(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "73 Magazine (December 1985)"

I a* ue #303 



OUR 25th ANNIVERSARY YEAR ! 





December 1985 

$2.50 USA 

$3.50 Canada 



Ama 




® A CWC/P Publication 



R4 International Edition 




9U^\\ 





FM and Repeaters 



WORLD SSB 




Results— 75 and 1 60m 
Rules for 1 986 






OA^iW 




1985 

Amateur Radio's 
Greatest Year? 



TSP1L 



•^ 



7447CT65946 




TTHMM 



ICOM 25-IOOOMHz Plus! 






5*fH> - iSgMfaV DCLAt 



vsc 



METtn 




COMl COMMUKlCATklNH RLCElVE* 



POWER 



— SCAN 3TAHT/STQP \ 

PflOW rStl -M MOOE MEMORY 



I ri rVI I 



f H ■ * 

f U U Lf u u u ? 3 




i 


■;: ■ 1 


- 



aET/MSET-Ci AUTOM 



RtMOTE 



Af fJ*IN 



SQUELCH 



LOCH. 



m ai r 



|P1 MM 



I..M: 


=5 



- 








/ 






1 




7 




D3 


■ 2 






H ■ 


* 6 








'U ] 


1 
| 


— 


" ■ 


• 


^^^B 


^ 


■ 








j[>0l 




^ ■ 


■ ™ 


















i, 
























HJ tj ft 
^"1 iS 


MEMOflV CH — 


WRITE 


■W 


ClEAR 


c 




ICOWTs commercial 
quality scanning 
receiver...Top 
quality at a gem 
of a price. 



ICOM introduces the 
IC-R7000 advanced technol- 
ogy 25 -2000MHz* continu- 
ous coverage communications 
receiver With 99 owner pro- 
grammable memories, the 
JOR7000 covers tow band, 
aircraft, marine, business, FM 
broadcast amateur radio, 
emergency services, govern- 
ment and television bands. 

Keyboard Entry, For 

simplified operation and quick 




tuning the IC-R7000 features 
direct keyboard entry. Precise 
frequencies can be selected by 
pushing the digit keys in se- 
quence of the frequency or by 
turning the main tuning knob. 

99 Memories. The 
I OR 7000 has 99 memories 
available to store your favorite 
frequencies, including the 
operating mode. Memory 
channels may be called up by 
Simply pressing the Memory 
switch, then rotating the 
memory channel knob, or by 
direct keyboard entry. 

Scanning. A sophisticated 
scanning system provides 
instant access to most used 
frequencies. By depressing 
the Auto-M switch, the 



IC-R7000 automatically memo- 
rizes frequencies rn use while 
the unit is in the scan mode. 
This allows you to recall 
frequencies that were in use. 

Other Outstanding 
Features: 

• FM wide/FM narrow/AM/ 
upper and lower SSB 
modes 

• Six tuning speeds; O.I ( 1.0, 
5. 10, 12.5 or 25KHz 

• Dual color fluorescent dis- 
play with memory channel 
readout and dimmer switch 

• Compact Size: 4-3/8*H 
x Jl'/VWx 10 7 /b*D 

• Dial lock, noise blanker, 
combined S-meter and 
center meter 



Optional RC-12 infrared 
remote controller 

Optional voice synthesizer 
When recording, the voice 
synthesizer automatically 
announces the scanned 
signal frequency 



■ 




* Specifications guaranteed 
from 25-TOOQMHz and 1260- 
1300MHz, No coverage frorr 
1000-1025MHz. Noaddioona 
module required for coverage 
to approximately 2,OGHz 

See the IC-R7000 receiver 
atyour local authorized ICOrV 

dealer. Also available is die 
IOR71A 0.1-30MHZ general 
coverage receiver. 

ALL THIS AT A PRICE 
YOU'LL APPRECIATE, 



ICOM 



First in Communications 




ICOM America. Inc. 2380-ll6Eh Ave NE. Beflevue. vVA 98004 / 3331 Towerwxx* Drive. Suite 307. Dallas^ 75234 

Ait stated specifications are approximate and subject to change without notice or oblation AM ICOM radios significantly exceed FCC regulations Smiting spurious emiutora. JT7Q009S5 








u\r,i-!mm 



ALL MAJOR BRANDS IN STOCK 



■ ■!■.. U'U, 



VjOX<0.<^vmvavvw..;v wv v-; ; ■; ; — ■-.; ;.;. .;„;. - <t .. _.;........■:... *..,«*-> v>v.^v.w;,vv|-v ■ ■■■-■■ --■ — ■ ■■_■ y m - ^ v 






.• : .• •: > 



• •. > •• .• •••:• ••%■ 
. -. .• •: :• • '• ••** 



1 -V: ;.:: I 



*m*M 







SUPERIOR GRADE 

GENERAL COVERAGE 

RECEIVER 



'*U«« 



™ - - — ,*■ 



Ibv ■ * d — 

2, Pg * 



ttK'd^S 



Regular $799 



S4LE/ 




vj>oyy , yo 



.- . ■ •. ■ ■ :■ ■: > ■■ 



ppPWWWPW^ * . ..,■■-'. : - ;!,J|:l|^ ?^!*?*!gygff? 



AWi 



. > ^ -. ^-. v a ■. x ;. ■> :■'.■:■ ^> x A y £ ; 

I •• • ■■]■ '•-■■-■■■ '---I 



TOLL-FREE PHONEl 

INCLUDING ALASKA AND HAWAII 



m*m 




;;S 




IC-37A 




220 MHz's BEST BUY! 

REGULAR $449 

SALE! $299.95 

LIMITED QUANTITIES 
THIS PRICE. 



■I.iiiii nnn i nH.i li W 



!!;.' !. U. 1 -• 




ICOM 



HAND- HELD S 



pi 

Ira 



!•:-.■ *> 

T:r:--5 





1 


I 


■ * 






















L 




..... m 


■ 


B 
B 
K 


• ■ 4 
■ ■ - ; 
BUB 
AD" 









f.:: 
Bj, 



IC-02AT IC-2AT IC-3AT 
IC-04AT IC-4AT 

AT GREAT LOW 
LOW PRICES 



■ 






■ 



■ : 

'..'■■ ': :" > 



ICOM IC-735 



THE LATEST IN ICOM'S LONG LINE 
OF HF TRANCEIVERS 




CALL FOR LOW, LOW PRICE 



w* 







: V 



. 
•■; 



:■ .- -nr 
. o ■ ■■■ 



:•;.-:■- 



-,. 






fffPIPPPPPP 



Jfc 



■ ■■ ■- 



Mrtta* 



•-•■• •■•; ;•;•:,-; ••.r^ay. 



FREE SHIPMENT 

MOST ITEMS. U.P.S. SURFACE 



....... I .... I.II.IIIMIIIIIIIUIIIII mmmmmm—^ 



«--■ 







> y .-. \ .-. 

' : : C .': f 

• '' > ' 
■ 
>'■:•• V ■'■ 






x-r-x-yv 



■■■.:■■. '.'. 



ritaMMMt 




ICOM 



LATEST 
EDITION 

IC-3200A DUAL BANDER 

COVERS BOTH 2 METERS 

and 70 CM 

CALL FOR 
LOW, 
LOW 
PRICE 




«;0? 



Stt" 



■ > :™ * :. v :. ;■ .::..:: : :- ;:•:»>■ :•■■. ■■-■■••.■•• 



MMBtMMMHaMatMIM! 



— 1B(|(B1 ^^ ^y^^^^g^^ jgj^jg 



BM«a 



Hiiii 



Bijfliua 



6 STORE BUYING POWER! 



i iiliiM 




800-854-6046 



TOLL FREE PHONE INCLUDING ALASKA AND HAWAII 
CALIF. AND ARIZONA CUSTOMERS CALL OR VISIT NEAREST STORE 

PHONE HOURS: 9:30 AM TO 5:30 PM PACIFIC TIME. 



PERSONALIZED SERVICE 

SOB FEflfl-EHO WflflJ 

P. r mird?nl 

JIM RAFFEPTT NflHJ 

VP §p. Cplif Chw. An^hilm 

(jEOhul. Wfleusv BurllnaarM 

DO N, rtflJPE G-ahij'id 

BOB. «7HDH PTioenlx 

GLENN, KSN* Sar Dlago 

AL. K6YRA Van Nut a 

M «j W i M im m ,ig Hnvw » STORE HOURS: 10 AM to 5:30 PM Mon. through Sat 



FREE SHIPMENT 

MOST ITEMS U.P.S. SURFACE 





ANAHEIM, CA 92801 

2620 W. La Pal ma, 

(714) 761-3033, (213) 860-2040, 

Between Disneyfand & Knotls Berry Farm. 

BURLINGAME. CA 94010 
990 Howard Ave., 

(415) 342 5757, 

5 miles south on 101 from San Fran. Airport 



OAKLAND, C A 94809 

2811 Telegraph Ave., 

(415) 451-5757, 

Highway 24 Downtown. Left 27th off-ramp. 

PHOENIX, AZ 85015 

1702 W. Camelback Road, 

(602) 242-3515, 

East of Highway 17. 



SAN DIEGO, CA 92123 

5375 Kearny Villa Road. 

(619) 560 4900, 

Highway 163 and Clairemont Mesa Blvd. 

VAN NUYS, CA 91401 

6265 Sepulveda Blvd., 

(818) 988 2212 

San Diego Freeway at Victory Boulevard 



4EA * AlUAUCE " *LPHA * *MECQ ■ fl * rt - CALLBOOK ♦CENTUHlAN -COUH^^ JSC • J iV Mil L F R ■ KAtaTflQN<C5 - SJGMAL-ONe 'S^O^E^ ■ tEW^O < Tt N t£C 
AMPHENOL * A*H*TEH MAflK ■ ANTENNA - COLUMBIA - CuflTIS * CUShCHAFT . KENWOOD-KtM ■ l*WSEN ■ lUNAR *MEf Z - TRlSTAO - rftl tX-VAN GORDON *VOCGM 
SPECIALISTS ■ ARRL - ASlRON * BASH * DAiWA ■ DRAKE * DX EDGE ■ E iMAC - ' MPj - MaGRO LOG * MiNi PRODUCTS ' * V<BflOPLE* * WEST ' VAESU and w( 
B£LD€N-flEMCH£fl"BFflO ■ BUTTERNUT . GU.FER -HAL 'HUSTLER 'HV GArN -iCOW ■ MfRAfiE -NYE »P*lOMAtt»ROHN»SHUBE ■ 

Pficas spGCitiCfttons. rfwscftptrtjfl$ $uQi&ct fo ctiiftgt without notice Caht antf Arizona res^erirs please $&o satms rai 



THINGS TO LOOK FOR 
(AND LOOK OUT FOR) 
IN A PHONE PATCH 



1 A patch should work with any 

radio. AM, FM, ACSB, relay 
switched or synthesized 

• Patch performance should not 
be dependent on the T/R speed 
of your radio, 

• Your patch should sound just 

like your home phone, 

• There should not be any sam- 
pling noises to distract you and 
rob important syllables. The 
best phone patches do not use 
the cheap sampling method. 
(Did you know that the competi- 
tion uses VOX rather than 
sampling in their $1000 com- 
mercial model?) 

• A patch should disconnect 
automatically it the number 
dialed is busy, 

• A patch should be flexible. You 
should be able to use it 
simplex, repeater aided simplex, 
or semi-duplex. 

■A patch should allow you to 
manually connect any mobile or 
HT on your local repeater to the 
phone system for a fully 
automatic conversation, Some- 
one may need to report an 
emergency! 

• A patch should not become er- 
ratic when the mobile is noisy. 

• You should be able to use a 
power amplifier on your base to 
extend range. 

• You should be able to connect 
a patch to the MIC and EXT. 
speaker jack of your radio for a 
quick and effortless interface, 

• You should be able to connect 
a patch to three points inside 
your radio (VOL high side, PTT, 
MIC) so that the patch does not 
interfere with the use of the 
radio and the VOL and SQ. set- 
tings do not affect the patch. 

• A patch should have MOV 
lightning protectors. 

•Your patch should be made in 
the USA where consultation 
and factory service are immed- 
iately available, 

ONLY 

PRIVATE PATCH III 

GIVES YOU ALL 

OF THE ABOVE 

BEWARE OF INFERIOR 
IMITATIONS 



N 

E 
W 



PRIVATE PATCH 

SIMPLEX SEMI-DUPLEX INTERCONNECT 





N 

E 
W 



With an amazingly low price, the all new PRIVATE PATCH III is the most 
powerful personal phone patch system available. You can use it 
simplex, repeater aided simplex (from your base) or semi-duplex (at the 
repeater). That's right, you will never have to buy another patch. 
PRIVATE PATCH III does it all! There are many new and important 
features which were formerly only available in our top commercial 
models. 

With a flick of the new connect switch you can patch your friends on the repeater into 
the phone system. One of them may need to report an emergency! 

No hassles with busy signals! If you call a number that is busy, just put your MIC down 
and relax. PRIVATE PATCH III will disconnect automatically. 

The new CW ID keeps you completely informed as to patch status. ID occurs when you 
access and again when you disconnect. ID is also sent after toll call attempts, all 

automatic disconnects, manual disconnect and when timeout is imminent. And of 
course your CW ID chip is free, 

PRIVATE PATCH III does not interfere with the normal use of your base radio. A new 
audio pre-amp permits audio take off before the VOL control As a result, the VOL and 
squelch settings do not affect patch operation. Of course you can also connect 
PRIVATE PATCH III to the MIC and EXT speaker jacks as before. 

A new digit counting system makes the toll restrict positive even in areas where you do 
not have to dial l T first. A secret five digit code disables the toll restrict for one toll call. 
Re-arm is automatic. 

Additional new features: MOV lightning protection — Three digit access code (eg,*93) 
— Spare relay position on board — Plus former features: 3/6 minute timeout timer — 
Digital fast VOX (pat. pend.) — 115 VAC supply — Modular Jack and cord plus 
much more! 

Please write or call for our four page brochure to get the complete story. 



Options: 

FCC approved coupler 

12 VDC or 230 VAC power 



Warranty? Yes, one full year! 



DEALERS 




f 



AMATEUR ELECTRONIC SUPPLY 
Milwaukee Wl. WicWiffe Oh. 
Orlando FL Clearwater fl_ 
Las Vegas NV 

COLES COMMUNICATIONS 
San Antonio TX 

ERtCKSQN COMMUNICATIONS 
Chicago IL 

HAM RADIO OUTLET 
Anaheim CA, Buriingame CA; 
Oakland CA. Phoenix AZ, 
San Diego CA, Van Ntn/s CA 

HENRY RADIO 

Los Angeles C A. Anaheim CA 
Butler MO 



JUNS ELECTRONICS 
Culver City CA, Reno NV 

MIAMI RADIO CENTER CORP 
Miami FL 

MIRES ELECTRONtCS 
Ft Lauderdale, Miar™ Ft 

Nfl,G DISTRIBUTING CORP. 
Miami FL 

PACE ENGINEERING 
Tucson AZ 

THE HAM STATION 
Evans vi I te IN 

CANADA 

DOLLAflD ELECTRONICS 
Vancouver. BC 



L / / /in 



(213) 373-6803 



CONNECT 
SYSTEMS 
INCORPORATED 23731 Madison St.. Torrance, CA 90505 




On the Cover: 

Our holiday "construction 
project" was designed by 
Dianne Rltson and Sue Hays, 
Parts placement diagram 
by Techart Associates. 
Amherst NK 



18 



26 



FM Your IC-730 

Put the icing on your ICOM— and discover why the 1Qm-FM 
craze is sweeping the nation! ....-..< N9DBX 



Join the SWOT Team! 

2m FM is fun, but using a repeater won't challenge your skill. 
Turn the switch to SSB and find out what ham radio is really 



about! 



t**»r<»*.< 



***»*« ' | 



KA3B 



4 What? 

7 oK\ — Greatest Year? 

55 Barter *PP Buy 

56 1985 Index 

59 Special Events 

60 Contests 

(>4 Above and Beyond 

66 Dealer Directory 

66 Corrections 
67, 92 Ham Help 

68 RTTY Loop 

68 Letter* 

69 Review 

72 New Products 

76 Fun! 

76 Be My Guest 

78 Satellites 

86 73 International 

92 QSL of the Month 

94 Propagation 

95 list of Advertisers 



38 



42 



44 



50 



52 



One-Chip Facsimile 

We all talk about the weather; now you can see it on your 
Atari. You'll be amazed at how simple it is WB8TPD 

NOAA's 2m UFO 

Your weather radio is a great signal source on 145.8 MHz. 
K9POX explains why .*...>:. K9PQX 

Secrets of Cellular Radio 

Take a guided tour behind the scenes of our newest repeater 

I ^w I II J vJI VJ'^jjl y . j - . * ■ . > i » * . r « . • j - - | t * g. i i 4 ■ 4 4 ;* * * t 4 f •( i 1^1 I ULM 

The San tec Spectacular 

Is your Santec becoming forgetful? Are its batteries going soft? 
No morel Here are two quick mods that bring your hand-held 
to within an inch of perfection. . > * W2IVS 



Saga of the Willie Wand 

W5RRH learned a new technique while building this 6-element 
2m beam. It's called cut and try and try and try. ... W5RRH 



Editorial Offices; Pm& Street farefborough MM 03d5fl, phone 6C3*924'9471 Adverting Offices; Elm Street, ^frjcborough NH 034S5, phone 603P2J 3M3fl Circulation OtfiC6&r Elm SPreef. 
Retafborough NH D345&, pnane 40^-924-94? 1 Manuscript*: CtiTtfttttfonf In the form of manuscripts wtih drawings and/or photographi or* welcome and win be considered for possible publication 
We can assume no responsibility tor loss or damage lo any material Please enclose a stamped. sell addressed envelope wlffi Bach submission Payment for tne use of any unsolicited material will 
tie (node upon acceptance All eonrrlbultona should be directed to the 73 editorial offices, "How to Wife far 7J" guidelines are available upon request US citizens must include their socio! security 
numoer wJlh submitted manuiicrip^. Subscription Inlormotlon: Gales In frie United Stales and Possessions: One Year {12 Issues) $24.97; Two Yeats \2d tunes) S3B.00; Three Years [36 Issues) SWOQ 
Elsewnere Canada and Mexico— %21 97/1 yea/ only. Li.S fundi Foreign surface mail— $44 97/1 year only, US funds drawn on \)$. dank Foreign air mall— please Inquire. To subscrloe, renew or 
change an address- Write to Subscription DBpartmeni, PO Bo* 931 Farmrngdaie NY it 737 Send Canadian changes of address to: 73, PO Bo* 1051 Fort Erie. Ontario CANADA \2A 5Nfl Return postage 
guaranteed for tenewals and changes of address, include ine address label from your mgsf recenl Issue of 73 for gflt subscriptions, include your name and address as well os those a* gilt recipients 
far questions concerning your subscription and to place subtcrfcrfan Orders, please cai\ us toll free ai *-fl00-645O559 between 9 am and Spmor wrtle to 7J, Subscription Department. PO Bo* Ml 
FarmingaoJe NY 1173? 73 for fftxSo Amateurs (ISSN 074&OSCDQ u putHisred manthry by CW Cc^Mnunlcditoni/PBle^arouQn. mc . 80 Rne Street. Peie^DOrougn NH 03454 Second class postage paid 
ai %1erooraugfi NH 03456 and at additional maiNng offices Canadian second doss maH regtffrofton number 9566 Entire contents copyright © 19ftS CW Cc^municcrhansfl^BlBftxxojgr. inc All ngfifc 
reserved No part of tfiij publication may be reprinted Or otnerwtie reproduced wttrtoul written permluion torn the puPUher MicrofRrn Edition- gntvemrty McroNm. Ann Aipor Ml 46106 Postmaster 
Send address changes to ? J tor -Qoafo Amateurs, Subscription Services PO Box 931 Rarrningdate NV 14737 Nationally rJMrtbuded by International Qfcuicftoft D«tn&jtpn; 



73 tor Radio Amateurs * December, 1985 3 




HAT? 



News from the Publisher 



The results of our poetry (quest ionable in some cases!) contest are in. Honorable mentions go to Peter 
Strauss K06R (Oakland CA)« Paul Danzer N1II (Norwalk CI), Brian Tandrow KR6B {Sim* Valley CA), Terry 
Russ NSATZ (Massillon OH). Casey Cassin KC7DY (Seattle WAK Verne Smith KA1NAV (Ba1h ME), and Ed 
Scatlon KA1JSN {Providence Rl). 

Our $100 prize-winner was written by William Templin KA0DYI (North Liberty lAh who gives special 
thanks to his wife Susan and his two friends named Steve. Here it is (with our apologies to Clement 
Clarke Moore), along with our very best wishes for a safe and happy holiday season . 



Twas the night before Christmas, when all 

through the town 
The snowstorm was raging, the phone tines 

were down; 
The wind it did howl, the tree limbs did crack, 
1 hope that St Nick isn't forced to turn back. 
The wife making cookies, the kids making noise, 
While away In the shack, by my rig I was poised. 
The finals were glowing, the mike gain was set, 
1 was chasing OX to see whal I could get. 
The bands were all empty, the frequencies clear, 
Except one lone station that sounded quite near 
He was calling CO and my interest did pique, 
When he ended Iran emission with the words, 

"Old St. Nick/" 
I answered back quickly, I used great dispatch, 
If this were St, Nicholas, good God f what a catch! 
We exchanged information, it was really 

quite graphic, 
Then he came back and said, 

"I've emerg ency t raf f ic r 
His reindeer were tired, his elves In a grump, 
il he didn't land soon, then his sleigh 

he would dump, 
I thought very carefully, I thought very hard t 
Then I gave him directions to my 

snow-covered yard. 
As he flew past my window, his hair like a mane t 
He reined in his chargers and called them 

by name: 
Whoa, Anode! Whoa, Cathode! Whoa, Zener! 

Whoa, Diodel 
Stop, Heater! Stop, Grid Leak! Stop, Bias! 

Stop. Trlode! 



You're flying too low! YouVe flying too fast! 
Look out, you dumb reindeer, his antenna mast!* 1 
So into the backyard the reindeer did drop. 
St Nick, the elves, and the sleigh went kerptop! 
Then at the back door, 1 heard this loud knocking. 
"Open up in there, or t wont fill your stocking!'* 
As I turned off the light and was leaving the snack. 
Into the house Saint Nicholas came from (he back— 
His two-meter rig held to his hip with a strap, 
"Hams Do It In The Shack" on Ihe front of his cap. 
The sack that he carried made his aged 

brow furrow. 
And he handed me a card that read, 

"QSL Via Bureau." 
His clothes were all sooty, from his shoes 

to his vest; 
I felt like a Novice taking his test. 
His fingers were calloused and from what 

I could tell. 
This came from a straight key that I'll bet 

he used well. 
I offered him coffee, I offered him smokes, 
I tried easing the tension by telling ham Jokes. 
Then he nodded his head and raised up his thumb, 
He smiled like an Elmer; did I ever feel dumb. 
He grabbed up his sack and went straight 

for the tree f 
And placed in the pile a targe present for me. 
When he finished his work he stood up, 

took a how, 
Then out the back door to his team he did plow. 
But I heard him exclaim as he flew o'er the land, 
"Beware the FCC, friend, we were both 

out of band!" 





73 for Radio Amateurs is a member of the CW Com muni cat ton si Inc. group, the 
world's largest publisher of computer-related in format ton The group publishes 
57 computer publications in more than 20 major countries. Nine million people 
read one or more of the group's publications each month. Members of the group 
include: Argentina's Computerwortd/Argerttina; Asia's The Asian Computerwortd; Australia's Computerwortd Australia, 
Australian PC Wot/0, Macworld and Directories; Brazils DataNews and MicroMundo Ch ilia's China ComputerLand; Den- 
mark's ComputerwortdiUanmark. PC Wortd and RUN (Commodore), Finland's Mikro; France' s Le Monde Informatique. 
Golden {Apple}. OPC MBMi and Dtstnbutioue; Germany's Computerwoche, Microcomputerweit, PC Weft, Software** arkt 
CW EdiUon/Semmar, Computer Business, RUN and Apple's; Italy's Computerwortd Italia and PC Maganne r Japans Com- 
puterwortd Japan; Mexico's CompuieTworldfMexica and CompuMundo; The Netherlands Computerworfd Benelux and PC 
World Benelux. Norway's Computerwortd Norge, PC World and RUN (Cprnmodore); Saudi Arabia's Saudi Computerwortd; 
Spain's Computerwortd £ spans. Mlcmsistemas/PC Wortd. Commodore World. Sweden's ComputerSweden, Mikrodatorn 
and Svenska PC; the UK's Computer Management, Computer News, PC Business Wortd and Computer Business Europe; 
Venezuela's Computerwortd Venezuela: the US's Computerwortd. Hot CoCo. inOder. tntowortd. Mac Wortd, Micro Market- 
world, PC Wortd. RUN. 73, 80 Micro, focus Publications and On Communications. 




TAFF 



EXECUTIVE EDITOR 
Susan Phi I brick 

MANAGING EDITOR 
Steve JewettKAIMPM 

TECHNICAL EDITOR 
Perry Donharn KWlO 

ASSISTANT MANAGING EDITOR 
Chris Schmidt KA1MPL 

INTERNATIONAL EDITOR 
Richard Phenix 

EDITORIAL ASSISTANT 
Nancy Cook 

DESIGNERS 

Dianne Ritson 

Sue Hays 

ASSOCIATES 

Robert Baker WB2GFE 

John Edwards K12U 

Bill Gosney KE7C 

Ctiod Harris VP2ML 

Dr. Marc Leavey WA3AJR 

Si it Pasternak WA&lTF 

Peter Stark K2QAW 

Peter Putman KT2B 



ADVERTISING 
t-8QCW41-*403 

SALES MANAGER 
Jim Gray W1XU 

ASSISTANT SALES MANAGER 
Nancy Ciampa 

SALES REPRESENTATIVE 
Ross Kenyon KAlGAV 



MARKETING MANAGER 
Hope Currier 



GRAPHIC SERVICES DIRECTOR 
Christine Destrempes 

GRAPHIC SERVICES MANAGER 
Dennis Chris te-nsen 

MANUFACTURING MANAGER 
Susan Gross 

FILM PREP SUPERVISOR 
Robert M. Vllieneuve 

TYPESETTING SUPERVISOR 
Linda P. Canals 

SYSTEMS SUPERVISOR 
Andrea Florence 



PRESIDENT/CEO 
James S- Povec 

VICE PRESIDENT/FINANCE 
Roger Murphy 

VICE PRESIDENT OF 

PLANNING AND CIRCULATION 

William P. Howard 

BUSINESS MANAGER 

Matt Smith KAItEl 

CIRCULATION MANAGER 
Frank Smith 

DIRECT AND NEWSSTAND SALES 

MANAGER 

RaJno Wlreln 

1-80Q-343472B 

DIRECTOR OF CREDIT SALES 
AND COLLECTIONS 

William M. Boyer 



FOUNDER 
Wayne Green W2NSDf 1 



PUBLISHER 
John C By mett 



4 73 tor Radio Amateurs * December, 1985 







pacesetter in Amateur radio 



Handy Handful. 



TR-2600A/36ooa 

Kenwood's TTt-2600A and TR-3600A feature DCS (Digital 
Squelch), a new signalling concept developed by Kenwood. DCS 
allows each station to have its own "private caM* code or to respond 
to a "group call" or "common call" code. There are 100,000 different 

DCS combinations possible. „ „ . Tri „„■. 

■"""" The Kenwood TR-2600A and the 

TR-3600A pack "big rig" features 
into the palm of your hand. Its 
really a "handy handful"! 

Optional accessories: 

• TU-35B built in programmable 
sub-tone encoder 

• VB^2530 2-m 25 W RF 
power amp. 

• ST~2 base stand/charger 

• MS-1 mobile stand/charger 

• PB-26 Ni-Cd battery 

• DC-26 DC-DC converter 

• HMC-1 headset with VOX 

• SMO30 speaker microphone 

• LH-3 deluxe leather case 

• SC-9 soft case with belt hook 

• BT-3 AA manganese/alkaline 
battery case 

• EB-3 external C manganese/ 
alkaline battery case 

• RA-3 2-m telescoping antenna 

• RA-5 2-m/70-cm telescoping 
antenna 

• AX-2 shoulder strap w/anL base 

• CD-10 call sign display 

• BH-2A belt hook 

More TR-2600A and TR-3600A infor- 
mation is available from authorized 
Kenwood dealers. 




• Simple to operate 
Functional design is "user friendlyr 
Built-in 16-key autopatch encoder. 
TX STOP switch, REVerse switch, 
KEYboard LOCK switch, high effi- 
ciency speaker 

• Large LCD 

Easy to read in direct sunlight or in 
the dark with convenient dial light 
that also illuminates the top panel 
S-meter 

• Extended frequency coverage 

Allows operation on most MARS 
and CAP frequencies. Receive 
frequency range is 140-160 MHz, 
(TR-3600A covers 440-450 MHz.) 

• Programmable scan 

Channel scan or band 
scan, search for open 
or busy channels. 

• SLIDE-LOC battery 
case 

■ 10 Channels 

10 memories, one for 
non-standard repeater 
offsets. 

• 2.5 watts high power, 
350 mW low 

TR-3600A has 1.5 watts 
high or 300 mW low. 



*£, 



TR*2600A shown TB-3600A rs available for 70 cm operation 

Complete service manuals are available for alt Trio- Kenwood fransceivers and most accessories 

Specifications and prices are subject to change without notice or obligation. 



Clii Tt'VlVt 



KENWOOD 



144 MHf FM TRANSCEIVER 



KEUCCM 



IH 



alert 



TX OFFSET MEMORY ADDRESS 



M 



Mor* 






&S/OS 



PS W8^9) 



TO/CO 



ALtRT 



PS.STE^ 






TR-2600A 



NWOOD 



TRIO-KENWOOD COMMUNICATIONS 
1111 West Walnut Street 
Compion, California 90220 




ANOTHER BREAKTHROUGH FROMAEA 



Packet + RTTY- 
Pakratt™ PK-64. 

If you Ve read about packet, or 
are already into it, vou know how 
exciting it is, With the hot new 
Pakratt PK-64 weVe just brought a 
new dimension to packet. The 
Pakratt PK-64 is a complete, fully 
assembled and tested packet radio 
controller which, together with a 
Commodore 64 or 128 computer, 
can convert your shack into a 
packet operations center. 
And we've included a new version 
o! our advanced MBA- TOR™ soft- 
ware to make it the first packet 
controller with AMI OR, Baudot, 
ASCII and Morse, But an even 
more exciting part of the Pakratt 
controller is its great price. 

Incredibly Simple 
To Set Up 

Just plug the Pakratt controller 
into the C-64 1 s game cartridge 
slot, add a mic connector for 
connecting to your particular 



transceiver, and yoif re set. 
If you're anxious to try it out, our 
new "quicksort" manual section 
can get you on the air in under 
1 2 hour. 

Simply Powerful 

The versatile Pakratt controller 
shows messages and connect 
status simultaneously on vour 
Commodore with a unique split- 
screen display. And it lets you 




PK-64 shown with HF modem option. 
Computer not included. 

send letter-perfect text from the 
text editor software while mon- 
itoring incoming messages. The 
20K byte QSO buffer stores more 
than 20 video screens of text! 
Disk commands let you save 



specific operating parameters for 
quick setup for emergency 
services, clubs, and multiple fre- 
quency use. And the Pakratt con- 
troller's standard, TAPR style 
modem gives you 300 and 1200 
baud operation with great 
HF/VHF performance. 

We can't possibly list all of 
the important features of Pakratt 
here. But the absolutely best part 
of the Pakratt PK-64 is that it's at 
your dealer now. So stop reading, 
run down to your local dealer, 
and check Pakratt out. Because 
the real challenge will be to find 
one after the other hams see it, 

Pakratt PK-64. Packet Power 
from AEA, At amateur radio 
dealers everywhere. 




Advanced Electronic Applications, Inc. 

P.O. Box C-2160 

Lynn wood, WA 98036-0918 

(206) 775-7373 

Telex: 6972496 AEA INTL UW 



Pakratt and MSA-TOR are trademarks of Advanced Electronic Applications, Inc. Commodore €4 Is a trademark of Commodore Electronics LTD. 



6 73 for Radio Amateurs • December, 1985 



EDITED BY PERRY DONHAM KW10 



Earthquake 



MEXICO CITY was shaken to its knees on 
the morning of September 20, 1985, when 
a savage earthquake struck near the resort 
ctty of Acapulco. The quake, measuring 7.8 
on the Richter scale (followed by an after- 
shock measuring 7.5), was the worst in 
Mexican history. For nearly a week the only 
communication in or out of the country 
was supplied by ham-radio operators. Al- 
most immediately, an emergency network 
sprung up on 20 meters, using five chan- 
nels for incoming traffic and one channel 
for outgoing messages, including regular 
news bulletins. Although the US State De- 
partment set up a hotline for concerned 
relatives, it was quickly overloaded and in- 
effectual. HeaJth-and-welfare messages 
were forwarded either via the National 
Traffic System or through independent 
clearinghouse nets to Mexico. Hams in 
Mexico would attempt to locate persons 
over the telephone (when it was working) 
or through word of mouth. At the peak of 
the disaster, it took an amazing three days 
to get word out of the stricken area. 

Probably the most significant effect of 
the earthquake has been the changed re- 
lationship between commercial broadcast 
stations and ham radio, ft was readily 
apparent that all of the major networks 
were using ham stations for news gather- 
ing, In an interview with Fred Maia W5YI,, 
Roy Neal K6DUE of NBC News stressed 
that using amateurs for commercial mes- 
sage handling was "condoned because 
there [were] no commercial facilities avail- 
able. The criterion is 'no commercial facil- 
ities available/ " The problem sterns from 
a recent FCC decision which states that in 
certain cases commercial stations may 
use hams for news gathering. The Radio 
and Television News Directors Associa- 
tion (RTNDA) interpreted this action in a 
rather liberal way, taking advantage of a 
clause which provides for a "common 
sense" approach to Its use. What's worse, 
each network has come up with its own 
way of looking at the rule. The result is a 
mishmash of conflicting actions and con- 
fusion among ham-radio operators. In a 
telephone interview with 73 Associate Bill 
Pasternak WA6ITF, FCC Private Radio Bu- 
reau Chief John Johnston W3BE claimed 
that all of the media-related ham activity 
was illegal. Another FCC staffer said, how* 
ever, that no measures would be taken 
against the networks unless a formal com- 
plaint was filed with the FCC enforcement 
branch. Gordon West WB6NOA noted that 
newsmen were using amateur radio for 
setting up logistics and discussing union 
pay scales for their crews while refusing to 



handle heaith-and-welfare traffic into the 
area. Clearly there is a serious problem 
here, Have the broadcasters gone too far? 
Or was there a justifiable need for the use 
of ham radio to conduct their business? 
Apparently it depends on whom you ask. 

Commercialism 



IN A RELATED STORY, the FCC has re- 
leased PRB-2, In which Lee Shobiom 
K6A0A. President and General Manager of 
London Bridge Broadcasting, Inc., has 
asked for direct access to a portion of the 
436-MHz band for "noncommercial" news 
gathering* Shobiom has requested a 
waiver of the amateur rules to allow him to 
use fast-scan television on 435 MHz to 
feed news of community Interest to his 
low-power television station for abroad- 
cast. The television station has a range of 
about 10 miles. The main reason for the re- 
quest is that the cost of microwave relay 
equipment is too high — and amateur gear 
is so inexpensive. Incredibly, about 40 
hams in the area fully support the idea! 
ARRL Executive Vice-President Dave Sum- 
ner K1ZZ, when notified of the petition, 
said the matter must be taken under con- 
sideration before an official League posi- 
tion could be taken. We here at 73 need no 
"consideration period" — we are dead set 
against any commercial use of amateur ra- 
dio, at any time, for any reason. 



Oh No, Mr. Bill! 



CALIFORNIA SENATE BILL 1431 was de- 
feated in a rather unorthodox manner. 
Sponsored by Senator Herschel Rosen- 
thal, Bill 1431 would have made it a crimi- 
nal offense to own, purchase, or listen to 
any form of radio capable of monitoring 
the 800-MHz cellular radio band. Joe Merd- 
ler N6AHU met with Senator Rosenthal to 
explain his fear that law-enforcement offi- 
cers unfamiliar with radio equipment 
would not be able to tell the difference be- 
tween legal amateur gear and illegal scan- 
ners. To prove his point, Merdler produced 
a Yaesu FT-709 and a similar-looking Re- 
gency scanner on the table and asked the 
Senator to pick the "illegal 11 unit. He 
couldn't. Merdler emphasized that more 
harm than good would be done by this law 
in the hands of untrained enforcement of- 
ficers. Senator Rosenthal told Merdler that 
the bill was not meant to encroach on the 
rights of ham operators, and that he had 
the utmost respect for amateurs. As a re- 
sult, what could have been a disaster to 
hams in California and a dangerous prec- 



edent for the rest of the states was 

averted. 



Fire Friends 



LOS ANGELES POLICE AND FIRE officials 
have gone on record as desiring greater 
access to amateur radio during times of 
emergency. The recent Baldwin Hills brush 
fires graphically demonstrated that ham 
radio could play a key role in the preserva- 
tion of life and property. In the Baldwin 
Hills incident, the Fire Department found 
that they had no way of telling what was 
happening on the other side of the hill 
from where they were fighting a blaze. Am- 
ateur radio, wilh its trained corps of skilled 
communicators, gave the department the 
eyes and ears they desperately needed. 



Academy Hams 



NINE HAMS from Los Angeles television 
station KTTV were recently commended by 
the National Academy of Television Arts 
and Sciences (the Emmy people). For their 
role in KTTV's "10 O'Ciock News/' which 
won four Emmys, a Certificate of Com- 
mendation was presented to Engineers 
Tim Qaskins KA6INW. Mert Garlick 
N6AWE, Dave Hallmark N6DKI, Bert Hicks 
WBGMQV, Don Halloway WB7ADU, How- 
ard Lang WA6UFM, Bill Pasternak WA6fTF, 
Charles Rozner WB6SKM, and the sta- 
tion's Technical Operations Supervisor, 
Robert S, Sudock WBSFDR KTTV won Env 
mys for Best Independent News Program, 
Best Independent Mini-Documentary Se- 
ries, and Best Spot Coverage of a Same- 
Day Breaking Story. 



FAR Out 



THE FOUNDATION FOR AMATEUR RADIO 

has announced the winners of this year's 
FAR scholarships: the John W. Gore Me- 
morial Scholarship ($900} to James H. 
Baker KI4YN; the Richard G. Chichester 
Memorial Scholarship ($900) to Eugene S. 
Reilly KA8JIG; the Edwin S VanDusen 
Memorial Scholarship ($350) to Richard K. 
Soper KA2IKV; the QCWA Memorial Schol- 
arships ($600) to Frances P. Horan 
KA3CJR, Hal T. Nguyen KABALZ, Carl H. 
Puckett KA7BWC, John E, Schnupp 
N3CNL, David J. Schmocker KJ9I, and 
John G. Sullivan N2DYC; the QCWA Robert 
S. Cresap Memorial Scholarship ($500) to 
Douglas Swlatlowski KA2KMT; the Radio 
Club of America Scholarship ($500) to 

73 for Radio Amateurs * December, 1985 7 



James W. Healy NJ2L; the L.R.L Scholar- 
ship (S500) to Diane E. Wlllemin N8CAY; 
the A.R.N.S. Scholarship (S500) to Michael 
Krensavage KA3CUP; the Columbia MD 
ARA Scholarship ($650) to Christine L 
Gray KA3NAK; the Baltimore MD Scholar- 
ship ($500) to Eric J. Smith KA3KJO; the 
Dade Radio Tropical Hamboree Scholar- 
ships ($500} to Christopher A. Atkins 
KA2QWC and David R. German N4FAD; the 
Lewis W. Wilkinson Memorial Scholarship 
($500) to Wayne R Poole KC4XL You can 
get information about next year's scholar- 
ships by contacting the Foundation for 
Amateur Radio, 6903 Rhode Island Ave- 
nue, College Park MD 20740. 



1985 



A PREDICTION: 1985 will go down in ham 
history as the greatest year ever for ama- 
teur radio. Not since incentive licensing 
was implemented have so many regulatory 
changes been made to the Service. 1985 
also saw the opening of new bands, the 
emergence of new modes, and the birth of 
a new DXCC country. This month we 7/ took 
back at the events of 1985 that wifi shape 
the future of ham radio in years to come. 

• PRB 1 — In October the FCC ruled in fa- 
vor of amateur radio in the matter of re- 
strictive antenna ordinances by passing 
PREM. In response to a petition filed in 
July of 1984, the Commission affirmed its 
commitment to ham radio and issued a 
declaratory ruling preempting all local reg- 
ulations which preclude or significantly in- 
hibit amateur communications. Specifi- 
cally, the Order stated that such regula- 
tions are "in direct conflict with federal 
objectives and must be preempted." 

• Novice Enhancement— Probably the 
most significant proposal to change the 
Amateur Service came mid-year when the 
American Radio Relay League submitted a 
petition aimed at increasing the privileges 
of Novice licensees. Designated RM-5038, 
the plan called for an expansion of the 
Novice ten-meter allocation to include CW, 
SSB, and data from 28.1 to 28.5 MHz, On 
220 and 1296 MHz, Novices would use all 
emissions with a power limit of 25 and 5 
Watts, respectively. The Element 2 exami- 
nation would be increased from 20 to 30 
questions to reflect the new privileges. Ac- 
tion is expected on RM-5038 early in 1986. 

• WARC Bands— Twelve meters became 
an amateur band this year. 24.890-24.990 
was opened to hams earlier than expected 
on a secondary, non-interference basis. 
The first day on the new band became a 
frenzy of state-working, as many stations 
garnered WAS-12 Meters in just a few 
days! Things are a bit quieter now; but the 
activity level is still substantial In the 
same Order; the Commission made the 10- 
MHz WARC allocation a permanent ama- 
teur band, 

8 73 for Radio Amateurs • December, 1985 



• Don't Be A Problem— Speaking at the 
1985 Dayton Hamvention, FCC Commis- 
sioner Ray Kowalski cautioned amateurs 
not to bother the government with all of 
their petty problems. He pointed out that 
hams use valuable spectrum, and that the 
pressures from commercial radio users for 
that spectrum had become greater than 
ever. Kowaiski reminded those in atten* 
dance that the easiest way for the FCC to 
deal with a "problem Service 11 would be to 
simply eliminate that Service. 

• Spread-Spectrum — Amateur radio's 

newest mode is spread-spectrum. While 
the Commission approved its use on 420 
MHz and above, a one-year moratorium 
was placed on spread-spectrum use so 
that adequate time would be available for 
the development of amateur standards. 
Several stations, In conjunction with the 
Amateur Radio Research and Develop- 
ment Corporation (AMRAD), are experi- 
menting with various systems under an 
STA. 

• 160 Meters— June was a busy month for 
the Commissioners. Apparently approving 
the new WARC band put them in a good 
mood, and they began to look for other 
things to approve. Docket 84-874 hap- 
pened to be on top of a desk, so hams can 
now use RTTY, FAX, and SSTV on 160 me- 
ters. The FCC felt that the limit imposed to 
protect the LORAN-A radlonavigation sys- 
tem was no longer necessary. 

• ZC4 Cyprus— Early in the year the ARRL 
approved ZC4, British Sovereign Bases on 
Cyprus, as a separate DXCC country, 
nearly 25 years after a treaty establishing 
the Republic of Cyprus, Contacts with ZC4 




1 



It took months to train her but it sure 
solved the bird problem! 



made after August 16. 1960, will be ac- 
cepted for the new country, but only if 
proof can be made that the ZC4 station 
was actually on a Sovereign Base (not all 
were). 

• Turkey — Amateur radio in Turkey took 
off when the Turkish parliament passed a 
bill allowing hams back on the air for the 
first time in many years. Four hams came 
up on 15 and 20 meters almost immedi- 
ately, and license exams are being given 
regularly, 

• KL7 Pribilof— The ARRL Awards Com- 
mittee overturned the DX Advisory Com- 
mittee's recommendation to add the 
Pribilof Islands to the DXCC list. It was the 
culmination of a ten-year effort to get the 
islands onto the list, 

• Cllpperton— The biggest DXpeditlon of 
1985 had to be FO0XX Clipperton Island. 
Primarily supported by the Northern Cali- 
fornia DX Foundation, the six-day opera- 
tions netted over 30,000 contacts on 160- 
10 meters and nearly 100 satellite QSOs, 
The expedition cost about $60,000. 

• 73 Magazine — The October, 1985. issue 
of 73 marked our Silver Anniversary. The 
event was highlighted by the Silver Eagle 
Awards, a special "thank you" to the 25 
people who most helped 73 in the past 25 
years. Each award winner received a 
chrome-plated' Astatic Silver Eagle micro- 
phone and our undying gratitude. Also* 52 
readers (50 states, one DX. and one Dis- 
trict of Columbia) were selected at random 
to receive copies of the 1986 Cafibook set. 
Here's to another 25 years! 

• Dick Bash— The publisher of The Final 
Exam series of study guides closed the 
doors on his business this year. His study 
guides were infamous in the ham commu- 
nity for containing verbatim questions and 
answers from the FCC amateur license 
tests. Once the VEC program got under 
steam and all of the questions were re- 
leased to the public domain, Dick had 
nothing to sell, 



Auld Lang Syne 



YEAR'S END is a good time to thank all of 

the people who have contributed to **QRX" 
during the past twelve months. These folks 
volunteer their time and skills to keep you 
Informed about your hobby: Bill Pasternak 
WA6ITF and the West fink crew, Fred Maia 
W5YI of The W5Y! Report, Paui Courson 
WA3VJB and the entire staff of the ARRL 
(including Gateway and the ARRL Letter), 
Gus Browning and his DX'ers Magazine, 
Vern Riportella WA2LQQ and AMSAT, and 
hundreds of hams who have phoned, sent 
letters, and called the 73 computer with 
their tales of hamdom. You all are much 
appreciated. 




AMERITRON 

WELZ 

LARSEN 

BUTTERNUT 

BENCHER 



■AVANTI 
■CALLBOOK 

■ ARRL BOOKS 

■ CABLE 
■CONNECTORS 



VISA/MASTER CARD 

FREE SHIPPING 

ON MOST RIGS FOR CASH! 



41 24 West Broadway, 

Robbinsdale, MN 55422 (Mpls./St. Paul) 



S.A.S.E. FOR OUR 
n "BENCH-TESTED" 

USED EQUIPMENT LISTING 



1-612-535-5050 

(IN MINNESOTA CALL 

TNT COLLECT) 



MON-FRI 9 AM - 6 PM CENTRAL TIME 
SATURDAY 9 AM - 5 PM 



TOLL FREE QUOTES 





of the day! 

Have you been trawling the bounding main for a new product? We have just 
netted it — the TP-38 microprocessor controlled community repeater panel which 
provides the complete imerf ace between the 
repeater receiver and transmitter. Scuttle 
individual tone cards, all 38 EI A standard 

CTCSS tones are included as well as time and hit accumulators, programmable 
timers, tone translation, and AC power supply at one low price of $595.00. The 
TP-38 is packed like a can of sardines with features, as a matter of fact the only 
additional option is a DTMF module for $59,95. This module allows complete 
offsiie remote control of all TP-38 functions, including adding new customers or 
deleting poor paying ones, over the repeater receiver channel. 

Other features include CMOS circuitry for low power consumption, non- volatile 
memory to retain programming if power loss occurs, immunity to falsing, pro- 
grammable security code and much more. The TP-38 is backed by our legendary 
1 year warranty and is shipped fresh daily. Why not set passage for the abundant waters 
of Communications Specialists and cast your nets tor a TP-38 or other fine catch. 



$595,00 each 

$59.95 DTMF module 




COMMUNICATIONS SPECIALISTS, INC. 

426 West Taft Avenue • Orange, CA 92665-4296 
Local (714) 998-3021 • FAX (714) 974-3420 
Entire UL3.A, 1-800-854-0547 








1 



' . o 






L£5lCi 









n 



a.. p ower 






pu 'o' these 



TyES 



vs 



s? 1 



V 



\\^ 



*■.** 



ffort* 









S333. 



ose 






- I 



<? p 



Q I hrf 



i. ^i?_z- 



Memo 



.X' 



y\aO 



t\» p 



*<*p**» 



w^ 



s eeo 



,s\° n 



a yja 



vverett u. 

FrOW: has a fail^* - 

if your customer ^B h . n 30 days, 

1 i-n^ro produce * s0 
«ith any ^ U nit -"V^T^r it « 

long as ° has not bee" 

that there a ^nths 

„ Ja „s and up to « sen d 

« a £ f t U o Win" ana ~ «£ < P^ noC 

unl »lused or tnodifla 

*~ SbU {or y our coatia-d nse 

support o !*W c . Mao, £o y QO shelf 

h as ° een . 100 o£ each ire 

« e "flediate delivery 
for itwn edl<1 



V.O* 



Best ^ e & a 



ds 



kO >.^t 






iftftflj**? ' 



Contact your naaresf dealer or Call Alinco Direct for the location nearest you. 



P.O. Box 70007 « 
44 Glen Carran Circle 



ALINCO ELECTRONICS 

Reno, Nev. 89570 Phone (702) 359-1414 • Telex 4993999 EGELECTR 

• Sparks, Nev. 89431 Facsimile (702) 359-1424 



^d with tfa, Axidci itt 'R&fceatefi&. 



* M#t**ta 












.,.*!-' 





€ ^ 







SCRtOOO 2M or 220 
REPEATER W/150 WT. 
POWER AMR & 30 A 
PWR SUPPLY. 



i*t me. 6e44tHe44<— cu&& ca*t4ta*(t cm- 



Spectrum now makes 3 lines of Repeaters — the 
world famous 'Super Deluxe* SCR100Q/4000, the Low 
Cost line of SCR77, and the NEW State of the Art 
Microprocessor Controlled SCR2QQ0X Line of 
Repeaters! 

The SCR77 Repeaters maintain the quality of 
design, components and construction which 
have made Spectrum gear famous throughout 
the world for years. However, all of the "bells & 
whistles" which you may not need or want have 
been eliminated— at a large cost savings to 
you! The SCR77 is a real "workhorse" basic ma- 
chine designed for those who want excellent, 
super-reliable performance year after year— but 
no frills! ( 4 PL\12 Pole IF Filter, Front End Prese- 
lector, and a 30-4QW Transmitter are the only 
'built-in 1 options available: but other equipment 
can be connected Via the rear panel lack.) 
Of course, if you do want a full featured/Super 
Deluxe Repeater, with higher power {30-1 50 W), 
and a full list of 'built-in' options, then you 
want our SCR1000/4000 or the NEW 
SCR2000X— The Ultimate in Repeaters, Avail- 
able with: Full Autopatch/Reverse Patch/ 
LandLine Control; Touch Tone Control of var* 
ious repeater functions; *PL'; "Emergency 
PwrJD"; various Tone & Timer Units, etc. 



Complete Line of VHF/UHF Rcvr. & 
Xmtr. Boards & Assys. also avail* 
able. Plus ID, COR, DTMF Control 
Bds., Duplexers, Cabinets, etc. 
Inquire. 



Repealer shown in opiionaF cabinet 



Call or write today for details and prices! Sold Factory Direct or through Export Sales Reps only. 




^m^*m 



SPECTRUM COMMUNICATIONS 



1055 W. Germantown Pk, S12 • Norristown, PA 19403 • (215) 631-1710 • Telex: 846-211 

12 73 for Radio Amateurs • December, 1 985 



ICOM VHF Transceiver 



OW CHECK +DUKEX 



TONE -DUPLEX 




tpamwHt 



HICEM 



POWUt 



MODE 









_ 


fW 1 


■ 



* « ICOM *i:'IHf ALL MODE 



n>*l 




^^B 






17114 





IHH.fl 10-3.3 3i 



VOX 



*<LC MtTtt PftL- v MODES 



TRANSMIT 



t>* 



ntcuvt 



PHOMIS Af GAis^yarcAE^ SQUUCH^rONE V 








■ X 

■¥ 











A/B A B SCAN 


■1 ■■ 


* 


ffO/M WWII M-VTO 


^^M ^^B 










B T 




HLI — j 


!MB3 




MHf 




1 




DOWN 










■■■ i 



-»/ 




The Versatile 1 00 Wa 
2 Meter Base System 



or the ultimate in 2-meter 
communications, ICOM 
presents the IC-271H trans- 
ceiver with a high dynamic 
range receiver and a 100 
vi/att transmitter, .And all 
the advanced functions of 
the latest CPU controffed 
radios. 



fere 






143.800 - 148.199MHz, 
expandable for MARS opera- 

32 full-function Memories 
with fithium battery backup 
100 Watts, fully adjustable 
on all modes 
Variable Tuning Steps, FM 
5KHz and I KHz; SSB 10Hz, 
50Hz and IKHz 




32 built-in Subaudibfe Tones 
High Visibility Display 
S-Meter and Center Meter 
canning Systems Memories. 
Modes and Programmable 
Band 

IC-HM12 Microphone with 
Up/Down Scan 
n,"Wx4%*Hx ]2WD 




The IC-271 

IC-27IA has the same out- 
standing featues as the 
IC-27IH, including an internal 
power supply, IC-PS25. 



• 



\ 




Opi il Features, AG-25 

switchable preamp, UT-1 5S 
CTCSS encoder/decoder 
{encoder is standard], 
JG-EX310 voice synthesizer, 
IC-SM8 two-cable desk mic 
and IC-SM6 desk rrric PLUS a 
variety of power supplies.., 
JC-PS30 system power supply 
IC-PS15 external or IC-PS35 
internal power supplies. 



/71H 

Shown wit^i i nit« rn 
power supply IC PS 



_, 



See the IG-271AJH) and 
other fine ICOM equipment 
your local ICOM dealer today. 



at 



raicoivr 



First In Communications 



flevue, WA 98004 / 3331 Towerwood Drive, Suite 307, Dallas, TX 7S234 

AJI stated ipetJfl cations are approximate and subject 10 cnange *mnoui notice Of obligation Ail ICOM radku significantly exceed FCC regulation! limiting spurioui emlukinj. 27tHl0fl4 




NEW 24 Page 
Buyer's Guide 
With Guaranteed 
Lowest Prices 

•Explains all about FREE 100 
channel Satellite TV and how 
to shop foF an earth station! 

* Lists GUARANTEED 
LOWEST PRICES,. .we wilt 
not be undersold, save 30-50% 
over local dealer prices! 

* Tells how to easily and quickly 
Install-Your-Own earth station 
and save $400 or more! 

•Shows how to demonstrate and 
sell earth stations from your 
home and earn extra money! 

unlden 



B ALCOA f "^^ 

The new S ATM AN Buyer's Guide is a nm*&$iTy for any 
prospective or current earth station owner who wants to 
save big money on name brand tat ell Lie products and 
also earn some extra money. Buy direct, Do-Jt- 
Yourself, and save wjih SAT MAN. Toll tree Ordering, 
no sales ta\ (IL only), major credit cards accepted, huge 
in-stock inventories available, and fast UPS shipping 
anywhere in U.S. Check with SATMAN before you 
buy... If> wilt nor be undersold! Call now for your free 
24 page SATMAN Buyer's Guide. 

1-800-4-SATMAN 

1-309-692-95 82 Illinois 




SATMAN 



»ith MELGOr 



PEORIA.. ILB1GH 

clip and ww 



1 JWM- SAT MAN 



^EAEAEAEAEAEAEAEAE 

*EAEAEAEAEAE, 

AEAEAEAgA^^TV^ 



&t 



THE IDEAL 
OMNIDIRECTIONAL 
PACKET ANTENNA 






Greatest Simplex Range for 
Price 

Maximum Decoupling Mini- 
mizes Computer Hash 
No Feedline Radiation to Lock 
Up Computer 



. 



PERFORMANCE 

• Low Vertical Radiation Angle 

• No Feedline Radiation 

• Wideband Matching Network 

• Efficient Design 

• Omnidirectional Pattern 









DEPENDABILITY 

• High Quality Materials 

• Weatherproof Design 

• Rugged Construction 

• Advanced Engineering 



PRICE & CONVENIENCE 

• Low Cost 

• Easily Installed 

• Compact & Lightweight 

• UPS Shippable 

• Inexpensive TV Mast Support 
(not Included) 



ISOPOLE™ is available for 
144 MHz, 220 MHz, 440 MHz 
Ask for our spec sheet and 
radiation pattern plots, or 
visit your favorite AEA 
dealer for more information. 







(Prices and specificafrons subject fo change wthout notice 
or obligation) 





AEA 

Advanced Electronics Applications, Inc. 

P.O. Box 02 160 

Lynnwooo\ WA 98036 

(206) 775-7373 

TELEX: 6972496 

AEA INTL UW ^^^ „ t f tf 6 

JEAE 

iAEAEAEAE 

IAEAEAEAEAEAEAE 

EAEAEAEAEAEAEAEAEAE 







July 1984 

Dayton photo-journey, cordless 
phones, construction methods 

August 1984 

Two tone tester, HWT01 mods, kW 

for 160 

September 1984 

V/UHK wattmeter, Timex RTTY 
system 

October 1984 

Fall antenna issue — 9 skyhooks! 

November 1984 

Color Computer SSTV, TVI cure 

December 1984 

Touchtone data display, transistor 
tutor, line conditioner 

January 1985 

1COM mods, extra VIC -20 memory, 
shoestring RTTY 

February 1985 

OSCAR uplink amp, I1F helicals, 6- 
mcier CB 

March 1985 

Volunteer exams, talking repeater 
controller 

April 1985 

Dayton Ham vent it hi special! 

Ishmod's Journal, the amazing 

Hat Ten na 

May 1985 

Antennas! A baker's dozen 

June 1985 

Special issue — RTTY, 9N1MM profile 

July 1985 

Dayton in pictures, world's largest 
array, add-on digital display 

August 1985 

Build a 2m transceiver, razor- blade 
radio, HW-101 updates 

In eaeh back issue, you'll also find our 
regular features as well as reviews and 
new product announcements. 

Each back issue costs $3,50 plus 
$1.00 shipping and handling. On or- 
ders of 10 or more back issues, there 
is a flat $7.50 shipping and handling 
fee. Send your cheek or money order 
to 73, Attn: Back Issue Orders, 80 Pine 
Si-, Peterborough, NH 03458, 




14 73 for Radio Amateurs * December, 1985 



Dan's Got It All 



I 










y 




FT-980 CAT 




FT-757 GX 



FT-209RH 



KANTRONICS 

THE INTERFACE } j 



TH-21AT 



KENWOOD 

TR-7600 TH21A 



» 



TS-940S 





WELZ CORP. 

VSWR/POWER METERS 



» 



Britt's 2-Way Radio 






Sales & Service 




250S Atlanta Street All Of These "Goodies'* And Many More At Super Savings, 

Smyrna, Georgia 30060 Come See Us Or Cal I 1 -800-24 1 -2027. 

Belmont Hills Shopping Center 
(404) 432-8006 



* 



SANTEC 







ST-20QET 
ST-400ET 







Bring 

things 

down 

to 

your 

level! 



WithThe HAZER Engineered 
for Rohn 20 & 25 Towers 

Antennas and ratal of mount on HA2ER. complete 
sytiem trans tower in vertical upright position Safety 
lock system operates while raising or loweftrvg. Never 
can fall Easy to install and operate 

Complete kit for 50 or less tower includes winch, 
cable, hardware and instructions 

Hazor 2 - Heavy duty alum 12 so ft load $297.00 ppd\ 
Hater 1 - Standard alum, ft sq. II. load $21 3.00 ppd. 

Hazer 4 - Heavy galv. steel 16 sq. ft load £276,00 ppd, 
Ball Thrusi bearing TB-25 for any of abovi* $42.50 ppd, 

Marlm also mfgs aluminum towers specifically 
engineered for use with the HAZER Two sizes - M-13 
1 13" wide} and M-19 (18 wide) 
Qwrwntef, t» HAZES wiH bring your antenna syttvm Oown 
io ground l*v*L Qrd#r Now. 



GLEN MARTIN ENGINEERING INC. 
P.O. BOX 7 253 

Boonvilte, Mo, 65233 
816-882-2734 





Falcon 

COMMUNICA TtONS 



\ 




Falcon Communications, Well Known For MOSFET Repeater Power 
Amplifiers, Also Makes A Hard Working Line Of Bipolar Power 
Amplifiers For Mobile/Base Use. Our 2 Meter Amplifiers Include: 



Model 5121 



Model 5122 



Model 5123 



2 Watts in = 150 out 

1 Watt in =90 out 

10 Watts in = 150 out 

2 Watts in = 50 out 

30 Watts in = 150 out 
10 Watts in =90 out 



List $285 



List $275 



Li si $235 



A FEW FEATURES: 

1) Made in the USA 

2) All mode (FM, SSB, CW) 

3) Optional plug-in receive preamp 



4) Automatic COR or remote keying 

5) Built in thermal protection 

6) Full 1 Year warranty 

For information On Our Complete Line See Your Local Dealer Or Call Factory 



Direct 



i 

v 



CIRCLE 155 ON READER SERVICE CARD 

P.O. Box 8979 • Newport Beach, CA 92658 

(714)760-3622 



I 
I 
I 

I 
I 
I 

I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 




Recruit 



£?* 



Get 73 for 



HALF 




Celebrate 25 years of 73 for Radio Amateurs 
by treating yourself and a fellow ham to an un- 
beatable subscription offer! 

Here's how it works — When you get a friend 
to enter a paid subscription to 73 for the low one 
year rate of $19.97, you can renew your own 
subscription for an unbelievably low $12,- 
50% savings off the regular renewal rate! 

You don't need special salesmanship abili- 
ties. Simply show your friend 73's: 

• high-quality construction projects and week- 
end gadget ideas. 

• articles about satellite TV, or about the grow- 
ing use of microcomputers in the harnshack, 

• monthly ham help features and new product 
news. 

• international reports. 

It's that easy, 73 will sell itself. And when your ham friend enters his name and address on the 
coupon or attached card, you'll get your 73 subscription renewal for half-price. 
But hurry! This special offer is available for a limited time only. 
So grab a ham friend, grab a pen, and come join the 73 silver anniversary super-savings celebration! 



r 



Y 





We want to join the 73 celebration— a new paid subscription for my friend, 
and a renewal for me at 50% off. 



SEND ME ONE YEAR OF 73 FOR RADIO 
AMATEURS AT THE LOW SUBSCRIPTION 
PRICE OF $19.97. 

□ Payment Enclosed 

D VISA DAE n MC 

Card # Exp. Date 

Signature 

Name 



BECAUSE I GOT A FRIEND TO SUBSCRIBE 
TO 73, EXTEND MY SUBSCRIPTION FOR 
ONE YEAR FOR ONLY $12,481 

□ Payment Enclosed □ MC 
D VISA DAE D Bill Me 



Card # 



Exp. Date 



Signature 
Name 



> 

X 



I I 



Address 
City 



State 



Zip 



Address 
City 



State 



Zip 



Canada & Mewco S22.97, Fdragn Surface $3B 97. One year arty. US tare* drawn 
on US bank Foreign atonal, please inquire 35DR6J 



Canada & Mexico $14.48, Foreign Surface $22 .48. One year any, US (unci 
drawn on US bank Foreign airmail, please inquire. 35DTC6K 



73 



far Radio PO Box 931 • Farmlngdale, NY • 11737 

Amateurs 







WHO YA GONNA CALL? 



International Radio, Inc. 
305-335-5545 



* NEW - 8 POLE CRYSTAL FILTERS FOB ICOM 
730-735*740-745 -7 51 - R70-R 7 1 - R7000 

Drop-in 2 1 kHt SS0 9 0115 MHZ Center Frequency 

(CFi Replaces FL-3Q .«..*•,, $49 00 

Drop-In 2 4 kHz SSB 45500 CF Replace* FL-44 

"^T " £ILj1 If ■ *«* + *■* ■- I * ft J -I ■ i ft I -I k A I i ■ r(3V VV 

(Wire-in \ 2 i kHz SSB 45500 CF ftopiaces fl^14 

Drqp-ln 400 Hz CW 9.0106 CF Replaces FL-32 

, $49 00 

Matched Sel SSS 2 1 kHz S139 00 

Matched Set CW 400 Hz , # _ $139 00 

* FOR KENWOOD TS-430 930-940 

Drop-In 6 kHz AM Filler . . , , . * . . t S49X 

* NEW TS-340S 2.1 kHz SSB MATCHED SET 
SWITCH KIT. Altow* Ww3e Narrow SSB. Use original 
Kenwood or iRl 2 1 1 iiTers in Receive 
INW*ODLFCT0RV PRICE , $16900 

* NEW TS-940S 400 Hz CW MATCHED SET DROP-IN 

(ON PC BOARDS I S13900 

Replaces Kenwood 500 Hz filter* exactly 

* AND 10 POLE CRYSTAL FILTERS AND 'CAS- 
CADE KITS AVAILABLE FOR MOST (COM 
KENWOOD AND YAESU RAOfOS- CALL OR WRtTEL 

Ail crystal Titters guaranteed two yean to original 
purchaser 

If you ever need tech meat assistance International 
Radio Inc otters a iuil service laboratory 

ICOM and Kenwood newsletter* 1 year 5 1 00 US ($12 
first class mart) S1 4 elsewhere SASE for details When 
ordering please specify radio an d crystal filter ordered 
-ase add $5 for shipping and handling USA S10 air 
mail, COO add S1 90 SiO overseas Fl, residents add 
sates Lax 

European orders via Garam-Funk Korn merrier Str 
1 10, 5350 EusMirchen Federal Republic o! West 

Germany 

WE ACCEPT VISA & MASTERCARD 



INTERNATIONAL RADIO, INC. 

1533 SE Village Green Dr.. Port St. Lucie, FL 33452 

(305) 335-5545 




Inter-Ear-Communication-System 

A space age system that allows you to send and 
receive your message through your ear and leave 
your hands free. 



WK 



• Replace your HTs awkward speaker-microphone with 
an n-ear microphone, 

• Discrete HT communications leaves you with both 
hands free. 

• Allows voice communications in noisy environments. 

• Our n-ear talk interfaces with almost all HTs, which 
have external speaker microphone output jacks. 

• Custom hybrid circuit 

• Low power consumption. Transmits at 5mA and less 
than lOuA when receiving. 

• One year warranty. 

Dealer inquiries are invited. 



IECS-200 




S99.95 includes IECS-200 control unit. Ear transducer, 
9V battery. 6-pin output connector and Instruction sheet, 
(Add 6% sales tax for California residents) 

Custom made interface cable for TEMPO S-1 5 and aiJ ICOM 
HTs are available at $19.95 

FOR ALL PREPAID ORDERS, SHIPPING AND HANDLING 
CHARGE WILL BE PAID BY N- EAR-TALK. 



communications, inc. 



22511 Aspan Street • Lake Forest • Calif. 92630-6321 
(714) 581-4900 Telex 29-7385 ACE UR Fax (714) 768-4410 



THREE OF AMATEUR RADIOS 
BEST KEPT SECRETS 



KC-1 



price, int.* tunuuis 
"Kansas City Kcyer" boasts 1500 characters of 
memory, 14 bullW* .mil lull pm^rmnimibilily. 

The Contest ers Choke" 

This 6502 microproces- 
sor design has 32-K of 
eprom and Jr>K of ram. 
Using simple user friend - 
Jy programming, ihe 
owner can automate 
most contest operations, 
and much more. 
Complete KC-1 systems begin at only $2 19-95 




Vl.«lii 



GP-1 



The "Ground Plane One" 
is a ten inch diameter, 24 

point cast alumaloy, buss used to attach the radials 

of any vertical antenna. 
Enjoy the benefits of a professional looking 

ground system for only $24.95- 



D-LAY-5 



An easy to install delay 
circuit thai works on the 

CDE/HYGAiN HAM II. Ill, IV and TA1ITWISTER 

rotor systems. 
Tins system mounts inside the control box and 

inserts a five second delay into the brake circuit 

Only $21.95 



- ORDEF 01 R FACTORY DIRECT CATALOG - 



IANCE JOHNSON ENGINEERING 

P.O. BOX 7363 

KANSAS CITY, MISSOURI 64116 



"TUNE IN" THE WORLD 

OF SPECIALIZED 

COMMUNICATIONS! 



Thousands of "Ham Radio" 
operators across the country 

are enjoying "Specialized 
Communications'' modes. 
Whether Its FSTV, SSTV, FAX, 
OSCAR, EME, RTTY, PACKET 
or COMPUTERS, today's Radio 
Amateur is a highly skilled 
Communications Specialist! 

Providing full, in-depth 
coverage of these modes is our 
business and we've been do- 
ing it now for over 19 years! 
And now we're expanding! 



iawi Restfems Mus: 
Add «% Site* las 

4% Added To Aft 
Qurge Card 0r*er* 



Now published "monthly" 10 times 
per year, SPEC-CO Mth readers are kept 
up-to-date in a world of fast moving 
modern technology. 

Why not give lis a try? Back issue 
samples are available for just $2.00 ppd. 
(Master Article Indexes add $1 ,00). 

Special Six Month Trial Subscription 
-St 0,00. U.S. /Canada/Mexico Annual 
Subscription S20.00. (Foreign Subscrip- 
tions slightly higher), 



SPEC-COM 



m 






Amateur Radio Specialized 

Communication Journal 

P.O. Box H 

Lowden, Iowa 52255 

(319) 944-7669 (Membership Services) 



"When You Buy, Say 73" 



73 for Radio Amateurs * December, 1985 17 



FMYourIC-730 

Put the icing on your ICOM — and discover wh y 
the 1Qm-FM craze is sweeping the nation! 



Sergio Cesar N9DBX 
5201 Toil view Drive 
Rolling Meadows IL bOOOS 



tt 



L 






"■LL Q3 2^r 
BR20 '» T@> t^ 

'Hh 



— Wr- 












« 



Ll 



4 



? £ -re 



i n 




uj_ 



«? 



-.ifflff : 



,5 -15 — w^as 

*♦ T 



C D5 










en 



#-to 



L 



i£i. 



tUt 



■ «t b* 



] 






I PIN 3 







PU4 -Wr 



^+ p,3 ^W? ,s 









T* ? * 






n /* 







01-1 




DO O 



C 



Q3 o^e I voo 




fci 



f/g 7. Detector unit 
18 73 for Radio Amateurs • December, t985 



For many hams, the 
ICOM IO730, by virtue 
of its compact size, light 
weight, and many built-in 
features, is perhaps the ideal 
HF rig for both mobile and 
base operation on today's 
crowded bands. One desir- 
able feature, however, is 
missing— 10-meter FM ca- 
pability, 

A simple FM modulator- 
detector board can be 
added to the IC-730 for un- 



der $30.00 with no modifi- 
cation whatsoever to the rig. 
When you are through, you 
will have an 80-Watt FM 
transceiver with dual-vf o ca- 
pabilities, allowing duplex 
operation for 10-meter FM 
repeaters and switchable to 
simplex on any frequency at 
the push of a button. The cir- 
cuit described below also in- 
cludes an option which 
allows you to maintain the 
AM operation, if so desired. 




Photo A. Modifications to the detector unit. 




Photo B< Mode switch with AM 8-V wire connected 



This module can be installed 
in most HF rigs and Citizens 
Band radios with excellent 
results. 

The Circuit 

The FM detector uses a 
Motorola quadrature detec- 
tor, an RCA limiting ampli- 



fier, and one transistor as 
active devices. To receive 
the FM carrier, an MC3359P 
high-gain, low-power FM i-f 
chip was used. This chip was 
chosen because it was de- 
signed for narrowband FM 
communication and data 
link and uses a 455-kHz i-f. 




Photo C RIT board. Arrow shows where RFC &V wire 
should be connected. Between the two capacitors, green 
wire SQ is soldered to the board. 



the same i-f as the 730, ll 
also has a squelch built in so 
that no added circuitry is 
necessary. 

The 455-kHz M from the 
IG730 is fed through a ce- 
ramic filter 5 kHz or 7.5 kHz 



wide directly into pin 5 of 
the 6-stage, limiting i-f (IC1). 
The 7.5 kHz is recom- 
mended for better received- 
signal fidelity. The i-f has a 3 
dB limiting sensitivity of ap- 
proximately 100 microvolts 



■ c t 



XtlF-4JS-tli; Q*L* 



-L 



s f* T 



f 

OP 

L 




> 


MECHANICAL 
FILTER 

MF-455-11 Z 


EO 


M 1 


GO 







j <a 



It 



rll- 



r^~ i 



Lf] 



^. 



CM 




C6i 



i u l -WV. +±l ^-^AA~ -Wr 



mm:. 



"63 



"*J 



Wr 



— WW-L HI- 



Ma C1 ? "H l ^ 

-WW H I— W* * ■/■ 



u 



-WW 





«3S 



CIO 



-wv 



HJB 



4AV 



-^ ?C Mi V-pSi^e r 1 



-Wv- 




*34 






«SI -«? 









0« 



cso 



RH 



D» 



s 



-M* 



010 



"TO" .El C64 ^" ti - 



-WV 



*» 



V** 



AfVr * 




~WW" 
— *M- 



HQ4 



PIT 



D2B 



*-> o 



S3 



*H} 



Uasv 




01 * is A 



-wv- 



»M 



^w*- 



**J 



A^r 




QJ0 



■ a; 



car T**- ■* 

HI— ■»* *ifc 



**Hf— -WW 



R143 



i i I 



3 ra ^ ¥ *, 



63' 



J I 



J2I 



est 



tZZHl 



J7 






O 



J3 



AW-"*» 

am hi so 
Wv W* 

T T 




QI 

010-13 

014-20 




a DO 




oa oi3 








o*-\ 




t 4 6v 




s o«-? n 



□ 



OP 



Fig. 2. Main unit 



73 for Radio Amateurs * December, 1985 19 




Photo D. Cable routing to converter board. 



The output of the limiter is 
internal! v connected to the 
quadrature detector; only a 
parallel LC network is 
needed externally to com- 
plete the circuit. The detec- 
tor output is amplified and 
buffered to the audio output 
(pin 10), which has an imped- 
ance of approximately 300 
Ohms. The value of the ca- 
pacitor off pin 9 controls the 
amount of de-emphasis 

Squelch 

A simple inverting op amp 
is provided in this chip with 
an output at pin 13. A filter 
was made with external 
impedance elements to dis- 
criminate between approxi- 



mately 7.5 kHz and 8 5 kHz. 
An external AM detector 
was used to check the pres- 
ence of noise above the nor- 
rnal audio, at which point 
pin 16 shorts to ground the 
input to the audio amplifier 
(squelch closed). In the pres- 
ence of a carrier, the noise 
level drops sharply, causing 
the detected AM into pin 14 
also to drop, and the 
squelch will open. Carrier 
levels as low as 01 micro- 
volts at the antenna input of 
the IO730 will open the 
squelch For a squelch con- 
trol the RIT potentiometer 
of the rig was utilized. RIT 
operation ts not affected in 
the SSB and CW modes. 




AM BV 

OPEN LUC 



*|f, LID * 

m 

PiUltO J 

t i. ttb ■ 

* 

PEG ■■' 

^ 

— ■ — *► 



7i. ltD * 



PlL *3J-* 



Fig^RK 

Power-Supply Switch 

The only transistor used in 
the power-supply circuit is 

to switch the voltage to the 
modulator chip, SK3223 
(IC2) Voltage to power the 
FM board is taken from the 
73G's AM circuit (AM 8 V), A 
5.6-V zener is used to keep 
power to the MC3359P con- 
stant and in its operating 
range Another voltage sig- 
nal (REC 8 VJ is used to 
switch Q1 off during receive 
so that any extraneous noise 
in the shack or mobile will 
not modulate the vco. 

Modulator 

To modulate the tC-730, 
an RCA SK3223 TV/FM 
sound i-t limiting amplifier is 
used. Its input from the mi- 
crophone (pin 6) is ampli- 
fied, lilii-red, and fed into 
the IC-730 vco Due to the 
ICs limiting capabilities, it is 
not necessary to make a 
mike gain control, but a de- 
viation control is added to 
its output pin 3. A .01 -micro- 
farad coupling capacitor 
(CI 7) was used to connect 
the modulator to the vco. 







Fig. 4. Mode switch. 

The quality of this capacitor, 
which is also the preem- 
phasis capacitor, will affect 
the modulation quality. (In- 
creasing its value will pro- 
duce more bass in the audio; 
decreasing its value makes 
the audio sound tinny.) An rf 
choke is added so that rf 
from the vco will not be fed 
back into the SK3223 

The Modification 

After the board is com- 
pleted, it is a good idea to 
pretest it to make sure it is 
working properly. Apply 8 V 
to the board (a 9-V alkaline 
battery will do). Connect an 
oscilloscope to the output 
of the modulator on the 
$SF2+$SF1sideofC8.(Ifno 
oscilloscope is available, 
use a small speaker or ear- 
phones for adjustment by 
ear.) Inject a small 1-kHz 
sine-wave signal to the input 
and check the modulator for 
distortions or any malfunc- 
tions. 

Connect a dc*coupled os- 
cilloscope or a VTVM to the 
output of the MC3359P at 
pin 1 and check for approx- 
imately 2.5 V dc. A 5-V-dc 
reading will indicate that os- 
cillation is occurring in the 



Cil 4l 

CB2 



can 

C64 









4> ~ ( 



A 



£11 



^a 



r 3* 

a 





-wfiJ* 

— - ■ 



iJL (^ 6 







Ml-V*- *? 



-\\- 



A. 



:• | 



U 



c 

H 



S H^ H|P"Hh«* 









=U -IH & 





j 



» S) HI- 



*M 




07 



C4J H »* 







Dtt? j 



49 rtl 



Fig. 5> PLL unit. 



20 73 tor Radio Amateurs * December, 1985 



c 

(jp r 5 © 




PH-1 




fll - J 









What you DO get is one compact package that TURNS ON RTTY BEADY — 
No program load, "SYS" commands, or rats nest of external wiring to enjoy the 

best in CW/RTTY operation, (AMTOR too, if added.) 



The simple, uncomplicated design and ease of 
operation are not to imply mediocre performance. 
On the contrary, Microlog's years of software and 
hardware experience combine in the AIR-1 to 
provide a level of performance found only in much 
more expensive dedicated systems. Compare for 
yourself or ask an AIR-1 owner, they're our best 
salesmen! 

» Computer-enhanced detection means extensive use of 

software digital filtering techniques for noise and 
bandwidth that track the operating speed and code. 

• Full speed RTTY 60 to 132 WPM. C\V to 150 WPM. & 
110/300 Baud ASCIL 

• Choice of Full- or split-screen display with large type 
ahead text buffer and programmable memories* 

• On-screen tuning indicators mean you never have to 
take your eyes off the video for perfect copy tuning. 
RTTY "scope" cross-hatch and "red-dot" signal 
acquisition monitor right on the screen, 

"When You Buy, Say 73" 



Keyword or manual control of VIC or Parallel printer 

and receive buffer storage, 

Convenient plug-in jacks for all connections. 

Single board design contains TU & ROM software that 

does not require external power. 

Full one- year warranty, 

WRU, UNshift On Space, Word wrap-around, Test 

"Quick Brown Fox" cc "RYRY" in ROM. Break buffer, 

Random Code generator, Handkey input. Real-time 

clock, sturdy metal cover and more. 

AIR-1 for VIC-20 or C-64 9199 (with AMTOR 
$279), Microlog Corporation, 18713 Mooney Drive, 
Gaitheisburg, MD 20879 Tel: 301-258-8400 

MICROLOG 

INNOVATORS IN DIGITAL COMMUNICATION 

Note; VIC-20 is a trademark of Commodore Electronics, Ltd. 
Copyright ©1984 Microlog Corporation 

73 for Radio Amateurs • December 1985 21 




Photo £ Connection to mike gain control. 



circuit If this occurs, it is 
due to lack of shielding on 
the input side of the chip It 

is very important that the 
0,1 -uF capacitor at pin 6 and 
7 be installed as close as pos- 
sible to the chip. 

A ground plane should be 
provided on that side of the 
chip, pin 1 through pin 9. A 
bypass capacitor (C7) can be 
installed directly across pin 
17 (ground) and pin 7 t on the 
foil side of the board. 

If an FM signal generator 
is available, inject a 455-kHz 
signal to the input of the 
455-kHz ceramic filter 
through the 470Ohm resis- 
tor (R15) P modulate the gen- 
erator with a 1-kHz signal, 
and you should see a clean 
1-kHz at pin 10. If such a 
generator is not available, 
make sure there is no dc at 
the i-f input side of the filter 

Installation and Calibration 

Remove all power and ca- 
bles to the unit Put a towel 
on the bench so you don't 
scratch the cabinet. With 
the operating manual in 
hand, familiarize yourself 



with the layout of the unit 
Open it, removing top and 
bottom covers (don't lose 
the screws). Find and iden* 
tify the main unit (top view), 
manual page 23, Fig, 7-1 , rf 
unit (left side of the rig), 
page 23, Fig. 7-2, and PLL 
unit (bottom view), page 24. 
Fig. 7-3, 

1) Install a 150k from D6 
cathode to D5 cathode 
(Photo AX 

1a) Install a 10k resistor 

from D6 cathode to R20 (Fig. 

1). 

1b) A relay or switch can 

be installed to open this re- 
sistor for AM operations. 

2) Solder cable from au- 
dio output of MC3359P to 
pin 3 of IC1 (Fig. 1). 

3) Solder cable (i-f signal 
to MC3359P) center to R1 7 
or D5 anode and shield to L3 
can (Fig. 2). 

4) Solder AM ft~V wire to 
mode switch (Fig. 4) open 
lug (Photo B). 

5) Solder REC 8-V wire to 

RITboard, Fig. 3(E). Photo C, 
arrow, 

6) Route cables to rf unit 
compartment. Photo D. 




