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Full text of "73 Magazine (October 1979)"



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October 1979 $2.50 



1^ 



34 Extremely Low Frequency Radiation: 
Cause for Worry? 

— studies on ELF are inconclusive, but 
the battle is joined WB2NEL 

36 An LED Display for the HW 2036 

— eliminates unwieldy thumbwheel 
switches ..__...... WA4BZP 



42 



SO 



52 



54 



58 



68 



74 



It's a Wattmeter . . . It's an Swr Bridge 

— - - It's Swattmeter! 

— a super home-brew project, . K4LBY 

The Double-Sawbuck QRM 
Annihilator 

— 3-IC circuit yields perfect CW 

. WA5QAP 



■i 4 I 



t * E ^ ^M •''■■ J- 



Center Insulator for your Next 
Antenna 

— do it yourself with PVC AC5P 

Another Approach to Repeater 

Control 

— uses 7516 chip for low parts count 
........... ...... W7JSW 

Yes, You Can Build this Synthesizer! 

— keep your crystal rig WB2BW| 

Analog Telemetry Techniques 

— while designed for medical signals, 
these circuits work with any analog 
data. . .y. K4IPV 



M 



The MICROSIZER: Computerized 
Frequency Control 

— a synthesized vfo replacement 
for most HF rigs. . . . N4ES, W4BF 



90 CW Fans: Give Superior Selectivity to 
your Atlas Rig 

— this mod uses an inexpensive MFJ 
filter. .:........,..... WB9WWM 

98 A Sensible CMOS TT Decoder 

— presented by popular demand 
, N6WA 

102 DTMFR for your Repeater 

-state-of-the-art TT decoding 

108 Freedom Fighters on Forty 

— SWLing the anti-Castro clandestines 
, KA5M 

112 The Miserly Mobile PVC Special 

— radiates a very economical signal 

..,,..... AA4RH 

114 FSK Fi3i for the 820S 

— the RTTY relay remedy . W1PN 

116 Einstein Was Wrong! 

—this story has a Mobius twist 

_ Phenix 

130 An 8-Bit DPDT Digital Switch 

— many uses. . W1SNN 

136 Get a Piece of The Rock 

— a DXpedition to Gibraltar 
W9)VF/ZB2CS 

142 Easy-to-Build 220 Transverter 

—simple hookup to any synthesized 
2m rig WA7SPR 




74470"65946 



1 



Never Say Die -4, Looking West- 10, DX-12, Letters -14, RTTY Loop -20, Micro- 
computer Interfacing -22, Ham Help -22, 29, 156, 174, 180, Awards- 24, Contests- 
28, OSCAR Orbits — 29, FCC -29, New Products -30, Dealer Directory — 139, Social 
Events — 154, Review — 178, Propagation -209 




X 

■ his time with a superior quality synthesized 220 
Ji MHz hand held transceiver. With an &2 in your 
car or pocket you can use any 220 MHz repeater in the 
United States. It offers all of the advanced engineer- 
ing, premium quality components and exciting 
features of the SI. It is completely synthesized, 
offering 1000 channels in an extremely lightweight 
but rugged case. 

If you*re not on 220 it's about time you try it and this is 
the perfect way to get started. With the addition of a 
matching Tempo solid state amplifier you can use 
your 5-2 as a powerful mobile or base station as well. 
It*s all you really need. And if you already have a 220 
MHz rig, the &2 will add versatility you never dreamed 
possible. 

Also„.the price is right The ni-cad battery pack 
charger, and telescoping whip antenna are included. 
Although not a necessary option, the touch tone pad 
shown in the illustration adds greatly to its conven- 
ience at a low price. 

The time has never been better to expand your 
horizons.-.there has never b^n a better little rig for 
220 than the &Z 



The Tempo iine also features a tine line of extremely compact 
UHF and VHF pocket receivers, Ttiey're low priced, 
dependable, and available with CTCTSS and 2-tone decoders. 
The Tempo FMT-2 & FMT-42 (UHF) provides exceilenl mobile 
communications and features a remote control head for hide- 
away mounting. 

The Tempo FWfH-42 (UHF) and the NEW FMH-t2 and FMH-15 
(VHF) micro hand held transceivers provide 6 channel 
capability, dependability plus many worthwhile features at a 
low price FCC type accepted models also available. 
Please call or write for complete intormatioa Also available 
from Tempo dealers throughout the U.S. and abroad. 



11240 W. Olympic BWd 

931 N Eucltd. Anaheim. Cahr 

Butler, Missouri 64730 



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TEMPO IS FIRST 




SPECIFICATIONS 

Frequency Coverage 220 to 225 MHz 
Channel Spacing: Receive every 5 kHz, 

transmit Simpleit or 

-1.6 MHz 

Power Requireinents 9.6 VDC 
Curreni Drain: 17 ma-staridby 

500 ma- transmit 
Batteries: B pieces ni^cad 

baitery included 
Antenna Impedance; 50 ohins 



Dimensions; 

RF Output: 
Sensjiivity: 

Pr1c«.» $349.00 

With touch tone pad 



40 mm x 62 mm K 
165 mm (1,6" x 2.6" 
K 6.5") 

Better than 1 .5 watts 
Belter than ,5 microvolts 



.S3 99.00 



SUPPLIED ACCESSORIES 

Telescoping whip antenna, ni-ca<l 
battery pack, charger. 
OPTIONAL ACCESSORIES 
Touch tone pad (not installed) :$39 • 
Tone burst generator: $29 95 • CTCSS 
sub-audible lone control: S29 95 • 
flubtjer tiex anfenna: $8 • Leather 
holster: $16 • Cigarette fighier plug 
mobile charging unit: $6 • Matching Z5 
watt output 13.6 VDC power amphfier 
(S-25): $69 • Matching 75 watt output 
power ampHtier (S-75): $169 



The I tAlPO S-h The wortd^s tirst synthesized 2 meter 
hand held transceiver. Its superb engineering and top quality 
components give it an uncommon degree of rel[abjlrty...a fact 
now proven by the thousands of units in use worldwide. 



TEMPO VHF & UHF SOLID STATE POWER AMPLIFIERS 

Boost your sigral « , give H the range and clarity of a high powered base 
itilion. VHF (135 io 175 WHz) 



Drive Power 


Out put 


Modet No. 


Price 


2W 


130W 


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$209 


low 


130W 


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$189 


3CW 


130W 


130A30 


SI 99 


2W 


BOW 


80A02 


$169 


10W 


eow 


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$149 


30W 


fiOW 


8OA30 


$159 


2W 


50W 


50A02 


$129 


2W 


30W 


30AD2 


$ m 


UHF (400 to 512 MHz) modeH. lower 


power »nd FCC type 


accepii 


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For »u unt^ except California 

Clftl nsftfei^ts ptease cait cqilect on our re{|ulai numbers 



gemMi 



Ptkxs sufafccl to cl»ng« wnfioui notiQv 



has your needs wrell in hand. 

Today's Amateur demands rugged, rapid and accurate communi- 
cations between Hams in the know. That's why they choose the 
Wilson Mark Series of hand-held radios. With exceptional qualities 
like these . , . why not choose the most popular radio available 
for yourself? 



ACTUAL 
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FEATURES 

Advantages such as solid state circuitry, rugged Lexan* case, 
removable rear panel (enabling easy access to battery com- 
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portable radio's versatility. In addition, Wilson carries 
a full line of accessories to satisfy almost any of your 
requirements. 



SPECIFICATIONS 

The Mark radios offer: • 144-148 MHz range • 6 Channel operation 
• Individual trimmers on TX and RX xtals* Rugged Lexan® 
outer case • Current drain: RX; 15 mA, TX; Mark 11: 500 mA, 
Mark IV: 900 mA • A power saving Hi/Lo Switch • 12 KHz 
ceramic fitter and 107 monofithic filter included ♦ 10.7 MHz 
and 455 KHz IF • Spurious and harmonics, more than 50 dB 
below quieting • Uses special rechargeable Ni-Cad battery 
pack • LED battery condition ifidicator • Rubber duck and 
one pair Xtals 52/52 included • Weight: 19 oz. including 
batteries* Size: 6" x 1.770" x 2,440". 

OPTIONS 

Options available, include Touch Tone Pad, CTCSS, 
Leather Case, Chargers for Desk Top, Travel or Auto- 
mobile, Speaker Mike and large capacity, small size 
batteries. 



W if son 



For more details and/or the name of your nearest 
dealer, contact: Consumer Products Division, Wilson 
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Manuscripts 

Comributlons in the torm ot manu 
scripts wnti dravvings ^nd/or photo- 
grsphs itm vvelcome ancF will be con- 
sidered for possible pub! I da t ion We 
can asBymii no responsjbiiU^ for Eos^ 
or Ejamage to any malaria! Pleas© 
enclf>se a stamped, self adt^r^ssD^ 
&n>)r€tQp€ with ^aeh sutHnission Pay- 
ment fot me use o( any i^nsoUc^teid 
matenai will be made upon aecep 
tance. AJi contributions shouNi be di^ 
reeled to the 73 editoriat ot rices 
Hoi«ir to Wfile I Of 73" guidelines are 
availabte upon request 

Editorial Offices: 

Pine Street 

PeierbOfoygh NH 03456 

Phone; 603-924 3B 73. 924-387^ 

Adveftising Officess 

Elm Streel 

Petfif borougli NH 03458 

Phijne 603^^24 7138, 924-7139 

Circulation Officesi 

Phofic 603-924 7?96 

Subscription Rates 

irr the United States and Possessions: 

One Year (12 issues) SIS.OO 
Two Years (24 issues) S30.00 
Three Years (36 issues) £4& 0<3 
Lifetime subs cfipt ion S240.00 

Elsewhere: 

Canadian subset iptioris— add S2.00 
per yeaf urrtess t^id Mrtlh U.S. curren- 
cy. 

AfE oftief foreifln— or^ year oniy^ 
S26,00 payable in U, S. cufrency 
ttirouQh a U.5 banl^ (surface mail^ 

To subscribe, 

renew or chonge 

an address: 

Write to 73 Magaiin^, SLtb^riptlon 
Depart nrien I. PO Box 931, Farming 
date NV t1737 For renewals and 
changes ot address, include the an- 
dress label trom your rrvosl recent 
issue ot 73 For gift subscriptions in 
clwde your name and attdfess as w*^ii 
as those o( gitt recipients Post 
master' Send change of address Infm 
mat ion to 7 J M&gaime. PO Eo« Sii, 
Famifngdale NV 1 1 737 

Subscription 

problem or 

questjoni 

Write to 73 ¥^gaiifi&. Subscription 
Oepattmeni. PO Bom 93 i Farm 
ingdale NY t173? Please include an 
address UtTet. 

73 Mag^iftw it$SN 0098-9010) tS putF 
I [Shed monthty by 73 Inc.. Pete? 
borough NH 034iB, Second class 
fWsla^ge is paid at Peterborough NH 
03458 and at additional maiijng til 
fices. Cop^righl (cj 1979 by 73. Inc Alt 
eights f^SRFv^jd No pari gi IhiS publi 
calion may bB reprinted of otherwise 
reproduced without wntten permJs^ 
sion trorn the publisher. MiCfOlilm 
Edition — Universily Microtilm. Ann 
Arbor Ml 48106 



W2KSD/I 

NEVER SAY DIE 

ecf/tor/a/ by Wmyne Green 




GLORY-SEEKING 

Having failed to make con- 
tact between Pack Monadnock 
mountain in New Hampshire 
and the WA1KPS DXpedition to 
New York State on 10 GHz, it ap- 
peared that sterner measures 
would be necessary. The Pack 
is a 2,500-foot mountain and 
has the benefit of a road going 
right to the summit- The only 
problems with that are the sur- 
prising cold and wind which can 
strike even on relatively warm 
days . . - and the pesky little 
black flies which can make a 
hot, windless day wretched. 
These tiny but persistent devils 
get into your hair, crawl up your 
sleeves and into your shirt, and 
BITE! 

Not far from the Pack Is 
Grand Monadnock mountain, 
reaching up 3,500 feet. Since 
this one has to be climbed on 
foot, it Is nowhere near as 
popular as the Pack. But, with 
six states already contacted on 
10 GHz and with all contacts 
being over a path of at least 50 
miles, I reluctantly agreed to 
take an expedition up in the in- 
terests of science and a world 
record . . . GutnnesSt please 
note. 

Tim N8RK/1, Sherry, and I 
struggled up Grand Monadnock 
the previous Sunday in order to 
make the Connecticut to New 
Hampshire contact. It took us 
about two hours to scramble up 
the 2yj-mile path of rock, but at 
least we were rewarded by get- 
ting a nice signal report over 
that path. Chuck Martin of Tufts 
Electronics was on the other 
end with Steve Murray K1KEC 
and Eric Williams WA1HON. On 
the second trip, I was able to 
talk Tim into going again, but 
Sherry had more sense and she 
passed up the great event. Jim 
Grubb WB1AFC, who works for 
Chuck, drove up from Boston 
and helped us cart the equip- 
ment up the mountain. 

We'd just taken along a 
barefoot Gunnplexer for the 
Connecticut contact. That was 
small enough to fit in a knap- 



sack, so it was easy to carry. 
The signals from that unit had 
not been overpowering, so we 
decided this time to take along 
some insurance in the form of a 
two-foot dish and a tripod. That 
was a bit more formidable to 
haul up the rocky path. Some of 
the focks are tig. 

Sunday arrived and the three 
of us headed for the mountain, 
talking with Chuck and his DX- 
pedition to New York via the Mt. 
Grey lock repeater. To say that I 
was not enthusiastic about the 
climb would be quite an under- 
statement. My normal exercise 
is to walk from my desk to the 
kitchen and back for a meal 
. . . maybe 100 feet total . < . 
three times a day. Then, ex- 
hausted from this, I stagger 20 
feet more and up a flight of 
stairs to my apartment to rest. 
Typing my editorials strength- 
ens little more than the outrage 
level in Newington. 

Nothing short of the prospect 
of achieving an almost unbeat- 
able world record of seven 
states worked on 10 GHz could 
have gotten me a second time 
onto that accursed trail up 
Monadnock. My knees had 
finally stopped making me limp 
a day or two earlier, and here I 
was about to insult them again 
with another struggle up the 
endless rocks, although I sup* 
pose that two and a half miles 
of stairs would pretty much do a 
person in, too. And on the way 
down, while you don't have your 
knees pulling your weight up, 
they do have to take shock after 
shock as you jump down one to 
two feet at a time. 

The day was warm and very 
damp. A dense cloud sat over 
the entire mountain, dripping 
now and then and threatening 
to dump rain on us at any mo* 
menl, W© had HTs along for 
both 146 and 220 MHz and we 
kept track of downpours which 
were just a few miles away as 
we huffed and puffed our way 
up . . . the sweat pouring off. Td 
lost three pounds the Sunday 
t}efore, and only by virtue of 



really diligent eating had I 
managed to regain my fighting 
weight in time for this ordeal 

The top part of the mountain 
is ail rock. Fires a hundred years 
or so ago had cleared the trees 
and shrubbery and allowed the 
dirt to be washed away, making 
the mountain one of the most 
accessible with ecological 
characteristics that normally 
are found only above Ihe tree 
line of other mountains. 
Naturalists apparently travel 
hundreds of miles to scramble 
up these rocks and dote on 
amazing ecology. I just sweated 
on it as 1 climbed. The top part 
was cooler as we got out of the 
trees, and there was no protec- 
tion from the wind. It felt 
wonderful . * * even in the dense 
fog. 




Just to convince you that 
when I say rocks, I mean rocks 
. . . here is what they call a 
"trail" It's foggy, and you can't 
see more than about 50 feet. 




Perhaps you can make out 
Tim with the disk on his back, 
disappearing Into the fog. Just 
to the left is Jim, bringing the 
tripod on his back, I brought a 
camera plus my most prized 
possession ,, , me. 



• ■■ I— TTl 




I 



• ^<'r"»<»»»**#j 





Cents-ability" in a 
quality HF Rig! 



The TS-520SE is mn economical 
new version of the TS-520S,,,the 
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on SSB and 160 watts DC on CW! 

The TS-520SE is a high-quatit^ 
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tended for ham-shack use. The follow- 
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the new "^SE" modeh 

• Replaced the heater switch 
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with the optional CW-520 
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operator] 

• Removed DC converter 
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• Removed transvertef 
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All other proven features and high 
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tajned in the TS*520S£r tncJuding: 

• Effective noise blanker 

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circuiL 

• RIT conlro). 



• Eight-pole crystal filter. 

• Buitt-ih' IB kHz calibrator. 

• Front-panel carrier level 
contfol 

• Semi-break-in CW wrfh 
sidetone. 

» VOX/PTT/MANUAL 
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• TUNE position for low-power 
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SPECIFICATIONS FOR THE TS-520SE 



iEMEMAL: 

Frequency fttinge: 


1J- MMHiU*9in} 
7,^ 7,3 mi (10 m) 

aj-aiMHiMfln) 

ai-a7««zi 


Mikdex: 


SSI CNSB, UBj. CW 


InteonA Ifipiriincc: 


U-n ^hm 


Freqiipncy Sttbilttf: 


allet mt miniite ol warm-up. 
and tfiLhin 110 M; during any 


Ptvtr RifilrmMli: 


IttHftCSMlMr 211 W itmmn 


*-"** 


\hM% tacAfs mit. f mim 
tafkU-VllwcHtsIni 


Wtlfihl 


IS.} pnMit 


TRAM&WIITER: 


2DII W m (SS8), ]6tl W D€ (CW) 


Cirrlflf SitpprBii^oii: 


aeUtrUtaq4aiie 


Uiwiilci Sidttoiuf Sif^mln: 


tatUf lliai M « 


Spmni Hiititiam 


if tttr lias -a il 


VllCf ipHRV ■NH^OT0CK' 


mk^m 


AF RespMIt: 


mumm 


RECEfVttt: 
SenEitiiiLy: 


mfiHhfniB{%^nm 


Silect^vltyj 


SSB:MkH^-Sd8:4.4]tHi/-6D(fa 
GW:0 5kH2J-§de:v:jltHr^E0dB 
(«ili«plianaiCWliJLiti ^ 


Im9§t Ri1i« 


tdtotluaSiil 


If RtitcMK 


HIteftinSii 


Initi Ostffit: 


IJ ftr CMte tad ttiH lai lia* 

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. . .fmrttitter in mmateur radm 

TRIO-KENWOOD COMMUNICATIONS INC 

lit! WEST WALNUT/COMPION. CA 902^^ 




EOtlOR/PUDLISKER 
Wayne Green W2HSD/1 

EXfOmVE VKE PRESI0CHT 
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KEWS EDnOR 

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EOlTOfUM ASSISTAIITS 

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Chip Jackson 
Ken Jeekso^ 
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Jotin W White 

PAIPfTPiC? 

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Larry Katianer WB2NEL 
Jo& k^^F G3ZC2 
Bill PaStwnaK WA6ITF 
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WBll«f Scott K6DIZ 
Peter Stark K20AW 
Chuck Sluarl N5KC 
But Turner WAiABI 

COMPUTER PROGRAMMING 
fijchafd J. Oykema 

CmiOMER SERVKI 
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Lorl Mugford 




Eventually we made it to the 
top, and here are Tim and Jim 
setting up the lOGHz system 
The two NTs at the bottom left 
provided us with communica- 
tions with the New York con- 
tingent . , . Chuck, Eric, and 
Steve, in the laconic Range of 
the Berkshire Hills, some 30 
miles east of Albany. 



I ween, and me at the site. A 
passing GiimDer lent us a com- 
pass just lo check out the dish 
heading, and we d come very 
close. 





Tim is looking around for a 
flat spot to set up the tripod 
and dish, a place with a view to 
the west and New York, hope- 
fully. This brought up the ques- 
kion oi which way was west* 
There is a compass rose paint^ 
ed on the top of the mountain, 
but it was almost 100 feet from 
where we were settinQ up, so 
we had to sort of relay the cor- 
rect bearing through the fog to 
aim the dish from Jim, standing 
at the rose, to Tim, halfway be- 



We got set up a little bit 
before Chuck and the others 
reached thei* hill in New York, 
so we sat and cooled oft a bit, 
festing, When Chuck was final- 
ly set upi we put on the headset 
and crossed our fingers. Would 
the whole trip be for nothing? 
There was no way in the world 
they would get me to go 
through thai ordeal a third time; 
whether we made it or not, this 
was the one and only try . , . so 
it had better work. Our topo- 
graphical maps indicated that 
it was very chancy. Maps of the 
horizon from the top of Monad- 



WORLDS BEST JOB 

How would you like to spend your time setting up and 

operating 3)1 of the latest ham gear . . . and getting paid for 
it? We at 73 Magazine are searching for a good technician to 
come lo Peterborough. New t^ampshire. and work in the 73 
ham shack. We want someone capable of installing, repair 
ing. and evaluating equipment, and generally keeping things 
in good working order. Some writing ability is also desirable, 
since we'll want equipment reviews for 73. 

All in all, this is probably the world's best job for an active 
and curious ham. When you're not erecting a new tower or 
troubleshooting a balky linear, you'll find that Peterborough 
is one of the best DX and contest locations anywhere. If we 
can hear 'em, we can work 'em . . . and we hear 'em all. New 
Hampshire also offers other advantages, such as no state 
sales or income taxes. 

If you can handle the job and don't smoke, drop us a 
line— tell us about yourself. Write to: 73 Magazine, Oppor- 
tunity of a Lifetime Dept., Peterborough NH 03458 Attention: 
Jeff DeTray WBSBTH. 



nock didn't gfve us much hope. 
The signals on 220 MHz, usual* 
ly a very good Indicator of a 
line-of-sight path, were mar- 
ginal. 1 had lo hold the HT just 
in the right spot to make con- 
tact. Two meters was a bit bet* 
ter, working on a direct simplex 
channel. 

The moment arrived , . . 
Chuck finally had his unit, with 
a four-toot dish, set up and 
ready to go. We both turned on 
the switches at the same time 
and the signal-strength needle 
swung right off scale . . . 
whoopee, we'd made it! Now 
what do you talk about on a 
solid and very private path like 
that? After a round of *'Come 
here, Watson, I need you" and 
some swinging of the dishes to 
peak the signals, we called it a 
day and packed up for the trip 
back home. 

The only incident of note was 
atiout halfway back down when 
Jim slid on a rock and went 
head over heels, landing on his 
pack on another rock. The only 
damage was a ruined canteen, 
which was better than a busted 
bach. My knees hurt only a day 
or two after the ordeal this time, 
so I suppose that I might be able 
to make the climb with no strain 
if I kept at It for a few more 
weeks. Don't worry. I won't. And 
I wasn't nearly as tired this time 
as the week before . . . hmm. It's 
too bad exercise takes so much 
time and is so little fun. 

If any of you happen to see 
Chuck, you might congratulate 
him on having the world record 
for working one state from the 
most other states. I remain the 
only human being who has 
worked seven different states 
from New Hampshire, and VW 
bet I will hold that record for a 
while, 

DONATE 

The question of ARRL finan- 
ces seems to get murkier all the 
time. We see letters crying for 
donations and we read about 
the horrible losses they are sus- 
taining with their staff, with few 
old-timers left and empty offices 
everywhere . . . offices which 
were just recently built at enor- 
mous expense. 

The donations for their 
WARC efforts are particularly 
difficult to justify. Noel Eaton 
testified before the manufac- 
turers that they have over 
$600,000 available, if they wish 
to spend It. In addition to that 
rather tidy sum, I see by the 
latest Annual Report that they 
still have kept up their $100,000 
fund for the defense of amateur 
frequencies ... and WARC 
would seem to qualify in this 
department. 

Now, it is entirely possible 
that the League is intending to 
spend more than $750,000 at 
Geneva this year. If their perfor- 

Continued on page 20 



6 



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Looking I4^est 



BiffPmt^nak WAGITF 
24854-C NBwhail 4vB. 
Ne^NhaH CA 91321 

I have yet to hear from the 
FCC in answer to the question- 
naire I mailed to them in May (re- 
printed here in the August col- 
umn), I didn't expect a quick 
response, but two and a half 
months ago isn't exactly yes- 
terday. Wheels in Washington 
move rather siowly as we all 
know, and in the meantime, the 
malicious interfefence problem 
out here grows worse. I suspect 
that it may be the same else- 
whefe; my mail seems to indi- 
cate this from time to time. Any- 
how, when and if the FCC ever 
gets around to answering, I will 
quickly share the information 
with you. 

The ARRL has formed the 
ECRBA! What's that, you say? 
The ARRL did what? I suspect 
that some clarification is neces- 
sary. The ^'ARRL" I am speaking 
about is not the Newington, 
Connecticut, variety, but an 
organization kr^own as the 
AtfantfC Region Repeater 
Legion. (Isn't that a great play 
on a set of logo letters!) This 
"ARRL" has now sprouted the 
east coast's first organized 
remote-base owners' organiza- 
tion, entitled aptly, the East 
Coast Remote Base Associa- 
tion (ECRBA). Founded on May 
26. 1979, the ECRBA currently 
has about a half-dozen member 
systems, with more joining 
each month. 

Unlike its west coast counter^ 
part, SCRRBA, the ECRBA does 
not act as a frequency coordina- 
tion council and does not 
assign systems to specific 
channels. In the areas in which 
their member systems operate, 
such activitjes are the domain 
of established frequency coor- 
dination councils such as 
TSARC. Its main purpose rs to 
act as an affiliation of, and 
thereby a voice for, individual 
amateurs and amateur clubs 
along the eastern seaboard who 
either now operate or are in- 
terested in the construction of 
amateur remote-base stations. 

It was to that end that the 
ECRBA established the follow- 
ing goals for itself: 

1) The promotion and support 
of current remote-base tech- 
nology and activity. 

2) The designation of simplex 
frequencies on VHF and UHF 
amateur bands upon which 
remote-base systems can meet. 

3) The coordination and filing 
of existing remote-base sys- 
tems in geographically diverse 
areas along the eastern sea- 
board so that communications 
over long distances can be 



achieved through the creation 
of remote-base networks, 

4) Such other purposes as 
may laier be defined by the 
ECRBA membership. 

The ECRBA appears to be the 
first such organization to be 
formed outside the far western 
and southwestern United 
States whose avowed purpose 
is fostering interest and expan- 
sion of remote-base operation. 
If you want more information, 
send an SASE to the East Coast 
Remote Base Association, c/o 
Atlantic Region Repeater 
Legion, 333 West 57 St., #306, 
New Vork NY 10019; For your ef- 
forts, you will receive an intor* 
mation sheet and an applica- 
tion for membership. 

THE INTERTIE DEPARTMENT, 

OR "ITS TIME FOR A REAL 

GAME PLAN" 

How many repeaters are 
there? 1.000? 3,000, possibly? 
Experts peg the number of re- 
peaters operational in the con- 
tinental USA at close to 5,000, 
with over 3,000 of them on two 
meters alone! Let*s face it. 
That's a heck of a lot of rf hard- 
ware sitting atop tall buildings, 
broadcast towers, and moun- 
taintops. What do we do with 
most of it? By and large we use 
it simply to gab a bit further 
than we could without such re- 
lay devices. In doing so, we 
miss one of the greatest com- 
munication challenges ever 
placed at our fingertips. The 
challenge? The creation of a 
coast-to-coast border-to-border 
VHF intertle. An Intertie that 
would permit amateurs from all 
over the nation to converse and 
communicate with t>ut hand- 
held transceivers. 

With all this hardware opera- 
tional already, why has such an 
intertie not yet been developed? 
Was not one of our greatest ol> 
jectives in overturning the re* 
suits of Docket 18803 to permit 
restoration of intercommunity 
relay communication and again 
permit repeaters to interlink for 
greater range? What have we 
done with this freedom we 
gained a few short years ago? 
Little! True, there have been a 
number of regional and Inter- 
regional experimental in- 
terlinks» most, if not all, pri- 
vately owned and operated with 
highly restricted access and 
usership. The few local open in- 
terties are a minority within a 
minority. The potential exists, 
the equipment is there already, 
and with the addition of a bit 
more human communication, a 
national system could come in- 
to being within a year or two. 

The key to the estabHshmenl 
of an open national intertte is to 



set our goal and then utilize 
what we already have. At the 
outset, a national organization 
to oversee the implementation 
of such an intertie is not nec- 
essary, although it could make 
the job a whole lot easier. Once 
off the ground, such an organi- 
zation, filled with many layers of 
bureaucracy that are the by- 
word of such organizations, will 
develop. Who knows, if we do a 
good enough Job, the American 
Radio Relay League may even 
take all the credit lor it. Right 
now, though, we must begin in 
as simple a way as we can, 
building outward from the local 
level 

You might start by locating 
another repeater in your area 
some distance away and ar- 
range some form of permanent 
interlink between the two. Then 
add a third system in the same 
or another direction. Exactly 
where you wind up, geograph* 
ically speaking, is not thai im- 
portant. Communicating with 
one another outside the normal 
coverage area of your favorite 
repeater is. If enough systems 
jump on this bandwagon, and if 
normal growth patterns prevail 
here as they have in repeater 
operation development Itself, 
then a national open intertie 
can and will develop of its own 
accord. 

What's nice about doing it in 
this way is that we need not add 
any new systems to the already 
overcrowded two-meter spec- 
trum. The radio links can t>e on 
420 MHz or, in areas where 420 
to 450 is already totally utilized, 
the 220 MHz band would be an 
Ideal choice. Even in areas 
where UHF is overflowing with 
activity, In most cases the 220 
MHz band lies dormant. Can 
you think of a better use for 220 
MHz? 

There ts another important 
prerequisite. For this idea to 
work, each area has to know 
what the next area is doing. To 
that end, "Looking West" could 
provide the space necessary to 
disseminate information, I can 
act as an Informational clear- 
inghouse and thereby give you 
monthly updates of who is ac- 
complishing what, where. How 
about it? Does the idea of such 
a national intertie intrigue you? 
Do you find interesting the idea 
of driving In downtown Chicago 
while conversing on VHF with 
two friends many thousands of 
miles away? 

At the very close of Dave 
Bell's new film, "The World Of 
Amateur Radio," the film*s nar- 
rator, Roy Neal K6DUE, states: 
''We look forward to the day that 
members of our fraternity will 
be going into space, to the 
moon and beyond, " Maybe for 
the moment this is but a dream 
of the future, but when Art Gen- 
try W6MEP placed K6MYK(now 
WR6ABN) on the air back In the 



1950s, ni bet that he had no 
Idea where it would all lead. Art 
had made one of his dreams 
come true, and out of early 
experiments such as K6MYK 
grew the VHF and UHF relay ac- 
tivity we have today. In reality, 
we have far more repeaters in 
more places than we know what 
to do with. Many lie dormant 
day after day awaiting some 
form of utilization. We have at 
our fingertips the ability to 
make the future part of the pres- 
ent. Any dreamers out there? 
Any lakers? 

THE VIDEOTAPE 
DEPARTMENT 

A few months ago, I pur- 
chased a truly great toy of the 
70s, It's called a Sony Betamax 
videocassette recorder-player 
and it has brought me many 
hours of joy. It sits comfortably 
in a special cabinet in our living 
room just below our Sony 19" 
Trinitron color TV, and it gets 
quite a bit of use, especially 
with my busy schedule. Orig- 
inally, it was the "time-shift" 
feature that caused me to pur- 
chase it: the ability to be else- 
where and yet not miss some- 
thing 1 wanted to see. Of late, 
though, 1 have come to see 
other uses for my toy, uses that 
transform it from the toy cate- 
gory into a useful tool — one 
that can be applied to amateur 
radio. First, however, let's take a 
look at what is available in 
home video recording equip- 
ment today. 

The Sony Corporation really 
started what would lead to the 
home video revolution back in 
1968 when it introduced in the 
US marketplace a video ma* 
chine that used W tape pack- 
aged in a convenient-to-use, 
fully-enclosed tape cassette. 
The unit was called the U-Matic, 
and it was not long before it 
became a standard in the broad- 
cast industry. While It was not 
as good as 2" high-band quad, it 
gave excellent results and soon 
began to nudge film from the 
limelight in news gathering and 
dissemination. By the early 70s, 
with the advent of the portable 
videocassette recorder-player 
along with light-weight (by com- 
parison) cameras, what is now 
called the "electronic news 
gathering'' or "electronic jour- 
nalism" era had begun. Today, 
the majority of news we see on 
TV is on videotape rather than 
film. 

For consumers like us, things 
lagged behind. Only the truly af* 
fluent could afford a U-Matic 
type machine. Tape cassettes 
were rather expensive and of- 
fered but one-hour record-play 
time. However, Sony foresaw 
the coming video revolution, 
and around 1975 it introduced 
its first W* format home video- 
cassette system to which it 

Continued on page f78 



10 




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DX 



Chuck Stuart N5KC 
Sits Menefee Drive 
Dstim TX 75227 

These are the heydays of DX- 
ing. If it seems like vwe keep re- 
peating ourselves on this sub- 
ject, bear in mind that we only 
want to make you aware that 
this is not the normai state of 
things. We are now at the peak 
of cycle 21, and, although there 
are many good days ahead for 
the deserving DXer, we are now 
on the downhill slide. Work 
everything in sight; those QSL 
cards will help you make it 
through the doldrums ahead. 
Hopefully some of the f of lowing 
information will help you in your 
quest. 

HEARD ON THE BAND 

VR3AH left Christmas Island 
July 22 and returned to the 
states, VR3AR plans lo remain 
active until February or March 
and there is a new operator 
there waiting only for the 
necessary license to begin 
operating. There is a possibility 
that Greg WB4PRU will handle 
the QSLs for this new station. 
During the period May 28, 1979, 
to July 8, 1979, while Doug 
VR3AH was in the states for a 



little R & R, Slim paid a visit to 
his station and managed a 
number of QSOs. W you logged 
VR3AH during this period, know 
that you have met the Slim one 
himself. 

Jerry WA1ZXF sent In the 
following in response to our re- 
quest for more CW activity 
reports. It covers a typical night 
on 20 meters and while nothing 
super rare is covered, it shows 
there is plenty of *' bread and 
butter" DX there for the taking, 
FC9UC'-On regularly 
from 1700 to 1900 UTC be- 
tween 1410 kHz and 14160 
kHz. Jean is always happy 
lo answer a CW call. 

UK2GAT— A club station 
operated by the various 
members. On nightly from 
2300 UTC between 14050 
kHz and 14070 KHz with a 
strong signal. 

YU2CAL— Mladen Is a 
nightly regular around 
1 4030 kHz. 

SP8R J— Another almost 
nightly regular Jurek puts a 
strong signal into the 
states around 14035 kHz. 

LZ1GG — Stan is on 
nightly from 0400 UTC 
around 14070 kHz. 
Jerry says there are many 



BfkBDD, formeri^ BA3EG, shown with his nice station in Palma in 
the Balearic islands. Eighty years young and stiff going strong, he 
prefers CW and can usuatiy be found on the low end of fifteen or 
twenty when the band is open. 



more such stations available 
nightly for the deserving DXer. 

The second annual Interna- 
tional Island DX Contest spon- 
sored by the Whldbey Island DX 
Association begins at 00002 on 
January 12, 1980, and runs 
through 2400Z January 13, 1980. 
This is a good chance to pick up 
some of the rarer islands foe 
your DXCC. Contest entry forms 
are available from Gary Pierson 
WA7GVM, Box C, LaConner WA 
98257. 

Roy W5VJT reports receiving 
QSL cards from UC2AF, 
UC2AFA, and UC2AFB. UC2AF 
is father to UC2AFA and 
UC2AFB. 

CK2CRS was the official sta- 
tion of the Canoe/Kayak World 
Championship. QSL to Serge 
Freve VE2FIT, 1506 des Mar- 
tinets, Chicoutimi, Quebec G7H 
5X9, Canada. 

Jean Ghys^ formerly 0N4KU, 
reports that Slim seems to have 
taken a Nklng to his old call 
because he has been receiving 
a number of QSLs for stateside 
contacts he never made, Jean 
says he is no longer active and 
that any conlacts with anyone 
signing 0N4KU are bogus. 

We received numerous re- 
sponses to our comments con- 
cerning the trend towards 
DXpeditions spreading the catl- 
ing stations out over a 40 to 50 
kHz portion of the band, thereby 
making it useless for any nor- 
mal use. Those defending such 
operations pointed to the fact 
that this method resulted in the 
highest QSO-per-hour rate. That 
argument misses the point en- 




tirely. The QSO-per-hour rate is 
not the problem. The problem Is 
that white such an operation Is 
in process, all normal day-to- 
day communications come to 
an abrupt halt. This hardly 
endears us to our fellow hams* 
While a few wrote to say that all 
splH -frequency operations 
should be banned (transceiver 
owners, no doubt), the majority 
favored spreading the calling 
stations out over no more than 
15 to 20 kHz. If this proves in- 
adequate, the DX station can go 
by call areas or even by prefixes 
within call areas. There are 
many ways to ensure a sue* 
cessful OXpedition, but wide- 
spread calling is not one of 
them, 

Johanna 0Y5J has been 
showing on 14240 kHz Mondays 
after 2330Z. This is the group 
led by WA2JU0 and a number of 
rare-type DX stations can usual- 
ly be found checking in looking 
for the deserving ones. 

5H3KS has been drawing 
massive CW pileups almost 
daily on 21022 kHz from 2330Z- 
Seems like 7J1 fs still high on 
most-needed lists in the W2 
area The JARL Is reportedly 
aiming for another all-out effort 
after the monsoon season. 

0E6EEG is said to be plan- 
ning another SZ4 effort for right 
about now. 

Scotty K5CO and Dave N2KK 
plan to remove the entire Indian 
Ocean area from your needed 
list and are right on schedule. 
They plan to start on FR7 Re- 
union Island around the first of 
December and then sweep 
through the area, taking no cap- 
tives. Dave is gearing up for 
some extensive 40 through 160 
action, while Scotty handles the 
10/15/20 demand. 

Seven or eight S79 stations 
did manage to get their licenses 
renewed on June 1 st, but the fee 
was a bit stiff — $82,00 each. 

FHeOM and FH8YL ask that 
cards be sent via their man- 
agers only. Seems that some- 
one in the local post office is an 
avid green-stamp and IRC col- 
lector. 

Those new J7 prefixes re- 
place the old VP2D prefixes. Al 
VP2DD now signs J7DD, 

VQ9TC now signs KG6J1Q. 

There Is a new DX-DX SSB net 
on 7082 kHz at Q500Z. N5RQ 
takes stateside check^ins at 
06302 on 7165 kHz. 

CQ Magazine has raised the 
price on all DX Certificate ap- 
plications to $5.00. 

Any ZA activity you might 
hear is probably Slim, but, of 
course, work them anyway. It 
will keep you in practice for that 
day when the real thing ap- 
pears. The present situation is 
as follows: The license applica- 
tion by SM4CMN and SM3VE is 
being ignored, DL7FT (who was 

Continued on page t60 



12 




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13 



^H 



n^ap 



Wi -Toon^ tit yn' t *: • v e r v ro- .jT 'r 




BEFUDDLED 



] 



I must admit that I like your 
magazine; technically, it strikes 
a middle ground between the 
continuous brilliance of Ham 
Radio and the occasional gems 
in QST. Nevertheless, the 
politicai rambllngs leave me a 
bit befuddled. 

For instance, I notice regular 
references to the "debacle" of 
incentive licensing. So what's 
the hassle? If you vvant the 
greater privileges, you get off 
your ass, stop complaining, and 
study for the next higher 
ftcense. 

If any body should not be 
complaining, it's you, Wayne, 
The way I figure it, you do a pret- 
ty penny's worth of business in 
code tapes and study guides for 
aspiring applicants. Seems to 
me if incentive was dumped, 
you*d have a major ''wallet- 
ectomy" there. 

But, ignoring that, I $t/// don't 
see what's so bad. Incentive 
licensing is the same system 
that made America great: Those 
with higher rank get higher 
priviieges, Tm convinced any 
one of us could get the Extra if 
he was motivated to study 
enough. At leasts unlike 
business or military worlds, 
hard work guarantees results. 

Seems to me Incentive licens- 
ing is like the American socio- 
economic system in a micro- 
cosm. \ don't see how you could 
like one and not the other. 

By the way, \ don't hold the 
Extra class, so this isn't the 
voice of the *'haves" telling the 
"have-nots" to be happy and 
shut up. It's just in recognition 
of a damn good system that ap- 
parently still needs defer>se. 

I also doubt that this will ever 
get into your rag since Tve tacit- 
ly called ali of you anti-incen- 
tive types un-American, 

At any rate, your mag is 
basically good, if all you read is 
the technical stuff. I may even 
renew. 

Bob Lombard! WB4EHS 
Ft. Lauderdale FL 



Bob, you need to talk with 
someone who has been around 
amateur radio for a few years 
and f/?e/7 you would understand 
the irony of the term "incentive 
ticensing. " Sure, the system is 
working pretty well now, but do 
you honestly think that what 
you see now Is all we ever had? 



In 1963, the League proposed 
what they called "incentive ti- 
censing." The Idea was to go 
back thirty years to the li- 
censing system of the 1930s, 
They proposed taking most of 
the phone bands away from the 
General class, the way It was 
pre^WWIL i put up such a fuss 
that eventually the FCC only 
took half the phone bands 
away. The whole idea was to get 
amateurs to upgrade. I said they 
would do better if they gave re- 
wards for upgrading; the ARRL 
said it would be better to take 
frequencies away and then give 
them back If you upgraded. The 
basic difference was one of 
punishment vs. rewards. 

This brought on ten years of 
zero growth, little upgrading (I 
have published the facts and 
figures showing the extent of 
this disaster), and the death of 
all of the major manufacturers. 
Then the FCC put through my 
suggestion of giving the call- 
sign of your choice to Extra 
class licensees. , .and clubs 
responded to my plan for get- 
ting them to offer Novice study 
courses, for which I published 
instruction manuals and pro- 
vided code tapes. Amateur 
radio finally started to grow 
again and at last we had an in- 
crease In Extra class licensees. 

The League saw what was 
happening and put out their 
ov]/n code course and did their 
best to cover over the incentive 
licensing fiasco. By the way, the 
FCC admitted that this was a 
complete debacle . . , that's 
why they changed the system to 
the present one - . , which is 
working reasonably well.— 
Wayne. 



STRIKING DISTANCE 



] 



It was over a year ago that 
you very kindly sent me the 73 
code system tapes, Le„ 5, 6, 13, 
and 20+ wpm, which were 
available at that time. 

Now that Tm copying the 
20 + at about 95% and working 
out at that speed, I thought you 
might like a breakdown of pro- 
gress since starting and until 
now. 

First, let me say that I think 
your system is excellent and 
without It would never have 
passed my CW test nor ob- 
tained my 28 (unrestricted) li- 
cense here in South Africa. 

Being a Master Mariner and a 



Nautical Examiner of Masters 
and Navigating Officers and 
also an ex-lecturer/tralning of- 
ficer of cadets preparing for the 
Mercantile Marine, I feel Tm 
qualified to give an opinion on 
your training method, which I 
feel is without equal. 

Second, although I'm 54 
years of age, I have always, 
since going to sea at 14, known 
the Morse code, so I didn't have 
to learn the characters from 
start. But, in the Mercantile 
Marine, candidates for the 
various Certificates of Com- 
petency are required to "satisfy 
the examiner of their ability to 
send and receive signals in 
Morse code by flash lamp up to 
6 wpm," 

I think you will agree that 
there is a world of difference be- 
tween copying a flashing light 
at 6 wpm 3ind sound. So I virtual- 
ly had to start from scratch in- 
sofar as sound was concerned, 

1 started on the 5 wpm tape in 
May, 1978. In July {just over 2 
months later), I passed the CW 
test (12 wpm) and received my 
7S license. Since then, I have 
had nearly 500 QSOs on CW and 
I can thank you for giving me 
that pleasure. 

From the 13 wpm tape, I 
moved to the 20+ wpm tape in 
August, and by December, 
some 5 months later, 1 was 
copying about 80%. As I have 
said already, I'm copying about 
95% now. 

Now Tm practicing on local 
weather reports in order to learn 
to copy at 25-30 wpm. It has 
been your excellent system 
which has placed me within 
striking distance of my goal. 

Norman Caseley ZS5NC 
PInetowrt, South Africa 



CUSHCRAFT 



It seems that we are always 
hearing stories of problems 
with service, quality, and 
delivery from the many manu- 
facturers and dealers of ama- 
teur radio equipment and sup- 
plies, I feel equal recognition 
should go to the manufacturer 
or distributor who gives service 
above and beyond the call of du- 

A couple of weeks ago, I pur- 
chased from a local dealer a 
Cushcraft ATB-34 triband beam. 
At the same time, I contracted a 
man with a crane to help me put 
it on my tower. Upon assem- 
bling the antenna 3 days before 
it was to be installed, I unfor- 
tunately encountered a defec- 
tive part. I thought my deposit to 
the Installer was lost because I 
contracted for a particular time 
and day and I knew for sure that 
the part would never make it 
from the wilds of New Hamp- 
shire to New Jersey in the 2 
days I had left. After a phone 



call to Cushcraft and a conver- 
sation with a gentleman named 
Hugh. I found out my worries 
were unfounded. At their ex- 
pense, they navigated through 
the woods and mountains of 
New Hampshire to the nearest 
post office immediately after 
my phone call. They had the 
part shipped Express Mail with 
a promise from the US govern- 
ment that the part would be at 
my door within 24 hours. Sure 
enough {for a change), the 
government was right. I had the 
part the next morning and the 
antenna went up the following 
day as scheduled. 

This personal service was, in 
my opinion, far beyond what 
can be generally expected from 
most of the companies with 
whom I have dealt in the past. 
Granted, if something you pur- 
chase is under warranty^ it will 
be repaired or a defective part 
replaced, but usually with a 
long delay even under emer- 
gency conditions as was my 
case. 

This experience with 
Cushcraft service shows the 
concern the company has for 
the consumer after the sale is 
made. Unfortunately, this can* 
not be said for many other com- 
panies I have dealt with. 

Ed Feins WA2ZDN 
linden NJ 



WOODPECKING 

I heard something on twenty 
last night that bothered the 
heck out of me. Please recall 
the correspondence concerning 
the "Russian woodpecker" and 
its cure from about two months 
ago. If you have not heard al- 
ready, this cure (CW tones in 
pace with the radar pulses) no 
longer works. 

Apparently the defense taken 
by amateurs was too effective 
for the Russians^ for they have 
modified their system. The 
tones are no longer the broad- 
band clicks of yore, but seem 
now to be a type of broadband 
FM. It sounds like the only way 
to cope with this would be to 
sync slow-scan signals on top 
of the radar, or use recordings 
out of sync to throw off their 
video display. Either cure is 
worse than the disease, with 
slow-scan and radar recordings 
chasing the intruder up and 
down the band! 

Wayne, please tell your 
readers that any time they hear 
the "woodpecker," they should 
immediately call the nearest 
FCC monitoring station. It's 
been said before, but if they get 
bothered with enough calls, we 
may get something done. 

1 haven't listened to the 
bands in the last week or so, so 

Continued on page 176 



14 



WHEN OUR CUSTOMERS TALK 

WE LISTEN. 




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Hoooeston, (I 



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Hannover 



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RTTY Loop 



Marc L Leavey, M.D. WA3AJR 
4006 Wlnlee Road 
RaadaJlatown MD 21133 

As much as I hate to do this, I 
am starting this month's col- 
umn with a word of caution. In 
my February, 1979, '^RTTY 
Loop," I relayed a bturb sent to 
me by a firm called "Teleprinter 
Art, Ltd." in Urbana, Illinois, The 
company presented itself as a 
source for all kinds of RTTY art- 
work, at reasonable prices. Its 
catalog is decorated with 
samples and stocked with many 
delightful bargains. If only it 
were true! Over the past few 
months, I have received letters 
from several individuals who 
have ordered material from 
Teleprinter Art, Ltd., and never 
received anything but their 
cashed checks. Comrnun- 
ication with the management of 
the company has been fruitless, 
and as of this writing almost 
one month has elapsed since I 
sent a letter of inquiry to them. 
No reply has yet been received. 
While I acknowledge that to 
date there is no conclusive evi- 
dence of wrongdoing by Tele- 
printer Art, Ltd., I would urge 
anyone anticipating doing 
business with that firm to ap- 
proach the transaction with rea- 
sonable caution. If anyone has 
further experiences regarding 
this company, either positive or 
negative, I would be interested 
to hear from you. 1 shall try to 
forward any such information to 
you all as received, and to keep 
you posted on the situation in 
general. 

Moving from the question- 
ably secret to the openly clan- 
destine, many of you have been 
writing in asking about press 



and weather frequencies. Fig. 1 
is an attempt to answer some of 
those questions. Now, before 
you get all bent out of shape 
and totally snowed by the chart, 
let me do some explaining. As 
suggested a few months ago, 
most of the commercial RTTY 
stations do not transmit "ham 
standard" 60-wpm, 850-Hz or 
170-Hz shift, tow-space RTTY. 
They do send anything they 
darn well want to, including 
strange shifts, shift direction, or 
speed. Thus the table. 

Whether or not you can copy 
the transmitted shift is more a 
function of the converter than 
anything else. By straddle-tun- 
ing, almost any shift should be 
copyable. The ST-6, for exam- 
ple, can copy 425-Hz shift with 
the autostart turned off. You 
will just have to try yours and 
find out. 

The speed may present more 
of a problem if you are using a 
machine which is not geared for 
the frequentfy-tound 67 wpm 
speed. Most Model 15s and 19s 
will do fairly well if the range 
selector is set to the high end. 
Again, experimentation may be 
the best bet. 

As more of these frequencies 
are received, I will try to compile 
them and include a list, periodi- 
cally, in the column. Let me 
know what you hear, and ril 
pass it along, 

A letter received from Richard 
Black W2DBU asks about the 
use of the ASR-33 on a Bau- 
dot/Murray circuit following 
code conversion. Richard 
writes, **. . . you mentioned that 
the ASR-33 Is just too slow to re- 
ceive 60-wpm RTTY. I do not un- 
derstand this as t believe that 
the old Baudot printers could 



copy this speed. Is not 60 wpm 
about 46 baud?" 

The answer to the question 
is, "Yes and no!" While 60 wpm 
is 45.45 baud and the ASR-33 
copies at 1 10 baud (or 100 wpm), 
that is not the problem. The 
statement was made with 
respect to a code conversion 
program which used a software 
UART for receiving the RTTY. 
Thus, decoding could not begin 
until, the last data pulse had 
been received. Following de- 
coding, the data must be sent to 
the printer before the next start 
pulse is expected. In a worst- 
case situation, i.e., receiving at 
''machine speed,'' this leaves 
the length of the stop pulse, 
about 31 ms, to send the char- 
acter to the printer. In order to 
send one ASCII character in 31 
ms, you need to send at a rate of 
at least 300 baud. That is where 
the problem lies. If you are con- 
tent to pause 100 ms or so after 
each character is sent, the 
ASR-33 will be able to follow. 
But you can1 do that practical- 
ly, so you really can't use a 
110-baud printer. 

Remember, however, that the 
constraint on the system is that 
the processor must be available 
for the full time that a character 
is being received. What if, you 
might suppose^ you presented 
the entire character at one time; 
could you then use a llO-baud 
output? Of course, you cant The 
way to implement this is to use 
a hardware UART such as a 
1013 to receive the RTTY, allow 



the processor a few micro- 
seconds or so to do a code con- 
version, and dump the ASCII in- 
to another UART or ACIA. This 
woutd work just fine, but it was 
not the scheme of the program, 
Hope this clears things up for 
you, Richard. 

NEAT TRICKS DEPARTMENT 

From time to time, I will try to 
pass along some neat tricks 
which can save you time and 
money while playing with your 
RTTY. I am sure that most of 
you are aware that repiacement 
ribbons for your TeletypeTM 
machines are available at any 
stationery and many variety 
stores. No, they may not be 
labeled as such, but any ribbon 
which fits an Underwood stan- 
dard typewriter will fit yourTele- 
type machine just fine. There 
comes a time, however, when 
you need a dark Image and no 
new ribbon is available. What 
then? Well, it turns out that 
most *ight ribbons are not out of 
ink, they are just dried out. A lit- 
tle solvent wil! frequently bring 
new life to an old ribbon, with 
almost no effort. What I do is 
spray some contact cleaner 
(I use one called LPS-1) along 
the length of the ribbon while 
the machine is spacing. Don't 
spray too much or you will have 
an inky mess of a machine- You 
want to just dampen the ribbon. 
Wait overnight for the excess to 
evaporate, and you have a re- 
juvenated ribbon. Like I said, 
neat triokl 



Ff^EQUENCY(kHz> 


SHIFT 


NORM/REV 


SPEED 


COMMENTS 


14484 


425 


REV 


67 


Reuter Nevws 


14573 


? 


9 


67 


French News 


146CM3 


425 


REV 


67 


New York News 


14700 


425 


REV 


67 


Palish News 


14845 


425 


NORM 


67 


UP Mews 


14900 


425 


NORM 


67 


Spanish News 


14974 


425 


REV 


67 


English News 



Fig. t Some RTTY press frequencies. 



W2NSD/I 

NEVER SAY DIE 

editorial tDy Wayne Green 



from page 6 

manceat the iast WARC in 1959 
is any criterion, where League 
officials were flown over at 
League expense, even with their 
salaries being paid by the 
League, and for no more impor- 
tant function than to attend 
some lavish parties, then they 
might indeed run through the 
three-quarters of a million. 

Will the League again have a 
lavish suite of rooms in one of 



the most expensive hotels in 
Geneva, all paid for by some 
80,000 generous League mem- 
bers? The concept of Yankee 
thrift seems not to extend down 
to Connecticut. If you are suck- 
er enough to eagerly send in 
your hard-earned money for 
these turkeys to enjoy them- 
selves at your expense, so be it. 
While on the one hand I keep 
hearing the moans of poverty 
from Newrngton, on the other * 
look at their recent balance 



sheet and find that their net 
worth increased last year by 
almost 10%. Most firms would 
count that as a profit^ but the 
League, being "non-profit," 
shuffles the bookkeeping 
around and puts the funds into 
stocks and bonds (they have 
over $1.5 million sitting in 
securities). 

The election of directors is 
coming up this fall and half of 
the directors are up for re- 
election. If you blindly return 
these chaps to office, then you 
must share in the responsibility 
for v\/hat is happening. With the 
exception of Don IVIiller, you 
have nothing to lose by turning 
the lot of them out. Darned few 
are active hams anyway . . . they 
are politicians and they're using 
your money for gratifying their 
egos. With some new directors, 
you might have a chance of gel- 
ting the entrenched clique 



kicked out of HQ and getting 
someone with business experi- 
ence into the job. 

I think every amateur really 
wants to be able to be proud of 
the ARRL and see it regain its 
leadership position. But we 
can't respect It when we see the 
double-talk and cover-ups . . , 
and when we see everyone 
we've known at HQ for years 
getting the hell out . . . except 
for Baldwin and Dannals. 

It is the responsibility of the 
directors to see that they have 
an HQ staff which will run the 
organization in the black. It is 
the responsibility of the mem^ 
bers to see that they vote in 
directors who wiil run the 
organ iiat ion and not be buf- 
faioed by a couple of people at 
HQ- In the meanwhile, sending 
more money to the League will 

Continued on page 170 



20 



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21 



yVlicrocomputer 
Interfacing 



Jonathan A, Titus 
Ohrlsfopher A. Titus 
David G. Larsen 
Peter R. Rony 

The purpose of this month's 
column is to introduce the read- 
er to soine of the characteris- 
tics ot the Intel 8253 program- 
mable interval timer, an ex- 
tremely versatile I/O chip that 
can be used in a wide variety of 
potential applications, such as 
a real-time clock, event count- 
ing, and period counting, in ad- 
dition to the replacement of 
software-implemented timing 
loops. 

The 8253 is a 24-pin inte- 
grated circuit that requires a 
single 5-volt supply and con- 
tains three independent 16-bit 
interval timers, each of which 
can be operated in six diffefent 
modes. An interval timer has 
been defined by Graf's Modern 
Dictionary of Electronics as a 
device for measuring the time 
interval between two actions or 
a timer that switches electrical 
circuits on or off for the dura- 
tion of the preset time interval. 
Fig. 1 serves the dual purpose 
of giving the pin diagram of the 



8253 chip and shov^ing how the 
chip can be interfaced with an 
8080 A/8085-b ased m i crocom - 
puter system using memory- 
mapped I/O- 

The 8253 chip contains four 
internal registers (three interval 
timers and a control register) 
that are decoded as memory lo- 
cations 200 000 through 200 003 
with the aid of the address bus 
signals AO, A1, and A15 {see 
Fig. 1 and Table 1), Observe in 
Table 1 that the RD and WR 
control inputs determine 
whether you are loading or 
reading a specific register, it Is 
not possible to read the con- 
tents of the control register. 

Table 2 summarizes the cod- 
ing for the 8'bit control register 
within the 8253 chip. Observe 
that bits D7 and D6 determine 
the selection of the interval 
timer, bits D5 and D4 determine 
the nature of the read/write 
operation associated with the 
chosen timer, bits 03^ 02, and 
D1 determine the mode of oper- 
ation of the chosen timer, and 
bit DO determines whether the 
timer counts down in binary or 
binary-coded decimal (BCD). 

Fig. 2 provides a block dia- 



■I-5 



eMD 



D7 
D4 



WICHDCOMPUTER 



03 

Dl 
CIS 

A15 
Al 



M£MR 



HEHW 



{> 



2e 



T^LQA 



£0 



\^ 



zz 



z^ 



I I 



D7 
D€ 

D5 
I>4 
OS 
Ut 

Ql 
D« 

CS 
Al 
AO 
RD 

Wr 



CLK2 
eATE2 

OUTE 



Ck.KI 

6253 ^'^^^' 
OUT I 

CLKO 

GATED 

OUTO 



19 



l« 



IT 



IS 



Id 



IT 



a 



lip 



, FROM BIT OF 
"^ OUTPUT PORT 000 

-> TO OSCILLOSCOPE 



fig. 1. interface circuit between a 8253 programmable interval 
timer and an 8080/8065 microcomputer. The 8253 chip uses four 
locations of memory In this memory-mapped interface circuit. 



THREE -ST4TE 

BJDIRECTIONAL 
DATA BUS 



A 



\7 



t>ATA BUFFER 



\Z 



COfJTflOL 
WORD 



5 



flESeiTASLE 

DOWN 

COUNTER 




CLK 

■GATE 
OUT 



(t 

[01 



RIGGER 
OR R£SCT 



Fig. 2. Functional diagram of each of the three 16-brt Interval 
timers In the 8253 chip. The gate input acts alternatively as a gate, 
trigger, or reset input, depending upon the mode chosen. 



gram for a typical counter in the 
6253 chip. The microcomputer 
loads the 16'bit down counter 
as two successive bytes, a HI 
byte and a LO byte, via the 
bidirectional data bus, DO 
through D7. If the gate line 
GATE is active, negative edge 
transitions at the CLK input 
decrement the counter. When 
the counter reaches zero, OUT 
becomes active, its actual 
behavior depending upon the 
mode programmed into the 
control register for the counter 
(see Table 2). The 8253 chip 
contains three independent 
16-bit counters, and each can 
be programmed independently 
in any one of the six modes of 
operation. The counter inputs 
and outputs, CLK, GATE, and 
OUT, for the chosen counter are 
independent of the CLK, GATE, 



and OUT input/output of the re- 
maining two counters on the 
chip. 

In addition to the address 
bus, data bus, and control bus 
connections shown in Fig. 1, 
the CLKO and GATEO inputs to 
counter #0 are respectively 
connected to the +2 (TTL) 
microcomputer clock output 
(typically 2 MHz) and to bit of 
accumulator output port 000. 
Any TTL level clock with a fre- 
quency of less than 2 MHz can 
be used as input to CLKO, and 
any suitably debounced switch 
or source of strobe pulses can 
be used to control the timer at 
GATEO. The output of the 
counter OUTO can be connect- 
ed to an oscilloscope to permit 
observation of each of the six 
timer modes of operation. 















Mimory address in 














demansifattDn 














(imgram and 


CS RD WR Al 


AO 




Interface circuil 


G 


t 











Load COunler WQ- 


200 000 





1 








1 


Load Gounier Wl 


200 001 





1 


D 


1 





Load counter #2 


aoo 002 





1 





1 


1 


Load control register 


200 003 








1 








Read coy titer #C 


200 000 








1 





t 


Read counter #1 


200 001 








1 


1 





Read counter #2" 


200 002 





G 


1 


1 


1 


Ho operation 
[three slat??) 


"■ 


1 


Xa 


X 


X 


X 


(three state) 


^~ 





1 


1 


X 


% 


No operation 
(ihree stated 


" 



X^ " don't care {logrt urlogFC 1). 



Table 1. Addressing the 8253 programmable Interval timer. 



D3 

ij 


X 

1 
1 



Bits 
D7 





t 

! 
OS 



Q 

1 

1 



1 

1 


Q 



D6 

1 

1 

04 

1 

1 

D1 
Q 
1 


1 


1 


1 



Control 1 unction 

Control word i^ lor count&r #0 
COTiiTOl word bs (or counter #t 
CorHfol word is for counter #2 



Latch bolh bytes of chosen counter for read operalEon 
Lo|£l or readonly most significant byte ot chosen cotmter 
Load or read only Ifiaat $ignifican1 byte of chosen courrter 
Load or read LS byte first, then MS byte of chosen coyntsf 

Mode 0: Oulput = 1 on ^ero coLinler 

Modfi 1: Retrlggerable variable-widm on^.sfiol 

Mode 2: Prograniimatjte rate gerierator 

Mode 3: PrD^r^mmabl^ square wave genqrat&r 

Mode 4; Delayed strobe (softwat e triggered strobe) 

fWgde- S: Triggered s|roJ>e (h^rdwar^ triggi?red strobe^ 

Count down in binary 

Counl down iri binary-coded decimal {6CD) 



X^ " don't care (logJcO Of logic 1). 

Table 2. Coding for the 8'bit control register In the 8253 chip. 



Ham Help 



1 need some help. I have 
recently inherited a Ham- 
marlund HQ-120X receiver and I 
am badly in need of a diagram. If 
anyone out there can help, I 
would gladly pay for copying 
costs. Thank you. 

Louis A. Johnson 

32 Crosscreek Drive, Apt. I 3 

Charlestown SO 29412 

I am in need of maintenance 
manuals for the following: 

1, Standard signal generator, 
model 82, manufactured by the 



Measurements Corporation of 
Boonton IMJ. 

2. Frequency meter, FM14 
A/U, made by Sentinel Elec- 
tronics, Inc. 

3. Signal generator, TS-323 
U/R. 

I will be happy to purchase 
these manuals or copies of the 
pertinent maintenance data, 
schematics, etc., and pay cost 
of mailing, 

Robert L. Marcon W5CBW 

Rt. 7, BOK 96A 

Lucedale MS 39452 



22 



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Squelch Unit • FP-4 AC Power Supply 



CPU-2500R/K 2M FM Transceiver 

with Central Processing Unit 



The age of computers has entered the amateur scene 
with the announcement of the CPU-2500R/K 2-meter 
FM transceiver. Controlled by a 4-bit central processing 
unit (CPU), the CPU-2500R/K contains a scanner, 4 
memory channels, manual or automatic tone burst, an 
optiona! sub-audib!e lone squelch, and 25 watts output. 

The keyboard microphone allows two-tone input for 
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Automatic ±600 kHz repeater split, or program a split up 
to 4 MHz using the memory. Keyboard microphone 
albws remote programming of odd splits. 

CPU scanner will search for a busy or clear channel, 
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23 



Awox6s 



Bill GoEney WB7BFK 
2665 North 1250 East 
WhidtBy tstartd 
Oak Harbor WA 93277 

Note: The address shown for 
Bilt Gosney in the August issue 
of 73 was moorrect. The correct 
address Is that showr^ above. 

As editor of 73'B newest col- 
umn, Tm quite Impressed with 
the warm reception received 
from so many of our readers sit- 
uated throughout the world. Ob* 
viously, my recent announce* 
ment of an exclusive 73 Awards 
Program has turned quite a few 
heads and stimulated the Inter- 
est of a great many. I thank you 
all for your written support arriv- 
ing from ait continents on the 
globe. 

Without further to-do, let's 
turn to part II of our two-part 
series and learn for the first 
time about the four stateside 
award programs being spon- 
sored by 73, Keep in mind that 
these awards were not meant to 
be an overnight venture nor 
were they designed to duplicate 
any in existence today. Each of- 
fers its own degree of difficulty 
and creates a sense of accom- 
plishment amongst those who 
are happy recipients. 

WORK ALL USA AWARD 

Sponsored by the editors of 
73 t^agazine, this award is avail- 
able to licensed amateurs 
throughout the world. To be 
valid, all contacts must be 
made January 1, 1979, or after. 
There are no band or mode re^ 
strictions; however, singie-band 
accomplishments will be recog- 
nized. 

To qualify, applicants must 
work each of the 50 US states 
within the same calendar year 
(January 1 through December 
31)* Annual endorsements will 
be afforded those applicants 
who can substantiate their 
claim. 

To apply for the Work All USA 
Award, make a self-prepared list 
of claimed contacts In alpha- 
betical order by US state, begin- 
ning with the state of Alabama. 
Indicate the state, the callsign 
of the station worked, the date 
and lime in GMT. and the band 
and the mode of operation. 

Do not sent QSL cards! Have 
your fist of contacts verified by 
two amateurs, a local secretary, 
or 3 notary public. Forward your 
application along with the 
award fee of S3 00 or 8 mCs to: 
Bill Gosney WB7BFK, 73 
Awards Editor, 2665 North 1250 
East, Oak Harbor, Whidbey 
Island, Washington 98277 USA, 

As you quickly surmised, the 
Work All USA Award with its 



1 2-month limitation, more or 
less in a manner of speaking, 
separates the men from the 
boys when it cbmes to working 
all states. 

Regardless of how difficult it 
may first appear, applicants 
who choose to work a few of the 
contesting events held each 
month or check into a few of the 
WAS nets will find the USA 
Award a relatively easy accom- 
plishment. 

Now, on the other hand, 
should you care to undertake an 
even greater challenge, take a 
hard look at this next award. 
This one was designed to ap- 
pear fairly simple at first glance, 
but will drive you right up the 
wall with frustration as it is pur- 
sued. Known as the District En- 
durance Award, you* 1 1 need to 
find yourself an accurate time- 
piece, as you'll have exactly six- 
ty minutes to work all US call 
districts. Simple, huh? Read on; 
there is a catch: 

DISTRICT ENDURANCE 
AWARD 

This award, sponsored by the 
editors of 73 hAagaime, is of- 
fered to licensed amateurs 
throughout the world. To be 
valid, all contacts must be 
made January 1, 1979, or after. 
There will be no band or mode 
restrictions. Contacts while a 
contest station or whrle working 
a contest station will not be 
allowed. Likewise, contacts 
made on any type of net opera- 
tions will be invalid. 

To quality for this award, 
applicants must work all ten US 
call districts in one hour or less. 
The time will commence the 
moment the first contact is 
made and will end with the time 
logged for the last district re- 
quired. 

To apply, applicants must 
prepare a signed declaration 
that all contacts were indepen- 
dent of contest or net opera- 
tions. Applications should in- 
clude a self-prepared list of 
claimed contacts in order of 
their prefix. Include the dale 
and time worked in GMT, the 
band and mode of operation, 
and the state, 

Do not send QSL cards! Have 
your list of contacts verified by 
at least two amateurs^ a local 
radio club secretary; or a notary 
public. Forward your applica- 
tion atong with the award fee of 
S3.CKJ or 8 IRCs to the attention 
of: Bill Gosney WB7BFK, 73 
Awards Editor, 2665 North 1250 
East, Oak Harbor, Whidbey 
Island, Washington 98277 USA. 

What would an awards pro- 
gram be like without some sort 
of QRP incentive? With this in 
mind, the editors of 73 feature a 



special ten-meter achievement 
award. Being an avid user of 
converted Citizens Band equip* 
ment, I found personal interest 
in this award and hope our 
readers will share the chah 
lenge, 

TEN METER 10-40 AWARD 

AvaiUble to licensed 
amateurs worldwide, this award 
sponsored by the editors of 73 
Magazme offers a challenge 
second to none. To be valid, all 
contacts must be made on the 
lO-meter band using only 
"channelized'' converted 
Citizens Band equipment or 
similar type ^'commercial 
units/' Power Is limited to 15 
Watts pep output. External 
amplifiers may not be used. 

To be eligible, all contacts 
must be made October 1, 1978, 
or after on either AM. SSS, CW, 
or FM. Mixed mode contacts are 
not valid. 

To qualify for this Ten-Meter 
Award, applicant must work 
and confirm at least forty (40) of 
the 50 US states. An endorse- 
ment for all fifty states will be 
issued to those who verify their 
claim. 

To apply, make a list of con* 
tacts in alphabetical order by 
US stale beginning with Ala- 
bama. Include the full callsign, 
date and time worked in GMT, 
band and mode of operation, 
and a brief description of the 
equipment used for each con- 
tact claimed. 

Do not send QSL cards? Have 
your list verified by two 
amateurs, a local radio club 
secretary, or a notary public. 
Send your application along 
with your award fee of $3.00 and 
8 IRCs to: Bill Gosney WB7BFK, 
73 Awards Editor, 2665 North 
1250 East, Oak Harbor, Whidbey 
Island. Washington 98277 USA, 

As noted in the Ten-Meter 
Award rules, recognition is 
given for single-mode contacts 
only. To the best of my knowl- 
edge, this award is the only one 
in existence that offers FM en- 
dorsement. Should you or a 
friend be involved in the latest 
craze of 1 0-meter FM operation, 
be sure to pass the word along 
that we have an award designed 
especially for you. While you 
are at It, why not lend your Sep- 
tember as well as this October 
issue of 73 to fellow amateurs 
who are not aware of our new 
awards program? All eight 
domestic and DX achievements 
are outlined. 

Though the title may be de- 
ceiving, this next award is prob- 
abiy the ultimate in our 
domestic program. Consider it 
the toughest to attain. A look at 
the requirements clearly iden* 
lilies the degree of difficulty in 
obtaining this award. Luckily 
we were sympathetic enough to 
eliminate any time limitations. 



CENTURY CITIES AWARD 

This award, sponsored by the 
editors of 73 Magazine, is avail- 
able to licensed amateurs 
throughout the world. Designed 
as a dual Work-All-USA effort, 
the applicant who qualifies for 
this accompMshment will 
realize he has achieved what is 
probably the greatest feat in do- 
mestic award programs avail- 
able today. 

As with alt the 73-sponsored 
awards, with the exception of 
the 10-meter Incentives, all con- 
tacts must be made January t, 
1979, or after to be valid. 

To qualify, the applicant must 
work and confirm a minimum of 
two cities or towns in each of 
the fifty (50) US states for a total 
of 100 US cities. 

To apply, prepare a list of 
claimed contacts, listing each 
one in alphabetical order by 
state. As shown below, include 
the full callsign of the station 
worked, the date, the band, and 
the city. Beginning with Ala- 
bama, your list will look some- 
thing like the following exam* 
pie: 

Alabama -W4Z22, March 31, 
1979, 14 MHz, Decatur; N4XXY, 
February 1, 1979, 21 MHz, 
Mobile. Alaska-KL7AB, 
January 22, 1979, 7 MHz, An* 
chorage; WL7WW, May 19, 
1979, 28 MHz, Fairbanks. 

Do not send QSL cards with 
your application! Have your list 
of contacts verified by two ama- 
teurs, a local radio club secre- 
tary, or a notary public. Enclose 
your verified list along with the 
award fee of $3.00 or S IRCs and 
send to: Bill Gosney WB7BFK, 
73 Awards Editor, 2665 North 
1250 East, Oak Harbor, Whidbey 
Island, Washington 98277 USA, 

ARROWHEAD RADIO 

AMATEUR FIFTY-YEAR 

CERTIFICATE 

A free certificate is being 
offered by the Arrowhead Radio 
Amateur Ciub of Duluth, Minn- 
esota/Superior« Wisconsin, to 
celebrate fifty years of orga- 
nized amateur radio in the Twin 
Ports area. 

For this award, any amateur 
within fifty air miles of 
Duluth/Superlor is considered 
an Arrowhead amateur. To re- 
ceive this award, US and Cana- 
dian amateurs must work five 
Arrowhead amateurs; all 
foreign amateurs must work 
two Arrowhead amateurs dur- 
ing the month of October, 1979, 

Contacts made during the 
Arrowhead Radio Amateurs Fif- 
tieth Anniversary QSO Party on 
October 20 and 21, 1979, may be 
used for this certificate. 

Logs must show band, mode. 
date, time in UTC. and stations 
worked to receive this award* 
Send logs, with SASE or IRC, to 
Arrowhead Radio Certificate, 

Continued on page t76 



24 



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MicrQplione not incliKted 



The VBC Model 3000, the worid's firat and only 
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For present VBC users we can provide a list of 
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The VBC Model 3000 provides full audio level compressfon 
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ampjitude compression and expansion used for many 
years in telephone and satellite communications. 
The Model 3000 is for mobile and fixed station use and 
requires no modifications to your existing equipment. It is 
completely self contained, including its own audio 
amplifier. The unit automatically switches into transmit 



NEW TOLL FREE OflDEfl NUMBEfl: [800] 4ZI-^1 

For all states excepr Call torn ia. 

CaJif. resittents please call collect on our regufar numbers. 



mode when microphone is keyed or voice operation is 
used. It connects just after the microphone on transmit and 
just prior to the speaker on receive. In addition to its basic 
function of operating in a narrow bandwidth, the Model 
3000 also increases the performance of your station in the 
following ways: 

• Reduces adjacent channel interference 

• Increases signal to noise ratio 

• Increases communications range 

Some of its outstanding features include: 

• High quality narrow band speech 

• Self contained transmit/receive adapter 

• Built in audio amplifier 

• 5 active filters with a total of 52 poles 

• Rugged dependable hybrid IC technology 

• Low power consumption 

Receive only features, such as sharp voice and CW filtering 
and amplitude expansion, provide improved reception 
without requiring a unit at the transmitting station. 
For the more advanced experimenter the Model 3000 Is 
available In a circuit board configuration for building into 
your present transceiver. 

Henry Radio is ready to offer technical assistance and 
advice on the use and servicing of the Model 3000 and will 
help introduce new owners to others operating NBVM 
units. Get in on the ground floor... order yours now. 
Price; VBC Model 3000 $349.00 

Circuit board configuration $275.00 
For more detailed information please call or write. The 
Model 3000 will be available from most Tempo dealers 
throughout the LI.S. and abroad. 




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llnijot^l Fr«G c:{7r«rig« M4\4JIMHi Cnm^R *l(h »iif Dobk! 
mic iritt Sll(!«^ r«[n()]« Inrjui nF mtmnrv nr tjl«t Iih||,. ^ni^ft p w " 
BfilPinlnfl, lii* ifloetts* Bsl»n1.iii'. in i HHr i fAJi* I^^W1 Foi 
AUtepRlCh IWi.Qa'llil Call Icr fipotfl 



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AMPMFIER 

t4«| HtebtfUBliii cr¥k<3 fflUn: Hjii It^Sft'tEAl IV di>v* "mi i?i, 
tmm Mrt4umuiip« iit w^c m^M k; i^ ■ fanpi l»riBf> mum n ib 
inpl L'3*VAC51]'MHir«^«9f Kinput l KWCK vn ''HJTtt PM' ■^■■H 
IpMHu^ OtiOilubeFllllQftl nn.H ^ittrfiir ChiAW 




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%Brv namt it«ti MtJU irt*iM)4iii9 [aH iiulii4 Hki tandt, wri Hiiir 



ALPHA 
76 A 

AlpM 704 by ETDflrrvi ry1l pBMir iptltvdiMi-lDpcanMftfvhHe* 
41 rir#d up 19 2.SKW l^P Sse, tlVW ■vtrtM C^ TuntMv 
1 B~/'M^i. J-MHKr Kwnlnil «iim* it IWWMl^, H W ckhIk 
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LM tl.lH— Can iHfw Qvet* 



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141-141 HNf IFM IrMMiriid Hinil 

MM fiai ffinnritl pini <rtx«t, Mi 
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For Gompftcl AnlAn na hirHin, CW ksfwm 
flnd iihJIq filters — 

lt'» MF J1 
Giv* u« a call to quota y'oijr iiMdtl 



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ISO Watts 

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160 Wans 



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2S1.9S 
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189 95 
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Ali Units «fid Accsis&rtvi 

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lOMdl&Mwiilotf 25i.Q0 

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pasLicAiroNS 

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U S CalliWOh 15.95 

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73 Qenerat Study Gyfde 4.95 
Plus Much Mof*i Cill Usf 



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ifigauge solid copp€fweld 50' 1.09 

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OUR FIHE REPUTATION SPEAKS FOR ITSELF , . •"YOU SHIP IT ^ WE FIX IT 

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''Near ARRL Headquarters'' 

Connecticut Residents Call: 203-667-0811 

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EASY DIRECTIONS: fit 15 Soyth — 2 blocks pas! McDonald s (Berim TufnpiKeJ 



SUB-DEALER INQUIRIES INVITED! (Send letterhead for complete package^ 



Confesfs 



Robert Baker WBZGPE 
75 Windsor Or, 
A too NJ 08004 

CALIFORNIA QSO PARTY 
Starts: 1800 GMT October 6 
Ends: 2359 GMT October 7 

Smgleoperalor stations are 
limited to 24 hours operating 
time witii on and off periods 
clearJy marked in the log. Multi* 
operator stations may operate 
the full 30 hours. Stations may 
be worked once per band per 
mode, simplex only. CA sta- 
tions that change counties may 
be considered new stations. 
EXCHANGE: 

CA stations send QSO 
number and county. All others 
send QSO number and state, 
province, or ARRL country. 
FREQUENCIES: 

CW— 1805, 3560, 7060, 14060, 
21060, 28060. 

SSB-1815, 3895. 7230. 
14280, 

Novice CW— 3725. 7125. 
21125.28125. 
SCORiNG: 

Each complete contact is 
worth 2 points; CA stations 
count the 50 states plus VO/VE 
1*7 and VY1 for a maximum of 58 
multipliers; non-CA stations will 
use the number of different CA 
counties worked ► a maximum of 
58. Final score equals QSO 
points times the multiplier. 
ENTRIES: 

Summary sheet and logs 
must be postmarked not later 
than November 1 and sent to; 



NCCC, c/o Alan Brubaker K6X0, 
34456 Coiville Place, Fremont 
CA 94536. Please include a 
business-size SASE with your 
entry. Awards for individuais 
and clubs will be awarded. 

QRP ANNUAL OCTOBER 

QSO PARTY 

Starts: 2000 GMT Saturday, 

October 6 

Ends: 0200 GMT Sunday, 
October 7 

Sponsored by the QRP 
Amateur Radio Club Interna- 
tional, Inc, the contest is open 
to ail amateurs and all are eligi- 
ble for the awards, Stations can 
be worked once per band for 
QSO and multiplier credits. 
General call is "CO QRP;" 
EXCHANGE: 

Members send RS(T}, state/ 
province/country, QRP number. 
Non-members send RSfT), slate/ 
province/country, power input 
In Watts, 
SCORfNG: 

Each member QSO counts 3 
points. Non-members count 2 
pomts per QSO. Stations other 
than WA/E count as 4 points. 
Multipliers are as follows: more 
than 100 Watts input -x1,25lo 
100 Walts =x1.5, 5 to 25 Walts 
input = x2, 1 to 5 Walts input = 
x3. and less than 1 Watt input = 
x5. Final score is QSO points 
times total number of states/ 
provinces/countries per band 
times the power multiplier. 
FREQUENCtES: 

CW— 1810, 3560, 7060, 1406D, 



Del 6 7 



Oct 13-14 



Oct 20-21 



Oct 27-28 
Oct 28 
Nov 3-4 

Nov 10-11 

Nov 11 
Nov 1M8 

Nov 24 
Nov 24 25 
Nov 25 

Dec 1-2 

Dec 1-3 

Dec 8-9 



Calendar 



QRP Annual October QSO Party 
Califomia OSO Party 
VK/ZL/Oceania DX Contest— Phone 
ARRL CD Party— CW 

Land QSO Party 
VK/ZUOceania DX Contest— CW 
RSGB 21/28 MHz— Phone 
ARRL CD Party— Phone 

Arrowhead Fiftieth Anniversary QSO Party 

WADM Contest 

Jamboree on the Air 

RSGB 7 MHz— Phone 

CQ Worldwide DX Contest— Phone 

Crazy Eight Net QSO Party 

ARRL Sweepstakes— CW 

RSGB 7 MHz— CW 

CQ-WE Contest 

1 PA Contest 
OK DX Contest 

ARRL Sweepstakes— Phone 
Austrian 160 CW Contest 
DAFG Short Contest— SW 
CQ Worldwide DX Contest— CW 
DAFG Short Contest— VHF 
ARRL 160 Meter Contest 
North Carolina QSO Party 
Connecticut QSO Party 
ARRL 10 Meter Contest 



21060, 28060, 50360. 

SSB — 1810, 3985, 7285, 
14285.28885,50385. 

Novice— 3710, 7110, 21110, 
28110. 

All frequencies plus or minus 
6 kHz to clear QRM. 
AWARDS: 

Certificates to the highest* 
scoring station in each state, 
province, or country. Other 
places will be given depending 
on activity. One certificate for 
the station showing three 
**skip" contacts using lowest 
power. 
ENTRIES: 

Send full log data. Including 
tuil name, address, and bands 
used, plus equipment, anten- 
nas, and power used. Entrants 
desiring result sheet and scores 
please enclose a business-size 
SASE. Logs must be received by 
October 31 to qualify. Send all 
logs and data to; QRP ARC Con- 
test Chairman, E. V. Sandy 
Blaize W5TVW, 417 Rtdgewood 
Drive, Metairie LA 70001. 

9'LAND QSO PARTY 

Starts: 1800 GMT Saturday, 
October 13 

Ends: 2359 GMT Sunday, 
Octotier 14 

A maximum of 24 of the 
30-hour period may be worked. 
EXCHANGE: 

9*land stations send RST^ 
county, and stale. All others 
send RST, state, province* or 
ARRL country. The same sta- 
tion may be worked once per 
band and mode. If any station 
change counties, it may be 
worked again. 
SUGGESTED FREQUENCtES: 

CW— 1805, 3560, 7060, 14060. 
21060,28060, -^VHF. 

SSB — 1B15, 3895. 7230, 
14280, 21355, 28600, 4- VHF. 

Novice— 3725. 7125, 21125. 



26125. 
AWARDS: 

Certificate to top score in 
each stale, province, and ARRL 
country, 2nd and 3rd if justified. 
Also top mobile, portable, multi- 
single, muiti-muUi, club, and 
t^ovice, 
SCORING: 

Each QSO is worth 2 points. 
Scores shall be computed as 
follows: 9'land — (#QSOs) 
(states + provinces -*- ARRL 
countries + 9-land counties) (2 
points/QSO) =total; others— (#- 
QSOs) (94and counties) (2 
points/QSO) =lotaL 
REPORTING: 

Submit summary sheet and 
log. Each new multiplier shall 
be clearly indicated. Send logs 
and a large SASE to 111 Wind 
Contesters, c/o John W. Slkora 
WB91WN, 8155 Woodlawn 
Street, Munster IN 46321, for 
results, 

ARROWHEAD FIFTIETH AN- 
NIVERSARY QSO PARTY 

Operating periods: 
1500 GMT October 20 to 0300 

GMT October 21 
1500 GMT to 2359 GMT Octo- 
ber 2t 
This QSO party is sponsored 
by the Arrowhead Radio Ama- 
teurs Club and is to help cele- 
brate fifty years of organized 
amateur radio in the Ouluth MN- 
Superior Wl area. The club was 
first affiliated with the ARRL in 
1929. The contest is open to all 
radio amateurs. All amateurs 
within 50 air miles of Duluth/Su- 
perlof are considered Arrow- 
head amateurs in this contest. 
Arrowhead amateurs may work 
anyone; amateurs outside the 
area may work only Arrowhead 
amateurs. The same station 

Cominu^d on page 174 



Results 



RESULTS OF THE 1979 COUNTY HUNTERS SSB CONTEST 



Fixod 


Mobif 


N7TT/2 


2,034.760" 


N4UF 


555,365 •• 


WD4FGW 


83S,83S* 


AI5P 


477,688* * 


WA9MSW 


809.710* 


K3KX 


253.242* 


WB4UPW 


786,828* 


WA9YJL 


94,188* 


W8WT 


346,104* 


WiBK 


62,964* 


K9QT0 


341,964* 


W5AWT 


51,531* 


W7JYW 


173,019* 


WflEWH 


48,160* 


WB9DCZ 


16S.20O* 


VE3IR 


17,861* 


WA2GPT 


83,185* 


KODZG 


15,067* 


W1DIT 


64.288* 






WD4PZN 


60,288* 


WOQWS 


343,555 


N7SU 


54,802 


(check log) 


WD8M0G 


50,400 






VE3RN 


39,344 


i 


DX 


K2EL 


8,250 


CT1BY 


61 ,236* * 


KflBBH 


5,610 


I2PHN 


48,440* 


N50Q 


3,320 


VK4VU 


45,268* 


WA9WGJ 


3.124 


CT1TZ 


1,804 


WB1ANT 


1,088 


LA5YF 


1,612* 


VE31R 


460 


StVL 


**Plaque Winner 


SWL-NU4276** 


'Certificate Rectpi«nt 


Netherla 


nds 24,336 



28 



OSCAR Orbits 



Courtesy of AMSA T 



The listed data tells you the time and place that OSCAR 7 and 
OSCAR 8 cross the equator m an ascending orbit for the ffrst time 
each day. To catcylate successive OSCAR 7 orbits, make a list of 
the first orbit number and the next twelve orbits for that day. List 
the time of the first orbit. Each successive orbit is 115 minutes 
later (two hours less five minutes). The chart gives the longitude of 
the day's first ascending (northbound) equatorial crossing. Add 
29' for each succeeding orbit. When OSCAR is ascending on the 
other side of the world from you. it will descend over you. To find 
the equatorial descending longitude, subtract 166 '^ from the 
ascending longitude. To find the time OSCAR 7 passes the North 
Pofe, add 29 minutes to the time it passes the equator You should 
be abte to hear OSCAR 7 when U Is within 45 degrees of you. The 
easiest way to determine if OSCAR is above the horizon (and thus 
within range) at your location Is to take a globe and draw a circle 
with a radius of 2450 miles (4000 kilometers) from your QTH. If 
OSCAR passes above that circle, you should be able to hear U. If it 
passes right overhead, you should hear it for about 24 minutes 
totaL OSCAR 7 will pass an imaginary tine drawn from San Fran- 
cisco to Norfolk about 12 nnfnutes after passing the equator. Add 
about a minute for each 200 miles that you live north of this line. If 
OSCAR passes 15*" east or west of you, add another minute; at 30 ^ 
three minutes; at 46*. ten minutes. Mode A: 145.85-.95 MHz uplink, 
29.4-29.5 MHz downlink, beacon at 29,502 MHz, Mode B: 
432.1 25-. 175 MHz uplink, 145,975-.925 MHz downlink, beacon at 
145,972 MHz. 

OSCAR 8 calcuiations are similar to those for OSCAR 7. with 
some important eKceplions. Instead of making 13 orbits each day, 
OSCAR 8 makes 14 orbits during each 24-hour period. The orbital 
period of OSCAR 8 is therefore somewhat shorter: 103 minutes. 



To calculate successive OSCAR 8 orbits, make a list of the first 
orbit numt>er (from the OSCAR 8 chart) and the next thirteen orbits 
for that day. List the time of the first orbit. Each successive orbit is 
then 103 minutes later. The chart gives the longitude of the day's 
first ascending equatorial crossing. Add 26^ for each succeeding 
orbit. To find the time OSCAR 8 passes the North Pole, add 26 
minutes to the time it crosses the equator. OSCAR 8 will cross the 
Imaginary San Francisco-to-Norfoik line about 11 minutes after 
crossing the equator. Mode A: 145,85',95 MHz uplink, 29.4 29.50 
MHz downlink, beacon at 29.40 MHz. Mode J: 146.90-146.00 MHz 
uplink, 435.20 435.10 MHz down fink, beacon on 435.090 MHz. 



OSCAft 7 Orbital Ir 


itofrrtjiHon 


OSCARS Of bit^l Inl 


(^^rmat^DTt 


Drtill 


Data 


Time 


Longitude 


Ofbtl 


Oste 


Time 


Long it ud? 




(OctJ 


IGMTJ 


CniM4fis ^W 




(Ocl> 


{omy 




22304qfp 


1 


0113:01 


M-9 


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1 


0004 26 


4TS 


22316 


2 


0012:21 


68,7 


fl025Abn 


2 


0009^05 


4SS 


22S?tX 


3 


mo&J3s 


S2l3 


803SX 


3 


0014:44 


50.2 


22341 


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mx&^6 


67^ 


e053ADn 


4 


0019 53 


515 


22^4 


5 


OT0015 


mM 


eOBJAbn 


5 


mmm 


52.8 


2Z367 


fi 


0154:32 


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fi 


003012 


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22379 


7 


0053:52 


79J 


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7 


003521 


55 4 


22332qtji 


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014B-QS 


92-8 


B109A^ 


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0040:30 


567 


22A&A 


9 


0CM7:29 


77.6 


8l23Abn 


9 


0045:39 


5a.o 


224UX 


10 


0141:46 


912 


8137X 


10 


0050:48 


59.3 


22429 


11 


0041:06 


76.1 


eiSIAbn 


11 


0055:57 


&0.6 


22442 


12 


0135:23 


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ei65Abn 


12 


0101:06 


61.9 


22454 


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0034:44 


R5 


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13 


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63,2 


22467 


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3B.1 


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14 


011124 


64.5 


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0028:21 


?ao 


a207Abfi 


15 


0116 33 


658 


22432 


ie 


0122:3a 


866 


022lAbn 


18 


Oiai 42 


67.1 


22504X 


17 


002T:5B 


71 4 


a235X 


17 


0126 51 


684 


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ie 


0116:15 


050 


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0132 00 


mr 


22529 


19 


0015:35 


69.9 


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T9 


0137 09 


710 


22542 


20 


010t:52 


83 5 


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20 


014218 


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22554 


21 


0009:12 


68.3 


B290Jbfi 


21 


0004 13 


47B 


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0103:29 


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B304Atin 


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0009 22 


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0002.50 


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0151:23 


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609 



FCC 



Some 73 r&aders have m- 
quired about the iegaUty of 
building and using the MDS 
receiving system featured in the 
August, 1979, issue C'You Can 
Watch Those Secret TV Chan- 
neis*% in response to these in- 
quiries, an FCC Public Notice 
{dated January 24, 7979) on 
MDS is reproduced here. 

The key issue seems to be 
whether the reception of MDS 
transmissions by an amateur 
experimenter constitutes an it- 
fegat '"benefit" under Section 
605 of the Communications Act. 
Before you construct your own 
MDS receiving system, we urge 
you to read the material below. 

UNAUTHORIZED INTERCEP- 
TION AND USE OF MULTI- 
POINT DISTRIBUTION 
SERVICE (MDS) 
TRANSMISSIONS 

In response to a few informal 
fnquiries and complatnts, this 
Notice is 3 reminder ttiat the un- 
authorized reception and ben- 
eficial use of addressed com- 
munications in the Multipomt 
Distribution Service (MDS) Is a 
violation of Section 605 of the 
Communications Act of 1934 
(47 U,S.C, §605). 

MDS m a common carrier ser- 
vice which utilizes an omnidi- 
rectional radio transmission to 
distribute addressed broad- 



band communications (usually 
forms of television infofmation) 
tor simultaneous reception at 
multiple fixed receive points by 
the members of commercial, or 
other institutional, subscribers 
in accordance with their 
specific transmission, recep- 
tion, and informational require- 
ments. 

MDS stations are not tefe* 

vision broadcasting stations, 
They operate on microwave 
radio frequencies (2150-2162 
MHz) which are allocated for 
common carrier service be- 
tween fixed points, and which, 
because of their high fre- 
quency, are not receivable by 
conventional television or other 
receivers. Additional equipment 
is required to down-convert or to 
demodulate the microwave sig- 
nal before it can be utilized by 
those television receivers, fac- 
simile terminals, or computer 
data display terminals autho- 
rized to receive the communica- 
tion by its sender. 

Nor are MDS stations dis- 
seminating radio communica- 
tions intended to be received by 
the general public. MDS station 
transmissions generally con- 
sist of various forms of private 
television, high-speed com- 
puter data, facsimite, control 
information, or other forms of 



addressed broadband commu- 
nications. This programming is 
provided to the station by its in- 
stitutional subscr]t}er and is in- 
tended to be received only by 
members of the subscriber 
organization located at the 
multiple receive points. The 
MDS station transmits this pro- 
gramming pursuant to a federal- 
iy-regulated tariff and is respon- 
sible for both its transmission 
and reception under Section 
21.903 of the Commission's 
Rules and Regulations (47 
C.F.a §21.903)< Although this 
rule permits the station's insti- 
tutional subscriber the option 
of owning the microwave receiv- 
ing equipment, such equipment 
must be instated, maintained, 
and operated pursuant to the 
carrier's instruction and con- 
trol. 

Section 605 of the Communi- 
cations Act makes it unlawful: 

—for a person not authorized 
by the sender to intercept radio 
communications and divulge or 
publish the existence, contents, 



substance, purport, effect, or 
meaning thereof to any per- 
sons; or^ 

—for a person not entitled 
thereto to receive radio commu- 
nications and use such commu- 
nication or any part thereof for 
his own benefit or for the 
benefit of another who is not en- 
titled thereto (emphasis added). 

Because materlaf transmit- 
ted over stations is not Intended 
to be ^'broadcast'' material 
within the meaning of Section 
605, authority for its reception 
and use must be given by the 
sender. Therefore, persons will 
be in violation of the law if they 
divulge, publish, or use for their 
own benefit any MDS communi* 
cations which they were not 
authorized to receive. 

Violations of Section 605 can 
result In either criminal pro- 
secution or civil tawsuit, or 
both. See KMLH Broadcasting 
Corp^ y. Twentieth Century 
Cigarette Vending Corp., 264 F. 
Supp, 35 (CD, Calif. 1967), 



I 



Ham Help 



I have a Heathkit^SB-llOA 
6m SSB/CW transceiver. I was 
thinking about getting a new rig 
that was more up to date, but 
after I saw the price tags on 
them, I decided to keep the 
110A. Can anyone recommend a 
noise blanker for this rig? 



Td like also to find out about 

all mods that can be done to the 

SB-110Ato modernize it. I would 

appreciate any information that 

anyone can give me. Thanks. 

SSG Gary Kohtala HL9TG 

USAFS^K, Box 194 

APO San Francisco 96271 



29 



N2W Products 



ICOM'S IC-701 ALLBAND ALL- 
SOLID-STATE TRANSCEIVER 

When an Icom IC-701 trans- 
ceiver arrived at the 73 shack, I 
was pleasantly surprised by the 
size of the three boxes that the 
rig, its companion power sup- 
ply, and several other accesso- 
ries were packed in. Times had 
certainly changed from when 1 
stumbted through the door with 
a brand new tube-type rig just a 
few years ago. The 70 Vs size 
(111 mm X 221 mm x 311 mm) 
and 7.3-kg weight malie it an 
ideal competitor in the growing 
mobile radio market. 

There is no tune-up to worry 
about, since the radio is broad- 
banded. You just set the band 
and frequency and start talk- 
ing, Ws almost as easy as 
operating a 2-meter rig. The 701 
has full coverage of the HF 
spectrum In the USB, LSB, CW, 
and RTTY modes. Receive ca- 
pability for the 15-MHz WWV 
signal is also included. 

After the rig was unpacked, 
there was concern as to how 
such a small box could possi- 
bly do so much. The controls 
seemed to be crowded and it 
looked easy to make a mistake* 
A month of operating has 
proven this to be an ill-founded 
fear. The front panel is well laid 
out— Icom certainly engineered 
it well. 

The solid-state finals ddh't 
need any coaxing to reach their 
rated 200^ Watt input leveL A 
thermostatically controlled fan 
is included, but in normal SSB 
use it has never had to kick in. 
This rig runs cool. It is impor- 
tant to use a well matched an- 
tenna with your 701, a small 
price to pay in an age when 
many ham shacks have anten- 
na tuners already. If the trans- 
mitter does overhieat, the f I ash- 
ing frequency display lets you 







p*-1t-(« &^, 



MtTBft f^. 






know that lt*s time to pull the 
switch and find out what's 
wrong. 

Versatile Vfos 

Anyone who operates 73's 
IC'701 mentions the synthe- 
sized tuning as an outstanding 
feature. The computer-compat- 
ible tuning system allows 
1 10'Hz increments m frequency 
selection. Even the most 
discriminating amateur should 
be pleased with being no more 
then 50 Hz from the desired fre- 
quency. The musicai effect that 
occurs when a heterodyne is 
tuned in always brings a smtle 
to the face of a first-time user. 

The tuning knob has a 5*kHz 
per revolution change, but a 
''fast tune" position allows the 
band to be covered in seconds. 
The only analog readout avail- 
able is from the 100-Hz and 
1-kHz dial markings. The idea 
of being totally dependent on a 
digital display doesn't seem so 
bad when you remember that 
dial backlash and the like are 
things of the past with the IC- 
701. No external vfo is needed, 
since the rig contains two in- 
dependent ones, it is handy to 
set vfo 'VA" on a particular 
receive channel and use vfo 
'*B** for transmitting when 
working DX. Total flexibility is 
the best way to describe it. 

This rig stands apart from 
the rest when an Icom !C-RM2 
is hooked to the accessory 
socket, it is a whole new world 
of operating when you can 
change bands and enter fre- 
quencies from a keypad. Push a 
button and you are on a com- 
pletely different band and 
predetermined frequency; push 
another button and the 701 
scans to the band edge, all in 
less time then it takes to say 
your call sign. The RM2 pro- 




afc.fi*: i-.wi..4K 



ic:-7^£}.s 



^•^*:^:':t^:^ 






6 6 6 



■S_/ Li>- liitt (it*tH •«.* 



•n; ; l.Jff 



•'itMt ^iqMl *•!, 



- 1^ 



'^- 8 6 « 



"itUi *• 6 .-^ir 



^mt»mm.<m ^ 



■■»W!W*f V?»*- ^' :S ■ 



tcom'B iO'701 transceiver. 



vides a second digital readout 
that is smaller than the 701 's 
display, but it is still very use- 
ful. Four frequencies may be 
stored in memory and three dif- 
ferent scanning rates are avail- 
able. Any number of schemes 
involving remote operation, 
crossband repeaters, etc., are 
possible, thanks to the compu- 
ter-compatible tuning system. 

Helpful Extras 

No matter how versatile the 
Icom IC-701 synthesiser is, the 
rest of the rig must also be con- 
sidered. Despite the lack of any 
pre-select control, the receiver 
seems to offer a sensitivity that 
is comparable to tuned rigs. 
SSB reception lacks any tinny 
or echoing quality, and the ex- 
ternal speaker does a more 
than adequate job. The pass- 
band and RIT features are very 
smooth and go a long way in 
eliminating troublesome QRM. 
The instruction manual honest- 
ly states that the noise blanker 
works best with pulse-type 
noise, but may not be effective 
in all cases. Mobile operators 
may not be interested in fea- 
tures like a 10-dB attenuator 
and selectable agc^ but loom in- 
cludes them for amateurs who 
take their operating seriously. 
Speech processors have 
become more than just an op- 
tion with most new trans- 
ceivers, and the 701 is no excep- 
tion. Icom advertisements 
suggest that the rf processor 
may be left on all the time 
without worrying about the 
final transistors. However, we 
found that the added punch 
given by the processor means 
slightly less fidelity for the 
operator on the other end. Pro- 
cessing is definitely used when 
1 am in a pileup or similarly 
tough situation. The proper ad- 
justment of the speech pro- 
cessor and microphone gain 
can be a bit confusing at first, 
especially when you switch to 
CW and the process control 
knob sets the output level. 
Hams who split their time be- 
tween SSB and CW will be 
pleased with the 701 's separate 
VOX delay values for each 
mode. No compromise here— 
there is even a separate volume 
control for the sidetone. 

The four VOX adjustments, 
plus seven other controls, are 
found under the access cover 
which is conveniently located 
on top of the radio. Icom has in- 
cluded an swr metering ctrcuit. 
Unfortunately, it Is easy to 
leave the '*set" switch on, 
canceling the power-out (PO) 
metering. The swr meter is nice 
for making occasional antenna 
checks, but it can't compete 
with the external variety. An- 
other frill is the dimmer switch. 
This allows the frequency dis- 
play and meter Illumination to 
automatically change when the 



room lighting shifts. 

A Few Bugs 

The IC-70rs most noticeable 
deficiency was revealed when 
it came time to interface the rig 
to the real world. Use with 
many linear amplifiers will re- 
quire the addition of a small 
12-volt relay for switching and a 
10k pot to control the ALC level. 
A more frustrating problem oc- 
curred when I tried to use an 
electronic keyer. The instruc- 
tion manual dictates that the 
terminal voltage of any external 
keying device must be less 
then .4 volts dc. Since many 
keyers use electronic switch- 
ing, they will not work here. 
When I contacted an Icom rep- 
resentative about this problem, 
he suggested that the keyer 
output circuit be modified. It 
was also mentioned that Icom 
does not consider this to be a 
fault of the 701 , and no changes 
are planned. 

To save space, a miniature 
phone jack is used for the key 
rather then the universally ac- 
cepted V4Hnch type, If you want 
to use the IC-RM2 remote con- 
troller in addition to other ac- 
cessories, it will be necessary 
for you to modify the 24-pin ac- 
cessory plug or obtain the iC- 
EX1 extension terminal. The 
EX1 overcomes the switching 
relay problem and offers a 
V4 -inch -jack-to- mini at ure- 
phone-plug combination for 
CW keying. Although the inter- 
facing problems are not insur- 
mountable, they can mean an 
un needed delay for the ama- 
teur who expects easy hookup. 

Since the 10-701 relies heavi- 
ly on digitally-based circuitry, rf 
shielding is very important. Cor- 
respondence with other hams — 
and on-air testing — have 
shown that feedback problems 
may occur, especial ly when the 
iC-RM2 remote controller and 
high-power amplifier are used. 
Good grounding practices and 
careful attention to the audio 
lines help to cure these bugs. 
The instruction manual gives 
adequate information on prob- 
lems that may result from 
misadjustment of the normal 
user controls, but little informa- 
tion is available about other dif- 
ficulties that may crop up. 

Icom has incorporated more 
then 470 solid-state devices in 
the 701 . The theory documenta- 
tion provides a general outline 
of the design, but with a few ex- 
ceptions, jt does not give a de- 
tailed description of individual 
circuits, Because of the com- 
plexity and small size of the IC- 
701, it IS doubtful that most 
hams would want to service it. 
Some instructions for internal 
adjustments are given. These 
often require a frequency 
counter^ rf voltmeter, signal 
generator, or oscilloscope. A 
highly competent dealer or 



30 



(com distributor is the best 
source of help for the less 
adventuresome owner. 

Being limited to admiring the 
rig's outward appearance is not 
an unpleasant pastime. The 
IC-701 is a sharp looking, highly 
functional unit. Except for peel* 
[ng lamination on the faceplate 
of the RM2, our 701. with ac- 
cessories, has performed well 
during daily use for the past 
month. Although Icom's com- 
pact *'black box'* seems 
dwarfed by the nearby antenna 
tuner, it is a real performer 
Icom, 3331 TowerwQod Drive, 
Suite 304, DaUas TX 75234; 
(274h62(h2780. 

Tim Daniel NSRK 
Peterborough NH 

30-MEGAHiHTZ, DUALTRACE, 
PORTABLE MINISCOPE 

Non-Unear Systems has in- 
creased the number of their 
MinisGope oscilloscopes to 
three with the introduction of 
their Model ^^^5-230 SO-mega- 
hertz, battery-operated, dual- 
trace miniscope. Its size is 2,9 
inches high by 6.4 Inches wide 
by 8.5 inches deep. The weight 
fs 3.5 pounds, including bat* 
teries. 

The MS-230 features atter- 
nate, chopped, and separate 
sweep modes. Internal and ex- 
ternal trigger modes are in- 
cluded. There are 12 vertical 
gain settings for each channel's 
range, from 0.01 to 50 volts per 
division. Timebase settings 
range from 0.05 microseconds 
to 0.2 seconds per division. Ver* 
iti^s are provided for timebase 
and vertical amplifier adjust- 
ment. 

The MS-230 Miniscope in- 
cludes a horizontal input chan- 
nel and an Internal calibrator 
The graticule consists of 
.25'inch divisions arranged 5 
across and 4 high. 

The MS-230 comes complete 
and ready to use. Included are 
Input cables and a battery 
charger permitting battery or 
line operation. Accessories in- 
clude a 10:1, 10-megohm probe 
and a leather carrying case with 
shoulder strap and belt loop. 

For further information, con- 
tact Non-Linear Systems, PO 
Box N, Del Mar CA 92014; (714}- 
75&1t34, Reader Service num- 
ber N22* 

A CRITICAL REVIEW 
OF THE DRAKE UV-3 

Drai<e^s three-band VH F/UH F 
FM transceiver has gotten a 
good deal of attention and dis- 
cussion. Tve had one since 
Christmas, and I'd like to pass 
on comments about my experi- 
ences with it. 

Vital Statistics 

The UV-3 is a synthesized 
unit with 5-kHz steps. Coverage 
rs ait of 2 meters, alt of 220, and 



440 to 450 MHz, The unit can be 

ordered with any one band, any 
two, or all three. Built-in offsets 
are zero, plus or minus 600 kHz 
on 2 meters, plus or minus 1.6 
MHz on 220, and plus or minus 
5 MHz on 440. Up to three addi- 
tional offsets may be pro- 
grammed on a plug-in diode 
board, and the same three are 
shared between all bands. The 
frequency may be set up on 
front-panel switches, or up to 
four frequencies in each band 
can be diode-programmed. A 
master switch selects either 
the front panel or any of the pro- 
grammed frequencies. The 
bandswitch is unconditional. 
There are no tune-up controls. 
Each band uses a separate rf 
section, each adding av?'' to 
the depth of the case. Each 
band has a separate antenna 
jack. Maximum power is 25 W 
on 2 meters and 10 W on the 
other bands. The "low" setting 
of the power switch is about 
10% of full power, and this can 
be changed by resistor substi- 
tution. There is a scan function 
which allows either pro- 
grammed frequency #4 or the 
front-panel frequency to be 
checked every few seconds— 
momentarily interrupting the 
selected frequency — and locks 
in if carrier ts present. A non- 
encodfng mike is supplied, but 
the jack is wired to accept a 
Drake encoding mike. A mobile 
mounting bracket is included. 
There fs an accessory jack. 

Viewpoint 

To make use of a theater 
review, it's necessary to be 
aware of the critic's prejudices 
and biases in order to put his 
comments in proper context- 
The same is true of a product 
review. 

I take the attitude that any 
piece of equipment built for a 
serious purpose, of which 
repeater communication is 
sometimes a prime example, 
should have a set of features 
and specifications that follow 
with logical precision from that 
purpose. That is, It should do 
exactly what it's supposed to 
do. 

There should be sufficient 
reserve performance to allow 
for expected component de- 
terioration. It should be free of 
quirks that get in the way of its 
intended use or which require 
attention from the user beyond 
that which is inherently re- 
quired by the function being 
fulfilled. It should be rugged, in 
the sense that conditions to be 
expected during use will not 
cause failure or degradation. It 
should be maintainable; as- 
sembly and disassembly need- 
ed to reach components should 
be easy, straightforward, and 
quick; parts should t>e readily 
available; and the design 
should be comprehensible, at 




The Mode! MS-230 Miniscope. 



least to the extent of avoiding 
peculiar tricks. 

This is the standard by which 
a commercial workhorse is 
judged. There's an awful lot of 
ham gear around that wouldn't 
begin to measure up to that 
leveL The first thing to say 
about the UV'3, though, is that 
it's a serious piece of engineer- 
ing. The things that I will be 
criticizing probably would not 
even be mentioned in a review 
of a lesser piece of gear. 

Performanca 

The UV-3"s strong suit seems 
to be raw performance. There is 
no heterodyne synthesis; in- 
stead, a single vco for each 
band is retuned in going from 
receive to transmit. While I 
have not had the opportunity to 
check the spurious output 
specs with the spectrum an- 
alyzer, this approach tends to 
eliminate most spurs right at 
the source. The spec is - 60 dB 
on 2 meters and 220, and - 40 
dB on 440. The lock range of the 
vco'S easily exceeds spec; on 
the 2-meter band it held almost 
from 142 to 150 MHz. 

Although the rf section is 
broadbanded and needs no tun- 
ing adjustments (except for 
dialing up the synthesizer), the 
output power was about 5% 



above specs across the rated 
bandwidth and didn't drop off 
too badly until the vco lost iock. 

An apparent instability in 
power output turned out to- te 
an effect of running off a 
storage battery with the 
charger turned off. Power is 
somewhat sensitive to supply 
voltage, but this is not a 
criticism. It just likes to be run 
off rated voltage, which rs 11.5 
to 15 volts. Incidentally, the 
negative side is grounded to 
the chassis, as are the antenna 
jacks. It requires a positive sup- 
ply. 

The audio is very good, to the 
point of attracting attention. 
I've repeatedly been asked, 
"That rig sounds pretty good; 
what is it?" To the ear, the 
response sounds smooth and 
distortion is not noticeable. 
There are no special audio 
shaping circuits; this makes it 
possible to wire the touch- 
tone^M encoder directly across 
the mike and have the correct 
twist relationship, On receive, 
the sound reminds the listener 
of the music receiver, allowing, 
of course, for the 12-kHz i-f 
bandwidth. The unusually large 
magnet in the speaker has to be 
one reason for this. If anything 
keeps you from communicat- 
ing, it won't be the rig's audio. I 




Drake's UV3 VHF/UHF FM transceiver. 



31 



don't consider this a luxury; I 
do consider it a benchmark 
against which to measure other 
rigs. 

Some highlights from the 
published specs: 

Frequency accuracy-- 
0.0005%, 0" to 60 X, 11, 5 to 15 
Vdc. 

Sensitivity— 0.5 uV max.f 
12'dBSfNAD. 

Adjacent channel rejec- 
tion— 60 dB, 15 kHz away. 

Image rejection— 80 dB on 
the 140 band, 60 dB on the 220 
band, and 55 dB on the 440 
band. 

While there is no spec as 
such covering overloading 
under very high off-channel 
field strength, the UV'3 is one 
of the few transceivers, ham or 
commercial, that doesn't 
misbehave going through the 
infamous ''Intermod Alley" 
along Boston^s Route 126. In- 
termod attenuation is given as 
-80 dB on 2 meters. - 75 dB 
on 220, and -55 dB on 440, 
Figures like this don^t tell the 
whole story because any re- 
ceiver has an overload point at 
which the front end goes 
nonlinear and mixing begins. 
This one has a very high over- 
load point; t have operated 
other transmitters near it 
without breaking squelch. 

Construction 

Its in the mechanical struc- 
ture and assembly that the at- 
titude of Drake*s people shows 
most clearly. There is a great 
deal of attention to detail — 
detail that most other manufac- 
turers might have skipped to 
save a few cents. I give Drake a 
lot of credit for resisting the 
temptation. 

You won't find sheet metal 
screws in the UV-3. Pemnuts 
are pressed into the aluminum, 
giving a deep steel thread. 
Repealed disassembly won't 
damage any sheet metat parts. 
Lock washers are used freely 
inside, so screws are unlikely 
to shake loose In mobile opera- 
tion. 

Access to almost all of the in- 
sides is obtained by removing 
two screws at the back of the 
top cover and sliding the cover 
straight back along a pair of 
grooves in the side extrusions. 
The bottom cover comes off the 
same way, if necessary. There 
are ripples along the edges of 
the top and bottom covers 
which, a! first glance, appear to 
be warpage in thin metaL When 
you look at the covers from the 
inside, though, it becomes ob- 
vious that those ripples were 
put there on purpose by a spe- 
cially made tool What they do 
is serve as springs, to wedge 
the covers tight in I he grooves. 
That keeps down ratttes at fair- 
ly high receive audio levels and 
most likely helps with rf shield- 
ing. 



Most of the circuiti7 is built 
on epoxy-gtass circuit boards 
which plug into a motherboard. 
These boards aren't going to 
crack if the rig gets dropped; 
there's a partial card cage to 
take care of flexing, and a hold- 
down is secured by a screw and 
the top cover. There was a little 
cost reduction here, but no leal 
corner-cuttmg. The screw that 
holds the hold-down is about 
1/16" too short so that it has to 
be backed all the way out to re- 
move a card and tends to drop 
into the works. A board puller is 
stored inside in a clip next to 
the speaker, Et's a simple type 
and has to be used carefully, 
but it cuts the risk of hurting a 
board or a socket. 

The front panel carries no rf. 
It is removed by taking out four 
screws and pulling It straight 
out ot the chassis. This is done 
when the remote control kit is 
used. 

The rf modules are full of 
shielding and tight construc- 
tion and don't look particularly 
easy to take apart in the field. A 
nice touch, though, is the ac- 
curate mechanical alignment 
of the side extrusions where 
the modules meet the main 
chassis and each other. There 
is no tendency for the top and 
bottom covers to catch at the 
joints. 

The aluminum parts have 
anti-corrosion surface treat- 
ment, apparently Iridite. Out- 
side surfaces are black 
anodize, black vinyl or biack 
paint. 

Uses 

The LIV-3 fits in as 3 main 
desktop or mobile workhorse 
for dependable local com- 
munication. The design clearly 
doesn't contemplate operation 
while in motion on foot. While 
this is not wholly out of the 
question. It would require a lot 
of external accessories, and 
the rig is a pretty hefty hunk of 
hardware as well as a power- 
eater. The power requirements 
are targeted at car electrical 
systems and can be supplied 
easily from an acoperated 
power supply. In emergency 
operation from a storage bat- 
tery, or during very long periods 
of mobile operation with the 
engine shut down, there could 
be a problem. More about this 
later. 

Drawbacks 

There are a number of defi- 
ciencies in the unit that have 
nothing to do with its com- 
munication capabilities. These 
are failures of concept rather 
than of design or manufactur- 
ing. 

Probably the most important 
Is that the current drain on 
receive is much higher than it 
should be. This one spec is 
anything but state-of-the-art. It 



is 0,9 A. Almost half of this is 
used up by the dial lights that 
make the frequency switch set- 
tings visible. Thus, in emergen- 
cy operation In a disaster in- 
volving general power failure, a 
battery small enough to carry 
easily to an operating position 
would be hard put to keep go- 
ing for a day or two. A full-size 
car battery would be called for. 

No method is provided for 
turning off the lights, and if the 
lights are simply disconnected 
to save power, the dark plastic 
window makes the dials almost 
impossible to read. As a stop- 
gap measure, I cut a piece ot 
1/16" acrylic sheet the same 
size as the window (which 
drops easily out of its groove 
when the meter is pushed back 
against the mounting spring) to 
make a clear window and dis- 
connected the lights. Unfor- 
tunately, this makes the 5 visi- 
ble whether the last digit is zero 
or 5. 

A better fix would be to glue a 
tBe<i switch to the top edge of 
the lamp board just under the 
top cover, wired in series with 
the lights. Laying a magnet on 
top of the cover would then kill 
the lights and allow the use of 
the original window without us- 
ing the lights— except to get on 
frequency. Drake really should 
do something about this. There 
should be a light switch at the 
very least, and putting in knobs 
that have markings out In the 
open would be better. As part of 
the latter, replacing the 0/5 tog- 
gle switch with a rotary like the 
rest would make operation a lit- 
tle easier. 

This leads us to the way you 
change frequency on a UV- 
3— the same way you preflight 
an airplane. That is, you do a 
complete checklist, examining 
and verifying the position of 
every switch and knob on the 
panel. If you're only moving 
Within the same megahertz, 
you can get away with Just 
twisting knobs in the display 
row* Any more than that and 
you're likely to end up with the 
wrong offset, out of band, or 
not changing frequencies at elL 

A few hours of thought about 
human engineering would have 
helped here. If the panel were 
as good as what's behind it, the 
frequency could be read unam- 
biguously from one row of 
digits — band, offset, and all. 
And if the diode board and 
selector switch were retained 
at all it would be obvious to the 
eye when the dial was disabled. 

Another thmg that didn't 
receive quite enough thought 
at the brainstorming stage is 
the remote control feature. 
Remoting, by itself, allows 
theft protection of the expen- 
sive parts by mounting the rig 
in the trunk or wherever else the 
owner's imagination and deter- 
mination aliow. However^ se- 



curity is only one of the pur- 
poses of remoting— the other 
is space conservation in the 
crowded front seat areas of 
today's cars. 

The panel of the UV^3 is plen^ 
ty big! Remoting cuts down on 
depth, but doesn't do a thing 
for the frontal area. I wouldn't 
particularly care to have a colli- 
sion while a UV-G panel was 
next to my legs, either. Using 
standard components, I figure 
a control panel could be made 
about twice the area of the end 
of a walkie-talkie and maybe 3 
Inches deep. Then if a blank 
panel were put on the main 
chassis with a recessed socket 
to take the miniature control 
panel, removal from the vehicle 
would be accomplished by 
unplugging the cabie from the 
main chassis panel and pop* 
ping the control panel into the 
chassis. This, incidentally, Is 
not an unreasonable home- 
brew project. 

Two of the features could 
just as well have been left out, 
to make space available for 
more useful things. 

The first ts the scan feature. 
When a carrier comes up on the 
priority scan channel the voice 
you were listening to goes 
away in mid-word. I can hardly 
conceive of anyone wanting to 
hear everything said on some 
other channel in preference to 
the QSO in progress. Reversing 
the priority might make some 
sense, but monitoring another 
machine really requires a sep- 
arate receiver. Also, whenever 
the frequency jumps to check 
the priority frequency and car- 
rier IS present on the selected 
channel, there is a short but 
loud burst of noise as the vco 
settles on the other frequency. 
This gels very annoying when It 
happens every couple of sec- 
onds and soon forces the user 
to shut the scan feature off. 

This should not influence 
anyone's decision on whether 
or not to buy the UV-3. When a 
feature is useless in principle, 
it doesn't matter whether or not 
it works. 

The other thing that could be 
eliminated is the diode pro- 
gramming. It was necessary on 
such early rigs as the 10-223, 
but when any frequency can be 
dialed up directly from the front 
panel internal diode program- 
ming is redundant. Efimtnation 
would also get rid of the conf u* 
sion with the channel switch. If 
you do program the diodes, do 
it on a day when you have plen- 
ty of time, and use a good light 
and decent tools. Check your 
work thoroughly, or. better still, 
get somebody else to do the 
checking. The layout of the 
diode boards is such as to in- 
vite mistakes. One thing they 
did right was to supply diodes 

CQrnmued on page J 64 



32 



1 n 




t^tdnti 



i - t «. 






a A 



■ -'J 



^ntt^mtt**' 



-iE*" 



rcYA^yAt^ m -\ 



(r> 



PanaMmie 



ntroducing Panasonic's Command Series top-of* 
the-line RF-4800, Everything you want in short wave 
Except the price. Like a five^digit LED frequency 
display. It's so accurate (within 1 kHz. to be exacll^ 
you can tune in a station , ^ 
even before it s broadcasting 
And with the RF-4800's eighlP 
short wave bands, you can 
choose any broadcast 
between 16 and 31 MHz, 
That s the full frequency 
range, That's Panasonic. 

And what you see on the 
outside is just a smalt part of 
what Panasonic gives you 
inside There's a double superheterodyne system 
for enhanced reception stability and selectivfty 
as well as image rejection. An input-tuned RF 
amplifier with a 3-ganged variable tuning capacitor 
for exceptional sensitivity and frequency linearity. 
Ladder-type cerarnic filters to reduce frequency 
interference. And even an antenna trimmer that 
changes the front-end capacitance for maximum 
reception from minimal broadcast signals. 

