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Full text of "73 Magazine (June 1980)"


• 





June 1*)80 S2.50 



1^ 



28 One Step at a Time: Designing Your 
Own Ham Gear 

— part I. .... W4RNL 

36 Down with Interpolation 

—a digital dispJav *or the Triton and others 

.,..,..., - , W4fQ 

42 Hooray! An AFSK Auto IDer! 

— a clean and legal ending for RTTY transmis- 
sions _ KlIJ 

44 Let's QSY to .52 

—ah, technology - ^ WB2RVA 

46 Five Test Equipment Bargains from 
Heath 

—the 5280 series features plenty of measuring 
power per dollar. . . . . , W2QFC 

48 The Phoenix Fi?t 

—an alarming analog-to-digital con version for 
oiit-of-time cloclk-radios WA3AJII 

50 QRQ, QRS-By the Numbersr 

—a digital CMOS code^speed mdtcalof 
W7BBX 

54 Adding a Scanner to Your 2m Rig 

— here's a method that works with many scanner/ 
transceiver combos. . , , . . WA8HEB 

56 Digital Transistor Checker 

—a 'hands-on'' proiect , , ,,, . . W4QBU/PV2ZBC 

56 CB to 10 

— part XXV; iisif>g those surplus 40-channel 
boards ,,..., ... . - AF8B 

60 The Stolen Rig Retriever 

— buik-ui gadget automaticatly sends your call 
wrth every transmission. ... WB6ICBM 

64 Constructing QRP Dummy Loads 

— useful and inei^pensive. . WIOLP 

68 The IC-211 Cookbook 

— mods and tweaks to improve performance 
IC3VGX 

74 Take a Hike 

—backpacking with an HW-^. . ... K4FO 

78 Tuning Antenna-Mounted Preamps 

— do it without additional wiring. . Staff 

60 PC Artwork Made Easy 

— lift Ljyoutsfrom the page with transparent con- 
tact paper, W3HIK 

62 Electronic Dice — a Family Pleaser 

-LasVegas. lookout!, . W7BBX 

84 Fun with Foozle 

W7B8X 

88 The Demise of Component Stores 

— parts places are past their prime VE3FL£ 



90 



94 



98 



104 



111 



112 
114 



118 

120 



122 



124 



130 



134 
136 

144 



146 



146 



152 



Priority Frequency Power-Up for the 
fT227R 

— the right place every time , . . WA1AUM 

^ Computerize Your Contest Paper- 
work 

-two BASIC programs do it all WAflWIA 

• ^ Emulate an Elephant 

— but let your mtcro bear the burden 

. . VEM6 

]j^ Prefix Challenge 

— try this while you're waiting for the band lo 
open up AC&P 

Check Chirp with a Choke 

**get 59^ every time with this quick fix 
WA2MEU6 

Reawaken thai Sleeping Rx 

— first steps m receiver a I ignmenL .... Sara 

Rubber Thumbs and Pilot lamps 

— if you re all thumbs, enlighten yourself! 

E3MPI 

Tempo S1 2-Meter Portable 

-eOO channels, to go! ........ Wfl^JHRV 

A Proper Pedestal for PCBs 

— handy holder eases circuit board constrtiction 

and repair , Staff 

Surplus Treasures 

—assemble a quality ham station for less than 
1200 lt1VIC/2 

Listen in Secrecy with a Giant Induc- 
tive Loop 

^monitor your rig from anywhere in the house— 
without wires .......... ZI.2AMI 

Those Hamtronics Kits ... How Can 
You Use Them? 

— an in-depth look at some electronic bargains 

WA4pyQ 

10 Meters for the SB-221 

—add the "missing*" band. WA2KSM 

Another Place, Another Time 

— working the paranormal band. . ' . Anon. 

Who Needs a $40 Soldering Ironl 

-here's why you may want to invest in one 

Staff 

Outboard Power for the 820 

— it's easy to connect a second set of ears to the 
Kenwood transceiver . . ..-- * * ■ ■ ■ lti7CIIFf6 

CB to 6 

— convert a 49-MHj HT into something, W9CGI 

Digital 6oat Anchor 

— using pencil, paper, and a frequency counter 
for receiver readout. ,,,,_..,.- WB1 ASl 







74470"65946 



I 06 



Never Say Die — 4, Looking West— 10, RTTY Loop — 12, DX — 14, Leaky Lines — 16, Ham 
Help— 16, 174, 184, Letters- 18, Contests — 20, New Products — 22, Awards— 24, Social 
Events — 170, OSCAR Orbits— 175, Corrections— 180, Dealer Directory — 209, Propaga- 
tion— 209 





<^oh(^ 



Stfown wfth 
optfonai toucf} 
lone fjcid 

Tempo S-1 

• The first and most thorQushly field 
tested hand-held synthesized radio available. 
800 channels in the palm of your hand. 

• Simple to operate. (You don't need a 
degree in computer programming) 

• Heavy duty battel^ pack allows more 
operating time between charges. 

• External microphone capability 

• The lowest price ever.,. $259.00 

• The S*lT (With touch tone pad 
mstaa€dy..$289M0 

Ttie Tempo line afso teattires a tine fine of extremely compact 
UHF and VHF pocket receivers. They re low priced, 
dependable, and availaWe wirh CTCSS and 2-torte decoders. 
The Tempo FMT-2 & FMT'42 (UHF| provides excellent mobile 
communications and features a remote control head for hide- 
away mountmjg. 

The Tempo FMlt-42 (UHF) and the new FMH-12 and FMH-IS 
(VHFI micro hand held transceivers provide 6 channel 
eapabffrty. dependability plus many worthwhiie features at a 
low prjce. FCC type accepted models atso available. 
Please call oi write for complete information. Also available 
from Tempo dealers throughout the U.S, and abroad 



the first in synthesized 

rtables gives you 
the broadest choice 
at the lowest price 

•Ihe neui 

* The only synthesized hand-held offering 5 watts 

Diltput. (Switchable for I or 5 watt operation) 

* The same dependability as the time proven S 
Circuitry that has been proven m 
more than a million hours of operation. 

* Heavy duty battery pack, 
^ External microphone capability. 
^ The S*5's exciting low price.. .only $299.00 
^ With touch tone pad $339.00 




SUPPLIED ACCESSORIES 

Telescoping whip anienna. ni-caci baiiery 

pack, charger 

QPTIOffAL ACCESSORfES 
12 Button touch tone pad {not mstalled): 
S39 • 16 Button touch lone pad (not 
installed}: $48 • Tone burst generator: 
S29.95 • CTCSS sub-audible Tone conkol: 
$29,95 • Rubber UeK antenna: $a • Leathef 
holster: S16 • Cigarette lighter plug mobile 
charging Lnil: S6 • IVfatcning 30 watt 
output 13 8 VCD power amplifier {S30): 
$89 • Matching 80 watl outpul power 
amplilref (S80]; $149 



SPEClFlCATiaiiS 

Frequency Coverage: 144 lo 148 MHz 

Channel Spacing Receive every 5 kHz, 

transmit Simplex or 

3^600 kHz 
Power Requiremenls: 9 6 VDC 
Current Drain; 17 ma standby 

StX) ma-transmit 
Antenna Impedance: 50 ohms 
Dimensions; 40 mm x 62 rnm?{ 

170 mm (i6'^ x 2 5" 

X 6,n 
Weight 17 o? 

Sensitivity Better than 5 

microvolls nommal for 

20cfb 

The Tempo S-2 

Tempo is first again. This time with a superior quality syntliesized 220 MHz hand 
held transceiver. With an S-2 in yourcaror pocket you can use 220 MHz repeaters 
throughout the U.S. tt offers all the advanced engineering, premium quafity 
components and exciting features of the S-1. The S-2 offers 1000 channels in an 
extremely lightweight but rugged case, 

If you're not on 220 this is the perfect way to get started. With the addftion of the S- 
25 (25W output} or S*75 (75W output) Tempo solid state amplifier it becomes a 
powerful mobile or base station. If you have a 220 MHz rig, the S-2 will add 
tremendous versatility. Its tow price includes an external microphone capability. 
heavy duty ni-cad battery pack* charger, and tetescoping whip antenna. 
PriGe... $349.00 With touch lone pad... $399.00 

TEMPO VHF & UHF SOLID STATE POWER AMPLIFIERS 

Boost your signal. . , give It the range and ctarlty of a high powered base 
statton. VHF (13S to 175 MHz) 



Drive Powef 


Output 


Mf>del No. 


Pnce 


2W 


130W 


130^^)2 


$209 


iaw 


130W 


13QA1CI 


S1B9 


30fW 


130W 


130A30 


Sl9d 


2W 


aow 


fiOA02 


S1€® 


low 


aow 


SOAIO 


St49 


30W 


eow 


80A30 


S159 


2W 


sow 


50A02 


S129 


2W 


30W 


3CiA02 


S 89 




WIF (400 lo 512 MHzl mo4«ii, lowcf power and FCC type accepted mod^s 
also available. 



Till FftEE QHDER NtJIiaER: rSOOt 4Z1 0631 

FfK a4l stales eiccpl Call lor nta 

Calif cesidcnis please call colleci m ouf regular numtiers. 

11240 W Olympic Blvd.* Los Angeles, Olil. 9CM}64 2l3/47r-€701 
931 N. Euclid. Anaheim. Calil. 92801 714/772^9200 

Bullef, Missouri 64730 ^U 816/679-3127 



Kmsmn 



fniM labpd le 



Move over imports, here's the new TEN-TEC 




the notable change in hf transceivers 



s 




tmu-rma I *^iOi( .adDiirA 



I H.DH^ 




HSJBC***^ *^ 




$849 



DELTA — the symbol of change— the name 
of a great new TEN-TEC transceiver. A 
transceiver for changing times, with new fea- 
tures, performance, styling, size and value. 
TOTAL SOLID-STATE. By the world s most 
experienced manufacturer of hf solid-state 
amateur radio equlpment 
ALL 9 HF BANDS. First new transceiver since 
WARC 160-10 Meters including the three new 
hf bands (10, 18 &L 24.5 MHz). Resdy^ to go 
except for pliig4n ofystab for 18 and 24.5 MH^ 
segments (available when bands open for usei 
SUPER RECEIVER. New, low noise 
double -conversion de^gn, with 0,3 ^V sen- 
sitivity for 10 dB S-^ N/N 
HIGH DYNAIHIC RANGE. 85 dB minimum 
to reduce overload possibility . Built -m. switch* 
able. 20 dB attenuator for extreme situations. 
SUPER SELECTIVITY. 8-pole monolithic 
SSB filter with 2.4 kHz bandwidth. 2.5 shape 
factor at 6/60 dB points. And optional 200 Hz 
and 500 Hz 6-poie crystal ladder filters. Eight 
pole and 6-pole filteTs cascade for 14 poles of 
near ultimate skirt selectivity. Plus 4 stages of 
active audio filtering. To sharpen that \*i 
response curve to just 150 Hz bandwidth, 
4'position selectivity switch. 
BUILT IN NOTCH FILTER. Standard 
equipment Variable, 200 Hz to 3, 5 kHz. with 
notch depth down to -SO dB. Wipes out 
mterfering carriers or CW, 
OFFSET TUNING. Moves receiver frequency 
up to r 1 kHz to tune receiver separately from 
transmitter. 

"HANG" AGC, For smoother, clearer, re- 
ceiver operation. 

OPTIONAL NOISE BLANKER. For that 
noisy location, mobile or fixed 
WWV RECEPTION. Ready ar 10 MHiL 
'^S'VSWR METER. To read received signal 



strength and transmitted standing wave ratio. 
Electronics liy switched. 

SEPARATE RECEIVER ANTENNA JACK. 
For use with separate receiving antenna, 
linear amplifier with full break- in (QSK) or 
transverters. 

FRONT PANEL HEADPHONE AND 
MICROPHONE JACKS. Convenient 
DIGITAL READOUT Six 3' red LEDs. 
BROADBAND DESIGN. For easy opera 
tion. Instant band change— no Euneup of 
receiver or final amplifier. From the pioneer, 
TEN^TEC. 

SUPER TRANSMITTER. Solid state all the 
way- Stable, reliable, easy to use. 
200 WATTS INPUT On ali bands including 
10 meters (with 50 ohm load). High SWR does 
not automatically limit you to a few watts 
output. Proven, conservatively rated final 
amplifier with solid-state devices warranted 
fully for the first year, and pro-rata for five 
more years 

100%' DUTY CYCLE, M modes, with confi- 
dence. 20 minutes max key -down rime. 
Brought to you by the l^der in soUd- state 
finals. TEN -TEC. 

QSK — INSTANT BREAK IN, Full and fast. 
to make CW a real conversation 
BUILT-IN VOX AND PTX Smooth, set^and- 
forget VOX action plus PTT control VOX Is 
separate horn keying circuits 
ADJUSTABLE THftESHOLD ALC S^ 
DRIVE* From low level to full output with 
ALC control, Maximum power without distor- 
tion, LED indicator. 

ADJUSTABLE SIDETONE, Both volume 
and pitch, Iot pleasant monitoring of CW 
SUPER STABIUTY. Permeability tuned VFO 
vwith less than 15 Hz change per F" change 
over 40" range after 30 min. warmup— and 



less than 10 Hz change for 20 Volt AC line 
change with TEN-TEC power supply, 
VERNIER TUNING. 18 kHz per revolution, 
typical 

SUPER AUDIO. A TEN TEC trademark. 
Low IM and HD distortion [less than 2%>. 
Built-in speaker 

SUPER STYLfNG, The 'SOs look with neat, 
functional Layout " Pa neli zed" grouping of 
controls nicely human engineered for logical 
use. New, smalkr size that goes anywhere, 
fixed or mobile {4^4"h x 11 ^'w x 15MJ. 
Warm, dark front panel Easy -to-read contrast- 
ing nomenclature. Black "clarn-shell" 
aluminum case. Tilt bail 
MODULAR/MASS^TERMINATION CON- 
STRUCTION. Individual circuit boards with 
plug 'in harnesses for easy removal if neces- 
sary. Boards are mailable 
FULL ACCESSORY LINE. All the options: 
Model 282 200 Hz CW filter $50; Model 285 
500 ih CW Filter $45; Model 280 Power 
Supply S139; Model 645 Dual Paddle Keyer 
$85- Model 670 Single Paddle Keyer $34,50. 
Model 247 Antenna Tuner $69; Modd 
234/214 Speech Processor & Condenser Mi- 
crophone $163: Model 215 PC Ceramic Mi- 
crophone $34,50. Model 283 Remote VFO. 
Model 287 Mobile Mount and Model 289 
Noise Blanker available soon- 

Experience The Notable Change In HF 
Transceivers, Experience DELTA. See your 
TEN-TEC dealer or write for full details. 



innr 



TEIM-TEC.IKC 

S£Vl£RVILL£, TENHCSSEt JlUl 

(BPfiMrfJll iMCOMiAvE €H«CMg4K4^^ 



Info 



Manuscripts 

ContrktHitiofi^ m tt^e fomi of manu- 
scnplB with flfawrings afxl^ photo- 
graphs aie wQlcome and wilt be con- 
SKfBfBd tor poss^ible pubttcaHon. W« 
cap assy me no respon^ibhiry for k3&& 
or dama^ to any rnateriat. Ptease 
enclose 9 stamped, ielf-aOdressed 
eoveiDpe with each subm^s^ior^, Pay- 
ment for t?ie use of any unsohcitecj 
material will be madi? upon accep- 
tance. All coniribulions should be di- 
rected to the ?3 editorial offices. 
"How to Write lor 73** guidelines are 
a¥ail:ei}ls upon request 

Editorial Offices: 

Rne Street 

PMevbOrougti I^H 03453 

PtiOW: 603-924^73 

Advertising Offices; 

Elm Street 

Pelerborough NH 03453 

Phon« 603-924 713e 

Circulotion Offices: 

E]fnStr««t 

Peiettiorougti NH 03458 

Rione: 609^4'7296 

Subscription F^otes 

In the Uhjiad States artd Posse&sJons: 
One Year tl2 issues] 318.00 
Two Years (24 Issues) $30.00 
Three Years |3S issues) J45.Q0 
Lifetime subscription &240.DO 

Elsewlierei 

Cariada— add $2iOO pm y«ar unless 
paid With y.S. cvrrency 

All ott>ef foreign— one year only— 
$26.00 payable in US currency 
through a U-S t>ank (surface ma it). 

To subscribe, 

renew or change 

on oddresss 

Wite to 73 Mags^iftif, Sut^scnptio^ 
Department, PQ Bqh 931. Faml^ng- 
dale NY 11737. Fof refiewals and 
ctianges of address, include the ad- 
dress latiel from your ff>osl reH::^^ 
]£SLie of 73 for gift sut^scriptions, m- 
clad© your name and address as well 
as Ihose of gift reciplenls Postmasler 
Send form *f3579 lo 7-3 M&g^zine, Sjb* 
scfiption Services, P O Bo% 931, Farm- 
ingdale. NY 11737, 

Subscription 

problem or 

questiofii 

Write to 73 Magazirne, Suhsciiplion 
Department^ PO Box 9^1, Farmmgdale 
NY 11737. Please include an address 
label 

73 Magaitne (ISSN DD9a-dOlO) Is pub^ 
Mshed month ry by 73, Inc., 80 Pine 
Street, PeiertJorough NH 0345fl. Sec- 
oikS class postage pa>d at ^terbor- 
ough NH 03453 and at atltfilionaf mait- 
ijig otiictis Copyrigtit (cf 1980 by 73, 
Itic. All rigtits r^eived. No pan of ttiis 
put}licatH?r\s rns^ t»e reprinted or other- 
wise reproduced without wTittefi per- 
mission from the publisher Microfilm 
Edition— University MicrOfOm, Ann 
Arbor Mf 46106. 



W2KSD/I 

NEVER SAY DIE 

editoriail by Wayne Gre&n 




W1HR 
Jim Fisk. editor of Ham HadfO. passed away on April 18th. 
His name will continue to remain synonynnous with ham 
radio, in the generic as well as the journalistic sense. His 
tireless efforts to propagate amateur radio will be missed. 
Anyone who Knows anything about hams wi(l say. quite sim- 
ply, 'Thank you, Jim. Your key will never be silent/" 



TRAVELS WITH WAYNE 

With ten meters opening up to 
Japan, I'm hearing from more 
and more of the charming peo- 
ple Sherry and i had dinner with 
in Tokyo . . . members of the 
Tokyo International Amateur 
Radio Association. 

As a remembrance of the din- 
ner, those present signed a 
card. It we can get a group 
together for the electronics 
show tour this coming October, 
we'll have a chance again to see 
the top-notch hams in Tokyo. 
We might also get a chance to 



see Yaesu or Kenwood. 

Just to give you an idea 
. , . here*s a picture i took of part 
of the Yaesu new product devel- 
opment labs. I suspect that 
there are more development 
engineers and technicians in 
this one lab than all ol the Amer^ 
ican ham manufacturers have 
combined. 



THE ASIAN CONNECTION 

There are several good 
reasons why you should make 
the big step and break loose this 



fall to join Sherry and me on a 
trip to Asia. The trip, which 
costs only about $2,000. will in- 
clude attending consumer elec- 
tronics shows in four coun- 
tries— JapaF>, Taiwan, Korea, 
and Hong Kong. 

If you've ever wanted to get Irv 
to business for yourself, you 
may want to look over the elec- 
tronics shows carefully. You'll 
find a lot of smaller businesses 
with products which could be 
Imported and sold in the US. 
There are a lot of firms smaller 
than Sony and Panasonic, you 
know, and many of these don't 
have the connections to sell 
over here... yet. Owners of 
ham stores m particular will 
want to look for interesting ham 
gear and consumer electronic 
gadgets which can be imported 
to give you an edge. 

After the first two weeks of 
the tour, sponsored by the IEEE, 




4 73 Magazine • June, 1980 



^KEI\l\A/OpD 

T . . , pitttsftter in amatfnr radm 



TRIO-KENWOOD COMMUNICATIOKS INC. 

1111 WEST WALNUT / COMPTON, CA 90220 



Hand-shack. 



Synthesized/ 
big LCD. 
10 memories, 
scararine. DTMF 





Put a ham shack In your hand. The TR-2400 
is the fdeaf hand-hefd for 2 meters FM. tt 
features a larg^ LCD readout that can be 
read in direct sunlight or in the dark, 5-klHz- 
step PLL synthesized operatmn, lOchannel 
memory, scanning, and 16-button autopatch 
DTMF encoder. 

TR-2400 FEATURES: 

• Large LCD digital readout 

Readable in direct surljght (better than LEDs). 
Readable in the dark {with lamp swjtch). Virtually 
no current drain (much less than LEOs) and dis- 
play stays on. Rugged and dependable in hot or 
cold tempefafure ranges. Straws receive and trans- 
mit rrequenc*es and n^eroory channel. 

■ S'kH2-step frequency selection 

PLL synthesized keyboard channel selection sys- 
tem. No *5 yp' switch needed. Selects from 
144.000 to 147.995 MHz. 

• UP/DOWN manual scan 

Single or fast continuous 5-kHz steps from 143.900 
to 148.495 MHz for Amateur and MARS or CAP 
simplex or repeater operation. 

* to memoHes 

Retained with tjattery backup (only 0,8 mA). "MO' 
memofy may be used to shift the transmrt frequency 
any desired amount to operate on repeaters with 
nonstandard split frequencies. 

* Butlt-in autopatch DTMF (Touch*Ton«^ encoder 

Uses all 16 buttons ol keyooard while transmuting, 




Automatic memory gcan 
Checks all 10 memory channels. Programmable 
to lock automatical I y on either BUSY (signal pres- 
ent) or OPEN (no signal) channels. 

Sub ton a switch 

Activates sutjaudtDie tone encoder (not Kenwood- 
supplied). 




Repeater or simpfex operation 

Convenient mode switch shifts transmit frequency 
+600 kHz or -600 kHz Of to the frequency stored 
in 'MO'' memory. 

Reverse operatfon 

Nonlocking switch shifts receiver to transmit fre- 
quency arxJ transmitter to receive frequency 

Extended operating time 

With LCD and overall low-current circuit design. 
Only draws about 28 mA squelched receive and 

500 mA transmit (al 1.5 W RF output), for longer 
operating time between charges. 

TWO loc^k swIK^hea 

Prevent accidental frequency change and acci- 
dent at transmission. 

BNC antenna connector 

Easy to connect extefnal antenna. 

LCD "arrow" indicators 

Show "ON AIR.' "MR" (memory recall). 'BATr 
(battery status), and "LAMP* switch on. 

High-Impact case and zinc die-cast frame 

Extremely rugged with antenna counterpofse. 

External FTT m Icrop ho n e an d ea rphone co n necto m 
Easily accessible on right side of transceiver 

Compact and Mghtwefght 
Only 2-13/16 inches wide. 7-9/1 6 inches high, and 
1-7/8 inches deep. Weighs only 162 pounds (in* 
eluding antenna, battery, and hand strap). 



Microphone FIT ancf audio termlnaJa 
Charger termmal 
Earphone Jack 



STANDARD ACCESSORIES tNCLUDEDr 

Flexible fubberlzed antenna with BNC connector 
Heavy-duly (450-mAh) NiCd battery pack 
External-standby (PTT) plug 
AC charger • External -microphone plug 

• Hand strap • Earphone 

NOTE: Price, specifications strd/eci lo change with- 
out notice anti obligation. 



OPTIONAL ACCESSORIES: 

ST-1 base Stand (shown) which provides 1,5- 
hour quick charge and automatic switch lo 
trickle charge, floating charge (operate while 
charging), 4 -pin connector for dynamic mi- 
crophone, and SO -239 antenna connector 
BC-5 DC quck charger CT5 to 2.Q hours) 
m-l delujce leather case flop-grain cowhide} 
PB-24 extra tjattery pack with charger adapter 
8H-1 bell hook 




Staff 



Wayne Groen \/V2NSD/-1 

ASSISTANT PUDLISKEK 
Jefffev^ OeTfiiy WBEBTH 

MAHAGIHG l\>llO*. 
John Burnen 

ASHSTAMT MAl4A<ittl€ 
EDTTOR 

NiVi EOlTCm 

Gene Smaiie WBerrovn 

E&nOftlAL AlSlSTAHfS 
Hsncy Noyd 
Richard PtienH 

PKOOUaiOH MANAGER 

Noel SeM WBIAflP 

ASSISTANT PRODUaiON 

MANA^Ci^ 

Robin Stoen 

ART DiPAKTMENT 
Steve Baldwin 
James Sutler 
Roberl Draw 
Bruce Hedin 
Kennem jJck«on 
Ctare McCiJthy 
Mictiael Murphy 
Oton Owens 
Palfice Scfltonef 
Susan Symonda 
John wnae 

0OQK PUBLICATIONS 
Jim Perry 

DOOK PftODUCTION 

Emtky Gfbba 
Chris erovtfrt NIAUI 

PHOTOGRAPHY 
Bill H&ydqipfi 
Tedd Cluti 
Teme ArKltnOfl 

TyPESETTlHS 
Barbara LattI 
SamBe<kil 
Saf>d»e Gunseih 
Karen Podzycki 

EXEOmVE VICE PKESTDEMT 
Sherry Smylhe 

CORPORATE CONTROLLER 
Alan Thulander 

EXECUTIVE ASSISTANT 

ACCOUNTING MANAGER 
Kfiud Ks\\&( KV4GGft 

DATA ENTRY 
Calhy DeS>lva 

CmOlLAllOli MAMAGER 

ASSinAMi CFRCULAnOH 

MAKAGER 

earbai^a Bioch 

cmcuLAnoH 

BUlIt SALES MANAGER 
GirinJe Boudrieau 

SHIPPING 

Mark Dendy 

6111 Barry 

Bryan HaaHfifls KAIHY 

RECEPTIONISI 
Helen G rammer 

ASSOCIATES 

Boben Salter WB2GFE 
Sanger Green 
Dave Ingram MtWJ 
Larry KahUftSf V^B^NEL 
Joe Kasset G3ZGZ 
Bill PaSlernnK WAglTF 
John Schullz W*FA 
Peter StaiH K20AW 

ADV^nTlSINO 
(A0^> 924.71 3d 

Aline Coutu, Mgr; 
Kevin Rufihako 
Nancy Giarnpa 
Marcia Stone 
LouFse Holdeworth 
Jetry Mernfi^ld 
Rita Rivard 
Hal Stephens 
Pho«b« Taylor 
Shirley Lary 
UiKta Catg 



you can add another country or 
two to your Itinerary, I'm plan* 
ning on getting up to Macao 
(CR9) and Canton, China (BY), if 
it is at all possible this time. And 
you can bel that Til be getting on 
the air from Korea (HL9) and 
Hong Kong {VS6), at the least. 
If you'd like to Join me on this 
trip, drop me a line and Til send 
you further Information. I figure 
that one or two tables (about 12 
to a table in China) of hams wilt 
t>e a lot more fun for a trip like 
this than traveling with the aver- 
age businessman. This is an op- 
portunity which comes along 
rarely, so make your plans now 
and come on along, ft runs from 
October 2nd to 22nd and you 
didn't have anything Important 
then anyway. 

LINEAR SUIT LOST 

WtriJe the FCC ban on the 
manufacture and sale of linear 
amplifiers capable of being 
used on the amateur ten-meter 
band was an excellent example 
of legislative overkill, that 
doesn't excuse the blundering 
amateur representative reaction 
to the situation. For those of you 
who are a bit hazy on just who 
did what to whom, I'll give you a 
fast reprise. 

The FCC. after being plagued 
by a rising number of TVI and 
other interference complaints, 
enacted a law making the manu- 
facture or sale of an 11-meter 
amplifier lIlegaL This put all of 
the "legitimate" makers of these 
amplifiers out of business and 
*eft the field wide open for the 
fly-by-night operators. Oddly 
enough, these birds didn't care 
how clean or dirty the signals 
from their amplifiers were 
, , , since they sold mostly by vir* 
lue oC their price and the buyers 
were completely unsophisticat- 
ed. 

The result was an ever In- 
creasing amount of interference 
as more and more of the dirty 
amplifiers were sold. The FCC, 
lacking money to do much more 
than grind its teeth over the 
situation, fumed. 

Some of the amplifiers were 
being peddled as "amateur" 
equipment, even though the 
parameters were totally CB* 
oriented and the products not 
even advertised or known to the 
hams. So the FCC decided that 
it was time to outlaw any ampli- 
fier which would be usable on 
the 11 -meter band ... and that 
obviously would have to Include 
all designed to wori^ on 10 



meters. Such a proposal was 
made and the public asked to 
comment on it at an open hear^ 
ing. 

A number of representatives 
from the Amateur Radio Manu- 
facturer's Association (ARMA) 
went to Washington to partici- 
pate. They got together the 
night before the hearing and de- 
veloped their approach to the 
situation. The ARRL counsel 
though he refused to cooperate 
with ARM A, did sit In on the 
strategy discussions . . . some- 
thing ARM A was to seriously rue 
the following day. Due to the 
heavy support of ARMA by some 
of the importers of ham equip- 
ment, the major US manufac- 
turers also refused to work with 
ARMA. The result was an unco- 
ordinated mess when the time 
came for testimony. 

One of the first on the line 
when the FCC commissioners 
opened the hearing was the 
ARRL counsel. He talked at in- 
credible length, putting the com- 
missioners down as knowing lit- 
tle about what they were doing 
(they were new commissioners, 
for the most part). He went on to 
randomly cover virtually every 
point that the ARMA group had 
outlined for comments, shoot- 
ing down the industry group 
presentation completely. The 
commissioners took turns leav- 
ing the room during the flllbus* 
ter. 

The key to getting coopera- 
tion from the FCC is, as with any 
other sales problem, looking at 
the situation from their view- 
point. The FCC was getting heat 
from Congress over TVI from CB 
radios with amplifiers. Their 
engineers had proposed making 
amplifiers illegal, including ham 
10m amplifiers. They were not 
interested in hearing that this 
would not work. All they wanted 
to do is what any other bureau- 
crat wants to do: give the im- 
pression of doing something. 

My proposed approach to the 
situation was to agree with the 
FCC that something should be 
done and then come up wtth 
some suggestions on other ap- 
proaches to the solution of their 
problem. Since amplifiers and 
the use of them were already il- 
legal, it was more a matter of 
running down the users and get- 
ting them off the air than trying, 
at this late date, to stop the sup- 
ply . , . something which i 
thought was not practical 
anyway. I tried to get ARMA to 
support a position of getting the 



FCC to work with ham clubs to 
hunt down errant CBers and do 
the iegwork for them. This would 
do more to solve the problem 
than any laws. I just couldn t get 
ARMA to go for the positive ap- 
proach . . * they insisted on go- 
ing for the negative . . , telling 
the FCC that a new iaw wouldn't 
work and that banning ham am- 
plifiers was a rotten way to go. 

So» after hours and hours of 
being told that the ban woutdn'l 
work, yp popped the Washing- 
ton lobbyist for the Electronic 
Industries Association (EIA) 
. . .a chap who knows how to get 
the FCC to do what he wants 
, , . and he told 'em the ban 
would work wonders. He told 
them this within five minutes 
and sat down. And he won the 
day. 

By this time, the commis- 
sioners were about ready to vote 
for anything to shut up the 
hams. I remember one commis- 
sioner getting really fed up with 
the League counsel. A simple 
question had been asked and 
the answer went on for ever. 
Finally the commissioner broke 
in and said, "We asked what 
time it was, not how to make a 
watch." And that's the way it 
was. 

Still not having learned any- 
thing from all of this, the League 
proceeded to go to court to try to 
force the FCC to tiack down on 
the linear ban. The courts are 

very reluctant to go against a 
government agency . . . know- 
ing that it is the governmeni 
which pays them and holds their 
promotions in their hands. Fur- 
ther, the general rule in the past 
on court cases against the FCC 
has been for the judges to 
dismiss the case on the basis 
that the FCC has the technical 
expertise to deal with technical 
matters . . . and that these are 
far beyond the possibility for the 
judge to understand. 

There was also some legal 
hassle over the failure of the 

League to raise a 'Mack of 
notice" argument in their Partial 
Petition for Reconsideration 
and Rehearing before the Com- 
mission. This turned out to t3e a 
serious oversight and consider- 
abiy contributed to the loss of 
the case. 

If I wasn't such a known fan of 
the League, 1 could be very criti* 
cal of them In this ten-meter 
linear ban situation. 

Continued on page t&2 



6 73 Magazine • June, 1980 



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■ Variable size NiCd Power 
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91.5 ZZ 


118.8 2B 


156.7 5A 


71.9 XA 


94.8 ZA 


123.0 3Z 


162.2 53 


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97.4 ZB 


127.3 3A 


t67.9 6Z 


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100.0 IZ 


131.8 3B 


173.8 6A 


79.7 SP 


103.5 lA 


136.5 4Z 


179.9 68 


82.5 YZ 


107.2 IB 


141.3 4A 


' 186.2 7Z 


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COMMUNICATIONS SPECfALfSTS 

426 West Taft Avenue, Orange, CaHfornia 92667 
(800)854-0547/ California: {714)998-3021 




,^15 



Looking M/fest 



e/// Pasternak WASfTF 
24854 Newhalf Ave. 
Newhait CA 91321 

Over the past nine years, we 
have written quite a bit about 
the original Southern California 
Repeater Association, as well 
as the two offshoot organiza- 
tions it fathered: TASMA and 
220 SMA. While we have men- 
tioned that two other organiza- 
tions exist, we have never really 
gotten involved very much with 
them. The other two to which I 
refer are the 10 meter AM^SSB 
QRP Band Planning Council and 
the Southern California Repeat- 
er Remote Base Association 
(SGRRBA). Currently, the IO- 
meter non-FM organization is 
rather dormant, but SCRRBA is 
alive, wetl, and looking with an- 
ticipation toward the future. 

SGRRBA differs markedly 
from most other area coordina- 
tion bodies. Firstp they hold but 
one meeting annually, and may* 



be that accounts for the fact 
that the get-together is always 
packed solid with attendees. 
Second, the political power of 
SGRRBA is vested in the organi- 
zation's elected officials. Hav- 
ing recently attended the 1980 
annual meeting held in Burbank, 
California, I can say that I am 
quite impressed by the direction 
SCRRBA is taking these days. 

For example, they have no in- 
tention of waiting for the ax to 
fall as a result of the reassign- 
ment made to the 420-450 MHz 
spectrum as a result of WARC. 
SGRRBA officials realize that 
changes are inevitable, and that 
the t>est defense in spectrum 
preservation is a strong offense 
based upon careful preparation. 
Because of this, SGRRBA offi- 
ciais will begin now to develop a 
dialogue with the ARRL, VRAC, 
and other concerned organiza- 
tions with regard to protecting 
the viabHity o! the current UHF 
spectrum. Should some other 



SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA PUBLIC REPEATERS 




AND SIMPLEX CHANNELS 




Location 


C«» 


fnput 


o^iipvi 


Access 


Sierra Madre 


WR6BD6 


2B32 


29.62 


107.2 Hz 


Ml WHsOfi 


WR6AAK 


^,^ 


29.64 


107,2 Hz 


Paios Verdea 


WR6AQS 


29,&Q 
G Meters 


29.69 


107.2 Hz 


Ml, WiiBon 


WR6AAK 


52,76 


52.525 


carrier 


John 3 lone Peah 


WH6AAJ 


52.76 


52.525 


carrier 


San Migjsf 


N6AEQ/R 


52.76 


52.54 


carrier 


Baldwin Hills 


WR6AQR 


52,90 


52.66 


carrier 


Santiago Peak 


WR6ADP 


53.33 


5372 


carrier 




a<4 M6t0fS 






Patos Vefdas 


WR6AKU 


AAQ,bDQ 


445.500 


iST.BHs: 


Gaialina Is 


WR6AAA 


442,000 


447,000 


Carrier 


San Diego 


WR6AFE 


442025 


447.025 


carrier 


Sulphur Mt. 


WR6A0X 


442,325 


447.325 


carrier 


Table ML 


WR6A2N 


442.325 


447.325 


carrier 


Monrovia 


WC6AAQ 


442,575 


447 575 


carrier 


Cfoatlin© 


WflSANP 


443.350 


44fi350 


carrier 


PalomarMl. 


WR6AII 


444.425 


449.425 


carrier 


Santa Monrca 


WA6RJG 


444.425 


449.425 


carrier 


i ML Oiay 


WR6AGF 


444.500 


449.500 


107.2^2 






AT¥ 






John^ione Peak 


W60RO 


434.000 
Simplex 
29,50 
29 60 

446 000 


1265.00 


15J50 Hz 



446.500 

439 500 tATV audio crharinel. 
±5 kHz de^ratiDfi) 



t. SCRRBA telieves the above data to be coifecL bul is rtot r^por^ 

sible tor its ultimate accyracy. 

2. No tmpression is intended or implied that the amateur frequefHiy 

tiands Mhich SCRRBA coof difiates are devoid of activity sKcept for 

th«t listed atX)ve. These listmgs represent in actuality oniy a very 

tiny pefcthtag^ot Ihe lata! southern Califomta activily. Repeaters 

and remote t>a,se sl^tions fiol listed above aw coordinated as 

prrvate («^e^. closed) systems; such systems gefierally tk3 not 

"we^cofne visit oib. 

3^ ^otB m the atx>if« ttstlfiQ should |>e reported to Ihe SGR^QA 

Techttiical Committee. 



service prepare overtures 
toward taking spectrum based 
on WARC tjecisions. SGRRSA 
wants to be ready to ward off 
such attacks. 

SGRRBA is also looking for in- 
put on the ytilization of the pro- 
posed 900* MHz band. It is be- 
lieved that the FCC may be hard 
put to assign 902 through 928 
MHz to any other service in tight 
of Canada's innplementatlon of 
amateur operation in that spec- 
trum already. If you have any 
ideas on this topic, you might 
send them to SCRRBA at PO 
Box 5967, Pasadena CA 91109. 

Unlike most other organiza- 
tlons of their ilk, SCRRBA does 
not seek widespread recogni- 
tion for Ihetr work. They believe 
slrongly In the concept of re- 
gional band planning for spec- 
trum that is not usually utilized 
by transient operators, and are 
totally dedicated to advance- 
ment of the technical state of 
the art. They are an interesting 
organization to watch, and over 
the years have quietly contribut- 
ed much to the science of ama- 
teur relay technology. 

SCRRBA oversees voluntary 
coordination for FM operations 
on 10 meters, 6 meters, 420 
through 450 MHz, and all spec- 
trum above. They also publish a 
listing of what they term '' Public 
Repeaters and Simplex Chan- 
nels" for southern California. 
The latest list was recently 
made available to us and is re- 
printed here for those of you 
who might wander out to this re- 
gion carrying equipment for the 
bands listed. 

There are two things to re- 
member in relation to this list. 
First, it is probably the most 
accurate listing of its type. Also, 
do not be deceived by the small 
number of UHF listings. Again, 
the ones listed are the ''open" 
systems-* available for use by 
any amateur. It is no secret that 
between 300 to 400 other sys- 
tems are operational in the UHF 
spectrum in this area, but all 
others are categorized as "pri- 
vate." Happy QSOing. 

PLUGGING VIDEOTAPE 
DEPARTMENT 

How would you like to have 
your very own copy of the new 
Dave Bell film, 'The World of 
Amateur Radio'*? The film is 
available for direct sate in four 
formats, at a price which is 
close to ''cost plus shipping.** 
The idea is to get as many prints 
into circulation as quickly as 



possible, and to do this it was 
felt that videotape might be the 
best way to go. The price sched- 
ule is: V2" VHS (SP speed only)- 
$30; Vz" Beta <Beta I or II only)- 
$30; and V4" U Matic-$55. 

Videotapes are available from 
me directly on a prepaid basis 
only. Checks or money orders 
should t>e made out to William 
M. Pasternak, and atl videotape 
orders sent to me In care of 
Westlink, 7046 Hollywood 
Boulevard, Suite 718, Hollywood 
CA 90028. 

In addition, 16mm sound film 
prints are available directly from 
Dave Bell for $95 each. Film 
orders should be made payable 
to Dave Bell Associates, and 
sent to 3211 Cahuenga Blvd. 
West, Hollywood CA 90068. 
Mark film orders for the atten- 
tion of Theresa Modnick, and af- 
low 4 to 6 weeks delivery on all 
orders (film or tape). Then, once 
you have enjoyed I! yourself, 
take it out aiid show it to civic 
groups, church groups, CB 
clubs or whatever. The purpose 
of the film is to introduce ama^ 
teur radio to the rest ol the 
world, and a film or tape Is of lit* 
tie value sitting on your library 
shelf. Each of you has the ability 
to become a spokesperson for 
amateur radio. The toots are 
available and the audiences 
await you. The best public rela- 
tions corps we in amateur radio 
have is ourselves. 



GOING TO THE AIRPORT CAN 

BE HAZARDOUS TO YOUR 

HEALTH DEPARTMENT 

Rob Diefenbach WD4NEK 
had a rather unpleasant expe* 
fience not long ago. He had 
taken his wife to Atlanta's 
Hartsfield Airport, and like most 
devoted amateurs, he was car- 
rying an NT with him. That's 
when the problem began, and at 
this point we will lei Rob tell the 
story: 

"Despite what overzealous 
rent-a-cops at Americans second 
busiest airport may try to telt 
you, there is no prohibition 
against carrying or using ama- 
teur transceivers in the gate 
areas there, 

''When I was told recently that 
I must remove the batteries from 
my 2-meter handie-talkie before 
passing a security checkpoint a! 
Atlanta's Hartsfield Internation- 
al Airport, I complied without ar- 
gument 1f you donH, you1l be in 
a lot of trouble." a smart ly-uni- 



Contfnued on page t69 



10 73 Magazine • June, 1980 



enter the new world of TEN-TEC 




S* 
eries 





r « M 



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>^ 




M K > ^ 



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NEW — ALL 9 HF BANDS. Full coverage 
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ALL SOLID-STATE. From the pioneer, 
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NEW 3-MODE, 2-RANGE OFFSET TON- 
ING. Another TEN-TEC first,., (1) Offset Re- 
ceiver Tuning, (2) Offset Transmitter Tuning 
and (3) Offset Transceiver Tuning. None 
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HzQr± 4 kHz. 

OPTIMIZED RECEIVER SENSITIVITY, 
For an ideal balance between dynamic range 
and sensitivity... from 2 ^tV on l60 to 0.3 /iV 
on 10 Meters. 

NEW OPTIMIZED BANDWIDTH. Seven 
response curves — four for SSB, three for 
CW. Standard i-f filter is an 8 -pole 2.4 kHz 
crystal ladder type. Options Include a 1.8 
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pole CW filter and a 200 Hz 8-pole CW filter. 
Switch an optional filter from the front panel 
to put it in series for up to 16 poles of filter- 
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has 450 and 150 Hz band widths for added 
attenuation. New toggle switches select i-f 
and audio filtering. Selectivity for any situa- 
tion. 

BUILT-IN NOTCH FILTER. Variable null 
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pass band from 200 Hz to 3.5 kHz with a 
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NEW BUILT-IN NOISE BLANKER Stan 
dard equipment New 2-pole monolithic 
crystal filter handles big signals easily, makes 
impossible locations usable. 
GREATER DYNAMIC RANGE. Better than 
90 dB, typically. Reduces front-end overload 
and distortion. Plus a PIN diode switch able 
18 dB attenuator on the RF gain control. 



NEW "HANG" AGC Smoother operation, 
2-SPEED BREAK-IN. "Fast" or ^^Slow" 
speeds. "Fast" for instant, full break-in. 
*'Siow" has a longer mute time before re- 
ceiver is actuated for working crowded bands 
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WWV RECEPTION. On the 10 MHz band. 
DIGITAL READOUT 6 shielded 0.43" LEDs 
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SEPARATE RECEIVING ANTENNA CA- 
PABILITY Use with separate components. 
Instant break-in linears, or transverters. 

"S"/SWR METER. Easy-to-read. Dectron^ 
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200 WATTS INPUT. On aJI bands, when 
used with 50 ohm load. Proven, conser- 
vatively rated design. FuUy warranted for first 
year* pro-rata warranty for five extra years! 
100% DUTY CYCLE, Full power hour after 
hour without fail. Ideal for RTTY, SSTV or 
any hard usage. 

BUILT-IN VOX AND PTT, Smooth VOX 
with 3 front panel controls. And PTT control 
at both front and rear panel jacks. 
BUILT-IN PHONE PATCH JACKS. Easy in 
terf ace to speaker and microphone signals, 
BUILT-IN CW ZERO-BEAT SWITCH. Puts 
you on exact frequency of a station being 
worked without being on the air, 
BUILT-IN ADJUSTABLE SIDETONE, 
Vary pitch and volume for easy listening. 
ADJUSTABLE THRESHOLD AUTO- 
MATIC LEVEL CONTROL. From low 
power to full output with full ALC control, 
FRONT PANEL CONTROL OF LINEAR 
OR ANTENNA. Auxiliary bandswitch ter- 
minals on rear panel permit simultaneous 
control of external relays or circuits. Disre- 
gard to interface with new TEN -TEC solid- 
state/CW Linear 

AUTOMATIC SIDEBAND SELECTION. 
And you can reverse it with the mode switch. 



SUPER AUDIO. A TEN-TEC trademark. 
Proper shaping plus low distortion. 
IMPECCABLE SIGNAL. Clean. Easily ex- 
ceeding FCC requirements, thanks to metic- 
ulous design, fine components, and conser- 
vative ratings. 

HIGH STABILITY. Deviation is no more 
than 15 cycles per degree temperature 
change after warm-up, 
HIGH ARTICULATION KEYING, 2y2 msec 
rise and decay time for sharp, clean keying, 
BUILT-IN SPEAKER Built info the bottom 
of the cabinet shelL Compression-loaded for 
better quality and higher efficiency. External 
speaker connections on rear panel. 
PLUG-IN CIRCUIT BOARDS. For easy re- 
moval if needed. 

FUNCTIONAL STYLING. Dark front panel, 
convenient control groupings, '*clamshell" 
cabinet, full shielding, and easier- to-use size; 
5y4"hx 14y4"wxl4"d 
POWER. Operates on 12-14 VDC for mobile 
or storage battery use. For 117 VAC use, an 
external supply is required. 
FULL ACCESSORY LINE. Model 217 500 
Hz CW filter $55, Model 219 200 Hz CW fil- 
ter $60, Model 218 1.8 kHz SSB filter $55, 
Model 243 Remote VFO $139, Model 255 
Power Supply /Speaker $169, Model 280 
Power Supply $139, Model 645 Dual Paddle 
Keyer $85, Model 670 Single Paddle Keyer 
$34. 50, Model 234/214 Speech Processor & 
Condenser Microphone $163, Model 247 
Antenna Tuner $69. All in matching color. 

Model 546 OMNl-Series C $1189 

See your TEN^TEC dealer, or write for full 
details. 



TEN -TEC, INC. 

SEVIERVILLE, TENNESSEC 17162 




RTTY Loop 



Marc 1. Leav&y, M.D. WA3AJR 
4006 Win fee Road 
Randaltstown M 21133 



Ttiis month marks the begin- 
ning of the fourth year of RTTY 
Loop. Several of you have asked 



how this whole thing got start- 
ed, and it occurred to me that I 
never really told that story, so 
here goes. As they say (whoever 
"they" are), there's a lesson in 
here for you! 
Several years back, our local 



ham ciub, the Baltimore Ama- 
teur Radio Club, was in the pro- 
cess of expanding and improv* 
ing its journal, The Modulator. 
Knowing that I was a RTTY buff 
and that \ had written many ar- 
ticles for 73 (thus presuming 
literacy, I suppose), I was asked 
to write a column for the *'new" 
Modutator: After some mulling 
over (must have taken ail of thir- 
ty or forty microseconds), I 



agreed and a column was born. 
Titled "Tele-Tips," the articles 
were about half the length of a 
typical RTTY Loop and dealt 
with radioteletype basics. 

After writing the first few col- 
umns, it became evident that 
the material being presented 
had a far wider appeal than the 
club newsletter affordeci, and 

Continued on page 176 




RTTY Demodulator Parts List 



CI, C7, C9,C14 


.001 disc ceramic 


C2 


,005 disc ceramic 


C3,C4 


500 pF S% polycarbonate or mylar* 


C5 


.01 disc ceramic 


C6, CI 6 


2 uF 25 V dc electrolvtic 


ca 


.01 uF 5% polycarbonate or mylar* 


CIO 


,47 uF mylar 


011,015 


♦t uF disc ceramic 


012 


BM uF 25 V dc electrolytic 


C13 


680 pF disc ceramic 


CI 7 


600 uF 25 V dc electrolytic 


018,019 


100 uF 25 V dceiectroiytic 


•to limit the amount of drift doe to heat* 


All resistors % Watt 10% except as noted. 


R1,R5,R1?.R20 


4.7 megohm 


R2,R18, R21 


2,2 megohm 


R3 


1 i) megohm V* Watt 5% 


R4 


7a megohm % Watt 5% 


R6 


7^k Ohm y. Watt 5% 


B7,R13,R22,R23 


10k Otim potentiometer, printed circuit type 


R8, R9. R15, R30 




R31 


10k Ohm 


R10,R11 


4 Jk Ohm 


R12 


1 2k Ohm y* Watt 5% 


R14,R37,R38 


Ik Ohm 


R16 


3,3k Ohm 


R19 


150k Ohm 



R24, R25, R26, R27 
R32,R33 
R2S 
R29 

R34.R35 
R36 

CR1,CR2. CR3,CR4 
CR5, CR6 



I megohm 

100k Ohm potentiometer, printed circuit type 

15k Ohm 

3,3k Ohm 

10k Ohm '.4 Watt 10% 

1 W34A germanium diode 
1N914 silicon diode 



CR7,CR8, CR9,CR10 

CR11 1N4007 rectifier 



CR12 
LED 

1C1JC3 

1 02 

Q1 
Q2 

T1 

T2 

Fl 

St 
S2 



^ 



1 2 volt 1 Watt zener dio4^ 

light emttting diode 

LM3900 CN (NationeO 
LM565 CN (NatiofiaO 

MPF 102 or equtvatent N-channel FET 
High voltage silicon f^PN transistor 
(Svivania ECG 228 or equivalent) 

1 ^k Ohm center -tapped to 8 Ohm transistor 
type otJTput Transformer used beck wards. 
115 Vac to 12.6 V ac % Amp filament fll 
ir^nsfornrker I 

% Amp fast blow f u^ and holder 

SPST on^ff switch 
SPOT sense switch 



MtSceltaneous 

5x7 chassis, terminal strip, #6-32 nuts and bolts, insulated 
spacers for rr9^2 to mount boards on chassis, holder for LED 



1 



fig. t. 



12 73 Magazine • June, 1960 



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DX 



James D. Cain K1TN 
306 Vernon Avenue 
Vernon 0106066 

73 Magazine is unique in 
many respects, not the least of 
which is that we can publish col- 
or photos in columns such as 
this; witness the DXers pictured 
herein. This should be encour- 
agement enough for you to send 
in your favorite snapshot for 
these pages. Please do so. US 
and Canadian hams, when you 
work a DX station, ask him to 
send a photo to the above ad- 
dress or direct to you for for- 
warding to this column, Thanksl 

While this is a DX column, not 
a contesting column, it seems 
prudent to discuss the ARRL DX 
Contest briefly. The League has 
given until June 15 for Interested 
parties to express their opinions 
regarding new rules which went 
into effect this year. A littie 
background is in order. The 
ARRL International DX Competi- 
tion began in the 1930s as a 
marathon affair It was always a 
"world works the US and 
Canada" activity. Through 1978, 
the Competition was two week- 
ends for CW and two weekends 
for phone; in 1979, the format re- 
mained unchanged but the 
schedule was cut to one week- 
end per mode. Then, late in 1979, 
despite reservations of the 
League's Contest Advisory 
Committee, the format of the 
Competition (and its name) was 
changed. The 1980 ARRL DX 
Contest was run by a set of rules 
closely paralleling those of the 
CO Woridwide DX Contest. 



Everyone was allowed to work 
everyone (except within one's 
own country) with a point struc- 
ture just slightly favoring the 
rest of the world working W/VE 
stations. Still with me? 

Well, it has really hit the fan. It 
seems that those responsible 
for the changes thought that the 
rest of the world's amateurs, 
contesters in particular, didn't 
like spending an entire weekend 
working just the US and 
Canada. Something of the "Ugly 
American" mentality was at 
work here, only it was the 
American sponsors of the oper- 
ating activity who were in that 
mode. They don't seem to have 
reminded us anywhere that the 
ARRL DX Competition has 
grown in number of entries 
steadily through the years* They 
were concerned that the CQ 
Worldwide DX Contest touts 
having more entries^ which is 
true. But the real truth is that the 
CQ Contest, due to its formal, 
results in hundreds of entries re- 
fleeting Europeans working 
each other on 80 and 40 meters 
(same continent, two points 
each), with nary a "DX" contact 
in the log. That is perfectly 
reasonable within the ruies of 
the CQ Contest, but it is no 
reason to make the ARRL Com- 
petition Into a poor carbon copy. 

We have letters from Euro- 
pean amateurs who have gone 
so far as to boycott the 1980 
ARRL DX Contest because of 
the new rules. Unbelievable as it 
may seem to the Newington pro- 
mulgators of the new rules, 
many of the contesters around 




the world absolutely love the 
two weekends of the year work- 
ing W/VE. There are parallels to 
that format: The Al! Asia Con- 
test is the world working Asia, 
and then there's the Worked All 
Europe every summer and the 
Bermuda Contest in fvlarch. 

So what's the connection to 
pure DXing, which is what this 
column is about? Presently, the 
United States is undergoing one 
of Its recurring periods of patri- 
otic fervor. Nothing wrong with 
that, and the concept can ex- 
tend to amateur radio. After all, 
we have more amateurs on the 
HF bands than the rest of the 
world and we are omnipresent. 
That is exactly why the old 
ARRL International DX Competi- 
tion '"world-works -the- US/ 
Canada" format was so popular. 
Just as many of us enjoy work- 
ing scads of Japanese stations 
once a year in the All Asia Con- 
test, much of the world par- 
ticipated in the ARRL Competi- 
tion for the pleasure of logging 
100-contact hours. That's what 
DX contesting is for. That's why 
European DXers put up special 
low-band fixed antenna arrays 
toward North America — to work 
us during the Internationa! DX 
Competition. 

If you agree with this point of 
view, send a letter to the Chair- 
man of the ARRLs Volunteer 
Contest Advisory Committee: 
Jim Stahl KBfvIR, 3592 
Atherstone Road, Cleveland 
Heights OH 44121. Of course, If 
you like the new rules, they 
would like to hear from you, too. 

Summertime propagation 
conditions are in full swing now, 
and if you are not familiar with 
the consequences, maybe a few 
words are in order. The low 
bands (160, 80, and 40 meters) 



propagate just as well now as 
they did in the winter. The prob- 
lem is, of course, static masking 
the weaker signals. On quiet 
summer nights, the signals will 
come through just fine, so don't 
give up on these bands. 20 
meters will be open round-the- 
clock, with openings to Asia 
from North America lasting later 
into the evening than they do in 
winter. Long-path openings will 
occur earlier in the morning than 
during the winter. 

15 meters can be fascinating 
during the summer. Look for 
weird openings to unexpected 
spots, Last July, during the 
lARU Radiosport Champion- 
ship, 15 meters opened from the 
US to Japan at 1300 UTC and 
stayed open untii after 1800 
UTCl Both days of the contest, 
no less. On the other hand, at 
the same time that 15 was open 
to Japan, 10 meters was dead as 
the proverbial doornail. 15 is not 
normally good on the North Pole 
path in summer, and 10 meters 
can die for days at a time. 10 
will, during these sunspot-rich 
times, occasionally stay open 
from North America as late as 
0000 UTC Into western Europe. 

The various magazines are 
full of articles on the malicious 
interference problem these 
days. While it js easy to take the 
attitude that the good old days 
were better (in many ways they 
were!), there are pros and cons 
to DXing and HF operating in 
the 19S0S. On the positive side, 
more rare stations are using bet- 
ter equipment and beam anten- 
nas, and the AM carriers are 
gone from the bands. Yet, as 
Larry Brockman N6AR staled in 
a recent article in CQ Magazine, 
ten years ago there was definite- 
ly less of the ugly nonsense con- 




Father Edmund HV2V0 (on right) and Tony Privifera, lOiJ (photo 
courtesy K3ZJ). 



Nao Akiyama JH1 VRQ, Overseas Liaison Officer of the Japan DX 
Radio Ciub and active DXer. 



14 73 Magazine • June, 1980 



nected with HF operating, espe- 
cially DXing. If some nerd 
breaks op your rag chew, you 
can just change frequencies or 
bands, but it deliberate interfer- 
ence voids your QSO with a new 
country of expedition, there may 
not be a second chance. Brock- 
man asserts that some of us 
have lost our manners; maybe 
some of us just never had any in 
the first place. Peer pressure 
seems the only answer, al- 
though most of us are hesitant 
to apply it. But good operators 
are still in the vast majonty* 

And now for a wrap-up of 
February and March DX happen- 
ings . * . 

TZ4AQS finished his operat* 
ing from Mali, topped by a two- 
week stint of heavy guest oper- 
ating by hiS QSL manager, 
0N6Ba 

Fred Laun HSIABD leaves 
Thailand this August. His 
30-meter aspirations were 
thwarted by terrible power-line 
noise, although he managed to 
work W8AH, N4AR, and K4Dy 
on 3.5. He was very active on 40 
meters, reporting that the "gray- 
line" path on that band paid off. 
It didn^t work on 80. HSIWR will 
try to take up the slack which 
will come with Fred's departure. 
Toshio Yai EP2TY continues 
active from Iran, despite Internal 
problems there. QSL him direct 
only, not to any Japanese man- 
ager. He is on 15 and 20 SSB 
regularly and on 10 meters occa^ 
slonally. 

At press time, Peter S2BTF 
was back home in Germany and 
it is not known if he returned to 
Bangladesh. He had been active 
on the controUed operation by 
W7R0 and VV7PH0 every eve- 
ning at 0045 UTC on 21340. 

March saw FR7AI operating 
FT from Tromeiin Island for 
about two weeks. The proposed 
Indian Ocean Union operation 
of N2KK, N5AU, and K5C0 was 
scuttled and thereby went the 
hopes of those needing 
Glorioso and Europa, among 
others. 

TN8AJ. in the Congo Repub- 
lic^ was workable on 15 meters 
via a weekend list operation at 
21210 or so on CW. His manager 
is WB9TTM. 

As for China, 2L1ADI had 
some plans in the works, but 
they fell through. In March, at 
least one American amateur 
was in Peking, and he was lis- 
tening. but without hopes for a 
license to transmit. There is talk 
out of Yugoslavia of a license 



for China operation sometime 
this year. 

Jim Smith P29JS got around; 
he operated VK9NS from 
Christmas Island in February. 
Karl Geng DL2AAAAf1 operated 
as VKeCK/Lord Howe, also in 
February. 

28750 became a favorite spot 
for DXers this past winter; a 
group run by DK20C attracted 
considerable quantities of rare 
stations, many of them being 
Europeans operating from 
African countries. The group 
met at 1200, 

Mike Smedal. formeriy EP2LI, 
continued active from Qatar 
(A7XD) and was found regularly 
on the Afrikaner Net (1300, 
21355), as well as on 20 and 10 
meters. A7XE was workable 
from lists on 15 meters. 

YMBGD continued to be dlf- 
ficult to work for those who can't 
get to their radios Monday- 
Friday. The Kansas City DX Club 
donated 500 QSL cards to the 
Iraquis to send to the lucky ones 
who have worked the club sta- 
tion. 

By the time you read this, the 

country of Burma will either be 
off most DXers' need lists or it 
won*t. How's that for hedging? 
George Collins VE3FXT/HS4AMI 
purportedly has permisston lo 
operate as XZSONU 15 April to 
15 June, in conjunction with 
UNICEF (United Nations 
Children's Emergency Fund), 
We^ll see. 

If you're trying for a T2 QSL 
card from a VE3HRS/TZ contact 
in September or October of 
1979, forget it. You worked a 
bootlegger. Same for 5X1AA 
and any BYs. 

I8KDB reported In late March 
that they were 3.000 QSLs 
through the 5,000 requests 
resutting from the TL0BQ opera- 
tion last December. 

PPOMAG came on from 
Trinidade Island In February and 
March, working CW only with 
plenty of 40/80 meter activity. 
He was there a full two months, 
awaiting the next boat out. 

Sri Lanka became easier and 
easier to work as John AcKley 
KP2A spent several weeks oper- 
ating as 4S7DX. He then spent 
two weeks on the Maldives as 
8Q7AR, followed by stops at 
East Malaysia, Thailand, Nepal, 
and Macao. 

Eric Sjolund SMiAGD began 
an African safari in Guinea 
Bissau, operating as J5AG. He 
was scheduled to be in 9Q5. 28, 
A22, and others, with operating 




Chet Lambert KXePP, Marshail islands. 



permission for most pending. 
All QSLs for his activity go to 
SM3CXS. 

March's big event was the op- 
eration from Heard Island by 
VK0RM. Here it is. as published 
immediately afterward in The 
DX Buitetin. 

HEARD ISLAND VKIIRM, 
IVIARCH, 1980 

A scientific expedition to 
Heard Island left Australia 
about 1 March 1980, intending 
to operate on the amateur 
bands with a Kenwood TS-120 
when time permitted. En route, 
expedition leader Con Veenstra 
and radio operator Bob Mc* 
Manama operated VKWM/MM 
to familiarize themselves with 
the radio. During the boat trip, 
the receiver in the TS*120 failed 
(switching diodes), but Mc- 
Manama repaired it. On 
Wednesday, 12 March, seven 
members of the crew were heli- 
coptered to McDonald Island, 
west of Heard, for a two-day 
stay; Veenstra and McManama 
stayed aboard ship. The crew 
was reunited on 14 March and 
arrived in the cove at Heard 
Island on Saturday. 15 March. A 
handful of amateur-band con- 
tacts were made from the ship. 

Ashore on Heard at daybreak 
on Sunday, 16 March, the group 
was maintaining twice-daily 
schedules with 0Z8AE/MM, and 
at 0900 UTC on the 16th, P29JS 



began taking a list of stations to 
be worked by VK0RM. Listed 
were two from each South Amer- 
lean country, three trom each J A 
and W/K cat! area, two from 
each major European country, 
three from each VE call area, 
and 108 VK/2L stations. At 
1200.VK3RM came on the fre- 
quency of P29JS and an- 
nounced that the TS-120 receiv- 
er had failed, but that they 
would attempt operations the 
next day. 

Some stations were worked 
on Monday, 17 March; VKIBRM 
showed at 1200. extremely 
weak, with transmitter prob- 
lems. Many VK and ZL stations 
on the original list were worked 
along with a couple of JAs. The 
operation was moved above 
14200 in an attempt to work 
North Americans, but without 
success, Jammers aggravated 
the situation. 

Further attempts were made 
on Tuesday, 18 March; 
0Z8AE/MM reported that the 
TS-120 had been taken back to 
the ship, were the final amplifier 
transistors were found to be de- 
stroyed, probably due to power- 
supply problems {overvoltage or 
spikes}. While some spare radio 
parts were kept on the ship, the 
Kenwood could not be repaired. 
A few stations were worked on 
Tuesday, but all of these had 

Continued on page 180 



73 Magazine • June, 1980 15 



Leaky Lines 



Dave M^nn K2AGZ 
3 Daniet Lane 
Kinnelon NJ 07405 

Question: What, precisely, is 
an S-meler, anyway? 

Answer Nothing more ttian 
an ejctremely erratic, unde- 
pendable instrument frequently 
ysed when giving signal reports. 

\ attempted to deal with this 
before, but to little avaii. The er- 
roneous practice persists, and it 
would take an earthquake, a 
tidal wave, a volcanic eruption, 
and a Kansas cyclone to bring 
home, finally, to the adamant 
ones who insist upon conttnu* 
ing with this meaningless exer- 
cise in futility that an S-meter 
report has about as much validi- 
ty as a message from a Ouija 
board. Maybe even less! 

The problem arose years ago 
when someone mistakenly con- 
cluded» because there are nine 
**S" units on the meter and nine 
gradations on the signal 
strength chart, that Eureka!, 
this must mean that there is 
some correlation between the 
two. Balderdash! There is none! 

Properly calibrated, an 
S-meter is supposed to read S^9 
for an incoming signal of 50 
microvolts. That some contem- 
porary manufacturers have seen 
fit to adjust their meters to 100 
microvolts has no more signifi- 
cance than the fact that some 
car manufacturers install 
speedometers that go up to 140 
mph in cars that can1 exceed 90 
or 100 mph. The important thing 
to know about S-meters is that 
apparently no two of them give 
the same reading on a given 
signal. Even the meters on two 
identical rigs made by the same 
manufacturer will vary. 

Granted that the si^gnaf report 
represents a piece of useful, 
valuable information to the 
transmitting operator, how can 
he make use of the data if it is 
rendered inconclusive by broad 
variations in accuracy? The an- 
swer, of course, is that he can- 
not make use of it. 

Signal reports should not be 
based on the S-meter reading 
for the simple reason thai they 
happen to be the least standard- 
ized item in your ham shack and 
canl be depended upon for 
accurate measurements. 

If you bought a frequency 
counter or a signal generator 



that operated with as much in- 
accuracy as your S-meter does, 
you would take it around to Ihe 
guy who sold it to you and bust 
him over the head with ill 

Just to refresh the memory of 
anyone who doesn't happen to 
have an ARRL logbook around 
(the R-S-T System of Signal Re- 
ports is reproduced therein), 
here is the table which repre* 
sents the accepted standard: 

1. Faint signals — barely 

perceptible 

Z Very weak signals 

3. Weak signals 

4. Fair signals 

5. Fairly good signals 

6. Good signals 

7. Moderately good sig- 
nals 

8. Strong signals 

9. Extremely strong sig* 
nals 

As you can see, there is noth- 
ing here to indicate any meter 
readings. The report is based 
upon a judgment call, , . a con* 
elusion. 

But it has now gotten so out 
of hand that If the incoming sig- 
nal makes the meter needle de* 
fleet to only S-5 or 6, the guy is 
embarrassed and tells the trans- 
mitting station, "You're only 
showing a 6, but my meter is 
■Scotch.^ You sound like an S-9." 
Well, for Pete's sake, If he 
sounds like a nine, that's what 
you're supposed to give him. 
Never mind what the blasted 
S-meter says! 

Only a couple of days ago. I 
heard a fellow give a report of 2 
and 1. He didn't miss a single 
word of the other guy's trans- 
mission, yet he gave a report 
that indicated that the other sta^ 
tion was practically unreadable, 
H was obvious that he was using 
his S-meter. How can you give 
an S-1 report when you copy 
solid, without losing a single 
syllable? 

I wish 1 had a buck in my pock- 
et for every time I've copied solid 
signals from someone whose S- 
meter reading was zero . . . the 
meter didn't even deflect. And 1 
needn*t remind anyone that 
there are times when 9-plus sig- 
nals are creamed by atmospher- 
ics, QRfV!, impulse noise- and 
the like. Even worse, you may 
hook up with one of those peo- 
ple who never learned how prop- 
erly to modulate a mike and his 
audio is so damned confidential 



that you can*t understand a 
blasted thing he says. The nee- 
dle of your S-meter may be de- 
flecting pretty vigorously, but 
his audio sounds like loose 
cowf lop * . , no definition, no 
diction, no highs . . . nothing but 
a super-saturated g^ob of soft 
glop that sounds as though he's 
got his head down in the toilet 
bowl! Readability, zilch! 
Strength? Stenglh of what? If 
there's little or no inteliigibility, 
how in the hell can you assign 
him a reading of any kind? Yet 
your stupid S*meter is showing a 
good reading. 

The only time Tve found a fair- 
ly useful application for the 
S-meter would be when two sta- 
tions, operating at roughly the 
same power from the same gen- 
eral location, were to run a test 
to see who had the relative ad- 
vantage. This might reflect 
many things -antenna perfor- 
mance, transfer of power, audio 
frequency response with higher 
audio peaks, and so forth. The 
meter would show the differ- 
ence. 

The most reliable way to give 
a signal report is by using the 
ears that the good Lord gave 
you. Use the R^^ST system (or 
the old and very reliable QSA 
system) and forget about the 
S-meter. 

Now, about the phenomenon 
sometimes called "one-way 
skip," another pet bete noire of 
mine. Is it possible for two sta- 
tions to copy each other at vary- 
ing levels? Well, maybe . . . and 
then again, maybe not. Suppose 
that one of them doesn't know 
how to use his receiver prop- 



erty . . . doesn't take advantage 
of his notch filter, his noise 
blanker, etc. Suppose one is us- 
ing a beam and the other a sim- 
ple wire. 

Here's an example. Some of 
us decided to go down to 40 
meters to see if there were any 
Pacific stations lurking out 
there in the middle of the night. 
Since 1 happened to own abeam 
for that band, we decided that f 
would call CQ DX Pacific. Quite 
a few Oceania stations respond- 
ed^ All the other guys were on 
dipoles and inverted V anten- 
nas. The DX stations were giving 
these jokers 5/7, 6/8, and 5/9 
reports, but they couldn^t even 
hear them* 1 copied every word 
due to the beam, of course, but 
although they were evidently 
putting good signals out into the 
Pacific, they couldn't hear their 
own reports. Said one of them, 
"Sorry, old man, but would you 
mind repeating my report? We 
have one-way skip." 

One-way skip, helH He simply 
had a lousy receiving antenna, 
that's all H operated fine on 
transmit, but on receive, it was 
the pits* 

So there you have it. My rec- 
ommendation for this month Is 
that you replace the S-meter on 
your front panel with a clock or a 
photo of the presidential candi- 
date of your choice . . . and 
please, the next time you work a 
guy with fairly good signals, 
give him the 5^7 he's entitled to 
instead of a crummy 5/2 that 
you'd report if you were relying 
on your stupid meterl And string 
up a good aerial instead of com- 
plaining about one-way skip. 



Ham Help 



I need a service manual or a 
schematic tor a Harrison 
LatKsratories model 855B power 
supply (0-18 V, 0-1.5 A>. 

H. Wade Krizan W5GHQ 

4d01 Goldfield^ Space 46 

San Antonio TX 7821 a 

I am in need of any info at all 
on what appears to be a digital- 
data cassette recorder. It is 
identified as a Compucord 1210, 
a product of Compucord, Inc., of 
Waltham MA. Unfortunately, as 
tar as I can find out, this com- 
pany no longer exists, at least 
not under thai name and/or not 
in Waltham. Any info on this de* 
vice or the whereabouts of the 



manufacturer would be greatly 
appreciated. Of course, I will 
copy and return any material or 
pay, for copying and postage. 
Thank you. 

Fred Goldberg WA2BJZ 

29 Clearview Road 

E. Brunswick NJ 08816 

I would like to start a singles 
net: divorced^ widowed, never 
married -any age. Let's get 
together and share our common 
situation. Women are encour* 
aged to participate. An SASE 
would be appreciated. 

Tim Skonfrtg N9ASI 
800 Water Street 
Dundee IL 60118 



18 73 Magazine • June» 1980 



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^ResfiBf Service— see page S10 



73 Magazine * June, 1980 17 



;-''J .-"'f'OrTTT ^,i 



t « 



c : 



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-f iT^ 








I 



NBVM PRO 



II 



I got a real Kick out of the staff 
articre about NBVM {73. Jan- 
uary, p. 30). It remindect me 
much of the articles and com- 
ments in the '50s about SSB vs, 
AM. 

You old-timers will remember: 
'*SSB sounds bad." ^'SSB is too 
expensive,'* "SSB is incom- 
palibte with AM — you need spe- 
cial equipment to receive it, 
'*SSB is hard lo tune and drifts 
too much," and "SSB requires 
constant readjustment of rf and 
af gain controls." Well, we ail 
now know that this was like 
arguing "apples and oranges/' 

True, on the equipment of the 
'50s. SSB was pretty strange 
sounding, required some calis- 
thenics with the gam controis* 
was hard to tune, and, while it 
didn't drift (usualiy), many of the 
receivers we used back then 
dfdl 

If your current "Super Duma- 
fligit*' transceiver isn't far more 
stable, with far better age action 
and better sideband detection 
capability than the one you used 
in the '50s, youVe probably still 
using the one you used in the 
^50sl 

Just one example: N8RK talks 
about probfems of fooling with 
gain controls using the ampli- 
tude expandor, 

I've used the same expandor 
circuit as contained m the VBC 
3000 (using my own NE570 pur- 
chased from Jameco) and once I 
got the hang of where to set the 
basic level controls, I find 1 only 
have to use the receiver af gain 
control on my Argonaut, KLM 
Force Five, Echo 11, Echo 70, or 
my SBE Sidebander ill convert- 
ed CB set. On the lower HP fre- 
quencies, some improvement 
can be gotten by reducing the rf 
gain control when talking to 
strong stations, but that is nor- 
mally the case with or without 
the expandor. 

As expanding the signal 
causes a change of 2 dB for 
each change of 1 dB of incom* 
ing audio, age overshoot and 
age level changes, etc., will be 



expanded by the same amount. 
Obviously, a properly desigr^ed, 
tight age with fast attack (5 ms), 
delayed decay (hang time), and 
a one*halt to one second decay 
time Is more compatible with 
amplitude expansion than the 
usual simpler age circuits found 
in many ham rigs, (The audlo-de^ 
rived age chip sold by Plessey 
as the SLB20 should work welL) 

Rather than go into a long 
technical treatise into the many 
presumptions and misunder- 
standings concerning NBVM 
that make NSRK's review mar- 
ginal, at best (IVe given Wayne 
Green much of the data and 
technical papers concerning the 
FCC tests, plus offers of tapes 
of my own data and experience 
—no response— 'loo busy/* he 
says), let me throw out a few 
questions, instead: 

1) How many years and how 
much flak came about before 
SSB got the bugs worked out? 2) 
How good did early units sound 
compared with the better AM 
rigs of the day? 3) How long did 
it take for operators to learn 
proper use of the mode? 4) How 
much modification of age tech* 
nlques and audio shaping was 
required to bring SSB up to cur- 
rent levels of performance? 

Along the political lines: 

1) Do you agree with N8RK*s 
evaluation that the 2100 Hz post- 
tion (1800 Hz bandwidth) is only 
a 33% savings? Seems to me 
that 33% out of 100 possible 
stations on a given band would 
allow 33 additional stations I 

2) Has the editorial policy of 
73 Magazine ever left you with 
the feeling that if the ARRL 
came out for something (espe- 
cially strongly for something) 
that 73 would take a negative 
viewpoint concerning it? Admit- 
ting thai QSTs editorial was 
overzealous (a common failing 
in that magazine , . . all mag^ 
azines?), is that sufficient cause 
for 73 to ''drive a stake into the 
heart" of a small American com* 
pany? I think Wayne ought to re- 
read his own "the Japanese are 
ahead of us, U.S. business is 
falling behind" editorial in the 
same issue as NBRK's attack on 



VBC and see if there isn't a bit of 
inconsistency there! 

rd be the first to admit that 
NSVM IS not yet perfect. It is, 
after all, the first product of a 
small company which is in- 
volved in larger, more complicate 
ed research. VBC has also pre- 
sumed that hams can make ap- 
propriate adjustments to prop* 
eriy interface with unit with their 
rigs (apparently not the case at 
73, if they couldn't find any im- 
provement under many circum* 
stances). 

Tve used the system at 
various times and found QRM- 
free capability vs- heavy QRM, 
depending on conditions. It 
doesn't always help, but many 
times It does. 

Slams like that in 73 are un- 
warranted- 
Jim Eagleson W86JNN 
Walsonvilla CA 

P,S. ni happily correspond with 
any interested amateurs on this 
subject and record demonstra- 
tion tapes for anyone supplying 
a cassette with mailer^ assum- 
ing Wayne "finds time'' to pub- 
lish this letter. 

If Mr Eagleson woM carefully 
reread the NBVM article, he 
will find that a number of good 
things were said about /V8VM. 
In parflcuiar, we noted ''at least 
12 dB of improvement** when 
the amplitude compandor was 
used. The NE570 chip is a very 
effective speech processor and 
had been covered in electronic 
pubilcations before NBVM ar- 
rived on the scene. If the VBC 
unit is marketed as being com- 
patible with current ham rigs, 
then it should be mentioned that 
age problems exist. Of course, 
the user can modify his radio to 
have a "property designed age,"* 
a topic that is not mentioned in 
the VBC owner's manual or QST 
articles. 

Mr. Eagieson claims that the 
73 report contained presump- 
tions and misunderstandings 
about NBVM. However, the the- 
orettcaf portions of the arttcle 
were based on information pro- 
vided by VBC and what is in the 
ARRL Radio Amateur's Hand- 
book. Is that information '*mar- 
ginai,'* too? The IZ viewpoint is 
not a solitary of?e The July, 
1978, issue of Spectrum, a pub- 
lication of the Institute of Eiec- 
trical and Electronic Engineers, 
Included an article about SSB 
NBVM and its possfbilities as a 
replacement for the tand-mobiie 
FM service. Because of wide- 



spread disagreement over 
NBVM\ a dissenting view was 
published alongside the favor- 
able article. The disagreement 
over NBVM is also found in the 
December, 197B, Spectrum. 
where several fetters raise gues- 
tfons about NBVM. 

The 73 Magazine review was 
written after a thorough on-t he- 
at r testing and correspondence 
with communfcattons special- 
ists. Electrical engineers, the 
VBC Corporation, an ARRL tech- 
nical staff member, and perhaps 
most importantly, a number of 
NBVM users were consulted. If 
NBVM or any other possible 
technological advance is going 
to reach its full potential, it must 
be able to withstand and benefit 
from an open and, it necessary, 
critical evatuatior} of its merits 
and downfalls. Would the read- 
ers of 73 Magazine want It any 
other way?— Tim Daniel N8RK. 

Jim, there was no one more anx- 
ious than I to have NBVM be a 
winner There may have been 
people more disappointed by it 
than me, but my disappointment 
resulted from giving it a real 
solid try. Harl<tng back to the 
early days of SSB is an unfair 
paraifeL And trying to discredit 
me as a reactionary fighting 
new ideas and techniques must 
strain all but Bift Orr's credutity. 
t can answer your questions 
about SSB for you. t was there 
and I was one of the pioneer 
users of SSB. 

1. How long before the bugs 
were worked out of SSB? There 
were no serious bugs. The early 
ham SSB equipment worked 
just fine. Old-timers with in- 
vestments in AM equipment felt 
three tened by it and tough t back 
emotionally over it. The use of 
AM receivers for tuning in SSB 
was not the best, but if worked 
well enough after about two 
minutes instruction on turnmg 
down the rf gain controL I visited 
many OX ham shacks and 
showed them how to tune it in 
, , . only to hear the chaps ap- 
pear on SSB a few months later. 

2. The early SSB rigs sounded 
fine. . . littfe diflereni from 
those we hear today. AM rigs 
sounded okay if you had a clear 
channel . . . but with the band- 
width and QRM. we did not often 
have clear channeis and the re- 
sulting sound was deafening as 
the carriers created a sea of 
heterodynes up and down the 

Continued on page T 77 



18 73 Magazine * June, 1980 




» 



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MYSTERY HILL DXPEDtTION 
Starts: 1800 GMT June 7 
Ends: 1800 GMT Junes 

The Mount Morlah Repeater 
Society will hold a DXpedition at 
Mystery Hill, North Satem NH, 
on the dates/times shown 
above. Mystery Hill is a 4000* 
year-old astronomical obser^ 
vatory and prehistoric temple 
pfesumed built by C^Hic and 
Iberian cultures, ft is the "stone- 
henge ot America" and has been 
defined as potentially the most 
important archaeological find in 
the Western Hemrsphere, It is 
most likely the oldest man-made 
structure in the United States. 
An attractive certificate wilJ be 
awarded for all contacts with 
KtMDX, the DXpedHion station. 
Send a legal size SASE to: 
K1RCT, PO Box 123, North 
Salem NH 03073. 



FRBQUBNCIES: 

Phone -3980, 7280, 14280, 
21:^0,28580, 146.52. 

CW-355C!, 3710. 7050, 7110. 
14050,21050,21110,28150. 

ARP CONTEST 
Starts: 0000 GMT June 7 
Ends: 2400 GMT June 8 

Sponsored by the Associacao 
de Radioamadores Portu- 
gueses. Only CT1 and CT4 
stations will count for this con- 
test. Please note CT2 and CT3 
stations are excluded. Fixed 
stations can t»e worked once per 
band, independent of mode. 
Mobile stations can be worked 
once per band and par county. 
Use all bands 80 through 10 
meters on SSB, CW, or AM. 
EXCHANGE: 

RS(T) and serial number start* 
Ing with 001. CT1/CT4 stations 
will indicate their county by a 
3-letter abbreviatron. 
SCORING: 

QSOs with stations located In 



Jun 7S 


Calendar 

Mystery Hill DXpedition 


Jun 7-8 


ABP Contest 


Jun 14-15 


ARAL VHP Con lest 


Jun 14-15 


VK/2U0ceania RTTY DX Contest 


Jun 21-22 


All Asian Contest - Phone 


Jun 22 


Worked All Britain Contest- LF Phone 


Jun 28-29 


ARRL Field Day 


Jun 28-29 


ORP ARC International QRP Field Day Con^ 




test 


Juli 


Canada Day Contest 


Jul 12-13 


lARU Radiosport Championship 


Jul 19-20 


Maine QSO Party 


Jul 20 


Worked All Britain Contest -LF CW 


Aug 2-3 


ARRL UHF Contest 


Augd^lO 


European DX Contest -CW 


Aug 23-24 


All Asian DX Contest *CW 


Aug 31 


Worked All Britain Contest -VHF 


Sep 13-14 


European DX Contest — Phone 


Sep 13-14 


ARRL VHF Contest 


Sep 13-15 


Washington State QSO Party 


Sep 14 


North American Sprint 


Sep 27 


DARC Corona 10-Meter RTTY Contest 


Oct 4-5 


California QSO Party 


Oct 4-5 


ARRL Simulated Emergency Test 


Oct1M2 


ARRL CD Party 


Nov 1-2 


ARRL Sweepstakes -CW 


Nov 0-9 


European DX Contest- RTTY 


Nov 6-9 


IPA Contest 


Nov 9 


International OK DX Contest 


Nov 15 


DARC Corona 10~Meter RTTY Contest 


' Nov 15-16 


ARRL Sweepstakes — Phone 


Dec 6-7 


ARRL lea-Meter Contest 


Dec 13-14 


ARRL 10 Meter Contest 



the county of Porto count 2 
points, while QSOs with sta* 
tions in other counties count 1 

point each. The multiplier is the 
number of Portuguese continen- 
tal counties worked, 275 maxi- 
mum per band. Multiply the QSO 
points on each band by the num- 
ber of counties worked on that 
band and add the band totals to 
compute the final score, 
LOGS & ENTRiES: 

The following information 
must be stated in the logs: call, 
name and address of applicant, 
call of station contacted, QSO 
number; abbreviation of county 
and report, points per QSO. New 
multipliers must t>e underlined. 
Use a separate sheet for final 
score caiculations. Log sheets 
and county lists may be ob- 
tained from ARP or from 
WB9BCY. Send $1.00 US for 
postage and printing. Log 
sheets must be mailed not later 
than July 30th to: ARP Contest 
Committee, PO Box 1245, 4021 
-Porto -Codex, Portugal. 

Certificates will be awarded 
for highest general classifica- 
tlon. highest score from each 
DXCC country, and highest YL 
score from each DXCC country. 

VKiZUOCEANIA RTTY 

OX CONTEST 

Contest periods: 

0000 to 0800 GMT 

Saturday, June 14 

1600 to 2400 GMT 

Saturday, June 14 

0800 to 1600 GMT 

Sunday, June 15 

This contest is now being 

organized and conducted by the 

Australian National Amateur 



Radio Teleprinter Society, PO 
Box 860, Crows Nest, N.S.W., 
Australia. Entry classes include: 
singleHDperator, multi-operator* 
and SWL. Each station may t>e 
worked only once per band, but 
may be worked on another band 
tor further multipliers. 
EXCHANGE: 

Serial number consisting of 
RST, zone number, and time in 
GMT. 

SCORING: 

As per CARTG Zone Chart, 
multiplied by the number of 
countries worked, multiplied by 
the number of continents 
worked {6 max,). After the above 
calculations, world stations add 
100 points for each VK/2L sta* 
tion worked on 20 nreters, 200 
points for each on 15 meters, 
and 300 points for each on 10 
meters. Countries count as per 
the ARRL list of countries, ex- 
cept that each VK, ZL, JA, VO, 
and W/K district count as sepa- 
rate countries. Contacts with 
one's own country count as zero 
points for multipliers. 

AWARDS: 

Awards will be issued for 1st, 
2nd, and 3rd on a world basis 
and also on a country basis. 
ENTRIES: 

Logs must show in this order: 
date and time (GMT), callsign of 
station worked, serial number 
sent and received, points 
claimed. Logs of myHI-operator 
stations must be signed by all 
operators, together with a list of 
their callsrgns. Logs of SWL lis- 
teners must contain both num- 
bers sent and received by the 
station logged. Incomplete log- 
gings are not eligible for scor- 



Resulls 







RESULTS 


5 OF THE 1ST9 VK/ZUOCEANIA 












RTTY DX CONTEST 










(Number or OSO& fcn parent heses} 






t. 


G3KJC 


319,700 


(100) 


15, Zl2Bn 


115,668 


(41) 


2. 


HB9AVK 


3t7,fl04 


(84J 


16. W4VZ 


114,460 


(36) 


3. 


MQAPO 


295,SBQ 


(82) 


17. VE2Q0 


107 J2S 


(44) 


4. 


SM6ASD 


264,996 


004) 


18. VK2ATO 


83,345 


(31) 


s. 


F6£CI 


X50J43 


(B1J 


13, VK2AJT 


78.aao 


(29) 


B. 


vKacaw 


273,420 


(SO) 


20, 0Z2X 


75,400 


(49) 


7. 


EA4XW 


2S2,37S 


(W) 








a 


W7DPW 


223,750 


(W) 








a 


DJ&JC 


215,63S 


(?«l 


UUUI^Of^RA TOR S J A TIQNS 


ia 


VK3KF 


194 J24 


(48) 


1. ISMYL 


M5i,744 


(184) 


It. 


Ferr 


146,920 


(71) 


2. VK2TTV 


3S1^7B0 


^m 


ii 


woeiup 


144,400 


m 


3. DKiMM 


269,5^ 


m 


ia 


JE2iWK 


120.a7S 


I41J 


4, VK2WG/P 


104,768 


1*7) 


1* 


VK44H0 


119,424 


m 


S. ¥K2BYf 


f3a,3€0 


&BI 



SWL STATfOiVS 

1. Itorst Ballenbergor Dl SWL 333,764 (91) 

2. Hans Norbert Sokol DL SWL 115.1S5 (64) 
X Kun Wu^lnor DL SWL 9S,4S0 477> 



20 73 Magazine • June, 1980 



mg. Logs must be received by 
the Ck>nt€st Committee by Sep- 
tember 1st. Address all logs to; 
W. J. Storer VK2EG, 55 Prince 
Charles Road, Frenchs Forest, 
20ea, N.S.W,, Australia. 

Summary sheet must show 
calisign of station, name of op- 
erator(s), address of same, 
bands used (a separate log is re* 
quired for each band), the points 
claimed for each band, number 
of VK/ZL stations worked, total 
points claimed, and signa* 
tufefs). 

The judges' decision regard- 
mg the plactngs in the contest 
will be final and no correspon- 
dence will be entered into re- 
gard tng the same. The logs be- 
come the property of the Con^ 
test iDommittee on completion 
of checking. 

ALL ASIAN PHONE CONTEST 
Starts: 0000 GMT June 21 
Ends: 2400 GMT June 22 
The purpose of this contest Is 
to enhance the activity of radio 
amateurs in Asia and to estat> 
lish as many contacts as possi- 
ble during the contest periods 
t>etween Asian and non-Asian 
stations. Please note that the 
contest periods have been ex- 
tended, scoring methods have 



t^een changed, and awards have 
t}een added for US stations. 

Entry classifications tnciude 
singld'Operator/singfe-band 
(160-10 meters), single-operator/ 
multi-band, and multi-operator/ 
multi^band. For single-operator 
classes, never transmit two sig- 
nals or more at the same time. 
Only one signal at alt times 
should be used. For multi-oper- 
ator entries, never transmit two 
signals or more on each band at 
the same time. Only one signal 
per band should be used. In all 
cases, no crossband contacts 
are allowed. 
EXCHANGE: 

OM stations send RSfT) plus 
two numbers representing oper- 
ator's age. YLs send RS{T) plus 
"00", 
SCORtNG: 

Non-Asian stations score 3 
points per Asian QSO on 160 
meters, 2 points on 80 meters, 
and 1 point on atl other bands. 
The multiplier is the number of 
different Asian prefixes worked 
on each band, according to the 
WPX rules. Please note that JDI 
stations on Ogasawara (Bonin 
and Volcano) Islands t>elong to 
Asia. JDI stations on t^tnami 
Torishima (Marcus) island be- 
long to Oceania, Do not count 




ALL ASIAN DX CONTEST 



¥«ir 



rj PHOMK 



Q Sinf\f Bind [, 



□ CW 



MKt1 






oocumnr 



CALL ^Cfi 



BAKD 
LSMKi 
i.SMKi 

7 UHi 


QSQi' 


pmrrs 


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OPERATOR'S 
CLASS 


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nSAL SCORE 


TOTAL 




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COMMENTS 













i DECLARE, a^ MY llONOUa THAT I HAVfi OPEMTtD LN 
COMPUANCE WITH THE J.AilL CQN . RL'LES AS WELL 

AS WTTH ALL RtGfLATlQJitS ft>R THE .WIATOJH RADIO OF MY 
COt.'VrRY. AK& THAT KY SUMMAfiV AMI LDC SHEETS ARE 
CORRECT AND TRUE TO THE FACT. 

DATE _ SIGNATURE 



US miJitary radio stations in the 
Far East (KA) as being in Asia, 

Asian stations use same con* 
tact scoring but for contacts 
with non-Asian stations. The 
multiplier is the number of dlf- 
ferent countries worked on each 
tjand according to the DXCC 
Countries List 

The sum of the contact points 
on each band times the sum of 
the multipliers on each band will 
give the final score, 

ENTRiES & AWARDS: 

Contest rules recommend us- 
ing a summary and log sheet for- 
mat similar to those shown. 
Please use separate sheets for 
each band and keep all times in 
GMT. Show each multiplier only 
the first time on each band. Both 
logs and summary sheet must 
arrive in JARL, PO Box 377, 
Tokyo, Japan, on or before Sep* 
tember 30th. Entries can be dis* 
qualified for violation of the con- 
test rules, false statements in 
the report, or taking points from 
duplicate contacts on the same 
band in excess of 2% of the 
total. 

Certificates will be awarded 
to those having the highest 
score in each entry in proportion 
to the number of participants 
from each country and also 
those from each call area in the 



United States. Only highest 
score if to or less entries, sec- 
ond place if 11 to 20 entries, 
third place it 21 to 30 entries, 
fourth and fifth places if 31 or 
more entries. In addition, the 
highest score in each continent 
of ihe single^operatof/multi- 
band and multi-operator/multi* 
band entries will receive a medal 
and certificate from the Minister 
of Posts and Telecommunica- 
tions of Japan. 

WORKED ALL BRfTAIN 
-LF PHONE 

Starts: 0900 GMT June 22 
Ends: 2200 GMT June 22 

This is the 4th of the five 
Worked All Britain contests for 
this year. The remaining contest 
is on August 31st. 

All contacts most be made on 
phone using Ihe 180> through 
40-meter amateur bands. There 
must be a one-hour break shown 
in the logs. The maximum op- 
erating time is 12 hours of the 
13-hour period- Operating class- 
es include: single- or muiti-op- 
erator, single- or multi-band, and 
SWL. In the case of multi-opera- 
tor, only one transmitter may be 
used at any time. There is a spe- 
cial section for mobile opera- 

Continued on page 181 





LOG SHEET 








iN t>X CO 


K, 


ALL KSJA 

\ \ PHOl 
LOG FOR MHi HAND 

CAl-L -SI 


NTEST 

new 












DATE 


TIME 1 STATTON 
(GMTJ 1 WORKED 


CONTEST NUMBEIt 


MULTl- 
PUEH5 


POINTS 


It 

ae 

10 


ISEHT} KRECEIVED) 






















































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TOTAL 






TOTAL 





















73 Magazine • June, 1960 21 



Nen^ Products 



REVIEW OF THE 
MORSEMATiC™ 

I never thought fd be excited 
over an electfonic keyer again. 
Like many ottier tiams, I built a 
WB4VVF Accu'Keyer several 
years ago and was perfectly 
satisfied with it— until a few 
months ago. The happy Telation- 
ship with my Q(d keyer was up- 
set by the arrival of the Morse- 
Matic, a remarkable little black 
box produced by Advanced 
Electronic Applications, Inc., of 
Lynnwood WA. 

The MorseMatic has so many 
features that It's hard to know 
where to starl. There are four 
basic modes of operation; 
Keyer, Memory Keyer, Beacon* 
and Morse Trainer. These four 
modes are selected via the 
rotary switch on the right side of 
the unit" s sloping control panel 
Once a particular mode is se- 
lected* corttrol is transferred to 
the keypad. By entering two-, 
three-, and four-key sequences, 
the many options of the Morse- 
Matic can be programmed to do 
your Wdding. Now, don't be con* 
cerned that you'll need a degree 
in computer science to operate 
the MorseMatic. To the con- 
trary, ABA has taken pains to 
provide a good, cJear instruction 
manual, with examples. In addi- 
tion, a chart containing a sum- 
mary of the various commands 
Is permanently affixed to the 
control panel of the keyer. 

Let's take a closer look at 
each of the four modes of opera- 
tion. 



Keyer 

On power-op, the MorseMatic 
is ready to go as a 20 wpm 
automatic keyer, with dot and 
dash memories and a gOO-Hz 
sidetone. From that point on- 
ward, you are in control Is 20 
wpm a bit too fast for you? If you 
tap out "-615" on the keypadp 
the keyer will be set to 15 wpm* 
■^*636'" sets it to 35 wpm. 
Speeds from 2 to 99 wpm can be 
selected. 

If you type an asterisk and 
hold down the " V key, the pitch 
of the sidetone will begin to rise. 
When it gets to a pitch you like, 
releasing the '^1" will keep It 
there. Two asterisks and the "1" 

key will lower the tone. 

For those who like to cus- 
tomize their CW, both the dot- 
space and dash-space ratios 
can be changed from their cus- 
tomary 1 and 3 to other values^ 
Other simple commands allow 
the dot and dash memories to 
be disabled and enabled a! will. 

Perhaps the ultimate in keyer 
customization occurs when you 
type "'5'' on the keypad. Believe 
it or not, this converts the 
MorseMatic Into a seml-auto- 
matte keyer, or "bug." Look out 
Vibroplexl 

Memory Keyer 

The memory feature of the 
MorseMatic is, quite simply, 
outstanding. It's easy to use, ex- 
tremely flexible, and makes CW 
operation, be It contesting or 
rag chewing, much, much 
easier. 




The MorseMatic^^ keyer from AEA. 



There are 10 memories avail- 
able, up to a maximum of 500 
characters. Thus you can store 
one message of 500 characters, 
10 messages of 50 characters 
each, seven 50-character mes* 
sages and one of 150 charac- 
ters, etc. The optional memory 
expansion boosts total capacity 
to 2,000 characters- 
Loading a memory keyer is 
sometimes a trying experience, 
but AEA seems to have per- 
fected it. Once you've placed the 
rotary switch in the ''memory 
load" position, it's a matter of 
selecting a memory (pressing 
one of the numtier keys) and 
sending with your paddle the 
message you wish to store. The 
normal ''automatic" loading 
mode even allows you to take 
long pauses while loading a 
message without having the 
pause show up when that mes- 
sage is played back. This works 
out great for those of us who 
can't always remember what we 
wanted to say. A '^real-time" 
mode is available for those who 
are a bit more sure of them- 
selves. Messages are conve* 
niently erased and edited. 

When you've loaded your 
messages, the main switch is 
turned back to lhe**keyer" posi- 
tion and you can send from 
memory or from the paddle, at 
your option. To send from one of 
the memories, you just tap the 
appropriate number key. The 
message wiJl be sent imme- 
diately, at whatever speed you 
have set on the keyer. Herein 
lies a nice feature of the Morse* 
Matic: You can record mes- 
sages at one speed and play 
them back at another. This is a 
real convenience. For example, 
when I begin a session of CW 
work with the MorseMatic, I 
usually set up the first four 
memories as follows. Message 
1 is a CQ; message 2 is my 
answer to someone else's CQ; 
message 3 contains information 
on my location, name, and 
weather; message 4 tells about 
my rig, my Job, my age, and any 
other "standard*' information I 
wish to pass along. Once these 
four memories have been set up, 
about 75% of my sending has 
been eliminated for the remain- 
der of the operating session. I 
can talk to Novices or Extras 
and merely change the keyer 
speed to match the skills of the 
other fellow. It quickly becomes 
natural to intersperse material 
sent from the paddle with mes- 
sages from the keyer memory. 



An added plus is that a memory 
message can be interrupted at 
any time, either by hitting the 
*'t" key or by tapping the paddle. 

The MorseMatic has come in 
handy wher> operating CW on 
the OSCAR satellites. With two 
antenna rotators to operate, 
along wrth transmitter and re* 
ceiver tuning, it's great to have 
the keyer do most of the send- 
ing. 

CW contesters were among 
the first to use the MorseMatic. 
One of the reasons they were so 
eager to get their hands on it is 
the provision for automatic gen- 
eration of contact serial num- 
bers. With this feature, a con- 
tester can load his exchange in- 
to a memory, programming the 
MorseMatic to insert the serial 
number in the proper place. 
Thereafter, each time the ex^ 
change is sent, the keyer will 
automatically increment the 
serial number. It*s a stmpte mat- 
ter to repeat the serial number or 
the whole exchange if the other 
station misses it the first time 
around. Without a MorseMatic 
or similar keyer, it will be diff*- 
cull to remain competitive in CW 
contesting. 

Beacon 

Tm told that the fellows who 
are experimenting with some of 
the more unusual types of 
propagation really appreciate 
this feature of the MorseMatic. 
In this mode, the keyer sends a 
message for a given length of 
time, then remains silent for 
another period of time before 
sending the message again. The 
guys who operate moonbounce 
and meteor scatter, for in- 
stance, often find it necessary 
to alternate sending and receiv- 
ing in this way in order to 
establish contact. 

With the proliferation of 
propagation beacons on 10, 6, 
and 2 meters, I suspect some- 
one will put a MorseMatic to 
work at this job. Now that would 
be a classy beacon. 

Morse Trainer 

A great number of optional 
functions are available in this 
mode, making the MorseMatic 
an outstanding gadget for 

teaching and learning Morse 
code. Two features of the 
Trainer mode deserve special 
mention. 

First of all, the Trainer can be 
programmed to gradually in- 
crease the code speed during a 
given practice session. It works 



22 73 Magazine * June, 1980 



this way: You begin by entering 
the starting speed, let's say 7 
wpm. Tlien you enter tine finish- 
ing speed, say 13 wpm, foii owed 
by the duration of ttie practice 
session, perhaps 15 minutes. 
When the keyer is activated, it 
then begins a IS-mlnute prac- 
tice session of random five-let- 
ter code groups, starting at 7 
wpm and gradually increasing 
the speed to 13 wpm by the end 
of the 15-minute session. The 
practice sessions can be as 
long as 59.9 minutes, with code 
speeds from 2 to 99 wpm, same 
as the regular keyer. 

The second feature of note in 
theTrainermode is its use ot the 
Farnsworth method of instruq- 
tion. In the practice session de- 
scribed above, for example, the 
actual characters would be sent 
at 13 wpm throughout the entire 
15-minute practice session. 
However, the inter-character 
space would be adjusted to 
make the starting speed equal 
to 7 wpm. As the session pro- 
gressed, the mter-character 
space would be gradually 
shortened, so that by the end of 
the 15 minutes, both the char- 
acters and the spacing would be 
at the I3'wpm rate. The 73 Mag- 
azins code tapes have used a 
similar method for years, (t 
works so well because the brain 
gets used to the sound of the let- 
ters sent at the higher speed. 

Getting on the Air 

Some of the newer solid-state 
rigs are a bit particular about the 
method used to key them. The 
icom 701, for instance, has prob- 
lems with some electronic 
keyers. By the same token, an 
older transmitter, m\h fairly 
high voltage at the keying jack, 
can zap the keying transistor of 
some units. The MorseMatic, 
though, seems to be immune to 
these problems. Tve used it to 
key all types of rigs without a 
hint of trouble. The rear panel 
has two keying outputs, one for 
grid block (rated up to -300 V 
and 30.0 mA) and a second for 
cathode or transistor keying 
(-h300 V, 300 mA). That should 
handle whatever you have lying 
around the shack. 

Aside from a lead to your key- 
ing jack, the MorseMatrc re- 
quires only a source of 12-V dc 
power and a paddle. The side- 
tone volume is adjustable from a 
front-panel control that also 
serves as an on-off switch. By 
the way, any messages you've 
stored in memory will remain in- 



tact as long as the 12-V supply 
to the keyer is not interrupt- 
ed .. . even when the front-panel 
control is turned off, 

AEA has taken all the best 
features from the many previous 
electronic keyers on the market 
and combined them into one 
easy-to-use unit. In five months 
of use, it's been 100% reliable, 
something one can't say about 
some memory keyers. If you op- 
erate CW. this may be the ulti- 
mate accessory. Besides, 
Father's Day is coming up; do 
you really need another tie? 

AEA, Inc., PO Box 2 WO, Lynn- 
wood WA 98036. Reader Service 
number 483. 

Jeff DeTray WB6BTH 
Assistant Publisher 

GLOBAL SPECIALTIES 

CORPORATION INTRODUCES 

WIRE KIT FOR BREADBOARDS 

Global Specialties Corpor- 
ation, world leader in solderless 
breadboards, has added to the 
extraordinary utility of these 
products with the introduction 
of Model WK^1 Wire Jumper Kit, 
a fully prepared assortment of 
insulated solid hookup wire in 
fourteen discrete, color-coded 
lengths. 

While ordinary hookup wire 
can be and usually is used for 
terminal'tO'terminal connec- 
tions In preparing a circuit on a 
solderless breadboard, it is 
nevertheless necessary to cut, 
strip, and bend the leads. This 
task is accomplished for the 
breadboard user with the WK-1. 

AWG #22 solid hookup wire is 
precut, prestripped, and the 
ends bent 90 degrees. Lengths 
are coordinated with insulation 
color to provide standard color- 
code jumper length identifica- 
tion. The fourteen lengths and 
their codes are as follows: 

0.1-inch (no insulation), 
0.2-inch (red), 0.3-inch (orange), 
0.4-inch (yellow), 0.5-inch 
(green), CS-inch (blue), O.T-inch 
(violet), 0.8'inch (grey), 0.9-inch 
(white), 1.0-inch (brown), 2.0-inch 
(red), 3,0-inch (orange), 4.0-inch 
(yellow), 0.5'inch (green). The 
above lengths are exclusive of 
the V4Hnch stripped ends. 

Twenty-five pieces of each of 
these fourteen lengths are sort- 
ed into compartments in a 
hinged-lid plastic case. For 
more information, contact 
Global Specialtfes Corporation, 
70 Fulton Terrace, New Haven 
CT 06509; (203)-624-31 03. Reader 
Service number 477, 




Wire Jumper Kit from Ghbal. 



UNIBOX ELECTRONIC 
PACKAGfNG COMPONENTS 

Unibox is a versatile line 
of packaging components de- 
signed for industrial, OEM and 
experimenter use. Composed of 
a series of attractive enclosures 
and a wide selection of acces- 
sories, the components may be 
custom assembled to meet the 
user's specific requirements. 

Enclosures are available in 
six sizes and five color combina- 
tions. Manufactured from a 
tough engineering-grade ther- 
moplastic, the enclosures may 
be readily customized with hand 
tools. Enclosure sizes range 
fTom1V4" X 2" X 2V4"to2" x 
4" X 5V4". 

For circuitry construction, 
custom epoxy-glass grid boards 
are available for horizontal and 
vertical mounting in the enclo- 
sures> The gridboard hole pat- 
tern accepts IC sockets and 
other standard lead configura- 
tion components. 

Two sizes of transparent red 
and smoke-grey windows are 



available for use with LED or in- 
candescent readouts, indica- 
tors, etc. 

Also available are two sizes of 
opaque grey panels for mount- 
ing switches^ potentiometers, 
connectors, etc. 

Resilient, non-marring feet, 
which fit aH enclosures, may be 
utilized for bench or desk-top 
applications. 

For more information, con- 
tact Amerex, PO Box 2815, 
Riverside CA 92516; (714)-686- 
1414. Reader Service number 
479. 

NEW FREQUENCY DIRECTORY 
FROM GROVE ENTERPRISES 

The first comprehensive print- 
out of official government radio 
communications frequency list- 
ings has just been released by 
Grove Enterprises. 

The Federal Frequency Direc- 
tory features more than 100,000 
discrete listings of frequencies, 
agencies, and locations of US 

Continued or^ page 166 




Unibox electronic packaging components from Amerex. 



73 Magazine • June, 1980 23 



y^M^ards 



Biff Gosney WB7BFK 
2665 North 1250 East 
Whidbey Island 
Oak Harbor WA 98277 

Travefrng to Scandinavia, we 
find our friends in Norway offer- 
ing amateurs worldwide a spe- 
cial achievement award for liav- 
ing made contact witfi amateurs 
in their country. Here are two 
awards tliat are sponsored by 
the Norwegian Radio Relay 
League and the Larvik Society 
of NRRL, respectively. 

WORKED ALL LA AWARD 

The WALA Award is available 
to any amateur who can provide 
evidence of f^aving filled the 
following requirements of the 
award; 

Applicants in Denmark, Fin- 
land, Sweden, and Norway must 
have two contacts on separate 
bands with a total of 20 counties 
of Norway. 

Applicants outside Scandina- 
via must work 20 different LA/LB 
stations on any amateur band. 
At least 6 of these stations must 
be located north of the Arctic 
Circle. Contacts with stations 
from JW (Svalbafd). JW (Bear 



Island), and JX (Jan Mayen) 
count for this award. 

All contacts must be made 
after January 1, 1950. Usual 
logbook information is required 
for claiming your contacts, 
along with the exact QTH of the 
station worked. Award fee is 
Nkr. 10, or 10 iRCs mailed to: 
NRRL Award f^anager, Alf 
Almedal LA5QK, N 4052 
Roeyneberg, Norway. 

WORKED NORWEGIAN 
CITIES AWARD 

This award requires appli- 
cants to work a minimum of Nor- 
wegian cities with no limit to 
date, band, or mode. It should be 
noted this award will not recog- 
nize contacts with LJ, LF, or LH 
stations. The three award 
classes are; Class 3-DX sta- 
tions work 5 cities, Europeans 
must work 10 cities; Class 
2 — DX stations work 10 cities, 
Europeans must work 20 cities; 
Class 1 — DX stations work 15 
cities, Europeans work 30 cities. 

GCR apply. Send your com- 
pleted tlst of contacts and appfl- 
cation along with the award fee 
of $1.00 and 2 IRCs or a total of 
10 IRCs to: Larvik Society of 



WORKED ALL LA AWARD 




1 Oslo 
3. Abtfald 

^.' Qpplihd 

t. Ve&l-foid 
& Tetsmark 

ID. Veal'AodQr 

It. Rog^Jond 

IS. etrgtn 

13, HOrd"«*nql 

H. SognagFicrdacn 

t6. S4r-lfptrdBlaa 
■\Tf. Nord-Trtndelafl 
TB. NordlAod 
ta. Troma 
2Q. Finnrfa^rk 
OWftpm IpiTttpritt 
S* Jan M^^en 
21. S^aHbQrd.e^ar laFarvd 



A 

& 
C 
D 
E 
F 
Z 
H 
I 
K 
L 


n 
s 
f 

u 

V 

V 

JX 
JW 



2i. Anidrclica. BauvBl^la^and 3V 



NRRU PO Box 59, N-3251 Larvik, 
Norway. 
Valid Norwegian cities are: 
Arendal, Bergen, Bodo, Dram- 
men, Egersund, Fredrikstad, 
Gjovik, Hammerfestf Halden, 
Hamar, Harstad, Haugesund, 
Horten* Kongsberg, Kristian* 
sand S., Kristiansund N., 
Kragero, Larvik, Lillehammer, 
Mandal, Molde, Mosjoen, Moss, 
hAo I Rana, Namsos, Narvik, 
Notodden, Oslo, Porsgrunn, 
Safpsborg, Sandnes^ Sande- 
fjord, Stavanger, Skien, Steink- 
jer, Trondheim, Tonsberg, Trom- 
so, Vardo, Aalesund. 

From the Vadso Society of 
the Norwegian Radio Relay 
League comes details about the 
worked all "communes" award 
for this Scandinavian country. 

WORKED ALL NORWEGIAN 
COMMUNES AWARD 

Licensed amateurs and 
SWLers worldwide are encour- 
aged to pursue the require- 
ments of this very challenging 
awards program. This award is 
issued tor contact with 25 dif- 
ferent Norwegian communes 
and endorsement stickers 
recognize additional communes 
in increments of 25 each. At 
present there are over 454 com- 
munes and 5 Norwegian arc- 
tic/antarctic areas which qualify 
for contacts. A special award 
wilt be issued to those who can 
work all communes and all arc* 
tic/antarctic areas. Only con- 
tacts on or after January 1, 1975, 
wilt count for WANCA. 

All bands or modes may be 
used; no crossmode contacts or 
contacts via repeater will be 
allowed for credit, QSOs via 
OSCAR sateliltes do count. Min- 
imum reports in all cases must 
be RST 338 or RS 33, Mobile or 
portable contacts count, but 
QTH must be stated on the QSL 
card. 

QSL cards are not required. 
GCR apply. Award fees; Nkr. 30 
for the basic award (10 IRCs) 
and Nkr. 10(3 IRCs) for endorse- 
ment stickers. No fee for handi- 
capped amateurs/SWL stations. 

A record book listing all Nor- 
wegian communes and areas 
for 15 Nkr, (3 IRCs) is available 
from the Award Manager. 

Certificates are issued for 
mixed mode, CW only^ SSB only, 
all RTTY, all SSTV, Novice, 
Mobility (only contacts with 
mobile or portables), and All 
WANCA. 

All fees are contributed to the 
LA5LG Fund for Norwegian 



Blind-Handicapped Amateurs. 
All inquiries should be accom- 
panied with at least 2 IRCs for 
an expected reply. 

All applications should be for- 
warded with the appropriate fee 
to: WANCA Award Manager, 
Sverre J. Schmidt LA1QK, PO 
Box 3, N-9801 Vadso, Norway. 

OX AWARDS FROM 
NEW ZEALAND 

I just received a very informa- 
tive packet of information from 
Jock White 2L2GX representing 
NZARTf the national amateur 
society in New Zealand. Jock, as 
Awards Manager, indicates all 
NZART awards are available for 
a very nominal fee and QSL 
cards are not required where 
verified lists can be provided as 
an alternative. To qualify, all 
contacts claimed for NZART 
awards must be made on or 
after November 1, 1945, Special 
endorsements are given for 
single band or mode accom- 
plishments. Send ah applica- 
tions to ZL2GX, 152 Lytton Rd., 
Gisborne, New Zealand, 

WORKED ALL PACIFIC AWARD 

To qualify for the WAP Award, 
an applicant must confirm two- 
way contact with 30 different 
Oceanic countries from the 
WAP list below. The cost of this 
award is 2 IRCs or US $,60. 

Eligible Oceanic contacts: 
Port Timor, Philippines, Adelie 
Land, New Caledonia, French 
Oceania, Wallis Island, New 
Hebrides, Baker/Howtand/Amer- 
ican Phoenix Islands, East 
Carolines, West Carolines, 
Mariana Islands, Marcus Island 
(Minami Torishima), Guam, 
Hawaiian islands, Johnston 
Island, Midway Island, Palmyra 
Island, American Samoa, Wake 
Island, Marshall Island, Java^ 
Sumatra, Borneo, Celebes, 
West Irian, Australia, Lord Howe 
Island, Willis Island, Macquarie 
Island, New Guinea, Norfolk 
Island, Papua, Nauru, Christ- 
mas, Cocos, Gilbert, Ellice, 
British Phoenix Islands, Fiji, 
Fanning and Washington 
Islands, Solomon Island, Tonga, 
Pitcairn, Sarawak, Brunei, North 
Borneo, North Cook Islands, 
South Cook Islands, Samoa, 
Tokelau Islands, Kermadec 
Islands, Niue island, New Zea- 
land, Chatham Island, Auckland 
and Campbell Island, Antarctica 
<ZL5on)y). 

Continued on page 179 



24 73 Magazine • June, 19S0 



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143.800 — IM.tOO MHx Moblfe Transceiv^ 



PULL 



Power to the mobile operators! This one Is brand new, and 
it carries a powerhouse punch wherever youVe going. 
ICOM unveils a full 25 watts of mobile power wfth the 
introduGtion of the new IC-S55A. When you want in- 
creased mobile QSO range, ICOM delivere; and nobody 
does it better. 

The microprocessor controlled K-ft55A Is a deceivingly 
compact unit which packs more big, multifeature fie^dbilrty 
than any other ICOM mobile to date- This one offers a 5 
channel memory, complete with memory scan^ adjustabte 
scanning speed, and auto-stop. The 5 channeJs can easily 
be written from any inband frequencies; m^ the scan 
function can be programmed to scan all 5 or onfy 2, stop- 
ping on any signal. 

Ukc the other new ICOM tnmsceivere, the IC-255A comes 
with 2 VFCs built-in at no extra cost The racfio is pro- 
^mmed to come up to power operating at 6O0Khz spirts, 



but It can be reprogrammeo \o any spilt of your choice. The 
dual WO's and single tuning knob provide you with smooth, 
easy tuning In 15KHz or 5KHz steps. 

The use of new tow-noise^ dyrramic range junction FET's (for 
the RF amplifier and the first mixer) and helical cavity filters 
(for the antenna and RF clrcurts) provides excellcrrt sensitiv- 
ity and fntermodulation distortion characteristics. A pair of 
high quality monolithk; crystal filters and ceramic filters facili- 
tates interference free reception reliability. 

The new iC-25SA's power is selectable 25W high or 1 W Jow^ 
yet it draws onty 5,5 amps when transmitting in the high 
power mode. A directty amplified VCO output, vwthout the 
use of multipliers or mixers, and a power module in the PA 
unit produce a very clean transmitted signal, wfth low 
spurious radiation. When you're in an RF 'a&^f the K-955A 
can get out the signal. To give your mobile FM operatiors 
big features wftti a power punch, give yourseff the K-USA. 



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26 73 Magazine • June, 1980 



I »■ m ■ ■ wa ■ ■ ■■■■.«> ■ ■ ■ ■ ■••• *4 •«•■•■'■■ 

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INNOVATORS IN DIGITAL COMMUNICATIONS 



One Step at a Time: 
Designing Your Own Ham Gear 

— part I 



L.B. Cebik W4RNL 
5105 HohtonHUk Road 
KnoxvUie TN 37914 

One of the most dif- 
ficult steps to take in 
our growth as radio ama- 
teurs IS the one that carries 
us from building to de- 
signing. The engineer has 
learned, through his inten- 
sive college training, com- 
plex mathematical ways to 
design circuits and equip- 
ment. The experienced 
technician seems intuitive- 
ly to know what to look for 
and what to do. What they 
do seems a mystery, but 
they do it well and their 
equipment works. 

But what about the ham 
who has just received his 
General class license? He 
has built a kit or two, and 
therefore is familiar with 
components, soldering, and 
adjustment of equipment. 



He has even built a device 
or two, perhaps a keyer, by 
reproducing the circuit and 
layout he saw in 73. Now he 
has been looking at some of 
the home-brew designs and 
wishes he could tackle 
something that complex. 
He does not exactly like 
what he has seen, however. 
Some of it is too complex 
for his needs; some is too 
simple. He has some parts 
on hand which none of the 
designs uses. But all he 
knows about ham radio is 
what he has learned from 
his fellow hams, his club's 
radio classes, and the books 
published especially for 
hams. As a salesman, 
school teacher, carpenter, 
or whatever the profession, 
he feels unprepared to 
tackle the big task of de- 
signing his own gear. 

If this description fits 
you, even if only loosely, 
this article is written for 
you. There is a way to go 



about designing, even 
though you are treading on 
new ground, which wilt 
maximize your chances of 
successfully building a 
piece of equipment that 
suits your specific needs— 
and which works. 

Designing, for the begin- 
ning designer, requires a 
step-by-step process to rely 
upon for the journey from 
thinking to operating. For* 
tunately, the process is not 
long or involved in its main 
steps. In fact, there are only 
seven major steps, along 
with a couple of smaller 
ones Here are the steps 
which you should use as a 
checklist for any building 
projects, the first three of 
which will be covered in 
Part One of this two-part ar- 
ticle; 

1) Setting down design 
obiecthes. 

2] Blocking out circuitry 
by stages. 