Photo F. Rf choke and resistor soldered to R2B, 



--f ill FKL 2 






m * vi 



I 



■ v s v 



-w- 



-*SQ f F<Q. 3 



fl(3 



CFl 




C2 

-it- 



^pc 




ICI 



-u 



•r 



HT 



it 



* 



■* 






A3 



1 



'2 



C3 



D.Ji 



!»3 CS 

M- 



M 

^h 



*2 

I |i * -V»Si ♦ 



i *v 



rh 



} 



D? 



Eil 



A-w\ )| A ) 



CIO 



AF OUT 
1 Fi6 I 



Fig. 6. FM detector. 




TO 
- MiC CONTROL 
CENTE* LUC 

• vZ 



M00 OUT 

H FIG 5 



Fig. 7, Limiting FM modulator 



Q 



**v 



i 



I 



m 



- : 



**N* *— ■- H 



si Switch 


ifi 


»® 


■■■ 


UI/FW 


c® 


CQ 


® 


OPTlOHAl 


6® 


fi® 


® 



V2 



r r 

NEC Bv AM av 

E P >G 3 C FIS 4 



i 



EN 



A FIG r 



torn 

-•Wh- 



-*~ -•: 






■~C FIG I 



FJg. 8, Power supply. Fig, 9, Optional AM/FM switch. 



22 73 for Radio Amateurs * December, 1985 



§ 



CT « W LtSU«W«ETE«OOT««**n'* 



Jtf-BfeW 



SB 



CM 8 



mn mom 



■meMM 



mmm 



**Wt 



RF BGOO 



] ] ] D 

111 ^ 



WUMf 



TREB(E 



; /.S5 5.D 



n w* 




■"»* mir 



n*ia» 



TUNING 



POWER 



AM HP GAIN 



iOCK TUNING SPEED 

* «■ flk F49F 



^IQrt. 



O 



JLCF«= .^ON 






Panasonic 



£'■ H 



The Panasonic Command Series. 

tuning, you'll hear the 

Now it's easy to listen in on the world's hot spots. 
With the Panasonic RF-B600 Command Series 
FM/LW/MW/SW receiver 

Its advanced microcomputer-controlled tuner lets 
you preset up to nine different frequencies. And reach 
them at the touch of a button. Or, press the appropriate 
buttons and tune in any desired frequency with direct- 
access digital tuning. It'll lock right in to every signal 
with a PLL quartz-synthesized tuner. Once tuned in, the 
Panasonic double superheterodyne system helps deliver 
a clean, consistent signal. 

There's even built-in auto-tuning to let you scan the 
shortwave band automatically as well as manually: All 
this means you can tune in Berlin, pick up Paris, or locate 
London in an instant. Without dialing all over the band. 



B Jttenc* net included. 



With double superheterodyne 
world loud and dear 

Both the RF-B600 and the RF-B300 are packed with 
features and built to go anywhere. 

The Panasonic Command Series offers something 
for everyone. With equipment sophisticated enough to 

impress the most =— ■ 

avid enthusiast, and 
automatic features 
that get you where 
you want to be. Fast. 

There's a whole 
world out there 



that's waiting to be 
heard. Tune into it 
with the Panasonic 
Command Series. 



O m 



Hf B300 



Panasonic 

just slightly ahead of our timer 




Fig, 10. PC board (foil side). 



7) Solder cable (audio in- 
put to SK3223] to mike gain 
control Photo E 

8) Solder wire SQ to RIT 
board, Fig. 3(F). 

9) Solder an rf resistor at 
the junction of R28, R29, 
C34, and R30, See sche- 
matic, PLL unit; add a 22k re- 
sistor to the choke and 
solder shield to nearest can. 



solder center of cable to re- 
sistor, route the cable and re- 
place shield cover, Fig. 5(H); 
Photo F. 

10) Drill two holes in the 
chassis at the rf unit com- 
partment (top of unit); be 
careful with the metal 
chips — the rig does not like 
them at all! Cut a piece of 
cardboard and cover the rf 







Parts List 




Unit 


Component 


Value; ID 




Source 


Price 


D1-5 


1N9l4or 
1N4148 




RSor 
Motorola 


S .20 


m 


1N4734A 




Motorola 


1,20 


C1 t 2 t 5,7 


.1 uF (104) 


CY20C104M 


Centralab 


.50 


C3, 4, 13 


.001 uF(102) 


CY15C102M 


Centralab 


.25 


C6 


4,7 uF 


ECEA1EV4R7S 


Panasonic 


.25 


C8, 10, 17 


.01 uF(103) 


CY15C103M 


Centralab 


.25 


C9 


100 pF 


CD15FD101J3 


CDE 


,35 


C11, 12 


10 uF 


ECEA1EV100S 


Panasonic 


.50 


C15 


1 uF 


EGEA1HV010S 


Panasonic 


.70 


C18 


2.2 uF 


ECEA1HV2R2S 


Panasonic 


.50 


All resistors 


V* W, 5% 






.20 


Rac 


150k 








Rl 


8.2k 








R2 


1,5k 








R3 


330k 








R4 


47k 








R5 T 16 


200k 








R9 


120 Ohms 








R10,ab 


10k 








R7 


18k 








R8 


470k 








R11 P 12 


1k 








R13 


22k 








R14 


10kpot(D©v) 


EUNK0AA0OB14 


Panasonic 


.30 


R15 


470 Ohms 








R6 


180k 








Q1 


2SA101S or 2N3906 (PNP) 




.25 


IC1 


MC3359P 




Motorola 


4.00 


CF1 


CFU455F (finer) 


Murata 


4.00 


IC2 


TA7061 or SK3223 




4.00 


T1 


455 Quad coi 


I— RCM-2A6597HW 


I— Toko 


2.00 


RF1 


1-yH rf choke 


L 




1,00 


S1 


Triple-pole smgle-throw 




4.00 


PI 


2-position right-angle connector 


amp 


1.00 


P2 


8-position right-angle connector amp 


2.50 




PC GROUND, 
I 6 D SHIELDS 



SHIELDED 
CENTER 
CONO 
SHIELD NOT 
CONNECTED 



Fig, 11, PC board I component side). 



unit. Install the board on top 

of the rf unit and plug cable 
to the board. (Holes are not 
required, but a two-sided 
tape is recommended to se- 
cure the FM board.) 

1 1 ) Take a break, get a cu p 
of coffee, and relax a bit. 

12) Now that you are 
cooled off and relaxed, let's 
check the work by starting 
at the beginning (Step 1), 
Make sure there are no sol- 
der pieces running around, 
bad connections, or shorts 
anywhere. 

13) Put some tape on the 
top and bottom covers to 
prevent the board from 
shorting to it. 

14) Connect the power 
supply and make sure RIT is 
off and CCW and speaker 
are connected, Turn it on 
and select AM mode. You 
should hear a hiss at the 
speaker Turn RIT squelch 
CW till speaker goes dead, 

15) If you have an rf gen- 
erator, feed a signal to the 
antenna input of about 100 
FMatl kHz with 4-kHz de- 
viation and adjust quad coil 
for best sound or best 1 kHz 
on the scope, connected at 
the speaker. It is a very sharp 
adjustment Connect the rig 
to a dummy load, feed a 
loud signal to the mike from 
the CW keyer, and adjust the 
deviation pot for 5-kHz de- 
viation. If you don't have a 
meter, adjust the pot to cen- 
ter and get on the air with 
someone to he!p you adjust 
the deviation. 



16) One relay is used to 
preserve AM— do connect 
the supply voltage to it be- 
fore any regulator of 730, be- 
cause it may not regulate 
properly with the additional 
current drain. 



That's all there is to % 
You're all set to explore the 
fun of 29.5-297 MHz. Tune 
first to 29.6 MHz, the inter- 
national simplex calling fre- 
quency. Next listen for 
repeater outputs in 10-kHz 
jumps from 29 61 -29.1*9. In- 
puts are 100 kHz below ejyt- 
put frequencies. 

BestDX! 

1 would like to thank all of 
you who helped me with this 
modification article, and a 
special thanks to the Crystal 
Lake Repeater Croup, AE9F, 
KN9N, WD9DRC. N9KC. 
KC9XU r Fred Palmer from 
I COM, and N9DP for their 
direct help in the design. 

Notes; To adjust squelch 

to your taste, lift R5 and 
change R6 so RIT pot is po- 
sitioned to your taste 
(squelch closed); then 
change R5 to adjust squelch 
tail; R5 can be as high as 
500k. The board can be ob- 
tained from the author for 
SI 5 00, the tested module 
and harness for 575.00, or in- 
stallation of the module in 
your radio for $110 00 plus 
shipping cost All mail and 
questions will be an- 
swered—please send an 
SASE.B 



24 73 for Radio Amateurs • December, 1985 



Here's G 



$1$ $ 



Reason to Be Jolly. 



Avoid the Rush. . Shop Early for Christmas 



Hatd to get through on our &QQ number? Car pttoft Warn or after y p m or it regular number ft you pay for fmJ ian fffd orator, nvr'A crsatt yout cfaer win Sf 



KENWOOD 




HP TRANSCEIVERS NEW SCANNER 

4*f9 33 

Continuous Coverage 
GO Mttjr-905 MHz. An mole 

HF TRANSCEIVERS 



NEW TS-9405 HF Transceiver CAL L 
ft iiti General Coverage Receiver 

TS - anscennF CALL 

«■!♦» Genera Coverage Recerwr 

-= "■ i jas«wrSU«flSP£DAL 
i Ger^a* CAtfa^e ftewvet 

tS 830S TraftSCC . CAL1 

160- IB Mete' WWfl Power Supply 

TS-530SP 160- tO Mole? KCVR CAtL 

Witfl P ■ F rer 

RECEIVERS 

R-2O0Q R-60D R-tDOQ. H- " ' CALL 

Ger?e*al Coverage Receivers 

VHF/UHF 




Tfi- 7950/ 7930 CALL 

S mater MoBila Uflils. 45 or 25 Walls 

I H 9130 2m All-mode ?.b Walls CALL 

TS ntA/TSSHA CALL 

All- mode Transceivers 

?m or 70cm mopile or base Station 

HANDHELDS 

TrV?6QGA 2ttt FH Trjnscew CALL 
Witri memories LCD sesw 

TH-?1*. ZtAT/Tn" 41A 4tAT CALL 

2m/70cm Unra^compict FM Transceiver 



FT 7 < CVF wife ffic 

th General Coverage RCVfl 
include* CW KtyW AM/f M Ctt Liter 

SWL RECEIVER 

NEW FRG 8800 SWL Receiver 510 00 
VHF c&rwarrers. Active Antennas available 

HANDHELDS 

fT2G9flH2mH7 299 95 

FREE FTS 6 Terra Encoder with FT 209RH 

FT2C3?mHT*iWTTF CALL 

FT 103 220 MH? H T *-1h TTF CALL 

Ft 703 4*0 WW H* MthTTp 

AN accessories in staci* 

VHF/UHF 

\FW FT ?70RH 2m 45rwall 389 95 

Very small mount- 

NEWFT?700HH2&'Wan 499 35 

Dual- band 2m and 44Q 




FT 726R For 2m 759 95 

[Optional modules lor frn 430.440 Wmzi 

Great lor Satellite Wor^ 



ANTENNAS 



TOWERS 



CUSHCRAFT 

A3 3 element tfj -15- 20m 205 00 

A4 4 Yemeni 10- 1 5< 20m 26* 95 

»3 I Dm Vertcal a 95 

2'«ft5SB'2i5ttBFU 2m Boomers 73 00 
*fi ■ Rmgo Ranger 34 95 

KLM 

4 A 4 -element TO- 1 5 20m 334 95 

KT34XA rj etement TO- 15-20.™ 479 95 

2m>1tX tl -element am 59 

2m- 16LBX 16-element 2m 91 .95 

MOSLEY 

'N3 3-eiement T riband Seam 26 & 95 

TA 33 3-element TO -1 5 20m 239 95 

fro 37 7-etonMffl ID* 15- 20m 465 95 

HUSTLER 

6-&TV i0-80m Vertical witn 30m 128 95 

5 ftTV tr>8Qm vVfctii 108 95 
MOBILE RESONATORS Suhdant Super 

lOandiSmefer 11.95 95 

2t) meters 15 50 21 95 

30 and 40 meters t7.95 25 95 

75 meters 19 95 36.95 

HY-GAIN 

391STH70X7 ele 10-15-20m CALL 

■ -plorer 14 II I l Gfll CAn 

■" HV -r3<jn7 iwtt f Hv Gam anient & 

Ian rmor - get free itop&ng on aft. 

MORE ANTENNAS 

At A .5350-*= CALL 

AVANT -V 151 30?mon^as5 31 95 
lARSift ill- 150 5/0 Irfag Mount 39 95 
UlkiQUADHC 141 95 

BUTTERNUT HF6V lO-80m Ve*t 1 12 95 
BU rTERNUT HF4B ?m Beam T89 95 
FOR OSCAR Dv CoShcrat! & KLM CALL 





Unarco-Rohn 



Sell-supponing towers 

HBX4Q 40 reel with Base *98.00 

nBX48aa-[«iwh(hBase 264.QC 

H &x S6 56' leet wi th Base 00 

HD8X40 Higner soaa *iiri flase 2*B DO 

HD8X4B Higner load wllh B^se S?S DC 
Other 8X, HBX. itOBx In Mock 

Guyed foldover lowers: 
FK255B 5&-tBBl ?5G 9*i.- 

FK4554 54 feel 4 1296 .00 

■Oltitr Si/BS if Strntisr sayrAgS 
F BK&rtr*9 ifcpoeC tre>QM 0JM0 
1Q% h*Qh& west sf !r* Rockm 

Straighl Sections: 

20G Stroght Section 37 

25G Siraignt Section 4* 

45G Straight Sectkon 1 09 00 

Complete Towor Packages 1 ALL 




CABLE BY SAXTON 
-: + 3MtiSpac 
Rca/u Foam 95% strcki 

8-wtreRotaior?nB 6 #22 
Mini « 95% Srt*rtj 



jo, 

25V ft 
i7*/H 

J3* 



GABLEWAVE HARDLINE Calf 




SANTEC 




HANDHELDS 

IC02AT V- CALL 

kC 04AT 440 H T/TouCMdoe CALL 

!C 2AT ?m rfr/Twcfitone 199 95 

1C 3A T 220 M Hz HT/ Tone htor>e 229 95 

IC 4AT 440 MHt HT/ToyontOfte 229 35 

SWL RECEIVERS 

R7l LitTntearjuarHillesW9.95 

Genera* Coverage Receiver 

VHF/UHF 

HiVi iC 3200 2m/440 Banfls 4B9-95 
IC271N tOO #arl 2m MCVR 95 

^3ce2mJHCVR47 



KDK 

FM240&B 



25-Mfl 



STLCLeatfterCas«torST T42 

SMSSpeajterMicto'ST 142 



299 95 

34 95 
34 50 



irar 




eeniur>22CYY*CVR 350 00 

2510 Mooei B 469 95 

Satellite S!iiliart for Oscar 10 
CORSAIR 1-1 Model 5B1 114 

ARGOSY II 5250 Digital. .565.55 

TRITON 425 HF Amp 1 SkW .CALL 



IC 271A Special 599 95 

All- mode 2m Transceiver 

HF TRANSCEIVERS 



SCANNERS 




NEW&C 73S HFXCVR 

IC'frlHF XnVR/GenCgvfn VI: 
Wi(r»PS35msiaHed 



CALL 

njia do 

1299 DO 



IC 745 76 

HF XCVRrGen Cov RCVfl 

MARINE 

Ml2i2-cJhWrc«ra?Tst5afrHeHT g& 

M2 76 ■cn.annd Synrriesrna NT 261 95 
MBO 75 watt j" cnanne^ Scanner 337 26 
M50C Commtrcial M80 429 95 

*e* M 5 .in- channel HT 325 95 



REGENCY 

NewRlOK- ' a-Ewig 9i- 

MX4W0r»&ie 30-900 MH; 306 QO 

H X 1 000 20-ch Handheld 199 95 

HX 2000 Handheld 120 9D0MHi 279 95 

MX3000 30-ch. 6-Danc moDiie 21C 

MX5000 2D-ch 25-512 MHl cont 354.95 

BEARCAT 

N«w 100X1 H.mflneln 22& OQ 

260 t fieri mot 180.00 

2020 40 ch /a«rcfatt 2 f 9 00 

210KW m W 

300 50 'th scanner / jntr 205 00 



SONY RECEIVERS 



20^ 

2010 SWL Receiver 

4910 SWL Receiver 



199 95 

279 95 

B9 95 



ACCESSORIES AMPLIFIERS 



BENCHER PADDLES 

Bia^ ■■me 36 95/4 B 95 

ASTRON POWER SUPPLY 
HS7A 49 95 RS20M 104 

A5t2A U 149 95 

RS20A W95 VS20M 124 

RS35A T33 95 VS35M 159 95 
RS50A 189 95 RS*- 209. §5 

TELEX HEADPHONES 

Pr ocom 2 50 1 1 *ad stt/MiC 72 .90 

Pracpm :■. ■ i-irjded phoi" 35.55 

Procom 350 LJiirjii^iii sel 5fl 95 

HMC 2 uhoefctim phone -2 5& 

SWL 6 1 (1 i«c >it head pnor» S 75 

Othe^ ; rr\ stoc* Caft 

SUPER SPECIALS THIS MQNTH 

B & W 

375 6 'Position Coax Switch 24 50 

425 1 *W im Pass Fitter 2&.50 

DAJWA/MCM/J.W MILLER 
CN-620/CM-54D Meiers 59.9b/69.95 
CN-620H/CN-6.1D Meters infi.OO/ !2fi 00 
CNW-4 19 Antenna Tuner 500 W 174.9^ 



TOKYO HY POWER 
VHfSUHFarnps CALL tor Ouoih 

hi 30V 2m Amp 2 in 30 Qui CaU 

HL &2V 2m Amp & ft*amp 1 o- BO CAH 



DA1WA 

.'OSSR 2!m Amp a tip 

MIRAGE 

823A2mAmpiilief 2 30 

ai0iE2mAmphfief tO- 160 
B3016 Zm Amplifier 30 1 BO 
61 'HON UHF Amp/ hi connfjetors 
8215 Zm Amp- 2 m, 150 oul . 
At0l5 6mAmp 1 50 Oiit 






84 95 

95 

199.95 

245.95 
242 95 



AMERITRON HF AMPS 
ALBOA 1200 watt 559 95 

AL&AHFAmpteO 15 389 55 

AL 12001 5MWA 1399 55 

KENWOOD 



* . 



CAU 



369 95 
16 C 
1132 95 



ArVIPHENOL 

Conned 0? s of ill kinds in stocl* 



CALL 



AMP SUPPLY 
l A tOOOA 150- 15m Amp 
?00Ai20OPEPTurief 
r ; i002B 2 5 KW nipersfl 

VOCOM AMPLIFIERS 

2 walls In 30 waits oyi2m Amp &9 ! 
2 waits in 60 waits oul ?tn Amp ID. 
2 wans in 120 watts out ?m Amp 169 95 
20QmW in. 30 wans out 2m Amp 84 95 



ROTATORS 

Alliance HO 73 1Q5 DO 

KfnproKR500Be«aliOftftoUlor 159 95 

H> smN CALL 

Hr-Gam Tailtvnstef VX CALL 

Hy-6amC045M CALL 

Hy Gain Kwy-auty 300 CALL 

Buy m Hf Besn: A get .in hOf'J far S39 55 



New VHF/UHF Amps 

from TE SfStems 

with Low Noise 

GaAs FET Preamp 

Call tor Quotes 



For Orders and Quotes Call Toll Free: 800-336-4799 

Virginia Orders and Quotes Call Toll Free: 800-572-4201 



HAL 

CWft 6850 Thereafter 746 95 

CRIIOORTTy/CWtmerlacB 214 95 

CRI 200 RTTV/CW tmerta 25 c - 

PACKET 

KAniremcs ctmtnjlier 1 39 95 

A£A PKT- i contronet 450 00 

AEA PK-64 controHie* Cai' 

HARDWARE 

MFJ T224 witn MFJ C-64/V-2Q Soft N 95 

MFJ 1229 DA 

K^mronics miprUce II 210 ■ 

■■i a CP-100 interface 2B* 95 

'• MPi MicrDoatch 

AEA Cl 1 ^ interface 17195 

Ktftlfonics U T *W 95 
lUntronics UTi 

PACKAGES 

WiCr^oq AID- 1 V<c < 20 .' C 64 

A£A CP> C-64 witn AmUjr 22^ 

SOFTWARE 

Kantronics Ham text 

Vlc-aO, C-64. AppiH CALL 

Kantronics Hamsoft/Amtor 
Vil- 2D C-i'J fRS BOcolPf AtiM fi9 95 
Kantronics Hamsofl 

tarl TR5-80C Tl-99 CALL 

Microlog Air Disk 

Vic?0ancC&4[ 3995 

Cartridge 56 95 
AEA 

MBA Tgit Vc 20 or CM 79,95 

MBA -ev 64 89 95 

Mar?le«t Vic 20 or C 64 79 95 

Df. DX hi AtA 95 <)b 

Dr.OSOoyAEA 7195 

Amateur Software ler Hie 
vii. 7 1 1 and Cemmoctore64 
■ •. tape 3! disk 

Ct- VtC-tQ 
Coniesr loo 95 24 95 

Arterina Design 

Mors* «i - 9 95 

Piapaga&cift Chan 

Suoer Lorj 19.95 19 95 
Net ComraBej 95 16 95 

DX T» ?5 

W aster Log (Disk) 28 95 





13646 iettsrscm Davts Higrr*. 
Woodbndge Vuginu 22* 

'malum 4 S<rvic? " ^3 106J 

StOWHoa^ «TT It 
Wf 10 am -8, 
10 a nt - 4 p m 

s W-F 9 a rr ~pm 
EatunHy ttl i,ni -4 pm 

S^nd 3 ;'" timp$ tor 3 t'yer 
lifftf fnQutften: toy/tort 

lACOMBE)}) 

Ou: associate store 

A jacNspn ftoac P 801 293 
LAGomtte Louisiana 7C 

r dOrmalwrt & Ser^ce |S 



AT%T i 

PHOME CENTER 



T^rms: W cftecArs sccepfj 

prrcrTs tf n oi \ru-h t;it 1 5 fti p p 1 ng I • 
COO fr?(?: 1^ J5 pfff package Prices ifi 
subieci to cftarffjif w^ftot/f w/ ■ 

yjfiorf Pr{3 
et"jiudrii?f At 
tecrtc r«/oc*i^«^ 

taw £fif suppoffs *ne 
m^Tiirsffi^ers fistrnttws To geld 
topv Bf a warYjfliy onor m purchase, 
can customer setwtx *t 703 641 TQ63 
and he ri/r/nsr>ef7 at tin CO 




"When You Buy> Say 73" 



73 for Radio Amateurs * December, 1985 25 



Harry A Schools KA3B 
1606 S. Newkirk Street 
Philadelphia PA 79145 



Join the SWOT Team! 

2m FM is fun, but using a repeater won't challenge your skill. 
Turn the switch to SSB and find out what ham radio is real ly about! 




Photo A, Here is the author as DA2AL in the Hunsruck 
Mountains of West Germany during a Region I VHF Con- 
test, putting a scarce grid square on the air. Although moun- 
taintopping isn't as popular in the US as it is in Europe, it is 
no longer rare to see American hams heading for the hills, 

26 73 for Radio Amateurs * December, 19&5 



Even as little as fifteen 
years ago, 2-meter SSB 
was basically considered a 
barren no-man's-land with 
only a handful of operators 
occupying the band. Activi- 
ty was slight, even in heavi- 
ly-populated areas such as 
the Northeast, with numer- 
ous band openings going un- 
noticed. However, the status 
of 2-meter SSB has changed 
dramatically since then, es- 
pecially over the last decade. 
With the advent of fully- 
synthesized multimode rigs 
and affordable power am- 
plifiers, receive preamplifi- 
ers, and antennas. 2-meter 
SSB capability is readily 
available at modest cost and 
is no longer the mode once 
inhabited almost entirely by 
the home-brewer and experi- 
menter. Even so, there are 
many amateurs who under- 
estimate its potential in 
terms of DX and reliable 
communication over appre- 
ciable distances- For the 
Technician-class licensee 
who yearns to work some in- 
teresting DX or for the old- 
timer who has had it with 
crowded repeaters, 2-meter 
SSB may be a ticket to fun 
and enjoyment. 

Let me point out that the 
main intent of this article is 



basically to inform the read- 
er that there is an abun- 
dance of 2-meter 5SB/CW 
activity taking place and to 
introduce the "Sidewinders 
On Two" organization, other- 
wise known as SWOT, which 
caters to the SSB/CW enthu- 
siast To fully cover areas 
such as antennas and radio- 
wave propagation would be 
almost impossible, as books 
have been written on these 
subjects, Therefore, I will 
make generalizations which 
can be researched through 
further reading 

Getting on the Air 

Unlike years gone by, 2- 
rneter multimode transceiv- 
ers are readily available as 
either large base-station 
units with built-in ac power 
supplies or as smaller base/ 
mobile rigs which require an 
external dc power supply if 
they are to be used at the 
home station. Whatever 
way you decide to go, re- 
member that the cost of a 
multimode rig is not much 
more than that of an FM 
transceiver. 

Two features which now 
are standard on most of the 
newer rigs have made life 
easier for the sidebander 
scanning and squelch on 



sideband, Besides having 
the transceiver scan for sig- 
nals during slow periods, lis- 
tening to receiver white 
noise for hours on end is a 
thing of the past As for pow- 
er outputs, most rigs now on 
the market run anywhere 
from 10 to 30 Watts P which 
is sufficient to work DX in 
most cases. 

Transverters. If it is not 
feasible to purchase a sepa- 
rate multimode rig, then a 
transverter would be an al- 
ternative to get on the band, 

If you currently maintain 
an HF station that was man- 
ufactured in the mid 1970s 
or later, there's a good 
chance that the manufac- 
turer of the rig has a 2-meter 
transverter which is compat- 
ible, The cost of a trans- 
verter, even if it requires 
modifications for use on 
your HI- rig, is well below 
that of a separate multi- 
mode transceiver 

Antennas 

Polarization. Some ama- 
teurs who purchase multi- 
mode rigs are disappointed 
when they venture into the 
low end of 144 MHz in 
hopes of finding someone to 
talk to, but hear nothing but 
receiver white noise instead. 
Although it is no fault of 
their own, a common mis- 
take made by newcomers to 
the band is to start tuning 
around using a vertically-po- 
larized antenna. Unless they 
are in a heavily populated 
area with many stations ac- 
tive on the band, chances 
are that they will hear abso- 
lutely nothing. 

On 2-meter SSB, just 
about everyone is horizon- 
tally polarized, and because 
of this, vertical antennas do 
not perform well The cross- 
polarization loss between a 
station running vertical and 
a station running horizontal 
is debatable. However, most 
agree that it is in the area of 
20 dB. With a loss figure this 
high, even local stations can 
sometimes be very weak, 
with severe fading if two sta- 
tions are cross-polarized. 





■ 20 


• W 1 00" w 


















AC 


* W 








! 








40* H 














o* 


IB 


It 


!9 


^T 


59 


69 


79 


•9 | 1* 






OB 


ll 


28 


48 


*Q 


SB 


£B 


n 


■B 


4fl 




at 


11 


IT 


11 


4T 


57 


6? 


tt 


|1 


•7 




M 


m 


u 


£6 


46 


56 


66 


76 


Hi. 


Mr. 




03 


IB 


25 


39 


45 


as 


65 


75 


ID 


.,, 




04 


H 


£4 


i4 


44 


54 


64 


74 


64 


34 




03 


15 


23 


a 


43 


53 


£3 


73 


Bl 


93 




OS 


l| 


£2 


3E 


42 


52 


bL J 


72 


« 


4£ 




Ql 


ii 


21 


31 


41 


SI 


61 


Fl 


61 


■i 


~Kd* hi 


M 


10 


H 


30 


*□ 


50 


6C 


70 


BO 


BO 


JV W9 















































40" N 



30* N 



Fig, 1. Shown above is the grid-square layout for the United States under the Maidenhead Lo- 
cator Each field is broken down into TOO 2° x T° grid squares measuring approximately 100 
x 70 miles in size, and numbered exactly like the Echo Mike field in the diagram. To figure 
out your own grid-square locator number, refer to the article on page 49 of the January, 1983, 
QST or the October, 1982, issue of the Lunar Letter, edited by KI7D, 



Horizontal polarization is 
preferred because signals 
that are polarized in this 
fashion are more consistent 
over greater distances, with 
less fading and flutter Also, 
since most man-made elec- 
trical noise is vertically po- 
larized a horizontal anten- 
na exhibits a nulling effect 
which greatly reduces static 
noise levels. 

The yagi. Just as ground 
planes are used widely for 
FM work, yagis are the work- 
horse of the SSB operator. 
Most operators utilize a 
single long-boom yagi 
mounted high enough to 
clear any serious obstruc- 
tions. Even if the antenna is 
30 feet off the ground, if it's 
clear of nearby buildings, 
trees, or power lines, it 
should work flawlessly. 
Long-boom yagis are gener- 
ally 15 to 20 feet in length 
with forward-gain figures of 
roughly 12 to16dB. 

Being relatively small 
compared to its HF counter- 
parts, the main advantage of 
the yagi is that it is light- 
weight; it can be turned easi- 
ly with a small TV-type an- 
tenna rotator A single yagi 
will work quite well even 
with 10 Watts, but usually 
the more serious operators 
or EME (moonbounce) en- 



thusiasts stack their yagis in 
large arrays for greater gain 
and directivity. Besides the 
yagi, other antennas which 
are used on SSB to a lesser 
extent are col linear arrays 
and quads. 

Omnidirectional antennas. 
If it is not feasible to erect a 
beam antenna due to space 
limitations, then a com- 
promise would be a halo. 
The halo is an omnidirec- 
tional, horizontally-polar- 
ized antenna which exhibits 
less than unity gain, Halos 
are quite popular with 2-me- 
ter-SSB mobile operators be- 
cause they are relatively 
small 

Another choice would be 
the squalo, which is actually 
a square halo Back in the 
1960s Cu she raft Corpora- 
tion manufactured a squalo, 
and at times they can still be 
found at hamfests and elec- 
tronics flea markets. 

Probably the best hori- 
zontally-polarized omnidi- 
rectional antenna that one 
could use would be the Big 
Wheel. As with the squalo, 
the Big Wheel was manufac- 
tured by Cushcraft back in 
the 1960s. It was very popu- 
lar due to the fact that it was 
rated at 3-d B gain, making it 
that much better than the 
unity-gain halo and squalo. 
Also, Big Wheels could be 



stacked for even greater 
gain, making them that 
much more desirable for 
those who cannot erect 
beams. Shaped like a three- 
leaf clover. Big Wheel con- 
struction articles are quite 
common in VHF antenna 
books under names like the 
cloverleaf and the turnstile 

Power 

As noted before, 10 to 30 
Watts is an adequate power 
level for working most types 
of DX on 2 meters. However, 
when it comes to attempting 
contacts on meteor scatter 
or aurora, a higher output 
power will prove beneficial 
I don't mean to imply that it 
can't be done with 10 
Watts it can! But due to 
the nature of these propaga- 
tion modes, a higher power 
level is required for opti- 
mum results. Most newcom- 
ers to the band soon find out 
that the average station runs 
somewhere in the area of 80 
to 170 Watts. And just like 
the HF bands, 2 meters has 
its share of those who run 
the full legal limit, especial- 
ly where moonbounce is 
concerned. 

Amps and Preamps 

As with mufttmode rigs, 
there is a wide variety of 
solid-state amplifiers avail- 



73 for Radio Amateurs • December, 1985 27 




Photo B. The use of transverters such as the FTV-901R, which 
is compatible with the Yaesu 901 series, is a cost-effective 
way of getting on 2-meter 5SB. 



able on the market Most of 
these amplifiers require any* 
where from 1 to 30 Watts of 
drive and will deliver any- 
where from 80 to 160 Watts, 
depending on the model 
Besides being switchable for 
SSB or FM use, most of these 
amps are also supplied with 
receiving preamplifiers 
which greatly improve the 
signal-to-noise ratio of the 
received signal For those 
operators who desire even 
higher output, there are 
many amplifier kits avail- 
able for the home-brewer, 
and to a lesser degree com- 
mercially available units 
which wilt provide a solid 
kW< 

Contrary to popular be- 
lief, most of the rigs today 
do not have hot receivers. 
Anyone who has been in- 
volved with the band for any 
length of time will tell you 
that the addition of a re- 
ceive preamplifier is a must 
For communications within 
a few hundred miles, a stock 
receiver may work just fine, 
but for weak-signal work or 
during marginal band open- 
ings, most rigs can't cut the 
mustard. The addition of a 
receive preamplifier can 
make the difference be- 
tween getting a Q5 copy on 
a signal or not hearing it at 
all. 

Preamplifiers can be pur- 
chased as small circuit 
boards which can be inter- 



nally mounted to your exist- 
ing transceiver, as separate 
enclosed units with BNC or 
S0239 connectors for quick 
and easy installation, or as 
the highly sensitive mast- 
mounted CaAsFETs, 

Propagation 

Radio-wave propagation 
on 2 meters falls basically 
into two categories, these 
being tropospheric and 
ionospheric. The tropo- 
sphere is a region which ex- 
tends from the ground up to 
about eight miles. It is here 
that most VHF propagation 
takes place and also where 
our weather is formed. Be- 
cause of this, 2-meter signals 
are greatly affected by tem- 
perature, water vapor, pres- 
sure, and, in general the 
movement of air masses and 
weather systems. Two types 
of tropospheric propagation 
that occur quite frequently 
are: thermal inversions 
which can extend signals be- 
yond 500 miles, and tropo- 
spheric ducting which has 
the ability to carry signals in 
excess of 2000 miles. 

Temperature inversions. 
Also known as thermal in* 
versions, this mode of prop- 
agation is most common to 
the 2-meter band. Tempera- 
ture inversions are formed 
when there is a reversal of 
the atmosphere's height-to- 
tem perature relationship, 
which in turn affects its re- 




Photo C Multiband, multimode capability is available in 
the VHF/UHF gear that is now available. Besides 2-meter op- 
eration, the Yaesu FT-726R is also operational on 6 meters 
and 70 cm through the use of plug-in modules. (Photo cour- 
tesy of Yaesu.} 



fractive index. Under nor- 
mal atmospheric conditions, 
there is a temperature de- 
crease with ascending alti- 
tude. However, there are 
times when the temperature 
at some point stabilizes or 
even rises with increased 
height when a layer of warm 
air is trapped between two 
layers of cooler air. This 
warm air constitutes a ther- 
mal inversion and with it 
the refractive index is in- 



ln vers ions can propagate 
VHF and UHF signals up to 
three times the normal 
range and, depending on 
their intensity, signals will 
be either weak with some 
flutter or rock solid with 
very little fading. This phe- 
nomenon is prevalent along 
coastal areas, especially in 
the spring and fall. This is 
the result of a greater tem- 
perature difference be- 
tween land and water. Al- 
though inversions are pri- 
marily a nighttime effect, 
smaller inversions often oc- 
cur just after dawn and after 
sunset, when some enhance- 
ment of the signal can usual- 
ly be noticed, 

Tropospheric ducting. The 
causes of tropospheric duct- 
ing cannot be explained eas- 
ily, but most scientists and 
propagation experts seem to 
agree that they are the prod- 
uct of wind shears, which 
are high velocity winds that 
are blowing in opposite di- 
rections to each other The 



boundary area between 
these winds has the ability 
to propagate VHF and UHF 
signals thousands of miles. 
Ducts can be very selective 
to various geographical 
areas, with other stations at 
points in between not being 
aware of its existence. In 
other words, if a duct were 
to form between New En- 
gland and Texas, stations in 
places such as Tennessee 
and Kentucky, which are 
along the duct's path, may 
not necessarily be able to 
take part in the opening. 

Ducting can continue any- 
where from a few minutes to 
a few days. It is this propaga- 
tion mode which has made 

possible QSOs between sta- 
tions in Hawaii and Califor- 
nia, which is a distance of 
approximately 2500 miles. 

ion osph er re propagat ion . 
Sporadic E, aurora, meteor 
scatter, and transequatorial 
propagation (otherwise 
known as TE) are propaga- 
tion modes that fall into the 
ionospheric or solar-related 
category. 

Sporadic £ Sporadic E gets 
its name from heavily ion- 
ized clouds that form in the 
E -region of the ionosphere, 
which is about 60 miles 
above the earth. It is rare for 
these clouds to reflect 144- 
MHz signals, but when they 
do r E-skip contacts can be 
made up to approximately 
1200 miles. The formation of 
these E-clouds is the result 
of wind shears and, to a cer- 



28 73 for Radio Amateurs • December, 1985 




EDGE 
CONNECTORS 

ALL AHE 1.56 SPACING. 




—TrTTTTTmriiTtli! 

22/44 EDGE CONNECTOR 

PC style $2.00each 

22/44 EDGE CONNECTOR 
S«4derlug Style S2-50 each 
28,'55 EDGE CONNECTOR 
PC. style $2,511 each 

10 for £22.00 
36/72 EDGE CONNECTOH 
PC style $3,00 each 

43/86 EDGE CONNECTOH 
PC.slyJe Si. 50 each 



TRANSISTORS 



2N706 
2W2222A 

PN2222A 

2N29C4 

2N2904 

2N2S0& 

MJ2955 

2N3055 

PIWD10K4Q 

TIP 121 

TIP 125 



.00 
.00 

.00 
,00 



forSt 

for St. 

for St. 

for St 

fur $1.00 

$1.50 

51 .00 

51 00 

75* 

75c 



• SPECIAL PRICE 
TRANSISTOR 

PN3569TG-92 N PN 
plashc lf#n*ji£(or 

100 for $8,00 
1000 for $60.00 

LARGE QUANTITIES 
AVAILABLE 



SOUND 
AND VIDEO MODULATOR 
FOR T.I. COMPUTER 



T.J. #UM138l-l Designee tor use wnh T.l com- 
puters- Can be used with video Sdvrcefi. Buiii-in 
A/B switch. Channel 3 or 4 selection switch 
Ope rale on 1 2 v ric . Hook-up d iagram in c luded 



$10.00 EACH 



+ DECEMBER* 
* SPECIALS* 

ALL V* WATT RESISTORS 

lDDOpcso' onevalue- $7.50 

ALL Vt WATT RESISTORS 

inOO ptsof one value $9.50 

1 AMP 50 VOLT DIODES 

IN400] TAPE AND REEL 
100 for $4.50 
1000 for $30.00 

D STYLE CONNECTORS 

DB2S PLUS 10 for SI LOO 

100 for % 100 00 

DO 2 5 SOCKET 10 foT $12.50 

100 for $110.00 

SOLDER TAIL I.C. 
SOCKETS 

24 PIN 10 for $2. SO 

100 tor $22,00 

1000 for $200.00 



SLIM LINE 
COOLING FAN 




ElnS* 99XMT62IOW 
noise fan Measures 
3H square x 1 deep 
21 csm.23tfb. 1700 ^pm 

SPECIAL PRICE . .112.50 each 



2K 10 TURN 

MULTI-TURN POT 
^— -» SPECTftOL 
B^ x #MOO 534-7161 

$5,00 EACH 




SOLID STATE 
BUZZER 



Star ffSMB-06L 
6 vdc 

TTLcOftipanble 
H-00 each 
lOforSS.OD 



±12 Vdc or 24Vdc POWER SUPPLY 



8 RA. SPEAKER 



C.T.S. Model 6B30 79 
6 ohms coil 
3.0 oi lernte magnel 
ry p ica I f e?s von a e * a nge ; 

100 -10. 000 hz 
Power ralirg 15 walls max 
□rilled to mount line 
matching- transform trs 



$5.00 each 

CASE OF 
B SPEAKERS 
$32 00 




CASSETTE MIKE 




TRANSFORMERS 




120 volt 
primaries 



$.6 volt* @ 750 ma , £ 3.00 

6volt^@150ma, $1,25 

12V.C.1. ig-2QQm?. $2.00 

16 volts @i 6 50 m b- $3-50 

16 volts @ 1 amp $4.50 

24y.c,t- © 200 ma. $2.50 

24v.c.t. @ 400 ma. $3.00 

26 v.c. t . @ 1 5 ampa £20-00 

30v.c.t.@2amps S5.00 



WALL 
TRANSFORMERS 



ad pJugdtrecii/ 

into 12D •iaz 

00! Ift! 



Dynamrt. cassette mike wtlh 
3.5mm plug arid on/oil switeh 
$1.50 EACH 10 FOR $13 50 

TWIST-LOCK 
CONNECTOR 



4 VDC® 70ma. 
ft VAC @ 500 ma, 
6 VDC ©750 ma, 

9 VDC @ 500 ma. 
12.5 VAC @ 265 ma 
24 VAC @ 250 ma 




$2.00 
$350 
£6.50 
$5.00 
$3.00 
$3.00 



MULTL VOLTAGE (g- 500 ma. 
3,4V> r 6 r ?v>Jorl2 VDC S7.50 



MINI-BOX 



Pomor»B*2t04 



Heavy-duty black 
phenolic project box wnh cover and 
screws. 2H ' X TVS X 1 '-a 
$1.00 EACH 




<^iC(& 




Same as Switcnaart #12CL5M 
5 conductor rn-Mne plug and chassis 
mount jack Twi s t-lpch s I yte i 
$2.50ySET 



LINE CORDS 



TWO WIRE 

6 16/2 SPT-1 flat 3 lor $1,00 

6 lS/2 3PT'2flal 

6 16/2 S JT round $ 1 - 25 eac h 

THREE WfRE 

6- 10/3 llai S1 50 each 

6 l8/3nound $2.00 each 
6 ■ 1 6/3 rou nd S4. 00 eac h 



COMPUTER 

GRADE 
CAPACITORS 

2,000 mfd. 200 VDC 

1V DIA x 5 HIGH 

3.600 mfd. 40 VDC 
)% DiA.x3aa-HlGH 

6,400 mfd. 60 VDC 

1%V DIA. x 4^ 'HIGH 

9700 mfd. 50 VDC 
1*»"0IA x4V;t'KlGH 

31,000 mfd. tS VDC 

T%TD(A.jc4 HIGH 
72,000 mfd. 15 VDC 
2 DIA. * 4=^ HIGH 

185,000 mfd. 6 VDC 

2V!"DlA.x4^ HIGH 



Iu.-n4 



£2 00 
£1.00 
£2.50 
$300 
$2 50 
S3 .50 
£150 



Tl SWITCHING POWER SUPPLY **^ 



&*^*%\ 



Compact, well -regulated swncJuing power supply 
designed to po^ef Texas Instruments computer 
equipment. 

INPUT 14 -25 vac @-1 amp 

OUTPUT - 12 vdc @ 350 ma. 

■ 5 vdc @ 1 2 amp 

- 5 vdc @ 200 ma. 

SIZE AW x4Vr*1\Wi high 



■M 



55.00 each 



^-%-y ■-•:.■?><■■■--.+ 



13.8 VDC REGULATED POWER SUPPLY 



-&L_ JJi 



W////W/M 

f 




These are solid stare. Iuiiy resulated 13 6 vdc 
power supplies Goth feature 1Q0% solid state 
cons? rue lion, fuse projection, and L.E.D, power 
indicator. U.L listed. 



&-& 



2 amp constant 4 a m p s u rg e 

3 amp constant, 5 amp surge 



£16-00 each 



$25 OOeacn 



D.C. CONVERTER 

3 




Dessg ned to provid e a stead y ■ 5 
vdc ^qj 2 40 ma. From a batl4fhy 
suppTy of 3:5 ro 6 25 voJts 
■> r, f x r,. . x i 

£1-50 each 



7 CONDUCTOR 
RIBBON CABLE 




Specira-strip red marker si 
26 ga stranded wire 

$5.00 per 100 roll 



RELAYS 

10 AMP SOLID STATE 



DELTRCW MODEL Q0\2/lb-l.7 
DuA I pi US a lid m i n u s J 2 Vdc ape n 
irwme powej supply. Can be uied as 
24Vdc@ ] 5 amp. INPUT: either 
1I5V.3C w 230 Vac 
Fully re^JJlaled compdffir grade supply 
7"k4^k 2^ 



$12.50 each 



10 for $110.00 






'SPECIAL PRICE* 
DUAL L.E.D, DISPLAYS 

.^SOhigt 1 , 7 segmaol L E.D.read' 
oots Mount in 24 pin DIP 
sockets. . 

M A N-e 6 40 «a nge , c .C ^5* each 

FND-5146 red.ee 7S* each 

OL-527r&d -.-:.a ?&C each 




CASSETTE 

MECHANISM 



? 



COHTROt 3 3£vdt r 7^ 

LOAP; 140 vac 10 amp' \ 
SIZE: 2Wn^x ■".. > : 

$9.50 EACH 10 EOR $90-00 





ULTRA-MINIATURE 

5 VDC RELAY 

Fujitsu # 

FBR211NED005M20 
High sensitivity 
COIL 120 ohms 
CONTACTS. 1 amp 
MtHJJUS m 14 pin DIP socket 
$1.25 each 
10 lor 410.00 

MINIATURE 

6 VDC RELAY 

Aromat#P3D-6V 
Super SmaJI 
£ PD.T. relay 
GOldcoliwir 
ContactS/ated 

1 amp @ 3D vcfc Highty sensitive, 
TTL direct drive possible. 1 20 ohm 
coil. 

Operate iram 4.3 - fi vtn; 
COIL 120 ohms $1,50 each 

17^*^ *7, h 10 lor $13,50 



13 VDC RELAY 

CONTACTS- S.PTJ.C 
1 amp (c& 1 20 vac 
Energize coil to 
open con tact 
COIL 13-vdcfcSQarims 



SPECIAL PRICE £1.00 each 

4PDT RELAY ^^ 

14 pmKH style 

3 ^rnp contact 

USED but fully 

tessed $1.? h 0esch 

Specify co*l yoJiau^ deswfed 

Either 24 vdc or 130 vac 

LARGE Q U A N T I TIE 5 AW J L A&LE- 

SOCKETS FOR KH RELAV 
75* each 

RC3TARY ACTION 
MICRO 



3Vr SPEAKER 

Bobrn 
impedance-. 
Full range 
speaker 
8 QZ magnet 
4 diagonal 
mounting cevityrs 

£2,50 each 10 tor £20,00 

SPRING LEVER 
TERMINALS 





11 



Two cofdr fz = r 

coded 

terminals on a 
slu rdy 2^ " x 

334* baHelite 
prate. 

Grea I for speaker enc losu re s or 
power supplies 
75f EACH 10 FOR £7.00 




Ne w h rtJTecjtassel 1 e m ec nan 's 1 n 
Includes record. 'pi ay E>ack arid 
erase heads 2-12VDC moio^ 
drive be^-, pullty^ .'it? VDC 
Soilernjids p»nch v/heei s ario other 
m achancaj o-ar 1 s T he se pa*- 1 s 
used on ol her current rnode!i 
decks, wouldicosr seye^a' times 
otjr £,eiimrj pnteii purchased 
separately Bund yourow^a-udu' 
ij! data recorder or use.fut spa^e 
parts t 3 * X3V x^'m 

S7 50 EACH 2 FOR $12.5-0 



MINIATURE TOGGLE SWITCHES 

ALL ARE RATED 5 AMPS @ 125 VAC 





OWK0N PC 5G3-C41 
Clockwise set ion micfo 
u^eii ni co<n operated 
mechanisms and ftiw torque 
opo rations 

RATED *>ajnps@ [2b Vat; 
£1.25 each 10 for Ml. 00 

imVA QUAN1ITIES AVAIL ABLE 



S.RDT 

(on-on) 

PC Style 
fM>n-ihreftded 
bushing 
754 each 
10 (or $7.00 

S.RD.T 
(on-off-on) 

PC style 
non-threaded 
bushing 
75* each 
10 tor $7.00 





S.RD.T. 

(on-on) 

Solder lug 
terminate 
$1.00 each 
IfJfqrSS.OO "fi 
100 for ££0.00 

S-RD.T 

(on-on) 

PC lug* 
Threaded 
bushmg. 
S l .00 each 
10 for 59.0.Q 
100 For $fl 0.00 





S.RDT. 

(on-off-on> 

Solde-r lug 
terminal's. 
£1.00 each 
tOfor$»00 
100 Tor £60,00 

D.RD.T. 

(on-on) 

Solder lug 
terminals. 
£2.00 each 

10 For $1S.0D 
1O0fpr£t^0.O0 





H 



^itf^SNAP ACTION 
W^* SWITCH 

Cherry elect. ffE-21. N of N.C 

lAcontads Suiiaoleior alarms 
and olber Jow energy circuits-: 
I'-fl UavOr 

45c EACH 10 FOR $4. JO 



STANDARD JUMBO 
DIFFUSED TIV2 

RED 1QtorS1.5Q 

100 tor $13.00 

GREErv lOloi-la.OO 
100 lor £17.00 

YELLOW 10 For $200 
10QforSt7.00 

FLASHER LED 

5 volt operalion 
rgij 1 1. mho T 1 *■* 
^ze $1.00 each 

BI-POLAR 

jumbo T l*a size 
2for$1,70 

LED HOLDERS _ 

Two piece holder 

lur |umi>OLED 

10lor€5C 100 Iqr $5.00 

CLEAR CLIPLiTE 
LED HOLDER 

Mfike LED-a lancy 
ind»cator Cfear 



D.RST, LIGHTED 

ROCKER SWfTCH 

1 1& vac lighted rocker ^ > 

snap mourns m '■' i" 

H mt* hcrff \[>f * f 

Orange lens 16 amp '-!, 1 

contaci ■T}- I J 

£1.50 %W 

MINI^PUSH BUTTON 

3.PST momientarv 
normally op u 1. 
'a crushing 
Red button. 
35« each 
tO lor $3 00 

KEY ASSEMBLY 



&■>• 



$:&'Jd 



^i/a ^, _ _^ 





DLL ELEartOflKS CORP. 



LOS ANGELES, CA STORE 
90S S. Vermont Awe, 
213 3S0-B00Q 

VAN WUYS, CA STORE 
6228 Sepulveda Blvd. 
818 997-1806 



MAIL ORDERS TO: 

P.O BOX 20406 

Los Angeles. CA 90006 

TWX - 5101010163 ALL ELECTRONIC 
EASYLINK MBX - 62887748 





TOLL FREE OftOERS ONLY QUANTITIES UMlTED 

1-300-626-5432 MINIMUM ORDER $10.00 

(ORDER ONLY) USA;$3 + 00 SHIPPING 

(IN CALIFORNIA; 1-800 258-6666) FOREIGN ORDERS: 
ALASKA, HAWAII, INCLUDING SUFFICIENT 

OR INFORMATION SHIPPING 

(213)330-8000 NO C.O.D.! CALIF RES. ADD 6Vi% 



5KEY 

S 1.00 each 
contains 5 singie-poje normally 
open^wnches iuTeas^re?? '■■ 
lung 

6 KEY 

11,25 each 
coniaios 6 smgle-pore ngrmaNy 
■::■[! vn ■-iwitclhe* Measures -t '■; 
long 

METAL OXIDE 
VARISTOR 

Popular CE * 10DLA1QA 
vans tor H oianncser 
$1 25 each 







■ 1 



When You Buy, Say 73 



*f 



73 for Radio Amateurs * December, 1985 29 



tain extent, intense thunder- 
storm activity, which pro- 
duces very high cloud tops. 

Excellent indicators for a 
possible E-skip opening on 2 
meters are TV channels 4, 5, 
6, and especially the FM 

broadcast band, which 
ranges from 88 to 108 MHz, 
Also, when skip conditions 
become extremely short on 
6 or 10 meters to within a 
few hundred miles, it is a 
good idea to begin looking 
on the band for something 
to happen. 

Although E-skip can oc- 
cur at any time, seasonal 
peaks do take place from 
June through August and 
again during December and 
January Openings can last 
anywhere from a few min- 
utes to a few hours, but 
since E -clouds are moving at 
a high rate of speed and 
their ionization density is 
critical for supporting 144- 
MHz signals, conditions 
change very rapidly. 

Finally, double-hop E-skip 
is rarer still, but it has been 
done, with contacts made in 
excess of 2000 miles. 

Aurora, Intense ionization 
of the polar regions follow- 
ing disturbed periods on the 
sun allows amateurs to re- 
flect their signals off heavily 
ionized patches or auroral 
curtains. Curtains are formed 

when solar disturbances 
emit particles which arrive 
at Earth a few days after the 
storm is first observed 
These particles then congre- 
gate at the polar regions and 
form what is known as an 
aurora. 

Since the aurora is a cul- 
mination of numerous patch- 
es of intense ionization 
which are in constant mo- 
tion, VHF and sometimes 
UHF signals are reflected 
back in different phases 
This multi-path reception or 
phase difference causes the 
received SSB signal to have 
a whispery or sometimes 
garbled effect and CW sig- 
nals to sound like a hiss in- 
stead of a pure note. 

Auroras are common dur- 
ing the winter and summer 



144.000-144.050 MHz 
144.050-144,060 MHz 
144.060-144.100 MHz 
144.10CM 44.200 MHz 
144.200 MHz 
144.200-144.300 MH2 



EME JMoonbounce) CW 

Beacons 

General CW and weak signals 

EME (Moonbounce) and weak-signal SSB 

National calling frequency 



General SSB operation 
Note: Upper sideband (USB) mode is used. 

Table 4. 144-MHz SS8/CW band plan. 



equinoctial periods, with 
peaks generally taking place 
from 4:00 pm to 8:00 pm lo- 
cal time For obvious rea- 
sons, the mid- and high-lath 
tude states experience many 
auroral openings per year, 
but from time to time its ef- 
fects can be felt as far south 
as the Gulf states. Contacts 
are normally on the order of 
800 miles, although some of 
over 1200 miles have taken 
place. 

Auroral contacts. By point- 
ing the antenna towards the 
north a few days after a so- 
lar disturbance, auroral con- 
tacts are possible. Normally, 
CW signals are the only ones 
to be heard, but if the aurora 
is intense enough, SSB can 
be copied with signals some- 
times well over S9. 

When calling CQ on CW 
it is customary to send "CQ 
A" or "CQ AU." On side- 
band, the call is simply "CQ 
Aurora." One important 
thing to remember is that 
since SSB is received as 
whispers or even garbles, it 
is imperative that one speak 
slowly, using phonetics and 
trying to enunciate words 
properly. Unless conditions 
are near perfect; E's r T's, C's, 
D's, etc., sound an awful lot 
alike. With pure notes not 
being received on CW, re 



Year 


Tropo 


E-Skip 


1976 


4 


2 


1977 


10 


6 


1978 


5 


1 


1979 


6 


6 


1980 


S 


2 


1981 


8 


7 


1982 


7 


11 


Total 


45 


35 



Table 1. Annual breakdown 
of observed band openings 
into the Fort Worth, Texas, 
area over a seven-year pe- 
riod. 



ports are given as 59A in* 
stead of 599. 

Since the aurora is in con- 
stant motion, signal strength 
will vary from time to time 
during the course of a QSO 
Therefore, it is sometimes 
necessary to peak for maxi- 
mum signal by moving the 
antenna a few degrees ei- 
ther way. At times, a move- 
ment of 10 degrees can 
make the difference be- 
tween Q5 copy and not 
hearing the station at all. 

Meteor scatter. As men- 
tioned before, sporadic-E and 
auroral propagation are pos- 
sible through the direct re- 
sult of intense ionization. 
This holds true with meteor 
scatter also. Meteors which 
enter the Earth's atmo- 
sphere burn up, leaving 
trails of ionization which at 
times have the ability to re- 
flect radio waves, permit- 
ting contacts in excess of 
1500 miles. The length of 
time that an ionization trail 
remains intact and intense 
enough to support 2-meter 
signals is dependent upon 
the size of the meteor and 
its orientation to the ama- 
teur station. Most meteor 
bursts [or pings] last a few 



Month 

Jan 

Feb 

Mar 

Apr 

May 

Jun 

Jul 

Aug 

Sep 

Oct 

Nov 

Dec 



Tropo 


1 
1 
3 
5 
21 

7 
2 
3 

3 



E-Skip 

1 





11 

10 

9 
4 




1 



Table 2. Monthly break- 
down of observed band 
openings into the Fort 
Worth, Texas, area over a 
seven-year period. 



seconds, with a rare few ex- 
ceeding 15 seconds, Thus, 
high-speed CW is the pre- 
ferred mode although SSB is 
being used more and more. 

Meteor-scatter DXing. With 
most contacts being ar- 
ranged through predeter- 
mined schedules with other 
stations, attempting to work 
meteor-scatter DX requires 
patience and perseverance. 
Since working through ran- 
dom meteors is time corn 
suming, almost all contacts 
are attempted during major 
meteor showers such as the 
Perseids in late July and ear- 
ly August, where the hourly 
rate of meteors entering the 
atmosphere is very high. 

The operating procedures 
for working meteor-scatter 
DX are too extensive to list 
here. However, the basic for* 
mat is for one station to 
transmit during the first and 
third quarter of each minute 
while the other station trans- 
mits on the alternate 15-sec- 
ond periods. It may go on 
like this for hours until both 
stations acknowledge call- 
signs and signal reports 
Most important though, is 
that phrases such as 'this is" 
and "your signal is" be elimi- 
nated, as most bursts are rel- 
atively short. As far as out- 
put power is concerned, 80 
Watts is sufficient for mak- 
ing contacts without too 
much trouble. Surprisingly, 
many amateurs have made 
successful QSOs with as lit- 
tle as 10 Watts 

Transequatorial propaga- 
tion, Transequatoriai propa- 
gation (or TE] has been evi- 
dent on the 6-meter band for 
some time, but just recently 
over the last decade has its 
presence been felt on 2 me- 
ters. TE takes place in the F2 



i son 

Summer 
Fall 
Winter 
Spring 



Tropo 

9 
6 
2 

29 



E-Skip 

23 

1 

1 
11 



Table 3. Seasonal break- 
down of observed band 
openings into the Fort 
Worth, Texas, area over a 
seven-year period. 



30 73 for Radio Amateurs * December, 1985 



& 




CORPORATION 



2852 Walnut Ave., Unit E 
Tustin, CA 92680 
(714) 832-7770 



Conodian Distributor 

Eastcom Industries, Ltd. 

4511 Chess*«xl Di\ 

Downsview. Ontario, Canada M3J 2V6 

(416)636-7995 




ASTRON POWER SUPPLIES 

> HEAVY DUTY * HIGH QUALITY • RUGGED • RELIABLE 



INSIDE VIEW- R&12A 



RS and VS SERIES 
SPECIAL FEATURES 

• SOLID STATE ELECTRONICALLY REGULATED 

• FOLD-BACK CURRENT LIMITING Protects Power Supply 
From excessive current & continuous shorted output 

• CROWBAR OVER VOLTAGE PROTECTION on all Modds 
accept RS4A. 

• MAINTAIN REGULATION & LOW RIPPl£ at low line 
input Voltage. 

• HEAVY DUTY HEAT SINK * CHASSIS MOUNT FUSE 

• THREE CONDUCTOR POWER CORD 

• ONE YEAR WARRANTY • MADE IN U.S.A. 



PERFORMANCE SPECIFICATIONS 

• INPUT VOLTAGE: 105- 125 VAC 

• OUTPUT VOLTAGE: 13.8 VDC ± 0.05 vtfts 
(Internally Adjustable: 1M5 VDC) 

• RIPPLE: Less than 5mv peak to peak (full toad 
& low line) 




MODEL RS-50A 




MODEL RS-50M 




MODEL VS-50M 



RM- A Series 




19" X 5 1 4 RACK MOUNT POWER SUPPLIES 

Continuous 
Model Duty (AMPS) 



RM-35A 



25 



MODEL RM 35A 



RM-50A 37 

SEPARATE VOLT S AMP METERS 

RM-35M 25 

RM-50M 37 



ICS* 
(AMPS) 

35 

50 

35 
50 



SiietlN) 
HXWXD 

5M*19xl2Va 
5Vi - 19 ■ 12V* 

5% x 19 x 12% 
5* x 19 x 12% 



Shipping 

Wt. (lbs.) 

36 
50 

JO 

50 



RS-A 




MODEL RS-7A 





Continuous 


MODEL 


Duty i Amps i 


RS-4A 


3 


RS-7A 


5 


RS-7B 


5 


RS^IOA 


( 1 3 


RS-12A 


9 


RS-20A 


16 


RS-35A 


25 


RS-50A 


37 


tehable vort 


and Amp meter 




Continuous 


MODEL 


Duty (Amps) 


RS-12M 


9 


RS-20M 


16 


RS-35M 


25 


RS-50M 


37 



ICS* 
(Amps) 

4 
7 

1 
10 

12 
20 

35 
50 



Sizt (IN) 
H x W X D 

3V< X BVi x 9 

3V< X 6V* x 9 

4 « VA « TO 3 /-. 

4x7Y*x10Y* 

AV? x3x9 

5x9x10V? 

5x11 x 11 

6 x 13V4 x 11 



Shipping 
Wt (lbs) 

5 
9 

10 

11 

13 
18 
27 

46 



RS-M SERIES 




ics- 

(Amps) 

12 
20 
35 
50 



MODEL RS-35M 



SI2B (IN) 

HiWxD 

AVi x 8 x 9 

5x9x 10'/; 

5x11 x 11 

ex 13V4 x 11 



Shipping 
Wt (lbs) 

13 

16 

27 
46 



VS-M SERIES 




MODEL VS 20M 



• Separate Volt and Amp Meters 

• Output Voltage adjustable from 2-15 volts 

• Current limit adjustable from 1,5 amps to Full Load 



MODEL 

VS-20M 

VS-35M 
VS-5QM 



Continuous Duty 
(Amps) 

g13.OTCg10YX<3SVDC 
16 9 4 

25 15 7 
37 22 10 



its* 

(Amps) 
@13.8V 

20 

35 
50 



Size (IN) 
HxWxD 

5x9x 10 1 /! 

5x11 x 11 
6x 13V- x 11 



Shipping 
Wt (lbs) 

20 

29 
46 






RS-S SERIES 




MODEL RS-12S 



• Built in speaker 

MODEL 

RS7S 

RS-10S 
RSOOL(ForLTR) 

RS-12S 

RS-20S 



Contlnous 
Duty (Amps) 

5 
73 
7.5 

9 

16 



ICS* 

Amps 

7 
10 

10 
12 
20 



SJze (IN) 

HkWxD 

4 x7Hx TDK 

4 x 7%* 10%i 

4 9 13 

4 % m 8 x 9 

5x9* 10K 



Shipping 
Wl (lbs) 

10 
12 

13 

13 

18 



region of the ionosphere 

and, as far as it is known, is 
accessible to stations cen- 
tered at equal distances on 
both sides of the geomag- 
netic equator For example, 
contacts of close to 5000 
miles have been made be- 
tween Europe and South Af- 
rica and between Puerto 
Rico and Argentina 

DX: What to Expect 

As with any phenomenon, 
the mechanisms which facil- 
itate VHP DX are at times 
unpredictable. Although there 
are exceptions to almost 
every rule of propagation, 
long-term statistical analysis 
of band openings does prove 
certain things. 

Len Hoops KC5IJ pro- 
vided me with a computer- 
ized list of band openings into 
the Fort Worth, Texas, area 
over a seven-year period 
from 1976 to 1982, Once I 
categorized these openings 
according to year, month, 
and season, it was evident 



that everything I had ever 
read concerning VHP propa- 
gation was basically true, 
The numbers didn't lie. 

Keep in mind that some 
parts of the country experi- 
ence more band openings, 
especially where trope is 
concerned. As mentioned 
earlier, this is due to geo- 
graphical location (tropo is 
more prevalent along coast- 
al areas). Despite this, the 
numbers are still indicative 
of seasonal peaks. 

Looking at the annual 
breakdown of observed band 
openings, it is interesting to 
note that the number of 
tropo-DX openings was 
about the same each year, 
whereas E-skip DX varied 
quite a bit. On the average, 
KC5IJ experienced 6 tropo 
and 5 E-skip openings per 
year. (See Table 1 .) 

The monthly breakdown 
shows that June is by far the 
most active month in terms 
of DX. This is true just about 
everywhere. Spring and fall 



show an increase in tropo 
DX which was noted earlier, 
and the summer months 
clearly reveal that this time 
of year is the best for work- 
ing E-skip. (See Table 2 j 

SSB/CW Band Plan 

Table 4 shows the band 
plan for the low end of 144 
MHz. For the most part, this 
particular plan has gained 
acceptance and is adhered 
to on a nationwide basis. As 
you can see, 144.200 MHz is 
the national calling fre- 
quency, and most of the ac- 
tivity is centered here. 

Making Contact 

On SSB it is perfectly all 
right to call CQ just as you 
would on the HF bands. As a 
matter of fact, this is stan- 
dard operating procedure, 
When calling CQ, it is gener- 
ally a good idea to give your 
callsign phonetically, your 
location, and in which direc- 
tion you are beaming (if a di- 
rectional antenna is being 



used). If a vertical antenna is 
being utilized, say so during 
your CQ. This will be very 
helpful because almost ev- 
eryone is horizontally polar- 
ized and the subsequent 
cross-polarization loss is 
around 20 dB> That weak 
signal that one may think is 
DX can sometimes be a sta- 
tion 10 miles away on a 
ground plane. 

Once contact is estab- 
lished with another station, 
a move up in frequency to 
144.210, 144 220, 144.230, 
etc., is recommended. Rag- 
chewing on or very near the 
calling frequency is frowned 
upon, so it's best to QSY 
once contact is made. As for 
CW buffs, it is OK to call CQ 
on CW on 144 200 MHz. But 
once again, it is recom- 
mended to QSY once con* 
tact is made 

Activity 

When it comes to the lev- 
el of activity on 2-meter 
SSB, it is no different than 



Day UTC Ti me 



Area 



Name 



Freq 



NCS 



ALL 


LOCAL 


TIME 




IS IN 


STANDARD 


TIME 


Sun 


1500Z 


10: 


00 


AM 


NYC 


East Coast 


144-250 


Sun 


0415Z 


8: 


15 


PM 


Nevada 


NV Activity 


144.225 


Bun 


1530Z 


B: 


30 


AM 


Tucson 


Ari zona— Tucson 


144.300 


Sun 


0300 Z 


8: 


00 


PM 


Orl ando 


Sunshine State 


144,250 


Sun 


0200 1 


8: 


00 


PM 


Arkansas 


Razorback 


144.250 


Sun 


0300Z 


9: 


00 


PM 


Twin Cities 


Mi nnesota 


144.250 


Sun 


0330Z 


7: 


30 


PM 


Bo. Calif. 


SOCAL 


144.250 


Mon 


0230 Z 


B: 


30 


PM 


INDIANA 


SE Indiana 


144.250 


Hon 


0300Z 


9: 


00 


PM 


So. Tex. 


So. Texas 


144.250 


Mon 


0400Z 


8: 


00 


PM 


Spokane 


Inland Empire 


144.250 


Mon 


0400 Z 


9: 


00 


PM 


Salt Lake 


Mtn. States 


144.250 


Tue 


0230Z 


9s 


30 


PM 


Greensboro 


N. E* SWOT 


144.250 


Tue 


0300 Z 


9: 


: 00 


PM 


Rip Grande 


Republic of Rio G 


1 44 . 250 


Tue 




9: 


00 


PM 


Anchorage 


Alaska 


144.200 


Tue 


0230 Z 


8: 


30 


PM 


So, 111. 


"Little Egypt 1 


144.250 


Tue 


0300Z 


8; 


,00 


PM 


Phoenix 


Ari zona-Phoenix 


l 44 . 300 


Tue 


0400 Z 


8: 


:00 


PM 


North Count 


NORCAL 


144.250 


Wed 


0100Z 


8: 


00 


PM 


CI evel and 


N. Central States 


144.255 


Wed. 


0200Z 


9! 


: 00 


PM 


East PA 


Delaware Valley 


144.250 


Wed 


0300 Z 


9: 


;00 


PM 


IA/MO/IL 


Tri -State 


144. 250 


Wed 


0300Z 


9: 


:00 


PM 


N. Texas 


Hdqrtrs 


144.250 


Thu 


0200 Z 


8: 


£00 


PM 


Chicago 


INDY 


144.250 


Thu 


0200Z 


9: 


:00 


PM 


West VA 


Tr i pi e-States 


144. 150 


Thu 


0400Z 


8: 


:00 


PM 


South Count 


NDRCAL 


144-250 


Sat 


1300Z 


71 


100 


AM 


North Texas 


Hdqrtrs 


144. 250 


Sat 


1600Z 


B: 


i 00 


AM 


WA-ID-MT 


Inland Empire 


144, 110 


Tue 


014SZ 


8: 


:45 


PM 


MD to OH 


Activity group 


144- 170 


Fri 


0145Z 


8: 


:45 


PM 


MD to OH 


Activity Group 


144. 170 


Sun 


0145Z 


e 


:45 


PM 


MD to OH 


Activity Group 


144. 170 



EFF. OCT. 27, 

WA2SLY/WA2FXB/WA2PJZ 

WA7JUD 

N7WS/W5DXN 

WA4GPF WD4FAB KA4WWL 

NR5A f WB5JAR T WB5PNZ 

W0KRX 

WB£NQA/KF6ZB/K6PV/5 
KA8MR I 
KD5CB NB50 
KB7N 

N7BHC 

KA1LMN/4 

N5DQD/WB5YVD 

KL7JAI/KL7IKV/KL7QS/ 

NSAFL/KA9HDZ 

KB7GH 

WA&ZJF 

K8RAQ/WD8PKQ/W8FQK 

WB2BJH/WA2ADS/N3BHS 

WB05WD/WB9WMM/N9CXD 

WD5DJT KA5NGG 

KA9EJJ/KACMXF 

WB8ZTWKJSJ 

N6EI0, K9TQT f K6HXW, 

WA5DBY/K5ASZ 

W7HAH/N7ART 

M3UM 

W3WN 
I43WN 



Table 5. SWOT nets currently active. 



32 73 for Radio Amateurs • December, 1985 



AMATEUR TELEVISION 




KPA51 WATT 70 CM ATV TRANSMITTER BOARD 

• APPLICATIONS: Cordless portable TV camera for races & other public service 
events, f emote VCR, etc Remote control of R/C airplanes or robots Show home 
video tapes, computer programs, repeat SSTV \o local ATVers OX depends on 
antenna Si and terrain typ 1 to 40 miles. 

• FULL COLOR VIDEO & SOUND on one Small 3 25*4 board 

• RUNS ON EXTERNAL 1 38 VOC at 300 ma supply or battery 

• TUNED WITH ON E C RVSTAL On 426 25. 434 or 439 25 mHt 

• 2 AUDIO INPUTS for a low Z dynamic and line level audio input found in most 
porta pie color cameras, VCRs. or home computers. 

■ APPLICATION NOTES & schematic supplied for typical external connections 
pac>agmg and system operation 

• PRICE ONLY SI 59 delivered via UPS surface in me USA Technician class 
amateur license or higher required lor purchase and operation 

WHAT tS REQUIRED FOR A COMPLETE OPERATING SYSTEM? A TV set with a 
TVC-2 or TVC-4 420-450 mHz to channel 3 downconverter, 70 Cm antenna, and coa* 
cable to receive Package up the KPA5. add 12 to 14 vdc antenna, and any TV 

camera, VCR, or computer wilti a composite video output Simple, eh? 

CALL OR WRITE FOR OUR COMPLETE CATALOG & more info on aN 
downconverters. antennas, cameras, etc.. or who js on in your area, 

TERMS: Vise Mastercard or cash only UPS COD by telephone or mall Teiephons 
orders 4 postal MO usually Shipped within ? days, all other checks musi clear before 
shipment Transmitting; equipment sold only to licensed amateurs verified in 19&4 
Caiibook Cattf include sale^, tax 

(818} 447-4565 m-f 8am-6pm pst. 

P,C, ELECTRONICS 

Tom W60RG Maryann W86YSS 





2522 Paxson Lane 
Arcadia CA 91006 



We Give You VHF 
Without VHC* 

( ~ Very High Cost) 



Proseming MiciQwaua Modules, the 
IcrW'COEl way lu ruN- Injured muhi 
mode Op p ration Sri SOMhi t<w Ufa 

and 432 Mh.- 

F_Kpand yBut MF lran«ceivef scapifrii- 

(t*S fQr K*S£ < - COtf 9* a V?4f 

mutiimod* rad«c 

AH rr»QOB*5 leaiul** 

* 25 Waits Rf dtdpul 

* Low ftoe* GaAeFET fconi and 

* TranirM AtC OrCui* 

* BF sensed VOK Tfl wutef*ng 

* AM-**yte aprttjort— SSB DrV FM, 

* Easj NM* a* k> youf pre*** HF 




AVAILABLE FROM 



THE "PX" SHACK 



VHFrUHF 
EQUIPMENT 



Ivars Lauiums KC7PX 

52 Stanwyck Drive 

Belle Mead. New Jcrsev OB 502 

(?0t> 574 6013 




ftew MU7 !J-J.^aR G*A*f • 
144 Mhj "Ean sa ' tJlu t 
UePncEF 5325 OD 

[QaWMPdete filial ia| 
fftftUa 

12?a Mk. 



frpn - TOpw 



micROWAve 



A/\_™°L_ 




16 Pin Header A Mating $ockal. 
Wart WT/PC 

156' Centers 5/1.00 

Crystal Clock Oscillator 50 

Miniature Speaker, 2", 8 OHM . 50 

Colli Far Radio Elect Fab- 94 TV 

Project, Toko »'S T-1, T-2, LI {12uH* 

L 2 |071uH| Com plan Sal Of All 

4 Cotli ... 8.SO 

MCI 330- Prime (Mo to) 2/tOO 

8FOtS5 Transact T 50 

0*4cC*jk 001u1 20/rOO 

7*123 Prime in all 3M OO 

470wi35VtRaaaJY 3/1 00 

«70*a i6Vi*jl1' 4/100 

2N3SCW 107100 

2N3305 10/100 

IN914 40-100 

1N414& 40/100 

1N523lB(5tV.Zer>er Dtodet 5/100 

Voltage Regu latent (Pf i rm? TO- 2 20) 7BD5. 
781 2 762*. 7905, 79 12- Mu o* Maich-3/ \ 00 
Mica I nsu lators For TO-220 PfcQ 20/ 1 00 
Voltage f?eg's (LLvnarked, 60% Pnmel May 
Include Posr1<ve7Neg & Adjust I 5/ 1 00 

/ a LOO tfotl age Reg [DM lOfi .TO- 92 1 J0/1 00 
PN2222A 20/1 OO 

.'N1G55 50 

; j n^Q8 20/100 

15 Cam (.15* PerlCTTL 
/4Q3 7442 74126 

7404 7450 74151 

741G 7474 74163 

7437 7476 74365 

7436 7495 74393 

7440 74107 

15 C«nl (1 5} Par IC 74LSXX 
74 L 902 74LS32 ?4LSl56 

74LS05 74LS74 74LS2S7 

MLSlO 74LS86 74LS257 

74LS20 74tSl53 74L5273 

20 C**t t 201 Par IC CMOS 
4001 B. 401 10 A050B 
MC838rDTij 10/1 OO 

Optoi9obtar|HtiG2-6PlhtD«Pl5pec& 40 
27lbtorr>m 145 

2732Eprom 195 

?764Epfom 2 45 

27128EPROM- 4 95 

256 K Dram 1 50ns Prune Hitachi I Ideal For 
Mac MMrades4 Expansion Pfojectai 4 95 
8243 (I/O Expander IC) W/Spaca 2 95 

UDN 6 1 18 lOiSplay urnMf "C Specs* 65 
1/DlH 6 T 28 95 

UCN4 1 168-Osc/Freq Dry Goo PC-Spac&5/1 
UCr4 480 H8Cr>anBf Mo4 L alch/ Of iver^ 1 00 
LM339 45 

LM^80tULN2280> 45 

555 Timers fTTJ 4/1,00 

N 1 55S ( Dual Timer Motoj 50 

741JOtJAmpfM^n^D^pHJFtelPkq| d/ 1 QO 
LM 13 10 I Unmarked Tested Pnmel 50 



t MI8R9 
LM39O0 
aM/F'M Radio 



4b 



IC f If 92 04 IrV/Specs-Holjttyi 

tS/lJOO 

ic Sockets 
SPIN/ 07 14 PIN/ 13 18 PIN/. 15 

18 PIN/ 17 20 PIN/ 19 22 PIN/ 21 

24 PIN/ .22 28 PIN/ 24 40 PIN/ 39 

7 Segment DtSpfayl 3 Common Cainf 1 'j 

7Segmern Di^piayi 6 Common Anm 55 
TnSfaleLEOs 3r ■ 00 

Jumbo Red IED vDirtusetl Lens, Prime iT^ 
AM 100** P^mr *5/tt , 100/S6 1 0007*57 50 
LED Maunling Dips. $ R*i05 15/100 

Te*as Inst/e 994 A KeybC^Cklnc/OaU Fpr 
Pma Made When Eacit Key Depressed 495 



2/100 

4/100 

30/100 

30 Feet/ 1 00 

50 Feet/ 1 00 

SO Feel/ 1 OO 

100 



D»p Swiicn* 1 2 Position 

Dip Sw<lcf>S Posihon 

Keytxwrd Push Button Tops 

Audio Cable 

2 24 WG Wre 

ZTAWG Wife 

Mini LubfPC*1o'f& Luprrcant] 

Mok=* PinW PvVStnp) 1 00/S2 500/S4 l f(/58 

Clock Modure-Crysrai ConiroOeo, Ceen 

Display/ 1 2 VDC/time 5el Swl dies/ Data-4 95 

Rotary SwttcMS Position. 5A 125Vt 3/t 00 

Giant Alph* Numeric Display I 1/2 X 2 

7X5 j 35 Total) Red LED Maln*/Spe<:s-4 95 

11 LEO Bar Graph Display-2-1/4 Ract 

LED r s|SpecifyRod.Grn.Amb) Specs. . 2 69 

Sevan Amp (7) ripped Transform arCan Be 

Wi red Fo« ( 7 5V.9 V. 1 5V, 1 8 V) Reg Shpg 



luu Transformer -24V 525mA 
i 2A rranslQimer 



Wan Plu 

6^3V 

1?V Center Tap Transformer 

Mim Audio Transformer % 

1N4007 

1N5059(200V 1 Ampi 

i N5060 i 400V 1 Amp] 

Zerw Diodes 20^ t W 

Zener Diodes 1 3V I W Glass 

256GOKCCry%!ji 

3 579545 Color Bur si Crystal I HC- 1 8| 

l MfU CfysiaJ 

6 MtM Crystal 



8,95 

i 50 

l ,»tj 

25C 

10/ 1 00 

20/100 

15/100 

10/100 

30/100 

30/ 1 00 

50 

50 

1 95 

• 15 



TO-5 Heal Sinter Bern* 10^1 00 

TO- 18 Heal S#nmi Bemj tO/ioo 
Super Sul>Mmi Ceramic Caps I AH lOOV) 

00l5ur 100VI152» 30/100 

0022irt 100VilB2t 30/100 

002 7ut 1 00V (2. 30/ 1 00 

0033UI 100V f 332i 30/100 

0039u1 1 00V (392) 30/ 1 00 

0O56uJ 100V (5621 30/ 1 0<J 

0062uf 100V 18221 10/ 1 OO 

4 7ur40VLylii;|ParJial) 20/100 

47 oi 25V Lyte: |R»diai| 1 0/ 1 00 

tOOOuf 18SV Twnt Lock 100 

3200ur 50V (Ideal Fo* Power Supplies)- 1 00 
56O0uT25V|CtirTUjGrade3-5/g X1|-3/1 00 

1ul50VMunohthrc5 . .10/1,00 

2 2 ut 50 V Monohlhira, , , 20/100 



0*p CapS-Se' v 1 * 2 Latf* i 7 1 3 3p* ? 00 
33uf lOOVDipMytv 10/1 OO 

1 000 PC Resistor Ass 1 1 30 Values) 1 12 W-S3 
Pots- 1 Meg. Linear Tapaf .. 5/100 

Moi ion Delecto* Bds 1 1 nc IC- >2} 7/ T O.OO 
Mot Del i[lCOnJy'ULN2232A) 3/S2-2O/10 00 
Proieci Bo*/Lfd For Detector 195 

Mi niaturfi Speaker For Deteclor 25 

E* tensile Construction Ariiclfl For Det Si 
TV Knobs 15/1 00 

Ammeter {0- 1 5 AC Amperes] 4.95 

Vol l/OHM Meier MVMNT (0-lK OHM. 
O300V) 295 

6VM Feature Gear Motor 50 

RF ChokeS-1 SuK, 6 2ur\ 1 2uK 22uh-l 0/1 00 
22/44 Pin Edge Card Connector . 50 
34 Pin Connector (FrjrQrrv«S)W/Hood 75 

6NC "T Cormectoi ( D&274 \ 95 

Mured Connedor Ass' t 1 0/ 1 00 

) SAMP 50V Bridge iGl TO-5 Pkg) 50 

25AMP 2O0VBfidgaiSo1oaT LmTemi 1 50 
Zenrtn TV RaplecamenttC Special $t Each 
22H2. 221 43, 221-45. 221-48. 221-69 
221-79 221-87.221 96. 221 -104. 221- 105. 
221-106. 221-140 

2SO900 f Honz Oulpui W; Damper t>od^2 95 
29C1 1 72B(Tosh4>Hoftf Output Transf-i 95 
Wtney^io 4 Bay Bdwtw UHf Anienna- 1 9.50 
fC Storage (Bug; Bot iHotts) 30 iCs-i 75 
Precision (MuMr-Turn) Tnm Pola (CopatK 
100 OHM. 500 OHM fn, 2K 5K, \GK 20K, 
50K 10OK20OK 50OK, 1M> 85 Eacri-a'Sa 
PlhvFr-lOVHc#Ml|Slr>g*eTurTi|Tnmnian 
100 OHM. 1K> (OK. 25K50X 10OK 4/Sl 
Heat Sefisitwe Sw itcrv 1 50 C 1 0/ \ 00 

Mi»ed CoH Ass r 10/1.00 

Bufzers 3/100 

Chip Resistor f 6 6 K} 20/ T OO 

Chip Resistor l* / K) 20/ 1 00 

Chip Cap 1 330 pf) 20/1.00 

JumbO Red LED W/Bmlt In Resistor 30/ El 
MRF901lHDbbyGrarie-6<?k.GQQdj 10/1.00 
IC Ass \ i M obby G rade, Some Mar keo>30/S 1 



20Cent(.20)74SCXX 
Series Special 

• Octal (nlariaca Circuits 

• Equivalent To 74L5XX Serial 

• Low Powar I SO CMOS Technology 

• Short Propagation Delay 
- improved Nwie Margin* 

• Nloti CuiranL Sink/ Source Capability 
^*SC V37-1 Of 8 l nverted Oecodet Latched 
r4SCi38-t Of 8 inverted Decoder 
J4SC139-1 Of 4 irrwened Decoder 
74SC237-1 Of S Non tnveded Latcned 
r4SC238-t 0*8 Non inifeded 
MSC239-1 Oi 4 Non inveded 
74SC240-Ociai Burter/Line Driver in* 
?4SG24t-Octal Butter/Line Dnver-WI 

f 4SC244 Octal Butter/ Line Dmnw-N/I 
74SC245-Octal Bus transceiver Non i 
?4SC373-Tran9oarenl Latch -Npn/tnv 



/4bC3'4-D Type flip- Fiop Norvi'-. 
'4SC533 TraBSparent Latcti tnver led 
74SC534D Type Htp Flop, invened 
/4SC540 Oclal Buffer/ Line Driver inv 
74SC54 I Octal Butter/ Line DrtveiN/l 
74SC583- Transparent LaTch invened 
74SC564 D Type Rip- Flop. Inverted 
/4SC573- Transparent Lalch. Nonylnw 
r"4SC574^D Type Flip- Flop, Non/ Inv 

u.ti.i Eii r* foj Ail Above n s 2 c jC 



Cypher IV Micro-Controller KH $129.50 

■ 1 MHz. 8B«r Micro processor 
cNAT 1NS6073J 

* Conliol Basic Inlerpreter On Chip 

* AulO-Slari Operation At Powef On 

• Fast 18 BM MuJhpJy And Divide 

* RS-232. Supports CRT S Senal Link 

• 24 Be Directional I/O Lines l8255Aj 

• RAM Memory 2 k £ipanoabif To 16K 

• Epson Memory EipandableTo II w 

* Built irv Eprom Pf ogra^nmer 

■ Pan rCeniro™« Pnnier interlace 

■ Optional Real Time Clock w Backup 



Pi* TV Hiroware Instaltation Rft Bio* Out 

Allow A* t2 95 * *3-50ShiPP">g Pe* Un.t 

All K*ts Contain 5 F Connectors fOO lo 

OHM Balun JOOOMM T&nn»naJ BtoCk2Ft 

75 OH M Patch Cord 2 Ft 300 OHM T*m Lead 

H/ion Capie Ties And UHF Antenna 

Modal *4124 %1 95 includes AH Of 

Trvf Above Fnus25 Feet Coa^di CaPle And 

Mounting Hardware For Indoor wait 'Ceiling: 

iniTatlation 

Modal e4880-S2 95 includes Ail OI 

Tne Aoove Plus 25 Feet Coana' Cattle And 

Aftmctrve EjrpanrjablB Pote/U-Botf For 

Eaay tndoor msraiiation 

Modal *4845 %Z 95 includes Ail Ot 

ffiH Above Plus 65 Feet Coaiual Cable Anrl 

AH Necessary U- Bolt Hardware 



model 705 Digital Multimeter 



W: vci*ei 
AC Yoilmy 
PC Cunwif 

AC Curmrtl 



one* t«w 



idghVIo iooov 

100^V lg 75CV 
0. 1 HA IQ * QA 
0.1 P* l« 10* 
D tfi Id 20MB 

laF ic »+* 



51 



95 



UHF-TV PREAMP 

lAs featured «n Radio Electronics March/ 
May Articles. lBft2| 

Thu rn#mpe/?snre an/enna mdun/ed pre' 
amp can add nxve Than 25 dB o' pam fo 
four lysfe/n Lofs of sahsfied" cusrpme^s 
and imp*** orders fd# tfus high quabfy * t f 
wfMCh rnc'udes a/r component parts PC 
3D Cii# Power Suppry and Safu/rJJ4 50 
Assembled l/ersKW? 15 7 50 






MICRO MART ««|HS ViS4 MC and telephone COO 5 Minimum order *10 00 Strung— 
US orders. %2 00 Canada and other countres S3 50 l»nciudes ins I Shipoing rate adfusted whert 
applicabJe NJ lesidenn add 9% sales lax. 

