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Full text of "73 Magazine (December 1990)"

DECEMBER 1990 

ISSUE i363 

USA $2.95 

CAN $3.95 






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Letters 



Number 1 on yduf Feedback card 



Mike Wengert 9M8XX Have bean ac- 
tive on 17m tateiy. Know what you 
mGBn about "con test -type" operation. 
Hate hi Everytime I gel on, nobody 
wants my opinion. . just m y OS L card! 
Wham, bam, thank ya ma'am! The Eu- 
ropeans won't gimme a minute's 
peace. There ate &till a few people who 
like to chatp but mosi ar© looking for a 
new country on a new band. Would like 
to get some mittdle and high school 
ham clubs going here, but licensing 
requires you !o be at least 18 years old. 
SelMefealinQp isn'iit? 

Consiifering that before iheARRL 's in* 
c&ntivB Ltc&nsing debacte, 80% of a// 
rww AmBTican hams were under tS, 
that*s one way to kBep Sabah from get- 
ting kids interested in high tech ca- 
reers. . Wayne 

A Maine reader writes: KtMAN has 
been given a fcae of $1 ^500 for "willful 
and Imentionai interfere nee'' by the 
Belfast iME) FCC office! I like your arth 
des abOLJt tf^js SfG MOUTH. He does 
nothing tor the area here in Maine; nor 
do we want htm on our repeaters We 
have NO USE for him in this area, and t 
am only some 35 air miles from him. 
Plus f belong to the Augusta Maine Am- 
ateur Radio Clut>, ar^d we all feel the 
same about him. Please keep up the 
*^good work.'* Nail hrm every chance 
you get! 

Yep, ifs a pity, Baxter*s tARN is a 
worthwhile idea, and when not end- 
tessfy promoting Baxter, does some 
worthwhiie traffic handfing. But this 
seems mosity because Ifte ARRL has 
so totaify dropped the bait in providing 
needed emergency senrices. When St 
Lucia was devastat&d by a hurricane a 
few years ago. the ARRL did nothing, 
so f sent a good operator down with a 
targe suitcase of ham gear to heip out 
And help it did^ Doesn't it make sense 
for the ARRL to initiate and coordinate 
emergmrcy services instead of ieaving 
it to chance?. . . Wayne 

Ozzie KAIifK Wayne Green. "Never 
Say Die'—eflher this guy was just re- 
teased from iha institution or he is ab- 
solutely brilliant 

To attract new people to ham radio* 
you need to sprinkle "radio dust" I 
remember as a young boy about nine 
years old peering into the back of a 
radio and seeing the strange ar^d magi- 
cal gJow from the gtass tjOttles^ and 
when I got my nose close enough. I 
inhaled "radfo dusf' and it went direct- 
ly into my blood stream. Once in the 
blood stream, it's there for life. 

Radio dust 4S a unique dirst baked 
from the heat of the vacuum tubes and 
the aroma of melting wax from con- 
densers and warm resistors. 11 will 
hook anyone into the weird world of 
radio. Alas, there is no more radio dust: 
vacuum tubes have all but disap- 
peared, and 50 have wax-covered ca- 



From the Hamshack 

pacilors, Wayne Green's idea for re- 
cruiting hams by aud^o visual methods 
is probably very good. Wayne, maybe 
f1l meet you on the air or in the institu- 
tion. 

8ni Wells N4VSK/AA, Atlanta GA As 
a 37-year-old entrepreneur m the com- 
puter business with almost two years 
as a licensed ham and ink still wet on 
my advanced ticket, I was appalled 
when 1 opened a letter from President 
Price requesting money to provide 
' 'special support" for representation at 
WARC-92, What kind of tdiois do they 
take us to be? Belter yet, what kind of 
idiots are running the ARRL? 

irs lime for th« League to start 
spending our money more wisely. I saw 
the letter as nothing more than a self- 
ingratiating espousal of what President 
Price hasn't dor\e, i.e.. get new hams. 
The cost of mailing that letter to ARRL 
members could have purchased (at 
cost) a lot of cop res of Tune in the 
World tor schools and clutis. which m 
turn would produce more hams. We, 
rank and f^le members Of the ARRL, 
need your help in purging om direc- 
tors. 

I propose that you give a full page ad 
to anyone who runs against an incom- 
bent director until the house is finally 
clean. Sure, it will cost the magazine a 
lot of money, but as you said, you've 
never lost enough money to put the 
magazine out of its misery. 

Heck, 111 provide whatever space it 
takes to help get some new faces in the 
ARRL annaai reports. 

Alas, thousands of brain^washed 
members wilt get out their checkbooks 
and send Price money. , . Wayrw 

Delvin R. Bunton, Vancouver WA 
Wayne, I like your editofials They 
make me think and take stock of my 
prejudices and cherished opinions. 
You've finally convinced me to change 
ffiy priorities and gel my license. I ar^ 
t^cipate taking my Novice test soon and 
upgrading to Technician shortly after I 
get my license. 

Even as a nonham subscriber for 
several years (I think about 10), I re- 
cruited the locat ham clyb (Clark Coun- 
ty Amateur Radio Club) to set up a 
booth at several Boy Scout activities 
{which they did), but it didn't result in 
any new hams that t know of. 

Over the years. I've attended ham 
club meetings where NO ONE came 
up to me {an obvious non member) and 
asked my name, interests, or anything 
else. Small wonder harrvdom is dyirvg 
off when potential new members are 
r>ot welcomed in a way that encour- 
^es return visits. 

Stephen Wfmmer WUiF, Raymond 
MS Having been a service tech for 
nearly 12 years (I quit 3 years ago), I 
enjoyed Gordon West's "Service Sur- 



vey Wrap-Up." I heartily agree with 1. 
improve your correspondence. A note 
that simply says 'doasn^t work" is a 
sure srgn that the radio does work, and 
that the problem is an accessory. 
Which brings me to a point I don't un- 
derstand: S. No accessories, please. 
Too many times I have spent two or 
three hours on a radio t»ecause I be- 
lieved the customer's note, only to find 
out later (when I finally got hold of the 
customer) thai the real problem was 
Iha mike or some other accessory nor- 
mally used with the radio. The really 
bad part about this is that I stilJ have to 
charge them (my kids need to eat, too). 
Nejct. i want to expand on 4. Better 
phone nt/mbers. Remember this coun- 
try has four time zones. Please give 
more than one number where you can 
be reached, and include the limes you 
can be reached at which number, as 
well. If you use an answering machiae, 
PLEASE piay the tape back once a 
day. Also, it has also been my experi- 
ence that answering services are even 
worse. 

Steve Weldon NGPZV, TJeCAR I just 
received your fourth notice for not re* 
newing my subscription. For the 
record, I have every intention of renew- 
ing my subscription as soon as I relo- 
cate in the states in a couple o( months. 

Most "junk" mail t receive gels 
thrown out before it's even opened, but 
a letter with "73" printed on it arouses 
my curiosity. Why? Because your e<fi- 
toriats are interesting, to the point 
(most of the time), and generally right 
on the mark. Tm stationed in Okinawa. 
Japan where entertain rpont of any kind 
js greatly appreciated. 

There have been many times when 
fellow hams have sat around their ra- 
dios on a slow evening and had a lot of 
fun discussing your ediioriais. Some- 
times when we don't receive our issues 
of 73 at the sanrie time, entire quotes 
are transmitted on the local 2m/70m 
simplex frequencies, Believe me, most 
hams are extremely happy to have 
someone with guts representing our 
hobby. 

73 is the bast ham radio monthly 
publication of its kind. There's really 
Ifttle debate on this between the 50 or 
so American hams stationed in Oki- 
nawa. QST is plain boring, but very 
informative on the political side of 
things, as well as giving currant con- 
test information Tm sure somebody us- 
es. CQ tsnH bad, but for the most part il 
seems to be put together hastily and 
without much of a plan. Kind of like 
someone decided at the last minute to 
put out a magazine. On second 
thought. I guess it is l>ad, sorry for the 
lapse. At least it isn't as dry to read as 
OSZ 

73. on the other hand, is a lot ot fun to 
read. The magazine opens up wrih 
what we call "Crazy Green's" bitch 
session. Then you have ''QRX/' which 
k^ps us abreast o( the most cun'eni 
news in amateur radio (OS 7 is normal- 
ly good for the fine detaits), followed by 
a variety of interesting artrcies perti- 
nent to the current generation of hama* 
Fox hunting, projects , equipment re- 



views, and "Ask Kaboom" artafi inter- 
esting to read and informatrve. 

My biggest complaint with 73 is all of 
the excellent articles on projects I'd 
like to build and reviews of equipment 
I'd like to purchase, with absolutely no 
verification from your staff. Let's face 
it, most hams who submit articles are 
"amateurs" (pardon the pun) in the 
electronics field. We need input like 
this, bul these guys make mistakes, 
heck even professionals make mis^ 
takes, and a double-check method is 
mandatory tor almost anything in this 
area. 

Having a member of your staff asr 
sembie and buikl these projects and 
report on assembly, function, and rela- 
tive worth, along with possibfe Im- 
provements, would be a major step- 
ping stone in 'professionalising" 
these articles. 

Next. OS F provides the best equip- 
ment reviews in the business. You can 
always count on the same set of specs 
being tested on every radio^ Sure, 
there is some good m formation in your 
articles, but they don't carry enough 
weight tor me to make a purchasing 
decision For that, 1 go lo QST, 

Do 1 expect you to agree wlh me? 
Doubtful, as you seem to have already 
thought out most aspects of your mag- 
azine, and Vm sure the reason for my 
complaint \s it just costs too much. 

Thanks for your great letter . Readers' 
opinions and criticisms are important 
to us, especiatty when they're as welt- 
stated as yours. Let me address your 
two matn points: construction projects 
and reviews. Though many of our 
projects are submitted by "amateurs, " 
the majority of construction articles we 
pubttsh are written by professionals 
wfio have some conneciton to the elec* 
tronics field. Your suggestion that a 
third party also build every project was 
greeted with enthusiasm by WBBELK. 
Unfortunately, we ne0d htm to &dit the 
magazine. We simply don't have the 
staff to re-buHd every project. 

In the area of reviews, t agree thai 
OST do&s a fine technical review. Why 
should we repeat their efforts? We 
want to give a true user's perspecttve 
in 7Z. You could calf our review styfe a 
'Afield test" review. 9y doing this type 
of review, we feel thai we add to the 
reader's information about a product, 
and provide a perspecttve that you 
can 't get anywhere e/se. Once again, 
thanks for taking the time to wnie . . . 

[>avidNtGPH 

As you say, even professionals make 
mistakes. Always check the '* Up- 
dates" department for improvements, 
f\ew information, and changes. That's 
what it's for. If you think there's an 
error in a construction article, get m 
touch with the author first, just in case. 
Send us a copy of your letter to the 
author so we can foitow op on it. We 
check out alt reports of possible errors. 
If you look over 'Updates" for the past 
couple of years, say, you'lt find that 
there are very few errors in our cofh 
struction articles, . . 

Linda KAWKM/KT 



2 7$ Amateur Radio Today • December. 1990 



THE TEAM 

PUBLISHER/EDITOR 
Wayrse Green W2NSD/t 

ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER 
OBvidCassiOyNIGPH 



MAMA0ING EDITOR 
Bill Brown WB8EIK 

PRODUCTION EDITOR 
Hope Currier 

SENIOR EDITOR 
Linda fler*eauKA1 UK M 

ASSOCIATE EDITOR 
Joyce Sawtelle 

CONSULTJ^G EDITOR 
MiksfihjgemWBaGLO 

COr^TRJEUTING EDITOHS 
MikeBrvceWeeVGE 
David CowhJgWAILBP 
MiClia&tGeierKBlUM 
JtmGrayWlXU/7 
Chuck Hoijghton WBSlGP 
Ar Hie Johnson N1 BAG 
Df Marc Leavey WA3AJR 
A/Ki^MacAlltsierWAszre 
Joe M(M KlOV 
Jim Morrrssert K6MH 
Bilf Pasternak WA6ITF 
Carole Perry WB2MGP 
Bot»WifmW5KNE 



ADVERTISING SALES 
REPRESENTATIVES 
Dan Harper 

ACCOUNT SERVICES 
Donna DiRusso 

1-603-525-4201 
1-800^2^-5083 
FAX f603} 525-4423 

PRODUCTJON MANAGER 
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PRODUCTION COORDINATOR 
Vikr Van Valen 

ART DIRECTOR 
Alice ScofieW 

TVPESETTiNG/PAGlNATlON 

UndaDrew 
Burh Benedict 
Sieve Jeweit 

GRAPHIC SERVICES 

Da^e Will tarns 
TrieresaVerville 

GRAPHICS PHOTOGRAPHiR 
Dan Croteau 

WGE PUBLISHING INC. 

CHIEF FINANCIAL OFRCER 
Tim Pe^^lkey 

CiflCUUTiON COORDINATOR 
Harvey Charidfer 

CIRCUUTION ASSISTANT 

Janet LaFountaine 

To »ibscr^: 1-90O-^9-<)388 

Editorial Offices 

WGE Centef 

Fores! Road. Hancock NH 03449 

60^-525^201 , FAX (603) 52S4423 

Subscription Services 
1 -800-289-0388 

Colorado/Foreign Siihserit>ers 
call 1'303^M7.sa» 

Wayne Green Enterprises is a division 
of Iniemational Data Group. 

Repdnts : Be first copy of an articte 
$3.00 (eacti additional copy-$l .50). 
Wnte to 73 Amateur Radio Magazine. 
WGE Center. Forest Road. Hawock, 
NH 03449. 



T^Amateur 



DECEMBER 1 990 
Issue #363 



Radio Today 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 



FEATURES 



9 Behold the BackPacketl 

Go take a hike with packet radio. 
, NW6H 

19 Upgrade Your HD-4040 

KISS your Heath HD-4040 and keep 

AX.25too! N2BU 

24 The vox Plus HT Accessory 

Enjoy base station performance 
— witti your HTi . . . WA2EBY 

35 Pack Your Seabag, ''Sparks'' 

Do you want to be a ship's Radro 
Officer? , N0MM 

54 Audio Powered Tape 
Recorder Controller 

Add convenience to your ham- 
shack KE0UV 



REVIEWS 



22 Ten-Tec's Hercules II 
Model 420 

Turn your rig into a 550 watt 
transceiver! , . . , N4LSJ 

30 The Lightning Bolt Dual-Band 
VHF/UHFQuad 

Two antennas in one compact 
package ,.*,,., WB8ELK 




Take a hike!. , . see p. 9. 

32 The PacComm PSK-1 

Connect to the world via the 
MiCFosatsf WA3USG 

38 The ICOM IC-726 

The HF+6 road warrior. , , NIGPH 

40 PT-340 Tuner-Tuner from 
Palomar Engineers 

Adjust your antenna tuner without 
transmitting, * KA1 LR 

Cover by Alice Scofield 

Cover Operatfng portabfe packet from 
Monhegan Isiand, Maine, (i to r): Evan 
Cooke. Adsm Cooke and Mike "Nuge'* 
Nugent WBBGLQ. (Photo by Henry 
Levy.) 



DEPARTMENTS 



61 AbQve and Beyond 
72 Ad Index 
64 Ask Kaboom 

75 ATV 

80 Barter n' Buy 
46 Dealer 01 rectory 

76 DX 

17 Feedback Index 
17 Ham Profiles 
48 Hams with Class 

61 Hamsats 
50 Homing In 

2 Letters 

56 Looking West 
4 Never Say Die 

60 New Products 
84 Propagation 
66 ORP 
7 QRX 
04 Random Output 

57 RTTY Loop 

76 73 Intern ati on aT 
52 Special Events 
ea Ungle Wayne's 
Bookshelf 

62 Updates 

66 199QAnnijallndex 



ft:kdback... 

Ft:KDBACK! 
It's like beinf tJwfe— 
light hen in our office^ f 
How? Jui^t take advantage 
of our FEEDBACK canl 
on page 1 ?. You'll notkc 
a f-Kdback number at 
the beginniiig ufeach 
article and column. We'd 
like you to mte whet ynu 
iTttJ so tlikal UFe cm pnnl 
what lypcs of EhJJiigs you 
likt best And then we 
will draw one Fecdbttcfc 
c^fd each nronlh for a 
fwc subsiCripticHt to 73 . 



¥ 




Editonal Offices 

WGE Center 

Hancock NH0S449 

phone: 60S-525-4201 



Advertising Offices 

WGE Center 

Hancocl(NH 03449 

pfrons: 800-225-5083 



Circulation Offices 

WGE Center 

Hancock NH 03449 

phone : 603-B25-4201 



Manuscripts Contributions in the form of manuscripts with draiA^ings and/or photographs are welcome 
and ^i^l be considered for possible publication We can assume no responsibiEity for loss or damage to 
arty mateftal Please enclose a stamped, self-addressed envelope with each submission. Payment for the 
use ot any unsolicited material will be made upon publication. A premium will be paid for accepted articles 
that have been submitted eiectronicaily (CompuServe ppn 7031 0,775 or MCI Mail' ' WGEPUB" or GEnie 
addi^ass "MAG73") or on disk as an IBM-compatibie ASCII file. Vou can also contact us at the 73 BBS at 
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to the 73 editorial offices. "How to Wnte for 73'^ gutdelinesare ava»lable upon request. US citizens must 
include their social security numtwr wiUi submittecl manuscripts. 

73 Amateur Radio Today (ISSN 1052-2522) is pubHshed monthly by WGE Pjblishfng, Inc.. WGE 
Cemer. Forest Road. Hancock, New Hampshire 03449. Entire contents 1990 by WGE Publishing, Inc. 
No part of this publication may be reproduced witlioul written pefmission from the publisher. For 
Subscription Services write 73 Amateur Radio, PO Bok 56866, Boulder, CO 60322-8866, or call 
1 '600-2 690388, \n CO call 1-303-447-9330. The subscription rate is: one year $24.97: two yeafs $39,9? 
Additional postage for Canada tsS7 GO and for olherloreign countries. $19 OD surface and $37.00 airmail 
per year. AH foreign orders must be accompanied by payment is US funds Second class postage paid at 
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number 9566- Microfilrti Edition— Uriiversily Microfilm, Ann Arbor. Ml 48106 Postmaster: send address 
changes to 73 Amsteur Radio, PO Box 58866. Boulder, CO 80322^866. 

Contract: By being so nosey asio read thts fine pnni, you have just entered irrto a binding agmement 
i*iith 73 Airtaieur Radio Today . You are hereby obligated to do somettitng nice for a ham fnend — buy him 
esubscrlpTion to 7$. What? Ail of your fiam friends are already subscribers? Donate a subscriplion to your 
local school iibraryl 



73 Amateur Radio Today • December 1990 3 



«M 



Number 2 an your Feedback card 



Never sa y die 



Wayne Green W2NSD/1 




CQ Owensboro 

Some i ale resting leriers tiave come 
from Owensboro (KY) with shocking 
news regarding W40YI, the ARRL di- 
rector and his sycophant minions Be- 
fore I jump off the deep end Kd like to 
hear from other local hams and OARC 
members about what's been going on 
with the cfub and the incredible ctvit 
defense scandal. Name$ will of course 
be kepi in confidence. 

ARRL Bashmg? Me? Forsooth! 

A lerter tn^m a Movice mentioned 
something about me bashing the 
ARRL . . and !he pmsFdent of his \qcsA 
ham c^ub teanng up a letter from 73 in 
front of his club members. You can 
imagine what I think of this jerk. 

Despite oonsiderable pressure from 
some directors to gat me to hang ARRL 
dirty finen out for you, Tve tried to keep 
my editortaJ comments 10 ways to im- 
prove the League, not how to hurt it. 1 
have little (o gain from bashing the 
League and a lot to gain from improv- 
Ifig it. This is my hobby too, you know. 

The next tme someone gripes about 
me bashing the ARRL you'M find that 
(1J I've been an active member far. far 
lorrger than he (or she) has (I have my 
50-year pin, how's he doing?). (2) I've 
kept very close track of the League for 
tfie last 40 years and known most of the 
directors, Ihe officers and the HQ peo- 
ple personally. (3) I've been more ac- 
tive in amateur radio than anyone else 
tn the world, I believe. I say that trnm 
the viewpomt of the hamming iVe 
done. . such as DXing from over 50 
countries, working via OSCAR, work- 
ing 350 countries, pioneering RTTY, 
repeaters. NBFM, SSTV. and SSB; 
won Sweepstakes, VHF. DX and other 
contests: built my own gear for many 
years: worked moonbounce. seven 
states on 10 GHz from NH, been pub- 
lishing ham mags for 39 years. FCC's 
NIAO member for years, four^ding 
member FCC'sLRPC, represented US 
at ITU in Geneva, have addressed ham 
clubs and conventions all over the 
world, etc. So why IS it out ot place for 
me to make suggestions for ways the 
ARRL can be improved? Who better in 
the hobby knows? 

I hear the inside dirt from disgusted 
ARRL directors. I've heard the FCC's 
side Of everything for the last 40 years 
loo, having talked with many of the 
Commissioners personally, I've regu- 



larly heard from disenchanted HQ 
staffers. 

Do you suppose that the people in 
the Industry know what's reaily going 
on? You better bet ihey do. And how 
many of tfrem have yow talked with con- 
fident! ail y? I know most of 'em person- 
ally and you It get your eyes opened ^f 
you talk with some of them. 

Now tell me thts, whal do you imag^ 
ine ( have to gain from bashing the 
AFtRL? Tve heard that this is supposed 
to sell magazines and that Wayne is 
out after the buck. 1 have never heard 
thai from anyone with an IQ in three 
digits or who actually knows me 
. - .and I don't expect lo. Bashing ihe 
ARRL does not sell magazines, it just 
makes blirrdty loyal members so angry 
they could spit. Mon-memt^ers rrK>stly 
could care less. There aren't many 
ARRL-haters. . Just mostly lovers who 
betieve the ARRL can do no wrong 

. and then there are about Iwo-thirds 
of the hams who really don't give a 
damn and realiy don't want to be both- 
ered- Most dori'l read any ham maga- 
zines at alL 

Aboirt Money 

People wtio are hung up ofi money 
are to be pitied, 1 sure don't envy peo- 
ple who spend like Donald Trump, i 
probably spend less money on myself 
than most of you. yet t see ways to 
make money everywhere I turn. There 
are incredible opportunities, once you 
lune your mmd to that wavelength. I 
could start at least pne new, profitable 
business every day. 

Tm an entrepreneur, Afways have 
been. When J was 12 1 started a mail 
order stamp business. If you read more 
than comic books and OSTyou know 
that entrepreneurs go into business for 
Ihe fun of it and few. if any, are money* 
oriemed. Oh, we know we have to 
make money or we go out of business, 
so we tend to make money. But the 
money is never the goal 

7Jhas lost a little money most, \\ not 
atl, of the 30 years since I started it 
Sure. I could set the ad rates higher 
and make a profit . .or charge more 
for subscriptions. . but as long as it 
doesn't lose a lot. big deal. ) publish it 
because I enjoy it. 

When I published computer maga- 
zines t put everything I made right back 
into startmg more magazines and ser« 
vices. I published dozens of books. 



hundreds of programs, and seven 
computer magazines. Whenever it 
looked as if we might get some money 
ahead I'd start a new publication gr 
service 

r4ow Im doing Ihe same thing again. 
I recently listed some of the new com- 
panies I've formed and am forming. 
There are even more now. with only our 
difficuHy in finding people slowing us 
down. 

I've er>joyed hamming for over 50 
years and Td like to be able to continue 
for what few years I've probably got 
left But Ihis means trying to get you to 
get the ARRL to do what needs to be 
done, f4ow tell me, do you honestly 
think my detractors know better what 
needs to be dorte than I do? Have they 
done their homework? I have. 

And tell me agairt about how they say 
Tm just trying to get more 73 sub^ 
scrit^ers because of greed . .and TU 
think they are nitwits. My apofogies to 
the other nitwits. 

i suppose, if the current ARRL direc- 
tors have tfieir way and you don't re- 
place them in the next election, I can 
always get started with some landline 
bulletin boards and CompuServe and 
get more involved with my Mac as a 
substitute, (t won't be the same as 
working DX on 20m. but it'll be fun 
reminiscing at)out our hobby after it's 
gone. 

Things can move fast these days. 
Look how quickly East Germany disap- 
peared. Arvd how fast the communist 
Eastern countries changed! The 1992 
ITU conference will soon be upon us. 
There we will face pressures from ev- 
ery country in Ihe world to gWe up our 
bands. Wilt we even have the support 
of our own government? How much 
would you like 10 bet? 

Friends tell me my problem is that 
Tm too much involved with amateur 
radio . - - that I care too much. After all, 
it's only a hobby f Mayt>e they're nght 
and 1 should spend more time on other 
things . . like music and education. 

Hold on, someone's calling me on 
the repeater. . gotta go. 

If Yqu Were President. , , 

Of the ARRL. nOI America- . let's 
not bite off too much al once. Bush has 
his hands full with Iraq, the budget the 
baJance of payments, the S&L mes£. 
the bank bomb (Third World loans)* our 
education debacle and so on. 



4 73 Amateur Radio Today • December, 1990 



And we In amateur radio have a dis- 
couraging srtualbn facing us. Here we 
are with large chunks of our spectrum 
allocations under siege from every 
quarter. What few of us are left are 
more involved with fighting each other 
than the enemy. If you are going to be 
anything more than a caretaker 
League president, arranging the deck 
chairs on Ihe Titank: as we sink, yog 
have an awesome responsibility. What 
would you do? 

Spectrum needs are avalanching 
upon us. The information Age means 
communications. We're talking tens of 
millions of personal telephones m shirt 
pockets, and that's just for starters. 
The next generation will be pocket per- 
sonal communications centers that will 
allow us to talk, handle voice-forward* 
ed messages I FAX, snd even data and 
graphics. We're talking major spec- 
trum needs, even with spread spec- 
trum commun^qations and data-com- 
pacting algorithms. 

Our delivery giants such as UPS and 
Federal Express wfll warn to be able to 
trace any package right down to the 
truck it's on . . . instantly. High defini* 
lion television, digital sound, world 
computer networking, and hypermedia 
access all mean more spectrum 
needs. 

Whal priortty would you give a bunch 
of testy old codgers, mostly retired, al- 
most none bfack or any other minority^ 
not even many women ,. .if you were 
going to be fair m allocating spectrum 
for them to while away their few re^ 
maining years instead Of watching TV 
or playing golf? 

You might want to listen and see 
what they're doing with the billions of 
dollars in frequencies they're using. 
Lei's see now, their most important 
band, by far, is 20 meters . .how's 
that doing? This is the band that a hun- 
dred Third World countries would give 
aJmost anything to use to broadcast to 
their expatriates and keep them in 
touch with their homeland. 

You start at the low end of Ihe Ameri- 
can phone band and you hear the pile- 
ups. . each with hundreds of crazed 
old men calling and cursing each oth« 
er, trying frantically to get through to a 
rare one. You hear the CaJifornia *'kilo- 
watts", . .which sound more like 
50,000 watts, all calling endlessly so 
that no one can even hear the weak DX 
station. You hear catcalls. You hear 
frustration and anger, not people hav- 
ing fun. 

Tfre beleaguered DX operator has 
little control of the mess he has gener- 
ated and no matter how he pleads for 
cooperation and a chance to actually 
talk with someone, the hordes are mer* 
ciless. This is blood. Thfs contact must 
be made. Just give me a signal report, 
never mind your damned name, you 
jerk. And break, break, who*s your OSL 
manager again? 

W«th a stgh you tune up the band. 
The next SQ kHz is full of chirping carri- 
ers. Slow-scan, Hmmm, pinup pictures 
from Penthouse and Gaftery. And one 
chap with a computer typing at about 
three words per miniJte onto his slow- 
scan raster. 



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• Newl D^gltai AF filter Synchronized 
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Receiver performance and sensitivity 
Kenwood's Dyna-Mix" high sensitivity 
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range is 105 dB, 

• Famous Kenwood Interference 
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Additional Features: • Built-in inter- 
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duty AC power supply and speaker 
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Multiple scanning functions 
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Optional Accessories 

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SO-2 TCXO * ^ VS-2 Voice synthesizer 
YK-88C-1 500 Hz CW filter for 8 83 MHz IF* 
YG-4 550-1 500 Hz CW filter for 455 kHz IF* 
VK-88CN-1 270 Hz CW filter for 8.83 MHz IF 
YG'455CN-t 250 Hz CW filter for 455 kHz IF* 
YK*88SN-1 18 kHz SSB filter for 8.83 MHz IF 

^ YG-455S-1 2.4 kHz SSB filter for 455 kHz tF* 

^ SP-950 Externa] speaker w/AF filter 

" SM*230 Station monitor w/pan display 

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- TL-922A Linear amplifier (not for QSK) 

* Built- tn for the TS-950SD 
t Optional lor the TS^950S 

KENWOOD U.SA. CORPORATION 

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tuner • SWT-2 70 cm antenna tuner 

• SP~41 Compact mobile speaker 

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Numlwr 3 on your Feedback c«nl 



EDITED BY UNDA RENEAU KA 1 UKM 



Radio Ofllcers NeediNl 



Radio officers are urgently needed! If you 

have a valfd FGC radiotelegraph license with a 
6-months endorsement (or one that has not 
lapsed more than five years), a U.S- Coast 
Guard license, and good health ; and if you can 
accept an immediate sea assignment, contact 
Mr. Bernte Sloller of the ARA (a radio officers 
union) at (201) 795^5536. You can also obtain 
additional information from Mr. Chhs Krusa, 
U.S. Maritime Administration, at (202) 366- 
5755 for referral to a shipping company, As- 
signment will be to a ship from the ready-re- 
serve fleet. So far, due to the Persian Guil 
crisis, 40 ships have been activated and more 
wilt be in the near future. TNX WSYI R&port. 
Vol. 12, Issue tfl9. Also* see the anicle "Pack 
Your Seabag, 'Sparks/ '' in this Issue ol 73. 



FCC Investigatiofls 



Ttie FCC's Field Operation Bureau Is in- 
vestigating reports of interference wiih the 
TIKI distress call on the maritime net frequern 
cy 14.313 MHz on the morning of May t9. Any 
amateur radio stations with tapes of the inci- 
dent are requested to mail them to Mr. John R. 
Hudack, FCC Room 744. 1919 "W St, 
Washington DC 20554. 

On another matter, the FCC has asked 
Glenn Baxter K1MAN to justify his praclfce of 
running taped "news" and bulletin transmis- 
sions without regard for QSOs in progress at 
the time the bulletins begin. The FCC also 
cited K1MAN for improper identification and 
running illegal phone patches* 

Concurrently, it seems, KIMAN sent the 
FCC a notarized affidavit charging KV4FZ, 
who was in contact with WD4GDP. with refus- 
ing to relinquish 14.275 for emergency logisti- 
cal Red Cross medical traffic with a station in 
Iran. The affidavit states there was malicious 
and intentional interference later the same 
day. KIMAN was quoted as saying that if the 
FCC doesn't take some of his recommended 
actions against KV4FZ, WD4PZT, and NR6X 
for repeated interference, he plans to take the 
FCC to the Circuit Court of Appeals in Wash- 
ington DC. Since Baxtef KIMAN, as the pro- 
ponent of AM modulation, took the FCC 
through the courts to the Supreme Court, this 
may be no idle threat. TNX B-N-T, Vol. 18. 
Issue 9, and the Balanced Modulator, VoL 
XXV, No. 9. 



Do Not P Kowalt 



A QSO with a Kuwaiti amateur could cost 
him his freedom or his life. Accofding to a 
message issued last September by the Radio 
Society of Great Britain via its QB2RS broad* 
casts, under no circumstances should you 



hold a QSO with any station operating from 

Kuwait. This is for the Kuwaiti amateur's 
safety. The RSGB says that the Kuwaiti Em- 
bassy in London requested Ihem to issue this 
bulletin to amateur operators woridwide. It is 
not known if the Kuwaiti ambassador to the 
U.S. made a similar request to the FCC or 
ARRL. TNX WBSilink Report, Sep. 28. 1990. 

lyesiionalile Questions 

Two questions in the outstanding pools 
may cause problems in future testing. The 
first is: 2H-t^. 1 What emission designator de- 
scribes singfe-sideband suppressed-carrier 
(SSB) voice transmissions? When this ques- 
tion was originally written, the answer was 
J3E. of course. But now that Part 97 has t>een 
rewritten, the answer according to the present 
wording of the rules is **sideband phone.** 
Thus, the question now gives away the an* 
swerf 

The second question is: 4A04.2 How mucft 
farther does the radio-path horizon distance 
exceed the geometric horizon? This question 
was originally released in the fall of 1986 with 
this answer as correct: **By approxfmately 1/3 
the distance.*' The dtstractors (wrong an- 
swers) included ''twice, 1/2, and four times the 
distance/' respectively. Having reservations 
about the answer, the ARRL asked their prop- 
agation technical advisor (not on the League 
staff) to look into the matter. He eventually 
determined that none of the answers were 
accurate. The Technical Advisory Committee 
for the Question Pool Committee advises that 
there is not a solid answer to the question in 
the frrst place. The committee believes at this 
point that the most practical way to handle 
both of these questions is to formally remove 
them from the question pool. TNX Western 
Carolina Amateur Radio SocietyA/EC Inc, 



Solar Cycle 22 



Recent activity suggests there's still 
some life left In Cycle 22. During the week of 
August 27t the solar flux index soared to a 
level of 317. The is close to the highest solar 
flux reading of 335, which occurred during the 
second week of July in 1989. The latest rise 
stayed above 300 for six days, and was ac- 
companied by several massive solar flares. 

Normally, a solarcycle lasts about 1 1 years. 
If the peak did occur last summer, as some 
suspect, that would put Cycle 22 on a 6-year 
schedule. But then again, since this is only the 
22nd solar cycle ever documented, maybe we 
don't yet know what the ''norm" is. 

Propagation expert Jim Gray W1XU re- 
minds us Ihat sunspots have t>een observed 
and recorded for only 250 years, and the sun 
is several biltion years old. Since even our 
best records reveal only the briefest instant in 
the sun's life, it's likely that we have a great 



many surprises in store for us regarding the 
sun's behavior. TNX The Ground Wire, VoL 
IV, No. IX, and 73 "Propagation" columnist, 
Jim Gray W1XU. 



Digital Audio 



Canada has been testing DAB — wide- 
spectrum digital audio broadcasting. First re- 
ports indicate quality far surpassing FM 
stereo. Expert observers in a specially 
equipped minibus reported superb audio with 
no multipath distortion, even when traveling in 
downtown "canyons'* and over steel bridges. 
Some of the passengers even suspected trick- 
ery, believing that there was a hidden CD play- 
er aboard the minibus. 

The transmitter for the first round of tests 
was a 1 kW unit modified to operate on UHF 
TV channels 68 and 69. Many observers ex- 
pect DAB to eventually replace both AM and 
FM broadcast stations in Canada, and per- 
haps the world. Canadian broadcasters are 
looking for American support at the 1992 
WARC Conference for a proposed digital ra- 
dio band. The desired spectrum would be 
somewhere between 100 MHz and 1 .5 GHz. 

It seems like everyone in the world is out to 
get more megahertz at WARC '92. Particular- 
ty worrisome to the ham community are tech- 
nologies like DAB and High Definition TV, 
which require very big blocks of the spectrum. 
TNX The LCARA Patch, AARCOVER. and 
Miles At^ernathy N5KOB for this information 
from Radio World, a magazine for commercial 
broadcaster. 



Dldali Publishing 



Do you ever have trouble locating past 
articles in the ham magazines? Some of the 
73 staff ran into Didah Publishing at the 
Deeffieid, New Hampshire, hamfest. In From 
Beverages thru OSCAR— A Bibliography, 
Didah has indexed every article ever put>- 
lished in OST, CO, Ham Radio, and 73 Maga- 
zine. It also includes 10 years of RadCom, 
Updates are available every Decernber. The 
entire data base is available on disk or mi* 
crofiche. They also provide printed lists, one 
Indexing over 3400 product reviews. You can 
contact Didah Publishing at P.O. Box 7368, 
Nashua NH 03060-7368. TeL (603) 878-3628/ 
883-5152. 



m 



• It 



. . .to all our contributors. You can reach 
us by phone at (603) 525-4201 or by marl at 73 
Magazine, Forest Rd. , Hancock NH 03449; and 
by e-mail on CompuServe ppn 7031 0. 775, MCI 
Mail *'WGEPUB" and the 73 BBS at (603) 
525-4438 (300-2400 bps), 8 data bits, no 
parity, one stop bit. 







73 Amateur Radio Today • December, 1990 7 



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Mumber 4 on your Feedback card 



Behold the BackPacket! 

Go take a hike with packet radio. 

by Jon Trent Adams NW6H 



I'm an explorer, so I enjoy amateur radio 
partly because of the security and com- 
panionship i[ affords me when I journey out 
alone into the badlands of the Southwest. 
Whether Fm away from home for just a 
night, for a weekend, or for a week or tw^o at a 
time, I always try to carry along some piece 
of equipment that will let me {or at least let me 
attempt to) communicate with local hams, or 
even with my friends back home. 

Carrying a little HF rig around is pos&ible, 
but stuffing a TH7DX and power supply into 
a suitcase is a bit difficuh. The AC cord is 
always a bear. In the Southwest, at least » I can 
carry a VHF or UHF handheld radio that 
mually lets me communicate locally— and 
sometimes all ihe way back to Los Angeles* 

Sofnettmes It Gets Lonciv Out There 

Not that 1 usually have very much to say— 
rd just like to know if the house is still stand* 
ing, perhaps try to set up a schedule on 40 
meters with friends back home, or maybe 
yak, jusi for the novetiy of ii, from some 
remote, isolated slab of sandstone near 
Moab, Utah, or from atop a big btock of 
ancient txrean reef in West Texas. Of course, 
underlying all these whimsical desires is the 
true purpose: To be able to provide reliable 
communications at a moment's notice from 
any weird location I find myself in. 

What's the best way of doing this? 1 could 
carry a QRP 40 meter CW rig. I could set up a 
station in a hurry with a small 10 wan radio, a 
battery and a long piece of wire, Then, as- 
sudung that an operator can be found out 
there in the QRM and N to hear my weak 
station, we might be able to communicate. 
Bui I might not be able to work locally, I 
might not be able to battle the big guns suc- 
ces^iiilty . I would have to be at the equipment 





Photo A. T7w individual components of ihe 
BackPacket. 



Photo B. Carving the foam for a snug fit. 

when the messages came in and, of course, 
operate the equipment when a message need- 
ed to be sent repeatedfy to get through the 
chaff {Yd also have to bone up quite a bit on 
my decidedly poor CW fist and ear,) Not a 
good solution for my predicament. 

Enter Packet Radio 

Packet provides a mode of communications 
liiat is relatively automatic and error-free. 
Given that there are now packet radio 
digipeaters in most parts of the Southwest 
(even in the wilds of Springerville, Arizona, 
and Pecos, Texas) there exists (in theory) a 
possible method for me to get information 
back and forth between almost any two far- 
flung points. Since I picked up my first TNC, 
linle more than a year ago, I have seen the 
activity on packet grow and expand into a 
somewhat viable network. 

\ needed a prototype mobile terminal to get 
into the system and lest the concept. My first 
attempt was with an MFJ-1270 TNC. I 
bought a little Epson PX-8 laptop computer, 
complete with built-in telephone modem, 
tape drive* serial ports and RAM disk. In my 
truck I installed the TNC, a Yaesu FT-209 
handheld 2 meter radio with mobile charger, 
and a quarter-wave mag-mount antenna stuck 
on the fender and dedicated to that radio. 
With a custom-made cable harness and dash- 
mounted interface box, I had a mobile packet 
station that allow ed me to use either the hand- 
held, low-power radio or the 25 watt mobile 
radio for the packet station. 

There it was! My first mobile packet station 
(don't type while you drive)! A moderate 
success, limited only by the 5 watt output of 



the FT-209 and the horrible amount of 2 
meter interference generated by the TNC. 
Bui I was able, in my short two week vacation 
through the Southwest, to keep in touch with 
the local packeieers and, occasionally, the 
hams back home. In fact. I generated quite a 
few* of the local contacts {o\xx there* local is 
within two hundred miles) simply by trans- 
mitting a beacon through the nearest 
dig ipe ate r with beacon texts like: ''Hoi a from 
NW6H mobile on US 60 near Datil, New 
Mexico," It was like shooting fish in a bar- 
rel— I lured them in with those names of ex- 
citing, exotic places* 

My friend Greg Noneman WB6ZSU was 
on vacation, driving from Los Angeles to 
Denver and back. He installed a similar sta- 
tion in his ir^ick. With it (relying occasion- 
ally on 40 meters— at that time the packet 
digipeaters in New Mexico were few and far 

Confimted on page 12 




Photo C Operating position when using the 
laptop computer. 




Photo D. The BackPacket ready for the hike. 
73 Amateur Radio Today * December. 1990 9 



I 




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Specificotiom subject to change without notice or obfigotion. Dealer inquiries invited. Copyright 1990 

CIRCLE 6S ON 



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CIRCLE 65 ON READER S£RVK;E CARD 



Cmttinuedfrom page 9 

bctweeo) he and I were able to leave mes- 
sages wiih one anoiher. We even scheduled a 
rendezvous in Roswell, New Mexico, at the 
local Dairy Queen! 

This success spurred me onward, I was 
ready for the big lime. By now, most of our 
Jiitle group of packeteers were packet- 
mobile, some always, others on an hour's 
notice. We decided to stretch our muscles. 

The First Public Experiment 

Our dedicated group of bit-bangers were 
invited by the organizers of the ** Angeles 
Crest 100 Mile Endurance Run" to put lo- 

geiher a packet radio demonstration by 
providing an alternate, redundjmt, and com- 
pletely experimental route for important 
status and welfare cominunications for the 
n^rly sixty runners in the race. This ultra- 
marathon foot race was held in Sepiember 
1 987 in the San Gabriel mountains above Los 
Angeles. The packet stations, spread out over 
the course of the race, were set up to pass 
runner times and location information to our 
main database computer at race headquar- 
ters, where Search and Rescue personnel 
would be able to monitor the runners' pro- 
gress. 

I found that generally the information col- 
lected via our network was available at race 
headquarters more quickly via our fledgling 
packet network, set up that weekend, than 
when it was sent on the established voice 
network that we paralleled. Our system did 
not work perfectly, but at least it proved that 
the ability was there* 

I called it another success. After the race, 
our group realized that what was really tieed- 
ed was a dedicated digipeater or tw^o placed in 
ideal spots on isolated mountain peaks where 
there was no access except by foot. Perhaps 
we could also add a few terminals a couple of 
miles from any power or vehicular access. 
These devices would need to be robust, easily 
transportable, and fully self-contained. It 
wouldn't be easy to lug a bunch of radio 
equipment up a four-mile trail in a briefcase. 
It had to be packaged correctly. 

Enter the BackPacket! 

The BackPacket consists of a PacComm 
Micropower-2 TNC, an Epson PX-8 laptop, 
a Yaesu FT-203 handheld, a 7 amp-hour 
sealed lead -acid battery, all encased in a very 
sturdy Ensolite laminate in a JanSpon day 
pack. The external pockets of the BackPacket 
hold antennas, connectors, chargers, extra 
cable, maps and other necessities. This ts 
important because it lets you grab the bag in a 
hurry without having to remember all the 
little parts that usually get lef^ behind. 

When operating just as a digipeater it has a 
lifetime of nearly four days; when used as a 
terminal it has sufficient battery life for any- 
where from one to three days, depending on 
the duty cycle of the terminal. 

What is the most critical problem when 
atiempnng to assemble something like this? 
Number one on the list is RFI— radio fre- 
quency imcrfercnce! l^t's face it— the digital 
world and the analog world (TNCs, laptop 
computers and radio transceivers) are quite 



incompatible. The common cure for RFi 
complaints involves bypassing and shielding. 
When that doesn't work, the next step is to 
put separations between the interacting 
equipment. 

The first two methods can help some, but 
the shielding can add extra weight, something 
I don't need here. Separation is an impossibil- 
ity because of the al ready -defined space of 
the day pack. The only other possibility is 
orientation: sometimes a few extra dBs can be 
squeaked out there. 

Constructing the BackPicket 

The BackPacket^s components are encased 
in a laminated sandwich of Ensolite, the ma- 
terial used for sleeping bag pads- This materi- 
al is a '^ inch thick closed celL den^« flexible 
foam that is available from most camping 
supply stores and is used to pad hips and 
shoulders when used as a sleeping pad. It also 
provides excellent protection for the laptop, 
TNC, radio and battery. 

My first step was to find a proper pack, I 
spent several weeks lurking around the vari- 
ous backpacking shops in Los Angeles, at- 
tempting to find a sturdy, durable bag that not 
only had enough physical volume to hold the 
parts but also had external pockets, gussets 
and other widgetry so that all vital accessories 
could be carried as pan of the package. 

Unfortunately, almost all of the bags I 
looked at weren*t designed for my purpose, 
(Don't these guys ever think of carrying a 
laptop computer and a 15 -pound battery 
around?) I considered briefly, then discard* 
ed^ the idea of building my own custom bag. I 
also looked at the plethora of camera bags. 
Most of these w^erc not deep enough to hold 
the computer, and all were frightfully expen- 
sive, (i figure that the camera bag manufac- 
turers know that you*ve gotta be rich to buy 
these fancy modern cameras,) Also, a back- 
borne bag would be easiest to carry and 
would leave my hands free; a camera bag 
flops around too much. 1 realized that most 
bags would require extensive modification to 
suit my needs. 

1 finally found a reasonable bag made by 
JanSpon: the Super Sack. This bag had just 
enough internal volume to hold all the re- 
quired equipment and not much more. At the 
least-protected points there would be no less 
than a half-inch of foam between any compo- 
nent and the outside. The bag is made of 
Cordura, a very tough, heavy nylon weave. 
Leather gussets and bosses are sewn on the 
bag at various places as attachment points and 
there are two long vertical pockets aside the 
main pack body. The entire base of the bag is 
made from a single piece of heavy, top-grain 
cowhide. It looked like a very durable bag* 
So, it came home with me. 

I needed a template showing the internal 
shape of the bag. The pack body itself js 
somewhat tear-shaped. I made a rough mea* 
surcment of the interior, cut a piece of heavy 
cardboard slightly oversized, then, through 
successive fittings, pared the cardboard down 
to size. 

Using the template, I cut 12 pieces of En- 
solite in this shape. At one half- inch per 



piece, 12 pieces slack up to provide a six-inch 

block of Ensolite sandwich. This stack of 
foam fits quite well into the bag volume, with 
Uttle gap. 

Next came the hard part: laying out the 
individual components, routing the cabling, 
and cuning out spaces in the Ensolite. 1 began 
with a single piece of foam as the base layer. 
This provided a minimum half-inch of foam 
between my back and any component in the 
BackPacket. On this layer I organized the 
TNC. baner> and radio. I drew the outlines of 
the components on the surface of the succeed- 
ing foam layers, and proceeded to cut out two 
pieces of foam with those exact cutouts, (A 
new X-Acto blade will last about two minutes 
in this service; be prepared to change the 
blades regularly.) These fit snugly on the 
bottom piece, with the individual layers of 
foam cemented to one another using standard 
contact cement* I-aycrs six through twelve 
were cut to house the battery, computer and 
control panel. I used this same construction 
technique to build up the full six-inch height 
of the foam block. The block breaks open 
between layer three and layer four to provide 
access to the radio and TNC. 

Once the components were in place. 1 built 
shielded cables and carved channels in the 
foam to accommodate these interconnects. I 
used shielded cables and metallized cable 
hoods wherever possible to keep the installa- 
tion electrically clean. 

The TNC, radio and battery base are locat- 
ed at the bottom of the foam stack. On top of 
the TNC and radio, separated by another 
half-inch of foam, rests the Epson laptop. 
The final foam layers surround the laptop and 
the rest of the battery, Two cutouts of foam 
protect the top of the laptop when the Back- 
Packet is in transit. 

I built an interface panel to control the 
whole thing. I brought out the antenna con- 
nector to an accessible point, away from the 
buried radio. 1 routed the audio output from 
the radio so that I could listen to the channel. 
In addition I installed power connectors to 
charge the battet^, and charge the laptop off 
the main battery, as well as fuses and power 
switches to protect the whole thing. 

A cast metal Budd box serves as the mount- 
ing plate for all this hardware. A one-inch 
speaker ai>d a toggle switch provide channel 
audio when required. A simple one-resistor 
charger supplies current to the laptop when 
needed to charge the computer buttery. 

Finally, a jutnper cable routes the antenna 
line from this interface panel to the antenna 
mounting plate at the top of the BackPacket. I 
cut a bracket of 0:062 -inch aluminum that 
rests between the top of the Ensolite laminate 
and the packcloth. Gravity holds the bracket 
in when the BackPacket lies flat; when in 
transit, the two closure zippers on the main 
bag hold the plate in. but still allow the anten- 
na connector to project out of the hag so that 
you can connect either an antenna cable or a 
rubber duck antenna. 

Accessories 

The BackPacket still needed some acces- 



12 73 Amateur R^dio Today • December, 1 990 




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sories. The laptop, and to a much lessor ex- 
tent the TNG, generated a great deal of RF 
noise. This caused a very high receiver noise 
level in the radio, located no more than an 
inch or so from either: Moreover* when a 
rubber antenna was attached to the connector 
at the top of the BackPacket. the noise level 
climbed quite high. At this noise level it re- 
quired signals of many microvolts to produce 
readable packets. I needed a transponable, 
easy antenna that was also very durable* 

r buili a simple rope dipole. Starting with 
20 feel of RG223 cable, 1 stripped off 19 
inches (quarrer-wave at 2 meters) of the 
shield from one end of ihe cable. Then I 
slipped on a 19-inch piece of braid over that 
eiKl and sUd it down so that it formed an 
electrical dipole, with the outer jacket of the 
cable forming an insulator between the coax 
shield and the added braid. Liberal use of 
polyvinyl tubing and heat-shrink potyolefin 
tubing sealed the whole antenna and made it 
quite durable. A rubber ring eye at the end of 
the dipole provided a hook for hanging the 
antenna from a branch or rope. A BNC 
connector at the other end completed the 
amem^. 

I needed a wall chaiger for the main bat- 
tery, various adapter cables and connectors 
for a variety of installations, a TNC instruc- 
tion book, plus writing instrumenis and pa- 
per. I also packed a clip-on, battery -powered 
reading lamp with a gooseneck so that the 
LCD screen could be read in the dark. The 
lantp also provided enough illumination to 
work the keyboard welL A magnetic-base 
mobile 2 meter quaner-wave antenna com- 
pleted the suite. All these accessories were 
packed in a couple of nylon stuff sacks to keep 
the small parts from wandering away. 

Final weight of the BackPackei, with all 
accessories included, is about 25 pounds. 
However, since it is carried on the back, it is a 
minor encumbrance; the most important 
thing is that it can be cotmted on to work and 
work well in almost any environment or lo- 
cation. 

Future Plans 

Futune modificattons to ihe unit may in- 
clude some sort of LCD meter thai indicates 
battery voltage. Also, it would be handy to 
know if someone has connected to the Back- 
Packet even with the computer off. I can 
achieve that either by building a small circuit 
within the TNC that will generate an audio 
beep lone on the local speaker, or less inva- 
sively« by constructing an optically-coupled 
sensor that monitors the status of the CON- 
NBCr lamp, and generates the saine beep tone 
if the lamp lights up. In addition, Td like to 
try some of the latest micro-size TNCs and 
miniature HTs now available. This would 
cenainly help to reduce the current drain and 
overall weight of the system. 

But for now, the BackPacket, along with a 
suitable digipeater. provides an exceUent and 
reliable communication method anywhere 
that I can hike, climb or bike. 



Jan Trent Adanis NW6H, 1139 S. Truro Sl, 
Inglewaod CA 9030L 



CII^LE 1 ON READEfl SERVICE CAFm 



14 73 Amateur Radio Today • December, 1990 




Hr Eqiiipmc?nl Regular SALF 

IC-76S Xcvr/ps/keyer/aulo tuner 3149,00 2699 




IC-781 Xcvf/Rcwf/ps/tun€r/scope,„. 6149 SISS 






KPEI^ « i j i u i "! ^"-m^i* ' 



■i*ifeiL*tiiimt$H I i^ ■■ 4H P> 



O o o o o 






IC 751A 9 oand *cvi/ 1 30 MHz rcwf 1699 OO 1399 



--**•«* 



PS- 3 5 InternaJ power supply 

FL63fl 250 HjT CW fitter llsd IFJ... 
FL'52A 500H/CWtilftr(2ndlF|„ 
FL-53A 250 Hi CW hner I2nd IFJ„ 
FL-70 2Z kHz wide SSB filter,.,.*. 



219 00199** 
S900 

nsooio9^ 

S IS 00 109'^ 
5900 




IC 735 HP icvr/SW fEvr/mM:.„. 1149 00 96^* 

PS 5S Ejdernal power supply ..„„,. 219 00 199" 
AM50 Automatic antenna tuner .... 445 00 389« 

FL'32A 500 Hz CW filter ..„ 69.00 

EX" 243 Eie^ctronsc Neyer ynft, ....*... 64 50 
tJT-30 Tone encoder ,.„,.,,..... 18.50 

IC-725 Hf )(cvr/SW TLvr. ...... (Sjemh 949 OD 799*^ 

AH-3 AutoFPaiic ani tuner., (Sp@m 489 00 379*^ 

iC-726 10bandxcvr/6m/.5-30MHzrx 1299 00 1089 
A "^-s Reguiar SALE 

IC*2KL HF solid state amp w/ps.. ...... 1999 00 1699 

IC4KL HF IKW out s/s amp w/ps €995 00 599S 

EX-€27 HF auto, ant setector (Spemf) 315,00 269*^ 
PS' 15 20A external power supply ..».. 175,00 159*^ 
PS'30 Systems p/s w/cord, 6 pm plug 349.00 319^^ 

SP-3 External speaher.,„ 65. 00 

SP-7 Small external speaker 51 99 

CR-64 Htgh stab. rel. jttat 751 A. etc ... 79.00 

SM-6 Desk micropttone. ..».„.., 47,95 

SM-8 Desk mic two cables, scan 89.00 

AT' 100 lOOW Sband auto, anl, tuner ... 445,00 389^ 
AT-50a 500W 9^band auto, ant tuner ... 589.00 519^^ 
AH-2 8-band tuner w/mount & whip .... 758 00 689^^ 
AH-2A Ant tiioer system, only.. (Spiem 559.00 469'^ 
aC'5 WorfdGiock„„„......,..fClM»fy 91.95 69'^ 

Acct^soriesfOT (C-765. 7S1. 725 • CALL for Prices 



?COM 



* Large Stocks 

* Fast Service 

* Top Trades 




VHf ■' UHF BBse Tran$neivGf& 
(C'275A 25w2mFf^/SSB/CWw/ps.,. 

IC-275H 100w2mFM/SSB/CW 

IC 475A 25w 440 FM/SSB/CW w/ps 
IC'475H lOOw 440 FM/SSB/CW (Sp^c) 
IC^575A 25w 6/ 10m icvr/ps (Sfmili 
IC-575H 25w iODw 6/lOm Kcvr.,..,.,. 



Regular SALE 
1299.00 1129 
1399.00 1199 
1399.00 1199 
1599 00 1269 
1399 00 1099 
16^9.00 1469 




^.'HF/n 



'\t]'\c' TrrinsreiV€-f^: 



' ■ -p ■ » i * I 



IC-229A 25w 2m FM/TTP mic 

1C-229H 50w2mFM/TIPrrnc 

IC-448A 25w 440 FM/TTP ... (Chmaf) 

Dand FM Trans ■ rs 
IC-3220A 25w 2m/440 fM/TTP mic... 
IC 3220H 45w 2m/35w 440 FM/TTP 

1C'2400A 2m/440 FM/HP... (Spmrif 
IC-2500A 35w 440/1.2GHZ FM 




II' band FM Transceiver Reguliir 

IC-901 2m/440 Fiber opt jtcvr f5^/J 119900 

UXR91A Broadband receiver unit... 389 00 

UXvi9A lOwiOmunrt......... 299.00 

UX'59A i0w6munit., 349.00 

UX-592A 2m SS8/CW module , 599.00 

yX-39A 25w 220MH2 unit fSp^) 349 00 
yX-129A lOw L2GH2 unit .......... 549 00 

VMF '\ MP Mnhiip Tf:in<^P vRf<? Regular 

IC 970A 25w 2m/43{J MHz transceiver 2895.00 

IC-970H 45w 2m/430 MH; transceswer 3149 00 

yX-R96 50905 Mhz receive unit.... 339.00 

^/nhde Anip-nriri Regular 

AH'32 2m/440 Dual Band mobile ant 39.00 

AHB'32 Trufikhp mount , 35.00 

Larsen PO-K Roof mount 23,00 

Larsen PO-TLM Trunk-lip mount 24.70 

Ursen PO-HU Magnetic mount..... 28 75 

1^ - Refular 

RP 1510 2m 25w repeater.............. IS4900 

RP-2210 220MHz 25 w repeater........ 1649,00 

RP 4020 440MHi 25w repealer,......, 2299 00 

RP-1220 12GHz lOw repeater. 259S00 



Sale 
929^^ 
349'^ 
269^- 
319*^ 
529*^ 
279** 
499«* 

Salt 
2499 
2699 
349** 

Sale 



Safe 
1649 
1399 
1999 
2249 




WSA 



Use pat 

CREDIT 
CARD 




Order Toll Free: 1-800-558-0411 



mEmnmufiim 




Regular Sale 

449.00 389^^ 
479.00 4 19« 

599 00 499^^ 
Regular Ss-: 
659.00 559'^ 

699 00 sas*' 

S99.00 699« 
999.00 869*' 



lC-02AT/High Power 
I C 04 AT 440 iCksmf) 

IC-2SA 2m „ (Sf^^h 
IC2SAT 2m/WfSpm 

IC 3SAT ?2U HT/TIP 
IC-4SAT 440 HT/TTP 

IC 2GAT ^m HT/TTP 
IC 4GAI 440MHz. TIP 

IC-32Af '2m/440 NT 
IC 24AT 2m/440 NT 



Regular SALE 
409 00 349" 
449 00 22T' 

419 00 299*'^ 
439 00 359^^ 

449 00 369*^ 
449.00 369*'^ 

429.00 379^' 
449.00 369^'^ 

629 00 549^^- 
629 00 549^^ 



ImitBJOfhf! . . FREE BP-82 external 7.2V @ 
: 300ma. battery w/ 1C- 2SAT or lC-3SATpucfiase 



IC-12GAT Iw 1.2GH2 HT/batl/cgr/TTP 

Airrmf\ hand handhf*ld?: 

A-2 5W PEF synth, aircraft HT,.... — 

A-20 Synth, aircraft HT w/VOR 

For HT Accessories • CALL for 

R'71A lOOkHz to 30MH? receiver...... 

ftC'll Infrared remote controller.,.. 