3) Circuit research and se- 



lection; circuit interaction: 
drive, matching, and 
switching. 

4) Parts acquisition. 

5) LBYOUt planning; cir- 
cuit interaction: shielding 
and isolation. 

6) Building, one stage at a 
time, 

7) Testing of each stage 
as completed, and circuit 
interaction: spurious oscil- 
lations and emissions. 

That is the entire list. The 
key words are italicized. 
Let's take a closer look at 
each of the items on the list 
and see how it fits into 
place as we design a piece 
of equipment, I hope that 
by the time we have fin- 
ished at least one doubtful 
builder will have been en- 
couraged to step into the 
workshop as a novice de- 
signer. 

Setting Down Design 
Objectives 

For any human endeavor. 



28 73 MagBzine • June, 1980 




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F/g. 7. A block diagram of a 33-30-MHz SSB receiver showing electronic stages in squares and control/mecbanicat 
elements in circles. This diagram ^sinf)plified from the Drake R-4B — is presented to show the techniques of embodying 
design objectives in a function diagram. It provides the designer with a general view of the stages through which the 
signal is processed and the switching and other control mechanisms, either necessary or available. Note, for example, 
that a five-section bandswitch is needed. Controls such as the notch depth and passband tuner are available, but the 
designer may later choose to include or delete them from the final design. The diagram also provides the elements of the 
conversion scheme— one of several possible schemes as shown in Figs. 2 and 3. Diagramming commercial and home- 
buift equipment as presented in amateur journals can assist you in deciding the functional details of the unit you want 
to build, as well as helping you to understand the equipment you have diagrammed: 



success demands that we 
set forth our objectives. On- 
ly when we are clear on 
what we are aiming for do 
we have any good chance 
of achieving it. Designing a 
piece of ham equipment is 
no exception. 

The task of getting our 
objectives down on paper is 
not too difficult if we ask 
ourselves the right ques- 
tions Here are some good 
starters: 1) What can this 
equipment do (and what 
can it not do)? 2) Why do I 
want to have it? 3J What 
featores or characteristics 
do t want it to have? 

The first question— what 
can the equipment do and 
what can it not do? — pro- 
vides a very important re- 
view of the basic purposes 
of electronic gear. It is not 
enough to think that a re- 
ceiver just receives rf 
energy and converts it to 
audio (or some other form 
of) energy. We must think in 
more precise terms. A high- 
frequency receiver for SSB 
and CW is a more exact de- 



scription. This sets limits to 
what we can put into it and 
what we cannot get out of 
it It tells us that we are 
limited to the ham bands 
between 3.5 and 30 MHz, 
and that we should not ex- 
pect good AM reception 
from the unit. Every piece 
of equipment we can think 
of will have some limits, 
and it is important to be 
aware of them. 

Knowing why you want 
to build the piece of equip* 
ment is equally important, 
since it allows you to note 
all the functions you want it 
to fulfill- If you want to 
build an OSCAR receiver, 
then perhaps coverage of 
all of the ham bands is 
not necessary. Converters 
placed ahead of a receiver 
for 28 MHz might fulfill 
your needs. Now ask what 
the receiver has to do to the 
OSCAR signals. Besides 
converting them to audio, it 
has to provide selectivity. 
And because OSCAR sig- 
nals near the horizon are 
likely to be weak, the 



receiver must be sensitive. 
Now the list of objectives is 
beginning to move away 
from the abstract and into 
the realm of the concrete. 
The next step is to refine 
further these objectives. 
How selective? 2 kHz for 
SSB and .5 kHz for CW. 
How sensitive? Less than a 
microvolt. 

The third question — con- 
cerning the main features 
and characteristics de- 
sired—includes many dif- 
ferent kinds of concerns. 
First, it can refer to oper- 
ating ease or complexity — 
lots of adiustments or few. 
Second, it can refer to 
building ease, e.g., use of 
circuit boards or perf- 
boards, metal work and 
cabinetry, tricky circuits or 
reliable ones. Third, it can 
refer to the nature of the 
item. Is it to be an experi- 
mental unit under constant 
revision, or a reliable piece 
of operating gear? Is it for 
your own use or for use by 
others? Is it to be a finished 
unit or a breadboard item? 



Even if you see an item in a 
handbook or article that 
seems to have just the fea- 
tures you think you want, it 
will pay to make a list of its 
advantages and disadvan- 
tages in light of just why 
you want to build it 

In order to keep track of 
your answers, you should 
make a list, and as you pro- 
ceed with the design pro- 
cess, add to the list. In your 
readings you will find new 
possible uses for a piece of 
equipment. For example, 
you may discover that a fre- 
quency counter might be 
used as a station read-out 
for both transmit and 
receive. If you decide you 
want the device to fulfill 
that function, be sure to put 
it on your list, since that de- 
cision will make a differ- 
ence in the specific design 
of the gear. As your list 
grows, you also will find 
yourself becoming more 
precise in knowing what 
you want The design objec- 
tives will eventually form a 
list of specifications for the 



73 Magazine < June, 1980 29 









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Fig. 2. Block diagram of a somewhat simpler receiver design, agairi with e/ecfronrc functions in squares and control/ 

mechanical functions in circles. This diagram — based upon Heath's HR-1 680— shows an alternative conversion scheme 
to that shown in Fig. 1. Rather than provide all levels of selectivity at one frequency through the use of several crystal or 
mechanical filters, this design provides SSB selectivity at 3J95 MHz and CW selectivity at audio frequencies. As shown, 
the switching in the front end is complex, but the manufacturer has simplified the process by the use of diode switching 
techniques, Rf and af gain controls have been omitted, since they occur in the same points of the circuit as in Fig, 1. 
Notice that this circuit uses fixed adjustments in its filter circuits, thus providing less flexibility than the receiver of Fig. 7 
(a much higher-priced receiver). For the home designer, there is often a trade<^ff until considerable experience is ob- 
tained. Simplicity of design with less flexibility is often the price of successful design and construction. With care, 
however, one can design a simpler unit both electronically and mechanically so that circuit refinements and additional 
features can be added later. If you have this in mind, special planning will be needed in the circuit selection and layout 
(both mechanical and circuit] phases of your design work. 



equipment you want to 
build, Clear thinking here 
will save many a headache 
later on. 

Blocking Out Circuitry 
By Stages 

Because many equip- 
ment articles begin with a 
schematic diagram of the 
unit, we can easily be 
tempted to make a mistake 
at this point. It seems 
natural to leap from our 
objectives into trying to 
find circuits which will 
achieve them. We quickly 
get lost in the maze of 
bypass capacitors, coil 
winding instructions, and 
coupling methods, our 
objectives soon take a 
backseat to the intricacies 
of components. As a result, 
when we do get the equip- 
ment working (if we get it 
working), it does not do 
what we hoped it would. 

To avoid this problem, 
we need to put a step be- 
tween our objectives list 
and our individual circuits. 
We need to block out the 
circuitry which will achieve 
these objectives. 

But first, let's make an- 



other set of lists. There will 
be two, one for the elec- 
tronic functions and the 
other for the mechanical 
functions. As you will readi- 
ly see, these two lists will 
overlap in a number of 
places, and that is impor- 
tant, too. 

On the electronics list, 
you should enter all of the 
functions you can think of 
that go into the unit you 
wish to build Some of them 
will be taken from your 
objectives list and others 
will come from your knowl- 
edge of what goes into a 
unit like the one you have 
in mind. Here, handbooks 
and articles can help. For 
example, suppose you want 
to build an HF receiver. 
Most such receivers will 
have the following stages: 
an rf amplifier, a mixer and 
heterodyne oscillator, an- 
other mixer and vfo, SSB 
and CW filters, i-f am pit* 
fiers, a detector, audio 
amplifiers, age, and meth- 
ods of tuning, adjusting 
gain, switching bands, and 
metering signal strength. 
This is your starting list. 

On the mechanical list, 



you should enter all of the 
mechanical functions that 
are part of a piece of equip- 
ment This includes vari- 
able controls, switches, and 
tuning devices, as well as 
plugs, jacks, cables, and 
other appendages. For the 
HF receiver referred to 
above, we will need a tun- 
ing mechanism and dial, rf 
and af gain controls, an on- 
off switch, a fuse, a line 
cord, an antenna jack, a 
speaker jack, a phone jack, 
an age on-off switch, and a 
band switch. Like the first 
list, this is only a starter 

The next step is to make a 
diagram of what is on your 
lists. The block diagram of 
these lists will differ some- 
what from those block dia- 
grams that appear in equip- 
ment articles; they are de- 
signed to show only the 
functions which the author 
thinks are important, The 
one made from your lists is 
for design, so It must in- 
clude both electronic and 
mechanical blocks. The 
easiest way to accomplish 
this is to choose different 
shaped blocks for elec- 
tronic stages and mechan- 



ical stages — say a square 
for one and a circle for the 
other. (It does not matter 
whether professional dia- 
grams use this method. As 
long as a diagram makes 
something clear to you, it is 
a good one.) Notice Fig. 1 . It 
sums up the entries on our 
list so far. 

Ah, but notice Fig. 2! It 
also sums up the entries. 
The point is that there are 
always going to be alter- 
native ways to accomplish 
your objectives. )ust as 
your reading and your con- 
versations with other hams 
gave you alternatives for 
your objectives, so, too, 
your reading will show you 
different ways to accom- 
plish your selected objec- 
tives, and so will manufac- 
turers. Drake uses the pre- 
mixing system in Fig. 1; 
Heath uses the system of 
Fig. 2. Which, if either, will 
you use? Notice the com- 
plex switching system com- 
mon to both: that is hard to 
build and may lead to align- 
ment difficulties. Fig. 3 
shows still another alter- 
native: separate converters 
for each band. Although 



30 73 MsgazfFje • June. 1980 



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Fig. J. Th/s shows a third block diagram of a receiver des/gfi, this one based ori a receiver /n the 1978 ARRL Hand book. 
The design uses a common conversion scheme, although in the past, many receivers omitted 160 meters and designed 

the basic receiver around 80 meters. Some of the design strategies are aimed at the home builder. Notice the use of 
separate converters for each band, which simplifies switching and permits optimizing performance for each band. The 
use of a 455-kHz i-f allows the use of easily obtainable components^ such as the filters. With proper selection of circuits, 
one might add other operating aids, such as an ultra-sharp audio frequency CW filter. Combining ideas from all three 
design philosophies, as well as others, can produce as simple or complex a receiver as one wants or needs; the point is to 
design to your objectives and within your construction skills. 



this may mean a few more 
parts and active devices, 
the switching is so much 
easier that the increase in 
size may be worth it And it 
does make home construe- 
tion easier, especially for 
the beginning designer 

The block diagram, 
therefore, is a good deci- 
sion-making aid. By explor- 
ing the alternatives in block 
form, we can make basic 
decisions about what 
means we will use to ac- 
complish our objectives. At 
the same time, we also can 
think through a number of 
important questions, such 
as what circuitry schemes 
will be the easiest to pro- 
duce with the methods I 
have of building and with 
the test equipment I have 
or will have? 

It is not necessary to 
make final decisions at this 
point. Having two or three 
alternative block diagrams 
will not hurt as you move to 
the next stage, as long as 
you remember the overall 
objectives and as long as 
you keep in mind that you 
are moving toward deci- 
sions which will result in 
spending money. On the 



other hand, every decision 
you can make at this level 
will be one more out of the 
way at the next level. That 
is why making lists and 
notes next to your diagrams 
is so important; they help 
you keep your place. 

The process, as described 
generally and with ex- 
amples, sounds a good deal 
more complex than it is in 
reality. We do part of this 
work in our heads whenever 
we read through an article 
that attracts us. All these 
procedures call for is to 
write on paper some of 
what we do in our heads. 
Paper-and-pencil is cheaper 
than burned-up or unused 
components. The Wright 
brothers are reputed to 
have said that they spent 
time with design drawing 
because what would work 
on paper would work when 
built. The same thought ap- 
plies here. And even if we 
never went a stage further, 
think of the advantages. 
First, we would have spent 
no money, and second, we 
would have learned a great 
deal about the workings of 
equipment like the item we 
wanted to build. 



Circuit Research and 
Selection 

Now is the time for more 
reading and writing, for 

now the time has come to 
fill in the blocks of stage 2 
with actual circuitry. Some- 
times we witi see an article 
which shows circuits that 
are perfect for several of 
the blocks in our diagram. 
But let's not count on it 
Even if it does happen, it 
pays to look at several 
alternative articles. Com- 
parison of circuits for each 
stage and function can 
teach us a great deal about 
what is going on in each cir- 
cuit and about what we 
should expect in the way of 
performance and diffi- 
culties. 

By now it should be clear 
that you are developing a 
fairly extensive file or note- 
book in the process of 
designing the piece of 
equipment you have in 
mind. Loose-leaf binders, 
spiral notebooks, or just a 
file folder all work well to 
keep your notes and plans 
together. And the notebook 
will grow as you get to the 
layout-planning stage and 



to the test stage. Keep it. 
Besides being a virtual text- 
book on the type of equip- 
ment you are designing, it 
also will be useful after the 
equipment is built More 
about that later on, but for 
now, here's just one hint 
based on personal experi- 
ence. 

Although Xerox® -type re- 
productions are speedy for 
filling up the notebook, 
they are not the best plan- 
ning device. Instead, draw 
out the circuit you are 
evaluating. In the process, 
you can think through the 
function of every com- 
ponent and the original 
author's rationale for 
choosing particular values. 
Understanding a piece of 
equipment means, ideally, 
understanding its overall 
function, understanding the 
function of every electronic 
and mechanical circuit 
block, and, finally, under- 
standing the function of 
every component. Rarely 
does anyone ever reach this 
ideal, even for relatively 
simple pieces of equip- 
ment, but in our research 
and selection of circuits we 
have a perfect opportunity 



73 Magazine • June, 193Q 31 



to approach one part of this 
ideal. Thinking in this 
detailed way about what 
we see in articles and hand- 
books reveals all sorts of 
things we do not know, and 
that leads to reading other 
materials or asking ques- 
tions in order to find the 
answers. You will be sur- 
arised how quickly you 
earn to figure things out for 
yourself and how nnuch 
easier the Advanced and 
Extra class tests become 
after practicing this for a 

^while. 

Research into circuits is 
not just reading, but 
reading with specific ques- 
tions in mind. Here are 
some useful starters. 

1. What drive level is re- 
quired for this Circuit? Does 
it require driving voltage 
only, or driving power? The 
answer to this question 
often will determine what 
the circuit for the preceding 
stage must be like. Of 
course, most low-level tube 
and FET circuits require on- 
ly driving voltage, whereas 
power stages and most tran- 
sistor circuits require that 
both voltage and current be 
supplied to the signal input 
of the stage. Except for rf 
power amplifiers, however, 
articles and their associat- 
ed schematic diagrams 
rarely give anything more 
than the signal voltages at 
certain points in the circuit 
(if they give anything at all). 
So you may have to do 
some additional reading in 
order to make good edu- 
cated guesses. 

2. What device is used in 
the circuit? The type of de- 
vice— e.g., MOSFET, J FET, 
transistor, tube, etc. — tells 
us much about other circuit 
requirements such as drive, 
output, power-supply volt- 
ages, possible operational 
and adjustment difficulties^ 
and cost For example, we 
quickly learn to think in 
terms of 12 volts and care- 
ful fi/indling while soldering 
forMOSFETs, ±15 volts for 
op amps, and possible spu- 
rious oscillations and extra 
bypassing for power tran- 



sistor circuits Knowing 
what device the author 
used can also tell us about 
expense, our ability to sub- 
stitute more readily avail- 
able devices, and the ease 
with which we can repro- 
duce the circuit 

3. What voltages are 
needed for biasing, and 
what current levels are re- 
quired for each bias point? 
The answers to this ques- 
tion, considering the entire 
block diagram of the equip* 
ment, tell us the total 
power requirements and 
hence what will have to be 
in the power supply Hold- 
ing down the number of 
different voltages needed 
by the entire unit stmpliiies 
power supply design and, in 
turn, helps us make deci- 
sions as to what circuits we 
ought to use. Here we have 
to compromise between 
the best circuits for the job 
and the complexity of pow 
er needs. Biasing require- 
ments also tell us much 
about what we may need in 
the way of filtering and 
regulation. 

4. What output level will 
the circuit provide? Again, 
the level may be specified 
in terms of either voltage or 
power, and we may have to 
reinterpret what is given, 
depending upon what the 
next stage requires. 

5. What are the input and 
output impedances? For 
many circuits, just the nota- 
tion "high" or "low" may 
suffice; for others, careful 
matching is a must. Reading 
the text accompanying the 
schematic can often pro- 
vide much of this infor- 
mation. 

6. Are there any special- 
ized components in the cir- 
cuit? Specialized com- 
ponents may be a relative 
term. Toroid inductors are 
special for some builders, 
natural for others, Crystal 
or mechanical filters may 
be thought of as special- 
ized in the sense that they 
will be a major expense. 
Evaluate the circuit in 
terms of the accessibility or 
affordability of specialized 



components: Can you find 
and afford the components, 
or can you substitute some- 
thing more accessible? 

7. How rigidly are com* 
ponents specified? Be sure 
to note components speci- 
fied as to type as well as 
value; it may make the dif- 
ference between a circuit 
that operates as in the origi- 
nal and one that fails. For 
example, builders of vfos 
often specify polystyrene 
capacitors for the feedback 
voltage divider, as these 
capacitors have excellent 
temperature stability. 
Those who use torotds in 
power amplifiers, espe- 
cially in solid-state designs, 
may be depending on the 
"self-shielding" property of 
the toroid in order to build 
the unit compactly; another 
builder may only have used 
them because they were on 
hand, without really need- 
ing them In short, evaluate 
the types as well as the 
values of components 
given 

8 Are buffer or isolation 
stages associated with a 
given circuit? If they are, do 
not omit them without first 
examining their function 
and necessity. Transistors 
and resistors are generally 
cheap, and an additional 
buffer stage can prevent 
problems of stability, espe- 
cially with oscillators. Or, 
the buffer may provide im- 
pedance transformation. In 
general, design thinking has 
changed with the transition 
from tubes to transistors. 
Given the heat, size, and 
power requirements, the 
minimum number of tubes 
used to be better for the 
home builder. Transistors 
are cheap, small, low on 
power drain, and cool 
devices; thus, we have be- 
gun to think more in terms 
of circuit performance. 
Rather than operate them 
at maximum gain, we use 
combinations of transistors 
to ensure that a circuit 
operates over the needed 
range (of frequencies, avc 
voltages, or whatever) and 
is reliably reproducible 



with minimum "twiddling.'' 
Tube circuits used to em- 
ploy diode-derived avc di- 
rectly applied to amplifier 
grids. In solid*state re- 
ceivers, it is not uncommon 
to use a diode, IC, and a 
2-transi5tor dc amplifier. 
Thus, you should select a 
circuit because it will work 
in the intended function, 
not because it is necessarily 
simple in terms of the num- 
ber of components. By the 
same token, do not choose 
an excessively-complex cir- 
cuit for a simple piece of 
equipment- 

These are not all the 
questions we can have in 
mmd as we research cir* 
cuits, but they will help us 
formulate others specific to 
the stage we are working on 
at the moment. It may be 
helpful to copy each circuit 
candidate in the center of a 
single sheet of paper in 
your notebook Then you 
can use the surrounding 
space for notes taken either 
from the source of the sche- 
matic or from your thinkmg 
on how this circuit will 
interact with others. Fig. 4 
shows a sample page from 
one of my notebooks. I like 
to ask my questions in the 
margins and then write 
down answers as I find 
them, even if I find the 
answer after I have tried to 
build the circuit Although I 
rejected this circuit, it 
proved helpful in designing 
the amplifier I did build. On 
pages of schematics which 
entered into the final de- 
sign, I also list (in circles) 
test values of voltages, rf 
and dc, as welt as current 
drawn. 

The process of research 
is also the process of selec- 
tion. Circuits that are too 
uncertain in repeatability 
or for which components 
are too expensive or hard to 
get find their way naturally 
into the reject pile. You 
may get specific ideas, eg,, 
on biasing or bypassing, 
from one of the rejects, but 
the page ends up in the 
back of the notebook. 
That's right, in the back of 



32 73 Magazine • June/1980 



the notebook, not in the 
wastebasket. You never 
know when a new project 
will make a reject into just 

the right circuit. 

With this reduced num- 
ber of circuits — no more 
than two or three for each 
stage, and often only one — 
the final selection takes 
place. But not quite yet. 

Circuit Interaction; Drive^ 
Matching, and Switching 

Before we can make a 
final selection of circuits to 
go into our equipment, we 
must evaluate their inter- 
action in at least three main 
areas: drive levels, imped- 
ance matching, and switch- 
ing, Other interactions will 
emerge later in the design 
process, but, for now, these 
will give you some idea of 
the process of translating 
your detailed thinking on 
individual circuits back into 
thinking about the orga- 
nized functioning of the en- 
tire piece of equipment 

The reason drive levels 
were recorded for individ- 
ual circuits is that each 
stage must supply signals to 
some other stage The ex- 
ception, of course, is the os- 
ciflator. Every other stage 
will be a mixer, amplifier, or 
other type of signal pro- 
cessor (e.g., IC divider or 
latch}* In general^ we want 
the drive fevels neither too 
low nor too high. If the 
drive level is too low. we 
may need to go to higher 
gain devices or circuits 
(especially with tubes) or 
add another stage (espe- 
cially with sohd state). 
Drive fevets that are too 
high can be equally trouble^ 
some and may even take 
out the base of a transistor 
or the gate of an FET. 
Matching levels for the two 
inputs to a mixer is also 
important; sometimes, de- 
pending upon circuit ar- 
rangement, having the 
same level at both inputs 
may be exactly wrong. 
Thus, the designer must 
think about getting the right 
levels. Using transformers. 



Questions: 

1. Would a JFET or MOSFET be stabler and 
easier to use? 

(probably easier to use with changes in circuit 
vafues) 

2, How can switching of tuned circuits be 
avoided? 

(use mixer with xtal oscillator and S-MHz vfo- 
see next two pages) 

3. Will surplus -e.g., 2N2a22 or 2N4 124 -work 
as well as the HEPs? 

{probably) 

4, Note problem of keying with a CW transmit- 
ter, 

(need a keying transistor a la ZOI or use a keyed 
mixer with 5-MHz vfo) 



Notes: 

1. Ctfcoit Is high-C Colpitts. 

2. Switchir^g occurs outside of tuned circuits to 
minimize mechanical instabilities. 

3. Feedback taken from emitter of HEP55 by 
tapping above emitter resistor. 

4. Ferrite beads and 100-Ohm resistor in HEP55 
leads suppress harmonics. 

5. IK resistor in base lead of HEP758 provides 
loose coupling. 

6. Tuned ctrcujt with step-down winding follows 
.001 uF to amplifier input, 

7. No dc or rf voltages are given. 



• 12V 



/?T 



01 



hi^H 



T 



'ZOO 



LI 






|(0O0 



fh 



470 






1 



2rt- 4 \pM 



iff 



5W 



40 
■O 



5IA 



5 

3E4.:fS 






KlOO 
SM 



* 



a6« jtiOO X 



r 




+^EF55 



cm 



40 Sift 

^ — 

«0 



5H 



♦- -Wi 



If not used, retain; 

a, use of ferrite beads 

b. buffer stage 



C1A/B Miller 2112 

LI Miller42Al06CBi 

L2 Miller 42A336CBI 



-© 



iff iff 






IX 



From OSr, Dec. 70, p. 46 



-31- 



-> TO OMP 



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iff 



Fig, 4. Sample page from one of tfie author's notebooks illustrating the method of copy- 
ing circuits for possible use. The vfo circuit with its buffer stage was not finally used, but 
much was iearned from working with the circuit and the article from which it came. 
Notice the questions and notes which surround the schematic. Only a few have been In* 
eluded from the original in order to preserve clarity. Answers inserted later have been put 
in parentheses. This was one of eight pages devoted to vfos alone before selection of the 
final circuit was made. 



capacitive dividers, or 
lower stage gain are three 
handy ways to reduce drive 
levels. 

The digital equivalent to 
drive is called fanout. For 
most digital devices, fan- 
out, or the number of stage 
devices driven by an out- 
put, is not a great problem 
That does not mean that ICs 
present no problems, just 
different ones If our unit 
combines different types of 
ICs— e.g., TTL, CMOS, etc, 
—we must be sure that the 
output(s) of one IC istare) 
compatible with the inputs 
of others. Data sheets are 
often helpful here. Since 
TTLs are still the main type 
available for ham use, data 
sheets for other types 
specify whether or not they 
are TTL-compatible, Two 
other digital interaction 
questions are these: Is the 



speed of the devices suffi- 
cient for this application? 
(There are high-speed as 
well as low-current alter- 
natives to most "regular" 
TTL ICs,) Will the timing se- 
quence of events create 
false or irregular operation 
of any later stage? In short, 
digital circuitry has 
analogies with the inter- 
action questions we pose to 
rf circuitry. 

Impedance matching is 
especially significant with 
transistors, but does not dis- 
appear as a consideration 
with high-impedance de- 
vices. Even tubes and FETs 
require step-up trans- 
formers for linking devices 
to low-impedance antenna 
lines. Crystal and mechan- 
ical filters usually are criti- 
cal in matching, whether to 
tubes or transistors. Tran- 
sistors have moderate im- 



pedances in low-power cir- 
cuits: Their input and out- 
put impedances are high 
compared with the usual 
50-Ohm antenna line, but 
low compared with cor- 
responding tube or FET 
values. Thus, when combin- 
ing circuits from earlier re- 
search, one cannot assume 
that a given rf transformer 
or coil with link coupling 
will work with a subsequent 
circuit when fed a different 
source. Handbooks can 
help you estimate values by 
referring you to tube/tran- 
sistor charts or to coil-wind- 
ing formulas The problem 
becomes more critical with 
higher- power transistor 
stages, since impedances 
may be exceedingly low. 
Modern design leans to- 
ward the use of baluns, but 
even the ratio of these must 
be chosen with care. 



73 Magazine • June, 1980 33 



lS-40il»4« 




rO-7 3l*Hi 



'[ 



i 5-4D 



BUFFEH 



//? 




KCTINQ 








riLTEH 



TO «LL %f*.^ES 






Fig. 5faJ, Simplitied block diagram of a low-power^ two-band tfansmitterof relatively standard design. Notice that a five- 
section switch would be required in order to permit switching between bands if the designer's aim is to minimize the 
number of active devices. Among other considerations for the builder are these: 7. Will switctiing the tuned circuits in 
the vfo degrade dial calibration? 2. Can the vfo be keyed without chirp or will the vfo have to run during the entire 
transmit period? J- How much will complex switching cost in parts compared to the cost of additional active devices? 
Compare this diagram with Fig. 5(bl 






S S-4UHJ 






BUFFEH 




"^— * SUFFER 



AMP 
i WATT 



flLTtS 




OSCILLATOR 
It aUHl 



KETihG 
THA*»SlSTOft 





T-TiMHl 



• eUFFEfi 



AMP 
£ WATT 



FILTER 
53-4 OMHf 




TO ALL STAGES BO * 



TO ALL STAGES 40 - 



TD VFO * 




Fig. 5{b]. Simplified block diagram of a low-power transmitter performing simitarly to the one shown in Fig. SfaJ. Separate 
crystal oscillator-mixer-amplifier chains are run for each band, permitting each circuit to be optimized and simpHfying 
switching. No additional tuned circuits are required over SfaJ, only active devices. The cost of the devices is more than 
offset by the savings on switching. Switching is done at low impedance. Since the vfo operates on a frequency outside 
the ham bands^ break-in keying is possible. Building each band assembly on a separate board provides easier construc- 
tion with fewer possible problems. The only additional design complexity lies in the need for a mixer for each band. 
Note that the three major questions raised in Fig. SfaJ are answered by this design. 

Switching is not just a pedance rf, especially in power tube amplifier for transmitter design for QRP. 



mechanical means for 
changing components in a 
circuit. Care must be given 
to what sort of energy is in 
the switching circuit and 
how it will interact with 
other energies in the same 
or nearby circuits In gen- 
eral, it is best to switch only 
dc. If rf must be switched, 
loW'im pedance lines should 
be used to and from the 
switch. Wherever possible, 
avoid switching high-im- 



oscillators. Not only will 
the switch introduce me- 
chanical instabilities, but 
the length of the lines intro- 
duces unwanted capaci- 
tances. These lines supple- 
ment capacitances ordi- 
narily used in fixed compo- 
nents and can produce un- 
desirable coupling to other 
circuits; an oscillating am- 
plifier is often the result 
Where such switching must 
take place — in a high- 



the HF region, for example 
— shielding is the main 
answer, as well as careful 
routing of rf leads. With 
transistors at low power, it 
is often easier and cheaper 
to build separate circuits 
for each band. This permits 
low-impedance switching 
at only the input and output 
circuits, along with power. 
Figs 5(a) and 5(b) make the 
difference clear in the 
simplified drawing of a 



The interaction consider- 
ations given here should be 
enough to let you make the 
final selection of circuits. If 
two circuits seem of equal 
value to you, a simple coin 
flip will settle the matter of 
where to start. Remember, 
you can always change 
your mind again later in the 
process. The building part 
of the process has not yet 
begun. ■ 



34 73 Magazine • June, 1980 



omorrow's Technology -Here Today! 

THE YAESU 



FT-207R 

"he "horse-and-buggy" days of crystal-controlSed 
andies are gone! Yaesus engineers have har- 
essed the power of the microprocessor, bringing 
00 800 channels, digital display, memory, and 
canning from a hand-held package. Only with 
'^su can you get these big performance fea- 
jiBS in such a compact package. 



BNC Antenna Connector 



Squetch Control and 
Tone Squelch On/Off 



Aufffo Ga(n (^ntrol 



4 bit CPU chip for frequency controL 

Keyboard entry of all frequencies 

Dtgilal frequency display. 

800 channels across 144-14$ MHz. 

Up/Down manual scan, or auto scan for busy/clear cJiannels, 

to kHz scanning steps. 
Five channels of memory 
Priority channel with search-back feature. 
Keyboard ksck to prevent accidental frequency change, 
Memory backup 

± 600 Ik Hz or odd repeater splits. 
Display OH/Off switch for battery oonsen^ation. 
B^ujpped with njbber ftex antenna, wallmount battery charger^ 

earphone, shoulder strap, and bett dip. 
Switchaple RF output 2.5 watts (minimum) or 200 mW 
Earphone for privaie listening 
2 Tone (Touchtone*) Input from Keytxjard 
Highly reliable LED frequency display (works in coJd temperatures 

and does not fade with age) 



Clear/Busy Auto Scan Selector 
Earphone Jack 

Repealer/Simplex Offset Switch 



Condensor Mike 



4*[>lglt LED Readout 



Priority Channel 



Keyboard Entry 



Keyt>oard Lock 



SPECtFiCATIONS: 

GBJERAL 

FrBqu€N^cy coverage: 144 148 MHz 
NiVTiber of channets: 800 
Emission type: Fl 
Batteries: NiCd ttatlery pack 
Ventage raqyinemeiit: IQJ VDC 
±10%, maxjmum 
Civtent consumptk>n: 

Recerve: 35 mA squelched ( 1 50 

mA unsquelclied wrth maximum 

aucft» 

Transmit: 600 mA (full power) 

Case dlmofTSlOns: 60^181xS4 mm 




Remote Speaker/Mike input 



Channel Busy Lamp 



Transmit indicator 



Display On/Off 



5 kHz Up 



RECEIVER 



HI-Low Power SwftcK 
(Bottom of Case) 



Cimuit type: Double oon version 

siiperh e rterody ne 
Ifrtermedlate frequendes. 

1st iF=t0.7 MHz 

2nd IF =455 kHz 

Sensitivity : Q.32 u V for 20 dB quieting 
Seiec^ity; t 7,5 kHz at 60 dB down 
Audk) OutpiJt: 200 mW at 10% THD 

Price And Specihcations Sut>jecl To 
Change Without Notice Or Obligation 



TRANSMITTER 

Power Output ; 2.5 watts minimum /200mW 

De¥lation : 1 5 kHz 
Spurious radiation: -60dBort>efter 
Mferophone: Condenser type 

{2000 ohms) 

OFTIONS 

LC-C7 Leather Canytng Case 
YM-24 (Hemote Speaker/MicfOp*K>ne 
Tone Squelch Unit 
NB4=^ Battery P&ok 
NO-Z Quick Charger 



¥Mgtit (wittt battsrtM): 680 grams 




ThB radio. 




180 



YAESU ELECTRONICS CORP.. Sast Walth«H Way» Paramount, CA 90723 • (213) 633^1007 
AESU ELECTRONICS Eastern Service Ctn, 981 2 Princeton-Glendaie Rd.,Cincinnati^OH 45246 



Down with Interpolation 

a digital display for the Triton and others 



Brooks Carwr W4fQ 
Rt 2, no% 407 
irmo SC 2906i 



Although designed for a 
Ten-Tec 540 or Triton, 
this readout should be easy 
to adapt to other trans- 
ceivers using similar con- 



version systems. It is a very 
small unit that sits unob- 
trusively on the trans- 
ceiver, costs little, is easy 
to build, and measures 



only 5 1/4" X 3 1/8" X 1 
1/8" (13 J X 7-9 X 2.9 cm). 
With seven ICs, six transis- 
tors, four display LEDs, and 
one voltage regulator, the 



TOP OF 54t> 
ACCESSOR T 
#L0« 







g^f^^^o 



tRlfSTAL 



PMOht> PLUS „ „ 

to <tv jftc« olr-- — & 

ON 540 ^— -* 



TOP VIE^ 
DL-704 

C1MMQH CJITTIOOC 
COft EQUlVALINTt 






1 
z 

4 


/./• 


14 


f 


/•• i 


« 
i 



e 
6 

CC 

DP 

c 






►5V 



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PRf:4MPLtfi£ft 



1 

WMV£:s»MP£ff 




[ajfi J [^ 



Pfr£SCAL£:ff 



t lOdHj 14 



iT> COUNT 



Hisrr 



{T> L*TCW 



y^O 



LSD 



CONPirCT ALL fl T^etTHEH ' 
COltlteCT AUU « TO€-£Trf£f» * 



ETC. 



t 



/ / 

u 



ALL ttEI1STl>ns 1/4 W4TT 



/ / 
/ _/ 



/ / 

Q 



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D 



nn 






ii^TO 



no 



t41 



Fig, 7. Readout schematic. 



36 73 Magazine • June, 1980 



parts cost is less than J20* 

The 540 is single conver- 
sion, and its vfo operates 
from 5 to 5.5 MHz on all 
bands. Vfo output is mixed 
with signals from a crystal 
oscillator, with crystals for 
each band, to produce mix* 
er injection frequencies be- 
tween 5 and 21 MHz for 
conversion of incoming sig- 
nals to 9 MHz. The display 
reads the mixer injection 
frequency down to hun- 
dreds of Hertz. 

Megahertz are not dis- 
played; this would necessi- 
tate a complicated switch* 
ing and diode presetting 
arrangement and is neither 
worth it nor needed. As it 
is, no switching at alt is re- 
quired. Incidentally, the 
Ten-Tec 544 digital dial 
also reads the mixer injec- 
tion frequency, and addi- 
tional wafers are incor- 
porated in the bandswitch 
to provide a megahertz dis- 
play. 

Integrated Circuits 

Two of the seven ICs 
serve to eliminate an addi- 
tional fifteen or more, if 
conventional TTL circuits 
were to be used. The 
CMOS CD4060, plus a 
7490, a 7473, and a few 
gates provide the time base 
and logic circuits. The 4060 
oscillates well with FT-241 
surplus crystals, available 
from jan Crystals. 

Crystal frequency is 
409 6 kHz, but a channel 
295 at 409.7 kHz will do 
nicely; the frequency is 
easily pulled to 409.6 kHz 
with the 30-pF series trim- 
mer in the crystal circuit. 
The 4060 can divide by 
2^ through 2^^ (except 2^^l 
In this oscillator, the crys- 
tal frequency is divided by 
212^ or 4096, to provide an 
output of 100 Hz at pin 1. 
How much simpler this is 
than a long string of divide- 
by-ten TTLs! 

The 100 Hz is fed to a 
7490 to be further divided 
for outputs of 50 and 10 
Hz- The 7473 divides the 10 




Pboto A. 




Photo B. 




Fig. 2, Circuit board 



73 Magazine • June, 1980 37 



470 



680 



iHP{3J 




7005 



Fig. 3. Parts placement — ground plane side. A • indicates a connection from etched side 
to ground plane. There are eight ground connections and 12 jumper wires. Components 
with dashed leads are mounted on etched side. For brighter display, use 150 Ohms in 
place of 270. These crystal frequencies may be used: 409.6 kHz with output from pin 1 of 
4060. 879.2 kHz from pin 2, and 1638A kHz from pin 3. 



Hz by 2 and by referring to 
Fig. 1, you can see we have 
outputs of 50, 10, 10, 5 and 



3 In 



5 Hz (some inverted) now 
available for the logic 
gates for count, reset, and 



LSD 



MSD 




I In, 



ETCHED SIDE OF DISPLAY BOARD 



3 In. 



H 




I In. 



HOLE FOR 
MOUNTfNG 
7805 



HOLE FOR 
PHONO JACK 



PADS FOR 7805 
CONNECTIONS 
BACK PANEL BOARD 



Fig. 4, Display and back panel boards. 



latch pulses, 

Cerd Schrick WB81FM, 
in his ''Universal Digital 
Readout" in the Decem- 
ber, 1978, issue of Ham 
Radio, makes use of the 
4060, as does Klaas Spaar- 
garen PAiJKSB in his "Drift 
Correction Circuit" in the 
December, 1977, issue. 

Philip Rand WIDBM's 
fine article entitled ''A Ver- 
satile Digital Frequency 
Display" in QST for Ho- 
vember, 1977. is the source 
for part of the time base 
and logic circuits used 
here For easy-to-under- 
stand information on logic, 
read this article. His wave- 
form chart applies here 
also, except that the neg- 
ative-going reset pulse 
must be inverted, as the 
74C925 requires positive- 
going reset and latch. I use 
a 2 N 222 2 as an inverter 
rather than another IC with 
only one section utilized. 

John Wolcott W4CCX 
and Johnny Chestnut 
WA4PtN use the 74C925 in 
their 'Lunch Counter;*' de* 
scribed in 73 Magazine for 
December, 1978, and that is 



where I became acquainted 
with this labor- and parts- 
saving chip. It contains the 
equivalent of counters, 
latches, and decoders for 
four displays, also internal 
multiplexing with a tree- 
running oscillator, and four 
outputs for common-cath- 
ode display LEDs, 

A 74196 prescaler lowers 
the 5-to-21 MHz input fre- 
quencies from the 540 for 
the readout to 500 to 2100 
kHz for input to the 
74C925. The 2N2222 pre- 
amplifier has a 25k-Ohm 
minipot for adjusting bias 
and the operating point of 
the 74O0 waveshaper This 
adjustment is somewhat 
critical at 21 MHz If de- 
sired, the pot can be re- 
placed by a fixed resistor 
once the correct value has 
been determined. Be sure 
the pot is connected as 
shown, and not directly to 
plus 5 volts. A 2N3904 can 
be used here and through- 
out as a substitute for the 
2N2222S. 

Construcfion Notes 

I used double-sided PC 

board, with the holes for 
the IC sockets and jumpers 
reamed slightly on the 
ground plane side to re- 
move copper which could 
short pins to ground. 
Grounds on the etched side 
were wired through to the 
gp side. Laundry marking 
pens make good resist lines 
for the etched circuit; if you 
use these, buy two (at 60C 
from K-Mart). If the point 
dries, it probably will be 
tomorrow before the ink 
flows freely again, so keep 
It capped every second that 
it is not in use. 

A damp rag and kitchen 
cleanser (Ajax, Comet, etc.) 
will clean the copper PC 
board before etching, and 
will remove the resist after. 
Ferric chloride is an easy- 
to-use etchant and takes 
about 30 minutes. The 1" x 
3" board for the display is 
spaced about % " from the 
circuit board to allow 
room for wiring, and is 
fixed in place by soldering 



3d 73 Magazine • June, 1980 



scraps of PC board at each 
end A press-fitted en- 
closure made from PC 
board and covered with 
black contact paper is used 
here to give the unit a 
finished appearance. A red 
transparent window is ce- 
mented in place, through 
which the display is 
viewed. Shielding does not 
seem to be necessary, so 
the enclosure can be made 
of just about anything. 

Checkout 

When the readout has 
been assembled, and with- 
out ICs in their sockets, 
check for sofder bridges 
between pins. Almost cer- 
tainly there will be some; 
use an ohmmeter — don't 
depend on your eyes. With 
the ICs in their sockets and 
power applied but with no 
input to the preamplifier, 
the display should read 
000 or 000.1. If not, check 
these pins for fast needle 
fluctuations on a volt- 




Photo C. 



meter set for 5 volts or 
more: 7490, pins 5 and 12; 

7473, pins 12 and 13; 7410, 
pins 6, 8 and 12; 74C925, 
pins 5 and 1 2 (with input to 
the preamplifier from the 
540, there should also be 
fluctuations on pin 11). If 
any of these pins reads a 
steady voltage, the thing 



some 



will not work and 
checking is in order. 

Hash from the readout is 
completely suppressed by 
the .1-uF and IS-uF capac- 
itors at the input and out- 
put of the 7805 voltage 
regulator. No other bypass- 
ing 15 necessary. The unit 
draws 150 mA. 



Calibration 

Calibration is a snap. 
Zero beat the 540 with 
WWV on 15 MHz {band- 
switch on 21, dial at 0, 
resonate between 3,5 and 
7) and adjust the crystal 
trimmer until the display 
shows 000.0, That's all 
there is to it. ■ 



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73 Magazine • June, 1980 39 



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73 Magaime • June. 1980 41 



Thomas P. Krohn K3IJ 
638 N. Laurel Si, 
HazhionPA 18201 



Hooray! An AFSK Auto IDer! 

— a clean and legal ending for RTTY transmissions 



Being a RTTY enthusiast 
of recent vintage, the 
first thing I do after tearing 
my latest copy of 73 out of 
the postman's hands is to 
screen the issue for articles 
pertaining to RTTY sub- 
jects, 

Joe Fox's article, "Dodge 
That Hurricane/^ in the 
January, 1978, issue found 



me comparing his crystal- 
controlled AFSK board with 
my present twin-tee circuit 
and its wandering space 
tone. Comparison led to a 
decision, and a few weeks 
later I was happily warbling 
away with tones accurate 
to a few hundredths of a Hz. 
With that project com- 
pleted, my next improve- 



ment was to be an auto- 
matic CW identifier to save 
my tortured finger from the 
chore of sloppily tapping 
out my call on the narrow 
shift button on the rack- 
mounted TU. 

Looking further into Joe's 
article, his Baudot IDer 
drew my interest, Since 
most transmissions end 




02 i*pmv tHtm 



4n 



Pin 9 



C* OUTPUT 
(OOHi 3HIFT 



nHUOm OUTPUT 
- TO A^s* 

ITOttt SHIFT 



IT 



SPASC 



Fig, T. Baudot-CW IDer schemaik. 



with DE, a call, and KK as 
the last words typed, it 
would be convenient to 
have the I Der send that as 
well. 

Gushing with confidence 
over the success of my new 
AFSK generator, the 
thought of marrying Joe's 
Baudot generator to a CW 
IDer thrilled me. Sitting 
down with schematic and 
pencil in hand to discover 
what changes would be 
necessary, I discovered 
happily that a couple of in- 
expensive gates, a single 
transistor, and a few small 
parts would do the job just 
fine. 

Theory 

A review of the AFSK 
board revealed that TTL 
levels were used to sink 
separate input lines that 
picked the proper tones. 
This made it necessary to 
switch the output of the 
IDer from the 170 shift line 
to the 100 shift line mid- 
stream in the ID cycle. 

Aha! Pin 9 of the data se- 
lector IC (U5) goes high 
halfway through the cycle. 
This line, therefore, was 
connected to one input of 
NAND gate U6B, with the 



42 73MagBiine • June, 1960 



data output from pin 5, U5, 
to the opposite input This 
routes data contained in 
the last 16 words of the 
PROM to the output pin of 
Kate U6B. See Fig. 1. 

This same line is inverted 
in U6C and applied to an 
input of U6A, whose oppo- 
site input receives data 
from the selector IC. This 
enables data in the first 
half of the PROM to be 
available at the output of 
U6A These output lines 
are inverted data, just right 
to sink the inputs to the 
AFSK. 

Our dual output prob- 
lem being solved, attention 
is paid now to turning the 
circuit on and off. Neither 
Joe's use of a timer to peri- 
odically start the cycle nor 
his inhibit circuitry to de- 
lay the ID until the comple- 
tion of incoming traffic 
was needed, so ICs U1 and 
U6 on his design were re- 
placed by two NAND gates, 
U1A and UIB, These are 
wired in an RS latch config- 
uration, the output con- 
nected to the reset input 
on counters U2 and U4. 

With the latch reset, the 
output is high and holds 
the counters at zero. By 
grounding pin 2 of U1 B, the 
latch is set and the output 
goes low, allowing the 
clock to step the counters, 
addressing the PROM and 
data selector IC. 

The 8-input NAND gate, 
U8, whose inputs monitor 
all the address lines, senses 
when the counters are full. 
When all address tines are 
high, the output of U8 goes 
low and resets the latch, 
completing the cycle. 

Checkout of the unit at 
this point provided perfect 
RTTYID, buttheCWcame 
forth at blazing speed. A 
way to reduce the CW 
speed was deemed neces- 
sary. Back to the drawing 
board- 

The only way to slow 
down the CW speed is to 
decrease the clock speed. 
Looking again at pin 9 of 
U5, this level, high during 



the last half of the cycle, is 
used to turn on Q1. This 
simply switches in addi- 
tional capacitance across 
the clock timing circuit 
just for the duration of the 
CW ID. Eureka! Slow CW! 
The value of this capaci- 
tance can be selected to 
produce the speed desired, 

Coostructaon 

Considering the blood, 
sweat, and tears that went 
into the production of the 
printed circuit board for 
the AFSK, I conceded that I 
was not yet ready for the 
second round, so the ID 
board was wire-wrapped 
on a piece of perf board 
with an edge connector at- 
tached. This system proved 
convenient in trouble- 
shooting a few gremlins 
that showed up in the form 
of a bad counter IC and a 
mislabeled IC pin on the 
original schematic. 

Parts placement is not 
critical, but be sure to scat- 
ter a few .I'uF disc capaci- 
tors around to soak up the 
spikes. My layout is shown 
in Fig. 2, 

The PROM 

The 8223 or 82S23 is a 
256-bit programmable read- 
only memory. The PROM 
outputs 32 words of 8 bits 
each. 

In laying out the pro- 
gram for your PROM, a 
truth table (Fig. 3) should 
be prepared- This type of 
device is the fusable-link 




IJT 



CLOCK 
COMIHMlENT^ 



U3 



U2 
7435 



US 
T4I3I 



.MJ^ 



Ul 



U6 

74OT 



Fig, 2, Suggested component layout 



type where once a bit is 
programmed. It is irrevers- 
ible. The truth table will 
reduce the chance of a mis- 
placed bit. The device is 
delivered with all memory 
locations low, and when a 
bit is "burned" into it, that 
bit will appear as a logic 
high output. In our IDer, 
the low is used as a mark 
with the high levels indicat- 
ing a space and C W output- 

The IDer described here 
scans the entire contents 
of the PROM one bit at a 
time, starting with output 
0. For the first 31 clock 
cycles, the 74151 data se- 
lector selects the PROM 
output at output and 
transfers this data inverted 
to output pin 5. At the 
32nd count the data selec- 
tor is instructed to select 
data from the output 1 out* 
out. For the following 31 



cycles, all output 1 data is 

transferred to the output, 
then on to output 2. This 
sequence continues until 
all bits of each address are 
scanned. When the count- 
ers are full, the count is 
sensed by gate U8, and its 
output pulse resets latch 
Ul, which completes the 
ID cycle. 

Programming the PROM 

The first 4 outputs con- 
tain the Baudot informa- 
tion, with each character 
and function occupying 8 
bits of data. The first bit, 
the start pulse, is always a 
space. Note that PROM ad- 
dress contains all mark 
levels with the start pulses 
beginning at address 1, this 
is necessary to ensure no 
output from the IDer while 
being held at zero by the 
latch, 



PROM Address 

111111111122 2 222222233 
1 2345S789012345676 90 12345678901 
OUTPUTS 

space Itrs D E 

Space K figs 3 

- * - M M S M M S - - - > • M M S ■ * - - ^ M 

itrs I J space 

■ * - • M M S M M S - - - - ' M M S ■ ^ * ^ - M 

K K c/r m 

--~MMS MMS MMS-*---M 

S S S S S S S S 5 s s s s 

as s 



M S - 

1 M S - 

2 MS* 



SMS 
4 



5 
6 
7 



S S 

s s s 



s s s s s s 



s s 5 as 



Fig. 3. PROM Truth Tab/e. M^ logic 0, S — logic 1. Unmarked positions in CW portion of 
program remain marks. Fill in dashed data from RTTY character table. 



73 Magazine • June, 1980 43 



Following the start pulse 
are the 5 Baudot-coded 
bits, and then 2 stop pulses 
(which are always marks). 
A total of 16 characters 
can be programmed — 
enough for a typical mes- 
sage to read, Itrs, d, e, a 
two-by-three call with shift 
functions, space, and K, 
followed by CR and LF 
functions. 

The remaining 4 outputs 
contain the CW program 
using the standard bit-us- 



age of 1 bit for a dot, 3 bits 
as a dash, 3 bits between 
letters, and 6 bits between 
words. 

The device I used to pro- 
gram the PROM is de* 
scribed in the article "A 
Simple PROM Burner/' by 
William Hosking W7JSW, 
in the December, 1977, 73. 
A word of caution, how- 
ever. The PROM I used was 
purchased from Quest 
Electronics, an advertiser 
in this magazine, and was 



marked as an 8223, I was 
unable to get it to accept a 
program — a problem de- 
scribed in Mr. Hosking's ar- 
ticle. Using his advice, the 
programmer was changed 
to 82S23 type. The device 
then accepted the program 
easily, regardless of its 
marking. 

Operation 

For operation, the board 
needs to be supplied only 
+ 5 V, ground, the outputs 



connected to the AFSK 
generator, and a push-but- 
ton switch to momentarily 
ground pin 2 of U1. The 
IDer will do the rest 

The clock oscillator 

must be set to the Baudot 
frequency used, 22 ms for 
60 wpm, 18 ms for 75 wpm^ 
or 11 ms for 100 wpm. 

My thanks to Joseph Fox 
WB4IXK for his excellent 
article— which inspired me 
to write this piece for 73, ■ 



Edward D. Hesse WB2R VA 
21S4 Decker A venue 
North Merrick NY nS66 



Let's QSY to .52 



ah, technology 



i i ^^o you've got that 
i3 new two-meter rig 
you wanted, huh, Joe?" 

"That's right, Ernie. A 
fantastic rig. Fully syn- 
thesized, too. Lets you go 
anywhere you want on the 
band/' 

"Fine business, Joe. Hey. 
let's not tie up the repeater 
with this QSO. Since you're 
synthesized, let's go to a 
simplex channel. What do 
you say?'' 

''Right, Ernie. Okay, let's 
try 146.52. How about 
that?" 

"WelL Joe, they like to 
keep .52 clear for calling. 
They get kind a annoyed if 
you rag chew on ,52/' 

''Yeah, that's right. 
Okay, how about 146 55?" 

"Not a bad idea, joe, but 
lately they've been using 
.55 for RTTY. We could talk 
on .58, I guess/' 

"Uh-uh, Ernie. I was just 



on it a moment ago and 
there's a bunny hunt about 
to start on it/' 

"Yeah, yeah. Say, you 
can go off on a 5-kHz off- 
set, can't you?" 

"Sure can, Ernie. Want to 
try, say, .535?' 

"Naw. Just checked it a 
few minutes ago. Two guys 
are chewing the rag down 
there. How about .565?" 

"just checked it while 
you were transmitting, 
Someone's calling CQ DX 
on it Must be a band open- 
ing tonight/' 

"Can you go up to 147?" 

"Sure can, Ernie, this 
Hara'kiri-400 goes any- 
where. How about 147,51?" 

"Sorry. )oe, thafs a prob- 
lem, too. .51 is our club's 
simplex channel. They like 
to keep it clear for club 
business — stuff like that" 

"Okay, I can understand 
that. Let's try .54. What 



say?'' 

"Well, they've been us- 
ing that for highway traffic 
for the east-west roads. 
Sort of reserved for mo- 
biles, you know?" 

"Yeah, i can see that 
Well, how about ,57?" 

"Well, that's for north- 
south road traffic. How 
about 147.525? That should 
be clear, right?" 

"Sorry, Ernie, The Bug- 
ville net is passing traffic 
on it right about now/' 

"Boy, things are getting 
tight, Joe. rd suggest .555 
but Tm afraid someone will 
let me know 'the frequen- 
cy's in use, old man/ Say, 
how about going some- 
where between 146.40 and 
146-60. That's simplex, isn't 
it?" 

"Hold it Ernie. There are 
some repeaters in that area, 
operating on one meg 
splits. We don't want to go 



simplex on an input fre- 
quency. How about going 
below 146? That's all 
simplex, Isn't It?" 

"No, sir. They've got 
repeaters there, but I don't 
know what frequencies are 
involved. Also, sideband- 
ers, CWers, and AMers are 
roaming around down 
there. Say, Joe, just got a 
real inspiration Should 
have thought of it before/' 

"Well, come on. Where 
do we go?" 

"Joe, 15 meters is dead 
this time of night. Let's 
QSY to 21 365 and well 
chew the rag down there/' 

"Fine business, Ernie, 
see you on 15, 1 want to tell 
you all about this 2-meter 
rig, especially the syn- 
thesizing, lust a super rig 
You can go anywhere you 
want on that band. HI tell 
you all about it— we're 
QSYing/'B 



44 73 Magazine • June, 1980 



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unknown item. The unit 
has three ranges for each 
of the three categories, i.e., 
10 Ohms to 10M Ohms, 10 
pF tolOuF, andlOuHtolO 
Henries. It may also be 
used for exact matching of 
any two or more items. 

Power for these kits is 
provided by a power sup- 
ply ($24 95) or each of the 
units may be powered by 
two nine-volt ''transistor- 
radio-type" batteries. I 
chose the latter and regret- 
ted it the second time I 
wanted to use the RCL 
bridge. The batteries were 
dead; I had neglected to 
turn the thing off! This 
prompted me to devise a 
very simple "power on" in- 
dicator by adding a small 



red LED to the front panel 

just above the "Power 
ON/OFF' switch. I drilled a 
hole just large enough to 
accommodate the LED and 
wired it from ground to the 
''ON" side of the power 
switch with a small current- 
limiting resistor in series 
with the positive lead. That 
red glow is a sure reminder, 
costs only a few pennies 
and a few moments of 
time, and consumes little 
energy. 

In these days of small- 
sized equipment, I am not 
impressed with the large 
cabinet for these kits. They 
all use the same type case, 
but it does have a lot of 
convenient storage space. 
Don't overlook the great 
advantage of portability of 
these units when battery 
powered. Field days, emer- 
gencies, vacations, or work 
time on the mobile rig finds 
these units perfect, rugged, 
and portable. The kits 
build easily; the instruc- 
tions are about the most 
extensive I have seen from 
Heath, or anyone else for 
that matter. They include 
many illustrations, circuit 
drawings (some greatly 
enlarged), and a very ex- 
plicit discussion of exactly 
how the circuit works and 
what it does when testing 
parts ■ 



4€ 73 Magazine • June, 1980 




TU-170 

$159.95 buys a terminal 
unit kit witin capabilities beyond 
your expectations for the price. And 
tine Flesher Corp 
TU*1 70 won't devour 
your precious space 
Wired units are available 
at 3234.95. Call or write 
today for our free 1 930 
catalog of affordable kits, wired units and accessories, 

liB»IEil CORP -» 

RO. Box 976 • Topeka, Kansas 66601 • 913»234*0198 




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The result is unparalleled accuracy and 
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FEATURES; 

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Thhs analog computer operates over 
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• RUCiGED TAUT-BAND METERS- 
Provide accuracy and readability 
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^ Hesi^er Sefvtc*—$ee page 2W 



73 Magazine • June, 1980 47 



Marc L Leavey, MM. WA3AJR 
4006 Wml€€ Road 
Randaihiown MD 21BI 



The Phoenix Fix 

an alarming analog-to-digital conversion 
for out-of-time clock-radios 



In mythology, the Phoenix 
was a great bird from 
which, upon its death, was 
born a new Phoenix, How 
many times have you 
wished you could do that 
with electronic equipment? 
This article describes jost 
such a transformation. 

There can be little doubt 
that one of the nnost 



widely-owned pieces of 
consumer electronics is the 
clock-radio. Almost every- 
body has one, and many 
have several Certainly one 
of the most common types 
of clock movements is the 
'flipping card' display, as 
in the pictured Sony 
Digimatic. tn this clock, a 
cylinder turns and sequen- 




The front of the dock-radio before modification. 



tially exposes cards with 
the digits printed on them 
to display the time. After a 
while, however, the move- 
ment becomes erratic as 
the motor seizes, and it 
eventually stops. Sug- 
gestions for re-starttng a 
stuck clock abound, from 
spraying the gears with 
silicone to popping it in the 
oven. This article describes 
a better way. 

The MA1001-A digital 
clock module has become 
available lately from sev^ 
era I su|^pliers and is reg- 
ularly featured in their ad- 
vertisements For around 
$10, this module has all the 
features one could want in 
a clock-radio (time, sleep- 
radio, snooze-alarm, etc Im 
a tiny package. With just a 
little work, this module, 
transformer and all. witi fit 
easily into the space vacat- 



ed by the old flippmy card 
display- 
Fig. 1 diagrams the con- 
nections to the module. 
Note the rather unusual 
voltage requirements, 
rather neatly supplied by 
the special transformer 
available from the dealers. 
Note also that the alarm 
output is not a tone, but a 
positive voltage intended 
to activate an external 
signaling device or tone 
generator. The LED dis- 
play at 1,22 cm (0.5 inch) is 
quite readable, and no RFI 
is generated since direct 
drive rather than multiplex 
circuitry is employed. This 
eases the marriage with a 
radio. 

The actual conversion is 
relatively straightforward. 
After removing the radio 
from its case, identify the 
micros witch connected to 






^m^__^3 


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m -7 04 


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An open view of tfie clock-radio before modification. 



The old and the new side-by-side. 



48 73 Magazine • June, 1980 



ttVAC AT 30dlA 



aUCH Efe 



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■20 VAC 
IIHE ^ 



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WC& 



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iOv*C at 4dO*A J- J- J- |- 

CEVTER T*P i. -J, T. i. 




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SLEEP 



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( £ 

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Fig. 7. M>^tOOT-A connect/ons. Use wire jumper at pin 6 
location (*} for full brightness of LEDs, or a resistor and 
switch for variable brightness. 



QH 
EQUIVALENT 



TO El 



miro 



TO rj ^ 




I 



/77 



1 



UAHUAL 

hadtO 

"OH' 



eXI^TIMS 
RADIO 



1 



Fig. 2. Connecting MA1001-A to existing radio. 



tfie Sleep lever. The con- 
tacts of this switch, when 

closed, enable the radio. If 
there is a separate manual 
radio switch, leave it 
alone! It will still work 
when the conversion is 
completed. 

Put a tag on the enable 
line, rennove the entire 
clock movement from the 
case, and discard it. 
Position the MA1001-A 
behjnd the panel opening. 
It was necessary to enlarge 
the opening in the pro- 
totype by removing a par- 
tition between the old 
display opening and the 



alarm set-wheel. Decide on 
a location for the six re- 
quired switches and 
transformer. In the pro- 
totype, the two control 
switches (Fast and Slow) 
were mounted underneath 
to prevent accidental use, 
and the Sleep, Snooze, and 
Seconds push-buttons were 
mounted on the top. The 
old Alarm/Radio switch ex- 
isting on the chassis was 
used to enable the alarm 
mode. 

Interfacing between the 
clock module and the 
radio is diagrammed in Fig. 
2. With this arrangement. 




GREGORY ELECTRONICS 

The FM Used 
Equipment People. 



MOTOROLA USED NI-CADS 



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TESTED 





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either activation of the 
Sleep mode or Alarm out- 
put will enable the radio. If 
untimed radio activation is 
desired, the original 
manual switch retains con* 
trol. 

A great deal of informa- 
tion is available from the 
four-digit display. Two LED 
"dots" note pm (vs. am) and 
arming of the alarm. 

Some may find this dis- 
play too bright for bedside 
use at night. A poten- 



tiometer, resistor-and- 
switch, or photocell ar- 
rangement can be inserted 
at the indicated point to ef- 
fect brightness control of 
the display, if desired. 

By means of this conver- 
sion, a useful piece of 
equipment can be returned 
to active duty. Besides be- 
ing gratifying in its own 
right, this is one project 
that even the XYL will ap- 
preciate. Who could ask 
for anything more^H 




A front view of the MATOOl-A module. 



A rear view of the MAIOOhA module. 



73 Magazine • June, 1980 49 



QRQ, QRS— By the Numbers! 

— a digital CMOS code-speed indicator 




CLOCM V CAL 



Howard F. Batic W7BBX 
12002 Cheviot Drive 
Herndon VA 22070 



Fig, I. Schematic diagram. 



With many electronic 
keyers and a wide 
variety of do-it-yourself cir- 
cuits now available/*^'* this 
direct-reading code-speed 
indicator calibrated in 
words per minute should 
find its way into a good 
many shacks. Whether used 
for code practice or orvthe- 
air operation, now you can 
tell your sending speed 
easily at a glance In addi- 
tion, this versatile unit can 
be used as an accurate 
event counter for a range of 
about 5-99 counts per sec- 
ond. 

Since the unit also has an 
input waveform condition- 
er, it has a high degree of 
noise immunity; the input 
keyer clock waveform 
which is counted may be 
sinusoidal, square, triangu- 
lar, positive or negative- 
going pulses, or complete 
combinations of these, with 



50 73 Magazine * June, 1980 



a peak-to-peak amplitude 
of from about iVi to 20 
volts Being fully CMOS, 
the two 7-segment readouts 
are the only real contrib- 
utors to current drain. But 
the best part is that the en- 
tire unit uses a minfmum 
number of readily available 
parts, and it can easily be 
constructed for about $25 if 
all parts are purchased new. 

Fig. 1 shows the com- 
plete schematic for the 
code-speed readout, The 
circuit is basically a CMOS 
adaptation of an earlier TTL 
version described by 
Jones/ but with many 
fewer components and a 
significantly smaller cur* 
rent requirement. For most 
electronic keyers which use 
a flip-flop dot generator/ 
the code speed in words per 
minute is equal to the 
number of keyer clock 
pulses which occur in 1.2 
seconds. With SI in the 
WPM position, the keyer 
clock pulses are led from 
your electronic keyer to |1, 
conditioned by Uld and 
Die, and fed to U3, a dual 
BCD counter. Each half of 
U3 drives a combination 
latch*decoder-driver for 
each digit. By this process, 
the number of clock pulses 
occurring in the 1.2-5econd 
interval (f = 0,833 Hz) 
generated by Ula and Ulf 
are counted and displayed. 
Additionally, the readout 
display will be updated 
automatically every 1,2 
seconds. 

Ula and Ulf are config- 
ured as an astable multivi- 
brator with a period of from 
0.8 to 1.05 seconds, the 
period being adjustable by 
R2, This multivibrator has a 
50% duty cycle, and its fre- 
quency is very stable with 
large power supply fluctua- 
tions. The multivibrator 
output is taken from Ula 
pin 2 and fed to a dual 
monostable multivibrator 
(one-shot). With each fall- 
ing transition of the U2d pin 
5 input, a positive-going 
pulse of about 20 microsec- 



onds is generated at U2a 
pin 6, and its complement 
at pin 7. When pin 7 of U2a 
goes low, the BCD count 
from both halves of U3 is 
latched into U4 and U5 
where it is decoded into 
7-segment format and dis 
played. 

When pin 7 of U2a 
returns to a logic 1, pin 6 of 
U2a returns to a logic 0; this 
transition triggers U2b, and 
a 20-microsecond positive- 
going pulse resets both U3 
counters to zero. As long as 
you continue sending, a 
synchronous keyer clock 
will continue to generate 
pulses and the count latch- 
reset sequence of U3, U4, 
and U5 will update the dis- 
play; when you stop send- 
ing, the keyer clock input 
also stops and 00 will be 
displayed on the readout If 
your keyer has an asynchro* 
nous clock, it will continue 
to generate clock pulses 
whether you are sending or 
not; in this case, the speed 
at which the keyer is set will 
be continuously displayed. 

C4 provides ac coupling 
from the keyer clock to the 
input conditioner R6-R7- 
Uld-Ule, This configura- 
tion of inverters is actually 
a high input impedance 
Schmitt trigger. The 
amount of hysteresis of the 
Schmitt trigger is deter- 
mined by the ratio of R6 to 
R7, in this case, 10% of Vcc 
or about 0.8 volts/ See Fig. 

Power is furnished to the 
entire circuit by a conven- 
tional full-wave rectifier 
bridge (D1-D4) and filter 
capacitor C6 One side of 
the transformer secondary 
is ac coupled to a second 
Schmitt trigger by C5, This 
Schmitt trigger, R8-R9-U1b- 
Ulc, samples the T1 sec- 
ondary voltage and pro- 
duces a 60- Hz square-wave 
output at pin 4 of U1 b. With 
SI a in the CAL position, the 
60-Hz square wave is again 
conditioned by Uld-Ule 
and then counted and dis- 
played by U3, U4, and US, 



This provides a means of 
calibrating the Ula-Ulf os- 
cillator to 833 Hz, or a 
period of 1.2 seconds; sim- 
ply adjust R2 for a reading 
of 72 on the display (60 if 
your ac-line frequency is 50 
Hz} and return SI to the 
WPM position for direct 
calibrated readout of the 
keyer speed in words per 
ininute. 

The values of CI, R1, and 
R2 have been chosen to 

allow a Ula-Ulf oscillation 
of 1.0 Hz. as well. With R2 
set to display 60 on the 
readouts in the CAL posi- 
tion (50 if your ac-line fre- 
quency is 50 HzX U3 is now 
being reset each second; 
therefore, when SI is re- 
turned to the WPM position 
the readouts will display 
the number of input pulses 
per second (up to 99, direct- 
ly). 

The frequency-deter mi fl- 
ing components R1 , R2, and 
CI can be adjusted as nec^ 
essary to cover the range of 
0.95-1.25 seconds, or other 
suitable intervals as de* 
sired. If your display wilt 
not read up to 72 when cali- 
brating, increase either R1 
or CI; if your display will 
not go down to 60, try de- 



.:^ 



faj 



«,n- 






R, 



4050fi 



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(b} 









4^98 



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(c) 



OUTPUT 
VOtTS 



f 7 



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TPl V^n TFh 



iv,„* ft/i Wgci 



_j ^ INPUT 




(d] 



Tm€ 



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HTlT£«C»t 



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-*■ tlUE 



Fig, 2. CMOS Schmitt trigger 
characteristics, faj Basfc 

CMOS Schmitt trigger (b) 
CMOS Schmitt trigger using 
inverters, (c) Schmitt trigger 
trarisfer characteristics, (d) 
Sinewave respor^se. 



"^ 



LSD *AS'y 



/^ \ / ,\ 



$1 

TTT-TTTTTTT 



&|Q 



r^ rz 






\Q^ __ 0-» -. SlO-Klft ' FMT-RS5 



^^ mini mmi 



HZ 

r> 

«5 



£ 



r^ 



^ 'VW 










WMrt 



I 



RESiSTOfl 




UHt COHD 
KOVAC 
60^ j; 



Fig. 3. Perfboard parts layout 



73 Magazine • June, 1980 51 



HAM-KEY " RADIO TELEGRAPH SENDING DEVICES 




Model t1K-3IVI 



H9 



95 



* Deluxe straight key 

* Anti-tip bracket. Can't tip 

* Heavy bsm. Ho need to attach to desk 



Add $2.00 Shipping 
fit Handling. 

* Navy type knob 

* Smooth action 



CC-3P shieJded cable 8t plug for HK-3M S2.49. 

Add S .50 Shipping 8t Handling. 
Mode! AT-B ami -tip bracket only, to convert any HK-3 to HK-3M. 

S2.99 Postpaid 




Model liK-4 



4495 



Add S2. 00 Shipping 
& Handling. 



Combtnation H K-l & H K 3 on same ba^ 

Straight key may be used conventionally or as a switch to 1rtgg«r 

a memory. 

CC»1/3P Shielded caWe with plugs for HK^ $5.99, 

Add ^1 .00 Shipping Si Handling 




Model HK-1 $ 



29 



95 



Add S2.00 Shipping 
& Handling. 

' Dual lever squeeze paddle 

* For use with ail etectronic keyers 

* Heavy base with non-siip rubber feet 

* Paddles reversible for wide or cfosa 
finger spacing 

CC-1P shielded cable St plug for H K-l S3.75 

Add $ ,75 Shipping & Handling. 

Model HK*2. $ameas HK-I but less base for incorporation in your 

own keyer.S 19,95 
Add SI .00 Shipping & Handling. 



Model HK-5A Electronic Keyer 



♦•>**'. 



69 



95 



* iambic circuit for squeeze keying 

* Self cofnpleting dots & dashes 
' Dot Si dash rnemory 

* Built^n sidetone 

* Battery operated with provisions for external power 



Add $2.00 Shipping 
& Handling. 

* Uses Curtis 8044 keyer chip 

* Grid bioc^ or direct keying 

* Speed, volume, tone 8t w#ight 
controls on front panel 

* Use with HK-1 or HK-4 



mallei cTiafge 



Order direct or from your favorite dealer. 

The HAM-KEY Co. 



30 



P.O. Box 28271 



St. Louis, WIO 63132 



Ptnne TOLL-FREE 1-800-325-3651 



VtSA 



creasing R1 or CI until both 
60 and 72 can be displayed 
within the ran^e of R2. 

The entire unit, including 
T1, was wired on a 3y<"X 
4-* perf board and Installed 
in an Archer cabinet (see 
parts list). A cutout was 
made for the two readouts, 
which were tennporarilv 
held to a smaller 1W"x 
lU' perf board by bending 
the readout leads through 
the perf board, Press^on dry 
transfer labeling was ap* 
plied, and the front panel 
sprayed with a light coat of 
acrylic spray before mount* 
tng SI. The small perf board 
with readouts attached was 
then epoxied to the inside 
of the front panel. The 
larger perf board containing 
the counter was mounted 
on #6 bolts, 1 V4 '* long, with 
three nuts under the perf- 
board on each bolt to pro- 
vide adequate clearance 
from the chassis. R2 was 
mounted near the edge of 
the perfboard and a hole 



was drilled in the side of the 
cabinet to permit calibra- 
tion with a small screw- 
driver without removing the 
cover. ]1, an RCA phono 
jack, the panel-mounted 
fuse holder, and a rubber 
grommet for the line cord 
are mounted on the rear 
paneL A suggested parts 
layout is shown in Fig. 3.B 



References 

1. Howard Batle W7BBX, "A 
Program mable Contest Keyer/' 
Ham Radio, April, 1976, p. 10, 

2. James Garrett WB4VVF, "The 
WB4VVF Accu-Keyer," QST, 
August, 1973, p. ia 

a S.M. Allen K4JEM, The New, 
Improved 'Best Keyer Yet/ " 73, 
March, 1978. p. 22. 

4. William Jones W7KGZ. "A 
Digital Speed Readout for the 
Electronic Keyer," QST, July, 
1978, p, 11. 

5. The Radio Amateur's Hand- 
book, 55th Edition (1978), p. 
356. 

6. Don Lancaster, CMOS Cook* 
booK Howard Sams & Co., Inc,, 
1977, p. 222. 





Parts List 


Archer 




Component 


Description 


Part No. 


Qty 


CI 


10-uF electrolytic 


272-1025 




C2. 03 


.001 -LiF disc 


272-126 




C4, C5 


0.1-uF disc 


272-135 




C6 


lOOD-uF electrolytic 


272-958 




D1D4 


Si 1A diode 


276^1101 


2 


F1 


V4-ASIo-Blofuse 


270-1288 




J1 


RCA phono jack 


274-346 




HI, R4, R5 


33k, V4-Watt resistor 


271-1341 




R2 


10k PC^mount trimmer 


271-218 




R3 


11M, V-i -Watt resistor 


27M356 




R6, R8 


10k, V4-Watt resistor 


271-1335 




R7. R9 


100k, y^-Watt resistor 


271-1347 




R10-R23 


330-Ohm, V4*Watt resistor 


271-1315 


3 


SI 


2P3T rotary swilch 


275-1385 




T1 


6,Z-y ac/300*mA transfomier 


273-1384 




Ul 


4049B CMOS IC 


276-2449 




U2 


4528A Of 4528B CMOS IC 






U3 


4518Aor4518BCMOSIC 


2762490 




U4, U5 


461 IB CMOS IC 


276-2447 


2 




common-cathode 


276-062 


2 




7-se9ment readout 






Miscellaneous 








Cabtnel 




270-252 


1 


Une cord 




278-1 255 


1 


Panehmoiint fuse holder 


270-364 


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52 73 Magazine • June, 1980 



1 



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73 Magazine • June, 1980 53 



Eric J, Grata wski WAEHEB 
303 12 Arnold Road 
Wiilowick OH 44094 



Adding a Scanner to Your 2m Rig 

— here's a method that works with many 

scanner/transceiver combos 



Using a scanning nnon- 
ilor receiver along 
with a twometer trans- 
ceiver will add a new di- 
mension to your mobile or 
base installation, tt lets you 
keep track of which fre- 
quencies are in use, in- 
creases the chance of get- 
ting the traffic report that 



m: 









you need, betters your 
chance of receiving a page 
white listening on another 
frequency, and permits you 
to eavesdrop on out-of- 
band transmissions such as 
NOAA weather broadcasts, 
police and fire dispatchers, 
etc., just to name a few, 
Adding a scanner can be 




Fig. 1. Test circuit for scanner front-end alignment Set VOM 
on decibel or tow ac voltage range. 



*NT > 




<^T0 MlHtfi 



Fig. Z Typical scanner front-end circuit Alignment se- 
quence is A, 6, then C 



as simple as installing an- 
other antenna and turning it 
on This has several disad- 
vantages which become ap- 
parent very quickly— such 
as: having to shut off the 
scanner before transmitting 
in order to ehminate feed- 
back, possible destruction 
of the scanner rf input tran- 
sistor, and the additional 
cost of another antenna. 

In this modern, push-but- 
ton age, there must be a bet- 
ter way to accomplish our 
goal, and there is. By taking 
a systems approach to the 
problem, the second anten- 
na was eliminated and the 
scanner is muted automat- 
ically whenever the PTT 
switch is activated. When 
the PTT switch is released, 
the scanner resumes nor- 
mal operation. 

Although this article is 
written with specific refer- 
ences to the Realistic 
PRO-40 scanner and Ken- 
wood TR-7500 transceiver, 
the principles are described 
so that other combinations 
of equipment may be used. 
In fact, another system was 
built for a base station us* 



ing a Realistic PRO-7B and 
Standard SRC^26MA, with 
excellent results. 

Scanner Modifications 

If you use the scanner on 

the frequencies for which it 
was designed, alignment of 
the front end is not re- 
quired. For reception of 
two-meter signals, however, 
some alignment of the 
tuned circuits will usually 
be required. This is easy if 
the circuit shown in Fig. 1 is 
used. 

With no signal applied to 
the scanner and the squelch 
open, adjust the volume 
control so that the VOM in- 
dicates about 80 percent of 
full scale The exact voltage 
is not important and will 
fluctuate with random 
noise. Most scanners have a 
front end similar to the 
illustration in Fig. 2. Apply a 
weak signal on the fre- 
quency of interest, Notice 
that the VOM reading will 
be less than before. This is 
caused by the limiting ac- 
tion of the receiver. Care- 
fully adjust the tuned ctr- 
cutts in the order shown in 
Fig. 2 until the lowest VOM 



54 73Magaifne • June, 1980 



reading is obtained, i.e., 
maximum quietrng is 
achieved, [n most of the 
scanners, the dips are quite 
sharp and usually within 
± 2 turns of the factory set- 
tings. 

This completes the align- 
ment phase. Disconnect the 
test circuit. With an anten- 
na connected, the scanner 
should now receive signals 
on two meters. 

The final scanner modi- 
fication consists of adding 
an electronic switch to 
mute the scanner while 
transmitting. It consists of 
adding a resistor and tran- 
sistor and changing a sec- 
ond resistor. Before going 
ahead blindly, refer to Fig. 3 
to see how the muting is ac- 
complished. 

The partial schematic 
shows a typical, series-type 
voltage regulator. The 
zener diode establishes a 
constant base voltage for 
the pass transistor. The pass 
transistor has unity voltage 
gain but provides current 
gain. As a result, whatever 
voltage applied at the base 
of the transistor appears at 
the output of the regulator 
but at a higher current- 
sourcing capability. 

In the case of the 
PRO'^40, +13,6 volts from 
the automobile battery 
drives the regulator. The 
zener diode holds the base 
of the pass transistor at 
+ 9.1 volts, and the output 
of the regulator is about 
+ 9.6 volts. In case you are 
wondering where the addi- 
tional 0.7 volts came from, 
it is the diode drop between 
the emitter-base junction in 
the pass transistor 

It is obvious then, that if 
the base voltage of the pass 
transistor could be reduced 
to zero during periods of 
transmitting, the output of 
the regulator would be zero 
for all practical purposes 
and the scanner would be 
muted. The electronic 
switch will do just that. 

By adding a garden-vari- 
ety NPN transistor such as a 
2N3904, as shown in Fig, 4, 
the pass transistor base 



voltage will be at ground 
potential whenever a mute 
signal is present. The mute 
signal turns on the switch* 
ing transistor which effec- 
tively shorts out the zener 
diode. When this occurs, 
the input voltage is shunted 
to ground through the cur- 
rent limiting resistor, R1. 
Since this resistor was not 
rated for the extra current, 
it must be replaced with a 
larger wattage resistor hav- 
ing the same resistance as 
the former resistor. The 
power dissipated in the re- 
sistor can be calculated 
from P = E^/R, where E is 
13.6 volts and R is the resis- 
tance in Ohms. 

The exact value of resis- 
tor R2 is dependent upon 
the mute voltage- It should 
be selected so that the Q2 
base voltage is between 
+ 0.7 and +1.0 volts when 
Q2 is turned on. In the ex- 
ample, a value of 12k pro- 
vides satisfactory perfor- 
mance with a mute control 
voltage of +9 volts. 

The mute control voltage 
originates at the transceiver 
and must be applied to the 
scanner over a wire A con- 
venient way to do this is to 
rewire the earphone jack to 
accept the mute signal. This 
negates the use of this jack 
for its original purpose, but 
since the internal speaker is 
used exclusively anyway, 
the jack would serve no 
useful purpose in our sys- 
tem. Use of the jack also 
avoids the need for another 
hole in the scanner. 

Note that if the mute 
plug is removed, the scan- 
ner will operate normally. 
The scanner thus may be 
used apart from the trans- 
ceiver. 

Transceiver Modifications 

The transceiver requires 

two modifications: An an- 
tenna lead must be brought 
out to drive the scanner an- 
tenna jack, and the mute 
control voltage must be 
generated 

The TR'7500 has an ac- 
cessory jack on the rear 
panel which may be used 



BATTEWT •■ 



* -* 



— TO 4UDI0 OUTPUT STASE 



♦— 



ITl 



Q 



* 5 1 w 



■*REG OUTPiTT 



I 



ffr 



ai 



♦S IV 



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Fig, 3. Original voltage-regulator schematic. 



BATtEMY *- 



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|ytLiTE> 

*9 V ^MUTEl 

V tn^t) 



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CI 



SEE T£XT 



¥i%, 4. Modified voltage regulator showing the electronic 
switch. R1 must be replaced with another resistor having 

the same resistance but a higher power rating. 



for all connections if you 

can compromise one of the 
functions provided for at 
this point. Fig. 5 shows the 
functions available at this 
jack. The T9 output pro- 
vides + 9 volts during 
transmit only Since this is 
just what IS needed for the 
mute control signal^ it can 
be used directly. The cerh 
ter-meter (CM) output 
would not normally be 
used, so it can be unsol- 
dered and taped. This pin 
may then be used for the 
scanner antenna lead. 

The antenna lead for the 
scanner must come off the 
receiver side of the antenna 
relay In theTR-7500, anten- 
na switching is done elec- 
tronically, so the antenna 
lead was picked off the re- 
ceiver printed circuit board 
and brought to the acces- 
sory jack with RC-174/U 
miniature coaxial cable. 
The receiver board can be 
removed quite easily by re- 
moving a few machine 
screws and unplugging the 
interconnecting harnesses. 
It is much easier to solder 
the coax to the board when 
it can be supported in a vise 
or on a table. 

After all connections 
have been made, reassem- 
ble the transceiver and con- 
struct an interconnect 




* T9 RED 



* €«ID SLACK 



** AF WHITE 



* CM BlUI 



Fig. 5. Wiring of the TR-JSOO 
accessory jack on the rear 
paneL The CM wire is re- 
moved and taped. The scan- 
ner antenna lead is then con- 
nected to this pin. 

cable to run from the trans- 
ceiver to the scanner (See 
Fig. 6). 

Testing 

Connect the scanner and 
transceiver power leads to 
the power supply and the 
interconnect cable be* 
tween the units. Connect 
the antenna to the trans- 
ceiver. 

Turn on the scanner 
and the transceiver. Each 
should operate normally, as 
before the modifications, 
with the sole exception be- 
ing a slight loss in sensitivity 
on the part of the trans- 
ceiver. This is not signifi- 
cant, since it is less than a 
0.1-microvolt degradation. 

Depress the PTT switch. 
The scanner should be dis- 
abled, as evidenced by the 
LED indicators being off. 
Normal scanner operation 
should resume when the 



73 Magazine • June, 1980 55 



TO SCAN NCR 



MUTE diCK 


*22AWa 




-4 


, RG1T4/a ^^„^ 


-* — ri^ 


,-=:i_ 


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TO $€«NNeit 
AfliTEPlMA Ji^K 







T9 



BHO 



ANT 



J At; it 



Fig, 6. Wiring of the interconnecting cable used between 
the scanner and the transceiver. 



PTT switch is released. 

Operation 

Besides being able to 
scan several channels for 



activity, there are a few 
unique ways to benefit 
from this combination. For 
instance, the transceiver 
can be set to a frequency 



you wish to morritor full- 
time, and the scanner will 
allow you to monitor the 
others. Or, you can "lock- 
out" all channels but one 
and listen fulltime on two 
frequencies simultaneous- 
ly. This comes in handy par- 
ticularly for monitoring a 
repeater and a simplex fre- 
quency during emergen- 
cies. 

If you have a TR-75CM), 
and duplicate this system, 



you might want to program 
the six available channel-se- 
lector switch positions to 
correspond to the first six 
scanner frequencies. This is 
really handy in mobile op- 
eration. 

Whatever your desire is, I 
am sure that once you've 
teamed a scanner and a 
transceiver with the auto- 
matic switching described, 
you will wonder how you 
ever got along without it.B 



Curtis a Goodson W4QBV/PY2ZBQ 
Av Francisco Giicerio 467 
Apartment 502 
13100 Campinas Sp. BrasH 




Transistor Checker 

a ^'hands-on'' project 



Most of us are familtar 
with the method of 
checking transistors for 
shorts and opens using the 
xlOO ohmmeter scale. Now 



you can check for amplify- 
ing action as well, using just 
your ohmmeter and your 
digits (fingers). 

In the case of an un- 








Fig. 1 





OHMS K 100 



_^ 



Fig. 2. 



known transistor, first 
determine which is the base 
lead by checking for diode 
action: Put one probe on 
any transistor lead and 
check for continuity to 
each of the other two leads. 
It usually will be between 
200 and 2000 Ohms Re- 
verse the meter leads and 
check again. It should read 
an open circuit The base 
lead is the one which reads 
like a diode to both other 
leads [see Fig. 1), 

Next, connect the ohm- 
meter prods to the col lector 
and emitter leads. We don't 
know which is which, but it 
doesn't matter yet. Now 
moisten your index digit 
and touch it to both the 
base lead and either of the 
other leads, ff you've hit it 
right, the meter will show a 
lower resistance. If nothing 
happens, touch your still 
wet finger to the base and 



the other transistor lead. If 
your luck is as poor as mine, 
and still nothing happens, 
don't give up. Now reverse 
the ohmmeter prods on the 
collector and emitter and 
repeat the wet-digit test. 
One of the four tests will 
show a lower resistance be- 
tween the collector and 
emitter if the transistor is 
amplifying. In effect, the 
wet finger serves as a high 
resistance from collector to 
base, biasing the transistor 
partially on (see Fig, 2). 

You now know the col- 
lector lead. It is the one that 
gives the lowered resis- 
tance when "digitally" con- 
nected to the base. If you 
know the polarity of your 
ohmmeter prods, you also 
can determine if it is an 
NPN or PNP transistor; If 
the positive prod is on the 
collector, it's an NPN.B 



S6 73 Magazine • June, 1980 



SOMETHING DIFFERENT 

he FT-107 Series with "DMS" 



* 



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It's A Cut Above The Rest 



- * OPTIONAL DIGITAL MEMORY SHIFT ("DMS") -| 

12dj$erete m^moriea. Stores individual frequencies 
or use as 12 full coverage VFOs (500 kHz each) 



Jf 



V^^itf '' 





Solid State 

240 watts DC SSB/CW 

1 60-10 meters, WWV 

(2 auxiliary band positbns are 
available for future expansion) 

RF Speech Processor 
SSB, CW, AM, FSK 
Built-in SWR Meter 

Ex<^ltent Dynamic Range 
Audio Peak/Notch Fitter 
Vartabie Bandwidth 
Full Line of Accessories 




%Jt 




J ^ 





The FT-107 has been created as a result of a blending of technologies — computer, solid 
state and RF design. By careful utilization of these disciplines and the experience gained from 
our FT-30t series, YAESU has achieved an HF transceiver which 'offers unique features 
(e. g. "Digital Memory Shift"), efficient operation and a level of performance that has been 
previously unattainable. 



(Receiver Section) FT-t07 TRANSCEIVER SPECIFICATIONS (Transmitter Section) 



Sensitivity: 0-25 uV for lOdB S/N, CW/SSB, FSK 

1.0 uV for lOdBS/N, AM 
Image Rejection: 60clB except 10 meters (50dB) 
IF Rejection: 70dB 

Selectivity: SSB 2.4 kHz at -6dB, 4.0 kHz at -60dB. 

CW 0.6 kHz at -6dB. 1.2 kHz at -eodB, 
AM 6 kHz at -6dB. 12 kHz at -60dB 
Variable IF Bandwidth 
20dB RF Attenuator 
f^ak/Notch Audio Filter 
Audio Output: 3 watts (4-16 ohms) 
Accessories: FV-107 VFO (standard not synttiesized) 

FTV-107 VHF (UHF Transverler) 
FC-107 Antenna Tuner 
SP-107 Matching Speaker 
FP-1 07 AC Power Supply 

Prce Ar>d Specifications Subied Tn 

Chancje Wiihout Notice Or Obligat(cn 



Power Inout: 240 watts DC SSB/CW 

80 watts DC AM /FSK 
Opposite Sideband Suppression: Better than 50dB 
Spurious Radiation: -50dB, 
Transmitter Bandwidth 3502700 hz (-6dB) 
Transmitter; 3rd IMD 31dB neg feedback 6dB 
Transmitter Stability: 30 hz after 10 min. warm up 

less than 1 00 hz after 30 mm. 
Antenna Input Impedance: 50 ohms 
Microphone Impedance: 500 ohms 
Power Required: 13.5V OC at 20 amps 

100/ 11 0/11 7/200/220/234 V AC at 650 VA 




^a3 



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Thorsmmm \y 



1179R 



YAESU ELECTRONICS CORP., 6851 Walthall Way, Paramount, CA 90723 • (213) 633-4007 
YAESU ELECTRONICS Eastern Service Ctr.,9612 Princeton-Glendaie Rd..Clncinnatl, OH 45246 



Don Nomtan A FSB 
41991 Emerson Court 
Eiyria OH 440SS 



CB to 10 

part XXV: using those surplus 
40-channel boards 



The Poly Paks flyer 
aroused my curiosity 
with the ad for 'A 40- 
channel CB board com- 
plete with channel selector 
for only $14 88/' and rn a 
reasonable time UPS deliv- 
ered what proved to be a 
rather sophisticated 40 
channel PLL CB set minLis 
the case, speaker, micro- 
phone, and volume and 
squelch controls, 

A little examination and 
research revealed that this 
is a very versatile printed 
boaH, used in several Hy- 
Cain units and several 
Kraco models. What appear 
to be missing parts are de- 
liberate omissions. These 
parts are ones that function 
in some other unit than that 
for which this board was in- 
tended. 

With a little work and in- 
genuity, this board can be 
turned into a fufly-func- 
tioning and illegal CB 
transceiver, and, with a lit- 
tle more work, it can be- 
come a neat IOmeter rig. 
All part numbers are silk- 
screened on the board, and 
all wiring is attached to 
numbered wire-wrap posts 
or to numbered holes in the 
board- My wiring instruc- 
tions will denote wire-wrap 
posts with a "P" and a 
number and board holes 
with an *'H" and a number. 

Only the board mount- 



ing screws, the heat sinks, 
the antenna connector 
shield, and the two disc 
capacitors on the bottom 
of the board go to chassis 
ground. All other ground- 
ing points are attached to 
one of the board grounds, 
CI, G2, G3. or C4, Board 
grounds will be 'BG" and 
chassis grounds "CC." Cot 
it? Heat up the iron and go! 

Wiring 

Solder a red lead for 
+ 12 V to HI, Solder a 
black lead for -12 V to 
H2. Wire the center pin of 
an antenna connector to 
P58 and the shield to CC. 
Attach the leads of the two 
disc caps on the bottom of 
the board to CG. Install a 
jumper from P9 to P20. 
Wire a power on-off switch 
between P20 and P25 Wire 
an outer lug of a 15k 
squelch pot to P7 and the 
other two lugs to BC, Wire 
an outer Jug of a 50k volume 
control to PI 9. Wire the 
center lug to P21 and the re- 
maining lug to BG, 

Wire the + terminal of a 
0-1 -m A S/rf meter to H34 
and the — terminal to BC. 
Wire one speaker lead to 
P23 and attach the other 
speaker lead to BC tempor- 
arily. In actual operation, 
the speaker lead is routed 
to BC through the PTT 
switch on the microphone 
A 500-Ohm dynamic mike 



is used. This mike has a 
DPDT PTT switch that 
opens the speaker lead as it 
grounds the PTT line. This 
is necessary sihce the mod- 
ulation transformer is also 
used as the audio output 
transformer, and an un- 
earthly howl results if the 
speaker is not disabled. 
This mike audio line goes 
to P22. the PTT line to PI 3, 
and the neutral to BC. 

Tune-Up 

Tuning up the receive re- 
quires a signal generator, a 
VTVM, and a little patience. 
The first step is to set the 
voltage on the PLL. Check 
your wiring a last time, ap- 
ply power, and check for 
smoke. If everything is OK, 
turning the volume and 
squelch controls should 
produce noise in the speak- 
er. Squelch range can be 
set with the on-board pot, 
RV101. Attach a VTVM 
probe to the end of R113 
nearest T101 and the 
ground to BG, 

What we're looking for 
here is 1.5 V on channel 1. 
Since the switch is not 
marked, we have no idea 
where channel 1 is, so tune 
T101 for 1.5 V on the 
VTVM and then rotate the 
channel selector clock- 
wise. The voltage should 
rise and abruptly drop. The 
voltage drop indicates that 
you have just gone from 



channel 40 to channel 1. 
Reset T101 for 1.5 V and 
remove the VTVM. 

Feed a 455-kHz signal 
through a .01 capacitor to 
the emitter of QHB, and 
tune T109, T108, and T107 
for highest reading on the 
S/rf meter. The S-meter 
range may be adjusted 
with the on-board pot, 
TV103. Feed a 10.7^MHz 
signal through a .01 cap to 
the base of Q115 and tune 
T106and L1 12 for the high- 
est S-meter reading. Set the 
channel selector to chan- 
nel 13 and feed a 
27.115-MHz signal into the 
antenna connector. Tune 
T105 and T104 for highest 
S-meter reading. You now 
can attach an antenna and 
check for "Big lO^s" and 
other esoterica amongst 
the local Cood Buddies. 

Set the channel selector 
to channel 13, attach a 
10-Watt dummy load, key 
the mike or ground the PTT 
line, and adjust LI 03, LI 04, 
T102, T103, LI 06, LI 09. and 
L1 10 for the highest S/rf 
meter reading. Rf-meter 
range may be adjusted 
with the on-board pot, 
RV104. 

10-Meter Conversion 

Getting the rig on 10 in- 
volves replacing crystal 
XI 01 and retuning the PLL, 
the transmitter, and the 



SB 73 Magazine • June, 1980 



receiver front end. The 
crystal formula for the new 
XI 01 is: N/3 + 11.806 MHz, 
when N equals the new 
channel 1 frequency minus 
26.%5 MHz. 

For example: tf we 
wished the new channel 1 
to be 28.965 MHz, then: N 
= 28.965-26 965 = 2.000; 
2, 000/3-=. 667; ,667 + 
11,806 = 12.473 MHz for 
the new XI 01, The crystaf 
may be ordered from any of 
several suppliers. Specify a 
parallel resonant mode, 
with a 30-pF load ca- 
pacitance, an HC-18 holder, 
and 005% or better 
tolerance. 

When the new XI 01 is in- 
stalled, return to the sec- 
tion on tune-up and reset 
T101 for 1.5 V on channel 
1 Retune the transmitter. 
It may be necessary to use 
the S-meter on a 10-meter 
receiver during initial 
transmitter tune-up until 
enough signal is obtained 
to register on the S/rf 



meter. Using a signal gener- 
ator or on-the-air signal, 
retune T105 and T104 for 
the highest S-meter read- 
ings. The center frequency 
may be adjusted by tuning 
CT101. The automatic mod- 
ulation-limiting level is set 
with the on-board pot, 
RV102. 

Additional information 
on rigs using this board and 
their conversion to 10 may 
be found in previous issues 
of 73^^ and in Sams Photo- 

References 

1. Part #92CU5554. Poly Paks, 
PO Box 942-A3, South Lynnf idld 
MA 01 940. 

2. Cliff Wiginton. Sr. W85BSG, 
"CB to 10 — Hy-Gain^s PLC 
Rigs," 73, September, 1978, p. 
172. 

3. Clay Webb W1 PI/^CB to 10— 
Convert a Kraco PLL Rig, " 75, 
October, 1978, p. 254. 

4. ^^Kfaco Model KCB-2330B." 
Sams Photofact CB Radio 
Series (CB-1761 Howard W. 
Sams and Co. Indmnapolis IN, 
1977. p. 6. 




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73 Magazine • June, 1980 59 



Hmlan r Curtis W86KBM 
3528 Castie Rock Rd. 
Diamond Bar CA 91765 



The Stolen Rig Retriever 

-built-in gadget automatically sends your 

call with every transmission 





AUmO _ 








OUTPUT ] 






























uz 

LATCH 




U3 a UA 
COUItTER 




PA OH 


1 


U6 

fi* NEW* loft 














■ 








■ 












1 . 






cw 




1 


PTT 




vot 


.UW£ 





SPE£f> 



Fig. 7. Block diagram. 



When VHF-FM activi- 
ty got into fult swing, 
equipment manufacturers 
started producing the "do 
everything*' transceiver For 
the average amateur, these 
radios are expensive, and 
rather than purchase single- 



I'SV 










or* I 



M 



A. A 

CI 



Fig. 2. Schemaf/c diagram. Note: If the IDer is desired to be used as a CW beacon (corh 
tinuous ideniificationl connect pin 4 of U2 to ground. 



mode or limited-coverage 

crystal-controlled units, a 
single transceiver ends up 
as his only purchase. 

These expensive rigs, 
when mounted in cars, have 
become tempting targets 
for the hamburglar. To 
counter the threat of rip- 
off, the amateur's re- 
sourcefulness is being se- 
verely challenged. He has 
responded with a number 
of strategies to outwit 
thieves and protect his 
equipment 

The best strategy, of 

course, is to remove the rig 
when the vehicle is un- 
attended. Next best is to 
hide it by stowing it under a 
seat or, better yet, by 
mounting it in the trunk or 
glove box. Locking mounts 
and alarm systems are also 
recommended. Antennas 
may be disguised to resem- 
ble standard broadcast 
antennas, which helps to re- 
duce vulnerability. How- 
ever, all of these steps may 
fail to prevent the loss of an 
expensive investment. 



60 73 Magazine • June, 1980 




SPEED 



\Z JUMPERS n£OD 



Fig. 3. Printed circuit board (foil s/de| 



For that reason, it makes 
sense to have some means 
of recovering your rig if it is 
stolen. The automatic CW 
identifier described here 
does just that. It identifies 
your call letters every time 
you "squeeze the pickte," 
Because the IDer is hidden 
Inside the transmitter and is 
silent to its operator, a thief 
may be unaware that the 
IDer is proclaiming your 
ownership after you have 
lost possession [ 

Several of these devices 
are now available commer- 
cially. But if you want to 
save money and tike to 
build or tinker with small 
projects, then this article is 
written especially for you. 
Because of the large capac- 
ity of the PROM used in the 
identifier, it turns out to be 
an excellent club project, 
the beauty being that the 
PROM can be programmed 
to contain sixteen different 
calls of 128 bits each 
Therefore, once the PROM 
has been preprogrammed 
and the three unique ad- 
dress jumpers have been 
properly connected, the cir- 
cuit will automatically 
transmit your selected call 
or any other short CW mes- 
sage. 

A block diagram. Fig. 1, is 
provided as an aid in under* 
standing the functions of 



the circuit, while Fig. 2 is a 
complete schematic dia- 
gram showing the pin 
numbers discussed. 

How It Works 

The clock oscillator de- 
termines the speed at which 
counters U3 and U4 will 
scan the PROM, U5. The 
output of U1 pin 3 goes low 
[ground) and arms the latch, 
U2. Pin 3 of tatch U2 now 
goes high, which turns on 
counters U3 and U4. The 
clock oscillator puts out 
pulses which are divided by 
the counters. The counters 
scan the PROM, U5, col* 
umn by column, until the 
last bit has been reached. 
The last bit in our case is 
number 128, Having 
counted 128 bits, pin 11 of 
counter U4 goes low, which 
causes pin 5 of U 2 to go 
high and then the IDer is 
shut off (latched). When pin 
4 is reset, the IDer wilt re- 
cycle itself, causing the 
message to be sent again. 

Although a perf board 
can be used, when you get 
the members of your club 
interested in a project tike 
this, fabrication of printed 
circuit boards, pro- 
gramming of the PROM, 
and assembly of the IDer 
become simple probfems to 
solve. Fig. 3 is a foil side 
printed circuit positive, and 




3 PROGRAM JUMPERS 
REQD - SEE TEXT 



E2 MIC 
INPUT 



Fig, 4, Component layout 



Message Number 

1 

2 

3 

4 

5 

6 

7 

8 

9 
10 
11 
12 
13 
14 
15 
16 



Address Jumper 

M TO N D TO H F TO G 

P H G 

H G 

R H G 

N H J 

P H J 

Q H J 

R H J 

H K G 

P KG 

KG 

R KG 

N K J 

P K J 

Q K J 

M TO R D TO K F TO J 

fig, 5. 



Fig. 4 shows the component 
layout. 

Once you have the PC 
board in hand, careful 
examination of the compo- 
nent layout is a must You 
should have a colored pen- 
cil to mark the symbols and 
jumpers as they are in- 
stalled. All of the compo- 
nents are mounted on the 
clear (non-foil) side of the 
PC board, It is recommend- 
ed that the resistors be in- 
stalled first 3S their cut-off 
leads are used for the 
twelve jumpers that are re- 
quired. Sockets for the ICs 
are not necessary, but they 



simplify troubleshooting 
and component replace- 
ment. 

Programming the PROM 

The PROM selected for 
the IDer is the Intel 3622. Its 
selection was determined 
by availability, large capac- 
ity, and price. Most elec- 
tronic suppliers have this 
PROM in stock, and for 
about $8.50 and a coding 
sheet they will program the 
PROM for you. 

PROM burning circuit re- 
quirements are given in the 
Intel data sheet, but corv 
struction and maintaining 



73 Magazine • June, 1980 01 



3 



ta 



16 



20 



24 



2& 



3^ 



5 



I 
5 

13 



1 K 
5 X 

13 X 



1 
S 
t 

t3 X 



K 
X 

X 






X 
X 



X 
X 
X 



X 
X 



X 
X 
K 
X 



X 
X 
X 
X 



X 
X 
X 
X 



40 

X X 

X X 

X X 

X X 



X 
X 
X 
X 



X 
X 



X 
IK 
X 
X 



44 



48 
X 



X 
X 



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&2 

X X 

X X X 

X X 

X X 



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X 
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tm 



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laQ 



124 



t2& 



fig. 6. Programming chart. Examples shown: line l^DE WB6KBM, line 2 — DE WbiAZ; 
line 3 -DE NbXA; line4^DE WB6KYO. Repeat thts chart 4 Umes. 



of critical supply voltages is 
very difficult. Several 
PROMs were burned using 
the manufacturer's recom- 
mendations, but the results 
were unsuccessful 

Sixteen different mes- 
sages should be determined 
prior to programming the 
PROM in order to utilize its 
full capacity. Each tine on 
the coding sheet is 512 bits 
long, so each line holds four 



12a-bit messages. There- 
fore, line 1 holds messages 
1 through 4, line 2 holds 
messages 5 through 8, line 3 
holds messages 9 through 
12, and line 4 holds mes- 
sages 13 through 16. Fig 6 
shows a portion of a coding 
sheet with the coding for 4 
sample messages. 

Before you start to fill in 
the coding sheet, you must 
know the following param- 




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eters. The 3622 device out- 
puts are initially high, and, 
if it is directly inserted into 
the IDer without first being 
programmed, a continuous 
tone would be produced. It 
is necessary to burn out the 
selected bits for the desired 
message. Before you deter- 
mine the selected message, 
you must keep in mind the 
T28"bit limit of each mes- 
sage. A single bit is a unit of 
time from which the Morse 
code is comprised. That is, 
a dot is one bit in length 
white a dash is three bits in 
length. Space between dots 
and dashes of a tetter is one 
bit, between letters it is 3, 
and between words it is 7. 
The first 4 bits of each 
message are left blank, 
thereby ensuring proper 
key-down of the transmitter 
and no loss of the message. 

Upon completion of the 

coding sheet, have a friend 
double-check your work. 
Errors must be corrected, as 
the PROM cannot be repro- 

grammed. 

When ordering your 
PROMs, you must state, 
"positive logic, high output, 
ones indicate high and 
blanks indicate zero/' This 
information will tell the 
company which programs 
your PROM which way to 
throw the logic switch. 

Testing and Connections to 
Transceiver 

Prior to installation of 
the programmed PROM, it 



is necessary to select the 
proper address codes. This 
is accomplished by con- 
necting three jumper wires 
determined from the chart 
in Fig. 5. This chart shows 
each message by number 
and which jumpers to use. 
Having installed the 
three appropriate jumpers 
as determined from Fig. 5 
and the PROM, a final test 
and checkout is recom- 
mended, as it lets you set 
the speed and volume of 
the IDer off the air You will 
need a 12'Volt dc source 
of 300 mA and an 8-Ohm 
speaker Connect the dc 
source to E3 and E4. Con- 
nect the speaker to E2 and 
ground. Ground the PTT cir- 
cuit. El, and adjust the CW 
speed control, R2, and the 
volume control, R6, to the 
desired settings, 

Connection to the trans* 
ceiver is quite simple. First 
find a suitable location. If 
none exists, then remove 
the speaker and install the 
IDer in its place. Most trans- 
ceivers have an auxiliary 
speaker Jack, so just add an 
external speaker and away 
you go. Refer to the sche- 
matic diagram. Fig. 2, for 
wiring connections. RG- 
122/U coaxial cable should 
be used for audio input to 
the mic if the distance is 
more than 6 inches. 

Since the CW speed has 
already been set, an on-t he- 
air test of the volume 
should be made The CW 
audio should be just below 
the level of your voice to 
provide for proper audibil- 
ity of your voice and the 
Morse code identification 

That's all there is to iti 
No more concern if you 
forget to identify yourself 
every time you go on the 
air, and you also can be 
proud of a job well done. 
This should get your club 
active again in the home- 
brew department 

! wish to give credit and 
many thanks to W6| AZ and 
N6XA for their testing, pro- 
gramming, and technical 
support on this project. ■ 



62 73 Magaiine • June» 1980 



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73 Magazine • June, 1980 63 



George A. Wilson, Jr. WIOLP 

318 Fisher Steef 
Wiiipoie MA 02081 



Constructing QRP Dummy Loads 



useful and inexpensive 



Small rf dummy loads 
are one of the more use- 
ful things to have around 
your workbench. A high- 
power rf load for of f-the-air 
transmitter tune-up and 
high-power testing is al- 
most a necessily, but that 
is not the present subject. 

Commercially-available 

toads tend to be precision 



devices that are relatively 
expensive. The ordinary 
workbench needs loads 
that are close to the stan- 
dard impedances and that 
have very little capacJtive 
or inductive reactance. 
This is another way of say- 
ing that they should have 
essentially one-to-one vswr 
(voltage standing wave ra- 
tio) at their operating fre- 



quency. Loads of this type 
that will handle ten Watts 
for short periods and five 
Watts for two or three 
minutes can be constructed 
easily d^n^ inexpensively as 
explained in this article. 

Construction 

The loads are built using 
several two-Watt carbon 
resistors clustered around 




Photo A. Typical dummy loads as described in the text. Note the screw terminals shown 
on the UHF connector loads^ These are for the connection of power-measuring circuitry. 



a coax connector or the 
end of a coax cable. Five 
two-Watt resistors will 
allow ten Watts dissipation 
until they heat to a couple 
hundred degrees tf they 
are arranged with an eighth 
of an inch of clearance be- 
tween them to allow cool- 
ing air to flow between 
them, they will handle their 
full ten-Watt rating long 
enough to adjust a two- 
meter FM transmitter rated 
at 10 to 20 Watts for max- 
imum output. Additional 
dissipation can, of course, 
be achieved by blowing 
cool air over the resistors. 

The photograph shows 

two forms of the load. One 
is connected directly to a 
UHF connector and the 
other is at the end of a 

short length of coax cable 

terminated at the opposite 
end with a BNC connector. 

The resistors may be 
chosen from Table 1 or, if 
you have a special toad 
value requirement, the 
parallel resistor formula — 
R = l/(1/R, + 1/R,+ T/Rj 
+ l/R4 + 1/R,)-may be 
used to arrive at suitable 
values for your special 
case. 

The first version of the 
load is constructed by 



64 73 Magazlr)e • June, 1980 




47 K 
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*D*PTEI| 



SHlElLD 



Fig. 1. Adapter circuh for VTVM with 11 megohms input 
resistance. Use carbon resistors only. The capacitor is in ^ 
and should be a ceramic type rated at 100 V or more. 

Resistors may be Vi Watt for power levels less than WO 
Watts. 





47lt 




















to LOJUl 


-1 










VTVI* 





















*TTENU*TOH 



Fig. 2. A 10:1 attenuator for use with an rf probe and 
VTVM. The 47k resistor should be 2 Watts for 1000 Watts 
and the measurements limited to short periods. 



soldering a piece of #12 or 
#14 5otid copper wire into 
the center pin of a UHF 
connector. Allow this wire 
to protrude about ^Vs" 
from the end that would 
normally accept the coax 
cable. Solder the resistors 
around the center conduc- 
tor just installed. One end 
of each resistor goes to the 
center conductor and the 
other end goes to the edge 
of the connector where the 
outer diameter of the coax 
cable would normally en* 
ter the connector. Space 
the resistors 1/8 inch apart 
(more rather than less) to 
a flow for air circulation. 
Trim the center conductor, 
leaving about 1/4 inch ex- 
tending beyond the solder 
joint. The extension can be 
used to connect a measur- 
ing circuit if you so desire. 
The second load is con- 
structed at the end of a 
coax cable using a similar 
technique to that just 
described. The outer insula- 
tion and braid are stripped 
back about 1 Vi inches. Di- 
vide the braid into five ap- 
proximately equal groups 
of strands and twist each 
group together. Trim their 
length to about 1/4 inch and 
tin each group with solder 
Minimize the heat applied 
to these points while tinning 
and, later, while soldering, 
to avoid melting the coaxial 
insulating material and 



causing a short circuit The 
resistors are now soldered 
from the center conductor 
to the five tinned points. 
The arrangement of resis- 
tors should be as previous- 
ly described for the load 
mounted directly on the 
coax connector. 

Results 

The original loads were 
constructed using 5% re- 
sistors and their resistance 
values were as calculated 
using a calibrated Simpson 
260 multimeter. The vswr 
was essentially one to one 
as indicated on a Heath- 
kit® swr meter at 147 
MHz. Chances of an equal- 
ly good match at lower fre- 
quencies is excellent. These 
loads are probably useful at 
220 MHz, but they were not 
tested at this frequency. 

Power Measurements 

Most amateur bench 

measurements do not have 
to be super-accurate. The 
most frequent need is to 
maximize or minimize the 
power being measured and 
to be assured that the 
power being measured is 
roughly what it should be. 
Remember that doubling 
or halving the transmitter's 
output will affect the 
signal received at another 
station by one-half an 
S-untt. Fighting for an addi- 
tional five Watts out of a 



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Irfl 
























iV 


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^*'qi 















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loqo 



VOCTS AFTt?* fO I DIVJ^OER 



Fig. 3. Power calf brat ion for a JS-Ohm had. 



toooo 



laoa 



•ATTS 

in 



100 



td 



tl 





i 1- » 












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, 








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u 


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01 



40 400 

VOLTS AFTER IQ * DtViDtR 



«00 



fig. 4. Power calibration for a 50-Ohm load. 



Combined 
Qty. Resistance Oty. Resistance Resistance 



5 


240 


5 


270 


3 


240 


5 


360 


3 


330 



300 



470 



48 

54 

52.2 

72 

74.9 



Table 1. Resistor choices for common load resistances 
(Ohms), 



100-Watl transmitter is just 
not worth ft! And, similarly, 
knowing what your output 
power is (as long as it is 

within the taw), to better 
the 20% is an unnecessary 
labor. 

Using the circuits and 
graphs shown in the figures, 
good approximations of the 
rf power delivered to a dunv 



my load can be made. Prob- 
lems such as capacitive 
coupling to the measuring 
circuit and poor rf wave- 
form can be ignored if the rf 
being measured is relatively 
free of harmonics and the 
adapter circuit or probe is 
shielded. 

The attenuator resistors 
[47k and 5.1 k) are included 



73 Magazine * June, 1980 65 



• YOU ASKED FOR IT • 

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to protect the diode in the 
adapter or probe. Normal- 
Iv, the diode*voltage 
limitation is about 30 volts. 
This value is exceeded 
before a power of 10 Watts 
is reached with 50- or 
70-Ohm loads. 

The formula for calcu- 
lating the power in a load is 
W = (E,,JVR = (E,x707)^ 
/R, where W is the power in 
the load, R is the load 
resistance, E^^^is the rms rf 
voltage across the load, 
and Ep is the peak rf 
voltage across the load. 
The graphs plot the value 
of rms voltage (as read on 
the VTVM's dc scale when 
using an rf probe or the 
adapter shown in the 
figure) versus power in the 
load. Peak voltage is also 
plotted in case the voltage 
is measured with a VTVM 
directly across the diode. 
The formula or graph can 
be used to change the scale 
on a meter if you are am- 
bitious enough to build a 



permanent measuring set- 
op. Note that the use of a 
low-impedance voltmeter 
in place of the VTVM will 
reduce the accuracy of 
power measurements but 
can be used to maximize 
the power in the load. Use 
the h|ighest voltmeter scale 
possible to minimize the 
error in power measure- 
ment, A VTVM, on the 
other hand, normally has 
constant input impedance 
and, therefore, mav be 
used on any scale. 

Conclusion 

Loads such as those 
described here will in- 
crease the potential of 
your workbench, making it 
possible to perform some 
of the measurements nor- 
mally performed by the 
wefl-instrumented service 
shop. 

The assistance of L.C.S. 
Wood W1WK in preparing 
the article is gratefully 
acknowledged. ■ 




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73 Magaiin^ • June, 1980 




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73 Magazine • June, 1980 6T 



The IC-211 Cookbook 

mods and tweaks to improve performance 



Bnat} M- Manns K3 VGX 
Box 2124, R.D,2 
Seven Vattevs PA 17360 



Si^Tired of listening to 
I white noise during 
SSB monitoring? Try this 
squelch modification/' 

The above title was cho- 
sen for my original draft of 
an article which never 
nnade it into print I had fent 
the article to a friend for 
review to detect any errors 
in spelling or punctuation 
and by the time I received 
the article back, I had in- 
vestigated a number of dif- 
ferent areas and compiled a 
lot of new information. This 
article includes all of the 
new information, plus the 
original SSB squelch modi- 



TO 

C0L1.ECT0R 
OF 614 III 

{*t3 9V&C I * w < > 



i 



TO PREAIfrP 
t + I^VOC. 



l2V,l/4ilt 
IflVEft 



HI FQtt AWCLE-UtlEJlH: 156 OHMS, E/^W 
FOR ^ANEL PM ^ Q^ 1^4 PBiZT^ OHMS. 



Fig.1. + 12-Vdc power sup- 
ply- 



fication. 

Since 1 don't have any 
convenient way of submit- 
ting nice pictures without 
many more weeks and/or 
months of delay, Tm afraid 
everyone will have to use 
the pictures in the Icom 
manual and my sketches. I 
would also like to say that 
some of the information to 
be presented was obtained 
directly from Icom East and 
Icom West and is so noted 
in the article. The following 
areas will be covered: 

• Service manual 

• Preamp installation and 

adjustments 

• SSB squelch modifica- 
tion 

• CW mode frequency off- 
set problems and correc- 
tions 

• Frequency adjustments 

• Miscellaneous internal 
adjustments 

SERVICE MANUAL 

While talking with the 
sales people at Icom East I 
was told that a service man- 
ual "is being developed" 
and will be available, al- 
though no projected availa- 
bility date was given. Great! 
Unfortunately, this meant 
that all of my other ques- 
tions had to be answered 



from a 13" X 20" schematic 
loaded with lines and parts, 
and by hunting around on 
the circuit boards. 

PREAMP INSTALLATION 
AND ADJUSTMENTS 

The stated Icom specifi- 
cations of 0.6 uV or better 
for 20 dB of quieting on FM 
and 0.5 uV or better for 10 
dB (S + N)/N for SSB looked 
good, but not great. Since 
I've had "Prog lines'' down 
to about 0.2 uV on FM, a 
preamp looked like a good 
bet if 1 could improve the 
noise figure and sensitivity 
on the solid-state front end 
of the 211. 

Mounting and In-Circuit 
Placement 

The preamp can be 
mounted on the power sup- 
ply supporting bar since 
there is free space avail- 
able. This will also place 
the preamp close to the 
area where the input and 
output leads are to be con- 
nected. To place the pre- 
amp into the circuit, it ini- 
tially looked like the foi! on 
the circuit board would 
have to be cut. However 
(courtesy Icom East], re- 
moving C202, which is lo- 
cated near the rf amplifier, 
Q47, and replacing it with 



the preamp solved the 
problem. Be sure that the 
input/output sides of the 
preamp match the input/ 
output sides of C202. The 
input side of C202 is on the 
antenna iack-L38 side, 
while the output side is 
toward L52. 

Power 

The preamp that I used 
(Angle-Linear) has a +12-V 
dc requirement to maintain 
the noise figure. Also, 1 only 
wanted power applied to 
the preamp during the re- 
ceive mode These require- 
ments were met by running 
the power lead from the 
preamp to the collector of 
Q34, which supplies +13.5 
V dc, and by using a zener 
diode and limiting resistor 
to obtain the +12 V dc at 
the preamp. [See Fig. 1 .) 

Adiustment 

Once the preamp is in- 
stalled and operational, 
R106 (which is the age con- 
trol] should be turned fully 
counterclockwise to stop 
the age voltage from being 
applied on low-level sig- 
nals. Without this adjust- 
ment the preamp would 
add nothing! 

For those interested in 
recalibrating their S-meters, 
the following information 



68 73 Magazine • June, 1980 



(courtesy tcom West) may 
be beneficial In the FM 
mode, 10 uV produces S9; 
adjusted by R167, In the 
' USB/CW mode, 32 uV pro- 
duces S9; adjusted by R132. 
Then, 320 uV should pro- 
duce a +20 dB indication; 
adjusted by R26. A 032 uV 
signal should just move the 
needle. 

Results 

Without the preannp, the 
IC-211 sensitivity measured 
0.5 to .6 uV in the SSB 
mode. With the preamp in- 

stalled and the age adjust- 
ed, t had 0.1 -uV sensitivity 
in the SSB mode The tests 
were conducted using a 
Singer FM10. 

