dena, California 
Coburn, Hilton K., Pvt., Co. I, Axtell, Montana 
Coen, Leon J., Pvt. 1 cl., Co. E, 1839 8th St., Alameda, 

California 
Coffey, Royal A., 1st Lt., Co. E, 413 Wallace St. N., Boze- 

man, Montana 
Cohen, Ike, Pvt., Co. A, 92 Willard Ave., Providence, 

Rhode Island 
Cohen, Israel, Pvt., Co. A, 3619 Stanton Ave., Cincinnati, 

Ohio 
Cokley, Lossie, Pvt., Co. B, Route 3, Clay City, Illinois 
Cole, Arlough E., Pvt. Co. D, Olympia, Washington 



250 



Coleman, Leslie B., Pvt., Co. M, 204Masten Ave., Ironton, 

Ohio 
Coleman, Loyd E., Pvt., Co. K, Kirk, Colorado 
Collins, Alonzo, Pvt., Co. D, London, Ohio 
Collins, Fkank, Pvt., M. G. Co., Wayland, Kentucky 
Collins, Harold R., Pvt. 1 cl., Co. H, 425 W. 3rd St., 

Moscow, Idaho 
Collins, Orvis B., Stable Sgt., Sup. Co., 2016 8th Ave., N., 

Great Falls, Montana 
Collins, Ralph D., Cpl., Hq. Co., 5805 Puget Sound Ave., 

Tacoma, Washington 
Collins, Thomas L., Pvt., Co. D, Miller, South Dakota 
Collis, Leon E., Pvt., Co. G, 2747 Cornell Ave., Indian- 
apolis, Indiana 
Collister, Viets, Cpl., Co. G, Madison, Ohio 
Colone, Edward C, Pvt., Co. G, Fremont, Nebraska 
Colton, Frank, Pvt., M. G. Co., 3319 Carnegie Ave., S. E., 

Cleveland, Ohio 
Colton, Joseph, Pvt., Hq. Co., 247 S. Flower St., Los 

Angeles, California 
Colwell, William E., Pvt., Co. K, Asotin, Washington 
Combetto, Joseph, Pvt., M. G. Co., New Castle, Wash- 
ington 
Comerford, Joseph G., Pvt., Co. D, Leonard Hotel, Butte, 

Montana 
Compliment, Lawrence, Pvt., Co. M, R. F. D. No. 1, 

Ironton, Ohio 
Conde, Pio, Pvt. 1 cl., Co. L, P. O. Box 536, Bremerton, 

Washington 
Condino, Joseph M., Pvt., Co. K, 11 Imperial Ave., San 

Francisco, California 
Condos, George, Pvt., Co. M, 269 Alder St., Portland, 

Oregon 
Confer, John M., Sgt., Co. G, 405^ E. Pike St., Seattle, 

Washington 
Conkey, Austin R., Pvt., Co. L, New Marshfield, Ohio 
Conway, Charles, Cook, Co. F, Bridger, Montana 
Cook, Charles O., Pvt., Co. I, Townsend, Montana 
Cook, Chester C, Pvt., Co. F, 321 N. Friends St., Whittier, 

California 
Cook, Lawrence, Cpl., Co. A, 412 W. Main St., Bellevue, 

Ohio 
Cooley, Warren R., Pvt. 1 cl., Co. H, R. F. D. No. 2, Box 

47, Harrisburg, Oregon 
Coon, Oliver M., Pvt., Co. C, Baker, Oregon 
Cooper, Albert R., Pvt., Co. F, R. F. D., Box 14, Prosser, 

Washington 
Cooper, Andrew J., Pvt. 1 cl., Co. G, 1041 Carolina St., 

Vallejo, California 
Coppinger, Frank W., 2nd Lt., 716 Valley Rd., Upper 

Montclair, New Jersey 
Corbelli, Adolph, Mus., Hq. Co., Box 38, McCleary, 

Washington 
Corbett, Thomas F., Pvt., Co. G, Chisholm, Minnesota 
Cordell, Jay A., Cpl., Co. E, Orefino, Idaho 
Cording, Charley B., Pvt. 1 cl., Sup. Co., Brittania Mines, 

British Columbia, Canada 
Cornell, Ralph D., Cpl., Co. L, 2139^ W. 16th St., Los 

Angeles, California 
Corner, Carroll N., Cook, Co. G, Phillipsburg, Missouri 
Corry, Roy, Pvt., Co. B, R. F. D. No. 2, Xenia, Illinois 
Cortland, George, Pvt., Co. D, Front St., Fremont, Ohio 
Corvello, Manuel C, Mus., Hq. Co., R. F. D. 90-A, 

Merced, California 
Costa, Edmund J., Mus., Hq. Co., 1711 21st St., Oakland, 

California 
Coulter, Raymond E., Cpl., Co. G, 7302 Harvard Ave., 

Chicago, Illinois 
Coundley, Ernest, Cook, Hq. Co., Wilkinson, Washington 
Courtney, Ray, Pvt., Co. F, 2 Prentice St., Worcester, 

Massachusetts 
Covalsk, Lookiam, Pvt., Co. F, Aberdeen, Washington 
Covington, Daniel N., Horseshoer, Hq. Co., Torrey, Utah 
Cowen, Frederick, Pvt., Co. L, 728 N. Main St., Napa, 

California 
Cox, Albert C, Pvt., 1 cl., Co. L, R. F. D. No. 1, Edmonds, 

Washington 
Cox, Everett, Cpl., Co. B, Traphill, North Carolina 
Cox, Fred L., Pvt., Co. B, Calvin, Illinois 
Cox, James W., Pvt., Med. Det., Almyra, Arkansas 
Cox, John J., Cpl., Co. F, Mcintosh, Washington 
Cox, Leo, Pvt., Co. K, Sesser, Illinois 
Cox, William E., Pvt., M. G. Co., Pembroke, Kentucky 
Coyne, Walter J., Pvt., Co. H, 3329 Lyndale Ave., N., 

Minneapolis, Minnesota 
Cozad, Paul N., Pvt. 1 cl., Co. H, 804 E. 1st St., Santa Ana, 

4 California, a 
Craig, Harry J., 2nd Lt., Hq. Co., Box 997, Bremerton, 

Washington 



Craig, Robert H., Pvt., Co. E, Woodland, Idaho 
Cram, Kenneth E., Pvt., M. G. Co., Maxbass, North 

Dakota 
Cramer, John W., Cpl., Co. H, Hailey, Idaho 
Cramer, Paul M., Cpl., Co. G, 51 W. Delaware PI., Chicago, 

Illinois 
Crandall, Dayton, Mechanic, Co. G, R. F. D. No. 2, 

Anacortes, Washington 
Craven, Howard, Bn. Sgt. Major, Hq. Co., 427 W. 6th St., 

Emporium, Pennsylvania 
Crawford, Arthur E., Pvt., 1 cl., Co. I, Route 4, Box 36, 

Sedalia, Missouri 
Crippen, Chester C, Pvt., Co. L, Skamokawa, Washington 
Crockett, Obie, Pvt. 1 cl., Co. F, Parks, Arizona 
Croll, Frederick J., Pvt., Co. M, 1513 Detroit Ave., 

Toledo, Ohio 
Crosley, John N., Pvt., Co. G, South Auburn, Nebraska 
Cross, Fulton B., Pvt., Hq. Co., Jordan Valley, Oregon 
Crossman, Ralph, Mess Sgt., Co. K, 2823 S. Flower St., 

Los Angeles, California 
Crovo, James, Pvt., Co. G, 306 Union St., Stockton, Cali- 
fornia 
Crozier, Hazlet M., Cpl., Co. K, R. F. D. No. 1, Findlay, 

Ohio 
Crump, Mathew L., Pvt., Co. A, 605 W. 15th St., Richmond, 

Virginia 
Cruse, Theodore, Sgt., M. G. Co., 3634 Corliss Ave., 

Seattle, Washington 
Crustalas, Panagotis, Pvt., Co. G, 1300 Adams St., Garry, 

Indiana 
Crystal, Herman, Pvt. 1 cl., Co. K, 163 E. 9th St., Salt 

Lake City, Utah 
Cudd, John C, Sgt., Co. F, R. F. D. No. 4, Box 34, Gonzalis, 

Texas 
Cullen, Barney T., Pvt., Co. C, care of A. W. Green & Co., 

845 So. Los Angeles St., Los Angeles, California 
Cullen, Francis J., Pvt., Co. M, 76 Broadway, Schenec- 
tady, New York 
Cullen, James A., Pvt. 1 cl., Co. K, 902 Poplar St., Oakland, 

California 
Cullison, William R., Pvt., Co. L, So. Heights, Pennsyl- 
vania 
Cully, John T., Pvt., Co. H, 604 S. State St., Aberdeen, 

South Dakota 
Culver, Samuel H., Pvt., Co. C, 222 W. Manor St., Los 

Angeles, California 
Cummings, Avery D., Col., 361st Inf., Camp Travis, Texas 
Cummings, Harold, Pvt., Co. G, 908 2nd Ave., S., Great 

Falls, Montana 
Cummings, James D., Pvt., Co. L, 901 11th St., S. E., 

Washington, D. C. 
Cummins, John E., Pvt., Co. M, 147 Thurman. Columbus, 

Ohio 
Cunningham, Harker, Pvt. 1 cl., Co. H, Edison, Cali- 
fornia 
Cunningham, John M., Pvt., Co. B, R. F. D. No. 3, Flora, 

Illinois 
Curlee, Arthur R., Cpl., Co. C, 814 19th St., Douglas, 

Arizona 
Curran, John H., Pvt., Co. G, Cummings Bridge Post 

Office, Ottawa, Canada 
Curran, Patrick F., Pvt., Co. D, 2502 W. Orange St., 

South Bend, Indiana 
Curti, Lorenzo, Pvt. 1 cl., Co. L, Yorba, California 
Curtis, Frank L., Pvt. 1 cl., Co. C, Norwalk, California 
Cusworth, John J., Cpl., Hq. Co., 12 A. B. St., N., Rosyln, 

Washington 
Dabbs, James, Cook, Co. F, R. F. D. No. 3, Hohenwald, 

Tennessee 
Daganhart, Harley E., Cpl., Co. I, Piqua, Ohio 
Dagres, George D., Pvt., Co. E, 1VA Capital St., Charles- 
ton, West Virginia 
Dahlstrom, Ralph A., Cpl., Co. B, 6243 Flora Ave., Seattle, 

Washington 
Daily, John F., Pvt., Co. G, R. F. D. No. 4, Box 138, Ko- 

komo, Indiana 
Daily, William E., Cpl., Co. C, Shell City, Missouri 
Daley, Jeremiah F., Pvt., Co. D, 332 Virginia Ave., San 

Francisco, California 
Dalton, Philip N., Cpl., Co. C, 836 Kingston Ave., Oakland 

City, California 
Daly, George B., Pvt. 1 cl., Co. H, 105 18th St., Milwaukee, 

Wisconsin 
Damsell, Ernest G., Pvt., Hq. Co., Healdsburg, Sonoma 

County, California 
Dandrea, Mickele A., Pvt. 1 cl., Co. E, 323 W. Indiana St., 

Spokane, Washington 
Danforth, Clyde E., Wagoner, Sup. Co., 7013 17th Ave., 

N. W., Seattle, Washington 



251 



Daniels, Joseph F., Pvt., Co. F, Belt, Montana 
Danielson, Erick, Pvt., 1 cl., Co. F, Alo, Montana 
Darcey, James, Horseshoer, Sup. Co., Colbert, Washington 
Darnell, Clarence A., Pvt., Co. A, 2402 St. Mary's Ave., 

Omaha, Nebraska 
Dattghhrty, James, Pvt., Co. B, R. F. D. No. 2, Flora, 

Illinois 
Daubher, Chauncey W., Sup. Sgt., Co. A, 708 Nevada St., 

Seattle, Washington 
David, Harry E., Pvt., 1 cl., Co. H, Puento, California 
David, Meddy M., Pvt. 1 cl., Co. H, Crows Landing, Cali- 
fornia 
Davidson, Frank, Pvt., Med. Det., 820 N. Marengo Ave., 

Pasadena, California 
Davidson, John, Pvt., Co. C, R. F. D. No. 6, Bowling 

Green, ( >hio 
Davidteh, William F., Pvt., Co. L, 2710 Keokuk St., 

St. Louis, Missouri 
Davis, Charles C, Cook, Sup. Co., 212 E. Adams St., 

Pittsburg, Kansas 
Davis, David H., Pvt., Co. E, R. F. D. No. 3, Box 75, 

Bolivar, Missouri 
Davis, Floyd F., Pvt. 1 cl., M. G. Co., 779 S. 7th St., E., 

Salt Lake City, Utah 
Davis, Homer J., Pvt., Co. B, 1012 W. Elm St., Lima, Ohio 
Davis, Leck, Sgt., Co. C, R. R. 2, Window, Indiana 
Davis, Leonard L., Pvt., 1 cl., Co. H, Bland, Missouri 
Davis, Thomas W., Sgt., Co. C, Bellvalle, Ohio 
Davis, Wallace W., Pvt. 1 cl., Co. D, 2701 K St., Sacra- 
mento, California 
Davis, Walter F., 1st Lt., Co. G, Sidney, Nebraska 
Day, Arista M., Pvt., Co. D, Bloomingdale, Indiana 
Cay, Clarence, Pvt., 1 cl., Co. A, R. F. D. No. 3, Westport, 

Indiana 
Day, John P., Pvt., Co. B, Twin Falls, Idaho 
Deardohff, Henry G., Pvt., Co. G, Winfield, West Vir- 
ginia 
Deain, Charles L., Pvt., Co. B, R. F. D. No. 4, Louisville, 

Illinois 
Deal, Martin Van B., Pvt., Co. L, Frazier Bottom, West 

Virginia 
Deamarel, Pvt., 1 cl., Co. M, Folsom, California 
Dean, Dell, Pvt., Co. I, Howell, South Dakota 
Dean, William, 1st Lt., Co. K, Berea, Kentucky 
Deary, John C, Wagoner, Hq. Co., Jordan Valley, Oregon 
De Bolt, Odas C, Pvt., Co. L, Sunbury, Ohio 
Deck, Wibur C, Pvt., Hq. Co., R. F. D. No. 2, Barnsville, 

Ohio 
Decker, Andrew J., Pvt., Co. A, 1414 Parkson St., Vin- 

cennes, Indiana 
Decker, Bdrnice E., Pvt., Hq. Co., Box 203, Beallsville, 

Ohio 
Deering, Lawrence P., Pvt., Co. F, 702 Cherry St., New 

Albany, Indiana 
Deitrick, William R., Pvt., Co. I, 1002 Penn St., Williams- 
port, Pennsylvania 
Deekreek, Edward, Pvt., Co. B, Box 26, Hessville, Indiana 
Delapp, Harry A., Cook, Co. B, Peola, Washington 
Delbow, August, Pvt. 1 cl., Co. A, Shakopee, Minnesota 
Dellinger, William H., Pvt., M. G. Co., Wardensville, 

West Virginia 
Dellis, Alfred G., Pvt., Co. F, 116 Winnepeg Ave., St. 

Paul, Minnesota 
DeLotell, Albert T., Pvt., Hq. Co., Portsmouth, Ohio 
DeMars, John, Pvt., Co. I, 211 Merrill St., Merrill, Wis- 
consin 
Demas, Gontenos D., Pvt., Co. D, 307^ Burnside St., 

Portland, Oregon 
Dement, Gilbert E., Pvt., Co. L, Wilgus, Ohio 
Demathakalis, James G., Pvt., Co. L, 2221 E. 0th St., 

Cleveland, Ohio 
Demetre, Charles, Pvt., Co. H, 1010 Alabama St., Vallejo, 

California 
Demorest, Claude S., Pvt., Med. Det., Merrill, Oregon 
Dempsey, Clayton, Pvt., Co. B, 1203 Commerce St., 

Petersburg, Virginia 
Dempsey, Walter, Pvt. 1 cl., Co. H, 1494 Underwood Ave., 

San Francisco, California 
Den Beste, Isaac, Pvt., Co. M, Sioux Center, Iowa 
Denbo, Jesse, Pvt., Co. M, Newton Stewart, Indiana 
Denney, Ray R., Pvt., Co. L, Canton, Montana 
Denney, Safford A., Pvt., Co. G, Conrad, Montana 
Denton, Joseph, Pvt., Hq. Co., Valparaiso, Indiana 
Denton, Walter B., Pvt. 1 cl., Co. H, 619 S. 14th St., Boise, 

Idaho 
Depaolo, John, Pvt., Co. L, Colfax, Washington 
Derickson, Bert, Pvt., Co. B, 1014 Albany St., Indian- 
apolis, Indiana 
Derosa, Joe, Pvt. 1 cl., Co. H, Folsom, California 



Derr, Lemuel, Pvt. 1 cl., Van Keet, Wyoming 

Desilet, Joseph F., Pvt. 1 cl., Co. C, 2702 N. Birch St., 

i :ii Irande, I Oregon 
DeSota, Clifford, Pvt. 1 cl., Hq. Co., Clevis, California 
Devan, John J., Wagoner, Sup. Co., 540 Union St., San 

Francisco, California 
Devendorf, Jeff M., Mus., Hq. Co., Montesano, Washing- 
ton 
Dbver, William, Pvt., Hq. Co., R. F. D. No. 6, Springfield, 

( lino 

Dbvebicx, Claude A., Cook, Co. I, 513 N. 14th St., Terre 

Haute, Indiana 
Davehs, Amos L., Pvt., Co. M, 1212 W. 9th St., Anderson, 

Indiana 
DeVine, Vincent, Pvt., Co. E, 51 N. Welles St., Wilkesbarre, 

Pennsylvania 
DeWeese, Livey W., Mechanic, Co. F, Pelouse, Washington 
Dewell, Charles O., Pvt., Hq. Co., 700 Maryland Ave., 

Canton, Ohio 
Dewey, George O., Pvt., Co. 1, 1210 W. 22nd St., Cheyenne, 

Wyoming 
Dey, Harry D., Sgt., Co. K, 317H Main Ave., Spokane, 

Washington 
Dibley, Fred J., Sgt., Co. D, Enumclaw, Washington 
Dice, Albert, Pvt., Co. F, Carthage Pike, Cincinnati, 

Ohio 
Dicelle, Nick, Pvt., Co. K, 212 W. 3rd St., Spring Valley, 

Illinois 
Diciccio, Gregorio, Pvt., Co. L, 386 Mararoneck Ave., 

Mamaroneck, Now York 
Dickinson, Friend S., Major, 3rd Bn., Seattle, Washington 
Dickman, Albert, Pvt. 1 cl., Co. D, 214 N. Bailey, Los 

Angeles, California 
Dickson, Charles W., Cpl., Co. C, Boyd, Oregon 
Didier, Julius, Pvt., Co. I, Beauchamp, Saskatchewan, 

Canada 
Diederick, Roy E., Wagoner, Sup. Co., Gen. Del., Frank- 

Diehl,' Clarence, Pvt., Co. F, 92 N. Brownell St., Chilli- 

cothe, Ohio 
Diehm, Gustave W., Pvt., Co. I, Sterling, Nebraska 
Dieringeh, Henry J., Pvt., Hq. Co., Toledo, Wash. 
Dietz, Joseph W., Jr., Pvt., Co. G, Lodi, California 
Digiorgio, Anselmo, Pvt., Co. I, Rue General Oaorio, 

126 Sao Paule, Brazil, S. A. 
Dillard, Emory, Pvt., Co. I, Mineral Bluff, Georgia 
Dillard, Robert S., Cpl., Co. D, Belton, Texas 
Dillin, Hugh, Pvt. 1 cl., Co. I, Volpon, Indiana 
Dillow, Herbert L., Pvt., Co. A, Cuba, Missouri 
Dilaorenzo, Luca, Pvt., Co. H, Wesley Hotel, Niles, 

California 
Dinwiddie, Ralph, Wagoner, Sup. Co., Deming, Washing- 
ton 
Dippel, George J., Cpl., Co. I, 173 Penn Ave., Mt. Oliver, 

Pennsylvania 
Dittentholer, George D., Pvt. 1 cl., Hq. Co., 1204 Roose- 

velt Ave., North Yakima, Washington 
Dixon, Linzzie It., Pvt. 1 cl., Co. I, Mattoon, Illinois 
Dobie, Alexander, Sgt., Co. H, 1323 Terry Ave., Seattle, 

Washington 
Doble, Milo, Wagoner, Sup. Co., Carrolls, Washington 
Dodge, Clifford A., Sgt., Co. C, Valley Falls, Kansas 
Dodge, Glenn R., Hq. Co., Bordeaux, Washington 
Doering, Oscar W., Cpl., Co. E, 2510 Fourth Ave., Spokane, 

Washington 
Doggett, Joseph R., Pvt., Co. L, Lara, Virginia 
Doherty, Frank P., Major, 1st Bn., 1814 S. Grand Ave., 

Los Angeles, California 
Doing, Frank G., Pvt., Co. M, R. R. No. 4, Box 51, Paines- 

ville, Ohio 
Dolan, John J., Pvt., Co. E, St. Claire, Pennsylvania 
Dole, Virgil, Cook, Co. H, Woodland, California 
Donaghy, Michael, Pvt., Co. E, Ehrenfeld, Cambria 

County, Pennsylvania 
Donahoe, Frank T., Pvt., Co. I, Paris, Montana 
Donahue, Joseph E., Pvt., Co. L, Mackay, Idaho 
Donoghue, Stephen M., Pvt., Co. A, 734 Elizabeth St., 

San Francisco, California 
Donovan, George M., Pvt. 1 cl., M. G. Co., 640 N. Brendo 

St., Los Angeles, California 
Doolittle, Lloyd A., Cpl., Co. D, 134 W. White St., Grand 

Junction, Colorado 
Dorenkamp, Anthony P., Pvt., Co. E, 7249 Semington 

Ave., Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 
Dornseif, Lorenz A., Mus., Hq. Co., Orange, California 
Dornseif, Philip L., Pvt. 1 cl., M. G. Co., Orange, Cali- 
fornia 
Dotseth, Kristian M., Pvt., Co. I, Einastranden P. O. V. 

Toton, Norway, Europe 



252 



Dougherty, James F., Pvt., Co. E, 16 Brainard St., Phil- 

lipsborg, New York 
Dow, Joseph H., Pvt., Hq. Co., 1267 Johnson Ave., San 

Diego, California 
Dowell, Emerson E., Pvt., Hq. Co., 223 2nd Ave., W., 

Seattle, Washington 
Downey, Glen, Sgt., Co. D, Palouso, Washington 
Downing, Wallace T., Captain, Co. B, 589 Drexel Ave., 

Glencoe, Blinois 
Doxstater, Benjamin, Pvt., Co. I, Kallispell, Montana 
Doyle, Patrick A., Pvt., Co. I, North Bend, Nebraska 
Dozier, John L., Pvt. 1 el., Co. I, R. F. D. No. 1, Indian- 
apolis, Oklahoma 
Drake, LaVerne C, Pvt. 1 el., Co. G, 300 Church St., 

Whitewater, Wisconsin 
Draper, Cecil H., Bugler 1 el., Co. G, 1338 St. Helens Ave., 

Centralia, Washington 
Drawdy, Charles N., Pvt., Co. B, Waltersboro, South 

Carolina 
Drewek, Conrad, Pvt., Co. K, 665 Arthur Ave., Milwau- 
kee, Wisconsin 
Drewitzke, Emil, Pvt., Co. H, 620 N. Garrison, St. Louis, 

Missouri 
Driscoll, Peter J., Pvt., Co. A, 1015 St. Ange Ave., St. 

Louis, Missouri 
Driscoll, Philip S., Pvt., Co. I, Alliance, Nebraska 
Drishinski, Peter, Pvt., Co. I, Conrad, Montana 
Drtjffel, Joseph F., Cpl., Co. M, Colton, Washington 
Dua, Israel, Pvt., Co. K, 1254 Kimball Hall, Chicago, 

Illinois 
Duane, Victor E., Pvt., Co. I, Oak Harbor, Washington 
Dubach, Marvin R., Cpl., Co. E, Auburn, Wyoming 
Duffy, John A., Pvt., Co. F, 748^ S. Main St., Butte, 

Montana 
Duffy, Joseph E., Pvt. 1 el., Co. H, 2887 22nd St., San 

Francisco, California 
Duggan, Austin, Sgt., Hq. Co., 509 N. 43rd St., Seattle, 

Washington 
Duke, Claud L., Pvt. 1 el., Co. D, Halfway, Oregon 
Duke, Warren L., Pvt. 1 el., Co. L, Eureka, Utah 
Dukes, Kenneth D., Pvt., Med. Det., Saratoga, Wyoming 
Dunbar, Roy W., Musician, Hq. Co., R. F. D. No. 3, Box 

91, Seattle, Washington 
Duncan, Donald D., Cpl., Co. I, Humbolt, Illinois 
Dunkel, Herman J., Pvt. 1 el., M. G. Co., R. F. D. No. A, 

Box 240, Sanger, California 
Dunkelberger, Harold I., Pvt. 1 el., Co. E, R. F. D. No. 

1, Box 105, Olympia, Washington 
Dunn, Charles D., Pvt., Co. H, 509 Columbia St., Cle- 
burne, Texas 
Dunn, Thomas E., 1st Lt., Co. M, 83 Walton St., Saratoga 

Springs, New York 
Dunne, Charles P., Pvt., Co. E, R. F. D. No. 2, Box 57, 

Langford, South Dakota 
Dunnigan, Joseph L., Pvt., M. G. Co., 938 Grove St., 

Avoca, Pennsylvania 
Duquette, Oliver, Pvt., Co. F, 983 S. Normandie St., 

Los Angeles, California 
Durick, John J., Pvt., Co. I, Portage, Wisconsin 
Durst, Edward A., Pvt. 1 el., Co. M, Pomeroy, Ohio 
Dutscher, Dwight E., Cook, Hq. Co., Route 1, Box 119, 

Snohomish, Washington 
Duval, Charles H., Pvt., Co. E, P. O. Box 1998, Bisbie, 

Duvall, Edmond T., 1st Lt., Co. G, 1316 First St., Louis- 
ville, Kentucky 
Dvorak, Frank, Sgt., Hq. Co., Aberdeen, Idaho 
Dwyer, Frank J., Pvt., Co. L, 645 State St., Tacoma, 

Washington 
Dwyer, William C, 2nd Lt., Co. G, 438 River St., Water- 
bury, Connecticut 
Dycus, John O., Pvt., Co. B, Waltonville, Illinois 
Dyberg, Herman, Pvt. 1 el., Med. Det., 1226 35th Ave., 

Oakland, California 
Dyksterhuis, Bert, Musician, Hq. Co., Lyndon, Wash- 
ington 
Dyreborg, Lewis B., 1st Sgt., M. G. Co., Box 281, Route A, 

Fresno, California 
Eakin, Billy J., Mechanic, Co. H, 1827 N. 53rd St., Seattle, 

Washington 
East, William H., Sgt., Co. E, 517 Franklin St., West 

Reading, Pennsylvania 
Easter, Millard J., Sgt., Co. M, Cabinot, Idaho 
Echolds, Eli F., 1st Lt., Co. H, Windfall, Indiana 
Eckert, Mathew L., Pvt., Med. Det., 1613 Warren Ave., 

Seattle, Washington 
Eckman, Andrew W., Pvt., Co. A, Latah, Washington 
Economou, John G., Pvt., Co. H, 1424 1st Ave., Seattle, 
Washington 



Eddy, Bret W., Lt. Col., 361st Inf., 510 Clarence St., Lake 

Charles, Louisiana 
Eddy, Elmon E., Pvt., Co. E, R. R. No. 6, Quaker City, 

Ohio 
Eder, Walter W., Pvt., Co. L, 2727 Warren Ave., Seattle, 

Washington 
Edgerly, Amos M., Pvt., Co. K, R. F. D. No. 3, Pataskala, 

Ohio 
Edwards, Donald C, Sgt., Co. H, 4534 44th Ave., S. W., 

Seattle, Washington 
Edwards, Frederick L., Pvt., M. G. Co., Adair, Idaho 
Edwards, Herbert S., Pvt., Co. H, 1508 Ralston Ave, 

Burlingamo, California 
Edwards, John O., Pvt., M. C. Co., Doon, Iowa 
Egnot, George J., Pvt., Co. E, 86 Sibley St., Ashtabula, 

Ohio 
Ehnes, Joseph M., Pvt., Co. I, 585 Charles St., St. Paul, 

Minnesota 
Eidsvick, Ludvig R., Cpl., Co. H, Seattle, Washington 
Eiselstein, Raymond D., Pvt., Hq. Co., Pomeroy, Ohio 
Eisenbeis, Gilbert S., Pvt., Co. E, 1017 Railway St., 

Williamsport, Pennsylvania 
Eklund, Harry, Pvt., Hq. Co., 1015 Arnold Ave., Hoquiam, 

Washington 
Eklund, Matt A., Pvt., Hq. Co., 1015 Arnold Ave., Hoqui- 
am, Washington 
Elder, George T., Sgt., Enlisted Ordinance Corps, De- 
catur, Texas 
Elliott, Harry S., Cpl., Co. H, 2637 N. 86th St., Seattle, 

Washington 
Ellis, Lester M., 1st Lt., Co. L, care of Y. M. C. A., Tacoma, 

Washington 
Elmore, Samuel H., Cook, Co. I, 604 S. 7th Ave., Yakima, 

Washington 
Elswyk, Jacob J. V., Pvt., Co. I, R. F. D. No. 2, Holtville 

California 
Emow, Fran C, Sgt., Co. C, 309 N. 6th St., Boise, Idaho 
Engelmann, Henry A., Pvt., Co. I, R. F. D. No. 4, Ed- 

wardsville, Illinois 
Engkraf, John J., Cpl., Co. F, Rupert, Idaho 
Engstrom, Jay C, Cook, Co. A, Poplar, Montana 
Engvall, Mandus G., Pvt., Med. Dept., Vega, Washington 
Enright, William F., Pvt., Co. I, Elkhom, Wisconsin 
Epperson, Fredrick W., Cpl., Co. A, 12th & Vine St., 

Port Angeles, Washington 
Epply, Rudolph J., Pvt., Co. H, P. O. Box 775, Maricopa, 

California 
Erbe, Robert C, Pvt., Co. D, 2513 E. 57th St., Los Angeles, 

California 
Ergles, Joseph U., Pvt., Hq. Co., Lawrence, Washington 
Erickbon, Albert, Pvt., Co. G, Quincy, Oregon 
Erickson, Albert J., Pvt., Co. D, 2717 N. Mozart St., 

Chicago, Illinois 
Erickson, Harry W., Sgt., Co. L, 4269 Aurora Ave., Seattle, 

Washington 
Erickson, James O., Cpl., Hq. Co., 6th Ave. Station, 

Tacoma, Washington 
Erickson, John M., Pvt., Co. F, Jarfvorey No. 4, Soder- 

telge, Sweden 
Erickson, John T., Pvt., Co. H, P. O. Box 14, Shoshone, 

Idaho 
Erickson, Lee, Cpl., Co. H, Springfield, Utah 
Erickson, Leif, Cpl., Hq. Co., Box 355, Yakima, Wash- 
ington 
Erickson, Peter, Pvt., Co. M, 1214 Polk St., San Francisco, 

California 
Ericson, Carl F., Pvt., nq. Co., 802 Eastlake Ave., Seattle, 

Washington 
Erman, Gerard M., Pvt., Hq. Co., 344 Jones St., San 

Francisco, California 
Erramouspe, Gaston, Pvt., Hq. Co., Geneva, Idaho 
Ersland, Nels L., Wagoner, Hq. Co., 951 N. 7th St., 

St. Paul, Minnesota 
Erving, Lester, Pvt., Co. I, 1226 13th St., Loraine, Ohio 
Eslinger, Clifford P., Pvt., M. G. Co., 223 Butler St., 

Cincinnati, Ohio 
Estill, Henry L., Cpl., Co. E, Tulare, California 
Etchemendy, Laurent, Pvt., Co. F, Buffalo, Wyoming 
Eustis, Harry V., Pvt., Co. F, 461 N. Fremont Ave., Los 

Angeles, California 
Evans, Gregg M., 1st Lt., Co. G, Emporia, Kansas 
Evans, Joseph, Pvt., Co. B, Flora, Illinois 
Evans, Morgan L., Pvt., Hq. Co., R. F. D., Garfield, 

Washington 
Evans, Roy T„ Musician, Hq. Co., 650 W. Grand Ave., 

Pomona, California 
Evans, Simon P., Pvt., Co. I, 6456 O'Dell St., St. Louia, 

Missouri 
Evans, William C, Pvt., Co. D, Danville, Virginia 



253 



Everett, Terrance, Pvt., Co. F, Salem, Arkansas 
Everhart, Clarence I., Pvt., Co. I, Upper Sandusky, 

Ohio 
Everitt, Wilfred M., Cpl., Hq. Co., 1851 E. 22nd St., 

Los Angeles, California 
Evertsen, Jalmar, Cpl., Co. B, 2629 N. Monticello Ave., 

Chicago, Illinois 
Ewino, Thomas H., Pvt., Co. F, U. S. Land Office, Billings, 

Montana 
Ezell, Gale, Pvt., Co. C, Delark, Arkansas 
Faber, Peter G., Pvt., Co. E, Lincoln St., Olympia, 

Washington 
Fader, Warren A., Pvt., Co. F, 606 Lincoln Ave., Mt. 