To help you controt all that sophisticated 



1 






i*i^^ 


mt ■mmti^^^^ 


in^^j^ ^^^m ^ 



^^^i 



circuitry, Panasonic's RF-4800 gives you all these 
sophisticated controls. Like an all-gear-drive tuning 
control to prevent ''backlash!* Separate wide/narrow 
[ bandwidth selectors for optimum reception even in 
^s,^^^ crowded conditions. Adjustable 

^V cafibration for easy tuning to 

^ ^- — exact frequencies. A BFO pitch 

controt. RF-garn control for 
Uncreased selectivity in busy 
signal areas. An ANL switch. Even 
separate bass and treble controls. 
And if all that short wave isn't 
f enough, There's more. Like SSB 
J (single sideband) amateur radio. 
All 40 CB channels. Ship to shore. 
Even Morse communications. AC /DC operation. And 
with Panasonic s 4" full-range speaker, the big sound 
of AM and FM will really sound big 

The RF^BOO. If you had a short wave receiver as 
good. You wouldn't stilt be reading. You'd be listening, 

ITTie abtMi V lt> rec^fv^ shEjti wai^e fefOa«fc«sts wUl vary wi!ti ani&f of f*^?? 

omrritaf'% gao^rapftic tocillon and ot^' factora >iou mov maed an Cfptionai on 

Panasonic. 

just slightly ahead of our time. 



RF-2mQ 



Larry Kahuner WB2NEL 
73 Magazine Associate 
PO Box B92 
Columbus GA JI90! 



Extremely Low Frequency Radiation 

Cause for Worry? 

— studies on ELF are inconclusive, but the battle is joined 



Invisible health hazards 
may hang over Amer- 
ica—radiation from high- 
voltage power lines. 

Scientists and research- 
ers worldwide are begin- 
ning to understand more 
about the effects of Ex- 
tremely Low Frequency, 
ELF, as they call it. And 
some of these scientists are 
becoming concerned. 

Most people betieved, at 
the time when high-tension 
wires first appeared, criss- 
crossing and looping over 
our major cities and the 
countryside, that the elec- 
tricity in the wires stayed 
there— that it did not leave 
the metal and pass through 
the insulation. 

Now, of coursei we know 
better. The flux set up by 
wires carrying high volt- 
ages is composed of two 
distinct forces: electric and 
magnetic fields. 

We also know that these 
fields, at the right inten- 
sities, can reach us. But, 
unlike microwaves, which 
have been proven to be 
dangerous, little is known 
of the possible dangers of 
low-frequency radiation. 

Presently, there are 
more than 100,000 miles of 
overhead high-tension 
lines in the United States 
which carry up to 765,000 



volts at 60 Hz (50 Hz in 
Canada, 25 Hz in most of 
Europe). For the future, 
power companies are look- 
ing to lines carrying 1 
million and 1.5 million 
volts — and that's what has 
many people concerned. 
The fluxes formed by such 
high voltages are enough 
to make your hair stand on 
end if you walk near them. 
And, If you hold a 40Watt 
fluorescent bulb under- 
neath a 345,000-volt line 
within about 100 feet of 
the line's right of way, it 
wilt light up. 

Why do we need such 
high voltage? The answer is 
simple. The higher the volt- 
age, the cheaper it is to 
transmit. Line losses are 
reduced as the voltage is 
increased. 

Around 1967, realizing 
that the way to go was 
higher and higher voltages, 
studies funded by the 
American Electric Power 
Company and carried out 
by Johns Hopkins Universi- 
ty looked at linemen who 
worked near high-voftage 
lines to see if they were be- 
ing affected by the fields. 

The linemen's health was 
studied, and so were some 
mice in the laboratory who 
also received exposure to 
similar ELF fields. Several 



of the linemen showed 
nominally low sperm count, 
but nothing conclusive. The 
mice seemed unaffected 
except that their progeny 
had slightly stunted growth. 
Again, however, the depar- 
ture from norma! fell within 
statistically acceptable 
limits. Even so, for most 
scientists and for the elec- 
tric power companies, this 
showed a need for further 
experimenting and tests. 

Then came Project San- 
guine, a Navy project to 
build a huge antenna net- 
work covering hundreds of 
acres in Wisconsin. It was 
designed to transmit radio 
messages to submerged 
submarines throughout the 
world's oceans. The trans- 
mitting frequencies would 
be near those of an over- 
head power line—actually 
a bit lower, in the 15-20-Hz 
range. 

The project was, to say 
the least controversial. En- 
vironmentalists objected to 
it because it would literally 
rip up large tracts of land 
needed to bury the anten- 
na. Others pointed to a 
study done by the Universi- 
ty of Wisconsin which 
showed that ELF affected 
the physiology of a slime 
mold. Other studies done 



during Sanguine's planning 
stages also showed that ELF 
affected some lower organ- 
isms. The studies did not 
necessarily show ill effects, 
but they indeed showed a 
Cause-and-effect relation- 
ship. Those studies, and 
citizen protests, were 
enough to table Project 
Sanguine. 

Around this time, the late 
1960s and early 1970s, a lot 
of other people started to 
get into the ELF act. For 
more than three years, New 
York State's Public Service 
Commission held hearings 
on the ELF situation. As a 
result of those hearings, 
packed by folks who didn't 
want a proposed 765,000- 
volt line running across 
their farmland, the PSC ad- 
mitted that ELF presents 
some health threat to those 
who live and work near the 
lines. 

The PSC did two things in 
response to its ELF hearings. 
It created an Administra- 
tive Research Council 
which would fund research 
on ELF's effects, and it 
widened the right of way of 
new lines from 350 feet to 
1,200 feet. Right now, how- 
ever, the Power Authority 
of New York is fighting the 
ARC on the grounds that 



34 



setting up a research group 
is not within the PSC's 
jurisdiction. The courts 
have not yet ruled on that 
point of law. 

One of the more vocal 
speakers at the hearings 
was Dr Andrew Marino, a 
researcher at the Veterans 
Administration Hospital in 
Syracuse, New York. "There 
is little doubt from the 
literature that biological 
changes do occur in hu- 
mans exposed to high-ten- 
sion wires/' he said. Marino 
has been studying the ef- 
fects of ELF on mice for 
about 3 years under a 
575,000 National Institute 
of Health grant. In previous 
studies, he found that mice 
exposed to ELF had stunted 
growth Results of his pres- 
ent studies have not yet 
been released. 

The US Department of 
Energy has allocated about 
$3 million for high-voltage 
studies, and Bob Flugum, 
assistant director of DOE's 
Power Delivery Program, 
said that about $7 million is 
being spent on research 
throughout the world. 

A famous study done in 
the Soviet Union showed 
that switchyard workers 
who worked near high-volt- 
age equipment showed 
pulse rate changes and 
blood pressure fluctua- 
tions. It also showed that 
the men and women had 
tremors during or shortly 
after exposure The studies 
were not conclusive, how- 
ever, because only about 
300 workers were studied 
— certainly not a large 
enough test sample. Even 
so, the Soviets have set 
maximum exposure stan- 
dards for their citizens. The 
US has not. The Soviets, 
you may remember, also 
set standards for micro- 
wave exposure before the 
US government even ac- 
knowledged that the super- 
high frequencies were 
harmful. 

"The most important 
proof that ELF alters biolo- 
gy is that some researchers 




are using it to heal bones/' 
said Marino. "There is no 
doubt it effects living or- 
ganisms, but exactly what 
those changes are, we are 
not yet certain/' 

Dr Harry Kornberg, a 

researcher for the Electric 
Power Research Institute in 
Palo Alto, California, is not 
as convinced as Marino 
that ELF affects humans. 
He said that work so far 
showing effects on humans 
and animals has been 
shoddy and not within good 
scientific procedure. EPRI 
is a research funding group 
sponsored by American 
utility companies, each of 
which gives the Institute 
money for its work. Korn- 
berg said, however, that we 
are just beginning to see the 
start of what he calls 
"highly controlled, high 
quality, clinical testing/' 

Farmers will tell you that 
grass turns brown under 
high-tension wires, and just 
recently Penn State report* 
ed that leaf tips turn brown 
in the lab under similar con- 
ditions. Another recent 
study which Kornberg be- 
lieves was done with good 
control was one at the 
University of Illinois. It 
showed that honeybees ex- 



posed to ELF build unusual- 
ly small hives. 

But Kornberg still dis- 
agrees that high-tension 
wires affect humans. 
"There have been no defini- 
tive studies which show it," 
he said. And he is correct- 
No one has yet studied 
large groups of people ex- 
posed to ELF for long peri- 
ods of time. Only then 
could we be certain that 
statistical and other labora- 
tory anomalies did not 
creep into the results. 

But even as scientists are 
beginning now to pull to- 
gether all the information 
on ELF, and excellent 
studies are being done both 
in and out of the lab, a new 
wrinkle has been added — 
direct current. In an at- 
tempt to make power trans- 
mittal even more economi- 
cal, power companies have 
begun experimenting with 
dc in voltages reaching over 
1 million volts. 

In case you haven't seen 
the papers in the past year, 
a battle over such a fine has 
been brewing in Minnesota. 
The fight is between en* 
vironmentalists and farm- 
ers on one side and the 
power companies on the 



other A 400,000-volt dc 
power line was planned 
from North Dakota to the 
Minneapolis-St Paul area. 
While the line's towers were 
being built, there was 
harassment allegedly from 
the farmers' side. They sup- 
posedly tore down towers 
and generally made life 
miserable for those build- 
ing them. 

Right now, the farmers 
seem to have lost the war 
The line has been built and 
is now under test awaiting a 
power plant's completion 
in North Dakota. 

Mike Casper, chairman 
of the Physics Department 
of Carleton College in 
Northfield, Minnesota, is 
writing a book about the 
struggle. 'Very little is 
known about dc's effects at 
such high voltage/' he said, 
^'and the line, once in op- 
eration, will be the largest 
dc carrier in the nation/' 
There is now one in Califor- 
nia. 

Casper, who has fol- 
lowed the fight from its in- 
ception several years ago, 
said that he expects to see 
continued guerrilla tactics 
from now until the 400- 
mile line carries its first 
electron , , , if it ever 
does.B 



35 



An LED Display for the HW-2036 

— eliminates unwieldy thumbwheel switches 



Tom French WA4BZP 
22044 Lakeland 
El Tom CA 926S9 



Since I purchased and 
built the HW-2036, I 
have had only praise for 
the unit. However, after 
operating the HW-2036 for 
some time, I found the 
thumbwheel switches 
quite worrisome. It is 
almost impossible to see 
how to change frequency 
in the car at night and very 



difficult to get to the 
switches while driving. For 
these reasons, I decided to 
modify my 2036. When the 
idea for this modification 
was in its earliest stages, 1 
knew I wanted to put the 
digital display in place of 
those awkward thumb- 
wheels, but I did not know 
what to use to set the 
operating frequency, I 
knew an external box to 
enclose such a unit would 
look messy, and that went 
against my main objective 
which was to enhance the 
looks and capabilities of 
my HW-2036, Then the 




HW-2036 with digital modification installed. 



idea came to me to enclose 
a circuit board inside the 
MicoderTM that would do 

just that. It was neat, com- 
pact, and would make the 
Micoder able to switch fre- 
quency and also keep it a 
touchtone'''^ pad, just as 
before. The finished prod- 
uct has a very professional 
appearance and 1 think it 
will appeal to those who 
want to update their units 
to digital readout. 

Circuit Description 

1 decided to put com- 
mon-cathode seven-seg- 
ment LEDs behind a red 
plastic lens to display the 
frequency being used. I im- 
plemented the Fairchild 
decoder/driver because it 
drives the LEDs directly 
(Fig 1). This means that 
dropping resistors are not 
needed from the driver to 
the display. In order to 
hold the BCD frequency 
and to feed it to the syn- 
thesizer board, I used 
SN74LS298S. These are 
quad two-input multiplex- 
ers with storage. The 2ero- 
or fivekHz digit is 
developed by a BCD-to- 
decimal decoder. This, in 
turn, is fed to an inverter 
for conditioning and then 



to a five-input NOR gate 
for the final 0/5-kHz output 
signal. This signal is corh 
nected to pin X on the syn- 
thesizer circuit board. 

The microphone cable 
can be replaced with a new 
one that has at least 
twelve conductors, t re- 
vamped the Micoder so 
that it is a touchtone pad in 
the transmit mode, and so 
that the operating frequen- 
cy can be selected in the 
receive mode (Fig. 2). Three 
chips were installed into 
the 2036 MB (MicBoard). 
The NE555 was used as a 
clock generator for the 
MCI 441 9 keypad-to-BCD 
decoder. The MCI 4410 
keypad tone integrator is 
also installed on this 
board. The original micro- 
phone element is retained 
but I added a 2.2k resistor 
from the original Micoder 
board. Two 7805 voltage 
regulators were added to 
supply the necessary 
voltage for the additional 
circuitry (Fig. 3), 

Chassis 

To accomplish the 
modifications, proceed as 
follows: Remove all the 
covers and knobs from 
your 2036. Care should be 



36 



taken not to ruin the syn- 
thesizer lock LED as you 
separate the front panel 
subpfate and bezel Next, 
remove the thumbwheel 
switches and save the four 
supporting screws and 
nuts. Fit the red plastic win- 
dow over the thumbwheel 
switch window and mark 
the locations for the four 
holes that you wiH drill to 
accommodate the previ- 
ously*removed supporting 
screws On the side of the 
window where the 0/5 
switch is located, a small 
notch should be filed in 
order for the nut [that 
holds the 0/5-kHz switch to 
the subchassis) to clear 
when assembled. Two #6 
screw holes have to be 
drilled to hold the 7805 
regulators against the sub- 
chassis. The first hole 
should be drilled beside 
the speaker and below the 
synthesizer board. See Fig. 
4. To get to the second 
hole, you will need to pull 
the power amplifier board 
a few inches away from the 
back panel (Fig, 5)l Drill 
these holes with care and 
do not let shavings fa 
near the boards, Instal 
both 7805 voltage regula- 
tors as illustrated in Figs. 4 
and 5 using silicone grease. 
Then reinstall the power 
amplifier board. 

Now remove the micros 
phone cable from your rig. 
It will be replaced by a12- 
to 24-conductor cable. 
Place some type of insula- 
tion over the speaker con- 
nections and side magnet 
preferably electrical tape. 
This will keep the snug- 
fitting 2036-DB (display 
board) from shorting on the 
speaker. The display board 
should be on a horizontal 
plane with the bottom of 
the display window. Use a 
plastic washer on the rear 
and front mounting hole of 
the 2036-DB. This will keep 
the mounting screws and 
nuts from shorting the bot- 
torn of the circuit board. 
Use 6-32 X 1V4" counter- 
sunk mounting screws for 
the 2036-DB (Fig, 4), 



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F/g. t, 2036-DB Display Board schemaiia 



i 

o 



o 



o 



MicBoard 2036-MB 

Disassemble the Micod- 
er completely by unsolder- 
ing all the wires and by 
removing the board Clean 
the terminal strip of all 
solder and wire. Retain the 
2.2k resistor and join it to 
one of the microphone ele- 
ment leads. Connect a 
ground wire to the micro- 
phone element ground. 
The remaining lead is con- 
nected for audio output. 
See Fig. 6, Remove the pin 
sockets from your old 
Micoder board and rein- 
stall in the new 2036-MB. 
These are the pin sockets 
that wi!l hold the keypad. 
Put the chips in on the 



component side. Do ob- 
serve correct pin locations. 
Connect pin 8 on the 
MCI 4410, pin 8 on the 
MCI 441 9, and pin 1 on the 
NE555 to the ground plane. 
Notice that the .01-uF and 
.047-uF capacitors are elec- 
trolytic, so observe the cor- 
rect polarity. The only 
parts that go on the under- 
side of the board are the 1 
MHz crystal and the .01 -uF 
clock capacitor, if the disc 
type is being used. 

After all parts are set up 
on the 2036-MB, follow the 
correct cable color code 
for interconnection to the 
2036 (Fig. 7). On the 
24<onductor microphone 



cable that I used, the end 
with pin connectors should 
go in the microphone hous- 
ing. 

Connect one wire to +5 

V dc on receive, one to + 5 

V dc on transmit, one to 
+ 5 V dc, one to ground, 
and the last to audio out* 
put — all on the 2036-MB. 
The + 5 V dc on transmit is 
labeled pin 3, 4*5 V dc on 
receive is pin 1, and audio 
output is pin 2. The +5-V 
dc power for the 2036-MB 
is acquired from the 7805 
IC*1 originally in the rig. 

Display Board 2036-DB 

Molex pins may be used 
as well as low profile 



37 



f^ECElVE 



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n 



FROM IC-I > 
tfiVDC 



THftMSMIT 



-^ TRANSMIT 
CONTROL 
Clf^CUlT 



4:?K ^^ OtfiF 




-^ AUOfO OUT 



INTERNAL 
VIEW 



Fig, 2. 2036-MB MicBoard schematic. 



sockets on this board. In- 
stall the sockets or directiv 
install the chips. Install 
220-Ohnn, Vi-Watt resistor 
R9 to make the decimal 
point connection. Ca- 
pacitor CI is only installed 
if triple or double digiting 
is encountered when you 
key in a number. The value 
of this capacitor is depen- 
dent on whether or not the 
SN74LS298 chips match. 
The capacitor should be 
somewhere in the range of 
100uFto470pF. If desired, 
SN74LS48 BCD-to-seven- 
segment decoder/drivers 
may be employed instead 
of the 9368s, by running 2k 
pull-up resistors to the 
LEDs. When using the 
SN74LS48 chips, pin 3 of 
the decoder/driver should 



be clipped off, as the lamp 
test function is not used. 
(To test all lamps, just key 
in four eights in a row,) Us- 
ing the pull-up resistors in 
this fashion makes for a 
rough time when you take 
the decoder/driver chips 
out and does not accom- 
modate my scanner option 
board. (See Fig, 8 for 
pinouts on both chip 
styles.) From the synthe- 
sizer circuit board, remove 
all of the pull-up resistors 
associated with the thumb- 
wheel switches: R401-409 
and R411-413. Make a 
small solder bridge with a 
piece of wire at the scan 
bridge to pin 10 of IC7 if 
you are not using the scan 
option on the 2036-DB. 
Resolder the wires from 



the thumbwheel switches 
to their corresponding 
display drivers. For the 
MHz, use IC8 pin 7. This is 
BCD 'W, which goes to 
synthesizer circuit board 
pin AT. IC8 pin 1 is BCD 
"B", which goes to syn- 
thesizer pin A2, and so 
forth. IC9 is used for the 
hundreds of kilohertz and 
IC10 is used for the tens of 
kilohertz. IC11 remains to 
display the one-kitohertz 
digit. Remove the wiring 
from the 0/5-kHz switch 
completely. Put in the 
0/5-kHz wire to the corres- 
ponding location on the 
2036-DB. You will have to 
make a small five-wire bun- 
dle, eight inches long, out 
of the wires in the micro- 
phone cable to make the 



strobe and the BCD con- 
nections from the micro- 
phone cable to the 
2036-DB. This Wire bundle 
does not have to be shield- 
ed, but should be run under 
the volume and mode 
switches. 

Install the25-uF, 25-Vdc 
and .01~uF capacitors on 
both outputs of the 7805 
regulators. Connect the 
rear 7805 to the +5B 
power hole and the front 
7805 to the +5A power 
hole. Install the ground 
wire connection to the 
2036-DB at this time. The 
common-cathode LEDs 
that you choose can be 
socketed. Align all four 
sockets on a flat surface 
and "super glue" them 
together. Install the 
2036-DB and, with a pencil, 
mark on the board the 
width of the display win- 
dow opening. Remove the 
board and "super glue" the 
four sockets in the center 
of the marked display 
opening and to the rear of 
the board as far as possi- 
ble. Keeping the sockets to 
the rear of the board will 
prevent the LEDs from 
scratching the red plastic 
lens. Remove the pins not 
used by the LEDs. Wiring 
from the sockets to the 
board should be accom- 
plished by using wire-wrap. 

Checkout 

After I completed all 
connections and reassem- 
bly, I tested my modifica- 



4 



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Fig. 3. 7805 voltage regulator schematic. 



feL 




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DRILL ONE hole: #6 






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CAPACITOR 



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Fig. 4, +5-vott ''A'' supply regulator location inside 
speaker area. 



38 



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F/g, S. +5-vo/t "B" supply regulator location inside 
transmitter area. 



Fig. 7. Corresponding signat'to-cabte colors used in the 
Radio Shack 24-conductor microphone cable. The end 
with the connectors should be placed in the Micoder. 



CONTROL 

CIRCUIT 



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AUDIO PtH 



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Fig. 6. Inside view of mic element and switch, showing the 
correct points for signal placement. 



AqiAi 


*A2»A3 


Address (data) 
inputs 


Ao,A' 


(1A2.A3 


Address (data) 
Inputs 


El 




Latch enable 


Lt 




Lamp test 






(act We low) input 


RBI 




Ripple btanking 


RBI 




Ripple blanking 






input 






(active low) input 


RBO 




Ripple blanking 


RBO 




Ripple blanking 






output 






(actfve low) out- 


a,b,c, 


d»e,f,g 


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put 








a,b,c,i 


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puts 









tion. I started with the 
2036-MB. With power on, 
the display should show 
random numbers and 
sometinnes letters. I 
checked pin 8 of the NE555 
for +5 V dc, and also pin 
16 of MCI 441 9 for +5 V 
dc. If this checks out, you 
may assume pin 3 of the 
555 is generating a clock 
pulse. This pulse is used to 
generate the keypad strobe 
upon depression of a key- 
pad number. The # and * 
are considered invalid 
digits, and, therefore, they 
wilt not generate a bit pat- 
tern when the operator 
selects a frequency. After 
depressing a valid digit, I 
looked for a short strobe 
pulse, one that goes from 
low to high and back to 
low. The BCD digit will be 
on the output lines as long 
as you hold your finger on 
the pad. Keypad data is fed 
to IC7 upon receipt of a 
keypad strobe pulse. It is 
then shifted in or out to the 
next stages, IC6, and so on. 
For IC7, which is the kHz 
digit, the BCD signals are 
sent to a BCD-to-decimal 
converter (IC3), This wil 



send a logic one out If the 
BCD input is between zero 
and four, and a logic zero 
will be sent if it is between 
five and nine. IC2 inverts 
the signals which are then 
sent to a five-input NOR 
gate for the final 0/5-kHz 
output, A logic zero equals 
zero kHz and a logic one 
equals a 5-kHz signal. 
Audio generated by the 



Fig. 8. Seven-segment decoder/drivers. Either device may 
be used, although 2k pull-up resistors will be needed with 
the SN74LS4fls. 



keypad'to-tone integrator 
MCI 4410 IS coupled direct- 
ly to the audio input line. 
In most units with this com- 
pleted modification, the 
transmitter deviation need- 
ed to be lowered- It is ad- 
visable to check your devi- 
ation and set it to not more 



than 5 kHz. 

To display the operating 
frequency of 146.820 MHz, 
simply touch in the digit se- 
quence 6, 8, 2, on the 
keypad. The same is true 
for 147.855 MHz; the digit 
sequence would be 7, 8, 
5, 5. When the push-to-talk 



QuantHy 
2 
1 

1 
4 
4 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
2 
4 
1 
2 
1 
1 
1 
1 



Required Parts 

Descriptfon 

+ 5-volt regulator 
24-conductor Mic cabte 
used on One-Hander"'''^** 
Touchtone kit 
Fairchlld 9368 LED driver 

SN74LS298 Quad 2-inpyt multiplexer 

MCI 44 19 2 of B BCD encoder 

SN74LS260 S-lnpUt NOR 



Type 
7805 

W-1878 

EK-2036 
443-694 



NE555 

443-807 

SN74LS04 

FND-357 



Source 

Radio Shack 
Radio Shack 

Data-Sfgnar 

Heathkit 

Hamllton-Avnet 

Hamilton-Avnet 

Hamilton-Avnet 

Hamilton-Avnet 

Heathkit 

Hamilton-Avnet 



Timer 

SN74LS42 BCD-to-decimal 

Hex inverter 

25-yF, 25- V dc capacitors 

Common-cathode 7-segmenl LEDs Fairchild 

Red plastic lens Radio Shack 

l-megohm V4-Watt resistors 

.01-uF disc capacitor 

220-Ohm y4-Watt resistor 

Ik y4-Watt resistor 

Super Glue 



Price 
$1.29 
$6:95 

$13.50 + postage 
S2.50ea. 
$2.00 ea. 
$3.00 
$ .50 
$ .40 
$1.00 
$ .40 



*Dat3'SignaL Inc., 2403 Commerce Lane. Albany GA 31707. 

* 'Order at local Radio Shack with instructions for manager to order from: Radio Shack National 

Pans, 1801 South Beach, Ft, Worth TX 76105. 



39 



KEYBOARD STI^OBE 



'■*SL 



n 



ct 



SYNTH. 0/5HI 



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KEYBOARD INPUT 






DISPLAY 
DECIMAL POINT 

SYNTH. MHz 



R9 



SYNTH. 
HUNDRED KH2 




MAKE THtS BRIDGE tF 
NOT USING SCAN OPTION 



d 




SYNTH 
TENS KHi 




^°i:: 



Fig. 9- PC board layout for the 2036-08 board. Top view 
shows components side; bottom view shows other side. 

fig. TO. PC board layout for the 2036-MB board. Left view 
shows component side; right view shows other side. 



iSf* 



A 
B 
C 

STROBE 



«- ^' 



-^— ^^v 



™T";^' 




switch is depressed, the 
keypad is now a touchtone 
pad. Be careful not to hold 
your finger on a digit and 
then let go of the push-to- 
taik switch — you will find 
yourself on some other fre- 
quency. 

Conclusion 

This modification has 
been on my H W-2036 since 
April, 1978, and I appre- 
ciate the rig more each 
day. It works beautifully, 
and realty is pleasing to the 
eye. The maximum overall 
cost for project parts 
should not exceed $65. The 
EK-2036 kit, which can be 
purchased from Data- 
Signal, Inc., includes a 
1-MHz crystal, a MCI 4410 
touchtone encoder, and 
assorted discrete compo- 
nents. There is another op- 
tion board which allows 



the HW-2036 to scan any 
1'MHz segment of the 
band and stop on any car- 
rier. A small push-on only 
switch is added at one side 
of the microphone to 
cause scanning to con- 
tinue, This works fine for 
those units that are not 
plagued by birdies at 
various divisions of one 
MHz. 

The MicBoard (2036-MB) 
and Display Board (2036- 
DB) can be acquired by 
writing directly to me. 
These boards are double- 
sided and plated through. 
The price for two boards 
and an instruction booklet 
is $16.95. For the intrepid 
constructor, PC board 
layouts for the two boards 
are shown in Figs. 9 and 10, 

My thanks to Jim Bell 
K4FUP for the accompany- 
ing photograph. ■ 



+ 5V 



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IB 



40 




ANTENNA SYSTEMS 

Multi Band Beam Super DX Series 



NEW HIGH PERFORMANCE TRI^AND BEAMS AS GOOD AS FULL-SIZE MONO BAND ANTENNAS. 
These beams employ hybrid system which is a combination of separated fufl*size driven 
element for each band individually and Hi-0 trap parastic elements. These feature result 
high radiation efficiency, high power rating and excellent VSWR in entire band width. 



1 




r-: 



3F3«DX 




3F370X 



MODEL 



BAND 



ELEMENTS PER 
BAND 



ANTENNA GAIN 



2Qm 

20m 
t 5m 
TQm 



»P»7DX 3F3ftDX 



14 2128 14 2128 



L 
3 
5 
& 



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FTKJNT BACK P*AT10 



lOdB 
lOdB 
25dB 



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a.DdB 



MAX, POWER INPUT 



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IMPED AN@i~ 



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7 , 5th 
5. 3*n 



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SUITABLE MAST_ 
WEIGHT 



IWIILT1 lAlill HAM OX Hlllil 

SPJIDX 






4- 1 



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SO-22 



ic 



SWISS QUAD VHP SERIES 



9f 



SQ-22 T WO MET ER DUAL QUAD 

ANTENNA GAIN AND FRONT TO BACK RATIO ARE WELL IM- 
PROVED WHEN TWO ELEMENTS ARE DRIVEN AT ONE TIME 
WITH PHASE DIFFERENCE COMPARED TO A SINGLE DRIVEN 
ELEMENT SUCH AS A CONVENTIONAL QUAD OR YAGI. THE 
50-22 PROVIDES THE OWNER WITH SUCH FEATURES SIMPLE 
ASSEMBLY AND LIGHT WEIGHT. 



KEN PRO ROTATORS 



KR-2000 




KR-600 




KR-400 




KR-500 




5 Highland Parkway, Norman, Oklahoma 73069 

Te 1 (405) 360 - 64 I O *'^*' 




U.S.A. 



41 



It's a Wattmeter 

If s an Swr Bridge 

It's Swattmeter! 

— a super home-brew project 



A. R. Pedrkk K4LBr 
1446 Hagen Lane 
Rackledge FL 3293S 



One of my favorite 
pastimes in amateur 
radio is designing and 
building antennas for the 
HF spectrum. I have a 



5-band trap vertical 
mounted 12" above 
ground, a ground plane 
vertical on the roof, a 
10-meter "sloper" which is 




Photo A. The Swattmeter is mounted in station operatmg position. The meter on the left 
reads forward power. Reverse power and swr are shown on the right 



part of my TV guy-wire 
system, a 3-band inverted 
"vee/' also part of the guy- 
wire system, and a couple 
of experimental 3/2- 
waveleogth wires on the 

roof. 

Now, 1 am working on a 
miniature quad, hoping I 
can find room to mount the 
thing. All this means that 
PL-259 coax connectors by 
the barrelful are coming in- 
to the shack. Of course, the 
only practical way to com- 
pare the relative perfor- 
mance of all these anten- 
nas is to use a husky coax 
switch so that I can readily 
go from one antenna to 
another during a QSO, and 
hopefully get some mean* 
ingful reports from the guy 
on the other end without 
making him wait until I 
disconnect and reconnect 
coax cables. 

With this thought in 
mind, I recently acquired a 
B&W Model 595 coaxial 
switch which is a S-position 
in-line model designed for 
wall or desk-top mounting. 
I preferred the in-line ar- 



42 



rangement to the axial con- 
figuration, in order to keep 
the thing from tooking like 
an octopus squatting on 
the shelf. 

Once 1 had the switch in 
hand, ] started to think 
about all the other out- 
board stuff I had con- 
nected between my trans- 
ceiver and the antennas. 
There was, of course, the 
low-pass filter, then an swr 
meter, and finally a bor- 
rowed power meter. Now, 
with the switch in place, 
the shack was beginning to 
resemble something out of 
Rube Goldberg. Besides 
the fact that it looked like 
a mess, did you ever have 
the need to determine just 
how long your transmis- 
sion line is for matching 
purposes? Some of my 
antennas load best when 
the transmission line 
length is in multiples of 
45'6" for RG-58/U. Out^ 
board devices are handy, 
but just how much length 
does a switch like the B&W 
add, anyway? (I'll admit 
that the length added by 
any one outboard device is 
negligible, but I'm a nit- 
picker. And when you add 
two or three other gadgets, 
you start talking feet, not 
inches.) 

Needless to say, the 
B&W came apart and I 
discovered that the effec- 
tive transmission line 
length was variable, de- 
pending on the position of 
the switch. Fig. 1 shows how 
the switch is wired as it 
comes from the factory. 

When the switch is in 
positions 1 or 6, the effec- 
tive length is the shortest, 
and in positions 3 and A, 
the longest. As I said be- 
fore, it probably does not 
mean much as a matter of 
practical fact, but what did 
matter was something else 
t noticed: There was a lot of 
wasted space in the guts of 
that switch! The space, in 
fact, looked tailor-made to 
contain a couple of meters 
and the necessary com- 
ponents for an swr/power 




Photo B, An inside view of the Swattmeter. The SO-239 connector on the left is the input 



bridge. 

And so the Swattmeter 
was hatched, which is real- 
ly what this article is about 
(I do ramble, don't I?). Line 
length forgotten for the 
moment. I took off after 
this new idea like a hound 
sniffin' grass, much to the 
exasperation of the XYL. 

You might ask, why 
bother? Well, it's neater 
and results in less junk out- 
board from the transceiver. 
Besides, it looked like a 
challenge, and then there's 
that line-length factor , . , 

Description and Criteria 

The accompanying 
photographs pretty much 
show how the Swattmeter 
is constructed and what 
vyent into it. There is really 
nothing new in its design, 
but, rather, a circuit 
modification or two. The 
wattmeter portion of the 
Swattmeter uses the 
100-uA dual meters can- 
nibalized from the Swan 
model SWR-1. Also can- 
nibalized from the Swan is 
the dual 10k potentiometer 
used for swr "set" What is 
different from the Swan 
meter is the toroid current 
transformer used as the 
directional coupler, rather 
than the transmission line- 



type coupler used in the 
Swan and similar inexpen- 
sive swr meters. I used the 
meters from the Swan be- 
cause I had them, and they 
were already calibrated in 
terms of power and swr. Of 
course, any lOO-uA meters 
may be used. The only 
criterion is that they fit into 
the space on either side of 
the switch. 

Fig. 2 is the schematic of 
the Swattmeter. You will 
see that, with some excep- 
tions, the circuit is similar 
to one described by Bruene 
in QS7 (April, 1959). The 
bridge circuit by Bruene 
uses a capacitive voltage 
divider and a current de- 
tector to provide two volt- 
ages proportional to the 
forward and reflected 
voltages or currents of the 
transmission line. See Fig. 
3. 

The circuit in Fig. 2 uses 
the stray capacitance be- 
tween the current trans- 
former and the line as part 
of the voltage divider. 
Most bridge designs try to 
eliminate stray capaci- 
tance so that a controlled 
amount can be used in the 
design. I figured, why fight 
it? I coudn't figure out how 
to shield everything in the 
confines of the B&W 



switch, and "if you can't 
lick 'em, join 'em!'' The 
variable 6- to 20-pF ceram- 
ic trimmer of Fig. 2 is the 
other half of the voltage 
divider. 

The design here uses a 
bif i I ar-wound current 
transformer in which the 
low impedance at the 
secondary is split into two 
equal parts. The center tap 
on the transformer is also 
part of the voltage samp- 
ling network (stray capaci- 
tance plus the 6- to 20-pF 
trimmer) so that the sum 
and difference voltages are 
available at the ends of the 
transformer secondary 
winding. With the values 
shown, the meter main- 
tains its calibration to 
within 10 percent over the 
frequency range of 3 to 30 
MHz — and probably from 



4 5 6 INPUT i Z 3 



r. 



^ 9- 



Fig. 1, Simplified wiring 
diagranrt, B&W Model 595 
coaxial switch. Note: Auto- 
matic grounding (not 
shown) of all unused posi- 
tions is incorporated. 



43 




Photo C A ctoseup view of nme^lug terminal strip and current trarisformer. The input 
SO-239 cor^nector is on the tower right 



1 to 50 MHz, although I 
have used only the former. 
The degree of isolation be- 
tween forward and reverse 



readings into a matched 
dummv load is excellent 
(estimated to be between 
20 and 30 dB). I can pump 



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Fig. 2. S wattmeter schematic 



nearly 500 Watts of rf into 
a 50-Ohm dummy load 
through the Swattmeter 
with nary an indication of 
reverse power. 

A three-position switch 
is used as a function/range 
selector allowing for two 
power ranges and an SWR 
position. Position 1 of the 
switch allows forward 
power measurement of 500 
Watts and reverse power of 
100 Watts. Position 2 reads 
1000 Watts forward and 
1000 Watts reverse, and 
position 3 is for standard 
swr measurements using 
the ''set'' control variable 
potentiometer to calibrate 
the left'hand meter in the 
conventional manner. Swr 
is then read directly from 
the right-hand meter. Alter- 
natively, the "swr set" 
potentiometer dial also 
can be calibrated in Watts 
if desired. When the func- 
tion switch is set at swr and 
the pot is wide open, max- 
imum sensitivity (both for- 
ward and reverse) is less 
than 5 Watts full scale, 

The wattmeter can be 
made more sensitive by in- 



creasing the number of 
turns on the toroid. This 
causes the inter-turn 
capacitance to increase, 
however, and causes the 
response to fall at high fre- 
quencies. Consequently, 
the directivity also falls. 
The values of Ra and Rb' 
were determined experi- 
mentally and can vary by 
10%, Rb should have a 
value of 150 Ohms if the 
Swattmeter is to be used 
predominately with 
72-Ohm cable. The values 
shown are good for 50- to 
53-Ohm coax. 

The 1 N60 diodes need to 
be matched for both for- 
ward and reverse resis- 
tance. They should be 
within 5% if possible, with 
the forward resistance 
more important than the 
reverse. 

A word here about by- 
pass capacitors is in order. 
Use good quality ceramic 
capacitors rated at 10O0 
volts. Some ceramic 
capacitors act as fine in- 
ductors, especially at the 
higher frequencies, and 
can cause all sorts of 
spurious readings. This is 
particularly important in 
the confined space avail- 
able in the B&W switch 
body, with all that rf bound- 
ing around inside. With 
good capacitors, non- 
inductive resistors, and the 
layout shown, you should 
have no problems. 



Constrijctfoii 

Assuming you have a 
the parts handy, the first 
step is to completely 
disassemble the B&W 
switch. I removed even the 
SO-239 coax connectors by 
drilling out the rivets in 
order to allow ground lugs 
to be mounted, one at each 
connector. The reason for 
this will be evident later on 
(remember the original 
line-length problem). Be- 
sides, the paint job on the 
595 didn't please me, and I 
wanted to ref inish the thing 
once I got the meter and 
control holes drilled. 

The layout is tight but 



44 



workable, and depends 
pretty much on the size of 
your meters and other 
components. The meters I 
used mount in a l^/^-inch 
diameter hole (which was 
convenient, since I hap- 
pened to have a Greenlee 
punch just the right size). 
Needless to say, but Til say 
it anyway, check all dimen- 
sions carefully. You get on- 
ly one chance for proper 
clearances. 

Once all the holes are 
drilled, the original finish 
can be removed (your op- 
tion) with lacquer thinner, 
and the unit primed and re- 
finished. I used Walsco 
Collins Instrument char- 
coal gray wrinkle varnish 
which comes m a conve- 
nient spray can. 

Once the paint is dry, 
you may wish to apply the 
panel markings before the 
components are mounted. 
It is easier if you know 
what you want and where 
you want it. Dry-mount let- 
tering is easy to apply even 
to wrinkle finish, but 
should be sprayed after- 
wards with a clear finish to 
protect the lettering. I 
usually do it the hard way, 
and put the markings on 
last just in case I want to 
change something at the 
last minute. 

The SO-239 coaxial chas- 
sis connectors should be 
mounted using 6-32 hard- 
ware with lock washers and 
a ground lug for each con- 
nector. Make sure there is 
no paint on the inside of 
the case, which may cause 
a poor m eta [-to-metal con- 
tact. Mount all the other 
components as shown in 
the photos, except for the 
nine-lug terminal strip, (It 
will be mounted after the 
switch has been wiredj 

First after all the hard- 
ware is secure, wire the 
coax switch. The input to 
the switch is now the first 
SO-239 connector on the 
left. This was done to allow 
room for the current trans- 
former. All output connec- 
tors were wired to the 




Photo D. Detailed view of the two-lug terminal strip and current transformer. 



switch in a clockwise direc- 
tion using 5" lengths of RG- 
58C/U, which is more flexi- 
ble than the others. The 
outer conductor of each 
length of coax is grounded 
to its respective SO-239 
ground lug, but stripped 
back out of the way on the 
end which connects to the 
switch. This provides for 
shielded leads all the same 
length within the Swatt- 
meter (I told you we would 
get back to that) and 
enables the switch-wiring 
to be routed easily out of 
the way of the other com- 
ponents. The effective 
transmission line length of 
the switch when wired in 
this manner is approx- 
imately 1 foot in all posi- 
tions, give or take an inch. 

Don't forget that the 
B&W switch actually has 
two decks, one of which 
grounds all unused posi- 
tions. In the original 
switch, this second deck 
was grounded at the switch 
at a lug on the switch 
spacer. I preferred to 
eliminate that lug and 
ground the second deck to 
the nearest SO-239 ground 
lug. 

The input side of the 
switch uses a 3" length of 
RG-58C/U, prepared as 
above and fastened to the 



input SO-239 in the same 
manner as the other cables. 
The exception is the other 
end, which goes to one lug 
of a two-lug terminal strip 
as shown in the photo. The 
second lug of the terminal 
strip is wired with bare wire 
to the input terminal of the 
switch. 

You may have to im- 
provise a little with this 
two-lug terminal strip, 
which is used to hold the 
toroid transformer. I found 
mine in my junk box and it 
was a perfect fit. 

As you can see in the 
photos, the current 
transformer is slipped over 
a short piece of RG-8/U 
center conductor and the 
stripped ends of the RC-8/U 
are then soldered to the 
two-lug terminal strip. Fig. 
4 illustrates a little more 
clearly how this is done. 
The physical configuration 



of the terminal strip tugs 
and the RC-8/U inner con- 
ductor acts as a half-turn 
loop, or primary, for the 
toroid. Actual dimensions 
are not critical, but the wir- 
ing to and from the ter- 
minal strip lugs should be 
soldered at the base rivet 
of each lug and not where 
the RG-8/U center conduc- 
tor is soldered. The toroid 
is held in place by a few 
dabs of silicone cement. 

The current transformer 
is wound on a T-68-2 (red) 
core which is rated for use 
between 1 and 30 MHz. Cut 
two pieces of no. 24 
enameled wire about 60 
cm (24") long. Put two ends 
together in a vise and twist 
until you have about 1 
twist per cm (IVi twists 
per inch). Wind 22 turns on 
the toroid, leaving about 
2V2 cm (rO out of the 
toroid on both ends of the 



IN> 



CURRENT TRANSFORMER 
(^*J 



— TO SWITCH 



< STRAY 



FWQ 



CAPACFTANCE 



S-TOpF 

CERAMIC 

TRIMMER 



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Fig. 3. Capacitive voltage divider with current transformer. 



45 




Photo E. Calibration of forward power meter. 



winding. The turns should 
be close-wound around the 
inner circumference of the 
core, and evenly spaced 
along the outer cir* 
cumference. 

Carefully remove all the 
enamel back towards the 
toroid, select a wire from 
each end of the winding, 
and test with an ohm meter 
to find two wires that do 
not show continuity. Con- 
nect these two wires to- 
gether and hold with a 



drop of solder. This is the 
center tap. Check for con- 
tinuity on the two remain- 
ing wires. The result is two 
bifilar windings in series, 
with a center tap, or 44 
total turns. Total induc- 
tance is approximately 11 
uH. 

The toroid coil should 
then be slipped over a 
short length of RC-8/U coax 
with the outer insulation 
and braid removed, and 
mounted and soldered to 



MOUr^TS OH 

SWITCH SPACER 



*<3 



BARE WIRE 

TO SWiTCH 




TO fHPlH 
COMNECtOR 



RG-eU INNEJl 
COMDUtTOft 



^ — SOLOE R 



Tt>RO(0 TRANSFORMER 



TO 9-LUG 
TERMINAL STRIP 



Fig. 4. Mount'mg the current transformer. 



the two-lug terminal strip 
as described above. 

After the toroid is in 
place, the rest of the Swatt- 
meter wiring is conven- 
tional. Wire the hard-to- 
reach items first, such as 
the meter bypass capaci- 
tors and leads, which are 
located under the seven- 
lug terminal strip once it is 
installed. I used a series 
3000, nine-lug terminal 
strip with a cadmium- 
plated steel mounting base 
for point-to-point wiring 
(available from Allied/ 
Radio Shack). ! did con- 
sider a PC board, but de- 
cided against it since the 
wiring is so simple. Also, 
the steel mounting base of 
the terminal strip makes a 
fine balanced ground 
point, as you can see in the 
photos. 

The mounting holes on 
the terminal strip are bent 
at right angles away from 
the lugs. One side is 
mounted under the bottom 
nut holding the first (input) 
SO-239 connector. The 
other side is secured with 
6-32 hardware through a 
hole drilled in the front of 
the enclosure. Use 
lock washers between the 
terminal strip mounting 
boles and the steel en- 
closure/SO'239 connector, 
as well as under each nut. 

The center lug of the 

nine-lug terminal strip is 
the junction or tie point for 
the toroid center tap. The 
2.2k resistor should be 
mounted on the underside 
of the terminal strip, using 
short leads. Use the metal 
base of the terminal strip 
as the ground point. Simi- 
larly, the 6- to 70-pF ce- 
ramic trimmer capacitor 
is mounted on thfe top side 
of the terminal strip. Again, 
use the metal base of the 
terminal strip just opposite 
of the center lug as a 
ground point for the 
capacitor. 

Do not connect the two 
outer wires of the toroid 
until all other wiring is 
completed. You will have 



to determine by trial which 
lead is forward and which 
is reverse. 

Use short leads for all 
bypass capacitors, and 
ground at the closest point 
possible. Do not add addi- 
tional capacitors. They 
aren't needed and could 
make problems. Route all 
wires from and to the nine- 
lug terminal strip under the 
terminal strip away from 
the toroid. Make the layout 
as uniform and symmetri- 
cal as possible. The last 
components to be soldered 
in place should be the trim- 
pots used to calibrate the 
two power positions of the 
function switch, Fig. 5 and 
the photos show the loca- 
tion of these trimpots. 

I used the miniature pots 
available at Lafayette 
because they were the 
smallest I could get my 
hands on inexpensively. I 
cut off the center connec- 
tor of each pot, and made a 
solder bridge from the re- 
maining part of the center 
lug to one side of the pot to 
conserve space. All four 
pots are held in place with 
solder. Forget the old 
adage of a ''good mechani- 
cal connection.'' "Solder is 
enough/' is my motto. 

Setup and Calibration 

Assuming that all other 
wiring is complete, tack- 
sofder the two remaining 
toroid wires to the ter- 
minals as shown in Fig, 5. 
You have a 50/50 chance of 
getting it right the first 
time, but Murphy's Law is 
still in effect, so don't 
count on it. 

Now comes the "smoke" 
test. Hook up the input 
connector to an rf source 
of at least 5 Watts and a 
50-Ohm dummy load to 
one of the output connec- 
tors. Make sure the Swatt- 
meter switch is in the ap- 
propriate position or else 
there will be smoke, and it 
won't be coming from the 
power meter! (Don't ask 
me how 1 know I) 

Set your rf source, 
transmitter, or transceiver 



46 



on 10 meters and the 
Swattmeter function 
switch to SWR. Run the swr 
meter "set" pot up full 
clockwise, and key the 
transmitter. A lot of power 
is neither needed nor 
desired at this point Use a 
rf output level that you can 
comfortably maintain for a 
period of time without wor- 
ry fng about your finals sag- 
ging. 

If all has gone well, the 
forward power meter (on 
the left) should register, 
and the reflected power 
meter may or may not 
register. Carefully and 
slowly, adjust the 6- to 70- 
pF trimmer capacitor and 
watch the meters for 
results. If the toroid is con- 
nected correctly, the 
reading on the reflected 
power meter should null 
out. if the null is experi- 
enced on the forward side, 
reverse the toroid connec- 
tions and try again. Use 
minimum power and try to 
hit the null square in the 
middle. You will find that 
the null is fairly sharp on 10 
meters, but gets broader as 
the frequency is reduced. 
Not to worry. Once bal- 
anced at 28 MHz, the 
bridge is okay at all other 
frequencies. 

At this point the bridge is 
balanced, and all we have 
to do is calibrate the two 
power positions. If you 
have used meters which 
are calibrated at 0-100 uA, 
calibration for power will 
be nonlinear because the 
meter samples voltage, 
whereas power is propor- 
tional to voltage squared. 
Table 1 shows the relation- 
ship between a 0-100 linear 
meter scale and power. 
Two power ranges are 
shown: 0-50 Watts and 
0-100 Watts. The meters 1 
used were already calibrat- 
ed in terms of power and 
swr (from the Swan SWR-1 ), 
and the power ranges were 
calculated to match the ex- 
isting scales. 

If you have to use meters 
calibrated at 0-100 uA, you 



can use Table 1 to deter- 
mine actual power and swr, 
or you can remake the lin- 
ear scales using dry-transfer 
press-on lettering. It isn't 
really atl that difficult. 
Calibration is a heck of a 
lot less difficult if the 
meter scales read power in- 
stead of microamperes. 

There are at least three 
ways to calibrate the 
Swattmeter, In each case, 
the wattmeter is calibrated 
by feeding power through 
the meter into a dummy 
load. It also is possible to 
infer calibration by 
measuring the dc output of 
the forward detector, 
which can be measured 
with a high-impedance dc 
voltmeter (more on this 
later). In atl cases except 
the last, the reflected 
power meter is calibrated 
by reversing the external 
connections to the coaxial 
line. 

The first method is to 
beg or borrow another 
wattmeter to use as a cali- 
brated reference. Simply 
connect the borrowed 
meter in series with the 
power meter between your 
transmitter and dummy 
load. Set the range switch 
to 0-500 Watts and crank 
up your transmitter for a 
10-Watt output as in- 
dicated by the borrowed 
meter. Adjust R1 for a 
10-Watt indication on the 
0-50 scale of the power 
meter. Move the range 
switch to 0-1000 Watts and 
adjust R2 for a 10-Watt 
reading on the 0-100 scale. 
Reverse the coaxial con- 
nections to the Swattmeter 
and calibrate for reflected 
power in the same manner, 
using R3 first for the 
0-100-Watt position, and 
R4 for the 0-1000-Watt 
position. 

The second method re- 
quires an rf voltmeter and 
measuring the power 
dissipated in the dummy 
load by measuring the rf 
voltage across the load. 
However, most rf probes 
designed for use with com- 




Photo F. Calibration of reverse power and swr meter 



mercial VTVMs are strictly 
limited. The reason is that 
the peak reverse voltage 
appearing across the probe 
diode will exceed the 
diode breakdown rating for 
a peak rf power of much 
over 10 Watts. (Ten Watts 
rf across a 50-Ohm dummy 
toad will produce about 
22.4 volts dcj Fortunately, 
all we need is one bench 
mark if we assume the 
wattmeter to be reason- 
ably linear, and a 10-Watt 



bench mark is as good as 
any. 

An alternative is to use a 
voltage divider, say 10:1 , in 
front of the diode detector, 
but that messes up the 
total load since the voltage 
divider then appears in 
parallel with the 50-Ohm 
dummy load. You can do it 
if you want to recalculate 
the load, for example, but 
it really isn't necessary. 
The Swattmeter isn't 
meant to replace a really 



TO 
SftNGEyFUNCTIOM 

Swire H 



TO 
TJIiCTlOW 



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BB»DfiE^ „^ 







CERAMIC 



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Fig. 5. Wiring diagranm, nine-fug terminal strip. 



47 



good high-accuracy watt- 
meter in the first place. 

The procedure using the 
second method of calibra- 
tion is the same as outhned 
above, using a second 
wattmeter. The reference, 
however, is your VTVM 
rather than the borrowed 
wattmeter. Connect your 
VTVM with the rf probe 
across the 500hm dummy 
load. (It won't hurt to 
measure the actual resis- 
tance of the dummy load 
first, since it may vary be- 
tween 40 and 60 Ohms, 
especially if it has been 
well-used over a period of 
years. Even good quality 
resistors change value as 
they are heated and cooled 
periodically.) Adjust your 
transmitter drive to pro- 
duce a 22.4-volt reading on 
your VTVM representing 
10 Watts of rf, and proceed 
as above to adjust trim 
pots R1 through R4. Use a 
very short coax jumper be- 
tween the Swattmeter and 
the dummy load for best 
results. If your dummy 
load resistance is off by 
more than 10% (45-55 
Ohms), use Ohm's Law to 
recalculate the proper 
voltage for TO Watts of rf. 

The third method that 
can be used reasonably to 
calibrate the Swattmeter is 
to infer the peak line volt- 
age from the dc output of 
the forward detector, 
which can be measured 
with a high impedance dc 
voltmeter. If you have ex- 
amined the Swattmeter 
schematic closely, you will 
have noticed that the 10k 
Ohm "Swr Set" controls 
act as load resistors for the 
two diodes for all positions 
of the range selector 
switch. This loads the 
diodes on the most linear 
portion of their response 
curve, and the calibrating 
resistors, R1 through R4, 
plus their respective 100 
uA meters, act as simple dc 
voltmeters measuring the 
voltages across each 10k 
controL 

No, Virginia, you can't 



use the Swattmeter meters 
for self-calibration, but 
you can calculate the 
voltage to be expected 
across the 10k "Swr Set" 
controls for a given rf 
power level through the 
wattmeter. Not wishing to 
bore you with the math in- 
volved, I have shown in 
Table 2 this relationship for 
the Swattmeter as 
constructed. 

From Table 2, you will 
see that 10 Watts of rf pro- 
duces 0.66 volts at the out- 
put of the forward detector 
(or at the reverse detector 
if the input/output rf leads 
are reversed). For 100 
Watts, the voltage should 
be 2.3, for 500 Watts, 5.2 
volts, and for 1000 Watts, 
7.5 volts. Assuming that 
you have built a nearly ex- 
act copy of the Swatt- 
meter, simply hook up a dc 
source across both "Swr 
Set" potentiometers, along 
with an accurate VTVM or 
DVM (no rf needed). Set 
the range selector switch 
to 500/100 and the dc 
source to 2.3 V Adjust R1 
and R3 for a 100 Watt 
reading on both meters. 
Next, set the range selector 
to 1000/100 and adjust R2 
and R4 for a 100-Watt in- 
dication. Run your dc 
source up to 7.5 volts and 
check both meters for 
1000-Watt indications. 

You may have to jockey 
R1 through R4 a little for 
compromise readings us- 
ing the voltages given in 
Fig. 6. The readings will 
vary a little because of the 
load produced by the 
100-uA meter movement, 
but don't worry too much 
about it. Remember, the 
Swattmeter is not intended 
to be a precision in- 
strument—just a handy 
combination gadget con- 
venient for tuning up and 
practical as a performance 
monitor for your station. 

Once the calibration is 
complete, put the back on 
and install it in a handy 
location. I installed mine 
(as you can see from the 



photos) on a swivel mount, 
using M-359 angle adapters 
to keep the coax neat. 

Potential Problems 

When first constructed, 
the Swattmeter was erratic 
on some frequencies — the 
cause being poor ceramic 
bypass capacitors. If you 
experience power peaks, 
and know it's not caused 
by your transmitter, 
replace the capacitors. 
Another problem ex- 
perienced was a negative 
swr indication at very low 
power levels! This was 
caused by slightly un- 
matched diodes which 
''turned on" at different 
voltages. If this happens to 
you, either increase the 
power level to get each 
diode turned on or rematch 
your diodes. 

Speaking of diodes, it is 
possible (although I've 
never experienced it) that 
the diodes in any direc- 
tional wattmeter are likely 
to produce harmonics of 
the applied frequency. 
Change the diodes if you 
suspect this is happening. 

As I said before, 
Murphy's Law is still in ef- 
fect, and you could run in- 
to some different prob- 
lems, I have covered all 
those that I experienced. 

Conclusion 

My Swattmeter is a com- 
fort when I'm on the air. 1 
can tune up the rig into a 
dummy load using very lit- 
tle power, switch to 
whatever antenna I want to 
use, and load the finals in 
just a few seconds. It is 
reassuring to know your 
finals are putting out just 
about what they should, 
and that there is minimum 
reflected power on the 
line. 

Variations are possible, 
if you don't like the design 
or if it doesn't fill your 
need. You can leave out 
the range switch and simply 
calibrate the ''Swr Set" 
control for various power 
levels. You can eliminate, 
on the other hand, the swr 



Power, 


0-100 Mefef 


Watts 


Reading 


1000/500 


100 


900/450 


m 


600/400 


89 


700/350 


84 


600/300 


78 


500/250 


71 


400/200 


63 


300/150 


55 


250/125 


50 


200/100 


45 


100/60 


32 


50/25 


22 


25/12.5 


16 


20/10 


14 


Swr 


0-100 Mater 




Reading 


1:3 


50 


1:2 


34 


1:1.5 


20 


Table 1. Meter scale cafibra- 


thn. 




Power, 


Forward Detector 


Watts 


Dc Output 


1000 


7.5 V 


900 


7.0 V 


800 


6.6 V 


700 


6.2 V 


600 


5.7 V 


500 


5.2 V 


400 


4J V 


300 


4.0 V 


200 


3.3 V 


100 


2.3 V 


50 


1.6 V 


10 


0.66 V 



Table Z Forward detector 
dc-output vs. power. 



function and simply have 
a forward and reflected 
wattmeter. You even can 
eliminate both controls, 
and replace them with 
fixed-value components 
for a "one range" Swatt- 
meter, Different power 
ranges are easy also — just 
adjust Rl through R4 for 
wattever (pun intended) 
JFuii scale power level you 
desire. And there are still 
more. . . let me see, now. If 
I put a 20-dB coupler in 
there, maybe I can come 
up with a spare receiver 
tap. Then there is the 
possibility of adding 
another diode and a capac- 
itor and an op amp to read 
peak power. . . no, on the 
other hand, I guess the XYL 
wouldn't stand for it!B 



48 



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49 



James S. Beemn /// WA5QAP 
165 Shady Lane 
Dayton TX 17535 



The Double-Sawbuck 
QRM Annihilator 

3-IC circuit yields perfect CW 



Having been a ham for 
almost 13 years, I 
guess you could say that I 
am set in my ways in some 
areas. One of these jost 
happens to be CW. I do not 
work much CW, but when 1 
do, I like to have a strong 
clear signal to do it with. 
This little circuit can give 
you just that. 

I like projects that use 
components that are easily 
obtainable and not too ex- 



*9V 

4 



IKPUT 

^ 



01 



^f 



^ff 



t; 



ff7 



Rl 



C5 JL ^ 
047 



iH 



14 



\1 



C4 
22 



^h* 



*SV 



t 



df 



«2 



pensive. All parts here can 
be obtained from your 
nearby Radio Shack for 
less than $10, as well as a 
copy of their book, /n- 
tegx^Xed Circuits,, Volume 3, 
Projects ($1.50), which 
helped me to understand 
the 567 better. 

Overall Description 

Basically, what this cir- 
cuit does is take a CW sig- 
nal from your receiver via 
the phones jack, and out- 



7404 



4 



♦ 5V 
4 



12 la-o 



**v 



£,£K 



S55. 



fR4 



itJ 



€3 
.01 



ft6 
JK 



10 9 

35V 

-3h- 



r<l 



1 



ih 



2 5V»C 
OUTPilT 



f/g. t. Schemaiic diagram of CW circuit R6 is a Bourns 
3339P-1-102 PC board pot Capacitor values are in m/cro- 
farads: resistor values are in Ohms. The 555 and 567 are 
minhDiP chips. 



put to you via speaker or 
headphones a clear, un- 
cluttered CW signal. It will 
work with very weak sig- 
nals that are almost im- 
possible to copy. It has an 
extremely narrow band- 
width so that it can easily 
separate two very close 
signals, especially when 
you are trying to copy the 
weaker of the two. If some- 
one has a poor-sounding 
signal (chirp), you will 
never know it. It will re- 
ceive RTTY, and you can 
tape a good signal off the 
air for practice later It re- 
quires very little power, 
less than a Watt, so you 
can use an ac supply — or a 
small battery will do. 

Circuit Description 

See Fig. 1 as you read the 
following description. 
Audio enters pin 3 of the 



I20VILC 
€QHt 



567 via coupling capacitor 
CI. The 567 is a tone de* 
coder which outputs a 
negative-going signal from 
5 volts to volts. The par- 
ticular frequency that is 
able to activate the output 
depends upon a combina* 
tion of Rl and C3. The 
center frequency can be 
determined by the equa- 
tion: center frequency ^ 
1.1 /Rl xC3. 

I used a center frequen- 
cy of 2300 Hz. C2 is called 
the low-pass fitter, and it 
determines the bandwidth 
that the 567 will pass at the 
center frequency. C4 is 
called the output filter, 
and it attenuates frequen- 
cies that lie outside the 
desired band of frequen- 
cies. 

Norma tly, pin 8 of the 
567 is high- When you tune 
across a CW signal so that 




m 



^^^ somvac 



iMm^M 






I 



Fig. 2. 5 volts at 1 Amp dc power supply^ 



50 



Ct^SO «PQtJ£WCYCOU>*T^ 




(■HIT |.:'*jl| 



FREQUENCY COUNTER KIT 

Outstanding Performance 



lasnsaii rtaaffpilaj 



lif 1* *5 




CT-50 



Incredible Price 



The CT-50 is a versatile and precision frequency countef yvhrch w'M measure Heaooui oaig 

trequenctes to 60 mHz and up to 600 mHz wtth the CT-600 option Large Scale stl^S^Om 

Negration, CMOS circLJitry and soEid state display techrfofogy ha^e enabled this counter to compensate 

match performance found in units selling for over three times as much Low power '"P"^ ^^c i f 

consumplion (typically 300-400 nna) makes the CT-50 ideal for portable battery operation Ovenoad sqv^ 

Features of the CT^SO include large 8 digit LED dispiay RF shielded all metal case, easy ^wIhT^^ ^*^" 

pushbutton operation, automatic decrmal point, fully socketed \C cfiips and input protection p^^^^ novAi 

to 50 volts to insure against accidental burnout or overJoad And the best feature of all is the siz$ a * 4 a 

easy assembly Clear, step by step jnstructi:ons guide you to a finished unit you can reJy on ics i3 umts s 
Ordef your todays 

CT-50. SO mK; couoter Kit ' S8$.9S ^;g.i Color TV caiibTatOTslabiltzer 

CT-50WT 60 mHz counter wired and tested 1 5$.9S Pf3,1 DC probe general pgrpoae probe 

CT-eoo, 60O mHjT scaler opifon add 29.35 hP-1 Hi gtt impedance prob^ non-loadir 



SPECIFICATIONS: 

Frequervcy rarige. 6 Hz to 6S mHz. 600 mHjr wuh CT-60O 
Resolution t'OHzf^^ 1 sec gate. i Hzch t sec gate 
Readout B digil. 4" fiigh LEO direcl readout m mHz 
Accyracy adiustable lo S ppm 

Stiibilily 2 ppm over 10 to 40 C. lempefalure 

comperi sated 

input BNC. 1 fTiegohm 20 p! direct. 50 pnm wtih CT-60C 

Overload 5QVAC maxhmgm. all modes 

Sen5(icv<ty Jess- than 25 mv to 65 mtii. 50-150 mv to SOQ 
mHz 

Power 1 1 VAC 5 Watts or 1 2 VDC r... 400 ms 

Size 6" * 4" a 2" fMgh qualtly aluminum case, 2 lbs 

ICS 13 units all socJteled 



SI 4.95 
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CAR 
CLOCK 



■ III I ' "" 



pae 



OP-AMP SPECIAL 



741 mini dip 

Bl-FET rrnni dip. 741 lype 



12/sa.oo 

10/52.00 



Ttte UN-KIT only 
S solder connections 

Here's a super booking, rugged and accurate auto 
Ctoclt.wtiicti is a snap to bufJd and install Cfock 
movemertt ts comptetely assembled— you only solder 
3 Wires and 2 switchies, takes about 15 minutes! 
Oi&play IS bright green with automatic brightness 
control p ho to ceff— assures you o( a highly readable 
dtspioy. -day or night Come& in ^ satin finish ^n- 
odized alurriinum case which can be attached 5 
different ways using 2 sided tape Choice pt.aiilver. 
hUick or gold t;^be (specify) 

DC-3 kit. 1 2 hour format S22,9S 

DC-3 wired and tesEed S29.95 

nOV AC adapter S5.9S 




Under dash 
car clock 

1?- 24 hour clocK in a tjeau'- 
tiful pSashc case features. 6 
iumtso RED LEDS, hrgh accuracy CI mm .■'mo.), easy 3 

wire hoottup.. display blanks wilh ignition, and super 
instructions Optional dimmer automatically adjusts 
display lo ambient light level 
DC-11 clock wMh mlg bracket $27 95 

DM- 1 dimmer adapter 2.50 



PRESCALER 

Extend the s^ange of your 

counter to 6O0 mHz. Works 

wi«th any counter Inctudes 2 

transistor pre-amp lo give super sens, typrcafly 20 

mv at 1 50 mHz Specify 4 lO or -:- 100 ratio 

PS-1 B, 600 mHz prescaler $59/9& 

PS-1 BK, 600 mHz orescafer kiJ 49,9S 




VIDEO TERMINAL 

A completely self-contajned. stand atone video ter- 
minal card. Requires onty an ASCII keyboard and TV 
set to t>ecome a complete terminal urvit. Tm^o units 
a^iiailable, common features are: single 5V supply, 
XTAL controlled sync and baud rates (to 9600), 
complete computer and keyboard control of cursor. 
Parity error controi and display. Accepts and gensf- 
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3216 is 32 char by 16 lines, 2 pages with memory 
dump feature. The 6416 is 64 char, by 1 6 lines, with 
scroUing. upper and lower case (optional) and iias 
R5-232 :and £Qma loop interfaces on board, Kits 
include sockets and complete documentation. 
RE 3216, terminal card t14§.9S 

RE 6416, terminal card . lSft.95 

Lower Case option, 6416 only IS.S'S 

Power Supply Kit . . - 14,95 

Video/ RF Modulator, VD-1 «.9S 

Assenn^bled, tested units, add 60. 00 



CALENDAR ALARM CLOCK 

The clock thats got it all. 6- 5" L£D$, ^2/24 hour, 

snooze 24 hour alarm, 4 year calendar battery 

backup, and lots more The super 7001 chip is used 

Size 5j(4k2 inches 

Complete kit, less case {not available) 

DC -9 134.95 



Ml 



mmmmm 



30 Watt 2 mtr PWR AMP 

Simple Glass C power amp features S limes pjo^er 
gain l W inlor8out.2infor 1&out,4Winfor30out 
Max output of 35 W. incredible value, complete with 
all parts, iess case and T-R relay 
PA-t, 30 W pwr amp kit 522.95 

TR-1 , RF sensed T-R retay kit 6.95 



Ramsey's famous MINI-KITS 



FM WIRELESS MtKE KIT 

TransmUs up tq 300' 

\q arty FM broftdcasit 

r^dio uses any type of 

mikG. Runs on 3 lo 9V 

Type FM-£ has added serr- 

silive raikefireamp stage 

F M - 1 kit S2.93 F M-? k M S4 J5 




COLOfi ORGAN/WIUSiC LIGHTS 

See music come alive' 3 different 
lighiB flicker with music OT\-e t!gh( 
for lows . one f r t h e irnd -ra n ge and 
one lor the highs. Each channel 
individually adjustaWe. and drives 
up to 300W. Great (or parlies, band 
music, nite clubs and more. 
Cornplete kit, ML-I %7M5 



iaH 



imsj^^HKj!^ 



LED BLINKY KIT 

A great attention getter which aJter- 
natety Ma5,he& 2 jumbo LEDs Use 
TOT name badges, buttons, warning^.— *^ 
panfil ii?)hi& aoyihing? Runs on 3 to' 
1 5 vails 
Complete kit. BL-I S2.95. 



VIDEO MODULATOR KIT 

Converts any TV to video monitor 
Super slahle, tunable over ch. 4-6 
Runs on 5-1 5 V. accepts sid yideo 
signal B^i uni^i on Ihe market^ 
CompieTelcil VO-t S6.95 





TOME DECODER 

A complete- 
tone decoder on 

a singJe PC board 
Features. 400-SO&0 
Hi adjustable range viia 
20 turn pot. vollag:^ regulation. 567 
1C. Useful (or touch-tone qlftcoding 
tone burst detect ion, FSK. etc Can 
also be used as a slable tone en- 
coder. Runs on 5 lo 12 voit? 
Complete kit, TD-t JS,95 




WHISPER LIGHT KIT 

An interesting kil, smati mike picks 
up sounds and converts them to 
tig hi The louden the souniJ the 
brfghier the ligM Completely se!f- 
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11 VAC conlrols up to 300 watts 
Complete kit, WL1 %tS5 



ramss^ siaBirDfilQs 

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A supST sensitive am- 
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up a pfr. drop at f 5 fe-et' 
G r ea f f r monitoring ba by s room or 
as generai purposes amplifier Full 2 
W rms oufpul. runs on 6 to 15 volls, 
uses 6-45 ohm speaker 
Complete kit BN-9 5S.B5 

POWER SUPPLY KIT 

Complete inpie -regu- 

lated power supply pro^ 
vides variable : 6 to 19 
volts at 200 ma and + 5V at 1 
Amp. Excellent load r^guJation, 
good niE^ering and small ^ize Less 
iransformers. requires 6.3V f« 1 A 
and 24 VCT 
CoTTiplete kiL PS 3LT S«.9S 



SIREtM KIT 

Produces upwafd and downward ** 

wa I i c h g r actef i si I c of a no I ice siren 
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volts, uses 3-45 ohm speaker 
Conriplete kit. SM-3 S2,95 



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A Super high performance FM 
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FM-3 wired and tested i^SS 





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Hard to find PARTS 



LINiAR IC* 




REGULATORS 




301 


$ 35 


reiviG 


$1 25 


324 


1 50 


r23 


50 


380 


1 25 


309K 


85 


300-8 


75 


7605 


85 


55& 


45 


7eL05 


25 


556 


SB 


7^05 


1 25 


566 


t 15 


7812 


85 


567 


1 25 


7912 


1 25 


14SS 


50 


7615 


85 


1900 


50 


TTL ICi 




ChffOS tCs 




74100 


35 


401 ] 


20 


7447 


65 


4013 


3& 


7475 


50 


4046 


1 as 


7490 


50 


4049 


40 


741 g6TI 


1 35 


45ia 


125 


SPECIAI- iCt 




5369 


1 75 


11C90 


1350 


TRANSISTORS 




10116 


1 25 


2N3g04 lyp« 


10 1 00 


4511 


200 


2N3-906 lype- 


10 1 00 


5314 


2^5 


NPN .30 W Pwr 


a-1 DO 


S3 75 A B 


2 95 


PNP 30^ Pwr 


3100 


7001 


650 


2NS055 


60 


4059 ^ N 


9 00 


UJT 2N2e46type 


3-2O0 


7203 


17S5 


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LED9 




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Jum-bo red 


8/1 00 


MRF-23eRF 


11 95 


Jumbo green 


6 1 00 


SOCKETS 




Jumbo yellow 


6-'t 00 


S pin 


10 2 00 


Minj red 


S 1 00 


14 pm 


10 2 00 


Mhcro red 


8/ ^ 00 


]Q pin 


10 2 00 


BiPo'ar 


75 


24 pin 


4 '2.00 


FERRITE BEADS 




£&pin 


4^200 


With info, specs 


15. 1 00 


40 pin 


3^2 00 


6 hole balun 


5/1 00 



liHiiainais 



TERMS: S^tislaCtton guaranieed Or money 
relunded COD. add $1 .50. Minimum order 
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seas add 1 5% NV residents, add 7% tax 



it generates the proper 
tone, pin 8 will go to zero 
with each dot or dash. So 
you end up with negative- 
going CW! 

The signal enters the 
7404, a hex inverter; at pin 
1 3; and leaves at pin 1 2 as a 
positive-going CW signal 

From here, the signal 
enters the 555 at pin 4. 

Data for the 555 can be 
obtained from The Linear 
Contfot Circuits Data Book. 
published bv Texas In- 



struments. The 555 can be 
set up to run in many dif- 
ferent modes. Here it is 
used to produce a tone 
every time it sees an input 
at pin 4- The frequency of 
this tone is determined by 
the equation: frequency — 
1.44/C5(R5 + 2R4). 

So, by changing the 
values of the components 
such as R4, you can vary 
the tone of the output in 
case you do not like my 
tone! You could even make 



^fike Mahney AC5P 

PO Box SJ 
Barite^iile OK 74001 



R4 a pot, but 1 did not, to 
keep the cost low. 

The 555 outputs the tone 
at pin 3, and its volume to 
your speaker is controlled 
by R6. Capacitor C7 was 
used as a filter because 1 
used a 5-voIt power supply. 
If you use a battery, it will 
not be necessary. And that 
is it; from the speaker 
comes un crowded, clear 
CW! 

Fig. 2 shows a simple 
5-volt power supply if you 



do not already have one. 

Summary 

You will find that the cir- 
cuit has a very narrow 
bandwidth so you have to 
be exactly at the correct 
"spot" to get an output, I 
have enjoyed using this cir- 
cuit for a couple of months 
now, and, who knows, it 
might relight the CW flame 
in you, now that you do not 
have to listen to everyone 
on the band at once! ■ 



Center Insulator 
for your Next Antenna 

— do it yourself with PVC 



Here is a scheme for a 
center insulator for 
your dipole or center-fed 
antenna that does the job 
beautifully and is inexpen- 
sive and easy to make. 

The parts are of the Vi- 
rnch, heavy-duty, schedule 
*3 PVC plastic variety, and 
should be available at your 



PVC 



I 1/2* L#IIQ 



SC»4£&UI.E 40 




nole to 
^ASS WIRE 




PVC mw% nuc 

lf2* S«EO *0 



1/1* THȣ*D 



f jTTifiG won 



fig. T. Details of center in- 
sulator 



local plumbing supply or 
large hardware store. Try 
to obtain parts that are 
grey in color, as the ultra- 
violet radiation from the 
sun is harder on the white. 
Painting the white PVC 
with a dark enamel will 
help here. The strain relief 
fitting may require a trip to 
your local electrical sup- 
ply store. My fitting is a 
Ralco brand made of cast 
aluminum which cost 89 
cents. This fitting cost less 
than a pair of coax fittings 
and is waterproof to boot 
Taking the fitting apart will 
show you how it works 
much more easily than I 
can describe, so I won't go 
into that. Fittings are avail- 
able that will accept the 



larger RG-8 size coax also, 
but I use 58C/U, with which 
the W-inch hole in the rub* 
ber grommet works nicety, 
Run the element wires 
though their respective 
end cap holes and tie an 
overhand knot about 1 
inch from the end of each 
wire (Hope you use strand- 
ed flexible insulated wire, 
hi.) Pass the coax through 
the strain relief fitting and 
out the unglued end of the 
"T" Strip 2 inches of the 
jacket off the coax and 
separate the shield and 
center conductor. Strip Vi 
inch of insulation off the di- 
pole ends and make the con- 
nection to the coax. Tape up 
the connections, and then 
carefully pul! the works 



back into the center of the 
"T" and complete as- 
sembly. 

Tighten the compression 
ring on the strain relief, and 
you're all set. If desired, 
before final assembly, the 
inside of the T-piug caps 
can be filled with wax, 
caulking compound, duct 
seal, etc., for additional 
protection against mois- 
ture through the end holes. 
You will find the com* 
pleted project very strong, 
professional looking, and 
easily capable of doing its 
job. It can be tied to a sup- 
porting structure with 
nylon or poly rope, and you 
can be assured of good in- 
sulation and lasting perfor- 
mance, 



52 



NEWFT-7B100W 
MOBILE/BASE HF TRANSCEIVER 

Enough power to drive those linears! The FT-7B is the high 
powered version of the popular 20 watt FT-7 that so many hams are 
running mobile in cars, boats, and planes around the world. Use 
the FT-7B as a top quality base station. New improvements include 
an audio peak filter (like our FT-901DM) to give you super CW 
selectivity, drive control, four 1 0M positions, full 80-1 OM coverage , 
28.5-29.0 MHz crystal supplied (other crystals available as op- 
tons), optional YC-7B Plug-in Remote Digital Readout, optional 
FP-12 Speaker/Power Supply Console. 



■ 


. -mu AfT o« 


■ 


J 


1 ' * 


1 


ri 


^9 '' ^ 




1 


MIC iAiH 


1 



AM 1/2S 
Vra t OFf I MB 



Yinyfif MMMi 



* ♦ 



FiJt IMAM C^ 



POWfil 



-8 



OFF 



AF^ RF 



asL^ 



J^ 



CAL1B 



TUNE ^ ORIVi 



SAND 





RECEIVER 

SafWttJvHy: O.SuV for S/N 20 dB 
hraigt rejection: Better than 50 dB 
F rafectiori; Bener than 50 dB 
Sttoetlvtty: -6 dB: 2.4 KHz. -60 dB; 4.0 KHz 
Cross-fnodulatiofi: Better than 60 dB im- 
minity at 20 KHz off a 20 dB input signal 



Audio output: 3 watts @ 10% THD 



THANSMITTER 

Emission: LSB, USB (A3j), CW (Al), AM (A3) 
Input povrar: A1 , A3j; 100 watts DC 
Carrtor suppression: Better ttmn 50 dB be- 
low rated output 

Unwrsnted sidetMind suppression: Better 
than 50dB @ 1000 Hz 
Spurious emission: Better than -40 dB 
Distortion products: Better than 31 dB 




w 



f4CSy 

V 




Pnce And Specifications Su b jec t To 
Change Without Nobce Or Obbgaiion 



579X 



VAE5U ELECTRONICS CORP., 159S4 



Clr_M12 



CA 90723 • (213) 633-4007 
nd..CkiefainiAL OH 45246 



BUi Hosking W7JSW 
8626 E. Clarendon 
Scottsduie AZ 8525 ! 



Another Approach to Repeater Control 



uses 7516 chip for low parts count 



Over the last couple of 
years, I have written 
several articles using the 
567 type of IC tone de- 
coder. If you have used 
these decoders, you prob- 
ably have discovered that, 
while they do the job, they 
have many limitations. 
They are very sensitive to 
input level, the decoding 
bandwidth changes with 
the input level, and there is 
bounce or ringing on the 
output. In order to func- 
tion well in a complete 
16-tone DTMF (touch- 
tone^M) decoding system, 
the 567s require a lot of 
special effort, not the least 
of which is the addition of 
an age amplifier. 

Our local repeater or- 
ganization is in the process 
of upgrading our control 
system and some of the 
first things on the list to be 
replaced were several 
567-based DTMF decoders. 
We reviewed the specifica- 
tions on several new mono- 



iUD10 




HIGH 
PASS 






lithic tone decoders that 
have come on the market 
in the last couple of years. 
After reviewing the specifi- 
cations, we decided on the 
Telenetics decoder which, 
although expensive (over 
$100), has several very at- 
tractive features, not the 
least of which is single- 
supply operation. Telenet- 
ics markets a system which 
consists of two ICs, a tone 
decoder, and an address 
selector, either of which is 
a stand-alone device which 
can be used without the 
other. Before proceeding 
with this article, I would 
like to acknowledge the 
help of Jay Hein WB7DQN, 
who did most of the initial 
logic layout. 

Decoder 

A very simplified block 
diagram of the 7516 de- 
coder is shown in Fig. 1. 

To briefly go through the 
decoder, it has an input 



LlMttEft 
AMP 



DET 




DET 



L1MITER 
AMP 




DECODER 



audio amplifier which will 
accept either balanced or 
unbalanced inputs. The 
amplifier output feeds low- 
and high-pass bandsplitting 
filters which separate the 
high- and low-group DTMF 
tone-group ranges. The out- 
put of the filters then goes 
into a limiter. That output 
then drives an envelope de- 
tector and the digit de- 
coder. The envelope detec- 
tors provide an input to the 
decoder portion which 
tells the decoder if valid 
dual tones are present. The 
decoder, through a digital 
counting scheme, decodes 
the tones and then pro- 
vides either a one-of- 
sixteen logic output or a 
BCD-coded output, de- 
pending upon what the 
user selects. One thing I 
didn't mention earlier is a 
speech detector circuit 
which prevents false de- 
coding with speech-type 
waveforms. The device 
also has several test points 




OUTPUTS 



-f~^AM¥- D15IT 



-r2>tQKHr CLOCK 



Fig. 1. Simplified block diagram of the Telenetics 7516 tone decoder. We obtained these 
and the address selectors direct from Telenetics, Inc^ 4120 Birch Si,^ Newport Beach CA 
92660. 



brought out which allow 
checking of device opera- 
tion. In addition to the test 
points, a lO-kHz clock sig- 
nal is brought out. This sig- 
nal is required by the ad- 
dress selector. The spec- 
ified operating range of the 
device is 8 to 28 volts, 
which adds to the versatili- 
ty. 

Address Selector 

The 7511 address selec- 
tor does just what its name 
suggests, i,e., recognizes an 
address. The length of the 
address to be recognized is 
user-selectable to lengths 
of 2, 3, 4, 7, or10 digits. The 
chip requires a 10-kHz 
clock which can be provid- 
ed directly from the 7516 
tone decoder This signal is 
used for internal timing. 
The selector provides 
either a positive- or a 
negative-going logic signal 
when the correct address is 
decoded, and the length of 
this output can be user- 
selected for 3, 5, or 9 
seconds. The ingenious 
people w-ho designed this 
circuit also provided for 
recognizing invalid digits 
through use of an "ANY 
DIGIT" output from the 
decoder or by resetting if 
too much time is taken in 
the digit selection. One 
minor drawback is the input 
voltage range; the max- 
imum on the address selec- 
tor is about 17 volts. This 



54 



normally won't present a 
problem. 

Control Decoder 

Now that I have in- 
troduced you to the device 
we are using, let's take a 
look at the complete re- 
peater control system we 
designed around these 
devices. 1 divided the 
system up into blocks 
which are a little easier to 
describe. The first of these 
blocks is the control 
decoder, the heart of the 
system. The decoder is 
shown in Fig. 2. 

The connections to the 
decoder and address selec- 
tor are very straightfor- 
ward and come straight 
from the Telenetics ap- 
plications notes, The 12 (I 
didn't use all 16) digit out- 
puts go to pads where they 
can be jumpered to the 
digit inputs of the address 
selector, in addition to 
these pads, 1 also ran the 
digit outputs out to the 
outside world so that the 
system can easily be ex- 
panded. 

There is a 10-kHz clock 
output from the decoder 
(mentioned earlier) that is 
needed by the address se- 
lector. I also ran this line to 
the outside so that addi- 
tional address selectors 
could be added at a future 
date. In order to ignore 
wrong addresses, the 
''ANY" line must also be 
connected. This line pro- 
vides a pulse for each digit 
decoded by the decoder. 

Pads also have to be pro- 
vided for the selection of 
the address length and the 
address-selector output 
duration. The selection of 
1-of-16 instead of BCD out- 
puts I have shown hard- 
wired, since that was the 
way our application went. 

We used the low-going 
output of the selector (Q) 
to trigger a 555 timer, 
which in turn puts out an 
enable signal to the rest of 
the function decode logic 
and will hold it for more 



COr^TROL 
JNHIQJT 



IN '■ 



ol 



CLOCK * 




FUWCTJON 
ENABLE 



O ON/OFF SELECT 



own LINES TO 
FUCTION LOGIC 



Fig. 2. Schematic diagram of the decoder section of the complete control system. In this 
and the following schematics, the arrowheads indicate connections contained on the 
printed circuit board, while circles indicate those lines which go off the circuit board. 
The * is available but not used. 



than the time available 
from the selector. The # 
digit is fed through U13A 
and is used to reset the 
enable timer if desired. The 
other input to U13A serves 
as an inhibit to the control 
process. If this line is high, 
it Will prevent enabling of 
the function-selection 
gates. 

Two sections of U13 are 
cross-connected as a flip- 
flop and run off the decod- 
ed 8 and 9 digits to provide 
on/off toggi ing of the selec- 
ted function. 

Control Logic 

The next section, il- 
lustrated in Fig. 3, recog- 
nizes that a valid address 
and control command 
have been sent and then 
provides an appropriate 
latched logic output to the 
outside world. In the case 
of the 6 and 7 functions, 
the logic in our system is 
hard-wired for timer 
disable and repeater 
disable, respectively. 

The first digit normally 
sent would be an 6 or 9 to 
set the on/off flip-flop con- 
dition. The on/off flip-flop 
output line controls the D 



inputs to the flip-flops in 
U6, 7, 8, and 9. Now, if any 
of the flip-flops are 
clocked by the action of 
U4 or U5, their outputs will 



follow the state of the D in- 
put and set or reset the de- 
sired function. 

In order to illustrate the 
operation this far, let's 



FUNCTION _^ 
ENABLE O- 
FROM LJ3 



FROM 
U I 

D-E- 
COOER 
OUT- 
POTS 






m 



It 



4019 






13 



12 



I J 



\o 



15 



/77 



14 



'4'[:>- 



'4' 

L"T'tz>- 



'£^ 



l€ 



U5 
4019 



\iT> 



*^^^ 



e W 



'4' 



I 



U6 
4013 



EO 



/77 



1-0 



s: 



9 



4 



Lt7 
4013 



jrrrj 



5 



13 



JO 



I? 



■e" 



I'D 



tS 



/7T 



'6' 



>r 



&H 



ON /OF 
SELEC 

FflOM 
Ut3 






9 



U8 
40IJ 



13 



10 



V 



'3' 



CONTROL 

)FUNCT(ON 

OUTPUTS: 



V. 



OFF 



4 



US 
4013 



ma 



/h 



I? 6 [ —^ TIMER 



^_r-v^ REPEATER 
■-^DISABLE 



10 



Fig. 3. Schematic diagram of the function decoder section 
of the control decoder. The control functions through 5 
go off the board for whatever auxiliary use may be needed. 



55 



assume that the correct ad- 
dress has been selected. U3 
will then provide a high on 
the function enable line for 
about 5-10 seconds. This 
high will let the appropri- 
ate control-digit pulses 
through to the rest of the 
logic. If the next digit to 
follow the address was, for 
example, a 0, U4 would 
pass the high through to 
U6, where, if pins 5 and 9 
were high, it would cause a 
latched high on the func- 
tion output. If the had 
already been high and pins 
5 and 9 were low, the out- 
put would have been reset 
to low. 

As mentioned earlier, 
the 6 function is hard-wired 
for repeater disable and 
the 7 function is wired for 
timer disable. I made no at- 
tempt to buffer the CMOS 
outputs because of printed 
wiring board space limita- 
tions and taecause I 
thought it would put some 
restraints on the versatilitv 
of the board. 

COR/Timer 

The last section contains 
the COR, drop out delay 
timer, time-out timer, and 



beep generator, The sche- 
matic for this section is 
shown in Fig. 4. 

The PTT transistor is 
driven by U14A, One input 
of U14A is fed with a diode 
OR gate which allows 
either the time-out timer or 
the repeater disable signal 
from the control circuitry 
to inhibit the transmitter 
PTT. The other side of 
U14A is fed from U14B, 
which allows PTT opera- 
tion from an external IDer, 
a second receiver, or from 
the internal COR switch. 

The primary receiver 
COR circuit requires a 
signal keyed to ground 
when the COR is active. 
This signal activates timers 
U15A and U15B. U15A 
then activates the PTT; the 
setting of the 50k pot on 
this IC will determine the 
amount of time the PTT 
will stay on after the COR 
has shut off (drop-out 
delav) Timer U15B acts in 
the same manner except 
that it controls the time out 
timer. U15B also triggers a 
beep generator comprised 
of U16A and B on its falling 
edge. This provides a short 



beep when the timer is 
reset. In order for this func- 
tion to work properly, the 
drop-out delay must be 
longer than the time-out 
timer time. 

A typical setup for this 
would be to set U15A for 
about 2 seconds and U15B 
for about 1 to 1 Vi seconds. 
Thus the beep would be 
heard (and the timer reset) 
about 1 second before the 
carrier drops. There is a 50k 
pot on the beep timer 
which sets the duration of 
the beep tone- 
One last connection to 
describe: The line marked 
COR inhibit if taken to 
ground, will prevent the 
timers of U15 from operat- 
ing. This effectively pre- 
cludes PTT operation from 
the COR. This line was add- 
ed as an afterthought to 
add to the possible 
methods of control. The 
last but not least section of 
this functional block is the 
time-out timer I neglected 
to mention that the 7511 
address selector also pro- 
vides an output which is 
the clock input divided by 
10,000, which, for the nor- 
mal 10-kHz clock input. 



provides a one Hz output 
By simply counting this 
output, time functions 
such as time-out can easily 
be accomplished. 

The time-out circuit then 

simply consists of a chain 
of presettable counters 
which count down the 1-Hz 
clock. The first counter, 
UIO, is hard-wired as a 
divideby-IO to give a 
lO-second output. The sec- 
ond two counters, U11 and 
U12, are provided with 
strapping pads to allow 
programming of the 
desired time out in in- 
crements of 10 seconds. 
The output of U13D is also 
fed back to UIO, where it 
stops the counting func- 
tion, thereby holding the 
counter in its present state 
and holding the PTT off. 
U14 resets the whole timer 
chain when the COR signal 
is removed. 

Operaiion 

In the last section J tried 
to tell you how this thing 
worked; however, its use is 
somewhat complicated, so 

1 will try to explain it in 
some detail. Using the 
system requires two basic 



.^Q, REP£ ATE Ff [FROM U^-M 



rTT 



iNHiSit 




IHr CLOCK 



l&'EKl 0«f* 



2I» ^CEiv^id 






01- D6 <K4I49/IN9I4 



.TIMER 

<3dis*bie 



*- J|-^BE£P OUT 



Fig. 4. Schematic diagram of the COR and timer sections of the control system. Note that the repeater disabfe and timer 
disable signals come directly from the function decoding logic [Fig, 31 



56 



stages: initial setup and in- 
terconnection/adjustment. 
Initial setup involves 
making some decisions 
and then strapping the op- 
tions according to your 
decisions. The first deci- 
sion is the length of the 
control address. This can 
be 2, 3, 4, 7, or 10 digits 
long. This option is set by 
installing a jumper be- 
tween pin 28 of U2 and one 
of the following pins of U2: 
27; 26, 25, 24, or 23. 

The second decision, 
once the length of the ad- 
dress is decided, is what 
the actual address will be. I 
think this can best be ex- 
plained by example. Let's 
say you selected an ad- 
dress length of three digits 
(U2, pin 28 to U2, pin 26) 
and an address of 9-4-2. Pin 
2 of U2 is the first digit in- 
put, pin 3 the second digit 
input, and so forth to 10 
(max.). Now, you would 
strap the first digit (pin 2, 
U2) to the nine digit output 
of U1 , which appears at pin 
25. Next, connect U2, pin 3 
to the four-digit output 
(U1-20), and finally U2-4 to 
U1-18 (the two output). 
Your decoder system will 
now respond to an address 
of 9-4-2. Taking longer than 
about five seconds between 
digits or sending a digit out 
of sequence will cause the 
selector to reset and reject 
the address. 

The last jumper you 
have to install on the ad- 
dress selector is the one 
which determines how 
long the output will stay 
active after a valid address 
is decoded, By jumpering 
U2, pin15 to U2. pin 16,17, 
or 1 8, you can select 9, 3, or 
5 seconds. The printed cir- 
cuit board being offered by 
the ARA* is hard-wired for 
a three-second time. 

One last comment re- 
garding the decoder: It can 
be jumpered for BCD out- 
puts instead of one-of- 

^Arizona Repeater Associa- 
tion, Suite 4000, Vailey Center, 
Phoenix AZ 85073, 



sixteen as was done here. 
To do this, you have to 
reverse the states of pins 1 5 
and 16. I don't want to go 
into any more detail since 
it is a whole different mode 
of operation. 

The selection of time-out 
requires installation of 
jumpers also. The jumpers 
on U11 set increments of 
10 seconds and the jump- 
ers of U12 set multiples of 
100 seconds. Both are pro- 
grammed by jumpering the 
appropriate bit high or low 
in a BCD code for the digit 
desired. For example, if 
you want a three-minute 
timer, which is 180 sec- 
onds, you would program 
U11 to an 8 and U12 toal. 
To do this, we connect pin 
4 of U11 and pin 3 of U12 
to +V and then ground 
pins 12, 13, and 3 of U11 
and pins 4, 12, and 13 of 
U12. This is now all of the 
jumpers required. The re- 
maining adjustments 
should be made once the 
board is installed. 

The primary connec- 
tions to the controller are 
shown in Table 1. 

Each of the function out- 
puts is a latched CMOS- 
compatible signal which 
can be used, with the prop- 
er buffering, to control a 
number of various func- 
tions. 

Conclusion 

There we have a com- 
plete repeater control 
system which provides 
control decode functions, 
primary repeater control, 
auxiliary control functions, 
COR/PTT functions, adjust- 
able squelch tail length, 
adjustable time-out timer 
length, and time-out 
beeper. With some profes- 
sional assistance, we got 
the entire circuit on one 
4V2 X 6 inch plug-in circuit 
card. The Arizona Re- 
peater Association is going 
to be marketing the printed 
circuit boards for the con- 
trol system along with a 
compatible CMOS iden- 
tifier printed circuit board. 



As of this writing, only pro- 
totype boards were com- 
pleted, so pricing was not 
available. For pricing and 
availability, either contact 
the ARA or me. 

One last comment; I 
almost forgot. Not shown 



on the schematic but pres- 
ent on our PC boards and 
highly recommended are 
.01 uF capacitors on the 
supply pins of each IC and 
18-volt zener diodes on in- 
put lines for spike protec- 
tion, 



Signal 

PRI RCVR COR 

COR INHlBiT 
PTT 



IDerON 



2ND RCVR 
COR 

BEEP OUT 

AUOiO iNPUT 



CONTROL 
INHiB 



Description 

An input iine that is keyed to ground wiien the 

primary receiver is active. 

A normaily open input line. A ground on this 

iine will inhibit operation of the COR/PTT. 

A transistor switch output keyed to ground 

and capable of about 200 mA. If anything 

otiier than a transistor circuit is to be keyedj 

tt should be through a relay. 

A high ( + V) on this Input line from the lOer 

will keep the PTT keyed whife the !D is being 

sent. 

Provides input capability for a second (link) 

receiver to operate the PTT. Note that this 

and ID both bypass the time-out timer. 

Adjustable audio output signal which can be 

fed into the transmitter mic input. 

This is the control audio input which may 

come from a control fine or from another 

receiver. Not normally fed from repeater 

receiver. 

This input, normally open, will inhibit the 

control decoding process if a high is placed 

on it. 



Table 1. Primary connections to the controller. 



MADISON 

DOUBLE YOUR WARRANTY POLICY 

Any large piece of gear we sell you (average $300 
or up) we will double your warranty periodj 

FOR EXAMPLE: A 3 rnonth warranty = 6 months 
from date of purchase. 1 year = 2 years from date of 
purchase. 

(OUR RELIABLE SERVICE DEPARTMENT REPAIRS 
NON-WARRANTY GEAR, TOO!) 

Simply send your rig in a good shipping carton, 
postage prepaid, with a copy of your receipt show- 
ing date of purchase. We will repair promptly and 
return by best way, 

NOTE; Manufacturers do not cover final in most cases, but we will ify! 

Try Our Competttive Prices, Too! 

You, the customer, can only benefit from the 
Madison Double Your Warranty Policy. 

Call Don - K5AAD or Mike ^ WSWM for specific 
warranty claim questions. 

h 

POUCY SUBJECT TO CHANGE WfTHQUT NOTtCt 
DOES NOT COVER SPBCfALS OR CLOSEOUTS. 





r — ^ 



ra 



'^— Electronics Supply, Inc. 

^ fr^iW35 

1508 JVIcKinney, Houston, TX 77002, 713/658-0268 



(^ R&ader Service— see page 211 



57 



Mkhuel ./. Di Julio WB2B WJ 
97 Woodside Rd. 
Mapiewoad NJ 07040 



Yes, You Can Build this Synthesizer! 



keep your crystal rig 



flFC2 to 



ECEtVER 




Fig. 7. 2m synthesizer schematic diagram. 



5S 



Alow-cost, [ow-power, 
compact two meter 
synthesizer can now be 
built due to recent devel- 
opments in COSMOS tech- 
nology. The synthesizer 
covers 144-148 MHz and 
can be adapted to almost 
any rig simply by program- 
ming the output divider 
and using the proper 
crystals in the beat os- 
cillator. Any repeater off- 
set can be generated, as 
the receive and transmit 
frequencies are indepen- 
dently set in 5-kHz steps. 
The unit uses a total of six 
integrated circuits and 
draws about 60 mA at 12 
volts. My unit is interfaced 
with a Heathkit® HW^202. 
See Fig. 1. Ql, along with 
its associated components, 
forms a vco which has ah 
output in the 22-25-MHz 
region depending upon 
what the voltage on VC1 is 
and if Q9 is turned on or 
off. Q2 is a buffer amplifier 
which is connected to one 
gate of mixer Q5. The other 
gate of Q5 is connected to 
Q7, which is the beat oscil- 
lator that also oscillates in 
the 22-25-MHz range de- 
pending on which crystal is 
switched into its base. The 
output of Q5 contains the 
sum and difference fre- 
quencies of the two signals 
present at its gates. RFC4 
and C21 form a fitter which 
allows the difference fre- 
quency to pass on to Q6 
which shapes and level- 
shifts the signal so that it is 
CMOS compatible. 

The first gate of Z4 acts 
as a buffer to drive 25, 
which is a divide-by-N 
divider. The divider is con- 
nected to divide by 800 
plus twice the switch set- 
tings, and then plus one if 
the 5-kHz switch is on. 
These switches are labeled 
as to what decade of the 
frequency they determine. 
The output of the divider 
goes to the input of Z3, 
which is a phase com- 
parator. The other input of 
Z3 goes to Z6, an oscillator 
/binary divider, whose out- 
put is 833333 Hz. This is 




the reference frequency. 
The output of Z3 is con- 
nected to a low-pass filter 
whose output goes to var- 
actor VC1 . 

Let us now trace a com- 

+ 

plete cycle of the loop (see 
Fig. 2). Suppose we want to 
transmit on 146.940 MHz, 
and we set the switches as 
such. Our divider divides 
by 800 + 2(294) - 1388. 
Suppose that the vco is 
free-running at 24.00 MHz. 
This mixes with the 



23.3333-MHz transmit crys- 
tal to give an output of 
,6667 MHz. This is divided 
by 1388 to give 4803 Hz, 
This is compared to the 
833333-Hz reference, and 



the 4046 raises the voltage 
to VC1 to increase the fre- 
quency of the vco. When 
the vco has an output of 
146.940 MH2/6 which is 
24,490 MHz, the loop will 



For 24-MHz crystals, connect point A (C17) to pins 1 and 5. 

For 12-MHz crystals, connect pin 13 to A. 

For 8-MHz crystals, connect pinStopin 14, pin7to12, pin lOto 13, and 

pin 14 to A. 

For 6-MHz crystals, connect pins 7, 10, and 12, all tied together, and 

pin 8 to A. 

Table 1. Programming chart for Z2. All of these connections 
are made directly to the socket pads of Z2. 



TO RECEIVER 

aS.£l&«MrlE 

22.B93MHI 



24-24.66etfHi 



74LS73 



■^ 



TO TR4WSM1TTER 
^1 a^ OR iZMtM 



e00tM*^l600 



FET 
VCO 



LOW 
PASS 



y^ 



^h 



22.2166 '■2_2.eB3MHi 
■24- 1^4,666 W Hi 



ERROR 
VOLTfiGE 



DUAl, GATE 
MI5CER 



4046 

# COMPARATOR 



1' 



LOCK 
L(QHT 



RECEWE 



,5.65-l-555MK* 



4059 *N 



DIVIDE aV £X SWJTCH 
SETTINGS-AhfO SKHj SWITCH 



OSClLLftTQR 



Ih 



e33-333Hz 

fiEFEfqewCE 



40^0 
OSCILLATOR; 



I 



2"- 
26.ee7KHi 



/77 /h 




TRAM5MI 



I 



iJ b 



^CEIVE 



A? 



VOLTAGE 
+ li;¥y[^ REGULATOR 



' 1- 



305 






# e 



+5V= 



UHe 

14* 

\ \ 

147 

/ / 

I4S 



lOOKHr 
THUMBWHEEL 



I 



+ V 

J 





SKHj 



lOKHi 
TffUA/iBWHEEL 



/ 



1 



V 



PTT 



"At 



4001 



T i TO TRAJ^SMlT^ 
„ ) RECEIVE 
T } CONTROL 



m 



e33.333Ht 



f/g, 2. Im synthesizer block diagram. 



59 



lock since (24.490 — 
23.333)/n388 equals 833.333 
Hz. 



The 4046 will adjust its 
output voltage so that the 
two inputs are identical in 



phase and frequency. Q3, 
Q4, LED 1, and asso- 
ciated connponents form 



an indicator that lights 
when the synthesizer is 
unlocked. This indication 



Parts List 



Reslstorg--aK 


% -Wan, five 


percent 




R1,R14, R23, R25, R38, R40, 


R41 


100k 


R2, R18, R42 






22k 


n9?, R3 






1.8k 


R4 






1.5k 


R7, R15, R44 






10k 


R13, R16, 






270 Ohms 


R43 






4.7k 


R6, R10, R12 






3.3k 


R17, R21,and 


one in radio 




100 Ohms 


R20 






820 Ohms 


R24, R26 






2,2k 


R27-R37 






1 megohm 


R39 






4.7 megohms 


R9 






220 Ohms 


R5 






390 Ohms 


R8, R19 






180 Ohms 


R11 






1k 


Capacitors - a 


II disc ceramic, unless otherwise noted 


C1,C2, C10, C14, C17,C23, 


C35, 




C36, C41, C45, 


C48 and twc 


1 in radio 


0.001 uF 


C50, C51 






0.001-iiF feedthroughs 


C3,C4 






100-pF si ver mica 


C9, C15, C16, ( 


318,019 




47 pF 


C12, C27, C46, 


C49 




33-uF tantalum 


C7, C22, C2S 






0.01 uF 


C42 






2,2-uF tantalum 


C43, C44 






0.1-uF tantalum 


C13,C25,C39, 


C47 




0.1 uF 


C24 






20 pF 


C29, C30 






270-pF silver mica 


C32, C33 






15-pF silver mica 


C8, C26, C40 






1-uF tantalum 


C38 






120-pF silver mica 


C5 






33-pF silver mica 


C20 






33 pF 


C21 






180 pF 


C6 






27-pF silver mica 


C11 






10 pF 


C31,C34,C37 






5-30-pF subminiature 
trimmers 



RF choices and colls 

RFC1 

RFC2, RFC3 

RFC4 

RFC6 

RFC6 

LI 

L2 

Semiconductors 

Z1 

Z2 

Z3 

Z4 

25 

Z6 

Q1 

Q3, Q4, 06 

06 

07, Q8 

Q9 

Q2 

VG1 

D1-D19 

LED1 

VR1 , VR2 

Crystals 

Y1 
Y2 

Y3 

Switches 

S5, S6, S7 

S3. 84 

S1,S2,S8,S9, 510,311 

Miscellaneous 

2 RCA phone piugs and jacks 
RG'174/U miniature SO-Ohm coax 
Amidon #64-101 lerrite beads 



47 mH 

IfiH 

100 ^H 

3.3 ^H 

10f4H 

Vfl-inch siug-tuned form wound 

with 8 turns of #22 wire 

20 turns #30 wire on Amidon 

#73-801 ferrite bead 

LM309H 

74LS73 

4046 

4001 

4059 

4060 

3N12S 

2N2222 

40673 or HEP F2004 

2N3904 

MPS6520 or HEP S0009 

2N2S57 

HEPR2503varactor 

1N91 4 diodes 

any type red LED 

5.1-volt Vz-Watt Eener diode 

23.3333-MHz, Heath #404-586* 
21,5500-MHz, Heath #404-584* 
2a667-kHz, Statek type SX-1H 

10-posJtion BCD switches with 

endpiates 

SPOT toggle switches 

SPST toggle switches 

* international crystal 
cat #435274 




Fig, 3. PC board layout 



60 



is useful when inrtiaFly tun- 
ing the svnthesizer, and 
warns the operator not to 
transmit if the loop be- 
comes unlocked due to 
component failure, etc. 

The second and third 
gates of Z4 generate two 
signals: T and T (pro- 
nounced not T), T is high in 
transmit and low in 
receive, and T is its com- 
plement. These signals 
switch between Yl and Y2, 
select which set of fre- 
quency switches is con- 
nected to the 4059, and 
turn Q9 on and off, which 
places C6 in parallel with 
the vco tank to lower its 
frequency range in the 
receive mode. Q8 is a buf- 
fer stage which isolates the 
vco from the output cir- 
cuitry. 

Before the signal from 
Q8 goes to the receiver, it 
is passed through the low- 
pass filter composed of 
CI 4, CIS, CI 6, and RFC2, 
This passes the 24^MHz rf, 
but keeps the VHF rf from 
the transceiver from get- 
ting into the synthesizer. 
Q8 is also connected to Z2, 
which is a quad flip-flop. 
By connecting the pins of 
Z2, as shown in the pro- 
gramming chart, Table 1, 
the chip can divide the 
24'MHz signal by 2, 3, or 4, 
giving a 12-, 8-, or 6-MHz 
output, The transmitter's 
signal also goes through a 
low^pass filter. 

Zl is a five-volt regulator 
which supplies power to 
most of the circuit. Some 
parts of the circuit require 
12 volts, and this is ob- 
tained at C46. In the 
HW-202, I take the supply 
voltage off the 11-volt 
regulated line within the 
radio. 

Parts layout is fairly 
critical, and it is recom- 
mended that the PC board 
layout shown in Figs. 3 and 
4 be used. Keep all leads as 
short as possible and 
mount Y3 and Zl flush to 
the board. The use of IC 
sockets is encouraged. 
Resistors R28-37 and 



diodes D4-15, D17, and 
D18 are not mounted on 
the board but directly on 
the switches concerned. 
C50 and C51 are .001 -uF 
feedth roughs mounted 
directly to the metal 
cabinet enclosing the syn- 
thesizer. RFC6 is not 
mounted on the board but is 
connected directly to feed- 
through capacitor C50, 
RCA-type jacks are used 
for the receiver and 



transmitter output con- 
nectors RG-174/U, 50- 
Ohm miniature coax is 
used to connect the re^ 
ceiver and transmitter out- 
put from the boards to 
their respective low-pass 
filters and jacks. The low- 
pass filters are assembled 
around the jacks. There are 
several jumpers that are 
connected to the bottom 
of the board (Table 2). They 
are noted on the parts 



placement diagram as )1, 
}2, etc. For example, a 
jumper must be connected 
from one point labeled J1 
to another point labeled 
J1 Some jumpers go to 
more than one place. For 
example, there is a )4a, b, 
and c. This means that )4a 
goes to J 4b and |4b goes to 
J4c. All jumpers are RC- 
174/U coax, and provision is 
made at each point for the 
shield to be soldered to 



-3 




C 



m 






-wv 








tr to 














2 



^ UJ 
^ </i <£ 

5 o. * 



IH 



Fig. 4. Component placement. 



61 





ground. Table 3 shows the 
cabie lengths. 

The switching arrange- 
ment I used [Fig. 5) was de- 
signed to l<eep the number 
of thumbwheel switches to 
a minimum. The arrange- 
ment consists of two sets 
of switches, one labeled A 
and the other B. S8 and S9 
are SPST switches that 
comprise the MHz selec- 
tion for the A set. Placing 
both switches down (turn- 
ing them off) sets the MHz 
to 144, S9 up (S8 down) is 
145, SB up (59 down) is 146, 
and both up is 147. S10 and 
S11 work in a similar fash- 
ion for the B set. S5 is a 
thumbwheel switch thatse- 
lects the 100-kHz step for 
A; S6 does this for B. S7 is 
another thumbwheel that 



sets the 10-kHz step for 
both A and B. SI selects 
whether or not 5-kHz step 
is used. S3 and S4 select 
whether or not the A or B 
setting will be used for 
transmit or receive. 

As an example, if we 
want to go on 146.34/146.94 
with A selecting the trans- 
mit frequency and B select- 
ing the receive frequency, 
we set 58 and S10 to on, 55 
to3, 56to9, S7to4,S3toA, 
and 54 to B. To go on sim- 
plex on 1 4634, say, to mon- 
itor the input, we set 54 to 
A. To go simplex on 146.94, 
we set S3 and S4 to B. To go 
on reverse 146.94/146.34, 
we set S3 to B and S4 to A. 
With this method of switch- 
ing, most common repeater 
pairings can be obtained. If 



a more sophisticated sys- 
tem is desired, an auto- 
matic offset^ could be built 
in, or a keyboard-type entry 
system^ could be used. The 
important thing to note is 
that the synthesizer only re- 
quires the BCD code of the 
desired frequency — no 
look-up table is needed. 

Mount all of the parts on 
the board in the following 
order: sockets, resistors, 
capacitors, chokes, tran- 
sistors and diodes, crystals, 
and jumpers. Before insert- 
ing the IC chips, apply 12 
volts to the unit and check 
for the proper supply volt- 
ages at the IC sockets. 
After turning the supply 



off, insert all of the IC 
chips. Turn the unit on 
again and the unlocked 
light should come on. The 
first signal to check on the 
unit is pin 14 of Z3, There 
should be a 5-vott peak-to- 
peak square wave at a fre- 
quency of 833.333 Hz. 
With an accurate frequen- 
cy counter, preferably set to 
measure the period, adjust 
C37 until the frequency, or 
period, is as stated. This 
adjustment could also be 
made by looking at pin 9 of 
Z6 and setting C37 for a fre- 
quency here of 26.6666 
kHz, Connect the positive 
lead of a VTVM or FET 
VOM to the lead of R1 
farthest from VC1, The 
voltage here probably will 
be either near zero volts or 
near 10 volts, either of 
which represents an un- 
locked condition. With the 
synthesizer in the receive 
mode, set the frequency 
select switches to 147.995 
MHz and adjust the tuning 
slug on LI until the voltage 
reads approximately four 
volts. The unlocked light 
should now be extin- 
guished. Change the fre- 
quency select switches to 
144.000 MHz and check to 
see if the tight is still extin- 
guished. Simulate the 
transmit mode by ground- 
ing the PTT line on the 
synthesizer and check to 
see that the synthesizer 
locks over the same fre- 
quency range in transmit. 
The voltages at R1 should 
be within 0.5 volts of one 
another for the same fre- 
quency on transmit and 
receive. 

Trim LI until the tuning 
range is correct. Any con- 



!&9 se 



54 ?$ 



SI 



\ 1 SS SB 



^7 



S£ - 



L^l* I \ \ \ 2M SYNTHESIZER 



ON 



lA 



,(^ (gf, 



3'g 1 



TPTAhSMJt J 



HCCEEVE 



®c 



y 



\Q^iiHf fl IOOKHt F> IOKHi 4 + B 



SCO 



SYMTHESl^El^ IS ON f46-i7 TRANSMIT p 146.97 HECEtVE 



Fig. 5. Switch arrangement 



1 . Cable J1 from pin 5 of Z6 to pin 14 of Z3; this Is the dlvide^by-N 
out. 

2 . Cable J2 from C24 to R20; tfiis is ttie beat osciilator-to-mixer 

line. _ 

3 . A Cable from J4a to J4b and one from J4b to J4g; this is the T line. 

4 . Cable J3 from R5 to 4-12 volts at R21; this is the + 12-volt line. 

5 , A cable from J5a to J 5b and J5b to J5c; these are + 5-yolt connec- 

tions. 

6 , Cable J6; this Is the T line. 

Table 2. List of required jumpered connectioris. Use RG- 
1 74/U coax. 



62 




Photo A. 



stant flickering of the un- 
focked light indicates an 
unstable condition, and the 
transceiver should be keyed 
only if the light is fully ex- 
tinguished. A brief flash of 
the hght when setting the 
frequertcy select switches, 
or when keying the trans- 
ceiver, is just an indication 
that the synthesizer has be- 
come unlocked momen- 
tarily while changing fre- 
quency. 

With the PTT line open 
(receive mode), connect a 
frequency counter to the 
receiver output jack and 
set the frequency select 
switches to 146,000 MHz. 
Adjust C34 until the 
counter reads 22.5500 
MHz, Ground the PTT line 
(transmit mode} and adjust 
C31 until the counter reads 
243333 MHz It should be 
noted that the reading of 
22.5500 MHz in the receive 
mode assumes that Y2 is 
21,5500 MHz, which is the 
proper crystal for a 
lOJ-MHz i-f. For any other 
i-f, the counter should read 
:24 3333 - Hf/6X This com- 
pletes the calibration of 
the synthesizer. 

The unit should be built 
n a metal box with a cover 
:hat makes good electrical 
:ontact all around its 
Derimeter. This prevents rf 
rom getting into the syn- 
ihesizer from the trans- 
:eiver. Connecting leads to 
he transceiver should be 



made with RG'174/U. The 
first step in interfacing the 
synthesizer to the trans- 
ceiver is to select Y2. Its 
value depends on the i-f 
frequency of your trans 
ceiver. For a radio with a 
10.7-MHz i-f and receive 
crystals in the 45-MHz 
region, Y2 will be (233333 
"10 J/6) = 21,5500 MHz, 
For other i-fs, (233333 — 
hf/6) will give the value for 
Y2. Even though the trans- 
ceiver takes 4S'MHz crys* 
tals and 22-23 MHz comes 
from the synthesizer, the 
receiver's oscillator and 
multiplication circuits do 
the proper multiplication. 
Receivers using 15- or 
22-MHz crystals will also 
work with this scheme. 

Connect the receiver 
output coax to the trans- 
ceiver at an unused re* 
ceiver crystal socket. Use a 
OOl-uF capacitor to cou- 
ple into the socket (Fig, 6). 

The transmitter output 
coax from the synthesizer 
also goes to an unused 
crystal socket, but a 
100-Ohm resistor and a 
.(X)l-uF capacitor are con- 
nected as shown in Fig, 7. 
The resistor assures 
smooth operation of Z2. A 
ferrite bead is placed as 
shown to act as a choke 
which keeps the VHF rf 
from entering the syn- 
thesizer. 

The PTT input line 
should go to a line in the 




Photo B. 



transceiver that is open or 
has at least +5 volts on it 
during receive and is 
grounded during transmit. 
This line will most prob- 
ably be the PTT line from 
the microphone to the 
relay. The -H2-volt input 
line can go to the same 
place from which the trans- 
ceiver gets power, but if it 
is at all possible, connect it 
to some source of regu- 
lated and hash-fitlered 
power within the rig. A fer- 
rite bead should be placed 
at the ends of the coax on 
both the PTT and +12-volt 
connections. See Fig. 8. 

The most difficult part 
of interfacing the synthe- 
sizer to a particular trans- 
ceiver is keeping stray rf 
from the transceiver from 
getting into the synthe- 
sizer. This problem will be 
noticed when your audio is 
reported as sounding bassy 
or distorted. A very severe 
case of rf leakage will 
cause the unlocked light to 
glow on transmit. A less 
severe case will cause the 



Cable 


Length (inches) 


J1 


SVi 


J2 


3V4 


J3 


4 ¥4 


J4ab 


ava 


J4bc 


4Vi 


JSab 


3Va 


J5bc 


2Vi 


J6 


3'A 



aforementioned bassy 
audio. 

If you have this problem, 
listen to yourself on a near- 
by receiver. Disconnect 
the receiver's coax at the 
synthesizer while transmit- 
ting, to see if the audio 
clears up. If it does, then 
this is the path of leakage, 
Try more ferrite beads or 
an additional low-pass 
filter in series with the 
other one. To check if the 
rf is leaking through the 
power supply line, tem^ 
porarily run the synthesizer 
off a 12-volt battery and 
see if the audio clears up. If 
it does, try more ferrite 
beads or a larger value for 
RFC6. To check if the rf is 
leaking through the PTT 
line, disconnect it from the 
synthesizer and simply 
short the PTT input to 
ground If the audio clears 
up, try more ferrite beads 
or another bypass capac- 
itor. If none of these 
remedies seems to cure the 
problem, then the transmit 



SrfVTHEStZEfT 



JQOI 



.HEEEE3. 



^y 



SOCKET 



Fig, 6, 



RG-ir4/'U 

FROM FEftFllTE 

SYNTHESJlEfi BEAD pOI 



t 



Table 3, Cable lengths (RC- 

174/U]. 



m 



ilOOA 



/jr 



UNUSED 
SOCKET 



f «. 7. 



63 




.ac4 PNOHO j*Cfc& 



Photo C 



coax is probably the path 
of coupling, and additional 
ferrite beads or another 
low-pass filter probably 
will fix it. 

Photo A is a spectrum 
analyzer photograph of the 
6-MHz output of the syn- 
thesizer being sent to my 
transmitter. The analyzer is 
set for a 30-Hz resolution, 



500 Hz per division, and a 
10 Hz video filter in place. 
The vertical is calibrated at 
10 dB per division. The 
signal is very clean; there is 
no sign of the 833.333-Hz 
reference sidebands, and 
the noise is 60 dB down, 
Photo B is the output of my 
transceiver with the syn- 
thesizer set at 146.000 




m 



HJV 



©t** 






tie 



TOfi*4i 




TOH 



flEAR P4f4EL lNTE:niOfl VIEW 



COAX to 

BATTERS 






HD-V 




OUT 



fitsiit 



A 



RDt JliOif 



FE#fl!T£ it: ASS. 



R£AA P&fiCL Ek;Ti:»}OR VpLW 



fig. fi. Rear panel connections. 



MHz. The analyzer is set 
for 3-kHz resolution, 100 
kHz per division, and 10 dB 
per division vertically, 
There are no close-in spurs 
Within 60 dB Photo C is 
also the output of my 
transceiver, but the resolu- 
tion is 30 kHz, and every 
division now represents 5 
MHz. The strongest spur is 
at about 154 MHz, but it is 
60 dB down, complying ful- 
ly with the latest FCC 
regulations for spurious 
output. 



In conclusion, this syn- 
thesizer is performing very 
well on my HW-202. It is a 
versatile design and it 
leaves room for many addi- 
tions that people may want 
to incorporate.! 



References 

1. ^'Autorrtatic Repeater Off- 
sets," Bruce McNair N2YK, 73, 
November, 1978, p. 82. 

2. ''A Practical 2m Syn* 
thesizer." Michael L Cohen 
WA3SYL 73. September, 1977, 
p, 146. 



ai»« 



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tieaUt mi 



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133 Ib5. 100 JbB: 


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levM 




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5 Element MflxtTnum 
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With 5un5pc?t cycle 21 now in the upswing, vou should be prepared fur the DK avaHaWe on the 3 top HF bands, 
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n 



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signed for use with 52- to 7 5-ohm 
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'Pick the one that best fits your haaIs: 



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MAGNETIC MOUNT 

stays put even al 

100 mph! "^ 

MM JM 150 lor 144 MHz use) *^"'^ 
MM JM 220 lor 220 MHz use $38.50 
MM-jM-440 lor 440 MH^ use) oomptete 



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Goes on quick and easy 
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JM 440K lor 440 MH? use 



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fender mounts $1 1 .50 



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J.W. Milder Division 
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I rt i i J j I — f ' t ti 



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fnptit /Output fmpedsnce: 50 Ohm 
pifn0ntia/ii.- 190 x 120 x 130 fnrri, 

6 K 4 X 4.5 in. 
Tpigrancs: t ^0% full scgle 



interference Filters 
From J.W. Miller 



R F S poach P roEftssor/M (uit\ »f -440 5 1 35 .95 

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ctippiri'Q 
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Coaxial Switches 





LOW PASS FILTEBS 

I r^put/<>utpUt irr^pedsr^;^ SDOftmi, 
iniftftion IOS4 .5 dB max.; VW5R 
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C-SII-T — $19.50 
25 W AM 50 W PEPS5B 

c.5i*-T — $2«,sa 

IdOQ W AM atfQO Vi PEP BSQ. 

HIGH PASS FILTEHS 

FiHit dtt&riuill«S Si'^nats b«low 40 
MMjc &y 4 powar rector ^raater 
ttian J.O-DD.DOa:!, 
C Siairi — ttflje: ?!i/300ohm 
C-SHS-Ta — SIOjar 75/ 75oh;m 
C-&13-TS"-*I&.1S 
a 00/300 ollrri 

AUDIO iNTEflFEHEl^CE 
FILTERS 

C'50S-R — $S,07 

IrStalU Fn the in^^ut liri«4 of 

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C-50«-R — f*,07 

1 1>^ tails m speaker Jin^s, umt wm 
take care oT rttrto sptak^f 

AC POWER LINE FILTERS 
An iBJ^ WBV to prevent radta 5.ig- 
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C-SOB-L — tS.sa 

3-KtUOi^ LC fWUr, -3 A max. 

fi-sectJon LC Illter (for mare 
severe tn terf ererrce] . -5 A max. 