MICH-MIT • m CEITWi hit., IfSTFIIlJI, U ITOM • |»1) fi 64400ft 



Cushcraft Corporation 
PO Box 4680 
Manchester NH 03108 

Jaybeams from: 
JASCO International 
PO Box 29184 
Lincoln NE 68529 



V- J Products J nc. 
505 E Shaw 
Pasadena TX 77506 

Dafwa USA t IflC* 
1908A Del Amo Blvd, 
Torrance Ca 90501 

Arcos (kits) 
Harold Bramstedt 
6104 Egg Lake Road 
Hugo MN 55038 



Antennas 

KLM 

PO Box 816 

Morgan Hill CA 95037 



Amplifiers 

Henry Radio 

2050 S. Bundy Drive 

Los Angeles CA 90025 

TE Systems 

PO Box 25845 

Los Angeles CA 90025 



Austin Custom Antennas 
RFD #1 , Tenney Road 
Sandown NH 03873 

F9FT (Tonna from France) by: 
N&G Distributing Corporation 
7201 NW 12th St 
Miami FL 331 26 

Communications Concepts 
2648 N. Aragon Ave* 
Dayton OH 45420 

Mirage Communication Equipment 
PO Box 1000 
Morgan Hill C A 95037 

Tokyo Hi Power Labs by: 

ENCOMM inc. 

2000 Avenue G, Suite 800 

Piano TX 75074 



Janel Laboratories 
33890 Eastgate Cir 
Corvallis OR 97333 

Radiokit 
PO Box 4115 
Greenville NH 03043 



Preamps 

Advanced Receiver Research 
PO Box 1242 

Burlington CT 06013 

Hamtronics, Inc. 
65 Moul Road 
Hilton NY 14468 



operated by Johns Hopkins 

University's Applied Physics 
Laboratory in Laurel, Mary* 



Table 6. Some of the major manufacturers of 2-meter SSB equipment. Brochures and cata- 
logs are available upon request 



The WB21EY beacon. 
Sponsored by Tom Rich- 
mond WB2IEY and the Roch- 
ester New York, VHF Croup, 
this beacon is also opera- 
tional 24 hours a day on 
144,051 MHz. Located in 
Naples, New York, in grid 
square FN 12, the beacon 
runs 3 Watts to a pair of Big 
Wheels. 

The WB2RJL beacon. The 
WB2RJL beacon has been in 
operation since August, 
1984, It is a 24-hour-a-day 
beacon on 144.055 MHz. 
The beacon is located in 
downtown Winter Park, Flor- 
ida, a suburb of Orlando, in 
grid square EL 98, and runs 
20 Watts to a pair of stacked 
Big Wheels Reception re- 
ports can be sent to Chris 
Johnson WB2RJL 



any other ham band — it has 
its up and down periods 
Generally speaking, 90% of 
all activity occurs between 
6:00 pm and midnight local 
time, and to a lesser degree 
from 8:00 am to 1 1 :00 am lo- 
cal time. But don't be fooled! 
Unfortunately, many opera- 
tors leave their rigs sitting on 
144.200 MHz and listen to 
white noise when the band 
may be open. Whether it's 
three in the morning or three 
in the afternoon, one cannot 
assume that the band is 
dead You have to make 
calls to get results. 

In addition to the SWOT 
nets listed in Table 5, there 
are many localized VHF 
cfubs which sponsor activity 
nights with nets open to all 
amateurs. One of the nicer 
things about the SSB portion 
of the band is that there is an 
even mix between rag-c hew- 
ers, VHF DXers, experiment- 
ers, home-brewers, and the 
like It is basically a band of 
moderate activity with plen- 
ty of elbow room for every- 
one. Splatter and QRM are 
almost nonexistent except 
for the busy periods of VHF 
contests, when everyone 



seems to come out of the 
woodwork And when the 

band cooperates with a 
good E-skip or tropo open- 
ing, 2 meters sounds much 
like 20 meters, minus the 
foreign DX of course. 

Referring to the seasonal 
breakdown, it is evident that 
spring is the best season for 
DX, Although the numbers 
of band openings for fall 
and winter are much lower, 
they do prove that tropo 
and E-skip can occur at any 
time. [See Table 3 J 

Over this seven-year peri- 
od, KC5I) worked 32 states 
via E-skip and 20 states via 
tropo for a total of 35 differ- 
ent states worked. His equip- 
ment varied over the years, 
but generally speaking he 
ran about 200 Watts of pow- 
er with antennas that in- 
cluded an F9FT yagi and a 
20-element col linear array. 

Normal Range 

The normal range of 
2-meter SSB and CW de- 
pends upon many factors 

such as terrain, antenna 
height antenna gain, power, 
etc. However, most will find 
that their range under nor- 



mal band conditions is on 
the order of 150 to 200 
miles, DX contacts are usu- 
ally referred to as those ex- 
ceeding 500 miles. 

Propagation Beacons 

As is the case with 6 me- 
ters and 10 meters, beacons 
are operational to assist am- 
ateurs in determining band 
conditions and to aid the 
beacon's operators in the 
study of radio-wave propa- 
gation, which is dependent 
on listeners' reports. There 
are currently three operation- 
al beacons in the US, with 
more in the planning stages. 
Amateurs are encouraged to 
monitor the beacon fre- 
quencies from 144.050 MH/ 
to 144 060 MHz and to sub- 
mit reception reports which 
will in turn allow propaga- 
tion phenomena to be better 
understood. 

The W3VD beacon. The 
W3VD beacon is operation- 
al 24 hours a day on 144 052 
MHz. The beacon, which is 
located between Baltimore, 
Maryland, and Washington, 
DC, in grid square FM 19, 
runs 25 Watts to a halo an- 
tenna at 30 feet W3VD is 



Sidewinders On Two 

In 1976. the need for an 
organization to promote 
2-meter activity on SSB and 
CW became evident, much 
like the SMIRK organization 
for 6 meters and 10-10 Inter- 
national for 10 meters. Two- 
meter FM repeaters were 
threatening to encroach 
upon areas that were being 
used by SSB operators. The 
frequency used back then 
was 145.100 MHz, and a 
new section above this fre- 
quency was being autho- 
rized for more repeaters* 
The opening of the band be- 
low 145 MHz to 144 MHz to 
Technician-class licensees 
caused the national calling 
frequency to be moved 
from 145.100 to 144.200 
MHz. Prior to this, only high- 
er-grade licensees were al- 
lowed to work in the area 
around 144.100 being used 
for DX work on SSB and CW. 

The SWOT organization 
was formed March 28, 1976, 
by four Fort Worth, Texas, 
amateurs: K5ASZ, WB5MEV 
(now KB5SV), W5ARR, and 
W5JTA (now KC5IJ), The 
charter members signing at 
this time were given num- 



34 73 for Radio Amateurs • December, 1985 



WANTED: 

OLD 
THINKER 

TOYS. 

CW Communications, ComputerLand and 
The Computer Museum invite you to send in 
your early personal computers, software, and 
memorabilia — you could win a free trip to 
The Computer Museum in Boston 




Your old, dusty 41 thinker toy" may now be 
ready to become a treasured museum piece. 
The Computer Museum in downtown Bos- 
ton — an international museum dedicated 
entirely to computing — is searching for the 
very best and most unique relics of the per- 
sonal computer revolution. 




Computer- 
Land, CW 
Communica- 
tions, and 
The Com- 
puter Museum 
are working to- 
gether to bring 
these early relics 
out of your attic 
and into the 
collection of 
The Computer Museum. The museum is es- 
pecially looking for kit machines, proto- 
types, programs, output, newsletters and 
memorabilia of early computing from 
around the world* A selection of the finest 
items will be used to create an exhibit on the 



evolution of personal computers and a cata- 
log highlighting the 
Museum's collec- 
tions. If your sub- 
mission is accepted 
for addition to the 
Museum collection, 
you will be invited 
to the grand open- 
ing of the exhibir 
and will receive a 
bound edition of 
the catalog. If your item is selected as one of 
the five best "finds", you will also receive an 
all-expense-paid trip to Boston for the grand 
opening party. 





So, get up to the attic, 
down to the cellar and 
into your closets, and 
tell us what you find! 
Call or write the Muse- 
um for an official entry 
form, or send a photo 
and description of your 
items by March 1, 1986 
to: The Computer Museum, Personal Com- 
puter Competition, 300 Congress St., Muse- 
um Wharf, Boston, Massachusetts USA 
021 10, (617) 426-2800, Telex: 62792318. 



ComputerloncJ 



The 

Computer 
Museum 





CUT CCMftMUNIC ATtONS 1WC 



Entries will be judged on significance, rarity, date, complecness and condition, Items particularly sought include pre-1980 machines, 
early serial numbers (get those number Ts out), machines made for purchase outside of North America (even modern machines are 
suughr in this category ); first releases or software such as first releases of operating systems, languages and mass*marketed and original 

applications; and prt-1980 photographs., [K-wsk-trcrs, ma n ua U and othei records, The Computer Museum is t i private non*profil 
l-Jlil iiiumal insrirution All donations are tax^deductible according Cq the provisions of Hie Jnrcrn.il Revenue Service, Thinker Toyis i^ 
a registered trademark of George Murrow & Murrow Designs, Inc. 



"When You Buy, Say 73 



n 



73 for Radio Amateurs ■ December, 1905 35 



bers 1 through 26, with lots 
cast by the organizing com- 
mittee for the first four num- 
bers. W5ARR was to be 
chairman, WB5MEV trea- 
surer, K5ASZ net manager, 
and W5JTA secretary, W5JTA 
also started a newsletter 
called the SWOT Bulletin; 
the first issue appeared in 
April, 1976 ( and it has been 
published at least 10 times a 
year ever since. 

The purpose of the club 
was to promote 2-meter SSB 
and CW with an emphasis 
on a study of DX propaga- 
tion. DX has thus become 
the leading interest of the 
members. Nets were orga- 
nized starting with the Fort 
Worth area managed by 
K5ASZ, and W5JTA (KC5IJ) 
extended the nets nation- 
wide. SWOT now has nets 
coast to coast, some with 
only a few members and 
others with as many as 50 
check-ins per meeting, (See 
Table 5J 

Membership in the SWOT 
organization is open to any 
2-meter operator authorized 
to use the band. Those who 
have worked two SWOT 
members become full mem- 
bers, while others may also 
join and become full mem- 
bers upon furnishing the 
callsigns and SWOT num- 
bers of two members worked. 
Application forms appear in 
each issue of the SWOT Bui- 
letin, although this form is 
not required. 

The dues are $5 00 with- 
out the Bulletin and $10.00 
with it. Renewals are the 
same except that family 
members, where extra mem- 
bership lists are not needed, 
will be $500 Applications 
can be sent to Howard Hall- 
man WD5DJT, 3230 Spring- 
field, Lancaster TX 75134 
The current membership in 
SWOT is over 2700 — with 
Canada, Bermuda, Europe, 
and all of the USA repre- 
sented. 

The SWOT Bulletin. 
which is now edited by Harry 
A. Arsenault K1 PLR, 704 Cur- 
tiss Drive, Garner IMC 27529, 
is a very informative publi- 



cation that the SSB/CW en- 
thusiastshouidn'tdowithout 
The Bulletin includes mem- 
bership activity reports, net 
updates, construction arti- 
cles, swap and sell items, 
new member listings, bea- 
con information, upcoming 
contests, VHF/UHF confer- 
ence information, schedule 
requests for meteor-scatter 
operators, and from time to 
time some very interesting 
propagation notes written by 
Emil PocockW3ER 

A certificate for working 

10 or more SWOT members 
is available. Fifteen more 
contacts gets a "Worked 25" 
seal and other endorse- 
ments are made in steps of 
25. Some members have 
qualified for over 350 SWOT 
members worked 

Each year a contest is set 
up for working other SSB/ 
CW stations, the rules of 
which are published ahead 
of time m the major ham-ra- 
dio magazines Jerome 
Doerrie K5IS of Booker, 
Texas, is the awards and con- 
tests manager. 

Grid Squares 

In order to stimulate ac- 
tivity on the VHF and UHF 
bands, some years back Eu- 
ropeans devised a QTH Ken- 
ner System , whereby the 
continent was divided up in- 
to grids which were deter- 
mined by longitude and lati- 
tude. With each grid and 
specific geographical loca- 
tion within the grid having 
its own alphanumeric desig- 
nators, the exact location of 
a station could be deter- 
mined. In time, collecting 
different grid squares be- 
came a popular competition 
on the bands. 

Unfortunately, the num- 
bering scheme utilized in 
this particular system could 
not be adopted for world- 

wide use. However, the 
Maidenhead Locator system 
has solved this problem, 

The first area defined by 
the Maidenhead system is 
the 20° X 10° field which is 
designated by two letters. 
This field is then broken 



down into 100 2° x 1° grid 
squares which measure ap- 
proximately 100 X 70 miles 
in size and are indicated by 
two numbers. To indicate lo- 
cation more precisely, two 
additional letters are used to 
indicate the 5' X 2.5' sub- 
square which is roughly 4 X 
3 miles in area. 

For example, the full loca- 
tor number for my QTH in 
South Philadelphia is FM 
29 JW. For on-the-air ex- 
changes, it is general prac- 
tice to give only the first 
four characters, or in my 
case FM 29. 

On January 1, 1983, the 
ARRL introduced an awards 
program called the VHF/ 
UHF Century Club Award 
(or VUCQ which involves 
the Maidenhead Locator, 
For 2-meter operators, it is 
required to confirm 100 dif- 
ferent grid squares to quali- 
fy for the award. (See Fig. 1.) 

Mountaintopping 

Except for contest week- 
ends, mountaintopping hasn't 
really caught fire here in the 
United States as it has in Eu- 
rope. Heading to the hills to 
put new grid squares on the 
air is commonplace amongst 
the VHFers abroad. It is 
hoped that more Americans 
will start heading for the 
hills, too 

Contests 

There are four major VHF 
contests sponsored by the 
ARRL that generate heavy 
activity on the SSB and CW 
portions of 2 meters. These 
are the VHF Sweepstakes in 
January, the June VHF QSO 
Party, the September VHF 
QSO Party, and the 2-Meter 
Spring Sprint which was held 
for the first time in April of 
1983 With many stations 
heading to hills and moun- 
tain tops for that extra edge, 
contests are the perfect time 
to go hunting for those 
needed states, counties, grid 
squares, etc. Rarely does a 
contest go by without some 
sort of opening taking place 



which turns the band into a 
frenzy that is unlike any- 
thing you've ever heard. 

Suggested Reading 

As noted earlier, my main 
intention was to inform the 
reader that there is activity 
on the SSB and CW portions 
of 2 meters and to introduce 
the Sidewinders On Two or- 
ganization. It was not my 
plan to delve into the techni- 
cal aspects of equipment 
antennas, and propagation, 
but instead to give a very 
brief overview on these sub- 
jects. I hope I have suc- 
ceeded. As for further read- 
ing and research, there are 
many excellent books on the 
market that the 2-meter en- 
thusiast shouldn't do with- 
out 

A few of these are the 

VHF Handbook for Radio 
Amateurs by W9EGQ and 
W6SA1, the ARRL Radio 
Amateur's Handbook, the 
ARRL Operating Manual 
and the Radio Society of 
Great Britain VHF, UHF Op- 
erating Manual by G3RPE 
and G6jP. 

One Final Note 

Two-meter SSB is re- 
garded by some as uninter- 
esting or even boring. True, 
it is not for everyone. But 
sooner or later the patience 
and perseverance of those 
who frequent the band pay 
off with tremendous band 
openings which make it 
seem all worthwhile. There 
is no comparing the elation 
of working VHF DX to DXing 
on the HF bands, as the 
propagation on HF is just 
too predictable. 

Just ask any 2-meter SSB 
convert It is much more sat- 
isfying to crack the pifeup 
for the South Dakota station 
on 1000-mile E-skip than it is 
to work that HV on twenty 
If you don't work the HV 
from the Vatican, he may be 
back again tomorrow, But if 
you don't work the South 
Dakota station on 2-meter 
E-skip well, you get the 
picture! ■ 



36 73 for Radio Amateurs • December, 1985 



LIMITED ANTENNA SPACE? 
B & W OFFERS SIX SOLUTIONS ! 



Barker & Williamson offers six new mufribancf trapped 
dipoles made to fit In less space than conventional anten- 
nas. You may not have room for that dream antenna farm, 
but no longer need limit your operating to one or two 
bands These new antennas provide low SWR on every 
band making a great companion for today's solid state rigs 

• Direct feed witn 52 OHM Coax 

• 1 KWCW. 2KWPEP SS8 
m SO-239 Termination 



MOvtv 


BANDS 


LfNOTH 


FWCE 


AS- 160 


w ao 40 : METER ■ 


137 Ft 


S12^? OC 


AxS ■ 


'3l V Mt"t*5 


96 ft 


:, « 


AS-BO 


80 40 20 METERS 


78 FT 




r tft** */ W 


B0. 4Q r 15 METERS 


6d Ft 


woo 


AS ■ 40 


40. m 15. 10 METERS 


40 Fr 


129 00 


AS -20 


.' lb 10 METERS 23 Ft 


99 00 



BW 



ADD 52.00 SHIPPING* HANDLING 



ALL OUR PRODUCTS MADE IN USA 

BARKER ft WILLIAMSON 

Qua lity Com murocafion Products Since 1 932 

At your Distributors Write or Call ^^^ 

10 Canal Street, Bristol. PA 19007 

(215) 786-5581 



r 






Little Board 



TM 



$249 



The World's Least Expensive CP/M Engine 



CP/M 2.2 

INCLUDED 




• 4 MHZ ZSOA CPU, 64* RAM ZBOACTC 
4-12KEFROM 

• Mirtf. mmto nappy Confrofter 
(1-4- Drives, Single,- Oouote Density, 
1-2 sided 40/30 traefc) 

• S R5232C Serial Pom (75-9600 baud A 
75-5S, 400 baud), 1 Centronics Printer Port 

a Power Requirement ► 5VDC at .75A, 

- 1 2VDC at .05A / On board -1 Sv converter 

• Only 5.75 x 7.75 inches, mounts directly to 
a 5-1/ 4" disk drive 

a Comprehensive Software Included; 
• Enhanced CP/M 2.2 operating system 
vwqtfi ZCPR3 



• Read wvnte/tarmat dozens o* loppy 
lorrnate (BM PC-0OSv M^P^ ( OSBOfthC, 
IWCMMOW-4 

■ Menu-based system customization 
m Operator-friendry m£nU she* 

OPTIONS 

• Source Code 

• lurboDOS 

• ZA0O5 

■ Hard disk expansion to 60 me^ebytes 

■ SCSI/PLUS'" multi-master I/O 
eMpanslon bus 

a Local Area Network 

• STD Bus Adapter 




IBM- , IHw Cap . £80**, Uo% inc . 
echcla\kK:;1urt»0OS- Soft*«fr 3000. Inc 



COMPUTERS INCORPORATED 

67 East £veh/n ***,. Mountain View, CA 94041 • C41 5} 962-0230 » TELEX 4940309 



J 






a*- 



X 



OiOufcf 



Rob, WA3QLS 









j. 

w 



Paul. WA3QPX 



71 Meadow Road, New Castle, Del. 19720 302-328-7728 

Factory Authorized Dealer! 9-5 Daily, 9-8 Friday, 9-3 Saturday 

KENWOOD YAESU ICOM TENTEC 

MICROLOG KDK SANTEC KANTRONICS 
AEA. AMERITRON, AND MUCH MORE! 



Large Inventory, Daily UPS Service 



800-441-7008 

New Equipment 
Order & Pricing 

NO Sales Tax in Delaware! one mite off I -95 
SERVICE, USED GEAR INFO: 302-328-7728 



Katherine. KA3IYO 



L 



JJP 



i 



"When You Buy, Say 73" 



73 for Radio Amateurs • December, 1985 37 



Gary Sargent WB8TPD 
42J^WttlowRunDnve 
Dayton OH 45430 



One-Chip Facsimile 

We all talk about the weather; now you can see it 
on your Atari. You'll be amazed at how simple it is 



Have you ever been tun- 
ing the shortwave 
bands and encountered 
the distinctive "screech 
screech" sound of a facsim- 
ile signal and wondered 
what type of information 
was being transmitted? Very 
interesting weather charts 
and satellite photographs 
are transmitted by various 
services continuously. These 
charts will allow you to an- 
swer pertinent questions 
such as: Will it snow on 
Kamchatka today?, ts the 
Gulf Stream changing its 
path?, or Should I take my 
umbrella to work tomorrow? 
If you happen to have an 
Atari computer system 
available, using the circuit 
and computer program de- 
scribed here you will be able 
to receive and display these 
facsimile signals. The re- 
ceived charts are displayed 
on the computer's monitor 
or TV screen and are roughly 



two displays wide and three 
displays long. A joystick is 
used to scroll the screen 
around the chart 

The components of this 
system are: a good-quality 
communications receiver 
with 5SB capability, a sim- 
ple tone-detector circuit, an 
Atari 800 computer system, 
and the computer program, 
VIStFAX, 

Capabilities 

This system will properly 
display facsimile signals 
sent at a rate of 120 or 60 
lines per minute [LPM)< 
These rates (particularly 120 
LPM) are used by most com- 
monly heard stations. 

The computer samples 
each received line a nominal 
480 times and can display 
512 lines horizontally. While 
this resolution can give good 
results, it is less than 50% of 
the resolution transmitted. 
Also, gray tones are not 



used. Thus this system is 
more suitable for high-con- 
trast, large-format weather 
charts than for satellite pic* 
tures and similar charts with 
much fine detail, 

Figs, 2 through 4 are sam- 
ples of charts that I have re- 
ceived at my location and 
are representative of the sys- 
tem's capabilities. 

Receiver Requirements 

The receiver that you use 
should be a stable, good- 
quality general-coverage re- 
ceiver with SSB capability. If 
your receiver provides ac- 
ceptable ease of tuning and 
frequency stability for SSB 
voice signals, it should be us- 
able for facsimile reception. 
I have used a Yaesu FRG-7 
and a Sony ICF6500W with 
good results. 

The Tone Detector 

The tone detector is a sim- 
ple circuit that connects be- 







TO ATARI 
JOTSTfCK 

PORT 2 



' i *■ i : } 

\ 9 ■ T j/ 

COHS£CTG« 

£SC vr£> 



Fig, 1> Tone-detector schematic. 
38 73 for Radio Amateurs * December, 1985 



tween the receiver audio 

output and joystick port 2 of 
the computer The detector 
converts the facsimile tones 
to TTL pulses that the com- 
puter can use. The circuit is 
shown in Fig. 1. 

The circuit is based on the 
XR2211 integrated circuit 
used as a tone detector R1 
and C1 determine the detec- 
tor's frequency, and R2 is 
used to adjust for the sharp- 
est detail as a chart is being 
received. The LED serves as 
a simple but effective tuning 
indicator, The circuit re- 
quires only 5 volts of power, 
which is taken from the 
computer 

The parts may all be ob- 
tained from local outlets. 
The construction methods 
used are not critical I even- 
tually added a few compo- 
nents to allow me to use the 
same basic circuit for CW re- 
ception. 

The Computer System 

The Atari 800 computer 
and the VISIFAX program 
are the heart of the system 
and control all aspects of 
reading and displaying fac- 
simile charts. The program is 
written entirely in assembly 
language and is not shown 
here because of its length 
(about 30 pages}, It is a com- 
plex program that uses sev- 
eral of the Atari's sophisti- 
cated capabilities to do the 
job at hand. The computer is 
required to have 48K of 
RAM because of the size of 




Fig. 2. GOES satellite picture as copied on 8080 kHz. Major 
doud cover areas and fronts are readily observed. 



the chart. A disk is required 
only to load in the program 
An optional printer may be 
used to produce a hard copy 
of the received chart and 
was used to produce the 
charts that accompany this 
article, 

VISIFAX At Work 

VISIFAX begins by initial- 
ing for operation, which in- 
cludes setting up the Atari's 
hardware timer #4 to inter- 
rupt to sample line data and 
plot it 480 times per line or 
%0 times per second. 

Next, the program will 
check the joystick plugged 
into port one of the com- 
puter to see if the displayed 
chart is to be scrolled on the 
screen. The scrolling effect 
is accomplished by manipu- 
lating the computer's dis~ 
play list. 

Finally, the program 
checks to see if a keyboard 
key has been pressed, If so, 
its corresponding command 
is performed. 

The computer screen in- 
cludes two lines of text at 
the bottom. These two lines 
display the available com- 
mands and certain status 
information. To invoke a 
particular command, only 
its first letter must be 
pressed. Any command may 
be used at any time. The 
commands are: 

RESET: An R will start the 
process of displaying a 
chart The chart is displayed 
as received from left to right 



and from the bottom to the 
top (so most charts are 
viewed normally, . .without 
your having to stand on your 
head!}. Pressing the R again 
will reset the displayed chart 
to the left of the screen with- 
out altering the synchroni- 
zation. 

SYNC: An S will have the 
effect of displaying subse- 
quent received lines down 
the display about one-half 
inch. This command should 
be used as required to prop- 
erly center the received 
chart Most stations precede 
charts with a short period of 
synchronizing lines that may 
be used for centering. 

LINE-SKIP: An L will in- 
crement the number of re- 
ceived lines to skip between 
displayed lines. This feature 
will allow compressing of 
the received chart horizon- 
tally, fitting more of it onto 
the computer's screen. I find 
that a LINE-SKIP count of 1 
is used most often. 

MODE: An M will step 
through the three possible 
modes of operation. The 
present mode is shown on 
the screen's bottom line. 
Mode 'one" indicates that 
the chart will be received 
and the process will com- 
plete when the right-most 
line is displayed. Mode 
"cont" allows the continu- 
ous display of charts, with 
one overlapping the last. 
Mode "wait" halts the dis- 
play of any more received 
lines but does maintain syn- 





■ 



I — W^i.^ 







■I ... rt©^ 3 



"1 X&& *■* 



V h| 



}iimiiiis*ft ! 



SFAX TES' CHART 



&LDG unrigs, 




^3?, 



^€0. , 

«?„ W*G_ 



mil EASTERN OCKHOGBAPHV CENTER 

^.mQKfTlOEWirikAHiuiluAkJ I im^jlUWminjw :iJM* li( a M..-nu'hk IIJH^'HIAfiilVr <i«- JUk^niunjiJWf -itUI*' \VUm'.1t6B, irfli* "Hurt iijiirt*j 

Fig. 3, Test chart copied from NAM on 8080 kHz. A good 

example of the resolution capabilities of this system. 



chronization. This feature 
may be useful to eliminate 
unwanted sections of a 
known chart. 

PRINT: A P may be used 
to print a copy of the present 
chart on a Gemini 10X 
printer The eight-by-eight- 
inch chart will require about 
three minutes to print To 
abort the printing process, 
enter another P 

LPM: A 1 or 2 may be en 
tered to select the desired re- 
ceived LPM rate. A 1 will 
select one line per second 
(60 LPM] r while a 2 will se- 
lect two lines per second 
(120 LPM), 

Finally, the right portion 
of the bottom line of the 
screen indicates the present 
number of rows (or pixels 
per received line) and the 
amount of time between 
samples, both shown as 
hexadecimal numbers. The 
<,>,+, or - keys may be 
used to increment or decre- 
ment these values. This may 
be required to fine tune your 
computer to synchronize 
with the received chart. 

How To Use the System 

Before starting up your 
computer, make sure all car- 
tridges are removed, tf you 
have an 80QXL computer, 
hold down the OPTION but- 
ton while powering on to 
make sure that Basic is out 



of the way. 800XL owners 
will also have to load in the 
TRANSLATOR disk before 
loading in VISIFAX. After 
booting, use Atari DOS op- 
tion L to load and start your 
copy of VISIFAX. 

Fire up your receiver and 
then connect its audio out- 
put to the tone detectors in- 
put and the tone detector's 
output to joystick port 2 on 
the computer. Tune in a 
strong facsimile signal until 
its characteristic "screech 
screech" sound is of a me* 
dium pitch. Then adjust the 
detector's TUNE control un- 
til the tuning LED blinks in 
time with the audio, 

Press R on the keyboard 
to start displaying the chart. 
Use the S and R keys as re- 
quired to properly position 
the chart vertically on the 
display. Fine tune to get the 
sharpest picture. 

Except when printing a 
chart, the joystick may be 
used at all times to scroll the 
received chart around the 
display, 

Where To Tune 

By far the best facsimile 
signals at my location are 
from the Naval Eastern 
Oceanography Center 
(NAM)on 3357, 8080, 10,865, 
16,410, and 20,225 kHz, 
Weather charts and satellite 
photographs of all types are 






73 for Radio Amateurs • December, 1985 39 



The 4S0TR0N 



NO TUNERS! 
NO RAOIALS* 



ANTENNAS FROM 1WKJ0 METERS NO COMPROMISE! 



Just a few comments from our satisfied customers: 




**...! hav* o**d your 80 < 40 meter Itoiron while stationed In 
G old Un*mo Bay Cu ba a n a It workvd grei tl Dept < Of Tts s Hairy " 

■■On January 11 and 18 1 go) into the fVma^ailne ssb cont*it. 
I didn't Iry for maximum number of conflj , Rather 1 tried for 
maximum number f states. In lees thai >urs total time I 

worked 3ft a taken end Puerto iftico, that lait one fa about a 2800 
mile haul from Aurora. Colorado, 

"lot too bad for whft looks flee a bird feedar W9IEQ" 





"I Juat got my Iaotron 40 on the eir tnU has surpassed my 
wildest expectation** My first evening QSO was with KB6EUC 
and wait — my second was with HX8GOT In Columbia* South 
America. The antenna sits oa a U0 foot mast and that Is It. My 
US reports ftav* been great. 

Congratulate as oa develop big the Isotron. I am spreading the 
good word among my ham friends, I think it's a super, compact 
antenna wonaa time has finally cornel KAJQwa" 

'■About two month ego 1 bought an Uotron SO and juat recently 
got it out of tflB : and up on e Ifr-foot pole. I am really 

intrigued by it and hi id a lot of fun trying to convince other 

stations that it la ol te high* I worked California when 

it was h*i*g<ng by a iH cnn the ceiling of the shack and 

It works even belter] NEED!"' (Photo: Isotron ISO) 



sr m 



Mi 



* 



WHY NOT ENJOY THEIR OPERATING PLEASURE & GIVE US ACALL 
WE WILL LOOK FORWARD TO TALKING WITH YOU, 

-40-METER 152 95 PLUS SI 7S SHIPPING flU-MI UK if, i 45 P3u5 M 75 - Shipping 

at>-HJ Combination - SHOCK) plu> SB SU Shipping 

ASK f OR PRICES OM OTHER MODE LS 

* See review in October 7j r \9ftA 




BILAL COMPANY 

S R 2 r Box 62, Dept 91 
Eucha.OK 74342 PH: 91 ft*2 5^4094 



* 



AMATEUR TELEVISION 



NEW 70 CM ATV TRANSCEIVER 

ALL YOU NEED IN ONE BOX 



$299 delivered 

TC70-1 




»• . 




• RILL COLOR. SOUND, a LIVE ACTION just like broadcast TV. Get on this 
excitino amateur video mode at our affordable ready to go price 

• WHAT IS REQUIRED FOR A COMPLETE OPERATING SYSTEM? The TC7D fS 
dottneonverter outputs to any TV on en 3 tor receivinc Connect a good 70 cm 
antenna and low loss coa*. Plug in any composite video source you want to 
transmit: Camera VCR. computer, etc Plug in any lowZ dynamic ithc or use 
color camera mic for Standard 4.5 mHj TV sound Connect to 13.fi vdc lot 
base, mobile, or port sole See chapt 20 1905 ARRL Handbook That s it! 

m WHAT CAN YOU E>0 WITH THE TC70-t ATV TRANCEIVEft? Show (fie shack, 
projects, computer program listings, home video tapes, repeat Space Shuttle 
audio and video II you have a TVRO, repeat SSTV or RTTY, Weather Radar, do 
public service events such as parades ^naratnons, races 1 CAP searches and 
rescues, the list goes on, DX depends on antennas and terrain, typically t 
tc 40 miles. We have video compensated RF linear amps for 20 (Si 19) or 50 
i$lfl9) watts pep for greater DX 

• FEATURES: Small 7x7x2.5* Push to Look <PTL) T/fl switching GaAsfet 
down converter tunes whole 420-450 mHz band. Two switch selected video & 
audio inputs RCA phone jacks and 10 pm color camera jack Xmii video 
monitor output Over 1 watt pep RF output on one or two (add $15) selected 
crystal controlled frequencies 439 25. 434 0, or 426.25 mHz 

CALL OR WRITE FOR OUR CATALOG tor more info o* who is on rn your area We 
stock antennas, modules, and everything you need on ATV. 

TERMS: Visa. MC. Of cash only UPS CODs by phone or mail Checks must clear 
bank before shipment Price includes UPS surface shipping in cont USA. oihers 
add 3 e, = Transmitting equipment sold only to licensed Tech class or higher 
amateurs, verifiable m 1985 can book or copy ot new license 



(81 8) 447-4565 m-f 8am 6pm pst 



PX. ELECTRONICS 

Tom W60RG Maryann WB6YSS 





2522 Paxson Lane 
Arcadia CA 91006 



broadcast nearly continu- 
ously. 

Canadian station CFH out 
of Halifax, Nova Scotia, on 
4217, 6330, 10,536, and 
13,520 kHz also puts out 
good facsimile signals CFH 
usually broadcasts one or 
two charts for the first 1 5 to 
30 minutes of each hour. 

I have also heard and 
printed charts from a num- 
ber of other stations. Try 
7640, 7670, 9400, 10,400, 
12,125, 14,435, 14,5" 
14.610, and 14.737 kHz. 

Where To From Here 

Several improvements to 
VISIFAX jump to mind. A 

nice feature woufd be saving 
and restoring charts from 
disk. Sometimes a chart is 
received without proper sy n- 
chronization, resulting in a 
chart that is split horizon- 
tally, vertically, or both. An 
option could be provided 
that would allow manipulat- 
ing a received chart to 
straighten out the chart. A 
more sophisticated tone de- 



tector and program changes 
could result in improved 
charts. There is a lot of room 

for experimentation and im- 
provements I would enjoy 
hearing from anyone who 

has made any of these, or 
other, modifications. 

The Atari Editor/Assem- 
bler cartridge was used 
to develop VISIFAX. The 
source-code file should be 
compatible (with a few mi- 
nor modifications) with any 
6502 assembler you might 
happen to have. 

Where To Get the Program 

For a fee of J5.00 to cover 
my expenses, I will send you 
an Atari DOS 2.0S formatted 
diskette (containing the 
VISIFAX program in source, 
object, and listing forms), 
the tone-detector sche- 
matic, and other various 
notes, I cannot accept any 
CODs or credit cards. The 
package is available from 
me at the address given at 
the beginning of this arti- 
cle ■ 



DOCKING BOOSTER 

Converts Your HT to a Powerful 

Mobile unit 



30 or 50 watts output 
16 DB CaAs fet pre-amp 
Fits on most car doors 
Mic hang-up clip 
icom.Yaesu, Kenwood 
2 Meters & 70 cm 



*J *^&$r'- •■■ 



m**"? 






CMC COMMUNICATIONS, INC. 

5479 Jetport Industrial Blvd. 'Tampa, FL 33514 

Phone: 813-885-3996 



40 73 for Radio Amateurs • December, 1985 



e TRS-80* RTTY 




ROM- 11 6 
RTTY-CW 
TRS-SO MOD Itl/lV 

'Trodtfrn-grk of Tandy Corp. 



THE MARTIN CO. (206)653-9596 

P.O. I0X 912 MARYS VIUE, WA 90270 



SYNTHESIZED 

SIGNAL GENERATOR 



MADE IN 
USA 




MODEL 

SG-10OF 

S429 9S 

delivered 



• Covers 100 MHz lo 199 999 MHz in 1 hH* steps #Jth 
itiumbwheei diaP • Accuracy + t- 1 part p«r 10 mil- 
lion at ail frequencies * Internal FM adjustable fro-m 
to 10O kHz a! a 1 kHz fate ■ External FM input ac- 
cepts tones or voice * Spurs and noise at least GO dB 
below earner * Output adjustable from 5-500 rnV a I 
50 Ohms • Operates on 12 Vdc @ VV Amp * Available 
lor Immediate delivery • £429.95 delivered * Add-on 
accessories available lo e*1end freq range, add infi- 
nite resolution AM. and a precision 120 dfi attenua 
tor • Call of write for details ■ Phone in your order as 
last COD Shipment 

VANGUARD LABS 

196-23 Jamaica Ave. Mollis. NY 1 1423 
Phone; (718) 468-2720 




NEW* * COUNTY' 64* * NEW COUNTY 64* * * 
COUNTY' 64 COME WITH THE POWERFUL LOGGING 
FEATURES OF CONTENDER PLUS III without WAZ & 
DXCC* / PLUS A SPECIAL COUNTY LOGGING 
SYSTEM. THIS SYSTEM TAKES THE WORK OUT 
OF COUNTY RECORD KEEPING. 
OTHER LOGGING SYSTEM AVAILABLE FROM 
CRUMTRONICS ARE: 

CONTENDER PLUS II ton» di*k| , *J4.96 

CONTENDER PLUS II with USA CA 

Inntt 1/ 1 3 Pt I , ■ « • * * ■ ■ ■_* * v* m •>■ **5 -J-j 

COUNTY' M (TWO DISKl , »3I J| 

USA CA ADD ON FOR CONTENDER PLUS II 

(2 DISK* ................... #12.00 

FOR FftEE FACT SHEET OR TO ORDER WRITE 

^*t«0*, c 

CRUMTRONICS 
SOFTWARE DIVISION 

P. O. BOX G1B7 
FORT WAYNE, IN 




COD ORDERS CAL1 21S/746-036O or 219 48S271B 
CRUMTRONICS ii our name togging \% our g*m* 



K3E 



MOBILE-TO-TELEPHONE 
SIMPLEX AUTOPATCH 




Here are a few of the many good 
reasons you should choose 

HamPatch 

■ Superior construction: commercial grade 

• Highly sophisticated toll restrict 

• Automatic tape-recording facility 

• 3kJigli access; field programmable 

• Advanced digital and linear circuitry 

• FULL ONE YEAR WARRANTY 

HatttPatch is your best buy. 



For further info on this 
and our other decoding 
products, call or writer 



HXF ELECTRONICS 
Box 73. Station A 
Islington, Ontario 
Canada. M9A 4X1 

Tfel. (416] 621-3733 







Treat yourself to the D-104 Silver Eagle* 



The world renowned D-104 
stands alone as ihe performance 
leader in base station 
amateur microphones. The 
T-L'FMMIM Silver Eagle is 
also recognized lor its out- 
standing beautv. 

A h right, vibrant 
appearance reflects ele- 
gance and style, AH exteri- 
or parts plus the base and 
handle are chrome plated to a jewel- 
like finish. 




As a result of Asiatic's 50 years 
of technology, this microphone is 
also extremely versatile. 
Factory wired, St can be 
easily converted to elec- 
tronic or relay operation. 
Adjustable gain provides 
optimum modulation. 

The D-104 Silver Eagle 
will make any rig look as 
good as it sounds. For 
more information, see vour Astatic 

■r 

dealer or write. 







Astatic Corporation 

P. ( J. Box 120 • Conneaui, t M 1 44O3O-0J10 * (216) 593-ttU 

In Canada: Canadian Astatic, LTD, 

l220EUesmereRd-,Unit2 

Scarborough, < inmrio Mil 1 2X5 * (416) 29^2222 



DIRECTION FINDING ? 



* Interference Location 

* Stuck Microphones 

* Cable TV Leaks 

* Security Monitoring 




• VHF and UHF Coverage 

• Computer Interface 

• Speech Synthesizer 

• 12 VDC Operation 



* 



New Technology {patent pending) converts any VHF or UHF FM receiver into an 
advanced Doppler shift radio direction finder Simply plug into receiver's antenna 
and externaf speaker jacks Uses four omnidirectional antennas. Low noise, high 
sensitivity for weak signal detection Call or write for full details and prices. 

p)DOPPLERSYSTEMS.nSC.^ i E^har«r 8 Cg l , (M2)998 . I1M 



"When You Buy, Say 73 



i i 



73 for Radio Amateurs • December, 1985 41 



Dave Miller K9P0X 
7462 Lawter Avenue 
Niles It 6U64& 



NOAA's2mUFO 

Your weather radio is a great signal source on 145.8 MHz. 

K9POX explains why. 



No, not the kind that 
shuttled ET to Earth, 
but Unidentified Formidable 
Oscillations that can cause 
your synthesized scanning 
transceiver to always stop at 
a certain frequency There's 
a strong carrier present with 
no modulation, and it can't 
be heard at your friend's 
house just a block away! 
With all of the gadgets and 
gizmos available today 
ready and willing to present 
potential interference prob- 
lems on our ham bands 
(computers, video games, 
VCRs, etc X I recently ran 
across yet another very 



R00 



W 



i6z,*r*i 



strong source, right in the 
middle of our precious two- 
meter band. I don't know if 
anything has been previ- 
ously written on this one; if 
so, I've not seen it anywhere, 
so here goes! 

As most hams are no 
doubt aware, our federal 
government sponsors a net- 
work of very useful VHF ra- 
dio stations in the 162-MHz 
portion of the spectrum 
known as the NOAA weath- 
er radio system The Na- 
tional Oceanic and Atmos- 
pheric Administration 
(NOAA) supports these sta- 
tions with staff and funding 







I5T I-F 



16.657 



MIXER 



05 






CHANNEL 
SELECTOR 

SWITCH 



162 5* 



,<6£Q20 

XT A I 



.455 



2ND I-F 



TO 

FILTERS 

AND 

t f AMPS 



At 



162.40 



'62 475 



~~ 



i 

i 



Fig. 1. Inside a weather radio. 
42 73 for Radio Amateurs • December, 1985 



to provide excellent, up-to- 
date weather information 24 
hours a day for a given geo- 
graphical area. 

The stations are very help- 
ful to private pilots, boaters, 
the farming community, 
out-of-doors tradesmen, and 
much of the remaining pub- 
lic in general. For a while 
there was some talk of ter- 
minating NOAA weather ra- 
dio for reasons of economy 
(budget cutting), but the lat- 
est word seems to be that 
the service will continue as 
it has in the past,,. thank 
goodness. 

NOAA weather radio 
provides another service for 
those who wish to avail 
themselves of it, i.e., an 
automatic-tone-alerting fea- 
ture during times of poten- 
tially dangerous conditions. 
NOAA wilt transmit a steady 
audio tone of 1,050 Hz (for 
10 seconds or so) to auto- 
matically trigger a siren-like 
signal and/or turn up the vol- 
ume on an "alerting" model 
receiver to warn the owner 
of dangerous conditions and 
allow him or her time to 
"batten down the hatches/' 
This is obviously a very use- 
ful feature to have, but you 
must leave the radio on and 
in stand-by at all times. 



which is not a particular 
problem today with very 
low-current-drain, reliable, 
solid-state receivers. 

Now that the background 
has been sketched in, let's 
take a look at the problem 
that was promised in the be- 
ginning of the article. Most 
of the better weather radios 
(especially those with the 
alerting feature) are quartz- 
crystal-controlled units. 
Many have more than one 
switch-selectable channel, 
each crystal controlled, with 
two i-fs [high and low) each 
with crystal-controlled local 
oscillators, and all done with 
one crystal 

Being the curious type 
that I am, I had to find out 
how they did all of this with 
just one silly crystal, and Fig, 
1 is the block diagram of 
what I found out. Three of 
the weather radios that I 
have (each of different man- 
ufacture) use the very clever 
scheme of Fig, 1 and offer 
three switch-selec table 
channels on 162-55, 1 62.475, 
and 162.40 MHz. Beginning 
with the middle channel of 
162.475 MHz, a 16,2020- 
MHz crystal is used to con- 
trol oscillator Q3 by ground- 
ing the "low" end of the 
crystal itself This 16.2020- 



MHz signal is then multi- 
plied by 9 to 14581 80 MHz 
and mixed in Q2 with the 
amplified incoming NOAA 
frequency of 162.475 MHz, 
The difference signal of 
16,6570 MHz (1st \4) is then 
mixed with the original 
16 2020-MHz crystal fre- 
quency in Q5 to produce a 
difference frequency of .455 
MHz or the 455 kHz 2nd if 
The 455-kHz 2nd i-f is then 
further filtered, amplified, 
and de-modulated to pro- 
duce an audio output from 
the receiver, , , clever, eh? 

A similar scheme is used 
for the 162 55-MHz channel, 
but in this case the 16.2020 
crystal has a trimmer capac- 
itor inserted between its 
"low" end and ground. This 
has the effect of raising the 
natural resonant frequency 
of the crystal from 16 2020 
to 16.2095 MHz, which 
when multiplied by 9 pro- 
duces 145.8855 MHz, which 
is beat with the incoming 
1 62.55 MHz to produce a 1 st 
i-f of 16.6645 MHz, which is 
beat again with 16.2095 
MHz to produce a 455-kHz 
2nd i-f. 

The last channel (NOAA 
frequency 162.40 MHz) has 
an inductance between the 
"low" end of the 16,2020- 
MHz crystal and ground, 
which lowers the natural f re- 
quency. The crystal now 
puts out 16.1 945 MHz, times 
9 to 145 7505 MHz, beat 
with 162,40 MHz to produce 
a 1st f-f of 16 6495 MHz, 
beaf again with 16,1945 
MHz to produce a 2nd i-f of 
455 kHz once. again. Notice 
that the 2nd i-f is always 455 
kHz, but that the 1st i-f is 
16 657, 16 6645, or 16.6495 
MHz The 1st i-f is a single 
stage and is rather broadly 
tuned to accommodate this 
spread of frequencies. Very 
clever, indeed I 

You've undoubtedly al- 
ready noticed that the 1st i-f 
local-oscillator output falls 
in the high 145-MHz re- 
gion... right in the middle 
of our 2-meter ham band! 
That, of course, is the prob- 
lem, Fig. 2 shows the various 
possible NOAA weather 



NOAA 


NOAA 


Crystal 


Multiplied 


Channel 


Frequency 


Fundamental 


Frequency 


1 


162560 


16.2095 


145.8855 


2 


162:400 


16,1945 


145.7505 


3 


162.475 


16.2020 


145.8180 


4 


162.425 


16.1970 


145.7730 


5 


162.450 


16,1995 


1 45.7955 


6 


162.500 


16.2045 


145.8405 


7 


162.525 


16.2070 


145.8630 



AM frequencies shown are in MHz. 



Fig, 2. NOAA frequencies. 



channels (1 to 7), their actual 
frequencies, the fundamen- 
tal crystal 16-MHz fre- 
quency, and the 145-MHz 
product of multiplying that 
frequency by nine. 

As can be seen, the 2-me- 
ter product can range any- 
where from 145.773 to 
145.8855 MHz, depending 
upon which channel the 
weather radio is tuned to, 
theoretically, \ say theoreti- 
cally because the actual fre- 
quency depends entirely 
upon how accurately the 
crystal at 16 MHz is tuned in 
the individual weather ra- 
dio, I've found the crystal 
fundamental to be off by as 
muchasl kHz, which would 
translate into a 9-kHz differ- 
ence from the 145-MHz fre- 
quencies shown in Fig, 2. 
Don't be too surprised at 
this, because the error can 
be compensated for by de- 
tuning the i-f stages in the 
weather radio from the 
"standard" shown without 
much loss of sensitivity. 

As an example, suppose 
that the 16.2020-MHz crys- 
tal for receiving NOAA on 
162,475 MHz was actually 
16.2021 MHz(1 kHz higher). 
The 16.2021 multiplied by 9 
would yield 145.809 MHz, 
v\hich # subtracted from 
162.475 MHz, gives a 1st if 
of 16,666 MHz; subtracting 
16.2021 results in a 2nd i-f of 
465 kHz instead of 455 kHz. 
If the 2nd i-f chain were de- 
tuned slightly somewhere 
between 455 and 465 kHz, 
the sensitivity of the weath- 
er radio would still be quite 
acceptable, but the 2-meter 
band product would be 9 
kHz down from where you 
might expect to find it, 
You're welcome to calculate 



the rest of the possibilities 
for yourself if you wish. By 
the way, the formula for 
determining the crystal fre- 
quency is: Crystal Frequen- 
cy = {Receive Frequency — 
.4551/10. All frequencies are, 
of course, in MHz. 

Now you might be won- 
dering how the 1st i-f local- 
oscillator (X9) product can 
cause any trouble at 145 
MHz more than a few inches 
away from the weather ra- 
dio. It shouldn't, of course, 
but after all, this is the real 
world! 

I invite you to try it if 
you're at all skeptical Just 
go into a store that sells 
weather radios, armed with 
your nifty synthesized HT, 
and ask to demo one of the 
sets, The Radio Shack 1 2-1 54 
is a good candidate. I'm not 
picking on this receiver. In 
fact, I'm very pleased with 
the sensitivity and perfor- 
mance of mine, but it does 
put out a very formidable 
oscillation on 145 MHz; so 
do other brands. 

Radio Shack stores are lo- 
cated all over the country 
and are usually very willing 
to give a demo of their prod- 
ucts to the customer. So 
there, no excuse! I haven't 
really tried to "clean up" a 
weather radio to reduce this 
formidable oscillation in the 
2-meter band (it's no longer 
unidentified), but I would 
suspect that it could be at 
least reduced if someone 
wants to try (and hopefully 
write a follow-up article to 
this one). 

A good place to start 
would be to install a series- 
resonant trap right in the an- 
tenna lead close to the rf 
amp input and tuned to 



145.80 MHz I suspect that 
there is a fair amount of 
local-oscillator leakage 
around the rf amp and up 
the antenna itself. This idea 
worked quite well on a cord- 
less telephone whose local- 
oscillator 2nd harmonic, 
39.130 MHz x 2 (78.26 
MHz), was creating a good 
bit of TVI on TV Channel 5 
(76 to 82 MHz) and interfer- 
ing with any nearby TV sets. 

Other approaches to the 
weather-radio radiation 
problem might include bet- 
ter rf bypassing (with .001 -uF 
disc caps) on the dc lines, 
ferrite beads on the various 
unshielded wires inside to 
discourage them from being 
"antennas," painting a con- 
ductive coating on the in- 
side of the plastic cabinet, 
etc. All of these suggestions 
will most probably help to 
some extent, and the sum to- 
tal could be surprisingly ef- 
fective. 

Of course, you can al- 
ways unplug the weather ra- 
dio (a sure cure) if it's yours. 
If it's in a neighbor's home, 
then it's time to become a 
diplomat. Let us all know 
your negotiating secrets. 
Then there is always the 
bright side of the picture: 
The 145 8855-MHz signal 
makes a dandy marker for a 
quick check of your 2-meter 
receiver's sensitivity In fact, 
you can put your battery-op- 
erated (most have this fea- 
ture} weather radio out in 
the backyard with a metal 
pail over it for a pretty de- 
cent "weak signal" source 
for tuning up your 2-meter 
receiver (adjust pail for de- 
sired signal strength). It's 
best to do this after dark so 
that no one will question 
your actions. 

[ haven't yet mentioned 
the fourth weather radio 
that I have that uses a 
49 990-MHz crystal and 
makes a great 6-meter 
lower-band-edge marker 
with just a slight retuning. 

Maybe some clouds ac- 
tually do have silver linings. 
I guess it all depends upon 
your objectives and ap- 
proach,! 



73 for Radio Amateurs • December. 1985 43 



Marc Stem N1BLH 
c/o 73 Magazine 
Peterborough NH 03458 



Secrets of Cellular Radio 

Take a guided tour behind the scenes 
of our newest repeater technology. 



What would happen if 
_ you set up a network 
of transceivers, linked thenn 
via a twisted-pair loop, con- 
trolled the whole setup with 
a master station, used poll- 
ing and diversity reception, 
relied on FM capture and 
low power, and put it all at 
UHF? 

Would you be: (A) estab- 
lishing a sophisticated re- 
peater network; (B) estab- 
lishing a sophisticated auxil- 
iary system; (C) establishing 




Fig. 1. The NYNEX Mobile 
Communications^* mobile 
telephone. (Courtesy of NY- 
NEX) 



a cellular phone system, or 
(D) none of the above? 

The answer to this ques- 
tion is (Q although it does 
sound as if you are setting 
up either a sophisticated 
repeater or auxiliary com- 
munications system be- 
cause that s essentially what 
the newest mobile- telecom- 
munications system actually 
is. The nationwide network 
of commercial mobile-cellu- 
lar systems now rapidly 
being established is little 
more than a series of UHF re- 
peaters tied together by a 
twisted-pair loop and con- 
trolled by a computerized 
master station or mobile- 
telephone switching office. 

Today's cellular commu- 
nications system grew out of 
a test which was set up in 
Chicago in the 1970s, That 
system, called the Advance 
Mobile Phone System, was a 
test bed where the concepts 
now central to the cellular 
phone system were proven 
Using a special Federal Com- 
munications Commission 
authorization, American 
Telephone & Telegraph 
(which controlled the Chi- 
cago-area telephone-operat- 
ing company at the lime) 
used frequencies in the 800- 



MHz spectrum to prove a 
cellular system would work. 

The aim of the system was 
to end the overcrowding and 
limited access to the con- 
ventional VHF mobile- 
phone system which could 
accommodate only 1,200 
users per market and which 
created long waiting lists for 
new subscribers, (The con- 
ventional system relies on 
one high-powered transmit- 
ter and receiver at a central 
location; all the mobile 
phones in an area talk 
through it. Because the num- 
ber of frequencies available 
was limited, there was little 
room for more than a few 
conversations. The cellular 
system ends this.) 

Cellular mobile commu- 
nication takes advantage of 
two concepts which have 
been known in amateur ra- 
dio circles for a number of 
years: capture effect and 
low power. Both interplay in 
the cellular system, so spec- 
trum is much more effi- 
ciently reused and the 
number of users on a typical 
system can increase dramat- 
ically — by a factor of 100 or 
more. 

The way this works is sim- 
ple. The typical cellular 



mobile phone puts out 
somewhere between one 
and five Watts, depending 
on conditions. A micropro- 
cessor inside the phone unit 
communicates digitally with 
a computer at a cell site's 
fixed transceiver to deter- 
mine the output needed for 
reliable communication. 
Typically, this output is 
somewhere around three 
Watts, although it can drop 
dramatically as the mobile 
unit approaches the fixed 

site. Whatever the amount 
of power, though, it is 
enough to capture the front 
end of the fixed transceiver 
on whatever frequency pair 
may be accessed by the 
computers. (The actual 
choice of frequencies is left 
to the microprocessors. They 
search their particular range 
of transmit and receive fre- 
quencies for an open pair 
and then establish a link be- 
tween the mobile unit and 
the cell site) 

Because the front end of 
the cell-site transceiver is 
captured, the radio "hears" 
only the particular radio 
with which it is communi- 
cating and no others. Here's 
where the interplay between 
capture and low power 
takes place. Because the 



44 73 for Radio Amateurs * December, 1985 



unit is operating on low 
power, neighboring celi 
sites— more about that in a 
few minutes— will not hear 

the conversation which is 
going on between the mo- 
bile and the fixed site. This 
enables the same pair of fre- 
quencies to be reused in a 
neighboring cell site, where 
another mobile unit will 
capture and hold them All 
this is done without the user 
knowing it's going on. 

(Actually, this is a simpli- 
fied picture of what is going 
on with the cellular mobile 
phone system, but it does 
show how concepts we 
know about are applied in 
other radio services, of 
which the cellular system is 
one.) 

To define the exact nature 
of the eel lular phone system, 
picture a map of your city 
and then overlay a honey- 
comb pattern of six-sided 
cells on that map. This is the 
cellular system. Each cell 
has a fixed transceiver site at 
its center. The fixed-site 
transceivers are, in turn, con- 
nected by wireline link to a 
computerized master site— 
the mobile-telephone switch- 
ing off ice (MT SO). The entire 
system is linked by the MTSO 
to the rest of the phone sys- 
tem, 

Why were six-sided cells 
chosen? It was an arbitrary 
decision made when the sys- 
tem was under development 
in Chicago, The actual shape 
of a cell can be just about 
anything and is as much 
guided by local terrain as 
anything else. The size of a 
typical cell is also arbitrary 
and will change over time as 
the system gains more and 
more users The reason the 
size will change is another of 
the advantages of the cellu- 
lar system. 

To accommodate a grow- 
ing number of users, the size 
of a cell pattern can be cut 
and more cell-site transceiv- 
ers added. As this is happen- 
ing r the power levels used 
throughout the system will 
be cut accordingly so that 
more units can use the sys- 



tem without interfering with 
one another. 

Since there is so much 
spectrum available and 

since the power levels will be 
very low, there will be little 
or no interference between 
units Units which may be at- 
tempting to access a fre- 
quency pair that is in use and 
which may be on the fringes 
of a cell just won't be heard 
by the cellular system be- 
cause stronger units will 
have captured it. These units 

will have to wait until their 
signals are at quality levels 
where the system will accept 
them As you can see, then, 
the cellular system is de- 
signed to collapse in on itself 
to be able to increase the 
number of users. 

This system works on fre- 
quencies in the 800-MHz 
spectrum. The FCC allo- 
cated about 40 MHz of band 
space, so this service can 
provide as many as 666 
channels for full-duplex 
communication in a given 
area. Thanks to low power 
and FM capture effect, one 
cell can support 333 calls at 
any one moment, as a neigh- 
boring cell also handles 333 
calls. 

To understand better how 
this system works, let's sup- 
pose that you are the person 
using a cellular phone and 
you are placing a call. When 
you first pick up the handset, 
a digital signal is sent from a 
microprocessor in the mo- 
bile unit to the nearest cell's 
central transceiver. That sig- 
nal says, in effect, "Hey, 
wake up F I want to make a 
call." Within milliseconds, 
the cell site says, "Okay, wait 
a minute/' and the micro- 
computers begin searching 
for an open frequency pair 
The lower frequency (845 
MHz, for instance) is used 
for transmit and the upper 
frequency (872.3 MHz, or 
whatever) is used for re- 
ceive. When open frequen- 
cies are found, the cell-site 
transceiver sends a signal 
back to the mobile unit tell- 
ing it to begin the call 

The next thing you hear in 




Fig, 2. Motorola's Dyna T*A*C base station. (Courtesy of Mo- 
torola) 



the handset is the dial tone? 
you can dial the number you 
want, and the call is placed. 
As the call progresses, both 
the cell-site transceiver and 



the mobile unit are in con- 
stant communication, well 
below the carrier in a digital 
mode. Some of this commu- 
nication is regarding billing, 







f/g. 3, The Boston Cellular Geographic Service Area fCGSAJt 
where NYNEX Mobile Communications Company initially 
provides cellular mobile phone service. The area covers 

about 1,800 square miles f has an estimated population of 3 6 
million, and services area code 617, NYNEX plans to expand 
the coverage area to include New Bedford, Worcester, and 
Springfield, Massachusetts, and Providence, Rhode Island, 

73 tor Radio Amateurs • December, 1985 45 




Fig. 4. Conventional mobile-telephone service uses one cen- 
tra! base station to transmit a powerful radio signal over an 
area up to 50 miles in diameter. Only one two-way conver- 
sation at one time can be conducted over a given channel 
anywhere in the coverage area f and the number of channels 
is limited. This process restricts service availability and in- 
creases chances that a call will be blocked. 



while much of it is about sig- 
nal strength and quality. 

Let's say you are moving 
away from the cell-site trans- 
ceiver As you do. the cell- 
site transceiver, which is 
watching the signal strength, 
senses that the gap is widen- 
ing between the mobile unit 
and the central site. As the 
gap widens, it sends a com- 
mand to the mobile unit to 
increase its power output, to 
which the mobile unit re- 
sponds The system tries to 
maintain a quality ratio of 
17-dBC/l and a signal quality 
level of 18-dB C/N As the 
gap widens further, the cell 
site orders the mobile unit to 
further increase its power, to 
which the mobile unit re- 
sponds again. This will con- 
tinue happening until the 
cell site learns the mobile 
unit is transmitting at full 
power. 

Now let's say you con- 
tinue moving away from the 
cell site, and even with max- 
imum power the signal qual- 
ity begins to drop At this 
point, the cell site performs 
another of its chores, The en- 
tire cellular system is polled 
digitally as a new path is 
sought for your call. When 
that path is found the call is 
switched within 50 millisec- 
onds. The switch is so fast 
that the normal user will 
never know it has happened 

The handoff, the switch 
from cell A to cell B, is ac- 
tually more complicated 
than it looks — on a digital 



level, at least The mobile 
unit must not only switch 
from cell A to cell B while 
keeping the signal quality 
up, but also it may have to 
switch frequencies to a new 
pair because the original pair 
on which the call was estab- 
lished in cell A may be in use 
in cell B, The transceiver 
may not only make the jump 
between sites but also be- 
tween frequencies. The mi- 
croprocessor inside the 
phone is usually extremely 
busy, therefore, at all times. 

As you can see, frequency 
agility is built into this sys- 
tem; it is a function of the 
digital electronics used for 
control But the cellular sys- 
tem isn't totally digital in na- 
ture because it relies on 
radio-frequency basics with 
which we are familiar We've 
already noted how the UHF 
cellular system takes advan- 
tage of capture effect and 
low power, but we haven't 
noted how it takes advan- 
tage of diversity reception. 

If you were to look at the 
typical cell-site antenna 
tower, you would see not 
one antenna but three, six, or 
more, arranged in a triangle. 
These antennas are handling 
not only transmission but 
also reception, and the cell 
site monitors all of them. As 
you travel through a cell dur- 
ing your call, the cell-site 
transceiver watches the re- 
ceived signal strength on all 
its antennas. It routinely 
polls those antennas to see 




Fig. 5. Cellular mobile-telephone service is provided 
through a system composed of three major elements: ceil 
sites, a mobile-telephone switching office I M TSQ), and ded- 
icated interconnecting circuits. The cellular system is di- 
\ ided into smaller geographic areas called cells. Adjacent 
cells are assigned different sets of frequencies. Cells suffi- 
ciently far apart can use the same frequencies simulta- 
neously. This permits the reuse of a single channel many 
times within a given service area t allowing hundreds of con- 
versations to occur at once. 



where the strongest signal is, 
and when it finds the stron- 
gest signal it uses that an- 
tenna for operation. 

If you were to watch the 
cell site as you move along, 
you would see the signal 
moving from antenna to an- 
tenna as your position 
changed. From this you can 
see that although digital 
polling is used the system is 
still turning to the best an- 
tenna among many for re- 
ception, for "diversity 
reception/'" I grant you that it 
may not be total diversity re- 
ception Since only one re- 
ceiver is used and digital 
electronics takes the place 
of the others needed, but it's 
a modern equivalent, to say 
the least. 

By now you probably 
have noticed that both the 
mobile unit and the cell-site 
transceiver are very capable 
units. Not only must they 
handle such mundane 
chores as identification and 
billing information, but they 
also must handle establish- 
ing the proper frequencies 
and setting proper power 
levels. The system is made 
up of a number of fre 
quency-agile units. The cell- 
site transceiver is even more 
capable because it must not 
only handle these functions 
but also monitor the mobile 
unit's location, bearing, and 



direction from the cell site, 
to determine which antenna 
is best or whether it's time to 
ask for a handoff to the next 
site. It's quite a system, and 
it wouldn't have been possi- 
ble without the modern mi- 
croprocessor. 

The system does suffer 
from the various problems 
long known to avid VHF and 
UHFers, of course, signal 
loss, multipath, and reflec- 
tion. However, the micro- 
computers in the system are 
programmed to handle this. 
Further since the frequency 
spectrum where the system 

is located is very much line- 

of-sight, its range can be lim- 
ited if the cell site's antenna 
isn't in an optimum location. 
Still, it manages to overcome 
these obstacles to provide 
reliable communications to 
hundreds of thousands of 
users across the country. No 
longer is a mobile radiotele- 
phone a symbol of an elite 
class of users r because cel- 
lular radiotelephone opens 
this realm to just about any- 
one. 

What does this all mean 
for us? For one thing, it likely 
points to the route equip- 
ment will be following dur- 
ing the next few years. 
Looking at the cellular sys- 
tem from strictly a mobile 
standpoint, you will find the 
units to be frequency-agile 



46 73 tor Radio Amateurs * December, 1985 



FM transceivers which are 
capable of increasing or de- 
creasing their power levels 
automatically. Some of the 
units on the market also 
have memory-dialing capa- 
bility, being able to store 10 
or more commonly-called 
numbers, and most of them 
can be programmed with se- 
curity passwords and other 
goodies. And, you will find 
as you look at the equipment 
available, that not only are 
more traditional mobile 
phones available, but there 
also are hand-held portables 
available 

Imagine, then, what will 
happen when local repeaters 
are able to control power- 
output levels and when you 
can store needed informa- 
tion in your mobile rig! Lev- 
els of local splatter and 
QRM will certainly come 
down, and it will make the 
mobile rig more convenient 
to operate, especially 
through the phone patch. 
Further, imagine what it will 
mean when we can link a 




ToMTSO 




Fig. 6. Cellular handoff makes mobile communications pos- 
sible and helps ensure service quality. Asa customer with a 
call in progress moves from cell to cell electronic equip- 
ment in the mobile-telephone switching office automati- 
cally transfers or "hands off" the call to the next celt site. 
There are no apparent changes in voice transmission qual- 
ity, and the call continues uninterrupted. 



network of repeaters into a 
cellular format routinely- 
Mobile units will be able to 
carry on reliable communi- 
cations not just for 50 miles, 
but, potentially, for hun- 
dreds of miles. Also, imagine 
if we tap the direction-find- 
ing capabilities of a cellular 
system. It will help us keep 
our own spectrum cleaner, 
also, And these are just a few 
of the possible uses of cellu- 



lar technology. It's quite 
likely our experimentation 
will lead to many more. 

In the near term, though, 
the cellular radiotelephone 
system has immediate im- 
pact on the 90OMHz band 
which will be opening to us. 
If you look through the 
pages of any current ama- 
teur publication, you will see 
rigs for 2 meters, 220 MHz, 
440 MHz, and even 1296- 



but not for 902-928. Since the 
cellular system operates just 
below our spectrum — it tops 
out at about 895 MHz — it 
won't be too hard to retune 
cellular mobile units for our 
own use and it won't be hard 
to retune base-site units for 
repeater use Of course, it 
will be some time before 
these units are available in 
traditional used-equipment 
channels, but when they are 
it will mean an exciting new 
technological opportunity. 

Finally, the cellular radio, 
with its emphasis on low 
power and spectrum reuse, 
will likely mean some new 
concepts for us. Instead of 
using QRO all the time well 
need only the amount of 
power, at any given mo- 
ment, for reliable communi- 
cations. If a cellular-like 
repeater system is built, 
imagine how many people it 
will be able to support! 

Cellular technology is 
here now and its possibilities 
are exciting. It remains only 
for us to pick up on them. ■ 



Unadilla Amateur Antenna Baluns 

For 20 years, preferred by Amateur, Commercial and Military Operators 

First with built-in lightning arrester-minimizes TVI, maximizes power handling 




<^^ 



v$* 



^ 



W2AU 1:1 & 4:1 

Qniy$17.95, UPS 

shipping & tax included 



♦ 



♦ 



W20U44F 

Onfy SI 9.95, UPS 

snipping A la* included 



W20U-VHF 

Orty $1 9.95. UPS 

Shipping S lax STduded 



W2AU Broadband Ferrite Core Baluns 

For medium power ( 1 000 watts RF mtn.) and broadband operation 3-40 MHz 
W2AU 1:1 



* 50 to 50 or 75 to 75 ohms 
•For dipoles. \Ts, beams, quads 

W2AU 41 

* 200 to 50 or 300 to 75 ohms 

* For high impedance antennas such as 
folded dipoles 

W2DU Non-Ferrite Very High Power Baluns 

W2DU-HF (High Power ) 

•1.8-30 MHz 

* 3000-9000 watts with 1:1 antenna SWR 
•1500—5000 watts with 2:1 antenna SWR 

W2DU-VHF (High Power and Extended Range) 

* 30-300 MHz 

•2000-4000 watts with 1 ;1 antenna SWR 

* 1 200-2400 watts with 2:1 antenna SWR 



BONUS! 




Free 

With 

Your 

Order 



The Dandy Dtpole 

Quickly design and con- 
struct any of over 180 mutti- 
band dipole variations, using 
traps. Wiring tables are in- 
cluded to take away the 
guesswork. Also includes 
dozens of practical details. 



Purchase from any of over 

300 dealers nationwide, 

or order direct 



□ Send free catalog PD84 

DW2AU 1:1 &DW2AU41 $17,95ea. 

□ W2DU-HF &GW2DU-VHF $19.95ea 

Tolal Order $ . 

7a* & UPS Shfpping Inc/adao* 

Name 



Address 

City 



Phone ( ) . 

D Am Ex 
Card # 



State. 



-Zip, 



D VISA D Mastercard 



Valid (AmEx only) 
Expires, 



i_ 



Check □ Money Oder 
To ORDER or request free full line catalog of 
baluns, antenna relays and antenna traps, call 

1-800-523-0027 

24 HOURS— 7 DAYS A WEEK! 

NY/HJ/AK/CAN residents please use coupon 
or call collect 315-437-3953, 8-5 EST 

1 week delivery for credit card 

2 weeks for personal Check 

60 DAY MONEY BACK GUARANTEE 

UnadiliatfteycQHnllne 

DtvisSon of Microwave Filter Company. Inc. 

6743 Kinne Street, E. Syracuse. NY 13057 R1 









** 



When You Buy, Say 73" 



73 for Radio Amateurs » December, 1985 47 



AES® Closeouts • AES® Closeojuts • AES® Closeouts 




AEAWB-1C Moscow Muffler'" Woodpecker Blanker 
Insfalts in feedhne between antenna and transceiver, 
reduces noise pulses by 40-50 dB Automatic T/R 
switching, 6dB RF preamplifier Clo&eout S69 95 




AEA BT I Basic Code Trainer (left): Computerized, 
keypad entry Characters are hrst introduced at 20 WPM 
then sent along wrth previously learned characters from 
I to 99 WPM Keys for sending practice, earphone rack 
lor private listening. 12V DC ,„„„.* Closeoul $59" 

BT-IP Portable Basic Code Trainer: As above, but 
wrth Nk cad battery and charger----- Closeout $69** 

AEA KT-2 Keyer/Trainer (right): Computerized, 
keypad entry Set speed /duration - sends 5 letter groups 

or random #ord lengths. Two levels of difficulty, supplied 
with 24,000 character answer book Keyer section. 1-99 
wpm, selectable dot/dash memory, independent 
dot/dash weightings variable monitor tone Full semi- 
auto or straight key modes. 12V DC ,. Closeout $79*$ 




AEA CK-2 Contested* Keyer: Computerized, keypad 
entry. 1*99 wpm, 10 section S00 character memory, 
edit r automalic contest serial generator Two presetlable 
speeds/stepped variable speed, auto, message reprnl 
with variable delay, dot/dash memory, dot/dash 
weighting message repeat, message resume. Full, semi* 
auto/stra^ht key modes 12V DC....CIoseoul S99 95 




AEA MM? MorseMatrr* Keyer: Computerized, key 
pad entry 299 wpm, 10 section 500 character memory, 
edit mode, beacon mode, automatic contest serial 

number generator, code trainer. Selectable tone, weight, 
dot/dash ratios, dot/dash memory. Full, semi-auto or 
straight key modes I2V DC....,,,. Closeoul $t49 s * 

AC-i L2V DC power supply tor tramer/keyers..., 14 w 




KENWOOD TM-401A 440 MHz FM Mobile: Covers 
440 0-449 975 MHz, 12 Watts output GaAs FET RF 
amplifier, dual digital VFO'S. 5 memories with lithium 
back-up Priority alert scan, memory and programmable 
band scan External speaker, 16- key Autopatch Of /DM 
microphone, mobile mount„, Closeout S289 M 




KENWOOD TR 8400 440 MHz FM Mobile: Covers 
440-450 MHz, 10 Watts output.. Dual VFO'S, 5 memories, 
memory scan, automatic band scan. UP/DN 
microphone, mobile mount Closeout S269 95 




KENWOOD DFC-230 Digital Frequency Controller 
for KENWOOD TS 120S. 130S/SE. 530S. 83QS, 20 Kz 
steps, 4 memories Scans m single, slow, or fast steps 

controlled from UP/DN microphone or panel switch. 
Operate split frequency, transfer frequency from VFO to 
memory or memory to VFO ,... Closeout $169^ 




HS-7 
Headphones 
. S19 95 



KENWOOD R 11 Receiver: 11 bands AM. FM 
broadcast t 13. 16. 19. 22. 21 31. 41, & 49m SW No 
BFO! Bandspread tuning, meter, 3" speaker, record & 
phone jacks, whip & fernte antennas, T%"n*4 l 
*i 3 6'd. Carrying case & earphone, uses 4 AA' ceils, 
Shown with optional headphones... Closeout S69 95 




VAESU fT-70aS 
440 MHz FM Handheld 
Covers 440 450 Mhz, 1 watt or 200 
mW output LCD display, Keyboard 
entry of all frequencies and splits 
for non standard repeaters 
Up/Down scanning, priority 
channel, memory scan, memory 
back-up. 16-tone DTMF pad. 
Equipped with rubber flex 
antenna, Ni-Cd battery pack and 
wall charger.. Closeout $229^ 




ICOM IC-45A 440 MHz FM Mobile: Covers 440.0 to 
449.995 MHr, 10 watts outout. Dual VFO's, 5 memories, 
priority channel, memory/band scan, memory backup 
UP/DM, TTP microphone, mount ,. Closeout S269^ 




ICOM KM51A 440 MHz Multimode Base: Use on 
OSCAR Mode B/J h or use with your favorite repeats 
SSB/CW/FM, covers430.0 to 440 MHz, 10 watts outout. 
3 memories wrth scan, programmable band scan, 
squelch on SSB, variable repeater split 117V AC or 
13.8V DC, with hand microphone .. Closeout S569** 




fCOM IC-720A HFTransciver: Broad banded transmit 
on 9 amateur HF bands 160 thru 10 meters with general 
coverage receive 0.1 to 30 MHi. 200 watts PEP input 
SSB/CW. 40 watts AM 1 3.8V DC. Closeout S749« 



ICOM CC-4 
12 24 hr World Clock 
Rotate globe to display the 
time in 24 maior aorid ernes. 
As tEfis light to show cubes, 
their local time ts sfoown on 
lower display along with date 
and alarm set time The upper 
display shows your local time. 
Alarm lunchon and hourly 
time signal I0"h*5 r 'w*4"d. 
Powered by 4 "A A' batteries 
Closeout » $79 s5 




I 




MasterCard 





Order Toll Free ■ Use your Credit Card! 



HOURS • Mon. thru Fn. 9-5:30; Sat 9-3 

Milwaukee WATS line: 1 -BOO 558-0411 answered 
evenings until 8:00 pm Monday thru Thursday. 

Please use WATS lines for Ordering 

use Regular lines tor other Into and Service dept 



Order Toll Free: 1-800-558-0411 



tn Wisconsin (outside Milwaukee Metro Area) 

1-800-242-5195 



HOU L*1ILUJ 



Inc. 