Vernon, Washington 
Fagundes, Joe, Pvt., Co. E, 3127 McKinzey Ave., Fresno, 

California 
Fainter, Oscar J., Pvt., Co. A, Higby, Missouri 
Fairchild, Frederick T., 1st Lt., Co. G, Seattle, Wash- 
ington 
Fakkema, Edd, Pvt., Co. B, Oak Harbor, Washington 
Falbo, Joseph, Pvt., Co. B, Sand Point, Idaho 
Falk, John V., Pvt., Co. L, 1002 E. 1st St., Aberdeen, 

Washington 
Fallon, John J., Sgt., Co. D, Rochester, Minnesota 
Fancher, Leslie I., Pvt., Sup. Co., Algona, Washington 
Fanning, Fred J., Pvt., Co. K, North Manchester, Indiana 
Fanning, Sherman W.; Pvt., Co. L, Gibson, Montana 
Farison, Raymond W., Pvt., Co. E, 126 Adams St., Fre- 
mont, Ohio 
Farmer, Fred L., Pvt., Co. H, Ballingar, Texas 
Farnham, Arthur N., Cpl., Co. F, Maxwell, Idaho 
Farraro, Annibale, Pvt., Co. H, 4113 West St., Oakland, 

California 
Farrell, Bruce M., Pvt., Co. A, Mt. Vernon, Washington 
Farrell, Talbert J., Pvt., Hq. Co., Route 45, Rupert, 

Idaho 
Farris, Homer, Pvt., Co. I, R. F. D. No. 11, Paris, Illinois 
Fascillo, Ralph, Pvt., Co. I, 1532 N. 5th Ave., Troy, 

New York 
Faulkner, Harry W., Pvt., Co. E, 1409 C. 1st St., San Jose, 

California 
Faust, Joseph W., Sgt., Co. I, Shelton Ave., Nashville, 

Tennessee 
Fawcett, Franklin D., Cpl., Co. D, Central Ave., Cedar- 
hurst, Long Island, New York 
Feauve, Hector A., Pvt., Co. F, 2026 Freemansburg Ave., 

Easton, Pennsylvania 
Feeback, Albert, Sgt., Co. D, N. Hamilton St., George- 
town, Kentucky 
Feeney, Martin, Pvt., Co. H, San Mateo, California 
Feist, Carl F., Pvt., Co. D, Stony Ridge, Ohio 
Feit, Ralph W., Pvt., Co. G, Columbia City, Indiana 
Feitelberg, Mayer N., Pvt., Co. B, 1752 Natona St., 

San Francisco, California 
Felter, Roy, Pvt., Hq. Co., 6021 7th Ave., N. W., Seattle, 

Washington 
Fennessy, Harry F., Pvt., Co. C, Locust Dale, Pennsyl- 
vania 
Ferguson, Arthur B., Pvt., Co. K, R. F. D. No. 2, New 

Lexington, Ohio 
Ferguson, Frank B., Pvt., Co. K, R. F. D. No. 2, Elders- 

ville, Pennsylvania 
Ferguson, Lewis J., Pvt., Co. G, 453 Windsor St., Marion, 

Ohio 
Ferrin, David W., Pvt., Co. G, 516 Ellis St., San Francisco, 

California 
Fiedler, Geo. W., Cpl., Co. E, 509 E. 6th St., Seymore, 

Indiana 
Fields, Clifford J., Pvt., Co. B, 206 W. Jefferson St., Casey, 

Illinois 
Fields, Lester K., Pvt., Co. M, R. F. D. No. 1, Coal Grove, 

Ohio 
Finley, Edgar T., Pvt., Co. I, 2202 Blackwood Ave., 

Sullivan, Illinois 
Finley, Harold V., Cpl., Co. E, 1302 Warren Ave., Bremer- 
ton, Washington 
Finley, Su, Pvt., Co. L, 511 S. Clay St., Sturgis, Michigan 
Finney, Cha. F., Pvt., Co. D, 311 Logan St., Circleville, 

Ohio 
Finzer, John O., Sgt., Co. K, South Park, Kentucky 
Firenzo, Alfonso, Pvt., Co. E, 449 Broadway, San Fran- 
cisco, California 
Fisch, William N., Pvt., Co. I, Brownsville, Minnesota 
Fischer, William M., Pvt., Co. E, Lansdale, Pennsylvania 
Fishan, Howard J., Pvt., M. G. Co., 416 11th Ave., W., 

Duluth, Minnesota 
Fisher, Henry A., Pvt., Med. Det., Walker, Oregon 
Fisher, William H., Pvt., Co. L, Creston, Washington 



Fitzpatrick, Anthony J., Pvt., Hq. Co., 1725 Dolores, 
San Francisco, California 

Fjeran, Oscar I., Bugler, Co. M, Powers Lake, North 
Dakota 

Flagg, John A., 2nd Lt., Co. E, 66 Edgeworth St., Wor- 
cester, Massachusetts 

Fleming, Alexander, Pvt., M. G. Co., 1109 N. Court St., 
Marion, Illinois 

Flick, Henry G., Pvt., Co. C, 42 E. 4th St., Bloomburg, 
Pennsylvania 

Flier, Joseph J., Pvt., Co. A, 7732 Virginia Ave., St. Louis. 
Missouri 

Flippence, William A., Pvt., Co. C, Lewiston, Utah 

Flores, Nicanor, Pvt., Co. K, Soqueyor, Philippine Is- 
lands 

Flynn, William T., Pvt., Co. E, 526 Orchard St., Edwards- 
ville, Illinois 

Foehner, Otto W., Pvt., Co. D, El Campo, Texas 

Fogerty, James J., Pvt., Co. G, 3037 Madison St., St. Louis, 
Missouri 

Foote, Lorenzo S., 2nd Lt., Co. I, Stronghurst, Illinois 

Fondren, Willie B., Pvt., Co. E, Box 313, North Yakima, 
Washington 

Fong Gui Duck, Pvt., Hq. Co., 209 Yesler Way, Seattle, 
Washington 

Fontes, Tony, Pvt., Co. A, 1421 18th Ave., E., Oakland, 
California 

Foreman, Samuel E., Pvt., Co. F, Osceola Mills, Pennsyl- 
vania 

Forsyth, Harry N., Wagoner, Sup. Co., Mabton, Wash- 
ington 

Fort, James H., Pvt., Co. B, Casey, Illinois 

Fortado, Manuel, Pvt., Co. M, R. F. D. No. 3, Jackson- 
ville, Illinois 

Fortune, James C, Captain, Co. L, 1351 Sutter St., San 
Francisco, California 

Fosberg, Arthur J., Pvt., M. G. Co., R. F. D. No. 4, 
Odessa, Washington 

Fossan, Jakob, Pvt., Co. G, 2012 6th Ave., Seattle, Wash- 
ington 

Foster, Charles H., Cpl., Co. A, Anaconda, Montana 

Fotland, Martin, Pvt., Co. G, 5701 Grand Ave., West 
Duluth, Minnesota 

Fouch, Albert M., Pvt., Co. M, 4413 Verne St., Cincinnati, 
Ohio 

Fournier, Louis, Captain, Co. C, Havren, Montana 

Foutch, James, Pvt., Co. I, Broughton, Illinois 

Fowler, Chelcey M., Pvt., Co. K, 661 M St., Fresno, 
California 

Fowler, Jasper, Pvt., Co. B, 412 Jackson St., Lawrence, 
South Carolina 

Fox, William L., Pvt., Co. B, 1116 S. Buchanan St., Marion, 
Illinois 

Frame, Charles M., Pvt., Hq. Co., 905 N. Lafayette St., 
Valpariso, Indiana 

Frampton, Jesse J., Cpl., M. G. Co., 1410 W. 4th St., Los 
Angeles, California 

Francis, Archibald C, Cpl., Co. F, Box 1315, Boise, Idaho 

Francis, William I. J., Cpl., Hq. Co., 5353 Crescent St., 
Rainier Beach, Seattle, Washington 

Franck, Howard R., Pvt., Co. C, Clovis, California 

Franken, John B., Pvt., Hq. Co., Glouster, Ohio 

Franklin, George C, Pvt., Co. F, 817 S. 17th St., Mattoon, 
Illinois 

Franklin, McKinley, Cook, Co. E, R. F. D. No. 3, Shoals, 
Indiana 

Frasier, Everett J., Pvt., Hq. Co., R. F. D. No. 4, Cald- 
well, Idaho 

Frazer, Raymond A., Cpl., Co. H, 1020 Grand Ave., Lara- 
mie, Wyoming 

Frazier, Claude, Sgt., Co. F, Colfax, Washington 

Frear, Fred L., Pvt., Co. G, Orfino, Idaho 

Frechou, Mike A., Pvt., Co. L, Route A, Box 143, Fresno, 
California 

Freedman, Jacob, Pvt., M. G. Co., 307 Penn Ave., Scran- 
ton, Pennsylvania 

Freidman, Edgar H., Musician, Hq. Co., Circleville, Ohio 

Freilich, Samuel, Pvt., Co. M, 1340 Bryden Road, Colum- 
bus, Ohio 

Freund, Edward J., Pvt., Hq. Co., Route 1, Box 48, Spen- 
cerville, Ohio 

Frey, Alvin L., Pvt., Co. E, Highland, Illinois 

Frey, Carl J., Pvt., Co. E, 564 Grove St., Columbus, Ohio 

Frey, Charles T., Sgt., Co. E, 111 W. Iowa St., Evans- 
ville, Indiana 

Freidman, Gregory, Sgt., Co. B, Mountain Home, Idaho 

Friel, Frank J., Pvt., M. G. Co., 606 Belmont Ave., Easton, 
Pennsylvania 



254 



Friemoth, Franck A., Pvt., Co. C, 204 E. 5th St., Dekphon, 

Ohio 
Fries, Adolph H., Pvt., M. G. Co., Route 6, Box 69, Marion, 

Illinois 
Friggens, William J., Pvt., Hq. Co., 363 W. Exchange, 

Akron, Ohio 
Frisbee, Bertie, Pvt., Co. H, Clara, Missouri 
Fritz, Henry, Pvt., Co. I, R. F. D. No. 4, Warrenton, 

Missouri 
Froman, Hjalmar, Sgt., Co. D, Murphy, Idaho 
Frost, Henry, Pvt., Co. F, R. F. D. No. 4, Robinson, 

Illinois 
Fry, George C., Pvt., Co. I, 42 Butler St., Penbrook, 

Pennsylvania 
Fry, Ned G., Pvt., Co. C, Westover, Pennsylvania 
Fry, William J., Cpl., Co. L, Malad, Idaho 
Fuda, Frank, Pvt., Co. I, Reggio-Calabria-Rochel Toncia, 

Italy 
Fugere, Napoleon, Pvt., Co. A, Horace, North Dakota 
Fuller, Arlie, Cpl., Co. K, Milton, Oregon 
Fuller, Earl W., Pvt., Co. C, Wolf Point, Montana 
Fuller, Walter, Pvt., Co. L, Walla Walla, Washington 
Funderburk, Elmer, Pvt., Hq. Co., 611 Gandy Ave., 

Taylorville, Illinois 
Funke, Leo C, Sup. Sgt., Co. D, Cottonwood, Idaho 
Furguson, Cleo F., Pvt., Co. F, Humbolt, Illinois 
Furnia, Arthur M., Band Sgt., Hq. Co., Montesano, 

Washington 
Fusco, Francesco, Pvt., Co. F, 534 N. Bromley Ave., 

Scranton, Pennsylvania 
Fynskov, Martin P., Pvt., Co. D, Osakis, Minnesota 
Gacketetter, Will L., Pvt., Co. E, Lake Benton, Minne- 
sota 
Gadsby, William, Mus., Hq. Co., Ilwaco, Washington 
Gaesser, Alphons P., Pvt., Co. K, Troy, Indiana 
Gegan, Charles A, Pvt., Co. B, 404 Shriff St., Paris, 

Illinois 
Gagliardi, Domenick, Cook, Co. C, 210 22nd Ave. S., 

Seattle, Washington 
Gagnier, Felix, Pvt., Co. D, 328 Florida St., St. Paul, 

Minnesota 
Gainford, Bernard J., Pvt., Co. L, 1624 Superior St., 

Cleveland, Ohio 
Galego, Francisco B., Pvt., Co. G, Farmington, California 
Gallagher, Cornelius J., Pvt., Co. E, 566 38th Ave., San 

Francisco, California 
Gallegos, Pass, Pvt., Co. D, Aguilar, Colorado 
Gallucci, Rocco, Pvt., Co. D, 280 1st St., Portland, Oregon 
Gamperline, Edward C, Pvt., Co. D, 912 7th St., Port 

Smith, Ohio 
Gannon, Joseph R., Pvt., Co. H, West Salem, Ohio 
Gannon, Harry J., Pvt., Co. M, 336>i 2nd Ave., San 

Francisco, California 
Garber, Oscar N., Pvt., Sup. Co., R. F. D. No. 3, Bracts, 

Nebraska 
Gardiner, Frank L., Pvt., Co. H, 507 Laughlin, The 

Dalles, Oregon 
Gardner, Herman, Pvt., Co. I, North Bend, Oregon 
Gardner, Sidney, Pvt., Co. L, R. F. D., Clovis, California 
Garrison, Orville D., Pvt., Co. G, Scappoose, Oregon 
Garry, Charles J., Pvt., Co. D, Yale, South Dakota 
Gasser, August R., Pvt., Co. L, Fremont, Ohio 
Gates, John A., Pvt., Co. E, Amhurst, Ohio 
Gates, Perry E., Musician, Hq. Co., Geona, Nance Co., 

Gatto, Frank B., Musician, Hq. Co., 2437 Polk St., San 

Francisco, California 
Gatzee, Emil H., Pvt., Co. B, De Sart, North Dakota 
Gaumer, Daniel H., Pvt., Hq. Co., 1612 Linden Ave., 

Zanesville, Ohio 
Gaxiola, Phillip J., Pvt., Co. D, King City, California 
Gieger, Charles H., Pvt., Co. K, 857 Thistle St., Seattle, 

Washington 
Gehres, Ignatius V., Pvt., Co. I, 330 E. Boone Ave., Spo- 
kane, Washington 
Gendreau, George E., Pvt., Co. F, Choteau, Montana 
Gendrow, Frank, Pvt., Co. B, Virginia City, Montana 
George, Owne, Pvt., Co. B, 1205 Eastern Ave., Conners- 

ville, Indiana 
Gerber, Richard A., Pvt., Hq. Co., 1109 San Pedro, Los 

Angeles, California 
Gerlach, Edward F., Sgt., Hq. Co., 765 Hayes St., Seattle, 

Washington 
Gerleman, Joseph, Pvt., Co. B, Selma, Montana 
Gerlits, Val F., Sgt., Co. D, 1546 9th St., Santa Monica, 

California 
Getz, Edward J., Pvt., Med. Det., 1504 N. Taylor Ave., 

St. Louis, Missouri 
Ghaner, Floyd W., Pvt., Co. F, Benore, Pennsylvania 



Gherardini, Guy, Pvt., M. G. Co., Tovey, Illinois 
Gainfelice, Nick, Pvt., Co. A, P. O. 138, Bellefonte, 

Pennsylvania 
Giannone, Giovanni, Pvt., Co. K, 27 Masonic Ave., San 

Francisco, California 
Gibbons, Abb E., Cook, Co. D, 1924 Cordova St., Los 

Angeles, California 
Gibbons, James F., Pvt., Co. C, 411 W. 2nd St., Los An- 
geles, California 
Gibbs, Frank J., Pvt., Co. E, 1122 27th Ave., N., Minne- 
apolis, Minnesota 
Gibson, Charlis H., Pvt., Co. K, R. F. D. No. 1, Kimbol- 

ton, Ohio 
Gibson, William E., Pvt., Co. B, 341 Harrison St., Portland, 

Oregon 
Gibson, William F., Wagoner, Sup. Co., Aurora, Oregon 
Gieger, Arthur H., Cpl., Hq. Co., 918 S. 4th St., Tacoma, 

Washington 
Gifford, Clarence E., Pvt., Hq. Co., R. F. D. No. 2, 

Wheelersburg, Ohio 
Gigear, Wilford M., Cpl., Co. B, Bison, South Dakota 
Gilbert, Albert L., Pvt., M. G. Co., 2901 Elliott Ave., 

Minneapolis, Minnesota 
Gilbert, Curtiss R., Captain, Co. F, Yakima, Washington 
Gilbertson, Philip N., Pvt., Co. A, Clarissa, Minnesota 
Gilchrist, Herbert, Wag., Sup. Co., 1906 14th Ave. S., 

Seattle, Washington 
Giles, Chrispen A., Pvt., Co. F, R. F. D. No. 1, Box 2, 

Toshes, Virginia 
Gill, John A., Pvt., Co. C, Thompsonville, Illinois 
Gill, Melvin, Pvt., Co. D, Florence, Washington 
Gill, Michael J., Pvt., Co. F, 320 10th St., Phillipsburg, 

Pennsylvania 
Gillespie, Homer H., Pvt., Co. D, Brownsville, Nebraska 
Gillette, Vivian L., Pvt., Co. A, Belleville, Wisconsin 
Gilman, Charles E, Bugler, Co. E, Hailey, Idaho 
Ginther, Noble G., Pvt., Co. A, Bonegap, Illinois 
Gievenco, Joe, Cpl., Co. M, 5116 Concord PI., Chicago, 

Illinois 
Gisselberg, Walter, Sup. Sgt., Co. B, R. F. D. No. 1, West 

Port, Oregon 
Giuriato, Ettore, Pvt., Co. F, Box 112, Antioch, California 
Givan, Frank L., Pvt., Co. B, Elizabethtown, Kentucky 
Glickman, David, Cpl., Hq. Co., Oakland Bank of Savings, 

Bldg., Oakland, California 
Goble, Wade, Captain, Co. H, Baker, Montana 
Godwin, William T., Pvt., Hq. Co., Parma, Idaho 
Goertz, David D., Wagoner, Sup. Co., R. F. D. No. 4, 

Hillsboro, Kansas 
Goetting, William G., Pvt., Co. D, Red Bud, Illinois 
Goin, Edward D., Pvt., M. G. Co., R. F. D. No. 1, Box 22, 

Lenore, Idaho 
Goin, Emery M., Cook, Sup. Co., 1225 N. 11th St., East St. 

Louis, Missouri 
Goin, Irel L., Cpl., Co. C, Echo, Oregon 
Goist, Clarence E., Cook, Hq. Co., South Prairie, Wash- 
ington 
Goldstein, Eliss, Pvt., Co. B, 2818 Cumming St., Omaha, 

Nebraska 
Gooding, Clarence C, Pvt., Co. B, Everson, Washington 
Goodman, Clifford, Pvt., Co. D, Brownstown, Illinois 
Goodman, Henry, Pvt., Co. C, 110 Hoffman Ave., San 

Francisco, California 
Goodman, Leifur, Cpl., Co. A, Alta Vista P. O., Burnaby, 

B.C., Canada 
Goodwin, Louis E., Pvt., Co. H, 138 9th St., Oakland, 

California 
Goodwin, Schyler, 2nd Lt., Co. C, 49 John St., New York 

City, New York 
Goonan, William, Sgt., Sup. Co., 1826 E. 42nd St., Los 

Angeles, California 
Gordon, Albert H., Pvt., Co. E, 1310 Main St., Cincinnati, 

Ohio 
Gordon, Cedric F., Pvt., Co. D, R. F. D. No. 3, Winchester, 

Illinois 
Gosejohan, William F., Pvt., Co. C, R. R. No. 1, Sparta, 

Illinois 
Goss, Steve, Cook, Hq. Co., 101 Madison St., Spokane, 

Washington 
Gotz, Frederick, Pvt., Co. C, R. R. No. 2, Auburndale, 

Wisconsin 
Goude, Harry T., Pvt., Co. C, Hooper, Washington 
Goulding, William A., Pvt. Co. I, 2029 N. Racine Ave., 

Chicago, Illinois 
Goumany, John F., Cpl., Co. E, 1585 E. Vernon Ave., Los 

Angeles, California 
Grabert, Rudolph A., Pvt., Co. M, R. F. D. No. 2, Broken 

Bow, Nebraska 



255 



Graden, Frederick W., Pvt., Sup. Co., 7237 44th Ave., 

S. W., Seattle, Washington 
Graehener, Alfred C., Sgt., Co. D, Giflord, Idaho 
Graff, Edward J., Pvt., Co. C, 1534 N. 4th St., Mankato, 

Minnesota 
Graham, James L., Pvt., Co. E, Paradise, California 
Graham, John S., Mechanic, Co. D, Frazee, Minnesota 
Graham, Lesley B., Pvt., Co. L, Bayside, California 
Graham, Mathew F., Pvt., Hq. Co., Stenington, Illinois 
Granquist, Sigfred C, Cpl., Co. K, 416H Denny Way, 

Seattle, Washington 
Grant, Lloyd, Pvt., Co. D, 810 E. 5th St., Northfield, 

Minnesota 
Graves, Buhhell P., Mechanic, Co. G, St. Helens, Oregon 
Graves, John W., Pvt., Co. H, 315 Madison St., Monroe, 

Washington 
Gravanis, Athanasios, Cpl., Co. A, 207 W. Main St., Mar- 
ion, Illinois 
Gray, Clarence, Wagoner, Sup. Co., Farmington, Illinois 
Gray, Everett J., 2nd Lt., 598 Walsworth Ave., Oakland, 

California 
Gray, Frank O., Pvt., Co. G, Sisters, Oregon 
Gray, Raymond W., Pvt., M. G. Co., Oak Grove, Kentucky 
Ghidiah, Vaso J., Mess Sgt., Hq. Co., 644 N. Broadway, 

Los Angeles, California 
Greear, Thomas J., Pvt., Co. B, 1100 Plymouth Bldg., 

Minneapolis, Minnesota 
Green, Elmer J., Cpl., Co. M, Winslow, Indiana 
Green, Forrest H., Cpl., Co. F, 8333 Dallas Ave., Seattle, 

Washington 
Green, John E., Pvt., Co. G, R. F. D. No. 1, Ogden, Utah 
Green, Leslie E., Pvt., Co. C, Raccoon Island, Ohio 
Green, Louis A., Pvt., Co. F, 87 N. Milton St., St. Paul, 

Minnesota 
Green, Nicholai, Cpl., Co. H, Arlington, Washington 
Greenberg, Rudi, Pvt., Co. L, 1742 Market St., San Diego, 

California 
Greenblatt, Joseph, Cook, Co. C, Box 464, Bozeman, 

Montana 
Greene, Howard M., Pvt., Co. M, R. F. D. Martins Ferry, 

Ohio 
Greene, Ray L., Pvt., Co. A, Red Key, Indiana 
Greene, Stanley P., Cpl., Co. H, 5010 7th Ave., N. E., 

Seattle, Washington 
Greenlees, Thomas, Sgt., Co. G, 712 11th Ave., N., Seattle, 

Washington 
Greenwald, Murray, Pvt., Co. M, 976 Washington Ave., 

Bronx, New York City, New York 
Gregory, Vincent K., Pvt., Co. A, 119 E. 28th St., New 

York 
Greimes, Grover C, Sup. Sgt., Sup. Co., 901 E. 70th St., 

Seattle, Washington 
Greive, Frank F., Pvt., M. G. Co., Edinburgh, Illinois 
Greeny, Martin, Pvt., Co. L, Opportunity, Washington 
Gresham, Frank S., Pvt., Co. G, Newlin, Texas 
Grider, Albert, Pvt., Co. H, Bass, Alabama 
Griffin, Chester E., Cpl., Co. C, 17th and Yarva, Tuston, 

California 
Griffin, Edmond, Pvt., Co. D, Klaber, Washington 
Griffin, Elzie, Pvt., Co. A, 505 Broadway, Harrison, Ohio 
Griffin, Herman W., Cpl., M. G. Co., Tustin, California 
Griffin, Lloyd H., 1st Sgt., Hq. Co., Gen. Del., Marshall, 

North Carolina 
Griffith, Harley K., Pvt., Hq. Co., 436 Hazelwood Ter- 
race, Rochester, New York 
Grigatis, Boleslaw, Pvt., Co. F, W. Railroad St., Heindel- 

burg, Pennsylvania 
Grim, Wheeler L., Pvt., Co. G, Mandale, Ohio 
Grimm, Thomas D., Pvt., Co. D, 4724 S. Normandie St., 

Los Angeles, California 
Grindstaff, John L., Pvt., Co. K, Marysville, Tennessee 
Grono, Bert W., Pvt., Co. D, Litchfield, Minnesota 
Groom, William R., Pvt., Co. E, Hackberry, Kansas 
Groome, Sherman, Pvt., M. G. Co., R. F. D., Edinburgh, 

Illinois 
Groscost, John E., Pvt., Hq. Co., 61 S. Mulberry St., 

Mansfield, Ohio 
Gross, John P., Pvt., Co. A, Plentywood, Montana 
Gross, Samuel S., Pvt., Co. C, 217 W. 79th St., Los Angeles, 

California 
Grote, Frederick A., Pvt., Med. Det., R. F. D. No. 2, 

Box 107, Tacoma, Washington 
Gruber, Andrew, Pvt., Co. D, Breda, Iowa 
Grumling, Lee G., Pvt., Hq. Co., 88 Highland Ave., 

Mansfield, Ohio 
Grzegorek, Frank S., Pvt., Co. F, 2305 N. Oakley Ave., 

Chicago, Illinois 
Guasti, Frank, Cpl., Co. D, 2828 National Ave., San Diego, 
California 



Guenthner, Martin J., Pvt., Co. G, 1528 Washington Ave., 

Piqua, Ohio 
Guenther, Otto D., Cpl., Co. H, Orange, California 
Guerriero, Santonio, Pvt., Hq. Co., 16 Terrace St., 

Youngstown, Ohio 
Guinnip, Raymond P., Pvt., Co. K, Compton, Illinois 
Guinotte, Leonard W., Pvt., Co. K, 1725 S. 19th St., 

Omaha, Nebraska 
Guirado, Larcus, Cpl., Co. K, Clayton, California 
Gulbrandsen, George, Pvt., Co. C, 511 S. 7th St., Tacoma, 

Washington 
Gustafson, Alfred, Cook, Co. D, Elma, Washington 
Gustafson, Carl G., Pvt., C. M, 620 Knight St., Miles City, 

Montana 
Gustafson, Otto E., Pvt., Co. B, Wahoo, Nebraska 
Gustafson, SwanE., Pvt., Co. A, Unityville, South Dakota 
Guterson, Benjamin, Pvt., Co. G, 715 15th Ave., Seattle, 

Washington 
Guymon, Melvin E., Pvt., Co. I, Ucon, Idaho 
Guymon, Vernone B., Pvt., Co. I, Ucon, Idaho 
Haas, Albert J., 1st Lt., Co. D, 218 9th St., S., Bismark, 

North Dakota 
Haase, John C, Pvt., Co. E, 1234 Ashland St., South 

Greenburg, Pennsylvania 
Haberman, Richard, Pvt. 1 cl., Co. F, Steelville, Illinois 
Hadley, Ralph C, Pvt. 1 cl., Co. F, 32 S. 5th St., Alaham- 

bra, California 
Haering, Norbert G., Pvt., Co. F, 2135 Gest St., Cincin- 
nati, Ohio 
Hafford, Edward J., Pvt. 1 cl., Co. H, Benicia, California 
Hage, Leo, Cpl., Co. B, R. F. D. No. 1, Belva, North Da- 
kota 
Hagerty, Paul C, Pvt. 1 cl., Sup. Co., 1028 Ravenna Blvd., 

Seattle, Washington 
Haggerty, Owen B., Pvt., Co. F, 8026 15th St., Seattle, 

Washington 
Haines, James J., Pvt. 1 cl., Co. F, 126 1st St., Ashland, 

Oregon 
Hall, Clarence E., Pvt. 1 cl., Co. D, 923 E. John St., 

Seattle, Washington 
Hall, Royal A., Pvt., Co. K, R. F. D. No. 3, Bellaire, Ohio 
Hall, Taylor, Pvt., Co. F, Pikeville, Tennessee 
Hallam, Glen C, Sgt., Co. D, 826 W. 6th St., Moscow, Idaho 
Hallan, Raymond H., Pvt., Co. L, Burnt Prairie, Illinois 
Hallett, Louis H., Pvt. 1 cl., Co. D, Aberdeen, South 

Dakota 
Halsey, George J., Cpl., Co. B, Box 91, Fort Wates, North 

Dakota 
Halsey, Michael, Pvt., Co. B, Box 91, Fort Wates, North 

Dakota 
Hambling, Sidney, Pvt. 1 cl., Co. E, Box 22, Fernwood, 

Idaho 
Hamil, Charles T., Pvt. 1 cl., Co. H, 362 W. 54th St., Los 

Angeles, California 
Hamill, Daniel J., Sgt., M. G. Co., 4101 Brooklyn Ave., 

Seattle, Washington 
Hamilton, Frank, Cpl., Co. F, 402 N. L. St., Livingston, 

Montana 
Hamilton, Frank E., Cpl., Co. M, Salmon, Idaho 
Hamilton, Harry L., Cook, M. G. Co., 2049 Madison Rd., 

Cincinnati, Ohio 
Hammer, Roy E., Wagoner, Sup. Co., R. F. D. No. l.Elber- 

ton, Washington 
Hammerberg, Alfred E., Pvt., Co. B, Route No. 1, Clin- 
ton, Minnesota 
Hanan, Ralph B., Pvt., Sup. Co., Coloflats, Colorado 
Hancock, Clarence, Pvt., M. G. Co., Alpine, Kentucky 
Hane, Harry N., Pvt., Co. B, Lincolnville, Kansas 
Hanebutt, Henry, Pvt. 1 cl., Co. C, Evansville, Illinois 
Haney, Albert H., Pvt., Co. K, 545 City Park Ave., 

Columbus, Ohio 
Hanks, Alvin M., Cpl., Co. F, Burnt Fork, Wyoming 
Hanks, Howard D., Mechanic, Co. F, Heber City, Utah 
Hansen, George B., Wagoner, Sup. Co., Box 48, Gonzales, 

California 
Hansen, Harry, Pvt., Co. B, 2106 W. 5th St., Davenport, 

Iowa 
Hansen, Peter, Pvt. 1 cl., Co. F, 2622 50th St. S. W., Seattle, 

Washington 
Hansen, Raymond H., Mechanic, Sup. Co., Renton, 

Washington 
Hanson, Arthur J., Pvt., Co. B, R. F. D. No. 4, Box 70, 

Detroit, Minnesota 
Hanson, Ben, Wagoner, Sup. Co., Valdez, Alaska 
Hanson, Hans T., Pvt., Co. B, Fairfield, Montana 
Hanson, Helmar, Pvt., Co. I, R. F. D. No. 1, Box 51, 

Willow Lake, South Dakota 
Hanson, Joseph B, Pvt., Co. L, 1006 W. Cedar St., Missoula, 

Montana 



256 



Hanson, William, Pvt., Co. C, 133 W. 5th N., Salt Lake 

City, Utah 
Hardacre, Christopher W., lat Lt., 62 Maple St., Wiuoo- 

ski, Vermont 
Harder, Ralph, Pvt., Med. Det., Zenda, Kansas 
Hardie, James M., Pvt., Co. A, Route A, Box 49, Salinas, 

California 
Harding, George S., Cpl., Co. A, 251 Inman St., Cam- 
bridge, Massachusetts 
Hardy, Orlado B., 1st St., Co. G, Redmond, Oregon 
Harke, Henry, Pvt., Hq. Co., R. F. D. No. 1, Itasca, 

Illinois 
Harman, Edwin W., Pvt. 1 cl., Co. B, care of Water Ser- 
vice Dept., Southern Pacific R. R. Co., Sacramento, 

California 
Harper, Clarence O., Pvt., Co. A, R.F.D. No. 3, Mendon, 

Ohio 
Harper, Earl A., Pvt. 1 cl., Co. A, 1102 W. 51st St., Seattle, 

Washington 
Harpster, John L., Pvt., Co. D, 833 River View St., Racine, 

Wisconsin 
Harr, Ernest E., Pvt. 1 cl., M. G. Co., Cheney, Washington 
Harrington, Jack J., Pvt., M. G. Co., Trona, California 
Harrington, John V., Sgt., Co. K, 1308 E. Alder St., 

Seattle, Washington 
Harris, Ephriam R., Pvt. 1 cl., Co. M, Route No. 2, Box 

15, Wilkesboro, North Carolina 
Harris, Flave F., Pvt., Co. I, Arlington, Alabama 
Harris, Grover C., Pvt., Co. D, Percy, Illinois 
Harris, Jake, Pvt., Co. C, 2373 E. 59th St., Cleveland, 

Ohio 
Harris, James H., Pvt., Co. C, 12 Gladstone Ter., Walker- 

ville, Montana 
Harris, John, Pvt. 1 cl., Co. I, Marshfield, Oregon 
Harris, Newton H., Wagoner, Sup. Co., Woodland, 

Washington 
Harrison, Mose C, Pvt., Co. F, R. F. D. No. 1, Pobo, 

Tennessee 
Harris, Thomas A., Pvt., Med. Det., Harriman, Tennessee 
Hart, Frank, Pvt. 1 cl., Co. B, Colfax, Washington 
Hartley, Charles W., Sgt., Med. Det., Harvard, Nebraska 
Hartley, William H., Pvt., Co. B, care of Mrs. Elsie Gliss- 

man, Millard, Nebraska 
Hartman, Francis A., Pvt. 1 cl., Co. C, 406 N. 10th St., 

Lebanon, Pennsylvania 
Harvey, Nathaniel L., Pvt., Co. H, Igacio, Colorado 
Hastings, John H., 2nd Lt., Hq. Co., 106 Summit Ave., 

Clinton, Massachusetts 
Hatch, Clyde, Pvt., Co. C, Vernal, Utah 
Haugan, Olaf A., Pvt. 1 cl., Co. I, Lebo, Montana 
Haulet, Emil, Cpl., Co. M, Wilkeson, Washington 
Hatjpt, Charles G., Pvt., Co. F, 4629 San Francisco St., 

St. Louis, Missouri 
Hawkins, Raymond L., Pvt., Hq. Co., R. F. D. No. 1, 

Kensington, Ohio 
Hayes, George L., Pvt., Hq. Co., Jerusalem, Ohio 
Hayes, Neal, Pvt., Co. B, R. 9, Mt. Vernon, Illinois 
Haysley, Roy W., Sgt., Co. M, R. R. No. 22, Sta. H., 

Louisville, Kentucky 
Hazard, Harry E., 1st Lt., Co. K, Gaylord, Michigan 
Hazen, Clyde E., Pvt., Co. D, 631 N. East St., Greens- 
burg, Indiana 
Hearty, Edward, Pvt., Co. H, 287 N. 22nd St., Portland, 

Oregon 
Heath, Frank, Captain, Hq. Co., Marshfield, Oregon 
Hecker, Eugene, Pvt., Co. F, 464 Church St., Portland, 