2 Position/Model CS-201 
4 Position/Model C5401 



$20,95 




ir 



/ 



m 




$SBM 



'.■'ti--|ipjii IJ't^ LSH /tin lift' 

WlA.i*«in F'*M-'-*;'Hr KDMHj 

Urn' \U,ni[i-\t4\nbO*AHi 
idtmii' ln-T>>v 



'xapi 'j3Mo:^3|ax *uea\5 'jaSuijg 'iSS '^^*J!IS '^J^MS 'uqoy 'joqoy 'AdusSo^ 'suo!JED!unLumo3 odij 'jeluoibj 





QUESTfON: Who has Acivanced Electronics, Alpha, AMECO, Amphenol, Antenna Specialists, Astatic, ^ 



^ ^ JjL ; ^ J^ 2^ i^ J^ PALOMAR ENGINEERS ^ i^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ 

R X NOISE BRIDGE $49M VLF CONVERTER $55.00 LOOP ANTENNA ALL BANDS PREAMPLIFIER 

Loop Aniplifier $67,50 $S9.50 

Plug-in loops $47.50 ea. 

mSuMt 



* Lun tUt iTvfii rtnf wtm m 

* Ra« m rtjtimini frt^mtcf. 

» InMMrtd MOD MH^. 

* Itapli It UEt. - ScK ranEJifiHJ. 



tamrettiVLflD SO mgjg^ Fw •» M«i iVf 
'"'""'^^ I rectnn pncni 3.5 ■ A MHl- 
JKSBa tif iMpli iiKmhi, 

ef t!» 175B meter band. 
J^ii«cpvefi nivLgijmn radnbcacent, WfWVB 



N \t^Vikin^ 



} 



Model MB IJ $295 
(with BaJun) $325 



V MB n pravfd«t; 

♦Constanl SWR monitoring * Precision tunin-g ot fmal amp * Harmonic suppression 
* Receive^ input impedancenmatchmgi * Maximum pcwer Irarrster to antenna *Con 
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wavelengih or longer, with Swn of 1 t 

MS II featurti; 
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B'W 



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5--BANDTRAPD1P0LE 
(80 thru 10 Meters) 

Power rmtBd 2k WP£P, ap- 
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Comptete with: wire, traps, erid 
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connector, heavy-dutv cast alurr^i- 
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ft. 



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550 tiOOKHz 
[Brudcast Bai^ 

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rum IJ to 54 MHz. tmtn AIL im«t<w 
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rratkm 



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-,'1 lc,=T»r-*"-.*i. '«K- 



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HF model 4360 ( is- 3o iuihzJ 



The 43'^CJ, 43&3 HAM-MATE Dfnyttltmjl WiU- 
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plittl^^^icirt^l SMhUjrd cif Hie irli^UStry -diniJ' will 
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IHRUUNE 
WWTMETHl 

MODEL 43 SI 25.00 

. Elements tTaWe 1 ) 2 30 MHz 45.00 

Elements (Table 11 25 1 000 MHz 38.00 

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covering your present frequency and power needs, add eattra rangi 
m if your requirements expand. 



Pre-3ssembfedr 
Model 370-11 
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Kit (illustrated): 
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C^ 



V^A 



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Name 



CaiJ 



Address 

City 

Onder: 



State 



FPrlces FOB Medford, MA. D Check Enclosed 

MA residents add 5% sales 

tax. 

Minimum $3.00 for ship* Card no* 



ping and handling on ALL ci„rt3tiirft 
ORDERS, Siignatore 



n Visa D Master Charge □ Send for Free Catalog 
PRICES SUBJECT TO CHANGE WITHOUT NOTICE 
^^^ Card eKp. date __^^^^ 



Radio Electronics 

OPEN DAJLY9-9 
SATURDAY 9-6 







206 Mystic Avenue, Medford, Mass. 02155, 1-800-225-4428, (Mass. residents: 1-617-395-8280 i^t3 




Analog Telemetry Techniques 

while designed for biomedical signals, 
these circuits work with any analog data 



WARNING: Udd or sale ot this or slmtiar devices is restricted urtdar Federal Law to physicians or on their orders. No attempt shoutd be 
made to diagnose or treat patients without medical supervision. 



Joseph / Can K41PV 
5440 South 8ih Road 
Arlington VA 22204 

The use of OSCAR to 
transmit human elec- 
trocardiograms (ECC — or 
EKG, after the German 
spelling), and the article in 
the FebruarVi 1978, issue 



of 73 Magazine ["Inexpen- 
sive EKG Encoder" by 
WA3AJR), indicate interest 
in the transmission of 
analog data. The tech- 
niques needed to transmit 
the human ECG are also 
useful for transmitting 
almost any form of analog 
data signal in which the 
repetition rate is low and 
all frequency components 



xs« 



xto 



MM * — -ir 



-N*' 

^w— — 4)- 



iwee 




tnftHT 

LE6 



Vcc 



fig, 1. Typical ECC preampliiier. 



fall into the "under 500 
Hz" range. In this article, 
we will examine such cir- 
cuits from the viewpoint of 
the human ECG and cer- 
tain other physiological 
signals, but the informa- 
tion can be applied to 
other problems as well. 

The ECG Preamplifier 

The peak amplitudes in 
the ECG waveform are on 
the order of 1 or 2 milli- 
volts, and significant fre- 
quency components exist 
in the 0.05- to lOO-Hertz 
range. Electronic amplifi- 
ers used in professional 
diagnostic ECC equipment 
will have this AHA- 
recommended frequency 
response, white equipment 
used exclusively for mon- 
itoring usually has a fre- 
quency response of 0.05 to 
40 or 50 Hertz [depending 
upon manufacturer}. 

ECG preamplifiers usual- 
ly are differential types so 
that their inherent rejec- 
tion of common mode sig 
nals can be used to elimi- 



nate 60-Hertz interference. 

Additionally, ECG pre- 
amps must be capacitor- 
coupled to prevent drift 
due to changes in the 
electrode-offset potential 
that exists between the 
electrode and the patient's 
skin. The electrolytic skin 
surface reacts with the 
metallic electrode to form 
a battery that produces up- 
wards of a voft or more. 

Fig. 1 shows the circuit 
for an ECC preamplifier 
used in a battery-operated 
radio telemetry transmit- 
ter. This circuit operates 
from a single 9- to 12-volt 
dc power source, although, 
in most non-portable appli- 
cations, it could easily be 
redesigned to take advan- 
tage of the operational 
amplifier's bipolar power 
supply terminals. 

The circuit in Fig. 1 is 
basically an ac-coupled 
version of the classic in* 
stru mentation amplifer, 
and has a voltage gain of 
approximately 1000 [see 
*'Op-Amp Encyclopedia" 



68 



by K4(PV, 73 Magazine, 
February, 1978). 

Under specific sets of 
circumstances, ac mains- 
powered equipment can be 
hazardous to connect to 
some patients, so modern 
ECG preamplifiers use 
isolated designs. In most 
cases, the output of a 
preamplifier such as in Fig. 
1 will be used to amplitude- 
modulate an oscillator op- 
erating in the 30- to 100-kHz 
range (see Fig. 2). The pre- 
amplifier will be on an iso- 
lated portion of the printed 
circuit board, along with 
the amplitude-modulator 
and a floating rectifier-filter 
that creates a dc power sup- 
ly from the 50-kHz signal. 
Alternatively, some use 
separate dc-to-dc con- 
verters that do essentially 
the same thing from a sepa- 
rate oscillator. 

The situations that 
create a hazardous en- 
vironment for patients do 
not ordinarily exist outside 
of the hospitat/medical en- 
vironment, but experiment- 
ers and science-fairists 
who might want to use 
these techniques are ad- 
vised not to connect peo- 
ple to any mains-powered 
equipment. The use of bat- 
tery power provides the 
same isolation as used in 
professional equipment, 
but only if the entire ap- 
paratus is battery oper- 
ated. 

Transmission Encoders 

Some portable units do 
not encode the ECG wave- 
form at all before trans- 
mission, and are called 
direct-FM telemetry sys- 
tems. In this type of 
transmitter, the output of a 
preamplifier such as in Fig. 
1 is applied directly to a 
varactor-modulated crys- 
tal oscillator. In one 
popular brand, the oscilla- 
tor operates at 12 to 14 
MHz and is multiplied into 
the 1 74- to 21 5-MHz region 
with the final deviation be- 
ing 75 kHz or so. 

Other models first en- 



code the ECC waveform in 
the form of a frequency- 
modulated audio carrier 
that can be transmitted 
over a wire or radio com- 
munications channel This 
method is called FM/FM 
telemetry. The encoder 
consists of a voltage-to- 
frequency converter, or 
voltage-controlled oscilla- 
tor (vco), that uses the ECG 
signal as its control or in- 
put voltage. The output of 
the vco is then applied to 
an ordinary FM transmit- 
ter. 

Fig. 3(a) shows a circuit 
for an ECG encoder that 
was originally designed at 
the National Institutes of 
Health (NIH)^ in Bethesda 
MD, for use in telephone 
call-in cardiac pacemaker- 
surveillance systems,^ The 
circuit was built into the 
case of a modem (modula- 
tor/demodulator used in 
computer systems), and 
was issued to patients. The 
box had a pair of telephone 
earpiece cups so that the 
tone could be transmitted 
down the line. The patient 
would phone in to the 
pacemaker clinic once a 
week, where an analog 
recording of the waveform 
was made, and certain 
computer measurements 
were taken. These were 



A 




^^ECTtFIER 
FILTEPI 



I 



SYNCMROWOUE 
DEMODiJLATOR 



LOW PASS 

FILTER 



r 



50 KNi 

OSCILLATOR 



m 



u. 



ISOLATEP SECTION 



NONISOLATED SECTION 



Fig, 2. Block diagram of an isolated ECG preamplifier. 



reviewed later by a car- 
diologist (an M.D.), who 
would decide whether or 
not to ask the patient to 
come in for a closer ex- 
amination. 

The encoder in Fig. 3[a] 
uses four 741-family- 
operational amplifiers and 
a Motorola MC4024P vco 
chip that drives a loud- 
speaker in the modem box. 
Note that this device is 
filtered too heavily to pro- 
vide diagnostic quality 
ECG recordings, but is suf- 
ficient for the limited pur- 
pose intended. For those 
who wish to use the circuit 
for a wider frequency- 
response system, some 
modification of the low- 
and high-pass filter sec- 
tions is in order. 

Gain is provided by 
amplifier A1, while A2 
serves as the high- and low- 
pass filter section. The fre- 



quency response was lim- 
ited intentionally so that 
interfering signals from the 
patients skeletal muscles 
did not obscure the ECC 
waveform — a necessity be- 
cause of the less-than- 
optimum situations in 
which recordings were at- 
tempted. The amplifier in- 
put lines were connected 
to a pair of 1.5-inch metal 
disk electrodes on the top 
surface of the modem box. 
This is not the best possible 
configuration, but is con- 
venient for the home pa- 
tient 

The 60-Hertz power 
mains will cause a tremen- 
dous interference signal to 
be present in nondifferen- 
tial amplifiers and in those 
differential amplifiers in 
which the input balance 
cannot be maintained. To 
overcome this, a 60-Hz 
notch filter, A3 plus the cir- 



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Fig. 3. (a) Encoder circuit (b) 60-Hz twin-T section. Alternate 
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LOW PASS 

FiLTEfl 



Fig. 4. Block diagram of a pu he-counting FM detector 



cuit in Fig. 3(b) is provided. 
A claim of 50-dB suppres- 
sion is made, but we could 
verify only 18-23 dB. 

Amplifier A4 serves as a 
level shifter between the 
ECG preamplifier and the 
MC4024P yco input. The 
output of the vco is fed to a 
loudspeaker for acoustical 
coupling to a telephone. 
Note that a series resistor is 
used between the speaker 
and the vco. This compo- 
nent is needed because the 
TTL output of the vco will 
be loaded too much by the 
low impedance typical of 
speakers, 

The output of the vco in 
Fig. 3(a) is too high for most 



radio transmitter audio in- 
put stages, and the 
waveform consists of a 
chain of square waves. To 
overcome this problem, an 
attenuator/low"pas5 filter 
is needed between the vco 
output and the radio trans- 
mitter input connector, 



Decoders 

Neither the circuit of Fig. 
3(a) nor the circuit 
presented in the February, 
1978, issue of 73 is useful 
by itself, except to show 
that your heart can control 
the whistle of the modula- 
tion in the loudspeaker] 
Unless a decoder (i.e., FM 
demodulator) is provided, 




TRfCeEfi 



DIFFER- 
ENTIATOR 



OUTPUT 



C6 



Fig. 5(al Practical hobbyist decoder circuit. 




INPUT FREOUEJ^CY <KHt) 



Fig. 5(b). Output voltage versus input frequency. 



all these circuits can do is 
whistle at you in step with 
the ECC waveform! 

The encoded signal is an 
audio-range (1 to 5 kHz) 
carrier that is frequency- 
modulated by the ECG 
waveform, Any phase- 
sensitive detection scheme 
could conceivably work, 
but two types are most 
commonly employed: 
phase-locked loops, and 
pulse-counting (also called 
digital) FM demodulators. 

A number of technical 
papers have been written 
that show the use of low- 
cost PLL chips for ECC 
telemetry decoding, but, in 
my experience, these cir- 
cuits have not been 
altogether satisfactory. It 
seems that many of the 
low-cost PLL chips do not 
recover rapidly enough 
following the ECG R-wave 
(the spike-like feature), 
This results in distortion of 
the waveform in an area 
that is of particular interest 
to the physician. Such cir- 
cuits should, however, 
prove interesting to the 
hobbyist who can tolerate 

some distortion. 

It is a little easier to use 
the pulse-counting detec- 
tor of Fig. 4, The signal 
received from the radio 
loudspeaker or telephone 
line will probably be weak 
and noisy, so the first stage 
will be an amplifier and 
bandpass filter stage. It 
should have a bandwidth 
that is not much greater 
than the signal's frequency 
swing, i.e., 2x deviation. In 
most encoders, the devia- 
tion is 25 to 75 percent of 
the unmodulated carrier 
frequency. 

The amplified audio-FM 
carrier is then squared in a 
Schmitt trigger circuit or 
other form of circuit that 
will produce output square 
waves from irregular input 
signals. The output of the 
Schmitt trigger is then dif- 
ferentiated to form spike 
pulses that are suitable for 
triggering a monostable 
multivibrator (one-shot). 

The actual detector con- 



sists of the one-shot and an 
integrator stage. This ar- 
rangement is common not 
only in telemetry applica- 
tions, but also in many in- 
dustrial and scientific in- 
struments, including FM- 
carrier tape recorders that 
record low frequency ana- 
log data on ordinary audio 
tape. This circuit produces 
a dc level that is propor- 
tional to the frequency or 
pulse-repetition rate of the 

input signal. 

Th^ one-shot produces 
an output pulse for each 
trigger pulse received at its 
input. The one-shot output 
pulses differ from the input 
pulses, however, in that 
they have a constant 
amplitude and duration 
[period). Only their repeti- 
tion rate varies with the in- 
put frequency. As a result 
the output of the integra- 
tor, which is a time- 
averaging circuit, is a dc 
level proportional only to 
frequency. Note that at 
least one high-quality hi-fi 
FM tuner uses this tech- 
nique at 10.7 MHz to de- 
modulate the FM i-f signal. 
The integrator is a form of 
low-pass filter, so the cir- 
cuit is inherently low-noise. 

A practical example of 
this type of detector is 
shown in Fig. 5(a). Note 
that this is not a clinically 
acceptable circuit, but it is 
able to produce results 
that are good enough for 
educational or experimen- 
tal applications. Most 
se r iou s e?cpe r i m ente rs 
wishing to transmit low- 
frequency human or ani- 
mal physiological signals 
by radio or wire, or to store 
them on an audio tape, will 
be successful with this cir- 
cuit. 

An LM311 voltage com- 
parator is the input signal 
conditioner. This circuit is 
connected as a zero- 
crossing detector and re- 
quires at least 200 mV of 
signal to operate reliably. 
Lower signals can be ac- 
commodated if I CI is pre- 
ceded with an operational 
amplifier gain stage. 



70 



The square waves at the 
output of the LM311 are 
differentiated by C1-R2 to 
form spike pubes that will 
trigger the 555 one-shot 
stage [IC2), The 555 output 
pulses have a constant 
amphtude and duration, 
but their repetition rate 
varies with the input fre- 
quency. 

The 555 pulses are in- 
tegrated in a three-stage 
RC integrator. The output 
is taken across capacitor 
C6, and is a frequency- 
dependent dc potential 
The graph showing input 
frequency versus dc 
voltage is shown in Fig, 
5(b). 

Does it work? I built a 
modulator using the 
A4/1C1 portion of Fig. 3(aJ 
and used a function gen- 
erator to drive its input. A 
triangle waveform of 2 Hz 
was selected because it ap- 
proximates the frequency 
components of the ECG 
waveform. The output of 
the modulator was atten- 
uated and then applied to 
the input of the circuit in 
Fig. 5(a), Fig. 5(c) shows the 
original input waveform 
from the function gener- 
ator (upper trace] and the 
dc output of the decoder 
(lower trace). Note that the 
demodulated version 
shows some, but not much, 
loss of high frequencies in 
the waveform. 

The vertical gain of the 
oscilloscope used was ad- 
justed to show more clear- 
ly the two waveforms. The 
amplitude of the upper 
trace was several volts p-p, 
while that of the lower was 
approximately 80 mV p-p. 
An operational amplifier 
following the integrator 
would build this level up to 
whatever level is required. 



^ 



INPUT 



fA> 




Accessories 

A qrs-beeper can be used 
by using the R-wave to trig- 
ger an audio oscillator, this 
is the "beep-beep'' used to 
good effect in doctor TV 
shows. A popular method 
is to use the R-wave to fire 
a one-shot that drives one 
input of a NAND gate. The 
other input of the NAND 
gate is driven by a 1 -kHz {or 
so) audio oscillator. 

Alternatively, the output 
of the one-shot that is trig- 
gered by the R-wave can be 
connected to an LED to 
form a qrs-flasher. These 
circuits are shown in Fig. 6v 
In both cases, the nonin- 
verting input of the com- 
parator might either be 
grounded, as in Fig. 5(a), or 
connected to a dc level that 
prevents the comparator 
from firing on noise im- 
pulses or, in most cases, 
the ECC T-wave, 

The circuit of Fig. 5(a) is 
also useful to make a car- 
diotachometer [jargon for 
heart-rate meter) if the 
time constants are 
changed. The ECC wave- 
form has a fundamental 
frequency of approximate- 
ly 0.5 to 2 Hz, so it will not 
work properly with the 
2-kHz values used when 
the decoder in Fig. 5{a) is 
used, but the same princi- 
ple is used in the 
tachometer. (The same prin- 
ciple has been published 
many times as an auto 
tachometer: incidentally, 
again with suitable compo- 
nent value changes). 

In the case of a car- 
diotach, the one-shot dura- 
tion should be 25 to 50 ms, 
and the values of the in- 
tegrator capacitors and 
resistors will probably 
have to be raised. The dc 
output meter can be 



CHJTPUT 




LEO 
ORS-FLASHEH 




Fig. 5[cl Input (upper) and output f/owerj waveforms. 



calibrated in beats-per- 
minute. If you do not have 
a 1-Hz range function 
generator to calibrate this 
circuit, then use TTL or 
CMOS counter/dividers a 
la crystal calibrator cir- 
cuits to divide the 60-Hz 
line from a 5-V ac filament 
transformer {not direct 
from the 115 V ac line!) 
down to 03, 1, and 2 Hz for 
calibration purposes, ■ 



References 

1. Holsinger, W,P. and Kemp- 
ner, K. M., "Portable EKG 
Telephone Transmitter," IEEE 
Trans. Biomed. Eng^, 19, pp. 
321-323, 1972. 

2. Klingenmaier, C.H. et a/, "A 
Method of Computer-Assisted 
Pacemaker Surveillance From 
a Patient's Home via Tele- 
phone," Computers and Blo- 
medicai Research, 6, pp» 
327-335, 1973. 



Call or Write for Delivery or Quote 



ICOM IC701 
with AC/MIC 




LEAVE A MESSAGE & WE'LL CALL YOU &ACKf 



DC LEVEL 



^&/ 



Fig. 6. (a) Qrs-beeper. (b) Qrs-flasher, 



All prices fob Houston, except ^here irtdlcated. Prices subject lo ctiange 
withoui notice, alt items guaranteed. Some iiems subject pnor sale. Send 
letterhead for Dealer price liiss Texas resudent^s add 6% lax . please 
add postage estimate, $1.00 minfmum. W&GJ, W5M6B, K5AAD. N5JJ. 
AG5K, W5VVM. WD5EDE. K5ZD WA5TGU. W65AYF K5RC. K5BGB 
WB5U3V, 



MASTERCHARGE • VISA 

MADISON 

ELECTROrilCS SUPPLY, INC 

1508 MCKINNEY • HOUSTON, TEXAS 77002 

71 3/658-0268 ^ M35 



p^ Reader Serv/ce— see page 21 1 



71 



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MOW w »"'*'* " 



artW*^"^ 



*••* 







How to 
Build a 
Micro- 
computer 

. . . and Really 
(Indvrstand It 



S9.9S 



'^^ 



y 



^^^^l^. 



Tools and Techni ques for Ele ctronics (BK7348) Is a 
comprehensive guide to the tools and construction prac- 
tices used by today's electronics hobbyist. This new 73 
Magazine publication should be a part of the library of 
anyone who has ever built or fixed any electronic gear.. 
The text and numerous pictures and illustrations provide 
an easy-to-understand description of the safe and correct 
way to use the basic and specialized tools needed for etec- 
tronics work. 

The first part of Tools a nd Tech niques for Electronics 
covers the basic tools that will assist the amateur htovice, 
CB operator^ or beginning computer kit buiider. It Is also 
an excellent review for more experienced hobbyists* The 
second portion of the text will be of interest to the ad- 
vanced tool user. It explains specialized metal working 
tools as well as the chemical aids that are used in repair 
shops* The final chapters of Tools and Techniques for 
Electronics discuss the construction skills that result in a 
professionaHooking project. 

Handy reference data on Englfsh/metric conversions, 
machine screw datani and the like will be found in the ap- 
pendlces. The contents of basic and advanced tool kits 
are outlined, and the book includes a list of suppliers. 

Whether you are interested in working with tubes or the 
latest wire- wrap techniques, a great deal of pride and 
satisfaction can be gained by building or repairing your 
own equipment* 73's Tools and Techniques for Elec- 
tronics shows you the way. 

Order your copy today! Only 
$4.95 from the Radio Book- 
shop. Use the handy order 
form on the Reader Service 
Card at the back of the 
magazine or phone toll free 
1-800-258-5473. 



it Complete eireuH biraril layatits In- 
eluded 

ifRmud^'madm boards available 

if Uses the popular 6502 chip (same as 

the KIM, PET, APPLE) 
iAf V$0§ readll^-avuilahte parts 
if Component hits available 

While considerable information is available on the 
generalrties of how a microcomputer works or how to 
program a microcomputer, youll be hard pressed to 
find information concerning the construction of a sin- 
gle, specific system. 

Finally, electronic hobbyists are able to build their 
own microcomputer system with Sam Creason's 
book, "How To Buifd A Microcomputer and Really Un- 
derstand \ir Creason's book is a combination 
technical manual and programming guide that lakes 
the hobbyist step-by-step through the design con* 
struction, testing, and debugging of a complete 
microcomputing system. 

Once your computer has been properly programmed, 
it can be a powerful tool for use in the amateur radio 
station. Examples include a CW generator, a digital 
voltmeter, and a programmable signal generator. This 
book is must reading tot anyone desiring a true 
understanding of small computer systems 



To order, write 73 Magazine Maii-Order Dept, #395 
Peterborough NH 03458, Include name and address 
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n Please rush my copy of "How To Build A Microcom' 

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72 



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Fred Studenberg W4BF 
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The MICROSIZER: 
Computerized Frequency Control 

— a synthesized vfo replacement for most HF rigs 



The use of microcom- 
puters in the operation 
of amateur radio stations 
has increased rapidly in the 
past year. Applications 
have ranged from simple 
Morse keyboards to com- 
plex antenna-tracking 



systems- One use that has 
been neglected is that of 
controlling the frequency 
of a transceiver with a 
microcomputer. Micro- 
computer frequency con- 
trol is extremely useful and 
flexible, but has not been 



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— 7^ 



BCO 



uie 

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CMO£ 



3f*.IV 



/77 




UI4 

VAtfeO 0ATA 

DETECTOR 



explored because of the in- 
cbrnpatibiHty of analog 
vfos in transceivers with 
the digital output of the 
microcomputer. Now, 
however, it is possible to 
combine a handful of inex- 
pensive digita] ICs with a 



L.P. FILTER 
5-5 5MHr 

svRfyiSvioociii 



■* RF OUT TO 
TRANSCEIVER 



U.2 



55aOKMz 



lOOKz 

OFFSET TUNE 
VOLTAHJE 



O/A 
CONVERTER 

<^ 



ffli 



IOOH£ 

UP/DOWH 

<"> 



UP/DOWN 



cLot:;K 



l^SEC STROBE 



U)5 

oieJT 

SELECTOR 



U4 
UP/ DOW f* 
CONTROL 



J? r" 



L_-...„. ^ 

TtL PARALLEL DATA IN 



UP QO-f/H 

I 

b ■ 
MANUAL TUNE IhtPUT 



CLOCK 



ffg, 7. 8/ock diagfam of the MICROSIZER. Ail parallel data bits are normally high be- 
tween data words for at least 7 fis. Valid data should be held for a minimum of 4 yts. All 
digit values are BCD. Digit selector: 100 Hz = 00; 1 kHz = 10; 10 kHz = 07; 100 kHz = 
11. 



\jA 



few discrete components 
on a single printed circuit 
board to form a 5,0-5,5- 
MHz frequency synthe- 
sizer. This unit can serve as 
a solid-state replacement 
for the mechanically-tuned 
vfos used in nearly every 
popular amateur HF trans- 
ceiver. Because thumb- 
wheel switches do not 
meet the amateur's re- 
quirements for casually 
scanning the bands, a con- 
venient method of 
"tuning" the synthesizer is 
needed. The marriage be- 
tween the computer and 
the radio was inevitable. 
This article presents a prac- 
tical approach to building 
an HF synthesizer for your 
transceiver, plus some sim- 
ple software to enable a 
6800-based microcompu- 
ter to control it. 

The Hardware 

The MICROSIZER, as it 
is affectionately called, is a 
sol id-state, digital ly- 
synthesized remote vfo 
that will operate with vir- 
tually any HF transceiver, 
It tunes the popular 5.0-5,5 
MHz vfo range in precise 
100-Hz increments and can 



74 




MICROSIZER in operation at WA0QJL 



be controlled by an fi-bit 
parallel interface port 
from any microcomputer. 
The frequency stability 
and signal purity are ex- 
cellent, exceeding that of 
most analog vfos. When 
controlled by a computer, 
a CRT terminal is used for 
entering and displaying the 
operating frequency. Alter- 
nately, the MICROSIZER 
can be used by non-compu- 
ter-equipped amateurs as a 
stand-alone remote vfo 
with fast or stow up/down 
tuning controlled by the 
station's keyer paddle. 
When operating without a 
computer, a digital 
readout in the transceiver 
is used to indicate the 
operating frequency. A 
dual paddle is preferred, 
offering a slow tuning rate 
of 500 Hz per second if 
either the up or down pad- 
dle is activated. If both 
paddles are closed simulta- 
neously, the tuning rate in- 
creases to 20 kHz per sec- 
ond, with the tuning direc- 
tion determined by which 
paddle was first closed. 

Circuit Description 

The MtCROSIZER's cir^ 
cuitry consists mostly of 
CMOS ICs and is contained 
on a single-sided 4.8" X 
5.3" PCB. The board has 
been designed for mount- 
ing in a Radio Shack Mode! 
270-253 utility cabinet. 
Most of the parts are 
available directly from 
regular advertisers in 73 



Magazine. A PCB and some 
other selected parts can be 
supplied by sources Ifsted 
in the parts list on page 82. 
Please note that the PCB 
layout printed here is 
copyrighted and reproduc- 
tion by individuals for 
other than their private use 
is prohibited. Microcompu- 
ter interface or local con- 
trol connections are 
through a 10-terminal con- 
nector on the rear panel. 
Other than an on/off 
switch, no controls are re- 
quired on the front panel, 
making out-of-the-way 
placement convenient. 

Circuit Operation 

Refer to the block 
diagram in Fig. 1 and the 
schematic in Fig. 2 for the 
discussion to follow. The 
vco (voltage-controlled os- 
cillator) operates directly 
at 5.0-5,5 MHz, using a 
high-Q varac tor-tuned Col- 
pitts circuit. The output of 
the vco drives the vco buf- 
fer, U3, and is then low- 
pass-filtered and applied to 
the transceiver The output 
level is approximately 2.0 
V rms across 1000 Ohms, a 
level compatible with the 
remote vfo input require- 
ments of most trans- 
ceivers. The output of the 
vco also drives a section of 
U3 used as a buffer, which 
is applied to mixer U2- 
Another input to the mixer 
is from the vcxo offset 
oscillator, U2, operating at 
approximately 5.9 MHz. 




Simulated '"dial" display. 



The difference frequency 
from the mixer is in the 400 
to 900 kHz range and is ap- 
plied to U9, a Hughes 
HCTR-0320, containing a 
3-stage programmable 
divider and a phase detec* 
tor. The 100-, 10-, and 
1-kHz BCD inputs to the 
programmable divider sec- 
tion of U9 determine the 
division ratio. The phase 
detector section of U9 
compares the output of the 
divider With a rOOOOO'k Hz 
reference signal, convert- 
ing any frequency or phase 
error to an error voltage to 
correct the frequency of 
the vco. The rOOOOO-kHz 
reference signal is derived 
from a 4D96-kHz oscillator 
and 12-stage binary 
divider, U1, 

Thus, five hundred 
1-kHz channels are pro- 
duced over the 5.0-5.5 MHz 
range by varying the data 
to the programmable dh 
vider from 400 to 900, This 
data comes from 3 sections 
of a 4-section data register 
composed of U10 through 
U13. This register is a 
4-decade up/down preset- 
table counter with outputs 
from 0000 to 5000, cor- 
responding to the five 
thousand 100-Hz channels. 
The output of the 100 kHz 
counter, U13, is modified 
by a section of U7 so that 4 
is added to its output. 
Thus, the data presented to 
the programmable divider, 
U9, varies from 400 to 900 
as the vco output varies 



from 5.5 to 5.0 MHz, The 
100-Hz steps are produced 
by varying the frequency 
of the 5.9'MHz offset vcxo 
(voltage-controlled crystal 
oscillator) over a 900 Hz 
range in nine lOO-Hz steps. 
This is accomplished by a 
digital-to-analog [D/A) con- 
verter (U8 and U18) con- 
trolled by BCD inputs from 
the 100-Hz section of the 
data register, U10. This 
scheme allows a lockup 
10-times-faster than at 
least one commercially- 
available HF transceiver — 
without sacrificing fre- 
quency resolution. The 
data register can be 
clocked up or down at a 
fast or slow rate by circuits 
from U6 and U4. This is the 
mode of operation when 
microcomputer control is 
not used. The data register 
is automatically reset to 
0000 each time power is 
applied to the MICRO- 
SIZER, preventing invalid 
BCD codes from upsetting 
U9- Microcomputer con- 
trol is accomplished by 
utilizing outputs of a TTL- 
to-CMOS converter, U16, 
to program the BCD preset 
inputs of the data register. 
The two digit-select bits 
are also converted from 
TTL to CMOS levels by U1 6 
and then decoded to one 
of four outputs by U15. 
UTS is enabled by a one- 
microsecond strobe pulse 
to load the data register 
with the BCD data present 
on bits 0-3 of the 8-bit inter- 



75 



M 



face. As in the manuallv- 
tuned up/down mode, 0000 
in the data register cor- 
responds to an approx- 
imateiv 5.5-MHz vco out- 
put frequency. The 5.9 
MHz offset vcxo is actually 
at 5.920 MHz so that DOOO 
will produce an operating 
frequency approximately 
20 kHz below each ama- 



teur band, allowing plenty 
of margin for off -frequency 
heterodyne crystals in the 
transceiver. The software 
calibration routine adds a 
constant to the desired 
operating frequency to 
produce the "data frequen- 
cy" that actually controls 
the MICROSIZER. Some 
transceivers, such as the 



Drake TR series, tune 
"backwards*' on some 
bands, in which case 0000 
would produce an operat- 
ing frequency approx- 
imately 20 kHz above the 
high end of the normal tun- 
ing range of the vfo. This 
causes no major problems, 
because the operating fre- 
quency could be sub- 



YSY 



*■"* «r n n 
'•* *e -• 

if f? II 



*5 l^ H 









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t 

I 

n 






I 









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it 



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m 



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a 



Fig. 2. SchemaC/c of the MtCROStZER. 



tracted from a constant to 

produce the desired output 
data and tuning direction. 

Power Supply 

The vco operates from a 
regulated 5-volt source 
provided by a 3-terminai 
regulator, U17. The rest of 
the circuits operate from a 
separate 3-terminal 12-volt 
regulator. Five votts for the 
TTL-toCMOS level con- 
verter is zener-regulated 
from the output of Ulfl 
Both Merminal regulators 
operate on 15 volts from 
the rectified and filtered 
output of a 12-volt trans- 
former A 10% variation in 
the ac line voltage causes 
no measurable shift in the 
output frequency. As is 
characteristic of all high- 
quality synthesizers, the 
frequency drift, even from 
a cold start, is very low, 
typically a few Hz. In the 
photograph of the spec- 
trum of the MICROSIZER, 
note that the 1-kHz sam- 
pling sidebands are down 
more than 60 dB. 

Possible Applications 

The number of uses for a 
computer-controlled trans- 
ceiver is limited only by 
the imagination. Here are a 
few seeds for thoughts. 
Many of you readers are 
programmers by profes- 
sion and could develop 
these ideas more effective- 
ly than we. 

Storage and Recall of 
Frequencies 

Any of the 5000 channels 
in the basic 5.0-5,5 MHz 
range could be stored for 
instant recall by the com- 
puter. These frequencies 
could be catalogued as 
channel numbers, or with 
more meaningful designa- 
tors (such as SSTV for 
14,230 MHz or W1AW for 
07.080 MHz). Some uses of 
this capability are: 

1. Scanning selected fre* 
quencies for activity; 

2. Split-frequency opera- 
tion for DX; 

3. Net operation and co- 
ordination. 



76 



EXECUTIVE 



CQWMANDS 
U D P 






f 



czr 



Of FPEO 
EKTER 



ERASE 



I 



iNCFREa 



1 



DECFREO 



UPTUHE^ 



DOwniTUNE 



OtLftT 



* 



1 



O^TACAtC 



IliCCAL 



PRlNTFREQ 



) SERVICE 






^ 




QCCCAL 



Spectrum analyzer photo of output 

and downlink bands. 



Fig. 3. Block diagram showing the functional arrangement 
of and linkage between the modules. 



Automatic Tuning 

The transceiver could be 
swept automatically over 
any given band or band 
segment and at practically 
any tuning rate, ignoring 
undesired band segments. 
Out-of-band operation or 
operation on unauthorized 
frequencies can be detect- 
ed by the tuning software, 
and an error message can 
be displayed to the opera- 
tor. This would be espe- 
cially useful during hectic 
contest or DX-chasing 
when the operator's atten- 
tion sometimes strays. A 
similar frequeocy-recog- 
nizatron scheme could 
make the transceiver "hop 
Dver" foreign broadcast 
QRM on 40 meters or bor- 
ing nets on 20 meters. With 
the computer's ability to 
decode CW, the times and 
Frequencies of rare DX ac- 
tivity could be monitored 
and recorded continuous- 
ly, especially during multi- 
3and single-operator DX 
contest operations, 

Doppler Shift Correction 
For OSCAR-Relayed 
Signals 

Using a variation of the 
automatic tuning mode, 

the transceiver could be 
tuned at the correct rate to 
track the Doppler shift of 



an OSCAR-relayed signal. 
Once a signal is initially 
tuned in, an OSCAR orbital 
prediction program and 



real-time clock in the 
microcomputer would 
determine the instan- 
taneous Doppler shift and 
retune the receiver accord- 
ingly. The operator need 
only enter the geographic 
location of the transmit- 
ting station and the uplink 



Remote Control Operation 

Virtually any microcom- 
puter can be operated 
from a remote location by 
the addition of a simple 
modem and a remote ter- 
minal. This would permit 




Fig, 4. Top view of PC board. 



77 



M 



an operator to control the 
MICROSIZER and the 
other station functions 
from any location where 
an audio link could be 
established The link could 
be either a telephone or 
radio system. Imagine 
operating your super DX 
station from your office 
telephone or through the 
local FM repeater! Unau- 
thorized control of the sys- 
tem could be prevented by 
the use of classified "pass- 
words" to limit computer 
access. 

Improved Frequency 
Display 

One common objection 
to digital readouts in con- 
ventional HF transceivers 
is the lack of visual "feel" 
when tuning. While tuning 
an analog dial, the opera- 
tor can visually relate the 
operating frequency to 
other frequencies in the 



band. With a computer ter- 
minal serving as a display 
device, a simulated "dial" 
can be created with fre- 
quency calibrations and 
graticules moving left or 
right as the frequency 
changes. Some terminals 
even offer high-resolution 
color graphics, making 
possible some really 
"sexy" displays. 

Some Software To Get Vou 
Started 

OK, enough about our 
dreams. What have we 
really done? Well, desiring 
to develop some really use- 
ful software, but consider- 
ing our lack of experience 
as programmers, we settled 
upon a few basic functions, 
which are: 

1. Continuous CRT read- 
out of the operating fre- 
quency; 

2. Ability to tune con- 
tinuously inlOO-Hz steps; 



3. Software correction 
for off-frequency hetero- 
dyne crystals; 

4. Relocatable code; 

5. Single a-bit parallel in- 
terface. 

This entire program was 
coded without the aid of 
an assembler, program- 
ming experience, or above 
average intelligence. Be- 
cause each module of the 
program was developed 
and tested separately, this 
500-byte program was only 
slightly more difficult to 
code than each of the short 
modules by itself. Our 
prime considerations ob- 
viously did not include fast 
program execution or 
ultra-efficient use of 
memory. An attempt was 
made to follow the basic 
guidelines of structured 
programming, but devia- 
tions were necessary 
because of the limitations 
of conditional branching in 




Fig. 5. Bottom view of PC board. 



a 



such a large program. 
Again, the program is mod- 
ular in form, and branches 
between modules have 
been held to a minimum. 
The individual modules are 
simple enough for even the 
novice to understand. Each 
module may be modified 
to satisfy some special ap- 
plication requirement 
without disrupting the 
functions of the other 
modules. Because the pro- 
gram is relocatable, it 
should be easily integrated 
into any 6800 system hav- 
ing access to MIKBUC® or 
SWTBUG® routines and 
520 bytes of RAM. Patches 
to other input-output 
routines will be very sim- 
ple. 

The Estecutive Routine 
t0030-O07Al 

The executive routine, as 
the name implies, is the 
master of this program. It 
monitors the system key- 
board, deccnJes your com- 
mands, and calls upon the 
other modules of the pro- 
gram to perform various 
functions. Fig. 3 is a block 
diagram showing the func- 
tional arrangement of and 
linkage between the mod- 
ules. Each module will be 
described in the text. The 
executive responds to the 
following commands: E — 
enter operating frequency; 
U — tune upward in fre- 
quency; D — tune down- 
ward in frequency; P— plus 
100 Hz (single frequency 
step); M — minus 100 Hz 
(single frequency step); 
A — add 100 Hz to calibra- 
tion offset; S— subtract 
100 Hz from calibration 
offset 

Upon receiving an "E" 
command, the executive 
calls upon the "opfreq 
enter" module, which 
prompts with 'FREQUEN- 
CY?" The operator enters 
six digits of frequency 
data. (Example: 142500.) 
Next, the "service" module 
adds this frequency data to 
the calibration offset 
(positive or negative), 
prints the operating fre- 



78 



quencv ("14250,0 kHz") on 
the CRT terminal, and out- 
puts the frequency-con- 
trolling data to the fre- 
quency synthesizer se- 
quentially through a single 
8-bit parallel-output port. 

A ''U" command tells 
the executive to call upon 
the ''uptune" module, a 
sort of "vice-executive" 
module, which in turn calls 
upon the 'delay/' ''inc- 
freq/' and "service" 
modules repeatedly until 
any key is pressed, at which 
time program control is re- 
turned to the executive, 

Similarly, on *'D'\ the ex- 
ecutive appoints '"down- 
tune/' another vice-execu- 
tive, to call the ''delay/' 
'decfreq/' and "service" 
routines repeatedly until a 
key is pressed. 

The ''F' {plus 100 Hz) 
command tells the ex- 
ecutive to call incfreq and 
service once only. The ex- 
ecutive immediately re- 
sumes command of the 
program. 

On "M" (minus 100 Hz), 
the executive calls decfreq 
and service, and resumes 
command. 

On "A" the executive 
calls upon incal and ser- 
vice, and resumes com- 
mand. 

On '*S^\ the executive 
calls upon decal and ser- 
vice, and resumes com- 
mand. 

Future plans include a 
much more powerful ex- 
ecutive to control synthe- 
sizer, Morse transmit and 
receive, and QSO logging 
routines. 

Erase Module [007B-0098) 

The erase module, when 
called, erases the screen of 
a CRT terminal by output- 
ting the proper ASCII con- 
trol characters. This mod- 
ule also initializes the 6820 
PIA of the synthesizer in- 
terface port 

Delay Module (OOEB-00F4] 

The delay module, 
called by the uptune and 
down tune ''vice-execu- 
tives/' determines the tun- 



ing rate of the uptune and 
downtune modes of opera- 
tion. The number of cycles 
of the delay loop, and 
therefore the time delay, is 
determined by the values 
of the two bytes of data 
stored at hex locations 
A022 and A023 of the 
system's 6810 scratchpad 
RAM. The maximum delay 
occurs when A022/A023 
contain FFFF, allowing 
65,536 loop cycles, for a 
delay of approximately 
1 75 seconds 

Incfreq Module 
[0099-0081} 

The incfreq module adds 
one (100 Hz) to the BCD 
frequency data stored at 
hex locations 0000^XK)5 A 
BRA command always 
routes the program flow to 




MICROSIZER in cabinet 



the service module. 

Decfreq Module 
[00B2-00D2) 

This module subtracts 
one (100 Hz) from the BCD 
frequency data stored at 
hex locations 0000-0005. A 
BRA command always 



routes the program flow to 
the service module. 

Inccal Module (01D6-01EE) 

Inccal adds one (100 Hz) 
to the BCD calibration off- 
set data stored at hex loca- 
tions 0007-OOOC. A BRA 

command always routes 



R43 



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RF OUTPUT 




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Fig. 6, Component layout of the MlCROSlZtR. lumpers are shown with dotted lines. 



DAT* 


SfORJ 


i^c ■■ ■ 

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(100 Hi> 


10^ 


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30 


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m fq 


(100 Kl) 




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00 


"0" 






0009 


00 


MQ« 


CiLIBSATION OKPiST DATA 


OOOA 


00 


"0" 






00 OB 


00 


"0" 






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00 


H0« 


(10 H^f35) 




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DO 


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DIGIT 


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20 


DIG It 


5 is "O- 


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0011 


32 


DIGIT 


3 is -2- (100 KHil 


OOU 


DO 


Stop CHASACTSS 




oooe- 


OOIF 


UNU3S0 ia^SSSTSO 


fOH fVTOSe NEiDS> 


0020 


10 


H013S 






OOZl 


20 


1>PAC3 






0022 


20 


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0023 


46 


M ppp 






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0026 


51 


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0027 


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0029 


kE 


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002A 


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007R 


59 


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002C 


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002D 


20 


SPA2i 






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20 


SPjyG3 






0021' 


yu 


STOP 


CHARACT3« 




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mmvM 




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m 


HI AC 


JSH IRi^ 


GET CHARACTER fBOH K^TfaOAR© 


0033 


SI 


45 


dWPA J^'Jtt 


W7 


0035 


27 


2C 


BEQ OOfil 


NO? 


0037 


ii 


50 


qtTA #50 


P7 


0039 


s? 


2G 


B&g OOtJ? 


W07 


003H 


81 


^4 


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3fl 


B£Q 0077 


NO? 


003F 


ei 


55 


GMPA #55 


ISl 


00*H 


27 


30 


BEa 0073 


NOt 


00^3 


81 


5J 


CJfPA #53 


S7 


00^5 


27 


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fcZa 006a 


HO? 


0047 


31 


41 


CHFA #41 


A? 


00^9 


27 


24 


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00^3 


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CiiPA #45 


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310 00^ 


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DF 


5SA 0030 


GET AKOTJKR Ctf*ft*Cf^R 


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005F 


eo 


70 


SSH OPFRSq 3WTSR OOP 5 (VIA BKAXC;:'! I5LAKD OODlJ 


0061 


20 


CD 


BRA 0030 


RSTURH TO filiCUTIVE 


OD63 


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4D 


B3R D^CFR^^ 


3 0052 


0065 


20 


C9 


BRA 0030 




0067 


SD 


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33R iNCFg:-:' 


j 0099 


0069 


20 


C5 


BRA 0030 




OOfiB 


eu 


£2 


B^R DZCCAL 


OIRR (VIA OXF) 


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20 


CI 


BRA 0010 




006? 


so 


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BSR l^tCKh 


01D5 (VIA 00CD3 


0071 


20 


BD 


BRA 0030 




0073 


60 


5S 


^H tJPfUKS 


0003 


0075 


20 


Bf 


BRA 0030 




007? 


SD 


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B^B DonrrrruH^ ock>f 


0079 


20 


B5 


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E RAM aooTlits 

^ - -- — ^ ^ 



0071 
0073 
003 
0082 

ooes 

0087 
OOBA 
ooec 
008P 
0090 
0091 
009S 
0093 

0095 

009fi 

0097 



66 

SD 

BD 

86 

37 
86 
B7 
01 
01 
01 
01 
01 
01 
01 
01 
20 



10 

ZlDl 
16 

i;lDl 

FF 
8010 
04 
8011 



LDAA f 10 
JSR OUTi^S 

LOAA n^ 

JSR OUTISS 
I^AA IfFF 
STAA BOIO 
l^DAA J? 04 
STAA 8011 
NO OP 



mum (COyFEOI^ P) 
ERASE EOF (COFTROL V) 



IlilTlALIZS PlA-SStABLlSH ALL 
B LIHSS OF PORT A AS OUTPUTS, 
(SiTFC 1/0 SLOT rf4) 



30 IRA SERVICE 0120 (VIA ISUUIO OOC93 



IHCPftSq iw>un!i-z 



0099 

009^ 

OOAO 
O0A2 
O0A4 
00 A 6 
00A7 
O0A9 
DOAB 
OOAO 

00 as; 

OOBD 



FS A020 

A6 00 

Bl DO 

27 CE 

64 OF 

as 01 

19 

A7 00 

ai 09 

2f 03 

08 

20 EG 

20 17 



LDJC A020 
LDAA X 00 
CKPA J m^ 
BSQ OOHO 
AIOA i^OF 
AI>DA #01 

STAA X 00 

GMPA ^09 

BLS OOBO 

INK 

BRA 009c 

BRA SeRVIC: 



C£T DATA 

STOP CT«jyi:;T£R7 



AJDO ONE 
OECTISAL ADJUST 

REPLACE 



PSCFREq RO0TTW5 



0092 

ooa5 

00B7 
0O^B9 
OCBB 
OOBD 
OOSF 
OOCO 
0DC2 
O0C4 
0006 
OOC? 
OOC9 



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84 

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08 
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PI WD NEXT DIGIT OF DATA 
01 2D (VIA ISLAND OOC 9) 

fSSE IWCFHEO) 



liDD HIKE (SAME AS SUBTRACT OHE) 



ISLAWD3 




OWh 


20 


AE 


oocn 


20 


53 


OOCF 


20 


5fi 


OODl 


20 


22 


UPTUH. 


? R0DTIN2 



00O1 
00D5 
00D7 

OODA 

OODC 
OODE 



m 

81 
27 
39 



16 

S004 

FF 
f5 



IDt A020 

LDAA X 00 

CePA i^^ 

lE^ O0C9 

A.NDA ^OF 

ADDA #09 

DAA 

STAA t 00 

CKPA #09 

BCT 00C9 

INX 

9RA 00H5 

BRA SERVICE 012D (ALSO SERVES AS ISLAND) 



BRA ERAiJE 0073 
fiRA 0127 
BRA 0129 
BRA 00F5 



BSR DEUlt 001 a 

E^B iNC^Tl^a 0099 

LDaa 8004 (or addrcKs «r input pt>r% u3«i to 

stop the tuniinj^.J 
CHPA fFP C^npare fetched vd.lu& to noroiAl value 

BSQ 0003 A4saLn. 

RTS 



DOWrfTUNS R0J3TIKE 



OODF 80 OA 

OOEl SD CF 



DSR !5ELAY 00^ B 
nSR D3CKREq 0QB2 
B6 800^ LDAA fiCiO^ (see ODD? of upttmc , ) 
Cr*PA 0FF 
6&Q OODF 
RtS 



O0S3 

O0E6 ai FF 

00E8 27 P5 

003A 39 

DELAY ROT] n IE 



OOSB FE A022 LOJC A0Z2 (Valu* »t A022 seta delay,) 



Program fhtmg. 



program flow to the ser- 
vice module, 

Deccal Module (01 EF-02071 

Deccal subtracts one 
(100 Hz) from the BCD cali* 
bration offset data stored 
at hex locations 0007*O00C, 
A BRA command always 
routes program flow to the 
service module. 

Opfreq Enter Module 
(OOF 5-01 2C) 

The opfreq enter module 
utilizes the MIKBUC® / 
SWTBUG® OUTEEE rou^ 
tine to display "FREQUEN- 
CY?" on the top line of a 

Ua 80 



CRT terminal Next, using 
the monitor's INEEE 
routine, opfreq enter ac- 
cepts six digits of frequen- 
cy data, with the 10-MHz 
digit entered first, and the 
100-Hz digit last. Opfreq 
enter does not accept 
decimal points or commas 
between the digits. The 
data entered is Stored at 
hex locations 0000-0005, 
with the 100'Hz digit at 
OOOa and the 10-MHz digit 
at 0005 

Service Module 
(012D-01D5) 

The service module is 



rather complex compared 
with the other modules of 
the program. For simplici- 
ty, this module was written 
and will be described as 
three separate modules 
that are unconditionally 
linked together. They are: 
datacalc, printfreq, and 
outdata. 

Datacaic Module 
(012D-016D) 

Datacaic takes the BCD 
operating frequency data 
at 0000-0005, adds to it the 
BCD calibration offset 
data at 0007-OOOC (positive 
or negative), formats this 



result for output to the fre- 
quency synthesizer, and 
stores it at 000 E -0011. 

Only four digits of 
data are required to drive 
the 05,000 0-05,500 OkHz 
synthesizer, because the 
units (5) and tens (0) of 
MHz never change. Al- 
though the 5.0-5.5-MHz vfo 
of most HF transceivers 
tunes backwards, this 
reversal is handled by the 
hardware of the synthe- 
sizer. This software merely 
outputs the four least 
significant digits of the 
BCD operating frequency 
data, plus or minus any 



OOEF 
OOFO 

OOF I 
OOP 2 
OOF^ 



09 
01 
01 
01 
26 
39 



FA 



BEX 
NO OP 

m OP 

m OP 

BN£ OOEE 
RTS 



OPFHt^Q Er^TSJ? RO'JTINS 



&0P5 
OOFS 
OOFA 

OOFC 
OOFE 
DlOl 
0102 



FE A020 

A6 20 

61 DD 

27 06 

BD EIDL 

08 

20 F^ 



LDK A020 

LDAA X 20 
C^EPA jji^DD 
BEQ 0104 
JSR OUTEJiE 
INK -'■'" 
BRA OOFS 



FIND DATA 

GST CHARA^TKR OF MsG- 
STOP CHARACTER? 
YES? BRANCH 
NO? FRiJfT CHARACTER 
NEXT GHARACTKR. 



OlOif 


FE 


A 020 


LDX A020 


FIND DATA STORAGii AREA 


0107 


BD 


EUG 


JSR iKcIEE 


GET 10 MHz DIG It 


OlOA 


A7 


05 


STAA X 05 


ST0R3 IT 


OlOG 


BD 


ElAC 


JiR TNEEE 


1 bVdiL 


CI OF 


A7 


04 


STAA X 0^ 


ST0R5 


OIU 


BD 


SIAC 


JSR INS5^ 


100 KHa 


0114 


A7 


03 


STAA X 03 


STORE 


0116 


BO 


SIAC 


JSR IMEES 


10 KHz 


0119 


A? 


02 


STAA X 02 


STORE 


01 IB 


BD 


ElAG 


JSR IN£E£ 


1 KHz 


OIIE 


A? 


01 


STAA X 01 


STORE 


0120 


BD 


SIAC 


JSR imni: 


100 Hz 


0123 


A7 


00 


STAA X OD 


STORK LAST DIGIT 


0125 


20 


A4 


BRA OOCE 


BRA SEHVICi VIA ISLAND 


0127 


20 


3D 


BRA 0166 


ISLAND 


01 S9 


20 


3D 


BRA 0168 


ISLAND 


01 XR 


ZO 


XJt 


BRA XXXX 


SPARE ISLAND 


DATACALG 


ROUT I MS 




01 2D 


66 


00 


LDAA (5/00 




01 2F 


B7 


A026 


STAA AO26 


TEMPORARY STORAGE 


0132 


E-'E 


A020 


LDX A020 


FIND DATA 


0135 


OC 




GLG 




0136 


a6 


00 


LDAA X 00 


GET OPFR"!;!! DIGIT 


0138 


3B 


23 


BMI 0164 


EXIT IK MlrJUS 


013A 


64 


OF 


AND A #0F 


AND MASK 


013C 


ba 


40 


OMA fl^40 




0135 

Ol&O 


B6 


07 


LDAB X 07 


GET OFFSET DIGIT 


Zk 


01 


BCC 0143 




01^*2 


iiC 




INCA 




0143 


C4 


OF 


ANDB ^OF 




0145 


GA 


50 


ORAB #50 




014? 


IB 




ABA 




oi4e 


19 




DAA 




0149 


84 


OP 


ANOA #0F 




01 4b 


BA 


A026 


ORAA AO26 




OliJ^E 


A? 


©E 


STAA X OE 




0150 


07 




TPA 




0151 


F6 


AO26 


LDAB AO26 




0154 


CB 


10 


ADDB rf^lO 




0156 


06 




TAP 




0157 


F7 


A026 


STAB AO26 




01 5A 


08 




INX 




015s 


20 


D9 


BRA 0136 




015D 


86 


DD 


LDAA #DD 


STOP CHARACTER 


01 5F 


FE 


A02a 


LDX A020 


FIND DATA STORAGE AREA 


01 6z 


A7 


12 


STAA X 12 


PLACE STOP CHARACTER 


0164 


20 


oa 


BRA SERVICE 


OI6E 



0166 20 6E 

OI6S 20 4E 

016a 20 CI 

Ol6C 20 XX 



BRA 01D6 
BRA 01 B 8 
BRA 01 2D 
BRA XXXX 



PRlNTFFZEq 1^ OUT INS 

016S F3 A020 LDX A020 
0171 06 10 LDAA #10 

0173 BD ElDl JSR DUTEEE 



ISLAND 
ISLAND 
ISLAND 
SPARE ISLAND 



FIND DATA 
HOME 



0176 


BD 


EOCC 


JSR DUTS 


SPACE 


0179 


BD 


EOGG 


JSR OUTS 




017c 


A6 


05 


LDAA X 05 


GET 10 KHz DATA 


017s 


BD 


EO6B 


JSR OtlTrfR 


PRINT RIGHT I^Y^BLE 


0161 


A6 


04 


LDAA X 04 


1 MHs 


OIB3 


BD 


E06g 


JSR OUTHR 


PRIMT 


0136 


A6 


03 


LDAA X 03 


100 mm 


0188 


BD 


E06B 


JSR OUTHH 


FRltiT 


OIBB 


a6 


02 


LDAA X 02 


10 Km 


01 BD 


BD 


EO6B 


JSR OUTHR 


PRINT 


0190 


a6 


0) 


L\>JiK X 01 


1 KHa 


0192 


BD 


EO6B 


JSR OUTHR 


PRINT 


0195 


56 


2£ 


LDM i/2E 


PERIOD 


&197 


BD 


ElDl 


JSR OUTEEE 


PRl^T PERIOD 


019A 


a6 


00 


LDAA X 00 


100 Hz 


01 9G 


BD 


EO6B 


JSR OUTrtR 


PRINT 


019F 


BD 


EOCC 


JSR OUTS 


SPACE 


01 A 2 


B6 


4B 


LDAA #4B 


ASCII K 


01A4 


BD 


ElDl 


JSR 0UTES2 


PRINT K 


01A7 


S6 


46 


LDAA #48 


H 


01A9 


BD 


ElDl 


JSR OUTEES 


PRINT H 


01 AC 


86 


5A 


LDAA ^5A 


Z 


OlAH 


BD 


Eirn 


JSR OUTEES 


PRlfJT 


01 Bl 


BD 


SOGG 


JSR OUTS 


SPACE 


01B4 


20 


06 


BRA 01 BC 


BRA OUTDATA 


01B6 


20 


32 


BRA 016A 


ISLAriD 


OIBS 


20 


35 


BRA OlEF 


ISLAND 


OlEA 


20 


XX 


BRA XXXX 


SPARE ISLAND 


OUrDATA ROUTINE 






01 BC 


FW 


A020 


LDX A020 


FIND DATA 


01 BF 


k6 


03 


LDAA X OB 


GET DATA BYTiS TO OUTPUT 


OlCl 


81 


DD 


cf.^PA mo 


STOP CHARACTER? 


Old 


27 


OB 


l^iiQ OlDO 


IF YiiS, EXIT 


01C5 


B7 


601 D 


STAA 8010 


OUTPUT DATA BYTE 


01C8 


4P 




CLRA 




01C9 


OB 




INX 




OICA 


43 




COJ.IA 




OICB 


B? 


8010- 


STAA 8010 


SET ALL OUTPUT BITS KICK 


OlCE 


20 


Ep 


BRA 01 BP 


REPEAT 


OlDO 


4F 




CLRA 


EXIT 


OlDI 


43 




COJmA 




0LD2 


B7 


8010 


STAA a 010 


SET OUTPUT BITS HIGH 


01 D 5 


39 




RTS 




INCCAL RO 


FJTIN^ 






01D6 


FE 


A020 


LDX A020 


FIND DATA 


01D9 


A6 


07 


LDAA X 07 


:CST DATA 


OlDB 


81 


DD 


GMPA #DD 


STOP CJIARACTER? 


OIDD 


27 


Oct 


B:i:Q oih:c 


YES? EXIT 


OlDF 


64 


OF 


ANDA #0F 


IN€RSS^£KT DATA 


OLEl 


8B 


01 


ADDA J? 01 




01E3 


19 




DAA 




aiE4 


A7 


07 


STAA X 07 


REPLACE DATA 


01E6 


81 


09 


CWPA ^09 




OlES 


2F 


03 


BT-K OIBC 


EXIT IP LESS OR EQUAL ZERO 


OlEA 


08 




INX 


POINT NEXT BYTE 


OlEB 


20 


ZQ 


BRA 01D9 


KEPSAT 


OlED 


20 


C7 


BRA 01B6 


SERVICE 


DECCAL ROUTTri'E 






OlEF 


b'si 


A020 


LDX A 020 


FIND DATA 


01F2 


A6 


07 


LDAA X 07 


(SEE IN'CCAL) 


01F4 


ei 


DD 


CWPA #DiJ- 


STOP CHARACTER? 


01F6 


27 


OE 


BEQ 0206 


YES? EXIT 


01F8 


84 


OF 


ANDA #0F 




OIF A 


m 


09 


AEDA #09 


DECREMENT DATA BYTE 


OlFC 


19 




DAA 




01 FD 


A7 


07 


STAA X 0? 


REPLACE DATA BYTE 


01 FF 


81 


09 


CMPA #09 




0201 


?P. 


03 


BCT 02O6 


EXIT IF GREATER THAN ZERO 


0203 

0204 


08 




INX 


POINT IfEXT BYTE 


20 


EC 


ERA 01F2 


REPEAT 


0206 


20 


AE 


BRA 01B6 


ISLAND 



calibration offset. 

Prinffreq Module 
(016E-01BB) 

Printf req, util izing 
OUTEEE, displays the op- 
erating frequency data 
stored at hex locations 
0000-0005 on the top line 
of the CRT terminal. The 
five most significant digits 
are output, then a decimal 
point, the last digit, and the 
letters '%Ur\ 

Outdata Module [01 BC- 
01 D5) 

Outdata outputs the pre- 
viously formatted BCD fre- 
quency control data stored 



at hex locations OOOE-0011 
to the 8-bit parallel-output 
port driving the frequency 
synthesizer. 

Modifications 

The uptune and down- 
tune modules repeatedly 
monitor the system's con- 
trol interface for the signal 
to stop tuning. An in- 
teresting alternative would 
be to monitor the parallel 
port connected to a tone 
detector used for CW re- 
ceive programs. The pro- 
gram would stop tuning 
when a signal is found, and 
with a more powerful ex- 
ecutive, jump to a CW 



receive routine. The ad- 
dress of the port tp be 
monitored is stored at 
00D8-00D9 and 00E4-00E5. 
The value of the ''normal'' 
byte found there is stored 
at 0DD8 and 00E7 (no stop 
command or no signal). 
Any different value stops 
the uptune or downtune 
function and returns pro- 
gram control to the ex- 
ecutive, 

Construcfion 

A full-size layout of the 
printed circuit board is 
shown in Figs. 4 and 5. Even 
With the double-sided 
board, it is still necessary 



to install 9 wire jumpers 
(number 26 wire) on the top 
of the board. Fig. 6 shows 
the jumper and component 
layout. Notice that the 
resistors are mounted ver- 
tically to conserve space. 
Plated-through holes are 
not used in the design, 
although if you make your 
own boards and have the 
facilities, you could do so. 
Our boards use "Z" wires 
to connect certain pads on 
the top and bottom sides. 
Fig. 7 shows the location 
for the "Z" wires, along 
with the method of in- 
stallation. The cost savings 
of plated-through holes 

31 ^ 



C1, 


56 pF mica 


012,13,18,19,22,26,27 


150 pF mica 


C2 


5/25 trimmer 


C3, 5. 6. 8, 29, 30, 31 , 9, 32, 33. 34 


,001 ceramic, 50 V 


016,17,20,25,28 


.01 ceramic, 50 V 


04, 10. 11, 15,21,23,36 


.1 ceramic, 50 V 


C24 


.47 uF, 25 V electrolytic 


C35 


220 uF, 36 V electrolytic 


CI 4 


2.2 uF, 15 V electrolytic 


R1,2 


270 Q, V4 Watt, 10% 


R4, 38 


470 Q, y4 Walt, 10% 


R37 


6.8k, V-i Watt, 10% 


R8, 9. 19, 20, 21, 25, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32. 33, 34 


10k, % Watt, 10% 


R43 


Ik, V4 Watt, 10% 


R3, 5, 7, 22. 23, 24, 39, 42 


1 meg, V4 Watt, 10% 


R35, 36 


33k, Va Walt, 10% 


RIO 


4,7k, V4 Watt, lOVu 


R11 


33k, V4 Walt, 10% 


R12 


5.6k, y* Watt, 10% 


R13 


aSk. V4 Watt, 10% 


R14 


12K, V4 Watt, 10% 


R15 


10k, V4 Watt, 10% 


U1 


CD4060 


U2. 3, 7, 4, 6 


CD401 1 


US 


CD4051 


U8 


CD4016 


U9 


HCTRO320 


U14 


CD4528 


U15 


CD4028 


U15 


7407 


U17 


LM340T-12 


U18 


LM340T5 


R16 


33k. % Watt ± 10% 


R17 


47K, V^ Watt 


Rie 


18k, % Watt 


R40 


4.7k, y4 Watt, ± 10% 


R6 


100 Q V4 Wall, ±10% 


L1 


10 uH, 37T #26 on .5^' T-50, mix #2 




core {Palomar Engirieers) 


L2,3 


8.2 uH molded chokes 


CR1, CR2, CR10, CR10, CR11, CR12, CR13 


1N4001 


CR9 


1N751A5,1 Vzener 


CR3, CR4, CR8 


1N4148 


CR5, CR6, CR7 


MV109 varactor diode 


Q1 


2N4416 


Y1 


4096 crystal, 20 pF, HC/6 


Y2 


5920 crystal, 20 pF,HC/6 


T1 


12 V ac at 300 mA (Rad^o Shack) 


Parts AvailabUity 

The following parts are avallabla front 
MICROSIZER, PC Box 44, Cedar Rapids (A 


SPST toggle switch, line cord, 
cabinet (Radio Shack), phono jack, 
printed circuit board, RG-174 min- 
iature coax 



52404: Ooubfe-sided, dfilted G*10 PCB, tin- 
plated, S17.00; MV109 diodes, ,75 ea. 
Hughes HCTR'0320 rs available from 
Coombs Associates, 1001 E. Touhy Ave,, 
Des Raines I L 60018. for $14 JO. 



more than offset the in- 
convenience of the "Z"- 
wire installation. The rf out- 
put is routed from the pad 
00 the PCB through minia- 
ture coax to an rf connector 
(RCA phono) on the rear. 
The PCB is mounted by 
removing the sheet metal 
screws that hold the rubber 
feet on the cabinet and 
replacing them with 5/8" 
4^ screws. The PCS is 
i 



spaced off the bottom of 
the cabinet by appropriate 
spacers (or just #4 nuts on 
the top and bottom side of 
the board). The power trans- 
former is mounted on the 
rear panel, using hookup 
wire to connect it to the 
PCB. Since the transformer 
was designed for PCB 
mounting, it is necessary to 
carefully bend the termi* 
nafs so that they will not 



short to the chassis. An 
SPST toggle switch and 
Vr-Amp fuse and fuse hold- 
er complete the mounting 
effort. 

The vco inductor, LI, is 
mounted to the PCB with 
an insulated washer and a 
5/8" 4-40 screw. Due to the 
tolerances in permeability 
of the toroid core, the ac- 
tual turns required may 
vary by 1 or 2 — so use the 



number called for in the 
parts list and remove a few 
if it is found necessary in 
the tune-up section. The 
two crystals are mounted 
directly on the PCB — just 
remember to solder quick- 
ly, in order to avoid too 
much heat on the pins. 

Test and Alignment— 

Computer-ControHed 

This step is easiest if you 
have the tuning program 
keyed in and ready to pre- 
sent data to the parallel 
data port connected to the 
MICROStZER. 

Apply the 120 V ac 
power and check for +12 
and +5 at the outputs of 
the two regulators. Con- 
nect a frequency counter 
to the rf output jack and 
enter a frequency of 
XXOOOO. (Note that the first 
two digits don't really mat- 
ter to the MICRO- 
SIZE R— they are only for 
the CRT readout to in- 
dicate the tens and units 
megahertz.) The MICRO- 
SI ZER should respond with 
a frequency somewhere in 
the range of 5.517 MHz. 
The exact frequency 
depends upon the frequen- 
cy of the 5920 mixer 
crystal. However, this is 
not at all critical since the 
'*A" or *'S" calibration 
commands will correct the 
data frequency so that the 
MICROSIZER supplies the 
exact frequency to the 
transceiver to make 
XXOOOO be at the bottom 
edge of any band Monitor 
pjo 9 of U1, the reference 
oscillator, and adjust the 
trimmer for 4096.000 kHz. 
Check the voltage at the 
junction of R35 and CI 5 
(control voltage to the vco) 
for 11 to 11,5 volts. If 
necessary, adjust the num- 
ber of turns on LI or their 
spacing until this voltage is 
achieved. Next enter data 
XX5000 and check that the 
output frequency moved 
down exactly 500 kHz. The 
vco tuning voltage at this 
point should be between 5 
and 6 volts. If everything 



m 



o^ 




I 



r 



^ 



\ 




IX 



/ 



/ V- i^^^ 



4 



4 



/ 



C ^ i^*" OBAUD ''^wROCOMPUTING AT CHRISTMA 

^^ ^ «■»■ pl«"k *>* one of ttiese 
j^^^4' t^ooks our gilt to 



"^ r^nk< « 1 



IfeMlfe^HH 



ii^^ 



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has checked out so far, in- 
put various frequencies 
and check that the 100 
kHz, 10 kz, 1 kHz, and 100 
Hz data move the frequen- 
cy as it should. At this 
point vou should be abfe 
to connect the MICRO- 
SIZE R to your transceiver 
and successfully perform 
all of the software opera- 
tions available. Notice that 
the lockup time between 
100-Hz steps is very fast 
and smooth, and tuning up 
or down is just like using a 
vfo, except that it's all 
done by the computer. 
Now enter a frequency and 
watch the CRT display 
show a jump to the desired 
frequency, accurate to 
within 100 Hz, in less than 
100 milliseconds. Try that 
with a regular vfo! ! ! 

100 Hz Adjustment 

If your tests showed that 
the 100-Hz steps within a 
l-kHz range were not ac- 
curate to within a few 
Hertz of the desired 100 
Hz, some adjustment on 
the digital-to-analog con* 
verier may be necessary. 
The values for R10-R17 
shown in the parts list may 
be juggled slightly to tailor 
the individual 5920 mixer 
crystal to the tuning 
diodes. Each 100Hz step 
voltage is controlled by a 
single resistor, with the ex- 
ception of the 900-Hz step, 
which is obtained by paral- 
leling a resistor with the 
one used for the BOO-Hz 
step* Table 1 shows the 
resistors and the 100-Hz 
steps that they control. If 
necessary, alter their values 
slightly— or, better yet, use 



Rwistor 


100-HiStGp 




CoTitrolled 


None 


000 


R17 


100 Hz 


R16 


200 Hz 


R18 


300 Hz 


R14 


400 Hz 


R15 


500 Hz 


R13 


600 He 


R12 


700 Hz 


RIO 


800 Hz 


Riimio 


900 Hz 



a pot to determine the ex- 
act values, measure them, 
and replace each with a 1 % 
unit 

Test and Alignmenf — 
Manual Tuning Mode 

If you don't have access 
to a computer to input 
data, you will probably 
need to measure the BCD 
output of the four data 
registers in order to deter- 
mine their output to the 
divider chip and D/A con- 
verter. When the unit is 
first powered up, the reg- 
isters should be alt pro- 
grammed with 0000, since 
C28 and R29 apply a 1-ms 
reset pulse when 5 volts 
first appears. Check that 
the output frequency is 
near 5 517 MHz, and zero 
the 1 kHz reference as 
described in the computer- 
controlled tune-up pro- 
cedure Now, ground the 




tntenor view oi MICROSIZER 

''up" tuning line, and the 
frequency should start 
changing in lOO-Hz steps at 
a fairly slow rate. If the 
''down" line is simul- 
taneously grounded, the 
tuning rate will increase. 
Momentarily remove pow- 
er and reapply it to reset 
the cou n ters to 0000; check 





Table 1. 



M 



Ffg, 7. "Z" w/re placement afong with method of insiallation. 



34 



+ F2V 



ftecEivE 



12V D^DT KEL».r 



TRAs^Mrr 



-^^-^ 






^ 



1^ 



L 



j-^ 



V*, 



AtfCffOStZ£/t 

UP 

GRDUND 

DOWN 

KEtEfi 



f- — -^ 
* 



• I DOT 



-j— • I DA^H 



-• I GPOtMQ 



f/g, S. Method for switching the keyer paddle between 
MlCROStZER tuning and keyer operathn. 



the vco tuning voltage as 
described in the computer- 
controlled tune-up pro- 
cedure Also, check the ac- 
curacv of the 100-Hz steps 
and vary the D/A converter 
resistors [RIO R17) if 
necessary. The tuning rate 
in the slow mode is con- 
trolled by C11; that in the 
fast mode is controlled by 
R25. They may be varied to 
adjust the tuning speed to 
suit your needs. If you are 
using your keyer paddle to 



tune, the simple circuit 
shown in Fig. 8 will permit 
it to tune the MICROSIZER 
in receive and operate the 
keyer in transmit. 

Hopefully, this article 
will inspire radio amateurs 
to surrender the almighty 
lunmg knob and discover 
the fascinating world of 
computerized "hamming/' 
The possibilities are end- 
less, and the cost of a com- 
puter is now less* than that 
of a good transceiver's 




There's a new, eighth OSCAR satellite in orbit, and the AMSAT team helped put it there! 

Your help is needed for future satellites. |oln AMSAT and support the new, ad- 
vanced Phase 111 series of OSCARs, engineered to provide communications over 
transcontinental distances for hours at a time* 

Send $10 membership dues to AMSAT, P.O. Box 27, Washington. DX, 
20044. Life membership rs available for a tax-deductible donation of $ 1 00 
or more, payable in quarterly Enstatlmerits If you wish. 

Phase m satellite solar cells may be sponsored for $10 each, and 
we'll send you a certificate specifying the cells you are sponsoring. 

For a tax-deductible contribution of $i,000 or more, we 11 
even Inscribe your name on a plaque to be placed In orbit 
aboard the Phase 111 spacecraft For posterity* and well send 
you a replica honoring your contribution. 

Dues and contributions may be charged to VISA or 
Master Charge. Phone us at (202) 488-8649. 




BATTERY-WRAP 

WIRE WRAPPING TOOL 

MODEL BW-2630 



POSfTIVE INDEXING 

ANTi-OVERWRAPPING 

BITS AVAILABLE 
FOR AWG 26, 28 & 30 

BATTERY OPERATED 

UGHT WEIGHT 





BATTERIES AND 
BIT NOT INCLUDED 



USA 

FORE^N 
PArfKTS 
PtN&mB 



BW-2630 


BATTERY-WRAP TOOl 


$19.85 


BT-30 


BIT FOR AWG 30 


$ 3.95 


BT-2628 


BIT FOR AWG 26 & 28 


$ 7.95 


RB-20 


TWO NI-CAD BATTERIES 


$10.75 




p-'OB 



OK MACHINE & TOOL CORPORATION 

3455 CONNER ST., BRONX,N.Y. 1 0475 U.S.A. 

TELEX 125091 

MINIMUM ORDER $25.00, SHIPPING CHARGE t2.00, N.r. CITY AND STATE RESIDENTS ADD TAX 



y^ RE^^ef Servfce—s^e fiag&Zfl 



85 



"^ai 






»iti 



•^tlQ 



"I 



COMPUTER SPEClAJJi 

1BK Dompu color II with yciur choici of aith*r (1) 
ftlS«95 program dimlcatti or ttii Compvcolor prch 
grHmminn msnuaU [AJ»o ioclud^ift th« SAMPLEU 
dtikatto froo from tlw nwniilocturtr.}— rvtwl 
vbIlw 11719.90— «n For 11950,00) 
16K or 32K PET grBphiO« eh- bu«inoan modofi — 
purch»B« the campiitors *chI ^trt c»»a«u« driwa 
FIIE.E1 

ISK petforCBM}— i 9B5.00 
3£K PET [or CBiWn^i1ift5.06 
BK PET— 9749 
WOitUI FAMOUS KlM-1 micrttc^mpufr 
ori||iowi 9502 dowtofumant ByTtwri. 
TH* but ivav pnwihlo l» REAUV L£ARN com- 
putor*— ovor 400 p«9«« of 4o«uni«ntittiocil 
9191.00 [rsgular 9179.001 

K1M-1 ■p9ci«J p«£kag«— tncltHtea th* KfM-1 ■■ 
ibaw« plu» ponrvr oupftly (miiiiipi poww for KIM 
p\u9 S<3 boards], book — "Programming a 
MlemcomiiiJtflF; &S02" and ''Tl^* Fimt 9&ok of 
KIM" 1198.00 Cr«ffuLar 9239.00] 



1 



*•<*»< n«VP 





P.O. Bon 17ia, Auburti AL 39930 

[formarly Ploinoman Micro Svatoma) 

Ovarsttaa inquiri** invicad 

Gall Toll Fres 1 900-933 9724 *^ ^^^ 

ragular ptiona numbar [206] 749-7735 



O:-^ 



Here is an exciting new device to improve your reception on 160, 30, 

the broadcast band, and on VLF. 

It is wall known that loops pick up far less noise than most other 
antennas. And they can null out interference. Now Palomar Engineers 
brings you these features and more in a compact, carefully engineered, 
attractive desktop package. 

Unfike ordinary direction-finder ioops^ it tilts to match the incoming 
wave front. The result: Deep nulls up to 70 db. You have to listen to 
believe it! 

Does the Loran on 160 give you a headache? The loop practically 
eliminates it. Broadcast station 2nd harmonic ruining your DX? Turn 
and tilt the loop and it's gone. Does your friend in the next block with 
his kilowatt block those weak ones? Use the loop and hear him lade out. 

Loop nulls are very sharp on local and ground wave signals but usually 
are broad or nonexistent on distant skywave signals. This allows locat 
interference to be eliminated while DX stations can still be heard from 
all directions. 

The loops are Utz-wire wound on RF ferrite rods. They plug into the 
Loop Amplifier which boosts the loop signal 20 db and isolates and 
preserves the high Q of the loop. The tuning control peaks the loop and 
gives extra preselection to your receiver. 

Plug-in loops are available for these bands: 
150-550 KHz (VLF) 
540-1600 KHz (Broadcast) 
1600-5000 KHz (160 & 80 meters) 
10-40 KHz (Omega) 
40-150 KHz (WWVB, Loran) 

Send for free descriptive brochure. 

Loop Amplifier $67.50; Plug-in Loop Antennas S47.50 each [specify 
frequency band). To order add $3 packing/shipping. Qallf. residents 

add sales tax. 



Tvasiej cHai9e 



MS* 



'111 



Box 455. Escondido. CA. 92025 • Phone: [714] 747-3343 



AMCT-80 

Automatic Morse Code Teacher 
for the TRS-80 

This 1$ the only mori^'e c^dR program 
Available fhaf will aiitomatie«llY tpeed 
gp or slow down <l«p«nd»n9 on yogr 
proficiency fo receive code. Will jend 
in smgle or group ckdrac^er mode. 
Written in machine len^yage. Specify 
Level I or Level 2 and memory size. 

AMCT-80 on cassette $14.95 
Send for TRS-80 catafog. 

COST EFFECTIVE 
COMPUTER SERVICES 

728 S. lOtK St., Suite *2 
Grand Junction. CO 81501 
(303) 243-3629 ^ct2< 



N«- SflTELLJTE 

For • 




home. 



Supefshafp Reoefsfkin— Color Like H&m B«fof9 

Get over 50 channels of television 

directly from the 

satellite! HBO, 

Showtime, the 

Superstations, and 

sports from around 

the world! 

Works Anywhere! 

Buy complela or build and saw. Our bodk telfs 
mmrythmg! Send $7.9S today or call cpur 24 hr. 

COD. HQtifn«i (3Q5J 8694283 

SPACECOAST RESEARCH •^^lU 

P.O Box 442. Oept G, Altirrvonle Springs. FL 3?TO1 




aa 



1^ Reaiiet Service — ^ee page 21 1 



r 



Instant Software New Releases 



t 



The tools, the training and the gannes. Instant Software has a 
package for you. Just check out these new releases. 



TRS-80* 




DEMO II Th^ cofTipany that brings you mcire 
programs far the dollar \s prt>ud to oU&t D«md 
II, an flixirao/ciinary package rhat contains pro- 
grams 10 suit yotir every mood:. 

• Tlc-Tac-Toe— Fun lor ihe mhote iamUyl You 
a]l know the rules. an6 thts version gives you 
ttireediff'^efit levefsotdltticuity. Qneof wliicti 
IS sure to su ft everyone in the family 

• Time Tflats— You won't tiave to leave your 
hQuse to experience "pre-race" excitemeni. 
It's yOii against the dock as you maneuver 
your cAj thrpygh th^ curves. cHutes, and 
chicanes of the computerized course. 

• !!•£•— Somewhere wiihin a ponderous 
mazfin Ihe secret home square waits for you to 
uncover its presence. If you're no I abne, you/ 
computer will be ^appy to oHor a two-player 
version so that you can both race to uncover 
your respective squares first t Amazing, 

• Hingmpn— How many people have grown up playing different versions of that old 
grade school standby, hangman? If you've never played the game on a cofnputer, 
you're In for a special treat! You or the computer will supply the word. With each 
wrong guess, the poor hanijman's figure grows — and only you can spare himt 

• Wtii««l of Fortune-- "There's One born every minute/' or so goes the o Ed saw. In 
this simulation of the carnival wheel of fortune, you tiave your choice of iUe regular 
or the "crooked" version, where you can't help but win. The casino w^tt even give you 
the ^eys to tfta ptace! 

• HurrlCMM — OK. all you disaster buffs, here s a proyram that will let you ctiart the 
|iath of oncoming hurricanes anywt^ere m the world, usmg data available from the 
Mitlonai Weatfier Service. 

• Inp^^Sure, everytsody talks about computer bugs, biit ho« many people tiave 
ever seen one? tt's you againsl the computer in this name, with the com{>uter rolling 
Ihe dice, to see which or*e gels to add another part to his ZSQ Bug. The first one to 
complete his "curse of computmg " wins, 

• Hor*a ftice— It isn't every day you get to see a horse race , . . al least n^l until 
nowl Up to 100 bettors can cheer their horses to the Imish line with their choice of 
Win. place, or show. For the TR5 80 Level IM6K. Order Ho. Q04aR t7M 

DEfyiO III This is the big one; big on value, big on tun— the perfect package for the 
beginner and old hand alike. Check oui this list of programs! 

• Race 1— It's you against the clock as you careen around the track In this simula- 
tion of a high -speed car race 

«Tirget UFO— Rack up a big score by destroying ail Ihe UFO's m the shortest pos- 
sible time. 

• I^IIb— EMperlmeni with population density tactors In this slmylalton oi the life cy- 
cle Of a colony of bacteria. 

• PfmiM Nufiibef Converter— Let your comituter figure out cfever wofds for all Ihose 
hafd-to-f^ensember phone numbers. 

• Siortiythm— Fact? Or fantasy'?' Who can say for sure' in any case, you and youf 
Inends will be ab+e to plot your biorhythmic curves whenever you want! 

• Qtmphics. Program— No user commands, just ^t back and enjoy as your TRS 80 
demonstrates its aftistic atfiitttes. 

• Race 2— After you've mastered Place 1. youll be ready for tfils more atJvance^ ver- 
sion — wuh a cttolce of five different tracks! 

• Hqcb* Race^Up to nine players can place their bets and watch the p<Miies run. 
The computer will keep track of the winnings. 

• Drawing Board— YourTFtS-80 supplies the "pencil and paper,'* and you supply the 
ability Messages or drawings may be stored on cassette for later unveiling 

• 2i*Hour Clock— That's right J his program allows your computer to act as a digital 
timepiece. Perfect for sporting events. For the TRS-80 Level II 4K and Level II 16K. 
Order Hi>. C^SSR $7.95 



.GjnnEniis^. 






Video Sfi*m^ 



•wtMn itiwi^v* 



VIOFO SPEED READING TRAmER As your 
eyes move along, reading this sentence, do 
you see the wards like I h i s ? Most 
people's reading speed is limited simply 
because they read Individual letters or words. 
Now you can increase your reading speed and 
cofTi prehension, and soon be reading wtiole 
words and pt^rases, with the Video S(>eed 
Reading Trainer package from instant Soft- 
ware. 

Using the wme scientific principle as th^ 
tachistoscope, a. mechanical device used to 
flash characters or words on a screen, this 
three-i^art program will I rain your mind to 
{fuickly recognize numbers, words, lettere, 
and {}hrases. 

The program wiM take you step by step 
through a systematic training procedure. You'll start at ivhatever leveJ of competen- 
cy you feel is appropriate, and the computer will automatlcafiy advance you as your 
reading spesd and comprehension Increase. For the Level II 16K TfiS 80 Microcom 
pu Itif . Qrde r N o. Q1 OOR S 7.95 





WETMriSOFTVmK& 



!»«» 



Smin<4« r«tliAge fV 



BUSINESS PACKAGE IV Business Package IV 
gives you. the businessman, a superb tool to 
help you make those important decisions. 
This package includes: 

• Business Cycle Analysis—TTiis program 
4sn't a crystal ball, but it can show you your 
businesses expansion and contraction cycles. 
You can plot any aspect of your business on a 
graph and see, in black and while, just what's 
happening This program will give you access 
lo in form at ton you coutdnl get before. 

• Rnancial Analysis — Would you like a fman- 
cial assistant who could mstantlv give you the 
figures for almost any kind of investment? 
Financial Analysiscan handle annuities, sink- 
ing funds, and mortgages, and compute bond 
yield and value. Youll have the facts you need 
at the tips of your lingers with this program. 

Included In the package la one specially marked blank data cassette for use in 
storing essential business data. 

Business Package IV^ with Its combination of analytic functions and convenience 
features, is An invaluable asset tor any businessman. All you need Is a TRS-BO Level I 
4K or Level II 1GK. Order No. 0019R S0.9& 

PERSONAL BILL PAYING How many times have you thrashed amund with your bills, 
trying to figure out what lo pay whom, and when? Wetf^ struggle no mof e. Instant 
Software presents: Personal Bill Paying. 

This advanced system goes far beyond simple checkbook programs. With Per- 
sonal But Paying, you can keep a computerized list of all your bills, with up to 22 ac^ 
counts, each listed with its name, number, due date and amount owed. 

Individuat accounts can be displayed with a fDonth^y-month breakdown of 
payments (including cf>eck numbers). Current accounts can tse separated from inac- 
tive ones and listed alon^ with alt ott>er perlinenf information. 

The package even inclLides options that let you save your data on tape for future 
use and easily delete or alter accounts. 

With Personal Bill Paying, you'll be able to maintain records noi only on what you 
paid for an entire year, but also on what you owe. so that you can keep closer track of 
your hard-earned money. 

For the Level II 1&K TRS 80 Microcomputer, Order No. 0103H S7.95 

AlftMAJL PILOT The Airmail Pilot package takes you back to the early days of avia- 
tion^ Your plane is the Curtis JN4-D, affectionately known as the Jenny, and your 
mission is to fly the mail from Coiumbus to Chicago. 

The Jenny carries only 26 gallons of fuel. You'll have lo sfop along Ihe way. Bad 
weather may force you down. Electrical storms may torn your aircraft into a mass of 
flaming wreckage, or tee may form on your wings and plunge you to certain death 
below. But the mail must get through. 

The onboard ciock will show your elapsed lime. Your mission is to complete the 
flight as quickly as possible. 

With the Airmail Pilot package, you can experience the thrills of flying when air- 
craft were mere fragile machines of wood and fabric. iScarf and leather helmet op^ 
llonal.) This program requires a IfiK TRS^BO Level II Order No. 0106R S7.95 



PET** 



INSlMfTSOFTWAJ^ 



^-Tvi 




1 



Deccir«fOr*t A*ibt«nt 




DECORATOR S ASSISTANT Quick, how much 
wallpaper, paint, paneling, and carpeting will 
you need to redo a room measuring 11' k 12' 
with two windows and one door? If you cringe 
at llie thought of doing alF those calculationa 
to find the square feet ot the materials needed 
and their total cost, then the Decorator's 
Assistant package is just what you've been 
waiting for. 

Whether you're s decorator, home 
re modeler, buitding supplies dealer, or juai a 
cost-conscious fiomeowner with one room lo 
do. yoult save lime and money. 

This integrated set of five programs will 
compuie t^te amouni of materials needed artd 
their cost. Just enter the room dimensions, 
the numtjer of windows and doors, and tfie 
base cost of materials, and in a flash you'H get figures showing how many roils of 
paper, gallons of pamt, sheets of paneling, or square feel of cafpeiing are needed to 
decorate ariy room. You'll also see Ihe total cost, and you can easily compare prices 
of different finishing materials. 

So Ihe next time you or a customer wants to know what it will cost to remodel a 
room or an entrre house, just reach for the Decorator's Assistant package Pof the &K 
PET, Order No, 01 (MP %TM 

*A trademark of Tandy Corporation 

**A trademark of Commodore Business Machines Inc. 



Get a Software Discount! 



TRS-80* 



Level I 

Knlght'a OyesURoliot Cha»«/Harso I^ac4 
t6K; Order No. 00030. 

Cav« BtploringnfBChl/Momorv 16K; Order No 001 OR. 

SUIus ol H<3mea/A.u|o Exp«ni«» 4K; Order No. 0012R. 



BUSINESS PACKAGE I 
When the TRS^ 
first appeared on 
the market, t>ush 
newsmen ewery* 
where became e^- 
citad at the pros- 
pect of bnn^inQ ihe 
corTi|>u1er's oonve- 
meTiCe and verbal lii 
1y to their busi- 
hesses at unpreoe- 
dented prices 
Thanks to In^tdnl 
Software. that 
dream is now a real- 
ity, Actually sax sep- 
arate programs^ 
Business Package I 
contains all the software youit need to malnLaln the 
books tor your cornpany— and on the least e^pens- 
kve TRS-BC produced. The computer will list youf 
fixed as&ets and larm daprectstion; allow for the 
r real Ion ol tape tiles for last access 1o your general 
lodger and other InlormaLlon: compute year -lo-d ate 
ledger from monttily ledfier data: compuie trial bal- 
ance arvd prof Hand loss statements: and combine 
■U data to produce a year-end batance. Package f ur- 
nlalied complete wrilh blank data cassette and de- 
tailed mstructtons for use 
Order No. OOfSR $^.95 



^VlMk 1 &MT mimWfl DP KSI| 


w • ■ ■ 


Busing 
Package 1 


[ 1 








Demo I 4K: Order No. 0020R 

Destroy All Subamomiwiffiiinboatt ^K: Order Ho. OQZ^R. 

f enonal Finance I 4K, Ordef No 0027 R. 

Doodles and Displays I ISK Order No. 0030R. 

Space Trek lit 4K: Order No. 0031 R. 

Fun Package II 6K; Order No, Q037R. 

Hex Pawn/Shultle CrafI Docklng/Spece Chase/ Sea Battle 
16K: Order No 0041 R. 



BUSINESS PACKAGE III 
Sales are the llteblood of vlrtuaily any business. 
With BuMness Package III. youli be able to malnialri 
inventories and work out discounts and commJsslon 
percentages On your computer, flving your cus- 
! ornery the fast answers they need and leavmg you 
more time In the field, 

ijivantttry 

Why spfirvg foi a la/Qtf compiiter whan you c«ri 
maintain afullTunnir^inventofYof upio 1153 items, 
shiowing stodt numbef, guarTtity, and price, on your 
THS-60? The program ailowa you to searcli fof ir»dl- 
viduai ttems or to rgi^iew your entire invenlory one 
l>lock at a time. The program is so simple to run that 
yOiif employee^ will be at>i« lo use il *llh only min* 
tmal training. 

Olscounl and Commfsaion Percentage 

This automated business function program ^s |ust 
the too[ you nead to handle so many of your daily 
catcutations. Any retail or whoiesaEe company can 
benefit from last, easy access to the fgllovving lnTor« 
mat ion; 

Selling Price 
Percent Markup 
Total Selling Price 
Discount Percentage 
Actual price 
Percent Chartge 
Percent Pfolil 

f0T \he 4K Levet I 

OrtterNoQOGW S79S 



Level I and II 

Basic and IntermecllAte Lufver LarKtef 

4K; U* 16K Ull; Order No. OOOlR- 

fipect Trwk II 4K L J. IBK L II: Order Ho. 0002f^ 

Beginner's Backgammon and Keno 4K l^t, 16K L H; 

Order No. 0004R. 

Ooll/Crossout 4K L.L 16H Lll; Order No, 0009R, 

Air Flight SImulallon 4K LI, leK Lll; Order No. 0017R. 

Oil Tycoon 4K L.L and Lll, Order Ho. 0023R. 



4// Packages $7.95 except where otherwise 'mdicated. 



HAM PACKAGE I 
Ham PacliaQe I— We had lo callit something, but 
this package is nol ority for hams it's gr^i for any 
experimenter or technician in n^ed of a dynamic ref* 
ersnceol popular electronics formulas: 

Ohm'ft taw 

Easily performs caiculations invotvlng voltage, 
current, resistancSi and pow^. 

Series and Parallel Csiculations 

Pinij the ¥4iuft Ol capacitors or resist OfS Jn 
parailel or seiles c^n::ults. 



Drapfitng and Votta§e Dividing 
This will give you the value of a dropplfig mistor 
and the ef fecti^ resistance ol lf« load. 

R/C Timi Conitant« 

Tttis section will calculate the reststance. capittcl' 
tafice, or the time delay of an R/C crrcurl, 

DJpoJe Antennae and Yagi Antertrtad 

These two programs will compute the dimensions 
Of an antenna to your exact frequency and give you 
an on-scfeen display— complete with all measure- 
ments! 

This program requires a 4K Level I or a 16K Level li. 

Order No. 0007B $fM 



BEGINNEFi'S iACKGAMMOHmENO Why Sil alone 
whan you can play these fascinating games with your 

TRS^BO? 

• Backgammon— Play againsi the computer. Your 
TRS-BO Will g^ve you a steady, ctiallenging game that's 
sure to aharpen your skills, 

• Kefio — Enjoy this popular L,as VegaiS gemNlfig game^ 
Gue&s the right numbers and win big 

You'll need a TRS-BO Levet I w II OTrtec N0.0004R S7.95. 



ELECTRONICS I 
if you're aiilt designing circuits I he old-fashioned 
way, let the Electronics I package introduce the 
latest way to go: 

Tuned ClrcuMs A Gall Winding 

Design tuned circuits for audio and radio frequen- 
cies. This two-part program will find the missing two 
values from any two of the following: frequency, ca* 
pacitance. Inductance, or reactance. The coll wind* 
ing section will calculate the numtier ol turri>a and 
wire gauge required for a close-wound air- or stug- 
tuned Coil from tha inductance, dja meter, length, 
and permeabiiity pt the coil. 

SS5 rimsf Ctrcullfi 

rirr>ers, Doih niQnostabie (one-shot } ar^d astaUe 
tosciilatoO. can t>e easity designed wrth this lwos>aif 
program. The program will a^sodraw a complete sche- 
matic on the screen o< your TRS-80, 

LM 3fl1 Pre^Amp Pestgn 

You too can quickty design an IC preamp With 
this program ait you rieed to ^ is enter I he para- 
meters, of the performance you want^ and the pro* 
gram does the rest — right down to drawinQ a de- 
tailed schematic of your circuit on the screen t 

You will need a 4K Level I or a 1iK Level H, 

Order No 0008R $7.95 



Bowling 4K L.L IBK Lll; Order No, 0033R. 

Santa Para via and Flumacclo 
4K Li, 16K L.H; Order No. 0043R. 

Level II 

Model Rocket Anilyzef a ltd PreFfight Check 
1SK; Order Ho. 0024R. 

Ramrqm PalroUTie FIghter/KUngon Capture 
16K; Order HO. 0G28R 



TRS-flO trriLlTY 1 €4ref wonder how some program 
mars give their programs that proFe^sional look'' ins- 
tant Software has the answer with ItieTRS-aoUliiity 
1 package Inclu-ded are: 

e RENUM^Now you can easily renumber any 
Level t1 program to make room for modification or to 
clear? up the listing. 

• DU PU K -- Th i 5 p rog ra m wi 1 1 le t you d up i Icate any 
3 ASIC, assembler, or machine-language program, 
verily the data, and record the program on tape. You 
can even do Level I programs on a Level II machine. 
For the Tf^S fiO Level II 16K. Order No. ooatR S7 95. 



INS1ANT SOFTWARE 



I9.gs 



TRS^SO 

LEVEL Jl 



Teacher 

tTfrieber 



« ^, 




OOSSl'^ VWI^III &:'lHli Inr J^J^ r.^-. ^w hU pi^jM. i Jl*. J— ly i ■ u tnr ftji^im i/i»r,.jmjr,.i\ 



TEACHER 

For decades, leading educators and compuiet scien- 
tislsatike have tieen touting the future role of computers 
i n educal i on , N o w y ou a n d you r t ami i y can reap tf^e bene- 
fits Of computer assisted instruction in the comfon of 
your own home. This practical program allows you to in- 
put any numt>ef of questions and answers from theflekls 
of science, languages, history —you narr\e it. Using this 
data^ the computer will prepare lisvsral types of tests. 
Quiz students— providing up lo three tilnts per ques- 
tion—even offer graphic rewards lor younger chiidrefi, 
all at the user's discretion. 

Teacher Date Triniltf 

Thi« time-saving program allows the Instrtjctor to 
record several teats sequentially on a single cassette, 
thereby permitting ihe administration of whole lessons 
without the inconvenience of changing cassettes. 

Teacher Is effective, practical, easy to use— perfect 
for leachersi parents, businessmen or anyone faced with 
learning a lot of material in the shortest possible time. 
Furnished with blank data cassette, 
Orct0r No 00B5R S9.95 

Space Trek IV ieK; Order No. D034R 

Ooodfes and Displays it 16K: Order Ho, 0042R. 

H04jsehold Accciuniani 1@K; Order Ho, 00e9R 

Financial A*»l»lint 16K; Order Ho, 00?2R. 

Bowling League Statistics Syslem 
16K, Order No 0056R. S24.96 

Cards 16K; Order No. 0063R. 



TRS^ UTILITY 2 Let Instant Sofiware charvge the 
drudgery ol editing your programs Into a quicfi, easy 
job. Included in this package are: 

• CFETCH— Search through any Level II program 
tape and get the file names for all the programs. You 
can also merge BASIC programs, with consecutive 
Nne numbers. Into one program, 

• CW RITE— Combine subrqglines that work In dlf- 
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Comput&r Packages Jnllinbled 
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__J 



CW Fans: Give Superior Selectivity to 

your Atlas Rig 

— this mod uses an inexpensive MFJ filter 



Hmry B. Ruk WB9WWM 
Box B47 

Bloommgion IN 47402 



AS have many other 
hams who enjov the 
use of the great Atlas solid- 
state, no-tune-up rigs, I 
quickly discovered that 



while it was great for SSB, 
it lacked a little in CW 
reception ability. This sim- 
ple modification will bring 
it around and make CW as 
enjoyable as sideband. 

The Atlas rigs have a fine 
SSB i-f filter, but if you try 
to copy CW with this unit, 
you find that there is no 
original factory CW filter, 
nor any adjustments to nar- 



row the hi bandwidth. The 
problem of separating 
close CW signals by tone 
atone is difficult and frus- 
trating, especially if you 
are a Tech trying to up* 
grade. (1 finally got my Ad- 
vanced using this rig on the 
Novice bands!) 

MF) makes a dandy CW 
audio filter with a select- 
able bandpass which is 




Audio circuh connections, showing new wires and placement of the filter output 
capacitor (smalt etectrolyuc) in the center of the picture. 



centered at 750 Hz and 
which is also the CW offset 
of the Atlas, making it an 
ideal choice. While you 
could outboard the unit 
and keep buying 9-voft bat- 
teries for the filter, I found 
it could be placed easily in- 
side the Atlas, deriving 
power and operational 
benefits from its location. 
While an audio filter is not 
as good as an i-f filter for 
CW, the performance of 
the hybrid unit when com- 
pleted was more than ade- 
quate, and only the worst 
of QRM and zero-beating 
of signals could not be 
overcome, A more demand- 
ing CW operator would pre- 
fer the narrower if filter, 
but this works fine for most 
of us, and, since it can fit in- 
side the rig, allows unim- 
peded mobile or portable 
operation. 

The MF| filter, model 
CWF-2, like most MFj prod- 
ucts, comes in a small box 
and is powered by an in- 
ternal 9-volt battery. Be- 
cause of the small size and 
super compactness of the 
Atlas, there isn't much 
room inside for add-on 
goodies, but the MFJ fits. 

The first step is to 
familiarize yourself with 
the operation of the MFJ 
filter. It employs a series of 



90 




Mounted bandwidth selector switch. 



active audio filters using IC 
chips and matched compo- 
nents for a 75OH2 center 
frequency and a variable 
bandwidth of 180, 110, or 
80 Hz, This allows easy 
copy without resorting to 
very low audio notes — 
nice in a non-CW rig— so 
you don't walk down the 



band, retuning to hear the 
other guy The selectivity is 
chosen from a multi* 
position slide switch. The 
MFJ unit is designed for 
use either between audio 
stages or between the rig 
output and a headphone 
jack, supplied on the front 
of the MFJ box. 



Modificatian Steps 

1. To complete the con- 
version as pictured in the 
photos, follow these easy 
steps. No mechanical work 
is necessary unless you 
have the noise blanker op- 
tion in your unit, in which 
case a single 3/8" hole is re- 
quired. 




The fitter board is nestled between the speaker and the back wall of the chassis. 



2. First, remove the 
screws holding the MFJ 
unit together There are 
four, two on each side of 
the box. 

3. Once the unit is open, 
you will see that the actual 
filter is contained on one 
PC board, held to the rear 
and bottom of the box with 
a rubberlike cement Us- 
ing an X-acto® or similar 
knife, carefully remove the 
PC board from the box. A 
wedging action between 
box and board is sufficient, 

4. Remove the switches 
and headphone jack from 
the box by removing the 
four screws and a large nut 
holding the %'* jack. The 
box should be set aside 
and all loose hardware 
stored in the bottom shell 
of the MFJ box. 

5. Label or identify on 
the PC board each wire on 
the MFJ unit, There are two 
wires for power, + and — , 
audio in, and three audio 
out wires. The electrolytic 
capacitor attached to the 
multi-position switch is 
removed and saved for 
later use. After removal of 
the wires, the switches and 
connector can be remount- 
ed in the MFJ box. The box 
can be reassembled and 
set aside for other projects. 

6. Remove both the top 
and bottom covers from 
the Atlas, 

7. Remove the hole plug 
on the front panel below 
the NB (noise blanker) 
notation or, alternatively, 
drill a small t3/8'1 hole 
wherever you would like 
the bandwidth selector 
switch to go- A good spot is 
near the af/rf gain controls, 
positioned to allow as 
much room as possible for 
fingers to turn the knobs, 

8. The switch selected 
for the rig shown in the 
photos was a Dale SP10T, 
A very small Alco or similar 
rotary with 4 positions is 
adequate. The Dale was in 
the ever-growing junk box. 
The type of switch used is 
the same as found on many 
HTs for frequency selec- 



91 



tion and is availabie from 
most parts houses, FM spe- 
cialty houses, and ham 
stores. Spectronics (1009 
Garfield, Oak Park IL 
60304) has some for use on 
Motorola HTs for adding 
more frequencies. The cost 
is about $4. 

9. Because the switch is 
reafly nestled in the rig, it is 
necessary to prewire the 
terminals. Five lengths of 
stranded no. 26 in your 
favorite colors, each about 
14" long, will do nicely. 
Prepare the switch for in- 
sertion, 

10. The PC board in the 
Atlas on the far right (fac- 
ing front) is removed for in- 
sertion of the switch. This 
is the rf module, PC-1 00; or, 
if you have the noise blank- 
er, find your hole and insert 
the switch as best you can. 

11. The wires from the 
switch are routed to the 
front corner and down 
through the open space by 
the wafer selector switch 



to the underside of the 
Atlas. There is a channel in 
the rf cover over the vfo 
near the front lip which can 
serve as a cable raceway, 
or the wires can be run 
around the outside of the 
Atlas chassis over the 
audio board, 

12. If you take the time 
and are neat, you can run 
the switch wires directly to 
the MFJ PC board Or, use 
the wires attached to the 
MFJ unit and splice in 
midstream. Being naturally 
sloppy (according to the 
XYL), 1 chose to splice in 
midstream. The MFJ board 
slips between the speaker 
magnet and the rear con- 
nectors of the Atlas. 

13, There is a red/white 
wire coming from the 
center terminal on the af 
level control which goes to 
the edge connector of the 
audio board in the Atlas, 
Remove the end attached 
to the edge connector. This 
is the input to the MFJ 



filter. This wire attaches to 
the #1 terminal (filler- 
bypass) position on the 
rotary switch. The audio irh 
put wire coming from the 
MF] filter board is at- 
tached to the af fevel 
center terminal, 

14* The output terminal 
on your selector switch is 
run to the vicinity of the 
edge connector andiscon^ 
nected to terminal 12 of 
the edge connector, using 
the electrolytic capacitor 
supplied with the filter 
(series connection). 

15. The + power lead of 
the filter is connected to 
pin 21 of the edge connec- 
tor. 

16, The ground lead is at- 
tached to pin 18 of the 
edge connector. 

17. The filter-select wires 
of the MFJ unit are con* 
nected to the terminals of 
the rotary switch in the 
order desired: 80, 110, 180, 
or 180. 110, 80 Hz. 

18. The Atlas covers are 



replaced. 

19. Turn oft and enjoy! 

Performance of the unit 
on the crowded 80- and 
40-meter Novice bands was 
excellent. Needless to say, 
tuning the Atlas with the 
filter in the 80-Hz position 
makes for fast tuning. It 
was found that the 180- Hz 
mode was adequate for 
most work and tuning, and 
the IIO-Hz mode was best 
for QRM-laden stations. 
The 8(>Hz mode was some- 
thing else, allowing you to 
hear the other stations 
chirp and drift with keying. 
You really can tell about 
vfo stability with the 80-Hz 
mode! 

All in all, the unit per- 
forms very satisfactorily 
and makes a good SSB rig 
an even better all-rounder 
for those of us who only 
dabble in CW. The MFJ 
unit is currently priced at 
S29 95 and is available 
from a number of sources, 
including MFJ directB 



for the famous HAM-KEY* and KEYERI 




Model HK-3M 




Model HK-1 



■ Dual-Jever squeejo 
paddle 

CC'1 shiefded cable 

plug lot HK-1 S4.49 



$2995 




it 



Model HK-2 

• S»me fl^ HK-1 less base 
ior IrwofpDralksn in own 
keyet 




$•1095 




With afrfj'ljp bracket even a hesvy- 
ffdn ded key pounder cdnnof Uf}, AH the 
featured ol the HK-J. 

• Oehjxe slfaigtit key 

• Heavy base — no need 10 attach !o desk 

• Navy t^pG knob 

CC'3 sNefded cate w/}^u% foe HK 3M S3. 95 



Model 
HK-5A 

Electronic 
Keyer 



■ Mfiw Csiblnei Colored -Keyed ta 
inaich rriosi modorn fidto equl|:mner»i 

■ aambic CHuW for saquaeze keying 
* S^-compiehng dots and ila&neji 
« Curtly 8044 I C C^tf%Qi^ 

Keyci Chip ^Q" 



Model AT* 

Ant i -Tip 
Bracket 

Converts any HK-S 

to HK-3M 

$299 



• CQjnblnatson ot HK-1 and 
HK-3 



CC-1/3 shieidod caWe 
w/pkig& (or NK'4 $7.95 



Order today direct or from your favorite dealer ■ Add $2.00 shipping & handling per unit (USA) Same day shipment 




92 



v^ Reader Service— see page 211 



I. 



ION 



TO: All Amateurs 

FROM: Wiison Systems, fnc. 

inflation , , , gas shortages . , . etc., all feading to higher prices each week, and cutting 
into the amount that we have to spend on our hobby. And face it, our hobby is what keeps 
us sane in this runaway inflation period, our escape from the hustle and hectio grind of 
working to make 3 living. We know — we see the same price Increases at the grocery store, 
the same increases in the gas prices, Wilson Systems, Inc*, is going to do something to help 
ease the purchase of your new tower and antenna. 

As you may know, in January of 1979, Regency Electronics, Inc, purchased Wilson 
Electronics Corp. What you may not know is that in August, 1979, Jim Wilson purchased 
back the antennas and towers. There Is now a new name to look for — WILSON SYSTEMS, 
INC. — With the new name and new company comes new ideas, methods, products and 
prices. Yes. prices. But not what you might expect, Wilson Systems is LOWERtMG the prices 
to where you will find it hard to believe . Check them out in the following pages of this issue. 
You will be surpris&d and pleased at what you will find. 

What are we doing that will enable us to lower the prices? Well, we are Hams, too. We 
like to pay the lowest price possible and wilt spend much time assuring ourselves this is 
accomplished. We feel the same higher demands on our money for the house, food, and bills. 
And as this demand increases, the amount of money left for our hobby decreases. So when 
money is spent, we want the best quality for the best price. 

There are a number of ways to bring the cost of a product down. By using a cheaper 
grade of materiaf, buying raw materials in larger quantities to obtain a better discount, by 
cutting the profit ratio, and by eliminating the middle man. Wilson Systems will not lower 
the quality of the product. In fact, we have improved the strength and quafity of almost 
every antenna in the line. The newfy designed monobanders will stay up under heavy icing 
conditions when others are falling apart. Wilson Systems *s currently purchasing at the 
lowest price possible from the aluminum companies, so these methods of cost reduction are 
eliminated. The third method mentioned is one that we have decided to consider as a part of 
the overall cost reduction plan, yet leaving room for research and development expense, so 
we may bring you the products you want and at a price you will like. 

The last method mentioned is always a risky one. The dealers do not want their profits 
cut back just as you do not want your pay check cut. If you cut the dealers' profits back, 
some of them will just push the product that will tend to give them the most profit, rather 
than the one that will be the best performing for you. A rather drastic form of this method 
is the one that Wilson Systems will be choosing. You will not be able to find the Amateur 
products of Wilson Systems in stock at the dealers, nor will they probably recommend them, 
(After all, as long as they're not handling them and making a profit, why should they pro* 
mote or even recommend them?) No, you will only be able to enjoy the most product for 
the least money by dealing with Wilson Systems factory direct. We will be offering you the 
amateur antennas and towers at prices that are below, in most cases, what the dealers pay for 
the products of other companies. And to make it even easier, we have a toll-free number for 
you to place your order. Now isn't this what you've been looking for? The best product for 
the least money I 

Just remember these four points: 

1 . Highest Quality 2. Lowest Price 3. Toll*Free Order Number 

The fourth point? Remember the name , . , WILSON SYSTEMS, INC. 

Yours Truly, 
Jim Wilson 

Wilson Systems, Inc. 



''->^M!?.MM9j^ 






WILSON SYSTEMS INC. MULTI-BAND ANTENNAS 

System 



-^ -» 



\^^ 



»^ 



A trap loaded antenna that performs like a 

monobander! That's the characteristic of this 
six element three band beam. Through the use 
of wide spacing and interfacing of elements, 
the following is possible: three active elements 
on 20, three active elements on 15, and four 
active elements on 10 meters. No need to run 
separate coax feed lines for each band, as the 

^SPECIFICATIONS 



bandswltching is automatically made via the 
High-Q Wilson traps. Designed to handle the 
maximum legal power, the traps are capped at 
each end to provide a weather-proof seal 
against rain and dust. The special High-Q traps 
are the strongest available in the industry 
today. 



Band MHz . , 14-21-28 

Maximuin pow«r input* Ltmal Itmit 

Gain (dBd) . , Up io 9 d8 

VSWR ^refrdn^jice , . . 1.3:1 
Impedance 50O 



Boom (O.D. N Lengths . . 2" x 24'2yi" 

No. of dements. .6 

Longest element _ . , . . 2S'2!^'* 
Turning fadius ....... t8'G" 

Majfimum mart diameter. 2" 



F/B ratjo 



2D dB or better Surface ar«a 



.8.6sq.ft, 



Wind loading @ 60 mph . , 215 lbs. 
Maitimym wind survrwal . . 100 mph 

feed method Coaxial Balun 

(supplied) 
Assembled weight {approit.53 lbs. 
Shipping weight (approx,L62 lbs. 



(Fornnerly System Thrwl 



'1, 



^ 



0^ 



Capable of handling the Legal Limit, the 
"SYSTEM 33" is the finest compact tri- 
bander available to the amateur. 

Designed and produced by one of the 
world's largest antenna manufacturers^ the 
traditional quality of workmanship and 
materials excells with the "SYSTEM 33". 

New boom'to-element mount consists of 

two 1/8" thick formed aluminum plates that 

will provide more clamping and holdir>g 

strength to prevent element misalignmenL 

— SPEClFiCAT 



-I 



Superior clamping power is obtained with 
the use of a rugged %" thick aluminum plate 
for boom to mast mounting. 

The use of large diameter High-Q Traps in 
the "SYSTEM 33" makes it a high performing 
tri-bander and at a very economical price. 

A complete step-by-step illustrated instruc- 
tion manual guides you to easy assembly and 
the lightweight antenna makes installation of 

the "SYSTEM 33" quick and simple. 

IONS 



Band MHz 14 2128 

liaxKniim pow«r input. Legal Itmit 

Gatn Idbd) Up to 8 d8 

VSVVR atrefOfMnce . . 1.3:1 
Impedancflf , . - . - _ . 50 ohnis 



Boom (O.D. X lengthL . . 2" x 14'4" 
No. element! ...,.., 3 
Longest ekmefit ,,.... 27 '4" 
Turning radiuf . . . 15'9'* 

Maximum mail diameiBT. 2'' O.D. 



Wind load ins at 80 mph .... 114 rbs. 
Assembled weight (approx J . 37 lbs. 
Shipping weight (approx.). . . 42 Ibs^ 
Direct 52 ohm fe«d--no balun required 
maximum wind> ujrvjval ... 100 mph 



F/B ratio 



20 d 8 or btitet Suffac« area 



S 7 sq, tt. 



mAMKMmM systems, inc. 



4286 S. Polaris Avenue 
Las Vegs, Nevada g9l03 
(702J 739-7401 
Factary Direct Toll frm 1 -dOO-634-6898 




4 BAND 
TRAP VERTICAL 
(10 -40 METERS) 

No band switching 

necessary with this 
vertical. An excellent 
low cost ox antenna 
with an electrical quarter 
wavelength on each band 
and low angle radiation. 
Advanced design 
provides low SWR and 
exceptionally flat 
response across the full 
width of each band. 

Featured is the Wilson 
large diameter High-Q 
traps which will maintain 
resonant points with 
varying temperatures and 
humidity. 

Easily assembled, the 
WV-1 A is supplied with 
a hot dipped galvanized 
base mount bracket 
to attach to vent pipe or 
to a mast driven in the 
ground. 

Note: 

Radiafs are required for 
peak operBtion. 
{See GR-1 belowh 

SPiCIFICATIONS: 

• Self supporting— no guys 
reQuired. 

• Input Impedance: 50 Q 

• Powerhsndling capability : 
Legal Limit 

• Two Htgh-Q Traps with 
large diamater coils 

• Low Angle Radiation 

• Omnidirectional 
performance 

• Taper Swaged Aluminum 
Tubing 

•Automatic Bandswitchtng 

• Mast Bracket furnished 

« SWR : 1 .1 : 1 or les$ on all 
Bands 



The GR'1 is the complete 
ground radial kit for the WV- 
1 A. It consists of: 1 50' of 7/14 
stranded copper wire and 
heavy duty egg insulators, in- 
structions. The GR^l will in* 
crease the efficiency of the 
GR'l by providing the correct 
counterpoise. 



iP^iCto and ^m^ficitvam wti^l Id etMrMp m thtiu I rielca. 



New^ Improved Wilson Towers 




NEW IMPROVED 
FEATURE 

Heavier wall tubing 

greatly increases the 

stress capabilities 

over the older 
TT45andMT-6t. 




M:^:W TT-45A 



Mounting the House Bracket 




FEATURES: 

• Maximum Nejght 46* fwiff handle 
10 sq.ft. at 38') @ 50mph 

»800 ib. winch 

•Totally freestanding with proper base 

* Total Weight, 189 lbs. 

The TT^BA is a freestanding tower, ideal for in- 
stallations where guys cannot be used. If the tower 
is not being supported against the housa, the pro- 
per base fixture accessory must be selected. 



MT^IA 



FEATURES: 

• Is freestanding with use of proper base 

• MaKimum Height is 61 ' (will handle 
10 sq. ft. at 53') iJ 50 mph 

« 1200 Ib. brake winch 

• 4200 Ib. raising cable 

• Total Weight, 350 lbs. 
Recommended base accessory: RB-61A, 
Fe-61A. 

The MT-61A is our largest and tallest freestanding 
tower. By using the RB-61A rotating base fixture 
the MT-61A is Ideally suited for the SY33 or SV- 
36, If you plan to moynt the tower to your house, 
caution should be taken to make certain the eave 
Is properly reinforced to handfe the tower. If not, 
one of the base accessory fixtures should be used. 



The Hinged Base Plate allows 

tower to be tilted over for 

access to antenna and rotor 

from the ground. 



GEWERAL FEATURES 

All towers use high strength heavy galvanized steel tubing that conforms to ASTM specifications 
for years of nriaintenance-free service. The large diameters provide unexcelled strength. All welding 
is performed with state-of-the-art equipment. Top sections are 2" O.D. for proper antenna/rotor 
mounting. A 10' push-up mast is included in the top section of each tower. Hinge-over base plates 
are standard with each tower. The high loads of today's antennas make Wilson crank-upsa logical 
choice. 



TILT-OVER BASES FOR TOWERS 



FIXED BASE 

The FB Series was designed to pro- 
vide an economical method of 
moving rhe tower away from the 
house. It will soppofi the tower m 
a completely free-standJrt§ vertical 
position, while afso having the capa- 
biltiies of tilling the tower ovef to 
provide an easy access to the an- 
tenna. The rotor mounts at the top 
of the tower in the conventional 
manner, and will not rotate the 
complete tower. 



FB-45A. S 79.95 
FB-61A... 109.95 




ESBB^"-^^'^ 



ROTATING BASE 

The RB Series was designed for the 
Annateur who wants the added con- 
venience of being able to work on 
the rotor from the ground position. 
This series of bases will give ihat 
ease plus rotate the complete tower 
and antenna system by the use of a 
heavy duty thrust bearmg at the 
base of the cower mounting posi- 
tion, while stiir being able to till 
the tower over when desiring to 
make changes on the antenna 
system. 



RB-45A 
BB-61A 



S119.95 
179.95 



\^ 



,1 




SYSTEMS, INC. 



4286 S. Polaris Avenye 
Las Vegas, Nevada 89103 
f702} 739-7401 
Factory Direct Toll Free 1-800 834-6898 




Tilting the tower over 

is a one-man task with 

the Wilson bases. 

(Shown above is 
the RB-61A.) 



Fric*i ancf ^Jcc4ftc■tlif^^a fubuct to criv^fi wtrtDul naKCl , 



WILSON MONO-BAND BEAMS 

At tast, the antennas that you have been waiting for are here! The top 
quality, optimum spaced^ and newest designed monobanders. The Wilson 
Systems' new Monoband beams are the latest in modern design and incor- 
porate the latest m design pf fnciples utilizing some of the strongest mater- 
ials available. Through the select use of the current production of alumi- 
num and the new boom to element plates, the Wilson Systems' antennas 
will stay up when others are fafling down due to heavy ice loading or 
strong winds. Note the following features: 

1. Taper Swaged Elemen ted The taper swaged elements provide strength where ^ 

it counts and lowers the wind loading more efficiently than the conventional 

method of telescoping efements of different sizes, M-520A 

2. Mounting Plates - Element to Boom— The new formed aluminum plates provide the strongest method of mounting the tie 

ments to the boom that is available in the entire market today. No longer will the elements tilt out of line if a bird should land 
on one end of the element. 

3. Mounting Pfates — Boom to Mast— Rugged t/4" thick aluminum plates are used in combination with sturdy U bolts and 
saddles for superior clamping power. 