FL-32A 500 Hz CW filter 

FL-63A 250 Hz CW filter (1st IF).... 

FL44A SSB filter |2nd IF).... 

EX-257 FM umt 

EX'310 Voice synttiesjrer 

CR44 Higt^ stability oscillator xtil 

SP-3 Extemal speaker 

CK-70{EX-2991 12V DC option 



52900 

Regular 

525,00 

62500 

Prices 

Regular 

$999.00 

70,99 

69.00 

59-00 

178 00 

49,00 

59,00 

79.00 

65.00 

12.99 



469^^ 
SALE 
479*^ 
549*5 

Sft»F 
869" 



159 



*i 




R-7000 2&MHz 2GHz receiver,...,...,. 1199.00 1029 
RC-12 Infrared remote controller.... 70,99 

EX- 3 10 Voice synmestzef 59.00 

TV-R7000 AlVonit.. , 139 00129'^ 




R-90OO 100KHz-2GHz all-mode rcvr ... 5459 00 4699 

Due to the size of the ICOM product Ime. some 
accessory items are not listed. If you have a question, 
please call. Prices subject tn cfiange without notice 



Top Trades I m We'll take your 
Clean Late Model gear in trade 
towards New ICOM Equipment. 

Write or Call loi our Quote Today! 



^ * 0¥et 3S Ifesfs m Amateur RbcHo 
HOURS: Mon, thru Fri. 9'5:30; Sat. 9-3 



FAX: (414) 358-3337 



5710 W. Good Hope Road; Milwaukee, Wl 53223 • Phone (414) 358-0333 



WICKLIFFE. Ohio 44092 

28940 Euclid Avenue 

Phone (216) 585 7388 

1-800-321-3594 



" BRANCH STORES pu.;?«'?r.?/^ ^'**7..,« 

CHICAGO. Illinois 60630 
ORLANDO. Fla. 32803 CLEARWATER. Fla. 34625 LAS VECAS. Nev. 8910e ERJCKSON COMMUNICATtONS 
62 i Commonweaith Ave. 1898 Drew Stieet 1072 N. Rancho Drive 5456 N Milwaukee Avenue 

Phone (407) 894-3238 Phone (813) 461-4267 Phone (702) 647-3114 Phone (312) 631 5181 

1-800-327-1917 No Toll Free Line 1-800-634-6227 1-800-521-5802 



62 i Commonwealth Ave. 
Phone (407) 894 3238 

1 800-327 1917 



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The ALINCO Model DR-590T is a full featured/dual band trance! ver that is user friendly, 
and puts the fun back in Radio. 

The DR-590T is packed with more features than most hams will ever use But it is 
engineered so thai you dont have to be an engineer to understand and use the various 
functions. The easy LCD display lets the operator know, at a glance, which functions are 
in operation. 

ALINCO has listened to you, the Ham, and incorporated many of the features you told us 
you wanted in a Dual Band ( VHF/UHF) radio. And we did it while keeping the operations 
truly user friendly. 




Ultra-Compact Body 
5-7A(W)x27H)xT(D) 

High Power (Selectable) 

High: 45T at VHF High: iW al IFHF 
Jiiddle low Middie 8W 

Low: 5W Low: 4 W 

Extended Receiver Range 

144.00 - 141995 Mtiz f TX ). 130 - 173.995 Mhi 

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(Specification guaranteed on amateur 

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permits requi 



FEATURES 



• ShBuitaDeous 

R«:eiviiig on both band.s at the same lime 
Scanning iniermix scan mode! on both bands 
at the same time, 

• Independent VHF & UHF Controls 

• Detachable 

With Ihe optional remoling kit, the front 
panel can be seperated from the main uniL 

• DSQ (DTMF Squelch) Functian 

• Code Squelch Function 

You can program a 3 digit code that will 
open the squelch only when the s^ime code 
s%nal is receive from another transceiver. 
This allows for selective receiving. Addition- 
aOy, with the optional tone ^uelch unit, the 



code squelch and tone squelch work 
together as a powerful calling function. 

Various Useful Paging Functions for 
ing Calling ana Individual 



DR-590T 




Remote Control Microphone 

With this microphone there are several 
functions thai can be controlled remoieiy: 
L Direct seuing of frequencies in VFO mode 
2. Up/ Down of memory channels In 

memurv mode 
S Shifting to call mode 
4, ARM (Automatic Repeater Mode) 
S VifF/UHF Switching 
6. Up/Down by 1 Mhi steps 
Z Setting and Selecting DSJ codes 
8. Setting and Automatic Dialer 

Scanning Features 

Memory Scan, Program Scan, ARM Scan, 
Band Scan, and more Scan. 

Memory Channels 

The unit has 28 memorv channels, one 
independent 'Call* channel and 10 ARM 
memory channels (40 channels in total). 
You can program set tones, shift frequences^ 
shift directions, and channel steps in each 
of the 28 memory channels. 

ARM (Automatic Repeater Memory) 
Function 

10 repealer channels can be memorized 



automatically. While ARM mtwle is active, 
scanning stops at vacant channels and 
pauses, then starts again automatically. 
This function is useful to find vacant 
repeaters. 

■ ABX (Automatic Band Exchange) 
Function 

* Bell Function 

' Dimmer Function 

Selectable 2 different brightness of LCD 

light 

* Three Priority Functions 

VFO Priority, Memory Priority and Call 
Priority, 

- Repeater Operation 

The DR-S90T can be used as a cross band 
repeater 

* Full Duplex Cross band Operation 

* Others 

1 Auto Dialer Function 

2 6 Channel Steps (5/10/125/15/20/25 
Khz) 

5. DTMF Monitor Function 

4 38 Sub-Audible Tones bulli-in 

5 And Many Other Features 




ALINCO ELECTRONICS INC. 

438 AMAPOLA AVE., LOT 130, TORRANCE. CALIFORNfA 90501 
Tel: (213) 618-8616 Fax: (213) 618-8758 

CIRCIX 67 ON READER SERVICE CARD 



Feedba ck 



In our continuing effort to presani 
the best in amateur radio features 
and columns, we recognize the 
need to go directly to the source — 
you. the reader. Articles and 
columns are assigned feedback 
numbers, which appear on each ar- 
tlcleycotumn and are also listed 
here. These numbers correspond 
to those on the feedback card oppo- 
site th»s page. On the card, please 
check the bo>t which honestly rep- 
resents your opinion of each article 
or column. 

Do we really read the feedback 
cards? You bet! The results are tab- 
ulated each month, and the editors 
take a good, hard kx>k at what you 
do and don't like. To show our ap- 
preciation, we draw one feedback 
card each month and award the 
lucky winner a free one-year sub- 
scription (or extension) to 73. 

To save on postage, why not fill 
out the Product Report card and the 
Feedback card and put them In an 
envelope? Toss in a damning or 
praising letier to the editor while 
you're at it. Yoy can also enter your 
QSL in our QSL of the Month con- 
test. All for the low, low price of 25 
cents! 

Feedback* TtUe 

1 Letters 

2 Never Say Die 
3QRX 

4 Behold the BackPacket! 

5 Ham Profiles 

6 Upgrade Your HD-4040 

7 Review: Ten-Tec Hercules II 

8 The VOX Plus 

9 Review: Ltghtning BoU 
Dual-Band 

10 Review: PacComm PSK-I 

1 1 Pack Your Seabag, *^ Sparks" 

12 Review: ICOMlC^726 

13 Dealer Directory 

14 RTTYLoop 

15 Looking West 

16 Hams wcth Class 

17 Homing In 
IB Updates 

19 Audio Powered Tape Recorder 
Controller 

20 New Products 

21 Above & Beyond 

22 Special Events 

23 Ask Kaboom 

24 QRP 

25 1990 Annual Index 
26AdfndeKl2/90 
27 ATV 
2B 73 International 

29 DX 

30 Barter 'n* Buy 

31 Hamsats 

32 Random Output 

33 Propagation 

34 Review: PT-340 TunerTuner 



fiumbef S on your Feedtsack card 



Ham profiles 

There are no "average" hams! 




Photo A. Left to right: Gem UA9MA. Chuck {Charfes Emify) WWW, and Serg 
UA9MC, visiting WINW in November 19B9. They are hokiing tophies W1NW 
53AND DXCC, 5BAND WAZ 5BAND WAS. 



Greetings from West Siberfa 

Gennady Kolmakov UA9MA writes 
us that he found out about amateur 
radio when ha was a freshman in the 
Institute of Railroad Engineers in 1972. 
At thai lima, there was an active collec- 
live radk} station, UK9MBA, at the insti- 
tute. He soon received hts personal 
call UA9MAF, and he built his first di- 
rectional antenna. Since then, his main 
interests have been DXing and con- 




Photo D. Steven O. Seifers N5GZP 
wins joumalism awards. 

From Interest to Career 

Licensed as an amateur radio opera- 
tor at the age of 12. Steven O^ Sellers' 
interest in the hobby led to hts first 
job — in broadcasting at a small, local 
station in his hometown of Kenedy k 
Texas, when he was 15. 

Steve N5GZP is active on 10 meters. 
He's a member of TEN-X Internal ionaf, 
the ARRU and the Palomar Amateiir 
Radio Out) in the IModh County region 
of San 1 ego. 

Recently, United Press International 
presented Steve with two broadcasting 
awards for two radio documentaries he 
produced and reponed. The awards 
were tor best investigative documefF 
tary in the Western Region and out- 
standing achievement in reporting in 
the Western Region TNXKGMG-AM/ 



testing. In the near future, he plans to 
learn about RTTY and packet. 

Olga, his wtfe, doesn't share his In- 
terest in amateur radio* although she 
accepts his hobby with respect and un* 
derstanding. But his sons, nine-year- 
old Mike and six-year-oid Alex, are suc- 
cessful ly studying CW. 

Besides radio, Gennady is interest- 
ed in music. He likes all kinds of Ameri- 
can con temporary music, such as all 
fom>sof jazz, 

Cunantly, he is vice-president of the 
West Siberia DX Cfub and he spends 
much time domg the admintstralive 
and c^rganizational work. In particular, 
tie's arranging a DXpedition to one of 
the far regions of the U.S.S.R. He*s 
also QSL manager for radio stations 
4K201L, 4K2BOU, 4K20KV, 4K2BA2. 
and4K4AB. 

'Td like to use this occasion to send 
through your journai my warmest wish- 
es to all Amencan ham radio fans. Td 
li^e to hope that radio helps people of 
our planet to understand each other 




Photo B. Off to a good start, s/x-yesr- 
oki Terry Van Sickfe KB5NTC pians to 
get his Extra in a few years. 

Going Far— Fast 

The Piano Amateur Radio Kltib 
(PARK) congratulates Terry Van Sick- 
le, son of Brenda NSL£U and Terry Sr, 
WQ5WXI, on passing the Novice Class 
amateur radio exams last August. Six- 
year-old Terry had been studying in a 
class taught by Tad Derx N50DR. The 
class, sponsored by PARK^ had 45 sty- 
dentsf 

Since Terry KB5NTC couldn't wrtle 
fast enough to copy Morse code by 
hand, he passed his code test by typing 
the code test portion on a laptop com- 
puter. 

Terry is a first grader at The Green- 
hill School in Addison, Texas. He's in- 
terested in learning how to work ama- 
teur satellites. He hopes to have his 
Extra Class by <he trme he's tO of 11. 
TNXJohn T Beadfes. 



belter and bring peace to the world/ 
TNX, Gennady, for your greetings and 
wishes. Aiso, thank you for sending ex- 
amples of the t>0auttfijf awards of the 
West Siberia DX Ciub. which we were 
happy to pui>fish m "73 intemattonai" 
from October 1939 until the summer of 
1990. 



Let s Talk! 

Bob Weinstein K£2FE, assistant 
principal of Richmond Hill High 
School, says that these high schod 
students love to talk with other high 
school students and they QSL "100% 



directly." They rapidly become disen- 
chanted when eti they get is "59 old 
man, QSL via the bureau. . /' dunng 
contests To Wayne, KE2FE says. "\ 
really agree with your idea about limit- 
ing credits for DXCC to certain contest 
dates." 




I 



Photo C. Bob Weinstein KE2FB (far back, on the right) and his ciass of high scfKX^t 
hams. 

73 Amateur Radio Today • December J 990 17 



a. 




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• Al! units available in 220 VAC inpul voltage 
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Number 6 on your Feedback card 



Upgrade Your HD-4040 



KISS your Heath HD^4040 and keep AX.25 too! 



by Mark Dieter N2BL! 



■ was in the mood to try sotnething new. I 
had a copy of K A9Q's Iniemet package for 
my Macintosh, but my old TNC would not 
support il (it requires KJSS). I didn'l want to 
invest lots of money in a new TNC, and I 
knew a KJSS upgrade would noi allow me to 
u.'ie the TNC in normal AX, 25 mode. I have 
an excellent temiinijl program thai would be 
useless without a full-function TNC, I wanted 
both, and T didn't wanl lo spend any money. 
Sound familiar? So I put the little gray cells to 
work and this is what I came up with. 

The KISS 

KJSS flCeep It Simple Stupid) provides di- 
rect computer-lo-TNC communica lions us- 
ing a simple protocoL Normal TNCs were 
designed to interface with humans, not com- 
puters. By designing the TNC for humans, it 
actually makes it harder to interface the TNC 
lo conipuier applications, KISS removes 
many of those restrictions by placing most of 
the TNC functions within the attached com- 
puter. A KJSS TNC only converts between 
asynchronous data for the computer to syn- 
chronous HDLC (High Level Data Control) 
for the radio, and it controls the transmitter. 
This allows the computer to maintain multi- 
ple connects, run new protocols, and other 
advanced functions, Some software packages 
like bulletin boards, TCP/IP (the KA9Q soft- 
ware), and others require a KISS TNC. 




The TNC 1 KISS upgrade from TAPR con- 
sists of a single EPROM. It costs about S12. 
For notmal installation, the new EPROM 
would replace the existing EPROM at hex 
address SEOQO. That^s U12 in the Heath HD- 
4040. If you replace that EPROM with the 
KISS one, your TNC will work fine in KISS 
mode. It's not even necessary to remove the 
other original EPROM chips. The TNC will 
ignore them. Of course, your TNC will not be 
able to operate in its normal AX.25 mode. 
But remember, wcVe not willing to give up 
our normal TNC functions for a KtSS! 

Making It Work 

What if we could mount both EPROMS in 
the TNC? Then all we have to do is t md a way 
to switch between the two EPROMS, right? 
Lucky for us there is already a socket in the 
TNC for an additional RAM or ROM chip — 
U8. So mounting the new chip is easy. But 
these EPROMS have 28 pins. How can we 



switch them a!I? The answer is: We don*t 
have to! All the address, data, and control 
signals, except one (more about that later), 
are the same as U 1 2. The only problem left is 
that the starting memory address of U8 is 
4000. The KISS EPROM must be installed 
at address SEOOO. 

All devices thai communicate with the mi- 
croprocessor have specific addresses as- 
signed to them . The address dect>ding circuits 
ensure thai the correct device is '"enabled" 
when it is addressed by the microprocessor. 
Each ROM chip makes up one 8-kilobyic 
segment of the entire memory. The starting 
address of each chip (8-kilobylc segment for 
ROM) is determined bv the address decoder 
y4. This IC decodes the high bits of the 
address from the microprocessor and pro- 
duces a chip select signal to the memory 
device that holds the particular memory loca- 
tion the microprocessor wants. The chip se- 
lect **enables" a particular memory chip and 




Figure L DPDT switch wiring demils. 



Figure 2. iMcmion of wires A, B, and Con the TNC I circtiir hoard (wire D amneas to the 5 volt 
bus), 

73 Amateur Radio Today • December. 1990 19 




Photo A. The Heath HD-4040 TNC. 




Phoio B. The insides (note jumper wire locanansi^ 



allows it to react to the address, cantrol, atid 
data signals from the microprocessor. Essen- 
tially, it turns the chip on or off. Remember, I 
said there is only one signal thai i*; different 
between U8 and U12. Yep, you guessed it! 
It's the chip select. 

What we want to do is re-map the starting 
address of chip socket U8 (starting address 
$4CKXJ) to U 12 (starting address SBOOO). This 
can be done quite easily by connecting the 
chip select signal for U12 to the chip enable 
pin on U8, then cutting the normal chip select 
traces from U4 to U8 and U4 to Ul2. The 
chip select of the unused EPROM must be 
tied to 4*5V. This effectively disables the 
chip and removes it from the circuit. 

By doing this we can make US have a 
starting addr^s of SEOOO, and we can disable 
U 1 2 , If we take the chip select sign^ for U 12 
and switch it between IJ12 and U8 (and 
switch ihe unused chip to -i-5V) we can 
switch which EPROM is seen by the mi- 
croprocessor at address SEOOO. 

So it turns out that we only need to switch 
one signal* the chip select. When we flip the 
switch and toggle the address SEtXX) between 
socket U8 and U 12, we toggle between KISS 
and AX -25 mode, 

Installation— Step by Step 

Very few parts are required to install 
this upgrade in your TNC: the TAPR KISS 
TNC I EPROM, a good quality DPDT 
switch, and a few strands of small-gauge 

20 73 Amateur Radio Today • December, 1990 



wirc (ribbon conduetor works great). 

In the following instructions I will be refer- 
ring to positions on the TNC circuit board. It 
is important that we have a common refer- 
ence to locate items on the board. All my 
instructions will refer to the board, looking at 
it from the component side, with front toward 
the front of the cabinet (LEDs are mountoJ in 
the front of the board) . 

Fir^, open the HD-4040 case. Find a spot 
in the case lo locate the DPDT switch. Make 
sure it will clear the board and aU compo- 
nents. I put mine in back near the power 
regulator. 

Second, remove the circuit board. When 
you make the hole for the switch you will be 
making lots of aluminum filings which could 
short components on the board. To remove 
the board you must remove seven nuts hold- 
ing the board in, and unplug the 7'pin power 
plug J4. Gendy pull the front LEDs back to 
clear the case. 

Next, put a hole in die case for the switch. 
Depending on the size and type of switch you 
have, the method will vary. Then reinstall the 
board into the case. 

Locate U4, U8, and U12. Everything 
should be marked on the circuit board. Care- 
fully install the TAPR TNC 1 KISS EPROM 
into socket U8. The notch end should match 
the notch shown on the circuit board. Make 
sure you do not bend any of the pins! 

Solder four 9Hnch wires onto the DPDT 
switch, as shown in Figure i. Mount the 



DPDT switch into the case. Insert wire "A*' 
into the hole in the circuit board, near 
the front left comer of 15, and solder. (See 
Figure 2.) Take your time — the hole is very 
tiny. 

Insert wire "*B** into the hole in the circuit 
boaiti directly forward of the left-most pin of 
iP8, and solder. Insert wire *'C" into the 
hole forward of U4 slightly lo the right of its 
centerline (it's the closest hole to U4 towards 
the front), and solder. 

Insert wire * * D' ' into one of the holes in the 
+5V bus (on the front right-hand side), and 
solder. Locate the circuit trace from U4 pin 9 
to U 12 pin 20, Since the board has traces on 
both sides it^s not obvious. It is the same trace 
that wire "A** is connected to. (See Figure 2,) 

Now, the tricky part. Take a very fme- 
tipped knife or scribing tool and cut the trace 
somewhere to the right of where wire * 'A" is 
connected. I found that a scraping motion was 
most effective. Make sure the trace is cut 
completely through. 

Locate the circuit trace from U4 pin 2 to U8 
pin 20. It is the same trace diat wirc **B" is 
connected to. {See Figure 2.) Cut the trace to 
the right of where wire B is connected. Place 
jumper JP6 to the right. Place jumper JP8 to 
the right. 

Operation 

With the upgrade in place, you're ready to 
try it out. Power-up your favorite terminal 
emulator and the TNC. If you don*t see the 
norma! welcome message from your TNC, 
power the unit off, flip the * 'Normal / KISS" 
switch^ and turn it back on. One position or 
the other will be the normal mode. CAU- 
TION: I recommend that you always turn the 
TNC off when changing the ** Normal / 
KISS^' switch. In normal mode your TNC 
should behave exactly as before, without so 
much as a changed parameter. 

To try out you r TNC 's new-found capabili- 
ties, you will of course need KISS software. 
Unfortunately, TAPR did not provide in- 
structions widi my EPROM. I found out that 
the TNC in KISS mode is fued at 4800 baud, 
8 data bits^ no parity^ and I stop bit. Your 
KISS software is probably already config- 
ured for that setup. None of the normal TNC 
settings have any effect on KISS operation. 
Remember all those TNC functions are done 
in your computer in KISS mode. If you have 
the optional Heath HDA-4040-1 TNC status 
indicator, the indicator LEDs will not work in 
KISS mode. 

Postscript 

Unfortunately, this upgrade uses up the 
socket for additiotial RAM (I wasn't going to 

add more anyway), but nothing is completely 
free, right? 

The KISS EPROM ps well as the KA9Q 
Internet Software Package is available from 
TAPR. To get an order form write to: Tucson 
Amateur Packet Radio, P.O. Box 12925, 
Tucson AZ 85732; {602) 749-9479, 



You may camact Mark Dieter N2BLI at 86 
Hiddenwood Dr. , Rochester NY J 461 6, 




y 



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Numbtf 7 on your Feedback ami 



73 Review 



by a Drayton Cooper III, N4LBJ 



Ten-Tec's Hercules II 

Model 420 

Turn your rig into a 550 watt transceiver! 



Ten-Tec. Inc. 

Highway 411 East 

Seviefville TN 37862 

Phone:(615)453-7172 

Model 420: $1275. 

Power supply 9420: $795. 



Ten*Tec's new Hercules II solid state 
linear amplifier fills an tmporlant niche in 
the equipment line-up available to today's 
ham. and does it with elegance and techno- 
logical appropriateness. 1 have operated the 
model 420, as the Hercules 11 is known at 
Ten-Tec. since March 1990. and il has per- 
tormed op to specs every lime I've turned if 
on. it is extremely easy to drive, requiring only 
35-50 watts Input to produce the full rated 
output of 550 watts. U is exceedingly quiet. It 
is. far and away, the simplest amplifier to oper- 
ate thai I've ever used. 

The Medium Power Niche 

First, a word about its power output capabili- 
ty. The 420 is not a classic "rock crusher." 
The ham who chooses the Hercules II should 
realize from ^he outset that this is a medium- 
power amplitJer. 

There is definitely a place tor a mediym- 
power amplifier in today's world. The rules 
and regulations we operate under stress the 
importance ol running only enough power to 
maintain satisfactory communication. It's very 
difficult to run a 1600-watt amplifier at much 
less than ^ull output without developing pfob- 
lems of reduced thermal efficiency in the final 
tubes. Generally speaking, reliable communi- 
cations can be maintained at much less power 
than the maximum allowable by law. It should 
be noted that Ihe difference between a 500 
watt power level and the full legal limit of 1500 
watts will only raise your signal a Httle less 
than an S-unit. That extra S-unit can be cosily 
If you look at the price of a full-power amplifier. 




Oulet, Easy, and Fast 

For years, solid stale technology has been 
portrayed as basically simple, straightfor- 
ward, and highly reliable. Yet with a few nota- 
ble exceptions, we have used the benefits of 
solid state technology only in QRP rigs and in 
transceivers up to the T00-t50 watt class . 

The Hercules II provides us with an opportu* 
nity to use the positive characteristics of solid 
state devices in a kilowatt-input-class amplifi- 
er. And the benefits are quickly recognizable 
the minute you switch on the 420. It is incredi- 
bly quiet, amazingly easy and simple to oper- 
ate, and it provides instantaneous QSK. or full 
break-in CW! 

Complete setHjp of the 420 can be accom* 
plishad in about 15 minutes. Open the box. 

22 73 Amateur Radio Today ■ December. 1990 



takeout the RFdeck, make the three intercon- 
nections to the transceiver, screw in the PL- 
259 from the antenna, conned the power sup- 
ply cable, and you*re ready to operate. it*s 
honestly that simple. 

A No-Sweat Amp 

Assuming you have an SWR of less than 2:1 
on your fe^line. you just turn il on and talk. 
There's no warm-up pericxi, no waiting for ca- 
pacitors in the power supply to charge up. no 
tube filaments to heat. And there's rK> grid 
drive fo peak or final circuit to dip. If you 're the 
lype who enjoys fiddling with his gear, this 
may be disconcerting at first. But believe me, 
it's a welcome change after years of worrying 
about loo much, or too little, grid current; 
about whether or not the final was loaded up 
"tightly'' enough; or about a fatal parasitic 
wiping out a $200 tut>el 

Since the theory of how Ten-Tec achieves 
1000 watts input with 12*voli transistors has 
been thoroughly covered elsewhere. I won't 
get into that. Suffice it to say that they do, and 
if something were to go wrong, the transistors 
would be much less expensive to replace than 
50-voll models. 



The 9420 Supply— Heavy is the Word 

Another feature of the Hercules II that 
should appeal to many in today's space-con- 
scious age is its size. The 420 takes up no 
more space in your shack than a full-sized 
transceiver. In fact, the Hercules il essentially 
matches the Tan- Tec Paragon or Omni-V 
transceivers for compactness. 

To accomplish this, the RF deck and the 
power supply had to be separated, as in the 
tradition of the Ten -Tec Titan amplifier. Herein 
lies the only disadvantage that I have discov* 
ered in the system. Naturally, a power supply 
capable of providing ef^ough current at 12-14 
volts DC to run a kilowatt-input linear has to be 
heavy. Unfortunately, the 9420 supply Is 



over the UPS weight limit and must be 
shipped separately from the RF deck of the 
amplifier. Larry Worth. Ten-Tec's service 
manager, told me that technicians at the fac- 
tory have successfully run a 420 on a heavy- 
duty car battery and an automatic trickle 
chargef. In some of their advertising, Ten-Tec 
suggests this as an alternate way of powering 
the Hercules IL It certainly would be a less 
expensive way to go. 

However, my experience with the 420-9420 
system since last March leads me to recom- 
mend biting the bullet and going with the com- 
plete package. As heavy as the 9420 is, It can 
be conveniently placed out of the way. Since it 
is controlled by the onoff switch on the ampli- 
fier, constant access to it is not necessary. 
Just put it where air can circulate around its 
heat sinks. 

Incidentally, the 9420 is wired so that it can 
provide power for a 1 00-watt class transceiver 
as well as the 80-amp amplifier Believe me, 
you don't have to worry at)out whether it's 
stout enough to handle both the amp and your 
rig. 

Remote Control Feature 

A final feature of the 420 should be men- 
tioned. Ten-Tec designed the amplifier so that 
it can be fully remote-controlled. They provide 
a remote head for the unit, and you can con- 
nect the RF deck to the head with a 12-foot 
multi-conductor cable. The remote head, 
which contains all the function controls found 
on the front panel of the amplifier, including 
the LED-dhven PEP output Indicator, can be 
placed on the operating desk, and the ampli* 
fier itself can then be situated in any location 
the operator chooses. 

This feature was originally designed so that 
the 420 could be operated as a mobile ampli- 
fier (RF deck in the trunk, remote head under 
the dash), but it may also be a valuable feature 
for anyone whose shack is smalL 

Since fii^ using a linear back in the early 
'60s (a home-brew pair of 4-400s), I have 
sampled a variety of the breed. Each of them 
needed some degree of special handling to 
get it to perform up to snuff. Thus far, howev- 
er, the 420 is the first amplifier I have ever 
used that actually feels and acts like an exten- 
sion of the transceiver itself. In fact, using it 
makes me feel like I'm running a 550*watt 
transceiver. 



RAMSEY ELECTRONICS 




COM-3 
$279500 



2 WAY RADIO 
SERVICE MONITOR 

COM-3, ihe worth's mos^ popuFar iow<osl servi^ce mor\t- 
tor. For shops bjg or small, the COM-3 ttelivecs advanced 
i^9pJ3.tiilii'i6£ fcif a fanisiJc^ pric@ — stnti out n^w i&^s^ pro- 
gfam allows you [o own a COM-3 for less Ihan $3.00 a day, 
Features •Dlrecl entry keyboard with programmable 
memory -Audio & iJansmHteF frequency coupler » LEO tjar 
grapih frequency/'errGr devhalion display •0.1-10.000 pV 
Qutpjt levels «Hagh receive seinslllvily, \&$.^ tri^^n S pV 
• 1 00 kHz to 999.99^5 MHz -ContlTTtiouS freque-ncy cover- 
age •Transmll prelection, up to 100 watis "CTS tone 
enc(>dec, 1 kHz and 'Sji.ttTnfli modulaii&n. 




RSG-IO 
$249500 



SYNTHESIZED 
SIGNAL GENERATOR 

Finally, a iovK:ost ia& quaidy signal generac&r— a iru* 
aftemathvie to the S7.,0OD generators. The FlSG-10 Is a 
hard wQrklfig, tjul easy to use generator it^i^ai lor (tie ^ab 
as well as toi production (esi. Lease It for less than $3,00 a 
day. Fealures «1 00 kHz lo 999 MHz • 100 Hz nesalutnn lo 
5O0 MHz. HOO Hz a-bOve • - 1 30 to -^ 10 dBm Ouipul rartge 
•0.1 dB oulpul resolution! "AIVI and FM modufalion •20 
programmable meimorles •Oulpul satectton in volls, dB, 
dBm wifh inslani conversion between uncts +RF output 
reverse power prelected •LED display gf all pararre- 
ters— iiti analog guesswork! 



FREQUENCY COUNTERS 



CT-70 7 DIGIT 525 MHz 



CT-SQ B DIGIT 600 MHz CT-tZ5 9 DrCIT 1 .2 GHz 



-^.. 



^^TfTh B olfo • 



n&rtisey EleetronJcs has Oeen manulaclur'irig elet- 
Ifonlc test gear for over 10 years and Is recognized for 
its Jab quality products at &ri?al<:1hroLjgl> prices. A\l of 
[.]4ir couniors cairy s. full one-y^a^ warrarily on parts 
and labor We lake gfeal pride in being the lafgest 
manyfactuiiOT of lo^^-cotc counters in ihe ei^nre 
U.S.A. Compare specif jcalions. Our counters ane full- 
feai4jred„ from audro to UHF, with FET high 
impedance inpul, prapsr wave shaping cIrcuUfy, and 
durable Ngh quaMy epoxy glass plaied-lhru PC 
board construe) ion All units are 100% manufactured 
in the U.S.A. All counters Inaturo r.O ppm accuracy. 




ACCESSORIES FOR COUNTERS 

TeJe^copic ship aAte^na — BMCpJiig. WA-iO ... SilflS 
High Impedance probe, llflht foacfi^g, HP-1 , St $.95 

Low-pass p^obe, amdious*, LP-i . , $iS-9$ 

Direct probe, general purpose use. DC-I . . IIS-SS 

Till t>al3. elevates coun^^r fcnr easy vi^wmg, TB-70 .... $ 9.9^5 
Reohargeabfefnlernaibatierypaoh.BP-4 . , , 3 9-9$ 
CT 90 oven timebase. I ppm accuracy, OV-1 : . 59.95 



ALL COUNTERS ARE FULLY WIRED & TESTED 



J^ODEL, 



CT-50 



CT-70 



CT-9CI 



:PT-125 



CT'250 



psioa 

PreseaFpr 



FREQ. RANGE 



aO Hz-600 MHz 



20 Hz-550 MHz 



lOHz-GOOMNi 



10HZ-1.25GH? 



10Hz^2.5GHz 
typically 3.DGH£ 



10MH*-1 SCHj. 

divide by 1000 



SENSITIVITY 



<25mVto500MHz 



<50mVlo150f^Hj 



^lOinV'lolSOMH; 
<150mVt0 600M'Hi 



<£5nnVto50MHi 
<r5mVlo500MHz 
■clOOmVtD IQHz 



<: 25 mV lo 50 MHz 
<:lOmVlo1 GHz 

<50rTfcVEoS.5GHz 



^5CmV 



xmmv 







SPEED RADAR 
$89.95 

complete kll 
5B-7 



Jew fow-cosl microwave Doppler 
3.darkll "clocks" cars, planes, boals, 
orses. bskes, baseballs, rrncsdels, run- 
ers. or vinually anythi^ng thai moves. 
Sperales at 2-6 OHe wtth over Vh -nvile 
ange LED di^g^tal readoul difspFays 
peeda in miles per tiour. kitomesers 
er higur. or feel per second! Ear- 
hone Output perm lis llslenrng to aciu- 
I Doppfer shift. Uses two 1-tb. coftee 
ar^S lor antenna ^'not Included] and 
jns on 12 VDC Easy lo Cnjilct— all 
licrowave circuitry is PC Stripline. Kit 
icludos deluxe ABS plastic case wllti 
p^erlv graphics for a professional 
joK A very uselyl ^nrJ Sul'-of-^un ku. 



yCROWAVE 
^TRUSIONALAHM 
, real microwave Doppler 
snsor that will detect a hu- 
ian as far a^ tQ la^t awvay. 
iperalea- On 1.3 GHz, and is 
01 affected by^heat. light, or 
ibratlons. Drives up lo tOO 
lA oylpyt. normally O'P&ri qr 
losed, runs on 12 VOC 
ompleta kit MD-3 $16.95 



ONEDECXIP£R 

oompiiele la^e decode* 
^a single PC board Fea- 
rer: =^00-5000 Hr ad- 
stabls rancpe via 2&(urn 
3[.TOfl|^reg!^-il:on,S|.7 
: U&eful for loucti'tone 
jrs;| delscljon, FSK, eic. 
an also ix us«J as A sra- 
e tone encoder. flu-Jis on 
la 12 volts 
Dm^sieiekit.TD-i i&.^B 



OLOft OPQAN 

ee mdsio come 
livfji 3 dideTSnC fights 
jcker with n^usic. 
i-n^ light each for 
tgh, mirt-range, and 
iws. Each indivrduaU 
.' «i<iiiisl9b^@ and 
rives up lo 300 W. 
unson no VAC. 
iL-t kH. $6.95 



■TMiFl 



8 



RESOLUTION 



1 Hz, 1 Hz 



1 Hz. 10 Hz, 100 Hz 



0.1 Hz, 10 Hz. 100 Hz 



0.1 Hz, 1 Hz, 10 Hz 



0.1 Hi. IHlJOHr 



Cronvert your existing counter 
Id 1 5 GHz 



PRrCE 



5189.95 



St30.9S 



S 169. 95 



5169.95 



$530.95 



$fl9,35 



BROADBAND 
PREAMP 




Soost those weai< sigMs to your 
scanner, TV, shortwave i-adio 0* fre- 
quency counter. Ffa! 25 dB gain, 1 to 
1000 MHz. 3dBNF. BNC connectors. 
Runs on 12 VDC or 110 VAC. 
PB-2, wired, includes AC adapter 
$S9.95 



2M POWER AMP 

Easy to buitd power amp has 6 Etmes 
power gam, 1W m, aW out, £W in, 
1 6W OUl, 5W is for 40 W out. Same 
amp as feaiured in many hami mag- 
•azirve arjicles. Complete wi-th alt 
pans, loss case and T-H relay. 
PA-1 , 4aW pwr amp kit . . ^, .: ; . $29 .95 
TP- 1 . PF sen^d Tfl relay kii . S e.95 



MUSIC MACHINE 

tJaat k'l itiaJt will produce 25 dilter- 
^rtt gLftMliil flrid popular Ipnes, 
P^U5 3 doorctiime sourtds Lots of 
lun l(y daan>ells, stiop. or swrs en- 
irances, car honn, music S?otiiM,eic. 

Runs on 9V bAltery ^jr wflll trgns- 
lormer E«elleni! spea>(0r volume 
3Jtd adju^tatriB ti^po and pitt^. 
fiiki our case set for 4 handMflie 
linisti^ k}04i 

Compleleliit, MW-5^ $24.95 

Case 4 K<«b sei. CM M-5 S 1 2 .35 



VOICE ACTIVATED 
SWITCH 

Vofce activated 
swilch kit pfovid&s 
switched output wilh 
curreni capabiltiy up 
to 100 rnA. Can drive 
relays, tights, LED, or 
even a lape recwrdfir 
motor, Runs on 9 
VDC. 
VS-1 kil. . . $6.95 



LJGHTBEAH 
COMMUNtCATORS 

Trar^Srrl^tS 9ydJ0 Over 
mlrared beam up Co 
30" — use simpfo lens- 
es to go up to Vi mile? 
Hum free, uses 30 kViz 
carrier. Great for wire- 
teas earphones Or un- 
det^iahte "bitg." 
Transmitter + receiv- 
er set. LBSC- S19.35 




FM WIRELESS 
MIKE KITS 

FM-3 
SHOWN 

P\ck the unit thal's righl for you. Alt 
units If^r^snnSt stable Signal in 30- 
108 MHz FM band up to 300' eiccepl 
(or hi power FM-4 that goas up to W 
mile. 

FM-1, basic unit . . $5.95 

FM-2. as above" bytwtth acWedmll^a 
prcamp ....... i ... ...... ... .$ 7.95 

FM-4, font! range, high power wilh 
very sensitive audio siection, picks 
up voices 10' away $14.95 

FM-3, oomptete unit includes case, 
baltery, swilch. antenna, and built -In 
condensDf mike. Eji-ceKent (ideJity, 
vejy Small, M SI 6. 95 

FM-3WT, as al^ve^ but tully wined 
afidleated $t9.95 

SMC, miniature sensithva mil^e car- 
tridge lor FM-t, 2, 4 .. $S.95 



PACKET RADIO 

Commodore CMn^^ packet 
fadia inladace. Uses famous 
German Pi^ic-om so^l^i^f^. Fea' 
lujss EXAfl IC ctiip set lor reli- 
able operal ion— runs HF or 
VHF lorhfis. «n<;lude« FREE disS? 
so'tyvare. PC tjoand, ail naces- 
sary pans and full documenta- 
ihon 
Complete kit, FC-1 $49 95 



TELEPHONE 
TflANSMITTEH 

Mirti-siied with profas- 
sionai performance 
Self-powered fronn 
phone line, transmits 
in FM b^aadcasi band 
up to Vj. mile ingtaHs 
easily anywhere on 
phone line or msida 
phonef 
PB-1 kit $14,95 



FMflADIO 
FulMledged superhet, 
mi^crovolt sensillvlty. 
IC detecior and io,7 
MHz IF, Tunes Std. 
Fi<A broadcast band as 
we^i ^S large pOrliornS 
on each end ideal for 
"bug" receiver, hob- 
by expertmenis or 
even as FM radios 
FR-1 hEt , . . $14,95 



LO NOISE PREAIMPS 

Make that reclever come 
ALIVE' Small size for easy 
inslailation wilh Hl-Q tuned 
inpul for peiak perform^ftce, 
E?tcellen! gairn and nOise lig- 
ure— guaranteed lo iniprove 
reception! SpecUy band: 
2}4—Pn-'iQ. SaO MHz— PR^ 
2O,440MHz— Pn^O. 
Each kll J17.95 



TJCKLESTIK 

A shochlna kW. Blfnlk- 
tng LED attracts vic- 
tims to pick up Inno- 
cerni-looking can— 
you watch the (unf Ide- 
aJ tor office desks, 
pad ies, nosey i(now-j(- 
alls^ 
TS-4 kit . . . . $9.95 



SUPER SLEUTH 

A super senaftiue am- 
plifier which will pick 
up a ptn drop at 15 
feel I Great for rYvoni- 
loring baby's ro^jffi or 
as geneial purpose 
amplifier Fuill2VW rms 
output. Runs on 6 to 
15 volts, uses 8-45 
ohm speaker 
6N-9 kil $5.95 



TV THAMSMtTTEW 

Transmit your VCR or 
TV camera throughoul 
your house. Stabte 
quallly signal, tur>stbie 
Ch 4-6. Accepts stan- 
dard video and audio 
Inputs. 
Complete kit, 

JM-7 $14.95 



BltOAOOAND 
PREAMP 

Verypoputar sensitive 
all-purpose preamp, 
ideal for scanner, 
TVs, VHF/UHF rtgs, 
counters. Lo noise, 20 
de gain, 100 kHi-1 
GHt, 9V-ia VOC OFH 
eration. 
SA-?kit . . $14.96 




$129 



FANTASTIC 2M FM TRANSCEIVER 

SYNTHESIZED— NO CRYSTALS TO BUY! 



Ramsey breaks the price harrier gn 2 meter rrgs? Here's the ideal 
rig for field days, hamfests, vacalions, second cars and packet (it 
even has dedicated packet connections). Six exparvdafcle diode- 
programmed channets, 5W RF output, sensitive duaf conversion 
receiver and EASY assembly. Why pay more for a secondhand 
old r^g wfiert you carv make your own lor iass- Have some fur with 
your own; truly AMERICAN-MADE FM rig! This kit coflws com- 
plete except for the case, mike aod speaker- ICOM or e(\un\ 
&peaker-mjke$ plug right in. Add our own beauliful case sol for a 
professiooai (aclory look. 

FTR-MSkil $139.95 

FTfl-146-C aluminum case & knob set . . . $24.35 



2 M & 220 BOOSTER AMP 

Here's a great booster for any 2 meter or 220 MHz hand-held unil. 

ThE?!^^^ i;>oi^er boosler^ defiver over 30 waiis ol oulpul, allowing you lo 

fill :ha repeater's full quieti'ng wtille the fow notse pneamp remarltabfy 

Improves receptkjn. Flamsey Electronics has sold thousands of £ rfleter 

aiTip kit£, bol (low we offer complelely w^red and tested 2 meter, as welt 

as 220 MHz, unila. Both have all ihe features o( jhe hjgih-priced boo^l- 

ers a1 a Iraclion of the cost . 

PA-1 Z MTR POWER BOOSTER ftO X potwor gain) 

Fully wired S. tested . , . $79;9£ 

PA^2D 220 MHz POWER BOOSTEfl (8 X power gain) 

FuJiy wired & lested $79.9S 




4 







QRP TRANSMITTERS HAM RECEIVERS 



20. 3S, 40, 80M 
CW TRANSMinERS 




JoFn iho fun on QWPl Thousands oi Ihese mini-ngs hava 
been sold and tone of DX contacts have been mad<e. 
Imagine working Eastern Europe with a $30 transmit- 
ter — that's ham radio at Its best I These CW ngs are ideal 
mates to the receivers at right, They have jwo-posision 
variable crystal control (one papular QRP XTAL mclifd- 
ed), onewati output and buili-in antenna swinch, Hunsort 
1 2 VDC. Add Dur matching case and l^nob set (or a harvd- 
Bome fl;nis.hed look. 

Yoyr Choifje of bands $29.95 

(Specify band" ORP-20, 30. 40 or aO} 
Maldilng case ft k nob sel, CQFI P . . .......... $i 2M 



E-Z KEY CMOS KEYER 



Send perfec! CW within an houir of receiving this kitl 
E3sy-tc-i^ui>ld kit has sidetor>e oscillator, speed coniol 
and keys mosS any Iranemitter. Runs lor monihs on a9V 
batlerv. 2&-page manual gives ideas onr making your 
own key for extra savings. Add our nnatthrng case set 
(or complete slation look. 

CW-7kil S24.9S 

Matching case kno^? set, CCW 5 1 2 .95 



ACTIVE ANTENNA 



Cramped fo- 5;?ace? Get longwire performance with 
thrs deskroip antenna. Properly designed uoil fnasdual 
HF arKi VHF Circuitry and built-in whip antenna, as well 
as external jack. RF gain control ajHJ 9V operation 
makes- unit IdeaF for SWLs, travelir»g hams or scanner 
buffs who need hcit\'ef reception. The matching case 
a Ad knob sel gives the un-it a hundred dollar look! 

AA-7Kil S24.95 

Matchingcasei knob set, CAA ,, , , . Sl£,95 



SPEECH SCRAMBLER 



Commurjhcate in toial privacy over phone or radio. Kit 
leatures full dupJex operation using frequeocy inver- 
sion. Both mike and speaker or Urte inVout connections 
Easy hookup to any radio^ and teleptiOr>e use requires 
no sitifeol oonnecliont Easy to bulfd 2 ^C circuit. Can afso 
be used to descram&le many 2-way radio s<gnats. Fin- 
tsh your Itit Off with the handsome case ft krvob sel. 

SS-7kit. . . $29.95 

Matching case ft knob set, CSS ,•..,,.....->-.:; $12.95 



SHORTWAVE RECEIVER 



20, 30, 40, OOM 
AD Mode RECEIVERS 



Build your own mini ham ^tatlo-n. Sansi^tive all-mode 
AM, CW, SSS receivers use direct conversion design 
with NEe02 iC as featured In OST and ARRL hand- 
tjooks. Very sensilive varaotor luned over entire bafvd. 
Plenty of speaker volurtie. fluns on 9V battery. Very 
EASY to buiW, lots of fun and eduoariorvat— ideal for 
tjeginner or old pro rjew so-page manual, Add the case 
set for well-fhted professional loo^. 

Vour ohoica of bands .... $27.96 

(Speciiiy band: HR'20, HR-30. HFl^O, HR-SO) 
Malching case ft kno^ sel, GHH $12.95 



2,6,10MTR,220 
FM RECEIVERS 




Ke<epan ear oft the local repeater ^ang, monitor the cope, 
chock out the woalhor or fust plain listen around. These 
sensitive superhet receavers af§ just the tecket. They tune 
Any 5 MHit portion of the barvd and have smooth varacior 
tuning, dual conversion wHtii ceramic IF filters, AFC, ad- 
fuS(able squelch and plenty of Speaker voiurme. flunson 
9V battery and performance that rivals the big rigs I For & 
complele Mnished pro loo^. add our matching case and 
knob set with scnaened graphics. 

FM communications receiver kit $29.95 

Specify bar>d: FR 146 (2m}, FR6 f&m}, FRlC (tOm), FR^ 

220(220 MHz) 
Matching case & knob seL CFR $12.95 



FM STEREO TRANSMITTER 



STEREO 





Run your own stereo FM station! Transmit a stable signal 
in the standard FM broadcast band throughout the house, 
dorrn OH' neigh borhooO- Connacis easily to line outputs on 
Co player, lape decks, ale. Runs on 9V baltery, has 
internal whip antenna and external antenna jack. Add opr 
case. set tor a " station" look! 

FM-lOkit .. $?&.9S 

Malching case set. CfM 112.95 



AIRCRAFT RCVR 



Faniasilc receiver ifiat captures the world wrth fust a 
1 2" antenna! Can receive any 2 MHz portion irom 4-1 1 
MHz. Truesuperhet has smooth varactor tuning, AGC. 
RF gain control, plenly o( speaker volume and runs on a 
9V battery Fascinating Scout, schod or club projecl 
provides hours of fun for even the most serious DXer 
For the car, consider our shodwa^^e converter. Two 
switchaljle bands {in 3-22 MHz range), each 1 MHz 
wide — tiunahJe on your car radio diaf. Add some interest 
lo your dfiive hOrrre^ 
Shortwave receiver kit, SRI S27,95 

Shortwave convener kit, sCi $24 95 

Matching case set for SRI, CSR $1^95 

Matctnng case sel for SCI, CSC $ 1 2.35 




Hear e^cJtEog aircraft communications^ pick up planes 
up lo 100 miles away! Receives Ii0-i36 MH2 AM arr 
band, smoolh varactor tuning superhet wilh AGC, ce- 
ramic lilter. adjustaWe squelch eMcetlenl sensiti:vi|y and 
tots of speaker volume. Huns on 9V battery, Great for air 
Shows or lust hanging around Ihe airport!' New 30-page 
manual details pilot iStlk,, lOd. A^ case 561 for "prq" 
look, 

AR-t Kit . , $24.95 

Matching case sel, CAR . $1?.9$ 



TERMS: Sati-BJaciidii ^u^ranje«d. tK^^i^\^flt taw 10 
Sdyi.. \i ndl filc^t^d. irEEirit inifirjgiinili Iprm fnr rf- 
lund. rXtid T'-6 iiip Ify n maxiinMm ^rSie) l^r ship- 
ninq nn nd Imei ^n* i nsura nee "For <©Fieigrn opsters 
^d t5^bfii4iu rfdce insii . *CDD (USA Qnly J add 
S4.50. -Oreler^ undtrSJp, pdtJ S3 Oft. 'HV Feai- 
denrEEi, odd T4|. »3ilES r.a >< . *sa-cr9^ paitm wjirrarrt^ 
tin Miia. »% -year parts a l£bcif warianl <f an vrifed 
unii^. 

RAMSEY ELECTRONICS. INC. 



„ PHONE ORDERS CALL 

g 716-924-4560 

■*■■ FAX 716-924-4555 
793 Canning Parkway, Victor, NY 14S64 



CIRCLE 34 ON REAOf Fi SERVICE CARD 



Number 8 on your Feedback card 



The vox Plus HT Accessory 

Enjoy base station performance— with your i-iT! 



by Mike Kossor WA2EBY 



After a long, busy season of fleamarke- 
teering, I managed to reallocate suffi- 
cient funds to finally invest in a 2 meter rigi 
With all the fine equipment available^ the 
selection wasn't easy. 1 wanted a rig that 1 
could take with me to hanifestST operate mo- 
bile, and use at home. The obvious choice? A 
full-featured handi-talkie, of course! 

The handheld I chose was perfect for taking 
to hamfcscs. I added the optional speaker 
mike, plugged the external 12 volt DC power 
cable into the cigarette lighter jack, made a 
mounting bracket, and enjoyed excellent mo- 
bile operation as well . But when I tried oper- 
ating the unit at home, it became apparent I 
was having to compromise. 

Unhandy Talkie 

During a recent VHF contest, I found 
myself joggling the HT, logbook, and pen^ 
trying to log and call CQ- 1 did my best at 
making contacts running a mere 2.5 watts 
RF output. Being limited to a single mode, 
FM, took its toll on my score, since 1 was 
unable to make CW contacts worth bonus 
points. 1 did try operating MCW (Modulated 
CW) using the tone pad, but the battery start- 
ed dying during the awkward QSO. 

With the battery gone, and out of the con- 
tost, J had plenty of time to think about how 
nice it would be to operate VOX on the hand- 
held, as I do on my HF gear. Logging would 
be so much easier. It would also be nice to 
operate MCW with a real key, and transmit 
the fiill 5 watt RF output available without 
having to worry about taxing the batteries to 
exhaustion. 

It also occurred to me that an MCW mode 
would be especially usefiil to individuals with 
Technician Class licenses who only have FM 
transceivers. How could they upgrade with- 
out practicing CW? 

My thoughts soon turned to action. My 
goal was to design an add-on accessory that 
could provide these desirable features, at a 
cost and complexity well within the realm of 
the average radio amateur. 

Features of the VOX Bus 

Whai evolved is the VOX Plus. This acces- 
sory uses the external microphone, speaker,, 
and power jacks of a transceiver, and adds the 
features of VOX operation or break-in 
MCW. It uses a clean 800 Hz sine wave 
oscillator complete with sidetone. A pro- 
grammable regulated power supply is also 
available to power transceivers requiring six 
to ten 500 mAh NiCd batteries, at full RF 
power output* 

24 73 Amateur Radio Today • Decembef, 1990 




*0 © 



Photo A. The VOX Ptus setup. (Photo by Eric 
Wagner,) 

These features resolved the initial short- 
comings of HT base station operation. How- 
ever, since I was using an external speaker, I 
decided to add an active audio filter, too. This 
way 1 could separately adjust the low and high 
frequency response of the received audio. 
Compensating for poor frequency response 
of transmitted or re-transmitted signals, I 
could customize the received audio for opti- 
mum readability, and also use the filter to 
attenuate annoying CTCSS tones, if present. 
A 2 watt audio power amp was added to 
provide sufficient audio output. 

One final feature I thought desirable was an 
audio tape interface for MCW. With this in- 
teii'ace, taped bulletins or code practice can 
be s^nt with full break- in operation. 

Circuit Overview 

The VOX Plus circuit is a combination of 
transistor switches and common op amp cir- 
cuits described in detail in many textbooks. 



Two good books on the subject are Analysis 
and Design of Integrated Electronic Circuits , 
by Paul M. Chirlian (chapters 13, 14 and 18), 
and Basic Electronics, by Michael M. 
Cirovic (chapters 14 and 15). The circuit 
does get a bit cumbersome when all the indi- 
vidual circuits are grouped together. Howev- 
er, Figure l, a functional block diagram, 
should give you a general idea of how the 
system operates. 

Referring to Fig, t, VOX operation re- 
quires MODE switch SI to be in the voice 
position. Switch SI A disables the MCW os- 
cillator while segment SIB connects the 
transceiver's microphone input to the VOX 
Plus microphone amplifier, The circuit is 
considered to be in an idle state when the 
operator is not talking and the transceiver is 
not receiving any signal. 

In this state, the positive input of compara- 
tor U2C is biased at 50% of the supply 
voltage, +0.5V, and the negative input is 
biased at +0,6V. The output of comparator 
U2C is tow (0 volts) because the negative 
input is at a higher potential than the positive 
input. The re-iriggerable monosiable multi- 
vibrator (or "one-shot") is also in an idle or 
stable state with its output low because it has 
not received a positive trigger voltage from 
comparator U2C. ptt switch Q3, controlled 
by the one-shot, is in the open state, placing 
the transceiver in the receive mode. 

Transmit Mode 

When the operator begins talking, the 
voice is picked up by the internal VOX Ptus 
elect ret microphone and amplified by UlA. 
The signal is then applied to the input of VOX 
amp UIB via switch SIB for farther amplifi- 



iHC» 



SIA 



VOICE 



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SUFFEI^ 



SIKEWAVE 
O&CILLATDi; 

y£4 




MCW MUTE 
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n 







^ vox AMP 



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MIC 6A1N! 



ACTIVE 
FILTER 



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ANTF-VOX 



MUTE 



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SPEAKER 



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AUPUFIER 



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fiVl 

vox CKELW 



ftMTIVOK GAIN 



nil 



PTT' 

Hi 



Kcvn 

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:0- 



TOWER SUPfLV 
U4 



1 



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Figure l. Block diagram. 




Figure 2, PC boa rdfoil pattern . 



cation. The highly amplified voice signal at 
the output of VOX amp UIB is then rectined 
by diode D3, 

The positive peaks of the rectified audio 
charge capacitor CJ7, which is connected to 
the positive input of comparator U2C. The 
+0,5 V DC bias level normally present on the 
positive input of U2C increases in direct pro- 
portion to the amplitude of the operator's 
voice. 

When the voltage level increases to about 



4-0.77, it exceeds the +0.6V value present 
on the negative input of U2C, and the com- 
parator's output goes high ( + V volts). This 
in turn triggers the one-shot and turns on ptt 
switch Q3, keying the transceiver. The out- 
put of the one-shot is also used lo mm on 
audio MLVTE swiich 04 toeliminaie * 'pc^'' in 
the speaker when switching from receive to 
transmit and back to receive. 

A sample of the operator's voice is fed to 
the microphone input of the transceiver and 



transmitted out. The trans- 
ceiver w ill remain keyed as 
long as the operator's voice 
is of sufficient amplitude 
to keep capacitor C17 
charged, maintaining the 
positive input of compara- 
tor U2C at a higher level 
than the negative input. 
When the operator's voice 
ceases, capacitor C17 dis- 
charges quickly through re- 
sistor R22, and the positive 
input of comparator U2C 
returns to its normal value 
of +0.5V. 