Oregon 
Hecl, James, Pvt., Co. B, R. F. D. No. 1, Prague, Nebraska 
Hedderick, George A., Pvt., Co. L, 325 Hanover St., 

Hamilton, Ohio 
Hedges, Lacy C, Pvt., Co. F, McClungs, West Virginia 
Hedrick, Walter E., Pvt., Co. G, Alderson, West Virginia 
Heenan, Leon J., 1st Lt., 10 Mill Rose St., Springfield, 

Heether, Robert A., Pvt., Co. L, 1708 S. G. St., Tacoma, 

Washington 
Heffner, Samuel, Pvt., Med. Det., Alpha, Idaho 
Heikka, Charles, Pvt., Co. D, Mt. Solo, Washington 
Heise, William A., Pvt., Co. G, R. No. 1, Delta, Utah 
Heldberg, Richard E., Pvt. 1 cl., M. G. Co., 268 E. 5th 

St. N., Logan, Utah 
Heleniak, Antoni, Pvt., Co. K, 3258 Webb St., Phila- 
delphia, Pennsylvania 
Helleotes, Christ J., Pvt. 1 cl., Co. H, 521 Santa Clara, 

Vallejo, California 
Helligren, Gunnar G., Cpl., Co. I, R. F. D. No. 2, 

Bow, Washington 
Hellstrom, Nels, Pvt., Co. L, Minot, South Dakota 



Helmes, Edmund, Pvt., Co. L, 537 Dandridge St., Cin- 
cinnati, Ohio 
Heltzel, John, Pvt., Co. L, Banks, Oregon 
Helvogt, Herman, Pvt. 1 cl., Co. G, R. F. D. No. 1, Hills- 

boro, Oregon 
Hemf, Frederick, Pvt. 1 cl., Co. K, 741 Prospect Ave., 

Steubenville, Ohio 
Hemphill, Fred C, Pvt. 1 cl., Co. D, 307 W. Heron, Aber- 
deen, Washington 
Hendershot, Edgel E., Pvt., Co. D, Elmdale, Montana 
Henderson, Arley, Pvt. 1 cl., Co. I, Moxee City, Wash- 
ington 
Henderson, Arthur A., Pvt. 1 cl., Co. D, Mapelton, 

Kansas 
Henderson, Bert, Wagoner, Sup. Co., Attica, Indiana 
Henderson, Calvin R., Sgt., Co. E, St. Anthony, Idaho 
Hendricks, Charles A., Pvt. 1 cl., M. G. Co., Whiterocka 

Utah 
Henger, Cornelius W., Cpl., Co. F, 815 Yesler Way, 

Seattle, Washington 
Heninger, Thomas L., Pvt., Co. H, 912 Corbett St., Port- 
land, Oregon 
Hennessy, Patrick M., Bugler, Co. G, 1349 3rd Ave., 

Vancouver, B. C. 
Henry, David R., Pvt., Co. H, Eolia, Missouri 
Henry, Robert B., Pvt. 1 cl., Co. M, 54 Warren St., Co- 
lumbus, Ohio 
Henry, Thomas M., Pvt., Co. G, 624 S. 2nd St. W., Salt 

Lake City, Utah 
Hensel, Roland R., Pvt., Hq. Co., 713 Vinton St., Toledo, 

Ohio 
Hensley, Lester L., Pvt., Hq. Co., Woodridge, Virginia 
Hensley, William, Pvt., Co. E, Manchester, Kentucky 
Hensley, William O., Pvt. 1 cl., Co. F, Parrotsville, Ten- 
nessee 
Henson, James O., Pvt., Co. B, 1017 S. 12th St., Mt. Vernon, 

Illinois 
Henton, John E., Pvt. 1 cl., Co. D, Quenema, Kansas 
Hepp, Carl A., Pvt. 1 cl., Co. H, 1940 Telegraph Ave., 

Oakland, California 
Herberger, Edward, Pvt., Co. D, Sparta, Illinois 
Herman, William F., Sup. Sgt., Hq. Co., 4332 5th Ave., 

N. W., Seattle, Washington 
Herren, Wilson T., Pvt. 1 cl., Co. D, Lake Zurich, Illinois 
Herron, James M., Pvt., Hq. Co., 120 Ceder St., Sno- 
homish, Washington 
Heslop, Edward T., Pvt., Co. C, West Weber, Utah 
Hesse, Martin H., Pvt., Co. D, R. F. D. No. 1, Box 23, 

Merced, California 
Hester, Martin, Pvt. 1 cl., Co. I, 312 Crescent Ave., San 

Francisco, Cal. 
Hetland, Ommund, Pvt., Co. B, Maxbass, North Dakota 
Hetrick, Henry P., Pvt., Co. H, Springdale, Pennsylvania 
Hettinger, Nedward J., Pvt., Co. I, Adelphia, Ohio 
Heun, Clarence, Pvt., Co. B, R. F. D. No. 1, Conrad, 

Montana 
Hewett, Albert M., Pvt. 1 cl., Sup. Co., 7002 California 

Ave., Seattle, Washington 
Higdon, Leroy T., Mechanic, Co. H, Allegree, Kentucky 
Higgerson, Louis C, Pvt. 1 cl., Co. D, Hoquiam, Wash- 
ington 
Higgins, James D., Cook, Co. A, 108 Mill St., Paterson, 

New Jersey 
Higgs, Lynn L., Pvt., Co. A, Starks, Wisconsin 
Higuera, Dan J., Pvt. 1 cl., Co. C, South Hollister, Cal- 
ifornia 
Hildreth, Kenneth H., Pvt., M. G. Co., Griggsville, 

Illinois 
Hill, James F., Pvt., Co. C, 708 Washington Ave., Wells- 

ville, Ohio 
Hill, William E., Pvt., Co. E, R. F. D. No. 2, Narris City, 

Illinois 
Hillbrant, Ward, Pvt., Co. F, Lemont, Oklahoma 
Hillebrecht, George A., Cpl., Co. G, R. F. D. No. 22, 

Orange California 
Hiller, Gustave, Pvt., Hq. Co., Paha, Washington 
Hillmayer, Charles, Pvt., Co. E, Hester St., Little Ferry, 

New Jersey 
Hilton, Lester, Pvt., Med. Det., 2326 Grand Ave., Everett, 

Washington 
Hilton, Robert G., Pvt., Co. F, 169 18th Ave., Seattle, 

Washington 
Hinekley, Roland S., Pvt., Hq. Co., 1629 Howard Ave., 

Seattle, Washington 
Hines, McMillan, Bugler, Co. B, Salmon, Idaho 
Hinton, John L., Cpl., Co. D, Clarksburg, West Virginia 
Hirschel, Edward J., Pvt. 1 cl., M. G. Co., R. 1, Tekor\ 
Washington 



257 



Hjellen, Peter O. I., Pvt., Hq. Co., 7033 24th Ave., N. W., 

Seattle, Washington 
Hoagland, Benjamin H., Pvt., Hq. Co., Latah, Wash- 
ington 
Hobbs, Joseph A., Pvt., Co. E, Turn water, Washington 
Hobson, Roy, Pvt. 1 cl., Co. H, R. F. D. No. 1, Box 53, 

Napa, California 
Hoskensmith, Asa P., Pvt., Hq. Co., B. & O. Water Fore- 
man, Creston, Ohio 
Hector, Frank A., Pvt., Co. E, 1074 Kensington Ave., 

Buffalo, New York 
Hodder, Eugene J., Pvt., M. G. Co., 1808 Gaty Ave., 

East St. Louis, Illinois 
Hodgdon, George E., Pvt. 1 cl., Co. D, Fir & Shorb, Los 

Angeles, California 
Hodge, Charles A., Wagoner, Sup. Co., Route No. 2, Box 

105, Puyallup, Washington 
Hodges, Harry D., Pvt. 1 cl., Co. K, R. F. D. 1, Erwin, 

South Dakota 
Hodgkinson, Frederick G, Wagoner, Sup. Co., Route 

No. 2, Vernal, Utah 
Hoefling, Walter, Cpl., Hq. Co., 108 Thorne Ave., Jersey 

City, New Jersey 
Hoessley, Maximilian R., Musician, Hq. Co., 303 Haight 

Bldg., Seattle, Washington 
Hofeld, John H., Pvt., Co. F, 2614 Granada St., Los 

Angeles, California 
Hoffman, Henry P., Captain, Co. E, 305 Lumber Exchange 

Bldg., Seattle, Washington 
Hoffman, Herbert M., Pvt., Co. L, 348 N. Sandusky St., 

Tiffin, Ohio 
Hoffman, Hohn E., Pvt., Hq. Co., 462 N. Mulberry, Mans- 
field, Ohio 
Hofmann, George J., Pvt., Hq. Co., Route No. 2, Ohio 

City, Ohio 
Hogan, Edward J., Pvt., Co. E, 2 Ziegler PI., Roxbury, 

Massachusetts 
Hogan, William B., Pvt. 1 cl., Co. I, Harpers Ferry, Iowa 
Hogg, Otto, Sgt., Co. L, Oregon City, Oregon 
Hogue, Frank B., Sup. Sgt., Co. L, Underwood, Wash- 
ington 
Hohman, Carl, Cook, Co. I, Irvington, Illinois 
Holcomb, Lee C, Cpl., Co. G, R. F. D. No. 2, Big Sandy, 

Texas 
Holeman, Beverly T., Pvt., Co. D, Tilden, Illinois 
Holitza, Harry H., Cpl., Ordnance Corps, 721 Greeley 

Ave., Kansas City, Kansas 
Holland, Ross T., Pvt., Hq. Co., Stanford, Ohio 
Hollis, Frank, Pvt. 1 cl., Co. K, Victor, Kansas 
Hollman, Harry, Pvt. 1 cl., Co. H, 722 16th St., Oakland, 

California 
Holm, Eric, Pvt. 1 cl., Co. D, Angus Hotel, Boise, Idaho 
Holman, Charles F., Cpl., M. G. Co., 555 Summit Ave., 

Pasadena, California 
Holmes, Floyd R., Pvt., Co. H, Hotel Astor, New York 

City, New York 
Holmes, Louis W., Pvt., Co. H, 819 Nebraska Ave., Kansas 

City, Kansas 
Holmquist, Herman A., Pvt., Co. L, Clarissa, Minnesota 
Holzbauer, Walter H., Pvt., Co. D, Chinook, Montana 
Homann, Oscar H., Pvt., Co. D, Mattoon, Illinois 
Hooshagen, John, Pvt., Co. D, Parker, South Dakota 
Hooton, Gilbert T., Pvt., Co. D, 37 E. Jefferson St., Tip- 
ton, Indiana 
Hoover, Charles E., Pvt., Co. I, Box 412, Uniontown, 

Pennsylvania 
Hoover, George W., Cpl., Co. K, Warriors Mark, Penn- 
sylvania 
Hoppe, Ernest H., Cpl., Co. I, Springfield, Minnesota 
Hopper, Irwin C, Pvt., Co. D, Toledo, Illinois 
Horan, Charles T., Pvt., Co. D, Ideal, South Dakota 
Horgan, Dell F., Pvt., Co. I, 302 South Ave., 21., Los 

Angeles, California 
Hornberger, Elmer H, Pvt., Co. D, Red Bud, Illinois 
Hosking, Samuel J., Pvt. 1 cl., Co. I, Roslyn, Washington 
Hosking, William A., Cpl., Co. F, 44 Broadway, Jackson, 

California 
Hotler, Albert, Pvt., Co. C, Goodlan, Ohio 
Hotter, Louis J., Pvt., Co. F, Ehrinfeld, Pennsylvania 
Houden, Emil A., Pvt., Co. F, Nekoosa, Wisconsin 
Hougard, Wilford R., Sgt., Co. L, 1358 Glemmaur St., 

Salt Lake City, Utah 
Houlis, Nicholas, Pvt. 1 cl., Hq. Co., 1313H 1st Ave., 

Seattle, Washington 
Housden, Frank G., Pvt., Hq. Co., 4004 Mapa St., Spo- 
kane, Washington 
Hovel, Harley L., Pvt., Co. E, R. F. D. No. 1, Sumas, 

Washington 
Hovermale, James E., Horseshoer, Sup. Co., Felt, Idaho 



Howard, Arthur H., Bugler 1 cl., M. G. Co., Langly, 

Washington 
Howard, Bennett W., Pvt. 1 cl., Sup. Co., 5121 Russell 

Ave., Seattle, Washington 
Howard, Byron A., Cpl., Co. H, 6743 14th St., N. W., 

Seattle, Washington 
Howard, Everett, Pvt. 1 cl., Co. D, 816 Albina Ave., 

Portland, Oregon 
Howard, George T., Pvt. 1 cl., Co. H, 821 S. Olive St., 

Los Angeles, California 
Howard, Robert C, 1st Lt., Co. C, Colfax, Washington 
Howe, Henry M., Pvt., Co. K, Sallisaw, Oklahoma 
Howell, Curtis C, Pvt. 1 cl., Co. K, 165H So. 21st Ave., 

Los Angeles, California 
Howell, Samuel S., Pvt., Co. F, Wheatland, Wyoming 
Howells, Merriam J., 1st Lt., 14 Sansome St., San Fran- 
cisco, California 
Howes, Alvion H., Sgt., Co. L, Ariss, Canada 
Howsden, James O., Pvt., Co. B, Huntley, Nebraska 
Hoyt, Kenneth B., Cpl., Co. E, Gresham, Oregon 
Huber, Edward J., Pvt., Co. K, 3829 Spring Grove Ave., 

Cincinnati, Ohio 
Huber, Harry J., Pvt., M. G. Co., Highland, Illinois 
Huckaby, Joseph A., Pvt., Co. I, Puryear, Arkansas 
Huddleston, Maurice L., Pvt., Co. H, Pittsboro, Indiana 
Hudson, Ernest J., Sgt., Co. E, Paris Crossing, Indiana 
Huebschwerlen Albert F., Pvt., Med. Det., Warrick, 

Montana 
Huether, Henry R., Pvt. 1 cl., Co. G, Ruff, Washington 
Huff, Ross L., Pvt. 1 cl., Co. I, R. F. D. 7, Yakima, Wash- 
ington 
Hughes, Argus, Cpl., Co. F, Benton City, Washington 
Hughes, Earl F., Cpl., M. G. Co., Box 406, Missoula. 

Montana 
Hughes, John E., Pvt., Co. F, Cresson, Pennsylvania 
Hulse, Hurshel B., Pvt., M. G. Co., Frogue, Kentucky 
Hunt, Collie, Sgt., Co. M, R. F. D. 1, Marion, Kentucky 
Hunter, Harry D., Pvt. 1 cl., Hq. Co., 1615 S. 11th St., 

Terre Haute, Indiana 
Hunter, William R., Cpl., Co. K, Pioneer St., Montesano, 

Washington 
Huntsman, Javis, Wagoner, Sup. Co., Tulsa, Oklahoma 
Huntzinger, Amos, Pvt., Co. H, Shalter, California 
Hunzicker, Clarence H., Pvt., Co. E, 14 W. Jefferson, 

Colorado Springs, Colorado 
Huppman, Joseph M., Sgt., Co. G, 416 24th Ave., N., Seattle. 

Washington 
Hurd, Joseph R., Wagoner, Sup. Co., Elba, Idaho 
Hurst, Howard D., Pvt., Co. I, Wheatland, Wyoming 
Hurt, Zeb V., Pvt. 1 cl., M. G. Co., Lind, Washington 
Huseman, Howard A., Pvt., Ord. Cps., Glenham, South 

Dakota 
Husha, Claude E., Pvt., Hq. Co., Box 42, Lake Village, 

Indiana 
Hutchey, John, Pvt., Co. I, 621 N. Keyser Ave., Scranton, 

Pennsylvania 
Hutchins, Thomas P., Pvt. 1 cl., Co. A, New Haven, 

Kentucky 
Hutchinson, George R., Pvt. 1 cl., Co. A, Byer, Jackson 

County, Ohio 
Huth, William R., Mechanic, Sup. Co., 320 Stanford Ave., 

Los Angeles, California 
Hutley, Sidney, Cpl., M. G. Co., 871 Montana Ave., Port- 
land, Oregon 
Hutto, Will L., Pvt., Co. H, Moss, Mississippi 
Hyatt, James A., Pvt. 1 cl., Co. A, Parowan, Utah 
Hysel, Rastus, Pvt., Co. A, Rabie, Ohio 
Igert, John S., Pvt., Co. M, R. F. D. No. 1, Booneville, 

Indiana 
Illich, Willie, Mess Sgt., Co. G, Klamath Falls, Oregon 
Iliff, Harry J., Cpl., C >. D, West Union, Iowa 
Imbrogno, Pasquale, Pvt., Co. H, 573 Chaney St., Keno- 
sha, Wisconsin 
Ingersol, Charles W., Pvt., Co. H, 158 E. 53rd St., Los 

Angeles, California 
Ingram, Harvey, Pvt., Co. I, R. F. D. No. 2, Plattsburg, 

Mississippi 
Irigoyen, Bertrand, Pvt., Co. E, Price, Utah 
Irwin, Thomas L., Pvt., Co. E, Redfield, South Dakota 
Isaacs, Harry W., Cpl., Co. K, 401 Locust St., Turlock, 

California 
Isenthal, John A., Pvt., Co. D, Indianapolis, Indiana 
Ison, Wyatt C, Pvt., Hq. Co., 504 Cascade Ave., Hood 

River, Oregon 
Jacketta, Joseph, Pvt., Co. L, 268 Clay St., Portland, 

Oregon 
Jacobson, Herman, Pvt., Med. Det., 1119 Lincoln St., 

Hoquiam, Washington 



258 



Jackson, Robert J., Pvt., M. G. Co., Weeksberry, Ken- 
tucky 
Jacobs, Harry L., Cook, Co. B, 2934 Hoyt Ave., Everett, 

Washington 
Jacobsen, Christian H., Wagoner, Sup. Co., Connell, 

Washington 
James, Henry B., Pvt., Co. C, Haines, Oregon 
James, Raymond A., Pvt., Hq. Co., Yakima, Washington 
Jamison, James A., Pvt., Co. G, Box 214, Brea, California 
Janowicz, George J., Pvt., Co. H, Lancaster, California 
Jaquith, Russell M., Cpl., Co. B, 1108 Rood Ave., Grand 

Junction, Colorado 
Jaros, James F., Pvt., Co. L, 2315 E. 88th St., Cleveland, 

Ohio 
Jarrell, Thomas, Pvt., M. G. Co., Watergap, Kentucky 
Jarvi, John, Pvt., Co. A, Scofield, Utah 
Jastad, Edward, Pvt., Co. G, Unalaska, Washington 
Jastad, George, Pvt., Co. F, Unalaska, Washington 
Jaynes, Samuel, Pvt., Co. L, 22 Canal St., Zanesville, Ohio 
Jeffers, Sterling A., Sgt., Sup. Co., 3612 36th Ave., W., 

Seattle, Washington 
Jeffery, Clarence A., Pvt., Co. K, R. F. D. No. 4, Box 21, 

Idaho Falls, Idaho 
Jefferies, George C, Pvt., Hq. Co., 1024 Madison Ave., 

Columbus, Ohio 
Jenkins, Charles W., Pvt., M. G. Co., R. F. D. No. 1, 

Pittsburg, Illinois 
Jenkins, Evan, Pvt., Co. L, R. F. D. No. 6, Oak Hill, Ohio 
Jenkins, Raymond S., Pvt., Co. L, 1817 Connecticut Ave., 

Washington, District of Columbia 
Jenkins, Wilford W., Pvt., Co. F, R. F. D. No. 2, St. 

Anthony, Idaho 
Jenkinson, Vincent J., Pvt., Co. F, 886 Eastern Ave., Fall 

River, Massachusetts 
Jensen, Bennie, Pvt., Co. L, Weston, Box 32, Idaho 
Jensen, Herman O., Pvt., M. G. Co., Alameda, Washington 
Jensen, Jens P., Pvt., Co. H, 942 Central Ave., Minneapolis, 

Minnesota 
Jernberg, Gus H., Cpl., Co. A, 314 N. Elm St., Fairmont, 

Minnesota 
Jerred, Johnnie C, Pvt., Co. H, Keller, Washington 
Jertsen, Harry I., Musician, Hq. Co., Charleston, Wash- 
ington 
Jesse, Louis F., Pvt., Co. C, General Delivery, Evansport, 

Ohio 
Joergensen, Axel R., Pvt., Co. D, East Stanwood, Wash- 
ington 
Johannessen, Joseph B., Pvt., Co. I, Hunt, Texas 
Johanson, Johannes, Pvt., Co. A, 27 W. 10th St., Reno, 

Nevada 
Johansen, John C, Pvt., Co. A, 419 Capp St., San Fran- 
cisco, California 
Johansen, Peter, Mechanic, Co. E, Newman, California 
John, Manuel, Pvt., Co. K, 25 S. Eldorado, Stockton, 

California 
Johns, Cyrus E., Cpl., Co. H, 2802 Walnut St., Seattle, 

Washington 
Johnson, Arthur L., Cpl., Sup. Co., 3615 Interlake Ave., 

Seattle, Washington 
Johnson, Ben W., Pvt., Co. C, 25th & Putman St., Terre 

Haute, Indiana 
Johnson, Carl A., Pvt., Co. H, 658 S. West St., Jackson- 
ville, Illinois 
Johnson, Carl J., Pvt., Co. M, R. 4, Decorah, Iowa 
Johnson, Carl L., Pvt., Co. G, 1834 E. 67th St., Los An- 
geles, California 
Johnson, Carl S., Pvt., Co. D, 513 S. 10th St., Laramie, 

Wyoming 
Johnson, Charlet W., Pvt., Co. E, R. F. D. No. 1, Box 47, 

Colton, California 
Johnson, Clarence A., Pvt., Co. H, New Lexington, Ohio 
Johnson, Edward, Pvt., Co. C, Sparta, Oregon 
Johnson, Elmer B., Pvt., Hq. Co., R. No. 3, Box 124, 

Seattle, Washington 
Johnson, Gust E., Pvt., Co. D, Jobs, Idaho 
Johnson, Henry, Pvt., Co. L, 650 Locust St., Sausaulito, 

California 
Johnson, Herman W., Cpl., Co. C, Buckeye, Washington 
Johnson, Howard E., Pvt., Co. C, R. F. D. No. 1, Box 187, 

Centralia, Washington 
Johnson, James, Pvt., Hq. Co., Millstone, Kentucky 
Johnson, Jesse A., Pvt., Hq. Co., R. F. D. No. 8, Decatur, 

Indiana 
Johns jn, John, Pvt.. Co. E, Elk, Washington 
Johnson, Knute, Pvt., Co. G, Aal Hallingdal, Norway 
Johnson, Leon H., Pvt., Co. M, 530 N. 22nd St., East St. 

Louis, Illinois 
Johnson, Lloyd W., Pvt., Co. D, Box 67, R. F. D. No. 5, 
McLeansboro, Illinois 



Johnson, Lyle I., Cpl., Co. C, R. F. D. No. 6, Shelby, Ohio 
Johnson, Olaf C, Pvt., M. G. Co., Crookston, Minnesota 
Johnson, Oscar, Pvt., Co. L, R. F. D. No. 3, West Baden, 

Indiana 
Johnson, Oscar J., Mechanic, Co. D, Strandberg, South 

Dakota 
Johnson, Oscar R., Pvt., Co. M, 57 E. 66th St., New York 

City, New York 
Johnson, Philip D., Pvt., Co. I, R. F. D. No. 2, Box 145, 

Goshen, Virginia 
Johnson, Robert G., Pvt., Co. M, 3824 S. Main St., Los 

Angeles, California 
Johnson, Rose H., Mechanic, Co. F, Rock House, Arkansas 
Johnson, Russell M., Pvt., Hq. Co., 607 5th St., Aurora, 

Indiana 
Johnson, Walter E., Cpl., Co. G, 1606 Colby Ave., Everett, 

Washington 
Johnson, William G., Cpl., Co. H, 826 Genessee St., Salt 

Lake City, Utah 
Johnson, William H., Pvt., Co. C, Star Route, Clifton, 

Texas 
Johnston, Ernest A., Cpl., Co. I, Odessa, Washington 
Johnston, Fount J., Wagoner, Sup. Co., Pearisburg, Vir- 
ginia 
Johnston, George E., Sgt., Co. A, Richville, Minnesota 
Johnston, Ralph H., Cpl., Co. E, Corcoran, King Co., 

California 
Johnston, Robert B., Pvt., Co. A, Agatha, Idaho 
Johnston, Thomas H., Pvt., Co. C, Atwater, California 
Jolly, Joseph R., Pvt., Hq. Co., 230 Innis Ave., Columbus, 

Ohio 
Jones, Benjamin H., Pvt., Co. C, 206 W. 79th St., Los 

Angeles, California 
Jones, Charles A., Sgt., Co. A, Burlington, Washington 
Jones, Charles E., Pvt., Co. C, 934 Ewing St., Seattle, 

Washington 
Jones, Edward O., Pvt., Hq. Co., Tokio, Ohio 
Jones, Elmer, Musician, Hq. Co., R. F. D. No. 2, Fern- 
dale, Washington 
Jones, Harold J., 2nd Lt., Co. K, Winner, South Dakota 
Jones, Harry, Pvt., Co. I, 1116 7th St., Anacortes, Wash- 
ington 
Jones, Hiram E., Pvt., Co. D, McLeansboro, Illinois 
Jones, Joe, Pvt., Co. C, Cedar Grove, West Virginia 
Jones, Lennie J., Pvt., Hq. Co., Summerduck, Virginia 
Jones, Randall E., Pvt., Co. H, 26WA 4th Ave., Seattle, 

Washington 
Jones, Reynold, Pvt., Co. C, Malta, Montana 
Jones, Robert G., Sgt., Co. B, Malda City, Idaho 
Jones, Sam L., Pvt., Co. M, Ready Branch, North Carolina 
Jones, Sidney S., Pvt., Co. M, R. F. D. No. 1, Beaz, Ken- 

ticky 
Jones, Stanley N., Pvt., M. G. Co., Vernal, Utah 
Jones, Stephen E., Sgt., Co. L, 3255 34th Ave., W., Seattle, 

Washington 
Jones, Virgin L., Cpl., Co. E, Hazelton, Idaho 
Jonker, Schelto, Cpl., Co. D, Sultan, Washington 
Jordon, George M., Pvt., Co. B, Aladdin, Wyoming 
Jordan, Leo M., Pvt., Co. H, 210 S. Larch St., Lansing, 

Michigan 
Jordan, Lester F., Cpl., Co. H, Redlands, California 
Jorgenson, Carl A., Pvt., Co. I, Oldham, South Dakota 
Josh, Everett L., Cpl., Co. G, Pinehurst, Washington 
Jovanovich, Blaz, Pvt., Co. I, 116 W. Park Ave., Butte, 

Montana 
Juday, Riley J., Cpl., Co. H, Heppner, Oregon 
Judd, Earl R., Mechanic, Co. B, Hagerman, Idaho 
Juell, Arthur L., Sgt., Co. M, 410 N. 4th St., Mt. Vernon, 

Washington 
Just, Harry W., Pvt., Co. H, Olympia, Washington 
Kadelbach, Albert, Pvt., Hq. Co., R. F. D. No. 1, Box 

109, Fullerton, California 
Kadin, Samuel, Pvt., Co. D, 637 Johnson St., Victoria, 

British Columbia 
Kaftarine, Jim, Pvt., Co. L, 180 Chestnut St., Manchester, 

New Hampshire 
Kaifer, Louis B., Musician, Hq. Co., Box 303, R. F. D. 

No. 2, Hayward, California 
Kaiser, Edward R., Pvt., Co. K, 116 Fayette St., Ham- 
mond, Indiana 
Kaiser, Emanuel R., Pvt. 1 cl., Co. F, 348 Cicotte Ave., 

Detroit, Michigan 
Kals, Joseph L., Cpl., Co. H, Box 68, Del Mar, California 
Kampa, John, Pvt., Co. K, Grenville, South Dakota 
Kamphoeffner, Fred W., Pvt., Co. L, Alhambra, Illinois 
Kane, William G., Mechanic, Hq. Co., 4929 Wesley Ave., 

Norwood, Cincinnati, Ohio 
Kangas, Frank I., Pvt. 1 el., Co. K, 1010 E. 1st St., Aber- 
deen, Washington 



259 



Kantner, Henry E., Mechanic, Co. B, 1308 12th St., High- 
land, Illinois 
Kanzler, Jacob, Captain, Reg. Staff, Court House, Port- 
land, Oregon 
Kapetano, Tom V., Pvt., Co. H, 504 James St., Seattle, 

Washington 
Kapla, Stanley U., Pvt., Hq. Co., R. F. D., Pound, Wis- 
consin 
Kaplan, Joseph, Pvt., Co. B, Richmond, Kentucky 
Karcher, Albert N., Pvt. 1 cl., Co. B, Dahlgreen, Illinois 
Karcher, Henry F., Pvt. 1 cl., Co. C, R. F. D. No. 3, 

Dahlgreen, Illinois 
Kauffman, Homer, Pvt., M. G. Co., R. F. D. No. 6, Sidney, 

Ohio 
Kauffold, Albert C, Cpl., Co. H, 2315 Brown St., Alton, 

Illinois 
Kaupert, Otto L., Cpl., Co. M, 2516 Bryant St., San Fran- 
cisco, California 
Kay, Ira, Pvt., Co. A, Philipsburg, Pennsylvania 
Keeler, Rollie E., Cpl., Co. D, Route No. 3, Junction 

City, Oregon 
Keene, Jesse A., Pvt. 1 cl., Hq. Co., Gold Bar, Washington 
Kegley, Paul, Musician, Hq. Co., 619 W. Lake Ave., 

Los Angeles, California 
Kehlele, Edwin B., Pvt. 1 cl., Co. M, Honolulu, Hawaiian 

Islands 
Keim, Raymond D., Pvt. 1 cl., Co. M, 808 Davis St., Ft. 