SSB SQUELCH 
MODIFICATION 

Most of my 2-meter work 
is done on SSB and many 
hours are spent monitoring. 
The ability to have squelch 
operation during these 
times (instead of listening 
to noise] seemed impera- 
tive. 

Normal Operation 

The circuit in question is 
comprised of Q11, Q49, 
Q50/ Q51, Q53, and Q54. 

Their functions are as fol- 
lows: 

Q11 —SSB audio preamp 
Q49 — FM audio preamp 
Q50 — audio tow-pass filter 
Q51 —receive LED switch 
Q53, Q54 — noise amplifiers 
During normal operation 
in the FM mode, audio from 
the discriminator is sup- 
plied to two points: the 
base of Q49 (FM audio) and 
the input of noise ampli- 
fiers Q53 and Q54 via the 
squeich control, Basically, 
noise present at Q53 and 
Q54 keeps Q52 (squelch 
switch) turned on Q52. 
when turned on, keeps Q49 
and Q51 off; thus, there is 
no audio output or receive 
signal LED lamp lighted, 
With a signal present, the 
noise at Q53 and Q54 is re- 
duced, allowing Q52 to turn 
off With Q52 off. Q49 and 
Q51 turn on, allowing audio 
to pass and lighting the re- 



ceive lamp. 

Mod ifica lions 

In the SSB mode, two 
things prevent the squelch 
from operating: +9 V dc is 
removed by the mode 
switch from Q53 and Q54, 
which keeps Q52 off; the 
SSB audio from Q11 is 
placed on the collector side 
of Q49, thus bypassing 
Q52's switch action upon 
Q49. To complete these 
modifications, proceed as 
follows: 

1 . Remove the top and bot- 
tom covers from the set, 
power supply module, and 
PLL box, [Note: Both units 
are connectorized for easy 
removal ) 

2. Unsolder the top side of 
R214. This side normally 
faces toward L53. 

3. Solder a wire to the free 
end of R214, route it under- 
neath the circuit board, and 
attach it to the emitter of 
the Q34 and D28 anode 
junction pad. This point 
supplies +9 V dc during 
receive. 

4. Unsolder the top side of 
C210(+ side), 

5. Solder a wire to the C210 
lead (+ side), route it 
underneath the circuit 
board, and attach it to the 
junction pad of the squelch 
cable (center conductor) 
and CI 64. 

That's it— just two wiring 
changes! This modification 
seems to work quite well 
and even SSB signals that 
just move the S-meter will 
open the squelch if it is set 
loose. I have not noticed 
any degradation in either 
FM or SSB audio or any 
"different'' operation of the 
squelch on FM. [Note: The 
age circuit is operational 
when in the SSB mode and 
the age fast/slow switch will 
control the length of the 
'^squelch tail.") 

CW MODE FREQUENCY 

OFFSET PROBLEMS AND 

CORRECTIONS 

When you operate, let's 
say, on 145,100.0 on FM and 
then switch to the CW 



ft EAR OF SET 







PLI. "a 031' 

^"^ METAL eOK) 






• B 














cmrTiON c-uos msiDE 






COVER WUST B£ REUt^VCD 
FOn ACCESS 








FM Lsa 

r i 


BIT 

i 

i J 


1 J I 1 




*POTS' 





FflO**T OF SET 



Fig. 2. 



mode, your CW carrier 
should be on 145.100 and 
your receiver on 145,100.0, 
This is not the case with the 
lC-211. There 15 a +30Oto- 
400-Hz receive shift and 
about a +800-to-1-kHz 
transmit shift. The transmit 
offset was manufactured 
into the IC'211 but, evident- 
ly, the receive change was 
not intended. These fre^ 
quency shifts pose quite a 
problem when trying to 
work EME or aurora and, 
during general contacts, 
may cause leapfrogging 
around the band. 

Receive Shift 

I eliminated the receive 
shift by shorting out R1 7 (68 
Ohms), which is located on 
the small circuit board near 
the mode switch (bottom 
side of rig). 

Transmit Shift 

On CW transmit +9 V 
dc or less is put to D50 
(anode), which cuts off D51 . 
This removes C316 and 
C251 from the oscillator cir- 
cuit and raises the transmit 
frequency about 800 to 
1000 Hz. A cure appeared 
to be easy: Lift the anode of 
D50 from the circuit board. 
This did correct the fre- 
quency shift, but the power 
output went to 2erol The 
FL1 filter will not pass the 
corrected frequency. 

Since the transmit offset 
cannot be corrected easily, 
a change in operating pro- 
cedures wilt have to suffice. 
Once you determine the 



amount of frequency shift 
you can compensate by us- 
ing split-frequency opera- 
tion. For example, using a 
+ 800'Hz shift with a 
desired operating frequen- 
cy of 1 44,1 00.0: 

1 . Use vfo A as transmit: Set 
dial to 144.099.2; your car- 
rier will be on 144,100,0. 

2. Use vfo B as receive; Set 
dial to 144.100 0. 

The receiver and trans- 
mitter will then track cor- 
rectly, the receive readout 
would be correct and you 
can ignore the transmit 
readout. Any minor adjust- 
ments to the receive fre- 
quency could be done with 
the KIT control. 

FREQUENCY 
ADIUSTMENTS 

Since the IC'211 has a 
nice 7-digit readout, I 
would like to feel sure that 
it IS correct, The IC"211 
does not "compute'' the 
operating frequency like 
the Kenwood TS-820. How- 
ever, neither does the TS- 
700SP, which only reads the 
vfo injection (And, I might 
add, the vfos are generally 
not linear over the entire 
4-MHz band!) The IC-211 
breaks down the LO injec- 
tion voltage into 10O dis- 
crete dc voltage steps and 
uses phase comparison of 
the vco and the LO, which is 
referenced to a very stable 
crystal standard. This 
makes for an extremely ac- 
curate readout once the rig 
is aligned properly. 

Now, on with ad- 



73 Magazine • June, 1980 69 



JtEAn Of SET 



i4«.g2|0 




^4 6,020.0 



COVE# NCCD NOT «£ ftEMOVED 



FM LSB RIT 

I J i 



"POTS' 



FltOllT OF SET 



Fig. 3, 



justments. There are two 
versions of the IC-211 out 
and the type which you 
have is easily determined 
by looking at the large 
sealed box underneath the 
rig. The older units, like the 
picture in the Icom manual, 
do not have openings in the 
case to get to all the ad* 
justments; the newer units 

do. 

Note: The rig should be 
turned on for about 30 min- 
utes to an hour before start- 
ing; all steps must be done 
in the order indicated, and, 
for the older units, the cov- 
er must be rennoved from 
the PLL box, (Caution — 
CMOS inside!) The older 
unit is aligned as follows 
{see Fig. 2): 

144^146 MHz 

1. Using either a signal 
generator or second 2* 
meter rig, set the signal 
source to 145,100,000 Hz as 
verified by a frequency 
counter, 

2. Set the IC'211 to 
145 100.0. USB, receive, 
and adjust the coil at "A" 
for zero beat. 

3. Set signal source to 
145,099,900 Hz. 

4 Set IC-211 to 145 099 9, 
USB, receive, and adjust 
pot at "B" for zero beat 

5 Set 1C211 to 145.100.0, 
FM, transmit and adjust 
R18 for exact frequency on 
the frequency counter. 
{Note: R16 and R18 are 
reversed in the Icom 
manual picturej 

6. Set signal source to 



145,100,000 Hz. 
7. Set IC-211 to 145.100.0, 
LSB, receive, and adjust 
R16 for zero beat (Note; 
R16 and R18 are reversed in 
the Icom manual picture^ 

146-148 MHz 

1, Set IC-211 to 146,025.0, 
FM, transmit and adjust ca- 
pacitor at point 'C" for ex- 
act frequency on the fre- 
quency counter. 

2, Set lC-2n to 146.020.0, 
FM, transmit and adjust ca- 
pacitor at point "D" for ex- 
act frequency on the fre^ 
quency counter. 

3, Repeat steps 1 and 2 as 
necessary to obtain correct 
readings, since these steps 
interact. The newer unit is 
aligned as follows (see Fig. 
3): The rig should be turned 
on for about 30 minutes to 
an hour before starting; ail 
steps must be done in the or- 
der indicated. 

144-146 MHz 

1. Using either a signal gen- 
erator or second 2-meter 
rig, set the signal to 
145,100,000 Hz as verified 
by a frequency counter. 

2. Set the IC-211 to 
145.100-0, USB, receive, 
and adjust L3 for zero beat. 

3. Set signal source to 
145,099.900 Hz. 

4. Set IC-211 to 145.099.9, 
USB, receive, and adjust 
the green pot/trimmer for 
zero beat. 

5. Set IC-211 to 145.100.0. 
FM, transmit, and adjust 
R18 for exact frequency on 
the frequency counter. 



[Note: R16 and R18 are 
reversed in the icom man- 
ual picture.) 

6. Set signal source to 
145,100,000 Hz. 
7: Set IG211 to 145.1 00 A 
LSB, receive, and adjust 
R16 for zero beat, (Note: 
R16 and R18 are reversed in 
the Icom manual picture,) 

146-148 MHz 

1. Set IC-211 to 146.025.0, 
FM, transmit, and adjust 
rear trimmer for exact fre- 
quency on the frequency 
counter. 

2. Set IC-211 to 146.020.0, 
FM, transmit, and adjust 
front trimmer for exact fre- 
quency on the frequency 
counter. 

3. Repeat steps 1 and 2 as 
necessary to obtain correct 
readings, since these steps 
interact. 



MISCELLANEOUS 

INTERNAL ADJUSTMENTS 

RE Power Output 

The transmit stages and 
adjustments are as follows: 
Q2a — 2 mW (ale controlled 
stage) 

Q30 — 100 mW; adjust 
C1 19, CI 23 

Q31-r6 W; adjust C132, 
CI 34 

Q32-10 W; adjust C142, 
CI 44 

EM 

On the front panel, you 
have the rf power adjust 

which only functions in the 
FM mode. In addition to 
this control, there are two 
pots inside the top cover 
directly behind the front- 
panel power control. The 
pot on the left sets the 
lower power limit (typically 
0.5 W) and is adjusted with 
the front'panel rf control 
set fully cotrnferc lock wise. 
The pot on the right sets the 
upper power level (typ- 
ically 10 W) and is adjusted 
with thefront'panel control 
set fully clockwise. 

SSB/CW 

Power output can be set 
for SSB/CW operation by 
adjusting R129, the ate con- 



trol pot. R129 is adjusted 
for maximum power out- 
put then backed off until 
the power just begins to 
decrease. 

If your 1C'211 has much 
more than 10 Watts of out- 
put, you should check the 
idling current on the driver 
and final (Q31 and Q32) to 
make sure they are set cor- 
rectly. The proper current 
for Q31 should be 30 mA 
and is obtained by ad- 
justing R127. The current 
for Q32 should be between 
60 and 70 mA and is ad- 
justed by pot R130, The ad- 
justment procedure is as 
follows: 

1 . Remove the top cover 

2. Locate the plastic 4-pin 
plug near the back, left- 
hand side of the set. 

3. Remove the male plug. 

4. Insert an ammeter in 
series with pins 2 and 3. 

5. Clip-lead pin 1 to pin 4. 

6. Turn rig on and place in 
USB mode, microphone 
gain off. 

7. Key microphone and ad- 
just R1 27 for 30 mA, 

8. Turn rig off. 

9. Insert an ammeter in 
series with pins 1 and 4 

10. Clip-lead pin 2 to pin 3. 

11. Turn rig on and place in 
USB mode, microphone 
gain off. 

12. Key microphone and ad- 
just R130 for between 60 
and 70 mA. 

13. Turn rig off, remove 
meter and clip leads, and 
replace jumper plug. 

SS6 Audio Gain 

In the SSB mode, using 
either an audio tone or 
voice Input (a long "five"), 
adjust R273 for maximum 
power output on a watt- 
meter. 

Carrier Balance Adjust 

Using a second receiver 
tuned to the operating fre- 
quency of the tC-211, put 
the IC-211 in the USB mode, 
microphone gain off, and 
key the transmitter. Adjust 
R270 for the least amount 
of signal/carrier received by 
the second monitor. (Note: 
A police/fire scanner that 



70 73Magaiine • June, 1980 



covers the 2-meter band 
works nicely as the second 
set) 

Swr Control Set 

1. Connect rig to a non- 
reactive 50-Ohm dummy 
load, 

2. With the transmitter 
keyed, put the slide switch 
(located beneath the top 
access panel) to the Set 
position (right). Using the 
Swr Set pot, adjust for full- 
scale reading on the meter. 

3. With the transmitter still 
keyed, put the slide switch 
to the Swr position (left) and 
adjust R1 35 for a null on the 
meter. R135 is located near 
the antenna jack on the top 
side of the set 

4 Remove the dummy load 
(set wilt not be connected 
to any antenna), put the 
slide switch back to the Swr 
Set position (right), key the 
transmitter, and adjust 
Rl 36 to read + 20 dB on the 
meter. R136 is located next 
to Rl 35, 



5. Reconnect the dummy 
load and key the transmit- 
ter. The meter should still 
read full scale. 

Bfo Adjustments 

1 For tJSB/CW operation, 
the 10,6985-MHz crystal is 
adjusted by C255. Measure 
with a frequency counter 
connected to CP9 (free end 
of R218. 470 Ohms). 
2. For LSB operation, the 
107015-MHz crystal is ad- 
justed by C259. Measure 
with a frequency counter at 
CP9. 

FM Transmit Modulator 

The 10.7-MHz crystal is 
adjusted by LI 2 and mea- 
sured with a frequency 
counter connected to CP2 
(free end of R317, 470 
Ohms). 

In conclusion, I hope that 
the information and various 
modifications provided 
here may be of interest and 
help to all IC-211 owners in 
enjoying this truly unique 
setB 




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1979 



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^ Beetfer Service— see page 210 



73 Magazme • June, 1980 71 



m 




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Far Yaur New Repeater System, ^t 
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If you do, youll find that there fsn*t a repeater on 

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72 73 Magazme • June, I960 




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t^R^Bder Service^ see page 2W 



73 Magazine • June, 1980 73 



WHfmm W. Muessig K4FD 
7203 Stafe€fesf Drive 
Annandale VA 22i)03 



Take a Hike 

backpacking with an HW-8 



It isn't often that you can 
enjoY three hobbies at 
the same time, but the 
junior op, Scott WD4LYN, 
and I did just that for a cou- 
ple of days two summers 
ago. Scott assembled an 
HW-8 QRP rig a few months 
before he received his 
Novice ticket and I quickly 
saw the possibilities of us- 
ing it on camping trips. We 



each took along a camera, 
completing the hobby pic- 
ture. 

This summer, rather than 
just piling all (XYL, camp- 
stove, cots, pots, pans, cats, 
and rig) into the car and 
heading for "civilized 
camping" complete with 
showers, we decided to 
trek, or backpack as ifs 
sometimes called, into a 



wilderness area nearby. We 
collected all the special 
gear needed: mountain 
tent, packs and frames, hik- 
ing boots, portable stove 
and cookgear, sleeping 
bags, light and heavyweight 
socks, and the not-to-be- 
forgotten first aid kit with 
"moleskin" for those in- 
evitable blisters. Orvthe-air 
testing of the QRP station, 




Photo A. The QRP station assembled and ready for packing. Note the antenna and 
counterpoise (plastic-covered hookup wire] wound on empty vitamin bottles, just behind 
the key and antenna tuner. 



using all accessories and 
the antenna we'd be taking, 
was the next step in getting 
ready. 

The HW-B had been on 
the air from the home QTH 
a few times and was used 
another time on an auto- 
mobile camping trip, so we 
knew itwould work well the 
way it was — no mods re- 
quired yet. The greatest 
concern was the antenna. 
We wanted something both 
light and practical, t 
wanted the simplest type so 
that we could work several 
bands without too much 
fuss. The solution was an 
endfed 65-foot wire with a 
counterpoise about the 
same length to substitute 
for a ground. To facilitate 
loading, 1 built a compact 
wire tuner and chose a 
lightweight plastic-cased 
Radio Shack CB swr bridge 
to see what was happening. 

The portable power 
source was almost a greater 
challenge until I recalled 
that the junk box contained 
two 6-volt motorcycle wet 
cells that I had on hand for 
a doorbell and burglar 
alarm project. They were 
spillproof and rated at 3 
Ah. Taped together and 
wrapped in plastic to con- 
tain any accidental leak- 
age, they made a neat 
5-pound package. Other 



74 73 Magazine • June, 1980 



type^ of rechargeable cells 
could have been used 
[nicads and gel-cells), but 
the added cost and weight 
to achieve the same capaci- 
ty were not considered 
worthwhile. Our HW-8 
drew less than 500 milliam- 
peres key down, so there 
would be plenty of juice for 
all the operating we'd get in 
on a 3-day trek. 

A final weighingnn of the 
gear rang up another 5 
pounds for the transceiver, 
plus 2 pounds for the tuner, 
swf bridge, straight key. 
featherweight earphones, 
cables, and the antenna and 
counterpoise wire, for a 
total of 12 pounds. To save 
weight, I mounted RCA- 
type phono jacks on the swr 
bridge and tuner and used 
phono plugs on RC*174/U 
miniature coax for rf inter- 
connections. 

Our first trek was 

planned for mid-July, but 
Murphy's law governed and 
Scott ended up with a 
broken wrist from a skate- 
board fall, which meant a 
full-length cast on the right 
arm — and a postponement. 
After 3 weeks the cast was 
shortened, and with his fall 
school-opening only a week 
away, Scott announced 
that he was ready to go. We 
made a quick trip to the 
local outdoor outfitters for 
freeze-dried food and 
maps, jammed everything 
into our packs, and in- 
formed the XYL that we 
were off. We weighed our 
packs before loading up the 
car and found we'd each 
be carrying 10 to 12 pounds 
more than recommended 
by the guide books: Scott 
would be carrying 32 
pounds, and I'd have 47 to 
tote. We couldn't throw out 
any of the food, and the 
QRP station required every- 
thing we had assembled. 
We finally decided we 
could sacrifice a couple of 
changes of underwear, but 
this drastic action resulted 
in a decrease in the weight 
of our packs of only a few 
ounces* 




Photo B. A dose-up of the QRP station as set up the fir%t morning. 



The area where we 
planned to backpack was in 
the upper part of the 
George Washington Na- 
tional Forest near Front 
Royal, Virginia, only 70 
miles from home. We ar- 
rived at a US Forest Service 
recreation area early in the 
afternoon of August 2Bth, 
parked our car in the day 
picnic area, pulled on socks 
and boots, adjusted our 
packs, and were on our way 
by 3 o'clock. Our plan was 
to hike about six miles that 
afternoon, to reach by 
nightfall the Little Crease 
trail shelter, built and main- 
tained by the Forest Ser- 
vice. The rugged terrain, 
uphill much of the way, 
plus 80 degree weather with 
high humidity, delayed us 
considerably so that stun^^ 
bling along with flashlights 
at 9:00 pm, canteens dry, 
we finally decided to put up 
our tent by the side of the 
trail, close to a stream. Ex- 
hausted, we both decided 
to forego a hot meal and 
any attempt at operation 
that night So it was water 
from the stream, trail 
snacks for the meal, and to 
bed — to listen to creeping 
and chirping things play 



leapfrog on the tent the rest 
of the night! 

t managed to get up early 
the next morning, assemble 
the stove, and fix a 
passable meal of freeze- 
dried scrambled egg with 
imitation ham, powdered- 
juice drinks, and hot 
chocolate. Next the rig 
came out of the plastic 
wrappings, and I strung out 
the antenna. It loaded up 
easily and I was ready for a 
9:00 am sked with Jim 
WD4LWE on 40 meters, I 
listened for him and called 
a few times with no re- 
sponse, so in 10 minutes we 
decided to try a few CQs. 
The signals were pouring in 
on 80, 40, and 20 and there 
was absolutely no QRN, but 
no one came back A bit 
disappointed, we packed 
up and headed for the desti- 
nation of the previous day, 
the trail shelter. It turned 
out that the shelter was on- 
ly another 45 minutes down 
the trail we'd been on the 
night before! 

The shelter was in great 
shape, had four plywood 
bunks, and offered good 
protection from the ele- 
ments. It featured a clean 



stream nearby and a nice 
cam pf ire area. This looked 
like just the place to spend 
the rest of the day and night 
and try some more ham- 
ming. We had reached the 
shelter at lunchtime, but 
were still somewhat tired 
from our previous day's 
trek and decided to make 
use of those bunks for 
awhile. 

Late afternoon, I fixed a 
dinner of freeze-dried stew; 
after cleanup, it was time to 
puti the rig out again and 
warm up the fist. The anten- 
na was supported at the far 
end by a sapling only 10 
feet above the ground and 
the counterpoise was 
placed on the ground 
directly beneath it. The 
map showed that we were 
in a depression between 
two ridges which were 2,200 
feet high. Our altitude was 
1,600 feet above sea level. 
Everything was ''go" and 
the bands sounded just as 
noise-free and hot as they 
had that morning. 

This time, instead of 
wasting time calling CQ, I 
decided to try something 
different: answer only the 
strongest CQs. The strong- 



73 Magazine • June, 1960 7S 



^:^^iSM£££:^M^^FWF 







Photo C The setup at Utile Crease Shelter, George Washington National forest, Virginia. 



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ence came right back and 
gave us a 559. When t told 
him about our operation, he 
expressed surprise in being 
able to copy our flea-power 
at that distance. After I 
signed with him, Scott 
decided to try out the rig in 
the Novice bands for 
awhile, but soon found that 
operating a straight key 
with the wrong wrist didn't 
work well at all Operation 
was now by flashlight and a 
candle 'lantern'' left by a 
previous hiker. Scott got no 
replies, so we decided it 
was time to QRT. 

The next morning, the 
30th, it was scrambled, 
freeze-dried omelets, hot 
and cold drinks, and time to 
turn on the rig once more, 
Forty meters was again live- 
ly, and at 7:00 am the 
strongest CQ heard was 
Jack W8JZH in Toledo. A 
quick call, and Jack re- 
sponded with 559, solid 
copy. There was no QRM, 
so I was able to get across 
details of the rig, where we 
were, and that we were 
planning to pack up the rig 
shortly after our QSO and 
retrace our steps to the car. 
We had a 20^minute QSO — 



a record for my QRP work 
on 40! 

It took us only about half 
the time to walk out as it 
took us to walk in, even 
with generous rest stops for 
picture-taking and eating 
wild blueberries which the 
bear and deer had over- 
looked. Our packs were on- 
ly slightfy lighter since one 
can only eat so much food 
(we still had enough for two 
more days) and there is lit- 
tle one leaves in the 
wilderness unless it can be 
turned into ashes in a camp- 
fire, 

A few d^ys after return- 
ing home, 1 dropped 
W8]ZH a note to describe 
the QRP operation in great- 
er detail- Jack very kindly 
replied and emphasized 
what is perhaps the real key 
to working QRP, an effec- 
tive antenna. The antenna 
we used was a compromise, 
of course, but it was 
tunable to several bands 
easily and worked as well as 
expected. Perhaps we could 
have gotten but better if the 
antenna had been higher, 
but that would have meant 
carrying more equipment — 
at least a slingshot and a 
ball of string. 

One lesson learned was 
that calling CQ with low 
power produces little in the 
way of QSOs. Always pick 
the strongest CQs to an- 
swer, but answer only if it 
appears the frequency is 
reasonably clear of QRM. If 
you get a response and it 
remains clear, youVe got a 
good chance of completing 
the QSO for your QRP log- 
book. 

Next time out we plan to 
take less in the way of 
clothes and food. Plans are 
underway already for these 
modifications to the rig: 
more audio to drive a built- 
in speaker, an internal swr 
bridge, and a 25-kH2 crystal 
calibrator. Now, does 
anyone have any ideas for 
an inexpensive, lightweight, 
biodegradable battery that 
can be activated by dipping 
it in a cool mountain 
stream? ■ 



76 73 Magazine • June, 1980 



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SUB-DEALER INQUIRIES INVITED! (Send letterhead for complete package) 



y^ Reader Sen/ice— S€& page 210 



73 Magazine • June, 1980 77 



Tuning Antenna-Mounted 

Preamps 

--do it without additional wiring 



73 Magazine Siaff 



It is often desirable to 
place a receiving pre- 
amplifier as close as pos- 



ANT 



PRE AMP 



9V 



4h 



vf^- 



D05 



-oRX 



9-ISV 
rUNsMG VOLT 



1 



■'WW*- 






RFC 
IZ-144 



v^FTiABLE gt-tav 



fig. 1. The basic idea of how to both power and tune a 
preamplifier over the same coaxial line that carries the rf 
signai. 



IN 




m oi cATco or nutttcff so 



fig, 2. An example of a 2-fnefer preamplifier to which 
remote fun/ng was applied. 



sible to an antenna. This is 
particutariy true on VHF/ 
UHF frequencies, since 
placing the preamplifier at 
the receiver does not im- 
prove the overall receiving 
system sensitivity as much 
as having the preamplifier 
at the antenna. The reason 
for this is that the attenua- 
tion of the transmission line 
used adds directly to the 
overall noise figure of the 
receiving system, and, at 
VHF/UHF, most commonly- 
used coaxial transmission 
lines do have significant at- 
tenuation. 

The disadvantage of hav- 
ing the preamphfier at the 
antenna is that it has to be 
of the broadband type. One 
cannot have the advantage 
of being able to have the 
"front-end" selectivity 
passible with a tunable 
preamplifier. Of course, 
there are ways around this, 
but most amateurs do not 
want to run extra control 
lines up to a preamplifier. 
Usually, in fact, it is desired 



to keep the installation as 
simple as possible by run- 
ning the dc voltage for the 
preamplifier over the trans- 
mission line using rf chokes 
and dc blocking capacitors. 

Quite by accident, a way 
was found to have the best 
of both worlds. That is, one 
can still run the dc voltage 
needed for a preamplifier 
over the transmission line. 
and, at the same time and 
over the same transmission 
line, have a means to re- 
motely tune the preampli- 
fier- An application tor this 
idea for a particular 2-meter 
preamplifier is described ir\ 
this article, but it can be 
modified to be usable with 
almost any remotely-lo- 
cated preamplifier. 

The accidental discov* 
ery of how to remotely 
tune the preamplifier came 
about when a 2-meter pre- 
amplifier was installed at 
the antenna with the dc 
power supplied over the 
transmission line A vari- 



78 73 Magazine • June, 1980 



able-vottage bench-type 
power supply was be- 
ing used inside to tem- 
porarily test the preampln 
fier, it was noticed that 
when the power supply 
voltage was varied, the 
preamplifier could actual- 
ly be tuned or peaked as i^^ 
dicated by the S-meter on 
the receiver. There were 
some protective diodes in 
the preamplifier and, as it 
turned out, these diodes 
were acting as varactor 
diodes when the dc supply 
voltage was varied and 
were actually tuning the 
circuits they were placed 
across. 

A simple extension of 
what was observed led to 
the idea illustrated in Fig. 

1. In this case, the dc sup 
ply voltage is fed over the 
transmission line in the 
usual fashion, using rf 
chokes and dc blocking ca- 
pacitors. The operating 
voltage for the preampli- 
fier stages is zener- 
regulated so that the stages 
have a constant operating 
point. However, by using a 
variable supply voltage, 
and having the variable 
voltage control varactor 
diodes, one can remotely 
tune the preamplifier while 
remotely powering it at the 
same time. 

A specific application 
for the idea is shown in Fig 

2. This is a dual-FET ampli- 
fier designed for the 2 
meter band using two of 
the newer Sliconix "super" 
FETs. The preamplifier will 
provide a gain of about 20 
dB and 1.5- to 2.0-dB noise 
figure. The FETs are availa- 
ble directly from Circuit 
Special is ts, P.O. Box 3047, 
Scottsdale AZ 85257, at on- 
ly 75 cents each plus 40 
cents for shipping. 

Although the purpose of 
this article was not to 
describe a preamplifier as 
such, those who do dupli- 
cate the preamplifier will 
find that it performs ex- 
tremely well As in any 
such VHP preamplifier, 
lead lengths must be kept 



short. There are so few 
components involved in 
the preamplifier that using 
the "isolated pad" type of 
construction on a single- 
sided PC board is probably 
easier for the individual 
builder than trying to etch 
a PC board. The circuit is 
inherently stable, and one 
has only to sufficiently 
isolate the various coils. 
This can be done by in- 
dividual can-type shields, 
or by simple barriers of PC 
board between the coils 
with the copper side of the 
barriers grounded to the 
main board containing the 
circuit 

The coils are first 
peaked in the middle of the 
desired operating range 
with a supply voltage of 
about 12 volts. Then as one 
changes frequency and 
varies the supply voltage, it 
should be readily noted 
how the preamplifier can 
be peaked using the vari- 
able supply voltage. One 
will probably have to do a 
bit of adjustment of the 
slugs in LI and L2 to get 
reasonable tracking be- 
tween the two tuned cir- 
cuits over the band. It 
should be possible, how- 
ever, to have the preampli- 
fier tune over the entire 
band. 

All of this work can be 
done on the bench before 
the preamplifier is remote* 
ly installed. Assuming that 
bench adjustment is done 
using the same enclosure, 
connectors, etc., as will be 
used in the final installa- 
tion, the preamplifier 
should work without dif- 
ficulty when remotely in- 
stalled. 

The remote tuning idea 
described can be applied 
to a host of preamplifiers. 



INTERNATIONAL 
ELECTRONICS TOURS 

THREE ELECTRONICS TOURS ABROAD 

Electronics Representative Association, Northern California 
Chapter, and Commerce Tours International wiil co-sponsor 
three electronics tours \n 1980 as follows: 

COMPUTER TOUR: 

Will visit Tokyo Information Processing Exhibition and 
6th World Computer Congress in Tokyo from October 
4th to October 10th, 1980, 

FAR EAST ELECTRONICS TOUR: 

Will visit four foreign electronics shows in Japan, 
Korea, Taiwan, and Hong Kong from October 8th to Oc- 
tober 22nd. 1980. 

EUROPE ELECTRONICS TOUR= 

Will visit London, Paris, and Munich Electronica '80 
from October 29th to November 9th, 1980, 

As described by Wayne Green in Januafy, 
Feb. 1980 73 Magazine 

Business appointments will be arranged in advance and at 
the shows. For further information, please contact: 

Janet Smith 

Commerce Tours tnternationaJ, Inc. »^332 

870 Market Street, Suite 744 

San Francisco, CA 94102 

Tei: (415) 433-3072. (415) 433-3408 



The only thing required is 
to modify the tuned cir- 
cuit(s) with suitable varac- 
tor tuning diodes. Table 1 
gives some of the capaci- 
tance variations possible 
between 9 and 20 volts for 
the readily-available and 
inexpensive Motorola MV 
series of voitage-variable 
capacitance diodes. Usual- 
ly, bv some form of par^ 
allel or series combination 
of the varactor diode with 
a fixed value capacitor, 
any tuned circuit can be 
modified for remote tun- 
ing. 

The basic scheme worked 
so well in the case of the 
preamplifier application 
that the idea came up to 



have the remote tuning of 
the preamplifier coupled 
to the main tuning on a 
receiver. That undoubtedly 
can be done using suffi- 
cient circuit sophistica- 
tion, but one should be 
aware of the fact that the 
varactor diode capac- 
itance value is tempera- 
ture-dependent. The varia- 
tion is not significant 
enough to be noticed dur- 
ing the course of a whole 
afternoon of operating, but 
it will be significant 
enough after periods of ex- 
treme temperature change 
to persuade one to leave 
the remote tuning control 
for the preamplifier as a 
separate one.B 



Tuning Diode Type 


Capacitance (pF at 9 V) 


Capacitance (pi 


F at 20 V) 


MV2101 


5 


3.9 




MV 2105 


10 


6 




MV2109 


25 


15 




MV2112 


40 


25 




MV2115 


70 


50 





Fig. 3. The inexpensive MotorotB MV series of tuning diodes will satisfy most needs for 
remotely tuning a VHF or even an HF preamplifier. 



t^fieader S&rvfe^—see page 2W 



73 Magazine • June, 1980 79 



Ed Eggm W3HIK 
12 Out House Lane 
Wescosville PA I8iO& 



PC Artwork Made Easy 

— lift layouts from the page with 
transparent contact paper 



A commercial product 
was introduced recent- 
ly to lift PC artwork from 
magazine articles. The 
material was quite expen- 
sive for my 14-year old son, 
Chris, a prolific builder. 



who hit upon an inexpen- 
sive alternative. 

Essentially all you need is 
some clear contact-type 
paper from your local 
K-Mart store [Kwik Kover), 
or any pressure-sensitive 



Coininaiid Your 
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transparent plastic. Cur- 
rently, we pay about $.59 
for a square yard. 

Make a Xerox® copy of 
the magazine pattern you 
wish to produce. The rea- 
son for this will be clear as 
you read on. Now carefully 
peel off the contact paper 
backing and apply the plas- 
tic to your Xerox copy of 
the artwork, forcing out all 
the air bubbles with a blunt 
instrument. The next step is 
to soak it in a dish of warm 
soapy water for about twen- 
ty minutes. After soaking, 
rub the Xerox paper with 
your finger until it is com- 
pletely dissolved. At this 
point you will have the 
plastic with an image lifted 
off the artwork. 

Now prepare your circuit 
board by washing it with 
scouring powder to remove 
contaminates, and allow to 
dry overnight. The board, as 
prepared now, is ready for 
sensitizing in a safelight 
area. We use a yellow bug 
light in a dark room for this 
operation. Since most mag- 
azine articles show positive 
artwork, we use a positive 
photoresist and carefully 
spray it on the copper side. 
This is then allowed to air- 
dry overnight in a dark 
room. 

Now place your contact 



paper mask over the copper 
Side of the board and use 
your exposure frame (we 
use two pieces of plate 
glass held together with 
clothespins). This should be 
done under safelight condi- 
tions only. 

Exposure can be done 
with sunlight, photoflood 
lamp, or even a fluorescent 
lamp. About four minutes 
in sunlight works for us; you 
may have to experiment at 
this point. 

After exposure, remove 
the mask and place the cir- 
cuit board in a developer 
solution per the instruc* 
tions on the solution bottle 
and slowly agitate. When 
all of the resist is gone, 
wash the board in fresh 
water to stop the resist ac- 
tion. Now clean the board 
with an SOS pad and soapy 
water. 

LIse the previously-made 
mask as a drill guide when 
drilling out your board. 

As you can see, this is a 
very Inexpensive way to 
reproduce professional cir- 
cuit boards. The contact 
paper also can be used to 
make decals for panels or 
meter scales, even in color. 
Naturally, the edges should 
be sealed with a little clear 
urethane to keep them 
from liftingH 



80 73 Magazine • June, 1980 




MFJ INTRODUCES THE 

GRANDMASTER 

MEMORY KEYERS 

At $139.95 this MFJ-484 GRANDMASTER 

memory keyer gives you more features per dollar than any other 

memory keyer available — and Here's Why . . . 



WEJ6HT CONTROL TO PENETRATE 
ORM. POLL TO C0M8tNE MEMORIES 
A AND B FOR 1 , 2. OR 3 FIFTY 
CHARACTER MESSAGES. 



MESSAGE BUnONS SELECT DESiBED 25 CHARACTER MESSAGES. 



SPEED CONTROL, 8 j;g 

50 WPM. PULL TO 
RECORD. 



lEDs (4) SHOW WHICH 
MEMORY fS IN USE AND 
WHEN IT ENDS. 




RESETS MEWOflY IN 

USE TO BEGINNING. 



TOME CONTROL 
PULL TO TUNE, 



VOLUME CON 

TROL. POWER 
ON OFF. 



DELAY REPEAT CONTROL 

(0 TO 2 MINLfTES). PULL 
FOR AUTO REPEAT. 



LED IHOICATES 
DELAY REPEAT 

MODE. 



MEMORY SELECT: POSt 
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SPLIT INTO MEMORY SEC- 
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TWELVE 25 CHARACTER 
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BINES A AND B. POSITION 
K GIVES YOU 100, 75, SO, 
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A iwHch comlifiies 25 character messages 
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To recoil, pull out the speed cofitrol, touch 
i message button and send To playback, 
push in the speed controJ, select your mes- 
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is to lU 

You can repeat any message continuously 
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to 2 minutes). Eiampte: CaN CO. PaiiSG. Lis^ 
t^. if m answef, it repeats CO apin. To 
answer simpry start senctifig. LED iiKlicates 
Delay Repeat Mode. 



Instanffy insert or make ehar^ges in any 
playing message by simply sending Continue 
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Memory T«sets to beginning with button, or 
by tapping paddle when playing. Touching 
message button restaris message. 

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Buin-in memory saver. Uses 9 vo!t iHttary, 
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Weight control lets you ad jus! dot dash- 
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Tftiie control. Room filling volume Speaker. 

Time function keys transmitter for tuning. 

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THIS MFi-482 FEATURES FOUR 25 OR A 50 AND TWO 25 CHARACTER 






Speed, volume, weight, 
tone controls 
Cnmbine memory switch 
Repeat, tune functions 
Built-in memory saver 



MESSAfilS. 




THIS MFi^4ai EiVES YDlf TWO 50 CHARACTER MESSAGES, 

* Speed, volume, tone 
controls 

> Repeat function 

> Tune functiorr 

> Built-in memory saver 



*79 



95 




Similar to MFJ-484 but with 10P4 bits of memory, less deiay repeat, 
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rear panel 6x2x6 inches- 110 VAC or 12 to 15 VDC. 



Similar to MFJ 482 bjt with two 50 character messages, less weight 
controls. Internal tone control. Volume control is adjustabla from rear 
panel- 5x2x6 inches, 110 VAC or 12 to 15 VDC. 




Order any product from MFJ and try it. H not delighted, returD within 30 days for a prompt refund (less shipping). 
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^B^M^BfSefVfQB—see page 210 



73 Magazine • June, 1980 ai 



Electronic Dice— a Family Pleaser 



Las Vegas, look out! 



Hov^ard F. Baiie W7BBX 
I2W2 Cheviot Drive 
Herndon VA 22070 



Looking for an inexpen- 
sive, easy construction 
project which can be used 
by the whole familv? Try 
"electronic dice" for a fun 
project with no hassle, no 
hard-to-get parts, and quick 
assembly in an evening or 
two. With its small size and 
complete portability, this 



goof*proof project was an 
instant hit and has been in 
nearly continuous use since 
it was eagerly snatched off 
the bench by my avid 
14*year-oId ''war-gamer." 

The schematic diagram. 
Fig. 1, shows the simplicity 
of the completed project. 
Ulb is configured as a sim- 
ple gated oscillator, its fre- 
quency being determined 
by R4 and CI . The output of 
the oscillator is fed di- 
rectly to a programmable 
counter, U2, whose BCD 



output goes to U3, a single- 
chip latch, decoder, and 
7-segment LED driver for a 
common-cathode display. 
U2 and U3 are repeated at 
U4 and U5 for the second 
digit. Additional digits can 
be added as indicated, with 
each digit representing one 
die 

Operation is very simple: 
U1 b oscillates at a very high 
frequency [about 50 kHz) 
for as long as the dice are 
being ''rolled'' by depress- 
ing SI. U2 is programmed 




Kfl-CAD 



fig. t. Schematic diagram. 



by DP1-DP4 (pins 2, 5, 11, 
and 14) to count downward 
from 6 to 1 with each input 
clock-pulse. When U2 
reaches digit 1, the next 
clock pulse resets the 
counter to 6 instead of con- 
tinuing to 0, and the count 
continues to recirculate 
downward through only the 
digits 6 to 1 , At some ran- 
dom time when you release 
51, the clock stops and the 
count is displayed. Ran- 
domness is ensured by 
keeping the clock fre- 
quency very high in com- 
parison with the number of 
times per second you could 
manually depress and re* 
lease SI . 

After SI is released, the 
display will stay lighted for 
about four seconds and 
then go out to conserve bat- 
tery power. This time delay 
is generated by the time the 
charge on C2 takes to decay 
through R3 to the lower trip 
voltage of Schmitt trigger 
Ulc. Depressing S2 recalls 
the last digit rolled by re- 
storing the charge on C2. 
and the display will remain 
lighted for another four 
seconds after 52 is released. 

When adding more dis* 
play digits to the two shown 
in Fig. 1, any of the four 
BCD output lines of the pro- 



82 73 Magazine • June. 1980 




ON-OFF 



6.3 VAC 
3D0mA 



3 1/2 mm 



50PJV 
1^ 



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Fig. 2. Nine-volt battery eliminator (0-100 mA). 



1/4 A 



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250(1 



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300ffiA 




£ 1/2 mm 



50PIV 
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f /g- 3. '^Nine-voW nicad charger. 



grammable counter can be 
used for the clock input of 
the next digit's counter. Al- 
though this divides the in- 
put clock frequency, the 
basic oscillator, Ulb, is op- 
erating at a frequency high 
enough to ensure random- 
ness in many succeeding 
counter stages. However, it 
is important that a counter- 
input clock signal be de- 
rived from one of the out- 
puts of the preceding 
counter stage (pins 1. 7, 9, 
or 15), not its input (pin 6), 
since otherwise the count- 
ers would be clocking at the 
same frequency and there 
would be no randomness 
whatsoever in the displayed 
digits. 

Note the absence of an 
on-off switch. Since afl ICs 
are CMOS, idle current 
drain is negligible (about 
0.005 microamps!) unless 
the displays are lighted. The 
drain is then just under 100 
mA, maxirrium, which ob- 
viously is the reason why 
the four-second display 
feature was incorporated. 
Although a 9-V nicad [ac- 
tually 7.2 V) transistor radio 
battery was used to permit 
r^echarging after a par- 
ticularly furious day of war- 
gaming, a standard inex- 
pensive 9-V battery could 
be used equally as well and 
coutd be connected direct- 
ly to point A (if no external 
power source is desired) or 
to the center pin of Jl (if an 
external power source is 
desired). 



)1 is a 3y2-mm jack to 
allow the electronic dice to 
be powered from an exter- 
nal battery or power 
supply, The simple power 
supply shown in Fig. 2 was 
constructed in a minibox 
1 Vi '' high by 2" wide and 4'' 
deep. It powers not only the 
electronic dice, but also a 
few thousand other gadgets 
around the house which use 
9-V transistor batteries, 
such as the Little Professor 
Mathbox^'^, Mattel I's elec- 
tronic football game, calcu- 
lators, radios, etc. It's really 
a battery-saver (money- 
saver)! 

J 2 is a 2y2-mm earphone 
jack to allow charging the 
nicad inside the electronic 
dice cabinet. The 9~V nicad 
used is actually rated at 
7.2-7.8 volts and requires 
7-10 mA charging current 
for 16 hours. An inexpen- 
sive nicad charger could 
have been built, as shown 
schematically in Fig. 3, but 
the simplest, easiest, and 
cheapest way to recharge 
the nicad is to connect it to 
a current-regulated power 
supply as shown in Fig, 4 
and adjust the current and 
voltage controls for the 
minimum required to 
supply 10 mA to the nicad. 
The earphone jack for the 
charger (J2) was purposely 
made smaller than the 
external Vcc jack, Jl, on all 
our ''toys" to make external 
hookups as ''kid-proof" as 
possible. 

The entire circuit shown 



in Fig, 1 was constructed on 
a scrap of perf board about 
iy2" X 2" using I C sockets 
and point-to-point wiring. 
The perfboard is mounted 
on two 3/4" #2 bolts, with 
three nuts under the perf- 
board to provide some 
spacing between it and the 
chassis. Component leads 
themselves can provide 
good attachment points for 
the ribbon cable to the dis- 
plays and for the wires to 
the jacks on the rear panel, 
SI and S2 (see Fig, 5). An 
inexpensive clip-holder for 
the battery is bolted to the 
chassis bottom with #2 
hardware. The cabinet used 
giv^s a nice finished 
appearance, as do the use 
of a panel-mounted display 
assembly and bezel, al- 
though these certainly are 
not necessary. 

After being in near-con- 
stant use for the last few 
months on both the exter- 
nal power supply and the 
internal nicad, Fm glad I in- 



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Fig, 4, Alternative 9-V nicad 
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TO 

CIRCUIT 



Fig. 5, 

eluded the option. The elec- 
tronic dice themselves have 
instant kid appeal, and the 
nicad permits complete 
portability. The only gripe 
IVe had with this project is 
that initially 1 made up only 
one unit! Try it; you'll like 
it, tool ■ 



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DEALER INQUIRY INVITED. 





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1275 N. GROVE ST. 

ANAHEIM, CALIF. 92806 (714) 6304541 



^ Reader Service— se& page 210 



73 Magazine • June, 1980 83 



Howard F. Buiie W7BBX 
12002 Cheviot Drive 
Hertjiion VA 22070 



«f4L0 



^ •— ® 



^4 *>JJ' .- 



S5 



■-0 



^^11<J) j-^J>^r 




Fun with Foozle 



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F/g. 1. Schematic diagram. 



Here's a fun little con- 
struction project that 
will challenge your logic 
abilities for many hours at 
a time. It's inexpensive to 
build, easy to operate, and 
totally engrossing. I call it 
"Foozle ' 

The game is built around 
a 7-segment LED readout 
and seven push-buttons. 
The object of the game is 
to start with all segments 
off, and then, by pressing 
one push-button at a time, 
to turn all the segments on, 
find a different sequence 
which will turn all seg- 
ments off, and then find a 
third sequence which will 
turn them all on again. 
There are two catches, 
however. The first is that 
each push-button controls 
more than one segment at 
a time; whether the seg- 
ments turn on or off de- 
pends on whether they 
were on or off before the 
button was pushed. The 
second catch is that the 
first and third sequences 
which turn on all the 
segments cannot be the 
same (the logic won't per- 
mit it)! 

Your assignment, should 
you choose to accept it, is 
first to figure out the logic 
of which segments are con- 
trolled by each push-but- 
ton and then to figure out 
the minimum number of 
push-button depressions in 
each of the three se* 
quences which will take 
you from all segments off 
to all on, back to all off, 
and finally back to all seg- 
ments on The START push- 
button initializes the 
display by turning all seg- 
ments off and resetting all 
the logic gates. 

Although the logic prin- 
ciples of Foozle can be 
figured out easily from Fig. 
1 [if you want to cheat be- 
fore the unit is built), the 



64 73 Magazine • June, 19B0 



02~P5 

IN4Ci0l [4) 




TO JJ 



Fig. 2. Power supply. 



minimum number of steps 
in each sequence is not so 
obvious, and Tm not going 
to give you any help there. 
What good is a game if 
there is no challenge to it? 
The logic is, of course, 
hard-wired and does not 
have any variation from 
game to game unless you 
want to interchange two or 
more push-button leads or 
7-segment display leads 
later on. However, should 
you happen to stumble 
across a sequence of steps 
which does ''win/' the 
chances are that you won't 
remember them all, since 
there are an infinite 
number of sequences. The 
chances are even greater 
that the sequence you 
stumbled across was not 
the one having the mini- 
mum number of steps! 

What the circuit does is 
change the logic state of 
selected segments when 
certain push-buttons are 
pressed. The seven input 
inverters serve to de- 
bounce the push-buttons; 
the U3, U4, U5a, and U5b 
gates serve as logic en- 
coders that determine 
which segments are con- 
trolled by which push- 
buttoris. With each push- 
button depression, a single 
positive-going pulse is 
generated by U2b and U2d. 
This pulse is fed to all AND 
gates, U6, U7a, U7b, and 
U7c; however, only those 
AND gate^ selected by the 
encoding logic of U3, U4, 
U5a, and U5b are enabled 
to allow the pulse to go to 
flip-flops U8, U9, U10, and 
Ulla, These are J-K flip- 
flops configured for alter- 
nate action: Each pulse on 
the clock input causes that 
flip-flop to change state. 
When the Q output of each 



flip-flop goes to logic 1, its 
corresponding driver tran- 
sistor is saturated, allowing 
current to flow through 
that segment of the read- 
out display. Depressing S8 
resets al[ flip-flops so that 
all Q outputs are logic 
zero; this cuts off all tran- 
sistors and turns all the 
display segments off. 

The unit shown was 
mounted in a standard 
LMB enclosure about 2''X 
3y2"X6''. The common- 
anode 7-segment readout 
was cemented onto a small 
piece of perfboard, which 
then was cemented to the 
cabinet. The eight push- 
buttons then were installed 
and hookup wires connect- 
ed to them and to the dis- 
play leads (see Fig, 3), All 
the basic logic circuitry of 
Foozle was built up on a 
separate perfboard about 
2V2^'><5y^" and mounted 
on four #4 bolts 1 V2'' long. 
The wires from the push- 
buttons and display were 
then connected to the 
logic board. Finally, a 
iVi-mn] earphone jack was 
added for supply of power 
to the entire unit. 

Since the game is com- 
pletely CMOS, current 
drain with all segments off 
is on the order of micro- 
amps. Any power source 
from 6-12 volts capable of 
delivering up to about 80 
mA (at 6 volts) to 130 mA 
(at 12 volts) will be ade- 
quate. The standard Radio 
Shack battery eliminators 
work very well for this 
game. D1 was added just to 
make sure that no damage 
is done if the supply polari- 
ty gets reversed uninten- 
tionally. 

One final circuit note: If 
you wish, the 7 driver tran- 
sistors can be eliminated 



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Fig. 3, 7-segment display 
(common-anode), 

and replaced with the cir- 
cuit shown in Fig. 4. This 
saves seven transistors and 
seven resistors; however, a 
common-cathode display 
must then be used. I built 
the circuit up as shown in 
Fig. 1 since I had the re- 
quired parts on hand. 

Well, if you've read this 
far, the chances are that 
youVe accepted the chal- 
lenge and are willing to 
spend an evening or two 
building it up, One word of 
caution, though: It proba- 
bly will take much longer 
than that to get the 
minimum number of steps 
in each sequence down 



UIO -1.5 *■ 



-v> 



a N^^ (O 350 



H^2 



'Wv 1 E 



141 -^IS 330 
UEO-II. 15-- If J>c* "Jv^ *F 




Fig, 4. Alternate common- 
cathode display drivers. 

pat! (Hint: The minimum 
number of push-button de- 
pressions for each of the 
three sequences is less 
than 12. Would you believe 
less than 1 0? Than 8?) Don't 
get too frustrated: if you 
feel you're about ready to 
self-destruct, take another 
hard look at the schematic 
and think about it for a 
minute! I 



A BETTER BALUN 



from Barker & 



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• Power Rating 2.5 KW-5 KW PEP 

• Frequency Range 3.5-30 MHz 

• SO 239 CONNECTOR 



Types Available 

Model BC-1 

50 ohms unbalanced to 50 ohms 
balanced 

Model BC-2 

50 ohms unbalanced to 200 ohms 
balanced 

Model BC-3 

50 ohms unbalanced to 300 ohms 
balanced 

Model BC-4 

50 ohms unbalanced to 600 ohms 
balanced 

See your dealer or write: 

Barker & WHIiamson, Inc. 
10 Canal Street 
Bristol, Pa. 19007 




B^W 



H* Reader Service — see page 210 



73 Magazine • June, 1980 85 




TRS-80/RTTY 

The Crowning Toi/ch 

ROM- 116 

Amateur RTTT Op«rstlivg Systvcn 

' MODES: RTTY (ASCtt or BAUDOT) • 
CW • 

• REAL-TIME CLOCK: 24 hour clock * 
Automafic updatinfi * Time display iri- 
clvdes day, month and y«ar. 

• SPLIT-SCREEN VIDEO: \1 lines receive 
feat • 3 Una trantmif fext or pre-typi- 
ng o meisage * 1 ljn« display, reo^- 
Hme cloek * Statut displciyed con- 
tinuouffy * Word-wroppinfi . 

• TWO SfRfAL PORTS PROVIDED: Port 
"A" -inteifoces to intsfnal or external 
fermlnal untt ' flS-233, TTL and 60 

mo, * ASCII/BAUDOT * Baud rotes of 
60, 66. 75. 100 wpm, or HO, 300, 
600, 1200, 2400, 4t00 ond 96O0 
baud * Mode/boi/d fate keyboard 
telectable any time * BAUDOT/ ASCII 
Feature wide range of speeds com- 
patible now ond in the future. Port 
^^B** R$-232/20ma ■ Baud rates of 
110, 300, 600, r200, 2400, 4800 and 
9600 * Supporti ony 8-levet seriol 
printer Of modem * Boud rate 
keyboard selectable * Eicpansion in- 
tertoce not required far operation of 
fteriol printer or modem. 



« BUFFERS: 7.5K Main text buffer * 
Pre-typed messages up to 7^5K 
possible, * 2.SK ^^n^ra\ purpose buf- 
fer • Pragrom wfth CO. TKT, CAU 
SIGNS, CONTEST MESSAGES, BRAO 
TAPf S. ETC. ■ loodoble from casseKe • 
Contents may be %^v^4 to cossette * 
1 /4K Call sign buffer " Program witb 
any message (coll iigns, etc.). 

• AUTOMATIC CW/ID: At the 
stoft/ofMi of eocti transmission * Every 
10 minutes * Provision for quick breah 
(no ID). 

• TRANSMITTER CONTROL: Transmitter 
turns on/off automatically via 
software control * Provisions made for 
quick break. 

• OTHER FEATURES; WRU ' RY/FOX 
tests * Repeat last transmission. • 
SEiCAL! Selcal saves oil or selected 
transmissions to cassette tape, serial 
printer or both« 

• SOFTWARE PROVIDED^ 2 RTTY Pro- 
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ASCII /BAUDOT Driver routines (permits 
use of "LUST" and "LPRINF' com- 
monds from bosic} * CW send /receive 
program. 

• HARDWARE REQUIREMENTS: TRS-80 
witti 16K RAM ' External terminol unit 
recommended (Flesher TU-170^ ST-6 

etc) * AFSK/FSK unit. 

• Board size 6x8, cabinet size 7x1 0«3. 



INTRODUCTORY 
PRICE 



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Telex No, 32-1042 



73 Magazine • June, 1980 



This MFJ RF Noise Bridge . . . 

lets you adjust your antenna quickly for maximum 
performance. Measure resonant frequency, radia- 
tion resistance and reactance. Exclusive range 
extender and ex panded capacitance range gives 
you mu ch extend ed measuring range. 

• Exdusive range extender • Ex panded 
/ capacitance range • Series Bridge 





This new MFJ-2Q2 RF Noise Badge lels you 
pic My adjust your £tngf« or muiudand dipole, in 
veded Vee. beam, vertical, motote whip or random 
system foe maximum per^wmance. 

Tels nsnoam ^ucncy aixl whetfier to shcKtsn 
or lengthen your antenna (of minimum SWfl over 
any portron ot a band. 

MF/s fxcluffve ungt exltniler, expanded ca- 
pacitance range ( ± 1 SO pi) gives unparalleled im 
pedance measurements, t to tOO MHz. Simple to 
use. Compre^ensFve computer proven manual. 

Worfcs with any receiver or Iranscaiver. SO 239 
connectors. 2 k 3 x 4 inches, 9 volt battery. 

Other uses: tune transmatch; adiust tuned cir 
cui!s: measure inductance, RF impedance of ampii 
fiers. baluns, Iranstormers; eleclncal length, velo 
city taetor, impedatice o( coaK: synthesize RF im 
pedances with transmatch and dummy load 



DnJer from MFJ and try it — no otitigation. If 
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BOX 494, MISSISSIPPI STATE, MS 3976? 



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power from 1-25 watts right from 
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Our confidence in the FM-88 & 
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Because the FM-88 is available 
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Reader Servtce — see page 210 



73 Magazine • June, 1980 67 



The Demise of 
Component Stores 

parts places are past their prime 



L foord VESFLE 
76S Giiidstone Drive 
Woodstock, Ontario 
Canada N4S 5T I 

Each time t drive past 
Peter's Wholesale Elec- 
tronics, I slow down, almost 
reverently, and permit my- 
self aged but fond mem- 
ories. 

Those were the days — 
decades ago, it seems — 
when we would rummage 
through the barrets of tubes 
and transformers and ca- 
pacitors, searching for the 
bargains, and then labori- 
ously spend hours trans- 
forming them into some 
useful contribution to 
amateur radio. In those 
days, Peter himself would 
wait on us, offering advice 
on parts substitutions, 
searching for some request- 
ed, exotic item, and answef- 
ing our questions about the 
new gear on the shelves. 
We would elbow up to the 
counter amidst the TV re- 



pairmen, and Peter would 
patiently wait as we spent 
our pittance, never once 
complaining about how our 
two-dollar orders might be 
interfering with his regular 
trade. 

Times have changed of 
course, Peter graduated 
himself to an office up- 
stairs, hired a flock of year- 
lings to tend the store, had a 
tendency to ignore his ham 
radio customers, and devot- 
ed his attention to the in- 
dustrial trade. Can't really 
blame him, though — a 
guy's got to make a living — 
but it surely would be nice 
if it were easier to obtain 
parts nowadays. 

And tVe changed. Vm an 
appliance operator now, 
and I know it I have lists of 
cliche-type arguments justi- 
fying my demise: lack of 
time, the difficulty in trying 
to keep up with technology, 
family responsibilities, ca- 
reer pressures . . . Still, I 
have those memories to re- 
call: the late hours spent 
hunched over the work- 



bench, the ecstatic joy of 
discovery when a project 
actually worked. 

My amateur radio inter- 
est has been waning and my 
involvement has become 
stifled and stereotyped: reg- 
ular rag chewing on 75, oc- 
casional DX-chasing on 20, 
semiconscious activity on 
2-meter FM. 

Why not, I asked myself, 
get back to buildmg? Why 
not, 1 said, face the ob- 
stacles, overcome them, 
and return to the joy of 
home-brewing? 

tt didn't take long for a 
project to come to mind. 1 
needed a keyen and just a 
short time ago 73 ran an 
excellent construction ar- 
ticle on one, complete with 
dot memory, automatic 
spacing . , , 

A few days later. I pre- 
sented myself at the store 
armed with a list of the 
parts my junk box lacked, 
bursting with novice-like 
enthusiasm. 

As I approached the 
counter the clerk took a 



look at me and said, ''Be 
with you in a minute/' and 
sidestepped me in favor of 
a TV repairman. Be humble, 
I told myself. 

That clerk never did re- 
turn; finally, one of his col- 
leagues approached me 
with raised and questioning 
eyebrows. 

'Teter around T' I asked, 
knowing what the answer 
would be, yet hoping that 
the fact that I knew the 
boss might influence the 
service and pricing t would 
get. 

'Nah," was the reply. 
"He's playing golf " 

I should have known. 
Ever since Peter got rich, 
that's all he does — play 
golf- (Except in the winter; 
then he takes extended va- 
cations.) 

"Need some parts/' I 
said, extracting the list from 
my pocket. The clerk's eye- 
brows shot up in despair 
Quickly I added, "lust a 
few." 

1 gave him the size for a 
small cabinet to house my 



88 73 Magazine * June, 1960 



keyer. He shook his head. 
"We don't stock cabinets 
anvmore/' he said, 'Too 
many sizes. We just order 
them on request. Takes 
about six weeks to get 'em/' 

I shrugged. "How about a 
miniature lOOO-Ohm pot?" I 
requested. 

He glanced on a shelf be- 
hind him. "Sorry/' he said, 
"We're out. They're back- 
ordered." 

"Really?" 

"Yup. Happens all the 
time/' 

"I need a couple of 
y2-Watt, 22-Ohm resistors/' 
I said. 

He nodded and disap- 
peared, returning with a bin 
and a confused look. 
"These things are all mixed 
up/' he groaned. "Let's 
see/' he mused, "if ! can fig- 
ure this out without looking 
at the chart. Would it be 
red, red . black or 
brown?" "Brown/' I said 
frowning, and then I real- 
ized my mistake. But it was 
too late; he already had 



plucked my choice from 
the bin and 1 couldn't admit 
my error Perhaps I might 
be able to find them in the 
iunk box after all. 

"A 6.3-volt transformer, 
about 200 mA/' was my 
next request 

He returned with what 
would appear as a monster 
in a keyer circuit. "It's the 
closest I have/' he offered. 
"One Amp" 

"Well, maybe I can get 
the . power from the ex- 
citer/' I said. 

"I don't think we stock 
them/' he said. 

"What?" 

"Exciters/' he replied, 
solemnly, 

I wanted to cry. "Never 
mind/' I replied. "I'll skip 
the transformer How about 
a half-dozen zero-one by- 
passes, low voltage?" 

He returned the trans- 
former to stock, lifted a 
blister-pack from a shelf, 
and tossed it to me, 

"I don't need all those/' I 
pleaded. 



"There's only twenty- 
five/' he said- 

"But I need only six " 

"Well, the package will 
cost you two bucks. If I 
break it, I have to charge 
you twenty cents each, so 
that's a bu ck- twenty " 

I sighed and nodded my 
agreement, then gave him 
my list of semis. He dis* 
appeared behind a wall, re- 
appearing with a package 
of universal replacements. 

"Don't you have the orig- 
inals, the jedec numbers?" I 
asked. 

He frowned at me. "Do 
you know how many tran- 
sistors there are? The num- 
bers you want are back-or- 
dered. But these will work 
OK ' Then he added. 'Of 
course you know we don't 
guarantee transistors?" 

I cringed. "Could I order 
the original numbers?" 

It was his turn to cringe. 
"t guess , . ." he replied, not 
very convincingly. "But we 
have a twenty-five dollar 
minimum invoice charge" 



"Twenty-five dollars!" 
He smiled, and grudgingly I 
agreed ''Order them " 

He reached under the 
counter^ but his hand came 
up empty Again he dis- 
appeared, this time return* 
ing with a sheepish grin 
"You won't believe this, but 
we're out of order forms. 
They're back-ordered. Let 
me get a pad of blank paper 
and ril take your order/' 

As I waited, my eyes 
wandered about the store, 
comparing its image with 
the vision of yesteryear. In 
the corner, with the few re- 
maining pieces of ham gear 
Peter stocked, I spotted an 
old Hallicrafters TO keyer. I 
could remember reading 
the ads for them years ago 
and wishing I had one. 

"How much? " I asked the 
clerk when he returned, 
pointing to the keyer 

He thought for a mo- 
ment^ then shrugged. "Fif- 
teen bucks?" 

Without hesitation I re- 
plied, ' Soldf'B 



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.^SS 



w^ Reader Sefl^tce—s^e p&§e 2t0 



73 Magazine • June, 1980 89 



Robert H. Dahtquist WA1AUM 
4 Brookside Terrace 
Atkinson NH 03811 



Priority Frequency Power-Up 

for the FT-227R 

— the right place, first time, every time 



Tired of finding your FT- 
227R on 147.000 MHz 
each time you bump the 
cigarette lighter plug? 
Would you iike the Memo- 
rizer to come on at your 
favorite frequency? Read 
on to discover two methods 
td the same end. 

Caution Your Memorizer 
contains CMOS logic ele- 
ments (ICs) which are sus- 
ceptible to permanent 



-s^* — (^ 



KXMHi J 



damage due to static dis- 
charge. Check your pencil 
soldering iron with an ohm- 
meter to ensure that the tip 
is grounded (connected to 
the third wire of the plug). 
If not, this is the time to 
update this very important 
tooL 

With both methods, the 
PLL counter is preset to 
your favorite frequency 
each time the Memorizer is 



HUNDREDS 



T£MS KHe / 



JO QTO9H3 



TO Q709-EZ 



TO 0709-4 



_ rngToa^a . 



TDQTOa-lS 



TDQToe-ra 




TO GMtJ 



All RESI^Tor^ S ARE 2 OR 3K 



TO OTO?-* 



■ T0+5V 



Ffg. 1 



turned on. (Consult Fig. 8 on 
page 19 of your manual.) 
As +5 volts rises from to 
+ 5, C702 [with R702) pro- 
duces a positive pulse to 
pin 1 of Q707, Q708, and 
Q709, This is the preset 
strobe input of the up/down 
counter. Presetting estab- 
lishes the initial frequency, 
depending on the voltage 
level applied to pins 3, 4, 
12, and 13. If the input 
level is low (0 volts), the 
counter stage will be set to 
a "zero/' Conversely, if the 
input level is high ( + 5 
volts), the counter stage 
will be set to a "one." Note 
that these inputs on Q707 
and Q708 are connected to 
ground so that both the 
100-kHz digit and 10-kHz 
digit are reset, i.e., set to 
zero. By inspection, you 
will note that pins 3, 4, and 
1 2 of Q709 are also ground, 
but pin 13 of Q709 is con- 
nected to +5 volts. If you 
check the Q308 Code Chart 
on page 36, you will find 
that this corresponds to bit 
P11 and results in 7 MHz. 
To alter this start-up fre- 
quency, it is simply a case 
of removing the appropri- 



ate grounded inputs and 
connecting them through a 
"pull-up" resistor to +5 V. 
Should you be fortunate 
enough to have only one 
favorite frequency, or want 
to minimize your cost, 
follow method 1. On the 
other hand, if you want 
switching capability to 
allow changes in frequency 
quickly and easily, follow 
method 2. 

Method 1 

In this method, locate 
the ''ones" in Table 1, Us. 
ing a sharp pair of small 
cutters, cut these pins on 
the component side of the 
PLL board between the 
chip and the board. Cut the 
pins as close to the board 
as possible. Then carefully 
bend each of these pins up 
from the board so that they 
are pointing up from the 
chips, Carefully connect 
each of these cut pins 
together with jumper wire, 
and then connect a resistor 
(2k or higher) from the 
jumper wire to + 5 volts, if 
you have selected any 
MHz value other than 7 
(144^ 145 or 146 MHz), it 



73 Magazine ■ June^ 1980 



wuj be necessary to re- 
move the +5 volts which 
Yaesu connected to Q709 
pin 13. Clip this pin in the 
same manner, and connect 
a jumper wire from it to 
ground. 

Method 2 

Cut and bend up Q707 
and Q708 pins 3, 4, 12, 13, 
and Q709 pins 4, 12, and 13. 

Cement 11 SPST switches 
(mini dip-switches) to a 
piece of Vectorboard® cut 
to fit in the tone squelch 
area. Note that the pins 
presently located in this 
area will line up with holes 
in the vectorboard. Solder a 
wire to one side of each of 
these switches. The other 
end of this wire will be at- 
tached to ground. Connect 
one end of a "pull-up" re- 
sistor {2k or higher) to the 
opposite end of each 
switch. Bus the opposite 
end of each of these resis- 
tors together and connect 
to +5 volts. Connect a wire 



from the junction of the 
resistor and each switch to 
the pin indicated in Fig. 1, 
Slip the vectorboard 

assembly over the pins in 
the tone squelch area. It 
can be secured easily by 
twisting one turn of wire on 
two of these pins above the 
vectorboard and soldering 
the wires to the pins. 

Consult Table 1 for 

switch settings. A logic 1 is 
an open switch. 

Observation of the fre- 
quency versus bit-pattern 
of the lOO-kHz and 10-kHz 
switch banks will reveal 
that the coding is binary- 
coded decimal (BCD), Ob- 
viously, the same pattern 
exists in part for the MHz 
bank. If you attempt to set 
the MHz bank to an invalid 
frequency such as 143 or 
149 MHz, the PLL will not 
lock up and the display will 
indicate one of two images. 
If the attempted frequency 
is lower than 144 MHz. the 
MHz digit will be blank If 





n CM 


m CM 

ca T- T- ^ 


« CM 

CO ^- T- ^ 




— — S 
Q. a. 0. 


c c c c 
Q. a Q. a 


c c c c 
a 0. £ Q. 


Digit 


o> cn as 
O o o 
K. h- h^ 

o a o 


a^ to <x^ io 

O o o o 
t-^ r^ r^ f^ 

o o o o 


r^ r^ r^ r^ 

o o o o 

fw f^ r^ p^ 

o o o o 





Not Used 








1 


Not Used 


1 


1 


2 


Not Used 


10 


10 


3 


Not Used 


11 


11 


4 


1 


10 


10 


5 


1 


10 1 


10 1 


6 


1 1 


110 


110 


7 


1 


111 


111 


8 


Not Used 


10 


10 


9 


Not Used 


10 1 


10 1 




MHz 


100 kHz 


10 kHz 



Table 1.1 = +5 volts; = vails. 



the attempted frequency is 
higher than 145 MHz, the 
display will read 9. XXX, 
where X is a valid digit 
However, the entire display 
will blink. 

A convenient method for 
simulating power-on cycles 
consists of momentarily 
shorting out capacitor 
C702. By setting each 
switch on, one by one, start- 
ing with the right-hand 
switch in each decade 



[bank), followed by short- 
ing out C702 while power is 
applied, you wilt rapidly 
check your success. With 
atl switches closed, the 
display will show .000, 
Opening the rfght hand 
switch of each decade will 
change that decade dis- 
play to 1 . The next switches 
have the value of 4 and 8 
respectively. 

Follow the chart to your 
favorite frequency, ■ 



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73 Magazine • June, 1980 91 



Instant SoftwarelNew Releases 



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GOLF/ 
CROSS- 
OUT 



Why wait for good weather? With 
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11 clubs and a putter with which to 
play the finest (electronic) golf course 
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wind factors which must be taken into 
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the low 70*s. 

You can play the standard 18 holes 
In ttie program, or design your own 
championship course. Simple instruc- 
lions are Included that let you design 
fairways, relocate greens and place 
water hazards where you want them. 

The Crossout program is the old fa- 
vorite peg puzzle game in a new com- 
puterized form. You play the game by 
jumping a peg over another into an em- 
pty square. The object is to leave one 
peg on the board in the center square. 
It sounds easy, but it*s no!. 
Order No. 0009 R S7.95, 



6 



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BALL 
TURRET 
GUNNER 

Fof years the Peiro Resource Conglom- 
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Imagine yourself at the control console of 
the LW 1417 Slratobtazer (Type B Strategic 
Laser Weapon) Your Hindsight Director in- 
fornns you thai a Gnat lighter is coming m for 
an attack. You position your gigawati laser 
turret until you can see the tafgel on your 
monitor. IhQ Range ir^dicator shows hes 
coming in fast. You center your tafgel sights 
on his location. The Tafgetmg Computer 



— TO ORDER: 

Look for these programs al the deafer 
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Inslan! Software Inc. 

Order Dept. 

Peterborough, N.H. 03458 

(Add Sl.OOfor handling) 
or call toll-free 1-800-258-5473 (VISA, 
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accepted). 



For a free catalog listing over 200 programs 
write: Instant Software Catalog Dept., 
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Prices subject to change without notice. 






Now available for TRS-80, PET and Apple. 

MIMIC 

A fast-action memory game. 

In Mimic, players are shown a sequence 
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With several levels ot skill. It's not hard to 
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TRS'80 Level II 16K. Order No. 0066R S7.95 
PET BK, Order No. 0039P $7.95 
Apple 24K (Integer), Order No, 0025A $7.95 



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Studies his course and speed as your finger 
tenses over the firing key, You know you'll 
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you see the fire command, and you instinc- 
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Ball Turret Gunr^ef. with your choice of 
mulllple leveis of difficulty^ optional sound 
effects programming, and superb graphics. 
ts mofe than jusl a game, lis an adventure. 
Experience it! 
Order No. OOStR $9,95 




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PET UTfLriY I 
YouYe working under a senous handicap if 
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The PET Utility I package gives you the tools 
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■Monitr — The Monitr program lets you write, 
edit. save, and verify any machine language 
and/or BASIC program. Jusl load and run the 
Monilf program and then load the program you 
want to edit. 

•Programmer's C af c ul alar -Tms prog ram will 
convert numbers into the binary, octal, dec- 
imal, and hexadecimal systems and function 
as a floating pornt calculator. It will also 
disp]!ay all four numbeiirtg systems simulta- 
neousty and allow you lo handle large num- 
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For the 8K PET Onter No. 0105P. S9 95. 



ACCOUr^TllMG ASSrSTAKT 
This package will help any tjusmessman 
solve many of those day-tOHJay financial prob- 
lems. Included are: 

• Loari Amortization Schedule -This program 
wiiJ give you a complete breakdown of any loan 
or investment- 

«Depr@ciation Schedule— You can get a depre- 
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methods: straight line, sum of years-digits, 
declining balance, units of production, or 
machine hours. 

This package requires the Apple 16K and Ap- 
plesoft II BASIC. Order No, 0088 A $7.95, 



Peterborough, New Hampshire 03458 603-924-7296 



T3 



92 73 Magazine • June, 1960 



Ask for Instant Software at a computer store near you. 



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74001 viji FjMviC^Anlft Mo 90i, 

Mi««lofi VwtD 

t37B So Btfscoin Aw , &iniD4« 

ttoMJy Wdfld 

1961 1 BiJiinG^ Qit. Dr., Unit ft 

Borthrtdge 

IC E House Inc. 

2^ Mortn E S1 .. San Qamflfd^fvai 

Jftdt Computer Prodiiclli 

Miriim<Ii». 

63S^l AimBd«n Rd . S«A JoSft 

0|»*monaCi«i(C3^ Boom 

1033 N^ SfCXBorfc Awft todi Afuf^vies 

ISAi« tUwthome St^,. LAwncteia 

HKfiia Sh«:i[ OeitiSf 

BZSO Mir ■ Mmsm BHd . San Qivqa 

Hvlio StiK^ Deater 

SO N CabF^ik? Hwy Hall Moon B*f 

Sintji R<3$9 Corriputer C#nltr 
M4 7lh St., Santa Rosa 

Silvsr ifiur EtecT. Conim 
1liafi2Cftntr^iAvg.,Chirip 

Thfl Ccmptiiier SiQre 

@0 Bro«dMi<By, Santa MontcA 

Colorado 

3M04 S AcOfFVl Si En§teWDQd 

Cdi$r*do Camputer Sysiefn* 
311 W 74th A>«- Wflrslmmtlar 

CovnpuTir SNadi 

1636 Souiti Fraiine. Puitltlkt 

Tn« Ckynputer stews 
2300 lArtltDn St . OcnvQt 

Connecticut 

AiTVfpicAn Buflrne55 Computirt 
454 Thimos St., Gtoton 

GcfTipuEarlab 

130 Jflirorson, Hbvi London 

CfifflpL^t^rlatud: 

1700 Ptfii ^4, Faifiie4il 

W Sktrt SI . HaindBn 

Corriput^ Mforlis 

f 490 pQfll 1^ E^ Litwrl]r PlUL 

Tlw Program Siore 

4300 WiicofTSf n A«« . N W . 

Mt«rting1aii. C 

Floftda 

Adwfrlurv InTerriaUDflal 

2O0 Bftid Cvpr«a5 Ct. LongwoQd 

AMF Elflcfronics 

1T14S N 30[hS(,, Tarrpfl 

Boyit'tberl CakrporallDn 

1320 Wvfti i^lh St,, Pun^mp Cliy 

Campiiitt Center 

6570C«r(iFai Awe , St PeiwiiHJiy 

CdftiputetUnd of Fi Laudardiifl 
30i3 fi F^MlCTXl Kvf Ft Lcui^ilale 



Cofnpntvf tvhif of JacliKXiviiK 
3in^ Unimrsily W^ W. 
^ncMcnMIe 

Oampulcriimi) ot Tampa 
1530 E Fowiflf Awe . Tame a 

GomputcHT Shaeiii 

3d3Q 8«*cfi ei^.. Jack&qnvirio 

QurhtW^lers EnteFprtaea 
236 Talboi Ave., MelbQurma 

Hftith Kn Eaftclronic 

4705 W iQrhAwe Center, Hipmah 

His CompuiermaiKMi 

i?K Cffre^s Ave . MAttHum* 

Sounif i09*t 

220) € III Mf 13m. G9in»w«ll» 

Uhalan Cc^tipviQ' Sion 
Aitpori fka Destin 

W^knrns AwliD & TV Ine 
20&2 LiE>vtir Si , jacksoftvuit 

GttorglB 

AtlaniA Cornputm M«rt 
Atlanta 

Compuiartand al AtFai^ii 
2423 Cotttii Parfcway, Smyrna 

Hawaii 

CompuiisMBTTd ol Hewall 

667 N Federal Hwy . Honolulu 

RadJo Sha<:h Asaac. Store 
171? S KlHfl Si , Hor^(jli|lii 

Idaho 

EloclrDiKc SpeoaiistB 
841 1 Faii^^ami Avs., Boi9t 

lllinote 

^IDf North StCM^Itn^ Peori* 



9&t1 N. IMwAiAh AtCl^ Hii*E 

Cofiwiar StatiOti 

36S9 Namaohi Rd.. Gfantla CHy 

Mttfwvfti Micro Compurers, Inc 
706 S Mam St . Loriib4rd 

ICafisas 

C^r^iral 4^dn!9$« Compuiere 
fl e. Bioadway, Hflr^nQlo^^ 

Maln« 

Miin ConrputTOnicf 

Ir^tcmm Pta^iu Bangor 

Radjo Sirach 

319 Mjtin Mall Hd . So ^Dflland 

Maryland 

Jack Fhnas Etedrisnjcs 

4Sn D*Mlm C»rc«a; PiwnIHa 

Th« OommCanlaf 

9634 Fi Wcaile nd . Laonl 

MassachusBtts 

ComputcrOlY 

tT^ Mam gi. Cliiari^rip<wm 

CQinputerCity 

9^ Woic;efiEer Rd., Frammonim 

CompylvriAi^d ot Boston 

214 W&fCester Bd , W^n^slay 

Computer Pi&cHages, Unlimlto^ 
244 W Boyliiton Si , Wesi Boylnion 

tignihoui-e Gompuler Softwifs 
14 Falj Rtvcf Ave . Rehc>balh 

New England EleclroTiict Co 
£79 Higftland Avft.. Naodnann 

Tti« Comiiut^ Stott 

3P$ Myilic Aw.. Mfsdfo^ 
Michigan 

2S3<51 Ford Rd . Gofdm dtf 

Com|>ut«r Connectioriia 

36437 CJrartd Rkirer. Farmipglon Hilts 

CompuTeriand ^r Grand Ranii^t 
2t27^B^^1 St. SE , Keniwtjot] 

Com P4Jt«r land □' Flcich4?9l6f 
301 S Livernole, Roct^eitfl-r 

Compiiiafland of SoylhfJ«Jd 

£9673 Motlhwestfi/n M*y , Saythri#l|1 

Compujlfrr Mart 

HOVU 14 Mil« Rd C4ai*4on 

1D3&W TftniloriAllM. B«i|l*OMh 
Tlv AnarnaiS' Sourcv 

T* Oide TeachH SHoppe 
T823 WiTs*iTTe SI Vpailanii 

Minnesota 

CoiTifH^tQriand oi Hophina 
11310 Hwy F .Hophma 

DlQIlal 0«n 
SumivIM* Center 

Mmnflftola Sortwarc Inc. 

542? Fnher St., White Sear L«1tfl 

Xtm Computers 

5717 Xurxes Ai^e.. N. BrnoMIn C«n1«r 

200 E M*irt 51 . West POim 



aiaFiQl*y St. Jackson 
W Vamofi FoAiet inc 
3t6Fol«vSt, Jack^iM 
Missouri 

CarTipi,H'iv,ir. fnc 

5t f i&ri'!.^rinr OaKa ShoppinQ CimiDr 

Florisuinl 

Odn^Dli'dalQc! Sofiwari^ 

}&5iit Cri^inwald Ckiurl. Bc^llo^ 

Montana 

Jnlermour^tam Cominatar 
5^ So 9mSt.. Uvjngstofi 

Nfsonsl Compuler 

i?i A»d 0*it Dr , Can Junction 

The ComptiutSaoni 

t?tA isiri St w «3S flAlii^ 

Nebraska 

CompMliflAfMl «l Om*l4 
tl03l Elvn SI . OmaHa 

Midiw«il C^HniKjtei' Co. Inc 
nn I SI . Omafia 

Mrdweii Computet Co Inc 
444? S e4ihS(.. Omarirs 

Midweil Gc^mpiileT Ctj. fr\c 
4403 S. B7th St., Omaha 

ScollabluM Typct^rJlsrs Inc 
1B24 Brpadway, Scoll&bluil 

Nevada 

Century 33 

4^66 Sprmff Mountain Rd . lh Vegas 

Hmm Hampshire 

BttinCrjriv^^ Corrrputar Cemcr 
MineatuniSr CorBont 

C0Mi|Mi«rCt1y 

tS25S WiKoit MdrK:h«!.lttr 

P»ul 4 TV 

Uajn Si , Frpmonl 

Poilsmouiri Compuier Ceftie* 
31 RAyn«« Avt,. Porttmoutrt 

Rad»o StiacK Asaoc Store 

Fairti^nliB Riaza, Keene 

New Jersey 

Compulor EncQunlar 
2Na3«au 51., Pnricetpn 

CoHTipuferland 

35 Plua Rta i4, W. Parunuv 

Coniipvlaf M«it of NJ 
501 Rl« £7. taviln 

DavftiEiedroniCi 

f>tBnn«vU(* SHOpfRng Cit . ^wnnrf vdla 

dH B Enlvfpntis Inc 

Rl«. 3a. nu(»9«faw Av«. Miplieshwti 

l^afiofui Corr^tjtrtig Ir^t 
Si Gsnif ai Sq Lmwood 

Radm ShacWJAJ Eleclronic 

Manatf<#l^ S^op>pirt(| Ctt 

Rl &r Allen Rd , Hackettsio«rn 

Ttie B>argain BfOthiefs 
G1«n Roc Sti^oppirvg Centsf 

ai&Scoich Road, Trenton 

ThaComputfrr Emporium 

SIdQ IDS, Avenues of Commertia 

24^ Rie 3a, Cnerry HiJI 

New Mexico 

Auifli Eitafon^Cfi CCL 
23SWi>vtomm N E . Aibw4u«fqu« 

La^ey and Assoctates 
Z9CBTahfiikCi N E . AitmqMerqMi 

Mftctwira Muiic i«ai}io Shad) 
401 W Cmitcrt CdristHd 

Smjtn Meti Compuim Cwnar 

121 Wvitt Dnwe. Suite 7. La* Crucat 

New York 

AriftIO Crafi 

114 Fltth A«« . N¥C 

But A, By In 

SSOOSlrebgtm Rd . Fr^donla 

Computer Cornef 

2^Q Hamlllon Ave.. Wtii.le Plalna 

Computer Era Cc^rp 
157C ^a Ave . NsM yorh 

Compulfrt Factory 

4SS L«iinQlori Air& , NYC 

Compuier Hou»e, IrK 

721 Atlantic Av« , Rocnesief 

Coinputerftainc} or N,aeu»u 

79 Waatimry A««. Caiie FI*C« 

GdmcMirar World 

5t9 Bo«to'^ Roat Rd Port deiler 

Comieii Ei«ctroniic&. inc 

2tBt Con«y liia'^d Ave , Btoohtyn 

Comt«<h Eiftctrontcs. inc 
SistanUtin^M9tJ 
Slof* 22DA, Sialen Island 

OiQkt;yl« Sy^iems Corp 
31 E. 31si©l.,Naw YorH 

HomuCprnpuler Conler 
B71 M[)i«OB Ave . Hor:tTie6tftt 

Kay EJactrtinics 
Sctienectady 

Lu,ti*n lEiacIf nn^ Inc 
21 Bfi3«d*av. Oemitle 




Peterborough, N.H* 
03458 1^ 33? 



Mr Cwnvultf 

im^ Rti^a, fWe t, WHfiiMnQecs Fatti 

Sofiron Sy tiern.! 

306 Columbia ti^rnpiiie Rerts&tilawr 

Ttm Compuier Tree Inc. 
4l» Hooper Rsl.. Emiwetl 

lipstsla Computtf Shop 

639 Frirnfih Rd,, Camfaua P\sia 

New Harltord 

Morth Carolina 

Byla Shot< uf Rsiioigti 

1213 HiiltbDrouQii St . Raiejgn 

Ohio 

Aluir BfjtairMHt Systems, ifie 
52SS Nonrt Otnm Dr . Dayton 

Aj,iri> V*d«0 EttclrorHcs 
SM E Mam Si . Lancastsr 

Gincinfiali Corrvfmter Sio«e 
Jew lfi1i#atal* Of . Cincinnati 

Compulariand 

4579 Qrvai Nontwrn StveL. 

H Oimt lead 

Compulerlafid 

&4^ BiiKn eiyd . Cotumbutif 

CompuE«riJind 

12aa Siom Ret . Mayti^ld He4(jtilQ 

Computer SlOfo qI t^tedo 
laHillwyCh D( , toiedo 

Forbeet Mn;iosy»)ems Inc- 
35 N Bra&d. FjultKorn 

Microcompule' Cantar 
7900 PafBffon Rdi . Dayton 

MKTO-Mmi Computw World 
74 ftatKPwood . CoMiintJui 

Umwmar Amaleui Raidiio. inc. 
l^SH AiOM Or CoHufribuS 

Oklahoma 

Soundi Etc 
Hyw 33,Waioniga 

Vein Strati FrOdiicts 
RAd ID Shack Daaier 
T14W TahBt,,Sapulpa 

Oregon 

Compulntlioid nf Partlarid 
12O20SW Minn St..Tlgaro 

Computer Pattiways Uniitiiiiied, inc 
2)S1 Dttvcoi Si S E H Salem 

TRS-SO PioductA Lid 

3&2DSE Vine^BidBd^, PoniVKl 

Pefmsyhrania 

ArtCO&aCI 

3012 Wygmtng ^"^ NMgsaM 
AJtcaEiaci 

Back Moiiniain STIOO Ctr, 
SriavefTOwit 

Audio Man 

51S Fifth Ava . New Brighion 

Computer /iTpfKihoppe 

3648 WilHam Penn Hwy, Monrosvilra 

Computer tand ol Harfisburg 
4644 C^rllais Pike, Mircnianicsbiirg 

Erlfr Computer Co 
2i27WftitSlh St , Eri« 

Migtnly Byle Computer CefiTer 
5^7 Easlon Rd. Hotstiaim 

p&sonti Compui«i Cenp. 
24-M Wm Lancaalar Ave . Paoll 

f^^nonai Compulai Corp. 

Frazcf Mall tancasier Ave Frafat 

Rho<ie Island 

.*«« Si ^^»m«dence 

Soulh Dakaia 

CB RadN> Shack 

21 9t and Bread^iy. Tarv^ton 

Tennessee 

Compiileflab 

671 S Mi^ncjcn Hbll Rd., Memphll 

H & H E3fK;|ronli;a Ini: 

500 N JaetttonSt,,TuliariOTna 

Texas 

Compuiaf Pod 

32GN Comna, ArlirkQlon 

Houalon Com&utm Tech 
^13 Biaaerwf. Seiiane 

ttiianct<ta Cofrvotei' 
TQSD Da^ii^wood t^Dusion 

goao StcffKnont Frwy , DaHas 

Pa,n AJtiaiican CIccI tnc 
ti 17 Conway. Mission 

liBdio SnacN, Daaler 
21969 K«ty Fravvyay. Katy 

Bam Micro Syttema 

6353 Camp Bowie Blvd.. Fl, Worth 

Waghaltsr Bookg Inc 
3(jr9anway PInia E.. Houston 

Utah 

PC Compultr Co 

1911 Wa«i 70 Souitt Provo 

Quaiily Tactifiology 

470 E. 2fld So^ Sail Lahe Ctly 

VfrgfnTa 

Compuiar Worfea 

Rt«^ e Qem OBA. ftmiaianbufo 



HoiTK ComtMJtar C«nt^ 
23?? Virginia fiaach Hvd, 
Virpnta Beach 

^tmAiiVHi* Rad«o Comm. 

1!^ Ptelnricli Ava . Colonial Heighta 

Washington 

Amen can Mercantile Co, Inc 
24ifi T»l Ava, S.. Seattle 

Byte StiopoT BeltovLie 
14701 N E 201ti Si , BeJlevue 

Computer I and Ql South King Co 
1S00 S 3316 Si . Suite 12 
Federal way 

Maorwtia Micro Syst^tfis 
^Bi^2 ThqmdrKe Ave . SeaJlle 

Pei«»«iiii GocnpiFtara 
S 104 ftwi. Spokarw 

¥« OU CoiniNjtaf Shop 

West Virginia 

The Compuiar Cornof (nc. 
Z^B«echuri,i A*c,, Mofaafrio«n 

Tl% Cavnputaf Store 

Mumcfpal Parking Bldg . Crwrtsalon 

Wisconsin 

Byte Stiop QF MiiwauKee 

64)19 Wesi Lay ton Ave., Gre#nrie(d 

Compulerland 

ems WliMnDy Way. Madison 

Pelted Microa^tefni 

42e&W Loarti^fRd, Milwaukee 

Wyoming 

CamtnUw Coftcapta 

1 »CM Logart Ave Ctvrmnm 

Pu«rtoRlco 

Tlie Mucf o oampirar Stora 
tsn Aim 49ttM T PWdO 
C^atftm Tarraca 



Canada 



CANADIAN DISTRIBUTORS. 

Mn:ron OJiitrlbiullnfli 

409 Queen Si, W, ToTonto, Ont 

MSV aA5 



Comtjulaiiand ol Winnipeg 

7f S PortRfia Ava , Winnipeg Man 

CompyrFtarl 

411 Roo«*r»tt A«« . Ottawa Qfitar« 

Mtcromaiic Sytltntt inz 

TOT aiJ$i thmk Rd . flfctimond fl C 

Mtcro Stiaca tg* W Cwiwia 
333 Parli Sltee4 Ragm i Sasli. 

DntKHi Nolctmoi, Lid 
12411 Stony l^atn Road 
Edmcmton, AftHKia 

Toiai Compul«r Sysiema 
A|aH, Oniartd 

Austria 

Byt& Stvop Mlcr&Dlol:lrciiic 
Fav^jnien^lt 30, Wien 

England 

Mighly Micro 

^ Card^H Rd . Wailofd Hmts 

Frsnce 

3X Rub Ha Lanihgiwl, P^ns 

Haty 

HOiilC t-r I 

Pmxrm Ob Angaii t. M^iano 

SwHzerfand 

Bii : -15. tuettcti 

West Germany 



EUROPEAN DISTRIBUTOR- 

Microsliap Boden^aa 
Mftihslr 3, ?7?a Markdorf 



AAAEiecironic 
HabsbutQartlr 134, FreJt^urg 

Basic Soliwaie^ ur^d Sctiu^ung 
Conslantin^tr gfl. Ko«in 2i 

Electronic HoOby Siiop 
MaxiTmlianilr Z7, Bonn 

Hcnnigar Qoniip(lt«r9 
La ndwaiwai f % Muancten 2 

lteroct3mpurli>f Centfr 
AtaWdef^ir 7 Dafmatadt 

Mijen«snlo4if 
Toeirenstr 6. Hot; liiiirct>^i 

R T R E^ac Ironic 
AdFers^tr 55. Hefdelbero 

Ausiralii 

Computer Country P(y Ltd, 
5 Tonkin Ave , Biilwyn VIC 

Oefor-eat Sti'll^are 
3£ Glen Towijir Dijva 
<S^en Wav«riy, VIC 

Suro-Load Soliwa/a 

P O Boa 2S. Watton, ACT 

South Africa 



StX/TH AFRICAN {^iSTRieuTOR^ 

^jh^Taiba^s. 

P0. 801 745^. Johannestiwg 



p^ fi9ad€f Service— sec fj^qe 2fQ 



73 Magazme • June, 1980 93 






Computerize Your Contest Paperwork 



two BASIC programs do it all 



Bernard Hohman WASWiA 
95 Prospect Street 
TWfm OH 44883 



Are you a contest oper- 
ator? Have you been 

assigned as a Field Day 
Chairman? If the answer to 
either question is yes, this 



article is for you! The two 
BAStC programs presented 
here will check for dupli- 
cate contacts, alphabetize, 
and print results in a form 



acceptable to most contest 
managers. You don't own a 
microcomputer? I don't 
either. I bet you can find 

someone who does. 



CALL DL1F CHLGK HHh SaUL l>RaCRf^ 
BY QE^mAft:} HOHnAN VABt^tA 
JULY S0^ 19 Ta 
BASIC VEI1» £.» 



B0S16 FLEW tfl^ITTEN 

^^m FlEM SWTP SK 
fl«lfl POHEE 6S,6J 

iiss piFi i»rid»<jic£i>«Kfci30)4iLineiJiM»t7S) 

ttae oic 1 j*"i"ttii i>-"t"iF$( I >-■*»"! Gt< i j»'*i"tHit jj"*'*** 

»ee« PfitMT "EHtER DATA"."C«FlI( 17JI 

0««S IHFUt 61 

«gb< »>htNr DfflfC I9> 

■•*« ir ftt--H£COFQ" THEM GOTO £100 

0041 Vl«m Pf < B»^ f, I i 

■ iffi IF tff***9" THEN 155 

011^ L£T fI-VALfVf> 

tl 13 IF II- i TKBi ft- 10 

• IM OH n eoTO S00. 30e«4PS^i00, 6ft, TM«S«i;,<7i0, ii0i^ it 
01^5 v*«?tiOitei*i^ lit IF wt*-"*" -mtM ttv 
0tb0 PniNT bif ES Mi lliVAJ,tD CMX^iceTa M 
*200 FDA D]"l TO Si? 
tSIf IF DMDn«*>V'-Tn&l E4« 
i2C« IF Dl<{:^|>»BStHO« PfiI**T"&UP*iG0TO 6* 
0Pa# HIXT 4)i 
f24« E>SCt)n«fiitPllI]|4Kt3>~«"EPIItllT Die DD^Dll GOTH 6J 

•9«f ron £t-i TO £00 

i3lt ir citt:i)*-*-^Ticai 340 

• 3tt ir £f<i;i>-Bl THIM PHI MT^DUP*! GOTO 60 

• 330 MOtT tl 
34r £lCCU«&i;£»fE:un-^t"t PRINT ESttl). Ell SOTO 60 

i!4.e0 roil ri«i TO £80 

04)0 tr rf(Ft>-'"0"tHEM 440 

iP420 IF rt(n}»a» theh piitnT'*oup**>coTo 60 

0430 irDCT Ft 

0440 Flfrn*BliFICF]+nx*'*'*i PRINT Fi(Fl>4 FliOOTO 60 

0S0« FOR 01* I ta ^00 

^b\^ IF [jtf QI}«>'«"T]IOI 349 

«*20 IF Gl(Gn>k8l TH^ PRINT"DUP"l GOTO fi4 

054^ ailGn"SSiCIS(Dr+ n-*'i"iPRINT aiCCHj GU QQTO 60 

H6FF1 FOR HI- i TO SBB 

P6ifl ir K*fHlJ-"t'* THEH b^B 

P6&0 IF }[HH^>'?Df THEN PRINT'^DUP'** QQTO fcfl 

a^3fl t^EXT HI 

0640 HtCNI?i«nsiK»(Hl*U«"*''tPniNT HI[F[ U^K 1 1 GOTO 60 

^700 f^n i\m\ TO •^m 

ff7l0 IF I»Un-"#" THD* 740 

0720 IF titni-Fai THSU PdlNT-^DWiGOTO €0 

#730 NDT T ( i 

0740 liU HvBSi (te I Ut}«''t^iPl^lNT ttct lUI tiOOTO 40 



1il8 L0 

0S3ia 

0<?»fl 

{19 20! 
0930 
a9£(fit 

i00e 
i«ift 

1*39 

L040 

life 

ni0 

1 130 

I 140 
21«f 

2 r ic 

tl» 
&t39 

2 140 

21fii 
2f«0 

ssia 

P300 

£310 
£40« 
2410 
2500 

£510 
S6ff0 
£610 

fi7#e 

£710 

ease 

3S 10 
£900 

2Q1{| 

3 000 
3010 

3n0 

;i£f0 

3 3«0 



^ THEN a40 
THEN PP INT "DUP'^t GOTO 



FOn J I- I TO 

IF J$tJ||-"i 

IF J£(JJMB£ THEN PW INT "DUP'^t GOTO 60 

NEXT J I 

JS{JO=Bii JirJI* t>-''l"lPBlNT Jt<Jl3,J UCOTO fttS 
FOR Kl^l TO SBPI 
if HKKU""*" THEN 9 40 

If KilK|>=as THEN FRlNt"PtFP"tCfJTD 60 
NEXT Kl 

KS(KI } = Bi:Kl(KU1 >«"t"lPFit?4T Kf < K I »^K I = GOTO t^^ 
FOR Ul=i T[J Sjltf 
IF LtlLl>^"t" mtti L04t 
IP LlCLD-Bf THEN PHt MT*'DUP"tCaTO 60 
NEXT LI 

L&CLn^BStLSCLl* l)«"i"tFKieit Li(L.I>«LllO£}TD 60 
FOR Hl*i TO 5«« 
IF ?liIJIl J = "t" THtM 1140 
if M|(MU-E1 THEW PlttMT*'6t.'P^t WTiO 6« 
MEXt HI 

HStMU-SSiniCSil* t}*'*«"t1^DlHt NlJNDfMLrC-OTt; 60 
PRINT CHI1S« lairC'ti 
FOfi Wl=l TO S0tNEXT Vt 

0*fi- I 
IF &=e THln 0«1# 
FDP. V-1 TO I0« 
FDR V^^l tn S#»MEXT V2 

ON GOTO 2^p»a}t0, 2400j2£00*?60-0«f700«2Sei*£^0tt^3t«»^3tBv 
K£Xt V 

IF Cl I V 1 == "#"TH£JI £]£• 
PRINT £»SC«>i«OT0 ai6« 
IF ElfVlv«"TNEM £|2» 
PPt:4T E&(¥)tGaTO 2I6« 
If FltVJ**'t*'THEW 212» 
PPINT FlCV>tGOTa £1^0 
IF G*fV3-"#"TH&l 2La« 
PRINT GlCWMGOTO £160 
IF HilV3-"#"THEW SI 20 
PPINT HMUMGOTO ai60 
IF lt*W)-"#"TH&l 2120 
PRINT IlcVliGOTO S I 61? 
IF Jt<VJ-*"*"THEM EI2B 
PRIMT JlClfJlGCTO 2.\m 
IF KKV>-"t"TK£N 2 I 20 
PhlNiT HifVJlCiaTO Sl^f) 
IF LlCtf>="t"THEN £(20 

pPiwt Li(iiJx GOTO si&ia 

I? M*{¥>-"t"THEN 32110 
PPINT MKVMGOTD £160 



PRINT 
PIP 



CHf1£c^0>iqOTO A0 



Fig. 1. Program 1 lisfmg. 



^ 



94 73 Magazine • June, 1980 



For a number of years I 

have had the job of prepar- 
ing Field Day forms (dupe 
check sheets) for sub- 
mission. Even before the 
June, 1978, event, I started 
thinking that there ought 
to be a better way to pro- 
cess the logs, Why not a 
microcomputer? I was 
aware that Dick Wright 
owned an SWTP system, so 
I called him and intro- 
duced myself. 

Dick did not have much 
experience in handling 
strings {alphanumeric 
characters), and 1 had 
never written a computer 
program in my life. I ex- 
plained that I was willing 
to learn the fanguage, so he 
lent me his BASIC manual 
and I began one of the 
more challenging and 
satisfying experiences in 
my life (I am now a con- 
firmed computer freak). 
Dick and I spent at least 
ten long July nights 
developing the programs 
to do the manipulations 1 
wanted, and these two 
BASIC programs are the 
result 

Dick's system included: 
SWTPC 6800, AC-30, 
CT-1024, KSR33J6K RAM, 
and 8K BASIC Version 2.0. 
We had only 8K of avail- 
able memory, so neither 
program is documented 
with instructions or REM 
statements. We found 500 
string variables (calls) im- 
possible to process in 8K of 
RAM without two pro- 
grams and the POKE(62,6) 
trick published in Kiiobaud 
(#19, July, 1978, "Little 
Bits"). Thanks, Dale, you 
saved our lives! 

Although the data was 
already on log sheets, the 
first program was written 
so that it could be used 
during a contest. It checks 
for duplicate contacts, 
places calls in ten different 
lists, and then records the 
valid data on cassette for 
processing by Program 2 
later Program 2 takes the 
data from cassette, alpha- 
betizes the calls, and prints 

^ ^t&<S^t S&fvice—see page 2W 



the lists for submission. 

Program 1 

Subscript string process- 
ing is rather slow when 
checking a single list of 500 
plus contacts for dupli- 
cates, so I assigned a dif- 
ferent subscript string for 
each of the ten call areas: 
D$(D1)forthe1s, E$(E1)for 
the 2s, and so on. By using 
this routine, only the calls 
in the area of interest will 
be searched for duplicates. 
You Will have to redimen- 
sion the arrays in lines 20 
and 25 according to an 
estimate of the contacts 
you will be making with 
each of the call areas from 
your location. As listed, 
lines 20 and 25 allow suf- 
ficient memory for con- 
tacts on 40 meters from 
northwest Ohio. 

Since the number in a 
call always appears in 
position two or three of the 
call, the MIPS function 
was put to good use. Lines 
&0 through 160 decide 
which list to search for du- 
plicates, and then the com* 
puter jumps to that rou- 
tine. If a duplicate is 
found, DUP is printed, and 
the computer again 
prompts with INPUT 
DATA? It's easy to make a 
mistake at 3 am If that 
happens, use CTRL C to get 
out of the program. In the 
direct mode (no line 
numbers), make the sub- 
script string variable in er- 
ror equal to "@'\ 

For example, an error in 
call area three, position 22, 
can be corrected by enter- 
ing LET F$(22) = "@": 

GOTO 50; and then you are 
ready to enter the next call. 
In order to know which 
string to change, I suggest 
you write D$ = 1, E$ = 2, 
F$==3 . . . M$ =0 on a 
piece of paper for refer- 
ence. Lines 200 through 
1150 are the dupe find rou- 
tines. 

When all the calls have 
been entered, it's time to 
record the calls on cassette 
for processing by the sec- 



SMTCR DATA? 


lC3DiV 


PC act V 


l«» 


EMYLR OAT At 


K3yEtf 


erf 




EUTEn DATA? 


IC9ACM 


A UP 




t;NTEn DATAT 


VS'IVE 


Unlive 


6e 


ENTER HAT A? 


K^DFX 


KeCFK 


A3 


EfllTER DATA? 


H^iyjj 


H*«4*l 


ts 


ENTEn CATAt 




flEADV 




#Lrrai(TBi«' 


«•" 


tttAnr 




#09TO#» 




EKTER CATAT 


K*UJ 


K4Va 


TS 


EH TEA CAT A? 


t€4KA 


K*Ktk 


T9 


EllTEFl DftTfl? 


VWmJA 


VB4PITA 


Sfl 


EMTtfl DATA1 


MtCOHD 


KQIIiH 




Mflir 




VA9AEK 




v«tnG 




lr»TXO 




Vt9TfA 




V9CL9 




^9GL 




VQDCA 




M^nD 




V^IC 




EM TEH DATAf 


WBOY 


WeOT IS AN INUAttC) liALL 


ENTEI^ tATA? 





ENTETt 


pyiTA? 


K3EICA 


IC3I3£A 


DATAT 


Itl 
WAHVt 


VfNVB 
EMTEF 


DATA7 




CUP 
tttTEP 


CATAt 


K9A0M 


DUP 
ENTER 


DATA7 


KBiyy 


KBDY IS AW 
ENTltP DATA? 


INVALID CALL 
KfliY 


t«*TEF 


CATAl 


6S 

vBnvh 


cur 

E^TEH 


CATA? 


K4V.ftl 


1C4VJJ tl 1 
EMTER DATA? 

iLET6l£8lJ-*'i'- 


BEAfflf 
EMTEP CATA? 


1 



K^VJG 9 1 

ENTEP DATAl FlEVOHEt 

REUORD tS AH ITf VALID CAI^t 
ENtEft DflTAT RECORD 



MtlF 
tfA9AI3C 

1(9 EVA 
V4€L 



Fig. Z Program J sample run. 



PRINTED CIRCUIT KIT 

Makes circuits THREE WA YS 



FULL «CALe AirrwOAK II4STC«« 



lAOA2J#IE ART 
P STRATI 044 



P^ILRI 

posmve 




NEGATIVE 



DEVELOPED 
PHOTO RESIST 
IWA&E ON 
COPPER CtAD 

CIRCUIT ao Ann 



ETCHEO 
CIRCUIT 
BOARD 




□ IRCCTSTCH DRIf TRANSFERS A^PUED TO COPPER CLAD BOARD 

Copy circuits right from a magazine using special photo film. 
No camera or darkroom used. Page is not destroyed in process. 

Do your own master art. make negatives, sensfriz© boards and 
etcti one or a hundred circuits; ail identical, all perfect 

For one-of-a-kind PC's, use special dry transfer patterns as 
a direct etch resist right on the blank copper board. 

Do it all with the ER-4 In stock at parts distributors or order 
direct. Add ?% shipping Minimum factory order: S30.00. 

ER-4 Compiete Photo Etch Set . S29.95 

ER-2 Assorted Etch Resrst Patterns & Tapes . . 4.25 

ER-3 1/4 lb. Dry Ferric Chloride (makes one pint) = 1.95 

ER'5 Six sheets Pos-Neg Copy Film. 5"x6" ....... 5.15 

ER-6 Film Process Chemicals .._.,, 2,50 

ER-71 Pholo Resist Liquid (negative) does 1700 in^ . 6.50 

ER-a Photo Resist Developen 16 oz, ....... 3.30 

ER-12 Power Etch bubble pump unit* 7,25 

*not included in Ef^-4 sef 



the DATAK cor p. ^m 

65 71 St St. • Guttenberg. N. J. 07093 



73 Magazine • June, 1960 95 



M 



9" THP^ 14^3 



fleets RIH ArtATtUB CALL SOBT ANt PfUMT PnQQRAH 
et&£ REJt WRITTEN BY EtENflHU HOKHM^J VASUIA 
tfti? nm ftEVtSED JULY 24j J9 7S 
#••0 }i£n SVTP 9K BASIC VXP^ S. * 

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135 IF R«5 Ttt&l Hl»Hl4rttFlICHlJ«El 
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ilE? IF F"9 TMEM L J -J-l«] sLS^Ll >«li 
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132 GOTO 60 

fflffi PRINT Blf* 15 AM tMUALtC 

250 tr tij*g THtny a9 5 

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NEXT K 

MEXt H 

PRE NT "7'S SORTED" 

IV «l<rS TWlJf 99S 

FOR IT- I TO Kl-I 

FOH K-ll*l Tt» Kl 

IF K»(li»<Kl<!Cli THEM 

I*D?T K 

KIXT H 

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ir Li<£ THtM ]f95 

FOR W- 1 TO t I- I 

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IF L1(N;i<L»()C} T«Eil 

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Lll!t7^Lieir» 

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MEXT K 
HEXT H 

PRIMT •♦9*S SOBTEir 
IF nl<2 THEH 1195 
FOR n*l TO »«1*1 
FOR K-M#L TO Ml 
EF H1(M]«H1[K> THEN 

NEXT K 

NEXT M 

PRINT "B'S SQPTED" 

GOTO 6ff 

JNPVIT *'£MTLP 

INPUT "EMTKR 

INPUT ''ENlfP 

IMPUT "ENTER 

FOJt K 

PFllHT 



905 



110 fi 



CrATE or FIELD DAY 1 Ei 6^ 23^ TS'% £5^ £6^Z 7 

FEELIf DAY CALL USED^'^AtlCl 

EANP WOHKE^ FOR THIS REPORT"^ At ( 3J 

HOD! OF aPEPATE0N''4 A1C4> 
ItalilPRlHTtHOfTK 
"PAGE i r'i PRINT fPHtNTrPFlEMT 



QOStlEf itei 

5-MI 
IF Dl>S THEH 5*D| 
IF EI*S THEM S'EI 
IF F]*£ THEN £«FI 
IF Gl*5 THEM &*Gl 
FOR T-J TO S 

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PRINT lA£e3 2i: 
EF T*«Fi THOf PnmT FIlTSJ 
PRIMT TA&<49>t 
IF T<:-6 1 THEM PRIIIT GlfTl* 
PRIHT TABt 6Al I 
IF T**m Tl^EM PRIMT H»<T>| 
FRIMT 
SPCT T 

FOR ?C-ITOI0iPlllHTiMEXTK 
PRINT "PAGE •^■"iPnillTiPP-IWTiPRIirT 
GDSU& 1 700 

IF JI>S 
EF Klȣ 
IF L»>S 
IF HUB 
FOR T-J 
1 F tci I 



S«J1 
S-KI 

S=H1 



THEN 
THEN 

771 EM 
THEN 
TO 5 

THtW PRINT 11{T>* 
PRINT TABI I6>» 
IF T«jj THEN PHI NT Ji(T)J 
PRINT TA5t3BJJ 
IF T*K1 THEN PRINT KItTX 
PRINT TASt4BlJ 
If T*L1 THEN PRINT LKTJJ 
PfllMT TABf64}J 
IF T*Ml THEN PRINT rtl*T>l 
PHINt 
NElfT T 
PRINT iPRINTiPRIMT 

ApI>I+£1 + FI*6L«-H1*1 i*4t*Ki*Li*n I 
PRIUT ^TOTAL NUMiiEfi OF CONTACTS 
FOS X<= 170101 PHtHTiHCXtK 
aOTO 60 
PRIMT TAEt 1T»J 

'^AMATEOH RADIO FIELC DAY CONTACT 

tPHIJffTl PRINT 

-QAT^ '♦/;5J*/*IE6P'«/*-JiTfTAfl<£»>| 

^CALL -;A112IJTA£^^ 40>J 

-fiMlli -'I hU ^ti TA&C 6#> i 

FOR Xm lTg7&iPRI«T*'-*'l tMEXTX 

PRINT 

RETtm 



'I A 



PRINT 

PRIST 
PHJHT 

PRINT 
^'RIKT 
PRIHT 



A£j»OnT* 



Fig. 3. Program 2 listing. 



ond program. Set up the 
cassette interface and the 
cassette machine for re- 
cord and enter RECORD 
The computer will jump to 
tine 2100 and the valid 
calls will be saved on tape. 

Program 2 

The contacts saved on 
tape by Program 1 are now 
readv to be used by lines 60 



to 160 of Program 2. As in 
Program 1, the calls are put 
into ten separate arrays. 
After all data is loaded, 
type SORT and the order- 
ing begins, SWTP BASIC is 
rather slow. To avoid the 
feeling that something is 
surely wrong, I had the 
computer print ''I's 
SORTED", '2's SORTED V 
etc., after each array has 



been alphabetized. 

After all sorting is com- 
pleted, type PRINT. The 
program then jumps to line 
1300 and asks for the date, 
call used, band, and mode. 
It then prints the calls on 
two pages with five call 
areas per page. At the end 
of page two, the total 
number of contacts is 
printed In Dick's system. 



his CT 1024, TVT, and KSR 
33 are all interfaced with 
port 1. If you have a dif- 
ferent arrangement, you 
must change the print 
routine accordingly. 

Conclusion 

With some changes, the 
two programs were tried on 
a TRS 80 Level II 16K and 
an OS! IP 8K. If you send 



M 



96 73 Magazine • June, 198€ 



cvTili iMrtkr 

i*5 SORTED 
SOFTEI> 
SOP, TEC 
SORTEC 

SOftTED 
SOFITED 

SORTLU 

SORTED 

SORTED 

VAttk7 



UtRIX 
SORT 



3*5 

4' 5 
5*S 
£«5 
7 »5 
«■£ 
* 'S 

EM TEH 
EHTCR 

EHTER 
CUTER 



fRIMT 

DATt OF riO-D DAY IE* 6* £0, 757 7* £f ?* 
riilt DAY CALL USEDf IHlXXK 
BANE VOBHtP rOH THIS REIPOI^T? JtOM 
MODE or OPEilATIOH? A3 



me an SA5E, I would be 
glad to forward the per- 
tinent information to adapt 

both programs for use with 
either of the abpve-named 
microcomputers. 

Don't forget that there 
are a lot of comppter 
owners out there who are 



eager to show off their 
systems and do something 
worthwhile at the same 
time. Thanks, Dick, for the 
use of your system, for the 
help in programming, and 
for h e t p i n g with the 
development of this arti- 
cle H 



MATEXm RADIO FIELD DAT CONTACT HEPOUT 



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ITAtZTX 


VE^Ui. 


ViUXtt 




tE?!EN 


ir*!fK 






VB^EHU 


ME3U0T 


UJlTJ 




V1^PP<S 


V9WES! 






VBC£OK 


VE3VfK 


¥*rKH 




VB0UCV 


U9K« 






Vfi^FM 


vtjm 


v^zijy 




tffWWCO 


v9oar 






IfetULO 


ifEavwA 


VAfAAC 




VB8Vinr 


V9|*C 






VbZTLK 


VE33M 


UA4BN I 




VDaiLGV 


W9PC£ 






«i*aWK 


M3At;H 


WAflBTG 




VtrS GOM 


W9PJT 





f/g. 4. Program 2 sample run. 



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210 



73 Magazine * June, 1980 97 



J 



Basif Barnes VE6BB 
Box 1226 

Bonny viife^ Afbena 
Canada TOA OLO 



Emulate an Elephant 

-but let your micro bear the burden 



Hns the following ever 
happened to you? 
You^re tuning around 80 
meters one night, call a 
CQ, and listen to the reply 
and a familiar voice: 

"VE6BB, this is VE6XYZ. 
Hi, Basil, old buddy How 



are the wife and kids? Did 
you ever get that 101 of 
yours fixed? Say, are you 
going to the picnic again 
this year? " etc. 

Now, you know the guy. 
YouVe met him lots of 
times The only thing is that 



20 
30 
40 
SO 

60 

fin 



lCHIl|(12)tl*' 11 h N 

iJfiPUT'*lfHlCH PRtnx *Rf VOU 
l;l"YaU MA¥ kllU (AJ,D1LETE 



1 



DIKECTOItT^: 

UfTEfiESTEB IKT ",PS 
lD)«LISt (LK {lit StARO 



(S) FOR HAMS' 



P-hHICH DO you 
IF A|Ci*n'"A" 
IK A|tl,U = "l/" 

lOOl+'iAD INPUT . . 

Ill) 

UQ 

150 

140 

tso 

160 



irAHT? 
TII1;N 
Til EN 
THEN 
TUFN 



110 
410 
220 
ZSO 



A£^IMCHAR$(0}: US 



T<l:MIiMBER^':G0TO40 
'OCJNE' FOR THE 



CALL WrtEN VOU COMPLETli- 



IFAS [1 ,3)="ENU"T}IIINIS0 



L70 

mo 

200 

210 
220 
210 
140 
2S0 

im 

270 

2ao 
^oo 

310 
320 
ISO 
S4a 
^50 
360 
370 
310 

400 
AiQ 
420 
410 

440 
4 SO 
4«»0 
470 
410 
490 
SOO 

'^ n 

SID 
S4 
550 



0PFN#O.P*: l"TYi*i; 

COSUB 540 

ltliAD#a'^4S*Z,A$.BS.C| 

I»Z+1;GOT0130 

I-I-t 

COSUB&40^ 1-2*1 

IKFUT-'CALLT "^A* [1 , 7} ; TFA$ f I ,4>-*»DO!iiE''THEN200 

llifUT'^NAHEt ",&| (L.IO) : lKFUT''<JTi-l7 "^Gl 11,10] 

HRtTE*0%4 3*£,AS«tf ,CS:COTOLbO 

Af CK3) = '*ENa":iin,2J»*'OF";C|(1.4J-"FlLE'* 

1i1lllEi0^43<£^AS^S$,£| tC0T0S20 

fNPUT"irfficii CALL DO rou msu to pelete? " tiH-.ii$^zhi*' 

OF£MtO,P$:I-0 

|l£AD#0%43*I^AS,if ,CS: IFZSI^Afl ,LEN(ZiS) )Tt&£M260 

tFA|{l.J)***E*!D"TtifcK510:I^l + l-COTCI24D 

S:«'2«^l:READlO\4 3*£,A|,el,CSiI^Z-t ;llllTEtO%4 3*Z,AipB|,t| 

IFAltt,3)>>'END''THEN500ELSEI>2*E:GDT0260 

!"ȴ CALL, NAME, OR QTH? " , :I9|*INCIIAK$ (0 ) : IZ$S 

IKPUT'*hHAT AllE VOU LOOllKG FOR? ''^ZSf*! 

OPEN* 0, PI: 2*0 

GOHUBS40 

llEAD#0%45*Z»Ai»a(.C|!lFAj(l , 3>^'END"THEN&00 

IF Z9¥(1*1}<>''C"TH12N 560 

lF4B$=Ain .LHNUBiJ3THEf*!A$,TAfl(lSJ , l!$ , TAP 135) ,C| 

Z-2tl:G0T0510 

1FZ9J[1»1K>"N^' THIN 390 

IFSa$ = B3n ,LtiN(Ze*)3THEl**!A$,TAB(lS3 , S$ .TAB (25 ) , Cf 

1^1*1 :GOTOilO 

lF£a$-CS[I,LEN(I8mtHENEA$,TAB(t5)«B$*TAG(2S}iC£ 

2»Z»1;GOTI>120 

nOP£KiD,Ff tI-0 

Y = 

READ#a%43*I **.B|,C| 

IFAS 1 1 »3)^ THLNSOO 

IAt«TABU£K1f «TAft(2S) ,CS:Y<^¥^1 

tF 1F>15 THEN 470 ELSE :;GOT0 

'"PRESS RETUSK TO CO^'^ii^yi. ":20|« 

IF ASC cr^^K^U TUEK 500 

Z=^Z*l7C0T0 4 20 

1 ; ITAat 12 )»''F 13*1 SHED" :GaTOS20 

I :l**XOT FOUND •• 

CLOSEiO; J :t"AGAlh7 ", :ES'll*CHARf (0) : !E| 

IF Ettl*l)-"T*' THEN 40 ELSE SSO 

A$=" ":ai-A}:CS=Ai:RETURM 



430 
iKCHAtfCOl 



^ 



Program listing. 