4828 W. Fond du Lac Avenue; Milwaukee, 



AES BRANCH STORES 



53216 Phone (414) 442-4200 

Associate Store 



WICKLIFFE. Ohio 44092 

28940 Euclid Avenue 

Phone (216) 585-7388 

Ohm WATS 1 800-362 0290 

Outside i oriA 111 left* 



ORLANDO, Fla. 32803 

621 Commonweafth Ave. 

Phone (305) 894-3238 

Fla. WATS 1-800-432-9424 

Outside 1 AAA 1^1 lAn 



CLEARWATER, Fla. 33575 LAS VEGAS. Nev, 89106 



1898 Drew Si reel 

Phone (813) 461 4267 

Mo In -State WATS 



1072 N Rancho Drive 
Phone 1 702 \ 647-3114 
No In- State WATS 
Outside i oi\a n* r+** 



Sir 1-800-321-3594 S 1-800-327-1917 No Nationwide wats KS™ 1-800-634-6227 



CHICAGO, Illinois 60630 

ERICKS0N COMMUNICATIONS 

5456 N. Milwaukee Avenue 

Phone (312) 631-5381 

15 mln. from O'Harei 



48 73 for Radio Amateurs • December, 1985 




HF Equipment Regular 

IC 735 HF Iransceiver/SW rcvr/mic 849.00 

PS-55 External power supply 160.00 

AT-150 Automatic antenna tuner . .. 349.00 

FL 32 500 Hi CW filter 59.50 

EX-243 Electronic heyerunit 50.00 

IC-745 9-band xcvr w/,1-30 MHz rcvr 999.00 

PS-35 Internal power supply 160.00 

EX 241 Markerumt, ,,..-.. 20.00 

EX 24? FM unit 39.00 

EX-243 Electronic keyerunil 50.00 

FL 45 500 Hz CM filter (1st IF) 59.50 

FL-54 270 Hz CW filter (1st IF) 47 50 

FL-52A 500 Hz CW filter (2nd IF) 96.50 

FL-53A 250 Hz CW filter (2nd IF) 96.50 

FL-44A SSB filter (2nd IF) 159.00 

HM-10 Scanning mobile microphone 39.50 

SM-6 Desk microphone... 39.00 

HM-12 Extra hand microphone 39.50 

MB 12 Mobile mount 19.50 



SALE 
749« 

14496 

314** 



779 9 - 
144 9 - 



89« 

89" 
144 9S 




IC-751 9-band xcvrAI-30 MHz rcvr 1399.00 1199 

PS-35 Internal power supply..-..., 160.00 144" 

FL 32 500 Hz CW filter (1st IF) 59.50 

FU3 250 Hz CW filter (1st IF)., ... 48.50 

FL-52A 500 Hz CW filter (2nd IF) , . . 96.50 89" 

FL-53A 250 Hz CW filter (2nd IF),.. 96.50 89" 

FL-33 AM filter 3150 

FL-70 ?.8 kHz wide SSB filter 46.50 

HM-12 Extra hand microphone 39 50 

SM-6 Desk microphone ... 39.00 

RC-10 External frequency controller 35.00 

MS-lg Mobile mount 1950 

IC-720A 9 band xcvr •(CLOSEOUT)* 1349 00 749" 

PS-15 20A external power supply 149.00 134" 

FL 32 500 Hz CW filter 59,50 

FL-34 5.2 kHz AM filter 49.50 

BC-10A Memory back-up 8.50 

SM-5 8-pjn eJeclret desk mtc 39.00 

MB-5 Mobile mount 19.50 

Other Accessories: Regular SALE 

PS-15 20A external power supply,.,,. 149.00 134 Hi ' 

CF-1 Cooling fan for PS-15 45.00 

EX-144 Adaptor for CF-l/PS-15 .... 6.50 

PS-30 Systems p/s w/cord t 6-pin plug 259 95 234" 

OPC Opt. cord, specify 2, 4 or 6-pin 5.50 

SP-3 External base station speaker.... 49.50 

SP-5 Remote speaker for mobiles .... 25.00 

CR-64 High stab. rel. rial (745/751) 58,00 

PP- 1 Speaker/patch (specify radio) ... 1 39.00 129" 

SM-8 Desk mic -two cables. Scan..... 69.95 

AT 100 100W8-band auto. antenna-tuner 349.00 314" 

AT-500 5O0W 9-band auto, antenna tuner 449,00 399" 

AH-1 5-band mobile antenna w/tuner 289.00 259" 

GC-4 World dock • (CLOSEOUT) • 99.95 79" 



ICOM 



HF linear amplifier 

IC-2KL 160 15m solid state amp w/ps 

6-meter VHP Portable 

IC 505 3/10W 6m SSB/CW portable 
BP-10 Internal Nicad battery pack 

BP-I5 AC charger - 

EX-248 FM unit 

L(MO Leather case , 

VHF/UHF base multi-mode* 
IC-551D SOW 6-meter SSB/CW.,. + .. + 

EX-106 FM option. 

BC-10A Memory back-up 

SM-2 EJectret desk microphone .... 
IC-271A 25W 2m FM/SSB/CW ....... 

AG-20 Internal preamplifier* . 

IC-271H 100W2m FM/SSB/CW 

AG-25 Mast mounted preamplifier* 
IC-471A 25W 430450 SSB/CW /FM xcvr 

AG-1 Mast mounted preamplifier* 
IC-471H 75W 430-450 SSB/CW/FM 

AG-35 Mast mounted preamplilier* 



Regular 

1795 00 

Regular 

449.00 
79.50 
12.50 
49.50 

34.95 

Regular 

69900 

12500 

8.50 

39.00 
699.00 

56.95 
899.00 

84.95 
799.00 

89 00 
1099 00 

84.95 



SALE 
1299 

SALE 
399" 



SALE 
599" 

H29S 



569 1b 
759" 
699" 
969" 



For a Limited time! 

With the purchase of an IC-271A/H or 
IC-471A/H get the matching PREAMP* 

for only • $100 Extra. 



Accessories common to 271 A/ H and 471 A/ H 



99.00 89" 
16O.0O144 95 
149.00 134^ 

39.00 

3995 

5995 

12.50 

7995 

Regular SALE 
549.00 479« 
649.00 579" 

Regular SALE 



PS-25 Internal power supply for (A) 
PS-35 Internal power supply for (H). 

PS-15 External power supply 

SM-6 Desk microphone 

EX-310 Voice synthesizer . ........ . 

TS-32 CommSpec encode/decoder. 

UT-15 Encoder/decoder interface 

UT-15S UT-lSSw/TS-32 installed... 

VHF/UHF mobile mutti-mudes 

IC-290H 25W2mSSB/FM,TTPmic. 
IC-490A 10W 430-440 SSB/FM/CW 

VHF/UHf/h2 GHz FM 

IC-27A Compact 25W 2m FMw/TTPmic 369.00 299 9: 

IC-27H Compact 45W 2m FMw/TTPmic 409.00 359^ 5 

IC-37A Compact 25W 220 fMJTP mic 449.00 299 95 

IC-47A Compact 25W 440 FM.TTP mic 469.00 399" 

PS-45 Compact 8A power supply... 112.95 99" 

UT-16/EX-388 Votce synthesizer .,. 29.95 

SP-10 Siim-lme external speaker ... 29.95 

IC-3200A 25W 2m/440 FM w/TFP 549.00 489" 

UT-23 Voice synthesizer 29.9b 

AH-32 2m/440 Dual Band antenna 32.95 

Larsen PO-K Roof mount 20 00 

Larsen PO-TLM Trunk-lip mount 20.18 

Larsen PO-MM Magnetic mount 14 63 

IC-1271A 10W 1.2 GH* SSB/CW Base 999.00 889" 

ATV-1200 ATV interface unit FBA 

PS-25 Internal power supply 99.00 89" 



EX-310 Votce synthesizer .. 

UT-15S CTCSS encoder/decoder . 

IC-L20 1W 1.2 GHz FM Mobile 

ML-12 1.2 GHz lOW amplifier..,. 

Repeaters 

RP-3010 440 MHz, 10W PM. xtal cont. 999.00 899" 
RP-1210 1.2 GHz, tOW FM r 99 ch. synth 1199.00 1089 
Duplexer 1210 1.2 GHz duplexes. 1199.00 1089 
Cabinet 249.00 



39.95 

79.95 
499 00 449" 
339.00 299 95 

Regular SALE 




Order Toll Free 
Use your Credit Card! 



Hand-held Transceiver 
Deluxe models Regu 

IC-02AT for 2m,..,.. 349. 
IC-04AT Tor 440 MHz 379. 

Standard models Regu 

IC-2A lor 2m, 239. 

(C-2AT with TIP....... 269. 

IC-3AT 220 MHz, FTP 299. 

IC-4AT 440 MHz, TTP 299. 



lar SALE 
00 289" 
00 289** 

lar SALE 
50 189" 
50 199** 

95 239" 

95 239" 



Accessories for Deluxe models Regular 

BP-7 425mah713.2V Nicad Pak - use BC-35 67.50 

BP-8 800mah/8.4V Nicad Pak - use BC-35... 62.50 

BC-35 Drop in desk charger for all batteries 69,00 

BC-60 6-position gang charger, all baits SALE 359.95 

BC-1GU Wall charger for BP7/BP8 10.00 

LC-I1 Vinyl case 17.95 

LC44 Vinyl case for Dlx using BP-7/8 17,95 

LC-Q2AT Leather case for Dl* models w/BP-7/8 39.95 
Accessories for both modeh Regular 

BP-2 425mah/7.2V Nicad Pak - use BC35.... 39.50 

BP-3 Extra Std 250 mah/8.4V Nicad Pak ,,.. 29,50 

BP-4 Alkaline battery case 12.50 

BP-5 425mah/10..8V Nicad Pak ■ use BC35 49.50 

CA-2 Telescoping 2m antenna.. 10.00 

CA-5 5/8-wave telescoping 2m antenna 1895 

FA-2 Extra 2m flexible antenna ,.., 10.00 

CP-1 Cig. lighter plug/cord for BP3 or Dlx..,.. 9.50 

DC-1 DC operation pak for standard models 17.50 

LC-2AT Leathet case for standard models 34.95 

RB-1 Vinyl waterproof radio bag..., 30.00 

KH-SS Handheld shoulder strap... 14.95 

HM-9 Speaker microphone.. 34.50 

HS10 Boom microphone/headset 19.50 

HS-iOSA Vox unit lor HS40 & Deluxe only 19.50 

HS-10S8 PTT unit for HS-10 , 19.50 

ML-1 2m 2.3w in/lOw out amplifier SALE 79.95 

SS-32M Commspec 32-tone encoder 29.95 



Receivers 

R-7000 25-2000 MHz, 117V AC 

RC-12 Infrared remote controller . . . 

R-71A 100 kHz-30 MHz, 117V AC 

R(M1 Infrared remote controller... 

FL 32 500 Hz CW filter..,. 

FL 63 250 Hz CW filter [Ut IF) 

FL-44A SSB filter (2nd IF)..... 

EX-257 FM unit .*. 

EX-310 Voice synthesizer^... 

CR-64 High stability oscillator xtal 

SP-3 External speaker .*. 

CK-7G(EX-299) 12V DC option 

NIB-12 Mobile mount r* 



Regular SALE 
899.00 789" 
T8A 

$799.00 659^ 

59.95 49 9 -- 
59.50 
4S.50 

159.00 144" 
38.00 
39.95 
56.00 
49.50 
9.95 
19.50 




VISA 



HOURS • Mon. thru Fri. 95:30; Sat 9-3 

Milwaukee WATS line: 1-800-558-0411 answered 

evenings until 8:00 pm Monday thru Thursday. 

Please use WATS lines for Ordering 

use Regular fines for other Info and Service dept. 



Order Toll Free: 1-800-558-0411 



I 



In Wisconsin (outside Milwaukee Metro Area) 

t -800-242-5 195 



ciUJJl 



4828 W. Fond du Lac Avenue; Milwaukee, Wl 53216 - Phone (414) 442-4200 



Inc. 



AES BRANCH STORES 



WICKLIFFE, Ohio 44092 

28940 Euclid Avenue 

Phone (216) 585-7388 

Ohio WATS 1-800-362-0290 

8KS* 1-800-321-3594 



ANDO. Fla. 32803 CLEARWATER, Fia. 33575 
Commonwealth Ave. 1898 Drew Street 

ne {305) 894-3238 Phone (813) 461-4267 

ATS 1-800^432-9424 No In-State WATS 

1-800-327-1917 No Nationwide WATS 



ORLANDO, Fla. 32803 

621 Commonwealth Ave. 

Phone {305) 894-3238 

Fla. WATS 1-800^432-9424 

Eff 1-800-327-1911 



LAS VEGAS, Nev. 89106 

1072 N. Rancho Drive 

Phone (702) 647-3114 

No In-State WATS 

Kff 1-800-634-6227 



Associate Store 

CHICAGO, Illinois 60630 

ERICKSON COMMUNICATIONS 

5456 N Milwaukee Avenue 

Phone {312) 631-5181 

S£f 1-8O0-621-5802 



"When You Buy, Say 73 



73 for Radio Amateurs * December, 1985 49 



Robinson Markel WINS 

405 Lenington Avenue, t8th Ffoor 

New York NY 70774 



The Santec Spectacular 

Is your Santec becoming forgetful? Are its batteries 
going soft? No more! Here are two quick mods that 
bring your hand-held to within an inch of perfection. 



In the October, 1983, issue 
of 73, I described in detail 
the virtues and vices (only 
one vice, actually) of the 
Santec ST-144, -220, and 
-440/uP hand-held radios. 
Good as they are, there is 
room for improvement This 
article describes two bat- 
tery-related ideas. The first 
prevents a loss of memory 
when the main battery is re- 
moved [or is dead) for ex- 
tended periods of time The 
second is a simple method 
of avoiding nicad "memory/' 
the bane of the recharge- 
able-battery user. Both will 
work on the new 5T-142, 
-222, and -442 also. Let's go. 

Lithium-Battery Backup 
The memory backup sys- 



tem in the ST-/uP radios is 
440 uF of capacitance which 
is kept charged as long as 
the battery is connected 
(and kept at a reasonable 
charge level). Disconnect 
the battery and you have 
about thirty seconds to con- 
nect a new one, otherwise 
all is lost {meaning the mem- 
ories, the scan interval, and 
the clock time) The addi- 
tion of a 3-volt lithium bat- 
tery and a 1N914-type diode 
will provide many hours of 
memory backup. 

The ideal battery is avail- 
able from Allied Electronics, 
catalog number 884-0435. It 
is made in Japan by Matsu- 
shita (Panasonic here), desig- 
nated BR-435, and says it is 
"for electronic fish float" It 





Photo A Backup lithium celt installed in the front cover 
Connections are made to the leads of C5. 

50 73 for Radio Amateurs ■ December, 1985 



is a small cylinder, 4.19 mm 
(0/165 inches) in diameter by 
35.89 mm (1,413 inches) 
long, with a short wire termi- 
nal at one end. The case is 
positive and the protruding 
wire terminal is negative. 
Both the case and the nega- 
tive terminal are made of 
aluminum, so you will need 
some Sal-Met™ flux or 
other aluminum soldering 
aid. Caution: Lithium bat- 
teries, like a number of 
others, can explode if sub- 
jected to high heat Don't 
use a high-wattage iron or 
gun + A small pencil-tip sol- 
dering iron is all you need 
for this job Fig. 1 shows the 
connections to make The 
series diode prevents the 
lithium battery from being 
charged by the main battery. 

The lithium battery fits in- 
side the front cover. To open 
the cover, remove the two 
screws under the back cover 
in the empty space below 
the battery, and the front 
cover can be swung aside on 
its flexible PC connector. The 
connector is pretty durable, 
but care should be used in 
handling the separated pieces 
of the radio. You can pull 
the end of the flexible con- 
nector from its socket on the 
main PC board, but be care- 
ful not to crease it when re- 
moving or reinserting. 

The lithium battery will 
rest above the microproces- 



sor PC board, in the slot be- 
tween the PC board and the 
top of the cover. Photo A 
shows the placement, with 
the wires toward the center 
of the cover In order to 
have the battery fit proper- 
ly, a small amount of mate- 
rial needs to be removed 
from the plastic boss that re- 
tains the top of the loud- 
speaker This is easily done 
with the tip of a small sol* 
dering iron. Use a tip that is 
close to the same diameter 
as the battery. The battery 
case needs to be insulated 
(shrink tubing is fine, but 
again, watch the heat). 

It is best to connect the 
lithium battery while the 
main battery is in the circuit; 
this avoids possible "crash- 
ing'' of the microprocessor. 
Here's how you do it First, 
connect the positive lead of 
the lithium battery (actually 
the cathode of its series 
diode) to the cathode end of 
D209. To find D209, remove 
the four small Phillips 
screws holding the micro- 
processor board and tilt the 
board up on the flexible 
connector. Locate C5 (com- 
ponent identification is on 
the top side of the board, 
and C5 is one of the two 
220hjF miniature electrolyt- 
ic capacitors near the upper 
end). D209 is the diode that 
is connected underneath the 
board to the positive side of 



C5; In most radios there is 
10k of resistance in parallel 
with D209. You want the end 
of the diode that is not con- 
nected to C5, that is. the end 
nearest the loudspeaker 
clearance hole. Some radios 
may have neither D209 nor 
the parallel resistor installed. 
If yours is one of them, just 
connect the positive lithium- 
battery lead to the positive 
lead of C5. Don't connect 
the negative lithium-battery 
lead yet 

Now, if you unplugged the 
flexible PC from the main 
board, plug it back in. Turn 
on the radio and make sure 
you get the "cold-start" fre- 
quency (146.520, 223500. or 
446.000 MHz, depending on 
the radio). If you don't, dis- 
connect the main battery 
for at least 60 seconds, re- 
place it, and check again. 
Now turn the radio off [but 
leave the main battery con- 
nected) and connect the 
negative lead (case) of the 
lithium battery to the nega- 
tive side of C5. The battery 
lead can be soldered to the 
capacitor lead just where it 
enters the board from below 
(using a micro-tip iron). This 
placement will allow you to 
disconnect it fusing a fine-tip 
soldering iron] in case there 
is ever a microprocessor 
crash. Turn the radio on 
once more to check for the 
cold-start frequency. Now 
put any frequency other 
than the cold-start into 
memory 1. Once more dis- 
connect the main battery 
for at least 60 seconds. Re- 
connect it and you should 
still see your stored frequen- 
cy (if the cold-start frequen- 
cy comes back, check your 
I ithium-battery connection). 
Replace the microprocessor 
board into the front cover. 

In operation with the 
main battery inserted, C5 
and its companion are 
charged to about 6 volts. 
The diode prevents the lithi- 
um battery from being 
charged at the same time. 
When the main battery is 
disconnected and the ca- 
pacitors discharge below 
about 2.5 volts, the lithium 



1N9I4 




SBOOVE 



MATSUSHITA 

- - - ■ ■■ - 



) 



ZENE« 
01 DDE 

1/Ztt 



i 



Fig. 1. Connections to Mat- 
sushita BR-435 lithium hack- 
up battery: 



battery takes over So far, 
mine has maintained the 
memories for periods of up 
to 24 hours with a fully dis- 
charged main battery. There 
isn't any reason to think it 
won't last longer; I just 
haven't experimented. 

One final word: Should 
the microprocessor ever 
crash or lock up, simply re- 
move the main battery, 
open the front cover, and 
disconnect the negative side 
of the lithium battery from 
C5 (which you can do easily 
with a small soldering iron). 
Leave it disconnected long 
enough for memory erasure 
to occur (60 seconds is plen- 
ty), then check for the cold- 
start frequency display at 
turnon. Reconnect the lithi- 
um battery. 

Battery Discharger 

That's right, discharger. 
This one is for the main bat- 
tery. Many articles about ni* 
cad batteries describe the 
"memory" effect that results 
from repeated recharging 
after only partial discharg- 
ing. After a few months of 
operating the ST-/uP radios, 
I noted a distinct shortening 
of useful life attributable to 
my tendency to put the bat- 
teries on charge as soon as 
the low-battery indicator on 
the radio began to flash. Dis- 
charging a fully-charged 
battery into a resistor load 
confirmed my suspicion; at 
a 500-mA discharge rate, 
typical battery life was 40 
minutes to a cell voltage of 
1 .0 volt. A new battery took 
more than 60 minutes to 
reach the same point! 

The same articles point 
out that the cure for nicad 
memory is several full dis- 
charge/charge cycles. Sure 
enough, after five or six of 
these, battery life increased 
to 62 minutes for one of the 



200 

i* 



HOP 



^ 



BATTERY 



RADIO SHACK 
276-20(7 

MPM REPLACE Mr 
POWER TRANSISTOR 




BATTERY CONNECTOR 
(ON COMPONENT SfQEI 

SANTEC EXTESISAL 

CHARGE ADAPTER 

PC BQAHU SOLDER SlOE 



Fig. 2. Schematic and layout drawings for battery discharger 
(K5VOU version). Dotted lines on the layout diagram indicate 
removed foils; heavy solid lines are added jumpers. 



original batteries and 70 

minutes for the other 

To maintain battery "for- 
getful ness/" I constructed a 
simple discharger using the 
"external charge adapter" 
manufactured by Santec 
(designated ST-EC). This is a 
small PC board containing a 
male dc power jack, a series 
diode, and a battery connec- 
tor. The power jack and 
diode are removed and, in 
the simplest possible ver- 
sion, a 20-Ohm, 5-Watt resis- 
tor is placed across the bat- 
tery connector. 1 added a 
subminiature metering jack 
(with 200 or 300 Ohms of se- 
ries resistance to prevent 
shorts when a meter is 
plugged in) for easier read- 
ing of the battery voltage. 

If you leave the simple 
discharger connected for 
too long a time f there is a 
risk of reverse-charging one 
or more of the cells, al- 
though I have not had this 
happen to any of my four 
batteries. To eliminate that 
risk, Tom Gentry K5VOU, 
who is President of En- 
comm, the Santec importer, 
suggested the circuit shown 
in Fig. 2. I constructed this 
on the external charge- 
adapter PC board, using 
Radio Shack parts and the 
layout in Fig. 2. The circuit 
stops discharging the bat- 
tery when the zener voltage 
is reached Referring to Fig. 
2, remove the diode from 
holes M and N and the plas- 
tic battery-charger socket 
from A, C, and E. Leave the 
white plastic battery con- 
nector and its pins. Cut away 
the foils as shown by the 



dotted lines and add the 
jumpers indicated by the 
two heavy lines. Drill hole W 
(diameter 3.2 mm or 1/8") for 
mounting the transistor, be- 
ing sure to place it so as to 
leave enough lead length for 
the transistor leads to reach 
holes B, C, and E, Mount the 
transistor on the component 
side and connect its B, C, 
and E leads to holes B, C, 
and E + Connect a 20-Ohm, 
5-Watt resistor between X 
and Y. Solder a 6.8- or 
7.5-volt f 1/2-Watt zener 
diode in series with a 330- 
Ohm, 1/2-Watt resistor, with 
the diode anode toward the 
resistor Insulate the combi- 
nation and connect it on the 
foil side with the diode cath- 
ode going to hole M and the 
free end of the resistor to 
hole A. That's it. 

When the ST-/uP radio's 
battery indicator begins 
flashing, replace the battery 
and plug the used one into 
the discharger for an hour or 
so before recharging. This 
will fully dishcarge the bat- 
tery and prevent memoriza^ 
tion. Caution: the discharge 
resistor and the transistor in 
Gentry's circuit get hot for 
a while; don't let the dis- 
charger touch anything 
flammable. 

The battery-related modi- 
fications described in this ar- 
ticle will add to your Santec 
operating pleasure. The 
time between battery re- 
chargings will stay at its orig- 
inal figure, and if you over- 
do it and absolutely kill the 
battery; at least you won't 
lose all the memory infor- 
mation. Have funlB 



73 for Radio Amateurs • December, 1985 51 



Saga of the Willie Wand 

W5RRH learned a new technique while buildingthis 
6-element 2m beam. It's called cut and try and try and try. 



Id Mahoney W5RRH 
J008 S. Norwood 
Tulsa OK 74 114 



ft&ST DIRECTOR 



DHIVEH £Ltut*r 



It probably would be bet- 
ter to name this article 
"Willie/' since it contains as 
much information about 
him as it does about his an- 
tenna, which I named the 
"Willie Wand Special" 

Willie W5FXP is one of 
those unique individuals 



r^^i 



-C 



com CE*rra conductor 

CQHHTCTS H£H£ 



«*5Ui A1E£ 




SLOTTED TO *LLOW 
FO*T *OJUSTM£NTS- 



KEFLECTOR 



COAJt SHIELD 
CONNECTS HCRE 



tfcQ 



I 



I 



1 I 

: ; 

! ! 



ecu* CABLE 
CONNECTOR 



BOON 



Ll^J- 



JJ 



CO*W 



Fig. 1. Coax connections. 
52 73 for Radio Amateurs • December, 1985 



that you have the pleasure 
of knowing only once in a 
lifetime. He first entered my 
circle of awareness as an in- 
structor at the technical 
school I decided to attend 
about 35 years ago. One of 
the subjects he taught was 
antennas. It was hard not to 
absorb some of his theoreti- 
cal and practical knowledge 
about antennas, since he en- 
tered into the task of beating 
some smarts into those 
dumb students with his 
usual enthusiasm. 

tt was at this time that I 
managed to become an am- 






ateur-radio operator — again 
largely due to Willie's enthu- 
siasm for the hobby Willie 
had been a ham for 15 years, 
having acquired his ticket 
back in 1935. 

After graduation, I kind of 
lost touch with Willie, par- 
tially because the technical 
school folded, but mostly 
because I drifted away from 
ham radio. As I found out 
later, Willie went to work for 
one of the major aircraft 
manufacturers, migrating 
eventually to their radiation 
laboratory, designing and 
testing antennas, naturally. 



The Willie Wand Special. 



About 33 years later, 
when i was just messing 
around with a 2-meter han- 
die-talkie, I flipped it over to 
5-2 simplex and there was 
Willie's unmistakable voice. 
As a result of this accidental 
QSO, I became an enthu- 
siastic reborn ham-radio op- 
erator, acquiring the 
necessary equipment to get 
on 2 meters and chew the 
rag with Willie and his 
friends This was timely, 
however, since I retired 
shortly thereafter and was 
needing something to fill the 
8-hour-a-day void 

One of Wi f lie's daily rou- 
tines consists of getting on 2 
meters at precisely 8:00 am 
every (and I do mean every) 
morning to chew the rag 
with his lifetime friend Clar- 
ence W5FDP, who lives in 
Muskogee, Oklahoma, 
These morning sessions 
were (and are) quite infor- 
mative and entertaining 
Quite a few hams just moni- 
tor these QSOs, reluctant to 
join in because of the long- 
winded transmissions, some 
sorely stretching the lOmirv 
ute ID time limit. In fact, 
they have their own exclu- 
sive simplex frequency since 
most of their transmissions 
would time-out just about 
any repeater 

I gradually became a 
member of this "Social Se- 
curity" net. Initially, my 2- 
meter antenna system con- 
sisted of a well-known com- 
mercial collinear vertical 
(Willie called it an inverted 
ground rod). This worked 
fine for local QSOs P but 
sometimes it wouldn't quite 
hit Muskogee, about 40 
miles away. Finally, out of 
exasperation, Willie offered 
to build me a beam antenna. 
Knowing that anything Wil- 
lie built would be almost 
perfect I accepted the offer 
before he had a chance to 
back out 

Naturally, thU antenna 
became the main topic of 
quite a few 8:0Oam SS nets, 

every aspect being thor- 
oughly reviewed by all par- 
ticipants. During one of 



these sessions, the matching 
network became one of the 
topics, most methods being 
thoroughly discussed. As a 
side note, Willie mentioned 
a matching technique that 
he had successfully used 
previously on a vertical an- 
tenna. This caught my atten- 
tion, so I suggested that we 
try it out on my antenna 
Willie jumped at the 
chance. 

Basically, this matching 
method consists of a series- 
fed driven element, with the 
coax cable entering the re- 
flector end of the boom, 
then going on into the driven 
element through a slot lo- 
cated in the center of the 
driven element (where it 
passes through the boom), 
continuing on out to an in- 
sulated gap on one end of 
the driven element. The 
coax shield is then con- 
nected to the boom side of 
the driven element while the 
coax center conductor 
passes through an insulator 
and then connects to the 
end stub (see Fig. 1). If the in- 
sulated gap is property lo- 
cated, the impedance will 
be 50 Ohms — a perfect 
match, 

Willie decided that my 
antenna should consist of six 
elements with a fiberglass 
boom. After scrounging 
around, I managed to come 
up with enough ^inch-di- 
ameter aluminum tubing for 
the directors and reflector. 
The boom was to be con- 
structed of 1^-inch fiber- 
glass tubing (which Willie 
already had) To allow room 
for the coax cable and fit- 
ting, we decided to use %- 
inch aluminum tubing for 
the driven element (which 
Willie also had). 

After several more SS net 
sessions, most parties fa- 
vored using a hood I ess PL- 
259 connector to terminate 
the coax cable (Willie's 
idea), With a little refine- 
ment in Willie's vertical mill 
(drill press), the PL -259 con- 
nector was turned down to 
be a snug fit in the end of the 
%-inch driven element. The 
fitting was then perma- 



Efl SCCTIOM 

OF •iRlVEAl El 



Outer section 

Of DAIVEK ELEMENT 



TEFLDii MA5,H£R 



~\ AT 



SET 5CREW5 



. 



L 



^^■^^p^ 




i ^ ■ i 

A L_T| 



* » 



I 



3ffl 



^ 



R6-!4^V 
CQAK 



ADAPTER 



—fr 



IM T 

' * r-T* 



;-_ 



L ° 



TOR 



L 



ZJ 



BRASS BLiSMlMi 



TEFLON OUrtH SLEEVE 



Fig. 2. Detail of coax connection, 



nently fixed in place with a 
short setscrew, the hote 
drilled and tapped through 
both the tubing and the 
meaty part of the PL-2 59 
connector. Naturally, the 
coax cable was properly at- 
tached and strung through 
the boom and driven ele- 
ment before everything was 
connected permanently. 
RG-142 coax was used since 
it is small in diameter (ap- 
proximately the size of RC- 
58) and has a Teflon™ dielec- 
tric. 

For attaching the PL-259 
center conductor, a brass 
bushing was likewise milled 
to the right size on the verti- 
cal mill, the hole in the bush- 
ing drilled out to fit the PL- 
259 pin. Again, a setscrew 
made this a permanent con- 
nection, the screw passing 
through the %-inch tubing 
and brass bushing and mak- 
ing contact with the PL-259 
center pin Before this was 
assembled, however, a Tef- 
lon washer was slid onto the 
PL-259 center pin, providing 
an insulating barrier be- 
tween the two pieces of the 
driven element (see Fig 2), 



o 



M 

► 8 
1. 7 
I 6 



I" 



- 



5 '« 

X 

E I 

I z - 



The basic antenna design 
was acquired from the NBS 
Circular, Technical Notes 
For Yagi Antenna Design 
(NBS^TN-688) Willie didn't 
know where to place the 
feedpoint, so for the initial 
try we decided to try it ap- 
proximately % wavelength 
from the center — this being 
about 9^4 inches, 

Willie had the antenna as- 
sembled and ready for test- 
ing practically overnight (at 
least it seemed that way to 
me), As usual, he did an ex- 
ceptional job, the elements 
firmly attached to the 
boom, straight and spaced 
within %4 inch of perfection 
Next to come was the tuning 
and feedpoint adjustment. 

Now, Willie doesn't settle 
for measuring swr down to 
0,1 resolution. He has his 
own special swr meter which 
reads 2 to 1 at fulf scale. 
Added refinements include 
a dummy load, an attenua- 
tor, and calibration load re- 
sistors for exact calibration 
With the dummy load and 
attenuator, measurements 
and tuning adjustments can 




P44 



145 146 i*? 



148 



149 



Fig. 3. 



73 for Radio Amateurs • December, 1985 53 



Reflector and director material 

Driven-element material 

Boom material 

Boom length 

Reflector length 

First director length 

Second director length 

Third director length 

Fourth director length 

Director spacing 

Reflector spacing 

Driven-element total length 

Driven element, center to feedpoint 

Driven element, feedpoint to end 

Estimated gain 



V*nch aluminum tubing 
\4ncfo aluminum tubing 
1-inch fiberglass tubing 
9 feet 

38.95 inches 
35.57 inches 
35.05 inches 

35.05 inches 
35.57 inches 
20.075 inches 

16.06 inches 
35.688 inches 
11.91 inches 
5.938 inches 
10-25 dB 



Table 1. Specs for 147-MHz, (^element beam antenna. 



be accomplished without 

worrying about the transmit- 
ter mismatch 

The initial tuning and 
alignment session didn't pan 
out too well. The antenna 
was resonant at about 145 
MHz (target frequency was 
147 MHz), and the feedpoint 
impedance wasn't even 
close. After much trimming, 
we managed to get the 
length about right, but the 
feedpoint impedance was 
still off The length of the 



driven element had to be re- 
duced to 35 n /t» inches in or 
der to achieve resonance at 

147 MHz 

The next tuning session 
consisted of cutting short 

pieces off the end stub, reat- 
taching these pieces to the 
opposite end of the driven 
element (on the other side of 
the boom], then re-centering 
the whole element. This in 
effect moved the feedpoint 
out from the boom This 
continued for several ses- 



i*o? 



HP 



nnCBBSCBBODlEB 
(B E9 B9 OS 06 8! 01 1 



AT LAST" A VtRV AFFQflDABU COMPUTER 
AT A VltKY AFFORDABLE PfUCE 



POWERFUL *-LkLf PHOGHAMMiBi t WITH JX O* MC.MORT PORTA 
Di.C-fi.rv * 13* l*<X MOOml SihGtE-JLET EnTRt COMMAND*- 

OURAfcLT. C' Ktt MtMR n AF*l TYPE HETB04HD-ZHM BAf.f FOUR 
CHIP DESIGN -ECHJf, AT ION At UNlOUE S*NT * * CHI C*. REPORT 

codes fop e«moh iDEHiirv- uhaph drawing and animated ems- 

Pl>V -ACCURATE TO *Uf PtcrMAL PLACES FQR FULL RANGE MATH 
AND SCIENTIFIC FUNCTION! AT AN AFFORDABLE PRICE 

*E CANNOT T6LL YOU THE MAKE OF The COMPUTER BUT n WAS 
MADt av A FAMOUS WAlCH COMPANY THE* USED TO SILL FOR 

twos 

*rE BOUGHT OUT WHAT THE *ACTOPT HAD LEFT \H StOC* AND HAD 
r.;> REMOVE THE lAHtLS.TuCSE iJNiTS- APE UMPACKAGFD LEW THE 
ffV WALL *QAFrTF u AMfl WAHUAL HECALTQF TNtS <S A tHSCOHUHMtU 
■ TfU THERE IS NO WARRANTY 



GET tmEm wxilE Tnfr LASt 



UWTTO 






S16J5 



AQA.PTQR 



H9\ 



See Sopternber 19&4 issue oC 73 fof T1MEX/RTTY article 



CHIP BONANZA ;at th*: 



vm 
mo 

ITS 



»io 



mah 



(REG turn 

(REG ta«n 

ear #qLK*pWi!p 



2£ THEY Afl£ A STEAL i 

)■ I EA (J> 1Q FOB f » QD 
B2 EA OH » FOR 1300) 
KL& E* OH 10 FC* KCH 
woo ea oh io poh v»aq 
c ea on io for naoo 

MSS EA OR « PGA fr*0D 
tT J6 EA OR 10 PQR tUtt 



t&K EA OR 
J29& EA OR 



HBPEGIAL.i 
lftUITCPU 



io for mm 

10 FOR 13900 
fl FOR 1 S00 

i FOR 1170*1 



TMS WOONL M ICHO-P 54 P| N fl BIT UB 
TMSOMlhL MlCftO-PP5| 

riMW04ANL W|CfM>P CLOCK OF N ANDDHIVfcH , 

THB BB1RANL MICRO-P COLOR GRAPHICS A NO DISPLAY 
KEYBOARD 194-4) 48 KEYS MEASURE 4 . 1 INLTEKI 



1 403 

1 9 0S 

V ■ < 



APPti U ind AP*>lE ii * COMPUTE* 
MawFRAMES Lturn MH*jt*i*fl HM 

lot**. - 



V*f A 

APPLE POWER 
SUPPlJES 



UftDpfc. 



Cassette Software 

i hvra rinmt* K>n*ii>« 

■and tor ltd pig «*B6-*14 **j 
Hfm Tpnm Prto« r n> »«, 
]rwi'.oe. «t^tn» 

TO (or Q9J0: 20 tQr HO » 

or «t KK atffret SflhrMi c**- 



HALS 

COMPUTER 
GOODIES 

irfifj t&S OS now fM AS 

Co*?i? cas&etfe pi*y*i 
loillerj op ) 1^9 W. 

9V. B SSO Ma icJapl*, i^mMimJ 
Icrr 14K RAM pw:hk| fro* 

10K RAM pack mrMJulfl, mo* 

pSTpiVOk 

I0K RAM prjch mrxMUt 
rafurdi&hfld flO.06 

RCA TV mt-Br**c« emit 

II A 

Dual |fiO* -lmA^bEIo KftdrfACt 

BBO 
TVlOsmputw gvfH twvA 



OROf «S OVf » BR HALL BE SMHHED PO&T AM> tACt^T 
ON 4 I«5 WHCHE AfATtCMAA CHARGES AHf RfOUESTED CM C«HfH5 LfiSB THAH 

f» pitAS* MctMOE AcviTioMAL gn ro* *ulnoung aw ma^ ag cxahgcs 

MCHCAAI HESCE^TS ADD «% t*Lfi TAX 5£NO JD* STAMF OH SAM *OH FREE 
»LTtA CAHAObAH OH0EH$ *00 ROD PQSTaG£ h U S 



Hal-Tronix, Inc. 

PO BOX 1101 DEPT. N 

SOUTHGATE. MICH. 48195 

PHONE (313) 285-1782 



* 





HAL' HAROLD C NOWLAMD 
WflZXH 



sions, the final result being a 
feedpoint ll 2 ^ inches out 
from the center with a 5 r ^ 
inch end stub. To achieve an 
swr which met Willie's ap- 
proval (1-03 to 1), pieces as 
short as K^ inch had to be 
moved from the stub end to 
the opposite end. These 
pieces were later replaced 
with a single piece firmly at- 
tached by means of an in- 
side sleeve pinned in place. 

Obviously, the feedpoint 
gap had to be covered some- 
how, desirably with some 
rigid insulating sleeve that 
would support the end stub. 
Here I was able to come up 
with a solution. A machinist 
friend made me a Teflon 
sleeve approximately 3 
inches long, 1 inch in diam- 
eter, and bored out to be a 
press fit onto the 5 / a -inch 
driven element. Properly 
greased with DC-4, this 
sleeve was forced into 
place As a final touch, Wil- 
lie had two pretty red plastic 
caps that perfectly fit the 
ends of the driven element 
Since this was to be a verti- 
c a 1 1 v polarized antenna 
(with the feed gap being on 
top), a hole was bored 
through the bottom cap to 
allow moisture to escape. 

The performance of this 
antenna was exceptional. 
When fed with 20 feet of 
coax, the swr was less than 2 
to 1 over a frequency range 
of 145 to 148.4 MHz, and 
less than 1 ,5 to 1 from 146 to 
147.9 MHz (see Fig 3). This 
matching method should be 
very efficient (minimum 
connections), and rt should 
be less susceptible to mois- 
ture since there are no reac- 
tive tuning components. 

I could hardly wait to get 
this Willie Wand Special an- 
tenna mounted on top of my 
house and hooked up to my 
rig Willie kept prodding me, 
of course, asking me every 
day "When are you going to 
get that antenna up?' r As 
quickly as possible, there- 
fore, I acquired a rotator, 
roof-mount tower, insulated 
mast (1 Ji-inch fiberglass tub- 
ing), rotator cable, and coax 
cable. Starting early one Sat^ 



urday morning, I really got 
with it By late afternoon r I 
had it all up and went into 
the house to give it a try. I 
just got through hooking it 
up to the rig and was trying 
out the rotator when the 
doorbell rang. Of course, 
there stood Willie with his 
head tilted back, admiring 
his Willie Wand Special 

This antenna has proved 
to be every bit as good as 
Willie predicted. If anyone 
wants to copy it, however, 
be prepared to go through a 
similar adjustment proce- 
dure. You will, however, 
have the benefit of Willie's 
experience, starting with the 
feedpoint about 11 ii inches 
from the center (for a 147- 
MHz center frequency). See 
Table 1 for material and di- 
mensional specifications. 

Willie has since assem- 
bled a second version of this 
antenna for another of his 
SS net buddies, George 
W5KQD. As expected, it is 
not constructed exactly the 
same, the driven element 
being built out of %-tnch 
thin-wall copper pipe The 
dimensions did, however, 
come out to be very similar 
to mine. 

The coax and coax fitting 
on George's antenna also 
are different, the coax being 
RC-115 (about the size of 
RC-8), and the coax fitting 
constructed out of a pipe-to 
copper-tubing adaptor 
(again milled into shape by 
the vertical milt). Since this 
adaptor was brass, the coax 
shield was soldered directly 
to it, and the complete fit- 
ting was soldered to the 
driven element. A similar 
brass insert and Teflon 
washer were used to insulate 
and attach the coax center 
conductor to the outer stub, 
Again, a Teflon sleeve was 
used to insulate and add ri- 
gidity to the feedpoint gap. 

If you happen to be within 
a 40mile radius of Tulsa be- 
tween the hours of 8 and 10 
am, give a listen on 146.46 
simplex. No doubt you will 
hear a strong signal being ra- 
diated from a Willie Wand 
Special I 



54 73 for Radio Amateurs • December, 1985 




ARTER J I\T BUY 



i dividual noncommercial) ...... . .25* per word 

Commerce! - ....,_. .eoe per word 

Prepayment by check or money order is required #i1h your ad. No discounts or 
commissions are available. Please make your payment (o 73, Rates For multiple 
inseriions are available on request 

Advertising must pertain to amateur radio products or services. No special 
layouts or positions are possible. AM advertising copy must be submitted 
typewritten (double-spaced) and must include luH name and address. Copy 
limited to 100 words, maximum. Count only words in text. Address, free. 

73 cannot verify advertising claims and cannot be held responsible for claims 
made by The advertiser Liability will be limited to making any necessary correc- 
tions In the next available issue. 

Copy must be received in Peterborough by the 5th of the second month 
preceding the cover date, 

Make checks payable to 73 Magazine and send to: Jim Gray. Advertising De- 
partment. 73 Magazine, 80 Pine St M Paterboroudh NH 03458. 



MOBILE IGNITION SHIELDING. Free lit- 
erature. Estes Engineering, 930 Marine 
Drive, Perl Angeles WA 9B362. BNB006 

MILITARY TECHNICAL MANUALS for old 
and obsolete equipment. 60-page catalog, 
$3.00. Military Technical Manual Service. 
2266 Sena sac Ave,, Long Beach CA 90815. 
9NBM9 

HAM RADIO REPAIR, tube through solid 
state Robert Hall Electronics, PO Bom 
8363, San Francisco CA 94128; <4G8)-72^ 
8200 BN62T9 

OSLS to order. Variety of styles, colors, 
card stock, W48PD GSLs* PO Drawer DX. 
Cordova SC 29039. BNB260 

THE OX'ERS MAGAZINE. Up-to-date, In- 
formal ive, interesting. Compiled and ed- 
ited by Gus Browning W43PD, DXCC 
Honor Rolf Certificate 2-4. Send for free 
sample and subscription information to- 
day. PO Drawer DX, Cordova SC 29039. 
BNB261 

COCO OWNERS— Free software and 
hardware brochure. CoCoNuts, POB 9866, 
San Jose CA 951S70B66, BNB265 

CASH PAID for traffic/speed radar equip- 
ment WMe or calr Brian R. Esterman. PO 
Box 8141. NorthHeld IL 60093: {312)251- 
3901 BNB271 

INDIVIDUAL PHOTOFACT FOLDERS: #1 to 
#1400, $3.00 postpaid. AJL. 414 Chestnut 
Lane. East Meadow NY 11564, BNB312 



IMRA™ International Mission Radio Asso- 
ciation. Forty countries, 800 members. As- 
sists missionaries with equipment loaned, 
weekday net. 14.280 MHz, 2:00-3:00 pm 
Eastern. Brother Bernard Frey. 1 Pryer 
Manor Road, Larchmont NY 10536, 
BNB326 

ELECTRON TUBES: receiving, transmit- 
ting, microwave all types available. Large 
inventory means next-day shipment in 
most cases. Daily Electronics, PO Box 
5029, Compton CA 90224; (213>774-1255 
BNE330 

WANTED: radios, tubes p«M339 for my 
collection. Howard Stone, HCR-3, Bo* 418. 
Deer River MN 56636. BNB332 

HAM TRADER YELLOW SHEETS, m our 

24th year Buy. swap, sell nam- radio gear. 
Pubhahed twice a moririv Ads quickly cir- 
culate— no long wart for results SASE for 
sample copy. $10.00 for one year (24 is- 
sues), PO Box 356. Wheaton IL 60189 
BNB335 

RADIO TRANSCRIPTION DISCS WANT- 
ED. Any size, speed, W7FIZ r Box 724— 
WG. Redmond WA 96073 0724 BNB347 

FIND OUT what else you can hear on your 
general -coverage transceiver or receiver. 
Join a shortwave radio listening club 
Complete information on major North 
American clubs and sample newsletter, 
% 1.00. Association of North American Ra- 
dio Clubs, 15Q0 Bunbury Chive. WhiHiet CA 
90601 BNB310 



CABLE CONVERTERS. Lowest price. 
Dealer inquiries accepted, Quantity dis- 
counts Free catalog. PG. Video Corp., 61 
Gatchell St.. DepL 73, Buffalo NY 14212, 
8NB349 

«TS8 ANTCNMA, l6Om-10m, no traps, 
$59 95 Weather-coot kit. SB9S. Openwire 
feedhne, roller induclors T antenna acces- 
sories, and much more* Kilo-Tec, PO Box 
1001, Oak View CA 93022 (806H646-9645. 
BN3360 

ROHN TOWERS— wholesale direct to 
users. 23% to 34% discount from dealer 
price. Atl products available. Write or call 
tor price list. Also we are wholesale tfis 
(ributor for hfeliax antenna cable. Hill Ra- 
dio, 2503 G E Road, PO Box 1405, 
Bloom i n at on I L 6 1 701 -1 405; (309^663*2 14 1 . 
BN6366 

HI-MOUND keying mechanisms now avail- 
able! Finest and most extensive Un© of 
hand keys, mofcfte keys and iambic pad- 
dles. Wrlle tor free catafog. Sky wave Ra- 
dio Systems Box CM, 943 BobletL Blaine 
WA 98230 BNB37B 

TR 7 USERS— NB-7 noise blanker, new, 
£65 ppd SL 300 CW fitter, new, $50 ppd 
HS 75 headset by Drake, new. $14 ppd. 
Tony Musero K3UKW t (215)-271*aS9B. 
BNB360 

CABLE TV CONVERTERS and equipment 
Plans and parts Build or buy Free infor- 
mation. C & O Electronics. 626 Rowerdaie. 
Depi 73. Ferndale Ml 48220 BNB383 

QSL CARDS: 100 for SS 00, 500 for $16 00 

For a sample, send an SASE to Ken Hand 
WB2EUF. PO Box 706, East Hampton NY 
11937. 8NB38B 

DX HEADING MAPS for Boston, New York 
City. Philadelphia. Baltimore. Detroit. At- 
lanta, Chicago, New Orleans, SI. Louis. 
Dallas, and Los Angeles. 11* x 17", $375 
ppd, Specify city, Bill Massey W2HOJ, PO 
Bok 417 h Hainesport NJ 06036 9NB392 

FflEE: 6frpage electronlc/compuler parts 
catalog. Hosfell Electronics, 2610 Sunset, 
SieubenvNIe OH 43952; (6l4).264-e464. 
8NB393 

p 

NEW! CW WORD COPYING COURSE! 
Compfele. Easy to- learn, QSO Tralnar™ 
Code Course. Includes two 60 minute au 
dip cassettes and complete instructions. 
Send $16 95 {Indiana residents add SO .85* 
Money back, satisfaction guarantee (less 
$2.00 shipping end handling). Business 
ai*e SASE gets free information. AVC In- 



novations, Inc., Depart menl 7C3, PO Box 
20491, Indianapolis IN 46220-0491 
BNB304 

BLACK DACRON* POLYESTER ROPE 
Send us your name, address, call letters, 
and $1.00 and we'll send you samples of 
our new easy-Knotting, easy-cull mg. UV 
protected, highly abrasion resistant *r*~ 
rope and all necessary ordering ^n forma- 
1km. Si. 00 credit on your first order! Syn- 
thetic Textiles, Inc., 2472 Eastman Avenue. 
Building 21-22, Ventura CA 93003: (805)- 
658-7903. BNB395 

KENWOOD 430S OWNERS! Stop 430S 
scanner on busy frequencies. When clear, 
resume automatically' Squelch activated! 
Reviewed QST frS^ 73 2/85, Worldwdio 
12/84. $19,95: 529,95 assembled. $2.50 
shipping, JA0CO Stop Scan. R1 Bo* 386. 
Alexandria IN 46001. BNB396 

SSB SQUELCH tor any radio 1 Improved 
circuitry! Active filters! 2V 3 "x5V» ', $54.95 
plus $2.50 shipping. JABCO Squelcti It, R1 
Box 386, Alexandria \H 46001. BNB397 

SOLAR ELECTRIC MODULES. Dealer 
price list. $1.00. Homestead Distributing, 
PO Box 451, Northport WA 99T57: (509)- 
735^142: BNB398 

SURPLUS AND MORE SURPLUS. Thou- 
sands of items, free bargain packed flyers, 
ETCO Electronics, Piattsburgn NY 12901. 
BNB3S9 

BUILD A COMPUTER AIDED DESIGNED 
6-dB stacked vert tea J omnidirectional 2- 
meter antenna for less than $50 00 using 
hardware-store materials. Send $5.00 for 
detailed plans and parts list. John De Ar- 
mond WD4O0C p PO Box 3657, Qe* eland 
TN 37311. BNB400 

BURGLAR ALARMS . . .300 plus whole- 
sale sources. Introduction to security 
alarm business. Terrific business/employ- 
ment opportunities. Get in now, Informa- 
tion S200. Security Electronics Inter- 
national, PO Box 14660, Grand Rapids Ml 
49501. BIMB401 

WANTED: a copy of a service manual or 
schematic for an SBE SB 450 UHF trans- 
ceiver. I will pay costs. Steven L Delay 
N9EEM. RR1. Pawnee IL 62S5& 522*6391 
days, BNB402 

ANTIQUE RADIOS, schematics, tubes, 
and literature For a large catalog, send 
it.00 to VRS{SU 376 Gilley Road, fciarv 
cheater NH 03103. BNB403 



/ 



COLLINS 

KWM-380 
KEYBOARD- 




Pipo Com mum cm 
tip-ri^ Has The Key- 
board Thi*i la Used 
With The Colhns 
KWM 380 For 
Remote Entry, 

KEYBOARD-MOUNTING FRAME ft SHIPPING S25 

To know more about our Touch-Tone* Encoders. 

CALL OR WRITE FOR FREE CATALOG & 

INFORMATION GUIDE 

Pipo Comrnunicahons 
P O Box 3435 * Hollywood, CA 50076 

213/852-1515 *ATA1 



<pipo communications 

Emphtsw rs on Quattly & Reliability 



ALL BAND TRAP 
"SLOPER" ANTENNAS! 



FULL COVERAGE! ALL BANDS! AUTOMA- 
TIC SELECTION wrthPftOVEI*W*aiherpf5or 
ici'id Tr«ci ■ tQ Gi Capper«rel<J Wire' 
GROUND MOUNT SLOPER5 - Ho R4di«ii 

CoflrteCt Top la Triii, Bulldlno*, Por*s.*Tc at 
ANY anpl« fiom StFilgfttup to SO d«flrt cs Tor 
cittern ""SLOPED 4 ' DX Awfotna Gam or 
tsend It inywhirt you need tol 2OO0 Wait 
PEP Input, mm Pfpmanenl op porta bin Use 
nitalli In IO mlnuUl SMALL - NEAT - 
ALMOST INVISA8LE - N« Am wm knowycu 
havo * Hl-Power DX Antanna, Idoil For CONDOs APART- 
MENTS- RESTRICTED AREAS - Pn-tunftd Int 2-1 or lest 
SWR over ALL bandt laNCapt eO-.(QO-300kc) No adjust- 
ment* nodded . EVER, COMPLETELY ASSEMBLED, with 
5Q ft RG-5STU 1 Cean fa ndllne and PL2S9 corxipctor - Built 
In HflhUng arrester - reidy In hiookupl FULL INSTRUC- 
TIONS! 

No. 10SOS - 60^40-20-13-10 ■*- 1 V-tp 49 ll. *49.95 

No, 1040S — 40-20-t5-lO — 1 trap SG fl. $43.95 

No 10205 20-15-10 1 trap 13 ft. $47.95 

No, 10 16 S-l&0-OD-40-2Q-15-tO -2 U*Pi 63 ft . - ST5 55 
SEND FULL PRICE FOR PP DEL IN USA (Canada li S&.OQ 
ejilra for pOMige etc} Or ordir using VISA, MA5CARD - 
AMER EUP- Gliro Numb.f Cm. D*tr Ph 1-306^235-5333 
+i±r-h<t*!f*- W« *hip In 2-3 day i (Par Cam i* tfiyif Guaranteed 
1 ft - IO diay money bat* I rial, 




Depi. A?- 12 



WESTERN ELECTRONICS 

Kearney Nabraika 6S&+7 



SWLS-HAMS 

CALL TODAY FOR ALL 
YOUR SWL & HAM NEEDS 

RECEIVERS • ANTENNAS 

TRANSCEIVERS • RTTY 
PUBLICATIONS • SWL 
YAESU • KENWOOD • ICOM 

HARDIN ELECTRONICS 

5635 EAST ROSEDALE 
FORT WORTH, TEXAS 76112 

1-800-433-3203 

IN TEXAS 817-429-9761 






"When You Buy, Say 73 



' • 



73 for Radio Amateurs • December. 1 985 55 



Gadget a 



1985 Index 



Hunt the Auto-Fox 

I* Your Repeater Dy 1 1 ■■ i .■ 

KOAA'a 2m UFO 

Pet faction Plus 

Talk la Cheap 

What You Bee li Where 

You're At 
Wutld war KlrfUM 



WLl&GTH automatic fax identifier 

WA4TCH -f- - -krihiie L telemetry BStCOdalX 

K9PQX we jtheOr^dtD signal ipyrcf 

WIPU*. unproved HTTY tuning 

WBqNQK .itfurdable voice synthesis 

add-on digital fr&quehcy 
! iplay 
WiRU Luil.l d foxhole radio 



Aug 


49 


Jan 


*JQ 


Pat* 


43 


JiUI 




Oct 


22 


Jul 


4 



3| 



ft c .ri"LE 



Arxpli t^rs 



AUTHOR 



DeSCRlPTlQB 



ISSUE 



Hooe^Brew the Blockbuster 
Satellite SuprejMnry 
Th.ir Glorious Gotiaet 



An* anna 6 

A Cr- VB ' 5 Aj~ j 

A Kew Angle fat Dxj>o]es 

A space-Saver So«er. Megger 

i ecu 

Al ligatored V-'.^ni* 
Aaw ■ Dr***s Art 



Brew a Coffee It 

. Id tbr Broadband tow 
Diaco^ax th* DLacons 
Con the Dayton Hafc*tat 
Don't Fail 
Dr. Ffd^itrr.iStir/* CB Ree* 

Fight wire 

Prbaee the Vat iCr. 

Porcupine Itobt 

Rotate the Be stain 

.. 

why ft> ** 

Sw: A * tb7 

The Bo-Baloney I t% 

The Rubber Du mfced 

Two For Two 
Up, Up* and A 
Jfl^n An t Pointed? 
whip the Ccaspetitiua 
Super Sepp for VHI' 



Construe* 



A Gcntu»aan'i Antenna 
A New Angle fur Djpolee 

A Scavenger "a Ami io 
A Epace-Sfivetr Seven M«gqrr 
AFSK. And Ye Shall Trnnscaiv* 
fef CCD 

Automate* the I 

Brew a Coffee Ground Plan* 
Bui Id a 1296" 
Build a Battur Hex 

loadband Bow Tie 

Bui Id th' o wn ittlar 

Ccnjure An II! Gai. 

Lficoyar the Dleoona 
Don the Dayton NsU-Mitmfl 
Or. FrBtiknnstain ' ■ Cfl Ream 
Exponent 1,1 1 Potential 
Fighting Fire With Wtra 
MarmaiiLcHt'feB QBP7 
Hear, Heart 

Home-Drew the Blookbuater 
How <5tM 1 l . S 1x7 
tmtdflt ATVJ 
la Your Repeater Dying? 
OlUu'a Pol I ; 
One-Ch ij. i tea ml le 
Operate D5CA* SB 10 Matara? 

1 Faction Plua 
Phase the Slat Lon 
Porcupine Mobile 
P r • . 1? 1 r n k . , ,-, 

Saga of trie W. I 1 
Satellite S tip rema try 

Shftestr 1 t>g RTTY 

Six for Two 

Slick PIC Trick 

So Uhv «-y Ca 1 1 It 

Wirelaas? 
£p<t«--h» Speech I 

Taw a Hit* 

Til* i ^ Cha 

The 3" "In* ■+■ <€ 

ownund* Project! Part 
- Dowtiiihrfa Project: P-> 
tibia Dig tone* 

hbet 
The ***=;*»■ tHj**r Pack 
The Butte* D**ck Debunked 
Th* T«7«aa Traf. -mi 

t Agj 
I «^ Out Your Tubaa ; 
tha TU-IOOO 
Tao for Two 
sip. Up, «Ad ;. 

HA.Hiftt:*?!^! Part 1 

Z 9JMiikZ*\ i:nt fart II 
ffh«l You Sa« ta where 
You're At 
*atatcnet Are Hot Cracker* 1 

WT.if the t-asajiet:. • 
H^rld Har Mireltn 

per Sepp for "/itF 



Ail Tni» an:l PCI It 
Cheap Efeath Help 
Supar Surplua Burprlaa 



WB3MU 

H202f 

KT3B 



wA4jil : 

■ 
ACair- 

mmtp 

AJQat 

-A. W 

WD9BLJG 
ail . 

tfUCQA 
Wl 

KAJJQM 
MaTYU 
t**TY« 
a 

N70«U 
arfiHXH 
wsa«i 

KABitCJ 
MMUXK 

tfaWY 

K1I3T 

W4ITVK 

«A*W-C 

wfcTYH 

AMM 

•. |fHM 

HA4U7H 



2"Kli 6-=e!.er linear 
aO-Watt Utlf amplifier 
te|.4.1d a Gonset 9?Z 



WA4BLC 
ttlOV 

KAOPHT 
W6JTTX 

KAfclFQ 
MP«XQP 

V.4! 

wrjrjjjj; 

¥Wll»« 
KlUOT 

WJ' 

wn.ii .■ 

W6TYIJ 

SSaUP 

rflW 
KL7GLK 
MBLilll 
WA«1 1 '1 
Wi&B 
WflBTPfi 
H6I0J 
Hj I'Ql 
KD2XX 

RDt 

PABRGJ 

AW9L 

HABJllE 

WA-tTk 

miHQi 

M-IKY 

Bl 

R-etchladtrja 

K*1T 

W4tSVK 
AGSB 

0A4K0 
f-*LwI 

WA4BLC 

nfr-; 

■reflni 



VA4YXH 

K4d 

HJtHOI 

HiBO 

aTAatr&t 



Jul 50 
Feb 
Jari 34 



aupar-ahort 4Wte ¥ir? 
the Case Edr 'er. :ce. 

dtpet«a 

(ulL^wava 40b loop 

m?r* on an 4a*£mo a.-. -en*: a 

a bamia For old anteiu 
National Radic Astrcxuay 
Ofceer'jat ory 
#»ty 440-MHz a-inenria 

ftOtt wcrder 
UP «hj 1 1 1 Si^ti J eage 
2a dock on yoctr hat 
-f icelline 
CI baaa ran^i* for 10= 
exponent la 1 Line natcrang 
15* V-ba«b array 

m at n*. 
trapped 1 a 1 array 

Mftd Mobile sag-^u-t 
phase- shift your pat. -.em 
6-eltTient 2-B bean 
6-eiewnt 2ai delta loop 
r ; 4 antenna 



44 

Sep S -: 

Jan 44 

A^j 17 

Hay 50 

Jul IB 

Sep JO 

Sap 3B 

May 1 ~< 

Apr 26 

Sep 40 

Sep ^2 

Sep 44 

Sep la 

Feb 42 

Kay 34 

Hay 40 

Hay 45 

Occ $2 

Sep SB 

Har 45 



uajK 



j'Duf antenna sy»;es FeL T J 2 



low^-tach antenna tL 
lO 4ft gala over a duck 

.' of 2s antannae 
hyhri. ar 

Sinclair bea«— ai«a-f 
7b *B*Uan* whip 
aJjapLa extended r-epp 



Hay 44 

«ay 47 

Hay 23 

Hay 12 

Kay SS 

Sep -l. 

Hay 52 



at4FXI 
*4YB 



aup«r -short lbOtn wire Nov 44 

Hie za&e far vertical Sep 54 

dipole* 

eiLreinely siiaple teceivec Aug 66 

j I'wave 4Cm loop Jars 44 

■ table AFSK generator Juti 32 

Tv-rrn on an amazing antanhd Aug 12 

control your iaesu With iJait 3Q 
nn KC- lu 

eaay 440 -MHr- antenna Sep 10 

ATV downconvetter act 40 

hQW»tO project enclosures b A4 

Btan wonder Sep 30 

two -ton a ssri tesUi Apr lb 

simple siqi.iiJ qeiii'cJtGr Hvit S2 

IIF multiband rage Kay i 7 

2t\\ duuk 6n your hat Apr 36 

Cfl bun 111 ri-'if^dc for iQm Sep 62 

HXponantlal line matdiinq Sep 44 

15m V^bomb itray Sep l j .u 

mea&uta hanrvonlc power Aug 29 

Mi adwiilibJf praamp Apr ?xi 

2-kW 6 -ma tat Linear Jul 50 

hottH>-br#W 5-meter nq Jan 5 7 

pLuy-lri fiBt-scan TU Auj 31 

ifi^ahanrtal Lelemetry encoder Jan '•. 

but kit an LIF hulix Feb 42 

Atari ayitem De-: ih 

1 45/43 5 -MHz converter KoV J6 

improved RTTY tunlnq fun 3>6 

* - i|iped vertical array Hay 54 

band mobile raag-mount Hay 40 

fiiii-1-aad. active rf proo Nov 46 

6--eLemerst 2ni fiei Gee 

Kttt UKP amplifier LB 

horae-nrew sLation anon ■ tor Aug 56 

rUrxpenaive terminal 46 

6-elonvent let delta i^op Sap 5B 

raj. printer add-on Jun 50 

5-L*n--t antenna Mar l~i 

taltling repeater Mar 
control 1*-: 

aiaart OOOlle power Apr 5 4 

af : la voice synthesis Oct 21 

hoata-nrew lO-HHt race* wet Jul 30 

,th 2," iceLver Aug: 14 

■i»iw-(;«y and a 1 1 grmeri t Sep .1 

the Ultiarate resistsr.re box Har 34 
C»Ut a»a*s-r^r 

I'Ow-tech antenna tuner Hay 44 

17-v^. - Jul 3B 

10 dS gain over a duck Hay 42 

aasaiL-^ain translator Fab 60 
checker 

band— scan far the TS-*j'JS Jul 44 

uae FtTTa inatead Sov 

lowbadgvt RTTY aasd?- Jan 14 

r Of 3> rtntenr. 1 = r=y 21 

. L2eir Hay 

. -ift, BAM to j :c-20 Jan IB 

add in AAM to your VIC-20 Jan 32 

aod-on digital frequency Jul 40 

iptay 

Nutler Bridge Wax m woet Sep 50 

2a> "Oatsxm* whip Sap *J 

build a foxhole radio Aug) 32 

^ple extended Z^pp Hay 5 1 



Morse keyboard for tbe PCX I Har 2 A 

L01 transalt off sen Har 4fl 

re^jvefmle the ORC-& Feb 54 



I/O 

All Thie and PCH l 
Autonata th* PT-<?57 

CoCo'a Counter 
Convert and Con Vera* 

mIv« Your oiak* a Physical 
One-Chip Facsifttla 
Slick Vt£ Tfi 
Speak- ■ -Il BTTY 
Through th* Looking. Olaaa 
VIC AAH*f tcatiUrti Part I 
VIC RAH i- MM Par'. 
where A* I Pa int. - 



Hiscellanaou* 

A Scavenger's Radio 
Above Intercept 
Ajaerica'a Draaai Array 



unarm sTork? 



Dot 



Ua? 



Datelines Dayton 

DO Volunteer Exa: 
rvturt ScMqc* 
Oood t» the Last 
In Search 0ft 
la Haft Pad 10 h 
Zshrod'a Juurnat 
lis* &*hgetou* Obaaaalon 
Join the iHOT 7«*el 
Jya** Leave »r Hera To Dial 
Looking £aat 
MOAA a la UFO 
Old Tubs a Sever Dial 
0B1 7 

Secrets of Cellular Radio 
Secrete gj Telshaiaxiing 
Silver Eagle Ausr i» 

i*« th* Onthlnkable: 
Part (II 

# Street a « 

I 

tu t-lve Streets; 
11 



TAB in' 
Pa 1 -. 

Tak 1 q ' 
Part 



Talk la Cheap 

Snake with LCD Cyea 
j Trivia 



Mobil a /Par tab in 

Don the Dayton Hat-tanna 
Secreta < ular Radio 
Take a Hike 

The bownunda Pi ■ ti Pai 
Thu Dawnundn Project 1 Peri 11 



Kodlfloationi 

h I | igatOTed Aritennaa 
Broken Qx Blues 

Ulj tO b i K 

Cheap Maabh Help 

Eight Moda for the 1C-730 

FM Your iC-730 
iCom h a I. ita toed Play 

LuRtnriL AtVJ 

Mod l I icfltlon Kiih La l 

NOAA'a 2m UffO 

On the Flip Bide 

ParCection Plus 

Q5K for Your Mintage VFo 

Ouash 0AM 

Rotate the BohtffLL Curtain 

Supar Surplus Surprise 

The U-U*y Qemoilu t,itor 

The Sau*. ('■• SpectacuLai 

There and Back Aga- 

Toaa Out Your Tubaa t 

WARC fur the FT-iQlE 



He* Products 

A-P 

Ace Cuaaiuiiicationa 
-ch 
ch 
AJEA 
A£A 

Alpha Delta 

Aeateur Wholaaate Electronics 
American Soldering Oevioee 
Antenna Special lata 

Specialists 

Special lata 

Specialists 
Ajtaociatad Technology 
Ave. Siectronica 
Bel leyTech 
Bel^Teat 

1 Bier .1 

BH1 , 1 

BV Engineering 
CaOeft Software 
Centurion: 
•c Vega 

<nsninicatlona 
CMC Cosssunicattcrfia 



Antanoa 
Antenna 
Antenna 




kications Specialists 

^icatlona Special Lata 

. rati one Special ltti 

rratufl 

Coaapu t e rwa r a 
ObQLact E* 

Cushcc if : 

Cuahean 

JstaLOG Soitwsre 



W4PX1 
KA6IP0 

kU40 

Bra ska 

WBBTPD 

KW9L 

WAbNUC 

HH4L 

Iraf ini 

U6LDB 

AtilS, 



Layton 
AJ0K 

HA4Brl 

W5YI 

BA5S 

B*SHYB 

MM • 

VE3K5F 

Hhippit 

- 
KAJB 
AT2B 
WA61TF 

- si w 
mum 

SUBLH 
KSEl 
Staff 
HA3YKI* 

HA6AXK 

WB6N.r 

HA6WTE 
WSSHJ 



BlBUl 
N3BEK 
SJttipaon 

! son 



WOKflP 

W7RXV 
. A 1 GY 
K6YH 

NUllt 

KS4I 
WHCHK 

A17C 
K9POX 

KLQPS 
H1PDI 
KAJGCQ 

KA4MT0 
WHUXI. 

WhSLLK 
W2 1 V'S 
BC7Q 
OA4KO 



MOfse keyboard for the PC Jl Har 76 

control your Yaeau with J«n 30 
an MC-tO 

software frequency counter J un 26 

tratumit C-64 files with »ov 52 
BaarteSt 

quality— ins pect ion tips Oct 56 

Ax^ri system Dec 7# 

cheap printer add-on Jun SO 

Heath H-S terminal progrSfli Jun 40 

CO It ware RTTY nOnitar Jur, 14 

- 24E SAK to your VIC-TO Jan IB 

add 3K RAM to your VlC-lO Jan 72 

Sir beas-aioer Hay J^ 



extrasxely sinple receiver Aug 66 

BritJLah WI : sucrei t cadio Oct 36 

Mational Radio Astronotty Jul IS 
Ofcaer va t ory 

Bxr.'^r.- i on preview Apr 12 

discueaion by natifjtaai VEC Har 28 

experiments in tisse Feb 30 

practical coeaaunicaticn tips Hay 36 

RTTY beyond the band edge Apr 4R 

dangers of rf eipoaurv Jun ?B 

the story cant i Sue a Apr 24 

growers? up with electronica Sov 50 

alternate 2m act in Lies Dec 26 

IfHF contesting at 42DO feet Sov 14 

25 years Of fun Oct 46 

wvsther— raoio signal source Dec 42 

the rcasance of" antique *«baa Oct 50 

replacement for SST Hov JB 

behind-the-acentr D#c 44 

acceeSing crsapaiter servicea Jun 24 

?3-*a 25th anniversary ivardi Oct IB 

Ej*P precaution a Aug 52 

ShackMaster introduction Sep 32 

using the hCC £hackHdstcr Oct J 7 

affordable Voice aynthes Oct 

tali tale from the Antlers Hay 24 

ute! iite-televiaiom primer Mar 14 



2r\ duck on your hat 
behind— the-scenea tout 

satart mobile pow- 

Dick Smith 2m. transceiver 



i e s erab 1 y and a 1 ig nme ill 



Aj.j 

Dec 


26 
44 


Apr 

Aug 


S4 
14 
11 



new banda for old antennns 
new coilg for your gdo 
Hy-Gaku CB on 50 «m- 
HW-1D1 trenami t ofFaet 
quick ICQM naproveiienta 
quick add-on 

ful I .1 to 30 Mtla Lrahamtir, 
plug-in faat-ecan TV 
IS Hw-lol perte-ups 
weather-radio signal aOurce 
Interface 11 revetae ahifl 
improved RTTY Luninq 
easy break-in keying 
TS-520' ftTTY receive mod 
phase-shift your patta 
rejuvenate the OSC-9 
revive the CV-B9A 
two simple mods 
band- scan for the TS- *!QS 
use P^Ts Lci^KtiaJ 

ie and 24 HH± aod 



M.*iy 
.lul 

,. .., 

Mat 

Jan 

Jul 



.* i;n 
Jun 



Jun 

Dec 

Jul 



PRS-475PG PCS repair system 
JUt-3d VHF FK «Onitor 
4RS-15o-laH powei suppi> 
witching supply 
ATO-IOOO 
PK-64 TBC 

OX -A twin-sloper antenna 
Theta-T77 

Wv^-i4GO soldering gun 
ASA-J 102-25 

. r«r axcplifiers 
cellular acietma 
wall chart 

software author "a aumual 
rf connector catalog 
Opti-Fhai 
CMOS keyer 
SO-Obxs connector kit 
Sitelogger 
Loci pro sofr-wv 
Contest Log 
Ear Crss 

&TKFitS-23;C -aoden 
AB-2O0XL rotor 
Docking Booatar 
uhtertna 

Kfi-1 teverse-biirsr. board 
TP-3S repeater ton* pa 

. ::iii:: ; -dialog 
&BBS,«4 aaxiibnx software 
inventory sy = tem aoftware 
free tool catalog 
catalog 

CE-64SS radio anaJLyxer 
Anateur Radio Logbook 



Haj 
nar 



56 
22 
48 
10 
LB 

12 
11 



Aug 4? 

Dec 4 2 

42 

•Tun 36 



54 
44 



Mrty 4M 
Feb 54 



46 
50 
44 
22 
22 



Aug 68 

Jan 82 

Har ?2 

JUL bft 

Sep ^5 

Dec 72 

?4 

B2 

S*p 75 

Dee 72 

73 

Sep 74 



Al 



Aug ig 
fi 



Oct 77 

Dec 72 

Jul SB 

Sep 74 
Apr 

ONTt 74 
Apr 

Hay 83 

Sep 74 

Hay 87 

Fab 6? 

bee 73 

Aug 66 

nar 72 

Har 12 

Jul 88 

Jun 66 

Jan 82 

Feb 68 



56 73 for Radio Amateurs * December, 1985 



rica 



Davie Tetn 
Dei sen rot ft 

D i J count 
K I 

Electronic 

ESCt 

OLD 

Gripaate Efttfjpniifs 
Ha; Coesiiutu.catiQ.rta 
Heart r on Les 

Uami r 

ll ^ I" r, J 

nan ■ i lch 
1144 thl 

Ilu.it |,KLt 

Heath) 

Heithl 

Help Twohrn-alcigteB 
Hii'Jirth Engineering 

ico*t 

I COM 

QM 
ICQK 
ICON 
I nte r n. * t ifHial £Lad ±© 

-Tia.1 Rjivo 

JeOfteei Tools 

JenS#Ti Tool L 

K* I rs 

Kaut-TtoniCS 
ITilfTMDCJiJ 

Kilo~Tec 

.raen 
Louis and Beech 
N'iK.'.r 
MFJ 
MFJ 

uafi Electronics 
i-in Electronics 
Hand 
Midland 

Mountain *•«, 

NfMl 

il a mu e oL E£*c-Lr 

tfon- Linear S-yst*«.i 

t e ' h. . 1 "orp. 

R "t : ) i ■ ll . ' ' 

a team 
■agency 

> - . _ ir: 

Santee 

SrtHI Produi - 

Still r onics 

Syntcat 

Tanas Inetrumesits 

T i i plett 

I'-m Gaka AesycidUK 

Twin Oak* Associates 

lilting Electronics 

tJnivcuai Electron 

■ sualtatic, Inc- 

VoCosj 

Wshl Clipper 

M*hl Clipper 

Mel* 

H*i'i Hadio School 

•tinner's Edge 

tfmtek 



Power Supplies 



at* 



Taka •! Hike 
The Peerless 



K."'» l '.-ii ri 



Power P-nek 



S3L-. 
K02G 



A Scavenger's Radio 


KADDMT 


Affleric* s treats Array 


AJOM 


id lid a 1296 st ripper 


WB6IGF 


f* Your IC-730 


S9DBX 


^clt 


ItASS 


Keaf, Hear: 


M610J 


Hod 1 . a 1 


AJ7 


Onr Facsimi te 


KrJSTPD 


Operate OSCAtl Of, iO Meters? 


W61QJ 


Quean JrtH 


KA-4MTC 


THe 30— Hater -PI -4 s Receiver 


X4ET 


The Dayton Downlink- 


W9. 


TVRO Trivia 


W€S.t.r 


War 14 Wmr Wireless 


H1I 



Repeat St S 

■ ',* Dayton Hat-tenim WA3CQA 

Hunt tflfl AutO-PO* WH4CTM 

la Your Repeater Dying? WA4TltH 

Jo HI the SWOT TearaJ KA3B 

Saja Of the Willi** Hand W5RRJ1 

SpttchJ Speed WA4TEH 

Takin' It io the Streets; WA6AXX 

Part t 

Takm* It to the Street at HA^AXX 

Part II 
The Downjnda Fr_ Part 1 f.mpsoa 

The DCwnunda Project i Part II Siopaon 

Clubber Duck Debunk*! W4HV1C 

The San tec Spectacular M2IV5 

p ih* Competition H3BHM 



fle v lev* 








ALA 






KIXU 


MEA 






K9EI 


.U,A 






WIKU 


Lai. 






wlxu 


C*G«n 






P»E1 


cn 






KJBUI 


ColAtcl 






K1VS 


Dick Snith 


£lectr 


KT2B 


Flesh- 






KR3T 


Fpi Ten^o 






K?£I 


OLB 






mrio 


Hal CCi-aim 


. .ion* 


KM 


•Ian D* 






JRT9EI 


HAftLOti 






K?EI 



PCUH'SO vork atatlon 
battery eiatciaer 

buying aultle 

catalog 

Kleen Line PDS- 

PLL Fron^iiancy aynthea i^er 

F353— FQ dlalr. drive 

PK1I. TNC 

rrljanniT n 

SPT-1 Spectra-Tun* 

cvr-*oo scanner converter 

-Jigital FSK i-.i^IuLes 

LhiG-aOO LIKE- 1 preamp 

PPA-220 pack«t any 

HD-4G4C TNC 

3A-25O0 duto riHt-.anna I linei 

Smart Outlet 

2-22 monochrtUTie Lerminal 

HalpDOS 

Super CW Audio filter 

1271A 
1C-1200A 

IC-A2 air- band HT 

-H7O0O 
Icon/Ke=wco4 cryataj filter 
TS-94o£ cry*tal filter 
JTlc-76 tool * 
LoqicS«op« 

Octofnia trousl a •hooter 
Packet CraaRKni^ator 
rvRC Antenna 

T!i-&eri<* ACetliarLes 
Weather booti 

■i-jii i-ban<l muULJ* 1 A/ite.ir.is 
KD-14-45G-HH 

5726 block drtWntJDnVerter 
MFJ-204 anl-pJirtft bridge 
MFJ-816 swr/w -er 

PTCS-1 and BTJ 
coniiiuiiicatiowi encoders 
deaktop repeater 

portable UHf" radgo 

Fhoto Trap -. _- ; i - _ 

ST- I actuator cable 

AJP-lC: J| ncultisaeter 

T^TO-l ATV tranaceiver 
Coesp-i-Fire ex; tngaiaher 
Complete Ikiwi 

- = . qaci 1 loacope 
XfiO scanner 

MRC-iao repeater contr a j.ier 
ST - 2O0ET / S7 - 4LHJKT 
flexiblo l 1 lunin.itor 
HF Slope r antenna 
Bl-ltO sj ■ - i- u i*er 
ifafftrahcf t^ooka 
MndeL 4 7QCr ii"il ■ | meter 
C.W T TutortHSft 
Amateiir TeetCilln 
UL-1O0 batt#ry charger 
satellite -•? lev la ion book 
Braille Display Processor 
VHr/UUf ampli fieri 
daaolderiog tool 
lao-Tip drit 1 
wit IneterB 
4aa: - _ r : - • • let 

Con tester 
aaARTlPQi&K pet deaigner 



Jul t« 
Mar 73 
Feb aB 



air.srt xo'dlIo power 
12-volt "i-Amp nipply 



a Mt rcnit: 1 y ml np 1 e re ce i ve r 
Watlor>al ftadlo Aatronoiay 
Obaervatory 

ATX dcwYz^nVerter 
guiclc add -an 
evpertnexita in tiJae 
■iSCAk doWftliftk preaikp 
15 HV-lOl per k^ups 
A* it i ayaten 
145/435-NBa converter 
TS-S20 PTTY receive pod 
hoaie-hre'w lO-WHr receiver 
DptiDixing your OSCAR aatup 
eatel lite— tetev jelon pruaer 
bu>ld a foNhgle rad>ci 



2m duck on your I 

autOnUitic fox identifier 

l*^channel telemetry encoder 
alternate 2ai activities 
e-elenent 2= beaa 
talking repeater controller 
Sha,ckMastel .-Jucticn 

aair>g the ACC $hackfl#i- 

k Ssiith 2= *, ranaoeiver 
aaaeaably and! aii^niwnt 
10 dS gain OV#f a duck 
two simple nod a 
2a "DatsaR"* wh 



Hay 
Sep 
Apr 
ttar 

bee- 
Dec 
tuy 

's i ; 

Jun 
Apr 
Sep 
iap 
.i in 
Dad 
Apr 
'mi 
Jul 
Mov 
Hoy 
Jun 
Aug 
Oct 
Feb 
Aug 
May 

Jul 
Jut, 

Mar 



Jai 
9ei» 

• 

Ami 
pata 
How 
Dt 
Fail 
He™ 

Aug 
Peb 
Pel 

Apr 
Jutt 
Jul 
Oct 
Apr 
Mov 
Dec 
Hay 
Jun 
Sep 
Fab 
Dae 
i >. 
Fab 
Dec 
Apr 
Feb 

Jul 

Apr 
Kov 

Aug 
Jun 
Mar 
Oct 
Fttn 



Am 
Jul 



9 ■ 



•i v 
Jun 
Jul 
Jul 
Her 

A.I J 



Apr 
Aug 

J..:. 

Cajc 
Dec 
Mar 
Sep 



74 
TO 
72 

72 
32 
S3 
66 

71 
75 
7S 
B2 
71 
*o 

76 
82 
65 
69 
7S 
69 
6B 

a 2 

69 

69 
6* 

73 

«9 

82 
7* 

i*B 
69 
7* 
72 

*e 
u 

74 

68 
69 
69 
7o 
6S 
49 
77 
71 
76 
73 
34 
65 
75 
68 
72 
66 
69 
72 
7Q 

60 

71 

76 

60 

46 

7i 

J7 

45 



*4 
JB 



Aug 66 

Ju 1 I B 



40 
19 



Feb 30 

Apr 20 

Aug *? 

Dec 38 



44 

3« 
24 
14 

32 



26 

50 
26 
52 
J8 
12 



Oct. 32 

Aug 14 

Sep 17 

Hay 42 

Dec So 

Sep 42 



WlcroAMTOa Patch 


M.n 


62 


I'KT-l 


Jun 


66 


! PTTY tuning Indicator 


Jan 


67 


tact ran 2o 


!-r| 


76 


uoq 


jun 


00 


5 1 USA Smart Pat< 


Jul 


?B 


40-ai InstAr i 


May 


69 


^-6312 IMF eattttwler 


Aug 




Tlf-1200 


Apr 


65 


Nir l software 


Jan 


67 


1 TTtC 


Dec 


TO 


Cafjtsaf 


Jut 


7a 


£tq>er Log 


Apr 


i. ?J 


Coaaaodore togging software 


Jul 


79 



Bay den Book a K9£I 

3eatha.lt 

- . 
I COW 

Kar.trotlica 
£eraapOd 
Kenvood 
Kerwood 
MtJ 
*¥} 

Regency 
Saikc. 

Sonn i.* t s a f twa re 

iiSB Electron lea 

Tea la Book Company 

TET 

Urjivo.ran.1 Slectfonirs 

VIOCOHH 

3 -CO* 

i?9 IKK Anteflnaa 



AFSRi And T* Shall TranscoiVw K9£lll 

CoCo'a Counter AC4Q 

In Search Of i STTT W *0tG 

on the Flip Side KlQP^ 

Perfection Plus WIPiii 

Quash QRM KA4HTO 

secret n of Tetehamrairig K^ 

Shaoatring RTTY W9gDK 

Spenk-Mo-Kvil RTTY WA6NKC 

The D-D/ty &d modulator WB5LLM 

Through 1 in- LaoKing Glaea KflM£ 
Tuns in the TU-lOOO 



Teat fguipeant 

•ken Ox Alua* 

- - .i- iar 
Conjure An Rf Oetiie 

■onic-Pree OJIF7 
F c ota e - l ie Unknown 

ipe That Signal 
The Incredible Digiohai 
The lncre1ibl« indue ^-o— Gauge 
TfLe Tetaa TraiiE-Tester 

Through tha LookLr.-] .ji^iS 
What- You See 2 1 Where 

you're At 
Wheats torm* Are Mot Crackei'M! 