Wayne, Indiana 
Keister, Oscar H., Pvt., Hq. Co., Tannersville, Virginia 
Keith, Charles N., Pvt., Co. F, Coupeville, Washington 
Kellas, Edward L., 1st Lt., Sup. Co., R. R. C. 205, Fresno, 

California 
Keller, Anthony G., Pvt. 1 cl., Co. F, 423 E. Penn. St., 

Whittier, California 
Kellogg, Rolla M., Pvt. 1 cl., Co. D, Artesia, California 
Kellogg, William H., Cpl., Hq. Co., 5805 20th Ave., N. W., 

Seattle, Washington 
Kelly, Vea R., Pvt., Co. C, Murray, Utah 
Kelly, Vincent J., 1st Sgt., Co. B, Skamokawa, Wash- 
ington 
Kelmer, John, Pvt., Co. D, New Athens, Illinois 
Kenney, Merl J., Pvt. 1 cl., Co. M, R. F. D. No. 2, Thorn- 

ville, Ohio 
Kepka, George, Cpl., Co. M, Wilkeson, Washington 
Kerby, Bert J., Sgt., Co. E, Orleans, Indiana 
Kern, Joseph, Pvt., Co. B, R. F. D. No. 2, Ilo, Idaho 
Kern, Laurel C, Pvt., M. G. Co., R. F. D. 7, Bellevue, 

Ohio 
Kerr, Jack C, Reg. Sup. Sgt., Sup. Co., 1632 35th Ave., 

Seattle, Washington 
Kerrigan, Peter F., Pvt., Co. F, Reedsburg, Wisconsin 
Kersey, Samuel B., Sgt., Co. D, 203 E. Polk St., St. Johns, 

Oregon 
Kerstein, August, Pvt., Co. K, Sauk Rapids, Minnesota 
Kessler, George W., Pvt. 1 cl., Co. F, 3903 Rhoda Ave., 

Oakland, California 
Kessler, Roscoe, Pvt., Co. C, Pullman, Richmond, Cal- 
ifornia 
Kettleson, Peter G., Pvt., Hq. Co., 1588 8th St., S., 

Portland, Oregon 
Kidd George S., Pvt. Co. L, R. F. D. No. 1, Caywood, 

Ohio 
Kidwell, George R., Pvt., Co. E, 1248 Columbia Rd., 

Washington, D. C. 
Kilburn, Ralph R., Pvt. 1 cl., Co. A, Ovando, Montana 
Killebrew, William L., Pvt., Co. D, R. F. D. No. 4, Win- 
chester, Illinois 
Killian, Harvey E., Pvt. 1 cl., Co. K, R. F. D. No. 1, 

Lorenzo, Idaho 
Kilpatrick, John H., Pvt. 1 cl., Co. A, R. F. D. No. 1, 

Altoona, Alabama 
Kimbrough, Cecil, Pvt., Co. I, R. F. D. No. 3, Box No. 192, 

Tacoma, Washington 
Kincaid, Jacob L., Pvt., Co. M, Lebanon, Indiana 
Kindelberger, John W., Pvt., Hq. Co., Burkhart, Ohio 
King, Eli, Pvt., Co. F, R. F. D. No. 3, Mannington, West 

Virginia 
King, Ernest J., Pvt., Co. B, Woden, Texas 
King, Homer T., Pvt., Co. A, Richfield, Utah 
King, Horace L., Pvt., Co. E, Sunnvdale, California 
King, Ira W., Cook, Co. C, 342 6th St., Bremerton, Wash- 
ington 
King, Lee, Pvt. 1 cl., Co. I, R. F. D. No. 3, Owensburg, 

Kentucky 
King, Silas, Pvt., Co. E, Route No. 1, LaFollette, Tennessee 
Kinnear, Lafayette A., Pvt., Co. C, R. F. D. No. 1, Box 

22, Provo, Utah 
Kiouses, John K., Pvt., Co. I, 761 W. Young St., Pocatello, 
Idaho 



Kirchner, Adolph G., Pvt., Co. L, 550 21st St., San Pedro, 

California 
Kirk, John, Cpl., Co. B, Challis, Idaho 
Kirk, Richard M., Sgt., Co. H, 517 Exchange Bldg., Los 

Angeles, California 
Kirkman, Bert E., Pvt., Co. K, R. F. D. No. 1, Exeter, 

California 
Kirkwood, Clarence E., Pvt., Co. I, Crooksville, Ohio 
Kirkwood, Finley, Pvt., Hq. Co., R. F. D. No. 2, Green- 
wich, Ohio 
K18OR, Roy, Sup. Sgt., Sup. Co., 1810 6th Ave., Seattle, 

Washington 
Kison, Simon, Pvt. 1 cl., M. G. Co., Ralston, Washington 
Kiviaho, Edward, Pvt., Co. L, R. F. D. No. 3, Box 69, 

Wadena, Minnesota 
Klaber, Russell F., Pvt., M. G. Co., Mariba, Kentucky 
Klapp, Charlie, Pvt., Co. L, 1332 E. Grand, Everett, 

Washington 
Klaus, Nicholas H., Cpl., M. G. Co., Box 752, Sumner, 

Washington 
Klein, Frank A., Pvt., Co. B, 1620 Knowlton St., Cin- 
cinnati, Ohio 
Klein, George W., Cook, Co. I, 1816 E. Columbia St., 

Evansville, Indiana 
Klein, William, Pvt., Co. F, Kings Park, Long Island, 

New York 
Keliner, Earl C, Pvt. 1 cl., Co. D, Batesville, Indiana 
Klepper, Thomas H., Pvt. 1 cl., Co. E, Rogersville, Mis- 
souri 
Klindt, Gustav, Cook, M. G. Co., 2251 Brandt St., San 

Diego, California 
Kline, Claud C, Pvt., Co. A, 434 S. Kalamazoo St., Paw 

Paw, Michigan 
Kloe, Harold V., Pvt., Hq. Co., 7313 21st Ave., N. W., 

Seattle, Washington 
Klundt, Peter, Pvt., Sup. Co., Odessa, Washington 
Knapp, Orton, 1st Lt., Co. M, 115 17th Ave., San Francisco, 

California 
Kneeland, Robert I., Pvt. 1 cl., Co. E, Shelton, Wash- 
ington 
Knickerbocker, Claude, Pvt., Co. K, R. F. D. No. 6, 

Monroe City, Missouri 
Knight, Hugh M., Pvt., Hq. Co., Kingsley, Oregon 
Knight, Robert B., Cpl., Co. F, 2526 State St., Everett, 

Washington 
Knose, George, Pvt., Co. F, R. F. D. No. 1, Cleves, Ohio 
Knox, John C, Pvt., M. G. Co., R. F. D. No. 2, Box 51, 

Woodlawn, Illinois 
Knudeson, George O., Wagoner, Sup. Co., Fort Duchesne, 

Unita Co., Utah 
Knudson, Elmer T., Pvt., Co. A, 3720 S. 1st St., Tacoma, 

Washington 
Kobman, George, Pvt., Hq. Co., 522 York St., Cincinnati, 

Ohio 
Koch, Fred, Pvt., Co. D, 755 Dawson St., New York City, 

New York 
Kocher, Harry G., Cpl., Co. G, 716 11th Ave., Seattle, 

Washington 
Kochman, Carl F., Bugler, M. G. Co., Duane, Minnesota 
Kohl, George P., Pvt., Co. B, 1724 S. 9th St., St. Louis, 

Missouri 
Kohls, William R., Sgt., Co. I, Ennis, Montana 
Kollias, Gus B., Pvt., Co. K, 816 Baker St., Bakersfield, 

California 
Knostant, John, Pvt., Co. K, R. F. D. No. 1, Marvin, 

South Dakota 
Kopf, Eugene C, Pvt., Co. M, Pasco, Washington 
Kerte, John B., Pvt., Co. M, R. R. No. 3, Glasgow, Mis- 
souri 
Kosek, George, Cpl., Co. K, Taylor, Arkansas 
Koskinen, Edward S., Sgt., Hq. Co., 11 Delaware St., 

Ashtabula, Ohio 
Koslosky, Joseph, Pvt., Co. F, 335 Carver St., Plymouth, 

Pennsylvania 
Kotoske, Edmond A., Pvt., Co. D, 12254 Wallace St., Chi- 
cago, Illinois 
Kotsakis, Vasileos, Pvt. 1 cl., Co. D, Box 27, Clifton, 

Oregon 
Kotzenberg, Arnold W., Pvt., Co. G, 6442 Suburban Ave., 

St. Louis, Missouri 
Kouts, William M., Sgt., Co. D, Crescent, Oklahoma 
Kovach, Louis, Pvt., Co. D, 7501 Edar Ave., Cleveland, 

Ohio 
Kovalchick, John, Pvt., Co. C, R. F. D. No. 1, Box 11, 

Byesville, Ohio 
Kovar, Fred E., Pvt., Hq. Co., Schwiler, Nebraska 
Kozak, Oscar G., Pvt., Co. D, 3624 McClintock St., Los 

Angeles, California 



260 



Kraemer, Lloyd W., Sgt., Hq. Co., 122 Throdon St., De- 
troit, Michigan 
Kramer, Alfred C, Cpl., Co. D, 2214 Kauffman Ave., 

Vancouver, Washington 
Kredel, Gustave P., Pvt., Hq. Co., 118 E. Frankfort St., 

Columbus, Ohio 
Kreh, Paul E., Pvt., Co. L, 4349 Virginia Ave., Cincinnati, 

Ohio 
Krueger, Ervin, Pvt., Co. M, 1112 Monroe St., Toledo, 

Ohio 
Kriens, Noble E., Pvt., Co. M, Route No. 2, Corvallis, 

Oregon 
Kreitel, George, Pvt. 1 cl., Co. A, Hosmer, South Dakota 
Kroger, Carl, Pvt., Co. B, 808 Clay St., Troy, Ohio 
Kron, Arvid, Pvt., Co. D, Loup City, Nebraska 
Kron, Elmer, Pvt., Co. A, 1727 E. 11th St., Spokane, 

Washington 
Krueger, Carl E., Pvt. 1 cl., Co. B, 1116 Pinewood Ave., 

Toledo, Ohio 
Krueger, Max E., Pvt., Co. B, Trail, British Columbia, 

Canada 
Kuntz, Anton, Pvt. 1 cl., Co. M, 406 N. 16th St., Portland, 

Oregon 
Kutcey, Fred, Pvt., Co. D, 976 E. 69th St., Cleveland, 

Ohio 
Kuss, George F., Pvt. 1 cl., Co. M, Box 156, Powell River, 

British Columbia 
Kuszke, Edward J., Sgt., Co. I, 1629 E. 25th St., Tacoma, 

Washington 
Kuykendall, Thomas G., Pvt., Co. F, Oakland, Mississippi 
Laabs, William, Pvt., Co. B, Rosebud, Montana 
Labounty, George, Pvt., Co. E, Bellingham, Washington 
LaChall, Francis X., Pvt., Co. D, 1920 W. Prospect St., 

Tacoma, Washington 
LaCroix, Henry, Pvt., Co. C, 201 W. 30th St., Los Angeles, 

California 
Lafferre, Charles B., Pvt., M. G. Co., Lewisville, Ohio 
Laitenan, David, Pvt., Hq. Co., 412 10th St., Hoquiam, 

Washington 
Lake, Orval E., Pvt., Co. K, Roberts, Idaho 
Lakits, Nicholas, Pvt., Co. M, 675 Anna St., Columbus, 

Ohio 
Lapasin, George J., Wagoner, Sup. Co., 1700 25th Ave., S., 

Seattle, Washington 
Lappin, Edwin H., Pvt., Co. B, 627 S. Montana St., Butte, 

Montana 
Lamantia, Nunzio, Pvt., Co. A, 153 Arkansas St., San 

Francisco, California 
Lamasters, William H., Sgt., Co. C, Mullan, Idaho 
Lamay, Charles, Pvt., M. G. Co., R. F. D. No. 3, Nelson, 

Ohio 
Lamb, Joseph L., Pvt., Co. D, Schrag, Washington 
Lambert, Ernest, Cpl., Co. B, 1454 Elizabeth St., Bremer- 
ton, Washington 
Lambos, John S., Pvt., Co. E, Chicago, Illinois 
Lamkie, Joseph P., Pvt., Co., K, 24 Bird St., Cambridge, 

Lamp, Wallace G., Pvt,, Med. Det., 4706 14th Ave., N. E. 
Seattle, Washington 

Lampe, William H, Cpl., M. G. Co., Gardnerville, Nevada 

Lamping, Frederick F., 1st Lt., Co. M, 218 Kinnear Place, 
Seattle, Washington 

Lane, Arthur, Pvt., Co. A, 2417 Broadway, Toledo, Ohio 

Lane, Thomas, Horeeshoer, Sup. Co., Lakeview, Oregon 

Lane, Uil, 1st Lt., Las Cruces, New Mexico 

Lane, Virgil M., Cpl., Co. M, 804 E. 7th St., Grand Island, 
Nebraska 

Lanham, Claude D., Pvt., Co. L, Taswell, Indiana 

Lankford, Oscar W., Pvt., M. G. Co., E. 19th St., Hopkins- 
ville, Kentucky 

Lant, Glenn A., Pvt., Co. F, R. F. D. No. 1, Meridian, 
Idaho 

Lanterman, Walter A., Pvt., Co. L, 1103 E. Main St., 
Columbus, Ohio 

Larkin, Owen B., Pvt., Co. K, R. F. D. No. 5, Stockton, 
California 

LaRocco, James O., Pvt., Co. A, Midvale, Utah 

Larsen, Albert L., Pvt., Co. E, Graham, Washington 

Larsen, Jens L., Pvt., Sup. Co., Route No. 2, Box 34, 
Vienna, South Dakota 

Larsen, Marius C, Pvt., Co. F, R. F. D. No. 2, Ellens- 
burg, Washington 

Larsen, Ola Willard, Pvt., Co. M, R. F. D. No. 1, Kamas, 
Utah 

Larson, George M., Pvt., Co. I, Pelican Rapids, Minne- 
sota 

Larson, Iver, Pvt., Co. A, Sherman, South Dakota 

Larson, Per A., Cpl., Co. K, 2119^ 2nd Ave., Seattle, 
Washington 



Larson, Robert D., Pvt., Co. L, 3347 Bloomington Ave., 

Minneapolis, Minnesota 
Laser, Joseph J., Pvt., Co. F, 1733 N. Albany Ave., Chi- 
cago, Illinois 
Lasicko, John A., Pvt., Co. I, Box 114, Audenry, Carbon 

Co., Pennsylvania 
Lasker, Max M., Pvt,, Co. G, 14 Massoit Place, Springfield, 

Massachusetts 
Latham, Dewitt G., Cpl., Co. I, Chugwater, Wyoming 
Latscher, Arthur A., Pvt., Deer Creek, Oklahoma 
Lauer, George L., Pvt., Co. I, Gabon, Ohio 
Lavin, John J., Cpl., Co. L, 1063 Tillamook St., Portland, 

Oregon 
Lawrence, Gordon, Wagoner, Sup. Co., Ravensdale, 

Washington 
Lawrence, Walter T., Pvt., Co. C, Florence, Ore. 
Lawrence, William, Pvt., Co. L, 489 E. Park St., Butte, 

Montana 
Lawson, William J., Pvt., Co. E, Deming, Wash. 
Lawson, John H., Wagoner, Sup. Co., 810 10th Ave., Seattle, 

Washington 
Lawyer, Lenna, Pvt., Co. D, R. F. D. No. 1, Charlston, 

Illinois 
Lear, Allard, Pvt., Col. L, Box 96, R. F. D. No. 1, Kent, 

Washington 
Lecm, Antonio, Pvt., Co. C, Lockville, Pennsylvania 
Ledig, Alfred H., Pvt., Co. E, P. O. Box 522, Upland, 

California 
Lee, Arthur T., Pvt., Co. A, 308 N. 9th St., Paducah, 

Kentucky 
Lee, Benjamin R., Pvt., Co. K, Box 482, Dinuba, California 
Lee, Emmett A., Pvt., Co. G, 1142 Broadway, Seattle, 

Washington 
Lee, Jack, Pvt., Co. H, 3138 Scott St., San Francisco, 

California 
Leeb, Joseph S., Pvt., Co. D, 2041 Grenshaw St., Chicago, 

Illinois 
Leedy, Hiram K., Cpl., Co. M, R. F. D. No. 2, Indian 

Springs, Tennessee 
Leeson, Harvey E., Pvt., Co. C, R. F. D. No. 7, Box 233, 

Seattle, Washington 
Lehman, Ellis E., Pvt., Co. F, 211 S. Hazelton St., Van Nys, 

California 
Lemm, Leander J., Pvt., Hq. Co., 905 29th Ave., S., Seattle, 

Washington 
Lemon, Orsa E., Cpl., Co. C, R. F. D. No. A 2, Box 291, 

Indianapolis, Indiana 
Lemon, Orville, Sgt., Co. K, 1246 C St., San Bernardino, 

California 
Lemond, Clarence F., Pvt., Co. E, 320 Chestnut St., 

Huntington, Indiana 
Lemons, Jeff D., Pvt., Hq. Co., R. F. D. No. 3, Cookeville, 

Tennessee 
Lemson, Jacob A., Pvt., Co. L, 204 N. Lincoln St., Zeeland, 

Michigan 
Lennon, Roy W., Pvt., Co. L, 216 S. 8th St., Yakima, 

Washington 
Leonard, Edward F., Pvt., Co. L, 120 Church St., San 

Francisco, California 
Leonard, Harry A., Pvt., Co. D, 221 W. 21st St., Lorain, 

Ohio 
Lepo, John, Pvt., Co. F, 49 Hazel St., Kingston, Pennsyl- 
vania 
Leroux, Felix, Pvt., Co. C, 126 E. 1st St., Los Angeles, 

California 
Levandoski, John, Pvt., Co. H, 907Englman St., Mamstee, 

Michigan 
Levik, Reinert, Pvt., Co. G, Truman, Minnesota 
Lewis, Alpha L., Pvt., Co. K, 327 W. Park St., Portland, 

Oregon 
Lewis, Charles E., Pvt., Co. L, Lewellen, Nebraska 
Lewis, Charles R., Pvt., Co. B, R. F. D. No. 4, Lattoon, 

Illinois 
Lewis, Elmer L., Sgt., Co. H, 3519 E. Spruce St., Seattle, 

Washington 
Lewis, Ralph A., Pvt., Sup. Co., 317 S. Arthur St., Poca- 

tello, Idaho 
Lewis, Robert, Bugler, Co. I, Montana Cafe, Great Falls, 

Montana 
Leybold, John, Pvt., Co. E, 3724 N. 22nd St., Tacoma, 

Washington 
Leybold, William J., Pvt., Co. B, 402 E. 2nd St., Butte, 

Montana 
Libby, Claude S., Pvt., Co. K, Eltopia, Washington 
Liden, Edwin C, Cpl., Co. B, Box 554, Miami, Arizona 
Lightner, Harry W., Pvt., Co. C, Kellogg, Idaho 
Liming, Faber, Pvt., Co. C, Wharton, Ohio 



261 



Lind, Otto P., Pvt., Co. A, Brady, Nebraska 

Lindberg, Gerald, Sgt., Co. G, R. F. D. No. 4, Box 108, 

Mt. Vernon, Washington 
Lindquist, Carl O., Pvt., Co. L, R. F. D. No. 3, Stroms- 

burg, Nebraska 
Lindsel, Guy E., Wagoner, Sup. Co., 1914 Dean Ave., 

Spokane, Washington 
Lindskog, George P., Pvt., Hq. Co., 549 N. Ave., 23rd, 

Los Angeles, California 
Linforth, Reginald H., 1st Lt., M. G. Co., 2740 Derby St., 

Berkeley, California 
Lindle, Ara G., Pvt., Co. D, Boring, Oregon 
Linkhart, Fred M., Bugler., Co. B, Trilla, Illinois 
Lio, Giuseppe, Pvt., Co. B, 2111 Riverside St., Miles City, 

Montana 
Lipp, Lee E., Pvt., Hq. Co., Bay View, Washington 
Lish, Ray E., Pvt., Co. K, Box 471, Rexberg, Idaho 
Litsas, Speres, Cpl., Co. M, Kato Fanare Driopis, Greece 
Litchen, Edward, Pvt., Co. B, 1932 Herbert St., St. Louis, 

Missouri 
Little, Everette H., Pvt., Co. F, 501 S. Figuroa St., Los 

Angeles, California 
Little, Luke, Pvt., Co. L, R. R. 1, Naples, Illinois 
Littlejohn, Wilfred R., Pvt., Co. F, Neighbors, California 
Llewellyn, Arthur, Pvt., Co. B, 364 E. Broadway, Butte, 

Montana 
Llewellyn, John, Pvt., Co. I, Falsom, New Mexico 
Llewellyn, Miles E., Cpl., Hq. Co., Kettle Falls, Montana 
Llody, Thomas H., Pvt., Hq. Co., Daniels, Idaho 
Lochridge, James C, Mess Sgt., Co. L, Auburn, Washing- 
ton 
Loeks, Gerrit, Bugler, Co. K, Campbell, Minnesota 
Loescher, William G., Pvt., Co. E, S. Grand St., Orange, 

California 
Logan, Fred W., Pvt., Co. I, Lemonts, Missouri 
Logan, Robert i\, Wagoner, Sup. Co., U. S. Navy, Wash- 
ington, D. C. 
Logathetis, George, Pvt., Co. G, Clifton, Oregon 
Lombard, Evan D., Pvt., Co. K, Bowman, North Dakota 
Lonchearich, Anton, Pvt., Co. E, Box 385, Red Lodge, 

Montana 
Lonergan, Charles A., Pvt., Co. L, 826 Hugh St., Ft. 

Wayne, Indiana 
Loney, George W., Wagoner, Sup. Co., 400 E. Elm St., 

Lodi, California 
Long, Harry U., 1st Sgt., Co. D, Calexico, California 
Long, Ira D., Pvt., Co. H, R. R. No. 2, Hillsboro, North 

Carolina 
Long, Otto J., Pvt., Hq. Co., Bellville, Ohio 
Longfellow, Joseph T., Col. Sgt., Hq. Co., 606 S. Cushman 

Ave., Tacoma, Washington 
Looney, Ephram, Pvt., Co. M, Route No. 4, Silver Point, 

Tennessee 
Lopez, Justo, Pvt., Co. D, 205 Alamdea St., Azusa, Cali- 
fornia 
Lorenz, Joseph, Pvt., Co. B, 3001 Indiana Ave., St. Louis, 

Missouri 
Borshbough, Eldon L., Mechanic, Co. M, Route No. 2, 

Clark, South Dakota 
Lothras, William, Pvt., Co. F, 771 E. Orangegrove Ave., 

Pasadena, California 
Loucks, Bert A., Pvt., Hq. Co., care of Montana Power 

Co., Divide, Montana 
Louden, Arthur J., Pvt., Co. D, 966 Araphoe St., Los 

Angeles, California 
Lougee, John, Pvt., Co. B, Liberty, Idaho 
Loughmiller, Chas. F., Pvt., Co. D, R. F. D. No. 1, 

Fredericksburg, Indiana 
Lovelace, Albert C, Wagoner, Sup. Co., P. O. Box 18, 

Chehalis, Washington 
Lubbes, Fritz, Sgt., Co. K, Muskogee, Oklahoma 
Locas, Joseph, Pvt., Co. F, 362 Burger St., Toledo, Ohio 
Locar, Lyndon J., Cpl., Hq. Co., Wasco, Oregon 
Lucas, Roland R., Pvt., Co. L, 509 Estelle St., Charleston, 

West Virginia 
Lucius, Edward C, Pvt., Co. K, R. F. D. No. 5, Box 61, 

Delphos, Ohio 
Lufkin, Joseph H., Pvt., Co. F, 130 E. 36th St., Los Angeles, 

California 
Lugg, Albert J., Pvt., Co. I, 139 W. Center St., Butte, 

Montana 
Luker, Rudolph, Pvt., Co. A, Aluntie, Utah 
Lundeen, Alton, Pvt., Co. F, R. F. D. No. 2, Rochester, 

Washington 
Lusk, Robert E., Wagoner, Sup. Co., Clarkston, Washing- 
ton 
Lutge, Julius, Pvt., Co. B, 1081 Capp St., San Francisco, 

California 



Luther, William O., Cpl., Hq. Co., 3616H Adair St., Los 

Angeles, California 
Luthi, Wesley E., Pvt., Co. L, R. F. D. No. 1, Powhatstn 

Point, Ohio 
Luthy, William H., Pvt., Co. K, Preston, Idaho 
Lyall, Will T., Pvt., Co. F, Imperial, California 
Lyle, Arthur R., Pvt., Co. I, Fisher, Indiana 
Lynch, George, Cpl., Co. E, Glendale St., Princeton, 

Indiana 
Lynn, Charlie B., Pvt., Co. C, Morganfield, Kentucky 
Lyon, Roy H., Cook, Co. H, 459 Aldine St., St. Paul, Minne- 
sota 
McAfoose, William R., Pvt. 1 cl., Co. C, R. F. D. No. 2, 

Kittanning, Pennsylvania 
McBane, Raymond, Pvt., Co. M, 58 Southwood Ave., 

Columbus, Ohio 
McBride, William, Pvt. 1 cl., Co. I, Lisngnnag, Ireland 
McCabe, John, Pvt., Co. I, Box 39, Casper, Wyoming 
McCafferty, Melton R., Cpl., Co. C, 1722 Clifton Ave., 

Rockford, Illinois 
McCaleb, John D., Cpl., Co. K, Williford, Arkansas 
McCallum, Sterling M., Band Sgt., Hq. Co., Genoa, 

Nance County, Nebraska 
McCammon, Roscoe, Sgt., Co. C, 2716 Beacon Ave., Seattle, 

Washington 
McCearley, John B., 1st Lt., Co. D, Black Hawk, Iowa 
McClain, Donald S., Pvt., Co. I, Greenfield, Ohio 
McClanahan, Leonard G., Cpl., Co. K, Box 1123, Van- 
couver, B. C. 
McConnell, Melden H., Pvt. 1 cl., Co. E, Rainier St., 

Charleston, Washington 
McCoppin, Oscar P., Pvt., Co. I, Chillicothe, Ohio 
McCormick, Clair, Pvt., Co. B, Route 10, Lopeer St., 

Flint, Michigan 
McCorvey, John G., 2nd Lt., Co. H, 134 Railroad St., 

Moultrie, Georgia 
McCoy, James, Pvt. 1 cl., Co. F, Meskill, Washington 
McCoy, Leonard D., Pvt., Co. L, Montour, Iowa 
McCoy, Lyle, Sgt., Hq. Co., Sumner Apts., Spokane, 

Washington 
McCrossin, Leo A., Pvt., Co. G, 110 Windermere Ave., 

Highland Park, Michigan 
McDerment, Hubert R., Pvt. 1 cl., Co. F, Ellensburg, 

Washington 
McDermott, Claude L., Cpl., Co. I, 338 Chestnut Ave., 

Long Beach, California 
McDermott, Orlando S., Pvt., Co. G, Nicktown, Penn- 
sylvania 
McDonald, Andrew, Pvt., Co. K, 20 S. Ophir St., Stock- 
ton, California 
McDonald, Frank J., Sgt., Co. C, 620 29th Ave., S., Seattle, 

Washington 
McDonald, George A., Sgt., Co. I, 1018 E. 35th St., Ta- 
coma, Washington 
McDonald, John A., Pvt., Co. A, Box 555, Sturgis, South 

Dakota 
McDonald, John B., Brig. Gen., 181 Brigade, Presidio, 

San Francisco, California 
McDonough, Gordon T., Pvt., Co. A, Van Alstyne, 

Texas 
McDonough, Thomas L., Pvt., M. G. Co., 623 S. 10th St., 

Cambridge, Ohio 
McDougal, John H., Pvt., Hq. Co., 1124 Lakeview Blvd., 

Seattle, Washington 
McDowell, Stewart, Cpl., Co. A, Diets, Wyoming 
McFarland, Ambrose C, Pvt. 1 cl., Co. A, R. F. D. No. 1, 

Box 147-A, Ogden, Utah 
McFerrin, Glenn H., Pvt., Co. F, Heppner, Oregon 
McGee, Jesse, Pvt., M. G. Co., Milford, Kentucky 
McGhee, William T., Pvt., Co. L, Cle Elum, Washington 
McGillvray, Claude L., Cpl., Sup. Co., 277 Lakedell Ave., 

Seattle, Washington 
McGinley, Frank, Pvt., Co. I, 806 S. 2nd St., Terre Haute, 

Indiana 
McGinn, Edward C, Pvt., M. G. Co., 829 52nd Ave., W., 

Seattle, Washington 
McGinnis, Emmet C, Pvt., Co. L, R. F. D. No. 2, Box 7, 

Frazeysburg, Ohio 
McDonagle, Michael F., Pvt., M. G. Co., 99 MacKubin 

St., St. Paul, Minnesota 
McGonigle, Asa C, Sgt., Co. E, 1121 Pacific St., Olympia, 

Washington 
McGouqh, Thomas J., Mechanic, Co. K, R. F. D. No. 2, 

Seattle, Washington 
McGovern, Michael J., Pvt. 1 cl., Co. M, 167 South Park 

Ave., San Francisco, California 
McGowan, Buddie C, Pvt., Co. G, Station A, R. 1, Oak 

Cliff, Texas 



262 



McGreal, John L., Pvt., Co. F, 217 W. 54th St., Los Angeles, 

California 
McGreevy, James F., Sgt., Co. A, Pomeroy, Washington 
McGregor, Bartley A., Pvt., Sup. Co., Petersburg, 

Indiana 
McGrew, Wilber W., Pvt., Co. C, Robyville, Ohio 
McHtjgh, Terence P., Wagoner, Sup. Co., 229 20th Ave., 

San Francisco, California 
McIntire, Thomas S., Pvt. 1 cl., Co. A, 403 N. Gaffey St., 

San Pedro, California 
McJannet, Lester I., Mechanic, Hq. Co., 1107 E. Denny 

Way, Seattle, Washington 
McKeever, William J., Pvt., Hq. Co., R. F. D. No. 2, 

Marshall, Michigan 
McKennie, William, 1st Sgt., Co. M, Ontario, Oregon 
McKiernan, William, Pvt., Co. M, Box 124, Roundup, 

Montana 
McKinnon, Vere, Pvt., Co. F, Somerton, Arizona 
McKlem, William B., Pvt., Hq. Co., 400 W. 4th St., Ana- 
conda, Montana 
McLaughlin, Daniel E., Cpl., Co. B, 917 8th Ave., Helena, 

Montana 
McLaughlin, James, Pvt., Co. B, 40 N. Hampton St., 

Boston, Massachusetts 
McLennan, Roderick, Pvt., Co. I, Casper, Wyoming 
McManaway, Thomas F., Pvt., Co. L, R. F. D. No. 1, 

Lucasville, Ohio 
McMasters, Shirley R., Pvt. 1 cl., Co. M, 313 N. Greenleaf 

Ave., Whitter, California 
McMeekin, Leslie, Pvt., Hq. Co., 6518 16th Ave., N. W., 

Seattle, Washington 
McMickell, Virgil R., Pvt. 1 cl., M. G. Co., Ness City, 

Kansas 
McNally, William J., Pvt., Co. K, 5017 Trasck Ave., 

Oakland, California 
McNee, John D., Pvt., Co. L, 4041 Gamma St., San Diego, 

California 
McNeill, William E., Wagoner, Sup. Co., 221 1st Ave., W., 

Seattle, Washington 
McPherson, John W., Pvt., Co. I, Riverside, Washington 
McQuinn, Howard R., Cpl., Co. M, Gays River, Nova 

Scotia, Canada 
McWithey, Stephen V., Cpl., Co. L, Missler, Kansas 
MacGregor, John D., Pvt., Med. Det., Waluga, Oregon 
Mack, Arthur F., Pvt., Co. H, Line Grove, Louisiana 
MacKay, Wallace M., 1st Lt., Co. F, 4133 Eagle St., San 

Diego, California 
Mackenzie, John, Pvt., Co. A, Van Norman, Montana 
MacKey, Charley F., Pvt. 1 cl., Co. B, Box 25, Harding, 

South Dakota 
MacKnight, William C, Regtl. Sup. Sgt., Sup. Co., 4322 

W. Graham St., Seattle, Washington 
MacRae, Alexander, Pvt. 1 cl., Co. A, Forsyth, Montana 
Madaule, Achille, Pvt., Co. K, Terra Bella, California 
Mader, Willard D., Pvt. 1 cl., Co. H, 723 Conklin St., 

Spokane, Washington 
Madge, Charles H., Pvt. 1 cl., Co. G, Irving, Illinois 
Maestus, Richard, Pvt., Co. A, 1004 Ximio St., Long 

Beach, California 
Maguire, George F., Pvt. 1 cl., Co. B, 778 Brunswick St., 

San Francisco, California 
Mahas, Gust, Pvt. 1 cl., Co. A, Box 281, Ruth, Nevada 
Mahoney, Carl, Pvt., Co. E, P. O. Box 372, Maricopa, 

California 
Main, Melvill L., Pvt. 1 cl., Co. E, 713 E. Palmera St., 

Orange, California 
Makholm, Marius, Sgt., Co. B, 2135 Clarence St., Racine, 

Wisconsin 
Malbert, Morris, Pvt., Hq. Co., 532 Mount Hope Rd., 

Cincinnati, Ohio 
Malgarin, Mansueto, Mechanic, Co. D, Black Diamond, 

Washington 
Malinkaitis, Branislaw, Pvt., Co. G, 119)^ Morris Court, 

Scranton, Pa. 
Mallon, Joseph, Cpl., Co. G, 2436 N. Reese St., Phila- 
delphia, Pennsylvania 
Malloy, Richard, Pvt. 1 cl., Co. K, Rockville, Oregon 
Malm, Seman A., Cpl., Co. I, Dos Palos, California 
Malone, Carl F., Pvt., Co. M, R. F. D. No. 7, Chillicothe, 

Ohio 
Maloy, Joseph D., Pvt., Co. I, Mount Vernon, Washington 
Mamie, Cleatus, Cook, Co. A, Overland, Missouri 
Mancuso, Gabriel R., Pvt., Co. D, 37 N. 5th Ave., Mt. 

Vernon, New York 
Manet, John L., Pvt., Co. E, Phillipsburg, Pennsylvania 
Mangini, Eugene, Pvt. 1 cl., Co. D, 945 W. 49th St., Seattle, 

Washington 
Maniates, Nicholas, Pvt., Co. M, Rose Lake, Idaho 



Maniotas, Harry D., Cook, Co. E, 3115 Witmore St., 

Everett, Washington 
Mann, Daniel D., Pvt., M. G. Co., Box 35, Ruff, Wash- 
ington 
Mann, John D., Pvt. 1 cl., Co. F, 335 W. Orange Ave., Mon- 
rovia, California 
Manning, Clarence E., Cpl., Co. L, Lewiston, Montana 
Manning, Ralph H., Pvt. 1 cl., Colchester, Vermont 
Mansfield, Homer, Pvt. 1 cl., Co. A, Canton, Ohio 
Mansir, Ross, Pvt., Co. K, 1811 Fourth Ave., Kearney, 

Nebraska 
Manuel, Joseph L., Pvt., Co. D, Gillisonville, South 

Carolina 
Maracci, David, Pvt., Co. K, 2237 Powell St., San Fran- 
cisco, California 
Marich, Fred J., Pvt. 1 cl., Co. G, 615 East St., Redding, 

California 
Marick, Joseph A., Wagoner, Sup. Co., Rock Creek, Oregon 
Marino, Carmen, Pvt., Hq. Co., Pocatello, Idaho 
Marino, George, Wagoner, Sup. Co., 2344 Eastlake Ave. 

Seattle, Washington 
Marino, Thomas, Pvt. 1 cl., Co. E, 656 Giblins St., Los 

Angeles, California 
Markell, William W., Pvt., Co. I, St. Clair, Michigan 
Markley, Frank R., Mechanic, Co. F, Lebam, Washington 
Marks, Charles, Pvt., Co. E, 908 Capp St., San Francisco, 

California 
Marquis, Joseph A., Cook, Co. H, Custer, Washington 
Marquis, Vernon D., Cpl., Co. A, 608 N. Tracy Ave., 

Bozeman, Montana 
Marron, Lee, Pvt., Sup. Co., Selina, California 
Marshall, Ernest B., Pvt., Co. I, 372 Morrill Ave., Co- 
lumbus, Ohio 
Marshall, Buy, Pvt., Co. I, Waveland, Indiana 
Marshall, Thomas W., Pvt., Co. I, Abanda, Alabama 
Marshall, Willie K., Pvt., Co. L, Earlysville, Virginia 
Martel, Louis N., Pvt., Co. D, R. 2, Somerset, Wisconsin 
Martin, Elijah W., Pvt. 1 cl., Co. D, Houton, Oregon 
Martins, Hamilton C, Cpl., Co. G, Pierce Ranch, 

Tomales, California 
Maitin, Harold, Pvt. 1 cl., M. G. Co., 207 Knox Ave., 

Spokane, Washington 
Martin, Iver, Pvt., Sup. Co., 1002 12th Ave., S. E., Minne- 
apolis, Minnesota 
Martin, Lee M., Pvt., Co. A, Route No. 1, Colleton Co., 

Ruffin, South Carolina 
Martin, Leslie C, Pvt. 1 cl., Co. G, Princeton St., Holy- 

oke, Massachusetts 
Martin, Oscar, Pvt. 1 cl., Co. G, 879 Turk St., San Fran- 
cisco, California 
Martina, John, Pvt. 1 cl., Co. M, 1315 S. Main St., Butte, 

Montana 
Martinez, Lewin W., 1st Lt., M. G. Co., 2401 Prospect St., 

Berkeley, California 
Martino, RaffaeloD., Pvt., Co. H, P. O. Box No. 3, St. 