Upon reaching its normal 
value, the circuit is back in 
the idle slate, which causes 
the output of comparator 
U2C to return to low. Thus 
the trigger pulse to the one- 
shot is removed, allowing 
its output to return to low after a predeter- 
mined lime delay set by VOX delay poten- 
tiometer RV3. PTT switch Q3 returns to the 
open state when the one-shoi '* times out," 
putting the transceiver back into the receive 
mode. If the operator pauses during his trans- 
mission and begins to speak before the one* 
shot 'limes out," the new^ positive trigger 
pulse from comparator U2C resets or re*trig- 
gers the one-shot circuit before it releases ptt 
switch 03* The transceiver will drop out of 













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Figure S. Scheinafic diagram ofihe VOX Pius. i^^To use the VOX Plus with other HTs, wirepin 2 for PIT when grounded and pin 5 for MIC audio 
out. For proper operation of the XM IT indicator LED, attach pin 4to -\- V and add a blocking diode in the F'fT tine as shown.) 

73 Amafeur Radio Today * December, 1990 25 






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Figure 4. Parts placement for the VOX Plus. 



M(W VQICE 
MDDE 



erator*s voice. The presence of 
the 800 Hz audio signal at the 
input to the VOX amp is con- 
trolled by MC W mute, Q 1 . A key 
or keyer activates MCW mute Ql 
and allows the 800 Hz signal to 
reach the VOX amp. The same 
process takes place as described 
for VOX operation, using the 
MCW signal instead of the opera- 
tor's voice. 

A second method of controlling 
MCW mute Q 1 is to use an audio 
tape player. Code practice^ CQ^ 
or CW message is recorded on 
audio tape. When played back 
into digitizer Q5, on/off keying 
pulses are generated, which con- 
trol MCW mute Q 1 . Note that 
since the tape audio only gener- 
ates on/off keying pulses, no tape 
hiss, hum, or background noise is 
heard. Taped code is QRM-free 



transmit mode between words if the VOX 
delay is set too short* 

Receive Mode 

When the operator is not talking and an 
incoming signal is received, the audio signal 
from the transceiver is conditioned by active 
filler UlC, then passed to a 2 watt audio 
power amplifier capable of driving a 4- to 
8-ohm speaker at a respectable level. 

A sample of the transceiver's audio taken 
from the active filter output is used to can- 
cel the effect of the audio picked up by the 
VOX Plus' electret microphone; this pre- 
vents the received signal from keying the 
transceiver. The transceiver's audio sample 
is taken from active filter UlC and amplified 
by anii"VOX amp UID, Diode D4 rectifies 
the audio sample. 

The positive peaks of the rectified audio 
charge capacitor C21, which is connected to 
the negative input of comparator U2C. The 
H-0,6V DC bias level normally present on the 
negative input of U2C increases in direct 
proportion to the transceiver's audio. The 
anti-VOX gain, conrroiled by potentiometer 
RV4, is adjusted so that the bias level in- 
crease on the negative input of comparator 
U2C equals the bias level increase on the 
positive input. 

The net result is that comparator U2C 
remains in its idle or low state because the 
negative input tracks the positive input bias 
level, and remains lower in level. The opera- 
tor can sdll initiate a transmission by begin- 
ning to speak while an incoming signal 



Table 1 . Power Supply Voltage 


Programming Resistor Values 


R51 


R52 


Output 


NiCd 


(1%) 


(1%) ^ 


Voltage 


Cells 


4.7k 


5t0 


t2.8V 


10 


3.9k 


5t0 


to.sv 


g 


2.2k 


330 


9.6V 


8 


2.7k 


470 


8.4V 


7 


3.9k 


820 


7.2V 


6 



is being received. 
The voice will 
cause an additional 
increase in the bias 
level only on the 
positive input of 
comparator U2C* 

When the in- 
crease on the posi- 
tive input of U2C 
exceeds the nega- 
tive input, the VOX 
Plus will key the 
transceiver and op- 
erate as described 
previously. Resis- 
tor R44 is used to 
discharge capacitor 
C27 when trans- 
ceiver audio ceases, 
returning the bias 
level on the nega- 
tive input of com- 
parator U2C to its 
normal value of 
4-0. 6V. 

MCW Mode 

MCW operation 
is selected by plac- 
ing switch SI in the 
MCW position. 
This starts the 800 
Uz sine wave oscil- 
lator, U2A, which 
applies a sample of 
its output to the 
transceiver's mi- 
crophone input and 
disconnects tJie in- 
ternal electret mi- 
crophone. Break-in 
MCW operation is 
identical to VOX 
operation, except 
the 800 Hz sine 
wave signal takes 
the place of the op- 




PhotoB. An internal view oj the VOX Pius. (Photo by Eric Wagner.} 




^* 



Photo C Close-up view of the completed circuit board, (Photo by Eric 
Wagnen) 



26 73 Amateur Radio Today ■ December, 1990 



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Table 2. Handi-Talkie VOX Plus 


Resistors 








All resistors are V* W, 5%. 


unless otherwise noted. 




R12 


2,7 


ohms 




R33,47 


10 


ohms 


V2W 


R52* 


510 


ohms 


1% 


R9 


680 


ohms 




R1 1,13,1 4,20,31, 32 


tk 


ohrns 




R49,53 


2.2k 


ohms 




R37,38 


3.9k 


ohms 




R34,35,42 


4.7k 


ohms 




Rsr 


4.7k 


ohms 


1% 


R1,2,3 


5.6k 


ohms 




R5,6.7,10J5,16,17,19, 


10k 


ohms 




39,40,41,43,48 








R36,45 


15k 


ohms 




R8.25,26,30,46 


47k 


ohms 




R22,27,28,44,50 


100k 


ohms 




R18 


150k 


ohms 




R23 


190k 


ohms 




R4 


330k 


ohms 




R21, 24,29 


1 


megohm 




RV1,3 


100k 


ohms 


1 turn trimmer 


RV4 


1 


megohm 


1 turn trimmer 


RV2.5,6 


100k 


ohms 


linear taper pot 


Capacitors 








C51 


18 


pF, 25V 


ceramic disc 


C15 


470 


pF, 25V 


ceramic disc 


CI, 2,3 


0.01 


pF, 50V 


ceramic disc, (NPO) or Mylar 


05,11.38,39,40.41,42, 


0,01 


pF, 50V 


ceramic disc 


43,44.45,46,47,48 








C49,50 


0.01 


pF, 1 kV 


ceramic disc 


C6 


0.02 


pF. 25V 


ceramic disc 


010,18,25,29,32,33,34 


0.1 


pF, 25V 


ceramic disc 


C16 


0.033 


pF, 25V 


ceramic disc 


G21,22 


0.047 


pF, 25V 


ceramic disc 


C23 


0.0047 pF* 25V 


ceramic disc 


C 17.27 


1 


pF. 25V 


electrolytic 


C36 


1 


pF, 25V 


tantalum 


C7.8 


Al 


pF, 25V 


electrolytic 


04,13.14,19,20,24.26, 


10 


pF, 25V 


electrolytic 


28,35 








C30 


47 


pF. 25V 


electrolytic 


09,12 


100 


pF. 25V 


electrolytic 


Oil 


1000 


pF, 25V 


electrolytic 


031 


2200 


pF35V 


electrolytic 


SemiconduGtors 








BR1 


50V, ' 


I.5A 


bridge rectifier 


LED1.2 


Tl style 


red 


D1,2 


1N52318, 5.1VDC 


ViWzener diode 


D3,4.5,6 


1N4148 


switching diode 


01,2,3,4,5 


2N3904 


NPN. transistor 


101,2 


LM324 


quad op amp 


103 


LM380 


2.5W audio amp 


104 


LM317 


adjustable voltage regulator 


Other Components 








Tl 


18V.; 


Ik 


power transformer 


SI 


DPDT toggle switch 




S2,4 


SPST togg e switch 




S3 


normally open 


push button 


J1,2 


mini-audio 


jack 


J3 


5-pin 


DIN 


jack 


J4 


RCA phono 


jack 


F1 


V2A fuse 


with hoEder 


Electret condenser microphone 






PC board 








AC power cord 








tieatslnli 








enclosure 








knobs 








5-pin DIN plug, mini-audio plugs (2), coaxial power plug. 


*See Table 1 . for R51 & R52 values. 




Parts kits are availalble from Micro Mart, 508 Central Ave., Westfield NJ 07090. Tel. (201) 


654-6008. PC board and components are $29.95, plus $2.50 S&H; the parts kit, less 


enclosure, heat sink, and knobs. 


is $49.76, plus $3 J5 S&H; the PC board only is $12.95, plus 


$2*50 S&H; and the power transformer Is $4.75 plus 


$3,50 S&H. 



and indistinguishable from hand-sent code. 

Other Features 

FUNCTION switch S2 disables comparator 
U2C so you can operate in manual mode. In 
this mode, you must use PTT switch S3 to key 
the transceiver. This feature is useful in voice 
mode when the room noise level causes false 
XCVR keying, or in the MOW mode to use 
the VOX Plus' sidetone as a code practice 
oscillator. A programmable regulated power 
supply is available for powering transceivers 
that operate from six to ten 500 mAh NiCd 
batteries. The output voltage is program- 
mable by changing the value of resistors R51 
and R52. See Table 1 for programming resis- 
tor values. 

Design Details 

A few words need to be said regarding 
some of the * 'basic** op amp circuits, since 
their physical implementation is slightly dif- 
ferent from the theoretical description. The 
design of the RC phase-shift oscillator re- 
quires some practical modification to attain 
dependable operation. 

In theory, ihe circuit will oscillate when the 
gain is set to a value of 1/29. This is a very 
critical value. If the value is slightly less, the 
circuit will not oscillate. If the value is slight- 
ly more, the output waveform will clip, re- 
sulting in distortion. This problem is over- 
come by adding amplitude compensation to 
the circuit. 

Back-to-back zener diodes are placed in 
parallel with feedback resistor R4, The zener 
diodes decrease the gain of the oscillator as 
the output amplitude approaches the positive 
power supply rail to prevent it from clipping 
and distorting the w^aveform. Because of the 
zener diodes, you need more gain to get the 
oscillator started, thus the gain is higher than 
i/29. 

In theory, the frequency of oscillation of 
the RC phase-shift oscillator is given as: / - 
0. 065/RC, The addition of amplitude com- 
pensation using the zener diodes causes the 
actual frequency to be lower. It is difficuh to 
predict the actual frequency of oscillation be- 
cause zener diodes are nonlinear devices, and 
therefore, linear analysis can not be used to 
determine it. The theoretical equation does, 
however, give a good place to start* 

A practical note penains to the use of the 
LM324 op amp. For capacitively coupled 
loads, a resistor should be used from the 
output to ground to increase the class A bias 
current and prevent crossover distortion {see 
the National Semiconductor Corp. 's Linear 
DamBook J 1988). This is the purpose of 
resistors R19 and R39, Notable distortion 
was present without them. 

The one-shot circuit corjsists of transistor 
switch Q2 and comparator U2D. The trigger 
pulse is applied to the base of Q2 via R25, 
which limits the base current to a safe value. 
Each lime a positive trigger pulse is applied to 
R25, Q2 discharges capacitor C 19 to ground. 
The voltage across C J 9 is applied to the nega- 
tive input of comparator U2D; the positive 
input of U2D is fixed at V/2, When C19 is 
discharged to ground » the voltage across CI 9 



28 73 Am^tBur Radio Today • December. 1990 



THC 



falls below V/2 and the ouipui of comparator 
U2D goes high. 

The output remaitis high uniil ihe voltage 
across C 19 rises above V/2 volis . The charge 
time of C19 is controlled by the series combi- 
nation of resistors R26 and RV3. VOX delay. 
The circuit is re-triggerable because capaci- 
tor C19 can be discharged repc;iicdly by a 
trigger pulse, effectively resetting its charge 
time. MUTE switch Q4 is activated by the 
output of the one-shot by charging capacitor 
C30 via diode D6 and resistor R3 1 . 

The voltage across C30 supplies base cur- 
rent to Q4 via base resistor R49. Q4 turns on 
and bypasses to ground the audio present at 
the junction of the voltage divider that con- 
sists of R40 and R4L preventing it from 
reaching the audio power amp U3. 

Capacitor C24 provides DC isolation. 
When the one-shot times out, diode D6 pre- 
vents C30 from discharging immediately. 
Mirra switch Q4 remains on while C30 dis- 
charges through resistors R49 and R50* and 
keeps the audio path shunted to ground. In 
this way, the attack and decay of the mute 
switch are controllied. and the introduction of 
noise by the action of the mute circuit itself is 
prevented. 

Construction 

Only common components are used in this 
project. Most of them can be found in your 
junk box. If you don*t have a junk box, you 
can get all the pans from Micro Matt (see 
parts list). 

Due to the number of compHjneots, I chose 
PC board construction. You could also use 
poinl*to-point wiring. Photo B. shows the 
circuit board mounted in a Radio Shack steel 
enclosure. Note that voltage regulator U4 is 
mounted on the copper side of the board, 
keeping the leads as short as possible to mini- 
mize RF pickup and lo maintain load regula- 
tion. This also simplifies access to the alu- 
minum heat sink mounted to the bottom of the 
steel enclosure. The steel enclosure does not 
make a suitable heat sink because of its lower 
thermal conductivity. The dimensions of the 
aluminum heat sink are 6" % 2.5" X 0.0625", 

Connect the transceiver's power, micro- 
phone, and speaker jacks with a 5-pin DIN 
plug, its receptacle mounted on the rear pan- 
eL Bypass capacitors C40. C43» C44» C45 
and C48 are mounted at the 5-pin DIN recep- 
tacle lo prevent RF from disrupting circuit 
operation. Access to the key input and tape 
AUDIO input are made with 3.5mm phone 
jacks. An RCA audio jack is used for the 
speaker output . Bypass capacitors C39, C41» 
and C42 associated with these terminals are 
also located on their respective jacks. 

Setup and Optrathm 

Check the circuit carefijlly before applying 
power. If all Uxsks good, set the function 
switch S2 to manual and set the mode switch 
SI to the MCW pof^iition. Set bass and tre- 
ble to center position, and Mtc OAtN control 
to minimum. Sei sidetone level control RVl 
to minimum by turning it CCW; then turn it 
H turn CW. Set VOX delay RV3 and anti- 
VOX gain RV4 to center position. Connect a 



4- to 8-ohm speaker to the speaker jack and a 
telegraph key to the KEY input. 

Before connecting the VOX Plus to your 
transceiver, turn on power switch S4 and 
check the programmed power supply voltage 
to ensure its value is correct, as selected from 
Table 1 . The supply voltage should be wiUijn 
5% of the selected value. Press the telegraph 
key and listen for the 800 Hz sidetone from 
the external speaker. Adjust sidetone level 
RVl to the desired level. 

Connect the transceiver to the VOX Plus. 
Be sure to use an external antenna to prevent 
strong RF fields from causing undesirable 
operation. Tune in a QSO and try varying the 
BASS and treble controls. You should be 
able to make muffled signals or tinny signals 
more natural sounding, and attain better read- 
ability. 

To operate break-in MCW, change func^ 
TION switch S2 to the VOX position and start 
sending. The VOX Plus will automatically 
key the transmitter when you start sending 
code. The transceiver should remain in the 
transmit nnxle until about i second al^er you 
stop sending. If the transmitter drops out be- 
tween letters or words* increase VOX defay 
RV3 by mming it CW. 

To operate voice, change mode switch 
SI to the voice position, turn the mic gain 
control to about % , and talk only when you 
what to transnih. Remember, you are now 
operating VOX, and you should turn the mi- 
crophone gain down when you*re not in a 
QSO. 



Mike Kossor WA2EBY, IS M I2th S/. . Kenil- 
H^rtA NJ 07033 



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73 Amateur Radio Today • December, 1990 29 



Numbers oo your Feed bach card 



73 Review 



by Bill Brown WB8ELK 



The Lightning Bolt Dual-Band 

VHF/UHF Quad 

Two antennas in one compact package. 



Lightning BoK Antennas 
RDlf2, Route 19 

Volant PA 16156 
Phone:(412)530-7396 
Price Cla&s: $50 (2-element 2m, 4-eiemenr 70cm); 
$80 (4-e!ement 2m, Sneiement 70cm). 



Whether heading out for a mountainlop^ 
foxhunttng or setting up a portable sta- 
tion at a moment's notice, it's best to iug as 
little equipment along with you as it takes to do 
the |ob. For dual-band operation, the biggest 
hasste is carrying two antennas, along with 
the associated masts and mounts. All this 
adds up to additionat weight and increased 
set-up time. 

Mike Duddy of Lightning Bolt Antenna has 
the answer, He has come up with a dual-band 
2jr\f70cm quad that is both lightweight and 
easily assembled in the field. 

The dual-bander pfovfdes you with a 2^le- 
menl quad on 2 meters and 4 elements on 
70cm using just eight Fiberglas'" rods ar- 
ranged te provide four crossed mounts. A 
larger version Is available with 4 elements on 
2m and 8 elements on the 450 MHz band. 

Easy to Carry and Assemble 

I had a chance to lest out the dual-bander 
during a recent expedition out to Monhegan 
IsJand. Maine (see front cover). The only way 
out to this remote island is to take a 10-mile 
ferry boat ride. Nuge WB8GLQ and I ware 
hoping lo operate packet with the space shut- 
tle SAREX mission (unfortunately scrubbed) 
from the vantage point of the lighthouse on top 
of the island, In addition, we planned to make 
a few ATV contacts on 70cm using 2 meters 
for our talk frequency. 

The dual-band quad comes packaged in a 
heavy-duty 3-foot-long mailing tube. Every- 
thing fits nicely inside, providing an excellent 
way to transport the quad. After packing our 
station up into two bags we hopped onto the 
boat to Monhegan. Once on the island, it was 
an easy hike up the steep trait to the light- 
house with our lightweight packet and ATV 
station. 

The onty toots needed to assemble the quad 
are a small screwdriver and a crescent wrench 
to tighten the U-bolt clamp to the syppoit 
mast. The spreader arms are constructed out 
of W Fiberglas'' rods which have grooves for 
holding the quad loops. Each rod has a 
threaded hole to accept the mounting screw. 
The spreaders are pushed through holes in a 
2-foot-long square boom. Each spreader is 
lettered and matches the letter on the boom- 
The spreaders can be quickly attached to the 
boom with the mounting screws. The wire 
loops are held in place by grooves In the ends 
of the spreaders. The four large spreader 
arms support the 2 meter quad loops along 
the ends, as well as supporting the reftector 
and the last director of the 70cm loops via 

30 73 Amateur Radio Today ■ December, 1990 



grooves cut into the middle of the supports. 
I found that the best method was to install 




Photo A. Evan Cooke (() and Nuge WB8GLO 
(r) use ttie Lightning Bolt quad to make con- 
tact onAV/ and 2 meters. 




Photo B. Close-up view of the dual-bander 
quad. 



the loops as I assembled each set of spreader 
arms- Once complete^ all I needed to do was lo 
mount the antenna to my mast with the U-bolt 
(included with the antenna). This version has 
holes drilled in the boom to allow end*mount* 
Ing to the mast. Total assembly time was 
about 10 minutes. 

The driven elements tioth have female BNC 
connectors attached, I found that the quad 
loops seemed somewhat loose m their 
grooves. However, this provided an easy way 
to change polarization quickly just by sliding 
the wire in the grooves. For a more permanent 
installation, you might secure the loops with a 
dab of epoxy. Lightning Bolt can also provide 
you with drilled holes instead of grooves for 
permanent mounting of the loops. Also. I 
found that the Ftberglas tx>om seemed a little 
rough in appearance. It may be a good idea to 
sand it down some to avoid the "itchy finger" 
syndrome. 

Our total station consisted of a Radio Shack 
Model 100 laptop computer, a Heath pocket 
TNC» a Kodak Diconix" printer, an ICOM 2m 
HT, a t-watt P,C. Electronics ATV transmitter, 
a GBC CCD-100 miniature TV camera, a 
Radio Shack pocket-sized color LCD TV 
receiver and. of course, the Lightning Bolt 
dual-band quad. 

Island-Topping with the Lightning Bolt 

Although the space shuttle launch was 
scrubbed, we did make a number of packet 
contacts up and down the coast of Maine, 
Also, we made a very successful contact with 
Jon WA2YVL in Freeport. Maine* on 2m and 
ATV. The gain is about what you'd expect 
from a 2-element quad on 2 meters: about S to 
7 dBd. On the 440 MHz band we saw about 9 
dBd gain. This certainly made the difference, 
since the quad brought Jon's signal from two 
lights on my HT to a full-scale reception. On 
439.25 MHz ATV the 4-elemem quad made 
the difference between a 50% snowy picture 
(using a V^-wave whip) to a full-color, nearly 
closed circuit image (using the 4-element 
quad). We observed about a 3 dB improve* 
ment over my home-brew 6 dBd 2-element 
quad. The front-to-back ratio seemed excel- 
lent, and we saw a nice clean pattern as we 
rotated the antenna. 

After a fine afternoon island-topping, we 
quickly disassembled the quad and headed 
down the hill for our return boat. 

We found the Lightning Bolt dual-band 
quad to be a great choice for portable opera- 
tion, and to be sturdy enough to survive a good 
deal of abuse! 



r 



If you always thought a microprocessor-controlled 
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We don't skimp on rf modules, either! Check the features on 
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Kit $1095; w/t only $1295! 




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above 

. flgOl 902-92&MHZ FM RCVR. 
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Number 1 on your Feedback card 



73 Review 



by Dick Goodman WA3USG 



The PacComm PSK 

Connect to the world via the Microsats! 



1 PacComm 

3S62 West Cypress Street 
Tampa FL 33607 
(813) 874-2980, (800) 223-351 1 

Price Class: $250 (Includes power suppfy. 
manual, and TNC/radio/lelemetry.) 



Orbiting the Earth at an altitude of 
approximately 800 kilamelers are four 
satellites which may be accessed and com- 
municated through via packet radio. These 
birds have something in common that is not 
shared by the other active ham salellrtes: 
They must be accessed using PSK (Phase 
Shift Keyed) modutation, rather than wtth corv 
ventionaJ AFSK (Audio Frequency Shift Key- 
ing), wtirch is the present terrestnal packet 
standard. These satellites are also known as 
"Microsats" because of their small size. 
•OSCAR 16 (PACSAT): euill by AMSAT HA. 
Can presently be used as a digipeater. Uplink 
frequenctes are in the 2 meter band, using 
conventional FM transceivers: downlink is in 
the 70cm band, using SSB reception, in the 
near future it will support a store-and-fonward 
mailbox. 

•OSCAR ie (WEBERSAT): Built by Weber 
State University in Utah. Contains an on- 
board CCD camera that downlinks its pictures 
via packet radio. Also contains an ATV experi- 
ment which will be activated in the future. 
•OSCAR 19 (LUSAT): Built by AMSAT Ar- 
gentina. Same characteristics as OSCAR 16. 
•OSCAR 20 (FUJI-2): Built by AMSAT Japan. 
Packet store-and-forward mailbox. Uptink 2 
meter FM; downlink on 70cm, using SSB re- 
ception. 

Why Use PSK? 

Current packet radio TNCs come with an 
AFSK modem installed. These are fine for ter- 
restrial packet communication over high qual- 
ity VHF links, but fail miserably when subject- 
ed to poor signal-to-noise ratios or frequency 
shift due to the Doppter effect. Existing AFSK 
packet modems must be maintained to within 
approximately i-50 Hz of the center frequen- 
cy. Since the Microsats are in low Earth orbit* 
their velocity in relation to the user is great. 
This equates to a very large Doppler shift 
when me satellite is at its closest approach. 
This shift is so great that a signal tuned in will 
drift completely out of the receiver bandpass 
in a matter of minutes. Existing AFSK 
modems would be virtually impossible to keep 
tuned dunng these conditions. 

The signals from these OSCARs are also 
taking fades from spin modulation and are 
sometimes weak. This is due lo the nature of 
the low gain antennas used on the satellites, 
arKl to the orientatior^ of both satellite and 
ground station antennas (eg: cross polariza- 
t!onJ. 

Rnaify, the present AFSK standard was ac- 
tually developed in the 1970s for use in com- 

32 73 Amateur Radio Today • December,! 



poter telephone modems. It was put lo use in 
TNCs because it was cheap and available, but 
it's certainty not state-of-the-art! What is need- 
ed for satellite work (especially low orbit satel- 
lites) is a modem that will perform well in the 
environment identified above, 

The Answer 

The PacComm PSK-l satellite modem tills 
ttiis requirement nicely. It is a small package, 
approximately T-^* high. 6" wide and 9" 
deep. It requires 12 VDC arid comes supplied 
with a small plug-in power supply. The PSK-1 
will do the following: 

1. Lock on and copy signals that are off fre* 
quency by as much as +400 Hz, 

2. Automatically tune the receiver to maintain 
proper center frequer>cy, 

3. Give excellent performance during poor 
signal-to-noise conditions. 

4* Allow you to stiti use the AFSK modem in 
your TNC for conventional terrestrial packet 
operation. 

5. Copy the telemetry data from Phase 3 satel- 
lites {OSCAR 10 and 13) from their engineer- 
ing beacons. 

Interconnections to Your Equipment 

PSK-1 to your VHF FM radio; The cable 
provided by PacComm has a 5-pin DIN plug 
lor PSK-1 connection on one end; the other 
end has stripped and tinned ieads for attach- 
ment to your radio. Note that this is the same 
pinout configuration for the TAPR PSK 
Modem. 

PSK-1 to your UHF radio: The cable provid- 
ed by PacComm has a 5-pin DIN piug tor 
PSK-1 connection on one end: the other end 
has stripped and tinned leads for attachment 
to your radio. Note that this is NOT the same 
pinout configuration as the TAPR PSK 



Modem. This connection MUST be made if 
you want the PSK-1 to automatically compen- 
sate for Doppler. 

FSK-1 to your TNCs * 'Radio" connector: 
The cable provided by PacComm has a 5-pin 
DIN plug for PSK*1 connection on one end: 
tfrie other end has stripped arKJ tinned leads for 
connection to your TNCs "Radio" port. 
(Note: Your VHF FM radio is no longer con- 
nected directly to your TNC, but is routed 
through the PSK-1 modem. This configuration 
will allow you lo switch to either the TNC*s 
AFSK modem for conventional packet opera* 
tion, or to the PSK-1 for satellite work.) 

PSK*1 to your TNCs modem disconnect 
header: The cable provided by PacComm has 
an S-pin DIN plug for PSK- 1 connection on one 
end; the other end has stripped and tinned 
leads for attachment to your TNCs modem 
disconnect header. Also provided is the 20-pin 
plug to attach to any TAPR TNC-1 or TNC-2 
clone inline header. The stripped and tinned 
leads attach to this and it simply plugs into the 
TNCs modem disconnect. (Note: The operat- 
ing manual included with the PSK-1 goes into 
considerable detail. It took me 15-20 minutes 
to wire the header plug. If you are presently 
using a TAPR PSK modem, your existing ca- 
ble will work finel) 

PSK-1 to your computer's serial port (RS- 
232 & TTL both supported): Please note that 
actual packet data is still routed via serial ca- 
ble going to your TNC. The connection identi- 
fied here allows control of many PSK-1 
parameters from youf computer. This is atso 
the port where Phase 3 telemetry data Is rout* 
ed (since it is simply ASCII data and not for- 
matted into AX. 25 packets). 

Once the PSK-1 is correctly interfaced to 
your computer, INC, and Radio(s) the fun be- 
gins. When power is applied lo the PSK-1 the 



.1 





Photo A. The PacComm PSK- 1 



990 



front panel LEDS cycle through a short self- 
test procedure and the modem Is ready for 
use. The front panel of the PSK-1 is fogically 
laid out with 9-status LEDs (which also func- 
tion as a bar graph tuning indicator), two up/ 
down tuning LEDS, a PLL "LOCK" LED, and 
two switches which can control set up of the 
PSK-1. 

Operating thePSK-t 

The PSK-1 may be set up by two methods. 
The first is with the function and select push 
buttons on the front panel. The fumction 
switch cycles through each of the four PSK-1 
functions. The select switch allows each of 
these functions to be configured independent- 
ly. For exampte, press the function switch 
until the mode function status LED is lit (each 
press of the push button cycles through one of 
the four functions). Now, by pressing the 
SELECT switch you can configure the mode 
function for Manchester PSK for satellite oper- 
ation, tenrestriaJ PSK, or 400 baud Phase 3 
telemetry gathering. Press the function 
switch again and the modem funclton LED will 
light. By pressing the select switch, the entire 
PSK-1 unit can be toggled in or out, thus allow- 
ing easy access to your TNC's internal AFSK 
modem. Pressing the function switch again 
will IHuminate the jt/sp function LED. De- 
pressing the select switch here selects which 
radiD(s) will be used with the PSK-1. In the 
jttNT position, all PSK-1 data (both TX & RX) 
will be routed from the VHP port on the PSK-1 . 
In the SPLIT position, TX data will be routed 
from the VHP port of the PSK^l to the VHP 
radio and RX data from the UHF radio to Ihe 
UHF pon on the PSK-t . Pressing the function 
switch again lights the afc function LED. Ttie 
SELECT switch now controls how the PSK*1 
tunes the UHF receiver to compensate for 
Doppler. 

The other method of setup is by computer 
control. The serial port of your computer must 
be connected So the PSK-1 SERIAL PORT (not 
ttie TNC serial port). I recommend using an 
A-B switch on your computer's serial port to 
accomplfsh this (A to your TNC, B to the PSK-1 
serial port). The same terminal program that 
you use for your TNC will work fine for con- 
trolling the PSK-1 . The default baud rate of the 
PSK-1 serial port is 1200 baud, no parity, 8 bit 
word length, 1 stop bit (1200, N3. 1). so initially 
set your terminal program to those parame- 
ters. You can change the PSK-1 serial port 
baud rate to match your computer to TNC 
baud rate later. Powering up the PSK-1 will 
present an entire series of menus which will 
allow setup of all previously specified parame- 
ters, plus options not available from the front 
panel switches. 

Either method of setup is detailed ade- 
quately in the PSK*1 user manual. I would 
strongly suggest reading ft from cover to cover 
before using the modem. 

tJ^ing the PSK-1 on the Birds 

Tune in the signal from one of the four Ml- 
Crosats on your UHP receiver in the SSB 
mode. Also, ensure that your TNC is in Ihe 
MONiTOf^ mode and mall is on. I found the lock 
LED on the PSK-1 to be a bit over-sensitive. 



and it wtll (Itcker on rafKJom receiver noise* 
But, when the satellite is tuned anywhere 
close to being on frequency, the lock LED 
will illuminate constantly, and the front panel 
status LEDs will function as a bar graph tun- 
ing indicator. If you have the automatic 
Ctoppler shift compensation feature active, the 
PSK-1 will finish tuning itself in arid you will not 
have to touch the receiver while tuning for the 
duration of the passf To use the auto tume 
feature, you must be using a UHF radio that 
has mike click up/down tuning capability. If 
you are tuning the receiver manually, use the 
CENTER TUNE feature on the bar graph. You 
should now see data from the Bird scrolling 
down your screen. 

I have used the PSK-1 with a TS-71 1/811 
combination in the automatic [>Qppler mode 
and it works Cfuite well. My home station uses 
a Hamlronics UHF receive converter driving a 
Kenwood R-2000 HF receiver, I have to tune 
the receiver manually, but the FSK-1 main- 
tains lock on the signal to about 500 Hz off 
frequency. 

To transmit, dial in the correct uplink fre- 
quency on your VHF radio and issue the ap- 
propriate connect request with your TNC. 
Since the satellites have automatic Doppler 
compensation on the uplink, you don't have to 
worry atx>ut keeping the VHF radio on fre- 
quency. Ensure that you don't over-dhve the 
VHF transmitter because PSK is a linear 
mode. There is an external adjustment for the 
modem's audio output on the rear panel of the 
PSK^1 . 

Some Final Thoughts 

The PacComm PSK-i is an excellent piece 
of equipment that should appeal to anyone 
Interested in using packet communication 
through any satellite. Since PSK is more im- 
pervious to weak signal and fading conditions 
than AFSK, it works quite well on the Phase 3 
birds, and is superior for terrestrial packet un- 
der ORM and QSB conditions. 

The PSK-1 will intertace to many TNCs. The 
operating manual details the following inter- 
face requirements: TAPR TNC 1 and 2Ctones 
fTNC 1 will not work on OSCAR 20). Pac- 
Comm Tiny-2 (what I am using), MFJ'1270, 
MFJ-1274. MFJ-1278, AEA PK-232 (read the 
manual carefully). AEA PK-8B, AEA PK-B?, 
Kantronics KAM, KPC-4 (KPC-1 & KPC-2 will 
not work with PSK-1 ). 

1 was amazed at how well the PSK-1 copied 
signals under conditions where an AFSK 
modem would totally fail. Tuning ts not at all 
critical— get within 400-500 Hz on EITHER 
SIDE OF CENTER and the data starts 
scrolling by! Once you've read the operating 
manual, mode changes and operation are in- 
tuitive. The ability to do rapid mode/funcbon 
changes from the front panel, or more de- 
tailed configuratton changes via computer 
control, is a real plus. Finally, the fact that the 
PSK*1 will decode Phase 3 telemetry blocks 
adds Ihe capability that would normally re- 
quire an additional dedicated $100 modem. A 
program to convert these blocks lo intelligent 
parameters is still required and available from 
AMSAT. 

I hope to see yoo on the birds! 





Duplexer w/Ccmix 
POWER: MMHiaOOwotts 
WM^i m worn 




COHNiaOR OUmJI: N4¥pe 
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I1II0D£L 446 INPUT: If -type 
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73 AmatBur Radio Today • December, 1990 33 



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Pack Your Seabag, ^^ Sparks 

Do you want to be a ship's Radio Officer? 

by Michael A. Davidson N®IV!M 



9? 



Lijibon, Naples. Palermo, Alexandria, 
Karachi. Singapore. CUL, lAR, SUH, 
ASK, 9VG: Ports visited and coastal stations 
worked by "Sparks/' a Merchant Marine 
radio officer* on a typical voyage. Is this 
something you always thought youM like lo 
do? Pack your seabag and come aboard! 

Prelend that two days ago you received a 
call: * *She*s a freighter going to the Med and 
Singapore. Do you want the job?** Sure you 
do! 

It's been a busy day. The plane trip, com- 
ing aboard, signing on. Now it's quiet. Here 
yoti are, on your first "solo"' job as a ship's 
radio officer. You go over the radio room 
equipment with the vacation-bound radio of- 
ficer. You've said your goodbyes, and the 
ship is your home for the next three months. 
The radio equipment looks familiar. The con- 
sole with the R/T MF and HF transmitters 
and receivers, the SSB and linear amp, the 
SITOR and SATCOM consoles over in the 
cx)mcr, don't look too different from the gear 
you became familiar with last year, while 
sailing as assistant radio officer. 

The Merchant Marine 

What is the Merchant Marine and how do 
you become a ship's radio officer? When 
people ask me what I do for a living, and I tell 
them [ sail in the Merchant Marine, they often 
respond. *'0h» yes, my son [brnther* etc.] is 
in the Marincsf** 

In the Merchant Marine, you Ve a civilian. 
The only direct military con- 
oeciion is with the U.S. 
Coast Guard Marine Inspec- 
tion and Safety Division. In 
addition to their governmen- 
tal duties, they set training 
and experience levels, con- 
duct examinations for deck 
and engineering personnel, 
and issue Merchant Marine 
seaman's papers. In time of 
war, the Merchant Marine 
would come under naval 
command and protection. 
For more information, call 
theU,S,C,G. at(3l4)425" 
4655. 

The vessels of fiie Mer 
chant Marine Heet are 
owned by companies whose 
business is maritime cargo 
transportation. Some spe- i 
ciaiized vessels are oil 
tankers, chemical and liquid 



gas carriers, bulk carriers, car carriers, and 
container ships or freighters. Merchant 
Marine ships carry almost anything that's 
impractical to transport by air due to weight, 
bulk, or quantity. The ships range in size 
from small coastal vessels with only a few 
crew members, to ULCCs (Ultra Large 
Crude Carriers) that measure up to 1 ,500 feet 
from stem to stern, w ith crews of 30 or more. 

On board there are four departments: deck, 
engine, radio, and steward. The first officer 
(chief mate) supervises the deck; the chief 
engineer, the engine room; and the chief 
steward, the ship's galley and housekeeping. 
Each is responsible to the ship's master or 
captain. 

Bui the radio depanment is unique. Unlike 
the other departments, it consists of only one 
person, the radio officer, who works directly 
under the captain's orders. 

What Does an R.O. Iki? 

By international law, ships equipped with a 
radio telegraph station must carry a radio 
operator to stand watch on the calling and 
distress frequencies, 500 kHz (W/T) and 
2182 kHz (R/T). There are some exemptions 
for coastal voyages, but generally the SOLAS 
(Safety of Life at Sea) regulation applies. 

At sea, seven days a week ' 'sparks " stands 
an eight-hour radio watch. The usual hours 
are from 0800 to 1200, 1500 to 1700, and 
1800 to 2000. He monitors 500 kHz and 2 1 82 
kHz and logs all traffic sent and received, and 




Fhofo A. Radio adveniure on the high seas. 



silent periods observed. Sparks is also on-caU 
24 hours a day for emergency repairs to elec- 
tronic equipment. 

In addition to the radio officer*s basic du- 
ties, he handles the transmission and recep- 
tion of the ship's traffic. The traffic could be 
CW (W/T) on medium-wave frequency (450 
to 535 kHz) or on the high frequency mar- 
itime bands (2 to 22 MHz) using either W/T 
or voice (R/T), radio telephone, or telex via 
SITOR on HF (basically the same as 
AMTOR), Using the satellite communica- 
tions terminal, SATCOM. traffic is passed 
telex or voice mode via INMARSAT. Fac- 
simile is being installed in more and more 
ships. This mode uses a voice channel on the 
SATCOM for transmit and receive, and il can 
also be used on HF channels. 

Although W/T (Wireless Telegraphy) and 
R/T (Radio Telephony) are United Kingdom 
abbreviations, they are used in ITU publica- 
tions and understood throughout the maritime 
radio world. 

Arrival and departure limes can be busy, 
with messages lo the ship's owners » charter- 
ers, and agents; observer weather reports; 
private calls for the crew via the high seas 
operator on R/T and SATCOM; and reports 
to the U.S.C.G. Amver system. Amver is a 
maritime assistance program that provides 
search and rescue (SAR) efforts. Participa- 
tion is mandatory for U.S. registered vessels 
and voluntary for **foreign flag" vessels on 
voyages over 24 hours long. 

Weadier reports at saa and 
FAX weather charts are 
copied daily by the radio of- 
ficer. The weather reports 
are broadcast on CW, 
SITOR, and voice by the 
U.S.C.G., U,S.N., and 
commercial and national 
coastal stations around the 
world. And in the winter 
months, on-station North 
Atlantic weather ships 
known as OWSs (Ocean 
Weather Stations) transmit 
up-to-date forecasts and 
storm warnings. They ako 
accept observer weather re- 
ports from ships passing 
throui^h their areas. 

Simple accounting for 
traffic charges IS also part of 
the R.O.'s job. Traffic 
charges are based upon 
word count or duration of 

73 Amateur Radio Today • December, 1990 35 



the message or telex. Charges, if not known . 

are requested from the coast station worked, 
or if via satellite, from INMARSAT tariffs in 
the radio room. The R.O. is, in effect, an 
agent for the ship's radio accounting authori- 
ty or company. It may sound complex and 
involved, but in practice it's quite simple. 
After completing your six months under the 
guidance of an experienced radio officer, you 
would be very familiar with these proce- 
dures- 

On arrival in port, you are usually free to 
go ashore. Maybe even have an **eyebtn 
QSO' ' with hams you worked off watch at 
sea. A visit with three JA's in Yokohama, one 
a Shinto priest, was the result of a QSO on a 
trip to die Far East, So if you don*t have any 
repairs or inspections coming up in pon» you 
can head down the gangway. But don*i forget 
to check the Sailing Board; you must be 
aboard one hour before sailing time. 

Becoming a Radio Olfker 

To be employed as a radio officer in the 
U.S, Merchant Marine, you must be a U.S. 
citizen and have the following licenses, en- 
dorsements, and documents: 

L An FCC radiotelegraph license. It 
must be at least a Second Class Ra- 
diotelegraph license with a Six Month Ser- 
vice Endorsement. 

2, A U.S, Merchant Marine Officer^s 
license, issued by the United States Coast 
Guard. 

3. A U,S, Merchant Mariner's Docu- 
ment (Z-Card), issued by the United States 
Coast Guard. 

In order to sail as the sale radio officer on a 
U,S. Merchant Marine ship, your ra* 
diotelegraph license must have a Six Month 
Service Endorsement. According to FCC 
Rules and Regulations, Part 83, in order to 
get the endorsement you must have '\ . -at 
least six months satisfactory service as a qual- 
ified radiotelegraph operator in a station on 
board a ship or ships of the United States/' 
Catch 22? Not really. If you have military or 
naval sea time experience with CW, as a 
radioman or radio operator, you could possi- 
bly get some credit for the service endorse- 
ment. Check with the FCC. Failing this, all is 
not lost. Later, TH describe various methods 
to get that **sea time*' and the endorsement. 
First, the license. 

The Radiotelegraph License 

As a prospective radio officer, your first 
step is to pass the FCC examination for the 
Second Class Radiotelegraph license (T-2), 
This two-part examination is held at FCC 
offices. The code test consists of transmitting 
arid receiving plain language at 20 wpm and 
16 code groupji per minute. The written, mul- 
tiple choice test consists of Elements U 2, 5, 
and 6. lt*s similar to the Genera] Radiotele- 
phone license examination, but emphasizes 
radiotelegraph practices and procedures, 
maritime equipmem, and radio direction 
finding. The FCC examiner may require you 
to draw block diagrams or schematics. On my 
exam, I had to draw a block diagram and 

3$ 73 Amateur Radio Today • December. 1990 



schematic of a direction finder. Til never 
forget that the antenna has a *'gap"I 

An excellent license preparation manual, 
the Marine Radioteie graph Operator License 
Handbook, by Edward M. Noll, is available 
from WPT Publications. 979 Young St,, 
Suite A, Woodbum OR 97071. Tel. (503) 
981-5 159, If you would rather not tackle the 
theory and code in one sitting, you can take 
the examination for the Third Class Ra- 
diotelegraph Permit (T-3) and get the code 
requirement out of the way first. This exami- 
natioQ consi^ of the code lest already men- 
tioned, plus Elements 1, 2, and 5, which 
cover basic law and operating practices. 

Then you can then concentrate your studies 
on Element 6, electronic theory. And while 
you're in the study mode, don't forget ihe 
Ship Radar Encorsement, Element 8. This 
endorsement will allow you to service and 
maintain the shipboard radar system. You 
can take Element 8 separately or with Ele- 
ment 6, 

Shipping Out 

All that effort and study pays off. Let's say 
you have your Second Class Radiotelegraph 
license with the Ship Radar Endorsement. 
You can almost smell the sea air. But what 
about that Six Month Service Endorsement? 
If you have a letter from either a shipping 
company or a maritime union stating thai you 
have been offered shipboard employment as 
an assistant radio officer or apprentice radio 
officer, the Coast Guard will issue you the 
U.S. Merchant Mariner's Document, or Z- 
Card, and the Merchant Marine Oflficer^s 
License. 

As suggested above, you can get the sea 
time for the endorsement through an inde- 
pendent shipping company. You would sign 
on as an ordinary seaman, engine room 
wiper, or galleyman. In your off-watch 
hours, you would stand watch in the radio 
room. You would have to keep a log for the 
FCC to evaluate, of the dates and hours you 
stood the radio watches, and have it signed by 
the radio oITicer and master, or captain. This 
can be a lengthy process, but it's a method 



Maritime CW (W/T) 
Working Frequencies (kHz) 

4188,5 to 4219.5 



6285.0 


10 


6324.3 


8377.0 


(0 


0435.5 


12565.5 


to 


12651.0 


1 6754.0 


to 


16858.5 


22250.5 


to 


22261 .5 



Sample Ships SITOR (F1 B} 

Working FrequenGies (kHz) 

Dial Setting 



4170.8 

6257.4 

8344.3 

12489.8 

16658.8 

22197.8 



4174.8 

6365.8 

6356.8 

12516,3 

16688-3 

22220.3 



that has been successhjlly used to obtain the 

endorsement. 

Sailing on ''foreign flag** ships as a radio 
operator is another way to obtain experience. 
This sea time would not be app!ieable toward 
the service requirement, but it could put you 
in a favorable position when applying to an 
independent company or to a union for an 
assistant radio operator position. Sailing for- 
eign flag, you would not be required to have 
the U,S,C,G, license or the Z-Card- You'd 
only need the FCC Second Class Ra- 
diotelegraph license and the appropriate 
country's seaman' s document. 

In the past^ ships of Panamanian and 
Libcrian registry have been traditionally used 
by * 'unendorsed'* radio officers seeking ex- 
perience. But with the increase in countries 
that offer '* flags of convenience" to ship 
owners (companies that don't have an agree- 
ment with a maritime AFL/CIO radio op> 
erator*s union), the possibilities have also 
increased. Without any prior ship radio opier- 
ating experience, it can be toogh. But serious 
listening on the maritime CW frequencies, 
and close study of the radiotelegraph proce- 
dures in the text, can give you the knowledge 
and confidence to tackle a first assignmenL 
See the table for frequencies. 

Training ProgrBms 

Certainly, the least cotnplicated way to go 
would be through acceptance into a union 
training program. The two major maritime 
radio officer unions are: The American Radio 
Association » M.M.&P. 26 Journal Square, 
Suite I SOL Jersey City NJ 07306^168, 
(201) 795-5536: and The Radio Officers 
Union, 1415 Nfoylan Road. Panama City 
Beach FL 32407, (904) 234-8448. 

These maritime unions have agreements 
with shipping companies to provide licensed 
radio ofllcers for their vessels. Depending 
upon (heir membership needs, the unions 
have programs for persons with the Second 
Class Radiotelegraph license, but without the 
Six Month Service Endorsement. Upon ac- 
cept^mce inm the program* you would sail as 
assistant or apprentice radio officer, gaining 
service lime (endorsement time) under an 
experienced radio or radio-electronic officer. 
Both the A.R.A. and the R.O.U. have resi- 
dent schools, where their qualified R.O.s can 
take the necessary courses to obtain certifica- 
tion as a radio-electronic officer, with the 
opponunity for taking advanced courses after 
certification. 

Signing maritime mobile has led to many 
QSOs where Tve been asked about the seafar- 
ing life, and how one becomes a ship's 
sparks. Getting that information on your own 
can be frustrating. This article should give 
you a gocKl idea about what those ^^sparkies** 
out on the high seas arc doing, and about 
those faraway places. Ready to pack your 
seabag? 



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73 Review 



by David Cassidy NIGPH 



The ICOM 10-726 



The HF+6road warrior. 



ICOM America, inc, 

2380 1t 6th Avenue N.E. 

Beilevue WA 98004 

(206) 454-761 9 
Price Class: $1,300. 




At the beginning of last summen television 
reception in the non-cable towns and 
villages of central New Hampshire turned 
strange. Every night, stations usually received 
with extreme clarity were fuzzy and filled with 
interference for most of the evening. For the 
rest of the world, this was another of the minor 
"inconveniences of living with old-fashioned 
broadcast TV. For a ham, it could mean only 
one thing: 6 meter DX\ 

Signals were comtng from places like Texas 
and Florida (I even saw the ID screen from a 
Dallas station). With this evidence of great 6 
meter propagation staring me in the face (liter- 
altyj), it was time to take a look at some of the 
available 6 meter equipment. 

On The Road 

Not too long ago, getting onto 6 meters 
meant buying or building separate equipment 
for that band. But not anymore. Now you can 
get the 6 meter band Included with your HF 
rig. ICOM took their 10-725, added 6 meter 
capabilities, and re-christened it the IC-726. 
I've had the chance to put in several hours 
behind the mike of this rig, and this is what 1 
found. 

The layout of the operating controls on the 
10-726 Js prelty straightforward. The mode se- 
lection buttons are stacked to the left of the 
main tuning knob, and the frequency controls 
are stacked to the right. 

The first thing I did after unpacking the rig 
was throw It on the front seat of my car, attach 
the antenna and power, and tune in the 20 
meter band. Then I started driving the 40- 
minute commute home from work. After scan- 
ning the phone portion of the band with the 
tuning controls on the supplied microphone (a 
very handy feature for mobrle operation), I 
called "CQ; ' For the next 20 minutes I had a 
very enjoyable QSO with a gentleman in Flori- 
da. By the time I pulled into my driveway, my 
hands were finding the controls without look- 
ing at the rrg. Even switching bands was no 
problem; you just push the button marked 
BAND, use the mike controls to select the band 
you want, then push the band button again, A 
quick glance at the frequency display, and 
that's all there is to It. A push of the lock button 
disables the main tuning knob but leaves the 



up^Dowiv but- 
tons on the 
microphone 
functional, so 
bumping the 
main tuning 
knob while 
reaching for 
the volume 
has no effect. 
This was 
my first expe- 
rience with 
mobile HF, 
and I was hooked. The 10-726 Is now my con- 
stant copilot during my daily commute. 

Back in the Shack 

Once I arrived home, it took only a few sec- 
onds to set up the IC-726 at the operating 
desk. There is a plate on the back of the rig 
that tells what each jack, switch and plug is 
for, so the confident need not even look at the 
manual. In fact, this rig is so plainly laid out 
that anyone familiar with modern transceivers 
probably won't need to read what is, with few 
exceptions, aweli-written instruction manual. 
(Once the initial excitement of any new piece 
of gear wears off, I would suggest spending 30 
minutes or so with the manual, and if you are 
adding a linear amplifier or other gear to the 
chain, I would strongly urge that you lake the 
time to go through the manual first.) 

The spec rundown for the IC-726 is fairly 
standard for a modern HF rig: general cover- 
age receiver, two VFOs, 26 memory channels 
(with two channels holding split frequencies), 
RIT, band and memory scanning, and variable 
tuning rates. One feature that I found very 
helpful was the built-in 10 dB preamp. Espe- 
ciatly during mobile operation, that extra push 
in thesignal4o-noise ratio can make the differ- 
ence. The built-in noise blanker was also quite 
helpful in eliminating ignition noise. The back- 
lit amber display is something else that 1 liked 
very much. All operating fur^ctlons have an 
indicator, so you only need to look In one spot 
to remind yourself exactly where you are and 
what you're doing (another handy feature for 
mobile operation}. 

On-the-Afr 

1 spent several weekends operating the \C- 
726 on every band, and in every available 
mode. Audio reports were consistently su- 
perb, even on AM where the newer rigs can't 
realty compete with the audio quality of some 
vintage equipment. 

Receiver audio is average, as long as you 
don't use the tiny speaker built into the cabi- 
net. Almost any extension speaker will sound 
better. If you plan to go mobile with this rig, an 
extension speaker is a must. The built-in 
speaker started buzzing at relatively low audio 
output in the quiet of the shack. Mobile opera- 



tion, even with the rig on the passenger seat 
and the speaker facing directly at me, was 
next to impossible. 

This is reaNy not a criticism of the trans- 
ceiver. In order to put a larger speaker in the 
cabinet, the cabinet would have to be larger. 
Consider the built-in speaker as sort of a back- 
up, and you'll have no problems or com- 
plaints. 

As stated earlier, band changing is a snap. 
Tuning is very smooth and precise, even when 
tuning down to 10 Hz steps. The knob tension 
is easily controlled by a front panel screw, so 
those who like a bosef or stiffer tuning can be 
accom m odated . 

What passes for tuning up in a modern 
transceiver is quick. Set your power level, 
check your SWR, and you're on the air. The 
lC-726 will give you 1 0O watts (40 watts in AM 
mode) on 160-10 meters and 40 watts (10 
watts in AM mode) on 6 meters into an SWR of 
1.3:1 or better. The automatic protection cir- 
cuits kick in at higher SWR and your total 
output will be reduced accordingly. 

QRP operation is a simple matter of turning 
down your RF power. Even when the power is 
turned fully counterclockwise, you'll still get 
about 1 watts output. This is due to the idling 
current supplied to the driver and final transis- 
tors to obtain bias voltage. If you want to oper- 
ate serious QRP, a simple attenuator could be 
put in line. 

What 1 Liked 

1. Of course, 6 meter capability has to top 
this list. It's great to have that extra band. Vou 
don't get it for free, though. Only you can 
decide whether or not its worth around $300 to 
have the extra band. The way I look at it, 
you're already spending a lot of money so you 
might as well shell out a little more. 

2. The front panel layout of this rig Is excel- 
lent. Mobile operations are safe and easy. 

3. The variable tuning steps are eas[ly ac- 
cessible. If you want to go from the FM portion 
of 10 meters to the Novice/Tech SSB sub- 
band, a simple button push lets you tune 1 kHz 
or even 1 MHz at a time. 

3. The 10 dB preamp is greatf I never real- 
ized I needed one until I had one. Now. I 
couldn't live without it, 

4. The back-lit amber display is well thought 
out and easy on the eyes. Everything you 
need to know is contained in about four inches 
of space, which adds another safety margin in 
mobile operation. 

5. The band stacking registers will remem- 
ber where you were the last time you were 
tuned to a certain band. At first I thought, "big 
deal/' but I found this feature very useful. 
Before tuning to another band, I always leave 
the VFO on a special frequency (the center of 
the phone portion, or maybe a net frequency). 
As I'm scanning the bands, that special fre- 
quency is waiting for me when I return. 



38 73 Amateur Radio Today * December, 1990 



6. The smoolh and precise tuning is a real 
plus. Many rigs get a bit cranky when you're 
tuning 10 Hz steps. The IC-726 was easy to 
tune and never wavered. 

What I Didn't Lite 

1 . ICOM's biggest sins are sms of omission. 
It woyld be nice if the tone encoder and CW 
fitter were standard instead of options, but to 
not indude the carryrng handle. . .shame, 
shame, shame. For a rig that is marl^eted as a 
base/mobile unit, the carrying handle should 
be standard equipment. 

2. The nr^anuat falls short in helping you set 
up digital modes. In today's world of packet 
TNCs and multimode controllers, the trans- 
ceiver manufacturers ought to get a bit more 
specific on how to set up their rigs for these 
modes, 

3. The noise blanker circuit does not oper- 
ate in the AM or FM modes. This made mobile 
AM work rather aggravating. 

Options 

ICOM has an extensive line of options for 
the IC'726. These range from the standard 



''Now you can get 
the 6 meter band 
included with 
your HF rig. 



ff 



choice of power supplies, antenna tuners and 
external speakers, to a programmable tone 
encoder, mobile mounting bracket and the 
missing carrying handle. 

The GR-64 high-stability crystal unit will 
improve frequency stabiiity. especially if you 
will be operating in extreme weather (the 
CR-64 is rated from -22''Fto + 140°F). There 
are two different CW filters available. The 
FUl00isa50OHzy-6dBfilter, andtheFL-t01 

isgoodfor250Hz/-6dB. 

Other options include the CT-16 Satellite 
Interface Unit, which provides easy tuning for 
satellite communications, and the CT-17 Lev- 
el Converter for remote control of the trans* 
ceivef through your computer's RS-232 port. 

Final Comments 

ICOM's usual quality is evident In the IC- 
726- After two months of heavy use, including 
the daily switch from the shack to the car. the 
rig hasn't given any trouble. The simplicity of 
operation makes it a breeze lo use, especially 
when going mobile. 

If 6 meters is not your cup of lea, then 
you might want to save yourself a few hundred 
bucks and check out the IC-725. But if you're 
the type of ham who is always interested 
in putting your callsign out on another band 
or in another mode, the IC*726 is a great 
way to get on 6 meters with no hassles. The 
next summer DX season is right around the 
oornerl 



When he's not motiie or busy in the ham 
shack, David Cassidy NiOFH is Associate 
Puhtisher of 73 Amateur Radio Today. You 
may reach him at 73. Forest Road, Hancock 
NH 03449. 




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73 Amateur Radio Today • December, 1990 39 



Number 34 on your Feedback card 



73 Review 



by Paul Grupp KAiLR 



PT-340 Tuner-Tuner from 

Palomar Engineers 

Adjust your antenna tuner without transmitting. 



Palomar Engineers 

1924-F West Mission Road 

Escondtdo CA 92029 

Tel. (619) 747-3343 

Price Class: $100 



The scenario repeats itseif hundreds of 
times every day: Two hams are in the 
middte of a QSO. Conditions are less than 
ideal, and both operators are hunched over 
their rigs, straining !o hear the other's name, 
QTH, and signal report. 

SLfddenly, an S9-f40 carrier comes up on 
frequency, obliterating any hope of complet- 
ing the QSO. Sound familfar? If you spend any 
time on the HF bands, you probably have lots 
of stones to tell about OSOs you've tost due to 
"carrier pollution, " 

Tuning Your Tuner 

Soma of the carriers whining away on the 
HF bands come and go with such precision 
that they are obviously the work of some fruit* 
cake intent on disrupting communications. 
Fortunately, the number of carriers transmit- 
ted as intentional jamming is small compared 
to those used to tune up rigs, amplifiers, or 
tuners. 

You'd have to be living under a rock not to 
know that you're supposed to use a dummy 
load to turie your rig or amplifier. However, a 
surprisingly large number of hams are un- 
aware that there is also a method of accurately 
tuning an antenna tuner without transmitting a 
carrier, which brings us to the subject of this 
revfew: The Palomar Engineers PT-340 
Tuner-Tuner. 