Co w pU Ler FrograMa 
Axuiteui' Kadto 



for 



H*y 



Ki*GQ 


SV-70OO -'»r 


A . , g 


70 


ilM 


2059-S 


Dec 


fi9 




IC-735 


gov 


■Q 


K9L. 


Packet Coaa»u 


Oct 




wA4ai^ 


TU-21A 


far 


60 


91 1 h 


TR-Ji^>JA 


Jun 




kc9lt 


T5-4JOS 


Feb 


70 


tiimi 


M>J*162i portable .ia 


54 ! 


74 


WtKU 


HFJ-*204 antenna ;iuj.a« bridge 


>": 


76 


NJBAH 


HklOOO scanner 


Jau 




KRJiT 


Pet*-2OO0 


A 3 f 




K9E1 


Kill jr Ji^r A:l,. . 


dej. 


77 


RT2B 


LT2JS transv. ■ 


i.'ie ..• 


,-i 


H 1 ku 


fl(.. l ii r . i.nin -... Tenia's U < < : -.La 




n 


KAJ.TOH 


it H- A miX. 


May 


6ti 


«WJO 


II j.hlnii Signals 
SataU 1 te TV 


Heir 




K9EI 


H-4 1 SSTV/GoiiiEnQdor a 
inter Tace 


Fel. 


70 


K9EI 


C MSO 


Mar 


60 


AHIS 


Space Saver DLpole 


Kay 


60 




SP-45M svr /power Meter 




70 


■;:aLH 


FT- 760 A 




67 



■ table AFSK g- ur 

software frequency et^i 

HJ I'Y bey end the band 

efface H rev^rae 

Improved HTTY tuning 

TS-52U RTTY receive bh irl 
acceaeirig ocunputei i i c«g 
inexpenalVQ tartnine] unil 
Hertih H-81 term in ii | p . i : am 
rt-wlve + r he CV-89A 
software RTTY mom' i 
low- budget RTTY modem 



Jun 


32 


Jun 


24 


Ap: 


48 


Jun 


42 


Jun 


36 


Jun 


44 


Jun 


24 


Jan 


4i, 


Jun 


40 


Jun 




Jun 


34 


Juh 


14 



H7KXV 

--:1PM 

'1BQT 

6a i ley 
KC6VP 
:h 
Ketchledgi 
KOSb 

r;N-lL 
K4KI 



coils for your fda 
two- tone SS3 tester 
*LPple si?-*: oetatvat 
swaaure harvontc power 
no-load active e t» 

hoaie-brew station aaHiitor 
the ultimata r«ui' »t 

cotl mi surer 
s&4ll-gaift traitaU 1 
Checker 

■■ ire RtTV rnom t 
■ i i-on digital frequancw 
ulapiay 
Hullar Bridge ■ i owr wot»B 



56 
36 

SOV 
A_ 



Aug 56 



Baj 

Jul 

Jun 
Jul 



Theory 

A \tfu Angle for uipolaa aiiGV 



Build a 6<»lter bci 


W4RKE, 


Orm't Fall for 5wr Fraud 


W1GV 


EXpcru Potential 


W6TYH 


QCkj 


KASS 


Give Tour Disks a Fhysic 


Krasfcri 


aaraajmic-Fre* suf? 


;ieop 


Is Han RadLO &*k i r-? Ua7 


VE3KSP 


QB1? 


aE2"QUK 


Secrota of Cellular k-idio 


ptlBUt 


Surviving the tin thinkable* 


WASYKri 


Part [ll 




sartri a Mofiern Myth? 


W6YUY 


Taklti' It to the Streets s 


WA6AXX 


Fai i 1 




Tfl^in' n to the s treat a i 


WA6AXX 


Part II 




Talk le Cheap 


|fB6»OH 


Toss Out YOur Tubes l 


OA4KO 


Translators A Biased Approach 


KCQEW 


TVftO Trivia 


H6SHJ 


afheatatonea Are Mot Cracker at 


K4KI 


zounds i Crouftdai 


K41FV 



case for vei ■ 

dipolea 

ti— (O project enrloiaree 
- fie 
aiponentia.1 Una k . 
eiprinents in Lis* 

■ 
Miiiife harmonic pc«> 
dangwrs of rf eipoaure 
replaceiaent for AST 
betiLnd- 1 he-scene a tour 
EMF precautions 

improve your antenna ay* 

SluckMaater intruih... ■ r 

using the ACC Shac'KMflUt **r 



TransHit'.#rii 

&ui!d the Ollie aTnistler MB5IPM 

Cheap Heath Help K6YB 

FM Your IC-730 09DBX 
Hoae-Brew the alockbuetar 

ICON'S Eirer-deJ Play K54& 

t net ant ATV I wtJctiK 

M.....U fixation Hani. \ I A17C 
Ope c ate tiSCAU Otl lO MotDrrJ? HblOJ 

QSK for Your Vintage Vfo KAJGCO 

Satellite Supremacy WJ'SEF 

Super Surplus Surpriee ft*SLF 

That QloriOUl Gonset KT2B 

Dayton Downlink W9JI>/8 

I ere and Back Again FC70 



Aaaerica'a Dreaj: Array AJOH 

Brew a Coffee Ground Place W 

3uii-t a 1294 Stripper WBtfOT 

CS to Six DA3GY 

Hear i Hear I «6toJ 

Horae-arew tna Btockbuater KB2WIK 

Bow Ooo«l la S Kti7cLk 

Hunt, the AutO"FOX WB6GTK 

Inatant ATV. H0-CSK 

Join the SWOT 1'eaml KA3 

Juet Laava M« Here To Plat KT2fe 

Operate wScaR cm in Meter a? wGtoJ 

Saga of the WilJie Wund W5KAH 

Satellite Supremacy M20CP 

Secrets Of Cellular Radio NIELLI? 

Sir for TWO KABRCJ 

That Glorious Gonave'. KT2S 

The Dayton Downlink w9 

The Pownunda Project; Part I Sinpsa; 

The POwnaiida Pec- Part 11 Sisspeon 

The "f Dues Debunked MtfVF. 

Santec Spectacular M2IVS 

Two for Two *A4aL: 

rr tepp for VHF MA4DSH 



two- tone SSB tester 
HH-1Q1 transai: if feet 
guick add-on 
2-VM" 6-rteter Ifnaiet 

, L to 3C H&S r. rrtiisinlt 

plu.-j-tn faet-acan TV 
15 hW-lOl perk-upM 
14 5,.' 4 if. -M Hr. converter 
■ ay break- in keying 
EOTJMwtt UHF amplifier 
rejuvenate the GMC-9 
rebuild a Qonsat 975 
optlmicLng -:..: JSCAU aetup 
band-acan for the 7S-930S 



-4 

j 4 

40 



Sep 50 



Sep 54 





44 


Sep 




B«q 


44 




3D 


Oct 


56 


. 


79 


Jun 


28 


■ 


79 




44 


Aug 


53 




ip 


Sep 


32 



Oct Jl l 



aFfordahle voice aynihaala Oct 22 

use PET 5 instead NOV 22 

insistor design tutoria Jan 26 

*rt!«i l Lte-tcleviatoti prieer Mar 14 

Muller Dridge for evr Woe» Sep SO 

install the perfect ground Apr 30 





3fe 


*3.1 


■i 


Dec 


10 


."_. 


SO 


Jul 


12 


Aug 


10 


Aug 


42 


Nov 


36 


Jun 


54 


Feb 


ia 


Feb 


54 


."i; 


34 




?4 


Jul 


44 



Sat; On a I BadiO Aatroboary 
Obaet'Jatory 
easy 440-MRz antenna 
ATV downconver^er 
Hy-Qam CS on SO H 
OSCAR downlink preaatp 
2-k« 6-sasier linear 
home-brew u-m^ar i 
autonatic fox identifier 
piu^-in fa at- a can TV 
i i ternaEe 2n\ act Lvt,tiee 
UHF eoateating at 4200 faet 

. I/435-MHe convtrtor 
6-iOement 2ni ti«am 
60 -Wat- UHF ampl I 
behind- the-scenea tour 
6-elertient 2n del- a loop 
rebel Id a Gonset 972 
opt isiz I ng your OSCAM setup 

:'k South 2» tranaceivst 
aaaembly and aligrusant 
IO d& gain over a d 
two sinple coda 
pair Of 2b antennas 
simple extended repp 



Jul 



;a 



- = - 


30 


. Z 7 


40 


. 


22 




20 


■ UJ 


50 


Jan 


57 




4B 


Aug 


30 


Dec 


26 


NOV 


14 


NOV 


36 


Dec 


52 


Feb 


18 


. -.-. 


44 


Sep 


SB 


Jan 


34 


Jul 


24 


Aug 


14 


5 r. : 


17 


Kay 




Dec 


SO 


Hay 


22 


Kay 


52 



73 for Radio Amateurs • December, 1985 57 



E&TRON 



RF ENTERPRISES 
Radio Frequency Notes #1 



**£to 



r 



S Program* on Diskette fur JBM 

• Design I' i Iter Networks. ResonAnl Circuits, etc. 

• Calculate \SWR. cross-product » 

• Can veil Volt, Amp, Power Ratios lo dR 

' Require* IBM or IBM compatible computer with at 
least 128K of memory and graphics or color graphics 
card instilled 

I ill <mm O Hrin il jkm. ■«■« fc* #* CHtM *4 tr-u I14 1 1 

irve#r ii ^»»ii or **a .fa «kni r-j^T ■* cod if ;*• n IM 
mv\ *Nfi» « r ifTfta iw SfcH ft— %o.r 11 «u -» Wi r« 
*o ki «au • mi ■ «* ca wit mm w-*?* > 



HOW USE BOTH SIDES Of VDUR OtSKEI 

5W DISKETTE 
HOLE PUNCH 

WITH DEPTH GUIDE and EDG£ GUIDE 




*i»T3filif 



i'h 



ilali 



■MM 



Only S10.00 add ^2,00 shipping 

Order 24 Hours a dav (215) 884 6010 

N P S Inc.Dopt, U3gB0anWO00WB JWfltTQim f* 19046 



* 



CUSTOM COMMUNICATION CONSOLES 

Personal, Commercial, Industrial & Governmental Applications 

Any shape St size to fill a corner or a room. Special design features & services are: 

« Replaceable front panel, for equipment changes. * Precisely cut front panel holes 

by computerized equipment. # Computer aided design for; Floor plan lay-out, & 

console design. * Design assistance, on-site analysis & installation are available. 

Constructed from plastic laminated birch plywood 8t black anrjdized 

aluminum extrusions. 

Contact: Larry Kushner, WA6BKC/4, President 

BCS, Inc., 5817 SW 21 Street, Hollywood, FL 33023 [305J 989-2371 



PACKET RADIO 




HI 



llarll |3 _ ■"_, ** 

ASCII — USA/ AX.25 
HDLC CONVERTER 

USA/AX.25 is the AMFtAD approved digital 
format STANDARD used on amateur pack- 
et radio networks. 



PAC/NET board only $80.00 

AssemblediTested, No iCs.90day warranty 

Package of all ICs except 2271 6 
EPROMs 



•in 



P AC/NET SYSTEM 



PACKET SYSTEM $240.00 

System Tested 4 5 x6" board complete 
with all tCs and programmed EPROMs 
personalised for each purchaser. Re- 
quires only single 8*10 volt Va amp power. 
1 year guarantee of rtardware^soft- 
ware/AX,25 standard RS232 serial ASCII 
at any usef baud rataRS232 HDLC for 202 
modem used for AFSK or direct to RF 
equipment for FSK. 



Custom Systems Custom Programming 

Bill Ashby 

■UK AND SON «»J 
K2TKN— KA20EQ 201-658-3087 
BOX 332 PLUCKEMIN N.J. 07978 



KITS 

PreAmplifiers-HF, 144MHz, 144MHz GaAs FET, 432 MHz 

Converteri-BF, 144MHz p 432MHz, 1296MHz 

Power Amplifiers— HF, 432MHz, 

Transverter— 1 44MHz 

Transceivers/Receivers/Transmitters— 20M. 40M, 

80M, Airband 

Processors— Oscar 10 Telemetry, Speech 

HF Antennas & Baluns. Noise Bridge, 

FET Dip Oscillator 

CUSTOM DESIGNED A FABRICATED PflJNTK) CWCUTT BOARDS 

COMPONENTS 

Aji ylwool connector^ 

Bt W COM IMHUA, SsHEfl** 

DAT *K rgCK)" frwnaors 

Hvemono *oo um ericicsures Tata) naictf rim & go**., coti n**^ 

jo m oo dMs nJ dnffi T<xoace>, ndi 

j w IM* pro t 

Knob* m shaft confers Wrt tnd 




1985-86 
CATALOG 

50* 




RAW KIT 
Box 411S 

Grftemiille. NH 03G4S 
(603} 878-1033 
talon 867697 



tWEt»T OP OWNERSHIP MAHAGEUEVT ANQ CiBCULAUO* i^Kjunad b T » US.C MB5< t T,|»i D 1 puWurahon n tor Hmd*a Amwtmun A 
Pubbcilian tic r£BN rJ7*5G80X 2 Dale o? tiii'vg, &apl*mb«< 3D. *B§J§ 3 Ffw^uefKr erf lEaue. Monthly. A. No o« <«u«( publlnriGd a>ini*il'y. H B AnnusJ 
Hftrt0i4pl>Vi pnt* ,. 12* * r *■ CampWe n>,l mg *0u<sn c J w n-s#r> q"1 lea of publication iSi-eel. Cuy Gpunly, 5r*f • a n :1 *|P Codnj fftat printers j . 60 Pint 
Sirs*!. Aplwl)WWI0fi. HinsDorouah Cmmtr. N N 034M 5. Ccwpiols ^i>ii<irj address o' the headQu i^ta' i o' yr*iri(ii bu&ine&9 apices c.i f"e publ^hcr 
' firiinui bd fine 5i'eei 1^i«rtx)r9UQtv Nljiibarou^li Gcurifir nJ H 0i4M fi. Names and ■: afTitH**!* malfma p4oiri#i»*i o< puon^-her. emtor, ana 
ranruiflirn} «3r(-jr P^Hit.M,,! ,^ame and Adn>»ain. Jefi.fi C Bunmll, AC Pine &1reel. Miefiiirouijfi. N.H 9^4$S E'JMui iNim«- iiiu *,JdraBsj, Susan Phil- 

18 Pln» Hvttl. PBleftOrouBfl. N.H 03456 M/in ng Mift EdUtir (Nam* «n() AdaressK $tev« Jffwalt. BO Pir4 Strwil . r%t*ft»rough, H M 03458 7. ^wner 
|I1 tinnnri t>v A ccrrpori rrt»n , its name and Addimh muhi Csa itllwl And *lna imm*£ti*ielv Itwtundti th« nunii and *ddinti««ia oi btDL^-ngSdHr-it tiwniisa 
i i< •idnif 1 p«rdin| or mere tn jaiai amaunt ul iiikK. h mn awnarJ by i cofpuriiion, rhm narnai inrJ afld'eSMfi of 1hn irtcMvirtUAi owiwrra mu&1 be given 
11 cwiiftd t,n « luuliiBisWu o! fj^her u n irtcnrnnralitd Urm, n« rmm« nr-cj uddrmb, H *ml it thai nt nwzh lntlivltluni mt*\ '■■■ JjMH !' I ho pirttNcalion 1a 
Muliliahod UM 4 nn-npro'il organizatm-n Its nsmaand nOdrerrB mum ba^iiladl^ Naipo. Inlernulionai Dalu Grr>up. TO B«n l^nQ. *i SDotjn Si , Framii'ipl'lam 
MA [I | mt H, tinawn (ifind hQlderri, mrjH"lo^fjn-«a and olhAr ancudly lujldeia nwniny r>r holding 1 porcflrit lit mors (A Idlal aiTmunl ot tmnda, mDrlga-gaa 01 
OllHf HaurlHBfl (ir Iher* It r>W», *> etnlep Namt, Pllrn;* J, Mc<5ow«rrs, PO B^k 1450, 5 Spaon St., Ffainlngham, MA 01 701 B- For campletioji by 
nemerctl! QrainUAtK»ri3 aulhiSMied lo mall At *p«Ctal fSitaa LBacl'lqn 423 12. DMM ontyl The purpose. FitrrfUJoh *nd pfjfiprnln itatus pT This Drganizallcn 
artd.1ti*tnarTi| i '.i. 1 1. iv Tor Federal Interne f*» pufpoa»a<an«N pne| Not applicable, rfl. F-Ktanl arid namm of Clrp^iHtlpfi |») Avarafla No. copies aach 
r»nu» dunrifl preceding 12 months fYi Adual Nd c.npnn at Itngl* Iulms pUbUlhed ne«itsl 1u i ii in,- 4ala A Tijt*i ^0 <H CQQt** prlfiJ«t (Nol Piess Bun) 

U4 1 1 1 ti3,fi2Q. B. Paid circuital ion t Salsi tfirough riaalnri and CAnlwa, AtT«| wndor-j and: CPulitaf lalAl .m U.BH.3 M 12.BW 2 MJiF aub^crlpTlon 
? iWU ift Jh Ml C Talal paid l <<" (Sum si lOttl Ami t0BJH*l *e,^&J (TV 4f ,467 D Ftf«tf>i1Mbunor! bv mAd. CitfMif Of Olfwr nHM09, aameha. 

ct.wnehiBaril*iy, and atner Free copies [X\ IJ32 ft) 81* E Total dutnbutlon iSum o* C and Tjy pQ 47 KM ff) 42 341, » ' iipHWi not oL«lr«ul«d > T Olfice 
no* larfl owef unoEconnlad. <f»tltad otfaw pnnNog i*j t »J <Yi ftir l Rotwms ripm rwjit aqe^tt pt| 7J 177 <V> 20.541 i> Total t&Kfl Of € Fl and 2— 
1*CuUS •QU4J M« {WW run snomtn If). Ai Ciq 7 ? .*44 in «MHQ. I r I carliri thai lr« itatarnon f s mads Of ™ abort II* cCrrvCf tin* COtftpMrta Statute 
•ndtitlii oi HSitw, pwtUiffMf, b ti wr * »i , mortaaet. ot uww X*n C Pumati Pubii«hoE. 






agas 




HAM RADIO 
CALENDAR 

Contest Ottes.forma.Meps 
Displays photo each month 

8.5"x1 1 ", spiral bound to hjng 

flat. Photos of operators .stations 
are 7x10. Room for notes,, skeds. 
Great for home or as qift 
sent vith your greetings! 

Send $7.93(DX=$9 00) 
KBIT Radio Specialties 

B-1015 Amherst NH 03031 




Amoteur} 




^ 



CommtmkQttons 

■^ _ — -* 

Etc 



2317 Vance Jackson Rd 
San Antonio T\ 78213 
l(5U) 734-7795 




SEMD 1*5$ 
R0R OUR 

CoMPETfTIVE 

PRICE 
SH RET 



rlCMjri 



• i 



~M0 pnt 




'Of 



Itatlio 
iiisilfmrN t 



S peel* I Report. 
Vfj-uo» 






BACK ISSUES 



PfflVATl 

EA-ftTW 

STAnam 



^ 



1977 to June 1980 

• * a • • . ■ a ■ ■ •_ . ■ * « • « > * * a )ji LIU vlil . 

July 1980 to Present 

Add $L00 per magazine for ship- 
ping. 10 or more back issues add 
$7,50 per order for shipping. 

Write for your copy today! 

73 for Radio Amateurs 
Back Issue Order Dept. 
80 Pine Street 
Peterborough, NH 03458 



SB 73 for Radio Amateurs • December, 1985 




PECIAL EVENTS 



Listings in this column are provided free of 
charge on a space-avatiabte baste. Trie fol- 
lowing in formation should be included in 
every announcement: sponsor, event, date, 
time, place, city, state, admission charge (if 
any)!, features, talk-in frequencies, And the 
name of whom to contact tor further informa- 
tion- Announcements must be received by 
73 Magazine by me first of the month, two 
months prior to the month in which the event 
takes place. Mail to Editorial Offices, 73 Mag- 
azine, Pine St, Peterborough NH 03458 



OAK PARK Ml 
DEC1 

The Oak Park High School Electronics 
Club witf sponsor its 16th annual Swap N' 
Shcp on Thanksgiving Sunday, December 
1 P 1985, from 8:00 am to 4:00 pm, at Oak 
Park High School, 13701 Oak Park Boule- 
vard, Oak Park Ml Donation fs $2.50 per 
person; after 12:00 noon, $1,50. 8-foot ta- 
bles wHI cost $8,00. Refreshments will be 
available. For further Information, send an 
SASE to Herman Gardner, Oak Park High 
School, 13701 Oak Park Boutevard, Oak 
Park Ml 48237; (313)-96B-2675. 

FARIBAULT MN 
DEC 7 

The Han dj -Ham Winter Manifest will be 
held on Saturday, December ?, 1985, be- 
ginning at 9:00 am, at the Eagles Club In 
Faribault MN. Talk-in on .19/79, For more 



information, contact Don Franz WBFIT, 
I 1 14 Frank Avenue, Albert Lea MN 560Q7, 

SOUTH BEND IN 
JAN 5 

A hamfest wilt be held on January 5, 
1986, at Century Center, on US 33 North 
between the St. Joseph Sank Building and 
the river, downtown South Bend IN, Table 
space is $1.00 per foot. Talk- in on .52/. 52, 
.99/39, .93/33, 69/.Q9, and 145.29. For 
more information, contact Wayne Werts 
K9IXU, 1889 Riverside Drive, South Bend 
IN 46616; (219) 233-5307 

WAUKESHA COUNTY Wl 
JAN 11 

The West Allis Radio Amateur Club will 
sponsor the Midwinter Swapfest on Sat- 
urday, January 11 f 1986, beginning at 8:00 
am, at the Waukesha County Expo Center 
Forum, Take I-94 to Co. F, south to FT, and 
west to Expo, Admission is $2,00 in ad- 
vance and $3.00 at the door. Four-foot ta- 
bles are $3.00 in advance, $4.qq at the 
door. For tickets or more information, 
send an SASE to WAflAC Swapfest, PO 
Box 1072, Milwaukee, Wl 53201 

VA STATE FAIRGROUNDS 
JAN 12 

The Richmond Amateur Telecommuni- 
cations Society will sponsor the ninth an- 
nual Richmond Frostfest on Sunday, 
January 12, 1986, from 8'30 am to 3:30 pm, 



at the Virginia State Fairgrounds. Admis- 
sion is $4.00. Fiea-market spaces are 
$4.00; $8.00 with an 8 foot table. VEC ex- 
ams will be held on Saturday. For more in- 
formation, write the Richmond Frostfest, 
PO Box 1070, Richmond VA 23208, or call 
BHI Scruggs N4DDM at (804J-272-8206. 

YONKERS NY 
JAN 26 

The Yonkers Amateur Radfo Cfub will 
hold an electronics auction on Sunday. 
January 26 r 1986, from 9:00 am to 3:00 pnr 
at Lemko Hall, 558 Yonkers Avenue, Yon- 
kers NY. Admission is $3.00; children un- 
der 8 are free. Inspection is from 9:00 am 
to 10:00 am and the auction will begin at 
10lOO am. Talk-in on 146.865/R, 440.15CMR, 
and 146.52. For more information, contact 
the YARC, 53 Hay ward Avenue, Yonkers 
NY 10704; (91 4)-969 1053. 

SOUTHFIELD Ml 
JAN 26 

The Southfield High SchooJ ARC wilt 
hold its 20th annual Swap and Shop on 
January 26 t 1 986, from 8:00 am to 3:00 pm r 
at Southfield High School, 24675 Lahser, 
Southheld Ml. Admission is $2.50. Two 8- 
foot reserved tables are $20.00. Each ad- 
ditional table is $10.00. For more informa- 
tion, write Robert Younker, Southfield 
High School. 24675 Lahser, Southfield Ml 
48034. 

TEACHER IN SPACE 
JANUARY 

The Concord Brasspounders ARC will 
operate W10C to commemorate Christa 
McAuliffe's teac her- ins pace flight of the 
space shuttle. Operation will be from 1300 
UTC on Saturday to 1259 UTC Sunday dur 



ing the first weekend following the launch 
of the shuttle with Christa aboard. Antici- 
pated launch date is January 22, 1986. 
Suggested frequencies are: phone —7.285, 
14.285, 21.385; CW-7.050, 14.050, 21.050; 
Novtce— 7.105. For a certificate 1 send an 
SASE to W1 OC, PO Box 221 4, Concord N H 
03301. 

BATTLE OF 

KWAJALEIN AND ROI-NAMUR 

FEB 1-10 

The Kwajalein Amateur Radio Club will 
operate spec Fa! -event station KX6BU from 
0600 UTC on February 1, 1986, until 0600 
UTC on February 10, 1986, to commemo- 
rate the 42 nd anniversary of the Bat tie of 
KwajaFein and Roi-Namur. Frequencies 
will be: SSB— 28.550, 21.350, and 14.250; 
CW— 28.050, 21.050, 14,050. and 7.025. For 
$6.00, stations working KXGBU will be is- 
sued a certificate, a QSL, and a 64-page 
book describing the Battle of Kwajalein 
and Roi-Namur. $3.00 will brmg a QSL and 
a certificate. All requests should be sent 
to: KX6BU, Box 444, APO San Francisco 
96555-008. 

DAVENPORT IA 
FEB 23 

The Davenport Radio Amateur Club will 
hold Its 15th annual hamfest at the Dav- 
enport Masonic Temple, Brady Street 
(Highway 61) and 7th Street, Davenport IA, 
on Sunday, February 23, 1986, from 8:00 
am to 4:00 pm. Admission is $2 .00 in ad- 
vance; $3.00 at the door. Tables are avail- 
able by reservation for $7.00, with E2.00 
extra for ac hookup, Table setup begins at 
7:00 am. Talk-in on 146,28/,S8 (W0BXR). For 
reservations, advance tickets, or more in- 
formation, contact Dave Johannsen, 2131 
Myrtle Street, Davenport IA 52804. 



MOVING? 

SUBSCRIPTION 
PROBLEM? 

Get help with your subscription by 
calling our new toll free number: 

1-800-227-5782 

between 9 a.m. and 5 p,m, EST, 
Monday-Friday, 

If possible, please have your mailing label 
in front of you as well as your cancelled 
check or credit card statement if you are 
having problems with payment. 

If moving, please give both your 
old address and new address. 



I 

I 

■v> 

i^ 
id 

ia 

i-d 

i V 



You read about it first 
in the New Products 
section of ham radio : 

"Many methods have been offered for 
learning Morse Code, some good and 
some not so good. This is a good one. 

Have you plateaued at TO - 13 WPM? 
MASTER the code in 40% less time, 

* The method based on the scientific 
principles of Skill Acquisition and 
Perceptual Learning 

Adopted by the U.S. MILITARY 
as the new training standard 

Four cassettes teach the entire alphabet in 
25 trials at 20 WPM! 
Includes numbers, punctuation, special 
characters, and an gJJ new intro tape. 



Send 



a 
o 

Q- 

o 



Name^ 
Call_ 



_set(s) @ S 19.95 each 
IL res, add $1 sales tax [5%) 



Class 



_ i 

—i ^* 



2 



Address 
City 



State 



Zip 



£_Q-I 



"When You Buy, Say 73" 



Mail to: TSG; PO Box 3897> Carbondale, IL 62902 

73 for Radio Amateurs » December, 1985 59 



4 



ONTESTS 



Robert Baker WB2GFE 
15 Windsor Dr. 
AtcoNJ08004 

COMMENTS 

This month's contest information is a 
little spare as everyone Is deciding on 
what dates to use for the 198© season. 
Shown in the calendar are the tentative 
ARRL contest dates for the first si* 
months of 1986, following the usual De- 
cember and January contests that have 
been confirmed so far. Note the addition 
of five new "sprints 1 " for 50 MHz and 
above, by the ARRL. 

One final reminder to contest sponsors, 
since everyone seems to oe forgetting. 
please $end your contest announce- 
ments, plus appropriate mies, directly to 
my home address, shown here. Material 
addressed to the magazine is only delayed 
and may not make the appropriate issue. 
This is especially important for overseas 
mail, which usually arrives at the last minute. 

While on the subject, all material 
should be mailed as far in advance as pos- 
sible. Be Neve it or not rny deadline for 
submission of material to the magazine is 
the 20th of the month, three months prior 
to the Issue date. For example, this mate- 
rial for the December, 1965, issue was due 
at the magazine on September 20th, So 
please mail early; don't forget that I need 
a few extra days to type everything, too. 

If you pick a contest date early In the 
year (even If you're still deciding on rules), 
at least lei me know the date once it's 
firm. That way it can be listed in the cal- 
endar as early as possible and we can 
help avoid overlapping and duplications 
with other contests. I'll also know whether 
or not you're sending more materials and 
can try to track it down if it doesn't arrive 
on time. 

That's it for now. Good tuck in the com- 
ing year! 



ARRL 160 METER CONTEST 
Starts: 2200 UTC December 7 
Ends: 1600 UTC December a 

The object is for amateurs worldwide to 

exchange QSO information, with WA/E am- 
ateurs on 1.8 MHz, CW only. DX-to-DX 
QSOs are not permitted for contest credit. 
Operating categories Include single oper- 
ator and mutti -operator (single transmitter 
only). Remember that VWVE stations may 
transmit onfy In the 1.800-1.825- and 
1 .830-1,850 MHz segments in confor- 
mance to the ARRL band plan. Please re- 
frain from using the 1, 825 -t 330-MHz DX 
window. 

EXCHANGE: 

RST and ARRL section, DXCC country 
name, or ITU region if maritime or aero- 
nautical mobile, 

SGOBING: 

Count 2 points per QSO with amateurs 
in an ARRL section. VwVE stations count 
5 points for DX QSOs. Multiply QSO points 
by total number of ARRL sections (74 mast- 
I mum) and DXCC countries (WA/E stations 
only). 

ENTRIES: 

Official forms and logs are recom- 
mended and are available from ARRL 

headquarters far an SASE or 2 IRCs. Logs 

60 73 for Radio Amateurs ■ December, 1985 



must indicate time in UTC, call, and ex- 
change. Multipliers should be clearly 
marked in the log the first time worked. 
Entries with more than 200 QSQs must in- 
clude cross-check sheets. Entries must be 
postmarked by January 4th and addressed 
to ARRL, 225 Main St., Newington CT 
06111. 

Certificates will be awarded the top- 



scoring single operator in each ARRL sec- 
tion and DXCC country and to the lop- 
scoring m u It i operator stations In each 
ARRL division and continent. Usual ARRL 
conditions of entry and disqualification 
apply, 

ARRL 10-METER CONTEST 

Starts: 0000 UTC December 14 

Ends: 2400 UTC December 15 

Contact as many stations as possible 
on the 28-MHz band using no more than 36 
hours of the 4&-hour contest period. Lis- 
tening time counts as operating time! En- 
try categories include: single operator 



mixed mode (phone and CW), phone only, 
or CW only. Multi-operator class is for sin- 
gle transmitter mixed mode only. 

No cross mode contacts are allowed. 

Mixed-mode, single-operator, and all 
multi-operator stations may work stations 
once on CW and once on S SB, One oper- 
ator may not use more than one callsign 
from any given location during the contest 
period. All entrants may transmit only one 
signal on the air at any given time 

EXCHANGE; 

WWE stations (including KH6^KL7)send 
RS(T) and state or province. DX stations 
send RS(T) and serial! number starling with 











1985 RESULTS 


















75-METER WORLD SSB CHAMPIONSHIP CONTEST 














Callsign, QTH. QSOj 


3, multipliers,, total score 














m 


■World Champion 'State, 


Provincial, or Country Champion 








W/VE Singte Operator 








NE6I 


CA 


73 


33 


12,210 




' T K4JPD 


GA 


1,153 


117 


754,650 


K6KUH 


Ml 


89 


27 


12,015 




* IM7DF/0 


KS 


1,265 


91 


596,505 


WB&YEW 


OH 


68 


33 


11.385 




mxA 


KS 


888 


84 


396,060 


W8SWN 


Ml 


74 


30 


11,100 




* VE3CYX 


ONT 


eat 


86 


317,770 


W4TWV 


SC 


49 


36 


10,070 




' N4KMY 


NC 


747 


75 


291,000 


KB7WN 


WY 


57 


32 


9J20 




* KC8P 


Ml 


627 


76 


248,140 


KC3LV 


PA 


60 


27 


6,100 




* AK1A 


NH 


709 


66 


239,910 


N5AFV 


OK 


48 


31 


7,440 




• KV&I 


NE 


720 


56 


202,720 


K2SCUr5 


TX 


44 


31 


6,975 




KB8LM 


Mi 


553 


63 


177,345 


NJ8L 


OH 


49 


27 


6,750 




* K9JFr7 


WA 


476 


64 


166,960 


WA8GLF 


OH 


54 


23 


6,440 




* KQ3V 


PA 


422 


74 


167,980 


W&NGB 


MN 


43 


22 


4,730 




* N4TG 


TN 


563 


58 


164,430 


K0UK 


CO 


35 


25 


4,500 




• KB9S 


Wl 


453 


64 


149,120 


WA1NCN 


CT 


46 


18 


4,050 




■ KA2AEV 


NY 


462 


60 


143,100 


N6CEO 


Ml 


23 


18 


2,610 




* W1BR 


MA 


421 


61 


133,895 


AF0S 


CO 


17 


15 


1,425 




KB8FK 


Ml 


471 


55 


129,525 


W1LU0/4 


VA 


8 


7 


240 




* KA1SR 


Rl 


401 


62 


129,270 














■ AA4UE 


VA 


454 


55 


127,875 


DX Single Operator 










* KKfflL 


CO 


468 


00 


125,950 


•"NP4CC 


Puerto Rico 


512 


97 268,090 


N2BJX 


NY 


456 


54 


124,740 


* OH1RY 


Finland 




296 


65 189,150 


" KD7SP 


NV 


404 


56 


115,640 


* DF9ZP 


West Germany 


246 


79 123,240 


VVA1UJU 


Wl 


463 


49 


113,925 


* VK6DU 


Austral 


la. 


199 


50 ! 


39,550 


W4TMR 


NC 


366 


60 


113,400 


* K3WGW 


Montserrat 


282 


61 i 


34,855 


' KS7T 


MT 


361 


55 


104,225 


VP2M 












■ KB1&C/9 


IN 


386 


49 


96,050 


" AH2U 


Guam 




179 


27 


46,575 


WA1BBB 


NY 


349 


51 


88,995 


* HCIOT 


Equador 


126 


50 


34,500 


N4KWX 


VA 


354 


42 


75,180 


* HR1FC 


Honduras 


105 


48 


31,200 


* W9UCW 


IL 


266 


53 


70,755 


* KF7Sf 


Alaska 




231 


26 


30,030 


WBSNULop. 










KL7 












* WR4F 


KY 


238 


56 


69,440 


JF2DQJ 


Japan 




61 


24 


12,960 


* AE5H 


MS 


270 


46 


65,260 


JA2YKA 


Japan 




61 


24 


12,960 


AF1T 


MA 


242 


51 


64,515 


EA3CCN 


Spain 




28 


12 


3,360 


' KI4RE 


GA 


234 


49 


58,555 


YU3PG 


Yugoslavia 


25 


14 


1,850 


*■ N3AHA 


DE 


231 


45 


52,650 


LZ1KOZ 


Bulgaria 


22 


11 


1,210 


" KDSPT 


WV 


216 


1 1 


51,460 


YU4EZC 


Yugoslavia 


14 


11 


770 


' VE2YU 


QUE 


196 


47 


47,940 


QZ3ZK 


Denmark 


7 


4 


280 


* K5GOE 


AR 


175 


50 


44,000 














• VE1BDT 


NS 


191 


44 


43,780 


WIVE MuifhOpetator 










KW2J 


NY 


190 


45 


43,200 


"K3TUP 


PA 


1,180 


97 


614,495 




* WA6FGV 


CA 


209 


39 


41,340 


* W8LT 


OH 


1>120 


92 


530.380 




W9LYN 


IL 


158 


50 


41,000 


* W9WI 


Wl 


1,025 


76 


400.520 




* KQ7Y 


A2 


175 


46 


40,940 


* N04R 


KY 


964 


75 


369,376 




* KB8KW/7 


WY 


162 


47 


39,010 


• KYflS 


CO 


892 


76 


364 a 42Q 




W8VEN 


WV 


155 


48 


38,400 


* KS90 


IL 


757 


77 


303,360 




W3ARK 


PA 


208 


35 


36,400 


* WA6PVA/7 


OR 


737 


67 


278,385 




KA2CDJM 


NC 


127 


46 


31 ,920 


" WA5VVT 


AR 


558 


64 


181,760 




W3KHQ 


PA 


108 


49 


26,420 


* W&QVE 


IL 


197 


50 


49,250 




KQ1F 


MA 


1T5 


46 


27,600 














N0CLV 


KS 


133 


40 


26,600 


DX Mufti-Operator 










* W4WIJ 


FL 


113 


44 


25,520 


**OK3KFF 


Czechoslovakia 138 27 


18,900 




KG6MO 


CA 


103 


45 


24,525 


JA9YBA 


Japan 




3 3 


90 




N7RO 


WA 


122 


39 


23,790 














WA4BSN 


GA 


180 


42 


23,140 


Check Logs. ZF2GO, K30X, N0BQW, 


LZ1L73 






" KT1J 


VT 


116 


38 


22,420 














WK4F 


FL 


95 


42 


21,630 


Mv fit-Op Participants 










* VE7AO 


BC 


102 


39 


21,450 


K3TUP K3TUP, KJ3L, 


N3BJ, AJBS 








KB7M 


WY 


115 


34 


19,550 


OK3KFF OK3KFF, OK3CQA, OK3-27147 






VE2DTI 


QUE 


103 


37 


19,240 


NCMR N04R, NC9C d 


KJ4DC 








N4UH 


NC 


S3 


43 


19,135 


WA5WT WA5VVT, WB5LRP, KA5NLY, WB5GFA 




WB2TKD 


NY 


95 


36 


17,820 


WA6PVA WA.6PVA, NI7I 


, N7GPO 








* WB0BHF 


IA 


102 


33 


16,500 


W8LT W8LT 


; K3JT. WD8LXX, WD8IXE, NZ4K, KD&NS 




K5GN 


TX 


84 


36 


15,660 


JA9YBA JA9YBA, JA9LNLL JA9VDA 








K8CV 


Ml 


74 


40 


14,800 


KS90 KS9C 


L NB9T, 


KA9DVY 








WD9IF3 


IL 


69 


37 


12,765 


W9WI W9WI, K9BC, 


AC9C, NA9D 








NABW 


OH 


70 


35 


12,600 


KY&S KY0S 


5 ADCO, 


NflEBM 









RESULTS 





75-meter stngie op World Cham- 
pton K4JPD. 



DF9ZP recovers from the 19&5 7S-me~ 
ter test 



K4JPD, K3TUP, NP4CC, AND OK3KFF 

WORLD 75 METER SSB CHAMPIONS 

With a smashing total Of 11? multipliers and 1153 QSOs. K4JP0 ts the 1965 
World 75-Meter Champion m the WA/E single-operator class. K3TUP ithree-ti.ne 
40-Meter Champion) has become the World Champion m the 75-Meter WfVE 
multU>pe ra !Qr class with 1180 QSOs and 97 multipliers, 

NP4CC earned World Championship honors by capturing the top slot for DX 
single-operator stations. With 512 Qs and 97 multipliers, NFMCC's score totaled 
288,090 contest points.. 

In the DX multi-operator class, OK3KFF has the distinction of becoming the 
1985 World Champion in that category. 

New champions sometimes bFeed new world records. This year's 75 meter 
event is no exception. N7DF and three fellow competitors* broke the standing 
World QSO Record established In 1984, Including this year's accomplish menis f 
the following are the top ten QSO totals: 







75-Meter QSO Records 






N7DF 


1985 


1.265 


W9WI 


1965 


1.025 


K3TUP 


1965 


1.180 


NQ4R 


1385 


964 


K4JPO 


1965 


1.153 


N4BAA 


1904 


894 


W8LT 


1965 


1,130 


KYiS 


1985 


892 


N7DF 


1964 


1,076 


M*XA 


1985 


an 



Can you imagine over tOOO Qs on 75 meters in 24 hours or less? Unbelievable, 
huh? In the 1965 contest, stations making 500 or more contacts included: N7DF 
(1265), K3TUP(11B0), K4JPD{1153), WflU (1120). W9WI (1025), NG4R (964). KY0S 
(892), N0XA (888), KS90 (757), N4KMY (747), WA6PVA (737), KV0I <72Q), AK1 A (709), 
VE3CYX (681), KC8P (827J, N4TG (563). WA5VVT (558), KB8LM (553), and NP4CC 
(512}, 

Stations compiling 70 or more multipliers Included: K4JPD (117), K3TUP (97), 
NP4CC |97), W8LT (92), N7DF (91). VE3CYX (86K N0XA (84), DF9ZP {79). KS90 (77), 
KC6P (76)> W9VVI (76). KY0S {781 N04R (75), M4KMY (75), and KQ3V (74), 

One of the advantages of grading contest entries is (he opportunity to team 
what fellow competiiors are using to radiate their signals From this year's logs, 
here \s an extract of wnat we teamed: 



Antennas Used (%) In the 7 5- Meter Com a si 




Inverted vee/dfpole 


57.5 


Stopers 


19.8 


Trapped vertical 


8.5 


Delta loop 


85 


Wire oeam 


3.8 


2-element yagi 


0,9 


Collins cage 


09 




The ops at 75-meter multiop runner-up W8LT (Lett to right; WDBIXE. NZ4K 
WD8LXX, KD8NS, And K3J T \ 

Looking to the top stations in each operator crass, here are halt the mgredi- 
ents to this year's championship stations: 



Single Op: 

*WPD GA 

N7DF KS 

K9JF WA 

N4TG TN 

KS8PK Ml 



FT-102 

FT^90WFT^02 
TS^30S 
IC-720 

Ts^aos 



2-ei yag< 
Collins discage 
Vertical 

Tilted delta loop 
inverted vee 



Multi-Op: 

K3TUP 

W8LT 

W9WI 

N04R 

WA4JXI 



PA 
OH 

Wl 
KY 
FL 



TS-930 

TS~83QSrrS 930S 
TS^30S 
Drake C-line 
TS-830 



???? (a secret?) 

Dipoje and longwlre 

Zepp, Inv, vee. verticals 

Dipole 

Phased ' -i -wave slopers 

If only a new. compact. 80-meter 2-element beam design would hit the market. 
Then next year we could all share the success enjoyed by K4JP0. Hey, Steve, 
how about sending me (KE7C> the plans tor your new array? Seriously, Buck 
(W970JV) and I would like to put one up* 

As the many cards and letters state, everyone is looking forward to the 1986 
event. The summer of 85 was busy here at the QTH. getting an array set up for 
75, How about your OTH? Are you ready for January? 

Mar* it down on your calendar The 5th annual 75-Meter World SSB Cham- 
pionship will be held from 0000-2400 UTC on January 12. 1986 Send for your 
paperwork right now. It's printed and ready for mailing to you? 

Forward an SASE to our new rules and forms address. We'll send you not only 
the Information tor the 75-Meter contest, but also the rules and forms lor our 
other contests as well, Address your SASE to: 1986 Contest Rules and Forms, 
Billy Maddox KA6JJK/3 t 1 W2 Bay view Vista Drive, Annapolis MD 21401. See you 
In January!— BiilGosney KE7C. 

75 Meter Soapbox 

N4BAA Sorry I didn't gel to operate! Really missed hearing K4jPDs new KLM 

beam. Everyone has been talking about it. Good job, Steve, 
W4TWW Very nice con lest. 
KE7C Goutdn'1 operate but sure look forward to next season. Lots of 75m 

antenna work this summer Maybe KLM will ship a 2-eiement yagi my 

way just for me to test out. . pssst. hint, hint 
N7DF Got to get a computer' Duping by hand is for the birds! Great contest, 

fellas. Lots of fun. 
QF9ZP Jose best to you and the contest committee. Very nice contest. See 

you next year 
JF2DQS Conditions were very bad. Not many East Coast si at ions. Of course. 

see you in 86, 
ZF2GO Waste of u me. Nobody I tstened in the DX wi ndow, (Hopefully the new DX- 

wtndow rules for 86 wilt improve the situation. . , fet 'S hope so — £ d l 






001. Maritime- and aeronautical-mobile 
slat Jons send RSfT) and ITU region ft < 2 + 3). 
Novice and Technician stations Sign iH or 
rT as appropriate 

SCORING 

Count 2 points per phone QSO. 4 points 
per Cw QSO, and 8 points for QSOs with 
US Novice or Technician stations Multiply 
the QSO points by the total number ot US 
States. Canadian call areas. DXCC coun 
tries (except US and Canada}, and ITU re- 
gions (maritime and aeronaut icat mobiles 
only} 

ENTRIES; 

Official logs and entry forms are rec 
ommended and are available from ARRL 



headquarters for an SASE or 2 IRCs Logs 
must Indicate lime in UTC, mode, call, and 
exchange for each QSO. Multipliers 
should be clearly marked in the log the 
first time worked. Entries with more than 
500 OSOs must include crosscheck 
sheets. Entries must be post marked by 
January i l|h and addressed to ARRL, 225 
Main St, Newmgion CT 06111. 

Certificates will be awarded to the high- 
est-scoring single operator station in each 
category from each ARRL section and 
DXCC country, lop mulii-operaior 
entries in each ARRL division and each 
continent, and additional entries as partic- 
ipation warrants. Usual ARRL entry condi- 
tions and disqualification rules apply 



G>GRP-CLUB WINTER SPORTS 

Daily from 0900 to 2300 UTC, December 
26th to January 1st. All radio amateurs in- 
terest ed in QRP are invited to take part in 
the club's activity No special exchange 
Information was mentioned in the infor- 
mation provided by the club. The operat- 
ing schedule for each day is as follows: 

0900-1 TOO. 14 060,21.060.28-060 

1100-1300= 3.560.7 030 

1300-1400= 10.106 

1400-1700 - 14.060. 21 060. 28060 

1700-1900- 3,560, 7,030 

1900-2100 * 14 060 

2100-2300 ^ 3.560. 7,030 

Reports on the Winter Sports Activity 
should be senl to Fred Garratt G4HOM, 47 



Tilshead Close, Druids Heath, Birming- 
ham BT4 5LT. England. 



CANADA CONTEST 

Starts: 0000 UTC December 29 
Ends; 2400 UTC December 29 

Sponsored by the Canadian Amateur 
Radio Federation (GARF). the contest is 
open to all amateurs and everybody worKs 
everybody. Entry classes include single 
operator allband, single operator single 
band, and multi-operator aJtband 

Use all bands from 160 to 2 meters on 
CW and phone combined. Ait contacts 
with amateur stations are valid. Stations 
may be worked twice on each band, once 



73 for Radio Amateurs • December, 1985 61 



RESULTS 




The Idfrmeter mutti-op World Champions at WB8IFP. (Left to fight: WD8RQD> 
KC8CP, WB81PP; WABPRA sitting,} 

N7DF, WB8IFP, I40UT, AND G0HH 
WORLD 160-METER SS6 CHAMPIONS 

A difference of 24 contacts determined this year's World Champion for single- 
operator stations. II has to be a heartbreak for WflEJ, who placed second behind 
World Champ M7DF. Both stations worked 56 states Jprovi rices and 13 DX coun- 
tries. Both stations beat N7DFs 1934 World OSO Record! 

The muiti-operator category was just as exciting. W88IFP became the World 
Champion by less than 8,000 points. Second-place station WfflGEM managed 30 
contacts more than the champ, however the multiplier count was 3 less. Here 
again, it was a line line between the two. Scores that close must be very, very 
frustrating. 

In DX, the competition was more relaxed. 140UT nearly doubled the score of 
runner-up YV2IF. He compiled 367 Qs, 10 states/provlnces, and 43 OX countries 
to earn the title for single-op DX stations. 

En the multi-operator category for DX stations, G6HH was unchallenged with 
a score of 25,680 contest points. 

Speaking of world champions and record-breaking scores, lefs review the his- 
tory of mis event! 

1981 1362 1983 

W8LRL W9RE KCSJH 

W4CN W8NGO K8ND 

C6ADV VP9BO YV3AZC 

ZF2DX YU7JDE 

1985 meant new world records. With the sunspot cycle favoring 160, QSO 
counts have reached new horizons. Let's look at the top ten to date: 



W/VE Single Op 
W/VE Multi Op 
DX Single dp 
DX Multi-Op 



1984 


1985 


WA2SPL 


N7DF 


K9ZUH 


WB8IFP 


EA3CCN 


f40UT 


i 7?n.l 


G6HH 



N7DF 


1985 


WtiEJ 


1985 


N7DF 


1964 


WORE 


1982 


WA2SFL 


1984 



1985 


1.084 


1985 


1,054 


1985 


1,048 


1984 


1,003 


1984 


991 



180-Meter QSO Records 

1,177 W0CEM 

1.152 WB8IFP 

1,125 KC8P 

1,118 VE3CDX 

1.096 KBHA 

During the 1985 contest, stations achieving 5Q0 or more QSOs included: N7DF 
j 1.1 77), W0EJ (1,152), WGCEM (1.084K WB8IFP{ 1,054), WB9NUU885), N04R(B71j, 
K1ZM (841), W8KA {754), W3TS (743) h WA1UJU {737), N8ATR {721), W4TMR (720), 
W10DY (090). KC8P {$45}. WD4KXB (639), NK7U {622), N4FNB (607). K3MO (590), 
WflJUR (550). and N4DDS (509). 

Stations with 50 or more states/provinces included: WB8IFP (57), W0CEM (56), 
W8KA (56), N7DF (56), K7QQ (56), W8EJ (56), WB9NUL (55), WBUR (54), WA4JXI 
(54), NK7U (54), K1ZM (54), K3MO (54), N04R (53), K7LXC (53), WD4KXQ {53), W3TS 
(53), WA1UJU (53), KG8P (52), W4TMR (52), WB1GQR (52), KA1SR (52), W8SVT (52), 
M-ICS (52), N8ATR (51), N4BNO (51), and VE5RA (50). 



In Europe. DX activity was fairly good. The following stations worked 20 or 
more DX countries: I40UT (43), EA3CCN (36), SP5INQ (33), OKUDX (31), LZ1KOZ 
(30), C310F (27), I4CSB (23), G6HH (22), and YV2IF(21). 

On the North American continent, the following stations worked 10 or more 
DX countries: WA4JXI (33), K1ZM (27), W10DY (15) k W8KA (15), KA1SR (14), N7DF 
(13), W0EJ (13). WD4KXQ (12), NK7U (11), KQ1F0U and N8ATR (10). 

For years operators have claimed they couldn't put up a 160 antenna on a city 
iot Each year we analyze the 160- meter entries just to disprove this myth. Here's 
what contestants used in the 1985 event: 

Antennas Used (%} in the 160-Meter Contest 

Longwire 38.9 

Slopers 33,3 

I n vert ed vee/d i poi e 11.1 

Other 11.1 

Vertical 56 

35.7% of the participants used a Beverage or series of Beverage antennas for 

receive. 

As far as the top five stations are concerned, you'd find a blend of state-of- 
ttieart equipment and a variation of antenna designs that have appeared In radio 
journals the past few years. A bit of effort, yes, but think of the signal: 



Single Op: 






N7DF KS 


FT-9O1/FT-&02 


Discage, Beverages 


WfflEJ [A 


KWM380 


'A -wave sloper. Beverages 


K1ZM NY 


TS-B30 


136' vertical 


WB9NUL IL 


???? 


1111 


W10PY OT 


79 "J? 

■ 4 p i 


???? 



Mull i Op: 

WB8EFP 
W0CEM 

W8RA 
N04R 
WA4JXI 



OH 

KS 

Ml 

KY 

FL 



Drake C-line 
TS-830S 
TS-830S 
Drake C-line 
TS-830 



Vj-wave vertical, Beverages 
Phased verticals, Rx loop 
130' folded unipo^ Beverage 
Shunt-fed tower 
115' shun Med tower, Beverages 

160-meter contesting Is at its very best This event has become the unchal- 
lenged favorite of SSB con testers worldwide. 

Plan now to reserve the 1986 contest weekend. The 7th annual 160-Meter 
World SSB Championship will be heid from 0000 UTC January 18, to 2400 UTC 
January 19, 1986, 

Send an SASE to the address below and obtain your own personal copy of the 
new and revised rules and forms. Once your SASE is received, we 1 II not only send 
you the forms and rules for the 160-meter even^ but also the information for all 
of the SSB championship events: 1936 Contest Rules and Forms, Bitty Maddox 
KA6JJK/3, 1162 Bayview Vista Drive, Annapolis MD 2H0h 

My thanks to Harry K1 PLR Harry has been our contest chairman for the past 
several years. We owe our gratitude to Harry for handling all the details without 
a flaw. He managed the 1985 event right in the middle of moving from Pennsyl- 
vania to North Carolina. Great fob. Harry, and our thanks again! 

To the contestants, you're special people. On 160, we call It the gentleman's 
band and rightly so! 73 appreciates your dedication and looks forward to your 
annual support. Be sure to share your contesting excitement with your 160 
friends. Fine-tune that antenna and let's do it again in 1986, okay I— But Gosney 
KE7C 

160- Mel 8f Soapbox 

KE7C Only sorry I couldn't stay around longer. Was nice to contact old 

friends and meet many new ones! Hats off to Harry K1PLR. who 

chairs this event each year! 
KG7PA Noise plague again. Utah is still considered rare, however. 
KS7T Rough on this end. Ran barefoot. Need either a tape recorder or a 

linear. 
KC8P Snow static was SB +■ 40 at times. Decided to pull the plug and go to 

bad. 
WfflCEM We all had a good time. When the temp is - 20 outside, the best thing 

to do is to contest on 160! 
KC0QO Big effort + low score = lots of fun ! 



on CW and once on phone. Neither cross- 
mode contacts nor CW contacts in the 
phone bands are allowed, 

EXCHANGE: 

Signal report and consecutive serial 
number starting with 001, plus province. 

SCORING: 

Score 10 potnts tor each contact with 
Canada, 4 points for contacts with other 
countries. VEtfl counts as Canada and one 
multiplier. Score 20 points for each con- 
tact with any CARF official news station 
using the suffix TCA or VCA, Multipliers 
are the number of Canadian provinces/ter- 
ritories worked on each band r on each 
mode. Contacts with stations outside 



Canada count for points but not multi- 
pliers. 

FREQUENCIES; 

1.810/1.840, 3.525/3.775, 7.025/7.070/ 
7.155, 14.025/14.150, 21.025/21,250, 28.025J 
28.500, 50.040/50. 110, and 14.4090/14.6520. 
Suggest phone on the hour, CW on the 
half hour. Since this is a Canadian-spon- 
sored contest, remember to stay within 
the legal frequencies for your count ryl 

AWARDS: 

Trophies will be awarded to the highest- 
scoring single- and multi-Operator ailband 
entries. Certificates will be awarded to the 
highest scorer In each category In each 



province/territory, US cal 
country. 



area, and DX 



ENTRIES: 

A valid entry must contain log sheets, 
dupe sheets or statement, a cover sheet 

showing claimed QSO points, a ilst of mul- 
tipliers, and a calculation of final claimed 
score. Cover sheets and multiplier check 
lists are available. Entries should be 
mailed within one month of the contest 
with your comments, photos, etc., to 
CARF. c/o N. Waltho VE6VW, Box 1890, 
Morinville, AB, TOG 1P0, Canada. 

Results will be published in TCA, the 
Canadian amateur magazine, prior to the 
next contest. Nonmembers of CARF may 
include an SASE for a copy of the results. 



The decision of (he contest committee 
shall be final in ail cases of dispute, 

WORLD SSB 

CHAMPIONSHIPS 

Announcing the January Classics— the 
1986 running of the World SSB Champion- 
ships! The first and only contests of their 
kind, these five (5) individual single-band 
events are world-renowned and amongst 
the most challenging events on the bands 
loday. Winners of each contest determine 
the World Champion for 15-, SQs 40-, 75s 
and 160-meter single sideband: 

January 1-1, 1986 

0000-2400 UTC 

5th 40-Meter World SSB Championship 



62 73 for Radio Amateurs * December, 1985 



January 12. 1986 
0000*4400 UTC 

5m 75-Meter World SSB Championship 

0000 UTC January 18 1986. 
through 2400 UTC January 19. 1966 
7lh 160-Meter Woffd SSB Championship 

January 25 1966 

Q0G0-24Q0 UTC 

2nd 15-Meier World SSB Championship 

January 26, T9S6 

0000-24QQUTC 

2nd 20-Meter World SSB Championship 

Stations may be worked only once per 
event All contacts must be two-way SSB. 
All stations, regardless of operating class, 
may operate the entire contest period, 

OPERATOR CLASS 

fa) single operator, single transmitter, 
SSB only, {b\ multi-operator single trans- 
mitter, SSB only. 

EXCHANGE 

Stations within the 48 continental US 
states and 13 Canadian province* or tern 
Tones transmit RS report and state, prov- 
ince, or territory. All others, including 
A rash a and Hawaii transmil RS report and 
ARAL DXCC country, 

QSO POINTS: 

S QSO points for contacts withm your 
own continent 

10 QSO points for contacts outside your 
own continent 

MUL TtPUERS 

T multiplier point is earned for each con- 
HftftfUaJ US slate (46 max.! Canadian prov- 
ince Of territory (13 max |, or ARRL DXCC 
country (excluding the United Stales and 
Canada) 

SUGGESTED FREQUENCIES 

21.250-21.350: 14 175-14 250; 7.050- 
7.080 (DXh 7.175-7.250 {W/VE F ; 3 760- 
3.700; 3.805-3 875: 1830-1850 1855- 
1900 MHi 

0X WINDOW 

For the purpose of this even!, DX win- 
dow frequencies are reserved tor split- 
band operation only. W/VE stations are 
not lo Iransrnil in the window at all. DX 
stations may transmit put must receive 
outside Ihe window frequencies, DX win- 
dows include 7 OBO-7.090, 3.790-3.8O5. 
1 825-1,830. 1.850-1.656. and 1,907-1413 
MHz 



FiNAi SCORE 

TotaJ QSO points 
points * claimed score- 



k multiplier 



ENTRIES: 

Entries must include (1) a contest log, 
{2} a dupe sheet for 100 or more contacts. 
(3) a list of mutt! pliers, and (4) a summary 
Sheet as outlined below. Be sure to in- 
elude your soapbox comments and a 
black and white photo for possible publi- 
cation. 

SUMMARY SHEET: 

Summary sheets must contain (1) con- 
test caflsign. (2) your state, province, terri- 
tory, or ARRL DXCC country, (3) station 
owner's name and mailing address. (4) a 
list of station equipment and antennaisi 
i5i Ihe operator class. (6( total QSOs. (7) to- 
tal QSO points earned, (8) total US stales 
wOffced. (9) Canadian provinces and tern- 
tories worked, (10) the total of ARRL DXCC 
countries worked. (11) total multiplier 
points, and (12) your claimed contest 
score. 

ENTRY DEADLINE- 

Entries should be mailed to Ihe appro- 
priate contest chairman listed below. En- 



1985 RESULTS 
180-METER WORLD SS8 CHAMPIONSHIP CONTEST 
Call sign, QTH. QSOs. State/Provinces, DX, total score 
WOrid Champion * State, Provincial, or Country Champion 



W/VE Single O 


perafor 










WB2TKD 


NY 


65 


29 


2 


10.385 


'"N7DF 


KS 


1,177 


56 


13 


411,240 


KB7M 


WY 


74 


2S 





10.360 


* W6EJ 


IA 


1,152 


56 


13 


40!, 560 


K1KJ 


CT 


62 


28 





6.680 


* K12M 


NY 


841 


5* 


27 


363.690 


N3AOE 


MO 


70 


24 





7,680 


' W09NUL 


IL 


835 


55 


9 


282.880 


WA6FGV* 


CA 


102 


13 


1 


7.210 


* WlODY 


CT 


690 


47 


15 


228,690 


N&IM 


CA 


65 


20 


1 


7,035 


' N8ATR 


OH 


721 


51 


10 


223,260 


KC0QO 


MO 


54 


22 





5,940 


* WD4KXB 


VA 


639 


53 


12 


211.575 


Wl LUG/4 


VA 


41 


23 





4,715 


' W3TS 


PA 


743 


53 


3 


208 r 880 


K5GN 


TX 


42 


22 





4,620 


' KC8P 
* WAIUJU 


Ml 
Wl 


645 
737 


52 
53 


7 



195,900 
195,305 


N3BG 

AABEE 


VA 
CA 


33 
21 


17 
13 






2,805 
1,365 


• W4TMR 


NC 


720 


52 


5 


193,230 


waizv 


OO 


18 


12 





1,080 


K3MO 
N4BNO 


RA 
NC 


590 
466 


54 

51 


5 
9 


176.705 
142.600 


DX Smgie Operator 










* WB1GQR 


VT 


436 


52 


9 


139.690 


'■I40UT 


Italy 


367 


10 


43 


198 T 415 


" KAfSR 


Rl 


385 


52 


14 


133.650 


* YV2IF 


Venezuela 


180 


40 


21 


109.800 


W8SVT 


OH 


400 


52 


7 


120,075 


- EA3CCN 


Spam 


193 


2 


36 


72.580 


- K6HN2 


CA 


440 


46 


5 


115,515 


• OK1JDX 


Czechoslovakia 


178 


5 


31 


31,330 


" W7AWA 


WA 


403 


44 


7 


f04 r 55O 


* C310F 


Andorra 


106 


1 


27 


30,100 


K7QO 


WA 


345 


56 





98.560 


■ SPSINQ 


Potand 


151 


2 


33 


28.525 


■ KQ1F 


MA 


359 


41 


11 


93600 


" 4U1UN 


UN HO 


205 


25 





25.625 


■ K4JPD 


GA 


318 


45 


6 


84,960 


' LZ1KOZ 


Bulgaria 


115 


1 


30 


20.150 


AF1T 


NH 


337 


46 





77,510 


14CSB 


Italy 


53 





23 


6,440 


' N4ICS 


KY 


288 


52 


1 


76 r 065 


G3SJX 


England 


24 





16 


3,840 


W8ILC 


OH 


287 


48 


3 


73,950 


OK1DVK 


Czechoslovakia 


31 





15 


2.400 


KB3MI 


BA 


271 


47 


5 


71,780 


LZ1KKZ 


Bulgaria 


26 





14 


2,030 


WA1BBB 


NY 


317 


42 


1 


69,015 


DL7MAE 


West Germany 


23 





10 


1.150 


• N5GDO 


MS 


282 


47 


1 


68,160 


SP6DVR 


Poland 


23 





9 


1.035 


KA8T 


Ml 


291 


41 





59,655 


KL7XO 


Alaska 


14 


fi 


2 


840 


K8WW 
4 V£5flA 


OH 
SASK 


282 
209 


41 
50 




4 


57.810 
57,510 


W/VE MuttrOperafor 










KR9G 


IL 


165 


48 


2 


41.750 


"WB8IFP 


OH 


1.054 


57 


7 


340,160 


N4NX 


GA 


170 


40 


7 


41.595 


- W6CEM 


Y\^* 


1 T 0©4 


56 


5 


332,450 


1 KV0I 


HE 


191 


36 





34,390 


* W3KA 


Ml 


754 


56 


15 


272.995 


• W2CVW 


NJ 


152 


37 


4 


31 T 980 


" N04R 


KY 


871 


53 


e 


268.095 


N4UH 


up 


166 


37 


1 


31,730 


" WA4JXI 


FL 


536 


54 


33 


250,995 


■ W4TWW 




132 


39 


4 


31.020 


■ NK7U 


OR 


622 


54 


n 


207,675 


■ KS7T 


MT 


139 


42 





29.610 


* N4FNB 


TW 


607 


48 


4 


156,860 


WI4R 


GA 


159 


36 





28,980 


1 WfljR 


CO 


550 


54 


3 


157,605 


" W8VEN 


wv 


143 


37 


2 


28,275 


N4DDS 


TN 


509 


47 


1 


122 T 400 


KG9D 


IL 


139 


40 





27,800 


* K7LXC 


WA 


303 


53 


1 


82.060 


* VE7ERV 


BC 


141 


36 


l 


27.690 


* WA2ZXS 


NY 


317 


47 


4 


81.655 


N5DSK 


MS 


129 


36 


4 


26 r 250 


* W84UUE 


VA 


264 


42 


5 


63,2! 5 


N3ADQ 


MA 


184 


26 





25760 


KA7IXH 


OR 


154 


27 


1 


21,840 


■ KC7PA 

■ VE4WR 


UT 
MAN 


133 
107 


32 
41 


1 

D 


22,110 
21,935 


OX Muitl-Qperai 


'or 










■ KA7T 


ID 


123 


33 


1 


21,250 


"GSHH 


England 


109 


2 


22 


25,680 


N8AXA/ORP 
* VE3IHB 


OH 
ONT 


128 
122 


33 
33 







20,795 
20,135 


MuttiOp Participants 










WB6JMS 


CA 


113 


34 


1 


20,125 


WA2ZXS KB3RG, N2FEC, N3DLL. K02H, 


KA2NIL, KA2TYR 


■ N4BSN 


TN 


108 


35 


1 


19,650 


N4DDS N4DDS, N4DRL 










KC3LV 


PA 


109 


35 





19,075 


N4FNB N4FNB. KA4UEU. WD4PRQ, WD4EOX 






KI4UJ 


KY 


121 


31 





18,755 


WA4JXI WA4JXL WA4SVO 










• WB5WAK 


LA 


107 


35 





18,725 


N04R N04R NC9L, N4JXI. KJ4DG 








WA6MJY 


Ml 


100 


36 





18.000 


WB4UUE WB4UUE.W4JVN 










VE2DTt 


QUE 


102 


34 





17.340 


KATiXH KA71XH, KA7TXF, KD7UX 








NA2Q 


MY 


105 


33 


3 


16.920 


K7LXC K7LXC. mi* 










AA4NA 


FL 


92 


32 


1 


15 T 345 


NK7U NK7U 


I, NI7T 










K9ZMI 


IL 


aa 


33 





14 t 520 


WBBtFP WBfllFP. N8E2M. KC6CP. WB6KXV, WD8ROD 


VESA FY 


SASK 


116 


27 





14,500 


W8KA W8KA, NF8C 










K4JLD 


PA 


1% 


26 


1 


14,310 


W0CEM WiCEM, WAftTKJ. ABAS. K&WA, WB*JHD 




WBRSG 


CO 


83 


34 





14,110 


G6HH G3SVL, G6HVY. G6WKL, G1ICB, G0ARY, 


GfiZHL, 


K8CV 


Mi 


88 


25 





12,760 


G4KMJ. G4NVQ, G4WCP 








N9KS 


Wl 


73 


29 





10,585 


WBIJR WGUR, KDBOZ, KA«CON 









triea must be POSTMARKED NO LATER 
THAN FEBRUARY 20, 1986. Late entries 
will be registered as check logs 

DISQUALtFiCATtON: 

Contestants may be disqualified if Ihey 
run illegal power, cause deliberate inter 
terence, fail to comply with the rules lor 
the DX window, attempt to achieve a scor- 
ing advantage, or if duplicate contacts noi 
cancelled exceed more than 3% of tne to- 
tal contacts made. Dec is ton 5 of the con- 
test committee are final. Disqualified 
stations vtitt be barred from these events 
tor one year thereafter. 

PENAL TIES 
A penalty of 100 QSO points will be as 





160-meter single op runner-up W$EJ. 



16Q>meter multi-op runner up WQCEM. 



73 for Radio Amateurs • December, 1985 63 



CA 

Dec 7-8 


LENDAR 

ARRL 160- Meter Contest 


Dec 14-1 5 


ARRL 10-Meter Contest 


Dec 26-Jan 1 


QRP Winter Sports— CW 


Dec 29 


CARF Canada Contest 


Jan t 


ARRL Straight Key Night 


Jan 11 


73 40-Meter World SSB Championship 


Jan 11-12 


Hunting Lions In The Air Contest 


Jan 11-12 


QRP CW Contest 


Jan 11-12 


ARRL VHF Sweepstakes 


Jan 12 


73 7 5- Meter World SSB Championship 


Jan 18 


73 160-Meter World SSB Championship 


Jan 24-Feb 2 


ARRL Novice Roundup 


Jan 25 


7$ 15 Meter World SSB Championship 


Jan 26 


73 20 Meter World SSB Championship 


Feb 8-9 


Dutch PACC Contest 


Feb 15-16 


ARRL International DX Contest— CW 


Mar 1-2 


ARRL International OX Contest— Phone 


Apr 12-13 


CARF Commonwealth Phone Contest 


Apr 14 


ARRL 144 MHz Sprint 


Apr 22 


ARRL 220-MHz Sprint 


Apr 30 


ARRL 432-MHz Sprint 


May! 


ARRL 1296-MHz Sprint 


Way 17 


ARRL 50-MHz Sprint 


Jun 7-8 


ARRL VHF OSO Parly 


Jim 28-29 


ARRL Field Day 



sessed tor each duplicate contact 
counted In a contestant's claimed score. 

AWARDS: 

A minimum of 100 QSOs must be 



worked in an event to be eligible tor a con- 
test award. Plaques will be issued to the 
World Championship Stations, Awards 
will be issued In each operator class, in 
each continental US state, Canadian prov- 




PRESS/EXCHANGE 



NEWSLETTER OF THE MONTH 

This months winner, The AM Press/Exchange, isn't the publication of a single 
club. Rather, it's a newsletter that ties together hams who love the fun and fidel- 
ity of AM communication, 

Edited and published by Don Chester K4KYV. Roger Frith N4IBF, and Pete 
Curry KA2TTU, the AM PfX covers the entire spectrum of AM radio, from the 
restoration of antique gear to current legislation af fee ting AMers. The Exchange 
part of the title comes from the free classified ads available to hams wanting to 
buy and sell AM equipment. 

To enter your club's newsletter in 73's Newsletter of the Month Contest, send 
it to 73, 80 Pine St reel, Peterborough NH 03458, Attn: Newsletter of the Month. 



ince and territory, and ARRL DXCC coun- 
try represented. 

RULES AND FORMS: 

Contestants are encouraged to use of- 
ficial contest farms. To obtain your own 
copy of the rules and each contest form, 
send an SASE to; Contest Rules and 
Forms, Bitty Maddox KA6JJK/3, 11 62 Bay 
view Vista Drive, Annapolis MD 21401, 



Mall Your Entry To: 
15-Meter Contest Chairman 
Gary Vest WA3KCY 
Star Route, Box 34 
Ho III day TX 76366 



4f>Meter Contest Chairman 
Dennis Younker NE6I 
43261 6th Street East 
Lancaster CA 93535 

160-Meter Contest Chairman 
Harry Arsenault MPLRM 
704 Curtiss Drive 
Garner NC 27529 

20- Meter Contest Chairman 
Chuck Ingram WA6R 
44720 N. 11th Street East 
Lancaster CA 93536 

75 Meter Contest Chairman 

Ron Johnson KC7PA 
68 South 3Q0 West 
Brigham City UT 84302 




BOVE AND BEYOND 



Peter H. Put man KT2B 
$4 Burnham Road 
Morris Plains N J 07950 

As l mentioned last month, one of the 
primary obstacles to operation on 220 
MHz— especially SSB and CW weak-sig- 
nal modes— is the lack of equipment As 
of this date h there is only one manufac- 
turer of 220 linear Iran avert ers, with an- 
other manufacturer about to introduce a 
model in the next month. {No, it's not 
ICOM!) As far as the selection of preampli- 
fiers goes, there's no problem there. I 
know of at least 4 sources for preampli- 
fiers, and there are several sources for am- 
plifiers, most of which are commercially 
made. 

The catch, as usual, is initial cost vs. re- 
turn on Investment. How likely is the 220- 
MHz gear to be used frequently? The 
costs of outfitting a modest station aren't 
excessive, but more operating enjoyment 
might be had on 432 for the given cost. 
The problem appears to be that everybody 
(well, most of the licensed hams in the US 
and Canada} is playing this waiting game: 
If there's enough activity, than I'll buy 




i 



->!-r 

ADD 2pF* 

— ir— 



1 



>'.'.'.■ 

f-'f.BDF MAXl 

INfUt 

CGUPUNG 



SfJ 



SNPUT 
CAVITY 



some equipment and get on the band. A 
sort of Catch 22 

One of the ways 1 hope to be of use to 
readers is to suggest options that will 
yield more use and enjoyment from your 
equipment, or any equipment you are now 
contemplating buying. If you're an avid 
VHF/UHF nut, then you may already have 
dabbled on 220, and you can skip this col- 
umn . But if you have a transverter, or some 
homemade gear, or are about to lay out 
the cash for a piece of 220-MHz equip- 
ment, then the rest of this column might 
Just interest you. 

One of the given factors regarding suc- 
cessful VHF and UHF operation is that It 
can never hurt to run more power. A typi- 
cal 220 station might use a transverter to 
drive a 60- or 120-WaU solid-state ampli- 
fier feeding a single yagi. Not a bad setup, 
but there are times when it would be nice 
to have about 3 dB more power going up 
the feed line to snag that rare grid or make 
a scatter contact. Are you in luck 5 

Fair Radio Sales, in Lima, Ohio, has 
long offered the answer to the VHF oper- 
ator who is long on enthusiasm but short 
on cash. A glance in their 1985 catalog will 



r 



* 



ADD ISpF* 



■tt 



CI 

3.3PF 




VI 
16930) 



ftl 



d CI 
-** I ?-£OpF 

' INPUT 
TUNING 



LI 



"THESE CAPACITORS SHOULD SE SIWER-MICA 

Fig, t. The AM -61 55 input circuit 

64 73 for Radio Amateurs * December, 1985 



reveal a strange-looking box called an 
l AM.6155/GRT-22" UHF power amplifier. 
And for $159,50. you get about 60 pounds 
of gear in two boxes, with a self-contained 
ac power supply. What is this monstros- 
ity? Well, It's a surplus FAA-type amplifier 
for who knows what communications in 
the 225-400-MHz band, and Fair Radio has 
come up with quite a full warehouse. Best 
of all P with little modification It becomes a 
400- 500- Watt power amplifier for 144 and 
220 MH2, The mods are simple and the 
parts are easy to come by. Interested? 
Read on. 

The AM -6 155 uses an El mac-type 8930 
tetrode In a ground ed-cathode grid- driven 
configuration. Such a tube In this mode 
ought to have about 20 dB of gain or so, 
but these amplifiers are only rated at 50 
Watts output. The reason is simple: Since 
the units were intended for continuous 
duty in FAA servlce h the input to the 8930 
grid is undercoupled. Hence, 10 Watts pro- 
vides about 50-60 Watts output in the un- 
modified mode. But there's no reason at 
all why, In the intermittent duty operation 
that hams require, the tube couldn't make 
more power. The only limiting factor Is the 
power supply, which Is stiff enough to pro* 
vide the extra Watts. 

If you have one of these beasttes or 
have rushed to the phone and whipped out 
your charge card to order one, follow the 
instructions carefully. First, make sure the 
Internal plunger for the input cavity is set 
to UHF and not VHF Refer to Fig. 1. The 
Input connector, J1, feeds a 1.8-pF varia- 
ble at the input of the shunt cavity. Obtain 



- ,25 tq'- IWV 



I 



TO GfilO 
OF 8$3Q 



56 V 

5W 



1 



lOOOfl 
5W 



^)J' 



Fig. 2. Use this to set the operating bias 
on the 8930 by grounding J 1, 



a 2-pF. 250- volt or better silver-mica capac- 
itor and shunt it across this tuning capac- 
itor. (It's labeled "Input coupling,' 1 ) Then 
locate the Input-tuning capacitor, and 
again, shunt it with an 18 p^ 250-volt or 
better silver-mica capacitor. When these 
modifications are complete, replace the 
covers and turn the power supply on, Con- 
nect your driving source (no more than 5 
Watts), wattmeter, dummy load/anienna. 
and set the plate Idling current at 50 m A, 
(This Is accessible through the top cover.) 
After you've set the Idling current, key 
your driving source. Adjust the in put -cou- 
pling and Input-tuning capacitors for max- 
imum output. Vou should see about 400- 
500 Watts with 4-5 Watts of drive. Not bad, 
eh? One additional thought: The connec- 
tion from the amplifier output to the rear 
antenna jack goes through a Birdtype di- 
rectional coupler, which will self-destruct 
at this power level. Remove it and replace 
■it with a double-female N adapter. Use a 
good wattmeter and slug to make these 
measurements. Incidentally, this Is about 
all the power this amplifier can make, and 
driving it harder will just suck the plate 
voltage down as the tube tries to draw 
more current. Set your driving source for 
the minimum amount of power needed to 
obtain full output and the tube won't go 
into saturation, 

Next, you may wish to add some means 
of keying the tube. One very effective way 
is to tie a 56-volt 4 5-Watt zener from the 
bias line to ground through a 100-Ohm, 5- 
Watt resistor. By grounding the resistor/ 
zener junction^ the operating bias can be 
obtained. When the resistor is in the circuit, 
set the bias control for full cutoff 1 or so 
that no Idling plate current is measured. 
Typically, this voltage will be around 130- 
140 volts negative. See Fig. 2 for this mod- 
ification. Fig. 3 shows yet another way to 
Key the amplifier, using a voltage doubier 
and relay to break the screen voltage line. 
All you'll need is a small 12-volt relay, a 
pair of 1N 4002/3/4 diodes, and two 200- uF, 
25-V<Jc eiectroiytlcs. The RCA Jack is use^ 
ful for keying. Merely locate and break the 



WORK THE U.H.F. BANDS 

Add a Trans^cncr or com tun ro \our rxisring iUm. ftm or 2m equipment** 
I'htHivr from iht larger tclcviKin oj nnnluJes jvaiUhk Un DV Ov AR, 
I Ml ftT\ 

TRANSVERTERS MV1T ^^ W 09 - 85 

MMT 144 28 $189.95 

MMT 432-28 (3) 1279.95 

MMT 439-ATV $349.95 

MMT 1296444 $329.95 

GTHfrlR MODELS AVAILABLE 

POWER AMPLIFIERS *** for **** 

all models include RF VOX & Ltw Noise HX Pro- Am pi. 

(no prc-amp in MML432-10U) 
: Miu-rt: tWMiKiipui MM1.144-1W-L5 

MHIW output MML144-KJO-S 

SOW i jutpui MML 1 44-50-S 

VI\S .MJtpuf MMLJ44-30-L5 




IWrji *Win 
JOWinpul 
1UW nijjut 

iWorfWn 



$349,95 
$209,95 
S 143,05 
1109.95 




USMHj- 



IWVfr output 
5*At output 
"*»W «utpui 



l2Wv]29ft VIII; 

ANTENNAS 

L296-LY $49.95 

10XY2M $69.95 

70 em/MBM 28 $39.95 

70cmMRM48 »4.95 

70 Liii/MBM 88 $94.05 



MML432-10D HJW input $379,95 

UML432-50 !QW input 1199 9$ 

MML432-3Q-LS t W Of 3W in *21995 
Comircsi «»m V\ au h for drLariv 





70/MBM 48 

Send 44c stamps for full details 
of our VHF/UHF items. 
Preselector filters Pre-ampliliers Antennas 
Low-pass filters Transferrers Crystal Tillers 
Varacior triplers Conveners 

Spectrum I nler national. Inc. 

Povi Office Bo* IQ84S 

i oncord. Mass. 01742 USA 



3 




j 



you can get in on the fun in packet radio! 



' VtMtfr 10 Gp*f lit wtd and mtwL 
' Optfftl** mlti Ydd TUMCtrrttt 
' Eiay to Iti'n lllf re opanE- 
BliflT m Pictal Modam i^d CW wJerrtthctiion 
Ust trim 1 CQdlpvltf. tartttirtil or Tdttypt 
Mac tun* 

1 Terminal. ASCII or BAUDOT, 45 Ed flMfl Blue! 
Radio LifiN Sp**di of jQC, 600 at 1200 Baud 
Aul email calif jclncts AX 35 gr VADC-1. 
Remoifr R«p«iltr Command Leckcul. 
Full B-dlr>p*»lBr opinllon In AX. 25. 
0*ei 90 Command! 

Siorat ractlvad maj&figei for delayed reading 
Abla lo display rth*r caOi wtiiiff conna; led 
"Blmck" Ifid "Traninirtnr modtK Ipr data hits 
Optralii ai an unalfand*d dipipaaler. 
'■Ba*c6n " rr«di 

Stgnili »»iiiibi* Ioe ttmyp* Moitit Control 
SltndiFd nwmory It IK, *jjnrnjibl- t& UK 
4JK UH *,»■!**« or tp*ail onfer 
Cm bt OMMatind tor LAit- 
Squtfcti bout tor lfeaitng of pete* chimk 
Cii w/i. SSID I ViDC • pmpumd iaa ROM 



MODEL PK1 




SPECIAL PACKAGE DEAL!!! 

Amateurs Only 

Incfufles FK! instated rn 
cabinet w:caD!e set k p*t supply 

s 209 95 

{If purcnasect separately S217.85, 



9'. 