Helena, California 
Maslaski, Charles, Pvt., Co. A, 55 3rd St., Superior, 

Wisconsin 
Mason, Millard D., Cpl., Co. D, Vernon Center, 

Oneida Co., New York 
Mason, Richard, Pvt. 1 cl., M. G. Co., 2302 I St., Bakers- 
field, California 
Massie, Oliver L., Pvt. 1 cl., Co. I, Wilgus, Ohio 
Matanane, Pedro, Pvt. 1 cl., Co. D, Fernside, Alameda 

County, California 
Matheos, Vasilios X., Cpl., Co. G, 1728 12th Ave., Seattle, 

Washington 
Matherly, Orlean E., Pvt., Co. G, Willis, Virginia 
Mathers, Charles R., Pvt., Co. L, Vigo, Ohio 
Matheson, Fred S., Pvt., Co. B, Cemetery Rd., Lake 

Liden, Michigan 
Matheson, Donald A., Jr., Pvt. 1 cl., M. G. Co., R. F. D. 

No. 1, Vacaville, California 
Mathews, Erick N., Pvt., Co. K, Prosser, Washington 
Mathews, Roland H., Cpl., Co. I, Evansville, Illinois 
Mathis, William, Pvt. 1 cl., Co. K, 1102 E. Eight St., Ander- 
son, Indiana 
Matthew, William, Pvt., Co. K, Saltillo, Indiana 
Matthews, David, Pvt., Co. I, Box 4, Klein, Montana 
Matthews, John W., Pvt., Co. F, R. F. D. No. 1, Healds- 

burg, California 
Matthews, Russell B., Pvt., Co. C, R. F. D. No. 6, Matoon, 

Illinois 
Mattimore, John J., Cpl., Co. I, 426 Sumner St., Toledo, 

Ohio 
Mauke, George R., Pvt., Co. A, 27 State St., Hammond, 

Indiana 
Maul, Carl F., Pvt., Co. B, 832 S. 18th St., Columbus, 
Ohio 



263 



Maxvold, Edwin C, Pvt., Co. L, DeSmet, South Dakota 
May, IIabhy G., Pvt., Hq. Co., 42 2nd St., Shelby, Ohio 
Mayhew, Irving L., Cpl., Co. M, Star Route, VVapate, 

Washington 
Mazman, Gaspar, Pvt., Co. L, Route 8, Box 185, Fresno, 

California 
Mazza, James, Pvt., Co. D, Philipsburg, Montana 
Mazzanty, Filippo, Pvt., Co. H, 552 Market St., Milwaukee, 

Wieconsin 
Meadows, Joe W., Pvt., M. G. Co., Prestonburg, Kentucky 
Mecham, Raymond B., Pvt., Co. E, 1106 7th St., San 

Bernardino, California 
Medder, Forrest, Pvt., Co. F, Texico, Illinois 
Mehlhoff, Henrich, Pvt., Co. A, Hosrner, South Dakota 
Meier, Joseph A., Pvt., Co. E, R. F. D. No. 1, Lamar, 

Indiana 
Meissnest, Harry' J., Pvt., Co. L, 536 S. 4th St., Lafayette, 

Indiana 
Melcher, John, Sgt., Co. E, Loomis, Washington 
Meldrum, Reed D., Cpl., Co. F, R. D. 2, Provo, Utah 
Mellier, Leander S., Pvt., Co. C, Prairie Du Rocher, 

Illinois 
Menard, Joseph, Pvt., Co. L, Box 166, North Yakima, 

Washington 
Menter, Ray f , Cpl., Co. D, Mulberry, Kansas 
Mentzer, Forrest E., Bugler, Co. L, North Lima, Ohio 
Menzer, Walter H., Pvt., Co. B, 416 Stanley Ave., Colum- 
bus, Ohio 
Mercer, Albert G., Musician, Hq. Co., Ashton, Idaho 
Mercone, Frederico, Pvt. 1 cl., Co. I, 1134 W. Walnut St., 

Shamokin, Pennsylvania 
Merrill, Stephen J., Wagoner, Sup. Co., Satsop, Wash- 
ington 
Mertens, Robert C, Pvt. 1 cl., Co. E, 1642 Berendo St., 

Los Angeles, California 
Mertz, Glenn A., Pvt., Co. H, Watertown, South Dakota 
Metheny, Nathaniel R., Pvt. 1 cl., Co. E, Terra Alta, 

Preston County, West Virginia 
Mettler, Oscar F., Pvt., M. G. Co., R. F. D. No. 3, Beecher 

Cut, Illinois 
Metz, Donald H., Pvt., M. G. Co., Michigan, North Dakota 
Mevert, William, Pvt. 1 cl., Co. F, Steeleville, Illinois 
Meves, Albert, Pvt., Co. E, 231 E. 7th St., Long Beach, 

California 
Meyer, Alfonz H., Pvt. 1 cl., Co. M, 1212 Best St., Buffalo, 

New York 
Meyers, Barney H., Pvt., Sup. Co., Gennessee, Idaho 
Meyers, Leo J., Pvt., Co. A, New Market, Minnesota 
Michael, Frank P., Pvt. 1 cl., Co. A, Gen. Del., Spokane, 

Washington 
Micheletti, Joseph, Wagoner, Sup. Co., Lucca Per Sant, 

Maria, Italy 
Mickelson, John, Cpl., Hq. Co., 1630 Lane St., Seattle, 

Washington 
Mijatovich, Milos M., Pvt., Co. I, Box 1071, Tonopah, 

Nevada 
Mikkelsen, Rasmus M., Cpl., Co. M, 1485 Valencia St., 

San Francisco, California 
Miles, Marvin E., Pvt. 1 cl., Co. D, Ephrata, Washington 
Miley, Albert B., Cook, Co. G, 1204 Vigo St., Vincennes, 

Indiana 
Millen, Alvin W., Pvt., Hq. Co., R. F. D. No. 3, Puyallup, 

Washington 
Millen, Earlam S., Wagoner, Sup. Co., R. F. D. No. 3, 

Puyallup, Washington 
Miller, Albert, Pvt. 1 cl., Co. M, LaConner, Washington 
Miller, Albert E., Pvt., M. G. Co., 327 S. Hope St., Los 

Angeles, California 
Miller, Andrew L., Pvt., Co. C, 1314 Orr Ave., Kittanning, 

Pennsylvania 
Miller, Edwin A., Sgt., Co. G, 3rd and Vermont St., South 

Boise, Idaho 
Miller, Ellis D., Cpl., Co. K, Weddervurn, Oregon 
Miller, Emil C, Pvt., Co. G, R. No. 1, Alexander, North 

Dakota 
Miller, Everett R., Pvt., Co. C, Wadsworth, Ohio 
Miller, Frank H., Pvt., Co. E, R. R. No. 3, Wellsville, 

Kansas 
Miller, George I., Pvt., Co. C, 845 Blaine St., Riverside, 

California 
Miller, Glenn E., Cpl., Co. A, Burlington, Washington 
Miller, Henry F., Pvt., Co. G, Fairmont, Minnesota 
Miller, John F., Pvt., Co. G, R. 1, Box 80, Bakersfield, 

California 
Miller, Joseph, Pvt. 1 cl., Co. I, Fairview, Montana 
Miller, Lorenzo G., Pvt. 1 cl., Co. A, 211 2nd Ave., S. W., 

Aberdeen, South Dakota 
Miller, Melvin, Pvt., Co. I, R. F. D. No. 1, Box 68, Etna 

Green, Indiana 



Miller, Raymond W., Pvt. 1 cl., Co. G, 1015 E. 55th St., 

Seattle, Washington 
Miller, Thomas M., Pvt., Co. M, 715 6th St., N. E., Canton, 

Ohio 
Miller, William H., Pvt., Co. G, 189 Rose St., Barburton, 

Ohio 
Miller, William M., Cpl., Sup. Co., E. 104 Sharp Ave., 

Spokane, Washington 
Millowshowski, Steve, Pvt., M. G. Co., Sheller, Illinois 
Mills, George A., Cpl., Co. G, 923 First St., Riverside, 

California 
Millsap, John, Pvt., Co. C, Beech Fork, West Virginia 
Milne, Eugene B., Pvt., Co. L, 34th and Donovan St., 

Bellingham, Washington 
Milne, McBeth A., Sgt., Co. I, 326 Pioneer Ave., Puyallup, 

Washington 
Milutinovich, Toma, Pvt., Co. M, 799 W. Tuscarawas St., 

Barbeton, Ohio 
Minard, Chauncey, Pvt. 1 cl., Co. B, 1707 Belmont Ave., 

Seattle, Washington 
Minch, Walter L., Pvt. 1 cl., Co. E, Reby, Missouri 
Minick, Clarence J., Captain, Co. G, 622 St. Paul, Kansas 

City, Kansas 
Mink, Burrell B., Cpl., Co. K, Hill City, Idaho 
Minton, Lee, Pvt., Co. F, Box 106, R. F. D. 1, Gadsden, 

Alabama 
Miranda, Raymond F., Pvt. 1 cl., Co. E, 198 Rialto Ave., 

San Bernardino, California 
Miranda, Theodore, Pvt. 1 cl., Co. F, Chatsworth, Cali- 
fornia 
Misselhorn, August, Pvt., Co. C, Campbell Hill, Illinois 
Mitchell, John D., Pvt., Co. D, McLeansboro, Illinois 
Mitchell, Walter J., Cpl., Co. K, Cherry Grove, Oregon 
Mitropoulos, John N., Pvt. 1 cl., Co. M, 210 S. Montana 

Ave., Miles City, Montana 
Mitsumori, Nisuke, Pvt. 1 cl., Co. F, 296 Kensington PL, 

Pasadena, California 
Mitleider, Johann, Pvt., Co. E, Blackfoot, Idaho 
Mock, Benjamin A., Pvt., Co. G, 2329 E. 37th St., Los 

Angeles, California 
Mock, Clarence E., Cpl., Co. B, Gilmore, Idaho 
Mock, Harry, Pvt., Co. L, R. F. D. No. 1, Box 53, Leesburg, 

Indiana 
Moctelme, Felician, Pvt. 1 cl., Co. B, DeSmet, Idaho 
Modin, John E., Wagoner, Sup. Co., R. F. D. No. 1, Boring, 

Oregon 
Moe, Chris, Pvt., Co. F, 2316 S. T St., Tacoma, Washington 
Moe, William, Band Cpl., Hq. Co., Archer, Montana 
Moellering, Henry W., Pvt., Hq. Co., Lamond, Wash- 
ington 
Moeur, John H., 1st Lt., Co. H, Tempe, Arizona 
Mohaney, Carroll B., Sgt., Co. K, 616 W. Shore St., Lex- 
ington, Kentucky 
Mohney, Roy M., Pvt., Hq. Co., R. F. D. No. 2, Box 32, 

Elma, Washington 
Mohr, Leonard H., Pvt. 1 cl., Co. K, Red Bud, Illinois 
Molinari, Albert J., Pvt. 1 cl., Co. B, 3580 17th St., San 

Francisco, California 
Mollisa, Gust G., Pvt. 1 cl., Co. M, 1529}^ 9th Ave., Seattle, 

Washington 
Molony, Otho F., Pvt. 1 cl., Co. K, Eden, Idaho 
Monogham, William G., Sgt., Co. K, Oregon City, Oregon 
Mondine, Jean, Pvt., Co. A, 1779 Douner Ave., San Fran- 
cisco, California 
Monsen, Joseph, Wagoner, Sup. Co., Box 443, St. James, 

Minnesota 
Moon, Ray T., Pvt. 1 cl., Co. F, Rupert, Idaho 
Moone, Arthur P., Pvt., Co. A, 318 Hanford St., Columbus, 

Ohio 
Moore, Archie E., Sgt., Co. I, R. F. D. No. 2, Flora, Illinois 
Moore, Charles F., Pvt., Cl. C. Saltillo, Ohio 
Moore, David, Pvt. 1 cl., Co. F, Box 301, Monrovia, Cal- 
ifornia 
Moore, Fred W., Pvt., M. G. Co., 124 Agines Ave., San 

Antonio, Texas 
Moore, Harlin T., Sgt., Co. K, St. Anthony, Idaho 
Moore, Thomas I., Wagoner, Hq. Co., Bowling Green, 

Missouri 
Morales, Joe, Pvt., Co. G, Elmodena, Orange County, 

California 
Moran, Harry% Pvt., Co. D, Sparta, Illinois 
Moreau, Victor, Pvt., Co. I, Morrisdale, Clearfield County, 

Pennsylvania 
Moreland, George, Pvt., Co. K, 419 Vesuvius St., Ironton, 

Ohio 
Morgan, Alfred, Pvt., Co. D, Quintico, Virginia 
Morgan, Charles R., Pvt. 1 cl., Co. E, 424 Beltz St., Ft. 

Wayne, Indiana 
Morgan, Edward T., Pvt., Co. L, Ririe, Idaho 



264 



Morgan, Harold L., Sgt., Co. G, 103 12th St., Astoria, 

Oregon 
Morgan, William C, Sup. Sgt., Co. E, 5664 S. Yakima Ave., 

Tacoma, Washington 
Morison, Max M., Pvt., Co. B, 226 Boerum St., Brooklyn, 

New York 
Moro, Sante, Pvt. 1 cl., Co. K, Box 388, Trail, B. C. 
Moroni, Bert F., Pvt., Co. M, 117-29th Indiana Ave., 

Chicago, Illinois 
Morrell, George R., Pvt., Co. K, Freemont, Utah 
Morris, Arthur, Pvt., Co. K, Westville, Oklahoma 
Morris, Elmer, Pvt., Co. A, Troy, Kansas 
Morris, Gerald T., Pvt., Hq. Co., 1017 Warren Ave., 

Seattle, Washington 
Morris, John W., Pvt. 1 cl., Co. F, R. F. D. No. 1, Mattoon, 

Illinois 
Morris, Leo G., Wagoner, Sup. Co., Cascade, Idaho 
Morrison, Jacob P., Pvt., Co. L, Villanow, Georgia 
Morrison, James E., Pvt., Co. A, 845 S. Hill St., Los Angeles 

California 
Morrison, James M., Pvt., Co. H, R. F. D. No. 1, Ventura, 

California 
Morrison, Philip, Pvt. 1 cl., Co. K, Fairfield, Washington 
Morrison, Webster E., Sgt., Co. M, 125 S. 5th St., Living- 
ston, Montana 
Morriss, Albert P., Pvt., Co. H, Savannah, Missouri 
Morrow, Chester, Pvt., Hq. Co., H. O. B. 156, Washington, 

D.C. 
Morse, Hick, Pvt., M. G. Co., Ritzville, Washington 
Morton, Estis L., Pvt., Hq. Co., Box 33, Ontario, Oregon 
Morton, George M., Pvt., Co. B, Napavine, Washington 
Morton, Harrt D., Pvt., Hq. Co., 4709 Moneta Ave., 

Los Angeles, California 
Morton, John F., Pvt., Co. C, Satsop, Washington 
Moses, George, Pvt., Co. A, 346 E. Galena St., Butte, 

Montana 
Moshier, Glen D., Pvt., Co. A, 1323 30th Ave., E., Seattle, 

Washington 
Moss, Heber L., Pvt. 1 cl., Co. E, R. F. D. No. 2, Burley, 

Idaho 
Mottner, Albert R., Pvt. 1 cl., Co. I, 502 N. Main St., 

Coleville, Washington 
Motz, August J., Pvt., Ord. Cps., 1020 Bailey St., Seattle, 

Washington 
Moulton, Charles R., Reg. Sgt. Maj., Hq. Co., care of 

State Bank of Portland, Portland, Oregon 
Mounger, Joe, Pvt., Co. F, Route 2, Wheat, Tennessee 
Mouzakis, Andreas, Pvt., Co. A, 1872 14th St., San Fran- 
cisco, California 
Mower, Francis M., Pvt., Co. A, Fairview, Utah 
Moyer, John W., Mess Sgt., Sup. Co., Big Lake, Washington 
Moylan, Daniel J., Pvt., Co. H, 879 Valencia St., San 

Francisco, California 
Muchow, Fred W., Cpl., Co. M, Crete, Nebraska 
Mueller, Karl R., Pvt., Hq. Co., 1616 E. 65th St., Seattle, 

Washington 
Mueller, Robert E., Pvt. 1 cl., Co. M, 1452 S. 9th St., 

Terre Haute, Indiana 
Mulholland, Harry B., Pvt., Co. I, 3330 4th St., N., 

Minneapolis, Minnesota 
Mullen, Edward J., Pvt., Co. K 

Mullen, John, Sgt., Co. A, 107 23rd Ave., Seattle, Wash- 
ington 
Mullen, William J., Pvt., Co. C, Woodriver, Nebraska 
Mulleniz, Jone E., Mechanic, Satsop, Washington 
Mumpower, Carl B., Pvt. 1 cl., Co. K, R. F. D. No. 2, 

Oregon City, Oregon 
Munsey, Edward W., Pvt. 1 cl., Co. A, 861 26th St., Ogden, 

Utah 
Murn, Paul C, Pvt. 1 cl., Co. I, Foley, Minnesota 
Murphy, Arthur P., Pvt., Co. B, 316 E. 3rd St., Anaconda, 

Montana 
Murphy, James C, Pvt., Co. B, 790 W. Copper St., Butte, 

Montana 
Murphy, John L., Pvt. 1 cl., Co. M, 2818 Harvard Ave., 

Cleveland, Ohio 
Murphy, Joseph H., Pvt., Hq. Co., 105^ S. Idaho St., 

Butte, Montana 
Murphy, Leo J., Cpl., Co. M, 20 28th St., San Francisco, 

California 
Murphy, Mike, Pvt., Co. B, 317 W. Clark, Anaconda, 

Montana 
Murphy, Peter, Pvt. 1 cl., Co. B, Montana Hotel, Ana- 
conda, Montana 
Murphy, Stephen S., Pvt. 1 cl., Co. I, Culdesac, Idaho 
Murphy, William E., Pvt. 1 cl., Co. E, R. F. D. No. 1, 

Emmett, Idaho 
Murray, Carl F., Pvt. 1 cl., Co. M, Sloughhouse, California 
Murray, Earl A., Pvt. 1 cl., Co. E, 703 19th St., Sacramento, 

California 



Murray, Ernest K., 1st Lt., Hq. Co., 3702 N. 25th St. 
Tacoma, Washington 

Murray, Frank E., Pvt., Hq. Co., 1266 18th Ave., San 
Francisco, California 

Murray, George E., Pvt., Co. L, R. F. D. No. 1, Botabel, 
Ohio 

Murray, Sutherland, Pvt., Co. M, No. 2 Fire Hall, Van- 
couver, B. C. 

Musante, Edward A., Pvt. 1 cl., Co. E, Jamestown, Cal- 
ifornia 

Muse, Brinkley D., Pvt., M. G. Co., Trimble, Kentucky 

Music, James, Wagoner, Sup. Co., Randle, Washington 

Musgrave, John C, Pvt., Co. A, 365 Clipper St., San Fran- 
cisco, California 

Musso, Gio B., Pvt. 1 cl., Ord. Cps., 602 Jefferson St., 
Oakland, California 

Musso, Victor, Pvt., Co. K, 18 Blackburn St., Santa Cruz, 
California 

Mustari, Joe, Pvt., Co. A, Timber Butte, Butte, Montana 

Muthler, Aloysius M., Cpl., Co. C, 1273 Ida St., Mt. 
Adams, Cincinnati, Ohio 

Mutrux, Clarence E., Pvt. 1 cl., Hq. Co., Baldwin Park, 
California 

Muzzy, Harold W., Pvt., Hq. Co., 4630 Creas St., Seattle, 
Washington 

Myers, Clifford L., Pvt., Co. G, Phillipsburg, Center 
County, Pennsylvania 

Myers, Darwin C, Sup. Sgt., Co. G, Kenton, Ohio 

Myers, George R., Pvt., Co. M, R. F. D. No. 1, Box 45, 
Franklin Furnace, Ohio 

Myers, John, Pvt., Hq. Co., R. F. D. No. 3, Euphrata, 
Pennsylvania 

Myhre, George R., Cook, Co. E, 3221 N. 28th St., Tacoma, 
Washington 

Myrebee, Selmer H., 1st Sgt., Co. E, Poulsbo, Washington 

Nashbaur, Frederick E., Sgt., Hq. Co., 1665 Union St., 
San Diego, California 

Naftzger, Roy E., Maj., 2nd Bn., Mchts. Nat. Bk. Bldg., 
Los Angeles, California 

Nagle, Cris, Pvt., Hq. Co., Windras, Colorado 

Nalley, Clarency, Pvt., Co. M, Woodsfield, Ohio 

Nantz, Ira D., Pvt., Co. A, R. F. D. 2, Lima, Ohio 

Naseth, Carl M., Cpl., Co. B, Marietta, Minnesota 

Naslund, Grover T., Pvt., Sup. Co., Bellevue, Wash- 
ington 

Nasset, Anton J., Pvt. 1 cl., Co. B, Schollsmade, North 
Dakota 

Nathanson, Joseph N., Pvt., Co. A, 760 8th Ave., San Fran- 
cisco, California 

Naught, Earl, Wagoner, Sup. Co., Rosalia, Washington 

Navone, John, Saddler, Sup. Co., 218 8th Ave., Seattle, 
Washington 

Neal, Clarence O., Pvt., M. G. Co., Assumption, Illinois 

Neal, Daniel O., Musician, Hq. Co., Lacey, Washington 

Neal, John A., Pvt., Co. M, Route No. 1, Waterloo, Ohio 

Neal, Hollis C, Pvt., Co. M, R. F. D. No. 4, Gallipolis, 
Ohio 

Neargaard, August E., Pvt., Co. B, Jordan, Montana 

Neary, Wesley, Cpl., Co. F, 1743 Miner Ave., Seattle, 
Washington 

Neathery, Clarence M., Pvt., M. G. Co., Sheldon, Mis- 
souri 

Neer, George L., Pvt., Co. K, R. F. D. No. 2, Mattoon, 
Illinois 

Neighbor, Clyde, Mechanic, Co. A, 30 E. Copper St., 
Butte, Montana 

Neiland, Ernest A., Pvt., Co. L, P. O. 55, North Portland, 
Oregon 

Neiman, Robert L., Pvt., Co. G, Osceola Mills, Pennsyl- 
vania 

Nelson, Albin S., Pvt., M. G. Co., Port Orchard, Wash- 
ington 

Nelson, Arthur J., Pvt. 1 cl., Co. G, R. No. 1, Monterey, 
Minnesota 

Nelson, Axel C, Pvt., Co. M, R. F. D. No. 2, Welbach, 
Nebraska 

Nelson, Bertel L., Cpl., Co. I, Route "J," Box 124, Fresno, 
California 

Nelson, Carl J., Wagoner, Sup. Co., 7713 5th Ave., N. E., 
Seattle, Washington 

Nelson, Edward H., Pvt., Co. I, 2801 Mariposa St., San 
Francisco, California 

Nelson, Ernest G., Band Cpl., Hq. Co., Lowell, Washing- 
ton 

Nelson, Ezra F., Pvt., Co. M, Washington Ave., Monta- 
bello, California 

Nelson, Harold F., Pvt., Co. F, 501 S. Illinois St., 
Streator, Illinois 



265 



Nelson, Neber, Pvt. 1 cl., Co. D, Box 15, Thayne, Wyom- 
ing 
Nelson, John E., Cpl., Co. K, R. F. D. No. 1, Blackfoot, 

Idaho 
Nelson, Nels A., Pvt. 1 cl., Co. C, 4416 N. 30th St., Ta- 

coma, Washington 
Nelson, William C, Pvt., Co. A, 82 Rosedale, Johnstown, 

Pennsylvania 
Neubauek, Paul F., Pvt. 1 cl., Co. G, Sherwood, North 

Dakota 
Neumeister, Harry, Pvt., Co. B, 3205 Colerain Ave., 

Cincinnati, Ohio 
Neuser, John W., Cpl., Co. F, 208 North Ave., Los Angeles, 

California 
Newby, Hiioh S., Pvt., Co. G, Monroe, Sevier Co., Utah 
Newell, James E., Band Cpl., Hq. Co., 1915 Riverside 

Ave., Hoquiam, Washington 
Newell, James J., Sgt., Co. B, 321 N. Idaho St., Butte, 

Montana 
Newlun, Jesse A., Cpl., Co. H, Little Rock, Washington 
Newman, Alfred T., Pvt., Co. B, Soda Springs, Idaho 
Newman, Curtis C, Pvt., Co. K, Landax, Oregon 
Newton, Frank L., Sgt., Co. I, 2146 C. St., Eureka, Cali- 
fornia 
Newton, Harold R., Cpl., Co. F, 517 l A W. 3rd St., Los 

Angeles, California 
Nice, Robert, Pvt., Co. K, R. F. D. No. 3, Dahlgren, Illi- 
nois 
Nichols, Christ, Pvt., Co. G, R. F. D. Box 59, Bollevue, 

Washington 
Nichols, Joseph D., Pvt., Co. D, Olio, West Virginia 
Nickolatsas, Nicklaos P., Pvt., 1 cl., Co. B, 1014 2nd 

St., Sacramento, California 
Nick(9on, Claude L„ Pvt., Co. L, 212 E. Fifth St., 

Cincinnati, Ohio 
Nicolavo, Tom, Pvt. 1 cl., Co. E, Box 569, Price, Utah 
Nicolini, John, Cpl., Co. F, Sonora, California 
Nielsen, Charlie A., Pvt., Co. L, 916 E. Pine St., Santa 

Anna, California 
Nielsen, Ralph, Pvt., Co. G, Elliott, Washington 
Nielson, Lendy A., Pvt. 1 cl., Co. B, R. F. D. No. 2, Blain, 

Washington 
Nilson, Nils M., Mechanic, Co. B, 410 10th Ave., Seattle, 

Washington 
Niosi, Rosario J., Sgt., Hq. Co., 1433 Bond St., Los An- 
geles, California 
Nivison, Robert C, Pvt., Co. L, 283 Lincoln St., Portland, 

Oregon 
Nixon, Vernon R., Cpl., Co. E, Tenasket, Washington 
Noffsinoer, Frank, Pvt., Co. K, Mapleton, Oregon 
Nolan, Charles W., Pvt., Hq. Co., Kenyon, Minnesota 
Nolan, James F., Pvt., Co. L, 26 Jefferson St., Haverstraw, 

New York 
Norbom, Roy L., Pvt., Hq. Co., 427 Leary Bldg., Seattle, 

Washington 
Nordell, Frederick P., Pvt., Co. A, Castledale, Utah 
Nordstrom, Harry O., Pvt., Co. M, Burns Ave., Kings- 
burg, California 
Norgaard, George, Pvt. 1 cl., Co. M, 53 3rd St., Portland, 

Oregon 
Norgen, Axel R., Cpl., Sup. Co., Everett, Washington 
Northrop, Donald A., Pvt. 1 cl., Co. M, 1010 W. Boone 

Ave., Spokane, Washington 
Noste, Ole C, Cpl., Co. A, 2S21 Commodore Way, Seattle, 

Washington 
Noreboom, William C, Cook, Co. K, Lyndon, Washington 
Nourse, Walter, Pvt., Co. A, Jackson, Minnesota 
Novak, William F., Cpl., Co. I, Chester, Illinois 
Noyes, Roy A., Mess Sgt., Co. E, Port Orchard, Washington 
Nutter, John M., Pvt., Co. H, Miller, West Virginia 
Nyberg, Andrew P., Pvt., Co. E, St. Anthony, Idaho 
Nylander, Harold W., Pvt. 1 cl., Co. F, Ripon, California 
Nystrand, John, Pvt. 1 cl., Co. D, 605 Yesler Way, Seattle, 

Washington 
Nyswaner, Guy B., Wagoner, Sup. Co., Talent, Oregon 
Oakes, James A., Sgt., Co. L, 267 Morris St., Portland, 

Oregon 
Oakley, HurdusG., Sgt., M. G. Co., U. S. Marino Hospital, 

Detroit, Michigan 
Oaks, Harold F., Cpl., Co. I, R. F. D. No. 3, Coleville, 

Washington 
Oatfield, Royal, Cpl., Co. G, Skamakawa, Washington 
Oberlander, John C., Pvt., Co. A, Paulding, Ohio 
OuKin.ANDEit, William J., Wagoner, Sup. Co., Route 1, 

Anaheim, California 
O'Brien, Charles F., Cpl., Co. M, 139 Missoula Ave., 

Butte, Montana 
O'Brien, Danny, Pvt. 1 cl., Co. E, 6409 E. 82nd St., Port- 
land, Oregon 



O'Brien, Dennis, Pvt., Co. F, 542 Elm St., Arlington, 
New Jersey 

O'Brien, Jack, 1st Lt., Sup. Co., Mt. St. Sepulchre, Wash- 
ington, D. C. 

O'Brien, John D., Regtl. Sgt. Major, Hq. Co., Neche, 
North Dakota 

Ochoa, Peter G., Pvt., Co. A, 1589 Underwood Ave., San 
Francisco, California 

O'Connell, Frank C, Sgt., Hq. Co., 3046 W. 64th St., 
Seattle, Washington 

O'Connell, Herbert E., Sgt., Hq. Co., 1419 Madrona 
Drive, Seattle, Washington 

O'Conner, Joseph E., 2nd Lt., Co. E, 5042 Michigan Ave., 
Chicago, Illinois 

Odum, Edwin W., Pvt., Co. G, 509 Pine St., Monterey, 
California 

Offield, Emra, Pvt. 1 cl., Co. E, Lugo, San Bernardino Co., 
California 

Offield, Louis, Pvt., Co. C, 1503 W. 28th St., Los Angeles, 
California 

O'Hea, John E., Pvt., Co. C, Box 126, Black Hawk, Col- 
orado 

O'Hearn, Edward, Pvt., Co. A, 128 Missoula Ave., Butte, 
Montana 

Ohlinger, Ellis A., Cpl., Hq. Co., Belding, Michigan 

Ohm, Fred, Cpl., Co. I, 1800 Piatte Ave., Matoon, Illinois 

O'Keefe, Daniel J., Sgt., Co. B, 919 Noe St., San Fran- 
cisco, California 

Olbertz, John L., Pvt., Hq. Co., 518 10th St., Hoquiam, 
Washington 

Oliver, Arvill, Pvt., Co. K, R. F. D. No. 6, McLeans- 
boro, Illinois 

Olley, Jerome M., Pvt., Co. G, 39 S. Rock St., Shamokin, 
Pennsylvania 

Olney, Daniel C, Pvt., Hq. Co., Rockland, Idaho 

Olsen, John H., Sgt., Co. E, R. F. D. No. 1, San Ber- 
nardino, California 

Olsen, Julius, Pvt., Co. D, Stanford, Montana 

Olsen, Lars P., Pvt. 1 cl., Co. M, Stanford, Montana 

Olsen, Olaf, Pvt. 1 cl., Co. M, R. F. D. No. 1, Box 162A, 
Poulsbo, Washington 

Olson, Alphonso R., Pvt., Hq. Co., 9th & Fulton, Mt. 
Vernon, Washington 

Olson, Anders A., Pvt., Co. L, 240 Main St., Spokane, 
Washington 

Olson, Bert, Pvt., Co. B, Superior, Montana 

Olson, Claude W., Sgt., Co. K, Potlatch, Idaho 

Olson, Harry E., Pvt., Co. C, Medical Lake, Washington 

Olson, Ingvald, Pvt. 1 cl., Co. B, Clarkia, Idaho 

Olson, Jacob, Pvt., Co. A, R. F. D. No. 1, Pollock, South 
Dakota 

Olson, Lee M., Pvt., Co. A, Sullivan, Montana 

Olson, Oscar, Pvt., Med. Det., 710 S. E St., Tacoma, 
Washington 

Olson, Zenas A., Sup. Sgt., Co. F, R. F. D. No. 4, Sher- 
wood, Oregon 

O'Reagan, John, Pvt., Co. K, 425 E. Fourth St., Cincinnati, 
Ohio 

O'Reilly, Thomas E., Pvt., Co. C, 1362 E. 56th St., Los 
Angeles, California 

Orfanu, Mike, Pvt. 1 cl., Co. D, McCleary, Washington 

Orlando, Jims, Pvt., Co. M, 1500 Sherrick Rd., S. E., 
Canton, Ohio 

Osborne, Charles G., Cpl., Co. C, Ajlune, Washington 

Osborne, Crawford J., Pvt. 1 cl., Co. K, Badger, Cali- 
fornia 

Osburn, Fred G., Pvt., Co. K. 