98 TSMagazfne • June, 1980 



you can't for the life of you 
remember his name right 
now, and he's waiting. Is it 
loe? Bill? Arthur? (You 
haven't actually worked 
him for over a year now — 
that's 1500 contacts ago.) 
Finally, you try "Jim" and 
the cool reply from the 
other end tells you two 
things: First, his name is Ken 
(oh, of course, rrow 1 
remember!). And second, 
you just lost another friend 
[relations are never the 
same again). 

Does that sound famil- 
iar? I'm sure that it's hap- 
pened to many others 
besides myself, and after 
the first time or two, it vir- 
tually forces one to imple- 
ment some form of card in- 
dex system. 

Well, if you have a mi- 
crocomputer and a North 
Star floppy disk system, 
then the following program 
can prove very useful. It 



stores, for instant recall, 
the callstgns, names, and 
QTHs of all hams that you 
work, with some additional 
side benefits that I'll ex- 
plain later. If you have a 
floppy disk system that is 
not North Star, then you 
will have to modify both 
the data-accessing pro- 
cedures and the North Star 
BASIC instruction set. 

The program is written in 
Release 4.0 of North Star 
BAS1C„ Once the program 
is typed up, then merely 
order NSAVE AMATEUR 
and the mtorpreter will 
create the file (type 2] and 
save the program for you* 

Disk Creation 

Type in Program 1, 
check it thoroughly, and 
save it (NSAVE AMATEUR). 
Now create some data files 
using radio prefixes for the 
file name, as in Fig.1, for ex- 
ample. With the example 



CREATE "VE".30 
CREATE "OX", 50 
CREATE "Kfr'%30 



An tAillpIc of usiat tbe '"CREATE" £« 



nd to Gfeal« djfa files 



Fig. 1. 



us Z = -1:COTO leO 

Enter thlf line Intcs^ the prDgrsm when ii£C«££in£ i diia fj]e for 

Ehe fjTitttiwit oalr , Mafc* one entry (bh lea^t} into the file 

Hfid theft d^e Vet fl this line. U»« line IIS for each tiew preifli tlmta file 



fig^ 2. 



A3*- 



■«*Tttn«a 



a*9] 






lib! lU 



•I* r^ 



. • • *' A If- L 



f*#i 



t.**-' 






- •* 



«lb on 



CM-600 $6,95^ 
RW-50 $2,98* 

NEWCM^eOO SOLDERLESS PROTOTYPE BOARD 

CM-600 is a unique systera for solderless construction of circuit prototypes, useful to 
both, engineers and hobbyists. The CM-600 is a neoprene board 4i" (114min) x 6'' 
(152mm) with 2280 holes on .100" (2.54mm) centers. Standard components 
including DIP'S are mounted by simply inserting leads into the holes in the long life 
neoprene materiaL Interconnections are easily made using 20 or 22 AWG (0,8 or 
0,65nim) wire jumpers. Positive contact is assured by the elasticity of the hole, which 
compresses the leads together. To remove components or leads, simply pull out. This 
fecilitates easy circuit changes making it Ideal for breadboarding experimental 
circuits. CM-600 also features numbered rows and columns for easy reference. 
Accessory Kit RW-50 contains 50 pes of AWG 20(0,8nim) insulated jumper wires of 
assorted lengths from i"(13mm) to 4"( 100mm). Both ends are stripped and bent 90° 
for easy insertion. In stock directly from 

OX Maclilne & Tool Corporation ^^ 

3455 Conner St, Bronx,N.Y. 10475 U.S.A. 
TeL(S12) 994-6600 Telex 125091 

* Minimum blUlngs $26.00, add shipping charge $2. GO 
Siw New York State residents add applicatile tax 



Reader Service — see pag$ 210 



73 Magazine • June, 1980 99 



shown, you will have three 
files, for VE, DK and W6 
contacts You can open 
files for any prefix you wish. 
You are limited only by the 
size of your disk storage, so 
I would suggest that you 
keep at least one disk just 
for your card index (byte in- 
dex?] files. In opening a new 
file that has just been creat- 
ed, however, you must 
nnake a slight modification 
to the program*- but only 
the first time. This is be- 
cause our random access 
dtita file is set up as follows: 

[CALL, NAME, QTH] 
ICALl, NAME. QTH] [...] 
["END", "OF"/'FlLE"] 

The program expects 
"END OF FILE" to be in the 

data storage as the last en- 
try and looks for Lhis to 
finish whatever it's doing. 
Consequently, when you 
have a brand new data file, 
you don't have an "END 
OF FILE" written in for the 
program to find, and it will 
return a TYPE ERROR This 
is how we get around it: 

(a) Enter the fine from 
Fig. 2 in your program 

(b) Now RUN the pro- 
gram and enter your new 
data file name as the prefix 
when requested by the pro- 
gram, bnter one call/name/ 
QTH a! least, and then type 
'^DONE" for the call when 
it is requested An example 
of this is shown in Fig 3 

(cl Finally, delete line 
115 and your data file is 
ready. 

Remember, you have to 
do this only once for every 
new data file you create. 
Once it is done and you 
have entered the calls, 
names, and QTHs of hams 
you've worked, then you 
can recall any detail in- 
stantly. 

The side benefits of this 
program include the fact 
that you also can search 
for all the hams you have 
worked who live in a par- 
ticular location. Thus, you 
can display all hams who 
live in Hobart, for example, 



or those whose names be- 
gin with B, or BOR, or 1 1 or 
even all VK7s, The program 
searches for whatever you 
have asked for, and ex- 
amples of this are given in 
Fig. 4. 

The Program Itself 

The program is written in 
North Star BASIC, Release 
4.0, using a DOS personal- 
ized for VDM and 3 P + S 
I/O. North Star BASIC per- 
mits multiple statements 
per line, separated by a co* 
Ion (:) or backslash (\). 
"PRINT ' may be abbrevi- 
ated by "V\ Any portion of 
a string may be accessed 
by string delimiters. For ex- 
ample, if A$ = "DEVON- 
PORT", then A${1,1) = 
''D^', A$(r3)= ''DEV^and 
A$t6.9) = '^PORT'\ 

In line 20, the CHRSn2) 
is a clear screen command. 
You may have to change 
that to suit your own sys- 
tem. 

The '1NCHAR$" com- 
mand in lines 50, 280, 470, 
and 520 waits for a single 
character to be input and 
operates on that character 
immediately without wait- 
ing for a carriage return. To 
modify these lines for Re- 
lease 3 of North Star 
BASIC, refer to Fig. 5- 

No dimensioning of char- 
acter strings is necessary 
with North Star BASIC but 
other forms of BASIC may 
require this during modifi- 
cations 

Random Access Files 

All files are accessed 

randomly, and for this to 
work satisfactorily, all 
blocks of data should be 
the same length. There- 
fore, line 540 sets A$, B$. 
and C$ to a certain length 
with a number of blanks, 
and entries made by you 
take up the first portion of 
that length. Should you 
enter any name or QTH 
longer than is allowed, the 
excess is truncated. 

Data [CALL. NAME, 
QTH) are read (and written) 
in blocks of 43 bytes, so 



tOpBrator entrltrs itre under E inrdj 

KtilLii rKl.1^11 ARE lOU lKT£ii.ST£U IN? V£ 

TQV PCAT ADD (A), DELETE I0)» LEST <L] PS SEARCH fS} FOt HAMS 

««tCH UO tm KA^TTT A 

TTPi 'POKH' FOR TH£ CALt tKlN VaU CCWPL£T£. 

CALir vibin 

NAME? ftASIL 

cALtT ggi?r 

Afi ejianplc fif a typ^iclJ ADD emtrr intQ the diLii file. Fpll^uing 
this vntrj)' delete litiir IIS {if entered) f-roa tli« frocranif and the 
prtflf file *VU' is t*ady f^ir (^urttisr eiitt-t^i,. 



Fig, 3. 



ton MAY A.DD (A), DEL£T£ (l»K t^St EL) OR SEARCH [S\ FOB HAMS 
l/llttll HD YDU KANTt S 
fit €ALi, NAHtJ Oft QTHT C 
IfllAT ARE VOU LOOKING Pol't ^gf 



VtlDl 


PEX 


PtHTI* 


VJi7TH 


RAY 


HOMRT 


VtTHC 


MAUiiCE 
FINISHED 


SYANStA 


ACAIRr 


¥ 





TOU MKK AWt |A). PELETE (DK LT5T (L) Oft SEAICM fS> FOR HAMS 

ITHICII VO you VAKTl £ 

BY CALL, KAME OR QTHT N 

iriLAT ARE VOU tOOllSC FOB? J£ 

VltfAH JOHN P£«T1« 

VK7JV JOHN LAUNC^STON 

FlNlSHEU 

AGAIN? N 

SotPt exAfnprLcs of yslng ths mcfiTch TQutickErin tht' prt^gmm to 
lialite oarticulAT calls or nuncft^ qt parta uF ca1I% qjf lUiiEGs 



fig* 4- 



$0 IMPUT "IHICH PO ton IfAKT^ **.A| 

210 IN#UT '■BT CALL, tfAMf , OR QTH? ",19% 

<7a ISPUT "PRESS RtTimM TO C0^T1KUE "* ,2H 
520 CLOS£#0: 3;lKPLrT*^ACAtKt ",ES 

If uilnf Rclfiisv 3 North $t«r P«9ic, thvn clilngci vitl h«ve tu b« 
viidv td fh« above lines a.% shoifn' (Release 3 dcei not incorporate 
I he *MNC]'^Afit" EODinianil} . 



Fig. 5. 



that to successively read 
(and write) the blocks of 
data requires multiplying 
43 by 1 , then by 2, then by 
3, and so on. This is han- 
dled by incrementing a 
counter, ;'Z". Thus, you 
can access any block mere- 
ly by setting Z to the cor* 
rect value (the number of 
the block minus one), mul- 
tiplying it by 43, and read- 
ing (or writing) from that 
point in the file, For exam- 
ple, the statement in line 
130- 

130 READ#0%43*2,A$, 

—means that from file No. 
[previously opened m line 
110), move the file pointer 
to the (43 X Z) position and 
read A$, B$, and C$, 

The counter, "Y'\ which 
appears \n lines 420-460 of 
Program 1 is designed to 



allow the VDM driver to 
display 14 tines and then 
wait for a carriage return to 
be input before displaying 
another 14 lines, ad in- 
finitum. Otherwise, the 
whole file can zip right 
past your eyes in a flash in 
a *'LIST" command In ef- 
fect, this is a form of in- 
program paging When the 
program pauses at that 
point, if it receives any 
character other than a CR, 
it stops at that point. 

Conclusion 

Don't let the small size 
of this program put you 
off. It's powerful enough to 
get the job done, and you'll 
appreciate having your in- 
dex at your fingertips. The 
program can stand further 
optimizing, but HI leave 
that to you " 



M 



100 73 Magazine • June, 1980 




DECIDE NOW . . . BECAUSE THE 
PRICES ARE GOING UP. 

If you hai>en 't made up your mind tohether to subscribe to SO Microcom- 
puting . . . NOW IS THE TIME. July 1, 1980 the cover price is in- 
f redoing to $2. 50 and along with it the subscription prices are going up. 
BUT, &) Microcomputing in gii>ing you from now until July IS, 1980 to 
SUBSCRIBE OR RENEW AT THE OLD RATES. 

SUBSCRIBE TODAY to the industry's only complete journal for the 
inters of the TBS-80* at the old rates of $IS.(X}/I year; $24.00/2 years and 
^6.00/3 years. Dont wait and have inflation hit again and pay the new 
rates of m.00m0.00/$45.00. 

OF COURSE, FLL BEAT INFLATION . . . 

fZl Sew Suhscriber □ Rerwiva! fplease affix an address U^ljrom 

your mi ml recent magazine^ 
LI i yeat/$i5M0 \3 2 tfeant/$24.00 D 3 yean^$36.00 

n Fayment enckmed Biili P Me U Master Chcirge 

Q Visa □ Atnerex 



Card # ^_ 
bigtiature 

Expire Date 



hUerhank i ^ 



Name/I Mhe!. 

Addre^ 

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State. 



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Camtdian: $ISAHK 1 year only . US funds. 

Foreign: $20M(K / yettr only. US funds. 

Please <iilotv 6-H weeks fijr processings 

-THIS CARD EXPIEESJULY /«, 1980^ 

ALL previom subscription offers to 80 Microcomptiting 
are void July iS, J 980. 



so 



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micracomputing 



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*« trademarlc of Tandy Ctxrporation 306B7 



Traditional 



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$ja.O0/Wefw York State residents add applKiable tax 



OK Machine & Tool ^'' 
Corporation 

3455 Conner St.. Bronx, N.Y. 10476 U.S.A. 
Tel. (213) 994-6600 Telex 133091 



^ Reader S&n/ice — see page 2^0 



73 Magazine • June, 1980 101 



u 



If you entoy driving, you're going to get a 
COMPUCRUISE. Once you see what it can 
tky, yoy just won't he able to live without it 



m @ ■ ■ ffi 

E :^ [fi ^ tD 




I8:SS 1 


. IB . ^1 


-^^^^^ 





This Qatjget fits inlo moat dashboards no strain even in a iirtj^ sports car like Itie Mazda RX-7 . . . and 
once you have it, every i rip is liikc flymg a 747. The darned tfiin^ tells you the lime, how fast you re oomg. how 
far you've twen on \t\\^ tr^p of since the East rega&sing, how many m^les per gallon you fe geltmg. «iiher at tire 
instant ot me average or^ the trip ot gallons pef hour at ihe motttent or for the trip lempvrvture outside 
. . . insidG lor toolant fempemture, it you j>ret6f) . . oh. it has an elapsed lime tor Ihe trip, a stop watcrt. lap 
tim«, an aiaarrrn . how mi>ch turihef lor your inp, how many gallons more the trip will take, how much loniger 
for the In p at your present average speed yes, it gives you your average speed for ihe Uip. Yow prelef it in 
metric, no strain , iMers remstning. etc Did^ we mention thai it also rias cruise ccnirof either at a speed set 
on Ihe control hoard or at whatevrer speed y^ou are travelmg'^ The Gompucfuise witi ke»ep you Dusy and emer- 
tamed during} any tr»p teMmg you more thari you tnW ever want to know 

The Compycrulse is not dilticull to inGtall though it does connect to everything esicept the cigarette 
lighter Unill you ve tried computerized travel you haven t found out how much tun driving can be It will work 
on any car not having fuel injeciJon and there is a Jront-wheel drive accessory gadget availatile tor only 
S4.40lfPOOl (regularly $5 50). 

The price lor the Compucruiss Is regularly $199.95 . and a bargain al that price. Well self you one of these 
fanlQstic gadgeis for $159.95 with cruise control {Model 44HPgQ2}, and $1127.95 wflhout (Model 4 VftPD03),Send 
money and start having funi 



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MOWS SOFTWARE 

SPEED READING 

COURSE 

A lachistoscope simulation 
which enables the user to in- 
crease reading and compre- 
tension speeds A must for 
any TT{S-@0 16K Level if 
owner. Onhy $5 pef cassette, 
Ord^*R200t 



HEAD ALIGNMENT KIT 

Best cassette racordet tape head 
alignment kit avdiia&le Solves 
loading probliems fKOOl^Of^y 

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Panasonic RS261 US Slereo 
Cassette Oacks — wJth auto^ 
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HONEYWELL 

Honeywell ASR-33 Communlca- 
tions Consoles with TTY, paper 
tape reader and punch Used, 
working when re moved Irom 
service. Shipp^ freight collect 
Of you pick up Weight 300 lbs. 
S375. Order ltP006S 



ABACUS 

Tl2 Abacus Paperweight— 

Hefty, brass, enoeifeni con- 
dition 
#SQ24 $3 SPECIAL PRfCE 



COMPUCOLOB 

HARDWARE 

Compucolor Compuler ftOOl 
luse as coniputer or 75 MHZ 
Color Monjtor)— 8K RAM, BA- 
SIC and DOS in ROM, good con- 
Ciillon. *(S025S S1400 each. 
SPECIAL PRICE 
Compucolor MlnFloppy— 5% 
Inch, good condiHon #S026S- 
$500 each SPEC»AL PRICE 
CompueokHT 8K RAM card- 
Si at ic f^AM, good condition 
iS027S-SiiO eactL SPECIAL 
PRICE 

Com(pucak>r Floppy Tap* Ortre 
— uses eight-track cartr^Jges. 
gocnJ condition tSDZSS-ltiO 
«»Ch. SPECIAL PRICE 



AL5-aO 

13 ALS'SO Operating system^ This 
syslem requares t2K RAM from 
OOOO to FFFR as well as ellher 
the SOLOS or CUTTER monilor; 
It Includes an Assembler/ Ed I tor 
IDDiaSl 1.60 each. 



POLYMORPHIC 

HARDWARE 
PplyMofphic Vkleo Terminal In- 
terface— Memory mapped video 
for S- 100 bus. Qood to eitcelieni 
condilion, fSQM-S 150 each. 
SPECIAL PRJCE 
PoJyMofphio S-IOQ Cabmets— 
Nice 5 slot S-TOO maintrarrie. 
good to SKcefient condition, 
f 0049 -S248 each. 



15 



PROCESSOR TECH 

SOFTWARE 
Proceiior T««h Extended Disk 
BASJC-Thla Is full disk BASIC 
on B" disk for HELIOS II disk 
controllers with PTOOS and 
greater Ihan t6K. #fX)l5S$70 

EKlerfded Disk BASIC oci eas^ 

M||#— This IS the sarT>e as 
{K^ftriNxiSly mentioned for the 
Disk BASIC from Processor 
Tech. Needs more than 1SK. 
iD0l7S-S62 

Extended Cassette BASIC— 
ThtS includes au file opefations. 
advanced functions for ^Jomg 
more Ihan playing games; lor 
SOLOS, CUTTER, and CONSOL 
Monitors #D016-S22 each 
BASIC S Irom Processor Tech — 
This Is a simple BASIC for a 
SOLOS. CUTTER, or CONSOL 
Monilor artd SK of RAM. #D013. 
Si1,60each 

ProcesiorTech GAMEPAC for 
dldc^e BASIC— Various s^mpfe 
pmes »O0i4SiOiXJeath 



TOL ZAPPIE 

3 TOL ZAP IK itonftor— Simple 
iK mooilor iD0073&$lO. 



LIMITED SUPPLY 

73 MAG. AUG. *79 

Contains controversial article 
"Vpu Can Wfllch Those Secmi TV 
Channels, ' Order #M001-S5 each, 
IPIus shipping and handling,) 



IMSAl 

PARALLEL I/O CARDS 
t IMSArParan*ll/0caEd44— 

■*- Foyj parallel pons, S-IOO. ex- 
cf^'fent condition. iO0093S'ST76 



IMSAl 
SERIAL I/O CARDS 
IMSAt Sttilfll IfO eami 2-1 fkilH 
Onti Sflfiat port, full control 
RS-232 control, S-IOO. new. 
«P0092S'$gO. 



ICOM 

DISK DRIVE 
ACCESSORIES 

ICOM PROM and 8" Olsk for 
SOLFOOS—Thisdtsk 
requires an tCOM SiOQ Disk 
Controller installed m an S-TOO 
iOO3i&$l50 

JCOM CP/M on a" Disk lof S-lOO 
— Requires an (COM St 00 con- 
troller in an S-tOO cabinet. 
«D032&$90 

ICOM FDOS-II on W l>tsk lor 
S-IOQ— Reguires an ICOM S-100 
cabinet, ho documentation. 
iD033S-$170each. 
ICOM fOOSfl on S'A'' Disk for 
S-100— Requires an ICOM S-100 
Mini-Floppy Controller in 
an 5-100 cabpnei. 
#00348 -£155- 



IMSAt SOFTWARE 

IMSAl IMDOS VZ.02on B 

Disktgr S tOO-No 
Ejocumentation Ijut thus ts 
apparenMy iMSAls verEion 
o* CP/M lc*f S 100 systems 
wfit% an IMSAt Disk Con- 
troilef #D0056SS-S75 each 



PROCESSOR TECH SOL 

4 SOL Computers-- dK RAM Mon- 
\ itor, &1D0, excellent condition. 

#D004S-S950 each 
! 7 TR EK-80 on C asse I te f or SOL— 

This Is one ot ihe besi real time 
space gamea availablei loday; 

needs QK. WD00S-S11 each. 



56 



KORTH STAR 

HARDWARE 

North Star Fknatlfig Point BASIC 
6vil— With s^eetal BASIC, rtew 
fD009^^S27D 

hk»th Star Floppy Disk Control- 
ler card— Single density. S-IOQ. 
new #00051 S24a 
&100 Edge Connector— Gokf 
Contacts, new «O05O S2 eacn, 
Bdecidef Card lor S-IOO (kllj— 
New #0^18120 each. 



102 73 Mm^t\m • June, 1980 



SPECIAL 10% DISCOUNT 

FIKM UST PfltCES 

SCOTT ADAMS ADVENTURES 
FOR TR&ao m SORCERER • APPLE 



•1 ADVENTUAELAND 
CaiiAwrreD lano encounterino 

WLD ANlMAiJS AND M^UQlCAL 
e£iHGS W+tJLE *0U THV TO 

RECOVER Lost TAeASuncs 

Of air ■SAflOIT ttP tfiS L«v4l » tW. 
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(m ftppi* 2JX-ll3.45 9ftch. un 

ia PIRATE ADVEkTURE 

SAIL TO ThEABunE iSLAr^O AMP 
TflV TO flECOVEW LONG JOHM 
SILVEFf'S LOST TREASURES 
OfiJQf iSAOOZT Pot TRS L«v«fl II IftK, 

tW A«^a ti«,— $ 13^5 tftcn «n 

rS MlSStON IMPQSSISLE 
ADVENTURE 

5AVC THE WO^tD^ FinST 
miTOHATED HUCLEAA IIEACTOfI 
WHEN iflXl COwPtiTE TOtW 

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SAVE COtJPfT CPtSTO FROM THE 

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MiTHS di= Jm ANOINT ALIEN 
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«VNILE tmi AMJ^ FA1ULOU& 

CMw fSAOO&T ^ TRS Mtvi 11 ^ flit. 

«v Apo^ 2«K— 91145 MCfl, iHl 

IT •fftSTEnY FUN NOU^ 

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STRaNCE^ fun house eCf Oi^E 
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<M« PGA007T lc>r TR§ Ufn*l » 1EVK 
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Apple 24K— 11:^45 eacli gih r:Aii*tl«. 

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AN tGYPtlAM TREASURE HUNT 
ttiROuGN A NEVifL'V UWCOVtlitD 
PyH*tgHD. COMPLETE WITH AN 
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fiv A|pt£>ii<i j4K— ST:)4%fl*Dn. on 



MAIL ORDER MICROS ^sa 

laps. 873 • PO Boi 427 * Merlbon) NH 63455 
Phona: [fi03) 324-3041 



m 



SALE 



TOL SOFTWARE DISK 

1 TOL FOGS & SuperflASrC 
fr on 8" Dl«k— This requires 
an ICOM Dish ContTOlSer 
md at leasi 20K of mamory, 
plus a 2APPLE MonJtor In 
an &100 CabineuAJtair, IM- 
SAI, etc). #O0055S'$125 

1 TDL System Software on 

syitem software requires a 
Honfi &tar Di^h Contmller. 
afvd a TDL S^tems Momtof 
Boafd I, arvd consists of 

fr>Q LoatJef, 2^ Editor. af«l 
TeMi Processor •D006&& 
S170 
1 TDL System Software on 
k SV*" disk— This IS 1 56 same 
as above^ bui does not re- 
t^lre Ihe Sy^^errrs Monitor 
BosrfJ I #D0O67S-SigO. 
1 TDL Syslflm Software &n 
k SV*'' disk-- Again, as above, 
but requires a HELIOS Disk 
Controller and the TDL 
SySt@rn& Monitor Board i\ 
(noHj. #000685 $170. 



CALLBOOKS 

tO% OFF 

iS^PCXQi-*as 116,95. now S152S 
DX^#CX02'was S15.96. rvow S14^ 



BOOK CLEARANCE 

UP TO 50% OFF 
Chernlstry with a Computer ^EdtM 

comppubJisher) (PSKtOIO—was 

$9.95, now 15.00. 
Computer OjQtionary {Cameiot- 

publisher) WBK1018— was S5,95, 

now $3.00 
FORTRAN Programming {Cairtfr 

lot-publisher) itBK1019— was 

S7.95. now MOO- 
FORTRAN Workbook rCametot- 

publisher) jKeKlOaO-was S4^, 

now S2i50 
A Quick Look at BASIC (Cameiof- 

publisher) #BK1D43— was S4.95, 

nowS2-5a 
How to Buy and Use Mir^^s and Mi- 

Cfos jSams-publtsher) lfflK1025 

—was S9.95. now S&OO. 
Home Compuier$ QuesUons and 
Answers. Hardware. {Dilithmm 
Publishers) was S7 96 now S4,00 
#BK10£3. 



VECTOR GRAPHIC 

SI 00 

Vector Graphic ROP^ft^RAM card 
— 12Kemply ROW sockets, 1K 
RAM. excel Lenl condilJon. 
iDOOTBS^tOO 
Veclof Graphi^c Aria log (n- 
terface — Allows iiotjbyast to in- 
lerface analoo eitpehments. 
S-100, WW. #O0079^S?9a>. 







WAMECO 5-100 Bam Computer 


Boards 










Retail 


MOM'S Price 




\0 ea 


CPU-1 


eoeO CPU Board 


26.95 


2295 


#LP001 


TOea 


MEM'IA SK Memory Board (2102) 


25,95 


2195 


#fLP002 


10 ea 


Mem 2 


16K Memofy Board i2l\4| 


2695 


22,95 


#LP003 


10 ea 


EPWI'2 


2708.2716 EPRQM Board 


25,95 


21,95 


#LP004 


IDea 


EPM-1 


170Z EPf^OM Board 


25.95 


21.95 


#LK>05 


10 ea 


RTC-1 


Heal Time Clock 


23.95 


20.50 


#LP006 


10 ea 


QM-O 


The Little Mother (9 sJotl 


30.95 


2^m 


#LP007 


10 ea 


OM 12 


The Quite Mother H 2 slot 


34.95 


29.95 


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5ea 


FDC-1 


Floppy Disk Board 


42,95 


38 95 


#LP009 


7ea 


FF^I 


FrofTt Panel IMSAl size) 


44.50 


37 95 


#LP010 


1 ea 


EPM-1 


1702 EPROM Board (asmbldl 
wtlhout EPftOMS 


49.95 


42^ 


#LP011 



ASK MOM 

For details of Oclobar 1930 Asian 
and European Electrpnlcji Touns. 
Sea January Wayne Green edllori- 
ais In Feb. 19B0 73 Magazine. Into 
#002. No charge. 

VERBATIM MINI DISKS 

ForTRS-00, Pet, App* 

(please specily wtitchii 

to PACK-ONL¥ t2«X» 

IP0D7 MOM'S pHers itie 

Best Tor Less Aftam* 



IMSAl SOFTWARE 

IMSAl IMOQS V3.02 on 8' Disk 
for S-100 — frio docurnentalton. 
but this is app^renriy IMSAl's 
version of CP/M for S-lQO sys- 
terns with an IMSAl Disk Con- 
troller. #0005653$ 75 each, 



PHONE INTERFACE 

Hovation Modem ir31Q2A— con- 
nects to any pnone, originate 
only, good condition #S021- 
S165 each SPECIAL PfllCE 
Nqvatkin Moderji ■43 — Con- 
nects to any pho^ie. originate 
only, good condition. iS023& 
S15S SPECIAL PRICE 



MOUNTAIN HARDWARE 
7 Mountain Hardware AC Controi 
* let— Remote AG outfet COhtrol, 
S-100, rrew #D040£S90 each. 



HEURISTICS 

SPEECH LAB 

Hauristks Speech Lab— Si 00, 
used, lair condinon #S042S'S90 
as 4S. SPECIAL PRICE 



SPECIAL PRJCE ir>cltjdesm&re than 20 ■ * 

disctxtnt. * indicates extra price reduc^ 
ticyn since last ad 

Ouaniiiies am limiled, immediale r«lup<J 
it onSttred itefn is no longer available 

TERM& FOS Martboro, NK USA LimitefJ 
si-ock, eve/ythlng guaranteed as de- 
scribed; you pay postage on returns 
PRINT orders clearly. Minimum order S10 
plus $2.50 shipping and handling charge 
in USA only. DOUBLE THAT ELSE^ 
WHERE Orders over $50 add b% for 
shipping in Coniinenlai USA, 10V& else- 
Mu'ti! {We will refund excess) Orders 
shipped UPS or insufed mail only. No 
CO0'$ pieas,e. Send US funds bv check or 
rnorwy ofiteT, For cretJil card purch^s^, 
add 4%. list AE_ M Cor VISA, nuftiber. and 
eKprration date. Mail to- MOM ^i. Depart' 
men! 671 PO Bov 427, MailtXKO HH 
03455 

Condttkin ol Inventory: 
N«« * oripiml cofitAiner 
Eic*li«nt = new. t>ut not in offgtnaf 
container 
Good = lasted or used in »lore 

Ptiorrt an«Mf»rfld by machine. Ordartl 
till en wllti credit cards, Questions 
answinid bf maii. Pissse leave your 
nams and address. 



BRAND NEW* TRS-80 s 
and accessories at FANTASTIC SAVINGS 



LEVEL II T6K COMPLETE. S720 rmS^OOlS 

IfiK EXPANSION UNtT S400 rmS-002S 

32K EXPANSION UNpr S525 WTRQ^Xn 

DISK DRIVES$425 each (Specify vvhich <inve you want) lfmS-004 



FRICTION MODEL PRINTER 
TRACTOR FED MODEL PRINTER. 
LINE PRINTER HI ^ANO CA&LE}. . 
MOO fl e4K 



$870 rTRS-OOSS 

.11350 rrRS-ooe 

S1550 rrRS^7 
S3400 tTRS^Kje 



TERMS; Shlpm^nj normally within one week of receipt of your or<lei' (wi:th cashiers check, money order, or credit card) for micro- 
computer and Ihree weeks for accessories (checks take tvi^o weeks extra to olear bank). ADO $2,50 PER ITEM for HANDLING. 
Everything will be sent to you with UPS Irelghl charges COLLECT. 

'NOT UPGRADED US^D OB nECONDmONBD LEVEL I's WiTH OLD KEYBOARDS BUT BRAND SPANKfNG NEW TRS&O's fN 
FACTORY CARTONS WiTH FULL FACTORY WARRANTY f COMPAnr PRiCES AND QUALITY AND ORDER FROM MOM'S, 



SIMULATED SURVElLLi^NCE VIDEO SYSTEMS 

Since the v*deo camera systems STe totally psycttologicaJ, that is, the visibility and suggestion of video cameras is what 
deters the I hi era desire to steaL all tt^ai is really needed is a device that appears to be a functioning video camera The SSV 
System provides the businessman with the same deterrent to crime as real systems at a fracf ion of the cost . bocajuse the 
camefas ano alarm t»o>ces are empty of e^ectrorijcs. but wouki4M crooks don't know this, and SSV Systems are enfremely 
realistic in detail. Some scan back and forth an^f alt have red fieofi li^hls They leature easy installation, mount on any wall, 
have metalcor>slructionthiDi>grTOu1. with wrinkle iinrsh paint, all aluminum lerts banket with l-stoiits. footage markings, and 
convex optcs. sirmjlated coaxial ca&ie and wall plate, manufaciiirer's uocondttiofial guarantee, ptus warnmg stickers io- 
cluded With all orders. 

SVS 900 Scanning camera feature$ 1 55 degt^ scanning act lOO. lor^g4i1e quiet. 1 rpm motor, only SlOO(fegulaftySl 19 95} 
catafOQ fPOOlO- 5VS-380 stationary camera is adjustable to any an^^lefor lixed view coverage Wf1f> mounting brackets and 
hardware, only KO (regularfy $58 95} catalog (fPOOll. or go lirst class with the SVS-2000, which has a soft h^ue finish with 
satin mylar trim only 5105 freguiarly Si 24,96) catalog #P00l2. the stationary version is only S55 ^regularly Sfi2 95| catalog 
#P0013. Alarm boxes are only S20 (regularly $34.95^ catalog #PQ0^4 and complele your look of having real surveillance 
equiprrient installed at yourt^usiness, horn© or off ice 



^Re&dm Servtce — see page 210 



73 Magazine • June, 1980 103 



Ron Cunn AG6P 
35B Aibatrois 4ve 
Uvermare €A 94550 



Prefix Challenge 

try this while you're waiting for 
the band to open up 



When fellow hams Vis- 
it your computer, do 
you spend time teHing them 
what it will do? Well, here's 
a way to show them what it 
will do, be they new Nov- 
ices or seasoned DX Honor 
Roll veterans. 

Lay ''Ham Prefix" on 
them and let them select 
their own level of difficulty. 
This 7K BASIC program will 
give prefiKes/countries like 
W, F, Canada, Mexico, and 



VK to the Novice and rate 
him at Extra, Advanced, 
General, or Novice (under 
30% yields "TRY AC AINn. 

The veteran, on the other 
hand, gets none of these 
goodies, but instead, gets 
to cope with ST, Turkey. 
Uruguay. VP1, Clipperton, 
and the like. 

All will receive one of 12 
full-screen awards at the 
end, along with final score 




and appropriate comments. 
Many may want a second 
chance, and every game is 
different! 

Most people even re- 
motely associated with 
ham radio will earn the 
SHORT-NOVICE level 
award, while not every 
DXCC holder will achieve 
the top CHALLENGE-EX- 
TRA endorsement on thefr 
certificate. 

This program runs on the 
8K Commodore PETTm ^5 

is, but will also adapt to 
anySK RAM/BASIC operat- 
ing system in a TRS-80, Ap- 
ple 11, Heath, etc., with a 
few simple mods that I will 
explain in detail at the end 
of this article. 

If you ve read this far, 
you'll appreciate a descrip- 
tion of the program's fea- 
tures. The 3 levels of diffi- 
culty revolve around 15, 
35, or 60 country/ham pre- 
fix identifications. Each 
series draws randomly 
from a pool of country/pre- 
fix pairs which are twice 
the size of the game, ex- 
cept that the CHALLENGE 



(60) series omits the easiest 
26 from its pool of 120 

In any game, 90% yields 
an Extra rating, while Ad- 
vanced, General, and Nov- 
ice follow at 70%, 50%, 
and 30% respectively. 
Under 30% brings up "SRI 
OM. TRY AGAIN/' 

Since the computer can 
only spell perfectly and 
since this is not a spelling 
test, there is an arbitration 
feature that allows you to 
call up a PROTEST to allow 
someone else to judge if 
you're close enough Who 
wants to let someone else 
beat him out just because 
it's hard to spell Rumania 
or Lithuania correctly? 

My compliments to Gary 
Toncre WA4FYZ and Chris 
Wiener N2CR on the basic 
idea which appeared in the 
May, 79, 73 Magazine. It 
has kept me busy for days. 
Further evolution could 
take place, for instance, by 
adding some competitive 
scoring features (before 
taking it to the local DX 
club meeting, of course!). 

Most of the required 



M 



1M 73 Magazine • June, 1980 



ITEM NO. 
WK-7 




mi;/'1»ii[i]l1;ii 



^54 



• MO S 1416 14-16 CMOS SAFE IHSERTER 

KIT INCLUDES * mos-2428 24-20 cmos safe inserter 

• MOS^4d 36-40 CMOS SAFE INSERTER 



« £K«1 t4-ie ErrRACTOR 

■ EX 2 24-40 CMOS SAFE EXTRACTOR 



pmP«TED 1M IT i A 



OK MACHINE & TOOL CORPORATION 

3455 CONNE*? ST., &RONX,N.Y. 10475 USA. 

PHOME e2l2lS94U00 TCLEI HO 12^091 



MOS-a42ft 



rATEiiT FrHOiN« 




MOS-141i 



EX-2 



MOS-40 



[ 



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INDIVIDUAL COMPONENTS 



MOS-1416 


14-16 PIN MOS CMOS SAFE INSERTER 


$ 7.95 


MOS-2428 


24-28 PIN MOS CMOS SAFE INSERTER 


$ 7.95 


MOS-40 


36-40 PIN MOS CMOS SAFE INSERTER 


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EX-1 


14-16 PIN EXTRACTOR TOOL 


1 $ 1.49 


EX-2 


24-40 PIN CMOS SAFE EXTRACTOR TOOL 


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MINIMUM BiLUNC 125,00. ADD SHIF^PING CHARGE 12.00. NEW YOUK RESf DENTS ADD APPUCABLE TAX. 



OK MACHINE & TOOL CORPORATION 3455 CONNER ST., BRONX. NY. 10475 (212) 994-6600/TELEX 125091 



Rwadef Service^-s^e jcwge 2fO 



73 Magazine • June, 1980 105 




fogram !f sting. 




S REM HAM P«fFII CQPVRICHT IflW »V miH GUNM 

^ F0Ry»aTa2^rPRIf«TtNEXT 

:»0 (^IMT-^UaiE TD HAH PREFIX? AMP ORlT' 

#0 fORM«OT010iP«INTiMf:iT 

I 



^3 [NPUT-HCAMi: OR CAIX 



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m PflIf4T"QIi "tm-rVOU WILL BE ASI££D TO 

-^O PHIWT ICiEKTlFV BAMDOM HAM PREf 1*£S AND THE" 

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Up PRINT-'VOU MILL &£ CR£1>IT£0 UlfH ONE 0602 rOR" 

104 PRINT' EACH QUEST I PN* ANp ONE QSL2 FOR EACH" 

I 

ICM* PRIWT'CORRECT ANSWER. " 

109 PR I NT I P0KE5946«t £4 

f 

lid PRlrvT'You wiH ^ rsTpd bsf ymir p»rc«rn " 
120 PRINT"ci3rr*ctf 9iv«n TWO irl«« on «4Cht " 
125 Pf^lNT 

i30 PR I NT* IF YOU WAVE NO IDEAi CMTCR '7^ 
135 PRII*T'THIN« "f 

140 PflINT"VOU'RE RIGHT? EKTEH 'P' TOR " 
1*5 PRINT"PR0TEST2 "t 
150 PRIMT'INSTCAO Of SECQNO GUES8^ 

192 PRtNTtPR|NT"CO BUM - RETURN UtTHOllT DATA IS FATAJ^" i PRIi^' 
lfr2 PfrlNT"¥OU HA¥ CHOOSE A gHOPTTZ^ CdTtttN PREFIIi " 
IM PRIW GATS OF IS COUNTRlEBi m ttP^Mr2 LEVEL' 
14* PRtPfT^CAriE OF 35 1 OR A CHAU-ENOCa SERIES OF' 
14a PR1NT"40* lUCLimiHC Tk^ MORE A^CANC4 'tPRIMT 
170 PI*IWT"9E1-ECT StBHORTJ* EfEiPERT)* OR " 
175 INPUT" (CI CHALL04GE SERIES NQU"ttm 
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190 irE»-"6"THEN260 
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240 N-15i&«-*'SHaftT"iCaT0445 
270 N-3$ie««"EXPERT"iGOttM4S 
2a0 ll*40iPt" "CHALLENGE" t DDTD445 

449 PRINTtPRINT 

450 PRINTOMIt * IttJHO' IH ANY NMtC* 

4frO mtHT-'m' fCAl^ PREFIX iNOJiOrS THE NLIH9CR" 

475 PRINT 

490 L«U}-^COT VOU ON T1MT ONE* ANOMCR tS 

900 LETW'OfRCn HEART OF PCM 

510 L£TX«0 

919 C*2#MiRI:M l#t or COUNTRlCd 

520 lJlMOt(C»tA*<C) 

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S30 R£ADQ«fniAf<iliREM ^^T Uf ARRAV 

535 PftJNTAHnr' "MNEKTItPRINTi PRINT 



I 



40 FOrtl-lTON 
9 €«<C«Rf4D(l»^>liREI1 RANIXJK SELECTION 590 



54§ LETT-OiPRINT 



552 e- INT IS) 



954 IFQ«CSM N0"THEN545 



995 IFNC>60THEN55a 




994 IFS{24THEN949 

55fl PRINTO«(Sn iFRlNTTAJi25)S 

340 tl«>llTG« 

942 IFG4^"?'"THENT-1 

570 [FA«fB)'G«THEN^90iREM A WINN&tf 

i7B irC»--P''TMEWlfiOO 

SaO IFT»OT¥«i#^lNT"SRt OHf TRY AGAIN 

9a9 trT*0TiCNai4»G« 

970 IFT*1T1«NPRINTL4(1I 

40O T-T^i 

410 IFT-lTfrffi1*59d 

420 PRINTtABU5)A4i9» 

432 EFX<)STHE3i439 

433 IFH^aTHErrftlNT^VCl KEEP IT UP M^ 

439 IF(H-XJ»13TMEN PRINT*PRINT"HDW ABOUT tRViNC FOR W A ifiPRINT 
63r W"H41 

440 PRENTiGOT04SO 

490 PRINT "CORRECT* WELL DONE' 
440 LETX^Xf-iiM-W+t 

4S0 PRINT" VOU NON HAVE "i Wi "/"i x» "GreoveeL" 

419 (l«f3M''N0" 

TOO NEXT I 

JIO IFX>*»3«NTVKNM4 

720 PRINT 

725 PRINT" VOU EMDED UP WITH "Jl/N I ^PERCENT -iPRIMT 

727 PRINT^HE HAVE ND MMkBB TO COVER THAT* < 

730 PRINT -SR£* TRV ACN OMt EACH GAHE IS OIFFERE^r 



739 PRINT' 



• ■ i * 



740 PRlNt"YOU CUD TRY UR HANO AT COMPUTER PROGRAMS- 

743 GOTOaSO 

744 irX>Oi9«NTHEM:t«"EXTRA''«GOr0754 
74* IFX )0* 7«NTKENCt= '^ADyANCED"i C0T0754 
74A IFX>0. 9iiNTHEM:«B"CEI4ERAL''iGaT07Sa 
790 C|»"NCWIC£"' 

?92 Df"A START* «iE«-" WITH ©OME EFFORT, "i GOTO 740 
794 PS-'-BIHPLY OUTBTANDING I "i E««^M1TH EABEi ^ i i;0TO74O 
754 W-^QUtTE GOOD* ''lE** "RAP IDLY. "iCOT0740 
75a D«""ait.'"*Ef-"e¥ working on 1T."iC0TD740 
740 PRIMT'VOUR KNOULCOCi: OF THIS iUBJECT" 
770 PR I NT "COMPELS US TO AWARD YOU "rC4^ DXCC*-|PftIICr 
790 LErV-X/W«lOOiY-INTfY> 

■00 PRINT' VOU HAVE ACHIEVEO A "lYp-I SSO/O^ *- 
aiO PRtNT^REEORD. THAT Ifi 'fOtli PRINT 
a20 PRINT- YOU AAi: GOOD ENOUGH TO GET THAT [mi£fi2* 
125 PRINT^OXCC AMARO 'lEtJ*** 

aaO PRINT^HE ARE GENERATING YOUR AWARD - QRX 1^ 
631 FORS^lTOlOOOOiNEXTe 
440 G06U£il020 
150 PfllNT"73 "iHt 

040 PRINT' THIS IS YOU? PET SAYING **i PRINT 'RUN'" 
165 C0T0399? 

eao DATA LifNMARKf 07 » CANADA »VE 
119 DATA Tip COSTA R I CA« FRANCE i F 
190 DATA KP4p PUERTO RlCOf Up USA » C< ENGLAND 
1?3 QATA SCXGIUNiONf 4X4 f ISRAEL 
900 IMTA XE^HEXlCOiDICfCERNANYrYVf VENEZUELA 
L 909 DATA ITALY^I ^^^^^^^^^^hb^i^^^^^^^ih 



4 



iy 1 



06 73 Magazine ■ June, 1980 



^£b DATA KZ^ t CAMAL ZONE i COLUtilB I A i Hit t ^Y i BfU 1 1 L 

919 OATA ^AlHt£A 

9^0 D^TA OEfMfSTRl A rAU8T»ALrAfVJC»HB» SWITZERLAND 

92 S DATA JAiJAPAM 

930 DATA C^i^CHlLtf FINLAND *ClNiKL7t ALASKA 

933 DATA RUeSIAi^UA^PQrCUfiAtNEM ZEALAND* ZL 

940 DATA HCtECUADORf BULGARIA fLZtZefSDOTH AFRICA 

949 DATA URUOUAViCX 

950 DATA rCtCaRSICAfMAXEitfiClMiftrfl SO 
992 DATA PQLAWDt SPi dMNTANAMO »AV»*KC4 

959 DATA LIBERIA r EL ^CUf UALEB 

997 I3ATA ltG6i GUAHi PITCAIRN*^ VR£# JAMAICAr^V 

960 DATA yOtfttWANIAt LIECHTENSTEIN*! H©0 

96S DATA UR2«E@TQNIAiCHRI9TMAe je* «* VKf^trrlCELAND 

965 DATA ZDd^ A8CENSICfff»FDRH0SAi SV 

967 DATA CUATEW ALA t TG f [HliFlWLAND*LUt ARGENTINA 

970 DATA JTr MONGOLIA 

972 DATA NCMWAV' LA 'LUXEMBOURG > L}Ci8Kt9UEDEM 

979 IWTA JVr JORDAN' NAVAgSA#tl£C4. MIDWAY* *KM6 
977 DATA GH» SCOTLAND t HUNGARY* HA 

980 DATA ST» eUDANi GREECE »SV'VPi» BEL! ZEi REM 60 
9a9 DATA ANDORRA»rC3| 

990 DATA VUi INDIAaVORV COAST' TU 

995 DATA Kl'6i RALItYRA' TURlCCVi TA 

lOOO DATA AP' PAKISTAN' CLIPPERTON*iFDS 

1020 PRINT-YOUR CERTIFIE^ATE OF ACHIEVEMENT** 

1 030 FORB« 1 T025 s PR I NT i N£X t 

1033 PRINT 

1040 F0RI-0T03B 

1050 PRII*TTABtI)^e"J 

1060 NEKTl 

1070 PRINT 

lOaO FRINTTAErf3>t"GARYiUA4FV2'CHRIBtN2€R#AND RfMiAC6P' 

t090 PRlNTTABf5H "HEREBY CONFER THE AWARD QF" 

1099 PRINTTAB<e)»C»l " DXCC TO ' * H» 

t9b0 FORI-OT03B 

iSlO PRINTTAK I >"*.-» 

1920 NEXT I 

1921 PftlNT" 'f 



1929 PfilNT^ft 

1930 PRlNT^S QDDD K 

1540 PRINT'** D D X 

1950 PRlNT"li D D X X 

i560 PRINT' 1 O D X 

1970 PRINT'li D D X X 

iSaO PRINT"* X 



cccc 



CCCC 



1990 PRINT"* DUDD K X 

1600 PRINT'* 

1610 PRINT"* 

1630 FORI'OTOSa 

1640 PRINTTABU J'**"» 

1650 NEXT I 

1660 PR I NT 1 PRINT 

1670 PRINTTAB(a)e«»iPRI^TTABtia»C« 

1660 FORI^^aTOSS 

1690 FftlNTTA8U>*n 

1700 NEXTI 





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'i>05 PRINT 
1707 RETdRN 
1710 eaT03999 
1600 PRIMT 

laiO PRINTTNIS IS HOT A SPELLING TEST* HAVE All 
1«15 PRINT" IMI^ARTIAL OBSERVER PRESS ANY KEY AND '" 
1620 INPUT 'COMPARE ANSWERS, "fM« 
i#22 I FMt*"'* THEN 1822 

1023 PRINTiPRINTTAa(5»Gl«rTAS(20Mt<8> 
1«24 PRiNTi PRINT 'ENTER 'A' IF PROTEST ALLOWED t " 
1026 INPUT'-AMY OTHER LETTER TO CONTINUE" If* 
1030 IFFf*<''A"TNEN&90 
1 840 FOR Y«0TO29 i PR I NT l NEX T f PR I NT 
1650 T«0*COT0560 

2000 DATA IS*BARDINIA»KURE IS* *» RH6' NiDWAY*»KM6 
2010 DATA OA » PERU » 6UR1 NAM tPZ I eV' CRETE 
2020 DATA VP9» BERMUDA i V36f HONG KONG' HL» KOREA 
2030 DATA PANAHAi HP i ^ AT ID ANtHVr HZ f BAUD t ARABIA 

2040 DATA BVALBARDrJUi YUGOSLAVIA' YUiZAiALBAi^lA 

2041 REN S2 

2090 DATA GUADEUMJPCt FG«NEM CALEDONIAtFK 

2060 DATA FHi MARTINIQUE p ST* PtEF^lEf FP' YEHENi 4M 

2070 DATA 4B7tSRI LANKA#9A'LIBYA>NIGER!Af 9N 

2Od0 DATA SIERRA L£QN£r?Lf 9V' SINCAPDREt TRINIDAD' 9r 

2O90 CATA HELLISH REEF#» VK9t LATVIA*' UQ2^ UP2' LITHUANIA 

2100 DATA UC6fAR^ENIAjMALI REP » t TZt UB' UKRAINE 

2110 DATA TIWILANDtHarHR'HOHDQURAg'HAITItHH 

21 20 DATA RFUNI ON r F R i FB& K ^ KERGUEL EN ' I RAN ' EP 

2130 DATA COOK I3»tt# ZKl' ZEi RHODESIA' GIBRALTAR i ZB 

2140 DATA ZAiALBANIAf YN^NICARAGUAi iRAOi YI 

2141 REHllO 

2150 DATA DX' GREENLAND' DENMARK ^OZiNETHERLANDSi PA 

2160 DATA Slii EGVPTfXVf VI ETNAHf LAOS' XU 

2170 DATA AFGHANI STAN* YA' CAYMAN JSfZF 

2iao DATA CEOA'EASTERt MOROCCO' CN>CT2' AZORES 

9000 PRINT -OK (DIAGNOBTICI ' 

3999 KHD 

REAOY* 




■■H^^^dii^riMf 



play instructions come up 
at the start of tine program. 
Your teaching responsibili- 
ty v^ill be limited essential- 
ly to showing each member 
how to type in and (return) 
[enter) (line-feed) the re- 
sponses. 

You will have to put in 
the goodies that you have 
worked, and a little time 
spent on the CHALLENGE 
series will make you a tiger 
in the DX bands yourself. 

Now let's look at the 
listing for function: The 
program starts with a re- 
quest for your name or 
calbign, gives instructions, 
then asks for your choice 



of series, be it SHORT, EX- 
PERT, or CHALLENGE. 

Lines 110 and 120 list 
strangely because of PET's 
lower-case organization. 
Make them read ''You will 
be rated by your percent'' 
''correct, given TWO tries 
on each." 

At line 500, the program 
begins by taking the series 
selected and loading up 
the appropriate data 
matrix from the data 
statements containing the 
prefix/country pairs. W and 
X are part of the scoring. T 
keeps track of how many 
guesses you've had, while I 
(line 540) watches the 



73 Magazine • June, 19S0 107 




Werrd Synibol You Tvpe In 

mil (lint* m) 'CRSRCRSR 

CRSR CRSR CRSR" 

2 (after word) RVS before word. 

SHIFT and RVS 
dfter word 

'X' or"Sf" SHIFT and d bar 

graphic [remem- 
ber the quotes) 



Fig. 1. 

number of pairs you've 
been given, as determined 
by N. 

545 randomly selects the 
next Q$-A$ pair to be 
presented. 

554 rejects previously 
used pairs. 

575 brings up the PRO- 
TEST subroutine, 

685 sets the Q$ iust used 
to "no/' so fine 554 will 
recognize that it has been 
used already 

700 directs the program 
execution back to line 540, 
until there have been N 
questions 

710 starts the scoring, 
which goes on for a bit. Ap- 



propriate comments are 
picked by the percent cor* 
rect to be used in the clos- 
ing remarks. 

This section contains the 
author's message: No- 
where is anyone, in any 
way, repeatedly put down 
I feel that a put-down is 
funny, once. Then it gets 
old. I am human, however. 
I could not resist putting in 
the comment, at 13 misses, 
"How about trying for 
WAS?" 

The program avoids 
''screen clear" and certain 
cursor-positioning com- 
mands that are not general 
BASIC functions except as 
noted below. If you have a 
screen clear, you can use it 
on lines 20. 60, and 1030. 

Some of the award 
graphics starting on line 
1050 should be made up 
using whatever you have 
on your machine. Experi- 
ment with this. It's fun and 
you can get many nice ef- 
fects. How would the let- 



ters DX look as a border? 
Try it by making line 1040 
read: For 1^0 TO 19 STEP 
2. Then put "DX" in line 
1050 

If you need a non-PET 
program, mark the listing 
as follows; 

Omit lines 50, 109, and 
180 

Delete strange charac- 
ters showing in lines 30. 
102,104,145,152.162,164. 
166, and 820 

Look at the discussion of 
the listing for the text of 
lines 110 and 120. 

860: Put in your ma- 
chine's name (Emily???). 

Option: The A$ (answers) 
appear on the screen while 
the matrix is loading at the 
start Go to line 535 and 
remove all up through the 
first colon(:] and it will not 
print. Keep it in until you 
have it running OK. as it is 
a great way to see if the 
matrix is loading properly. 
It can then be removed if 
you don't like it 



For those of you who are 

typing this program into 
your PET, you must inter- 
pret the listing as shown in 
Fig.1. 

This program was a 
pleasure to work on and is 
a challenge to run. It loads 
in a couple of minutes 
from a cassette and is 
guaranteed to be a pleasur- 
able adjunct to your com- 
puter system. 

I'll try to help you with 
your Ham Prefix bugs. 
Please describe them as 
completely as possible and 
enclose an SASE. In the 
meantime, type carefully 
(especially those fly speck 
( ), I), (;X and (:) characters). 
They bear an importance 
that is all out of proportion 
to their size. 

My compliments to 
Wayne, who in less than 
two decades has led me to 
SSB, FM, and now com- 
puters! Oh Cod, what 
next? M 



HF/SSB 5 BAND 
TRANSCEIVER 



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• Pwr output: Wodel SS 105S IB watts 

Model SS 1050 lOQ watts 

• Covers m 80 M. 4QM. 2QM J5M and IQM bands 

• Ace. avail incl. Noise Blanker ^OQHz CW filter. 
FM. RX and TX modLiles. Clip-on rechargeable 

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M 



108 73 Magazine • June, 1980 



The 1980 Atlanta HamFestival 

and 
Georgia State ARRL Convention 

June Zl-ZZy 1980 

Downtown Atlanta Marriott Hotel 
GIANT covered Fleamarket/Swapshop! •140 Major Exhibits! 
More than 25 Forums/Meetings! • Special MJCROPROCESSOR Section! 

FCC Exams! • Programs for Ladies & Children! 

Parking for thousands of cars! • Activities Galore! 

Registration: $3 per person IN ADVANCE^ $4 at the door 

Children FREE! 

11 you do not receive a Preregistration Packet by May ISth^ write: 

Atlanta Hamfestlval 1980 

P.O. Box 45183 
Atlanta, GA 30320 

Hotel Rates: $36 per day single OR double! 

Write for Hotel Reservations to: 

Marriott Hotel • Courtland at International Blvd. • Atlanta, GA 30303 

or phone: Area 404/659-6500 and hurry, hurry, hurry! 

THE BEST HAMFEST IN TH£ WORLD! 



AN INVITATION 



July 1, 1980, the cover price ai KILOBAUD MICROCOMPUTING 
is going up to $2.95. In nation has TinalTy hit, BUT, we woutd like to 
extend you an INVITATION TO BEAT INFLATION . . . SUB- 
SCRIBE OR RENEW youT present subscription from now until July 
18, 1980, A T THE OLD RA TES, 

DonU miss an issue of the industry's most complete and informative 
journal by letting tliis SA VINGS pass by . . . fill out the coupon 
below today* This price increase makes all other Kilobaud Microcom- 
puting subscription offers void on July 18th . . , so hurry and BEA T 
THE 18% INFLA TION\ 



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□ New Subscriber D Renewal (please affix an address label from your most recent magazine) 

a I year/$18.00 □ 2 years/$30.00 D 3 years/$45.00 

n Payment enclosed Bill: D Me G Master Charge D VISA P Amerex 

Card # Expire Date_ 

Signature . 

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KILOBAUD MICROCOMPUTING PO BOX 9*>7 FARMINGDALE NY 11737 



306B6 



^Re&d&r S&n/fce—s^e page 210 



73 Magazme • June, 1980 109 




• 




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selecting o ' " " MHz mode" ^^^^' 'hQ qq ijium yuu gjifi i^ 

blllty. the new world of 960 MHx IQ imrndctiateiy 8 

w jdes t ha AC adapter and br ftarger for ono i Whs 

price to quality features ratio in i , . . ander :om'. 



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Stanford I . So/ms WAZMtUtt 
243 Acaiane^ Dr. #5 
Sunnyvale CA 94086 



Check Chirp with a Choke 

— get 599 every time with this quick fix 



The choke described 
here solved the chirp 
problem I had which result- 
ed from having antenna 
current on the outside of 
the coaxial transmission 
line get into my home-brew 
vfo. Although the power 
leads entering the vfo were 
carefully filtered, chirp was 
reported when the 3.5-MHz 
vfo was used on eighty 
meters, but not when multi- 



plying to higher bands. The 
fact that the vfo was chirp- 
free on the higher bands in- 
dicated that it was stable 
and suggested that the 
cause was rf feedback from 
the transmitter when it was 
operated straight through. 

The first experiment tried 
was to wind about 30 turns 
of miniature coax on a 
large-size oatmeal box and 
use this coax in the feedline 




Transmission-line choke wound with RG-58 foam coax on 
a 1.58-inch ferrite core. Turns are held in place by a cork 
pressed into the center. 



between the transmitter 
and antenna tuner. The 
tuner feeds a short wire 
antenna in the attic over ar\ 
apartment and is worked 
against a ground connec- 
tion to a pipe which is part 
of the heating system. In a 
system of this configura- 
tion, current in the antenna 
wire is balanced by an 
equal and opposite current 
which spreads out in the 
ground system. Since the 
feedtine coax is in a strong 
rf field, some of this current 
will flow along the outside 
of the coax. Winding suffi- 
cient coax into a choke will 
provide a barrier to current 
on this path. The oatmeal- 
box choke did the trick: no 
more chirp on eighty. 

An improved choke was 
corrceived when the author 
espied a large toroidal core 
in a box of goodies at the 
local radio club. As shown 
in the photo, 10 turns of 
RC-58 foam-dielectric coax 
were wound through the 
core. The inductance of this 
choke is 21 microhenries 
(less than the oatmeai 
choke), but also is effective. 
A measurement of core per- 
meability yielded a value of 
120. indicating that it is 
probably intended for low- 
frequency use. This leads 
one to wonder whether 
much rf power is dissipated 



in the core. The output of 
my old Harvey-Weils trans- 
mitter is 25 Watts; if only 2 
Watts were dissipated in 
the core, it would get very 
warm, but. in fact, there is 
no perceptible temperature 
rise. 

Similar results would 
probably be obtained if one 
used a salvaged core from a 
TV flyback transformer. 
Several cores could be 
stacked to increase the in- 
ductance, if necessary. If 
solid dielectric coax is used 
rather than foam-type di- 
electric, the turns should be 
larger to avoid distorting 
the coax, which could ad- 
versely affect swr or result 
in breakdown. 

The use of low-frequency 
ferrite material in a high- 
ffpquency choke is quite ef- 
fective and is the basis of 
the ferrite-bead chokes 
commonly used in the VHF 
region, The choke de- 
scribed here might be lik- 
ened to a giant ferrite-bead 
choke. Although such a 
choke has substantial resis- 
tance in addition to its in- 
ductive reactance, it does 
not produce appreciable 
power loss in the present 
application since rf ground 
currents find alternate low- 
impedance paths in the re- 
maining parts of the ground 
system. ■ 



73 Magazine • J u ne, 1 980 1 1 1 



Mkhuei Sura 

PO Box 245 

Port Washhmon NY 11050 



Reawaken that Sleeping Rx 

— first steps in receiver alignment 



Almost every ham goes 
through the trauma- 
tizing experience of realiz- 
ing that his or her receiver 
needs an alignment Typi* 
cal signs of this common 
matady are loss of sensttivi- 
ly (the receiver is not as 
"hot" as it used to be), loss 
of frequency-readout ac- 
curacy Ifor those of us who 
use a transceiver, the first 
indication of this problem 




very well may be a "what- 
were-you-doing-out-of-the- 
bandr' admonition from 
an FCC observer), or what 
might be described as a 
general deterioration in the 
performance of the re- 
ceiver. 

Many amateurs simply 
let the receiver suffer a 
protracted and tortuous 
death. Others, in a fit of 
panic, thumb through their 



HE X^fiOMAt. 




SMALL 

tH ex AGONAL 



LARGER 

HEkAijONAL 

MEADS 



\ 



TIP |U40£ 
0^ HCtAL 




SMALL 



Fig. I Several tools used for Aligning receivers. Note that 
except for the screwdriver tip at the end of the center 
figure, each tool is made of plastic. This prevents the cir- 
cuit being aligned from being affected by a metal tooL 



AI«TEMNA 



w 



4ADVe.M£tiT &f AUfiMUEiyT PflOCEOURE 



- HF AMP 



FIRST 






CRYSTAL 
OSCILLATOR 



1-F AMP 



HETERODVNE 

FREOUEfttCY 

OSCILLATOR 



fogs or notes for the phone 
number of that celebrated 
guy "who really knows his 
stuff/' Still others heave a 
sigh of surrender and tear- 
fully send their receivers 
out, either to the manufac- 
turer or to a technical lab, 
musing about the possibili- 
ty of equipment mainte- 
nance someday being cov- 
ered by Blue Cross, 

In any event, like so 

many aspects of our hobby 
which so often are con- 
sidered untouchable, it is, 
in the last analysis, fear 
and ignorance which keep 
us at arm's length from 
amateur radio's most in- 
teresting exotica. 

I would like to present a 
step-by-step procedure for 
receiver alignment that 
may make the process a bit 
more palatable for even 
the most timid of hams. 

The equipment needed 
for a satisfactory alignment 
is simple. You will need the 



OETECTOn 






SR£«KEI} 



tH 



Fig. 2, Ulustration of the movement of the alignment procedure. The alignment begins 
with the first stage of the last i-f amplitier and ends at the rf amplifier. The receiver in the 
figure is a double-conversion superheterodyne type. 



following: 

1}A VTVM 

2) A calibrated rf signal 
generator whose frequency 
limits are from about 1,5 
MHz to about 30 MHz The 
generator must have a pro- 
vision for modulating its rf 
signal (These generators 
are common enough so that 
they can be borrowed and 
cheap enough so thai they 
can be bought ) 

3} A 50"Ohm resistor. 

41 A 0.001-uF capacrtor, 

5) An appropriate align- 
ment tool (see Fig- 1)- 

The alignment procedure 
is one which moves from 
the last i-f section of the 
receiver back toward the 
front end of the rf section. 
(Refer to Fig 2 for orienta- 
tion.) The starting point is 
the grid or base of the first 
stage of the last H, (Some 
receivers have more than 
one f-f stage.) You will, of 
course, need a circuit dia- 
gram of your receiver Fig. 3 
shows typical starting 
points for both tube and 
solid-state circuits. 

You will have to prepare 
a 50-Ohm termination net- 
work for the signal gener- 
ator's lead. Refer to Fig. 4 
for this. 

Before making any ad- 
justments at all, let the 
receiver, the VTVM, and 
the signal generator warm 
up for at least one-half hour 
(one hour is preferable). 



112 73 Magazine « June, 1960 



While the gear is simmer- 
ifig, vou can look at the 
schematic of the receiver 
and locate the foil owing 
points: 

1) The grid or base of the 
last H- 

2) The grid or base of the 
preceding i-f(s). 

3) The associated i-f 
transformers. 

4) the output of the AM 
detector, 

5) The oscillator trimmer 
capacitors for each band. 

6] The slug-tuned oscilla- 
tor coils for each band. 

Each of the above-men- 
tioned points or com- 
ponents must be located 
on the schematic and phys- 
ically located in the 
receiver. 

The first part of the 
aMgnment procedure will 
be for the last i-f stage. 

Procedure — First Part 

l)Set up the receiver 
controls for AM reception. 

2) Clip the VTVM dc 
probe to the output of the 
AM detector. 

3) Connect the signal 
generator (with the 50-Ohm 
termination) to the grid or 
base of the first stage of the 
last i-f, (Of course, the 
ground lead of the genera- 
tor is clipped to the receiv- 
er's ground — usually the 
chassis) 

4) Set the frequency of 
the signal generator very 
precisely to the frequency 
of the last i-f of your receiv- 
er. This information is in the 
receiver's manual It is im- 
portant that the frequency 
setting of the signal gen- 
erator be extremely precise. 
(A calibrated frequency 
counter will obviate the 
need for a precisely-cali- 
brated signal generator. 
Often, the use of a frequen- 
cy counter permits a much 
more accurate setting of 
frequency than is possible 
with a signal generator 
dial.) 

5) Turn the modulation 
switch on the generator to 
internal modulation. 

6) Feed only enough sig- 



nal into the receiver to 
cause a small deflection on 
the VTVM. (Set the VTVM's 
scale appropriately — not at 
1000 Vdc!) 

7] Find the last i-f trans- 
former. 

6) The adjustment will 
start with the transformer 
winding closest to the AM 
detector. Stick in a suitable 
alignment tool and turn it. 
Don't be afraid. You will see 
the meter pointer move. 
Tune the slug for maximum 
meter deflection. 

9) Move your way back 
toward the input of the i-f 
section, turning the slugs in 
the transformers for great- 
est meter deflection, 

10) When you have fin- 
ished tuning all the slugs, 
start from the beginnfng 
and go through the pro- 
cedure again. Then do it a 
third time. 

1T)lf your receiver has 
an i-f stage (or stages) pre- 
ceding the one just aligned 
(double-conversion), follow 
the same procedure to peak 
that stage- However, the in- 
termediate frequency will 
change Look it up in the 
manual. 

Remember that the ac- 
curacy of alignment is a 
direct function of the ac- 
curacy of the signal gen- 
erator's frequency and 
peak indication on the 
VTVM. 

We now move to the 
alignment of the rf stage, or 
front end, of the receiver. 
The following preparation is 
necessary: 

1)Feed the generated 
signal (with the 50-Ohm 
network at the end of the 
probe) into the antenna 
jack of the receiver. 

2) Again, allow a long 
warm-up of the gear (the 
signal generator, the 
receiver, and the VTVM). 

3) Connect the VTVM 
leads to the speaker ter- 
minals. 

4) Turn the band selector 
to the highest band 

There are three ad- 
justments that wilt have to 
be made: 



PftO&E Goes HEfl€ 



FROM O£CiLLAT0Ft -fr 




rh I 






o) 



SiGHAL GENERATOR 
PROBE aO£S HERE 



FROM OSPLLATQi^ 



b) 



^ 



r 






Fig. 3. Starting points for a receiver alignment in a tube (a) 
and a transistor (b) unit. The circuits diagrammed illustrate 
the last i-f stages of the receiver. 



jxa 







Iv aCCfiVEHi 



fTT 



Fig. 4. 50'Ohm termination network. Use sbiefded cable. 



1) Calibrate the high-end 
dial frequency with the os- 
cillator trimmer capacitor. 

2) Calibrate the low-end 
dial frequency, usually by 
adjusting a slug in the 
oscillator coil, 

3) Align the tuned rf 
stages. Some receivers 
have more than one adjust- 
ment tor each stage. Check 
the manual for that infor- 
mation. 

Procedure— Second Part 

1) Align the dial pointer 
at both extremes of its ex- 
cursion, 

2) For the high-end ad- 
justment of the top band: 

a) Set the (modulated) 

rf generator to 30 
MHz. Turn the receiv- 
er tuning dial in the 
vicinity of 30 MHz. 
You should see two 
meter deflections. 
One of them repre- 
sents an image fre- 
quency The one you 
want is the funda- 
mental frequency, in- 
dicated by the greater 
meter deflection of 
the two, 

b) Adjust the oscilla- 
tor trimmer for the 
highest band so that 
30 MHz corresponds 
to the greatest meter 



deflection. 

c) Follow the same 
procedure in adjust- 
ing the low end of the 
band. Set the signal 
generator to that fre- 
quency. Find the fun- 
damental on the re- 
ceiver and adjust the 
oscillator coil slug for 
maximum meter de- 
flection. 

d) Make the adjust- 
ment several times 
back and forth be- 
tween the high end 
and the low end of the 
band. Make the last 
adjustment at the 
high end. 

e) Before going on to 
the next band, make 
sure that this one is 
impeccably tuned. 

f) Repeat the high-end 
and low-end proce- 
dure for each band on 
your receiver. 

When you are finished 
aligning alt the bands, go 
through the procedure 
again to guarantee opti- 
mum performance of your 
receiver. 

And that's it. Obviously, 
a tune-up procedure on a 
complex receiver can be 
tedious (not difficult!). 
That's why most amateurs 
save it for a rainy day. 
Good luck!H 



73 Magazine • June, 1980 113 



Rubber Thumbs and Pilot Lamps 

— if you're all thumbs, enlighten yourself! 



James R. A vofi K3MPJ 
239 Foxcroff Road 
Pimburgh PA 15220 



If youVe ever been on 
the losing end of a tussfe 
with a snug-fitting pilot 
lamp of the style that's so 
common to surplus radio 



equipment, you'll appreci* 
ate the fun I used to have 
with the home-brew device 
shown in Fig, 1 It's a two- 
level constant -cur rent 




nicad battery charger that 
uses a 100-W lamp to con- 
trol the 40C^mA charging 
source and a 6-W lamp to 
control the 25-mA tnckle 
source. It's the latter that 
used to lest my religion. 

During one of those 
dreaded sessions when I 
was trying to replace the lit- 
tle devil, I was literally 
clutching at straws to gel a 
grip on the defective lamp 
without breaking the gtass* 
It was then that I tried a 
clerk's rubber thumb over 
it, as pictured in Photo A. 
The rubber surface grips the 
glass all around evenly 
when you gently push down 
on it- For smaller diameter 
lamps, simply cut the open 
end so the whole thing is a 
little shorter 

Even when we hams 
overtly try to tmplement 
the KISS method (Keep It 
Simple, Stupid), it's very dif- 
ficult unless its by acci- 
dent!! 



J 



lio 



ow 



_rfl!t.KL,E: 



IFfp 1 1 t III 



cs 






>f- 



I 



Photo A 



F%J. 



114 73 Magazine • Jurie, I960 




ne 



IS CWIM6 voa nm 

70 f /6f/7 

mnnmn 




73 Magazine is increasing its cover price (and subscription price) on July 1, 1980. BUT we would like 
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73 Magazme * June, 1980 115 




International incorporates advanced 
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preselector for external antenna. Covers 300 
KHi to 30 MHz in five bands. Adjustable tele- 
scoping antenna. Controls: Tune, Band Selector, 
Gain, On -Off /Bypass. LED. FET, tiipolar circuitry. 
110 VAC, 9-12 VDC or 9 V battery for portable 
use. Phono jack \m external ant. 5x2x6 in. 




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MFJ-1040 RECaVEfi PBESEIECTOR, Improves 
weak signal reception, rejects out- of- band sig 
nals, reduces image response, 1,S to 54 MHz. 
Up to 20 db gain. Low noise MOSFET. Gain 
control. Bandswitcb. Can use 2 ant., 2 rcvrs. 
ON-OFF/Bypass. 20 db attenuator. LED. Coax, 
phono jacks. 110 VAC or 9-18 VDC, 8x2x6 in. 
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11$ 73 Magazine • June, 1980 



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DETACHABLE HEAD: The control head may be aeparaled from the radio 
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SIX-CHANNEL MEMORY: Each memory is re-programmable. Memory is 
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MEMORY SCAN: The six channels may be scanned in either the ''busy" 
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FULL*BAND SCAN: All channels may be scanned In either "busy** or 
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NSTANT MEMORY-1 RECALL: By pressing a button on the microphone 
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ADDITiONAL OFFSETS; Provides three additional offset values: +0,4 
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2S WATTS OUTPUT: Also 5 watts *ow power for short-dJstance commyn- 



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9670 Dee Rd., Apt. 409 
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Tempo S1 2-Meter Portable 



800 channels, to go! 



Two-meter FM is prob- 
ably the most popular 
aspect of ham radio ever to 
come along. With repeat- 
ers in virtually all areas of 
the country, one can be In 
touch with police in case 
of emergency or just wile 
away the miles on the in- 
terstates chewing the rag a 
bit However, once at your 
destination, you either sit 
in the car with your syn- 




The Tempo SI FM tr^ns* 
ceiver. 



thesized rig (a real pain on 
hot summer days) or drag 

out a 12-vott power supply 
to continue your hamming, 
That problem has now 
been solved by the boys at 
Tempo. 

Synthesized HT 

Te m po, through Hen ry 
Radio, has released their SI 
synthesized HT-type porta- 
ble rig. This nifty little rig, 
1.6" K 2.5" X 6.5" [40 
X 62 X 165 mm) in size, has 
all the features of all but 
the most expensive mobile 
and base rigs. Its small size 
and light weight (about one 
pound) make it very attrac- 
tive to traveling hams 
who'd like to stay in touch 
on two meters but don't 
want to pack a 1 2-voU pow- 
er supply in their baggage 
With an upcoming trip to 
VK2-land, this was ex- 
tremely important to me. 
Best of alL it's synthesized 
in 5-kHz steps from 144.000 
MHz to 147.995 MHz for 
complete coverage of the 
two-meter band, including 
the new repeater sybband 

The frequency of opera- 
tion is selected by three 
thumbwheel switches (1 
MH^, TOO kHz, and 10 kHz] 
and a +5-'kHz slide switch 
located on the top of the 



unit Repeater offsets 
1-600 kHz, simplex, and 
+ 600 kHz] are selected by 

a slide switch on the back 
of the unit. 

Theory of Operation 

The heart of the whole 
thing is a vco which oper* 
ates in the range of 44 4333 
MHz to 45.765 MHz fol- 
lowed by a tripler which 
results in a two-meter out- 
put minus 10.7 MHz. This 
frequency is mixed with the 
incoming two-meter signal 
for receive in a dual con- 
version mode, which results 
in a sensitivity of better 
than.3uVfor20-dBSiNAD. 

For transmit, the tripled 
vco signal is mixed with 
either a 10-7-MHz signal 
for simplex or wilh 11,3- 
MHz or 10.1-MHz signals 
for +600 kHz or -600- 
kHz repeater offsets, re- 
spectively. Three buffer 
amps and a power amp 
then kick the signal up to a 
whopping 1.5 Watts out. 

Frequency stability is 
maintained by a phase- 
locked loop circuit which 
really seems to do its job 

well, The worst frequency 
deviation I've measured 
was -80 Hz. and that was 
at 144.000 MHz Granted. 



this is outside the amateur 
band, but since phone 
transmissions aren't auth- 
orized below 144.100 MHz, 
this really isn't anything to 
worry about unless you get 
your jollies bangmg away 
on the pysh-to-talk switch 
and trying to decipher 
squelch tails as code. 

Versatile Operation 

Since I live near 
Chicago, Tm practically 
within spitting distance of 
umpteen repeaters and 
have no trouble hitting 
most of them within a fif- 
teen-mile radius As such, 
my SI has taken over many 
of the duties previously 
dealt out to my other two- 
meter rig. 

For those of you who live 
out in the boonies, say, for- 
ty miles or so aw^ay from 
the nearest machine, don't 
despair, for Tempo also 
has 30-Wcitt and 80-Watt 
matching amplifiers avail- 
able. Connection is made 
through an antenna jack on 
top of the rig right next to 
the earphone jack 

And for you autopatch 

users (I'm probably the on- 
ly ham left who doesn't use 
autopatch), a touchtone''"M 

pad is available factory-in- 



118 73 Magazine • June, 1980 



stalled for an extra half of a 
C-note. 

I've had quite a few 
QSOs with my rig and have 
been given nothing but the 
best reports for audio 
qualfty and readability. 
While listening on my 
other rig through what pass 
around here for hi-fi 
speakers, the transmitted 
audio sounds more like 
broadcast quality than any 
other rig I've ever heard. 
The received audio is crisp 
and clean with none of the 
hollow squawk-box sound 
so common to other por- 
table rigs. 

The SI is powered by an 
internal 250 mAh nicad 
battery pack (supplied) 
which is charged at a rate 
of 50 mA by a little plug-in 
charger [also suppUed). Ac- 
cording to its label, the 
charger will work on both 
60- Hz and 50-Hz current, 
needing only a step-down 
transformer to work on 
foreign current This is 



another plus for the ham 
who wants to take his hob- 
by overseas with him, 

Unlike its nearest com^ 
petitor in the synthesized 
portable field, the SI can 
be operated while charg- 
ing. Therefore, if this is to 
be your only two-meter rig, 
you won't be QRT while 
the batteries are being 
charged [about 10 hours 
for a completely dead bat- 
tery pack). Fortunately, 
though, dead batteries 
shouldn't plague you, since 
the transmit indicator LED 
also lights up and stays on 
continuously while receiv- 
ing when the battery 
charge is about used up, 

A Few Disadvantages 

Naturally, nothing is 
perfect, and this is true 
even with a neat little rig 
like this. 

The first thing is that 
you're limited to simplex 
or standard repeater off- 
sets If a weird offset is 



needed, you either modify 

the thing or do some fancy 
thumbwheel flipping. Tve 
opted for the latter, since I 
hate drilling holes or doing 
anything else to void the 
warranty of a new unit. 
Besides, I'm all thumbs. 
and the rnnards are packed 
in pretty tight. So here's 
one for the Mod Squad to 
tackle All that is necessary 
is to add another crystal 
and a four- (or more) posi- 
tion switch to accommo- 
date the oddbati repeater 
offset position[s). 

Next, it would be nice to 
have an external mike for 
use in the mobile, as pick- 
ing up the whole thing with 
both its power and antenna 
cables dangling could 
hamper your ability to 
drive and talk at the same 
time. Again, the problem is 
space — where to mount 
the mike connector. If this 
were done, though, it 
would add much more con- 
venience to an already 



great rig 

Finally, the Lexan case 
could stand being made a 
bit heavier. This really isn't 
too much of a drawback as 
long as you don't plan to 
drop kick the rig across the 
room or pitch it off the 
edge of the Grand Canyon, 
Still, an ounce of preven- 
tion , . . 

Summary 

While it might be a bit 
presumptuous to say that 
Tempo's SI transceiver is 
the greatest thing since the 
audion tube, just consider 
the 800 channels, a hot 
receiver, and the clean 
1,5 Watts out of a one- 
pound rig that fits neatly 
into your hand. Consider- 
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able and a price only slight* 
ly higher than that of most 
six-channel rigs, I'm sure 
you'll at least rank it right 
up there among the top ten 
goodies to come along in 
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73 Magaime • June, 1900 119 



73 Magazine Siitf/ 



A Proper Pedestal for PCBs 

handy holder eases circuit board construction and repair 



When working with PC 
boards, either to 
repair them or to put to- 
gether kits which use them, 
it often is handy to have a 
holder for them so that 
hands are free for solder- 
ing, placing test leads, and 
other tasks Many such 
holders are avaiiable com- 
mercialty but they tend to 
be a bit expensive. One 
can, however, with a bit of 
ingenuity, usually use 
available parts to home- 
brew a very satisfactory 
holder. 

This article presents a 
description of one home- 
brew holder made out of 



available odds and ends. It 
has some features which 
even commercial holders 
do not have — such as pin- 
point illumination on the 
underside of the board so 
that one can hunt down 
bad connections, cracks, 
and so on. You may not 
wish to duplicate this par- 
ticular holder exactly, but 
you can use the ideas 
presented to develop a 
holder using available 
materials. 

Photo A shows the com- 
pleted holder. The circular 
base is the lead weight 
from a discarded table 
lamp, and is about 5 inches 
in diameter. Any sort of 




heavy base is suitable. An- 
other version of the holder 
was constructed later using 
a piece of W steel plate 
about 4x8 inches in size as 
the base. This base proved 
to be even steadier than 
the circular one shown. 
The rest of the holder con- 
sists of an arrangement of 
BNC connector hardware 
and a gooseneck section. 
The arrangement of the 
BNC connector hardware 
allows the PC board being 
held to be rotated into any 
conceivable position. It 
also can be rotated rapidly 
around so that one can get 
at either side of the board. 
This is a feature which 



many commercial holders 
do not have, and it is ex- 
tremely convenient when 
one has to check back and 
forth frequently between 
the component and foil 
sides. 

The arrangement of the 
BNC hardware is shown in 
Fig. 1. Since each of the 
connectors can rotate on 
its axis and the UC-306 
right-angle adapter can 
rotate fully on both of its 
axes, one can readily ap- 
preciate how it is possible 
to achieve any PC board 
positioning. 

Assembly is extremely 
simple. The BNC hardware 




Photo A. Jhl% is the completed holder. 



Fig. h Simple assembly of the holder using BNC connector 

hardware. 



120 73 Magazine • June, 1980 



just connects together and 
the two female BNC con- 
nectors are of the single- 
hole mounting type. The 
gooseneck is a standard 
lamp type approximately 
9" long which should be 
available at any large hard- 
ware store. It has a thread- 
ed stud on each end which 
loosely fits into the back of 
the UC-88 plugs Epoxy ce- 
ment can be used to make 
a firm bond between the 
studs and the plugs. In fact, 
the assembly of the goose- 
neck and the two UC 88 
plugs should be prepared 
first and the epoxy allowed 
to set thoroughly. 

Two plastic clothespins 
are attached to the plate 
shown in Fig. 1 using 6 x 32 
hardware and wing nuts. 
The plate can be of alu- 
minum or plastic. The 6 x 
32 hardware is placed with 
equal spaces along the 
4''-long plate so that the 
clothespins can be moved 
to accommodate any 
small' to medium-size PC 
board. 

Photo B shows the hold- 
er in use, and also illus- 
trates the hardware mount- 
ing on the 1- X 4-inch holder 
plate for the clothespins. 
As one looks at the photo, 
the PC board can be rotat- 
ed fully 360*^ horizontally 
and also 360*^ in and out of 
the page. 



Although the holder as 
shown was used for some 
time quite satisfactorily, 
the thought later came to 
develop also a lamp func- 
tion since the BNC connec- 
tors provide an available 
electrical connection no 
matter how the holder is 
rotated. The unit was 
disassembled and a wire 
connection made between 
the two UC-88 plugs on the 
ends of the gooseneck. 
Electric power was run to 
the female BNC connector 
in the base of the holder 
The lamp was installed on 
the 1- X 4'inch plate as 
shown m photo C. In this 
case, just a simple flash- 
light bulb was used, with 
leads soldered to it 
(covered by shrink tubing) 
and to the female BNC 
connector on the 1- x 4-inch 
plate. Later on, the unit 
was modified to use one of 
the 12 volt, high-intensity 
bulbs as a source of il- 
lumination. In any case, 
the illumination feature 
has proved to be extremely 
handy when examining PC 
boards — particularly com- 
plex boards with close- 
spaced foil patterns. The 
board is illuminated from 
the foil side, and then by 
carefully viewing the 
board from the component 
side one can often locate 
faults {breaks and solder 
bridges) which otherwise 






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would not be readily ap- 
parent. 

There is no need to 

follow exactly the con- 
struction of the holder as 
described. Possibly, one 
can devise an even better 
system using two goose- 
necks where there is a 
holder and illumination 



source at the end of each 
gooseneck. 

Whatever form the hold- 
er may take, however, it 
can be ^lh extremely useful 
toof around the shack for 
even some non-electrical 
application where a 'third 
hand" would come in 
handy. ■ 



Photo B. This shows the holder in use. Note how the 
clothespins can be set to accommodate different sizes of 
PC boards. 




Photo C A tamp can easily be added to the holder to pro- 
vide ittumination for tracing PC board faults. 



73 Magazme • June. 1980 121 



Anhur Giltman Kl VIC/2 
14 Pine Streei 
Princeton NJ OSS40 



Surplus Treasures 

assemble a quality ham station for less than $200 



The price of new ham 
radio equipment has 
gotten so high these days 
that starting or expanding 
an amateur radio station 
can he tremendouslv ex- 
pensive. State-of-the-art 
quality has a justifiable 
premium put on it but 
what is state-of-the-art 
today is run-of-the-mill 
tomorrow, and the values 
that are available on the 
used-equipment market 
bear this out The sub- 
millionaires among us 



would do well to consider 
used (previously owned) 
equipment for their next 
purchase. For a newcomer 
to the hobby, there is a 
gold mine of excellent gear 
to be had for a small per- 
centage of what equivalent 
new gear would cost. 

My own experience in 
this area comes from buy- 
ing and selling at the local 
flea markets a few times 
each year. These outings 
not only have provided 
quite a lot of enjoyment 



but they have given me the 
opportunity to examine a 
lot of different types of 
equipment — some an- 
cient, and some not so an- 
cient. The station that I am 
presently using is built 
around top quality bar- 
gains obtained by utilizing 
just a bit of patience and 
experience at these mar- 
kets. 

Although I own a trans- 
ceiver, I wanted a little 
more versatility for oper- 
ating CW and RTTY. My 




Swan 300B didn't really fill 
the bill Usually a couple 
of quality rigs show up at 
each flea market, so I 
wandered around in search 
of something suitable that 
1 could afford. What 
caught my eye was a mint 
National NC-303 with 
matching 6- and 2-meter 
converters and speaker. I 
was hooked, especially 
since the asking price was 
$125. 

For those who don't re- 
member, the NC-303 is a 

wonderful, large receiver 
which, in 1964, retailed for 
about $450 without acces- 
sories. The dial and band- 
switch mechanism would 
cost nearly that to dupli- 
cate today. So, with nearly 
100 pounds of receiver in 
my, trunk, I headed home 
to try it out. It worked 
perfectly, and the silky* 
smooth controls are a 
pleasure. The NC-303 can- 
not be accused of being 
miniature, but it certainly 
does feel good, and signal 
for signal it equalled or 
surpassed the performance 
of my Swan (especially on 
CW). 

Well, that receiver de- 
manded a matching trans- 
mitter, so at the next few 
markets I concentrated on 
finding a suitable compan- 
ion for it. The fruit of my 
tabors was a Hallicrafters 
HT-37 SSB transmitter in 



122 73 Magazine • June, 1980 



perfect condition for the 
remarkable price of $60. 
[The original price of the 
HT-37 was also about 
$450.) This transmitter was 
one of the most popular of 
its day. It uses a phasiog- 
type sideband generator 
and is very stable and easy 
to operate. In about 10 
minutes I added an FSK cir- 
cuit to the HT-37 and was 
on the air. Reports on all 
modes have been excel- 
lent, and the total in- 
vestment, including speak- 
er and converters, was 
SI 85 1 

Why buy new super-ex- 
pensive gear? Possible rea- 
sons may be as follows: (1] 
It is certainly smaller. t2) 
The new aH'Solid-state rigs 
take less time to warm up 
and, on the average, they 
drift less. (3) Transceivers, 
especially broadbanded 
ones, require less fuss* 

My own personal com- 
ments on these are, in 
order: (1) 1 like big equip- 



ment. It somehow feels 
and (ooks more substan- 
tial (2) My two units take 
about 10-15 minutes to 
come to temperature, after 
which stability is perfectly 
acceptable. Not all olcf 
gear drifts. (3) The opera- 
tion of separate receiver 
and transmitter, while not 
as simple as a transceiver, 
allows ail sorts of conve- 
nience, especially on CW 
and RTTY. True, in most 
cases zero-beating the 
transmitter is a bother, but 
it quickly becomes part of 
the routine. 

To this I should add the 
most important point of 
alL For under $200 I have 
assembled a station that 
can equal the performance 
of most new gear at 3 to 5 
times the price. A slightly 
less ambitious station 
could be put together for 
even less. Novices take 
note. Cost is certainly no 
excuse for inferior equip- 
ment.B 



r MOVING? 

Let us know B weeks in advance so that you won't 
miss a single issue of 73 Maga2ine. 
Attach old label where indicated and print new ad- 
dress in space provided. Abo include your mailing 
Idbel whenever you write concerning your subscript 
tion. it helps us serve you promptly. Write to: 





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tcity 



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73! 



THE MAGIC OF HAM RADIO 

by Jerrold Swank / W8HXR 

Under various callsigns, Jerry Swank 
W8HXR has been heard on the ham bands 
since 1919, He has watched amateur radio 
grow from the days of Model A spark coils 
to an era of microprocessors and satellite 
communications. In The Magic of Ham 
Radio, Jerry g ives his account of our hobby 
during the past six decades. 

W8HXR has often been where the ac- 
tion is. Jerry has responded to calls for 
help from earthquake-stricken Managua 
and tornado-ravaged Xenia. Antarctica, 
one of man's loneliest outposts, has been 
a bit less lonely, thanks to Jerry's tireless 
phone patching efforts. Drawing on his 
own colorful experiences and those of 
many other hams, Jerry has compiled this 
word-picture of what ham radio was and is. 

It has been said that any sufficiently 
advanced technology Is indistinguishable 
from magic. Ham radio fits this description 
quite well. In what other activity is it possi- 
ble to meet people, reunite them with loved 
ones, even save their lives without actually 
seeing those youVe helped? Yes, there is 
something magical about ham radio, and 
we hams are the magicians. Order BK7312 
$4,95;* 



*Use the ofder card in the back of this magazine or itemize 

your order on a separate piece of paper and malt to: 73 Radio 

Bookshop • Peterborough NH 03458. Be sure to include 

check or detailed credit card information, no C.O.D. orders 

accepted. Add $1.00 handling charge. Note: Prices subject to 

change on books not published by 73 Magazine. Questions 

regarding your order? Please write to Cystomer Service at the 

above address. Please allow 4-6 weeks for delivery. 



73 Magazine • June. 1980 123 



Listen in Secrecy with a 
Giant Inductive Loop 

— monitor your rig from anywhere in 
the house — without wires 



Fred Johnson ZL2AMJ 

IS Field Street 

Upper Hun, New Zealand 

My late father doe 
ZL2CA1 developed a 
hearing impairment in later 
life and was outfitted with 
a number of hearing aids of 
various types. Several had 
"telephone" coils fitted in 
them. These use a pick-up 
loop or coil which can be 
switched in place of the 
normal hearing-aid micro- 
phone. The loop is held 



^^ 1^ m » 

I 




alongside the telephone or 
its earpiece so that stray 
energy from the induction 
coil or telephone earpiece 
can induce a signal into the 
loop. It is then amplified 
and ted to the hearing-aid 
earpiece. 

By this means, a deaf 
person can hear on the 
telephone far more effec- 
tively than with the normal 
telephone earpiece or with 
an amplifer-type tele- 
phone. The characteristics 
of the hearing aid can be 
tailored to fit the hearing 
deficiency of the individu- 




m 




\ 
I 



ft TUBWS 25 QA tfif^mtk t 

WOiiND ftROUWD THE \ 

HOUSE b^l THIS LEVEL 




at. 

On an occasion when my 
father visited me, he men- 
tioned that he would like 
to feed the audio output of 
his amateur receiver to his 
hearing aid directly, to 
avoid the loudspeaker4o- 
hearing-aid audible link. 
This would give better 
acoustic quality for his par- 
ticular hearing require- 
ment and would eliminate 
other shack noises from be- 
ing picked up by the hear- 
ing-aid microphone. A sim- 
ple experiment quickly 
showed that these hearing 



EftRPteCE 




i 



COIL AND AMPLif tER 



fig, 1. How one house was wired for induction-wireless. 



Fig. Z A simple ir\ductiorh 

loop receiver. 



aids are not only useful for 
the amateur with a hard-of- 
hearing problem, but are 
useful for the amateur with 
good hearing, too. Many 
useful amateur radio ap- 
plications are possible, 
plus some other useful ap- 
plications, too. This article 
outlines several uses to 
which hearing aids with in- 
duction or telephone coils 
can be put 

The Loop Around the House 

Five turns of 25-gauge 
enameled wire were 
wound around the house. 
Fig. 1 shows the scheme. 
The house is two-story over 
most of its area. The loop 
was wound around at the 
upper-floor level by simply 
winding it around the out- 
side! The number of turns 
on the loop does not ap- 
pear to be critical; five to 
ten have been found to be 
adequate. The position of 
the loop is not critical; 
anywhere between floor 
and ceiling seems to be sat- 
isfactory Several houses of 
different styles have been 



124 73Magazif}e • June, 1980 



fitted, and all installations 
seem to work effectively. 

The loop could be made 
from one turn of a multi- 
conductor cable (if you 
have a suitable length 
available) by connecting 
the individual conductors 
in series to form a multi- 
turn loop. The gauge of 
vifire used does not seem to 
be cfiticaL 

The two ends of the loop 
aw connected in place of 
the loudspeaker in the 
receiver or tape recorder 
that you wish to monitor. 
An "external speaker" 
socket can be used The 
audio gain setting should 
be about the same as that 
for normal room loud- 
speaker use No damage 
appears to have been done 
to any audio amplifier by 
the removal of its usual 
loudspeaker and replace- 
ment with this unusual 
load. I have used the loop 
with my two-meter gear for 
monitoring the local re- 
peater. It can also be used 
on my FT-101B on the HF 
bands so that if I have to 
leave the shack, t can con- 
tinue to listen to the rig 
unhindered as I move 
about the house. 

Coverage 

Testing coverage from 
this induction-wireless unit 
is rather like checking the 
coverage of a two-meter re- 
peater, but the distances 
are smaller! There are nulls 
and peaks and extensive 
areas of first-class cover- 
age. The signal level falls 
quite quickly outside the 
loop, but is usable to about 
one loop-diameter or more 
away. My loop covers most 
of my property In a two- 
story house, excellent cov- 
erage is obtained across 
both levels. 

The Receiver Units 

Hearing aids with 
telephone coils make ex- 
cellent monitors. Two 
general types have been 
tried. The hearing aid with 



separate earpiece (Fig. 2) is 
a good unit to use for per- 
sons with normal hearing. 
It fits in a pocket and can 
be carried easily. Quite 
simply, if you wish to leave 
the shack, switch from 
speaker to loop and grab 
the hearing aid. Push ear- 
piece into ear, switch on, 
set audio level, and put 
unit jn pocket. You can 
then wander about the 
house monitoring the 
shack receiver as you go. 

The spectacle-type aid 
(Fig. 3) also works very ef- 
fectively as an induction 
receiver. It is ideal for per- 
sons who are hard-of-hear- 
tng and who have spec- 
tacles already fitted. Some 
spectacles have atiiplif iers 
fitted into each side-piece 
but usually only one is fit- 
ted with a telephone coil. 
Spectacle receivers are a 
bit elaborate for a person 
with normal hearing to use, 
but a very good applica- 
tion will be given later. 

Power-line hum prob- 
lems are not serious. The 
signal-to-hum ratio is 
generally such that the 
hum is not noticed. The 
response characteristics of 
the hearing aids reiect 
signals at the low-fre- 
quency end of the audio 
spectrum hence minimiz- 
ing the hum problem. 

It rs quite uncanny to 
walk about an absolutely 
quiet home and monitor 
amateur signals via a pair 
of spectacles with no one 
else listening. Secret listen- 
ing applications suggest 
themselves! 

Audio-Coupled Listening 

Other applications for 
induction-wireless become 

possible. It is not always 
convenient to wind a loop 
around a house. For short- 
range and portable use. a 
ferrite rod [from an old 
broadcast radio) can be 
used. It is wound for its full 
length with 2 5-gauge 
enameled wire and con- 
nected in place of a 
er in a receiver. The 




PIC* -UP CWL 




Fig. 3. Hearing-aid spectacles fitted with a telephone coil 



rod can be placed under a 
shelf above a rig and this 
gives close-area direc- 
tional coverage. The num- 
ber of turns or quality of 
ferrite used does not seem 
to be critical. By this 
means, a deaf person can 
operate his rig using his 
spectacles for listening. 

Secret Listening 

A small broadcast-band 
radio has been fitted with 

such an added ferrite rod 
wound with wire and con- 
nected in place of its 
speaker. It can radiate to 
spectacles over some six 
feet or more. This means 
that "no-wire" private 
listening to the radio is 
possible — secret listening 
with no one else hearing it 
(see Fig, 4). 

I have attended meet- 
ings (which I knew were go- 
ing to be boring] dnd have 
listened to a radio located 
in my briefcase alongside 
my chair without anyone 
else hearing it or knowing 
about it Anyone spotting 
the frames of my spec- 
tacles would assume I was 
going deaf— -and 1 proba- 
bly got undeserved sym- 
pathy as a result! 



Conclusion 

Other applications tor 
induct ion- wireless soon 
present themselves. For 
monitoring the local re- 
peater or a net when you 
have to leave the shack, it 
is ex('[li'nt. It is unfor- 
tunate that a multi-channel 
system is not as simple! 

If you have to wear spec- 
tacles fitted with a hearing 
aid, and if your hearing aid 



fig. 4. A receiver fitted for 
''secret listening/' 

is fitted with a telephone 
coil, then I expect that you 
will be delighted to fit a 
loop around your shack or 
house and listen to your 
receiver through your spec- 
tacles. You will find it very 
convenient, and it does not 
disturb the other occu- 
pants in the house — they 
lear nothing! 

My father, Joe ZL2CA, 
was intending to write an 
article on this topic to help 
others who were hard-of- 
hearing and whom he con- 
sidered would gain enor- 
mous benefit from this 
induction-wireless system. 
He became a silent key 
before he completed the 
task, so I have done the job 
for him. My grandfather 
was deaf, my father was 
deaf, and my turn will 
come It will not be a hand- 
icap if I can put a pair of 
hearing-aid spectacles to 
other use! 

I am interested m cor- 
responding with others 
who have experimented 
with audio-coupled wire- 
less systems of this type. 
Good listening! B 



73 Magazine • June, 1980 125 



WILSON SYSTEMS TOWERS 

- IN STOCK - 



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Features: 

Max, Height; 77 ' 
Mh. Height: 24' 
Weiglit: 700 lbs. 
Winch: 1500 lbs- 
Cable: 6400 lbs. 
Requires FB-77B or 
RB-77B & will be 
totally freestanding 



16' 



16' 



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Featuree: 

Max. Height: 61' 
Min. Height: 23' 
Weight: 450 lbs. 
Winch; 1200 lbs. 
Cable: 4200 lbs. 
Ho Guys required 
when mounting 
against house. 

For completely 
ffeestanding in- 
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RB-61 B or 
FB-61 B below- 



■roo 



'3.5' O.D. 



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Features: 

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Weight: 250 lbs. 
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Cable; 4200 tbs. 

No Guys required 
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For comptetely 
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RB-45B or FB-45B 
below. 



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Wilson Sv^tems uses a new high strength carbon steel tube rrtanufactiired especially for Wilson Systems. It is 
25% stronger than conventional pipe or tubing, The tubing size used is: 2" 6r 3% 095; 4Vi" & 6'' .125, B'' 
-,134 All tub rug is hot djp galvanized. Top section is 2" 0.0, tor proper rotor and antenna mounting. 

The TT^5B and MT-61 8 come complete with house bracket and hjnged base plate for against-house mount- 
ing, For totally ffeestanding Installation, use either of the tilt-over bases shown below. 

The ST'77B can not be moynted against the house and must be used with the tilt-ovef base FB-77B qr RB-77B 
shown beiow. 



TILT-OVER BASES FOR TOWERS 



FIXED BASE 

The FB Series was designed to 
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house. It will support the tower m 
acompletety free-standing vertical 
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the antenna. The rotor mounts at 
the top of the tower in the con- 
ventional manner, and wjtl not ro- 
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FB-4fiB. .112 lbs.. . M74.M 
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ROTATING BASE 

The RB Series was designed for 
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ground position. This series of 
bases will give that ease plus ro- 
tate the complete tower and an- 
tenna system by the use of a 
heavy duly thrust bearing at the 
base of the tower mounting posi 
tion, whiie still being able to tilt 
the tower over when desiring to 
make changes on the antenna 
system. 

RB-4BB. 144 lbs.. *239.95 
RB-61 B . 229 lbs. . *324.95 
RB-77B . 300 lbs. . *489.95 



IV SI 



Tiiting the tower over is a 
one-man task with the Wil- 
son bas.es. (Shown above is 
the RB-61 B. Rotor is not 
included.) 



WILSON 

SYSTEMS, INC. 



42B& & Pald»i-k Avf L.i^ Vi-q^s Pifvddii 89^03 



WILSON SYSTEMS, INC. PRESENTS 

THE NEW SYSTEM 40 TRIBANDER 



3 MONOBAND ANTENNAS IN ONE - EACH WITH FULL MONOBAND PERFORMANCE 



FACTORY DIRECT 
ONLY 



*299 



:<^ 



/ 



<^ ■ 



f-: 



:i 



A NEW CONCEPT IN ANTENNA DESIGN 

USING A 26 FT. E 



•It 




FOR THE SERIOUS DXer WHO WANTS MONOBANDERS ON 10-15-20 

FOUR FULL SIZE 20 MTR ELEMENTS WITH 10 dbd GAIN 

THREE WIDE SPACED 15 MTR ELEMENTS WITH 8.2 dbd GAIN 

FOUR WIDE SPACED 10 MTR ELEMENTS WITH 10.2 dbd GAIN 

ONLY ONE FEED LINE REQUIRED 

DESIGNED WITH NO INTERACTIONS BETWEEN ELEMENTS 

ALL DRIVEN ELEMENTS AND DIRECTOR ELEMENTS ARE INSULATED FROM BOOM 

ALL PARASITIC ELEMENTS ARE FULL SIZE 

BROADBANDED-NO SEPARATE SETTINGS REQUIRED FOR PHONE OR CW 

SAME QUALITY HARDWARE AS USED IN ALL WILSON ANTENNAS 



SPECIFICATIONS 

Max. Pwr Input Legal Limit Longest E^e^^ent ............. 36 ' 

VBWR @ Res . . .... 1 .2:1 Turning Radius. 22 6 ' 

Impedance , . . . 50 ohm Surface Area . , 1 2.1 sq. ft. 

F&ed Method . . Coax Bafun Supplied Wind Loading @ 80 mph . . . 309 lbs, 

Matcining Method . . . Modified Beta Assem, Weight 75 lbs-. 

Fm Ratio 25 db Shipping Weight 84 lbs. 



IB 
METERS 



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AVAILABLE ONLY 
FACTORY DIRECT 

CALL 

1 -800-634-6898 fSee' 



IV Sf 



WILSON 

SYSTEMS. INC. 



42J?6 S Polaris Im Vegas. Nevada 89103 

PRICES AND SPECIFICATIONS SUBJECT TO CHANGf WITHOUT NOTICE. 



WILSON SYSTEMS INC. 




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Capable of handlfng the Legal Limit, the 
SYSTEM 33 is the finest compact tri- 
bander available to the amateur. 

Designed and produced by one of the 
world's largest antenna manufacturers, the 
traditional quality of workmanship and 
materials excells with the SYSTEM 33. 

New boom-to-element mount consists of 
two 1/8" thick fornned aluminum plates that 
will provide more clamping and holding 
strength to prevent element misalignment 



Superior clamping power is obtained 
with the use of a rugged 1/4" thick 
aluminum plate for boom to mast mounting. 

The use of large diameter High-Q Traps 
in the SYSTEM 33 makes it a high perfornv 
ing tri-bander and at a very economical price. 

A complete step-by-step illustrated in- 
struction manual guides you to easy as* 
sembly and the lightweight antenna makes 
installation of the SYSTEM 33 quick and 
simple. 



SPECIRCATI0N5 



Band MHz .14^21-28 

Max. power input. . .Legal limit 

Gain {dbd) Up to &dB 

VSWR at resonance 1 .3:1 

Impedence. ........ .60 ohms 

F/B ratio. ..... .20 dB or better 



Boom (O.D, X length)2" x 14'4" 
No. elements. 3 



Wind load @ 80 mph . . 114 lbs 
Assembled Wt 37 lbs 



Longest element 27'4" Shipping Wt. 42 lbs 

Turning radius 15'9" Direct 52 ohm feed 



IOM£TEil£ 



CW-- 
Phonfl 



Max, mast diameter . , .2" O.D. 
Surface area 5.7 sq. ft. 

ACTUAL SWR CURVES 

IB METERS: 



no balun required 
Max wind survival - . . 100 mph 



Li I 






A'^ — 



31AMITEA5 



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WITH OTHE-'t 








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BRAND 
tt 

.BRAND^ 
HG 

i-WILSONh 
SYSTEJV^ 



"Tfif rim •"■--■--"- 



jnm^f^^^f^mmmmmmm. 



Compare the site and strength of the boom 

to element clamps. See who offers the largest 

and heavi^t duty« Which would you prefer? 



Wtlson Systems traps offer a larger diameter 

trap coii and a larger outside housing, 

giving excellent Q and power capabilities. 




ADD 40 METERS TO YOUR TRI-BAND 
WITH THE NEW 33-0 MK 

- //V STOCK - 

Now you can have the capabilities of 40-meter operation on the SYSTEM 36 
and SYSTEM 33. Using the sanne type high quality traps, the 40-meter addition 
will offer 1 50 KHZ of bandwidth, The 33-6 MK will fit your present SY36, SY33, or 
SY3 and use the same single feed line. 

The 33-6 MK adds approximately 15 ' to the driven element of your tri-bander, 
increasing the tuning radius by 5 '6'' This addition will offer a rotatable dipole at 
the same height of your beam. 



IV Sf 



WILSON 

SYSTEMS JNC, 



42H5 5 Po|*fis Ave,. L*s V&t|3*. Npw^da B9T03 

Pf iceis and specif icat'icins iubj^ct to change lAriihcujt notice?. 



ORDER 
FACTORY DIRECT 
1-800-634-6898 



5- 



li 




Y :i 



WV-IA 

4 BAND 
TRAP VERTICAL 
(10 -40 METERS) 

No bandswitching 
necessary with this 
vertical. An excellent 
low cost DX antenna 
with an electrical quarter 
wavelength on each band 
and low angle radiation. 
Advanced design 
provides low SWR and 
lA exceptionally flat 
response across the full 
width of each band. 

Featured are the Wilson 
large diametet High-Q 
traps which will maintain 
resonant points with 
varying temperatyres and 
humidity. 



Easily assembled, the 
WV-IA is supplied with a 
base mount bracket 
to attach to vent pipe or 
to a mast driven tn the 
ground. 

Note: 

Radtals are required for 

peak operation. 

{See GR-T below) 



u 



SPECIFIGATIOIMS 

19' total height 

Self supporting — no guys 

required 

Weight - 14 lbs. 

Input impedance; 50 f^ 

Powerhandling capabiHty: 

Legal Limit 

Two High-Q traps with farge 

diameter coils 

Low angle radiation 

Omnidirectional 

performance 

Taper skA/aged aluminum 

tubing 

Automatic bandswitching 

Mast bracket furnashed 

SWR: 1.1:1 or lesson alj 

haad^ 



GR-1 



The GR-1 fs the complete 
ground radial krt for the WV-1 A. 
It consists of 150' of #12 
aluminum wire and heavy duty 
egg insulators, instructions. The 
GR-1 will increase the efficiency 
of the WV-IA by provldrng the 
correct counterpoise. 



WILSON SYSTEMS, INC. 



SYSTEM 36 



CALL 

FACTORY DIRECT 

1 -800-634-6898 



A trap loaded antenna that performs like a monobander! That's the charact eristic of this six elemeriT Three band beam, Throiigh the use of wide 
spacing and interlacing of elernents, the following rs possible: three active elements on 20. three active elements an 15, and four active 
efements on tO meters. No need to run separate coax feed lines for each band, as the bandsv/ftchmg is aytornatfcallv made via the High-Q 
Wilson traps. Designed to handle the maximum (egat power, the traps are capped at each end to provide a weather-proof seal against rain and 
du^. The sp^ciat High-Q traps are the strongest available in the industry. 



Compare the SY-36 with others . . 



» «^ ^ i. rtW jA f W viiM^ ^ 



k-os^rtq^^^WiP^ 



BRAND 



BHAAIO 
HG 



-VVILSOMh 
SYSTEMS 






Compgre the size end strength of rhe boom 

to alernent c tamps. See who offers the Largest 

and heaviiKt duty. Which wcHJld you prv^? 



WilBon Systemft traps offer a larger diemeter 

(rap coil and a brgef Qinside housing, 

giving flxcejilenl Q and power capabilities. 



dPECfrtCATldNS 

BmdtdOt. ........ ..^...^.. \A1^2» 

KAtKirnu/n pow^r mput. ...... Legal Limit 

G^JnldSd) ,. -. 9dlj 

VSWfl @ resonarice .....•.*"»„ 13:1 

ImpQdsnce .50 dhm 

Ff B Ratio ........,..,.., ZOdbor B«tt«r 

BoomjOD « Length! , 2' n 24 216 * 

No of Elements. . ^ ,.*,,..,,,«,,,*,.>,. , 6 
Lo^QM.rE^e^^^enl, .,*«*.....*. . 2f '2!4 " 

Turning Radius IB'B* 

MflKlrnurn Maat DlamBter ..,,,....,, 2' 
Surface Araa ... - fi.O k|. ft. 

Matching Method Bota 

Wind Loading # fiO mph 216 Fb9, 

Maximum Wind SufvivBL lOQmpti 

Feed Method Coaxjal Ealun (tupplii&d] 

A&sembJed Weight (epprox.i , . . . &3 Ihs. 
Shipping Weighr (approxj ...,.», 62 Jtra. 



I«"»'**^^""^»"»" — "^"■•"■■•"■•■■■" — ■ — "»^» — — — — — •* — "^ 

1 WILSON SYSTEMS. INC. -4286 S. Palaris FAC 1 R Y D 1 R ECT ToJW=ree Order Number - 

J us Vegas. NV - (702) 73^7401 ORDERBLANK 1 "800-634-6898 i 

g WILSON SVSTEMS ANTENNAS WJLSOfti SYSTEMS tOWEWS ^ 


' rt-^ 


MocM 




Shippkig 


Prips 


oir^ 


ModisJ 


Omaipbon 


Shippino 


P*fa8 ■ 


. Oif^ 


P%»ciplion 




SV« 


1 E9ft. TitMndiir for 1 D, m 20 Mlrv. 


UPS 


299.95 




TTMSa 


Frees^ncfirig 4S' Tubu^ Tgwor 


TRUCK 


37d^ ■ 




SV36 


e B« TnbBnder ft* 10. TS. 20 Wtn 


LH»S 


209.» 




RB45e 


Rotating Base fOf TT-JiBB w'tSi ow faature 


TRUCit 


239Ji * 




SV33 


a El6. TrflBf>if9 for 10. IS, 20 Mit$ 


Uf*S 


15d.95 




FB45a 


Hxe<l tlase tor 1 f -4tie wtyr o%«r l«ativ« 


TRUCK 


174.9S 1 




SMMK 


40 Mtr. Mod Krt for SY^ Et SY3S 


UPS 


54 J5 




MT«1S 


FifSKtBfiQviD qI TuDular Tdww 


TRUCK 






WV1A 


Tr^ Vonic^ for 10. 15. 20. 40 Mit*. 


UPS 


■3^.aO 




RB^e 


iteicatir>g Base for MT^I B Mftil Ovtf f tfitwe 


TRUCK 


324.9& 1 




GR^I 


Ground FlsJali ikir WV 1 A 


UPS 


13.K 




F&€1B 


Fixed Ra^ for MT^B w/lit 9v«r f«atijre 


THUCIC 


2«995 1 




M520A 


& eements on 20 Mtis. 


TRUCK 


234.95 




ST77B 


Free^tsndEng 77 ' Tubulat TowSf 


TRUCK 


104a96 1 




M^2QA 


4 Etemertts on 20 Mtrs, 


UPS 


T64.95 




RB-77B 


Roisnng Base tot ST-77B wfuit ovef featurB 


TRUCK 


489-95 1 




M^t&A 


5 EJ^monts U4i 15 Mtra. 


UPS 


134 95 




^-776 1 Rxeo tjase for ST 77B w/1ih ova* fsafyre 


TRUCK 


3S995 ^ 




M^tfiA 


4 Elflmerrts on 1 5 Mtm. 


UPS 


89.95 


Pric« 


ft Effective June 1 -30. ! 990 Nevada Resktenrs Add Sal«s Ta« ■ 




MS10A 


5 Elements en tO Mtrs. 


UPS 


89.96 


Shjp C.O,D, D Check encksaed D Charge to VISA Q MasterChai^ Q ■ 




M410A 


4 Elements on 10 Mtrs. 


UPS 


74.95 


1 




^ ACCESSOflies 






Cwd 


No. 


Fxpirnn 1 








T'X ' 


Tft[f TwiBtor Rotor 


UPS 


26d.95 


ftttnlr Un CJnm&tiiF^ 




HO-73 


Alliance Heavy Dutv Rotor 


UPS 


1 09.95 


Dann fuDl aignaiurB 






1 




RC^C 


a/C Rotor Cable 


UPS 


a2/FT, 


Nainfl 1 




RG-SU 1 


flG^U Foam-Uhra Flexible Coaxial 

Cable, 38 strand center cDOduntir. 11 gBi>ga 


UPS 


.21 /FT. 


Sttftfti ■ 

li 


1 NOTE: 


Phona 


■ 

SUi«» 7i|i « 


On Coaxi^ a/id Rotor Cahfe. mtitimum oedet is 100* and 50' multiples. 
1 F^ic«£ and specifications subject to change wiThoul mitice. 
1 Nin«tv ^90J Day Limiteii WarTanty-^l Products FOB Las Vegas, Nevada 


Prices and speaf ication£ sublet lo change wnfxwt nc 


?tice. 


1 
1 



Robert B. Grove WA4PyQ 
Rt 1, Box 156 
Brasstown NC 28902 



Those Hamtronics Kits . . . 
How Can You Use Them? 

an in-depth look at some electronic bargains 






Photo A. T50 FM exciter: a high-quality VHF kit at a low price. 



Through the years, many 
fine companies and 
products have come and 
gone in the capricious 
game of consumer elec- 
tronics. Ham radio certain- 
ly has not escaped its share 
of casualties. But one com- 
pany which has been 
around for a while is Ham- 
tronics, well-known for its 
quality kits and reasonable 
prices. 

Recently, I decided to 
have an up-to-date look at 
their growing catalog to 
see for myself some of 
their more recent products. 
1 was so impressed that I 
decided to take a closer 
look at some of the kits. 

T50 2-WaU VHF Exciter 

Designed to put out 2 
Watts on any one of three 
bands (6, 2, or 1 W meters), 
this $44.95 rig will accom- 
modate six crystal-con- 



130 73 Magazine • June, 1980 



trolled channels. Either 
narrow-band FM or CW 
modes may be selected. In- 
dividual crystal trimmers 
allow precise netting for 
accuracy. 

For voice transmission, a 
trimpot allows adjustment 
from O to 7 kHz deviation. 
A phase modulator in- 
cludes audio shaping and 
filtering for maximum 
audio punch. Microphone 
gain is adjustable separate- 
ly from deviation limita- 
tion. 

With TVI such a con- 
stant problem, I paid par- 
ticular attention to sup- 
pression of unwanted spu* 
rious signals. The T50 
shielded oscillator and 
multiplier coils and a 
three-stage harmonic filter 
at the output keep har- 
monics and spurious sig- 
nals down 60 dB. 

The little board mea* 
su res 3" X 7 W/'x 2", and re- 
quires 13.6 volts dc at 400 
mA for full output. 

LPA2 Linear Power 
Amplifier 

For the VHF and UHF en- 
thusiast who needs that ex- 
tra margin of power, 1 rec- 
ommend a look at the 
Hamtronics line of linear 
power amplifier kits, start- 
ing at $59,95. Requiring on- 
ly 1- to 2-Watts drive (and 
thus fully compatible with 
the T50 exciter and XV2 
and XV4 transmitting con- 
verters, as well as with 
most commercial por- 
tables), these amplifiers 
may be ordered for outputs 
from 15 to 45 Watts! And 
they may be used on side- 
band, FM, CW, AM — you 
name it. They are available 
for the 50-, 144-, 220-, and 
432'MHz bands. 

Output transistors are 
fully vswr protected; they 
are high-gain, emitter-bal- 
lasted devices. 

As with the T50, a 1 3 6-V 
dc power supply is re- 
quired (but at 2 to 8 Amps, 
depending upon the ampli- 
fier chosen and the drive 
level) Heat sinks are pro- 
vided with these kits. 




Photo B. LPA2'15 finear amplifier is typical of several Hamtronics power amplifiers for 
VHF applications. 



R7S VHF FM Receiver 

For the purist who wants 
only the best reception on 
two meters, the R75 single- 
channel strip receiver 
should fill the bill. Nominal 
i-f bandwidth is ±7 kHz, 
but filter cascading is 
available as an option to 
make passbands very nar- 
row. 