The Tuner-Tuner allows you to adjust an 
antenna tuner without transmitting. On the 
front panel of this simple device is a rotary 
switch with Iwo positions, off and tune. A red 
LED Oashes rapidly whenever the switch is in 
the TUNE position, On the rear panel are Iwo 
SO-239 connecters, one marked transceiver 
and one marked tuner. A 9 volt battery clip 
and battery holder are also provided. 

Just Hook It Up 

Installation and operation couldn't be 
easier. Simply connect the Tuner-Tuner 
between your transceiver and antenna turh 
er, and set the front panel switch to tune. 
(You'll hear a loud hissing noise from the 
tiansceiver.) Tune the receiver to a frequen* 
cy near where you wish to transmit, and 
turn ils AGG off. Then adjust the tuner's 
controls until the noise level is as low as pos- 
sible. Bingof You've adjusted your an* 



tenna tuner for minimum SWR, 

The Tuner-Tunef must be switched off t)e- 
tore transmitting. The front panel LED flashes 
at a rapid rate whenever the Tuner-Tun r^r is on 
to help you remember this. If you lorget to 
switch it off before transmitting (and believe 
me, you will at least oncel) an AGX 1/100 amp 
fuse protects the unit against damage. One 
spare fuse is provided, and a good thing^ too. 
Just try finding an AGX 1/100 amp fuse at your 
local hardware store. 

Tuner-Tuner tn Use 

I installed the Tuner-Tuner In my shack just 
after moving to a new QTH. This provided 
perfect condilions for a test* since the tower 
wassliti in pieces on the ground, and !he only 
antenna installed was a lOO-foot wire about 35 
feet high, center-fed with ladder line. The an- 
tenna was matched with an Ameritron ATR-1 S 
antenna tuner, and ted with a Kenwood TS- 
940S transceiver. Since the antenna and loca- 
tion were not familiar to me, I had no idea what 
the correct settings for my tuner controls 
would be. 

Ease of use varied from band to band. The 
first band I tried was 10 meters. Adjustment of 
the tuner's controls produced an obvious dip 
in the noise level from the TS-940S- On 15 
meters the dip wasn't as obvious, and it turned 
out that the dip was an extremely narrow 
range that was very easy to miss when adjust- 
ing the controls. Once I found it, it was jusi as 
deep as the dip on 10 meters, but I had to 
adjust the controls carefully to avoid missing 
the dip altogether. 

On 75 meters, the effect was exact- 
ly the opposite. The dip was wide 
and gradual, and large move- 
ments of the tuner's con- 
trols produced a barely 
ooticeable reduction in 
the noise level Switch* 
ing the receiver to AM 
and following the S-me- 
ter helped. Dips in the 
noise level thai were 
barely perceptible to 
the ear were immedi- 
ately obvious on the S- 
meter. 

In every case, the 



antrnma tuner control settings I came up 
with using the Tuner-Tuner corresponded 
to 3 low SWR reading on the TS-940S 
built-in SWR meter. Most readings were 
around 1 .2 to 1 , which is a perfectly accept- 
able match. 

My only complaint is that when the fuse is 
blown (by accidentally transmitting when the 
unit is on) the Tuner-Tuner still appears to 
work. The noise level is lower than usual, but 
the nulls still appear, although with incorrect 
settings of the tuner controis. resulting in high 
SWR. This could easily cause problems for a 
casual user who is unaware of the internal 
fuse. I'd like to see a mod that causes the 
Tuner-Tuner to ga completely dead when the 
fuse LS blown, removing any ambiguity about 
Its condition. 

Conclusions 

After using the Tuner-Tuner for a few 
weeks, I find that it takes a little longer than to 
simply tune for minimum SWR while transmit- 
ting. But that's a small price to pay for elimi- 
nating my contribution to the carrier pollution 
problem. If even ha^f of the amateurs who use 
antenna tuners used a device like the Tuner- 
Tuner, the outrageous level of carrier pollution 
heard on the bands would be significantly re* 
duced. If you use an antenna tuner, you 
should seriously consider adding a Tuner- 
Tuner to your shack. 



Contact Paul Grupp KAILR at 22 Lawrence 
Street Pepp&reU MA 014B3, 




40 73 ArrtatBur Radio Today • December, 1990 



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IBAVWU€AllATEUnSUFRT.7t ICACCWRO .KCWCASTIE PE 
ltiAL£AH00liftlMCAT1OllS,€XE.9THST.HtAL£Ali.FL 

MIAMI RAIW CENTER COfV^.^SOWaAGER ST. MlAW].a 

N A G DISTRifiUTOftS . l ^ NORTHWEST UTH AVE. , UW*, FL 

BJ'S AMATEUfi RADIO IMC, , 251 3 SOUTHWEST 9TH AVE , FT LAUDETOALE, FL 

a^WNYSSUMRlSE.SKO SUNSET STRIP SUNRISE FL 



out an entry form at any of these locations* 



AMATBJR ELECTROMICS SPtv. 1B9S DREW ST . CIEWIWATER. Fl 
COTRONICS-HADIO SHACK, 220D SE FEDERAL HWY. STUART. FL 
ATUNTIC NEWS. £663 H. ATLANTIC AVE . DAYTONA BEACH, FL 
OUAOELECTflONO, KfflN PACEflL^D . PEN3AC0LA. FL 
AMATEUR ELECTfiO^tlCS. 621 COMMONIfllEALTH AVE . OfiLANDO FL 
HAM RADIO OUTLP" 5071 BUFORD HIGHWAY ATLANTA, QA 
RADIO SALES * Se^lCE.aSOO I2TH AVE , COLUMBUS. GA 
TRt STATE. 200 W NORTHWEST HWfV MT PROSPECT. IL 
KAMR/ISIOTOh^STQfE. nr WMSTLEYST.WHEATON. IL 
£RlCSONCOMilMCATK]NS.54Sf N UiWAlUHAVE^CHOGOU 
C8 S}>ECiA|£!S. iSOl LffCOUWA v ABT^ SOUTH 6END. #1 
ftSSOQATED AMMO C0HU3Gia€0ieei.0veUlO RAM. RS 
DAMTS, mNQPH iM9M3fTt}N ST . NEiiiinM^ ^ 
PSftmBHTfilCMC. TtiS SO TTN Sr . LOUSniEIV 
la^eOUiCiTSOI^TRQ.yTTlftOMlllA 

JMATEJnAUNOCIR tii7NSTHST,BALTIi3HE,l|) 

HgEiKTflQNiCS 72224EVANSTON.MUSKgQ0M,li 

NORWEST£LECTTO»CS. 339i7 PlYlCUTHflO-, IJVONiA. W 

LITTIE PflOF£^OflS»lCTR.,2£i7< MICHIGAN AVE .DEAllSOftN. Ml 

flAOlOCOWMUNlCATCNS, 151QEA5T PEAftL, HAZEi PARp?, Ml 

MICHIGAN RADIO. ^5000 NIWE MILE f^DAD.E DETROIT Ml 

PUICHASE RADMD SUPPLV, 3?? E HOOVER AVE , ANN ARBOR, Wl 

FERRPS RADIO, 2173Q JOHN k, HAZEL PARK, Ml 

HAL'TRONIK. 12671 DIX TOLEDO HWY. SOUTHGATE. Ml 

KEN'SS WAY R;\DI0. 2135 LAKE STREET, XALAMA200. Ml 

AWATEURRAOIOCOKSIGNM£NT,3SI5THST NORTHWEST. NE^fVflfiKjH TON MN 

SATELLITE CktY. 12581 CENTRAL AVE . EUINI, MN 

N0flT><WESTRAfflO. 1Z3£ FAST ST , OULUTH. UN 

GATeMAYEl£CTHONCSOFUO.ai23^PAG£&V^.ST ySt^UO 

USSOURlAAOOCCHTQl TlSMVaU6H€SSPKLN KANSASCmr.HQ 

HOOPER BBnRQHCSUPPLY.lTQiPASSRGAO Ek.€3Sim 

FIUI^rSNBIS.339S.liftllSr.HGHPaNTJC 

rnmBLiwmmem m^mm,m 

HAUEVWOimH.^NO MMMAY SAUHltt 
LAS»e«BBnnOMCS.2l EtfKUDWAY DBMi£.llt 
gUetSHCfmuVESSRARK AVt^FAfliWGE. MJ 
ATKHSON&SHTNMC ITLBmSST.EATONTDWNNJ 
PAGE Of€ NBIIISTAI®. 1 1^ MOr^TGOlCRt NE, ALaXMJERO^ 
ElECITOMChlODULEeom TURNER HCeBS, NM 
RENO WOO, 1?aL£N CABRANCiRCLE SPAR»<S, W 
RADIO WORLD 1556 NEVADA HKJHWAV SOULDERClTY, HV 
SPARTAN ELECTRONICS IMC , 6143 JERICHO TURNPIKE COMMACK. NY 



EAST-^OAST .AMATEUR RADIO. i% MCCONKEY DRIVE. TONAWANDA, NY 
HIRSCH SALES CO., 219 CALIFORNIA DR.. WlLLlAHSVIilE. NY 
WORLD WIDE NEWS. lOOST. PAULST . flOGHESTER. NY 
UHFCOMMMUNICATIONS. TIFFANY AVE. RAMCO SUlLDfNG. JAMESTOWN. NY 
BEECHCROFTNEWS STAND. 19333SE DilBLiNGRANVlLE. COLUMBUS. OH 
LEO'SfiOOK & WINE SHOP. 330 N SUPERIOR STREET. TOLEDO. OH 
ELA-CO ELECTRONICS INC _ fl7iAi(E AVE . ELYHIA OH 
NORTH OlUSTED AJyiATEUR ftADiO DEPOT. 2*4© LORAW ROAD, 
NORT>l OLMSTED, Om 
KENMAR irilSlllES.fia65NAflCy JOST. N W. NQm>lCANTCN,OH 
WftERiALAlKfBIt RWO. t2» A«A OR . REYKXDSSURO. OH 
FAAftAOOSAiES. ({JliEURBUl L1IA.0H 
AUA~E^EL£CTTO«:ia»«eUClJDAVE.MQiaf?€,0H 

GBflUR¥2t€aHHiC/|1lOKS BucieiiTTOOum^iMr a o^ 
mmH RAOOSUPPIY. ITP STHIES AVE-W^ NORTM TCnc. CM 

fwiiAJ«»RA0DSiFaY.i3*s£^RAieAVER]miAw on 

R&RCOyUUMCATaC nQN0ITTHEASTUMO»IAVLPORT|A»C^.OR 
GECngE^etHmOCS. 110 HiGHWAVSaW. DUNDEE. OR 
KAUBUeiGB^IMC ,l170AVl6\nLL£ R0AD,miI7WQV)VE. PA 

WARRENRAOIO. I3i5 PEACH ST . ERIE. PA 

JRS DlSTR^BUTOftS. &46 W MARKET ST , YOflK. PA 

WH^ESiDE ELECTRONICS, Wl5SALTSeURG ROAD. PinSBLJRGH, PA 

MEMPHIS AMATEUR ELEC, 1*65 WELLS STATION ROAD, MEMPHIS. TN 

MUSIC CITY / HAM SHACK. aiO-SGALUTlN flOAD. MADISON, TN 

CT hCTGAN. ma EAST 3^TH ST , CHAHANOOGA. TN 

AUSTIN A^WT£^JR RADIO SDP , 5310CAMERON ROAD. AUSTIN, n 

GATEWAY ELECTRONICS Of TX, 9890 WESTPARK DRIVE. HOUSTON. TX 

ElECTHONK f'ARTSOUTLET. l73iaNlGHWAY 3. WEBSTER. TX 

ELECTRONIC CENTER INC. ^09 ROSSAVE. DALLAS. TX 

OTY aECTROMC SUPav, ALEX. M315AT1NELL HOUSTON. TX 

VALLEY RADIO CeVliH TSS^H 77$tAl9MESTW. HAAJUGEM TX 

HAiDNBBniVSlIC aSE ROSeMtE.IT WDRTKfX 

IICGH1MC..S707-AIIOBUO SANAffTONCtX 

STSOOMMUNCATONS ^1S3S0 TQOEASf SALtyVEOrrr.UT 

onnffuTLtesre ^^tae so SALTLAXEOTY^UT 

SOUBSYSiadEGCIfQNCS. f^HfiMlSlll^ MIVOUC VA 

HW »AOD OUTLET. tABOailAOAieiCA Da IIOOOOROOE VA 
00IMeTRADiDS^^STeiS.O0 WRONMDDRniEBtAaC m 

SKAar^wi$iTcoMELH;Tnoii:s.G2DWQnriSK}HMr VERNON 

AliAlE/n fW)0 TBUUI SmANE 2S SOUTl^ G IIWtD RO . 9>^^ 
C COHM 51 1 5 1 5TH AVE HW . SEATTLE. WA 
AMATEUR ELECTRONIC SPLY .S?!0 WEST GOODHDPERD. MILWAUKEE W/ 
CHESTER ELECTRONICS, 7703 SHERIDAN RD.. KENOSHA Wl 



P 




^smo 



HOW TO ENTER 

Visit yourlocaJ participating amateur radio dealer and fill out 
an Official Entry Survey. Only one entry' per month per person. 
Dupiicaic entries will he disqualified. 

Once every month, we will pick 5 names from every partici- 
pating retail outlet. * One of these lucky hams will receive that 
month's prize package, but all of them will be entered in the 
Grand Prize Drawing, to be held in April 1991- 

Visit you local retailer cver>" month to check if your name is 
on the Ham It UpJ Tote Board* which lists all the Grand Prize 
entrants from that store. While you're there, fill out the next 
month's Official Entry Survey, Remember, you can enter once 
every month. You get six chances to win a fabulous prize 
package and six chances to be included in the Grand Prize 
Drawingf 

After weVe given away all of the monthly prize packages, 
well take the Grand Prize Drawing entries (30 from each par- 
ticipating retailer) and give away over $30,000 worth of great 
ham gear, 

'ir^nu arc uitabk lo tmier i| 1 locst r^taikr, you nu^ crfmin an orficta! EEltr>' Survey by 
isoKliiig an S.A.S.E lo Hiiiii It Upl Smcrpstakcs. "^ Amateur Rsdio Todav. Fofesi RokJ. 
Hancodc, MH 03449^ Rtrtum ihe tnay litrn'r)* to ihc vimc addims, and yo4] wfff be cuic^ftHt 

This Month's Prize Package 
is worth over $1,200,001 

If you Ye this month's winner, you'U receive an MFJ Priate Package. 

including: 

MFJ-949D Deluxe 300 watt tuner 

MFJ-n 12 Multiple DC oudei 

MFJ-I08B Dual dock 

MFJ -30 Golden Classics of Yesterday by David Ingram K4TWJ 

MFJ'32 Packet Radio ts Made Easy by Buck Rogers K4ABT 

MFJ-35 The Wonderful World of Ham Radio 

by Richard Skilnik KB4LCS 
MFJ- 1 281 Easy DX Software (IBM compatable) 
MFJ-1286 Gray Line DX Advantage software (IBM compatable) 

Plus, the A£A Isoloop HF Antenna 

You'll also receive these grtat prizes. . . 

Outbacker mobile HF antenna 

A custom QSL order from Chester QSL Cards (a S250 value) 

Antenna Specialists glass mounted 2 meter antenna 

Unadilia 5 band antenna kit 
GGTE Morse Tutor software 




KENWOOD 



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46 73 Amateur Radio Today ■ December. 1990 



Number 13 on your Feedback card 



Dealer directory 



CALIFORNIA 



San P te g o 

Hard to find parts » surplus electronics, 
standard line ilems. Hams, hobbyists, 
industrial professionals — from nuts A 
bolts to laser diodes. . .Electronically 
speaking. Gateway's got it! M^F 9- 
5:30. Sat. 9-5. GATEWAY ELEC- 
TRONICS, 9222 Chesapeake Drive, 
San D»ego CA 92123. (&19) 27d- 
6802. 



COLORADO 



Denver 
Hard lo find parts, surplus electronics, 
standard line rlems Hams, hobbyists, 
industrial professionals — from nuts A 
botts to laser diodes. . .Electronicalfy 
speaking, Gaieway's got it! M-F 9- 
5t30, SaL 9-5. GATEWAY ELEC- 
TRONICS. 511S N, Federal Blvd. ^32- 
B, Denver CO 00221. (303^ 
45S-S444. 



DELAWARE 



New Castle 

Factory authorised dealer! Yaasu, 
ICOMp Kenwood^ Ten-Tec» AEA, 
Kanfronics, DBSI Mfg., Amerdfon, 
CLfshcratt. HyGain. Heath Amateur 
Radio, hiell Sound. DELAWARE AMA> 
TEUR SUPPLY, 71 Meadow Road, 
New Castle DE 19720. (302} 32a- 
7728, 



fOAHO 



Preston 
Ross W87BYZ has the largest slock of 
amateur gear in (he intermountain 
West and the bes! prices. Over 9,000 
ham related gear in stock. Calt us tor 
"all" your ham needs today. ROSS 
DISTRIBUTING CO., 78 5. State. Pre^ 
ston to a32&3. (208) 352-0830. 



KANSAS 



Wellington 
We have it! AEA, ASTRON, BUTTER- 
NUT, CALLBOOK, COMET, DIA- 
MOND, HEATHKIT, HUSTLER, 
KANTRONICS, LASER COMPUT* 
EFIS, MFJ. RADIO SHACK. SMILEY 
AltfTtNNAS, TEN^TEC, VALOR AN- 
TENNAS ^ more. SmafI town service 
wtth discount prices. DANDYS, 120 N* 
Washington. Wellington KS £7152, 
(316) 32e-€314. Circ^ Reader Ser- 
vice 263 for more infomiation. 



MISSOURI 



St. Louis 

Hard to find parts, surplus elet^troniCSi 
standard line items. Hams, Inobbyists, 
Industrial professionals— from nuts & 
bolts to laser diodes. . . Elect ronically 
speaking, Gateway's 901 it! M-F 9- 
5:30. Sat 9-5. GATEWAY ELEC- 
TRONICS. 8123 Page Biyd., St. 
Louis MO 63130. (314) 427-61 16. 



NEW YORK 



Jamestown 
Western New York's finest amateur ra- 



dio dealer featuring ICOMM^rsen- 
AEA-Hamtrontcs-Astron. New and 
used gear. 8 am Jo 5:30 p.m. , Sat. and 
Sun. by appointment. VHP COMMUNl- 
CATIONS, 280 Tiffany Ave., 
Jamestown NY 14701. (716) 664- 
6345. Circle Reader Service number 
129 for more information. 

Manhattan 
Manhattan's largest and only ham and 
business Radio Store. Featuring MO- 
TOROLA, ICOM. KENWOOD, YAE^ 
SU, AEA. SONY, BJRO, TEN-TEC, etc. 
Full stock of radios and accessories. 
Repair lab on premises. Open 7 days 
M-F, 9-6 p.m.; Sal & Sun.. 1 0-5 p.m. 
We ship wo^ldw^de, BARRY ELEC- 
TRONICS, 512 Broadway, New York 
NY 10012. (212) 925-7000. FAX 
(212)92S-700n 



OHIO 



Cotymbus 
Central Ohio's full-line authorized 
dealer for Kenwood, ICOM, Yaesu, Al- 
inco, Info-Tech, Japan Radio, AEA, 
Cushcraft, Hustler, and Butternut. New 
and used equipment on display and 
operational in our 4000 sq. fl. store. 
Large SWL department, too. UNIVER- 
SAL RADIO. 1280 Aida Drfve, 
Reynoidsburg (Columbus) OH 
43068.(614)866-4267, 



PENNSYLVANIA 



Trevose 
Authortzed tactory sales and service. 
KENWOOD. ICOM, YAESU. featuring 
AMERITRON, B&W, MFJ, HYGAIN. 
KLM. CUSHCRAFT. HUSTLER. 
KANTRONICS, AEA. VIBROPLEX. 
HEIL, CALLBOOK, ARRL Publica- 
tions, and much more. HAMTRONICS, 
INC., 4033 Brownsvnie Road, Tre- 
vose PA 19047,(215)357-1400. FAX 
(215) 355-8958. Sales Order 1-800- 
4^-2820. Circle Reader Service 379 
for more information. 



TEXAS 



Dallas 
In DaHas since i960. We feature Ken- 
wood, ICOM, Yaesu. AEA, Butternut, 
Rohn. amateur publications, and a full 
line of accessories, Facotry authorized 
Kenwood Service Center. ELEC- 
TRONIC CENTER, INC, 2809 Ross 
Ave., Dallas TX 75201. (214) 969- 
1936, Circle Reader Service 74 for 
more information. 

Houston 
Hard to find parts, surplus electronics. 
Standard line items, Hams, hobbyists, 
industrial professionals — from nuts & 
bolts to laser diodes. . . Electronically 
speaking, Gateway's got it! M-F 9- 
5;30. Sat. 9-5. GATEWAY ELEC- 
TRONICS, 9890 Westpafk Drive, 
Houston TX 77063. (713) 978-6575, 



DEALERS: Your company name and message can contain up to SO words for 
as little as S420 yearly (prepaid), or S2 10 for six months (prepaid). No mention 
of mall-order business please. Directory text artd payment must reach us 60 
days in advance of publication. For example, advertising for the April '91 
Issue must be in our hands by February 1 st. Mail to 73 Amsteur Radio Todsy^ 
Box 276, Forest Road, Hancock NH 03449. 



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494,114+ Hams, via your computer 
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Use our toll-free lines. 

Trade? Yes, we give the highest trade-ins for clean, sale- 
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ASTRO N/M FJ/AR R L7Nye Viking/MIRAGE/ 

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AIVtECO/ICOM/BencherJnc./SONY/HUSTLER 

1-800-441-0145 (IN TEXAS) 1-800-527-2156 • ask for Ham Dept, 



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Carote Perry W82MaP 

Media Mentors, fnc. 

PO Bom 13164$ 

Siamn Isiand NY J0313W06 

73 from 72 

TTie melodious sound of "73 fronn 72*' 
hes become famifiaron 28.303 MHz every 
Tuesday and Thursday a1 12:30 p.m. EST 
Gordon West WB6N0A and I began The 
CO All Schools Net two years ago in re- 
sponse to the ARRL's challenge to get 
more school kids exposed to the airwaves. 

I open ihe Net as the East Coast Net 
Control from Intermediate School 72 in 
Staten Island, New York. With over 400 
youngsters a term taking my course, "to* 
IfOduciion to Amateur Radio/' we felt that 
the Net provided a great opportunity to 
involve our students with other schools 
across ttie country. Neither Gordon nor ( 
realised that there were so many schools 
with access to ham radio. We were also 
delighted lo receive letters from many 
teachers who we^e listening to us wiih 
SWLca|>abtlfties. Irt many cases, listening 
10 the othet children on the Net was the 
molivaiion fof these classes to gtt irv 
votvedinhamradK). 

Either Gofdofl or Joe N6CftX is Wesi 
Goest Net Control, inviting schtoo^s across 
Amenca to check In with us . So ma n y won* 
dftfful hams t^ave been supportive by act* 
tng as relays during efratic conditiorts on 
Ihe 10 meter band^ We ctiose 10 meters so 
that all Novices would feel welcome to join 
us. 

Benefits of the Net 

As any good salesperson can teil you^ 
it's important that your customers (m this 
Case, studenis) expenence a relevance to 
their lives when you're trying to sell them 
on an Idea The t»enetits of getting young 
people on the air talking to other young- 
sters are readily observable. Classes 
speaking with oitier classes in different 
parts ol the work) verifies that it's OK to 
have fun in school and on the ham radio. 

Speaking with their peers gives the chil- 
dren a chance lo discuss matters oi muiu* 
af interest m addition to ham radio. In* 
evitably, Inendships begin to form 
between the students at ditferent schools. 
We began some toliow-up activities which 
added ii>credib^e enrichment to our radio 
experiences. We'd like to share some of 
these «deas with other instructors who are 
concerned with keeping the interest level 
high. 

One of the immediate benefits of enrich- 
ment activities is that every siudeni can 
pursue his own particular interest at his 
own speed. Remember that in a regular 
classroom, ham radio should be used as 
the vehicle to motivate learning and to 
sti m u late creat i v ily i n a II ot h er areas of the 
school's curricula. 

Extras and Enrichments 
A pen-pat exchange is usually the fust 



Number 16 on your Feedback eaftJ 

involved with the exchange to see what a 
school in another part of the country was 

mW[^9^ B^r f m tfV ^^Hi#l'^^^9 ^^^^ several months of wonderlut e%- 

changes of letters, pictures, videos, and 

"skeds." Bob and I decided to share our 
experience with other inslructors. The fol- 
lowing IS an excerpt from Bob's writings 
on our coasl4ocoast connectKjn, 



Recently, we spoke with Ban^ KB6RAA, a 
teacher in Los Angeles, California. Tfie 
kids in hts class t>ad recently expenenced 
a minor earthquake. What a drfference it 
ntade to be aWe to sp^k directly to chil- 
dren who cou^ tell us what the earth- 
quake fett like from a chitd's perspective. 
My students were able to ask, 'Was ft 
scary^ Oid you go home or slay If* school 
when the earthquake hit? What precau- 
tions do the schools in your part ot the 
country take?'' II was absolutely fascinate 
ing[ 

The Net has provided some real 
firsthand current events lessons tor us. 
Many ot the children in Barry's class ex- 
changed letters with my classes, It was 



From Sob Jost AA6AQ 

Amateur radio in fhe ciASsroom has 
sparkBda unique partners^tp i^etwetn tha 
students at tntermediate School 72 in 
Staten isiEand. New Yofk, and Manchester 
GATE Bfementary Schoci m Fresno. Ceii- 
iomm. These two schoais at opposites 
ends oi the country have been meeting on 
The CO M Schools Net {2&,303 MHz) 
Tuesdays and Thursdays at t730 UTC, 
exchanging video-taped school tours end 
writing pen-pal tetters 

For the sixth grade students at 
Manchester GATE (a Gifted and Taisnted 




Photo. The children dtd projects on earthquakes as a resuit Of cur contact with 
Barry's Class in Los Angeles. 



follow- up to some really good OSOs. 

7$ Amateur Radio Today ■ December, 1990 



interesting to compare the newspaper 
coverage in their local Los Angeles papers 
with what we were reading on the East 
Coast We had some real thought-provok- 
sng discussions in class about media cov- 
erage of disasters that we had been able 
to monitor ourselves in cfass on the radio 

The next step was to encourage Ihe pen 
pials to make their own arrarvgements to 
speak With each other on the air Any 
teacher woukl be thrilled to see the excite- 
ment that these "skeds" generate m the 
classroom. So many excellent communi- 
cations skills come out o1 these foltows^p 
adivities that they really quality as leairv 
ingatitst>est. 

Another terrific foitow-up activity we do 
with some of the schools we've contacted 
is to exchange videos. We recently 
videotaped a tour of our school in Staten 
Island, showing the different types of 
classes and what the building and the sur- 
rounding community look like. Each child 
got on Ihe tape and inlrodLiced him or her* 
self and told something about their hob- 
bies and likes and dislikes. We sent the 
tape to the Manchester Elementary 
School in Fresno, California, where we 
had made contact with the teacher, Bob 
Jost AA6AQ, In return we received a copy 
of the video that his students made lor us. 
It was entigfitentng for all the youngsters 



Education magnet school in the Fresno 
Unified School District) and me. it started 
when we heard through tha ham 
grapevine that WB2MGP and the kids 
from IS. 72 were reguiarfy getting on W 
meters to chat with hams atl over the 
world. Several times during the fall guar- 
ler. we tried unsuccessfully to check into 
the Net. Then on January 23. f990Jthap^ 
pened. We met Carole, and the kids had a 
great BO-minute QSO. We promptly 
matted a QSL card and a list of dass mem- 
bers. When a QSL card from New York 
arrived in FresDO. tt created quite a stir. 
Several days later we met on the atr agmn. 
and as we concluded our chat. Carole 
cryptically told the class, ' ' You "re going to 
iike what we 're sending you*" 

Students at Manchester impatiently 
checked the mail every day to see if the 
"mystery from Staten Island 'had arrived. 
After several days of disappointments, 
a thick package arrived at my home. The 
first item of business the following school 
day was the viewing of a wonderful videO' 
taped tour ot iS. 72 led by several stu- 
dents^ The tape concluded with Carole's 
cfass members introducing themselves. A 
lively discussion ot the simtlanttes and 
differences between the two schools 
and the kids with the "strange accents" 
fottowed. 



The students in Room 2f qukkty voted 
to write letters to their new pen pais and to 
produce a video-taped tour of our school. 
An exciting day ot deciding what to fiimt 
planning camera angles, and scnphm^ting 
fottpwed. We decided to start with anottier 
CQ Atl Schools Net cor^tact with 
WB2MGP. Conditions on W meters were 
dismal, but Jack N5PSJ in Friendwood, 
Texas, was able to copy both Califomta 
and New York. As tie swung Ins beam 
back and fcrfh i?efween the EMt and Wesf 
Coast, Jack refayed the message ttrnt the 
videotape from New York fiad arnved in 
C^Woma. and that as we spoke, we were 
filming the Fresno video. 

Most Of f^bruary 15, 199&, was ^>ent 
touring the school and filming the sights at 
Manchester GATE. The whole school was 
buzzing about "the kids in New York," 
and several other classes asked to see the 
Staten Island video. Students in Room it 
concluded the tape with each class mem- 
tier presenting a short monologue intro- 
ducing themselves to IS. 72, After some 
editing (the original tape was Over 90 min- 
utes long}, the final copy was mailed along 
with the ftrst batch of pen pal letters. 

i established a marginal contact with 
WB2MGP on February 20 and several stu- 
dents managed to say hello to tfteir new 
friends before fading stgnais ended the 
Q$0. Tfien on February 27, Carote came 
right back i^m^ we called Tfie VH^otape 
had arrived* Sixth graders crowded 
around the radio in the back of the Ctas$- 
room to ^k to equally exated New York' 
ers. The per^pat fetters began amving 
once or twice a week Dehghfed kids 
claimed their personally addressed letters 
or vied for the ones addressed to ^"any 
sixth grade boy/girt'' or "aomeww who 
tikes The N&¥ Kids on the Block' " or 
'someone into martial arts.^* Return fet- 
ters came bacA regularly. Some students 
bypassed the school mail and exchanged 
letters and photographs directly. 

As the school year progressed^ extend- 
ed QSOs between WB2MGP and myself 
found the students talking about a variety 
of topics ranging from their favorite music 
groups and sports teams, the weather, 
school dress codes, after^school activi- 
ties, homework, and all the other topics 
intermediate grade students find interest- 
ing. The students at Manchester reguiarfy 
remind me when it's ttme to listen for 
WB2MGP. The tetters may have sl&wed 
down a bit, but the interest in amateur ra* 
dio and the excitement of talking to some- 
one on the other Side of the contityent re- 
mains. Students m the ahef-schoot Ham 
fliadio Club at Manchester GATE School 
are wortmg on getting thetr own tickeis, 
like ''those kids in New York. " 

Station de^is: Bob Jast AA6QA, Room 
2t, t^anchester GATE School; 2305 E 
Dakota, Fresno CA 9372S. {209} 44 f^ 
6747. Or 5055 E. Hedges, Fresno CA 

93727 {209} 255-9553. 

Listen for Us 

Many interesling and friendly ham radio 
operators have checked Into the Net to 
encourage the children to get involved 
with ham radio. Their spirit and enthusi- 
asm are contagious over the ainvaves 
right into the classroom. 

Please join us on The CQ All Schools 
Net and help us to show young people all 
that IS exciting and stimulating in amateur 
radio, 



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FuU0mnCA9263$ 

Throw Your Voice 

Surprises are what give competitive 
transmitter hunting tts excitement. 
When you set out from the start point, 
you have no idea where you will end up 
or how long it will take to get there. 
Usually, you know nothing atx>ut what 
the fox's setup will look like. The hid- 
den T could be a bunch of gear in an 
old ice chest, or a riandie-laJkte in the 
bustle. The antenna could be plainty 
visible in the dear, or deverty camou- 
ffayrBd. 

The hi<iden Fs modulation seldom 
gives a good clue. One Sunday sfter- 
noori, t had the hunters checking under 
freeway overpasses instead of in the 
tranquil park where I was located. All it 
took was some tape-recorded speeds 
way sounds playing in the background 
as I tafked to the hunters^ 

Things get even more interesting 
when the hunters drive up to the hid- 
den operator, but Ihe transmitter arid 
antenna are nowhere m sight, "You 
mean this isn'i the hidden T7 We've 
beefi Itstenirvg to you talking /' Some 
of my favorite hiding axperienees 
have been times wher? 1 was alj^e to 
watch ail the fun from a nearby otsser^ 
vaiion point, while talking to the 
hunters through a distant hidden trans- 
mitter. 

A dual-band mobrle transceiver 
makes this easy. Many models such as 
the Kenwood TM -62 1763 1/72 1/731 se- 
ries are easily modified to serve as a 
crossband repeater. Set it to transmit 
on the 2 meter hunt frequency, conceal 
it with a storage battery and antenna at 



Radio Direction Finding 

the hiding spot, and talk through It on 
the 220 or 440 MHz band from your 
vantage point. 

Dual-band hand-helds can make 
great remote hidden transmitters, too. 
On one Sunday afternoon hunt, f put an 
100 M IC-32AT and a motorcycle bat- 
tery down in a sprinkler hole along the 
Santa Ana River bicycle trait. I talked to 
the 2 meter hunters through the dual 
bander via 440 MHz. It was great fun 
watching the hunters wander around 
trying to figure out wheie the transmit- 
ter was, but there were sonve dose 
calts--a couple of hunters almost 
stepped on the rig! 

I( you try this trick, be ^ry careftil to 
provide cooling for the radio. I wrapped 
the tC-32AT m a towel and put it in a 
plastic bag to protect it from jarnng and 
moisture. In doing so, I gave it too 
much thermal insulation, i was only 
transmitting intermittently, but by the 
end of the Inunt, the back of the hand- 
held was hot enough to fry an egg! 
(Well, almost.) Fortunately, it didn't 
fait. Next time Til be sure to allow for 
free air Flow and perhaps include a 
small fan. 

The Fox Commander 

Saturday night transmitlor hunts in 
the Los Angeles area require the hider 
to transmit continuously. Some hiders 
use endless tape fecordmgs to provide 
the continuous audio, but most have 
concocted some sort of tone/iD box. 
Adding remote control to either system 
is easy and provides a lot of conve- 
nience, 

That brings us to this month's con- 
struction project. The Fox Commander 
is a simplet effective remote control 
system for your hidden T's push-to-talk 



(PTT) and audio. By adding the circuit 
Shown In Rgure 1, you can "throw 
your voice." ma km 9 short or long 
transmissions throu9h the concealed 
bunny using your UHF handheld or 
mobJIe rig. The Fox Commander also 
lets you (urn the target transmitter arid 
Its audio ton^ on and off with the con- 
trol transmitter's DTMF buttons. 

The heart of this project ts a tiny 
(2^>^'' K V/2'*} single-channel UHF re- 
ceiver {Photo A), Originally designed 
for pocket pagers, U has a sensitive 
MOSFET input dual conversion drcuH, 
with fractional microvolt sensitivity and 
excel rent adjacent channel rejection. It 
draws only about 10 mA from a + 6 volt 
power source ■ 

These surplus UHF receivers are 
available for $12.^5 each, plus han^ 
dling charges,, from Lynn Johnson 
Etectronks (UE), (Lynn WA61-NU has 
quantity prices for larger orders.) The 
UIE receiver has no speaker oulpyt 
stage, but this isn't necessary for this 
project. The audio output is just the 
right leveJ to drive subaudible tone 
(CTCSS) and dual-tone (DTMF) de- 
coders. 

There is atso no squelch on the re- 
ceiver, but using a CTCSS decoder In- 
stead of carrier squelch makes your 
control link more secure. It also adds 
immunity to squelch trips from inter- 
mod ar^d RFl The MC3357 IF chip in 
the receiver has provisions for a carrier 
squelch, if you are willing to do some 
miCfO-surgery to add it, but I recom- 
mend the CTCSS method instead. 

Cryslalling Up 

As shipped, the t_JE receiver is 
tuned up on a 454 common-carr^er 
frequency. The first thing to do is to 
decide on your control frequency and 
order a crystal (XI). Hams can legally 
do controlling anywhere in the 420- 
450 MHz band, e^tcept in the 431^33 
and 432-435 MHz segments. 

Choose a quiet frequency in keeping 
with the band plan in your area. A call 



mc III PUT 






w 








Photo A. The matchbox-size LJE re- 
ceiver mounts under the afuminum 
cover pfare with adrtes/ve foam. Keep 
the i^id k> the anienna connector 

SiiOft. 

10 your UHF frequency coordination 
council may be in order. 

Calculate the crystal frequency by 
subtracting the (F frequency (21.4 
MHz) from the receive frequency, then 
dividing by nine. For example, a 
47.1778 MHz crystal sets the receiver 
for 446.0 MHz. 




Figure T. SchBmatic diagram of the Fok Commander. 
50 73 Amateur Radio Today • December, 1990 



Photo S. The Fox Commander circuit 
ffts easily inside the Un-Mustc Box. The 
aiuminum cover piste forms a ground 
plane for the UHF control antenna. 



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73 Amsteur Radio Today • December, 1990 51 




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FECIAL EVENTS 

Ham Doings Around the World 



DECI 



APACHE JUtyCTlON, AZ Ta^ Syperslrllon 
ARC wit! spofVSOt K^tnitr?! ai !t>B R^M Rod«0 
Grounds irom 7 AM-£:30 P1U AdMirssion Si, 
sales spatx S3 TsMt-tfi on 147 tgf 7^ OommcA 

FAmSAULT , WN TTw afinual Coupage Cemm 
WWnm Hamlet mM b« hAJ 81 ItW Lajfut Oub. 
Mating wflti r^gtuiition at 9 AM "Hmm w« b« a 
HancNHam flqutpAWm aucliofi. dirliWr if rwOfi 
and iiro^ram Taiit'in on Vna 1 4& 79 rapMMf Con- 
(act Ofjn f/anj Irt^RfT. 1114 Rar* ^i*-. 4/&eff 
L^d MN 56007 



DEC 2 



HAZEL PARK. Ml TTie Nazal Park ARC will 
spoflsof ii3 251 h annual Swap A Shop ai the Hazd 
Park Higti School from B AM-2 PM Advan^a ad- 
missiQni %2, S3 ai tn# dcKi^r Ttckm and talblii ra«ar~ 
V9t!pn$ by mail MP ARC , PO Sa* 36*. Hji/ef 



DEC 21 



VERONA. NY Th» MadiSorvOwidd AlC noUS 
VE Exams, me [firid: F^ncta^ oi avary month it itw 
MadisorvOneiiJa BOCES on Spnng Rd Tlm«: 7 
PM Technician fhrou^h Extra ctass lasts cost 
$4 95 Talk'tn on 145 37 ConTid L^CfnJtrd Pep/- 
Ack WF2V. ^315} 853-8974. Can also tM raachfld 
on 146.79. 145,37, WF2V^ WA2TVE, orPOPY- 
A CK# TOFB20 RADC AF MtL 



PEC 30 



SOUTH BEND. lU Trts Ftepea^^f v^iiiry Ham- 
last Commidefi ■*iM ^t>4d a Hamf esi Swap & S^%p 
at Century Carrter on US 33 Tsbtes iSiS' round; 
SlS/ax2.5 red angular S20/e WaM Ioe«ii0«i«^ 
Tifc4n on S2'S2, 99-39. 65^-09= 3*-**, t4§,29 
Contact fcVa>4M M^#ns K^X(/. rai9llpMM»diiDr.. 
South8en&m4SSJ6 01^233-5307 



SPECIAL EVENT STATIONS 



D&C 1-3 



FLAMmGO. B. HieEvsri^todMABCwiBoper- 
^ W4SV1 from 1400£SSL->900Z Sun to CQla< 
braile th9 43fd anniversary ot Evargiadaa Naiionaj 
Park FraquwioesPhone^T ^30, 14 240.2133(1 
andS837S,CW-7|}30, 14lld0*rid2l T30 Stfid 
QSt and two urtft) of po^agt for unfciidsd cettiii- 
cam to EAIIC; ^O Sox I f % MxnatfOBd R. ^3090- 
0113 



DEC1S-16 



NEW JERSEY Tha Major Armstrong Memorial 
ARC will opgrate W2XMN S«t rrqm 1300- 
1S00UTC and Sun from 1900-2200 UTC, Fe- 
quei^cies. 10 meters 2B.400 h25 kHz due lo 
QRM Special caniiicates will ba aenl to alt sta- 
lions making contaqi with us on ihoaa ciays and 
tim&s Ploasa send a SASE iB^^' x 11 "J te 
W A W A P C , POBojr 5B1. A^no HJ 07620. 



DEC 29- J AN t 



PASAOENA, CA ^rv# R^it > Flep«a?#r ARC 
opfiratv KE6PE ?rcT^ T&OOZO-ioaZ, Sal. afld 
Sun , (rom tha Wngley Mansiofi. to cornmeiiioiatB 
Ihd l02ri(|Anntv«rsaryoi^diaTouririame^ofRo9p 
es. ffaquAficiH' T4.2S0, 21 335 and 2B 4S0. Ain^ 
ateirs in Caifbmia^tevada can cofiUd the ^a- 
tioft on 2 maiors via iha cliitu fspeatcf 
144.0701147 4l0or0f? 220 rtMtts vid Th# Gomjo? 
Coflnectkm For certificate send OSL and 9 )f 12 
SASE (50 cents) lo Relay Rep^ster Club, PO Box 
8h Atcadia CA S JOm-SOiB. 

EVERY WEDN E SD A Y N IGHT TrJvJa Hei is held 
eveiv Wedntitidav night al 7:30 PM onlJi* 145.17 
and ^4 ti6t«p«Bti?r3 kicated m Rhode tsiand Net 
opefators ftf« D»/t K>« tBf/Q Biv^LonKAl OCf 

EVERY THURSDAY NIGHT The RJ Technical 
Talk Ro4jnd Table giDUp rr weta awy Thursday 
evening ai 7 PM on the 223 Bfl (KAtPBS re- 
pmAi&ti Th«pMrpoa»dfthan«Cisioh«lpameieiM« 
«¥ith arsvren to ta clinim i y ratoed aJiiacta. The 
COOrtinatdr ^ Hie net is MVC t<A lEGY- 



Oontimmd from pag& 50 

I ordered m^ cryst^ from CaJ Crys- 
tal > a locaf company, tf you order fmm 
Cal, just gtve your receive frequency 
an^ state ttrat ttie crystal Is for the Uyrm 
Johnscn receiver. Cost is $12.50* 
$16.00 postpaid, depending on how 
fast you want rL 

If you order frgm another crystal 
company, give the receive frequency 
and crystal frequency, and specify IHC- 
18 holder, ^QO-size en closure, end 8.5 
pF toad capacitance. Better yet, send 
along with your order the 454 MHz 
crystal supplied in tt^e receiver. This 
wilt hefp the manufactufer make a 
crystal that fits and works perfectly on 
yoijr chosen frequency. 

Wiih the crystal fof 70cm installed, 
control range using a 6V4 " whtp ante fi- 
ne wilt be several blocks without any 
further tuning up. If you have access 
to a weak signal source or a signal 
generator, peak the RF and multiplier 
stages tor maximum sensilivtiy. UE 
supplies a schetnafic and parts layout 
with your order to help you find the 
tuned circuits. 

The TS-32P CTCSS decoder 
(^7.95 from Communicatrons Spe* 
cialists) Is ideal for this project tiecause 
it has a built-in audio filler 10 buffer the 
received audio and get rid of the sut>^ 
audible tone ahead of the DTMF de- 
coder circuit. Before installing the TS- 
32 P, use the supplied layout drawing to 
find jumper JU-1 and cut it. 

The SS1-202 DTMF decoder IC is 
fast, non -falsing, and lOleranl of audio 
sfipui level varialions Seller yet, it is 
cheap and works with an ordinary TV 
color t>urst crystal {X2), It's hard to 
go wrong with this circuit if you use 
good construction practices, Put sock- 
ets en U2 and U3« and check the wir* 
tng before plugging in the iCs. Bypass 
the U3 Vcc supply with C3 right at the 
socket, 

A 7805 or LM309H regulator (U1) 
supplies +5 volts for all parts of the unit 
excepi the TS^2P and PTT control. 
The UE receiver works fine at this 
sligl^tly reduced voltage. Diode 01 pro- 
tects you from (he agony of reversing 
the 12 volt supply polarity and frying 
the circuit In your haste to get the fox 
on the air. (I learned that lesson the 
hard way.) 

Photo B shows a typical tone/ID box 
with the Fox Commander installed. 

Unless you plan to be a long way 
from the hidden station, a 6V4 " whip Is 



adequate lor a control antenna. I nevm 
bother with an etched board for a sim- 
ple non-RF project like liiis, since 
poini-to-point wiring on pert board 
lakes only a few minules. 

Beep— You're On 

Operating the Fox Commander Is 
simple. Just key your UHF control 
transmitter (with CTCSS on) and you 
are talking through the hidden T. 

K1 closes, overriding the tone box 
audio with the control receiver audio. 
K1 opervs when you ynkey the control 
link. Rip-f^op U2 a/b controls the hid- 
den transmitter*s PTT. Key the controf 
link and press DTMF 1 to turn on the 
hidden rig; press to turn it off. 

Audio input can come from a por- 
table tape recorder or your favorite 
tone generator circuit. (See; Moetl and 
Curlee, "TheUn-MusicBox/'pp. 193- 
200. in Transmitter Hunting^Radio Di' 
recUon Finding Simpfified, TAB Books 
#2701 , available from ''Uncle Wayne's 
Bookshelf", and Morrow, '*Huni the 
Auto-Fox*" in 73 Amatmjr RadtQ Ta- 
daft August 1965, p, 48.) Automatic 
CW identification is nice, but not nec- 
wss&xy if you remember to identify your 
hidden transmitter by voice every ten 
nynutes using the control link. Set R7 
for proper deviation of the repeated 
control audio, You may need to change 
the value of R1 to equalize the levels 
between your audio source and the 
control receiver output. 

Two transistors (01 and Q2) Insure 
enough drive to cJose the PTT relays in 
most transceivers. If hunt mles c^ll for 
regular, tinned transmissions, just add 
a circuit to cycfe the PTT off and on by 
pulling the base Of Q2 to ground. 

U2c sets the flip-flop to key up the 
hidden T automatically at power-up. 
This allows local use of the tone box 
without the control link, and assures 
immediate resumption of the fox's 
transmission tf the battery connection 
Is interrupted momentafily. It you 
woutd prefer the unit to come up in the 
OFF mode ai power-upt remove the 
wires from U2-10 to U2-5 and U2'1 to 
U2-2. then wire U2*5 to U2-3 and U2- 1 
toU2-1, 

Remoiety operating your rig will add 
a new dimension of fun to being the 
hider, so get started on your Fox Com- 
mander. My next column will have 
more to say about the perils and plea- 
sures of hiding. 



Parts Sources 

UHF Receiver: Lyilfl Johnson Electronics, P.O. Box 51 268, San Jose CA 

96 1 51 -1 268; (458) 274-2534. 

UHF CrystaJ (X1): Cal Crystal Lab. inc.. 1142 fi. GWMTt St.. Anaheim CA 
92S01; (714) 991-1580, {SOOJ 333-9825. 

CTCSS Decoder: Communications Specialists, Inc., 426 W, Taft Ave., 
Orange CA 92666'4296: (71 4) 998-3021 . 

Small Parts (Radio Shack Numbers) 
SSI-202 OTMF Decoder (U3) 276-1303 

Color Burst Crysial (X2) 276-1310 

5-vOJt regulator (Ul ) 276-1 770 

Relay (K1) 275^241 



52 73 Amateur Radio Today • December, 1990 



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73 Amat&ur Radio Today • December, 1990 53 



J 



Nyrnber 10 Qfi your Feedback card 



Audio Powered Tape 
Recorder Controller 

Add convenience to your hamshack. 



by Gregory R. Mclntire KEOUV 



Have you ever needed a device that 
would turn a tape recorder on and off 
through the presence or absence of the audio 
being recorded? I wanted to record the trans- 
missions from the Russian cosTnonauts on 2 
meters, but 1 could never be at home when 
they were active, i needed just such a device, 
with a few more requirements. In addition to 
stopping and starting on its own, I wanted it to 
operate without external power. I already 
have too many plugs in the wall. Nor did I 
want 10 use batteries, since the device would 
be in service for long periods of time. 

Audio Activated Ciretiit 

After much trial and error experimenting 
widi various types of transistors, T devised a 
simple yet effective circuit. The finished de- 
vice is basically a switch that will open or 
close any circuit {such as a tape recorder mo- 
tor supply line or pause control), of up to 3 
amps or up to 60 volts (it mu<it not exceed 20 
watts), by the presence or absence of an audio 
signal. It requires no batteries or power sup- 
ply. The audio signal itself supplies the power 
to operate this switch. 

The actual switch is a power MOSFET. 
Although it requires an extremely tow 
amount of gate current for operation, it does 
require at least 4 volts at the gate. Voltage at 
an 8 ohm audio source is much less than 4 
volts at normal audio listening levels. In fact, 
I consider the audio quite loud with a peak 
voltage of only 1.5 volts across an 8 ohm 
speaker. So» unless the audio source is a 
ghetto blaster cranked up lo full volume, the 
voltage levei of the audio must he increased in 
order for it to turn the MOSFET on. 




Photo A. The recorder controller circuit, 
housed in a small plastic box, is ready to be 
hooked up. 

Increasing the Voltage 

An 8 to 1000 ohm audio transformer is used 
for two purposes: First, it presents an 8 ohm 
load to the audio source (such as the external 
speaker jack of a radio), and secondly, it 
multiplies the voltage several times. It still 
does not step up the audio voltage enough at 
low or moderate volume levels, though. 
Therefore, 1 used a network of four diodes 
and four capacitors to quadruple the voltage 
output of the transformer. This reduces the 
available current, but there is still much more 
current than the MOSFET requires. 

Since using an external speaker jack will 
usually disconnect the receiver's speaker^ 1 
included an external speaker jack in this cir- 
cuit. A second jack supplies the actual audio 
source for recording. Except for a slight at- 
tenuation of the audio, caused by the resistors 
in series with the jacks, this device has no 
effect on the quality of the audio source. 

Circuit Operation 

Audio from an 8 ohm source is fed to the 



B20n 



H\-l OUTPUT 



-® 1/9" P 



HOH£ ^ACK 






LO'I OUTPUT 



® 1/a* PHOME. JACK 



ea TO I KO 

AUDIO 
TfiANSFOfiMER 



C2 



E)4 







1 



D1 



Rl 



:c3 



^C4 :; 



IQMEG 



X 



C5 

.05 



-0-4 




[RF5II 



TO TAPE 

RECORDER 
ON /OFF 
SWITCH 



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01-04 IN9I4 
CI-C4 O.I^F 



2ENER IS AMY VALUE 
FROM € TO 18 VOLTS 



Figure /, Schemaric of the audio-powered tape recorder controller. 
54 73 Amateur Radio Today • December, 1990 



8 ohm windings of a small audio trans- 
former. The audio is also connected to two 
other jacks through appropriate resistors, 
to provide audio sources for external speaker 
and/or tape recorder input. The output (high 
impedanee) windings of the transformer is 
fed to a * *diode, capacitor voltage quadrupler 
circuit/' This provides enough voltage to 
switch on the power MOSFET. A zener 
diode is used at the MOSFET gate to clamp 
the voltage to a safe level, since a high audio 
level from the source can be multipiied above 
the maximum gate voltage. 

The output of the MOSFET (drain to 
source) does not supply any voltage or cur-- 
rent, but rather acts as a single-pole, single- 
throw switch- This switch opens and closes 
the circuit of the tape recorder's motor via a 
relay in the tape recorder or via a remote 
control jack on the recorder. That iSj the 



2 im 




V4' 



T(k TAPE RECCfflDEA ON/QFF 
SWITCH WILL Switch UP TO 
•BOVtlC AT 3 4MPS VTItH AUEQU^TE 
HEif SINK GU P^WEH MOSFET 




Figure 2. (a) PC board foil pattern, (b) Parts 
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Figure 5, (a) Two methods of connecting the 
tape recorder controller to the motor of the 
recorder. 

(b) Controlling the recorder via the built-in 
remote control/pause jack. [Ed Note: Some 
recorder pause controls have a grounded 
center pin; just switch polarities on the con- 
troller output in this case.} 



Parts List 

All components are available at Radio Shack stores. 



1 

T1 

C1 ,C£,C3,C4 

C5 

D1,D2,D3,D4 

D5 

R1 

R2 

R3 

R4 



iRF511 power MOSFET 

audio transformer 

0,1 ^Fcaps 

0.047 ^F cap 

1N91 4 diodes 

^ener diode 

resistor 

resistor 

resistor 

resistor 



plLfgs and jacks as required (see text) 



* Or any zener value between 6 and 15 votts. 

** For tape recorder lime input use an 820 ohm resistor; for mjc 

input use a 100k resistor or pot. 

A blank PC board is available from FAR Circuits, 18N640 Field 
Court, Dundee IL 601 1 S for $3 + $1 .50 postage. 



CmCLi 1S3 ON READER SERVICE CARD 

56 ZS Amateur Radio Today • December. 1 



MOSFET can be inserted into the tape 
recorder motor supply line if the recorder 
does not have buik-in remote control on/off 
operation. 

Construction Notes 

Any construction technique can be em- 
ployed here, as nothing is critical about this 
circuit. I made a printed circuit board, as 1 
fmd this method of construction simpler and 
more goof-proof than perfboard or point-to- 
point wiring. 

I used a small plastic box (Radio Shack 
270-230) to house the unit. I also wired one 
'/^ " mini phone plug to the input of the device 
and another such plug to the switched output, 
as my radio speaker jack and tape recorder 
ON/OFF jack are both the same. Use whatever 
type of plugs and/or jacks you need for inter- 
facing your own equipment. 

Although it wouldn't cause any damage to 
put the wrong plug into the wrong jack, I 
advise labeling the plugs. The IRF51 1 power 



MOSFET is internally protected against stat- 
ic shock, but it's still a good idea to take care 
when installing MOS devices. 

Two jacks mounted in the plastic box are 
connected to the audio source via limiting 
resistors. They are used for a source of audio 
for the tape recorder and a source for an 
external speaker. The 22 ohm resistor is put 
in series with an external speaker because the 
transformer already provides an 8 ohm load 
to the audio source (scanner, transceiver, 
etc.). This also ensures that an external 
speaker will not drop the voltage below the 
threshold of the MOSFET. 

Ready to Record 

Plug the audio input side of the device into 
the external speaker jack of any audio source. 
Plug or connect the high impedance jack into 
the tape recorder audio input. (If your audio 
source already has a tape jack for recording, 
this will not be necessary, of course.) If your 
recorder has a line input, R4 should be 820 
ohms. If you use the mic input then R4 should 
be a 1 00k resistor or pot. The switched output 
of the controller should be hooked up to the 
recorder's PAUSE/REMOTE control jack (Fig- 
ure 3b). If your recorder has no pause/ 
REMOTE control jack then you can connect the 
output of the device into the 
motor circuit of the recorder. If 
you use the direct connect 
method, the IRF3 L L MOSFET 
must be inserted into the nega- 
tive or grounded side of the mo- 
tor or motor relay (Figure 3a). 
Cut the wire on die motor and 
connect the drain pin of the 
MOSFET to the motor or the 
motor relay. Connect the 
source pin to ground. 

Now turn on the tape recorder 
and set it to record. Slowly 
turn up the volume of the audio 
source until the recorder motor 
starts turning. This should oc- 
cur at a low to moderate volume 
level. If it doesn't, check your 
wiring and connections. Also 
be sure you have the polarity correct on all 
five of the diodes. 

I tried several minor variations of this cir- 
cuit (with different transformers^ capacitors, 
and resistors) and it worked just as well. The 
main requirement is to send 4 volts minimum 
to the gate of the MOSFET to switch it on. 

The MOSFET switches on fast, but when 
the audio source stops, it waits a second or 
two before it switches off. This way it doesn't 
switch off during pauses between words. At 
the start of a transmission, you rarely miss a 
single syllable* and the end doesn't drop off 
in mid-sentence. 

For a couple of months now, I have been 
using this device, sometimes connected to the 
2 meter rig and sometimes to a scanner. It 
works very well; and perhaps best of all, it 
doesn^t require batteries, wall transformers, 
or any other source of power! 



RS 276 2072 
RS 273-1380 
RS 272-135 
RS 272-143 
RS 276-1 122 
RS 276-562* 
1 megohm 

10 megohm 

22 ohm 
820 ohm*" 



Gregory R. Mclniire KE0UV, Hillsview Tn 
a, Loi92 , Belle fourche SD 5 771 Z 



990 




Number 1 4 on your Feedback card 



TTY LOOP 



Marc I Leavey. M.D., WA3AJR 
€ Jenny Lsne 
Baltimore MD2t20B 

ICOM Computer Control 

Ai ihis lime of year I am always lorn 
between putting together a column 
devoted to gift giving — * ' Everything the 
RTTYfcomputer ham always wanted 
but didn't know how to ask for*' — or a 
column devoted to suggestions on 
whai 10 6a while locked m the shack on 
these cold wmter evenings. Well, some 
material on th% fatter topk: crossed my 
desk, and ti is so good, I just have to 
share it wt(h you all. 

r found this little gem in the amateur 
radio database on Delphi, and after 
discusstng the matter with the SYSOP, 
Vm presenting it lie re. Cart Clawson 
N7KBV originated this piece on com- 
puter control of ICOM amateur radio 
gear. 