Ott, Benjamin F., Pvt., Med. Dot., Live Oak, California 

Ott, Crawford E., Pvt. 1 cl., Med. Det., 2028 N. 11th St., 
Kansas City, Kansas 

Ottina, Lorenzo, Pvt., Co. C, 1608 E. 45th St., Los An- 
geles, California 

Ottmar, Emanuel, Pvt., Co. G, Ruff, Washington 

Owen, Floyd H., Cpl., Co. B, 1632 E. 86th St., Cleveland, 
Ohio 

Owen, Walter J., Pvt. 1 cl., Co. F, 921 Oregon St., East 
Bakersfield, California 

Paccassi, Milton R., Cpl., Co. K, 1570 32nd St., Oakland, 
California 

Pack, Oscar C, Cpl., Co. B, Jasper, Ohio 

Palagi, Joe, Pvt., Co. M, McQueen Addition, Butte, Mon- 
tana 

Palikar, Anton, Pvt., Co. A, 321 S. 1st St., San Francisco, 
California 

Palm, JonN N., Pvt., Co. K, R. F. D., Mansfield, Ohio 

Palmer, Carl W., Pvt. 1 cl., Co. L, 506 Bright St., 
Indianapolis, Indiana 

Palmer, John W., Pvt., Co. C, Danville, Kentucky 



266 



Panagiotu, Antonios, Pvt. 1 cl., Co. A, Raymond, Wash- 
ington 
Pano, Louis, Pvt. 1 cl., Co. I, 420 Mill St., Cincinnati, Ohio 
Panner, Thomas J., Pvt. 1 cl., Co. F, 1200 Elizabeth St., 

Pasedena, California 
Pantano, Pietro, Pvt. 1 cl., Co. M, 280 1st St., Portland, 

Oregon 
Pantel, John, Pvt., Co. K, 1810 Chester Ave., Bakersfield, 

California 
Papapietro, Domenico, Pvt. 1 cl., Co. A, 2366 26th St., San 

Francisco, California 
Pappas, Pete, Cook, Sup. Co., P. O. Box 241, Dallas, Oregon 
Paris, James, Pvt. 1 cl., Co. G, Clifton, Oregon 
Park, Charles R., Pvt., Co. L, 1123 Missouri Ave., Port- 
land, Oregon 
Parker, Chester A., Pvt., Co. A, 1521 6th St., Eureka, 

California 
Parker, Joseph H., Cpl., Co. F, 416 E. 65th St., Los Angeles, 

California 
Parker, Leo, Pvt. 1 cl., M. G. Co., 201 N. Wall St., Hillyard, 

Washington 
Parker, Marshall F., Pvt., Co. B, P. O. Box 118, El 

Cajon, California 
Parker, Russell E., Pvt., Hq. Co., 325 Lincoln Ave., 

Pomona, California 
Parker, William G., Captain, Med. Det., Cashmere, 

Washington 
Parker, William R., Pvt., Co. M, Mentor, Ohio 
Parkes, James, Pvt., Co. A, Phillipsburg, Pennsylvania 
Parkins, Joseph M., Pvt., Hq. Co., 733 Slater St., Santa 

Rosa, California 
Parkinson, Bernard, Pvt. 1 cl., Co. H, Box 41, Big Lake, 

Washington 
Parks, Ernest, Wagoner, Sup. Co., 2107 24th Ave., S., 
Mi Seattle, Washington 
Parrish, Reuel H.T., Pvt., Co. K, 227 W. 3rd St., Los 

Angeles, California 
Parshall, Jesse J., Wagoner, Hq. Co., 5210 15th Ave., S., 

Seattle, Washington 
Parsons, Dexter, Pvt., Co. G, R. R. No. 2, Box 13, Galax, 

Virginia 
Partlow, Remer, Sgt., Co. M, Sumas, Washington 
Pasini, Pasqual, Pvt., Co. H, Box 53, Tolt, Washington 
Passenger, Allen L., 1st Sgt., Co. H, R. F. D. Box 255, 

Seattle, Washington 
Patterson, Hubert B., Pvt., Co. F, R. F. D. No. 7, Fay- 
ette, Alabama 
Patterson, Orlando, Pvt. 1 cl., Co. A, Randolph, Montana 
Paul, Findley W., Pvt. 1 cl., Co. B, Rexburg, Idaho 
Paulin, Arthur C, Sgt., Co. M, 1244 E. 42nd St., Los 

Angeles, California 
Paulsen, Paul R., Pvt. 1 cl., Co. M, 4010 Ashworth Ave., 

Seattle, Washington 
Pavlik, John D., Pvt., Co. M, Verdigre, Nebraska 
Paxton, Virgle, Pvt. 1 cl., Co. K, Box 315, Springfield, 

Oregon 
Payne, John R., Cpl., Co. B, Moorsburg, Tennessee 
Payne, Fred H., Pvt., Co. K, Graceville, Montana 
Payne, Louis W., Wagoner, Sup. Co., 1818>£ 9th Ave., 

Seattle, Washington 
Payne, Paul, Cook, Co. I, 308 Lafayette St., Jefferson City, 

Missouri 
Payne, Walter A., Pvt. 1 cl., Co. E, R. F. D. No. 2, Moores- 

burg, Tennessee 
Peak, George C, Pvt. 1 cl., Co. F, 3190 24th St., San Fran- 
cisco, California 
Pearce, FraftonC, Sgt., Co. E, 2951 Foster Court, Denver, 

Colorado 
Pearce, Warren, Pvt. Co. I, Paradise, Utah 
Pearson, Fred A., Pvt. 1 cl., Co. C, R. F. D. No. 2, Addy, 

Washington 
Pearson, Nels E., Pvt. 1 cl., Co. E, Fernwood, Idaho 
Pearson, William E., Cpl., Co. F, Van Nuys, California 
Pease, Daniel K., Mechanic, Co. L, Drummond, Montana 
Pederson, Barney, Pvt. 1 cl., Co. D, 7733 Walnut Drive, 

Los Angeles, California 
Pedersen, Godtfred M., Cpl., Co. H, 3034 W. 64th St., 

Seattle, Washington 
Pederson, Richard, Pvt. 1 cl., Co. M, Moorpark, California 
Pedersen, Sorn, Cpl., Co. A, Bartlett, Illinois 
Peel, Harry W., Pvt. 1 cl., Hq. Co., 421 W. Franklin St., 

Taylorville, Illinois 
Peffers, Albert R., Pvt., Co. G, R. F. D. No. 3, Box 111, 

Ellensburg, Washington 
Pehrson, Carl A., Pvt. 1 cl., Co. F, Virginia, Idaho 
Peirce, Robert G., Cpl., Co. E, 2424 Federal Ave., Seattle, 

Washington 
Pelizzari, John J., Cpl., Hq. Co., 603 Humboldt St., Reno, 

Nevada 



Pellegrino, John, Pvt., Co. A, 3946 N. Fairhill St., Phila- 
delphia, Pennsylvania 
Pelly, Thomas J., Pvt., Co. G, 1146 W. Granite St., Butte, 

Montana 
Pelton, Hugh H., Sgt., Co. K, Mackay, Idaho 
Pendroy, Frank F., Pvt., Co. B, Pendroy, Montana 
Pentico, Walter E., Pvt. 1 cl., Co. K, Edson, Kansas 
Penwell, Daniel L., Pvt., Co. H, Greenfield, Ohio 
Peppler, Clarence G., Wagoner, Sup. Co., 1737 1st Ave., 

S., Seattle, Washington 
Perelli, Benjamin J., Pvt., M. G. Co., R. F. D. 2, Renton, 

Washington 
Perkins, Edward L., Pvt. 1 cl., Co. E, La Habra, California 
Perks, Reginald A., Pvt. 1 cl., Co. A, 223 Fair Oaks St., 

San Francisco, California 
Perri, Pasquali, Pvt., Co. H, 2725 Norman St., Seattle, 

Washington 
Perrone, Ferdinando, Pvt., Co. B, 36 7th S. West St., 

Seattle, Washington 
Perry, Jesse O., Sgt., M. G. Co., 1602^ S. G St., Tacoma, 

Washington 
Peterson, Elmer, Pvt. 1 cl., Co. K, R. F. D. No. 1, Rupert, 

Idaho 
Peterson, Elmo A., Pvt. 1 cl., M. G. Co., R. F. D. No. 2, 

Parma, Idaho 
Peterson, Gustave A., Pvt. 1 cl., Co. D, Northwood, Iowa 
Peterson, Harry W., Pvt., Ord. Cps., 2410 F St., Belling- 

ham, Washington 
Peterson, Hilden L., Pvt. 1 cl., Co. A, Fairview, Utah 
Peterson, John, Pvt. 1 cl., Co. B, Rexburg, Idaho 
Peterson, Martin A., Pvt., Hq. Co., Hilgora, Idaho 
Peterson, Martin D., Pvt., Co. I, Kingsburg, California 
Peterson, Peder M., Pvt., Hq. Co., 912 12th Ave., Seattle, 

Washington 
Peterson, Murlin A., Sgt., Co. L, Franklin, Idaho 
Petersen, Nels S., Cook, Co. M, Route A, Box 91, Del Roy, 

California 
Peterson, Nickles, Pvt. 1 cl., Co. M, Box 503, Bend, 

Oregon 
Peterson, Sanford E., Pvt. 1 cl., Co. I, 1422 Gardner Ave., 

Spokane, Washington 
Peth, LeRoy H., Pvt. 1 cl., Co. E, 5040 19th Ave., N. E., 

Seattle, Washington 
Petropoulis, Stathis, Pvt. 1 cl., Co. D, 321 10th St., Ho- 

quiam, Washington 
Petry, Edwin L., Pvt., Co. E, Seventeen, Ohio 
Petsch, Frank, Pvt., Co. G, Bell Plain, Minnesota 
Pettit, William S., Pvt., Co. F, R. F. D. No. 2, Marengo, 

Ohio 
Peukert, Albert A., Pvt. 1 cl., Co. H, R. F. D. No. 12, 

Box 436, Los Angeles, California 
Pfeif, Henry, Pvt., Co. L, Odessa, Washington 
Pfeilstecker, Leo R., Pvt., Co. K, 19 S. Elizabeth St., 

Mt. Healthy, Ohio 
Pfenning, Joseph, Pvt. 1 cl., Co. D, Midvale, Idaho 
Pfund, Southall R., 1st Lt., Co. B, 955 Geary St., Apt. 6, 

San Francisco, California 
Phelps, LeRoy R., Pvt. 1 cl., Co. F, 3609 N. Orchard St., 

Tacoma, Washington 
Phelps, Thomas H., Pvt. 1 cl., Co. F, 64 N. Fisher Ave., 

Blackfoot, Idaho 
Philipchuk, Nick, Pvt., Co. L, Donnelly, Minnesota 
Phillips, Archie H., Pvt., Sup. Co., 2313 E. 83rd St., 

Cleveland, Ohio 
Phillips, Edward L., Pvt., Co. C, Horte, Montana 
Phillips, Frank, Pvt., Hq. Co., 1917 South, E., Tacoma, 

Washington 
Phillips, Louis, Cpl., Co. G, Box 151, Black Diamond, 

Washington 
Phillips, Oliver C, Pvt., Co. L, Toppenish, Washington 
Phillips, Roy, Sgt., Co. H, 8032 N. E. St., Seattle, Wash- 
ington 
Philpott, McElree, Pvt., Co. D, Guston, Kentucky 
Phipps, Edward C, Pvt., Co. H, 1485 E. 49th St., Los 

Angeles, California 
Pickel, Emil J., Pvt., Co. L, 2121 B St., Bellingham, Wash- 
ington 
Pieper, Gustave H., Pvt., Co. I, Irwin, Idaho 
Pierce, Frank A., Wagoner, Sup. Co., Route 6, Box 286 B, 

Seattle, Washington 
Pierce, Walter D., Cpl., Co. I, 2010 Southwestern Ave., 

Seattle, Washington 
Pieri, Frank, Pvt. 1 cl., Co. B, 159 Collingwood St., San 

Francisco, California 
Pierson, Carlos L., Pvt., Co. L, Daniels, Idaho 
Pike, Will C, Pvt. 1 cl., Co. F, 131 Powell St., San Fran- 
cisco, California 
Pilgrim, Bert, Pvt. 1 cl., Co. E, Myra, Texas 



267 



Pinkham, Seth, Pvt., Co. G, 265 Cottage St., New Bedford, 

Massachusetts 
Plakanouris, James, Pvt. 1 cl., Co. B, P. O. Box 194, Miles 

City, Montana 
Platt, Frederick C, Cpl., Co. A, 220 W. Hancock Ave., 

Detroit, Michigan 
Plummer, Walter J., Pvt. Co. C, Grant Grayson, Virginia 
Poe, Earl B., Cpl., Co. L, 623 7th Ave., S. W., Puyallup, 

Washington 
Poggensee, Harry, Pvt., Co. L, Route No. 1, Auburn, 

Washington 
Poggio, August L., Pvt., Co. K, R. F. D. 3, Box 67, Stock- 
ton, California 
Pointer, Oral J., Cpl., Hq. Co., 36 N. Edgewood St., 

West Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 
Polder, Leendert, Pvt. 1 cl., Co. F, R. F. D. No. 6, Box 

680, Los Angeles, California 
Polioudakis, John, Pvt., Co. D, 288 Burnside St., Portland, 

Oregon 
Polly, Clyde E., Pvt., Hq. Co., Galier, California 
Pomeroy, Elmer E., Pvt., Co. C, Eureka, Montana 
Pomeroy, John P., Pvt. 1 cl., Co. G, 621 25th Ave., N., 

Seattle, Washington 
Pomroy, Adolphus, Pvt., Co. A, 604 W. Quartz St., Butte, 

Montana 
Ponto, Frank A., Pvt., Co. I, Faribault, Minnesota 
Ponton, Millard J., Pvt., Co. H, 1194 C St., Fresno, 

California 
Pope, John F., Pvt., Co. D, Carson, New Mexico 
Poplin, Edward J., Wagoner, Sup. Co., 232 Bradford St., 

Raymond, Washington 
Poppie, Ernest, Pvt. 1 cl., Co. F, Arborn, Idaho 
Porter, Joseph F., Pvt., Hq. Co., Dounev, California 
Postel, Louis, Pvt., Co. H, 48 VV. 34th St., Chicago, Illinois 
Poston, Robert, Cpl., Co. F, Centerville, Idaho 
Poulos, Tom, Pvt., Sup. Co., Forest Grove, Oregon 
Pounds, Herman, Pvt., Hq. Co., E. 804 Kiernan Ave., 

Spokane, Washington 
Powell, David J., Pvt., Co. D, Vayland, South Dakota 
Powell, Roy W., Pvt., Co. E, Jobs, Ohio 
Powers, Fred C, Cpl., Co. I, 225 N. 4th St., Corvallis, 

Oregon 
Powers, John, Pvt. 1 cl., Co. D, 820 14th St., San Francisco, 

California 
Powers, Thomas, Pvt. 1 cl., Sup. Co., Lehi, Utah 
Prante, Charles D., Pvt. 1 cl., Co. L, Cody, Wyoming 
Preston, Jerry, Sgt., Co. G, R. A, Box 117, Elma, 

Washington 
Preston, Lyman E., Pvt. 1 cl., Co. M, R. F. D. No. 1, Free 

Water, Oregon 
Prevo, William H., Pvt. 1 cl., Co. E, R. F. D. No. 3, 

New Virginia, Iowa 
Pridemore, William R., Pvt., Hq. Co., 2840 E. 4th St., 

Los Angeles, California 
Priem, William F., Pvt., Co. G, Bellingham, Minnesota 
Prinzing, Albert W., Cpl., Co. B, P. O. Box 1221, Great 

Falls, Montana 
Proebstel, Rudolf R., Pvt. 1 cl., Co. A, Weston, Oregon 
Proulx, Frank P., Wagoner, Sup. Co., Leadore, Idaho 
Prusha, Edward, Pvt., Co. I, 1702 P St., Southside, 

Omaha, Nebraska 
Pryer, Edgar, Pvt., Co. M, 324 Penn St., Jeffersonville, 

Indiana 
Puccinelli, Nicolo, Pvt., Co. B, 597 Lenzen Ave., San 

Jose, California 
Pulliam, William A., Cpl., Co. F, Box 552, 335 S. 

Southern, Globe, Arizona 
Pullum, Leo B., Pvt., Hq. Co., Trenton, Utah 
Pulone, Joseph, Pvt., Co. H, 6306 S. Hoover St., Los 

Angeles, California 
Pulos, Dan, Pvt., Co. I, Box 1135, Pueblo, Colorado 
Punke, Arthur, Pvt., Co. I, Panola, Illinois 
Puthuff, Orville, Pvt., Co. L, Hangingrock, Ohio 
Questo, Frederick J., Pvt., Co. C, R. F. D. Box 78, lone, 

California 
Quick, Raymond B., Pvt., Co. G, R. No. 4, Lebanon, 

Indiana 
Quilici, Amos, Pvt., Co. H, Yaerengtton, Nev. 
Quilici, Guido, Pvt., Co. B, Carson City, Nevada 
Qcinby, James A., 1st Lt., Sup. Co., 205 S. 9th St., San 

Jose, California 
Quint, Ralph, Pvt., Co. K, 108 South Walnut, Youngstown, 

Ohio 
Rachel, Michael B., Pvt., Co. L, Robins, Ohio 
Raczysnki, Casimir A., Pvt., M. G. Co., 2105 S. Central 

Park Ave., Chicago, Illinois 
Radford, Otho H., Pvt., Hq. Co., R. F. D. No. 1, Pomeroy, 

Ohio 



Radke, Carlisle A., Pvt., Co. G, 192^ Union Ave., N., 

Portland, Oregon 
Raeael, William, Pvt., Co. H, 309 J St., Benecia, Cali- 
fornia 
Raines, Waldo E., Sgt., Co. G, 4038 74th St., S. E., Port- 
land, Oregon 
Rainey, William F., Pvt., Co. H, 1812 Luzerne St., Scran- 
ton, Pennsylvania 
Rainwater, Jack R., Pvt., Co. B, R. F. D. No. 2, Box 100, 

Albany, Oregon 
Rakofski, Andrew, Pvt., Co. C, 426 S. Hanauer St., 

Nanticake, Pennsylvania 
RaLonde, Francis M., Pvt., Co. E, R. F. D. No. 2, Olym- 

pia, Washington 
Ralstin, Albert E., Cpl., M. G. Co., Mohler, Idaho 
Ramsdell, George V.,lstLt.,M. G. Co., Shedd, Oregon 
Ramsden, Silas A., Mess Sgt., Co. M, 8713 Greenwood Ave., 

Seattle, Washington 
Ramsey, Walter S., Pvt., Co. I, Island Lake, Wisconsin 
Randall, Ernest, Sgt., Co. I, Smithfield, Market, Bir- 
mingham, England 
Randall, Payton W., Pvt., Co. M, Bozeman, Montana 
Rankin, James B., Pvt., Co. L, Hugo, Oklahoma 
Rantaia, Viney J., Pvt., Co. D, Vader, Washington 
Rapp, Lloyd R., Cpl., Co. D, 211 E. Parmer Ave., Glendale, 

California 
Rasar, Floyd, Cook, Hq. Co., 610 Jefferson St., Seattle, 

Washington 
Rash, James A., Pvt., Co. E, Box 37, Rose Lake, Idaho 
Rasmussen, Anchor C, Pvt., Co. K, Turner, Montana 
Rasmussen, Ernest C, Pvt., Co. A, Haley, North Dakota 
Rasmussen, Frank E., Cpl., Co. B, 511 Prindel St., Che- 

halis, Washington 
Rasmussen, Harold P., Pvt., Co. G, 3207 Emerson St., 

Seattle, Washington 
Rasmussen, Lawrence C, Pvt., Co. E, Lowell, Washington 
Rasmussen, Roy W., Pvt., Co. D, Harrisburg, Oregon 
Ratcliff, Edwin L., Pvt., M. G. Co., Craig, Colorado 
Raterman, Henry A., Pvt., Co. K, 1556 Borten St., Cin- 
cinnati, Ohio 
Ratzman, Wilhelm F., Pvt., Co. E, 1604 3rd St., Snohomish, 

Washington 
Rawlings, Raymond J., Pvt., Co. M, 1219 Addison Rd., 

Cleveland, Ohio 
Rawson, Lansing R., Pvt., Co. F, 716 Meredian Ave., South 

Pasadena, California 
Ray, Dexter W., Pvt., Hq. Co., Paster, Washington 
Rayhill, McKinley, Pvt., Co. E, Station A, Charlestown, 

West Virginia 
Reaume, Joe, Pvt., Co. F, Tenn. and Kelly Sts., Mobile, 

Rebelski, Martin, Pvt., Co. A, R. F. D. No. 3, Webster, 

South Dakota 
Rebold, William D., Pvt., Co. G, 167 Superior Blvd., 

Wyandotte, Michigan 
Reddick, Alfred L., Pvt., Co. H, 1022 E. 49th St., Los 

Angeles, California 
Redden, William H., Pvt., Co. M, 1409 12th St., Ports- 
mouth, Ohio 
Redlin, Alvin W., Pvt., Co. D, Baldwin, Wisconsin 
Redmond, Harold G., Pvt., Co. H, 32 Gratten St., San 

Francisco, California 
Reed, Arthur, Pvt., Co. H, Rialto, California 
Reed, Dorris, Pvt., Co. G, Bellefont, Center Co., Penn- 
sylvania 
Reed, Frank, Pvt., Co. M, Terre Haute, Indiana 
Reed, Gilbert I., Pvt., Co. F, N. 3303 Stone St., Spokane, 

Washington 
Reed, Miles S., Sgt., M. G. Co., Langdon, North Dakota 
Reef, Robert R., Pvt., Hq. Co., Roosevelt, Utah 
Reese, Jerry W., Cpl., Co. C, Lyman, Washington 
Reeves, Homes, Pvt., Co. B, Laurel, Mississippi 
Reeves, John L., Pvt., Co. F, Broughton, Illinois 
Reichelt, Emil A., Sgt., Co. B, 398 N. Main St., Fon Du 

Lac, Wisconsin 
Reid, Harold G., Cpl., Co. D, 322 Windsor Place, Long 

Beach, California 
Reid, John G., Pvt., Co. H, Gulliver, Mich. 
Reidt, Joseph A., Pvt., Co. L, Station A, Vancouver, 

Washington 
Reiger, John C, Pvt., Co. I, 1407 Pleasant St., Cin- 
cinnati, Ohio 
Rein, Earnest C, Sgt., Co. B, Webb, Oklahoma 
Rein, Paul F., Pvt., Co. M, 3rd St., Portsmouth, Ohio 
Reine, Lewis, Pvt., Co. C, Lakq Mills, Iowa 
Reinerts, John, Sgt., Co. B, 1120 Van Houten St., Port- 
land, Oregon 



268 



Reinwand, Louis W., Pvt., Co. I, Isabelle, Michigan 
Reisinger, Raleigh F., Pvt., Co. C, 773 E. Livingston 

St., Columbus, Ohio 
Rehbein, Edward, Pvt., Co. H, 170 Beach St., Portland, 

Oregon 
Rehm, Frank, Pvt., Hq. Co., 430 N. Hill St., Los Angeles, 

California 
Rekstad, Hans A., Mechanic, M. G. Co., Willow Lake, 

South Dakota 
Remick, Raine, Pvt., Co. B, 1226 Rucker Ave., Everett, 

Washington 
Remington, Jay D., Pvt., Med. Det., Box 192, Portola, 

California 
Remiro, Charles L., Pvt., Co. K, 140 Bridge St., Weston- 

ville, California 
Reninger, Grant I., Pvt., Co. A, Downers Grove, Illinois 
Reno, Harvie D., Pvt., Co. H, 23 S. 1st Ave., Phoenix, 

Arizona 
Renwick, John, Pvt., Hq. Co., Emmett, Idaho 
Rettig, Alfred, Pvt., Co. L, Box 52, R. F. D. No. 1, Hol- 

gate, Ohio 
Rettke, Otto J., Pvt., Co. C, Gen. Del., Hanover, Kansas 
Reyling, Otto L., Pvt., Co. K, Dahlgren, Illinois 
Reynolds, Garrett C, Pvt., Co. E, R. F. D. No. 3, Atticam, 

Indiana 
Reynolds, James J., Pvt., Co. L, Martins Ferry, Ohio 
Rice, Bernard M., Cpl., Co. A, 3217 Holden St., Seattle, 

Washington 
Rice, Jesse, Pvt., Co. K, R. F. D. No. 1, Hillsbourgh, 

Kentucky 
Rice, Jules V., Cpl., Co. H, 705 W. 63rd St., Los Angeles, 

California 
Richard, Albert F., Cook, Co. K, Bremerton, Washington 
Richards, Harry H., Pvt., Co. A, 517 N. Montana, Butte, 

Montana 
Richards, Howard J., Cpl., Co. B, P. O. Box 184, Lewiston, 

Montana 
Richards, James, Pvt., Co. F, 209 N. 12th St., Charleston, 

Illinois 
Richards, Raymond C, Sgt., Co. K, Renton, Washington 
Richardson, Ira C, Pvt., Co. F, Fair Grange, Illinois 
Richardson, John, Wagoner, Sup. Co., 3434 14th St., Seat- 
tle, Washington 
Richardson, Leonard, Cpl., Co. E, W. 7th and Cherry 

Sts., New Albany, Indiana 
Richardson, Robert, Pvt., Co. A, Box 53, Whitney, South 

Dakota 
Richardson, Robert G., Cpl., Co. K, Galex, West Virginia 
Richardson, Walter R., Pvt., Co. M, 103 13th Ave., N., 

Seattle, Washington 
Richelman, Harry, Pvt., M. G. Co., Price, Utah 
Richey, Nassie, Pvt., Co. K, Utopia, Texas 
Richmond, William H., Mach., Co. E, Sykes, Montana 
Ricker, Henry W., Pvt., Co. C, Arden Hotel, Cleveland, 

Ohio 
Ricketts, Richard M., Mach., Co. E, Jerome, Idaho 
Ricks, Perry J., Sgt., Med. Det., Rigby, Idaho 
Riddell, Wilbur J., Pvt., Co. D, 446 Lake St., San Fran- 
cisco, California 
Riddle, Harry, Pvt., M. G. Co., Normal, Kentucky 
Riddle, Newt B., Pvt., Co. B, Lynden, Washington 
Riederer, Fred J., Pvt., Co. F, 2005 E. VanagetSt., Phila- 
delphia, Pennsylvania 
Rietmann, Otto, Wagoner, Sup. Co., lone, Oregon 
Riggs, Gilman B., Pvt., Hq. Co., 260 Wygant St., Portland, 

Oregon 
Riley, James, Pvt., Co. C, R. F. D. No. 5, Kenton, Ohio 
Riley, Jesse, Pvt., Co. I, Bertha, Ohio 
Riley, John W., Sgt., Co. H, R. F. D. No. 3, Oakland, 

Indiana 
Riley, Lester H., Pvt., Co. G, Richfield, Utah 
Riley, Lloyd F., Pvt., Hq. Co., 4103 8th Ave., S., Seattle, 

Washington 
Riling, Chester C, Pvt., Sup. Co., 4200 Logan Ave., 

Altoona, Pennsylvania 
Ring, Frederick I., Cpl., Hq. Co., 1119 Howell St., Seattle, 

Washington 
Riolo, Tony, Pvt., Co. B, 1901 Magazine St., New Orleans, 

Louisiana 
Rista u, John W., Pvt., Co. G, R. F. D. No. 3, Spokane, 

Washington 
Ritchie, Everett P., Cpl., Co. F, lone, Oregon 
Rittenhouse, Glesson, Pvt., Co. K, Duvall, Ohio 
Rivers, Joseph R., Pvt., Co. C, 1316 S. Eye St., Tacoma, 

Washington 
Roach, Jesse, Pvt., Co. H, Fraziers Bottom, West Virginia 
Robarge, Joseph, Pvt., Co. D, R. F. D. No. 2, Bow, Wash- 
ington 
Roberts, Araha O., Pvt., Co. G, Olene, Oregon 



Roberts, Cuktis W., Wagoner, Sup. Co., Carmen, Idaho 
Roberts, Hugh, Wagoner, Sup. Co., 115 M St., Rock 

Springs, Wyoming 
Roberts, John A., Pvt., Co. K, Box 254, Rigby, Idaho 
Robertson, Jim, Cpl., Co. M, 5011 Meridian Ave., Seattle, 

Washington 
Robertson, Manuel M., Pvt., Co. G, 223 Front St., Salanas, 

California 
Robertson, Sam W., 2nd Lt„ Co. D, 2222 Pillsbury Ave., 

Minneapolis, Minnesota 
Robertson, Simon D., Pvt., Co. I, R. F. D. No. 1, Williams- 
ton, North Carolina 
Robertson, Thomas, Pvt., Co. B, U. S. S. Denver, care of 

Postmaster, New York City 
Robie, Rothwell W., Pvt., Co. H, Milton, California 
Robins, Adlai E., Sgt., Co. E, Waterville, Washington 
Robinson, Henry E., Pvt., Co. I, Biloxi, Mississippi 
Robinson, James W., Mechanic, Hq. Co., 127 19th St., 

Seattle, Washington 
Robirds, Ray M., Pvt., Co. A, 1247 11th St., Santa Monica, 

California 
Robnett, Roy, Pvt., Co. H, Detroit, Michigan 
Rocchetta, Lui, Pvt., Co. I, Lago Genova, Borghetto, 

Vara Per, Italy , „ 

Rockwell, Ruben L., Pvt., Co. H, 328 E. 60th St., Loa 

Angeles, California 
Rodgers, Dudley, Pvt., Co. F, R. F. D. No. 4, Robinson, 

Illinois ,. 

Rodgers, Henry E., Pvt., Co. A, R. F. D. No. 3, Joliet, 

Illinois . 

Rodgers, John R., Wagoner, Sup. Co., Memphis, Tenn- 

CSS66 

Rodriguez, Reuben R., Wagoner, Sup. Co., 509 Madison 

St., Monterey, California 
Roeder, Matthew J., Pvt., Co. I, Granville, Iowa 
Rogers, Andrew, Pvt., Co. K, Patton, Pennsylvania 
Rogers, Ballington, Bugler, Sgt., Hq. Co., 716 29th 

Ave., Seattle, Washington . 

Rogers, John, Pvt., Co. M, 28 Tripoli St., Mola Ban, 

Province, Italy 
Rohr, Otto J., Cpl., M. G. Co., 1728 K St., Sacramento, 

California 
Rosier, Jess N., Pvt., Co. L, 303 Wynooche St., Montesano, 

Washington 
Rome, Mathew P., Pvt., Co. E, San Jacinto, Calnornia 
Romee, Guiseppi L., Pvt., Co. E, 504 2nd St., S., Seattle, 

Washington 
Romhild, Carl W., Pvt., Co. L, Hennessy, Oklanoma 
Rominski, Frank F., Pvt., Co. M, 1143 Blum St., Toledo, 

Ohio . ,. ,, 

Roney, Fred, Pvt., Co. H, 623 N. 32nd St., Billings, Mon- 
tana , . 
Roos, Richard, Pvt., M. G. Co., Cheney, Washington 
Roose, Edwin C, Pvt., Med. Det., 108 W. 75th St., Seattle, 

Washington 
Roozen, William H., Pvt., Co. A, Mott, North Dakota 
Rosasco, Bartholomew, Pvt., Co. C, P. O. Box 2, St. 

Helens, Oregon 
Rose, Alexander, Cook, Co. B, 2506^ Grand Ave., Everett, 

Washington 
Rose, Fred C, Sgt., M. G. Co., Glenn's Ferry, Idaho 
Rose, Hubert B., Pvt., Hq. Co., Box 655, Tenino, Wash- 
ington 
Rose, Lester, Pvt., Co. L, Box 881, Bandon, Oregon 
Rose, Linne W., Sgt., Hq. Co., 6316 40th Ave., S. W., 

Seattle, Washington 
Rose, Ray J., Pvt., M. G. Co., St. Edwards, Nebraska 
Rose, Terrance V., Bugler, Co. F, Pe Ell, Washington 
Rosenblad, Henry S., Pvt., Co. I, 1275 Rhode Island St., 

San Francisco, California _ 

Ross, Charles T., Pvt., Co. E, 7420 Roseberry St., Los 

Angeles, California 
Ross, Frank M., Cpl., M. G. Co., Bieber, California 
Ross, John A. H., Cook, Co. L, 207 Main St., Centraha, 

Washington 
Ross, Lester A., Pvt., Med. Det., Garner, Iowa 
Ros, Raymond R., Pvt., Co. C, Perma, Montana 
Rosser, Jay A., Pvt., Co. E, Bellingham, Washington 
Rota, Inigi, Pvt., Co. D, 1311 S. K St., Tacoma, Wash- 

RoteI, °Charles E., Cpl., Co. E, 2103 High St., Selma, 

California _ ., 

Rowden, Morris A., Pvt., Co. G, 2225 H St., Bakersfield, 

California . n ... 