4. Hofes^ There are no holes drilled in the elements of the WKsoo HF Monobanders, The careful attention given to the design ha; 

made it possible to eiiminate this requirement, as the use of holes adds an unnecessary weak point to thf 
antenna boom. 





Wilson's Beta match offers 
maximum power transfer. 



the Wilson Beta-match method, it is a "set it and forget it'' process. You can now assemble the an 
tenna on the ground, and using the guidelines from the detailed instruction manual, adjust the tuning ot 
the Beta-match so that it will remain set when raised to the top of the tower. The Wilson Beta-mate^ 
offers the ability to adjust the terminating impedance that is far superior to the other matching method; 
including the Gamma match and other Beta matches. As this method of matching requires a balanced line 
it will be necessary to use a 1 :1 balun, or RF choke, for the most efficient use of the hf Monobanders. 

The Wilson Monobanders are the perfect answer to the Ham who wants to stack antennas for maximunr 
utilization of space and gain. They offer the most economical method to have more antenna for less mo 
ney with better gain and maximum strength. Order yours today and see why the serious DXers are run 
ning up that impressive score in contests and number of countries worked. 

SPECIFICATIONS 



Model 



MS 20 A 



M420A 



M515A 



M4 1 5 A 



M510A 






20 



20 



15 



IB 



10 



Gain 
dBd 



115 



F/B 
Ratio 



10,0 



12.0 



10,0 



12 



75 d8 



25 dB 



25 dB 



26 d8 



2&dB 






. InaniKi 

i 1 vtnn 

litnrti 



500 KHz 



wswH m 

RtfKin^incB 



500 KHz 



400 KHk 



400 KHz 



1 5 MHz 



1.1:1 



1.1:1 



1.1:1 



1.1:1 



1.1:1 



ImpodBnet 



son 



50 li 



50 12 



50 Si 



50 f2 



Matching 



Beta 



B^ta 



Beta 



Beta 



Beta 



£LBirt*nli 



Longest 

Element 



36'6*' 



36'6" 



25"3" 



24-27^" 



^B'B" 



Booin 

O.D. 



I'p 



2" 



rtf * 



i** 



2" 



Boom 
L.enftt^ 



34'3V/^ 



26 "O" 



ff\** 



26 '0 



17'0" 



26*0" 



Turning 
Radius 



25'1" 



22"6" 



17'6" 



14'ir' 



160" 



Siirt*ce VUintllocfi 

!Sq Ft,* ILbll 



8.9 



7,6 



4.2 



2.1 



2.8 



227 



189 



t07 



54 



72 



MaKimom 
Mast 



2 



»* 



ift 



2" 



2" 



2" 



/)iiurt>bltd 



68 



50 



41 



25 



36 



M410A 



^0 



10.0 



25 dB 



1 .5 MH2 



1.1:1 



50 n 



Bets 



4 



18'3" 



2- 



12*11" 



ir3" 



1.4 



36 



if* 



20 



I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 



WILSON SYSTEMS, INC, - 4286 S. Polaris 
Las Vegas, WV 89103 - (702) 739 7401 

WJLSDN SYSTEMS ANTENNAS 



i 



QlV 






\ 



FACTORY DIRECT 
ORDER BLANK 



Toll- Free Order Numba 

1-800-634-6896 



*^W33 



WILSON SYSTEMS TOWERS 



Mockl 



SY33 



SY36 



WV-IA 



GR 1 



M520A 



M-420A 



Dtmription 



3 11*. Tnbander lor 10, IS, 20 Mirs. 



6 £le Tri balder for 10^ 15, 20 tAtn 



Trap Vertical for 10, 15, 20. 40 Mtrs. 



Ground RadtaU fpr WV- 1 A 



5 Elements ort 20 Min 



4 Eit>'n*fit5 on 20 Mirs. 



M-515A 5 Elements on IS Mtrs. 



M-415A 



M510A 



M410A 



wmmA 



HD'73 



RC-BC 



RG-eu 



4 Glemffrtis on 15 Mtrs. 



5 Ebemefits on 10 Mtrs. 



Shippirtg 



UPS 



UPS 



UPS 



UPS 



TRUCK 



UPS 



UPS 



UPS 



UPS 



4 E(en>ents an 10 Mtri. 



Mobile Antenna 5/8 X on 2, '4 Aon 6 



ACCESSOR 1 15 



Ailpartce Heavry Duty Rotor 



8 C Rotof Cable 



UPS 



UPS 



UPS 



UPS 



RG-GU Foam-Uttra Flexible Coastial 

Cable 38 strand center conductor, 1 1 guage I UPS 



Price 



SI 39.95 



130 95 



44 .95 



9.96 



199.95 



1 39.95 



119S5 



79 95 



84.95 



64.95 



19 95 



109 96 



1 2/li 



.21 /N- 



I 
I 
i 
I 



Note On Coajnial and Rotor Cable, fninjmum order is 100 ft and in SO'^ irvultiples 

Prices and specifications syb|ect to change without notice 

Nifiefv 0<iv Linntted Warrant v- Alt Products FOB Las Vegas. Nevada. 



/^ JL 1/^ *-frO 



QtV' 


Mod«l 


Dftieription 


Shipping 


Price 




TT45A 


Freehand rng 45' Jybular Tower 


TRUCK 


$ 219 9f 




RB4SA 


Rotating Base for TT-45A iw/lill over feature 


TRUCK 


119 9 




FB-4SA 


Fixed Base for TT'45A w/iilt over feature 


TRUCK 


79 9 




MT-61A 


Freestanding 01' Tubular Towsr 


TRUCK 


3999 




RS-eiA 


Roiaiing Base for MT-61A w/tilt OfVCf ftature 


TRUCK 


1 79 9 




FB^IA 


Ftxed Base tor MT-61A wv/tilt over feature 


TRUCK 


109 9 




STB-50 


Tnrusi Bearing 1 yp5 


189 



Nevada Resideats Add Safes Tax 

ShipC,0,D, D Check encrosed D Charge to VJss D M/C D 
Card # Expires =^ 



Bank *^ 



Signature 



f^ease Prim 

Name 

Street ^____ 

City 



Phone 



State 



Zip 



New CMNI/SERIES B 

Filters The Crowd 



The new OMNl/SERJES B makes today's bands 
seem less crowded. By offering a new l-f selection 
that provides up to 16 poles of filtertng for superior 
selectiuity. And a fiew Notch Fiher to remove 
QRM. No other amateur transceiver we know of 
out -performs ft, 

NEW IF RESPONSE SELECTTON. OMNI comes 
cqurpped with an excellent 8- pole 2 A kHz crystal 
ladder i-f filler which is highly satisfactory in nonnal 
conc^tions. But when the going gets rough, the new 
OMNI/SERIES B, with optional filteis in^Jled, pro- 
vides tvwo additional special purpose it response. 

The 1,8 kl-fe ciysml ladder filter transforms an 
unreadable SSB ^nai in heavy QRM into one that 
gets the message through The 0.5 kHz 8-pole filter 
provides extremely steep and deep sktris to the CW 
passband window which effectively blocks out even 
the very strong adjacent signals. 

Both of these filters can be front- panel switched In 
series with the standard filter fo provide up to 16 poles 
of filtering for near- ultimate selectivity, tn addition, the 
standard CW active audio fitters have three 
bandwidths (450, 300, and 150 Hz) to give even 
further artenitation to adjacent signals In effect 
OMMl/SERlES B has six sdectJvity curves— three for 
SSS and three for CW, That's true state-of-the-art 
selectivity. 

NEW NOTCH FILTER. A variable frequency notch 
filter in OMNI/SERIES B is placed inside ^e AGC 
loop to eliminate interfering carriers and CW signals 
without affecting received signals. Attenuation is more 
than 8 "S" units (over 50 db} for any frequency 
between 0,2 kHz and 3.5 kHz. 

OMNI/SERIES B RETAINS ALL THE 
FEATURES THAT MADE IT FAMOUS, 

All solid-state; 160*10 meters plus convertible 10 
MHz and AUX band positions; Broadband design for 
band changing without tuneup^ without danger; 




^yurr of 

liHl 1 



OMNI/SERIES S IF RESPONSES 

WFTH STANDARD AND 

OPTIONAL FILTERS. 




NOTCH FILTER PERFORMANCE 
ADJUSTED TO 1 kHz POINT 



irar7 



TEN -TEC, INC 

sevieRvrtiE, tennes&u sim? 

EXPOt^T:57t5 UNCOLN AVE., CHECAQD, ILL C0€46 



Choice of readouts —OMNI- A for analog dial or 
OWfl-D for digital dial: Built-in VOX and PTT 
facilities; Selectable Break-In* instant or delayed 
receiver muting, Dual-Range Receiver Otbet Tun* 
lug. ±5 kHz or ±0.5 kHz: Wide Overload 
Capabiljties* dynamic range typicaDy exceeds 90 dB 
and a PIN diode switched 18 dB attenuator Is also 
included: Phone Patch Interface Jacks; Adjustable 
ALC: Adjustable Sidetone; Exceptional Sensitiuity; 
200 Watts input to final with tiM warranty on find 
transistors for firstyear. pro-rata for 5 years: 100% 
Duty Cycle for RTTY SSTV or sustained hard usage; 
12 VDC Cifcuitiv (or mobile use, external supplies 
for 117/220 VAC operation: Front Panel Micro- 
phone and Key Jacks; Built-in 25 kFIz Calibrator in 
analog dial model: Zero* Be at Switch: "S*7SWR 
Meter: Dual Speakers; Plug-In Circuit Boards- 
Functional Styling, black textured vinyl over 
aluminum "darrisheQ*' case, complemenlary nonre- 
flective warm dark metal front panel; Complete 
Shielding: Easier*to-use size: 5i4Ti x WV^'w x 
14''d; Full Options: Model 645 Keyer $85; Modd 
243 Remote VFO $139: Model 252MO malching AC 
power supply $139: Mode! 24a Noise Blanker $49; 
Model 217 500 Hz S-pole Crystal Ladder CW Filter 
$55; Model 218 LS kHz 8-pole Crystal Udder SSB 
Filter $55: 

OMNI owners note: Your OMNI can be converted to 
a SERIES B modd at the factory for just $50 (plus $5 
for packing and shipping). The notch filter replaces 
your present squelch control and provision is made 
for the two additional optional filters; a partial panel 
with new nomenclature is provided. Contact us for 
details. 

Model 545 Series B OMNIA $949 
Model 546 Series B OMNl-D $1119 

Experience the uncrowded world of OMNI/ 
SERIES B. See your TEN-TEC dealer or write for full 
details. 



RESOMAIC 



OtK 






VO)( ftli'CIT 



u n D 
t u c 



MC 






Kb«W 



PMOHES 



MIC 


, 




o 


11 Its 

' QANE> 


^^^^H^BB 





©MNI-0 



TiBir 



NOTCH 



SfLECliVfrr 



*rt ON Off 



flow* ft on 01^ 



ItfODE 




A Sensible CMOS TT Decoder 

— presented by popular demand 



C. Warren Andreason N6W A 

PO Box 8306 

Van Nuys CA 91409 

Several years ago, 73 
Magazine published 
one of my articles titled 



^^Autocall 76'' (June, 1976). 
At that time, I offered 
printed circuit boards and 
the response was over' 
whelming. To make a long 
story shorter, over the time 
span, the circuit was re- 
designed using CMOS, and 
commercial printed circuit 



boards were developed. 

While that circuit was in- 
tended for paging use, 
there were many letters 
asking how the circuit 
could be modified to work 
as a control circuit in a 
repeater with an on/off 
function. I designed a new 




Photo of completed decoder. 



circuit with a plug-in 
printed circuit board that 
meets this requirement 

This unit that is being 
presented is a totally self- 
contained single-function 
control board that requires 
only a 1 2- to 1 5-volt power 
source at about 100 mA 
and virtually any level of 
audio. The input is high im- 
pedance so it will not load 
or affect the audio line to 
which it is attached, and it 
adjusts its own input gain 
so that whatever audio in- 
put level is present is opti- 
mized for maximum per- 
formance. The output of 
this unit is in the form of a 
reed relay which can han- 
dle loads of up to 10 Watts. 
The relay contacts are 
isolated from all circuitry 
and may be used in any 
manner required. The cir- 
cuit contains everything 
necessary for tuning and 
programming, without the 
need for test equipment. 
Once set up, the unit will 
respond to a four-digit 
touchtoneTM code, latch- 
ing the output relay, and 
releasing the relay upon 
reception of the proper 
and different four-digit off 



98 



c&^TA$fr oorm/T AmpLfFi^^ 



SEQUENCE lOSW 



OFF * WXYW 



GIO 



AUDIO 

l»*PUt 
,<V-IOVP-P 




CDLUHN I 



fig. T, Schematic of remote-contro! decoder. All reshtors 14 W, 5% unless otherwise stated. On all ICs, connect pin 14 
to + 12 volts and pin 7 to ground unless otherwise stated. Circuits TOO, 200, 300, and 400 are identical except that part 
101 becomes 201, etc. 



code. This unit cannot be 
triggered by voices, yet will 
work even under the most 
trying conditions- 
Circuit Description 

See Fig. 1, The input 
stage of this function 
decoder is a self-adjusting 
automatic-leveling ampli- 
fier. It will take its input 
from any point which has 
audio available. The input 
impedance is on the order 
of look Ohms, so it will not 
load the audio line to 
which it is attached, 

U1 forms a fixed-gain 
amplifier and the rectifier 
stage sampling the output 
produces a dc voltage 
level which is directty 
related to the output am- 
plitude of the amplifier 
stage. This dc voltage is fed 
back to Q1. which turns on 
as the dc voltage goes in 



the positive direction. As 
the dc tries to go higher, 
the FET conducts more, 
shunting the input signal 
away from the amplifier in- 
put and not allowing the 
amplifier to produce any 
greater output 

In this way, the input 
stage regulates its gain to 
allow only small changes 
in the output, while the in- 
put may vary over a wide 
range. 

The constant-level audio 
is fed to the inputs of cir- 
cuits 100, 200, 300. and 
400, which are tone de- 
coders. Two of these cir- 
cuits are tuned to column 
tones, and two to the rows. 
The desired decode tones 
are decided on and a 
touch tone dial (Fig. 2) is 
used to determine which 
columns and rows are 
needed. The leftmost col- 



umn used wilt be referred to 
as column 1; column 2 Is 
the rightmost^ In a like 
manner, row 1 is the upper- 
most used row, and row 2 is 
the lowermost used row. 
Circuit 100 is tuned to the 
column 2 tone, circuit 200 
to column 1 tone, circuit 
300 to row 1 tone, and cir- 
cuit 400 to row 2 tone. 

These four decoded 
tones are fed into U2, (Fig. 
1), which detects tone pairs 
and gives the digit-decode 
outputs. Output "A'' would 
be row 1 and column 1; 
output "B" would be row 1 
and column 2; output "C" 
would be row 2 and col- 
umn 1, and output "D" 
would be row 2, column 2. 

The decoded digits are 
fed to the W, X, Y, and Z in- 
puts in the order in which 
the numbers are desired. 
An example would be the 



69? 



O — © — 



?T0 



O— 0— 



e&£ 



$41 



O — © — 
— — 



1209 



»3M 



(4TT 



Fig. Z Touchtone keypad 
showing row and column 
tones. 

control number 1-3-7-9, 1 
(column 1/row 1) output 
"A" goes to "W" 3 (cot- 
umn 2/row 1) output ' B'' 
would go to "X", 7 (column 
1/row 2] output "C would 
go to "Y". 9 (column 2/row 
2) output "D" would to to 

Anytime a digit is de- 
coded, the output on pin 



99 



mm 



13 of U 3 goes high, turning 
on Q3 and discharging C8, 
The low at C8 is inverted by 
the other half of U3, and is 
fed through R11 to the en- 
able inputs of the se- 
quence logic. As long as 
the enabling output from 
U3 is low, the sequence is 
held in a reset state, but the 
decoding of a digit and the 
subsequent discharge of 
C8 will enable the sequenc- 
ing logic for a period deter- 
mined by the charge time 
of C8, 

If another proper digit is 
not received by the time C8 
is charged by RIO (about 3 
seconds), the logic is reset 
As the proper sequence of 
digits is received, the flip- 
flops formed by U4 and U5 
are set, in turn, until U5, 
pin 11, goes high with the 
proper decode of the 
fourth digit of the "on" 
code. When pin 11 is high, 
it drives the base of Q2, 
causing the transistor to 
conduct and relay RL1 to 
pull in. The relay wilt stay 
closed until the flip-flop 
driving Q2 is reset by the 
"off" code. The "off" code 
is the same as the "on" 
code except that the first 
digit of the code is also 
used as the fourth digit. If 
the code 1-3-7-9 were used 
as the "on" code, the "off" 
code would be 1-3-7-1. 

LED1 in the collector of 
Q2 is a status light which 
allows the person looking 
at the board to know if the 
relay is energized. If the 
LED is lit, the relay is 
energized. 

The network made up of 
C7, CR3, R9, CR4, CR6, R11, 
and R15 is used to provide 
power reset protection. In 
the event of a power fail- 
ure, the unit will always 
come up in a mode where 
the relay is off (open con- 
tacts) when power is re- 
stored. 

As mentioned earlier, 
this circuit is extremely ef* 
fectfve and is in use in 
many repeaters, working as 
described. Some of the 
earlier units (based on the 
Autocall circuit with 



modifications for this task) 
have been on hilltops in 
repeaters and have been 
operating for several years 
without problems, so the 
circuit has been well 
proven. 

In building this unit, it 
would be wise to select 
good temperature-stable 
components for operation 
in the area of the tone 
decoders. Resistors R102 
and R103, and capacitor 
C103 must not change 
much if the tuning of the 
tone decoders is to remain 
stable. Show some care in 
handling and soldering of 
the CMOS logic, as I can at- 
test to what a soldering 
iron with a leaky tip can 
do. If in doubt about your 
iron, ground the tip with a 
ctip-lead near the handle. 
CMOS is great stuff but it 
cannot handle high volt- 
age, even at extremely low 
current levels. 

A final note of interest is 
that on the printed circuit 
card, the decoded digits, A, 
B, C, and D are brought out 
to a patch point and the se- 
quencing logic inputs W, X, 



Y, and Z are also brought to 
the same point where con- 
venient strapping is avail- 
able for programming, 

Professional PC boards 
and all components are 
available from CW Elec- 
tronics (the author) as 
shown in the parts list 

Tuning -With Test 

Equipment 

Provide an audio source 
and observe audio at pin 3 
of any tone decoder on an 
oscilloscope. Adjust R7 un- 
til the audio peaks are 
about 200 mV. After de- 
ciding which tones to de- 
code, connect a frequency 
counter which has a high- 
impedance input to pin 5 
of each tone decoder (567), 
and, in turn, adjust each 
associated pot until the 
proper decode frequency is 
read as the vco idle fre- 
quency. This is done with 
no audio being fed into the 
unit. 

Tunings Without Test 
Equipment 

Connect the audio input 



to a source of touchtones. 
Set R7 midrange and Intro- 
duce the row 1 tone into the 
unit. This can be done by 
pushing two buttons of the 
touchtone pad simul- 
taneously. Adjust pot R103 
until the LED lights. Lower 
the adjustment of R7 until 
the LED goes out. Raise the 
adjustment of the R103 
about 2 turns past the point 
where the LED lights again. 
Now, in a similar manner, 
provide the desired row or 
column tone, and adjust 
the other three tone de- 
coders. R7 is set only once 
and just the tone decoders 
need adjusting. Make sure 
each tone pot is set in the 
center of the range, half- 
way between the drop-out 
points. 

lumpers 

When all four decoders 
are set decoded tone pairs 
will appear at outputs A, B, 
C, and D. Provide jumpers 
from A, B, C, and D to W, X, 
Y, and Z to obtain the de- 
sired order of decode, i.e,, 
first digit to W, next to Y, 
and so on. 







Paris Lfst 


Item 


# Beq. 


Discrlptlofi 


Designation 


741 


1 


Op amp 


U1 


4071 


2 


Quad OR 


U2, U6 


4012 


1 


Dual NAND 


U3 


4011 


2 


Quad NAND 


U4, U5 


567 


4 


Tone decoder 


U101,U102, U103, U104 


MPF111 


1 


Ffcl 


Q1 


MPSA13 


2 


NPN transistor 


02, 03 


LED 


. 5 


Lfghl-emitting diode 


LED 101, 201, 301, 401, LED 1 


tN914 


6 


Signal diode 


CR1, CR2, CR3. CR4. CR5. CR6 


IN 4733 


1 


Zener diode 


Z1 


270 Ohm 


3 


V2-W, 5% resistor 


R15, R16, R17 


470 Ohm 


1 


V4.W, 5% resistor 


R4 


IK 


5 


V*-W, 5% resistor 


R101.R201. R301,R401,R13 


5.1k 


4 


V4-W. 5% resistor 


R102, R2(J2, R302, R402 


10k 


2 


y4<w, 5% resistor 


ni,R2 


100k 


7 


V4*W, SYo resistor 


R3, R6, R5, R12, R11, R14, R15 


560k 


2 


V4-W, 5% resistor 


R8, RIO 


1 Meg 


1 


V4-W, 5% resistor 


R9 


10k 


5 


Trlmpot 


R7, R103, R203, R303, R403 


•luF 


4 


Myiar™ capacitor 


C103, C203, C303, C403 


1 uF 


5 


Electroiytlc capacitor 


01,02,03, C4,C6 


3uF 


4 


Electrolytic capacitor 


C101. 0201.0301,0401 


10 uF 


7 


Electrolytic capacitor 


05, 07, 01. €102. C202. 0302. 0402 


10 uF 


1 


Tantatum capacitor 


08 


100 uF 


1 


Electrolytic capacitor 


07 


Relay 


1 


RA31441121. Eiec-trol 


RL1 


PCB 


1 


Printed circuit board 


Available from OW Electronics, PO 
Box 8306, Van Nuys CA 91409. Full kit 
is S42.00. Optional sockets for ICS 
3.00, Optional edge connector 2.00- 



100 



1 1 
1 


^^P^^H ^B^^^ ^H^l 



•J 


i 



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HAM-KEY 



* 

Model 
HK-3M 



bV/IA antHip bracket even a heavy- 

handed key pounder cannot Up. All the 

features ot th% HK-3. 

• DeluK© straighi key • Heavy base 

* Navy type knob 





19 



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ALPHA 

ATLAS 

COLLINS 

DENTRON 

DRAKE 

HY GAIN 

ICOM 

INFO-TECH 

KENWOOD 

MOSLEY 

STANDARD 

SWAN 

TEMPO 

TEN-TEC 

WILSON 

YAESU 

AND MANY 

"others. 





I 




« 'Z'l 1 



pYa 



k 



8340-42 Olive Blvd • PO Box 28?71 • St Louis MO 63132 



DTMFR for your Repeater 

— state-of-the-art TT decoding 



O. C. Stafford K4 A LS 
3702 Holls Cfiapet Road 
Gntnsboro NC 27401 




VSS^ VOO VOO 



ie^3Hl DISABLE {H\%\ 



?« 



RANOE 
COUNTER 



i. 



CCJReELATlOM 
FUNtTtON 



JEST ^ ,,t 



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TEST i 

OUTPUT iXOV*-T^ 



TqWCa^SE 



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SHAPING 



RANGE 
COUNTER 



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C:ORHEl,AT<(J*li 

FUNCTION- 



t5 



Trftlttte 
AMD }! 

DEC00(W5 



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eUNARt OUTPUT 
SetECT [BJN} 

■OUT Pat HOLD (HLDI 
Ay DID 0£TfCT tAUD} 
SiLlJilCE RtSET<5ltl 
SfNDBE f£T) 



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LOW SHOUP 
OUTPUTS 



Fig. 1. CRC 5030 block diagram. 




Fig. 2. Dual-loop tone decoder. 



Decoding touchtoneTM 
signals in a noisy en- 
vironment can create real 
problems. Having the 
autopatch come up in the 
middle of a rag chew or 
turning on the air condi- 
tioner in the middle of 
winter can be embarrass- 
ing. 

The development of the 
NE 567 by Signetics. the XR 
2567 by EXAR, and the 
Mostek MK 5102 simplified 
the hardware required to 
construct tone decoders. 
Now you can replace the 
NE 567 and XR 2567 com- 
bos with a single chip — the 
CRC 8030 made by Rock- 
well-Collins. The chip costs 
more than the MK 5102, 
but then it does more and 
has more output functions. 

When coupled with a 
suitable front end section, 
you can make a dual-tone 

multi-frequency receiver 
(DTMFR) that has fast lock- 
up time, practically no 
false outputs, and a few 
other features that will be 
discussed later. Pin con- 
nections for the CRC 8030 
are shown in Fig, 1, 

Fig. 3 shows the block 
diagram of the unit I built 
three filters for use with 
the CRC 8030, but the one 
shown here seems to be the 
easiest to adjust and main- 
tain. This circuit also pro- 
duced some circuit tips 
that can be added to the 
decoder circuit described 



102 



by Buffing ton {73 Maga- 
zine, April, 1977), to 
decrease the lock-in time, 
A singfe-stage age 
amplifier drives XR 2567 



dual-tone decoders. The 
decoders form bandpass 
tracking filters for the two 
tone groups. A simplified 
diagram of the filter circuit 






)(R2567 




74 00 

SELECT 
GilTE 


FH 


CRC8Q50 




HPGN 

GfiOUP 
FJLTER 




^ 




V 




















1 


FL 
















1^ 


XR25G7 

LOW 
GROUP 

F3LTER 




7450 
SELECT 












k 



















Fig. 3. Block diagram of the DTMFR. 



Fo = n/ F-( + F2 







Freq. (Hz) 






Cap. (uF) 


732 


095 


1270 


1553 


CI 


at 


0.1 


.047 


.047 


C2 


.22 


.22 


.10 


.10 


CZ' 


2.2 


2.2 


2.2 


2.2 


C2' 


1.0 


1.0 


1.0 


1.0 


C3' 


10.0 


10.0 


10.0 


10,0 



7^2 



asa 




LOW SROUP CEWTER FHEQUEt^CY 



1270 



15 53 



J 203 




HIGH GROUP CENTER fREQUEMCY 



Fig. 4. Free-running frequency settings. 













1209 




1336 


i 




1477 






1633 










D1 


D2 


D4 


D8 


D1 


D2 


04 


D8 


D1 


D2 


D4 


D8 


D1 


D2 


D4 


08 


697 


1 














1 








1 


1 








1 





1 


1 


770 








1 





1 





1 








1 


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1 


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852 


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1 


1 








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1 


1 








1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


941 


1 


1 





1 





1 





1 








1 


1 















Fig. 5. Touchtone matrix: binary outputs. 







LOW &ROUP 



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f/g. 6. Schemat/c of DTMFR. Values for C2, C3, C2', and C3' are found in Fig 4. 



103 



is shown in Fig- 2. Each 
decoder has two control 
joops. When no signal is 
being received, the de- 
coders are free-running at 
the center frequencies 
shown in Fig, 4. The smaller 
value for the loop filter 
capacitor allows the unit 
to lock faster- When a tone 
appears within the pass- 



band and the first lock oc- 
curs, pin 3 or 6 goes low 
and the second loop takes 
over, reducing the band- 
width and over shoot. It's 
like driving at 90 miles per 
hour and stopping imme- 
diately, if not sooner. In 
other words, the bounce is 
gonel After this occurs, the 
output of the locked de- 



coder is then gated to the 
CRC 8030. 

The CRC 8030 examines 
the input signal and, if it 
likes what it sees, generates 
a strobe pulse to indicate 
valid data, and all within 
40 ms! Whenever a signal is 
present, AUD (pin 13) goes 
low to indicate a tone is 
present. The SIL (pin 3) 




stops sending out 10 milli- 
second pulses. Output can 
be 2-out-of-8 or binary if 
the BIN (pin 23) is held low. 
Binary output format is 
shown in Fig. 5. The output 
can be stored in the output 
register if HLD (pin 16) is 
held tow. 

1 decided to use the INH 
[pin 4) to inhibit decoding 
of any tones unless a tone 
from each group is present 
Neat, huh? 

Adjustments 

Adjust the four decoders 
to the free-running fre- 
quencies shown on the 
chart of Fig. 4 by first 
grounding pin 3 or 6 of the 
respective decoder. Next, 
apply a single tone of ap- 
proximately 1 volt to the 
age amplifier and adjust 
the low-tone group control 
for 1 volt at the input to the 
decoder for that tone 
group. Repeat this pro- 
cedure with the high-tone 
group. 



J03O iTfP 
TUPEB ?0 
Ol?S QQZ 



/QCNOTE$ PIM#t 




LEADS 
100 t TO % 



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PIN #14 



3tlOUAM- 



— BOONOM — 



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NO 


FUNCTtOtf 


HO 


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l£D9Mf 

HLO 

SC 

VKI 

St 

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FM 

Ol/69Tllff 

l4?tHt 

MIS 



Fig. 7. PC board. 



Fig. 8. DTMF detector (CRC 
8030). 



104 



The age amplifier should 
handle signals from 50 
millivolts to 5 volts while 
holding the output con- 
stant. 

The dual-lQck circuit for 
the XR 2567 can be incor- 
porated in existing systems 
without too much trouble 
and cost. With this circuit, 
it is possibie to use a stan- 
dard card dialer which 
would make autopatching 
a lot easier and safer while 
mobile in motion. 

Further improvements 
can be made to the front 
end by using separate age 
amplifiers with suitable 
filters for each group. I 
would appreciate any and 

Parts Usi 

FCs^ Transistors, and Diodes 

1 741 op amp 
1 MC 7805 
1 CRC 8030 
4 2N4126 

3 7400 

1 1N4001 

2 1N69T 

1 MPF 111 

2 XR 2567 

Resistors 

112Jk, V* -Watt, 5% 
2 10k, y4'Watt, 5% 
1 1 meg. % -Watt, 5% 

1 510 6hm. y4-Watt, 5% 

2 100k, V4-Watt. 5% 

4 8.2k, V4-Watt, 5% 
4 5.1k, V-i-Watt, 5% 
8 Ik, %'Watt, 5% 

4 10k, y* -Watt, 5% 

2 10k sfngle-turn pots 

Capacitors 

3 .1-uF disc ceramic 

4 1-uFtan.,35 V 
410-uFtan.. 35 V 
2.047-uFtan.,35V 
1 100-uF efec, 35 V 
4 22 uF tan., 35 V 
2 .47-uF tan., 35 V 
4,1-uFtan.,35V 

Other 

90 Mo^ex pins 

1 22-pin, .156" -spacing card 

edge connector 

1 3,57-MHz xlal 

Circuit boards and parts can be 
obtamed from: 

0,C, Stafford Electronic S. and 0. 
427 S. Benbow Road 
Greensboro NC 27401 



all comments on this cir- 
cuit ■ 

References 

1. XR 2567 Data Sheet, EXAR In- 
tegrated Systems. 

2. CRC 8030 Data Sheet and Ap- 
piicatfon Note, Rockwell- 
Collins. 

3. "Toward a More Perfect 
Touchtone Decoder," J. H. 



Everhart. 73 Magazine^ Novem- 
ber. 1976. 

4, Autocall TS;- C. W, An- 
dreasen, 73 Magazine, June, 
1976. 

5, "More Repeater Control De- 
vices/' BIfl Hosking, 73 Maga- 
zine, December, 1977. 

6, 'Tow Cost Tone Deocder/' 
Chris Winters, 73 Magazine, 
November, 1977. 



3. "Digital Aytopatch," Buff- 
ington, 73 Magazine^ April, 
1977. 

9. "Complete Repeater Con- 
trol,*' Buff ington. 73 Magazine, 
June, 1977. 

10. "Fake 'Em Out/* Bufflngton. 
73 Magazine, May 1978. 

11. ''Single IC ToucfiTone 
Decoder," Larry Nickel, Ham 
Radio, June, 1978, 



^ 3 (v ^- en !^ 10 

I^Hiiii 




fig. 9. Component layout 



105 



SCR 1000 VHF—SCRWOOUHF 



c%at 



450 MHz 



30W Output, 
low Noise/Wide Oy 
namic Range Front End 
\Qi Excellent Sensi- 
ttvity & IM Rejection. 
Ser^sitivily: 0.35uV Typ, 
a Pole IF Crystal Filter. 
Full Metering, Lighted 
Status lndfcators/Con< 
tfol Pushbuttons. Btry. 
Pwr. Input, AC Pwr. 
Supply. CW iOer, etc., 
etc.* 



Made in USA 



ew Repeat 
^eptU^ Your 



I 



er 




t^TVa^ Sftec S^emtm! 



Whether you want to instalf a new repeater 
system or upgrade your old one, don'l you want 
the /mest Vepealer avallat)!*^ at a reasonable 
price? And don't you want to Duy i? from a fepu ta- 
ttle ;f If m ? with years of experi^ric*j in Repealer 
^%^^rn?>^ A l^■^mt'>any thM^wffl^l^n^'tJehind the 
^'*-^'*■^bu■.^ ii yuv; '■■" ----:^'^^^^^ \- problem? 
mm^ around .iijr^5 p^rtormahce. 

bllHv ol accassories and op' 

^.-..K pfic»BBy^ea^ Into the com- 

putMion. j 

If you do, you'll find that there isn't a repeater on 
the market that really compares to the SCR1000 
or 4000! There are low-pow^ef barebones' units, 
and there are super ^expensive repeaters (which 
don't even offer many of our features^! All things 
considered, we feel that the SCRlOOO & 4000 are 
simpty the fmest repeaters avar/ad/e-pro* 
duced by a very reliat^le company which spe- 
cializes Sfmcificalfy in this fieid. So^ make your 
next repeater a Spec Comm. Years from now, 
you'H still be g[ad you didf 



(on 




Shown in Optional Cabinet 



Available with FuH Autopatch/Reverse Patch/Land-Line Control; Touch Tone Control of various repealer functions; 
"PL": "Emergency Pwr, I.D.'^; various tone & timer units, etc. PLUS--the finest Duplexers, Cabinets. Antennas, 
Cables, etc. Our Repeaters are sold factory direct only, or through Forefgn Sates Reps. Get your order in A.S.A P ' 



1 80 Day Warranty 




SPECTRUM 



Can or write today and get the detaits! Export Orders — Contact our internationaf Dept. 

■^^^^^^^^-^^^^^—1055 W. Germantown Pk., Dept. SIO— ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ 



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>*^yH?^ Sfiec^ixmm '^'PtJC^^cA^lottal (^ommumcoUf^^u -^i^e" 



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I a 35 uV Rcvr, 

Sore PoJe Crystal FHr, 

Beauliful AtKfiO— HX & TX 

Very R&asor>able Pncel 



#Very 3ltf active wcxxigrain hou&iRQ. 



SC250 25 Wt, 
Mobile unit 




• '*Bupm ^i/ggecf " tiotising 




SC300 25 Wt, Base stafron 

t Built-in AC Power Supply, 

I Ffcmt Panef Status Ifvdicalor Ligtija, 

'Opt^onaJ Revf. Scanning Fynction AvaiiatstOL 



SPEC COMM REPEATER BOARDS, SUD-ASSEMDLIES & ACCESSORIES 



SCR100 
BOARD 




These are Profeisional 

All 



'Tommerciai Grade" Units — Designed for Extreme Environments (-30 to +60** C/ 

eqyipmant assembied St tested. For 2M St 220 MHz. ^q^ |-|q BOARD 



SCR100 Receiver Board 

• Wide dynamic range? R^educes oven cad. de- 
sense", and 1M. 

• Sens. D.a uV/20 dB Qt. typ 

• Sel. -edB « ± as KH£. HOdB fi ±30KHz. (S 
Poia Crystal Ftlr) 

• S Meter' Output 

Exc, audio quality] Fast squelch t $139.95 
w/xtai. 

SCR100 Receiver Assembly 

• SCR1D0 fnounled m shielded iiotjstng 

• San^ as used on SCRIDOO 

• Completely asmbld. w/FT. cap^ S023d conn., 
AF GAJN POT. etc. C2tl&i» 





SCAP Autoptteh Board 

• Provides all ba&Ec autopaich functions 

• 3 Digit Access: 1 Aux. on/off function; Audio 
AGC; Buiif'^n Timers; etc. 

• See Our Dec. 73 Ad or wflte/call tor 
details $235.€0 

RPCM Board 

« Used w/SCAP t>oard to pf ovide Reverse Patch" 
and land-tine control ot rpfr 

• Inciudet land line "ansitverino" cfrcullry. 17995 

WP641 Oyplexef 

• Superior Band Pass/Band Reiect design 

• Provider ^reai rejection ot "out-cl band" 
signais 

• Extfemeiy easy to adjust 

• - 93 dB typ isolation SSSO DO (fully Chd out 
w/SCRiOOO> 




FL'6 



I f If 




FL-6 Rcvr. Front-End Preselector 

• @ HI Q Resonaiprs with FET pfeamp. 

• Provide tr^merrdoiis re^tion at ''out-of-band" sig rials 
w/out ttie usual 1^$^! Can often be u^n! instep of large* 
eKpenaive cavity tl Iters. 

m Exlremely i>elpf ul at sites with mafiY nearby VHF transmit- 

• Gain: apx. 10 dB. 

• Sele^llvily: -20 dB ^ ±2.0 MHz; -60 dB © ±6 MHz 
(lyp.), SSSOO. 

TRA^1 Tinner Reset AnnunGiator Board 

• Puts out a lone ''beep" on rpir xmtr, apx. 1 sec^ atter rtvd. 
^i^nal drops— thus aikr^ing lirrte for breaMefs, 

• Resets rptr, time-out timer when tone is emitted. 

• Ad|u9table lime delay and tone duration, 

• For use with CTC10O and IDIOO/ZSO. 

• $20.95 (Add $29.95 for Inst, ^i ck. out In SCR1000). 

TMR-1 Timer Board 

• Can be set up tOf t of 2 configuraiiof^. 

• *1} Time Out Warnfog Tone. 

• tZ) ^Kerchunkef Killer^- inntaJ 
Rptf , Xmtr. Iiey^up delay. 

• For tise wiSCRlODO, orCTClOO/iD250. S20.95. 

CTC-100 COR/Tlmer/Gontrol Board 

#Cornplele COR circuitry. 

• Carrier Hang' & TO. Timers. 

• Re mole xmtr. Inhibit/Reset contfoJ. 

• Provision tor panel conlrol switches & famps. 

• 1DD% Solid State CMOS logic. 

• Many ottier features S36JQCI 

ID250 CW ID & Audio Mixer Board 

• Adjustable ID tone^ speed, jevel. Uming cycle. 

• 4 Input AF Mix#r & Local MIc amp. 

• COR Input & xmtr hold cffcuiIs 

• CMOS logic; PROM mefnory— 250 blts^chan. 

• Up to 4 diftereni 10 channels t 

• Many oltief features Programn^ed 175:00 
(1 eiian j Add' I Chan t*.m ea. 



8CT110 Xmir/Exciter Board 

I 7 Of 10 Wts. Output 100% Pyty Cycief 

I infinite VSVffi proof 

I True FM for enc, audio duality 

I NeD¥ i^esign— specifically tor continuous rptr. 

service 
^ Very low in '"white nojse" 
I Spurious -70 d& 
' With .0005 Vb xiaL $119.95 
tQA-ia 30 Wt. Amp board & Heal Sink. 3 sac. UPf 
& ret pMr, sensor $55.% 

SCT110 Transmitter Assembly 

^ SCT110 mounted in shielded housing 
I Same a$ used on SCR 1000 
I Completely asm bid. w/F.T. aaps, S0239corin. 
1 7 Of 10 Wt. unit S205.00, Add S69,95 for 30 Wt. 
unit 




TTC100TOUCHTONE 
CONTROL BOARD 

TTC100 Toiichtone Control Board 

3 digit ON. 3 digit OFF control of a single 

ropeater function. Of. 2 lunctiOns OH (2 digits 

each} witb 1 dfgtt (each) OFF. 

Can be used to pull in a relay, trigger logic, etc. 

Typically used Jof Rptr. OlSi^OFF, HUlO Pwr., 

PL ON^OFF, Patch Inhiblt^Reset, etc. 

Sta bl e , a n t J 4af si n g d es ig n . Ss LI mi t on acces s . 

135. OO ^S1 25.QO mat. & ckd. out in SCR 1000}. 

2 Function or Cuslom Programming - 4- $75,00. 

For Addl Function(s)— Add a ^Psrtmi TTC" 

eo«/d. $4Z00 



COMMUNICA TIONS 



»^Sfl 



Norristown, PA 19401 



Send fQf Data Sheets! 
(ShipJHandL^$3.75 PA fesidents add 6% tax) 

(215) 63M710 



Freedom Fighters on Forty 

SWLing the anti-Castro clandesti nes 



Horry L, H^hnst Jr. KA5M 
3002 Vatky Meadow, Apt. 144 
Dallas TX 75220 



Hams by their very na- 
ture are "talkers/' 
whether by SSB, FM, CW, 
or RTTY, I love to yak, too, 
and that desire to talk is 
one of the main reasons I 
wound up with my ticket- 
But there are times when 
listening is far more re- 
warding than speaking, and 
I can't help but wonder 
how many hams are aware 
of some of the remarkable 
things which could be 
heard on 40 meters during 
the first six months of 1978. 
My mike and key gath* 
ered dust for several weeks 
as 1 spent my operating 
time searching the 7070- 
7100 kHz range for a Sparb 
is h-s pea king OM who iden- 
tified himself as "El Com- 
andante David." His sta- 
tion used no call letters, 
only the slogan "Radio 
Rebelde." David did not 
engage in the usual ham 
QSOs; rather, he used his 
station to deliver impas- 
sioned and moving speech- 
es against the regime of 
Fidel Castro in Cuba. As 1 



listened to Radio Rebelde's 
broadcasts, I found myself 
becoming emotionally in- 
volved with David's situa- 
tion, hoping desperately 
that he would manage to 
avoid detection by the 
authorities for another 
night. 

David was a Cuban radio 
amateur. Radio Rebelde 
was a Cuban ham station 
pressed into service as a 
broadcasting station, 
David faced the death 
penalty for treason if 
caught by the Cuban 
government. 

I entered the ranks of 
ham radio after several 
years as an SWL (shortwave 
listener). Unlike many 
hams who get their start in 
SWLing, I have never lost 
interest in the hobby and 
stilt belong to a number of 
SWL clubs. Thus, I was 
aware that interesting 
things do pop up from time 
to time in the 40 meter 
band. Almost yearly, some 
teenagers get ahold of an 
AM phone transmitter like 
the DX'60 or Johnson 
Ranger and set up a boot- 
leg broadcasting station 
for a few days (one I par- 
ticularly remember took to 
the air in 1973 under the 
callsign "WTIT, The Sound 



of Young America!"). Dur- 
ing the first few years 
following Castro's rise to 
power in Cuba, 40 meters 
was the site for several low- 
powered freedom stations 
operating from various 
locations inside and out- 
side Cuba [SWLs refer to 
such hidden stations as 
"clandestines"). But such 
activity decreased during 
the 1970s, with the last ac- 
tivity I can recall having 
taken place in 1975. 

But recently Castro has 
become much more ven- 
turesome. Despite the con- 
tinuing stagnation of the 
Cuban economy and hard- 
ships suffered by the 
Cuban people, Castro 
decided to launch large- 
scale involvement of 
Cuban troops in Africa. 
American sources estimate 
that over one-quarter of 
Cuba's armed forces are 
currently involved in 
Africa and the strain upon 
the homefront is report- 
edly severe. Goods and ser- 
vices, which have long 
been in short supply, have 
in some cases become vir- 
tually unobtainable by the 
average citizen. Moreover, 
certain portions of Africa, 
particularly Angola, are be- 
coming as difficult for 



Cuba to extricate itself 

from as Vietnam was for 
the United States. Casual- 
ties are high, especially 
among black troops in the 
Cuban army, and this has 
resulted in smoldering 
racial tensions within 
Cuba. 

Given such a backdrop, 
it was perhaps inevitable 
that some form of new 
anti-Castro clandestine 
radio activity would spring 
up. The first inkling came 
in the pages of FRENDX, 
the monthly bulletin of the 
North American Shortwave 
Association [PO Box 13, 
Liberty, Indiana 47353). 
During November of 1977, 
several SWLs reported 
hearing a station identify- 
ing as 'Radio Abdala" 
operating in the AM mode 
on frequencies centered 
around 7085 kHz. All 
broadcasts were in Span- 
ish, using male and female 
announcers reading scath* 
ing critiques of Castro and 
communism in general. Its 
theme music played at 
sign-on and during station 
breaks was from "2001, A 
Space Odyssey/' It claimed 
to be operating from within 
Cuba itself, but most 
listeners doubted this, if 
for no other reason than its 



106 



elaborate and professional 
production. A better guess 
placed the transmitter 
either in southern Florida 
or somewhere in Central 
America, ''Abdala" turned 
out to be the title of a well- 
known Cuban exile group. 

Yet another anti-Castro 
clandestine was heard bv ^ 
Miami SWL during Decem- 
ber, 1977, operating in the 
7000-7025 kHz range The 
Miami SWL, Timothy Hen- 
del, recorded one of his 
receptions and forwarded 
the tape to well-known 
SWL Glenn Hauser, editor 
of the "Listener's Note^ 
book" section of the 
FRENDX bulletin. Glenn 
was able to glean from the 
tapes such tidbits as the an- 
nouncer claiming to be op- 
erating from the Oriente 
Province of Cuba '* espe- 
cially for the Revolu- 
tionary Armed Forces." 
The station indentifted 
itself as "Radio Rebelde, 
unida a Radio Libertad 
Cubana" and the an- 
nouncer referred to him- 
self simply as "El Coman- 
dante David/' 

I noted such reports with 
interest but was unable to 
find either Radio Abdala or 
Radio Rebelde during 
checks during January of 
1978, The two stations 
gradually began to fade 
from my memory until the 
evening of May 5, 1978. I 
was tuning 7080 kHz 
around 0300 GMT when I 
ran across an AM station 
badly QRMing the Euro- 
peans trying to work the 
states on SSB, Despite my 
best efforts to tune out the 
pest, his strong signals con- 
tinued to obliterate 7060. I 
flipped the mode selector 
on my rig to AM and decid- 
ed to see if 1 could identify 
the lid. 

Something about the arv 
nouncer's voice imme- 
diately caught my atten- 
tion. It was strident urgent, 
emotional. I found myself 
struggling to remember the 
Spanish I took as a college 
freshman. Certain words 
kept popping up clearly in 



his speech: "Cuba/' 
"Angola/' 'Sovietica/' and 
"la tirania de Fidel Castro." 
1 now realized what I must 
be hearing, and it was soon 
confirmed with the identi- 
fication as "Esta es Radio 
Rebelde, unida a Radio 
Libertad Cubana." 

I heard Radio Rebelde 
again on May 9, and on 
May 10 I heard both 
Rebelde and Radio Abdala. 
By this time I was hooked 
on listening for these two 
stations. I caught Radio 
Abdala on May 10 at 0135 
CMT on 7080 kHz. Both 
male and female speakers 
were heard, and talks were 
interspersed between musi- 
cal breaks. Signal strength 
was excellent, yet modula- 
tion was quite crummy. I 
kept listening until they 
signed off at 0210 At 0253 
on 7088 kHz, t again 
caught Radio Rebelde and 
David at the mike He 
seemed to be having some 
sort of transmitter trouble 
this night, as the carrier left 
the air several times while 
he was speaking. Once it 
returned on 7089.5 kHz. 
David left the air promptly 
at 0300 and was heard no 
more that night. 

I tuned for both without 
success on May 11, but 
again caught both on May 
12. This quickly developed 
into a pattern; if one sta- 
tion was on, the other was 
sure to be on later that 
night. Radio Abdala was 
caught at a 0122 GMT tune- 
in on 7082 kHz while Radio 
Rebelde and David were 
heard beginning at 0201 
CMT on 7089 kHz, David 
was rapidly proving the 
more interesting of the two 
stations. His voice delivery 
was seemingly extempora- 
neous, and frequently 
there were moments of 
dead air while he seemed 
to collect his thoughts He 
claimed to be broadcasting 
from a hidden location in 
the mountains of Oriente 
Province and that there 
was a large underground in 
Cuba ready to rise up 
against Castro, He at- 



tacked the shortages of 
goods in Cuba and accused 
the Cuban government of 
falsifying casualty reports 
for its African operations. 

I couldn't help but won- 
der if David was a radio 
amateur like myself. On 
May 12, I found out. At 
0325 David paused and his 
carrier left the air for a few 
moments. Another Span- 
ish-speaking voice came on 
frequency, mocking David 
and asking, in effect, ''Why 
don't you give up? No one 
is tistening to you 
anyway!" Immediately 
David's voice returned to 
the air, angrily challenging 
the unidentified intruder. 
No, no, that's not the case, 
claimed David. Radio 
Rebelde had ''muchos, 
muchos oyentes" (many, 
many listeners). Thus 
wound up, David once 
again tore into the Cuban 
government and Castro un- 
til 0400 GMT, when he 
signed off and thanked his 
listeners. 

David had to be listening 
to his transmit frequency in 
order to hear his heckler, in- 
dicating that he was operat- 
ing transceive. That little 
incident convinced me 
that Radio Rebelde was ac- 
tually a CM/CO amateur 
station in disguise. 

As May wore on, 1 could 
hear both Radio Abdala 
and Radio Rebelde two to 
four times per week. I 
began to note that David 
was being subjected to 
"jamming" of a sort, such 
as swishing vfos and rough 
ac-modulated tones al- 
most zero beat with his 
signal At the time, I merely 
chalked these up to noo- 
dle-brained stateside 
hams. 

On May 24, I caught a 
new voice on 7090 kHz 
from 0152 to 0159 GMT. 
This speaker was definitely 
not David, but another 
Spanish-speaking OM at- 
tacking Castro. At sign-off, 
I caught a clear identifica- 
tion as "Radio Libertad 
Cubana/' the station sup- 
posedly ''united" with 



Radio Rebelde, I felt ex* 
hilaration as I realized that 
David was not alone, that 
there were others inside 
Cuba who were working 
with him. And the very next 
night, May 25, David and 
Radio Rebelde were back 
on 7090 kHz until 0300 
GMT. 

About this time, I was 
seized with an almost ir- 
resistable urge to com- 
municate somehow with 
David, to let him know that 
his message was being 
heard outside the bound- 
aries of Cuba, From several 
sources, I was able to form 
what I feel to be a reason- 
ably accurate guess as to 
the true identity of David 
and his amateur callsign. 
Writing a letter was ob- 
viously out, due to the 
chance it could be inter- 
cepted by Cuban author- 
ities. I toyed with the idea 
of ignoring several FCC 
rules and using AM phone 
on. David's frequency, 
sending him greetings in 
Spanish. I decided, how- 
ever, to stay within the 
rules. 

!n retrospect, I wish I 
hadn't. 

Things came to an 
abrupt head on June 2. At 
0235, 1 caught David and 
Radio Rebelde on 7080 
kHz, 10 kHz lower in fre- 
quency than normal. His 
subject, as near as I could 
determine with my limited 
Spanish, was the growing 
influence of Castro in 
Venezuela and his designs 
on that nation's large oil 
supplies. But, at 0238, he 
was suddenly QRMed by 
an English-speaking OM 
using the call CM2HB, call- 
ing CQ for stations in 
Europe. CM2HB was using 
SSB, but his signal was so 
perfectly placed atop the 
AM signal of Radio Rebelde 
that he could be copied 
without using a product 
detector. CM2HB and 
Radio Rebelde were iden- 
tical in strength, and 
CM2HB continued to call 
CQ for several minutes, 
The operator of CM2HB 



109 



had to be aware of Radio 
Rebelde on the same fre- 
quency, and I knew his 
choice of frequency could 
not have been purely ac- 
cidentaL 

At 0253. CM2HB got 
tired of CQing and left the 
frequency. In his place 
popped up someone swish* 
ing his vfo across the fre- 
quency. Through the QRM, 
t could hear David's voice 
thanking listeners for their 
letters. I couldn't help but 
wonder if this wasn't just 
some wishful thinking on 
the part of David, since if 
the listeners could figure 
out how to get a letter to 
Radio Rebelde, the Cuban 



authorities surely must 
also have had some inkling 
as to the identity of David. 
David exchanged bits of 
conversation with another 
Spanish-speaking station, 
but the talk was too fast for 
me to follow. Abruptly, at 
025B, Radio Rebelde left 
the afr. 

I tuned the 7080-7090 
kHz range for several 
minutes before I caught an 
open carrier on 7080. At 
0315, Radio Libertad 
Cubana came on the air, 
picking up Radio Rebelda's 
theme of Cuban influence 
in Venezuela. I was never 
able to catch the name of 
the announcer for Radio 



Libertad Cubana, but it was 
not David's voice that I 
heard. I didn't get the 
chance to listen to much of 
Radio Libertad Cubana this 
night, for, at 0317, several 
stations suddenly came on 
the frequency, all using 
CVV. There were four or 
frve stations, all neatly 
spaced in the bandwidth of 
the AM signal so as to com- 
pletely destroy the intel- 
ligibility of Radio Libertad 
Cubana. t switched my re- 
ceiver into the CW with a 
narrow bandpass filter and 
found that each of these 
CW stations merely sent 
CQ over and over without 
signing any call At 0325, 






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Radio Libertad Cubana left 
the air and the mysterv CW 
stations likewise ceased 
operations. 

The rest of the evening 
was a confusion of jum- 
bled activity on 7080 kHz. 
At 0330, I caught David's 
voice again, engaging m a 
brief QSO with another 
Spanish-speaking amateur 
using the AM mode. At 
0335, Radio Rebelde again 
took to the air, with David 
this time sharing the mike 
with another male an- 
nouncer. As soon as he 
began his transmission, 
David was jammed by a 
couple of other stations 
which began sweeping 
their vfos across his fre- 
quency. At 0345, Radio 
Rebelde left the air as 
David wished all his listen- 
ers a good night and 
thanked them for listening. 

To date, I have not heard 
Radio Rebelde, Radio 
Libertad Cubana. or Radio 
Abdala since, 

I have carefully searched 
40 meters in the months 
since June 2, 1978, many 
nights, but have failed to 
hear David's distinctive 
voice once. Nor have any 
receptions of the three sia- 
tions appeared in the bul- 
letins of any of the SWL 
clubs that I belong to. 

It could have been that 
David and his compatriots 
simply got tired of their ac- 
tivity. Or the jamming ac- 
tivity of June 2 could have 
indicated to them that it 
would be best to lie low for 
a while. A much more omi- 
nous possibility is that 
some of them are currently 
in a Cuban prison or even 
dead- 

But if David or some of 
his friends should some- 
how read these words, I 
hope that someday he'll 
return to the air to let his 
listeners know that he's 
still all right. And if you 
should come across an AM 
station in the CW portion 
of 40 meters some evening, 
stop and listen. It could 
well be David. ■ 



11D 



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A quitkte-cheapie for 2m. 



Richard L. Hiadky AA4RH 
Rte, 2, Box 240 
Summ^rland Key FL 33042 

Want a quickie-cheap- 
ie two meter anten- 
na for youT car? One that 
doesn't need a ground 
plane, and makes a near- 
perfect match to the feed- 
line? Try this: 

Take a piece of RG-59/U 
coax, long enough for your 
feedline plus about ten 
feet. Trim the outer cover 
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e^A^INC T!OD 



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to enlarge the diameter to 
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braid). Now, work the braid 
down over the top of the 
outer covering of the coax, 
so that the braid is folded 
back over itself over the 
outer covering When it is 
all smoothed down, trim 
the length of the braid to 
one-quarter wavelength for 
the frequency you want 
(1925 inches for 146 MHz). 
Tie or tape the braid in 
place. 

Next, cut the exposed 
center conductor and in- 
sulation about two inches 
from the folded-over end 
of the braid. Remove the 
insulation except for about 
an eighth of an inch. Now 
cut a piece of brazing rod 
(or #10 copper wire) to a 
quarter wavelength and 
solder it to the free end of 
the center conductor of 
the coax, with the rod but- 
ting against the insulation 
Tape, or use heat-shrink 
tubing on the joint 

See what you have now? 
A half-wave antenna fed at 
the center, and matched to 
the coax it's made from. 

Now take a quick trip to 



the hardware store and get 
a piece of Vi " PVC or CPVC 
pipe. Cut it to the length 
you want for your finished 
antenna. Insert the end of 
the antenna through the 
pipe so that the rod pro- 
trudes about twelve to 
fourteen inches. Plug the 
end of the pipe around the 
rod with auto body filler 
(such as "Bondo") or 
epoxy. After this sets up, 
you can pour the rest of the 
pipe full of fiberglass resin 
if you want, but it isn't nec- 
essary if you've put a good 
plug in the rod end. (CPVC 
material seems to slow the 
setting of fiberglass resin, 
but it will set up in timej 
All you need now is the ap- 
propriate fitting for the 
other end of the coax, and 
you're on the air. 

The swr on my antenna is 
practically the same across 
the entire band, about 
13:1. I have it in a six-foot 
piece of pipe which gets 
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body, so its pattern is not 
distorted by the metal of 
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have on the roof. The C PVC 



pipe is flexible enough to 
bend almost double if I for- 
get to take it down before 
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the noise is terrifyingl). 

The same approach 
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slide it over the piece 
you're going to use as a 
feedline. You can then sol- 
der the braids together, 
and I find it protects the 
outer covering of the RG- 
11/U if you work a small 
piece of fiberglass cloth 
under the place you're go- 
ing to solder The braid will 
easily expand enough to 
pull it over the top of a 
couple of layers of cloth. 

This is a good project for 
a rainy Saturday The 
antenna works well, is 
cheap, and, with a little 
care, can be made good- 
looking. Try itlB 



112 



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NO MONK€V BUSIN€SS1 



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Good Deals on most Brands 

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All Inquiries handled by Active Hams with 

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1^ R&Mder S«rviC»—S€0 page 21 1 



113 



■■■ 



FSK Fix for the 820S 

— the RTTY relay remedy 



Talk up this "talk it up'' solution. 



HughAitken WIPN 
J 55 Amity St. 
Amhersi MA 01002 



One of the many attrac- 
tive features of the 
Kenwood TS 820S trans- 
ceiver is the fact that cir- 
cuitry for FSK (frequency 
shift keying) is already 
buitt in, so that the owner 
who wants to operate 
radioteletype has no need 
to start digging around in 
the vfo or local oscillator 
Additionally, when in the 
FSK mode, one can use the 
very sharp 50OHz CW lifter 
and get really remarkable 
selectivity. When trans- 
mitting FSK, the rig even 
automatically cuts down 
the power to a level safe 
for continuous service. 

There is, however, one 
slight difficulty. To key the 
transceiver, you have to ar- 
range matters so that the 
FSK input is grounded on 



FSK aUITPUT 




mark and open on space. 
This is a little different 
from what you may have 
been used to. If you own 
the ST-5 terminal unit 
made by HAL, for example, 
or its big brother, the ST-6, 
you can't just connect its 
FSK output to the FSK in- 
put on the TS-fl20S. The 
reason is that the HAL units 
provide negative and posi- 
tive voltages at the FSK 
output — about —12 volts 
on mark and +12 on 
space. This is an excellent 
method for keying most 
transmitters, but don't try 
it on the TS-820S. Such 
voltages will confuse the 
diode circuits Kenwood 
uses to shift frequencies. 

The obvious solution is 
to insert a sensitive relay in 
your RTTY closed-loop cir- 
cuit and use its contacts to 
key the transceiver. This rs 
what I did, at first using a 
small encapsulated relay I 
had bought from Poly 



tSVDC 



2^212% OR 
EQUIVALENT 




02 
SMZ2ZZ QR 

EOU»V*LENT 



rT 



Tq T$-fta9S 

FSK INPWT 



ID 



Fig. 7. An FSK re/ay for the TS-B20S. 



Paks. It worked fine, ex- 
cept that it didn't seem 
quite "state of the art/' and 
also it made the required 
CW identification a little 
awkward. (Since I was no 
longer using my ST-5 to 
provide keying voltages, I 
couldn't use its CW ID 
capability.) What you end 
up doing is inserting a hand 
key in series with the 
relay contacts. Just re- 
member to close the short- 
ing lever on the key after 
you've completed your ID. 
I forgot several times and 
ended up transmitting a 
fine unmodulated carrier, 
but no RTTY. 

There had to be a better 
way, and there was. If 1 
have learned anything in 
fifteen years of ham radio, 
it's that the best way to get 
help with a problem is to 
"talk it up" — preferably on 
the air. That's what I did. 
My solution came from 
Cordy WB9TCB, who had 
had the same problem. He 
passed along a simple two- 
transistor circuit which he, 
in turn, had gotten from 
Mel WORV. 

Fig. 1 shows what is in- 
volved. You need two NPN 
switching transistors 
[2N2222 or equivalent], a 
couple of resistors, and a 



scrap of perf board. The 12 
volts dc can easily be 
"stolen" from your ter- 
minal unit. Note that you 
get your CW identification 
by grounding the base of 
the second transistor — and 
you don't have to remem- 
ber to close any shorting 
lever! I built my unit out- 
board, but it shouldn't be 
too hard to squeeze it into 
the cabinet of your ter- 
minal unit unless you are 
very cramped for space. 

If you use audio frequen- 
cy shift keying (AFSK). of 
course, none of this applies 
to you. All you have to do 
is feed your audio tones in- 
to the phone patch ''in" 
jack on the rear wall of 
the cabinet. Your problem 
then will be quite different. 
Since you will be transmit- 
ting lower sideband (LSB), 
you won't be able to use 
that beautiful sharp CW 
filter. There is a modifica- 
tion to get around this 
problem, made available 
by the Dovetron Corpora- 
tion, but it involves several 
internal wiring changes in 
the TS-820S, and you may 
not want to do that. There's 
no reason why you should. 
With this solid state relay, 
going the FSK route is 
easy. ■ 



114 



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COMMUNICATIONS 
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NEWI SO-Chinnel Beircat 300 MEWI Bearcat 8 Track scanner Witn tflC DCSt. 



$^ Reader Servtce—iee f^age 2t 1 



115 



Richard Phenbc 
c/o 73 MagaziiK 



Einstein Was Wrong! 

this story has a Mobius twist 



TO quote the inspiring 
words of that highly- 
placed military official in 
1776, "You can't make an 
omelet without you break 
eggs' 

True* Remember that 
near-total blackout of the 
East Coast in 1965? And 
power-outages all over New 
England in February, 1978? 
And then there were those 
electrical failures around 
Peterborough, N.H. (home 
of 73 Magazine), early this 
year. 

Well, I'm sorry! Honest. I 

didn't mean to cause them. 
They were just by-products 
of a revolution — they hap- 
pened because 1 was work- 
ing on a revolutionary step 
forward in the field of ham 
radio which now can be re- 
vealed for the first time. 

I'm not going to tell you 
who i am> yet. (That name, 
above, is a phoney, as must 
be obvious.) There are still 
too many soreheads around, 
and 1 will not risk exposing 
myself to the mobs until my 
Mobius-twist, All-purpose, 
Synergistic, Lumped-con- 
stant circuit, Hanger-hung, 
Folded dipole, Phase-veloc- 
ity Transcalent-Transceive 
System (MASLHFPTSTM) js 



bringing happiness into the 
average American home. 

Background 

Those blackouts were 
simply normal side effects 
of my genius. They were 
only because of little slips 
of memory, actually, for I 
am far from inexperienced 
in using electrical stuff. 

Electrical stuff has 
always fascinated me, I 
remember my introduction 
to the field, in 1934, in 
Brooklyn, N.Y., when I was 
only 14. I hooked a crystal 
or something up to a ra- 
diator—I forget exactly 
how — and heard voices! 
And I couldn't have been 
older than 20 when I was 
able, most of the time, to 
find WIZ, WEAF, WOR, 
and some other stations on 
the family wireless! 

As it happened, most of 
the years between those 
early triumphs in the thir- 
ties and the Big Blackout 
of the sixties were devoted 
to other hobbies in which I 
also excelled — I was 
Brooklyn basket-weaving 
champion in 1939— -but I 
kept in touch with elec- 
trical stuff through the 
science section of Time 



and articles in Reader^s 
Digest. (Not much of im- 
portance was going on in 
the radio field in those 30 
years, anyway.) 

But then, a few years 
before the East Coast inci- 
dent, I ran across a book 
which has been guiding my 
research in sixteen areas 
ever since. With regard to 
science, a single little- 
known fact published in 
that book brought my in- 
terest in electrical stuff 
flooding back. I started 
work on my MASLHF PTSTM 

at once and went all out 

East Coast lights went all 
out, tool Joke! (Sorry,) 
What I had done was to 
hook up my Mark I trans- 
ceiver [which utilized that 
little-known fact! to an 
antenna system consisting 
of all of the overhead lines 
in Greater New York with 
trackage of the N.Y, Cen- 
tral, Pennsylvania, and 
Boston and Maine rail- 
roads as the ground sys- 
tem. 1 was so eager to start 
operating that I didn't 
check out the circuits, but 
plugged in the power sup* 
ply (the main generator of 
Con Edison) and blooey! 

I had forgotten to fuse 
it! 



Now look, I've already 
said I'm sorry. And please 
note: Each of the other out- 
ages, in 1978 and 1979, af- 
fected fewer people than 
the one before. If that's not 
progress, I don't know 
what you wanil 

Oh, yes, the little-known 
fact. I shall quote it exactly 
as it appears in the book — 
and you can check it out 
yourself. 

. , . electncity wit! pass 
through copper wire at the 
rate of two hundred and 

eighty-eight thousand miles 
in a second of time— a ve- 
locity greater than that of 
lights 

And on the very next 
page (p, 910), that vital in- 
formation is augmented by 
reference to the ''electric 
fluid'' which gives rise to the 



'The Circte Of Know/edge, 
"Essential Facts of Everyday 
interest in Nature, Geography, 
History, Travel, Governmentp 
Science, Invention, Education, 
Language, Literature, Fine 
Arts, Phiiosopliy. Reiigion, In- 
dudtry, Biograpiiy. Human Cul- 
ture, and Universal Progress/' 
Henry W. Ruotf, M.A„ Litt^D., 
D,C.L., EdItor-ln-Chief, The 
Standard Publication Com* 
pany, 1919. 



116 



appearance of lightning, 
and its velocity, which 

. . . is not less than two 
hundred and fifty thousand 
miles per second. 

Well, I ask you! With this 
knowledge of more rapid 
electricity than was recog* 
nized anywhere and of the 
existence of a fluid form of 
the stuff, what couldn't I 
do? 

I won't bore you with all 
the difficulties of those 
early years of the develop- 
ment and microminiatur- 
ization of the Mark I 
MASLHFPTSTM. | had to 

revise all of Einstein's for- 
mulas, too, of course, and 
gradually build up my 
knowledge of ether (which 
obviously does exist, after 
all; I have renamed it 
CLOP-for Global Lubri- 
cation Of Power), but I will 
share with you one dis- 
covery which will help you 
over any difficulties you 
may have in accepting the 
fact that relativity is a lot of 
bunk. 

Einstein was secretly ^n 
associate of Bitten, Batten, 
Button, Distribution, and 
Ozymandias, that Madison 
Avenue firm which had the 
Waltham, Transworld, and 
Ivory accounts! He dreamed 
up his concepts of time, 
velocity, and size simply in 
order to sell watches, plane 
tickets, and the Large 
Family Size! 

(Yeah, I thought that 
would shake you. I found 
out because I'm also an ex- 
pert in advertising, men- 
tion of which leads me to 
the next phase of my re- 
search, the development of 
the Mark II MASLHFPTSTM^ 
the heart of which was my 
1954. 18". black and white 
Phiico TV set. I selected it 
because of that advertising 
slogan. You know, "You 
can be sure— if it's Phii- 
co/') 

By early 1978, I had 
charted the lines of flux of 
the electric fluid at my 
QTH and had developed 
the Mobius-twistTM com- 
ponent of my antenna. This 



produced the well-known 
single-sided band which, 
naturally, provides con- 
stant resonance at all fre- 
quencies. I wanted to 
watch the Bruins playing 
hockey on Channel 38, but 
my Phiico wasn't VHF — 
just UHF. [Or vice versa; I 
always get those two mixed 
up.) Anyway, in my mulling 
over this problem I sudden- 
ly remembered that 8 plus 
9 plus 10 plus 11 adds up to 
38! There was my answer! 

Eagerly, I hooked up 
Channels 8, 9, 10, and 11 in 
series, attached my anten- 
na, and plugged in. Blooeyl 
I had barely glimpsed 
Yastrzemski, I think it was, 
poised for a slapshot, 
when the lights went out in 
Connecticut, Rhode Island, 
Massachusetts, Maine, 
New Hampshire, and Ver- 
mont. 

f had forgotten to hook 
in my Adjustment Circuit 
Box! 

Back to the drawing 
board, so to speak. 

But good comes from 
everything, and as I rebuilt 
the blown parts, i was able 
to perfect a modification, 
the NNTM (No-Noise) 
attachment, which pro- 
vides 100% effective rf 
suppression — no non-Ion- 
izing radiation on any 
band. 

And so it was that by 
February of this year my 
Mark III MASLHFPTS^^ 
was an almost-fully-tested 
QRN-free, all-mode trans- 
ceiver; covering all bands 
from 12 Hertz (VVLF) to 
300,CXX) GHz (Ultra SEHF), 
(It was possible to go 
below and above these fre- 
quencies, but under 12 
Hertz I kept falling asleep 
for some reason, and over 
300k GHz something kept 
happening to my eyeballs.) 

Only one last step re- 
mained to prove the value 
and reliability of my 
Mobius twist and the Ad- 
justment Circuit Box: turn- 
ing it on. I flipped the 
GPMT switch (giga-pole, 
mega-throw) to Channel 



M 





Fig. 1, (a) Schematic of Mo6/t/s-tw/st^H folded dipole, 
banger-hung receive system, (b) Isometric presentBtion 
showing the location of the twist vvfth Z,:Z.-.y,;V (see 
equation in text), (c) Detail of the twist 



4271 and powered it . . . 

Wefl, the blackout in 
Peterborough is hardly 
worth mentioning (no 
newspapers outside of 
some in N.H. and Boston 
did), but in the midst of 
some strange vibrations 
which made vision dif- 
ficult, for about 72 seconds 
I watched the most incredi- 
ble sight: The pictures 
coming in on my tube from 
the studios of the MCBC 
(Mars Galaxy Broadcasting 
Company) were in colorl 
Yes, in colorl 1 reached for 
the PTT unit to ask how 
come and blooey! 

The blackout was noth- 
ing; the tragedy was the 
fire in my shack, for I had 
been forgetful again. 

Construction 

Nobody is perfect; there 
is this one component with 



which I am having difficul- 
ty and with the rebuilding 
of which I am going to ask 
your help. Well get to it. 
But first, let's cover the ob- 
vious construction — the 
OB construction, l_catt it. 
[The other is the OB con- 
struction,) 

Fig. 1 shows the basic re- 
ceive system So long as 
the total length of the 
Mobius strip is exactly L as 
in the following formula, it 
is not critical whether the 
unit of measure is the inch, 
chain, furlong, hand, or 
fathom. L can be made up 
of ells, even. Joke! (Sorry.) 
But L must = (300,000 GHz 
- 12 Hertz)/X(Z-Y), 
where X is the altitude of 
your QTH and Z and Y are 
its latitude and longitude, 
respectively. (If your shack 
is in Death Valley or else- 
where below sea level, it is 



117 



^■« 



CEILING 



TEACUP MAMGEf^ 




{[XSTAItCES M«r BE m 
OTHER UHITSp ( f , 
FATHOUS. IF orH t» 
ftELDW SEA LCVCi, I 



-MAPLE COAT HANGEH 



-AtaTEhhA 



nr 



TO rEEOLlUe AWD AOJUSTIBEWT 
CIRCUIT BCm 



r-is'4" 



s-z* 



■ 
A 



c 



Fig. 2. Pan^ pfacement for the antenna Brray. and linear 
relationships to ambient reshtances, resonances, and 
other wave influences. A — walnut bookcase: B — steel file 
drawers; C — bathroom pipes [find mean distance). 



recommended that vou use 
fathoms,) 

Fig. 2 shows the critical 
distances between the 
Mobius twist and those 
elements which my ex- 
periments have shown pro- 
vide the most favorable 
reception Substitution of 
some materials is OK. The 
bookcase, for example, 
may be made of ebony. 



balsa, Hawaiian monkey 
pod, or Cuamanian ifil in- 
stead of walnut, but the 
steel fife drawers must 
contain from 36 to 42 back 
issues of 73 Magazine; 
back issues of Ham Radio 
produce QRM, QRN, QSB. 
QSD, QTA, and 1-1 condi 
tions. 

The other important 
item is the Adjustment Cir- 




li you ciiWipf os^jifeif leciitMjitiyy , y^LJ 

need the i-^A t wi Cart'i b^ outcopied b^rause 

its design^ corfipti ^- p^rtij. an-d moderri technology 

off^r iandiinft copy over radio circuits. 



Stop& ORM with se]ectat>)€ 
55 4>r 100 Hz. filters and 
two tone fimiterie»& operation 

Decision (eve I cor reel ion 
iinproves selective fading 

Uses either 1 7Q volt^ 60 
Ma. or RS-2 32 loops 



Video operation available. 

interfaces microcompyters. 

^e can tristatl your Xitex 

SCT- too board inside, loo 

Conlinuousfy adjustable 
shifi from TOO to 1000 Hi. 

Write for details. Visa ^nd 
Master Charge accepted. 



$449.00 

FOB Coluinbys, Ohio 
Dealer inqyiries Wetcome 




.^127 
700 Taylor Road 
Columbus, Ohio ^1210 
(6141 864-2464 




ffg, 3. Setup for the three steps. A— pulley system to jerk 
up cover ID} of Adjustment Circuit Box (E) when B, putley 
system to weight (CI drops weight when mule (f) kicks over 
table if) sending flying C — all componenls from your junk 
box, H ^copper wires of assorted lengths, and I — pots of 
molten solder, into the per f board-lined Box and onto the 
cover as it flies up and over. (Note: Weight C should he 
positioned to hit mule / on head to keep him calm until 
ready for the next setup.) 



cuit Box. It nrust measure 
exactly 2' x 2' x 8' inside 
dimensions, with all six in- 
terior surfaces covered 
with perfboard. Consult 
Fig. 3 and assemble all 
parts as shown. 

Well, here is where your 
help is needed. You see, 1 
was so anxious to get my 
transceiver operable that I 
plumb forgot to diagram or 
list, as I installed them, the 
diodes, triodes, tetrodes, 
pentodes, octodes, pigeon- 
todes, resistors, trans- 
formers, inductors, sole- 
noids, thyristors, shields, 
spark gaps, fuses, piezo- 
electric crystals, and 
switches! 

Silly me! 

But if you will do as I 
shall do, complete a setup 
as in Fig. 3, and follow the 
three simple steps listed 
below, one of us will have 
to come up with the inter- 
nal electrical stuff for the 
Adjustment Circuit Box 
just as t had it arranged 
before the fire last 
February. 

Step 1 Back a mole up 



to the setup and then an- 
noy him. 

2. Let the solder harden, 
plug in the circuit, and see 
if it works. 

Step 3. Set everything 
back up again, and go back 
to Step 1 . 

Conclusion 

There is one at every 
ham f est, and. Buster, I can 
hear you now, saying, "It 
won't work!" OM, you 
have forgotten the well- 
known fact that if a few 
thousand monkeys are pro- 
vided with typewriters, 
sooner or later they will 
write the complete works 
of William Shakespeare. 

All we have to do is to 
make monkeys out of our- 
selves by following the 
steps, and after some 
unknown number of mule- 
kicks in the future, that one 
last, essential component 
for the MASLHFPTSTA^ will 
be recreated. 

And then, by golly. Til be 
able to figure out why that 
MGBC program came in in 
COjfor. ■ 



118 



p^ Readier Service -- see p&g6 Sit 





The 

In the Northwest ! 

ATLAS • ICOM • KENWOOD • YAESU 



Call 206-364-8300 

to plaee your ordmr. 

We IMJII pay for call 

when order is shipped. 



Kenwood 7600 
2m FM Transceiver 





Kenwood TS12QS 




Kenwood TS180S 



Ag^T-riJ|i/li'WI|il!i''l'mii^iuin'iilu'Vii 







Yaesu FT10TZD 




COMMUNICATIONS -a« 

17550 15th Ave. N.E, • Seattle WA 98155 • (206) 364-8300 




Other bcations: (Walk-in customers only) • Beltevoe— 12001 N.E. 12th • Everett— 4610 Evergreen Way e Open Mon. thru Sat. 



NEW MFJ Deluxe Keyer has S peed Readout 

Socket for external Curtis memory, random code generator, keyboard. 
Uses Curtis 8044 IC. Gives you dot-dash memories, weight, speed, 
volume, tone controls, speaker. Sends iambic, automatic, semi-automatic, 
manual. Reliable solid state keying, RF proof, s peed Readaut m^ter 

lets you read to SO WPM, 

Sockmt for Curiim mmmory, 
imndom cadm gBnmrBtor^ kmjftoord. 



ri 




»79 



95 



Ttie new MFi-IOS Muke Beclrotilc Iteyer i Is 
based on ihe proven Curtis 8044 IC keyer ctwp. 
Speed readou! meter lets you read sending speetf 
10 50 WPM, S&cket i optional cable with plug, 
$3,00} rets you use external Curtis memory, ran 
dom code generator, keyboard (available from 
Curtis Electro Devices^ 

Sends Iambic* atttofnatic. lemi-iulomafic, 
manual Use squeeze, single lever or straighi Key, 

iamuic operation with s^jueeze key. Dot-dash 
insertion Semidutomatic "bug" operaHon provides 
auiomatic aots and manual dashes. 

Dot-dail) mfmory, sell completing dots and 
dasheSp jam proof spacing, instant start. HP proof. 

Ultri reliable solfd- state keying: ghd block, cath- 
ode« solid state transmitters (-300 V, 10 ma. 
max, + 300 V, 100 ma. max). 



AH contnifs are on front panel: speed, weigbl^ 
Xom vmume, furnitron switch. Smooth lir^ear 
speed control. B 1o 50 WPM, 

Wei g tit control adjusts dot-dash space ratio; 
makes your signal distinctive to penetrate ORM, 

Tone control. Room flFfing volume. Built-in 
speaker. Ideal lor classroom teaching. 

FurtctJon switch selects otf, on. semi automat 
ic/manuai, tune. Tune keys transmitter (or tuning. 

Compietely portable. Operates up lo a year on 
4 C cells. 2.5 mm phone jack lor external power 
(6 to 9 VDC), Optional AC adapter $7.95. 

Eggsheir white, walnut sides. 6x3x6 inches. 

Stereo phone Jack tor 
key, phono fack outputs. 
OPTOHAL BtHCHEir [AMBC ^^.^^^_ 
PADOLL Dot and dash pad ^^^^ '^^^ 




dies have fulty atijustable tension and spacing. 
Heavy base with non-slip rubber feet eirmi nates 
"walking." $39.95. 

Order from MFJ and tFy ft - no obligation. If 
not deljgJited. return it within 30 days for refund 
(less shipping), One year unconditionaj guarantee 

Older Uidiy, Call toll tree 800-6471800. Charge 
VISA, MC or mail check, money order for 179-95 
plus S3^00 sNppimg for MFJ 40& keyer and/or 
539. 9S plus $3.00 shipping for Bencher paddle. 



CALL TOLL FREE . . . 8Q0-fi47-1800 



For technical inlonnation, order^repair status, in 
Miss,, outside continental USA, call 601-323 5S69. 

MFJ ENTERPRISES. INC. 

eOX 494, MISSISSIPPI STATE. MS 39762 



^ Header Service —s&e page 217 



119 



There's only 
one bad thing 
about a 



• • • 



Kenwi 
from G.I.S 
She'll hate it 




O 





Your poor wife. Now that G.I.S.M.O/s handling Kenwood, it's only a 
matter of time until you own a TS-520SE with DG-5 digital frequency 
readout, or one of Kenwood's other impeccable products. The TS- 
520SE Is the result of Kenwood expertise and your Improvement sug- 
gestions. The PG-5 option gives you crystal clear, dead accurate 
readout while sanding and receiving. 

Only problem is your lady's going to see a lot less of you when you 
get hooked on Kenwood quality. 

We've got the entire Kenwood line* For a free, instant quote (mail's 
too slow), call the toll free number below. 



C.I.S.M.a..1-8 



t I 



845-6183 



InS.C. call 1-366 7157 

2305 Cherry Road, Rock Hill. S.C. 

29730 (Exit 66- B off I -77 J 




Qfid Alone Video Termmo 

irsBwEFJHIKLMNOPQRSTUUyXVZE^-J". 



^f-r_4AA VfHEO OOARD FEATURES 

iijtdhMk^ atiil paging 




<jf cmnpl 



tnnmiit 



wrrex com 



ORDEB 



'liHUfilPhtNiJit^i 



»XIT€X MORSE TRANSCEIVER 



MRSIOO FEATURES: 

* Connects directly wfth any ASCI I or Baudot 
Teletype* /Termjnal 

* Operates from 1 to 150 WPM with Auto- 
Sync. 

* Displays WPM rate of copied signal plus 
FIFO buffer status. 

* Contains a buiJl-in 80 Hz bandpass filter 
and sidetone osciHator. 

SSdS Asumbled $ T»ted • S22S Com(vl«le Kit • 195 Pifiltt KH 




NEW FROM XITEX.., ABM-100 
Unjv«fu( Canverttf ASCII • BhiiJioI • Uorvc 

The ABM-100 ts a universal code convertef 
for translating between A5CM and Baudot, 
or between Morse and ASCII (or Baudot) 
Also used as a TTY* speed converter, 
Assembled and tested the ABM wUI operate 
from a single *5V supply and sells tor S129. 
Wrrte for complete datalls 



"CALL FOR QUOTE" 



KENWOOD 
TS-520SE 




MADISON ELECTRONICS 
SUPPLY, INC. .M3S 

1508 McKinney • Houston, TX 77002 

(713) 658-0268 

MASTERCHARGE • VISA 



Direction Finders 

If you're serious about direction finding, you 
want the best, most dependable equipment 
for a fast find, whether it's for a downed air- 
craft or a repeater jammer. 

We have ground, air, and marine DFs in the 
100^300 MHz range. Over 2,000 units are 
in the field being used in search and rescue, 
amateur and commercial services, and marine 
applications. They work on AM, FM, pulsed 
signals, and random noise. Left-right DF 
allows you to take accurate bearings even on 
short bursts, with no 180° ambiguity. Or use 
it in the Receive mode and work signat 
strength with our antenna or yours. 

Prices start at about $200, and all equipment 
is factory-built, complete, ready to use. They 
are backed by warranty, a money- back guar- 
antee, factory service, and assistance from the 
experienced L-Tronics staff. Write today for 
a free brochure and price list 



L— Tronics Attn; Amateur Dept. 
5546 Cathedral Oaks Road 
Santa Barbara, CA 93111 



t^LIO 



MY COMPETmON KNOWS 
ME, YOU SHOULD TOO. 




COMPLETt KfTSj COWSTSTING OF EVERY ESSEMTIAL PART NEEDED TO 
MAKE YOUR COUNTER COM PUETE HAL-600A 7DIGIT COUNTER WITH FRE- 
QUENCY RAP^G£ OF Z£RO T0 600MH^ FEATURES TWO INPUTS: ONE FQR 
LOW FREQUENCY AND ONE FOR HIGH FREQUENCY: AUTOMATIC^ERO 
SUPPRESSION HME BASE IS 1.0 SEC O^ .1 SEC GATE WITH OPTIONAL 10 
SEC GATE AVAILABLE ACCURACY ±.001%, UTILIZES 10MHz CRYSTAL 5 
PPM 
COMPLETE KIT ...„.,\.|129 

HAL*IOOA 7 DIGIT COUNTER WITH FREQUENCY RANGE OF ZERO TO MO 
MHz. FEATURES TWO INPUTS; ONE FOR LOW FREQUENCY AND ONE FOR 
HIGHFREQUENCY, AUTOMATIC ZERO SUPPRESSION TIME BASE IS 10 SEC 
OR .! SEC GATE WITH OPTIONAL 10 S£C GATE AVAiLABLE. ACCURACY 
i 00r%. UTILIZES 10-MH2 CRYSTALS PPM 
COMPLETE «IT ,,,,, .„**..„_ .•* »109 

HAL' SO A B-DIGIT COUNTER WITH FREQUENCY RANGE OF ZERO TO 50 
MHz OR BETTER AUTOMATIC DECIMAL POINT, ZEFtO SUPPRESSION UPON 
DEMAND, FEATURES TWO INPUTS ONE FOR LOW FREQUENCY INPUT, AND 
ONE ON PANEL FOR USE WITH ANY INTERNALLY MOUNTED HALTRONIX 
PRE SCALER FOR WHICH PROVISIONS HAVE ALREADY BEEN MADE 1.0 
SEC AND .1 SEC TJME GATES. ACCURACY ±001%. UTILIZES lO-MHz 
CRYSTAL 5 PPM. 
COMPLETE KH $109 

fftt-SCALEB KITS 

HAL 300 Pil __.._.....$! 9.95 

{Pre-^ritled GIO board and »H compqnents) 

(Same as abov% with preamp} 

Inn L Dvv rll-Li « m * « ■«* ■- • * m^ m * m * * m * * r * * » ■» m *m*^*^***9 «'* V'-*-' 9'4'«V3 

<Pre^rtlleO GID baard and ali cofnponents) 

HAL600A/fil. ,.. * $39,95 

(Same as abovfi but with pfeamp) 

TOUCH TONE DECODER KIT 

HIGHLY STABLE DECODER KIT COMES WITH 2 SIDED, PLATED THRU AND 
SOLDER FLOWED G 10 PC BOARD, 7-567 ft. 2-7402, AND ALL ELECTRONiC 
COMPONENTS, BOARD MEASURES 37* x SVi INCHES, HAS t2 LINES OUT- 
ONLY S19.9S 

DELUXE 12BtJrT0N TOUCHTONE ENCODER KIT utilizfr^g rhi; new ICM 7206 
c^ip Provides botht VISUAL AND AUDIO indicahons* Gomes wilh its own two- 
tona anodized alyminium cabinet Measures only 2 2J4 x 3 3/i" Comptete *ith 
Touch-Tone pad, t>oard« cry^slaJ, ctiip a^d all necessary coiTipOfients to ftnish 
trie kit 
PfllCEOAT... „- ,„. * «-.„.., ...$2S.0$ 

f Qf those who wisn to mount the encoder In a tiand-held unit, the PC board 

measures only 9/16" x 1 3f4 '. This partial kit with PC board, crystal, chip and 

components, 

PfllCED AT„ ..... . lt4.9S 

ACCUMEYIR-MLMORV OmON KIT THIS ACCUKEYER MEMORY KIT PRO- 
VIDES A SIMPLE. LOW COST METHOD OF ADDING MEMORY CAPABILITY 
TO THE W84VVP ACCUKEYER. WHILE DESIGNED FOR DIRECT ATTACH- 
MENT TO THE ABOVE ACCUKEYER, IT CAN ALSO BE ATTACHED TO ANY 
STANDARD ACCUKEYER SOARD WITH LITTLE DIFFICULTY. 114.95 

ACCUKETU (im THIS ACCUKEYER fS A REVISED VERSION OF THE VERY 
POPULAR WB^VVF ACCUKEYER ORIGINALLY DESCRIBED 9Y JAMES GAR- 
RETT, IN GST MAGAZINE AND THE 1975 RADIO AMATEURS HANDBOOK. 
SI6.9-S 

ACCUKIVtl— MEMOlir omON KIT— TOGETHER ONLY III^IKk 

6*DIGIT CLOCK # 12/24 HOUR 

COMPLETE KIT CONSISTING OF 2 PC G10 PRE- DRILLED PC BOARDS, 1 
CLOCK CHIP, 6 FND 359 READOUTS. 13 TRANSISTORS, 3 CAPS. 9 
RESISTORS, 5 DIODES, 3 PUSH-BUTTON SWITCHES, POWER 
TRANSFORMER AND INSTRUCTIONS. 

DONT BE FOOLED BY PARTIAL KITS WHERE YOU HAVE TO BUY 
EVERYTHtNG EXTRA. 



nttCtOAT 



'^l.SWfPBl 



!#*■ *.««>l M-t-w^ 



CiOCK CASE Available and will Hi any one of the above docks. R^itilat 
Prtce . . . $6.50 ■■l Oaly f4.S0 vfKA be^ht «rtfli ctock 

UX-DiGn ALA 1 Ml CLOCK ICIT t9# home, camper, RV. oc field-day use. Operates 
on 12-voJl AG or DC, arid has its own eO-Hz time base on the board. Complete 
with all electronic components and twopiece, pre-drilled PC boards. Board 
size 4" X 3". Compieie with speaker and switches. If operated on DC^ there la 
nothing more to byy.* 
rilCED AT „..,.. i 16.95 

Twelv&^voli AC line cord for thoee who wish to operate the dock from 1 10 volt 
AC. U.95 

SHIPPING INFORMATION 

ORDERS OVER $15.00 WILL BE SHIPPED POSTPAtD EJtCEPT ON ITEMS 
WHERE ADDITIONAL CHARGES ARE REQUESTED ON ORDERS LESS THAN 
S15 00 PLEASE INCLUDE ADDITIONAL Si 00 FOR HANDLING AND MAILING 
CHARGES SEND SASE FOR FREE FLYER. 



\ "MAI 





HMT HA80LD C HOWIAHO 
WiZXH 



HalTronix .H24 

P.O. BOX 1101 

SOUTHGATE, MICH. 48195 

PHONE (313) 285^1 782 



*^ HsmtS^r Senrice^see page 2tJ 



121 



ALL-MODE VHF amplifiers 



FOR BASE STATION & REPEATER 



MODEL: V350 



■t Buih (n 1 1 5Q30 VAC Supply 

iV AM-FM CW SS0 RTTY 

Ti60dB Harmarnca 

i^eOdB Spun pus 

^ Heavy Duty Design 




All Solid- 




MODELzVISO 



;V Auiomattc T/R Switching 
frVSWR PrOTQtled 
tt ^^^ 3V/3A Accessory Socket 
iVU-S- ManufactLifnd 



MOQEL 


FREdUENCV 


INPUT 


1 

OUTFUT 1 


SIZE 
WxDmH 


WEIGHT 


FAN KIT 
REQUIRED 


FRICE 


1 V7B 


5a52MHf 




B l&W 


iO0l2OW 


2ieK330Kl7amm 


1 1 7 kg 126 Ibs^ 


Nd 


$339 00 


V3eo 


SaSSMHj 




& low 


40O^5OW 


432 n 330k iTBmm 


23.4kg(52ltj^ 


Yes 


S89'jOO 


V70 


144^148MH£ 




101BW 


7&90W 


2teit330Kl7Bmm 


11 7kg(2erbsl 


No 


$315 00 


V71 


l44^T4SMHz 




t 3W 


75 90W 


21 Git 330* 173mm 


11 7kg(26ibs} 


No 


«349 00 


vieo 


t44.14BW3Hz 




&ISW 


170-KMJW 


2l6s33aKl7Smm 


13 5kgl30tt»» 


CW6FW! 


»539 00 


V3S0 


T44 14ai^Hf 




1020W 


35O-4O0W 


432*030* 179rTwn 


23 4k3l52lb6ij 


Yes 


$a9&oo 


-^1306 


2202^MHj 




10 1&W 


70 8&W 


216*^J0w178mm 


n 7kgl261S«S 


iMo 


t323.00 


VT36e 


220-225MNjr 




25-35 W 


14O160W 


216x330^17amm 


n 7kgt26ltjal 


CW%FM 


S46S00 


F1 10 






*% 


135Kl35KS0rTim 


1 kpl2 2lbsl 




& 3300 


Fun Kit, 115VAC 


F220 




Fan»Ci1.230VAC 


•k 
^ 


1 ^x 1 ^JiSOmm 


1 kgt2.2Lb&l 




^33 00 


•F13& 




FonKt?, USVAC 


■i 


38tx140xe9mgn 


3.2 kg ( 7lb:sJ 




s 59 00 


'F235 




Fan Kit. 230VAC 


* 


381x140«89nnnn 


3.2 kg t libs} 




S &9 C30 


RMO 


IS Iritih Ruck AdspiD 


r 


4e3je3Jc % 7SrnrTi 


t kg t2.2 tbaj 




» 25 00 


•BM-2 


19 tnch Rack ArJ^pto 


r 


ia'7)s32x28mm 


,&kg(1.1 l|>sJ 




9 T2 00 



' Used Wilh the VaeO & V350 Amptif iers 



Dealer Inquines Invited 



Oth«r FroqueticieB Available on Bef|uest 

Now me«ts all FCC requi rem outs 




mn^iBi ditf9i> 



RF POWER LABS, INC. ^r27 



VfSA' 



LA^ 110131 tSth Place N.E- KirKt^d, Wastimglon 38033 Teleplione; (2061622- 1261 • TELEX No 32-1042 




inear Transverters 

for 1 296 M Hz 

M&M has been appofniedthe exclusive U.S. distributor for these 
flew products from SOT A Communications Systems Ltd, 
These units art produced by SOTA under a license agreement 
from UKW, and are the commerciaf versions of some products 
previously in issues of VHF Communtcations. 



SIMILAR TYPE UNITS AVAILABLE 

FOR 432 MHz 
RX « NF 2.5 dB • TX - Power 15W 

Dual/Freq 432/435 



1296TRANSVERTER 

« Receive NF under 3 dB 

« fmage RejeclJon 20 dB or better 

• Output Power 2V2W min 



• Covers 1296-1298 with 
28-30 MHz input. 
144 MHz available soon 



NEW FOR 144 & 220 MHz 

10 and 11 element YAGI's from the 
original 220 EME design of WB6NMT. 
Call or write now for information. 



1296 CONVERTER 

• Receive portion of transverter only with same specs 



1296 POWER AMPLIFIER 



• sow outpul • 

* Compatible with transverter 



BuiU-in AC Supply 




Contact M&M for price and avatlablity of atl items. 



RF MSTRIBUT 



f : 



PC BoK 82183 • San Diego, CA 92138 • 2785 Kurtz SL Suite 4 • San Diego. CA 92110 
Call (714) 299-9741 



i^Li7 




122 



i^ R&adBf Servics^see pago 27 1 



CUSTOM TRANSFORMERS 




HMAVY-DVTY 
HEPLACEMENT TRANSFORMERS 



6TI LK 2000 p]*re $ 1 35 

COLLINS 30S- 1 Power , Si I 5 

COLLINS KWS- 1 Plat* 5135 

COLLINS 5 r6F. 2 Power $95 

DENTTiON I GO- 1 OL Pow^r . $125 

ORAKtL4BPiiiie SI65 

GONStTCSa-lOOfowH I 95 

OONStTCSe-201 ro««r .. $(35 

H-CRAFTTRS KT-IZ fowef $ 95 

H-CRArtiRS HT-37 Powef S 95 

HEATHDX-lOOLVPower.., % 95 

HEATH DX- 1 00 Modi $ 95 



HEATH HA' I PUie. , . 
HEATH H?( 10 Pow*r.. 
HEATH SB 220 PUte , 

HENRY 2KPIdie 

HEhERYZK iPower 
HIMRV 2IC 4 Power 
HENRY3K.APlJVtif 
HENRY 3K A DC Choke 

EFIT'BOLT Plate 

EF| 500 Modulation . 

EFJ 500 DC Choke 

NATLNCLZOOOPlAie. 



OFF-THE-SHELF SPECIALS 



PtATt xrwRi 
PLATE XfMRz 
PlATt XFMRi 
PLATE XFMR: 
PLATIXFMR; 
PLATE Xf MR: 
PLATE Xf MR: 
FILMT XFMRi 
FILMT XFMR: 
FILMT XFMRs 
FILMT XFMR:^ 
FIL CHOKE: 
DC CHOKE. 
SWG CHOKE: 



30O0 VAC ^ 3.0A CCS 2 30 PfEJ- 1 20LB . . 
24O0VAC@ l:5AICA5 2Z0 240PRi'4JLB 
3000 VAC ® ! ,5 A CCS 230 PR1-60LB . . 
3000 VAC @ 0.7 A ICAS { I 5/230 PRI 27LB. . 
3500 VAC @ 1.0 A ICAS I I 5/Z30 PRt'4 I LB 
4000 4 600 V AC ^ I . 5 A IC A S 2 3 O PR I - 60L B 
6000 VCT@0 8A CCS I I5'230PR^ 4 ILB 
5 VCT ® 30A 1 i 1 PR^ 9 5LB 

7 5 VCT * 2 I A J 1 7 PflI-9 5iB 

7,SVCT# 55A I I 5 230PRM4.6LB 

7 5 VCT # 7 5A II S 2 30 Pfi 1-20.216 

30 AMP Bl hlnar V^ognd on '/ jf 7 " TOd 

8 OHenrlei® I 5 AMPDC41LB 

S 30H«^iirles@ I 0AMPDC2 3LB 



SI IS 
195 
$125 
$t50 
it 55 
$165 
1165 
$ S5 
1125 
$ 95 
% 75 
$U5 



$4 SO 
'SISO 

$195 

. $ 1 r 5 

.$150 
$195 
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Many others *tto ^vmifmbtm. Wtita tar tm^ h^t Qr quot* on srtv cuitom 



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^06 




4007 Fort Blvd. "El Paso, Texas 79930 

Trrieohone (915) 566-6365 



■FunjBf (.hflfyi' 



Call or Write for Delivery or Quote 



KENWOOD TS180S 




LEAVE A MESSAGE & WPU CALL YOU BACK! 

MADISON 

ELECTRONICS SUPPLY, INC 

1508 McKINNEY # HOUSTON. TEXAS 77002 

713/653-0268 *^M3S 

MASTERCHARGE * VISA 



Ad pnces fob Hdusron, except where mdicat«d Prices subject 1o cHange 
without notJce, all items guaranteed. Some items $LJb|€Ct prior sale, Send 
leitertiead for Dealer price H si Texas resJderils add 6% tax . . please 
add postage estimate. Si. 00 mtnimom W&GJ. W5MBB. K5AAD. NSJJ. 
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A BiBakthraugh In Technology! 

MiCROPIWCESSOft COKTHOUEB 
STHTHESfZED HANDIE 



FT.207R 



144-148 MHz Range 
3 Watts Output 



VAESU 



4 MemorJes plus 
Programmabte Offset 



BNC Antenna 
Connector 



Squelch Control 



Audio Gain 
Conirot 



Memory and 
Band Auto Scan 



Automatic Battery Saver 
Feature for LED Display 

Prkjnly Channel 
Rubber Flex Antenna 



Clear ^Busy Auto 
Scan Sefecfor 

Repeater/Simplex 

^ Offset Switch 
\ 

__ Remote 
Speaker 'Mike 
Input 



Condensor Mike 



5-0»g;t LED 
Readout 



Keyboard Encoded 
Frequency Entry 

Keyboard Lock 
guards againsi 
accidental frequency 
change 




Channel 
Busy Lamp 

Transmit 
Indicator 



Display 
On /Off 



5 KHz Up 



Optional Equipment: 

Tone Squelch* Speaker /Mike. Nicads, Battery Charger 

fiss alf the features foa ceutd want in a vetf comfiSfct package 



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TOWER ELECTRONICS 

24001 Alicia Pky„ Mission Viejo, CA 92691 

pi 4)760-8900 

"The Southwest 's hill4tfie Yaesu Distributor" 



i^ Reader Sefvtce^see pag# 2t t 



123 




• 







LONG'S 
HAM 



Prtces in ttiis catalog subject to change 

without notice. Prices good only 
while supply lasts. 






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NOW! 




200 WATTS PEPI KENWOOD TS-120S 
All solid state HF SSB transceiver 

No tune up! hAiniatunzed circuits, solid state construction builHn 
digital diapJay. IF shift* finaf transistor proteclron. VOX. noise 
blanker, 25 KHz marker Frequency range is 80 to 10 meters and 
WWV^ modes: SSB and CW, power requirements: RX-0.7A 13.8 
VDC. TX-1SA 13.& VDC. 3^/?"Hx9y4"Wxt3%"L. We (9 hi 11J IbS. 



699.95 




NEW 

KENWOOD 

TS«520SE 

High quality HF transceiver 

With no heatef switch, DC-DC converter fermfnars, or transvertef 
lerminais the TS-520SE features 200W PEP SSB. bu^lt-in 25 KHz 
calibrator, semi^break-m CW, VOX/ PTTy Manual operation. 20 dS 
HF attenuator, provisions for 4 fixed cl^annets, and speech 
processor. It's an affordable quality HF transceiver freq. t60to 
10 meiers. 



List, C«ll for quote. 



629.95 



List. Call for quote. 



VtSA 




KENWOOD TU922A 
2000W linear amplifier 

Featiires: 2 3*500Z final 1 titles, ttme delay fan circuit, frequency 
range: 160 thru 15 meters. dnvepo*er 80W or more for fuii output. 
RF input power SSB 2000W PEP. CW & RTTY: tOOOW DC. power 
requirements: 120/220/240 VAC 50/60 Hz. 



1199.00 



List. Call for quote. 



I 



I 




KENWOOD TR-762S 
25 watt transceiver 

Memory channel with simplex or repeater operation ± 600 KHx 
transmitter offset, mode switch for switching the transmit freq. up 
Of down, (ull 4MHz coverageon 2m ( 1 44.00*1 47.995) . 800 channels, 
5 KHz offset switch. MHz selector switch, digital freq. display, and 
unlock indicator *or transceiver protect ioo. 



425.00 



List. Call for quote. 



Bj 




MAIL ORDERS PO BOX 11347 BIRMINGHAM AL 35202 • STREET ADDRESS ?BQB nn AVENUE SOUTH BIRMINGHAM ALABAMA 3523. 







QENTHON 

MT-200CIA 
ftnt#nna tuner 

A full power tuner with continuous 
tuning 1.8 to 30 MHz, front pan^I ground- 
ing switch, handles a full 3KW PEP. 
Inputs; unbalanced coax {SO-239 con- 
nectors), random wire balanced line, 
built-in heavy duty balun (3 cores) . capa- 
citor spacing SOOOV^ transforms load 
imp. to 50-75 ohms. 



199.50 



BIG 
BUY! 



List Call fof quote. 



DENTRON MT-3000A 
antenna tuner 

Oentron's ultimate tunerf For coax/an- 
dom wire, and balanced feed systems, 
built*! n antenna selector switch for 5 dif- 
ferent an ten r\ as, power handling in 
excess of 3 KW PEP, built-in 50 ohm 
250W dummy load, duaJ watt metefs, 3 
core heavy duty balun. continuous 
tuning: 160 to 10 meters. 





349.50 



LisL Call for quote. 




DENTRON 

Super Tuner 

Plus antenna tuner 

Matches any feediine, butlt-in heavy duty 
2 core balun, selectable antenna func- 
tons (4 antennas), aiternate output, rela- 
tive output meter. lOOOW CWand 1200W 
PEP SSB, comiriuous tuning 1.9-30 Mi4i. 



149.50 




OENTRON Jr. Monttar 

Featuring: continuous tuning 1,8-30 
MHi, foHAfard reading relative output 
power itieter, 300W power capabitity. 
buHt-Jn balun, mobite mounting bracket, 
ceramic rotary switch 23 position, 
capacitor spacing 1000 V. antenna 
Inputs: coax, unbalanced, random wire, 
balanced feed line. 



List. Cart for quote. 



79.50 




DENTRON 

W-2 waltfTietef 

ftead both forward and reflected watts at 
the same time, forward watt scaJe: 2000 
or 200. reflected watt scale: 200 watts, 
low insertion loss, frequency range; 1.S 
to 30 MHz. accuracy 1 5% has 2 SO-239 
connectors, sensor box may be 
extended 4'. 



CaJI today. 



99.95 



List. Calf for quote. 



DENTRON 

BFg Dummy 
load 

Now you can tune-up off the air with the 
Btg Dummy" U has a fiat SWR, full freq. 
coverage from 1 ,8 to 300 MHz and a higli 
grade ol industrial cooling oil furnished 
with the unit, Fully assembled. Cut out 
the QRM factor now! 



29.50 



Call today! 




DENTRON 

GLA-tOOO 

linear amplifier ^ 

Freq. coverage 80 to 15 meters, cowers 
most MARS freq.. RF drive: Max. 125. 
power consumption: 117 VAC 50/60 Hz 
12.5 Amps« factory I used at 15 Amps. 234 
VAC 50/60 Hz 7 Amps. DC mput: 1 KW 
CWand1200WPEPSSB Final tubes 40* 
50A tubes (6LQ€}. 



24.50 



/m^ 




DENTRON 
All band 
doublet 

antenna 

Covers 160 thru lOmeters and has a total 
length of 130* (14 ga stranded copper). It 
may be made shorter. It is center fed 
thfough 100' of 470 ohm PVC covered 
balanced transmission line. Assembly is 
corripleta. Antenna tuner re<juired. 
Tunes 160 thru 10 with 1 antenna. 



24.50 



Call today, 




DENTRON Cllpperton L 
linear amplifier 

Hl/Lo Power switching, covers 160 thru 
15 meters. 2000W PEP SSB, 1000W DC 
on CW. RTY, SSTV. continuous duty 
power supply 2500V idteSSa 1800V idle 
CW, covers most MARS frequencies, 
easily changed 117V or 234V AC 50/60 
Hz Final lut>eS- 4-5726. 



List Call for quote. 



599.50 



<r(«t««^ >v>„^» ) 




DENTRON 470 
Ohm Ladder line 

A 100 foot length of 470 ohm 1 KW 
balanced all-weather feedJine, Insulated. 
Use with any compatible antenna. 



12.00 



Call today! 




DENTRON 
DTR-2000L 
2000W predfilon 
linear amplifier 

Features a Broadcast proven 8877 tube, 
freq. coverage leotbru 15 meters, covers 
most MARS freq., modes; USB, LSB. 
CW. RTTY. SSTV. power requirements: 
234/1 17 VAC 50/60 Hz RF drive power 
t25W max and 65W RMS min for I KW 
DC input 1 S-21 MHz 2000W PEP, 



List Call for quote 



1199.50 



List, Call for quote. 



VfSA 



iTTTt 



d 




MAIL ORDERS PQ BOX 11347 BIRMINGHAM AL 35202 • STREET ADDRESS 2806 'Th AVENUE SOUTH BIRMINGHAM ALABAMA 3S233 





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your own notatipfts UN 10047 1. 



IN tODO? 

AMIL BpicM Operaftig id CoruiftU ol ARRL 
Ham Radio Gu^o^. ^uii coil or U S are* call map. 
ARRL (09 book. 70 ARI^ radtogravm I N 10O63 

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ARRL Jwlillti CommimicaUoni incFudes 
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to mtlar DXIng HandbniMk. CorMii:iri»4 sections 
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Tlw AmeteuF fladk» V«f1ic«l Antenna N ifrdbooli 
The tirtt tiook tor amateurv ^olelty itioul vertica] 
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iJOCT 

Tli« C h aN ngi of IW The untque operating 
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on builttmg sirnp^ eqiiipcn^nt I N 26^12 4,$$ 




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Radio Frequancy InlerftrehC* A new book to 
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Tlie Trutt^ Aboul CB Anlafinai by Wm Orr, 
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IN 33407 mm 

Collins RadNi Co- SSB Amateur Single 
Sideband i N 10O92 4,35 

73 Magazine VHF Antenna Handbook I N 
2630? 4.95 

73 Magazine Novice Clau Study Guide. I N 
2e30Q 4.95 

73 Magazine Gefieral Class Study Guide F N 

7b:^iu SJS 

The Severage Antenna Handbook. I N 26206 

5.00 
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Amaleur TV in a Nutshell I N 26322 5.00 

Ho« to Make Beller QSL i. I N ?6304 4.95 

The Complete Handbook of Stow Scan TV, 1 N 
30&lfl S-t5 



Remember, you can Call Toll Free: 1-800-633-3410 in the USA. or call 1-800-292-8668 in 
Alabama for our low price quote. Store hours: 9:00 AM til 5:30 PM, Monday thru Friday 



VfSA 




• 




MAIL ORDERS PO BOX 11347 BIRMINGHAIVI, AL 35202 • STREET ADDRESS 2608 7TH AVENUE SOUTH BIRMINGHAM ALABAMA 3523' 




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iH 30621 S.9S 

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I N 30525 5.95 

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I N :i0536 5.95 

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Electronic Conversions. Symbol*, and Formulas 
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30507 S.« 

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I N 30526 4.95 




Radio Amateur 
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Map LilK^ary A complete sat of maps prefix w^orld 
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OX cellbOPk blue IN 10055 
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1.50 

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30 MHf ihen get thrs booh tl covers evefylhinu 
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Remember, you can Call Toll Free: 1-800-633-3410 in the U.S. A or call 1-800-292-8668 in 
Alabama for our low price quote. Store hours: 9:00 AM til 5:30 PM, Monday thru Friday 



V/SA 



•iVO 






MAIL ORDERS P.O BOX 1 1347 BIRMINGHAM. AL 35202 • STREET ADDRESS 2808 7TH AVENUE SOUTH BIRMINGHAM, ALABAMA 35233 




t 






ORDER 

NOW! 




YAESU 

FT-901DM 

All mode 

HF transceiver 

Covers 160 thru tO meters. Variable IF 
bandwidth rejeclion tuning. CW audio peak 
filler, builMn Curtis keyef. RF apeecii 
processor, 10 second tune mode timer, 6146 
finals, auto mic gain control. 25 KHz crystal 
calibrator and ± 5 KHz claritier, builMn VOX. 
leoW DC input for SSB/CW, flOW AM/FSK/FM 
DC- DC converter. 




1459.00 



List. 



YAESU FT'202R 
2m handheld 
FM trapicefver 

1 watt output minimum. 6 
channel capabilHy, 
^eitibility helical whip 
antenna, equipped with 
tofwburst, com pad size 
and light weight S-meter 
and battery condition in- 
dicator, operated on 8 AA 
NiCid or 7 A A dry cell 
batteries. 3 pr . Xtats incL 



Call for quote. 



199.00 




LJst. Call for quote. 





YA€SU FRG-7000 
cummunlcilloni r^efver 

For the short wave listener, this unit has 
full coverage 0,25-29.9 MHz, modes; AM. 
SSB, & CW, digital freq., display, digital 
GMT/local clock, CPU clock timer, AM 
noise limiter, built-in power supply for 
AC. Listen to the world! 



655.00 




YAESU FC-M1 

antenna tuner 

Qesigned as part of the FT'901 series, 
treq. coverage is 160 to 10 meters, 500W 
PEP. It has 3 coaxial outputs & 1 
longwire. builtHn wattmeter & SVVR 
bridge witti 25. 250 & 500W scale. 



Ltst. Call for quote. 



1 99.00 



w 




YAESU FTV-90t n 
VHF/UHF/OSCAfl transcehrer 

A three band transverter for the 901 
series. The basic model has 1.44 MHz 
capability and plug in modules forSO and 
430 MHz are optional. Repeater offset Is 
provided tor & and 2 meters and full 
duplex operation on Oscar modes. A/B/J 
is possible with an external receiver. 



Ltst Call for quo(0. 



455.00 



List Call for quote. 





YAESU 

FV-901DM 
synthesized 

scanning VFO 

PLL synthesis in 100Hz steps auio- 
maticaiiy scans the band, extended 
nremory for 40 freqs.. claififier for fine 
tuning RXrrx Fof unt>eatabie ItexibMity 
control, this i5 the unit Matched to the 
FT-901 line. 



415.00 



L^st. Cell for quote. 




liwmi 



SP-901 
matching 

speaker 

For the ham. who wants ttre t>est this 
speaker matches the FT-901 series A 
fine addition to your Vaesu rig. 



35.00 



Call today. 



YAESU 



YAESU 

YM-2500 keyboard 

m*c lor the CPU*250OR 

For remote control operation of Ihe 
CPU*Z500R, 4 memories can be 

fjrogrammed and recalled from the rnic 
t has scan capabihty and touch lone 
encoder for auiopatch use. You can 
select any 2m Frequency from the mic. 



\f 



69.00 



Calt today 



^f f *.■ ,4 .< h* I ,ii4-ri I FH ■< 1 .1 n I ,-11 > ■ '■ I ■! 11 1 . 1 ' i 1 11 " 1 'T *'1-»i ■ 

'tni'tiiumwii-ft -in,. »-in,"H If i«nni,lh<niii»T ****** 



BIG BUY! 



f ttttiittlffl 

i-=: 


\ 




^3^ Tn^i'M y^ m. 




w * * 


-i.^r-Av.v::;^*!-^ 



YAESU 
FT-101ZD 
High perfomiance 
HF transceiver 

Covers 160 thru 10 meters plus WWV. modes: LSB. USB. and 
CW, built-in power supply, input power: laOWDC digital and 
analog frequency readout. 6146 final tubes, RF speech 
processor variable IF bandwidth [300 Hz to 2.4 KHz), noise 
blanker VOX attenuator 10 dB or 20 dB 1 00-234 V operation TX 
RX freq. offset. 



895.00 



List. Call for quote. 




YAESU 

CPU-2500RK 

2m FM transceiver 

With 800 PLL channels, automatic scan over entire 2m band, 4 
memories, toneburst. 25W Hi/3W Lo, 13 6 VOC al BA contin- 
uous, Freq. coverage: 144-148 MHz. Comeg with a keyboard 
mic that allows remote input of memory or dial freqs up/down 
scanning, aux. repeater selection to 4 MHz. 2 tone input for 
autopatch. 



585.00 



List Call for Quote. 



VISA 





JjLi 




MAIL ORDERS PO BOX 11347 BIRMINGHAM AL 35202 • STREET ADDRESS 2808 7TH AVENUE SOUTH BIRMINGHAM ALABAMA 35233 







CDETX 

Till Twtiter 
ant«nna rotor 

Towerinstalfation only. Turns Wsq.tl. of 
antenna. Wedge braking. Conlroi box 
1/110/T20 VAC, LEO mdicalors. meter 
for di ration readout Line cord: 3 vvire 
grounded, 8 line conductor cab!e 
required. 



299.95 




CDE 
Horn IV 

antenna rotor 

Pmpornt accuracy with snap action 

switched %vedge brake and rotational 

controls, To*er mounted only. Turns 12 

sq. ft. of amenna. 6 conductor cablo 

required. 



List, Call for quote. 



224.95 



List. Call for quote. 



DRAKE TVi filters 

TV'S200-LP TVI IMltr — 
The low pass f ifter has 200 
watts on 6 meters. 1000 
watts below 30 MHz. SO- 
239 connectors- 

26.60 Call today, 

TV-3300-LP — low pass 
filter. Attenuation: better 
than 80 DB above 41 MHz 
2000W PEP, SO-239 con- 
nectors. 

26.60 Call today. 






LAFtSEN LM-MM 

1SDK magnatic mount 
antenna 

Tfie 5/8 wave length 2 
meter antenna consists of 
a 49" stainless st^l rod. 
quadruple pEated. coil for 
t44-174 MHz, cable and 
magnetic mount Coil 
threads 5/16" x 24 threads. 
3 dB gain over a % wave 
antenna. 

Call today. 

List. 



39.45 



•A 




DYNAMIC 
INSTRUMENT 

battery 
recharge r 

Charges C size. O size. 9 Volt transistors 
jn 14-16 hours. AA penlights will 
recharge in 5 hours. Over charging is 
impossible. Safety plug allows only Tow 
vollage to the charger. 5 year war ran ly. 



12.95 



Lis! Call for quote. 



SHURE 444 detk rtite 

Has PTT switch, adjust- 
able head Freq. 300 to 
3000 Hz. Omnidirectjonal 
with controlled magnetic 
mic element for SSB. 
High impedance: 50K 
ohms. 



39.18 





MFJ-0044 IC deluxe keyer 

Sends iambic, automatic. * semi-auto- 
matic, or manual. Dot and dash 
memories, totally RF proof, solid state 
keying, front panel controls, weight 
control, tone control, function switch. 3 
conductor %" phone jack for key, phono 
jacks for keying outputs. Squeeze key 
optionat. 



69.95 



List, Call today. 




DYNAMIC 
INSTRUMENTS 
rechargeable nickel 
cadmium l»atterlea 
Guaranteed tor S years. > 

9L£v AA h**rmt.**tt**tt.t*tMw*' LIST o* fs 

Size D ..,....,., List 7,50 

Size 9 Bolt List 9,95 

Call for quote. 




TELEX 
CM-1 320 

headset 

"Top of the line" with a boom micro- 
phone-ceramic, high impedance. The 
choice of DX-peditions, 



List Call for quote. 



75.25 



CUSHCRAFT ATV-5 HF 
5 tMnd vertical antenna 

Wide operating bandwidth: 2.1 
SWR bandwidth with 50 ohm 
feed line ts 1 MHz on 10 meters, 
more than 500 KHz on 15 and 20 
meters. 160 on 40 meters, and 75 
KHz on 80 meters. Resonance 
can be adjusted. Coaxiai con- 
nector takes PL-259. Hgt. 293 
inches. 2000W all bands. 



109.95 



List. Call fof quote. 




HY-GAIN HB-MAG 2B7 
Hy-bander foldover antenna 

A magnetic mount antenna with 
foldover for hatchback cars. 5/6 
wave provides low angle radia- 
tion for maximum gain. Rachet 
foldover thru 180 degrees. Holds 
position up to 120 mph. Less than 
1.4:1 VSWR, 144-146 MHz. 3 dB 
gain. 



19.95 



Call today 




AEA 
AD-1 

autoftiatic 
dialer 

Get 18 numbers from a 1-2 punch. Make 
quick and safe auto patch calls. The AD- 
1 features Key -Pad Programmable mem- 
ory. buiINn speaker, MOS micro- 
processor and crystal controlled. Mates 
with virtual ty all amateur FM transceivers. 



List. Call today. 



89.95 



List. Call today. 



VISA 



•TK! 



HJJa 




VtAIL ORDERS PO BOX 1134/ BiftMiNGnAM Al 35?02 • STREET ADDRESS ?«0e 'Th AVfNUEi SOUTH BIRMINGHAM ALABAMA 35233 



An 8-Bit DPDT Digital Switch 



many 



Welcome to tri state. 



Stiftifjg M. Oiberg WISNN 
19 Loreita Road 
Wutiftam MA 02154 

A couple of projects re* 
quiring the eight-bit 
output from an ASCII 
kevboard have been com- 
pleted at WISNN. These 
are an ASCII-to-Morse con- 
verter and an ASCIhto- 
Baudot translator. 

A Southwest Technical 
Products KBD5 keyboard 
was purchased for the first 
of these two units, and 
later, when a television 
display and microcomputer 



to ASCn TO 
BAUDOT EJtCOOER 



n 



TVT 



ASCII 

TO 

ftAUOOT 



I J TO 



ZQHV 



TRIST*TE 
SWITCH 



A ^ C 1 1 



from the same source were 
added to the station, the 
keyboard was included in 
the display framework. It is 
a considerable task to 
disconnect the keyboard 
each time the other units 
are used. Some might say 
why not use the micro- 
processor in the computer 
to eliminate these two 
peripherals. I thought of 
that, but also remembered 
the time and effort spent 
on them and decided that 
some means of switching 
the eight-bit output 
wouldn't be too much of a 
task. 

By using tristate quadru- 



ple bus buffer gates with 
three-state outputs, as is 
often done in the micro- 
processor data input and 
output streams, it ts very 
easy to reroute the eight- 
bit output from the key- 
board to either of the 
aforementioned peripher- 
als and to use the TV 
display to read what is be- 
ing sent 

The bus buffers are 
74125 and 741 26 chips. The 
inputs of these devices are 
paralleled and fed into the 
eight-bit inputs of each of 
the external units. The 
ASCll-to-Morse unit does 
not require the full eight 



fi « r e TC^ TVT 4N0 DR «BO0 

< I 



TO flSCTi TO 

f IN COD en 




f^H?T?? 