N7KBV: Several ICOM products fea- 
ture a buift4n computer interface con- 
nected to a ^/i " phone jack ort the rear 
paneK ICOM gives no information 
about this interface in the mstruction 
manuals ttiat Cve seen, but my dealer 
managed to get it frt>m ICQM for me. 

This interface, called the "Ci-V," m 
standard on the following models: 735. 
761 , 275, 375. 475, and R7000. Eariier 
models (751 , 271, 471, 1271 , and R71) 
used the CI-1V parallel interface, which 
can be connected to Cl-V by ICOM's 
UX' 14 converter. 

Thie information I received was writ- 
ten with the 735 in mindt but a iisting of 
a BASIC program to control the R7000 
was appended. I beHeve it will help with 
the other models, loo. The control 
codes and data format should be the 
same for ati of them. 

The computer tnterface allows you to 
do such things as: set and read the 
frequency and modulation mode; set 
VFO A. VFO B. or memory mode; se- 
lect memory channel: store displayed 
frequency into memory; and transfer 
displayed memory-mode frequency to 
a VFO. 

Even without a computer, you can 
run a cable between the remote conirof 
jacks of two rigs, and whenever the 
frequerrcy or modulation mode of el- 
ther is changed, the other will track it if 
possible. (If (he rigs have incompatible 
frequency coverages, like the 735 and 
R7CMX), funny things can happen,) 

The btdi^reciKinal interface uses TTL 
levels on a singfe line for sending and 
receiving serial ASCII data. You may 
need an appropnate hardware intor^ 
face io convert the RS'232 to TTL, for 
example^ (I understand Commodore 
computers have TTL inputs and out- 
puts, and require no interface.) I used 
the Motorola MC14B8 and MC14B9 



Amateur Radio Teletype 



chips powered by two 9«volt batteries 
to interface to my RS-232 line. Table 2 
lists the pinouts tor this interface. If 
you'd rather buy something, ICOM 
sells ihe model CT-17 level converter 
fortheRS'232. 

The interface uses a 'carrier-sense, 
muitiple-access with collision detec- 
tion'' local area network protocol so 
that multiple rigs can be connected in 
parallel without difficulty. Thus, you 
can use the same RS-232 tine and lev- 
el-converter fnlerface to control many 
rigs. Each ng must have a unique ad- 
dress, which is set by internal jumpers. 
Each model comes factory preset to its 
own address, which is 04 for the 735 
and 08 for the R7000. Table 2 has infor- 
mation on the jumper settings. 

In the following fist, ^'receive'* and 
"send" refer to dala transmission. 
Thus a "receiver" isn't necessarily an 
R7000; it's any device receiving data 
from the Cl-V bus^ "Rig" means an 
ICOM product using the CUV interface. 
The rigs send and receive data in vari- 
able packet lengths, formatted as fol- 
lows: 

Data Format 
Byte ff Contents 



1 


hex *FE* (I.e. 11111 1 tO binary. 




254 decimal) 


2 


hex -FE* 


3 


<RX> 


4 


<TX> 


5 


<Code> 


6^n 


< BCD data of variable length > 


n + 1 


Jiex TD" 



The two hexadecjmai FE bytes sig- 
nal the beginning of a packet^ and the 
FD byte signals the er^d. <Code> is 
the control code sent by the computer 
to the rig, which determines the action 
that the rig will lake. In some cases, the 
receivirtg rig wilt fnclude a control coda 
in its response to the sender; sdO 
Table 1, <TX> ts the address of the 
device sending the data, and < RX > is 



the address to which the data is being 
sent. When a hg responds to a data 
packet. It addresses that response to 
the <TX> in the packet. Thus, if your 
computer requests a rig lo report its 
frequency, tl will address that report to 
the computer and other rigs wilt ignore 
Ihe data. (Of course, the computer can 
lie about its address and trick orve rig 
mto talking to anotherf) Your computer 
should use its own yniquei non-zero 
address on the network. I wilf assume 
in the examples that the computer is at 
address 02. There are two control 
codes that can cause any rig on the 
network to respond when sent with 
< RX> =0; I discuss these beiow. 

Bytes #6 through #o contain data re- 
quired by the control code, in BCD for- 
mat with 2 decimal digits per byte. Fre- 
quency dala is sent starting with the 
byte containing the 1 Hz and 10 Hz 
digits. These digits are sent even if 
they are not used by If^ rig, so that the 
data format ts the same for all rigs re* 
gardiess of their frequency covefage 
and resolution. For example, 25.13244 
MHz is broken up into two-digit groups: 
25, 1 3, 24, and 40, then coded in BCD. 
In other words, consider each digit 
group to be a hexadecimal number in- 
stead of decimal. The decimal values 
of these BCD digit groups are 2x16-1- 
5 = 37, 1 X 16 + 3 = 19, 2x16 + 4 = 
36, and 4 x 16 + >= 64. Now send 
ttiese groups, sianing wrth the least 
significant. The complete dala packet 
will be. in hexadecimal: FE FE < RX> 
<TX> <Code>40 24t3 25FD. 

tf you have more than one rig on the 
neh^ork. you may occasionally receive 
a sequence of 5 bytes of hex TC\ This 
is the "jammer code" used by a rig to 
Indicate that a collision has occurred. 
Each rig, when sending, monitors the 
interface. If It does not receive exactly 
what it sent, a collision occurred, i.e., 
another rig was sending data at the 
same time. If a rig delects a colHsion, it 
wrN send the Jammer code as soon as 
the netwofk is idle. A ng that receives 
this code realizes that a collision has 
occurred and ignores the previously re- 
ceived packet. Because the ICOM re- 
mote control ports are bidirectional, 



HS23Z 
Conned tar 



! 

Z 
3 
4 
S 





o- 



Xmkt 



4 

o 

4 



ficv 



1^ 






M 



D 1 



mm 



Am 



L Orh 



/Tlf 



'1 






Rn«i 



489 
Recctvpf 



ram 



1 




fCOM 

Remole 

plug 



ICOM 

RS232-TTL 

Converter 



+9* 



^'I'l^^'jil 



9^ 



Figure. BS-232 to TTL cortverter 



your computer will receive everything it 
sends, so you can check for colMstons 
from your oompyter, too. 

Conlrot Codes arYd Responses 

Mosi of the codes are addressed to a 
specific rig, whrch addresses an ac- 
iMiowledgmeni pacltet to the <TX> 
contained m the control packel. The 
firsi two codes. 00 and Ot , can be sent 
to the ''group call" address, 00, in 
which case any rig will receive ihem 
without sending an acknowledgment. 
These two codes are sent In this way by 
any rig when its mode Or frequency is 
changed by manual control, and are 
received by any rig on the network. 
This allows a number of rigs to track 
each other in frequency and mode 
witlKKft computer intervention. Rigs 
con be inhibited from sending and re- 
ceiving group call packets by an rnter- 
nal jumper. See the tables for more 
details. Jh&se codes can also be sent 
with a specific, non-zero <RX>, in 
which case they will be received by the 
addressed rig even if the group call 
function is disabled. 

Here are some examples for the 735. 
The 735 is at address 04 and the com- 
puter Is at 02. First, let^s find out what's 
in memory channel 1 (code 08 to set 
the channel, and code 03 to read the 
frequency). Assume the 735 has the 
frequency 7.12750 MHz stored in 
memory #1 . 

Computer to 735: FE FE 04 02 08 01 FD 
735 to computer: FE FE 02 04 FB FD 
Computer to 735:FE FE 04 CS 03 FD 
735 to computer FE FE 02 04 03 00 75 

1207FO 

Now let's change the frequency and 
mode to 14.02500 MHz USB (codes 05 
ancfOS). 

Computer to 735: FE FE 04 02 05 00 50 

0214FO 
735 to computer: FE FE 02 04 FB FD 
Compulef to 735:FE FE 04 02 06 01 FD 
735 to computer FE FE 02 04 FB FD 

Now store the new result in rnemory 
if\ . This channel is already displayed, 
so all you need is oo<te 09, the store 
command. 

Computer to 735:FE FE 04 02 09 FD 
735 to computer: FE FE 02 04 FB FD 

^8-232 to TTL Converter 

This Is an easily built converter that 
will run your ICOM gear from a sfan* 
dard RS*232 line. You can build it fn an 
hour or two for alKDut $10. 11 uses two 
inexpensive, wideiy-a vail able chips — 
the Motorola MC14SS line dhver and 
the MC1489 line recervef (see the fig- 
tire). The only other things you need 
aie a box. connectors, a power switch, 
and a couple of 0,01 or 0.1 capacitors 
10 bypass the power supply leads. I 
used two 9V tjatteries for power. Power 
for Ihe 1488 can be ±9 to ±15 volts, 

Contmue^onp. 59 



73 Amateur Radio Today • December, 1990 57 



Number IS on your Feedback canl 




OOKING WEST 



Bill Pasternak WABiTF 
28197 Robin AveftUQ 
Saugus CA 9t350 

Handicapped Waivers: 
The View of an Expert 

Aprlt Moell WA60PS is opposed to 
the granting of waivers to handicapped 
individuals who claim Ihat they cannot 
pass Mors^ <x}de tests in excess of five 
words per ininute. Moeil is an expert in 
the ti^id of rthdbiiitation of handi- 
capped persons. Now in pri^^vate pfac* 
tice, she spent 15 years serving as the 
Director of Occupational Therapy at St, 
Jude Hospital and Rehabililation Cen* 
ler in FuHerton, California, where in 
T977 she developed and introduced 
the Rehab Radk) Program. 

A licensed amateur sir^ce 1976. Apnl 
Moell holc^ an Advanced Class ticket 
She is an expert in the field of using 
amateur radio as a therapy tool. In this 
interview with me, as producer of 
Newsline Radio, she shares some 
stafiling mslghts into the issue of 
waivering CW testing for haiid^capped 
appficanis for amateur radio upgrades, 

Hewftline: The FCC says that it will 
waive Morse test requirements for 
handicapped radio amateurs who 
claim that they cannot copy Morse 
code at speeds greater than five 
words per minute. What effect do yoy 
see this havmg on the handicapped in 
gener^al? 

Moell: I am concerned about it be- 
cause people who are not disabled 
sometimes say things like. '^Isn'UNs a 
nice thing to do for the poor handi- 
capped?'' which immediately puts ev- 
erybody with a disability into one cate- 
gory. 3t is a put-down because you are 
saying to anytiody with a disability, 
"You are not as capable as the rest of 
us. 

We have many disabled peopte in 
the hobby who have shown us Ihat they 
are equaHy capable, and in some cas- 
es, more capable. I can think of several 
hams who are deaf and blind, but who 
got N censes. I know a 9entteman« a 
quadfiplegiCt who had to leam the 13 
wpm code in his head because he is 
ynabre to write. 

I think that putting afi people with 
disabilities in one group, and assuming 
they are not capable, is a very bad 
precedent . 

Newsline: You indicate that the gen- 
eral public does not understand who 
the handicapped are, and groups them 
all together. Has this been a problem 
for the handicapped? 

Moell: The non-handicapped make 
a lot of assumptions about the liandi- 
capped. That has been an ongoing 
problem. The handicapped are individ- 
uals with individual differences and ca- 
pabilities, just like you and me. 

Newsline: fn teaching amateur radio 
to handicapped individuals, have you 



ever run into someone who could not 
leam the code and who could not get a 
license? 

Moell: Yes, I have, and ttiose have 
been people wfro have suffered certain 
kinds of brain damage so that they can- 
not process adequately. I think that we 
have to havs certain requireinents [for 
becoming licensed], if a person can't 
process adequately, he's probably not 
going to be able to function adequately 
on the radio. 

I don't see it that ditf erenlly from driv- 
ing issues. You do not waive the re- 
quirements for a driver's license for 
someone who may not be safe as a 
driver. In the case of radio, Iwhile] it 
might be nice for the severely disabled 
to hold licenses, if they cannot process 
information property, they will not tie 
able to operate con^ectly or safely with 
their equipment. But these persons 
can still enjoy amateur radio as a third 
party, with a licensed ham running the 
equipment. 

Newsline: Could any of these peo- 
ple who were unat^e to learn Morse 
code have passed the theory ejtam? 

Moell: If they haven't t>een able lo 
handle the code, they often have not 
been able to handle theory, either, 
because they couldn't retain the in* 
formation or became confused. Or 
they may have trouble learning new 
maierial, even though they might be 
fine with things they teamed several 
years ago. 

Sometimes the code has been a real 
t>Qan for people with physrcal limita- 
tions because it's the only way they 
can communicate, Some have prob- 
iems expressing themselves, and it's 
easier to communicate \n Morse code 
than by voice. Vm concerned that if ihe 
FCC grants too many waivers, it'll de- 
crease the pool of amateurs wfm are 
usir>g code, and we may make it harder 
for the disabled people who need to 
communicate in code. They are not go- 
ing to have anyone to communicate 
with. 

Newsline: Then you consider the 
code a valuable tool for the handi- 
capped? 

Moellr Again, you can't group all 
handicapped people together, but I am 
aware of a number of disabled hams to 
whom code is the primary mode of 
communication. I think it's important 
that learning the code be affered to 
them [the handicappedt. To assume 
Thai because someone rs handi- 
capped, she or he can't leam the code 
is a very faulty assumption. 

Newsline: Apparently this waiver 
system came about as the res u it of one 
person who contacted King Hussein 
JYl, who in turn contacted President 
Bush, who then contacted the FCC and 
said^ '*Vou will do this." Was it fair lo 
the handicapped of this nation for the 
leader of another nation lo dictate poli- 
cy toward them? 



Moell: This issue is really of serious 
concern to me— whether it has to do 
{pnmafily] wtth the handicapped or not 
To have a citizen go to the leader of 
another country lo gain something for 
personal benefit, and to have our gov- 
ernment react as it apparently has. is 
appalling. I am as concerned about 
how Ihis was done as I am about the 
result. 

Nftwaflrw: Tirte evidence is that ihis 
ts what happened. Should tire issue 
now be brought to our legislators or 
would an appeal to them be a waste of 
time? 

Moelt: I would hate lo think that in 
our country that would t>e a waste of 
time. Maybe we won't get the decision 
reversed, but I certainly think that we 
stiould let our representatives know 
that we are not happy with Ihat pro- 
cess. This might be considered small 
potatoes to some people [an issue im- 
portant only to hams]. But what other 
things are going to be done this way? 

Newsline: What about our other 
elected repfesentatives, the Amer^c^n 
Radio Relay League? 

Moetl; I think that the League needs 
to take the lead in saying, " How did this 
happen, and why wasn't the ham com- 
munity involved in it? Why weren't we 
asked about it? Why weren't opinions 
gathered?" I think the League should 
be very rrnlignanl about the process . 

Nobody is saying that we shouldn't 
make reasonable accommodaiions for 
people with disabilities, and I think that 
reasonable accommodation is being 
made in the VE system. I have been 
involved in some of that, where we 
have had people with disabiiities tesl- 
ed. But. we are not talking about that. 
We are talking about a process that 
was done in a very inappropnate mafh 
ner, and 1 think that is where the 
League needs lo focus* 

Newsline: You are considered one 
of the national experts on using ama- 
teur radio in rehabilitation. You say you 
were never contacted? Do you find it a 
btt strange ttiat the experts like you and 
Handi-Hams were left out of the deci- 
sjon process? 

Moell: Yes. It bothers me to think 
thai (he leader of a foreign government 
can call and say, "Gee— what about 
this poor soul?" and have a policy 
changed [without our government] get- 
ting infonnation from nationally recog- 
nized groups, especially the Handi- 
Haifis, and the ARRL 

Newsline: How do you think handi- 
capped people who fought for their li- 
censes might react? 

Moell: I would certainly hope that 
people fwith disabilities] who currently 
have amateur licenses will share their 
thoughts and feelings about this situa- 
tion. I think it would shed some light on 
the fact that there are many varieties of 
disability, and to show [our Congres- 
sional representatives] how dangerous 
and inappropriate it is to try to group 
everybody together. 

There are hams who are essentially 
bed-bound or lK>use-bound because of 
cardiac candtlions. There are people 
who are bVir\d, and wtio have severe 
cerebral palsy and limited motor con- 



in>l. They operate with mouth sticks 
and mouth switch^ and use Morsa 
code! I would like to think that some ol 
those hams will comment about what rl 
took for them to upgrade and how they 
feel about this new policy. 

NewsHne: What about the future? 

Moell: I am concerned about the 
precedent that we may b^ setting. Will 
someone claim thai medication makes 
it hard to concentrate on teajning the 
rules? Or thai a learning disability 
keeps him from learning and using 
Ohm's Law? Will there soon be preS' 
sure for theory waivers? 

Newsline: Playing devil's advocate 
for a moment, who are we the healthy 
10 decide who should or should not 
hold an amateur license based on a 
physical or even a mental handicap? 

Moell: I don't think we are deciding 
that. We're talking about guidelines, 
and I think we have set some up for 
people to operate reasonably and sate- 
ly on the air, Peopte who can meet 
those requirements with reasonable 
ac com modal ion^w ho can show in 
some way Ihat they understand the 
rules and regulations of safe operation 
and can understand the required 
code^ should receive theEr licenses. It 
is not discrimination wher^ you set up 
basic requirements and then let any- 
one who can achieve them be a part of 
the Amateur Radio Service. 

I do not decide who can drrve a car. 
What we do as 3 government is lo set 
up guidelines saying that m order to 
drive, you have to pass these minimum 
requirements* Many disabled people 
drive. We make accommodations for 
them with hand controls, sensUized 
steering, and things like that. I don't 
see amateur radio as being different. 
We are not deciding that som&tKKly 
with a particular disability should or 
shouldn't be in ham radio. What we are 
saying is that we have reasonable stan- 
dards and we do what we can to help 
people meet those standards. I don't 
think it is inappropriate or unrealistic 
for us to say that rK>t everytxxty should 
be able to upgrade, 

Newsline: There are some who dis- 
agree With your position. A Mr, Mon- 
cure in Virginia feels that this waiver 
system does not go far enough, and It 
Is a handout to the handicapped. He 
says he may agair> litigate to get ail 
Morse code requirements eliminated 
for the handicapped, As sonteone wtio 
has worked with the disat;>led for so 
many years » how do you feel about a 
handicapped person like Mr. Moncure 
taking that view? 

Moell: Maybe the code has been dif- 
ficult for him, but there are some dis- 
abled people tor whom theory is as 
much of a hindrance as code, just as in 
the rest of the ham population. Some 
have had problems with theory for 
maybe some of the same reasons that 
he cites as causing trouble with the 
code. It couid be medication, but again 
I am concerned with the blanket ap- 
proach that says all handicapped are 
the same. He assumes thai everytx>dy 
(handicapped] has the same prot^ 
terns, instead of focusing on ways he 
m^ht help his own particular situation. 



58 73 Amateur Radio Today • December, 1990 



He sounds like he is bright and en- 
ergetic enough, that I think he coy Id 
pass a flexibly admin jstere<l exam if he 
applied )he same energy lever and par- 
si sience to studying the code! 

Newsline: Winding up. v^hat M^ould 
^u like 10 see as a result of all that has 
happened? 

Moell: t would like to see the FCC 
stop for a momertt and take anothar 
look. Say [to themselves], "Hey. waiE a 
minute, what are we doing? Is this real- 
ly the ri^ht way to go? Let's talk with 
people who have had experience along 
these lines.'* 



If, after careful study, the FCC de- 
cides that waivers are the way. I hope 
they wiJi talk wilh groups like Hand!- 
Hams, because i don't feel that ail 
physciar^s can sign off for someone 
and say that that f here is a good m&on 
for them not to he able to learn the 
code. I think you need to have people 
who are e)(perienced in the areas of 
physical medicine and rehabilitation 
making the decisions, and not the gen- 
eral practitioner or opthomofogist, for 
example. 

I hope that we will be able to get our 
ieaders at the League and our leaders 



in Congress to take a look at the pro* 
cess and explain 10 us why they did 
what they d(d. That's wtiat I hope fw, 
and I aJso hope that rtothirig like this 
ever happens again, in this way. 

Late News 

On Friday July T3, the United States 
Senate passed, and sent to the presi- 
deni for his signature, the omnibus 
Americans in Oisabi lilies Act of 1990. 
The House of Representatives had 
previously passed an almost identi- 
cal bill, and President Bush promised 
to sign it into law as soon as it ar- 



rived on his White House olfice desk. 
Tlie bill directs the public and private 
sectors to make sweeping accom^rK^ 
dat^ons for the nation's several mitlion 
disabled c'rtizens. and does this wi^ 
the force of federal law Peyton Mon- 
cure^ the indivdual who has been the 
moving force behind abolishing all 
Morse Code testing for handicapped 
applicants for amateur radio ticienses. 
has vowed to use the terms of the act ifi 
court to achieve this goal before the 
end of 1 990. It appears 1 hat the next act 
m this drama will be with Mr. Moncure. 
de WA6ITF 



Continued from p. 57 



Table 1 . Codes and Respons«* 

00 Set frequency. See the text ior format of frequency data See code 05 below 
for more details. 

01 Set modutation mode. One Of two data bytes are required to indicate the 
mode desired. 



Data 


Mode 


00 


LSB 


01 


USB 


02 


AM 


03 


CW 


04 


RTTY 


05 


FM 


0500 


SSB {R7000) 



02 Report tunmg rai^ge, No data required. The rig will report its frequency 
limits in the fomtat: 

re FE <RX> <:TX> 02 <ypperlimit> 2D < lower limit> FD 
(Hex 2D iS the ASCII hyphen.) Ac^^rdtng to I COM, some rigs report ihe 
lower hrm first. 

03 Report frequency. No data required. The addressed ng returns its dis- 
played frequency to the sender in the format: 

FE FE <RX> <TX> 03 <Frtquency> FD 

04 Report modulation mode. No data required. The addressed rig returns its 
mode to the sender using the codes listed atiove. Rigs wtih selectable 
bandwidth return an additional byte indicating the bandwidth in the format: 

FE FE <RX> <TX> 04 <Mode> < Bandwidth > FD 





Bandwidth Codes 


Data 


Bandwidth 


01 


Width 1 (widest) 


02 


Width 2 (narrower) 


03 


Width 3 {narrowest) 



05 Set frequency. The data format is given above. If the data contains fewer 
digits than the rig uses, the digits sent wiil t>e changed and the rest wtII 
remain the same. If the rig receives valid frequency data within its tuning 
range, it responds with a packer containing the data "FB": 

FE FE <BX> <TX> FB FD 
If It didn't like the data, it responds with "FA": 

FE F€ <ftX> <TX> FAFO 
These acknowledgment codes are used by alT following commands. 
The 735 responds to out-of- range frequency data by sending the "FA" 
acknowledgement and: 1) II the frequency it receives is less than 0,1 MHz. it 
sets its frequency to 0.1 MHz. 2) If it received 4 bytes of frequency data more 
than 30 MHz, it sets itseif to 30 MHz. And 3) if it received more than 4 bytes of 
freqyency data, the data is ignored. 

06 Set modufation mode, li one byte is sent, it sets the mode per the atiove 
table If two bytes are sent, the second is the IF bandwidth, 

07 Set VFO status. If no data is sent, the ng changes from MEMORY mode to 
VFO mode. If data OO or 1 is seni . Ihe rig sets VFO A or VFO B fespecii vety. 

Ofi Set memory chanrtel. if no data is sent, the ng changes from VFO mode 10 

MEMORY mode. If BCD channel data is senl. the ng changes to that 

memory channel. 
09 Store displayed frequency and mode into displayed memory channel. No 

data required. 
OA Write Irequency and mode from displayed mernory channel to a VFO. No 

data required. 



and the 14B9 requires +5 to +10 
volls. With a stitlable DC-DC converter 
chip, and a 7BL05 or 78LQB. you could 
power the circuit off o( your 13,8-V 
suppty. Or, rf you" re devefn you could 
figure out a way to iriChle charge two 
9V NiCds off of youf RS-232 line. See 
Table 2 for pinouts and jumper selec- 
tions. 

There are jumpers in the ICOM rigs 
to set the device address and baud 
rate, and to enable the group call fea- 
ture. You must look on the schematic 
to find them. The jumper to enable the 
group call feature is called the ''trans- 
cetve" bit by ICOM. and may be la- 
beled with ■ TRV" on the schematic 
The others are labeled 'D8n'" on the 
735 and R7CK}0* looh tor something 
similar. The rigs are factory-set to 1 20Q 
baud, iransceive enabled 

The table gives specific information 



from ICOM on the 735 jumpers, and for 
I ha R7000 1 make a Itkeiy guess based 
on the 735 codes and schematic. 

Last Words 

I certainly thank CaH for his fine 
work, and I hope that this material will 
enable mar^y of you to more fully use 
Ihe features in some of the more so- 
phisticated amateur rigs. 

Next month, who krrows! Maybe I'll 
have something from youf You see, 1 
reafly do read my maiL and I appreciate 
your comments, suggestjons, and tips. 
Pass them along to me by maiL at the 
above address, or on Delphi (user- 
name MARCWA3AJR) or Compu- 
Serve (ppr> 75036,2501) Until next 
time, my best wishes to you and yours 
this holiday season, tor a Happy Han* 
nukah. Merry Christmas, and a happy^ 
heatthy new year. ^1 



Table 2. PInouts and Jumper Selections 



ForthB M68: 



For the 1489: 



Pin 

1 
2 
3 
7 
U 

1 
3 
7 

14 



Connect to 



■V 



ICOM remote jack center conductor 

RS-232pin3{RD) 

Ground 

+V 

RS-232pin2(TD) 

ICOM remote jack center conductor 

Ground 
+V 



Ground pin 7 of the RS-232 line aod the outer conductor of the tCOM remote 
[ack, and you're on line. 

Jumper Selections 
For the 735- The jumpers use lines labeled DBO through D65 at connector 
J22 on the PL board. Lines DBO through DB2 set the device address. Line DB3 
is the transceive enable. The baud rate is controlled by DB4 and DB5 accord- 
ing to: 



0B4 


DBS 


Baud 








undefined 


t 





9600 





t 


1200 


1 


1 


300 



The 735 ts set at the factory to address 04. 

For the R7000 Th©|ompefs use Ifnes DBO through DB7 at connector J1 7 on 
the lo^ board. The address is set by DBO through 0B4; DBS rs the transcei ve 
enable, and the baud rate is set by DBS and DB7. The factory address is 03. 

For other ngs: Determine the address by hooking the rig up to your computer 
and manualty changing the frequency or modulation mode. You will receive a 
group call packet that contains the address of the rig as its 4th byle. 



73 Amateur Radio Today • December, 1 990 59 



Number 20 on yDur Feedback cand 



New products 

Compiled by Hope Currier 



PRODUCT OF THE MONTH 



MFJ ENTERPRISES, INC. 

MFJ-207 

The new MFJ-207 Hf SWR analyzer in* 
stantJy grves yt>u a OQrnplat& picture of youf 
anienna SWR over an entire band, wiihoul 
a transmittef, SWR meter or arty other 
equipment. 11 makes setting yp and trim- 
ming your antenna precise and easy. All 
you do is plug your anienna into the coax 
connector, set the Mf^J-207 to the frequen- 
cy you want, and read your SWR. II even 
has a frequency counter outpult so you can 
connect your frequency counter for precise 
digiial read*out. Plus, the MFJ'207 is bat- 
tery-operated, so you can lake it right to 
your antenna and measure the aritenna's 
SWR directly, e^immating the distorting ef- 
fects of the coax. Ssnce you can immedi- 
ately see SWR changes, you'll kfKW right 
away which adfustments to make. 

The MFJ-307 \% priced at $100. and 
comes with MFJ*s one-yeaf uncondihonal 
guarantee. It runs on a 9 volt battery (not 
Included), or 110 VAC with optional MFJ- 

1312 ($13). Contact any MFJ dealer or hAFJ Enterprises, inc., P.O. 

BoKj94. Mississippi State MS 39762; (60 f) 323-5S69, FAX (601) 323- 

655t TELEX 53 4590 MFJSTKV, (800) 647-1800. Or circle Reader 

SefviceNo 201- 





AMERITRON 

Ameritron lias released a new 600 
watt tineaf amplttief, the AL-811 The 
AL-81 1 uses three 8t i A tubes to 6e\m 
er 600 watts PEP or &00 watts CW from 
160-10 meters. (Ea&y modificaiion in- 
structions for 10/12 meters operation 
requires presenlatjon of a valid ama- 
teur license.) A Pi* Network tuned input 
circuit matches the tubes to 50 Qbm 
exciters It lets even the fussiest solld^ 
state rig perform flawlessly, A vernier 
reduction drive on the plate control 
makes tuning precise an^d easy Dual 
illuminated meters give you a complete 
picture of your operating condition: 
One meter gives you a continuous 
readirtg of grid current; a second 
switchabie meter lets you monitor high 
voltage and plate current. 

The suggested retail price tor the AL- 
81 1 is $600. For more information, con- 
tart your Ameritron dealer or Amer- 
itfon, 1 16 Wittow HoaiS, StarHvifie MS 
39759; (60 f} $23-B2ti, (800} 647- 
1800, FAX (601) 323-^51. Or Circle 
Reader Service No. 203, 




CURTIS 
MANUFACTURING 

Curtis Manufacturing Co., Inc. has 
imroduced Cable Organ izerSn an mex- 
pensive new system designed to Keep 
computer and eiectricai cables neat 
ar^d organized. Cabie Organizers will 
straighten up those corifusfng cord tan- 
gles behind your equipmeni. A special 
custom labeling capability provides 
quick and easy cable ktenlification No 
more unplugging the wrong cofd by 
mistake^ Cable Organizers comes 
with: one 10-slot cord mar^agef, iwo 
bund ler clips, six runner clips, and ten 
biank peel -and- stick labels for custom 
labeling. Self-adhesive mounting al- 
lows quick and easy inslaltaiion, 

Tlie suggested retail price is $10, in- 
ctuding a ilfetinie war rarity. Contact 
Cufiis Manufacturing Company, inc., 
30 Fitig^mtd Drive, Jeffrey NH 03452; 
(603) 532-4123. Of cifcle Reader Ser- 
vice No. 207. 




CONTACT EAST 

Contact East has released a new 
suppiement to their general catalog. It 



indudes thousands of tools and test 
instruments for testing, ^pairing ar^d 
assembling electronic equipment, in* 
eluding many brand-name items. 
Product tines, shown in full color with 
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cJtloscopes> soldering equipment, 
DMMs, EPROM programmers, tone 
test sets, inspection equipmeni, light 
meters, sweep^function generatorSp 
LCR meters and telecom testers. Also 
Included are work benches, precision 
hand tools, tool kits, and our custom 
tod kits designed lo meet yojjr indiviO* 
ual needs All products are fully guar^ 
an teed. And if you pface your order by 
4 p.m., it will be shipped that day To 
ofder this hee catalog, call (508} 682- 
200 or write to Contact East, 335 Wiilow 
Street North Andover MA 0l&45,0f 
Circle Reader Service No. 205. 




COMPUTER AUTOMATION 
TECHNOLOGY INC- 

The CAT-100 automatic control op- 
erator wrif enhance your existing re- 
peater system by ackfing features usu- 
ally available only m conlrollers costing 
thousands ol dollars more. The CAT- 
1CX)*s user-friendiy voice ar*d compre- 
hensive manual make it easy to inter- 
face with your present controller. II is 
fully field-programmable, so you can 
customize the CAT-tOO to meet your 
particular needs. Tlie synthesized 
voice will announce the time, identify 



your repeater, and interact with you 
during control and programming oper- 
ations, (You can select from seven dif- 
ferent voice message anncMincements 
tailored to amateur repeater opera- 
tion.) The scheduler permits automatic 
control of your repeater system, Stjdy 
OTMF commarfds of up to 31 digits in 
length can be stored in the CAT-100 
memory. Program the command and 
time, the CAT-1 00 will do the rest. Five 
user function switches, easy to change 
with a DTMF command, control equip- 
ment a! the repealer site, A cor\trol au- 
thorization feature permits you to as- 
sign each oontio^ operator a unique 
prefix number, ^nt$ indrvrduatly limit 
their level of control. A computof inter- 
face is included. 

The GAT- 100 is priced at S229. COfV 
tact Comput&r Automation T&chnoksgy 
inc., 4631 NW. 31st Ave,, Suite 142, 
Ft Lauderdale FL 33309; (305) 978- 
$171. Or cifcle Reader Service No. 
206, 



FINE TUNING 

Fine Tuning, a rton-profit organtia- 
liOfi of senior radio hobbyists who spe- 
cialize in shortwave broadcast DXing. 
has released the ihifd edition of Pro- 
ceediftgs. Proceedings 1990 is a col- 
tection of in-depth reviews, articles and 
features for the SW8C DXer. Every ar- 
ticle Is written with expertise by leading 
radio hobbyists and thoroughly exam- 
ined by a review panel of top-nolch OX^ 
e^s. Included are reviews of receivers 
and accessories, sm great DXing fea- 
tures, compendmms on DXpeditfOns 
and modifications for the Sony ICF- 
201 0/2001 receiver, antenna articles, 
afKl muoh more. This year's edition is 
an essential reference for anyone 
wishing to increase their enjoyment 
and skill as a shortwave broadcast 
DXer. 

Proceedings 1990 costs $19.50. 
plus $2 postage. For more information 
and prices for postage outside Noah 
America, cor*lact Fine Tuning SpeciBt 
Pubticarions, % John Bryant. RRT if 5 
Box f4, Stitfwater OK 74074. Or circle 
Reader Service No. 204. 



KUBY 
KOMMUNICATiONS 

Kuby Kommumcaiions' HT and 
scanner all-metal vehide window arv* 
lenna mount assembly is lightwerghi, 
compact, and durable. No tools are re- 
quired—it comes ready-to-use, and ii's 
easy to mount and remove. The mount 
can be slipped off and tossed into the 
vehicle for security, but with the win- 
dow rolled up light the mount is secure 
to the vehicle. No scratches on your 
vehicle's roof! This antenna mount was 
designed to tie used with a supplied HT 
rubber ducky antenna that eliminates 
wind loading problems- Optional Bel- 
don RG-SS or RGk174 coax cable is 
avaHable. 

The HT/Scanner 8NC is priced at 
$20 with cable. $1 3 without, plus $2.50 
shipping and handling. For more infor- 
mation, con lac t Kuby Kommunica' 
tions, 19254 Tranbarger Street, Row^ 
/and HBights CA 91748; (818) 964- 
1 188. Or circle Reader Service No. 
202, 



60 73 Amateur Radio Today * December. 1990 



Mumber21 on your Feedback car^ 



Abo ve and beyond 



at. Houghton WBSfGP 
San Diego Microwave Group 
6345 Badger Lake Ave. 
San Diego CA 921 19 

5670 MHz LO & Converter 



Browsing through back issues of 
Feedpoint, the North Texas Mi* 
crowave Society newsletter, I found a 
design for a 5.6 GHz microwave build- 
ing block PC board in the July 1988 
issue. The original article was pub- 
lished in Germany and is ysed in this 
oolumn courtesy of CQ-DL magazine^ 
12/87. Credit for this converter design 
goes to Roman Wesolowski DJ6EP 
and Jurgen Dahms DC0DA. 

This project was just what the doctor 
ordered, everf in time for Christmas. I 
could not balfeve the sfmplicfty of the 
design and the methods for construct- 
ing such a truly fine converter for 5.670 
GHz. This discovery completed the 
search for a working design that I 
thought was not available. Prior to this I 
was assembling components to put a 
system together, and I had not com- 
pleted the gathering phase, This PC 
board made the job a lot easier I have 
to praise our German amateur counter- 
parts for their workmanship. See Fig- 
ure t for the schematic. 

Circuit Description 

The circuit uses two GaAsFET am- 
plifiers, one for the receive pre-amplifi- 
er stage, and the other for a transmit 
ampfifier stage. The transmft amplifier 
provides about 5 mW power output and 
helps balance out the filter loss. The 
5.6 GHz filters, ir^terestingly designed, 
use two 3/4 -inch copper pipe caps with 
Vb'inch stubs for coupling rnto the fil- 
ters. The depth of the stub determines 
the bandpass and filter loss. One- 
fourth of an inch is a good compromise. 
Each filter is fed from independent 
transmit and receive mixers, further 
simplifying ihe circuitry. See Figure 4 
for details - 

The mixers use any good mixer 
device^ such as the ecofiomicai HP 
5082-2711 to the high performance 
stnpNne HP 5082-2794. Alpha 6-5827- 
00 strjpline types are also suitable. The 
RFC for the 144 MHz cojpEing mixeT" 
input/output is an a fr- wound colL I used 
5 turns of ^32 wire, If you want a form, 
use a 1 meg V4W resistor. 

Other parts for the PG board, such 
as the transmit attenuator, are com- 
mon, Use carbon resistors, not wire- 
wound types. The variable inductor L in 
the preamp stage is a NEOSCD 5061 . A 
suitable replacement can be made by 
winding 4 turns of #26 magnet wire 
over a l^-inch slug tuned form. The 
stripline PC board is etched from dou- 
ble-sided 0.031 -inch Teflon'" stock. 
Leave the side opposite of the stripline 
un etched to act as a ground plane. Af- 
ter drilling the board, I used a V4-inch 
sharp drill bit to ream out the holes on 



VHF and Above Operation 



the ground plane to ailow the compo- 
nents' leads to pass through without 
shorting out. Please note that those 
connections indicated with a ground 
symbol on the schematic should be 
jumpered from the stripline side of the 
board directly to the ground plane side. 
Most of the components including the 
pipe cap filters are mounted on the 
ground plane Sfde. The chip capaci- 
tors, RF chokes, the mixer diodes and 
a few of the resistors are mounted on 
the stripline side. See Figure 2 for parts 
placement and the foil diagram. 









2-5W 



— W*— 1 
lOOil I 



,^j)0l 



^ 




Lulijll 



0141 MfiROLlNE coat! \Opr 



X 



-Sh- 



II2VI 
♦ RX 
144 MHt 



07 



HSF-lla; 







lOpF 



^llSVl 



*TX 



Ida* 



MOF^moz 



m 



,_ --©-□ @-n-^H^" '" 



:o.o€n 



f 

I Wr^H I^M 



iWR ■ 



T^QdOi 



□ 



/77 



*7 
1— "Ws- 



n.m: 



in 



TgtflS' 



:n5^F ]^ 



n 






in 



'pfiOJ 



ffi 



.47 



'D"-'«ICRCii»^Av£ 3TRIPLIWE MuEfi OlODtS 
4 -SEf T£)i;t 



;iOeP- 



m 



Ft S/^ in Cy KfE CfiP W/iCJ-lf 9HASS BOLT \H 
TOP M FRtflUfl^CT AQJUS' 

tlt«PRIHtFO CIRCJfT BVPAS5 CAWCITOR 
t(i/-t PC eWli^Bf 



Modificatioris 

The IF system for this converter 
works at 2 meters and has an on-board 
U-310 receive 2 meter preamp. If you 
desire, you can replace this preamp 
with other preamps by coupling direct- 
ly out of the U-310 input ctrouit. 

I have made several modifications to 
the original PC board to suit my re- 
quire ments. For exam pi 61 I removed 
the crystal multiplier that was part of 
the Jocal oscH later drive circuit. The 
system as onginaily designed used a 
crystal oscillator running at 117 MHz, 



Figure 1. Schematic of the 5.6 GHz microwave converter. 



and one tripler and five doublers multi- 
plying the crystal frequency to 5616 
MHz, The final doubler circuit, located 
on the main PC board, is driven by 
2808 MHz from the oscillator PC 
board. 

I modified the circuit by eliminating 
the crystal oscillator PC board and re- 
moving the multiplier (doubler) on the 
main converter PC board. I replaced 
this entire circuit with a 5.6 GHz, 
phase-locked "brick" local oscillator 
(see Figure 3). The brick provides a 



local oscillator output directly at 6.615 
GHz, (5760 operating frequency - 145 
MHz IF frequency = 5.615 GHz local 
oscillator.) This greatly improves sta- 
biMty and simplifies cor^struotion. 
There^s nothing wrong with the multi- 
plier string, but if a high quality oscilla- 
tor is aval lab la from surplus^ why not 
use it? 

Phase-Locked Bnck Oscillators 

The phase-locked brick oscillator 
can be described as a compacts self- 




^MT/REC MIXERS/ FILTERS + tx 

5.& 6li! REC/XMT ampljfiers 
H4MHf RECEIVE PRE-AhtP 

L= 4 TURNS #^S ENAMELED COVERED WJRE 0" 1/6 m SLUG-TUNED FOft*^ iOR NEOSED #5061} 
♦MtXINTED ON FOIL SIDE OF BOARD 



r 



Figure 2. (a) Foif diagram ar}d (t^) parts placement (as viewed from stripline side). 



73 Amateur Radio Today • Decennber, 1990 61 




EXTERNAi. OSCILLATOR 

9<? TO APPROXiMATELY i05¥Hz , 




























































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liARMQNlC 
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MIXER 




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SEARCH AM^" 
































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Figure J- The mtcrowave tfick asQitiator^ 









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— K BOAHI {Cail TEFLOtl! 



figure 4. The ^-inch pipe cap Mer for the 
SB GHz converter. Adjust the pin tengrh 
for fffter shape Bnd kxss (approxtmateiy 14 
tnchfong}. Use RG-SWUcemer conductor 
feaving the foam msuiation mtaci Adjust 
the Mt for remfiar^:^ al 5670 MHz or cfe- 
sired frequency^ 

coniainod system for local oscHlalor irv 
ieclion, hence the name ''brick/' 
Availat?iHtv depends on the drifting 
Winds of surplus. The circuitry internal 
lo a bftck is qufie extensive; new, they 
COS1 atx^ut S1 70O each. 

WDrking surplus bricks were prcced 
at S2S lo $35 when I hey first slaited 
to show up, bm prices on all micfo- 
wave related components have fcioeri 
steadily rising. I have seen tested, cer- 
tifiabid bricks sell for a ^ow of $50 and a 
high of aOout $75, depending on their 
condition, Tve picked up bargain 
bricks at S5 each, only to find them in 
serious trouble. 

The crystal oscillator for controlling 
the tarick can be internal or externa j lo 
the basic brick. The bricks with internal 
oscillators make the system simpler, 
bill Ihey are getting hard 10 find in 
surplus. 



If the brick you obtain needs an ex- 
ternal oscillator circuit, see the Sep- 
tember and October issues of 73 tlris 
year, in which I describe a crystal oscif- 
fator circuit and a ternperalure control 
circuit in this column. 

The brick I am using does not have 
an Internal oscillator, so Tve put the 
external oscillator and temperature cir- 
cuit lo use. It is a lot easier to build the 
crystal oscillator and buffer stage than 
the entire multiplier siring. 

Two transistors lof a 100 MHz oscil- 
lator and a single op amp for tempera- 
ture control are not difficult to put to- 
gether. Ttie external oscillator supplies 
the brick's harmonic gejierator. whose 
overall multiplication ratio is 60. That 
means that the crystal is multiplied 12 
times, arxi controls the high power os- 
ciitalor. phase-locking it at the I2th 
harmonic. A dfode multiplier multiplies 
this phase-locked signal five times to 
the 6 GHz range. The crystal myttiplier 
(12J. times the hamionic multiplier (5)^ 
ectual5 60. 

The oscHlaiors showing up on the 
surplus market are coming from tele- 
phone companies, who are shifting 
from microwave lo fiber optics for com- 
munications systems. Most equlpmenl 
is junked out to scrap metal dealers at 
ten cents a pound. Now this sounds 
great, but don't forget that the bricks 
come with about 300 pounds of relay 
rack and support equipment, After this 
is removed, the Junkyard still has Ihe 
bulk of iron and unusable equipment 
left over. You have to find the brick 
oscillators before they're turned into 
scrap metal People are catching on 
and demanding higher prices for them* 



All is net a bed of roses, as you must 
purchase this equipment without any 
form of guarantee. My local scrap deaU 
#r has lold me several limes in price 
negotiations tJiali "*Vou canl romance 
a junk man." Their price is firm I Look* 
ir^g for treasure in a scrapyard can t>e 
tols of fun^ tMjt it takes time aitd ts 
wrought with dead ends 

Crystal MultifiUers 

Here are a few hints on how to prop- 
erty tune a crystal multiplier for com- 
parison. Some oMhe details are appli- 
cabfe to general building at higher 
frequencies. Component parts and 
construction techniques are very im- 
portant, and not paying attention to de* 
tan will give poor results. 

First, let's assume a multiple stage 
circuit like the original one used for the 
5,6 GHz converter. Adjust each multi- 
plier stage for a clean stable output, 
making sure the output is on the in- 
tended harmonic. Don't tune the circuit 
for maximum, as a system, by the 
tweak and peak method. Sure, it puts 
out power, but on what frequency? And 
what about oscillator garbage? I bet 
it'd have lots ol false outputs and be 
somewtrat unstatile^ It's better to tune 
each stage as a separate output ttetore 
piooeeding on to the next stage, mak- 
ing sure it's on frequernry and not seM- 
oscillating. (PutI the cfysial; the system 
should be stable and not oscillate). 

As t staled earlier, circuit constnjc- 
tion techniques are very critical be- 
cause at microwave frequencies, the 
Size of the components becomes a 
larger and larger fraction of a wave- 
length. A short wire connection at low 
frequency can be a very large imped- 
ance, or RF choke, at microwave fre- 
quencies. Poor construction tech- 
niques and solder blobs can render a 
microwave circuit useless. Don't leave 
solder rosin on the PC board. Clean it 
with alcohol or other thinners. Just as 
you tune one stage at a lime, do Ihe 
same when building. Do not populate 
Ihe entire PC t>oard with component 
parts at one time. You could place 
most of the ''nonvolaifle" parts, tran- 
sistors, and diodes only as needed 
while testing. This should minimize any 
circuit problems. 

Mailbox Comments 

Junjf Tamara JHtMOY of Tokyo in- 
quires about ttie brick oscillators for 
both 10 and 6 GHz bands We are 
sending him detatts on the bncks He 
reports thai a 2.4 GHz ropaaler was 
settled m Tokyo recently, and activity 
has increased on that band. He be- 
lieves that soon this wave of interest 
will cover all of Japan. Well, Jun[i, I 
hope the interest spreads and maf^y 
other amateurs enter the fascinating 
world of microwave communications. I 
started in amateur microwave several 
years ago, being Interested In building 
simple and practical circuits for our mi- 
crowave bands. 

Ray Kajma of Farrell, Pennsylvania, 
writes that he is looking for an APQ-1 1 
radar manual. He's also looking fnto 
small antennas, and has researched a 
spiral antenna capable of operation 



over many GHz. A spiral antenna, like 
a log array, starts smalt in the center 
and spirals out. the dual elements get- 
ting broader as they circle out. Contact 
Ron at 317 FJorida St.. Farrell PA 
16121. 

Terry N8SIF questions the pola- 
plexer. Does it function as a circulator 
and detector? Also, he wants me to 
describe my TWT and power supply. 
Well. Terry, ihe polaplexer is not a 
circulator, in that no magnetics tsolate 
the detector from the transmit source. 
The polaplexer was first used over 40 
years ago with ttn cans of resonant 
size. The polaplexer derives its isola- 
tion from the fact that transmit Is 180 
degrees offset from the receive, one 
horizontal and one vertical In the 
waveguide or tube< Local oscillator 
Injection is controlled by upsetting the 
inherent balance by a B/35 brass bolt. 
This boll Is positioned at 45 degrees, 
and its depth of penetration controls 
transmit injection of current into the 
detector diode for bias. 

The TWT or traveling wave tube that 
I use is a surplus item from telephone 
equipment for analog microwave 
transmitters that became obsolete. 
The TWT ts a helix tube 6 to inches 
long, its plaie structure a spnng-ltke, 
spiral-wound coil tt is surrounded by 
special magnets to cor^taln an electron 
beam Ughtiy focused in the coil. The 
power supply requires several high 
voltages— 600. 1200. 3000 volts— 
which are adjusted to each tube type, 
Cun-enls are quite low; in the 3 to 25 
mA range for lOW types. 

My TWT funs off 24 volts DC at 3 
amps on transmit and has an output of 
10 watts. My Reld Day station has two 
options. One is the lower, more conve- 
nient solid state amplifier with 200 mW 
output for 1 2 volts at 1 ,3 amps on trans- 
mit The other Is the TWT with Its power 
supply. The power supply is as wide as 
a relay rack (19 inches). It's 8 inches 
high and weighs about 10 pounds. The 
tube is 10 inches long in its protective 
case. 

The large battery supplies that the 
TWT needs for a lull day's operation 
(two 12V. 26 Ah) pose a problem for 
Field Day microwave contests. The 
battery might tie overktil, but Ji can last 
a full weekend without recharging. 

Bricks Available 

By the way, I have obtained several 
extra 6 GHz brick oscillators similar to 
the ones described m this column The 
bricks are as good as new, and ril 
make them available for $50 each, 
postpaid U.S. They require an external 
oscillator {^00 MHz crystal, approxi- 
mately). All have been tested and are in 
good condition, phase-locking at 6 
GHz, with the typical 6 GHz output 50 
lo 1 00 mW { +20 dBm maximum). 

The last weekend of the ARRL 10 
GHz Contest is about to start, and I 
hope to get some pictures to let you 
know what's happening. As always, I 
will be glad to answer any questions 
concerning this and other VHF/UHF 
microwave -related items. Please in* 
elude an SASE for a prom pi reply. 73 
Chuck WB6IGP 



62 73 AmaieuT Radio Today • December. 1990 



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73 Amateur Radio Today * December. 1990 63 



As 



Numbef 23 on your Feedback card 



K KABOOM 



MichaeiJ. GeierKBWM 
% 73 Amateuf Radio Today 
WGE Center 
Forest Read 
Hmicock NH 03449 

Still More Troubleshooting 

Last month we discussed the ins and 
outs of various radio circuit stages, 
with aslant toward andarslanding and 
fixing them without schematic dia- 
grams. There's plersiy more to go. so 
let's get righi to it. 

Detectorsi Tfits ts rather a broad 
area. The circuit conf guration will de- 
pend, Of course, on the mode (AM, 
SS8. FM, etc.) being detected, fn a 
muttimode rig, several detectors will be 
present. The simplest detector is the 
diode used in basic AM 4'eceivers. 

You will find it hanging off the end of 
the last IF transformer. Generally, it ei- 
ther works or it doe^nH. However, most 
rigs, even if they receive AM. avoid tt^e 
diode detector because there are 
much better-performing schemes. The 
product detector is a balanced ar- 
rangement whose outpui is the product 
of a local oscillator and the receivad 
signal. By "product'* I mean lli© math- 
ematical kind, as in multiplication. So, 
this circuit has some gain, instead of 
Ihe loss inherent in the passive diode 
defector. Atso, by feeding in the BFO 
instead Of the local oscillator, the 
product detector makes a very nice 
SSB and CW demodulator. Consa- 
querttly. i1 is common in sidet>and HF 
rigs. As with all detectors, look for it at 
theendolthe IF chain. 

It may be an IC or it may have diodes, 
transistors or FETs. The giveaway is 
ttiat it has two inputs and only one out- 
put, it IS essentially a mtjcer, so it looks 
like one. If it doesn't seem to be work* 
ing; check tfiat both ifiputs are there 
before you Start yariking any parts. If 
you do puii parts to check them, pyll 
and replace them one at a time to avoid 
unbalancing the circuit by swapping 
^'identical" components. 

FM Is another story altogether. Vari- 
ous detector schemes have been de- 
veloped over the years, including the 
ratio detector, discriminator, pulse in* 
tegratof, etc. Tf>e job of the FM detec- 
tor IS to convert wiggles in the incommg 
carrier frequerK^ into corresponding 
voltages. Tlie result of this process is 
reconstruction of ttie same audio sig* 
nals which caused the frequency wig- 
gles at the transmitter. Most rigs use 
discriminator-type detectors, which 
consist of two diodes and an IF coil with 
an extra winding. The coH has to be 
tuned to the unmodulated carrier fre- 
quency for the circuit to produce good 
audio. If It is even a little bit off. tr>e 
recovered aiKJio will be significantly 
distorted. I remember of^e rig that re- 
ceived clear audio when disassem- 
bled, but always sounded distorted 
when the case was put together. It 
turned out that someone had replaced 
the original, magnetically-shielded 
speaker with a cheap , unshielded one. 



The Tech Answer Man 

The new speaker's magnetic field was 
detuning the discriminator coll when 
the case was assembled, t^ecause it 
was right on top of iti Moral: Never take 
ANYTHING for granted. 

Some rigs use ceramic discHmina- 
tors. These are smalK pretuned. three- 
legged beast ies. Because they have 
no adjustments, they can be looked at 
as either/or devices; Either they work, 
or they don*t. They have no active com- 
ponents, so they usually work. 

Pulse integrators are not common tn 
radio equipment, but Ihey are excel- 
lent, low-distortion FM detectors and 
are worth exploring , as Ihey are handy 
for home-brewtrvg. The ides is simple: 
Make narrow pulses from the incoming 
carrier by applying it to a monostable 
multivibrator (one-shot), Now inte- 
grate, or low-pass filter, the pulses with 
a simple resistor/capacitor (R/C) fitter, 
and voiia, aydtoE As the carrier tre- 
quertcy increases, the "on" time of the 
pulses wilt be more freqoent, causing 
tho capacitor's voltage to rise. As the 
frequency decreases, tt^e '*oii" tirne 
will be less frequent, and the cap's 
voltage will decrease. The flyctuating 
voltage will correspond to the original 
audio signal. 

Low-level audio amps: If you have 
a signal at the output of the detector, 
but have no audio closer to the speak- 
er, check tiie low-level amp stages. 
These are straightforward circuits, and 
they may be made of transistors or iCs. 
In some rigs they're op amps, in any 
event, their function is to build Ihe sig- 
nal up enough to dnve the speaker 
amp stage. The signal voltage should 
get bigger at each stage or , in the case 
of an emitter follower stage, it should 
stay about the same. 

You may wonder al the purpose of 
an amplifier that seems lo have no 
gain. Why is it there? Because tt^ere 
are two kinds of gain. When the signal 
gets bigger, that's voltage gain. When 
it doesn^t. the purpose is most likely 
current gain. In other words, the 
stage's Output can drive a lower 
Impedance load without getting wiped 
out. Current amplifiers are called 
"buffers." especially when they are 
made from op amps. 

Noise blinkers: There are various 
types, but the basic idea is to blank the 
audio output at the instant of a noisd 
pulse because the brain finds the ab- 
sence of sound far less intrusive than a 
sudden "pop." Blankers use a high- 
pass filler to look for noise pulses, 
which hawe a far faster rise time than 
normal audio. It can be hard to tell 
when noise blankers are broken. They 
can be pretty particular regarding 
which noises they will eliminate, even 
when ihey work. Unless you have 
some handy source of impulse noise, 
such as an electric drill you will have to 
check components out-of 'Circuit. 

Some noise blankers can be fairly 
compIeK, with variable levels, 
thresholds, time constants, etc. These 
can involve digital gates and decision* 
making circuits. Jysl as with the sim- 



pler variety, you need to inject noise to 
do any reaJ tfouble^iooting. If you do 
try. simply trace the noise pulses 
through the highisass filter into the 
noise amp and any circuits that follow. 

Squelch circuits: These can fool 
you into thinking your low-level audio 
amps are not working because they 
gate the audio on Bn6 off. Some 
squelches have their own gate transis- 
tors* while others stiort out the base of 
the first low^evet audk> amp. If the amp 
doesn't seem to worlt. always check 
the squelch first. 

Although some SSB rigs have 
squelch circuits, they are most com- 
mon on FM rigSf where they're an ab- 
solute necessity because of the loud 
Wank-channel "whoosh"' which would 
otherwise drive you crazy. Ttte usual 
FM squelch technique ts to exploit that 
whoosh. The annoying notse contains 
lots of high-frequency audio energy 
which is outside the normal signal 
passband that would be delivered by a 
transmitting station. A high-pass filter, 
followed by a rectifier and smoothing 
fitter, will deliver a DC voltage when the 
noise is there » and next to nothing 
when a carrier is present. (Even if 
there's plenty of audio modulation on 
the carrier^ it will never approach the 
high*frequency content of the noise.) 
The output of ttre rectifier/filter drives 
the squelch gate transistor. Some 
squelch circuits can be a bit more com- 
plex, but the basic scheme is the same. 
If you have no audio, check the squelch 
gate. It may be shorted. If the audio's 
there but the squelch won't work, it 
may be open Of course, check the in- 
put to the transistor first*^lhe trouble 
may lie farther upstream. 

AM/SS6 squelches work just the 
Other way around. They look for an al>- 
sence of signal, champing the audio off 
when the signal drops below the 
threshold you set with the squelch con- 
trol . With AM and SSB, of course, there 
is no loud wideband noise because the 
iF stages are not being driven to their 
saturation point. In fact, amaprobjec^ 
five is that the front end and JFs be as 
quief as posaibie. The troubleshooting 
procedure is pretty muc^ the same as 
for FM rigs, except that ttm iignal lev- 
els in the early stages are inverted < and 
there is no high-^pass filter. It all still 
comes down to a gate being driven by 
the received signal. 