Rowe, Charles W., Pvt., Hq. Co., 153 Harrison St., Seattle, 

Washington 
Rowe, Jesse L., Pvt., M. G. Co., Priceville, Kentucky 
Rowland, Keith W., Pvt., Co. E, Benewah Route, Tekoa, 

Washington 



269 



Rjzek, Roman S., Pvt., Co. M, 382 Sobiski St., Milwaukee, 
Wisconsin 

Rozzano, Charles, Musician, Hq. Co., Roslyn, Washington 

Ruble, Walton L., Cpl., Co. B, 825 F St., Centralia, Wash- 
ington 

Ruder, Arthur J., Pvt., Co. F, 1203 Brendo St., Los An- 
geles, California 

Ruggerio, Iqnazio, Pvt., Co. B, 1756 W. North Ave., 
Chicago, Illinois 

Ruggles, Miles W., Pvt., Co. M, 312 Market St., Ports- 
mouth, Ohio 

Rumsey, Morris J., Pvt., Co. D, 90 Board of Trade, Chicago, 
Illinois 

Runte, Frederick, Pvt., Co. I, Bassette, Montana 

Rushmer, Earl M., Cpl., Co. M, 2410 S. 12th St., Tacoma, 
Washington 

Rusieka, Joseph E., Pvt., Hq. Co., New Prague, Minnesota 

Russell, Bert L., Pvt., Co. B, 1411 G St., Sacramento, 
California 

Russell, Bert M., Pvt., Co. C, 7510 17th St., N. W., Seattle, 
Washington 

Russell, Earn, Pvt., Co. A, Welleston, Ohio 

Russell, Harry W., Sgt., Co. F, R. F. D. No. 3, Parma, 
Idaho 

Rust, George T., Pvt., Co. H, 538 Scott St., Springfield, 
Ohio 

Ruth, Carlos E., Pvt., Co. K, 102 S. Garfield St., Dayton, 
Ohio 

Ruud, Lorenzo, Cpl., Co. I, 31 E. 3rd, N., Logan, Utah 

Ryen, Arthur, Sgt., Co. B, Rockdale, Texas 

Saarels, Otto, Cpl., Co. L, Box 53, Ilwaco, Washington 

Sadler, Clyde J., Wagoner, Sup. Co., 37 N. I. St., Top- 
penish, Washington 

Sagar, Rudolph C, Pvt., Co. B, 244 E. Park St., Butte, 
Montana 

Sagen, Edward E., Pvt., Co. G, 613 Commercial St., As- 
toria, Oregon 

Saine, Fred, Pvt., Co. A, Humbolt, Tennessee 

Salcido, Edward, Cpl., Co. K, care of Oriental Cafe, 
Bakersfield, California 

Salmonson, Clarence W., Band Cpl., Hq. Co., 8317 15th 
Ave., N. W., Seattle, Washington 

Salyer, Thomas E., Pvt., Co. F, Masonic Home, Louisville, 
Kentucky 

Sambrakos, Alexander J., Pvt., Co. E, Carlisle, Washing- 
ton 

Sammon, Thomas L., Pvt., Co. H, 415 Pacher St., West 
Avoca, Pennsylvania 

Samson, John H. C, Pvt., Co. K, care of R. B. Donnell, 
Reedley, California 

Samuelson, Adolf F., Pvt., Ord. Co., 323 W. San Sal- 
vador St., San Jose, California 

Sandefur, Fred M., Pvt., Med. Det., 1103 W. 4th St., 
Spokane, Washington 

Sanders, Charles R, Pvt., Co. L, Cassandra, Tennessee 

Sanders, Herman, Pvt., Co. F, R. F. D. No. 4, Grant Park, 
Matoon, Illinois 

Sanders, Thomas, Pvt., Co. M, 4255 Cedar St., New Boston, 
Ohio 

Sanders, William T., Pvt., Co. D, Pittsburgh, Kansas 

Sanderson, Jimmie, Cpl., Co. A, R. F. D. No. 3, Athens, 
Alabama 

Sanderson, Lewis, Pvt., Co. M, Orleans Bar, California 

Sandgren, Arthur E., Wagoner, Sup. Co., 6010 Detroit 

f-'M Ave., Seattle, Washington 

Sandquist, Mitchell, Cpl., Co. E, Box 444, South Bend, 
Washington 

Savage, Leon E., Capt., Sup. Co., Fort Wright, Spokane, 

*3 Washington 

Sawyer, Maurice V., Cpl., Co. E, Burlington, Washington 

Sayer, Edward D., Pvt., Co. L, Morrill, Nebraska 

Scalf, James H., Pvt., Co. C, Julian, Montana 

Scalf, Joseph K., Wagoner, Sup. Co., Randle, Washington 

Scalzo, Antonio, Pvt., Co. K, 2004 Day St., Seattle, Wash- 
ington 

Scarborough, Lloyd T., Pvt., Co. C, R. F. D. No. 30, 
Shiocton, Wisconsin 

Schable, Louis O., Cpl., Co. I, 4005 Rooker Ave., Everett, 
Washington 

Schaefer, Edward, Pvt., Co. H, 620 Illinois Ave., Butte, 
Montana 

Schaeffer, Alfred C, Pvt., Co. M, 1508 3rd St., Ports- 
mouth, Ohio 

Schanbeck, Johan, Cpl., Co. E, Kimama, Idaho 

Schar, Homer E., Pvt., Hq. Co., R. F. D. No. 1, Sardis, 
Ohio 

Scheid, Joseph Jr., Cpl., M. G. Co., 6410 Mission St., San 
Francisco, California 

Schenk, Frank. Pvt., Co. A, Pittsburg, Kansas 



Scherini, Achile, Pvt., Co. H, Tulaur, California 

Schiedeler, Anthony, Pvt., Co. A, 126 Sagamore St., San 
Francisco, California 

Schlegel, Arthur W., Cpl., Co. L, 813 S. 14th St., Tacoma, 
Washington 

Schmidt, Andrew, Pvt., Co. F, 771 S. Merengo Ave., Pasa- 
dena, California 

Schmidt, Kasper, Pvt., Co. A, Angela, Montana 

Schmitt, Alfred E., Pvt., Hq. Co., 1616 Market St., Oak- 
land, California 

Schnarr, August, Pvt., Co. B, Raymond, Washington 

Schoeberl, William, Pvt., Co. E, Salem, South Dakota 

Schoewe, Claire R., Pvt., Co. K, 901 Warren St., San- 
dusky, Ohio 

Schofield, Vao, Cpl., Co. K, Spring City, Utah 

Schroeder, Carl H., Pvt., Co. E, Yelm, Washington 

Schroeder, Edgar A., Pvt., M. G. Co., 2711 Jackson St., 
Seattle, Washington 

Schroeder, William H., Pvt., M. G. Co., 616 N. 49th St., 
Seattle, Washington 

Schroder, William R., Pvt., Co. D, 1010 Maryland Ave., 
Butte, Montana 

Schultz, Harry C, Pvt., Co. B, Rosalia, Washington 

Schulz, Louis, Cpl., Co. A, Lakefield, Minnesota 

Schultz, Theodore H., Pvt., Co. A, 388 N. Exchange St., 
St. Paul, Minnesota 

Schultz, William E., Sgt., Co. M, 12606 Cornado Ave., 
Cleveland, Ohio 

Schumacher, Carl, Pvt., Co. L, 424 E. Jackson St., Colum- 
bus, Ohio 

Schumacher, George W., Pvt., Co. B, 437 Waller St., San 
Francisco, California 

Schumacker, John S., Pvt., Co. C, 428 Redding St., Red- 
ding, Ohio 

Schuster, Henry P., Pvt., Co. E, 2755 McAllister St., San 
Francisco, California 

Schwandt, Edward, Pvt., Co. I, 4417 Barring Ave., East 
Chicago, Illinois 

Schwankhaus, Edward H., Pvt., Co. M, 619 Steel Ave., 
Dayton, Ohio 

Schwartz, John, Sgt., Co. L, Logan, Utah 

Schwarzrock, Otto L., Pvt., Co. A, 615 W. Main St., 
Lewistown, Montana 

Schweers, George A., Sgt., Co. A, Forest Grove, Oregon 

Schweikert, Joseph L., Pvt., Co. G, LaManda Park, 
California 

Schweitzer, Harry N., Mechanic, Co. M, Box No. 2, 
care of Charles Youtz, Alto Lona, California 

Schwenck, Charles L., Pvt., Co. D, 1327 S. Catelina St., 
Los Angeles, California 

Schwender, Fred A., Pvt., Hq. Co., 755 25th Ave., N. W., 
Seattle, Washington 

Scogsburg, Edward, Pvt., Co. M, Arnot, Tioga County, 
Pennsylvania 

Scollon, Bartholom F., Pvt., Co. G, Easterville, Iowa 

Scott, Harold E., Cpl., Co. H, QWA W. 6th St., Los An- 
geles, California 

Scott. Josephus, Pvt., Co. A, Marlow, Oklahoma 

Scott, Lonie, Pvt., Co. E, R. F. D. No. 3, Sebree, Kentucky 

Scott, Shell, Pvt., Co. G, Lakeview, Iowa 

Scott, Warren, Pvt., Co. L, R. F. D. No. 3, Butler, Ohio 

Scouten, George, Pvt., Hq. Co., Waitsburg, Washington 

Scramlin, Edwin M., Sgt., Hq. Co., 7048 Jones Ave., 
Seattle, Washington 

Scuttich, Frank, Pvt., Co. A, 1222 6th St., Oak Grove, 
Monterey, California 

Seablom, Agur G., Pvt., Co. E, Knappton, Washington 

Seaboldt, Vernon, Sgt., M. G. Co., 52 Nelson St., New 
Brunswick, New Jersey 

Seaman, Edward F., Band Sgt. Mgr., Hq. Co., 2114 Wood- 
ford St., Toledo, Ohio 

Seay, Milo B., 2nd Lt., 1410 Senate St., Columbia, South 
Carolina 

Sedergren, Emil C, Bugler, Co. L, R. F. D. No. 2, Puy- 
allup, Washington 

See, Vernon A., Pvt., Co. K, Boville, Idaho 

Seelye, Albert, Musician, Hq. Co., Barber, Idaho 

Seide, Harry A., Pvt., Co. G, 1028 E. 22nd St., Los Angeles, 
California 

Seidlitz, Richard J., Pvt., Hq. Co., Chester, Montana 

Selig, Moses, Pvt., Co. E, 506 17th Ave., San Francisco, 
California 

Selstad, Henry A., Pvt., Co. A, 2401 3rd Ave., Seattle, 
Washington 

Sembach, Charles J., Pvt., Co. F, R. F. D. No. 1, Osgood, 
Indiana 

Semones, George D., Pvt., Co. L, Sciotiville, Ohio 

Sendy, Edward A., Pvt., Co. H, 293 E. 49th St., Los An- 
geles, California 



270 



Sents, Henry E., Pvt., Co. D, R. F. D. No. 1, State College, 

Pennsylvania 
Sepulveda, Lee, Sgt., M. G. Co., P. O. Box 5, Deeth, Ne- 
vada 
Serpa, Peter R., Pvt., Co. K, Half Moon Bay, California 
Settles, Robert B., Pvt., Co. M, R. F. D. No. 2, Omaha, 

Texas 
Sevres, Phineas, Pvt., Co. C, McLeansboro, Illinois 
Severson, Ole A., Pvt., Co. A, care of Al. G. Severson, 

Hampden, North Dakota 
Seymore, Charles W., Cpl., Co. K, 174 Riverside Drive, 

Seattle, Washington 
Shaeffer, John T., Cpl., Co. H, Ohino, California 
Shafer, Earl A., Pvt., Co. C, Bantry, North Dakota 
Shakeley, Thomas F., Pvt., Co. H, Petrolia, Pennsylvania 
Shaner, Harry, Cpl., Co. H, Webster Apts., Tacoma, 

Washington 
Shanklin, Roy E., Pvt., Co. I, R. F. D. No. 4, Crawfords- 

ville, Indiana 
Sharabjoan, John, Pvt., Sup. Co., 501 S. Gloss St., Los 

Angeles, California 
Sharkey, George E., Pvt., Co. A, R. F. D. No. 2, Kent, 

Washington 
Sharp, Charles, Pvt., Co. I, 3723 S. M. St., Taooma, 

Washington 
Sharp, Elmer E., Pvt., M. G. Co., 3514 E. 39th St., Spokane, 

Washington 
Sharrard, Martin J., Sgt., Co. H, 6279 Ellis St., Seattle, 

Washington 
Shaw, Harry, Cpl., Hq. Co., 4417 4th Ave., N. W., Seattle, 

Washington 
Shaw, James A., Pvt., M. G. Co., 1121 E. 5th St., Olympia, 

Washington 
Shaw, William H., Pvt., Co. E, cor. Central and Union 

Sts., Olympia, Washington 
Shea, Frank T., Pvt., Co. L, 402 Broadway, San Francisco, 

California 
Shearer, Franklin L., Pvt., Co. H, 209 Commonwealth 

Ave., Detroit, Michigan 
Sheffer, Lester S., Pvt., Co. L, 1221 Clay St., Henderson, 

Kentucky 
Sheline, Pearl, Pvt., Co. K, 1306 New Jersey Ave., Wells- 
ton, Ohio 
Shelley, Albert L., Cpl., Co. G, Tidewater, Oregon 
Shelton, Benjamin, Pvt., Co. C, Medora, Indiana 
Shelton, Everett R., Sgt., Hq. Co., 5642 44th Ave., N. W., 

Seattle, Washington 
Shepard, Paul F., Pvt., Co. F, 812 N. 8th St., Grants Pass, 

Oregon 
Sheridan, Harry L., Pvt., Co. H, 318 Butler St., Etna, 

Pennsylvania 
Sherman, George R., Pvt., Co. B, R. F. D. No. 1, Box 87, 

New Straitsville, Ohio 
Sherman, John, Pvt., Co. M, R. F. D. No. 1, Ironton, Ohio 
Sherman, William S., Pvt., Co. M, 265 Siebert St., Colum- 
bus, Ohio 
Sherry, George E., Wagoner, Sup. Co., 1402 N. 50th St., 

Seattle, Washington 
Shiave, Joseph D., Pvt., Co. G, 317 N. 3rd Ave., Pocatello, 

Idaho 
Shields, Edward, Cpl., Co. K, 246 W. Park Ave., Columbus, 

Ohio 
Shields, Robert, Pvt., Co. F, 627 Ottowa St., Leavenworth, 

Shigley, Calvin, Pvt., Co. B, 4200 9th St., S., Seattle, 

Washington 
Shirts, Ersell, Pvt., Co. B, Esclante, Utah 
Shoemaker, Fred E., Pvt., Co. A, Bainridge, Ohio 
Sholund, Michael, Pvt., Hq. Co., 511 Davis St., Olympia, 

Washington 
Shonk, John J., Pvt., Co. L, 421 Wheeling St., Lancaster, 

Ohio 
Shore, Harry A., Musician, Hq. Co., 667 10th St., Oak- 
land, California 
Shott, Carl A., Pvt., Co. D, 430 Moler St., Columbus, 

Ohio 
Shott, William A., Pvt., Co. B, Boyes Springs, California 
Shroyer, Jacob D., Pvt., Co. L, Caldwell, Ohio 
Shults, Isaac N., Pvt., Co. K, Ashton, Idaho 
Siebert, John W., Pvt., Co. F, Poison, Montana 
Sievbrkropp, Herman, Pvt., M. G. Co., Odessa, Washing- 
ton 
Silacci, Louis P., Pvt., Co. K, Cayucos, California 
Siler, Ray, Pvt., Co. I, 391 Sandusky St., Columbus, Ohio 
Siljan, Ingar, Pvt., Co. A, Arcada, California 
Silver, Abraham, Pvt., Co. L, 475 W. Broadway, Portland, 

Oregon 
Simensen, Andres, Mechanic, Co. L, 2418 Harvey Ave., 
Fresno, California 



Simmons, Claude, Pvt., Hq. Co., 452 Alameda Ave., Reno, 

Nevada 
Simmons, Henry H., Pvt., M. G. Co., Fillmore, Missouri 
Simmons, James E., Pvt., Co. G, 1563 E. 33rd St., Los An- 
geles, California 
Simon, Harry, Pvt., Co. B, 273 San Carlos St., San Fran- 
cisco, California 
Simonich, Joseph A., Sgt., Co. A, Timber Butte, Montana 
Simons, Thomas L., Pvt., Co. A, Sedro Woolley, Washington 
Simonson, Charles L., Sgt., Co. K, R. F. D. No. 1, Belling- 

ham, Washington 
Simonson, James M., Pvt., Co. A, 6725 18th Ave., N. W., 

Seattle, Washington 
Simpson, Charles E., Sgt., Co. L, 713 22nd Ave., Seattle, 

Washington 
Simpson, James W., Pvt., Co. L, 635 E. Pearl St., Cincin- 
nati, Ohio 
Simpson, John M., Musician, Hq. Co., Kirkland, Wash- 
ington 
Singer, Abraham, Pvt., Co. G, 207 Hooker St., Portland, 

Oregon 
Singleton, John, Cpl., Co. K, Lakeview, Oregon 
Sisto, Angel J., Sgt., Co. G, 3817 Grand South Ave., Los 

Angeles, California 
Six, William, Pvt., Co. F, 3414 Michigan Ave., St. Louis, 

Missouri 
Skaggs, Marcus D., Pvt., Co. H, 447 61st St., Oakland, 

California 
Skidmore, Sylvester, Cook, Co. I, Port Royal, Kentucky 
Sly, Ernest M., Pvt., Hq. Co., 1010 Gallia St., Portsmouth, 

Ohio 
Smethurst, Walter, Mechanic, Co. I, Klein, Montana 
Smith, Albert L., Cpl., Hq. Co., 437 W. Page St., Dallas, 

Texas 
Smith, Alvin R., Mechanic, Co. L, 745 S. 5th St., Columbus, 

Ohio 
Smith, Bonar O., Cpl., Co. E, Ureka, California 
Smith, Charlie, 1st Sgt., Co. A, 767 32nd Ave., Seattle, 

Washington 
Smith, Clarence L., Pvt., Co. I, Lincolnton, Georgia 
Smith, Clarence V., Sgt., Hq. Co., 7006 8th Ave., N. W., 

Seattle, Washington 
Smith, Clifford D., Pvt., Co. G, Route No. 6, Rockdale, 

Texas 
Smith, Durward A., Pvt., Co. E, Cor. Green and Walnut 

Sts., Nanticoke, Pennsylvania 
Smith, Everett L., Pvt., Co. G, 35 N. Chester Ave., Pasa- 
dena, California 
Smith, Frank, Pvt., Co. K, 109 Leibrandt Ave., Santa Cruz, 

California 
Smith, Frank L., Pvt., Co. L, Utica, Kentucky 
Smith, Fred J., Pvt., Co. F, R. F. D. No. 6, Bellevue, Ohio 
Smith, George E., Pvt., Co. H, R. F. D. No. 2, Stickney, 

Pennsylvania 
Smith, George S., Pvt., Co. M, 708 S. Alabama St., Butte, 

Montana 
Smith, Guy R., Sgt., Co. F, Clinton, Washington 
Smith, Ikel, Pvt., Co. E, Withrow, Washington 
Smith, John, Pvt., Co. L, Dublin, Indiana 
Smith, Joseph E., Cpl., Co. G, Brawley, California 
Smith, Harrison M., Pvt., Co. B, R. F. D. No. 6, Mt. 

Vernon, Ohio 
Smith, Kenneth L., Sgt., Sup. Co., Bellevue, Washington 
Smith, Lavern R., Pvt., Co. H, Springfield, Oregon 
Smith, Percy L., Sgt., Co. H, Redmond, Washington 
Smith, Ralph E., Wagoner, Sup. Co., Davenport, Wash- 
ington 
Smith, Richard L., Cpl., Hq. Co., 1340 Cascade Ave., 

Chehalis, Washington 
Smith, Richard L., 1st Sgt., Co. C, R. F. D. No. 2, James- 
town, Missouri 
Smith, Starling C, Pvt., Co. M, 430 Jefferson Ave., Colum- 
bus, Ohio 
Smith, Stephen E., Pvt., Hq. Co., Orway, Ohio 
Smith, Thomas L., Cpl., Co. D, 764 S. 1st West St., Salt Lake 

City, Utah 
Smittle, Clifford, Pvt., Co. M, R. F. D. No. 1, Nelson- 

ville, Ohio 
Snodgrass, Harry H., Cpl., Co. D, 316 San Bernardino, 

Covina, California 
Snow, Coleman, Pvt., Co. F, Teasdale, Utah 
Snowdon, Albert, Pvt., Hq. Co., 8317 15th Ave., N. W., 

Seattle, Washington 
Snowden, Edwin F., Pvt., Co. G, 1017 W. 37th PL, Los 

Angeles, California 
Snyder, Harry, Pvt., Co. G, Collbram, Colorado 
Snyder, Karl, Pvt., Co. H, 2006 Magnolia Ave., Los An- 
geles, California 



271 



Snyder, Thomas J., Pvt., Co. K, 427 S. Perry, Montgomery, 

Alabama 
Snyder, Walter R., Pvt., Co. L, Yoe, Pennsylvania 
Solano, Alonzo L., Cpl., Co. L, 1415 Bates Ave., Los 

Angeles, California 
Solie, Daniel, Pvt., Co. A, Stanley, Wisconsin 
Solomon, Henry, Pvt., Co. B, R. F. D. No. 2, Burbank, 

South Dakota 
Solomon, Jesse J., Pvt., Co. B, Harper, Texas 
Solve, Melvin, Pvt., Co. H, 66 11th St., Oakland, California 
Somes, Walter E., Cpl., Co. A, Waterville, Washington 
Sommers, Rudolph, Cpl., Co. M, Montpelier, Idaho 
Sones, Harry R., Pvt., M. G. Co., Muncey Valley, Sullivan 

County, Pennsylvania 
Sonnenbero, Louis E., Pvt., Co. A, Industry, Texas 
Sonnichsen, Hans D., Pvt., Co. E, R. F. D. No. 3, Bridge- 
water, South Dakota 
Sonnenberg, Raymond H., Pvt., Co. K, Melrose, Wisconsin 
Soper, Edward W., Pvt., Co. K, Arlington, Washington 
Sorenson, Marvin L., Cpl., Co. L, Driggs, Idaho 
Soteros, Thomas, Pvt., Co. H, 1029 L St., Sacramento, 

California 
Soule, Rudolph W., Pvt., Co. G, De Soto, Kansas 
Souza, Joe R., Pvt., Co. G, Box 165, Wayne Ave., San Jose, 

California 
Space, Rosco L., Pvt., M. G. Co., Weippe, Idaho 
Spangler, George L., Cpl., Co. B, Sispuoc, California 
Spangler, Ralph, Pvt., Co. M, 1714 Fairfield Ave., St. 

Wayne, Indiana 
Sparks, Ralph W., Pvt., Co. H, R. F. D. No. 6, Columbus, 

Indiana 
Sparrow, Patrick J., Sgt., Co. H, 702y 2 Pine St., Seattle, 

Washington 
Spatig, Ernest A., Pvt., Co. K, R. F. D. No. 1, Breston, 

Idaho 
Spatz, Herman, Cpl., Co. M, R. F. D. No. 2, Box 55, Oregon 

City, Oregon 
Speck, Theodore A., Pvt., Co. B, 840 Nebraska St., Toledo, 

Ohio 
Speechly, Edward R., Pvt., Co. B, 264 Clinton Park, 

San Francisco, California 
Spiegelberg, Edward, Sgt., Co. M, 5233 S. 1st St., Tacoma, 

Washington 
Spindler, Joseph A., Pvt., Co. I, Box 28, Station K, College 

Hill, Cincinnati, Ohio 
Splane, Millard A., Mechanic, Co. A, Sedro Woolley, Wash- 
ington 
Sprague, Mack I., Wagoner, Sup. Co., Wenas, Washington 
Springer, Charles W., Pvt., Co. B, 429 Evans Ave., Reno, 

Nevada 
Springer, Robert C, Wagoner, Sup. Co., 812 S. 86th St., 

Fernhill, Washington 
Springmier, Edmund J., Pvt., Co. C, 1337 Locust St., 

Cincinnati, Ohio 
Sprowell, Earl H., Pvt., Co. F, 225 Euclid Ave., Rock 

Springs, Wyoming 
Spruzzola, Henry R, Pvt., Co. H, 3532 Telegraph Ave., 

Oakland, California 
Squires, William, Pvt., Co. D, Burnett, Los Angeles Co., 

California 
Staff, Oscar B., Pvt., Hq. Co., Box 76, Uson, Idaho 
Stafford, Alex, Cpl., Co. F, 519 C. St., Rock Springs, 

Wyoming 
Stanhope, Tiefin, Pvt., Co. D, R. F. D. No. 6, Chilli- 

cothe, Ohio 
Stanley, Arthur, Pvt., Co. C, 7151 W. Cattett St., Heck- 
man, Kentucky 
Stanley, Wayne B., Sgt., Co. F, Rochester, Washington 
Starke, Frank W., Sgt., Co. G, 135 Clinton Ave., West 

Hoboken, New Jersey 
Starks, William K, Pvt., Co. L, St. Lawrence, South 

Dakota 
Starr, Delano T., Mechanic, Co. E, Lake Preston, South 

Dakota 
Startzell, Kenneth R., Pvt., Co. I, 60 Richards St., 

Brookville, Pennsylvania 
Statler, Martin R., Pvt., Co. A, 619 N. 1st St., Iola, 

Kansas 
Stave, Thomas, Pvt., Co. F, R. F. D. No. 3, North Yakima, 

Washington 
St. Denis, Paul V., Cpl., Co. L, 921 S. Lawrence St., Wi- 

Stecher,' Otto, Cpl., Co. D, 3016 19th St., Everett, Wash- 
ington 

Stedham, John I., Sgt., Co. G, 1681 Williams Ave., Che- 
halis, Washington 

Steelsmith, Samuel R., Cpl., Co. G, South Prairie, Wash- 
ington 

Steinback, Joseph W., Pvt., Co. G, Sprinbrook, Wisconsin 



Steinbicker, Julius T., Cpl., Co. M, 1811 Fairfax Ave., E. 

Walnut, Hill, Cincinnati, Ohio 
Stellmach, Louis, Pvt., Co. E, Rice, Minnesota 
Stender Hugo J., Pvt., Co. L, St. Lawrence, South Da- 
kota 
Stenmoe, Seymore W., Pvt., Co. G, 127 N. 84th St., Seattle, 

Washington 
Stephen, Henry P., Pvt., Co. G, 3432 A Sabina St., Los 

Angeles, California 
Stephen, Jodie C, Cpl., Co. L, Red Rock, Texas 
Stephens, John W., Pvt., Hq. Co., Hillsboro, Oregon 
Stevens, Earl F., Pvt., Co. F, Pomona, California 
Stevens, James F., Pvt., Hq. Co., 693 Everett St., Port- 
land, Oregon 
Stevens, James R., Pvt., Hq. Co., R. F. D. No. 2, Freeport, 

Ohio 
Stevens, Oscar P., Pvt., Co. H, 4905 Wilton Place, Los 

Angeles, California 
Stevens, William E., Pvt., Co. F, 4357 Lockwood St., Los 

Angeles, California 
Stevenson, Jesse, Pvt., Hq. Co., 1024 Front St., Ports- 
mouth, Ohio 
Stevenson, William C, Pvt., Co. K, Ontario, Oregon 
Stevenson, Stephen J., Pvt., Co. H, 437 Newbrunswick 

Ave., Perth Amboy, New Jersey 
Stewart, Bert H., Pvt., Hq. Co., Freeport, Ohio 
Stewart, Legrande S., Sgt., Co. C, Blackfoot, Idaho 
Still, Harry E., Wagoner, Sup. Co., Glenn's Ferry, Idaho 
Stiner, John O., Pvt., Hq. Co., 507 Pioneer Bldg., Seattle, 

Washington 
Stitt, Samuel C, Sgt., Co. A, American Falls, Idaho 
Stockman, Edward, Pvt., Hq. Co., 1320 4th St., Chehalis, 

Washington 
Stockstill, Harry, Pvt., Co. C, 4411 E. First St., Los 

Angeles, California 
Stoekos, Nick, Pvt., Co. H, 2440 Folsom St., San Francisco, 

California 
Stoffel, Paul J., Pvt., Co. A, Mascoucah, Illinois 
Stokke, Alfred, Cpl., Hq. Co., 3004 10th Ave., S., Seattle, 

Washington 
Stolting, Ralph H., Sgt., Hq. Co., 412 23rd Ave., Seattle, 

Washington 
Stone, Ernest H., Pvt., Hq. Co., Almo, Idaho 
Stone, Vern F., Pvt., Hq. Co., 3801 Telegraph Ave., Oak- 
land, California 
Stotz, John, Pvt., Co. A, Box 25, Armour, South Dakota 
Souder, Calvin F., Sgt., Co. G, R. F. D. No. 1, Box 98, 

Sabastapol, California 
Stover, Luther S., Pvt., Co. H, Bishop St., Bellefonte, 

Pennsylvania 
Straabe, Gilbert, Pvt., Co. D, Devon, Montana 
Strachan, Thomas M., Pvt., Co. K, 518 Clinton Ave., 

Detroit, Michigan 
Stracner, Elbert, Pvt., Co. K, Cleveland, Arkansas 
Strand, Reuben L., Cpl., Co. C, Clipper, Washington 
Stransberg, Gustav E., Pvt., Co. B, 413 Birch St., Ana- 
conda, Montana 
Strandrud, Halvor, Cpl., Co. A, 1515 W. 51st St., Seattle, 

Washington 
Streeter, Charles H., Cook, Co. F, R. F. D. No. 1, Bow, 

Washington 
Streitwieser, Louie, Cpl., Co. B, 4230 20th Ave., S., 

Minneapolis, Minnesota 
Strickler, Ernest W., Pvt., Co. A, 399 Keyes St., San 

Jose, California 
Strole, Ray D., Pvt., Co. G, 1492 W. 26th St., Los Angeles, 

California 
Strong, Leo S., Pvt., Co. C, Garden Grove, California 
Stroup, Roderic V., Pvt., M. G. Co., R. F. D. No. 3, 

Cheney, Washington 
Struck, Arthur L., Pvt., Co. C, 1020 Warren St., Daven- 
port, Iowa 
Stuckey, Albert D., Pvt., Co. G, 106 Paul St., Coffeyville, 

Kansas 
Stufflebeam, Edward, Pvt., Co. M, R. R. No. 2, Nelson- 

ville, Ohio 
Subia, Enos, Sgt., Co. G, Hollister, California 
Sudhoff, Henry A., Pvt., Co. C, R. F. D. No. 1, Elk, 

Washington 
Succa, Mike, Pvt., Co. A, 6th & Madison St., Seattle, 

Washington 
Sullenger, Edmond R., Cpl., Co. L, 509 Bank of Italy, 

Fresno, California 
Sullivan, William H., Pvt., Co. E, Vancouver, Washington 
Sund, Leonard E„ Wagoner, Sup. Co., 313 Fairview Ave., 

Seattle, Washington 
Sunt, Axel, Pvt., Co. E, R. F. D. No. 1, Box 78, Kent, 

Washington 



272 



Sunzeri, Toney, Pvt., Co. B, 1018 Lucas St., San Jose, 

California 
Sutherland, Cecil W., Pvt., Co. K, Edson, Canada 
Sutton, George F., Pvt., Co. A, Austin, Minnesota 
Sutton, James C, Pvt., Co. M, Arco, Idaho 
Swafford, Henry K., Pvt., Hq. Co., 1210^ 2nd Ave., 

Seattle, Washington 
Swanberg, Enoch E., Cpl., Co. B, R. F. D. No. 3, Mt. 

Vernon, Washington 
Swanson, Albert, Pvt., Med. Det., Staplehurst, Nebraska 
Swanson, Albert J., Pvt., Co. G, Rib Lake, Wisconsin 
Swanson, Arthur N., Sup. Sgt., Sup. Co., Castle Rock, 

Washington 
Swanson, Carl A., Pvt., Co. L, R. F. D. No. 1, Box 316, 

Turlock, California 
Swanson, Carl M., Pvt., Co. B, 1712 N. Albany Ave., 

Chicago, Illinois 
Swanson, Charles G., Pvt., Co. D, Monroe, Washington 
Swanson, Herbert B., Pvt., Med. Det., R. F. D. No. 5, 

Box 56, Morrison, Illinois 
Swanson, Herbert G., Pvt., Co. C, R. F. D., Box 34, 

Parlier, California 
Swarts, Thadeus A., Sgt., Co. F, Wichita Falls, Texas 
Sweat, Jack, 2nd Lt., Co. F, Dutton, Montana 
Sweeney, Mike C, Pvt., Co. K, 318 Grand Ave., Tumway, 

Iowa 
Sweet, Andrew, Pvt., Co. K, Aptos, California 
Swift, Floyd, Pvt., M. G. Co., Eddinburg, Illinois 
Swinger, Oscar L., Pvt., Co. L, Morrisonville, Illinois 
Sydenstricker, Lonnie, Pvt., Co. A, 1117 Clark St., Le 

Mars, Iowa 
Sykes, Frank D., Pvt., Co. B, La Belle, Missouri 
Tabert, Otto, Pvt., Co. K, Munich, North Dakota 
Tfil, Paul, Pvt., Co. G, 600 Courtlandt St., Perth Amboy, 

New Jersey 
Tait, Lawrence O., Pvt., Co. B, R. F. D. No. 5, Peru, In- 
diana 
Talbot, Henry- L., Pvt., Co. K, Preston, Idaho 
Tampanes, Panagiotis A., Pvt., Co. H, San Francisco, 

California 
Tank, Arthur E., Cpl., Co. A, 1056 11th St., Milwaukee, 

Wisconsin 
Tanner, Maynard C, Pvt., Co. A, Brookland, Penn- 
sylvania 
Tannler, John, Pvt., Co. L, Hillsdale, Oregon 
Tapia, Enrique, Sgt., Co. D, Box 114, R. F. D., San Fer- 
nando, California 
Taralla, John, Pvt., Co. I, Aglie, Terino, Italy 
Tarlson, George, Cpl., Co. B, Box 1035, Paulsbo, Wash- 
ington 
Tarpley, Boston, Pvt., Co. H, 5916 Woodlawn Ave., Los 

Angeles, California 
Tasoni, Ernest J., Pvt., Co. E, R. F. D. No. 2, Box 6, Kent, 

Washington 
Tate, Robert R., Pvt., Co. H, 2908 Western Ave., Seattle, 

Washington 
Tatum, Roscoe I., Pvt., Co. H, 705 Bacon Road, Richmond, 

Virginia 
Tavelli, Augustine J., Pvt., Co. E, Cape Horn, Washington 
Taylor, Elbert M., Pvt., Co. M, Blythville, Arkansas 
Taylor, Ernest, Pvt., Co. K, Jacksonville, Ohio 
Taylor, Herman, Pvt., Co. K, Jacksonville, Ohio 
Taylor, Herman M., Pvt., Co. F, Centerville, Mississipp 
Taylor, Jud B., Sgt., Co. E, Morgantown, North Carolina 
Taylor, Samuel L., Cpl., Co. H, 7014 25th Ave., N. W., 

Seattle, Washington 
Taylor, Stuart, Cook, Co. F, Ocean Park, Washington 
Taylor, Wilbur L., Jr., Pvt., Co. G, 316 Andover St., 

Lawrence, Massachusetts 
Teats, Foster L., Pvt., Hq. Co., 910 Leekbourne Ave., 

Columbus, Ohio 
Tedwell, Oscar, Pvt., Hq. Co., 947 Francisco St., Los 

Angeles, California 
Templeton, Leroy E., Pvt., Hq. Co., 2514 E. Union, 

Seattle, Washington 
Tentes, Peter, Pvt., Co. H, Clifton, Oregon 
Terranello, Angelo, Pvt., Co. M, 413 Cherry St., Kansas 

City, Missouri 
Terrazone, Tony J., Pvt., Co. H, 1672 Glen Ave., Pasa- 
dena, California 
Thanos, John E., Pvt., Co. D, Long Beach, Washington 
Tharp, Howard, Pvt., Co. A, Senora, Kentucky 
Thaut, Heinrich, Pvt., Sup. Co., Ritzville, Washington 
Theobald, Carl G., Cpl., Co. D, Desert, Utah 
Therlwell, Walter, Pvt., Co. B, 2828 24th St., San Fran- 
cisco, California 
Theubet, Frederick P., Cook, Co. K, 1906 James St., 
» Bellingham, Washington 



Thiemens, Herman C, Pvt., M. G. Co., Espanola, Wash- 
ington 
Thomas, Althe, Cpl., Hq. Co., Davenport, Washington 
Thomas, Charles A., Sgt., Co. E, 837 5th Ave., E., Cedar 

Rapids, Iowa 
Thomas, David, Pvt., Co. F, Montrose, Colorado 
Thomas, George A., Pvt., Co. M, Thorp, Washington 
Thomas, George J., Pvt., Co. I, 834 Anthony St., Berkeley, 

California 
Thomas, Peter, Cook, Co. L, R. F. D. No. 1, Malad City, 

Idaho 
Thomas, Ray, Cpl., Co. L, R. F. D. No. 4, West, Mississippi 
Thomas, Rolla W., Pvt., Hq. Co., Urbana, Missouri 
Thomas, Rudolph G., Bugler, Co. D, 1042 Everett PI., 