Selectivity options for 
the R75 include 4 incre- 
ments, from an LC filter 
(±30 kHz at 60 dB down) 
to a razor-sharp 8-pole 
sheer (±9 kHz at 60 dB 
down). Prices are from 
$69.95 to $99.95 for these 
receiver kits. 

l-f boards are available 
separately for $20 less than 
the full kit prices. 

Sensitivi^ is an extraor- 
dinarv 0.2 microvolts, 
making the R75 a natural 
for 136 MHz satellite re^ 
ception of NOAA/ATS as 
well as for 143/149 MARS 
operation. 

The low-noise FET front 
end is gate protected, and 
shielded double-tuned 
coils are featured to en- 
hance singfe-signa! recep- 
tion. The crystal oscillator 



is voltage regulated, and a 
trimmer allows tight cali- 
bration. 

Built-in test points as- 
sure optimum tune-up. The 
2-board receiver (rf and 
i'f/audio) requires 13.6V dc 
at 60-150 mi 1 1 tamps and 
will provide 2 Watts of 
audio — that's enough for 
virtually any application! 

R85 UHF Receiver 

For an additional $20 
over the cost of the R75, 
you can be the proud 
owner of a UHF receiver 
with the same excellent 
specifications as the VHF 
version. 

This UHF receiver af- 
fords an excellent oppor- 
tunity for those ATV ex- 
perimenters who don't 
wish to invest in an expen- 
sive commercially-assem- 
bled UHF receiver. A 
matchfng transmitter will 
be described shortly. 

R110 Aircraft Receiver 

With the increased inter- 
est among scanner enthu- 
siasts, it isn't surprising 
that someone has finally 
offered a VHF aircraft- 
band receiver. The primary 



hitch that has prevented 
scanner manufacturers 
from including the aircraft 
band in their program- 
mable scanners is the fact 
that while the land mobile 
services are all FM, aircraft 
still tenaciously hold on to 
the AM mode. 

While Regency Electron- 
ics now offers their Digital 
Flight Scan receiver, only 
Bearcat has both land 
mobile FM and aircraft AM 
in one receiver (models 
BO220 and BC-300). 

The Hamtronics R1T0 re- 
ceiver kit is an excellent ac- 
cessory for the owner of 
FM-only scanners. It is de- 
signed for 1 1 0- to 1 30-MHz 
reception, but can also be 
used on virtually any fre- 
quency from 26- to 220- 
MHz. 

Sensitivity is 0.2 micro- 
volts for 10 dB signal-plus- 
noise to noise — (S + Nl/N. 
Selectivity is not particu- 
larly a problem in the air- 
craft band, so the receiver 
has moderate selectivity. 

The R110 features 2 
Watts of audio, squelch, 
S-meter output, rf age cir- 
cuitry, and a dual-gate 
MOSFET front end. It is vir- 



73 Maga^rne • June, 1980 131 




Photo C. R75 VHF single-channel receiver — a hot per- 
iormer. 



tually the same receiver kit 
as the R75, and sells for 
$74.95. 

Preamplifier Kits 

Not all receivers have 
the degree of sensitivity we 
would like. For that reason, 
Hamtronics offers a fine 
series of receiving pream- 
plifiers to bring up the ap- 
parent sensitivities of 
those questionable front 
ends. Basically, all a pre- 
amp needs to do is to bring 
a weak signal up to a level 
that can ride over a re- 
ceiver's inherent noise, and 
the job is done. 

For receiving applica- 
tions in the 20-to-230-MHz 
range, the P8 will probably 
fill the bill It has two 
J-FETs in cascade, pro- 
viding 20- to 25-dB gain 
with only 2.5 dB of noise! 
And it will continue to pro- 
vide that gain within 6 dB 
with frequency excursions 
as much as 3% off center 
frequency. 

One possible applica- 
tion of a preamp like the P8 
Is in the extension of fre- 
quency coverage of pro- 
grammable scanner radios. 
It is welt known that a lis- 
tener can pick up images of 
frequencies lower than he 
can tune, but their signal 
levels are way down. 



Suppose that you would 
like to hear the ATS sat- 
ellite at 135.575 MHz; 
no programmable scanner 
covers that range in the FM 
mode. By using the P8 pre- 
amp tuned to that fre- 
quency, Vt?u would be able 
to pick up the image fre- 
quency (roughly 21J~MHz 
higher) on your scanner! 
Simply double the if fre- 
quency and add that num- 
ber to the received signal 
frequency. With Regency 
and Radio Shack program- 
mables (10.7-MHz i-f), 
simply add 21.4 MHz (ATS 
would be tuned in at 
156.976), For Bearcats, i-fs 
may be 10,8 or 10.85 MHz, 
so you would add 21.6 or 
21J MHz. It's that simple. 

The only drawback from 
such a system is when the 
preamp also increases sig- 
nal levels of loud VHF sta- 
tions on the normal rf pass- 
band of the receiver. This 
can cause intermod prob- 
lems. But the technique is 
viable in a pinch! 

The P8 kit costs only 
$10.95; a premium P9 is 
available for $12,95 ($21,95 
wired) which boasts lower 
noise and sharper pass- 
band (6 dB bandwidth 
within 2% center fre- 
quency). 



For UHF, try the PI 5 pre- 
amp with 20-dB gain and 
5-dB noise figure for any 
10-MHz segment between 
380 and 520 MHz. ($18.95 
kit; $27.95 wired). 

Scanner enthusiasts may 
wish to try the image-en- 
hancement receiving tech- 
nique using this converter 
to tune in the elusive 406- 
to 420-MHz government 
band. As before, add twice 
the i-f frequency to the de- 
sired frequency, and punch 
up the total on your UHF 
scanner. 

Accessories for the Receiver 

For expanding the flex- 
ibility of your receiving in- 
stallation, let me call your 
attention to several in- 
novative circuits from 
Hamtronics. Their AS10 
scanner adapter permits a 
four-channel s can n i n g 
function to be added to 
any fixed-frequency re- 
ceiver. Two adapters may 
be linked for 8 channels, 
and so on. 

The PI 3 receiving multi- 
coupler allows the use of 
two receivers simultane- 
ously on one antenna. Any 
segments of the 26- to 
230-MHz range may be 
selected. The PI 3 is mod- 
eled after the P9 VHF pre- 
amp, and provides 15-dB 
gain in each channel. 

The A3 multichannel 
adapter allows a single- 
channel receiver or trans- 
mitter to be multichannel- 
ized. tt accepts crystal fun- 
damentals from 10 to 20 or 
38 to 55 MHz (specify 
model). The A13 affords 
six-channel capacity. 

XV4 UHF Transmitting 
Converter 

OSCAR Phase III is a 
snap using this neat little 
$99.95 transmitting adapt- 
er with your 1 0-meter trans- 
ceiver. The XV4 requires a 
minimum of only 1 milli- 
watt of drive. [An at- 
tenuator will be necessary 
with most exciters). Output 
power is 1-1 Vi Watts on 
SSB, CW, or FM. Image re- 
jection is down 60 dB. 



The circuit utilizes a 
double-baianced mixer to 
assure low spurious gen- 
eration and guarantee 
easier alignment as well. 
Two oscillators are pro- 
vided for remote switching 
of operating frequency 
ranges. 

Frequency stability is 
good, too. Thermal drift is 
less than 200 Hz per hour 
at constant ambient tem- 
perature, or within 1 kHz 
for 10° F temperature 
change. 

. Several options of an- 
other version, the model 
XV2 transmitting convert- 
er, are available to allow 
outputs on 2 or 6 meters as 
well as 220 MHz. They may 
be driven by a CB or 
1 0-meter rig. 

A novel XV28 transmit- 
ter down-converter allows 
a two-meter rig to serve as 
an exciter to drive one of 
the other converters. For 
example, a two-meter 
transceiver connected to 
the XV28 will now have an 
output in the 28-MHz 
region. This signal may be 
injected into an XV4 for 
432-MHz operation. 

Hams who have not yet 
had the experience of op- 
erating 432 have a treat in 
store. OSCAR Phase 111, 
amateur fast-scan TV, UHF 
repeaters, and other oper- 
ating modes await the new- 
comer to UHF ham radio. It 
is especially active in met- 
ropolitan areas. The Ham-^ 
tronics transmitting con- 
verters permit one of the 
most cost-effective ways I 
know of to get quality 
hands-on exposure to this 
interesting portion of the 
spectrum. 

Hamtronics provides an 
unusual opportunity for 
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A copy of the new 1980 
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writing: Hamtronics, 65F 
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14468.B 



132 73 Magazine • June, 1980 




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73 Magazine • June, 1980 133 



10 Meters for the SB-221 

add the ^'missing^' band 



John P. McNeil WA2KSM 
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Shirley, LJ, NY U967 



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are similar; only the input 
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coil, then place low-pass 
filters across the other 
coils. In this way, this fre- 
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add the additional parts, 
and wire according to 
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schematic. 



The band switch must be 
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It would be interesting 
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this missing band on the 
SB-201! 

I would like to thank 
George Sintchak WA2VNV 
for his assistance in prep- 
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134 73 Magazine • June, 1980 




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73 Magazine • June, 1980 



135 



Name and address 

Withheld by request 



Another Place, Another Time 

— working the paranormal band 



It was ten ye^rs ago that 
Wayne wondered, in his 
editorial Golumn, if any 
ham had ever experienced 
any supernatural contact in 
the operation of his hobby. 
1 think I may have snickered 
at the time, but it wasn't 
three years later that it hap- 
pened to me, I have asked 
Wayne not to release my 
name or address, as I fear 
that I would be swamped 
with letters — letters from 
para psychologists right 
down to the ordinary gar- 
den-variety of nuts. 1 prefer 
not to get involved The 
events I am about to reveal 
have not been polished into 
a story; names have been 
changed. 

There were the three of 
us and our wives. We con- 
gregated on two meters 
every evening — 145,1 MHz 
to be exact. This was back 
in the AM days, about 1971 . 
How we originally got to- 
gether, I cannot recall. This 
triumvirate consisted of 
Sam, a retired tool and die 
maker, and his wife, Stella, 
Then there was Doc, a 
general practitioner of 



medicine, and his wife, 
Margie. And, me. involved 
in electronic manufactur- 
ing, and my wife, Marian. 

It was a rather curious 
group in that our wives 
seemed always to be pres- 
ent in the ham shack, offer- 
ing their comments on the 
conversations held by the 
three of us males. At 8 
o'clock promptly, you'd 
hear: 

''You there. Doc? How 
about you, Sam?" 

Invariably our QSOs 
would start in this informal 
way. Professionally, we 
could not have been further 
apart, but from a hobby 
standpoint we were three 
typical ham nuts. Over a 
period of three years we 
were involved with fac- 
simile> RTTY, fast-scan TV, 
and just plain yacking into 
the mike. 

Then one evening Sam 
broke some news. "Vm go- 
ing to sell this place and 
head for Oregon. This LA 
smog is too much for me/' 

And that's exactly what 
happened. Sam moved to 
Oregon, with the comment 



that perhaps we'd better 
move our nightly QSOs to 
75 phone so they might be 
continued. 

Well, Doc and I with the 
background comments of 
our wives, continued to 
prattle on each evening for 
about six months or so. His 
wife, Margie, like all 
Margies 1 have ever met, 
was vivacious, peppy, and 
had a sparkling sense of 
humor However, I noticed 
less and less participation 
by Margie One evening at 8 
pm the phone rang just as I 
was about to go on the air- 
It was Doc, 

''Glenn, t thought I had 
better tell you this on the 
telephone rather than on 
the air. Margie is a very sick 
girl and is in the hospital. 
It's leukemia and I'm afraid 
the prognosis is negative," I 
could hear a sob in his voice 
as he talked. 

Doc was right a few 
weeks later, Margie passed 
on We, of course, attended 
the funeral It was obvious 
that something within Doc 
died also when his beloved 
Margie left this world. I'd 



listen at 8 pm, and no Doc. 
After a few weeks went by, I 
called him and suggested 
that ham radio might be a 
therapy for his mind. 

"No, Clenn,^' said Doc, 
'Tm selling out and am go- 
ing to give up the practice 
of medicine. Tm tired of be- 
ing a pill dispenser There 
are more important things 
to be done I'm going to 
find a cure for leukemia if I 
have to spend the rest of my 
life and my savings to do 
so." 

As it turned out. Doc, 
through his professional 
friends, was given lab- 
oratory space in a targe 
pharmaceutical manufac- 
turing plant. Doc not only 
worked days, but far into 
the night. Our contacts 
were strictly by tele- 
phone—and few and far 
between. 

The months rolled by. 
One day I persuaded Doc 
to have lunch with me. 1 
was shocked at what he 
had done to himself, al- 
though I said nothing. He 
had lost a great deal of 
weight and was just a tired 



136 73 Magazine ■ June, 1980 



shadow of himself. 

Then it happened. Early 
one morning the phone 
rang. It was the plant- The 
night watchman, making 
his round about 1:00 am, 
found Doc on the floor in 
the laboratory. He detect- 
ed a faint pulse and im- 
mediately called the para- 
medics. They arrived 
minutes later and did all 
they could, but Doc was a 
goner. He had fust worn 
himself out and his heart 
gave up. 

Doc's wishes for a brief 
and simple funeral were 
obeyed His son and 
daughter came from back 
east— the only family he 
had, aside from a host of 
professional friends who 
filled the small church. 

When my wife and I ar- 
rived home after the 
funeral, we simply sat 
down in the living room 
and stared at each other 
We had lost our best 
friends in just one year's 
time. Life would not be the 
same. 

Then things began to 
happen. That night the bed- 
side telephone rang about 
1 am. Or, at least, I thought 
it rang, for something woke 
me up. Half awake, 1 lifted 
the receiver. All 1 heard 
was a dial tone. No one was 
there. Wrong number, I 
thought. 

The next night, and the 
night after that, it hap- 
pened again, and always at 
the time Doc died, al- 
though this thought did not 
occur to me until much 
later The morning after 
the third occurrence, I 
awoke and sat up, thinking 
about the bell 1 had heard 
ring. It was not a telephone 
bell, although similar in 
pitch. So that night I pulled 
the phone plug from the 
wall. 

So now we have arrived 
at the weekend. It was a 
Friday night. We had con- 
cluded supper and the 
dishes were done- I walked 
into the ham shack, fol- 
owed by my wife, who 

^fftidfrf Service — seepage 3JQ 



brought the evening paper 
with her. She sat down and 
began to read. I sat down 
at the operating desk and 
stared at my equipment. 
Probably from force of 
habit more than anything 
else, I flipped on the two- 
meter receiver and turned 
on the transmitter fila- 
ments, I looked at the re- 
ceiver dial. 145.1 MHz, just 
where it had been an- 
chored for more than three 
years. The S-meter was reg- 
istering nothing but noise. 

Then it happened. A 
voice seemed to come over 
the radio. It said: 
'Glenn , . . this is Doc . , , I 
have been trying so hard to 
reach you . . . are you con- 
scious of my voice?" 

I was terrified, to say the 
least I turned and fairly 
shouted at my wife who 
was not more than ten feet 
away, reading her news- 
paper. "Did you hear? It's 
DocI" 

She looked up, staring at 
me as though I had taken 
leave of my senses. "1 don't 
hear anything," was her 
comment. 

"Come closer,'^ I 
shouted, grabbing her by 
the hand. I no sooner 
touched her than her ex- 
pression changed to fright. 
"I hear him , . . it's Doc 
talking . . be quiet!" 

We sat there in front of 
the receiver. I had not 
released my wife's hand. 
Doc's voice continued. 

''Glenn, all my work will 
be for naught if those notes 
are lost. I was almost 
there * , , just a few more 
weeks and I would have 
achieved my goal . . . it's 
BCC, I am now sure . . , 
find my notes and give 
them to my doctor friend 
at the lab . . , he'll know 
what to do . . - '' and his 
voice disappeared. But 
before that happened, I 
had looked at the S-meter 
It had remained in the 
noise level 

I think my wife and I 
must have stared at each 
other jn profound shock for 




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more than a minute. Finally 
I said to her, "That was Doc 
alright, but his voice was 
not coming through the 
speaker!'' 

"That's right/' she com- 
mented. "And I didn't hear 
him until you grabbed my 
hand/' 

"We didn't hear any- 
thing, really, did we. now? 
lliat message was a com- 
plete and instantaneous 
thought implanted in our 
minds. It did not have the 
variation in tonal quality 
that one hears when one is 
talking to you/' I observed 

The wife agreed. A mes- 
sage had come through 
''from the other side" but it 
was not spoken to us as we 
had thought Of that I am 
positive 

The next morning I called 
the company where Doc 
had been spending his time. 
I talked with the M.D. who 
was In charge of the 
laboratory and told him 
what happened. There was 



a silence, and then he asked 
me to have lunch with him. 

"I've got to question you 
more about what hap- 
pened/' he said. "Please 
have lunch with me/' 

I agreed- We met and dis- 
cussed the events of the 
previous evening over and 
over. My knowledge of 
medicine is restricted to the 
use of aspirin, I wasn't sure 
that Doc had said "BCC" or 
if I had heard just letters of 
a complete word. However, 
my host seemed to know 
what it meant. He thanked 
me for my time, and we 
parted, although 1 think he 
gave me a very curious 
over-t he-shoulder glance as 
he left. 

In the years that have 
now passed, I have learned 
that extensive experimenta- 
tion with BCC vaccine has 
been undertaken by various 
agencies in trying to find a 
cure for leukemia. I hope 
they are successful and 
that Doc was right. ■ 

73 Magazine • June, 1980 137 



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powdr output 



scan 
clear/busy 



5kHz up 



auto pitch 
encoder 




Just ffick a swptch and the CPU-2500RK will perform complex contror opera- 
tTons- The CPU scanner moves you instantly up or down the band, and will 
search for a busy or clear channel, as desired. In the manual mode, a press 
of the mic PTT switch will halt the scan Instantly, 800 PLL synthesized chan- 
nels are available In 5 kHz steps Over the entire 2 -meter band A photo- 
interrupter frequency selection technique is used, and fulJ 6-diglt frequency 
display ts provided. Four memory channels are available for simplex or 
repeater operation, and an additional memory channel may be used for a split 
of up to 4 MHz. The keytxjard microphone contains up down scanner con- 
trols, a two- tone encoder (or auto patch, and remote provisk}n for dialing in 
operating or memory frequencies A dual gate FET front end lets you pull in 
those weak signals, while the transmitter puts out a solid 25 watts at HI 
power (3 watts Low power) Convenience features include "busy channel" 
and "on the air*' lights, a mernory backtip feature, single -shaft control for 
volume and squelch, and manual or automatic tone burst selection 
Engineered for peiiormance. using the latest technology, the CPU-2500RK 
Is the dawning of a new age for 2'metef FM transceivers, Mobile mounting 
bracket included. 



w 






Price 
419.95 





Use your Master Charge 
or BankAmericard/VISA 
when you order. 



Ham Radio Department Store 

MAIL ORDERS: P.O. 60X 11347 BIRMINGHAM. At 35202 • STREET ADDRESS 2808 7TH AVENUE SOUTH BIRMINGHAM. ALABAMA 3S233 



136 73 Magazine • June, 1980 



NEW! ICOM IC-2A 2-meter 
synthesized hand-held 

transceiver 



NEW! 



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At last, jfs here! Icom's answer to hand-held 
transceivers! Lightweight and compact, about the 
sizo of a doltar bfll, the 10-2 A Is loaded with features 
at a very affordable price. Includes 800 syntheatzed 
channels (no crystals!), ±600 kHz repeater offset, 
simplex/ duplex switeh, 1 .5 watt otftput h^h power 
switch and battery saving .15 watt low power 
switch. Frequency setectk>n by thumb wheel swit- 
ches, Ttie IC-2A has 3 Nicad Power pack stzas 
available to suft your needs. Easy slip on/sJrp off tx>t- 
tom Nicad makes it the most compact HT on the 
marf<et. Also features 5 kHz channel selection, 1 
kHz channel selection, transmit indicator, squelch 
and volume controls, and speaker/mic jack. Built-in 
speaker and condenser mic tncluded. Optional 600 
ohm dynamic mic may be used. Frequency 
coverage: 144,000 - 147.995 MHz. Transmtssion 
power: hJgh: 1 .5W at 8.4V. Low: J 5W. Sensitivi- 
ty: less than 0.4uV for 20dB Noise quieting. Selec- 
tivity: ±7.5KHz at *6dB point, ±l5KHz at the 
-0OdB point. Audb: more than 300mW. Equipped 
wflh rubber antenna and bett cilp. 

Price 189.53 

with alkiKna battery pack (w/o battarlaa) 

Price 218.03 

with Nic«d pack and watl chargar 

Price 237.03 

daluxa modal with Nicad pack 
wall charger, and touch tone pad 

Back Vlaw 



HiflLfi power 



sfmpfax/duptox 

±600 kHz 
offset 



I d » v^ 



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Top View 



I .'^-mm 



a<|ifelch 



on/off 



transmit 
indicator 



VOL* 



6N0 antenna 
^}nn actor 

lOliHZ channel 
seiectton 



*:«:* >■,■-*_' 



4-4 P. 9 . 



M M t * a 



spesker/mfc 
jack 



+5kHz channel 
selection 



mc 



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Oh<1^ k-Wht 



MNi 



tdllHfc 



Call 
'foil free 



SCO* 633- 3410 



IN ALABAMA CALL 1-800-292-8668 9 AM TIL 5:30 PM CST, MONDAY THRU FRIDAY 



Reader ServKe^S9V p&ge 270 



73 Magazine * June, 1980 139 



KENWOOD'S TR-9000 

2-meter all- 
transceiver 




memory recall 



RF gain 
and PIT 



dfg^ttl 

display 



scan $wltch 



S & RF 

malar 



hofd switch 



memory store 



TX offset 




mode 

switch 



power 
switchi^volume 



down scan 



<i 11 II I 



T 



Urn TR-9000 is a Irghhwerght and compact 2~meter FM/USB'LSB CW 
transceiver with advanced and convenient functions at an affordable price. 
Operates on all 2'meter Amateur frequencies as welf as MARS and CAP fre- 
quencies between 143.900 and 148.99 MHz, It features Duilf-in dfgital 
VFOs tor selecting frequencies in convenient steps and five memories for 
swrtching in convenient steps and five memories for switching quickly to 
specific frequencies FM mode has two frequency selection positions (FMI 
& FM2} for easy mob% operation FMI position provides lOkHz steps for 
fast tuning and FM2 position provides SkHz and tOOHz steps. The built-in 
busy stop scan of the entire band automatically locks onto a signal Scanning 
resumes wHen the signal disappears Auto busy scan function only in FMl 
and FM2 modes. Free scanning in the USB/LSB/CW position over 4 MHz in 
the 1 44 MHz band. New hand-held mtc with up*down switch enables conve- 
nient frequency changes in steps determined by the positions of the mode 
and D. Step. Other features include TX offset which shifts trans mit frequen- 
cy fof repeater operation, RF gain control, HIT circuit, built-in high quality 
noise blanker. Hi Low power switch, and a new adjustable angle mounf for 
mobile installation. Power output: Hi (SSB,FM.CWJ tOW. Low (FM, CW} 
1W. Freq. range: 144 to 147.9 MHz. Power requrrem en t: 13 8V DC ar2.9 
amps hi transmit, 



$ KENVN/OOD 



Price 

449.10 





Use your Master Charge 
or BdnkAmerJcard/VISA 
when you order. 



Ham Radio Department Store 

MAILORDERS P.O. BOX 11347 BIRMINGHAM AL 35202 • STREET ADDRESS 2808 7TH AVENUE SOUTH aiRMINGHAM. ALA8AMA 3S233 



140 73 Magazine • June, 1980 



KENWOOD SPECIAL! For a 

limited time, get a free SSB 
filter,plus save over $380 
when you buy the TS-1 SOS 



plus accessories! 





M^riR 



tOHf 




OS^/fllff M4CCA1N nfPffR 



AJT/nQt 



*i© ffMj-m wm9 



i 9 C I §0 



® @> # ig: :® 






>^CTS4¥trOOO 



55% Ta(,hiCi Viq TS 100^ 



fgwiH SINB CONII^ i^i «fT ^iC O^F 



HoniaB 



W £HiF T. 
DOl^W UP 



BIS 







'**. 

'^i»: ; 



GA(M 



ARLV 






BAAfd 



j;^ 



15— 









The TS-1 803 with DFC (Digital Frequency Controi) is Kenwood's top-of-the- 
line alJ soild state HP SSB/CW/FSK transceiver covering 160 thru 10 
meters. Features include four memories with digital up/down paddle-switch 
tuning. Memories are usabte tn transceiver or split modes, and can be tun- 
ed in 20 Hz steps up or down, slow or fast, with recall of the oflginal stored 
frequency. Adaptable to three new bands and VFO covers more than 50 kHz 
above and below each band. Digital display flashes blinking decimal points to 
indicate "out of band," Other features are tunable noise blanker, duai RIT, 
RF speech processor, RF attenuator, and VSWR protection circuit. Powef: 
1 3.6 VDC at 20 amps. Input: 200W PEP/1 60W DC ool 60-1 5 meters and 
1 60W PEP/1 40W DC on 1 meters, Receiver sensitivity: 0.25yV af lOdB 
S/N, Hunry and get a tree YK-88 SSB filter with the purchase of the TS-1 SOS 
and accessories. That's a 59.95 vaiuel 




l«SJMrr 



AAaa 



TS-1 SOS W/DFC 



Price 939.95 

TS-1dOS wio DFC pricd 799.95 

Accessories for TS-1 80S 

AT -1 ao matching antenna tuner _ , , , , , . Price 1 27.05 

VFO-160 matching remote variable frequency osciliator. ...... Price 1 38,82 

•SP-1 80 matching external speaker , , Pric© 49.95 

*$p«akor must b« purchased with inothftr K#nwood Hem worth over 
St 00.00. 



Buy the TS-1 SOS 

and the 

accessories and 

save $383.98 plus 

get a SSB fitter 



aaq 



(a 59.95 value)! 



fTTT 



Call 
'Mllree 




SCO- 633- 3410 



IN ALABAMA CALL 1-800-292-8668 9 AM TIL 5:30 PM CST, MONDAY THRU FRIDAY 



73 Magazine • June, 1980 141 



your 





NOVICE CLASS 



AOVANCE0 CIAIS 



AMEfUCAN RaE»0 RHAY UACUE 

ArUAtrur R«lk» 
^ Map of the World " , ^, 



tADiO THIOIY 
CO U ill 




O AMATEl 
NSE GUIDE 



N 



20 




ARRL Books, 
Tapos A Maps 

1. ARRL Ridlo Amatfturs Grt«t 
CIrcto Chart of th« World - a must 
for alt ham radio operators. I{em 
No. 10003 1.2S 

2. ARRL Map Library - a com- 
plete set of maps, prefix wodd 
map, great circle chart, map of 
Nortfi America and wofid atlaa. 
Item No. lOOOa 4.50 

3. ARRL Prsflit M«p of Moitti 
Arfi#rlca, Order yours today Item 
No, 10004.,.. 1.25 

4. ARRL Nq¥Ic« and A book • 
questions arrd answers. Your 
study guide for entry into the ex- 
citing world of amateur radio Item 
No. 1 0009. . . 2,CM3 



5. ARRL Tachntclah Q«naral Q 
and A book ^ questions and 
answers to help you pass the FCC 
exam. Item No. 1 0009 . _ . . 2.50 

6. ARRL 1960 Radio Amataur 
Handbook - contains valuable 
tteory, Gtrcult and operating infor- 
mation for all les/els of amateur in- 
terest. Item No, 1 001 1 .... 10,00 

7. ARRL Radio Afnatour's 
Lfcansa Manual - a new and com- 
plete study guide. All tt\6 latest 
FCC rules and regulations for the 
higher class license exam, (tern 
No. 10012.......---.. ....4.00 



8, ARRL Log Book - large spiral 
boynd book, 
item No. 1001 5 1.75 

e. ARRL Und«rftandlng 
Amit«yr Radio * establishes 
technical groundwork for ail 
phases of amateur radio, Item 
No. 10016.. .5.00 

10. ARRL Antmnna Handbook - a 

book full of valuable information 
about antennas for the amateur 
operator. Item No. 1 0026 . . . 5.00 

11, ARRL Tuna In thtt World 
with Kim Radio -learn ail at>out 
amateur radio witti a text and a 




morse code cassette. For the 
beginner studying for the Novice 
exam. Item No, 10031 . . 7,00 

12. 19B0 US Cailbook - order 

your 1 980 edition now wftt^ com- 
plete up-dated information. Item 
No. tQ033. ......16.95 




13.1680 OX Callbook-new 
listings included, with standard 
time charts, great circle bearings, 
postal information and much more, 
item No, 10034 ,..,15,95 

14. ARRL Code Kit - boost your 
code speed from 5-13 ¥vpm. For 
the Novice or Technicsan going for 
the General or Advanced license, 
item No. 1 0046 8.00 

15. SlmpJt Low Cost Wire 
Antennas - learn how to build effi- 
cient antennas ttiat get out. Itenr» 
No. 1 0058 , . . , 5.95 

16. ARRL World Map - a must for 
all amateur radio operators. Item 
No. 10099 .,,.3.50 

AMECO Books A Tspos 

17. AMECO Questions & 

Answers for Advanced Class 
Exam - to help you pass your FCC 
advanced class exam with sample 
questions and answers. 
Item No. 24809 1,75 

10, AMECO Radio Theory 
Coura« ^ preparation for Novice, 
Technician, General, Advanced 
and Extra classes of FCC 
licenses. Includes FCC-type ques- 
tions and answers, item 
No. 24812. . . ., .. .5.05 

19. AMECO Gan#rftl Claaa QSO 
codaUp««105-QT-12, 13, 14, & 
15 words pdr minute, item 
No. 24827 .4-95 

20. AMECO 701 Quaiflon and 
Answer Oulda for th« Novice 
Exam * FCC questions and easy 
to understand answers with FCC 
type practice exarn. Item 
No. 24828 ,,,_ .1.00 



Use your Master Charge 
or BankAmericard/VISA 
when you order. 



Ham Radio Department Store 

MAIL ORDERS: P.O. BOK 11347 BIRMINGHAM, AL 35202 • STREET ADDRESS: 2806 7TH AVENUE SOUTH BIRMINGHAM. ALABAMA 3S 



142 73 Magazine • June, 1980 



5. ta 



18- I Q as 



Mirege 

2-m8ter 

impHfiers 

Features include built-in receive preamp, 
adjustable delay ior SSB. and automatic 
internal or external relay keying. Perfect 
for your HTf Will handle as little as 1 to 2 
watts JnptJt. Freq, range: l44-148MHz 

B1 OS 1 0W in • SOW out 1 52.»6 

B1016 10Win^t60W out. . . . . 251,&6 
B3016 30W in - t60W out 215.96 



CDE T2X Tftiltwrster antenna rotor 

A super duty metered cornmunicatjons 

rotor with eiectnc locking wedge brakes. 
Capable of handling up to 30 sq. ft. of 
antenna and requires 8 conductor cable 
tor installation Complete with control 
bojc. 

Prfc« 240.00 




DRAKE TV-3300-LP low pass filter 

Low pass filters, properly attached to 
tranamitters attenuate all harmonics fall- 
ing in any TV channel or the FM band 
1000W max. below 30 MHz Attenuation 
better than 80dB above 41 MHz, 

Prlc* 28.60 






KENWOOD PCA phon« patch 
The PC-1 features NULL control. FIX and 
TX gain controls and VU meter Connects 
between a transceiver and a phoneline 



Prlctt 90.06 

[}all 
loll 



zznLXznu 



V' 




NEW* KENWOOD HC-10 World Clock 
With 2 separate digital displays, shows 
time in both GMT and local, gives date, 
day of week, and can memoftze starling 
time of QSO Able to program 2 different 
time zones of any 2 countries Displays 
time of 10 designated cities around the 
wortd. 

Price 89*05 




f!> J©.^,©.f5.€).€^ 



B & W 595 €08x switch 

Features 6 outputs, a power rating of 2 
KW PEP and VSWP of (ess than 1,21 up 
to 150 MHz. Grounds all unused anten- 
nas. 

Prie« 22. SO 



SA VE $90! 



WW 



SHARP CB^2460 
40-channel CB transceivei 

A fuJt featured 40-channGl CB with 
RF' signal meter, channel 9 pnonty 
monitor with LED readout, detachaole mic 
with PTT switch. PA operation optional, 
Also delta t\jning. squelch control and 
automatic no»se li miter. 



BENCHER BY-I Iambic p«ddl« 
With solid silver contact points, full range 
adjustment, non-skid feet and heavy steel 
black-textured base, 

Prlca 4 2.05 



ODE HAM IV antenna rotor 

A metered communications antenna rotor 
with electric locking wedge brake 
Designed to handle up to 15 sq. ft. of 
antenna, For in-tower mounting only. Re- 
quires 8 conductor cable. Complete with 
control box, 

PrlQm 1 70.05 



/IKf *' 



tm-^t 






■ •••» 



MFJ-t41B Versa tuner II 
Has SWR and dual range wattmeter, 
antenna switcti, built-in balun and 300W 
RF output. Has SO- 2 39 connectors and 
mobile nrK>unting bracket. 

PriG« 70.05 



tj t '-^ . 



Price 



DYNAMIC INSTRUMENTS 

nickle cadmium rechargeable batteries 

Never run out of batteries agafn. 
Guaranteed tor 5 years 

Sl£eAA Price 2 for 4.13 

Size C Price 2 for 5.15 

Size D price 2 for 5.30 



9 vol! 



Price 



9.50 each 



800- 633- 3410 



N ALABAMA CALL 1-800-292-8668 9 AM TIL 5:30 PM CST, MONDAY THRU FRIDAY 



73 Magazine • June, 1980 143 




who Needs a $40 Soldering 

Iron? 

— here's why you may want to invest in one 



11 Magazine Staff 



M 



ost amateurs prob- 
ably start out by ao 




This is the complete Welter "soldering station/' The LED 
indicator which was added can be seen in the lower left- 
hand corner of the upper, sloping portion of the stand. 



quiring one of the standard, 
garden-variety soldering 
irons selling for $5 or so, 
and operating directly off 
110 V ac Such irons are 
probably fine to start off 
with, especially if one 
chooses a wattage suitable 
for the types of compo- 
nents being soldered, but 
after a period of time, one 
will start to notice various 
disadvantages. The tips will 
usually corrode rather 
quickly, the temperature of 
the iron will not be stable, 
and the heavy line-cord 
tends to curl or kink, mak- 
ing the iron unhandy to use. 
In some cases, these irons 
may even have such poor 



f 



liQv AC 



T 



: 24V 
.2A 



isolation from the ac line 
that sensitive components 
such as FET devices are 
damaged during the solder- 
ing process. 

If one does a fair amount 
of soldering, it is worth- 
while to consider the pur- 
chase of a more sophisti- 
cated type of soldering 
iron. Probably the ultimate 
would be a cordless iror 
with a constant-tempera 
ture regulator of some sort 
instant heat, and high ca 
pacity for extended period 
of soldering, Unfortunatel> 
such an iron does not exist 
The cordless irons whic 
are available are exceller 
for many portable applici 



ftOOCO COiiPQiltMTS 



470-141 
OH LEO 



I 

t 



^v^^ 



LEO 



PI 

-w 



V DbOOES 



^ 



I 

\ 
I 

t 









I 
I 
I 
I 
t 



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GffD O- 



I 



Ih 



Fig. 1. Diagram of the soldering iron, including co 
ponents for a heater indicator light. 



1*4 73 Magazine • June, 1980 



tions where a small number 
of connections have to be 
made. They are not suitable 
for most bench-type appfi- 
cations, however. The time 
an on/off sequence is gone 
through for a soldering op- 
eration, and the limited 
operating time per charge 
(10 minutes continuous op* 
eration for some cordless 
models), make this type of 
iron unsuitable. 

Probably the best com- 
promise for bench work 
which is available is one of 
the loW'Voltage irons which 
have a constant-tempera- 
ture feature. This article 
describes one such iron, the 
Weller WTCPN series, and 
also includes some small 
modifications the author 
has found usefuL 

The Weller WTCPN is 
available as a "soldering 
station" for about $60.00. 
The station consists of a 
power unit or stand and a 
pencil-type soldering unit. 
The power unit houses a 
24-volt, 2-Ampere trans- 
former, a cleaning sponge 
compartment, and a metal 
tip tray to store extra tips. 
These features can be seen 
in the photograph. 

The soldering pencil con- 
lects to the power unit via 
] very flexible, silicon, non- 
burning cord. One still 
vishes, of course, that the 
:ord were not present but 
me hardly notices its pres- 
■nce, and even after long 
isage, it wil! not krnk in any 
lanner. We have been us- 
ig a similar but earlier ver- 
on of this iron for over five 
ears without any cord 
roblems. 

The iron is wired so that 
le tip is grounded. That is, 
e ground wire from the ac 
le cord is wired through 
' that it connects to the 
etal frame of the iron 
lich holds the tip in place. 
ie could, of course, ac- 
ss this wire in the stand 
d connect it to the 

tind foil on a PC board if 
e especially sensitive 
rriponents were being sol- 
ved. 



A main feature of the 
iron is its temperature con- 
trol system. It is rather 
unique, but won't be de- 
scribed in great detail since 
it is nothing that can be du- 
plicated by the experi- 
menter. Basically, each in- 
terchangeable tip used with 
the iron has a ferromag- 
netic disk on its base. The 
tips do not screw in but are 
simply dropped in place in 
front of the iron and held in 
place with a screw-down 
collar. The ferromagnetic 
disk loses its magnetic 
property when it reaches a 
specific temperature. This 
disk interacts with a spring- 
loaded permanent magnet 
and switch in the soldering 
iron assembly to turn on 
and off the heater element 
also contained in the as- 
sembly. So, one constantly 
hears a faint clicking noise 
as the tip calls for heat or 
shuts off the heating ele- 
ment so that it can maintain 
a constant temperature. 
The whole heat-control 
mechanism is self-con- 
tained in the soldering pen 
cil, 

A variety of Weller tips is 
available for the iron and 
probably will satisfy most 
needs. We have found on 
occasion, however, that the 
miniature screw-in tips 
made by other manufactur- 
ers such as Ungar have ad- 
vantages. One of the Weller 
types was modified, there- 
fore, by cutting it off just 
above the ridge on the tip 
which fits the hold-down 
collar. The body of the tip 
was tapped to accept the 
screw-in tips. This arrange- 
ment has worked very well 
since the ferromagnetic 
disk on the bottom of the 
Weller tip preserves the 
temperature-control fea- 
ture while providing added 
versatility from a wider 
variety of tips. 

Another feature that was 
found to be useful was the 
addition of an indicator 
showing that the heating 
element in the iron was be- 



Hib publicQtion 
is Qvoikible in 
fnicfofofm 




Please send me additional information. 

University Microfilms International 

300 North Zeeb Road 18 Bedford Row 

Dept. P.R. Dept, P.R. 

Ann Arbor, Ml 48106 London. WC1 R 4EJ 

U.SA England 

N am© 

Institution ^ 

St reet 

City 

Stat© 



Zip 



ing sequenced on and off. 
Such an indicator was add- 
ed as shown by the dotted 
lines in Fig. 1. In this case, 
advantage was taken of the 
voltage drop across two or- 
dinary power diodes to ac- 
tivate an LED. This scheme 
also, of course, half-wave 
rectifies the 24-voit ac sup- 
ply. The iron possibly has 
to cycle "on' a bit longer 
because of this, but abso- 
lutely no effect on normal 
usage has been noted. 

Another scheme would 
be to insert a small resis- 
tance in series with the cir- 
cuit and place a lamp 
across it. A Vi-Ohm resis- 
tance, composed of sev- 
eral standard 2.7-Ohm 
resistors in parallel, will 
produce about 1 volt when 
the heater is operating and 
can light a small 1.2-volt 
flashlight bulb such as a 
type #211. The LED in- 
dicator used was placed in 
the lower left corner of the 
upper part of the stand 



in 



the 



and can be seen 
photograph. 

From an electrical view- 
point, the only thing the 
stand contains is a 24-volt 
transformer. One can, 
therefore, just purchase 
the soldering pencil and 
power it with any suitable 
transformer. The pencil is 
available separately as 
item TO201 , sells for about 
$20,00, and comes com- 
plete with one tip, In fact, 
we used an earlier iron of 
this type powered by some 
old 6.3-volt filament trans- 
formers wired in series to 
produce 18 votts, and it 
provided excellent service 
for years. We believe the 
whole soldering iron/stand 
assembly is worth the 
$40.00, but this way you 
can have essentially all of 
it for $20.00! 

Weller products are 
manufactured by the 
Cooper Croup, Electronics 
Division. P.O. Box 728, 
ApexNC27502.B 



I 



73 Magazine • June, 1980 145 



John R fml KL7CRF/6 
6170 Downey Avenue 
Long Beach CA 90^ 



Outboard Power for the 820 

— if s easy to connect a second set of ears 

to the Kenwood transceiver 



For working DX, especial- 
ly on CW and SSB, 
nothing can beat a separate 
receiver and transmitter or 
a transceiver with remote 
vfo for split-frequency op- 



gXTinhAL Ut.t€iVt.R 






uuti 



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n 



eration. Many DX stations 

and DXpeditions operate 
split frequency for a variety 
of reasons. 

If you own a TS-820 and a 
second receiver (Drake 



R'4A, in my case} and don't 
want to spend the extra 
bucks for the VFO-820, this 
change is for you. 

Merging the 820 with a 



TS ezQ 



jyUPEfl _ 



AHTtHHA 
® 






IHltlMG CiiBLE 



NOifWAij.v CLOSE 
(RqUTt TO REUOTi COPINECTOR 
Fail NOnWilLtY OPtN CONTACTS* 



BiCLOSiiBC, UIMlStM, rTC 



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TD AJMTENNAi^CI^AX SWITCH^ ETC 



f\g, 1. Showing separate/combine switch, the configuration at KL7CRF/6 uses a separate 
4B TV vertical antenna, switched on to the external receiver when the switch is in the NOR- 
MAL position. When going to the 820/EXT RECEIVER position, whatever antenna h on the 
820 is also used on the external receiver. 



second receiver is sim- 
plicity itseff and provides 
real versatility. The cost is 

minimal and, for most, will 
only involve the purchase 
of a connector from Ken- 
wood. 

The change is a no-holes 
modification, taking advan- 
tage of the transverter con- 
nector on the rear of the 
820. At this connector, out- 
puts are available to power 
the TV-502/506 transverters, 
antenna inputs, etc. Also in- 
cluded is a normally-closed 
relay contact 

Modification ^ 

1, Purchase a male con- 
nector from Trio-Kenwood, 

1111 West Walnut Ave, 
Compton CA 90220. It i! 
part #E09-1 2724)5 (formerly 
part #£09-1204-05). 

2, Make the followinj 
connections to the nev 
connector. All cable 
should be long enough h 
reach the external receive 



146 73 Magazine * June, 1980 



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AC CURRENT: 100 nA TO 10 A 

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and an eKternally mounted 
switch— see Fig. 1. 

[a) Small shielded 
cable tRC-174, etc J, 
center conductor to 
pin 8, shield to pin 9. 
This IS the ^'muting" 
cable for the external 
receiver (most receiv- 
ers use closed-to- 
ground contacts for 
"normal" operation 
and open contacts for 
"muting"). Check 
your manual before 
making this modifica- 
tion. Normally-open 
contacts, if your re- 
ceiver needs them, 
are available on pins 5 
and 1 of the remote 
control socket on the 
rear of the TS-820. 

[b) Shielded cable, 
center conductor to 
pin 7, shield to pin 9. 
This is the receive an- 
tenna relay contact 
output of the TS*620. 

[c) Shielded cable, 
center conductor to 



pin 6, shield to pin 9. 
This is the TS-820 re- 
ceiver antenna input. 

(d) Jumper pins 3 
and 10. This maintains 
250 V dc within the 
TS'820. 

(e) Close up and 
secure Ihe connector 

3. Run external connec- 
tions to a DPDT toggle/ 
slide/rotary switch as de- 
sired. Connect as shown in 
Fig. 1 . I mounted the switch 
in a small minibox, next to 
the TS-820 for convenience, 
with RCA connectors for in- 
puts and outputs. The purist 
may choose to use PL-259, 
BNC, etc. The impedance 
bump in the line to the re- 
ceivers caused by the 
switch and connectors 
should be minimal. 

4. After making the con- 
nections, you are ready to 
try it out Place the trans- 
verter switch on the rear of 
the 820 to ON and plug in 
the newly-wired connector 
Place the external switch to 



NORMAL. The 820 receiver 
should operate normally. 
The external receiver will 
switch to its own antenna. 
Place the switch to 820-EXT 
RECEIVER. The 820 receiv- 
er should go quiet and the 
antenna on the 820 will be 
switched to the external re- 
ceiver. Key the 820 trans- 
mitter and ensure that the 
external receiver mutes cor- 
rectly {depending on your 
muting configuration). The 
external receiver will mute 
any time the 820 transmit- 
ter is keyed, either in nor- 
mal or combined, guarding 
against any high incoming 
rf to the separate receiver. 

To return the 820 to nor- 
mal operation for resale, 
etc., merely pull out the 
connector, put the trans- 
verter switch to OFF again, 
and you are back to normal. 

This change could also 
probably be applied to the 
TS-520. Check the TS-520 
manual One can still use 
the VFO 820 in this configu- 



ration with the TS-820 with 
no changes required, pro- 
viding even more flexibility. 

I have been using this 
change for some time and it 
works beautifully. Of 
course, no attempt has 
been made to make the 820 
transceive with an external 
receiver. This is strictly for 
split frequency operation 
or as a transmitter/receiver 
operation. My main interest 
in ham radio is RTTY opera- 
tion, and this combination 
certainly makes it a plea- 
sure when working drifting 
stations. RTTY with a trans- 
ceiver can be a pain when 
two stations start leapfrog- 
ging down the band be- 
cause one is drifting 

I claim no originality for 
this modrf rcation. There are 
any number of ways this 
could be accomplished and 
many probably already 
have done so This is an 
economical way to do it 
and, best of all involves no 



«H. ReatSer Semce— see page SW 



73 Magazine • June, 1980 147 



Dave Brown W9CCf 
HR 5, Box 39 
Nobtesvifle IN 46060 



CB to 6 

convert a 49-MHz HT into something 



Do you need an inex- 
pensive nneans of 
communications? Whether 
you hunt, fish, put up anten- 
nas, go to hamfests, or just 
have a need now and then 
for a v^rireless telephone, I 
think I have just the answer 
for you. 

If you have ever owned 
or listened to the ''toy" vari- 
ety 100-mW CB handie* 
talkies, most of which were 
on channel 14, you prob- 
ably will agree that they are 
worthless for doing much of 
anything — including mon- 
itoring channel 14! WelL 
great new things have hap- 
pened in the CB handie- 
talkie 49-MH2 band. 

I purchased from Radio 
Shack a pair of Archer 
transceivers, catalog 
number 6CM001, with bat- 
teries, for just under $17, 
That was just before 
Thanksgiving, 1978. While 
these are not kW transmit- 
ters (50-mW rated, !^-mile 
rangel at least they are 
crystal controlled! The 
receivers are not muiti-con- 
version masterpieces 
(superregenerative detec- 



tors), but they are more 
than adequate. Now for the 
bad news— and why I per- 
sonalized mine. 

First of all, the unit has 
no squelch. Being used to 
the serene silence of 
2-meter FM, the "blowing" 
noise continually grinding 
forth from the speaker was 
going to drive rtie bananas. 
Next, to add to the noise 
problem, there is no 
voldme control, either! 
Something had to change 
and fast. Adding a squelch 
to a radio that has only 
three transistors and draws 
20 mA on receive seemed a 
bit much then (but open to 
future thought), so I add- 
ed the next best thing — a 
volume tontrol. Less noise 
is not no noise, but it beats 
bunches of noise hands 
down. The next question 
was where to put it 

If you have not looked at 
these little rtgs, by all 
means do so, They are 
much smaller {5H" x 2- 
11/16" X 1-5/8") and lighter 
(039 lbs/177 g) than their 
older, bulky, antique 
&feusins on channel 14. Real 
shirt-pocket radio is here! 



They even use a 2-inch 
speaker/mic for reasonable 
quality sound. Not hi-fi, but 
nice Small is nice — but 
crowded. There just was not 
anywhere to put a shaft- 
type volume control, miriia- 
ture, sub-miniature, or 
otherwise. Therefore, the 
following compromise en- 
sued. 

I did find a corner down 
under the battery and foam 
rubber battery pad where I 
could hide a small screw- 
dri verity pe, multi-turn pot. 
If you use a Bourns trim pot, 
model 3006P1-501 (500- 
OhmX and follow the drill- 
ing diagram in Fig. 1, it just 
fits nicely. Start the hole 
with a #50 or smaller bit and 
finish very slowly with a #25 
(or so] bit to |ust clear a 
smaJl'blade screwdriver. 
Use Eastman 910Tm adhe- 
sive (very few drops) to hold 
the pot down in the corner 
as shown — flush with the 
case side, front, and bot- 
tom. This will leave the 
pot's brass adjustment 
screw aligned in the hole 
you drilled, sticking out 
about half the thickness of 
the case. This is far enough 



to reach easily for adjust* 
ment but not far enough to 
bump out of adjustment 

Follow the instructions in 
Fig. 1, and you will do just 
fine. I modified this part of 
two transceivers in exactly 
an hour, including time 
spent figuring out a place to 
put the pot, how to route 
wires, etc. The trimpot is a 
multi-turn unit, so you have 
a nice slow change in 
volume until you reach the 
level you want. Have a 
friend move out about 100 
feet with one unit and 
transmit to you while you 
adjust the pot. You will be 
quite surprised at how low 
you can go and still not 
miss any calls. 

Since there is virtually no 
one else on 49 MHz yet, 
you can instantly tell when 
someone calls just by the 
sudden low-level noise 
reduction. However, the 
sound level is now down far 
enough to make it hard to 
understand every word 
without literally holding the 
radio up to your ear. Break 
out the screwdriver? Not on 
your life! Read on. 



148 73 Magazine • June. 1960 



If the code key on the HT 
really produced Al tele^ 
graphy there might be a 
benefit to keeping its func- 
tion as is, but A2 is what 
they make do with. It may 
teach a few kids the code, 
but for just about anything 
else, it is worthless. The key 
Is a simple SPST leaf switch 
formed by a leaf contact in 
the case and a contact on 
the board. Fig. 1 includes in- 
structions so you can free it 
up from its tone function 
and put it to good use: to 
short out the volume-con- 
trol pot you just installed. 
Voilal We now have a push- 
to-receive switch for full 
receiver volume, without 
having to stand for the full- 
volume racket all the time! 

While 1 was at it I added 
an earphone jack for per- 
sonal listening with the 
transceiver clipped down 
on my belt This may be 
tough unless you have a 
female chassis-mount min- 
iature phone plug close to 
the size of mine. I stole 
mine from an old pocket 
BC-band radio, so I can't 
really help you with part 
numbers, A lot of the 
similar jacks I have seen in 
stores are just too deep be- 
hind the panel to fit. Look 
around, and you're sure to 
find something if you want 
the addition badly enough 
[and I did!). 

It is wired with the pink 



speaker wire going to the 
NC contacts (when no male 
plug from the earphone is 
inserted) to complete the 
speaker function. The 
center pin gets the audio 
when the plug is inserted. A 
new wire goes from where 
the pink wire was, near the 
PIT switch, to the jack's 
common switching pole 
(not the case or ground) to 
route audio> during re- 
ceive, from the area of the 
PTT switch to either the 
speaker or earphone. This 
way the speaker operates 
normally until an earphone 
is ptugged in. 

Another addition was a 
tab-type belt hook to give 
hands-off listening ability 
while working on antennas 
or trotting around ham- 
fests. It really goes hand-in* 
hand with the earphone 
modification. Be very 
careful with the mounting 
hardware and its place- 
ment or you will either 
short out or break the PC 
board with the unit all 
closed up. 

The rest of the modifica- 
tions really make it a ham 
radio, if you so choose. I 
am still waiting for the 
proper crystal to arrive to 
complete this one myself. 
A big (too big, physically) 
crystal was tried on 50.7 
MHz in its huge can-type 
holder (HC-fe). The radio 
tuned right up using a field- 



(1) Remove battery. 

(2) Remove back cover screw. 

(3) Squeeze top and bottom to remove back cover. 

(4) Remove the one screw holding the board in place, 

(5) Remove and keep the blue jumper, A-6. 
m Drill #60 hole next to A. 

(7) Solder new 6" leads into A and B and dress toward the battery 
compartment. 

(8) Remove the brown lead at C and place in A- fold over and 
solder to A. 

(9) Cut and remove the foil shown, 

(10) Use blue jumper from B to switch pad X. 

(t1) Glue the pot in place and connect it to the added leads. 
Shorten the leads as required. Connect so that resistance de- 
creases with clockwise rotation of the pot screw. 

(12) Dress the foam and cardboard back over the pot connections. 

(13) Check for lead dress clearance, solder bridges, etc. 

(14) Temporarily hook up battery and chec*^ out the unit, 

(15) Reverse steps 1 through 4 to re^assemble. 

(16) Push the code button for full volume. 



Strength meter by holding 
the radio very steady, and 
backing off on L2 a bit to 
get the 840-kHz increase in 
frequency. The FCC surely 
was nice when it moved 
the new CO HTs right next 
door to 6 meters (chuckle!). 
That's it— one adjustment 
and one new crystal of the 
KSS-T8B type. I'm sure that 
any of the crystal manufac- 
turers can fix you up if you 
send the old crystal and the 
schematic along. 

There are many like me 
who have jumped at the 
new multi*mode synthe- 
sized rigs for 2-meter home 
use, probably with a 
crystal rig for the car 
(unless you drag one rig 
back and forth], and just 



can't find the loot to have a 
handie-talkie as well I 
hope this can be the 
answer to your personal- 
ized radio needs. Get a 
pair, and get a friend on. 
While on the 49-MHz CB 
band, they have to use the 
built-in antenna (it is nice 
and short), but once the 
HTs are moved to 6 meters, 
a 5/8-wavelength loaded 
antenna, or even a one- or 
two-stage trunk-mounted 
PA, would be legal. Now 
let's see, where can I fit in 
another jack for the anten- 
na connector? 

If you need any help, 
just send an SaSE, but this 
one is so simple it should 
be all done and running 
before you know it. The 



FOIL TO FOIL 

MADE FH^W 
BLUE JUMPER 
REMOVED 
iETWEE«i &-e 

CUT AND 
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COPPER 




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fig. 7. Volume control and push-to-receive mods. 



73 Magazine * June, 1960 149 




Organise j;ottr shack with a 

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radios use a common 
9-vott transistor radio bat- 
tery available about any- 
where, which is nice, and 
there are even 9'Volt nicad 
batteries around in the 
same physical packages 
now. (Now let's see, if t 
throw out the radio PC 
board, I'll have room for 
one more jack for the 
charger!) Seriously, since 
50.7 MHz was once more 
or less a standard spot for 
AM mobile/portable opera- 
tions, I would like to sug- 
gest we all meet there. It 
would make it nice for 
hamfests and some QRP 
fun. Any takers? 

Another ham friend of 
mine and 1 have contem- 
plated buying another pair 
of HTs and using the tele- 
scoping antenna as a 
gamma-type rod built right 
onto a 3-element yagi 
antenna. We would keep 
the regular cases as spares 
for the first pair of radios, 
and build some kind of 



waterproof case (PVC tub- 
ing with end caps?) around 
the radio, mounting the 
whole thing right on the an- 
tenna. We would then add 
a resistor and zener in 
place of the battery and a 
small set of reed relays for 
T-R switch-over, sending 
the audio, switch-over con- 
trol, and power up and 
down a rotor-type cable. I 
really think this use meets 
the letter, but not the spirit, 
of the FCC regulations on 
"built-in'' antennas, so the 
FCC can relaxi 

We are going to 507 
MHz before we try this 
part 50 mW — wow! Any- 
one who can suggest a 
means of A1 keying a one- 
transistor rig like this 
would find his comments 
welcomed by me, and if 
you decide to ioin us on 
"flea-power" radio, by all 
means drop me a letter or 
card so we can listen for 
you. At least it shouldn't be 
a dull year on 6 meters. ■ 




G.I.S.M.O. -" 

2305 CHERRY ROAD 

ROCK HILL, S.C. 29730 

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150 73 Magazine * June, 1980 



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FOR ORDERS, INFORMATION OR A CATALOG WRITE OR PHONE OUU^W^ f "Ow I ^ 

FROM FLORIDA PHONE (305) 771-2050/771-2051 




Optoelectronics inc 

5821 N.E. 14 AVE. FT. LAUDERDALE, FL 33334 



»^SS 



^ Bender Service — se&psge 2W 



73MagBZirte • June. 1980 151 



Richard C. Force WBIASL 

Box 78 

Greenfield NH 03047 



Digital Boat Anchor 

using pencil, paper, and a frequency counter 

for receiver readout 



Awhile back, I found a 
real treasure at a local 
garage sale. It was an old 
HQ-145A receiver, a little 
the worse for wear but in 
operating condition. Be- 
sides, the price was right at 
S25 cash-and-carry. 

After bringing the gear 



home, I found that it had 
been accunnulating dust 
since it was new around 
1960. After cleaning and re- 
tuning, it proved to be a 
pretty fine piece of equip- 
nient despite its age. The 
sensitivity was good and 
the selectivity, due to 



crystal phasing and slot 
filters, was acceptable for 
general listening. 

The one thing that did 
bug me, however, was that I 
could not get the dial to 
read accurately even with 
its 100-kHz calibrator On 
the ham bands, the calibra- 




Photo A. The t W x T Vi "' buffer circuit board car) be seen to the left of the bandswitch. 
The output phono jack can be seen below the buffer. Keep the leads from input and out- 
put as short as possible. The receiver may have to be realigned sUghtty after installation 
of the buffer. 



tion was fairly good on the 
calibrated bandspread for 
these bands, (At least you 
could tell where you were 
within 10 kHz.) But on the 
other bands there was not a 
calibrated bandspread, and 
without a book full of graph 
paper and the use of the 
logging scale as a refer- 
ence, you were never sure 
just where you were listen- 
ing. 

By the way. the graph 
paper method has been 
used for years. It's simple, 
but time consuming and 
not as accurate as I really 
wanted. Besides, a graph 
has to be made for each 
band of frequencies be- 
cause receivers, including 
the HQ-145A, are not linear 
in their tuning, As a result, 
when you get down to the 
lower frequencies, you can 
use quite a bit of graph 
paper. [See Fig. 1.) 

The graph-paper method 
is as follows, in case you are 
interested in using it before 
you build a digital readout: 
First, mark the X axis, or the 
vertical lines of the graph 
paper, to correspond to the 
logging scale of your re- 
ceiver (usually to 100). 
Next on the Y axis, or the 
horizontal lines along the 
left side of the paper, mark 
the frequencies in which 
you are interested, placing 
the lowest frequency on the 



1S2 73 Magazine • June, 1980 



bottom line and proceeding 
up the paper. When your 
paper is ready, set your 
receiver to the lowest fre- 
quency on your graph, us- 
ing your 100-kHz calibrator 
and the main tuning dial. 
Keep the bandspread set at 
0. 

Next, begin tuning up in 
frequency, using the band- 
spread dial only. Every time 
you come to a signal from 
the 100-kHz calibrator, 
mark it on the graph paper 
by finding the coordinates 
of the frequency and the 
logging scale number After 
you have done this for 
every 100-kHz point be- 
tween and 100 on the log- 
ging scale, draw a line be- 
tween the points. Now you 
can read any frequency in 
the range off the graph by 
following the frequency 
line over to the graph line 
and then down to the X axis 
to find the logging scale 
number. Conversely, you 
can determine an unknown 
frequency by following the 
logging scale number up to 
the graph line and then 
over to the frequency. You 
should be able to tell from 
the way the points lie on the 
graph that the receiver tun- 
ing is not very linear, even 
over a narrow band of fre- 
quencies. This contributes 
to the inaccuracy of the 
method, as does the re- 
setting of the main tuning 
knob the next time you 
want to use the same graph. 

Being spoiled after using 
many pieces of modern 
electronic gear with bright 
digital readouts, the cali- 
bration drawback to the 
HQ-145A annoyed me no 
end. Therefore, I decided 
something had to be done 
to fix this problem. 

After searching through 
stacks of old magazines 
and reading various books, 
it suddenly dawned on me 
that to put a direct-reading 
digital readout on the HQ* 
145A was going to cost me 
quite a bit of money. And, 
let's face it, the receiver 
cost only $25. 

It suddenly occurred to 



me that 1 did not need a 
direct-reading readout on 
the HQ-145A; all I needed 
was a way to determine 
what frequency I was listen- 
ing to. The wheels started 
turning, and, before long, I 
had decided to read the os- 
crtlator frequency directly 
with my frequency counter, 
and to subtract, mathemati- 
cally, the i-f of 455 kHz to 
give me the frequency of 
the received signal. 

The first attempt at doing 
this failed miserably be- 
cause, as I had expected, 
the addition of the frequen* 
cy counter to the load on 
the oscillator drew the os- 
cillator so far off frequency 
that I could not re-calibrate 
the receiver to the frequerv 
cies on the main dial. 
Therefore, I had to add a 
high-impedance input buf- 
fer between the oscillator 
output and the counter. 
This stopped the pulling 
problem completely, and 
the receiver retained cali- 
bration with the counter in 
or out of the circuit. So, if 
my counter was doing duty 
somewhere else, the receiv- 
er still functioned as it did 
before the modification. 

The buffer, which is 
shown in Fig. 2, was built 
completely out of junk-box 
parts, but I am sure that if 
the parts were purchased 
new they would not cost 
more than a couple of dol- 
lars. It is also small enough 
to fit into any chassis (1 Vi" 
X 1 Vi^'). The power for the 
buffer was stolen from the 
receiver filament supply 
[Fig. 3), A phono jack was 
mounted in a vacant spot 
on the chassis as near as 
possible to the mixer. This 
jack was connected to the 
output of the buffer and 
had easy access from the 
top of the receiver for the 
insertion and removal of 
the frequency-counter 
cord. 

This scheme wilt work 
with any superheterodyne 
receiver with any i-f, be it 
455 kHz, 1600 kHz, or what 
have you J ust remember to 
subtract the correct if for 




Fig. T. Graph used to find, roughly, a wanted frequency. As 
can be seen, the line is not linear due to norhlinear tuning 
of the receiver and to logging scale errors. 



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NB>S0020 



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Fig. 2. Buffer circuit 



your receiver. In fact, the 
highest band of the HQ- 
145 A is double-conversion, 
and the first i-f is 3035 kHz. 
To find the frequency of 
a signal which is tuned in on 
the receiver, just subtract 
the i-f from the displayed 
figure. To set the receiver to 
a pre-determined frequen- 
cy, just add the i-f to the fre- 
quency desired and then 
tune the receiver until that 
figure is displayed on the 
frequency counter. It's as 
simple as that It^s nice to 
be able to pre-tune the re- 
ceiver for a desired fre- 
quency and know that 
you'll be right on the 
money. 

As an example, suppose 
you have a receiver with an 
if of 455 kHz and you have 
a schedule on 7.235 MHz. 
To find the frequency, you 
would add the 7.235 MHz 
and ,455 MHz and get the 
figure 7.690. Tune your 
receiver until this figure is 
displayed on the counter, 
and you will be listening on 
7.235 MHz, 

Suppose you are tuning 
across one of the interna- 
tional broadcasting bands 
and discover a signal which 
you can't identify. The 
display reads 10.445. By 



fl£CflvEff 
FlCAUENT 



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sav 




TO ALt 

FJLAH£NTS 



to eUF^FCA 

+ 6- 12V 



Fig. 3. Power supply for 
buffer, from the receiver 
filament supply. 



6C4 y9 

OSCtLLATO 



TO 

BUFFER 
J^PUT 



CONV 




Fig. 4. Take-off point for 
HQ-145A receiver rf should 
be taken off the grid of the 
1st mixer or converter tube. 

subtracting .455 you dis- 
cover the actual received 
frequency is 9.990 MHz. 
You can then turn to a list 
of international broad- 
casting frequencies and 
have a big advantage in 
identifying the signal by 
knowing the frequency. 

It takes a pencil and 
paper or a calculator to 
read the frequency accu- 
rately, but the price makes 
the little additional work 
seem very much worth it.B 



73 Magazine • June, 1080 153 



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ITHE IMPROVED "ORIGINAL" 
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Ovef ttie years^ we have had many 
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#Sam« large size contacts as fur- 
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Exlia-lone. fin^er-filtjna molded paddirs with 
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PHONE PATCH Model No. 250-46-1 measures 6-U2" wide. 2-1/4** 
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Bducjtnon. Fsr fur} i^id s^nntt. 



Yau on even create mnd jp^v vo^ 4«*m 
progrftFTH. ATARI'f BASIC L«ngua9» Cif- 
tr«di^ givR vau d^r?i;t ao;£5$ io your campu- 
ter*i central pnKcutnp unn, mflmary and 
cokif. wiind and frie wansTtr c4ipabr]kTi«i 
So you csn design, wftt-e dnd trTiptfmeril 
yoUT^ own pr^r^ms Or fflodify djcrttitng OI'H 

to s«it your ™;eds. EbsiIy. Ei'Ofi. it you'irtr 
newer tafked to a computer b* For ft 




AfAII' HO™ fCriBfACl MODULI 









AT AH I Mftmory Modytn 

jOpfKMlilll 

UniQM* 8K •nd IfliC p^ln RAM mod 
Uln kt vou ifiitttAllv expind vour compu'- 
nr"^! mtmrnii ffWfiw#v up fo <HK, 

SIC $124.95 
I6K $199.9S 



ATARI S10 Disc DRIVE 

lOptioral^ 

Lhei it^ndvd S'A" efiffcen'K to^ tdd up to 

SSK bviK sf fapid jcmi& rnfornrnfion itsf 

jge For eacfi dhslcette. As muyf as imtr &\Q 

Oitk DifTfe ifntts can b« Qperrtvd inti^l 

$699.95 



ATARI' 400 " Pf RSONAL COMPUTER SYSTEM 



||_ HTJiWHOO] 



i 



.■._:'asir=.i:.':iWoraQOiT:-jt£jcaG5i 
cr (J Lj lii (a o o-QOOtjatas 




a: 



$630.00 



ATARt 400 

The ATARI 400 Pirrtunul CompuiBr ie 
juit (hut: ■ computt^i t1tit you can uie. It'& 
iilily tc> own And aiiy ia ciparjilA. Even if 
you've nivqr uitd a coEnpulor bcfofD. 

But dnfi'i liri iii limpla opcrsiian fool 
you The ATARI 400 H « luJl-fledBeril gen- 
fr4l purpote compuTfr thut ctn 90 « Icmgi 
way towirdi ilmpfifylnt] yourcornpIeK life. 



All you havQ to da Et pTck \i prugn'ii'm frofn 
ATARI'S comprehenfiive library of plug- in 
cfirtriidga arid casKsttt tape ioftwar«. Every- 
tlhing from smglj bn^liness. Tfianatjprin^rH (o 
hamu liriBnc4s .and 'CmTlput^n .ted i,'dycatinii 

Piui some of tht moil chiiilEn^Lnfl'ri ma-^i 
CKciling computer gamH ever. 



The system 



Tht ATAHi 900^** sv^tf"* piavides easy acc»5 to 1 wide varitttv of houtphbid infCHrmauon Vi^i^ iut h m music composinan. electrpnic 
art, and household security contral Am all planned jipplic4tion» lor th«> ATARI 500 SiV^iem The educaticKia! and cnlGrtamment va^ue 
built mio the iv^tem is endless 

For pr<}fefSK3ndl us«. the ATARI EQO is eKpandabl^ lo li«!p up m\h the ftwdl* ol most small businesses, and wrth the needs of jargi? 
busmesses where the central computer is ovetloadcMl 




CASlCni P«0«4iLli« 



Business & household 
management 

• Ptrional Financial Maiug'tfnFnl 
Income ^nd eikpen^ record Iceeping 
keyed to rapid retnwaJ lor «nco<ne iajl 
purposes 

• Record Itecpinc Books, ntcofdi. ferial 
number*, insurance policies 

• Pkaife AcoMint Management {With 
tfv<k printing] 

• Personal Captlal Imrfttnwfit Manage- 
mfltt Stocks, bonds^. reaE e^taEe. 'with 
stocl (jtiotatKm serv tee 

• Mailnii Lbtf Address Book (With prin- 
liniJ 

• CofnpHuterii«J AppQtntntent Catendaf 

• inventor\r Miarug^emcnl 

• Accounts Fayable 

• ToutlHTp*"! Ttatnef 
» Payroll 



Educational applications 

The eiciusinfe ATARI MO Educatioiul 
Library on audia^''digital cassettes, con- 
la tn^ over ?0itub}ects, m^iliKtiiif: 



• Algebra 

• Econ<HTi:>cs 

• Auto h^charwc* 

• SocKilofv 

• US Hiuorv 

• Co^^teimg: 
P^ocedurei 

• Vocabulary 



• Bask P%y<holOfY 
■SpellviB 

• Spanish 

« Accounting 

• Cafpentry 

• Creal Classics 
■ SiaitsiHis 

• Sasic EI«lrK:ay 

• World Hiitcity 



Buddf^r 
Direc ( intefac t ror^ wil h 1 he coffipule* Vak es 
place (hrpufh the keybcuard tHevivton 
screefi, md speaker Thrs running diat(>«ue 
i fa e twi eefi rhe mer and tlw compuler t^ 
hightt|{hted by immediate feedback on ac- 
cui^acv and ur>de«standifii 



Entertainment applications 

The ATARI SOU a capable C1I playtni 
sophistHiated ihrnking and icium gamei 
The Eiiteriaiinnkeni Program Librarv coo- 
sisU of 

Thinking ga'mcf 
Chess 

Sackgafnmon 
8irvin<crif S^mulaiHHis 
Stock Market Simulation 
Spiace Adventure 
Stralegv Games 

AcficMi games 

FoiiT-Plaver Basketball 
Superbug -^ Duvirs^ Came 
Camre ot Liife 
Super Breakout ^^ 




from Barker & Williamson 



On thb page Tufts 
brings you , . • 



5 -BAND TRAP DIPOLE 
(80 thru lOMetersJ 




Pre-assembled: 

Model 370-11 Kit (iriuitrateah 

^ $64.95 Modal 370-12 - $54.95 



Modd 

404T 
40et 

4oerT 
Aim 

4t6T 
432T 
SD4T 
506T 
B08T 
510T 

sirr 

S32T 

GCMT 
e06T 

eoar 
fitffr 

632T 

ecMT 

flOCT 
S08T 
SIOT 

aisT 

332T 
IQOffT 

looai 

to TOT 
t204T 

9 2ogr 

1Z08T 
I210T 
I216T 
IZ32T 



Dia. 

1/2 
1/Z 
1/2 
1/3 
1/2 
1/2 
&« 

B/B 
5iS 
5/S 

3/t 

a/4 

3;^ 

1 

1 

I 

1 

t 

t 
IIM 
11/4 
IIM 
11/4 
11/4 
11/4 
11/2 
11/3 
11/2 
11V2 

n/2 
n/2 



TPI 

4 

G 

S 

10 

16 

32 

4 

& 

S 

TD 

IS 

32 

4 

6 

a 
ia 

32 

4 

€ 

8 

10 

IS 

33 

4 

B 

A 

ie 

32 
4 

B 
20 
IB 
32 



Wire 

Size 

{AWG} 

IB 

It 

is 

30 
24 

n 
ta 

18 

18 

20 
24 
IS 
13 

1S 
1$ 

2Q 
24 
16 
18 
18 
18 
30 
34 
14 
14 
Ifi 
IS 
30 
24 
14 
14 
16 
18 
20 
24 



Length 
of Coilt 
flnchet) 

2 

3 

2 

2 

2 

2 

3 

3 

2 

3 

3 

3 

2 

3 

2 

3 

3 

3 

3 

3 

3 

3 

3 

3 

10 
10 
10 

to 

10 
10 

to 

10 

to 
to 

10 

to 



PRICE 

£2 JO 

3^ 

^-33 

3 42 

3.&3 

275 
3^ 
3J7 
3^ 
3.4fl. 
3£3 

2m 

3.10 
2,17 

3J0 
3JI 

343 

3.ei 

3J1 

7M% 
2S2 
2M 
3-73 
3.78 
6.TT 
GJ3 
TJ7 
7J3 
7.48 
7^ 

6Je 

6.79 
7.17 
724 
7JS0 

7 82 



Modifl 

Numbcf 

I404T 

t406T 

t408T 

»410T 

14 1ST 

1437T 

leWT 

iet}6T 

160ST 

isicrr 

1S16T 
20D4T 
3006T 

x»orr 

20 IDT 
24MT 

a4oeT 

3408T 
2410T 
185-1 
18^2 
3204T 
330eT 
32081 
33l0t 
4004T 
4C30eT 
4Q0ST 
4010T 
4804T 
4806T 

4aoeT 

4eiOT 



Di*. 
13/4 
13/4 
13/4 
13/4 
13/4 
13/4 

3 

2 

2 

3 

3 

2\n 

31/3 
21/3 
21/3 

3 

3 

3 

3 

3 

3 

4 

4 

4 

4 

& 

h 
h 

§ 

6 
6 



4 

a 
e 

10 

ta 

33 
4 

S 
8 

m 

16 

4 

8 

10 
4 
S 
B 

10 



4 

6 

a 

to 

4 



8 

10 

4 

6 

a 

10 



Wre 

Sim 

(AWG) 

14 

14 
14 

16 

ta 

24 
12 
14 
14 
16 
18 
12 
12 
13 
16 
10 
13 
14 
14 



10 
13 
12 
8 
10 
12 
13 

a 

10 

13 
12 



Length 

of Coils 

{Inches} 

10 
10 
10 

10 
10 
10 
10 
10 
10 
10 
HI 
fO 
10 

to 

10 

to 

10 
10 

70 



10 
10 
10 
10 
10 
10 
10 

to 

10 

10 
10 
TO 



PRICE 

$7.10| 
5j01 

5.121 
S.23 

s.as 

5.65 
9-60 1 
9.71 
9.S2J 

gj»4 

10,14 
10^1 

IIJ&I 

11J2 

nj23 

13.T7 
13.28 
13.40 
13.SD 
52 33 

6939 
70 74 

67 23 
83.1& 

a4,7fl 

86.94 
90.4S 
9334 

9036 
100:^ 
1 08.00 



COAXIAL SWITCHES AND ACCESSORIES 




MhMI3T» 





HpMEHA-I 




tor timdiwrlchiflo. OK-rWPOrk 



MIM^UX* Ail Wound C«iii 

tOfnen«S KKISJ. 4 Is IS Eur: 




Mad*i I9i-1 raiaciG I r^rt PEP 
MntSeH ? 35? '41*11 iu 2 KW PEP 





IF' 



Model 377 



t^M-WI 



•%4«t5MA 




Model 593 
MODEL 

37S 

376 



377 

S50A 

551A 



tm 



MCNl^SM 





590G 

502 

593 
594 



DESCRIPTrON 

SWITCHES 

PFtOTAK switeti. Groundt Mi 9K09Vt tetect»d ouiput 

crixurt. 6 Outliuti. 

PROTAX twttch, GfoufKll mH ixctpf Hf^ecfed oulpui 

dfcuit, Sixlh sMritctn pcMit^QH i^oundft «ll DulpLTb- 

SOutpuu 

Ca>K**l Aniit«nni Rti«y 

Afiltnn«/nF Co4h Swit^ ^ OutputL 

^unna/BF COiK Smich. 2 Otoptm 

S0«ciil 3iM>la. 2^pioaiiiM Hvifdi us«d to twitch 

mn/f HF divtci in or ovi Qt pat in connection 

in » ea4vi*l tnu, 3 DutDutiv 

Bnefccl Ofi4v, loi- iwll t»«umirig of Ttdiai 

oofmctomnUhcs, 

AntKnn«/RF Cci«k Switd^. 5 OutoutL 

Gf e>yirtdi til t«c*p« itltct^d oafput circuii. 

Afittrma/RF Cov SMntdi, 3 Outmm. 

Singia pota^ 3 pwiion AriT«riii« Rl^/O^aii Sw<rtch. 

D.F.O.T. AmsnAi /RF Qmk Swtdi Intwi^iw^i 

liwo QutfKJti IwtwwMn fmo tfiputi. 

Gr5un<ii Ait iHespf ttlfeiMi otitpul circtiirL 

6 Output*. 



PRICE 



S19.7S 



19.75 
23-SO 
17.50 
14.9& 



17.95 

18.50 

18J50 
17.75 
17.50 

ie.2& 

2150 




Model 333 dummy Joaci wan 
merer - Favorite LIghtweioht 
PottBhie-lBO WATT BATING - 
Ah Coo ted. Ideal f^eldiervlce unit 
for mobile 2 -way radio — CB, 
marine^ bu^irh^st bundi. Beit tor 
QRP amateuf ys9, CB, with zero 
to B vuatt« full icele loifv power 

'Vftfrn LntfhMi 1,3 1 «• >]««iHt 

hiwn HJar*** 3HI vMTH < im iilW»wn> 

WfttimrlPi ManiM «B O «»« D 1 », H TikO 

ftiiB' ■*" • r' » ■- 

^Hoam^ Wiw^i 7 flat. 




Model 374 dummv load watt- 
meter — Top pf ttkg Line — 1500 
WATT RATING - Oil Cooled. 
Our highest power combination 
jjnit. Rated to 15D0 watts input 
(intermittent). Mater ranges are 
individyally calibrated for highest 
Accuracy. 

WliWln L«HTn*n l-.S 1 id JJO Mi-l| 

if^^a fl tnati i yStQ «»ir* DC iirt^mi it^nt 

Wdntmvtar H«n»H D IE. O H. b3Dd. B laQO 
fiiH *>".*- > tV4" 




High Ppw<y ^ 1D00 WATT 
FlATiNG - Oil Cooled - motiml 
334A dummy I'oed wartm#f^. 
Our fr>o«t PKipuiar comhinacion 
utnit^ Handlftt fuM amateur power. 
M^ter rarities jndividuallv C'li- 
braied. Can be pa*i«l mounta<L 





Wide r>r>g« attenuator - ModeJ 
371 -T, Seven rocNc^ switches pro- 
vi<le attsnuation from 1 d8 ta 61 
dB in t-dB steps. Switches erei 
m*fkecl in dB, t-2-3 S-ia^C^SO, 
Sum of ai:tuated switches (IN 
potitton^ gives attjenuetiort. With 
all switches in OUT position, 
tl^re is NO insertion loss. Attefv 
uator installs in coaxial tine usmg^l 
UHF cor^riBctors. 



fxtsT^mmtu 



lant 




I 



I 

iTl 



I 



I 



I 



• 



On this page Tufts 
brings vou , . . 

Tempo 
Paiomar Engineers 



i. 




$299.95 



ANTENfJATUNER 



H*tt It 1 rmt twn«t t!h*t putf w^x* power 

Hm h W h full Iv^al o o wcr vnd thun lotnt . ^nd 
WQtki yirrfh cot)i. %iin^ vnr* md tufinced 
lifm, And n l«n vou iu«iw up wthout goiog 
onlNr Jir. 

An tunm torn lome rt (Knver. riwsify mi iht 
ifn^xtwa eeiU tftd thv hmitm cot*. To ikmJ 
thhi wn fwitcriad ffo^n ^, 12 v¥ir« f^^ the 
matrt induqior to !^" €(^>p0 liilifA|. It csn 
csrfy fiwi timti itw rf eurnnt. And Mw'ire 
movsiJ Ifi* bslun front ih* ouif^r^ wtierr n 
almfHi n**tf wtm m dcH^ trnDHbnof. la 
thfl inpul «rHite ii iJMrayi 4oe%. Thia mora 



Tht btoo««t prcMyitnii wLifi runoff, n gtttinq 
llMffv funod y^. With lhr« kr\a>bft to tyne 
on your tr»nctiv«r arid thrw ort th« tuner 
Bmi 14(1 u^ondi io do U Imc iri« itarnfn^ in 
vpur trtnicvivtf manuifl ihit'ii TK »cDmJ5 
ptt fcftot]. W* hiwfi i better vny; » buiit in 
50 Qhm noiit Kind^ ihvt lirti you h! ttw 
turwr cantroU Mi^fic-ut trdnimitiinti. Ar%d a 
liiVitch thai leii you lurw youf tratHmiri^r 
iniD A dummy load, So you chu do tfis 
who I A- cunaijp withoui going ofi t^F air. 
S^v«« rhai tm«l^cuii QRM. 




TEMPO 



TEMPO 

portatksgivm you 

ths bfoadatt cftorce 

ST tiie iowmi price 



^ 



^ 



R'X NOISE BRIDGE S55,00 




Ititn Ihe !rulh iliemi your antenni. 

Flild n ind X firr pr:^t>n#ti«. 

BfMdtuM 1 lao Mttt. 

$in\fW lit uw. ~ &eH contiUinl. 



FREQUENCY STANDARD 
$42.50 



tDD.5a,Z5 ia«iid 

5i Khi. Mirtttn teltrl- 
|l)<tl»ipt«tit«nich 

EiBquenMn ilinltm, 
Saurt w«vt S^nvl. 

ES IHi IB SO KHj. 
ittwt ^THfl ifif- 
ptitcsittraiiflH 

Viint on, Mt i 




ALL BANDS PREAMPLlFtER 
S89.50 




Uiiti tt9l«iivl|fl AU 
hrMdujI 
• Fwftctftn 



Jjl. 



^ 



* Tha only tynchoiftd lwKt4icli3 offir^ 
S witQ ouipui. iSwitchalito for 1 or 6 
Witt QperilionI 

* The ume dipfiidttaUiiv is iht ilma 
prodien S-1, Drcuitry that Hm bmtn 
pfOven in motif thjin 4 miTl^on houn 1:^ 

* Heavv "^^^v taittty Pfc>«. 

* TeiHcopfng wtjip intmnft, 

* fxtfirrul micrDpftofi«c«pai»lily. 

the Tempo S-2 

Tempo it fprtt again. Thii timf with « 
%utJtr\w qiuHrv lynihr^ietct 220 Ml-ff htnd- 
hekj trwucHVif . With an S 2 in youf tar ot 
pacfc«l: yoa on uw 320 MKjt rqipfttvrf 
ttirouQhoui the US, It pffAr; itl the tdvinc- 
ed sngineering^ ptemium qunlltv ConipKi- 
nents and exciim^ riratureii of jht S-1- jhtf 
S-2 oFf«rt IQOO channels in *n ffntremtly 
I l^htwirif hf but rugqaEi ch#^ 



^ 



PRICE LIST 




TfltfipO'S-S 


S34dOQ 


TempG S-5 with touth fone ped 


3^^ 


13 Sution toudi tone pad (nol ifisulledl 


39JXI 


Ifi Sutton tamsh lotttfmd Cnoi nn^tsHedl 


48 OQ 


Tofte btmt gerieratDt 


?9S& 


C i CSS lub^udible tone oontral 


29S5 


Ridibnr tl^x »nt«vta 


BOO 


Ll«lh«f hol'rtpr 


16.00 


CifitTtts iFghtxf plug nxiibile dugginfl yiiii 


GjOO 


Mnchm^ 30 watt mjipui 13.3 VGO 




pO»«r wfn^ifier (530) 


SPDO 


Matdiinf W wwn output pow«r si^ifcf (SSOI 


149 jOO 


Tenpo S-2 


349 00 


Tcffiipo S 2 wiiti tDiid> lone pad 


39fjOO 


TpnpoS-l 


209.00 


Tempo S-1 inrirti touch tew pod 


xmon 


« you ti not cm 220 thfj « the perffct 


^ 



^ 



^ 



^ 



S3S I3SW oti3]Putl or S-7B I7SW mjtputl 
Tempo lolJtl stale anptifiir it bq^ina; 1 
powerful motjiit at base rrstiDn. M yiu Iimv 
it 320 MNi rig, th« S-3 wiH mm im^tttnAym 
wrutiiify Its Igw phce inducfei wi «fti«rnal 
micfophciie capsbiltty, he«y duly iij<4d 
tSftery pack^ char^r, and ffiiescDping whip 
antenna. 



Tempo S'1 

• T^e lint arnJ iticurt thproi^ly tEeld lined 
handheld syniheiizftd radio a^aiFable. 
800 charinets in the paim of your hand. 

• Smpte tcj operate. f¥oy don"* neeti a 
dcffK irt campuier pro^gramrnEng). 

• Ktavy dusv battery pack alloiiM rtnofe 
ojMfaiJng time betvweeii eharges. 

• ExtBroal rnicrophone caiiabifity. 



3^ 



^ 



y^ 



VLF CONVERTER S50 J5 




Hew devHte i!p«ni up th« worU dI VIF ritfNi. 
Conveni VLF lo &0 melers. For ui« Mllti am 

tbortwive rt celvef covering 15 4 MHe, 

AlfvancBff (tesmn fer ^impte aper^iian, 

hjtflhpidocmaiice, 

G^» rec«p1JCiti otlhe 1750 mrler band. 

AltB Ctfveri niiviQatiffn raEJiateicDiri. WWVBk 

itiip-ta-ifiDfc, 2 no IF brpidcfsi b^nit. 



RF TRANSFORMER $42.50 




1*1 hi 



hi 2&a0 watt CM 
Feral 




11, 17.1. ^ Oftrn inltnui, 
■rtnp ■nlemu. 

I- 



BEAM BALUN S47.50 




> Ukei^riae^ 
- t7-»yMz- 

* 1:1 v4:i(iiaafaMlt 

* M flai^H ttief luriwarL 



LOOP ANTENNA 
Loop Ampirfi«r $67,50 
Plug-In loops $47,5(1 ts. 

• piuit'jn lEiDpi 

iviTli1)ltt«r: 
1BD0-ti060 KHi 

(Bniilteitt Bind) 

(VlF. 17SDi^ellt4ind} 
4D'1SD1<H2 
(WWVB, Lgr<n| 

• NvHt PmI inlerft>tnci 




500 W.RF TRANSFORMER 

$35.00 



Ni S0« win CW 

eipirkMKHalMit 
CvmvBieiil ivrttEti telutiM 
tl taii«iivi tfpi 





'* RF Qfflv 



I^CHWf. 



MODEL 2K BALUN S42,50 




• RnlaaiGAMet 

• 1 TjAimj. 

• 1:lir4:1rii«af 




PALOMAR ENGINEERS 



IC KEYEfi 597.50 




Sends Manual, Seml- 

Aulomittc, Fullliulatnallc, 

OdI MemDrv. Oisli MemorY. 

Squeeze and limbk^. 

MiKi Fealujes Ihan any oihf r kt^er. Bulft'in 

lidelDnE. 'spcdker, losti ant tiAuWit conlfolt. 

Fullv AlUuKlabli eenlael spiting and piMIe 

iiJisiqn, Till peitict pi^le tiuth wW Amut 

VDH. 

Salter^ Dp«raled. Hesvy ihtilcletf dte-uvt 
rirttal cut. 3-lb. tti ^ l»ie. 
Bv Ifte Waild'i oldeil minulaclurer el 
Bwclnniti: lieyi. 



CW FILTER $39.95 




10 He.. 
GgHplfcC 



MODEL IK BALUN S22. 50 




• i.7-3iiitL 

• lHlw4:1 mimiiil 



F9FT 



ON REMAINING 
F9FT ANTENNAS 



SALEl 

1/3 OFF 
REGULAR PRICE! 



9B 19 Eiemenu 

- t44/43S 



Special OSCAR ^96 19 El*fTi«ntt - 144/435 



TECHNICAL DATA 




Frequency rjngt MK^ 


1M/f46 


CUin ISO 


14 dg 


Vcrt>c«l iptfiutf angle 


2 * 19* 


1m it 


FfotTMO-tiick ridna 


Ifdft 


Side inbi stcinastion 


>50dfi 


SWR 


<1J 


Impede ncr 


sa 


Wfi^hr 


t9kt 


Phyvcii If ngtti 


3 3ni 


WtncHoJit* 


6,4 Ikgp 


"The ifii^utieit vji^ue tf givtn nt 


-3(IS 



S77S5 

430/440 

2ji14'' 
2*16" 

SQ 

11 H 

3-3 m 

5-,4i£gp 



BElefTtents— t44 MHi 



9 Elements - 144 MHz 


S39.9S 


TECHNICAL DATA 




Frequericv range MHi 


t44/t46 


QtinlSO 


14 de 


Hor»j'Dnral iperture angte* 


2 K !9" 


V«rtic«1 Apertuff angTe* 


2x23' 


Ffoni ID-back ratio 


15 dB 


Sidtlot^e artcnuaiion 


>50dB 


SWft 


< 1^ 


lmp(»dant» 


50 


Wfl^ghi 


1.9 kg 


PtiysiCil length 


3,3m 


Windlottd* 


6.4 kgp 


*Thp IndJcaied uiilii? js gtwern at 


-3de 



21 Bhments - 432 MHz 




21 Elements - 432 MHz 
TECHNICAL DATA 

FreciuiJncy ran|)« MHi 
Gmn I BO 

Veftical aiperture arihglfl 

Frortt-tO-bBCfc FAUO 

Side IoIh attenujlJon 

5wn 

tmpedarice 

Weight 

Ph/ikjl lentfi 

Windlaad* 

*TH« indiCaied viAut h oivm *f 



;5 £/emetits — 144MHz 



Antennas 
for the 
Active 

Amateur 



16 Elements - 144 MH2 

TECHNICAL OAT A 
Ff equ#r>cy ranfff IIHf 
Gain ISO 
hi&rifiMitfl ipei^Tur* angle* 

Front-nHiACk raftki 
Skle lAte itttTiuitkon 
SWR 
lmpc<tenoe 

*T*i# rfidicitfld va^LW « given at 



S79,9S 
144/14S 

2 » IB* 
2i If 

22 dS 

^1.2 

50 

44 kg 

G.4fn 

'3d8 



MICROWAVE MODULES 
TEXAS RF 



t-i-n 



M t« t:?" W M 



SALE! 1/2 PRICE' 

ON REMArN[NG 

MODULES 






CC!^ 



» u m 1 44^ 4J} .^t^ 1 tV 







ii«*r* 4i«* 



IhU mux <*«l«*aT CQil^ 

vtnftH 

la^M, ^«.f«, 19-1% >4 J« W^Hv 



144 V>bT HI>m^eT 

iii[«hr s vt* i*uci4*.-^-a. A* 
hMI «**>4-''«» ^ -^^'-|-T' lit 



i«B «#HX oouai.t ca««^ii. 

SiOM HCMf f T CO f»V m f f ■ _ 

tnict44;9 - wuici44<4 



M ^i »Mji i Ipii i t t »fBrjn**0m 3 KHt 



T4* Hint DUJli CuTPt/I WDfi 
VUAf#4 

TL« «■*« l^iA 1< J^ P» W4»W*W|- 
I npuT ir.^^>pitf.T 144- 14^ WMf 




ie«B 
ifiT yKz ae-3a VHt iti 



UClUMi 



: UtNTt tii4«-tdf WMr If r 

t n iii nii fc icir v^ik' 4T 1 see iwet ao «iHf 



TRANSVERTER5: 

MMT 144/aB ...,..- 259 

MMT 144/SO , 259 

MMT 432/2BS, 329 

MMT 432/50S. .,,,., 329 

MMT 432/144S 3a9 

RECEIVING CONVERTERS: 

MMC 144/28 ,,*.,>, 65 



MMC 144/ZaLO, , . . 
MMC432/2SS, , , , , 
MMC 432/144. . . . . 
MMC 1296/28. . . . , 
MMC 1296/144 . . . . 
VARACTOR TIPLER: 

MMV 1296, 

ATTEtHUATORS: 
MAA 16 



70 
95 

95 
85 
a5 

110 



27 



,95 
.95 
.95 
.95 
,95 

95 
.95 
.95 

.95 
,95 
.95 

.95 

.95 





CorneH-Dubilier 



TAILTWISTERTM 



HAM IV 




■ For th^ fslew Super- 
Co m my n teat ^ons Antennas 

■ New Thickwall Castmg 

■ N&w Steel Ring Geer 

* New h/leiai Pjnfon Gear 

* NeiA/ Mciior Pr«brak$i 
*New Super Wed^e Brak^ 
■New L.i,0, Control Bojt 

* Saf^ 26 Volt Oper«tK>r) 
Desjigned for the newefT 
king'^iiH communiceiion 



nas. The TAIL TW*$TE 



onf 
rTI 



M 



of the 
amttsn- 



ii the 



ultimate m antvnna rotationiai 
devices- Th« TAIL TWISTErTM 
starts tivith a deluxe control box 
featuring «nap action controls foe 
brake and dirsctJontl controls; 
UE.D. indicators signel rotation 
and tH-ake opera lion, wtiilt' the 
Uhjminarad mater providieai direc- 
tion readout Thi» nrnw control 
l30K couples to the newest b«ll 
rotor. Usinng the tima tested to*l1 
roto/ jprirvcipje. the TAIL T*V*ST- 
g^pTM '^^ ^ brand newdesigin with 

ttiickwsM caisi*n9t end six boll 
assembly- A brand new motor 
widi prebrake action brtn^^ The 
antenna tv*tem to an eoiiy stop, 
while The massive SQruere front 
brake w«diQe tocks Th« asf4mb|y jfi 
place. A riaw itainle^ steel Spur 
gear system provides final drive 



Into a new steel ring gear for totat 
reUabrhty. Triple race, 133 ball 
bearing assembly carries dead 
weight and maintains horizontal 
stability. 

An optional heavy duty lower 
mast adaptor is available for light- 
er loatjs with mast mounting, 

F^rice: S 2 79.00 

The HAM IV sets new levels of 
performance. Snap action 
star! tc bed wedge brake and rota- 
tional gootrois brings pfnpofnt 
accuracy to large directioi^al ar- 
rays popular \t> communications. 
A new motor provided pre brake 
action to asist in slowing down 
rotational rna^^, $nd the new 
thicker wedge brake offers far 
stronger lock- in phase action. To 
take full advantage of this new 
design, the HAM III is designed 
for m- tower mourtting, A nevt^ 
optmnal heavy duty lower msst 
ardeptor is available when the 
HAM III is to be mast mounted 
with smaller arrays, A stainFess 
$teel spur gear system multipli^ 
the torque into the dual race 9& 
bailt bearing support assefrr^biy 
a&urTng years of rrouble free per 
formance- Prtcfi: $189,00 



I 
ill 



I 



On thb pag» Tufti 
brings you . . . 

T0§ex 
NPC 




PflOFE^IONAL HEADPHONES 
& HEADSETS 

iooMi«icri£AD$rrs 

F<if #» yli3m«t« an eommunicttiont coo¥<rii»fict idd •ffidencv Kten i boom mk 
h««tllrL Ua'V'tifiie ftw«rit«L of prqfiiipkaml canmLffiiations. toom mic l>i*dBt] iJiow 
mpf* pif^ mrf mdbifity witila il^ayt katpi^ th« fn>c profxrlv postKined for f&a, pftcrM 
voiot trvwiHoiivi, Scom fnlcroc^ianB m« campAtti^v tdjuftibiB R> ^low pHrfwt pott- 
tidmnf And . boom Naditti l«irvt both h^ndt rrw ta parform mher taltL 

Alt mcKtai n Hi|kpt«d Mtfi '^dott ttlking " micr?|ihon« CD l«nrt «mtiicnt nob* pi^-ilp 
an^J fXDviiff BiptriQff ifittriSfiliiNtv ^^^ mtidtl it » oonvmient, inRna puih-fiChliSi 
iv^tch. which ciii bt wirtij for fithtr pMth toiilk ntiy cDfrtrDt or inlc eircwt inftmipi 
for voice iTperaud traramitart. Til* tMritch m«v bv u»d « i mcnwnttrv puh-lMfrtoft or 
It cin b« fockKt m Lite dc>wn pofit^on All moduli h«v« tough^ ftexuble. B fooi cofdf whj<^ 





I 



f ^ 




r»,<? 



C-610 



C-1210 



C-1320 



Head phone Jack Bo}< 

Ham Qub^, fheld day cdnt«it OENifiitidn. 

No mgra jury rigi far multipk hafld'ph&riM, 
%\n %** phone Hacks with IndMdual volum« 
control, fl foot cord with ^" phonn plug. 

S14.30 



itf ¥ \W .f 







\ 



\ 




CM -6 TO 



CM-1210 CM^1320 CM-1320-S PC-100 



HTC-2 HMC*2 HTC-91 



MODEL 



Hcadphonfl S«nfitJvJtv 
Raf 0002 Dynei/cm^ 
1 in W input. %kHt 






Micfophont 
frequcncv 






StniitnrifV 
S^lcrti i «oJtAnia^»b« 
it 1 kHz 



PRICE: 



ceiD 



T 



103<JB SPL 
'gctB 



3.2 
20 ohnit 



HkDOohmi 



SWL-610 



10CMBSPL 
±Sda 



C tZID 



lD3dB SPL 






3:z 

20ohmi 



C-1320 



iDSdB SPL 
JSdB 



CM^tO 



lOartS SPLl03dBSPL 



3^ 

20ohiTit 



.^SdS 



31 
20ohrm 



SO 
EdOOHi 



^5 da 



Ch^-121Q 



±3d9 



3.3 
20 ohms 



50 

aoooHi 



sidg 

±SdB 



CM-1320 



lOSdB SPL 
*5d0 



3^ 
20oiwnf 



m 



CMta^QS 



lOBoTB SPL 



3.2 

20ohfTu 



PC-tOO 



200otwTit 



50' 
SOOOHf 



tv^l 



51 d8 
±5dg 



S 10.45 



it2.25 I $29.70 $41311 S47.20 



S82.75 I 



r^^vn 



:5dB 



SS9t5 



SO 
1200 Hj 



Xj3m 



KTC'2 



3.3 
20 ohrns 



100 
3000 Hz 



kmct 



3J? 
20olmit 



100 
3000 Hi 



HFCil 



^2 

SOohmt 



100 

3000 H£ 



LCTM 



Low 



Low 



t16^ 



S15J5IJ 



ii>jo 



0S 



THOMSQhi CSF 



NPC 



ELECTRONICS 




MODEL NET PRICE 

12V4 S13.9S 1D4R t40J& 

102 %7Am 108RA $79W 

107 $2S9& lOBRM »daJ6 

1031^ S3dd& IdSR $14d.ft& 



MODEL 1113ft 



: -glcifl* and Cumnl M«iari 

Eilri hEtny duiy ufiil qu^Dv cwi^nL 1 Vi ^i At; It in U vnlh Di: ^tH 
r^iH-Hglli lOimp^tDnMiiinij;. ^£ Ji^t m%t All t«lill IIHi rwDifl 
dtul Ci/iD<il uvFi<iud Di'Efvaiisv v^ Vvfmii p^tc^m teuli^ ii^m 

(iTlMtfTi Qqnch piTWEi ei«tV ''nr Ittling ind urrirlhg =&! <hgtirk btpffiitf 
nttlmjqiJiprTHinl 

1 ;i ft I wc 




IVIODEL 108I1M 

a 




MCX3EL 107 



Wrd « Amu FopiP 

PFDtri<rtHI 



i^i4Kll»ns siicitihr HI OltWSiDnp Its HHi^ a! :ii I,> rtUR M i Wpl 

UTlriLlge, c^Lb^He pJ^^ a c^ idCD ii! j Doiwor QllKt 

ConhiuiME CikFiTfTi I t^yll Loadl -A t\fp |i 

Qi/lpui V<?llai»e I'No LuM I I % V >t>.i> 

OtJiDbil vnli^u* |f MII4 CiMl) Ij)' V '- ' 

Ni^ilMEltullLDBdi b V liM". 

Cwt 3 iHiksk, iWh ■ '&'>• mi miMAiW*^H 1^ 



MCX1EL12V4 

my n:ii voir;. AC m 1? ^pmi 

bi: IdEdlly iuitEd U\y rruis) 

4ipliciti[>ns iFKliJ[ti[ig B'iraci HicieA liuyiBi riliMni cit ^^rfiQ 

Eo&HCln liiwplsysi vilhvi pawix MVrii] 




NWl 



C^nhnttfHS C^rrt^iiEiiFiill U4i*i|j 
tkibikJl SfdrtHgei:hD LudI 

rnlriihg C>ti<i,iKir 
HuvtejI-iiJi L[Md| 
flttDfi CircLi'l l*Tut*c1iirt 



I :ri /imit 

1A y tniJ 

i| V nifl 
ft.WKi4jr' 
d vmti 



iMiThlOU't H£T€R A%]7 0v<lt¥0fcT|MEt 




MODEL iQ3n 



Pam- i«i#r<v 



4.qn#ffns i^S veOs AC id u « toMif 0(L ^Ql mitiiiinlH HH'idtn Ft 
intti4 i:4ll>|P>)ii«iiS if\6 t ]m{i& IMn IdliiNv llnM Itf 40(P<Kltl<in4 
ivhtiF nrhhim-^ Oq |,l<3l;illP| «-! Iit«<iaiin1 iHtc^rti m (3 iTMtMlilkiCHI 
iituii T4aiii iJitfii iiLinsiTpltn. M^ li«qti quaJibf fliy#i| liKh HW Wtn 
tiin iImj m uhH la IricUrctir BB 17 mi eh laAlrin 

\^H • 9VDQ \i* I IVDC 

4 Amp 
- • JC'WtN k *rlTip 

|iii*i4 lWti«4 it>l MiiHtiih] Wv^lfli I HWi 




I iPii'i'liHid'na^MliNiP 

■ l|''lUli 



MODEL 102 

^AnvlAi^ t!«|i4 3l*ia. 



Fkudloni 4Jlii>lW ii^ rjMviil 

Mfl IHl if»4l1 AL lU l?.v«illl 

DC £ 1^ imm csH^iKNui. 4 urnpi ih«i Fi'viHM miOM \a mvhf >' 
i«]i>]'. «! Jt irarJ* cantdge'. euutia In^pit^B or cir iKHq in i hiH.-r 
in ntllEi 

t;niirrfii/i.itli C.MrHAtii -I' yii lmdIi 8^ ( AllG 

Qvinpul VDflifc {No, i-Didil t| M' mti 

(lumul Vi?ll*ii« tFuu H imUt t f V mm 

P ill^Jig C^IHUilOii n 004? wC 

R4I|]I* 'P u* LlMdh B V HHfl 



^ Unarco-Rohn 



COMPLETE 25G TOWER PACKAGES 

SO' Guyed Tower: includes tap sectron, 4 regular 
sections, base pJate. rolor plate. 50' guy wire, 2 guv 
3S5emblie5 with torque tiari, 3 eiincrete guv anchors 
and other mi^ceJIarteous hardwafo. 

TOTAL REGULAR PRICE $594.02 

SALE PRICE 464.02 



SAVE $130.00 

50* Bracketed Tower; includes top section, 4 
regular sections, bane plate, rotor plate and unlvarsaJ 
house bracket. 

TOTAL REGULAR PRICE $366 J 5 
SALE PRICE 266JB 




SAVE $100.00 



On this pig* Tyfts brings you 
Datong Fox 

Bencher Bifd 



D 



DATOivG ELEC-moi\jio& ufvirrso 



*1t 




FL1 * • , Frequency- Agile Audio Filter 



ImOOEL FLl 
FrttqiMflcv — Agik Auilia RtVH 
The Datong Fftqy€ficv Agik Audio fitltf it 
inundffd Drinujilv fpr [tofT-<tettcior ii^<l 
filtering #i flF md LF comrnunicjuom 
reoeiveft for SSB ind VH li offers a" 

to ENe u«st including r 

For ihe SS9 c^fHrrtm: 

* Fast aufortidiic ^uppfnslion of ifitvrftrinfl 
hfftPfCKivne whi»it«s if» th* rtngi 380- 
3000 H2 by « unique Mtrcli-lock^nd' 

tracit ftotcb f jfter. The^ Track irtfl florch can 
to l^fl Jn circuit with no dudfbie effect 
until > whittle iK3^«ri m whic^ iCAi^ 
the vvtt4itlff win 'diiappfidr' vvithfn tvp^- 
caHy on* uH^ond. 



• A oontifiiKiuil^y «ijun4bl« ludkj "wm- 
<^7w' or a variitrie^widi^ nocich to 'im- 
ptmvr nrdiHTon in fti* |v«^nse ot att\m 
off tune SSB. RTTY or SSTV sigF^t. 

F^r ifMi CW QfMfvfiir: 

• ContmytHJitv variable csntefffequency 
1280-3000 H;} and bandwidth (25- 
1000 HiJ ftir Fkerf^ct mjichlng of recetver 
p«iib4nd to changirig lund Cddittons. 
wndjrvg Sf>ee<H, and personal FMrfefisnce. 

• Flat-tapfied. iteep-ikined mponjse 5htp« 
fof optimum Hie of lunlng combined 
with flxoelEent noise rejection . 

• iinflfr tTjni;ng law With bart<Jyiridth inde- 
pendent of frtquB^cy and ga-rn JTid^p-qn 
dfnt cf barrdwidth far natufat 'feef. 



ilWllM« 'Ik- 



«« fl « 



» ra* 






QArOND 



ALfTCDIVlAtia **. 



ASP . . . Automatic Speech Processor 



ASP 

AMtomi^ic SpBiCih Proceiiar 

The ASP latarnaliy gflneratM Jr* 0«n SS0 
^tgnai and proceuet it up fq 30 tb.l Thii 
prDoessedi lignil 11 d«modLilitfid and deliver- 
td to your rifl'* mic input v^ifh fully luto- 
matic AGC control o* bofti input md output 
leveJ , 

ASP Features: 

■ (nstttli twrvvaefi rnic wd vinvnirifirl 
« No f:)£«d to op«n thf ripl' 

■ Pyih titiTid Hleetton af procssing 



Hflrmonic di^stortion — lesi liian O.S% art 

lnt«rni>l tone flenflrator allows easv and 

Rccurate iniitial adjustmeni — no scop& 

nmded. 

Sdlectdble HiZor LaZ mlc input. 

OpoTitn from 12 Vde internal or 

external, 

SiiB7»")( T^". 

Fot UW in PTT ^|i*onVOX> operation. 



PfllCE 

I ASP Automstk Speedi ProcftHfir 
F L-l Fnqu«ncv A«ite A«aclki F^tur 
IMM yPCortv«rttr 
C^TO Cod* Tutor 
DATEST I 

oATEsrrn 

10-75 
RFC M RF Dippet Board An»(mb*r 

I moo 



21«J6 

379.96 
15S95 

I69 9& 
17S.aS 

20,00 



MODEL O-70 

Mof»Tii*9f 

Th« McifH Ttitof provfdB a hi^h< efftctrw 

fmn way to practice Morse t»cte receptfon at 

4II l«v«ti of fkilL It p'TOn'ades an unlimited 

tupply oF prvciliioci Motte at ttw turn of A 

fwitch. pkrt a buitt-in cHdIUtor for sentfiii^ 

prtctwi* 

070 FA«tyr«: 

• FVoducei randon^ ftw cjKvraeter froutB- 
You c*n ^MxAe Atl lettefi. all figw*!. 
Of mixed. 

• Car>£)r8tect vvi«bl« «pee«l {£^-37 wpml 
and varifbte clHay fup to 3 
twtwaan Itnert for afTtimum 
e ffici a n cY- TH* deiay factrFty irwant 
That rl^i (vam ihc start you c^fi learn 
each ktler and numbef as H ought to be 
tcafnt. ttut a vinth ihe dots arxt dashes. 
«4lhiii c letter f»t mough to form a com- 
p4el« KnjrHJ pattefn, bur witft a long delay 
tiCTween each letter. As rou improva yg*' 
iiffiptv nfduce the delay iae tn e gn bttierf. 

• Internal loMdjpeakef. pfus penonal eif- 
piece fof pnvatc liShUnir>g 



I 



» 
»1( 



ElsctrcNik 




$©B VHF model 4362 (i40-iso mh*l» 
S99 HF model 4360 ( is- 30 mhiJ 



ThF Aim, 4^6? HAM-MATE Oirvciional Wilt- 
melcn. *rt: ifiMTlivi type inyitinRe^l'i for Ttiuuinlig 
larwjrd cir reflected power m SO^ihrn coanial 
trsnwtKSMWi Irtitt. TtiCTf *IT tfifrct i4firtffllilfl& i^* 
iW TTiD^I 41 THRUilNE* Waumeler - th* 
pMi>1leiMgn<l tundd'd Q>f ttir indiriify— and Mi 
aa-LV^IrU rn^ai^r KF p<nwT flow uAi» Jity IokI 
COfldilUfili. Eith ifeUli't«tef H narito^iorj pfwnir , 

rlrmc nt vid: mdrr citilHaled in *aU3, ill iTKHinEKt 
in t h<y)v(m{MCI |rtAtȣ hObaifV. Il h tMi type oT 
hM c^nirkEiLiDr) tfid the diTKtieB*! THIttiLmE f 
com&f^ EnnoHf, MrttlHitf lanjift. Hhi acECKim far 
(tv H ip e tiiaU r of thr HAM-MATE WjIl HMlm. 



THRUUNE 
WVTTMFIBl 






la 33* 



^4 






H' 


W 


H 


VC 


«CI 


"Mf 


rif 


J«l 


Jft 


wc 


HC 


Wf 




«w 


^m 




M 


lORi 



MODEL 43 

eitfrritnn <Tabl« 1) 2 30 MHi 
Elem«ria (T«bl« 11 25-1000 MHz 
Carrvmg c^tm for Model 43 & 6 Al«meftt« 
CarrvJnq cei« for 1 2 alcmertis 



¥13SilO 

50JOO 
42J0O 
28J0O 
17J0O 



READ RF WATTS DmECTLYl (Spetsitv Type N or SO 239 con- 
nector*) 0.45 ^ 2300 MH2, 1-10,000 Watt* ±5%, low imerttorv VSWR 
— 1,05, Urtequalfsd oconomv and t(*J^ito*ntv* Bmv ontv ^hc eiemantUl 
i:ov«rjng vour present frequet^cy and power n«ed^ add e^xtra ranges 
letei^ rf v^^'Jr r#qiulrefr>enti expand. 




I 



The Bencher Ultimatg f*addf9 . . 
a dual lever. Iambic kever paddl« 
that will increQte your speed, 
accuracy & operating comfoi't. 
•adjustable CONTACT 
POINT SPACING ^ Pr*ci<ion 
screw adjustments on each set of 
contacts make exact lettinQs en&v 
Contact posts are ftpitt and locked 
bv set screws, ehmjnating ih& 
need for locknuts. 

• wide pange of tension 

ADJUSTMENT - T«nil on on fin- 
ger knobs Is maintained by a long 
expansion spring. Dual screw ad- 
justments adjyst spring tension tc; 
match yoi^r "*f*t/* 

• self ADJUSTING NEEDLE 
BEARINGS- KeviriQ fhaftt prvot 
in nyjon bearings that "fJoat" on 
machined brass flttir^gi, Sprirtg 
tension prevents tree play and 
sfop; elimifiates contact bounce 
and backlash. 

• SOLIO SILVER CONTACT 
POINTS - The contact points af* 
soMd silver for a lifetime ot flaw^ 
less keyjng. 

• precision MACHlNiO COM 
PONENTS — Main fram«» coritacf 
posts^ spring post and bearing ring 
are a^l machined from solid brass 
. ^ ^ polished and chrome oiated 
fof durab^iitv afif$ riich appear- 
arice. The Bencher Paddle loc^s at 
good as it works! 

• heavy steel BASE: NON^ 
SKID FEET - Finished in an 
attractive black Mrinkia fint^ 
(chrome plating optipnat). iht 
bnase ft^easures 9«&Gm x 10, 2cm k 
1.3cm thick. It weights 1 kilogram, 
and 'kMjth its i^on-fkid rubber feet 
isos solid as a rock. 

Model BY 1 Standard B^ack Bate 
. — $42^5- Model BY-2 PpO»l\ed 
Chrorrve Base , . . $52S5. 

BencHeRjnc 



I 





Firal IS the Fok XK. R reisds all 
bands and tucke away on the visar, 




Our remote (BW) unine "oyt-oi- 
atghl" when JngJaiied, Out-o^sight m 
perbntidnE:^. too. 




And now tii«r«'t Sapetfuil 



1 j:'*r lii ? 



i f ■t-jisvr^'li 



:^oyTie 

rot^r warning systerr. . ^ , s h*E 10 

luns the secisihvity capabiiUtT ci any 
cDnvmttiDTial roddi defeetor. it ra idea! 
br cusEtom cnstaiJabonK^ 





PRICE LIST 




Qnlflf 






No, 


Desoiptioft 


l»rice 


ttO 


FoxXK 

AJI band detector w/ialf 






comsined aundJ^niual alartn 


STOd£» 


©0-2 


Ml band daa^or «/feni0te 






QOfmol. watarimcif 


SI 39.00 


60-9 








radv wvnirtg lyitam 


S2S9S5 



• 



CMM 





Designed t» give ycu sverv »d¥aniiQ», 
ivfiry capability, livhatHvtr ymir o|Mritiii(} 
ip^icidllv Tctally ^olid-Etili, S bindt, bftwd- 
band dfisigfi, anatog u-ic^ dlgitil nadDHU, 
buiti-kn VOX and PTT,. tsuilt in tcljyitiiMtt 
iqueFch, buih-in 4-poiiti^n tW/SSB filLit, 
8 pott* crystal SSB filitsr. 2 ipe«d: breitk-in^ 
WWV reception, front pan«i control &f 
IJmAr or 3ntMvi3 bsnc^witc^infli buitt-in 
Xihont p*ich tacki. built-in "timid" cryitil 
C4librsii>r. t^j:li-rrF ttwo btmt wtiidn, Hp«r«u 
racciviiiii antenna capabf^ity. thfilt-m SMft 
br^dga, front pmeJ microphow tfid pi»na 
rada, «flustid3te «uiom«Tk iml cDnnrul: 
iiHiilt-Eft odjustabfe stdefone. cIlliJ efintfKH' 
NiD«vta«dHl spakwrv •utomatie ilcM»nd 
HtKHon, priij^ cirtuit bords. 1jVPC^ 
11TVAC [cx«fiuJ iupply it r«qMif«d for 
fixed EUtion yfeh Kcstontti HViUbl*^ 



OMf^l SPECIFICATIONS^ 

FrequHHiv a*nd*: 1.8-2 J. 3A^,0, 7J0- 

7.5, H,0-T4.5, 3 1.0- 2 IB, 2e.0-?aS, 38. &- 

290. 29,0-395. 2fl.&-30.0 MHr tranr 

caive; TO.G-10.5 MHz receive only. 

Pfrmeability tumd VFQ gnd rtcfivar ff 

anorslifier. 

VBfniar Tuningi T3 kH? pwr riyolutlon, 

typlc^l- 

OMNI-A Accuracy^ 11 kHz trqni n(»«rflit ?5 

kHf CfFibfation pr^int, 

Pulsed 2S kHi: cryxiAi QflllbritQi' In 

OMNIA. 

OMNI D Atsuwy: ±100 Hi. 

OMNI -A Reidaut; Srid« rul* di«| Lndtcatei 

100 kHz segment, ciil ifkirt IfKrinmnl tu 

1 kHz. Thfts dill iralat. 

OMNI-O ftBadcHit; Si% dliit, 0.43" LEO 

nqimttal$^ Least iignitkwit cSntit indidting 

100 Hi iP'An. al} athm red 

VFO SobOitr; Ufi iHati 15 Hi zhangs 

ptr F^« avfffagid over i iO tfwift troen 

70 to no , ttter 30 minul* wirmup. 

LtK fhon 10 He di^nge [rom 105 to lis 

VAC line wItiQi w^bm uimq 7 EN TEC 

pOHMT supply. 

Autonatie liikiH^ election, rtvtrvWt. 

Fravisani for remott VFO, **£f6ti 7*3 

l\>winf flflriisii rwiKiict'v control! 




570 



Cfinturv21 (570 or 574) 

NtivJiCB Excluiiva 

Pyrchflie youF Century 21 i|570 or 574) 
from u} and have jp a one yaar to Apply 
thit full purchase pricv towardi i mitdftl 
540, &44, &4B, or &4& lAi'tiAn you upgridf 
your staiion. 



ADDiTlOMAL CRYSTALS 
Exiitnd 10m covfr^gi m JOMHIh- tHadmi 
ni 29.0 to 29.5 MHr Mpdtl 2U 39 5 t<a 
30.0 MHz- 

MQOEL 24B - NoiM BlankSf 

f^ig-in PC assembiv for iithtr rruKltl, 
Efffctrveiy blanki moit rm^ii« notic, 
BUAk«f it nserted mia fvcnvin^ if ehwrne-l. 
DniMint nvit]di on front pontil. 

MODEL Z45 - CW Filfw 
ftuo-m PC flHSfnbfy cctctiitti of 'our a^iw. 
kMV Q op-vn^ CerEter frK^ucricY oi 7iO H*, 
bjimfuridth of tSO Hz. Two K*1«ctiviTv 
r«$ixfrvH nnilable itritti ttxftn pWHil control. 
5h«p« facTor of 7.2 @ 6fB0 dB 




w * 



MODEL 240 - 160m Convirl&f 

Provides 160m operation «t 7&% powbt 
jovfll. In additicn to using 540/544 VFO f fir 
I variabit trbnsceive operation, am ol two 
owner-ialscted cry&tal pOiltfon4 can bfl uJ^d 
tor traniniiiting whilt the VFQ k> uiad for 
rm^eivmg. This is useful for lutenlno In tht 
DX vvindow and transmitting ou'tiidf of it. 
Hotflftdin macdiingi tfittwyr*. 