Audio power amps: These, of 
course, drive the speaker. Usually, the 
audio power amp is a current amplifier 
arKJ does not exhibit voltage gain. If 
discrete, it is almost certainly a posh- 
puti circuit* or some vanat^n. Irt this 
scheme, there are two transistors and 
each one amplifies only one half of the 
audio waveform. Severe audio distor- 
tion in the power amp is nearly always 
caused by one of those transistors fail- 
ing. If it is accompanied by hum which 
does not vary with the volume control, 
suspect a shorted transistor. It not, 
kx>k for an open. Often, these transis- 
tors are matched pairs, and should be 
replaced the same way. Using off-the- 
shelf + unrelated parts can cause over- 
heating and increased distortion. Also, 
when you replace a shorted transistor, 
be sure to replace any resistors con- 
nected to its emitter, as they may be 
damaged, tf the transistors are good, 
see if there is a large, electrolytic cap 



t>elween the amp and speaker A short- 
ed or leaky one will often cause symp- 
toms which mimic a bad transistor. 

IC power amps are becoming in* 
creasingly common. When they go* 
they usually get so hot you can't touch 
them for more than a second. If the 
audio looks good going in but nettling 
comes out, and the speaker coupling 
cap is OK. the IC b protiably bad. 

By the way, tjefore you get too in* 
vof^d in tracking down power amp 
troubles, check that the speaker is 
good and is CONNECTED. A bad ear- 
phone jack or blown voice coil can 
waste lots of your time. Blown speak* 
ers are especially common in HTs be- 
cause they are often played at high 
volume in cars. Also, some HT speak- 
ers are rated far t?elow tfta power level 
the rigs' amps can deliver. 

The Circuits 

Now, let*s look at some drcMte pe- 
culiar lo transmitters. 

Speech processors: There are two 
types, AF and RF. The audio frequency 
processors usually are compressors, 
and work much like the automatic level 
control circuits on cassette tape 
recorders, only faster. They attempt to 
keep ttie average audio level close to 
the peaJc level, Altfrotigh the Hf tech- 
nique has domrnated for many years, 
AF processors have begun to reap- 
pear, and they are remarkably effec- 
tive. If the processor passes audio but 
does not compress, check the variable 
gain element h Typically. it*s an FET 
connected between the input and oul- 
pul of Ifie amplifier stage passing the 
audio. If there's jusi no audio at all. 
Check the amp itself. 

RF processors are considerably 
more complex. They actually work at IF 
frequencies. The basic scheme is to 
take the modulated IF signal and detib- 
erately overdrive it so that the peaks 
are clipped off. The result is that the 
average level is close lo the newly- 
dipped peaks. To avoid the horrerv 
dous distortion and splatter this seem- 
ingly ugly process generates, the 
signal is then fed through a tiandpass 
filter which amoothes the edges and 
keeps the signal within the normal 3 
kHz limits. If there's no output, check 
all stages, starting from the proces- 
sor's input, for the presence of a modu^ 
lated carrier. You need lo put audio 
into the mike, artd you actually may 
have to operate your transmitter to do 
this test, so use a dummy kiad. Under 
no circumstances should you be on the 
air as you talk into the mike and start 
probing for signals. Needless to say, 
be careful to avoid injury when working 
near a live transmitter. 

If the processor passes a signal but 
does not seem to have much effect on 
it, there probably isn't enough gain to 
drive it to clipping. Remember, bBkm 
the dipping point, the whole thing is 
just an amplifier. You should be able to 
see the d^ppjng on the signal at the 
bandpass filter entry point If not. 
check the gain stages between the 
mike and the fitter. 

Weill once again I'm out of room, 
and we still aren't finished! Next 
month, we'll wrap this up ar>6 move on 
to something else - 



64 73 Amateur Radio Today • December, 1 990 



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73 Amateur Radio Today • December, 1990 65 




Number 24 on your Fe«dback card 



Mike Bryce WSaVGE 
2225 May^Qwer NW 
MassiHon OH 44B46 

The Varfabte Crystal Oscillator 

When you slart talking about QRP^ 
without question rhe conwersation 
turns to portable-mobile setups. 
Portable requirements are a bit dif- 
ferent as opposed to home station use. 
Not©, however, that when I'm talking 
portable, Tm really talking portable. 
Smali figs you can carry into places 
you wouldn't dare take a commercial 
rig. Wes Harward WTTOl described 
such equipment tn his mountain- 
eering figs. Smaller ccwtrols. less ener- 
gy use. and frequency stability are 
utmost- In keepfng with the topic of 
frequency control, this time weM) look 
al a special type o( frequency control: 
the VXO. 

The Variable Crystal OsciJIatorp or 
VXO. Is a very good compromise be- 
tween being rock-bound or using a 
I ess-th an -perfect VFO. In portable use. 
a VFO can sometimes be extremely 
hard to keep stable, due largely to the 
temperatures you encounter in the out- 
back Mechanical stress also affects 
the stability of the VFO. It is dlfftcuR to 
|<eep capacitor siaior-shaft bearings, 
drives and vernier dials operating OK- 
rectly while sitting on top of a rock. A 



Low Power Operation 

VFO win more than likety get trounced 
off frequency if the rig is dropped a 
small tieight. say off the top of our rock 
iedge onto the ground. 

Comparisons to the VFO 

A VXO can overcome most of the 
troubles affecting the VFO~at s cost. 
We lose a great deal of flexibility. Even 
the best designed VXO has a limit on 
the amount of swing one can ''rubber'* 
the crystal, depending on the frequen- 
cy used. Tlie type of crystal and circuit 
of the VXO will give tis the required 
frequency spread. We can get atXHJt 2 
to 12 kHz of swing. The tower the opef* 
atfng frequency, the less the amount of 
frequency swing. For SO and 40 me- 
ters, you can took at atXHit 2 (o 4, may- 
be 5 kHz worth. As you go higher in 
frequency, you can achieve a much 
wider frequency swing. At 20 meters, 
you can have a VXD with a 10 kHz 
swing. On 15 meters, you Can some- 
times get a VXO range of 12 kHz— 
maybe more. Above 15 meters. yoLi 
don't see too much use of the VXO. just 
too much ground to cover. You' It still 
need a shoe box futi of eryslaJs 1o cover 
all of the 1 meter band. 

Because the VXD can give you crys- 
tal control stability with the movement 
Of a VFO, now and then we'll see them 
used in VHF gear. IRunning the VXO at 




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$6 73 Amateur Radio Today • December, 1990 



cnntal 




4.rK 




vw^^^^ 



2H2222 



10K 



*TQ 



ZOuH cmi 



7"^v 



VXOtiJt«! 



or 



5.1 votts 
regulated 



Figure. The ciBSsic VXO circwt. The inductor gives the crystaf more swing. 



a lower frequency, we can get est eel* 
lent slal^tlity wilti multiplier sieges in 
the kans#iiner to achieve the required 
operating frequeney^ Changing th0 fre- 
quency of the VXO will result in a large 
frequency shtft at the final stage, Voti'll 
see this scheme often used in home- 
brew 2 meter if ansmitters- 

Crystal Type 

Often, the type of crystal you use will 
make or break Ihe VXO. The popular 
FT-243 crystals wilt not work very well 
with a VXO. in many cases, the VXO 
just won't work at all, You 'If find the 
frequency swing to be very litlie, and \n 
some cases, unstable. The best bei is 
fhe AT cut crystals. I get my crystals 
from Jan Cryslats /see ' 'Updates" tn 
this t$su0 for thff correct phone num- 
ber}. I use a 30 pF load capacitance in 
a HCQiU holder. You can use the least 
expensive crystals; you're not launch- 
ing missiles with these, so get the 
Ot% tolerance rocks and put ihe 
change m your p<K;ket. 

I've used various VXOs in the past 
Some have worked great and others 
have been vast disappointments. All 
but a few real pocpers have provided 
stable operation. 

The figure shows a classic VXO cir- 
cuit. Note the coil in series wiih ihe 
crystal. This inductor gives the crystal 
an even greater swing. But you have to 
t>e careful not lo increase the mduc- 
tar>cetoo much, or you il losecortirol of 
the crystal and the circuit will then l>e- 
come a VFO. Youll need to experi- 
ment. A good rule of thumb m to use 
atKJUt 1 5 liH for 30 meters, 20 yH for 40 
meters, and 12 ^K for 20 meters. 
Again, these are starting vaJues Nolh- 
ing js set in stone, so you must experi* 
men I for accuracy. 

Selecting Crystal Frequency 

Deciding on the frequency of the 
crystal can be frustrating! IVe found 
out the hard way I ha! you just can't be 
sure where the crystal will oscillate! An- 
other rule of thumb is to choose a crys- 
tal iow0f in frequency than what you 
need. Most VXOs will oscitlaie the crys- 
tat higher ihan the frequertcy marked 
on the crystal, so the VXO control will 
then allow for frequencies higher xhary 
the marked frequei^. 

If you order a crystal at 10.102 MHz, 
the oscillator will output a frequency of 
10.102.7 MHz because of the 001% 
tolerance of the crystal, tf the crystal is 
used in a local oscillator, you can add 



capacitance to towerihe operating fre- 
quency of the crystal. Since we're not 
using the crystal in this application^ we 
have to adjust the outptit to suit our 
needs. When we connect the VXO ca- 
pacitor, we swing the cry staJ's frequen- 
cy even high&r than marked. With the 
VXO I have t>een using for some time, I 
can 9et about 7 kHz worth of swmg, all 
on ttte higher end of the marked fre- 
quency. 

Now just when you thought it was 
safe to break out the crystal catalog, 
you have to consider that some VXOs 
will move the crystal frequency both 
lower and higher than the marked fre- 
quency. This seems to happen when 
the Pierce crystal oscillator is used as a 
VXO. In most cases, the VXO will only 
altow you to move the frequency 
higher. 

Even though the VXO Is crystal con- 
iTolfedt be sure to include vottage regu- 
lation to the oscillator You don't want a 
ctttrpy signal on ihe air. You can use a 
small zener diode I prefer the 7BL08 
three-terminal regulator for VFOA/XQ 
use. They're cheap, easy to use. and 
work great. 

As in the construction oi VFOs, be 
sure to enclose the circuit with some 
type of shielding. Double-sided PC 
board is great for this. 

You may also want to use a vernier 
drive attached to the mam VXO capaci- 
tor. This will help in tuning in the need- 
ed frequency. Sometimes the VXO 
capacitor and crystal combination 
cause a nasty littla problem. The tuning 
becomes nonlinear The frequency 
spread is not distributed evenly 
thoughout the tuning range of the ca* 
pacitor. This results m having the en- 
tire tuning range of the VXO bunched 
together on one end. Best bet is to re- 
place the crystal and or tuning capaci- 
tor. 

Don't Overlook It 

A VXO can prove a good trade-off 
between moving all over the place with 
a less than perfect VFO, to moving a 
tittle bit with rock- sot id slabtlityf Don't 
cut the VXO Short for your next trans- 
mitter pfoject. Look for a VXO 30 meter 
transmitter coming very soon next 
year. Next month vwll start on a sta- 
tion transmit control board. Also, we'll 
Mnven the Drake "B'" and "C" series 
receivers for the WAAC bands. 

Until next month, everyone have a 
good holiday season, and see you next 
year, here m the ''QRP' column 



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Number 25 on your FeedbiCk card 



1990 Annual Index 



Subject/ Article 
Amplifiers, Audio. 

40WOSKCWainp 

Accessocy Plug 

AGC 

Audwa Paich Panel 

AudkO Riwerod 

HnMlw 

quafity headsef A mike 
speaker 
VOX Plus 
wicte-t^ajrid preamp 

Antennai 
bearn, HF 
eoiiceninc cofn£K3 



Description/Column Author 



Issue Page Subiect/Arttel* 



Description/Coiumn Author 



Issue Page 



ffipote for HT 
dipoleslopef 
dipole. veftical 
dummy 0ucky 
terriie nxl, fsj6LZW 
»^ Homer 
K:2ATmo(! 
tJ-antenna. duaf^bafwt 
J-pote. 2m 

LPOA/yag* combo 
mobila, t/aftey^ 
mount, portable 
PRB-1 enforcemeni 
quadSm 
quads €m 
quads, aN k^nds 
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radial system 
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Iranamatch, SPC 
tree anlerina 
turnstile antennas 
verticat 10m 
vertical iVim 
vertical Hf 
venicaL omni-gatn 
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Pre amps 

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svfTiclriiTtg ease 
Tape Roc ContmHer 
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specification 
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lof HF rig 

KTAoeessory 

UolofolatCs 



^D loop spec^aF 
ttw' RayGun" 
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Tl&m % -wave 
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dummy Joad tor MT 
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using RG-17i 

146;220 MH2 

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tueckwarcl. invened^ 

40m adjustaJste 

for vei/hor polarizaiion 

iQing spare lire 

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portable 

lor RDFirrg 

(or RDFing 

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pi jua cutter 

T0^20m 

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"aereodlpity'^ Bearcat 

multlb^ind 

collinaer, VHF/UHF 

use w/2 antennas 



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video digitizer 

LAMLINK.WHATSUP 

QSO Sohware 

tracking OS' 13 

rec ham- radio, Usenet 

RTTY Loop 

PCa tayout 

software lor CW 

source of 

RTTY for Apple It 

dIgHal modes 

VC-lQOOt)oard 



w/GaAsFETs 
interlacing radios 
(o>f 80tT( receiver? 

, Packet, etc. 

USB/L SB packet 
QQOHzs^ift 
modem a^cuit 
fww equipinefil 
ptttltile system 
programTnai>te iDer 
Teri-Tec & NMne-brew 
ustng LCDs 
Hamsats 

fiMJiB bW AMTOR 
Packet Talk 
2mTNC 
torpedtel 
ad|u£lrFienta 
RTTY utiit 



N5HNN 

W6YUY 

KA9NEH 

NlCTl 

KBKJV 

WB6«3P 

WBBIGP 

WB6IGP 

VE5XZ 

WA3UKC 

WA2EBY 

VESEFC 



W1XU 

KA5DNP 

N8KDD 

W8MOV 

WA3EKL 

KAdOGD 

DA1QB/WB7T4ZCJ 

KlOV 

KA8CNI 

W5VUY 

AASKB 

W1GV 

K1NIT 

W880-K 

KC3Y8 

KA7FQW 

K3YWY 

K«OV 

KiOV 

WASZm 

W»WU2 

WV8R 

W4RNL 

WAtLBP 

KH6FMT 

WA6ZQS 

ItAILCO 

KASN 

WA6SVT 

W9DUU 



WB2QSZ 

WA5ZIB 

K6YDW 

KA9CS0 

K9EYY 

WA3AJR 

W5JG 

WA3AJR 

Q.H^L.N. 

KA1TGA 

WB&JNW9 

Nt4RVE 

WA3AJR 

WB9RRT 

WB9DY! 

WA3AJR 

WA3AJR 

WA3AJH 

WASAJR 



MAR 
SEP 

JUL 

DEC 

MAR 

APR 

tsiOV 

FEB 

JUN 



UAY 



weeiGP 

WB6RON 
WD4PU 



WA1L6P 
nDnnun 
NW6H 
WB^GP 

W08VGE 

wAszm 

M2eLl 
WA3AJF) 

WB6R0N 

WB6ROt4 

WaGOi 

WB6RON 

WA3Ajrt 



DEC 

APR 
JUN 



AUG 
MAY 
JAN 

oec 

JUW 

MAY 

OCT 

DEC 

DEC 

JUL 

FEB 

JUL 

JUL 

MAR 

SEP 



36 

36 
32 
45 
54 
58 
62 
71 
10 
32 
24 
31 



RTTY 

RTTY cross display 
RTTY, tuning m 
RTTY video icmrt 
TNC Connect Alarm 
lone warbler 
TS-4306 AGC 



conirollens.itmtrs 
tuning scope 
pulse generator 
VC-1000 
wttti ffip-flop 
for EPROM keyer 
mo(^ for AMTOR 



OCl 


41 


JUN 


10 


SEP 


2S 


MAY 


m 


SEP 


IS 


JUN 


57 


NOV 


41 


FEB 


45 


APR 


60 


JUN 


77 


MAR 


4a 


OCT 


^ 


JUN 


45 


JUN 


22 


APR 


ae 


SEP 


44 


hbB 


B 


JUN 


24 


JAN 


54 


SEP 


68 


NOV 


51 


APR 


44 


NOV 


12 


OCT 


22 


MAY 


24 


JUL 


42 


SEP 


29 


JAN 


18 


APR 


B9 


AUG 


10 


JUL 


9 


JAN 


41 


APR 


57 


JUL 


26 


JUN 


21 


JUN 


26 


DEC 


57 


JUN 


77 


APR 


52 


MAY 


58 


JAN 


35 


MAY 


U 


JAN 


24 


JUN 


61 


hta 


13 


OCT 


26 


JUL 


70 


AUG 


42 


MAR 


61 


ttB 


40 



61 

S4 
30 



48 

76 
24 
58 

70 

6i 

46 
81 

19 
70 
58 



5e# Btso CofTifHiters anti Software 



56 

64 



General Interest 

AB4RL Arthur Tan 

AL7KU. Gilbert Monroe 

Alaska t^am graduates 

SeaHam? 

Bhutan 

Bouvel Ktand 

Burton. Rjchaid 

CaJIsipgnS 

Carft)4e Perry 

Communcelor 

Convmynicaiof 

Communicaior 

COSIN 

CQ All Schools Nei 

oxcc 

OXCC, enclaves 

DXOA Countries 

DK Dynasty Award 

DXfiet» 

harkjicapped waiver 

handicapped wairver 

Htgfi on ATV 

Hooked on Foxtnuntntg 

Jamboree RadM) 

Japan 

Just Do It! 

KSKEJ, Orrtn Brand 

KA2 VL P. Martin Gruen 

KA3WDW. Andy Robmsofi 

KA3WMS, Stepfianie Hassan 

KASWMJ, Jennifer Doerrie 

KBHyBDV, Aaron Gremer 

K92IQF, Chris MignemS 

KB2IGG, Mary Ales Ira 

KB2IGY. Mery Seteraj 

KB2JFU, Avraham M Broges 

KaSAQV, Kevin Biekert 

KB5AWP. Ken Cameron 

KB5NTC, Terry Sickle 

KC6MJJ. IDavId Pioirowskl 

KC9HP. Hap Holly 

KF7LX, Toddimie 

KF8CP, Sieve Mindy 

King and Us. Tt^e 

marketing ham radio 

Memories 

N4YZW, Michael Johnson 

N5GZP. Steven O Sellers 

N6PNY, Kelly Howard 

N6WRL Mark Hendrl^cson 

NSGEV. Michael Adams 

N8HEY,MaryBeardslee 

ND5Y. Dwjghl KaJim 

OSCARS in Classioom 

Pack Your Seabag 

pile-up techniques 

proper OSUng 

OStingprodlems 

OSL roiJt^ 

ROFing, clubs 

Rchmond Hill HS 

San Francrsco Quake 

SAREX. space 

ServKe Survey 

5erv>ce Survey 

S#rvice Survey 

Sermee Stjrvey 

Service Sufvey 

Service Survey 

Service Survey 

Shanng the Adventure 

Solar Car Race 

Soviet Union 

Soviet Uniofi 

teaching ham radio 

UAdMA. Gennady Kolmakov 

VHP iBlening 

W9L0V. Dale Shimp 

WA4SIR- Ron Panse 

WASaKD. Rev. Gil Pries 

WA8UMT. Rich Redoi^ey 

WAavWY.JimSftala 



HamProfites 

Ham Profites 

Ham Profiles 

boking tor Elmer 

QXc^umn 

DX column 

Looking lAtesI 

mfofmailKMi in 

mterviewr 

Looking West 

Looking West 

Looking We^ 

student netuforti 

benefits 

new applications 

DX column 

corrected lisA 

member^ 

awards difectofies 

WA60PS interview 

WS3HGW ifT^fview 

beioon marnage 

account 

ham scouts 

Biggest Ham Country 

Hams with Class 

Ham Profiles 

Ham Profites 

Ham Profiles 

Ham Profiles 

Ham Profftes 

Hem Profiles 

Ham Profiles 

Ham Profiles 

Ham Profiles 

Ham Profiles 

Ham Profiles 

Ham Profiles 

Ham Profiles 

Ham Profiles 

Ham Prolites 

Ham Profiles 

Ham Profiles 

King Hussein VE6/JY1 

Hams with Class 

the 1940s 

Ham Profiles 

Ham profiles 

Looking West 

Ham Profsies 

Ham Profiles 

Ham Profiles 

Ham Profiles 

aclivities 

merctiant marines 

DX cxilumn 

DX coluTTirt 

standards 

DXcolumri 

lun for kids 

ham graduates 

1989 

NistOfY 

Ajtnoo 

ICOM 

KnniMiood 

IBpiflif mJHII 

Teft-Tec 
Wrap-up 
Yaesu 

Mary Duffield 
& public service 
oariisigfis 
Cattstgns 
quaiitfesrweded 
Ham Profiles 
above & isekTw 2m 
Hasn Profiles 
Ham Profiles 
Ham Profiles 
Ham prof jtes 
Ham Profiles 



WA3AJR 

WA3AJR 

WA3AJR 

WASAJR 

UA1AU.We9EGA 

WB6IGP 

KAtSUN 



Staff 

stfldH 

staff 

r46SlW 

WSl^NE 

W5KNE 

WASflF 

W5KNE 

KB2IGG 

WAsnr 

WASTTF 
WABfTF 
WB2IIIC 

WB2MIGP 

W5KNE 
W5KNE 



OCT 
AUG 
JAN 
FES 
MAY 



W5KNE 

WA6ITF 

WASITF 

KS8J 

N9FHF 

WQ4eNU 

WAILBP 

WB2MGP 

staff 

slaK 

staff 

staff 

slaff 

staff 

staff 

staff 

siaff 

staff 

staff 

staff 

steff 

staff 

staff 

staff 

staff 

McGregor a VE6V 

WB2MGP 

W6CK 

staff 

stall 

WA6ITF 

staff 

staff 

staff 

staff 

NaiWJ 

NSMM 

W5KNE 

W5KNE 

W5KNE 

WSKNE 

K80V 

Staff 

WASriT 

WAeiTF 
W86NOA 

WB6NOA 
WB&NOA 
WB6NOA 
WB6NOA 
WBeNOA 

weeNc^ 

KA1UKM 

WBSELK 

WSKNE 

WSKhtE 

WB2MGP 

staff 

r^2DUP 

stalf 

staff 

Staff 

staff 

staff 



JUN 



APR 

JUhr 

OCT 

JUN 

NOV 

JAN 

AUG 

AUG 

MAY 

APR 

JUN 

JUL 

JUN 

DEC 

SEP 

FES 

OCT 

SEP 

MAY 

DEC 

OCT 

AUG 
JUL 
MAR 
MAY 
NOV 
JAN 
SEP 
AUG 
OCT 
SEP 
JUN 
MAR 
FEB 
JAtsI 
JUL 
APR 
MAY 
DEC 
MAY 
MAR 
JUN 
APR 
iPJAN 
SEP 
JUN 
OCT 
DEC 
FEB 
SEP 
SEP 
SEP 
AUG 
MAR 
DEC 
APR 
MAR 
OCT 
DEC 
FEB 
DEC 
FEB 
MAY 
SEP 
JUN 
APR 
MAR 
JUL 
OCT 
AUG 
MAY 
OCT 
JUN 
JUL 
OCT 
DEC 
OCT 
FEB 
MAY 
OCT 
JUL 
JUL 



78 
42 
64 
48 
14 
89 
77 



17 

17 
17 
B4 
52 
46 
66 
73 

20 
41 

38 
84 

18 
48 
59 
84 
80 
81 
80 
58 
60 

ts 

58 
1§ 
24 
56 
17 
17 
17 
17 
17 
17 
17 
17 
17 
17 
17 
17 
17 
17 
17 
17 
17 
9 
43 
66 
17 
17 
7B 
17 
17 
17 
17 
11 
3S 
55 
54 

50 
78 
62 
17 
16 
38 
20 
40 
70 
28 
14 
38 
46 
IB 
34 
85 
73 
56 
17 

62 
IT 
17 

17 
17 
17 



60 73 Amateur Radio Today • December. 1990 



Subject/Article 



DescHptionyColumn Author 



WLTexQ, erynSitzer 


Ham Profiles 


■taff 


WL?BXR, eilzabelh Bitzer 


Ham P/ofiles 


staff 


WL7BXS, Sarah 8rrzef 


Ham Pforiles 


^laff 


Worlds of Gus Browrting 


DX pioneer 


W4BP0 


For other news, see the "Lett&rs, " "ORX. " and "73 


fntemattooi 


Newr Say Die ' ' ana edrtortals by K6MH. WB^ELX, and N IGPH 


New Prociiicts 






AAA Engineerinig 


Signal Sentry 


^ratf 


AEA 


HFteotnnn 


siaff 


Almco Elect rtHifcs 


aHWUl an<f4e0T 


SlAtt 


Amefitron 


AL-811 amp 


statf 


Afrwfitron 


AL-flPamp 


staff 


ARl/Ani&rc^n l^^ianpa 


AFM70O 


staff 


Ashlorr FTC 


Aries-2 


staff 


AstTOnCorp 


SL-1 1 A po*9r supfsly 


staff 


Baylin Pubiicaikoos 


Ku^Sartd Sat TV 


staff 


B^ylm P^&lcaiiofks 


scrambling mettioffs 


staff 


Baylin Publications 


TVRO, ant software tXKWs stati 


Bird El&crroiiicCorp. 4410A 


wattmeter 


slaff 


Bfian Be«;(ey 


MNC program 


staff 


Brian Beezley 


MN &YO ant software 


^laff 


Cellular Security Gfoup 


MAX aniennai^ 


staff 


Chester QSL Cards 


order by BBS 


staff 


Communications Specialists 


DCS-23 


staff 


CompuEer AutomaHQrr 






Technology 


CAT'IOO 


staff 


Connect Sy stems Inc. 


Model CS-700 


staff 


Contact Ea&l 


catalog 


stafi 


Contact 8as( 


catalog 


staff 


Contact East 


catalog supplement 


staff 


Contact East 


catalog supplement 


staff 


CuJ-ry Communicatior^s 


ANB-I089preamp 


Slaff 


Curlis Manufactunng Co. 


CabJe Organizers 


start 


CushcraftCS28M 


mag mount antenna 


statf 


Cu&licfaft D3W 


WAHCdipQie 


atetf 


Cushcraft Tea-3 


yagi 


staif 


Cusiom Antenna 


omfw 


stall 


CyberRe search 


PC S^iems Handbook 


staff 


Electron Processing, Inc. 


Antenna PlitR-l 


•iaff 




LPF-f Mm 


staff 


Oscifofi ProciftBBino. Jnc, 


Sc^rtTKf Fitidk: 


staff 




Signal gen/counter 


(Etaff 


Rfie Tuning 


Pfoceedtnffs 


^aft 


H€li|X^vifer. Ir^ 


SotefPoMef Pack 


ttaff 


ICOM iO<V??OQAJH 


diial-band FM mobile 


fltalf 


COM IC'9?0 


muJi3)ari(J trar^sceivef 


staff 


International Radio and 






Comput&rs 


T^ Enhancer 


stiff 


Japan R adio Co, JST-1 35 


HFtransc^fver 


itsff 


K-COM 


tetephone fillers 


staff 


Ktfby KommnnkcaUOf^ 


vehjcte window mount 


stall 


MFJ ^nisrprtsoa 


1112 multiple outlet 


^alt 


MFJ Enterprises 


207 HFSWR analyzer 


staff 


MFJ Entarpris$$ 


&&0 voltage monitor 


ditf 


MFJ Enierprtses 


924 &0OW ant. tuner 


staff 


MFJ Enierpffflfls 


548 300W ant, tuner 


staff 


MFJ Enterprises 


speaker/mEkes 


aiaff 


Micro-Circuits Co. 


shielding dessgn 


staff 


Mic roc raft 


code scanner 


staff 


Motorola Inc. 


Rnel telemetry radios 


staff 


Nemaj Etectronica 


cables 


staff 


Nevada preamps 


J.t.M.MlOOGaAsFET 


staff 


OpEoefectronics 2210* A 


treq. finder/counter 


staff 


Pajomar Engmeefs baluns 


high power 


staff 


Periphex. Inc. 


PB-ZS and &S 


siatf 


Phjdystran 


HPTG'l" 


slaff 


Poyntek Associates 


FuU-Santd antenn«is 


staff 


Rad K} Amateur QallbOQ^. Inc. 


on dtsk 


staff 


Rad>a Works 


BemoteBalun 


staff 


RF Tronics 


CAD-CYCLER 


staff 


Rotating Tower Systems 
SGC SB-2000 


Wire & bases 


staff 
ttilf 


Ht^ ssd radioteieptiiMw 


Somerset Electror)te« 


MICFKK)EC 


st«ti 


Spi-^Mfg 


2rr» baf% sta. ariL 


Stan 


Sufpjys Sales of Nebraska 


AFT terminal 


staff 


SVSPEC INC OVP-tZ 


ovefvoliage R^B 


iiall 


System One Control, inc. 


FOlogi 


itril 


TAB Books 


T^k 10 ttve World 


^ifl 


Tripp Liter 


EPG-t200 


siaif 


Van Gorden Eng^fieorihg 


HhQ snt & ins. 


staff 


VtS Study Cartts 


Novice thru Eirtra 


stall 


Waiter Scientific Inc. 


ELF-50 monitor 


staff 


Witiicer Scientific Inc. 


ELF-50D monitor 


staff 


Yaesu USA 


FT- 1000 xcvT 


•tail 


YaflsuUSA 


G-2&D nstator 


staff 


Holjday Buying Guide 


1990 


staff 


Power Supplies 






1 ampragulaied 


using dead VCR 


WSiVGE 


dual voltage 


bencti supply 


WeWTU 


fow voltage 


current limited 


WA3AJR 


mobile organizer 


for 12V hookups 


AH2AR/8 


Switching Power Supplies 


FETs 


WB6IGP 


switching power supply 


60 Hz, 11 OV 


WB6IGP 


UNi-e 


porta-power adapter 


W3RW 


Receivers 






LORAN 


& locator manufactyrera 


hJY3F 


NR5At7mQRP 


receiver convener 


WBSVGE 


Ramsey HR-4 


eictending range 


NBKDD 


Receiver Hunl 


flORng 


WA4TEM 


fegenefativfl 


1 transistof 


WB«NQM 



Issue 


Page 


Subjecl/Ailicle 


De^c ript 1 a n /Colu in 


in Author 


Issue 


Page 


AUG 


17 


Reviews: Books, Tapes, MIsc, 








AUG 


17 


Cuckoo's Egg 


by Sloli 


WA5ZI8 


JUN 


37 


AUG 


t? 


Elements of Microwaw 










NOV 


40 


Technology 


byCarr 


WBdHHI 


APR 


2d 


s, f^us W2NSn's 


H0« Ham Radio Handbook 


byK9£tD 


N4RVE 


MAR 


44 






Rad^o Joumai 19t2'-40 


byWiCRC 


HA5E 


jur^ 


26 






I une rn on Te4ephofie Calte by K2AES 


WASZU 


FEB 


60 






Fof ^ftwaf0 reviews, s®e 


' 'CompuWrs and Sotrwsm. ' ' 








JUM 


62 












J UN 


64 


Revtevra: EquTpmefit 










APR 


92 


A& A Engineering 


Signal Sentry 


WB6ELK 


OCT 


t4 


DEC 


60 


ACE AR^SaO 


pCiCkQt scanner 


N3aAH 


JUL 


48 


MAR 


70 


AEA430A 


tor FSTV 


WA4UUU $ K4IMHN AUG 


24 


OCT 


68 


AEA IsoLOOp 


HF antenna 


KA7LDN,KQ/UA 


SEP 


10 


APR 


tz 


AEAMM<3 


Morse Machine 


KA3ELV 


FEB 


36 


^P 


aa 


AEAMX^ 


$mSSeCWHT 


WB6IGP 


FEB 


30 


JLN. 


62 


Al^flCO DR-570T 


2m/70cm motiia 


NSIB 


l-fcB 


26 


Jim 


62 


Amentron AL-62 


linear amplifier 


WA4R10 


SEP 


S2 


AUG 


70 


Anwritron RCS-4 


coax switch 


WA4BLC 


JUL 


36 


FEB 


68 


Antennas West 


OuiCk Launch 


WIXU 


OCT 


26 


OCT 


ea 


Cetlulaf Security Sy^em 


MAX'l46amefina 


NIGPH 


NOV 


B 


MAR 


70 


Command Techrrotogies 


MF-2500 


f^^E 


APR 


32 


JUL 


61 


Cushcratt D3W 


WARC dipole 


WA49LC 


MAY 


32 


UCI 


es 


ElencoMl90Q 


digital multimeter 


WB9RBT 


MAR 


38 


OCT 


66 


Engineering Consutfing 


Com shack 64 


N7{PY 


FEB 


32 






GAP Antenna Products 


GAP DX^VI 


K5CNF 


OCT 


m 


DEC 


60 


Heath Company 


adapter & coax kit$ 


WB9RRT 


NOV 


47 


JUN 


62 


ICOI^ tSGATHT 


w/1 2GH2 0p. too 


WBStGP 


JAN 


36 


JAN 


75 


ICOM 725 


mobile rig 


N4RVe 


FEB 


54 


JUL 


6^ 


ICOM 726 


mobile w/6m 


N1GPH 


Dec 


3fl 


SEP 


62 


ICOM 765 


DDS unit 


WAIEYP 


FEB 


22 


DEC 


60 


ICOMCT-16 


satellite interface 


KA7LDN 


JUL 


34 


APR 


92 


Jotm Fluke Mfg. Co 


Model 67 DM M 


WB9RRT 


SEP 


45 


DEC 


60 


Lightning Bolt Arriennas 


VHF/UHFquad 


WB6ELK 


DEC 


30 


JUN 


64 


L L. Grace 


Kansas City Tracker 


WA3USG 


AUG 


64 


JAN 


74 


MFJ^6 


Grandmaster memory 








FE3 


sa 




keyOf 


WA4BtC 


APR 


30 


lAAY 


56 


MFJ -9410 


Versa Tuner II 


KT2a 


FEB 


37 


AUG 


70 


PacComm 


P&K-1 sat. modem 


WA3USG 


DEC 


32 


MAR 


70 


PaJomar Engirwers 


P 1 -340 Tirner-Tuner 


KAIi-R 


DEC 


40 


JUL 


62 


PC Elecironfcs 1 250 MHz 


ATVdowncon & ant. 


Kiov 


AUG 


36 


JUU 


64 


P^po Comm u niir^iions 


p.7 0TMFpad 


W5PFG,W50RW 


JUN 


54 


JAN 


74 


Pytam^ Sound 


PS-£5sup^ 


NtCTl 


JUN 


12 


DEC 


60 


Ram^^y SA-7 RF amp 


QfoacitTafw 


AH2AR/e 


FEB 


ao 


AUG 


70 


Stnilti Design 


portable spectrum prdbe N4RVE 


JAN 


30 


SEP 


62 


T.D. Systems 


ATV system 


NtfVN 


AUG 


49 


MAY 


56 


TaMff Inc. 


the CEUACK 


NU3T 


ftlOV 


se 






Ten^Toc, Inc. 


Hef€4ilesiiMod9i420 


N4Laj 


DEC 


22 


FEB 


m 


TefrTec, inc 


OMNf-V HF xcw 


WA4fll.G 


APR 


10 


MAR 


70 


The Coope€ Group 


WeOef Pyropen 


KA9KAF 


SFP 


55 


JUN 


64 


UnidBn NR'2600 


moblterig 


WA1R 


MAR 


32 


DEC 


60 


YdmiFT-lOOD 


transcerver 


WA4a*-C 


OCT 


16 


JUN 


64 


Yaesu FT-4700RH 


mobile Irar^sceivei 


K3RVN/Gt£ZZ 


JAtJ 


20 


DEC 


60 


For software reviews, see "\ 


Cotnpijters and Softwi^e. " 








JAN 


74 












SEP 


6t 


Satellfte Operation 










AUG 


70 


BADR1.DOVE 


Ham^als 


WABZIB 


OCT 


76 


MAY 


&e 


F^-20 & other sets 


treqs. and modes 


WA5ZiB 


MAY 


46 


JUL 


62 


GPS 


saielNte location system 


NY9F 


JUL 


18 


JUL 


61 


Micfosais 


Hamsai& 


WASZiB 


AUG 


44 


JUL 


62 


A^ode B Ground Station 


torO-S-13 


ND9T 


APR 


22 


FEB 


ea 


modems for ha msats 


BBS, digipeatsr 


WASZIB 


JUN 


ST 


JUN 


64 


Phase IN Hamsat 


sign^al reporting 


W3LOY 


MAR 


40 


JUN 


6? 


portabl4» setup 


briefcase-size 


WASZlfl 


SEP 


66 


JAN 


74 


ROBOT ID Keyer 


Hamsats 


WA5ZFB 


APR 


57 


APR 


^ 


Rudak2,U-a9, 13 


Hamsais 


WASZIB 


JAN 


78 


JUL 


61 


Rudak 2/AMSAT'U 


Hamsats 


WASZIB 


JUL 


62 


JUL 


61 


SAREX'90 


ttams In space 


W3IWI WA4StR, 






DEC 


60 






W3X0 


MAY 


90 


MAY 


56 


SARE3C 


Hamisata 


WASZIB 


MAR 


9 


AUG 


70 


Spa<^ SyfTipc^ium 


fiamsats 


WASZIB 


FEB 


50 


APR 


92 












FEB 


66 


Test Equipment, Misc. 


Circuits, Repair 








SEP 


62 


coii E&si«r 


L A f escmartt itfK\ 


N4Tlrit 


SEP 


48 


SEP 


62 


oocnpui ing countec 


HP5360A 


WRRIGP 


FEB 


45 


MAY 


56 


continuity beeper 


tow power 


W90TW 


JAN 


% 


JAN 


74 


dumrny loads tor DC 


usmg headlights 


VE1GM 


SEP 


22 


JUN 


62 


Held strength meter 


baste pfp^ect 


KM4KT 


SEP 


9 


MAY 


56 


field strength meter 


tiorRlS^ing 


ictov 


MAY 


60 


OCT 


S8 


frequency eountafs 


Above $ Bayorid 


WB6fGP 


JAM 


62 


OCT 


68 


FSM sniffer 


for ROFirig 


KtOV 


JUL 


7B 


SEP 


62 


rSMsfkifter 


LM294imod 


KIOV 


AUG 


66 


MAR 


70 


gauss meter 


A cal%fator 


fCB4ZGC 


JUN 


34 


JUL 


61 


inductance/capacitance 


C-64mflter 


KOgCN 


JUL 


54 


JIAN 


74 


oscillatof 


100 MHz overtone 


WB6IGP 


OCT 


64 


OCT 


66 


Poor Man & Servr^R Monitor 


multiple tests 


N6MWS 


JAN 


10 


NOV 


61 


proiect ion circuit 


using MMiCa 


WBBfGP 


MAY 


77 






Sp^trum AnaJyzef 


Si circuit 


KE«UV 


FEB 


41 






temperature control 


circuit 


WB61GP 


SEP 


70 


JUL 


77 


VXO tutorial 


& classic ciircuil 


W88VGE 


DEC 


66 


OCT 


10 












NOV 


57 


TheorVt Conslmction Tips, How-To 








SEP 


24 


baslcioolkii 


Ask Kaboom 


KB1UM 


FEB 


70 


JUL 


66 


basic tool kit 


Welcome Newcomers 


KAIUKM 


JAN 


2 


AUG 


64 


circuit stagey 


recognizing I hem 


KB1UM 


(40V 


54 


MAR 


14 


CTCSS 


what II is 


N6MWS 


JAN 


77 






fix or ship? 


AskKaboom 


KaiUM 


APR 


42 






frequency 


sta^iEity&shill 


KBIUM 


MAR 


85 


JUL 


2t-2 


Ground Rules 


PCBs& circuits 


WB-iEHS 


MAR 


25 


FEB 


:^ 


Hamlest Shopping 


tips 


K8SI 


JUL 


40 


MAR 


12 


lieatgun 


construction uses 


WA1FHB 


SEP 


26 


JUL 


12 


fKvikirvg up right 


connections 


K81UM 


JUL 


60 


MOV 


34 


hot glue gun 


use in construction 


WA4aLC 


APR 


45 



73 AmatBur Radio Today • Decemb©f. 1990 69 



Subt^t/Article 

^mpec&f^oe matching 
jammeflMflfing 
jammer b^jsting 
junk box 
Kitauirding 
Make Your Own 
math for hams 
Painless RGBs 
power regulation 
power igpplkes 
RTTY fundament^ 
Tune Dtvfsiofi MuniplM 

troubleshooting 
iroubleshoorSng 
troubleSl^ooting 
VFOfl&VXOs 



Descrfption/Column Auttior 



AskKaiKKVR 

nDFing 

flDFing 

sidckirtg up 

rips; Ramsey 

Circuit Boa rd« 

lerms, notaiions 

making loil diagrams 

Mk Kaboom 

Gw^ttching & linear 

RTTVlJOop 

biiMtepace meMte 

lips 

w/o schematic 

w/o schematic 

w/o schematic 

useful lips 



Se& Ih0 "Propagation*' coiumn (or predictions on the 
'Vnci& Wayn&'s Baokshetf " 



Transcctvers 
TDGHiFun 
CaaMite Box Special 
tkskmTBS 

Fire-eall xcvr 

IC-735 rrifld 

mamgry bank for TS'940S 

TTL j<cvr 

Transmitters 

2m W Ftre-Sal! 
2m W Fir^-BaH 
^nVVFire-eaJ] 
Sml^l^pOW^ FM 

3Qm\ gtmdif^ crystdi 

30m mods 

40/aOm 2-ttJbe 6C4 

De2S xmtr 

ELTa 

EUTS & PELTS 

Fox Commander 

JAeUVG3 controller 

One-Tube 

VFO circuit 

VFO Ctf cuil 

Updates 

2m portable quad 
Alinco DJ 500 



eOfUfilete system 

aom.sw 

Irof^t etid mod 
"Smoke Deiector" 
lor QRP 
external circuit 
for 40m 



»ceiuM 

KiOV 

tc»ov 

WBaVGE 

K4ZRA 

WfiWTU 

KBIUM 

W89RRT 

KBIUM 

KB1UM 

W4TAL 
KA9KAG 
KB1UM 
KeiUM 
KdlUM 
WBaVGE 
bgst tirtf^s tp op^ratG, 



WB6IGP 

KfilUM 

K3VLO 

wB«esv 

WBAVGE 
WQ0NQM 



Fof iJOQ^S, B66 



caiibrarion WB^ESV 

OBflsmjctiDil WBdELK 

slOir K»600 
lighrw^igM. expefidable WA4AOG 

kMhCOSt iseaooft WA4ADG 

OfiP WB8VGE 
cofitroHer^ sideton^ gen WBBVGE 

w/Pierce osc 6A05 WBSVGE 

ORP WBSVGE 

RDFIng people KCOV 

proposals K&OV 

!of hidden T KiOV 

FAX t ransm iss Kjn W A 1 LBP 

ORP xmtr AUefi 

ORP wtevGE 

refinements Wa8VG£ 



re June '90 K3YWV 

ra Sep, 90 staff 



Issue Page Subfect/Artrcle 

JAN 48 AMSATBBS 

MAR 52 ARSWOCUO 

JUN SO G-&4 & tS4t convefSNm 

APR 85 OaJtas Remote Imaging 

JUL 32 OXD A corrections 

SE P 36 Easy Tu n i ng fof the H R-^S 1 

AUG 69 ferrjte rod ant schematic 

JAN 22 Flavorigl 

MAY n FSM artcle 

JUN 50 GEEIectronjc Service number 

JAM &4 GM. Scotiand 

MAI^ 20 Gool-Proofl*egefircw 

JUL 24 Ham Profiles 

SEP 5e JASIJY G3 FAX 

OCT 58 Jan Crystals 

DEC 64 Kenwood Service Mum ber 

AUG 78 Kenwood Warranty 

PodablelOCBBS 

ORP circuit 

ORP column 

ROBCKiOPY 

T.D Systems address. 

TecJfiTips 

TTVKiCVT40m 

USSDrum 

variac danger 



Video; ATV.FSTV.SSTV 

73 ATV bat loon 

ATV ballooning 

ATV & travel 

BACAR 

canwrps 

Color SSTy for Ataii ST 

kite ATV 

kite/balloon 

MFJ-1292 

mobile equipment 

Model Rocket ATV 

pOftable ATV 

R/C airplanes 

RC Helicopter ATV 

siwittimstoo 

VldtoCl^ure 

video RDFirtg 
AUG 22 WEBERSAT 

NOV 84 WEBER SAT 



Description/Column Author 



APR 


18 


APR 


46 


JUW 


32 


NOV 


24 


JUN 


76 


APR 


34 


NiOV 


30 


NOV 


22 


f40\f 


18 


MOV 


14 


AUG 


U 


JUL 


tfi 


JAN 


52 


pm 


38 


MAR 


66 


NOV 


76 


OCT 


52 


NOV 


86 


DEC 


50 


MAY 


24 


NOV 


38 


SEP 


48 


OCT 


59 



phone number 

rieMafctt'90 

re Jufy '90 

reFets'SO 

re Qci 90 

re Nov. "89 

re Feb, '90 

DigvKey part number 

re Sep '30 

reAp4ir90 

re Aug 90 

re Nov '90 

re June "90 

re May '90 

m Aug. '90 

new 

new program 

re Aug. '90 

re July '90 

re Aug '89 

re Oct 90 

re Aug. 90 

reOcl. '89 

re Nov. '90 

re Apfit '90 

re June 90 



WA5ZIB 
stalt 

WA4W0L 
Staff 
K4EQY 
K3JML 

wseiGP 

KB1UM 
KM4KT 

GM7CXM 

staff 

PT2KU 

WAlLfiP 

staff 

staff 

Bta^ 

Huge 

N6PQP 

stall 

WB9DYI 

stati 

K5BDZ 

KS1UM 

staff 

WA2RGB 



Iswe 


Page 


APR 


45 


APR 


45 


SEP 


61 


APR 


45 


DEC 


82 


FEB 


59 


MAY 


47 


MAY 


76 


OCT 


75 


JUL 


59 


NOV 


84 


DEC 


83 


OCT 


TS 


NOV 


64 


NOV 


84 


SEP 


81 


DEC 


82 


OCT 


75 


OCT 


75 


JAN 


59 


DEC 


82 


S£P 


61 


JAN 


59 


DEC 


82 


MAY 


47 


SEP 


61 



I BaMoons 

summer "90 
high attitude 
h«lpfu[ttps 



for ATV video 

Part II 

delta wing 

ATV 

video digitizer 

ATV 

& flight computer 

RS Pocketvision 

8DayTon"90ATV 

ATV 

VO-1000 

ATV 

ATV 

equipment 



WBBELK 

W&eELK 

WB8ELK 

ZS8AKV 

WB8ELK 

WB50S2 

WQBELK 

W08ELK 

WA3AJR 

weaELK 

N81Y0 

weaELK 

WB8ELK 
WA8HTF 

W68ELK 
WA3AJR 
WB6ELK 
WB8ELK 
W88ELK 



NOV 


74 


AUG 


30 


SEP 


79 


MAR 


to 


Jim 


B2 


JAN 


41 


OCT 


54 


FEB 


76 


APR 


52 


APR 


SB 


AUG 


52 


DEC 


75 


AUG 


74 


AUG 


57 


MAY 


53 


fEB 


48 


JUt 


50 


MAR 


64 


MAR 


64 



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Many ATV repeaters and individuals are retransmitting 
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• lis itai,^^ for fit •*_ Sji.cDf:^ fM D S* 44 -ft 1 1 H 




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(818) 447-4565 m-l eam-5:30pm pst. Visa, MC, COD 

P.C. ELECTRONICS Tom(W60RG) 

2522 S, Paxson Ln Arcadia CA 91007 Maryann (WBeYSS) 



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70 7$ Amateur Radio Today • December. 1990 



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109 A i A Engineering 83 

164 Ace Communicatbns oi Indianapoiis 4^ 
1 Advanced Computer Control! ...... 14 

65 Advanced EEectraric 

Applicatjons .... 10,11' 

as Aerospace ConsuJTlng 83 

67 Alinco EJectfonics 16' 

194 All Electronics Corporation 37 

* Amateur Electronics Supply . . . , . . IS* 

1 96 Antenna Service ».,,....,, SS 

1 07 Antennas West 79 

1 35 Antennas West 83 

13a Antennas West 65 

5 Antenr^as West . 79 

90 Antennas West 51 

89 Antennae West 29 

236 Antennas West 47 

• Antique EJectronic Suppty 79 

271 AnliQue Radio Clas&ifjed 83 

• Associated Radio 42 

16 Astron Corporation 18 

£43 AXM, Jnc 53,85 

21 B&B.Inc 47 

53 Barker & Williamson 79 

41 Barry Electronics Corporation 21 

42 Btlaf Company 51 

• BMG Engmeering Depot 47 

197 Brainstorm Engineering 71 

118 Brian BeezJey K6STI 29 

84 Broadcast Technical Service ...... 55 

56 Buckmaster Publishing 79" 

170 Buckmaster Publishing 47* 

168 Buckmaster Publishing 49* 

7 Buckmaster Publi:$hing 65* 

■ Sutternu! Electronics ....... 34 

165 C&SSales, Inc. 37 

116 CATS. . 51 



HSJ page 

• CB City International 79 

127 Cellular Security Group 51 

13 Cellular Security Group S3 

HO Cellular Security Group 65 

1 66 Coaxial Dynamics , 42 

156 Commpute Corporation . 67 

99 Communication Concepts, Inc. ... 65 

121 Communications Electronic 27 

10 CommunicationsSpeciali&l 13" 

40 C<imputer Automation Technology . 67 
15 Comteico 79 

12 Connect Syslems , 1 

1 46 Creative Control Products .^ . . , 71 

134 Crystal Creations SB 

• De I aware Amateu r S uppl y v * . . . 53 

13 Doppler Systems , 14* 

• Down £ast Microwave . 71 

143 Eteciron Processirtg 67* 

133 Electronic Center, Inc. 47 

165 Electronic Engineering , 71 

S Elktronics 34 

• Engineering Consulting 74 

268 Etched Call Sign Cups 67 

169 G & G Electronics 82 

193 GGTE .47* 

1 7 QLB Electronics 46 

72 Gien Martin Engineering 41 

192 Grapevine Group 47 

• Ham Radio Toy Store ...... 63 

57 Hamtronlcs, Inc 31 

179 ICOM America GV2* 

77 Interfiex Systems 71 

42 Isotron 51 

• K-Comm , , .... 42 

• Kenwood USA Corporation . . 5,6,CV4" 
234 Lentinl Communications 47 



R.S.^ page 

47 Link^Com .,..., 42 

• M Sc N EI&clFonics 65 

25 Madison Electro rbic Supply .... 49 

lOl Maxcom, Inc. 65* 

241 Media Menlcrs 63' 

44 Metro Printing ................... 37 

86 MFJ Enterprises 8 

160 Miicro Computer Concepts 76 

144 Micro Control Specialities 41 

119 MicroR&D 47 

32 Midland Technologies S5 

• Missouri Radio Center 88 

• N.E.Lilsche 71 

91 HBO Distributors 46 

54 NCG , . . , . 33 

23? NCG 39 

• Nenial Electronics — . , B5 

78 North Olmsted Amateur Radio 79 

• OmarEleeironies , es 

96 Orlando Hamcation 34 

• PC Electronics 70" 

• PC Electronics ... 74* 

152 Pac-Comm 61 

178 Pacific Cable Company, Inc 53 

1 99 Palomar Telec^jm ;'k> ^ 65 

68 PeriphOK 85 

1 d8 PliffC Electronics h G5 

» Procomm 77 

235 Quem^nt Electronics €6 

1 32 Ouernent Electronics 52 

24 Quorum Communications 82 

31 Radio Amateur Callbook 39 

76 fladio Engineers 71 

48 Radiokii 74 

34 Ramsey Electronics 23' 

14 Renaissance Development 53 

254 floss Distributing .......... 79 



R.S.# page 

• Royal Instruments Company . . ^ . . 65 
71 Rutland Arrays . , , 85 

153 SalelUte City 56' 

182 SCO Electronics 87 

182 SCO Electronics 67 

95 Sensible Solutions 65 

250 Software Systems , 79 

244 Software Systems , , 77 

183 Spectrum tntsmational 42 

87 TCELabs 71 

232 TE Systems 55 

1 24 Texas Bug Catcher Antenna 53 

6 The Antenna Specialist 41 

• The Ham Center 42 

131 The Ham Slation 49 

150 The Radio Worlds 71 

1 1 5 The RF Connection 42 

62 TMR 55 

49 Traxit, Inc 83 

• Tropica] Kamboree - 63 

• Uncle Wayne's Bookshelf 86^87 

• Universal Amateur Radio 63' 

1 20 Van Gorden Enginsering 83 

1 04 Van iderstine & Sons, Inc. 51 

79 Vanguard Labs — 51 

• VHP Communications 67 

195 Vlbroplex Company, Inc. ........ . 29 

1 91 W & W Associates 77 

38 W9FMN Aniennas i : : :, 51 

2Q Wolfe Communications 51 

• Yaesu Eleciroftics Corporal ton CV3 

69 ZCo Corportation S3 

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72 73 Amateur Radio Today • December, 1990 



Continued from p. 4 

Now we're up to 14.275 and there's 
Glen Baieier K1 MAN with his tapes that 
go on for whai seems like hours, byl he 
claims only last 45 minutes. Now he's 
bragging that he transmils his "bul- 
letins" over 100 times a week, Oh^ 
there, he*s doing a commercial for Ra- 
dio Scan magazine. 

Atwve I hat. for the next 50 kHz. we 
find we're m the middle of what seeriis 
likea waf . Hai&. frustration, artger, bad 
language, jamming, more catcalls. 
Hey, Uiis is a hobby? 

So ttifs is the b^si amateur radio 
has to offer, eh? Utis rs thetr famous 
20 meter band? Why, this is a sewer. 
This is disgusting! Why should some 
obviously deranged old men be per- 
mitied to waste such a valuable re- 
source? What on earth Is the mat- 
ter with the FCC? How can they not 
close down this mess entirefy and turn 
these jncredibfy valuable frequencies 
over to someone who has better use 
for them? 

Well, let's give one more listen and 
see what wa can find in between the 
DX piie-ups, the slow*scan porno and 
the lotal chaos above 14,275. Sure 
enough, there are some retired old 
men in there tafking with each other. 
Thay*re endlessly repealing their calls, 
a signal repon, their 'handte/' a bhef 
weather report, the make and rroxJel 
number of their transceiver and anten- 
na, and a mention that sorry, they 
didn't get much of the last transmissiofi 
dye to OR M, 

You know that in just a littfe over a 
year representatives of every coun!ry 
in the International Tetecommunrca- 
tions Union will t^e meeting in Madrid to 
decide how to reshuffle the spectrum 
for better usage. 

You also know that the Third World 
countries have little use for amateur 
radio. Few of the African hams are 
black, ft's a white man's hobby. . . 
and most of the men who get on the 
air while visiting these countries ig- 
nore their laws, run Illegal power, 
and even talk home via phone patch- 
es. Why should these countries be 
interested in giving up frequencies 
they need so a handful of oW American 
men can waste them? Of what pos- 
Sib\e benefil is amateur radio to their 
country? 

Your Job, ,, 

Let's see. as the ARRL president all 
you have to do is gel amateur radio 
growing again, particularly by attract- 
ing youngsters; cteari up the bad oper- 
ating on our bands: and get the Third 
World counihes to fscogmze how valu- 
able amateuf radto can be for them and 
thus protect our bands ai the 1992 
Madrid and 1993 Geneva WARCs, 
You're not going to do all this with 
something simple like a no-code li* 
cense, that's for sure- 

No, you're obviously going to have to 
mount a barrage of new programs. 
Worse, unless a bunch of new direc- 
tors have been elected, you're proba- 
bly going to have to fight around 13 
directors for every program you want to 
inrtlale. On the other hand, you have 
some power at your command too. It 



you can gel control of the Executive 
Committee you've got QST at your 
beck. . andthelARU. 

Now, the programs. . .it's going to 
take a bunch and you've got to gel 
moving quickly. 

Okay, first you1l have to get to work 
deaning up our bairds so we can be 
proud of them. We know the FCC 
doesn't want to get involved, so we* re 
going to have to do this ourselves. 
Well, we're supposed to be self-polic- 
ing anyway. We've always bragged to 
the FCC al>out this, so it's about time to 
live up to our billing. 