Los Angeles, California 
Thomas, William A., Pvt., Hq. Co., Urbana, Missouri 
Thomason, Clifford E., Pvt., Hq. Co., 440 W. Washington 

St., Paris, Illinois 
Thome, Clarence C, Pvt., Co. L, Carey, Ohio 
Thompson, Archard J., Musician, Hq. Co., Montesano, 

Washington 
Thompson, Clarence, Pvt., M. G. Co., Cabin Creek 

Junction, West Virginia 
Thompson, Edgar W., Pvt., Co. K, R. F. D. No. 1, Jackson- 
ville, Ohio 
Thompson, Frank S., Pvt., Co. I, R. F. D. No. 2, Spring- 
field, Kentucky 
Thompson, Roy A., Cpl., Co. G, New Rockford, North 

Dakota 
Thompson, Sven, Cpl., Co. G, R. F. D. No. 2, Nez Perce, 

Idaho 
Thompson, Taylor, Pvt., Co. F, 739 E. 4th St., Chillicothe, 

Ohio 
Thompson, Walter, Pvt., Co. B, 519 Kirkham St., San 

Francisco, California 
Thompson, Walter D., Pvt., Co. K, R. F. D. No. 3, Porters- 

ville, California 
Thomsen, Thomas K., Mechanic, Co. G, 613 45th St., W., 

Seattle, Washington 
Thorf, Abraham M., Sgt., Co. B, Rexburg, Idaho 
Thorkelson, Joseph T., Cpl., M. G. Co., 3208 N. 44th St., 

Seattle, Washington 
Thornton, George A., Pvt., Hq. Co., 673 E. 11th Ave., 

Columbus, Ohio 
Thornton, Nathan A., Pvt., Co. L, Burley, Idaho 
Thrasher, James G., Cpl., Co. L, Poyner, Texas 
Thurman, Elbert R., Sgt., Co. K, Hayward, California 
Thurow, Otto F., Cpl., Hq. Co., 2018 9th Ave., Seattle, 

Washington 
Tibbals, Mirton L., Cpl., Co. H, 333 Solo St., Santa Bar- 
bara, California 
Tilsinski, Alex, Pvt., Co. D, Ivanhoe, Minnesota 
Tillett, George W., Sgt., Co. C, 257 W. 21st St., Ogden, 

Utah 
Timm, John P., Pvt., Co. C, R. F. D. No. 1, Hartline, Wash- 
ington 
Tippie, Edward, Pvt., Co. L, Postine, Ohio 
Tjpps, William B., Pvt., Co. G, 429 Ruth St., Glendale, 

California 
Tipton, Clarence, Pvt., Co. M, R. F. D. No. 3, Nelsonville, 

Ohio 
Tipton, Joseph, Wagoner, Sup. Co., Crane, Oregon 
Titus, Ralph, Pvt., Co. G, 9047 4th Ave., S., Seattle, Wash- 
ington 
Toepel, Leo J., Pvt., Co. L, 508 W. 24th Ave., S. E., Spo- 
kane, Washington 
Tofton, Michel, Pvt., Co. M, Sweet Grass, Montana 
Tolleshaug, Michael K., Pvt., Co. C, Rainier, Orgegon 
Tolliver, Roy R., Pvt., Co. B, 101 S. 13th St., Terre Haute, 

Indiana 
Toland, Riley E., Pvt., Co. M, Crooksville, Ohio 
Tomany, Otto T., Sgt., Co. C, Morton, Washington 
Tomlinson, Denny C, Pvt., Co. C, Adelphi, Ohio 
Tomlin, Benjamin M., Pvt., Co. D, R. F. D. No. 1, Payette, 

Idaho 
Tomlin, James E., Pvt., Co. D, R. F. D. No. 1, Payette, 

Idaho 
Tonda, Henry, Horseshoer, Sup. Co., Box 412, Black Dia- 
mond, Washington 
Tone, Owen R., Cpl., Co. A, Spring Grove, Minnesota 
Toney, Charles O., Pvt., Co. C, Joseph, Oregon 
Toole, Joseph H., Pvt., Co. A, 940 Utah Ave., Butte, 

Montana 
Toomer, Clifford H., Mach., Co. D, Montpelier, Idaho 
Toops, Harry M., Pvt., Co. C, Denver, Colorado 
Torell, Albert E., Pvt., Co. A, 2426 Broadway, Everett, 

Washington 
Torres, Manuel P., Pvt., Co. D, Columbia Cafe, 22nd 
and 7th Ave., Ibor City, Tampa, Florida 



273 



Torrey, Carl E., Pvt., Co. L, R. F. D. No. 2, Ashley, Ohio 
Torstenson, Irving N., Sup. Sgt., Co. H, Sawyer, Wis- 
consin 
Toughill, Hugh, Pvt., Co. L, 73 William St., Newark, 

New Jersey 
Touvell, Edward J., Cpl., Co. C, 409 Silver Cliff, Cam- 
bridge, Ohio 
Towey, George S., Pvt., M. G. Co., 1009 Wall St., Hillyard, 

Washington 
Toy, Ah, Cook, Sup. Co., 1511J/6 4th Ave., Seattle, Wash- 
ington 
Trainer, Floyd, Pvt., Co. E, R. F. D. No. 1, Box 42, 

Zaleski, Ohio 
Trayssac, Emil A., Pvt., Co. G, Drawer 1000, Whittier, 

California 
Treibel, Albert H., Cook, Co. G, 2606 Rockefeller Ave., 

Everett, Washington 
Treide, William P., Cpl., Co. G, 1716 Electric Ave., S., 

Pasadena, California 
Tribbey, Maurice A., Pvt., Co. G, 255 Bay View Drive, 

Long Beach, California 
Triebwasser, Christ H., Mechanic, Co. K, R. F. D. No. 2, 

Odessa, Washington 
Triola, Frank, Mus., Hq. Co., 839 Gladys Ave., Los An- 
geles, California 
Francisco, Trouchet, Captain, Co. M, Hammond, Oregon 
Trout, John G., Pvt., Co. E, 1023 B St., San Bernardino, 

California 
Troxer, Shad, Pvt., Co. L, Maynardville, Tennessee 
Truax, Ira B., Pvt., Co. E, Farmer City, Illinois 
Truman, Ralph W., Pvt., Co. C, 1320 Maiden Lane, West 

Springfield, Ohio 
Trusty, Frank, Pvt., Co. F, Salyerville, Kentucky 
Tschirly, William C, Saddler, M. G. Co., R. F. D. No. 1, 

Greenacres, Washington 
Tucker, Elmer, Sgt., Med. Det., Weston, Oregon 
Tucker, Elmer E., Pvt., Co. M, 2210 Salvador St., Cincin- 
nati, Ohio 
Tucker, Floyd C, Pvt., Co. I, Red House, West Virginia 
Tucker, William G., Pvt., Hq. Co., Roundup, Montana 
Tudor, Sollie, Pvt., Co. C, Nicholasville, Kentucky 
Tuma, John, Pvt., Co. A, Ledgerwood, North Dakota 
Turk, Frank T., Pvt., M. G. Co., 708 Hutton Bldg., Spo- 

Turnbull, Lester, Sgt., M. G. Co., 1766 Alki Ave., Seattle, 

Washington 
Turner, Clarence E., Pvt., Co. H, Alaho, Washington 
Turner, Frank, Pvt., Co. B, 132 Broadway, N., Seattle, 

Washington 
Turner, Hobart A., Pvt., Co. C, Munson Station, Penn- 
sylvania 
Turner, Leslie M., Pvt., Co. C, 824 Wells Ave., N. W., 

Canton, Ohio 
Turner, Nathaniel S., Pvt., Co. A, R. F. D. No. 9, Craw- 

fordsville, Indiana 
Turner, Reginald J., Pvt., Co. I, Gen. Del., Minneapolis, 

Minnesota 
Turner, Robert W., Pvt., Co. C, Riverton, Utah 
Turner, William E., Pvt., Co. K, Beach, Mississippi 
Truney, Raymond, Pvt., Co. C, Kittaning, Pennsylvania 
Turpie, Charles, Pvt., Co. D, Washougal, Washington 
Tuttle, Hiram, Mechanic, Co. K, Beach, Washington 
Tyan, Abe, Pvt., Co. D, 201 W. 56th St., Los Angeles, Cal- 
ifornia 
Tyson, Elmer E., Pvt., M. G. Co., E. 524 9th Ave., Spokane, 
Washington 

Ubaud, Adrien J., Pvt., 1 cl., Co. B, 813 Howard St., Los 

Angeles, California 
Umholtz, Elmer H., Pvt., Co. C, Hot Springs, Montana 
Ungerbuhler, Joseph A., Pvt., Co. A, 1616 Sycamore St., 

Cincinnati, Ohio 
Ungerecht, Roy E., Pvt., Co. C, Cannelton, Indiana 
Uren, George H., Pvt., Co. D, 422 Kate Hays St., Grass 

Valley, California 
Unzleman, Manton P., Pvt., Co. M, R. F. D. No. 3, Sno- 
homish, Washington 
Vaatenan, Herman, Pvt., Hq. Co., 302 S. Main St., Butte, 

Montana 
Vail, Walter E., Pvt., Co. B, Port Angeles, Washington 
Valencia, Frank C, Wagoner, Sup. Co., 314 Webster St., 

Monterey, California 
Valentine, Edward A., 1st Lt., Co. L, Board of Trade 

Bldg., Portland, Oregon 
Valerio, Vito, Pvt., Co. L, 919 Second St. Hoquiam, 

Washington 
Valpianni, Raffaele, Pvt., Co. G, Firwood, Oregon 
Van Borg, Louis F., Pvt., Co. D, 3552 S. Tyler St., Ta- 

coma, Washington 



Vandanski, Charles, Pvt., Co. E, Socman Ave., Scranton, 
Pennsylvania 

Van Denburg, Chester A., Pvt., Co. K, Cottage Grove, 
Oregon 

Van Horn, Clifford, Pvt., Co. I, R. F. D. No. 9, Green 
Bay, Wisconsin 

Van Houten, Lance F., Cook, Co. H, 434 E. 49th St., 
Los Angeles, California 

Vasko, John, Pvt., Co. L, Box 101, Gloucester, Ohio 

Vaughan, Elbert G., Pvt., Co. E, Eldon, Missouri 

Veinfurt, Edward J., Pvt., Co. L, 2852 Cherokee St., St. 
Louis, Missouri 

Velin, Arthur W., Pvt., Co. C, Boras, Sweden 

Venitz, Rudolph, Sgt., Co. B, 924 N. Hamilton Ave., 
Indianapolis, Indiana 

Vercota, Frank J., Pvt., Co. I, 1145 E. 147th St., Los An- 
geles, California 

Verduco, Michael, Pvt., Co. I, Los Angeles, California 

Verrue, Elmer R., Sgt., Hq. Co., R. F. D. No. 1, Box 155, 
Pasadena, California 

Vest, John W., Pvt., Co. I, R. F. D. No. 10, Chillicothe, 
Ohio 

Vetter, Charles E., Musician, Hq. Co., Box 682, Sunny- 
side, Washington 

Via, Carlo, Pvt., Hq. Co., Harrington, Nevada 

Vigue, Frank, Pvt., Co. D, Westmond, Idaho 

Vincent, Ray R., 1st Lt., Co. C, 6th Ave. and Willow St., 
Yakima, Washington 

Vintin, Eugene, Sgt., Co. G, Grass Valley, Oregon 

Vittoni, Peter J., Cpl., Co. M, Gen. Del., Seattle, Wash- 
ington 

Vitullo, Joseph A., Pvt., Co. L, Commonwealth Bldg., 
Denver, Colorado 

Vivian, Gordon, Pvt., Co. H, 130 S. Flower St., Los An- 
geles, California 

Vogel, Raymond G., Sgt., Co. C, 4616 Sunset Bldg., Los 
Angeles, California _ 

Vogt, Martin O., Col. Sgt., Hq. Co., R. F. D. No. 2, Dun- 
das, Illinois 

Voisin, James E., Pvt., Co. E, Jewett, Texas 

Volz, Fred N., Pvt., Co. M, 958 Philadelphia St., Coving- 
ton, Kentucky 

Voorhees, William H., Pvt., Co. A, Merrill, Iowa 

Vopni, Egill, Pvt., Co. L, 2107 28th Ave., W., Seattle, 
Washington 

Voris, Ben H., Pvt., Co. G, R. F. D. No. 1, Buffalo, Mis- 
souri 

Wachsmuth, Albert L., Cpl., Co. K, Springfield, Oregon 

Waddell, Rolla S., Bugler, Co. F, Chesterfield, Idaho 

Wade, Edward De Vin, Pvt., Co. E, 2201 S. Clinton St., 
Morningside, Sioux City, Iowa 

Wade, James H., Pvt., M. G. Co., Price, Utah 

Wade, James M., Pvt., Co. B, 906 E. 5th St., Dayton, 
Ohio 

Wagner, Clarence, Pvt., Co. C, R. F. D. No. 5, Anaheim, 
California 

Wagner, George W., Wagoner, Sup. Co., New Oxford, 
Pennsylvania 

Wagner, Louis A., Pvt., Co. A, 1890 New St., Columbus, 
Ohio 

Wahsaquom, Alexander, Pvt., Co. H, North Port, Michi- 
gan 

Waite, Floyd, Pvt., Co. F, R. F. D. No. 1, Ora, Indiana 

Walden, Daniel R., Pvt., Co. L, 1800 D. St., Bellingham, 
Washington 

Waldvogel, Arthur J., Pvt., Co. F, 1037 Dorr St., Toledo, 
Ohio 

Walker, Archie, Pvt., Co. K, 1709 California St., Everett, 
Washington 

Walker, Elmer F., Pvt., Co. E, Tumwater, Washington 

Walker, Lawrence G., Pvt., Co. A, Grand Ledge, Michi- 
gan 

Walker, Loyd, Cpl., Co. F, Emmet, Idaho 

Walker, Sidney A., Pvt., Co. K, Gold Beach, Ore. 

Walker, William A., Pvt., Co. G, R. F. D. No. 4, Box 41, 
Loogootee, Indiana 

Walkup, William F., Cpl., Co. G, Burns, Harney Co., 
Oregon 

Wall, Warren C, Pvt., Co. H, 445 E. 28th St., Los Angeles, 
California 

Wallace, E <win M., Wagoner, Sup. Co., 5233 47th Ave., S.-, 
Seattle, Washington 

Wallace, Joseph A., Cpl., Co. H, R. F. D. No. 2, Battle- 
ground, Washington 

Wallace, Stanley J., Cpl., Co. K, 1031 N. Vine St., Ke- 
wanee, Illinois 

Wallenten, John, Pvt., Co. B, Wishek, North Dakota 

Waller, Osie, Pvt., Co. B, Anna, Illinois 



274 



Wallick, Albert M., Musician, Hq. Co., 3943 Ferdinand 

St., Seattle, Washington 
Walls, James G., Cpl., Co. M, 694 E. 20th St., Portland, 

Oregon 
Walp, Carl T., Mechanic, Hq. Co., Berrydale Ranch, 

Okonagan Center, B. C. 
Walrath, Weston W., Pvt., Hq. Co., Olympia, Washington 
Walsh, Edward P., Pvt., Co. L, 1868 Church St., San 

Francisco, California 
Walston, Ray E., Cpl., Co. H, Monroe Hall, Cheney, 

Washington 
Walt, Raymond C, Pvt., Co. C 
Walters, Perry R., Pvt., Co. C, R. F. D. No. 1, Mark 

Center, Ohio 
Walters, William, Cpl., Co. I, Congo, Ohio 
Wanke, Erwin J., Pvt., Co. C, Edgely, North Dakota 
Ward, Frank, Pvt., Hq. Co., 2141 Rice St., Cincinnati, Ohio 
Ward, Frank J., Pvt., Co. L, 642 44th St., Oakland, Cali- 
fornia 
Ward, Joe B., Pvt., Co. B, Tiger, Washington 
Ward, William B., Pvt., Co. C, 969 Vernon Ave., Portland, 

Oregon 
Wares, Harry A., Sgt., Co. A, 541 Temple Place, Seattle, 

Washington 
Warbdrton, George, Pvt., Co. G, Coalville, Utah 
Warringholz, Carl H., Pvt., Co. E, 419 9th Ave., San 

Francisco, California 
Washburn, Joseph E., Pvt., Co. I, 617 W. Spring St., New 

Albany, Indiana 
Wassell, Fay E., Cpl., Co. E, Clay Center, Nebraska 
Waters, Elmer J., Pvt., Hq. Co., 817 7th Ave., N., Seattle, 

Washington 
Waterstradt, William, Pvt., Co. F, Detroit, Kansas 
Watkins, Edgar E., Mechanic, Co. C, Bayville, Oregon 
Watkins, Edward, Pvt., Co. E, Pleasant City, Ohio 
Watkins, Oswald A., Pvt., Co. A, Foston, Montana 
Watson, Earl, Pvt., Co. L, Sumas, Washington 
Watson, Harvey C, Sgt., M. G. Co., Loris, South Carolina 
Watson, Henry A., Pvt., M. G. Co., 1901 Wilson St., Falls 

City, Nebraska 
Waugh, Fred J., Pvt., Co. H, Mill Point, West Virginia 
Waugh, James, Cpl., Co. K, 603 Velmer St., Vincennes, 

Indiana 
Weatherby, William, Cpl., Co. K, R. F. D. No. 1, Sumas, 

Washington 
Wethers, Everett, Mess Sgt., Co. F, 201 7th St., Raymond, 

Washington 
Weaver, Stonewall J., Pvt., Hq. Co., 619 2nd Ave., S., 

Nashville, Tennessee 
Webb, William N., Pvt., Co. B, R. F. D. No. 1, Heber City, 

Utah 
Weber, Jacob N., Pvt., Ord. Corps, 629 Chase Ave., Walla 

Walla, Washington 
Weber, John, Pvt., Co. H, 761 E. 14th St., N., Portland, 

Oregon 
Wegrich, Alphonso F., Pvt., Hq. Co., 1905 Filbert St., 

Oakland, California 
Wehrman, Joseph A., Pvt., Co. E, R. F. D. No. 2, Minster, 

Ohio 
Weigle, Lee H., Musician, Hq. Co., Shannon, Illinois 
Weimer, Richard S., Bugler, Co. A, Rockford, Pennsyl- 
vania 
Weir, Harry T., Musician, Hq. Co., Rosebank, Staten 

Island, New York 
Weiss, Carl O., Pvt., Co. I, 709 Main St., Olympia, Wash- 
ington 
Weiss, Edward, Pvt., Co. H, 1020 59th St., Oakland, Cali- 
fornia 
Welch, Percival, Cpl., Co. B, Thornloe, Ontario, Canada 
Welde, Virden C, Cpl., Co. H, 169 Park Ave., San Jose, 

California 
Wellbaum, Henry, Pvt., Co. G, 340 E. Court St., Sidney, 

Ohio 
Welling, Robert H., Pvt., Co. H, State Road, Vanderbilt, 

Pennsylvania 
Wells, Shalmer W., Sgt., Co. F, 225 37th St., N., Seattle, 

Washington 
Wells, James G., Cpl., Co. H, 517 S. 2nd St., Laramie, 

Wyoming 
Wenner, Harold F., Pvt., Hq. Co., Okanogan, Washington 
Wentland, Alex, Pvt., Co. K, St. Anthony Falls, Idaho 
Werk, Herman C, Pvt., CI. F, 1720 Kirkwood Ave., Pasa- 
dena, California 
West, Louis, Pvt., Co. G, Johannesberg, California 
Westad, Hans T., Cpl., Co. A, Mt. Vernon, Washington 
Westberg, Gustav H., Pvt., Co. G, Starbuck, Minnesota 
Westenpeld, Walter H., Pvt., Co. D, 516 Wagner St., 

Ft. Wayne, Indiana 



Westerfield, Edward, Pvt., Co. H, 30 Goodwin St., Dar- 

roncator, Pennsylvania 
Westover, Wilfred W., Pvt., Hq. Co., R. F. D. No. 3, 

Box 32, Olympia, Washington 
Weyer, Aaren M., Pvt., Co. M, Cunningham, Washington 
Wheaton, Therold, Sgt., Co. B, Lorenzo, Idaho 
Wheelhouse, Clifton Y., Cpl., Co. G, Owensville, Indiana 
Whitcomb, Emery W., Pvt., Co. M, 7749 17th Ave., Seattle, 

Washington 
Whitcraft, William H., Pvt., Co. L, 1306 Avenue A, 

Flint, Michigan 
White, Charles A., Pvt., M. G. Co., Pleasant Hill, Illinois 
White, Charles P., Pvt., Co. D, 2516 E. 21st St., Oakland, 

California 
White, Fenton F., Pvt., Co. K, 150 Los Olivos Ave., Daly 

City, California 
White, Joseph H., Pvt., Co. C, 543 Dewey Ave., Cambridge, 

Ohio 
White, Rollie E., Pvt., Co. G, Newport, Nebraska 
White, William, Pvt., Co. B, New Straitsville, Ohio 
White, William H., Pvt., Co. K, R. F. D. No. 1, Boise, 

Idaho 
Whitlock, Oath W, Pvt., Co. F, Mt. Sterling, Ohio 
Whitman, William C, Pvt., Co. G, R. F. D. No. 6, Neosha, 

Missouri 
Whitney, Jack W., Cpl., Co. F, 1448 W. Folk St., Chicago, 

Illinois 
Whitney, Ralph H., Bugler, Co. E, 2340 45th Ave., S. W., 

Seattle, Washington 
Whitney, Wellman W., Cpl., Co. A, Sequim, Washington 
Whitthorne, Clinton, Sgt., Co. D, Columbia, Tennessee 
Wickersheim, Earnest J., Pvt., 1 CI., Co. E, Orange, 

California 
Wicker, Richard V., Pvt., M. G. Co., "The Mornings," 

Marion, Massachusetts 
Widgeon, William E., Bugler, Co. H, 614 W. Linden Ave., 

Logansport, Indiana 
Wieland, George, Pvt., Co. K, 2330 Gladstone Ave., Cin- 

innati, Ohio 
Wies, Joseph W., Co. D, Pvt., Seneca, South Dakota 
Wiese, John B., Pvt., Co. A, R. F. D. No. 4, Blackfoot, 

Idaho 
Wight, Howard M., Sup. Sgt., Co. I, Corvallis, Oregon 
Wilcox, Eddie L., Pvt., Co. G, Sauk Center, Minnesota 
Wilcox, Lawrence R., Pvt., Co. L, Bridgewater, South 

Dakota 
Wilder, Roscoe, Sgt., Co. F, R. F. D. No. 5, Winslow, 

Indiana 
Wildung, William F., Pvt., Co. F, 103 E. 14th St., Pitts- 
burg, Kansas 
Wilfong, Hugh A., Pvt., Co. M, Orefino, Idaho 
Wilkins, Jesse T., 1st Lt., Co. H, Ehprata, Washington 
Wilkinson, Ralph, Pvt., Co. H, 1504 Mollon St., Spokane, 

Washington 
Wilkinson, Thomas B., Pvt., Co. F, Newman, Georgia 
Willenborg, Louis, Pvt., M. G. Co., R. F. D. No. 2, Sigel, 

Illinois 
Willey, Jess J., Pvt., Hq. Co., Box 517, Dewey Ave., Baker, 

Oregon 
Willey, Lewis E., Pvt., Co. F, Thornton, Washington 
Williams, Bernard U., Sgt., Co. L, Batchtown, Illinois 
Williams, Charles E., Pvt., Hq. Co., 817 Division St., 

Kellogg, Idaho 
Williams, Clarence H., Musician, Hq. Co., Republic, 

Washington 
Williams, Edward, Pvt., Co. M, Tulalip, Indian Rev., 

Marysville, Washington 
Williams, Edward H., Pvt., Sup. Co., 1124 W. 50th St., 

Los Angeles, California 
Williams, Floyd T., Sgt., Co. L, Turner Station, Kentucky 
Williams, Harry, Pvt., Hq. Co., 939 Davis PL, Seattle, 

Washington 
Williams, Herbert J., Pvt., Hq. Co., 357 West Ave., Los 

Angeles, California 
Williams, Horace P., Pvt., Co. C, 1646 Berendo St., Los 

Angeles, California 
Williams, Otis W., Pvt., Co. M, R. F. D. No. 1, Hickman, 

Kentucky 
Williams, Ray V., Pvt., Co. L, Salem, Indiana 
Williams, Robert E., Pvt., Co. D, Chase City, Virginia 
Williams, Robert E., Pvt., Co. M, 1233 Elsimore Ave., 

Cincinnati, Ohio 
Williams, T. Henry, Cpl., Co. G, Prescott, Oregon 
Williamson, Laurence, Pvt., M. G. Co., 102 Brooklyn St., 

North Adams, Massachusetts 
Willie, John H., Wagoner, Sup. Co., Robe, Washington 
Willis, Kenneth C, Pvt., Co. M, 1961 Harrington Ave., 

Oakland, California 
Willis, Meredith E., Pvt., Co. C, Brawley, California 
Willmorth, John A., Pvt., Co. G, Twist, Washington 



275 



Wills, Ira, Cpl., Co. K, 102 E St., Santa Rosa, California 
Wills, Laurence, Pvt., Co. H, 712 2nd Ave., N., Fargo, 

North Dakota 
Wilmer, Frank J., Pvt., Co. H, West Port, Indiana 
Wilson, Albert, Wagoner, Sup. Co., 522 12th Ave., S., 

Seattle, Washington 
Wilson, Albert G., Cook, Co. H, 719 S. Olive St., Los 

Angeles, California 
Wilson, Alfred B., Pvt., Co. H, Lampasas, Texas 
Wilson, Archie C, Pvt., Co. B, Dayton, Wyoming 
Wilson, Carl, Pvt., Co. G, R. F. D. No. 1, Williamsport, 

Ohio 
Wilson, Louie L., Cpl., Co. A, Burlington, Washington 
Wilson, Noah B., Pvt., Co. A, Whitesburg, Georgia 
Wilson, Sidney H., Bank Cpl., Hq. Co., Wapinitia, Oregon 
Wilson, Stacy A., Wagoner, Sup. Co., Rufus, Oregon 
Wilson, Walter, Cook, Co. D, Bend, Oregon 
Wilson, William G., Pvt., Co. C, 1436 Sunset Ave., Utica, 

New York 
Windell, Carl L., Wagoner, Sup. Co., 231 6th Ave., N., 

Seattle, Washington 
Wing, Wong, Pvt., Co. C, Milwaukie Hotel, Seattle, Wash- 
ington 
Winland, John C, Pvt., Co. C, Lewisville, Ohio 
Winningham, Robert E., Sgt., Co. F, Watkins, Oregon 
Winter, Edward H., Pvt., Co. L, Bryant, Washington 
Winter, Everett B., Cook, Co. B, Dell Rapids, South 

Dakota 
Winters, Emmett, Pvt., Co. D, R. F. D. No. 2, Box 115, 

Greenup, Illinois 
Wintjen, Harry H., Pvt., Co. B, 4834 Indiana Ave., Chi- 
cago, Illinois 
Wish, Paul J., Pvt., Co. H, 2 Railroad St., Upper Lehigh, 

Pennsylvania 
Wilson, Robert, Pvt., Co. I, Ionia, Kentucky 
Wistrand, Oscar, Pvt., Co. L, R. F. D. No. 1, Box 114, 

Paulsbo, Washington 
Witte, Irving C, Pvt., Co. F, 922 Eklund Ave., Hoquiam, 

Washington 
Wohlhueter, Earl M., Pvt., Co. L, Fairmont, Minnesota 
Wolbert, Clarence L., Pvt., Co. C, 705 N. 4th St., Ironton, 

Ohio 
Wold, Harold, Pvt., M. G. Co., 1640 E. Wabash Ave., 

Spokane, Washington 
Wold, Helmar I., Cook, Co. I, 3575 E. T St., Tacoma, 

Washington 
Wold, Sigurd A., Pvt., Co. M, 506 E. 1st St., Aberdeen, 

Washington 
Wolf, Archie D., Pvt., Co. K, Weiser, Idaho 
Wollman, Joseph J., Pvt., Co. F, 546 Prindle St., Chehalis, 

Washington 
Wolsborn, John H., Pvt., Hq. Co., Ritzville, Washington 
Wolz, George, Cook, Co. G, 715 W. 170 St., New York City, 

New York 
Wood, Frank E., Pvt., Co. K, Poston, Ohio 
Wood, Hahry E., Sup. Sgt., Sup. Co., 4712 70th St., S. E., 

Portland, Oregon 
Wood, Hillie R., Cpl., Co. M, 3541 Marmion Way, Los 

Angeles, California 
Wood, Ralph W. E., Wagoner, Sup. Co., Waldon Island, 

Washington 
Woodhouse, Thomas J., Sgt., Co. A, 1116 Market St., 

Seattle, Washington 
Woods, Alfred, Pvt., Co. F, Bison, South Dakota 
Woods, Ira C, Pvt., Co. L, Zaleski, Ohio 
Woods, John H., Sgt., Hq. Co., 2910 Truse Ave., Kansas 

City, Missouri 
Woodworth, Thomas W., Pvt., Co. D, R. F. D. No. 2, 

Boise, Idaho 
Woodyard, Robert, 1st Lt., Co. I, Sunnyside, Washington 
Worley, Dale O., Pvt., Co. H, 1435 Kirkwood Ave., Pasa- 
dena, California 
Worth, Dewey F., Pvt., Co. G, Lake Wells, Florida 
Wright, Alfred H., Pvt., Co. H, 1822 Sacramento St., 

San Francisco, California 
Wright, Charles T., 2nd Lt., Co. H, Box 80, Kingston, 

Massachusetts 



Wright, Claude M., Pvt., Co. H, 8453 Kingston Rd., Los 
Angeles, California 

Wright, George E., Sgt., Co. F, Seaview, Washington 

Wright, Howard F., Pvt., Co. K, 120 E. 3rd St., N., Platte, 
Nebraska 

Wright, Noah, Pvt., Co. H, Bayard, Ohio 

Wright, Roy, Sgt., Co. I, R. F. D. No. 1, Nelsonville, Ohio 

Wuestefeld, George, Pvt., Hq. Co., 40 Hofi St., San Fran- 
cisco, California 

Wulfekuhle, John C, Pvt., Co. D, 116 Ramsey St., Cin- 
cinnati, Ohio 

Wuller, Joseph, Pvt., Co. D, 905 Rosemont Ave., Cin- 
cinnati, Ohio 

Wycinski, Frank, Pvt., Co. C, Rendville Ohio 

Wylder, Edgert A., Pvt., Co. B, 4011 Adams St., N., 
Spokane, Washington 

Wyse, Harry H., Pvt., Co. H, Bentleyville, Pennsylvania 

Yates, Carl, Cook, Co. I, 616 W. Hill St., Louisville, Ken- 
tucky 

Yates, Saul, Pvt., , Buchtel, Ohio 

Yeackel, John W., Wagoner, Sup. Co., R. F. D. No. 1, 
Toppenish, Washington 

Yeaman, Ralph, Pvt., Ord. Cps., Cheney, Washington 

Yedinak, John A., Pvt., Co. A, 246 M St., Rock Springs, 
Wyoming 

Yentes, Charles F., Pvt., Co. E, Huntington, Indiana 

Yetter, Cecil, Pvt., Co. I, Granada, Minnesota 

Yoakam, Harold, Pvt., Co. B, R. F. D. No. 1, Box 258, 
San Jose, California 

Yosivoff, Pano T., Pvt., Co. I, Delosersnik, Prilepska, 
Bulgaria 

Young, Jean C, Pvt., Co. C, Empire Hotel, Spokane, 
Washington 

Young, John H., Pvt., Co. I, 1212 S. Boyle Ave., St. Louis, 
Missouri 

Young, John W., Bugler, Co. M, Sedonia, Washington 

Young, Maurice L., Cpl., Co. G, 2815 Gold St., El Paso, 
Texas 

Young, Oscar E., Pvt., Hq. Co., 16 Broadway, Tacoma, 
Washington 

Young, Spencer, Pvt., Co. L, 856 E. 3rd St., S., Salt Lake 
City, Utah 

Young, Will A., Pvt., Co. M, North Yakima, Washington 

Youngken, Donald, Sgt., Co. G, 5516 Echo St., Los An- 
geles, California 

Yuill, Julius O., Sgt., Co. M, Soap Lake, Washington 

Zaepfel, Albert M., Pvt., Co. L, 219 Ave. G, Snohomish, 
Washington 

Zamboras, Anastasios G., Pvt., Co. E, 212 1st St., Ray- 
mond, Washington 

Zanella, Jacob F., Pvt., Co. G, 3207 San Pedro St., Los 
Angeles, California 

Zeazeas, Mike G., Pvt., Co. L, 245 Morrison St., Portland, 
Oregon 

Zeek, Banner, Pvt., Co. G, Star Route, Toledo, Oregon 

Zeek, Frank, Pvt., Co. A, 1105 S. 9th St., Ironton, Ohio 

Zeiger, Francis L., Mechanic, Co. B, 4115 R St., Omaha, 
Nebraska 

Zelinski, Thomas, Pvt., Co. C, 113 Albert Ave., Newark, 
New Jersey 

Zeller, Arnold J., Musician, Hq. Co., 604 E. Madison 
St., Portland, Oregon 

Zeller, Christian, Pvt., Co. L, 6204 84th St., S. E., Port- 
land, Oregon 

Zern, Lee P., Cpl. Co. G, 3715 Wall St., Los Angeles, Cal- 
ifornia 

Ziegelmaier, Joseph D., Pvt., Co. L, R. F. D. No. 2, Box 
107, Tacoma, Washington 

Zimmerman, Oral W., Musician, Hq. Co., Miller, South 
Dakota 

Zipperle, Harry, Pvt., Co. E, 125 Montana St., San Fran- 
cisco, California 

Zuglis, Pete, Pvt., Co. D, Garfield, Utah 

Zurilgen, Walter B., Pvt., Co. D, 1535 Hearst Ave., 
Berkeley, California 



H 2*6-79 



276 
















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