MODEL 24Z- Remote VFO 

Duplicsttf of S40/S44 VFO for speritlopn. 
on Two froquen-ci'SS.. Swilch, with L£D indi- 
cators^, allo^n^ selection of tix noialhle 
modes, TRANSCEIVER trinimlt «nd 
receivfij REMOTE tramrn^i and rcmclve; 
TRANSCEIVER iransmiT REMOTE r*e&lv*, 
REMOTE tr&mmitTRANSCErVER mcmve; 
TRANSCEIVER iranimii' both rucBlvi}; 
REMOTE tran^smtt-both r«ceiv«. Full brflok- 
in i£ pr«$efved for alt rnodM^ Two cryitjf 
poiillon^. aslfrcttd from frotlt pdhal, for 
ipat fr«|Li-Hicy or out of ba/t\d uM. M^tiehing 
encioture. Plu^ inio iccfiiory tocktt on 
mthtr Model ^4Q or 544, 



^2M 2e2M,'E 





a^3M;2S2M E 



MODEL 2B2M/262M/E 

MODEL 252M/252M/E (11G-230 VACJ 

AC Poyver Supplies 

FolJy Yoixaqs i^qui^itt^ to proyldc hiahlv 
ftsbls. pure DC J225WI from 117 VAC. 
Panel DC amfn^ter. Irt^iantaotoiii OVtrloid 

protection circuit pr^vi}nu dsmegjfl caund 
by fixcessiyo current drain; r«Mt by rnomBn- 
i&FV lum-off. Mode] 262M hai. In addition, 
a campletE VOX syitflm.. VOX controli if 
located on front pant I. Lovt fritqu4iL4:y 
C0iTi(jionflnl3 in voice, b«low cut-off fra- 
qusncy of !ip«akei-. actua^tfr T/R funcfion. 



TEN-TEC 





MODEL 247 - Antenna Tuner 

Match as SO ohm unbetanc^d output frotm 

transmitter to a unrlDty qf bnlincad of un- 
balanccHij ^ninnnji Irnpcdance;;. Popular 
univeriai Transmatch circuit wuh one kV 
capacitor spacing and 4l@'t4p lilvar platad 
inductor (pat. pending] iKowi werniar 
adjustment up lo 200W rf t*tlnfl. Haod&ome 
iinclo&iLir€ matches 540/544 tramcwlveri. 



WODEL 277 ANTENNA 
TUNER/SWR BRIDGE Sfi&.OO 

Thii w«r&atllii anieooB tuner offer* the 
fcime unique feaTuris of thi modal 247 plui 
ilife handy addition of i i^iUAn SWR bridge 
arid ffWttr. Thi SWR rnattr ihowi rat Id* of 
h1 up ID 5:1 and valun In-batween; hai 
p«nel mounted Seniitlivlty Coniral and 
Fofward- Rfivrrie Switch Makti nn idtM] 
acootory m rh* TEN TEC Oniury/21. 
sue: 2 1/3''H M 10 1M"W * Q ^/J 'D 




MODEL B45 - EJactronic K«y«f 

Th« 645 fceyar use trjv^rfto* fwr i ttf rinf jnd 
kt p* Mm^ui by the tTV^oaivirr Ito ii it com 
pttible wtth mf TEN-TEC tr^wwiwrj. 
Adjustaliie magmtic piddla rnutn, ^If 
Gontpletirm character). Dit md dWi 
orlfli with defeat xwiti^o. 




MODEL 241 - Crystal Oiciltmor 
Si:* DY^al pobtioni <allo«r cipMritHi|| sisot 
frH]i«nd« m or out of bandi. W»ll aitcfici 
i9n^ 1O0 kHz from SO m^ AQ mctvr 
bmd edgH and 300 kHf m rvnaining 
bVHh. Cinnot be uxd vnifi Uo6tH 342 
Of 2441. Plugj mto acatforiet iockati 
Matching encloBtre. 



See back iHmr for iptcials I 
MODEL DESCRIPTION 

ACCE^OI=llES 

20aA Crynal Calibrator 

206 CW F i It er. for Mod»l 509 

212 Cryitai fof Modeli 540/B44, 29.0-29.5 MHz 

2 1 3 Cry itaj . for Mode 1 1 B40/B44 , 29.B -30 jO M H z 

214 ETeafet Microphona, tor Mqdd 234 
2 1 5P Microphone . Cer AfoJa ^» i h pi ug 

21 BPC Microphone, Ceramic witb plug and coil cord 

217 500 H£ B Pole Ladder F i Iff r 

21B I.ekHzSPolaLftddarFiUar 

234 Speech Procetior 

240 Orw Sixty Convarur, for Model i 540/544 

241 Crystal OiciHator. for Models 540^544 

242 R«iTlqta VFO. fo' Modeh 540./>S44 

243 ttemote VFO. for MwSeh 545.'546 

244 Difitjl Raaitou^/Cauntar for Models 540/B44 

245 CW Filter, fo* Mo<l«l 540/544 

247 Antenna Tuner 

248 t4oae Shankcr, for ModtK 545^546 

249 Now 9 lankir. «of WodtU 540/544 
373 CrrstMl . for Modeh 570/674. 2a&-39Xl 
278 Crystal Calibniw. toir Uodpl 570 

277 Antmoa Tuner /^WR OruJ^, tor Model 570 

1102 Snap-up U^ Ipair} 

11 40 DC Drcuit Brae k*f . f iv Madali 540/^44 v^d 545,^^46 

1145 KfKiiSKforMo<leH540.SOe 

1 160 Q«9^io4taffi Ptowctor^ tot lledils 252/262 SBrln 

11 711 DC Circuit ZrMkm. for Model 570 

POWER SUPPLIES 

210 117 VAC. 13 VDC, 1 A 

210/E SanwH Mode I 210. but 11^/^30 VAC 

3S3W 117 VAC, 13 VDC, 18 A 

252M/E Same » Model 2S2M. twt 1 15/330 VAC 

25tMO Sam? ai Model 252M, but maictm GMNJ 

2&i2MO;iE Same ai Model 252MO. but 1 15/230 VAC 

3€3M 1 1 7 VAC, 13 VDC, 18 A, Deluxe, i^lth VOX 

2fi2M/E S«me «f Model 2G2M. but 1 1 5/230 VAC 

TRANSCEIVERS 

509 ArQonau t , S W . SSB /CW , 3 .5-30 MH z 

540 TransrtJver. 200 W SSS/CW , 3 .5- 30 M H 2 

S44 TranKeiuer, Digital, 200 W. SSB/CW, 3.5-30 MHz 

B45 OMNI-A, Analog, Seriei B , SSB/CW. 1 ,8-3D MHt 

570 Cfl ntury /2 1 , 70 W . CW , 3. 5-29 MHi 

574 Centurv/31 , Digital. 70 W. CW. 3.S-29 IVIHj 

KEYERS 

64 G Ultramai jc . Dual Pedd le tor 54 5/S46 

670 Single Pddcfle Ktyar, for Model 570/574 

KR 5A Single Paddle Ka^ar, 0- 1 4 VDC 

K R-20A Single fiddle Keyer, 1 1 7 VAC/8-t4 VDC 

KRBO ULtramatk Kayar, Duet Paddia, 1 1 7 VAC/a-l4 VDC 



PRICE 

S34 50 
34^0 

s.oo 

5.00 

39.00 

29.50 

34.60 

SE.OO 

EB.DO 

134.no 

llOUtl 

35.00 

179.00 

139 00 

197.00 

25.00 

^JOO 

49 00 

29 00 

»iW 
ffiJOO 

Tin 

875 

500 

1500 

e.75 

34 JO 
39,00 
130.00 
146 00 
139,00 
146 00 
159 jOO 

teeoo 

389.00 
699,00 
869.00 

1119.00 
349.00 
448.00 

8S00 
34. EO 
38.50 

ee.60 

110.00 



» 



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d* Mi -v Ml* Tia* 




On this page Tufu brings you 
Cushcrsft 
Ssve Your Radio 



4^ ib ^^^ M«. r« 

IflTlMfl *t 




i^tvlPI 



AU PRICES SHOWN ARE LIST PRiCESf 
CALL FOR SPECIAL PACKAGE PRfClNCE 



Skywalcer 




PRICE LIST 



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ATI M - 10-1 5' 20 Meters 

iNi Lut<iO>in ii\% 1* j Iwil) pnraiii.p k^'kt. :1m 
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On thii paga Tufts brings yo« , 
Fttrco Stfng&r Hitachf 
Ham -Ke y A tH^nce 



^^S^um^^m^ 



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»74.95 



glraal § EMl@^SCg[P 



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MECHdNICAi- 



■Mm**"" f^^i q**lp>l^ 'm t". 73fl MHl i;DTniTTUi<iEFliiin l-i*|i C>1>frM(t -tQ bv 
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Wrnd LCfrl 4.ild MPM 



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4311 

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S46.50 




HITACHI 
OSCILLOSCOPES 




S^n^e and <}u# trxi, IS and 30 MHr Al 

fpLff tugh twri«ttvitv NiE4chk otcillcHcupa 

- ihiilt to dcmvidfng Hiudii <|u^titv nmn- 

■hnyrm itilt tD fw»«ati»re tigrmlt n low ^ 
tniiV/dtviiUatfi liMith X5 vntial fndi)iiiifi4 
It'l. 4 ipccificJiiofi ycm won't find on jriv 
dthw IS or 3D MHf icope. Piut: Z-jk.i 
moduUUOfl, tTKi roUtiOA. fftji^ |Ml«^ X Y 
<>p«rtf «r» lor itl fouf fCOiW' incxfalt. aid X 1Q 
twtvfi mafnJf*ettkvt. And. t»it> 30 ^^- 

Fof WMl* Qt up^JtHMTi', henciKKtallv^elatecl 
ooniroH m froupfd im« Thf«« liloda on 
t^ color ccxlsd front ptnel 

^ V* JOa 30 MHz Dmi Tiace $e^SO 

- V'SOT 30 MHz Sfiifc Tsao! £67030 

• V*152 15 MHf DmlTface Sg25.2S 

V^TSI IS MHz Single Tfaoft »«g030 



HAM-KEY 



f M 



Model HK-3M 




i9 



.95 



CC: 



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Model HK4 





tf% " -~ * — 1 — - — r 



■^ AlA I 



RADIO TELEGRAPH 
SENDING DEVICES 

Model HK-1 




GClPi 



^4t«w*lmi«i»N« ifin 



Model HK 5A 
Electronic Key^r 




ALLIANCE 




$119.95 



HD-73 HEAVVDUTY 

ROTATOft 

with exdustve Ouait -S|>eed Contrail 

F^pt ar%i$fvi3s vp to 10J iq. U. at wmd tMd 
op^ Nlasi Bippofi bfick«i de*pv CiBm«n 
esy centerJFi^ puj offnt i pantive dfm 
T>Q-ilip^ ORliDn. AutomAic: tsttke KtiDn 
oAhions Etopt ta reiducc rr«rr<A ftr«i!i»t 
Uniquf contiol uflit featuim D-UAL-SPCED 
rptifian with one fnnv-fmition. fArndi 
SPEaFICATJQNS; llaK. mntt k»d twfKiinf 
ffwmeW - 10.0Q0 fln.'lbi liide-ihrun m*f 
Tummg*: Stanifvg lorquc - 400 ifl.-flu,: 
H«i<den«d aed dviw ^em. Boiii^, - 
lOEKJ/S" ffimieter IK^ikned); llcuf . 
0*ArfiMii9i. tioi bond tbiKt lighudl.Tlifn't 
fnuch. mud!) ntwE. 



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TUFTS 



lEIectrohic Department Store 
OPEN DAILY 9-9 
SATURDAY 9-6 



Q 



mmtii ciurge 



ORDER BLANK 




P. O. Box 27, Medford, Mass., 02155, Tel. 1-617-391-3200 



Pr\em FOB Medford, 
Mass^ Mass. residents 
Add B% safes tax. 
Mmimum $3.00 for 
shipping and handling 
on all orders^ 



CAT. 
NO. 


PAGE 
NO. 


DESCRIPTION 


QUANTITY 
ORDERED 


UNIT 
PRICE 


TOTAL 
PRICE 




1 


































1 














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Name . 
Addres 
Citv 


Call 




5% Sates Tax 
(Mass. Residents) 




s^ 


Slate Zip 


'otolj-w* 


Shipping 
and Handling 


S3.00 
Mm, 


r~1r*i«B«<ir en^ln#«r4 PI \/i«3 Ft M jict« r f^ti^ rn« rn^UinH FriKi r 


PR ICES SUBJECT TO CHANG E WITHOUT NOTICE | 
Card no. Card aicp. data 


Amount 
Enclosed 




$t§nattj 


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SPECIAL PRICING NOTiCE 

Many of the major items, such as transceivers, are availalbe at special discount pricts, A complete list of these special 
discount prices may be obtained by writing or calling our mail order department, tf your order contains one of the 
items on the current discount list our sates staff will make sure that you receive the fower prices. 



TUFTS SUPER-SAVER SPECIALS 



KENWOOD 

TS-180 

TS-120S 

TS-8205 

TS-520S 

TS-520SE 

TL-922A 

TR-7600 

TR-7625 

RM-7§ 

TR-9000 

TR-2400 

TS-700SP 

TS-600 

TR-S300 

R-IQOO 

ICOM 

ic-7omc 

IC-551D 
IC-SSl 

1C-402 

tC-260A 

IC-255A 





!C*2S1A 


665.00 


FT-7B 


640,00 


ETO lALPHA) 




$10119.00 


tC-24S (dBitlO^ 


299.00 


FRG-7 


349.00 


76A 


$1345.00 


663.00 


IC^215 


169.00 


FRG-7000 


599.00 


78 


2339.00 


1199,00 


lC-211 


769,00 


YC-SOOJ { lOPPMJ 


219.00 


3 74 A 


1696.00 


7 83.00 


IC^S02S 


229,00 


YC-5 00S { 2 PPM) 


369.00 


YAG» 




593,00 


fC-202 


199,00 


VC-500E {.02PPM) 


499.00 


ANTENNA SALE 




113<>.00 


IC-502 


214.00 


R.L. DRAKE 




Cushcrafl ATB-34 


$ 259.00 


325.00 


1C-2A/nfcad 


229.00 


TR7/OR7 


$1413.00 


Cushcraft 20-4CD 


269.00 


357.00 


lC-2AT/nlcad 


279.00 


L7 


1136.00 


Cushcraft 20-3CO 


179.00 


109.00 


YAESU 




T4XC 


599.00 


IVlQ5iey TA-33 


$ 239.00 


TBA 


FT-107IV1 


$1071.00 


R4C 


599.00 


Mosley TA-33 Jr. 


179,00 


395.00 


F I-901DIV) 


1382.00 


UV3 


942.00 


Mostev TA-36 


349.00 


599.00 


FT-IOIZD 


850.00 


DSR? (demol 


2250,00 


Hy<^aJn TH6DXX 


S 296.00 


679.00 


FT-IOIZ 


706.00 


DENTRON 




Hy-Galfi TH5DX 


239.00 


339.0O 


FT-707 


TBA 


DTR-2000L 


$1044.00 


Hy-OaiO TH3MK3 


20€.00 


499.00 


FT-207RA 


399.00 


CJip|Mflon-|_ 


610.00 


Hy-Gain TH2MK3 


134.00 




FT-202R 


149.00 


MT-2OQ0A 


173.00 


Hy-Gain 402BA 


215.00 


$1300.00 


FT-3a7RB 


389.00 


TEN TEG 




Hy-Gaift 205BA 


296.00 


634.00 


FT-22SRO 


829.00 


509 Argonaut 


$ 368.00 


Hy-Gain 204BA 


224.00 


429.00 


CPU'2500RK 


499.00 


540 Trrton 


610.00 


Hy-Gam 155BA 


179.00 


327.00 


FT-627RA 


369,00 


S44 Triton Digital 


716.00 


Hy-Galn OB 10/15 


139.00 


460.00 


FT-e25RD 


eso.oo 


S45 Omni "8" 


900.00 


Hy-Gaift IBHT 


359,00 


36B.00 


FT-127RA 


439.00 


546 Omni "B" Digital 1061.00 


Hy-GaIn HY-QUAD 


247.00 



I 



I 

»1 1 



I 



I 



( 



• 



Neiv Products 



from page 23 

Government radio communica- 
tions installations in the 2-420 
MHz spectrum as released 
under the Freedom of Informa- 
tion Act. 

Ttie exhaustive volume com- 
prises the entire unclassffied 
computer file for ttiat frequency 
range. It includes Justice, 
Treasury, NASA, FCC, FA A, In- 
terior, Army, Navy, Air Force, 
Coast Guard, and many otfier 



Federal Government agency 
listings. 

The entries are arranged in 
order of frequency, agency, and 
geographical location, and in- 
clude installations in the 50 
states, possessions and protec- 
torates, and space satellites. 

The Federal Frequency Direc- 
tory is available for SI 4.95 
postpaid from Grove Enter- 
prises, Box 156K, Brasstown NC 
28902, and from qualified 
dealers. Inquiries are invited. 




The Argonaut 515 from Ten Tec. 




Icgm's new fC-2A. 



Reader Service number 48T 

NEW TEN-TEC "ARGONAUT" 

515 UPDATES WORLD'S MOST 

POPULAR QRPp RIG 

Latest in the famous Ten-Tec 
"Argonaut^' QRPp line, the 
Model 515 brings the perfor* 
mance level of the '80s to low- 
power operation. 

Featuring a new super-^sensi- 
tive receiver front end, the 515 
has 0.35-uV sensitivity, a 4-pole 
crystal lattice filter with 2.4 kHz 
bandwidth, a unique optional 
combination CW filter and vari- 
able notch filter in an outboard 
cabinet, and a new heterodyne 
vfo with a new permeability- 
tuned oscillator which provides 
increased calibration accuracy. 
Argonaut's band coverage 
(80-1 Om) has 10 meters split into 
new 500-kHz segments {others 
optional). Other features include 
offset tuning with LED indicator, 
resonate control, direct frequen- 
cy readout, QSK instant CW 
break-in, adjustable sidetone 
level and pitch, "S"/swr meter, 
low-distortion audio, and built-in 
speaker. 

The broad band transmitter 
section features a new design 
no tune final for instant band 
change, 5 Watts input, new LED 
output Indicator set for 2-Watt 
voice operation, TVI filter, 
automatic 750- Hz CW offset, 
automatic sideband sejection 
(reversible), and PTT. 

New styling in black and 
bronze colors with new knob 
design and new tlit-up bail make 
the Argonaut 516 a handsome 
addition to any QRPp en- 
thusiast's operating position. 

For full information, see your 
dealer or write Ten-Tec, Inc., 
Highway 411 East, Seviervilie 
TN 37862; (615)^453-7172. 

NEW HAND HELD 
FROM iCOM 

Icom's new hand-held is final- 
ly here! The IC-2A 2-meter hand- 
held covers 144,000 through 
149,995 MHz in 800 synthesized 
T-R channels with setectable 
1.5- or .15-Watt output. This unit 
is only slightly larger than a dol- 
lar bill (35mm thick, though) and 
weighs 450 grams (1 pound) In- 
ciuding batteries and flexible 
antenna. Power may be supplied 
via an alkaiine or nicad battery 
pack {8.4 volts). Audio Is handled 
by a built-in speaker and con- 
denser microphone, but an op- 
tional 600-Ohm dynamic micro- 
phone can be used. Sensitivity 
is rated at less than 0.4 ^V (0.2 ^V 



typical) for 20 dB of quieting. Ap- 
proximate current requirements 
on transmit are 400 mA at T5 
Watts and 160 mA at .15 Watts; 
on receive^ at maximum audio, 
current drain is 140 mA and 20 
mA squelched. Three sizes of 
snap-on nicad packs (250 mA 
standard) allow the 1C'2A to 
carry the power you need. 

IC-2A packages are available 
with alkaline battery pack (with- 
out batteries), nicad battery 
pack and wall charger, and 
nicad battery pack, wall 
charger, and built-in touch- 
lone™ pad. Options to the basic 
unit include a speaker/mike, 
drop-in desk charger, and 
leather case, ioom America, 
Inc., 3311 Towerwood Dr., Suite 
307, Oaffas TX 75234; (214)-&20- 
2780. 

Gene Smarts WB6T0V/1 
News Editor 

HAM SCAIM-2 

Frequency-scanning adapt- 
ers for 2-meter radios have been 
on my mind quite a bit for the 
past year, especially since a tot 
of that time was spent design- 
ing and constructing two dif- 
ferent scanners for the popular 
loom IC'22S. 

I learned from that experience 
that all of these scanners go 
about their business in much 
the same manner. So, when a 
friend asked me about scanning 
his Kenwood 7400 A transceiver, 
I knew that any adapter, whether 
built by me or someone else, 
would be based on the principle 
of counting through the desired 
range of frequencies digitally — 
eliminating the need to spin the 
dials. By letting the little chips 
supply the necessary electrical 
bits, one can do other things 
and let the scanner take some of 
the drudgery out of life. 1 opted 
to purchase a ready-made unit. 

Since they all start out the 
same way, there must be some- 
thing which sets apart the 
various scanner products on the 
market. That something is fea- 
tures. So, after taking in ail the 
literature that I could gather 
from the manufacturers, the 
product chosen for the 7400A 
had to be the Ham Scan-2. 

It seems that this unit has alt 
the user features that I would 
have built Into a scanner and 
more. Furthermore, it is the only 
one that I could find which has 
them all. 

Among the more important of 
these operator conveniences 
are: 



166 73 Magazine • June, 1980 



RON POWDER and FERRITE PRODUCTS 

AMID0IM^ 



^A26 



UNIVERSAL CONVERTER 

A SCII - B AUDOT - MORS E 

ABM-200 



Fastr Reliable Service Since 1963 



Small Orders Welcome 



Free 'Tech-Data' Flyer 



Toroidal Cores, Shielding Beads, Shielded Coil Forms 
Ferrite Rods, Pot Cores, Baluns, Etc, 

12033 OTSEGO STREET, NORTH HOLLYWOOD, CALIFORNIA 91607 



LtOftP 



+5v 



nn^Jno t 



ASCII 



BAUDOT 



50 144~ REPEATERS ~220 450 Mhi 



BASfC AUTO PATCH 
^ Access, i^Disabie and adjustabiQ Timer. 
COMPLETELY ASSEMBteO— $75.00, 

EXTEHStON BOARD 



Arttifafsing,, 3 cstgtt sequ&rfttnf Touch Tone'^^ 
decoder mth automatic resel ArtUtaistng 
Ring detector^ reverse stfto patch capabitiiy 
for basic auto psfch sn<i two, two- watt audio 
smpffh'&rs. 

COMPLE TEL Y ASSEMBL BO— $140.00 



N«w and Improved 

RAC«iv0r 

and Transmlltttr 



Avntlftble S«par«(«ly- 




yj^\ Pto Mk X 



COR identifier: AH oit one board, pfngrammsbi^, Fullf Ad- 
iustsble, tfme out (.5-7 min.}, hang time (01 mm,;, idsntifier 
{iW min.^. tone, speed. ¥Olume, L.E.D. autpttts, tow purr^nt 
drain CMOS ^ogfo, plugs for sssy instatfation and temov^t pius 
much more. $89.95 GOMPLETELY ASSEMBLED 

Basic R&peal&r 509.9 5 COMPLETELY ASSEMBLED 

2M 13(^t75 MHi Bimic R*p«at«r for 2 meters with alt the fea lyres oi the HI 

Pro Mkl lass the powar suply and Imnt pan«l controls and accesBarles. 



REPEATERS 



50 MHz $889,95 450 MHz 899,95 
144 or 220 MHz 799 95 



PA Res. add 6% tax 
PWS SHiPPfNG 

i>'46 



Moggfore Eleclrmiic Laboraiory 



04 S WCSTTOWN RD. 
WEST C;HE£T|£R. PA. 1»3^«C 



PHONE ztB ^ae-eosf 



Tfie A8M~200 is a universal code converter 
for translating between ASCII and Baydot, 
or between Morse and ASCII (or Baudot). 
Also used as Tjy^- speed and I me length 
converter Inserts directly between TU and 
TTY«' RS232 & current plus 40 char FIFO 
buffer, Write for details ........... .$1S9. 



C.O.D. 



OEM Inquiries invff^d. 

XITEX Corporation check 
9861 Chart well Dr. 
Dallas. Texas 75243 ^®^ 
214-349-2490 



I master cluroi' 




^ 




SHAKESPEARE AND 

KENWOOD 

Kenwood^s big littte rig— all solid state with 200 watts input, digital 
readout, and IF shift. How about five band HF mobile with the available 
mobile mount? YouVe heard the quality of this rig on the bands. Join 
the growing group of hams in the knoWp running the TS-120S. It's 
at $699.95, but call for quote! 

Here's maximum convenience, maximum performance, and all the 
features you need for the very best in HF operation. PLL circuitry pro- 
vides stability, IF shift and available filters provide selectivity, DFC 
provides versatility and the transmitter provides 200 watts of solid 
state punch to make you heard. The retail price is $1149.99 with 
DFC, but call for all the information and a quote on thia tremen- 
dous piece of equipment. 

Electronics Supply, Inc. 





*'45 



1508 McKinney • Houston, Texas 77002 • (713) 6580268 



•The front-panel diais on the 

radio do not have to be zeroed- 

out to scan through the desired 

range of frequencies. 

•It wiii go through the whole 

2-nneter band in an annazing 20 

seconds* 

•The unique design allows for 

one channel of memory. 

• No portion of the easHy- 

selected scan range is skipped 

over Of omitted, 

•The frequency can be 

"bumped'' in 10-kHz steps with 



the scan start/stop switch. 
•Scanning cannot be engaged 
while the transmit button is 
depressed. This prevents one 
from accidentally kurchunking 
every repeater within range. 
(Repeater users have got to ap- 
preciate this benefit greatly.) 
•The whole unit fits nicely in- 
side the case of the radio. 

The installation justified my 
high expectations of the prod- 
uct. There are a lot of wires in 
the frequency-determining sec- 




The PA 1 -to from THS. 




Lars&n Kulduckie KD-4 antenna. 



tions of a digital phase-locked 
loop radio, and, if one is not 
given precise instruction, dig- 
ging into them could prove di- 
sastrous. The Technical Clinic 
instructions left nothing out and 
were set up a la Heathkif^, with 
one thing being done and 
checked off at a time. The unit 
went into the radio without a 
hitch. The scan start/stop 
switch mounts in the micro- 
phone using existing wiring and 
a few jumpers. The scan on/off 
switch is an unused terminal of 
the 7400A tone selector. 

Operation is as smooth as the 
installation. With the scanner 
running, an occupied frequency 
stops it for 3 to 4 seconds, 
enough time to decide if you 
want to stay there and moni- 
tor/operate for a while. A flick of 
the start/stop switch is all that is 
needed. Should you get tired of 
listening around, a twist of the 
scan on/off switch brings the 
previously dialed-in panel fre- 
quency back on the radio; noth- 
ing to it. Everything is packed in- 
to two operator motions. 

This particular unit has been 
in operation for several months 
without missing a beat, and 
many hams in my area report 
having used them for much 
ionger with equat results. The 
reliability seems to be uniform. 

Technical Clinic advises me 
that they have other types of 
products on the market and in 
the works. If these are as com- 
pletely slick and functional as 
this unit, I look forward to trying 
them all. 

One more thing: In these days 
of loophole-filled warranties, a 
good one is worth the price of 
the product^ and Technical 
Clinic has a great one: "Should 
you install one of our units ac- 
cording to our instructions and 
it fai is to work, just send us both 
pieces. If the unit hasn't been 
tampered with, you will get your 
radio back with an operating 
unit installed. Pronto." How 
about that? Solid! Just as solid 
as the product they make. Tech- 
nical CUnfc, PO Box 636, Sterl- 
ing Heights Mf 43078; (313)-2S6- 
4836. Reader Service number 
482. 

MikeZedanWOSJLW 
Attica Ml 

PA MO, 2-METER CLASS C 
AMPLIFIER 

The PA 1-10 is a solid state 
VHF power amplifier designed 
for fixed or mobile operation. 
The amplifier operates Class C 



for FM only. The PA 1-10 pro- 
vides a nominal 10 Watts output 
for 1 Watt of input. T-R switch- 
ing is accomplished by diodes 
and quarter-wave stubs which 
are ac-coupled to ground. The 
amplifier is factory tuned to 
operate in the 144-148 MHz ama- 
teur band plus or minus 1 MHz 
for MARS or CAP operation. 
Some retuning may be required 
for out-of-the-band operation. 

This design uses rugged bal- 
anced emitter rf power transis- 
tors to ensure long life and high 
swr protection. The size and 
weight of this amplifier are kept 
to a minimum without sacrific- 
ing performance and reliability. 

For more information, con- 
tact THS Electronics, Rt. 1, Box 
195, Greene NY 7377$; (e07)-66e- 
8071. Reader Service number 
476. 

LARSEN ELECTRONICS 

OFFERS FULL LINE OF 

ANTENNAS FOR 

HAND-HELD RADIOS 

Larsen Electronics, Inc., of 
Vancouver, Washington, has 
developed a full line of 
Kulduckie antennas to mate 
with all the most commonly 
used hand-held radios, 

Larsen offers eight helical 
type Kulduckie models which 
operate on low, high, and UHF 
band frequencies {136-174 MHz, 
406^420 MHz, and 450-512 MHz), 
Eight quarter-wave models are 
also available to operate in the 
406-420 and 450-512 MHz bands. 
They are all color coded by fre- 
quency for easy identification. 

Larsen's Kulduckie antennas 
mate with Motorola, GE, RCA, 
REPCO, and many other popular 
hand-held models. 

They are ruggedly construct- 
ed to take the rough usage com- 
mon to this type of antenna. 
VHf and UHF models are 
spring-wound for flexibility and 
plated with high conductivity 
material for Larsen's maximum 
radiation efficiency. 

They are also all-weather-pro- 
tected by a tough heavy-duty 
coating of an exclusive step 
design which prevents detuning 
from shorting and adds flexibili- 
ty. They handle a full 25 Watts 
and are flexible enough to bend 
180 degrees in all directions. 

For more information, write 
Larsen Eiectronics, Inc, PO Box 
1686, Vancouver WA 98663. 
Reader Service number 480. 



168 73 Magazine • June, 1980 



XITEX INTRODUCES 

"SMART TU" 

FOR ASCII/BAUDOT/MORSE 

Xitex Corporation has just an- 
nounced the addition of the 
UDT'170 (Universal Data Trans- 
ceiver) to its data products line 
for RTTY and Morse operation. 
The UDT-170 connects directly 
between the user's ASCII or 
Baudot Teletype* or video ter- 
minal and the station trans- 
ceiver. For the user wtio does 
not currently have a teletype 
or video terminal, the Xitex 
SKT-100 video terminal is rec- 
ommended. 

The UDT-170 is actually the 
combination of a microproces- 
sor-based data converter plus a 
high performance RTTY ter- 
minal unit (TV). In the receive 
mode^ the TU takes the RTTY or 
Morse signal from the receiver 
audio output and converts it to a 
dc signal which is fed to the 
data converter portion of the 



UDT-170, Here, two single-chip 
microcomputers are used to 
convert the ASCI I/Baudot/Morse 
input signal into an RS'232 or 
60-miJlfamp output signal which 
has been regenerated to match 
the mode (ASCII or Baudot), 
baud rate, and line length of the 
user's terminal 

\n the transmit mode, the 
serial output signal from the 
keyboard on the user's terminal 
is fed into the data converter in 
the UDT-170 where it is con- 
tinuously buffered and regener- 
ated in the desired output mode 
{ASCII, Baudot, or Morse) and 
data rate. 

The UDT-170 will operate at 
any FSK shift from less than 1 00 
Hz to oven 000 Hz, Baudot rates 
of 60, 67, 75, and 100 wpm, ASCII 
rates of 110 or 300 baud, Morse 
fates from 1 to 150 wpm with 
''Auto Track," and line lengths 
from 40 to 80 characters. Other 




The UDT-170 

features include a 2-digit LED 
display for the copy wpm rate 
(Morse only) and buffer states, 
and an optional CW "indent" 
feature for RTTY operation. 

The UDT-170 is packaged in 
an RFI'protected metal enciO' 
sure measuring 12" x 7%" x 



from Xitex, 

3V2" and operates on either 115 
or 230 V ac, 50/60 Hz. For addi- 
tional information, contact X//ex 
Corporation, 9861 Chart well Dr., 
Dallas TX 75243; (214^349-2490. 
Dealer inquiries and overseas 
orders welcome. Reader Service 
number 473. 



Looking k/est 



from page 10 

formed ARC Security employee 
told me. 

"But when I returned to the 
same checkpoint after seeing 
my wife onto her plane, I asked 
the supervising guard under 
what authority the demand had 
been made. The supervisor, an 
ARC sergeant, toned the 'de- 
mand' down to a ^request,' which 
he claimed is routinely made on 
behalf of the airlines which con- 
tract for ARC'S services at the 
Atlanta airport, 

"Contacted by mail; Delta Air 
Lines (the largest carrier head- 
quartered in Atlanta) confirmed 
that even such a 'request' has no 
legal basis. Wayne G. Reel, 
director of Delta's Atlanta sta- 
tion, wrote that 'ARC Security, 
Incorporated, employees have 
been advised that there are no 
laws or statutes presently in 
force that prevent radio commu- 
nication on our concourses/ 

"ARC management, in a tele- 
phone interview, acknowledged 
that their employees had made 
errors in the Incident both by 
demanding that the handie- 
talkie be disabled and in claim- 
ing that amateur communica- 
tions were prohibited beyond 
the checkpoints, 'Our officers 
make millions of judgment calls 



every month/ said Tom Cleary, 
regional manager for ARC 
Security* They must assure 
themselves that any item car- 
ried past the checkpoints is 
okay. Radios are okay. The 
guard only had to assure him- 
self it was a radio/ 

'^Cleary said that ARC checks 
point guards do not receive ex- 
plicit instructions on how to 
ascertain that a radio is just that 
and not a bomb or gun. Every 
guard asked to pass a radio 
through a checkpoint makes a 
decision based on his or her 
own knowledge and experience. 
1f a guard is uncertain about an 
item, he will ask the owner to 
wait and defer the judgment to a 
supervising guard, an airline 
employee, or law enforcement 
personnel/ In the deadly serious 
business of searching for harm- 
ful items in American airports, 
such double checks are agree- 
ably endured by most people. 

"The ARC executive con- 
firmed that the contracted 
security guards have no authori- 
ty to detain anyone. That 
authority is limited to law en- 
forcement personnel with legal 
cause. ARC employees can and 
occasionally do escort persons 
with suspicious or unusual hand 
baggage to the gate areas to 
report that baggage to airline 



employees or flight crews. Such 
a report might be made if a 
security guard believed a 
traveler intended to use a radio 
on board an airliner without 
proper permission. Such use is 
banned/' 

THE WINTER OLYMPICS 

DEPARTMENT 

Amateur radio played a rather 
important role at the Lake Placid 
Winter Olympics. 

Depending on whom you 
speak with, any one of three 
separate groups was the "offi- 
cial" Olympics station. I had an 
unofficial Westlink correspon- 
dent covermg the games, con- 
centrating his reports on the 
amateur radio activity related to 
the event. Thanks to Ray Thill 
WA9EXP, we were able to ascer- 
tain exactly what was going on. 

An organization known as the 
"Winter Olympics Radio Ama- 
teur Network" was the official 
station, operating from the ath- 
letes village. There was only one 
problem. Due to the station loca- 
tion, it was impossible for the 
average amateur to wander by 
and utilize the equipment. The 
main function of WORAN was to 
handle traffic in and out of the 
Olympic village, and reports are 
that Lincoln Dixon and his crew 
did a splendid job. I do not have 
a total count of the number of 
pieces of traffic handled, but I 
understand it was enormous. 
Contrary to earl ier reports we re- 
ceived, the "torch run communi- 



cations" was not a WORAN op- 
eration. They were a part of it, 
but the actual operation was put 
together by staffers from ARRL 
headquarters. Dubbed "Opera- 
tion RollerbafI" by those par- 
ticipating, a caravan of ama- 
teurs escorted the Olympic 
torch from the moment it landed 
in the USA until it entered the 
Olympic stadium. According to 
Steve Mendelsohn WA2DHF, 
one of the amateurs who helped 
put the network together, the en- 
tire operation ran flawlessly, 
even though the schedule kept 
changing on a moment's notice. 
The final amateur station at 
the Winter Olympics was actual- 
ly a joint effort by members of 
the press corps covering the 
event — particularly the techni- 
cal people from the television 
operations. Since the FCC had 
stopped issuing special event 
callsigns, the group obtained 
the callsign VE30LP from the 
Canadian DOC and operated it 
"/Z' from a number of locations 
as a commemorative station. 
Their goal was to provide a 
recreational station that would 
be accessible to as many ama- 
teurs as possible, and for this 
reason stations were set up at 
the International Broadcast 
Center, the Ramada Inn, and 
Howard Johnson's, If you 
worked VE30LP/2 during the 
Olympics and wish to QSL with 
them, try sending your own QSL 
to Box 307, Sunland CA 91504. 
By the way, if you haven't fig- 



73 Magazine • June, 1980 169 



ured it out yet, VE30 LP stood for 
VE3 "Olympics Lake Placid." 

As if this were not enough, a 
group from within this group 
also provided a number of spe- 
cial event repeaters for the dura- 
lion of the event. They were built 
in California with equipment 
supplied by the Sober Radio Em- 



pire of Los Angeles. Both were 
open systems operating under 
the cahsign WD6DYZ/2/RPT; 
they were placed in operation by 
engineers from ABC-TV, 

Whiie the Olympics only rec- 
ognized one of the three, 
WORAN, as the "official" Winter 
Olympics amateur station, I 



doubt if anyone would realty 
mind If Looking West proclaims 
all three as having provided a 
truly outstanding "officiar' ser- 
vice. We congratulate all on a 
splendid job. 

One closing comment: Plans 
are already being formulated 
here in Los Angeles for the 1984 



Social E/ents 



Listings in this aofumn are 
provided free of charge on a 
space avaifabie basis. The 
fotlowing information should be 
inctuded In every announce- 
ment: sponsor, event, date, 
time, pface, city, state^ admis- 
sion charge (if any), features, 
talk-in frequencies, and the 
name of whom to contact for 
further information. Announce- 
ments must be received two 
months prior to the month in 
which the event tai^es p^ace. 
They should be sent directly to 
Editorial Offices, 73 Magazine, 
Pine Street, Peterborough NH 
03458, Attn: Soci^t Events. 

MANASSAS VA 
JUN1 

The Ole Virginia Hams 
Amateur Radio Club, Inc., will 
hold its seventh annual Manas- 
sas Hamfest on Sunday, June 1, 
1980, at the Prince William 
County Fairgrounds, Route 234, 
Manassas VA. Booths are avail- 
able. Admission is $3.00, chil- 
dren under 12 are free, and 
taitgaters are $2.00. Talk- 
in on 146.37/146.97 repeater 
(WB4HHN) and 146.52 simplex. 
For further information, contact 
Joseph A. Schlatter K4FPT, Ole 
Virginia Hams ARC, Inc., PO Box 
1256, Manassas VA 22110. 

BRAIfSlTREE MA 
JUN1 

The South Shore Amateur Ra- 
dio Club will hold its annual auc- 
tion on Sunday, June 1, 1980^ at 
the Viking Club, 410 Qulncy 
Avenue (Route 53), Braintree 
MA. A flea market will precede 
the auction from 10:00 am to 
2:00 pm in the Viking Giub park- 
ing lot, weather permitting. 
Space is $3.00; bring your own 
table. No reservations are nec- 
essary. The auction will start at 
2:00 pm and admission is free. 
There will be a 15 percent club 
commission on auction items 
only. For further information, 
contact The South Shore Ama- 
teur Radio Club, c/o Krislen 



Johnson K1WQ, 86 Alton Road, 
Quincy MA 02169. 

CHELSEA M! 
JUN1 

The Chelsea Swap and Shop 
will be held on Sunday, June 1, 
1980, at the Chelsea Fair- 
grounds, Chelsea Ml, Gates will 
open for sellers at 5:00 am and 
for the public from 8:00 am until 
2:00 pm. Admission is $1.50 in 
advance or $2.00 at the gate. 
Children under 12 and non-ham 
spouses are admitted free. Talk- 
in on -52 and .37/ .97. For more in- 
fofmation, write William Alten- 
berndt, 3132 Timberline, Jack- 
son Ml 49201. 

WILMINGTON OH 
JUN1 

Clinton County area ama- 
teurs wiii sponsor the first an- 
nual Clinton County area Ham- 
fest 1980 on June 1, 1980, 8:00 
am to 5:00 pm, at the Clinton 
County Fairgrounds, Wilming- 
ton OH. Admission will be $3.00; 
12 and under are free. Flea- 
market space is free. There will 
be door prizes and free parking. 
Food and drinks will be avail- 
able. Talk-in on J2/;12. For more 
info, send an SASE to CCARA 
c/o Russ Eidemiller WD8NP2, 
310 Bethel Lane, Wilmington OH 
45177. 

MUNCIEIN 
JUN1 

The Muncie Area Amateur 
Radio Ctub Amateur Spectacu- 
lar will be held on Sunday, June 
1, 1980, on the Ball State Uni^ 
versity campus with over one 
acre of indoor space. Advance 
tickets are $2.00; $3.00 at the 
door, with children under 12 
free. Features will include food 
prices of the 1960s, over 
$2,000.00 in prizes, forums on 
traffic and nets, computers, 
ARRL, etc. Talk-in on .13/.73, 
223,30^224.90, and .52/.52. For 
information and registration, 



please contact MAARC, PO Box 
3111, Muncie IN 47302. 

GUELPHONTCAN 
JUN7 

The Guelph Amateur Radio 
Club will hold the Central On- 
tario Amateur Radio Fleamarket 
and Computer Fest on Satur- 
day, June 7, 1980, from 8:00 am 
until 4:00 pm at the Centennial 
Arena^ College Avenue West^ 
Guelph, Ontario, Canada. Ad- 
mission is $1.00, with childfen 
12 years and under admitted 
free. Admission for vendors is 
an additional $2.00. There will be 
commercial displays, home- 
computer displays, and the 
Sidebanders dinner at 5:00 pm 
(contact Jack Kirby VE3AFN). 
Refreshments will be avallabie 
during the day. Talk-in on .52/.52, 
.37/97 KSR, and ,96/36 ZMG, 
For further information, contact 
Rocco Furfaro VE3HGZ, Guelph 
Amateur Radio Club, PO Bok 
1305, Guelph, Ontario, Canada 
N1H 6N9or call (519)'824-1157. 

GREELEY CO 
JUN7 

The Northern Colorado Ama- 
teur Radio Club will hold its 
Superfest II hamfest on Satur- 
day, June 7, 1980, from 7:00 am 
to 4:30 pm in the Weld County 
Exhibition Building, Greeley CO. 
Features will include an operat- 
ing satellite teievision receiving 
station, the Colorado Code Con- 
test, and an auction. Additional 
special events are planned for 
families. Registration will be 
$3.00, with exhibition space and 
swap tables included at no extra 
cost. For further information, in- 
cluding details about commer- 
cial exhibit space, contact Gus 
Fox, PC Box 895, Greeley CO 
80632. 

HUNTINGTON WV 
JUN 7 8 

The Tri'State Amateur Radio 
Association will hold its ieth an- 
nual hamfest on June 7-8, 1980, 
at the Huntington Civic Center, 
Huntington WV. Admission is 
$3.00 for both days, with addi- 
tional prize tickets $1,00 each. 



Summer Olympics. The Los 
Angeles Council of Amateur 
Radio Clubs has appointed Bill 
Principe AJ6J to spearhead 
amateur radio's participation in 
the event. Amateurs with ideas 
on the project should write to '84 
Olympics Communications, do 
TASMA, PO Box 444, Northf idge 
CA 91328. 



Prizes will be awarded both 
days. Commercial and flea 
market spaces are available at 
reasonable prices. Activities will 
include forums, hidden-trans- 
mitter hunts, a left-footed CW 
contest, a Saturday night ban- 
quet, and lots of demonstra- 
tions and activities for the non- 
amateurs, XYLs and harmonics. 
Hotels, restaurants, shopping 
areas, and a limited number of 
RV hookups are within walking 
distance. Talk-in on 146.04/ 
145.64. For more Information, 
contact the Tri^State Amateur 
Radio Association, c/o Phil 
Jones WD80TJ, 309 22nd Street 
West, Huntington WV 25704. 

MAYVILLE ND 
JUN 8 

The Goose River Amateur 
Radio Ciub will hold its annual 
hamfest on June 8, 1980, at 
Island Park, Mayville ND. 
Features will include a flea 
market, an auction, door prizes, 
free coffee, and camping facili- 
ties. For more information, call 
or write Mary Carlson, Route 2, 
Hatton ND, (701 (-543-3287. 

JEFFERSON CITY MO 
JUN 8 

The Missouri Single Side 
Band Net Picnic will be held on 
Sunday, June 8, 1980, at Binder 
Lake, Jefferson City MO. There 
wili be a covered dish dinner 
served at noon and drinks will be 
furnished by the Net. For infor- 
mation, contact Benton C. 
Smith K0PCK, net manager, 
Prairie Home MO 65068. 

ALLEN WOOD PA 
JUN 8 

The 9th annua! Milton Ama- 
teur Radio Club Hamfest will be 
held on June 8, 1980, rain or 
shine, at the All en wood Fire- 
men's Fairgrounds, located on 
US Route 15, 4 miles north of 
1-80, AUenwood PA. Hours are 
from 8:00 am to 5:00 pm. Regis- 
tration for sellers Is $2.50 in ad- 
vance or $3.00 at the gate. XYLs 
and children are free. Featured 
will be a flea market, an auction, 
contests, cash door prizes, a 



170 73 Magazine • June, 1980 



free portable and mobile FM 
clinic, and supervised children's 
activities. There wilJ be an in- 
door area available, plus food 
and beverages. Camping and 
motets are located nearby. Talk- 
in on .37L97 and -52 simplex. For 
turttier detaiis^ write Kenneth E. 
Hering WA3IJU, RO #1, Box 381, 
Allen wood PA 17810, or phone 
(?17)-538'916a 

GRANITE CITY I L 
JUN8 

The Egyptian Radio Club will 
hold a hamfest and flea market 
on June 8, 1980, beginning at 
8:00 am at the ERG Clubhouse, 
Slough Road, Granite City IL 
Tickets are $1.50. Refresh- 
ments, activities for women and 
children, and overnight camping 
are available. Prizes will be 
awarded. Talk-in on 146J6A76 
and 146.52. 

AKRON OH 
JUN8 

The Goodyear Amateur Radio 
Club will hold Its 13th annual 
hamfest picnic and flea market 
on Sunday, June 8, 1980* from 
10:00 am to 5:00 pm at Goodyear 
Wingfoot Lake Park, near Rtes, 
224 and 43, east of Akron OH. 
There will be five main prizes, in- 
cluding a Kenwood TS-120S 
with PS-30, a Tempo SI, a Hy- 
Gain TH3-MK3 antenna, a Den- 
Tron Super Tuner Plus, and a 
Bird wattmeter. Featured will be 
a large flea market, auction, and 
picnic area. Tickets are $3.00. 
Talk-in on 146.04/.64. For more 
Information, contact D. W. 
Rogers WASSXJ, 161 South 
Hawkins Avenue, Akron OH 
443ia 

MONROE Ml 
JUNd 

The annual Monroe County 
Radio Communications ham- 
fest will be held on June 8, 1980, 
from 8:00 am to 4:00 pm at the 
Monroe Community College on 
Raisinville Road, Monroe Ml. 
Tickets are $1 ,50, with XYLs and 
children free. There will be free 
parking and plenty of table 
spaces available. Features will 
include a contest, an auction, 
and displays. Talk-in on 146.13/ 
.73 and .52. For information, 
contact Fred Lux WDBITZ, PO 
Box 982, Monroe Ml 48161, or 
call (31 3}- 243^1 088, 

STEVENS POINT Wl 
JUN8 

The Central Wisconsin Radio 
Amateurs, Ltd., will hold its 3rd 
annual swapfest and family pic- 



nic on Sunday, June 8, 1980, at 
Bukolt Park, Stevens Point Wl. 
Admission will be $2.00 for 
adults, children wili be admitted 
free. Swap tables and tailgate 
sales will be $2.50, At 8:00 am, 
rolls and coffee wili be served 
and at 11:00 am, a BBQ lunch 
will begin. At 3:00 pm, a raffle 
drawing wiii be held with a grand 
prize for hams of a Yaesu FT- 
202R 2-meter HT. Also featured 
will be a beverage stand, an in- 
door lodge, outdoor grills, horse- 
shoe courts, picnic tables, and a 
kiddie korner. Talk-in on .07/. 67 
and.22/.82(WB9QFW). 

BETHEL OH 
JUNS 

The Bethel Amateur Radio 
Kiub will hold the second annual 
Bethel Ham Trade Around on 
Sunday, June 8, 1980, at the 
Bethel Middle School grounds, 
SR 222 Angel Drive, Bethel OH. 
Activities will begin at noon. 
There will be a smail tailgating 
fee. Bring your own tables. The 
flea market will be in a large 
wooded area and will be for 
radio and electronic items. If ft 
rains, it wiil be held inside the 
school auditorium. There wiii be 
prizes, refreshments, restrooms 
inside, displays, and surprises. 
Talk-in on 146.825/.225. For fur- 
ther information, contact Russ 
Canter WBSSiD, 129 Morris 
Street, Bethel OH 45106. 

WILLOW SPRINGS IL 
JUN8 

The Six Meter Club of 
Chicago, Inc., wiii sponsor the 
23rd annual ABC Hamfest on 
Sunday, June 8, 19S0, at Santa 
Fe park, southwest of Chicago, 
91st and Wolfe Road, Wiiiow 
Springs IL. Advance registration 
is $1.50 or $2.00 at the gate. 
There will be picnic grounds, re- 
freshments, and parking avail- 
able. Featured wiil be a large 
swappers' row, displays in the 
pavilion, an AFMARS meeting, 
and prizes of a color TV and 
IC'215or Bearcat 210. Talk-in on 
146.94 or WR9ABC .37/, 97 
(PL2A). For more information 
and advance tickets, contact 
Val Hellwig K9ZWV, 3420 South 
60th Court, Cicero IL 60650. 

BARRIEONTCAN 
JUN 13-15 

The Lake Simcoe Hamfest 
will be held on June 13-15, 1980, 
at Molson^s Park, Barrie, On- 
tario, Canada. Doors will open at 
12:00 noon on Friday, June 13. 
Registration at the gate Is $5.00 
and pre-registration is $4.00, 



with children under the age of 18 
admitted free. Talk-in on 
VE3LSR 146,85, 146,52 simplex, 
and 3780 kHz. For information, 
reservations, or tickets, write to 
Lake Simcoe Hamfest, PO Box 
22B3, Orillia ONT, Canada L3V 
6S1. 

WOLF POINT WIT 

JUN 14-16 

The twenty-fifth annual NE 
Montana Hamfest will be held 
on Saturday and Sunday, June 
14-15, 1980, at the Lewis and 
Clark Bridge Park, south of Wolf 
Point MT. Free overnight park- 
ing and camping spaces will be 
available. Features will include 
a flea market, a used-gear auc- 
tion, door prizes, and a potluck 
picnic on Sunday. Talk-in on ,52 
simpiex and 3900 kHz. For more 
information, contact WB7QDL 
orWB7QDN. 

CROWN POINT IN 
JUN IS 

The Lake County Amateur 
Radio Club will hold its annual 
Dad's Day Hamfest on June 15, 
1980, at the Lake County Fair- 
grounds in Crown Point IN. The 
event will be held indoors again 
this year in the Industrial Arts 
Building. Take 1-65 to exit S.R. 
231 west (Crown Point) to S.R, 
55 south and follow the signs. 
Tickets are $1.50 in advance 
and $2.00 at the door. Talk-in on 
147,84/.24 or 146.52 simplex. 
For more information and 
tickets, write Tickets, PO Box 
1909, Gary IN 46409. 

FREDERICK MD 
JUN 15 

The Frederick Amateur Radio 
Club will hold its 3rd annual 
hamfest on June 15, 1980, at the 
Frederick Fairgrounds, East 
Patrick Street, Frederick MD. 
Grounds open at 6:00 am for 
commercial and tailgating: 
breakfast will be available. The 
hamfest opens at 8:00 am for 
general admission. Donation is 
$3; $2 extra for tailgating. YLs 
and children are free. There will 
be plenty of on-grounds food, 
drink, and parking. Talk-in on 
146.52 simplex (K3ERM). For 
more information, contact Mike 
Staley WB3LJK, New Market 
MD 21774, or Hamfest Commit- 
tee, PO Box 1260, Frederick MD 
21701. 

JACKSONVILLE IL 

JUN 15 

The Jacksonville Area Ama- 
teur Radio Club will hold its 15th 
annual hamfest and flea market 



on June 15, 1980, at the Morgan 
County Fairgrounds, Jackson- 
ville I L. Tickets are $1 .50 each or 
four for $5.00, Featured wiil be 
free coffee and doughnuts from 
8:00 am to 9:00 am, food on the 
grounds, and indoor facilities. 
Talk-in on ,52/-52. 

TERRE HAUTE IN 
JUN 15 

The 34th annual WVARA 
Hamfest will be held on June 15, 
1980, at the Vigo County Fair- 
grounds, one mile south of 1-70 
on US 41, Terre Haute IN. Over- 
night camping will be available. 
There will be a free outdoor flea 
market, a covered flea market at 
$2.00 for a 12 X 12' space, with 
some tables and ac available, 
XYL bingo, food, refreshments, 
and valuable prizes. Advance 
ticket sales are $2.00 or 3 for 
$5,00. Tickets at the gate are 
$3.00, with children under 12 
free. Talk-in on .25;.85 and .52 
simplex. For tickets and infor- 
mation, send an SASE to 
WVARA Hamfest, PO Box 81, 
Terre Haute IN 47808. 

VANDENBERG AFB CA 
JUN 15 

The 1980 Santa Maria Swap- 
test and BBQ will be held on 
Sunday, June 15, 1980, at Union 
Oil's Newlove Picnic Grounds, 
south of Santa Maria, off US 
101. Tickets are $7.00 for adults 
and $3.50 for children 6 to 12, 
with children under 6 free. Extra 
drawing tickets are $roo each 
or 6 for $5,00. Featured will be 
prizes, including a new Yaesu 
FT'707, QLF and Q8K contest, 
and swap tables. Swap tables 
are $2.50 each. Talk-in on 
WR6ASW, 146, 34/. 94. For 
tickets or more information, 
write Santa Maria Swapfest, PO 
Box 161 5j Vandenberg AFB CA 
93437, or contact KABAKC at 
(805)-734-1380. 

MIDLAND Ml 
JUN 21 

The Central Michigan Ama- 
teur Repeater Association, inc., 
will hold its sixth annual Swap 
and Shop on Saturday, June 21, 
1980, from 8:00 am until 2:00 pm 
at the Midland County Fair- 
grounds, Midland ML There wili 
be computer displays and 
demonstrations, door prizes, 
and an auction held at 1:00 pm 
for gear that isn't sold. Tickets 
are a donation of $3.00 or 2 for 
$5.00, with XYL and junior op 
free on the OM's ticket. Talk-in 
on 146.73 WRSARB and 146.52 
simplex. For more information 



73 Magazine • June, 1980 171 



and tickets, send an SASE to 
R. L. Wert W8Q0I, 309 E. 
Gordonville Road, Rte. 12, 
Midland Ml 48640- 

DUNELLEN NJ 
J UN 21 

TtieRaritan Valley Radio Club 
will hold its ninth annual ham- 
test and flea market on Satur- 
day, June 21 , 1980, from 8:30 am 
to 4:00 pm at Columbia Park, 
Dunellen NJ. Registration for 
sellers is $3.00, donation tor 
lookers is $2.00, and spouses 
and children are free. Prizes will 
be awarded, including a first 
prize of a Tempo S1 and a sec- 
ond prize of a frequency count* 
er. Refreshments will be avail- 
able. Talk-in on 146,025/.625 and 
146,52, For details, write RVRG, 
RD #3, Box 317, Somerset NJ 
06873, or phone (201)-356-8435, 

BLACKSeURG VA 
JUN 23-27 

A workshop entitled, ^TRS-BO 
Interfacing and Programming 
for Instrumentation and Con- 
trol" will be held on June 23-27, 
1980, at the Virginia Polytechnic 
Institute and State University, 
Blacksburg VA- This is a hands- 
on workshop with the partici- 
pants working with and design- 
ing interfaces for the TRS-80 mi- 
crocomputer. For more informa- 
tion, contact Dr. Linda Leffel, 
CEO, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg 
VA 24061, Of phone {703)'961- 
5241. 

DUNKIRK NY 

JUN 28 

The Northern Chautauqua 
Amateur Radio Club will hold its 
second annual Lake Erie Inter- 
national Hamfest and Flea 
Market on Saturday, June 28, 
1980, at the Chautauqua County 
Fairgrounds, Dunkirk NY. Regis- 
tration IS $3,00 in advance and 
$4.00 at the gate. Flea market 
space is $100- There will be 
radio dealers, door prizes, and 
refreshments. Talk-in on ham- 
fest station W2SB, .25/.86 and 
32 simplex. For more mforma- 
tion and an easy-to-follow 
map, write Mike Samuelson 
WB2DFM. General Chairman, 
PO Box 319, Brocton NY 14716. 

OXFORD ME 
JUN 28 

The Yankee Radio Club, Inc., 
of Maine, wilt hold its Yankee 
Hamfest '80 on Saturday, June 
26, 1980, at the Oxford County 
Fairgrounds in Oxford ME. Fea- 
tured will be computer displays, 
talks on selected subjects, a 



ladies' program, a youth pro- 
gram, swap tables, door prizes, 
and a buffet dinner In the eve- 
ning. Registration will be $8.00, 
complete with a dinner and door 
prize chances; $7.00 for early 
registrations. For admission on- 
ly, at the gate, the cost is $2.50, 
Camper hookups will be avail- 
able for Friday and Saturday 
nights at $2.00 per night. Tatk-in 
will be on 146.28i.88 and on 
146.52. For Information and reg- 
istration, send an SASE to Lyn- 
da Mount, 198 Cony Extension, 
Augusta ME 04330. 

BELLE CENTEB OH 
JUN 29 

The Champaign-Logan Ama- 
teur Radio Club, Inc., will hold 
its annual hamfest on Sunday, 
June 29, 1980, at the Memorial 
Hall In Belle Center OH. A 
special grand prize, as well as 
many door prizes, wil! be given 
away. Tickets are $1,50 in ad- 
vance, $2,00 at the door, and 
trunk and table sales space are 
$3.00. Talk-in on 146,52 simplex. 
For more information, contact 
CLARC, Inc.. PO Box 637, Belle- 
fontaineOH 43311. 

BOWLING GREEN OH 
JUN 29 

The 16th annual Wood Coun- 
ty Ham-A-Rama will be held on 
Sunday, June 29, 1980, at the 
Wood County Fairgrounds, 
Bowling Green OH. Gates wi(l 
open at 10:00 am, with free ad- 
mission and parking. Tickets are 
$1.50 in advance and $2,00 at 
the door. There will be drawings 
for prizes, and tabtes and trunk 
sales space will be available. 
There will be advance table rent- 
als to dealers only. Talk-in on 
.52. For more Information, write 
to Wood County ARC, c/o C, 
Falls, 201 Martendale, Wal- 
bridge OH 43465. 

HARRISBURG PA 
JUL 4 

The Harrlsburg RAC Annual 
Firecracker Hamfest will be held 
on Friday, July 4, 1980, at the 
Shellsville VFW Picnic Grounds, 
Take exit 27 off 1-81 north of Har- 
risburg at PA route 39, then fol- 
low the signs for one mile or call 
for talk in information. There are 
shade trees and a pavilion. Park- 
ing for 1,000 cars will be avail- 
able. Food will be available or 
bring your own picnic. Admis- 
sion is $3.00; XYLs and children 
are free. Tailgating is $1.50. 
Many valuable prizes will be 
awarded. 



BURLINGTON ONI CAN 

JUL 5 

The Burlington Amateur 
Radio Club will hold its 6tn an- 
nual Ontario Hamfest 1980 on 
Saturday, July 5, 1980, at the 
Milton Fairgrounds, just south 
of the intersection of Highways 
401 and 25 (Exit 39). General ad- 
mission is $3.00; children and 
ladies are free. Pre-registration 
before June 15, 1980, is $2,00. 
Gates will open Friday, July 4, 
1980, at 12:00 noon and Satur- 
day. July 5, 1980, at 7:00 am. The 
flea market opens at 8:00 am 
and tabtes are free. There will be 
camping available and food and 
prizes. Talk-in on 147.81/.21 
VE3RSB, For mformation, write 
BARC, Box 836, Burlington ONT, 
CAN L7R 3Y7, 

OAK CREEK Wl 

JUL 12 

The South Milwaukee Ama- 
teur Radio Club will hold its an- 
nual Swapfesl '80 on Saturday. 
July 12, 1980, at the American 
Legion Post #434, 9327 S. 
Shepard Avenue, Oak Creek WL 
Admission is $2.00 and in- 
c^udesa happy hour with free 
beverages. Prizes Include a 
$100 first prize, a $50 second 
prize, and a variety of other 
prizes. Activities will begin at 
7:00 am and continue until 5:00 
pm. Parking, a picnic area, and 
hot and cold sandwiches, as 
well as liquid refreshments, will 
be available on the grounds. 
Overnight camping is also 
available. Talk-In on 146.94, 
More details, including a map, 
may be obtained from the 
South Milwaukee Amateur 
Radio Club, Inc., Robert 
Kastelic WB9TIK, Secretary, 
PO Box 102, South Milwaukee 
Wl 53172. 

WILKESBARRE PA 
JUL 13 

The Broadcasters' Amateur 
Radio Club will hold its third an- 
nual hamfest on July 13, 1980, 
from 9:00 am to 4:00 pm at the 
Pocono Downs Race Track. Rte. 
315, Plains Twp., IVa miles north 
of Wilkes-Barre PA. Admission 
is $2.50, XYLs and children are 
free, and there will be no addi- 
tional charge for sellers. Gates 
will open at 8:00 am for set-up. 
There will be unlimited outdoor 
and indoor space, refreshments, 
prizes, a free FM clinic, and ac 
power available. Talk-in on 
147.66A06 and 146,52 simplex. 
For more information, contact 
Charles Baltimore WA3lsiUT, 



BARC, 62 South Franklin Street, 
Wilkes-BarrePA 1S773, or phone 
(717)823-3101. 

INDIANAPOLIS IN 
JUL13 

The Indianapolis Amateur 
Radio Convention and Hamfest 
will be held on Sunday, July 13, 
1980, at the Marion County Fair- 
grounds. For further informa- 
tion, write Indianapolis Amateur 
Radio Association, Box 11086, 
Indianapolis IN 46201. 

WAUKESHA Wl 
JUL 19 

The Kettle Moraine Radio 
Amateur Club (KMRA) will hold 
its annual hamfest on Saturday, 
July 19, 1980, beginning at 7:00 
am, at the Badger Raceway, 
Waukesha Wl. The Badger 
Raceway is located west of 
Dousman on U.S, 18, ZVs miles 
from the intersection of 1-94 and 
State Highway 67. There will be 
overnight camping on the 
grounds on Friday, Tickets are 
$1.50 in advance and $2.00 at 
the door. Talk-in on 146.52» 
52.525, and 28.650 MHz. For ad^ 
dittonal information and ad- 
vance tickets, write KMRA 
Hamfest, 108 Shepard Ct,, 
Mukwonago Wl 53149- 

GARY NO 
JUL 19 

The Gary Amateur Radio Club 
will hold itsSth annual Mid-Sum- 
mer Swapfest on Saturday, July 
19, 1980 {rain or shine), at the 
Gary Lions Club Shelter (next to 
the Gary Senior High School), 
Gates will open at 9:00 am. 
There will be an auction (no fees) 
from 1:00 pm to 2:00 pm. Prize 
drawings will be held from 2:00 
pm to 2:15 pm and will Include a 
Kenwood TS-520SE, a Yaesu FT- 
202 with nicads and charger, a 
CDE Talltwister" rotor, a Hy- 
Gain TH3 Sr., and others. Regis- 
tration is $3.00. Tables will be 
rented or bring your own. Talkin 
on 146.28/ .88 and 146.52/.52. For 
more information, write CARC, 
Box 53, Gary NC 27611. 

BLVTHEVILLEAR 
JUL 19-20 

The 1980 Arkansas Army 
MARS Convention will be held 
on July 19-20, 1980, at the Na- 
tional Guard Armory, Highway 
61 souths Biytheville AR. Regis- 
tration is $7,50 and includes a 
catfish supper and pancake 
breakfast. Talk-in on 148.01 and 
.07/. 67. For more informa- 
tion, contact Richard Duncan 



172 73 Magazine • June, 1980 



WB5CNV/AAR6SH, 209 Wilson 
Street, Dell AR 72426, 

BELVIDEREIL 
JUL 20 

The annual Big Thunder ARC 
Hamfesi will b© held on Sunday, 
July 20, 1980, at the Boone 
County Fairgrounds. There will 
be a large indoor facility and 
plenty of outdoor space avail- 
able, as well as camping after 
6:00 pm on Saturday. Talk4n on 
146.52 Simplex and 147,375 re- 
peater. For more information, 
write Mike George, 6159 Broad- 
view; BelvlderelL 61006. 

CANTON OH 
JUL 20 

The Canton Amateur Radio 
Club and the Tusco Amateur Ra- 
dio Club will hold the 6th annual 
Hall of Fame Hamfest on Sun- 
day. July 20, 1980, at the 
Nimishillen Grange near Louis- 
ville OH, just off of Route 62, 
East of Canton OH. Admission 
is $2.50 in advance and $3,00 at 
the gate. Talk-in on ,52/.52. 
.19^,79. and 72/. 1Z for reserva^ 
lions and information, contact 
Max Lebold WA8SHP, 10877 
Hazelview Avenue, Alliance OH 
44601. or phone (216}-621^794, 

DETROIT LAKES MN 
JUL 20 

The Detroit Lakes Amateur 
Radio Club will hold its 4th an- 
nual picnic and swapfest on 
Sunday, July 20, 1980, from 
10:00 am to 4:00 pm at Long 
Lake Park, lY* miles west of 
DetroH Lakes on Highway 10. 
Tickets for the drawing are 
$100. Picnic and swap tables 
will be available, Taik-in on 
l46.22/,82and 146.52/.52. For ad- 
ditional information, contact 
Russ Berger NOARZ^ 1406 Long 
Avenue^ Detroit Lakes MN 
56501. 

LOGANSPORT IN 
JUL 20 

The Cass County Amateur 
Radio Club's third annual ham- 
fest will be held on Sunday, July 
20, 1980, from 7:00 am to 4:00 pm 
at the 4-H Fairgrounds. Go north 
of Logansport on Highway 25, 
turn right at Road 100, and fol- 
low the QSY signs. Advance 
tickets are $1,50; $2.00 at the 
gate. Outside setup is free; 
undercover is $1.00. Bring your 
own tables. Free overnight 
camping, refreshments, and 
door prizes will be available. 
Talk-in on 146.52 and Logans- 
port Repeater 147,76/. 18. For in- 



formation, write Roy E. Man- 
nikko WB9PKN, 530 North 
Crcolt Street, Logansport iN 
46947. 

GOLDEN CO 
JUL 20 

The RMRL will hold its annual 
Field Day Demonstration and 
Swapfest on Sunday, July 20, 
1980. at 10:00 am at Karl Ram- 
sletter's (WAOHJZ) Ranch, It is 
located on top of Guy Hill, High* 
way 93» Golden CO. Signs will be 
posted. There will be door 
prizes, tt would be appreciated If 
everyone would make his con- 
tribution to the potluck lunch by 
bringing his favorite dish and 
chairs and/or blankets. Soft 
drinks will be provided. Talk-in 
on .34 and .94. 

MCKEESPORT PA 
JUL 20 

The Two Rivers Amateur 
Radio Club will hold its annual 
hamfest on Sunday, July 20, 
1980, at the Penn State Univer- 
sity, McKeesport Campus. Mc- 
Keesport PA, A flea market will 
be held outside on the hard sur- 
face and car spaces will be 
$5.00, There will be food and 
drink, door prizes, and free ad- 
mission. Talk*in on 146.22/.82. 

WASHINGTON MO 
JUL 20 

The Zero-Beaters ARC will 
sponsor the Washington Ham- 
fest on Sunday, July 20, 1980, at 
the Washington Fairgrounds, 
Washington MO. There will be 
prizes and good buys for the 
ham, and bingo and a candy 
scramble for other family mem- 
bers. Features will include a 
commercial dealer exhibit, a 
large traders' row, and delicious 
food. Talk'in on .52 simplex. For 
more information on tickets, 
prizes, and camping, write 
ZBARC, Box 24, Dutzow MO 
6334Z 

MONACA PA 
JUL 20 

The Beaver Valley Amateur 
Radio Association will hold its 
third annual hamfesi on Sun< 
day, July 20, 1980, at the Com- 
munity College of Beaver Coun- 
ty from 9:00 am to 5:00 pm. Reg- 
istration is $2.00 each or 3 for 
$5.00; children under 12 wiil be 
admitted free. Refreshments 
will be available, as well as free 
parking, indoor vendor space, 
and a paved outdoor flea 
market. There will be a drawing 
at 4:00 pm and door prizes all 



day. Including a first prize of a 
Kenwood TS-520SE transceiver, 
a second prize of a Kenwood 
TS-2400 synthesized hand-held, 
and a third prize of a Cushcraft 
ATB-34 t riband beam. Talk-in on 
146,25/.85 WR3AAA, 223.26/.66 
WR3AAA, and 146,52 simptex. 
For further information and 
advance registration, contact 
either Gary Mohrbacher 
WB3FKE, 3417 47th Street, 
New Brighton PA 16066, (412)* 
843-9546, or Adam Horniak 
WB3JZN, 182 Edgewood Street, 
Aliquippa PA 15001, (412^378- 
9667. 

WR1GHTST0WN NJ 
JUL 20 

The West Jersey Radio 
Amateurs, Inc., hamfesi will be 
held on July 20< 1980, at McGuire 
AFB, Wrightstown NJ, from 9:00 
am to 4:00 pm. Admission is 
$2.50 and advance orders re* 
ceive an additional chance at 
door prizes. Spouses and 
children are free. Tailgate or 
table space is $2,50 per space; 
bring your own table. Refresh- 
ments and activities will be 
available. Door prizes will be 
awarded continuously and a 
major door prize of a 2-meter 
transceiver wfll be drawn at 3:30. 
Talk-in on .52 and 146,925, Ad- 
vance tickets are available from 
club members or send an SASE 
to Mary Lou Shontz WB2QIU, 
107 Spruce Lane, Route 16, Mt. 
Holly NJ 08060. For additional 
Information, call Mark Mlllman 
N2MEat{609)-871-6691. 

RAPID CITY SO 
JUL 25-27 

The Black Hills Amateur 
Radio Club will hold its 1980 
South Dakota Hamfest and Pic- 
nic on Friday, July 25, through 
Sunday, July 27, 1960, at the 
Surbeck Center, South Dakota 
School of Mines campus. Rapid 
City SO. Registration v^ill be 
$6.50 before July 1st, and $7,00 
after July Ist and at the door 
beginning at 4:00 pm on Friday, 
July 26th. Door prizes will be 
awarded along with a pre-regis- 
tration prize. There will be 
forums, tours, exhibits, a trans- 
mitter hunt, a flea market, con* 
tests, and YL activities. Flea- 
market tables are free. A Sunday 
noon meal will be catered and 
tickets will be available at the 
door. Assistance will be provid- 
ed in obtaining lodging or trailer 
parking facilities. Talk-in on 
146.34/.94, or contact W0BLK, 
To pre-fegister or obtain further 
information, contact Black Hiils 



Amateur Radio Club, PC Box 
1014, Rapid City SD 57709. 

OKLAHOMA CITY OK 
JUL 25-27 

The Central Oktahoma Radio 
Amateurs will hold the Okla- 
homa State ARRL Convention 
and "Ham Holiday" on July 
25-27, 1980, at Lincoln Plaza, 
4445 Lincoln Boulevard, Okla- 
homa Ctty OK. The program will 
include an ARRL forum and 
technical talks. In addition, a full 
program is scheduled for the 
ladies, Pre-registration will be 
$5,00 if received before July 19, 
After that date, it will be $6.00. A 
special award is being given to 
encourage pre- registration. 
There will be many other 
awards. Adequate rooms are 
available for commercial ex- 
hibitors and flea market swap- 
pers. Unlimited parking space is 
also available. Mail your regis- 
tration to CORA. PC Sox 15013. 
Oklahoma City OK 73155. 

SEATTLE WA 
JUL 25-27 

The 26th National ARRL Con* 
vention will be held on July 
25-27. 1980. at the SEA-TAC Air- 
port Red Lion Motor Inn, 18740 
Pacific Highway South, Seattle 
WA 96188. Basic registration is 
S7.00 before July 1,1980. $9.00 
after that date; additional family 
registration is $6.00, $7.00 after 
July 1, and student registration 
Is $7.00. Features wifi include 
prizedrawlngs.forumSr displays 
and new equipment exhibits, 
tours, and much more- Roy Neal 
K6DUE of NBC News will be the 
featured Saturday-night ban- 
quet speaker. For additional de- 
tails, write John H, Brown 
W7CKZ, Promotion Chairman, 
SEANARC m PO Box 68534, 
Seattle WA 98168. 

NASHVILLE TN 
JUL 27 

The Nashville Hamfest will be 
held on Sunday, July 27, 1980> 
t>eginning at 8:00 am CDT at the 
National Guard Armory, Sidco 
Drive, Nashville TN. Admission 
is $1,00 and tables are $3.00. 
Refreshments will be available 
and the hamfest will be all 
indoors. Talk-in on ,90/. 30. 
For more Information, contact 
Radio Amateur Transmitting 
Society {RATS), PO Box 2892, 
Nashville TN 37219. 

WEST FRIENDSHIP MD 
JUL 27 

The Baltimore Radio Amateur 



73 Magazine * June. 1980 173 



Television Society will hold its 
annual BRATS Maryland Ham^ 
fesi on Sunday, July 27, 1980, at 
the Howard County Fair- 
Qfounds, just off 1-70 and Route 
32 at Route 144, West Friend- 
ship MP. Beginning at 8:00 am, 
activities will be held rain or 
shine. Talk-in on .63/.03, .16/J6, 
and .52 simplex. For information 
or table reservations, write 
BRATS, Box 5915, Baltimore MO 
21206. 

JACKSONVILLE FL 
AUG 2-3 

The Jacksonville Hamfesi As- 
sociation is pleased to an- 
nounce that the 1980 Jackson- 
ville Hamfest and ARRL Florida 
State Convention will be held on 
August 2-3, 1960, at a new loca- 
tion, The Orange Park Kennel 
Club at the intersection of 1-295 
and US Highway 17. Advance 
registration is $3.00 and is avail- 
able from Jacksonville Hamfest, 
1249 Cape Charles Avenue^ 
Atlantic Beach FL 32233. Price 
at the door will be $3.50. A large 
indoor swap mart will be fea* 
turad. with tables available at 
S5.00 per day. The table reserva- 
tions can be ordered from Andy 
Burton WA4TUB> 5101 Younis 
Road, Jacksonville FL 32218. In- 
teresting programs and forums 
are planned and many manufac- 
turer and dealer exhibits will be 
displayed, as well as new equip- 
ment. Plenty of family activities 



are available close by and hotels 
with special rates and a good 
selection of accommodations 
are within walking distance. For 
more information, write JHA, 
911 Rio St. Johns Drive. Jack* 
sonvilleFL 32211. 

ANGOLA IN 
AUG 3 

The Steuben County Radio 
Amateurs will hold their 22nd 
annual FM Picnic and Hamfest 
on Sunday, August 3, 1980. at 
Crooked Lake, Angola IN. Ad- 
mission is $Z00* There will t^e 
prizes, picnic-style BBQ chick- 
en, inside tables for vendors and 
exhibitors, and overnight camp- 
ing (with a fee charged by the 
county park). Talk^ln on 146,52 
and 147.81/.21 

NORTH HAVEN CT 
AUG 16-17 

The South Central Connecti- 
cut Amateur Radio Association 
will hold its Super Scarafest 'SO 
on August 16-17, 1980, at the 
Ramada Inn, at Exit 12 of 1-91 1 
North Haven CT 06473. Booths 
will be available. Features will 
include a ham and computer 
flea market, an auction, special 
events for non-ham spouses 
and children, and drawings tor 
prizes throughout the show. 
Prizes will include a solid-state 
low-band transceiver, a synthe- 
sized two-meter HT, a micro- 
computer, and a 600-MHz fre- 



quency counter. Admission will 
be $4.00, pre-fegistration before 
July 1, and S5.00 at the door for 
both days. Talk-in on 146.01/ 
146.61. For further information, 
write Super Scarafest '80. PO 
Box 5265, Hamden CT 06518. or 
call Jeff Wayne K1YLV at (203)- 
281 -6038 between 9:00 am and 
9:00 pm EST. 

PENSACOLA FL 
AUG 31 

The Five Flags Amateur 
Radio Association, tnc, wili 
hold its 1980 Ham-A-Rama on 
August 31. 1980, from 8:00 am to 
4:00 pm at the Pensacola Munic- 
ipal Auditorium, Pensacola FL. 
Admission will be $1.00 and 
swap tables will be available for 
$5.00 each. Additional Informa- 
tion can be obtained by writing 
to the FFARA. PO Box t7343, 
Pensacola FL 32522. 

MELBOURNE FL 
SEP 6-7 

The Platinum Coast Amateur 
Radio Society will hoid its 15th 
annual hamfest and indoor 
swap-and-shop flea market on 
September 6-7, 1980, at the Mel- 
bourne Civic Auditorium. Admis- 
sion is $3.00 In advance and 
$4.00 at the door. Swap tables 
are $5.00 per day. There will be 
food and plenty of free parking 
available, as well as awards, 
fofums, and meetings. Taik-in 
on ,25/,85 and .52/.52. For reser- 



vations, tables, and information, 
write PCARS, PO Box 1004, Mel- 
bourne FL 32901, 

BOULDER CO 
SEP 26 

The Boulder Amateur Radio 
Club will hold Barcfest '80 on 
September 28. 1960, t)eginning 
at 9:00 am at the Boulder Na- 
tional Guard Armory, North 
Broadway, at the city limits, 
Boulder CO. There will be an 
auction and a snack bar. Ad- 
mission is $2.00 per family and 
includes a door prize drawing 
and swap space- TaTk-in on 
146.10/.70 and .52/,52. For fur- 
ther information, contact Mark 
Call NOMC, 4297 Redwood Ct., 
Boulder CO 80301, Of phone 
(303)442^2616. 

CHICAGO IL 
OCT 16-19 

National Computer Shows 
(formerly Northeast Exposi- 
tions) will hold the Midwest Per- 
sonal and Business Computer 
Show from Thursday. October 
16, through Sunday. Octot>er 19, 
1980. at McCormack Place, 
Chicago IL Show hours are: 
Thursday through Saturday, 
1 1:00 am to 9:30 pm and Sunday, 
11:00 am to 6:00 pm. General 
adult admission is $5.00. For fur- 
ther information, contact Na- 
tional Computer Shows, PO Box 
678 Brookline VUlage MA 02147, 
or phone {6l7)-624-0000. 



Ham Help 



Tm looking for a dial drum and 
S-meter for a Heath RX-1 Mo- 
hawk receiver. 

L Chapin K82JV 

10442 Hart Avenue 

Huntington Woods Ml 43070 

I would like to contact any 
teenagers who are interested in 
forming a net on the 15-meter 
Novice band. 

Dave Mlheldc 

41 Morrison 

Belleville IL 62221 

I need to locate a source of 
old callbooks dating back to 
1945. Any old odd years would 
help* 

Cart A. Mitchell K1J0J 

Box 1003 
Fairfield CT 06430 

I need help in altermg a Bear- 



cat 220 to receive outside of its 
pre-programmed bands. I have 
reached only multiple dead 
endSp so far. If you know a way 
or have an idea, please let me 
know. Thanks. 

SI Davis 

Box 3704 

APO NY 09009 

rd appreciate a schematic, 
manual, or any info on a Halli- 
crafters Model S 380 communi- 
cations receiver. I will pay copy- 
ing charges and postage or do 
the copying and return to yoy 
poslpaid. Thanks very much. 

R. L. Foster N5BUW 

PO Box 1296 

Albany TX 76430 

i need a 6907 tube for local 
repeater control (450 MBz). but 
not at $351 Would anyone like to 



trade one for six UX 120 tubes, 
tested for af and rf oscillation? 
ril pay all shipping. 

H. Eddy W2eU 

3 N, Belmont 

Oneonta NY 13620 

I have an impedance bridge 
made by Clough/Brengle. mili- 
tary nomenclature ZM*1 1. 1 have 
not been able to find any sort of 
instruction manual for iL Does 
anyone have any information on 
this unit? 

Richard Need WB4Y0D 

PO Box 246 

Waxhaw NO 28173 

Tm looking for ham call 
license plates for my collection. 
] would like to swap for or buy 
plates from other states and 
provinces. 

Bryan Hastings K AIM Y 
64 Concord Street 

Peterborough NH 03458 
(6O3}-924-60O2 

I need a schematic of a filler 



(300-3000 Hz), a CW reception 
method using a simulated 
stereo technique, and an El MAC 
transmitting-tube catalog, 1976 
or 1977. 1 also would appreciate 
any help from American radio 
amateurs (books, surplus, etc.). 

Santos Henn 6W8HS 
ARAS B.P, 971 

Dakar, Senegal 

1 am interested in the future 
employment opportunities for 

persons holding a 2nd class 
radio telegraph ticket with air- 
craft endorsement (especially in 
the maritime field). Thanks for 
any assistance. 

SSG. Gary S. O'Neal 

138th Ord Co 

APO NY 09253 

I am trying to start a chess 
players net, evenings, on 75 
meters, 

Charles E Martin AB4Y 

PO Box 3370 

Bowling Green KY 42101 



174 73 Magazine • June, 1980 



OSCAR Orbits 



Courtesy ofAMSA T 



Any satellite placed into a near-Earth orbit suffers from thie 
cumulative effects of atmospheric drag. Thte muchi publicized de- 
scent of tfie St^ylab space station was a grapiiic demonstration of 
these effects. 

The OSCAR satellites are subject to atmospheric drag, of course, 
and the present period of intense solar activity has accentuated the 
problem. During this period, our sun has been expelling huge 
numbers of charged particles, some of which find their way into the 
Earth's upper atmosphere, increasing the density (and thus the 
drag) there. It is through this region that the OSCARs must pass. 
OSCAR S, in a lower orbit than OSCAR 7, is the more seriously af- 
fected of the two. 

If the drag factor is not considered when OSCAR calculations are 
performed, long-range orbitat projections will be in error. For exam- 
ple, by the end of 1979, OSCAR 8 was more than 20 minutes ahead 
of some published schedules. The nature of orbital mechanics is 
such that extra drag on a satellite causes it to move into a lower or- 
bit, resulting in a shorter orbital period. Thus, the satellite arrives 
above a given Earth bound location earlier than predicted. 

Using data supplied to us by Dr. Thomas A. Clark W3IW1 of AM- 
SAT, the equatorial crossing tables shown here were generated 
with the aid of a TRS-80TM micfocomputer. The tables take into ac- 
count the effects of atmospheric drag and should be In error by a 
few seconds at most. 

The listed data tells you the time and place that OSCAR 7 and 
OSCAR 8 cross the equator In an ascending orbit for the first time 
each day. To calculate successive OSCAR 7 orbits, make a list of 
the first orbit number and the next twelve orbits for that day. List the 
time of the first orbit. Each successive orbit is 115 minutes later 
(two hours less five minutes). The chart gives the longitude of the 
day's first ascending (northbound) equatorial crossing, Add 29"^ for 
each succeeding orbit. When OSCAR is ascending on the other side 
of the world from you, it will descend over you. To find the 



equatorial descending longitude, subtract 166^ from the ascending 
longitude- To find the time OSCAR 7 passes the North Poie, add 29 
minutes to the time it passes the equator. You should be able to 
hear OSCAR 7 when it is within 45 degrees of you. The easiest way 
to determine if OSCAR is above the horizon (and thus within range) 
at your location is to take a globe and draw a circle with a radius of 
2450 miles (4000 kilometers) from your QTH. If OSCAR passes 
above that circle, you should be able to hear it. If it passes right 
overhead, you should hear it for about 24 minutes total. OSCAR 7 
will pass an imaginary line drawn from San Francisco to Norfolk 
about 12 minutes after passing the equator Add about a minute for 
each 200 miles that you live north of this line. If OSCAR passes 15° 
east or west of you, add another minute; at 30^, three minutes; at 
45°, ten minutes. Mode A; 145.65-95 MHz uplink, 29,4-29.5 MHz 
downlink, beacon at 29,502 MHz. Mode B: 432J25'.175 MHz uplink, 
145.975-.925 MHz downlink, beacon at 145.972 MHz. 

At press time, OSCAR 7 was scheduled to be in Mode A on odd 
numbered days of the year and in Mode B on even numbered days. 
Monday is QRP day on OSCAR 7, while Wednesdays are set aside 
for experiments and are not available for use. 

OSCAR 8 calculations are similar to those for OSCAR 7, with 
some important exceptions. Instead of making 13 orbits each day, 
OSCAR 8 makes 14 orbits during each 24-hour period. The orbital 
period of OSCAR 8 is therefore somewhat shorter: 103 minutes. 

To calculate successive OSCAR 6 orbits, make a list of the first 
orbit number (from the OSCAR 8 chart) and the next thirteen orbits 
for that day. List the time of the first orbit. Each successive orbit is 
then 103 minutes later. The chart gives the longitude of the day's 
first ascending equatorial crossing. Add 26^ for each succeeding 
orbit. To find the time OSCAR 8 passes the North Pole, add 26 
minutes to the time it crosses the equator. OSCAR 8 will cross the 
imaginary San Francisco to-Norf oik line about 11 minutes after 
crossing the equator. Mode A: 145.85-.95 MHz uplink, 29.4-29.50 
MHz downlink, beacon at 29.40 MHz. Mode J: 145.90 146,00 MHz 
uplink, 435,20-435.10 MHz downlink, beacon on 435.090 MHz, 

OSCAR 8 is in Mode A on Mondays and Thursdays, Mode J on 
Saturdays and Sundays, and both modes simultaneously on Tues* 
days and Fridays. As with OSCAR 7, Wednesdays are reserved for 
experiments. 



DSCAB 7 OflBITAL rNFOHWRTIOM FOB JUHE 



OlSCAE fl OR&IT'AL I H FORMAT lOH FOR JUNE 



tiSCftlt 7 OUBIT^L rWrOB,HAr30M FOE JULY 



OSCAR a ORBITAL INE'ORHA.TION FOR JULY- 



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•^ Reader Service — see page 210 



73 M&gBzine • June, 1980 175 



RTTY Loop 



+ LOCAL LOOP 



4T0il 



aemH 

TOfl-OlDS 



from page 12 

several sample columns were 
presented to the staff of 73. A 
favorable reception was en- 
joyed, and the material vn/as re- 
written and the column renamed 
"RTTY Loop." At about that time, 
another shift in the club paper 
resulted in the abolition of "Tele- 
Tips," so now only the offspring 
remains. 

What's the lesson? Simple. 
When the editor of your club 
newsletter sends out a plea for 
material -and they all do that 
every monXh — answer HI With- 
out good input, any club or iocal 
publication wiil fold. Give it 
good stuff and you may find 
more there than you thought. 
OK? 

Now, where were we? Before 
interrupting our line for ASCIi 
fast month, we were about to 
conciude our look at home-brew 
demodulators. Let's start this 
month with Fig. 1. This was 
called a "drift-free TU" when 
J. a Cain VE7DBK published it 
in the September, 1977, issue of 
73. Why "drift-free"? Well, after 
limiting and passage through a 
bandpass filter tuned for 2200 
Hz, a phase locited loop {an 
LM565) is used to decode the 
audio Input. As pointed out 
several months ago, the PLL has 
the ability to "track" input, by 

LrMITER 



"locking on'* to the signaL Thus, 
drift, as a disturbing factor, is 
minimized. A rather nice feature 
of this design is the use of a 
squelch circuit to provide "mark- 
hoid" in the absence of a signal. 
This locks up mechanical tele- 
printers to prevent their "run- 
ning open.'* A high-voltage tran- 
sister is used to directly key the 
loop, as we are seeing more and 
more in demodulators designed 
these days. 

Just as integrated circuits 
can replace discrete circuitry, 
as with the PLL above, so they 
can be used to redesign pre- 
vious techniques. Such is the 
case with the demodulator pre- 
sented in the November, 1978, 
issue of 73. Winford Rister 
WB4MBL'S design uses 741 op 
amps as active filters to select 
mark and space signats. Fig. 2 
shows the basic circuit, minus 
required power supplies of +5V 
dc, +8 V dc^ +160 V dc, and 
± 7.5 dc, A sample power supply 
schematic is illustrated in the 
original article. All of those 
various voltages are necessitat- 
ed by the mix of TTL, op amps, 
and transistors. Whewl With 
this demodulator, after selec- 
tion by the active filters, the de- 
rived signal is fed through TTL 
logic to produce the desired key- 
ing waveform* Again, a sturdy 
transistor does the keying. It is 



BAMD PASS FILTER 




eoon IN 

FROM RCVH 



50 

TURNS 



^lOOK 



sincONrx 



^h 



■.oea 



.01 



lOOK 




OPTO' 
SOLflTOfl 
CIRt^UlT 



IM 



m 



interesting to reflect on how we 
have come -from using the re- 
ceiver bfo to select the tone, to 
TV width coils, to toroids (which 
represented state of the art for a 
long time), to active filters. 
Through use of op-amp active 
filters, seiectivity unmatched 
except by carefully-matched, 
read "expensive," networks can 
be achieved cheaply and in a 
small package. 

Speaking of small packages, 
we will close our look at home- 
brew (or home-brewable) con- 
verters with the demodulator of 
Fig. 3. Also from the November, 
1978t issue of 75, this design by 
Lauren Colby is one of the most 
intriguing of all we have looked 
at. tt needs no power suppty, 
won't fry external components, 
and contains a grand total of 
two active components, and 
they are identical! What Lauren 
did was to couple two standard 
toroids to a MOSFET discrim- 
inator by adding a second coil to 
each toroid, producing a trans- 



* vcc 

* PHASE -LOCKED LOOP AND AWPLiFIER 




4 + 

LOCAL LOOP 

n 

-8 TO 12 V. 

ADJUST FOR 
60 mA CURRENT 
IN LOOP 



Ffg. 3, 



Fig.Z 



former. The discriminator is able 
to derive power from the loop 
while keying it- Now, granted, 
you are not going to key a 150 V, 
60 mA loop with this one, but for 
keying a computer or TVT input, 
this is not that bad. Sure looks 
interesting! 

And now.., ASCII update. 
Last month, we covered the ear^ 
ly information and some specu- 
lation about the new ASCII rules 
and regs. The FCC has released 
the full wording of the docket, 
and there is more to it than we 
originally thought. Not only 
does the rule allow transmission 
of ASCII with baud restrictions 
as outlined last month, but ft 
also frees us from the 60 wpm 
(45.45 baud) limitation on 
Baudot communication. Five- 
level information may now be 
passed at 60 wpm (45.45 baud), 
67 wpm (50 baud), 75 wpm (56.25 
baud), or 100 wpm (75 baud). 
Aiso, the door has been left 
open to use of other non-stan- 
dard modes of data exchange, 
such as binary-coded decimal or 
the old IBM favorite, EBCDIC 
(Extended BCD Decimal Inter- 
change). Maybe even Selectric 
will be allowed. Now, these are 
not presently authorized, and in- 
ternational (ITU) regulations 
may prevent international use 
until those regulations are up- 
dated, but it appears that the 
FCC is looking into allowing us 
to use pretty much whatever we 
want to here. 

And now, it's resource time 
for all the fans of the Loop! I 
have a note here from Dave 
Lundquist WA2UWK, who has 
acquired a Lenkurt model 25-A 
demodulator. While he would 
like to get the thing up and run- 
ning, he is having a time inter- 
facing it with his equipment. He 
requests any information be for- 
warded to him at 23 Three Vil- 
lage Lane, Setauket, New York 
11733. Drop me a line, too, if you 
send over anything, OK? 



176 73 Magazine • June, 1980 



The giant Greater Baltimore 
Hamboree and Com put erf e si is 
now tiistory. Wayne WZNSOn 
gave two talks to the crowd, and 
one item stood out: RTTY 
stands alone as the vanguard of 
new commynications tech- 
niques. All the skills we have 



developed on RTTY can be pui 
to good use on other digital 
communications circuits. Let us 
here at TB know what you are 
working on. Write up that circuit 
or program so that more can 
benefit. If you would like* send 
RTPf programs to RTTY Loop, 



and they will be published for all 
to benefit 

Next month, the spotlight will 
remain on reception techniques. 
We will start to shift our focus, 
however, toward those many 
commercial devices available 



on the market. I will try to relay 
information made available 
from manufacturers, other in* 
dividuals, and my personal ob- 
servations on that equipment I 
have used, f won't forget your 
questions, either, here in RTTY 
Loop. 



. 4 ' » I L 




from page 18 

bands. SSB was far preferable 
except for rare occasions when 
one might take advantage of the 
better fidetity of some AM rigs 
. * . artd when sonrething more 
than a tour-inch speaker was be- 
ing used. 

3, t found most operators able 
to cope quite weft with SSB after 
a few minutes instruction. There 
were problems unfit they 
teamed the use of the rf gain 
con trot, admtttediy. 

And 4, We could do without 
some of the signal shaping and 
processtng. 

Though I am in most ways a 
cQnservati\re, t think my record 
of trying new idess and promot- 
ing those with promise is an en- 
viable one. i started building 
RTTY equipment in 1948. . . got 
in on NBFf^ experiments in the 
very early days of 1946, when 
that was first invented by a chap 
not far from me. t was an en- 
thusiastic and early supporter 
of $$TV, of moonbounce com- 
munidations, of OSCAR, repeat- 
ers, FM . . . etc. There are few 
experiences in amateur radio 
that I have not personally expe- 
rienced and enjoyed. And when I 
find something which f think is 
good, t do all i can to get others 
to share this enjoyment with me. 

With the work schedule and 
the traveling I do these days, it is 
not possible for me to do every- 
thing personalty as I used to, so 
yes . , . f am "'too busy*' to set 
up and spend weeks evaluating 
new ideas. But I did work closely 
with Tim on this and read all of 
the material submitted . . . fis- 
fened to the tests, both on tape 
and live . . . read reports, talked 
with some of the people in- 
volved over the air and on the 
phone. I recognised the pioneer- 
ing effort by Henry Radio to 



bring this system to the hams 
and for that reason I was all the 
more hopefuf that /I would prove 
to be ail the promoters said it 
was . . . and more. We need new 
ideas and new modes of com- 
munications in amateur radio, 
for they are fun and help 
generate enthusiasm. I think 
Ted Henry should get a tot of 
credit for putting up the venture 
money to give this NBVM sys- 
tern a try. 

t can be much more critical of 
the League . . . as usuaf . . . but 
am t unjustified? They appar- 
ently promoted the system with- 
out even trying it, going on the 
basis of the claims of the pro- 
moters. They sold the idea, with- 
out trial, to trusting QSJ readers 
through articles and even a 
chapter in the Handbook.^ Now, 
when we checked with the ARRL 
about this, I understand that 
they are **unable to find'' the 
equipment in their tabs and that 
the *'whole issue is dead/* 

Tim Danfef did a massive 

amount of work on the project, 
funded by 73 Magazine. He 
v\forked for many weeks on it last 
summer and his aim was to try 
to make it work, not to debunk it. 
His final report was cautious 
and conservative, if perhaps dis- 
couraging as far as the future of 
NBVM is concerned. But then 
the NBVM promoters must be 
used to that by now, for most of 
the recent reports Tveseen have 
not been encouraging. I can un- 
derstand their enthusiasm , . . if 
they had been able to make 
something work out and then 
been able to sett it to the in- 
dustry, they could all have been 
multimillionaires. Getting hams 
to prove the worth of new modes 
of communiCBtions is a well 
tested and proven route. We did 
it with FhA, SSB, NBFf^, SSTV, 
etc. There are some new modes 



in the wings and perhaps they 
will turn out to be more practical 
than NBVM. Or perhaps the 
NBVM people will come up with 
some improvements and yet win 
the day. 

In talking with Ted Henry, I 
found that a great many of the 
units he was setling were going 
to commercial and government 
tabs. They, too, are interested in 
results and will beat a path to 
the door of the successfuf 
pioneer of useful new tech- 
niques. Well see what comes of 
their tests of NBVM. - Wayne. 



HAM POWER 



• 10-meter amplifier ban 
•Elimination of club, miKtary, 
and RACES licenses 
•HFCB 

•Proposed "type acceptance" of 
ham gear 

• Elrmination of secondary sta- 
tion, repeater^ and special-event 
callsigns 

•Ending of hamfest license ex- 
aminations 

• Crazy callsigns 
•Quiet zones 

• Monitor station protection 
•and on and on and on . , . 

Enough is enough! Where will 
the FCC stop? When the Ama^ 
teur Service is a jungle like CB? 

After decades of peaceful 
cooperation with radio ama- 
teurs, the FCC has recently em- 
barked on a course committed 
to destroying amateur radio as 
we all know and love it. In a 
series of misguided attempts to 
rectify problems in another 
radio service and In a self-cen- 
tered effort to reduce their own 
workload, the Commission has 
seen fit to ransack and pillage 
the very foundations of amateur 
radio. 

Editorials in QST^ CO. 73, 
World Radio, and Ham Radio 
Horizons have all blasted the 
Commission's treatment of 
amateur radio. QST even went 
so far as to title their November, 
1979, editorial, "The FCC: Public 
Servant, or Public Enemy?" 
While ham magazines have rare- 
ly agreed on any topic, aU are 
currently united in their criti- 



cism of the FCC. 

This letter Is being sent by a 
group of concerned radio ama- 
teurs who are fed up with being 
choked by an insensitive and 
unresponsive FCC bureaucracy. 
We think it's time that ham radio 
operators take their gripes right 
to the Commission's doorstep. 
Perhaps, if the FCC had visible 
proof of the frustration and 
resentment held by most 
amateurs today, they wouldn't 
be so cavalier in their rulings. In 
the great tradition of the First 
Amendment to the U.S. Con- 
stitution, it's lime for hams 
"peaceably to assemble and to 
petition the government for a 
redress of grievances." 

On August 23rd, 1980. we 
want to see hams come to 
Washington by the bus-, trajn-^ 
and plane-load for a day-long 
rally against the FCC's amateur 
policies. We want to hold a 
mammoth demonstration some- 
where within the Capitol (right 
outside FCC Headquarters, rf 
we can get the police permit, or 
on the steps of the Cap+tot) and 
publicly express our anger with 
the Commission. 

Just think of the publicity. 
With, say, 10,000 hams protest- 
ing recent FCC ruttngs, the news 
media will never again confuse 
us with CSers. In addition, there 
will be speakers, entertainment, 
and a general effort made to 
educate the public atx>ut ama* 
teur radio and our plight. Well 
even have representatives of our 
group meet with selected con- 
gressmen, senators, and other 
government officials. By sunset 
on August 23rd, the entire na- 
tion will know what amateur 
radio is and how the FCC is kill- 
ing us. 

Now. what can you do to help 
make our pian a reality? We 
don't want your money; we need 
your support. Write your ARRL 
Director and the ARRL Presi- 
dent, Vice Presidents, and Gerv 
eral Manager. Send letters of 
support to ham magazines. 
Most of all, talk up the August 
23rd rally on the air. 

The farmers do it and war pro- 
testers do it — now we can do it, 
too. There is strength In unity 



73 Magazine • June, 1980 177 



and unity in numbers. After 
August 23rd, the FCC will think 
twice before dreaming yp anoth- 
er stupid rule change. 

The August 23rd Rally 

Committee 

Aa2U and WB2IBE, 

Co-chairmen 

Glendale NY 

Hey, how come one of the chair 
men has a funny caff? Silver to 
you, too. But, about the rally . . . 
if t thought it would do any good, 
I would be pushing the heif out 
of it. Actually, I think It would do 
a tot of harm. Oh, there are some 
things that should be done, but 
amassing hams in Washington 
during August, when everyone is 
on vacation, is not a priority 
item. Right now, the main prob- 
lem that we have Is a very 
serious image problem with the 
FCC commissioners. Getting 
the League to can their Wash- 
ington counsel should be num- 
ber one on the list of ways to im- 
prove the image of amateur 
radio with the Commission. I've 
already written about the inex- 
cusable incident where he 
patroniiingiy lectured the new 
commissioners and, to my view, 
made the linear ban Inevitable. 
The further action to taf^e the 
Commission into court over it 
was just more arrogance and 
hurt us badly. The continuous 
pressures to get the FCC to try 
to stem the fide of jamming and 
bad language on the ham bands 
should be stopped immediately. 
We need good vibes, not con- 
stant bad ones. A staged media 
event, which is what you are pro- 
posing^ is unlikely !o bring joy to 
the commissioners. We should 
be working on letting them know 
about our good points and our 
value to the country, not making 
their lives miserable. They just 
have too many ways to get even. 
— Wayne. 



[ 



THE HUMAM FACTOR 



I am not yet a ham, the price 
of most equipment keeping me 
from being one, but I do occa- 
sionally pick up a ham magazine 
just to keep current in some of 
the things going on. 

My ship was on a port visit to 
Athens, Greece, and I found my- 
self with nothing to read, I dis- 
covered, on one of my wander- 
ings, a bookstore calling itself 
the ''American Bookstore" and, 
indeed, most of the books car- 
ried were in English, Your maga- 



zine was among the many on 
ham radio and electronics in 
general If you are Interested, 
right now in Athens, the price for 
73 Magazine is 190 drachmas, or 
an even $5.00. 

The issue I picked up was the 
January, 1980, issue^ and the ar- 
ticies in it were very interesting, I 
wish to compliment you on a 
fine magazine — the best in the 
field, I feel. 

The editorial by Wayne Green 
has to be one of the most com- 
prehensive ones that I have ever 
read and I agree wholeheartedly 
with most of his views. As a 
naval communicator and as a 
person interested in ham radio, 
most of his propositions make a 
good deal of sense. However, I 
disagree with him on one point. 

In the latter part of his edi- 
torial, he discusses the '*band- 
width problem," His views on 
time-sharing, or automated con- 
tacts, while being innovative in 
the technological sense, take 
much of the human factor out of 
operating. Sure, the bands may 
be congested in particular 
spots, but if DXing rare contacts 
is reduced to a two-second ex- 
change between machines, 
what is the point of being a 
ham? One can gel just as much 
satisfaction and more informa- 
tion exchanged by having a pen 
pa!. 

As I said earlier, I am not a 
ham, so I do not reaily know the 
thrill of contacting a remote and 
hard-to-find station^ but I am the 
shipboard MARS operator and I 
know the thrill of having my 
100-Watt transmitter make a 
connection good enough for 
phone patches when v^e are 
floating off the coast of Turkey. 
It must be somewhat similar. I 
can't see how Wayne can, in the 
same editorial, speak of the joys 
of rag chewing and then discuss 
manners in how one can elim- 
inate same. 

If, by some chance, J get lucky 
and find your February or March 
issue in one of these backwater 
Mediterranean ports we puif in- 
to, I'll buy it. If not, I will delay my 
continued readership until we 
return home, You have a most 
interesting magazine. 

J. E Richardson 
FPO NY 

Just in case some amateur 
might not think your letter 
through and might have the 
question unanswered about 
automated contacts, I'd better 
reply. Anyone who has done 



much DXing will tell you that 
there is iittie rag chewing going 
on with DX stations . . . particu- 
larly the rare ones. The pressure 
is on to make contacts as short 
as possible so that as many sta- 
tions as desire can make a con- 
tact with the rare station. By 
automating this nonsense, we 
will end up with a lot more rag 
chewing and, I think, a much 
better amateur radio. The coun- 
try hunters can rack up their silly 
scores (i have weii over 300 
countries confirmed) and the 
hams in rare spots will be able to 
give these contacts without hav- 
ing to spend months or even 
years fighting pileups to satisfy 
the demand. Their automatic 
station will grind out the thou- 
sands of duty contacts, leaving 
them free to sit back and rag 
chew when they have the desire. 
I think amateur radio will grow 
faster in rare spots if it is fun for 
the local operator , . . and con- 
stant pileups and screaming 
angry hams demanding QSLs 
are hardly enjoyable for the long 
run. — Wayne. 

MEDICAL STATION 

Under the direction of Dr, 
Steven H. Posner WB2QET/8, a 
station has been set up at the 
United States Public Health Ser- 
vice office in Cleveland OH for 
the purpose of handling emer- 
gency and priority medicai traf- 
fic from any maritime or land- 
based station. The station has 
phone-patch capability to any 
medicai facility in the U.S. 

Begun on March 17, 1980, 
the station operates Monday 
through Friday, monitoring 
28.911 MHz for the first 5 min- 
utes of each hour, 0800 to 1600 
hours Eastern Time. 

Dr. Steven H. Posner WB2QET 

Lakewood OH 



PURE LIBEL 



Allow me to take this time to 
express to you, Wayne, what a 
great job you and your staff are 
doing with 73 Magazine. Per- 
sonally, I find that it covers a 
wide variety of subjects in the 
greatest of detail. With tech- 
nology increasing so rapidly, 
this type of information can be 
most helpful to today's ham. 

Because the quality of 73 
Magazine is so high, I am left 
disgusted with Ham Radio Hori- 
zons' commeut about your mag- 



azine. To me, it seems to be pure 
libel. Addttionaiiy, if I were a 
newcomer to ham radio and un- 
aware of the true content of 73, 1 
probably would not subscribe to 
it after reading those com- 
ments. 

In conclusion, I would tike to 
say I think 73 Magazine is great. 
In fact, I will probably scrape up 
enough money for a lifetime 
subscription when renewal time 
comes. It's too bad that people 
get away with libelous com- 
ments which could have a 
detrimental effect on others. 

Bradley F. Hardin KBSOC 
Sugar Grove WV 

Thanks for the nice letter. The 
referenced libel has to do with 
my editorials, which i think have 
stood the test of time. But, If you 
think it over, can you point to 
anyone in history who has tried 
to move things along who hasn't 
been put down with petty libel 
like that?— Wayne. 



FULL OF WHAT? 



i have a feeling that the Nevw 
Product Review of John 
Meshna's Viet Nam surplus 
transmitters may have some- 
thing to do with the first day of 
April. 

However, 1 was impressed by 
the apparent unintentional play 
on words in the description of 
the transmitter's usefulness in 
delecting "troop movements." 

Keep up the good work, I don't 
mind a little crap in 73 once a 
year. After all, QST is full of it 
every monthl 

Michael W. Babb N4PF 

Louisville KY 



BOO AND YEA 



\t would be Interesting to 
know how many other licensed 
hams have found that some 
snake in the grass is using their 
caM letters to work DX. Or is my 
case unusual? 

For hams outside the US, I 
would like to acknowledge 
cards received through the 7th 
District Portland DSL office 
from Ti9CF, lORDJ, I3GJZ, 
SM5AQD, DK5AX. and SW lis- 
teners OK3-915 and DL-H11/ 
1631274. None of the frequen- 
cies or times of contact coin- 
cides with the log at W7AR dur- 
ing 1 978 and 1979. The only clue 
to the liiegal operation is the 



178 73l\4agazine • June, 1980 



name Doug and the state of 
Oregon. We may be seemg only 
the tip of the iceberg. 

On the positive side, to count- 
er the bellyaching over shabby 
sales and service, I'd like to rec- 
ommend Brodie Electronics, 
one of your advertisers in Moore 
OK, for friendly service beyond 
the call of duty. 

F. W. Anderson W7AR 
Seattle WA 

Weli Andy, it wouldn't be so bad 
if the chap would work some de- 
cent DX and get you some rare 
cards^ In the meanwhile, per- 
haps everyone can keep an ear 
peeled for "Doug" and his crum* 
my signal. And Doug, if you're 
reading this, either get your own 



call or work some rare stuff for 
Andy. Regarding Brodie Eieo- 
tronlcsi Three Cheers! — 
Wayne. 




The Black River Amateur 
Radio Club will be operating a 
special event station during the 
National Blueberry Festival in 
South Haven Ml on July 16-20, 
1980 (Monday through Satur- 
day). The call of the station will 
be WD8AGC and the frequen- 
cies used will be on or near 
3.975, 7.275, 14.275, 21.375, and 
28.375 MHz. CW operations 
will be conducted randomly 
throughout the Novice/Techni- 



cian subbands. Any station 
working WD8AGC during this 
period can receive a colorful 
postpaid certificate by mailing a 
QSL card to The National Blue- 
berry Festival, PO Box 224, 
South Haven Ml 49090. 

Charlie Marrell 

Secretary, BRARC 

W3tervliet Ml 

117 BIG ONES 

Any ham in the worid who 
works a West Virginia amateur 
the week of the slate's 117th 
birthday celebration will receive 
a beautiful certificate from the 
Secretary of State of West Vir- 
ginia bearing the West Virginia 



seal and signed by the Secre- 
tary. 

Simply send your QSL report 
of the contact to the attention of 
the Secretary of State, the 
Honorable A. James Manchin, 
Room 157, State Capitol Buifd- 
ing, Charleston WV 25305, and 
simply wish West Virginia a hap- 
py 117th birthday. This event 
starts Flag Day, June 14, and 
ends at midnight EST June 20, 
West Virginia's birthday. Look 
for West Virginia's hams 15 kHz 
up from the bottom of each Gen- 
eral band segment. 

Lovell Webb N8LW 
President, Kanawha Amateur 

Radio Club 
Charleston WV 



Awards. 



from page 24 

NEW ZEALAND AWARD 

The NZA award is available to 
all radio amateurs other than ZL. 
A total of 101 contacts are re- 
quired to qualify for this award. 
All contacts must be made after 
Decembers, 1945. 

Applicant must make the 
following contacts: 35 ZL1 con- 
tacts, 35 ZL2 contacts, 20 ZL3 
contacts, 10 ZL4 contacts, plus 
1 contact with a ZL ^'territory" 
{either New Zealand, Antarctica, 
Chatham Island, Kermadec 
Island, or Campbell Island). This 
one contact may be substituted 
by 20 additional ZL contacts not 
already claimed. 

Fee for this award Is US $.50 
or2IRCs. 

WORKED ALL 
NEW ZEALAND AWARD 

The WAZL Award requires 
that contact be made with 45 dif- 
ferent branches of NZART — ex- 
cept for overseas appi icants, for 
whom only 35 contacts are re- 
quired. 

A special endorsement is 
given if the WAZL Award is ac- 
complished within a 12-month 
period of time. Mobiles operat- 
ing outside their regular branch 
area must sign the branch from 
which they are mobile while op- 
erating. Endorsements are also 
given for single band or mode. 
All contacts must be made after 
November 1, 1945, to qualify, 

NZART branches are as 
follows: 



01 Ashburton, 02 Auckland, 
03 Western Suburbs, 04 Cam^ 
bridge, 05 Christchurch, 06 Dan- 
nevif ke, 07 Blank, 08 East South- 
land, 09 Egmont, 10 Franklin, 11 
Gisborne, 12 HamiUon, 13 
Hastings, 14 Hawera, 15 
Hawke's Bay Central, 16 
Horowhenua, 17 Huntly, 18 Hutt 
Valley, 19 Ingtewood, 20 
Manawatu, 21 Manukau, 22 
Marlborough, 23 Marton, 24 
Motueka, 25 Napier, 26 Nelson, 
27 New Plymouth, 28 Northland, 
29 North Shore, 30 Otago, 31 
Pahiatua, 32 Rahotu Coastal, 33 
Rotorua, 34 South Canterbury, 
35 South Otago, 36 South West- 
land, 37 Southland, 38 
Taumarunui, 39 Tauranga, 40 Te 
Awamutu, 41 Thames Valley, 42 
Titahi Bay, 43 Wathi, 44 
Matamata Radio Club, 45 
Waimarlno, 46 Wairarapa, 47 
Waitara, 48 Wanganui, 49 West- 
land, 50 Wellington, 51 Eastern 
Bay of Plenty, 52 Wairoa, 53 Te 
Puke, 54 Patea, 55 Waitomo, 56 
Hornby, 57 Tokoroa, 58 Helen- 
ville, 59 Mangakino, 60 Taupo, 
61 Central OtagOt 62 Reefton 
Boiler; 63 Upper Hutt, 64 North 
Otago, 65 Papakura, 66 Auck- 
land VHP, 67 Kawerau, 68 North 
Canterbury, 69 Kapiti, 70 
Fielding, 71 Rodney, 72 Opotiki, 
73 Hobson, 74 Western VHP. 

NEW ZEALAND COUNTIES 
AWARD 

The Basic NZC Award re- 
quires contacts with 20 different 
New Zealand counties. Endorse- 
ments for 40, 60, 80, and 100 are 
made with a special certificate 



lor 112, A map showing the 
counties fs available by writing 
NZART (ZL2GX) directly. 
Enclose 10 cents or 1 IRC to 
cover handling. 

The initial award with any or 
all endorsements costs 45 cents 
or 3 IRCs. Separate endorse- 
ments thereafter cost 10 cents 
or 1 jRC. The special NZC 112 
Award costs 45 cents. 

Contacts may be made single 
band or any mode to qualify, 
GCR apply. Applicants must 
provide a list of contacts detail- 
ing the usual logbook data. 

5x5 AWARD 

This premier award has been 
instituted to recognize the in- 
creasing interest in 5-band DX 
operation. The initiai award re- 
quires that the same station be 
contacted on 5 bands repeated 
with 5 different countries. 

A certified list with full QSO 
data and fee of $1 .00 is required. 
The certificate is outstanding 
and is overprinted in embossed 
gold. Contacts must date from 
1945. 

ZLA AWARD 

To qualify for this award, ap- 
plicants must contact Auckland 
City ZL1, Wellington City ZL2, 
Christchurch City ZL3, Dunedin 
City ZL4, Antarctica ZL5, Camp- 
bell island, Chatham Island, and 
Kermadec Island. There are en- 
dorsements given for single 
band or mode. 

Award fee is 45 cents or 3 
!RCs. GCR rules apply. 

INDIVTDUAL ZL 
DISTRICT AWARDS 

All ZL district awards are 35 
cents each or 3 IRCs, Later en- 



dorsements are accessed at 10 
cents or 1 IRC apiece. All con- 
tacts must be dated post war, 

ZL1 Award -Contact 125 dif- 
ferent ZL1 stations. Endorse- 
ments are recognized for 175 
and 250 contacts. 

ZL2 Award — Basic award re- 
quires contact with 100 different 
ZL2 stations, with endorse- 
ments given for 150 and 200, 

ZL3 Award — Basic award re- 
quires 50 ZL3 contacts, and en- 
dorsements are given appli- 
cants claiming 75 and 100. 

ZL4 Award — This award re- 
quires only 25 ZL4s be worked, 
with endorsements given for 35 
and 50. 

CAPTAIN JAMES COOK 
AWARD 

The GJC award, as it is called, 
is to perpetuate the memory of 
this world famous navigator and 
seaman — in three classes. 1. 
The basic "Saitor" class requires 
contacts with G in Yorkshire, 
F08, ZL2, VK2, and KHS. 2, For 
'^Officer" class, applicant must 
first possess all the Sattor class 
contacts plus ZL1, ZL3, ZL4, 
VK3, VK4, VK9 New Guinea, and 
any Antarctica station. 3. For 
"Command" class, both the 
previous classes must be 
earned plus five of the follow- 
ing -VE2, VO, A35, YJ8, FK8, 
CEO, and KL7. 

Cost of this award is 45 cents 
in stamps or IRCs. GCR rules ap- 
ply- 

YL 2L AWARD 

The Women Amateur Radio 
Operator Award (WARO) re- 
quires VK and ZL stations to 
work at least 12 members of the 
WARO. DX stations must work 



73 Magazine • June, 1980 179 



at least 5 members. All contacts 
must be made after June 1, 1969. 
and must include one each frocn 
ZL1, 2, 3. and ZL4- 

Net contacts do not qualify. 
There are no band or mode Itmi- 
lations; however, all contacts 
must be made from the same 
QTH toralL 

Unlike all the previous awards 
shown so far, send your list of 
contacts atong with your QSL 
cards \o the Award Custodian, 
Thelma Sou per ZL2L0, 62 Kirk 
Street, Otaki, New Zealand. 