: 11X11 X»| 

UiOtttDCJtaOGiM 



PK1- FCC CERTIFIED— wired and tested in cabinet S209« 

Amateur Pnoe Sffit 55 

PK1S- Subassembly board— wired and tested S164 K 

Amateur Price S149** 

PKD0C* Documentation on iy- Refundable on first PK1 $ 9 
purchase 

Please specify Call Sign, SSID Number, and Node Number when ordering 
Contact GIB for additions! info and available options. 

We offer a complete line of transmitters and receivers strips, preselector 
preamps. CWlD'ers & synthesizers lor amateur i commercial use. 

Request our FREE catalog *C* Ww welcome. 



GLB ELECTRONICS JNC. 

151 Commerce Pkwy M Buffalo, NY 14224 
716-675-6740 9 to 4 



IHl ^/HF SHOP K1-800-HAM-7373 cSI m 7)474:9399 



ASTHON — SALEI 



RS-7A 


4S» 


RS-3SA 


123. ra 


RS*12A 


S2.™ 


RS-35M 


13fl.« 


RS-12M 


78.W 


VS-35M 


156« 


RS-20A 


79« 


RS-50A 


179 « 


RS-20M 


96+s 


RS-S0M 


203 26 


VS20M 


114» 


VS-S0M 


£23. « 



Kill 

2MieLBK,22G-22LBX,432-3l3LBX-M.*° 
2M 1 4C^6S » 2M-22C-10B* 

435-10&-110* 43tS-*0CX-l44.» 

KEN PRO ROTORS 

KR4OTKR500 12S,"/I&4« 

KR-S400MR-5600 247 *^3C» » 

HENRY AMPS 

2 KO CLASSIC 
2002A/2O04A Less Retay 
3002 A/3004 A Less Relay 



] 250./ T 350. 
2100/2100 



AMP SUPPLY 

LK-500ZB 

LK^SOOA 

IHHAQE-FREE UPS BROWN 

MIRA3E 



I.M7" 

$2,045.00 
ON ALL 



A10I5 - 235. 50 
B23A - &3 iS 
B215 - 245 » 
B10B - 149 95 
B1016 -23S.» 
B3Q16- 19»* 
MP*1 ■ 99 » 



C-22A 

C-106- 

C-10^2- 

D-24N - 

D-1010N - 

D-30TON ■ 

MP-2 



- B5 « 
1G9.« 
24«.« 
177." 
279 ■» 
2St °° 
•99* 



FOR THE BEST DEAL IN TOWN CALL THE BEST 
NUMBER AROUND 1-800-HAM-7373 



CUSHCRAFT AOP-1 OSCAR PAK-133 .« RINGO RANGER 
KENWOOD T8-940S/AT - CALL UST VAESU FT 757GX 

KENWOOD TR2B00A H + T. - CALL US! YAESU FT 726R 



II <2-220-440)-33>° 
XCVR . . . CALL US 

....... ..CALL US 



KENWOOD 

FACTORY AUTHORED DEALER 
CALL US FOR AMERICA'S LOWEST 
PACE ON ALL YOUR KENWOOD NEEDS 
iFREE UPS BROWNON KENWOOD GEAR» 



CUSHCRAFT 
2T5W8 - 73 * A-3 

421 aXL - 91 * A-4 

M - 250 » 40-2CO 

OTHER MOOELS IN STOCK — 



200« 
267 « 
267* 
CALL 



CUE DUE THE SWEEDJSH BOOMER 
USED BY MANY TOP 10" CONTESTS RS 



144-t SAN 2MTR15EL 



75* 



PARABOUC 
1296 28 IW TRANSVERTER 339« 

12B9<144 3W UP CQNV 319," 

1296 DUAL TUBE AMP CAVITY 439,** 

2PORT POWER DIVIDERS (2-220-432} 50 .■* 
4PORT POWER DIVIDERS f 2 -220-432) 55 * 
1296 2 PORT DIVIDER 57." 

1296 4PORT DIVIDER 62 .« 

1269/9S DISH FEEDS 89" 

2304 DiSH FEEDS 89 « 

1296 SLUG TUNERS 65 95 



YAESU — FACTORY AUTHORIZED 
DEALER CALL FOR THE BEST DEAL 
AROUND ON THE RADIO FULL LINE 
FREE UPS BROWN ON YAESU GEARS 

MUTIK LTD. 
DO YOU OWN AN ICOM VHP XCUR? 
DO YOU WANT TO IMPROVE THE RECEIVER 
■ TRY OUR MUTEK FRONT END BOARD - 
YOU'LL SE GIAD YOU DID' 
RPCB2lt/35l RD FRONT END 143 * 

FOR ICOM 211 Ofl 251 
RPCB27! FRONT END FOR tm * 

ICOM 27 1 A OR 271 H 

RPCB225 FRONT END FOR 143 ™ 

YAESU 221/225 

SLNA 50S 6MTR PREAMP 84 » 

SLNA-T44S 2MTR PREAMP 64. » 

10QWHF SWITCHED. N F. <: (db.GAJN I5db 
SBLAI44E 2MTR MAST MOUNT R.F. 
SWITCHED PREAMP.250W THRU POWER, 
N.F. <Wb15dbG 1B9." 

GLNA433E 70CM MAST MOUNT R F SWIT- 
CHED FREAMP.&OW THRU N.F.-cldfc 
G = 15db 172 « a 

GF8A-144E ZMTRMAST MT PREAMP. 1KW 
THRU POWER G-lSdb N.F.<.Bdb WITH 
AMP SEQUENCER 289 i » 

GLNA^*32E 70cm MAST MT PREAMP. 500 W 
THRU. G=l5dD NF<ldb WITH AMP 
SEQUENCER 299 ■■ 

HIGH DR DBM XVRTRS FOR6 t 2MTRS 
COMING SOON' 



TONNA F9FT ANTENNAS ARE BACK! WE ARE THE EXCLUSIVE U.S. DISTRIBUTOR INTRODUCTORY 
1269/1296 QUAD ARRAY COMPLETE WITH 4-23*1 YAGIS: 'H' FRAME POWER DIVIDER; PHASING 



SPECIAL: 

LINES; CONNECTORS 



FOR OS ^AR MODE L OR TERRESTRIAL APPLCATlOHS REGULARLY 339 » SALE PRICE 

OTHER GREAT. HIGH PERFORMANCE ANTENNAS BY TONNA (CALL FOR SPEC SHEETIT) 



GREAT 



5 EL 6 METER YAGl 

21 EL 70on YAGl 56* 

IATV MODELS IN STOCK) 

70cm OSCARTWrST 68* 

2x19 EL(38«H.) 

WATCH OUR AD FOR NEW LINES!! 



215. 



13 EL 2MXR YAGl 59 * 

23 EL 1296/69 Y AG » 46" 

17 EL 2MTR SUPER YAGl 68 .» 

55 EL 1296 SUPER YAGl 68 « 

9 t 19 el OSCAR ANTENNA 2M I 
FOR STACKING 



19 EL TOcm YAGl 44 " 

2MTR OSCARTWIST 65 .» 

2«9 EL. MBfll) 
70cm ON A COMMON BOOM-GREAT 

75 M 



SS8 ELECTRONIC 
K80G1 6 To 10 DBM RCV CONV. 115 " 

K2001 2 To 10 DBM RCV CONV US* 

K7001 70cm To 10 DBM RCV CONV 115* 
K23C1G 23cm To 10 or 2 RCV 
CONV G F FRONT END AND DBM 159 » 
TV 1 44- 28 1 1 W 2MTK X VR TR 209 * 

TV-43226 1 1 DW 70c m X V RTR 299" 

TV-22i> 28-10 10W 1 V* M XVRTR Coming Soon 
DX 144 PREAMP N F <: .4db 130 » 

DX 220 PREAMP N.F < .Sdb Coming Soon 
DX-432 PREAMP N.F < 5db 130 » 

(WON DAYTON 1985 N F CONTEST) 
DK-1296S PREAMP N.F 5db 158" 

OK 2320 PREAMP N F < 8db 188 " 

PA-2310 128971296 l OW LWEAR AMP 275 * 
LT-23S 1298 10W LINEAR TRANS VERTER 
2MIF 810 » 

LSM -24 1 269-2 OSCAR MODE L XMlT CONV 
IW 

OUTPUT, 2M.I.F. 299." 

MICROLINE 13 VkW 2 3GHZ XVRTR SYSTEM 
2M t F 410" 

MCROLINE 13 3W2.3GHZ XVRTR SYSTEM. 
2M.I F 875" 

SLA 13 2304 3W AMP 285 " 

MAST MOUNTED PREAMPS 
MV144V 250W R,F SWJTCH WITH 12V 

SUPPLY INTERFACE 176." 

MV432V 1S0W R.F SWITCH WITH 

INTERFACE 185.** 

MV-144S-01 1KW THRU PWR WITH 

SEQUENCER 309" 

MV-432S-01 500W THRU PWR WITH 

SEQUENCER 319" 

MV-1296S 100WTHRU PWR WITH 

SEQUENCER 3*9" 
OTHER HIGH QUALITY PRODUCTS IN 
STOCK-CALL FOR CATALOGUE 



TORUS Pttca 
tsm COO* 



I *1tFlAtf furiU 

pndr |q Mp> 

to j lS*k rtindnng 
LrMiyi *f our iBhjuHoh Order? &*c+Q wi M «n> 
*«feradl f * ifv and no^cancafiAtii* lambd a, m* «<7T 
t» itMjmtl m t«*P 9 bank e^tckt. out «P OB iai MWJ 
*fl*ft« lururc pwxftasoa. Aji pricav an FOB tADurv 
i«int0D Wfc or pchtM of ongrrt P"ca* Oa no* tmii&mt 
afklglfHng un»esa knd*c&t«l. vw» mm nol 1 — oo « «i tn# 
for Oafnagaa lu mfccha/MfiBe d> \tm dvlhnrv rarrmr 




16 5 Mountain Bivd Pt 309 HOURS Monday thru Friday 9AM~3:aoPM 
Mpjntamtpn Pa '870 " Salurdays 10 a m * 12 p.m, 



"24 HOUR PHONE SERVICE 
FOR YOUR CONVENIENCE 1 ' 



MC/V1SA/C O D 



"When You Buy, Say 73" 



73 for Radio Amateurs ■ December, 1985 65 



25 V 



X 



VOLTAGE 
DOUSLEfi 
IN4QQ2 

— m — 



RELAY 
IZVDC 



T 



i 



IN4002 



20O>F 
25V 



m 



FROM S.JVAC 
FILAMENT FEEOTHRQUGH 
C5 (BROWN WIPE, 00 
NOT REMOVE I 



f&HC OR 
PHONO 
JACK 



COM* i <HMO 



<^ 



(MOUNT OM 
REAR PANEL J 

THANSMlTTffi KEYING 
(SHORT ^0 TRANS Mil ) 



"■390 V 

[SMALL RED WIRE! 
REMOVED FROM 
FEEO THROUGH, C9 



TO SCREEN -GRID 
FEEDTHROUGH, C9 
(SMALL RED WIRE1 



Fig. 3. One method of keying the amp, The voltage doubter wilt not be needed if a 6.3- V- 
ac miay can be iocs ted, 



RF 

DECK 

(REAR* 




ADO 220*11 
OR 2 70Ktt, 



SOLOtft LUG 



Fig. 4. D&n't forget to add this resistor. 

screen lead from feed through C9 on the 
tube enclosure, and install this circuit in 
aeries. Finally, add a 27Qk*Ohm, 1 Watt re- 
sistor from feedthrough C12 to ground on 
the tube enclosure. This will ensure that 
the screen does not take on the potential 
of the 20fiO-vol , t power supply when not 
connected (See Fig. 4.) 

There you have ill It couldn't be much 
easier. The unit measures 7 Inches by 19 
inches by 16.5 inches and will lit on a 
good sturdy operating table. The blower 
might be a bit noisy, but It's a small price 
to pay. From all reports^ these units are 
fast disappearing from the Fair Radio 
warehouse in Ohio, and although I'm sure 
they have a large stock, it can't last for- 
ever, Note that a similar amplifier, desig- 



nated type AM-6154, is also offered, but 
for more money. This unit, while offering 
similar performance at 144 MHz, will not 
cover 220 MHz. The AM 6155, while in- 
tended to operate on 220 MHz, will ac- 
tually cover 144 MHz, provided that the 
internal cavity plunger Is set to VHF. You'll 
need to experiment with the values of the 
shunt capacitors on the Input, but a fin- 
ished unit will behave as well as the 220 
amplifier. Now there's no excuse for not 
working Ihe 220-MHz tropo openings! 

It would appear that grid-square mania 
has caught up with us all. The past ARRL 
September VHF QSO Party featured more 
stations operating portable than I can re- 
call in a long time. Some went out of their 
way to put such rare grids as FN 51 in 
Cape Cod on the air on 144, 220, 432, and 
1 296 MHz. Other operations surfaced from 
EM 65, (Tennessee/ North Carolina border), 
FM OS (West Virginia), and FN 25 (Quebec). 
Conditions were generally mediocre, ex- 
cept for some sporadic openings on tropo 
on 432 and 1296 MHz, and a fairly good 
tropo opening on 144 MHz Sunday night 
towards the end of the contest. What a far 
cry from last September, when the storm 
lashing South and North Carolina created 
such intense tropo conditions that sta- 
tions In Massachusetts worked Georgia 



DEALER DIRECTORY 



Fontann CA 

Complete linti ICOM,, DittiTrsjn, rtfn-Tec, Mirage, 
Cubic, LLUm fc rtv^r 40CKI tlecfrgnic prpdutl!; for 
hobbyist tK-limdan, fiiperiniGf^er. Ahcj CB ra4k>, 
Urtil-rtVfjbilc. Funtuui Ktcctmnlcs.,. Bfili $\em Ave., 
Fontiiri, CA 92315, 022-77 1 (r. 



Prtston II> 

Ross WJJ7BVZ has lhr largest stock Of airtHlettrKrar 
in the Interrncnuitam West and che best prices. Call 
me for tbll your ham needs. Ross Distributing. 78 So. 
Slate, ?mtun ID S316J, SS2-0&S0, 



San Jose CA 

Bay a/en 1 * ncwcRi amateur radio stone, New & used 
amateur radio sale* & service. We fcaltirc Kenwood, 
iCOM, Azrien. Yaesu, Ten-Tec. Sariiec & many 
more. Sluvrr Radio, |nc, F |775A S. Winchester 
Blvd., i amp Ml < * WHX'Mt, ?704i6S, 



New Castle DE 

h'actonf Authorized DealetfYaesu, [COM, Ten-Tec. 
KDK, Kenwowl, AiiA, KarttroFiics H Saniec. Full line 
of accessories. No sales la* irt Delaware. One mile 
off 1-95 Delaware Amateur Supply, "71 Mcatfcm 
RoMli, Mtw CiStlf . DE I VT2W, m-Tttt. 



Littleton MA 

The reliable ham store serving ME. Full line o| 
ICOM, & Kenwood- Yacsu NTs, Draltc, Daiwa, 
B&W accessories. Curtis. & Trac keyers. Larseti,, 
Hustler, Telex/ Hy-Gain products. Mirage amps,,, 
Astron P.S., Alpha Dtlata proietiorfi. ARRL Sl 
Kftfllroriitt iliSltuCtiun aids. Whistler radar detec- 
tors. Full line Of uGax fillings. TE1.-COM Kletlmnic 
CummRnkitlons, 67S Great Rd. (Ri. 11*), Llulc- 
lon. MA QI46Q, 4W-3400/J040. 



I>erry NH 

Serving Ihe ham community witti rvew and used 
equipment We Kt*Kk and service most majoi Lines;: 
AEA, Asiron, B&W, Cushcraft, Errcomm, Hy 
Cain. Huitler. ICOM, Kenwood. KLM, Larsen, 
Mirage, Mosley; boots, rotors, cable and coimec- 
lors, Business houra 10 "? Monday through Thurs- 
day, and 10-5 Friday and Saturday, Rivtfldeh 
DrclruniLJi, B l.und»ndcrr> R<nd, I3errj NH QJMLlft. 
434-5311. 



DEALERS 

Your company name and message can contain up to 25 words tor as little as 
$150 yearly (pre paid) p or $15 per month {prepaid quarterly). No mention of 
mail-order business or area code permitted. Directory text and payment must 
reach us 60 days in advance of publication. For example, advertising for the 
March '86 issue must be in our hands by January 1st- Mail to 73 Magazine, 
Peter borough, NH 03458, ATTN: Nancy Ciampa. 



J7 



B-ZKH 
-^/vv—— 



J- £00 tO IQOOoF 
'CHIP CAP 

ft? 



iQpF 
INPUT yf-f 



4.7 Kfl 

— I^^r- 






1000 PF 

FEED 

THfiOUCH 

-s 



ETC. 

\4 =- 






i 






zfner through 



IGOOflF 

._! . E !P. rh 



m 



s JO so 



100 dF 
— )( OUTPUT 



LI 




IOpF 



ft? 



2O0- 

.IDOOtf 
CHIP CAP 



m 



fT? 



,< 



; 1/4 w 



G2 



4 



a& 



S30 3O 



■v - r 



Fig, 5, A 220-MHz preamp using a Tt S-3030 G a As FET (courtesy of 220 Notes/ 



on 12-96 MHz! Such conditions are not 
likely to be seen again for a while. 

As I write this, Hurricane Gloria Is 
churning up ttie Atlantic Coast; she will be 
a memory (unpleasant for some readers, 
no doubt) by the time you read this. It will 
be interesting to see if a storm of this 
magnitude— Level 4 r approaching 5— will 
create major disturbances In propagation 
on the higher UHF bands. Perhaps the 
Massachusetts-Georgia path will open 
again. There is certainly going to be un- 
usual propagation observed on 144 MHz 
as a result of the storm, no matter where 
it comes ashore. 

Incidentally, one easy way to set up a 
"beacon" monitor is to get ahold of a ru- 
dimentary secondhand television with 
UHF coverage and pick a station about 
50-100 air miles from your GTH, Fasten a 
UHF high -gain antenna to your tower or 
mast in a fixed position towards that sta- 
tion, During periods of possible enhanced 
propagation, leave the set on white oper- 
ating other bands or working around the 
house. You can be tipped off by increasing 
signal strength from the distant station. 
For Indications of openings on lower 
bands, select a station In the range of 
channels IT, 12, or 13 about the same dis- 
tance away. Use the same method of fix- 
ing a beam to your mast Try to use a 
narrowband beam, and if necessary 5 make 
one. A 220 beam will do the trick If needed. 
You don't need to see the picture, fust 
hear the audio. For that matter, a radio re- 
ceiver with TV sound would be adequate. 

Let's wrap up this column and our dis- 
cussion of 220 by publishing a circuit for a 
dual-gate G a As FET preamplifier for 220 d 
courtesy of Kent Britain WA5VJB and 220 
Notes for August, 1985. The Tl S-3030 is a 
relatively new device but should be avail- 
able shortly, tt is claimed to have 25 to 27 
dB of gain with a noise figure of .5 to .7 
dB. ImpressiveE See Fig 5. 

Coll specifications are as follows: L1, 5 
turns, 3/16' 1 diameter. L2 is identical but 
tapped at 1 1/2 turns from the feed- 
through-capacitor end. C2 is a 10-pF trim- 
mer. The entire unit can be assembled on 
a piece of G10 board with the foil side up 
using standoffs, feedth roughs, and piston 
trimmers to support the components, One 
thing to remember is that GaAsFETs are 
susceptible to high rf fieids! it's best to 
use some sort of sequencing device and 
make sure that the power to the preamp 
and relay drop out before the 220 transmit- 




ter and amplifier are energized, otherwise 
you'll have a barbecued G a As FET. A sim- 
ple way to avoid this problem is to use two 
feedlines — one on transmit and one on re- 
ceive — and employ a tower-mounted 
SPOT relay, such as a Dow Key or similar 
model. The reJay should be energized in 
the receive mode and de-energized in the 
transmit mode, This will ensure that your 
investment In a good preamp survives 
your operation habits. One additional ben- 
efit of this method Is that when you shut 
your station down, the mast-mounted 
preamp is taken out of the line, so that 
lightning or other hostile forces of nature 
don't send the preamplifier to an early 
grave. 

A typical noise figure for a 220 receive 
converter or transverter is likely to be 
about 2 dB or so Using the GaAsFET on 
the tower may be worthwhile if your feed- 
line run is 50 feet or more. Note that your 
S-meter readings will now be out of 
whack, as the idling receiver noise level 
might go as high as S7 or S91 A good way 
to correct for this Is to obtain an in-line 1 0- 
or 20-dB attenuator good for UHF and mi- 
crowave frequencies, I use two of them in 
my station: one at the receiver i-f output 
from my 432-MHz Microwave Module, cor- 
recting the S-meter readings back to S2 on 
receive when no signal Is present, and one 
at the output of a 220-MHz MOSFET 
preamplifier to prevent overdriving the rf 
amplifier in my 220- MHz Microwave Mod- 
ule. Failure to add such a pad led to all 
kinds of Intermod whenever I was beam- 
ing east towards New York City and chan- 
nel 13. 

These pads are easy to obtain. I bought 
five for 10 dollars from a focal surplus 
house, and they are silver-plated with a fe- 
male BNC connector at one end and a 
mate BNC at the other. They show up at 
flea markets as well and can be useful for 
a variety of applications, One of the best 
applications Is reducing the drive from a 
low-band exciter {such as the Kenwood 
TS-430S) to the associated transverter, 
cutting the output from 10 Watts to about 
1 Watt. This is necessary when using a tet- 
rode grid-driven amplifier. Don't put the at- 
tenuator at the output of the 10-Watt 
exciter or you 1 !! blow it up. These devices 
are only rated for about 100 milliwatts or 
so of power dissipation. 

Thanks to Dale Clement AF1T for his 
notes on converting the AM -6 155, Thanks 
also to 220 Notes for the preamp circuit- 



ORRECTIONS 



A few gremlins crept Into OAdKO's article, 'Toss Out Your Tubes," which appeared in 
the November, 1985, issue of 73. 

In Figs. 1 and 7, capacitors marked nF should be marked pF. Variable capacitors Cl f 
C4, C6, and C12 are 1^8 pF In Fig. 7 t C7 is 500 pF, 



66 73 for Radio Amateurs • December, 1985 




AM HELP 



We are happy to provide Hem Help list 
tngs tree, on a space-available basis We 
are not nappy when we have to take time 
from other duties to decipher cryptic 
notes scrawled Illegibly on dog-eared 
postcards and odd sued scraps of paper 
P tease type or pnm yovr request {neatly'), 
double spaced, on en & V> " k 11™ sheet of 
paper and use upper and lowercase let- 
ters where appropriate Also, please make 
a "V* look tike a "J/ + not an "t r mi which 
cooid he an "et" or an "eye™ and so on. 
Hard as if may be to believe, we are not te* 
miliar with every piece ol equipment man 
utactured on Earth tor the fast 50 years' 
Thanks tor your cooperation. 

I have a Radkj Shack PC-2 computer 
witti a cassette interface, pnntox r and RS- 



232C interlace. Can someone give me ad- 
vice on how lo use this computer for RTTY 
or as a code reader? My HF rig is an ICOM 
JC-745, 

Ron Fran* K3WJL 

1660 St u rt> ridge Drive 

Sewickley PA 15143 

(412>36fr6G63 evenings 

I'm looking For information about an 
ITBOS'GRC panadapter. 

Jim Ash worth K4DSJ 

Route % Box 218 

Chunchula AL 3&521 

I need a manual for an Ampe* SP-300 
instrumentation recorder and an original 
R-390A manual. I'm aiso looking for an R- 



389, and I have R-392 parts available for 
just shipping charges (sorry, no tubes!). 

Terry O'Laughlln WB9GVB 

169 Ohio Avenue 

Madison Wl 53704 

I am looking lor schematics or a service 
manuat for an HP AN/USN-1D5A oscillo- 
scope 

X Crockett 

Route 2, Box 143 

Walla Welle WA 39362 



I need a schematic diagram or service 
manual for an Okidata Microltrte 82A 
printer 

Marvin MOSS W4UXJ 

Box 20601 

Atlanta QA 30358 

I need schematics and service informa- 
tion for a BC-1068 and a BC-1068/A re- 
ceiver- 
Elizabeth Sheehan 
PO Box 246 
Pembroke MA 02359 



Does anyone have any ham-radio pro- 
grams tor the Hewlett Packard HPQ7 or 
HP75 computer? 

Dr. len Flshman KC2EW 

305 Halton Rd. 

Dewftt NY 13224 

I need service information and a scne 
mat ic for an FDK 750-A 2- meter all-mode, 
made by Fuku Yama Electronics Co. Ltd, 

Mark Edwards N8EGJ 

3204 Walnut SlrMt 

Port Huron Ml 4*060 

|*m looking for a sei of relays for a Swan 
1011, a manual for a Tempo S-1 HT and 
accessories for a Kenwood TS-520. 

Tony Byrum KAJVFN 

2009 West 5th 

Ottumw* 1A 52501 

I am looking for information on using an 
Apple It + to receive weather facsimile. 

Oe Alcorn KA6C0E 

741 East Grand view Ave, 

Sierra Madre CA 91024 




-UP YOURERP* 



-* 



MAGNET MOUNTS 
For HT owners operating inside a venicle and want- 
ing increased T7R range, RF PRODUCTS has the low 
cost solution. 

Remove your BNC antenna from the HT and mount 
on trie RF PRODUCTS BNC magnet mount. Install the 
magnet mount on the roof top and connect the BNC 
co-ax connector. 

The rnagnel mount (part no. 199-445) has 10 feet of 
smafl (5/32*) co-ax with BNC conector attached. 
PftlCE $1595 rVi.O. or cashiers ck_, via UPS gnd, Fla. 
residents add 5% tax, for air UPS add $3.25 
The RF PRODUCTS Magnet Mounts are one of the few mounts available that can be repaired 
should the co-ax cable be damaged. The large surface area capacitance disc provides proper 
ground plane coupling for 1/4 and 5/8 wavelength VHF and UHF antennas. 
MODELS AVAILABLE WITH THE FOLLOWING CONNECTORS & CO-AX TYPES. 
ANTENNA CONNECTORS: BNC, TNC, 1 1/8* (MOT.), 5/16-24 STUD, 3/8-24 SOCKET, 
COAX CABLE: RGT22/U, RG-58A/U, mini 8X. 
TRANSCEIVER CONNECTORS: BNC, TNC r PL^259 T type N, 



RF PRODUCTS 

P.O. Box 33, Rocktedge, FL 32955, U.S.A. {305) 631077$ 






NEMAL ELECTRONICS 



J^m*i 



COAXIAL CABLE SALE 









v^ 



<o ' 









/': • vv\f|; 



4 . 



HG8U20ft , PU259ea end 
RG214U dbl silver shield. 50 ohm 



$4.95 
$1.55/(1. 






h' wvIy 



POLYETHYLENE DJELECTFUC 
RG59AJmii spec 96% shield tl ^ tJ _^_ 



I4crft 
36*rft 

lOc/ft 

ase/it 



R6213 noncon ram mating 95* 1 * sheiid md spec 

RG174/U mil spec 96 f • shield 

RGl TU96*% Shield. 75 ohm mil spec 

RGSU 96" , sn.eid mil spec S29.95J1 00 ft. or 3i*rt1. 

HG6A7U double shiekd 75-ohm 25er , lt. 

PG58AU stranded mil spec 12c/ft 

RG5S mil spec 96* I shield i i«/tt 

LOW LOSS FOAM DIELECTRIC 
RGdX95% shield $14 95*100 ft. or 17c/ft. 



RG59AJ 70% copper bf aidu 

RGauflO-i. shield 

RGSBUdO^ snieid 

RG58U95 D a shield 

RG59U 100** io<l sn«ekl TV type „ 



RG8U 97 % shield n^ leqw Betdflfi&?Ui 
Heaty IXrty Rotor Cable 2 16 ga. & ia ga 
Rot or Cabte frcon 2 16 ga. 6-22 ga 



.Mm. 

19*rtt 

07*m 

toc/ft. 
lOtrli 
31erfi. 
36c/ft 
T9e/ft. 



Grounding strap, heavy duty tubular breid 
3/16 tn, tinned copper lOeMl. 

3t8 in. tinned copper 30c/ft. 



CONNECTORS MADE IN USA 

Amphenol Pi 259 79< 

PL-259 Tef lOn/Sitve* $1 .59 

PL 259 push on adapter shell 1 01 S 3 89 

PL 259* SO 239 10/S5 89 

DoubJe Male Connector St 79 

PL 25S Double Female Gonnec lor 98c 

l ft paich cord w'RCA type plugs each end 3/Si .00 

ReduterUG US or 176 IDfft.99 

UG 2S5 (PL 259 to 8NC) $2.95 

ElbO*(M359i 11.79 

F59A<TVtype| KVS2.1S 

UG 2 ID U Amphenol Type N Male for RGB S3 00 

BNC UGS8C'U. male Si 25 

'& inch Mike Pluq tor Co'ptinse* St 25 

UG273 BNC to PL-259 S3 00 

FREE CATALOG 
COD add S2-00— FLA Res add 5% Sales Tai 



Orders under 530 00 add $2 00 

Connectors— shipping 10% add'l. 53.00 minimum 
Cable— Shipping $3,00 per 100 ft. 
12240 NE 14th Ave., Depi, 73 , No. Miami, FL 33161 Call (305) 893*3924 



— TEST EQUIPMENT 

RE CONDITIONED AND 
LAB CALIBRATED 

URM-2S SIGNAL GENERATOR. 10 KHZ TO 50 MHZ 
AM'CW MODULATION. 400 & 1 KHZ, RF OUTPUT 
0-2V OR 0-1 V PRECISION 50 OHM STOP ATTEN 
UATOR, SMALL PORTABLE UNfT £245 OO 

URM-2e SIGNAL GENERATOR 4 MHZ TO 405 MHZ 
CALIBRATED OUTPUT TO 2V, MODULATION 400^ 
1000 HZ, CALIBRATED OUTPUT ATTENUATOR. 
SMALL PORTABLE UNIT 245 00 

HP606A SIGNAL GENERATOR, 50 KMZ TO 65 MHZ. 
RF OUTPUT 01 TO 3V IN 50 OHMS, CRYSTAL CAL 
IBRATOR 400/1000 HZ MODULATION 375.00 

HPfiOftC SIGNAL GENERATOR. 10 MHZ TO 4&Q MHZ. 
1 MV TO 1V RF OUTPUT INTO 50 OHMS, AMCW 
OR PULSE MODULATION, CALIBRATED 
ATTENUATOR 34500 

T&-51Q/U SIGNAL GENERATOR, 10 MHZ TO 420 
MHZ, AM/CW OR PULSE EMISSION OUTPUT VOLT- 
AGE TO 5V, CALIBRATED ATTENUATOR. 4GQ/1Q0Q 
HZ MODULATION. 295 00 

HPS14A SIGNAL GENERATOR 900 TO 2100 MHZ 0.5 
MV TO IV INTO 50 OHMS. INTERNAL OR EXTERNAL 
PULSE OR FM MODULATION CALIBRATED 
OUTPUT. ... 345-00 

HP616A SIGNAL GENERATOR 1.8 GHZ TO 4 2 GHZ 
CALIBRATED OUTPUT 0.1 MW TO IV INTO 50 OHMS 
INTERNAL, EXTERNAL PULSE OR FM 
MODULATION ... 375.00 

HP618B SIGNAL GENERATOR 3.8 GHZ TO 7.6 GHZ 
0,1 MV TO 1V INTO 50 OHMS. CALIBRATED OUTPUT. 
INTERNAL, EXTERNAL, PULSE FM AND SQUARE 
WAVE MODULATION. . . 37500 

HP620A SIGNAL GENERATOR 7 GHZ TO 11 GHZ 
CALIBRATED OUTPUT 1 MV TO IV INTO 50 OHM 
INTERNAL, EXTERNAL. PULSE AND FM 
MODULATION 450.00 

SG-557/URM-52 SIGNAL GENERATOR 3 8 GHZ TO 
7 6 GHZ, 0.1 MV TO IV INTO 50 OHM CALISRATED 
OUTPUT, INTERNAL, EXTERNAL PULSE FM AND 
SQUARE WAVE MODULATION. MILITARY VERSION 
OF HP 61 SB 325 00 

SG-13/U AIRCRAFT VOR7ILS SIGNAL GENERATOR 
RANGE 106 MHZ THmj 135 9 MHZ AND 329 9 TO 
335 MHZ, OUTPUT SIGNAL INCLUDE VOR. LOC 
AND GLiDESLOPE AND 1000 CPS SAME AS COL 
LINS 479T-2, OPEFIATES FROM 2S VDC AT 3'/z AMPS 
BENCH POWER SUPPLY OR AIRCRAFT BATTERY 
DEAL FOR AIRCRAFT RADIO REPAIR 285 00 

JERROLD 900A SWEEP GENERATOR RANGE 5 
TO 1200 MHZ. 03 TO 400 MHZ SWEEP WID" 
OUTPUT iS FLAT 5DB TO BOO MH7, 1.5DB TO 1200 
MH2 BUILT-IN RF DETECTOR 32S 00 

HPaSSIB^SlB SPECTRUM ANALYZER AND DIS- 
PLAY SECTION. FREO RA*^JGE 1ft 1 MHZ TO 12 GHZ 
TYPE N COAXIAL INPUT. WITH EXTRA WAVEGUIDE 
MIKERS RANGE CAN GO TO 40 GHZ, TEN CAU 
BRATED SPECTRUM WIDTHS 1O0 KHZ TO 2 GHZ 
5ENSITIVFTV UP TO - 100 DT3M 1 65000 

WE ACCEPT VISA, WC. OR CHECK. AOO SHIP- 
PING WE SNIP BEST WAY, SATISFACTION GUAR- 
ANTEED, IMMEDIATE SHIPMENT PHONE BILL 
5CEP 704-524-7519. 



ONtCS 



HIGHWAY 441 
OTTO. NORTH CAROLINA 23763 



R 



n 



When You Buy, Say 73" 



73 for Radio Amateurs * December, 1985 67 




TTY L 



• II 



P 



Marc i. leavey, M.D. WA3AJR 
6 Jenny Lane 
Pikesvilte MD 21208 

This is a crazy month On ihe one hand, 
I have been planning the content of this 
month's column tor months: we have been 
taking a look at the ma Lena I you all have 
sent in about various computer RTTY pro- 
grams. On the other hand, hind of a tradi 
tion has arisen wiin (he Decern Der issue 
where we lake a walk through the market- 
place, so to speak. Then again, 73 blew my 
mind with the Silver Anniversary issue. 

My sincere thanks to each and every 
one of you who named me, and I suppose 
this column, for (he Silver Eagle award. To 
be so chosen means quite a bit to me and 
certainty speaks to (tie readership ol this 
column, which many of you tell me is the 
first thing you turn to when your issue of 
73 arrives in the mail Then again, it is kind 
of startling to realize (hat this magazine 
has been published two more years than 
Johnny Carson has been on "The Tonight 
Show 

Well, this month lei's See what aft ot you 
Commodore users had to say. Now, I know 
that I am going to catch some flack for 
this, but I will look at both VlC-20 and C-64 
programs together this month. From the 
letters \ have received, it appears that 
many of you who are using one of these 
machines have used the other, also. 
There f of a. Jumping seems appropriate 

I want to apologize ahead of time for not 
having some of the manufacturers' ad 
dresses this month. It seems thai some of 
these folks do not advertise where I read, 
nor did the amateurs using the programs 
send in any specific ^formation. So, some 
of what 1 pass along will be essentially all 
that I received. 

Jerry Welhrauch KBHZI. in St. Paul, Min 
nesota, Is using a C-64 computer with a 
RAK Electronics program. He states that 
it Is very easy to use and that he was able 
to interface It Eo a DT-800 demodulator 
with an Inverter chip and transistor. 
Sounds straightforward, and Jerry is happy 
with the setup. 

By far, though, the great bulk of you 
seem to be using a select few RTTY pro 
grams. In no particular order, let's see 
what some of you have to offer up. 

Kantronics, a company whose name I 
should have in a one-key macro on my 
word processor, puts out a program called 
Hamtext for the Commodore computers, 
One of you felt that "the Hamtext package 
is absolutely first rate. {Don't | bother with 
Ham soft at alt, for it pales by comparison. 
Ham text features ten message buffers 
that can be any size, a type- ahead trans- 
mit buffer that defaults to 256 bytes out 
can be set to any size, automatic insertion 



of the time of day, automatic return to re 
ceive, and diddle mode. 

( The sense of the RTTY signal can be 
Inverted on both transmit and receive, in- 
dependently. Auto CR and auto LF can be 
enabled or disabled. The software will 
also transmit text files directly from disk 
Or tape. The buffer area is partitioned 
among the message buffer, the transmit 
buffer, and whatever is (eft over is given to 
the holding butter which stores all trans- 
mitted and received text on a FtFO basis. 

"On the C-64 approximately 30K of 
buffer is available, and approximately 3K 
on an unexpended VlC-20. As an added 
bonus. Hamtext on the C-64 generates, 
with the internal C-64 sound chip. RTTY 
tones which are very close to the 2125- 
and 2295-Hz standard frequencies. Ham- 
text on the VlC-20 also generates tones, 
but because of the limited frequency res- 
olution of the VJC sound chip, the tones 
are not suitable." 

Another of you, also using this sofware. 
relates that in using the VIC. "the worst 
feature of the VIC for RTTY is that it can- 
not save to disk or tape while copying, 
This means that at least 16K ol added 
memory is highly desirable to allow ade- 
quate receive buffe' 

AN fs not golden, however, as one of you 
wrote. "The Hamtext plug-in module I 
irash-canned after the linear amplifier 
erased the ROMs. II had no shielding 
whatever." Oh, well. 

Microiog's AIR 1 is another RTTY inter- 
face many of you have had experience 
with. One of you says that "the AIR-1 is a 
fine piece of equipment. It has a lot of de- 
sirable features; it is easy to operate and 
does not require a tape or disk drive to 
load. AN In all It performs well. I do have 
one major complaint, and therein lies my 
problem. 

"The Alfi-1 Is noisy At least it is when 
used with my rig. When I turn on the C-64 
without Ihe AIR 1 Installed there is a very 
slight Increase In background noise. The 
noise Is barely perceptible and does not 
cause the S needle to move. However, 
when I have the AIR-1 cartridge In place 
and turn on the computer, the 5 needle 
lumps between 1 and 2 units. It is really 
noisy! I have tried any number of things 
including .001 uF caps on all connectors 
and passing the shielded cable through a 
toroid coii. Nothing has had a significant 
Impact on the self-generated noise 

"The end result of the noise Is that I 
cannot work the weaker stations. That is 
not serious, just frustrating." 

Of course, those long lists of ice-cream 
flavors are there because we ail have dif- 
ferent tastes, and the same goes for RTTY 
terminal programs. Another of you liked 
the AIR-1, and added that although it did 



not coma equipped for transmitting 850- 
Hz shift Mlcrolog was very helpful In mak- 
ing the mod Hi cat I on. 

And then there's the AEA CP-1. You see, 
there again the opinions tiy. Another help- 
ful company Is credited with adapting mis 
device to transmit the B50-H? signal ire- 
quired by some services) that It does not 
normally transmit. On the noise front, Ihe 
affected station noted that "there was 
none of the self-generated noise. It was 
quiet. What a pleasure to use." 

In general, it would appear that all of 
these units provide a good interface for 
the ham wanting to put his VlC-20 or C-64 
on RTTY Each has features and options 
that make it Slightly different If you look 
around, you can find folks boosting or 
burying each of them, Good tuck, and I will 
keep you posted on whatever else I hear 
here, 

My thanks to all the others who sent in 
information on their systems: David Rea- 
saner N4KTY, In Huntsville. Alabama. Billy 
M.elsen WB4APC. in R&dcliff, Kentucky, 
Cdr William Radtcan N7CAD/KA2WR, and 
Robert Smils VE7EM0, in British Colum- 
bia. Always appreciated, folks 

Okay, get your walking gloves on as 
your fingers stroll along 73 Boulevard, the 
finest shopping district this side of Radio 
Row. If you don't get that reference, look 
up someone in QCWA and ask for an inter- 
pretation. Once again, 11 is time for our an- 
nual search for the RTTY goodies on sale 
in the pages of the October issue of 73 

We are going to ignore transceivers and 
the like {although I know that you need 
those for RTTY, too) and just look for 
RTTY'Specific manufacturers and dealers, 
We nil paydirt on page 8. with an ad from 
ege, Inc., featuring many of the RTTY 
packages mentioned above. They have the 
cryptic "CALL" for some Items Instead of 
a price, so maybe you can haggle. Try their 
loll -free number, 1-800-3384799, and take 
a shot 

Page 25 features an ad from Mlcrolog 
showing their AIR-1 mentioned above I 
should note I hat Micro) og moved some 
lime back, so soma letters or Ihe like may 
have been lost In the shuffle. Anyway, tell 
Ihem that "RTTY Loop" sent you when 
you call or write them if you are interested 
In the AIR l or any other of their products. 
Their addresa Is 18713 Mooney Drive, 
Gaitherstiurg MD 20879. 

Burled In the Barry Electronics Corp. ad 
on page 43 Is mention of all of those RTTY 
Interfaces again. Still no prices, though 
Hmm, this could be interesting If you're in 
the market, Drop them a note at 512 
Broadway. New York NY 10012, and see 
what turns up. 

Another one of Our manufacturers, AEA, 
features their new CP-1Q0 Interface on 
page 55 Featuring all kinds ot shifts, baud 
rates, and features. If looks tike quite a lit- 
tle package. Anybody using one yet? AEA 
can be reached at PO Box C*2160. Lynn- 
wood WA 98036, No. I donl know how they 
can do all that manufacturing in a post-of- 
fice box, either 

A surplus dealer, H&R Corporal ion. fea- 



tures a cabinet for a Model 23 KSR Tele- 
type 1 in the ad on page 59. Cheap, yet. I 
have no idea who would want one, per- 
haps one whose presently-owned one is 
all scarred up. but they might have oiher 
goodies. \ guess a note to them at 401 E 
Erie Avenue, Philadelphia PA 19134, might 
pry loose a "free catalog." 

The Martin Company, operating out of 
another post-office box, advertises a box 
meant for TBS-80 Mode* 1 1 1/4 RTTY on 
page 60. To date, no one has written that 
they are using this thing, but if you're in- 
terested, they are at PO Box 962. Marys 
villeWA 98270. 

Hey. AEA has another ad on page 6? 
(this one a whole page) lo tell you about 
ihetr ATU-1Q0O Advanced Terminal Unit 
Enough features to knock your socks 
off— 1 guess at a price to match! If you 

need this level of equipment, at least th^ 
ad looks good, and I am sure that AEA 
would be delighted to inundate you with 
information. Send a note to the same post- 
office box mentioned above. 

Let's not forget MFJ. whose three-page 
ad appears from papes 91 through 93. 
There's plenty of interest to the RTTYer in 
this ad, including their Mf J-1224 RTTY in- 
terface. They have a toff-free number to 
call, 1-800-647-1800; give it a fry. 

Finally, Kantronics is showing their new 
Universal Terminal Unit in their ad on page 
95. Another ol the high-class new demodu- 
lators now available, this one may be just 
what you're looking for I should in Ink lhat 
a fetter to 1202 E_ 23rd Street. Lawrence 
KS €6046. should produce some results. 

Well r more and more. I am impressed by 
the number of manufacturers catering to 
the growing RTTY market. Be sure, folks, 
when you contact these advertisers, that 
you fell them that you saw mention ot 
their products In ?3s "RTTY Loop Thai 
is important to us— and to them, so thai 
they can tell where that valuable advertis- 
ing dollar is reaching the mosi readers. 

I have received several pictures of RTTY 
shacks worldwide. Would you be Inter- 
ested in a "Shack of the Month" or some 
such? No contest, no awards, nothing like 
that, just a chance to see another ham's 
setup on a semi-regular basis. Lei me 
know. If there Is some interest, we will put 
It Tit 

I have been busy between the mall at 
the above address and CompuServe 
(75036.2601), If you are waiting for a re- 
sponse and too much time In your view 
has gone by r don't be 3hy, Drop me an- 
other note and tell me so I do get behind 
now and then. 

Next month we will look at a computer 
that has had its share of ups and downs. 
At one time there were a half-dozen mag- 
azines devoted to this computer. As I write 
this, I learn of the demise of the next- to 
last one, which will merge with a sister 
publication soon. I do not think this re- 
flects on the computer but on the publish- 
ing industry. Oh, which computer? If you 
haven't guessed yet. I'm not going to spill 
it. Just be sure not to miss next month's 
column. 




ETTERS 



[ 



QUALITY, NOT QUANTITY 



I am not a ham, but I am working on it 
My wish IS to make my first "Shed" wHh 
my father. W4H8K. on Christmas Eve. 



In reference to Mr. Monte Stark KU7Y"s 
letter in the June, 19&5. issue of 73, i have 
to agree with him on keeping the Morse- 
code portion of the amateur-radro license 
test. With Morse code as a way of separat- 
ing Ihe truly interested people from the 
"slobs" on the street, it can only mean a 



more quality person wilt be operating the 
ham bands, instead of some e* CBer who 
could care less whose OSO he is interfer- 
ing with. 

Now I realize that there are slob types 
in the amateur field also, but how would 
you feel if the ham bands sounded like 
profane channel 19? How would you feel 
having one of those loudmouthed, no 
brained, loiiertongued individuals pollut- 
ing the airways white you are trying to in- 
struct your wife or your children on proper 
procedures and radio etiquette'* 

Being the holder of a Restricted Radio- 



telephone Operator's Permit and being 
able to operate on the HF, VHF, and 
26.626-MHz frequencies of the Crvit Air Pa- 
trol has taught me to be a more proficient 
radio operator, and I appreciate the "clean 
airways' 4 of the CAP. So those Of you out 
there in amateur-radio country should sit 
back and reevaluate the goodness in 
keeping Morse code and the laziness of 
those who do not wish to learn it Just be* 
cause It works for other countries to have 
a no-code license does not necessarily 
mean it will work here in the States. As for 
73, well you guys keep up the good work, i 
truly enfoy my personal copy each month. 



73 tor Radio Amateurs * December, 1985 



From a future Novice to all you old timers, 
God Bless. 

John E Evofssl RR 387 
Dugway UT 



WAKE UP 



We are in sorry shape, I fear A casual 
chat with our Section Manager revealed 
thai many amateurs in Nebraska are 
against the ARRL enhanced Novice privi- 
leges proposal, some adamantly so. If this 
is I rue throughout the US, I think we have 
big problems in that I believe this Is just 
the attitude that will be the death of our 
hobby. Look at the numbers on page 9 of 
the August, 19B5. QST. The numbers are 
stilt no! In our favor 

One of the favorite arguments seems lo 
be that the bands are crowded enough al- 
ready. Oh. really? Has anyone tried oper- 
ating the HF bands mid-mornmg on a 
weekday? People who work nights should 
be made a target of our efforts il there *s a 
general feeling that me bands are too 
crowded The bands certainly are not over- 
populated most weekdays. 

Some repeater operators are concerned 
about losing 220 MHz to Novices because 
Ihey may havs to find new territory for 
their control links. Yes, there are lots of re- 
pealers, . .probably more than we need in 
many areas, although not In Nebraska, 
But if they could take away bend privi- 
leges by state, they could easily revoke 
220 here since the control links wouldn't 
even occupy a space of several kHz, let 
alone five MHz. We are not going to keep 
the band if we just use it for control links. 
We must get more people on the band one 
way or another. A space can be reserved 
for the control links by band plan, as is 
done now. Novices can respect band 
plans, too: They must on the HF bends 
and do. 

As one who acquired Novice privileges 
when phone operation was permitted on 2 
meters, I see no problem in once again 
permitting Novices to operate phone. 
This, as has been stated In League litera- 
ture on the subject, is even less of a prob- 
lem now since the Novice license Is 
renewable. During my term as a Novice, 
the phone privileges were taken away, I 
have often wondered whether this is a 
contributing factor to the seemingly low 
number ol hams who are my own age (32) 
or who were licensed about that time 
{1966} 

it s lime to wake up, folks. There will 
SUM be plenty of room for Ihose of us who 
like to tinker and prefer CW and SSB rag- 



DIDDUU 



J V V V 



U 



\J \J U 




fflffiffiffi HE 



I~Wd264 




rfjtf S HVM 



nniieUiin 



HM6264 




HM6264 



SJIJIISIiiio 



on 



o 
o 
o 



WB5QWF 



3/85 



TOP 



SPST 
SWITCH 



Swtrcfidbfe Hamsoft for your V/C-50 Wore that the mtddie HM6264 is located on the re 
verse srde of the board. 



chews. But we have a dual problem: Lack 
of population on the ham frequencies win 
lead to their loss and ultimately to the ioss 
of the hobby; the lack of population will 
become worse if would-be newcomers are 
not Interested in joining our ranks. This la 
the only real Stab at a solution yet pro- 
posed and It appears to be one which has 
been given much forethought. Hams 
spoke oul against nocode, H&r& is a com- 
promise. Lei's put away petty differences 
and gel behind It for the continuance of 
our hobby. 

Michael S. Lennen KDfEV 
Omaha NE 



[ 



FUCK YOUR VIC 



] 



You might be interested in Knowing thai 
the VIC-20 memory expansion < M VIC RAM* 
rfication: Part I/ 1 January, 1985) described 
in 73 can live In the same board and share 
expansion-port contacts with a ROM. 

I bought my VIC to use as a RTTV ma- 
chine and vowed not to get hooked on the 
computer capabilities, but I didn't like hav- 
ing to pull my Hamsoft ROM pack out of 
the expansion port to return (o normal 
computer operation. I soon learned lhat I 
could turn off Hamsoft by applying # 5 V 
to pin IS of the 2732 EPROM. and I in- 
stalled a switch to turn it off and on. 

I laid out a board with two HM 6264 s and 
the Hamsoft memory on top and one 



HM6264 on the bottom, so they could 
Share connections. 1 made a list of Ham- 
soft connections by tracing out the origi- 
nal board, A single pole, single-throw 
switch was mounted on the board to se- 
lect either the memory or the amateur pro- 
gram. To turn the memory on, +5 V IB 
applied both to pin 13 of the 2732 and to 
pin 26 on each of the HM6264s. When 
Hamsoft is on, 2732 pin Ifi floats rather 
than being grounded. 

Andy Pickens WBSQWF 
San Antonio TX 



[ 



PROVE IT, PACKET 



] 



I've been reading about and listening to 
discussions on packet radio Some seem 
to want to believe that it'll replace RTTV/ 
AMTGFUCVWASCIJ on all bands. 

At a ham feat, one proponent of packet 
advised all those attending to Get rid Of 
your GvWRTTY/AMTOR gear now; by the 
end of the year packet will be the only 
mode used on Ihose subbands. and you 
won't be able to even give away that other 
stuff." How he was able to say that with a 
straight face was rather amazing. 

Personally, I don't believe packe* wiJi 
ever replace GW/HTTY7AMTOR though it 
might have some uses; unless prices 
come down, <t will remain as satellite com- 
munications has. stnctJy a rich hams toy 



After all why pay $500 and up tor an in- 
terface capable of only one thing, when 
for half of thai you can get an interface 
usable on four modes? it makes abso- 
lutely no sense. 

At the same hamfest. another packet 
proponent declared, "Packet interfaces 
will be below $200 by the end of the year ' 
but he carefully failed to specify which 
year this miracle wilt happen. 

As to packet being error free, I seri- 
ously doubt lhat it Is, or will be: even on 2 
meters and above. Remember — AMTOR 
was claimed to be absolutely error-free 
and I think that was proven wrong later on. 

Another thing that's overlooked is the 
bandwidth used by packet. At 25 wpm, CW 
Is about 100 cycles In width. So at 300 
baud, packet is about 1200 cycles in 
width. And, at the speed packet keys a 
transmitter, wear on the relays is severe 

If. and Jt"s a huge if. packet can be made 
affordable to the average ham, it may sur- 
vive, but as long as It remains as it is now. 
a rich ham's toy, then it won't have much 
chance of survive). How many readers re- 
member "narrowband voice modulation 
(NBVM)." which was supposed to do away 
with SSB around 1978? Unless something 
happens, packet will go the same way. 

Getting back to satellites for a moment 
It's always amused me to read that it only 
takes about 200 Watts erp to access OS- 
CAR 10. It that's so, how come whenever 
you see photos of a station's antennas 
they're always funning 25- or 30-foot 
dishes or stacked 12-over 12 arrays? 

Gary Payne KE6C2 
Fresno CA 



DISK DOPE 



L 



I read your article concerning diskettes 
i, Give Your Disks a Physical." October, 
1§B5| and wholeheartedly agree with your 
observations. The best diskettes that I 
have seen through the microscope are 
Maxell. They have Ihe smoothest surfaces 
and Ihe best lubricant. 3M appears to be a 
middle-of-the-road product as far as sur- 
face quality is concerned. Verbatim is 
nothing more than 3M quality, Dysan ap^ 
pears to be the same thing as 3M but with 
a better polish. I confirmed that the Dysan 
raw material Is in feci procured from 3M. 
Some of the bargain diskettes tend to vary 
greatly from box lo box and, in tact, from 
disk to disk- The old adage, "You get what 
you pay foC is certainly (rue with disk- 
ettes. Very good article 

Bob HIM W4NIM 
Cedar Rapids I A 




EVIEW 



HY-GAIN 205B-S ANTENNA 

II there's one thing you soon realize 
after making your first contacts on VHF, 
it's the need for some kind Of gam an- 
tenna It can be a col linear, a 5/o-wave, an 
extended J, or a zepp. but whatever ihe 
cho4ce, the message is clear Unity-gam 
antennas are fine for local or repeater 
worfc, but they won't cut it for weak signal 
or long-haul FM simplex. 

One of the classic solutions to this 
problem ^s the yag> or beam antenna, With 
this type of antenna, a resonant dtpole is 
used on a common boom with several par- 
aartic Glornents which take the dipoie's 
Signal and direct it toward the station you 



wish lo transmit to. The parasitic ele- 
ments essentially take the signal from the 
dipole and combine it into a "beam" of ra- 
dio-frequency energy so that rather than 
radiating and losing energy in two broad 
lobes, mat extra rf is collected and used 
efficiently in one direction. 

Enter Ihe Tefe* Ky-Gain 205 B-S five ele 
mem 2-meter beam. It is an antenna 
which should prove valuable in FM -sim- 
plex as well as repeater work. It also pro- 
vides a noticeable increase in system 
efficiency when you move from your vertt- 
caily polar t^ed unity-gain VHF antenna. 
Suddenly, signals which were hash are 
readable, and distant repeaters which 
were barely there are a solid S3. 



To be certain, the 205B-S isn't the 
worlds highest gain VHF antenna. Af- 
though it boasts a respectable gain (9 dB|, 
I here are specialized 11- or 15-elemeni an- 
tennas with reflector arrays which have 
far more gain. SUM, for the average FM op- 
erator this antenna should be more I ban 
enough. 

When you first open the 2D5B-S box, the 
first thing you notice Is its size. The boom 
is 75 inches long, which is quite a bit for 
an end-mounted antenna. You also notice 
the quality of the materials used Al- 
though the boom and antenna elements 
are aluminum, the rest of Ihe antenna 
parts are si am l ess steef. which should en- 
sure long life It will also make thts an- 
tenna virtually maintenance free. 

Assembly ol this antenna is quick, 
thanks to the quality of the instructions 
Although the written instructions are quite 
cryptic. Telex Hy-Gam uses very detailed 
exploded views of each section of the an- 
tenna, and Just by using those views you'll 



have no trouble put tins the whole Thing to- 
gether, it took less than an hour at N1BLH 
to have it assembled and ready for check- 
out. 

About the most troublesome part of the 
assembly process Is the beta match. You 
See, rather than using a gamma match to 
bring the antenna Into resonance with 50- 
Ohm coaxial cable, Telex Hy-Gain uses a 
bela match and coaxial matching trans 
former. Actually a folded dipole, the driven 
element presents a basic Impedance of 
200 Ohms, which must be transformed lo 
50 Ohms. The coaxial balun handles this. 
II you can fmd 200-Ohm transmission line, 
you can feed this antenna directly, but 
you'll si i N need some kind of matching de- 
vice to keep your rig happy 

To assemble this matching system 
(after you've assembled the dipole}, you 
must first place the U shaped beta rod on 
the dlpofe's elements. Then tighten it to 
the boom with a small clip and self-tap- 
ping sheet-meial screw. When this is 



73 for Radio Amateurs * December, 1985 69 



done, you then take the balun and attach 
it to the beta rod. You then attach your 
coai directly. 

I know this sounds simple, and it is 
fairly straightforward, but like many 
straight roads tn lite, this one has some 
curves First there is no provision for an 
SO-239 female connector. You must at- 
tach ihe shield and center conductor to 
the same studs as the transformer assem- 
bly. 1 found me best way to handle this 
was by attaching solder lugs to the shield 
and center conductor, as Hy-Galn has 
done with Its balun When this setup Is fin- 
ished, you are advised lo weatherproof the 
entire assembly. Using a lacquer such as 
Krylon will make short work of this 

This weatherproof I ng is mandatory. If 
you Ignore it you'll soon find the perfor- 
mance of this antenna going downhill be- 
cause your coax will fill up with water I 
used cable putty to handle this Just to 
have the ability lo quickly disassemble 
things if I had to. 

And. although this method of matching 
an antenna is quite functional, il would be 
far easier using the gamma match which 
is favored by other manufacturers Beta 
matching is especially limiting 11 you must 
lake the antenna apart later on. 

The rest of the assembly involves little 
more than sliding the antenna elements 
through eye bolts that are inserted in the 
boom and tightening them down. You 
must measure the elements to determine 
their proper position, so the lengths are 
correct, But this is little trouble. 

As I rioted earlier, the boom seemed 
huge when compared to the four-element 
beam I have run at N1BLH, Where the for- 
mer beam was spaced for optimum gam 
on a short boom (about 40 inches) with lit- 
tle thought given to optimizing the front- 
to-back raho, the 2Q5B-S uses spacing 
which both optimizes gain and front-to- 
back ratio, Spacing was about 2 wave- 
lengihs My tests showed the antenna had 
about 18 to 20 dB of front -to-back ratio, so 
thai most of the energy was concentrated 
In the direction in which Ihe antenna was 
pointed. 

Further lasting showed that this is a 
broadbanded antenna. As I checked vswr 
readings. I found that Ihe curve I had 
drawn nearly matched Ihe one In Hy- 
Galn' $ literature. The beat-case vswr was 
i i at 146 MHz and the worst-case was 
T 5:1 as I n eared the band edges, The 
match was good Tor my normal FM oper- 
ating frequencies at the upper end Of the 
2-meter band- However, since It was so 
broadbanded. I was easily able to move to 
the other end of the band for some weak- 
signal SSB and CW work 

And, when i checked Ihe antenna's gs 
with another station about five miles 
awayv I received a signal report of S9 * 40. 
I realize (hat the other station didn t have 
a laboratory-grade receiving meter, but the 
performance of the antenna was certainly 
impressive since I was only running 300 
mW, li was even more Impressive because 
the antenna was mounted on a temporary 
mast about 5 feet oft the ground near 
some construction equipment. 

Overall. I was favorably impressed with 
the antenna, with the exception of the 
matching system. I found it performed as 
advertised and it handled all the chores i 
called upon it to do. 

A word to the wise for those contem- 
plating this antenna' Be aware that al- 
though the antenna is lightweight, it still 
presents quite a load to the mast. Use a 
good 2- inch piece of steel pipe in fact, the 
U-boHs supplied are meant for that size 
mast- The antenna can be mounted fo" 
ther vertical or horizontal polarization 

Sp, for the operator looking for the step 
inio Ihe world of gain antennas, look at 



the 205B-S. It should work as well for you 
as it did forme- 
Merc Stem NtBlH 
Framingham MA 

GLB PK-1 

PACKET CONTROLLER 

Packet-radio controllers offered toddy 
are of two types— TA PR-corn pat able' and 
"not TAPFHompatible." A similar distinc- 
tion is made m the modem industry be- 
tween "Hayes" and "not Hayes" No one 
Is saying that Hayes modems are better 
than non-Hayes modems, or thai TAPfl 
TNCs are better than non^TAPRsi They're 
simply different The GLB PK*1 TNC (Ter- 
minal Node Controller) falls into the "not- 
TAP FT category* 

Inside the PK-1 

The PK-t Is small (B'xWA'x2% and 
the reason is clear once you Open the 
case. Inside there are only thirteen inte- 
grated circuits and about twice thai many 
resistors, capacitors, and transistors. 
Compare that lo the over 25 ICs and doz- 
ens of discrete components in the Heath 
HD-4040 (a TAPR clone). 

The PK-1 uses a Z-SO microprocessor 
and the popular Bear 2206/221 1 chip sal as 
a modem. The board comes with 6K of 
FIOM (read-only memory} and 4K RAM [ran^ 
dom-access memory^ and there are sock^ 
els provided lor another lOKof RAM. With 
factory modification the PK-1 can handle 
byte-wide RAM. Increasing the total mem- 
ory to 64K E8K ROM and 56K HAM). Ill ex- 
plain why this extra memory might be 
handy in a moment 

There are three externa! connections to 
the PK-1: two 10-pin edge-card connectors 
and a miniature phone jack for power (11 
to 14 V dc at 200 mA). Power may also be 
applied to one of the edge-card connec- 
tors. P2, which takes care of the lines 
going to and trom the transceiver. P1 (the 
other 1Q< pinner) handles the terminal inter 
face. The front pane) houses an on/oft 
switch and a momentary-contact push, 
button for resetting the controller. 

Interlace r 

Connecting the PK-1 to your radio and 
computer Is straightforward. You can buy 
ready-made cables from GLB or you can 
make your own at home- Either way, a 
word of caul Ion is In order: P1 and P2 are 
identical plugs, and they are not keyed 
Check them twice before you power up' 

The interface from the PK-1 to yout ter- 
minal is via a "modified" HS-232 protocol. 
I say modi f ted because only one voltage 
rail is used. - 12 V dc is a mark and V dc 
is a space- Many popular interfaces use 
•n<s method to simplify circuitry and cul 
the parts count, and it seems to work jusl 
fine. Pour RS-232 lines are supported: TXD 
and RXD (data In and oul). RTS (request to 
send), and CTS (clear to send}. A spare 
line, pin 9, Is connected to + 5 V dc Inside 
the GLB and can be used to power an op- 
tional RTTY Interface board that allows 
you to attach your PK-1 to a standard Mur- 
ray teleprinter. 

Five signals go to and from your trans- 
c elver: receiver audio, transmitter audio, 
receiver squelch, push-to-talk, and 
ground. Audio levels fo the PK-1 can be 
anywhere between 5 millivolts and 3 volts, 



and GLB recommends that you tap audio 
directly from the discriminator output. 
That's a good idea, since the result win be 
audio that has not been de-em ph as t2ed or 
otherwised processed. However, for the 
faint of heart (tike mej, audio from the 
speaker jack is OK. In fact, you can im- 
prove the audio duality from there a bit by 
installing a ,001 -uP capacitor in Hne with 
the audio wire Transmit audio from the 
PK-1 is about 1 volt* 

You won't need the squelch signal un- 
less your packet activity takes place on a 
channel shared with voice users, The TNC 
looks for the presence Of a tone to deter- 
mine whether or not Ihe frequency Is busy. 
On an ad-packet channel Ihere's no prob- 
lem—every signal has a tone. In some 
cases, such as a voiced packet repeater, 
you'll need to hook up the squefch line so 
that the TNC will know when voice com- 
munication is going on 

The push-to- talk line switches to ground 
when the transmitter is keyed. All of the 
rigs I've worked with use this convention, 
as does most of the gear around these 
days. 

Operation 

There's no denying it. The PK-1 takes 
some getting used to. The reason that the 
chip count Is so low Is that GLB has imple 
mented In software what most designs do 
in hardware. This means that the proces- 
sor is kept extremely busy— so busy, in 
fact, that a separation must be made be- 
tween sending and receiving packets. You 
must enter and edit your text off-line, then 
input il into the PK-1. And the PK-1 won't 
display incoming packets until you tell it 
to. You might think that this would be awk- 
ward (and I must admit that I did at first), 
but it isn't After using the system for a 
short time, you become familiar with me 
commands and techniques and it is as 
easy as anything else you've had to learn 

Connecting to another station is done 
as a series of Steps, First, your station call 
must be entered using the SC command Of 
you specify your catlsign when you order 
your PK-1, it will be permanently stored In 
the ROM). Neat, set the destination-sta- 
tion call using the SD command. You can 
specify a dlgipeated route using SV. Pi- 
rial I y, entering AC {automatic connect} will 
send a connect request to the station 
specified by SD, using the route described 
by SV. Once conversion is established, the 
PK-1 enters a "chat" mode. And this is 
when the extra memory I mentioned be- 
fore comes in handy. 

Here's the reason that you need an off- 
line editor to type your text The PK-1 can- 
not handle incoming text at the same time 
you are typing. Faced with the choice be- 
tween the character coming from the key- 
board and the packet coming over the air, 
the processor will save the character at 
the expense of the packet. After all, the 
packet will be repeated until it is correctly 
received, GLB mentions that you could 
simply stop typing when you hear an in- 
coming packet. That may work in some 
places, but here In New England the local 
channel Is busy all day and all night— and 
my packets don't sound any different than 
anyone else's. Besides, who wants to lis- 
ten to BRRRAAAPPP QGftRAKK all of the 
lime? 

The solution, then, is to assemble your 



WHAT DO YOU THINK? 

Have you recently purchased a new product that has been reviewed in 73? 
If you have T write and tell us what you think about it T3 wMI publish your com- 
ments so you can share them with other hams, as part of Our continuing effort lo 
bring you the best In new product information and reviews. Send your thoughts 
to Review Editor, 73 Magazine. Peterborough NH 03458, 



text offline and let the PK 1 store incom- 
ing packets until you are ready to see 
them. GLB even has a program to do It, 
called CPK, which they can supply for a 
variety of computers 've also seen sev- 
eral programs posted on the local PflBSs 
(packet bulletin boards* incoming pack- 
ets are stored in a buffer until you call for 
them. Buffef means memory, and you get 
4K of it with the PK r The system uses 2- 
3K for packet storage, and this seemed to 
be plenty for casual conversations, if you 
plan any long missives or are one of those 
people who measures social status by the 
K, by all means fill up the available space 
in the PK-1 with RAM 

Digipeating 

This Is a thing that the PK-1 does ex- 
/tamely well. Like any TNC, it can digl- 
peat packets, but the PK*Vs design makes 
<t very we*l suited to remote opera 
tion. This means that you can put this 
board up on a mountain or a tower and 
just leave it there. All that's required is to 
pull the PK-1's data in i*ne high. In this 
mode, no terminal t$ connected to the 
TNC — programming is done by connect- 
ing via packet radio Vou can turn the dtg- 
tpeater on and oft. change parameters, 
display ihe system's status, or whatever 
else you might want to do |ust as if the 
machine were sitting In Iront of you. 

A "watchdog" circuit is available from 
GLB for use in re mo led tg I peaters. The cir- 
cuit monitors a square-wave output by the 
processor If this signal Is not present for 
20 seconds, the watchdog will reset the 
PK-1, which automatically comes up in the 
unattended-repeater mode. This is an ex- 
ceptionally good thing to have. The mod- 
ule doesn't cost very much and is guaran- 
teed to save you a lot ot grief ! 

Final Thoughts 

Overall I was impressed with the GLB 
PK-1. At first I was intimidated by the 
sheer number of commands (81h but you 
really only use a handful of them. The rest 
are interesting to play with, and you can 
learn a great deal about data transmission 
just by fiddling with the various parame- 
ters and looking at the results, Using an 
editor to prepare text also raised my eye- 
brows until I tried IL I can't say that I love 

doing It, but I can say (hat I don't notice It 
any longer. 

The documentation Is more than ade- 
quate. Separate sections deal with com- 
puter interfacing and on-line operation, 
providing a Quick "cookbook 11 description 
of how to get the PK-1 on the air. Once 
things are hooked up ^fH$ running, you can 
turn to the extensive command descrip- 
tions to learn more than you ewer wanted 
to know about how the PK-1 works Every- 
thing Is explained in easy -to- understand 
terms and nothing is assumed. A very nice 
touch is a command reference chart 
printed on the back cover of the manual, 
which lists commands by function. I cop- 
ied this chart with a photocopier set for 
reduction and pasted the now-tiny aid 
next to the CRT of my Xerox computer. 

So there It ls> If you're looking for a su- 
perb remote digipeater, try the PK-1. it It's 
an Inexpensive way to get on packet that 
you want, try the PK-1 {It sells tor $200 as- 
sembled), The engineers at GLB took a 
look at amateur packet radio and at the 
available TNCs on the market and came 
up with a design that is unlike any other It 
took real guts to market a product that 
wasn't merely a copy ot an already-popu- 
lar unit, and their gamble has paid off with 
the PK-1. 

If you want more information, contact 
GLB Electronics, lnc, t 151 Commerce 
Parkway, Buffalo NY U224. 

Perry Don ham KW10 

73 Stall 



70 T3 for Radio Amateurs • December, 1985 




Photo A. The SSB Efecrwrncs LT23S T?9fr MHl tf&nsvetf&r. 



LT23S 1296 TRANSVERTER 

The l296rMHz amateur band. Of 23 cerv 
timeters as it is frequently called, has long 
been a dark mystery to most amateurs. 
The logistics of getting something to os- 
cillate at that frequency in a stable man- 
ner, as well as amplifying the resultant 
signal and mod u fating it. have served to 
discourage all but the most technically 
competent amateurs from ever operating 
on the band. Add the problems of design- 
ing a high-gain^ low-noise front end. and 
the difficulties of getting all of Ihis stuff to 
work with piles of interconnecting chassis 
and cables without a degree m electrical 
engineering, and you have the situation 
that existed not loo many years ago on 23 
cm. 

With the advent of transverters using 
low-noise front ends and the reductions in 
Chassis size made possible by sol fd state 
Circuits. 1296 began to be seriously con- 
sidered by many UHF operators There 
were still the problems with power, but 
even receivers with 5 dB noise figures 
could pull a weak, drifting CW signal out 
of the ether using a homemade disk con- 
structed from chicken wire or door screen- 
ing on an old TV antenna. Coffee-can 
feedhoms were the order of Ihe day and 
for the adventurous it was the loop yagi A 
big step from the old days, but still not as 
convenient as a 144-MH2 mullimode trans- 
ceiver. 

Two developments have finally brought 
23 cm down to earih for the casual opera 
tor the Gallium Field Effect Transistor 
(GaAsFET) and new lines of htgh-gain (10- 
15-tiB) power transistors tot grounded 
base operation at up to 3 GHz. It was in- 
evitable thai some manufacturer would 
marry the two tn a high-performance 1296 
transverter. What was surprising is that 
the manufaclurer was from Germany— no' 
Japan* Enter SSB Electronics of tserlohn. 
West Germany, and the LT23S transverter 
Al first glance, the LT23S Is an attrac- 
tive, functional piece of equipment, It 
measures 1 1 %S " wide (30 cm) by B v* "deep 
(22 cm) by 3% * high {Q cm). The case Is a 
hard aluminum shell with a plastic ring 
surrounding the from panel A heat sink 
protrudes about ¥%' (4.5 cm) from the 
bach panel 

The from panel contains the following 
controls: From the left, a switch selects ei- 
ther of two crystal i-f frequencies- The sup 
plied crystal will downconvert the 1296- 
1296-MHz band to 144-146 MH; Many se- 
rious com esters obtain a second crystal 
to Shift the desired band segment up so 
that the conversion at two meters is now 
146-148 MHz. This eliminates any possi- 
ble feedthrough from strong nearby sta- 
tions on t44 MHz during a contest (In 
Europe, Ihe twr>meter allocation ends at 
146 MHz. so shifting the conversion fre- 



quency up makes sense.) The formula for 
this crystal is detailed tn the owner's man- 
ual 

Next is a transmit switch. This does ex- 
actly that and disables the receiver while 
setting the idling bias for the driver and fi- 
nal transistors. This function is paralleled 
by a rear-panel RCA-type phono jack. One 
merely grounds this lack and the unii goes 
into the transmit mode. The nexl switch is 
for power and controls the feed from the 
rear- panel dc connectors. Finally, there is 
a power meter that indicates output in 
Watts, On the rear panel connections are 
made for input'output to a 1 44 -MHz trans- 
ceiver, 1296 receiver input from the an 
tenna, and 129B rf output (claimed 10 
Watts across 50 Ohms). Three binding 
posts are supplied dc mpuL 113 8-14 5 
volts del. ground and a second red post 
that supplies dc voltage m receive and 
cuts off while in transmit. This is lo pro- 
vide for a mast mounted preamp if one rs 
used- 

Aii in all. the LT23S breaks new ground 
on 23 cm by offering ihe user a simple- lo- 
use transverter. One merely adds an an 
tenna relay, antenna, power, and multi* 
mode 144- MHz transceiver. The front end 
provides sufficient gain to work most sig- 
nals encountered on the band, while the 
10 Watts will carry a distance. That Is, as- 
suming the user has connected low- loss 
transmission line and a good gam an- 
tenna to the LT23S! Remember that con- 
ventional RG a/U has about 10 dS of loss 
per 100 feet at fhis frequency* so some- 
thing more along the lines of BeJden 9913. 
Vk * of even \ m hardline te in order Bui 
having it all in one case instead of on 3 or 
4 separate chassis with a myriad number 
of connecting cables can't be beat. 

Now, On to the meat and potatoes ot 
this review: How weft does it work? The 
first LT23S sample made its way back 

from the VHP Shop in Pennsylvania as 1 
was in the midsl of frantically assembling 
a 432MHz station For the Slide Mountain 
DXpedition (see the November, 1985, Issue 
of 73), and consequently it sal on the shelf 
for about 3 weeks until I was able to atari 
making qualitative tests. One problem 
which surfaced immediately is thai the on 
board crystal oscillator drifted severely, lo 
the tune of about 100-200 Hz per minute! 
This was unacceptable, and on-air tests 
with Tom Waldron K03R the proprietor of 
the VHF Shop, convinced him that it was 
indeed galloping up the band. 

Another unit was exchanged for the test 
unit and it, too, suffered from the Same 
malady, and almost at the same rate! Sub- 
sequent conversations with the factory In 
Germany, Rick Connor WB2NPE, I vara 
Lauzums KC2PX, and other U23S users 
resulted In many solutions to Ihe problem. 
Tom KQ3R suggested using a higher- 




Photo S. f aside me LT23S (top view J. 



grade crystal and said he will equip all 
models imported into the USA with crys- 
tals from International Crystal in Okla- 
homa. Flic* WB2NPE suggested rounding 
the crystal case and shorting the unused 
crystal socket pins In the second oscilla- 
tor together. Both mods worked, but the 
ultimate correction came via Ivars KC2PX 
through an unnamed amateur In Okla- 
homa, who removed the coupling capaci- 
tor from the unused oscillator to the first 
multiplier stage. That permanently fixed 
the problem, and I recommend to all LT23S 
owners the following modification: 

The covers and inside board must be re- 
moved by loosening all screws around the 
case and panel on the front. This gives ac- 
cess to the underside of the mixerfi t7 
switching board Locate the 2.7-pF capac 
i tor from the unused second oscillator and 
deso^der it out of the circuit Replace the 
cover and all will be well. Note thai the 
supplied crystal is In channel 2, or "F2 ir as 
labeled on the front panel. The unit ex- 
hibits excellent stability (not measured) 
after this modification. Should you desire 
to use this oscillator again, merely replace 
the capacitor, or better yet, switch the 
crystal in the '"F2" socket. 

Photo fi shows Ihe main chassis layouL 
First-class workmanship Is evident here. 
One unique feature of Ihe LT23S is that un 
like other trans verier s. you need not use 
an attenuator io cut down the drive from 
your multimode radio {assuming the max- 
imum drive you are supplying is about 10 
Watts^ Two f j ted- value resistors form a 
50-Ohm, 10-Watt swamping network to 
"bum up" the excess power. For those us- 
ing muhimodes with adjustable output, I 
recommend turning the drive at 144 MHz 
all the way down to the minimum of 1 or 2 
Watts. The swamping network will take 
care of the excess, A clearly marked po- 
tentiometer, "P IN," controls the drive 
level, and lor your particular radio you 
should set Ehls pot fully counterclockwise 
before applying drive. Carefully Increase 
the sensitivity until the front panel meter 
just aboui pins. 

This brings us to a note regarding ac- 
curacy of that same meter Usmg a Bird 
Model 43 wattmeter, 25-Watt 1,1-1445 Hz 
slug, and Bird dry dummy load, the power 
measured when ten Watts was indicated 
on the LT23S was actually B.5 Watts. This 
measurement was made using a T 4 volt 
power supply, and when 10 Watts is ac- 
tually measured on the Bird 43. the LT23S 
meter is pinned lo the right. The sampling 
circuit in the LT23S uses an HP 2800 not 
carrier diode with a 50-Ohm terminated 
coupler. It's likely thai me response of 
other 2800 diodes could vary all over the 



place, so it's not worth worrying about the 
accuracy of the meter. It la helpful as a rel- 
ative output indicator, and if you are really 
a mipicker. it could be recalibrated 
against a laboratory-standard wattmeter, 
SSB recommends using a 14.5-volt sup- 
ply tor the transverter How much of a dif- 
ference does this make? With a 13,8-volt 
supply, maximum output was 7.5 Watts. At 
14 volts, It was 8.2. And at 14.5 vol is, it was 
Indeed 10 Watts. That's how much! If you 
are using an external amplifier, the differ- 
ence between 7.5 and 10 Watts might not 
cause much consternation, but it you plan 
on running the unit barefoot, crank the 
output on your supply up. Most commer- 
cially-made power supplies can easily be 
adjusted for higher output with an internal 
pot or zener between the regulator and 
ground. 

The receiver front end was tested for 
noise figure usmg a Hewlett-Packard 
model 340A noise-figure meter. On this 
equipment, the noise figure turned out to 
be 20 dB, SSB claims LBdB, so the mea- 
surements are close enough for govern- 
ment work, as they say, The HP-340A is 
about fifteen years ols and the discrep- 
ancy could exist there. It was not possible 
to measure the 1 -dB compression point as 
only about -20 dBm of signal could be 
generated on the available test equip- 
ment. This is a very strong signal for 1296 
and could be likened to working a station 
wiih about 1-kW erp about a half mile 
away, or closer No delectable compres- 
sion occurred at this point. Simitar tests 
on Other SSB 1296 preamps indicate the 
actual T-dB compression point to be about 
dB or slightly better, so I'll assume that 
is the case here. 

Receiver conversion gain is specified at 
24 dB. The measured value is 18 dB. which 
is adequate, but it would be nice to have 
the additional 6 dB or so, especially when 
using an older multimode or two-meter 
converter with a mediocre front end, In re- 
ceive, the unit consumes 150 mlillamps of 
curreni When in standby, the value is 350 
mJlliamps. and key down with 10 Watts it's 
2.5 Amperes, So a small power supply of 
3^4 Amps will do ihe job Another note ot 
caution: The final transistors. Phillips 
BLU99S, are not swr protected Be careful 
not to abuse them by transmitting into 
suspect toads or unknown loads. They are 
not cheap to replace and not easy to come 
by. Under normal operation, an swr of 2:1 
can be tolerated without difficulty 

Weill Enough of that. Let's shut off the 
signal generator, unhook the spectrum 
analyzer, and engage In some on-the-air 
tests. The LT23S performed admirably in 
the recent CQ WW VHF WPX contest, 



73 for Radio Amateurs * December 1985 71 



wftere the NV80/2 oroup netted 16 QSOs, 
in the ARRL September VHF QSO Party, 
18 stations were also worked from this 
QTH, Reports were of exceptional linearity 
of the audio waveform, and listening to 
other LT23S users confirmed this, Speak- 
ing of which. It appears to be the hot setup 
around here in northern New Jersey, as 
nearly halt of the stations I worked 
claimed to be using one! It doesn't take 
long tor good news to spread, apparently 
At KT2B. I use the LT23S to drive a single 
3CXKXK yielding about 70-80 Walts of our 
put. This feeds 60 feel or" V Spiioline and 
Bien drives 4 * 23 F&FT 23-cm yagis Tne 
previous setup, using a Microwave Mod- 



ules 1296/144 and SSB PA2510 amplifier, 
worked welt, but the receiver in the LT235 
gets the edge, as the noise figure In the 
MMT 1296J144 is about 2.5 dB or so. One 
confusing aspect was learning to wire the 
antenna relay backwards— that is, ener- 
gized in "Receive" and out in the "Trans- 
mil" position. I had to remember to reave 
the power switch on, otherwise the ampli- 
fier went into standby with an tdtmg cur- 
rent of 45 mA. A modified Dow-Key relay 
did the trick. The modification consisted 
of replacing the UHF connectors with type 
U, since I lost 1.5 dB on transmit using the 
UHF type! 

The exciter in both cases is a Kenwood 



TR 9000, which has a fairly good front end 
but can scan memories and change Ire- 
quenctes at a very rapid rale. When I heard 
activity on part of the band, I programmed 
it into memory and scanned until I heard a 
station I needed during the activity hours. 
The LT23S does not have rf-detected 
switching and must be hard-keyed 
through the RCA jack on I he back. A foot 
switch takes care of the problem, or you 
can use a keying jack on your multimode 
if it's there I instated an internal reed re- 
lay In the TR-9000 and that did the trick. 
This was the way to go on 1296 during the 
contests! I had a ball with the LT23S and 
have one very minor complaint. The earth 



(negative! connection on the rear panel 
suffers from a condition where it comes 
loose and floats. You'll try making a se- 
cure fit with the power supply leads and 
go crazy, Apparently the bindrng post 
comes loose inside, and substitution of a 
typclal American-made post cures that 
problem. 