MIZ* 



i 



TO ASCtt KETB04ltO 



Fig. 1* 



bits, and two of the buffers 
are unused in this require- 
ment; however, they are all 
used in the other unit Ad- 
ditional buffering was 
added to the bit stream 
output of the keyboard to 
reduce the load to the 
keyboard translator chip, 
which requires only one 
TTL load per bit. 

Tristate buffers operate 
so that when the control 
input of each of the 74125 
gates is high, the output is 
disabled; simultaneously, 
the 74126 outputs are low. 
The switch action there- 
fore is completed, Control 
of the logic is from switch 
SI which can be mounted 
near or on the keyboard. 

As shown in the flow 
diagram, the data from the 
keyboard is directed into 
one or the other peripheral 
devices and into the televi- 
sion display. It may also be 
fed into the parallel 
input of the SWTP 6300. 
This operation provides 
"canned" sentences for 
retransmission recalled 
from the memory of the 
microprocessor 

There are many types of 
tristate chips available. I 
am sure that, by the time 
this is printed, it will be 
possible to find one LSI 
that will do all of the func- 
tions described. The ones 
used in this circuit are inex- 
pensive and readily avail- 
able from dealers found in 
the ads of this magazine. ■ 



130 



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68 



What bave 
v'ou missed ? 



63 



JUNE 63. Surplus Issu&i DM0- 2 Beacon 
Tx on 220: increasmg ARC -2 uari*c«ivef 
selectivity, PE9'7A pcpwer supply co^ver- 
sion, 80^346 band-spread, Induclance 
lester; converlmg BC £30 TX, beginners 
HX using BC-453, receiver molorlunmg, 
tcansistorCW momtor; eC-442 antenna re- 
lay conversion; rnot^il^ loadings coi^ls; icv 
creasiTiQ Two-ef seleclivity, TV with live 
ABT 26Tx, TaC^ RXort 220; AR05 HF RX 
&TX;ARC-3TXon2m, 

AUQ M. ealtery-cp 6m station, diode noise 
generator: vtdeo moiJutation, magic T-f^ 
sv^^tch.; antenna gain; halo mods, CW 
break m, VEE besm dgsign; coax losses; 
rf waiimeter; TX tube guide: diode power 
suppty; "Lurictibox" squelch; swr explan- 
ation; vertical antenna \nfoi info on Win- 
d<jm antenna. 

OCT 63. WBFM transceiver ideas. Hf 
propagailon; cheap phone palth; remote- 
tuned VAQ\i construclion hints; antenna 
coupler; fs vertical : fiiarren! rransiormer 
construction, 2ni nuvjsior converter, La- 
fayette H E 35 mods; tjuyer's gutde to RX & 
TX; product deleetor: novel converter; 
e:ompact mike an^ptifier 

Available Issues published Irom t9€Ch 
1$$3 are listed at the end ot ihfs 
catalogue. 



64 



FEB $4. 2m myh^chafin^i exciter; RX de- 
sign ^deas. mafic !/r switch; Foudspeaker 
enclosures; 40m 2 W TX; look at test 
equipment, radio grounEia: 4Qm ZLspecial 
apienna: neutratizalion. 

Available issues published Irom 1904 are 
listed at I he end of this catalofjU'e. 



65 



Available issues published fiom 19ii are 
listed at the end of tt^ is catalogue. 



66 



Available issues published from I9<6d are 
listed at the end oi this catalogue 



67 



MAV B7. Quad Issue! 432 quad-quad -quad; 
expanded HF qtjad; two el quad; mini- 
quad. 40m quad, quad experiments; ha^f- 
quad, Lhree-el quad; quad biblfography: 
FET vfo: tube troubleshooting; HF dummy 
load: understanding ' dB"; Hf SSQ^CW 
RX. geometric circuit design: GSB 201 
tfansceive, FET converter tor i0-20m; bi- 
pass ftX filters. 

JULY 67, VE ham rad^o; VEt hams: OSB 
adaptor; home-brew tower; transistor de- 
sign; '39 World*! Fair; ground plane an- 
lenna, G4ZD t>eam; SSiV monitor; UHf 
"ET preamps; IC "ir' atrip; venicai an- 
■enna, VHF/UHF dipper; tower hints; scope 
monitoring, operating desh; S tine cross- 
band; N-9chool ham club; Heath HR-10 
moda. 



OCT i7. HF sotidstate RX; rugged rotator; 
des^ofiiog slug -tuned coils^ 



FET convert- 
er, SSTV pix g*nerator^ VHF tofj^fieriOdiCS; 
rcttatable dipole; gamma-match cap; old- 
(ime DXing; modern OXing, 



JUNE 68* Surplus Issuel transr^fmar 
trick*; BC-1206 RX. APS-13 ATV TX; to*- 
¥6tiat|e dc supply* surplus scopes, FM rig 
commercial «al lypes, Wilcox fd RX: re- 
storing old equipment; 7^A 1 RX mods; 
TRA 19 on 432; frequency counter use*; 
(ranscetver power supply; uses tor cheap 
tape recordefs; surplus convefsion bibllo 
grapt^y; RT 209 waikie on 2m; ARC-1 guard 
RX; RTTY TX TU. 

JULY (MS. Wooden tower construction; lilt- 
over towers; erecting a telephone pole; IC 
AF gscillator; 'dB" explained; ham club 
tips {pan 1), 

SETT ea. Mobile VHF; 432 FET preamps; 
convertmg TV tuners; xiat oscillation sta- 
bility; parallel tee design; moonbounce 
rhombic; 6m exciiar {corre^ctionfi Jan. 69): 
6m transceiver (corrections Jan 69j: 2m 
DSB amp; ham club tips (part 3^ 

NOV B8, SSB xtai tillers; soiidslate 
troubleshooting; IC frequency courtier 
fmany errors d omissions): -'CV" leans- 
formers; space communications Odyssey; 
pulsar info, Ihin-wire antennas; 4Gm tfan- 
sistor CW TX/RX, BC 34BM double conver- 
sion; multifunction tester; copper wtre 
specs; thermistor applications; hivoMage 
transistOf EiSt; ham club tips (part 5). 

Availfbte issues published from 196$ are 
list«d at the er^d oi this catalogue. 



cab^e sbi€idmg. trartslsiOf tfieory^ AM 
noise iimiter, AFSK generator transistor 
amp debugging: measure meter resis- 
tance; diOde^siack power supply; Iransls- 
tor testing; 2 Vt W 6m TX; HX-IO neutraliz- 
ing, capacilof usage radio propagation, 
AM mod percentage: Eictra class license 
study (part SK 3 400Z linear, ATV vidicdr^ 
camefa; 2 transistor testers; FET com- 
pressor. r1 plate choke 

OCT ASh Supef-g3>n AQti anterina; FEt 
chirper. telephone tnto; scope calibrator, 
thyfector surge piotector slower tuning 
rates, iderttHy cahbratoe harmonics F(W 
adapter for AN! TX, C6 sets on €m. propot - 
lional control xlal oven;xtal filter mstalla- 
lion, Q-mulbplier; transceiver power sup* 
ply; EKira class sludy ipart 9) 

NOV 69, KG X 3 on 6m; it notch li tiers, dial 
calibraimn; HW 32A external vto; fimcon 
veirter; feedlme mfo; rf Z-brldge; FM mo- 
bile hints, umbrella antenna 432-34 TX 
(part 131. power supply tricks wittn diodes; 
tianststor Keyer: transistor bias design; 
xlal^ VHF signal qenerahon. e'ectTonie 
variac, SB -33 mods. Extra class study 
(part TO); SBM linear improvements. 

DEC 69. Transistor-diode checker . dummy 
toad/at tefiuat or; tur>ed filter chores; band 
switching Swan 250 & TV-2; BS mH »lec~ 
tivtty, math exercises; RTt iilal calibrator; 

transistor PA design; HV mobile p,s.; 1-TO 
GHz freqmeler; CS ng on 6m; Extra class 
license study {part 1 1); 1970 buyer's guide 



69 



70 



Available tssues published from 1967 are 
listed at the er»d of this catalogue. 



J AH 68. Suppressor compressor; HW 12 
on 760; beam tuning; ac voltage control 
2m Iran si Si or TX; LC power reducer; spec- 
irum anafysis inf ojjm translator RX; oper- 
ating console: RTTY autostart; calculat- 
ing osciHatlon stability; tow-powe=r 40 CW 
TX, sequential reliy suritching, sightless 
oper*lor s bndge; hain club tips (pan 7). 

FEB 6ft. SSTV camera mod for last scan; 
tri-band linear; selective AF filter: unijunc- 
tion transistor info, Nikola Testa biogra^ 
phy; mobile msta^tafion hints; Ejitra class 
license study (part IK 

MAR Q9. Surplus issuer TCS TX mods; 
cheap compressormmp; RXZ calcula- 
tions; transistor keyer; better balanced 
modu^atoc; transistor osciifators; usin9 
|»towers, hat^wave feedlme mlo; surplus 
conversi^on bibliography; Extra class 
license study (part 2). 

At>R «l.2-channel scope amp: ftX preamp: 
Two*«r PTT: variable dc toad, swr bridge; 
160 kHi marker gen , sorrve transistor 
specs; SB^tQ monitorscope m^ods; port- 
able 6m AM TX; 2m converter; Extra class 
license study tpart 3). 

MAY as. 2m turnsfife; 2m slot, RX atlenu 
ator, generatof fstter: short vee. quad tun- 
ing; using antenr^ascope; measuring an- 
tenna gain, phone patch regs; swf ir^di- 
catpr, I60n^ short verticals 15m antenna; 
Hf propagation angles; FSK exciter; kW 
dummy {o^(Ji, hi-ppwer linear; Extra cla&S 
license study (pail 4^; all-band curtain 
array 

JUNE 69^ Microwave power generation; 
6m SSB TX; 432-er TX/RX; 6m convefter, 
2m 5/B v^ave whip; UHF TV tuners ATVvid- 
eo modulator; UHF FET preamps: RTTY 
montlorscope; Extra class license study 
Ipart 5K building UHF cavities, mmivee for 
tO-20m; VHF vfo. 

JULY 69. AM modulator: SSTV signal gen 
erator, 6m kW tinear; 432 KW amp. 432-34 
TX/RX, fim IC convener, radio-controlled 
models, RTTY IC TU: audio notch tiHei; 
VRC19 conversiorn lutie substitution; 2m 
transistor exciter; Extra class license 
study (part 6). HF FETvfo. 

AUG fift. FET re§en tot 35 MHz up: FM 
crystal switching: 5/&wave venicai; intro- 
duclion to tCs; RTTY tone generator; 
good^bad transistor checker; 2m AM TX; 
measure transistor Ft; I60m propagation, 
triac applications: simple if sweep gen- 
erator; tranststof keyer S8- TOO on 6m: jttal 
tfequency measurement. Extra class 
license study (pad f\i FM devtati;on meter; 
QFIP AM 6m TX: circular quads; FM nolee 
llgure; transistor parameter tracer. 

SEPT §S. Tunnel diode Ifieory; mag'c t*e; 
soldering techniques; wave-travel theory; 



lion. Diode Stacks, Deluxe Receiver Ga»n 
Conlrol — using one transistor and a 
lener; Reed Flelays for Coaxial Swilching, 
Beer-Can Two Meter Coajtia! Antenna; 
Converting 24 V Relays to tl6 V nc: Ver- 
satile 2m MOSFET Converter— low nptse. 
high gam. uUra stable 

NOV 70. Drfierential J-FET preamplifien 
Remote Quad Tuning; Two Watt SiK Meier 
Transmitter— using the crystal hetero- 
dyne vto; Semiaulprnatic FM channel 
Scanning: LQw-cost Automatic Keync— an 
e^celtsnt 'first project". Ac SwUcWng 
with Setl Powered ICs — clflver zero volt- 
age switch; Ptoneer f^adio on the Prairies 
—what It was 9Jke 45 years ^go: SST I 
Solid-State Transceiver for 40 Meters, A 
Low -Cost RF Wattmeter^ CahtKale Tttat 
Calibrator 

DECTO SofKi?tate VHFem^iterdeMa ire 
quency control for SS8; 2m transistor FM 
TX, HW lOOoftset tuning, Iltlfe§sle' dip 
per 3^500Z HF linear General class studv 
tpari 5). Iransi-test |no good eftws*) 
transistor p.s eurfeni ti miter 

Available Issues published Irorrv 1970 arr? 
Listed at the end of this catalogue 



JAN 70. Transceiver accessory unit: 
|>ench power supply; SSTV color method; 
tyase-tuiTM^ c en ter^ loaded antenna; 6m 
bandpass filter; Extra class licen^ study 
(part 12J, rectifier diode u&age; facsimile 
info. 

FEB 70. I&inch I5«i dipole. 6m convcfter; 
t^igti^er^sity PC bdard: camper mobite 
hints: 2m frequency synthesizer, encod- 
ingfdecoding for repeaters; 0X-3S mods, 
panoramic VHF RX, variable -2 HF mobile 
mount; Extra class license study (part 13); 
linear IC info, QRP 40m TX. IC Q muHipli 
«r 

MAfi 70. Gdo applications, charger tor dry 
ceiis^ FM trequercy meter; PC board con- 
struction; ham FM standards; cheap rf 
wattmeter; mulfifreq FM oscillation; "\4" 
system modules (part !); Six-er mods: ^& 
dip nte: Motorola 41 V conversiofi. CW 
monitor; buying surplus logic; SSQ-23A 
sonobuOy conversion; GRC-9 RXfTX con- 
version; Extra class study (part 14}; intro 
lOVHFFM. 

A^H 70, Nois^ tiianket; 2nfi hot earner d*- 
oda convener, repeater controller, undef 
standif^ COR fepeater; 7;8 wave 2m an 
tenna; Extra class study (pan I5):inexpen' 
sive semiconductors; renovating surpi^us 
meters, linear amp b^as regulatCK'; hi^}er- 
(drmailce H amp & age syslem; SSB bio 
tor shortwave radio: vacuum tube toad 
trox; general FM dope t repealer guide, 
meggerlng your antsnna 

MAY 70> comments on "FM docket' 
tieWB: future oi CW. FM AM RX atignef; 
5i^wave verticals; usir>g 2m intetligenlty; 
auto burglar alarms, power supplies ftom 
surplus components; 'if system 
modules (part 2}; VHF FET preamps; 
educated "idiot" lighls; postage-stamp 
5m TX. Extra class study (part 16), flistiop 
IFNL; iow-band police monitor; mobile 
CW TX: Wichita autopatoh. 

JUNE 70,DDRR antenna; vfo circuit; re^ 
mote swr indicator, tndoor Hf veMlcat, 
two RX on one antenna: environment A 
COQK loss; 2^\ trap verticals, tigying sur- 
plus; two 40m QRP TX, 21 dB 2m beam; Eit- 
tra class study (part ^Ti. 

JULY TO, Improved Color Slow -Scan Tele- 
vision; How lo Buitd a Keyer; 45&-MHJ 
Mighty Mite— one- transistor superre^en- 
eratlve receiver. Cheap^e 6-Meter Halt- 
Gallon— use ftn As and be heard, A High- 
Performance Power Supply— using an IC 
voltage regulator; Latham Island DXpedU 
tlon; DtJ to Power; Pfotection for Grid 
Dipper Coil's; Mobile CW Receiver; QSL 
tnfl . . . Ham Radio's Own Con Game. 

SEPT 70. Integrated Circuit CW ID Gen- 
erator; The Indication Osciliator— another 
dtppei circuit, 1-400 MHz: Tuning VHF Re- 
ceivers — clever infinite attenuator and os- 
cittator unil, Repeater Anienr^a Separa^ 



7> 



JAN 71. Split phones far DXrng. Hparh 
ten-er mods, CW duly cycle repeater ze- 
boater, HEP IC protects. JO t5-20m para 
tMiiic ideas: lightning protect con IC RX ac 
cessory: attic antennas, double-balai>ced 
rrrlxers. permanenl marker tool, ham 
license study questions. 

FEB 71. metal locator, varactor theory. 
AFSK unit; SSTV patch bom; ATV hints. 
RTTY tuning indicator, tone encodef^de 
coder; 220-MH7 converter. SSTV maiinp' 
deflection; iCcodeoScJIIatpr.ernTXbe^Ji. 
er; General class study (part 6J: RTTY in 
tro; perfboard terminft). low otimmeter 

MAR 7 1.1c audio ftlier; IC 6m coitvertet. 
trap vertical ideas; digital courrter info, 
surplus aqulpment iaenilfif:ation; Ml 
linear; simple phone patch, repeater audio 
mixer: digital RTTY accessories, C0'>i 
hanger gtound plane; General class sil : i 
ipart 7> 

MAY 71 ► 75m mobile whip. 2m preamr. 
iTansisior amp design. lOm OSB TX, poi ■ 
able FM trarisceiv^ directory^ audio com 
pressor-ciippet; transistw LM freq'netei 
450 MH2 lirfk TX; SJmpEe At liUer, t lube 
2m transceiver, surplus 2m power amp. 
General ciass study tpart 8y 

JUNE 71. 2m beam experiments, 3 el 2m 
quad, miitti-band dipo% paiierns: w*^^**^'-* 
t»HoQn vertical, pocket-pager se; 
Two-er vIp, luning mobile whips, transis 
top power supply; capacity decade bon 
40m gain antennas: General class study 
(part I) 



JULY 71. tC audio processor, audto signal 
generaiof . CW filter, Zni FM oscitlator: 2Tti 
co*^*neaT vertical, FM supplier directory. 
Motorola G-strip converstcm; transistor 
beta tester; General class study (pari tQ) 

AUG 71. Ham facsimile (pan in SOU- Watt 
linear, dimensions tor July collinear: 
4 tube 601^40 statton, via digital readout; 
Jupiter on 15m; Gerierai class study (pan 

1 1 J, pink fickel wave meter. 

SEPT 71, Transtotmefless power sup- 
plies; solid slate TV carriera, iC sutistity 
lion, two rf wattmeters; \C compressor 
age; multichannel HT200; ham facsimile 
{part 2^; causes of man made noise; vto 
with tracking mixer; General class study 
(part 12K transistor healsinkir>g. tC pulse 
generator; phone patch isotaiion; hcd 
wattmeters. 

OCT 71. Emergency repealer COR: Irans- 
cetver power supply, predicting meteor 
showers, digital switching: reverse-cur- 
rent battery charger, passive repeaters 
earth groyrKJs; audio tailorirtg" filler*^ 
Swan 350 mods. 

NOV 71. S-el 75m beam, motor- tuned 
ground p^ane: 2m gam tfertjcal; transistor 
biasing; spiit-^ite repeater, fox-huntirtg 
audio tiller, irarisistorrdiode lester. ctal 
tester, 6m kW amp. 1D'lS-20m quad, Iran- 
sisfor pi-net final; antenna feedlina; com 
municationsdBs; 2300-MH2 exciter 

DEC 7T. Convett Your 7 MHz Cubical 
Quad to All Bands; The Iridoor Quad; Get- 



^■b 



ling to Kfiow Tee Squared Ell; More Po*er 
From 6l4€s; f^ad^o Di recti on/Range Find- 
er; Mors« Memory— 30-tetief memory for 
Miwil, contests, eic; S€R Mobile Theft 
Alarm, OX OSOs oc coti tacts: Code Sfiort- 
hand: VHF Double Sideband 



Ti 



72 



FEB 7Z A Sottd'Stale Hrgh Fretjuency He- 
Qenerat^ve Receiver — si cheapo using 
one IC; Tips for Raising Your Code Speed 
10 20 WPM: Why Not Try QRP? VHF Oum- 
my Load Wailmeter; CW DX On Vt Watt — 
enloy ORP with this 1 Wa! r rig; 20-60 W 1-4 
Band TX— twolgbe CW transmiUer, 
OuicN aricJ Easy PNP^NPfsi Transistor Sort- 
V, Se I ''Contained Fte fleeted Poi^er ar«d 
OW Monitor; Circuity. Circuity. Qi rcutt^, 
Bie Automatic Trarksmission L»ne Tuner 

MAY 72, Quick Band Change Mobile An- 
tenna— wfth output indicator: How to Get 
the Slytf mto the Mouse. Anti-CW mrv 
Autoslart: A Modern VHF Frequency 
Coufiler— can be built toi under S1CK); TV 
Sync Genera tor = using fCs; PadFO As- 
tronomy, Noise and Receiving Antennas; 
The Sewerplpe Antenna— 2m FM, of 
course: Gircuits, Circuits, Circuits: Simpie 
Car Ammeier— all solid state 

JUNE Tit Sut Elemer-ts on Twenty Metefs 
— eSimifiaie QRM . Slow Scan Television — 
basics. Active Filler Design and Use— all 
kinds of filters . Part I: Radio Astrono^ 
my tor Amataura (Part U), 20 dS Qeams — 
lesign and constfucUon of VHF anten- 
nas; Phasing Mulliband Verticals — ten 
thru eighty meters; 300-MHz Frequency 
Sea lef— eat lends frequency counters to 
VHF. Circuits CFrcuits. CifCuiti; RTTY Fil- 
ters—elliptic tunctJon tjftefs: Troutsle^ 
StiQOling for tl>e Novice 

JULY m Solid State VHF Ampniler; The 
Phase-Locked Loop; VHf Converters; Add 
SIS T Power; 1296-MHi Mixer; The VHF 
SpeciAtiSts FM Arfipliflef; Metectr Shower 
OXing; Tone Oecodef and Carrier Relay 
Circuits— using the 741 op amp; Flying 
Spot Scanner for SSTV— solid-state unit, 
simple, relatively: Active Filter Design. 
Part \l 

AtlO 72. SSTV irttfo; speech processor, 
FM repeater jfiio, tes^ pfobe construction, 
GE Progf ine ac supply. 432 rf testing; pre- 
amp compressor; Six-er mods, phone 
patch; Two-er mfo; solar mfo, SCR regu 
lator for HYPS; "ideal"' Rial oscJllarar; FM 
RX adapter; auLo theft alarm. 

SEPT 72. PlumtJicon TV camera; Vi/VWa 
bG^kH^ RX; CQiar tut»e signat generator; 
CW active fitter, rf lesttng at 129&35P0 
GHz; batyn antenna feed; iransisior 
power sup|»ly; IC 6m RX, IC FM/AM detec- 
tor ipari 2); active filter design (part 3^; 
K20AW trequency counter (part 3), 2m fre- 
quency syrilheaizer {part ij, 

OCT 72. Coi^eciio^s tor Aifg FM RX 
adapter; 2m frequency syntfiteaiier (pari 
5 ; 6m transistor vfo; nano-ampere metef; 
1 1 rrve- frequency measu/ement (pari lji;ac- 
rive hJier destgn tpaft 4), fepeater ttmen 
Eiiira Class Q&A {part 3); balloon vertical; 
IC generator; ilme-delay relay; 432 filter 
Ideas, dc-ac inverter; hc-diode converter; 
RTL decade and nixie driver; pius-minus 
suppty for ICS. 

NOV 72. HF transistor power amps. HTTY 
SelcaJ, IC trf RX transistor keyer; em^er- 
Oency power; 220*MHz preamp, double- 
re Ita antenna; simple converter using 
modules; HF rt tester; 'lumped line 
oscillator; 2m frequency synthesiser (part 
3k K20AW counter errata. 2m preamp; Ex- 
tra €la:$s QAA (part 4); ni-Z votlm^tsr, 
N-koJa Tesfa story: VHf swr metef: tran- 
sistor regen RX; 432 SS8 trafisverter; ac 
arc welder; intro lo computers, hybrid AM 
modulator; HR-10 RX mods; lOm transit- 
lor AM TX; 40m ground plane; IC logic de- 
monslraior; overload protection; i-f/rf 
sweep generator; digital frequency count- 
er; aural TX tuning. 

DEC 7Z SSTV scope analyzer; ^n PM ftx. 
tone t>urst encoder and decodef ; universal 
i"t amp; autopatch hookup; LM3S0N info; 
voltage variable cap info; 2m 18-Watt amp; 
SS8 modulation monitor; KtaJ fraq/ 
activity meter; 10 A var. dc supply; trarts- 
m ESS ion line uses; radio astronomy; in- 
dijctancf meter; 75 to SOnt transveit^r; 
l£D info; 4€lfn preamp; transislo^ yfo: 1972 
inden; 2m pfeamp. 



JAN 73* HT'220 touch tone, 3^1 20m ya^i: 

50-MHz trequ«ncy counter Sp*ich pro- 
cessor; 24one generator, FM teat set: tilt 
over tower; 2m converter usiog moduiess, 
lunable AF filter; sl^^-band linear; tOm l-f 
tuner; diode noise limJter; CW/SSS age; 
HW-22A transceiver 40m mod: HAL ID 1 
mod. 

MAft 73. A Fast'Scan f^acsimtie System-^ 
use il With SSTV; St* aiHi Two Wete^ Hi^h 
Power — using a $25 surplus amplifier, A 
Digital Tape Distributor For RTTY; The Am 
pie Amplifier— alt band, 1200 Walts: Pop 
ular SSTV Circuits (Par! 11 j; Imptoving I he 
liidoor Antenna Syslem— using copper 
toil; FM Deviation Meters. Time Fre 
querM^y Measuring System (Part I ML An 
other Use for 400-Cycle Translo*me*s. 
Bandpass Filter Design 

APR 73. FM deviation meter; 2m FET pre- 
amp; two 2m power amps, repeater corv- 
trol (part I); repealef ttcensmg. European 
2m FM; FM scanne* adapter. RCA CMUlS 
mods, ttgtitnirtg detector. CB alignment 
gadget: Iransisior rl power amf»s (part 2\ 
repeater economics 

JUNE 73. 220 MHz siQnal generator; UHF 
power mater; repeater licensing info, 
RTTV auloswiich. 40m hybrid vfo TX, an 
tenna polar mourti; tO-l5 20ni quad 
K20AW counter mods; doutite coaic an 
tenna. i>am summer [OlJ; tone decoder 
fieid strength meter, r^icad Pattery pack: 
ohmmeter: FCC tegs (part 1j. 

JULY 73. Tuneable Oscillators lor 2m FM 
Receivers: Basic A TV System— a T 44 
transmitter strip does most of the wo*k; 
Mu I II pie Output Frequency Standards- 
lets you calitKate your receiver ir> QG2b-Hi 
incremefits; Digital Identification Unit; 
450 MHz Power Divider— easily-con- 
structed matching system lor stacked ar- 
rays, CW Fillers, Bared and Compared — 
complete with scope traces and taand- 
width specs 85 <JB Gain 2m Antenna; 
Compromise Mullit^and Antennas; Gnd- 
0?p Tunmg the Ouad Antenna 

AUG 73, Loo period ics (pail It; lone bursi 
generator; rf power amp design, transistor 
radio intercom; l60m anienna; SSTV mon- 
itor; low-cost frequency counter, VQM de- 
sign; QRP 40m TX; 432.MHZ exciter: FM 
audio processing; FCC regs (paft 3J. 

SEPT 73. Repeater con trot system, log f>e- 
tiodics (pad 2); 2m RX calibrator; PLL IC 
ap p F tea t tons, TT pad hookup; Heath HW 7 
'S" meter; OSCAR-6 Do p pier; 2m coaxial 
antenna: 2m converter; IC keyer; measure 
antenna 2; FCC regs jpart 4 J 

**0V 73. 450 MHz exciter, imro to ATV cir- 
cuits, ntcad voltage monitor, autopatch 
connections: IC meter ampli her; TFI-22 ac 
supply, irnioor vertical IC AF tilter; mo- 
mentary power fatlure pfoteotpon; tSOfit 
antenna coupler; Motorola HT into; SSTV- 
ISB, Ciass B AF amp; FCC regs (part 6) 



74 



FEB 74. SSTV monitor Info' IC audio 
amps, scope sweep generator, l5/20m 
yeriical; teleptwne line control system; 
PC board construct rofi; vaf-O AF tilter; 
blown-fuse rnOicator. AQm CW station 
with Ten-Tec modules. stmpJ^e preamp 
compressor. single-iC f^X; -432-34" final 
assembly; transistor keying circuit; 7 seg- 
ment readout with nixie driver. 

APR 74. VOX tot repeaters; tone^pe rated 
relay; HF trans vertef; tO to 2m TX convert- 
er; rerrroie conirol panel tOf scanner: RCA 
FM TX tuning, subaudible tone generator, 
FCC regs fpart 9). repeater alias 

MAY 74» CO car ignition; audio compres- 
sor info; inlerference suppression lof 
tK>a1&; auto bu^gEar atarms; 2m LC preamp, 
10m FET converter 

JUNE 74. Poor Man's Ouad; Reconciling 
the LonQ Squared Ouad— developing a 
new type antenna; Antenna Load Indica- 
tor: Matching: Remotely tunable Ar^tenna 
Coupler; A Practical Ground System for 
160: Wide- Range Antenna Tuner Old An 
tennas and New Batuns— builct a double 
zepf?; A Multiband Ground ptane- 10-40 
meters; Mod Quad for Frystraled 
Dwetlers. 



JULY 74. J-tOCXJA linear; universal fre^ 
quency generator: universal AFSK gener^ 
atOf; 555 IC timer fiOm phased array: 135- 
ltHi-4a2-MH:r pfeamps. lOm QRP AM TX, 
3001} V dc supply; how to read diagrams 

AUG 74. Toroidal direclional wanmeters; 

450-HNrfz FET preamp, usegdoto find "'C": 
Thmiine TT pad hookup; R390 & R392 RX 
mods; Iracking CW filter, aural voltmeief. 
universal reoulated supply, SSTV scan 
converter; TTL ^OQiC problems. tO timer 

SEPT 74. MOSKFY electronic keyer ipart 
t), WX warning system: Heatti (0^103 
scope mods; ORP 6m AM TX; rf speech 
clipper, audio noise limiter; WX satellite 
on SSTV monitor; universal IC tester; mrn- 
iaiure rig construction; tower consifuc- 
tton. Iniinile rt attenuator; eiectrontc 
photo flash Ideas; IC "select -o-ject." 

OCT 74. Microtransistor circuits; synthe- 
sized HT-220 (part 1); fepeaier goverrv- 
ment; regulateo 5 V dc supply; FM Seicat: 
removable mobi le antennss; Motorola me- 
terlng; 2m vertical cotlinear; Motorola 
model code: 2m coaxial dipote; !.6-MH2 M 
strip, MOSKEY eiectrofiic heyer (part 2y. 
carbon mike circuit, hi' power lo-pass ttl- 
fer; Sm preamp: 3-Wfre dipole; ATV sync 
gene rat Of; NCX-5 mods, mobile wh>p for 
apartment dwellers; SSTV automatic 
vertical trigger. 

NOV 74. K20AW counter update: regulat- 
ed S V dc suppty, wmd direction indicator, 
syntf^esized HT-220 [pari 2|. 20m 3-et 
beam; autopatch pad hookups; double- 
stub antenna match. Novice class instruct 
iion. digital sw^r mater (part 1), ©m con- 
vertef i1.6 MHz i-f); "Cbridge': MOSKEY 
electronic ke/er (part 3i; Aug. SSTV scan 
converter errata; repealer olt-lfequency 
indicator. 

DEC 74. Care of meads, wtnd speed/direc- 
tion indicator, WX satellite video convert- 
er; eleclronkc keyer, Hints for f^ovices, un- 
known meter scales, SSTV tape ideas, 
TTL logrc proPe, public service band con- 
verter; tuned-diode lest receivers; digital 
swr meter fpart 2); telephone pole tieam 
support, rhombic antennas; 1974 Indei 



75 



FEB 75- Heath HO-IO scope mod for SSTV: 
electronic hjeyer; digilal sateMite orbttal 
ttmei OSCAR'7 operation; satetfite Oflail- 
a* prediction. Heath SB- 102 mods: com- 
paring FM & AM; repeater engineenng; 
Robot SO' A SSTV camera mod; neutraliz- 
ing Heath SB ilOA, Bounceless' IC 
switch; tape keyer for CW TX. 

MAY 75. IC Caltsign Genef«ior, Ptaying 
wfih Powef or* 432; Does Ether Cau^e 
Gravity?: OSCARing Your FM Rig: in Pur- 
suit of the Perfect SSTV Picture; Ac Power 
For the HW 202; You Can Work 75m DX; 
The Postage Stamp Squelcher; disaster in 
Honduras. 

JUNE 75, Hom« Brew this S5TV Monitor; 
El Cheapo Supertieam; The Smart Alarm; 
RF Power at 432: Dirt Cheap Tuna&le IF 
for Converters Ail Band Frequency Mark- 
er; Front Burner for SiXp Three on Fifteen; 
Pre St o? Transistor Checker from VOM; 
How to Put on a Professional Slide Show 

JULY 75. OSCAa Special? Antennas for 
OSCAR— What Really Works'*; How You 
Can Take OSCAR'S Temperature, FM 
Alignment Oscillator; Tlie Audio Synthe- 
sizer for RTTY, SSTV and Whatevef. Ham 
Radio in the Arct+c— 1925; Gee, W?iat's a 
Zepp?; Vertical Antennas tor the Novice; 
Preventing Regulator Carnage: The Ulti- 
male in Variable Selectivity: ^one Paicb- 
ing— A Public Service 

AUG 75. ^4J5f432>MH7 tietleal antennas 
tpart 2): 20 minute ID timer, digital swr 
computer {part 1); detjugglng rt feedback; 
DVf^ buyer's guide; WX satellite monitor; 
CMOS "accu-lteyer"; PC board methods: 
sweep4ube final precautions; compact 
mult I band di poles; small digit at clock; ac- 
cessory vfo fo* HF iransceiiver: modem 
non -Morse codes; multi-funciFon genera- 
tor; 2m scanning synthesizer errata: 
KP 202 walky cfjarQer; lOm multi-element 
beam. 

SEPT 7S. CaicMlating frequency counter; 
WX satellite FAX system (part t); IC mHIt^ 
voiit meter, three-button TT decoder; 
troubleshootina SSTV pix, 40m DX anten 
rkas, I46/432-MH2 helical antennas (con^ 



elusion); digital swr computer (conclu 
sionj; reed relay for CW bk-m, NE555 pre- 
set timer^ powef- failure alarm; portable 
QHP fjg power unit, precision 10 V die re- 
ference standard, i35-kHz it strip; tftte- 
phone handsets with FM iransceivefs: 
Motorola T-44 TX mod for ATV; G-eawh.- 
synlhesizer Ipart 1), nam radio PR. 

OCT 75, A deiuice TTY keyboard {pari 1j; op 
amps: a basic primer: an introduction to 
microprocessors; 2m synthesizer (conclu- 
sion}, saleilrte FAJt system Iconctusion). 
regulated supplies idis petting the mys- 
tery!; digital logic made simple: FCC inter- 
view, a contest uP system, digital clock 
(Imebases. I he operating desk, QRP 432; 
ham PR. 

NOV-OEC 75, Blockbuster double issu^- 
Flip fi ops exposed, breakihrough in fas" 
scan ATV; strobing displays <s coo!, the 
tuned lunch box (antenna tuner to* H- 
transcetversj, a deluxe TTY keyboard (pari 
2): Ihe 127^ rotating mast; less than Si 00 
mulll-purpose scope tor your shack (pari 
1); predicting third order inlermod; feed- 
tine pfimer; ORMmg ir>e Thud Reich, why 
tubes haven't died: mstanl circuits — build 
your own IC test lig, the K20AW synthe- 
siser PftOM-oted. a ham's iniro to micro- 
processing, ground fautl inlerniptet ::^ 
keep alive circuit lor yourself K a S1 str.p 
chart recorder; an even simpEer clock 
oscillator: the Fun City surplus scene; u[ 
daitng the Heath IB- 110 1 counter. 256 
pages I 



76 



FEB 76. Build a Starf leet Communicator — 
Tfokkies spectal. Synthesized IC Fre- 
quency Stand ardt You Can Make Photo 
PC Boards. How's Your Speech Ouadiy?: 
ASC It to- Baudot converter. flTTf Autocall 
—the Otgital Way, improving the FT tot. 
Night DXing on tO and t5m; Really Soup 
Up Your 2m Receiver; Put Your SB 10 on 
T60m. 



r 



MAY 7S. Special Antenna Issue! The Mag 
nrltceni Sevens MicrohelDi: An Allband In 
verted Vee, Cfosed Loop Antenna Tuning: 
The 7S^m Broadbander; The Magic of a 
Matchmaker; How to Coan Your Antenna; 
40m DXing— Clly Style: The Secret 2m 
Mobile Antenna: An Inverted Vee for 
teO/SOm, The D^poJe Dangler; Amateur 
Weather Satellite Reception. Scan Your 
HR-2i2. A Vety Ctieap »0— the Model i5; 
Code t:k>nverter Usmg PROMs; A Nifiy 
Cassette -Computer Systems. The Ins and 
Outs of TTl: BuHd a CW Memory; 
5;8 Wave Power for Your HT; 5S5 Timer 
Sweep Circuit tor SSTV: AM Is Not Dead — 
It Never Existed at All; Computer Lan 
guages — S^mplitied- 

JUNE 76. VHP Soeciair Super COR— Digi- 
tal, of course!; Touchtone Decoder- us 
ing a calculator readout; Simple Amateur 
Jv Transmitter, Amateur TV Receiving 
System; Mobile Autodialer; Autocall m— 
using a touchtone decoder , Build This Lab 
Type Bridge — and measure transformer 
impedances. How Those Triangle Thmgs 
Work — a sort of oo amp handt>ook; Those 
El Cf ting Memory Cfiips — RAMs. ROMs. 
PROMs. etc. ASCll/Baudo! with a PROM 
-for ribbonless RTTY on computers. Aim 
Your Beam Right— with a programmable 
calculator 

JULY 76. Perfect CW— drive em craury with 
(tie keycodef I; Ttie Mini Mite Allband ORP 
Rig —a mighly 7 Walts, A Fun Counter Ptoj- 
eci— urvder S50; Bulid a FAX from Scratch 
-»then get satelHte pictures and other 
things; Der Repeatermelster — repeater 
controi with ID: The Giant Nixie dock: 
Creative SSTV Programming; CW Reg en - 
erator/Procass: What's Upon ^56 MHzf; TT 
Pad for the Wilson HT; Power Supply 
Testirkq— to save your d^ttal circuits; A 
RTTV/Computer Display ijnit: Your Com^ 
puter Can talk Morse, Gain for Yoiir HT— a 
half -wave whtp; The Super Transmatch; 
Simple VHF Monitor. 



SEPT 7&. The Sisrprising DORR Low Noise 
Antenna fpart lit; Ullrasimple Regulation 
with New I C— power supply design great- 
ly s^mpljfie<1 Can an Indoor Antenna 
Work?— making the best out o1 a bad bar- 
gain; Inexpensive 12 VoHs for Your Base 
Station; A Test Lab Bonanjta— usmg 3. 
transistor radio; Protect Your VHF Cor 
verter— no^el antenna relay, ridicuiousJy 
Simple RTTY System; How to Catch a 
CBer; A 450- MHz Transceiver for Unde- 
SIX; Space Age Jun<jue II: PROM Mem 
ofy RevLSded; &gni Trace Scope Adapter; 



iJiUJSm 



■iiiilMai^ 



ROM Zsf "neaky Baudot — wdh 
1 . • ^Cll keytK>,i ,* inT-.'^i"-. ^raptllcaTef' 
fT»''?al— usir^g surplus^ *fs Are Ho\ 
— they're simple 

OCT 76. audlfl a Wskd 2 Band Mot^Ue Aft 
i^Tiina; Build a Counter for Vou^ Receiver; 
H w Do Vou Use tCs7 (pari UK OR P Fun on 
1 80— have a real baN wHh Just 5 
r. r .. The Hybrid Quad— Ioim wmijioa<J, 
*?vpfinse, hAssie' , Fteqyeficy D^tedlor foi 
ir ^^ii Oountef: ProQrarmrtabfe: CW ID Oml 
— for fTTTY, re: '^s, mobile, eic. New 

IC9 for the C ...i ler Cuttur© — simpler 
<]<?LiiiteFs with less ijsed ptswer: Is My Riq 
VVrkiug Of No'l?^bul>d ari efl»ctr.'>.' 
radiated t^ekJ meter and know'' O 

^uarar^ieed; BuMd a Super Stanctanj— 

gOflf light ^owrt to 1 Hz. The tncredible 

Lambda OfotJe. Mectianical RTTY BuTter, 

Mnv« you Lifted n THac Ynt?; How To inter 

fie a Ciook Chip— Baudot. BCD, Of ASCII 

wersJor*: A TTL Tester-- great for of" 

4 r feed bargain iCs. The H&m Ham Pro 

.*i r*iei _ mahirig those cofltmifided uPs 

BASIC? Wfiat'fi Tt^al -the tkftstcs ol 

-^ "'SIC, The Spf f Aft ot Programmm^j (part 

HQV 76. BbockbUBte? zaB-po. issue f Cord- 
less Irori Tips: R'lcycte MobiTe; BuilflaSim' 
pie Lab Scope--co4ts tess than 170'; Get 
OP S«)t with Syrplus— the et cheapo BT-70 
ta a 7ia Sural, The Beam Sav^er— rotor mem- 
or* aysleftn; Updalotl Universnal Frectuency 
atof. The Shin-Pockel Touchtorie; 
josj Crystal Display Guide, SelfPow 
^^'-■d Mike Preamp; The Wind Counter. Thp 
S30 i% Not Dead" The Ammziiig Inverted L 
— *nlefin» fOf 20, 40. ar*d 80m. Butler. 
Ctiargers Eitposed: How Do You Use iCs 
(part ill). Thiirty Years of Ham RTTY: Big 
Mrjtsd Surgrar Atafm: Dandy Digital Dial 
1 ler. Weather Satailite Display Con- 

u II, rtam. Timesharing is Here *Df You! 
T.np Soft A't of Pfoflrammmg (part IflK 
OSCAR Smoke Tester —power Swppiy 
test(w; The Man Who Invented AC— Tesla. 
th&mBa\^^1 pioneer ol tt>eiT) all. Bevdol to 
ACf^t^^Qy ^ani ^0 (earr^ programming^'', 

t and BASIC— an InlBTpretcr tor a 
t com p titer: Toward a More Perfecl 
i.>tj^rti3rie Oecodef, Using a Wireless 
EroftdcaQter. Tt^e Qu^l Spy —amateur y n 
coverE spy ring in the US! , The Benefits of 
Sidc4one Monitoring — and how to doll. 

DEC 76, Co Tone for Ter»— airtrple sub- 
audibje encoder, World's Simplest Five 
Barvd Receiver?; How Do You U^e ICs? 
jpatl I VJ; A Swpef Cheapo CW IDer; The ZF 
Special Ajilenna, CT/OOi Cloctibtistef 
Saving a CBttf; A H am B Qon^pui er; What s 
5 LSI Bunk ? — a n o St rich s eye vie* 
o< the microprocessof ; The Soft Ah of Pro- 
grammtng (pan IIH; Put Snap Into Your 
SSTV Pieiures— ysing a $20 frequeticy 
standard; What^a All This Wire-Wrap 
Srult?— talk about cold 30»def joinis* Ek 
piodiJig the Power MylTi, Exploding (hie 
SWft Wylh, The IC-25 Waikie— ponebiiza 
Hon with n^cad^; Watch OX wilh a Spec 
tntm Analyser- DXtng with a Weather Map 

HOLIDAY 7a.55aftfcEeS'^^'^>f Ah Incitpen^ 
54ve 40O-Wart HF Ampi tow Do Vot* 

^ iCs'^ ipart Vv. Mobile Smottey Detector 
•" S GHr; use •! Of lose ri!. Ad^i RIT to 
11..-.: TrB"^""""ver: DXpedM^o^n: Memories 
for a LKft — relfections Of HKHL; Oe 
sian Your Own QRP Durrvmy Load; Fail- 
"uper Charger— mud if ate, tool. The 
nf T6" Anter^ne for iSOm: Replacing 
life Switch — simple TR system lor 
Novw:e Now Vow Can Syntfr>e5)se— 
VHP En^in9e?mg approach lo2m har 
, .mi?ss; Hutchinson sf^emedy— I he ch:- 
iess CW machine, The Mod Sqund D' -^ 
th.? pocket Scanner— Radio Shack Pro 4 
update; TR'22 Mod Squads What Gomput 
ers Cs" -"'^ ^-- t Do; A Ham ShacK File 
Hand , - ^ in BASIC *0f OSLs. re- 

peaters, etc ; Prmr Voyr Own Logbook- 
on yotJT nearest computer. Shoeing Yotir 
HT. Cash In on the CB- installation for 
Fun and profit, Tuning Those Btg Antenna 
Col la; The Sm Mod Squad Tackles the 
' er Padio— and wins'. Hamming by 
i=jLi-L'r, A eO'Foot Anlenr^a On a 2tt Foot Lot 
—solving a *Orn Novice problem. DnaJ- 
Votiage Power Supply; An Aulopatch 
Busy Sign a « the QLB— a gut ay lock 

at a synthe&L£ur : iHow to Bug an Automat 
ic Keyer; A 4S0 Dupiewef— that fits myour 
car. Will Stiver-Zfnc Replace Ihe Nlcad'* 



77 



J A N 7 7. SSTV Test G ener at o r ^ i n va I uab Fe 
ti fag no Stic toot; How Does Your Rig Per- 
fcrm?— an example us^ng the HW-7, 



WhaTs The Best Antenna lor 160'^— the 
invertea vee compfomrse, 200 lb. Cookie 
— microwave repeaier oonlroi, A Super 
U»|t— a program tor the ham shacK com- 

Skutet; f^racftc^l Sotar CeU Powers-great 
or remote lepaaters; A Simple RC supsli- 
tuifon BoK — using a matrix; Double Side- 
band; Something New?— one lor voice, 
one for SSTV; A Vest Pocket QRP fiio-tf 
you have a big one, Antenna Magic 
— good advice on antenna lundami^l^s. 
Rfjs 40 more. 

FEB 77, Give That Professional Look To 
Your Home Brew Equipment— win pri2:es: 
G<v€ the Hamburgiar Heart Faiiure-^car 
atarm system. Content SpeciaJ Keyer— 
has short but vdequale memory: You Can 
sour»d better With Speech Pre-emphasts 
— e simple circuit which will work won- 
ders. Getting a Patent— Is It Really Worth 
It?— how to do it. If you really want to; 
SSB The Third Method— bet you cant' 
even name the first two. The TTL One Shot 
— another d coital building block; Comput- 
erized Satellite Tracking— the needed 
software; On ve More Safely With A Mob^^e 
Dialer— hold 4 or 9 phone numbers m a 
PROM ; Tune Up A Randorn Wire— world's 
simplest antenna for BO-15. Plus ID more 

ilAfl 77, Pitcairn istand— an inside tooliat 
VR6TC. HOW Oo You Use tCa?— part VL 
PROM M^sege Genefator For RTTY — 
key bca rets are o^olete; IneKpetisiye Van- 
ahle DC Supply —easy and quick; The His- 
lory of Ham RadJo—part I; Versatility Plu^ 
For the HW 202— ejrternal channel mod 
Making Your Own PC Boards— part \, An- 
nouncing the PCF — legal aid toe ham 
pr 0*3 1 ems. Build Your Own Ca' Regulator 
-solid state. The Happy FJyefS — tun and 
public service Plus t5 more. 

APn 77. RTTV^ What s That?-how to get 
started with teletype, Making Your Own 
PC Boards- pa^t II, 80CW for the 6800— it 
works. The Super '"fcrV- what'tt they 
think ot notf The f ^eeder — dtivitig 

a high power amplitier; What About Sur- 
plus Nicad^?— how to tesi and repair 
Ihem; The Hislory of Ham Parilo— part 11; 
Retrre to a Ham Heavon—how to go on a 
permanent DXped^tion, The Carbon Mar 
v^et— best mobiie mike jet?; The Mintcom 
Receiver— 1malty» a QnP ellbandet. Plus 
36 more 

MAY 77. Build The WoflcJsSlmpiest Kever 
— uses 555 timers; Predict the Weather! — 
a complete satellite receiver. The Hfslofy 
of Ham Radio- part ill; Let BASIC Conltoi 
foijt Nejct Contest!— With Emierided Tiny 
BASIC tangu*ge. Understand Your Pel 
Rock— lips on crystal osciUalor^; TTL 
Techniques -^bypass those glitches; Stop 
Timeouts! — buHd this tO-minute ID timer; 
Quick Vertical— for 2€ and 40; Try Power 
Savef Logic— a guide to CMOS apphca- 
tions All-Electronic Selcal— usesa UART 
for ¥fr -y Plus 54 rmiie 

iUNi 77, BuHd This CW Filter— darned 
good; The W1SB Story— a visit with the 
king of 160; Ten Watts on 2— it's possible 
w^th I his fock crusher!: At Last! A (Qm 
Band Pian— requi^g a. CB racJ^o: Sheet 
Metal Brake- butTd micfowave compo- 
"^nis. Pracl+cal PS Design- do it right 
s lime; Regulaled Nicad Charger— 
don'l cook 'em I Current-Saver Counter 
DF^pfay- mulilplex those LEDsf; f^ew PC 
Techniques Unveiled!—' dig cut your old 
chemicals: Mow Do You Use ICs- part VIE 
P^us 22 more 

JULY 77. A aaitefy Volt age Monitor— hgw 
simple can i^o \C project get?; Hunting 
Noise— wilh a grtd dJpper; Hams Prohi 
From CS — how to set up a service center: 
Patch Up Vouf 101- Simple mod tor the 
HW^IOl. Dfi>oie Pesitjner Prog ram— cat- 
culates coils ami tenglh; CB to 10- parts 
m. IV. and V; Worlds Smallest Continuity 
Tester — it" s almost minute: Digital Syn- 
thesizer — fevJtalJze old xmtr strips; Phone 
Patch T^ps— a lost art?: Dfgital Clock Falj- 
Safe— so you won't miss the train Ptus 18 
mwe 

AUG 77. Antenna Special? Centeffed Spe- 
cials- for the smalt city lot. Build a Dou 
ble Bazooka— give your signal a t:ilast; 
0.irt Cheap Drrectlonal Array— for the se- 
rious DX hound; Instant PS^eguiation— a 
quickie; The Zeppy Verltcal — a perfect 2m 
antenna: Tt^ SJK Array Revisited— mex - 
f.dr-^ive ^f-.f^ effective; Buikl a Brute Power 
mpietely regulated and pro- 
tected, Computer Logger— tof Those who 
keep logbooks; bulfd a kW Linear— a 
4 IQOO provide* the punch; PC Layout Tips 
— ne)(| lime, do it rignt> Pius 44 more 



SEPT 17, RTTY Special! A FAAROUT DSC 
ped 1 1 ion —airborne VHF and OSCARS So 
YOU Want to Gel Into RTTY?- Call For 
Papers '" winner; Design an Active RTTY 
Filler— ehminaie CW QRM an<| noise; 
Build a RTTY Message Generator— it's 
programmablel; FSK for the Drake— easy; 
Baudot To ASCII Converter— use it for 
OSCAR RTTY. RTTY With the KiM— fea- 
tures touih-m display', FSK Jor the FT-tOl 
—a simple mod for RTTY. No^se Reiector 
— fifeat tof CW or phone receivers; A Prac 
tica! Jm Synthesizer— who said it cant be 
buitl? Plus 17 more. 

OCT 77. WAS— Easily*— catching the 
lasl few, Try Youi KfM-1 on RTTY ^ Gil L on 
your computer. Try a Trapped Dipo^e— 
sa^ copper and coavl; Novice Antenna 
Specials- tips for that tirst antenna; Trat 
tic Handling Explained— a lost eft?; One 
Cent Channels For the ►C 22S— Inflatton 
I Ighter f; Sensitive Meters Saved , Add Ja^^ 
to Your Tempo— with a few Sample mods, 
Inter est fXt In Television? — how to get 
starts Digital To Au4io Decoder— (or the 
tjlind opetator Plus 26 moie. 



Dec 77.The History of Ham Radio— part 
V; How Do You Use IC3?-pafl VUl; A Kilo- 
watt AlieiTiatrve- try a gain antenna; The 
0A4FB Story— American repeater m Ger 
many, Ccrftiputertied Global Calculations 
— flndiru) the tie St way to Pago Pago; ^iin, 
Shetla. Ffun:— real lite ratfJo control; CB to 
tO— parts Vt and Vll; amplitude vs. Fre- 
quency-poor man's spectrurn analyzer: 
Regenerated CW--CW as you like It. Plus 
41 more 



78 



JAN 78, Build a Belter Phone Patch— hy 
brid-Dp amps— the works: Build a 3 ■'i Dig 
Jt OVM— reptaces old m^jierg.'; QRP Htnts 
—lot low'powef freaks. Custom-Made 
Thermistors — for prec»se values; UHF 
Piopaoatlon— believe it, Put an ELF m 
Your Keyer— sneaky compuler strikes 
again- CB to 10— pari VtU; The Extreme 
3a:s^ics of Antennas- for pre-Novicet; 
Versatile Transistor Tester— $ava expen- 
sive devices; How to dissipate 200.000 
Megawatts- fool Mother Nature. Plus 3€ 
more. 

MAR 76, Old Rigs Can Uve Again!- a 
guide to thecf resurrection^ Kovices. Pad- 
dle Youf Way lo Happiness— super de- 
luxe Novice keyer; ^22^ MHz— Use h or 
Lose fl<— srmple gear you can build and 
enjoy. New Protection For Your Car — sim- 
ple force field system; The W(^ld of Tone 
Control— a virtual encyclopedia on the 
subiect; Another Approach to the ASCII/ 
Baudot Headache— a Model 15 and an 
SWTP system. Surprisingly LOw-Cosl l^b 
Supply— an !C regulator does rt^ The So- 
lar-Powered Ham Station— one hundred: 
Watts, yet!; Are You Afraid To Build"?— 
how to get organised and started; How to 
Use a Varactor— And Why — seml^ exhaus 
Uve article Plus 33 rruM'e. 

APR 76. How to Succeed on 1296— cat- 
food can ^Watt imp^iften How Do Yog 
Use iCsl— part tX; The ChaHenge of tO 5 
GHz— use it or lose 11 to Smokey; Now 
Anyone Can Atlord a Keyboard— surplus 
keyboard, KIM, and software; Is TTL At 
ready Otjsoleta?— CMOS vs. TTL. improve 
Your HW'202l —more f lexJbdity. etc ; Sim- 
ple CW Interference "Fiher'" — diode co<t& 
regeneration; How Sui^spols Work— ba- 
stes for The Novice; Use Noise to Tune 
Your Station — build Ihi^ simplie npise 
generator; Danger? Microwave Radiation I 
-^)ust how much IS dangerous? Plus 19 
more. 

MAY 78. Official FCC RFI Repori^cunng 
radio antt TVI; ^ake Em Out With Remote 
Control'— TT^iper filed control uni^; Now 
— A Digital Capacity Meter!— simple con 
struction project; DMM Survival Course — 
all" al:>out using digital mutiimeiers. 
Build This ExcHi ngty S<mp^ Receiver. 
Diary of a Survivor- cyberosis victim tells 
all: The Super Select-o-Ject— lull lotten 
QRM with this hller System; The Miser's 
Delight Repeater Comrottar— the very IDI; 
Make Antenna Tuning A Joy —Instant swr 
bridge The COR Goes Solid Stale— turn 
in g two Midland rigs into a repeat ef Pius 
18 more. 

JUNE 71. Antenna Special Wait Till You 
Try 16 ElemenlE! — t&cfB gam on 2m ts a 
real kick. Working 15m with a 20m Beam 
—by adding three more elements; Resur- 
recting the Beverage Antenna— try this 



SiS-year oi£t. low-noise, tow band antenni 
Better Than a Quad? — ^ri. a delta loop; 
Towefing (.ow-BarKl A as—be.'^e'k 

mathematician hgures impedance. Mod 
ernize the Matchboit —increased capabili 
ty lor a classic coupler; The 75m DK Chas 
er Antenna- the 5Jf$A works on 75m as 
well as 2m; Computerized Loop Antenna 
Design — in BASIC. Novice Guide To 
Phased Antenrtas— j^art I; The21 Efemem 
Srown Bombef^2ni t>eam wntn s^disticaL 
ty strong stgnial. Pigs 29 mofe 

JtiLV 7B. fteincarnating Old Test Equip' 
ment— a 1942 capacitance meter in born 
again, Novice Guide to Phase<i Antennas 
—pan It; Byild Your Own Otg^tai Dial— 
great update fof yout recetver; YfHjr 
'^ope Can Be improved- simpl'e catii- 
bratot; The S5 Memory Keyer— for fa;iFy 
cheapstcaies, RAMmed By Morrow — 
eCONRAM ill lauded. VHF Notch Filler-* 
rejection can be beautiful; Yes, You Can 
Build A Synthesizer' —220 MHz syntheslz- 
ef tor uTrtier S50. A Darn Good iDer — f^ 
peaters§et smarter every day; VHF Trans- 
verters and the FT 101— qui^ckle FM con- 
versior». Plus 34 more. 

AUG 7&. Radio Row Revisiied— It's aflve 
and well in Tokyo: A CompFete K Band 
Transmitter— easy to build: POwef Line 
DX—f almost) wireless remote control. 
The End Of RF Feedback— he^res how the 
pros do it; CB lo tp— pert tX, A WWV 
Primer— become a calibration freak; Su 
per Cherger^keape nlcads up to snutt 
HW-101 Owners. Cheek This'-RIT moci 
for the good old HWlOi, Ham Radio Is 
NOT a FTich Man's Hobby* another myth 
eKpfocJetf ; New Lrfe tor Dout^le Sidet>ani3'^ 
—^ awake, ye pioneers, and ^et cracking 
Plus 34 more. 

SEPT 78. Another tC 22S Scheme— for 
oddball repealers: Tracking the Wiid Tur 
key— OF tips. DVM Scrapbook- the ba 
sics; How Do You Use IGs''— part X: Com- 
puterized OSO Records- who needs a 
logbook'*; CB to tO— parts X \ Kl; Build 
the Triple Threat Keyer— g real Novice 
project; The Ten Meter AM Antenna Spe- 
clal— $5 vertical also works on SSB or FM: 
Build the IC Eitperimenter — getting 
started with TTL and CMOS, Two Meters 
at the SummU— a l>acKpackers delight 
Plus37 mofe. 

OCT 7a. DXpedlflohing — a "how to" 
guide; The HiBloryol Ham Radio— part VI; 
BuilCiIng From Magazme Artl^cies^ihe 
tveiadboafifhiM I re-wrap way: High Seas Ad- 
venture— Mam Style — part L Use a Com- 
putef? Who, Me?— yes, youl. Bird Watch^ 
mg in BASIC Land— another use for your 
micro; Worlds Cheapest QSLs— BASIC 
program keeps your log , too; Happiness ts 
a Smart Scanner — mod^ for the PBM/ 
AWE f=MSCt: A Perfect Power Supply ?— 
well . almost: Antenna Design: Some- 
thing New'— controtted'Current distribu- 
tion Pigs 3? mo*e 

NOV 7B. Murphy fi Masterpiece — me lost 
weel^end; How About Some Ham Shack 
Salety?— don'l be a statistic. The History 
ot Ham Radio— part Vli CB to 10— part 
XIV: a Peaiistic PiL ti§\ Hjgh Sea$ Adven- 
ture-Ham Style-<-^B^ II, SQuelchifymg 
Cheap Receivers— junk-boM project. Buf^d 
the Brule— unique heavy-duty power sup- 
ply; The Circuit Board Aquarlum—no fish 
story: Who Needs Transistors?- you do!: 
Ham Help! -- a telephone a it] tof the plind- 
PluiS 47 more 

OEC 70, A DXer s Dream vacation— try 
sunny Moni&enat; Close Encounters— 
the eyes of Texans are upon them; Re- 
ceiver Diseases— and how lo cure them; 
Confessions of a Stripper— confirmed 
lunkor feJIi all; Whither Microcomputers'' 
—a pro looM ahead. This Is Your Com- 
puter Speaking' —how to d^ai up yotir mi- 
ctq: Bjg Max Attacks— it's W2DUvs K4Ki. 
in the batllo ot the bazooka, WARC 79 
Preview— showdown in Geneva; Build the 
Flexl- Filler ^a very active device. Code- 
Practice Osciiiators^an ejfhauslive re- 
port. Plus 29 more 

Also AvaHible: Decemtmr, t960; June. 
July, August, September, October. De- 
cember, 1961; January, February, Novem^ 
ber, 1962; Jj^nuary, April, May. July, Sep- 
tember, November, t&&3. January, March. 
April. July, SepiemtMf. October. Novem- 
b©f. December. 1964. May. June July, 
August, December. 19^5. AiigusT Septem^ 
b^t, December, t%6, January. February, 
March. April, June. August. September, 
December, 1967; January. March, April, 
May, August. October, December, 1968; 
October. 1970 



tt 



KEN>A/OOD 




ALK 

9D79 



TS-180S DUAL SSB 
FILTER 

What advantages are provided by the dual SSB filter system 

in the TS-1H0S? 

The dual SSB filter system in the TS-IBQS provides ttie following 

advantages: 

• Improves receiver signaKo-noise ratio (S/N). 

• Improves receiver setectfvity- 

• Allows greater RF speechf rocessor compression level. 

Which filters are supplied as standard features? 

The TS-180S operates with these filters: 



YK-88SSB IF SSB Filler #1 


Standard, Bultt^^ 


YK-88SSB FSSBFJter#2 
(for Am f Iter system) 


Optional 


YK-88CW 500-H? CW Filter 


Optional 



Hew itiuch is selectivity improved by adding Ihe second SSB 



Even with just the one standard SS8 filter, the TS 180S is very selec- 
tive. Passband wrdths with the sfngle and dual filters, as well as with 
the CW filter, are shown below: 



RESPONSE 


SINGLE 
SSB FILTER 


DUAL 
SSB F LTER 


CW FILTER 


■ -6 dB 


2.4 kHz 


2.2 kHz 


0.5 kHz 


-60 dB 


4.2 kHz 


3.0 kHz 


1.5 kHz 



The newly developed MCF type 
fillerjndudjng both the YK-88SSB 
and YK-88CW, has sharp response 
chafacteristics, The newer filters 
are notable m their lack of re^ 
sponsa "humps' away from the 
mam portion of the passband 
curve. 



■I* - 



H - 



\ 

\ 




\ 


( 

i 


\ 


i 
t 


' 


1 
t 


1 


t 
1 


\ 


1 


1 

1 


r 




f 


- 






J WMItFa^t 



m — 



iKBIKYDHIflKI 1111(1 



How much does the secoftd SSB filter improve S/N? 

Adding a second crystal SSB filter between the IF amplifier and the 
detector reduces wideband noise from the IF amphfier by 3 dfi, thus 
giving a certain improvement m overall receiver S/N. 

How does the dual SSB filter system also improve RF speech- 
processor compression level? 

The (ollowing maxtmum compression levels are available with the 
TS'iaOS RF speech processor: 



PC-1 PHONE PATCH 

Is a matching phone patch availabie for Kenwood equipment? 

After many requests. Trio Kenwood is introducing the PC-t phone 
]atch. which may be connected between a transceiver and the 
elephone-line. (We recommend obtaining a voice connecting arrange- 
ment from the telephone company for legal attachment to the tele- 
phone line,) 

Ones the PC-1 ose a hybrid circuit for VOX operation? 

The PCI js able to interconnect the transmitler. receiver, and teie- 
phone \m voice coupler while accommodatmg a great difference m 
voice levels to and from the telephone line, and cancelling the audio 
level from the receiver at the input to the transmitter's VOX circuit, 

ts the PC-1 easy to adjust? 

Three easy adjustments are made after a phone call is established: 

• NULL contfDl, with a clear, continuous signal tuned in on (he trans- 
ceiver, for minimum deflection of the PC-1 meter- 

• RX GAIN control, Id about D VU on the PC-I meter, for hearing ttie 
signal clearly through the telephone receiver. 

• TX GAIN control, for proper VOX operation while the party on the 
telephone speaks. 











S NGLE 
SSB FILTER 


DUAL 1 
SSB FILTER 


MAXIMUM 

COMPRESSION 

LEVEL 


ISdB 


30 dB 



The dual filter system functions in the IF stage, which is common to 
both Ihe transmitter and receiver. The RF compmssor speech proc- 
essor m the TS'180S is always on, with seledable time constants of 
SLOW (natural sounding audm) and FAST (more audio punch for the 
pite-ups). Up to 15 dB of compression in the FAST mode may be 
achieved without sideband expansion [splatter), using a single hiter 
With the dual filters, the sideband is filtered again and a high-quality 
SS8 signal of high talk power is obtained, with a maximum compres- 
smn level of 30 dB without splatter. 

Can both the optional second SSB filter and optional CW filter 
be used for receiving at the same time? 

Yes. 

Where is the dual SSB filter system located in the TS-1S0S? 

The dual SSB filter system is in the TS-IBOS IF unit and the second 
filter may be installed easfly by the user. The general circuit configu- 
ration IS shown below. 









t3 — \t' *— ' 



i^rr 



iiiv 



I ~ "" I 

I I 

• T I 



11' 



'*^^ 



•n* 



m 



t 



I 



I 



Romld C Williams ni^JVF/ZBlCS 
1147 N. Emerson 

Indianapolis IN 46219 



Get a Piece of The Rock 

— a DXpedition to Gibraltar 



Slow careful CW, calling 
CQ, "deWOaEDX/' 

"This must be a fairly 
new ham/' I thought. 'M'll 
give him a new country/' I 
called at 10 wpm, and back 
he came and said. "Where 
is Gibraltar?" 

There I was, sitting in the 
shack of limmy Bruzon 
ZB2BL, which he very kind- 
ly loaned to me for a few 
days for my '78 ZB2CS ex- 
pedition. In '73, I had 
operated from the Caleta 
Hotel on the east side of 



The Rock. In 75, I was on 
the west side of The Rock at 
the Montarik Hotel, and in 
78, t was lucky enough to 
have Jimmy's quad to help 
things along. 

Twenty meters was in 
fine shape in late July and 
the USA was roaring in. I 
slid up to 14.285 for some 
SSB operation This time I 
was going to work a lot of 
Generals that I had not 
picked up before. One of 
the first was WA2PYI, who 
had lust received his Gen- 



eral and reported that I was 
his first SSB contact, his 
first ZB2, and his first DX. At 
the other extreme, W1 HZV 
confided that in 46 years on 
the air, I was his first ZB2. 

SSB signals from the 
USA are fantastic in Gibral- 
tar. US hams are excellent 
operators. On a stand-by, 
the QRM was fierce, but 
when I went back to one 
station, everyone else was 
silent. The only times there 
were any problems with 




Jhh v/ew shows the town of Cibrattar, left, the airstrip, €er}ter, and the towr) of La Linea, 
Spain, beyond the airstrip. 



several talking at once 
were when conditions were 
marginal and some prob- 
ably were not hearing me 
well enough to know who 1 
was trying to work. A num- 
ber of 6s and 7s came 
through well, and even 
KL7HRN was readable 
through the east coast cur- 
tain. It is possible, with a 
little concentration, to 
pick up 4 or 5 calls in a 
pileup and then work all of 
those before picking up 
more. This was not during a 
contest, but I was trying to 
work contest-style to con- 
tact as many as possible. 
About 50% of the people I 
worked said I was a new 
country for them This is a 
real pleasure for one who is 
accustomed to being a run- 
of'the-mill W9 on the other 
end of the pifeups. 

Gibraltar is probably 
best known through the ef- 
forts of The Prudential In- 
surance Company and its 
slogan, "Get a Piece of The 
Rock" The model that Pru* 
dential uses in TV advertis- 
ing is only about one-tenth 
of The Rock. The Rock ac- 
tually extends about 3 
miles to the right of the 
model as shown and the 
airstrip is at the foot of the 
model just to the left. The 
concrete runway has one 
end in the Bay of Gibraltar 
and the other end in the 
Mediterranean. After con- 
siderable air travel, this is 



136 



the only place where I ever 
saw a jet airliner put the 
jets in reverse while still 
100 feet off the runway. I 
found out that the British 
Trident is one of the few 
airliners to be able to han- 
dle this condition. 

On one trip to The Rock 
I made the mistake of tak- 
ing in three cardboard car- 
tons of radio gear. This was 
impounded by customs, 
and 1 had to wait 24 hours 
while officialdom made a 
ruling that I could get it 
back If your gear is in a 
suitcase, there is no prob- 
lem. 

A license is not hard to 
get The postmaster is in 
charge of such things, and 
a letter In advance with a 
copy of your personal 
license is enough. The fee 
ts about $2. Almost 200 
ZB2 calls have been issued, 
but most of them are 
British servicemen long 
gone to other duties, and a 
scattering of occasional 
visitors like myself who 
show up once every few 
years. The most recent 
visitor, a few months ahead 
of me, was Ken Palmer 
K2FJ/ZB2C, who ran a 
Gibraltar expedition in 
February '78. An important 
consideration to remember 
IS that Gibraltar power is 50 
Hz and 250 volts only. 

Parts and accessories are 
hard to come by. Almost 
everything must be or- 



dered and shipped in; duty, 
plus the shipping costs, all 
add to the expense. Jimmy 
ZB2BL is a TV service man 
and is able to get ahold of 
some electronic parts, but 
there are needed items 
which normally are not in 
TV stock. There is a hi-fi 
store on Main Street across 
from the Montarik Hotel 
which has Kenwood 520 
and 820 transceivers for 
sale at considerably higher 
prices than here in the 
USA. If one didn't mind the 
extra expense, it would be 
possible to fly in and buy 
equipment locally to get 
on the air. 

Gibraltar's people are 
bilingual. The schools and 
all public business are of- 
ftclally conducted in En- 
glish. Everyone Speaks 
Spanish most of the time, 
however. The well-educat- 
ed people speak both quite 
well. With American or 
British visitors, they speak 
English all the time. They 
switch back and forth 
when speaking to each 
other. The reason, they 
told me, is that some ideas 
are expressed better in one 
language and other ideas 
better in the other. 

Gibraltar is isolated; it is 
a peninsula connected to 
Spain. There is a road, but 
the gates were closed by 
the Spanish government 
ten years ago and no one is 
allowed to pass through. 




This is the ZB2BL triband quad with its owner. 



Many residents of The 
Rock have relatives and 
friends in Spain. In order to 
visit they must take the 
boat across to Tangier and 
then back to Algeciras, 
This means a considerable 
cost in money and time to 
make what should be a 



simple, inexpensive, short 
trip. Spain wants control of 
The Rock. The closing of 
the gates is part of a move 
to get the British to leave. 
The citizens of Gibraltar 
much prefer English rule, 
and many of them are of 
British descent 





W9PBT examines an 18tb century cannon. 



The Rock was known in Roman times as "Mons Calpe. 



ff 



137 




The eastern face of The RocL 



The only time the gates 
are opened is on the rare 
occasion when a critically- 
sick person is taken 
through to the Gibraltar 
hospital There is no com- 
mercial or tourist traffic 
allowed. 



The Rock apes are 
known far and wide. These 
are really monkeys in 
terms of size, but since 
they naturally do not have 
tails, they are classified as 
apes. With the rise of 
human population, they are 



concentrated in one area 
known as the apes' den. 
The British Army looks 
after them and supplies 
food and medical atten- 
tion. They can be tricky 
rascals, stealing cameras 
and purses, and at times 
they bite. It is best to be 
careful when around themi 

There are plenty of good 
hotels and restaurants 
available. The population 
is about 18,000 and there 
are stores, bars, banks, and 
all the normal activities of 
any medium-sized town. 
Ham radio from Gibraltar 
is quite interesting, as one 
is in demand and a pi leu p 
starts in a hurry. About half 
the people ! worked want- 
ed a card for a new coun- 
try, A transceiver and a 
dipole are plenty. There 
are several places to set 
up — In hotels, up on The 
Rock, or even in a rented 
car for mobile operation. 
From the south end of The 
Rock at Europa Point one 
has a clear shot in all direc- 
tions. 

One place which might 

look good is the top of The 
Rock, but it IS no good for 
HF work. Apparently due 
to the almost vertical cliffs 
falling away on two sides, 
the angle of radiation is not 
useful for DX. It has been 
tried with very poor results, 
while at lower levels, sig- 
nals were strong both com- 
ing and going. The top is 



good for VHF. As a matter 

of fact, the Gibraltar 

Amateur Radio Club was 

planning a 50.3 MHz 

beacon to be placed in 

operation from the top of 

The Rock before the end of 

1978. An earlier beacon on 

50 MHz was heard over 

much of the eastern part of 

the USA in early 1978, and 

all the reports from this 

success have encouraged a 

better effort. 

My wife, Milly, had a 

good time shopping in the 
Gibraltar stores for things 
to bring home to our four 
daughters and two grand- 
sons. After three trips to 
Gibraltar, I have two very 
good friends there, and this 
time we had even more 
social get-togethers as my 
wife came, too, and we saw 
more of the Gibraltar 
wives. We had dinner with 
Jimmy ZB2BL and Tere 
Bruzon, and Cecil ZB2CF 
and iourdis McEwen. On 
my earlier visits I had met 

both of these ladies and 
formed the opinion that 
they did not speak much 
English. It turned out that 
they were a little shy, and I 
very much admire their bi- 
lingual abilities. If I could 
speak Spanish half as well 
as all of them speak En- 
glish. 1 would be quite 
pleased. As it was, I man- 
aged to add a few more 
words to my Spanish vo- 
cabulary. 





Milly Wiiliams W9PBT/ZB2 and a French tourist watch a 
British Army keeper of The Rock apes. 



Cecil McEwen ZB2Cf and }immY Bruzon ZB2BL are hunt- 
ing for a defect in a hading coii. 



138 



Jimmy Bruzon ZB2BL is 
without a doubt the lead- 
ing amateur on The Rock. 
He operates the DX bands 
and OSCAR He also is in 
charge of ZB2VHF, the 
beacon operation, and a 
real pusher behind ZB2BU, 
the Gibraltar Amateur 
Radio Club. The club has 
several members who are 
working towards licenses 
and a very neat new club 
meeting room with a Ken- 
wood 520 about to be in- 
stalled. Jimmy earns his 
money as a TV service 
man, and several people 
told me he is the best. 

Cecil "Mac" McEwen 
ZB2CF has given many 
happy 5BDXCC hunters a 
contact on 75. He also 
works various other bands 
at times. He recently 
moved into better living 
quarters, but has some 
antenna restrictions. He 
hopes to get something 
better than his present ver* 
tical and loading coif in the 
air. 




This is the proposed site for the new 503 MHz beacon, atop The Rock in abandoned for- 
tifications. 



I now have 46 countries 
and 35 states worked from 
ZB2, so I will be going again 
in the next couple of v^^rs 
to finish off a DXCC and 



WAS from The Rock. 

For those who would like 
to give it a try from 
Gibraltar, I will be glad to 
offer suggestions and ad- 



vice and answer questions. 
It's an easy place to get to 
and to become the center 
of a real pileup. Now I'm 
planning Gibraltar IV 




q)EflLER qMRECTORr 




Tell them yoti iiw 
tbeir nime ie 73 



Fontana CA 

We carry the follo^ins: JCOM, Midlandp Am- 
cpm, DenTron. KLM. Swan. Drake, Ten- Tec, 
Wilson. SST. MfJ. Hv-Gain, Lunar, Nyc- 
V I king. B4W. Redikilowatl, CuihCfiifl, 
Mo*ky* &if SifnaU Pipo, «c. Full Service 
S(we foalui FkttroHici. M62M SJmn A«,* 
Fintuu CA »23J5. iZZ-Tlli. 

Santa Clara CA 

Bay area's newwi AETiateur Radio store. New& 
used Ainajcur Radm iaies ilt strvici;. Wc fra- 
turt Keciwpod, fCOM. Wilson, Yacsu. Alias. 
Ttti'Tcc 4 many mort. S-kavrr Riifl&, >550 
LeHilii^ir AmiH. StflU Clan CA 9505]. 



Prrsiofi ID 

Ro» WB^ B VZ, has th<- f. argnt Ssoct of Ajm- 
trur Cemr m ihc Imermounuin West and ihc 
Beat Prices Call me for JiJli yom ham m^ds. 
Bnu Dbirlhullng, 7» So. Stalt. Prwtoii ID 



Terre Haute IN 

Your ham hradqiianef'& located in Ih? hcati of 
Uk mid^f^t HcriHirr EJean>Bi«* In*-. 4M 
Meadows Sltappiai IcnRr, P.n. Bo% 2001, 
Tfm Hauir IN 47W2* 23B-I45A. 



Camden NJ 

X-Battd (A other frei4uencii:s) Mtcro»awe 
Cotnptifitftitv & Equipcnml. Laboratory Grade 
T«i Instrumentt, Fow« Supfjlm. lOOCTt in 
iiocl ai all iiin«. BUY A SEl L tW popular 
mak^-HPTrR FXR, KSLSafen-^en^inger, 
ciL. t.*clroitif kt^arch iMh%, 14D terry Ave.. 
Camdtn MJ UUKM. 54I'42(K!. 

North ArimglOD NJ 

Colftm, GeiWMJ Ridio, TekircKiii. HeT^tfli 
Pat'ka'd. IM^lQ )aJ<iH vernier. CAsh or irade 
fOf cube* or gear Ted « IKIW, IX O, (SC ., 
[0 Scrhiuj^ler Avtpue» ?*(*♦ Arlinilon Ni OTOJl 
W9-4246. 



Hou!%lon TX 



Ejtpcrimcnrcr'i r 



^1 tilrctronic and mc- 



cibanical components fo^ campuiei peioplr, 
audio |te&pJp^ hams. roNi( tiuiliJcrv. ct- 
perimeoiers Open sj* da>^ a **et (**lr«ty 
ElnrircMikB Inc.* i9J2 OarkcfBt. Htm^tan TX 

n06J, 9TI-6ST5, 

B^ 

Sin Antonio TX 

Compkre 2 wsy «rvice shop. CaU Dec, W5FSP. 
Sdikii. Attas, Avtati, Banl. msick Cal. Cmh- 
Oaft, Hustkf» ICOM. KDK, felenifcood, MFi, 
Nye PakHisaf . Shure, Swan, Tempo, Vacnj ajid 
dtbeii. App4iHiiev# Fquipmrnl Cjo*« Inc., Oil 
Vam Jackson Road, San Amufiio T% TSZO, 
T34-7TO3. 



Denver CO 

Ejiperimcnier's paradisct Ekcironic and 
mechanicaE cctmppn*rnrs for eompuiei people, 
audio pcopilc, harm, robol builders, ex peri- 
focniers. Opeii si* dav^ a week. Galena? ilec- 
tnmtki C'or^.. ZU9 lA . 44th A»e,, Dn^rr CO 
in211.4St'5444, 

New Castle DE 

ICOM, Ten-Telt. Swaji^ KDK, NDI. Tempo. 
Wibon; Authorized dealer; I mik off i-95. No 
sdeMax. fleUwarr Amaleur SupplVt 71 Meadow 
Rd., New Qwak Ut 15r?20, J2»-772a. 



UttidiNiMA 

The h*m wore of N,E. yow can rdy on. Kcn- 
ttood, ICOM. wnson. Yacsu, DcnTroii, KLM 
■mixi, BftW fwkches A watt met er^^ Whist ter 
radar detectors, Bearcar. REgcnizy^ iknrennas by 
Larsen. Wihon. Hu^iIct, GAM. TEL-COM 
Ifbc. Commiinicatiims Ji EJcctrofiki, 6TS Grtal 
Rd., Rl. n% IJMtelOR MA Ol4b>0. 486-3<M0. 



Calumiiiis GA 

fc£l*moOI>^^AESt— DRAKE 

The world's moii fa mastic amateur show- 
room! Ynu gotta ».eif i; [» heticvc jil Radio 
Wttolf^aJf, 1012 Auburn Avenut, C^iluniibu:^ 
CA J11W6, 561'700<». 



Laurel MD 

We flOCk Drake. Icoin. Ten -Tec, Swran. 
Tempo, Dentrofi, DS], KDK, Wilton^ Midland 
and olhcTi, Cati toll free 80a*3H^»6 T1*e 
Comm C'enirr. Inc^, Laurel Plaza t Rie. IVfl^ 
laurel MO imiH. 



St Loub MO 

EJlpeii merger's paradiu! Ekcircmic and 
fn<<cfianica) componenii for computet people^ 
audio pcople> ham^, robot builders. cAprti- 
mentrrs. Open six days a wetrk. Ciilewajr Elcc* 
tronicfi Corp., 8113-25 PaRe Bl*d., Si. Loult 
Mf]63130, 42T-«lt6. 



S^Tftcuse^Cenlnil NY 

Wc deal, w^c trade, ue diio^unt, we pifase! 
Yaptu. Tcn^Tev. CusHcraft, Drake. Dentron, 
KLM. Midland, BAW, ICOM, H>i«in, Swan. 
Amcom, Tdto. Mirage, DSI «£- Compleie 
Z'wav s<:r^ice iihop! Ham-Booc Radki (INir. 
Slereo Rrpair filtop) [tlOA Eric Blvd. Easi, 
Sj^raciifie NY 0214. 446'226«. 

Syracuse-Raow^lJtica NV 

Fealurtne: Yaon, ICOM. Drake. Atlas, Den 
Tron. Ten-Tec, Swan, Tempo. ItLM. Hy- 
Gain. Modey. ^^'Uson, Larii^n, Midland 
SriiUihwest Techrtical Products. Vou won'i he 
tJl^a|1 pointed with equipment /service. Radio 
World. Onflda Couniy Airport^ Terminal 
HuildiDK, Orlskanv NV 13424. 131*2422. 



Scran ton PA 

ICOM, Bird. CuihCraJt, VHF Engimxriaif^ 
Antenna Specialist*, Buket A Wiltiamson, 
CDE Rotators. HAmKfyi* Bdden. W2AU/ 
W2VS. Shure, Regency, CES Touch-Tone 
pad!, Radin Amateur Callbooks. LaRde Dec- 
Iriialea, 1112 Grand^le^ St., Scranton PA 
\tSm, 343-2114. 



Pan Angeles WA 

Mobile RFl sliieldiTi|[ Tot dimination of igni- 
tion and alter fiai or m>i-ii^ Sandirtii straps. 
Co^mponent5 for '^do-ii-youisdr' priij«1^ 
Pleniv of free adnce. Fj4» FRKinminK' '* 
Marine Dn*t. fort Ai^fio W\ 9S3«£, 4ST* 

DEALERS 

Your corrtpany name and message 
can coniairt up to 25 words for as 
tittle as SfSO yeariy (prepaid), or 
$15 per month r prepaid quarieriyj. 
No mention of mail-order business 
or area code permitted. Directory 
text and pay men r must reach us 45 
days in advance of publication. For 
example, advertising for the 
December issue must be in our 
hands by October iSth. Mail to 73 
Magazine, Peterborough NH 
03458. A TTN: Aiine Coulu. 



139 



DSI HAS DONE IT AGAIN 



issm 




INCLUDES PROPORTIONAL OVEN TIME BASE 



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MODEL 5600A KIT 



WHY BUY A 5B00A: Because &5% of the assembly Is compleled by DSI 
[and you are onty one hour away from soiving all those difficult bench 
problems, from setting the frequency of a audio signal to within 1/10 of a 
I HZ, to checking the frequency of a 486 MHZ mobile radio. Whether you 
jare servicing a VTfl, trouble shooting a PLL circuit, the S600A Is the right 
jcounter with accuracy thai will "meet any FCC land mobile, broad- 
cast or telecommunjcations requi reman ts. On the t^nch or in the fietd 
the 5600A will do the job you o^d. The 5600A includes a self contamed 
[battery holder providing Instant portability of we offer a lOhour recharge- 
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ATION — 

CALL 800-854-2049 ^CALIFORNIA RESIDENTS CALL 800-542-6253 



F4CTS ARE FACTS: Wiih the introduction of theSSOOA. The sun hassd 
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OSi BUT FACTS ARE FACTS No counter manufacluref except DS| 
offers a Full Range 50 HZ lo 60O MHZ counter with — 9 Digits — 0.1 H? 
resofulion — .2 PPM 10° to 40 ** C proportional oven — BF pre-amp-| 
600 MHZ prescaler — three selectable gate times — oven ready^ standby 
and gate time indicator lights as standard features — For only S149.95 kit 
and $179,9S tactofy wired. In fact the competition doesn't even come 
close unless you consider $20Q.OO to $60Q>0Q close. Wllh DSI having the 
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7924 Ronson Road 
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Easy-to-Build 220 Transverter 

— simple hookup to any synthesized 2in rig 



Frank Kaimus WA 7SPR 
Presid&ifr R.F. Power LabSt Inc. 
llOB—ilSlh PiactN^K 
Kitkiand WA 98033 

One day I took a good 
look at my 2-meter 
gear and found that I had 
an unusual amount of 2- 
meter equipment but only 
one Midland 1 3-509 for 220 
MHz. This disturbed me 
somewhat, because 220 



MHz is coming up strong in 
this country. Having only 
one piece of 220-MHz 
equipment to choose from 
made me wish that there 
was some way 1 could con- 
vert my excess 2-meter 
gear to 220 MHz, so that I 
could goon all of the chan- 
nels without having to buy 
additionaL expensive, syn- 
thesized 220 equipment. 

Well, it did not take me 
very long before I came up 
with a block diagram show- 



ing how I could get around 
the purchase of a 220 MHz 
synthesizef by using my 
2-meter synthesizer in- 
stead, and making it re- 
ceive and transmit on 220 
without the external LO in- 
puts required by many 
transverters. No connec- 
tions are needed from the 
transverter to the 2-meter 
transceiver except for a 
piece of SOOhm coaxial 
cable from the transceiver 
antenna connector to the 




Photo A. 



transverter input connec- 
tor. See Fig, 1, The trans- 
verter runs off + 12 volts at 
about 300 mA for the 1- 
Watt model, and about 2 
Amps for the 10-Watt ver- 
sion. 

I connected my proto- 
type to the accessory 
socket of the Multi-2700, 
The antenna connects to 
the output of the trans- 
verter. That's it! All of the 
switching and converting is 
done automatically by the 
transverter. The decimal 
readout remains as is, and 
the MHz are converted as 
follows: 145 MHz is 222 
MHz, 146 MHz is 223 MHz, 
and 147 MHz is 224 MHz. 
It's as simple as that! 

If you want to go to 
223 500-MHz simplex, you 
set your radio to 146,500 
simplex and let the trans- 
verter do the rest. If you 
want to go to some repeat- 
er frequency, let's say 
222.500 in, 224.100 MHz 
out, you simply set your 
2-meter radio to the re- 
peater output frequency 
[147.100^224.1001 flick 
the transverter mode switch 
to Repeater, and bingo! 
You have an instant 1.6- 
MHz offset putting you on 
a repeater mode for all 220 
repeaters. 

You can work simplex, 
duplex, reverse, and listen 
at any repeater input fre- 
quency to find those hard- 
to-locate secret machines. 



142 



10 WAtT 
mUHSCClVER 



AHTfRWA 



E2Q MMc 



ftHTP^ 



+ lgVa- 



KCVR 



O- 



TJ 



-D + iEv 



*o or 

TO *^I2¥ OF 
EXTEfMAL FOtVEn 



f/g. 1. Trails verter connec- 

Theory — How It Works 

Fig. 2 shows in simple 
blocks the signal flow from 
and back into the antenna, 
and also from and back in- 
to the 2*meter transceiver 
Fig, 3 is a complete sche- 
matic. The system is divid- 
ed into two parts: the 
receiver and the trans- 
mitter. 

Receiver The 220*MHz 
signal received by your 
antenna is fed to a narrow 
bandpass fitter with very 
low loss at 220 MHz, but 
high rejection at 146 MHz 
and all other frequencies 
located outside the 
220-MHz band This is re- 
quired to keep strong 
2-meter stations such as 
local repeaters from get- 
ting through the trans- 
verter and into the very 
sensitive 2-meter receiver. 
Also, the filter keeps local 
FM broadcast stations out 
of the front end of your 
transverter, which could 
cause possible tntermod- 
ulation distortion. 

The filtered 220-MHz sig- 
nal goes through pins 6 and 
5 of the T-R relay to the PET 
preamplifier stage. This ex- 
tra stage of amplification 
was needed to reduce the 
noise figure of the trans- 
verter to about 2.5 dB in- 
stead of the 6-7 dB offered 
by the double-balanced 
mixer following it. Note 
that both the input and the 
output of Q11 (FET preamp) 
are tuned for good rejec- 
tion and best noise figure. 
The gain of the preamp is 
about 12 to 15 dB, depend- 
ing on the mood of the tran- 
sistor that you happen to 
have in the circuit The out- 




Photo 8. 



V 



Z20«Hf 




put is coupled directly to a 

double- balanced mixer 
consisting of D5 through 
D8 and T8nT9. Our 220-MHz 
amplified signal is now 
mixed with a 77:000-MHz 
LO from crystal oscillator 
Q8 through power-splitter 
T7, with the i-f fed to pin 9 
of T-R relay K1, From here 
it travels to the transceiver 
connector, already con- 



Fig. 2. 

verted to a new frequency 
of 223 -77 = 1 46 MHz, The 
2~meter transceiver con- 
nected to this terminal will 
eat this newly converted 
223-MHz signal right up, 
just as if it had been 146 
MHzI 

Transmitter: This part 
proved to be much more 
difficult than the receiver 
because of the fact that we 



have a 10-Watt signal 
feeding a mixer capable of 
only 1 milliwatt of power 
conversion. Also, the signal 
needed to be re-amplified 
to a point where it was 
again usable for reason- 
ably distant commun- 
ications; in this case, 1 
Watt, or 10 Watts, as you 
prefer. You may decide 
that 1 Watt is sufficient to 



143 




Fig. 3. Shielding beads are indicated by FB. Unless otherwise specified, resistors are in Ohms, capacitors in picofarads, 
and inductors in microhenrys. 



144 




Fig. 4. Top of PC board. 



get you where you want to 
go, or you may want to go 
all the way and stuff the PC 
board with all of the parts 
needed for a full 10-Watt 
output. 

The board has been de- 
signed to make it a 1 0-Watt 
unit. For the 1-Watt setec- 
tion, the last stage, Q6, is 
omitted and the C34 ca- 
pacitor connects to pin 7 of 
K1 instead of to C27 and 
LI 3, as is shown in the 
schematic. 

When transmitting, let's 
say on 223.500MHz sim- 
plex, your transceiver is set 
to 146 500'MHz simplex 
and produces anywhere 
from 2-12 Watts. The rf 
power is received through 
the tiansvertei input con- 
nector and is routed to pin 
9 of K1. The signal is fed 



through the relay [pin 10) 
to a dummy toad capable 
of absorbing the energy. 
The rf detector, D15, con- 
nected to the transceiver 
input signal, causes Q9 to 
conduct, thus pulling in K1 
and consequently feeding 
the signal to pin 10 of K1. 
Two 100-Ohm resistors 
in parallel give us 50 Ohms, 
creating sufficient stray 
coupling to sample about 1 
milliwatt of rf energy from 
the dummy load. This 
small, 1 mW at 146.500 
MHz, is fed to T2 of a 
double-balanced mixer (D1 
through D4) With the 
mode switch in the simplex 
position on the transverter, 
we have selected the 
77.000 MHz oscillator fed 
from the T8 power-sptitter. 
The mixer upconverts the 



signal to 223.500 MHz at 
the base of Ql . Two stages 
of selective frequency 
amplification boost the 
small signal [about 200 
microwatts) back up to 
about 20 mW at the input 
of our highly selective 
bandpass filter, starting 
with C9 and ending with 
CI 9 

This filter was necessary, 
not to make the transverter 
work, but merely to satisfy 
the FCC spurious-radiation 
specification requirement. 
Tuning is very delicate and 
could mean the difference 
between getting the system 
to work or not getting it to 
work. Power output of the 
filter should be around 1 to 
5 milliwatts- The output of 
the filter drives Q3 and 
then Q4. Both stages boost 



the newly-converted signal 
up to TOO milliwatts before 
entering a two-stage micro- 
strip-designed 1 - or lO-Watt 
amplifier board. Tuning is 
not very critical, but care 
must be exercised when 
installing the parts. Make 
sure all leads are as short 
as possible, and that only 
non-inductive parts are 
used. Remember, this proj- 
ect is to be used on 220 
MHz, not on 80 or 20 me- 
ters. It may sound picky, 
but it's not; 220 MHz is a 
far cry from HF, and what 
may work at 20 MHz will 
not work on 220 MHz — 
take my word for it. You 
may wind up settling for Vi 
Watt instead of 10 Watts, 
and you will be wondering 
why. 

The output of the final 



145 




Fig. 5. Bottom of PC board. 



power amplifier feeds pin 7 
of K1 through pin 6 to the 
bandpass antenna filter 
and out to the coax, in the 
form of a very clean and 
respectable 223-500-MH2 
signaL How about that! 

Should you want to work 
the 220 repeaters, all you 
have to do is to put your 
transverter mode switch to 
repeater, and forget it. The 
transverter automatically 
will select the 75.400-MHz 
oscillator, Q7, and connect 
it to the T1 mixer as before, 
except that the output fre- 
quency will now be 1.6 
MHz lower than for sim- 
plex The receive frequen- 
cy will not be affected by 
this offset. It will still 
receive on the 77-MHi os- 
cillator. White receiving on 
simplex, the 75,400-MHz 



LO is disabled through Q10 
and D14, eliminating possi- 
ble spurious responses 
created by the two oscilla- 
tors beating. While trans- 
mitting, the 75400-MHz 
LO is disabled only if the 
mode switch is in the sim- 
plex position. Both oscil- 
lators are powered by a 

9-vo1t zener reference 
diode for good frequency 
stability. For extra pre- 
caution, one may want to 
put a diode in series with 
the 12*V lead for reverse- 
polarity protection. 

One more note about 
the narrow bandpass filter. 
If properly tuned, the filter 
should be 4-MHz wide and 
pretty flat, because of later 
stages following the filter 
going into saturation am- 
plification. 



Construction 

If you are going to make 
do with 1 Watt of power 
out, you will be making 
things a bit easier on 
yourself than does the ham 
who may want to go all the 
way up to the last stage of 
10 Watts. The 10-Watt 
stage requires a little extra 
drilling and fitting to get 
the studded final power 
transistor in place. We wil[ 
get into this a bit later. 

The transverter was de- 
signed in such a way as to 
make it possible to assem- 
ble the entire unit on one 
PC board (double-sided) 
with only the LED lights, 
power switch, mode 
switch, and connectors to 
be wired after completion 
of the board. Foil patterns 
for the top and bottom of 



the board are shown in 
Figs. 4 and 5. Fig, 6 shows 
parts placement I did, in 
fact, test and align the first 
unit outside the box, and 
later installed it into the 
box and completed the wir- 
ing of the final box within 
20 minutes, including drill- 
ing the holes. An LMB box, 
no. CO-3, measuring 6" X 
7V2''X2.75'' high, was 
found to be just the right 
size to fit the PC board 
with only 1/8" of room left 
all around the box interior. 
No more extra room was 
needed because all of the 
wiring was located on the 
PC board. The panel LEDs, 
switches, and rear panel 
connectors did not require 
more than 1/8" all around 
to sneak a wire through 
The box also lends itself to 



146 



> 



^ 




Fig. 6. Parts location. 



this project very well 
because it has a removable 
top cover, enabling you to 
finish the wiring complete- 
ly with all sides exposed. 
Tuning and testing will be 
made easy because of this. 
See Photo B. 

The two switches and 
three LEDs located in the 
front panel take 1/4" holes. 



and the two UHF connec- 
tors in the rear panel can 
be the 5/8"-diameter type 
or the 4/40 mounting-screw 
type. They are spaced 
about 3Vi'' apart and are 
set up about 1 Vi" from the 
bottom of the cabinet, to 
clear the PC board. When 
mounting the connectors 
and the front-panel lights 
and switches, be careful to 



locate them in a place 
where they do not interfere 
With the components pro- 
truding from the PC board, 
RG-174/U minicoax is used 
for input and output con- 
nectors and also for the 
mode switch, SW2, con- 
trolling the two oscillators. 
The ground braids of the 
three cables are connected 
together at the switch and 



are left free-hanging. The 
cables will be quite secure 
because all the connec- 
tions make them very rigid. 
The three Ik resistors for 
the LEDs are connected 
directly to the LED ter- 
minals, and the other ends 
of the resistors are sol- 
dered straight to the PC 
ground When soldering 
your components to the PC 



147 



Farts List 



Rt50. 51 
R2, 7, 10,18, 
19, 28, 29 
R3 

R4, 39 

R6, 13 

R6 

RS 

R9 

R11,31.32 

R12 

R14, 16 

R15 

R17 

R20,M 

R21, 23, 26 

R22, 25, 37, 38 

R24, 27 

R33 

R34, 35, 36, 52, 

53,54 

R40 

R41 

R42— R49 

CI, 4 

C2^ 3| 5^ 8| 37| 

38,39,44,46. 

49,51,52,57, 



3 Resistor, 100 Ohm. Vi-W, 5% 
7 Resistor, 22 Ohm, V^-W. 5% 



1 Resistor, 

2 Resistor, 

2 Resistor, 
1 Resistor, 
1 Resistor, 
1 Resistor, 

3 Resistor, 

1 Resistor, 

2 Resistor, 
1 Resistor, 

1 Resistor, 

2 Resistor, 

3 Resistor, 

4 Resistor, 
2 Resistor, 
1 Resistor, 
6 Resistor, 



62k Ohm, V4-W, 5% 
ISf^Ohm, V4'W, 5% 
a2k Ohm, 74 *W. 5% 
l.aitOhm, V4-W, 5% 
820 Ohm, Vt^\N, 5% 
330 Ohm, 1-W, 5% 
100 Ohm, V4-W, 5% 
2.7k Ohm, y4-W5% 
10 Ohm, V4-W 5% 
200 Ohm, Vi'W, 5% 
390 Ohm, V4-W; 5% 
120 Ohm, Vi-W, 5% 
4.7ltOhm, V4-W, 5% 
101^ Ohm. V* W, 5% 
510 Ohm, V4-W. 5% 
100k Ohm, 74 ^W, 5% 
Ik Ohm, V4-W, 5% 



1 Resistor, 3k Ohm, 'A-W, 5% 

1 Resistor, 39k Ohm, V4-W, 5% 
8 Resistor, 390 Ohm, 2 W, 5% 

2 Capacitor, Electroiytic 10 uF/35 V 
17 Capacitor. Disc, ,001 uF 



58, 52, 63, 64 

C6, 7, 36 

C9, 19, 56 

010, 13, 15, 17 

011,12, 14,16, 

16 

C21,24, 48. 50 

022,25 

023,26 

027,29 

C^, 67 

C30 

C31 

C32.43, 45 

033 

C34, 35, 54 

C20, 40, 42, 47, 

65, 69, 70 

C41 

053 

€55, 60, 66. 68 

C59 

C61 

D1— D8 

D9 

D10, 12, 13 

D11, 14, 15 

D16 

D17. 18 



3 Capacitor, Mica DMtO 10 pF 

3 Capacitor, Mica DM10 5 pF 

4 Capacitor, Stackpoie .5 pF 

5 Capacitor, Variable R-Triko 120-06, 1.2-10 pF 



4 Capacitor, 
2 Capacitor, 
2 Capacitor, 
2 Capacitor. 

2 Capacitor, 
1 Capacitor, 
1 Capacitor, 

3 Capacrtor, 
1 Capacitor, 
3 Capacitor, 
7 Capacitor, 



Disc, .01 uF 

Mica DM10 220 pF 

Electrolytic 6 uF^ V 

Mica DM10 12 pF 

Mica DM10 20 pF 

Mica DM10 18 pF 

Mica DM10 82 pF 

Mica DM10 68 pF 

Variable, Arco #403 Z^ pF 

Mica DM10 15 pF 

Variable, Arco #402 1-20 pF 



1 Capacitor, Mica DM 10 33 pF 
1 Capacitor, Mica DM10 62 pF 
4 Capacitor, Mica DM10 1 pF 
1 Capacitor, Stackpole 3 pF 
1 Capacitor, Mica DM10 6 pF 
8 Shottky diode, HP-5082-2080 
1 Diode, zener, 1N4739, 9 V 
3 Diode, LED 
3 Diode 1N34 

1 Diode 1N4002 

2 Diode 1N914 



board, take a little care not 
to push them ail the way 
down to the ground plane; 
some components may 
have bare spots and could 
cause shorts across the top 
side of the PC board. Make 
sure your solder connec- 
tions are good, and free 
from splashes. This will 
save you time when you 
get ready to fire it up. 
Details of filter construc- 
tion are shown in Fig, 7. 

The transparent rub*off 
lettering worked well for 
the marking of both front 
and rear panels. Make sure 
you put the following re- 
minder on the front panel, 
as is shown in Photo A: 
145 = 222 MHz, 146 = 223 
MHz. and 147 = 224 MHz. 
This will keep you from 
guessing the new frequen- 
cy after the project novelty 
has worn off and you can't 
remember the conversion 
formula. 

If you are planning to 
put in the last amplifier 
stage for a full 10 W of out- 
put power, you will have to 
drill a 3/8" hole directly 
underneath the stud of the 
transistor. Place a piece of 



1"x 2" aluminum over the 
stud before you put the 
screw back on it, !t will act 
as a heat sink, necessary to 
keep the finaf cooled. You 
may want to add more fins 
to make the radiating sur- 
face larger, if you feel the 
transistor is getting too hot. 
Make sure your heat sink 
does not make contact 
with any part of the PC 
board that is not ground; it 
may cause short circuits. 
The PC board should be 
raised at least 1/4" from 
the deck by using four 1/4" 
metal spacers. This will 
provide sufficient clear- 
ance, and furnish a good 
solid ground to the chassis. 
The MRF225 driver transis- 
tor must also be equipped 
with a top-hat heat dissipa- 
tor. 

Alignment and Adiustment 

After careful inspection 
to make sure that all of the 
correct parts have been in- 
stalled In the proper 
places, you may proceed 
with the first step of the 
checkout procedure. All of 
the wires should be con- 
nected, including the 



lights, switches, and con- 
nectors. Should there be 
any serious problems, you 
will not have to dismantle 
the whole thing again If all 
basic tests are positive, you 
may align the transverter 
"into the ball park/' and 
then remove the panel 
gadgets and final-assemble 
the unit. 

Last touchrup Is usually 
easy. Take it one step at 
a time. With 12 volts ap- 
plied to the red wire and 
the black wire grounded, 
flip the power switch to on. 
The "on" LED should light 
and also one of the mode 
lights, depending upon 
which position the mode 
switch is in. Flip the mode 
switch to the other position 
and the other LED should 
light The total current 
drawn from your 12-volt 
supply is between 150-220 
mA if all is normal. 

Receiver and 
Antenna Filter 

Tune in a known 
repeater on 220 MHz and 
hook up the transverter as 
in Fig. 1, Set the power 
switch to on and the mode 



switch either to simplex or 
repeater operation — it 
does not matter in the 
receive mode. Set the 
2-meter transceiver to the 
frequency corresponding 
to the converted frequency 
as described earlier. For in- 
stance, if you have a busy 
220-MHz repeater on 
224.100 MHz, set your 
2-meter transceiver to 
147.100 MHz and tune C69, 
C70, L5, L6, and L7 for 
maximum S-meter reading 
on the 2-meter transceiver. 
Should you have problems, 
it may be that the oscil- 
lator (77,000 kHz) is not do- 
ing its thing, Usually, a few 
turns In either direction 
with the variable capac- 
itor, C65, will get it going. 
AH you need to do then is 
to put it on frequency by 
tuning C65 to a point that 
will show zero or midscale 
on a 2-meter discriminator 
meter. One more time, 
tune all of the previously- 
mentioned tuning ele- 
ments for maximum signal 
strength. This completes 
the alignment of the anten- 
na bandpass filter and also 
the FET preamp. Your sen- 



148 



T1.2, 8,9 

T3 
T4 
T5,6 

T7 

T12 

Tiail 

T13 

T17 

T14 

T15 

T16 

LI. 2, 3, 

L4, 14 

L5, 6, 7 

L9 

LIO 

L11 

L12, 13 

RFC-1, 2 

Z1 

12 

Z3 

Z4 

B 

Y1 

Y2 

K1 

SW1 

SW2 

01.2,3,4, 

10 

05 

06 

Q11 



7 8 

I , Up 



4 Transformer, mixef, trifilar (see kit) 

1 Transformer, filter input, SVaT #16, .191 Ld, 

1 Trarrsformer, filter output, SVaT #16, .191 i,dM tapped Vi-tyrn cold end 

2 Transformer, osclilator, 10T #32 on Gowanda .158, tapped 2T cold end 
1 Transformer, splitter, trifilar (See Kit) 

1 Transformer, splitter, bifilar (See Kit) 

2 Transformer, matching antenna, 4y2T #16 on V4" i.d, tap 2T cold end 
1 Transformer, matching. 3T #20. .180 i.d., c4 

1 Transformer, matching, 2T #20, .180 i.d., CA 

1 Transformer, matching, 5T ^0, .180 i.d., tapped 2T cold end 

1 Transformer, matching, 5T ^0, .180 i.d., tapped 3T cold end 

1 Transformer, matching, 4T #20, .180 f.d., c-t 

3 CoiJ, 5y2T#16, .191 i.d. 

2 Inductor, 1 uH, molded 

3 Inductor, variable, Gowanda #7 (.158) 

1 Inductor, 50 nanohenry, 5T #20 AWG on R2 
1 Inductor, 35 nanohenry, 2T #20 AWG on R3 

1 Inductor. 30 nanohenry, r5T #20 AWG on 0.25" Ld, 

1 Inductor, 90 nanohenry, 3.57 #18 AWG on .25" i.d. 

2 Inductor, 44 nanohenry, 2T #18 AWG .25" i.d. 
2 Choke, VK200 19MB 

1 Transformer, microstrip, 2200 x 62 mils 
1 Transformer, microstrip, 1200 x 62 mils 
1 Transformer, microstrip, 1000 x 62 mils 
1 Transformer, microstnp, 1600 x 62 mils 

6 Bead, Ferroxcube 56590a5/3B 
1 Crystal, 77.000 kHz 

1 Crystal. 75.400 kHz 
1 Relay, R10-EVX2-V185 
1 Switch, power, JBT. SPDT 
1 Switch, mode, AIco MST 215 

7 Transistor, MPS918 



1 Transistor. MRF225 

1 Transistor, MRF226 

1 Transistor, 2N2270 

1 Transistor FET, 3N202 or 40822 

1 Cabinet, LMB, #00-3 
IN/OUT 2 Connector, 80-238 

1 PC board (see kit) 

4 Spacer, 74" brass 
(For parts, PC board, etc., contact Frank Kalmys WA7SPR, 7016 NE 138th Street, Kirkland WA 98033.) 



sitivity shoufd be good — in 
the neighborhood of 15 
uV, or so, even if your 
2-meter radio is not that 
great. Remember, the 
transverter FET preampli- 
fier is now your front end, 
and will set the noise figure 
and sensitivity unless your 
2-meter radio is really bad. 



Transmitter 

If you possibly can do it, 
get ahold of any power 
meter capable of measur- 
ing a few milliwatts, like d^n 
HP 430 (real cheapl and 
disconnect the center tap 
of T2, Connect a 50-Ohm 
resistor to ground from the 
end of the wire connecting 
to the T2 c-t. You now can 
fire up your transceiver in 
the low-power position. 



You should measure no 
more than 1 milliwatt, or 
so. In the 10-Watt position, 
you will measure 7-10 milli- 
watts. This is fine. If you do 
not get these readings, it 
may be necessary to 
change the coupling of the 
twolOO-Ohm resistors, R50 
and R51 , to get more or less 
power sampled from the 
dummy load. 

Once you satisfy your- 
self that you have suf- 
ficient drive for the mixer 
(consisting of T1 and T2 
with the quad diodel you 
can proceed to the LO cir- 
cuit, Q7. With the mode 
switch in the repeater posi- 
tion, the 75.400-MHz oscil- 
lator is selected. We must 
make sure the oscillator is 
working properly before 
we can continue. A fre- 



quency counter will help a 
lot — or a spectrum ana* 
lyzer. (The latter is men- 
tioned for reference only, 
realizing that the average 
ham can't afford that lux- 
ury,) 

Connect the counter to 
R18 or pin 4 of the mode 
switch. AdiustC47 for a fre- 
quency reading of 75.400 
kHz. You may now recon- 
nect the C"t wire of T2 
previously disconnected* 
Disconnect the 5-pF capac- 
itor, CI 9, from T4 and 
measure power into an rf 
meter connected to this 
point, or into a spectrum 
analyzer. Tune C20, C11, 
CI 2, CI 4, CI 6, and CI 8 un- 
til you get some power out- 
put from the narrow band- 
pass filter. This is the 
hardest part of the tuning, 



and it may take several 
repeated efforts to get the 
filter to pass some rf. It rs a 

very touchy filter, and 
although all other circuits 
are working, it might ap- 
pear as if nothing was 
working at all. The filter 
can block all signals if not 
tuned correctly. If in 
doubt, disconnect the filter 
and bypass it to see if the 
220-MHz signal is present 
after all of the mixing and 
amplification from the pre- 
vious stages. If so, connect 
all back as before, and 
continue tuning the filter 

until you get some re- 
sponse. It shoufd be possi- 
ble to get 5-MHz bandpass 
from the filter, with very 
steep skirts. 

The reason for the sharp 
filter is to reject the 
closely-located spurious 
frequencies caused by the 
mixer third harmonic (3 X 
75.4 = 226.2 MHz) and the 
frequency we want to pro- 
cess. Careful tuning will 
get the spurs down 60 dB. A 
spectrum analyzer is again 
the ideal toy to do it with. 
If all is done right, you 
should measure +6 dBm 
of 220-MHz signal at the 
output of the filter. Recon- 
nect R19 and tune C42, 
C40, and C33 for maximum 
power output at the anten- 
na terminal of your trans- 
verter. It should be about 1 
Watt. If you want to go to 
10 Watts and you have in- 
stalled all of the necessary 
parts, no tuning is required, 
The final amplifier is 
somewhat broad banded 
(about 10 MHz wide) and 
shouEd produce about 60% 
efficiency when driven 
with 1 Watt and 12.5 volts, 
The output transistor is 
open- and short-circuit- 
protected for all load 
phase angles up to 15 V of 
dc input. Total current 
drawn by the transverter is 
300-400 mA for 1-Watt out- 
put models, and 1.8 to 2 
Amps for 10-Watt models. 
Harmonics and spurs on 
the prototype and first pro- 
duction unit were greater 
than 60 dB down. 



149 



50LDC?1 






-SDLDPI 





CTO 



ew 




SOl-DeA TO CAOIMD f>lJWC 



Fig. 7, Construct/ofi tecfr* 

n/que — 2-5ect/on antenna 
filter and S-sect/on spurious 
filter. 

After all checks out OK, 
YOU mav proceed with the 
final assembly into the 
cabinet. Remove all lights, 
switches, and connectors 
and set the PC board inside 
the chassis with the crystal 
oscillators toward the rear 
of the cabinet Mark the 
four mounting holes and 



drill them. Mount the PC 
board and string all of the 
cables through the cracks 
between the cabinet and 
the board for final wiring. 
You should not have to do 
much touching up after the 
final mounting process. 

Putting the Transverter On 
The Air 

After all circuits have 
been checked out and are 
working, the best way to 
tell what kind of a job you 
have done is to actually 
put the monster on the air 
and (et the critical ears of 
your fellow hams judge 
you. Do not tell them what 
you are testing— they may 
be biased one way or 
another. If you are ex- 
periencing problems with 
noise or funny squeals in 
your 2-meter radio, it is 
your transverter doing it. It 
can be eliminated by slow- 
ly tuning one or the other 
oscillator slug until it 
stops. It wilf be caused by 



one of your oscillators put- 
ting out spurs if its tuning is 
not fight- All you need to 
do now is to tune your 
2-meter transceiver to sim- 
plex and let the transverter 
do the rest, It will put you 
on simplex receive and 
transmit if your mode 
switch is in the simplex 
position. If you want to go 
on a 220 repeater, leave 
your 2-meter radio on 
simplex on the repeater 
output frequency, but put 
the mode switch to repeat- 
er, and you are instantly in 
repeater-mode operation. 
You are now capable of 
tuning in to as many possi- 
ble combinations as your 
2-meter rig permits. If you 
have a 12-channeI radio, 
you will have 12 channels 
on 220. If you are lucky 
and own a synthesized 
2-meter radio, you will be 
able to play with 800 or 
1 000 channels on 220 MHz. 
Have fun, friends! I am 
sure having me a ball with 



this transverter! 

The parts list is com- 
plete. All parts are easily 
obtainable from any local 
electronics shop. Most 
parts should be junk-box 
items, except for the high 
quality caps and Schottky 
diodes. A PC board is avail- 
able for $14.00 from 
WA7SPR if you do not 
want to tackle your own 
layout, The hard-to-find 
toroidal transformers also 
are available in a small kit 
for $4 50 (T1-T2-T7-T8-T9 
and T12), All other parts 
are available from the 
same source, should you 
have difficulties finding 
them in your area. 

Total cost for the 1-Watt 
unit, assuming you have to 
buy everything, came out 
to about 65 bucks; it is $16 
more for 10 Watts, If you 
have an average junk 
box, and wind your own 
coils, the 1'Watter should 
cost you no more than 
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NEW MFJ-624 Deluxe Hybrid Phone Patch 

Feature Packed: VU meter for line level and null. Has receiver gain, 
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Separate transmilfer and receiver gain conlrols 
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Null control Im indximum jsolation. 



Function swilch: OFF for normal operation ON 
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Ftato jacki for patch in patch 04il speaker, 
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inches. $49.95 plus $3,00 shipping and hand 
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For technical inlormation, order/repair status, m 
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150 



j^ Besder Service— see page 211 




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t^ Reader Senri€e—see p^ge 211 



151 



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j^ fte^^er s^rvtcesee page 2f l 



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153 



Social Events 



UstifiQS in fhfS column are 
provided free of charge on a 
space-avaitabfe basis. The 
foflowing information should be 
included in every announce^ 
ment: sponsor, event, date, 
time, ptace, city, state, admis- 
sior\ charge (if any), features, 
taik*in frequencies, and the 
name of vv/jom to contact for 
further information. Announce- 
ments must be received two 
months prior to the month in 
which the event takes piace^ 

BLACKSBURG VA 

OCT 1 -6 
Two expanded workshops on 
80SO/60B5/Z80 microcomputer 
design, microcomputer inter- 
facing, software design, and 
digital electronics are being 
given by the editors of the 
popular Blacksburg books. Par- 
ticipants Have the option of re* 
taining the equipment used in 
these courses. Dates are Oc- 
tober 1-6, 1979. For more infor- 
mation, contact Or. Linda Lef- 
fel, C:E.a. VPI and SU- Blacks- 
burg VA 24061, or phone (703> 
961-5241). 

HOUSTON TX 
OCT 5-7 

The Houston Area Amateurs 
win host the ARRL West Gulf 
Division Convention on Octo- 
ber 5-7, 1979> in Houston, 
Texas. For further information, 
contact Houston Ham Conven- 
tions, Inc., PO Box 79252, 
Houston TX 77024, or phone 
(713)466*0518 or (71 3)-223-31 61 . 

SIOUX FALLS SD 
OCT 5-7 

The "79 ARRL Dakota Division 
Convention will be held from 
October 5-7, 1979, at the Sioux 
Falls Airport Ramada Inn, locat* 
ed off Exit 81 on 1-29. Sioux 
Falls, South Dakota. Featured 
Will be technical and operating 
forums, a ladies' program^ an 
ARRL forum, a large exhibit 
area, and a banquet. Prizes in- 



^ 



i^^*^*" 



^S 



^»J 



If you have a 
senous problem 
with a ham firm, send 
them a tBtter with all 
the facts In detail, plain- 
ly and simply . . . and 
send a copy to Wayne 
Green W2NSD/1,c/o 73 
MAGAZINE. 73 protects l^ts 
readers more than any other 

fnagazine. 



elude an advance-registration 
prize of a DenTron GLA-1000 
amplifier, a grand prize of a Ken- 
wood TS-820S and a second 
grand prize of a Wilson System 
OneTM antenna and WR-500 
rotor. Registration Is $15.00 
($16.00 after September 1) or 
$6,00 lor the convention only 
($7.00 after September l). TalK- 
h on 146. 16/. 76. For further in- 
formation and convention-rate 
hotel accommodations, write 
Sioux Falls Amateur Radio 
Club, Box 91, Sioux Falls SD 
57101, 

WARRINGTON PA 
OCT 6 

The Mt. Airy VHF Radio Club 
Inc., will hold its Hamarama 79 
and Mid-Atlantic States VHF 
Conference on Saturday and 
Sunday, October 6-7, 1979. The 
conference will be held on 
Saturday, October 6. from 9:00 
am to 5:00 pm at the Warrington 
Motor Lodge, Rte, 611. Warring- 
ton, Pennsylvania. Featured will 
be an all-day VHF program, a 
cocktail hour and get-together, 
and a buffet dinner. Registration 
is $3.00 in advance, or S4.00 at 
the door, which includes the flea 
market. The buffet dinner is 
$9.00. The f(ea market wilt be 
held on Sunday, October 7, from 
8:00 am to 4:00 pm, rain or shine, 
at the Bucks County Drive-ln 
Theatre, also on Rte. 611 Reg- 
istration is $2.00 with taitgating 
$2,00 per space (bring your own 
table). Featured will be amateur 
radio equipment, electronic 
parts, surplus, and door prizes. 
Talk-in on 146.52 W3CCX. For in- 
formation, write Ron Whltsee 
WA3AXV, Chairman, PO Box 
353, Southampton PA 18966, or 
phone(215)-355-5730. 

CORNWALL NY 
OCT 6 

The Orange County Amateur 
Radio Club will hold its annual 
auction on Saturday, October 6, 
1979, at Munger Cottage, Corn- 
wall, New York. Admission is 
$1.00 and includes a chance on 
a door prize. The auction begins 
at 1:00 pm and sellers should ar- 
rive at noon. Talk-in on ,52, For 
further information, contact SMI 
Lazzaro N2CF, 11 Jefferson St., 
Highland Mills NY 10930. 

TAYLOR Ml 
OCT 7 

The third annual RADAR 
Hamfest and Swap 'n Shop will 
be held on Sunday, October 7, 
1979, from 9:00 am until 3:00 pm 
at Kennedy High School, North- 
line Rd,, Taylor, Michigan. Ad- 
mission is $2.00. Featured will 
be computer displays, ham 
gear displays, door prizes, and 



food. Talk-in on ,93/.33, .52/,52, 
and .99/.39. For Information, 
write RADAR. Inc.. PO Box 
1023, Southgate Ml 48195, 

ROME GA 
OCT 7 

The Northwest Georgia Ama* 
teur Radio Club will hold its an- 
nual Rome Hamfest on October 
7\ 1979, at the Coosa Valley 
Fairgrounds, Rome, Georgia. 
Gates will open at 9:00 am. 
Talk-in on 14S.34/.94 and 
146.oa5/.085. For further Infor- 
mation, contact WB4AEG, Box 
274, Adairsvilie GA 30103. 

BERRIEN SPRINGS Ml 
OCT 7 

The Blossomland Amateur 
Radio Association will hold its 
fall Swap Shop on Sunday, Og- 
tober 7, 1979, at the Berrien 
County Youth Fairgrounds^ 
north of Berrien Springs, Mich- 
igan, on US31, beginning at 8:00 
am. There will be commercial 
exhibits, prizes, refreshments, 
plenty of free parking, and dis- 
play space. Space for self-con- 
tained campers, al $3.50 includ- 
ing electricity, is on the 
grounds. Talk-in on 146.22/.82. 
Advance tickets are SI. 50; $2.00 
at the gate. Eight-foot tables are 
$2.00 and are restricted to elec- 
tronic items. For advance tick- 
ets and information, write 
Charles White. 1940 Union Ave., 
Benton Harbor Ml 49022. 