There was no mention of an 
award fee, but to be safe and 
courteous, it is advisable to 
enclose at least an amount for 
sufficient postage to return your 
cards. 

In the event you missed the 
address fof all applicants for 
NZART awards, please forward 
your requests to Mr, Jock White 



ZL2GX, 152 Lytton Road, 
Gisborne, New Zealand. Be sure 
to tell Jock you heard about the 
NZART awards from 73 Mag* 
azine. 

CANADIAN AWARDS 

FROfWl CARF 

The Canadian Amateur Radio 
Federation, Inc. (CARF) is 
pleased to announce the fol- 
lowing radio amateur awards 
available to operators world- 
wide. 

CANADAWARD 

A coJorful certificate will be 
issued to any amateur who con- 
firms two-way contact with all 
Canadian provinces and ter- 
ritories. Awards will be issued 
for any band six to one-sixty 
meters and any mode via 
OSCAR satellite. Modes may be 



mixed. CW, SSB. RTTY. SSTV, or 
any other authorized emission. 

All contacts must be made 
after July 1 , 1977, To qualify, ap- 
plicant must forward QSL cards 
with S2,00 or 10 tRCs plus suffi- 
cient funds for the safe return of 
your cards. CARF members 
need only submit sufficient 
funds for returning your QSLs. 
Mail your fee, application, and 
QSLs to: CANADAWAROa PO 
Box 76752, Vancouver BC, 
Canada VSR 5S7. 

List of Canadian provinces 
and territories which qualify for 
this award: V01/V02 New- 
foundland and Labrador, VE1 
Prince Edward Island- VE1 Nova 
Scotia, VEl New Brunswick, 
VE2 Quebec, VE3 Ontario, VE4 
Manitoba, VE5 Saskatchewan. 
VE6 Alberta, VE7 British Colum^ 
bia. VE8 Yukon Territory. VES 



Northwest Territories. Note: 
V01 or V02 count as one re* 
quired contact. 

5 BAND CANADAWARD 

A special plaque will be 
Issued to any amateur who con- 
firms two-way contact with ait 
Canadian provinces and ter- 
ritories on each of five separate 
bands (12 cards per band for a 
total of 60 cards). All contacts 
must be made after July 1, 1977. 
Submit the 60 cards with $10.00 
or 70 IRCs plus sufficient 
postage for the safe return of 
your QSLs, Should you work 6 or 
7 bands using the same 
CANADAWARD criteria, special 
endorsements will be provided 
upon proof of your claim. As 
with the basic CANADAWARD, 
forward your applications lo PO 
Box 76752. Vancouver BC, 
Canada VSR 5S7. 



DX 



from page 15 

tieen worked previously. Four 
US stations had tried and failed 
to make contact on Monday; 
none attempted Tuesday, 

Futile attempts to steer the 
VK0RM crew to some radio 
equipment purportedly [eft on 
Heard some 20 years ago were 
made on Wednesday, 19 
March.VKIPG had been on 
Heard at that time. P29JS and 
VK0RM moved to 21205, but no 
contact was made there. Noth- 
ing was heard of VKfflRM after 
about 1300 UTC on Wednesday, 
19 March. 

Does this story make you 
start thinking about your solid- 
state rig and its limitations? 
What if the Heard boys had 
taken a Collins KWM-2 or a 
Drake pair? Better yet. what if 
they had taken rwo Kenwood 
TS'120 radios, one for a spare? 



When there*s no Radio Shack on 
an island, having only one rig 
(with transistors in the final]< is 
risky; at best. Convenient, yes, 
but _ . 

We began the April column 
with a comment about the 
beginning of the new decade 
("unless you're progressive and 
follow the decade-begins-in-'SI 
theory'^). That was bound to 
bring at least one response, as 
indeed It did: 

Dear Editor: 

This fetter refers to the first 
sentence in your article in JJs 
issue for April, 1980, and reflects 
my dismay in discovering that 
the writer who has earned my 
respect with his intelligent* 
pleasurable reports not onfy 
holds lo an absurd version of the 
meaning of "decade/' but also 
persists in publishing it. I am 
dissappointed in you. 

Any dictionary you might con- 
sult will lell you that a decade is 



a "group, set or collection of ten 
things, especially a period of ten 
years." When you count any ten 
things, even years, you begin 
your counting with "one" {not 
"zero") and end with "ten" (and 
you insist on getting ten singles 
for a ten-dollar bill, don't you?). 
When you count your toes, you 
wind up with ten; tf you continue 
the count on your fingers, you 
wind up with twenty .. .ot, to 
put it another way, your second 
decade of digital appendages 
inaiudes the twentieth. Carrying 
this further: The Christian Era 
began with the "Year One" (not 
"Year Zefo")^ the first century 
ended with the year 100, the 
nineteenth century ended with 
the year igoOi the twentieth cen- 
tury began with the year 1901, 
its seventy decade ends with 
f980, and that its eighth decade 
begins in *81 (to quote you) is 
just the most siniple, methemat* 
ical fact *- not "theory," 

Will you have the goodness to 
correct your published state- 
ment in one of your subsequent 
articles, not for me, but for the 
sake of other readers whose 



Corrections 



In my article, "A Micro<)on- 
trolled Ham Station'' (April, p. 
76), Fig, 1 on page 77 inad- 
vertently shows a Small System 
Hardware TRS-232 Converter 
t>etween the TRS-80 Expansion 
Interface and Western I/O Selec* 



trie Printer. The TRS-232 Con- 
verter IS totally unnecessary as 
the Western I/O printer works 
directiy off the expansion inter- 
face. 

Robert M. Richardson W4UCH/2 
Chautauqua Lake NY 



in regard to "The Paper, the 
Station, and the Man*'(Fetjruary, 
p. 54)» a few errors occurred 
which you might want to cor- 
rect: 

On page 56: The flier's name 
in the N.Y.-to-Norway flight was 
Thor Solberg. He later became 
the owner and operator of an air- 
field near Morristown NJ, 

On page 58: The call letters of 



own misunderstanding may 
have been enhanced by yours? 

Most sincerely, 
Heduert Schwartz K21VU 
Professor Emeritus, NYU 



Well, darn iL at least my ad- 
monishment came from an 
academic. Nice to hear from 
you, Herb. I was thinking of 
things 1 ike measuring ... a yard- 
stick begins with zero, doesn't 
it? And if I give you a ten-dollar 
bill and ask for change, don't I 
start with zero dollars, until you 
hand me the first one back? And 
did the sixties end with the 
murders of Robert Kennedy and 
Martin Luther King in 1968, or 
did they end with the puitout 
from Viet Nam and the abolish- 
ing of the Selective Service In 
1973? 

As you can see, we thrive on 
letters, opinions, even criticism, 
And photos for the column, too. 
Letters make fun reading while 
scanning the bands for DX. We'd 
like to hear from you — good, 
bad, indifferent. 

All of the material for this col- 
umn came from The DX BuUetin 
out of Vernon CT. 



the Louise Soyd Expedition 
were LA9Z; they operated in the 
amateur bands. 

On page 59: i retired on June 
1, 1969, after 69 years with the 
Times, 

Incidentally, my name is 

IVERSEN. 

Reginald Iversen K4QZ 
St Petersburg FL 



180 73 Magazine ■ June, 1^0 



Conteste 



from page 2 1 

tors. 
EXCHANGE: 

RST, QSO number from 001, 
WAB area and county. Book 
nymbers and districls may be 
requested but aw not manda- 
tory as part of the exchange. 
SCORING: 

Score 5 points for each com- 
pleted QSO. Stations may be 
worked on other bands (or extra 
points. 

Multipliers for UK con- 
testants are each WAB area and 
each overseas country (DXCC 
Hst). In addition, Alderney, 
Guernsey, Jersey, and Bark 
count as separate countries. 
The remainder of G, GD, Gl, GM, 
and QW count as one multiplier 
only. 

Multipliers for overseas corv 
testants are each WAB area, 
county^ and each G prefix (G, 
GD, Gl, GM, and GW). Multi- 
pliers count on each band. Le.. a 
station worked on three bands 
= 3 multipliers. 

For mobile entries, every con- 
tact made from a different area 
will count five points, but the 
multiplier counts once only (i.e., 
mobile station from ten different 
areas — score Is 10 times 5 
points, but only one multiplief 
for the mobile station). 



AWARDS: 

Certificates for the leading 
contestant in each class or en- 
try. For awards, each G prefix is 
separate. There will also t>e car* 
ttflcates issued to the leadmg 
contestants from each DXCC 
country and also to SWLs. Cer^ 
tificates for 2nd and 3rd will be 
issued if there are tO or 25 en- 
tries from a particular country or 
call area. 
ENTRIES: 

Logs must show the title of 
the contest, name and full 
postal address of contestant, 
QSO details, total points 
claimed, multipliers claimed, 
and the full details of all op- 
erators when multi-operator en- 
try is submitted. Logs must be 
sent to the contest manager: 
R. L Senter G4BFY. 27 Station 
Road, Thurnby, Leicester LE7 
9PW, England. 

Entries must be postmarked 
not later than one calendar 
month following the date of the 
contest and must be received by 
the contest manager not later 
than 40 days following the said 
contest. A signed declaration 
that the station was operated in 
accordance with the current li- 
censing conditions must ac* 
company all entries. It is a con- 
dition of entry that the decision 
of the WAB Contest Manager 



and the WAB Committee shall 
be absolute in the case of 
dispute. For SWLs, all stations 
logged must be participating in 
the contest and giving serial 
numbers which must be logged. 
The RSGB will be notified of the 
results and the Contest Man- 
ager will supply a detailed result 
sheet on receipt of an SAE on or 
after November 1st. 

QRP FIELD DAY 
Starts: 1800 GMT June 20 

Ends: 2100 GMT June 29 
(same dates/times as the ARRL 
contest if they should change!) 

Sponsored by the QRP Ama- 
teur Radio Ciub International, 
Inc., the contest is open to all 
amateurs and all are eligible for 
awards. Portable stations may 
operate the 27-hour span \f 
setup is after the start of the 
contest. Non-portable stations 
may operate a 24-hour period 
only. All modes are accepted. 
t>ut no repeater QSOs and no 
pre-arranged contacts. Stations 
can l>e worked for credit once 
per band. No multi-transmitter 
stations are allowed. 
EXCHANGE: 

RS(T) and ARRL section, 
SCORfNG: 

Each QSO counts 2 points. 
Bonus points are +500 for por- 
table {in field, non-commerclai 
power source), + 100 for all bat- 
tery power, and + 300 for all 
solar power. Multipliers are as 
follows: more than 100 Watts do 
output power = x1; 30.1 W to 



100 Watts dc output = x1.5; 
mi Wto30 = x2;3.1 W to 10 
- x4;1JWto3= x6;0JWto 

1 = xlO. 

Final score is QSO points 
times power multiplier; then add 
bonus points. Multi-operator 
stations divide by the number of 
operators. 
AWARDS: 

Certificates to the highest- 
scoring 1sl, 2nd, and 3rd place 
stations overall, 
ENTRIES: 

Send full log data, including 
name, address, and call used. 
Also equipment, power Input on- 
ly, antennas, and bonus infor- 
mation (battery, solar, portable). 
Results will be published in the 
QRP International Newsletter, 
etc. Entrants desiring results 
sheet and scores, please 
enclose a business size SASE* 
Logs must be received by July 
30th to qualify. Address entries 
to: QRP ARCI Contest Chair- 
man. Edwin R. Lappi WD4LOO, 
203 Lynn Drive, Carrboro NC 
2751 a 

CANADA DAY CONTEST 
Starts: 0001 GMT July 1 
Ends: 2359 GMT July 1 

Sponsored by the Canadian 
Amateur Radio Federation 
(CARF), the contest is open to 
alt and everybody works every* 
body. Use all bands from 160 to 

2 meters on CW and phone com- 
bined. Entry classes include 
single-operator, al[band; single- 
operator, single band; and multi* 



Results 



neStlLTS OF THE 1979 

PENNSYLVANIA OSO PASTY 







PENNSYLVAMtA STATSONS 








rW£ TOP Tf N OUT OF STATE 












Outer 








an 


QSOi 


C'tfufities 


Points 






Te^l 




Slate 








VE3DAP 


95 


33 


3135 


cair 


Counif 


QSOs 


PAQSOm 


050s 


Sections 


Coutiti^S 


Seom 


VE3KK 


7S 


30 


2250 


NSAOT 


Perry 


m? 


45 


542 


52 


25 


122.202 


W2IMO 


75 


2» 


2175 


K30NW 


Adams 


^9 


75 


^4 


51 


29 


56^547 


WA20TC 


m 


Z7 


1755 


K3NB 


Schuylkill 


410 


101 


mm 


45 


^ 


^.344 


WtTFF 


u 


2? 


1725 


WB3GZV 


Columbia 


265 


m 


196 


33 


27 


21.581 


KUTS 


m 


25 


1512 


WA3UNX* 


Erie 


187 


m 


132 


37 


23 


16,657 


W3PYZ 


m 


23 


1255 


WB3KCK 


Oelawara 


135 


^ 


100 


23 


23 


7J05 


N2RT 


52 


24 


1246 


W3HDH 


Cantre 


104 


35 


09 


2f 


15 


6,S34 


KtVUT 


50 


23 


1150 


ADBJ/3 


Allegheny 


77 


13 


54 


31 


10 


6.3SS 


WSWG 


46 


21 


1006 


l^3Ri 


Pike 


82 


25 


57 


25 


20 


6.326 


WA2NPP 


4i 


21 


1006 


W3ADE 


Dauphin 


t2a 


53 


75 


22 


22 


ejifi 










K3SWZ 


York 


125 


57 


55 


21 


23 


5,481 










K3HWt 


Crawford 


&7 


32 


55 


24 


16 


S,44B 




PENUSYLVANtA COUNTIES MiSStNG 




W3ZX 


Centre 


112 


44 


56 


19 


24 


4,712 




Clarion 


Potter 




KA3DGT 


Centre 


59 


5 


54 


25 


5 


4,676 




Clinton 


Snyder 




W3CNS 


Lancastar 


S5 


25 


50 


22 


12 


4,S10 




Fayette 


S III liven 




AD30 


Tioga 


6S 


30 


55 


22 


19 


4.290 




Foresi 


Susquelianna 




K3VX/3 


Mercer 


BO 


24 


56 


21 


16 


4.032 




FuUon 


Union 




W3CEI 


DaupTiin 


72 


25 


44 


1« 


16 


3,040 




Lebanon 


Warden 




W3TEF 


Blair 


74 


35 


39 


19 


20 


2,556 




MctCeari 


Wayne 




wescAi 


Lure me 


74 


32 


42 


17 


22 


2,666 




53 of ttie 67 counties were 




N3ASe 


Beaver 


37 


15 


22 


15 


12 


1.215 




refrresented. Lei's hope fof 




•Western Pennsytvania Witiner 














e dean sweep nenl year 





73 Magazine • June* 1980 181 



operator, single transmitter, all- 
band. Ail contacts with amateur 
stations are valid. Stations may 
be worked twice on each band, 
once on CW and once on phone. 
EXCHANGE: 

Signal report and consecutive 
serial number; VE1 stations 
should also send their province. 
SCORING: 

Score 10 points for each con* 
tact with Canada, 1 point for 
contacts with others- Score 20 



points for the first contact with 
any CARF official news station 
using the suffix TCA qjf VGA. 
Multipliers are the number of 
Canadian provinces/territories 
worked on each band and mode 
(12 provinces/territories x 8 
bands x 2 modes for a max- 
imum of 192 possible multipli^ 
ers). Contacts with stations out- 
side Canada count for points 
but not muitipliers. 
FREQUENCfES: 



Phone- 1810, 3770, 3900, 
7090, 7230, 14150, 14300, 21200, 
21400,28500.50.1, 146.52. 

CW-18tO, 7025, 14025, 
21025,28025,50.1, 144.1. 

Since this Is a Canadian- 
sponsored contest, remember 
to stay within the legal fre- 
quencies for your countryl 
AWARDS & ENTRIES: 

The CARF Canada Day Con- 
test Trophy will be awarded to 
the highest-scoring single-op- 



erator entry. Certificates will be 
awarded to the highest score in 
each category in each prov- 
ince/territory, US call area, and 
DX country. Send all logs includ* 
ing dupe sheets, summary 
sheet, and comments to: Cana* 
dian Amateur Radio Federation, 
Box 76752, Vancouver B.G, V5R 
5S7, Canada. Entries should be 
postmarked before July 31 si 
and include an SASE for a copy 
of the results. 



W2NSD/I 

KEYER SAY DIE 

ec//tor/a/ tty Wayne Green 



from page 6 

WHISTLING 

My Interest In police radar 
detectors should not be news to 
you^ since I have been writing 
about them off and on for some 
time now. The array in the 73 
mobile office (a Dodge van . . . 
the performance of which has 
convinced me that efforts to 
keep Chrysler in business are 
against our national interests) 
has risen to seven these days. 
Talk about overkill! When a 
police car is passed, the van 
lights up like a busy pinball 
game, with hoots and buzzers 
sounding and lights of all colors 
flashing. 

I've written about the Cincin- 
nati Microwave Escort unit. It Is 
about 20 dB better than the 
diode models which have been 
sold for the iast few years. This 
was put together by some refu- 
gees from Drake and was the 
first superheterodyne receiver 
for the 10.5- and 26-GHz bands. 
That 20-dB difference is a big 
one. amounting to about one 
hundred times the gain. This 
means that the receiver detects 
radar signals substantially 
before the diode units. 

The Whistler company is not 
far from Peterborough, just over 
the border, down in Massachu- 
setts. Sherry and I drove down 
there the other day to see how 
they were doing with their detec- 
tors . , . and in particular their 
new superheterodyne receiver, 
the Model Q-1000, Well, they're 
still selling the diode units in 
good numbers, with the Q^IOOO 
sales still just a small percen- 



tage of the production. I have a 
feeing that once people under- 
stand what is at stake, they will 
not accept anything less than a 
superhet. 

A couple weeks after the visit, 
my turn came up to get a test 
Q-1000 from their production. I 
went right out and checked it 
against the Escort, It seemed to 
be about the same in sensitivi- 
ty... which means that it 
sounds off as soon as there is a 
police car anywhere in the 
neighborhood. With the diode 
units, you have to develop the 
ability to instantly brake when 
the detector sounds, for you 
often have less than one second 
to slowdown if you happen to be 
lead-footed {as I am). Radar 
units are unable to lock on your 
car if you are changing speed, 
so a fast response will avoid 
anything worse than a scowl 
from the fuzz, If you get a blast 
from the detector and you start 
looking to see where the radar 
unit is* you're in trouble. You 
really have to develop a com- 
pletely automatic braking ac- 
tion. 

With the superheterodyne 
models (sometimes called quad- 
radyne), you have the luxury of a 
few seconds to ponder the loca- 
tion of the radar unit. My re- 
flexes are automatic, so now I 
ponder as I drive along about ten 
mites under the speed limit . . . 
Instead of ten miles over. I have 
read enough about radar units 
to know that you should leave a 
healthy margin for their error. 
Once you get used to the effi- 
ciency of the superhet, you feel 
almost naked with one of the old 



diode detector types. I really 
hate to drive without one of the 
good detectors. 

Whistler called the other day 
to see if I would be interested in 
doing some tests on their diode 
unit in comparison with the 
brand new and highly touted 
Fuzzbuster Elite. Sure^ I was 
game for that. They brought up 
the unit and we set it up in the 73 
van alongside the other detec- 
tors (Fuzzbuster, Bearfinder, 
Super Snooper, Fox, Q-1000, 
Escort, and Micronta). They had 
a K-band radar unit with them 
and I got out my X-band Sport 
Radar Gun (a present from 
Chuck of Tufts Electronics). We 
ran tests in the spots where the 
local police have found their 
radar units the most effective in 
generating income for the 
town . . . such as the hill out in 
front ol our Instant Software 
building and a sharp road curve 
a mile beyond that. 

There was no question but 
that the regular diode Whistler 
unit was able to pick up the 
radar signais before the new 
Fuzzbuster Elite. . . about one 
second ahead under norma! 
driving speeds. Considering the 
short time you have for slowing 
down with the diode detectors, 
this is significant. But none of 
the units even came close to the 
warning given by the Q-1 000 and 
the Escort. There is a long hill 
coming out of the only stoplight 
in Peterborough. The radar was 
set up out of sight just over the 
top of this hill. The Q-IOOO 
picked it up halfway up the hill 
and the diode unit got it just as 
the radar car came into view as 
we crested the hill. The differ- 
ence between the various diode 
detectors was a matter of per- 
haps 100 feet in sounding off, 
while the Q-1000 got all excited 
over 1000 feet before that. It was 
picking up the signals bouncing 
off traffic signs, passing cars, 
trees, etc*, and announcing the 
radar from way down the 
hill . . . and around corners. 



The Whistler people feel that 
the difference in price is such 
that it will be a lot more difficult 
to sell the superhet units (they 
run around $250-$300). Consid- 
ering the expense and the psy- 
chological damage of a ticket, 
not to mention the problems 
with keeping a driver*s license^ 
the cost of the detector is hardly 
significant. Of course, if you 
haven't yet gotten a radar-in- 
spired ticket (even if you weren't 
speeding), you may not really 
care about all this . . , yet. 

The Fuzzbuster Elite certainly 
was a disappointment. I wonder 
why they are not getting into 
business with a superhet in- 
stead of Gomrng out with just 
another diode gadget. The 
"Elite" name on it may confuse 
some people with the Escort 
name. I don't know what's with 
those people . . . the firm, Elec- 
trolert, has done a fantastic job 
of fighting legal battles over 
radar detectors and they were 
one of the first with a detector 
which worked well enough to be 
of real value. But since then they 
have done some disappointing 
things.. Jike that fake "new 
mode!" with an Escort unit in it 
sent to a magazine for test. 
Their legal kit for people want- 
ing to fight radar tickets is 
superb. 

The Whistler Q-1000 Is avail- 
able from any Whistler dealer. 
The Escort is only available 
direct from Cincinnati Micro- 
wave, 255 Northland Blvd., Cin- 
cinnati OH 45246. 

CLEANING UP COMPUTERS 

With some 30,000 microcom- 
puters already in the hands of 
hamSt about the only thing that 
stands between our having 
30,000 RTTY fans and reality is 
the horrendous noise these 
computers generate and radiate 
into our radios. It is high time 
that some hams tackled this 
problem and solved it 

Despite many warnings, the 
manufacturers of microcomput- 



182 73 Magazine • June, 1980 



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' Reader Service— see page 2W 



73 Magazine • June, 1980 1S3 



ers took the easy way out and 
built systems which generated 
severe radio frequency inter- 
ference. Noise generation rs a 
logical result of the type of con- 
struction used for most compu t* 
ers, where a bus structure is at 
the heart of the system. Thts 
means that there are a bunch of 
wires going all through the com- 
puter which are carrying high- 
frequency radio signals, so of 
course they are going to radiate. 

One possible approach to the 
problem is to seal the computer 
unit m a shielded box, filtering 
all cables entering the box. The 
Cromemco computer uses this 
system with a good deal of suc- 
cess. This does increase the 
weight, size, and cost of the 
computer significantly. 

Another approach from the 
manufacturing end is to shield 
each individual module of the 
system, which Atar^ has done 
with success. This, too, in- 
creases the cost of manufac- 
ture. And remember thai every 
manufacturing cost is magnf* 
fied substantiaMy as it goes 
through the marketing chain, 
reflecting an increase to the 
customer on the order of three 
to five times the increase in 
manufacturing coat. 

There is a need for experimen- 
tation in the field of reducing the 
interference from computers* V6 
like to see you tackle this prob- 
lem and solve it. I don't know 
how much can be helped by lin- 
ing the inside of a TRS-80 
keyboard box with aluminum 
foil and grounding it, or whether 
the only answer is a separate 
shielded box for the CPU sec- 
tion, t do think that we can work 
out a reasonable solution which 
will allow microcomputers to be 
used in the ham shack, 

73 Is thus soliciting articles 
on RFl cures for the various 
microcomputer systems. We're 
also Interested in further arti^ 
ctes on usir^g these computers 
for RTTY communications, 
ASCII communications, etc. 
Mere is a subject you can tackle 
and get your teeth Into* If we 
have any less than ten times the 
number of articles on this sub- 
ject than all other ham maga- 
zines combined, I am going to 
t)e disappointed. 

THE FUTURE ARRIVES 

Sometimes \ get impatient tor 
technological changes which 
are obviously going to arrive. 
Last fall, when I finally got my 
hands on a Yaesu FT'207R, I felt 



a great sense of satisfac- 
tion . . . the future had arrived. 

Large scale integrated cir- 
cuits and the resultant micrch 
processor have made it possible 
for us to have a radio transceiver 
which is about the size of our 
smaller hand transceivers, yet 
includes the features of a scan- 
ner and synthesizer. 

Those few FMers who were 
around ten years ago may re- 
member one of the first FM rigs 
on the market. It was a unit put 
out by Galaxy and it had four 
crystal-controlied receiver and 
four transmitter channels. The 
unit had long wires running 
around and switches which had 
to t>e banged now and then to 
make good contact; in general, 
the equipment was prehistoric. 
Stability was not a big feature. 

Rigs grew more stable and re- 
quired vast amounts of crystals 
through the mid-70s. Finally 
loom broke through with the 
IC-230 synthesized rig. Now we 
have a hand-held programmable 
transceiver. It will scan the en- 
tire band looking for active 
channels , , , or it will scan pro- 
grammed channels. You can 
use it with 600-kH2 offset or pro- 
gram in the offset you desire for 
repealers. 

Remember when the first digi- 
tal readouts arrived? That 
wasn't very long ago, and now 
there they are even on my hand 
unit! The 207 seems to have just 
about everything the sophisti- 
cated base station transceiver 
would have, plus a belt clip. I 
think we'll be seeing these used 
not only for hand use, but also, 
with a power supply and ampli- 
fler^ for use in the shack and in 
the car, I know Tve put an ampli- 
fier in the car and taken out the 
old mobile rig. Now I don't have 
to worry about the rig being 
ripped out some night or while 
Tm in doing shopping some- 
where. 

The 207 has a jack for a 
remote microphone. That's 
most useful at hamfests where 
you don't want to have to wrest 
it from your belt every lime 
someone calls. 1 find it handy tor 
skiing, too, where the rig is in a 
pocket and only the clip-on mike 
is out there on my coat collar for 
easy use. 

This Isn't an advertisement 
for the 207, so t won*t go into all 
of the features. There are plenty 
and the rig ts incredibly flexible. 
Frankly, Tm hard put to look a 
lot further ahead for any signifi- 
cant technological improve- 



ments. What is there left to do? 1 
can see some little details which 
might be added, but when just 
about everything you can get rn 
the most sophisticated base 
station is built Into a hand trans- 
ceiver, it seems like a dead end. 
You can be sure of one thing 
... my 207 is with me just about 
everywhere I go . . . and, if I'm in 
your town, I'm listening to your 
repeaters. There is no way to 
hide them from a synthesized 
scanner. 

NEW CALLSIGN RUMOR 

A letter came in from one of 
our better authors in the mid- 
west . . . and he was all upset. 
He'd been talking on 40 meters 
and three of the hams on the 
round table had personal 
friends who were Engineers In 
Charge of local FCC facilities 
and they all had the same story: 
In the near future, all caltsigns 
would be reassigned by the FCC 
computer every time a license 
was renewed. Further, the ARRL 
was warned about this a year 
ago. but they ignored it 

My reaction was balder- 
dash. But, just to make sure, I 
called the FCC and checked 
with the horse's mouth. Balder- 
dash was the correct response. 
This silly fumor probably got 
started as a result of the policy 
of the FCC to permit changes of 
callsigns at renewal time if your 
class of license permits same. 

The FCC used to have all 
sorts of hassles about callsigns. 
Now that almost anything goes, 
the beefing is almost zero, so it 



is highly unlikely that they 
would go out of their way to stir 
up that hornet's nest again. 
They haven't. 

Here's a good rule; If you hear 
a rumor that sounds like 
baloney, the chances are good 
that it is. If the rumor would en- 
tail a lot of controversy and e)^- 
pense for the Commission, it 
has a high probability of toeing 
unfounded. 

PRICE INCREASE 

ft will prot>ably come as no 

surprise at all that the 73 cover 
price will be going up with the 
July issue. So will the subscript 
tion rate. It'll be S2.95 per copy. I 
expect, and a one year rate of 
$25 (US). 

You can stave off the higher 
prices if you get busy and ex- 
tend your subscription for three 
years at the current rate of S45 
(in the US). That would save you 
$30 over the next three years, 
unless it tsecomes necessary to 
put another increase in the in- 
terim, which is not at all unlikely, 
considering the rate of our infla- 
tion. 

Remember, too, that your 
money is devaluing rapidly, so 
the more things you buy now, 
the better off you are. If you try 
to save your money, it will 
shrivel up in your pocket. 

There is little likelihood of 
printing, paper, or postage costs 
going down, so subscription 
rates are unlikely to go down 
. . . just up. 

Procrastination Is the thief of 
money. 



Ham Help 



I am studying for my Techni- 
cian and have purchased a 
Hammarlund HQ-110 receiver 
to help build up my code speed. 
I need an operating manual and 
schematic for this rig. I will be 
glad to pay copying expenses 
and postage. Thanks very much 
for any help. 

Edward 4. Hannlgan, Jr. 

20551 Salt Air Circle 

Huntington Beach CA 92646 

I need a 2AC Crystal Cali- 
brator for my Drake 2B, If you 
can get your hands on a new 
one, 111 pay the new price. Any 
help would be appreciated. 

Frank M. Shelton WSNYH 

Box 150 

Jenkiniones WV 24046 



f will be vacationing in the 
EurekaArcata, Cafrfornia. area 
in August, 1980. I would like to 
meet some of the local hams 
during my stay. 

HerbLipsonWBFBH 

17S97 Tracoy 

Detroit Ml 46235 

Does anyone have a manual 
or schematic for a National 

HC-98 receiver? If you can lend 
me yours, please let me know. 
I'll send you a mailing envelope, 
and then burn a copy of yours 
and return it to you along with 
reimbursement of your mailing 
cost. Thanks. 

John Yares KA41MM 

9660 Coachman Court 

Pensacola FL 32504 



184 73Magaime • June, 1 990 



Lynda Says . • • We can't thank you enougtu 

AM of you out there. For the year of '79 was great for all of us. I would like to pass 
along the savings to you. Select one of these fine transceivers with either your 
credit card, trade-in or cash deah We want your business and thank you for it. Why 
not find out why Hams from all over the world come to CTG. We are on the South 
Shore on Long Island with a real Ham Radio Showroom that can't be beat. Come 
in, call at any hour or write for free brochures. Export inquiries invited. 





Tti-Tic D Trmtcaivtr. 160-tO Mtrs. Digital 
Readout Four position CW/SSB Filter 200 Watts 
SSB^ Regularly sells for S1.1 tS.OC/Now S9S5.0O. 





Kimwf TSIZOS. ao-10 mm Digital Readout. 
Analog Diat 200 Watts SSB power. Reg. 
S699.00/Nm SCfiSOO. 




Swin 100MX Sofid*Stite. 10-30 Mtrs. 235 Watts 
SSB power wjt^ noise blanker, Regularly sells lor 
$699 J5/H0W $549.00. 



NCX 1000 Transceiver. 10-80 Mtrs. 1 kW SSB. 
AM. CW. RIT Control, Speech Clipper. Built-in PS. 
Mucti more, Regularly sells for $1,095.00/Now 

SI. 495.00. 





Swan Astro 150 VRS Tuning 10-80 Mtrs. 235 Wafts 
SSB. Fully Microprocessor Controlled frequencies. 
Regularly sells for $925.00/Now $705.00. 




ICenwCKJcf TS180S wrth OFC, ISO-tO Mtrs, 200 
Watts, Digitally Tuned Memory^ Regularly 
SI J49.d5/NDW 11.092.46, 




Swifi 102BX Tnitscelvir Dual PTO s 235 Watts 
SSB ^ CW. 1.8-30 MHz LF. Passband Tyning. 
Tunable Motch fitter , mycfi, mych more. Regularly 
sells for $Mg5.00/How $995.00, 




f^ake Ta7/OR7 Reg $1.395.00/Call Jor your 

price. 



GOE Tailtwister Rator TX2 
aeg$349,00/Mow $169.00 




Kantfonics Fietd Day TTY Code Header. Reg. 
$449.aO/NowS350.00. 




Communications 
Technology 

Group, Incorporoted 



^^as CommunicQtions for Worldwide Use 



448 Merrick Road 
Oceanside, N. Y. 11572 

1708 Rockaway Avenue 
Lynbrook, N. Y, 11563 

(516) 536-5724 

Telex 640-596/TWX 510-225-7536 



He&iiet Sentce^see page 2W 



73 Magazine * June, 1980 185 



1^47 




MFJ SWR/ 
WATT1VIETERS 

NEW Multi-Sensof SWR/Peak 
Reading Wattmeter. O perate 
2 ri g s simultaneousl y: 

HF, VHF, QRP. 

ill 9'"' 



MFJ^a25 Deluxe Power Sentry is MFJ^s exclL- 
sive Multi-Sensor SWH/PEAK Wattmeter^ 

Plug in any 2 sensors: HF, VHF, or ORP (see 
specs below). Switch selects one ol two. Comes 
with one sensor of your choice. Use remote or 
mount in cabinet. 

Operate 2 rigs simultaneously or alone. Switch 
selects rig to monitor 

Forwarciyredected power in 2 ranges. Dual 
meters, 2% movements. Peak or average power. 

Read SWR direetly ot either rig from 1:1 to 
6:1. Has SWR sensftivity control. 

Switch selects sensor A or D or grounds 
sensors for protection in transit and from 
minor static discharges. 

Lighted meters, battery check. Black steel 
cabinet. 6-3^4 x 5-3/8 x 5 3/4 inches. 9 V bat 
tery or 110 VAC with optional 
AC adapter. $7.95. 




The MEW MFJ-B20 Power Sentt^ is MFJ's 
exclusive Multi-Sensor SWFtMattmeter. 

Plug-in sensors for HF, VHF, and ORP (see 
specs below), Comes with one serjsor of your 
choice. Use remote or mouni in cabinet 

Monitor forward/reflected average power, 2 
ranges. SWR 1:1 to 6:1. 2% meter movement- 
Has range/ mode, reflected/ tor ward power 
switches, SWR sensitivity control. 

Lighted meter (requires 12 V). Rugged black 
steel cabiiiet. 3-7/3 x 5-3/8 x 4 1/2 inches. 

PLUG-IN SENSORS: HF, VHF, 
QRP. $29.95 EACH. 

Plug up to two in MFJ-B25, one in MFJ-820. 

MFJ'SaO HF SEHSOR. 1,8 to 30 MHz. 200 
and 2000 watts forward, 20 and 200 watts re- 
flected power, full scate. 5 watt SWR sensitivity. 

MFJ-831 VHF SENSOR. 50 to 1 75 MHz. 20 
and 200 watts full scale forward and reflected 
power. 5 watt SWR sensitivity. 

MFJ-832 QRP SENSOR. 1.8 to 30 MHz. 2 and 
20 watts M scale lomard and reflected power, 
500 milliwatt SWR sensitivity. 

Aluminum cabinei. SO-239. 2-1/2 x 2 5/8 x 
2-1/4 inches. Remote or mount in meter cabinet. 

Order from MFJ and try It. II not delighted, 
return within 30 days tor refund {less shipping). 
One year unconditional guarantee. 
QnJer yours today. Call toll free fl00^G47-1S00. 

Charge VISA, MC. Or mail check, money order. 
Add $4 00 each for shipping and handling. 



CALL TOLL FREE . . . 800-647-1 800 



Call 601-323-5869 fof technical information, or- 
der/repair status. Also call 601 -323-5869 outside 
continental USA and in Mississippi. 

MFJ ENTERPRISES, INC. 

BOX 494, MISSISSIPPI STATE. MS 39762 



I 



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73 Sherwood Ct., Huntington. NY. 11743 US A 




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OiML SPOTmR 



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INSTRUMENTS 

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j^%M 




186 73 Magazine • June, 1980 



NEW PRODUCTSI 

Super Color S-1QQ Video Kit $129,95 Etf II Adapter Kit $24.95 

Expantlatile to 256 x 192 higl) resoJution colnr Plu^^intoElf 3fprovidi'n0SLipeiElf44^nd5Qpin 
grsp^ics. 6547 with alF display nr^odes computer plu£ S-1D0 bu^ expansion. (With Sup&r Ex- 



controiied. Memory mappsd. IK RAM ^Kpanda- 
bieto 6K. S-100 bus 1602, 8090. BOSS, ZSO etc. 
Delivery Jariuarv "ao. 

1802 1&K Dynumjc RAM Kct SU9.00 
Expandable to 32K. Hidden refresh w/cioclfs up to 4 

MIHz w/no wait ^ta\m Addl. 16K RAM (63 

Quest Supef Basic 

Quest, the Jeader m mejtpensive 180Z systems 
arnpunces another tirst Ques! is the tirst coni- 



pan^^on}. High and low address (^isptays, state 
and mode LED's QptlonsI $1S.O0. 

Gremlin Color Video Kit $69.95 

32 J( 16 alpha/numerics and graphics: up to B 
colore with 6847 chip: IK RAM at EOOO. Plugs 
into Su|ier Elf 44 pin bus. tin high re^. graphics- 



al lowing some credit for ca^^ette version. New 
improved v&r^ion with improved speed and accL- 
paiiy worldwide to ship a lull s^2s Basic for ^m2 ^^^y "^^ a^ail- ^ou^ee list for I/O now ind, 
systems A complete tun cation SUrper flasic by Siip«r Basic on Cassatle Hfl.OO 

Run- CenkBf including floating point capahiJity 



with scientific r atat ion { n u m bf r ran ge ± . 1 7E^^ , 
32 ttit integer t2 billion. IWuEii dim arrays: Siring 
arrays; String manipufation; Cassette I/O, Save 
and load, Bas.ic. Dataaiid machine language pro- 
grams: and Over 75 Statements. Functions aod 
Operators. 

Easily adaptable or most 1802 systems, Re- 
quires 12K RAM minimum for Basic and u&er Coming Soon: Assembler, Editor Dlsassem- 
programs. Cass &tte version in stock rrow. ROM bier, DA/AD, Super Sound /Music, EPROM 
versions coming soon uvith exchange privilege programmer. Stringy Floppy System. 



Tom Pitlman's 1A02 Tiny Basic Source listing 
now available. Find out how Tom Pitlman wrote 
Tiny Bfask and how tu gel the mos) otrt of it. 
Nflv«r offerei] heforfl. $13-00: 

S-10& 4 Slot Expansion S 3.95 

Super Monitor VI. 1 Source Listing S15.00 



tij^?^^ 



Jv-'j 



aula? im* lit 



0^' 



RCA Cosmac Super Etf Computer $106.95 

Compare features before you decide to buy any A 24 key HEX kflylioard includes IS HEX keys 

other computer. Thera is no prher computer on plus lotd, re<al. lun, wall, input, memory pn>- 

the mar1(et today that has aJI th« desirable bene^ iKt, rnonllor select arid stngle atop Lar^e, on 

fits Qf the Sniper Ell fa r so 1 1 ttie m o ney Ttre Super board displays pro v ide outp ut and o phonal hlflh 

Etf is a small sinsle board computer that does and lew address, There is a 44 pin standard 

many bio things. It is an excellent computer for connector slot for PC cards and a 50 pin connec- 

trajfiing and for learning prpg ramming with its tor slot for the OuesE Sjper Ex pans] on Board 

machine language and yet it is easiFy expanded Power supply and sockets for all tC'a are in- 

with addlflenal mamory. Full Basic, ASCII eluded in the price plus a detajied 127 pg. instruc- 

Keyboards, video character geffesrafion^ etc, tlon manual which now Includes over 40 pgs. of 

Before yoij buy another smalt connputer, see if it software info, including a series of lessons to 

includes the following features: ROM monitor; help get you started and a music program and 

State and Mode displays: Single step; Optionaf graphics target game. Many schools and 

address displays; Power Supply, Audio Amplifier universities are using th-e Super Eff as a course 

and Speaker; Fulfy socketed for ail IC'S, Real cost of study, OEM's use It for training and RS.D- 

of in warranty repairs: Fult documentation Remember, othe r com puters only offer Su per Etf 

lh6 Stipar Etf includes a RDM monitor for pro- features at additional cost or notataH. Compare 

gram loading, editing and e(xecuti on with SI NI3LE betore you buy. Super Elf Wl 5106.95, High 

STEP fm pragram deiiugging wli^ch is not in- address opllan SB 95, Low address option 

cfuded in others at the same price. With SINGLE $9,95. Custom Cahinel with driUed and labelled 

STEP you can see the microprocessQ r chip o per a- pfexigia ss fro nt panel |24 . 95 . Expa nsi on Cabi net 

ting with the unique Quest address and data bus vt/rth room for 4 S-10D boards S41.00. Nitlad 

displays before, during and after executing in- Battery Memory Saver Kit SG.95. All kits and 

struGtions. Also, CPU mode and instruction cycle optfons also completely assembled and tested- 

are decoded and displayed on 8 LED indicators, (hiesttfata a 12 page monthly software pub- 

An RCA 1861 ^dftO Br^phics chip allows you to Hcation for 1802 computer users is available by 

con nect to your own TV wit h an i nej^pensive video s^ b scri phon fo r $1 2 . OO per year. Issues 1-12 

mod u lal r to d □ graphics and ga mes. There is a bound $1 6 . 50. 

speaker system included for writing youj own Tiny Sasic Cassette StU^OO, on ROM $38^00* 

music Of using many music programs already original Elf kit board $14.9S. 1d02 software; 

written . The speaker amplifier may-aiso be used Moews Video Graphics S3.50. Games and Music 

to drive relays for control purposes S3 JO, Chip 8 Interpreter S5.S0. 

Super Expansion Board with Cassette Interface $89.95 



TTtisls tmly an astounding valual This hoard has 
been despgntd to allow you to decide how you 
want it optioned. Tlie S^per Expansion Board 
comes with 4K of low power RAM fully address- 
able anywhere in 64K with buitt-in memory pro- 
tect and a t^ssetie Inierface Provisions have 
been nrtade for all other options on the same 
board and ittitsneatty mto the hardwood cabinet 
abngsJde the Super Elf. The boa/d includes slots 
for up to 6K of EPflOM (2708. 2758, 2716 or Tl 
2716) and isf^lly socketed. EPROM can be used 
for the monitor and Tiny Basic or other purposes. 

A IK Super ROM Monitor $19.95 is available as 

an on board option in 2708 EPROM which has 
been preprogrammed with a program taader/ 
editor and error checking mufti tile cassette 

read /write software, {relocatible cassette file) 
another exclusive from Quest, ft includes register 
save and readout, block move capability arM:! 
video graphics driver with blinking cursor. Break 
points can be used wifti the register save feature 
to isolate program bugs quickly, then follow with 
single step. The Super Monftor is written with 



subroutines aflowing user^ to take advantage of 
monitor functions simjjiy by cailing them up. 
Improvernents and revisi-ons are easily done with 
the monitor. If you have the Super Eijpans^on 
Boafif and Super Monitor ttie monitor is up and 
running at the push of a button. 

Oth^r on board options include Para Met Input 
and Output Porif with lull handshake. They 

ai 1 w ea sy con nectio n of an ASC 1 1 key h 03 rd to the 
input port RS 232 and 20 ma Current Loop lor 
teletype or other device are on board and if you 
need more memory there are two S-TDD slots for 
static RAM or video boards. Also a IK Super 
Monitor version 2 with video driver for full capa- 
bility display with Uny Basic and a video interface 
board Parallel I/O Ptirt$ $9 J5, RS 232 S4.54]p 
TTY 20 ma l/F 51.95. S-100 S4.5D. A 50 pin 
connector set with ribbon cable is available at 
SI 5.25 tor easy connection between the Super 
Bf and the Super Expansion Board. 

Power Supply Kit for the compiete system (see 
Multi-volt Power Supply be3ow). 



Same day shipment. Rrst line parts only 
Factory tested. Guaranteed money back. 
Quality IC's and other components at fac- 
tory prices, 

INTEGRATED CIRCUITS 



P.O. Box UZm, Santa Clara, CA 95054 
Will calls: 2322 Walsh Ave. 
(408) 998-1640 



^60 



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ID.gs 

14.95 

13,95 



CKTsmu:! 




1 WHI 


4.30 


1 MHi 


4 Sfl 


i*AHi 


4,25 


5mt 


4.25 


IDiMhfi 


fl.M 


IB M»i 


3W 


20 MHz 


;^oo 


32MKf 


^90 


337168: Hir 


4.^)o 


1.fi432MH5 


45e 


3.5795 Mftr 


1 30 


S.^HiOa-M^ 


1 6i 


2 097152 HHt 


450 


2.H6?i MHi 


450 


3 27^8 Ml+i 


450 


5.DEaB MhU 


4 50 


S.1R5 MHr 


450 


5.7U3 MHl 


4 5(5 


6.5S-36 HHI 


4£lA 


14 aiBia kHi 


4: 35 


IB 4:3^ MHz 


*M 


22 1184MKU 


4.511' 



KEtegAnos 

Fyltif 4Ss?nl[Ht8 77.50 

53 ksf A&tll ;ifiyh»rd VI iSO Do 

MfflBi trrdo^urt 29.95 

LEOS 

Red TOTd Fi 

Grnn. rMtawTTPI* 20 

JurrbQ Hisd .2d 

SrBEH. Orangr, Yill!rw Jumbc .25 
CU|lOft LEEl HDmfltin* Cllp4 B,'^1.25 
^9pei>rVfail. Bmtnr. gripHi., ystSm, iMsrI 

CONtlNlHTAL SPEOlALTlEB' In EtK* 
Cc'tin't^c ; ne n- tjrripahojrj it^rfouip 
niAx-iBD B sitA r»q. far. tizi.gs. 

OK WIDEW^AFTODLEInEtiRli 
Parlibit HiijMmBbBr 114.110 

Complelfl H« 04 APPtviutii in st«K. 



SPECIAL fA^iDUiCTS 
MWliBfeb Slosrwaicti fmer 

viL^i 10 PD !(!»( 
PC jiaard 
SwIklhiB mm PWibi^^h 

3 OPS &*<le 
EnCAdfrt HLiD%55-b 
rirtirDitlet ^K^. lo9\ti 

Anlvicer m 
Mp!>cr il] TnGDEr 

FiilnCiir Kll 
Mad4( 15D;0u3 

OraSPnr Ki 
SliiDlilr^Vi □jp)l 

HulJi'ntPitr 
Clecl Calrndk^KM 

3.^ MMi JFitqitHney 

CDUhlAr Kit 
VI MHl ^raitwnfv 

Ceiunltr Hit 



IfZi.Oa 
S334.K 
5569 00 

123.15 

I3T.5C 



KETBOiyiD ENCODERS 



A¥5-S376 

AV5-91DO 

Air5-93K) 

740922 

7-4C923 

H&0l65-i 

4,Y5-**ffl 



I12S« 

17.95 

10.SO 

1&,M 

5.J: 

&50 

i.as 

10 Sl} 



jaojdp piBE iT.ga 



iH^iP 
COnfflKD 

ODP-isei 

IHUlTfflfD 

Av^mu 

AT5- 1(1^4 
3^41 



19J6 
12.95 



D CHRvdHi R^E 

UBSS? 2J5 

d32S& 3-35 

Opvir I.JO 

DfSG 155 

DA!5P 2-10 

DAtS& 3.10 

HidwkSVtDlgtitllDmul' 



(4T.75 



THAHSfOflMIBS 

5V 3CG tM 3.35 

12 yplr 3W ma runSlpfrtipr 1 H 

IJ.&VdTBODma a. 75 

12^^ 2^ mawall pFug 2 95 

12V CT 250 rnnrallUMg 3 50 

24VCt4O0™ 3.96 

ICIV 1 .2 aFmp wall pIuq 4 BS 
I2y B WP it 95 

12V ^ rnan-ill plug <.7« 

12V I amp Will jiliie S %• 

12V 3 aiTl0 a.5D 

1(1/1 & VAC a/1 K VA watf plug 9. 75 



UniiBttfr 
S1»piii»Mt Hit 
Am 0I«3 Vtl 
OhgllaF Dusk Kll 



IB.H 

M-95 
17. H 

14. a^ 



4.S5 



2513B unpif i:si5.S 
f7flS 7 75 

171 FT I ffl-Bt 

271 6 InC^i S4-M 
l'37l6fiite(24Q.OO 



IHj'ISt EpriMn KID 
Eitendir Idwd 



SB9 JU 

^390(1 

JSIQ9 



HOSi'M^MDHT fUD [|7, 
2101-1 £.9& 

2HJ2.1 .95 

7103'Al,-4 1.25 
£102iUI-5l. l.«l 

21L02-1 1.1 a; 

31U4A.4 4.35 
i1*7fc4 3.75 
?111'1 3.75 

S-IIS-J iM 

2l14L3fflhiE7.40 
21141 4Sgu5.4[t 



273? 

?r5e 

■SlA 
B74t 
B74tii 
r7SSA 
NBJSJri: 
hlft2Si3:3 
N62Sl2e 
ig&25i3a 
NKS131 
H62Sia« 
1d&:£Sl3.7 
0*18577 
3223 



65 00 
32.50 
&5.1M3 
75.M 

K.ao 

2.95 
650 
3-7& 
:B.5Q 
3.5(f 
a.75 
B.7& 
290 
; 90 



iC cr tm .H 

^5{ib typd .Ck3£ 

100 par \fjx 01 5 

lEOQ par hipe .0^2 

S par lype 6.7$ 



Tarninil «13|B45.1]0i 



MAhU CA 

UAN3 <:£! 

MAN72.74 CAi'CA 

SL7CI4 CC 

0l7?17.'[?L7fl7fl £A 

0L727.7Jfl C4tC 

OL747;7!iO Cfti'CC 

0L75(J a 

FTfPM CC 

|f^50il/5O7 C&'CA 

fflD501'5T0 CfVCA 

fNOno^iM? <:cru 

3 -dipit Buiibis 

4 liiDii; flutbn 
cXifl riijar«:«!ni 
EKii.Ofl-jnrKijeni 
gdipii 14 pia 4i$pby 
Id dios diapUy 

7520 Qiiraif ptwlODBis 
TJLJM Hrr 
MAN:^40 CC 

MAN4«io (:a 

MAlUti40 CO 

MAN4710 CA 

MAN474a CO 

MAN«40 CC 

MANe7tq CA 

MANE740 CC 

I4A1M7A 
■lAIMZf 
HAiei2A 

Wi.n IraittJjMitiif 
HAIOtJJl Tttnshrriar 



2710 2.90 

925 .39 

300 1.0O 

3O0 1 25 

340 1.D0 

500 ItiO 

9M 1.85 

BOO 1 95 

1:57 .70 

S&O 1.3± 

5O0 90 

aoia 2.20 



Rockwell AIM 65 Computer 

6502 based single traard with full A&CJI keyboard 
and 20 column ttierinal printer. 20 ctiar. alphanu- 
Ftieric display. ROM monitor, fully expandable 
$3?5.<HI. 4K version S450JO. 4K Asserr^t^ler 
IBS. 00. BK BasJc interpreter ItOO.DD. 

Special srrtall power supply for AIM65 as&ern. in 
frame $49.00- Complete AIM6S in thin briefcase 
witli power supply $4fiS.OO. MoJded plastji:; 
enclosure to fit AIMG5 plus power supply S47.50. 
Special Package Price: 4K AIM, 8 K Basic, power 
sup pry. cabinei S699.D0 

AIM65/KIM,'VIM,-'Supej* Elf 44 pin expansion 
tioard; 3 femaFe and t male bus. Board pljs 3 
conn^tprs S22.95. 

AIM65/'KIM/VIM l,'0 Expansion Kit; 4 parallel and 
Z serial ports plti^ 2 internal timers 139.00. Pf\QH 
programmer for 2716 SI 50.00. 32 K RAM Board 
asserm $419,00, 1SK RAM assem. S360.D0 

Multi-volt Compuler Power Supply 

0v Samp, ±l&v ,5 arrp, 5v 1.5 amp, -5v 
.5 amp, 12v .5 amp, -12 option. ±5v, ±12v 

are regulated. KitS29.95. Kit with punched frame 
S37.45. S^l. 00 shipping. Kit of hardwares 14. 00. 
Wood grain case $10,00. S 1-51} shipping.. 

PROM Eraser 

win &ras& 25 PROMs in 15 minutes. Ultra- 
vioietp assembled S37.50 

Safety switch/Timer version %SBM 

SO Hz Crystal Time Base Kit $4.40 

Converts digital clocks from AC Itne frequency 
to crystal time base Outstanding accuracy. 

NiCaci Battery Fixer/Charger Kit 
Opens shorted cells that won't hold a charge 
and ttien charges them up, all in one kit w/full 
parts and instructions S7.2S 



LRC 7000 - Printer (389.00 

40/64 column dot matrix impact. 
Interlace all personal computers. 

S-10Q Computer Boards 

SK Static RAM Kit 

&K Static Gadbotft Econa IIA Kit 
16K Static Qoriboul Econo XIV Kit 
24K Static God bout Econo VllA-24 K 
32K Static Godbout Econo X-32 Kit 
16K Dynamic RAM Kit 
32K Dynamic RAM Kit 
54K Dynamic RAM Kit 
Video Interface Kit 



£td paper 



S129.00 
145.00 

S285,00 
it 435. QO 

$575,00 
199 00 
310,00 
470.00 

S12S.O0 



80 IC Update Master Manual S55.00 

Comptete iC data SBlector. 2700 pg. master refer- 
ence guide, Over 51,000 cross references. Fr6« 
update service tti rough 1980. Domestic postage 
$3.50, 79tC Master doseaut S29.95. 

ZSO Microcomputer 

16 hit lyo. 2 MHz clock, £K RAM, ROM Bread- 
board space. Excellent tor control. Base Board 
^28.50. Full KitS99.00, Monitor £20.00. Powar 
Supply Kit S35.00, 

Video Modulator Kit $8.95 

Convert TV set into a high quaJil^ monitor w,''o 
affecting usage. Comp kit w/fiili irtstruc. 

Modem Kit $60.08 

State of Ihe an, orig., an&wer. No tuning neces- 
sary, 103 compatible 300 baud. InExptnsivc 
acoustic coupler plans Inciudeti. 

BSR Cootrollef $39.95 

Connect your computer to the BSR Home Controi 
System. Computer controlled ultrasonic trans- 
mitter for your BSR Software tor 1802 user. 



TERMS: $5. 00 mm. Dfder U.S. Funds. Calif residents aitd 6% iai. 
fiankAmericard and Master Charge accepted. 
Shipping charges will be added on charge cards. 



FREE: Send for your copy &^ out NEW 1980 
QUEST CATALOG. Include 28c stamp. 



i^R&&der Service— see page 210 



73 Magazine ■ June, 1960 187 




^38 



Quality Kits 



Function Generator Kit 



■■■'. ■■.r.i''. 




Provides three basic uvave- 
fomns: s'n^, triangle and 
square ^^ye. Frequency 
range from 1 Hz to 100K 
Hje, Output ampjitudefrom 
volts to ov&r 6 volts (peak 
to peskS. Uses a 1 2V supply 
Of a ±6V ^Ut syppty. In- 
cludes chip, PC. 8oard, 
components St instructions. 



JE2206B ...... ^19.95 



Digital Thermometer Kit 




Dual sensors - svvftching controf for indoor/outdoor 
or dual moriitoring. Continuous LED ,8" ht. display. 

Range: ^O'^F to 199°F / ^O^C td lOO^'C. Accuracy 
i1° nonninaL Set for Fa^irwnheit or Celstus. Simulated 
wainut case. AC wall adapter included. 
SS?e: 3y**'h x 6-5/S"w x 1-3/3"c[. 

JE300 $39.95 



Digital Stopwatch Kit 



ftW i i^i i uMtu i 



:^ • . . 'wa < 



*- 

!*** 









Use Irtersil 7205 Chip. PJated 
thru double-sided P.C. Board, 
Red LED display^ Ttmes to 
&9 minutes, 59.59 seconds 
with auto reset. Qyarts crystai 
controlled. Three stopwatches 
[n one: singie event, spiit 
Icummubtive) and taylor (se- 
quentiai tfming), Use^3 penlite 
batteries. 

SizeM.S" h2.15"x .90" 



JE900 $39.95 



4~Digit Clock Kit 



6-Digit Clock Kit 




i^nrr; 





Jumbo 
6-Digit Clock Kit 




Bright ,357" ht. red dispiay. Sequential fl^shi^ng 
eofon. 1? or 24 hour operation. Black extruded glu- 
minLim case. Pressure switches for hours, minutes and 
hold functions. IncludeE a\\ components^ case end 
waii transformer, Size^ 37-" x 1^/' k VA" 

JE730 $14.95 



Bright ,300 ht. common cathode dispJay. Usas MM- 
5314 clock chip. Switches for hours, minutes and 
hold functions. Hours easily viewable to 20 ft Simu- 
leted walnut case, 1 1 6 VAC operatic n^ 1 2 or 24 hour 
operation. Includes ail components, case and wall 
transformer. Size: ^%*' x 3-1/8" x VA" 



JE701 



■ * * ■ 



$19.95 



Four .630" ht* and two 300" ht. comm. anode dis- 
plays. Uses MIVI&314 ciock chip. Switches for hrs., 
mins., and hoid functions. Hours viewabie to 30 ft- 
Sam. walnut case. 1 15VAC operation. 12 or 24 hour 
opefation. Irtci. all componentSr case and wall trans- 
former. Size: 6^*" x 3 1 iB" x 1^." 

JE747 $29.95 



Regulated 
Power Supply Kit 



>*S^^ 



^^tipfli^ji 




Uses LM309K. Heat 
sink provided. PC 
board construction. 
Provides solid 1 amp 
@ 5 volts. Includes 
components, hard- 
ware St instructions. 
Sl?e;3ys"K5'^x2"h 



JE200 $14.95 



Multi-Voltage 
Board Kit 



Variable 
Power Supply Kit 



■^-'Ai 






ADAPTS TO JE200 
SUPPLIES ±5Vp ±BV and ±12V 

Independent iosd rating at single 
terminal. ±12V:l60mA, j;9V;20O 
mAp-5V;250mA. DC/DC convert' 
er with +5\/ Input. Tofiodal hi- 
speed switching XMFR. Short 
circuit protection. PC hoard con- 
struction. Piggy -baK:k to JE20O 
board. Size: 3Y2" x 7' x 9/16"h 



JE205 $12.95 




Full 1.6 amp @ B-10V out- 
put. Up to .S amp @ 15V 
output. Heavy duty trans- 
former, Three- terminal LC. 
voltage regulator, Heat sink 
provided for cooling effi- 
ciency. PC board construc- 
tion, 120 VAC input. 
Size; 3Y2' X 5" x 2"h 



JE210 



■ ■*(»41|'dk 



$19.95 



62-Key ASCII 
Encoded Keyboard Kit 




The JE610 ASCII KEYBOARD KIT can be Interfaced into most any computer 
system. The JE610 kit comes complete wfth an industrial grade keyboard switch 
assembly (62 keys), IC's, sockets, connector, electronic components and a double- 
sided printed wiring board. The keyboard assembly requires +5V @ 150mA and 
—12V @ 10mA for operation. Features: 60 keys generate the fuli 128 characters, 
upper and |:ower case ASCII set. Fully buffered. Two user-define keys provided 
for custom applications. Caps 1ocl< for upper case-only alpha characters. Utiliz&s 
a 2376" (40-f>in} encoder read-only memory chip. Outputs directly compatibfe 
with TTL/DTL or MOS logic arrays. Easy interfacing with a 16-pin dip or 18-pin 
edge connector. 

JE610 $79.95 



Hexadecimal Encoder Kit 




FULL 8-BIT LATCHED OUTPUT - li-KEY KEYSOARD 

The JE600 ENCODER KEYBOARD provides two separate hexadecimal digits 
produced ffom sequential key entries to allow direct programming lor 8-bi1 
microprocessor or 8-bii memory circuits, Three (3) additional keys are provided 
for user operations with one having a bistable output avaitab]e- The outputs are 
latched and monitored with 9 LED readouts. Also included is a key entry strobe^ 
Features: Full 8-bit tatched output for microprocessor use. Three user-define 
kuys with one being bistable operation. Debounce circuit provided tor all 19 keys. 
9 LED readouts to verify entries. Easy interfacing with standard 16-pin ICcon- 
nector. Only -1-5 VDC requirad for operation. 



JE600 



tiki 



ill* 



$59.95 



(Pn'ces Subject To Change) 



SEE YOUR LOCAL 




DISTRIBUTOR TODAY!! 



For Distributor Information, write or phone JIM-PAK? 1355 Shoreway Road, Belmont, CA 94002 (415J 595*5936 



188 73 Magazine ■ June, 1980 



431436 MHz R.F. Amplifiers 

431-436 MHz (or other 5 MHz in the band) ampltfiers are novv mailable for your 
IC-402 or similar low po>ft/er exciter and the Echo 70 or sirnilar higher power escdter. 
These amps are linearized and are aimed at the new satellite operarton. Thev have no 
rev. amp. normally but they can be ordered with a very iow noise pre-amp. on special 
request / 



Modef 


Power In 


Power Out 


DC 
Cur^/ 


Price 


Operating 

Range 


Mode 


VAR50A6JVI 


1-6W 


30-50W 


6A 


$279,95 


431 -436MHz 


SSB'CW 


VAR100A6M 


3-8W 


50 100W 


12A 


369.96 


t r 


t * 


VAR100A01M 


1-6W 


800 OOW 


ISA 


399.95 


1 t 


tt 


VAR70A20M 


5-20W 


20 70W 


14A 


299.95 


IJ 


ft 


VAR100A15M 


5-20W 


50-1 OOW 


15A 


399.95 


r + 


it 




j,^!^ 


CUSHCRA FT TWIST 







Complete your station with the Cushcrsft "twist" antennas. 

A432-20T 20 element flO horiz. and TO vert J has the careful balance of gain and 
directiviiy needed for OSCAR work ,..,.. V- S59,95 

A144-20T similar to the A432'20T except for 2M. This antenna will provide a "gam 
\balanced system", when ysed with the 432 twist antenna ......,,..,,. $^,96 

VISTA POWER SUPPLIES 
You will need a heavy duty power supply for your afnptifier and VISTA can fill the 

VISTA X fl 8 amps CCS , . . , , SS4.95 

VISTA XX R 16 amps CCS , . . St 19.95 

VISTA XXX R 30 amps CCS St79.95 



' LlH^R PftE-AMPS 
LUNAR preamps are also available to help out on ihe receiving end. 

PAE432'5 420-4501V1 Hz, ultra low noise. : . .■. 

PAF432'2 420-450MHz,w/ input filter 

PA1 144 2 meter pre amp. (inline). ,....., 



■j^t 






S69.95 
S54.95 
$52.95 



jf^ COMTRONIX 

COMTRONIX ■ KF-1 200 1296 MH^ FM xcvr. Freq coverage 1294-1296 MHz adjust- 
able, 12 channels w/ 1296 MH^ instcifled. Output power 1W, type M antenna connect- 
or. Operating voUsge ts 12-14VDC. Rcvr, is cyrstat controlled inple conversion super- 

het. sensitivity 1 uV for 20dB quieting $599.95 

Spec^Mt order affow 4-8 weeirs tor delmery art fhts item. 



FT-101 TS520TS-820 

Good news for owners of the TS-820, TS- 
520 and the FT-lOl transceivers* The RM 
kits have been designed to overcome, as 
much as practical, the deficiencies in the 
receivers o( these amateur radios. These 
rigs usually have sufficient sensitivity, but 
lack selectivity and the capability to handle 
strong signals without overload, the RIVI 
kfts deal with these problems in an effect- 
ive and economicaf manner. The kits are 
easily installed in about an hour. A basic 
tool kit IS required, including a small solder- 
ing iron. 

'7 found the 820's re/ecr/on of adjacent 
Chan no f stgnafs much better than they were 
before," ■ WD9*** 

"The RM-820 ts an absolute success. / am 
h&amig stsitons that f never knew were 
there. I have aiready recommended your kit 
io a coupte of 920 owners. *' 

'^My FT fOtE sounds better than it ever 
has; the RM Wf IS a real bargain/"- K2** 

There are just a few of the many reports we 
have had s'fice the RM kits first went on the 
market "RM kits are an eJtceffent invest- 
ment tn improved receiver performance. " 
Now many hams have found what this 
statement means — performance at a fair 
price. And now, for your convenience, we 
have a 24-hour toll free number for your 
VISA and Master Charge orders only. Just 
call 1-800-854-2003. extension 873, nation- 
wide, or 1-S0Q-522 1500, extension 873, 
ttom Catlfo^n^ai any time of day wfth your 
order. Be sure and tell the operator which 
rig vo^J have so you can get the kit for your 
radio (RM-101, RM-820 or RM-520). Re- 
membef this lire is for orders only. If you 
have any quest[ons, call direct or write 
Vineyard Amateur Radio. 

The price of the improved RM series kit is 
SI 7,95 f + ta?< for CA residences). 



-CALL OR DROP US A LINE FOR THE EVERY DAY LOW PRICES ON - 



Ten-Tec, Cushcraft, Yaesu, I COM, Superex, Trackeyers, Bencher, Centurion ducks, Ameco, 
Callbook, Sceibi, ARRL, B & W, Bearcat, Berk Tek, Lunar, Mirage, "RM" kits, Hanimex cal- 
culators, Comtronix, Midland, Phone Mate, Astatic, Turner, Vista, Fuzzbuster, Tri Ex, Larsen, 
PIPO, Theft Alert Alarms. 



Damk AdH m\v A np 




All prices F. O. B. Oxnard, C O. D. add $5. 50 
VINEYARD AMATEUR RADIO ^^ 

Art (WA60YS) - Sales and Service - Jay (WB6YQN) 

4407 Vineyard, Oxnard, CA 93030, (805) 485-0942 



VfSA 



Orders 



(nc«t«r ClMHia 

-■■■ rBrn«kfli iMM-r 



FOR YOUR VISA AND MASTER CHARGE ORDERS ONL Y CALL 
Nationwide 24-hour order line California 24-hour order line 

1-800 854 2003, Ext. 873 1-800-522-1500 ext. 873 



^ Reader Service— see psge 210 



JBMagazitre • June, 1980 las 



7294 N.W. 54 STREET 
MIAMI. FLORIDA 33166 



50239 



10/$5.00 
50/$20.00 



100/$35,00 
1000/$300.00 



PL259 

Amphenol 
,60« ea. 



E. F. Johnsan S Meter 

Edge Meter 250 UA. Fits in 5/S x 1 3^8" hole. 
MTG holes on each end MM" behind paneL 
Black scale 5 bottom 120 top 
$1.25ea, 5/S5.00 



E. F, Johnson Signal Strength 

Meter 200 UA 2%" x2Vi " Sq. mounts m 
rv*" hole T" behind panel Scale: 1-30 db top 
5 boltom 
Sjj 95ea 5^S20 00 



PANEL METERS 



$4.00 ea 



2 for $7,00 



25-0-25 dcVotts i 2%'^ x 3" 



) 



2V4 



0-25 dc Volts 
0-50 ac Votts 

■Shunt Required 



) 



2V* 



Double Row/Wire Wrap .100 



25 pins 
30 pins 
50 pins 



$3.49 ea 
$3.96 ea 
$5.43 ea 



10/$30.00 
10/$32.00 
10/$45.00 



Double Row/Solder Eyelet .156 

6 pins $1,10ea 10/S 9.O0 

15 pins $1,&5ea 10/S12.&0 

22 pins $2.0e&a 10/S17.00 

43 p 1 n^ $3 .66 e a 1 0/$30 .00 



C& K SWITCHES 

PART# MOVEMENT 



7101 
7103 
7108 
7201 
SI.ODEA 



ON/NONE/ON SPST 
ON/OFF/ON SPST 
ON/NONE/(ON) SPST 
ON/NONE/ON DPDT 
6 FOR S5.00 



6TVGAMES0N(1)GHIP 

Gen Instr AY-3-8500-1 

28 Pin Plastic Case 

EVERYDAY LOW PRICE $7.60 ea 



URPLUS 
LECTRONICS 



PHONE: 1305) 887 8228 
TWX; 810-848-6085 

WHOLESALE -RETAIL 



CB SPECIAL 



Brand new printed circuit board assambly. Used in all HyGaIn 40 Channel 
CB transceivers. Fits many oth«ir manufacturers' un\U also. Squelch 
pot/volume contra lohann el selector switch not included. Board 

1 -9-7,50 08. 50-99 — S.DOea. D I mens Ions 

10-49-6.50 ea. 100-up-5,50 ee. 6" x BVa" 



CB SPECIAL W/40 ch SW same as above 

1 '9 $ 1 0. 50 ea. S{} 99 $9.00 «a. 

10-49 $^.50 ^a. 100 up S8.50 ea. 



TRIMMER CAPS 

Can ftt in your walch 

3,520 pF & 530 pF 

$.7Sea., 2;S1.25 



New Hy Gain 40ct> 



Serviceman Special 

CB Less Case. Speaker 



&. Knobs us IS) 

S 1 4 95 ea 



NEW Hy-Gain f^emote 40ch CB UessCase speaker &ConirofMic 
[3SI5) S14 95ea 



ASTATIC T-UG8-D104 

PREAMP Desktop microphone 
w/cfystal eiemeni 3 Pin Plug $35 ea. 



ILEX COPY UENSR&J.e.1 
Focal Ufifith (155WM) 1 ¥<" 
ai/ie-U,! me fixed iris. 
S7,S0 ea. 



D. 



9 Position Dip Switches 
16 pin (AMP) Si. 50 ea. 
10/S13.SQ 



NEW E-F, Johnson Power Mjc/Less 
Cord. Desktop St/le Si 9.95 ea 



CERAMIC IF FILTERS 

EFC L455K 

$3.50 ea. 



t6' WO DEM CABLES 
10#22gd wJr& v^/shleld, 
DB25P conn & DB5't22&-t 
cover on one 4nd 
(B.SOea. 10^50.00 



12 Vdc RELAY 
SPST 35 Amp Contacts 

Open Frame 
Rugged, great for mobite use 

$4.50 ea 5/S20 00 



1 



25' MODEM CABLES 

13#22ga wire Wilshltild. 
D&25P conn & DB&1 228-1 
tover on one end 



POLY FOAM COAX 
50 Ohm 

Low Loss = to RQ174 

S4.95/100' S3-00/50' 



ULTRASONIC 
TRANSDUCER 

Detects sound ab^ve the ran^e of human 
hearing! Transmits & receives 
$2.50 ea. 5/$lO.0O 



MAGNETIC PICK UP 
TRANSDUCER 

Converts motiort 1o ac voltage wUhout 
mechanical llr^kage 

W )( 2^' w{& shielded cable 
$4J5 ea. 



22 pins/ Double Row/Dipped Solder 
.15e $208 ea 10/$17.00 



12 V DC Horn 

2" diameter x 1 %" deep 



,75 each 
3/S2.00 



Au t ron|c El e c t A u 1 o A i a rm 
Easymstallation independentcir- 
CLjits solid state 12V neg ground 
tS.QO ea. 

Extra lytic 

4800 fiF at 7 5 VDC 

1 Vfl'' length x 1" diameler 

S3.0Q each 

50 fiF at 200 VDC 

1 3/i" length X V/' diameter 

$2.00 each 



12 Vdc RELAY 

SPST Open Frame 

5 Amp Contacts 

Mfg-Magnecrafi 

$1.50ea 4/$5.00 



22 pins/Double Row/ Wire Wrap 
.156 $2.44 ea I0f$l9.00 



100 ASSORTED DISC CAPS 

(FULL LEADS) 20 EA OF 5 

DIFFERENT VALUES $2,00 

PER PACK 



172 



1 1 



Whita PorcalaIn 
Egg Insulator 

1" SOcea. 3 for $1.25 



15^ MODEM CABLES 
14#Z2ga wire w/shield, 
DB2SP conn &DS51 226-1 
cover Ofi one end S6.00 ea. 10^555.00 

15' MODEM CABLES 
10tf229a wire w/shield, 
De2SS conn & DBS1226-1 
cover on one end $6. SO ea. 10/SGO.OO 



ASSORTED ELECTRO LYTICS 



CAPS RADIAL LEADS 



2200 uF @ 16V 
.25 ea. lO^S^.OO 



SOLDER LUG TYPE CAPS 

60 UF ^ 350V 1 ■ Dk3" L 

50 UF © 450V V Dx av^" L 

50 UF .@ 450V V' 0x3" L 

60€ EA. 5 FOR $2.50 



EFJ CRYSTAL OVENS 
6V/12V 75° 
$5.00 ©a. 



SOLDERLESS TEST 
PROD (BLACK) 

Threaded type, molded handle 
$.40 ea. lD/$3^50 



USED MUFFIN FANS 

3 blades, 110V AC, ^V^" sij. 

S5.§5 



CW MINI SLIDE SW 

DPDT.15ea.lO;Sl.2S 



ALL STAR AIR 
VARIABLE 

24-275 pF .75 ea. 



RED SEVEN SEGMENT 
DISPLAY 



TIL 322P $1.00 ea. 



BOURNS' EDGE 
MOUNTING 

5K pot single tum 
3345W series S1.BQ ea. 



12 VOLTS @ 1/2 AMP 



VALU&MFQ 



63,000 

10,000 

2J0O 

2.900 

3,000 

ie,ooo 

21,000 
1,000 
34.Q0O 
450 

500 
240 
50 






® 



VOLTS 



15V 

213V 

25V 

25V 

25V 

25V 

25V 

50V 

50V 

75V 

100V 

300V 

450V 



D»A 



3" 

V/r' 

1 y*" 

AW' 
3" 

iw 

IVi" 
IVj" 

1V-" 



X 
X 
X 

% 

X 
X 
X 
X 
X 
K 
)t 
X 
X 



LENGTH 



53/4" 

4Vi^' 
4** 

3y^" 

5Vi" 
274" 

3V4" 

2" 



PRICE 



4 00 ea 
3.00 ea 
2.00 ea 
2,00 ea 
2.00 ea 
3,00 ea 
3,00 ea 
2,50 ea 
3,00 ea 
2,00 ea 
2.00 ea 
2,00 ea 
2.00 ea 



IC SOCKETS 

Cambion 

Gold Plated Wire Wrap 

14 pin .35 ea l0/$3.00 

16 pin .38 ea 10/$3.30 



COMCO XTAL FILTER 

23^6" X 1" X *4^' 
13KC BVt/ £10.00 «a. 



Coax Connectors 

UG'273/U BNC-F/UHF-M 2.50 

UG-255/U BNC-M/UHFF 3.00 

UG-146A;U N'M/UHF'F 4.50 

UG-83B/U N-F/UHF-M 4.50 

UG 175RG 58 Adapt. ,20 

UG 176 RG-59 Adapt. .20 



Filament trans former 
1^i"x2"xr $1.50&a. 



CTS DP6P ROT SWITCH 



.so ea. S/S2.d0 



AXIAL LEAD ELECTRO 
LYTIC CAPACITORS 



2 uF 

IDuF 

20 uF 

50 uF 

Z2 uF 

3.3 uF 

1 uF 

2uF 



@ 15V 
@15V 
#15V 
® 1SV 
@25V 
® 25V 
@ 3SV 
© 1S0V 



12 ea. 

for 
$1,00 



25 uF @ 25V 
3 uF @ 50V 
5 uF @ 50V 

10 uF @ 50V 

250 uF @ 2SV 

100 uF ^ SOV 

SO uF m 75V 



1 



ISea. 

for 

$2.00 

10 ea. 
for 

$2.00 



AU ma tenai guaranteed • ff for aiyy feason yov are noi SB ft$f>ed. our products may be retufned ^ithtn W days for a tuii rotund ^/ess sf^tppmg). Piesse add S3 
TERMS, for shipping and harrdhng on aW orders Additiorjai 5% charge for shipping any ttem over 5 lbs COD s accepted for orders totaitng S5000or more Aff orders 
Shipped UPS unt^ss_ofherwJse^pecified^Jori^^ 

EQUIPMENT / COMPONENTS / WIRE & CABLE / ACCESSORIES 



H^64 



North 32iid Stroat/Unit -1 Phoenix, Arizona 85008 [608] 

We accept checka, MaatarChargai and Viae 

Prices subject to change without notice 




WE ACCEPT MASTERCHARGE, VISA, CHECKS, AND C.O.D.'s PHONE IN YOUR ORDER 
NO ORDERS WILL BE ACCEPTED UNDER $10,00, NOT INCLUDING SHlPPlNGl 

HAH HICROWAVE RECEIVERS 

21 00 -2400MHz 

28dB GAtN 

2,5 to 3d8 NOrSE 

Assembled and tested with 90 day guarantee $299.95 

$5,00 shipping with charge card or money order enclosed. $10.00 shipping if C*0,D, 

RECEIVER KIT $169,95 Includes antenna, power supply box, P.CB. and parts, 
down converter P,C,B, and parts, and complete instructions* 



HfSCELLAMEQUS PARTS F0R_HJ1R 

YAGI antenna 

Power supply box 

Power supply P.C.Bp 

Power supply transformer 

Powe r s upp I y kit, comp I e te 

Down converter kit 

Down converter assembled and tested 

Power supply assembled and tested 

Down converter P,C*B* 

Instruct Ions 

MRF901 

HRF902 

MRpgii 

7812 
MBDlOl 
HBI 101 

2835/lM57n 

IK Pot 

Matching transformers, 75 Ohm - 300 Ohm 

Two-way splitters 

Chassis type F connectors 

Cable type F connectors 

Barrel type F connectors 

One 6 foot RG59 with connectors and 

one 50 foot RG59 with connectors 



$ 59-95 

12.95 

if. 99 

3.99 

49 , 95 

79.95 

114-95 

59*95 

19-95 

10.00 

3.99 
12,50 

4,29 
1.99 
K99 
4.99 

1.99 

3.00 

1-99 

2.99 
2/. 99 

4/. 99 
.76 



TOROIDAL CORES 


SEMICONDUCTOR 


1"* radius by 


INSULATION MICA 


3/8'* high 


ASSORTMENT 


3-30 MHz 


10/$1.0Q 


$1 ,00 each 






CRYSTAL ASSORTMENT 


1 3/8" X ^' 


10 assorted $1 ,99 


3-30 MHz 


25 assorted 5,00 


$1 ,25 each 


50 assorted 9*00 


1 7/8" X 3/4" 


PANEL FUSEHOLDER 



18.99 



dUANTITY PRICES AVAILABLE FOR 10 AND UP 



3-30 MHz 
$3.00 each 

MICA INSULATIOK 
T0--3 type 
10/51. 00 

SEMICONDUCTOR 
MOUNTING HARDWARE 
ASSORTMENT 100 pes 
$1-99 

RG130B/U 75 Ohm 
COAX 100 ft./S6,99 



for 3AG type fuses 
69c e^ch 

INLINE FUSEHOLDER 
for 3AG type fuses 
69t each 

SEMTECH DIODES 
S9HVM 2.5 KV 
$12-99 each 

ONE POUND SOLDER 
63/37 *032 size 
H2=3.5% S9.95 



ZEMERS 










[Watt 


]Mlt728 


to ]Kk7Sh 


10% 


V$1.00 


IWatt 


1N4728A 


to 1N'+76'»A 


5% 


3/$1.00 


5OOMW 


1N75i 


to 1N759 


10% 


6/$!. 00 


5OOMW 


1N751A 


to 1N759A 


5% 


VSi.oo 


5OOMW 


1N957 


to 1N973 


10% 


6/$1.00 


5OOMW 


1N957A 


to 1N978A 


5% 


V$i.oo 



AA N I CADS 

USED/Pull outs from calculators 

79^ each or lOO/$59.00 SOLD AS IS 



NICAO BATTERY CHARGER 

Will charge 4 AA cells at a time 

55-95 



^Reader SeiVfC9—s&e page 210 



73 Magazine * June, 1980 191 



DIGITAL MULTIMETER 



600 mHz COUNTER 



OM-?0^ 



ki*™* 






l«#^#£ 



,v«*k'^"'** 




$ 



99 



»9 V 



WIRED 




WIRED 



Low cost, high performance, that's the DM-700 Unlike some of the 
hobby grade DMMs available, the DM-700 offers professional quality 
performance and appearance at a hobbyist pnce. II features 26 
different ranges and 5 functions, all arranged in a convenient, easy to 
use format. Measurements are displayed on a targe 3^? digit, Vz inch 
high LED display, with automatic dectrral placement, automatic 
polarity, and overrange indication. You can depend upon the 
DM'TOO, state-Df-the-art components such as a precision laser 
tnmmed resistor array, semiconductor band gap reference, and 
ral fable LSI circuitry insure lab quality performance for years to 
come. Basic DC volts and ohms accuracy is 0.1%, and you can 
measure voltage all the way from 1 00 ^tv to 1 000 volts, current from 
0.1 fia to 2.0 amps and resistance from 0.1 ohms to 20 megohms. 
Overload protection is inherent in the design of the DM-700, 1250 
volts. AC or DC on all ranges, making it virtually goof proof. Power is 
supplied by four C size cells, making the DM-700 portable, and, as 
options, a nicad battery paci^ and AC adapter are available, The 
DM'70O features a handsome, jet black, rugged ABS case with 
convenient retractable tilt bail. All factory wired units are covered by 
a onp year limited warranty and kits have a 90 day parts warranty 

Order a DM'70O. examine it for todays, and if you renotsatisifed 
in every way. return it in original form for a prompt refund. 



Specifications 

DC and AC volts: 
DC and AC current: 
Besbtance: 
Input protection: 

Input Impedance: 

Display: 

Accuracy: 

Power: 
Size: 

Weight: 



1 00 liV to 1 000 Votts, & ranges 

1 /lA to 2-0 Amps. 5 ranges 

O.lii to 20 megohms. 6 ranges 

1250 volts AC/ DC all ranges fuse protected 

for overcurrenf 

10 megohms, DC /AC volls 

3V2 digits, 0.5 inch LED 

0.1% basic DC volts 

4 'C cells, optional nicad pack, or AC adapter 

6"Wx3''Hk6"D 

2 lbs with batteries 















Prices 








DW'700 wired + tested 


£99.95 






DM 700 Kll form 


79.95 






AC adaptef/chargef 


4 95 






Micad Dack witti AC adaptencharger. 


14.9& 






Probe kll. 


3 95 













T£RM&: Satiifactlon guaranteed or 
money relunded, COD, add S^.^ft. Min- 



E*Tf f [H ^■hliHtn j^mtlti linr^HTTiTi [71 



110.00. add 5 J 5, AiW 5% tor postage, 



15%. NY resldftnta, add 7% taK, 



r«ia-iilBr charge 



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TheCT-70 breaks the price barrier on lab quality frequency counters. 
No longer do you Inave tosettle tor a kit. half-kit or poor performance, 
the CT-70 is completety wired and tested, features professional 
quality construction and specifications, plus is covered by a one yea r 
warraf>ty. Power for the CT- 70 is provided by four AA' size batteries 
or 1 2 volts, AC or DC, available as options are a reload battery pack, 
and AC adapter Three selectable frequency ranges, each with its 
own pre-amp, enable you to make accurate measurements fronn less 
than to Hz to greater than 600 mHz. All switches are conveniently 
located on the front panel for ease of operation, and a single input 
jack eliminates the need to change cables as different ranges are 
selected Accurate readings are insured by the use of a large 0.4 inch 
seven digit LED display, a 1 .0 ppm TCXO time base and a handy LED 
gate light indicator. 

The CT-70 is the answer to all your measurement needs. In the 
field, in the lab. or in the ham shack . Ord er yours today^ examine it for 
1 days, if you're not completely satisfied, return the unit for a prompt 
and courteous refund 



Specllicatfons 

Frequency range: 
Sensitivity- 

Stability: 

Display: 

input protection. 

Input iimpedance' 

Power: 

Gate: 

Decimal point: 
Size: 
Weight: 



1 Hz to over 600 mHz 

less than 25 mv to ^ 50 mHz 

less than 1 50 mv to 600 mHz 

1 .0 ppm, 20-40' C: 0.05 ppn^/"C TCXO crystal 

ttme base 

7 digits. LED. 0.4 inch height 

50 VAC to 60 mHz, 10 VAC to 600 mHz 

1 megohm, 6 and 60 rnHz ranges 50 ohms^ 

600 mHz range 

4 AA' celb, 1 2 V AC/DC 

0,1 sec and t ,0 sec LED gate light 

Automatic. aJ! ranges 

5"Wxiy?'Hx5V?"D 

1 lb wtih batteries 



Prices 

CT-70 wired + tested 

CT-ro kit form, 

AC adapter 

Nicad pack iMth AC adapter/charger 

Telescopic wtnp antenna. BNCplug. 

Tilt bail assembly ... 



$99.95 

. 75.95 

4.95 

99& 



^62 BOX 4072, ROCHESTER, N.Y. 14610 

PHONE ORDERS CALL 
{716)271-6487 



192 73 Magazine • June, 1980 




SPECTRONICS. .Mc 

lOM OartMS St, <M Part, IfHiwli • €0304 

C312) 849-B777 ^w 



BARGAIN , 

FAVORITES! 



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« Mylli-ttarK], Muiti- frequency 

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• Fully assem&ie<l and pre-turied — no measuring, no cuMmg 

• All wealher ratw! — 1 KW AM. 2 5 KW CW or PEP SSB 

• Proven performance — tmrt trian 10 000 tyve t3een deiiverec 

• Pierniit use ot The full capabrlities of todays 5- band xicvrs 

• One teedUnc t&r operai^on on all bamfs 



80-40 HD/A 80/40 Mtr Dands (69) . , 
7»40HD/A 75/40 Mtr bands (66) , . 
75-tOHD/A 75/40/20/15/10 Mtr (66). 
80'10HD/A 80/40/20/15/10 Mtr (69). 



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MODEL PLF 2E 240 VAC 50-60 Hj opera r ion S54 9& 

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MODEL PT 2E , 240 VAC 50-60 Hz operation *79 95 



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tor for Wf lAon 1405 1 1 B . ^ 

liod«l Mlf-227. 5wn«. but wm BNC con- 
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WilKm 14021 Tem po 11 1 ,50 



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COMPARE THESE FEATURES 
WITH ANY UNIT AT ANY PRICE 




FREQUENCY RANGE: Receive and transmit: 23.000 to 29.995 
Ml-tz, lOKHz steps wKhbuiit-in +100 KHz repeater offset. 
ALL SOUO STATE-CMOS PL DIGITAL SYNTHESIZED. 
SiZE: UNBELIbVABLE! ONLY 6 3/4 * X 2 3/8" x 9 3/4"\COMPARE! 
iUICROCOMPUTEf^ CONTROLLED: Aii scanning and frequency- 
control functions ace pertormed by microcomputer. 
DETACHABLE HEAD: The control head may be separated from tHe 
rad^o tor use m l>mfcled spaces and for security purposes. 
SIX-CHANNEL MEMORY: Each memory is re-prpgrammable. 
Memory ^s felamed even when the unit is turned off, 
MEMORY SCAN: The six channels may be scanned in either the 
"busy" or "vacant" modes for quick, easy location of an occupied 
or unoccupied frequency. AUTO RESUME, COMPARE! 



FULL-SAND SCAN: All channels may be scanned in eiifier "busy 

or "vacant" mode. This is especially useful for locating repeater 

frequencies In an ynfamil^ar area. AUTO RESUME. COMPARE! 

INSTANT MEMORY-I RECALL: By pressmg a button on Ihe 

microphone w front panef. memory channel 1 may be recalled for 

immediate use. 

MIC-CONTROLLED VOLUME AND SQUELCH: Volume and 

squelch can be adjusted Irom the micfophone for convenience in 

mobile operation. 

DIRECT FREQUENCY READOUT; LED display shows operating 

frequency. NOT channel number. COMPARE! 

TEN (10) WATTS OUTPUT: Also 1 watt low power for shorter 



distance communications. LED readout displays power selection 

when transmitting. 

DIGITAL S/RF METER: LEDs indicate signal strength and power 

output No more mechanical meter movements to fat I apart! 

LARGE V?'INCH LED DISPLAY: Easy-to-read frequency display 

minimizes '*eyeS'Off-the-road" time, 

PUSHBUTTON FREQUENCY CONTROL FROM MIC OR FRONT 

PANEL: Any frequency may be selected by pressfng a microphone 

or front -panel switch. 

SUPERIOR RECEIVER SENSITIVITY: 0.28 uV for 20 dB quieting. 

The squelch sensitivity is superb, requiring less than 0,1 uV to 

open. The receiver audio ctrcuits are designed and boitt to exacting 

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InTelligibitity. 

TRUE FM, NOT PHASE MODULATION: Transmitters audio quality 

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OTHER FEATURES: Dynamjc Microphone, built In speaker, 

mobile mounting bracket, external remote speaker jack (head and 

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ACCESSORIES: 15' REMOTE CABLE,. „$29.95. FMPS-4R A/C 

POWER SUPPLY $39 95. TOUCHTONE MtC. K1T...,$39,9S. 

EXThRNAL SPEAKER. ..,S18.00. 



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Telephone [305} 233 3631 • Tele* 60 3356 
HOURS: S'6, Mon. - Thuf\. ^^ 

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DEALER ir^QUmiES INVITED 



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ELECTRONfC'S 



PARTS WAREHOUSE 



^62 



We now have available a bunch of goodies too 
good to bypass Items are Nmited so order today 



PO BOX 10101 
Rochester, NY 14610 

716-586-3950 
716 381 7265 



MINr KITS - YOU HAVE SEEN THESE BEFORE NOW 

HERE ARE OLD FAVORITE AND NEW ONES TOO. 

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FM 

MINI 
MIKE 




A supef higti perlormante FM wire- 
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signaf up to 300 yards with ex-cep- 
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FM 3 Kit $14.95 

FM'3 Wired artd Tested 19.95 




Transmits up 1o300" to 
any fM broadcast ra- 
dio, uses any type ot 
mfke Runs on 3 to 9V Type FM-2 
has added sensitive mike preamp 
stage 

FM-1 kit iy.95 FM-2 kit $4 95 



Color Organ 

See music come 
alive! 3 different 
lights flicker wi^th 
music. One light 
each for, hjgh 
mid-range and 
lows. Each indi- 
vidually adjust- 
able and drives up 
to 300 W runs on 
110 VAC. 

Complete kit, 
ML-1 

se.ds 



video ModulBl^r Kll 

C&nvens any TV (0 vjdco monitor Super 
Ststjie tunabte over ch 4-6 ftvns flf* j- 
1 5V. accepts std videosignal Bescuniion 
I he markeli Camprete mt. VD-i fT.ftS 



Led BJinliy Kit 
A great attention get- 
ter which alternately 
flashes 2 jumbo LEDs 
Use tor name tsadges 
buttons, warrmg 
pane^ lights, anything! 
Runs on 3 to 15 volts 
Complete kit, BL-1 
*2.95 




Super Sieulti 
A super sensitive ampli- 
fier' *ft\ ich uvil I piok up a 
pin drop a MS t&ei* Great 
for monitonng baby's 
room or as general pur- 
pose amplffier Fulf 2 W 
rms output, runs on 6 to 
15 volts, 1J3&5 8-45 Ohm 
speaker 
Compfete kit, 0N-9 

$5,9& 



CPO-1 

Runs on 3-12 Vdc 1 v^all out. 1 KHZqood forCPO, 

Alarm, Audio Oscillator. CompJete ktt $2,9'5 




Whisper Light Kit 

An interestifig k'w, smaft mike 
picks up sounds and converts 
Xhetrt \o light The louder the 
souncf. the brighter the light. 
Incfudes mike, controls up to 
300 W, runs on 110 VAC. 
Complete kit WL-1 




Universal Tim^r KU 

Prpvides the b^^ic parts and PC 

board r^qurred to provide a source 
ot precision liming and pulse 
generadon Uses 555 timer IC and 
<nclud?^S A rang^ gf parts for mosi 

Timing needs 

UT-5 Kit 55,95 



Mad Blaster Kit 

Produces LOUD ear shattering 9n<j 
attention getting srren like sound 
Can suppiy up (o 15 watts ol 
ObnOKrOLi& audio Runs On 6- IS VDC 



M6-T Kit 



$4.95 



Ton^ Decoder 
A complete tone deco* 
der on a single PC 
board. Features: 4S0- 
5000 Hi adiustable 
range via 20 turn pot, voltage regu- 
lation. 567 iC Useful fOf touch- 
tone burst detection FSK. etc 
Can aUso be used as a stabie tone 
encoder Runs on 5 to 12 voHs. 
Compleie kit TD-1 (5.95 



Stren Kit 
Produces upward and downward 
yvaif cbaractensric of & police 
siren. 5 W peak audio output, runs 
on 3-15 volts, uses 3-45 ohrr* 
speaker 
Complete kit. SM-3 $2,95 



60 Hx Time Bate 

HijfiS 0" 5 f 5 VDC Low curr^erK i? Swisi- I 
mm-^ month SC.CwrAf-.v TR.7 KiP tS.l54 



CaJI Your Phone Order in Today 

TERMS: SritFsfflf.TionguaranieedOr monpy 
r*?lundort COD add Si 50 Minimum orde^ 
S6 00 Offlers under SlG 00 iidd S 75 Add 
^'^a (or poshicit? msurr^nc-iO handling 
Oversen^s add 15"ri NV r^^sidents .idd ^''■'a tn* 



CLOCK KITS 

Your old tavorlilei. are liere 9g»in, Ov«f 7.000 Sold to Dale. 
Be on« or the gang and order youn today! 

Try your hand at building the finest looking clock on the 
market. Its satin finish anodfzed afuminurn case looks great 
anywhere, svhile s^x .4" LED digits provide a highly readable 
display. This is a complete kit, no extras needed, and it only 
takes 1-2 hours to assemble. Your choice of case colors: 
silver, gold, black (specify). 

Clock kit, 12/24 hour DC-5 $24.95 

Clock with 10 min. ID timer, 12/24 hour. DC-10 $29.95 

Alarm clock, 12 hour only, DCS $29,95 

12V DC car clock, DC-7 $29.95 

For wired and tested clocks add $10 00 to kit price. 

SPECIFY 12 OR 24 HOUR FORMAT 



Car Clock 

Ttie 1114-lClT, only 5 sofcfer conn^cflanft 



Hefe fi A SLJp'fir locking rugg?<1 anci 3tri.Jrg!? SUtg (^lijf^k. ^h^ch 15 9 5n^p iQ tJUiIri antj 
ihsjafi Ciocii mov'sment ^t compt^i&l-/ assemtjl&d — y^u only solder 3 wires and 3 
^wilCh«S t.akQ$ about 15 minu)e$i Di$pliiy \S bright f^r^en wilh j^utpm^lic: ttngtilne^^ 
COftTi'OJ pnaiocfiir - assure yO<J i?l B Oighly readable display day or mtght Come^ m A 
sal I n Ufii&f\ a nc»d»J! td ^ l u m m u m cnse. w h ic h ca n bn a1 1 Ache.a 5'd 1 f re ran t ways u&m g 2 s idt^ d 
lape Choice of ivh^r black or c^old ca%b (ip^oiv\ 



DC-3 k\l 13 hoL'r for mar 
DC-S wfed and tessed 



S29.95 



Calendar Alarm Clock 
Thecfock Ihat's got U all 6-5" LEDs. 
12/24 hour. $nooze 3'4 hoi/r slarm 4 
year calendar battery backup, and 
lots more Thie super 7001 chip is 
used Size. Sx4x.2 inches Complete 
kji. less case i'not available] 
OC'5 $34.95 



Und#r Dash Car C^ocli; 

\2.-2A houf ctKick in 3 ti^-3vMt\j\ pUsHz Da'SB Isalurss. 
6 |umbc? RED LEDS. fii^ri iccuraCy | CiO>%k. essv 
3 wire +iaoKijp. di-splar Wantfi wi1h ignn-ion anij 
Slh[>ftr in'JhruCli'CiflS OptiOnJI i^JimrrHJir altiOmthtarly 

DC'tl tliJfiln wilh rtilg brickef %2t.ii hit 

DU-I dimm-pi' adaplB'r IS.SO 

A<]<] $ 3 D QO As^y and Te.si 



PARTS PARADE 



Video T^rmlrift 

AcompiBipiy ssH'Gonlainetl si^nd aio-ne video te'mir>aii card Weqinres orily an ASCNKftytwjafd ana tv 
set Ip&ecome a comjifelffi'efminal ijnir Fftjturinsjr* sififjkB 5V juMitif JfTALconlroNtfdSvncaP'dbatjrf 
raCcs JlD KOOl comptBte compHJier and Kpy'bDard CQ«iiroi ol cursor I^btiIji srfpf cofitr&l ^ncf ^►5pijy 
Accepts arid gfneralQa:S«M£l A!^Cl> t>lu^ p^r'^ll^l k^^bOJ^rd inpul Th^ 6416 ij M< Char byl6lin?s Mirn 
SCroMldq uppor and lowe^ cflse 'opMonaH and ^as flS-2a? and ^Oriya loon inserlacea on board Kiru 
ir>c!HjdE fiockfiSifi and compiiRl^ d0C(jrrr*i^taliisri 
RE £4iG 1«rmir>al card hit 4 add S^OO ror Mr«d uni11 $1«9.95 

Pukwfrr SLftKJiV J 14.95 

nf ModLiialoi hil 17.15 



rC SPECIALS 



LINEAI^ 



301 
324 

&S6 
565 

?41 

3900 

3914 
B038 



«» 



t as 

fl.SO 
1150 
$ .45 
tl.OO 

$i.m) 

$1.Chtli 

10^(2.00 

$ -SO 

f .so 



TTL 



74S00 


i .40 


7447 


f .e& 


7475 


$ .so 


7490 


S.50 


74196 


$1.35 



SPECIAL 



40 n 
4013 

4049 
40S9 

4511 

4srs 

5639 



CMOS 



^fP 



.50 
.50 

si.as 

50 
£9^00 
$2.00 

S1,3S 
S1.75 



FtEAOOUTS 

Ftio^^ *' cc 11 m 

fNDS07.-&lO S'C A 1.» 

M*i*+ 7j/rtPT730 33' C A 1.W 
HP yfiil 4i"-C A IM 



tlC90 

10116 

720& 

7207A 

72160 

7107C 

53 T4 

5375A&/G 

7001 



$15.00 
$ 1.25 
$17.50 
S 5.50 
$21.00 
$12.50 
$ 2,95 
$ 2,95 
$ 6.50 



Resistor Ass"! 
Ag&orlment of Popular values - -A 

watt Cul lead tor PC mourttin^. W 
center. W leads, bag al 300 or 
more. 

£1.50 



Switches 

Mmi toggle SPOT St-00 

Fled P us hb Lit ions H O 3/11 .(MJ 



Earphones 

3" le-ad?' S ohm go£jd fpr ^rifi^U ?&ri-& 
spe3.ltier5 alarm clocks, eic 

5 lor 51,00 



Mini 4 ohm Sp«il(*r 

Appron 2-*" diam Roundi 
(ypfi for radfos mike eic 
3 \tit ($.(H> 



Crystal s 

3S79545 MHZ $1.50 

10 00000 MHZ S5,00 

&248S00 MHZ $5,00 



AC Adapters 

GofJil ryj cl[>[:*i5 nicad 
Ctsajgefftjili 110 VAC plug 
pn-& end 

SSvdt^^OmA 11,00 

16 vac @ teCkmA $2,50 

\2 -^ac f® 250mA $3.00 



Solid St«t« Burzerf 

STTiall buizer 450 H;. 66 dB soumd: 
output on 5-12 ydc a I 10-30 mA TTL 
corripatibic 11.50 



Slug Tuned Co(l» 
Small 3/16" He;< Slugs turned eofi 
a turns. tOforJlOO 



AC Outlet 

Panel Mounl wilti Leads 

4/S1.00 



FERRITE BEADS 

W4lh Jnfo Bfid fp«c.& iS/tl.OC 
t Hole Balun Beads a/)t.Dti 



Socheti 

8 Pin ia/$2.oa 

14 Pin t0/$2,00 

16 Pin TO/$2.00 

24 Ptn 4/$2.00 

2fl Pin 4/i2.O0 

40 Pin 3/*2.aO 



TRANSISTORS 



JN3904 NPh* 


IS.'ll^QO 


iN3W6 PNP 


\%'%i.m 


2^Jt403 PNP 


i5/fi.n 


?N441Q NJ^N 


is.'ti.oa 


2M4B16 FET 


4^1 i.n 


2*t&4[>t PhtP 


5/tl.lKi 


jN6ei2flC*F 


4/11 m 


?Na7Ti NPN SiFicon 


I1.U 


?N5179 UHF NPM 


3/<t-n 


Po*»r Tib JSIPN 40W 


)/tt.« 


Powar Tib PMF 4eW 


a/iJH 


UPF 1 Cits'/:} |SJ£4«4 


«$$ 


^PK^ 39M Typv 


ia/lA.» 


PNP 3WW Typ* 


9VI2,» 


£iM»&ai 


•.H> 


2N»46 UJT 


3/|3.«li 



DIodet 

5 1 V^ener 20/*1.00 

lN9i4Type 50/*1.00 

1KV 2Amp e/$1.0O 

100V lAmp 15/$1.00 



CAI^ACITORS 

tAHTALUM 

OiOD^d E&oxv 

1.5uF25V3/$1.00 
1.8yF25V3JS1,00 

.22 uF 25V 3/$1.00 



ALUhtlNUH 

EfoCUOl^liC 

tDOO uF i6v Prsoiar t-M 
^00 gF ^V AjiiaF I..SO 
ISO uF TfiV Axia«S/»1.IU 
10 uFi&V Radtai 10^11. C» 



DISK CEflAMIC 
Ot tSV disk 30/11 .H 
1 t^V IS/11 00 

001 !$v aoti M 

lOQpf JD.'tl.DO 

(M7 16V iO/(l.« 



DC'DC Cfini^entr 
+ 5 vrfc iJipul prod '9 vcfc @ 30ma 



25K K) Turn Tnim Pol $1.00 
1 K ao Turn Trim Pol S .50 



Ceramic IF Filters 

Mini ceramic f fUers 7 kHz 

B.W. 455 kHz $1.50 eo. 



i| 




Ti1mnt*r Capi 

Sprague > 3-40 pt 

Stable Polypropylen>e 

,SQ *a. 



Audio 
Pre3cal«r 

Make tiigh resolution auc^io 

measurments. great for musical 
insirumenr Tuning, PL looes, etc 
MuJtipliesaudJo UP nn frequency, 
selectable xlO or xlOO. gives .01 
HZ resQiution with 1 sec gate 
ttme! High sensitivity ot 25 my. 1 
meg input z and built-in filtering 
gives great performance Rur^s 
Oh 9V battery, all CMOS. 
PS-2 kit $29.95 

PS-2 vviretJ t39.9S 




I 



SOO MHz 
PRESCALER 



Extend the range of your 
counter to 600 MHz Works 
with all counters Less than 
150 mv sensitivity, specify - 
10 or -100 

Wired, tested. PS-IB $59,95 
Kit PS- 18 $44.95 



aO Watt 2 mtr PWR AMP 

Simple Class C power amp features 8 tirnes power g^m. 1 Win 
for 8 out , 2 W i n for 1 5 out, 4W in for 30 out Max output of 35 W. 
incredible value, complete with all parts, iess case and T-R retay. 
PA-1 . 30 W pwr amp kit $22.95 

TR-1 , RF sensed T-R relay kit 6.95 



MPF-238 iransistor as used m PA-i 

S-lOdtj gam 150 mh? $11, f 5 



RF actuated relay senses RF 

(1W) and closes DPDT relay 

For RF sensed T-R reiay 

TR-1 Kit $6.95 



Pow«r Supply Kll 

Complete triple regulatHd pqwer 
suppfy prpviiJes variable 6 to 13 vol Is at 
200 ma and ^5 at \ Amp Excellent foad 
regulation, good filtering and small 
Siie. Le&s Iranatormers, requires 6.3 V 
i9 1 A and 24 MCT. 
CorriDlete kii PS-31T $^.95 



Qryttsl MIcroptione 

Small 1" diameter 'A" thick 

cry?rg1 mike cartridge $.75 



25 AMP 

100V Brrdge 

$1,50 each 

Mini-Bridge 50V 

1 AMP 

2 for $1 .00 



Coax Connector 

Chassis mount 

BNC type $1.00 



Mint T\Q-M4 Coax 
10 fL tar $1,00 



§ Volt Battery Clip* 
Mice qijahlyr cFips Sfof^l.tN) 

^■" Rubber Orommets 10 lor $t M 



OP'AMP SjKdal 

ei-FET LF 1 3741 - Direct pm for pin 74 1 compatible, but 500,000 MEG 

input z. super low 50 pa mpul tiifrent, low power iSrain 

SO for only $9,00 10 tor $2.00 



Pint flag 

AesE oF chiohE5. di&c caps lanc fesiBta^s 

Uan^is^Drs. ijiodes MICA c^ps etc 

%m iMf iiQO [VCJ 11.00 lg 1^119 S^hmtA) iZ-H 



Connvclora 

6 pin type gold conTacJs Cor 
mA'i{}03 cflf ctock modul* 



\-m4% - /Our choice, please specify 

Mini Red, Jiiimbo Red, High Iniensity Red, Mluminator Red i/|1 

Mini Yellow, Jumbo Velfow. Jumbo Green 6/(1 



Vinclvrv 
Motorola MV 2^8 30 PF Nomm^l cflp 20-90 PF - Tunable fang* 

,S(» H{A or ^tl.W 



7flMG 


$1.25 


79MG 


$1.25 


733 


1.50 


309K 


$1.15 


7805 


$1.0« 



Regutalort 



7Q12 


$1.M 


7815 


ti.oo 


7905 


$1,25 


7912 


$1.25 


7915 


$1,25 



Shrink Tubing Nuba 

NicB precut pees of shrink size 1" x W 

snriril< To 'M" Greal toi sp'rces M/il.Ofl 



M^n( TO-&2 Hest Smks 
Thefm alloy Bfdnd S lor $1.00 

10-^20 H«aT Sinks 3 lor $1.00 



Opto Isolators - 4N28 type 

Opto Reflectors - Photo diode + LED 




$.S0 ea. 
$1.00 ea. 



Mol«x Pin* 
Pi*Dl#x already precirt in J^ngth of 7 Perfect 
lor 14 pjn aockgl:? 30 fj#i_!g!L*lJJ__ 



CD& PhalocaM 
R«sistance vanas with ligh). 250 ohms lo 
ovgr 3 rneg 3 for $1.00 



t^ Reaaer Service-^ sse page 2 W 



73 Magazine ■ June, 1980 195 



Bargains 



SOLDERTAIL SOCKET SPECIAL 
14 pin S0/S4.9S 16 pin 50/S4.95 
20 pin 40/S4.95 24 pin 30/S4.95 

40 pin 20/S4.95 



US pi?i 50/S4.95 
28 pin 30/S4.95 



TRANSISTORIZED SPECIAL 

ff yt/u ever needed to stock up on transisfors^ you had 
better do it now. General purpose NPN transistors f simi- 
lar to the 2NJ904^ are now 1O0/S7.95. while general 
purpose PSP rranststors (similar to the 2N3906) are now 
100/S8.95, Quantities are limited at this special price. 

THE CLOCK AND CASE SPECIAL CONTLNUES 
The ^L\1003 is a great car clock module; it mcludes a 
built-in crystal controlled timefoase, runs off H2V DC. 
ind features blue-green fluorescent readouts for easy 
lisihihty. The case Itas an optical filter to bring out the 
hest of the readouts, along with mounting hardware to 
attach the clock under (or on) your dashboard. SI 9.95 

I6k DYNAMIC R.VMS: 8/S69 - SPECIAL LOW PRICE! 
Ideal for expanding memory in TRS-SO* -I and -If as well 
as machines made by Apple, Exidy, fieath, newer FETs, 
etc. Low power, 250 ns (4 MHz) parts. Ad^i S3 for two 
DIP shunts plus TRSSO* instaUatimi Instructions. 

*TRS-EQ iA a irsidemark of the Tomiy Cot^f oration 

WE HAVE THE VOLTAGE REGULATORS YOU NEED 
Posit IPC I A, TO-220 package^ 78 series only S1.38 each. 

Choose from +5, -^6, +^, i~l2, H5\ -f^tS, and i~24 Volts 
Negative lA. TO'220 package, 79 series only $L49 each. 
Choose from -5, -6, -8^ -12, -15, -18, and -24 Volts, 

transistors &FET's 



2N2221 

2N2222 

2N2907A 

2N3055 

2N3904 

2 N 3906 

2N4124 

2N4304 
2N4400 
2N4917 
2N4946 
2N5227 

2N5306 



2NS449 

2N54S4 

D41DI 

D44C4 

D4SC4 

D45H8 

TIP3055 

MPS3694 
FPTIOO 
FET-I 
FET-2 

FET3 
FET-6 



NPN TO'18, unmarked 
PNPTO-l 8, unmarked 
PNP plastic case, house number 
NPN TO-J, house hck power type 
NPN TO' 1 05, house number 
PNP TO- 105, house number 
30 V^ 200 mA, 330 mW, TO-92 
w/minhFE J20to360 
TO- IS plastic N-JFET, gen purp. 
NPN pias tic , house number 
PNPT0-lQ6case 
NPN TO-] 06 case 
Ideal small signal 3 lead, silicon 
rranstsior, PNP, TO-92, 30V 
Silicon transistor, TO-92, Darling- 
ton NPN 25 V^ 300 mA, 400 mW, 
hFE 7000 to 70000 

Silicon NPN transistor 

RF N-FET 

PNP TO-202, I A max power type 

TO-220, 4A. 30W, 55 V, NPN, 

minimum hFE 25 

TO'220, 4 A, 30 W^ 55 V, PNP, 

minimum hFE 25 

TO-220, house number, PNP, lOA, 

50W^mV,hFE60min. 

Silicon NPN fjower, tab case elect. 

NPN/generat purpose 

Ph a to transistors 

Dual N-JFET VHFjUHF. T0-I8 

DualN'JFET VHFjUHFamp^ sim. 

to 2N4416, TO-I8 

Dual N-JFET low noise audio amp, 

TO- 18 

House number, general purpose 

631 type dual mte MOSFET Ideal 

for RF amp/mixer applications 

with a dB NF at 200 MHz 



7/$L0O 
5/$ 1.00 
5 /SI. 00 
1/$0JS 
5 /SI. 00 
5/SLOO 

3/Sl.OO 

2/Sl.OO 
5/Sl.OO 
S/$1.00 
6/S 1 .00 

6/Sl.OO 



3/SLOO 

6/S 1 .00 
3/Sl.OO 

1/S0.50 

1/S0J5 

1/S0.75 

3/S2.0O 
I'SOJS 
4/SLOO 

1/S0.50 
3/SLOO 

3/SLOO 

2/SLOb 





SPECIAL SPECIAL SPECIAL SPECIAL SPECIAL 

JU ceramic disc capacitors, with full leads (not cut for 
PC insertion/. Ideal for bytmssing TTL and other logic 
circuits, audio coupluig. and audio bypass apfylications. 
Available in quantity only: 500/S 16.95 or for even 
greater savings. I000/S30.0d. Stock up nowl 
SPECIAL SPECIAL SPECIAL SPECL\L SPECIAL 




% Watc only; may be 5'? or 10^. All resistors iiiay only be 
ordered in multiples of 1 00 fi.e. you cannot purchase one 
2, 7k resistor; you must order 100^ 200, 300, etc, I 

EACH VALUE: SI,70/hundred (I pkg) 
TEN VALUES: S15.30/thous3ndf/(?/7Jtgs; 



82k 
91k 

100k 

UOk 
120k 
130k 

130k 
160k 
180k 
200k 
220k 
240k 
270k 
300k 
330k 
360k 
390k 
430k 
470k 
510k 
560k 
620k 
680k 
750k 
820k 
910k 
LOM 
LIM 
1.2M 
1.3M 
L5M 
L6M 
1,8M 
2.0M 
2.2M 
5,6M 
6.8M 
22M 



TERMS: Ctf/ rex add tax. Alt^w 5% shipping; eicejj refunded. VTSAfMtmer- 
charge mJt our 24 Hour order dak ar (4 15) 562^ ^, COD OK with xtr&f ad- 
dreis for UPS. Speciai prices gtfod through rover moitth of magsiine mhiie 
lupplfet laft: other prUrew wubieci to change without notice. Add St limndiing 
to Grdert under $15. Th&nkifor your tusinefs! 

SEND FOR oUr CATALOG TODAYI 



1.0 Ohms 


47 Ohms 


2.0k 


1.2 


51 


2.2k 


1.3 


56 


2.4k 


1.5 


62 


2.7k 


1.6 


68 


3. Ok 


1.8 


75 


3-3k 


2.0 


82 


3.6k 


2.2 


91 


3.9k 


2.4 


100 


4.3k 


2.7 


110 


4.7k 


3.0 


120 


5.1k 


3.3 


130 


5.6k 


3.6 


150 


6.2k 


3.9 


160 


6.8k 


4.3 


180 


7.5k 


4.7 


200 


8.2k 


5.1 


220 


9.1k 


5.6 


240 


10k 


6.2 


270 


Ilk 


6.8 


300 


12 k 


7.5 


330 


13k 


8.2 


360 


15 k 


9.1 


390 


16k 


10 


430 


18k 


11 


470 


20k 


12 


510 


22k 


13 


560 


24k 


15 


620 


27 k 


16 


680 


30k 


18 


750 


33k 


20 


820 


36k 


22 


910 


39k 


24 


Ik 


43k 


27 


1.1k 


47k 


30 


1,2k 


51k 


33 


1.3k 


56k 


36 


1.5k 


62k 


39 


1.6k 


68k 


43 


1.8k 


75k 



3/$2.0O 





•^it 



GODBOUT ELECTRONICS 
BIdg. 725, Oakland Airport, CA 94614 



196 73 Magazine • June, 1980 



MiNrATURE SCREWDRIVER 




RUGGED CONSTRUCTION 
IQM'iOf U3t&-- l.'B-TIP 



■4=!i"" 



, , .,, 2/^1.00 



MAGNETIC RETRIEVER TOOL 




P^cks up Alusivfi matal parts or tQ&ii 
in hBfd-tb-r«ach placds. 

EXTENDS TO 26K" - ROTATES Zm" 
STRONG, LIFETIME iWAGNET 

IWRT'2281 , . , $3,95 



COJiTINENTAL SPECIALTIES 



LOGIC PROBE KiT 




SPECIFICATIONS 
Input Impedance: 300.000 Oh ins. 
Thresholds: 'La" 30%Vcc - 'Hi" 70%Vcc 
Maximum Sp^ad: 300 ns^c, 1.5MHz 
Input Pfotectipn: ±SOVDC continuous 117VAC 
for 1 5 sec. 

Power 3QmA @5V -40mA @ 1 5V - 25V max. 
reverse voltage protected; 36" cable with color 
coded clips included. 
Operating T^mp.t 0-50*C. 
DimenMons: &.SL x 1 OW K 0.7O in. 
(147 X 25 5t ISmnit 
Weight: 30 02. {85 gmj 
LPK-1 , w w m - 521. 9S/ Kit 



;;///// 







Proio Clips 



m}}>? 



t4^PI« CLIP 
Ifi-PIMCLtP 
24-P3MCLJP 
404>^MCLIP 



PC*14 

PC-24 
PC'40 



■- i 



S 4.50 
S 4.75 
ST 0.00 
StG.OO 



Proio Boards 




pa^ , . * . . 
PB-100 . . . . 

PB 10T . . , , 
PS-102 . . . . 
PBIOS . . . . 
PB-104 . . . . 
PB-203 . , , . 
PS-Z03A, , , 
PB-S03A'Kit 



. si7.es 

. . 19.&5 
. . 22.B5 
. . 2e.95 
. . 44.95 
. . 55.95 
, . 99.95 
. 155.00 
. 13t.OO 




Jumbo S-Digit Clock Kit 

* Four .lai'^tit. and twD .3q(l"l1t. 
com man gnodA dlspl^avi. 

* |J»S MM^M clock chip 

* gii^ltcne; tor haurs^ minuted ind hoJd f ufEttlani 

* Houi^i Msily ytewatjifi to 3a tact 

* gEm-UlAtfld walnut C9ie 
*L*VAC operation 

'A \2 or S4 hiour q-parflilOn 

* lr>cli.tcJ4-E all conrvpaneotSf cjs« ind wall tt'a^JfOfdHT 

JE747 $29.95 




JE701 



• enght .3M ht. ■iirjfnm. cath- 
^d dliplBV 

• Usflfl MM53"t4 clock chij? 
*Swltth*i for hours, iTilnutsB 

and hotd nn-oile^ 

■ Hrs. «atliy vleuvlib]4 to 20 1t. 