All in all, a nice piece of work from SSB 
Electronics. The LT23S sells in the $650 
price class and the sole US Importer is the 
VHF Shop. 16 S Mountain Boulevard, 
Mountain top PA 187Q7. 

Peter Put man KT2B 
Morris Plains NJ 




EW PR 



■ I 



UCTS 



MJDIAN ELECTRONICS 
DTCS-1 AND BTD 1 

Midian Electronics has introduced iwo 
products for mobile radio service, the 
DTCS-i DTCSS encoder/decoder and the 
6TD-1 Burst Tone Decoder 

The DTCS-I programmable DTCSS en 
coder'decoder 15 compatible with Digital 
Private Une*", Digital Channel Guard™, 
Digit a I Quiet Channel 71 *, and Digit at Call 
GvanJ™ The DTCS-f employs the 64 stan- 
dard digital codes plus additional non- 
standard codes and uses a 134 Hi turn* 
ofl tone 

The BTD-1 Burst Tone Decoder leatures 
Operation over a wide input range After a 
burst is decoded, a 2400-Hz lone alerts the 
user Momentary and latched outputs are 
provided which Will drive a horn a call 
light, or some other indicating device, 

For more informal km about either of 
these Midian products, contact Midian 
Electronic s, lnc, t 2302 East 22nd 5 freer, 
Tucson A 2 857 13 



ANTENNA SPECIALISTS 
BROADBAND VHF AMP 

Antenna Specialists' new model ASA- 
3102*25 VHF power amplifier provides 
50-115 Walts of output from 5-35 Watta of 
input between 150 and 174 MHz without 
tuning. The amp incorporates a low-toss 
TJH relay and is fully protected from dc-po- 
lahty reversal and hign vswr. The unit has 
been type-accepted under FCC Parts 81 
and 90, 

For complete specifications, conlacl 
Antenna Specialists Company, PQ So* 
12370, Cleveland OH 44H2Q37Q. 



BIRD CONNECTOR 
ADAPTER KIT 

Bird Electronic Corporation now oilers 
a Wt ol precision SOOhm adapters which 
allows iniefconnection between any com- 
Oi naii on ol four popular rf connectors. In- 
cluded in the kit are one male and one 
female UHF. BNC. and TNC connector, as 
well as two male and female N connec- 
tors. Five couplers are included so that 
five complete adapters can be assembled 
at one time. 

for complete information about this kit. 
contact Bird Electronic Corporation,, 
30303 Aurora Road, Cleveland OH 44139. 

GRIPMATE ENTERPRISES 
OFFERS EXTRA HANDS 

A new product from Grip mate Enter 
prises solves the "not enough hands" 
pioblem for hobbyists. The Gripmate con- 
sists of a base, which is clamped to the 
work table, and- four adjustable arms, each 
of which carries an alligator clip. Two ex- 
tra arms provide a 2.5 sc magnifying glass 
and a magnet for special jobs. 

More information fs available from Grip- 
mate Enterprises, inc., PO Box 5179, Ar- 
lington VA 222060168. 



AEA PAKRATT™ PK-64 

Advanced Electronic Applications, inc., 
has announced the model PK-64 packet, 
RTTY. AMTQR, and Morse communica- 
tions system for the Commodore 64 and C- 
128, 

The PK-64 features an on-screen tuning 
indicator, split-screen operation with sta- 




rve Bird Rf fntersenes Adapter Kit. 



tus indicators, disk, cassette, and printer 
capabilities, ten message/command buff- 
ers, text editing with block moves, a 2DK 
QSO buffer, and a keyboard-selectable HF 
or VHF modem with pre- and post-detec- 
tion filtering for improved signal- to noise 
performance. Text received in one mode 
may be retransmitted In any other mode. 

Features specific to packet radio Include 
a connect alarm, connection with up 1o ten 
stations simultaneously, a dale and/or time 
stamp for incoming messages or connec- 
tions, a user-generated message for auto- 
matic response to connections, and a 
hardware HDLCfor full-duplex operation. 

For more Information, contact Ad- 
vanced Electronic Applications, inc., PQ 
Box C-21GQ. Lynn wood WA 98056. {2Q6k 
775-7373. 



AMATEUR TESTCALM 
FROM TWIN OAKS 

Amateur Test calm is an anxiety reduc- 
ing audio cassette offered by Twin Oaks 
Associates. Developed by Dr. Thomae 
Linde KZGT and Dr. Michael Whiddon, Am* 
ateur Testes I m is Intended to increase a 
student's attention, concentration, and 
data recall. The student hears simulta- 
neous verbal and non-verbal messages de- 
signed to reduce apprehension and stress 
during amateur licensing exams. 

For more details, contact Twin Oaks As- 
sociates. 8t. 5, Box 37, Knoxville I A 50TJ& 

Tl ELECTRONICS 
REFERENCE BOOK 

Basic Electronics Technology is a new 




Antenna Specialists VHf broadband power amplifier. 

72 73 for Radio Amateurs • December, 1985 



ABA's model PKS4. 




Comm unsca tions Specialists' TP33 Shareo Repeater Tone Panel 



one- volume reference guide to semtcon* 
duct of circuits end systems from Texas In- 
■ trum«iMS> The book explains how 
semiconductor circuits work in amplifiers, 
oscillators, power supplies, radios, TVs, 
and computers. Each chapter ends In a 
summary followed by a short quiz. 

For more information, contact Texas In- 
struments, inc ., PO Box 225474, MS 8218, 
Dallas TX 75265. 

CS1 SHARED REPEATER 
TONE PANEL 

Communications Specialists has an* 
nounced the TMB Shared Repeater Tone 
Panel. Microprocessor controlled* the TP-30 
provides all 38 El A standard CTCSS tones 
to allow up to 38 subscribers. Built-in time 
and nil counters record the activity of all 
CTCSS tones on the repeater's channel. 

The TP-38 has a low current drain, la 
suitable for battery- or solar-powered re- 
peater sites, and is static- and I ighlm ng- 
proiected. An LED display shows all re- 
ceived CTCSS tones received, whether 
<h«y are active in the panel or not. An op- 
tional unit, the TF-DTMF. allows all control 
functions to be pert orrned remotely with a 
12- Of 16-toutton touch tone^ pad. 



For complete details, contact Commu- 
nication s Specialists, Inc.. 426 West Taff 
Avenue, Orange CA 92665-4296; (800h854 
0547. 



S-COM MRC 100 
REPEATER CONTROLLER 

S- Corn's MRC- 100 Is a 6809-Oased re- 
peater contr otter with 8K of NOV RAM and 
16K of EPROM Features include a polite 
CW identifier, CW messages with variable 
speed and pitch, an auto patch and reverse 
autopafch with mixed-mode dialing, a 200- 
n umber telephone dialing memory. DTMF 
and SVG-tone paging, a CW clock and cal- 
endar, and programmable passwords for 
remote control. 

The M RC 1 00 requires 3- 15 volts at leas 
lhan 300 mA. A diode-isolated automatic 
external-battery changeover input la also 
provrded tor emergency use. 

For more details, contact SCom, PO 
Box 6921. Fort Collins CO 80525. 



HEATHKIT SMART OUTLET 

Heatfifcit's Smart Outlet Bos waits until 
a device plugged into one of seven sock- 







The Smart Outlet Box from Heath. 



ets is turned on, then supplies power to it 
ana the remaining six out lets. An eighth 
outlet is constantly on for units such as 
clocks which require continuous power. 
The Smart Outlet uses UL -approved surge 
protectors and power taps, and is avail- 
able In either kit or assembled form. 

To receive more information about the 
Smart Outlet Box and a tree Heath cata- 
log , write Heath Company, Dept, 150-589, 
Benton Harbor Mi 49022 In Canada, write 
Heath Company, Dept- 3100, 1020 Isling- 
ton Avenue, Toronto, Ontario M8Z3. 



GLB PK1L PORTABLE 

PACKET CONTROLLER 

GLB Electronics has introduced the 
PK1L, a packet-radio controller designed 
specifically for portable and solar-pow- 
ered dlgipealers. 

The PK1L is entirely self-contained In a 
4.6" x 5M" xf shielded enclosure. The 
circuit includes an onboard CMOS Z-80A 
CPU. flK of programmable memory, a pre- 
programmed 32K ROM, an RS-232 inter- 
face, and a packet modem, The system 
draws 25 mA and can be powered oy solar 
cells or a 9- Volt transistor-radio battery. 



A lithium battery is employed for mernofy 
retention. 

For further information, contact GLB 
Electronics. inc., 151 Commerce Parkway, 
Buffalo NY 14224. 



KENWOOD TH-SERIES 
ACCESSORIES 

Two new accessories are available from 
Kenwood for the TH-senes of pocket 
transceivers 

The PB-21 H is an extra-fife ntekei-cad- 
mium battery pack rated at 500 mAh (the 
standard Pfl-21 is rated at 180 mAh), It 
weighs 6V ounces and is \ inch longer 
than the PB-21 

The BC-6 is an ac-operated two-pack 
quick-charger which doubles as a dc 
power source for a TH- aeries radio. The 
BC-6 can fully charge either a PB-21 or a 
PS 21 H In one hour Also included is an 
adapter cable which allows the HT to be 
operated while the batteries are charging, 

For complete details about these and 
other Kenwood accessories, contact Ken- 
wood-Trio Communications. PO Box 7065, 
Compton CA 90224. 




PORTAQUADS 

2-MTR & 2TIO MHi 
FOLDS INTO CASE CA. ADD 

SPECfFY BAND $73,95 6% TAX 

RADIO ENGINEERS 

3941 ML BRUNDAGE AVE. 
SAN DIEGO CA. 921 H 



Hr 



AUTHORIZED KENWOOD 
IC0M RADIO DEALER 




H L HE ASTER INC ?Q3 Bvrtrtanwm Pike. Ckftebuiti, W VA 26301 
Btn&wv Phone (3CW» 6?4 S4« orW VA Toft -Ft w 1-8D0-3&-3177 

M ara « rtecttf KASOHX. 91 fcdg«l*fc Piaet OrmMtd Budi F|* 32074 

Find) An aw« &yum 

nmetTnm 

C* us *X J qtfltacvv Wm WW Saw You Morwy'H 






1986 CALL BOOKS 

U.S. Edition $18,95 

Foreign Edition $17.95 

If Ordered Before Dec. 1, 1985 

NCN ELECTRONICS 

436 Valley Rd. T West Orange, N.J. 07052 
(201)674-8148 




—received mv moneys worth with /us I one 
issue..." 

—J. Ttenbtck 

always stop to read CTM. even though 
most other magaitnes I receive (and write fori 
ontf get cursory examination..." 

— Fred Btechman, KStJGT 



USA 



$15.00 for 1 year 

$2500 
$35.DDiland) S55.00(air) 



Mexico, Canada $25.00 

Foreign S35.DDUand) - S55.00(air) 

(US (undS &nlyf 

Permanent ( U . S Su b sc ripti q n) $ 1 00.00 

Sample Copv 53.50 

CHET LAMBERT, W4WDR 

1704 Sam Drive * Btrmmghanr AL 35235 

1 2051 854-0271 



FULL COLOR 

at economy prices! 

Must provide coior print or slide 
and sketch of layout 

20C per card — Minimum order 1000 
Also 1 & 2 color cards at tow prices 

VALLEY PRESS (206-845-9549) 

Ask for Dennis, KR7Q 

207 West Stewart. Puyaliup, WA 98371 



THE COMMODORE COMBINATION! 



u 



lu; tt tnttu 



PUS 



T 
t 



« . THE 
COMMODORE 
I ftAM*$ 
COMPANION 

Aj 1 •afuied 00 Bcxdlo Sw*d*a 
TtoOlG NvthaikHkli and Lh* 

theQamrai iorvBam^ Compactor £ . j>: psgep::-:-' 
back guide t© sing yow Qanmodofe computer m lhe 
hamshack 3cod solid information on where to tmd 
software and hardware to use fur CW RTTY AMTCSLSSTV 
packet pigpog o tt en prechquon aiiienna modeling 
satellite tjactoftg and much mare includes a Lif ot cww 30 
sources ol Commodore amateur radio spflware aodhard- 
vzre nr.3 z t.tzti&^piri clover ^mQQaim* arlicies and 
reviews abou) uung Commodore mactunes in (he 
hamshack 

Carnmana Poll A 32 page rapnn! ol the popular 
Command Poet column That include* Basic language pro- 
gram Listings you can type in for CW and RTTY send and 
receive, dupe checking program exchange ar.d more ir 
also serves a* a tuional on the basics of interfacing 
Commodore machines lor control operations; 

Commodore Ham* Companion SIS* 1 
Command Posi $9** 
SPECIAL $19* tor ton books when 
ordered together 

c^piie* on dii U5 ordea 

Maiteicajd and Visa accepted 




PO Box 3043 

^ )rtnqff eM tt. 

O270B 



a 



When You Buy, Say 73" 



73 for Radio Amateurs * December 1985 73 



John J Meshna Jr., Inc. 

P, Q Box 62 19MmonSt K Lynn, Ma. 01904 Tel: (617) 595-2275 



COMPUTER TERMINAL BUILDING BLOCK 



$50.00 



This is a great beginning for a computer terminal. It is a brand new, Panasonic, 9 * 
TTL input monitor complete with its own self-contained, switching power supply, 
and a removes bie (four screws) triple output power supply. The whole assembly 
runs on 1 1 5 /2 30 V, 5 0/60 Hz. Now for some specifics: 9 " green phosphor, TTL 
input monitor, attached regulated 12 VDC ? 1 .5 A power supply used exclusively to 
run the monitor and an attached triple output switching power supply with outputs 
of 5 VDC® 3. 5 A, +12 VDC^BOO ma, and —12 VDC @ 5 00 ma. The assembly has 
mounting feet and should be a snap to make a case for* Comes with hook up data. 
New, factory boxed. We are offering this to you 4 ways: 

* COMPLETE SET-UP AS SHOWN, including monitor, low voltage supply and 

triple output supply. SPL-I16 38, 14 Lbs., $50.00, 5/$ 2 2 5, 00 

* TRIPLE OUTPUT SUPPLY ONLY, SPL-117-38, 3 Lbs, $15.00 

* 9" MONITOR ONLY, (you supply low voltage input) SPL-I14-38 , 10 Lbs. $ 25,0 

« 9" MONITOR W/LOW VOLTAGE SUPPLY ONLY, SPL-1 15 -38, 12 Lbs. $40.00 



Green phosphor 
+5, +T2,-12VDC Supply 

12VDC Supply 



CRT 




I 

1 




Monitor Chassis 
w/ Display Board 



We are now selling guaranteed working, starlight scopes which 
allow sight in almost total darkness. They are so named because 
they incorporate a light amplification tube which uses the available 
star or moon light to allow you to see * without being seen. The 
scope has a spectral response of 4,500 to 8,000 angstroms, 
resolution of 50 lines/mm, viewing area of 25mm, standard 
50mm Ft.4 lens, optional telephoto 135mm F2.8 lens, cross hair 
reticle and optional carrying case. A great tool for security and 
naturaUst appMcations. Runs on 9VDC transistor radio battery. 
Due to the nature of this device and people only having a one time 
use for it r we cannot accept returns for refund, credit or exchange 
on this item. To our knowledge, this is the least expensive starlight 
scope on the market, includes 90 day warranty. 

STARLIGHT SCOPE SPL 130A-39 $1,200,00 

Optional TeJephoto Lens, 135mm F2.8 SPL-131A 39 $95.00 

Optional Fitted Carrying Case SPL 132A-39 $66.00 



ATTENTION; 

SECURITY PERSONNEL 

NATURALISTS 

HOBBYISTS 

NEW SEE4N-THE-DARK EQUIPMENT! 




1/2 Height 1 MEGabyte Disc Drives 

Here we go with another blockbuster buy on disc drives which should 
make the competion's head spin! We are offering brand new, Mitsubishi 
no. 4853, 1/2 height, 1 megabyte, mini floppy disc drives, These drives 
are beautiful. They are fully Shugart 3 4 pin compatible. All are double 
side> double density, SO tracks per side units, Each runs on +5 vdc, ,5 A 
and +12vdc r ,7 A, Just the drives to use with your IBM, Sanyo or other 
computer. Each order will come with schematics and pin out data, 
SPL-S5C-35 $175.00 each $175.00 each, 2/S32 5.0 0, 5/$ 725.00 

New, 75 watt power supply. +5vdc 5.5amps, +12vdc 4amps, -12vdc ,3amps 

115/230 input Made by G I, fully enclosed, with schematic* 

Shpg. wt. 4 lb. PS-1Q $50,00 




Use wit /i 

* IBM ^ 

* RADIO SHACK 

* HEATH 

* XEROX 

* SANYO 



HIGH POWER SURVEILLANCE IR SCOPE 




This Infra-Red scope was designed specifically for long range surveillance 
use. The built-in, totally invisible, 5 watt halogen lamp IR source is 
coupled with a premium grade type 6 32 image converter tube, 265 mm 
f4.2 lens, and 16 power military spec, color corrected eyepiece make 
this an ideal unit for viewing of clandestine activities or animals. The 
scope is capable of detection at more than 30 feet, recognition at 
300 feet and positive facial identification at 1 50 feet. It runs on 
12 VDC which makes it ideal for mobile use. It comes with a remove- 
able hand grip which allows for tripod mounting, 2 power cords for 
cigarette lighter or battery terminal instructions and a 90 day 
warranty. Listed below are accessories which make this a very 
versatile instrument, The scope and accessories are new and guaran- 
teed functional. Net wt. 5-1/4 Lbs. 
IR Scope part no. ELD Shpg. Wt 7 Lbs. $735.00 ea, 



ACCESSORIES: 



12 VDC GELL BATTERY for above. Shpg. Wt. 6 Lbs. $35,00 

Bl OCULAR EYEPIECE whfch can be used in place of the standard 
eyepiece. This allows the scene being produced by the IR viewer 
to be seen by the operator up to 4 ft away. 2 Lbs. $89.95 



MALE "T" fl.6 CAMERA DAPTER for SLR cameras 

Shpg. Wt t Lb, $129.00 

MALE "C" to FEMALE "T" ADAPTER for CCTV, requires use 
of above male "T" f1.6 adapter. Shpg. Wt, 1 Lb. $29.95 




Free 72 page catalogue available or send $1,00 for 1st Phone (617) 595-2275 to place your order by phone, 
class service to P, O. Box 62 E, Lynn, Ma. 01904. MC, VJSA, or American Express charge cards accepted, 



3r2s 

■■■■ — * , , jfc _ _ j i 



\. 



J 




74 73 for Radio Amateurs ■ December, 1986 




THE FIRST NAME IN 
ELECTRONIC TEST GEAR 





20 MHz DUAL TRACE OSCILLOSCOPE 

Unsurprised qum M r at an undealatue price, the Ramsey oscillo- 
scope DDinpim to others, costing hundreds more. Features include 
a component letting circuit for resistor eapaenur digital circuit and 
diode testing • TV video sync filter * wide bmndwidlh & high senti* 
ttyiiy * internal gnifeute • tram pant* trace rotator • Z jU4 • h»gh 
Semrtwty n-y mode ■ regulated power Supply • Ou^t-ir calibrator 
• rac* solid irt 9 oarH'ifl • USA- Add fl&W per gitK for pottage, overseas orders 
•dtf 15% of total order lor insured Surface M«M 




high ut»*j hgc* on 



45 MHz DUAL SWEEP OSCILLOSCOPE 



Tne Ramsay 121 * a ou#» t«ne£vss. dstayea **r*p urn* thai *neluosse Outline. 
a*gn* delay f"»* tope/mfl dear **wi«va during ivy snort rise innea c< p>q*- be* 
ouency »a-*rt>wii Ottiet fealwrcs indud*: venaro trigger ne*do*i * SO ca*- 
braiad meap im ranges horn 05 s->*> is 02 n& a». • lurry eotiisiabts sweep 
bme • US uiiaap ntao/nPicailion * f**i tnggar sources. CHI. CK2 LINE EKTrrtai 
anaPtfTemaJ iv -rvyje- ■ fco«4 panel ■-* operadaarL Za-m <nput * ***** 01**-- 
anoaefGrtt mwQhz mairtBr aii da ea ej^ia m unc-g trace * eeeapflaaiaraa 




95* 




RAMSEY D- 1100 
V0M MULTITESTER 

Corn pad and T-n-liatilu. designed Id 
iflrvico □ wide variety Of equipment. 
Natures in etude * mirror toack 
scale • double -jeweled precision 
moving coil * double overload pro- 
tection e m ideal low cost unit foi 
the beginner or as a spare back-up 
unit 

lest leads and 
llery inclufltd 




$12" 




NEW RAMSEY 1200 
V0M MULTITESTER 

Check irart&istors. diodes and 
LEDs wHh ihln professional quality 
meter, other features include; 
decibel stale • 2QK V ott metering 
system • 3'.v" mirrored scale » 
polarity swiicn * 30 measuring 
ranges * safety probes • high 
«mpect piislic case 

lest teads and 
Datlny included 




tff" 




$669. 



RAMSEY 0-3100 
DIGITAL MULTIMETER 

Reliable, accurate drgilai rnea- 
turemenls at an am«lng|y low 
cost ■ in-line color coded push 
buttons, speeds range selection 
• abs plastic tilt stand • recessed 
mpui jacks • overload protection 
on all ranges • 3' i digit LCD dis- 
play w.m «ulo faro buId polarity 
4 tow BAT indicator 



$4995 



In' leads, and 
battery included 





CT-70 7DI6IT525MHZ 
COUNTER 

Ijib duality at a &cv*Mhrough pnee. Faetures 
• 3 frequency ranges each win pre amp a dual 
elect ■ We gate t nw * gate actwty indicator 
« 50m v <a T50 MHz Typ>ca r i«§nsJtr*rry • and* 
frequency range ■ t ppm accuracy 

$4 4 095 *«r»dinetudei 

CT-?0*t 

&P-4 nicad pack . 



CT-90 9 DIGIT BOO MHz 
COUNTER 

The most versatile for fees than $300 Feature* 3 
teatctaole gate urne* * 9 digits * gate ^ ro.caior 

• dspa f now • 25m v tso MHz typical sen , 
Srtmty • 1D WHs timeCMtse lor WWV csikpr alion 

• i ppfn accuracy 



S-14995 



OV- 1 1 PPM oven Kmebftse 
BP-4 mead pac^ 



wired includes 
AC adapter 



11M95 

59.95 

8 95 




CT-125 9DIGIT1.2GHZ 
G0UNTER 

A 9 digit counter lhal will outperform units cost- 
ing n-jndredi mone * gale jno*eator * 24 mv @ 
150 lAnz typtcai sensitivity • 9 d*gn display 
• 1 ppm accuracy * dtsptay noJd * dual inputs 
with preempt 



*169 95 

BP-* mead pat* 



wired includes 

AC adapter 




CT-50 6 DIGIT 600 MHz 
COUNTER 

A wermai tie lab Oeneh counter with optional 
racetve frequency adapter whicn turns me CT- 
50 in ro a digital readout for molt any receiver 
■ 2i mV \i t» MHz typ*cei een» ■ 8 digit 

diiptey * i ppm accuracy 

0*.i ...... $133.95 

BA-1 receiver adapter hit 14-S5 







DM-700 DIGITAL MULTIMETER 



ptnaflan m 

Tkons • 3 z 
metre deci 



Uity at a tjodoy.st price Fsav 
denirer ■ .- ■-- mod 5 t .- i - | c- 
, ED display * auto- 
tecemeni * automatic pofantv 



*119 95 

□ M-7DG*it . . . 
MP-i probe set 



wired irtctudes 
AC adapter 



AUDIO MULTIPLIER 

Trie PS-2 is handy lor hrgti r es olu t ion avo«o 
molu tton meesAirements. muiDpties UP m ire- 
quency * qteti for PL lone measurements 
• mulbpf res by >0 or 100 • COT Hi resolution A 
built-in signal preamp ■ condnioftet 



PR-2 COUNTER PREAMP 



The PK-7 is ideal for measuring wee 
from 10 to t 000 MHi • flat 25 Ob gam • BNC 
connectors * greet for shifting ftp * ideal 
receiver/TV prear 



S4995 



$4495 



wired includes 
AC adapter 



PS- IB BOO MHz PRESCALER 

Extends the range of your present counter to 
600 MH; * 2 stage pnsamp * d'odc Oy >P ce> 
t • tartsmvity 2SmV @ tSO MKr • &NC 

connectors ■ dnres any Counter 



wired include* 
AC adapter 







PR-2 kit , 



PS-akit 



ii iA ¥ «i.i (.1 



ACCESSORIES FOR RAMSEY COUNTERS 

TQlescopic whip antenna — BNC plug , . S B.95 
High impedance probe, light loading . . . 16.95 
Low pass probe, audio use ........... 16. 95 

Direct probe, general purpose use 13.95 

Tilt bail, for CT-70. 90, 125 , . - 3.95 







PHONE ORDERS CALL 

716-586-3950 

TELEX 466735 RAMSEY CI 



TEAMS: • satisfaction guaranteed • examine far 10 days; il nol pleased, return Jn 
original form for rBlund • add 6\ for shipping and Insurance lo a maximum el 
S 10.00 • overseas add 15% lor surlace mail • COD add 12 50 [COD in USA only) 
• orders under Sib. DO add SI 50 • NY residents add 7% sales tax • 90 day pans 
warranty an all kits • 1 year parts A labor warranty on all wired units 



MJiM^£: ¥ 2575 Baird Rrf. 

Penf ielii N.V. 1462$ 



"When You Buy, Say 73" 



73 for Radio Amateurs • December, 1985 75 




UN! 



John Edwards KI2U 

PO Box 73 

Middle Village NY 71379 



AMATEUR TV 

A few years ago, when the home-video 
craze began I told ail of my friends trial 
we were on the verge of an amateur- tele- 
vision (ATV) boom. 'Soon," I predicted, 
we'll see ATV att over the place till be- 
come so popular we'll see a frequency 
squeeze so Ugh) that it will make 2 meters 
look like the wide open space - 

I was wrong 

What happened? Video equipment is 
cheaper today than over before In the late 
1960s, a black-and-white videotape re- 
corder cost aboul $2000. Today, I've seen 
color VCRs advertised tor as little as $250. 
A color camera In the 1960s would have 
cost you a cool $50,000 or so. Today, you 
can get one for less loan $500, All In all r 
you can got an ATV station up and running 
for under £700 — antenna and everything. 
And that's wUh new equipment. If you're 
willing to scrounge around for used gear, 
you can probably gel on Ihe air tor under 
$300. maybe even less 



So why hasn't ATV taken off? Remaps 
it's tor the same reason AT&T's Picture- 
phone service never made tt. Maybe hams 
just don' I want to see each other's ugly 
mugs. Of maybe ATV rs just suffering from 
ihe same malaise as ham radio in general 

Bui I think the reason is more funda- 
mental 1 belteve the sort of people who 
are likely to be attracted to ATV are turned 
off by the code requirement. Think about 
it lot a minute: teaming Morse Code to op- 
erate a VCR, camera, and TV transmitter. 
Sort of like being required to know how to 
lap dance before being allowed lo drive a 
car. Totally irrelevant skills. 

So ATV, like much of ham radio, Ian* 
gulshes. In the meaniime. I can enjoy the 
relatively vacant band space to show vid- 
eos of my vacation to Europe, my trip to a 
vintage car show, the installation of my 
TVRO dish, and other activities to a few 
selected friends. 

Still, It would be nice if I could Find a few 
more people to bore. 



ELEMENT 1 
MULTIPLE CHOICE 

t) The aspect ratio of a standard television 
picture is 

1) three units high and four units wide 

2) four units high and three units wide 
3| one unit high and three units wide 
4} three units high and five units wide 

2) Lighting tniensity is often measured m: 
1) decibels 

21 lumen minutes 

3) brightness degrees 

4) loos can dies 

3) The I i tile red light found on fop of most 
studio TV cameras is officially known as: 

1) a tittle red light 

2) an idiot light 

3) a cue light 

4) a laily light 

4) The unit professionals use to transfer 
film images to video is called a: 

1) movie projector 

2| film -to- video adapter 

3| film chain 



4) kinescope 
5) Which of the following fs not a video 
pickup tube: 

1) v id icon 

2} plumb icon 

3) image orthicon 

4) image iconocon 

ELEMENT 2 
TRUE-FALSE 

True False 

1) A ,E Gen Lock" locks the 
synchronising genera- 
tors from two different 

video sources. . _^ 

2) A "High Key" means a 
hign-impedance signal. 

3) "Head Room" is the 
apace between a tele- 
vised subject's head 

and celling. 

4) The Image iconoscope 
Is sllll widely used in 
high-quality TV cam- 
eras, 



5) The image orthicon is a 
highly sensitive video 
pickup tube, 

6) Lens focal lengths are 
usually measured in 
inches 

7j A floodlight emits un- 

diffused, directional 

light. 
6> A "halo" is a dark flare 

around a very bright or 

reflecting object 
&| One "pans*" a camera 

up and down. 
10) "Stent track 11 scanning 

is the same as "helical 

scanning." 



ELEMENT 3 
SCRAMBLED WORDS 

Unscramble these words relating to 
ATV: 

maarec omognllb 

calemmun klupcp 

apet doelv 

n oast ret silletevno 

cyns Isnesrhglb 

ELEMENT 4 
FILL IN THE BLANK 

i) An undesirable double image is a 



2) A mirror- 1 ike device that singles out 
red or blue light is a , filter, 

3) A gradual transition from one picture 
to another where the pictures brielly 
overlap is called a 

4} A fluorescent light Is also called a 
light 

5) Fading a picture is also called "going 
to ." 

6) Commercial TV transmissions have a 
-line resolution. 

7} TV audio is modulated. 

8} Commercial TV has an audio subcar- 

rier that is MHz above Ihe 

picture carrier, 
9\ TV video is 



modulated. 



10) Perfect ATV reception Is often referred 
to as - copy. 

THE ANSWERS 

Etement J: 

1 — 1. 2—4, 3—4, 4—3, 5—4. 



Element 2: 

t— True Prevents picture rolling. 

2— False High- intensity lighting. 

3^ False Top of the TV %tr&*n 
and subject. 

4— False The iconoscope hasn't 
been used for years. 

5— True Very sensitive 

6— False Usually in millimeters, 

7— False Diffused, non-direc- 
tional light. 

8— True Most evident when us 
Jng a cheap camera 

9— False One "lilts" a camera up 
and down and "pans" it 
from lef t to hght or right 
to left 

tO — True Commonly used on 
VCRs 

Element 3: 

camera, contrast, video, luminance, sync, 

television, tape, blooming, brightness, 

pickup 

Element 4; 

1— ghost 

2— dichroic 

3— dissolve 

4— cold 

5— black 

6—525 

7— frequency 

8—4.5 

9 — amplitude 
10 — closed-circuit 

SCORING 

E foment 1 

Five points for each correct answer. 

Etemem Z- 

Two and ooe-ba5f points for each correct 

answer. 

Elements 

Two and one-half points for each correct 

answer. 

E tement 4- 

Two and one-half points for each correct 

answer. 

How dad you do? 
1-20 points— You re out of focus 
21-40 points— You're a longs hot 
41-60 points— Only alight signal 

distortion 
61-&0 points— Armchair copy 
81-100 points— An instant replay, 
please 




E MY GUEST 



REACH OUT 
AND SERVE SOMEONE 

We hams pride ourselves on being 
trained communicators, but how many of 
us are really using ihat training tor the 
maximum benefit of our communities? lis 
not enough for a lew hams with handie- 
1 alkies to just suddenly show up at a pub 
lie- service event or a disaster. If we really 
want to serve, we have |b get actively in- 
volved In showing civic leaders what com- 
munications capabilities we can ofler, for 
routine local festivities as well as emer- 
gencies, 

Better yet, we should show them how 
they can moat effectively use all the com- 
munications resources available to them, 
Radio amateurs — and especially the local 
emergency coordinators— should be tele 
communications managers. We should be 
Familiar with all of the radio assets avail- 
able to a community, not Just the hams, 
ham equipment, and ham frequencies, 
Sure, this means more work for us. Out It 



Gumst Editorial oy fed Harris N6ftU 

means we serve our cities better and feel 
prouder of our contribution, 

Coordinate All Resources 

Many of us are working actively with ouf 
communities in disaster planning, bul 
(here are plenty of other times throughout 
the year when we can acquire valuable ex 
penence and simultaneously demonstrate 
our expertise and willingness to help. 
Whether you're planning for a parade or a 
natural disaster, don't depend on olhers to 
figure out what your ham group can do. 
Find out all you can about the event and 
how your city handles it, then suggest 
specific ways In which you can help. 

For Instance, would it be helpful to have 
packet radio to send the correct order of 
participants to a parade announcer? 
Hams on bikes or motorcycles for easy ac 
cess through crowds? ATV In a plane Our 
ing a forest fire? Remember, some of 
these may need to be done off the ham 
bands, on government or business fre- 



quencies, A combination of city, ARES, 
and REACT resources might provide the 
perfect solution. Advance planning will 
give you time to get the necessary clear- 
ances and equipment. 

When you're outlining your capabilities 
to non-hams, don't just list the equipment 
you have available, describe its capabili- 
ties instead or saying. "We have twenty 
operators who have synthesized radios 
equipped with DTMF encoders." explain 
thai. "We have twenty trained people who 
can take their hand-held radios anywhere 
you need them. They can use the radios to 
relay information among your people at 
those remote sites or back to your head- 
quarters. They can transfer messages be- 
tween your agency and others, They can 
also direct-dial local emergency services 
from the field or. in some instances, call 
any telephone number you want." 

Keep Up on the Latest Technology 

It's vital that amateurs who want to 
serve their communities keep up with cur- 
rent technology. In these days of inexpen- 
sive portable equipment, Its inexcusable 
to show up at a disaster with a crystal- 
controlled iwo-channei radio that only 
runs on ac! Encourage your community's 
emergency agencies to have state-of-the- 



art equipment also. Ask I hem to provide 
funds for the purchase of amateur-radio 
equipment It's surprising how much 
money is available in city and county 
budgets or through state or federal grants 
for such purposes if you just took for it. 

At the very least, ask them to buy anten- 
nas that you and other local hams can in- 
stall in locations that will be vital during a 
disaster. In the San Franctsco Peninsula 
area where I live, for instance, hundreds of 
antennas {including coa* runs to conve- 
nient radio setup sites) have been in- 
stalled in schools, hospitals. Red Cross 
offices, forest service headquarters, fire 
and police departments, as well as in city 
and county emergency operations cen- 
ters. 

Along the same lines, look lor ways to 
support your local agencies with sophisti- 
cated communications they can't afford. 
For Instance, ask your local amateur-tele- 
vision afficionados to provide fast-scan 
TV between a disaster site and police, fire, 
forest service, etc.. headquarters. The 
same goes for packet radio. Few commu- 
nities can afford their own packet sys- 
tems, but by taking advantage of local 
hams, they can have this valuable medium 
available to them. 

Utilizing new technology to the fullest 



76 7$ tor Radio Amateurs • December, 1985 



THE MOST AFFORDABLE 

REPEATER 

ALSO HAS THE MOST IMPRESSIVE 
PERFORMANCE FEATURES 

(AND GIVES THEM TO YOU AS STANDARD EQUIPMENT!) 



Band 



Kit 



10M,6M, 
2M,220 $680 



440 



$780 



Wired 

$880 
$980 



FEATURES: 




SENSITIVITY SECOND TO NONE; 0.15 uV (VHF), 0,2 uV (UHF) TYP. 
SELECTIVITY THAT CANT BE BEAT! BOTH 8 POLE XTAL FILTER 
& CERAMIC FILTER FOR > 100dBAT ± 12KHZ. HELICAL RESON- 
ATOR FRONT ENDS TO FIGHT DESENSE & INTERMOD. 
OTHER GREAT RECEIVER FEATURES: FLUTTER-PROOF 
SQUELCH, AFC TO COMPENSATE FOR OFF-FREQ TRANSMIT- 
TERS. SEPARATE LOCAL SPEAKER AMPLIFIER & CONTROL 
CLEAN, EASY TUN ETRANSMITTER;UPTO 20 WATTS OUT (UPTO 
SOW WITH OPTIONAL PA). 



HIGH QUAUTY XMTR & RCVft MODULES FOR 
REPEATERS, LINKS, TELEMETRY, ETC. 



R144/R220 FM RCVRS for 2M or 220 MHz. QJ5uV 
ser>s.;8 pole x tal filter & ceramic fitter in i-f F helical 
resonator front end for exceptional selectivity, 
> 100 d Bat ±12kHz t best available today. Flut- 
ter proof squelch. AFC tracks drifting Kmtrs. 
Xtal oven avafl. Kit only $138. 
R451 FM RCVR Same but for uhf. Tuned 
line front end, 0.3 uV sens. Kit only S138. 
R76 FM RCVR for TOM. 6M, 2R or 220. As above, 
but w/o AFC or he!, res. Kits only ST 18. Also avail wM pole f titer , only $98/kit 
R1T0 VHF AM RECEIVER Kit for VHF aircraft 
or ham bands or Space Shuttle, OnlyS9S. 




T51 VHFFM EXCITER for 10M.6M2M, or 

220 M Hz. 2 Wat ts cont Inuous. u p to 3 W 

intermittent. $68/kiL 

T451 UH FFM EXCITER 2 to3 Watts, Kit only $78. 

Xtal oven avail, 

VHF & UHF LJNEAR AMPLIFIERS. For either FM or SSB. Power levels 

from 10 to 45 Watts to go with exciters & xmtg converters. Several models. 

Kits from $78, 




NOW— FCC TYPE-ACCEPTED TRANSMITTERS & RECEIVERS A VAILABLE 
FOR HIGH BANDS* UHF. CALL FOR DETAILS. 



RECEIVING CONVERTERS 



Models to cover every pract real rf & if range lo listen loSSB 
FM . ATV, etc . N F - 2 dB or less 



LOW-NOISE P REAM PS 




VHF MODELS 

Kit with Case S49 

Less Case $39 

Wired $69 



UHF MODELS 

Kit with Case $59 

Less Case $49 

Wired S75 



Artlenn* 
Inpul Rnnga 

2A-32 

50-52 

50-54 
144-1*0 
1*5-147 
144-144 4 
1*6-146 
144- 146 



230-22* 
222-226 
220-224 
22-224 



432-434 
435-437 
432-430 
432-430 
*39 25 



Receiver 
Oulpul 

144-1 48 
28-30 

144-148 
28-30 
2a-30 

27-Z7.4 
ZS-30 

2B-3Q 
144-148 

m^™* ho 

50-5* 

2S-3D 



28-30 
29-30 

144- t4B 
5U-54 
61.25 




SCANNER CONVERTERS Coi>y 806 MHzDandonany scan 
ner Wired/tested ONLY S8B 



TRANSMIT CONVERTERS 



Hamtronics Breaks 
the Price Barrier! 

No Need lo Pay $80 to $125 
fore GaAs FET Presmp. 



FEATURES: 

• Very Low Noise: 0.7 dB VHF. 0.8 dB UHF 

• High Gain: 18 to 28 dB, Depending on Freq. 

• Wide Dynamic Range far Overload Resistance 

• Latest Dual^gate GaAs FET, Very Stable 
MODEL TUNES RANGE PRICE 



LNG-28 


26-30 MHz 


$49 


LNG-50 


46-56 MHz 


$49 


LNG-144 


137-150 MHz 


$49 


LNG160 


15CM72MHE 


$49 


LNG-220 


210-230 MHz 


$49 


LN6-432 


40CM70MH2 


$49 


LNG-BOO 


S00-960MHZ 


$49 



For SSB. CW. ATV, FM b etc. Why pay big bucks tor a mutti 
mode rig for each band? Can be linked with receive convert- 
ers lor transcetve 2 Walts output vhf. 1 Watt uhf. 



For VHF, 
Model XV2 
Kit $79 
Wired $149 
(Specify band) 

For UHF, 
Model XV4 
Kit $99 
Wired $169 



E*citar 
Input Range 

2fr30 

28-29- 

2S-30 
27-27 4 

28-30 

50-54 
144-146 

50-54 
144-146 

29^30 

2S-3C 
50-54 
61.25 
14S 



Antenna 
Output 

144-T4S 

145-146 

50-52 

1 44 1444 

220-222* 

220-224 

50-52 

'44-146 

2B-30 



432-436 

439.25 
432-*** 



■ Ada$20 tor 2M input 



VHF & UHF LINEAR AMPLIFIERS. Use wrth above. 
Power levels from 10 to 45 Watts. Several models, 
Kits from $78. 



HELICAL RESONATOR 

P REAM PS 



low-noise preamps with 
helical resonators re- 
duce intermod and 
cross-band interference 
in critical applications, 
12dBgain. 







Model 

HRA-144 
HRA-220 
H R A-432 
HRA-( ) 
HRA-( ) 



Tuning Range 

143-150 MHz 

213-233 MHz 
420-450 MHz 
150-174 MHz 
450-470 MHz 



Pric e 

$49 
$49 
$59 
$54 
$64 



ACCESSORIES 



• MO-202 FSK DATA MODULATOR. Run up 

to 1200 baud digital or packet radio sig- 
nals through any FM transmitter. Auto- 
matically keys transmitter and provides 
handshakes. 1200/2200 Hz tones. Kit only 
$45. 

• DE-202 FSK DATA DEMODULATOR. Use 
with any FM receiver to detect packet ra- 
dio or other digital data in +( 202 ,T modem 
format. Provides audio conditioning and 
handshakes. Kitonly$38. 

• COR-2 KIT With audio mixer, local 
speaker amplifier Jail & time-out timers. 
Only $36. 

• COR-3 KIT as above, but with "courtesy 
beep". Only $56. 

• CWID KITS 158 bits, easily field program- 
mable, clean audio. Kit only $68. 

• A16 RF TfGHT BOX Deep drawn alum. 
case with tight cover and no seams. 
7x8x2 inches. Designed especially for 
repeaters. $20. 

• DTMF DECODER/CONTROLLER KITS. 
Control 2 separate on/off functions with 
touchtones* e.g., repeater and auto- 
patch. Use with mainoraux, receiver or 
with Autopatch. Only $90 

• AUTOPATCH KITS, Provide repeater auto- 
patch, reverse patch, phone line remote 
control of repeater, secondary control via 
repeater receiver. Many other features. 
Only $90. Requires DTMF Module. 

• SIMPLEX AUTOPATCH. Use with your FM 
transceiver System includes DTMF & Au- 
topatch modules above and new Timing 
module to provide simplex autopatch and 
reverse autopatch. Complete patch sys- 
tem only $200/kit. Call or write for detaHs. 



Send $1 for Complete Catalog 

(Send $2.00 or 4 IRC's for overseas mailing) 

Order by phone or mail • Add $3 S & H per order 

(Electronic answering service evenrngs & weekends) 

Use VISA, MASTERCARD, Check, or UPS COD. 



amiromcs, inc. 

65-D MOUL ROAD • HILTON NY 14468 

Phone: 716-392-9430 HamHon^cs• ta ■ ragistarad tradamar* 







also means you'll be able to bring into the 
public-service fold many hams who would 
otherwise feel ihey have nothing to con- 
tribute. Hams who can't send 25-wpm 
code can perform a tremendous service by 
sending traffic via packet radio. Hams 
who are housebound or don't have porta- 
ble equipment can act as relay stations 
between two or more amateur-radio emer- 
gency nets. 

Your job as an emergency coordinator 
is to facilitate communications, offering 
your served agencres a wide variety of 
communications methods to manage the 
disaster more efficiently. Find what niche 
each group of hams can fill, and put them 
in charge of It. Be creative In utilizing the 
amazing variety of skills that radio ama- 
teurs can offer. 

Train Everyone 

Just as Important as coordinating 
equipment is training the people using it, 
Whole books could be (and have been) 
written on this, but let me review a lew 
points. For instance 1 we probably all need 
a reminder from time to time about keep- 
ing net communications brief and to the 
point When providing communications, 
restrict the traffic to that actually needed 
to support the agency. Resources, logis- 
tics for amateurs, and the like can be han- 
dled on other channels. 

Too often we hear hams talking to hams 
about non-disaster- related topics, tying up 
the frequency and making a bad impres- 
sion on the agencies who are depending 
on us and the news-gathering people and 
citizens with scanners who may be listen- 
ing in. it's surprising how many more peo- 
ple can participate on a single channel 
once we get dowri to the essentials. Try 
listening to your (ooat fire channel for a 
while— you'll quickly understand how they 
can manage 30-50 radios at once during 
an emergency I 

Incidentally, teach your hams not to be 
afraid to let go of the microphone once in 
a while. Complicated questions and an- 
swers hetween agency personnel can best 
be handled by letting the people involved 
talk directly to each other. It's perfectly 
feasible to do (his while maintaining the 
legally required control over our equip- 
ment. Despite our training in passing 
traffic, there's no reason to add another 
person to the Information flow if Its not 
necessary. Communications improve, 
agencies have more participation In the 
disaster-management activities, and they 
reach a new appreciation for us that re- 
suits in more requests for our services. 

Also, make it clear to your hams that 
they must take an active role in offering 
their help during disasters, even once 
theyre at their assigned location. I've 
seen amateurs assigned lo a shelter sit all 
day doing nothing, simply because they 
didn't let the people In charge know what 
services they could provide. High turnover 
both among the amateur operators and 
the agency people (such as shelter per- 
sonnel) mandates constant reminders of 
the hams' presence and capabilities. 

Vou can also provide a great servEce to 
your community by being willing to train 
non-hams in the use of radios for commu- 
nity events and emergencies. We hams 

have lots of experience in using radios. 
DorTt be stingy with it I 

If there's a major local event coming up, 
ask the organizers to let you give a train- 
ing session a couple of weeks In advance. 
At the workshop, you can demonstrate 

how radios work and mention things that 
might go wrong (like the signs of battery 
failure). Show people how to speak prop- 
erly into the microphone and give them 
hints on how best to identify themselves 
and to call others. Remind them to use 



plain language, to be succinct, and to 

avoid needless chatter. 

Any time you're working with neophyte 
radio operators, think of ways you can 
"foolproof" the operation of the radios. 
For example, at the 1984 Olympics at Stan- 
lord University, we covered the switches 
of the handie-talkies with duct tape so 
Ihey wouldn't get knocked Into the wrong 
positions. We also put a sticker on each 
radio listing the frequencies used by each 
group (medical, security, etc.). 

Besides teaching non-hams about ra- 
dios, don't forget the opposite side of the 
coin: learning about their jobs and needs. 
For instance, I recommend that hams (es- 
pecially emergency coordinators) take 
Red Cross shelter-management classes. 
Nol so you can run a shelter, since your 
strength during a disaster will be keeping 
the radios going and the information mov- 
ing. But if you're ever assigned to a shelter 
during a disaster, you'll better understand 
the needs of the people running Et, so 
you'll be able to communicate those 
needs more effectively. In a nutshell, you'll 
be more helpful; — and that, after all, is the 
bottom line of amateur radio. 

A Real-Life Example 

Here on the San Francisco Peninsula* 
we had a great opportunity to put this pro- 
active philosophy to work during the 1984 
Olympics. For ten days> Stanford Univer- 
sity hosted soccer preliminaries tor the 
XXIIIrd Olympiad, and among the many 
hardworking volunteers were eleven hams 
working for the Technology Group. 

Our overriding attitude in approaching 
this assignment was, "Were here to help." 
Weeks before the games began, we were 
assisting Technology Manager Chris Veal 
with his planning. I attended as many co- 
ordination meetings (both before and dur- 
ing the Games) as I could, looking for 
ways we could help. 

In at least one case, our early involve- 
ment headed off a communications di- 
saster. Not long before the games began, 
we discovered a problem with the com- 
mercial hand-he Ids due to be shipped up 
from Los Angeles, In southern California, 
the frequencies assigned to the Los An- 
geles Olympics Organizing Committee 
(LAOOC) for security and administration 
were going to be clear during the games, 
but here in the Bay Area they are used 
heavily by local news-gathering agencies? 

The manufacturer who was supplying 
the radios to the LAOOC didn't have time 
to recrystal them for different frequencies. 
So we swung into action up here, got per- 
mission to use some government frequen- 
cies, found some radios that would 
operate In that band r and ordered 75 of 
them. At the end of the Olympics, they 
were sold off, making the totai cost nearly 
the same as renting would have been. 

Had we just sat back and shown up the 
first day of the Games with our communi- 
cations van and waited for a terrorist at- 
tack, Ihe Olympics communications might 
have been in shambles, and we would 
have missed a tremendous opportunity to 
help. 

During the course of the Games we 
sought out and were called upon to help 
with many other tasks, which we gladEy 
handled. Most were related to telecom- 
munications, but if we had a spare person 
we were happy to help even with ones that 
weren't. We didn't want to adopt a "we 
only do electrons" attitude. Our flexibility 
pafd off in the respect we got from Olym- 
pic organizers— and more importantly, In 
the pride we felt at our participation. 



cations for your town's big events, there's 
yet another way your expertise can help. 

A lot of cities — especially smaller 
towns — can't afford telecommunications 
consultants, so they rely for advice on 
manufacturers' salespeople. You, on the 
other hand, can be an unbiased consul- 
tant. Just make sure you stay levelheaded: 
This Is not the place to grind axes about 
antenna ordinances or cable- television in- 
terference- Once they trust your opinion, 
you'll be able to address those problems 
caimly and rationally — and with more 
friends In high places on your side. 

Overall local hams are going to be bet- 
ter informed than most people on what 
communications equipment is on the mar- 
ket, what technologies are being tried, and 
which ones are working. Your expertise 
can help your town make better-informed 
decisions on the purchase of emergency 
communications equipment, or on cable- 
television franchising. 

Your electronics knowledge can also 
help proven! RFI problems during local 
events. Many committees have summer- 
time air shows; local hams can work with 
the FA A and FCC to make sure ground- 
based radio activities don't interfere with 
the airplanes. In fact, whenever multlband 
frequencies are in use, you should check 
to make sure they don't interfere with 
each other, or with broadcasting equip- 
ment. 

Get Involved 

If there's one message I could leave you 
wlih, it's this: Get involved. Take an active 
role in planning communications for your 



community. Don't sit at home waiting for 
someone to figure out what you do and 
what needs doing. When you're on the 
scene of a disaster, show initiative. Don't 
just show up with a "cordless phone" and 
a warm body. 

Make yourself valuable to your commu- 
nity by becoming a telecommunications 
expert. Keep up on the latest technology 
SO you Can choose the best equipment for 
every com m uncial Ions need. 

If you're an amateur-radio emergency 
coordinator, know your people and what 
special talents they have. Who should be 
assigned to work with the schools? Who 
with industry? Who with the tire or police 
departments? Who with the press? 

What do we hams get for all this hard 
work? Self satisfaction. Knowing that 
we've learned more and contributed more. 
You're a unique Individual, with many 
more talents than just pushing a micro- 
phone button, You have special talent, 
skill, and aptitude that will make you val- 
uable to your community- 
Extend yourself beyond the attitude of. 
"Okay, I'm here with my radio; tell me 
what to say." Reach out, find out what 
people need, and serve those needs. 
Everyone has a contribution to make; it's 
up to each of us to find out what that con- 
tribution is and make it. 

Ted Harris N6HU is Disaster Services Di- 
rector for the Palo Alto (California} Area 

Chapter of the American Red Cross, and 
Amateur Radio Emergency Service- (ARES} 
Emergency Coordinator for Stanford, CaA 
ifornia, 



Satellites 






USING THE AO-10 APOGEE PREDICTIONS 

Apogee predictions for the month of December are provided for three sections of the 

United States: Washington DC at 39H 77W, Kansas at 39M 95W, and California at 38IM 
122W. Times are in UTG and apogee In this case is mean anomaly 128 rounded to the 
nearest whole hour. Use the chart as a guide In aiming your antenna, then fine-tune the 
azimuth and elevation values to peak the satellite's beacon signal. If you require more 
accurate orbital predictions, contact AM SAT at PO Sox 27, Washington DC 20044. 

AMBAT-DSCAR 10 APOBEE PREDICTIONS 

DECEMBER 1965 



Act As Community Advisors 

If you've still got time and energy left 
after planning and supervising ccmmuni- 

78 73 for Radio Amateurs * December, 1985 









WASH 


KANSAS 


CAL I F 


ORBIT 


DAY 


TIME 


AZ 


EL 


AZ 


EL 


AZ 


EL 


■»==■= 


: = = = = = : 


™ B SI SI £K SI c 


— = =: z= z=: — 


====== 


mmmmm 


rtatiffl= = 


======= 


=== 


£167 


1 


£100 


140 


7 










£139 


£ 


£000 


131 


1 










£194 


5 


0600 










£31 


i 


£196 


6 


0600 










££6 


3 


£196 


7 


0500 










£18 


9 


££00 


6 


0400 






£30 





£09 


15 


££02 


9 


0400 






££5 


3 


£0£ 


16 


£304 


10 


0300 


£30 





£17 


9 


19£ 


19 


££06 


n 


0£00 


223 


6 


£07 


14 


161 


£0 


£208 


1£ 


0200 


£17 


a 


£01 


15 


174 


19 


££10 


13 


0100 


£06 


13 


191 


16 


163 


IS 


££!£ 


14 


0000 


19S 


17 


180 


19 


153 


15 


£314 


14 


£300 


187 


19 


166 


19 


143 


U 


££16 


IS 


2300 


161 


id 


162 


16 


139 


6 


££18 


IE 


££00 


169 


la 


152 


13 


130 


1 


£££0 


17 


£200 


163 


16 


147 


10 






££££ 


IS 


2100 


153 


13 


13S 


5 






£££4 


19 


£C00 


144 


9 


130 









£2£6 


£0 


1900 


135 


4 










£££3 


£1 


1900 


131 













££33 


£4 


0500 










229 





££35 


£5 


0400 










££1 


7 


££37 


EG 


0400 










£16 


9 


££39 


27 


0300 






££8 





£06 


14 


££41 


£8 


0300 






£23 


3 


£00 


IS 


££43 


29 


0200 


££6 





£15 


9 


190 


18 


££45 


30 


0100 


££1 


5 


£05 


13 


179 


19 


££47 


31 


0000 


£1£ 


11 


195 


17 


166 


16 



MAKE CIRCUIT BOARDS 
THE NEW, EASY WAY 





.-■} ■■ 


r 












^«p 




■ H 


£ 








*iY'-'i 


•^■sce 




' 








• : * 


j?*'_ M _ 











WITH TEO200 FILM 

JGST 3 EASY STEPS: 

* Copy circuit pattern on TEC-200 film 
using any plain paper copier 

* Iron film on to copper clad board 

* Peel off film and etch 

convenient 8J4 x 1 1 size 
With Complete Instructions 

SATISFACTION GUARANTEED 

5 Sheets for $335 1 Sheets only $5.95 

add 50p postage /Y Y Res, add safes te* 

The MEADOWLAKE CoTp. 

Dept. 7, P.O. Box 497 
Northport New York 1 1 768 



ENGINEERING CONSULTING 

INTRODUCES 



TOUCHTONE DTMF 

to RS-232-C 
300 BAUD INTERFACE 



CUM PUTS A 




0AP-1 



TOUCH TOMS 

• Lisa your computer Co rfecdda DTMF tauchtonefi- 

• Reteiv^ 3l* 1 Edtgitsa^tastas UiHyctin bo transmitted 

• Easily program your computer in BASIC todecuOy multr- 
digjt "stn ngs". display digits, sound afarms. observe 
secret, codes, control relays remote base. 

• Simple to use; just- provide +13 VDC and audio ftonk 
twn wires to the R5-EN32-C serial input on your com pu 
ter, enter as km pie BASIC .program and begin to dauode 

• Sample BASIC program and matructjons included 

. le □ indcat^ "Decode- A-Pad" 

Modal DAP-1 _j- -— , j— , QC - 

Wired and Tested SfcS S 9 • H S3 

Includes shipping USA Ca I addresser, a'di} G" 
VISA end M^terCard accepted, or send phe (.:!*• M [] Lu 



ENGINEERING CONSULTING 

583 CANDLEWOOP AT., BF1EA. CA 3SBB1 
7l4/e71<-BOOS 



MiNihM 



■UjMiH; 



8 




- MODEL TTK - 

$22.95 



SB 30T DTMF Recover 
Receive all 16 DTMF digits 
No additional filtering 
Output BCD of hex format 
Low power [29ma @ t0V) 
Kit includes 3 58Mhr crystal 
23 pin IC socket, resistor. 
capacitors, data sheet 
and schematics 




i Completely wired S tested 
» User program able 

* LED status indicator 
i Open collector our.pi.it 
I Central relays; mute audio 

* Control link on/off 

* Custom IC rftsures high 
reliability & small size? 

i Fits inside most ngs runs 
on 10'VCC[35ma] 

i Over 1500 different codes! 
• Makes eacellpnt private call on busy repeaters! 
t Use it to turn on audio or sound on alarm 
ft Momentary and latch r rig outputs 

MasterCard and Visa accepted, or send nheck/M O. 
Dal address add t3%. price includes shipping USA Bend to: 



ENGINEERING CONSULTING 

583 CANOLEWOQD ST., BREA, CA 92821 
TEL: 714-671-2009 



WIRED & TESTED 
- MODEL TED- 

$59.95 



"When You Buy, Say 73 



tt 




ENGINEERING CONSULTING 
INTRODUCES 



fei 



'REMOTE A PAD 
MODEL RAP-1 



2 FOUR DIGIT DTMF 

DECODEF!S,PLUS 16 DIGIT 

KEYPAD CONTROL 

TUNE THE WORLD PROM 
YOUR HANDHELD VHF/UHF RADIO 



• Auflia LOnes tram fmf ^urrv flrfl ea^uprted tn tfvlid it Hit b+'ltCh-E-S which 
eonlrtf any i{3 digit k*jfjwd inl 3 radio or Dth^r Oir^irr 

• Some e KMrfiptEE you ca^ r-i ; (lira ■ ui r:lude trie Pro- Searc h " FUat^Lur 1 mcaie baa m 
rwmattlrt. I COW iC-701 nHCOIWl IC-£1 t *han usiiig ih± HM-2 qonErolier 
ICOW 1BS0 & ?pij fijden PCS 400D; hflrtd^eltfE such as Yaittii Ft -SOB. 
FT-70B ICOM IC-D2AT. end many mCife 

• ftnythino rnu can do maminLir rtith yn:,r tb digit hay-pad. th* RAp-t W ii> do 
remotely writing uutiio tokiLh seines 'mm atoy sourer 

• "wO |lrj>> 'Jigil| pr-flflrammable fcC^t* i::lda& are UBPO" to O0nrnLi: i«my& or 
DChfii' on 'oM lunf.:Liu r '--i 

UED detudEi atatu-a mdiGaLore sno momBnt^ir^ plu& 

:.i--iHy arete dhcncfer ouiput& ere provided 

^^ Opld inr> sa rd Bdge co r>n E-Dtor 1 lj .^m d ip *oc(i r.i an^J 

nbtKyn r-abln firn Mipphtiil 

An CMHF; low puwiirdrain [3Dma): SSI B01 p*»flap 

HaaV Bight ymros t^l •vwn't*!!] 4 OJiu mfl^ irtpefarle1*ith 

th'i Bxtstitigi fcsypBal a'^ t*ie ri^dio yoo w*^ to cpnu-pi r*- 

iiiuLb!^ Cortiiect aud-Li'ncim ^nysciijrrj' IP vnits DC *nd 

fiiuar* in control, 

Thn rfujll i Jiyil deecid«r& wHi turn your hphkj. pr» mnd PH 

u-jm^ yuur ^regrammaPle access code 

OniinUai iriLerJace d^agrafVG and m&t-'-iict-Dn? innludwt 

with purcheae Inse^face tB&ie lor Pru Search" sg.a^: 

| plugs in ace sccKetl 



Modes RAP^I 

$149.95 

Remote A Pad 

F emote control 

interface board 

and DTMF 

decoder 



ICOM IC- 

AUDIO BLA 



BLASTER " MODULE 




• Mod-jiemKiiilk, i«aldas.thB I'adiD m 1D miiut«s 

• BorjStfl iiuOmLn negrly 1 wn'.'. 

• Lo*: ppwnr i1-j.hu (itriiu f.'aOd-tSyl 

• Cc™piei-R fjfen by *i*p iflasthi£EiDna -nui-jded 

• Cofcacia tDe LOW aijirl'n prpfcicm* 

• CJi -ve BiCPrna* speoherp txt PjjI I vuHinu.' 
BUen &ign?i^. Viil.li Uy/t rlc^i'Jt.njr' 1 

." '*l 
( 

F - 1 
\ 



Murtel AG 

Price includes postage and handling. U.S.A. CA res. a 



Sflnd check or money order to - 

ENGINEERING CONSULTING 

583CANDLEWOODST..BREAPCA 92621 
[714)671-2009 



/ 



»7 



7H0T 
QjCKSM/TH _^ 



VjT 



/3Z «4ffiS 66*W)ia> WfThtKHS* 

ZAMDAtOBE 
PUB : BONUS OXlPCNS. 
WORTH #LfiEPe&W8L£- 






Rush me my copy of ttie Dick Smith 
Catalog, I enclose $1 to cover shipping 



Name . . 

Address. 
City 



i » * p ...... > 



/5F 



Zip 



E i ■■ p> P I A * ■ 



IP--* 



I 



DICK 5MHH ELECTRONICS INC. 

P.O. Box 2249, Redwood Citv CA 94063 




MULTI-BAND SLOPERS 

ALSO: Ol POLES * LlMJTEO-SPftCfe AWTENTJAS 



Oul&tanding O^MOBsmaniCB ol W9INWanlcnnji& is wftll knowril Nywan- 

-jov multlband BIG-5tGNAL reporlsl AuJurrJpUc UamflswiLctung ■ Vary 
low SWR-Coa* l*e-di ■ Jkw pow^r . Compact ■ f U L LY A 556 W B L E 13 
lo vour spflCtliPil cenleHrequBncyoachoflriia ■ Eaay to .nstall ^ v&r v 
|ow profjja -CQinpl&lo Inslruclipnc -Vour pafsonai phecH flcoa pteJ 



4 RAND $LOPER - E6Q ao.40.Sa. or20M 6D H Ion? $ ^R ppd 

3 160, BO, 40 M 50n. ■■ $ ^3 ■■ 

2- ao.JQM 40 11. -- $35 - 

3 -- MO-TflAP DlPOLE - 160, fiO, 40M lljii.long 1 71 ■■ 

2 - " - SO, 4DM 85T(, ■■ $ &5 ■■ 

9-8ANO BRACE-SAVEHCHPOLE't&OlhrulOM* 46fl.Jp nQ .S -B5 ppri 
* Re^wiroa *ido-ri>iiQO lwi«*<80, 40. ?0, ISM WlPiOul IuiISt) 



SEN D 5ASE I Or complex d^lait s gi Hies» and oltier uniquo aniflnn a& 

W9INN ANTENNAS 312 394 3414 

BOX 393S MT- PROSPECT, IL 6005* 



WIRELESS REMOTE CONTROL EXTENSION SYSTEM 

!TI2A:LII\IT — 





Control your TVRO, VCR, or CABLE 
TV from Any Room! 

Works on most infrared controlled devices. 

Immediate Shipping - Wholesale 8c Retail 

M ERR! MAC 

SATELLITE 

MERRIMAC, 
Wl 53561 



608493-2291 




TO QHDEFL 
& INFO 



CRYSTAL FILTER SALE 

Top-quality 8 pole CW/SS&/AM FOX TAN«0 Filters 

For most Mode is from; 
KENWOOD - YAESU - HEATHKIT 

Also DRAKE R 4CV7 Line, COLLINS 7SS 3B/C, 
and ICOM (FL44A Twin) 

25% OFF LIST!! 

Check your IF to find List Prices fix the totowng flanges: 
IF Hangs- 3 to 11 MHz — 

For all Yaesu, Kenwood, Healh .$ 60 

IF Range: 444 to 44&KHz — List prices as follows: 

Yaesu . . . S75, Kenwood ... $1 1 0, Icom . . . S100 
CON JnE75S3-B"C£5QH*BW only) S125 

Drake R4C — 

GUF1 (191 if BKHi BW) torSSBCW % 65 

GUF2 {1st IF BOO BW) with PC Board for CW ...... . $100 

2nd IF — SiMcial 125Hz J or conleslers . . . , , ■$ 7$ 

All otherbandwidths $ 65 

Oralis FR-7, R7, 250, 400, 1.SK, 2.1K SW S 60 

MATCH EL>PAIR CW AND SSB FILTERS 
FOR TOP PERFORMANCE 

TS830mOI940 — 

CW 400 Hz or SSB 2. Ik Hz Each Pair) £170 

CW 400Hz and SSB 2.1 kHz (Both Pairs) £300 

fMWf Hint SSE's so improve V8T frV CW'$ at$ ad needed!} 

Ff-ftaJ (SSB 2.1 'k He Pair) £150 

FILTER CASCADING KITS FOR 
SUPER SELECTIVITY 

For FT-W1 or TS43CS 
(includes board and 2.1 Filter) .3 75 

FILTER BANDWIDTHS AVAILABLE 

(CW in Hz, Others in kHz) 
CW: 125, 250, 400. 500 — SSB: 1-8, 2.1,2.4 — AM: 6.0 

• Not every bandwidth for e^ry model, we send ctasest 
« Since 1978. Fox Tango fitters have oeen raiee Q&sV 

• Fox Tango stocks titters tar txuhi old and current rigs 

• Use FT's ro til optional CW/AW spots, o? reotace unuts. 

• Unlirrated lime guarantee to original filler pirrchssefs. 

• All filters finest a-oole discrete-crys-iai consmjcum. 

- Moss titters are designed tor easy drop-in instaiiation 

• Complete irtstmctons and free pans lurnished lor Gibers 
■ Limited syppiy of the most popular types - Oroer MQW r 

• Sato ends flocombw 3r 19SS Plica rises lkH*y in 'Bfil 

SPECIAL FILTERS 

Send specifications for oju'Oiation on astonytMlt lih^s tor special protects 
Mraclive prices and sarnies lor OEM or volume purchasers Miar-vaiue 
oedine and Irade reslndiofis arohahly mako Ihis \our last chance to buy 
top^quallty Japanese- made filters St reduced prices. 

ORDERING INSTRUCTIONS 

SPECIFY: Make of Sat. Motel Number, Filter Bandwidth. IF 
DEDUCT : 2b% from above List Prices rfieg. $60 - Sale $45 1 
SHIPPING: S3 US. $5 Air (US & Canada), $10 flsewhere 
QflBFJfc Mail or phone. VISA/MC AcceplBd. FL add 5W to 

GO FOX TANGO -TO BE SURE! 

FOX TANGO CORP. 

P.O. Box 15944 
W. Palm Beach, FL 33416 
,1 Telephone: (305) 683-9587 





73 for Radio Amateurs • December, 1985 79 



TOUCH TONE® CONTROL 



NEVER BEFORE HAS SO MUCH CONTROL. . . 

COST SO LITTLE!! 



Qnty the genuine has these trademarks 



MODEL CS-16 $164* ma , eu , 



net 




MODEL CS-1688 $189 Am 



aleur net 



Two independent user programmable 
three digit passwords permit hierarchy 

Control. 

The secondary {user) password can 
only access 8 of the 16 latched (on/off) 
functions. 

However full \B function control is 
available to control operators using 
the primary password. Additionally 
secondary password access can be 
enabled/disabled with a special 
primary password command. 

Our CS-16 puts repeater control 

ops IN CONTROL 




Our new CS-1688 is the most powerful 
touch tone controller in the Industry! 

DIP switch prog ram inability allows 
you to choose any of these ten 
mode/f unction combinations* . . 

OUTPUT FUNCTIONS 

D t 2 3 4 b 6 7 S 9 - H A B C 

D-T GROUP ft C GROUP 



r 
2. 
3. 
*- 
S 
6 
7 

e 
a 

10. 



9 LATCHED 
a LATCH EO 
& MOMENTARY 
B MOMENTARY 

1 OF & SELECT 

1 OF a SELECT 

1 OF 5 SELECT 



and 
and 

anrj 
and 
and 
amJ 
ftfld 
16 LATCHED 



« MOWENtAKTY 
1 OP a SELECT 

& LATCHED 
i 01 H .1 II 

fl MOMENTARY 
1 Of a SELECT 
B LATCHED 



TtiMrjMRJfAkY 
i OF 16 SELECT' 



COMMON FEATURES 



• Open collector (can drive relays 
directly) and logic outputs for each 
of the 16 functions 

• SSI-2Q2 central office quality XTAL 
controlled tone decoder 

• Adjustable pre-amp accommodates 
10MV 2 volt input 

• Retransmission of control tones 
can be eliminated by use of either 



open collector or data strobe logic 
outputs 

* Operates from 10-25 volts DC. 
Reverse polarity protected 

* AV2" x 6Y2" glass board with 44 
pin gold p fated edge connector 

* Comes complete with manual and 
mating connector 

Add $3,00 P&H Calftorma residents add sales lax 



Call or write for information on these signaling products also: 

Model CS-10 DIP relay board, packages 10 dip relays. 

Model CS-100. , .A 19" rack mount that houses a control card and two 
CS-10's. All inputs and outputs available on convenient barrier strips. 



TYPICAL REPEATER CONTROL APPLICATIONS 

HI/LO POWER - PUCOP - TIGHT/LOOSE SQUELCH — OPENCLOSED SQUELCH - 
REPEATER ONrtJFF - AUTOPATCH OHOFF — TOLL RESTRICT ONJOFF - RINGBACK ONJOFF - 
LONGSHORT HANGTIME — ANTENNA 1/ANTENNA 2 — REMOTE BASE QNOFF — F,JF, - 
AUX UNK ONJOFF - TONE MUTING ONOFF - SPARE TRAMSMfTTTiR 1NOUT - ETC. ETC 

SELECTOR MODE APPLICATIONS 
1 OF H FREQUENDES — l OF N PHONE LINES — I OF N ANTENNAS — 1 OF N REPEATERS ETC 



/ / / lh 



CONNECT 

SYSTEMS 
INCORPORATED 



23731 Madison St 
Torrance, CA 90505 
Phone (213) 373-6603 



i^^i 




AT&T 




They are your assurance of quality 
and performance 



is Factory Pre-Tuning Good? 
No— it Just Does Not Work! 

Every HF mobile installation has its 
own characteristics, and the antenna 
must be tuned to fit them. Only the 
Spider T ' Antenna with its patented 
tuning st&eves can bt tailored by the 
user to fit his own requirements. If the 
antenna is later moved to a different 
installation, the Spider™ can always be 
re-tuned as needed. 

Beware of Cheap imitations! 



The Most Convenient 
Antenna for 
Mobile Work 

No more stopping to 
change coils. Once 
the Spider"' Antenna 
is tuned for 10, 15. 
20 and 40 (or 75) __ 
meters* just switch 




your transceiver from * — >— 
band to band — the 
antenna will follow j^ 
by itself. ^T 




We Hfliv No Dealer%~Order Direct 



MULTI-BAND ANTENNAS 

7131 OWENSHOUTH AVENUE* SUITE 363C 
CANOGA PARK, CALIF., 913 03 
TELEPHONE: (818) 341*54*0 



ATTENTION 

Foreign Computer Stores/ 
Magazine Dealers 

You have a large technical 
audience that speaks English 
and is in need of the kind of mi- 
Cfocomputer information that 
CW/Peterborough provides. 



Provide your audience with 
the magazine they need and 

make money at the same time, 
For details on selling inCider, 
80 Micro, Run r HOT CoCo 
and AmigaWorid, contact: 



SANDRA JOSEPH 

WORLD WIDE MEDIA 

386 PARK AVE. t SOUTH 

NEW YORK, NY 10016 

PHONE (212) 686- 1520 

TELEX— 620430 



80 73 for Radio Amateurs • December, 1985 



COMMUNICATE 






U»n» #7M 



OUR 25th ANNIVERSARY YEAR! 



for Radio . 

Amateurs 






nlfr 



Special Report: 
Volunteer Examiners 

HAM-DAY '85- 
Are You Ready? 

Ten Million Resistors: 

The Incredible Digiohm 

PRIVATE 

EARTH 

STATIONS 






^.p 



v 



FIRST WITH US , 

THEN THE WORLD! 

Better communications start with your subscription 



to 



73 J™ Radio Amateurs 



*M« 



YES! 



Start my no-risk subscription today and send me 12 issues 
of 73 for $19.97. I'll save 33% off the newsstand price! 



□ CHECK/MO D BUI Me Ipkaac make dxdt payable a> 79 



Name_ 

Address. 
City 



Zip 



Canada &. Mexico ill.fl. I year only, US folds drawn on US hank- 
Forngn nirface S39.97. 1 year only, US fundi drawn on US bank. 
Fomgn airmail, pkaae inquire. Please allow 6-6 week* for delivery. 



75 



/<"■ Radio 
\ mat ours 



PO Box 931, Farmingdale, NY 11737 






AEAEAEAEAEAEAEAEAE 
AEAEAEAEAEAE. 



AEAEAEAEA 




&t°*. 



9&^ e \* C<>^ e 




$79.95 



\m. 



A Realistic Simulation of 
On-the-Air, Two-Way 
Morse Code Ragchew' 
Contacts (QSOs). 

• Makes Upgrading of Morse 
Skills Easy and Fun 

• Does Away With Drudgery 

• Skilled Operators Enjoy 
the Realism 

• Operate Anytime — Re- 
quires Only a Commodore 

C 64 (or OI28) and A TV Set 

• Removes the "Mystery" of 
what to Say in On-the-Air 
Contacts 

• Excellent Practice for Be- 
ginners and Old "Pro's" 

• Si audard Format and Com- 
mon Abbreviations Used 
for All Exchanges 

• Send Morse with your key- 
board 

• Select Appropriate QRM 
and QRN Levels 

• Select the Portion of the 

Band* — Novice or Low 
End 

Ptictw and Spet:ifKnnijn> Subjen lo t/hjuigr Without 
Noticr <tr Obligation 

ADVANCED ELECTRONICS APPLICATIONS. INC. 
P.O. Box C 2160, Lynn wood, WA 98D36 

TELEX 6tT?4» 
AEA INTL m 

r?06) rtwm 



j^ss^ 



EAE 
IAEAEAEAE 
■AEAEAEAEAEAEAE 
EAEAEAEAEAEAEAEAEAE 



Take it with you. 







r 



V— — 





r 






i 



ShackMaster" puts your home station pn the palrp of 
your hand Whether portable, mobile, around the yard 
or around I own you'll be linked in rough your handheld 
to your high performance equipment at home, Even call 
home From any Touch -Tone phone and operate , 

Scan the bands, change modes, select antennas, turn 

ar on and off- all from your Touch-Tone keypad. 
Check into nets, work skeds, ragchew and DX without 
being ned down to the shack 



CICC 



advanced 
computer 
controls, inc. 



Exchange electronic mailbox messages with your 

family - like 1 H be late" , or "Air isOK" Or talk with your 
family direc I ly Ihrough ShackPatch* , with you in remote 

control of your home station Report traffic accidenis or 
disabled motorists through your home phone while 
mobile or portable with PersonaiPatch" 

All the power of your home station [and more) really can 
follow you anywhere to fmd out more about 
ShackMaster 1 " just write, send us your QSL or call and 
talk with us at 408-749-8330. 



1Q01G Ncmrtg* Square * Qjpettno CA 350H i406> ?49 9330 



IRON POWDER and FERRITE PRODUCTS 

AM1D0IM .. 

Fast Reliable Service Since 1963 



Small Orders Welcome 



Free 'Tech-Data' Flyer 



Toroidal Cores, Shielding Beads, Shielded Coil Forms 
Ferrite Rods, Pot Cores, Baluns, Etc. 

12033 OTSEGO STREET, NORTH HOLLYWOOD, CALIFORNIA 91607 



82 T3 for Radio Amateurs * December, 1985 






MFJ'S BEST 300 WATT TUNER NOW GIVES YOU A 
AND REFLECTED POWEK - ALL AT A GLANCE. 




M F J-949C MFJ't ben 300 wttt tuner ft now even better! 
_ _ -^^g- The MFJ-W9C ilMit-ono Deluxe Verta Tuner II gives 
1 flQ ^ u atuner - cross-needle SWR/WaTtmeier, dummy load, 
■ w antenna switch ahd balun in a new compact cabinet. 



CROSS-NEEDLE METER THAT READS SWR, FORWARD 

You gat quaTity conveniences and a clutter-free snack at a super price. 

A new crota-needle SWR/Wattmeter gives you SWR, forward and reflected 
power— an at a single glance. SWR is automatieany computed with no controls to 
set. Has 30 and 300 watt scale on easy-to-read 2 color lighted meter (needs 12 % 

A handtome new black brushed aluminum cabinet matches an the new rigs. Its 
compact size (10x3x7 inches) tarces only a little room. 

Yeo can run full transceiver power output— up to 300 wstis RF output— and 
match coa*. balanced fines or random wires from 1.8 thru 30 MHz. Use it to tune 
out SWR on di poles, vees, long wires, verticals, whips, beams and quads. 

A 300 watt 50 ohm dummy load gives you quick tune ups ahd a versatile six posi- 
tion antenna switch lets you select 2 coax lines (direct or thru tuner), random wire 
or balanced line and dummy load, 

A large efficient airwound Inductor— 3 Inches in diameter— gives you plenty of 
matching range and less fosses for more watts out, 1000 volt tuning capaci* 
tors and heavy duty switches gives you sate arc-free operation, A 4:1 baTun is 
built-in to match balanced lines. 

Order your convenience package now and enjoy. 




SUPER 
KEYBOARD 

MFJ-496 

$169.95 



Price slashed 50% to $169,951 Get a full feaiu'e 
Super Keyboard that sends CW/ftTTY/ ASCII for 
the price of a good memory keyer. 

You get the convenience of a dedicated keyboard 
—no program to load— no Interface to connect- 
Just turn It on and It's ready to use. 

Tnli 5 mode Super Keyboard lets you send CW, 
Baudot, ASCII, use it as a memory keyer and tor 
Morse Code practice. You get text buffer; pro- 
grammable and automatic message memories, 
error deletion, butter preload, buffer hold, 

A 256 character keyboard buffer gives you per* 
feci CW even if you "hunt and peck". A meter 
reads CW speed and buffer remaining. 4 mes- 
sage memories lets you store up to 256 charac- 
ters, 4 preprogrammed messages lets you send 
CQ CQ DE. CQ TEST DE, DE P QRZ. Has speed 
weight, tone and volume pots that remembers 
their settings even arter power Is turned off. Send 
60 WPM Baudot and 100 baud ASCII. 

You can uta It ti t deluxe full feature memory 
keyer that has automatic and programmable 
memories, Iambic operation, dot -dash memories. 
Has random and pseudo random code generator. 

Automatic aerial numbering, message repea- 
ting, tune switch, shielded for RFL 12 VDCor 110 
VAC with MFJ-1312, $9.95, 12 x 7 x 3!A Inches. 

CROSS-NEEDLF SWR/WATT 
METER MFJ415 $59.95 

MFJ'i croti-needle 
SWR/Wattmeter gives 
you SWR, forward 
and reflected power 
—all at a tingle 
glance! SWR is auto- 
matically computed 
—no controls to adjust. Easy-to-use push 
buttons select three power ranges that give you 
OR P to full legal limit power readings. Reads 20/ 
200/2000 W forward , 5/50/500 W reflected and 1 : 1 
to 1:5 SWR on easy-to-read two color scale, light- 
ed meter. Needs 12 V. ±10% full scale accuracy. 
6V? x 374 x 4 1 /* inches. 



2 KW COAX 
SWITCHES 



MFJ-1702 

$19.95 




$29.95 "H-im 





Initantly telect any 
antenna or rig by 
turning a knob. Or- 
ganizes coax caules 
and eliminates plug- 
ging and unplugging. 
Unused terminals are 
grounded to protect 
your equipment for stray RF, static and lightning. 
2KWPEP.1 KWCW. For 50 to 75 ohm. Negligible 
loss. SWR, and crosstalk gives high performance. 
SQ-2395. Convenient desk or wail mounting. 

MFJ-1702, 119.95. 2 petition!. Cast aluminum 
cavity construction gives excellent performance 
up to 500 MHz with better man 60 d8 Isolation at 
450 MHz. Heavy duty, low loss switch has fess 
than 20 mitliohm contact resistance, less than 0,2 
dB loss and SWR below 1:1.2. 2 x2Vzxt indies. 

MFJ-1701, $29.95. 6 positions. White markaule 
surface for recording ant, positions. 8VS x 1 Vi x 3 In, 

ANTENNA CURRENT 
PROBE mfj-206 $79.95 

This new breaklhru MFJ Antenna 
Current Pro&i lets you monitor RF 
antenna currents— oo connections 
needed' Determine current distri- 
bution, RF radiation pattern and 
poiaf ization of antennas, transmis- 
sion lines, ground leads, building 
wiring, guy wires and enclosures. 

• Indicate trantmlitlon line radiation due to high 
SWR, poor shielding or antenna unbalance, 

• Detect re-radlatfon from ram gutters ana guy 
wires that can distort antenna field patterns. 

• Detect RF radiation from ground reads, power 
cords or building wiring that can cause RFl. 

• Determine if ground system is effective. 

• Pinpoint RF leakage in shielded enclosures, 

• Locate the best place for your mobile antenna, 

• Use as tuned field strenght meter. 
Monitor! RF current by sensing magnetic field . 

Uses an electrostatically shielded ferrite core, FET 
RF amplifier, op-amp meter circuit for excellent 
sensitivity, selectivity. 1.6-30 MHz. Has sensi- 
tivity, bandswltch, tune controls, telescoping an- 
tenna for field strenght meter. 4x2x2 inches. 