ROCK HILL SC 
OCT 7 

The York County Amateur 
Radio Society will hold its 28th 
annual hamfest on Sunday, Oc- 
tober 7, 1979, starting at 8:00 
am, at Joslin Park, Rock Hill, 
South Carolina, Registration is 
$2.75 each or 2 for $5,00 in ad- 
vance, or $3,00 at the gate. The 
main prize is a Yaesu FT- 
901 DM. A barbecue dinner Is 
available at the park. Talk-in on 
146.43/147,03 and 146.52. For 
more information, v^rite York 
County Amateur Radio Society, 
Inc.. PO Box 4141 CRS, Rock 
HUl SO 29730. 

OTTAWA ONT CAN 
OCT 12-14 

The Radio Society of Ontario 
will hold its 1 1th annual conven- 
tion at the Skyline Hotel, Otta- 
wa, Ontario, Canada. On Friday 
evening, there will be a buffet 
and dance. On Saturday; there 
will be demonsUations, forums, 
technical sessions, a women's 
program, and a banquet and 
dance. On Sunday, there will be 
a flea market and delegates' 
meeting. For information, write 
PO Box 5076, Station F, Ottawa, 
Ontario, CAN K2C 3H3. 

SYRACUSE NY 
OCT 13 

The Radio Amateurs of 



Greater Syracuse will hold their 
annual hamfest on October 13, 
1979, from 9:00 am until 6:00 pm 
at the New YorK- State Fair* 
grounds, located adjacent to 
i-690, 3 miles southeast of Ihe 
New York State Thru way. Exit 
39, one mile northwest of 
Syracuse, New York. For com- 
mercial exhibitors, a fee of 
$15,00 wilt include a booth with 
a display counter ten to fif- 
teen feet in length or a table and 
two chairs. Included in the 
$15.00 fee will be two tickets to 
the hamfest. Accommodations 
are available at nearby motels 
or travel trailer and motor home 
space will be available on the 
grounds. Commercial exhibi- 
tors will be able to set up their 
displays Friday night from 7:30 
to 10:00 pm or on Saturday 
morning from 7:30 to 9:00 am. 
For more information, contact 
Bob Edgett or Paul Dunn, exhib- 
itor chairmen, clo Radio Ama- 
teurs of Greater Syracuse, PO 
Box 88, Liverpool NY 13088, 

ASHEVILLE NO 
OCT 13 

The Western Carolina Ama- 
teur Radio Society will hold its 
Asheville Autumnfest on Satur- 
day. October 13, 1979. at the 
Asheville Civic Center, Ashe- 
ville, North Carolina. There will 
be ample space for manufactur- 
ers, dealers, and the flea 
market, which will be in another 
part of the arena. A concession 
stand will be operated by the 
Civic Center. All manufacturers 
and dealers will have separate 
booths. And it will be possible 
to drive directly to your booth 
for unloading. 

MEMPHIS TN 
OCT 13-14 

The Mid-South Amateur Ra- 
dio Association and participat- 
ing Memphis-area clubs witi 
sponsor the Memphis Hamfest 
and Tennessee State ARRL 
Convention on October 13-14, 
1979, at the Youth Building at 
the Mid^South Fairgrounds, 
Memphis, Tennessee. Featured 
will be forums, exhibits, a giant 
flea market, FCC exams, a hos* 
pi tali ty party, and commercial 
and manufacturer exhibits. The 
display area will be open from 
9:00 am to 4:00 pm on Saturday, 
and from 9:00 am to 2:30 pm on 
Sunday. Fifty trailer hookups 
are on the premises, which the 
Memphis Park Commission will 
rent for $5,00 per night. For fur- 
ther information, contact the 
Memphis Hamfest, PO Box 
3845, Memphis TN 38103, or 
phone Clayton K4FZJ at (901)- 
274-4418. 

BEAVER OK 

OCT 14 

The Beaver Hamfest will be 

held on October 14, 1979, at the 

Fairgrounds Building in Beaver 



1&4 



OK, Doors open at 8:00 am, wrth 
registration at 10:00 am. Tickets 
are S2.50 each. There wil* be a 
covered-dish iuncheon, 3 short 
program at 1;30 pm, swap 
tables, and door prizes. Camper 
hookups are nearby and the 
eveni is airportnzilose. Talk-in on 
,01/,61 and .52. For details, con- 
tact Stelfa Shaw WB5VUN. Box 
310, Beaver OK 73932. 
(405)'625-3368. 

LIMA OH 
OCT 14 

The Northwest Ohio Amateur 
Radio Club will hold its annual 
hamfest on October 14, 1979, at 
the Allen County Fairgrounds, 
Lima. Ohro. Two large heated 
buildings will house the ham- 
fest where tables will be avail- 
able for S3,00 each. A flea 
market will be held outside for 
free. Advance tickets are $2.00 
each. For information, send an 
SASE to NOARC, PO Box 211, 
Lima OH 45802. 

WEST GHENT NY 
OCT 14 

The Northeastern Slates 
160-Meter Amateur Radio Asso- 
ciation will hold its annual elec- 
tion and banquet on Sunday, 
October 14, 1979, at Kozel's 
Restaurant, Rte. 9H, West 
Ghent, NewYork.T1ierewill bea 
flea market in the rear parking 
lot at 1:00 pm and a roast beef 
dinner at 5:00 pm. All hams and 
XYLs are welcome. For reserva- 
tions and details, contact 
William Derby WA5I0D, Secre- 
tary/Treasurer, 14 Plain St,, 
Medfield MA 02052. 

ISLIP LI NY 
OCT 14 

The Long Island Mobile 
Amateur Radio Club, Inc, will 
hold its Hamfair T9 on Sunday, 
October 14, 1979, from 9:00 am 
until 4:00 pm at the Islip Speed- 
way, Rte, 111 (Islip Ave.j, one 
block south of Southern State 
Pkwy., Exit 43, or come south 
from the Long Island Express- 
way, Exit 56, Islip. Long Island, 
New York. There will be free 
parking, door prizes, and 
several contests. Admission ts 
$1,50 (non*hams are freej and 
$3.00 per seller's space, which 
permits one person to enter. For 
information, call Hank Wener 
WB2ALW, nights, at {516>-484- 
4322, or Sid Grossman N2A0I, 
nights, at(5l6)-68l-2l94 

ANAHEIM CA 
OCT 19-21 

The ARRL Southwestern Divi- 
sion Convention will be held on 
October 19-21, 1979, at the 
Sheraton-Anaheim Hotel, lo- 
cated at Ball Rd. and 1-5, 
Anaheim, California. The con- 
vention will begin on Friday 
evening with registration and 
exhibits from 4:00 pm until 9:00 
pm. On Saturday, registration 



will begin at 8:00 am and ex- 
hibits and technical sessions 
will run from 9:00 am until 3:30 
pm, FCC tesling will continue 
until 3:30 pm also. The ARRL 
Forum will be held from 4:00 pm 
until 5:30 pm. with a no-host 
cocktail party being held until 
the 7:30 pm banquet. The Wouf f 
Hong pageant will be held at 
00:01 am PST on Sunday morn- 
ing. At 9:00 am Sunday morning 
the various breakfasts will be 
held and the exhibits will again 
be open until noon. The pre^ 
registration deadline is Septem- 
ber 15, 1979. Advanced registra- 
tion price, which includes com- 
plete program, banquet, ex- 
hibits, and technical sessions, 
is $1 7.00, and $19,00 at the door 
The charge for the banquet only 
is $12.00, and for exhibits and 
technical sessions, the charge 
is $5.00, pre-registration: $6.00 
at Ihe door. The ladies' program 
and luncheon is S6.00. pre- 
registration only. For more in- 
formation and pre-registration, 
contact Hamcon, PO Box 1227, 
Pfacentia CA, or phone (714)- 
9937140, 

CEDAR RAPIDS lA 
OCT 19-21 

The 1979 ARRL Midwest Divi- 
sion Convention and CVARC 
Hamtest will be held on Oc* 
lober 19-21, 1979, at the Five 
Seasons Center, Cedar Rapids, 
Iowa. Tickets are $4.00 in ad- 
vance or $5.00 at the door. 
Forums will include FCC, 
ARRL, DX, antenna, AMSAT/ 
OSCAR, FM and repeaters, mi- 
croprocessors, modern CW, 
and more. A flea market will be 
held at $5.00 per table with 150 
tables available. Reservations 
are good for Saturday and Sun- 
day and must be paid in ad- 
vance. Pre-regtstratlons will be 
taken through October 1, 1979, 
Setup begins at 6:00 am Satur- 
day. FCC exams also will be 
given on Saturday. (Send Form 
610 and copy of license two 
v^'eaks in advance,) There wilt 
be many prizes, including a 
grand prize of a deluxe HF 
transceiver, a TH6DXX anten* 
na, a HAM III rotor, and a 60-fi 
Rohn 25G tower. There will be a 
Saturday-evening banquet, 
with Senator Barry Goldwater 
K7UG A as guest speaker. There 
are many hotels and motels 
available. Talknn on 146.34/,94. 
For information, write Conven- 
tion, Cedar Valley Amateur 
Radio Club, Box 994, Cedar 
Rapids lA 52406. 

READfNG fWA 
OCT 20 

The Quannapowilt Radio As- 
sociation will hold its annual 
auction on October 20, 1979, at 
the Knights of Columbus Hail 
in Reading, Massachusetts. 
Doors will open at 10:00 am and 
the auction will start at 11:00 
am. Food and refreshments will 



be available, Talk*in on 146.52. 
For information, call Bob 
Reiser AAIM at (617)-272^219. 

SAVANNAH GA 
OCT 20-21 

The first annual Hostess City 
Hamfest will be held on Oc* 
tober 20-21, 1979, at the Na- 
tional Guard Armory, Eisen- 
hower Dr., Savannah, Georgia. 
Admission will be $2.50 in ad* 
vance and $3.00 at the gate, 
with tables for $5.00. Featured 
will be a flea market, iadies' 
programs, awards, and FCC ex- 
ams. Talk-in on .37/.97, .10/,70, 
,28/.88. .63/.03. and 3.975 kHz, 



For additional information and 
advance tickets, write the 
Hostess City Hamfest Com- 
mittee, PO Box 1237, Pooler GA 
31322, or phone (9t2)-748-6125. 

BILOXI MS 
OCT 20-21 
The Gulf Coast Ham/Swap 
Fest will be held on Saturday 
and Sunday, October 20 and 21, 
1979. at the International Plaza, 
located at the west end of the 
Biloxi-Ocean Springs bridge on 
Highway 90 in Biloxi MS. Tables 
are $3 per day or $5 per week- 
end. Talk-in on 146.13/73 and 
146.52. For information, ad- 




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See Adirondack for 

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,[D)Q[a®[}fl[MEK sJ?i?y 

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Just 5 minutes from N,Y. Thruway — Exit 27 



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vance tickets, and tables, con- 
tact Al Williams WD5GNR, 
31 1 Va DeMontiuzin Ave,, Bay St. 
Louis MS 39520. 

NORFOLK VA 
OCT 20-21 

The fourth annual Tidewater 
Hamfest'Computer Show-Flea 
Market will be held on October 
20-21. 1979. starting at 9:00 am 
at the Norfolk, Virginia* Culturai 
and Convention Center SCOPE, 
NorfoJk, Virginia, There wt!l be 
60,000 square feet of air-con- 
ditioned exhibit and flea market 
tailgating space available. 
Featured will be ARRL meet* 
ings, DX and traffic forums, and 
a CW contest. FCC exams are 
planned for amateur upgrading 
on Saturday from 9:00 to 12:00 
am. A special feature will be a 
dinner cruise and banquet on 
the Spirit of Norfolk cruise ship 
on Saturday night for $16 per 
person, or $30 per couple. Ad- 
vance registrations are $2.50 
(include an SASE) or $3.50 at the 
door. Flea market tailgate 
spaces are i3M per day. For 
tickets and information, write 
TRC, PO Box 7101, Portsmouth 
VA 23707. 

KALAMAZOO Ml 
OCT 27 

The 25th annual VHF Con- 
ference in honor of Walter Mar- 
burger W8CVQ, founder, will be 
held on Saturday, October 27, 
1979, at Western Michigan 
University, Department of Elec- 
trical Engineering, Industrial 
Engineering & Technology 
Building, Room 3034, Kalama* 
200, Michigan, At 10:00 am* 
there will be a morning registra* 
tion; a final registration will 
commence at 2:00 pm. At 2:30 
pm, Dr, Larry Oppliger will give a 
welcome. This will be followed 
by three speakers. At 6:30 pm, 
there will be a dinner at the 
University Student Center (by 
reservation only). For reserva- 



tions, write Electrical Engineer- 
ing Dept., Western Michigan 
University, Kalamazoo U\ 
49008, 

CHATTANOOGA TN 
OCT 27-28 

Hamfest Chattanooga will be 
held on October 27-28, 1979, at 
the Chattanooga State Tech- 
nical Community College, Chat- 
tanooga, Tennessee, Events in- 
clude FCC exams, prizes, con- 
tests, exhibits, forums, and 
tadtes' programs. The indoor 
dealer area Is $15.00 per table 
and the outdoor paved flea 
market area is $2.00 per space 
each day. Talk-in on .19/.79 and 
3980, For pre-registration, with 
prize ticket and information, 
send $1.00 to Hamfest, PO Box 
95, Chattanooga TN 37401, 

LONDON ONT CAN 
OCT 28 

The London Amateur Radio 
Club will hold Its 2nd annual 
Swap and Shop on October 28, 
1979, from 8:00 am until 4:00 pm 
at Lord Dorchester High School 
in Dorchester, just off 401, Ad- 
mission and tables are both 
S2.00, Featured will be displays 
and prizes. TalK-in on .78/. 18. 
For more information^ write 
VE3CSK, RR#1, AilsaCfaig. On^ 
tario, Canada NOM 1A0, 

MARION OH 
OCT 28 

The 4th annual Heart of Ohio 
Ham Fiesta will be held on Oc- 
tober 28, 1979, at the National 
Guard Armory, Marion, Ohio* 
Featured wiJI be a flea market, 
prizes, and forums. Dealer 
space will be available. Talk-In 
on .90^30 and .52. For more In- 
formation, contact Paul Kllzer 
W3GAX, 393 Pole Lane Road, 
Marion OH 43302. 

FT. MYERS FL 
NOV 3-4 

The Fort Myers Amateur Ra- 



Ham Help 



1 was recently sent a General 
Electric 40-channel mobile 
Citizens Band AM transceiver 
by a relative in the USA. I would 
like to convert this rig to the 
10*meler band, A friend lent me 
some copies of 73 Magazine 
and I see you've been running 
articles on this conversion, but I 
didn't see any covering my set. 
It's a model 3-5801 

Could any of your readers 
help me with this conversion? I 
promise to try to work you with 
this rig once it's on ten! 

Incidentally, 27-MHz CB from 
the USA can be heard over here 
quite well when the skip is righL 

My own equipment at present 
is Sommerkamf FLDX500 and 



FRDX500 and I operate all 
bands 80-10 at 100 Watts out- 
put, although I have an FL1000 
amplifier which can go up to 600 
Watts. 

I hope some of your readers 
might be able to help me. The 
full name of the village QTH 
here is LLANFAIRPWLLGWYN- 
GYLLGOGERYCHWYRNOROB- 
WLLANTYSILIOGOGOGOCH. 
So if anyone wants a QSL from 
the (I believe) second largest 
place name on earth, just let me 
know. 

John Panry GW3VVC 
**Ar AllV Lon Hedydd 

Llanfair P.G, 

Anglesey, North Wales 

United Kingdom LL61 5JY 



dio Club and the ARRL will hold 
their Hamarama '79 on Movem- 
ber 3-4, 1979, from 9:00 am lo 
5:00 pm on Saturday and from 
9:00 am to 3:00 pm on Sunday at 
the Ramada Inn, on the Caloo- 
sahatchee River, Ft, Myers, 
Florida, A hospitality welcome 
center will be held on Friday, 
November 2nd. from 7:00 to 
10:00 pm. Featured will be deal- 
er displays, forums. YLand XYL 
awards, computer displays, 
and a gigantic flea market. 
Registration is $2.00 each in ad- 
vance or $3.00 each at the door. 
Talk-in on .28/.88. .19/. 79, .52, 
and .94. For information, send 
an SASE to Bob Sioal K4VGN, 
PO Box 05-37, Tice FL 33905, 
(813)-334-6190, Or Don Redd 
WD4ER0, 1857 Sunset Place, FL 
Myers FL 33901, (813)'332'1825. 

WEST MONROE LA 
NOV 11 

The Twin City Ham Club wtll 
sponsor North Louisiana's an* 
nual '*Hamfest'* on Sunday, 
November 11, 1979, from 8:00 
am until 3:00 pm at the West 
Monroe Civic Center, North 7th 
Street and Ridge Avenue. West 
Monroe, Louisiana. Tickets may 
be purchased at the door or in 
advance for admission and for 
the prize drawings. Featured 
will be swap tables for buying, 
selling, or trading amateur and 
related equipment, displays of 
new radio and electronic equip- 
ment, information on becoming 
an amateur operator, and 
prizes. Everyone is invited. The 
building is heated and cooled 
for your comfort. Talk-in on 
.25/.85, 321.52, and 3910* 

FRAMINGHAM MA 
NOV 11 

The Framingham Area Radio 
Association will hold Its indoor 
electronic flea market on Sun- 
day, November 11, 1979, from 
10:00 am until 2:00 pm at the 
Framingham Police drill shed 
behind the police station, Fra- 
mmgham, Massachusetts. From 
Rte. 9, take Rte. 126 south to 
the center of Framingham. 
Sellers' setup time is from 9:00 
am to 10:00 am. Advance table 
reservations will be $5,00, with 
tables available at the door for 
$7,50, Refreshments will be 
served outside the flea market 
area. Talk-in on 75/. 15 and .52. 
For information or reserva- 
tions, write Framingham Area 
Radio Association, PO Box 
3005, Framingham MA 01701. 

CLEARWATER FL 
NOV IMS 

The Florida State ARRL con- 
vention will take place on No- 
vember 17-18, at the Sheraton 
Sand Key Hotel on Clearwater 
Beach J Clearwater, Florida. An 
Icom 701 HF station is the main 
door prize. The latest update on 
WARC proceedings is |ust one 
of the interesting forums we 



have scheduled. FCC exams 
will be given on Saturday at 9:00 
am. Please send 6t0s to the 
Tampa office by November 9. 
There will be ladies' events both 
days, with a luncheon and style 
show on Sunday, Tickets are $5, 
which includes a Tappan micro- 
wave oven as first prize. The 
QCWA Gator Chapter will host 
the Saturday luncheon, with all 
hams and guests welcome, too; 
tickets are $6. Saturday evening 
banquet tickets are $9, Swap 
tables are $10 for both days — 
no oneway tables, all advance 
sold. There should be plenty of 
parking with courtesy buses 
running on demand for the dura- 
tion of the hamfest. We have ar- 
ranged for special room rates at 
$30 double, per day, with each 
extra person $4 and kids under 
18 free. Hamfest donation is $3; 
each advance ticket includes 
two free prize tickets. Talk-in on 
.37/. 97 and 223.34/224.94. 
Please make ail reservations 
through and checl^s payable to: 
FGCARC (Florida Gulf Coast 
Amateur Radio CounciL Inc.), 
PO Box 157, Clearwater FL 
33517. For ham convention and 
hotel reservations, phone (813)- 
461-HAMS. 

MASSILLON OH 
NOV td 

The 22nd annual auction, 
Auctionfest T9, sponsored by 
the Massillon ARC, will be held 
on November 18, 1979, from 8:00 
am until 5:00 pm at the Mas- 
sillon Knights of Columbus 
Hall, Massillon, Ohio. The flea 
market opens at 8:00 am, with 
auction action at 11:00 am. 
There will be prizes and dis- 
plays. Talk-in on 1 46.52 simplex. 
Tickets are $2.00 In advance; 
table reservations are $1 00 per 
table. For further Info, wirite to 
Joe Turkal K8EKG. 1234 Con- 
cord NW, Massillon OH 44646. 

FORT WAYNE IK 
NOV 18 
The Allen County Amateur 
Radio Technical Society Is 
sponsoring the seventh annual 
Fort Wayne Hamfest on Novem- 
ber 18, 1979, from 8:00 am to 
4:30 pm in the Allen County In- 
diana Memorial Coliseum, Fort 
Wayne, Indiana. For more infor- 
mation, write Victor M. Locke, 
Reservation Chairman, 1415 
Edenton Drive, Fort Wayne IN 
46804, Of phone (219)-432* 
8047, 

OAK PARK Ml 
N0V2S 

The Dak Park High School 
Electronics Club will present a 
Swap 'n Shop on Sunday, No- 
vember 25, 1979, at Oak Park: 
High School, 13701 Oak Park 
Blvd., Oak Park, Michigan. 
Donation is $1,50 and tables are 
$2.50, There will be refresh* 
ments and door prizes avail- 
able. 



156 



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But don't just take our word for i1, ask any liam Of order a set 
and see for yoursell. 

CM-I Novlco. A complete course wth 5, 7 and 9 WPM code 
group practice. 

CM-1^^ G^iOTil No instruction, just practice. '/? hr at 11 WPM. 
1 hr. at 1 4 WPM and '/;> hr at 1 7 WPM. Tape incfudes coded groups 
and straigt^l text. 

CM-2 Extra Clati* Mostly straigtil lext, some groups 1 hr at 
20 WPM, ■/? hr. at 25 and 30 WPM 

All courses are two hours tong and come with key sheets tof 
checking problem areas. 

To order, send youf check, money order. Master Charge or Vtsa 
number (aJong with card expiration date) to Codemasler Specify 
number and quantity of tapes desired Tapes are $7.95 each. 
two for $1 4. and three for $t 9. Also specify 7" reel or cassette. 
We'll send your lapes post paid by fourth class mail First class, 
Canada and Mexco orders, add $1 per reel. 50C per cassette. 
To order by phone, call (401 ) 683-0575. 
R,l, residents, add 6% 
sales tax. 

Pickerirg 
Codemaster Co,, 
P.O Box 396 D, 
Portsmouth. R.) 
02871 



Pickering Codemaster. Your key to code, 



V lBROPLEi r 

Vlbroplii^ hit iHiill for tfiote wtio usi iltctronic 

kf yers. the firM! ktying michjfiitm iviilibk 

the 
Vibro-Keyer 

"deluxe" 

$65™ 







-Tfe OLDEST WUC 



• Utetime guarantee againsi 
manufacturing defects. 

• Regislered serial numtier. 

• Vii)foplex * quaHty throyg?i-out. 



'Standard ' model with wrinkle 
finished casi iron base available 
forS49 50. 



' Adjustame jeweled bearings. 
' Tension and cootad spacing 

tuiry adjustable. 
' Large, solid, coin silver contact 

points. 
' 2Vt lb. clirome plated steel 

base rests m non-skid leet. 
' Top parts designed from our 

world famous 

VibropleK®"Onginal.*' 

Availableat your dealersorthrough the factory 
Send check, money order, or use ym\ VISA or 
Master Charge W^e pay all shipping charaes 
except on orders outside the continental U.S. 

See your dealer or write lor literature on all our worltf fimous line to: 

The Vtbmplex Company, Inc, ^V24 
P.O. Box 7230 476 Fore Si Portlinl Maine Ml M 

Or call: |2tJ71 775-7710 



¥IHIF 
©KflBf 2 2 8 

n yoii aipetid more thAA S0% 
of yottr K^iifc*gfct<fcg houra oa 

abowe tS MHs 
jfim'U w&At to be OA ow cinai- 
latkMi list lor a linr wmmi' 
mam3Ai$ piibllcatioa« 

EaidiFflEE 
(in addition to 
meihta) & NEW PRODUCT 
REVIEW, a TEOmiCAL 
TOPIC article and a GUEST 
EDITORIAL «adi of gcanal 
Inft^^cst to VHFom* 

lb bcconw a aHbacrllKr 
mcrdr a&id y&mr QSL (or a 
fwateant) with your Call L«t- 

FOR VHFcn ONiy' 



Corp 

^C3 PO. Box 5250 

Linoister, PA 1760t 



The Only 
Automatic Dialing 
Touch Tone MIC 



The CES Mo(M 23SA 
Autofii«tic MicrcH 
dial«r ha* a 10 
rtumb#r mtmory that 
can stora a van 11 
dl^tt numbara. Jual 
dial *ar^ on# digit to 
bHng up auto-fMtohf 
pays* and dial phona 
numbar automati- 
cally. Pfografn Diaf* 
Ing spaad tor virtu ally 
mn)f rapaatar auto- 
palch, than dial 
numbar at fastast 
apaad. Automatic 
PTT wKh manual or 
automatic dialing. All 
dialing and pro- 
gramming dona ffOm 
Kay board. LEO indi- 
cator for program- 
ming or PTT and . » * v^CiiS 

ALL COMTAINED IN A SMALL MIC. 



69.^5 



At your Ham Radio Dealer 
or Call or Write 



CES 



KiMMlMrATlONS 
KLKCTHONIfS 
sKKriAlTIHS. mr- 



399 W Fiir&«nM Ave Wintar Parli, Fla 327fl« 

30S. 645 04 74 



ALL BAND TRAP 

VERTICAL ANTENNAS ! 



FULL t 4th wave: - Atl Bandsl Auto- 
matic Selection wHK proven Hl-Q Tf«p». 
3 Models-ALL salf ■upporUng - GrouniS 

or r«of mount. HEAVY Double wall 

laamless Alumlnunni lower lecttcin - HI 
IMPACT POLY Low Lo*^ Plastic Co- 
ver OVEB*ALL. NO WOBBLY, LUMPY 
TRAPS ^ MO UNSIGHTLY CLAMPSi 
needed - Sain a vl£« an the way 
141 - t V4** - Traps hkMen tauMe. You can 
Lttc K, In a 1 ft. ig. &achyarti N^ohbors 
wH never know tha li a Hl-Power ALL 
D^e^Uon DX Anienna^ FOR APART* 
MENTS, ROW HOUSES, MOBILE 
HOMES - CONDOS etc. where min- 
imum space and neat appeai'ence H 
MANDATORY? lnitant"Prlve in^^r^und 
mount finc+iidcd) , Uie wrtti or without 
radtak* (Incliided) (All angle roof mount - 
Efctral COMPLETELY PRETUNED - 
NO ADJUSTMENTS NEEDED EVERl 
NO TUNER NEEDED Over AR Bands 
(eicept ao meter - 400 KC) SWR 1-1 
to 2-1 at Band edges, Stnd, S0239 con- 
necter - 50 ohm for any length RG5BU 
- RGBU 1«edHne. Matches ALL MAKES 
TRANSRECIEVERS. 2000 Watt PEP. 
Shipped in 5 ft. Boi - PREPAID IN 
USA. Assembles In 3 min. usbig only 
tcrewdPf¥er. WEATKERPROOR 

No.-AVTeO-lO S Band 24'^" $7995 
No- AVT40-10 4 B«nd IB'S" S69.95 
No.- AVT20-10 3 Band iS'e" S5B,95 

SEND FULL PRICE FOR PP DEL IN 
USA (Canada ii $5.DO eitra fof post- 
age, cler«ca4, Custom* «tcJor order u«ing 
VISA (Bankameficartt) or MASTER 
CHARGE or AMER EXP. <^« Numbar 
and El. date- Ph 1-306- 2 36-5333 
9AM -6PM weekdays We «hlp \n 2-3 
Prices will Increase Sept 1^ so 
order NOW AND SAVE. AH 
Afiiennai Guaranteed for 1 year 
- 10 day money back iriBL Made 
tn USA. Free inf. Avallalile from 

WESTERN ELECTRONICS 

Dept.A7-IOKftarney No, 6B847 




Introducing the 

QDX- 32 

The Quad You^ve Been 
Waiting For! 




SPECIFICATIONS 



ELECTRICAL 

Gain over dSpole .,.,,.... 7db 

Frorft/back ratio 20 

Front/sJde ratio , 37cfb 

Lishtweight--«asy to assemble— 
UPS ^hippabJe 

Power Ra{tng 2KW PEP 

Poianzation Horizontal 

Jnput Impedence ......... 52 ohnis 



MECHANICAL 



Actual weight 

Shippfrtg weight .... 
Wind surface area , . 
Lateral tin rust at 10O mph 
Wind SLfrvival rating . 

Overal^l l^engtln 

Heigiit & width 

Turning radius 



26JIDS. 
40 lbs. 
9.2 sq. ft. 
370 (bs. 
eO mph 
S ft.-S irr. 
1S n-s in. 
12ft.-2(n. 



the indispensable 

BIRD 43 

THRULINE- WATTMETER 



price: — 



— 1220.33 

FOB — OKL* CiTr 




A New TriBand Cubical QUAD 
Antenna from 

HI-RELI, INC. 

/or 10, 15 and 20 meters 



HI-REU, INC. 

Represented By 

SRODfB Bl BCjnOfitCS COAiPANY 

SE37 EiloKWDDd Driv* 

Moam, DhlahDrnn 731 B'l] 

406-T94-D40A 



ffidilei I *lkJP 



s^BA2 




Read RF Watts Directly. 

0.45-2300 MHz, 1-10,000 watis ± 5%, Low Insertion 
VSWR^ 1.05. 

Unequalled economy and flexibility: Buy only the 
element(s) covering your present frequency and 
power needs, add extra ranges later if your re- 
quirements expand. 

THRULJNE Model 43 RF Directional Wattmeter 

and Elements in Stock. 




T 





ffl 



^Mas 



-j^— Electronics Supply, Inc. 

1S06 Mc Kinney • Houston, Texas 77002 • (713) 65S026€ 




SIGNAL 



® 



UNflDILLA 

'W2(IU'Balnis 

DfMANOED BV 



^U9 

Still 
Only 



PfrQFESSIOflflLS 
ffOftLfl WIDE 
OVEA l2rEAKS 



^TNeOriginal Lightning Arrest 

*6S0*Str(ii£th 
*StiJnl«ss Har^wart 

fSrilei ASSISTANCE? 

^fiUNRANTEED Gall: ffUSH CUNMISON, WAZiOT 

T«ll-Fr«e 800-448-1666 
INYS Correct 315-437-3953] 




1:10R4:1 
PEP 



FULL-POWER, QUniriY 
HUM flNTENNfl PARTS 



NT YOUR^DERLER 

* raluks trips- insulators 

* quadpaatsanteina klis 

* boom/mast mounts wire 
+ cable connectors 



WRITE FOR FULL CATALI^G 
flBtlttse 30C Stamps] 



FIf 



ILTEB 



UNADILLfl/HElfCO DIVISION [Otpt. JJ_] 



ST^aKINNC StflEET.£flSTS¥flACUSE NEWvOflK 13<K7 



DEALERS WANTED- OVER 300 WORLD-WIDE 







WHERETHEHAMISKING 

Let Us Fill Your 




t 





FOR OVER 30 YEARS 
Specific Needs From 



^H8 



OUR $2,000,000.00 AMATEUR GEAR INVENTORY 

ALL THE FAMOUS NAMES— TRANSCEIVERS— AMPLIFIERS— ANTENNAS— TOWERS 

Give us a try before you buy • Call Jim Titus 

la Division of TREVOSE ELECTRONICS, INC/ 4033 Brownsville Road, Trevose, PA 19047i 



INTRODUCES 

OUR NEW 

EXCLUSIVE 

MOBILE ANTENNA 

ir GREATER FIELD STRENGTH 
-k GREATER TUNING RANGE 

• ALL NON-CORROSIVE PARTS 

• ALL THREADS U.S. STANDARD 
3/8 K 24 

• MADE ENTIRELY OF QUALITY 
MATERIALS 



OUR FINEST KIT only $8550 

Radiator, Mast, 10 Met^r Adaptor, and 
1 oa. 75, 40t 20 and 15 Meter Coils 

(Parts may be purchased separately) 

Common 2 - 4 - 6 and 8 MHz MARINE 
frequency coils atso available 

2 to 30 M Hi Custom Frequency 
CoilSf made to order 



FREE UPS SHIPPING 
ON PREPAID ORDERS 



n«^tef fh*^ 



215-357-1400 



Con ta ctyour fa vo ril e dea ier o r 
i^ASZ Write for brochure 



AHF/ANTENNAS 

2814 5. Bay water Ave. 
San Pedro Ca. 90731 
Phone (213) 831-5444 

Dealerships available 



i^ Header S&rvice—see page 27 7 



159 



■i 



IRON POWDER and FERRITE PRODUCTS 

AMID^N 



i^A26 



Fast, Reliable Service Since 1963 



Small Orders Welcome 



Free 'Tech ^ Data' Flyer 



Toroidal Cores, Shielding Beads, Shielded Coit Forms 
Ferrite Rods, Pot Cores, Baluns, Etc, 

12033 OTSEGO STREET, NORTH HOLLYWOOD, CALIFORNIA 91607 




PERSONALIZED LICENSE PLATE FRAMES 

YOUR NAME. QTH. 73 ETC. IN RAISED. WHITE 
LETTERS ON A BLACK BACKGROUND. 

' DURABLE, DIE CAST METAL FRAME 
' TRIPLE CHROME PLATED 

• LETTERS CHEMICALLY FUSED 
' FITS ALL AUTOMOBILES 

• ACCOMMODATES ALL LICENSE PLATES 

• EXCITING NEW GIFT ITEM f 



V^ 



» OKDfcKINC. SPECIFY TDP 
LINE COPY (12 LETTERB MA\ 
IWCIUDING SPACING* AMATEUR 
RAimY APf'FAHS f\S SOTTOM 
INi ON ALL f«AMES UNLESS 
OTHERWISE SPECHIED (12 
UTTERS MAK J 



8 



95 



PER FRAME 
POSTPAID 

*^A107 




AJT ENTERPRISES 

4442 VINTON AVENUE CULVER CITY. CA. 90230 (213) 836-2Z23 

SATISFACTION GUARANTEED OH MONEY REFUNDED 
CHECKS AND MONEY OHDEf^S ACCEPTED. CALIF. RESIDENTS ADD 6% SALES TAX 




THE FIRST CHOICE IN 

REPEATER CONTROL 

The Power and Flexibility of Microprocessor Technology 

AUTOPAICH, REVERSE PATCH, SMART ID, ACCESS CODE 
MUTING, MORSE CODE ANNOUNCEMENTS, FLEXIBLE 
FUNCTION TIMEOUT. COURTESY TONE, LINKING, 
CONTROL OP. FUNCTIONS. TWELVE USER FUNCTIONS, 

,.. AND MUCH MORE. 

Cqll Of write for speciftcdtions: 

MICRO CONTROL SPECIALTIES (617) 372-3442 

^MW 23 ELM PARK GROVELAND, MA. 01834 



AMATEUR 
TELEVISION 



FAST SCAH 



420-450 MHx 



APTRON OFFERS THE ATV 
ENTHUSIAST THE MOST 
COMPLETE LINE OF IQUrPMENT 
AVAILASLE 

^Model 1570B ATV REPEATER 
a complete unit- transmitter, 
re eel ver-demoeiulcifor^ control, 
identifier^ power supply 

*TXR15A ATV TRANSCEIVER 

a complete unit- ISw^ transmitter 
Viflth subcarrier sound, dual 
fre<|yency xtal converter-ch2or 
3 out, power supply 

•TX15A ATV TRANSMITTER 
ct complete unit- 15 w, subcarrier 
sound, power supply 

«XR70B XTAL CONVERTER 
dual frequency, ch2or3 out, 
high performance, power supply 

*XD2SB IN-UNE DETECTOR 
sonnples-detects video modulot- 
ion of xmtr output ^ video output 
drives any standard tv monitor 

*TD100A VIDEO- AUDIO DEMOD 

demodulates converter output, 
video drives monitor, audio 
drives speaker, power supply 

nv HANDBOOK for the AMATEUR 

Call 812 33&477S, or write for 
our detailed catalog, 

APTRON LABORATORIES ^M 
PO Box 323,&loomington,IN 

47402 



S^ 



rAESU 

\J 



FT-207R 



in stock at 



CENTRAL NEW YORK'S FASTEST Gf^OWtNG HAM DEALER 



TOWER ELECTRONICS 












>^MTmi 



-^^ 



ffW 






-C" 



cow 






Featyfing Yaegg, icom. Drake, Atlas. Ten-Tee, Swan, Oentfon, Pace, Paiomar, Alda. 
Midland, Wilson. KOK, MfJ. Microwave Module, Standard, Tempo. Astron, KLM, 
Hy-Gairs. Mosley, tarsen, CushcrafK Hustier. Mini Products, Universal and Tnstao 
Towers^ Wes^rvtce everyfhmg we self Write or call for quote, You Won't b© OisapomlwJ* 

We are just a few minutes off the NYS Thruway (1-90] Exit 32 



CALL TOLL FREE ONEIDA COUNTY AIRPORT TERMINAL BUILDING 
1.800-448791 4 ORISKANY. NEW YORK 13424 



Bob 
WA3MSH 



Warran 
K2IXN 



NY STATE RESIDENTS CALL 315-337-2622 or 315-337-0203 



24001 Alicia Pky. 

Mission Viejo, CA 92691 

(714) 769-8900 



.^ ^ 



t^' 



^^ 



Para-graphics is proud to announce fts' new 
portfolio of QSL's. The portfolio contains our 
complete line of QSL Cards... not small 
reproductions, but actual size, FULL COLOR 
prints. Included in the portfolio are twelve 
brand new, FULL COLOR cards. 

Send $1.00 today, for your QSL portfolio. 

The $1.00 is redeemable 
with your first order of QSL's. 



pcva-grc^shics 



*^P20 



exclusive QSL's for the Ham Radio Operator 

P.O. Box 268, WhltehaK, PA 1 8052 
A DMston of AA Printing Service. Inc, 
801 Ttiird Street. Wtiitetiaii. PA 18052 




ANTENNAS 

Model 0JA446 

TWO METER AMATEUR BAND t4€-14dMH2 

* NO QROUNO PLANE REOUIAED 

* USE FIXED. MOBIiE. OR FOftTABLE 

« MB GAIN OVER i&OTROPlC IN MOST MOBILE 
APPLICATIONS 

• OVERALL LENOTH LESS THAN 64 INCHES 

• COLLAPSIBLE TO 32 INCHES MAY BE PACKED IN SLIit- 
CASE FOR THOSE OUT-OF TOWN TRIPS 

• STEEL WHIP AND ADAPTER INCLUDED FOR MOBILE AND 
FIXED APPLICATIONS 

* VSWR LESS THAN 1.2:1 

PRICE $39.95 UPS Prepaid 

220 MH2 — $37.95 450 MHz — S37.95 






C3 



i^M^ 



Electronics Supply, Inc. 

tSOa McKinn«y • HouMon, Tettas 77002 * (ri3> 6SSa2SS 




4" X 2W X r 



irSHEREil 



THE 



AMCODER 



A NEW ERA IN CW REGENERATION 

• Select any CW signal that's 40 hz away 
from any other (Tune — 400 to 1 500 hz) 

• Lock and switch to "auto'' and you have 
tape qua% audio. On© and one only 
signal reception. 

• Only 20 mv of audio above receiver 
noise required for acquisition. 

• A 40 db over S9 signal, 50 hz away 
cannot come through. 

• Reduce operator fatigue by not listenrr^ 
to any other band and/or signal noise 
except the one you want to work, 

• Variable acquisition frequency ^-400 to 
1500 hz. 

• Variable oytput tone frequency^ 100 to 
2000 hz. 

• Variable output audio fevel (drives ear- 
phones or station speaker). 

Kit includes afl parts inciuding cabinet, 
power supply and complete instruc- 
tions. Epoxy glass boards, plated and 
pre-drttled. 

Available — ^Factory wfred and tested with 
1 year warranty on parts and workman- 
ship- 
Kit— $69.95 FWT— S89.95 
VISA and Master Charge Aixepted- 
AMC ENGINEERING ^Mm 
P. 0, 8ox 427, Jessup, ilD 20794 



Directional RF wattmeters 
from 

Dielectric 

ThenewlOOO-A 

Wattmeter from 

Dielectric accepts 

plug-in elements 

that permit RF 

measurements from 

100 mW to 5000 watts full-scale and from 2 MHz to 1 

GHz. The large 4 Vi** meter face Is easy to read and has ±5% 

full scale accuracy and great resolution. 

TliB 1000- A is available in a convenient all-purpose kit that 
includes a SNIFFER adjustable RF signal sampler, spare UHF 
connector and patch cable* All contained in a durable 
carrying case, 

RF Instruments for Professionals 

For tlie name of yotir local distributor, caD ToU Free 800-341-9678. 

A limited number of distributor loca lions are currently available; inquiries weli^uned* 




^ 



DIELECTntC COMMUIMICATIOIMS ^oa» 

A UNIT OF GEISTEnAL SlQlMAI. 



RAYMOtvC. MAf« 04071 * TB_ 207-6^-4^5 • B0&341-g&7a 



t^ Reader Service— see pag# Fll 



161 



How You 
Can Convert 
Your Rohn 

25G Tower to a 
FOLD -OVER 



CHANGE, ADJUST OR JUST 
PLAIN WORK ON YOUR 
ANTENNA AND NEVER LEAVE 
THE GROUND. 



If you have a Rohn 25G 
Tower, you can convert it to 
a Fold-over by simply using 
a conversion kit. Or, buy an 
inexpensive standard Rohn 
25G tower now and convert 
to a Fold-over later 

Rohn Fold-overs allow you to 

work completely on the 
ground when installing or 
servicing antennas or rotors, 
This eliminates the fear of 
climbing and working at 
heights. Use the tower that 
reduces the need to climb. 
When you need to ""get at" 
your antenna . . . just turn 
the handle and there it is. 
Rohn Fold-overs offer un- 
beatable utility. 

Yes! You can convert to a 
Fold-over. Check with your 
distributor for a kit now and 
keep your feet on the ground. 

AT ROHN YOU GET THE BEST 



Do nol attempt to raJse antenr»a or 
antenna support nearpovworJines— 
You can be KILLED 




Unarco-Rohn 



Dn/islon of Unarco Indusmos. Inc. 
P.O. BoK2000,Peofle. Illinois 61 6Qi 






#.^iia 



Write for CATALOG 

CRAMMED WITH GOVT SURPLUS 
ELECTRONIC GEAR send sot for handling 



t|. AK^AIT-ll 1f«n9inttt«r foi i^. 40 20 imC *0 
mrto> 1 00 W^ii> Qufpul pf* ^M. QW h. MCW 

With AMtOKsS^? SO 
#1, SCl^lZ IIANUWrrtitLCilVlt lOO 1^& mc 
Oyst^l CcKitfOlIrd on A Ctumnet tKc.«ll«fM condition 

Allfijb«M2 50 
i], AtC'5 riAN^MlTTEi wnh all tub» Jind t;ry%tv(l 
BMritln*?v^- $16,9S 

*4. AC rOWlJI SUrrLV toi Jtlmve ECARWrisltcr tompktrlv 
wkr^l^rnliiT'iEf^i St'iiw $Z6 SO 

i5. iaS/AlO^ VHF UCIlVti Cfysf^ Conuo^led on 4 

itft. r^I I/AKS VHi rriunm^cr. CryMJtl ControHed on 
4 chAnnrK EOO I S6 mc 

Bl*n<^^*niv^T10'ti^'ftp^iOn<^«T^ SZO SO 

IT- i-23^AiC ti tlCUVm l^SSOKCconilnuCHi^iun 
irt*^ LT^ed wif h All lubet S 1 6 95 



Terms: F.O 8 NYC. 25" u ileposri wirh order. baFance 
COO or remiltancG m lull Sut>|pci: to pfiof sale and 
O'^'ce change Wriie for eii!*lc»<^— %pict S0< tor pc»t.4g^ 

G4.G Radio llectjonlcs CO. 

45*47 WARREN SI. (2iid floor) 

NIWYORK/NY IDOO? Th. 2 1 2-267 -4605 

OPEN 9rtm to 5 pm 



►^G2fl 



' Ji€i£€rj^am€s 



UGUlATtH roWtt SUPFIT 

± 1 iV 6 iunp. or tan be tofioccted in p<iTa1lel for J IV II 
amp. Voltaae adjustable 10- I4V RejjuiiiTlon .01%. S k 
8" X 16' SHPT WT 23# PRtCE: S^OOOta, 



I IV, B a^> AOfUSTAHLE- I O- 1 4V curt«nt llmJied SHORT 
PROTECTED, O.V PROTlCIlON. S ■ S x 9 . SHTT. WT. 

i^i rf%KX;S^aooeA. 



s£ifcrmA//GS 






,IID>H 17191 



tMlliiwilt 



1206 S. Napa Street # Philadelphia PA 19U6 



PtNNA, RESIDCNT PLEASC ADO e"**. SAl£S TAX. All PRECIS 
AR£ r, O A- OUR WAREHOUSE. PHILA, PA AIL MERCHAN^ 
DISt ACCURATE AS TO DESCRlPTiON TO TMt BEST Of OLR 
KNO\.Vl_EDG£_ YOUR PURCHASE PWIONEV RETLMXD If NOT 
SATISriED. MIN. ORDER SlOOO 



antennas 

MODEL AP-1 

80, 40, 20, 15 and 10 meters 

$35.00 

MODEL AP-2 

40, 20, 15 and 10 meters 
$30.00 

MODEL AP-3 

20, 15 and 10 meters 
S25.00 

SHIPPED POSTPAID USA 
SEND FOR FREE BROCHURE 

RUDY PLAK 

W6TIK ^pe4 

PO BOX 966 
SAN MARCOS CA 92D69 












162 



^ Reati^r S^rviGS—s&B psge 5n 



QUASAR VIDEO 
TAPE RECORDER SALEI 



MESSAGE MEMORY KEYER 




• Records to two hours, color or block & 
white 

• Records off th# oir— reeord one pro- 
grorn whlfe watching onother 

• Camera input to moke your own 
topes 

• Con be used with optronol timer whffe 
you ore crtjt 

• Pouse contfoi for editrrig 

• Limlied suppiy- these $f,000 VTRs 
were demomiroiofs & come with new 
woffontee . . . ^499 
Si 00 wofch of new blank tope wlfi 
be included at no extro chorgel 

Svnd for ogi n«vw cotologf 
S^ Stiippl/ig c^arg« p«f ottim • NO CO,D.sl 

Biil: G MC D Visa 
I Credit card # 

■ Exp. dale 

_ Signature 

Name ^ . 



I 



Address 



State 



Zip 



I 
I 
I 

I 



TUFTS 



Medfofd MA 03155 
MftOO) 225-442& 
(61 7J 095-62*0 



*^T3 I 




REPEATER 
AUTOPATCH 

Offer your club COMPLETE 

emergency communications 

Commercial quality, gold plated contacts, plug 
in, epoxy glass PC boards. 12 voll DC or 115 vott 
AC opefstion - Power supply included. Four 
digit access - Single digit releases - Field 
programmable- Hybrid network - No switching 
required. FCC certified telephone line coupler. 
Auxiliary "In Use" contacts sypplied. Larrd line 
"call-rn" signaffing control contacts provi{^ed. 

Price complete 1498 + $3 shipping & handling. 
Master Charge, Bank money order, or certified 
check acceptable. 

Accessories: CES-300 powered tone 
pad * 159 BUS-COM Soft-touch* telephone 
powered mike/pad element -S34.%, y^mm 




MONROE ELECTRONICS, INC. 



412 Hoiisel Av«., LyndowiHe, N-Y. 14098 




Model n TUOt 



«69.95 



Featurps; 

• Advanced CMOS message memory 

• Two (50 char each) message 
storage 

• Repeat function 

9 Records af arty speed — piays i)BCh 
at Bny speed 

• Longer message capactfy 
Example: send CQ CQ CO OX dm 
WB2YJM WB2YJM K—ttten pfay 
second message on contact— de 
WB2YJM QSL NY NY 579 579 Paul 
Paul K 

• Use for daily QSOs or contests 



Sfate-of'ttie^art-CMOS fteyer 

Sett compteftng dots and dasties 

Both dot and dasty memory 

tambic keying with any squeeze 

paddle 

5-5Q wpm 

Speed, voftime. tone, tune and 

weight controts 

Stdetone and speaker 

Low current dram CMOS battery 

opera t ton — por table 

Detuxe quarter-inch jacks for key^ 

ing and output 

Keys grid btoch and soitd state ngs 

WtREO AND TESTED FULLY 

GUARANTEED - LESS BATTERY 



^ 



^^ 



s^^ 




J^"^ 



Features: Deluxe CMOS 

Electronic Ke yer 

I Stme^fttt^^n CMOS cifcuitfY 
I Seft comptering dats and <fastfes 
> Both dot a fid dash memory 
^ IAf\4BtC he^fftg with any squeeze paddf& 
5-50 vffpm 



Spemt, wefgttf. tonm, volume fane conirQtB & std^tan^ *tflCf| 

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Low cunmtt drtm CMOS b3 fiery operaUOfi—potiaMe 
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Keys griti btoch »n4 solid state rigs 
Wired and (est&($ — fuHy guBranteed — fass battery 




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^9.95 



Features CMOS ELECTRONIC KEYER • 



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die 

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m Speed, \rotume, tone, weight S tune 
con trots, sidetone and speaiier 
MODEL TE122-same as TE133 less 
wgt, tune, solid State keying S36.50 



FEATURES; 

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rich red paddfes 

• Ffve way bmding posts 

• Use With Trac Cf^OS keyer or any 
keyer 



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operation 

m Detuxe quarter inch Jacks for keying 

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*^ Readef Service— see page 2 J f 



163 



New Products 



from page 32 

With pre-^cut and pre-bent leads. 
You won't be pushing diodes 
with plier-nicked leads or the 
wrong spread mlo the sockets, 
damaging the contacts. For 
this reason, if the 50 diodes 
supplied aren't enough (un- 
likely), I recommend ordering 
the extras from Drake. Since 
the extra offsets beyond the 
standard ones are set up on a 
diode board, elimination of 
diodes would require the odd- 
ball offsets to be set up with 
switches on the front panel. 
That wouldn't be a bad idea, 
anyway. 

The power connector fs a 
2-pm Jones with the pins ex- 
posed on Ihe back paneL There 
ought to be a guard around It to 
protect the pins from damage If 
the unit Is dropped. Recessing 
would be better, but there isn't 
room inside. Also, there should 
be some kind of locking feature 
to keep this connector from 
vtbrating off in mobile opera- 
tion. 

The accessory connector Is 
very well thought out as to the 
functions provided on it, but it 
needs to be relocated to the 
back panel and changed to a 
type that permits a strain relief 
on the cable. 

Because of heat sink limita- 
tions, the transmitter cannot 
run continuously at 25 Watts, 
This should never be a problem 
In two^way voice operation, but 
continuous RTTY or data trans- 
mission would require either 
reduced power or additional 
cooling. 

Like almost all other 
transceivers, the UV-3 puts the 
encoder, if present, on the back 
of the mjke. That makes safe 
phoning while in motion a 
rather uncertain proposition. 
The encoder keyboard for any 
mobile rig should be mounted 



on somethfng that is secured to 
the vehicle, such as the control 
panel, to allow operation with 
one hand on the wheel and both 
eyes on the road. The oft- 
proposed solution of stopping 
to phone is no answer if the 
problem involves reporting a 
drunk driver and keeping him in 
sight until the police come up. 

The UV-3 represents a big 
step forward in fitting a VHF 
transceiver to the needs of the 
amateur service. On the other 
hand, the fit isn't quite perfect 
yet, and a little more tailoring 
would be in order either on the 
next product or after they take 
another look at the placement 
of the controls on the panel. We 
hope Drake won't be seduced 
in the direction of copying any 
of the more spectacular but ir- 
relevant features of competing 
products. 

We are unlikely to see a 
transceiver of higher basic 
quality, especially at ham 
prices. In many of the most im- 
portant performance specifica- 
tions, though, quality is as high 
as ham applications require, so 
that improvement is probably 
not even definable. Various 
added features could be con- 
ceived to fit the unit to specific 
operating situations, but the 
accessory jack provides plenty 
of hooks for doing such things 
outboard, 

I, for one, won't hold my 
breath waiting for a better 
transceiver to come along. R. L 
Drake Company, 540 Richard 
St., Miamisburg OH 45342; 
(513)'866-2421. Reader Service 
number D11. 

John A. Carroll AB1Z 
Bedford MA 

USER REPORT: THE DATONG 
FU1 AUDIO FILTER 

The audio filter has become 
an increasingly popular add-on 




The Datong FL1 audio titter. 



device in the amateur station. 
The reasons are clear. Today's 
amateur bands are becoming 
more crowded as more and 
more amateurs are licensed in 
the US and abroad, and more 
broadcasters and Intruders 
sneak onto our frequencies. 
With the tremendous increase 
in QRM, amateurs have had to 
search for ways to improve 
reception ability. To some ex* 
tent, recent developments in 
receiver design and construe- 
tion have helped, but unfor- 
tunately there is a trade-off for 
the improvement: It is expen- 
sive! 

Audio filtering has become 
popular because it helps to 
reduce the Increased QRM, is 
relatively inexpensive, is sim- 
ple to install in a receiver audio 
line, and is an effective filtering 
technique for everything ex- 
cept front-end overload and in- 
termodulation. 

The current state of the art in 
audio filters can best be seen in 
the Datong FL1 "Frequency- 
Agile" filter. It is manufactured 
in England and is truly the Rolls 
Royce of the current filter 
market. The FLI has ail of the 
most advanced features avail- 
able in audio filtering, plus a 
couple that are unique. 

By far the most unusual 
feature of the FL1 is its 
remarkable automatic notch 
system. With this system in 
operation, the filter auto* 
matically seeks out carriers 
and heterodyne whistles and 
suppresses them. If, for exam- 
ple, someone plops a big car- 
rier near a frequency one is 
operating on, he will hear the 
carrier for about a second, and 
then it will practically disap- 
pear, totally automatically. The 
S-meter reading, of course, will 
not change, but the operator 
will not hear the carrier any 
more and wiN hear the signal he 
wants to hear. This feature is 
especially effective on 40 
meters, where it serves well to 
combat all of the broadcast 
carriers. I have had QSOs on 40 
that would have been impossi- 
ble without the FLI, and it 
works well on other bands, too. 
Tuner-uppers and carriers are 
no longer a problem. 

The filter accomplishes this 
feat through a highly Ingenious 
phase-locked loop system. Not 
only does the phase-locked 
loop system allow for auto- 
matic notch tuning during SSB 
operation but it also provides 
another feature, a limited 
automatic frequency-control 
system which allows for easy 
receiver tuning with even the 
narrowest of bandwidths. The 
filter will crank down to a band- 
width of 25 Hz rather smoothly 
and with no ringing^ although it 
is easy to tell that it is right on 
the verge of ringing, especially 



with high-speed CW. 

In typical SSB operation, the 
automatic notch system is left 
operable. SSB signals can be 
either peaked or notched, al- 
though 1 have found that peak* 
Ing generally works best. When 
adjacent QRM and splatter are 
severe, the automatic notch 
system can be defeated to 
allow for manual tuning of both 
the bandpass width and the 
center frequency of the filter. 
Here the FL1 has advantages 
over many of the audio filters 
now available. First, the gain of 
the filter is independent of 
bandwidth. This means that the 
bandwidth can be narrowed 
without affecting the gain of 
the audio, whereas on many 
filters ft is necessary to read- 
just the volume whenever the 
bandpass is narrowed. When 
the FLI bandpass is set on an 
extremely narrow setting, there 
Is a slight reduction in gain, but 
not nearly so pronounced as 
with most other filters. 

Second, and more important, 
the bandwidth of the fiiter is in- 
dependent of its center frequen- 
cy. In some filters of the con- 
stant-Q type, it is necessary to 
alter the bandwidth whenever 
the center frequency is 
changed. This is not so with the 
FL1, and the result is a smooth 
"feel" to the filter frequency 
tuning which approximates re- 
ceiver tuning itself. 

The FLI is more effective for 
SSB work than other audio 
filters 1 have tried. Normally, I 
leave the filter in the automatic 
mode when I am on SSB and it 
does all the work. It knocks out 
any nearby carriers, CW or 
RTTY, that show up. When 
QRM gets tough, though, I 
switch to manual control and 
adjust the bandpass and center 
frequency for maximum in- 
telligibility with minimum 
bandwidth. 

On CW, the automatic notch- 
ing system is normally (eft off 
because it will tend to notch 
out the signal one wants to 
listen to, The FL1 is very 
smooth on CW, even at ex* 
tremely narrow bandwidths. 
This is due to the fact that It 
contains a limited afc function 
with a bandpass width of about 
±50 Hz, making the filter tune 
smoothly across a wide range 
of center frequencies. On 
filters without this afc feature, 
it is difficult to tune in (or notch 
out) desired signals at extreme- 
ly narrow bandwidths due to 
drift and varying frequencies in 
a net or roundtable. On the FLI , 
however, the afc action keeps 
the filter on the received signal. 

Should you wish to operate 
without the b.\c feature, all you 
have to do is push in a button 
labeled -afc and the function is 
disabled. Normally, for CW 
work, I use the filter in the peak 



164 



position with fairly narrow 
bandwidth. It is then possible 
to vary the center frequency 
and tune across several CW 
signals, even though they may 
be practicafiy on the same fre- 
quency. One ends up wtth a nar- 
row window which can be 
moved up and down a nymber 
of signais, letting in only the 
one wanted. The filter works so 
well on CW, even in heavy con- 
test operation, that f have 
decided not to purchase the op- 
tional CW crystal filters for my 
new solid-state transceiver. 

The filter has its own audio 
amplifier circuit which will 
deliver about 2 Watts into an 
8-Ohm load. This is sufficient to 
drive headphones easily and 
speakers at aH but the loudest 
levels. Even with the volume 
turned up high, the audfo is 
smooth and distortion-free. II 
sounds very good in a pair of 
8*0hm stereo headphones. 

The FLl has a comprehen- 
sive switching and control ar- 
rangement with three variable 
knobs and five push^buttons on 
the front panel. The knobs and 
buttons are large and easily ac- 
cessible^ which, in this age of 
ever-increasing rrviniaturiza- 
tion, is a pheasant change. One 
of the knobs controls the band- 
width and varies it from 25-1000 
Hz in the peak mode and from 
20-800 Hz in the notch mode. A 
second knob controls the 
center frequency, varying it 
from 280-3000 Hz. The third 
knob controls the volume and 
is ganged with an adjustable 
pot on the back of the unit 
which allows the input level 
from the receiver to be preset at 
any desired level. This gives 
considerable flexibility in the 
type of headphones and speak- 
ers which can be used with the 
FLl, and it also ensures that 
the audio level coming out of 
the speaker will be constant 
whether the FLt Is on or not. 

The five push-button switch- 
es turn the unit on and off, turn 
the ate function on and off, turn 
the automatic notching feature 
on and off. control whether the 
filter is in the peak or notch 
position, and allow the filter to 
be left on but bypassed. One 
front^panel LED indicates when 
the unit is on and another one, 
labeled 'Mock/' indicates when 
the automatic notch has cap* 
tured a carrier on SSB or when 
a signal has been correctly 
tuned in and peaked on CW. 
The headphone jack is also on 
the front panel. 

The unit is obviously of high 
quality constructfon, with two 
printed circuit boards and 
quality components packed in* 
to an attractive, high-impact 
plastic case. The unit is by- 
passed against rf, and I have 
noticed no rf getting into it ex- 
cept on a couple of occasions 
when I have operated the ampli- 



fier into extremefy high swrs. 
The FL1 is a complex filter with 
numerous functions, and it 
therefore is packed with parts, 
including eight iCs, six tran- 
sistors, and eleven diodes. It re* 
quires power of between 6-0 
and 16 volts at about 100- 
300 mA, depending upon how 
much audio Is needed. I use a 
little 12-V dc supply which 
works quite wetl. Provision is 
made internally to plug in a 
standard nine-volt battery. 

The FL1 is a super fitter, but 
no piece of gear is perfect, and 
this one does have some minor 
problems. First, it uses rden- 
tical DIN jacks for the speaker/ 
headphone output and for the 
power supply input. The filler 
itself is protected against im- 
proper plug*ins, but it might be 
possible to destroy a power 
supply If one accidentally 
plugged it into the wrong jack. 
Second, the unit Is very light- 
weight (a little more than IV2 
pounds), and It will slide across 
the table when one tries to 
push in one of the push-but- 
tons. I have had to weigh mine 
down to get it to stay still. 
Third, the price for the unit is 
somewhat steep at $179.95 (al- 
though lately several other 
filters have come out in the 
same price range). 

The FL1 is. however, worth 
the price, 1 have used both 
home-brew and commercial 
audio fitters in the past, but I 
have never used one that even 
begins to compare to the FLl. I 
have found that most audio fil- 
ters work well on CW but are vir- 
tually worthless on SSB, and 
this is where the FLl shines. It 
is far and away the best filter 
for SSB work I've used, not only 
when it Is in the automatic 
mode and doing the work itself, 
but also when it is in the 
manual mode and one controls 
the bandwidth and center fre- 
quency. And on CW, the FLl 
compares to any other filter Tve 
used until it gets down to ex- 
tremely narrow bandwidths. 
There, because of its afc func- 
tion, it performs better than the 
others. Since I have decided 
not to purchase any of the op* 
tionaf crystal fillers for my new 
solid-state transceiver, the 
filter has practically paid for 
itself already. 

Audio filtering has been 
proven to be effective^ and with 
all of the filters coming out on 
the market, obviously it is be- 
coming more popular. It is 
somewhat surprising that more 
of the manufacturers have not 
included audio filtering in their 
transceivers and receivers. Until 
they do, we shall have to con- 
tinue using add-on devices, and, 
of those on the market today, 
the Datong FLl appears to be 
the leader. Datong Electronics 
Limited, Spence Mills, Mill 
Lane, Bramley, Leeds LSI 3 




OK's "Just Wrap"TM tooL 



3HE, England, UK. Reader Ser- 
vice number D62. 

R. Stanley Dicks WSYA 
Wheeling WV 

OK INTRODUCES 

REVOLUTIONARY WIRING 

TOOL 

OK Machine and Tool Cor* 
poration has announced "Just 
Wrap"TM^ a revolutionary wiring 
process and series of tools that 
produce wire-wrapped connec- 
tions without prior stripping or 
slitting of the wire insulation. 
Designed to wrap on , 025-inch 
square posts, each tool carries 
a 504oot spool of 30 AWG wire. 
The tool will wire continuously 
through any number of pins 
(daisy chain). It is equipped with 
a handy built-in wire cutoff and 
is equally suited for point-to- 
point wiring. Wire Is available \n 
4 colors: blue, while, red, and 
yellow. 

For further information, con- 
tact OK Machine and Tool Cor- 
poration, 3455 Conner Street 
Bronx NY 10475. Reader Service 
numt>er05, 

THE AIM AUTODIALER 

You are fighting bumper-to- 
bumper traffic during the drive 
home after a hard day at the of- 
fice. Suddenly, a car in the op- 



posite lane swerves out of con* 
trol and causes a serious acci- 
dent. The confusion that results 
does not allow you to take your 
hands off the wheel for more 
than a second or two. Luckily, 
you recently installed an auto- 
dialer on your two-meter rig. 
Only two buttons are pushed 
(one to access the patch, an- 
other to dial the number) and 
you are in touch with the near- 
est police station. Not only does 
the Advanced Electronics Ap* 
plications (AEA)AD'I autodialer 
make autopatch operation 
easy, but it also makes it safer 
for you and your fellow motor* 
ists. 

The AD-1 resembles a normal 
touchtone pad, except that it is 
slightly thicker and heavier. The 
tough black plastic case con- 
tains the circuitry necessary to 
store and recall ten seven-digit 
numbers, provide easy call- 
back, and act as a conventfonal 
touchtone pad. An additional 
eight numt>ers may be stored in 
a special factory-programmed 
chip. The design makes hookup 
to most amateur FM trans- 
ceivers a simple task. 

The heart of the AD-t is four 
integrated circuits which pro- 
vide tones that will satisfy even 
the most stringent repeater. The 
keyboard contains the ten 



165 



numerals pfus the * and # func- 
tions. The user gets a reassur- 
ing click when a keypad is 
depressed. Other features in- 
clude a small speaker so that 
the output may be monitored, 
as well as a periodic warning 
tone when the unit is in the pro- 
gram mode. 

The AD-1 comes with a four- 
pin microphone connector and 
a short length of coiled cable. 
Depending on the rig, it may be 
interfaced between the micro- 
phone and transceiver or 
hooked to an accessory socket. 
The push-to-talk method in- 
volves acoustical coupling. This 
is a bit more awkward, but in- 
volves no permanent connec- 
tions other than a 12-voll sup- 
ply. An internal potentiometer 
allows user adjustment of the 
output leveL If you are only in- 
terested in acoustical coupling* 
then the AD-IP might be a good 
choice. It is identical to the 
AD*1, except for the fact that it 
has only a speaker for output 
and contains a rechargeable 
battery. 

The $1 29.95 price might seem 
high for an occasional auto- 
patch user, but with a bit of 
Imagination the AD-1 and AD-IP 
could be incorporated in a vari- 
ety of telephone projects. The 
26-page instruction booklet 
gives a fair description of the 
various modes that are avail- 
able. 

Autopatch operation has al- 
ways been a great way to show 
off the utility of ham radio. Now, 
you can make it safer and more 
fun with the AEA autodiaier. Ad- 
vanced Electronic Applications, 
inc., PO Box 2160, Lynnwood 
WA 98036; (206)-775'7373, 
Reader Service number A94. 

Tim Danlef NSRK 
Peterborough NH 



THE OSL ORGANIZER 

With today's more sophisti- 
cated rigs and less cluttered 
radio shacks, how do you keep 
QSL cards neatly ofganized, 
wall preserved, dog-ear resis- 
tant, and always on beautiful 
display? 

A specially designed orga- 
nizer is now available from Mil 
Industries of Panorama City, 
California. The QSL Organizer 
contains heavy-duty plastic 
pages with roomy 4" x 6" slip-in 
pockets. Each page holds 6 
QSLs (back to back), enhancing 
their appearance by its crystal- 
clear clarity. The silp-ln pock- 
ets, accessible from the top, 
allow cards to be arranged or 
rearranged quickly and easily. 

The QSL Organizer album is 
specialty designed to hold the 
slip*in pocket pages. It's a 
beautiful 9" x 14" three-ring 
binder, richly padded in long- 
lasting "Brown^Hide" vinyl, with 
a gold-printed Inscription on the 
cover and spine. Pages are 
easily inserted or removed. 

For further information, con- 
tact Mil Industries, PO Box 
44457, Panorama City CA 91402. 
Reader Service number Ml 17. 

THEX1TEXMRS-1D0 
MORSE CODE TRANSCEIVER 

The increasing popularity of 
microcomputers has done more 
for ham radio than just improve 
repeater control and advance 
RTTY operation. The Xitex 
MRS-100 Morse code transceiv- 
er will be of interest to the new- 
est Novice as well as the old- 
time CW operator. When used 
with a standard ASCII or Baudot 
terminal, it becomes possible to 
generate and receive Morse 
code at any speed between one 
and 150 words per minute. 




The QSL Organizer. 



The heart of the MRS-100 Is a 
3870 microcomputer, it con- 
tains 2048 bytes of ROM which 
hold the programming neces- 
sary to generate and copy code. 
The result is a single MOS inte- 
grated circuit which will convert 
a Morse input (do levels) on one 
pin to a serial ASCII or Baudot 
output on another pin, and con* 
vert a serial ASCII or Baudot in- 
put on a third pin to a Morse out- 
put on a fourth pin. By adding a 
power supply, 80-Hz filter, and 
the necessary switching and in- 
terfacing, a complete transceiv- 
er is created. 

The success of a dedicated 
microcomputer lies in the quali- 
ty of the internal program, A 
MRS-1D0 owner doesn't need to 
worry about being at the mercy 
of the ROM's contents. Xitex 
spent several years developing 
the most versatile approach 
possible. The copy algorithm is 
compensated to accept a wide 
range of fists at speeds that will 
meet anyone*s needs. Most 
code receiver systems assume 
arbitrary values for the rela- 
tionship between code element 
spaces, character spaces, and 
the dot/dash ratio. The MRS-100 
does not. It continually evalu- 
ates the received signaL allow- 
ing speed shifts from 150 to 1 
wpm, or vice versa, missing only 
about five characters before 
locking in on the new rate or 
style. 

The problem of generating 
Morse characters is somewhat 
more straightforward. The 
MRS-100 goes beyond the usual 
Morse keyboard utility since It 
contains a 32-character FIFO 
(First In, First Out) buffer. This 
allows the operator to type 
faster than the transmitted 
code and results in a smooth, 
clean signal. If an ASCII key- 
board is used, it may be pos* 
sible to RU60UT mistakes so 
that the ham on the other end 
hears perfect CW. 

The MRS-100 tested at 73 
came assembled, in an attrac- 
tive 7-inch by 8-tnch by SVa-tnch 
black and grey cabinet. The 
43-page instruction manual in- 
cludes guidelines for the as* 
sembiy of the kit version as well 
as information on hookup and 
use. Ideally, the Xitex SCT^IOO 
video terminal should be used 
as the display device. However, 

a Model 33 Teletype® was 
pressed Into service for our 
tests. The hookup directions 
left something to be desired if 
you were not using an SCT-100 
or an older Baudot machine. 
The addition of a reed relay and 
diode were necessary to get the 
system up and running. The 
frustration of interfacing was 
soon offset by several hours of 
enjoyable use. 

The Extra class portion of 40 
meters was the first testing 
ground. The headphone jack on 
a Kenwood TS-820 provided a 



source of audio for the MRS- 
100, and soon I was "copying" 
code at twice the speed I am ac- 
customed to. It was apparent 
that other fellows were using a 
computer, too, since the 
teletype was spitting out flaw- 
less text at 40 words per minute. 
I guess 1 was disappointed that 
this previously uncopyabie 
code did not contain secret 
messages, so I soon found my- 
self tuning across the Novice 
band. Needless to say, most of 
the signals did not sound like 
they were machine generated, 
but the MRS100 easily slid 
down to the five-word-per- 
minute range, copying the mis* 
takes in addition to the correct 
characters. 

The Search-Track- Lock 
switch provides the operator 
with three distinct copy modes. 
The search mode allows the 
unit to synchronize and track 
the received audio while output- 
ting the corresponding ASCII or 
Baudot characters. If no in- 
stantaneous large shifts in 
speed are anticipated, the track 
mode may provide a more 
stable output. The reduced cap- 
ture window allows a more 
accurate determination of the 
dot/dash and spacing decision 
points. The third mode is a lock 
type which is useful when there 
are frequent noise spikes that 
may be interpreted as false 
dots. When the operator switch- 
es from the track to the lock 
mode, the capture window and 
all internal decision points are 
locked to their currant values. 

The threshold control, like 
the search-track'lock modes, is 
best understood after several 
hours of practice. I found that 
the MRS^IOO would occasional- 
ly get locked at too high a 
speed. By adjusting the thresh- 
old and the level of the input 

signal, I was able to overcome 
these troublesome quirks. The 
input circuitry for the receiver 
portion of the MRS-tOO is rela- 
tively simple, yet the unit is able 
to compensate for fading, even 
when the signal is seemingly 
overcome by noise. There is, 
however, very little tolerance for 
an adjacent signaL An active 
filter circuit with an 80-Hz band- 
pass provides slightly more im- 
munity to ORM, but I doubt If 
the MRS-100 would function 
well under contest-like condi- 
tions, in addition to the filtered 
CW, a completely regenerated 
Morse signal is available from 
the local sidetone oscillator. 
This provides a useful way to 
set the threshold and input 
levels. 

A two-digit LED display 
shows the speed of the received 
signal. This does not have the 
versatility of the conversion 
algorithm since there area num^ 
bef of ways that code spacing 
can be set. When I used a 6 wpm 
73 code tape as an input, the 



166 



display read approximdtely 16 

wpm. This is not too surprising 
when you remember that the 73 
tapes use a character speed 
that is much faster than the 
word speed. The display pro- 
vides a good relative indication 
of speed, but I don't think it can 
be interpreted literally in most 
cases. 

The sending portion of the 
transceiver performed well. The 
code speed may be set from the 
keyboard or external BCD 
switches can be wired to do the 
job. The biggest probJem is in 
keeping up; luckily, the RUB- 
OUT key on an ASCII keyboard 
lets you fix errors that are 
bound to occur if you are not 
used to high speed typing. An- 
other deficiency involves Trans- 
mit/Receive switching. An ad- 
dendum to the instruction man- 
ual shows that a single-poie 
single-throw switch must be put 
in series with the rig's keying 
line. This is In addition to the 
Send/Receive switch on the 
front of the MRS- 100. One 
switch is bad enough, but two 
are cumbersome. This problem 
could be overcome with a bit of 
custom wiring and a relay; un- 
fortunately, Xitex gives no sug- 
gestions. 

Old-timers may scoff at the 
idea of using a computer to 
send and receive Morse code, 
but there are several advan- 
tages to the MRS'100 that 
shouldn't be overlooked. It en- 
ables amateurs to transmit CW 
messages and data at speeds 
comparable to or better than 
most amateur teletype opera- 
tion without the numerous FCC 
RTTY restrictions to contend 
with. A ^*RTTY emulate^' func- 
tion allows the MRS-100 to 
transmit and receive predeter- 
mined code characters for the 
TTY or ASCII keyboard charac- 
ters not normally used in Morse 
operation. Two stations using 
MRS-IOOs could thus exchange 
automated, high-speed trans- 
missions that could replace the 
need for legalized ASCIL Just 
hook the unit to your computer 
and start transmitting. 

If you're just a beginner In the 
world of ham radio, the 
MRS-1D0 can help to improve 
your fist. It's amazing how much 
difference it can make when 
yoy see the results of your send- 
ing printed on the TTY. Finally, a 
code computer can allow non- 
hams to share in the excitement 
of CW operating, 

The MRS-100 is available in 
three forms. An assembled ver- 
sion costs $295, while a com- 
plete kit goes for $225. A partial 
kit consisting of the microcom- 
puter components and circuit 
board can be had for $95. Ap- 
proximately $70 worth of add!- 
tiona! parts are needed to com- 
plete the partial kit. As comput- 
ers become commonplace in 
the ham shack, we are bound to 



hear a lot more comments like 
^'Keyer here is a computer; it 
copies the code, too." With the 
MRS' 100, you can brag about 
your automated station at any 
speed between 1 and 150 wpm! 
Xitex Corporation, 9861 Chart- 
well Drive, Dafias TX 75243: 
(214}-349'2490. Reader Service 
number X3. 

Tim Daniel N8RK 
Peterborough NH 

HUSTLER INTRODUCES MEW 
TEN-METER YAGI ANTENNA 

A new beam, designated the 
10-MB-4, is the conclusion of ex- 
tensive design refinements of 
previous beam technology. The 
result is a four-element yagi op- 
timized for best directivity, ex- 
cellent front-to-back ratio, and 
maximum gain through selec- 
tive element spacing and pre- 
cisely resonated element 
length. 

The 10-MB-4 employs a gam- 
ma match feed system and is 
fully adjustable for a 1.2:1 or 
better swr at resonance. 

The mechanical structure of 
the Hustler 10-MB-4 is ruggedly 
designed to withstand severe 
weather yet light enough to be 
accommodated by a TV anten- 
na rotor. The entire antenna is 
constructed from high-strength 
aluminum tubing and can be 
easily grounded for lightning 
protection. 

For further information, con- 
tact Hastier, inc., 3275 North B 
Avenue, Kissimmee FL 32741. 
Reader Service number H36. 

THE HEATH KIT 
DEVIATION METER 

Have you ever had someone 
tell you that you were over- 
modulating on your two-meter 
FM rig? One solution to over- 
modulation Is the new Heath- 
KjtTM Deviation Meter Kit 
(I M -4 180) from the Heath Com- 
pany. This deviation meter can 
be a useful addition for anyone 
who operates FM equipment. 
At a cost of $149,96 it is not for 
everyone, but it will permit 
more amateurs to check their 
equipment's deviation levels 
accurately. 

Construction 

The kit can be constructed in 
two or three nights. Only two 
printed circuit boards are used, 
a main circus! board and a con* 
verter one. Ail components (ex* 
cept the front-panel controls, 
the front-panel jacks, and the 
meter itself) are mounted on 
these two circuit boards. The 
front push-button switch as- 
sembly solders directly to the 
circuit board and simplifies 
assembly, The kit uses eight in- 
tegrated circuits which are 
mounted using IC sockets. Six 
of these are RCA COS/MOS op- 
erational amplifiers which help 
minimize current drain but re- 
quire cautious handling. 



The main circuit board holds 
all of the circuitry except for the 
converter circuitry and the 
front^panel mounted items. The 
converter circuitry is mounted 
on a separate circuit board 
which is mounted in a shielded 
enclosure on the rear of the 
front panel. 

Calibration 

The alignment and calibra* 
tion requires only one piece of 
external equipment. The devia- 
tion meter's local oscillator can 
be aligned using a frequency 
counter or a standard FM 
broadcast receiver. The front- 
panel meter is used for align- 
ment and calibration metering. 

Operation 

The deviation meter requires 
ten AA celts for operation. The 
manual indicates an operating 
life of about eighty hours for 
either zinc-carbon or alkaline 
cells, A battery charger/ 
eliminator for use with nickel* 
cadmium batteries is an op- 
tional accessory. Battery volt- 
age can be checked by the use 
of the front-panel BATT push- 
button. 

A tune switch allows you to 
peak the meter indication using 
the main- and fine-tuning con- 
trols. The fine-tuning control is 
a potentiometer which controls 
a varactor diode in the local 
oscillator. The fine-tuning con- 
trol simplifies tuning at VHP 
and UHF frequencies. Opera- 
tion from 25 to 50 M Hz uses the 
local oscillator fundamental 
output, but operation from 50 to 
1000 MHz uses the local oscii* 
lator harmonic outputs. A dual- 
gate MOSFET is used as a 
variable frequency oscitlator; 
This is a diode-protected de* 
vice, and while no precautions 
are given in the manual, I ad- 
vise caution when InstaHIng 
this transistor, since the one I 
Installed failed to operate. A 
replacement was installed with 
no problem, A hot-carrier diode 
fs used as a frequency-convert- 
ing mixer. An i-f gain control is 
provided on the front panel to 
control sensitivity. Between 50 
and 500 MHz, the deviation 
meter has a minimum sensitiv- 
ity of 35 mV, Accuracy (full 
scale) is specified as plus or 
minus three percent. 

Meter ranges of 0*2. 0-7.5, 
0^20, and 0-75 kHz peak are 
selected by front-panel push- 
buttons. The 0-7,5-kHz range Is 
useful for setting the FM devia- 
tion of amateur equipment. The 
0-2-kH2 range uses a low-pass 
filter and is most useful for ad- 
justing continuous tone-coded 
squelch systems. The deviation 
meter uses a pulse-counting 
detector operating at a 200-kHz 
l-f. 

A speaker output jack is pro- 
vided for an external speaker 
(no internal speaker is pro- 



vided). The audio amplifier pro- 
vides 100 mW minimum Into an 
6-Ohm speaker. A front-panel 
switch selects a de-emphasis 
of 750 us for two-way radio, or 
75 us for standard FM broad- 
cast. This de-emphasis switch 
affects only the speaker out- 
put. 

A scope output fs provided 
on the front panel. This output 
provides a nominal 13-mVykHz 
peak superimposed on a dc 
voltage of about 2.7 volts. This 
output permits you to monitor 
the input for clipping which 
would not be apparent from the 
meter reading. 

Conclusion 

I enjoyed constructing my 
Heathkit deviation meter and 
find it simple to operate. Its por* 
lability makes it ideal for 
checking the local repeater or 
your friends' equipment. I par- 
ticularly like the ease with 
which subaudible tone levels 
can be checked. Heath Com* 
pany, Benton Harbor M/ 49022. 
Reader Service number H5. 

Bruce A. Beyerlein WB9WFH 

Waukesha Wl 



THE JSOPOLETM 

AEA (Advanced Electronic 
Applications, Inc.) has devel- 
oped the ISOPOLETM, a new 

vertically-polarized, omnidirec* 
tional, gain-type base station 
antenna which provides truly 
superior performance over any 
other low-cost antennas now in 
the marketplace. tSOPOLE's 




AEA's ISOPOLETM^ 



167 



F 



i MiTcx cone 







Xnex's ABM- 100 code converter. 



revolutionary double-cone de- 
sign results In virtual etimina' 
tion of the ma|or problem plagu^ 
ing other base-driven vertical 
antennas. This problem is the 
inadvertent and unwanted cou- 
pling of ff currents onto the sup- 
porting structure and the shield 
of the feedlina, seriously 
degrading the radiation pat- 



terns of most competitive an- 
tennas. On the-air fieid tests 
have shown a substantial signal 
improvement in favor of the 
ISOPOLE when switching be- 
tween the other competitive 
antennas and the ISOPOLE 

The ISOPOLE's unique new 
design features a double- 
decoupled, center-driven, 




Heathkit's new catalog. 



1 V4-wavelength antenna to pro- 
vide maximum theoretically ob- 
tainable gam for a dipole. All rf 
connections are protected from 
the weather. The ISOPOLE is 
pre^tuned at the factory so that 
the user can obtain an 8*MHz 
bandwidth by following the sim- 
ple assembly instructions. The 
ISOPOLE is Intended for instal- 
lation atop a standard TV mast 
(not supplied) and is packaged 
in a 7" X 7" X 29" shipping con- 
tainer. 

For further Information, con- 
tact Advanced Eiecuonic Ap- 
ptications, inc., PO Box 2f60, 
Lynnwood WA 98036: (206y775- 
7373. Reader Service numt^er 
A94. 

MICROCOMPUTER-BASED 

CONVERTER TRANSLATES 

ASCII/BAUDOT/MORSE 

A new single-board code con- 
verter; designated the ABM-100, 
is now available from Xitex Cor- 
poration for translating be- 
tween ASCII and Baudot or Bau- 
dot and ASCli. Utilizing a pair of 
MK-3870 single-chip microcom- 
puters, the board provides two 
independently programmable 
serial data ports which are inter- 
nally connected. Programming 
is accomplished using on-board 
DIP switches lor selecting the 
baud rate, line length, and data 
format for each of the two ports. 

Eight different baud rates are 
provided, from 110- to 1200- 
baud ASCII and from 45.45- to 
74.2-baud Baudot. Output line 
lengths of either 40, 64, 72, or 80 
characters are also selectable. 

Other features include a built- 
in FIFO buffer, interfaces for 
both RS^232 and 20/60-mA cur- 
rent loop operations, and speed 
conversion capability. 

A third port is provided for 
translation between Morse 
code and either ASCII or Bau- 
dot. This permits the generation 
and decoding of Morse signals 
(dc levels) using conventional 
ASCII or Baudot equipment. 

For further information, con- 
tact X/fex Corporation, 9861 
Chartweit Drive, Dattas TX 
75243: (2U)-349'2490 Reader 
Service number X3* 



HEW HEATH KIT CATALOG 
AVAILABLE FREE 

A completely new OS-page 
catalog, describing nearly 400 
eleclronic hits designed for the 
do-it*yoursetfer, is now avail- 
able from Heath. 

Product categories offered 
include electronics learning 
programs, test instruments, 
convenience and security prod- 
ucts for the home, stereo com- 
ponents* color television, auto, 
marine, and aircraft acces- 
sories, personal computer sys- 



tems, and much more. 

New products In this catalog 
include the All-ln-One H89 com- 
puter with floppy disk storage, a 
five-antenna remote coax 
switch for use in amateur radio, 
a 3 Vs -digit autoranging multi- 
meter, a low-priced dc-to-5-MHz 
single-trace oscilloscope, a por- 
table solid-state VOM for the 
hobbyist, and professional 
quality audio equipment. 

For further information, con- 
tact Heath Company, Depart- 
ment 350-880. Benton Harbor Mt 
49022. Reader Service number 
H5. 



TEN TEC'S MODEL 232 
SWlTCHER/25 

Within recent years, tran- 
sistor switching power supplies 
have come into wide use for 
sophisticated electronic equip- 
ment. They are characterized by 
the use of high frequency trans- 
formers and transistor switch- 
ing to produce the regulated 
output voltage. 

Switching power supplies are 
more complicated than the con- 
ventional pass-transistor types 
and are more expensive. How- 
ever, they offer many advan- 
tages over conventional types. 
Some of these are greater effi- 
ciency, cooJer operation, lighter 
weight, excellent regulation, 
protection against overvoltage, 
better reliability, and the 
capability of being powered by 
117 to 230 volts, either ac or dc. 

Ten-Tec has announced a 
state-of-the-art switching power 
supply, the Model 232, It can be 
used to powef any Ten-Tec 
transceiver or any other 12 V dc 
system, with current require- 
ments up to 25 Amperes. 

In operation, the 1 1 7- or 230'V 
ac input is first rectified to ap- 
proximately 160 V dc, plus and 
minus, using a doubler for 1 1 7 V 
ac and a bridge configuration 
for 230 V ac. This high dc volt- 
age is applied to a switching cir- 
cuit to produce pulses at 25 
kHz. The internal oscillator that 
applies the switching signal to 
the transistors also adjusts the 
pulsewidth in accordance with 
a feedback circuit from the out* 
put line, so that the average 
value of the pulse train is 13.5 
volts, plus a small amount of 
loss. The puisewidth-controlled 
signal is then rectified and fil- 
tered to the 13.5-volt output. No 
heavy 60-Hz power transform- 
ers are needed with this system, 
and should the switcher stop 
oscihating, the output voltage 
drops to zero instead of a high 
dc value. 

The Model 232 complements 
the OMNI transceiver series in 
cabinetry and cable and con- 
nector compatibility. For further 
information, contact Ten* fee, 
Inc., Seviervme TN 37862. 



tea 



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169 



W2HSD/1 

NEVER SAY DIE 

editorial t>y Wayne Green 



from page 20 

fust encourage them to waste 
more , , . like the government. 

The League can make money 
so they will t>e ahle to do the 
jobs we expecl Ihom to . , . such 
as get amateur radio e&tatj- 
lished on a good footing in most 
of the Third World countries . , . 
and put up a more intelligent 
battle against FCC rules which 
are harmful, To do this, they 
need someone running the 
place with some busmess back- 
ground and, as far as I can see^ 
they don't have it. 

The ads In QST should bring 
in about S3 million per year . . . 
and so should the member- 
ships. Books should bring in 
another $1,5 million, at least. 
With expenses around $6 mil- 
lion, that should leave a good 
supply of money for ARRL ac- 
tivlties and lobbying. 

^0— USE IT OR ELSE 

The makers of marine radio 
equipment certainly showed up 
the GB manufacturers for a 
bunch of yokels when it came to 
grabbing off a chunk of a ham 
band for commercial use. You 
can put me down as paranoid 
for thinking of the job as an ac- 
comptished fact, but we'll see 
what the bottom line is when all 
is said and done. 

The CBers, led by the ex-Hy- 
Gain people, got the Idea that 
Ihey could sell everyone on CB 
rigs again if they got a new CB 
band opened up. And this one 
would be bigger and better than 
the 23 channels that were then 
making them rich. Quite a bun- 
dle of money was poured into 
the effort^ and it looked as 
though it might Just make it. It 
would be interesting If an In- 
vestigative reporter could spare 
the time to try to find out where 
a whole bunch of lobby 
money was spent on this proj- 
ect. It went first to the EIA, as I 
understand it. Then I noticed 
that a chairman of the FCC 
started acting very strange » be- 
ing totally convinced of the 
need for a CB 220-MHz band 
despite the contrary advice 
from his technical staff. Was 
this a coincidence? 

In my younger days, I used to 
think well of everyone and be 
very surprised when I dis- 
covered that things were not 
always what they appeared. 
Then, as I looked more careful- 
ly, 1 found that things are 



seldom what they appear. And 1 
think this holds in spades for 
politics and our beloved govern- 
ment. 

And why, if this chap were not 
in the lobbyists* pocket, did a 
major equipment manufacturer 
at the time want to bet with me 
that 220 would soon be a CB 
band . . - as he was bringing out 
a new 220*MHz transceiver? 
And why did the FCC chairman, 
who then went on to the White 
House staff, keep the pressure 
on for the CB 220 band? Why 
would he care any more about 
that once he was out of the 
FCC? 

The maritime equipment 
manufacturers have long 
wanted to get the ham 220-MHz 
band for marine use. Think of 
the radios some four million 
pleasure-boat owners would be 
buying! Now, \ don't know how 
they managed to get their way 
with the US WARC preparatory 
group, but they put I ad the 
sleeper of the decade on ama- 
teur radio when their plan sud* 
denty appeared in the finished 
report. 

Amateur groups have been 
furious about this, pointing out 
that the whole thing was totally 
illegal. The final report was 
made on matters which had not 
been through the legal hurdles 
prescribed by the Adminis* 
trative Procedures Act— with no 
Notice of Inquiry and the usuai 
fact-gathering and discussion 
stages. No, this crafty (pardon 
that!) bunch kept the whole 
thing under wraps and never 
gave any opportunity for op- 
position. 

The 220*M Hz amateur groups 
are pretty upset over this coup. 
They've tried to get some 
satisfaction from the FCCt but 
have been thoroughly put down. 
My contacts with the FCC tell 
me that we lost a lot more than 
we ever thought when the ham 
manufacturers refused to coop- 
erate with each other in the 
linear opposition hearing . • . 
and then the ARRL's counsel 
Booth harangued the Commis- 
sioners at length, putting them 
down- 

The League is acting as 
though it is part of the con- 
spiracy, telling the 220 groups 
not to worry— everything will be 
all okay. Yes, I'm aware that 
some of the ARRL directors are 
going around to clubs saying 
that I don't know what I'm talk- 
ing about .. /but you notice 



that they never challenge me 
face to face. I have in my files 
copies of letters from ARRL of- 
ficials to 220 clubs which say 
not to worry , . , that the FCC 
has assured them that all is 
okay for the ham band at 
WARC. 

My gradually-developed para- 
noia suggests a rather different 
story, ft tells me to be careful of 
news like that and to look for 
the gimmick. In this case, let's 
look at a scenario. Let's sup* 
pose that there is a group that 
wants more frequencies for a 
new maritime band. Let's sup- 
pose that this group knows 
damned well that even without 
any lobby hams can be difficult 
to put down, so their best ap* 
proach is not to go the CB route, 
but to slip something through 
the back door. We've already 
seen that they are pretty shrewd 
at this. I don't think anyone has 
even figured out who managed 
the sneak ptay with the WARC 
position or how it was done. 

Next, let's assume that this 
group is not stupid enough to 
think that a lot of other coun- 
tries thousands of mites away 
from us and with no substantial 
pleasure-boating population 
are going to jump at this prop- 
osition. In other words, anyone 
above the grade of moron is go- 
ing to know that this proposi- 
tion is not going to stand the 
ghost of a chance of becoming 
international law as a result of 
WARC. The band involved is a 
television band in some coun- 
tries and is not even a ham band 
in much of the world. 

Okay. Now we see that some 
group spent a lot of time and 
effort (that means money) get- 
ting this into the US WARC posi* 
tion. Knowing that it would be 
defeated at WARC, why did they 
invest so much? Well, there is a 
kicker known as a footnote. The 
US delegation at WARC can 
say, shucks fellows, we're sure 
sorry you didn't go for this fan- 
tastic band which we need des- 
perately for our four million 
pleasure boats, but we agree 
with your right to decide these 
things on a one-country, one- 
vote basis. We also ask that a 
footnote be appended to the 
allocations table reserving the 
right for the US to do as we pro- 
posed. A bunch of boats In the 
US on 220 MHz with low-pow- 
ered equipment Is no hair off 
anyone In Lesotho* so we get 
our footnote . « . and we also get 
a new maritime band . . . and 
lose a nice ham band. 

It Is going to be more difficult 
for the maritime equipment 
manufacturers to keep this one 
moving tf we get busy and 
populate the band. But we've 
been sporting '^220, USE iT OR 
LOSE IT* buttons for several 
years, and the action is still 
scanty. Slogans and guilt are 
not people movers. We'll have 



action on 220 MHz when 
enough amateurs are con- 
vinced that they should spend 
the time and money to buy or 
build equipment for that band 
. * . and not before. 

You get people to do things 
when they think it Is to their 
tjenefit. This is why 1 was so op- 
posed to the very concept of 
what was joi^ingly called Incen- 
tive Licensing . , . which was 
anything but that in its original 
concept. You get people to do 
what you think best only when 
they agree that it is going to 
benefit them. I think this holds 
for usmg 220 MHz. and thus I 
propose that we do something 
atJOut this. 

The 220-MHz groups have 
been particularly derelict in 
their approach to the situation, 
and if the consequences were 
not so severe for amateur radio, 
I could almost enjoy their 
discomfort now that they see 
the band slipping away from 
them. For the most part, these 
groups have been smug and 
cliquish. They've found a band 
where they are not much 
bothered with the rising tide of 
idiots and kooks who have been 
making life miserable for some 
of the 2m repeater owners. 
They've felt that secrecy is the 
best answer in order to protect 
their private preserve. So we see 
little written for magazine publi- 
cation and little in the way of 
reported accomplishments from 
these groups. 

The result of this snobbery Es 
that there are but a few hundred 
repeaters on 220 MHz and a very 
few thousand users. When you 
talk with these people, you find 
that their reaction is almost 
universal *,. they think 220 
MHz Is fantastic, but please 
don't tell anyone. They like it as 
it is and don*t want the screw- 
balls from two meters to come 
up and get their kicks. 

WelL fellows, you have to 
make a choice. You have to de- 
cide whether it is worthwhile to 
keep the band for your little 
group and keep it a secret 
...and possibly lose it com- 
pletely . . - or whether it is get- 
ting time to open up 220 to 
everyone and perhaps be able 
to save iL 

I think that we should be able 
to work out some practical solu- 
tion to the fruitcakes who mess 
up repeaters. Little has been 
written of a constructive nature 
at>out this, and it is a situation 
that really needs to be tackled. 1 
get tapes from southern Califor- 
nia of some of these goings on, 
and it's almost enough to get 
the Ku Klux Klan out recruiting. 
I don't know how those fellows 
are able to put up with that crap 
without wringing a few necks, 

220'MHz repeater groups do 
find some substantial benefrts 
to the band. Their repeaters are 
generally able to coexist with 



170 



most commercial band repeat- 
ers without anywhere near the 
severe intermod problems from 
which 45O-MH2 repeaters often 
suffer. There are still a lot of 
repeater channels available on 
this band . . , so perhaps this 
might be the place to put some 
of the needed experimental re- 
peaters which will give us ac- 
cess to the lower bands, 

I'm still enthusiastic about 
developing cross-band repeat- 
ers which will let us remotely 
access repeaters hundreds of 
miles away. I'd like to see 
repeaters whtch could double 
as remote base stations cross- 
banded to the other ham bands, 
including the DX bands. With 
the remote tuning system built 
Into the Icom 701 , we have a big 
start in this direction. We'd 
need some scheme for indicat-^ 
ing the frequency used via the 
repeater . . . and some way to 
turn the beam . , . let's see 
some articles. 

When you come down to it, 
articfes in the ham magazines 
are the answer. You do the in- 
venting and the pioneering — 
then write about it, pointing out 
the fun and things which can be 
done. These articles will get the 
action we need. Where would 
two-meter FM be today if 73 had 
not published hundreds of ar* 
tides, several books, and got- 
ten the word to everyone about 
the fun they were missing? Old- 
timers will remember that the 
first reaction of most hams was 
that they didn't want to read 
about it—didn't want to be 
bothered. But they eventually 
did read, and then began to read 
more, and eventually they tried 
it. 

With articles on what is going 
on, with articles on new ideas 
and circuits, with articles on 
new equipment which is avail* 
able., .with all this, we will 
spark interest in hundreds . . . 
then thousands . . . tens of 
thousands ,., and we just 
might make It. it*s In the hands 
of the 220 groups. Write about it 
or write it off. I guarantee that 73 
will try to publish as much good 
information about 220 as possi- 
ble. 

WARC REPORT 
Senator Gold water, apparent- 
ly concerned over the conflict- 
ing reports about WARC, re* 
quested the Library of Congress 
to prepare a report on the mat- 
ter. The Library's Congressional 
Research Service (CRS) did 
some looking into the situation 
and reported, "The official US 
approach to the . , , conference 
could be characterized as one 
of cautious apprehension. 
There has been a change in 
public stance since eariy May; 
until that time, Department of 
State officials, especially US 
WARC delegation members, 
had been expressing a degree 
of optimism.*' 



The study went on to say that 
Third World opposition to the 
US proposals "may prove a con- 
siderable challenge to US poll* 
cymakers and representatives." 
The problem here is that politics 
is involved rather than technical 
considerations. The report said 
that "the US delegation is not 
totally pessimistic about the 
conference's outcome." 

Several past ITU meetings 
turned fruitless because the 
Third World nations refused to 
enter technical discussions, but 
insisted on using ttie ITU to ex- 
press their political views and 
frustrations. 

No one can say how this con- 
ference may work out, obvious- 
ly. But the preponderance of 
evidence and projections of 
past actions are certainly not 
comforting. 

MORE FAKE HAM GEAR 
BEING SOLD 

Last year, an outfit in 
Houston, Texas, came out with 
a police radar jammer, calling it 
amateur equipment because it 
had a transmitter built in. The 
onty purpose of this equipment 
was to jam radar. We surely 
don't need more illegal equip- 
ment being sold under the false 
pretense that it is for hams 
when the fact is that it is in no 
way intended for ham use. 

Now this firm, Microwave 
Devices, Inc., has a new and im- 
proved model whfch is being 
promoted as a ham transceiver 
for either X or K band- The dial, 
which used to be calibrated In 
mph (the speed it would in- 
dicate on the police radar unit), 
is now calibrated in audio fre- 
quency. What a ripoff of ama- 
teur radio! 

!t isn't even necessary to use 
a transmitter to give police 
radar units a false indication of 
speed. We ran an article a cou- 
ple of years ago showing how to 
build a completely passive unit 
which woufd both indicate the 
presence of radar and return a 
reflected modulated signal to it 
showing the speed of your 
choice. I presume that most of 
the people who built this fiend- 
ish device are put away safely 
now In various prisons around 
the country after discovering 
that police have no sense of 
humor. Eventually, every user 
just has to give the fuzz an in- 
dication of 200 mph while driv- 
ing along at 25 mph. The radar is 
right, and the court believes it, 
no matter how ridiculous, Any 
driver going 200 mph should be 
put away. 

The recent cases where 
police radar units were able to 
clock a house at 80 mph has 
hurt the reputation of radar a 
bit. And not a few hams have 
been hauled before judges who 
have had no knowledge of or 
even interest in discussing the 
question of false readings on 



radar units, even when attempts 
are made to offer proof that a 
mobile ham rig can throw radar 
readings almost anywhere, 

I'm no fan of police radar. Go- 
ing slower than normal, namely 
55 mph, may save gas, but it 
sure wastes a lot of my time, 
which is far more valuable than 
the cost of the gas involved. 

The car magazines have ex- 
ploded the gas-saving myth 
anyway, by pointing out that the 
amount of gas saved by driving 
at 55 mph instead of 65 mph is 
far less than we would save if 
we Increased the pressure in 
our tires by one pound! And as 
far as saving lives, when you 
look closely at the actual 
statistics, you find that we are 
losing more as a result of the in- 
attention brought on by driving 
55 mph on tOO-mph roads. They 
have not put any speed limits at 
all on roads in most European 
countries. 

POLICE RADAR HELD 

ILLEGAL! 

A Washington DC court 
recently heard a case against a 
chap who had been arrested for 
having a radar detector unit in 
his car. The court spoke out 
against this quite clearly. The 
judge drew the parallel of a 
driver who kept a pair of 
binoculars on the seat beside 
him to look ahead and spot 
speed traps. Can the law be In- 
terpreted so that the citizen can 
be prohibited from carrying 
binoculars in the car? 

But that was only a small part 
of the judge's comments. He 
went on to point out that police 
use of radar is an intrusion by 
the government without a 
search warrant Issued on prob- 
able cause describing the place 
to be searched and the persons 
or things to be seized. I-He felt 
that this was clearly an un- 
warranted search since there is 
no consent to such a search. 
The judge said that a citizen 
using the highways in a vehicle 
has a right to know whether or 
not the government Is monitor- 
ing his actions. 

Thus, with no positive 
evidence that a crime is being 
committed (speeding), the 
police have no right to search 
you with their radar to get 
evidence against you of this 
crime. 

The court felt that the police 
infringed upon the citizen's 
rights under the First Amend- 
ment, the Fourth Amendment, 
the Fifth Amendment, the Ninth 
Amendment, and the Tenth 
Amendment to the Constitu- 
tion, and that the infringement 
constituted an invasion of a 
citizen's privacy, a denial of a 
citizen's right to know what 
officials of the government are 
doing, an illegal search and 
seizure of the citizen's property 
in an electronic sense, and a 



violation of the citizen's rights 
as retained by the people. 

Lawyers may want to refer- 
ence The Daily Washington Law 
Reporter, July 19, 1979, page 
1257. 

MICROPROCESSORS 
AT WORK 

Well, when I started running 
microcomputer articles in 73, I 
warned you that these fiendish 
little contraptions would find 
thei r way i nto our rad i OS . . , and 
they have. 

Recently, when I finally 
managed to con Icom out of a 
701 for a test, we plugged it into 
the ETC 374 linear and a Wilson 
tribander beam up on a Rohn 
tower and had at the DX. Mercy 
me, as the CBers say, what a dif- 
ference! 

It took hardly any time at all 
to get used to being able to tap 
out the desired frequency on 
the remote control unit, f'd hit 
14.2000 and zap, the radio 
would be right on 14.2000 MHz. 
To tune up the band, all I had to 
do was push the UP button and 
it would advance 100 Hz at a 
time... or If I held my finger 
down, it would skip on up the 
band. I soon got used to stop- 
ping on the next voice tuned in 
almost right on channel. If it 
was some choice DX, but in a 
contact, I just would touch the 
MEMORY, WRITE, and #1 but^ 
tons . . . and tune on up the 
band. Then, every now and then, 
I would check the DX channel by 
touching MEMORY, READ, #1 
and the rig would pop back on 
the desired channel. 

Hey, maybe ten meters is 
open! 28.5000 and click-click, 
Tm listening to ten. Hmmm, I 
must not forget to switch the 
band on the linear. To cover the 
band quickly, looking for sig- 
nals, I'd switch to the 1-kHzscan 
position and let 'er rip. Nope, 
dead , . . so let's go to 21.2500 
and check fifteen. After working 
my way up the band, checking 
out a few Gs and DLs, I'd run in- 
to a JY and a J6, both rare 
enough to warrant some pa- 
tience. At the first break of 
either of these stations, I gave a 
short call , , . and no answer. 
Damn, I forgot to switch the 
linear! More waiting for a break, 
buttoning back and forth be- 
tween memory 1 and 2, check- 
ing both channels . . . then tun- 
ing on up the band, listening for 
more DX . . , back to the two 
channels again. I finally got 
both of 'em. 

A PUBLISHING CAREER? 

You could do worse. In fact, 
most people do a lot worse. 
Despite the cutbacks in employ- 
ment at the ARRL, amateur 
radio publishing is doing well as 
an industry and is both fun and 
profitable . - . an excellent com- 
bination. The staff at 73 has 
grown from about five ten years 
ago to 110 at present, though 



171 



this includes Kilobaud MICRO- 
COMPUTtNG and instant Soft- 
ware, Sometimes H is difficult 
to l<now wf^o is wori^ing how 
much for what. 

We've openings for some 
peopie in severai departments, 
and being an active ham is not 
going to hurt one bit. 

We need a ham editor to help 
Jeff DeTfay WBBBTH with edit- 
ing articles, selecting material 
to be published, and following 
up on an endless number of 
special projects. There just 
might be some Investigative re- 
porting, too. 

If we're going to get involved 
with any kind of a national orga- 
nization, we'll need a ham or 
two to coordinate these mat- 
ters. This might be something a 
retired military ham could get 
his teeth into. 

Then there is the need for a 
ham who can both read and 
write to help Jim Perry in the 
book department. We'd like to 
step up our book production to 
five or six new books a month in 
the ham and computer fields. A 
knowledge of microcomputing 
will help a bit here. 

Instant Software has about 
30 -full-time employees and 
we're looking for double to tri- 
ple that in the next few months, 
which means there are open- 
ings for people with experience 
in marketing J advert i sing ^ pro- 
duction, accounting, packag- 
ing, data processing, and man- 
agement. Some computer hob- 
by background won't hurt here, 
either. 

The Peterborough area is 
completely smog-free . . . you 
couldn't ask for cleaner air. We 
ask that all applicants be non- 
smokers and not smokers who 
think they can give it up for a 
good position. 

(n add i ton to the usual dry 
resume'^ Td like to have a letter 
telling me what particular 
qualities you might have for 
working here. I would prefer 
people who are anxious to learn 
a lot and who will be working 
toward the development of their 
skills. 

Ten years ago, it never even 
occurred to me that my publish- 
ing firm might one day grow 
larger than the ARRL, but we 
seem to have arrived at that 
point this year! 



We've received a couple of 
beefs about a firm called HMR. 
These people are not adver* 
tisers in 73, by the way, 

INSTRUCTIONS FOR MAKING 
SUPERB APPLESAUCE 

First, cut up apples, removing 
the cores and any blem- 
ishes . . . spots, bruises , . . but 
leave on the skins. Cut apples 
into bite-size chunks. 

Put in a large pot, perhaps 
four to eight quarts at a time, fill 



one-third to two-thirds full with 
water (depending on your con- 
sistency preference), cover, and 
bring to a boil. Boil about five 
minutes at most^and stir the ap- 
ples now and then to make sure 
all are cooked about the same 
amount. 

When the apples are fairly 
soft, turn off the heat and add 
about Vi cup of sugar for each 
quart of apples. This wili vary 
some depending on the tart- 
ness of the apples. It is difficult 
to get an apple which is too tart 
for applesauce . . . Tve never 
found one. Stir In the sugar well 
and let it cool just a bit. 

Spoon the *sauce into plastic 
freezer containers, mark with 
the type of apple and the date, 
and let them cool. Later you can 
freeze them with no loss of 
flavor. 

I prefer Transparent apples 
by far, with the second 
choice being Duchess . . . then 
Wealthy. Macintosh and Mc- 
Cowen are okay, but not nearly 
as great as the first. I had to 
plant my own trees just to get 
the type of applesauce i like. 

Milderappfes may need some 
lemon juice to add tart , , . use it 
sparingly and taste as you go. 
Truly tame apples may even 
need some cinnamon. 

This process of making ap- 
plesauce is so infinitely better 
than anything available canned 
that you will never go back to 
store applesauce again. Even 
old, soft apples of the most 
bland type will make better 
'sauce than the best canned 
stuff. 

I often keep a lot of apples in 
the refrigerator so that I can cut 
up one or two to have for lunch 
with some Havarti or Jarlsberg 
cheese. Eventually these ap- 
ples get a bit withered and 
soft ... so I then 'sauce 
them , . . you can cut up a 
remarkable lot of apples while 
watching TV and not waste your 
time so totally. I save some 
videocassette movies for this 
process. 

If you prefer canning your- 
self, this works fine, too. I like 
freezing because it is a lot 
simpler for applesauce and 
even for jams, too. 

Hey, don't strain the *sauce. 
The peels of the apples soften 
up when you cook them and 
have some of the best flavor* 
Some peels will give the 'sauce 
a nice red color. 

You have to have your own 
tree for Transparent or 
Duchess, both very early ap- 
ples. They don't last but a day 
or two when they ripen, so they 
are not useful for selling. When 
your Transparents start to get 
ripe, start shaking the tree 
every day and don't let 'em 
ripen all the way on the tree. My 
first apples this year were 
ready to eat rn mid-July, which 
is incredible for New Hamp- 



shire. I think the Transparent 
and the Duchess are the finest 
apples in the world. 

JUNE WINNER 

"The Voice of Wolf Creek" ap^ 
parently reached quite a few of 



our readers, since they voted Dr. 
William a Hess WGCK's article 
of the same name the best in 
our June Issue. Enrich the 
author of your favorite article by 
$100 by using your Reader Ser- 
vice card ballot! 



PETERBOROUGH FLEA MARKET 




As if Sherry doesn't have enough to do, she decided to run a flea 
market in the parking lot of the 73 West building, in June, That's 
Sherry In the middle, with Ross, our fulHime piumb&r, on her left, 
going in to see what he can do with the air conditioning system. 




Aline Couta, our advertising manager, brought over some of the 
pontes from her stables so there would be pony rides for the kids. 
One of the nice aspects of hving in New Hampshire is that you can 
have your own stable if you like. Aiine has quite a spread, complete 
with an indoor riding ring, and she and her family board about 30 
horses and ponies. 




Here are some of the pony rtdes . . . note the country background! 
Peterborough Is a smalt town, and just one-half mile from the center 
of town you start getting into the forested areas. Though only an 
hour from Route 128 around Boston, Peterborough is a rural area^ 



172 



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Confesfs 



for interested amateurs wishing commemoralive photo QSL 
to make contact with the B-29. A card is planned. 



may be worked once on each 
band. The genera* call witt be 
"GQ ARAC 50." 
BKCHANQE: 

Arrowhead amateurs send 
RS(T), county, and stale. Ail 
others send RS(T) and ARRL 
section Of country. 
FREQUENCIES: 

CW-3535, 3725, 7035, 7125, 
14035. 21035, 21125, 28035. 
26125, 

Phone -3980, 7280, 14280, 
21360,28560, 
SCOmNG: 

Each CW contact with a 
Novice or Technician counts 5 
points; ait others count 1 point. 
Multipliers are: 5 for 
Novrces/Technicans, 5 for 5 
Watts or less, 2 for 6 Watts to 
200 Watts, 1 for 201 Watts to 
legal limit. Arrowhead amateurs 
take the number of points times 
the sections/countries worked 
times the multiplier to get the 
total score. All others take 
numtier of points times 5 times 
the number of counties worked 
times the muHiplier. 
AWARDS: 

Plaques totop'SCoring Arrow-^ 
head amateur and top-scoring 
amateur outside area. Cer* 
tificates for second and third 
place and to top-scoring ama- 
teur in each ARRL section and 
country, 
ENTRIES: 

Logs must show band, mode, 
date/time in GMT, station 
worked, exchange sent and re- 
ceived, if more than 100 con- 
tacts are made, dupe sheets 
must be included for each band 
used. Send entries to: ARAC-50, 
123 E. 1st Street, Dulyth MM 
55802, with an SASE for awards 
and results. Entries must be 
postmarked by November 21. 

CRAZY EIGHT NET QSO PARTY 
The Crazy Eight Net of Pitts- 
burgh PA will hold its first an* 
nual QSO party on October 28 
and all stations are welcome to 
participate. Only certificate 
holders, however, may submit 
logs! All contacts must be 
made on 10 meters. Operating 
period will be the fuM 24 hours 
beginning at OCKK) GMT October 
28. Scoring as follows: Each 
contact is one point with an 
additional point for each con- 
tact having a 10-X number, and 
another additional point for 
each contact having a Crazy 
Eight number. Maximum point 
value per contact is 3 points. 
Awards will be Issued to the top- 
scoring DX station. Submit logs 
with call, name, QTH, time, fre- 
quency of contact, 10-X number, 
and Crazy Eight number to con- 
test manager no later than 



November 28. Contest manager 
is J*m Lundberg WB3ICC, 571 
Washington St, McKeesport 
PA 151 3Z Enclose an SASE for 
a copy of the results. 

CLUB STATION WD4K0W 

Members of the Colquitt 
County i-iam Radio Society will 
be operating club station 
WD4K0W from the site of the 
second annual Sunbelt Agricul- 
tural Exposition on October 9. 
10, 11, 1979, The hours of opera- 
tion will be 0900 to 1600 EDST 
each day. 

This annual Sunbelt Expo Is 
the largest agricultural show in 
the south. The first Expo last 
year drew 140,000 visitors from 
all over the United States and 
Canada during the threeday 
period, and this year atten- 
dance is expected to hit 
200,000. 

Operations will be mostly on 
40 and 20 meters around 7.250 
and 14.300 MHz with some 
operations in the other HF 
bands. Ttie members will also 
be listening for visiting hams on 
the local repeater, 146.19/79, 
Visiting hams are invrted to visit 
the amateur booth at the Expo 
and operate the amateur sta- 
tion. 

This year, special QSL cards 
are being printed for this event 
and will be available for those 
making a contact and desiring 
one. For more information, con- 
tact the Colquitt County Ham 
Radio Society, PO Box 813, 
Moultrie G A 3176a 

W3LWW CELEBRATES 20TH 
ANNIVERSARY 

The Foothills ARC of Greens- 
burg PA will be celebrating its 
20th anniversary by holding a 
mini field day from 1400 UTC, 
Saturday, October 20. through 
1400 LTTC, Sunday, October 21, 
1979. 

Phone and CW operation will 
take place on tO through 80 
meters, 5-10 kHz up from the 
bottom of the General cJass por- 
tion of each band. 

Certificates will be awarded 
to anyone working W3LWW 
(SASE required^, 

AIRSHO '79 

An aeronautical mobile op- 
eration aboard a Boeing B-29, 
using the call W5DX, is sched- 
uled to take place during the 
Confederate Air Force Ghost 
Squadron's Airsho "79, October 
4th to 7th, in Harlingen. Texas. 
Communications wiii be 
available on 14.285 MHz and 
21.385 MHz (as propagation per- 
mits) during the hours from 
12:00 pm to 5:00 pm COT. Local 
fixed stations will act as liaison 



Results 

1979 BARTG RTTY 
CONTEST RESULTS 
SiHGLB OPEflATOfl 
Call Points Total Countries 

QSOs 
F9XY 445720 290 37 

W3EKT 428610 298 34 

W7SV 408292 290 36 

iT92WS 400656 237 36 

15GZS 392274 252 35 

W3FV 372204 260 33 

S1VI6ASD 3S6S44 265 34 

K8NN 346632 229 36 

15FZI 321816 242 33 

C5AAN 319510 241 34 

MULT/ OPERATOR 

Call Points Total Countries 

QSOs 

15MYL 525332 373 44 

W1MX 384116 23S 36 

G3ZRS 306816 211 37 

SM5HEV 286704 235 32 

G3UUP 263256 227 31 

DK»OW 225342 167 30 

0K3RMW 174848 164 32 

Y03KAA 160430 163 27 

LZ1K0P 149760 192 31 

UK4FAD 119520 149 25 

SHORTWAVE LISTENERS 



Call 


Points 


QSOs 


Countries 


11-50071 


568764 


381 


37 


IV3-13018 


420912 


292 


45 


OK1-11857 


389546 


263 


45 


P. Menadier (USA) 


354760 


250 


37 


H. Ballenberger 


326890 


233 


33 


Kurt Wustner 


237440 


175 


32 


Terry Musson (GB) 


130744 


152 


29 


DM8987m 


120628 


114 


26 


Barry Ni@ndorf(GB) 


112394 


62 


32 


Anton IVIuench (DL) 


95616 


108 


28 



Ham Help 



Tm interested in learning 
about all the modifications 
which can be made to the Clegg 
Venus 6m transceiver. Vm par- 
ticularly interested in reducing 
the receiver internal noise level, 

1 have been told that replace- 
ment of the 128E6 converter 
with a dfferent tube and some 
wiring changes reduces the 
noise level. If anyone has any 
info on this or other changes, 1 
would appreciate hearing from 
them. 

Leon A. Savidge WA3EFE 

Box 268, RD U2, Park Ave. 
BInghamtonNY 13903 

I have been contacted by a 
local Civil Air Patrol (CAP) unit 
in need of radio equipment, tf 
anyone can donate equipment, 
operating or not, I am willing to 
donate my time and parts to 
repair the equipment and pay 
shipping charges, if needed. An 
IRS donation form can be made 



available to donors lor tax use 
for some equipment. 

CAP operates on 4.4-MHz 
SSB, aS.S'MHz AM, and 143.90- 
and 148.90'MHz FM. CAP is a 
volunteer air search and rescue 
group that has saved several 
lives of victims of downed air- 
craft. 

If you have any equipment 
available, or would like more in- 
formation, please contact me at 
the address below, Thank you, 

Peter J. St. Amaud 

PO Box 695 

Lowell MA 01853 

I have a Cosmos Industries 
Cosmophone 35 transceiver 
that I would like to obtain a 
manual for. Can anyone lend 
me a manual or a copy of same? 
Of course, copying costs would 
be covered, 

Mel Stoller K2A0Q 

51 Allandale Avenue 
Rochester NY 14610 



174 



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175 



/Inwards 



fmm p^ge 24 

123 E 1st Street, Dululh, Minn- 
esota 55802, before December 
1, 1979, to receive this free 
award. 



As time goes on, be sure to 
continually check this column 
for announcements of any new 
awards we may have added to 
our program. A month doesn't 
go by that i scratch out another 



set of ideas and consider them 
for submission to headquarters 
staff. Perhaps you have some 
ideas of your own. Use your 
creativity, put your ideas down 
on paper, and forward them to 
me. 

In the meantime, continue to 
work those new contacts 
whether it*s for a new state, city, 
or DX country: theyVe all impor- 



tant to you, so don*t waste 
another minute! You work the 
stations and we'H issue the 
awards; the 73 Awards Program 
offers something for everyone! 
Next month we will travel 
overseas and review the various 
awards being offered by our 
foreign friends. Additionally, we 
wilf look at a coupte programs 
offered by stateside organi- 
zations. 



ovj r:oonH d 



• ^ 




from page 14 

this may be oid news to you. 
However, I heard the Russians 
playing with twenty for 45 
minutes last night and it hacked 
me off so much I had to let out 
anxiety somehow. . .so I wrote 
you, 

Steve Baumrucker WD4MKQ 

Chapel Hill NC 

P.S. Went back to my rrg and 
the Russians reverted to the old 
radar system and things were 
business as usual! Can't figure 

this one out. . . 



2M BEACON 

A two-meter beacon station 
has been put on the air by the 
Marissa Amateur Radio Club, 
Inc.. on July 1, 1979. This bea- 
con will be to plot propagation 
and signal paths in the two- 
meter amateur radio band. The 
beacon will prove very useful to 
ail who work the VHP spectrum. 

The beacon is a project of the 
teenage group of the 100 mem* 
ber club which is located 50 
miles southeast of St. Louis 
MO* The group wilt need to 
make a full report to the FCC at 
the end of December so all re* 
ceiving stations are kindly 
asked to send their reports and 
weather conditions at the time 
to the club station, WD9G0E, 
PO Box 68, Marissa, Illinois 
62257, attn: beacon committee. 

Technical information: 

Frequency— 144.050. 

Emission— A1 and F1 (a 
slightly deviated 1-kHz signal Is 
on top of the A1 CW signal so 
that FM receivers are capable of 
detecting it). 

Power— one Watt output 
from a VHF Eng. rf strip. 

Control -220'MHz link. 

Emission control— VHF Eng. 
CW-ID board with solid-state 
keying circuits added. 

Power supply — 12-V auto* 



type sealed battery with charg- 
ing circuit. 

Antenna— 4 stacked di poles, 
2 vertical, 2 horizontal 

Height— 250'. 

Location— Baldwin, Illinois, 4 
miles southwest of Marissa, Il- 
linois, 55 miles southeast of St. 
Louis MO, 

Times of operation are con- 
tinuous, 24 hours per day. 

Sob Hell K9EID 
Marissa IL 



THE QUEEN 

Many thanks for the terrific 
coverage you gave the 
Associated Radio Amateurs of 
Long Beach and me in Bill 
Pasternak's stoty about W6R0 
in the wireless room aboard the 
Queen Mary. 

This operation is not just a 
single PR stunt. With few excep- 
tions, the station operates 
seven days a week with vol> 
unteer hams from throughout 
the area. I believe this is the on^ 
ly time any poblic display of 
amateur radio on a continuing 
basis has ever been estat> 
lished. So interested are the 
tourists in the operation that an- 
swering questions about ham 
radio occupies a great deal of 
our operator's time. As the sta- 
tion Is part of the tour, it is 
estimated that about 80.000 
people Will see the station in op- 
eration during a year* 

Again, many thanks for at! 
your interest, from all of us in 
the Associated Radio Amateurs 
of Long Beach. 