• SlmulatBd Tivalnui c&eb 

• 1 15 VAC opBraTlon 

• 12 or 24 hr, operation 

■ loci, 4i\\ compon^rtfa, case & 
^A/ftEl tran^fornner 



6-Dlgit Clock Kit $19.95 
Regulated Power Supply 

Uws LM309K. Heat sink 
provided. PC b&ard con- ^* 
struct ion. Provides a solid 
1 amp @ 5 voSts. Can suppiv up 
to i5V, ±9V and i12V wjth 
JE205 Adapter. Includes compo- 
nents, hardwares end;in$tructrons. 
Size: 3^^" X 5" x 2"H 

JE200 $14.95 





ADAPTER BOARD 
-Adapts to JE200- 
±6V, ±9V and ±12V 



DC/ DC converter with +5V input. Toriodal hi- 
speed switching XIVIFR. Short clrcuk protection, 
PC board construction. Pig:gY'back to JE 20D 
bo#rd.Size:3^yi'K2"i«9/16"H 



JE205 



$12.95 



MICROPROCESSOR COMPONENTS 



3226 
8257 



MC5SI3Q 
MC6B02CP 

MceaEO 



CPU S ?.95 

B-8ii lf||^ut''Oulpln 3,2S 

f imriDy iFitBTfupl CcrKrot ^.^ 

Bi-[ht«dicintf g(js Drivtr a.4S 

Clock GniEratqri'Drivflr 335 

@us D'ivei 3..4S 

System CnnhrcllBr^QuL Drinf 4 $5 

$ystt?r* CoolnsllBr fi.tS 

Prog Coinm ifflfUSi^RT) 7.35 

Prpg, rnlerMal fimar 14.95 

Pfofl Psrwh tjiOtPPri a.jj 

Profl. DMA CBittnrf 19.B5 

r«)E lrilfl"J[:-l Cnntrtvl 19.95 

MFSJ 

htPU wllti CkicH and Ram 

l3aX8Sl*lipR»{n 

^jijUt inttcAdaintMCSBSDf) 

PrJDrity Imenuid CnntriQllar 

1l??4Jigai!ROMi:MC6B,ii3[>-B| 

Aaymnn ronnus Cn^iT! Adaplc^ 

5y[>Chr4[t<iu$ Scnal DaJa Ad^jil. 

O-eOD bps \Hq\m MOOEM 

Z40P bOt Uadul3<a>r 

Quid i-3[ate Bus Trans |yr41-;!6l' 



MicnQPRQCESsan manuals 

hf-Un Us4f Mifiual S7,$Ci 

M'CDfliea? U!Kf*jU/iiud 7.S0 

M-i^&SD Llser Manual : S.QO 



(HMf 



25T3(?1'Hl) CMraclr Ce[i6r3Tori:nfi|»r BSej *9.'K 

^S|3P321) Char^cUf GBtwralarllawt^ i^a3«t 9.-06 

?S16 Cnar^ctar Ce^iaratiar \t\M 

imbimi 2IHB'BIE Read only M«rticirv 1 s« 



RHCHDPitDCIESSQfl CHIPS--«lSCELLAItE&US ■ 

l$Oi)?eOCl OPU 
ZSMfT^O-lJ CPU 

COP I ess CPU 

2650 M*^ 

650j! cf'y 

&3^$ 9-Bin UP<U M/clDck, RAhl, 1,>D Unas 

PflM5 CPU 

TM39fiODJL ie-3i1 MPU w^hanlwarff. mm\^ 

5HJFT RECISTEJIS 

MM500H DMI n 9lt Oynamii;! 

MM&Q3M Diul M BiL Dynamic 

iMM60^H Dual IG Bie Staliia 

ww^OfiH Dtiai ™ Bit iAm-, 

mM^IOH £iii.al M BIL AoGuniulSlsr 

MMMISH SMii^lPBttOl^naiiMC 

xllpd+T 1*24 Dynamt 

2514 He« 3i^ M SLiflic 

2&2S [hial 132 BIE 3<aU£ 

252* 51? Stalic 

2525 1024 DyiiSiflle 

2^27 [hjal 256 Bit STaHH: 

5526 Du9l I"Hd Sl^dc 

2529 Dual 240 Bil SsalK 

-2532 Quad BO Bit Sialic 

3M1 FIIB 

741^70 4K>1 Raglstej- me rrriSsateV 



3J.95 

7.^§ 

12.95 
M.H 

7.95 

S.« 

12.B5 

l4.StS 

3 25 

19.95. 
10.95 

11.95 
1J95 
19.96 



.55 
.50 
.Sfl 

.B9 
3.95 

2.85 
?.W 
4.00 
i.DQ 
295 
5.S5 
2.4ft 



RMI'S' 

acatk 

Oyrumn: 

SCatK. 

£latJE 

SO He 

Slatic M05 

Slqtic iliflns 

Static 45frig low HcwSi 

Simile jaClns: 

Slatk: 300ns li^ jidwbi 

£?3t)« 

Dy^aifllc 

^tlE 

Static TH^tt 
StHfic ' 

Dynamfn 1C p^ 

□ynsmlc: l£ pin 25QJV9 

Slatic 

Dyrwmic 350ha 
iTiQusa (iHrK#d) 
Cviftinw: 

pnoirs 

171HA aiHB FAMPS 

S?16IMTiL 16*:- EPfiOW 

TWS2516 15lf' EPROM 

^271B^ "ResilitK stngle -5V pawar supply 

TMSJ532 4*013 tPRDM 

tim BK EPfiOW 

37T6 t.l IfiK" EPflOW 

*'ftequlrfls 3 valEages. — 5V, +5V 



UQl 
1103 
2iai(8101) 

;i03 

SILO? 

21I1(B111S 

5112 

21U 

2U4L 

^1t4-3 

21T4L-3 

5101 

52flO.'21D7 

745200 

|MK«27> 
UPC416 

|HK41^i5> 
TMS4*M- 

■ISNi 
TMS4{M5 

2iir 

MUS2S2 



256K1 

10^4^1 

2SSJi4 

256K4 
25fiX4 
1024X4 
1324X4 

1(^X4 

256M4 
4096X1 

25SX1 

5sext 

4K 

16ft 

4K 

102«4 
t6,SI4X1 

2KHI 



SI 4& 

t.75 
l.« 

%M 

4.^ 

735 

10.35 

m.^ 

11 95 
7.5& 
4S5 
1.7S 
4.S5 
2.» 
4.96 

14.% 

UM 
9.95 

*n.oc 



tl2V 



5301-1^761 n 10J4 
BM[)-117R)2| 2&& 



A-r-S-1B13 3DK BAUD 



UJIRT'S ■ 



5 95 



£2323 

82^115 

828123 

?d1flfl 

■41&D 



3Z3(B 

4II$& 

£2Xe 

512 

256 

H124 



TrislA^ln Blf^^lJ' 
Qpe^ C BIpnlajF 
Opfln CoiHWiCir 

TflStStf 

m OlMn DflftidOl 

TTLOpoi Ccitlqctar 

Slavic 



59.9D 

TO. 95 
5a. 95 

14.9& 
3.49 
2.95 
3.95 

ig.« 

9.34 
3.95 
2.&5 



JEBOO HEXADECIMAL 
ENCODER KIT 

FEATURES: 

• Kill 4 titt ]^cV6A autjiLfl ror itt^^' 

• 3 Usflf \M\^ luyi wilh on« bWIO bl- 
ii3&* gperaiicn 

• Dabourice jiicuil j)rc>¥KJetJ for all If 
iceys 

• lE& raadQUI ta ■■« r^y anliiES 

• easy *ilHlacirHI Wdh sr*fl*J:rfl Ifi. sin 
1€ ciKnnficlEir 

• OnE^ -»$VPC rcqbJied ttir Dpe'^idhs 
FULL a eiT lATCHIED OUTPUT— 19 KtVBOAHD 

The JECJOO £iV{l(Jer K^tidird- prpwidas Iwc s^epa^aCa haxaaecimal 
diqirt^ prDdisced rrarn se4i^«<1t>J)l ^ Wlirl^S lO allfW direct prpg- 
if4-nmi:^ 1(11 5 bit miCfpprccasaDr or 6 bt mfl^nQry cjHOulti. trtrea 
■I a I addituriaHflysai* provKJed ^)^ umj gperitidns *i1tiar*hauing 
i ttv.^^s Dulpi^; aviii^iala Th* kjIsjuIS Jit lak>ifid *fliJ ni^nito^cl 
•ft '\' \.\y\ ii;Mnu\% AlSiD ■nclipdad & a i(«^ anlry strobs. 

JE600 ,$59,95 

KBKjrdiactmal Kfvpsd only $14.95 





m. 


JL 


Iri-LI 






^ 


}' 




1 




is: 


■li 




I 



DIGITAL 

THERMOMETER KIT 




■ Oual isnsQri— AwLt^hlrvg centra b for \n- 
do-ar/Dutdaflr itf dual moniiq.i'bnfl 

'ContinuOws LED ,3" hi. dispts^v 
■Pans*- -40*1^ CO l^&'F / -40°C to tOO^ 

■ Ate u r»c V : ± 1 '^ n m I nfl I 

"SaT for Fanrflfilhei;! or Calaius rHaJnfl 
■6im, walnut case - AC uvall Bdapt«r inct. 

■ Size; 3-1/4"Hm6-5/B"W>(1-3/8"D 

JE300 $39.95 




62-Key ASCII Encoded Keyboard Kit 

^..^_^.^ FEATURES: 

^' *— *€0 Kftys gan«rate the fuEl \2E c^ar^ 

'"^ " ■ icters, upper and tower caK ASCII 

* Fully buffarad 

* 1 ijser-d«f ins kav^ provided tor 
custom applications 

*Caps lock for upper ca$B hrXi/ 
alpha charactors 

•UtJEJifii a 2376 (40 pin) ancoder 
re^d cnly mamory cHip 
The J E61D&2-K0V ASCII Enisddad Keyboard aOutputs directly compatible with 
Kit can be interfaced into most any com- TTL/DTL or mOS logic arrays 

putaf systeim. The JE&lO Kit comes com- • Easy intffrfacina with a 1&-|iin ijip 
pL*ie with tn ittdutlrjal grade keyboard or 1 Spin «lge connector 

switch 9$semb1y |62 keys}^ IC's, sockets, 
connector, #l«ciroii9c componefits and a iBAIlT^ ^70 fte 

doiible-sided printed vuirinij l>Dard. Th« vEvf\^ ^/ YbVv 

keyboaJ'd assaitibly requires +SV @ IBOrnA „^ ,r ■« ■ ■ i i^ijinr 

and -12V ® 10mA for opwatien. B2-Kev Keyboard pnly ■ . £34.35 

HiCKOK 1X303 Portable LCD Digital Multimeter 

■ Qtj Q i^uli l:-flh=, 3Vi l>gn UcJiU Gij-slt' D miIbv "Oviji ?l» Itfuiriod opaitnion "^ir j^u oatinrv 

•Avl^mutic J:Hti.l»*lli'H¥**i&i«liti'*"init:aion •lOp*iiV OC f 3. DmirivllV » IfcLiSK BCJiKV 
♦ l^rnngnin) Fjnctiom ■ Btfflj*** Cyijalic^ eaifi jnil riemoiiib»m«j^ttiir«iM|Ji^f* FSl 
< Full liHt vHK't^^rijmv 

$FEi;iPI[rilTI£]Nk. lie wxi ■» ■w.^irt ■£! lii'V Im 'OOOV AttvfHT ■lO.l'S lip ±fl 5» 1 1 ; hrtinil- rwwi^ lOMlil 

Mi^ -liiji ■i'.V i..[!|.-J Mfl'^' ..' JBd-'V il^W 

) j4C V«'?tl*C«.rTD PIWJI- (1 "L' :a-WIN"i fl=''i«C, ."tT.fi* nJt S8. S* 1 i I 'SlIB rMH 41 61il4lf:«»M P^p: Wfl' 

I P J iin . HM^ppnH IE Ld> FnuHT ^H^ii: D1 In JOU 11 itHi-^«t i«.£S irtf ±a.BH. ' l 'tkl 4% '■!]{>- ^^^ !.^.<-l*rl 

T.t J II I inu..! u:-iic-;ll"J Iv iK-fiC *J il'-atf 

D C -u u < ■- p " I .« ' ■"Mi r {I '< 'i-* 'iP < tKn^iI. . Jk'ixu' ppf . I > jMi .*d » .xa ^ 1 . 1 , 

Ml j,t; rHJ.1 : J.aic 

LX303 T% ACCURACY $74.95 

LX304 .5% ACCURACY , . $89.95 

'i->--^a. ^AHTNg. ueati+ii^riiDN rn\t.i 

flC-3 115V AC APAFTEfl . 7.50 

CC-3 PAODED CAftflYlfUG CASE 7.S0 

VP-ID XIOOCPflDttE ADAPTffl lUptn IdKJ . 14-95 

VMO «)lV&CPflOBE 3^-*0 

CS-1 10 Ar^O DC Currnnl aiurtl . . 14-96 

$1ID.Q0 lAiti. Order — U.S. Funds Only Spec Shsets - 25rf 

Cal if . Residents Add 6% Salefi Tax 1 gSO Cara \nq Ava ilable - Send 41 # stamp 

pQstatft- Add &^ plus SI Insurance (it datiradli 





ameco 



ELECTRONICS 



PHONE 

ORDERS 

WELCOME 

(415) 592-8097 



6€0 



MAIL ORDER ELECTRONICS - WORLDWIDE 

1355 SHOREWAY ROAD, BELMONT. CA 94002 

PRICES SUBJECT TO CHANGE 



i^38 



The Incredible 
'*PennywhfStte 103 



$139.95 



Kit Only 




TUB PHnir^lTtlfl in ^ Hp*lJlfi OF rwerfllftfl flit* tc and fram aiidlD inflE wlthoul 
criL^'CJ! S[5*til neflUHremgnils ^Mlha rBccrdar anO It Is able tfl MmmiinirjKle diractv wilh 
anatiiar iPodGm and tewlMi for Iglephone ' tUiT..'iwng' and OflinuntnicatNOHS In 
icHtillon . i1 ia Iraa al arlical WHtiSliRMtS anffls Dwitl inm flon-prEcisiDn. JBa^iviilM'-t 
l>-irl: 

.Fisqciaf^cV'^'^'ft Kaylng, rull -dumlax ^hair-Jlutim 

■B«^aDla|i 

.100 esirf 

fevMtirofioin. Sfrijil (PBturn Iti math tevcl roouirnc 

Intwsfn each thai^dBF) 
R«cn*» Ctiinnii FfflOfuenckHi . . .2<lih tti fgr sfosg; im tfa Igr ma/k. 
Trimmh EhBiiul f riqu«n«m . .Switth SglflCtlDlfl LO* |fl!SrmU| - tOTg sp«*. 

1270 mitlf, Mi^ti - 025 space, 2225rtrJit 

. -46 dDm a[:ci?u5t)CdDy CQuplail. 

,-15 WrTi nsmlrtil *d^ti¥r*t>lt liom ~fr stb-'d 

10 SQdlnn 

.Frequency ■f*re(*iice sutomsiicBilir adiusn to 

aiii>wiDrapDriiion btitwwn 1300 »; s^i 2^00 Hl 

.f lA F^S^f'^^C ^r .JCl ^ current loop itrBcetw is 

optOtMlstK) aftd fWft-ODlaO 

.120 V^C, single p^lasa. Td W«ts. 
Ptijsieal Alt aiinpnnentE mounl on j ili>giE 5' ^y 9' 

prmieai tirculi: bt^rd. AH ctmiptfi^ms iikhk^^ 
R«qLiir6E a V0A4, Aiiifla 0^illab3r. Fracuan-ri' C^iunCer hnd-'v 0«?tilascf>PB to allin 



Dill TniWnisiHin HB]h«!i 

Maiimum Db1ji Rati ,, 

DbIi fDim*i 



Tf insmll LjbwI ^ , r . . . 

AaeelvB Fraquflnc'i ftklqnKC 

Digllil ElBlB InlBiim 

PnwBr Jtaqu^rvjitBHls 



TRS-80 
16K Conversion Kit 

Ejxptnd your 4K TRS-80 Systotir tq 1BK. 
Kit -Ewimes complete with - 

* a each UPD4t6^ I1€K PynacmC Hams \ SSONS 

* Documer^tation tor convarsion 



TRS-16K 



$75.00 




jusr 



• 30 AWG wire 
^ Daisy qhain or 
point to-point 

*No $tflppiing 
iu$l wrap 

JWIB 
JW-1 H 
Jrt IV 
JVU1 R 




■ .0^" aiuare posts 

♦ Built-in cut off 

* includes 50 ft. wire 
or fitting required- 



Win 

pillar 

Blue 
WhHa 

Red 



14.81 
l4Ja 
14.9B 



JUST UURAP Replacement Wire 



P>rl Nit. . C^BlOf 

R JW-B Blue 50 ft, roll 

R-JW-W White BO ft. roll 

R-JW-Y Yellow 50 ft, roll 

R JW-R Red,. ..BOii.roii 



Prtctf 

S2.9e 
2.98 

2.9e 



JUSr UURAP' Unwrap Toot $3.49 





Vacuum Vise 

VacLJUiii.ti.aaed Nght-dLHrV 
viae tor small cOrnporteMss 
and aiaembtl-B^. ABScon- 
ttrvrtiori- 1 Ji" Ja-uu*. Iti" 
travel . Can be p & rm a i^ finT I V 
installed. 



VV-1 .. . .$3.49 




ADJUSTABLE WRENCH 




• Two ^izei.: 6" and 10" 
•Proftis&ionai QuaUty 
«CbrornB Vanadium Steel 



6"- AW -6 . . S4.95 10"- AW-10. . *6.95 



JOYSTICK 
VIDEO CONTROLLER 








^BQM-T y rrw 



INfll&E PCin ^«w 



*(D£AL FOfl ALL VIOEO GAMES OR REMOTE CON- 
TROL PROJECTS 

• SMALL CASE SI^E: VVT'H x 2-3/8" W K 4 5/l6"L 

• 2 MIIVIATU8£ PQTEIUTIOMETERS-4DK OHM EACH 

• SPST PUSH BUTTOIM CONTROL 

• SWIRE CONNECTION CARLE - ft FEET LONG 

• aUGGED PLASTIC CASE 

JVC-40 $4.95eaclTy 



t^ResaJef Service — see p&g^ 21Q 



73 Magazine • June, 1980 197 





OCIATED RADIO 



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SD1 2 CONISER BOX 43 
OVERLAND PARK. KAN 



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AHS FAKS SV&IS A 49TH CAII Old 




D 2U-MOTOI15 MOToitS, a55(d, siaei speeds & »>iTes. 1 5^12 vok», i- 2551A* S2.9^ 

D 200 LOr^C LEAD DISCS, prime, inart«i cap*, «si.''*^<i Rufeiffti ir/5^> . . l.S* 

O lOO'PLASTIC TRANSISTORS, unli^iled, 10-92, iSSL Ivpes (*26(M] i,W 

D »a-$LIDE SWITCHES, varfws shapes, iiies, afid t^pes, ■:fl2726} 2.^9 

U n-TRAMSlSTOB ELECTEOIYTICS, epoKV ^ncapfuUtf'd, 4&st, values, (#2747> 2,99 

D iSd-HAiF WATTErtS, TOO^;i, rulur-coded resistors, assl. vaJues, (*i046) 2,99 

D aS-SLl[>£ VOLUME CONTROLS, viHouii vdlue* A Itrcs, fur Hi-fi, elc. (*3{JS?k 5.^^ 

G SO-UPRIGHT ELECTROS, 1{»0%, jssorled values & voUjges, ihai^ikI, (^3226? . 2,9':' 

U aO'RQCKEJl SWITCHES, white rockefSr PPOT, solder lugs, 12SV 4A, ('^ISOSAl 2.9 

U SD-HJNJ HOTS, pc style, singfe turn, assorted values, (f^ 33453 , , , , , . J-^ 

D 2(i'}\}MBO RED LtDS, 3V 1<t mA, 100% ^ochI m^leridl, red dame icn&e, ! 4 3369) :^.99 

n 3'SOyKO TRIGGERS, sound aclivaled amp, SCR Ingigered, on J" bciard, (^3625) 2.*9 

D 5D-TRAN5ISTOK SOCKETS, a-:sortmen| may inirlwde; TO-19,5,6&,3. etc, <J^3ft45) J,99 

D lOa-CABLE TIES, 4" non-slip whiEe pl^lic, hke Ty wrap^ <«51l8> 1.9$ 

D 1S0-FEEOTHRU CAPS, AfSDftfid rypes & sizes, (or RE, U«E, elc, (^56684) ...;.„...., 2.99 

t!j 25{)'Vi WATT RESISTOHS, asstd, cjrboos, carbo-fiEms, some 5%ers, (fr5797A> -_-. 2.99 

D lOO-Pl FS!s¥ CAPS, reramk hlocts ■" assort^ siies 4 vUue^, Nfian> , ,,,,-,.. 2.99 

U 3Q-HOBIIV LEDS, assorted types 4 colors, mosHy dims, som^ uoori, <*fc225> . , , 3.99 

D im PC-StMICOjy SPECIAL, usorted semii of all tvpes. Vnt^it^_m3iwiA, l^SJDO) . . . 2 99 

D 100-TTls, 74«J seriM, IncF, gales. Hip- flops, etc. times led, {fb22bj . 2-9^ 

D S- BRASS LOCKS wilh It^y, TV/' Inrg, for donrs? wincfowi;, etc. '('ifftlSJ^ 2-99 

n 250-MOLE>i SOCKETS, "(Jn-a-jirip ,, make your own pc sockets, t#fe2SSJ 2.99 

D 4-LM-747 OP AMPS, lOO^i prints, dual linear op amp, DEP pa<;tiage, f.a^2it2] 2.99 

n 50'RC A PKO NO PLUGS poptjiar audio.' speaker plugs, T00% material (c 329 J) 2.99 

□ 200 'PRf F ORM£DHALF WAT TEAS, res Jtl^n , color coded, *sit 0^62 46} 2 *^ 

n IS-CRYSTALS, assorted types, some H6/U, some Ij-^queircy marked, (i^frJStV ,_,,_,, 3.99 

D 150-SUBiUrNr IF TRAMSFbaMERS, ass|. mav include; £isc. antenna, elc (^6:259) 3.99 

D 60'SQUARE OHM RESISTORS, prime resistors, asst. values, j^rab 'em: 4 4^6261 1> ... 2.99 

D 30'MICRO MIMI REfD SWITCHES, 1 ' long, for alarms, relay syslems, elc. (^6263) . , . 2.99 

n 200 PC. -CAPACITOR SPECIAL, Msl- mylars, pnJys, mi<:as, ek- tflO'A good, ikbZMi ,,. 2-9? 

3 20-PLrSH BUT TON ALARM SWITCH, SPST, momenlary, NC, w/hardwarc, C if 6267) ,..,, 2.99 

U 500* PC. -,H A ROW ARE SIJKPRISE, 1'apprcn.) 1 lb, assl, scrtv>is, warliers, etc. (^62?1l , . 3,99 

D J0-9V BATTERY CLIPS, snap conoecr&r, coded, irrsulated l^^ads, if^hl^) 2.99 

D fr- WATCH GUTS. S-lunclion, LCD slyle, assorted si^es, untested, <^fei87> 2.99 

D 10-HEAVV DUTY LINE CORDS, while, 2 cond. t fl. It gauge, (^62^2) 2-99 

D 20-SINGlE PIN IED5, green, micro ilyle, 3V IflmA, 100%, Ufr193f 2-99 

a 40- LEP /TRANS I ST OR SOCKETS, 'inap-ln", 3 pc leads, lor T0-S,tB,4S,etc, K*297> .. 2.99 

D MO PRECISION RESIST 0»S, VtW, t%, axlaJ L#2*afl ).,.,.,,.»....... 2.W 

D 3'25A 50V URIDGES, 'block^' lype, wi(Fi four ]ug-type leads, ^6311 J 3.9^ 

D lOO'DTL IC's, mostly dual JK flip flops, marked, lOO'i prime, {66444* _,,.„. 3,W 

C 300-ON£ W AFTERS, ailt. 1W rehtistors, mostly carboni, some 5%er5. C?^ 63641 , , . , ,^. , 2,99 

3 40-INSTRUMENT KNOBS, for half mufiri shafts, some w/po inters, (#6498) , , 2,99 



■ r ^ -' tr-§ 



SO-SCRs A TRIACS, jsscirled values, id Amp TO-22U, untested. iffiyJJ?) ... 
1'Ce CONVERTER, receiver CB on car radio, l2 VOC opetaLieai, tJ^Sl93> . . . 

40'EDCf CONNECTORS, as$t. 4 A 6 pin, 3 sided, pc leads, <*6364^ 

20-6 CELL BATTERY HOLDtRS. for A A size cells, ^V clip rccep Ileal, ifihi^i 

60-THERMAL FUSfS, bteat; jii 257 f. 14 gauge ixiti Jeads, (#*367) 

4'0.&" HOBBY READOUTS, 4 dtgjt panels. Com, Cathode, unlestcd, (#63»4) 

25-TfNV SLIDE SWITCH, only 1/7" cube, SPDT, PC leads, [^4ifl5> 

SO-TO-5 TttlACS, 50-600 prv,, 3 lead 10-5 tins, 60'!,+ yitlrf. (^&321> ............ 

ao- PLASTIC POWERS, 35 watt, npn S, pnp, 50-300 bvcbo, TO-220, (^6237) 

100-2 WATT RESfSTORS, «5ciri?d <:arbons, films, etc some ^-'-ers, (ii'623e) 

ISO PC-HEAt SHRANK, lil<e TheJ-mu-Ftt, a^st^ sfzcs, shrinks S0%, 4i<^b239) *, ♦, 

2&-MAGNETIC DISCS, Plai,UEIov 13/16 dEa. x 1/fl' discs, (.^^194} 

150' PLUGS & SOCKETS, Assorled lypei & styles, wide vari*ly, (itf3S27) 

15'PA'2*3 PC BOAHRS, for CE PA- 763 stereo amps, pre-efched, (^20133 

40-$tEREO INDICATORS, trny red l.SV bulbs, for Hi-fi repiacemeiit, 4 11^6344) . , ,„. 

40-aOOV 1A RECTIFIERS, type IN4006, epo;ty, axial leads, (j»6245> 

4'2A 50OV BRIDGES, siUcon, iaU wave reclHiers. TO-S case, U624e) 

10'QUAD PHONO JACKS, 4 RCA jacks on 3 i TV," Baltelite sirtp, i=f^6249) , , 

SO-MODULAtt SWitCHIS. by Centralab, 'push-on^' DPDT, <>PDT, etc., f43150A> . . 

150- "4000' RECHFIERS. IN 4000 series, may induder SO to lOOOV, (#2417^ . 

IS-THOMBWHEEL TRIM POTS, snap-in lype, assorted values, (^6399) 

SO-MAGhllffED MAN-3's. 7 segment 0. " high, w/'bJbble" magnifier, (^6257) 

1-I,R. E^JCOUf, ."i-? watls^ hetero-j unci ion coast, for Pulse mode, (*'6445) . 

3W-aULLPLATtS, asst. resislnr-capackor network^, naHous valiies, {ttbl&Z} ,.,, 

iSO-MEtAL CAN TRANSISTORS, aisL 2N fi's \n TO-S/1,1B, frnne unmvked, t#36P3) 
24-LM 340T VOLTAGE REGULATORS, untested TO-220, may iocl. 5 -34V, <#2A3S! . . 

150-?OLVSTVRENE CAPS, assorted types, slyles, & siies, alj goiid, iif2729) 

100-PLASTJC LENSES, assorted styles, & coroa-s, M6366} 

2S0-CFRAM1C CAPS, asst. lubulars, NPO's, temp, coefficient, etc (»f5039) , 

60-THERMrSrORS, various types & SlyEes, neg. Cucfficieni, TOO'.., ^1^4099) 

25-IC SOCItETS, assl. 24.20, & 40 pi^n sockets on G-10 bo^ard, (#6300) 

15-Mim PLUG & CABlF SETS, 3.1 mm plug, 6' iniulated 2 cond, leads, t<*6269) 

2Q-RCA PHONO JACKS, popular tiiJ^i iacl^ {in a B^kelit strip, (#6330) 

250-PRE'FORMED DFSCS, caps w/leads for PC use, mixed vafues, (#2605) ... .. , 

50- AXIAL ELECTROS, asst. values, volls, sizes. What a buy I, i4 3227> .., . . 

lOn-METALLlt RESISTORS, mostly '^ waiters, asst. vaL t-5% tol, (!tf62SO) .,,ii, 

IflO-FOWERS I*0WERS, 3 IO T watt power reiJstprj, (*62aT] . ,,..,,,.,,. 

1S'l€NJTiQM SUPPRESSION CAPS, for auEo radios, decks, etc, O.S mf (#fi234) , 

200-COILS & CHOKES, asst. RF,OSC,IF. and peaking types. (^^62^3) 

50-POWEH TA8 TRANSISTORS, plastic NPN, TO- 220, asst. ivpes, untested, (ff2425} . 

24-SKfNNY TRIM POTS, mulli & single turn, asst. values & types, [»&2e5) *«.., 

3(hH0eBV OPTO COUPLERS, untested, mini DIP, 1SO0V isolation, (#2629) ,,,;;*.... 
t5-LINE CORDS, heayy-duly, Ifl gaufie, 6'. mofded pluft, 2-c6n4- <.#$499) 



FREE! FREE! 
WITH ANY S30 ORDER, PICK A $2.d9er FREE 



«Sr 







ynTi-" 






•^j 



.jry.^ 






Cat, M«. 42CUfi52fi 



TV GAME CHIP & BOARD SET 




Yi3J.i rt comma ndtng Hherman cluss tii"k on patrci]. tiuddcniy 
LhernVs QCi iix.ii,lQMi(ni to your rijchl- Vflu've heen sighted bj ttit 
unflmj- Qtiiikly you. swing vjuur iurirtit Atsd Fkra . . . Pa]y i^aks 
hrinKNi back the LhriJl of Sbmurecl uijmhaL in a iJS pin lilJP witK 
Gi;li*tfal iTiaimment's AY■■'i■^^\'if)■i■ Tank. Battle Uame. Chip :itirl 
buarnf *eL The itiitiaE roEfjOnaC tdr thisi item was. so phBnOmi:n^=l 
Lhat rta've b**n aearchinj the v^rtrld &fei- torepieniEh our alruin5y 
c!tjpSf^1.tii3 sttick. Finally in Lh.« tflr r^Jichea of Hon j Kung . . StJC 
I^E^K! I Bui to avoid diss ppn^ntiiitjit, ordtr I'iow . . they *£?ld «njt 
hfefijre . . and they'll nell Out ygftinll Bflarde haT-e; Bhi^ld«l FM 
Jisinikivlatwjection, (a S4.'9^ valine aitme;'. 1C"h, traiiBiiitCTa, ^iipK. 
tti:. Chif cjtpahilJtifiE- Twu inrfejieiidflratly controlkbl-e t^mk-; 
whkh *)cji|fKle &. rrugment -vi-hcn hit by ahi^lla or mi nee, 3 lor- gr^i 
& rs;v-«nie efujeds. RealiBLic tank Tntitur, trfrels st|Ufi«k, and BipJu^ 
ajOn aoundfl, (iy,tcvma:ti,e- pn-acreon Miotin^, Ui» (;&]i5ri, and moTe' 
Tank gaiiiE chip \%> IM^. tluarantaed. Wilha llltl* tiiBeimity and 
perhaps a fe^!v parts. yyu C^n tecjeat* histcry's grcal tjiaik batllea 
. . . Lh the tomfort of ycur hn^rofe- Sit*- SV, k 6-5.'& s 1'a." Wt: fi o*. 



TANK GAME CHIP LESS BOARD 



995 



* General Jnatruments AY-S-SfOO'l 



Cat. N«. 92CU650S 



Sf ND f OR TREE CATALOG 



Poly pQk/ 



@ 



HOW TO ORDER 

We huner MA^TEflCHAt^CE^ VtSA, ch»ck, Jind C.Di,P- 

\2^% dftwnl. Order hy ^\innt or R1«ll. Minimijni Ord«rz 

iloPteav« it«t« C^t. Hq. ^ deicrtptliMS,. name & month 

•at fflaxarine. POSTAGf : USA;; add $1, CAMADJAH: «dit 

$S, FOREICK: idd SIO, IU$ lundi;. ticcesB wiE» b* 

raturnad. OPtM ACCOONT^i Ipiuii be lliled * rated in * *#fcj*j^in Pk. ■«>■>£ nvA^A 

buft & Bt^ad&tteet; Net - 3D PHflNE; (51T| f45 MiB. 5PUT H I^YNnrlLLD, mA93- 01»*ll| 



P.O. BOX 942, A6 ^sa 



60 MINUTE DIGITAL 



COUNTDOWN 
TIMER 

• Counts Down To 00 Minutes, 00 
Seconds From Any Point Up To 59 
Minutes, 59, Seconds 

• Alarm Bell Rings Repeatedly When 
Counter Reaches 00 

Truly an J tern th*h*v^;j'jrth.e cao tme! Versstiltj cuuntd'i^n firrn':!' 
by Litton makcsi Sn tdt^^fsl dartroom. lab, or w^orkbench ;ii!(;iis¥«Nr>. 
Coutits down \a> M Mm.. ftCl Sei:. "from any deEjrsd poinl U[i Mj rJ^ 
Min. fjil Sec. UpK^n T*-wih'm^ Oti.fHl, tli^ alarm betJ '■dings" uoftly, 
^'i^J f&peate until power itt intorrTjplwS, fit eauMer ia reEel. Alao 
mdudftN HPST micro switch whiih tnftjjiets devsc^-'i up to I1& 
VAC, ;JA, wheii tiiiser conipletea it't cycle 8/8" hiich whitie digits 
on two n»l9<:;a:i r^lPt^MlH Minuteii Irom OU to ^&. Third roll-ar 
shows Secande IrcHn Of^ W 59- BarT*ULi,Tie mechan^Bni is cdm 
pleteiy t-esattable via, 1 -a/'iB' ' Ion j fl « tied sshafl, and Jarga thumh- 
whteS control, both fn3fit mounted . I.iKhLwfiiffist alunninum 
fryrti* hrtui^H. the machaniain, 3W ] 15 VAC, fHl Hi^. nititLhr. Belt, ^ 
Mjcriiw^vLtcIi afe rear-njounted. Comes with Ift" irianlaied wira 
liMdn ^**i 4 1^1! 2^.*' Wt: 9 oa. 



ULTRA-SMALL 

LCD CHRONOGRAPH 

MODULE 

STOPWATCH! 
ELAPSED TIME INDICATOR! j[ 

Mard to be<liev'e.? Read DnI I^'eatur^a Incltideir .Z.fn" LCD dl»}?3#^, 
.^SlyPIv] indicatDir, ^conda indicator and Bwitch^hJo nunurrk dp^i- 
piny. Uuill-ln Alaftn circuit ^ith vannblc Skrp «iid Smns^e 
mooBa, KaaL ^t for Hra, A^inutct. it Elecandu: Built-in buck! it 
LanipE, and niwe! l-i;]i'16 x 1,'!J'" dlu-pSav panel is »Lit- 

roLinaai;! uy m :i-3/B it I-1.-4" bl;ack rei:ep] nto. fit6 Anywhtrt! 
LVjrriiis,TA.ilhcon5pJe£a ipecs and hwkupinJci. ftequii*j^ LSA VliC. 
OrrJi-r Npw^ because w^v^r befort has bo much beeji ,3fT<jF<id tfl so 
miny . . tor m NU]*' 





COMPACT CONDENSOR 

BOOM MIKE 



« Space Efficient 

• Practical Overhead *'Boom" Design 

:# Minimizes Sound Coloration 



SnppEy Voltage. 9V. SenBlLivity. -€3 dB k J KKi. Ityp.t ^F«< 
q uency HMpnnse : f ■ 1 5 Kha Tm ped : .^-3K dhm* 'r J Khi. Si Jpt- 






ALARM crotkr^^^^ 
DUAL ZONE TIMERl 



$24.50 



9;2CU«403 



Fi;3 idta.i K 1-l/r'. With Spt^-fl 



Cat. Na. 92CU6374, 



$3.50 

3 FOR $9 



*^ Header service— see page 210 



73 Magazine * June, 1980 199 



(^«l^ 



electroi|ic§ 



^4a 



1900 MHz to 2500 MHz DOWN CONVERTER 

This receiver is tunable over a range of 1900 to 2500 mc and is intended for annateur radio use. The local oscillator is 
voltage controlled (i.e.) making the i-f range approximateiy 54 to 88 mc (Channels 2 to 7). 

PC BOARD WITH CHIP CAPACITORS 13 $44.99 

PC BOARD WITH ALL PARTS FOR ASSEMBLY $79.99 

PC BOARD ASSEMBLED AND TESTED $120.00 

POWER SUPPLY KIT $44.99 

POWER SUPPLY ASSEMBLED AND TESTED $69.99 

YAGl ANTENNA 4' LONG APPROX. 20TO 23dB GAIN $59.99 

YAGI ANTENNA 4' WITH TYPE (N, BNC, SMA Connector) $64.99 

2300 MHz DOWN CONVERTER 
includes converter mounted in antenna, power supply, antenna, 75 ' and 3' RG59 cable v»?ith connectors, 

75 to 300 ohm adapter, Plus 90 DAY WARRANTY $299.99 

OPTION #1 MRF902 In front end. (7 dS noise figure) $349.99 

OPTION #2 2N6603 in front end. (5 dB noise figure) $400.00 

2300 MHz DOWN CONVERTER ONLY 

10 dB Noise Figure 23 dB gain in boxw/ith N conn. Input F conn. Output. $149.99 

7dB Noise Figure 23 dB gain In box with N conn. Input F conn. Output $169.99 

5 dB Noise Figure 23 dB gain in box with SMA conn, input F conn. Output $189.99 

DATA IS INCLUDED WITH KITS OR MAY BE PURCHASED SEPARATELY $15.00 

Shipping and Handling Cost: 

Receiver Kits add $1.50, Power Supply add $2.00, Antenna add $5.00, Option 1/2 add $3.00, For complete system add 
$7.50. 



Replacement Parts: 






MRF901 $5.00 


MBD101 


$2.00 


MRF902 $10.00 


.001 chip caps 


$2.00 


2N6603 $12.00 


PC Board only 


$25.00 with data 



3.7 to 4.2 Gc SATELLrTE DOWN CONVERTER 

70 MHz i-f (30 MHz @ 3 dB) 10 dB min. IMAGE REJECTION 

15 dB max. Noise Figure 15 dB Gain 

ASSEMBLED AND TESTED WITH N OR SMA CONNECTOR FOR INPUT AND F CONNECTOR FOR OUTPUT 

$499.99 

I-F AMPLIFIER FOR ABOVE 70 MHz 

45 dB Gain — 30 MHz @ 3 dB — ASSEMBLED AND TESTED F CONNECTOR $129.99 

DEMOD FOR ABOVE 70 MHz 

COMPOSITE VIDEO OUTPUT (NO RF) — ASSEMBLED AND TESTED $159.99 

TERMS: 

MASTER CHARGE, MASTERCARD, VISA, BANK AMERICARD. WE CHARGE 5% FOR HANDLING 

CARD NUMBER EXP. DATE 



YOUR SIGNATURE PHONE NUMBER. 



PLEASE SEND POSTAL MONEY ORDER, CERTIFIED CHECK, CASHIER'S CHECK OR MONEY ORDER. 
PRICES SUBJECT TO CHANGE WITHOUT NOTICE. WE CHARGE 15% FOR RESTOCKING ON ANY ORDER. 
ALL CHECKS AND MONEY ORDERS IN US FUNDS ONLY. 
ALL ORDERS SENT FIRST CLASS OR UPS. 

ALL PARTS PRIME AND GUARANTEED. /£:ri^\'-yA^ 'IA'5'7 

WE WILL ACCEPT COD ORDERS FOR $25.00 OR OVER, ADD $1.50 FOR COD CHARGE. (OUZI L^Z'JXjJ I 

PLEASE INCLUDE $1.50 MINIMUM FOR SHIPPING OR CALL FOR CHARGES. ?602'i 242-89 1 6 

WE ALSO ARE LOOKING FOR NEW AND USED TUBES, ^ ^ 

TEST EQUIPMENT, COMPONENTS ETC. O 1 1 1 \17 r^o*vY«lU«/%l 

WE ALSO SWAP OR TRADE. Zlll W , l^ailieiDaCK 

FOR CATALOG SEE MNUARV. 1980. 73 Magazine, 10 phoenk. AriZOna 85015 



200 73 Magazine • June, 1980 



FAIRCHaO VHF 

95H90DC 
95H@1DC 
11C90DC 
11C91DG 
11C83DC 
11C70DC 

iicsaoc 

11C44PG/MC4044 
1lC24DQMC40a4 

ncoeoc 

11C05DC 
11C01FC 



AND UHF PRESCALER CHIPS 

350 MH2 Pre sea tor Divide by 1W11 

360 MHz Proscatsf Divide by 5/6 

€50 MHz Preacalm Divide by TQ/lt 

650 MHz Prescalef Divide by 5^6 

1 GHz Divide by 248/256 Prescaler 

600 fAHl Flip/Flop with reset 

ECL VCM 

Phase Frequency Detector 

Dual TTL WCM 

UHF Pr«acal«f 750 MHz D Typd Flip/fl^ 

! GH2 Coyntdr Divide by 4 

Hi{|h 5p«^ Ou«i 5^4 input NO/ NOR Gale 



RF TRANSfSTORS 



19.50 

9.50 

16.50 

16.50 

29.90 

12.30 

4.53 

3.82 

3.82 

12.30 

74.35 

15.40 



WISPER FANS 

This fan ta syp«r quiets efftcieni cooiir^g where low acoustica^l draturbance ia a 
mysi Size 4.66* x 4.68' x t.SO'. impedance proieciad, 50^ Hz, 120 Vac. 

sg.99 

TRW BROADBAND AMPLIFIER MODEL CA61SB 

Ffa^quency response 40 M Kl to 300 MHz 
Gain: 300 M Hi I6 dB Mm., 1 7.5 dB Max. 

60 MHz to - > dS from 3I» MHz 
Vol lag*! 24 voi ts dc at 220 ma majc . $1 9.99 

CARBIDE - CIRCUIT BOARD DRILL BITS FOR PC BOARDS 

Size: 35, 42, 47, 49, 51 , 52 S2.15 

SJza: 53, 54, 55, 56, 57, 58, 59, 61, 63, 64, 65 1.85 

Size: 66 1.90 

Size: 1 .25 mm. 1 .45 mm 2.00 

Size: 3 20 mm 3,58 

CRYSTAL FILTERS; TYCO 001 198e0 same as 21 MF 

10 J MHz Narrow Band Cryatal Filtaf 

adB bandwidth 15 kHzmin. 20dB bandwidth 60 kHz min. 40dB bandwidth 150 

kHz mm, 
UI|imaie50dB;ln9eftiofi ioss W&B max. Rif^ie i.0iiemax.Cl.0'»^/-5pf 3600 

Ohma. S5,95 

MURATA CERAMIC FILTERS 

Modeis SFl>455D<55kKz $3 00 

SFB456D455kHz aOO 

CFM-455E455kHjt 7.95 

SFE-10.7 10.7 MHz 5.«S 

TEST EQUIPMENT — HEWUeTT PACKARD — TEKTRONIX — ETC, 

Hawlett Packard: 

491C TWTAmpnrter2to4Gc ! watt30dBgain S1 150.00 

eOSD ID to 420 mc , 1 uV to 5 V into 50 ohms Signal Generator 500.00 

61 2A 450 to 1230 mc ,1 uV to .5 V Into 50 ohms Signal Generator 750,00 

61 4A 900 to 2100 mc Signal Generator 500.00 

61 6B t .8 to 4 .2 Gc S ig nal G a n erator 400.00 

61 BB 3.8 to 7.2 Qc Signal Ganerator 400.00 

B20A 7to 11 Go Signal Generator 400.00 

G23B Micro wave Test Set 900.00 

624C Micfowave Test Set 950 00 

3200B 10 10 500 mc vhf Oscillator 450.00 

869 1 A 1 to 2 Gc Plug t n For S6«}A Sweeper 300.00 

S692A 2 to 4 Gc PI ug i n For 6690 A Sweeper 600,00 

d693A 4to8Gc Plug In For 6^0A Sweeps dOaOO 

d742A Ret lect ion Test Un i 1 2 to 1 2.4 Gc lOmOO 

Taktroriijt: 

1906 350 kHz to 50 rm: OsdJMor 150.00 

Alhiclit 

473 225 to 400 mc AM/FM Si gnal Ga nerator 750.OO 

Sir>giir: 

MFS/VR^ Universal Spectrum AnaEyzer with 1 kHz to 27.5 mc Piug In 1200.00 

Kalieli: 

XR63ai00 TWT Amprif ier 8 to 12,4 Gc 10O watts 40 dB gain 920000 

Polirad: 

2038/2436/1 102A 

Calibrated DbpFay wfth an SS9 Analysis Module and a 10 to 

40 mc Si ng la Tone Sy n 1 hefii zer 1 500.00 



TYPE 

2N15fl1 

21^1562 

2N1692 

2N1693 

2r^J2632 

2N2d57JAN 

2N2676 

2N28da 

2M2927 

2N2947 

2N294a 

2142949 

2N2W0 

2K3287 

2143294 

2N3301 

2N3302 

2N3304 

2Na307 

2N3309 

2N337S 

2N3553 

2N3755 

2N3818 

2N3a66 

2N38eeJAN 

2N3d6es^ANTX 

2N3924 

2N3925 

2N3927 

2N3960 

3N4072 

2JM4135 

2N4261 

?N4427 

2N4429 

2N4430 



2N495e 
2N4fi9e 
2N497B 

2^5090 
2N5108 
2NS1D9 
2N5ieO 
2N5179 
2N5ia4 
2N5216 
2N55e3 
2N55a9 



PRICE 

J15.00 
15.00 
16.00 
15.00 
45.00 
2.45 
12.35 
2500 
7.00 
17JJ5 
15.50 
3.90 
5,00 
4.30 
1.15 
,75 
1i» 
1.4Q 
10.50 
3.90 
6.75 
1.45 
7.20 
6.00 
1.09 
2.70 
4.43 
3.20 
6,00 
11.50 
26.25 
1.70 
2^00 
14.60 
1.09 
7.50 
20.00 
3.50 
2:80 
2.12 
19.00 
&» 
3.90 

3,34 
.80 
2.00 
47.50 
4.43 
4.60 



We can suppiy any 
value chip cftpac^ 
ftors you may need. 

PRICES 



1 lo 10 
11-50 
51 100 
101 up 



«t.99 
1.49 
1.00 

POfl 



POR = CALL FOR PRICE 



TYPE PRICE 

2N55gO $6.00 

2N5591 10.35 

2N5637 20.00 

2N5641 4,90 

2N5642 8.63 

2NS643 14.38 

2N6545 11.00 

2N5764 27,00 

2N5d42 8,65 

2NSd49 19.50 

2N5862 5000 

2N5913 3.25 

2N5a22 10.00 

2N5942 4600 

2N5944 7.50 

2N5945 1090 

2N5946 13.20 

2N6060 5.45 

2N60d1 6.60 

2N6082 9.90 

2N60e3 11.80 

2N6064 13.20 

2 N 6094 5,75 

2N6095 10,35 

2N6096 19.35 

2N6Dg7 saoo 

2N6136 16,70 

2N6166 36,80 

2N6265 75.00 

2N6266 10000 

2N6439 43,45 

2N6459/PT9795 10.00 

2N6603 12,00 

2N6604 12.00 

A50'12 25.00 

aFR90 500 

BLY568C 2500 

BLYSeaCF 25.00 

CD3495 15,00 

HEP7^S3014 4.95 

HEPS3002 11.^ 

HEPS3003 29.68 

HEPS3005 985 

HEPS3006 19.B0 

HEPS3007 24,^ 

HEPSaOlO 11-34 

HEPS602e 2.56 
HP35B31B 

HXTR5104 5O00 

MM 1500 32.20 



CHIP CAPACITORS 

Ipf 27p| 

IJpl 33pf 

2^f 39pf 

Z7pi 47pf 

3.30f 56pf 

3.9pr 66pf 

4.7pr espf 

5.6pr lOOpf 

6.8pt llOpf 

8.2pf I20pf 

lOpf l3Qpt 

T2pt ISOpf 

t5pt leOpf 

IBpt 160pf 

22pf 2D0pf 



ATLAS CRYSTAL FILTERS FOR ATLAS HAM GEAR 

5.52-2.7/8 

5-596-2. 7;a/u 

5,595- .50W4/CW 

E59S-2.7LSB YOUR CHOICE $24.95 

5^595-2. 7ySB 

5.645-2.7/e 

9.0USB/CW 



TYPE PRICE 

MM1550 S10Q0 

M Ml 552 50.00 

MM1553 56.50 

MM1601 5-SO 

MM1602/2^J5842 7.50 

MM1607 8.65 

MM1661 15,00 

MM1669 17.50 

MM 1943 3.00 

MM2605 3.00 

MM2608 5,00 

hiMaooe a 15 

MMGM916 1.00 

MMT72 61 

MMT74 .94 

MMT2&57 ^Sa 

MRF304 43,45 

MRF420 20,00 

MRF450 IIJS 

MRF4S0A 11^ 

MRF454 20.10 

MflF4S8 16.95 

MRF475 5.00 

MRF476 5.00 

MRF502 .49 

MRF504 6-95 

MRF509 4.90 

MRF511 8,60 

MRF901 5.00 

MRF5177 20.70 

MRFB0D4 1,44 

PT4ie6B 3.00 

PT4571A 1,50 

PT4612 5,00 

PT4626 . 5.00 

PT4640 5.00 

PT8659 1072 

PT97S4 24.30 

PT9790 41.70 

SD1043 5.00 

SDtlie 3.00 

SD1118 5.00 

SD1119 3,00 

TA7993 75.00 

TA7994 100,00 
TRWMRA2023'1.5 42,50 

40281 10,90 

40262 1 190 

40290 2.46 



240pr 
270pf 

aoopf 

330pf 
360of 
390pf 
430pf 
47Dpf 
SlOpf 
560pf 
620pt 

6eopf 

620pf 
lOOOpf 



1200pf 

ISOOpf 

tdoopf 

2200pf 
2700pJ 
3300pl 
3900pl 
4700pl 
5600pr 

eaoopf 

82Q0pf 
.OlOmf 
,0l2mt 
,015mf 
.OlBmf 



*^f^eader Service— see page 2r0 



73 Magazine • June, 1980 201 




■ ■•••« 

« I a > ■ m 







^•»at* 



!«• 



^••V*^ 



ALARM CLOCK KITS: 

4 Digit .5" 

Here it is! Thefirstof several quality kits we have been asked 
tor: Here Is what you get — unbelievable as it may sound... 

National - 5375AA Clock Chip 

Bowmar Clock Stick Readout (L.E.D.) 4 digit - 1/2" 

Transitors 



fHHfflHfHffflfflfHIfflfflfll^;//. 



MICRO MINI 
TOGGLE SWITCHES 

6 for $5 with hardware. 



1 
1 

13 
2 
2 
1 
4 
1 
2 

29 
1 
1 



Push Buttons lor time set 

Toggle Switches for alarm 

Filter cap 

1N4000 series diodes ^ 

1N4148 O^^^ 

Disc caps 

Resistors ^ 

Transducer (Speaker) tor Alarm 

LED Lamp for alarm indicator 









P.O. Board $2,25 

Plug In 
Transformer $1.50 




990 



EACH 



• • * • * •CABLE TIES* * * * + • 

MAKE YOUR PROJECTS ^'N EAT + TIDY." 4" CABLE 
TiES AT A FANTASTIC PRICE. GET THIS BARGAIN 
AND ' TIE ' IT DONW *2.D0 <or 100 or better yet S1S.0O 
lor 1000 



S-14 V,D.C. 



BETTER BEEPER 



Two audio oscillator— a low frequency pulse oscilla- 
tor— eilher or bolh audSo frequencies can be shifted 
[warbiadjor pulsed on arid off. Constant tone capabil- 
ity. Any combination of pulses and warbles or tones. 
1 7/B' DX 1 3i4" ALARMS— TOYS— TESTING— ETC. 
Complete kit . . S3.5S or 3 for $9 



D.C. MODEL 



CASE $150 



Same as above except it includes 60 Hz timebase, 
This Kit Includes: 



1 
1 

12 
2 
2 

27 
1 
1 



National 5375AA Clock Chip 

Bowmar Clock Stick Readout - (L,E.D.) 4 digit - 1/2" 

Transistors 

Push Buttons for time set 

Disc caps 



Resistors 
MOV 

60 Hz time base 
P.O. Board 



$2-25 



$12.75 



CASES3.50 



RCA SENSITIVE GATE TRIAC 

TO-5 CASE. HOUSE #40531 

ALSO SAME AS T2300D. 

2.5 AMPS 400 PIV 

5 FOR $1.19 

Perfect for Dimmers, Color Organs, etc. 

PC LEADS 




5 VOLT REED RELAY 

An absolutely fantastic item. Compare tliis 
price with any advertiser. While They Last. 

$1.10 

Turns on at 10 MA, Drops out at 5 MA, 




We bougttt 350,000 LED'l, 

And you g«t th# Mvtn§L 
R«ds. greens, yeilows, orange, small, 
nie<iiumr large. Bags of 25 - mixed $2.75. 

That's only 114 each. CQmp^n thi$ bargain up tp 
iw\i:m our price 



FACTORY PRIME 
Bt - Polar LEO 59^ ea. or 10 for $5 



LAB-BENCH VARIABLE ^^^ „q 

POWER SUPPLY KIT ^ 

5 to 20 VOC at 1 AMP. Short circuit 
protected by current limit. Uses IC 
regulator and 10 AMP Power 
Darlington, Very good regulation and 
low ripple. Kit includes PC Board, all 
parts, large heatsink and shielded 
transformer. 50 MV. TYP, Regulation. 



TOSHIBA POWER AUDIO AMP 

5.8 WATTS RMS Typical Output. 50 to 30,000 HZ 
+ 3 DB. For CB's, tape decks, PA^s. etc. Works off 
of a single supply voltage from 10,5 to 18 VDC. 10 
Pin plastic DIP with speciat built in heat sink tab 
Perfect for use on 12 VDC. $099 
With Data ^ each 



CLOCK MODULE OPTIONS 
MA 100B A and D MAI 01 3 

Switches and pot lor all options. 

Induct es^ 

6 push buttons 

1 toggtft 

1 IQKpQt 12.50 

Alarm Parts [including htgli Impedance 
transducer). Much more ©nicient Ihan a 
speaks r $1.S0 

Transducer onty tunbellevabty loud) il.lO 



16K DYNAMIC RAM CHIP 

WORKS IN TFIS-80 OFL APPLE II 

16K X 1 Btls 16 P<n Package, hame as 
Mostek 4 It 6-4. £50 NS acce&S- -JIO NS 
cycle time Our besl price ypt for this state 
oi the art RAM. 32K and B^K FIAM board's 
u^ing this chip are readily available These 
are new fully guaranteed devices by a 
mafor mfg. 

VERY LIMITED STOCKS 

"MAGAZINE SPECIAL" 
B/$79.50 



60 Kz CRYSTAL TIME BASE 

Uses MM5369 CMOS d ivider IC 
with high accuracy 3-579545 

MHZ C^ysta^. Use with all MOS 
Clock Chipsor Modules Draws 
only 1 -5 MA. All parts, data and 
PC Board included 100 Hz. 
same as above, except $S.9£ 



SILICON POWEf) 
SOLAR CELLS 

2 Inch DJa. ApproK. .5 VDC at SOO 
Ma. m sunhght. F'actory nei^ units. 
nol Tejects as sold by oihefs. 
Series iot higher voltage, paraila! 
for hightr currerti Converts solar 
anorgy dlr^ctlj' to etectncity 



LIMITED aUAMTITY. 



*5 



99 



ea 



NATIONAL SEMICONDUCTOR 



L< 



COLOSSUS JR." JUMBO CLOCK MODULE 

$8,50 



MA1013 
BRAND NEW! 



^ 






f^ 




AfiSeHBLED! NOT A KIT! 



: ;. ■, ij F i : T U R E P S L LO^E Q t T ' 



1A,CXFMR:$t.9fil' 



l*f RFECT f Oft USE 
WITM A TIMES A $E. 



« BrJghl 4 dJ^il Ch.T" LED Dliplay 

« CompH«tt»-Add onry Tranafpnrier ^nd Suritch«g 

* 24 Hour Alnrrm SJgnfti: Outi^ut 
« ia Hour R*al Time Format 

^ SO ar '64 Hz OperpHqn 
'* PoMAr F^ailiire Incticatkin 
'r LED Brighlneift ConlrOil 

* S4e«p and Snoaze Ti^m^r^ 

^ Alarm "esn" and PH indicators 

* Direct Driv* - No RFI 

^ Direct Replacemeni fat iMA1D12 
« Cpmes with Full Data 



SONY 2a WATT AUDIO AMP MODULE 

#STK-054.23WATTS SUPER CLEAN AUDIO. 20 HZ to 
100 KHZ + 2 03. HYBRID. SILICON. SELF- 
CONTAINED MODULE ONLY 1% x 216 IN„ WITH 
DATA. 
COMPARE AT UPTO TWICE OUR PRICE! S6.50«acK 



FAIRCHILD PNP 

"SUPER TRANSISTOR" 
2N4402. T 0-9(2 PlaslJQ. Silicon PNP 

Driver. HighCurrenl. VCEO-40HFE~ 

SOlO 150 at 150 MA. FT'150MHZ. A 

super "BEEFED-UP" Version Of Iha 

^^^*'^ 8 FOR S1.19 



SOUND ACTIVATED SWITCH 
Not a kit Already assembfecl 
Clap your nands and lum on 
lights, TTiusic boxes coftee ptis, 
etc Full spec, sheet with #ach 



unii 



mt 



10 for S5.50 



Digital Research: Parts 

"^ (OF TEXAS) 

P.O. BOX 401247 • GARLAND, TEXAS 75040 • (2141 271-2461 






« V ^ ■. 




TERMS: Add 50^t postage, we pay balance Orders under? 15 add !*IIJ* 
75C handling. No COD. We accept Visa, MasterChafge and "••# 
American Eitpress cards, Tex. Res. add 5% Tax. Foreign orders '*••* 
(except Canada) add20%P&H,90DayMoneyBackGuarantfleon;**** 
all iterrs. ^ • 

■" • *■■_ 






202 73 Magazine • June, 1980 



^33 



GET ON PHASE THREE FOR MUCH LESS THAN YOU THINK! 



These Low Cost SSB 

TRANSMITTING 

CONVERTERS 

Let you use inexpensive recycled 
1 0M Of 2M SSB exciters or> UH F & VH F! 



Linear Gorv&rters for SSB, CW, FM, etc. 

A fraction of the price of otJier uuM, no need to 

spend $300 - $4003 

Use wfth any excftef; works with input levels as 

low as 1 mW. 

Use low power tap on excfter or simple resistor 

attenuator pad (instruclhons Included). 

Link osc wfth RX converter for transceive. 




■■HiLi'-Ls*; 



HAMTRONICS 

DOESITAGAINT 



NEW XV4UHF KIT- ONLY $99.95 

28-30 MHz in. 435-437 MHz out; 1 W p.e,p. on ssb, up to 
1ViW on CW or FM. Has second oscillator for other 
ranges. Atten. supplied for 1 to 500 mW input, us© 
external attenuator for htgfier levels. 



Extra crystal for 432-434 MHz range 
XV4 Wired and tested 



. , . $5.95 
$149.95 




XV2 VHF KIT - ONLY $69.95 

2W p e,p. output with as Uttle as 1 mW Input. Use simple 
external attenuator. Many freq. ranges avaflabls. 



MODEL 

XV2-1 
XV2-2 
XV2'4 
XV2-6 
XV2*7 



XV2 Wired and tested 



INPUT (MH2) DUTPUT (MHz) 

28-30 50-52 

^e-30 £20-222 

28-30 144-146 

23-29 (2 7-27 A C B) 1 45-1 46 44-1 44.4) 

144-146 50-52 

, .S109.95 




Easy to Build FET 

RECEIVING 
CONVERTERS 

Let you receive OSCAR and other 

excftrng VHF and UHF signals on 

your present HF or 2M receiver 



VHF KIT 

VHF Wired 

MODEL 

CA28 
CA50 
CA50-2 
CA144 
CA1 45 

or 
CA146 
CAS20 
CA2202 
CA110 
(lessxtal) 




$34.95 
$44.95 



RF RANGE 

2fi-32 MHz 

50-52 

50-54 

144-146 

145-147 

1 44- 1 44,4 

146-148 

220^222 

220-224 

Any 2 MHz of 

Aircraft Band 



OUTPUT RANGE 

144-148 MHi 

28-30 

144-148 

23-30 

28-30 

27-27.4 (CB) 

28-30 

2S-30 

144 148 

26-28 

or28-30 



Kit less xtal ..$29.95 



UHF KIT 
UHF Wired 



$34.95 
$44.95 




MODEL 

C432-2 
C432-5 
C432^ 
Kit less xtal 



RF RANGE 

432-434 
435-437 
432-436 



OUTPUT RANGE 

28-30 

28-30 

144-148 

$29.95 



Professional Quality VHF/UHF 

FM/CW EXCITERS 



Fully shield &d designs 

Double tuned circuits for spurious suppression 

Easy to align with built-in test aids 




XV28 2M ADAPTER KIT - $24.95 

Converts any 2M exciter to provide the lOM signal 
required to drive above 220 or 435 MHz units- 



IT'S EASY TO ORDER! 

• Write Of phone 716-392-9430 
(Electronic answ/ering service evenings & weekends) 

• Use Credit Card, UPS COD. Check, Money Order 
» Add S2.00 shipping a handling per order 



T5O-50 6-chan, 6IVI, 2W Kit $44.95 

T5D-1 50 6-chan, 2M, 2W Kit $44.95 

TSO-220 6-chan, 220 MHz, 2W Kit S44,95 

T450 1-chan, 450 MHz, ^W Kit S44.9S 



See our Complete Line of 

VHF& UHF Linear PA'S 



• Use as linear or ciass C PA 

• For use with SSB Xmtg Converters. FM ExciterSi etc. 

LPA2-1 5 6M, 2M. 220; 1 5 to 20W $59-95 

LPA2-30 SM, 2m; 25 to 30W , 389,95 

LPA2-40 220 MHz; 30 to 40W $1 1 9,95 

LPA2-4S 6M, 2M; 40 to 45W .....,..$119.95 

LPA4-tO 430MHz; 10 to 14W .......:.. S79,95 

LPA4*30 430MHz; 25 to 30W -.,..$1 19.95 

See cataiog for compiete specifications 

Call or Write to get 
FREE CATALOG 

With Compiete Details 

(Senct 4 iRCs (or overseas msilinfl) 



FAMOUS HAMTRONICS PREAMPS 

Let you hear the weak ones too! 
Great for OSCAR. SSB, FM. ATV. Over 14,000 in 
use ttiroughout the world ort al I types of receivers. 



Pd Kit $12.9S 

PI 4 Wirecl $21.95 

Specify band wlien ordering 




1V2"x3" 



• OeJuxe vhf mode) 
permits * 

4MHz ic^and 
9 2 stages 



for applications where $pace 
I M od e Is a vai table to cover any 
in th$ 2e to 230 MHz range • 12 Vdc 
# 4deal lor OSCAR • 20 dB gain 



P8Klt $10.95 

Specify band when ordering 




• Miniature vhf model for tight spaces^aze only Vi jt 2^ 

• Mode f s aval I able to cover any 4 M H z band I n t h e ra ng © 
20 to 230 MHi • 20 dS gain • 1 2 Vdc 



PI 5 Kit 
P35 Wired 



$18.95 
$27,95 




• Covers any 10 MHz band m UHF range of 380 to 
520 MHz • 20 d8 gain • 2 stages • 12 Vdc 



NEW VHF/UHF FM RCVflS 

Offer Uriprecedented 
Range of Selectivity Options 



Mew generation 
More sensitive 
More selective 
Low cross mod 

Uses crystal filters 

Smailer 

Easy to align 




R75A* VHF Kit for monitor or weather sattelite service- 
Uses wide L-C filter. -60dB at ± 30 I^Hz $69,96 

R75B* VHF Kft for normal ntjfm service. EquiiwaEent to most 
transceivers. -60dB at ± 1 7 kHz. -eOd B at ± 25 kH z. . . $74.9 5 

P75C* VH F Kit for re peater se rvice or h fgh rf density a rea. 
-60dBat±1 4kHz, ^eOdB ±22h.Hz,-l 00dB±30kHz S84.95 

R75D' VHF Kit for split channel operation or repeater in 
high density area. Uses S-pole crystal filter, -60dB at 
±9 KHj, -1 OOdB at ± 1 S kHz. The ultimate FBoeiver! . . , S99.95 

* Specify ba nd: 1 0M , 6 M , 2M, or 220 M Hz, May also be used 
for adyacent commercial bands. Use 2M version for 1 37 MH2 

WX sateilites. 

RS5( ) UH FFM Receiver Kits, trSpEe conversion, include 
C4 32 UHF Front End ModuJe. Add $20 to above prices. 
(Acfd selectivity letter to model number.) 

A1 3-45 A 6 Channel Adapter for receivers $1 3,95 

WX-25 Weather Tone Alert * . . $24.95 



NEWR110VHFAM RCVR 



AM monitor receiver i^tt similar to R75A, but AM. Avaiiable 
for 1 0'l 1 M, 6M, 2M, 220 MHz, and 1 1 0-130 M Hz aircraft 



band. 



'■ V # V 4, i.* * 



S74.95 



ronics, inc. 



65 E MOUi RD - HILTON, NY 14468 



w- Resder Service-- see page 210 



73 Magazine • June, 1980 203 



^i2 



P.O. Box 401244-E Garland, TX. 75040 (214) 278-3553 



SUPER SUMMER SPECIALSl 



SUDE SWITCH ASSORTMENT 
An outstandtrig bar^am includes miniature and 
standard sizes and multiposit^on units AU new lirst 
quafity, name brand swficties Try one pack and you'll 
reorder more SPECIAL — f2 for Hi 20 (Assortment) 



1/2W RESISTOR ASSORTMENT 

A good mix of 5% and 10% values in both full lead and 
PC lead devices. All new, first quality. 

f***^* (Asst ) 200 pleses/ 2.00 



XAN SUPER DIGITS 



•99 



.6" JUMBO LED 
r SEGMENT 

RED 

6^0 COMMON AMODE 
5640 COMMON CATHODE 

ttiOVW A SUPER HEAD OUT AT A SUPER BUY! These 
are Jaclory fresh prime LED readouts^ not seconds Or 
rejects as sold by ot^lefS. Compare our price and s«nd 
for yours foday. but hurry, the Supply is limited] 
SPECIFY: COMMON ANODE OR COMMON 
CATHODE 



^2N5191 
NPN 



SILICOfi 

POWER 

TRANStSTQR 



Vceo = 6CIV ^^ *°^ 
IC ^ 4A 
Hfe 25-100 

@ 1 6A 
*HSE ti 



3/%^ -00 
I0a/S25.00 



PN2222 i2N2222A} 

MOST POPULAR NPN 

GEN PURPOSE 

TRANSISTOR. 

TO - 90 Vceo = 40V 

Pd ^ 5W 

Hfe -■ 100 - 300 



THE PiRFECT TRANSFORMER 
11?VAC prirnary. 12VAC secondary @ 20ania 
Great for all you CMOS, or low power TTL 
projects, PC board mount. 

g«« ea. 3/S2.50 
Sise: 1.5" Wx 1.25" D k 1.25" H 



A¥3-a910 PROGRAMMABLE SOtiND GENERATOR 

The AV3-S9iiO is a 4J0 pin LSI chip wtth ihree osciil^tgrs. three 
amplitude controEs. programmable natse generator, tt^ree 
mikefs. an envelope genefalor. and (tirsQ D/A converters that 
Br« GOnfroHed by 8 BIT WORDS No exte^^nal pol3 ot caps 
required Thrs chip hookdd to an B bu mici^oprocessor chip or 
Buss (BOSD. 2fiO. 6B00 etc I Uh be atHftware controlled lo 
produce aJmosi any &ound It will play ttiroe npte chords, make 
bangs. »h1$Vles^ sirens, gunsnotA, explosions, tileet^, ^^hines. 
E^r gruimt^. In arfMiiiofi. it Fisa provniofii to control rts own 
mrnnory chips witti two 10 pom Tht Chip requires *SV @ 
TSma and a standant TTL tktdk oscillator A tfut^ mciEdtbte 
ctrcitit 

SI 4. 95 W- Baste Sp#c Sheet (4 pagas) 
30 page manual with S-100 intertace instructions and 
sevefal programming examples, SS.CKI eKtra 



OVF-» OVER VOLTAGE PROTECTOR 6,95 

Provide cheap insurance for your expensive equipmenL 
Trip voliacfQ is adjustable From 3 to 30 volts. Overvaltage 
instantly Tires a 25 A SCR and shorts the output to protect 
ecjuiprriern. Should be used on units that are fused. Dt 
rtsctiy compatibfe with the PS 12 and PS- 14. All electron- 
ics supplied. Drilled and plated PC board. 



ULTRASONIC RELAY KIT 

Invisible Beam Works Like A Photo 
Electric Eye COMPLETE KIT .AIlPansA 
PC Board Use Up To 25 Ft. Apart 

S21-S0 

Optional entry delay and Alarm Timeout 
Circuil will source or sink up to 200 MA 
DC, 

$3.95 



AUTO-^AN CLOCK KIT 



• 12 Mr Formal 

• 6 Dt^it ^" LED Readouts 

• Ouartz XTAL Tim abase 

• Alarm & Snooze Options 

• Noise FilteriF^Q 

• Easy Assembty •12 VDC 

• 4 6/8' )( 3' X 1 1/2" 

• An Paftsi 



$16J5 



ZULU 11 CLOCK KIT 
X'RATED! 



WITH CALENDAR 
AND MOX" CIRCUIT 



X'TRA VALUE: All Itie compooenls and hign qufiliiy plated G-1D PC BcHrdG 

lire piOynJcHlJ 

K-TRA CARE IN DESIGN: Easy Ass^ennbly' Lat^E open Inyoul 

I 'CELL EN CE IN ID£AS: S years of {ieisigned prDducls lot me Afnaleiir radio 

maiket 
K-CEtilNCE m mSTnUCTIOriS: Ctear ai«p-by-»1ep in*1rwd(qnfi *im 

cjuflliiv iJlur-lTfllififis And schpnnfttjc 
K ■ TH A F EAT U Fl ESiT here hat fvevef been b clock mii^mMO many f ealures— an 

■ Unil ope^atiiji isn ^ithm M VAC or 12 VDC, 

* On board quart; XTAL TIHEBASE Of 60Hf AC iin« frp; curi be used 

* Automatic eATTCRr BACKUP ^ 

* R^ad'^ in.f 24 HOUR TIME 3^i2^ DAY CALEMOAfl. 

* Urt^u«MOX'~ ClRCurf BciivMc«rea<iouiiwt|haliaiiitcliplonoi«*dtiylh# 
iMc lor 4 *taandK Or thvy c^vi bv tumefl on cofitlantty. 

■ >Mnftn u««<3i moo lit readoul^ tfisf^k «ne- ignnion h iH( 

* S9*gM ttOtm SUPPRESSION sr>d luflerr f«¥«f»t eira^iti 

» Briqbt 1 "£ LED'i stK» ttpyts minuig arai iceoodi. 



19.95 

LESS CASE 

ACCESSORIES 

CiMtom High 4rnpic1 
Molded Cftfe wnn RuOr 
L^ns. AviJIibl* in Slut or 

T«n. 

S6.S0 

1T7 VAC t9 1% VAC 
Tr«t»h>rfn#i. 

SI 2S 



r:r 



! 



Sound Effects Kit 

Ttw SE4I1 Seui^ Elltct> K Jl n « «pdV»tfi *t«^ a^ V^>u nma w oaiKf ■ 

progrsmmftbid^ stzsjinc: aitecti t wc t rir wOffi^ mtaiUt^^ tn^^pttiKm 

Out kit is cSo^tgned to r#aity ting oui the Tl 76477 Sound Ctiip Only 

Xt^ SE-01 p rqrti ^ » you wctti oddafiOfUt d^cuitry tfm mcUimA a 

PULSE aCMenATOII, UUX OSCIUJITOfl and CDMPAniTOfl to 

maJt» mot^ cofnplkR toum^. a vu^ We hecp ycu ^n c<j ii^ing th« Hit 

woh m civr, edvf to-lotlff* cof^ttrt^iCNi manual and w« s^tow you 

how m esstly pif ogrsm th)«uniT Otrwdeaief^A^II 41611 ythi the chip or 

a "kif □! pant &m you ire on your own to cto the rmHi diftbcull 

p^n ifna4(#nia*1t0uinMis* WLlhhnftfhoii tim? aHeryDubuiidth^SE-OI 

yoii can easily erftatc* OunihotK, Explosiorts. Spaca Sounds. Slaam 

Trains and much n&f* W* tmnh Ihe 0uliet BE-Ot is thie ties! d^al on 

the rnarkei birt don t «h us, — ash itie 15»IM0 happy SE-^t owniffl 

Oompicta Kit With QuBlUy FIntea PC Board S17,S0 

(Lous biliary a soeah^er) 

Unfrn Of oup Kottc Includes dddltional progri^mminQ 

iDharlo plu? qijurtctrly updates $5.00 



SWALL 



7 WATT AUOtO AMP KIT 

SINOLH HVBRtO IC AND COhilPONENTS KT ON A 2"' * U" PC 



BOAFIDllNCLUOSOi RUF^SON I'j VDC GPEAT FOR AH¥ PROJECT THAT 
NEEDS AN INEXPENSIVE AM^- LEES THAN 31ii IMD C^ 5 WATTS 
COMPATIBLE WITH SE-Cll SOUND It (T 15,95 



PARTS 

tUaMi (CA3CM€| XF^tor Array „.. 

RCA 4043fl JOaV &A TTtmC TO-S , . . 

CAaWft PICA XiltOf Artay 

IMSCT Ion* D«ODder . ^.^ ,.. 

cn*m% Pii CMOS 

LMS303 Qua<rCamparaiaf _-.^. 

3SC 1I4» High Ffaci NPN T(>97 ... . 

WPS A £0 NPf4 Qcn^at Furpcise 

TL4M B if.' Graph D rhrw w/specs 

Tt19 i?V lA IftaoitlalDr -- 

7«0S £V tAAogufalof , .. 

TSMQS 5V 'V^ fieg TO-5 fHse *] 

LM3fll Tamp Traisduair wi^ipec3 

?55 r*fnac IC ......... ^ 

iNSoai PUT wiapeca ., ...., 

IL'1 Opto Isolator w^^specs 

iMZm ?W AudtD rC w 'specs 

LM3TT Dual LM3W w^spe^s 

TIP-3Q PNP POwtr TD-220 . , 



t^^ MUSIC FOR YOUR EARS 

Buiiol s EI«clronlc Music M&cWn*'" Klf las 3 
jingle 3S Pin MiofOl^r^icessof Chip wAlh ROM 
thiil hai b«ert progr amf^e^d tD piay ine f irsi 6 to 
10 riotes o1 th^2S ^oiHiiaT lunes listed b«iow 
Each tune ctfi easily be actdre^ed indivldiiaiiy 
or ployed ^«quencsa!ly af the pusti o1 a Dutton 
TtKp 3 chi me acq uen o^ 9B act ivalecj ai any t in-ii' 
by teftar^te switcti closured so when uiMt tt a 
fSoottiefl orie ooof c^n play sorigs wtijle two 
otlvsrs Will play dTff<^enT chimes. The unit has ~ 
5 wait BU4flQ Aii^ and wiH run ofi aWief 17VAC 
« 12V0C. Optional lUVAC lranstoirn»r « 
dvailttHe Coftff faction is ^&^ simfiie. woi^k 
with «ny S Of 1i6 oti^ sjit^akeT, ^ norrt sfieakef 
(f^ol Includefl i Tunes^ can be remotely 
prograiTim^d using a single roi^ry switch, (fiot 
indudtKl), it desired. 



ComptaleKil S16.95 



Translarmi?r Si, 35 

Fof LT#rrtiK:>ni 

on liTVAC 



CALL OR WRITE TODAY FOR FREE CATALOG 



NO COD 

SEND CHECK, M.O.. OR 

CREDIT CARD If 

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204 73 Magazine • June, 1980 




License sTudy qtidEs & tapes 



tt * 




'"^ *'*frmi 



• NOVICE STUDY GUIDE-SG7357— Here is a completely new study 
guide and reference book for the potential ham. This is not a ques- 
tion^answer memorization course. Electronic and radio fundamentals are 
presented and explained in an easyto-understand fashion, prepat ing the 
beginner for the Novice exam. Includes the latest FCC amateur regula- 
tions, as well as application forms. Easily the best path into the exciting 
world of ham radio! $4,95.' 

• GENERAL CLASS STUDY GUIDE— SG7358— A complete theory course 
for the prospective General or Technician. This reference explains transis* 
tor, amplifier, and general radio theory, while preparing the Novice for the 
**big" ticket. After getting your ticket, youli use this guide again and again 
as an electronics reference source. Not a question/answer guide that 
becomes dated when the FCC updates the amateur exams. $5,^/ 



• ADVANCED CLASS LICENSE STUDY GUIDE— 361061 —Ready to upgrade your license? To prevent retaking the FCC theory exam, 
you need the 73 Advanced theory guide. SSB, antenna theory, transmitters, and electronics measuring techniques are covered in 
detail in this easy-tofollow study guide. Special modes and techniques, such as RTTY, are also treated. An engineering degree is not 
necessary to master the Advanced theory — try this book before visiting the examiner's office! 56.95/ (Published by TAB Books 
previous to recent changes m FCC exam material.) 

• EXTRA CLASS LICENSE STUDY GUIDE— SGI 080— Before gorng for your 1 x 2 call, it pays to be a master of the Extra class elec- 
tronics theory. This study guide is the logical extension of the 73 theory course. All the theory necessary to pass the exam is 
presented. Antennas, transmission lines, swr are discussed, as well as noise, propagation, and specialized communication tech- 
niques. This book is not a classroom lecture or memorization guide, but rather a logical presentation of the material that must be 
understood before attempling the Extra exam. Save yourself a return trip to the FCC and try the 73 method first] $5.95/ 



^ raovicE A\ 



!11 



NOVICE THEORY TAPES 
Startling Learning Breakthrough 



• NOVICE THEORY TAPES— CT7300— Startling Learning Breakthrough, You'll be astounded at how 
really simple the theory is when you hear it explained on these tapes. Three tapes of theory and one of 
questions and answers from the latest Novtce exams give you the edge you need to breeze through your 
exam. 73 is Interested In helping gel more amateurs, so we're giving you the complete set of our tapes for 
the incredibly low price of ONLY $15.95:* 

Scientists have proven that you learn faster by listenrng than by reading because you can play a 
cassette tape over and over in your spare time— even while you're driving! You get more and more info 
each time you hear it, You can't progress without solid fundamentals. These four hour-long tapes give 
you all the basics you'll need to pass the Novice exam easily. You'll have an understanding of the basics 
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first listening to these tapes? Set of 4— $15.95.* 

These tapes ware made previous to recent changes In FCC rjSes, These minor changes do not affect ihe theory Involved, A new set of tapes 
reflecting thesa ruJe changes Is being developed. Expected avail abiNty is June 19^. 




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S WPM — CT7305— This is the beginning 
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al aU. U lakes them through thne 26 tetters, 
10 numbers and necessary punctuation. 
Gomp\e}e with practice every step $f the 
war u^ir^g the newest bNtz teaching tech- 
filques It IS almost mtracuJous! In one 
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^are ai}le io master f he code. The ease of 
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"THE STICKLER" 

a+ WPW— CT7306— This is the practice 
ispe ior th« Novice antd Technician li- 
censes. It is made up of one solid hour of 
code, 5<^it at the off icial FCC star^ard (no 
other lape we've heard uses these stan- 
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when they are suddenly — undef pressure 
— faced with chaiactefis sent at 13 wpm 
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13 per. You need this extra margin to ovef- 

come the panic which is universal in the 

test Situations Whefi vou ve spent your 

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thank heavecis you had this bach-^weahins 

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"COURAGEOUS" 

20+ WPM— CT7320— Code is, what gets 
you when you go for the Extra class Ih 
cense, h is so embarrassing lo panic out 
Just because you didn t prepare yourseJI 
wilh this tape. Thojgh this is only one 
word faster ^ the code grqups are so dlf Fi- 
cull that you'H almost Tan asleep copying 
the FCC stuff by comparison. Users report 
that Ihey canl t^elieve how easy 20 per 
fieally is with this fantastic one hour tape. 



''OUTRAGEOUS" 

2S + WPM— CT7325— This is the lape for 
thai small group of overach^eving hams 
who wouldn't t>e content to simply satisfy 
the code requirenvents ol the Eittra Class 
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in 73 s CW 'HaJl of Fame. 




#1Jse tfie ordef ca^d m the bacii of this magazine or itemize your ordet on a separate piece of papef and mail to: 73 Badio Bookshop • FetertiorDugh NK €345c 
Be sure lo include check Of detailed credtt card mtormation. 'Add St. 00 handling ctiarge ^klle: F^tce^ subject to c^iange on tiooks r»Qt put^tshed by 73 Magazine. 

Questions regarding your onjer? PtFease write to Customer Service at the above address Ptease allow 4^ weeks for delivery: 



FOR TOLL FREE ORDERIIMG CALL 1-800-258-5473 



7^ TEchNicAl libRARy 




• BEHIND THE DIAL— BK7307— By Bob Gfove. Gel more fun out 
of shortwave listening with Ihts interesting guide to receivers, 
antennas, frequencies and interference. $4.95/ 

• THE CHALLENGE OF 160— BK7309^is the newest book in the 
73 technical library, dedicated to t60 meter operating. Si Dunn pro- 
vides all necessary informatton to get Started on this unique band. 
The alf important antenna and ground systems are described in 
detail The introduction contains interesting photos of Stew 

Perry's (the King of 160) shack. Thts reference is a must for new 
and experienced "Top Band" operators. Price: S4.95/ 

• !C OP-AMP COOKBOOK --BK1028— by Walter G, Jung. Covers 
not oniy the basic theory of the IC op amp in great detail, but also 
includes over 250 practical circuit applications, liberally il- 
lustrated. 592 pages, SVi x 8V>, softbound. $12.95/ 

• THE POWER SUPPLY HANDBOOK— BK7305— Need a power supply for a gadget you^re building? In the POWER SUPPLY HAND- 
BOOK there are dozens ready-to-build, plus detailed steps for designing your own. There are circuits and parts lists for all kinds of 
supplies, ranging from simple DC types to highly stable regu lated versions. If you need a circuit to convert a DC voltage to a higher or 
lower voltage, tu rn DC Into AC, or AC to DC— then this is the book you need. With more than 400 pages, you should be atde to find just 
the circuit you need. Without a doubt one of the best power supply source books available, compiled by the editors of 73. $7.95.* 

• INTRODUCTION TO RTTY~BK73aO— A beginner^s guide to 
radioteletype including telelypewriter fundamentals^ signals, 
distortion and RTTY art. You can be a RTTY artist! A 73 publica- 
tion, S2.00,' 

• THE NEW RTTY HANDBOOK — BK7347— is a new edition and 
(he only up-todate RTTY book available. The state oJ the art has 
t>een changing radically and has made all previous RTTY books ob- 
solete. It has the latest circuits, great for the newcomer and expert 
alike. $5.95/ 

• PROPAGATION WIZARD'S HANDBOOK— BK7302"by J. H. 

Nelson. When sunspots riddled the worldwide communications 
networks of the 1940's» John Henry Nelson looked to the planets 
for an answer. The result was a theory of propagation forecasting 
based upon interplanetary alignment that made the author the 
most reliabfe forecaster in America today. The book provides an 
enlightened look at communications past, present, and future, as 
well as teaching the art of propagation forecasting. S6 95,' 




?-_.. 



IK 



mm 




• SSB , . • THE MISUNDERSTOOD MODE— BK7351— by James B. 
Wilson. Single Sideband Transmission . . . thousands of us use it 
every day, ye! it remains one of the least understood facets of 
amateur radio. J. B. Wilson presents several methods of sideband 
generation, amply Illustrated with charts and schematics, which 
will enable the ambitious reader to construct his own sideband 
generator. A must for the technically-serious ham. $5.50/ 

• MASTER HANDBOOK OF HAM RADIO CIRCUITS- BK1033- 

This is an encyclopedia of amateur radio circuits, gleaned from 
past issues of 73 Maganne ar\6 carefully selected according to ap- 
plication. You'll find many youVe never seen before, some new 
twists on the tried and true, and several that have been long forgot* 
ten but are well worth remembering. Where your interest ranges 
from ragchewing to EME, from CW to slow-scan TV, from DX to 
county nets, this handbook will be a welcome addition to your 
shack. Sa.95.' 






**•!$ 




• WEATHER SATELLITE HANDBOOK -BK7370- Simple equip- 
ment and methods for getlmg good pictures from the weather 
satellite. Antennas, receivers, monitors, facsimile you can builds 
tracking, automatic control (you don't even have to be home). Dr 
Taggarl WB8DQT.S4.95/ 

• TOOLS & TECHNIQUES FOR ELECTRONICS -BK734a- is an 
easy-to-understand book written for the beginning kit builder as 
well as the experienced hobbyist. It has numerous pictures and 
descriptions of the safe and correct ways to use basic and 
specialized tools for electronic projects as well as specialized 
metal working tools and the chemical aids which are used in repair 
shops. $4.95* 

•THE CONTEST COOKBOOK -BK730a- reveals the secrets of 
the contest winners (Domestic, DX and specialty contests), com- 
plete with photos and diagrams of equipment used by the top 
scorers. Find out how to make 150 contacts in one hour. $5.95* 



^ Use the ordef card in the back of this magazine or itemize your order cm a satjarate i^iece of paper and mail tti: 73 Radio Bookshop • Petefbari:}uCih NK 03453 
Be sure to include check or detail^ credil car^ infofmation * Add 11.00 handhng cttarge Note: Rices sublet Iq change <jn Ixx^s net putMsshed Oy 73 Magau^ine, 

Quest iOHi3^ regarding your ordjcr? Please write to Cu3iQ<TieF Service at ihe a:dovc address Please allo^ 4-6 w&eks for d^ivery 




FOR TOLL FREE ORDERirMG CALL 1-800-258-5473 



TEST EQUIPMENT 



• RF AND DIGITAL TEST EQUIPMENT YOU CAN 

BUILD— BK1044—Rf burst, function, square wave generators, 
variable length pulse generators— 100 kHz nnarker, i-f and rf sweep 
generators, audio osc, af/rf signal injector, 146 MHz synthesizer, 
digital readouts for counters, several counters, prescaler^ 
microwave meter, etc. 252 pages. $5.95.* 

• VOL I COMPONENT TESTERS- LB7359— ... how to build 
transifetor testers (8), diode testers (3), IC testers (3), voltmeters 
and VTVMs (9), ohmmeters {8 different kinds), inductance (3), 
capacity (9), Q measurement, crystal checking (6), temperature (2), 
aural meters for the bfind (3) and all sorts of miscellaneous data on 
meters . . . using them, making them more versatile, making stan- 
dards. invaluable book. $4.95.* 

• VOL. U AUDIO FREQUENCY TESTERS—LB/aSO- . . . jam 
packed with all kinds of audio frequency test equipment. If you're 

into SSB, RTTY, SSTV, etc., this book is a must for you ... a good 
book for hi-fi addicts and experimenters, too! $4.96.* 

• VOL. Ill RADIO FREQUENCY TESTERS— LB7361— Radio frequency waves, the common denominator of Amateur Radio. 
Such items as SWR, antenna impedance^ line impedance, rf output and fieid strength; detailed instructions on testing these 
items includes sections on signal generators, crystal cafibrators, grid dip oscillators, noise generators, dummy loads and 
much more. $4.95,* 




TEST EQUIP- 
d in servicing 



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• VOL. IV IC TEST EQUIPMENT— LB7362— Become a troubleshooting wizard! tn this fourth volume of the 73 
MENT LIBRARY are 42 home construction projects for building test equipment to work with your ham station an 
digital equipment. Pius a cumulative index for ail four volumes of the 73 TEST EQUIPMENT LtBRARY. $4,95/ 

=ThE WElL-EouippEcl kAM shAck 

•THE MAGIC OF HAM RADIO- BK7312- by Jerroid Swank, 
W8HXR begins with a brief history of amateur radio and of 
Jerr/s involvement m it. Part 2 details many of ham radio's 
heroic moments, Hamdom's close ties with tine continent of An- 
tarctica are the subject of Part 3. In Part 4 the strange and 
humorous sides of ham life get their due. And what of the 
future? Part 5 peers into the crystal ball. $4.95.* 

• A GUIDE TO HAM RADIO -BK7321 -by Larry Kahaner 
W82NEL. What's Amateur Radio ail about? You can learn the 
basics of this fascinating hobby with this excellent beginner's 
guide, it answers the most frequently asked questions in an 
easy-going manner, and it shows the best way to go about get- 
ting an FCC license. A Guide to Ham Radio is an ideal introduc- 
tion to a hobby enjoyed by people around the world. $4,95.* 

• HOW TO BUILD A MICROCOMPUTER- AND REALLY 
UNDERSTAND IT^ BK7325- by Sam Creason. The electronics 
hobbyist who wants to build his own microcomputer system 
now has a practical * How-To" guidebook. This book is a com- 
bination technical manual and programming guide that takes 
the hobbyist step-by-step through the design, construction, 
testing and debugging of a complete microcomputer system. 
Must reading for anyone desiring a true understanding of smalf 
computer systems. $9.95.* 

• LIBRARY SHELF BOXES -These sturdy white, corrugated, dirt-resistant boxes each hold a full year of 73, Kiiobaud Micro- 
computing or 80 Mfcrocomputing. With your order, request self-sticking labels for any of the following: 73, Kilobaud Microcom- 
puting, 30 Microcomputing, CQ, QST, Ham Radio, Personal Computing, Radio Electronics, Interface Age, and Byte, Order 1 — 
BX1000-for $2.00*; order 2-7 - BX2002 - f or $1.50 each*; order S or more- BX 1002 -for $1.25 each*. 






style y 




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• QSL CARDS- 73 turns out a fantastic 
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of having them done elsewhere because 
they are run as a fill-in between printing 
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250 Style W-QW0250-for $8.95*; 500 
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S13.95.* Allow 6-12 wks. for delivery. 

• OWNER REPAIR OF RADIO EQUIPMENT— BK7310— Frank Glass K6RQ shares over 40 years of operating, servicing, and 
design experience in this book which ranges from the elementary to the highly technical written for the top engineers in the fieid. h 
is written in narrative style on the subjects of electronic servicing, how components work, and how they are combined to provide 
communication equipment. This book will help you understand the concepts required to service your own station equipment. 
$7.95.* 

♦ Uae the ord^r card id the back ot mis magazine or itemize youf order on a separate piece of paper and mail to: 73 Radio Bookshop * Peterborough NH 03456. 
Be sure lo inctude ciiecH or detailed credit card inforrration. 'Add Si .00 handing cr^arge. Note: Prices subjeci to cnange or> books not pubfisiied by 73 Magazine. 

Questions regarding your order? Please write lo Customer Service at She above address. Please ailow 4-6 weeks for deiivery. 

FOR TOLL FREE ORDERING CALL 1-800-258-5473 



• BACK ISSUES— Cortiplete your collec- 
tion; many are prime coflectabies now, 
classics in the field! A full collection is an 
invaluable compendium of radio and elec- 
tronics knowledge! 

Singte back issue — ^STOOOO— 

$3.00*; 

25 our choice— ST2500"$12.00*; 

25 your choice— ST2501 —$25.00*; 

5 your choice --ST0500- $8.75"; 

10 your choice— ST1 000 - $1 4.00. * 

• FREE BACK ISSUE CATALOGS are yours 
for the asking . . . specify 73 Magazine and^or 
Kilobaud Microcomputing back issue catalog 
when you send your name and address to us 
on a postcard. 



i^S**^ Book 



• 73 DiPOLE AND LONG-WIRE ANTENNAS— BK1 01 6— by Edward M. Noll W3FQJ. This is the first collection o1 virtually every typeof 
wife antenna used by amateurs. Includes dimensions, configurations, and detailed construction data for 73 different antenna types. 
Appendices describe the construction of noise bridges, line tuners, and data on measuring resonant frequency, velocity factor, and 

swr. $5,50/ ^^^^ GIANT BOOK OF AMATEUR RADIO ANTENNAS- With the 

GIANT Book of Amateur Radio Antennas by your side, antennas 
will become the least of your worries. Over 450 pages of design 
I ideas, theory and reference data make this book live yp to its title. 

The 7 chapters cover everything from basic antenna theory 
through designs tor DIY accessories, as well as dozens of antenna 
designs. Whether planning to build or buy, design or admire, test 
or enjoy a ham antenna — this is the book for you. From the editors 
of 73; published by Tab Books. $12.95* hardback- BK7304, $6.95* 
paper — BK11 04. 

• 73 VERTICAL, BEAM AND TRIANGLE ANTENNAS — BK1069— 
by Edward M. Noll W3FQJ. Describes 73 different antennas for 
amateurs. Each design is the result of the author s own ex- 
periments covering the construction of noise bridges and antenna 
line tuners, as well as methods for measuring resonant frequencyt 
velocity factor, and standing-wave ratios. 160 paoes. $5.50/ 

• VHF ANTENNA HANDBOOK— BK7368— The NEW VHF Antenna 
Handbook details the theory, design and construction of hundreds 
of different VHF and UHF antennas ... A practical book written for 
the average amateur who takes Joy in buildinp, not full of complex 
formulas for the design engineer. Packed with fabulous antenna 
projects you can build, $5.95.* 



^**fe4tW 









.».■" 






• PRACTICAL ANTENNAS FOR THE RADIO AMATEUR - BK101 5 
— A manual describing how to equip a ham station with a suitable 
antenna. A wide range of antenna topics, systems, and acces- 
sories are presented giving the reader some food for thought and 
practical data for construction. Designed to aid the experienced 
ham and novice as well. Only $9.95.* 

• TTL COOKBOOK -BK1063- by Donald Lancaster. Explains 
what TTL is> how it works, and how to use it. Discusses practical 
applications, such as a digital counter and display system, events 
counter, eiectronic stopwatch, digital voltmeter and a digital tach- 
ometer. $9.50. 

• CMOS COOKBOOK -BK1011 -by Don Lancaster. Details the 
application of CMOS, the low power logic family suitable for most 
applications presently dominated by TTL, Required reading for 
every serious digital experimenter! $10,50.* 

• TVT COOKBOOK— BKi 064— by Don Lancaster. Describes the 
use of a standard television receiver as a microprocessor CRT ter- 
minaL Explains and describes character generation, cursor con- 
trol and interface information in typical, easy-to-understand Lan- 
caster style. $9.95/ 

• BASIC NEW 2ND EDITION - by Bob Albrecht. Self-teaching guide to the computer language you will need to know for use with your 
microcomputer- This is one of the easiest ways to learn computer programming. $6.95/ (BK1081) 

• HOBBY COMPUTERS ARE HEREi— BK7322— If you want to 
come up to speed on how computers work . . . hardware and soft- 
ware - . . this is an excellent book. It starts with the fundamentals 
and explains the circuits, the basics of programming, along with a 
couple of TVT construction projects, ASCII-Baudot, etc. This book 
has the highest recommendations as a teaching aid for 
newcomers. $4.95.* 

• THE NEW HOBBY COMPUTERS— BK7340~^This book takes It 
from where Hobby Computers Are Herel leaves off, with chapters 
on Large Scale Integfation, how to choose a microprocessor chip, 
an introduction to programming, low cost I/O for a computer, com- 
puter arithmetic, checking memory boards, a Baudot monitor/edi- 
tor system, an audible logic probe for finding those tough prob- 
lems, a ham's computer, a computer QSO machine . . . and much, 
much morel $4.96* 

• HOW TO MAKE MONEY WITH COMPUTERS - In 10 information 
packed chapters, Jerry Felsen describes more than 30 computer- 
related, money-making, high profit, low capital investment oppor- 
tunities. $15.00/ (BK1003) 

• RTL COOKBOOK - BK1059 - by Donald Lancaster. Explains the 
how and why of RTL (Resistor-Transistor Logic) and gives design 
information that can be put to practical use. Gives a multitude of 
digita[ applications ranging from the basic switch to the 
sophisticated counter. 240 pages; $6.50.* 

Use the order card m the bacl^ of Ihis magazine Of itemize your order on a separate piece of paper artd mail to: 73 Radio Bookshop m Peterborough NH 03458. 
Be sure to include chec^ or detailed credit card information. "Add Si. 00 handling charge. Note: Prices subject lo change ors books not published by 73 Magazine. 

Questions regarding your order? Please write to Cusiorner Service at the above address. Piease allow 4^5 weeks for delivery. 




FOR TOLL FREE ORDERING CALL 1-800-258-5473 



q)EflLER 

DIRECTORY 




Fontana CA 

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I di stii, Wiijori. liuslkr, GAM llJ^CilM tm. 
Cuminunlcjifctiis. & Ekf^ronlc^. 675 Cirt«] Hd., 
K4. 1 14, Udk-Con MA 01460. 4115-3040. 

laurel MD 

Kenwood. t>nir. JCOVt^ Ten-Tec, Si»an^ Den- 
cron, Tonpo and manv ham accnuifies. Alw 
4:Djisi|Mjier> bv Apple and Eiikty. C^ loll free 
l'«00-AifM4S6 TheComin tcnirr, 1nc.< I^yret 
Ptaja— Rl. in, IjwrI MD 30ftlO. 

St. Louts MO 

Eiperimenler'4 paradise! tkcironic *nd 
mediankaf rofnponems fof iiounpuier people, 
.ludio pcQt^lc* fiaim, robcH bttikfcri. es|Jefi- 
tnniltr^. Open i,i% days a week- ilaivmuy Elcc- 
rniiiii-s f^«>rp.. ft 123-25 Pi$^e H\\d.. HU l^iuis 



Camden NJ 

X-band (& oiher frequencies) Microwave 
Computicnls ii tqaipmrnl. Labaralory Grade 
Test I Tiwru merits, Power Supplies, I000\ in 
aock ai tiil tinics^ BUY ^ SELL aU populur 
makes — HP» GR^ FXR, ESI. Sorcnaen* Sjngcrn 
inc. Lectmnk- KcTM'irrli IjiIh, 142J leffi At^r., 
l^anHleii VJ m\m. 54l«t200. 



Symcuse— Central .^JY 

Wc dcAJ. w« iraJe^ ^r di^n^iiat, we 
Yaesu. Ten -Tec, CuilKfaft, Drake, Dcfiiron. 
KLSl, Midiami, BAW, ICOM. Hjgain. Swan, 
."^rncoro* Tdoo, Mirage, DSl etc. Complete 
2-way service ^wp! Ham-^ne Radi« CtM*. 
Slexva ttfiHir S^hDti) 32Mr) hiit Bl^d. I^U 
S»i>ane SV BlU. 4«-1166. 



Syracuse-Rmne-Utica NY 

Feaiurifig: Yae^u, ICUM, Drake, Atku*, Den- 
Tronn, Ten-Tec, Swan, Tcmpoi KLM^ Hy- 
Gain, Mo&lcy, WiUon, Larsen, Midland 
Southwest Tei:hiiJcal Producis. Vaii won'i ht 
disappoirvtc^cl vviib equipment Ait vju'e, Rnifln 
World, Oneida Count} Airport-TeFmiiniil 
Buililiiig, ()iiKkpii} ISJY 13424. m-^UU. 

PWa« PA/Caxndf;ii Nl 

>^avegujdc & CO«tVH] niicrOrH«>3%« OMItpOflOItt 
± equtpfFJoil, LaboratcHi £nidc (ctl IntfUH 
meniji, pdifcCT ^upplic^. Bm. sell & tra^ iU 
popular mike^. HP, t^R, FXR, E5J, Sorcna«l» 
Snger» ttz. l.«ctn»ak Rtseancfc Lal»«i l4Ui 
Fcfn AtT., C^mdni NJ 08104, 54M200. 



Columbus OH 



All majm brands Eoilufed m ihe Ixiical t»d bcii 
ham store for milc^ ajroufwi. Come ifi aj^d twni 
ihc kncfb^ befcfc yau buy. We^hip U-PS too, 
UnivenKl Anwleur Rwiki^ Inc., 1280 AJda Dr.. 
Rt> noldsburK (ColHmlnis) OH J30«i, fl6<M2Al. 



Huu^^ion TX 

E;tpcn[Titoicr*8 puradiscl Elect ronic and me* 
chanical c:omponen[s Tor computer pcopk^ 
audio people, KfemE, robm builders, ch- 
petimenters. Open ^n. day& a v^^h. Cialewny 
Fiecironlci INc, mM Hatktrtsl, tluuslun T\ 
TKP6J. 97i^657S. 



San Antonio T% 

Caniploc 2 w«y lemee iiiop. Call Dee. WSFSP. 
Sdkog Ajvimna Spedaliit^ Avas^. A^den. 
Bird^ Hy^^ain. Siandxrd «Hiimiiniealion»^ 
Genave. Hem>. CuihCraft* Husilef, ICOM. 
KDK, MFJ. Nye» Sliure, Sm-so, Tempo, TawTa 
and nthcr^, Ajpliwrr & Eqafpmeni C<i., Inc.. 
1317 y*nct Jael£$oii Road, >aB Antoiiki 1\ 



Port Angeles WA 

Mobile RFt shielding Tor eliiriinotion or igni- 
tion and aiiemaior noisei. Bonding siraps. 
Components for "do'lt-yourseif' projcci'i, 
Pluntv iif free -idvicET &lfes Ejiglnecrint, '^.W 
Marine Drive, t*url Anjtdes WA yajfrl, 4S7- 
0W4. 



DEALERS 

Kowr company name and message 
can comain up io 25 words for as 
Utile as $150 ytarty f prepaid), or 
$15 per month (prepaid quart erf y), 
.\o merriion of mail-order business 
or area code permitted. Directory 
text and payment mtut reach us 60 
days in advance of publication, for 
example, ad%enising for the August 
issue must be in our hands by June 
1st. Mail to 73 Magazinet Peter^ 
borough A// 03458. A TTi\: Aline 
Coutu. 






propagation 



by 

J. H. Nelson 



1 
























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A - Next higher frequency may atsa be usefut 

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73 Magazine • June, 1980 209 




SaSlgjasfe© Peterborough. n.h. 03458 



LisT oF AdvEmisERs 



To receive full Information from our advertisers 
please complete the following postage-paid card. 



R.S. No. Pige 

9 AR Tectinical Products Corp BO 

6 AMC Engrneering 135 

2 Advanced El&ctronac ApplEc^tlons 

■ ■■Aft rij'di'.fe. t, A m m. M M m a'.M. m ^ m m m iL m ■■ ■ hi ■ r V'F 

483 Advanced Electronic Applications 
22 

3 AED Electronics, 39 

300 Alde^lco , 135 

6 Amateur- Wholesale EfecL 
.,117. 194 

7 American Crystal Supply 133 

479 Amerex ... 23 

334 Amidon Assoctales. .......... 167 

301 Appliance & Equip, Co., Inc. 
133, 1S6 

8 Aptron Laboratories. ^ . -■ 91 

* Associated Radio ......... 1 98 

Atlan^ta HamFestival » = . 109 

10 Avanii Research & Develop, , , . . 71 

11 BarKer-Wiiliamson 6& 

12 aullet EJectronicB ... 204 

13 Clegg ..87, 133 

89 Clutterfree Modular Consoles 

....150 

332 Commefce Tours Intemat (nc . 79 

14 Comm Center, NE .63 

15 Comm. Specialists. 8, 9 

S5 Comm. Tecti. Group ... 183, 185 

16 Crown Micro Prod 66 

331 DATAK 95 

330 Debco Electronics. 78 

Digital Research Parts 202 

20 DSI instruments. .............110 

* 80 Microcomputing _ . . 101 

23 FlesherCorp 47 

323 Fox Tango Corp. 62 



f^.S. Nol Pag9 

302 GgiG 1=^adio ElecL Co , 133 

24 Gemini instrument Co 186 

25 Germanlown Amat. Supply. .... 134 

27 Q.LS.M O.......... 150 

477 Global.,......,...,..,. 23 

28 Godtsout Electronics 196 

Gregory Electronics — ,49 

461 Grove Enterprises -vi ** . , ... 23 

304 HFT, inc, 186 

Hal Comm. Corp,... 13 

31 Hal Tronic 59 

3D The Ham-Key Co .52 

32 Ham Radio Center 45 

33 Hamtronics, NY, 203 

34 Henry Radio Cov I! 

37 iRL... ., ........71 

35 Info-Tech, \m,^ . . . , 53 

337 Instant Software 92, 93 

36 International Crystal Wq 116 

38 Jameco Elect ronics. ..... 188, 197 

39 Jan Crystals. .135 

40 KLM Electronics 119 

Kantronlcs , 151 

KB Microcomputing , , . , . 109 

Kenwood „.,„.„ Cov IV. 5 

480 tarsen Antennas 168 

41 LaRue Electronics 1 47 

84 Long Path Radio. .86 

42 Longs Electronics,, ,,.,,,138-143 
47 MFJ Enterprises... 61. 87, 116, 186 

46 MH? Electronics. 200, 201 

53 MOM'S. ,,, 102. 103 

43 M&M RF Distributors 108 

44 Macrolronlcs. 1 83 

45 Madison Electronics S jp. , 135, 1 67 



R.S. No. Page 

46 Maggiore Electronic Lab 167 

49 Micro Control Specialties .66 

313 Micro Management Sys .... 97 

50 MicrocraJt Corp. . .151 

51 MicrolOg Corp 27 

52 Mid Com Eiectronics, Inc 66 

31B National Comm. Group Co 83 

54 OK Machined Tool. ...99, 101, 105 

55 Optoelectronscs. inc. ...... 89, 151 

57 P.C. Electronics , . . 59 

Paiomar Engineers 26 

Partridge Electronics 47 

58 Poly Paks. 199 

69 Quest Electroniics. 187 

63 RF Power Labs, Inc. 8S 

61 Radio Amateur Call book. 52 

Radio Wodd 151 

62 Ramsey Electronics. ..... 192, 195 

65 S-F Amateur Radio Services 

53, 67 

Seatt le N at i o na r A m a leur Radio 
Convention , . . . 121 

64 Semiconductors Surplus, 191 

333 Sentry Mfg. Co .* , ♦ , , 137 

73, . . ,.. . , ... , 115, 2054gS, 21 Q 

66 SignaToraflers, Inc 47 

317 Space Electronics 136 

309 Spacecoast Research 133 

67 Spectronics, i nc , . . 193 

68 Spectrum Comm 72, 73 

69 Surplus Electronics. 190 

70 Swan Electronics ,.19 

73 TET, USA 40,41 

324 THS Electronics 175 

476 THS Electronics 16S 

462 Technical Clinic 166 



R.S. Nol Pftg« 

72 Tele Tow'r Mfg. Co. 183 

Ten Tec, Inc.. 3, 11 

75 Ttiomas Comm, 77 

76 Trac Electronics 26 

335 Tri-Ex Tower .17 

77 Tufts Radio Electronics 154-165 

310 Ultima Electronics, Ltd. ....... 186 

31 1 Vanguard Labs 133 

86 Vineyard Amateur Radio 189 

79 Wacom. h ......>. 47 

80 Western EEoctronics, ......... 175 

Wilson Sys., Inc 126-129 

82 X itex Corp .... . . ..*... 87, 1 67 

47B Xitex Corp. , 1 69 

83 Yaesu Electronics. . . Cov III. 36, 57 

336 Z Associates .>i^..,,, . . . 186 



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BK1016 73 DIPOLE & LONG WIRE ANTENNAS 

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BK1081 BASIC NEW2HDEDmON,....,,,.,S 6 95 

BK7307 BEHIND THE DIAL t 4.95 

BK7309 CHALLENGE OF 160 $ 4.95 

CT7305 CODE TAPE - 5 WPM $ 4.95 

CT7306 C0DETAPE^6+ WPM ,.$ 4.95 

CT7313 CODE TAPE "13+ WPM $ 4.95 

CT7320 CODETAPE-20+ WPM $ 4.95 

GT7325 CODETAPE-25+ WPM. .$ 4.95 

CT7394 CODE TAPES (ANY FOUR ABOVE). . $15.95 
BK7308 THE CONTEST COOKBOOK. ......$ 5.95 

BK7304 GIANT BOOK OF AMATEUR RADIO 

ANTENNAS ._......... $12.95 

BK7322 HOBBY COMPUTERS ARE HERE. . . $ 4.95 
BK7325 HOW TO BUILD A MICROCOMPUTER & 

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To order^ complete the following postage-paid card, or itemize your order including 
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Catalog # Hem Price 

BK73aO INTRO TO RTTY $ 2.00 

eK73l2 MAGIC OF HAM RADIO $ 4.95 

BK1033 MASTER HANDBOOK OF HAM RADIO CIR- 
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QWO&OO OSL CARDS -STYLE W-500. S13.95 

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QX0500 QSL CARDS - STYLE X - 500 Si 396 

QY0250 QSL CARDS- STYLE Y-250. . , , . . $ 8.95 
QYO5O0 QSL CARDS - STYLE Y - 5130, ..,...$ 1 3.95 
BKt044 RF DIGITAL TEST EQUiPMENT. . . .. S 5.95 

BK7347 RTTY HANDBOOK >.. S 5.95 

BK1059 RTL COOKBOOK... $ 6.50 

BX1000 SHELF BOX - 1. , . , $ 2. 00 

BX1001 SHELPaOXES^2-7 $1.50 each 

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SGI 080 STUDY GUIDE - EXTRA CLASS S 5.95 

SG7358 STUDY GUIDE -GENERAL CLASS. $ 5.95 
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$ 4,95 

LB7361 TEST EQUIP LI BV3- RADIO EQUIP. S 4.95 
LB7362 TEST EQUIP LIB V4 - IG TEST EQUIPS 4.95 

BK734a TOOLS & TECHNIQUES ..$ 4.95 

BK1063 TTL COOKBOOK $ 9.50 

BK1064 TVT COOKBOOK..,., S 9.95 

BK1069 VERTICAL BEAM & TRIANGLE ANTNS 

$ 5.50 

BK7368 VHP ANTENNA HANDBOOK .$ 5.95 

BK7370 WEATHER SATELLITE HAN DBOOKS 4.95 



210 73 Magazine • June, 1980 



REAKR 
^RVICE 

73 Magaiine, P-0,B, 2739, Clinton* iA 52735 



Reader Service: Return this card to receive full information on the 
products advertised in this issue. Refer to the ad. You will find num- 
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numbers on one of the cards on this page, include your name, ad- 
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This card is valid unti! September 30, 1980 

Please help us to bring you a better maga- 
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L What is your age? 

n A, under 18 
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D a 41-60 

□ E, over 60 

II. ARRL 

n 1. Love it 
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D 3, Hate it 

IIL If you are not a subscriber 
please circle number 500* 



1 

2 
3 
4 
5 



29 
30 



76 
77 
78 
79 



6 
7 
Q 
9 
10 



11 
12 
13 

15 



16 
17 

IB 
19 
20 



21 
22 
23 
24 
25 



31 
32 
33 
34 
35 



36 
37 
38 
39 
40 



<*1 
42 
43 
44 
45 



46 
47 
48 
49 
50 



126 
127 

i2e 

129 
130 



131 
132 
333 
134 
135 



136 
137 
133 
139 
140 



141 
142 
143 
144 
145 



146 
147 
148 
149 
150 



51 55 

52 57 

53 58 

54 59 



61 66 

ez 67 

63 68 

6«i 89 



55 60 65 70 



71 
72 
73 
74 
75 



T51 156 

152 157 

153 156 

154 159 

155 160 



161 
162 
163 
164 
165 



166 171 

167 172 
!6Q 173 

169 174 

170 175 



251 256 261 266 271 

252 257 262 267 272 

253 25S 263 268 273 

254 259 264 269 274 

255 260 265 270 275 



376 3ai 386 391 396 

377 3fi2 387 392 397 

378 383 368 393 398 

379 384 389 394 399 

380 385 390 395 40G 



81 
82 
83 
84 
85 



86 
87 

m 

69 
90 



91 
32 
93 



96 
97 

98 



94 99 

95 100 



176 181 186 191 196 

t77 182 187 132 197 

T78 183 168 193 198 

179 184 189 194 199 

180 185 190 195 200 



276 281 286 29l 296 

277 282 287 292 297 

278 263 286 293 298 

279 2S4 2S9 294 299 

280 285 290 295 300 



201 206 211 216 221 

202 207 212 217 222 

203 208 213 218 223 

204 203 214 219 224 

205 210 215 220 225 



101 106 111 116 121 

102 107 112 117 122 

103 108 113 118 123 

104 109 114 119 124 

105 110 115 120 125 



226 231 236 241 246 

227 232 237 242 247 

228 233 238 243 248 

229 234 239 244 249 

230 235 240 245 250 



301 306 311 316 321 

302 307 312 317 322 

303 308 313 318 323 

304 309 314 319 324 

305 310 315 320 325 



326 331 330 341 340 

327 332 337 342 347 

328 333 338 343 348 

329 334 339 344 349 

330 335 340 345 350 



401 408 411 416 421 

402 407 412 417 422 

403 408 413 418 423 

404 409 414 419 424 

405 410 415 420 425 



426 431 436 441 446 

427 432 437 442 447 

428 433 438 443 448 

429 434 439 444 449 

430 435 440 445 450 



451 456 461 466 471 

452 457 462 4fi7 472 

453 458 463 468 473 

454 459 464 469 474 

455 460 465 470 475 



351 356 361 366 371 

352 357 362 367 372 

353 358 363 368 373 

354 359 364 369 374 

355 360 365 370 375 



476 481 486 491 496 

477 482 467 492 497 

478 483 488 493 498 

479 484 489 494 499 

480 485 490 495 500 



73 Magazine • June 1 980 



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FT-707 is shown with 
sptional FV-707DM VFD 

& Scanning Microphone 



THE FT-707 
WAYFARER 



The introduction of the "WAYFARER" by Yaesu is the beginning of a new era in compact solid state 
transceivers. The FT-707 "WAYFARER" offers you a full 100 watts output on 80-10 meters and operates 
SS8, CW, and AM modes. Don't let the small size fool you ! Though it is not much larger than a book, this Is a 
full-featured transceiver which is ideally suited for your home station or as a traveling companion for mobile 
or portable operation. 

The receiver offers sensitivity of .25 uV/IQ dB SN as well as a degree of selectivity previously unavailable in a 
pacl<age this small. The "WAYFARER" comes equipped with 16 poles of IF filtering, variable bandwidth and 
optional crystal filters for 600 Hz or 350 Hz. Just look at these additional features: 



FT-707 with Standard Features 

Fast/slow AGC selection 
Advanced noise blanker 
Built-in calibrator 
WWV/JJY Band 
Bright Digital Readout 
Fixed crystal position 
2 auxiliary bands for future expansion 
Unique multi-color bar metering — monitors 
signal strength, power output, and ALC voltage. 



FT-707 with Optional FV-707DM 

A Scanning Microphone 

Choice of 2 rates of scan 
Remote scanning from microphone 
Scans in 10 cycte steps 
Synthesized VFO 

Selection of receiver/transmitter functions 
from either front panel or external VFO 
"QMS" (Digital Memory Shift) 



Impressive as the "WAYFARER" is its versatility can be greatly Increased by the addition of the FV-707DM 
(optional). The FV-707DM, though only one inch high, allows the storage of 13 discrete frequencies and with 
the use of "DMS" (Digital Memory Shift) each memory can be band-spread 500 KHz. These 500 KHz bands 
may be remotely scanned from the microphone at the very smooth rate of 10 Hz steps. 



The F-707 "WAYFARER" is a truly unique rig. 
See it today at your authorized Yaesu Dealer. 




w 



TheratUo, 






YAESU ELECTRONICS CORP., 6&S1 Walthall Way, Paramount, CA 90723 • (213) 633-4007 
VAccui ci crrianMir.c i=««tof« ft.fwica i^_flai 3 Prinroton-Glendala Rd.. Cincinnati .OH 45246 




/ 



New 




meter direction. 




TR-9000 



A compact transceiver 




FM/SSB/C W plus 



TR-SOOQ 



Konwood's done it again! Now, 
It's the exciting TR-9000 2- 
meter all-mode transceiver... 
complete with a host of new 
toatures. Combining the con- 
venience of FM with long dis- 
tance 9jm and CW In a very 
compact, very affordable 
package, the TR-9000 is the 
answer for any serious Ama- 
teur Operator! Versatile? You 



Not«: Price, specifications subject to 
change without notice end obligation 



bet! Because of its compact- 
ness, the TR-9000 Is ideal for 
mobile installation. Add on Its 
fixed station accessories and 
it becomes the obvious choice 
for your ham shack! 

See your Authorized Kenwood 
Dealer now for details on the 
TR-9000... the new direction 
in 2-meter all-mode trans- 
ceivers! 




U^/OOWM micro- 
phan. CtUnd.ril} 

4i>*nDr ilaii. 



®Kei\l\A/OOD 



.. .paaMttrr in atnaUttt rndiu 

TRiO KENWOOD COMMUNICATIOIMS INC, 
1111 WEST WALNUT/COMPTON, CALiFORNiA 90220