One thing we do need from the FCC 
is a way to at least temporarily suspend 



prodded !o get radio clubs started In an 
*"adopt-a-school" program. They need 
coverage in the local newspapers, on 
radio and TV, 

It tsn*t going to be easy prying kJdS 
away from TV, but it can t>e done. We 
have a lot to offer kfds, but as long as 
they've never even heard of amateur 
radio, we aren't going to get far- 

We need vi^leos thai e^plair) the fun 
we>e having and ftow litlte t\ can cost 
to get started. They need to know 
about repeaters, fox hunting, OSCAR. 
packe!. QRP. etc We m^ghl StaJl to 
Class action libel suits against TV or 
movie producers who depict hams as 
nerds. Of course Ihey might claim truth 



"Why should these 

countries be interested in giving 

up frequencies they need so a handful 

of old American men can waste them? 

Of what possible benefit is amateur 

radio to their country?" 



the licenses of troublemakers. . plus 
an immunity from legal harassment 
which might result. Could we make it a 
felony to sue over an amateur radio 
matter? I would prefer capital punish- 
ment, but Td settle for a felony convic- 
tlonn 

The next move would be to set up a 
team at headquarters to organize the 
ARRL member clubs to get out there 
and bury the bad apples in suspen- 
sions. 

The DX pileups can be cured, as Tve 
mentioned before^ just by limiting 
award credit to contacts made during 
contests. Once the DXCC and Honor 
Roll pressures are taken off, the pile- 
ups will blow away. This not only will 
clean up our bands enormously, it'll 
eventually result in us seemg thou- 
sands of hams getting on from rarer 
countnes. This isn't gotng to hurt when 
the votes are counted at WARC. 

Ne>n we need to get back where we 
were 25 years ago and start attracting 
youngsters again. Hundreds of thou- 
sands of youngsters, not jusi the 
dozens we're getting now. 

There's no easy fix on this like (here 
is for cleaning up our bands Here we 
need another HQ team, dedicated to 
promoting amateur radio growth. This 
means organizing every member club 
in the project. It means helping them 
understand the importance of public 
relations. . of making amateur radio 
visible and getting across to ktds that 
it's fun . No kid should be able to get out 
of the fifth grade without knowing 
about how neat ham radio is. 

Clubs need to get a newsletter help- 
ing them organize community oommg- 
nicdtions efforts. . for parades, races, 
walkathons and so on. They need to be 



as a defense, playing tapes of our 20m 
band^ 

But What Abotit WARC? 

There's never been an attempt to get 
ham ambassadors to visit the leaders 
of Third Worfd countries and explain to 
them how amateur radio can benefit 
them and their countries, Afl it would 
take is a couple retired hams with some 
lime and a few thousand dollars in trav- 
el expenses. 

Heck, I went to Jordan and talked His 
Majesty King Hussein into setting up 
amateur radio. YouVe not going to find 
a stronger supporter of amateur radio 
today than Jordan. If I can do it, so can 
the ARRL. . .and they should. 

Voujust talk money, that's aJt. Third 
World countries have to pay through 
the nose to import technicians to help 
set up. operate and service com muni- 
cations, efecironics and computer sys- 
tems. These techs can cost £500 to 
SI .000 a day vs. a few doHars il they 
had some of the?r own people. So put 
ham sEatfons in ihe schools, provide a 
teacher, and soon you'll have hun- 
dreds and then thousa n ds of you n g 
amateurs, all anxious to team t>ecause 
it's fun. It works. Heck, it'll even work 
here, it used lo before the League 
wiped out our school radio clubs with 
their "incentive licensing" proposal 25 
years ago. 

Yes, there's a lot to be done. . .but 
it's all do-able if you have someone 
with guts and drive as president. That 
you? You're going to have to draw 
straight lines, even if they bisect a few 
balky old directors. 

Simitar Situation 
In 1969. when I spotted FM and re- 



peaters as a possible way to help get 
amateur radio growing again after five 
years of losing newcomers, I went at it 
every way i coukf, I set up my own 
repeater so Td know what I was writing 
about, t published hundreds of articles 
on the subject. I organized repeatar 
conferences around tfie country to get 
dubs to cooperate and standardize 
Channels, I published a monthly re- 
peater magazine and a flurry of books. 
if worked! Within two years re- 
peaters were the biggest ham activity 
in the country and I'd gerverated a new 
$100 million industry ^ 

When I saw the potential for the mi^ 
crocomputer in 1 975 f started one mag- 
azine after another, organized industry 
meetings to set standards, put on a 
huge microcomputer industry show in 
Boston, established one of the first 
mass produced software companies, 
started some software retail stores 
(ended up with a 56 Softwaire Centers 
Chain), and so on. 

Right now Vm tackling the music in- 
dustry, it^s dominated by a cartel of s\x 
iniernalfonal megacorporalions 
fowned by Sony, Mitsubishi, etc.) and I 
want to break their hold over some 
5.000 independertt music companies. 
I've got a long list Of projects Tve 
formed or am forming to do this. Each 
has to be profitable, but the end goal is 
to sell more independent music. 

Wait'll you see all the ways I'm pro- 
motirrg the sale of indie music vta 
samplers in hotels, dance studios, 
m^ftu rants, book stores, hi-fi stores, 
discount stores, etc. I've already start- 
ed releasing samplers and I'm gearing 
up to crank out up to a dozen a month I 
Then there's my international talent 
hunt, looking for undiscovered per* 
formers who should be record* 
ed . and wrH be on indie Eabels. 

If you were to take over as president 
of the ARRL you'd be faced with one 
heck of a job, just as I was. But it would 
be a challenge and fun. Just as it was 
tor me. You have the tools you need to 
make it happen, all you have to do is 
organize and manage the many efforts 
it's going to take. 

You'll be talking with the FCC Com* 
missioners and selling them on what 
you want to do. That won1 be hard 
t>ecause you 11 be solving many prot^ 
lems for them . . . and helping to cut not 
only ttwiraggravatkin, but saving {hem 
money. Further, by attracting young- 
sters to our hobby, you'll be laying the 
groundwork for a much stronger Amer- 
ica in a few years. That Information 
Agesiulf isn't hype: it's where the mon* 
ey is right now and where it's going to 
be even more concentrated in the fu- 
ture. 

You'll have to get out and visit some 
Third World leaders to get this program 
started. It'll take a selling Job. but you 
have so much to offer you aren't going 
lo get many tumdowns, 

You're going to be the keynote 
speaker at every major ham test and 
convention, whipping up excitement 
and cooperation. You're going to make 
videos to help sell member clubs on 
cooperating. You're going to have to 
find some good ham writers and set 



f 



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73 Amateur Radio Today • December, 1 990 73 




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them 10 turning gut the n&od&d support 
publicatkins. 

You're going to have to cultivate an 
atmosphere of cooperation al HQ. tl 
^"l going to t» easy, titjl you aren't 
going to gel much done if everyone is 
tied up with inlemal politico. ..and 
afraid to say anything. 

You're going to have to work with the 
QST edliof$ to get ihe covers Into the 
'90s and out of Ihe *50s. Then you can 
put QST on the newsstands so it can 
help attract newcomers. I'd even plan 
on starting a newcomer's magazii^e, 
once the dam has been broken and we 
Stan seeirkg new blood. 

Using determination and creativity, 
the president of Ihe ARRL can change 
America's role in the neict oeniury, 
helping lo gel badt ou r consumer eleC' 
tronic industries, revivirig our research 
lal^. The a Her native is the gradual 
death of amateur radio in America. 

Japan understands how critically inv 
porta nt amateur radio Is to their suc- 
cess in electronics manufacturing and 
research and how it's the powerhouse 
behind their financial power. This is the 
power that's made it possible for them 
to buy mora and mora of our antertaln- 
mant industry ^ 

Oh, You Don*! Agree? 

On what point don't you agree? Do 
you disagree that our bands need 
cleaning up? How about our need for 
growth? Our ham industry is down to 
25% of what it was 25 years ago. You 



disagree that we need to attract young- 
sters? Or maybe that we can? 

How about WARC? Hech, if you're 
an AHRL member you got a letter ask^ 
ing for money, Cfting a N>ng list of the 
problems we face tn Madrid in 1992. I 
think you're a sucker if you sent mon- 
ey. Many true believers will, no doubt. 

I didn't bring up gettmg the National 
Traffic System onto packet instead ot 
Chugging along al around TO wpm on 
CW. I didn't suggest organizing teams 
to be sent to emerger\cy areas to set up 
communications oentare . . Jike In 
Saudi Arabia lo handle welfare traffic 
for ou r m iti tary wh o a re sitti ng in the hot 
sun with little lo do. 

How about sending loams to Jordan, 
Egypt and India to handle traffk: for the 
thou^nds of refugees streaming into 
Jordan from Iraq? 

When St. Lucia was devastated by a 
hun'tcane i sent 73 staffer Tim Daniel 
MBRK down wFth severaj trunks of ham 
gear, ft helped to tide them over and we 
got a very n ice commendation from ttie 
island governor. So where are the 
ARRL emergency teams when they're 
needed? Heck, even K1 MAN and his 
blithering has been able to do better 
than the ARRL In helping with emer- 
gencies. Far tjelter, 

If you ware president of the Laague, 
wouldn't you have a ball getting ama- 
teur radio going again? I know I would. 
But it's going lo take guts, creativTty, 
and wofid^iass problem soling skills. 
It'll be fun, if you take it on 



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74 73 Amateur Radio Today • Decombor, 1990 



Atv 



Number 27 on your Feedback card 



Biil Brown WB8ELK 
%73 Magazine 
Forest Road 
Hancock NH 03449 

The Mt. Washington 
DXpedition 

On August 4, a group of enter- 
prising hams ascended to the top 
of Mt. Washington, New Hamp- 
shire, to hook up the 146-655 re- 
peater and to try for some real 
ATV DX. This 6,288-foot peak is 
the highest point in New England 
and provides 2 meter coverage 
from as far as Albany, New York, 
to the mid coast of Maine. \Vs also 
the home of the worst recorded 
weather in the world! Winds ex- 
ceeding 238 mph have been 
recorded (just before the ane- 
mometer broke!) . . , . Even on a 
hot summer's day it can be down- 
right bone-chifling on the summit. 

Mike WA1PTC drove his ATV- 
filled van up to the top, Cal 
WA1W0K brought along NIKK's 
10 watt ATV station and headed 
up the mountain along with Mike 




Photo A, Working Mt. Washington 
from Monhegan lslar}d, Mame^ 
From left to right, Adam and Evan 
Cooke holding the portable ATV 
package. 



Ham Television 

N1CGF, Chan KA10U and Vern 
NiCKX. Situated on top of the 
weather observatory, they in- 
stalled the beam and hooked up 
their 10 watt ATV transmitter to 
provide New England with an af- 
ternoon of excellent video. They 
knew they were in a good spot 
when the first signal received was 
a P4 picture from the KAIAFE 
ATV repeater in N. Andoven Mas- 
sachusettSi nearly 100 miles to 
the south. 

Meanwhile p somewhere off the 

coast of Maine I hauled my 

portable ATV station out to Mon- 
hegan fsland. Situated 10 miles 
off the coast, the view from the 
base of the lighthouse provided a 
line-of-sight path to Mt, Washing- 
ton (100 miles to the west). On a 
clear day you can actually see the 
peak's silhouette just after sun- 
set. Assisted by Bob KC1MC, 
atong with helpers Adam and 
Evan Cooke, we hauled every- 
thing up to the top of Lighthouse 
Hill. 

After setting up, we gave the 
crew on Mt- Washington a call and 
got an immediate full-scale reply 
on 2 meters! Mike WA1 PTC point- 
ed the beam our way and provided 
us a bird's-eye viewof the visitor's 
center with a P4 full-color picture 
complete with great subcarr ter au- 
dio. My receive setup consisted of 
nothing more than a stock Radio 
Shack Pocketvislon'^ 23 LCD TV 
with its onboard whip antenna! 
Visitors to the lighthouse museum 
on the island were amazed to see 
the live pictures of the cog railway 
chugging up the side of Mt. Wash- 
ington, complete with its whistle 
btowing. 

We were also able to send a P2 
picture up to the mountam with 
just 1 watt to a vertical V4-wave 
whip. Jon WA2YVL tn Freeport 
exchanged two-way P5 pictures 
with the Mt. Washington crew as 
well as with our station on Mon- 
hegan Island. 

Tugboat TV 

Jon WA2YVL is the captain of a 
large ocean-going tugboat. Every 
two weeks he heads out on a two- 
week journey up and down the 
Eastern Seaboard with a large 
barge in tow. On October 4 he set 
sail from Providence heading to- 
wards Delaware. He brought 
along a 1 watt ATV station and 



• 




Photo B. Bill WBSELK receives 
the Mt. Washington signal with his 
portable LCD TV (Monhegan Is- 
land). 

transmitted a signal on 426.25 
MH2 in hopes of stirring up some 
activity. His antenna is mounted 
90 feet above the water on a mast 
above the bridge. Bob WA1WVJ 
from West Haven, Connecticut, 
first saw him on the morning of 



up to Block Island, over 50 miles 
away. 

Jon plans to add a live camera 
to his station on the next couple of 
trips and may be covering differ- 
ent areas of the East Coast, pos- 
sibly as far north as Portland, 
Maine. Anyone seeing his signal 
should give him a call on 144.34 
MHz. If you'd like to find out his 
schedule, drop him a line via 
packet radio. His packet address 
is WA2YVL @ K1RQG.ME. Also, 
we will announce his schedule 
and location during the weekly 
ATV net on 3.871 MHz at 8 p,m. 
eastern time. 

You never know just where 
Jon will end up in his journeys up 
and down the coast. At the time of 
this writing he's in New Haven 
harbor having a great time work- 
ing W2W0D, KB2BUA, WA2FNQ 
and KA1 DBS. 

Since band enhancements oc- 
cur somewhat frequently along 
the seacoast, Jon thinks it may be 
possible to work stations from 
Maine to South Carolina with a 
good opening from his seafaring 
vantage point. If anyone sees the 
tugboat signal, you can QSL to 
Captain Jon Andrews WA2YVL, 
P.O. Box 367, So, Freeport, ME 
04078-^357. 




Photo C. Tugboat ATV. 



October 5. Even though the tug- 
boat was over 70 miles to his 
south, and shooting over a good 
part of Long Island, he was P3 to 
P4. The tugboat signal was even 
able to access the WiNRE ATV 
repeater In West Haven as well. A 
few days later on the return trip 
from Delaware. Jon was rewarded 
with successful ATV contacts at 
distances up to 100 miles away 
thanks to a band opening. John 
WAItAO in northern Connecticut 
received a P2 picture at times, 
Dave WA1UQC and Fran N1GAU 
both received the signal near the 
Hartford area. WA1WVJ started 
receiving the tugboat transmis- 
sion at 9 a.m. and could see him 
all day long as the boat travelled 




Photo D. Jon WA2YVL at the helm 
of the A TV tugboat. 

73 Amateur Radio Today • December, 1900 75 




Number 2S on your F^^dback card 



INTERNATIONAL 



Arnie Johnson N16AC 
103 Did HomestBad Hwy. 
N. Swanzey. NH Q3431 

Notes from FN42 

winter in New England is upon 
us again. We have moved past a 
very beautiful fall foiiage season 
with leaves in shades of red, gold, 
brown f yellow^ and orange. Those 
of you who have not seen New 
England in October should try to 
visit then. 

You can enjoy a late afternoon 
and night on Friday, and a whole 
day on Saturday, at the 
Hosstraders Ham Fleamarket at 
the Deerfield Fairgrounds in Deer- 
field, New Hampshire, The fall 
date has stabilized on the first Sat- 
urday in October, and the Spring 
Edition is the first Saturday In 
May. It Is said that the best deals 
happen on Friday night. 

You can also enjoy the N&w 
England ARRL Conference and 
ham fleamarket at Boxboro. 
Massachusetts, the second week- 
end in October. This year the 
weather was wonderful at Deer- 
field, but Boxboro was deluged by 
rain from the remnants of two hur- 
ricanes. 

At Deerfield, I had the great 
pleasure of meeting our Ham- 
bassador from Kenya, imagine 
my surprise when Hooked up from 
my selling table and saw a name 
tag with Rod 5Z4BH on itl Rod 
Hallen was back in the United 
States for a conference. He had 
heard about a "small ham flea 
market" and he decided to attend. 



There were over 5,000 paid ad- 
missions. The entire proceeds 
went to the Shrine Hospital Burn 
Clinic In Boston. 

Rod and I had a very nice chatf 
and he informed me that he has 
extended his stay in Kenya for one 
more year so we will have the 
pleasure of his informative obser- 
vations and news from Kenya for 
another year. "It*s a small world, 
Part II, " took place at the same 
table when one of the hams I was 
selling with^ Dave N2GE, came 
over and reintroduced himself to 
Rod. Dave had been in Kenya dur- 
ing the summer and had met Rod 
at the embassy. Unfortunately, 
this was the one day I didn*t take 
my camera with me, so I couldn't 
get a picture of Rod for this 
column. 

I have had a very rewarding and 
satisfying year with 73 Amateur 
Radio Today and *7$ Internation- 
ai " The news from our Hambas* 
sadors has been timely and inter- 
esting. But we've lost a few of our 
past Hambassadors along the 
way. I feel this is an appropriate 
time to recognize those who have 
contributed so much during the 
past year, and make a plea to our 
readers for volunteers to increase 
our staff of Hambassadors, 

If you do not see your country 
represented in the following list of 
Hambassadors and wish to volun- 
teer, please drop me a note at the 
address above or the address of 
the magazine. You can also reach 
me through the 73 BBS. (See the 
'Table of Contents" page.) 

Your written skills in English do 



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Australia 

KenGottVK3AJU 
36A Lansdowne Road 
St. Kilda, Victoria 3183 
Australia 
"Silent Ke/ 



.n 



Brazil 

Carlos Vienna Carneiro PY1CC 
Afonso Pena, 49/701 
a0270 Rio de Janeiro 
Brazil 

Buigaiia 

Milan Postadshteff LZ2MP 
PO Box 237 
7000 Russe 
Bulgaria 

Cyprus 

Aris Kaponides 564JE 
PO Box 1 723 
Limassol 
Cyprus 

Hong Kong 

Phil Weaver VSSCT 
Flat 39C Two Park Towers 
1 Kings Road 
Hong Kong 

Israel 

Ron Gang 4X1 MK 
Kibbutz U rim 
D.N, Hanagev 85530 
Israel 

Kenya 

Rod Hallen 5Z4BH 
Box 55 

APO New York 09675 

Republic of Korea 

Byong-joo Cho HL5AP 
PO Box 4, Haeundae 
Pusan 61 2-600 
Republic of Korea 



Liberia 

Mahnr^DUd Idera-Abdullah EL2CE 
PO Box 20*4262 
1000 Monrovia 20 
Liberia. West Africa 

Lithuania 

Jonas Paskauskas LY2ZZ 
PO Box 71 
Siauliaip2354D0 
Litliuania 

Mozambique 
Phil Gray KA7TWQ 
cfo CARE, C.P. 4657 
Maputo 
Mozambique 

New Zealand 

Des Chapman 2L2VR 
469 Kennedy Road 
Napier 
New Zealand 

South Africa 

Peter Strauss ZS6ET 
PO Box 35461 
NorthciiffZA-2115 
Republic of South Africa 
"Silent Key' 



,p» 



Spain 

Woodson Gannaway NSKYB/EA 
Aparlado 1 1 

35450 Santa Maria de Gufa 
(Las Palmas de Gran Canaria) 
IslasCanahas, Spain 

Sweden 

Rune Wande SM0GOP 
Ffejavagen 10 
S-1 55 00 Nykvar n 
Sweden 

Union of Soviet Socialist Republics 

Gennady Kolmakov UA9MA 

PO Box 341 

Omslc-9g 

USSR 



not need to be perfect. That's 
what I am here for. But I am not 
perfect, either, so that is why 
Wayne hired wonderful people 
like Linda, Hope, and Joyce, to 
keep the rest of us straight. Don't 
be afraid. WE NEED YOU! 

You will never get rich in the 
publishing business (ask Wayne), 
especially by becoming a Ham- 
bassador. The pay is a FREE air- 
mail subscription to 73 Amateur 
Radio Today as long as you sub- 
mit timely information three to four 
times a yea r. The rewards are see- 
ing your name in print AND know- 
ing that the rest of the world is 
made aware of the newsworthy 
ham events happening In your 
country. 

As a matter of fact, I just re- 
ceived a letter from a ham in Bul- 



garia who wishes to become a 
part of 73 Magazine. Keep an eye 
out for offerings from t\4(len 
Postadshieff LZ2ti4P. His address 
appears In this column for those 
who wish to communicate with 
him. 

This is B holy time for many reli- 
gions, and it*s the end of the 
present year and the beginning of 
a new year. I am sure that I can 
speak for our 73 Hambassadors 
when I pass to all the best of wish- 
es for the holy season and the 
coming new year. May there be 
peace and prosperity to alt, and 
may all hams in all nations make 
the world a better place to live. 

And now, the list of 73 Hambas- 
sadors who have submitted infor- 
mation during 1990.—Arnie, 
N1BAC\ 



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73 Amateur Radio Today * December, 1990 77 




Number 29 on your Feedback card 



Bob Wmn W5KNE 
c/o(mZDX 
P.Q.BOU 8322m 
Richsrason TX 75063 

The Colvins 

Uoyd ar>d Iris Colvin, W6KG aird ^mOL 
r«spdctiv«fy, are of> The DXpedLtion trail 
aQaln. The first two operations of this six- 
month DXpedition. they signed 5HBQL 
and 707KG- TTiey usually remasn at each 
local ion iof ihree or four weeks. They'll 
feiurn home in March Contacts with the 
Colvins count for the YASME Award. For 
all of their operations, QSL via YASME, 
P.O. BOK 2025, Castro Valley CA 94543, 

VPflWW and XUI DX— Pirates? 
There is considerable doubt thai the 



Hams Around the World 

September operation by VP6WW was 
legitarnate. The operator gave hts location 
as South Georgia and said td 05L via 
G3hVVW, G3HWW is the eal»sign of 
the York Amateur Radio Sooeiy. and the 
secretary erf the society knows nothifvg 
about VP8WW! Ttvanks OX News Sheet ei 
al. 

J A1 NUT notes thai ttie recent operation 
by XU1DX was r^ot [egitimate. The or^ly 
operator currently active from Kam- 
puchea/Cainbodia is Sokun^ who oper- 
ates XUBDX, She is not prctlcient at CW 
and seldom operates the mode, 

CEiSanFeliM 

Weak rumors mention the possibility 
that one of the members ot the military 
garrison may be an amateur radio opera- 



tor, with expected arrival around January 
1,1991. 

Leningrad InternatioiiglHamventlon 

Plans for next year's convention in 
Leningrad, to be held the first week in Au- 
gust 1991. are underway. Further details 
may be obtained by writing to Amateut 
Radio Center Inter-Radio, P,Q Bo* 73, 
Lenin^r^ 1 96070, USSR. 

QSL Notes 

T3$BC. ZL20W is not the QSL manager 
fof Henry T3f6C She has not received 
togs from Henry since April , The new man' 
agerisKTEHI. 

QSL manager WN5K. due to Sickness in 
the family, is no Conger the OSL manager 
for YSWD. YSiMAE, VP5U, VP5DG, 
VPSHG, VPSHL and VP5JD. The last six 
stations will find stateside managers, but 
cards for VSIOD should be mailed to the 
Ca/^ijoo^ address, Thanks WN5K. 

HS0B, HS0M, HS&SMandHSMCQSl 
cards now go to NY2E. Note that NYSE 



has a new address: Ray Riker, 433 Palo 
Alio Drive, Palm Sprmgs FL 33461, 
WA4BCO is ill and can no longer hairdle 
these cards. Thanks NY2E. 

KC4AAA Antarctica Bo£5 NC6J has in- 
formed the ARRL thai he can only confirm 
contacts for this station for the period Au- 
gust 1 966 through October 1 989. The iww 
support group operating there now won*! 
send him the logs Bob suggests the fd^ 
lowing OSL route: Antarctic Support As- 
soc., 61 Inverness Drive East, Suite 300. 
Ertglewood CO aoiia. Thanks NJ1Q of 
the ARRL 

7Z1AB Ssuifi Arabia, There are 
several QSL routes for the Am eric art 
Embassy station in Saudi Arabia. For op- 
erators flick (NeTRE), Dirk (WB3ZIZJ 
and Dau (DL7ALC) QSL via WB2WOW. 
Cards for operator Don KS9F go to 
WA1S 

XU8DX. JA1 NUT can only confirm con- 
tacts made after April 19, 1990. Contacts 
made with YL Sokum made before that 
date should be sent to F2YSW2 



1^9eCW 

4K4Q0 

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4U1ITU 

SHKQL 

5T5HH 

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Tpsew 

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jT7eSH 

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KC6EE 

KC6GV 
KH2I/KHB 

LX2PA 

LZSf^ 

U5Z 

N6BUV/KHB 

005YU 

OH0BT 

0H2AQ/DJB 

0N4USA/P 

0Y3QN 



A piratel Don't QSL via KA6V/7. 

via RA 1 GO'S 1 990 CaUbook address 

via IBYRK 

circa SepL 1 1 . 1990: USA via AA6MC: Europe via G0MFO 

via YASME (see 707KG) 

H. Hourtofi, Box 1 172. NouakcfKin. Mauntania 

RTTY via KBaSS; Other via WB4LFM 

viaZSseK 

YASME. P.O Box 202S, Castro Valley VA 94546 

via U7XB 

For op^ators Rich (M6TRE), Oirk (WBaZlZ) arMJ Dau (DL7ALC) 

wa WB2W0W. For operator Don (KS9F) OSL via WA1 S. 

vtaK4eAI 

viaABtU 

vJaDL2GBT 

via VS6CT 

Should be QRT QSL via bureau ONLY,toWD0HHM. 

viaWB4NF0 

Peter Laschan, Koernerslr 1 3, A-6020 Innsbruck, Austria 

Bo3< 1, Nuku alofa, Tonga 

viaAJ5P 

via LU6FHF 

Bo^ 538, Nanking, People's Republic of China 

Wiliy Petit, Rue Jules Valtes. BT E No, 1 

F' 76920 Amfreviile La Mi Voie, France 

viaCTlCQK 

viaEAlANE 

via EA5GE0 

via F6AJA 

viaVElAL 

vi a FR4CN 

SamTorop#. Box 3040, Noumea, New Catedortia 

viaGSGWA 

viaG4aHX 

To G(&KUC via RSGB bureau 

via64XTA 

viaGSZAY 

viaG43AH 

viaHLBAP 

via K9EL 

viaF2VX 

Marcus Bristof, Box 245, Oomtnica 

P O. Box 11 27, Ulan Bator. Mcmgolia 

viaWB4ZBI 

PSC 5, Box 1 055a. APO San Francisco CA 964^0 USA 

viaJA2fslQG 

JH2BNL, Yuji Wada, P.O. Box 73, Sekishi 431-31 . Japan 

viaLAlEE 

via LA2GV 

viaJKIKRS 

via PA3DKC 

viaLZlRU 

viaLZIKDP 

viaWD6DNE 

Box B, Tripoli 604, Lebanon 

via DL4DSR 

viaQH2BVF 

viaONSPL 

via 021 ACQ 



QSL Routes 




P29NEP 


Nathan, PC- 60x769, East Highlands Province. PNG 


P299C 


viaWBlGWB 


PAiGAM/ST2 


via PAiGIN 


FA3FAC/SU 


via PA3FAC 


PJ6MS4E 


YiaWS4E 


PY1QN/PV8 


viaPYlON 


RIAJ 


via UZejWA 


R1S0 


via RA3YF (see this i$sue) 


RA3YF 


Vlartimtr Scheft^kov. Box 27, 241000 Srynsk. USSR 


RLiPiKASZYF 


P.O. Box 1 489. Santa Monica CA 90406-14» 


ALC) R09W 


vtaUOiGWW 


flYlBAJWaSG 


P.O. Box 1 161. 460051 Orenburg. USSR 


S79NBD 


viaJGlNBD 


S03HRA 


viaOJilF 


ST0YD 


viaf6AJA 


ST2YD 


via F6AJA 


SVeHS 


viaDJ8MT 


T32HK 


viaJL3UIX 


TM1BRE 


(CW) via FBI MUX; (SSB) via F6GMS 


T080NR 


via F6ELE 


TR8RY 


viaFF6KGU 


TU2UI 


viaWABZWR 


U9W/KA6ZYF 


see RL0P/KA6^YF 


U9W/W6/G3MHV 


see flL8P/KA6ZYF 


UA6U/VE6JO 


via VE6J0 


ULTP/G3IWHV 


seeRLBP/KAeZYF 


UMflQDX 


Sox 1 , Kadzhi-Sai 722452, Kirghiz, USSR 


UW2F 


via UA2FM 


UW4HM)RL4L 


Sox 6267, Kuibyshev 4443067. USSR 


V31BB 


via Gordon Silverman. N3ADC, 77 Homestead RoaJ, 




Levittown PA 19056-1349 


V47NXX 


viaKB2XR 


V51BI 


viaDF2AL 


veaAN 


viaJA2NQG 


V63AH 


viaJA2BNL(seeKC6DX) 


V73BL 


viaWB4CSK 


VPSfVrNSXX 


viaNSXX 


VPSVAA 


viaWS4E 


VQ9TB 


Tom aenlon, P.O. Box 55. hPU San Franctsco CA 96€i5 USA 


WA^NWHHa 


ATvin Blevins. 8090 1 5th St. E, Samsota Ft 34243 


WB4CSK/KH6 


viaWB4CSK 


XE2XSQ 


viaKSTSQ 


XX9XJ 


Two routes mentroned; K6JJ and K&JJE; neither call is in the 




^moCaftbook. 


Y9iAf^ 


viaY2lR0 


YE®K 


P.O. Box 77, JKWB, Jakarta 10270, rndonesia 


YJflAI^H 


via KF7PG 


YN1CC 


Jos0 says via Box 2971 . Managua, but W3HNK &ays via 




W3HE^K 


YS1HUKE 


via N8FU 


ZDBS 


ViaAKOM 


ZDBZ 


via W6CF 


ZF2NBZF8 


via W5ASP 


ZF2PM 


viaNE4L 


ZF2PN 


via NE4L 


ZM7Af^0 


viaZLlAMO 


2S6®PTA 


viaZSEfB 


ZWiJR 


via PP5JR 


ZYBBl 


viaPYBBl 



78 73 Amateur Radio Today * D&ceml>ef, 1990 



G5RV All-Band QuicKits 



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Over aOld Nam Hemf. m Stcci^.. sW Pnces C^fih FOB Pffe^Hin 

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73 Amateur Radio Today • December, 1990 79 



Number 3Q on your Feedback card 




ARTER 'N'BUY 



Turn yoyf M ham and computer gear ir>to cash now. Si^re, you can wad for a 
Immfest to iry and dump ii. but you know you 11 gel a Taf more reansfic price if you have 
it o«l where 100,000 active ham poieniial buyers can see it than rtie few hundred local 
hams who come by a flea market rai^te. Check youf attic, garage, cellar and closet 
shelves and get casli lor your ham and compirtef gear befofe it's too old to sell, You 
know you're noi goJng to ose it agam^ so why leave it for your widow to throw out? That 
stuff isn't getting any younger! 

The 73 Bea Markei, Saner 'n' Buy, costs ytju peajtuts (almost) — comes to 35^ a 
iMWd for individual jnoncomrnercidl) ads ami $t .00 a word for commerciai ads. [}on't 
piQft on lelting a long story. Use abbreviatioos, cram it in . But be tionest Ttiere are 
ptefUy 04 hams who love to fi% things, so if it doesn't worff, say so 

Maice yOiir JiSt, count the words. mcJuding your calt. ^dress and phone numt»ef ■ 
include a chedc or your credit card ntrmbef and expiration. U you're placing a 
commeroat ad; include an additional phone numtier, separate frum your ad 

This is a monttriy magazine, not a daily newspaper , so figure a coupte monihe 
b^ore the action starts, then bo prepa/ed. H you get too many cafls, you pri^^d ft low. 
If you don't get many calls, too high 

So get busy Blow Iho dust oft, check everything oyt. make sure ft still works right 
and mayt)e you can help make a ham newcomer or retired okl timef happy with tt^ 
rig you're rioi using now. Or you might get busy on your compcfter and put together a 
gst of small gear/parts to send to those mteresied? 

Send your ads end paymerit io the Harfer *rt* Bay, t>onna DiHusso, Forest Road* 
Hancodt HH 03449 sndgsi s&ffofU*0 phone c^is. 



HAM RADIO KITS & ASSEMBUES for ^ari- 
OLi£ QST & 73 c£>n^rructK}n article We also 
offer books and electronic components Fof 
catalog, send legal size SASE wf45c postage 
Of$1 00toA&AEngjneefing,252i W LaPaa- 
maa<.AnaheimCA92i01. BNQ25§ 

AZDEN SERVICE by lornwr factory techno- 
ctan. Fast turnaround PC 5 300 NiCads 
936 .95 Souttiem Technologies Amateur Ra- 
diOp Inc., 10715 SW 190 St. #9. Miami FL 
33157, (305) 238-3327 BlsrB2G2 

WE PRO-PHINT VOUH CALLSIGN Ofi a but- 
ton. Send £2.00 and 3ASE lo' KC College An 
Inc., 14 Hillel Place. Brooklyn, NY 11210. 
Many/KBZLGC. BNe263 

QSL CARDS- loqk gOdd wilh lop quality 
printing, Choose slandard designs or lully 
customized card^. Better cards m@an more 
returns lo you, Free brochure, samples. 
Stamps appreciated. Che&ier QSLs, Depi A. 
310 Commercial, Emporia KS 66801 , or FAX 
request lo (31 6} 342-4705. BNB434 

SUPERFAST MORSE CODE SUPEREASY, 
Subliminal cassette $10 LEARN MORSE 
CODE IN 1 HOUR Amazing new suporeasy 
technique. SIO. Botti £17- Moneyback guar- 
an lee Free caialog: SAS£ Batir, Oept 73-€. 
1 1 96 C) I r us. P aim bay FL 32805 BN BS3 1 

aB.220/221 OWf^ERS^ 20 detailed mods 
wtiich include 160-5 meter operation, 05K. 
-^enl^anced p.s S€% rebate tor new mods 
submrtled' 9 pages ot 3-5Q0Z tecfi info St 1 
postpaiiJ —info SASE. BOB KOZLAREK 
WA2SQO. 69 Memorial Ft^e. Camwood Paric 
Ml 07407 BNS58t 



V SSSS USED Dm^emhef (ONLY) SPE- 
CIALS: KENWOOD TS-830S S899 90. TS- 
520S.DC.CW W99 90. H-5000.VK-«eA.VS-t 
$869 90. TM^S2tA $4?9 90. TSOOS.WAT 
SV300 (XI. iCOlyl IO-7B1 $4659 SO. lC-761 
S1je»9a. K>730 $539 90. PS-15 $122 90. 
AT 100 $249 90. Yaes^j FT'727R $279 90. 
FT-22SRO $589 90. NC-flA $©5 90. NC-3A 
$39 90. MFJ^g84 $229 90. MFJ 9893 
^29.90: DEKtTBOl^ GLA-iOOO $3^9 90. 
CtlPPERTON L $200,00 AS IS LOOKtMQ 
FOR SOMETHIMGl«3T USTED''' CALL OH 
SEND S.A S E , HAVE OVER 190 USED 
ITEMS m Slock. MENTION AD PRICES 
CASH FOB PRESTON HOURS TUESDAY - 
FRIDAY 9 00 TO 6 00. 9 00-2 00 P M UOH- 
OAVS CLOSED SATURDAY A SUNDAY 



ROSS DISTRIBUTING COMPANY. 78 
SOUTH STATE. PflESTON ID 83263. (208) 
S52-0830. 8NB654 

WRITTEN EXAMS SUPEREASY. Merrxsry 
aidfi from p&yctiio>ogisl/er>gineef cut study- 
time 50%. Nohrtce. Tech, Gen: $7 each Ad* 
vanced, Extra: 512 each. Moneybackguaran* 
lee. Batir, [>epl 73^ 1 T9S Crtrys. Palmbay Fl 
32905. SNB^SI 

ROSS* $$5$ NEW December (ONLY) SPE^ 
CIALS: J S.C- f^G-213500FT. $150 00; KEM- 
WOOD TM^631 A $629,90, TR^S4{>0 $349 90, 
TM-701A $452.90. TH-41AT S209 90. TM^ 
241 A $394 90, TS-940S/WAT $2055,00. TS^ 
440SyWAT $1199.90. TH'75A $43490, TH- 
31 5A S339.99, TH'31BT 5229.90; tCOM 
IC'765 12609,90. lC-781 $5099.90, IC-24AT 
$539,90, lC-735 S919.90, IC-2SA $289,90. 
IC'28AT $317.50. 10-471 H $939.90; YAESU 
FT-411E $329.90, G-5400B S445,90, FT- 
1000D $3619.90, FT-4rO $394 90, FV- 
101 DM $229,90. FT-33R $259.90, VR-901 
$499,99, TOKYO HY-POWER HC-20Q 
$109.90, HL-t02V S239.99, HL*t60V 
$299,90. HL-e2V $139.90, MFJ 127BT 
$299,90, ALL LT.O, (LIMITED TIME OFFER} 
LOOKING FOR SOMETHING NOT LIST^ 
ED?? CALL OR WRITE. Over 9O04 harrvre- 
tated items In stcx:k for immecttate shipment. 
Mention ad Fnces casti, FO.S. PRESTON 
HOURS TUESDAY-FRIDAY 9lO0 TO 6;00. 
9:00-2:00 P.M. MONDAYS CLOSED SAT* 
UROAY & SUNDAY. ROSS DISTRIBUTING 
COMPANY, 78 SOUTH STATE PRESTON 
ID 83263 {208} 852-{%30. BNBT09 

HAM RADIO REPAm sA ma»tes. models Ex- 
penenced, reliable service Robert HaiJ Elec- 
rronics. Bex 28D3€3, San Francisca CA 
94 12^^0363. (406)729-8200. BNB751 

WANTED: Ham eqiripnient and oftiei ptoper- 
ty Tha Radio Club of Junior High Schocri 22 
NYC, Inc . ts a nonprDfit organization, grant- 
e<l 501 (CK3) status by the I RS. mcorpofaied 
with \\m goal o^ usir^ the theme d^ ham r^tio 
to furthjar and enhajice ttie ediicatjon ot 
young people oatiomvide. Your profierty do- 
nation or firtancial support would be greatly 
afipiQctaied and acimovdadgsd with a rece^ 
lor your tax deductible cofrtnbutkm. As 1990 
draws to a dose, pfease lodt over whatever 
unwanted equipment you maY tiave, amj call 
IIS We wil pick up or arrange shipping, You 
will fBcerve The lax ded t/ction , but ff»osl impot- 
lant. tt^ pnvifege of knovrtfig ttiat your gitl 



really made a dlft^renc^ in the educaiiart artd 
upbringing of a youngster. Write us atr RC of 
JHS 22. PO Bow 1052. Mew York NY 10002- 
Round the cPOCk HOTLINES: VOJCE (516) 
674^072. FAX (51 6j 674-9600. BNB762 

*'HAliLO^ ' COMPUTER PROGRAM Full 
featuraf. iB modules. Auto-Jogs, 7-&arid 
WAS/DXCC Apple. IBM. CP/M. KAYPBO. 
TANDY , CR8 S24 95. 73-KA^ AWH. PB 20 ! 5, 
Peabody MA 1 960. BNB775 

LAMBDA AMATEUR RADJO CLUB Interna- 
tional amaleyr radifOf^futi for gay and l^bian 
hams On-air skeds. monthly newsletter; and 
annual ga[lterin$ at Daylon t215) 978- 
LARC, PO Box 24810, PhllddaJphia PA 
19130. BNB812 

HAM RADIO REP Am CENTER, quality work- 
ma/^ip Solid state ^ tut^e. aiJ makes arx) 
mMffits. Al&i? repair HF amptifier^ A-Z Eiec- 
UDOic Repa[r, 363a East. Indian School Rd^. 
Fhfwmx AZ SSO^B. (602^ 956-30(24 BNS874 

INEXPENSIVE HAM RADIO EQUlPUENT. 
Send postage stamp for Ii5t Jim Bracfy— 
WA4DS0. 3037 Audrey Or . Gaslonia NC 

280S4 BNesso 

WANTED: BUY h SELL All types of Electron 
Tubes Call lofl tree i (BOOJ 421-9397 or 1 
(612) 429-9397 CAN Electronics. HarohJ 
Brar?al«dl4 6104 Eyg Lake Road. Hugo MN 
55038. BNB900 

ELECTRON TUBES: All types 4 sizes Trans- 
milling, receiving, mic^rowave Large m- 
vontory * ^^^w day pipping Ask about our 
3^5002 special Daily Electronics. PO 6or 
5029. Compton CA 90324 ^8003 340- 
6867, eNS9t3 

COMMODORE 64 HAM PROaRAMS— & 
dJSk sides over 200 Ham programs £16 95 
25^ stamp gels unusual software catalog of 
UliUtlas, Gamas. Adult and Britfshi Disks. 
Home-Spun Softuvare^ Bo* t064'BB, Estero 
FL 33929. BNB917 

BATTERY PACK REBUILDING: SEND 
YOUR PACK / 4eHR SERVICE ICOM; BP^ 
BP3fBP22 $19,95, BPS S2S 95, QP7/BP& 
$32.95. BP70 $a.&S. KENWOODi PB21 
S1SJ5. P621H $21,96, P825/2e $34,95. 
VAESUF»^B9S19.95,FNB10S23.95,FNB11 
$27 95, FNB4/4A $36. 95. 'U-OO-IT IN- 
SERTS'" ICOM; BP2 $17.50. 6P3 $1695, 
BPS S22 95. BP7m $27.50, BP22 $17.95, 
BP70 $25 95 KENWOOD: PB21 $12,95. 
P021H$ie.95.PB24A25/26Si9 95 TEMPO; 
SI/2/4/15 $22.95, YAESU FNB4/4A $32 95. 
FNB9 $16 95. FNBlO |1S 95, A20EN: 
$19.95. 'NEW PACKS W/CASE:'* iCOM 
aPSB (9 4V/800 BASE CHG ONLY) Sa4.95. 
YAESU: FNB2 $19 95. FNB 12 $44.50. SAN- 
TEC: 142/1200 $22,95 FREE CATALOG, 
$3.00 Stupping/order, PA+6«V%. V1SA~M/C - 
$2. CUNAflD. R,0. 6 Box t04^ Badford PA 
15522. (914} fi23-7000. BNB^l 

WANTED: Manuals and/or schematics for 
Hammanund HO- 100 & HO-145X, copy OK. 
Wayne Nortti. 542 Watert^oni^ Melbourne FL 
32934 



SATELUTE MONTHLY AUDIO CODES \ 
(900 J HOT SHOT intended lor lasting only. 
S3,50 per call eMB93S 

COD€ HTTY Send Receive Dtsk V1C'20. C- 
64^ Mnd $5 Tape $6 Codeware, BoJi 3091, 
Nashua NH 03061. 3110940 

KOME^BREW^PIIOJECTS UST SASE 
WB2eUF. Box TOe. Easi Hampton NY 1 1937 

BNB943 

WANTED IBM^PC/CLOHE AND PACKET 
equiprn#nt tor Ru55«an amateur emefg^ency 



radio Service — tax deductible. Dave Larsen 
KK4WW, PO Box 341 , Floyd VA 24091 (703) 
763^331 1/382-4458. BHB94S 

WANTED: Manuajs (including Sctifimatics) 
tor LAFAYETTE SIGNAL GENERATOR TE- 
20 Meyef Minchen AG5G. 4635 SW FWY. 
H04jston TX 77027. (713}622'^161. BNB952 

HIGH PERFORMANCE 2M BEAM. Oratnati* 
catly improve your Cusht^ratt llHalernant 
beam's DiRECTIVITY & GAJN. EASY conver* 
Stan pians needing tvq extra parts Or hMorrw- 
bfew &^lerfient beam from irKluded dimen- 
sions. $10, check or money order WB90ZB. 
De0. 73« P.O. Box 357, t^Oimt Prospect IL 

eoose. BNB^s 

WANTED; Pro^ 1380 mcfocompvlefs and 
pufolicatior^ tor musei^jni. KK4WW, Dave 
Im^^n.^ Blacksbuig Group. PO So* 1 . B4acha- 
t34Jfi9 VA 24063 (703) 753-331 1 , 



WANTOl: Yourt>dp donating iSM-PC ckxie, 
lechnicai and calllx>oks for LARN emertiMK^ 
radio sendee in USSR I «ili personally deipver 
equipment io UB5WE David Larsen 
KK4WW- (703) 7B3-3311 . &NB967 

25-420 MHz MILITARY AVIATIOH FRE- 
QUENCY OIHECTORteS tor NORTH AMEH- 
IGA — over 20.000 newly researched iisiirt^s. 
HAP3. BOK 754, Fteminglqn NJ 0Se22*07S4 
{201)806-7134. BNB95S 

BACK-PACKET Jump tjack-and-foriti be- 
tween packet radio and any MS-DOS apfiica- 
tion with the press ot a key. Source code 
induded, ^19.95 to WA4APU 6521 Creeh- 
stone Place. Charlotte NO 2821 3. BNB959 

FREE Ham Gospel Tracts. SASE. N3FTT, 
51S3 Gramercy, Clifton Hi^ PAl90ia 

BNB960 

FIVE WATTSl Nine partsl 30/40 melerlrana- 
mitler! Radio Stiack parlsf Plans— S2 plus 
stamp! Bill Lauterbach, 1709 North W@st, 
# 1 03, Jackson M 1 49202. B IM B 962 

THEY OFFERED PEANUTS for your trade- 
in? Contact Radio R^cycJers for a quote on 
'For Sale" list. 3221 W, Lincoln Ave.. MHwau- 
Kea Wl 53215. (414) 383-9001. BNB963 

AMIGA, MACINTOSH, ATARI XL/XE/ST 
Amateur RadJo pubNc domain software, 
$4,0O/dtsk. SASE tof catalog Specify com* 
puiarj WA4EFH, Bok 1646. Orange Park FL 
32067-1646. 8N89€5 

PRINTED CIRCUIT BOARDS lor projects in 
73, HAm Radio. QSL Aflfli Handbmk. List 
SASE FAR Circuits. 18M&40 Fietd Ct . Dun- 
dee IL 60118. BNBdee 

AUTHORIZED AMIGA & COMMODORE Ser- 
vice Center. Send SASE for pnce list Caltan- 
der Eledronics. PO Box 363. Bakerstown PA 
15007. BNB87t 

TRADE FOR tOM TRANSCEIVER Panason- 
ic RF-B6S. Covers: LW, MW, SW, FM (153 
kHz-2d,9d§ IcHz). BFO tuning ror SSB 36 
memo, doctc (ocaiAjTC Digital read-out, dl- 
reci access keypad GecKge Moa^PO Box 
8^. Jacksonvitie Fl. 3^20 1 (904) 387-37 f 5 
after 1 500 hr. BNB972 

NEEDED: Schematkr for ^maiS 2 meter amp. 
N^MJ. (412> 531-7443 anytime. 6^6973 

MscSAMUEL HORSE CODE TUTORtAL 
SOFTWARE tor the Macmtos/i Sp«<eds io 90 
ViTpfn StandanJ or Fransworlh mode. Ran- 
dom ctmractef and word genefatkm. Bandofit 
QSO simulation Also, send code Irom yottr 
ovtm XQia files. Send $^ 00 plus S2.00 snip- 
ping and haridting to: Avant Sysimns, F^ Box 
5437. Pitts&urgii PA 1 5205 BNB97^ 



m 73 Amateur Radio Today • December, 1990 



H. 



Number 31 on your Feedback eard 



AMSA TS 



Andy MacMister WASZfB 
14714 Knightsw&y Drive 
Houston TX 77083 

Packet via Satellites 



Packet via amateur sateifites has 
been around since the early days of 
pacl<6t radio acttvity. Even before the 
first ARRL Amateur Radio Computer 
Networking Convention in 1981 at the 
National Bureau of Standards in 
Gaithersburg, Maryland, AMSAT ear- 
marked Special Service Channels 
(SSGs) for packet communications on 
future high-orbit ^at@llite$. Dr. Hank 
Magnuskt KA6M, designer of one of 
the first packe! diglp eaters, was in 
charge of setting standards for S3C 
use. This came at a time when AMSAT 
was stilj recovering from the loss of 
Phase 3 A^ which was to have been the 
first high-orbit, long-life hamsat. Phase 
3 A met a watery end when its Ariane 
launcher failed to achieve orbit tn early 
1980. 

Packet operation thfough analog 
satellite transponders is comparable to 
direct user-to-user packet procedure. 
Early tests were made al 1200 baud, 
but acllvity at 300 baud using HF 
modems was more reliable due to the 
weak-signal nature of satetlite commu- 
nications at the time. The use of the 
analog transponder space for packet 
experiments was never popular, 
though. The store-and-forward poten* 
tiaf of the AX. 25 protocol was not ad- 
dressed via the transponder medium. 
A digipeater in space, or some other 
digital mailbox system for handling 
packets, was needed. 

Determining the Standards 

At the 1983 ARRL Amateur Radio 
Computer Networking Convention in 
San Francisco, California, Phil Kam 
KA9Q presented the paper, "Modula- 
tion and Access Techniques for P AC- 
SAT," and Don Connors KD2S pre- 
sented 'The PACSAT Project/' Don^s 
paper described the design goal of 
"total global access by all hams to a 
St ore- an d-f or ward packet message 
handler'* via satellite systems. He ex- 
planned the need for packet satellites 
and described the on-board systems 
and technical parameters for a If satel- 
lite subsystems. 

PhiKs paper on modulation tech- 
niques ^ when viewed with Don's, laid 
down the blueprint of today's Mi- 
crosats from frequency choices to 
modulation methods, it was obvious 
that a form of phase-shift keying (PSK) 
would work better than standard audio- 
frequency-shift keying (AFSK) on an 
FM carrier for packet-satellite down- 
links, and that ^s what we have today. 

AFSK-FM has advantages that in- 
clude low cost, simplicity, and easy 
Doppler tracking, but it has some seri- 
ous disadvantages. These include in- 
efficient bandwidth use and poor noise 
performance. 



Amateur Radio Via Satellite 



The UoSAT-OSCAR-11 FM down- 
link requires 1 5 kHz to support a 1200 
baud signal, while a PSK signal with 
the same bandwidth coutd easily carry 
9600 baud. AFSK-FM exhibits a sharp 
noise threshold at a relatively high car- 
rier-to- noise ratio. Problems with im- 
pulse noise are also evident. Anyone 
who has been active with VHP packet 
has noticed that even strong signals 
are difficult to copy when powerline 
and auto ignition noise get into the re- 
ceived signal. 

Other concerns with satellite down- 
links include fading and polarization 
fosses due to spacecraft rotation and 
orientation with respect to the ground 
observer. 



The DCE Experiment 

In 1984 when U-0-t1 went to orbits it 
carried the Digital Communications 
Experiment (DCE) which provided a 
proof-of-concept testbed for PACSAT 
work. The experiment continues to act 
as a mailbox in orbit to test digital com- 
munication software and provide data 
on hardware survivability, current con- 
sumption, arid operational behavior in 
space. Only a small number of hams 
around the world are active as gateway 
stations through the DCE, but others 
can route their messages to these 
gateways for uptinking to UO-1 1 , Mes- 
sages can sometimes be seen be- 
tween telemetry frames on the 145.825 
MHz FM downlink at 1200 baud. 

When Fuji-OSCAR-12 was launched 
in August 1986, hams had their first 
opportunity to find out what PACSATs 
were all about. Whenever the mode 
"J" (2 meters up and 70cm down) digit- 
al transponder was active, stations 
could access the mailt>ox and leave 
messages for hams on the other side of 
the world. Signals were good, but bat- 
tery problems made continuous activi- 
ty impossible. After only a day or two 
the system needed recharging, with 
corresponding down periods and loss 
of all the messages in memory. EvQn 
with these problems, the open mailbox 
was an exerting packet experience. 

Fujl-OSCAR-20, faunched in Febru- 
ary of this year, is e»<periencing similar 
difficulties, but this time they are relat* 
ed to temperature problems. The satel- 
lite is too hot. High current consumers 
(ike the digital system must be shut off 
for long periods to keep the internaf 
temperature at a reasonable level to 
avoid serious battery damage. Sched- 
ule annourvcements from the JARL 
{Japanese ARRL counterpart) have 
provided some relief to those stations 
listening for the satellite, 

Today's Packet Satellites 

In January 1990, an Ariane-4 rocket 
placed four AMSAT-built Mi crosats in- 
to a nearly perfect sun-synchronous or- 
bit at 800 km. The satelliteSf nine inch- 
es on a side, all carry similar pay loads 
of packet and scientific experiments. 



All of this group of Microsats have 
store-and-f onward capability, with two 
of the four carrying packet com muni ca* 
tions as their primary payfoads. The 
other two are for more educational pur- 
poses and include a charge-coupled- 
devlce (CCD) camera for Earth imag- 
ing and adigitai speech synthesizer. 

In addition to the packet communica- 
tions systems, the Microsats incorpo- 
rate highly efficient so Ear panels, inno- 
vative power supply designs. VHF and 
UHF transmitters with DC to RF effi- 
ciencies as high as 76 percent, and 
computers using 1.3 micron surface- 
mount technology (SMT) devices with 
a megabytes of memory that use only 
about half a watt. All of this (batteries 
included) goes into a nine-inch cube 
weighing less than 22 pounds. 

The packet systems are primary to 
AMSAT-OSCAR'16 and LUSAT 
OSCAR-19. They each have five uplink 
receivers and two downlink trans- 



order a copy from the Superintendent 
of Documents, Government Printing 
Office, Washington. DC 20402-9325, 
for $2.25, shipping included. Ask for 
GPO stock number 052-003-01 1 74-3, 

Easy Packets from Spac# 

D-0-17 transmits standard packet 
using AFSK-FM on 145.825 MHz. It is 
the perfect place to get started with 
satellite packet activity. Typical power 
levels from the satellite provide a 10 dB 
improvement over U-O-ll signals and 
can be heard on almost any antenna. 
Anyone who rs currently active on VHF 
packet can hear the signals and see 
the resulting raw telemetry and mes- 
sages on their CRT or other display 
device. 

For those who can capture the data 
to disk, programs are available to de^ 
code the data and display information 
on the satellite's activities and health. 
One program found on many bulletin 




Photo, WEBERSAVs view of the sun. Taken on 8/WBO at 0508 UTC. Photo 
courtesy of Weber State Coltege. 



mitters. WhNe all receivers are on si- 
multaneously, only one transmitter per 
satellite is usuafly active for packet 
downlinking. A complete frequency 
chart of uplinks and downlinks can be 
found in the May 1990 "Hamsats." 

While the objectives of DOVE- 
OSCAR-17 and Weber-OSCAR-tB dif- 
fer from the store-and-forward objec- 
tives of the other two satellites, they 
offer exciting possibilities to those with 
educational interests. 

Microsats are small and light be- 
cause it costs 1 6 times more per pound 
for AMSAT to get their pay loads into 
orbit now than it did five years ago. A 
$20,000 satellite launch in 1985 would 
cost $320,000 today. Interest in the Mi- 
crosal or Itghtsat concept has height- 
ened in recent years. As the world be- 
comes aware of the potential of the 
small or "micro'* satellite, AMSAT 
finds itself competing for launch space 
once filled with ballast and nearly free 
for the asking. 

Just after the launch of the Mi- 
crosats, a background paper for 
Congress became available. Entitled 
"Affordable Spacecraft: Design and 
Launch Alternatives/' it covered sev- 
eral different ideas on satellite con- 
struction from 'Mlghtsats" to "fatsats" 
and from simple devices to highly com- 
plex and compact designs. You can 



boards is NK6KTLM. It is usually listed 
as NK6KTLM.ARC (for archived). After 
"un-arc'ing"' the file, the "readme" 
document explains how to activate the 
easy-to-use program, Fifty-seven 
channels of data can be decoded and 
examined with this program. 

Picture Packets from Space 

W-0-18 takes snapshots of the Earth 
near the equatorial regions and sends 
them to Earth in packet form on 70cm, 

The picture information is stored on 
the satellite in digital form and sent on 
one of the 70cm PSK transmitters. 
It's not sent pixel-by-plxel; two good 
passes are needed to coltect a com- 
plete image. On one pass, odd-num- 
bered lines are sent, and on the next 
pass, the even-n umbered iines. When 
data from two subsequent passes 
are received and merged, a complete 
image can be put together. Any gaps 
that occur can be filled with values 
from adjoining pixels to make a clean 
picture. 

Each day the satellite typically sends 
data for one picture, allowing Earth 
stations four to six opportunities to col- 
^ect enough data to build a complete 
picture. 

To capture and display the images, 
you need a PSK modem in conjunction 
with a standard packe! terminal node 



73 Amateur Radio Today • December, 1990 81 



Kr' 




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controlter (TNC). Several modems 
have been described in recent "Harrr- 
sat*' columns. They include the 
G3RUH unil available in kit form from 
Radiokit, the TAPR kit from the Tucson 
Amateur Packet Radio Corporation^ 
the PacComm Microsat PSK modem 
from PacComm, the DSP- 12 Multi- 
mode controller from L.L, Grace, and 
|h0 Microsat Demodulator as de- 
scribed by W60IJ in the September 
1990 issue of QEX. A receive system 
capable of operation at 437 MHz SSS 
with digital frequency control from the 
PSK modem is needed. Finally, to 
complete ilie system, you need an an- 
tenna (omni is fine), a PC compatible 
computer with EGA or VGA graphics, 
and appropriate software. 