DIGITAL SWR/WATTMETER 

MFJ41S 

$89.95 

Furry automatic Digital SWR/Wettmtter reads 
SWR 1 :1 to 1 :9.9 directly and instantaneously— no 
SWR knob to set. Huge 0.6 inch bright orange 
digits make across-tht-room reading easy. 12 
segment LED bar graph wattmeter gives instan- 
taneous PEP readings up to 200 watt RF output. 

Good, bad, mismatch trl-color LEDi Indicate 
SWA conditions. Small size (5 Viz x 4V4 x 1 In.) and 
eaSy-to-reao digital display makes it ideal for mo- 
bile use. For 50 ohm systems. 1.&-30 MHz. 12 
VDC or 110 VAC wittl MFJ-1312, $9.95. 

MOBILE ANTENNA MATCHER 

MFJ-910 $19,95 

Lower your SWR and 
get more power Into 
your mobile whip for 

solid signals and 
more QSOs, 

Your solid state rig puts out more power and gen- 
erates less neat. For 10-80 meter whips, Easy plug 
-in installation. Complete instructions on how best 
to lower SWR. Fits anywhere, 2!/i x 2'A Inchas. 

TRIPLE OUTPUT LAB POWER 
SUPPLY MF.M0O2 $149.95 





Triple output lab quality power iuppfy gives you 
plenty of voltage and current for an your analog 
ahd digital circuits. You get 3 eompietery Isolated 
output* 2 variable 1,5-20 VDC at 0,5 amp and a 
fixed 5 VDC at 1 amp. Connect in series or par- 
allel for higher voftage and current, It's sfiort cir- 
cuit protected, has excellent line (typlcaily 0.01% 
/V) and load regulation (typically 0,1%), 2 light* 
ed 3 Inch precision meters monitor voltage and 
current simultaneously. It's ruggedly built so 
you'll get many years of trouble free service. 12 x 
3x6 Inches. 110 VAC with safety ground. 






ORDER ANY PRODUCT FROM MFJ AND TRY IT-NO 
OBLIGATION. IF NOT SATISFIED, RETURN WITH- 
IN 30 DAYS FOR PROMPT REFUND {leu shipping}. 

* One year unconditional guarantee • Made in USA 

* Add $5.00 each snipping/handling * Cat) or write 
for free catalog, over 100 products. 




MFJ ENTERPRISES, INC. 

Box 494. Mississippi State. MS 39762 



TO ORDER OR FOR YOUR NEAREST 
DEALER, CALL TOLL-FREE 

800-647-1800 

Can 601-323-5669 In Miss, and outside 
continental USA Telex 53-4590 MFJ STKV 




J 



«+ 



When You Buy, Say 73" 



73 for Radio Amateurs * December, 1985 &3 









MFJ VEBSA TUNER II 

teii.pcTOn M*TCw»wt urn 

lti ■ C«4* I 









300 WATT ANTENNA TUNER HAS SWR/WATTMETER, ANTENNA SWITCH, BALUN. 
MATCHES VIRTUALLY EVERYTHING FROM 1.8 TO 30 MHz. 

MFJ 1 * fastest selling tuner packs in plenty at new features! 

• New Styling? Brushed aluminum front All metal cabinet 

• Hew SWR/Wattmeter! More accurate Switch selectable 
300/30 wall ranges Read forward/retlected power 

• New Antenna Switch! From panel mounted, Select 2 coax 
lines, direct or through tuner, random wire/balanced line or 
tuner bypass for dummy load 

• New airwound inductor! Larger more efficient 12 position air- 
wound inductor gives lower losses and more watts out. Run up 
to 300 watts RF power output Matches everything from 1 B to 
30 MHz dipoles. inverted vee random wires, verticals, mobile 
whips, beams, balanced and coax lines. Built-in 4:1 baiun for 
balanced lines 1 000 V capacitor spacing. Black 11x3x7 inches. 
Works with all solid state or tube rigs Easy to use, anywhere. 



fffi 



tetPCTtfn M*TCTf»B(t IP 






» 



1*0 OIL UFj-MiO 



$99.95 



MFJ- 9410 



NEW 
FEATURES 



RTTY/ASCH/CW COMPUTER 
INTERFACE 



MFJ-1224 

$99.95 








Free MFJ RTTY/ASCII/CW software on tape and 
cable for VIC-20 or C-64. Send and receive com- 
puterized RTTY/ASCII/CW with nearly any per- 
sonal computer (VIC-20, Apple, TRS-BOC, Atari, 
TI-99, Commodore 64, etc), Use Kantronics or 
mosi other RTTY/CW software. Copies both mark 
and space, any shift [including 170. 425, 350 Hz} 
and any speed (5-100 WPM RTTY/CW, 300 baud 
ASCII). Sharp 8 pole active fitter for CW and 170 
Hz shift. Sends 170, 850 Hz shift. Normal /reverse 
switch eliminates retiming. Automatic noise limiter. 
Kantronics compatible socket plus exclusive general 
purpose socket, 8x1Vix6m, 12-15 VDC or 1 10 VAC 
with adaptor, MFJ-1312, $9.95. 

RX NOISE 
BRIDGE 

Maximize 

your antenna 

performance! $DS,SD MFJ-202B 

Tells whether to shorten or lengthen antenna for 
minimum SWR. Measure resonant frequency, 
radiation resistance and reactance. 
New Features: individually calibrated resistance 
scale, expanded capacitance range (±150 pf) 
Built-in range extender (or measurements be- 
yond scale readings 1-100 MHz. Comprehensive 
manual. Use 9 V battery, 2x4x4 in. 

INDOOR TUNED ACTIVE 

we w' 1MPR° VE0 - ANTENNA 

JthhigW gain -World Grabber " rinlrf 
wan v or W€ eeds reception 

of outside long wires! Ur.ique tuned Active 

Antenna minimizes intermode, improves seh 

Ivity, reduces noise outside tuned band, even| 

functions as preselector with external antenn; 

Covers 3-30 MHz. Tele 

scoping antenna. Tune* 

Band. Gam, On -off 

bypass controls. 6x2x6 in. 

Uses 9V battery > 

1B VDC or 110 VAC with 

adapter, MFJ-1312. »,». MFJ-10ZDA 579,95 



* 



POLICE/FIRE/WEATHER 
2 M HANDHELD CONVERTER 

Turn your synthesized scanning $39*95 
Z meter handheld into a hot Police/ ■■ » MFJ 
Fire/Weather band scanner! 1 1*313 

144-148 MHz handholds 
receive Police/Fire on 154- 
158 MHz with direct fre- 
quency readout Hear 
NOAA maritime coastal 
plus more on 160-164 MHz. 
Converter mounts between 
handheld and rub&er ducky 
Feedthru allows simultaneous 
scanning of both 2 meters 
and PoEice/Fire bands No 
missed calls. Crystal controlled Bypass/Off 
switch allows transmitting (up to 5 watts) Use 
AAA battery. 2V4x1 VtatVz in. BNC connectors 



MFJ VHP 
CONVERTER 



_ihwhi 



/T77 



T< 




NIFJ/BENCHER.KEYER 
COMBO 

MFJ-422 

$109.95 

The best or 
all CW worlds 

a deluxe MFJ Keyer in a compacrC&ntiguration 
mat fits right on the Bencher iambic paddle' 
MFJ Keyer - small in size, big in features Curtis 
8044-B IC, adjustable weight and tone front panel 
volume and speed controls (8-50 WPM) Built- 
in dot-dash memories Speaker, sidelone. and 
push button selection of semi-automatic/tune 
or automatic modes Solid state keying Bencher 
paddle is fully adjustable: heavy steel base with 
non-skid feet Uses 9 V battery or 110 VAC with 
optional adapter. MFJ-1305, 59.95. 

VHF SWR/WATTMETER 

LOW COSt MFJ-B12 $29.95 

VHF SWR/ 

Wattmeter! 

Read SWR 

(14 to 170 MHz) 

and forward/ 

reflected power 

at 2 meters Has 30 and 300 watts scales Also 

read relative field strength 4x2x3 in. 






fW 



• # 



6 



1 KW DUMMY LOAD 

mfj 250 539.95 

Tune up fitl extend 
life of finals, reduce 
OflM! Rated 1KWCW 
or 2KW PEP tor 10 min- 
utes. Halt rating for 20 
minutes, continuous at 
200 W CW, 400 W PEP. 
VSWR under 1 2 to 30 
MHz, 1.5 to 300 MHz 
Oil contains no PCB. 
50 ohm non-inductive resistor Safety vent 
Carrying handle. Vf&ti&A in. 

24/12 HOUR CLOCK/ ID TIMER 

MFJ-IOB 




$19.95 M&^ 




L 



,, 



Switch to 24 
hour UTC or 
12 hour format? 

Battery backup — 

maintains time during power outage. ID timer 
alerts every 9 minutes after reset. Red LED ,6 inch 
digits. Synchronizable with VWW. Alarm with 
snooze function. Minute set, hour set switches. 
Time set switch prevents mis-setting. Power out, 
alarm on indicators. Gray and black cabinet. 5x2* 
3 inches. UO VAC, 60 Hz. 

DUAL JUNABLE SSB/CW/RTTY 

MFJ-752S 599.95 




Dual filter? give unmatched performance? 
The primary filter lets you peak, notch, low 
pass or high pass with extra steep skirts. 
Auxiliary filter gives 70 db notch, 40 Hz peak 
Both filters tune from 300 to 3000 Hz with 
variable bandwidth from 40 Hi to nearly flat. 
Constant output as bandwidth is varied, linear 
frequency control Switchabte noise limitsr for 
impulse noise Simulated stereo sound for CW 
fets ears and mind reject ORM Inputs for 2 rigs 
Bugs into phone jack Two watts for speaker 
Off bypasses filter 9-18 VDC Of 110 VAC with 
optional adapter. MFJ-1312, 19.95 



ORDER ANY PRODUCT FROM MFJ AMD TRY IT HO 
OBLIGATION IF HOT SATISFIED, RETURN WITH- 
IN 30 DAYS FOR PROMPT REFUND (lets shipping). 
• One year uncondltloml guarantee • Made in USA 
■ Add $5.00 each shipping/handling • Cafi or write 
for free catafog. over 100 products. 



84 73 for Radio Amateurs ■ December, 1985 




MFJ ENTERPRISES, INC. 

Box 494, Mississippi State, MS 39762 



TO ORDER OR FOR YOUR NEAREST 
DEALER. CALL TOLL-FREE 

800-647-1800 

Ca?l 601-323-5B69 in Miss, and outside 
continental USA Telex 53-4590 MFJ STKV 







MFJ 24 HOUR 
LCD CLOCKS 

These MFJ 24 hour clocks make 
your DXing, contesting, logging 
afid SKEOlng easier, more precise. 

Read both UTC and local time 
it a glanca with the MFJ-1D6, 
$19,96, dual dock that displays 
24 and 12 hour time simultaneously. 
Or choose the MFJ-107, $9.95 
single clock for 24 hour UTC time 

Botn are mounted in a brushed arumlnum frame, 
feature huge eaiy-to-*ee 5/8 Inch LCD numerals 
and a sloped face that manes reading across-the- 
shack easy arid pleasant 




MFJ-108 

$1(195 



19 



LOCAL 



111 



M HOUR DUAL LCD CLOCK 



MFJ-107 

* $ O 95 




9 



ffff 

MFJ 14 HOUR LCD CLOCK 



MCOf l M* j rsf 






You can i Bad hour, minute, second, month and 
day and operate them in ah alternating time-date 
display mode. You can also synchronize them to 
WWV tor split-second timing. Both are quartz 
controlled for excellent accuracy. 



They are battery operated so you don't have to 
reset them alter a power failure, and battery 
operation makes them suitable lor mobile ahd 
portable use. Long life battery included. 

MFJ-108 Js 4Yix1x2 In. MFJ*! 07 is 2V4x1x2 In. 



RTTY/ASCII/AMTOR/CW mh-iw 
COMPUTER INTERFACE $179.95 



i 
I 



■ ex.,:m- ■..**>'■' ** "' ' : ■ T 



CI 



#««* 




everything you now) li Included for tending and 
receiving RTTY/ASCil/CW on a Commodore 64 
or VIC-20 end your ham rig. You get MFJ's most 
advanced computer interlace, software on tape 
and ail cables . Just plug in arid operate. 

The MFJ-1229 ft a general purpose computer In- 
terface that will never be obsolete. An Interna? 
DIP switch, TTL and RS-232 ports lets you adapt 
the MFJ-1229 to nearly any home computer artd 
even operate AMTOR with appropriate software. 

A crosshair ' 'scope " LED tuning array maltes 
accurate tuning fast, easy and precise. 

You an transmit both narrow {170 Hz} and wide 
(850 Hz) shift while the variable shift tuning lets 
you copy any shift (100-1 000 Hz] and any speed 
(5-100 wpm, 0-300 baud ASCII). 

Automatic threthold correction and sharp multi- 
pole active filters give good copy under severe 
QRM weak signal and selective fading. 

Then't an FM {limiting j modi for easy trouble 
-free tuning that's best for general use and an 
AM (non -limiting} mode that gives superior per- 
formance under wea* signal and heavy QRM. 

A handy Normal/Reverie twitch eliminates re- 
timing while checking for Inverted RTTY. 

An extra charp 800 Hz CW filter really separates 
the signals for excellent copy. 

12 1 /* 1 12'/i x 6 Inchei. Use* floating 18 VDC or 
110 VAC with MFJ-1312, 59,95. 

MFJ PORTABLE ANTENNA 

MFJ'i Porta hie Antenna lets you operate 40, 30. 
20, 18, 15, 12. 10 meters from apartments, motels, 
camp sites, vacation spots, any electrically clear 
location where space for full! size antenna is a 
problem. 

A telescoping whip (extends 54 in,) is mounted 
on self -standing 5W x Wk mY* inch Phenolic 
case Built-in antenna tunerlteld strenght meter. 
50 feet coax. Complete mufl-bafid portaole an- 
tenna system thai you zzn £e nearl y afty wftOT 
300 watts PEP. 




MFJ-1621 

$79.95 



MFJ ANTENNA BRIDGE mrmmb 

Now you can quickly optimize your $79 . 95 
antenna for peak performance with 
thlt portable, totally wif -contained 
antenna bridge that you can take to 
your ahtenna site— no other equip- 
ment Is needed. 

You can determine It your antenna li 
too long or too short, measure Its 
resonant frequency and antenna 
resistance to 500 ohmt. It's the 
easiest and most convenient way to 
determine antenna performance avail- 
able todaV to anyone. There's nothing 
else like it ahd only M FJ ha* it. Built-in resistance 
brilge. null meter and tunable oscillator-driver 
fl.j-30 MHz). Uses 9 V battery. 4x2x2 Inches. 

REMOTE ACTIVE ANTENNA 

The authoritative "World Radio TV Handbook 
rates the MFJ-1024 as "a first-rate easy-to-oper- 
ate active antenna ... Quiet with excellent dy- 
namic range and good gaTn M , Very low noise fac- 
tor ... Broad frequency coverage ... the MFJ- 
102f Is an excellent choice in an active antenna*'. 
54 Inch remote active antenna mounts outdoor 
afca^ from electrical noise for maximum signal and 
minimum noise pickup. Often outperforms long- 
| hundreds of feet long. Mount anywfiere-atop 
i, buildings, baiconies. apartments, ships, 
with any radio to receive strong clear signals 
an over the world. 50 KHz to 30 MHz. High 
dyrlhiic range eliminates Intermediation. Inside 
corwol unit has 20 d 8 attenuator, gain control 
Switch 2 receivers and auxiliary or active 
ahtenna, "On" LEO. 6 x 2 x 5 in. 
50 ft. coax. 12 VDC or 1 10 VAC with 

MFJ-1312. $9.95. 

MFJ-1Q24 

$129.95 
200 WATT VERSA TUNER 

200 watt 

Versa Tuner 

matches coax, 

random wires 

and balanced 

lines from 1 .8 thru 30 MHz. Works with atl solid 

state and tube rigs. Very popular tor use between 

transceiver and final amplifier. Efficient air-wound 

inductor gives more watts out, 4:1 bafun, 5x2x6 in. 



ROLLER INDUCTOR TUNER 




Meet the m von e Ttnioi v ir t to atompact roller 
Inductor tuner that lets you run up to 3 KW PEP 
ahd match everthmg from 1.8 to 30 MHz. 

Designed to match the new smaller rigs, the 
MFJ-9B9 Is the best roller inductor tuner pro- 
duced by MFJ. Our roller inductor tuner features 
a3-dig)t turn counter plus a spinner knob for pre- 
cise inductance control for maximum SWR reduc- 
tion. Just take a look at all these other great fea- 
tures! Built-in 300 watt. 50 ohm dummy load, 
built-in 4:1 balun and a built-in lighted meter that 
reads SWR and forward and reflected power in 2 
rahges (200 ahd 2000 watts). Accuracy +10% full 
scaTe. Meter light requires 12 VDC, 6 position an- 
tenna switch 10V4 x AVz x 15 inches. 

MFJ "DRY" DUMMY LOADS 




MFJ-2K 

$84.95 




MFJ-260 

$26.95 




MFJ's "Dry 11 dummy loads are air cooled— no 
messy oil. Just right for tests and fast tune up, Non- 
inductive 50 ohm resistor in aluminum housing 
with SO-23S. Full load to 30 seconds, de-rating 
curve to 5 minutes. MFJ-2SJ (300 watt). SWR 1/1:1 
to X MHz. 1.5:1 , 30-160 MHz, 2Yzx2Y*x7 in, MFJ- 
262 (1 KW), SWR 1 ,5:1 to 30 MHz. 3x3x13 inches. 

MFJ ELECTRONIC KEYER 



MFJ-407 

$69.95 



MFJ-407 Deluxe Electronic Keytr sends lafnbfc. 
automatic, semi-auto or manual. Use squeeze, 
single lever or straight key. Plus/minus keying. 8 
to 50 WPM. Speed, weight, tone, volume controls. 
On/Off, Tune, Seml-aOto switches. Speaker. RF 
proof. 7x2x6 inches. Uses 9 V battery, 6-9 VDC 
or 110 VAC with AC adapter, MFJ-1305, $9.95. 




ORDER ANY PRODUCT FROM MFJ AND TRY IT-NO 
OBLIGATION. IF NOT SATISFIED, RETURN WITH- 
IN 30 DAYS FOR PROMPT REFUND (less shipping) 

• One year unconditional guarantee * Made in USA 

• Add $5.00 each shipping/handling • CaTI or write 
for free catalog, over 100 products. 





MFJ ENTERPRISES, INC 
Box 494, Mississippi State. MS 39762 



TO ORDER OR FOR YOUR NEAREST 
DEALER. CALL TOLL-FREE 

800-647-1800 

CaD 601-323-5869 in Miss, and outside 
continental USA Telex 53-4590 MFJ STKV 



MM' 





INTERNATIONAL 



Each month, 73 brings you 
ham-radio news from around the 
world* In this collection of re- 
ports from our foreign correspon- 
dents, we present the latest 
news in DX, contests, and events, 
as well as keep you abreast of 
the technical achievements of 
hams in other countries. 

if you would like to contribute 
to your country's column, write 
to your country's correspondent 
or to 73 Magazine, Pine Street, 
Peterborough NH 03458 t USA, 
Attn: Interna tionaf Editor. 



sa^ . 



7i^, 



AUSTRALIA 

J. E Joyce VKBYJ 
44 Wren S freer 
Atlona 3018 
Victoria 
Australia 

VK4 RTTY GROUP 

The South East Queensland Teletype 
Group recently held a seminar In Ihe Com- 
munications Building of I he South Bris- 
bane TAFE College, Ihe main aim being to 
introduce interested amateurs Into the 
RTTY mode of operation, The seminar cov- 
ered most subjects on RTTY from very ba 
sic topics to the writing of the most 
complicated computer programs for HTTY 
and was deemed a greet success by all 
who attended. 

The introduction to the seminar was 
given by the president of the SEQTG, 
Doug VK4A0C, who also lectured on the 
modulatorVdemodUFator requirements and 
design and AM TOR with store and forward 
repeaters. Other subjects covered were: 
computer software for RTTY, Siemens 100 
teleprinters {technical), packet radio, the 
Tefetype™ Models 14 and 15 {practical), 
and modem tuning (practical). 

The SEQTG Is probably the most active 
RTTY group In Queensland iVK4), with a 
large reference library on both mechanical 
and electronic date on RTTY. They also 
have a 2-meter repeater located on Mt 
Cotton (near Brisbane) tor both data and 



voice, plus for RTTY DXers a weekly news 
service transmitted on 7.035 MHz each 
Monday night at 1000 UTa For anybody 
wishing to know about RTTY activities 
within Australia, ) could suggest nobody 
better than the SEQTG. PO Box 164. Fon> 
litffe Valley, Queensland 4006. Australia. 

SOUTH AUSTRAUA— VK5 

The state of South Australia, like Victo- 
ria, is a very young state, considering that 
we as amateurs talk to countries that have 
histories that go bach thousands of years. 
We as Australians are proud of our history, 
however and to us, celebrating 150 years 
of statehood is a big event. 

So, 1986 for VK5 Is a time to celebrate 
statehood, wtth special events starling in 
1966 The official launch of S.A. amateur- 
radio communications took place during 
the week 27th May- 1st June, in support of 
the WIA <SA> iubtlee 150 celebrations. 
The launch was from the Renaissance 
Center in the Bundle Mall, the center of 
Adelaide. 

A week's program of worldwide con> 
muni cations was used lo demonstrate, 
with display material, as many modes of 
communication as possible, including MR 
CW, RTTY. ATV, and satellite. Three oper- 
ating local ions were used: a mobile radio 
van, a radio rental shop's ground-level 
window, and the spacious restaurant on 
the 61 h floor of the Renaissance Center. 
The restaurant has a commanding view of 
the suburbs and the hills overlooking Ade- 
laide and, therefore, is an excellent point 
of contact from which to work. 

The purpose of the activity was to pro- 
mote SA. in advance of S.A.'s Jubiiee 
150th year, to highlight its birthday year, to 
promote activities of worldwide interest, 
and to demonstrate the many facets of the 
hobby of amateur radio. A special-event 
Jubilee 150 callsign was activated, to- 
gether with the propagation, worldwide* of 
a unique QSL card which has been spon- 
sored by the S.A, Department of Tourism, 

The coordinators, on behalf of the WIA 
{S.A,| and SA amateurs, invited VlPs from 
the government, the JubiSee 150 Commit- 
tee, and the Adelaide City Council, to par- 
ticipate In the launch, A special! effort on 
the launch was to link up with Texas, USA. 
S.A.'s sister state. 

A sample of the QSL card and the award 
wilt be made available for publication at a 
later date, and it and a full program of ac- 
tivities will be detailed and published in 
the WIA's Amateur Radio Magazine 




Instructor Rod VK4KAP shows the workings of a model J0O Teieprinter during the SEQTQ 
ttTTY seminar. {"You hit it hem" says florfj 

86 73 for Radio Amateurs • December, 1985 



VK7-TASMANIA 

Tasmania, like most of the eariy settle- 
ments In Australia, started out basically 
as a prison cofony. The prison settlement 
of Port Arthur on the southernmost point 
of Tasmania was the furthest that the En- 
glish couid send their prisoners, using the 
old adage, "out of sight, out of mind/' ap- 
parently. 

The very few who did survive the trip out 
plus Ihe harshness of the penal system 
found a gem of an island in the southern 
ocean that even today, because of its rug- 
ged grandeur, has not been fully explored. 

Tasmania, these days, is the main port 
of call for fuel and provisions fot ail those 
multinational fishing fleets that fish the 
southern ocean; It also IS the main refur- 
bishing port for our VKt stations in Ant- 
arctica. It is one of the main apple and 
potato suppliers to the mainland. That is 
why we call it "The Apple tsie." 

The Tasmanian Devil 

Tasmania is perhaps best known by DX 
award hunters for its Tasmanian Devil's 
Award, which appears to be one of the 
moat sough | after pieces of wallpaper 
available from "down under 

The Tasmanian Devil itself is well de- 
picted m those Watt Disney cartoons as a 
whirlwind f ferocious teeth, with a sour 
disposition. It is said that they can be 
tamed by feeding them with hand-held 
pieces of chocolate— if you are not fright- 
ened of losing your hand. Of course? 

There are approximately 500 licensed 
amateurs within Tasmania. Of these, only 
150 would be active on HF, so the latest 
QSL card figures I have for 1964 of around 
11.015 Inwards, and 7,672 outwards Is 
equal lo 51 cards each, outwards, so ex- 
cept for a few keen DX operators, they are 
not very active. This makes the above 
award a little harder lo get, but it 1$ well 
worth the extra effort. 

Broadcasts 

There is a local Sunday WIA news 
broadcast on 7,130 MHz (or Saturday at 
2330 UTC) for those si at Ions wanting to 
check band conditions or get more Tasaie 
Devil contacts. There also Is a nel running 
for the Sunday broadcast Info on Saturday 
at OB30 UTC on 3 570 that la worth checking. 

RTTY 

RTTY activity from the north coast of 
Tasmania has Increased lately, courtesy 
of VK7NW. The main operating time is 
1000 UTC on 3,625 MHz. For those inter* 
est ed in RTTY, other UTC broadcast times 
from VK3 are : 

3.545 0030 VK2HL (Hcrst) 

7045 0030 VK2DPM (Alan) 

14.095 0030 VK2QAY (Rod) 

21,095 0130 VK2AJP (Joe) 

Repeal an 

Tasmania, being very mountainous 
compared with the rest of Australia, has, 
over its small area, four repeaters on 2 -me* 
ter FM and f Out on 70 cm. and it i$ not un~ 
usual for the VK7 operators to access the 
VK3 or VK5 2-meter repeaters across the 
300 to 500 miles of ocean between us Hi- 
red contact on 2-meier S$B is also quite 
common, without large beams or power. 
To highlight this, the following appea/ed 
in "QRM " (the Tasmanian Drviston o! the 
WIA's newsletter) It is reprinted with the 
permission of editor John VK7JK. 
FRUS TRATION SECTION 

With great aspirations for some expert- 
menial DX operating. Alan VK7ZAR and 
Greg VK7KJ set out at the stan of a week- 
end in early January (al the height of sum- 
mer] and headed off m the direction of Ben 
Lomond . 5,000 feet up. They were carrying 
a toad of equipment covering from 6 me- 
ters to 1296 MHi and had set up HF links 



prior to their departure. Bui on their ar- 
rival, what did they find? It was browing a 
gale and temperatures were down to treez 
ing. Conditions, as Greg says, "were VKft" — 
visibility nil and, with those windspeeds, 
no antennas either! Mike VK7ZWW had 
the key to the ski lodge, but where was 
he?? David VK7ZCTT was a 1296 contact, 
but later on Saturday morning they had to 
cancel everything. To cap this story, on 
Saturday evening, Andy VK7ZAY in Ho- 
barf, heard a ZL calling on 144.1 $$S" 
After travelling 600 km for nothing, that 
reaily was the end. 

GreflVK7KJ 

VK7Ry r s SOUND AQVtCE 
If she *ants a date— METER . If she 
wants an escott— CONDUCTOR . it she 
wants chocolate— FEEDER If she's a 
poor cook— DISCHARGE R. . . if she eats 
too much — REDUCER if she is 
wrong — RECTI R ER . If her views an? too 
narrow- AM PURER. If she wants too 
much— RESISTOR. . . If she wants lo 
marry you— ELIMINATOR - If she's a 
heathen— CON V EMTO R If she comes 
lo your home— RECEIVER If she It 
mi ssiny— DETECTOR If she won't go 
away— TRANSMITTER, . . tf her stays ere 
too tight— LOOSE COUPLER. If she s 
too fat— WOBBULAT0R- 

VK7 Convention 

in June, a special convention was held 
to help celebrate the WIA's 75th birthday 
This convention was held in the Montrose 
Bay Yacht Club overlooking the beautiful 
Derwent River, it was special because 
never before had there been so many and 
so diverse events and exhibitors gathered 
in one place in Tasmania. 

They had. fur instance, a reenactment 
of the first spark transmission and talks 
by VK7AW on computer-aided design of 
loaded dlpoles and vertical antennas, 
VK7ZPK gave a lecture on I rack ing ama- 
teur sal el I ites by computer, while VK7ZAR 
talked about setting up a satellite sia 
lion— the equipment required and how to 
work same. 

There was a iarge amount of home-brew 
gear; the best crafted of this equipment 
was entered for the Max Loveless award 
(see below). 

Department of Communications repre- 
sentatives were in attendance wilh all 
their technical expertise, plus state-of-the- 
art test equipment, to lest ffree of charge) 
any amateur's equipment as to its transmis- 
sion or reception specifications If either was 
found lack i n g , friend; y adv Ice was given as to 
the best way to solve the problem. 

In all, a very successful convention, fin- 
ished off with a gala dinner at the JHobart 
Masonic Club. 

Winnie the War Winner 

Max Loveless VK7ML, a former State 
Councillor of the Tasmanian Division of 
the WIA, died in April. 1d71. Max as well 
as being an active amateur, spent a life- 
time In "rear' wireless communications. 
He played with the newfangled gadget ry 
of the early 30s, worked for the ABC In 
Hobart prior lo World War II, and spent 
lime in the AIF on Timor during the early 
dark days of that conflict 

It was there that he buitt "Winnie the 
War Winner.' the radio transmitter con- 
structed on kerosene tins and butli up of 
recovered domestic radio equipment, cap- 
lured Japanese apparatus, and the re- 
mains of a low-power Australian wireless 
set Until tfte successful contact with Dar- 
win on this apparatus, using a Morse key 
made from bamboo/,! i, the 200-odd Austra 
iian Army personnel who had been left on 
Timor were thought to he either killed or 
POW They had lived off the land for a 

Continued on page 94 



va 






m 

m 
m 

Sir 




**i 



." 



ii] 



••j 




For the best buys in town 

21 2-925-7000 

Los Precios Mas Bajos en 
Nueva York 




KITTY SAYS: WE ARE NOW OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK. 

Saturday & Sunday 10 to 5 P.M. 

Monday-Friday 9 to 6:30 PM Thurs. to 8 PM 
Come to Barry's for the best buys in town, 

ONV Safety 
belts-in stock 




— '-*r 1ST T# " 



1C— R71 A, 751, 745, 27A/H, 37 A, 47A P R-7000, 
127A, 271A/H, 3200A, 471A/H 1 735 



KENWOOD 



SSI 








m 

K 

X 

m 



Santa Kitty says. 

"Seasons Greetings to AH" 

Antennas 

A-S 

Cusncraft 
Hustler 
KLM 

METZ 
Mini-Products 

Mosley 

R-600, R-1000, R-2000, TS-940S/AT 
TS 430S.TR-3600A, TR 7950, 
TW4000A. Kenwood Service/Repair, 
TH21/3t/41AT t TM-211A/ 
411A4TS711AWI1A 

COMPU-RRE EXTINGUISHERS 
EXL-5OO0E RTTltWMTOfl TERMINAL 



1 T 



mssy 

FT-ONE. FT-98CL FT-757GX , FRG-88QG 
FT-726R. FRG-9600, FT-270RH t FT-2700RH 
YAESU ICOM 

FTT/2/7G3R IC2AT 
FT-2/709R/H IC02AT- 
FTC-1903 IC-04AT 

I 



Lind Mobilt NfT 
Midfand.' Standard 
Wilton Maxon 
jflMU FTC-2203. FT 4703 

(com IC M12 (MiHnil M700 
Tempo M-1 




VoCom/Mirage/Daiwa 
Tokyo Hy-Powef 
Amplifiers & 
S/8XHTGain 
Antennas iN STOCK 




SMART PATCH 
CES -Simple* Auiopater* 5trj SA WiH Pate* PM 
Transceiver To You* TeJeohone Great For 
Tetepnone Caus From Mobile To Base Simple 
To Use S3 19 95 

PRIVATE PATCH Hi in stock 
CELLULAR 'PHONES STOCKED 
FLUKE 77 Multimeter 



A Unco 
Power Supplies 




Nye MBV-A 3 Kilowatt Tuner 



AMERITRON AMPLIFIER AUTHORIZED DEALER 



3BS 



£ 





Yaesu FTR 2410, Wilson 
ICOM IC-RP 3010 (440 MHz) hi 
ICOM IC-RP 1210 {1,2 GHz) 



SANTEC 
ST222/UP 

ST-2QT 
ST-442/UP 




*■ 



,#* 



46 Watts, $68 



Soldering 
Station, 



II 



Si 



■» 



M 



JBC soldering line in stock 

MiCROLOG-AjR i h Air Disk, 
SWL, Morse Coach 

KANTRONICS 
UTU interface II, 
Challenger Packet Comm. 

EIMAC I 

3-5002 
572B, 6JS6C 
12BY7A & 
4-400A 



Computer Interfaces 

stocked: MFJ- 1224 

AEA CM, PKT1, DR.DX 
CP 100, PK-04, Or, QSO, 

Morse University 



I* 



MFJ Models 

422,313,124 4 9410 



»*.* 



1 1 



ALPHA AMPLIFIERS 



AEA144MHZ 
AEA 220 MHz 
AEA 440 Mhz 
ANTENNAS 




BIRD 
Wattmeters & 
Elements fei 
In Stock 



! ^> 




Complete Butternut Antenna 
Inventory In Stock? 



DIGITAL FREQUENCY COUNTERS 
tnonjr« Pro Com E ^meeting' 

Model TR-1O0O O-lGffc 1300HH 

(M00MHT 0-13GHi 1296HH 

Long-range Wireless 
Telephone for etporl in stoc^ 



BENCHER PADDLES, 

BALUNS, AUDIO FILTERS, 

IN STOCK 



MIRAGE AMPLIFIERS 
ASTRON POWER SUPPLIES 
Sax ton Wire & Cable 




MURCH 
Model 

2000 A, 
A-LS, B 
in stock 



HEIL 

EQUIPMENT 
IN STOCK 



Tn E* Towers 

■■^ 

Hy-Galn Towers 

& Antennas, and 
Rolers will be 
Shipped direel to 
you FREE of , 
shipping, cost 



New TEN TEC 
2591 HT, Corsair II, Argosy 11, Century 22 



- m 



MAIL ALL ORDERS TO BARRY ELECTRONICS CORP., 512 BROADWAY, NEW YORK CITY, NY 10012 



m 



New York City's 



LARGEST STOCKING HAM DEALER 
COMPLETE REPAIR LAB ON PREMISES 



&' 



"Aqui S* Habla Espanol" 

BARRY INTERNATIONAL TELEX 12-7670 
MERCHANDISE TAKEN ON CONSIGNMENT 
FOR TOP PRICES 

Monday-Friday 9 A. M. to 6:30 P.M. Thursday To 8 PM. 
Saturday & Sunday 10 A.M. to 5 P.M. (Free Parking! 

AUTHORIZED DISTS MCKAY DYMEK FOR 
SHORTWAVE ANTENNAS & RECEIVERS 

IRT/LEX -"Spring St Station p 
Subways: BMT "Prince St. Slation" 

IND "F" Train Bwy. Station* 

Bus: Broadway #6 to Spring St, 

Path— 9th SUSIh Are. Stilton. 

Kg £S ;# SB15B f 3B r 3?3B'S5 25 25 y£ *&WK\ 






Commercial Equipment 
Stocked: ICOM, MAXON, 
Midland. Standard. Wil 
son. Yaesu We serve 
municipalities, busi- 
nesses, Civil Defense, 
etc. Portables, mobiles, 
bases, repealers 



We Stock: AEA T ARRL, Alpha. Ameco, Antenna Specialists, Astatic, 
Astron, B & K, B & W\ Bash, Bencher, Bird, Butternut, COE, CES. Collins^ 
Communications Spec. Connectors, Covercrait, Cushcratt, 
Datwa, Denlron. Dtgimax k Drake. ETO (Alpha), Eimac. Encomm, Heil- 
Sound, Henry, Hustler (Newlronics), Hy-Gain, \zom, KLM. Kantronies. 
Larsen. MCM fDaiwa), MFJ, J.W. Miller. MintPro-ducts, Mirage. 
Newtronics, Nye Viking. Palomar. RF Products, Radio Amateur Callbook. 
Robot Rockwell Collins. Saxton T Shure T Telex. Tempo. Ten-Tec. 
Tokyo Hi Power, Trionyx TUBES, W2AU, Waber, Wilson, Yaesu Ham and 
Commercial Radios, Vocom* Vibroptex, Curtis, Tri-Ex, Wacom Duptexers. 
Repeaters, Phelps Dodge. Fanon Iniercoms. Scanners. Crystals . Radio 

Publications. 



Sir 




WE NOW STOCK COMMERCIAL COMMUNICATIONS SYSTEMS 
DEALER INOUfRIES INVITED. PHONE IN YOUR ORDER & BE REIMBURSED 
COMMERCIAL RADIOS stookfrd A **rvlc*d on pr»ml*H. 

Amateur Radio Courses Given On Our Premises, Call 

Export Orders Shipped Immediately. TELEX 12-7670 





A 1.5 KW output HF linear amplifier built to last a lifetime. 



• Full legal output of 1,5 KW 

• Uses two 3CX800A7 Eimac triodes 

• All Amateur HF band coverage 1.8-23 
MHz (easy modification for 28MHz and 
authorized WARC bands) 

• Ten element bargraph of peak power 

• Separate plate current meter 

• Metered plate voltage, grid current* 
forward and reverse power 

• Plate dissipation: 1600 watts 

• Drive required 65-100 watts 

• Automatic level control 

• AMTOR compatable 



• Full breaks (QSK) 

• Overdrive indicator 

• Compact, matches modern transceivers 

• Separate power supply for easy station 
layout 

• Four status indicators 

• High efficiency, tape wound transformer 

• Tilt-up bail 

• One year warranty 

• UPS Shippable 

• Made in USA 



A lifetime investment in SUPER COMMUNICATION. The TITAN 425 Linear Amplifier delivers 
the full new legal power limit of 1500 watts PEP ssb output and 1500 watts of full break-in power for 

QSK cw, or AMTOR. This cool running dependable design delivers the punch to be heard under any 
band condition. And it is brought to you by the leading American supplier of hf Amateur equipment 
with the same kind of reliability you've come to expect from TEN-TEC gear. 



Commercial version available on special order. 

$100.00 CASH BACK 
With TITAN Purchase 



SEE YOUR DEALER OR WRITE 



inn 



TEN -TEC. lit 

UV1ERYIUE, TENNESSEE 31H2 



Give The Gift 
That Arrives 
With 
Frequency 



This Year, 

Make It A Gift Subscription To 73 

It relays valuable information, has a built-in repeater, and will bnng joy to 
every ham on your gift list. It's a subscription to 73 for Radio Amateurs 

, . .the perfect present for year-round enjoyment. 

When you send someone 73, you're sending more than just a great maga- 
zine with great articles. Every month, 73 is also: 

A valuable and reliable source for new equipment information. 

A storehouse of dart-yourself weekend gadgets and complex projects. 

A complete catalog of hobby equipment— everything from satellite sys- 
tems to microcomputer interfaces. 

This is the year to send your favorite ham a message worth receiving. Send 
a year of 73 for just $19.97—12 issues at 33% off the newsstand price! To 
order, simply return the coupon, or call 1-800-258-5473, (In NH, dial 1-924- 
9471.) 




JL Hi 9 1 I Want To Give A Great Gift This Year, please send a 73 grit subscription 

to the person named betow. I'll pay $19 97 for 12 issues—a 33% savings— but I won't be billed until after the 
holidays. 

□ Payment Enclosed □ Bill Me 

Please rnake checks payable to 73 



Gift Reaper* 



My Name 



Address 



Address 



Crry Stele Zip Oty S^e 2 p 

Canada A Me*coS£237. 1 year crty US luncfe cra/*> en US bar* fcwv&i Sut&e S&37 r year ortv US trcte efrawn en U5 bark Fbregn tamai. oteas* rt|u*e 
G* aut»cc*crB begin ™& fre fcsi wmfrrfr issue of T9B6 

CW Communications/Petert)orough • PO Box 931 • Farmingdale, NY 11737 



65DR6 



The RF Wattmeter Model 81 000- A from Coaxial Dynamics, Inc. 
does more than provide accurate rt measurements. Testing of 
transmission lines, antennas, connectors, Alters and related 
components can reveal unknown problems and assure 
optimum equipment performance. 

The 81000-AK Wattkit features this easy-to-read RF 
Wattmeter (pictured here), with its optional carrying case and 

, an array of elements and 
I accessories, Coaxial 
Dynamics elements can he 
purchased separately for 
use in other manufac- 
turer's Wattmeters. For 
more information on the 
81000-A Wattmeter or any 
of the complete line of 
Coaxial Dynamics RF 
products and OEM com* 
ponents please contact 
Coaxial Dynamics, Inc. 












SPECIAL ELEMENTS 
AVAILABLE FOR 

CELLULAR RADIO 



COAXIAL 
DYNAMICS, INC. 

15210 Internal tetany. Ckwiand. OH 44135 • (216) 267-2233 
Outside Onto, WATS: (BOO) Cental, lefts; 980-630 






here is the next generation Repeater 



MARK 4CR 



The only repeaters and controllers 
with REAL SPEECH! 



No other repeaters or controllers match 
Mark 4 in capability and features- That's 
why Mark 4 is the performance leader at 
amateur and commercial repeater sites 
around the world. Only Mark 4 gives you 
Message Master tm real speech • voice 
readout of received signal strength, 
deviation, and frequency error • 4- 
channel receiver voting • clock time 
announcements and function control • 7- 
helical filter receiver • extensive phone 
patch functions, Untike others, Mark 4 
even includes power supply and a 
handsome cabinet. 



Create messages just by talking. Speak any phrases or 
words in any languages or dialect and your own voice 
is stored instantly in solid-state memory. Perfect for 
emergency warnings, club news bulletins, and DX 
alerts. Create unique ID and tail messages, and the 
ultimate in a real speech user mailbox — only with a 
Mark 4. 



***<***)& 



Call or write for specifications on the 
repeater, controller, and receiver winners. 



"-+ r- 



iiiiiS 



— * 



MICRO CONTROL SPECIALTIES 

Division of Kendecom Inc. 
23 Elm Park. Groveland, MA 01834 (617) 372-3442 



90 73 for Radio Amateurs • December, 1985 




the 

HAM STATION 

P.O. Box 4405 
220 N. Fulton Ave. 

Evansville, IN 47710 

Stores Hours 
MQN-FRI 9AM ■ 6PM 

WARRANTY SERVICE CENTER FOR 
(COM YAESU. TEH TEC 

Terms: 

Prices Do Not Include Shipping. 

Price and Availability Subject to 
Change Without Notice 
UPS COD *2,*° Per Package 



m 

ATU-WSupwb interface 
CM 00 Ddwti <niHace 
CF .: inurim 
MP-' Mc'ppeich 
MBA. ^Ofl Solwrp 
W-OtW 050 

mm 

ALftiO 

\ «4£ V-; 

ALPHA DELTA 

T rvwtt apt & Power S t r tps » n si acfc 

AMERfTflON 

Ampii r.orB & Remote Switches 

AKTDftU IKQAUSTS <AVJUfTf> 
A?'53jG2U*Gift» 

AP20C 3G 220 M*2 3* &*£ 
AftBr3G4QMHZ 

AMS6iG*KMH£ 

ARRL 

Books A Publications in stock 

AtlHOM 
R5?a W Amrj 
RSt9A7^1Q>Amp 

2A H2 Amp 
RS2QA |#8 Jpaj 

RS20U ! fr# *-? i 
RS3WIW&** 

*SJ5M30=A-S 
ft&iCA 3- 52 Anc 
R$50VP*MAe* 



ZA'iBten 



J1IQQ00 
CAlL 

tag 95 

[£3.33 

85 00/7300 
CAU 

CAU 
Ceil 

38 K 
34 90 

JfiK 

>., . . Call 

S 49DG 

59 DO 

09 00 

IB 00 

1®0C 

'3500 

'490C 

'HDD 

225 QC 



&US4 

an 



WTTlflKIT 




MF4BK i5 -iiSltr 


siftx 


Hf 39 Bunr*y Bw" 


17»J§ 


12 M 


20130 


HF6V flO-IDM Varticlc 


11995 


TBR-i^DS iMMABasQiaio f 


4900 


FIMKI flswi Moun Ki| 


49.00 


SIR- is Radial kh 


2900 


*F 2V 80 *t»M Vemca 


• 


JMCVmflArtZM Vance" 


5590 


50 3M0 JD-5*2MH2 Swmw Art 


55 IB 



3?frt« S0-1QM F»5kJ Dart 

AT "0 $ Be* T^o to* 

AT £ * Sit 'ie DipCK 

&ti Sa*m *C Accesses « sloe* 



7100 
5800 

CM! 



MERRY CHRISTMAS from Dan, Sandi, Laura, Rick, 

Mark, Steve, Russ, and "The Q". 



COeJCCT PTTBB 
atfenii 



CUSHOUP 

MULTI-BAND 

A3 

M 

R3 Moiev Tuned veri 

VHF-UHF 

J15WS ZM Wd« Band 

30WBSt»M215i 

3Z-19 Bqow *»ElI 2M 

AttM 

A44H 

AM9-11 

Rjopftingr?M6W22G4SQ 

AO 5 ' -*e*jo* 



Mm 

C<a&:4€0MH2 

CN5<0 5frF*MiH: 

CN550 f 4*250 MHZ 

CNG2Q6 i *T5dMHZ 

CN63Q T46450MMZ 

CN720B Same As CNfifte.ailargir Meier 

CS401 4 Pas SwiKJi 

CS201 J Pos Swittft 



3S95 



1215 00 
279 00 
27900 

79 00 

219 00 

9500 

32 as 

31 oc 

44 00 



6300 
7200 

ei oo 

nO 00 

130.00 

CALL 

B2GG 

£300 



SlKDK 




MAI 

Canputir intrliCM 1 Ded<a(«i Tennnafi 

m 

Pradiicts n Slack 

All AnjlBUf Anlinnji* nn Sinck 

HT-&AIH 

*H7D)tS 7£l TfiturW 
ElOlOf* U 3£L Tnftifldtr 

!§hts kkiom vandal 

?ftftYTWS»<aM Wc*> 
•4AVffWB5 4&'0«^nci 
i» Be#**S*oi 
V3S V3S v*S » r-cao K to 



CALL 

CALL 

S47B00 
32900 
435 0C 

is« 

DMA 
DAU 





ICOM 




7&1 Top Of foe Ml 

74S G*ri Cow 

735 Ftf!aSl£ N** Xw 

S'!A WoriC C-ttts Recem*! 

fl-7OO0 uitimele Scarmar 
4 Nt* 1 2GHZ 6tSt ft tg 
i7lH43(M50W2Ai)lnM 

271AS71H 211 Afeiotit 

47A 4404^2 ItoDH 

PA aflHMZ woei 



$1179 00 

769 00 

CALL 

C*ll 

CAU 
CALL 



»7«9?5 
3B9f£ 

CAa 



ntfTH 2M 25W I *£« MctMS 

3AT«AT220«*K 

2AT3IHT 

02AT2IAT HT 
04AT 440 MHZ H | 
32QC Duattantf MoDiic 
Dull Banc Anwnas «n Stoch 



s 22915 
199% 

I'M gc 

4269.96 
CALL 
CAU 



Sv«f Hugt inv»mo^ ol Acc«sc"i« 4 Rates 



UWTBOMCS 




^fl 



U TirSt 304AJ T»RMtf y« 

nartKtt0M«««4ct 

i»9 ^m e g) ot ScAwi I Pic T»n 

KLIf 

3K-14C 2U Otuiar Am 

2M-22C 2M C-rcuia? Anr 

2M-T6LBX JM Anl 

435-1 8Cw«S2 

435-40CX Cifcula- Anl 

Many More Antennas '" Sioch 

URSEN 

NLA ' 50.22Di*ft MAG Mnt 

NLA 2m DuaJ Sine MAG tf ii Am 



'2airttriac»/^wSo**»'f 

tE28rteHce*»f Soften 

WC 300* WiTi^r »t) uafl 

94iC jCC *.*JI keVi Nre 

B4 Aflfevd &Ugt 

42 <.*tv arx** 1 O»oc 
tCHOuftiCtoch 

MICROLOG 
Products in slock 

MMOI 

Bin 15 iDVI^OW-Praemp 

B3016WBOW-^Miflfl 
S?3A ZfaOW-Prsamp 
0*fll0r* IC'iOOW 430^150 MHZ 

•ftf 

MfrV^ Tne Ljumatt Tjii## 

RADIO AMATEUR CALLBOOK 
19S6 North Ampncen C*Mboc* 
1986 hrdsmaliofUil C«J4Doo)t ........ 



Ed 



CAU 
SI79C 

CAU 
22595 

CAU 

I 86 00 

1»00 
10500 

'2000 
11995 

CALL 

% 4295 
5995 

HA* 

fiOO 

anas 

T3&D0 

mm 

n% 

^-: 
* 19.94 



. Ceil 

524995 
2W95 

399 IS 



S49995 



*219!> 



TEN -TEC 

sascArflt»r sa« 

25'0 S4l|Mt Sim MTi.Op 

259i am mT 2S935 

23 2KW - unr $269.96 

4229 3KW TuW KK $19995 

Largt Stock pi Ten T« Products CALL 

TOKYO Ht-FOWEfl 

HL»V3-30WAmp $ 6295 

HL30V 3-30W Amp 7500 

HL1WV3 ifrieCW Amp 29595 

HLiawzsasieowA-np 25995 

hl^A»449MHZ3-2WAfflp 10595 

^l2DU*3(WJ9M.iZ 1 >'(»ftA.iC S329J5 

H&JOtt 2KW T W 29635 

<400i-^r«!tAaiNeiAMr SIS 

t*U2 2 1* Ctfe: ftee^ mnt mourn -995 

hAA7^ CM Gas* ?»!»*•««« ™*ni lt|9S 

MU 

S* 5 22C ^22C" Wn2 *«* Mr MI95 

SP230 t»-t» WZtolfttr ±r. 

S^4» 1*525 MHZ Pft*Mt w» 

[Xj Sm Bw Annma :^- 

CTl^OuroirU^lXrSOOMHZ S120Q 

CTT5H Sam* as above tut «fH£ttfl ?1 00 

OF73S Mobil* OupleJcer 2995 

OP-ED 77D-E Dual Band Anienna 3995 

DP-SPM Mag Mm tor above Antenna 24 95 

urge Slock ol All SWR & Pome- Mffftm CALL 



SAAfTfC 

ST » r Nee S^jro- 






MiOtUoZDefilk 



CAU 
SS500 



TEN-TEC 




Nr< & Caw. 



CAU 

CAU 





FRO 9600 60-905 MHfc Scannai 

FRG8800 Hf Comnmncabons Rcvr 

FTTiTGK Owi £> tor 
f P757HD HBfl^ Duty Power Suppy 
FC757AT Atflo Ant. Tuner 
MMB-20 Mounting Backei \v 757GX 
FT72Sfl Tri Banfl Kcv- 
FT726P MoOjIbs m StOCk 
M0-1B6 Devi Mc 
FTa»ftH2MMT 5W 
RTTOft 4JW 2M Mq&« fte* fTS-l 
rfjm RH Duaf Bml Mot* Fut FTS4 
Vtfj Lege Stooi of RtootiM 
Cai^Dmei 

MTATOAI 
U-nO 
HQ73 

DIM 

-yGenOMS 
HyGwiH«n4 
HyGen T2X 
HfOnn HDR300 
KnvPiQ KR500 
KirvPrO KR.540OA 
Kin-Pro I K.R-W00A 



COLLECTOR'S ITEMS 

i960 Ham Station Calendft* 

II Cap w»in Ham Si at on logo 



CAU | 

CAU 

1425 M 

CALL 

17500 

23500 

-Z4 0O 

CALL 

CAU 

tff» 

as as, 

CAU 

>__ 



|4§9S 

$109 95 1 
Cel^P^a 
CAU 
CAU I 
CAU 
CAUl 
T 55 001 
I2fi0.0O| 
$324.00 



ST30 
14 99 



S«nd SASE for our new & 
used equipment list. 




E55 





AMEX, MC, VISA & C.O.D.s WELCOME- FREIGHT FOB EVANSVILLE 



For Orders and Price Checks Call 800-523-7731 



Indiana call 1-812-422-0231 
Service Dept. 1-812-422-0252 




I convinced my club to buy a repeater controller 
from ACC and I'm glad I did. 

The group I belong to was looking to upgrade our system 
and I was the one asked to investigate. Of course, we've 
always been the best in our area but we needed more. 
We needed a system that was reliable, easy to interlace, 
cost-effective, and something that would free-up the tech- 
nical committee for more interesting projects than just 
keeping the equipment running. 

Everyone in the club put a few bucks into the pot and 
it was ours! 

We really use the features [ike the scheduler, remote 
programming (from an HT, over the phone, or via a com* 
puter terminal), informative voice messages and courtesy 
tones, telemetry, remote bases, and the most sophisticat- 
ed autopatch ever designed for amateur use. 

Of course, the controller is state-of-the-art, commercial 
quality, and built to last. Workmanship so solid even the 
military uses them. 

What impressed me even more, though, is the support 
we get from the staff at ACC — both before and after 
the sale. And they protect our investment through simple 
plug-in software upgrades., .new features and capabili- 
ties that keep our club on top. 

t feel good about recommending the Advanced Computer 
Controls line of repeater controllers. After all, it's my club's 
money that was spent and my reputation that was on 
the line. 

Call or write lor detailed specifications on the RC-850 and RC-85 
Repeater Controllers. 



advanced 
computer 
controls, inc. 



10016 Northridge Square * Cupertino, CA 95014 (408) 749-8330 

92 73 tor Radio Amateurs • December. 1986 




New for 

KENWOOD TH-21A, 31A. 41A 
a Fastcharger by 

Charge-Rite 

safely charges in 15 minutes 





INTRODUCTORY 
PRICE 

$54.95 

+ $ ■" hlppln urjdlmg 



Features: 



* Charges In 15 minutes 

* Constant Current 

* Automatic Voltage cut-off 

* Battery doesn't heat -up 



* 12v-14vdr input 

* Charge from any point in 
discharge cycle without 
developing "memory" 

* Proven in daik use 



Optional AC adapter tilth DC and mobile COflffl 

available S 19.95. 



Charge-Rite 

P.O. Box 4175, Vero Beach, FL 32964 (305) 234-4448 



Pau* WB4WIG 
Dr "S" WA4DRV 




QSL OF THE MONTH 

To enter your QSL mail it in an envelope to 73, 30 Pine Street Pelecbofougn NH 03458 
Attn: QSL of tne Month Winners receive a one-year subscription (of extension) to ?3. Entries 
not in envelopes cannot be accepted. 




AM HELP 



I'd like to get in touch with anyone Inter- 
ested In starting a rag-chew net on 6-meter 
FM simplex in San Diego County and be- 
yond. 

B. Kirscnner WBIVCQ 

266 Cartssfl Drive 

Sen Louis Ray CA 82056-1 745 



I need a schematic and any other Infor- 
mation for a Hall icr afters S40A receiver. I 
win gladly pay copying and postal 
charges. 

G. Samkofsky N4ZB 

1420 Mount Vernon Drive 

Holiday FL 33590 



« 



Kantronics out SMARTS 

the competition 



Presenting three Intelligent, versatile, 
compatible terminal units. 



W 



"SMART" means an internal microprocessor is used 
to improve performance and add versatility. The 
"Smart" Kantronics TU's can transmit and receive 
CW/RTTY/ASCII/AMTOR or Packet when 
combined with your computer and transceiver. 

Any computer with a serial RS232 or TTL 
port can connect directly to a Kantronics TU. 
A simple terminal program, like one used with a 
telephone modem, is the only additional program 
required. Kantronics currently offers Pac- 
term and UTU Terminal Programs for 
IBM, Kaypro, Commodore 64, VIC 20, and 
TRS-80 Models III, IV, and IVP. Disk 
version $19.95. Cartridge $24.95. 

UTU The Universal Terminal unit (UTU) 
is the original "Smart" amateur TU. 
CW, RTTY, ASCII, and AMTOR can all 
be worked with this single unit. 
Switched capacitance fitters and 
LED display tuning make using the 
UTU easy for even the Novice. 12 
Vdc 300mv power supply required. 
Suggested retail $199.95. 

UTU-XT The UTU-XT is an enhanced 
version of the UTU. Programmable baud 
rates, tone frequencies, and tone shifts give 
special versatility. Automatic Gain Control and 
Threshold Correction circuits greatly enhance 
sensitivity and selectivity. A RTTY signal 
detect circuit mutes copy with no carrier, and 
the CW filter center frequency and bandwidth 
are programmable. Power supply is provided. 
Suggested retail $359.95. 






Packet Communicator Kantronics 
joined the Packet Radio revolution with the 
Packet Communicator. The unit is an AX.25/ 
Vancouver compatible TNC with features not 
found in other units, including Direct TTL 
connection for easy hookup to the VIC-20 and 
Commodore 64. With our onboard modem 
you can select either Bell 202 or 1 03 tones for 
VHF/UHF or HF work. Power supply is pro- 
vided. Suggested retail $219,00. 






For more information contact your I 
Kantronics dealer or write: 

? Kantronics 

1202 E. 23rd Street 1913) 842-7745 
- ■ Lawrence, Kansas 66046 



i 




INTERNATIONAL 



from page 86 

number of months and kepi 1 5.000 Japa- 
nese troops occupied, »rho could otfief- 
wise have been moving )mo northwest 
Australia J, Wfnnte" is now preserved in 
lha Australian War Museum in Canberra. 

Plgn»r Memorial Collection 

Not many amateurs nave the honor of 
an award (or r in this case, a collection) 
named after them, but the Max Loveless 
Pioneer Memorial Collection was created 
by the Tasmanian Branch of the Telecom 
Technicians' Union (ATEA) to honor a per- 
son who used his sit 1 1 is in amateur radio 
not only to help other amateurs Out also 
his country in a time of need Tne follow- 
ing Is an excerpt from meir impressive 
promotional literature 
"Th* Tasmanran Branch of ihe Telecom 
Technicians 1 Union {ATEA} has decided to 
honour Max's name and the memory of all 
those people who have been engaged, by 
vocation or pastime, in the pioneer days of 
communications, The endeavours of these 
pioneers have brought us to the current state 
of theart which we now all enjoy,'* 
"H la Intended that a colled Ion of valve- 
era equipment will be gradually assem- 
bled, restored to working order, and made 
available for public display Hopefully, the 
whole collection will be able to be eventu- 
ally placed in a permanent formal mu- 
seum environment, maybe through the co- 
operative efforts of established authori- 
ties In the area. It is not intended that this 
collection should compete m any way with 
existing endeavors by other public Of pri- 
vate initiatives, rather, we would see our 
efforts as being complementary to exist- 
ing endeavours by both public and private 
collectors. We think ihe preservation of 
■dual 'communication' equipment, as dis- 
tinct from telephone/exchangs/telegraphy 
and domestic wireless, has been largely ne- 
g I acted. We a I m to ass I st i n f i 1 1 1 ng that gap. 4 ' 

Obviously, if the collection Is to get under 
way successfully, apparatus Is required. In 
particular, the following items are eagerly 
sought {some limited funds are available for 
the purchase of such equipment): 

• Old ex-service gear: In particular, we 
would like to get hold of an RiOt or an 
R1D9 set (these were actually in use on Ti- 
mor and would be fundamental to the col- 
lection), no. 22, no 19. HRO, AFL8. ATS, 
AR88 028 B40. and similar apparatus. 

• Home-brew apparatus of all types which may 
have been discarded in intervening years. 

Should you feel able to assist us m this 
most worthwhile venture, please contact 
me by telephone In Hobart, 002 286 351. or 
perhaps write to: Barry Rlseley, Branch 
Secretary. ATEA, GPO Box 215c, Hobart. 
Tasmania. Australia, 






LIBERIA 

Brother Donanf Stef fes. CSC 

EL2AUWB8HFY 

Brother* of tfte Hofy Cross 

Sr Patrick High Softool 

POBox 1005 

Monrovia 

Republic pt Liberia 

Moses EL2BS is on the alrt He may be 
found up and down the 20-meter band call- 



ing CO and cheerfully picking up anyone 
who would like a Uberian contact, Moses 
operates a Drake TR-4C into a Mosley TA* 
33 through one hundred and fifty feet of 
hgliax. 

So what Is there to get excited 
about? WeM, a couple of things, Moses Is 
a young Llbenan. He is a student at the 
University of Liberia. He came to us ask- 
ing, "What la ham radio?" Now, having fin 
Ished our radio course with gusto and 
holding his own call, he has no radio and 
little likelihood of getting one. 

We knew that this was going to happen 
when we started, four years ago. a pro- 
gram to expand amateur radio in Liberia 
We decided then that the club station was 
the answer Moses operates club station 
EL2RL. which is the property of (he Liberia 
Radio Amateur Association. The Drake Tft- 
4C was donated by David Shaw PJ6DFS of 
the Dutch Antilles. The TA-33 is my own see* 
lion antenna which i switch to the club sta- 
tion through the long heliax— which is 
another donation. 

Yes, we are excited With this station In 
operation we see progress and, more im- 
portant than that, with his experience of 
opera! |ng this station, Moses has devel- 
oped Into an excellent operator. He runs 
traffic Into the States for some of the local 
missionaries, and with this new skill he 
has been able to take a job as a radio op- 
erator for an international company which 
has offices here in Monrovia. 

We have two other club stations One is 
operated by a missionary In Buchanan 
and the other by a missionary in Gbonga 
I have np details on recent activities in 
these two places, but \ do know that they 
are teaching classes in amateur radio. We 
have tested students in these mission 
communities and the results are discour- 
aging. Their success rate, like Ours here In 
Monrovia, Is very low. We could write 
paces of reasons for this low success 
rate, bet lei us say simply that these Li- 
berlan young people work under great 
handicaps, In spite of all this we see no 
other direction in which to go, We must of- 
fer this training In amateur radio to stu- 
dents, young and old. through our 
missionary people in the outlying areas, 
and set up stations for them to use— oth 
srwise It will not be done. 

When I came to Monrovia In i960, this 
work of Instructing and testing was al- 
ready going on. The Liberia Radio Ama- 
teur Association at that time was under 
the leadership of Mr. Waicott Benjamin 
EL2BA, who was Its president Even now 
he is known as Mr, Amateur Radio of Libe- 
ria, Without his persistence and dedica- 
tion it Is doubtful that amateur radio 
would have survived In these parta. That is 
another whole story which needs to be 
written. Working with him was Mr. "Lee" 
Ruff EL2FE. who did all the technical 
work. Lee also wrote the examinations, 
and between the two of them they ndrmn- 
ttaftti lhafn Lee is in engineering and 
management with Firestone. He keeps the 
plantation going. 

Today we carry on. Ben EL2BA is still 
the power that keeps us going, though we 
now have the help of many other people, 
both native and expatriate. We hope to 
write Into history many more success sto- 
ries like thai of Moses. 

Give Moses a call on 20 meters beiween 
tB00 and 1900 Zulu on Monday or Wednss 
day. He will tell you about Liberia and its 
amateurs from the point of view ol a na- 
tive, 




ROPAGATIOIM 



Jim Gray W1XU 
73 Staff 



EASTERN UNITED STATES TO: 



GMT: 


DO 


m 


04 


D6 


cm 


10 


12 


14 


16 


IS 


» 


22 


Ai ■■■ ; • 














.::.i 


20 










ARGENTINA 


20 


,u 


40 


4U 


m 


B0 








20 


y 


: 


A U ST MALI A 


20 




2u 




■ ii 


,i. 


. ■ 


2 Li 






r.- 


L5l 


CANAL ZONE 


15 


20 


20 


4Q 


40 




2 a 


20 


15 


15 


15* 


15* 


6 NO I AND 


20 


40 


Hi! 


10 


40 




20 


1 • 


:»■ 


2*} 


20 


20 


MAWAM 












tfj 


- 








151 


lb 1 


INDIA 












2G 1 


. . : 


-J 








15* 


JAPAN 


2d 












. 


20 










MEXICO 


15 


- 




40 


ftfl 






:.. 












. 


1 15*1 


PHILIPPINES 






















Puerto mco 


15 


:, 




M 


■ "_■ 




20 




, 


IS 


■ IS* 


SOUTH AFRICA 






hi i 


-0i| 




] ^ 


15 


15 


20 - 


U S.S.A. 


40 


so 


ao -o 


* ti u 


. 


20 






WEST COAST 




B0 


-■ 




to 


■ 


20 




! 





CENTRAL UNITED STATES TO: 




WESTERN UNITED STATES TO: 


ALASKA 


15 


-" 






40 


■ 




40 


40 






20 


ARGf N7INA 


15 


20 




40 




■ 




40 




15 


1 


IS 


AUSTRALIA 




zo 


20 








40 


80* 


40 


]5> 


15 


l r - 


CANAL ZONE 


vi 


20 




..■ 


'i0 


kQ 






,' II 


IS 


15 


15 


ENGLAND 






B0* 


4 










20 


20 






HAWAII 


15 


1 5 






21 1 


20 


20 


.20 








l f i 


INDIA 




20 






















JAPAN 


15 


20 






40 


40 


40 


'. i 


40 






20 


MEXICO 


20 


20 




i0 


40 


40 




20 


13 


15 


15 


PHILIPPINES 


15 


20 










4a La 










PUiflfORICO | 20 | 20 




ta 


40 


40 




lis 


15 




SOUTH Af RlCA „ : jl 


iot 














ts 


l ? 


- 


UL IS. H. 




\of 


vol 


-di 








20 


J ' j 






EAST COAST 


_ 




, 


- 


ZG 













1 = May be open only once or twice during month, 
* =Try next higher band, 

G = Good, F = Fair, P = Poor. 



DECEMBER 

SUM MON TUE WED THU iiv. SAT 


1 

G 


2 

F 


3 

F 


4 

F 


5 

G 


6 

G 


7 

G 


8 

p 


9 

p 


10 tl 

P G 


12 

G 


13 

p 


14 

p 


15 

p 


16 

p 


17 

G 


18 

F 


19 20 

p p 


21 

p 


22 

F 


23 

G 


24 

p 


25 

F 


26 27 

Gj G 


28 

G 


29 

G 


30 

G 


31 

G 





94 73 for Radio Amateurs * December, 1985 



ADVERTISERS 



A EAy Advanced Electronic Applications 

_6, 14,82,95 

Ace Communications 17 

Advanced Computer Controls , . ,62, 92 

Alinco Electronics . <■-■. 1 1 

All Etectronics 29 

Amateur Comm., Etc. 58 

Amateur Electronic Supply 48, 49 

Amidon Associates - 82 

Ampro Computers, Inc 37 

Astatic Corp * ...,......,.,.. 41 

Astron Corp . - r *> , . . 31 

8CS T lnc --5B 

Barker & Williamson . . . . . . ~ ........ . 37 

Barry Electronics . .', . - - S7 

BM al Co - 40 

Bill Ashby & Son , - 58 

Brill's 2-Way Radio 15 

CW Communications, Inc. 35 

CESJnc. ...... .. .....96 

CMC Communications ..■-•. .40 

Charge-Rite , t ........ , , . . 92 

Coaxial Dynamics , „ ♦ . « 90 

Communications Specialists, Inc 10 

Computer Trader ,...., ^ 73 

Connect Systems, Inc. * . - 2, 80 

Crumtronics 41 

Delaware Amateur Supply ,,.,,-- 37 

Dick Smith Electronics 79 

Doppler Systems , - - ■ 41 

EGE, Inc - * £5 

Etron RF Enterprises 58 

Engineering Consulting , . . r , 79 

Falcon Communications 15 

Fox-Tango Corp 79 

GLB Electronics .,-,., .65 

Glen Martin Engineering -15 

HXF Electronics T r , r .41 

H.L. Heaster, Inc. . * «73 

Hal-Tronta - *.*-• . r ♦ . . 54 

Ham Radio Outlet . 

The Ham Station 91 

Hamtronics, NY 77 

Hardin Electronics ; 55 

ICOM America, Inc. . . ■ * 13 . Go* II 

international Radio, Inc. ............. .17 

John Meshna, Jr, Co.. Inc 74 

Kantronics -B3 

KBIT Radio Specialties 58 

Kenwood > * v- 5 P Gov. IV 

Lance Johnson Engineering . , . , 17 

MFJ Enterprises 83, 84 t 65 

The Martin Co. - 41 

Meadowlake Corp -■*;. 79 

Merrimac Satellite , 79 

Micro Control Specialties M 

M icrolog Corp, ,.......--- ■*.*:-* 21 

M icro Mart . . . ,*,.., 33 

NGN Electronics 73 

N.P.S., Inc, ,.- - 58 

Nemal Electronics. «... ^7 

PC, Electronics ......... ^ = .33, 40 

The H PX" Shack , 33 

Panasonic • « 23 

Pipo Communications ....... r .,.....--■-■ ■ 55 

QSKY Publishing -'- -73 

RF Products 67 

Radio Amateur Cattbook, Inc 95 

Radlokil ,......,,- 1* 53 

Radio Engl neers - ■ • 7 ^ 

Ramsey Electronics 75 

73 

Back Issues 14, 58 

Dealer Ad /■+ - ^ 

Subscriptions 16, 59, 81 , 89 

Satman - ■ 14 

Step Electronics ,.--•■ » ^* — ■* 

SpeG'-Com .* ,..........-■■ 

Spectrum Communications 

Spectrum International ....... 

Spider Antennas . 

TSG - ■ 

Ten-Tec 88 

TNT Radio Sales ■ ■ 9 

UnadillayReycoWnline * ^7 

The VHF Shop - 65 

Valley Press 73 

Vanguard Labs ................ . . , .41 

W9IMN Antennas. , 79 

Western Electronics . ....,...,. 55 

Yaesu Electronics Gov. '" 



17 
12 
65 

eo 

59 



1986 
CALLBOOKS 




The "Flying Horse" 
has a great new look! 

It's the biggest change in Call book history 1 
Now there are 3 new Callbooks for 1986. 

The North American Callbook lists the 
amateurs in all countries in North America 
plus those in Hawaii and the u,S. possessions. 

The International Callbook lists the calls, 
names, and address information for licensed 
amateurs in all countries outside North 
America. Coverage includes Europe, Asia, 
Africa, South America, and the Pacific area 
(exclusive of Hawaii and the U.S. posses- 
sions). 

The Callbook supplement is a whole new 
Idea In Callbook updates, Published June 1, 
1986, this Supplement will include all the 
activity for both the North American and 
International Call books for the preceding 
6 months. 

Publication date for the 1986 Callbooks is 
December 1, 1985. See your dealer or order 
now directly from the publisher. 



D North American callbook 
IncL shipping within USA $25,00 

incl. shipping to foreign countries 27.60 

n international Callbook 
incl. shipping within USA $24,00 

IncL shipping to foreign countries 26.60 

D Callbook Supplement* published June 1st 
Incl. shipping within USA $13,00 

incl. shipping to foreign countries 14,00 

SPECIAL OFFER 

□ Both N,A. & International Callbooks 
incl. shipping within USA $45.00 

Incl, shipping to foreign countries 53,50 

************ 

Illinois residents please add 6V*% sales tax. 
All payments must be in U.S. funds. 



RADIO AMATEUR 



llboolt 



INC. 




Dept. B 

925 Sherwood Dr, ( Box 247 

Lake Bluff, \L 6O044, USA 



Tel: (312) 234*6600 




VEAEAEAEAEAEAEAEAE 

\EAEAEAEAEAEAJ 

\EAEAEAJA^£ 




More Hardware Features And 
Performance Than Any Other 
Morse, Baudot, ASCII, AM- 
TOR, SITOR, or H.R P&cket 
Terminal Unit Anywhere At 
Any Price! 






. 



Your ATlMOOQ's 

VERSATILITY 



. . .Puts you on all digital modes 

• Morse/Raudot/ASCII/AJVlTOR/SlTOR/ 
H.F. packet (Software not Included) 

• TTt, I/O logic inversion fur use with vir- 
tually any soft wart* 

• Built-in TTL/KS-232/and loop keyer I/O 

• Optional 19 Inch rack mount kit 

• 13 VT)C operation, 1 10 VAC adaptor sup 
plied 



PRECISION 

, . .Puts you precisely on frequency 

• AU sldfts, 170 Hz fixed or to 2000 Hz 
adjustable 

• Set AFSK output tones independently 
from 1000 to 3000 Hz to one Hz 

• 32 poles, active filtering 

• Set receive filters to one He accuracy 

• Set receive MARK & SPACE filters inde- 
pendently from 1000 to 3000 Hi 

• CW filter adjustable 700 to 2500 Hz 



PERFORMANCE 

, , . Puts you ahead of all the rest 

• Front-panel squelch control 

• Discriminator-type tuning indicator 

• 32 Poles total active filtering 

• Built-in 4 digit counter 

• Twin full-wave detectors 

• D.C. coupled automatic threshold correc- 
tion 

• 5mV to 5V AGC 



Ask your AEA dealer tor a demonstration, or send 
tor our latest specification sheet 



"When You Buy, Say 73 fi 



Advanced Electronic 

Applications, Inc. 

P.O. Box C-2160 

Lynnwood, WA 98036 

(206) 775-7373 

TELEX: 6972496 

AEA INTL UW ^^^^ <tf£ 

^EAE 

AEAEAEAE 

AEAEAEAEAEAEAE 

EAEAEAEAEAEAEAEAEAE 

73 for Radio Amateurs • December, 1985 9S 



.J 



What To 
Look For In A 
Phone Patch 

The best way to decide 
what patch is right for you 
is to first decide what a 
patch should do, A patch 
should: 

• Give complete control to 
the mobile, allowing full 
break in operation, 

• Not interfere with the 
normal operation of your 
base station. It should 
not require you to con* 
nect and disconnect cab- 
les (or flip switches!) 
every time you wish to 
use your radio as a nor- 
mal base station. 

• Not depend on volume or 
squelch settings of your 
radio. It should work fee 
same regardless of what 
you do with these con- 
trols. 

• You should be able to 
hear your base station 
speaker with the patch 
installed. Remember, you 
have a base station be- 
cause there are mobiles. 
ONE OF THEM MIGHT 
NEED HELP. 

• The patch should have 
standard features at 
no extra cost. These 
should include program- 
mable toll restrict (dip 
switches), tone or rotary 
dialing, programmable 
patch and activity 
timers, and front panel 
indicators of channel and 
patch status. 

ONLY SMART PATCH 
HAS ALL OF THE 
ABOVE. 

Now Mobile 
Operators Can 
Enjoy An 

Affordable 
Personal Phone 
Patch. . . 

• Without an expensive 
repeater. 

• Using any FM tra nceiver 
as a base station. 

• Tlie secret is a SIMPLEX 
autopatch* The SMART 
PATCH. 

SMART PATCH 
Is Easy To Install 

To install SMART PATCH, 
connect the multicolored 
computer style ribbon cable 
to mic audio, receiver 
discriminator, PTT. and 
power, A modular phone 
cord Is provided for con- 
nection to your phone sys- 
tem. Sound simple? . . . 

IT isr 



With -S WAR ' 



ou are in ^ 



t 




With CES 51 OS A simplex 
Autopatch, there's no waitii 
for VOX circuits to drop. 
Simply key your transmitter 

to take control. 



sonal autopatch. SMART PATCH uses the only operating system 
that gives the mobile complete control. Full break-in capability al- 
lows the mobile user to actually interrupt the telephone party. 
SMART PATCH does not interfere with the normal use of your base 
station. SMART PATCH works well wilh any FM transceiver and pro- 
vides switch selectable tone or rotary dialing, toll restrict, 
programmable control codes, CW ID and much more. 

To Take CONTROL with Smart Patch 
- Call 800-327-9956 Ext. 101 today. 




1 C 

LL&VJJ 



^ 






a s 





How To Use 
SMART PATCH 

Placing a call is simple. 
Send your access code 
from your mobile (exam* 
pie: *73). This brings up 
the Raich and you will 
hear dial (one transmitted 
from your base station. 
Since SMART PATCH is 
checking about once per 
second to see if you want 
to dial, all you have to do 
is key your transmitter, 
then dial the phone num- 
ber. You will now hear 
the phone ring and some- 
one answer Since the en- 
hanced control system of 
SMART PATCH is con- 
stantly checking to see if 
you wish to talk, you need 
to simply key your trans- 
mitter and then talk. 
Thafs right, you simply 
key your transmitter to 
interrupt the phone tine, 
The base station auto- 
matically stops transmit- 
ting alter you key your 
mic. SMART PATCH does 
not require any special 
lone equipment to control 
your base station, li sam- 
ples very high frequency 
noise present at your 
receivers discriminator to 
determine if a mobile is 
present. No words or sylla- 
bles are ever lost. 



SMART PATCH 
Is All You Need 
To Automatically 
Patch Your Base 
Station To Your 
Phone Line. 

Use SMART PATCH for: 

• Mobile (or remote base) 
to phone line via Simplex 
base, (see fig I j 

• Mobile to Mobile via in- 
terconnected base sta- 
tions for extended range. 
(see Bg. 2.) 

• Telephone line to mobile 
(or remote base). 

• SMART PATCH uses 
SIMPLEX BASE STA- 
TION EQUIPMENT. Use 
your ordinary base sta- 
tion. SMART PATCH 
does this without inter- 
fering with the normal 
use of your radio. 



WARRANTY? 

YES. 180 days of warran- 
ty protection. You simply 
can't go wrong. 
An FCC type accepted 
coupler is available foT 
SMART PATCH. 



Communications Electronics Specialties, Inc. 

P.O. Box 2930, Winter Park, Florida 32790 

Telephone: (305) 645-0474 Or call toll-free (300)327-9956 



• 



YAE&H 




^AESO 




nspsa 



. 



"FT-203R 



703R 






OTMt > 



I.- 







JJ 





f 



Why buy a tow-power thumbwheel 
HT when Yaesu's high-power hand- 
helds are available for virtually the 
same price? 

Ours give you 2.5 watts RF output 
right off the shelf Or 37 watts with 
the optional FNB-4 battery pack. 

Ours come with a hi/low power 
switch. A relative signal strength/PO 
meter with nighttight And built-in 
VOX capability (Optional headset 
required.) 

Plus ours offer options like a 
DTMF keypad. And a plug-in sub- 
audible tone board with both encode 
and decode capability ^ 



And thanks to our unique robotic 
assembly of surface mount com- 
ponents, it's all enclosed in a light- 
weight and compact case, measuring 
just 2-6 x 14 x 6.1 inches. 

Choose from three models: 
the FT-203R for 2 meters, the FT-7D3R 
for 440 MHz, and the FT-103R for 
220 MHz. 

As standard equipment you get 
a rechargeable battery AC wall 
charger: rubber duck, earphone, belt 
clip and soft case, 

Plus a wealth of optional acces- 
sories, Including a fest charger VOX 
headset with boom mic, Mobile 



radio hanger Speaker/microphone. 
DC car adapter And much more. 

So don't settle for low power 
in a thumbwheel HT 

Go with Miesu. The best way to 
get more power for your dollar 




Yaesu Electronics Corporation 

6851 Walthall Way Paramount. CA 90723 
(213)633-4007 



9070 Gold Rark Drive. Hamilton. OH 45011 
(513)874-3100 

Pft«s ami specifications subject to change without notice- 



44 



DX-cellence!" 



TS-940S 

The new TS-940S is a serious radio 
for the serious operator. Superb 
interference reduction circuits and 
high dynamic range receiver com- 
bine with superior transmitter 
design to give you no-nonsense, no 
compromise performance that gets 
your signals through! The exclusive 
multi-function LCD sub display 
graphically illustrates VBT. SSB 
slope, and other features. 

»100°/o duty cycle transmitter 

Super efficient cooling system using 
special air ducting works with the inter- 
nal heavy-duty power supply to allow 
continuous transmission at full power 
output for periods exceeding one hour. 

• Programmable scanning. 

• Semi or full break-in (QSK) CW. 



* Low distortion transmitter 

Kenwood's unique transmitter design 
delivers top "quality Kenwood" sound 

• Keyboard entry frequency selection, 

Operating frequencies may be directly 
entered into theTS-940S without using 
the VFO knob. 



Optional accessories: 

• AT-940 full range (160-10 in) automatic 
antenna tuner • SP-940 external 
speaker with audio filtering • YG-455C-1 
(500 Hz), YG-455CN-1 (250 Hz}, 
YK-88C-1 (500 Hz) CW filters; 
YK-88A-1 (6 kHz) AM filter • VS-1 voice 



• Graphic display of operating features, synthesizer • SO-1 temperature 



Exclusive multifunction 
LCD sub-display panel 
shows CW VBT, SSB slope 
tuning, as well as fre- 
quency, time, and AT-940 
antenna tuner status. 

• QRM-fighting features. 
Remove "rotten QRM" with 
the SSB slope tuning, CW 
VBT notch filter. AF tune, 
and CW pitch controls. 

• Built-in FM, plus 
SSB, CW t AM, FSK* 



r 




compensated crystal 
oscillator • MC-42S UP/ 
DOWN hand mic. 

• MC-60A, MO80, MOS5 
deluxe base station mics. 

• PC-1A phone patch 

• TL- 922A linear amplifier 

• SM-220 station monitor 

• BS-8 pan display 

• SW-2D0A and 
SW-2000 SWR and 
power meters. 




High stability, dual 
digital VFOs 

An optical encoder and 
the flywheel VFO knob 
give the TS-940S a posi- 
tive tuning "feel" 
40 memory channels. 
Mode and frequency may 
be stored in 4 groups of 
10 channels each. 
< General coverage 
receiver. 
Tunes from 150 kHz to 

30 MHz. 
* 1 yr. limited warranty. 

Another Kenwood First. 

Complete servtce manuals are available tor all Trio- Kenwood transceivers antf mosr accessories 
Speeifocaf tons and prees are subject to change without notice or obligation. 



MoreTS-940S information is available 
from authorized Kenwood dealers. 

KENWOOD 

TRIO-KENWOOD COMMUNICATIONS 
1111 West Walnut Street 
Compton, California 90220