Nate Brightman K60SC 
Long Beach CA 



FIRED 



] 



tn your August editorial, 
under the subcolumn ''WARC/' 
you write that if the ARRL 
doesn't shape up, youll do 



something about iL We trath 
know that the League won't do 
anything, so it's time you went 
Into action* The winds have 
been changing for a long time, 
and the boys in Newington still 
can't tell from which direction it 
blows. 

I think you can get enough 
support from progressive and 
concerned amateurs to make a 
new organization successful. 
This is to (pardon me) light a fire 
under your ass and get you mov- 
ing so that therell still be 
amateur radio in the years 
ahead. 

Keep up the good work with 
73. You may not have all the 
answers, but you raise the right 
questions. The League's LRPG 
Is a hollow toothless group set 
up to quell the increasing dis- 
satisfaction brewing in the 
amateur ranks. The time has 
come to stop talking and take 
positive actron, and you're the 
man to lead the way. Best 
wishes for your continued suc- 
cess. 

Scott Liebling W A30XQ 
Baltimore MD 



NEUTRAL 

I have often felt that 73 lacked 
a rallying cry^ a slogan if you 
will, an eye-catching, rousing 
phrase with an impact— words 
that would instantaneously im- 
part to anyone picking up a 
copy of 73 the thrust and 
dynamic spirit of the magazine 
and its editor/publisher 

CQ states, on its cover, "Serv- 
Ing Amateur Radio Since 
7945"— not much there* 

QST says, ^'Devoted Entirefy 
To Amateur ftad/o"— pretty 
blandl 

How fitting rl would be to see 
the cover of 73, alternatively the 
vacant topside space of your 
editorial page, reflect the credo 
which I believe best exemplifies 
73 and Wayne's personal 
stance in the field of ham radio: 
'*Neutral in nothing affecting 
the destiny of amateur radio.'' 

If that doesn't say it all, I don't 
know what does. Wayne! It 
would be interesting to deter- 
mine how it strikes your staff. 

Anyway, it's yours to do with 
as you wish. - ,you may even 
desire to have It inscribed on 
your headstone when and if you 
ever depart this mortal sphere! 



All the very best, Wayne, and 
please continue to be non- 
neutral (actually, I have no fear 
that you wilf ever change^. I do 
enjoy receiving ?'3over here and 
have a ready recollection of 
your visit to Frankfurt several 
years ago. 

Burt Hubbs DJOKQ 
Frankfurt, Germany 



LONELY 

I got a brand-new OB rig and 
converted it to ten meters, using 
the "73 band plan/' just as sug- 
gested in the magazine. 

Three weeks have passed 
and I have spent hours in con- 
sultation with this little box and 
its attendant power supply. My 
fingers are worn to the bone, go- 
ing back and forth, up and down 
the forty positions, seeking a 
signal ... some kind of 
noise . , . a voice from the past, 
perhaps . . , even an old, much- 
used cuss^word from the CB 
band would delight met I can 
report nothing! Though the job 
checks out perfectly with the 
meter, Tm wondering if I'm even 
within the ten-meter band. 

Considering the fact that 
there must be hundreds of ama- 
teurs who are suffering from the 
same malady, would you try to 
scare about two or three dozen 
down our way so that we might 
achieve just one contact and 
make our efforts worthwhile? 
You have no Idea how lonely it*s 
been these last weeks! 

Dean Sturm K8CYW 
Huntington WV 



NIGERIA 



3 



Amateur operation here in 
Nigeria is now picking up and 
more stations are getting on 
each month, including even 
some activity on SSTV, so be- 
fore long Nigeria should be one 
of the not-so-rare countries on 
the bands. Some calls heard on 
the bands have other prefixes 
than the old 5N2; now you might 
hear anything from 5N0 through 
5N9, depending on which zone 
the station Is in; the zones are 
divided among the 19 stales 
that comprise the Federal Re- 
public of Nigeria. 

Richard Fitzgerald 

WA5UTF/5K4 

Lagos, Nigeria 



176 



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177 



Looking M/est 



fto/n ps^ to 

gave the trade name Betamax. 
The first Betamax units (SL- 
7200 series) were also one-hour 
time timit machines like their 
big brother the U^Matic. but 
tape cost was less than half as 
much. Slowly but surely the 
Betamax caught on and began 
to spread into many American 
homes. 

The one-hour time limit was 
still a drawback, however, until 
in late 1977 RCA and a number 
of other manufacturers an- 
nounced that they also would 
be entering the home video re- 
cording market with machines 
utilizing the VHS recording for- 
mat. VHS. which stands for Vid- 
eo Home System, is also car- 
tridge format, but It has the add- 
ed advantage of up to four 
hours record-play time. Unfor- 
tunately, Beta and VHS car- 
tridges differ in size and are not 
interchangeable. Most VHS ma- 
chines are two-speed affairs 
that record two hours at full 
speed or four hours at half 
speed, with some reduction in 
overall resolution at the re* 
duced speed. 

Not to be left out in the cold, 
manufacturers committed to 
the Beta format countered by in- 
troducing dual-speed and half- 
speed machines that gave up to 
two hours record-play on a one- 
hour tape cassette and then in- 
troduced a IVa-hour tape that 
would give up to three hours at 
half speed (or "X2" as ft is 
called). Again, the Beta vs. VHS 
race was on with VHS appear- 
ing to be the eventual winner. 

(A few weeks ago I read in one 
of the trade journals that 
Toshiba has developed an "Up 
To 6-Hour Beta Format Ma- 
chine," and with this occur- 
fence, the outcome of the race 
for the consumer dollar is any- 
one's guess. However, this 
should not keep you from ob- 
taining a machine of your 
choice if you desire one.) 

Regardless of which system 
is the eventual winner in the 
race to become the national 
standard — if, indeed, there ever 
Is a winner or a national stan- 
dard established -it*s safe to 
say that both the Beta and VHS 
formats will be with us for a 
long, long time. Tapes, both 
blank and prerecorded, are in 
abundance for both formats, 
and both systems perform ad- 
mirably. I went with Beta be* 
cause I happen to like the ma- 
chine and the results I get, but 
you should not judge by this. 
Judge for yourself, based upon 
your personal tastes and needs. 
I will tell you that having a home 
videocassette recorder Is well 



within the pocketbook of most 
people these days. Even 73 
writers. 

Suppose you. yourself, have 
what you feel to be a good 
amateur-radlo-related presenta- 
tion. You have given it locally 
and now other clubs or conven- 
tions far distant want you but 
cannot afford to pay for trans- 
portation and/or lodging. You 
want to go, but with gasoline 
now over a doilar a gaflon, you 
are forced to decline. If only 
there were some other way! 

And Indeed there is, if you or 
someone you know happens to 
own a home videocassette re* 
corder and a camera. Even If 
not, they can be rented. Add a 
few lights and a friend to act as 
cameraperson and you literally 
have your own mini-pfoduction 
company. If you have the equip- 
ment or can get your hands on 
it, your cost for the raw tape will 
be between $14 and S20. 

You do not have to be an ex- 
pert at producing your own 
''educational spectacular." Sup- 
pose you make a mistake half- 
way through. If the machine you 
are using has good lockup, you 
might be able to rewind back 
past your boo-t)oo and pick up 
the presentation from that 
point. Or, you could simply re- 
wind all the way and begin 
again, H*s up to you and 
depends upon the level o1 per- 
fection you are seeking. That's 
the nice thing about tape. 
Mistakes cost only time* 

Video recording is here to 
stay and what can be done with 
it wiil amaze you once you get 
into it- Each day new ideas pop 
up in which a videocassette re- 
corder can play an important 
part. Who knows; someday in 
the future this magazine may 
come to you in the form of a 
videocassette. Imagine having 
Wayne Green in your living 
room reading his famous edi- 
torials to youl 

THE TEXAS REPORT 

Walt Wiederhold W50G2 is 
the Texas State Coordination 
Chairman for the Texas VHF- 
FM Society- In the current issue 
of that organization's newslet- 
ter. Walt relates the following: 

*This quarter has seen a net in- 
crease of eight repeaters in the state. 
01 course, this is a Qraduai change 
and not something that takes place 
overnight. Many of the new repealers 
have been in the pianning stag© for 
SorpiB time and have just been put on 
the air. 

"We are always glad ^o see more 
repeaters since they sen^e such a 
good purpose In the amateur world to- 
day. But don't Forget that Other forms 
of communication work very well In 
the amateur bands and they should he 
used where possible. Working DX 
through a repealer doesn't really prove 



your rig as much as working the other 
station direct would. So you have a 
good antenna and you find that ^ou 
can work across the state line into a 
repeater over there which is 200 feel in 
the air with qufte a bit of power. 
Wouldn't It be better to use your In- 
genuity to talk to a station like your 
own without the yse at the repeater? 
"E¥ery band from six meters 
througi^ 1296 MHz can be wsed for 
repeaters and a^so foe these other 
forms of communicatiorig. It would be 
most gratifying lo see a big mcrease in 
aclAvtty ^n the 220 and 450 MHz bands 
and also in the higher frequency 
t>ands. We are not saymg that 1296 is 
ttie lop, . . just thai it seems tike the 
lop riglit now iusi as six and two 
meters did at one time. Greater things 
are coming, so how about getting In on 
the ground floor by using your talents 
to escplore the uses of the higher fre- 
quency bands? Didn't mean to leave 
out t^n meters eithef, but It's a spei^ial 
band In itsefi. 

"Wichita Falls, an April 10th, proved 
the need for emergency- powered re- 
peaters. We hope a !ot of operators 
will try to provide such power for their 
repeaters so they wM I be more likely to 
stay in operation when the need 
arises. Several repeaters in the state 
already have emergency power. Tor- 
nadoes can strike anywhere. Does 
your repeater have auxihary power? 
Even the club generator, usually used 
on fieJd day. can be used fof Ifiat pur- 
pose. Think about it a bit and make 
some neetied improve men Is tn your 
setup.' 



TO THE FUTURE 
DEPARTMENT 

I wish to close this month 
with the following thought frorti 
Jean AJ6V which appeared in 
the June, 1979, Issue of Key- 
KUx, the newslettar of the Santa 
Barbara Amateur Radio Ciub. 
With the World Administrative 
Radio Conference now upon us. 
! feel that the fohowing is truly 
apropos, 

•^Many things have happened since 
Samuel F. B- Morse on Friday, May 
24th. 1844, at 8:45 am seni the first 
telegraph message to Alfred Vail over 
the wires for ad^stanoe of forty miles. 
If each one of you will look back over 
your experience with radio and Mor^e 
code, you will see what I mean. The 
technology of this event was far 
beyond the scope of most people of 
the time and the event itsell was prob- 
ably viewed In the same way that you 
and I react to pictures from Jupiter, I 
i^eep wondering about the future of 
amateur radio and what the communi- 
cation pfcture will look like In the year 
2000 - - r 

As we remember the achieve- 
ments of Samuel F. B. Morse, 
Thomas Edison, and others, so 
should we remember the fore- 
going from AJ6Y. in a very few 
words, Jean has said it alL 



Review 



INDEX TO HOW TO DO rr 
INFORMATION 

(1976 edition, Mary Lou Lafhrop 

and Norman M. Lathrop, 

Norman Lathrop Enterprises, 

PO Box 198, 

WooBter OH 44691; 

Wlpages; 

$10.00 + $h16 shipping} 

How many hobbies do you 
have? Mine number at least 
seven at the moment: micro- 
computing, photography, elec* 
tronics, astronomy, scale 
modeling, camping, and (of 
course) amateur radio. These di* 
versa avocations have one thing 
in common. They are dOHt-your- 
self hobbies— active, rather 
than passive, ways of using lei- 
sure time. 

Recently, I discovered a very 
useful tjook for us do-it-yourself 
types. It's called the index to 
How To Do it information. This 
book Indexes magazine articles 
from 52 different publications, 
ranging from McCaiVs to Sci- 
entific American, and Nat ion at 
Carvers Review to Kilobaud 
l^icrocomputing. That's quite a 
range. 

More than 1,000 subject 
areas have been used to catalog 
the magazine articles, making It 
easy to zero in on specific items 
of interest. Subject areas are 
liberally cross*referenced, so 
youUI often find yourself look- 
ing for more information under 



headings you might otherwise 
have missed. When you look up 
*'Radio/' for instance, you are 
advised to check no less than 13 
other subject headings for fur- 
ther information. 

The index is very strong on 
eEectronics, photography, and 
all types of crafts. At present, 
articles from the ham maga- 
zines are not included, but new 
publications are being added to 
the Index every year. Naturally, 
this book is useless unless you 
have access to the publications 
it references. However, if your 
local library has a good period- 
icals collect ion, ten dollars in- 
vested in the index to How To 
Do It informBtion would be 
money well spent. 

Jeff DeTray WB8BTH 
Assistant Publisher 




178 



Call or Write for Delivery or Quote 

DRAKE TR7 

Transceiver 




LEAVE A MESSAGE & WE'LL CALL YOU BACK! 





-j^— Electronics Supply, fnc, ^^^^ 

t50e McKlnnty • H qui (an. T«x« 77002 * (713} 6S8 026d 




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179 



DX 



from p^ge ?2 



the last to operate there several 
years ago) is talking about 
maybe trying again next sum- 
mer, and a G-land group has 
high hopes tor an operation in 
the immediate future. Wofl< 'em 
first , . .etc. 

Hans STORK has a new linear 
and TH3 beam courtesy of the 
W7PH0 group, look for IHans 
on Sundays around 21320 or 
28600 kHz and during the week 
on 14225 kHz between 1500Z 
and 1 600Z. 

Bob T2AAA is on 14225 kHz 
almost daily from 12002. 

A group of UA0 types will be 
signing UOY from Tana Tuva in 
rare zone 23 from now through 
November 20th. 

Congratulations to Dan 
WD6CDU/KH9 for a first-rate 
performance from Wake Island. 
Dan's debut into DXpeditioning 
was a model of good operating 
practices. 

0H2BH had to cancel his Mt. 
Athos pians due to a prior com- 
mitment with the stork, 

DJ9ZB'S QSL Managers Dh 
rectory is updated quarterly and 
presently contains some 39O0 
listings/ Price is $5,00 and it is 
available directly from DJ9ZB. 

Lou 3A2HB keeps regular 
Tuesday skeds with NIACW 
and W4LRI on 14240 kHz at 
20002, 

Father Moran 9N1MM is 
down to 100 Watts since his 
linear died. Someone advised 
him to tune for maximum 
smoke. That's what he did and 
that's what he got, 

During the period October to 
to November 10, Dutch ama- 
teurs will be allowed to add a 
*'5" to their callsign, signifying 
50 years of amateur radio in the 
Netherlands. PA0s will become 
PA50S, PAIS become PA51s, 
etc. 

Slim was back at his original 
QTH recently again signing 
8X8A from Cray Isiand. Some 
may remember when Slim 
signed 124NG, lined up a QSL 
n^anager, and then actually for- 
v^arded his logs and a stack of 
QSL cards to the manager. 
Everything was going fine until 
the ARRL bounced all the cards 
back. 

Jim Walter WA4GWP, who 
recentiy signed VP2VF0, 
dropped us a note to let 
everyone know that the correct 
QSL route is 249 Cleariake Drive 
W.. Nashville TN 37217. 

New officers of the Northern 
California DX Club are Presi* 
dent -Ted Davis W6BJS, VP- 
Ron Rasmussen K60P, Secre- 
tary-Joe Diilow W6UR, and 
Treasurer — Dave Palmer 
W6PHF, Directors are Charles 



Kump W6ZYC, Hal Godfrey 
N6AN. and Merle Parten K6Da 

Gordon Orelli K10R has 
worked WAZ from five different 
QTHs. Working 3B8DA finished 
his latest one off from Brazil 
Wonder if anyone else has 
worked WAZ from more than 
two locations. 

ZS4MG reports never re^ 
ceiving any H5AA logs, so he 
can't nil the many QSL re- 
quests. 

Has anyone received a bona 
fide card from LU3ZY or SRSAL? 

ARRL membership at the end 
of May totaled 167,541, up from 
165,163 at the end of January. 
Total amateur licenses came to 
363,820, including 66.363 
Novices. 89 J 62 Technicians, 
120,903 Generals. 84.181 Ad- 
vanceds. and 23,211 Extras. 

For the last couple of years, 
there has been a persistent jam- 
ming of DX activities in Europe. 
Finally fed up with the constant 
interference^ a group of irate 
European DXers set out with 
RDFs and soon identified the 
culprit as an El \yp^. Swedish 
authorities have forvLrarded 
complaints through official 
channels and some Swedish 
amateurs have openly identified 
the El station in on-the-air QSOs 
in a vain attempt at clearing up 
the problem. SM5BBC was re- 
cently discussing the problem 
on the air and a few days later 
ZA26C showed up giving 
SM5BBC as the QSL route. Slim 
seems to be not only persistent, 
but vindictive as well. 

The correct QSL address for 
all of KSVT's operations in- 
cJuding K5VT/5T5. /6W8. /5H3, 
SV5, and XT2AE. 9G1LM, and 
TY9ER is c/0 W2TK, 366 Ruther- 
ford Avenue^ Lyndhurst NJ 
07071. 

Although it may all be 
straightened out by the lime 
this column appears in print, as 
of eariy August the TH8JM 
problem was stilt very much up 
in the air with those holding 
QSLs wondering If they would 
ever be accepted by the DXCC 
desk. The origin of the TH8 
prefix dates back some ten 
years when the American Am- 
bassador there was issued a 
TH8 license with the stipula- 
tion that the Ambassador could 
issue THB licenses to any 
members of the Embassy dele- 
gation, but not to visitors. 
Since this privilege was never 
rescinded and since TH8JM is 
an Embassy communications 
officer and therefore a member 
of the Embassy delegation, it 
would seem on the surface that 
everything is on the up and up 
and there would be no prob* 
tems in getting the confirma- 
tions accepted for DXCC credit. 



Of course, (ife for the deserving 
is never easy and problems 
have developed somewhere 
along the line. Fortunately, 
another license, TL8JM, has 
been issued and the necessary 
documentation forwarded to 
those hard-to-please guardians 
of the eternal DX flame in New- 
ington. The Delta DX Associa- 
tion has forwarded a new 
Yaesu rig, and, if everything 
works out, before long TL8 will 
probably be just more garden- 
variety DX. 

NOVICE CORNER 
Never, but never, go to your 
local post office and purchase 
IRCs, The best source for IRCs 
at a reasonable price is one of 
the more active QSL managers. 
They receive IRCs from over- 
seas stations and are usually 
quite happy to unload them in 
bundles of 25 or so for 
something in the neighborhood 
of a quarter each. An especially 
good source is the QSL man- 
ager or managers of a recent 
DXpedition to some exotic lo- 
cation. They receive literally 
thousands of IRCs and general- 
ly announce their availability 
once the QSLing has been 
taken care of. Once the an* 
nouncement has been made, 
they disappear in short order, 
so it is Important to pJan ahead 
and get your request in early- 

OKINOTORISHIMA 

We just received two photo 
QSLs from the recent JF1IST/ 
7JI DXpedition to Okino 
Torishima and they are fan- 
tastic! One shows a wide view 
of the island(?) with the operat- 
ing platform jutting up from the 
sea. The other one has a close- 
up shot of the tent on top of the 
operating platform. Hopefully, 
we will have some color shots 



of this one-man operation for 
next month's column. 

WEST COAST DX BULLETIN 

With honest regret, we report 
that the weekly West Coast DX 
Bulletin ceased publication 
with the July 18th issue. The 
Butfetm was a one-man effort 
by Hugh Cassidy WA6AUD. 
During the all-too-short eleven- 
year life of the BuUetin, Cass 
somehow managed to never 
miss a week in bringing us all 
the latest DX news, Much of 
what you read in this column 
came straight from the 
Butietin's multi-colored, hand- 
typed pages. Thanks a lot, 
Cass; it was fun. 

DX RIDDLE 

Someone finally sent in the 
correct answer to our DX Rid- 
dle—which three DXCC coun- 
tries share the same prefix but 
are located within separate 
continental boundaries? Ac- 
tually, there turned out to be 
more than one correct answer 
Will Roberts AA4NC and Tim 
Fanus WB3DNA guessed KA1 
USA, KA1 Ogasawara, and KA1 
Minami Torishima. Rick Cole 
WD4CTA was the only one to 
come up with the answer we 
had in mind: HKO Mai Pelo, Hm 
Bajo Nuevo, and HK0 Serrana 
Bank. Congratulations, guys, 
and thanks to everyone who 
took the time to send in an 
answer. 

That's about all there is for 
this month. Remember, pic- 
tures and OX news are always 
weicome. 

Thanks for much of the 
preceding to JAINRH, 
WD4CTA. AA4NC, WB3DNA, 
WD9C0A, WA4PRU, WA1ZXF, 
NBAJA, VE2FIT. the LIDXA 
BuUetin, World radio News, 
and, for the last time, the West 
Coast DX Bulletin, 



Ham Help 



f wish to purchase, in any 
condition, a 6C-314. \ will pay a 
fair price plus shipping costs, 

Kenneth Hunt 

6519 Valhalla Ave. 

Klamath Falls OR 97601 

I need operating manuals 
with schematics fora Hallicraft- 
ers SX-40B receiver and an Eico 
720 transmitter. I will pay in ad- 
vance by money order for origi- 
nals or good copies. 

George E. Davidson KA4FNB 
5290 Joan of Arc Place 
College Park GA 30349 

An Icom 701 international 
users club is now operationaL 
Send an SASE for details. 

Rob Pohorence N8RT 

9600 Kickapoo Pass 

Streetsboro OH 44240 



Tm looking for information on 
how to combine my Superboard 
II from OSI with ham radio for 
RTTY, ft^orse, and ASCII send 
and receive functions. Can any- 
one help? 

C. B. Smith VE31EN 

33 Todd Road 

Agincourt, Ontario 

Canada MIS 2K2 

I have a Midland model 13^95 
SS& Citizens Band radio, and 
wtsh to convert it to 10 meters. 1 
have not as yet seen an article 
on this particular rig. Can any- 
one help? I recently picked up 
my General ticket and l am 
curious as to what is happening 
on 10 

Larry Starkweather 

5731 Desert View Or, 

La Jolla CA 92037 



180 



f^ 



Matwm 



ft*- 



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Super Expansion Board wiOi Cassette Interface S89.95 



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TERMS: SSJOmin. ofderU.S. Fiwiili. Calif retidenls add6%tii, 
ia numeric art} and Mailer Ctiarge accejiteii. 
Shipping chaiges will be itid^ed on charge cards. 



Same day th<P"^<£>^t ' - ' iep»tso% 
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INTEGRATED CIRCUITS 



P.O. Boi 4430 M Santa Ctara. CA 95054 

for wiir calJ only; i^O^) 9^8-1640 






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atifc S:F5 00 4#; weisiJii $450 00 M Assem- 
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Vtdeo Modulator KiL SS.9S 

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Aulo Clock Kit S17.95 

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Full Six digit battery operated 2-5 vo 's 
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PfiCad Battery Fixer/Charger Kit 

opens snoneo cells that won i hold a charge 
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parts and instructions 17.25 



S-1Q0 Computer Boards 

-'■ "'^ - RAW M Govijsui S135.0D 

: . .RAMKJt 265 CW 

24K SlatiC nAU KjI 433 00 

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64K Dynamfc RAM KH 470.00 

6K;t6K Eprom Kit (less PROMSi tM.DO 

Video interface Kit 5139.00 
Motherhoard 139^ Extendflr Board SB-99 



79 IC Update Master Manual %3bm 

Compieie IG data selector. Z500 pg master raiir- 
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update service itituuqh t979 Domestic postage 
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PROM Eraser 

Wir er*5e 25 PROMs ti 15 mmuies Utr^ 
vwlef. assemb^ $34.50 



Hickoli 3Vz Digit LCD MyltJmeter 

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Digital Temp. Meter Kit S39.9S 

Indoor and outdoor. Swttcties Pack and forth 
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181 



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TEKTRONIX 

1L30 SPECTRUM ANALYZER Plug-in 
925 MHz- 10.25 GHz $899-00 



MICROWAVE PARTS 

HP"5082-2a35/lN5712 
MDB101 $1.50 
MRF 901/911 $3.00 
,001 Chip cap $1.00 



TEKTRONIX model 575 
transistor curve tracer $300.00. 



HP851B/d551B MICROWAVE SPECTRUM 
ANALYZER: 10 MHz-40 GHz = 1 GHz 
gate. $3599.00 



POLARAD SPECTRUM ANALYZER 

DU2/TSA-W with STU-2W plug^in 
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TEKTRONIX 3T77 SAMPLING plug-in 

lOps to 0.2US 10X Magnifier 
Single Sweep will work in tek. 560 
series scopes 

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TRW CA6O2/CA2G01BU Microelectronics 

Broadband Amplifier. 15 to 270 MHz 
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$9-99 each 



BURROUGHS 100-Element Dual Linear 
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$9.99 each DATA 50o each 



TEKTRONIX 190A 

constant amplitude 

signal generator .35 through 50 MHz, 

50 KG. Priced at $150.00 



ANTENNA ROTOR CABLE 

Columbia #04083 

eCond. 2-#18, 6-#22 

100 FT Spools $10.99 



MONSANTO 

FREQUENCY 

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ITT/JENNINGS VACUUM RELAYS 

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ALPHA METALS SOLDER 

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SST A-1 VHP AMPLIFIER Kit 

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STANDARD POWER SUPPLY 

MODEL SPS-120-5 

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POWERTEC POWER SUPPLY 

MODEL 2B5-3 5 VDC @ 3AM PS 
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UNELCO RF CAPS.# 350 VDC 

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HP MODEL 140A OSCILLOSCOPE 

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KILOVAC VACUUM RELAYS 

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MABUCHI 375S^2265 

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3 VDC 2400RPM 

4,5 VDC 5500RPM 

6 VDC 7700RPM 

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ALL EQUIPMENT IS FOB 



PHOENIX ••••«« 



182 



Does Your Shiny New Rig Really Have: 

"STATE-OF-THE-ART" SELECTIVITY 



t^^Tfiueatek 




Add an Autek. 



QF-IA Active Filter 

For SSB & CW 

PATENT PENDING 




Only $65 ppd. U.S.A. 



115 VAC supply built- 
in. Filler by -passed 



SUPER-RANGE 
Auxriiary Notch re- 
jects 60 to 11,000 Hz! 
Covers signals other 
notclies can't touch. 



Four main filter 
modes for any QRAA 
situation. 



Continuously variabie 
main selectivity {to an 
incredible 20 Hz!) 



Continuously variable 
main frequency* (250 
to 2500 Hz, all modes.) 



AUTEK pioneered the ACTIVE AUDIO FILTER 
way back in 1t72. Today, we're still maintaining that 
engineer fng leadership. Ogr QF-IA evolved from 
suggestions from thousands Of owners, and ycdrs of 
dedicdtton ro making the ^'tiltin^ate" filter no 
gimmicks — ius* someining mat really "workB" like 
the «d ^ays, You're in tor a treat \ 

Autek fitters gai r\ed their reputation by usjng a 
cos^y INFINITELY VARIABLE design. YeL mass 
productiofl (we sell only ONE MODEL — the best) 
fnakes W a tremendous &ar^ain^ You're not limitett 
tsy a few fixeO posifiOfts You vary selectivity 100.' I, 
aifid vary trequeticy over the entire usable audio 
range, PEAK CW Cor vo^ce) wilti an incredible }« HZ 



ftANO WIDTH, but also variable all the way to 
•'tiflt/' Imagine what the NARROWEST CW 
FILTER MADE wilt do to QRMt Reject whistles 
With the mosi flexible NOTCH you've ?ieard Wide or 
narrow Depth to 70 dS LOW PASS heaps you cope 
with SSB hiss and splatter, Sfcirfs exceed 90 dB. MOSl 
above features were in the popular QF-1 (S«e 
excellent review in March, \%J1 OST ) The new "A" 
model is more selec rive, adds a HIGH PASS mode fi>r 
SSB. arid a great AUXILIARY NOTCH i J^ to £0 dB) 
10 give TWO NOTCHES. NOTCH/ PEAK. NOTCH/ 
LOW PASS, or NOTCH/ HIGHPASSI If ttlls dO^Sn'f 
convince you, please ASK ON THE AIR. Owners are 
our best salesmen* 



Oiw to cost and panel -space IJmJtatmnE, even the 
latest rigs only include a fractiotn of tite QF 1A 
features, We recommend you buy the best rig you 
can afford, spend 13,000 or more, then add a QF-tA 
and listen to the improvement! WORKS WITH 
Yaesu, Kenwood, Drake, Swan, Alias. Tempo, 
CoHins, Heatti, S/I.eic ANY Rll^f 

Hooks up rn minutes. Pl^ug into your riffS ptfone 
lack, or attach to speaker wires. Plug speaker or 
isttones into OF^IA rear panel jack. That's *ii Filler 
supplies I waft to till a room. No batteries r<|d- ( 4- li 
VOC hookup possable.1 61^x53^3' vv Handsome 
light /dark 9f ey styling. Get yours today.! 



CMOS PROGRAMMABLE KEYER MAKES CW FUN! 




HEWHT 



□reUTIfiQ 



RBC^T 



i^^A ir>iv d ' 






© e f 




Calls CQ while you relax. 

Also remembers name, QTH, contest exchanges 

Record anything you want in seconds! 

Model MK-1 $99.50 ppd. U.S.A. 



Our classic MK-1 should make you 
wonder why anyone would buy an 
ordinary keyer, when memory costs so 
Utile! Records J messages. Just select 
*Yecord/* tap the A. B, C, or P 
message, and start sending at any 
speed! Record over otd messages as 
easily PUytiack by tapping the same 
biittwi. Each message twids about 25 
ctvaracters (letters, numbers). Total 
100 characters Handy repeat swftch 
repeats message torever untji r^^et. 
Very useful for CQ'S. YOU SIT BACK 
AND WAIT FOR A CALL! Anottier 
switch combines Two messages for 50 



ctiaracters. "Memory-saver" feature 
stamfard. 

This "Stale of the -art" keyer pleas- 
es beginners and CW **pros" alike. 
DOT AND DASH MEMORIES, TRIG- 
GERED CLOCK. IAMBIC. SELF 
COMPLETINO, JAM PROOF. S lO 
10+ WPM. LATEST CMOS FOR LOW 
CURRENT. Built-rn monitor, speaker. 
Widely adiustabre tone, volume Per- 
fect weighting at all times. Ht^k fiddling 
wittr an adjustm.erit ft^at varies w(th 
speed NEW: OUAL TRANSMITTER 
OUTPUTS key ANY moilem (post 



1943} ham rig directly withouit a 
t>atlery or relay, including diHrcuit to 
key sohdsrate rigs. 11SVAC .uppiy 
built in,, or connect t-14 VDC lo w^^f 
paf>eL Use with Af^Y paddle AxlT'^K 
S" Burned rn and tested. Sockets for 
IC'S. Fun instructions 

NOW AVAILABLE. 40f« BIT MEM 
ORY EXPANDER (ME-H allows 16 
messages, 400 chars. & '"combine" for 
kjfiger messages. Plugs info n^emory 
socket of ANY MK-1 ever made^ In- 
stalls }n 10 to 30 mins. Full instruc 
lions Buy yovr MK-t now and easily 



PI«t»Rush 

ppd. vra 
Speedy UPS* 



add memory Jater if you wish [ 

ORDER WITH CONFIDENCE. NO LONG DELAYS 

HERE. We ship 95% of orders from stock, 1 year 

limited parts & labor warranty* Try our great 

service! VrSA & MC Welcome. 

Order by mail or call our TOLL FREE order 

ODerator \ 

NATIONWI DE 1-800-854-2003 ext. 842 

CALIF. 1 800-522-1500 ext. 842 

CALL24 HOURS, 7 DAYS A WEEK, 
Important: Operator can only take your order* For 
other information, you must write. 

Box 5127F 
Sherman OakS/Ca, 

91403 



<^utek 12e6eMek 



»yAtQO 



r 
I 
I 
I 

I 
I 
I 

! 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 



FLASH! AAK^lusedto 
set new world's CW 
record. A single op- 
erator worked 3992 
DXQSO's & 275 band- 
countries in only 48 
hours! Get the choice 
of champions — 
AUTEK, 



ORDER BLANK (Or Use Separate Sheet of Paper! 



D Qff.lA Filter at $*5.0O 

LI MK 1 Keyer at i^9.S0 

P Mil Expander for MK-1 ar$40 (factory Installed) 

O ME-1 Owrver installed at $30 (saveSIO) 



Add A% tax in CalEf, Add S3 each to Car^ada, Hawaii and Alaska, t2 for 
UPS air. Add SlS each elsewhere (shipped a tr). 

Enclosed is $ ^ 

VISA or MC^ Exp. date 

NAAAE 

ADDRESS 



CITY 



STATE 



ZIP 



Send to Autek Research, Box 5127F, Sherman Oaks, 
Ca. 91403, 



^B&ader Senr#c#— see page 21 7 



183 



AZDEN • NEW! • AZDEN • NEW! i^ AZDEN • NEW! • AZD£N 




REVOLUTIONIZES THE STATE OF THE ART 

AWE AND AZDEN introduce the brilliant NEW PCS-2000 

MICROCOMPUTER CONTROLLED 



2 METER FM TRANSCEIVER 




NOT $550.00 

INTRODUCTORY 
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COMPARE THESE FEATURES 
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• FREQUENCY RANGE: Receive and transmit: 144.00 to 147,995 MHz, 5Khz 
Steps + MARS CAP* and MULTIPLE OFFSFT BUiLT IN- 

• AIL SOUD STATE CMOS PL DIGITAL SYNTHESIZED. 

• SIZE: UNBELIEVABLE^ ONLY 6^A ' k 2^" x B'A'\ COMPAREI 

• MICROCOMPUTER CONTROLLED: AM scanning and frequency- control 
functions are pertormed by mjcroconiputer 

• DETACHABLE HEAD: The control head may be sepa rated from the radio tor use 
in limited spaces and tor secur>ly purposes. 

• SIX-CHANNEL MEMORY: Each memory is re-program ma b[e. Memory is 
retained even when the unit is turned off, 

• MEMORY SCAN: The si* channels may pe scanned in either the "busy" or 
"vacant" modes for quick, easy location of an occupied or unoccupied 
frequency. 

• FULL'BAND SCAN: All channels may be scanned in either "busy" or 'vacanr 
mode. This *s especiaUy useful for locating repeater frequencies in an 
ynfamiltar area. 

• INSTANT MEMORY' 1 RECALL: By pressing a tmtton on the microphone or front 
panel, memory channel 1 may be recalled foe immediate use. 

• MIC^CONTROLLEP VOLUME AND SQUELCH: Volume and squelch can be 
adjusted from the microphone tor convenience in mobile operation, 



• ACCESSORY OFFSET: With one optional crystal, three non-standard offsets 
become available 

• 25 WATTS OUTPUT: Also 5 watts low power for short distance communrcation, 
« DtljITAL 5/RF METER: LEDS indicate signal strength and power output No 

more mechanical meter movements to fall a part t 

• LARGE ^-INCH LED DISPLAY: Easy lo- read frequency display mmimizes 
"eyeS'Off-ihe road' time. 

• PUSHBOTTON FREQUENCY CONTROL FROM MIC OR FRONT PANEL: Any 
frequency may be selected by pressing a microphone or front-panel switch. 

• SUPERIOR RECEIVER SENSITIVITY: 0.28 uV for 20-dB quieting. The squelch 
sensitivity is superb, requirtrg less than 0.1 uV to open. The receiver audio 
circuits are designed and built to exacting specifications, resulting in 
unsurpassed received-signal intelligibility 

• TRUE FM. NOT PHASE MODULATION: T ra ns m i tted audio qualityts optimized 
by the same high standard of design and const ructmn as is found In the 
receiver. The microphone amplifier and compression circuits offer 
intel^pgibrlity second lo none. 

• OTHER FEATURES: Dynamic Mtcrophone. built in speaker, mobile mounting 
bracket, enter nal remote speaker jack {head and fad loj and much, much more. 
All cords, plugs, fuses, microphone hanger, etc. included. Weigtrt 6 lbs. 

• ACCESSORIES: IS' REMOTE CABLE $2995. *MARS CAPKIT... TBA. PCS 6R 
A/C POWEft SUPPLY... $49,95. 



master chaqe. 



AMATEUR-WHOLESALE ELECTRONICS 



,^Aai 




8817 S.W 129th Terrace. Miami, Florida 33 178 

Telephone (305J 233-3631 • Telex: 80 3356 

U.S. DISTRIBUTOR DEALER INQUIRIES INVITED 



ftOO 



OilDEf? NOW TOLL FREE 

Cf^dflt cflfd holftefs may use 

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AsJitor«»fatL' "^! 

mm f^4-7ads 

[n Caltfwnia iSOO) 85? 7777 
Alsslt^and Hawa^ (800) 824 7919 



«o 



o 




184 



FIVI2016A 



EgKDK 



All SoUd State-CMOS PL digital synthesized - No Crystals to Buyf SKH^ steps - 144-T49 
MHz-HUGE %" LED digital readout PLUS MARS-CAP and MULTIPLE OFFSET 8UILT IN. 

• 5 MHz Band Coverage - TOOO Channels (instead of the usual 2 MHz to4 MH2-400 
to 800 Channels) • 4 CHANNEL RAM IC MEMORY WITH SCANNING AND 
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$29900 

REG. $369.00 




Mod»l FMT»a 4R 



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SHOWN WtTH OPIJONAL |jp-S0O MiCRO-f RO^RAMMER* I*** 



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COMPLETE WtTH 17' COAX 
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SALE 



2500 



NEWI 

TOWER 
MASTER 

40 fwt Salt' 
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Regular 

»399 



COMPLETE 

With Hinged <^ 
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Our Price 

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IN CALIFORNIA (800) 852-7777 
ALASKA and HAWAII (800) 824-7919 




AMATEUR-WHOLESALE ELECTRONICS 





8817 S.W. 129 Terr. 

Miami, Fla. 33176 

Tel: (305) 233-3631 '^**^ 




SSTT- 

i^TRA Ti\iki:H uii:L[:;\E 



^ir^.i3y,rr^^B 



IXTRA Tt'NEK PELrXn Mutches sinv aiUtnim-- 
c(Mt3c re*1 or runrloin wjrc nn ull bumlN (IGO-lfl 
mcrcrs). Tunc (ml the SWR on ymir eintciinit U*t 
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4iiitt»ul cEi! nihility • SiWH putt fit- willi S^islor 
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CDsix fcii anicnnut*, random wtrt, fir timer by pu^s • 
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TiirtCfl rjtit SWK on 
lirty untttinii — c"[iK 
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liujijicfl, yut cfmi- 
piict: ^Vh' ^ S'^" 





oiilv S37.9S 



SSTT-3 MOBILE 

IMPEDAIVCE 

TRAXSPCIRMER 



MiJtches o2 ohm 
coiix fo iIjc lowtr 
tinpcflancc [pf a 
niobilc \\liijp. Tiipti 
between S unci 5fl 
ohms. B--M) MHz 
3f>n wutlr. nntpiit. 




aiily$19.9S 



SST T-1 RAHDOM WIRE 



All bundE4 (lOtt-10 
m.)\viili smy wire • 
'Z{)\m «* lit put * 
Atiy transceiver ■ 
I[<Miic iif futrliibSc 
* Ncf3-n Uine-u|j 
Jnritcatof, 




only $29«9S 



^•^iTDl^l li*llLJ OrMMT LOAD. lOlKJW PEU 

I ,5:1 1-^:^5 MJl;^ SetilecL ^-\ / H" x^-A / H" . 

SWT rir-1 a* UR- *'L<*€H. (ilmit reel LKH 

Qiiinernls. Mtantb in\d diiv iiit^ft ut f*"!^'^ oflnitinn. 
riciiiirirnJ fur yoitr desk, 1 inVAf\ 

oulyS22.9S 

KJ^TO-l liAIJ'X forbuUncciiUiiejs 3lK)\V. 



■ 



4'all (2111) a7G-S»»7 Iti <iracr C MMK. VISA, 
or j^laitiiifr C'liHr^ii£. 

To ilr«l«tn 

Send u check i>r immcy unkr—rtr use your >\C. or 
VISA. .\<U1 rt^S Klilppiiiti iind lismcllliiM. r^jhT. rc>ri- 
dent^. ill id Siilesbix. 




i^SIO 



RO.BDX 1 LAWfNiDALE, CALIF, 
QOSeO CS13] 37'B-SQQ7 



\^ Redder Service— see page 21 1 



85 



EIMAC 3-500 Z 
Special price — limited quantity 

SrSO.OO/pair 



ALL CRYSTALS S4.95 



TEKTRONIX 

SflSA Oscilloscope 

with 82 dual trace plug in 

DC 100 MHi SaOO.OO 

TEKTRONIX 

IL30 Spdctruir Analyzer p1ijg4n 
925UH£'10.2&GHi S899.00 



MURATA CERAMIC FILTERS 
Model SF0-4SS0 

455 kHz S3.00 
Model SFB-4550 

455 kHz 12.00 

Tfp»:CFM.455E4S5kH2 S7,95 
Type: SFE-IO.? WJ MHz S5.95 



HEWLETT PACKARD UHF. VHF, AND MICROWAVE SIGNAL 
GENERATORS AND SWEEPERS. AND OTHER EQUIPMENT 



MODEL 434A 

Caloiimeiric power meter 

S4&0.00 

MODEL 400DR 

Vftcuum tube voltmeter 

S79.95 



MODEL 606A 

50 liHz lo 65 MHi 

AmV to 3V Into 50 ohm« 

SI, 000.00 

MODEL T5510/U HP&OaD 

10 MHz to 420 MHz 

,1V to .SV 



MODEL 416A 

Ratro meter 

$125.00 

MODEL 61€B/A 
1.8 to 4.2 GHz 

only $399,00 

MODEL 6830 

2 lo 4 GHZ 
ONLY $299.00 



MODEL 413AR 

DC nyll voltmeter 

^112.50 

MODEL 618B 
3.6 lo7.6 GHz 

only S499.99 
A Model S299.00 

MODEL 61 2A 

450 to 1230 MHz 

.luv to .5uv into 50 ohms 

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MODEL 620A 302A with a 297A 

7 to 11 GHz Wave Analyzer and Sweep Drive 
.223V to lyw. 20 HZ to 50 kHz 

$699.99 $799.00 



WI5PER f AN5 

This fan Is super {?u)e1, etticlent cooling where low acoystJcai disturbance is a must 

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TRW BROADBAND AMPLIFIER MODEL CA61SB 

Frequency reaponse 40 to 300 MHZ 

Gain 300 MHZ ledB MIN. 

17,5dB MAX. 

50 MHZ to - IdB from 300 MHZ 
Vottaoe 24 volts DC at 220ma MAX 

ONLY $14.95 



CIRCUIT BOARD 

Size Price 

35 $2.15 

42 $2JS 

47 $2.15 

49 $2.15 

50 $2.15 

51 $2 J 5 

52 $2.15 

53 SI. 85 

54 $1.65 

55 SI 45 
58 $1.65 
57 S1J5 



1 
1 

3, 



DRILL 
Size 

56 

59 

€0 

61 

62 

63 

64 

65 

66 
25 mm 
45 mm 
20 mm 



BITS 



Price 

S1J5 
SI. 65 
$1.65 
SI. 65 
$1.65 
$1.65 
$1.85 
$1.65 
$1.90 
$1.85 
$1.65 
$3.58 



MICROWAVE DIODES 

HP. 2835 2.20 

MA4e82 5.00 

M8D101 1.89 

MBD102 1.96 

1Nfi31 6 00 

1N5711 2 20 

1N5712 3.45 



MCT303L 
MCT461FI 
MC1469G 
MC1550G 
MC1560R 
MCl56eG 
MC1569R 
MC4024P 

MC6e20P 
2513 

6060A 
270m 
2716TI 
MCU60R 



INTEGRATED CIRCUITS 

$2.00 MCl46aR 

6.90 MC 14691) 

205 MC1560G 

1,50 MCt5B3R 

12.40 MC1568L 

5.31 MCt^OG 

815 MCT648L 

Z.B2 MC1648P 

6 95 MC6800P 

6 95 MCfi8B21 P 

3 95 4U&-200NS 

8.95 TMS4060 

29,95 TMS4024 

540 1702A 



$5.15 

3.55 

10-20 

10.00 

5.00 

6.50 

4.70 

3.75 

9.95 

1ZO0 

1037 

695 

13.90 

4.95 



Prrces ei'e subiect to chmngB. Some ttem^ are in timited quanta f. 



192 kHi 


2.3525MH£ 


2987MHz 


5.42663BMH26 871MHZ 


26.66667 MH? 


315 


2S,^256 


2.9989 


5-4^636 


8B79500 


26 8965 


3735 


2366 


3.001 


5.456 


8 666 


26 9 


49.710 


2,374 


3.0235 


5.4675 


8 905 


26 958 


70 


2.375 


3.045 


5 4^90 


8.9305 


27 70 


8i.a 


Z367Z5 


3.049 


S-SUDS 


8,939 


27.77778 


9ft 


i3B5 


3Jm 


5.515 


8956 


27.645 


225 


2396875 


3,062 


55215 


9.0265 


27,9 


250 


242 


3067 


5.544 


9545 


26 728 


285714 


2 4375 


3074 


5. 55 IS 


9555 


^88889 


578 


Z4427& 


3tl25 


5,559 


9565 


289 


720 


L44% 


1128 


5,5685 


9,5K 


2893868 


i.dOOOMHz 


245 


3,137 


5.574 


965 


29 896 


1.226i 


Z4fm 


313975 


5.5815 


9 7 


25 9 


13047 


24612«» 


31435 


5569 


9.75 


30 0000 


14 


2482 


3144 


5.604 


98 


309 


1.455 


2466 


3145 


5619 


985 


31.0000 


1.6B9nO 


2,5 


ai5l 


5.6115 


9.9 


31 11111 


1 7 


2^1375 


11545 


5.63^6S 


9.% 


3166667 


1 7E375 


2,56 


1158 


5.B415 


9.999 


319 


1T7t25 


2581 


31585 


56715 


100000 


32.0000 


1773125 


2604 


31615 


5-675 


lOOtO 


32 72722 


178675 


2 6245 


3,1625 


56fln 


10.020 


32 6 


180224 


2618 


3166 


S695 


10.021 


329 


1,81875 


2.8^25 


3t07b 


5.7 


1D.040 


330000 


1.845125 


2 633125 


3.177 


5-7105 


10 20833 


33 33333 


1.84375 


2639 


3181 


5 733333 


?080375 


339 


1845625 


2 63575 


3ia7fi 


6-00 


11. 


34-0000 


1.84575 


2 64325 


3-18475 


621D 


11.13 


34 4444 


1.646 


2.646 


3.1885 


6.32145ft 


11,1805 




16425 


2647 


3 2rtCW 


6.3804 T6 


11.228 


KOOOO 


184975 


2650750 


a207?*S 


6.380833 


11^75 


35 55555 


18675 


26545 


3.2105 


6.381041 


11^7 


36 0000 


ijosias 


265875 


3 2165 


D.3DlDaD 


11.2995 


36 21750 


1.S25 


2,860 


3 2175 


6.382291 


11.3565 


36.68667 


%m7 


2M2 


3.23^5 


€3ft?9t6 


11-535 


3700000 


imz 


^66575 


323275 


6 3S4166 


11-705 


37 2175 


1.962 


26695 


32365 


63B47B1 


11.750 


37 385 


1966 


2,677 


323//b 


6363541 


11755 


37 460 


199*2 


288075 


32365 


6385416 


11-605 


37 77777 


1.995975 


2661 


;% 738875 


E427TMn 


11655 


3600000 


19M750 


26B4S 


3 23925 


645 


11905 


36 33333 


S.OUOO 


2,66625 


a.24 


647 


11 953 


38 77777 


2 0285 


2,89575 


3.24025 


6 4711 


11.96125 


36.77778 


205975 


27 


3,2405 


6 510 


11,965 


36.86886 


2,126175 


2,702 


3241 


6.537 


1270666 


38.88889 


2,1?795 


2704 


3 2425 


6.567 


12.8666 


39.00000 


2,1315 


2,7t075 


3 244 


6562 


12925 


39160 


2 133275 


2 715 


3.248875 


6.612 


12.93 


40 00000 


213505 


2718 


3,24975 


B.6645 


12.95 


41 Mill 


3.1^0825 


2,723 


3 2515 


5.673 


1299 


4166666 


2,1425 


2730 


3255 


6.693 


13.09 


43.33333 


2 144625 


2-7315 


3,256125 


67 


13102 


45 


2 14675 


2,73225 


3 258625 


6705 


132155 


47 48 


2.14B875 


2 732825 


3,261 


6.723 


13.2453 


48 5DO0D 


2.151 


2.733 


3,261125 


6,7305 


132745 


49 34166 


2,153125 


2,737 


3 268625 


6,738 


13 2845 


49.95 


2,15375 


273975 


3271125 


6,75125 


132945 


53 45 


2,155 


2.742125 


3273625 


6,753 


13.3045 


57 45 


2,15525 


2.7425 


3.276125 


6 7562 


13.3145 


59 45 


2.157375 


2,744 


3.3 


6,7605 


13,3245 


eo.45 


2,1595 


2,7445 


3.3345 


6.7712 


133345 


6195 


2.16375 


2 74475 


34045 


6,77625 


13.3445 


65 80633 


2.166375 


274&a7S 


3.4115 


6680000 


13.3545 


66 66667 


2,17012S 


2751 


3.4325 


6,910 


13395 


72.855 


2,172a 


2,764 


3.4535 


6.340 


14.315 


75185 


2.174375 


2,75525 


3.4675 


7.0057 


15.016 


76.66667 


2,1765 


276237S 


3 4815 


715 


15.020 


62.75 


2,17925 


27735 


3.4975 


717333 


T5036 


B3. 


2.ia475 


2,776625 


35 


7.1B6666 


16.39074 


84 


218575 


2,76 


3.579545 


7193333 


16.39166 


85.833330 


21W125 


2814 


3.64 


7.34350 


1651111 


90 033 


2207063 


2817 


37735 


7,35 


1675185 


93 1346 


2206313 


26225 


3.80 


7390 


16-965 


93 535 


2 209563 


2.835 


3J03 


7.443 


17.0U925 


93 9353 


2210812 


385 


3805 


7.45850 


17.01016 


943 


2210613 


2654 


3.901 


7.4615 


17.015 


95 35 


2212083 


2854285 


3908 


74685 


17,0^ 


106850 


2 214582 


2865 


3 9168 


7.4715 


17.115 


14864 


2 2t4563 


2868 


4.O00O 


7.473 


17-16fV 


147 09 


2,215625 


2-8725 


4.011 


7.47850 


17.215 


165.5 


2 2T7936 


2876675 


4 126666 


74815 


17 8710 




2 2^975 


2887 


426 


7 49850 


179065 




2 22212S 


2889 


4-3 


7-5 


17 91 65 




2 22325 


2894 


4.57 


7.5015 


17.9265 




222875 


2,910 


46895 


7.79850 


17S365 




Z22675 


2 930 


4 6965 


780150 


179465 




223735 


2 925450 


47 


7.81 


1 7.966S 




2.2395 


292545 


4.7175 


7926667 


17.975 




2 24075 


2931 


4 7245 


8 00764 


17.9735 




2 24t 


2 94375 


4 7315 


8075 


T8.290 




2246 


29*5 


4 765 


6lfy>7t 


18.330 




2 2475 


2 94675 


489 


6.364 


19 100 




2 2925 


2952 


5O0O0 


8820 


201 




2.2975 


2966 


S1312S 


8.^^ 


23 7S 




2 320 


2 973 


5139^5 


8 837 


23 575 




2 326 


2980 


5 14T9T7 


B6455 


?fi.47B67 




2 32625 


2.981 


5 164"iAT 


6854 


259 




23288$ 


2.98325 


5.3484^ 


88625 


s.yyyei 





186 



Polorad Mode! 1206 

1.9S Io4.20 GHz 

signat source 

S400.00 

Model 1107 3.6 to 8.20 

GHz signal generator 

S550.00 

Alfred Model 6320 

Sweep signal generator 

2 4 GHz S339.0D 

TUNNEL DIODES 
TYPE PRtCE 



TD261A 


S10.00 


TD266A 


10.00 


1N293Q 


7,65 


lN293d 


7.65 


1N4395 


5.40 



FETS 




3N128 


$1.00 


40673 


1.39 


MPF102 


.45 


MPF121 


1.00 


IIPF131 


1,00 


AA NICADS 




Used/puM ou 


1 oJ catculaiors 


7Si each or 


S59.00/1Q0 



E,F. Johnson lube socket #122-0275 -CM}! 
for 3-4007, 3*5002. 4-1 25A, 4*2&0A. 4-400 A 

32g.95/pair 



Magic Lantren Model ATCR3 
2350 MHz down converter and power supply with Bogner anienna 

S299.95 
OifTJftBd quantity avBiiBbiB — may be back orctefe^l 



MM15&2 50.00 

MM1553 56.50 

MM 1601 5.50 
MM1602/2H5842 7.50 

MM1607 B.65 

MM 1661 15.00 

MM1669 17.50 

MM1943 3,00 

MM2605 3.00 

MM260B 5.00 

MMe006 Z15 

MMCM91B 1.00 

MM 172 Ml 

MMT74 .94 

MMT2857 2.68 

MMT3960A 6.25 

MRF245 31.05 

MRF304 43.45 

MRF420 20.00 

MRF450A 10.35 

MRF472 1.15 

MRF475 2.90 

MRF476 1-38 

MRF502 .49 

MHF504 6.95 

MRF509 4.90 

MRFSn 6.60 

MRF901 3,00 

MRF5177 2070 

MRF8004 1,44 

PT3539B 3.00 

PT41B6B 3.00 

PT4571A 1.50 

PT4612 5.00 

PT4628 5.00 

PT4640 5.00 

f3TB659 10.72 

PT9784 24,30 

PT979C 41.70 

PT9e47 26.40 

SD1043 5 00 

some 3.00 

SD111B 5,00 

SDin9 3.00 

TA7993 75.00 

TA7994 100.00 

40281 10.90 

40282 1190 
40290 2.46 



Hf TRANSISTORS 


V 


2N5ia4 


2.00 


TYP6 


PRICE 


2N5216 

2N5583 


47.50 
4.43 


aNi5ei 


S15.00 


2N5689 


4.60 


2N1562 


15.00 


2 N 5590 


6.30 


2Nl6g2 


IS DO 


2N5591 


10.35 


2N1^3 


15.00 


2 N 5637 


20 70 


2N^57JAN 


2.45 


2N5641 


4,90 


2N2B76 


1^35 


2N564a 


14,38 


2N2880 


25.00 


2N5645 


11.00 


2N2927 


7.00 


2N5764 


27.00 


2N2947 


17.25 


2N5842 


8,65 


2Nr294a 


15.50 


2N5e62 


50.00 


2N2949 


3.90 


2N5913 


3.25 


2N2950 


§,00 


2NS922 


10.00 


2H32S7 


4.30 


2N5942 


46.00 


2N3294 


1.15 


aNS944 


7.50 


2N3301 


75 


2 N 5945 


10,90 


2N3302 


1.05 


2 N 5946 


13,20 


2N3304 


1 48 


2 N 6080 


5.45 


2 N 3307 


10.50 


2N6081 


8.60 


2 N 3309 


3.90 


2N60e2 


9.90 


2N3SS3 


1.45 


2N60a3 


11.80 


2N3616 


60O 


2N60S4 


13-20 


2N3866 


1.09 


2N6094 


575 


2N3e66JAN 


2,70 


2mQm 


19.35 


2N3B6eJANTX 


4.43 


2N6097 


2B,00 


2N3924 


3.20 


2N6136 


18.70 


2N3925 


6.00 


2N616G 


36.30 


2N3927 


11.50 


2N6265 


75.00 


2N3950 


26.25 


2N6266 


100.00 


2N4072 


1.70 


2N6439 


43.45 


2N4135 


2.00 


BFR90 


3.00 


2N4261 


14.60 


BLY568C 


25.00 


2N4427 


1.09 


BLY568CF 


25.00 


2N4429 


7.50 


NEP76/S3014 


4.95 


2N4430 


20.00 


HEP33002 


11.30 


2N4957 


3.50 


HEPS3003 


29.88 


2N4956 


2.80 


HEPSaOOS 


9.95 


2N4959 


2.12 


HEPS3006 


19,90 


2N497& 


19.00 


HEPS3007 


24.95 


2N5090 


6.90 


HEPS3010 


11.34 


2N5l0e 


3.90 


HEPS502fi 


2.56 


2N5109 


1.55 


MM1500 


32.20 


2N5180 


3.34 


MM15&Q 


10.00 


2N5179 


49 







electroi|iC^ 



2111 W. 

Phoenix, 



MHZ ELECTRONIC KITS: 

m #1 

Moiordt MCI44iaCP CMOS Tofift Genofalor 

CMOS Ton© Generator uses 1MHZ crystal to produce standard dual frequency 

Ing signal, OfcrecKy compahble wirh 12 key Chomefic Touch Tone Pads. Ktt includes 

the faklOh^flng 

1 Motorola MCt44!0CP Chip 

1 PC Board 

Ai^d all other paris lot assembiy NOW ONLY 115.70 

with 1 MHz crystal $20.65 



KH #2 

Fitlrchltd 9BH90DC Pra^calar 350MHZ. 

95H90DC Pr^scaler divides by iO to 350 f^HZ This kit wi 

to 350 MHZL Kil includes the followng: 

1 Fairchild 9SH90OC Chip 

1 2N51 79 Transistor 

2 UG-S8/U BNC Confieciors 
1 PC Board 

And all other parts tor assembly. 



take any 35MHZ Counier 



NOW ONLY S19,9S 



FAIRCHILD 

95 H 90 DC 

95H910C 

11C90DC 

11C91DC 

11C63DC 

11C700C 

11C580C 

11C44DC 

11C24DC 

11C06DC 

11C05DC 

11C01FC 



VHF AND UHF PRESCAL€R CHIPS 

350MHZ Presca^er Divide Oy 10/1 1 

350MH2 Prescaler Divide by 5i6 

650MHZPrescaier Divide by T0/1t 

eSOMHZ Prescaler Divide by 5^6 

iGfiZ Divide by 248/256 Prescaler 

600MHZ Flip/Ffop with reset 

ECLVCM 

Phase Frequency Detector (MC4044P/D 

Dual TTL VCM (MC4024PiL) 

UKF P res cater 750 MHZ D Type F Up/Flop 

IGHZ Counter Div4de by 4 

High Speed Dual 5 4 Input NO/NOR Gale 



$ 9 50 

696 

16.50 

15.95 

29.90 

1230 

4.53 

362 

3B2 

1230 

7435 

15.40 



CRYSTAL FILTERS: Tyco 001-19630 same ii 2194F 

10.7MHZ Narrow Band Crystal Filter 

3 db bandwidth 15kh^ min«iniim 20 db bandwidth 60Khz minimum 40 db bar^d width 

tSOKhz mlr^imum. Ultimate 50 db; Insertion loss i.Odb Max Ripple 1 Odb Max. Cl. <^ 

- 5pf. Rt. 3600 Ohms. 

NOW ONLY S5.95 



TUBES 



2E26 


$5 00 


4X150G 


70 00 


3^5002 


90.00 


VOOTK 


144 00 


3'1000Z 


225 00 


572B 


39 00 


3B28 


5.00 


eiiA 


12.95 


3X2&00A3 


150.00 


813 


29,00 


4©5A 


64.50 


5894 


39 00 


4-125A 


68.75 


6146A 


525 


4-2&0A 


80.00 


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625 


4h4O0A 


8150 


6159 


10,60 


4'IOOOA 


255.00 


6293 


18,50 


5-500A 


145.00 


6360 


7,95 


4CX250B 


38.50 


6907 


35,00 


4CX?50F 


53.50 


6939 


9 95 


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53.50 


7360 


10,60 


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72 00 


7984 


10 40 


4CX250R 


46.00 


8072 


45 00 


4CX350A 


60 00 


8156 


7.65 


4CX350FJ 


70.00 


6226 


127 70 


4GX1000A 


289 00 


B295A/PL17Z 


32600 


4CX1500B 


285.00 


6458 


25 75 


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400 00 


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50-00 


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DIGITAL MULTIMETER 



600 mHz COUNTER 




pftrt-700 



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Low cost, higfi performance, that's itie DM ^700. Unlike some of the 
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performance and appearance at a hobbyist price. II features 26 
different ranges and 5 functions » all arranged in a convenient, easy to 
use format, h^easurements are displayed on a large 3*/? digit, V? inch 
high LED display, with automatic decimal placement, automatic 
polarity, and overrange indication. You can depend upon the 
DM-7IK). state-of-the-art components such as a precision laser 
trimmed resistor array, semicortductor band gap reference, and 
reliabie LSI cifcuitry insure lab quality performance for years to 
come. Basic DC volts and ohms accuracy is 1%. artd you can 
measure voltage all the way from 1 00 yiv to 1000 volts, current from 
0.1 fiB, to 2.0 amps and resistance from 0.1 ohms to 30 megohms. 
Overload protection is inherent in the design of the DM -700. 1250 
volts. AC or DC on all ranges, making it virtually goof proof Power is 
supplied by four *C' stze celts, making the DM-7D0 portable, and. as 
options, a nicad battery pack and AC adapter are available. Ttie 
DM- 7 00 features a handsome, jet black, rugged ABS case with 
convenient neiractable tilt baJL All factory wired units are covered by 
a onp /ear limited warranty and kits have a 90 day parts warranty. 
Order a DM-700, eKamlne it for 10 days, and 11 you're not satisifed 
in every way. return it in original form for a prompt refund. 



The CT-70 breaks trie price barneron tab quaJity frequency counlers. 
Ho longer do you have tasellle lor a kit. f»alf-kit or poor performance, 
the CT-70 is compieteiy wired and tested, features professional 
quality construction and specifications, pius is covered by a one year 
warranty Power for the CT-70 is provided by four 'A A' size batteries 
or 12 volts, AC or DC, avaiiable as options are a nicad battery pack, 
and AC adapter. Three seEectabie frequency ranges, each wnh fts 
own pre -am p. enable you to make accurate measurements from less 
than 10 Hz to greater than 600 mHz. All switches are conveniently 
located on the front panel for ease of operation, and a single input 
jack eliminates the need to change cables as different ranges are 
selected. Accurate readings are Insured by the use of a large 4 incin 
seven digit LED dispiay, a 1 .0 ppm TCXO time base and a handy LED 
gate light indicator 

The CT-70 ts the answer to all your measurement needs. In the 
field, in the lab, or in the ham shack Order yours today, ejtamme jt for 
10 days, if you're not completely satisfied, return the unit for a prompt 
and courteous refund 



Specifications 

Frequency range: 
Sensitivity 

Stability: 

Display 

tnput protection: 

input impedance^ 

Power: 
Gate: 

Dectmal point: 
Siie 
Weig^vt 



10 H^ to over 600 mHz 

less than 25 mv to 1 SO mHz 

less thAti 1 50 mv to 600 mHz 

t ppm. 20-40^C: O.OS ppm/ 'C TCXO crystal 

time base 

7 digits. LED. 4 mch height 

50 VAC !o 60 mHz, 10 VAC to 600 mHi 

1 megohrri, 6 and BO mHr ranges 50 ohms, 

600 mH^ range 

A 'AA' cells. 12 V AC/DG 

t sec and t sec LED gatft hghi 
Automatic . all ranges 
S*'Wjc1W^)c5'.^"D 

1 lb with oahenes 




TiRMS: Saiisfactlon ouarantt^d or 
money refuodwt COO^ add *1 -50. MIn. 
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IfUurancc, tiandllr^g, Ov«r»u, «fd 
15%. NY mtdient*. Add 7% tu. 






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Prices 

CT-70 ^ired + tested. 

CT'70 kit lorm , — 

AC adapter. . . 

Nicad pack wUh AC ad*ipteF/ch3i^f 
Tetescc^pic whip ant^^firi^. BNC plu9 
Till bail asserntfiy 



75.95 

4.95 

14.95 

7.95 

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These Low Cost SSB 

TRANSMITTING 
CONVERTERS 

Let you use mescpensive recycled 
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ZW pep. output v¥fth 1 mW dnv© 

U^ low power tap on endtm m atte^iuator pad 

Easy to align with buiti-in test points 

Ltnh wft*i VHF RX conveffer fOf tfansceJve 



KIT ONLY $69.95 



MODEL 

XV2-1 
XVS*2 
XV2-3 
XV2^ 
XV2-5 
XVZ-6 
XV2-7 



INPUT (MHx) OUTPUT (MH^) 



28-30 

28-30 

£8-30 f26-28) 

28-30 

28-30 

28-28 

144-146 



50-52 

220-222 

222-224(230-222) 

144-146 

145-147 

144-146 

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PI 4 Wired $24.95 

Sp6clfv band when ordering 




# Deluxe vhf model for appfioatrons where space 
permits • IV j(3*' • Model* ftvattable to cover any 
4 MHl band m the 26 to 230 MHr range • 12 Vdc 

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P8 Kit SI 0.95 

Specify berxj when ordenr^ 



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P15 Kit 
P35 Wired 



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• Covers any e MHz band in UHF range of 380 to 
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Easy to Build FET 

RECEIVING 
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MODEL 

cae 

050 

C50-2 
C144 

Ct4S 
C\AQ 

C146 
C220 
C220-2 

CI to 

C110-ELT 



AF RANGE 

28-32 MHz 
50-52 

50-52 

144-146 

145^-147 

14&-14a 

144-148 

220*222 

220-222 

Any 2 MHi of 

Aircraft Band 

121,5(121,61 




MODEL 



0432*4 
0432*7 



RF RANGE 



432-434 
435-437 



OUTPUT RANOE 

144-148 

28-30 

144-146 

28-30 

28-30 

28-30 

26-28 

28-30 

144-146 

26-28 

or 28-30 

C0 Chan 9 (17) 



UHF 

KIT 

OMLY 

S34.9S 

OUTPUT RANGE 



20-30 

2S-30 



Professional Quality VHF/UHF 

FM/CW EXCITERS 



Fully shielded designa 

Double l:uned circuits for spurtous supfsression 

Easy to aiign with buKt-ln test aids 




T5O-S0 6-chafi, 6M. 2W Kit ....-* S49.&5 

T50-t50 e^han. 2M. 2W K<r --. S4&95 

TSO'220 6-ctian. 220 MHz. 1 ViW Kil S4&.9S 

T40/T2€l 1 1 -Chan. 4S0 MHz, 2O0fTiW Kit 549.95 



See our Complete Line of 

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m U^e as linear or ula^t, C PA 

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switching. Kit only *^^ ^^ 

LPA 2-45 VHFPA,2Win/40-45WoutCanalSOb«uS' i 
wiltifl-lOWdnve. Kit once -..*^^>.*- S109 9& 



L PA 4- 1 UHF PA, 200-SOOm W i n/6- 1 OW out , KitjKtce 
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New R75 One Channel 
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Offers Unprecedented 
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Newganerstion 
More sensitive 
More seieetiva 
Uses cryetal frilar$ 
Smaller 
Easy to iaiign 




R75A Kit tor monitor or weatt»er satelNte service 
-60da at± 30KH1 S59.55 

R75B Kit for riotmgl ntjfni service. -60dB ^1 ±17KHz, 
nSOdB at ± 2S KHi, .^««,.w..... S74.95 

ft75C Kit tor repeater senriGe. -60dB at ± 14 KHz, 
-80dB at ±. 22 KHi. SS4.95 

R750 KitfarsplitchanneloperaUon. uses S pole crystal 
frJ^erf -60dB al ± Q KHz, -lOOdB at± 15 KHz.- , $99.95 

Specify band: lOM. 6M, 2M, or 220 MHi, May also be used 
on adlacent commerciat bands. Use 2M version for 
137MHz WX satellite. 



HAMTRONICS SIX CHANNEL 
VHF & UHF FM RECEIVERS 

In use by the hundreds throughout 
the world. Unlimited applications. 



Comrnercial grade des^n 
Easy Id build S align 
70 or lOOdQ selectivity options 
Low sy^l@m cost 
Compartrnentized shielding 




1170 VHP Recewer kit for ^QM. 6M. 2M, 220 MHjf or 
edjiacent commercial bands — . S74.95 

OptioiTat K!a i i itler tot 1 0OdB adjacent ctwnf*el , S 1 0.00 



S79 95 




RSO UHF Receiver kit for any 2MHz segment ot 380 to 
520 MHz baind^, »,. a... --**:..**.**,, ----*. $89,9'- 



IT'S EASY TO ORDER! 

• Write or phone 716-392^9430 

{Electronic answering service evenings & weekends) 

• Use Credit Card, UPS COD, Check. Money Order 

• Add S2.00 shipping & handling per order 



Call or Write to Get 

FREE 1979 CATALOG 

With Complete Details 

(Send 4 IRC*s for overseos maifing) 




(^ flearf^r Bervfce — see page 21 ^ 



^H13 



189 



• ••■•< 

• ••«< 

• ••«< 

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• •••*' 



16K EPROM CARD-S 100 BUSS 





8K LOW POWER RAM KIT-S 100 BUSS 

SALE 



OUR 

BEST 

SELLING 

KIT! 



USES 2708's» 

Thousands of personal and business systems around 
the world use this board with complete satisfaction. 
Puts 16K of software on line at ALL TIMES! Kit features 
a top quality soldermasked and silk*screened PC board 
and first run parts and sockets. All parts (except 2708 s) 
are included, Any number of EPROM locations may be 
disabled to avoid any memory conflicts. Fully buffered 
and has WAIT STATE capabilities. 





OUR 450NS 270rS 
ARE Se,d5 EA. WITH 
PURCHASE OF KIT 



ASSEMBLED 

AND FULLY TESTED 

ADD S25 



2 FOR S225 

(450 MS RAMSIjt 

Thousands of computer systems rely on this rugged, work 
horse, RAM board. Designed for error-free, NO HASSLE, 
systems use. 

KIT FEATURES: 



1 



•••«•* 
•••••< 
••••*< 
••»••' 
•••««> 
#••*<< 



Doubled sided PC Board with solder 
magk and silk screen layaul Gotd 
ptated contact fingers 
2 All sockets included. 
\ 3. Fully bulfered on ail address and data 
lines 

4. Phantom is jumper selectable to pin 
67, 

5. FOUR 7605 regulators are provided 
y \oncard^ 



BSank PC Board w/Documentation 

Low PfOfile ScK:*t€t Sel. 13.S0 
Support iC's ^TTL & Regulatorsi 

S9.7S 
Bypass CAP s (Disc & Tantalums) 

$4.50 

ASSEMBLED AND FULLY 
BURNED IN ADD S30 



mm 



##««•*. 

^••••* 






«•• 



16K STATIC RAM KIT-S 100 BUSS 

PRICE CUT' 



^r 



«279 



KIT 







• ••••■ 

• •••- 

• •••*' 

• ••••* 

• ••«-< 

• •••-* 

4l#**>- 

• •••«* 



FOR zsor^s 

ADD $20 

FULLY 

STATIC. AT 

DYNAMIC PRICES 



WHY THE 2114 RAM CHIP? 
We le#l rh£ 21 14 will ti^lhe n^Kt tndti^try standard 
RAM chip iUke \tiG 2'\Q2 was) Thii fneani pnce. 
RuaiiabiJily, and quality vytll dIJ be-goodi Next, the 
?114 IS FULLY STATlC'Wef^MhFflislheONLY 
wAy 10 ^0 on th& S-11XI Busts I W^'vS 4II h^ard tti« 
HO^ROFl stpriRs about soma Dynamic Ram 
Bonrds having iroubie wilh DMA and FLOPPY 
DISC DRIVES Wrm nijoda ihm^ kinds al 
problanfift? And final ly, even flrfiOng Other 4K 
StatHC RAM's the2114 Btartcts Oul^r^ot bII4K static 
Rams an? cf eated equal' Somn of the orher 4K's 
liave clocked chip enable iinss and various Eimmg 
wtnfJCJwE jMtl ai crillc*! hj. Dynamic I^IAM:^ Som^ 
of dtir cQmp-^Flor^ 1&K bottrdS use IFiflse ' Iricky ' 
rji^icm But rutf us!TKe2ll4(»ibeONLV logital 



liiiiiiiiiiiiiii 
iiiiiiiiiiiiHii 





KIT FEATURES 

1 Addrfniatyle as four sepafatft 4K Blockf 

2 ON BOARD BANK SELECT circuitry 
iCromBrnco Slflndfird'} AMows up 10 51 ZK fln 

3 Uses 21 14 (450NS) 4K Sialic flamB 

A, ON BOARD SELECTABLE WAIT STATES 
5 Double aided PC Board, with sdldor mash and 
sill* screfrndd laygiul Gold piated {^ontacl lingars 
S All address and data Ime^ fuMy butft>ri.^d! 
f Kll mcliidQS ALL parts and sockflU. 
B PHANTOM IS lumpered to PtN 67 

9 LOW POWER undet 2 amps TYPJCAL trnm Ehe 
^ Vott Birss. 

10 Blank PC Board cai^ be popuiatKl 113 any 
mijllHpi« of 4K 



BLANK PC BOARD W/DATA— S33 
LOW PROFILE SOCKET SET--S12 ASSEMBLED & TESTED -ADD S30 
SUPPORT JC'S ft CAPS— S1B=^5 21 14 RAM S— a FOft $69 95 



16K STATIC RAM SS-50 BUSS 




IM 



■IIIEIIIIIIIIII 

r , v p . , . 

flillllllllllllll 



FlILLY STATIC 
AT DYNAMIC PRICES 



FOR SWTPC 
6800 BUSS! 



KIT FEATURES: r Addressable on 16K Boundaries 

2. Uses 2114 Static Ram 

3. Runs at Full Speed 

4. Double sided PC Board. Solder 
mask and silk screened layout. 
Gold fingers. 

All Parts and Sockets included 
Low Power Under 2 Amps 
Typical 

COMPLETE SOCKET SET— S12 



ASSEMBLED AND 
TESTED - S30 



5. 
6, 



BLANK PC BOARD— $33 

SUPPORT \CS AND CAPS S19.95 



S-100 Z80 CPU CARD 

ASSEMBLED AND TESTED! READY TO USE! Over 3 years of 

design efforts were required to produce a TRUE S-100 Z80 CPU 

at a genuinely bargain price! m lyiLi^i $i CQ95 
FEATURES: H mriMl \;j^ 



Perfect For 
OEM's 



2 or 4 MHZ Operation. 

Generates MWRITE, so no front panel required. 

Jump on reset capability 

B080 Signals emulated for S-100 compatabilltv 

Top Quality PCB, Silk Screened, Solder Masked. Gold Plated Contact 

Fingers. 






Z-80 PROGRAMMING MANUAL 
By MOSTEK, orZILOG Trie most detailed explanation 
ever on the working of the Z-80 CPU CHIPS. A! least 
one full page on each of the 158 Z-80 instructions A 
MUST reference manual for any user of the Z-60. 300 
pages. Just off the press. J-| 2.95 



PROC. TECH. QUITS THE MICROPROCESSOR BUSJNESS1 

FACTORY CLOSE OUT - SPECIAL PURCHASEl 

#16KRA 

16K S-1 00 Dynamic Ram Board - $149:^^ 

ORIGINALLY PRICED AT $423 each! 

We purchased the remaining inventory of PT's popular 
16K Ram Board when they recently closed their plant. 
Don't miss the boat! These are brand newjully tested, 
ASSEMBLED and ready to go. All are sold with our 
standard 90 day limited warranty!! 

72 Page Full Manual Included Free! 



NOT ASSOCIATED WITH DIGITAL RESEARCH OF CALIFORNIA. THE SUPPLIERS OF CPM SOFTWARE. 



Digital Research: Computers 

^^ (OF TEXASJ "^ 

P.O. Box 401565 • GARLAND, TEXAS 75040 • (214) 494-1505 



TERMSt Add 50c posta^fle, W« pa mce Ord**r^ undpr S 1 5 add 75C handling 

Ho C O D We accept V^sa. MasttfCnarge and Am^f^cjin E)cpres3 cards TcJt 
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Back Guararrlee on an itpnis 






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NATIONAL SEMICONDUCTOR 



AfElV/ 



CAR CLOCK MODULE - #MA6008 



$6 



99 



each 



INCLUDES CRYSTAL TIMEBASE! 
WORKS ON 12 VDC! 



Originally used by HYGAIN to indicate time and 
channel on an expensive C.B. Mini size, self 
contained module. Not a Kit. Four digits plus 
flashing indicator for seconds. Includes MM5369 
and 3.58 MHZ crystal for super accurate time base. 
With hookup data. 

MFGR's CLOSEOUT 



LIMITED QTY 



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NATIONAL SEMICONDUCTOR 



MILITARY TIME FORMAT! 






JUMBO CLOCK MODULE 



MA1008D 
BRAND NEW! 



.>^*V 




$495 
REG. <9.95 



ADO S1.9S FOR 
AC XFMR 



ZULU 

50% OFF SALE! 



PERFECT FOR USE 
WITH A TIMEBASE. 



FEATURES: 

* FOUR JUMBO ^^ INCH LED DISPLAYS 

* 24 HR REAL TIfUlE FORMAT 

* 24 HR ALARM SIGNAL OUTPUT 

* 50 OR 60 Hz OPERATION 

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* DIRECT LED DRiVE (LOW RFf) 

* COMES WITH FULL DATA 

COMPARE AT UP TO TWICE 

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FAmCHILD RED LED LAMPS 

lfFLV5057 MediUfT Slj!e. Clear GflBEf RED EMITTING These are not 
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10 FOR *r» 




50 FOR *4« 

WE BOUGHT 250,000 PCS " 



LAB-BENCH VARIABLE POWER SUPPLY KIT 

5 to 20 VDC at 1 AMP. Short circuit protected by current 
limit. Uses IC regulator and 10 AMP Power Darlington. 
Very good regulation and low ripple. Kit includes PC 
Board, all parts, large heals Ink and shielded 
transformer- 50 MV. TYP. Regulation. $15.99 KIT 



LED BAR GRAPH AND ANALOG METER DRtVER 
New from National Semi #LM3914. Drives 10 LEO 
direct ty lor makmg bar graphs, audio power meters, 
analog meters „ LED oscilloscopes, etc, Unrls can be 
stacked tor more LEDs A super versatile and truty 
remarkable IC Just o^tl 
SPECIAL PRICE: $3.99 includes 12 PageSp^c. She«l 



CLOCK MODULE OPTIONS 

MAIOOe A and D MA1013 

Switches and pel for all ophons 

(ncltjdes: 

5 posh buttons 

1 toggle 

1 10K pot 52.50 

AEarm Paris (including high Impedence 
transducer) Much more eflicteni Ihan a 
speaker. i1.50 

Transducer only tuTibelievfibly loud!} $1.10 



16K DYNAMIC RAM CHIP 
WORKS IN TRS-30 OR APPLE II 
1BK X 1 Bas 16 Pin Pschage. Same as 
Mostek 4116-4 250 NS access 410 HS 
cycle time. Our bes! price yet tor f hi& state 
ot the art RAM 32K and 64K RAM boards 
using this chip are readily avatlat^le These 
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ma|ot mf^. 

VERY LIMITED STOCK! 

"MAGAZINE SPECIAL ■ - B/S7B.50 



SONY 23 WATT AUDIO AMP MODULE 

#STK-054. 23 WATTS SUPER CLEAN AUDIO. 20 HZ to 
100 KHZ ± 2 DB. HYBRID, SILICON. SELF- 
CONTAINED MODULE. ONLY 1V^ x 2Vi IN. WITH 
DATA. 
COMPARE AT UP TO TWICE OUR PRICEi *8^*each 



NATIONAL SEMICONDUCTOR 

"COLOSSUS jr;^ jumbo clock module 



MA1013 
BRAND NEW! 




ASSEMBLED' NQT A tt.iT* 



VANUFACTUREWS CLOSEOUT' 



PEHFtCT FOP* use 
WITH A T|U£BAS£ 



Bn^tit 4 (bail Q.T LED DiSplsy 

Cornp^el^AcM only TrsnslonneT mnti 5wi1ch«« 

24 Hour Alarm Signal Outpol 

1Z Hour Real TlrT>e Formal 

50 Of &0 H7 Qpffition 

Powef Failure IndficxtioA 

LED Bnghtntst Control 

Sle«p and Snooze Timwi 

AJarm on' and P'M indic^lcs^'i 

Direct Diive - No RFl 

Direct ReplaoMiieiit tor WA 1012 

COfTi>es with Ftilf Oats 



SO Hi CRYSTAL TIME BASE 

$4.95 (Complete Kl^ 

Uses MM5369 CMOS divider IC 
with high accuracy 3,579545 
UHZ Crystal. Use with aJi MOS 
Cloc>< Chips or Modules. Draws 
only 1.5 MA Alt parts, data and 
PC Soard included, 100 Hz. 
same as a botfe> estcept S5-95 

' — nmeHiLD php — — 

"SUPER TRANSISTOR" 
2N4402- TCh92 PIftslfc Silicon PNP 
Dnvef High Current VCEO-40HFE- 
50 10 T50 91 150 MA FT-1 50 MHZL A 
super BEEFED-UP" Version of the 

^^ 8 FOR $1,19 



SILICON POWER 

SOLAR CELLS 

2 Inch Oia. Approx 5 VDC ar 5O0 
MA in sunligtit Factory new units 
not rejects as sold by others 
Serses tot higher voHage. paraHel 
tor higher Cuff ent Converts solar 
energy direclty to electricitv 
LIMITED QUANTITY. #^gg 



$5 



e& 



JUM80 IC ASSORTMENT 

All new not rejects BiG 
computer mfg. Surplus Some 
standard mafked. many house 
numbered. TTL. DTL, LINEAR 
All prime. 1st line 
50 for SI. 59 



'«*< 



500 tor $12.95 [[H^ 



TOSHIBA POWER AUDIO AMP 

5.8 WATTS RMS Typical Output. 50 to 30.000 HZ 
+ 3 DB. For CB's, tape decks, PA s. etc. Works off 
of a single supply voltage from 10;5 to 18 VDC. 10 
Pin plastic DIP with special built in heat sink tab. 
Perfect for use on 12VDC. $-599 
With Data. 



53 



each 



'*#*4 



■•••#1 

■w«»4 



Digital Research: Parts 

^^ (OF TEXAS) 

P.O, BOX 401247 • GARLAND, TEXAS 76041 • (214)271-2481 



TERMS; Add 50c postage, we pay balance Orders under $15 add ^il*!! 
75c handling No COD. We accept Visa. MasterCharge and **•••# 
American Express cards Tex Res add 5% Tax, Foreign orders ***'*J 
(except Canada) add20% P&H 90 Day Money Sack Guarantee on "r**#* 
all items. 



• • • 



■ ^ * ■■ p * 
• •• • * • 



■ «'«#* 



• • • • 



■ * « « 



* • • • 
« * * a 

* • * » 



» « • 



19 * • * 
• * * * 






« • « • 



« » « • 



« # * • 



• * « 



* * • 



V> 



# • • • 







SPECTRONICS. .Nc 

1009 Gartietd St., Oak Park, HUnois ■ 60304 

(312) 848-6777 



DIPOLES^OTORS, 
ACCESSORIES 

Ai Warehouse-i o-Voii SiWiUi^s 



KLM 



KLM 144-1 4B'11 2 meter beam. ..... $47,&5 c 

KLM 144-148-14 2 meter beam. .,.,., 65,95 d 

KLM 144-146-16 2 meter beam 72.95 d 

KLM 219-226-7 220 MHz beam 28.95 b 

KLM 219-226-9 220 MHz beam 29,95 b 

KLM 219-226-11 220 MHz beam. . . . , . 32.95 c 

KLM 219-226-14 220 MHz beam 49.95 d 

KLM 420-470-6 UHF be^m 19.95 b 

KLM 420^470-1 4-UHF beam 31.95 c 

STANDARD BALUNS for abv beams. 24.95 b 



icirsen 



LM150K 2M 3db, mob ant w/cable . . $31 
NM0150 2M adapt ant TADfTAE ml. .27. 
NLA150K^V bole, 3db mob w/cable 33. 
LMQ-K V4 wave w/cable 136^512 MHz . 9. 
LM220K 220 MHz. 3db mob w/cable . 32. 

LM440K UHF 5db mob w/cabfe 30. 

tVllVILMISO 2M Mag mt 3db gain ant. . 40. 
PQ i/i wave port and W/PL259 conn. . . 5. 



.95 c 
.10 b 

.75 c 
.55 b 
.00 C 
.00 c 
75 d 
25 a 




HALF-SIZE FULL PERFORMANCE 
Multi-Band HP Communtcations Antennas 



fe 



MOn-^AItf KO Dipblrta 

■ Drift 1iair ths length q1 ijonwnuonal tiall-rtflve dipftlitt 

' Mui^t-tiana frfulll-rnsQUeiKjy 

■ M4Airnutn pHitipnai^ - m titvri. Inartlng colli, m siufeg 
Fukl^p.ftssftftiblM Snd pfs-tiinntl - no'-me^suFiog, no euiHrtp.. 

- All *eaiPBer fftietl - I RW.AH. -2:5 KW CW OF PEI» $^: 
' Piaw1i;eeH0ms*K« - nwtB Ihart iO.OOD ttairfi beasn deU'rfa.feiJ 

■ Parrtiil liaJt of Ihft fuN Mpablliltea i»l tiKmv'i; S-band ^i&rws, 
' Dfti; 1*<siline Idf typiffiiiiflft fjti ^11 Cauda 



40-1 OHO/ A 40/20/15/10 Mtrs (36) . . . 
80-40HD/A 80/40 Mtr bands (69) . . . 
75/40HD/A 75/40 Mtr bands (66) . . . 
75-10HD/A 75/40/20/16/10 Mtr (66).. 
80-10HD/A 80/40/20/1 5/10 Mtr (69). . 



$63-25 c 
. 61 .25 c 

. 58.75 c 
.78.25 c 
. 80,25 c 




■^1 



MODEL 
595 

$2150 



Our most popular switch. 6 position, 
grounds all except selected output circuit. 
Can be mounted on wall, on desk, or almost 
anywhere. Good to 150MHz. Wt. 

2 lbs. 




375 6 position, axial lead, gnd 

376 5 pos, PROTAX, gnd pos ...... . 

550A5 pos,Radiali nognding 

550A2 2 pos, Radial, economy sw , . 

590 5 pos, axja], panel mtg 

50OG same as above w/gnd unused 
592 2 pos axkl, panel mtg 



$19.75 a 
.10.75 a 
, 17.50 a 
.14.95 a 
18.50 a 
.18.50 a 
. 17.25 a 



''SLINKY'' Dipoie Antenna 



m 




l^'M SU^PfiHf 



iQMlT SoPfLiEfl 



A lot af performance in a littSe sp^^cis. on SO/ 75. 40 and 
20 meters Only onp seTting needed for full h{ind cover 
gg&— Edw VSWR throoghout. Can be set at any length 
from 24-40" an 80/75 molers. 12-35' on 40^ 6-18' on 20. 
Band change t^kes l$5& than a minute. Hantit&s 1000 
watts CW, 200O PEP on 3S9- With 50' RG-58/U 
coax .... . $43. 9B 



NEW! ^** PORTABLE WHIP ANTENNA 




$3250 



SiHiptei depflridabfo whip is desianfid: 
i3S£>ecia1ly Sor aparlnnenT (Jwellers and 
reirters who cennol ir^t^ll a peirria. 
oeni anienrid Tunes itie 2 fi. 10. 15. 
20 and 40-nnist*f Afna1eL>r bands 
Olfer:^ VSWR of 1 1 1 wheo property 
a<||t4-5ted to operating freqju-eMcy liJE>rtl 
fcf use as a porlabte emtsryency iin 
le-nna, !oo. Aftich^jMS lo Himoal any 
honizonJal support with a s^npte clamp 
bracKet 

W^iOh^ le^s than 2 pounds including 
liw fci^se losing coif^ (nol used lor 
6 2 melers). cqax. iine and cckintei'- 
pqis^ Whip i$ £2''^ ' long di3as5e?rn- 
bl^d. 4SxCftnds to 57" Mcxjril is 14' 
loog Power- ralJng, 360 WHila BSB CK 
CW 
Hijdel 370-10 132.50 





SOUTH RIVER 

'*\ 
HDTTRiPODS /'/ ^^^v 

Galvanized steel. 
Lag Screws incL 
UPS Shippable. / j^ 

HDT-10KD 10' tripod, hvy duty ..... S49.95 g 

HDT-5 5^ tripod, galvanized.. 24.95! 

HDT-3 3' tripod, galvanized . . ; . . .... 15.95 c 

ST-SN Stamless chimney ml (parr) . , 17.50 c 
PFM71 Hvy duty self sup roof mt .... .8.95 c 

2791 Guy wire wood screw hooks (3), . 1.54 a 
2751 thread x 7^V turnbuckle (3) .... 3.46 b 

2871 50' #8 alum ground wire 4-35 b 

2876 100^ #8 alum ground wire. . , . 8.19 c 

GND-4CP 4' copper plated grnd rod. . . 3.39 c 

S-1625P 2Vs ft. X 1 Vfl" mast . , 3.95 C 

A.125.5P 5 ft. K 1 V4 " alum mast 11.50 c 

WHEN ORDERING FROM 
SPECTRONrCS, REMEMBER: 

ALL PRICES are subject to change 
without notice. When any item carries 
a special sale price lower than shown 
in the catalog, you will automatically 
receive a refund if you overpaid with 
youf order. 

C.O.D. ORDERS require payment to be 
made by cash, certified check, or 
money order only. We will gladly quote 
you the exact amount that the delivery- 
man will ask for. 

SHIPPING CHARGES must be added 
to your order. Please refer to the chart 
on the order blank page and add to your 
total, 

ALL ORDERS sent F.O.B. Oak Park, 
lltinois. 



r^THt 



I iTEm 




Famous "W2AU" Balun 

$^495 



% nEEi 



tUltT-IH I W« ^^i 

1- '' 







AID DEL 1:1 
MODEL AA 



MFH mfV t^Lli* 



HI 
i.i>a 









m 




—.J 



1 tlfiNaitS FlLl 2 KW PEP ftMO THEN SOME. Broad Sanded 3 Jo 40 Mq. 

2. HELPS TVl PHOBLEWS E> ??f!d-.:L,iif| ■:.i>ai. Ljiic R^Hl^aMuBj 

3. HOW ALL STAINLESS STEEL HABBWARE, S0239 Ptiut^Ee Silv-er Plated 
4 IMPROVES F;B RAriO It> f<f:iJt.L^RR Comi lin*-. P^ciUp 

5. REPLACES CENTER INSULA TOR. Wilh^^and^ Anttnna fulldl Qv?.t EOC Lt 

6. HllLl-IN LICHTHIND ftHRfSTIB Hslpi PfCJtetl flalun — CquW At&Q Sa 
Vcur V^jIujUIl- Gt'.rf 

7. BUILT4N, HANG-UP NOOK. Ideal hor Inverted Vees. MuMi-Ban^l flnlenfvi 
tjipajes fleam dnd Qu^ids 

NOW BfiNG USfO ey ALL BRANCHES. Qf THE OS. tt^MlXi FORCES FJI 
RCA, CIA. CJ^NADIAN miHSi QEft. PLUS THQIiSANPS QF KAM^ Tl 
WOflLO OVER 

Comes in 2 niodlels. 1:1 matches 5D cr 75 ohm unbatanctd Lcd^e Un^] Id 
or J5 ohm balanced iD^ri -I-: I ritodel matcliei 50 or 75 nhm urbabnc 
(coax line! Ec 2 DO or 30D ciltm b a! fitted Id ad. 

Model 1:1 S14.9S M«ilel 4 1 i14.1 



DIPOLE HEADQUARTERS 

CABLE 

8U FOAM, hi dens braid 50 ft $11.9£ 

eU FOAM, hi dens braid 100 ft, 22.0C 

RG58A^U stranded center 50 ft 6.9£ 

RG56AyU stranded center 100 ft 9.95 

RG58 3 ft W/PL259 each end. _ 3.3£ 

RG58 5 ft W/PL259 each end. 4,39 

RGSa 50 ft W/PL259 each end. . . 9.9£ 



COPPER WIRE 

#14 stranded, 100 ft spool 

#14solidcopper enameled tOO'. 



. 5.91 



INSULATORS 

Egg Ins, porcelain per pair . . , 

DOG BONE, porcelain set of 3 . , , . 

HY GAIN #1 55 center insulator 

HY GAIN Cycoiac end ins per pair . 
MOSLEY dipoie center insulator , . 

COtflfECTORS 

PL259 UHF male, 2 per pkg 

S0239 UHF female chassis mt ..... . 

UG17S Adapts RG58 to PL259. pkg 2. 
UG176 Adapts RG59 to PL259. pkg 2, 

PL258 UHF double female 

DM-SP UHF double maie ......... 

M359 90 deg UHF elbow conn 

UG88U BNC male for RG58 ........ 

1094 BNC female ...._ 

M35S UHF 'T^ connector 

UG255 UHF female to BNC male .... 
UG273 BNC female to UHF male .... 



.M 
1.25 
5.95 
3,95 
5.7S 



1.53 
, M 
M 
..5S 
.M 
1.6S 
2M 
1.4S 

lie 

2M 
3.49 
2.45 



>•** *i* •!*»j* ****** »*• 



*> 






*> 



*^ 



•:* 



*t* 



ESTIMATED WEIGHT COOING 

Afiei rhe price of each item you will find a 
letter, i.e., 19.95 a. To make 3t easier to fJg- 
ure shipping costs, these letters indicaie 
the approximate weight of the ilem as 
Follows: 

«. Le&? than 1 lb f. 20-30 lbs. 

11.13 lbs. d. 7-10 Ebs g. 30-40 lbs. 

c.4^ Iba. *. 10-20 lbs. h, 40-50 lbs. 

* will be sent truck collect. 



*i* 



**• 



*i* 



«4i 



HF & VHF BEAMS 
and VERTICALS 

At Warehouse-To-Yoii Savings 




SPECTRONICS. INC 

1009 Garfield St., Oak Park, Ittinois ■ 60304 

^sfli C312) 848-B777 



antenna 




2 MTR DUCKIES 



n 

U 

M^4 



Model HM-4, Has 5 16' 32 thread Fits 
Motorola HT's ICOM IC21 5 and Standard 
146A 17.00 

Model HM-S, Same as above, but with 

PL-2S9 connector 17,00 

Model HM-226. Same, with TNC cortnec- 

iar for Wiison 1405 S1S.50 

Model HM-2a7. Same, but wittn BNC con- 
nector lermination S12.0Q 

Mod«l HM-22B. With F connector for 
Wilson 1402S Tempo $11.50 







ii 

If 

HM-S 



^rt180 2mln 3db trunk lip ant. $33.50 

tfl179 2mtr, 3db hole mount ant .... 29.00 

\fl20 2mtr, 3db for marine use. , 39-00 

tfl176 440MHz 5db trunk lip ant ... , 33,00 
W17S 440MHz 5db hole mount ant . 29.00 
W224 220MHz 4db trunk lip ant .... 33.50 



MClAil ASP-694 1/4 -Wave 
fVE WW I Magnetic Antenna 

Low profile magnetic antenna with cabJe 

and connector. Tunable 108-51 2 MHz. 

Can be converted to gain antenna later 

Wt.:3lbs. 

Model ASP-694 . , , $21 .00 



b 
b 
b 
b 
b 
b 




cushcmft 



12 2meterRlngo base ant — ... . $24.95 b 
^X2 2mtr Ringo Ranger base ant . . 39-95 c 

^220 220MHz RIngo base ant 24.95 b 

^X220 220MHz Ringo Banger 39.95 c 

U50 UHF Ringo base ant 24.95 b 

1X450 UHF Ringo Ranger bse ant . 39.95 c 

16 6 meter Ringo base ant 36,95 c 

1X2K Adapts 2M Ringo to Ranger . 16 J5 b 

l47-4 4ele2M FM beam ant 24.95 b 

147-11 11 ele2M FMbeam.. ,36,95 c 

I47-20T lOele 2M vert/horz twist. . . 62,95 d 

144-7 7 ele 2M CW/SSB beam 26.95 c 

144-11 11 ele 2M CW/SSB beam, ... 36.95 d 
1 44-1 OT 10 ele Twist OSCAR ant . , . 42.95 c 
[44-20T 20 ele Twist OSCAR ant . . . 62.95 d 

!20"7 7 ele 220MHz beam. 26.95 c 

i20-11 1 1 ele 220MHz beam 34.95 c 

149-66 ele UHF FM beam 24.95 c 

t49-11 11 ele UHF beam.,.. 34.95c 

^32-11 11el432MHzSSB/CWbeam 34.95 c 

■M4D 144-1 48MHz Four Pol^ 69.95 c 

■ M24D 220M Hz Four Pole 64,95 c 

■|VI44D 435-450 M Hz Four Pole 64.95 c 

>Q-2 2M Squaio horiz ant 19.95 b 

iC-1 Coax f ightning arrester. 4.95 a 

^C2- Coax lightning arrester. 4.95 a 

rB34* 4 ele 20-1 Omtr beam .....219,95* 

rV3 20-10mtr trap vertical 49.95 e 

rV4 40'IOmtr trap vertical 69.95 e 

rV5 80-1 Omtr trap vertical 89.95 e 

)0'3 3 element 6 meter beam 39.95 d 

jO'S 5 element 6 meter beam ..,,.. 59.95 B 
>8-3* 3 element 10 meter beam ..69.95* 
^32-20T 432MHz 20 ele twist. 59.95 d 



2M BASE ANT, PACKAGE 



1 



I 






Here's what you get 

Cushcraft AR2 RJngo 
South River. 
PFM71 Roof mgtint. 
A125'5P 5' alum mast 
Lag bolts. 
50' 8U foam coax. 
PL259 coax conn. 



S 




0: 



$59" If 

Wt,16 fbs 




FINCO 



The most rugged 6 & 2 meter beams we've 
seen yet!! 

A 2-10 10 ele, 2M beam , $44.95 d 

A 2-5 5 ele, 2M beam, 9.5db gain 27.95 c 

A 2-2 10 ele, 2M dual polarization. . . . 46.50 e 

A62 6&2M antenna on one boom 74.95 e 

A6'5 5 element 6M beam, lldb .46.50© 

A6-3 3 ete 6M beam, 7db gain 30.00 d 

A 1 Va 220M Hz 1 ele, 1 3.8db 32,95 d 




59 



95 



"BUCK-BUSTER** 
SF-2 ANTENNA 

Fits all Hustler deluxe mobile 
mounts. 3/8''x24 base. 5/8" 
wave two meters, 3.4 db gain. 
SWR at resonance: adj. to 
1.5:1 or better. Bandwidth : 6 
MHz, 2:1 or better SWR 100 
watts max. 



T 



1 



$7995 



NEW 4-BTV 
VERTtCAL 




SF-2 



One setting covers 10, 15, 20, 
40M. Space restricted or un- 
limited, you get top signal re- 
ports, consistent contacts and 
complete coverage. Add 5th 
band with a 75M resonator. 
Use one feedline, any length. 
Requires no switching or 
matching devices, is lbs. 



1 



4'BTV 



M01 Mobile mast 

M02 Mobile mast 

RM10 10 Meter resonator 

RM1 5 15 meter resonator 

RM20 20 Meter resonator . 

RM40 40 Meter resonator . 

RM75 75 Meter resonator 

RM80 80 Meter resonator ..... 
RM10S10M resonator 2KW PEP .. 
RM15S15M resonator 2KW PEP .. 
RM20S 20 M resonator 2KW PEP . . 
RM40S 40M resonator 2KW PEP . . 
RM75S 75M resonator 2KW PEP . . 
RMSOS^OM resonator 2KW PEP - . 
CGI 44 5.2db 2mtr ant \ x 24 stud . 
CGT144 Same but trunk lip mount. 

SF2 3db 2mtr ant "^ x 24 stud 

SF220 3db 220MHz ant V^ x24 stud 

4BTV 40-10mtr vertical . 

G6-144 2mtr base ant 6db 

BM1 Bumper mount ^/^ x 24 thread. 
RSS2 Mobile resonator spring . . . . 
0D1 Quick disconnect V^ x 24 



S22.95 C 
. 22.95 C 
. . 6.95 b 
. . 7.95 b 
. . 8.95 b 
,14.95 b 
.16.95 b 
.17.95 b 
.11.05 b 
.12.95 b 
.13.95 b 
.16.95 b 
. 31 .95 b 
.31.95b 
. 26.95 b 
42.96 C 
. . 9.95 b 
.11,95 b 
. 79.95 e 
. 79 95 d 
, 15.95 d 
. . . 5 J5 a 
. 16.95 a 



iffiJIUatn 



r 



r' 



I 



VERTICAL ANTENNAS 

Model 14AV0/WB 

• 40 thru 10 m^lers 

• Vli^ide band performance 

• N«w Hy-Q trap$ 

SeJf'Supporting. auTomaiic band switcliing 
veLticaianienna. Orrim-directional perfor- 
mance. Favorabte L^C ratJo High Q True 
Vfl wave resonance on all bands. Low angle 
radration pattern. Tapef swagged seamless 
aluminum construction. 1?" double-grip 
mast brackel. Full circumference com- 
pressiort clamps at tutjing joints. Weight: 
S2 Itss. ^^, ^^ 

ModellflAVQ/we $57.00 

Modal 18AVT/WB 

• AulomstiiC band switching 

• Completely Self-Supporting 

« Omni-Pirectional Pi&rlormanc© 

Ttiree De*;fed-up Hy-Q traps parmjt auto- 
matjc switching. 5 band capability. Favor- 
able L^G ratJo^ Top loading coil. Across 
the band perfofmance with one furnished 
setting for each band (10 thru 40}. True vi 
wave resonance on aM bands. SWR ot 2:1 
or less at band edges. Low angle radiaiton 
pallern, Extra heavy duty tapered swaged 
seamless aluminum tubing Vtfiili full cir- 
curmference, corrosion resistant com- 
pfession clamps at tubing Joirits. Antenna 
can-be moLinted vvithout guicte wires. 25^ 
high. Weight: 10.7 lbs. 
ModeliaAVT/WB . $7e.a3 



BN86 Ferrite balun for 80-10mlrs. . . $15.95 a 

155 Center insulator for doublet. ..... 5.95 a 

156 End insuL for doublet (pair) . . 3,95 a 

leHT* HyToweraO'lOM vertEcai ..239.95* 

18V Econoiny 80tru 10M vertical 24.95 c 

12AVQ 20-1 Omtr trap vertical. 39.95 c 

14AVQ 40'10mtr trap vertical .57,00 d 

ISAVT/WB 80-1 Omtr trap vertical .... 79.95 d 
2BDQ Trap doublet for 80 & 40mtr , . , 39.95 d 
5BDQ Trap doublet for 80-10mtrs. . . . 69.95 e 
THSMklll* 3ele20-10tribander ,,179.95* 
TH6DXX * 6 ele 20-10M tribander. . 239.95 * 
TH3 Jr 3 ele tribander (750W PEP) . . 129,95 e 
HYQUAD* 2 ele quad 20-10 mtrs .189.95* 
103BA 3 element lOMtr beam . .,,,,, 54,95 e 

153BA* 3 element 15mtr beam. . . 79.95 

204BA* 4 element 20mtr beam _, 179.95* 
402BA* 2 element 40 mtrbeam,.. 169.95* 

64B * 4 element 6 meter beam , , . 39-95 

270 6db fiberglass 2M antenna 39.95 e 

203 3 element 2 meter yagi 15.95 b 

205 5 element 2 meter yagi 17.95 c 

208 8 element 2 meter yagi 25-95 c 

214 14 element 2 meter yagi . 31.95 d 




TA33 • 3 el triband beam 2KW PEP . $1 89.95 
TA33Jr* 3eletrlband 1KW PEP ... 149,95 * 
TA36 • 6ele triband 2KW PEP .... 269,95 * 

CL33 * 3 ele Classic . . , 209.95 * 

CL36 * 6 ele Classic 269.95 * 

TA40KR 40mtr adpt for TA33/36 92,95 e 

IV1PK3 2KW conv kit for TA33Jr 67.65 e 



CC^E 



HAM 1V Rotor with control box 
T2X Tailtwister xtra hvy dty . . . 

CD45 Medium duty rotor 

AR22XL Light duty rotor 

Mast adaptor for Ham II/T2X. . 
South Center meter kit 



$149.95 f 
.219.951 
, 119.95 f 
. . 59.95 e 
. . 29.95 d 
. . . 3.00 a 



HIGH TECHNOLOGY AT LOW PRICES 



MA1003 CLOCK MODULE $16.50 



Here is a clock module designed specifically for mobile applications. No 
external timebase necessary; a buitt-m tinnebase, accurate to .01%, pro- 
vides the tinning accuracy you need. We don't use wash-out prone LED 
displays, either; instead, you get blue/green flourescent readouts that are 
as beautiful as they are readable. No time consuming, tedious assembly; 
just add two time setting switches, attach 12V DC, and you're ready to go 
{order our matching case mentioned below for a truly professional look). 
Additionally, our applications sheet tells you how to take maximum advan* 
tage of this module in mobile situations, including how to hook up the 
display so that it dims at night, and blanks to conserve power when the igni- 
tion is off. 

Also avaiiable: Matching case with mounting hardware, and an optical 
filter that brings out the best in the clock readouts^ for $5.95. 

This clock is not only an excellent addition to your car, van, boat, or 
home, but also makes an excellent gift. Order now, and you'll have It ready 
to go in plenty of time for Christmas giving. 





aa 



m 




12 VOLT, 8 AMP POWER SUPPLY KIT $44.50 

The original hefty 12V supply, and still going strong.,, one look at the 
Specs will tell you why this has been our longest-running kit. Handles 8A 
continuous, and 12A (!) with a 50% duty cycle. Features foldback current 
limiting, crowbar overvoltage protection, RF suppression, adjustable out- 
put 11-14V, heavy-duty custom wound transformer, and much more. 

Applications? This supply powers mobile transceivers (ham or CB) in the 
home, as well as other automotive/mobile home accessories (tape players, 
radios, TVs, etc.). It also makes an excellent bench supply, or can power 
bunches of floppy disc drives. 

Assembly is about as simple as we can make it: All parts, except for 
transformer/power diodes/filter capacitors mount directly on the circuit 
board — including power transistors and heat sinks. 

This supply Is available from stock. Please include extra postage for this 
Kit, as the transformer adds quite a bit of shipping weight. 




16K MEMORY EXPANSION CHIP SET 

regularly $109, now $87.20 

We're keeping our competitive edge on this very popular product by 
continuing our 20% off sale. Expands memory in Radio Shack-80, Ap- 
ple, and Exidy Sorcerer computers. Compare with similar kts: 250 ns 
access time, low power parts, DIP shunts included, 1 year limited war- 
ranty, and easy-to-follow instructions that make memory expansion a 
snap. We don't give you fancy packaging; we prefer instead to give 
you the best possible parts at the lowest possible price* 

RF POWER TRANSISTORS 

We've been offering these for a tong, long time . . , and frankly, we 
were puzzled why these super parts were taking so long to sell. But it 
seems like the word is getting around, because more and more hams 
and ordering these prime, high frequency transistors. So, it looks like 
we won't be offering these all that much longer; If you want to take ad- 
vantage of great parts at low prices, act now to avoid disappointment. 
Just thought you ought to know . . . 

2NRF-1 2 GHz RF power transistor. Pd max (@ 25 degrees C) 3.5W, 
Pout min @ 2 GNz LOW, Pin 310 mW, efficiency @ 2 GHz 
30%, round shape, similar to RCA 2N5470. $4.95 

2NRF-2 2 GHz RF power transistor. Pd 8.7W. Pout 2.5 W, Pin 300 
mW, efficiency 33%,*cfoss shape, simitar to RCA TA8407. 

2NRF-3 2 GH2 RF power transistor. Pd 21 W, Pout 5.5W, Pin 1.25W, 
efficiency 33%, cross shape. Similar to RCA 2 N 6269, $6.95 

2NRF-4 2 GHz RF power transistor. Pd 29W, Pout 7.5W, Pin 1.5W, 
efficiency 33%, cross shape. Factory selected, prime 
2N6269. $7,05 



ECONORAM^XV 
MEMORIES ! ! 

We're announcing two new^ fully static, 
fiigti density/low power Econorams designed 
from the ground up for electrical and 
mecfianical compatibility witfi the Heath H8 
computer. Econoram XV-16 has 16Kx8 of 
memory, organized as a single 16K block; 
Econoram XV-32 has 32Kx8 of memory, 
organized as two 16K blocks. In addition to 
the standard goodies that are a part of every 
Econoram'*" — socketing for all ICs, high 
quality board, oKcellent thermal design, full 
buffenng, etc. — these boards include a 
bank select option for implementing 
memory systems greater than 64K. 

Econoram XV-16 costs $329 in '*unkit" form 
(sockets, bypass capacitors p re-soldered in 
place to make assembly a simple, one even- 
ing project), and $395 assembled and tested. 

Econoram XV-32 unkit price is $599, and $729 

assembled and tested, H you're an H8 owner, 
we're sure you'll be very pleased with the 
latest addition to our family of fine static 
memories. 



TERMS: Add $1 handling to orders under 
$15. Allow up to 5% shipping, more for the 
12V 8A supply (excess refunded). Give street 
address for UPS delivery. VISA* /Master- 
charge* call our 2A hour order desk at 
{AiS) 562-0636. CODs OK With Street address 
for UPS, Cal res add sales tax. Thank you for 
your business! 

194 





GOD BOUT ELECTRONICS 
BIdg. 725, Oakland Airport, CA 94614 



FREE FLVER: Wh«1her you're a computw 
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v'Q4 



Transistor Checker 




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Custom Cables & Junipers 



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Part No, 

DB25P-J-P 
D&Z5P-^-S 
DB25S-^-S 

DJU-1 
DJ16-] 

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DJJ4-1-24 




^J'^^ 



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DB 25 Series Cables 
Cdble Length ConneictQfB Price 

4 R. 2-DP25P Sl5.9Sea. 

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Dip Jumpers 



1 ft. 
1 ft. 
1 ft 
Ifj. 
1 ft 
1 1t 



1 14 Pin 

1-f6Pin 
1-24 Pin 
2-!4 P\w 
2^t6Pin 
2-?4 Pifl 



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DS^&P [53 picturet:^ PLUG lArteetii flS2:i5) $2,55 

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D85122fi'1 Cable CovBr for D82SP or DB2SS S1.T5 

PFIINTED ClflCUn EOGE'CAflD 



15/30 

tsyae 

lf?/44 

50/1TO ( 100 Spacing) 

SOVtOD i; 1?5 ?ifiii;;ingi 



PINS (Scfldef Eyelet) 
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PINS (Solder Eyelet) 
P^WS (Wire Wrap) 
Pir-J5 (Wire Wrgp) 



R6B1-1 



S1.95 
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* PTessure swltenei ror hours, mlriut« ft hold functions 

* Imciluides all comporBnis, case an0 wdjl t r jl n 5 r o riTi^^ 

* Slit: J^i .K IV- a \V4 



JE730 



^14.95 



Jumbo 6-Dtgit Clock Kit 




* Four ,63fl"ht. ard two .3ClD"'ht. 
Common a nods displays 

* Ums MMHSiM dock cm p 

* Sv^itcties for hauTS, nrinutcs and hold f£>rKftlart£ 

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'^ Simulated walrvilt Ca£« 

* 115 VAC operatian 

* i? or 3fl hour operarion 

* inciuifJe& au camppnantB, case and wfili Uinsformer 



JE747 



PT-l-lBlBh 



$29.95 



," j:o J 'ZB 



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and hdid rp-Srf&t 

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♦ Simulated walnut tfl*& 

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* 1 ^ or 24 hr. operajthOn 
*lncl. all Ci^rii'iponentSr case Sj 

wall transf&riTior 

• Si^e: &5i" X 3-t/B" x 1 ^" 



6-Digit Clock Kit $19,95 



aiiMOTE CDirriQL 

TEAKSMITTEH k RSCIIVEB 




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^ i-HviuHliii (ii- iiLii !■ EiR nriMi I- inkrHiii 

jnt.u'.ii ibKi 
+ rtiiutairrf A [HEi i. l im iitriiJiv 

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CPU 


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Ptofl. ftrqjh t'tJ (PR} 


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M^MI with C!o(;N and Fldi!i 


24JS 


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2^16 CliarHctBi GartGrdrtar 1D.'$;5 

M)iSS3CW ^04e-^ Rud OlDy Utirm^ i:9& 



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ZaOlTacCl CPU ,$19.86 

ZBai^if.ani-ii cpu 2*."K 

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DynamK^ISliir] 


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LH'04te 


161!; 


I^Viltfnft Igvin 


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(MK41 IE) 








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4K 


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45r(L 








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SIMIJC 


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I702A aO+B FAHQ$ 

znmntv mr eprom 

tH3£51« 16K* EPRDM 

t*#S3532 4KXB EPROM 

27Da aK EPHOM 

Z7ieti 16K" mow 

"fljaijuirai 3 voftafisS, — 5V. » SV, .12V 



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Prof o Board 203 




A |iir.»l :±.idf muu tmtit 

Diri * biJ* m r«j[jlu3tdr itMrr- 
pinnr prm^ sv9#^. Jwi |>ilij' 
in iiiil {lyM hulldiqr £ HtTI 

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Inr ixiAiiig ii^iii^i. Ildll CDii 
lAiAefl wrih [iiT»(T (Miilfh 

<ri<^I!H lllllll ^Id iJUtWH tuct 

Z4>14 Min {)IP nuk-4Y *■ 
iriioilbii cna-un^ quihEi^' cms. 
*lt m(talinnFlivT^Liinn. 

bikt. 



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PBZii: 



^TSMO 



PB-1(W 
Pfl-101 



L rWi H 

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iiiitfil mpv4\4 tisvEit mil i[i 

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9.a :c-3.[}if 1.4 



PrtM 



$44.95 
554.K 



62-Key ASCII Encoder Keyboard Kit 




The JE61Q 62 Key ASCII Encadflr Kayboard 
Kit tin be tnterfacsd into most any com- 
puter system. The J EG 10 Kit comes com' 
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sMfitr::!! aQ^mbly ifiS: koy^il, IC's, sockets, 
Canneetar, electronic campcnents and a 
doui3l«-5t^^ printBd wiring bosFd. The 
kByhosrd asMTnhtv f^quires +5V # ISDmA 
wid —12V @ lOmA fof operation. 



FEATURES: 

•eo Keys generate the full 128 char- 
acters, upper and IqwHr case ASCII 
fflt 

* Fully buffered 

* % user-dafine 1<ays provided for 
custom applfcdtions 

*Caps lock for uppar esse only 

alpha characters 
'Utilizes a 2376 (40 pin) micqdsr 

rAad only ineinory chip 

'Outputs directly compel lb la with 
TTL/t>TL or MOS log^ic arrays 

* Easy interfacing wilti a IG^ptn dijf 
or 1 B-pin edg$ cooneetor 

JE610 $79.95 

62'Key Keyboard only. .$34.95 



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JE200 



Digital Stopwatch Kit 

* use [ntersM 7Zfl5 Chip 

» F»lat«d thru dowble-tideo p.C: Soard 

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* UMJ 3 peniite oaEleji^s 

* Size: 4-5" n 3,li'' V. rW 



*■ ■,'.,■ 



I V 






jis?^ 



JE90D $39.95 




JEZDD $14.95 



5V'1 AMP 
POWER SUPPLY 

^UsesLMS^K 
^Hoat sink provi^ad 
«PC Board construction 
^ProvidfrS a saiid 1 amp 

@ 5 volts 
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+ 9V and +12V with 

JE2D& Adapter 
*l n c I ud«s compon«nts, 

hafdwara & instructions 
fcSii*: 3M"xS"Ka"H 



JE205 




.iyeHr 



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- Ada^tJtoJ£2DD - 
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switching XMF R 
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*fC Erd, construction 
^ifiggy-back to JEZOO 

bo Bird 
'Size : 314 '3e2"3S 9/1 e"h 

JE205 $12.35 



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TRS-80 

16K Conversion Kit 

Expand your 4K TRS-80 System to t6K. Kit 
comes complete with: 

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' Documentatron for conversion 



TRS-16K 



$75.00 



COMPUTER CASSETTES 







* 6 EACH 15 MfNLiTE HIGH 
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* PLASTIC CASE INCLUDED 
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CAS -6 

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SUP 'R' MOD II 

UHF Chaitnel 33 TV Interface Unll Kit 

W([tQ Sand B/W or Ccilar System 

* Converts TV to Video Display tor 
home computers, CCT^ camsfa, 
Appf« If. wotfcs *i!ti Cromecfl Daz- 
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etc 

NfOD II i£ preruned Eo Charrel 3S 
(UHF). 

* Includes coaxl-ai cftbte and anl«nFia 




MOD II 



$29.95 Kit 



Function Generator Kit 



siflt, iti^nijla A square w^ve 
* Frefluancjlf jange from 1 Hz to 
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■ DulpiFt amplitude fFom O-v^lts ti3 
aver 6 vdHs (p«ak. to peH^ 

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IDEAL FOR TRS ftO CASSETTE COKTftOLLER 



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motor hjnclifliiis, iTiDnilefS 
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and unplu^ing ol caij\B5 dur- 
ing computet ioading ojxeia- 
tlOJi tvpm cassftflu. 




#cc-ioa 

$29.50 




Micro- 
^ ^ Miniature 
III Joystick 

2 each 100K pots (Linear Taper} 
Printed Circuit Board Mount 
Size: V x 1-3/16^'x 1-3/T6" . 



Micro-iVliniature Joystick 



S4.95y 



f/^ Readier Servicv — see p&ge 211 



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I^LASCPl OI*TO COUPLHr type H11CJ. mini dip, «#57l») __„„/iiVr*, . 

i-LlN£ COKDS, 6 ft. IB g?ug«, 3 cond. wh^e w/pEug, MS^ST") 

1S-SINGL€ PIN MICRO RED LEDS, 100^^ mal«riil, 3 vott& 'it 10 mili, (J^JSW) 

40- FEED THRU CAPACITORS, used ^or hams, RF, UHF circuifrr. ('^^5047) 

4D-PLA&TIC TRAhlSl^TOH^r '^it'd ujilPitEHif and hobb^r ^^thtk^M .....,,,.. 

6-faV IMdlCATOieS, w/ lead 5, iesi lamp mamufacturcrj exi;«&5, <45ft»3> 

40-MtTAL CAN TSANSrSTORS, aiird types, hobby^ untested, {#26(9(3A) 

10-UP«ICHT FIFCTBOS, 100% assf d value? and vortag^t, !#J«M1> 

40-SEMI'CON g^UPRJ^SE, ^eners, rtctiri^rt, Irdn^slors, etc, U-leil, (#12261 ... 

6iS-STAB1STORS, axiaL for r^gu^Ori A campulcrt^ U-tetl, (#^140) .. 

40-SQLlARtPC COILS, upn^hts, as forled values, l^or PCipplkationi, (#11H^) 
SO-I WATT ZENtRS, 3.3,B,T0,12,1!»V, etc. double plug, untested, £^1«hI) . 