The most commonly used data-col- 
lection software is TLMDC version 3 by 
N4HY. Like NK6KTLM for DOVE de- 
coding, you can find it on many BBSs. 

First the TNC is put in the KISS mode 
by sending it the command KISS ON 
followed by RESTART. Then TLMDC 
is run according to its ''readme" docu- 
ment. Norma! deta and messages are 
displayed on the screen while a raw- 
data file is collected and stored by the 
program during the course of a pass. 
Upon exiting the program, a second 
program is needed to read the raw- 
dara file and display the results. 

WEBERWARE 1.0 from Weber 
State University is avai!able from 
AM SAT and is currently the best sys- 
tem for picture display and manipula- 



tion. This collection of programs allows 
the user to change parameters of the 
viewed image, merge in other passes 
of the same picture, fill mixed piKels* 
print the results in black-and-white, or 
colorize the scene according to color- 
burst information sent with the picture 
file from the satellite. To get the TNC 
back to normal operation, it may be 
necessary to give it a hardware reset 
by turning it off and disconnecting the 
back-up battery. 

W*0*1 8 is also capable of receiving 
and storing an image from Earth. It has 
a 1265 MHz receiver for standard ama- 
teur television (ATV) reception. On 
commands from the control station in 
Ogden, Utah, it can take a snapshot of 
a picture sent from an Earth station and 
retransmit it via the packet system. 
Early experiments with this scheme 
have demonstrated that very high-pow- 
er or high-gain antennas on the ground 
are needed for picture uploads. 

SAREX 2 Update 

NASA officials were forced to scrub 
the launch of STS-35 on September 
11. 1990 due to another hydrogen leak 
in the rear engine compartment. The 
next opportunity for Columbia and the 
Shuttle Amateur Radio Experiment is 
in early December. AMSAT will once 
again publicize the frequency plans 
and schedule information for the mis^ 
sion as the launch approaches. Check 
the May 1990 issue of 73 for back- 
ground information. 



Upda tes 



Number 1 8 on your feedback card 



CIRCLE 169 OK READER SEfiVICE CARD 

82 73 Amateur Radio Today • December, 1990 



DXDA Corrections 

See the OctOliei' '90 issue, pag€ BP. S^ipan and 
Rtsia Is^ami should tolh b« KHI, not KH2. These are 

tt)« onl^ t^o cofrections. h^anBuia IslarMl and TimirBn, 
also KHiJ, are cofrect as iisied. Guam iscarrecUy fisted 
as KH?. TP4X Paui Swanzeniinib&f K4EQY sn KH§^ 
fartdiorcaitfDgus. 

RO BO-COPY 

See the alwv* artfcle in the Od. '90 ]s&u% f age 

28. Mil<e Hansen WB9DYI: "Thanks to input from 
readers,. I've verified Biat there are Ewo errors in the ppn 
selectiofi^soltware versioni (or the iignaJ inpjl to 
R08C>COPY. These errcrts aJfect SOME bui noE alt pin 
seleclionteoftware combinaiions. If you are noE geitirkg 
any respofise from ROSO-CGPY once the main 
screen appears, one ol Ifie following fixes should cjre 
the prabiem. 

"For sottware downloided Iromthe 73BBS prior to 
October 16: The version qt the software labeled 
ROBO-EXE uses the 'DCD' (dala carrier detect) sig^a^ 
tor input, WTthe Wiring indic:^tor} a$ sfa/etf in the 
aftsde. 

"FIX 1] Move the signal irpui Irom llw 'fll' pin to 
'DCD.' The correct ssgnal input pin for the ROBO.EXE 
version is pin 1 on a DBS connector and pin 8 on a 
0625. 

"F(X 2. Download the updated soJrwara ^rs^on 
R0BQ2.EXE from the 73 BBS. Ctteck to make sure 
that M signal pin is it^ed 'fli/ The "Rr pin is number 
9 on a DB9 and pift 32 on a DB25 . Note fhaf W for ihe 
DBS5 type conmctor is statsd if}corf$^fy in the ariscfe. 
The D&9 pin numhef is listed cqirectiy. There are no 
other dilfeiences between ROBO.EXE and 
R0B02.EXE ^KC&pi the pqn seiection char^gee. 

"For software received directly (rom WB9DYI; The 
only software version sent I h rough the mail is 
ROBOZ.EXE. even jhough i1 is labefed ROBO.EXE, 
You may want to rename your copy to match the new 
name. Check lo maike sure thai tht signal pin is indeed 
'RL" 

"I'm sorry fof thii mix-up. I changed co^nputers dur- 
itig Ihe f\n^\ stages ol Ihe ROBO-GOPY check ojt and 
must have archived the wrong vefsion oi the soU- 



New Kenwood Warranty 

Kenwood anrtaunces a new Wisnranty progrftm 

for all nevv amaieur radio products purchased in the 
United States. Effective October 1, 1990. all new 
Kenwood transceivers, receivers, accessories, and 
Dptions carry a lull qne^year warranty Irom the elate of 
purchase. 

New waira/ity cards a/e beir>g issLied loi existing 
dealer stock, but (hey may not be avaNable iniliaHy. A 
sales receipt dated or^ or after October 1 , 1990, is She 
only dwumentatton necessary tor warranty claims. 
Additional information is availatile by mail from Ken- 
wood: USA Corpofation, Amateur Radio Customer Ser* 
vice, P.O. Boi 2274S, Long Beach CA 9O801; by 
phone al|S IS) 761-7140; or via the Kenwood BBS at 
(?13J 761-82^4 (2400 baud max, & bits, no parfty, 1 
stop (>i(.}. Add this new wananty into to the Kenwood 
servioe article by WB6N0A In the April 'SD issue. TNX, 
Kenwood, forMbutlstin.. 

Goof -Pro of Goof 

See "Goot^Pfooi Regenerative Receiver'^ \n the 
Nov. '90 issue, page 3^, Figure 4. The parrs piace^ 
rmeni should indicale Headphor>e3 (i^ using the head- 
phones-only option— in which case you don't need to 
buM ^tie LM33^ audio anip section) where il shows 
Audio output. The S ohm speaker is attached where rt 
shows SPKdeWBflEU( 

KANDs, not ANDs 

Se« ''TTL Transceiver for 40 Meters" In the Ngv. 
'90 issue, page 30. Look at the "IC Layout" in the 

upper Ie4t comer o1 Figure 1 , The little circles were left 
off the top ot the syrnixal describing the type of gate, 
rendering them AJ^Dgate^ when they should be f^AND 
gates. See the proper symbol in the ligure. TNX 

KBWM for caiching this. 



Figure. Thefittfedfcieoniop 
signifi^ that tft& gate is s 
NAf^Dgate. 




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73 Amateur Radio Today • December, 1990 83 



Number 32 on your Feedback ca rd 



R, Number 12 9n your Feed! 

ANDOM OUTPUT 

David Cassidy NIGPH 



agic 

My generaiiorj (thirtysomethfnig) is 
ttie last generation itiat will be amazed 
by radio. The fad ttiat t can sit in my 
bedroom and talk to some cither per- 
son sitting in their bedroom on the 
other side of the globe slill f ill^ me with 
wonder. Thai, in a nutshell, is why I 
became a radio amateur. To this day, I 
still have a childlike feeling of awe 
every time I turn on a tmnsceiver. Oh, I 
know why \he whole thing works and I 
even have a pretty good grasp on how 
the whole thing works. I don't care 
about Marconi, the ARRL study guides 
or the FCC exam. I know that radio is 
magic! 

Kids loday grow up with magic. It 
has become commonplace. They 
have dozens of channels of cable TV 
piped r?gh| info ttieir homes with no 
intederence They learn at>out com- 
puters before they learn to read. They 
don't realtze thai a computer is magic. 
They have never known a time when 
ordinary men and women didn't climb 
to the top of tall rockets and travel into 
space. It wasn't so long ago thai a 
space launch was an international 
event. Now, the major networks don't 
even provide live coverage for space 
shuttle launches, Space travel ts mag- 
ic, and they don 'I even know \l. And 
what about communication satellites? 
In a world where 1 can si! in my car (my 
car^) and talk to anyone, anywhere In 
the world on a telephone, what is ihe 
big deal abo^t a bunch of old men sit- 
ting in their ham shacks? Radio is low 
tech. Even packet is a dinosaur when 
you compare H to wfiat your average 
iwelve-year-old can do with a Com- 
modore 64 and a modem. 

I feel sorry for today's kids because 
they don't have that magic. Even 
though I grew up in the age of televi- 
sion, it is personal communications by 
radio that has always fascinated me 
(what is television, after all. but radio 
witf^ pictures?) 1 still remember vividly, 
as Tm sure most of yoo do. the first time 
1 9at aJone t^&hind the key of a code rig 
and sent my own callsign, Somewhere 
in Texas another person sat by his 
code key and returned my CO. There \l 
wasi My own catlsign. coming over the 
speaker — coming out of thin air. Jt was 
magic, 

I think kids today have lost that 
sense of magic Sure, they car) re- 
create the experience that rrrost of us 
had— sitting behind a radio that gEows 
in the dark, the smell of warm dust 
on the tubeSt tistening for that faint 
CO. They can buy the old rigs and have 
a ball with them, but I don't think 
they have the same sense of amaze* 
ment many of us experienced , Modern 
transceivers are great. They have all 
kinds ot bells and whislles that we only 
dreamed of len years ago But still, 
don't you sometimes wish you had a 
radio the size of a Volkswagen sitting 
on your desk— all dials and knobs and 
meters — just sitting there, waiting for 
you to '"Ihrow the big switch"? 

I kr^ow 1 sound Jike an old-timer 
grumbling about the "good ol' days.*' 
but all of this is leading up to somrethmg 
I'd like you all to consider. 

The problem of getting young peopEe 
interested in amateur radio has been 



84 73 Amateur Radio Today • December, 1990 



talked to deaih. The reasons why kids 
never get involved in this great hot»by 
are numerous and have been stated 
and restated to the point of redundan- 
cy. To be sure, there are a few bright 
spots. People like Carole Perry 
WB2MGP are actually doing some- 
thing about it. (Dd you realize that she 
teaches amateur radio to 400 students 
every semester? Four hundred^ Not all 
of those kids get or keep a license, but 
can you imagine what would happen if 
only one school in evsrf state could 
follow her example?) The fact remains 
thai unless we figure out a way to mar- 
ket and self amateur radio to kids, 
many of us wilE live to see the end o1 this 
hobby. Unless we have the numbers 
that demand attention, and the youth- 
ful enthusiasm to fight for the dispro- 
portionate amounl of spectrum we oc- 
cupy, It won't be long before amateur 
radio is reduced to repeater wars on 2 
meters and two old men calling CO OX 
on 20 meters (both on the same fre- 
quency, no doubt). 

It all boils down to this: We have 
got to find a way io put the magic 
back into amateur radio. We have got 
to figure out a way to show yoyng 
people that they can have a blast 
with this hobby. Do you think your aver- 
age tweive-year^id wants to spend his 
Saturday afternoons sitting behind a 
desk saying, '^You^e 5-9. I'll QSL 
through the bureau/' or "You're num- 
ber ISS'—good luck In the contest," or 
"Rig is . . antenna is , QTH is . , 73 
and CUL** That*s not m^cl Thafs 
boringi 

There are so many things about 
amateur radio that would fascinate a 
kid. Carole Perry has dozens of kids 
running around the hatis of her school 
with little code practice osciilators that 
look like Star Trek communicators. 
These kids know a secret language— 
l^orse code— and they think it's great. 
Tbey know that radio is magic be- 
cause they can rroid the magic m their 
hands. 

We published a letter a few months 
ago from a gentleman who was help* 
ing his grandchildren put together 
crystal radio sets. You give an eight- 
year-old a pile of parts, show her what 
to do, then watch her face as voices 
start coming out of something she has 
tHJiH tierself . You won't have to expiair* 
to that eight-year-old about the magic 
of ham radio. She'll know it's magic. 
It's right there in front of her, and she 
did it herself. 

Joe Fairdough WB2JKJ is the driv- 
ing force behind the Junior High 
School 22 radio Club in New York, He 
has taken a bunch of street kids from 
tfve toughest pan of a very lough city 
and changed their Irves, He is literally 
changing lives with nothing but ama- 
teur radio. You don't have to explarn to 
his kids that radio is magic. They are 
living proofl 

Do you remember what it was like, 
the first time you heard your very own 
caJIsign coming through the speaker? 
Dkj any of you feel you had the power 
of the universe right there at yoar fin- 
gers? Do you, oh patient reader, re- 
member the magic? 

Can we get the magic back... 
please? 



Numtwr S3 on your Feedback c«rd 



M^^ Numcwr 33 on you 

Fropagation 



Jim Gtby WiXU 

2 we: Chateau CIrcte 

PaysonAZB5541 

A Few Good Days 

Unfortiinately, December is MOT 
predicted to be a particularly good 
month for DX on the high frequency 
bands. The "Good" days, indicated 
by '^G" on the calendar, are expect* 
ed to center around the 6th and the 
leth: the "Poor" days. "P" on the 
catendar, center around the 
10th and the 25th. All the oth- 
er days of December trend 
from "Fair" (F) to "Poor^^P) 
orfronr>"Poor"to'Talf;* 

Coupled with an unsettled- 
to-active nriagntettc field on 
the ■ ' Poor" ' days . you can ex- |-^^ 
pect earty darkness in the 
Northern Hemisphere, with 
bands above 20 meters clos- 
mg shortly before or after 
dark. The bands beiaw 20 
meters will Itkety be quite us- 
able, even on the "Poor" 
days. You can expect DX 
across the equator, especial- 
ly across the north pole Into 
the USSRp during evening 
hours local time. 

Winter solstice propaga^ 
tion on the higher HP bands 
of 20-1 meters is likely to be 
daytime only, with some 
short skip possibilities occur'- 
ring on many days. . but 
don't expect too much for 10 
and 12 meters. Any DX you ,c*iwLa5NE \m 



Jim Gray WIXU 

half. Listen just before and after 
dark, and just before and after dawn . 
I hope my gloomy forecast is 
wrong, and Tm looking forward to 
giving yoy a better one nead month. 
Remember to monitor WWV at 18 
minutes after any hour and look for 
LOW "A" index and HIGH solar flux 
reports for your best conditions* 
Trends are always helpful if you 
keep a I09 every day. The best of 
Season's Greetings to a*i of you 

























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CHICLE 68 ON RE:ADER SERVICE CARD 

73 Amateur Radio Today * December, 1990 85 



Uncle M^ayne's Bookshelf 




I 



m&5i * 199t Pnssportlo 
World Band Radb 
ify inttmmotitfi HnHidcaHing 

You can have the wortd it yom 
iui^atipfi. You'dl ^ the bda( Hi- 
tion luid linw; grid*, ihe 1991 
Buypr'!! Guide and mott 384 



Al^.^l^M • W«attier Sateirite 
Harrdbook t4th Ed.) 

KcM oH the i*n:^&t Ekpandcd ^nd 
revised to reflect lodiy'i vi^eatlvr- 
bH Htdl 1^ techttkOk^ . 120. CM 

Aftl-W ♦ CDinpinion S<jtt- 
wan for W«itHer S si«I^Ke 
Kindboofc 

5 S4 - h4S- DOS noppy S lO.M 



VIS Study C«rtl« 

Advance the c<b> vtv^ wiih VIS Study Onh. CoaipKt. Up-tt^-ilite Raih 
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Dtu. SclktHHlici fli your fiaiertips. Uicd SLCCESSFirLLY by ^ges 6 

NOVICE visai $11. fS 

TECW VlSOa 10.95 

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EXTRA VtSOS 14,45 



Lam* Coda Pragrams — (Availaijla on 5% * cllak,^ 

Incj^mHjvc conplcte ^umJ) gv ' ^ '- "iiifiaui for bulli the €61^128 
Cuffmnoduret and the JBI^l i^utuf — . -, i^rafrmfm iidiKie ufdaljed FCC 
imiltifrie cfadke ara^vn^ fiTtmuiaji. whemiik iymboU. dia- 
and unwLBJsd | VE) upnfHc tf ^t 

[DMF^fftf Cmimoflor^ ^an # 



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COMOI 

COW02 
COM03 
COMIM 

CO%f05 



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$14.^ 
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IBM97 • Amateur Rad^o Pact 97 Ftuiaa ( includes updated, revi^ied 
Comiiu!bs,icin $ Rules. Vf<L-«nhiCf JU* t9S9J 5 "A* 4isis IBM compaiible 



IQMO 1 2 • Map Library fry Xt^i& AmaJttir Callho&k Inc. 

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I Wurld Atkfr 4-i;ciliv 2fl pfi.|;t.-s $ ] 2 »00 



ARRL BOOKS 



AR22UU - Ant«nn« 

Imp&tfance Matching 

irv Wiifred N, Ctttyftt 
Advanced amncL^urs, unienrj dcM^ai 
finginccrs, (4;cliriJi:iaiih. Mdsl cfifn^ 
prchc.'inijivL* buijk. WriLlL'n isii usin^ 
Smtlh Charts in Nolvinj;! iiTipcdunce 
niaichmgprcihlems- $I5.1KJ 

AR2472 • Tune In Ihe ^oiid 

with Ham Radio Kit (Bth ed) 
BrpUJid New Edition. Haitier td rcAd, 
rcvlMrd lex I tovcrii ihc cjitettiian 
pool Si on IVovJE^e euni:^ |iv<Mi on 
November I , I ?*89 u^d Inter. Ctjdc- 
it^achinf and ciidc-priciicc cii&- 
M;[itbii included m ij'ie kit $1 ^i^oo 

AIU46« • Tun« In the World 
Booli only %HM 

At%21«^7 » Dalaaook 
VBUiAblc aid in the R P dca p n c ng:i ■ 
nctr,. techhician, mdm anauiilcur. 
antttfupeririifntcr, CornnKinly uccd 
tables, irhirui. and tboK Imrd-tf)- 
reitimibcr fomiulas . $11.00 

ARAS4I * Interfereno* 

Handbooll 
Wntlen from an RFJ »lci]ili% per- 
jpCiCliwe. His expcn^u:^ m iol*'ifi| 
\mc rf ctr nee prabknu. 1 1 l.M 

ARilPl » WlFB'aH«lflfC»r 

HawKamt 

Guides liie nev^ciMnirner ihroui^h 
ihc male oC nciii' opcr^tmp ind 
leciuuc*! pnjcffikrci Pyi k^gelht' 
s sttfkm jnd f0 an the AIT Ili.lO 

AM4L4] « WlFB'sDea^ 



07D9I * oxer's Directory, 
1d90-§1 Ednion 

ComjKted hf Frt4 Oiirrrri&n 
Miv^i complete list oi radio listen^ 
crs ever! Feanires over IIWO li>.lcji- 
eR from ovei 7^5 caumries Alio 
included is full iufcmiuiikm ofi over 
100 mdb clubb woridwkle f4.95 

aiF04-t * 44 Pow^rSuppliei 

for Your Electronic Proved 

b\ Robert J. Tnu3ittr amd 

Jammkam L. M^o 

Writtef) at the ba^ic levd, perfect 

fw iim begizmcr. Tbc rcad^ is 

given caaa^ ckOftNiw theory to 

ufldcntBiid the co oc eptt expkined 

dtrooElKM the ^wk $15.9$ 

10W020 • HSRJ Origlnat 2nd 

Op ^1 7iJii RMffffrty SiMJ 

A iie« editifon in m eafy-to-vsc 
^^^vhed" lornui. Sioifi^ tihd ihc 
pic&c md ifisaacly ^ve avadibk 
B^xni bcadn:^, Cdotioesi ideaifi- 
C)iaicn$, Znor ideiiiicaniDii, I^Mat 

Iff- 15 



t6PB6* Packet User's 
Notebook 

If^ SBf* Abfrn K4ABT 
Qv^r ^ diagr^irtk ihuw Uicd aiid 
true CQitnectioni for popular 
T^Ca, im^ri^ver^^ and c«npyt- 
er^, A gemiine nuts^-^od belts bow- 
tixln mamial Brand new! $9.95 

09D22 • The WofW Him Hel 

Directory A^ tftir WitA^wtii' 
New— liecood editifln now o^cr 
60O net [isitings. Thit hook intro- 
duces the spcemJ mtcixst ham nuJtu 
networks 3TK} show*; ycm wlun 4inii 
where vcRi can tL re them in S9.>0 



15*002 • Scanner and 
Shortwaire Anawer Book 

hy Bifh Grvrr 
Wheth&r ytHi have difTiculi)' cal/x- 
laung world time Eonet «f ire ay- 
tng to figure oui ktloheru, mcfa- 
lieruL, and meicr band, this book 
>" 1 1 ^ prriivtcfc The a nis wcrs 1 1 J.lAS 

lOFOTI • 1991 tnterrulional 

Caltbook 
The new 1991 Inteniatkiiiil CkU- 
bcHjk Hm 500,000 littiiaed tvdin 
amiiatrs ifi ifie contatm omside 
^kifili AnKTka h £«^en South 
Anwfka^ Europe. Ainca, Aita. 
tntJ thr ^dlk ««■ (cxdnsive gC 
Hawaii AAd dK U.S. rmriyrn ai ? 

M9.95 

1QD091 • 1991 North 
Anwrtcan CaJltwolt 
Tfcc 1991 N<mb Ameocon Call 
boo^ \^» At calUi. names, and kI- 
drew infommkHi foro*ef 500.000 
liccraed rodau anuteunh in all t,-iitin- 
tnesdl'NqrUi America, from Pana- 
iBaipCaiBda rnfctudingGnealaDd, 
Bemttnli. and ihe Cafthl)£3fl tt- 
landik pluv Hawaji and ihe US. 
puMc^iHtim. S29,95 

05A4!i • Eaay-up Arrlennaa 
for Radio LJateners and 
HmmM hfBtnmfdM.Soti 

Ltltc t« (cam hu» mcmunriKt !"«f - 
ci)sl ^ easy - ioerect intennax ^ tin \ 
up Antemut will heip ytm 1 1 6 ,50 

i)tD40« DXPowar 

iftectlve Techn^rque* for 

Radio Arrrflteura 

by Eugttte H. Tiitaa k^KSCw 
2 5(5 page I* , 1 1 1 1 LiNtraiiurki. . S9 . 50 



Here's jmc the hut4 fur the a^id 
builder c^ AmlRff Railki equip- 
mem* This ploid-Lugu^ bcxii ts 
filled widt lanplc proLUcai pm^octi 
thai am he Niili yvtng reodiK 
availoMe cumipuiicfas and amnxvi 
hand ontf t94 i^agei. fti^M 



ARIWl • ARRL 1991 
Handbook (6Sth ed\) 

W L-hiifcpicrs, ttaiuring 2.100 !ii- 
hlL's, fj^Urcx und churls. The mnst 
ciimprcficnsive, well urbanized 
uiul ijlT(iriJuh]i? i^Lmrct; nf Amateur 
RadiEi rcfertncc miiicriiil. 1232 
pugCH. $25.00 

AH04U2 * Solid State Design 
Chick full of gtxxl, bftsjc inlorma^ 
iH'ii — iafiTUil dc!ti^nR and applica- 
Tions; descriplitmN of recti veri, 
TratiKmitfcrs. power supplies, and 
tciit equipnicnt St 2,00 

Af^i^O^S • ARAL Antenna Book 
RcptcvcnLs tiK Ih!s1 ami mti^t high- 
ly re^Mr'd>i^iJ infonriBtinn on anicmia 
fLndflnKnLiiLs. tran^mtssipn lintv 
dc^^igh, and von&trijctiun of wire 
antennia. SIH.DO 

ARiaH6 « ARRL Operating 

Maniial 
Pacri^ With infcHmaikHi on how io 
make ihc bcsi lue of your stabon. 
including: uMeriKing home comi- 

icurn^ ttS.M 

AJIOJ56 - Iforse C«ide: 

The Essential Language 
bv i.. iVtcr CwTOB Jr. W30KV 
Tc I E% tif cvohuiaa fhui strai|bt ke^' 
tu t/omfui^i. Gi^es ptoctkaJ ad- 
vicr oti Irommg the code imd its 
modnti'day ieks. S5.il 



J^RH»;^ • TheDXCC 
Compoiikm 

bf Jim Kimrmm KRIS 
The DXCC Compamon qDdb aid 
to umpk. itniftaforuani leniB^ 
what yau need lo be a siiaaeafa l 
DXef Tlte rcwicT wdU Ic^a atam 
equipment Matriintt proptfjaksn 
and ptirupfi. Ti'&all hne and ci'iv to 
undermoind. J28|;Ages. S6.a0 



AR22Sb« First Steps In 

Radio by Doug DeMitii WIFE 
Series of QSTiirtide*. See camptv 
nent,s tLs.^mbled Into pniciical cir- 
CLjils and huw the cirtiuil^ rniike up 
your radio gear %5A)iO 



AR2%0 • Transmission 
Line Transformers (2nd Ed) 
by Dr. Jtrry Sevick WlFMi 
PraciicaJ de-signs, speciHc infor- 
rnatian on consiruction techniques 
and sources of male rial, More de- 
signs for antenna tuners, hybrids, 
and for ibe VHP jind LIHF handM 
272 pp, iZ(i,m 



AR0194 • Antenna 

Compendium Vol. 1 
M.^[c rials on vcrtiiruU, qiiAdb, 
Joopi^ Yagji* nc4uced uic anten- 
nas, bafuos, Smi:ih Cham. Amen- 
na palarizolkm, and other inlerei^t- 
iag subjects , S 1 0<00 



AR2545 • Antenna 

Ccunperutium VoL 2 
41 papers cove rift g venicals^ 
yj^t&, quods. muhrbatKf and brcmd- 
band iivsieins, anternu sctcctitm^ 
and QKicbmiOfc. $12.00 

AR2636 • Companion Soft- 
ware for Antenna 
ComperKiiurti Vol. 2 

5^* MS-DOS ]liipp> tlO.iO 

AR£M«& • WIFE'S Antenna 
Notebook 

{rjDotigDeM9»WJFB 

Gel the best pcirformalKC nut of 

iinpbmisve *irc mtennis and ^er- 

; ticals. Build tuner and SWR 

bnd^Es SS.OI 

AAO^S * QBP Noiebook 

bytkmgDeMawWtrB 

Presents caeitnictkM projiects foe 
the QRP opefouir. tmm a simple 1 
watt cr>^sSal-i::ofKfi)nfid trsttuniner 
lo moK eomplei tiaasoeiver de- 

HgB. 14.01 

AR 1 250 • tog Bo<i4(— 



ARfIL License Manuat 
BeiEinnmg wdh Vunt m the WtwM 
With Hum Mutlm l-uf ihc Novice and 
pfoj^rcs^mi?; [hroti^h the crhlically 
avi; la Lined AKKL tjr^me Mtitiutit 
wrie?. for tjijc Tec time Ian throuijti 
EjilruCldHit; occur Qie te\lexplinu- 
Liom of [lie mBterinl covered along 
iiVith FCC question ptwb and «n- 
(twcr ktsys, 

AR2375 * Technician Cl«ft« 
AR2^3i:} • General Class 
AR0L66 • Advanced Class 

KucU$4i.OO 
AR239i * Extra Claas UM 

AROJIO* Yagl Antenna 
Deiign 

Hum ktMittf publi!«he!d a ieri$t of 
aniclcs on Vagii^^ T^c mftienai 
friHn thc^ articles thit in pre»nUsd 
hcfc wa% polisihcd itnd eiipaniifed by 
Dr. UifrAon. SlS.OO 

AR2tn,i • Hovlce Antenna 
Notebook 

No^icei. ^\\\ learn, ajnong a^m 
diinf &, hew nmennu openue, and 
wh4t £ovenu their efleeljvene?i« 
for ihort^ and lai^^iitanx com 
municatioa. iW.OO 

AR0437* AHRLn*pealer 

Directory 1990-1991 
AJmou Ifli.iiOU liuufi tiBcla^Df 
updated Iturnft fiw MS. GA, ST. 
NC. TN. KY, WV^ittJ VAl with 
over 220D dijt.ipeaiBn, Band ploib. 
cress (PL^ Tone Chart, oompl- 
tAkn of frequeiKY ccmdlnildri, 
ARRL Specui Service Clubs, ad 
beacon lutioffH frcm MM Hz lo 

24catg um 

AR20«3 • Complete OX 'er 
2nd Ed. by Boh ijH-krr W9KM 
hcAtti h0w iQi latot OX Mttd dbaatt 
hard HQ^icf OSL CWfe. MM 

AR5tbQ • ORP Classks 
CoUeeoM 4tf tntsk* from Uy 15 
yn of ARRL fnMicitiom ixt bitild- 
lE^ Tccenvent, namminen. tnn-^ 
sonv^, aEismriei. 2SK pp^ %%1M 



QIC Ml • The Commodore 
Ham^B Companion 

hy Jim Gmltbs K9EJ 
160 pafes of uicbil inft^mMioit on 
wlccling a Commodore ctnnputcr 
ff»r The ham shock, where Vi Tind 
special iied i^tiigiiims. ftie Com- 
modorc-pac-kel coan^rtiaai. and 
mofc! S?JO 

03S 1 1 ' Shortwave Receivers 
Pnt and Preaent 

Caaaii£ guide ts 2D0+ ilaviws ve 
noeivm nambcanvd in the let 
20 >eafi . Gi^es lu^ mforiDalkni Ob 
cocfa model int^faidii^ c<r«rrage» 
ibtptogF. CEici&l lype^ pcffomiaace, 
new vifoe. med vsiat. ett. T^sxas 
IX) nmst models. Tie Blue Book of 
tharvuk^vc rttib lolnc. I9B7. ICH 
p^ces -. vTt % 11. M.95 

0!^H24 • Radio Handbook, 

MO pages ^ cver^iiMng vou woia- 
ed to know ohoui rodao coaunuoi- 
cofion. Indepdi snuh' of AC/DC 
futHJonxmols^ SSB. loijenBas^ am- 
piilkti.. power aqjplie:^. and more- 
S29.5(l h»rd cover dohr 

tJ3Rui * World Press Servfcaa 
Frequencies (RTT¥) 

^ JhiMniu Harrmp&n WEQSfV 
A compfulifi ns [ vc mony^il ':o^cnng 
R^tnteletype news oionitaring — 
i.i7nntn$ oil tnformoiion — anccnna^ 
recciven, terminal units, plus 
three eittcnsive frequency lisis- 
Co^eri 65 World Press Services 
bruadcBsiing iin English. "The 
OriglnaJ Preu Book." S4 pages. 

S8^ 



AR0477 • Low Send 0X1 ng 
How lo meet the thiilieng^ of the 
di:fter^nt forms of 1 60. 30, amJ 40 
ineier propagation with cf fee Live 
antenna^, tquiptnciiL ^nd Dfieral- 
itig siratcgiic^. $LO.(KI 



IHB65 • The Beginner 'a 
Handbook of Amateur 
RBdicM-2nd£dlton 

Combines thec^- and practice in an 
euy-io-iiniieri^und fDnnaf, and 
pnrvi'idcj. informaiion for choosin|( 
sod io^LidJing rad>o recci^'er& and 
ijansmitiers, antcnai:is, transmit- 
Stan Itnes^ and les cquipmem. 400 
page&, 291 LIluiumiiMis. IIS.IV 



AR2CL10 • YourGafeway to 

Packet RadI o 2nd £di t ion 
Filled with infurrnaUon fur all anta- 
Icuni TeJIs everything you iieed to 
know about this popular new 
mode: how to get started, equip 
I rent you need, and more. $12.00 

AR2456* FCC Rule Qook 

(athed) 
This New Edition is almost 50% 
falter, The tutorial chapters in the 
froni of the book aiu a nmjor up- 
grade oVcf liif- piEviotis cdllon^. A 
musi for evcr^ Active todio oma- 
leur^ S^.DO 

AR21T1 • HInis and Kinka 
Find the answer to that tricky protk- 
lem. Ideas ior istiing np ^our gear 
fpT €OmJpiflnble and cffkrienl opcr- 
olion. ^M 

AR2I0? < Saleinte Anthology 
The latest inknialion on OSCARs 
9 dirough 1 3 H well » the RS saiel - 
liics. rnfonnatioD do the osc of dt- 
gtiaJ modc§, ttsckiiiE, .aicieniias^ 
ttUDAK. microcompuier. and 
hkitg! SS.OO 

AROCw^ • SatefTlte 

Experiment ^'''^ Hoi^booik 
Ufidnr cnie ixy^^ ' tfac Ana- 

lewr Radio Openitor needs to knan' 

\A Utdef ttl ^t mtmaanratt! flirough 

OSCAR sdElfitEs. Sit-tl 

AR2S9§ • Space Atmanac 

by Ai^hmy X. Cartis iU ATA' 
E^fTODidtnar)' boal,. C^Jtures the 
breaihukme; recem news^ from 
ipicr. biclydes olMui 40 pages oo 
Aduieitr Radio saiellites. Find al- 
musi sRythaof you nuthf waot no 
kootir iluut men's nip id ihe imn. 



CrTR25 • Tha RTTY Llatener 

by Fftd OitwrmoM 
Cotnpiles tssucf I ihri:iy:gfi 2fJ of liie 
RTTV Lisiener Se«-aetaer. Coo^ 
fains iqMOMdale, hard^li^-rindi W^ 
fomuiion on advance l^tTY «ii 
FAX moniionng technMiiue* and 
fnK|iKDcies- 156 pp. llf^fS 

Q5C6? « Commodore 64 
Troiih^eshoQtir^ & Repair 
Gukje bytUA^fiC.Bramtf 
SiEp b^ sirp ihrough the complcjii- 
ti£& of ttiokjng himfik repam to 
jixavComavdorehil' SlI^SQ 

tDA345 • Beam Anianna 
Handbook 

frr ^^imam Qtt H ASA// 
Staurf GnntH M'2IJr 

Yagt beam theory, coaiyruclifm, 
ap^ration. Wire beoitis. SWR 
curvci. Matching tyiiemi. A 
' ' imisi' ' for .%erinus DXers- 11 1 *9S 

0IA87 • The Shortwave 

Liatenaf' a Antenna 

HarKtbook Ai' fu^btrtj. Ttnisttt 
Beef up i^hunwavi: reccpiuin. «:■< 
paciiy and increase liAiening enjoy- 
ment easily and inrApensively. 

Sll.lM 

\}Til6 • aaslo Electron lea 

Prepared by ike Burtau af 
Navai Ffm&rtntt 
Thoroughly revised in 1V72 Cov- 
its the iinportiint a&peut& of applied 
elt:i]t.ronii:bi und clriiironicii com- 
municaiiorts. 
567 pp. $10,95 

\:aa\ * Second Layal Baalc 
El ect ron Ics Frfpartif by rhf 
Bureau ofXavtJ frrsonnri 
Sequei to BmU^ Eittfrnnivx , ihcff> 
opjeh I regiment of the mtirr ad- 
v^niccd levels of applied cld^tron- 
1CS. Includes m^rowave receiving 
and irawimitiing Hundred* of e*^ 
cclleni dijigrams, 325 pp- $7.S0 

IGM44 > Wortd Attas 
by Radio Amaleur Ct^ibiiiok IttCk 
I 20 pp. of fiilL color. HI ' k lOH '> 
I comainik NiHth Polaj projiecfian (?f 

the w^ivrld: mopi of all bcvcn i:onii' 

nems. We$4 IndiekCanbbfinn aiea. 

and Pairific Oeeom. iS^M 

01 P22 • The Packet Radio 
Handbook 

by j£MM*aa JL Maiy9 JPtTT 
". .an eKcelleni piece of wort. 
Weil wtmh feaimi; for b^ the 
e&penenced and the new pai:|i:a' 
tecT- .- die defimtj^eg^ude loams' 
teor pKJwi ppcntwa." 

— Giiryn Retdy WIBEL 
Oaly f I4J0 

09C09 « Shortwave 
CtandeaUne Conf Idential 

ky Cerry L. Dtxier 

CovcTf all daodcfttne twoadcaat* 
inf. 001101? by coui^: telli fre* 
quenS^, oihrr unpubHili^ istat- 
mtboo: spy, nsMiT^tAM, freedom 
figtuers. rebel, oaarchui todia, 
seerci radio. Cvrrcnt pvlMicaiMni. 
M pages. 18.50 



I AS 10 • Air Sc^n Guide to 
Aeronautical Commuiiica- 
tion* (5th Edition) 

by Tom Kneitel K2AES 
iasi coifiprLihcnsi ve gu ide tci inon ■ 
oring aemnauiitjiil commuEJca- 
i:)n m (he US, Expanded lo cover 
I Canadian land airports and 
^ptanc bdiKCfj^ p]ii^ listings ff^r 
entral Amertca, the Caribbean^ 
orth At far He, and the Pacific 
:;rri[ortc>;. $14*95 



* RTTV Tcday 
by Oave tngram K4TWJ 
nly up^tJO-date RTTY book inex- 
Lence, Covers all fatcts^jf RTTY . 
lOhi cOETiprchKniJkvu RTTY guide 
'erpLibliiihed, FuJIy Jllu^^t rated. A 
jsi. 1 12 pages, S8*S0 

SC30 • The Commodore 
Ham's Companf on 

byJimGrubbsK9Et 

a pages of information on seJect' 
g a Commodore for the ham 
ayk, where XQ find !i.pecia[i?ed 

ograms, [he CcimmodorE'- packet 
mnection. and ti)oine1 $9*50 

M22I < USMilflafV 
Gommujiications (Part 1J 

:!ab witli US Miilitary eommunl- 
rioFi channelh on short Vt'avc, 
>vt:rs frequent: ie.^, background 
: point lo poinl frequencies for [he 
lilipplrtes. Japan and Korea, Indi- 
and Pacific Oceans, and more. 
2 pages SI 2.95 

1^222 * USMihtary 
Communications (Part 2) 

>vcr* US CtKLSlguard, NASA, 
\P, FAA, Dept, of Energ>\ Ped- 
al Emergency Management 
jiency. Disaster Comniunica- 
■ns, FCC, Dcpi. of Jujitice. From 
KC to 9073 KG 79 pages. 

$12.95 

M223 • US Military 
Communicattons (Part 3) 

lis part complietes the vast overall 
iquenty lijii of US Mililary jicr- 
?cs, from 89^3 KG lo 27,944 
:.7KpaEe!^ $t2.95 

im\ • 1^90 Shortwave 
Directory 6th Edition 

by Bob Gr&ve 
I excellent refsfCrtce for ^forlh 
nerican shortwave lisleners. this 
idr'is bible i£ crammed with up- 
date, accurate frequency and 
rf LrLformation from lOKHz to 



I0A343 • All AlK>ut Cubical 
Quad Antennas 

by Wiliiiim Orr W6SAIJ 
Stuart C&tmn W2LX 
The ''CJaKsic*' on Quad design. 
theory. constTucHon, operation. 
New feed and matching systems. 
New data. $9.50 

10A344 • The Radio Amateur 
Antenna Handbook 

by WUtiiWi Orr W6SAI/ 
Stuart Cownn W2LX 
Vagi beam ihtory^ construction. 
operation, wire l^eanis, SWR 
curves. Matching systems. A 
"must" for serious DXeni. SH.SO 

tOA346 • Simple, Low-cost 
Wire Antennas for Radio 
Amateurs 

by Wmimt Orr W6SAI/ 
Stuart Com an W2LX 
Ail Nev*''! Low^coit, mukt-band an- 
tennas; inexpetisive beam^. "l!n- 
viivibie"' antenna.^ for ham^^ in 
"lough" lotaE ions' New data. 

$IJ.50 

I0A342 • AH At>out Vertical 
Antennas 

ty Wiffiam Orr W6SAt/ 
Stuart Cawaa W2IJC 
Effective^ kiw-cost verticals 10- 
I6(J m. -DX, rnu]tiband; compact 
verticals for small spaces; ground- 
ing: te^^c equipment: lightening. 

$Jft.SO 

mA347 • All AtioutVHF 
Amateur Radio 

by Wiitiom Orr W6SAI 
DX propagation. VHP Yagi gnd 
Quad beams, repeaters and how 
they w.ork. fJSCAR satellites and 
how to use tliem. SIL9S 

I5A24 « Verticat Antenna 
Handbook, 2nd Edition 

by Paui ff^ U? mPl 
A claiisie. Reprinted with updaief?, 
including an addendum on antenna 
dcsigT3 for 1 60 meters. Also, feed- 
ing and matf^hing, .ihort veriicalfi, 
ground effects, and more. 
139 pages, paperback. S9-'9'5 

09V] J • The Basic Guide to 
VHF/UHF Ham Radio 

by Ed^a/ti M. !\alt 
This book provides a first rate in- 
Eroduciion to life on the 2.6 and 
] .25 mteter bands as weH as 23* 33> 
and 70 CM. $6.50 



t>4M54 • GGTE IMorse TtJtor 
F[oppy disk for IBM PC, XT, AT, 
and compatibles. Learn the Inter- 
national Morse etxie or improve 
your capabilities. One diskette wi]l 
lake you from t>eg inner through ex- 
tra class in eas-y self- paced iesii^oaii. 
Standard tjr Farns worth mode. 
Code speeds^ from I to over 100 
words per m inuie . $1 9.5& 

n'^E94 * Crash Course Tn 
Electronics Technology 

by Louis E. Pr^metjr. 
With a proven format of pro- 
grammed in.*itructioTi, thi^ book 
teaehes you the basics of electricity 
and electronics in a step-by-stepn 
easy-Co-undenstand faftbion . $2 1 »S0 

OIB033 • Talk To The World; 

Getting Started In Amateur 

Badio ^v Ume^ P. r>ax K3JD 

and Morton Keyser i\3MK 

Pfovides irtformaEion and practical 

tips on obtaining a novice license. 

Authors take the mystery tTut of 

technicat and procedural aspects of 

ham radio. Si 1+50 

09S42 • The Scanner 
Listener's Handtat>ok 

by Edward Si/omre iV2BFF 
Get the tnon out of your scanner 
radio. Covers getting started, ,':ican- 
ncfsartd receivers, antennas, coas- 
ial cabEe, accessories, computer 
conlr{>l]Eid monitoring.^ mtjue. 

%t4M 



03S208 * Radioteletype 
Press Sroadcasis 

by Michaei Schaay 
Covers schedules of Press Services 
hy time, frequency, and ccumtry 
broadcasting in EngK^h. French. 
German. Spanish, and Portuguc.^. 
£>etfliled Press Agency Portraits. 
120 pp. S13.95 

t>IC80 • Master Handbook of 
1 01] 1 C if cu its— S o\ id-State 
Ed. by Keiulait Webber Sgi&ians 
With this outstanding reference in 
hand, electronics hohbyist,s and 
professionals; sviM never have to 
search for schematics again. Com- 
pletely update^, the book is thor- 
oughly indexed and ail 1001 eir- 
cu i IS a re clea riy il I u.'it rated .430 pp. 
$19.5(^^!lctiyer 

I1TS8 • Tune tn on Telephone 
Cal la hy Tom Kn^tef K2AES 
Fonnatted as a ffequiii]i;y list with 
detailed description of each service 
and its location in RF spectrum. 
Provides basic inforniaiEOn fot casu- 
al listeners getting started and de- 
tai Is for ardent eni husiasts . $ ) 2 . 95 

0^P33 - The Pirate Radio 
Directory 199€ Edition 

bj George Ze I Jer 

Contains data on some 100 pirate 
stations }ietive during t989 How to 
tune in pirate broadcasts and get 
QSLs f rotn the stat ioni . $7,95 



THEVORLD $4.00 




OlTOl • Transmitter 
Hunting: Radio Direction 
Finding Sft^ipl^fied 
by Joseph £>, Moefi K§OV and 
Thomm S. Curlee WB6UZZ 
^i6 pages , 248 ill usts . $ 1 7 .50 

03K205 • Guide to Radio- 
teletype {RTTY J Stations 

by J. Ktingenfusx 
Updated book covers all RTTY sta- 
tions from 3MHz-30MHz. Press, 
Miiitary, Commercial, Meteo, 
PTTs> Embassies,, and more. 
105 pp. SJ2.#5 

15S003 • Comrnunicatlons 
SatellHes (3rd Edition) 

by Lany Vim Horn 
Chapters on channelization band 
plans, transponder identification^ 
Lacematianal sateliii£;s^ Diore. $7.04 

07A66 • Aeronautical 
Communications Handbook 
by Robert E. Evans 
Exhaustive,^ .scholarly treatment of 
shortwave aeronautical listening. 
Wet I organized J up-to-date. 
266 pp. $19*95 

07R2O • A Radio Journal 
1912-1940 

Hy Russ Rmnnker W9CftC 

A fascinating trip through lime. 
[Eajiy to read and informative, edu- 
cational and entertaining. A trip 
down memory larte to the ear[y 
dniys of radio, $7.95 



03SD4 • The Hidden Signals 
on Satellite TV 

by Thomas P. Harrington 
and flfl* Cooper Jr. 
Tune in thousands of Telephone, 
Data, Telex, Teletype, Facsimile 
Signals on most of the TV Satel- 
lites; plus ail 5Ut>carrijers. Covem 
equipment, hookups, where to 
tune 234 pages. tl9.50 

0lP6a * Pirate Radio Stations^ 
Tunfng Into Underground 
Broadcasts/i^' Ajidrm^ iL Ytider 
Cotnpfeheitsive guide to tuning in^ 
identifying, and contacting the 
tnost unpredietable stations on the 
radio spectrum. 192 pp. $12^50 



How can the World's Bt^st DX Map cost onJy $4,00? Obvi- 
ously, a serious bJ under which you should lake advantage of 
before we discover it. This is the only world map in bliick 
and white so you can color in the countries as you work them ! 
Further, it has almost all of the official lARU 400 countries 
on tt. which no other nnap at any price has. 



CODE TAPES 

ttc am hrW rrt ffw lt(t i-inie timu-hu-ha ii a* maii- fftf tvdi' m ilmpii tu Itarrt thai it 's 
•mn-priihiem. llerewifh the worid '.¥ eusieai rtnif ctmr'H' — tiitii (tfth£i\i^(ia<i^ i?fhattL'f 
\vf gtittf^r shfir ifcfTLtfs thi.s nfftnzirsg tff h- shornW "hwy, fi's fiuiu-fe-proof. Mosi 
'<ip!e are uhie II* whip (hraaf;h thr Ninycrr iesi ajier ipendinf^ ie\s than shref h^ivrx 
•fh /m GfwsiK and Jtif i"?^"ft/f/'. PeftpSt" i^fut fuav '^hftt »p on ofhi^mxle Viturufi 
ui fhis tme dt?*:i the^oh in ajijfy. Gcfin/f after ytmr C^rtprp/.' ti V fihtM4i timi'. t}.\^ she 
ifi. Bffakfr nmf yatf 'ii Iff tit^tr i^fitre you kntm' it. .A wre*: ihunkf do it. FfuFTf rrr^. 
hipm ciiiif almoinS iftv-ariahh- appfnr.i Sa ftxuse trrfpnmfjfe, iri'fVffS'af*!^, petifUi- 
fH b^tm\ diimafie. Um'le W^yne atrfept.i rttr re^ponsihitiiy ivhaifver for artythinij 
It ftappefLX U.> those vfhf> arejhrfiiih enough tt^ usf the QtiUf^gequi lihvptn tapt^. 



20MO9<> * Computing Across 
Atnerica 

by Stei^ett K. Roberts N4NRVE 
Roberts has written anicles tor 73 
\fagijzme about the technical as- 
pects of his US tour on his recum- 
bent bicycle. Covers his adven- 
tures^ people be met, and peaces he 
saw, [f your tifestyle seems a little 
conrmin^^re^thishw}]*;. S9*95 

IIRFIS ■ The "Top Secfet" 
Registry of US Government 
Radio Freqy en isles {7th Ed.) 
by Tom Kneiid ii2AES 
Thii scanner directory has become 
the standard reference source for 
frequency and other importam in- 
formation riclaiing to the communi- 
cations of fedetal agencies. 25 lo 
470 MH7. " S19.95 



1 A70 • Practical Antenna 
Handbook by Joseph J. Carr 

Design, build, modify', and install 
your own antennas. Carr, a 20-ycaf 
veteran of technical writing, has a 
unique ability to present complex 
technicaE concepts in an easy-to- 
understand way. 416 pp. $21^50 

1 1 F52 • Feireirs Confidential 
Frequency Li^ 

Compiled by A, G. Iftdfi^ey 
All frequencies from4MH7-2^MH2: 
covering ship^ embassy, areo, Vol- 
met, Interpol, nutnbers. Air Force 
One/Two,, more 37ft pp. $19.^ 

IISR97 * National Directory 

of Survival Radio 

Frequencies 

by nm KneU^I K2AES 
HarKJy and concise reference guide 
to high interest communications 
frequencies required by survivaE- 
ists. Includes chapter on building 
errtergency com EnunicaiioiLS anten- 
na svstem,'^. $^*95 



I ISM n * Scanner Modifica- 
tion Handbook by Biii Creek 

Provides straight forward step-by - 
step instructions for expanding the 
operating capabilities of VHF 
scanners. Filled with inte resting 
text-, helpful photos, tables, and 
figures. S17.9S 

nE:B06 • Guide to Embassy 
Espionage Communications 
byTomKneitdKlAES 
Candid and probing examination of 

worldwide cmliassy and (alleged) 
espionijge communication sy sterns 

and networks. Extensive nation- 
by -nation directory of embassy sta- 
tions is included. Slfl.^S 



105 "Genesis** $5.*S 

*pm— This is the beginning 
<t^ taking you through the 
letters^ 10 nutntjers, and nec- 
ary ptinctualion. complete 
h practice every step of the 
Y. The ease of learning gives 
ifidence even to the faini of 
n. 



ri3 **Back Breaker" SS.*5 
f wpm — Code groups again, 

I brisk l3-»- wpm so you'll l>e 
lly at ease when you sit down 
front of a steel y-ey (id voiun- 
r cxatniner who starts scnd- 
you plain language code at 
y 13 per. You'll need this 
ra margin to [ivcrc{>mc the 
:er panic universal in moist 
I siiuations. You've come 
i far. so don' I get code shy 



73T06 ^*The Stickler'" $5.yS 
6+ wpm— This is rhe practice tape 

fnrlhow who survived the ,S wpm 
tape, and it\^ also the tape for the 
Novice and Technician licenses, ][ 
i;^ comprised of one solid hour of 
€{jdc. Characters arc .sent at 13 
wpm and spaced at 5 wptn. Code 
groups arc entirely random charac- 
ters sent in groups of five— defi- 
nitely not tiiemorizable! 



73T20 "Courageous'- $5.95 
20+ wpm— Congratulations! 
Okay, the challenge of code 
ib what's gutEen you this far« io 
don't quit now. Go for the extra 
clafls ticense. We send the c<jtle 
faster than 20 per. It*s like wear- 
ing^ lead weights on your feet 
virhen you run: You'll wonder 
why the examiner is scruiing so 
slowly! 



Uncle Wayne's Bookshelf Order Form 

You may order by mail, telephone, or fax. All payments are lo be in US funds. Allow 3 weeks 
for delivery. 



Item# 



Qty. 



Price 



Total 



Name 
Street 
City_ 



U.S. orders add $2.50, Canadian orders add $3.50 -* Shipping 
TOTAL 



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TOTAL $ 



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nAE DMC nVISA n Check/Money Order 



Telephone: (603) 525-4201 
FAX: (603) 525-4423 

Expiration Date 



Mall: 73 Magazine, Attn. Uncle Wayne. Forest Road, Hancock, NH 03449 





MasterCard— VISA— Discover— COD 



Missouri 



> 

m 

> 

m 
> 



O 
O 



> 



> 

£ 
in 



o 



> 
z 

m 



m 

m 
o 



0i 



m 

o 
m 

39 



=1 

m 

31 



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FT-736R VHF UHF BASE STATION 

• SS8, CW. FM on 2 Meters 
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• Optional 50 MHz, 220 MM? or 
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• 25 Watts Output on 2 Meters, 
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• 10 Watts Output on 6 Meiers 
and 1 2 GHz • 100 Memories 








FT-470 



COMPACT DUAL BAND 

FM HANDHELD 
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21 Mefriories tot Each Band 

Dual VFO's for Each Band 

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To be 
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Our Direct Digital Syn- 
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up and h * 
lower <J^- "^ >^ 
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traditional 
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continuously adjust- 
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up to 200 watts gi^ es you 
excellent ** Barefoot" output for 
pileups, plus generous drive for 
your linear, UTiile the Stereo 
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simultaneous reception 
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band dual receive or 
diversity reception 
using tTto antennas^ add 
the optional BPF-1 I 

module, Anto^.^t^] 

The FT4000 also cimrit^ 

has the optional Digital \bice 
Storage (DVS-2) to let you play 
back i6-seconds of receive 

memory and two 
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second) mes- 
y sages in 
' transmit. A 
y fast-action 
y Automatic 
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offers 39 memories 
for quick band 
changes. The QRM 
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cascaded filter selections, IF 
width control, IP shift, IP notch 
fUter, all-mode squelch ^ dual- 
mode noise blanker and CW 




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• 100 Memories. 

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Range- lOBdB. 

• Multimode Selection on 
Packet/RTTY. 

• CW Spot. 

• Independent mode and filter 
selection on SSB/CW. 

• Mode/Frequency/Filter Infor- 
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TH-77A 

Compact 2m/70cnfi Dual 
Band HT 

Here's a radio that deserves « 
double-^take! The TH-77A is a 
feature- packed dual band radfo 
compressed into an HT package. 
The accessories are compatible 
with ourTH-75,TH-25,andTH-26 
Series radios. Repeater and remote 
base users wtii appreciate the DTMF 
memory that can store all of the 
DTMF characters f, #, A, B, C, and D) 
that are usually required for 
repeater functions! 

• Wide band receiver coverage* 
136-165 (118-165 [AM mode 
118-1361 MHz after modification) and 
438-449.995 MHz. TX on Amateur 
bands only. (Two meter section is 
modifiable for MARS/ CAP. Permits 
required,) 

• Dual receive/dual LCD display. 
Separate volume and squelch con- 
trols for each band. Audio output can 
be mixed or separated by using an 
external speaker. 



band repeat function. 

• Dual Tone Squelch System (DTSS), 

Uses standard DTMF to open 
squelch. 

• CTCSS encode/decode bullt-tn. 

• Forty-two memory channels. 
All channels odd split capable, 

• DTMF memory /a utodialer. 
Ten 15-digit codes can be stored 

• Direct keyboard frequency entry. 
The rotary dial can also be used 

to select memory, frequency, 
frequency step. CTCSS, and scan 
direction. 

• Multl-functaonf dual scanning. Time 
or carrier operated channel or band 
scanning, 

• Frequency step selectable for 
quick QSY Choose from 5. 10, 12.5, 
15, 20, or 25 kHz steps. 

• Two watts (IS W on UHF) with 
supplied battery pack. Five watts 
output with PB-8 battery pack or 
13.8 volts. Low power is 500 mW. 

• DC direct-in operation from 6.3-16 
VDC with the PG-2W. 

• T-Alert with eiapaed time Indicator. 

• Automatic repeater offset on 2 m. 

• Battery-saving features. 

Auto battery saver, auto power off 
function, and economy power mode. 



COfnpTe re sent^ice manu&fs am &vaifabfe tor ilf Kenwood trBnsoeiv^m^ and most Bcctssorhs^ 
Sp9citiC3tto^s and f^aturss sfb sutifeQi ro Change wrr/rcHff n&ticG orcbligatiQn. 



• Supplied accessories: 

Flex antenna, PB-6 battery pack 
(7.2 V. 600 mAHX wall charger, belt 
hook, wrist strap, keyboard cover. 

Optional accessories: 

• BC-10; Compact charger* BC-tl: Rapid 
charger • BH-6: Swivel mount • BT-6: AAA 
battery case • 0C-1/PG-2Vr DC adapter 

• DC-4; Mobile charger for P8-10 • DC-S: 
Mobile charger for PB-6, 7. 9 • PB-5: Z2 V, 
200 mAh NiCd pack for 2.5 W output 

• Pe-6> 7.2 V 600 mAh NiCd pack • PB-T: 
7.2 V, 1100 mAh NiCd pack • PB-8: 12 V, 
600 mAh NiCd for 5 W output • PB'9: 

7.2 V, 600 mAh NiCd wrth built-in charger 

• PB-tl: 12 V, 600 mAh OR 6 V, 1200 mAh, 
for 5 W OR 2 W • HMC-2: Headset with 
VOX and PTT* PG-2W: DC cable w/fuse 

• PG-3F: DC cable with filter and cigarette 
lighter plug « SC-26, 29: Soft case 

« SMC-30/31: Speaker mics. • SMC'33: 
Speaker mic, w/remote control • WR-1: 
Water resistant bag. 

KENWOOD U.S.A, CORPORATION 

COMMUNICATIONS &TEST EQUIPMENT GROUP 
RO. BOX 22745, 2201 E. Dommguez Street 
Lang Beach. CA 90601-5745 

KENWOOD ELECTRONICS CANADA INC. 
RO. BOX 1075, 959 Gana Court 
Mississauga, Ontario. Canada L4T 4C2 

KENWOOD 

, . . pacesetter in Amateur Radio