4-ROCKER 5WJTCHESr OPPT, soliter Eyekt t*TinifiaU. (^3303) 

bO-LONG IE AD Di^CS, 100% prime, ttldrWd cipaciiori, (#5<B9^) , 

fa-MJMI TRANSFORMERS, asii'd outpuii, inteni^ge JL aurflD, V 3q. <#329S) . 
1-TV/AUt>tO SHIELDED CABLE, 3 cond. IS f1. w/»CA phone plugs, (4^12) . 
25-t>ATA ENTRV KEYCAPS, ^" sq. A's & functions, uil. coId», T#4Q13) . „ 

2-CE iW AUOfO AMP, type PA-263 IC chip, mono, (A 1523> , . ,,,.„,,, 

l-MERCt>R¥ TILT SWITCH, N-C, Tiled 24VD<; -^ ,D5A, w/kads, <*5ba6) ,, . 
6-POWER TABTRfACS, lOO^i prime, IIMlV, TO-220. <#SHaa) ...<,,...*.,*, 
6-POWER TABSCH'J, 10O^ prinw, lOOV, TO-2aO, (#S904) ...,...,...,,.,. 
2 -WATCH LCD's, 3Vi digit, asit. Iirp««/ (i^e: 1" n IVi" (ipproitJ (#SW6> , . . 
4-TV INTERLOCK JACKS for TV/pcnuer mt. cCr, sdtfer tab terms., Cf^SSI^) . . 
4-MOS fETS, 3N12S, by FftirchiJd & RCA, TO- IB, mm? duaEs, <#1tafi) -,.-,* 

4'PtiOTt> ELEtlTHrt DARLrNCTON TRANSISTORS. 2NS777, (*3176) 

fc-AC "UTILnV" OUTitTS, for IV ml. ctr., solder lugs, (#iM2) ..... 

lS-NE-1 LAMPS, neon red. for IIOVAC, lest resistor, (#1*35) .,__,,,,„,. 
20ON4148 SWrTCHING DIOr>ES, 4pS, lOOV ;jC lOmA, axial 100%, {#3000) .. 

2-4 AMP SaiCON RRIDGE eFCTIFEER, SOOV, bloirh ityle, (#S*2B) 

4'VAR ACTOR DIODES, var. tuner caplc if an£e, 20-SO pi {#^087) 

^0 -PR EC 1^1 ON RESISTORS, ^'j^ 1, & 2 wltU. 1 Vi, UiDi'Ltd lypei, itt3^3) . 

6D-CERAM1C CAPS, alil'd viL A tlylM, inci; lububrS, NPO'ft, elc, (#590) .. 
25-PLASTiC SCR'i, inch 20OV, untested, hif;h yield, TO-92, (#319?) ....,;.;. 
+0- MOLD ED CAPACITORS, tubular, ji^st'd volt, lol ml. *xiai Jeadi (#UE6*7) 
^0 MICRO ZENER & RiCT. KIT, assf d volUges, only 1/fl ' jq, U-I«l, <fll2Slf 
I.IINE CORD, B ft. 3 cQfid, 1^ gauge, vittyl rtvaided plug & gnommet 413661) 
t-SCDT MlCftO SllOe SWITCH, tirtly 3/7" cybe, for PC mount E?:^3429> .,.. 

lO-PR.-RCE MUGS & lACKSr for ludio, speakers, el<;.. (#403) - 

S-2NJ<)55 HOBBY TRANSISTORS, 100^, TO-3, C#377l I 

10-ZENERS. 1 watt 9.1 vnlli axial leads 100% (#5370A) 

44MN414S, 4 NANO, SWITCHING] DIODE, ixJal leads untested (4S923) 

3'RELAVS, BABCOCK 6VDC^ SPST, plastk cjse f#S«07) 

1 -25 AM P BRIDG E R ECT I F I EH, 50 volts, 1 Wi (# 59*») ,..__.,.**, 

2-QUADRACS, 10 amp 200 PRV, TO-220 ITO^i {#S9lS> ,.,, ...„*. 

60-MiNi RESISTOXS, 30-1/2W, 30-1/4 watt, jtxiiti, color coded. (#5922} . ... , 

12-SCRS-TRIAC'qUADRACS, assl. vofti. TO-230 case Ua087) _,„ 

10'BULLPLATES, a»t. reaUtor/capjicitor networks, virioLis slyies, (#SBBO) ... 
2-AIR TRIMMER CAPS, alum, plales, V^ shafl, panel mt solder lugi, (#Sft5a] 
30-MOLEX CONNECTORS, nylon, ^fsl'd styles, rolnrs, & # of cdnd. CWSftiS) 
t'3 COND. UNF CORD, B U. ila|, w/rinE terminals, 2 AC, 1 CND, (#5703.1 . . 

4-12 VOLT LAMPS, w/leadt, poputai vnftagfe. lOO's of utti, tif3'942] 

2S-TTL iC's, untested, aMt'd gates, Ifip flops, el c. 14-16 pin^ (#S95S) 

20-1000 PI V GLASS AMPS, micro- mini, a^ial, silicon, raled B lA, (#5903^ .. 

1-11 VCT 200 mA TRANSFORMER, 115 V prim., PC mount, (#5977) 

ZO-4110 mW ISV ZENERS, micro- ity It, asst. rpdJcy A [{[XSI, 100%, ixitt, {ti'5914} 
lOO-UNMARJCED CAPS, popylar values, myldrs & polyslyrene, 100%, {tt 5992} 
60-ONE WATT ZENERS, assorled vollAges, ^Uit p*k, dbl plug, Li-test, 1#5947» 
50-MICRO ZENER&, 1 wjlt, 2-MV, DD-7 & mic;rD eposy, axiaE, 100%, (#59059 

50Opc-H ARC) WARE SURPRISE, assl screw r nuts & watherJ> (#5a91> 

fiO-dlASS AMPS, up to IKV, 1N4000 series, g\iii encased, uoleited, Cff590Z) 
300-PC BOAHD PASTS, boirdj loaded w/100% pirts, bobby bonanza, (#594«) 
fi-Rf NPN TftAMSISTORS, lype-2N1059, BVcbo; 40V, TO-32, lOO%, l#S44S) . 
2 -BR ASS DOOR LOC*(S, w/key, for doon wtndows, etc. 2-1 /S' ml. ctr (#5^49) 

1 -PUSH -PUSH CB SWITCH, OPDT, \ a ^^ % 3/fli", 100^8 of Ui«, (#34*3) 

30-^ CRIMP'ON" TERMINALS, rings and spadev, for i^ ia-2(J wire, (#1^551 . . 
^-CALCULATOR KEYBOARDS, mulli-lunclEDn. 17 keyi Ind up, (#3774) ..... 
50-aNE-WATT RESISTORS^ popular assort, some 5%ers, 100'a of uses, (#3£44) 
SO-METALLIC FILM Vi WATTERS, utt. vilues, marked, axj^t leads, (#1&05) , , 
4- RIBBON CABLE CONNECTOR, sinj^Je sided, 9 contacts, PC Jeadf, («rS9i67) . 
3-"SUPER" 2N232'i, NPN, ICBO'60V, hleJlOO 1 W -^ 2A, TO-92, 100%, (#3952) 
1-11 VDC MINI BLOCK RELAY, ipdt, 1 i 3;* i S/B", 175 <i*im, lA, (#5937) . 
10-t.5V CHAIN-n- WHEAT I.AMPS, 5/1*", w/lO" leads, Iftm ; BED, (#6002) .. 

Id-IF-FM OF AMPS, by RCA, FM-UHF cifcuitry. TO-S, 10 Jeads, US95t) 

10-NPN SWITCHING TRANSISTORS, i»t'd gen. audiiii & swilcbin^ (#2S9S) 
1-12 VDC SOLENOfO, tlmilir to Guiidian t6'P, w/plunger, ^" itrolce, (f^^OIS) 



lor 1. 



1.29 



fqr 1.30 
far 1 .30 
for 1 .30 
for 130 
for I.Sfl 
for 1.30 
for 1.30 
tor 1.^0 
for 1.10 
for 1.30 
for 1.30 
fof 1.30 
fof 1,30 
iw 1.30 
fur 1 .30 
fof 1 .30 



1,29 



1.291000 
1.29 120 



lor 1,30 
for 1,30 
lor I.JO 
for I.B'O 
for 1.30 
for 1.30 
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fur 1 .30 , 
for 1.30 > 
for 1 .30 ' 
for t.30' 
for 1 .30 ' 
for 1 .30 1 
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»«•««*•«* 



•••«■*«* 



* P 10-HCIMBUCKER CONTROLS W/KNOB, for TV vertical, horii., etc, (#SllSlJ . 1,29 

* D SO-C APACITOR SPECIAL, rfisti. mylars, Jnd more, (#3775) 1.29 

J n 4-HOBBY VOLTAGE REGULATORS, LM'3C9, 320, .340's, TO-3, ft3330A» 1.29 

J a 12-PANEL SWITCHES, assorted ilirfei., rolaries, modularf, etc, £#39*) . 1*39 

^a 60- RESISTOR SPECIAL, '/* lo 1 wltt. cartponi, carbo- films, «tc. (#35096) .... 1.39 

* O 65-HALF WATT RESISTORS, assid, carboni, carbo-fiinu, vahoui values, (#454! 1,29 

* D 6-LM340T VOLTAGE REGULATORS, 5 to 24 volU, TO-220. f#5B97) ...*.,.. 1,29 

* tJ 40-POLVSTYRENE CAPACITORS, «Eit'd values and vollagei, (#1052) ... ».„, 1,39 

* G 15- THERMISTORS, rejialors thsal change wFth llie teirppetlture, (#2040) 1.29 

* D 65-V^ WATT RESISTORS, asit'd values, melal lilm, marked, (if 5797) „„ 1,29 

J a 1-12VDC 5PDT relay; ISO ohm coil, 25 mA, lililV (#5937) .,,.,.,..,_ 1,29 

a Li IS- VOLUME CONTROtS, aiit. values, audio, and switch too! (#592) .. . 1.29 

« n 60'PREFORMED DISC CAPS, haitdy atsorimenl ol values, marked, (#11B1) .. 1.19 

■ n 1 0- AX I Al E LECT ROS, assorted values and capacitance, (#5901 ) 1 . 19 

* D 60-Gt.ASS ZENERS, 400m W, unteiteil, belter than 50% yield, (#5099) ....... 1.£9 

* □ 10- PC TRIMPOT5, tc^wdrtver adJBtt, KKorted value*, (#3346) ....*. 1.^9 

* IIJ 25-4" CABLE TIES, pUitic, like Ty-vi^rap style, (#S2l7l 1.14 

LJ 5- CRYSTALS, may include; CB, ham various shapes and iixtSf (#57163 1.19 

« D 40-POWtR fiEStSTORS, aborted typei, includes 2 ta 10 w.il1en, (#22B) .... 1.19 

* D 40- TWO WATT RESISTORS, carbo-filmi, carbons, ume 5%en. (#45&) 1.29 

« D 50- TERMINAL STRIPS, assTd solder and icrew typei, 2 Iubj & up, (#334) ... 1.29 

* D 1 -WATCH GUTS, LED, who know^ how good, micfo-digilal bDnjmr«, (#511 S) 1,39 

* D lO-IOOOV lA RECTIFIERS, tN4d07, epnxv caie, axial teads, (#S936! .... 1.39 

* U 5-MULTI-DlClT LED REAOOtiTS, bubble magnifier, 2 lo 6 digits, (#3634! . . 1.29 
9 a 10-POWER TAB TRANSISTORS, NPN, plastic, TO- 220, (#»29) ,, , , , 1,29 

* D 6-PRECISJON TRIM POTS, aist'd sinsles and murii-lums, unletlcd, (#a3B9) > 1.39 

* U S0-1N4{iaO RECTIFIERS, epffiy, axiaJ Teads, unlested, (#2594) 1.29 

■ D 3Dfi£.-HEAT SHRINK, Thermo- fit, useful astt. of sizes, shrinks 5ft*/* (#5148) . . 1.29 

* D tO-SLIDE SWITCHES, SPST, SPDL etc, all shapes and iihs, <#5917} 1.29 

* D 25-DTt't, 100% pr^nw, asst'd «ip f^ops, etc., marlted, (#3709) ,„,... 1-29 

J □ 4-HOBBY OPTO COUPLERS, ISOO VOLT ISOLATION, U^lttt, (#2619A^ ..... 1.M 
^ n fi-TAPE RECORDER EARPHONE, for radjas, record trs, & ahmtf (#2946) 1.29 

* D 5-MICfiO MINI lACKS, in a block, tot 2mm lub-mtnt plugi, (^1437) 1.29 

* D 5-PL-55 PHONE JACItS, standard btisbing, fo^- hams, rommunicalifm^ f#SaAB) 1.29 

* D 40-RED DEVIL CAPACITORS, handy isiort. of pop, valuei., avjal leads, (#3923) 1,39 
J D 50-MrCAS as4t, sli«-r»-sha|i«, incU "lilver*" twi (#373) ,....,,„,,.,„... 1.29 
JD lO-TRANSlSTQR SOCKETS, farnpn and prfl lyp*f, (#5944} . . . , ..,i ,i,.. ... t.29 

«a 12-LED DRIVER iCs, limiEar tii 75491, (#50»0) ,.. 1.29 

*0 lO-MODULAA SWITCHES, Centralab "pufth-on" type, up to OPDT, (#3150) , 1,29 
*0 5 '"MOTORS MOTORS", small, high speed, asird si^ei, 3-fcVDC, (#2551! .. 1,39 

* D 2-HEAVY DUTY LINE CORDS, 8 ft., 2 cond,, TS gauge, black intulalJon, (#SB03I 1.39 
*n 10'LED SOCKETS, 'fnap-in^' minis, fp» LfDS, and trans istori, loo! (#57*5) .. 1.39 
*n 10-MV-54 MtCRO-MlNI LED5, flat lop «tyle, diffuied red lens, (#1759) ....... 1.29 

Zn 30-W4RE NUTS, twisl-ond, fot #10-24 gauge w^re, (^3724^ 1.29 

a D 2- ALUM, HEAT SINKS, 2Wx3", (of power labs, innumerable uses, (#S33i) . . 1.29 
« D 1-"MTCRO MINI" METER, 'h" dia, 0-1 basic movement (#SB5S) -,,.. 129 

* □ Z-DOUBLE-SJOED PC BOARDS, 3''i12" hiffh quality C-tO gkvi, (#5694) , . . , 1.29 

* P 60-TUBULAR CAPACITORS, as i I'd IDOmmTto ,1mf to 600 WVDC, (#3SA319) l.ifl 
*D 6-MlCRO MINI RETO SWITCHES, 1" long, lot alarms, relays, etc., [#1258! ., 1.19 
*D TD-TANTELUM ELEtJTROS, asiTd mini, iJiial, bermetkalEv sealed, 4 #5640) ,. 1.19 
(D SO-DISC TYPE CAl»S, incl; NPO, fii-Q, mylar, cef amies, assl'd values, (#4373 t.29 

* D M'CDILS & CHOKES, assi'd RF, OSC, IF, parasitic types, (#35A297) ,. 1.29 

« D &-SW ITCH CRAFT PHONO JACKS, W^Q, chasii mount, teflon b»e, (#S119) , 1.29 

* o 1-T0^3 HEAT SINK, heavy duty aluminum, prepunched for TO-3, (#4003) . . 1.39 

*G 65 -MO LEX SOCKETS, 'on-a-slrip", for murtipEe pin dips, (#1609) t.29 

*0 6-PAlRS 9V BATTERY CLIPS, w/nid & black coJor-codcd leads, (#3052) ;..; 1,29 

Jn 1'UHF TUNER, 3 fanjj, uhf TV unit, 300 ohm, p*i- direct drive, (#2927) 1.39 

«G 15-HUMBUCKER CONTROLS, asi-nrted values, manufacturers dump, (#3007) 1,29 
«n 30-SUBMINI IF TRANSFORMtRS, sEug tuned, thieEded, ■;#35A9) 1,29 

* D IS "POP" OPTICAL LENSES, plano-cor>vex, 1" dia., plastic, (#5043) .- 1,39 

* □ 40-AD}USTABLE FERRITE CORES, center cut lor hex adjust, (#5701) ........ 1.29 

•D 3-1.5V MENI tAMPS, only 3/32 ' d«., dr*ws 15mA, w/t" wire leads, (#5693) 1.29 

* Q 3a-FT. WIRE-WRAP WIRE, 30 guage, insulated, Conllnuaus length, (#3003) . . 1.19 
! D 4-MONO TAPf HEADS, m^y ind; cassette, B-track, reel to reel tooE <#57B9) 1.29 
J D 5- DUAL DIGIT "BUBBLl:' READOUTS, HP5002 Jtyle, red. dip type (#574B> , 1.3$ 

* D 40-MET Al & PLASTIC TRANSISTORS, aiit'd stzei (ff19W) , 1.19 

* U 2 -HI PWR. TRAt^SISTORS, Motorola type, M|320t, NPN TSW, f 0-66, (#2797) 1.39 

* n 60- GERM. GLASS DIODES, similar to INK axial leads, untested, (#642) 1.29 

* □ 40-1N914 Switching diodes, silicon, 4nS, glass, unles^led, (#1433 . 1.29 

*D 4-AM/FM VASE I ABLE COnD., 3 bands, "poly-con" Vt" square,^ (#3924^ 1,39 

* U 3 -MICRO switches, SPST, NO contacts, plunger style, solder tabs, {#57B5) 1 .39 
« U lO-MULTI-G ANG POTS, audio 2 ganKS and up, assi d types and valuer, (#5326! 1 .29 
V P 10-MA^-3's, 7 segment, w/bubbie magnifier, 100% material, (l^:^43li . . , 1 ,29 

* D 3-Pl-2?9 COA?C PLUG, males to SO-339, Amphenol, (#5321) 1 .29 

*n 1-LITE SENSITIVE UNI|UNCT!ON TRANSISTOR, programmable, (#,5719) ,,,, 1.29 



30 for 1.30 

too for t.30 

for 1 .30 

2* for 1 .30 

HO for 1,30 

130 for 1,30 

1 2 for 1 ,30 

AO fur 1 .30 

30 for 1,30 

130 for 1,30 

2 fori, 3D 
30 for 1,30 

120 for 1.30 
20 for 1.30 

120 tor 1.30 
30 fbr 1-M 
SO for 1.30 
10 lor 1.30 
00 tor 1.30 
BO lor 1.30 

too for 1.30 

3 for 1.30 
20 fat 1.30 
10 for t.30 
20 for 1.30 

12 far 1.30 
lOO far 1.30 

60 for 1.30 
30 for 1,30 
SO for 1.30 
a for 1.30 
16 for 1.30 
10 tor 1,30 
IB for 1.30 
BO for 1.30 
100 fOf 1.30 
20 fo^ 1.30 
24 for 1.30 
20 (or t.30 
IB for 1.30 

4 for 1.30 
20 for 1.30 
20 for 1,30 
60 for 1 ,30 

4 for 1 ,30 

2 for 1 30 

4 fori. ID 

130 for 1,30 

13 for 1.30 
20 for 1.30 

100 lor 1.30 
130 for 1.30 

12 for 1.30 

2 fDt1.30 

130 fof 1.30 

12 fori .30 

2 for 1 .30 
30 for 1 .30 
60 for 1,30 
30 for 1.30 
BO for 1.30 

6 for 1 .30 
60 for 1.30 

a tor 1.30 
lOfor 1.3« 
BO for I.JO 

4 lor 1.30 

130 for 1.30 

BO for 1.30 

B iot 1,30 

6 f« 1.30 
20 fot 1.30 
20 fof 1 .30 

6 for 1,30 

3 for 1 ,3li 



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HOW TO 
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when DrdeririB, aiwoys ute 
ealiiioQ number, type no,n tbe 
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OKlp, RF ftnd Mod Trnn^istorfl, iini MnU:mlB MC 
aeriea PLL. t&ay be used for lU nte'L^r c«ii,v«rviEiii, {asuf 
ccfnCinuing aerl«a "Cfi to 1(1" in 73 magazine). The 
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2136 JLrntBO TAPEB RED 

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1944 Jumb? TtUqw 

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TELEPHONE 

l«»k b«ll and cuitril 



lft\ 



1^ f^eader SeFVfG& — se& page 21 1 



197 



7294 N.W. 54 STREET 
MIAMI. FLORIDA 33166 



URPLUS 
LECTRONICS 



PHONE: (305)887 8228 
TWX: 810 848 6085 

WHOLESALE -RETAIL 



PL259's/SO 239's 

Quality American Made 
10/$5,00 100/$35.00 

50/$20.00 1000/$300.00 



£• F, Johnson NICAD 

12.0 V. 1.2 AH (Tz 10 hr rate 
41/2 ' x1 7/8" x1 3/4 ' $14^5ea. 



E F Johnson External Battery 
Charger Mode 1 239-0206-00 1. output 

14.5 V dc tff 50 m A. S3, 50 ea 



E. F. Johnson S Meter 

Edge Meter 250 UA Fits in 5/3" x 1 3^8'^ hole 
MTG troles an each end MM" betifnd panel. 
Btack scale 0-5 bottom 1Z0 top 
51,25 ea. 5/$5.00 



CB SPECIAL 

Brand new printed circuit board assembly. Used in ail 
HyGain 40 channel CB transceivers. Fits many other 
manufacturers" units also. Squelch pot/volume control/ 
channel selector switch not included. 

V 9-7 50 ea. 50-99-6.00 ea. ^""^'"^ 

10-49—6.50 ea. 100-up— 5.50 ea 



Dimensions. 
6 K 6 * 



NEW Hy-Gain Remote 40ch CB UessCas?^ speaker a Control M^c 



Serviceman Special 

New Hy-Gam 40ch CB Less Case. Speaker 



Knobs jas is) 

$14.95 ea 



IC SOCKETS 

Cambion 

Gold Plated Wire Wrap 

14 pin .35 ea 10/$3.00 

16 pin .38 ea 10/$3.30 



SIGNAL DIODE 
IN 4148 

$5.00 PER 100 

25.00 PER 1000 

OR t5 FOR $1.00 



Edge mieter same as above with silver scale 

and reads SWR MO 

Sl.25ea 5i%S.OO 



ASTATIC TUG8-D1 04 

PREAMP Desktop microphone 
vv/g rpta I &\ ^me nt 3 Pi n PI u q S35 ea . 



New 40 CH 08 Boards 

1-9 $10.50 ea 
10 49 $9.50 ea 

w/40 ch SW 

50-99 $9.00 ea 
100-up S&.50 ea 



E. F. Johnson Signal Strength 

Meter 20011 a 2'^/"x2V^"'Sq. mourns m 
TV4" hole y betiind panel Scale: 1^30 db lop 
0-5 bottom. 
$4.95ea 5/$ 20. 00 



PANEL METERS 

$4.00 ea 2 for $7.00 

25-0-25 dc Volts } 2V*^' x 3" 



0-25 dc Volts 
0-50 ac Volts 

Shunt Required- 



} 



22 pins/ Double Row/ Dipped Solder 
.156 $2.0Be3 1O/S17.0O 



NEW E-F- Johnson Power Mic^Less 

Cord. Desktop Style $19.95ea 



SOLDER LUG-TYPE CAPS 

50 UF ffi- 350V r^ D X 3" L 

50 UF fai 450V 1" Dx SV^" L 

50 UF (fi'450Vr" Dx 3" L 

eOflJ EA, 5 FOR $2.50 



MODEM CABLE 

50' cable contains 
13 # 22 ga. wire DB-25p with 
D8-51226 1 cover on one end 
$6.50 ea 10/$50,00 



EFJ CRYSTAL OVENS 

6V/12V 75° 
$5.00 ea. 



22 pins/ Double Flow^WIre Wrap 
.156 S5.44ea 10^$19.00 



MINI TOGGLE SW 
C&H 

SPDT 

Sl.OOea 6/$ 5.00 



X 2% 



M 



Double Row/ Wire Wrap .100 



25 pins 
30 pins 
50 pins 



$3,49 ea 
$3.96 ea 
$5.43 ea 



10/$30.00 
10/$32.00 
10/$45.00 



C & K SWITCHES 

PART# MOVEMENT 



7101 
7103 
7107 
7108 
7201 
$1.00 E A 



ON/NONE/ON SPST 
ON^OFF/ON SPST 
ON/N ONE/ON SPST 
ON/NONe(ON) SPST 
ON/NONE/ON DPDT 
6 FOR $5.00 



E. F, Johnson 

40ch Selector 
Switch 
$3.50ea 



2 SI DEO 
.062 Cdi^p^r Cla^l Boafd 

9 ^ * X 1 a • * ■ 



OOea 



3.'S5.00 



Sony f^KS4A 

2 conrtuclor mini phono 

plug wpaicti cofd 3 '6' 

long 12 OOes 



POLYFOAM COAX— 50 OHM 

Equal to RG174 

$4.95/100' 

Low Loss 

Polyfoam 

Coax Cable 



Double Row/Solder Eyelet ,156 

6 pins Sl.lOea 10/3 9.00 

15 pins £l.55ea 10/$12.50 

a2pjf>s $2.0Sea 10/$17,00 

43pin^ S3.S6ea 10i/$30.00 



100 ASSORTED DISC GAPS 

(FULL LEADS) 20 EA OF 5 

DIFFERENT VALUES $2,00 

PER PACK 



12 Vdc RELAY 

SPST Open Frame 

5 Amp Contacts 

Mfg-Magnecraft 

$1 .50 ea 4/$5.00 



12 Vdc RELAY 
SPST 35 Amp Contacts 

Open Frame 
Rugged, great for mobile use 
S4.50ea 5/$20.00 



6 TV GAMES ON {1) CHIP 

Gen Instr AY-3-8500'1 

28 Pin Plastic Case 

EVERYDAY LOW PR)CE $7.50 ea 



Coax Connectors 

UG-273/U BNC-F/UHF-M 2.50 

UG-255/U BNC'M/UHF'F 3,00 

UG'146A/U N'M/UHF-F4,50 

UG-e3B/U N'F/UHF M 4.50 

UG-175RG-58 AdapL .20 

UG-176 RG 59 Adapt. .20 



STAN COR 

TRANSFORMERS 

STEP-DOWN AUTO (3) 

COND LINE CORD 

W/RECPT 

GSD 200 (230V In/ 115V Out 

@ 200 Va> $12.00 ea 
GSD 400 <230 In/115 V Out 
400 Va)$ 14.50 ea 



RECEIVER FRONT ENDS 

Made by EFJ 

132-174 MHz 

$12-00 ea. 



CRYSTAL FILTERS 
10.7 3/Lead 

Can Type 
$3.00 ea. 



TRIMMER CAPS 

Small enough to fit 

in your walch— 

3.5 to 20 pF 

5 to 30 pF 

$.75 ea,. 2 for $1,25 
5 for $3.00 



CAPS 

2200 UF f?z 16V 

Radial Leads 

.25 ea. 10/52.00 



CERAMIC IF FILTERS 

EFC L455K 
$3.50 ea. 



White Porcelain 
Egg Insulator 

IVa" X 1" 50c ea. 
3 for $1.25 



ASSORTED ELECTROLYTICS 



VALUE/MFD 

250.000 

30,000 

63,000 

10,000 

2JO0 

2,9D0 

3,000 

18.000 



@ 



m 



VOLTS 

5V 

15V 

15V 

20V 

25V 

25V 

25V 

25V 



DIA 

3.. 

3" 
IVa" 

1V^" 
IVa" 
2" 



X 
X 
X 
X 
X 
V. 
X 
X 



LENGTH 

53/4*^ 
AVi" 
5Va" 
53^4" 

2" 

4" 



PRICE 

$4.00 ea 
4.00 est 
4,00 Ba 
3.00 ea 
2.00 ea 
2,00 ea 
2.00 ea 
300 ea 



21,000 
39,000 
1,000 

34,800 

450 

500 

240 

50 

140 



m 

m 



asv 

45V 

50V 

50V 

75V 

100V 

300V 

450V 

450V 



2W 
T 
1V<" 
3" 

IV^" 

IV4" 



X 
X 
X 
X 
X 
X 

^ 

X 
X 



3" 
53/4" 

.5Vi" 

2" 
3" 



3.00 ea 
3,00 ea 
2.50 ea 
3.00 ea 
2.00 ea 
2.00 ea 
2.00 ea 
2.00 ea 
2.00 ga 



Aii mareridt guars ft te&d • if for any reason you are not satisfied, our products maybe returned wtthin Wdaysfora tuff refund (fe&s s flipping^ Ptease add $3 
TERMS, fof shipping and handhng on a^i orders Additional 5^/o charge for shipping any item over 5 ftis. COD'S accepted tor orders totaling S5QQ0 or mote, Aft orders 
shipped UPS urtfsss otherwise specified. Ffonda residents piease ^dd 4% sates tan Msntmijni order $75.00 



EQUIPMENT / COMPONENTS / W/RE& CABLE / ACCESSORtES 



■9 



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jJ:-jsi^{-:.->>>^;i;^>>>>:ty«-:^i".""JIO:^i~"-'-*7':^^ 



■:,':ifcW>S^H^i^'*-i^'-'-^J>;<v:-4^^<^w*^'(^^ 



North 32itd Street/Unit -1 Phoanix, Arizona 8500B [602] 956-9423 

We accept checks, MasterCharge, and Visa 

Prices subject to change without notice 



R.F. CONNECTORS 

UG'1095A/U $3.99 

UG'58/U 3.29 

UG-30C/U 3.00 

UG-27C/U 3.50 

PL-259 .50 

SO'239 .43 

UG-175 .36 

PL-258 2.99 

UG'106 69 

UG-177 .69 

UG'2?4/U 3.27 

UG-447/U 150 

UG-492 3.69 

UG-306/U 3.00 

UG-646/U 3.29 

UG-260B/U 1.59 

UG-1094/U .90 

UG-701/U 3.00 

UG-212C/U 3.00 

TUBES 

3500Z $90.00 

572B/T160L 34.00 

6146 5.09 

6146A 5.99 

646W 7.95 

811A 12.95 

81 1 9.95 

40X250 B 36.95 

4CX250R 39.95 

6KD6 4,99 

6LF6 4.99 

6LQ6/6JE6 6.25 

6950 6.65 

2E26 6.00 

3B28 5,00 

4X1 50A 15.00 

6360/A 7.95 

6939 5.95 

7289^2039 4.95 

8072 45.00 

4-400A 90.00 

8877 300.00 

PL172 250.00 

4-1000A 160.00 

4-250A 35.00 

FERRITE BEADS 

12/$.89or 
100/$4.0O 

1N914/1N4148 

30/$1.00of 
120/$3-00 



R.F. TRANSISTORS 



2N2857 

2N2857JAN 

2N2947 

2N3375 

2N3553 

2 N 381 8 

2N3866 

2N3S66JAN 

2N2866JANTX 

2N3925 

2N394e 

2 N 3950 

2N3960 

2 N 4072 

2 N 4427 

2N4877 

2N4957 

2N5108 

2N5109 

2N5179 

2N5589 

2N5583 

2N5590 

2N5591 

2 N 6080 

2N6081 

2 N 6082 

2N60B3 

2N6084 

2N6095 

2N6097 

MRF502 

MRF8004 

SS2548 

40280 

40281 

40282 



$1.80 

2.45 

1 7.00 

7.00 

1.80 

6.00 

1.09 

2.70 

4.43 

6.00 

2.00 

26.25 

4.70 

1.70 

1.09 

2.57 

3.50 

3,90 

1.55 

.59 

4.60 

5.00 

6.30 

10.35 

5.45 

8.80 

10.75 

12.00 

13.20 

10.35 



.75 

.75 

3.50 

10.90 

11.90 



TRIMMERS 5-80pf 

45<Deachor 10/3.50 
or 100/25.00 

CHOKE[U252]2 5mh 

150ma 30MHz 

2/$1 .00 

TRIMMER CAPS 

small enough to 
fit in your watch 
as-llpf 75€each 
or 10/$6,00 

PISTON CAPS 1.2-I0pf 

75<ceachor 10/$5.50 



m m C ■ i ■' 9 

IVIPF4391 

MPF112 

IVIPF102 

40673 

3N128 

2 N 5248 

MPF131 

2N4303 

2N3958 

iVIFE200G 

(VIFE2001 

IVIFE2008 

IVIFE2009 

[V1FE3002 

MMF-5 

IVIFE120 

2N3436 

2N4416 

MFE131 



$ .75 

,69 

.43 

1.39 

1.35 

.60 

.60 

.45 

2.95 

.90 

.99 

4.20 

4.80 

3.35 

5.00 

1.00 

2,25 

1.00 

1.05 



MICROWAVE 

1N21D 

1N21C 

1N21WE 

1N23B 

1N23C 

1N23CR 

1N23E 

1N23F 

1N23WE 

1N25 

1N121WE 

IN 286 i 

1N416E 

1N446 

1 N3655A 

1N5153 

IN 57 11 



or 10/ 6,50 

or 10/ 5.50 

or 10/ 3.50 

or 10/10.00 

or 10/10,00 

or 10/ 4.50 

or 10/ 5.00 

or 10/ 3.50 

each 

or 10/ 8.00 

or 10/ 8.00 

or 10/36.00 

or 10/39.00 

each 

each 

or 10/ 8.50 

each 

each 

each 

DIODES 

$ 1.40 
1.05 
2.00 
1.05 
1.06 
2.00 
2.00 
4.10 
2J0 
3.03 
4.00 
5,00 
5.00 
8.00 
4.00 
15,00 
1,20 



ADDITIONAL R.F. 
TRANSISTORS 

40894 $ 2.50 

IVIRF454/568BLYCF 17.10 

BRIDGES 24 AMPS 
SOOPiV $2.99 each 

LM566V VCD/FUNC- 
TION GENERATOR 

$.99 each 

LM340T-5 & LM34QT 

-12 $1.49 each 



VACUUM 

CAPACITORS 

Amperex IVIodel CVC 
10/1k'5KV405A 10 pf to 100O 
pf @5000 voits $59.95 



MC40S4P & 
MC4044P 



$3.25 each 



HEP 170 2.5 Amps 

1000PiV10/$2.00or100/$14.50 

POTTER S BRUM- 
FIELD 12VDC RELAYS 

SPOT 25 Amps $5.95 

2PDT 3Amps $1.99 

KILO VAC H-8/54 
VACUUM RELAY 

26 volt coil $29.95 each 

E. F. JOHNSON TUBE 

SOCKETS for 3-400Z and 
3-5000Z tubes $29.95 per pair 

TOROIDAL CORES 

T-37-6 6/1 .00 

26/4.00, 50/6,00 

100/10.00 

4CX25aB/R SOCKETS 
AND CHIMNEYS NEW 

$14,95 per set (1 soci<et, 1 
chimney) 



B&W COILS 

1206T 
2006T 



$3,99 
$7.99 



FAIRCHILD REGULA- 
TOR 78H05KC $6.99 each 



TUBES 

6146B 



$6.50 



h^lNIMUM ORDER $S.QO 
Minimum Shipping $1 Insurance 35^ 
per $100. COD cliarges 8B^ to Street ad- 
dr^sa onlyl We prefer stree t address as 
we sliip UPS and P O. Bo;? #'s take up to 
50% longer to deliver We accept VISA 
or Mastercharge. Please tlst complete 
card number and expiration date. Allow 
10% extra for shipping of heavjf ttesm. 
We reserve the right to change prices 
without notice. AIM terns listed are sub- 
ject to prior safe. Some items fisted are 
in smali quantities. 



t^ R&^der Service^see page 2ft 



199 



ftlLLET ELECTB«IICS 



PO BaX40l244E SAni-AND TEXAS 75040 



A RARE FIND! '^^^ 

LAMBDA HIGH POWER REGULATOR 3205 MODULE 



-01 SOUND EFFECTS KIT 



76477 CHIP IS 
IKCLUDED, EHRU, 



$16.95 

LESS SPtAKtR 

* BATTESY 



$12.95 

W/SPECS 

LIMITED QTY. 



HI 



is^^^H 






• 5V @ IDA wifti B-30VDC input. 

• Current limiting, thermal shutdown and short protection. 

• ,2% Load regulation. 

• Only 2 ext&rnal components needed. 

All you need to add is a transformer, rectifier, heatsink 
and filter cap to have a super regulated supply for 5 volts 
at 10 amps! 

SPECIAL BONUS! Order the 3205 Module and get FREE 
a LAMBDA L-20-5 overvoltage protector that triggers at 
6.6 volts up to 20 amps. 

LAStSU - 1.SA Four Terminal Adjustable Regulator. 3- 

30V W/current limiting, short protection and thermal 
shutdown. TO-S style. All units are prime. Spec sheets 
included, $2.50 



^H»' 



i\ 



WA 



i44h*^4 



I « .fr-^ * *-+ * I 



»«r«ri.» i«-#«4444JuM^%44-*14i*li4 ****** i^*** •»»«**^»«»***' 



AY3-8910 PROGRAMMABLE SOUND GENERATOR 

The AY3-agiO is a 40 pin LSI chip with three oscillators, three 
amplitude controls, programmable noise generator, three 
mixers, an envelope generator, and three D/A converters that 
are controlled by 8 BIT WORDS. No external pots or caps 
required. This chip hooked to an 8 bit microprocessor chip or 
Buss (8080, Z80, 6800 etc.) can be software controlled to 
produce almost any sound. It wiil play three note chords, make 
bangs, whisties. sirens, gunshots, explosions, bleets, whines^ 
or grunts. In addition, it has provisions to control its own 
memory chips vi/ith two iO port5. The chip requires +5V @ 
75ma and a standard TTL clock oscillator. A truly incredible 
circuit 

$14,95 W/Basic Spec Sheet (4 pages) 
60 page manual with S-100 interface instructions and 
several programming examples, $3,00 extra 



TheSE'Oi is a complete htt that 
contain? ad ihe parts to build a 
prog ram m able sound eH&ct$ 
generator. Desigrsed ai'ourid 
the ngw Texas Inalrumenls 
SN7$4T7 Sound Chip, \n^ 
board provides banks qt MINI 
DIP switches and pQts to 
program the various com- 
binations ot the SLF OsGiilator, 
VCO, Noise. One Shot, and 
Envefope Controls. A Quad Op 
Amp \0 is used to Implement 
an Adjustable Pulse Genara- 
lof. Level Cornparator and 
Multiplex Oscillator fof even 
more versatilHj^. The 3^^" x.6" 
PC Board features a prototype 
area to allow for user add&d 
circujtfy. Easily programmed 
to duplicate EKplosions, 
PhaBor Quns, Steam Trains, or 
a I mo si an irvfiriPte number of 
other sounds. The unit has a 
multiple of applicalior^s. Th-e 
low price included all parts, 
assembly manual, programming charts, and detailed 76477 chip speci- 
ficaliona. K runs on a 9V battery (not Included) On board 100MW amp 
wKI drive a small sp'eaker directly, or the unit can tw? c^onn acted to vour 
stQrao with in-credibk results'! (Speaker not included). 



i\ 



4** 



4 DIGIT Va INCH CHARACTER LED DISPLAY 
Bowmar readout stick with coions. COMMON 
CATHODE ONLY. 100% Prime- All segments 
and colons brought out to edge pads. With 

pjnout LIMIT 5 PER CUSTOMER 



IL-1 OPTO ISOLATOaS 

av LITSQHIK -t. P-f^ Clf 
':; T * h OA R D P I N cut L E D- 
TT|*hiSI3rOH COMQIKAl lOrt 
SM 

IfWtf rue* ijttn 



/"^ 



ULTRASONIC SENDER RECEIVER KIT 



^\ 



TOTAL StCUfliTY! CQinpMely inwiaitile uStrasonic {23KHZ) Sound befliti 
w^iJrks like a ph^to^lectflc beam but is unaffected by tigtit, heat or noiise- 
Sepafatc Transmitter and I^^Ceiver Cftfl be used from 6 inches to 25 teetl A 
solid ebject breakirtg the beam causes an output io go low th&i wt^l sink up 
10 1 50 MA Id Drive a Relay, TRI AC^ elc Complete «lactrorhics are provided. 
Worhs on IJVDC (unreguJaledl and drawfr less Ibai^ 10Q MA. Use it for 
burgltr alaFfns. obiect caunlen^, automatic door openers, automatic door 
betla, «leclronic raT Irap^^) and mor«. 



Ppltonal efyny dsley sncJ Alarnv Timeout Circuit i 
4viir s<K«H;e c sloN up io £Qe MA OC. J 



MC13S1P FM'IF AMP 
AND DISCRIMINATOR 

USED IN FW % TV SOUND 
CIRCUITS. ntOUlRES MINI- 
MUM EXTERNAL COMPO- 
NEWTS. 14 9m DIP. DtRECT 
REPLACEMENT FOR HEPC 
60B0. ECCa 749 ^nd MfrNV 
OTHERS. HOUSE it 
WaTH aPEC$ so« 



Catalog price: SJ:atf' 
FALL SPECIAL: $1,90 



NEW ITEMS : 

LM3046 (CA3046] Transistor array .75 \ 

LM3909 LED Flasher .50 J 

CA3086 RCA transistor array .80 



I 



* DIGIT Aura/ VAN CLOCK 



• ham ik ittmn QfMWi 

• Hai^l FILTEOINC 

* EAST TO A^iieiE 

i 4^' I r 1 1'-^" 

« gnU-LfD & PLATES P1^ BOARDS 



H^EtiTl mad4 snim 

hardwood ■taasii Il» tlw 

Clock Fhi^lLLd^a 

mtiy fnyfl niter snd byck 



739 FAlRCH^Ld 



DUAL LOW f*Ol5E 
A.UOtOPHE- AMPLIFIER 



ABC 2/1. 6ft 



J 



9500@75V 
Computer 

Grade 
Filter Cap 

2 -as ^ 



r^ 



WIREW«AP Wii^* 

30 Gfiitit 
KYNAR^'lniut4t. 

500 FT 

A50 



COHlPLETt KIT ^_« j-_ 



r 



WMBLE ALfiRll Kh 



A fun EASV kit (ci aitftmble that ^rrnti an ear 
U Kicing 10 w»H di^^t tans wrram. Kesemblea 
tLiruDBBn lirBfi wyiitl- GrMt Tor s\^nvtt at tavi 
0(;»HBtei from 5- 1 3VDC at up ru I *mn taiin« 
12VDC«B nhTf\ ^akerj Over five ifiousand 
ha^e boen Eo*d All pBng intJuding fC boarfi!, 
l«svpaa*CT. «h ^«% Ortu£ftli^/a-02 



2.50 



y. 



7 WATT 
AUDIO AMP KIT 



SMALL. SINGIE HYOHID It AM 
COMPDNEMTS FIT DN A ?^ it 3' PC 
QOAR0 imDlUDEDl. nUNS DN 12 VDC. 
GREAT Fflfi *ltV PnnJ£C7 TKUT NEE&S 
AN INEXPEN&iVE AWP IfSS THAN 3'^'. 
THD (a) 5 WUTS. CDMPATIBIE WITH 
SE^OI SDUHD KIT. ^ » ap 



MC14fi9R POSITIVE V0LTA<3E 
REGULATOR 

14 AMP COMPLETE SPECS ANO 
APPLICATIONS SHOW HOW TO BUiLD 
FtxED OR VARIABLE POWFB ^UPPLtEg. 

FROiu 3 TO affyoc ohi^te externau 

S€Rie5 PASS POfl CURHfiMl TO 20 
AMPSI 



1.2S EA. 
1P/10.0O 

HOUSE § 



u 



-NO GOD'S vADD 5% FOR SHIPPING -ORDERS UNDER SIO. 

-SEND CHECK OR MONEY -TEX RESIDENTS ADD 5% TAX ADD .75for HANDLING 
ORDER OR CHARGE CARD NO. ^ FOREIGN ORDERS ADD 10%, (214) 278-3553 

PHONE ORDERS ACCEPTED ON VISA a MC ^^m^ 



PARTS 




aoi OP mf a LtflD CAM 


3/100 


7Z3VDLTHEG. IflLEABCAW 


.SO 


M3T41 FET INPUT m MINI Dip 


a/1.10 


30.BOO £0) I5\l COWPUTEfi GRADE 


210 


imm NPM CtN. PURPI35E 


mm 


2M44{]^ PNP COHPLIHEHT 


8/IW 


imm PUT, W/SPECS 


.&Q 


LM3B0 ?W AUDIO 3C W/SPtCS 


1.09 


LW377 QUAl LM380 W/SPECS 


2.m 


•7815 VOLT REG iS iStf 


m 


725 LOW M0IS6 OP AMP 


m 


IL-1 DPTO ISOLATOR MINI QIP 


m 


* MEM 631 BLAL GATE ffO^ FET. 




DIODE PROTECTED. SIMILAR 




TO 4M73 


50 


MVie?4 VftfllCAP DtODE ID PFO 


.49 


IM4{|051A?QQV DIODE 


15/LOO 


riP3D TAS PNP POWER 


3/1.00 


*MC135IPFHIF.I]fSCIC 


m 


'IHE1ICATE3 ITEM IS •'MWt NUMBEnEQ' 


LiDS 




JUMBO GREEN 


4/.B9 


JUMBO BED 


5/J9 


WEBIUM TIED r^*) 


.15 


MEDIUM GRN OB YELIOW 


.ts 



200 



QTY. DIODES/ZENERS 

1N914 lOOv 10mA 


.05 


MICROX RAMS, 
Clou's, E PROMS 

QTV. 

8T1 3 2.S0 


1N4005 


600v 


1A 


,08 


m4O07 


lOOOv 


1A 


.15 


tN4148 


7Bv 


10mA 


■05 


8T23 


2.50 


TN4733 


5,1 V 


1 W Zenner 


.25 


8T24 


3.00 


1N4749 


24v 


IW 


,25 


8T97 


1.75 


1N753A 


6u2v 


500 mW Zener 


.25 


74S18S 


3.00 


1N7aaA 


lOv 




.25 


1488 


1.25 


1N759A 


12v 




.26 


1489 


1.25 


1N5243 


13v 




.25 


17Q2A 


6.50 


1N5244B 


14v 




.25 


AM 9050 


5.00 


1N5245B 


ISv 




.25 


1 CM 7207 


6-95 


1N5349 


12v 


3W 


.25 


1 CM 7208 


13.95 


QTY. SOCK ETS/BR 1 DG ES 

8-pin pcb ,16 WW 


,35 


MPS 6520 


10.D0 


MM 5314 


4.00 


MM 5316 


4.50 


14-pin 


n,"'" 


.20 WW 


.40 


pr 


L^U 


MM 5387 


3.50 




i_ 


.25 WW 


.45 


iD-pin 


pcD 
pcb 


MM 5369 


2.95 




.30 WW 


.95 


1 8-pln 


TR 1 602B 


3.95 


20-pin 


pcb 
pcb 
pcb 
pcb 


.35 WW 


1.05 


UPD414 


4.95 


22'pin 


.40 WW 


1.15 


Z80A 


19,50 


24-pin 


.45 WW 


1.25 


2 80 


14.50 


28-pfn 


.50 WW 


1.35 


Z80P10 


10.50 


40-pin 


P 


cb 
01 


.55 WW 
TO'3 Sockets 


1.45 
.35 


2102 


1.45 


MoJex pms . 


2102L 


1.75 


2 Amp B 


rtdge 


1 00-prv 


.95 


2107B-4 

11 1 A 


4.95 


25 Amp 1 


Bridge 


200-prv 


1.50 


2513 Upper or Lower 7. 2 B 


^T^Y^ IRAN 


SISTORS, LEDS, etc. 

(3N2222 Plastic ,10) 


.15 


2708 


12.50 


2N2222M 


2716 DJS. 


29.00 


2N2222A 






,19 


27ie(Svl 


69.00 


2N2907A 


PNP 
PNP 




J9 


275S ibv) 


32.95 


2N3906 


^Plastic) 


.19 


3242 


10.50 


2N3904 


WPN 


(Plasiid 


.19 


4116 


13.50 


2W3054 


NPN 




.55 


6800 


13.95 

1 dc 


2 N 3065 


NPN 


15A 60v 


.60 1 


T1 PI 25 


PNP 


Dar[ington 


1.95 


€850 


/.9b 


3030 


9.50 


LED Green 


Red, Clear. Vellow 


JB 


D.L747 


7seB 


5/8" High CO m-a node 1,9 5 1 


8085 


Z2.S0 


MAN72 


7$eg 
7seg 


com-arwde (Red) 


1.25 


8212 


3.75 


MAN 3610 


corn-anode J Orange} 


1.25 


8214 


4.95 


MAW82A 


7 seg 


com-anode (Ye How J 


1.25 


8216 


4.50 


MAN74 


7seg 


corn-cathode (Red} 


1.S0 


8224 


5.25 


FND369 


7 seg 


com-c^thode jRed} 


^25 


8228 


6.00 




9000! 


SERIES 

QTY. 

9322 


,6S 


8251 


8.S0 


QTV, 


8253 


18,50 


9301 


,85 ' 




8255 


9.50 


9309 


.50 




9601 


,30 


TMS 4044 


10.95 




.25 




9602 


.45 


9316 1 







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QTV. 



C MOS 

QTY. 
.75 I 4037 



QTV. 




QtV 


7400 


,?0 


7432 


- T T L ^ 

QTV. 

45 \ 74Hia 


.35 


<»TY. 

74L&51 


B-1-79 
.75 




7401 


.2fl 


74S3 


.35 


74H11 


.25 


74LS74 


1.50 




7402 


.20 


7494 


.75 


74H15 


.45 


74LS75 


1.20 




740a 


.20 


74&5 


.60 


74H2D 


.25 


74LS7G 


70 




7404 


.45 


7496 


JQ 


74HZ1 


.25 


74LS86 


,95 




74D& 


.35 


74100 


1.15 


74H22 


.40 


74LS9CI 


as 




74W 


,35 


74107 


.35 


74H30 


.30 


74LS93 


.85 




7407 


.55 


74121 


.45 


74H4a 


.3S 


74LS9G 


zoo 




nm 


An 


74122 


M 


74H50 


.30 


74LS107 


JO 




7409 


M 


74123 


.55 


74H51 


.30 


74LS109 


1.50 




7410 


M 


741 2S 


.45 


74H62 


.20 


74LS123 


1.35 




7411 


2^ 


74126 


.45 


74H53 


.25 


74LS138 


2.0D 




7412 


.25 


74132 


.75 


74HS5 


.25 


74 LSI 51 


.95 




7413 


.45 


74141 


.ID 


74H72 


M 


74LS153 


1.15^ 




7414 


.95 


741 4& 


1.35 ' 


74H74 


.35 


74LS1S7 


l.lS 




7416 


.25 


74150 


,B5 


74H101 


.95 


7415160 


1.15 




7417 


,411 


74151 


1.15 


74H103 


.55 


74 LSI 64 


2.99 




7420 


.25 


74163 


1.15 


74H106 


\.\b 


74LS193 


2.90 




7426 


.25 


74154 


1.15 


74L00 


M 


74LS195 


t.15 




7427 


.25 


741^ 


.70 


74L02 


.3fl 


74LS244 


Z.90 




7430 


.20 


74157 


.65 


74L03 


.35 


74L$259 


1.50 




7432 


.50 


74161 


.95 


74L04 


.40 


7415298 


1.50 




7437 


.20 


74153 


M 


74L10 


.30 


741S367 


2.50 




743B 


.30 


741S4 


.75 


74LZ0 


.45 


74LS3fiS 


1,26 




744D 


.20 


74165 


IJfl 


74L3fl 


,55 


74LS373 


2.50 




7441 


1.15 


741 fi6 


2.25 


74L47 


1.95 


74sao 


.60 




7442 


.55 


74175 


.90 


74L51 


.55 


74S02 


.45 




7443 


,45 


74 ITS 


.95 


74L55 


.35 


74S03 


.35 




7444 


.45 


74177 


1.10 


74L72 


.65 


74S04 


.55 




7445 


.75 


74180 


.95 


74L73 


.70 


74$0B 


.45 




7446 


.70 


741 SI 


2.26 


74L74 


.75 


74509 


.66 




7447 


JO 


74182 


.75 


74L75 


1.05 


74S10 


.45 




744S 


SO 


7419Q 


1.Z6 


74L85 


2.00 


74S11 


.45 




7450 


JB 


74191 


1.25 


74L33 


.75 


74S2tl 


.35 




74S1 


.25 


7419Z 


,75 


74L123 


1.95 


74S2Z 


.55 




7453 


.20 


74193 


M 


74LS0O 


.80 


74S40 


,30 




7454 


.25 


74194 


.95 


74LSQ1 


A% 


74360 


,30 




7450 


.40 


74195 


.05 


74LSD2 


.55 


74S51 


.35 




7470 


.45 


74196 


.95 


74LSQ3 


.45 


74S64 


.15 




7472 


.40 


74!97 


.95 


74LS04 


.65 


74S74 


1.50 




7473 


.25 


74198 


1.45 


74LS05 


.45 


74S112 


.00 




7474 


.50 


74Z21 


Z.Z5 


74LSaS 


,6S 


743114 


.05 




7476 


.35 


742SS 


1.50 


74LS09 


.45 


74S133 


.85 




7476 


AQ 


74367 


1.35 


74LS10 


,45 


74S149 


.75 




7480 


,75 


75451 


,B5 


74LS11 


.45 


74S15t 


.95 




7481 


.35 


75452 


.65 


■" 74LS20 


.46"' 


74S153 


,.95 




7482 


,95 


75491 


.65 


74IS21 


.46 


74S157 


.3E 




7481 


.95 


75492 


,65 


74LS22 


.45 


74S15S 


.80 




7485 


.75 


74HI10 


.20 


74LS32 


.60 


74S194 


2.25 




7486 


J5 


74H(M 


.30 


74LS37 


.45 


74S1&6 


200 




7489 


LD5 


74Ha4 


.30 


74LS3B 


.65 


74S267(8ia3iZ.95 




7490 


.55 


74H»5 


.Z5 


74LS40 


JO 


8131 


2.75 




7491 


,70 


imQB 


M 


74LS42 


1.25 





l^L, 



QTY, 



LINEARS, REGULATORS, ETC, 

QTY. QTV. 



MCT2 



.95 



j038 



2^ 



1-M201 



J5 



-'» IHTEGRATED CIRCUITS UKLIMITED 

7889 Ciairemont Mesa Blvd., San Diego, California 92111 

Out of State 1-800-854-2211 TWX 910^35 1577 Telex: 697-827 

(714) 278 4394 Calif omla Residents 1-800-542-6239 



LM301 



.45 



LM308 



.65 



LM309H 



.85 



LMaOd t340K-5) 1.B0 



LM310 



.85 



LM3l1l8-14PinJ .75 



LM318 



1.50 



LM320H6 



.79 



LM320H15 



JB 



LM320H24 



,79 



LM320K5 



1>65 



LM320K1 2 



IM. 



1JW320K1 5 



1,65 



LM320K24 



1.6S 



LM320T5(7905) 1.65 



LM320T12_ 



IM. 



LM320T1 5 



i^ 



LM323K 



5.95 



LM324 



1,25 



LM339 



.75 



7805 (340T51 1.15 



LM340T12 



.95 



LM340T1 5 



.95 



LM34QT18 



,95 



LM340T24 



.95 



LM340K12 



1.25 



LM340K15 



1.25 



LM340K18 



1.25 



LM340K24 



t.25 



LM373 



LM377 



3.95 
3.95 



78L05 



.J^ 



7eLl2 



..25. 



78L15 



.75 



78M05 



.75 



LNl3a0|8-l4Pin| 1.19 



LM7Q9 t8-l4Pirtj >45_ 



LM711 



.45 



LM723 



*40 



LM725 



3.50 



LM739 



1,50 



LM741 (8-14) 



.45 



LM747 



1,10 



LM1307 



1-75 



L!Vll45e 



,65 



LM39QQ 1-5Q 



MAME, 



STREET ADDRESS 



CITY 



STATE 



^ ZIP. 



NE555 



.45 



NE556 



,85 



NE565 



1.15 



NE566 



1,25 



NE567 



.95 



TA7206 



4.95 



76477 



2.95 



95H90 




PHONE, 



CHARGE CARD # 



BA MC _ 



C.O.D. 



WILL CALL 



UPS 



^ POST- 



NET 10th OF THE MONTH. 



EXP. DATE 



SPECIAL DISCOUNTS 



PO #. 



ALL ORDERS SHIPPED PREPAID - NO MINIMUM - COO ORDERS ACCEPTED - ALL ORDERS SHIPPED SAME DAY 
OPEN ACCOUNTS INVITED - California Residents add 6% Sales Tax. PRICES SUBJECT TO CHANGE WITHOUT NOTICE. 
24 Hour Phone Service - We accept American Express/ Visa / BankAmericard / Master Charge 



Total Order 
$3G-$99 
$100 $300 
$3Q1-$1000 



Deduct 
10% 
15% 
20% 



i/^ Reader Service— see page 21 1 



201 



VARIABLE POWER SUPPLY KIT $11^5 



Continuous! Y Variable from 2V to over 15V 

Short Circuit Proof 

Typfcal Regulation of 0.1% 

Electronic Current Limiting at 300mA 

Very Low Output Ripple 

Fiberglass PC Board Mounts AJI Components 

Assemble in about One Hour 

Makes a Great Bench or Lab Power Suppfy 

Includes All Components except Case and Meters 




FREE 



(Cor FET's WITH 
$5 6i $10 ORDERS. t 
DATA SHEETS 
WITH MANY ITEMS. 



ADD $1.25 FOR POSTAGE/HANDLING 



SPECIALS "THIS MONTH ONLY 



miia 


1j nrmimum Uju d-F 611V KHihA 


ID^SI 


LM3EI8M 


law Biis Currflnd Dp Amp- Super 


7Di 


$aM 


Miiiti 


CirFTtpnium Uii^iJe 6(JV i:Ql]mA 


*ret 


LMJOSK 


b Vdl Htf Jitor 


Tn-3. 


.B4 


iiy^H 


aUicdfiClndvltlDVIQniA 


Zhi%i 


LM317K 


Adjiif EtifaEi V»llBt» FlBSHJdftar 


1-3TV 


3.5D 


rtam 


Hoi Car^btrQitii^BlHfJfldQ. 1.14,^ 


I1.0D 


LM^GflN 


?Wjrn fluJifl Pwwir AmpfHiBr 


aw 


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PawE> ViT«iQr 1-2W Out 94^2MHz 




tJEE€SA 


PIbBUd Ldcktd Liii]|] 


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ISpBtiife Girculti i»i:lud«d with F7t 


SZ-Ofl 


imi'itti 


PrHciii^ii V^FtBQi Fl*rMlg|«r 


DIP 


3/51 


DIODE GRAB BAC-MiNBd £4(ien, mctl1iBrs.,B4c. 


S0^1 


LM747 


Dijal 741 Co<iv|ji:ri.ulHl Qp Am|» 


DIP 


2/S1 


Hirfl6 


MU H>gti-£|^d Swiltli nm 


4/S1 


11 DZ 


l[)Z4BKSl9tinFl:AWlll»Z4Kt) 


DIP 


(t,75 


^9 IS 


UKF Trandflnr-A^c/Amf] m{i (* 1 BHr 


*^^1 


itintit 


FET-lnput Op Anif] Ii4i:«i U£ 536.' 


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19S 


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P.'ChHiiiiil FET Anl.|ilHlir Z^UD'^ittlia! 


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CRMMik 


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Dtp 


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tfiiMZ 


PSiPPF ftmiriifiarB SwttEli 


Irti 


fttflSSi 


Dn^l Hifh G^in [Ep Am;> 


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mDIP 


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Lf 1!^ LDEIC PROSE lih-TTL, CMOS, cK, 

MKliinBd eiw aiEliMl«d -Vi Hf. «SBmbly 
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^dEAF^LY 10150 SEIWICaNOUqTORS, KITS, CAPACITOFrS, ETC. SEND 2&e STAMP. 



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umdnr Imt. Dui| |.i}l raKtmt tramplaw kS iiWluKteS -ftiW *rid rfifl liiadi OHLV S7.afl 

FIXED FIESULATEQ POWIH BUPPUV KITi-S»iflfT-etf<atJ( pr«t iVitfi Hinmi*! C4irr<fH 
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RC419BDN TtSV 4^ EOmA VOLTAGE REGULATOR 1C. V«rv WJy to 
use, Mftkei a neat Highly ^egu.l[rt*d -ISV Supplv far OP AMP'^, etc. 
Hequines only Udw^ijatdl OC jtB^^OV) iimd 2 bypass capacHjore. 



UVith E>ata S^wel and SctiBm^tics. Et-^in mDIP 

RC4136 Ouart Ml Low-Wciise Op Amp mDIP 
LM1304 FM. Multi^kx St^rea Dsmadulatar DIP 
Wnn FM IF Subsyitertl (IF Amp, Dot., LimiterJ DfP 
1N€2«3 Hen Cjirtlef Diode Q.4V iP ImA 0.1n? D0.3S 
ZfeNEHS-Spwifv Voltaiie 3.3. 3,9, 4.3, 5.1, 6.8.. 8.2 
9A,n, 12, 16, 16, tS, 20. 22. 24, 27, or 33V (±10*1 



St 26 

$0.95 
0.99 

1.00 

4aOmW 4/'$T.0D 

1 Watt 3/$1 .00 



• MONEY-BACK GUARANTEE 

• ALL TESTED AND GUARANTEED 



ADVA 

BOX 4181 GB, WOODSIDE, CA 94062 
TeL (415) 328-1500 



ELECTRONICS 



VARflCTQFlS 

IN^TU 

F7 4121^ Hi 
HVB^[M4J 

HIVIOI 
HVIffilft 



21171 B 
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7 K2U&2 
211 IBM 

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21*3954 



SD.Z4 2N4DS1 
.£4 ZN4Ct$^ 



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2N4JDa 
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2NM1SA 

2l44ft&Bln 

2K4a£1 

2lf4n?& 

?!H9fllE 

2iHEB1 

2KI4BBt 

ZKBOBJ 
ZRMIBt 

JIISIBS 

?N'&ia3 
JNI197 

SHI Stag 

£N!i?1i 

ZKB3«7 
211 i43? 
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21IS4E4I 



I.H|S11M44 



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3^1 
3/^1 
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35.11 [> 
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2WSfi3 B 
Z1I'&E4B 

C«M* 

CHSU 
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MPFIHia" 

IVIPF1B« 

MPF112 

SEIdl^l 
SEtODi 
^211 Bil 

ttisai 
SEHOi] u 

sc^a3 

1€&BZ(] 

rtsTS 1* 

TIS75 

DmiTAL 
usisnBM 
&iy7aaBii 

SN741BN 
SNTilSBN 
SN"jr4qD"N 
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'SNT^7llt 
JEJV74?^N 

S1474MM 
UH£AHlC'l 



Z/31 
Zi'Sl 

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W.BQ 
l/tl 
3/S1 
3/Sl 

a/Si 

3/11 

qj-^l 
3/41 

4;si 
4i'n 

4.'tt 
3/11 
$3.BD 
)/»l 

IC'i 
SZ.IE 

.IG 
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.41 
Jji 

.44 



|,H1PDH 
LM^B t AN 
LH1I17H 

tlVtlBK, 

11*311 m 

LM32BK.I2 
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1T.SB 
.27 
11 
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94 
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t.35 

1.3.^ 



tJ134aK-E 


ti2a 


LMHdrrE 


12(1 


LMl4grr.E 


lifl 


LIW34flr'1? 


1JB 


LttWf 15 


IJB 


LM 3441 21 


Ulf 


LM37«Pi* 


,5? 


LM377N 


£.M 


LM3IB1I 


1J9 


WSiSS^' 


2i11 


NE£5&A 


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.« 


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.23 


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1*1 


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*i.fllJ 


LHMlCti 


1^11 


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4^$1 


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M 


LtXHIttl 


ti 


7UCJ DIP 


J5 


■/4D^g niP 


lilB 


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.IB 


LM13n4lt 


US 


LMijsarf 


an 


I.MZ111N 


t^M 


itflZBSflCf 


1.5S 


374QiQE 


i.g^ 


c;A3B.iia 


i.if 


EA3<Me 


M 


iwia?brj3 


1.45 


GA3tBS' 


.52 


twww 


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RC41f4D 


1.54 


Flt4t14TK- 


Z.»l] 


HCiiS&n*i* 


1 :^5 


RtllBEiTK* 


E.25 


LLtt^ZfiBCN 


Z.OB 


.hmmuH 


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iNbS^B^ 


.Afl 


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t^Pi^iUhVZ 


1.2S 


ana! DIP* 


3.7& 


nm^K^ 


.19 



1^ *SUPER SPECIALS: ^ 



1tSt34 Gflfinaniuin Diode 10^$T 

1IM914 100V/1 0mA Diode ^0/Sl 

1N4001 S^)\^,'1A ttectifker T5i/Sl 

1N41S4 3QV 1N9t4 25/St 

BR1 6QV '^A BFida# Rcc 4/ST 

?N3232 MPftf Tranaittor 6/51 

2N2907 PWP TrantJntM- 6/$1 

2N30S5 Portar XistPr 10A S0.7S 

2N 3904 NPW Anlp?/Sw j3 1 W 6/51 

aN39<)« PNP Amw.'Sw j.nffl> 6^1 

CPeSO F&WfrT FET 'AAfrift S5 



FSA2501M Diode Array 
MP F 102 aOQMHz RF Amp 
40673 MOSFET HF Amp 
LM324(luBd 741 Op Amp 
LiM^?6 Pas Valt Ewq mDtP 
NtiJSS TimBrmDIP 
LM7S3 5-37VHfigDIF 
LM741 Comp Op Amp mDIP 
LM14SQ Duel 741 mDIP 
CASOfifiE Trans Array DIP 
RCA29 Pwr Xiitor TA 30W 



RFJJ91 RF PflWflr Abip Tramiftw 10-25VV (a 3-30MH2 T0^3 
555X Trniflfr 1;w^1hr Different plnflur irtiii 555 fMw/data) 
RC4104TK Dual Tracking Regulator .'OJ tp 30V 15* 3tTOmA TO-Ci? 
RC4195TK Duiil Tnatking Regulator il5V ^^ IQDmA <TO-Ei6) 
a038 WBTOform diwifif stor -^n f. UVaw Vyiili Clmiitt^ Data 



2m 

SI 75 
.94 
.S& 
.38 

3/S1 

3/51 

/d 

$5.00 
3/*1 

$2,50 
$2.2G 
$3 76 



NEW SPECIALS 



LMSISCN 

LI\/1318D 

LM33gN 
Lt\/l380N^fi 

NE567V 
XR567CP 
LIV1723CN 
LM747CN 



High Speed Op Amp 50V /^s mDIP 
High Speed Op Amp 50V/ms DIP 
Quad Oampdratar Single or Dual Supply 
14W AudiD Power Amplrfier 8'22V 

Tone Decoder (PLL) D^DIHz to SQOkHz 
Tone Decoder (PLL) D.OIHz to 5DQ kHz 
Precision Voltage Regulator 2-37 V DIP 
Dya[ 741 Compensated Op Amp 



SA0 1024 Dual 512 Stage (1024) Audm De(ay Line 

"Bucket Brigade" AppL Data included 
XR2206CP Function Generator with applic, data 
XR2242CP Long-Range Precision Timer ^s to days 
1 YEAR TIMER Kit'2 XR2242's and Applic Note 



LM29D1N 
CA3018A 
CA3D28A 
RQ4B58 



Quad Comparator +SV or 2 to 36VDC 
4-TransistoT Array/Darlington 
RF/IF Amplifier DC to r20MH^ 
Dual High Gain Op Amp mDIP 



SPACER Kit 4 ea of 5 assorted size spacers 

±15 VOLT Regulated Power Supply Kit-Easy assembly, 
5mV regulation, 100mA, fully protected. 
Includes all components and hardware, 
no PCB or case-Add $LBQ for shipping 



$0.94 
.90 
.79 

.90 

.99 

.99 
3/$l 
2/$l 

$18.95 
4.40 
1.50 
3.00 

$K20 

J9 

1.2S 

3/$1 

$1.00 



IW270 
IN 823 

11\I914 
1N3044 
TIU304& 
11^3071 

2N2915 

2N3819M 

2N4020 

2W4445 

2N5394E 
2N5912 
2N6028 
2iyG449 

CP640 



Germanium Diode 80V 200mA 

Temp Comp Reference 

6.2V±5%-.005%f C 

Silicon Diode 100V 10mA 

100V Zener IW-Better than an QB3 

110V Zener IW-Better than an OB2/OC3 

200V 100mA Switching Diode 40ns 

NPN Dual Transistor 3m V Match ^ilDO 
N-Channel RF FET lOOMHz Amp 
PI\IP Dual Transistor 5m V Match ^?250 
N-Channel FET 5n Switch 

Uftra-Low Noise J-FET Audio Aitip 
Dual J'FET RF Dif Amp to 800MHz 
Pragrammafale Unijunction Transistor 
300 Volt N'Channel J-FET Amp/Sw 



SI 3.95 



I 



Broadband FET RF Amp 140dB 

Dyn Range 
E304 N-Channel RF FET 3.8dB NF 1^400MHz 

MPSA12 NPN Darlington Transistor fj20,000 
TIS88 W-Channel FET 400MH2 RF Amp 

RESISTOR Kit-150 pes %W, 20 most common vafues, 
individually packaged, 5 to 20 pes each . 

PC: BOARD Mounting Kit-Q ea ^pa4;er, screw, nut 
and washer^32 pes total . 



4/$1 

$0,00 

Z5/$1 

J5 

.75 

.30 

$1.95 
,3i 

5.00 
3.B0 

$1.25 

2.90 
,45 

2.00 

$4.50 
JO 
.75 
,60 

$4 J 5 

$1.00 



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ELECTRONICS 



BOX 4181 GB 
WOODSiDE, CA 94062 
Tel.(415) 328-1500 



202 




INSTRUMENT CLOCK CASE KIT 

A real |«w^i for those small prajects. 
Hinged tqp door allo>^s you to hide your 
control area. OO. 4'/* " * 4" x 1 3/4" 

SI 99 each. 




AHTINNA SELECTlHa SWITCH D P.D J. 

Long through slide Switch providing cor- 
rect Jso^sTiorr for 300 OHM Twin Lead. 
35' ea. 4 lor ON LV SVOO 



DIQOES 








TYPE 


VOLTS WATTS 


PRICE 


tN400l 


50 


lA 


iSrtlOO 


1N40D2 


too 


tA 


15/$100 


'N^Mj 


200 


1A 


laaioj 


1N40CM 


400 


1A 


12S1 CS!) 


lfSt4O05 


600 


1A 


10/91.00 


tN40QS 


aoo 


1A 


10^100 


lN400r 


1000 


1A 


erst ^0 


1N&400 


50 


3A 


5^1 Gu 


1NS401 


TOO 


3A 


5/$l00 


1N5402 


200 


3A 


5fSl2L 


1N5403 


300 


3A 


4^125 


1N5404 


400 


3A 


4/S125 


1N&405 


500 


3A 


4i%^49 


1N5406 


600 


3A 


4^1. 4S 


1N5407 


soo 


3A 


3^1.49 


1N540B 


1000 


3A 


2/$ 99 


1N414S 


75 


10M 


20/SrOO 


nOOE SALE 


1li414B 






100^195 








1I>00'S14»5 




TAPE/PieeL 





FERRDX CUBE TORROID CORE 
9n6"i.D, 95* 




DIP SPACED FLEX JUMPER Pre en^ V/r 
i^ and pre -si ripped. Phg. 20 S1.S9 




IHSTAUMENT/CLOCK CASi KfT 

Perf^t ror your oplo projects Solid 
aLummum coostrucuon wUh real walnut 
si€tes.O-a5-a»"tw5-3ffl ■ by 2".Sfi 55 ti. 




DEFECTIVE CALCULATORS 

Welt, some are and some are not We 
can't attoTd *he time io test Ihern S2-50 m. 
B:attefie£ not included 2/%*0Q. 




Electronic 




i^ua 



ActM^cHinf united ppcducts 



Corp. Hdqf*.. 2300 tst Ave, — S^aitle, WA 98121 • (206J 652 502S 




TRANSFORMER Pn no VAC s«c it 2 
ana^VCT Q ,1 amp S-SSCi^ 




ROTRON WHISPER FAN #WR2H1 

75CFM. I15VAC Net $17.00 Meas, 4" 
a<am NOTE: These arc not putt outs, 
these are new, VOUR PRICE S9,9S 




CRYSTAL 3.579545 MHZ 

This \b the one you need tor your time 
baae Reg Pflce $4.95 YOUR PRICE SZSO 
(whJIe ttiey last) 




L.E.D. WATCH GUTS (untestedl 
M\ rake 2. 1.5V Bat Mens size 75* m- 2 rur 
11.00 

REPEAT OF A SELL -OUT A complete 12 
hour digital ctoctt. Some are nranLfacture 
line r^iects, some are returns, and some 
are iusi scratched. Features: hours, 
mtfiuies, alarm, snoore alarm. Parts value 
atone would equal S20 00. you pay imty 

EDCE METER ioo<j-iOO ua '4" by 
line" Compare with other meters 
COSlifts S6,00 IWy SaJW «. Why pay nnore? 



I 25 
,50 

.25 
.50 
.25 



THE GOODIE BOX 

100Oul25VDCP'C . 

2000 u* 25VDC A?<IAL 

taga, LtNECOHOe", .*.. . 

Tftmmer C^p. 3-30pl VERT. P-C. 
RCA Jack, Right Angle P^ 

TrNI JAX 50* ea- 3^1.00 

TO-220 Clip on Heal Sink. ........ . .20 

#30 Kyn ar (an y colorl 100' Spoot . 1 .00 

S pea Kef Terms . IS" ea 1 0/ 1 .00 

lOKUnZwatl Pot rr. ,*,,,. , 50 

AAAHecttargeabtet^l'CAO 95 

Mim Plug .50 

5 RD.T. mm. Slide Switch 25* ea 5/1 00 




A.P, PHODUCTS 

ACE 212 534.95 

We stock the full line ol A-P Breadboard 
Products. 




22VDC (J» 140 MA Adapter 
4.5 VDC (p) 265 MA Adapter. 



SI. 95 
SI, 95 




t2VDC RELAY 
X 3/4 X 3/8" 
ONLVSlWea. 



MINIATURE D.P.DX 

500 OHM Coil l-I^S 
ARROW WI»NF2T2V 

PC Mount 

CLOCK OtSPlAY 

National Serm S Qigil Mutlipleited 
Display; 33'^ Charactets (Common 
Cathode) I HEM B^T tkl JUST SI, 



1/4 WATT 5% DEPOSITED CARBON RLM RESISTOR ASSORTMEHTS 

ASST A 10 ea t OHM I.S OHM 2 OHM 2,7 OHM 3 OHM 3.6 OHM 

4 7 OHM 5,6 OHM 6.8 OHM a 2 OHM 
ASST. B 10 ea TO OHM 12 OHM 15 OHM IS OHM 22 OHM 27 OHM 

33 OHM 39 OHM 47 OHM 56 OHM 
ASST C 10 ea 68 OHM 82 OHM 100 OHM 120 OHM ISO OHM 

ISO OHM 220 OHM 270 OHM ^0 OHM 390 OHM 
ASST. D 10 ea 470 OHM 560 OHM 680 OHM B20 OHM IK 1 2K 

15K1.8K2 2KZ7K 
ASST. E 10 ea 3.3K 3-9K ATK 5,6K 6.8K B.2K lOK 12K 

15K 18K 
ASST F 10 ea 22K 27K 33H 39K 47K 56K eftK a2K lOOK 

120K 
ASST. G 10 ea 150K 180K 220K 270^ 330K 390K 470K 

560K680K820K 
ASST. H 10 ea !M 1_2M 1.5M 1.8M 2.2M 2,7M 3 3M 3 9M 

4 7M 5.6M 
ASST AH INCLUDES ALL RESISTOR ASSORTMENTS (800 pes) 



100pcsS2.40 

100 pes S2.40 

100pcsS2-40 

1Q0PCSS2L4O 

t00pcs*2.40 

100 pes S2 40 

100 PCS $2.40 

1QQpcsS2-40 
$14.96 ea 



till I 
■ I 1 1 ^ 

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1 





T1>1 



PARTS BOARDS a gtest way to buy pafts 
on a budget. We gu grantee your money's 
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SECOWJS MINUTES HOUftS DAY MOkTh 
If your crdBT t0Ea^ S5000 cr mve ifrt m^ 
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mm 




TvHF Ab ore 

pan inlHiiiii a1 n i mi T ii li^sti«'ClBPgelVta*ev(liat 
upted ttatw v^Ft i VHT venaa^ 9 c^n^mi^ iMKfc m*w 
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203 



NEW! 




Tunable 420 MHz Fast 
Scan TV Converter 

Receive Fast Scan Amatetir TV in 1^* 420 to 
450 MHl BaAd With any TV £«t. Low nc^ise. 
ftjgti Qdirt ti Amp with Vafactor turned input 
and out puis fiu^U m AC supply. Comes irr 
two lorvQ walnut & beige caiHnet m«as4jrmij 
hmr n A-tW X 4-im' Factory wired 
mm 2 yew guatantee atvC-10 S6995 



Basic VaraclOr Tunw 
& PS Kit wAfistaictions 



ALDELCO 
ELECTRONIC 



THE VERY POPULAR 



compoNv 



TOPE 
ACCUKEYER 

KIT 



Self Completmg Oois k Dashes 
Iambic Operation 
Single Dot S Da$i^ Memories 
Provision for Atiachmerit of 
Memory for DX or Contest Work 



ATVO-lOK 



U9.95 




Revtsed: vftriion o1 ttve Accukeyet featured In t5e ARRL Handbook 
Has moie logical IC Layout and ON Board gidetone O^ciHatOf In- 
dt^des PC Board. TTL JCs, 555Timef . IC Sockets, Switch* Speaker 
Transtslors, cdpacdors and resistors- Requnres 5 VDC- $19.95 

Use our P5-5 t%wef supply kit to powef keyer & Memory only 17.95 

m ^ 

MEMORY ADD ON KIT 

3 each: 2102, Push 
Button Switch^ Led, 
16 Pin Socket S6.00 



NEW 
1056 BIT 
EXPANDABLE 
MEMORY KIT 



INCLUDES PC BOARD 
AND PARTS STILLONLY 



ACCUKEYER MEMORY KIT 

• Same ai^e PC Board as Accukeyor 

• Supplied with one 2102 h^emory Chip 

• Room on the board for three more 

• Four chips will total 4224 BITS 

• LED Indicator for Programming 

• Adaptable to other keyers 

• RaqtJires 5 volts DC 



CRYSTAL SOCKETS 

HOLDS 8 HC25U % 59 
Smqle MC25U 29 



BUILD A € DIGIT 500 MHz 
FREQUENCY COUNTER 



$19,95 



RF TRANSISTORS 



SOiOt&-4 

so 1074 

SD1076 

SOtD68 

SDt0e9 

501143 

sonsa 

$01272 
so 1278 
S0 1416 
S0 1428 
301433 
S0 1434 
S0 1451 
SOI 477 
2 N 5945 
2 N 5946 



SOW 

75W 

25W 

40W 

10W 

12W 

30W 

SOW 

70W 

45VV 

BW 

50W 

50 

toow 

TOW 



4.5dO 

lldb 

13 

6 

5 

10 

SJJ 

6 

10 

6,7 

6.5 

7-5 

5 

14 

5 

3 

6 



450MHz 

30MHI 

50 

450 

450 

200 

200 

220 

50 

175 

175 

450 

450 

50 

175 

450 

45r 



380-4 LFL 

SOOeLFL 

SOO^FL 

5tX^6LFL 

SOO*LFL 

MT72 

TOlt7 

MT72 

fcAT72 

50«^^FL 

500-6LFL 

MT90 

500-6LFL 

500-6LFL 

500^LFL 

MTgo 

MTar. 



15-25 

21 15 
24.00 
23-2S 
27.15 
1095 
12-30 

9 60 
16.30 
28-30 

22 65 
9.50 

34.00 
IB. to 
52-85 
10-75 
13 00 



2Na375 
2N3553 
2N3d66 
2N4427 
2^5589 
2N5590 
2N5591 
2N5913 

2N6oao 

2N6081 
2N6082 
2NG0&3 
2N60&4 
2N6094 
2N6095 
2N609G 
2M6097 



3 0W 
2 5W 

low 

1 Ow 

30W 

low 

25W 

1 75W 

40W 

15W 

25W 

30W 

40W 

40W 

15W 

30W 

40W 



400 MH? 
175 MHj 
400 MN7 
17SMHZ 
175 MHz 
175 MHz 
175 MHz 
?75 MHz 
ITS MHz 
175 MHz 
175 MHz 
1T5 MHZ 
175 MHz 
175 MHz 
175 MHz 
175 MHz 
175 MHz 



TQ€0 

T039 

T039 

T039 

MT71 

MT72 

MT72 

T039 

MT72 

MT72 

MT72 

MT72 

MT72 

X106 

X106 

X10G 

^106 



560 

1 40 

125 

135 

4 75 

780 

10 25 

1 70 

540 

S.45 

10 95 

12.30 

16 30 

660 

850 

1035 

20 00 



TELCO COMMANDER SERIES RF POWER AMPLIFIERS 






Walls 


Watts 




ModeJ 


Input 


output 


144-148 M 


125 


1 


25 


S 99.00 


180 


10 


BO 


$149,00 


250 


25 


100 


$199.00 


256 


25 


160 


$249.00 


256 


1-25 


25-180 


$299-00 


ULTRA 430 MHz II 


3^5 


up to 50 


$379.00 




COMPLETE LUNCH COUNTtH KITS79.95 
Includes a reprint at a six page consiruc- 
Ikon article Irofn Oec ?978. 73 Magazine 



Other UHF models in production 



FMMC 1 



••• 



Dynamic 

Touch 
Tone Mlc 




laKDK 



FM2016A 

144 to 149 MHz 1000 CHANNELS 



Ne« Yorher^ must 
pay sales lav 



AM the features of tfie 201 5R 
and now with adjustable 
sine wave PL 60 Hz to 203 
Hz. Adjustable low power 
position 1 Watt to 16 Watts. 

Low, Low Price 



Aldeico can supply 3 PC 
boards. Silk screened front 
panel and complete instruc- 
tions for only $12.50 & ship- 
ping. 

SOME PARTS USED IN COUNTER 



1lC90Prescaler 
74C925 Multiplex 

F936a Driver {2) 
IMHzXTAL 

10.60 pF trim cap 

Resistor Ktt 
Capacitor hit 



14.50 
9,95 
790 
7 95 
60 
1,75 
5S0 



See ^ijc page consi ruction article m Dec 
?97S 73 Magazine 

ALDELCO KITS 

DUAL DIGITAL 12/24 HOUR CLOCK KIT 
NOW WITH A NEW WALNUT GRAIN 
WOOD CABINET _ . 

ONLY 



SHOWN WITH OPTIONAL uMOO MICRO PROGRAMMER 

Bu/ youf KOK from Aldeico ar>d we'll pay UPS shipping and insurance In the 
48 states. Sorry no charge cards accepted on 2016A 



$299 



SI 31 ^3 ^1 a 



m/ 



S49.95 



Re^jglaied ADPS 
Mod**] FMPS-4R 



$39 95 



I 



• • • 



• • • 



ALARM CLOCK KIT 

% Big 0.^ IB.D Dispiay^ # On Bosfd^C TfSffiform^r * 12 
Hour Formst with 24 Hour A farm * Sft&oiC FiMluw ♦ 
^l^pSfid Ttmc^f Timer fenhjre m^k$^ 1fit$ Popijiat tn Bmad 
ca$f Sl&ttons. It's a naiufai lor cars, boats and campers 
when userf Witt} optiQfial crystsi tfrne Oase fit$ our &tan 
darit cabtnet IPf 95 

CfyStM t Ifm sbase when p tirchas&d withc toch SJ flS 



12 or 24 HOUR DIGITAL CLOCK KIT 



freeie feature tor 



Uses 5 Dtspisf LED 5314 Cfoch Chip 
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licENSE sTudy quidES & tapes 




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• NOVICE STUDY GUIDE— S67357— Here is a completefy new study 
guide and relerence book for the potential ham. This is not a ques- 
tion/answef memorization course. Electronic and radio fundamentals are 
presented and explained in an easy-to-understand fashion, preparing the 
beginner for the Novice exam. Includes the latest FCC amateur refuta- 
tions, as well as application forms. Easily the best path into the exciting 
world of ham radio! $4.95/ 

• GENERAL CLASS STUDY GUIDE— 507358— A complete theory course 
for the prospective General or Technician. This reference explains tran- 
sistor, amplifier, and general radio theory, while preparing the Novice for 
the **bio" ticket. After getting your ticket, you'll use this guide again and 
again as an electronic reference source. Not a question/answer guide that 
becomes dated when the FCC updates the amateur exams. $5,95/ 

• ADVANCED CLASS STUDY GUIDE— SGI 081— Ready to upgrade your license? To prevent retaking the FCC theory exam, you 
need the 73 Advanced theory guide. SSB, antenna theory, transmitters, and electronics measuring techniques are covered in 
detail in this easy-to-foHow study guide. Special modes and techniques, such as RTTYt are also treated. An engineering degree is 
noi necessary to master Advanced theory— try this book before visiting the examiner's office! $5.95/ 

• EXTRA CLASS LICENSE STUDY GUIDE— SG10B0— Before going for your 1 x 2 cdIL it pays to be a master of the Extra class 
electronic theory. This study guide is the logical extension of the 75 theory course. All the theory necessary to pass the exam is 
presented. Antennas, transmission lines, swr are discussed, as well as noise, propagation, and specialised communication 
techniques. This book is not a classroom lecture or memorization guide, but rather a logical presentation of the material that must 
be understood before attempting the Extra exam. Save yourself a return trip to the FCC and try the 73 method first! $5.95/ 



Ijf MOVICE ^ 





NOVICE THEORY TAPES 

Startling Learning Breakthrough 

• NOVICE THEORY TAPES— CT7300— Startling Learning Breakthrough. YouNI be astounded at how 
really simple the theory is when you hear it explained on these tapes. Three tapes of theory and one of 
questions and answers from the latest Novice exams give you the edge you need to breeze through 
your exam, 73 is interested in helping get more amateurs, so we*re giving you the complete set of our 
tapes for the incredibly low price of ONLY $15.95/ 

Scientists have proven that you learn faster by listening than by reading because you can play 3 
cassette tape over and over in your spare lime— even while you're driving! You get more and more info 
each time you hear it. 

You can't progress without solid fundamentals. These four hour-long tapes give you all the basics 
you'll need to pass the Novice exam easily. You'll have an understanding of the basics which will be 
invaluable to you for the rest of your I ife! Can you afford to take your Novice exam without first listen- 
ing to these tapes? Set of 4— $15.95/ 








SSTV 



• SLOW SCAN TELEVISION 

TAPE— CT7350— Prize-winning 
programs from the 73 SSTV 
contest. Excellent for Demo! 
$5.95/ 




73 CODE SYSTEM TAPES 




TjfCOK COURSE 



Z 



Any Four Impmm For 11 5.95 1 

S4. 95 Each I* 



ti 



GENESIS 



II 



5 WPM— CT7305— Thfs is the beginning 
tape fof p«opte who do noi know th^t co6& 
at all. It takes lh€m through the 2B letters, 
TO numbers and' necessary punctyation, 
com p Fete with practice ever^ step of I he 
way using the newe^l biiiz leaching tech- 
niquB^. It is almost miracutous! In one 
hour many people — incJudin9 kids ol ten 
— are able to master the code. The ease of 
lea/ning gives confidence to beginnefs 
who might otherwise drop out- 

••THE STICKLER" 

6+ WPII— CT7306— Ttiis is me pmciice 
tape for the Novice and Technician li- 
censee. U is made up ot ofie solid ho<jr of 



code, sem at the official FCC stanejard fno 
(>iher tape we've hearcJ uses these stan- 
dards, BO many people ftunk the code 
ivben Ihey a/e syddarTly*^wnder pressure 
—faced with characters ser^t at 13 wpm 
and spaced ior 5 wpmK This lape is not 
m«fTiortzabfe, unlike tlve^any 5 wpm tape. 
Since the code groups aie entirety random 
civaracters sent ir> groups o* five. 



"THE CANADIAN" 

10 + WPM — CT7310—T3 hasn't forgotten 
the Canadian hams— our 10 WPM tape 
prepares you to breeije through your coun- 
try's licensing exams Like the other code 
groups, the tape Is not memocizable and, 
once mastered, provides a margin of safe- 
9y In the actua) text situation. 



(I 



BACK 



"COURAGEOUS" 

20+ WPM— CT7320— Code is what nets 
Y^u Ahen you go tor the Extra class It- 
cense It IS so embarrassing to panic out 
Just because you didn't prepare yourself 
with (his tape. Thougti this is only on« 
word taster, the code croups are so dpffi- 
cult that you'll almost Tall asleep copying 
ttie FCC St uf J by comparison Ugefs report 
that they can't tnelieve how easy 20 per 
really Is with this fantastic one houf tape. 



"OUTRAGEOUS" 

25+ WPM— CT7325— This is the tape lor 
thai small group of overachleving hams 
who wouldn t be content to simply satisfy 
the code requirements ol I he Ei^tra Glass 
license, It's the toughest tape we've got 
and we keep a permanent tUe ot hams who 
have mastered t\ Let us know when you're 
up to speed and we'lJ i<nscribs your name 
in 73's CW "Hall of Fame/' 



13+ WPM— CT7313— Code groups 
again, at a brisk 13 per $o you will be at 
ease whefi you sit down In ffonl of the 
steely-eyed government inspector and he 
starts sending you plain tang jape at only 
13 per. You need this eitua margin lo ovef'^ 
come tfie panic which is urtiversal in the 
test situations. When you ve spent your 
money and lime to lake ihe test, you'll 
Ihank heavens you had this back-breakir>g 
tape. 




Use the order card in the back of this magazine or itemize your order on a separate piece of paper and mail to: 

73 Radio Bookshop • Peterborough NH 03458. Be syre to include check or detailed credit card information. 

*Add $1,00 handling charge. Note: Prices subject to change on books not published by 73 Magazine. 



FOR CUSTOMER SERVICE CALL [603) 924-7298 



7^ TECllNiCAl LibRARy 




• BEHIND THE DIAL— BK7307— By Bob Gfove. Gel more fun out 
of shortwave listentng with this interesting guide to receivers^ 
antennas, frequencies and interference. $4.95.* 

• THE CHALLENGE OF 160— BK7309— is the newest book m the 
7J technical library, dedicated to 160 meter operating. Si Dunn pro- 
vides all necessary tnformation to get started on this unique band. 
The all-important antenna and ground systems are described in 
detail. The introduction contains interesting photos ol Stew 
Parry's (the King of 160) shack. This reference is a must for new 
and experienced ''Top Band'' operators. Price: $4.95.* 

• IC OP-AMP COOKBOOK— BK1028— by Walter G. Jung. Covers 
not only the basic theory of the 10 op amp in great detail, but also 
includes over 250 practical circuit applications, liberally il- 
iuslrated. 592 pages. 5Vi x BVz, softbound, $12.95.* 

• THE POWER SUPPLY HANDBOOK- BK7305— Need a power supply for a gadget youVe building? In the POWER SUPPLY HAND- 
BOOK there are dozens ready-to-buiidp plus detailed steps for designing your own. There are circuits and parts lists for all kinds of 
supplies, ranging from simple DC types to highly stable regulated versions. N you need a circuit to convert a DC voltage to a higher or 
lower voltage, turn DC into AC, or AC to DC— then this is the book you need. With more than 400 pages, you should be able to find just 
the circuit you need. Without a doubt one of the best powee supply source books available, compiled by the editors of 73. $7.95.' 

iNTRODUCTION TO RTTY— BK73aO— A beginners guide to 



radioteletype Including teletypewriter fundamentals, signals 
distortion and RTTY art. You can be a RTTY artist! A 73 publica- 
tion. $2.00.* 

• THE NEW RTTY HANDBOOK "BK7347- is a new edition and 
the only up-to-date RTTY book available. The state of the art has 
been changing radically and has made all previous RTTY books ob- 
solete. It has the latest circuits, great for the newcomer and expert 
aiike. $5.95,' 

• PROPAGATION WIZARD'S HANDBOOK-SK7302^by J. H. 
Nelson. When sunspots riddled the worldwide communications 
networks of the 1940^3, John Henry Nelson looked to the planets 
for an answer. The result was a theory of propagation forecasting 
based upon interplanetary alignment that made the author the 
most reliable forecaster in America today. The book provides an 
enlightened look at communications past, present, and future, as 
well as teaching the art of propagation forecasting. S6.95.* 

• SSB . . /THE MISUNDERSTOOD MODE— BK7351— by James B, 
Wilson. Single Sideband Transmission . . . thousands of us use It 
every day, yet it remains one of the least understood facets of 
amateur radio, J. B, Wilson presents several methods of sideband 
generation, amply ijilustrated with charts and schematics, which 
will enable I he ambitious reader to construct his own sideband 
generator. A must for the technically-serious ham, $5.50/ 

• SSTV HANDBOOK— BK7354(hardcover), BK7355(softCOver)— 
This excellent book tells all about it, from its history and basics to 
the present state-of-the-art techniques. Contains chapters on cir- 
cuits, monitors, cameras, color SSTV, test equipment and much 
more. Hardbound $7.00. softbound $5.00/ 

• WEATHER SATELLITE HANDBOOK— BK7370— Simple equip- 
ment and methods for getting good pictures from the weather 
satellite. Antennas, receivers, monitors, facsimile you can build, 
tracking, automatic control (you don't even have to be home). Dr. 
Taggart WB8DQT, $4.95. * 

• 73 DIPOLE AND LONG-WIRE ANTENNAS— BK 101 6— by Edward M. Noll W3FQJ. This Is the first collection of virtually every type of 
wire antenna used by amateurs. Includes dimensions, configurations, and detailed construction data for 73 different antenna types. 
Appendices describe the construction of noise bridges, line tuners, arid data on measuring resonant frequency, velocity factor, and 

swr, $5.50/ 





DipolB anti 
lAntennas 



• THE GIANT BOOK OF AMATEUR RADIO ANTENNAS— BK7304 
—With the GIANT Book of Amateur Radio Antennas by your side, 
antennas will become the least of your worries. Over 450 pages of 
design ideas, theory and reference data make this book live up to 
its title. The 7 chapters cover everything from basic antenna theory 
through designs for DIY accessories, as well as dozens of antenna 
designs. Whether planning to build or buy, design or admire, lest 
or enjoy a ham antenna — this is the book for you. From the editors 
of 73; published by Tab Books. $12.95 Hardback/ 

• 73 VERTICAL, BEAM AND TRIANGLE ANTENNAS— BK1069- 
by Edward M. Noll W3FQJ. Describes 73 different antennas for 
amateurs- Each design is the result of the author's own ex- 
periments covering the construction ol noise bridges and antenna 
fine tuners, as well as methods for measuring resonant frequency, 
velocity factor, and standing^wave ratios. 160 pages, $5.50* 

• VHF ANTENNA HANDBOOK— BK736e— The NEW VHF Anten- 
na Handbook details the theory, design and construction of hun- 
dreds of different VHF and UHF antennas , , . A practical book 
written for the average amateur who takes joy in building, not full 
of complex formulas for the design engineer. Packed with 
fabulous antenna projects you can buitd. $4.95/ 

Use the order card in the back of this magazine or itemize your order on a separate piece of paper and mail to: 

73 Radio Bookshop • Peterborough NH 03458 Be sure to include check or detailed credit card information. 

*Add $1.00 handling charge. Note: Prices subject to change on books not published by 73 Magazine 





FOR TOLL FREE ORDERING CALL 1-800-258-5473 




TEST EOUipMENT 



• RF AND DIGITAL TEST EQUtPMENT YOU CAN 

BUfLD— BK1044— Rf burst, function, square wave generators* 
variable length pulse generators— 100 kHz marker, i 1 and rf sweep 
generators, audio osc, af/rf signal injector. 146 MHz synthesizer, 
digital readouts for counters, several counters, prescaler, 
microwave meter, etc. 252 pages. $5,95/ 

• VOL I COMPONENT TESTERS— LB7359— ... how to build 
transistor testers (8), diode testers (3), IC testers (3), voltmeters 
and VTVMs (9), ohmmeters (8 different kinds), inductance (3), 
capacity (9), Q measurement, crystal checking (6), temperature (2), 
aural meters for the blind (3) and all sorts of miscel ianeous data on 
meters using them, making them more versatile, making stan- 
dards. Invaluable book. $4,95/ 

• VOL It AUD»0 FREQUENCY TESTERS— LB7360- ... jam 
packed with ail krnds of audio frequency test equipment. If you're 

into SSB, RTTY, SSTV, etc. this book is a must for you . . , a good 
book for hi-fi addicts and experimenters, too! $4.95.* 

• VOL III RADIO FREQUENCY TESTERS— LB7361— Radio frequency waves, the common denominator of Amateur Radio. 
Such items as SWR. antenna impedance, line impedance, rf output and field strength; detailed instructions on testing these 
items includes sections on signal generators, crystal calibrators, grid dip oscillators, noise generators, dummy loads and 
much more, $4,95. ' 

• VOL. IV IC TEST EQUIPMENT— LB7362— Become a troubleshooting wizard! In this fourth volume of the 73 TEST EQUIP- 
MENT LIBRARY are 42 home construction projects for buildrng test equipment to work with your ham station and tr^ servicing 
digital equipment. Plus a cumulative index for aM four volumes of the 73 TEST EQUfPfVlENT LIBRARY. $4,95/ 




rhE WELL-EQuippEd Uam shAck 



• 73 MAGAZINE BINDERS- Preserve and 

protect your collection for your lifetime! 
There's no excuse for lost issues when you 
have these handsome red binders with 
gold lettering. Order 1—6N 1001 — for 
S6.50-: 2 or more— BN 1002- Por $6.00 
each.* (specify 1978 or 1979 binders) 

• est CARDS — 73 turns out a fantastic 
sertes of QSL cards at about half the cost 
of having them done elsewhere because 
they are run as a fill-in between printing 
tiooks and other items in the 73 Print Shop. 
250 Style W— QW0250— for $8.95'; 500 
Style W— QW0500— for $13.95*; 250 Style 
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OX0500— for $13.95*; 250 Style Y— QY0250 
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$13.95/ 





Slirle X 




r. 



S^leY 



nsD/i 



style W 



• HOW TO BUILD A MICROCOMPUTER— 
AND REALLY UNDERSTAND IT-BK7325 
— by Sam Creason. The electrontcs hobby- 
ist who wants to build his own microcom- 
puter system now has a practical "How- 
To" guidebook. Sam Creason 's book is a 
combination technical manual and pro- 
gramming guide that takes the hobbyist 
step-by*step through the design, construc- 
tion, testing and debugging of a complete 
microcomputer system, $9.95.' 

• 1979 WORLD REPEATER ATLAS— 
BK7346— With a new easy-to-use format, 
the 1979 World Repeater Atlas is the larg- 
est ever published by 73. More than 230 
pages of repeaters, listed by both location 
and frequency, together with over 50 loca- 
tion maps— make this the best repeater 
atlas ever! Nearly 2000 separate repeater 
locations are shown on the maps, with 
greater accuracy than ever before. $4,95.* 

• BACK ISSUES— Complete your collec- 
tion: many are prime collectables now, 
classics in ihe field! A full colleclion is an 
invaluable compendium of radio and elec- 
tronics knowledge! 

Single back issue— STOOOO— 

$3.00-; 

25 our choice^ST2500— S12.00'; 

25 your choice— ST2501 —$25.00* ; 

5 your choice— ST0500— $8.50*; 

10 your choice— ST1000— $14,00. * 



• OWNER REPAIR OF AMATEUR RADIO EQUIPMENT— BK7310— Frank Gfass shares over 40 years of operating, servicing, 
and design experience in this book. There are several books and numerous articles available on the subject of repairs to elec- 
tronic equipment, The Information within these books ranges from the elementary to the highly technical written for the top 
engineers in the field. But this book stands out from the rest in that it is written in narrative style aimed at conveying the con- 
cept of electronic servicing, A written discussion of how components work and how they are combined to provide communica- 
tion equipment is used to help the reader understand the concepts required lo service station equipment. $7.95.* 

• A GUIDE TO HAM RADIO— BK7321— by Larry Kahaner WB2NEL. What's Amateur Radio all about? You can learn the basics 
of (his fascinating hobby with this excellent beginner s guide It answers the most frequently asked questions in an easygoing 
manner, and It shows the best way to go about getting an FCC license. A Guide to Ham Radio is an ideal introduction to a hobby 
enioyed by people around the worid. $4.95/ 

• LIBRARY SHELF BOXES— These sturdy white, corrugated, dirt-resistant tjoxes each hold a full year of 73 or Kitobaud Micro- 
computing. With your order, request self-sticking labels for any of the following: 73. Kitobaud Mtcrocompufing, CO, OST. Ham 
Radio. Personal Computmg, Radio Eiectronics, tnterfaceAge, and Byfe, Order 1 — BX1000— for $2.00*; order 2-7— BX2002— for 
$1.50 each*; order 8 or more— BX 1002— for $1.25 each*. 

Use the order card in the back of this magazine or itemize your order on a separate piece of paper and mail to: 

73 Radio Bookshop • Peterborough NH 03458. Be sure to include check or detailed credit card information. 

*Add $1.00 handling charge. Note: Prices subject lo change on books not published by 73 Magazine. 



FOR CUSTOMER SERVICE CALL [603] 924-7298 





That^s the size of the ^w^orld's 
most comprehensive guide to 
the subject of ham radio; 

18 years of 73 Magazine. 



The back issues of 73 are a gold mine of interesting articles. Unlike 
tf>e otiier magazines, which fill their pages with activity reports, 
there's little to go stale in 73. You'll find pioneering articles on SSTV, 
FIVI, repeaters, ICs, and computers. Even the editorials are fun as 
Wayne Green's dire predictions, like the debacle of incentive licens- 
ing, have come to pass. 

Clip the coupon below and send for 73's new back issue catalogue. 
Treat yourself (or a friendly ham) to some fun, and a fantastic bargain 
to boot. 



YESI Rush me 73's FREE Back Issue Catalogue! 

Name 

Address ^ 

City 



State 




magazine 

PETERBOROUGH NH 03458 



Zip 



203 



ALL NEW 1979 

REPEATER ATLAS 

OF THE WORLD 



worn 



^'fW^ 



i.,c:,o,.-..:. 
w'oio'i'' ■:■■ 



^^U^ 



^irfJ 



im 



. -. ^-- ■-■:-, 

■I'v.' ■ 'I-"',0 O «> ' "I' »_ 






:<J.r 



***^^^*^^.. 



■ ■.•z-j'ii'.'XfXi: 
■.-::.'-i;'t:.':>,.'?^: 



The a[E new 1979 Repeater Atlas is now available as a 
result of the cooperation o1 hundreds of individuals, 
repeater groups, and coordinators. This is the largest 
atlas available anywhere. It includes 234 pages, 50 
location maps, over 4,500 stations, and 9,000 entries, 
in a new, easy-to-use format indexed by location and 
frequency. Call Toll Free (800) 258-5473; have your 
credit card handy and order your 1979 Repeater Atlas 
(BK 7346) today. $4.95 

J^ magazine 

Peterborough I\IH 03458 




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propagation 



by 

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7n 


7S 


14A 


31 


14 


14B 


76 


WESTERN 


UNITED 


STATES TO: 


ALASKA 


21 A 


14A 


1-1 


7 


7 


J 


7 


7 


7A 


14 


21 


21A 


ARGENTIMA 


21A 


21 


14 


M 


14 


,. 


7e 


14 


2TA 


21 A 


21A 


31A 


AUSTRALIA 


3S 


?e 


?1 


14 


^a 


79 


?B 


7B 


14 


14A 


J1A 


21A 


CANAL ZONE 


;?tA 


14 


14 


7 


7 




7A 


^H 


21A 


31A 


21A 


21A 


Er^GLAMO 


7B 


7 


'i 


I 


7 




7B 


14 


21A 


21 A 


21 


14 


HA^Air 


m 


•21 A, 


23 


14 


7 




7 


7 


14 






2« 


21A 


2S 


INOIA 


14 


14 


14 


7-B 


7B 


7tS 


7& 


70 


14 


14 


14 


7B 


JAPAN 


21A 


21 


14 


7fi 


7B 




7 


7 


7 


78 


1>4 


2tA 


M6>ttCO 


21A 


14 


14 


7 


7 




7 


14 


21 


31 


yiA, 


21A 


PHILIPPINES 


?1A 


2IA 


21 


7B 


7fl 


m 


7R 


7A 


14 


14 


14 


21A 


PUERTdflFCO 


21 A 


14 


14 


? 


7 j 




7 


14 


21 


?1A 


?^f 


21fi_ 


SOUTH AFRICA 


14 


14 


7P 


?E5 


78 


7B 


7fl 


14 


21 


21A 


21A 


21 


U.S. S. R. 


7e 


7U 


7 


7 


7B 


7B 


7B 


7A 


14 


14 


14B 


?B 


EAST COAST jj^^ 


14 


7 7 


7 




7 


14 


^1 , 


21A 


21 A 


31A , 



A 
B 
F 
G 
P 
SF 



Next higher frequency may also be useful 

Difficult circuit this period 

Fair 

Good 

Poor 

Chance of solar flares 



sun 


mon 


tue 


wed 


ihu 


Irl 


sat 




1 

G 


2 

F 


3 

G 


4 

G 


5 

G 


6 

G 


7 

a 


8 

G 


9 


10 

G 


11 

F 


12 

F 


13 

F 


14 

F 


15 

G 


16 

G 


17 

G 


18 

c 


19 

G 


20 

G 


21 

F 


22 

F 


23 

G 


24 

G 


25 

G 


26 

G 


27 

Q 


28 

G 


29 

G 


30 

G 


31 

P 1 







mm 




Peterborough, n.h. 03458 



2x 



[ 



446 ABC Communications ,119 

A1 Ai^irondackBadioSupply. ... 155 023 

AZ4 Actva Electronics. ........... 202 01 1 

A94 Advanced Etectrcnles AppHca^ D25 

tiona. . 165, 167 F5 

A60 AED Electronics. 1 69 G27 

A92 AHF Antennas 159 G12 

A107 AJT Enterprises. 160 

A2 AJdeica 20* G26 

A40 Amateur Radio Supply of Nasli' G22 

vtlte, Inc .... .73 64 

A21 Amateur-WtlDlesate' Beclmnics 

..... 184, 185 H24 

A'JOe AMC Engtneering 161 H2 

A26 AmidOJi ... 160 H16 

Amsai ., . ,, as HB 

AaO Anteck .^,-. .173 H5 

Afi Aptrof) Laboratories 160 H3 

Associated Radio. 19B H44 

A100 Autek 163 H36 

B23 BafK«r Wltti3mson . ...... . tSl 

BS4 Ba^ry Efectroni^ci . . . . 152 t45 

B42 Brodi^ Electronics CO 159 132 

Be Buiiot Electforttcs 200 J43 

C3 aeqg 151, 156 19 

C21 CoaHit 18 127 

C106 Command Productions . . 157 J1 

C5B Communkations Center, ME J2 

- . , , .49, in 

C5 Comfnunlcaiions EI#ctron»c^1l5 

C115 Com mynicatrons Electronics KT4 

Speciaiii-;. >58, 177 

C6 Co^municattOTLS Specialists K4 

. 16. T7 US 

C105 Commu meal ions i TV Unltd, I5i2 L9 

C124 Cost Effective Computef Service LTD 

86 M-^e 

06 Peter W Dahi Company 123 M35 

062 Datong 164 

029 Oietectnc Communications, . 161 M36 

Digital Research Cofp 190 Ml 00 



Digital Researoti Parts. ...... 191 

Dowetrofi. . .*,... 177 

QraKEi .,«,,.. 31 

DS1 JnslruTnenIs 140, 141 

Fleatier Corporation. .173 

Gemini Instrument Co*^*-. .,. 157 
GermanioMn Amaleyr SuppTy 

. -. 113 

G SG OectfO«ics 

G.I.S.M.O. 

Go<ItXHJt Electronics. 
Hal Communications. 
Hal-Tromji. . 
Ham Radio Center. 
Hamtronics. NY ... 



121. 
.92, 



162 

120 

194 

\b 

179 

101 

.... 1B9 

,,..169 

tea, 173 

Ctl, 25 

157 

167 

19 

175 

67-89 

tS7 



Hamtronics, PA..*. .. 

Heath. 167, 

Henry Radio. 
HFT. Inc 
Hustler 

ICOM 

InfO'Tecti. tiw; 

instant Softwaie 

tnsta-Pac... 

Integrated Circuits, Unltd 201 

\Rl 11B 

Jameco Electronics 195 

Jan Crystals t5l 

Kantromcs. . ... 169 

Kenwood. ... . . CIV, 5, 135 

K^ BectfcmiCS 18 

Kilobaud Miorocomputin^ 63 
KLM EJecrTon*c& tS 

The lx>gic Store ,...&& 

Long s Elect ronics 1 24- 1 29 

L'Tronics .121 

l^acrotronlcs. (nc. ... 153 

1*4 a dJ son Electronics Supply 
57. 71, 121, 123, 153, 159, 1B1, 179 
Maggiore Electronic Lab. 157 
Metz . 64 



M52 MFJ Enierprises . 21. m. 1T9, 150 

1^6 y\HZ Electronics , IBG, 187 

M69 M Icro Control Specialties 160 

M95 Micro Management Systems. . 18 

M109 MH EnduBtries 152, 166 

M7e M & M RF Distrjbutors/LunaF. 122 

M57 Monroe Electronics 163 

N22 N on Linear Systems 31 

OS OK Mach hne & Toot . B5. 1 65 

03 OptoePectfontcs. Inc .110 

Paiofnar Engineers . B6 

P31 Panasonic .33 

P20 para-graj^tiics 161 

P41 PC- Eiectfonics 153 

P4 A Pickering Codemas ter Co. ... 1 58 

P&^ Rudy Plak . . 162 

P2 Poly Paks. .... 197 

Q3 Quest Electronics. . . 161 

Rt Radio Amateur CaltbOdh 176 

Radio World. 160 

R8 Ramsey EiecUomcs 51.188 

H27 RF Power Labsjnc. 122 

S16 Selectronics 162 

S63 SemJconductor Sur|>ius 182. 199 

S3 Sentry ManufaclLring. ..... 153 

S33 S-F Amateur Radio Services 

.... ,..■,.. 18, 1 69 

S1 17 Spacecoast Research .86 

S7 Space Electronics. , — 152 

Sai SpectrtKtics, Inc. . 192, 193 

88 Spectrum Comrmin . 106. 107 

810 SST Electronics. 18S 

543 Surplus Elecifonics 196 

544 Swan E I w'r Mtg . t3o , 1 77 
T52 Tele-ToKvr Mfg, Co, . 1 77 

Ten Tec, Inc 11,97 

T55 Tm^ USA . , 41 

134 Thomas Commun . 26, 27 

T4B Tower E tec ironies Corp. . 123. 1 60 

Tta Trac Electronics Corp 163 

T3 Ttftls Rad*o Elec 66.67,163 



U10 


UDM Er*terprises , . 157 


U13 


Ultima Ejecuonics, Ltd 157 


U9 


U nadllla^Rey CO Division . . 159 


U2 


UnarcoRohn , , , . ifi2 


UB 


Uniiad Products 203 


V24 


Vibroplex 13. 158 


WIS 


Wacom _... 155 


W18 


Western Beclromcs 15a» 17S 


W2 


Wflson Bectropic^ 3 


W33 


Wilson Systems, Inc . . .93^96 


K3 


Xltei Cotp. 120, 166. 166 


Y1 


VaesitElec. ClU,7,23-53 


From 73, 72, 131 134. 179, 2X^^09 



'Reader Service Inquiries rrel Ivonored. 
Plea&e contact ad¥ef1is.er directly. 



BK1016 

STOOOO 

ST2500 

ST0500 

ST 1000 

ST2501 

BK7307 

BN1001 

BN1002 

BK7309 

CT7305 

CT7306 

CT7310 

CT7313 

CT7320 

CT7325 

CT7394 

BK7321 

BK7304 

BK7325 

BK1028 
BK7380 
CT7300 

BK7310 





73 DIPOLE a LONG WIRE ANTENNAS. $ 5.50 

73 BACK ISSUE , . - $ 3.00 

73 BACK ISSUES— 25 OUR CHOICE. , $12.00 

73 BACK ISSUES— 5 YOUR CHOICE $ 8.50 

73 BACK ISSUES- 10 YOUR CHOICE. ........ $14.00 

73 BACK ISSUES— 25 YOUR CHOICE , , $25.00 



BEHIND THE DIAL 

BINDER-73— 1, . 

BINDER— 73—2 AND UP 

CHALLENGE OF 160 , 

CODE TAPE— 5 WPM 

CODE TAPE— 6 + WPM. _..„..., 

CODE TAPE-10 + WPM 

CODE TAPE— 13 4- WPM , . 

CODE TAPE^20 -I- WPM. . . , . 

CODE TAPE— 25 + WPM. .......... 

CODE TAPES {ANY FOUR ABOVE) 

GUI DE TO HAM RADtO. ,..,.... . 
GIANT BOOK OF AMATEUR RADIO 

ANTENNAS $12.95 

HOW TO BUILD A MICROCOMPUTER & REALLY 



495 

6.50 
6.00 
4.95 
4.95 
4.95 
4.95 
4.95 
4.95 
4.95 
SI 5.95 
$ 4.95 



S 

$ 
$ 

lb 
$ 

s 
$ 
$ 
s 

s 



UNDERSTAND IT... 

IC OP AMP COOKBOOK. . . . 

INTRO TO RTTY 

NOVICE THEORY TAPES, . . 

OWNER REPAIR OF AMATEUR RADIO 

EQUIPMENT 



$ 9.95 
S12.95 
S 2 00 
$15 95 

$ 7.95 



BK7305 
BK1015 

BK7302 

QW02SO 

OW0500 

QX0250 

QX0600 

QY0250 

QY0500 

BK7346 

BK1044 

BK7347 

BX1000 

BX1001 

BX1002 

BK7351 

BK7354 

BK7355 

CT7350 

SGI 081 

SGI 080 

SG7358 

SG7357 

LB7359 

LB 7360 

LB 7361 

LB7362 

BK7348 

BK1069 

BK7368 

BK7370 



i ■ 9^ * * 



POWER SUPPLY HANDBOOK 

PRACTICAL ANTENNAS FOR THE RADIO 

AMATEUR , . , , , 

PROPAGATION WIZARD'S HANDBOOK. , . , 

QSL CARDS—STYLE W— 250 

QSL CARDS— STYLE W-500 
QSL CARDS- STYLE X— 250 
QSL CARDS— STYLE X--500 
QSL CARDS— STYLE Y— 250 
QSL CARDS- STYLE Y— 500. . , 
1979 WORLD REPEATER ATLAS 
BF DIGITAL TEST EQUIPMENT. . 

RTTY HANDBOOK..,. 

SHELF BOX — 1 , 

SHELF BOXES— 8 AND UP $1 

SSB THE MISUNDERSTOOD MODE 
SSTV HANDBOOK (HARDCOVER). . . . 
SSTV HANDBOOK (SOFTCOVER), . . . 

SSTV TAPE. ..,,,... 

STUDY GUIDE— ADVANCED CLASS. 
STUDY GUIDE— EXTRA CLASS. ..... 

STUDY GUIDE— GENERAL CLASS. . . 

STUDY GUIDE— NOVICE CLASS. 

TEST EQUIP LIB V1-C0MPTESTERS 
TEST EQUIP UB V2--AUDIO TESTERS. . . 
TEST EQUIP LIB V3— RADIO EQUIP. _ , . . 

TEST EQUIP UB V4-IC TEST EQUIP 

TOOLS & TECHNIQUES. 

VERTICAL BEAM & TRIANGLE ANTNS 

VHf ANTENNA HANDBOOK. 

WEATHER SATELLITE HANDBOOK. 




.$ 7,95 

, S 9.95 

.S 6.95 

.$ 8.95 

S13.95 

S 8.95 

.$13.95 

.$ 8.95 

.$13:95 

.$ 4.95 

.% 5.95 

$ 5.95 

-S 2.00 

50 each 

25 each 

. $ 5.50 

.$ 7.00 

.$ 5.00 

,S 5.95 

$ 5.95 

5.95 

5.95 

4.95 

4.95 

4.95 

4.95 

4.95 

4.95 

5.50 

4.95 

4.95 



.s 

$ 
.$ 
,$ 
.$ 
.$ 
.$ 
.s 
.s 



210 



I 



i 



BNC Antenna Connector 



Squerch Control 



Condensor Mike 



&-Digft LED Readout 



Keyboard Entry 




MICROPROCESSOR CONTROLLED 
U SYNTHESIZED HANDIE 



Ctor^Busy Auto Scan Selector 



Repeatef/Simpleii Offset Switch 



Audio Gam Control 



^ Remote Speaker/Mike Input 



Channel Busy Lamp 



Transmit Indicator 



K^board Lock 



Display On/Off 



5 KHz Up 




The Yaesu FT-207R Sfnihesaed Hantiie 
has ail the features fou could want in a weif compaci imci(a§e 



144-148 MHz Range 
10 KHz Steps 

3 Watts Output 

4 Memories plus Programmable Offset 
Priority Channel 

Memory and Band Auto Scan 



Optional Equipment: « 

Tone Squelch, Speaker/Mike, Nicads, Battery Charger 



Keyboard Encoded Frequency Entry 

2 Tone (Touchtone® ) Input from Keyboard 

Keyboard Lock guards against accidental 

frequency change 

Odd Splits Can Be Programmed from Keyboard 

Automatic Battery Saver Feature for LED Display 

Rubber Flex Antenna 



Price And SpectficatKins Subject To 
Change Without Notice Or Obligation 




679X 



YAESU ELECTRONICS CORP., 15954 Downey Ave., Paramount, CA 90723 • (213) 633-4007 
YAESU ELECTRONICS Eastern Service Ctr, 981 2 Princeton-Glendale Rd., Cincinnati OH 45246 






• . • synthesized, BIG LCD, 
10 memories, 
scanning . . . and more! 



KeniMDOci TR-2400 . jrs a svnttteslwi] 2 m^ter 
han€HY«id transceivtr. .the answer t© any 
Amateurs operating rcqiilrements! rts many 
a<fvaticefi features Inctuoe: 




CONVENIENT TOP CONTROLS 



le m c ' jnlighr Abetter than L£DsJ 
in the dark iwith lamp switchJ 

r rent dfain (much less than LEOsJ 
ivs on 

i transmit frequencies and memory 



1 



always \ led with battery backup) 
ory scannino tfor 'busy* or ^open' 

ilfowlno operations: 






v> TOM 
<- AUtC 

channe^s} 
Mode $\wltch 

• Simplex 

• Standard repeater by offsetting the transmit frequency 
+ 600 kHz or - 600 khi 

• Repeater with nonstandard splits bv offsetting the 
transmit frequency to any freauencv stored in memory 10 

• REVSRSIc momentary switch for the following applications: 
Checking signals on the input of a repeater 
Determining if a repeater is 'upside down"" 
6uflt-ln Touch-Tone g^anerator using 16-button iceyboard 
iceyboard sefection of S-Mi channels from M4.000 to 
147.99S MHz 

UP/OOWN manual scanning and operation from 143.900 to 
148 495 MHz in single or fast continuous 5 kHz steps. Even 
operates on MARS repeaters withm this range by using memory 
10 for transmit offset frequency 

• ICO ^anrow" Indicators 

• -ON Air 

• Memory recall 

• Battery status 

• Lamp switch on 

• TWO lock S¥/ to prevefit accidentar f requer^cy change and 
accidental transmission 

• - 1 tsubtone module not Keriwood'Sypplied* 

• Bwc antenna connector 

• 1.5 \ft^att$ Rf output 

T?ie TR'2400 comes witli the following standard accessories: 

• Rexibie rubberrzed antenna with BNC connector 

• Nicad battery pacfe 

• Battery charger 
Optional 

• Leather case 

• Base Stand (for quiclt cliarge 
and easy base-station 
operationi 

• DC iautomobileJ quicic charge 



STOP 




FLOC** 



Q^rOW ^^^ 



WAI*** 



sToi- o^^?!:^ 





\^ 



ST'1 BASE STAND COPTJONAU 



(Suhircl ta FCC tpprov^h 

SEE YOUR AUTHORIZED 
KENWOOD DEALER FOR MORE 
INFORMATION ON THE TR-2400. 

KEN\A/OOD 

,*.pmet§etter m mmaitur radio 

TRIO KENWOOD COMMUNICATIOMS INC, 

tni WEST WALNUT/COMPTON, GA 9Q220 




See Kenwood's l^aah Tatk" in this issue tor more iatormatkya